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Trzm 



trcrzs 



A7>D 



,,„.,^ A KEY 



\ CLASSICAL PRONUNCL^TION 

or 

^xt^, Eatin, an)r Scripture proper ;0am(0 ; 

/ \{f) nC WHICH 

THE WOBDS ARE ACCENTED AND DIVIDED INTO STLLAU^ES 
EXACTLY AS THEY OUGHT TO BE PRONOUNCED, 

ACOOaiHKO TO KULES BRAWN FROM ANALOGY AND THE BKST USAGE. 
TO WHICH ARE AODED» 

TERMINATIONAL VOCABULARIES 

OP 

GREEK, HEBREW, AND LATIN PROPER NAMES, 

IN WHICH THE WORDS ARE ARRANGED ACCORDING TO THEIR FINAL 
SYLLABLES, AND CLASSED ACCORDING TO THEIR ACCENTS; 

BY WHICH THE GBNBBAL ANALOOY OF PRONUNCLATION MAY BB SBBN AT ONB 
▼IBW, AND THB ACCBNTUATION QF BACH WORD MORE EASILY RBMBMBBBBD. 

COKCLUDIKO WITH 

OBSERVATIONS ON THE GREEK AND LATIN ACCENT . 
AND QUANTITY; 

WITH SOME PROBABLE CONJECTURES ON THE METHOD OF FREEING THEM 

FROM THE OBSCURITY AND CONFUSION 

nr WHICH THEY ARE INVOLVED, BOTH BY THE ANCIENTS AND MODERNS. 



Si quid novisti rectius istis 
Candidus imperti : si non, his utere mecum. Hob. 



By JOHN WALKER, 

AUTHOR OF THE CRITICAL FROfOUNCIKG DICTIONARY, ETC. 



THE NINTH EDITION, 

WITH ADDITIONS, AND CORRECTIONS. 



(y 



LONDON: 



PRINTED FOR T. CADELL; C. J. G. AND F. RtVlNGTON; LONCMAN/ RXES,* OBME,- 
BROWN, AND GREEN; J. BOOKER; bIlDWIN AN!) C^lSOC!! ; 'WHITTJ^fBR, / 
TREACHER, AND ARNOT ; SIMPKIN AND MARKh/LL ;- AND- HOULSToA 



\^^ 



1830. 

(•■ ( 



THE NEW YO' K 
PUBLIC L.-nRARY 

890372A 

ASTOR, LENOX AND 

TILDEN KOUNDATIONS 

K 1937 L 



G. WOODFALL, anoel court, skinner street, London. 



PREFACE. 



The Critical Pronouncmg Dictionary of the English 
Language natundly sx^ggested an idea of the present 
work. Proper names from' the Oieek and Latin form so 
considerable a part of every cultivated living language, 
that a Dictionary seems to he imperfect without them. 
Pdite sdiolarB, indeed, are seldom at a loss for the pro- 
nunciati<m of words diey so frequently meet with in the 
kamed languages ; but there are great numbers of re- 
spectaUe English scholars, who, having only a tincture 
of classical learning, are much at a loss for a knowledge 
of this part of it It is not <»ily the learned professions 
that require this knowledge, but almost every profession 
above those that are merely mechanical. The professors 
of painting, statuary, and music, and those who admire 
their works — ^readers of history, politics, poetry — all who 
converse on subjects ever so little above the vulgar, have 
80 frequent occasion to pronounce these proper names, 
that whatever tends to render this pronunciation easy 
must necessarily be acceptable to the Public. 

The proper names in Scripture have still a higher claim 
to our attention. That every thing contained in that 
precious repository of divine truth should be rendered as 
easy as possible to the reader, cannot be doubted : and 
the very frequent occasions of pronouncing Scripture 

a2 



IV PREFACE. 

proper names, in a country where reading the Scripture 
makes part of the religious worship, seem to demand some 
work on this subject more perfect than any we bave 
hitherto seen. 

I could have wished it had been undertaken by a per- 
son of more learning and leisure than myself; but we 
often wait in vain for works of this kind, from those learned 
bodies which ought to produce them, and at last are 
obliged, as being the best we can obtain, to turn to the 
labours of an unassuming individual. Being long engaged 
in the instruction of youth, I. felt the want of a work of 
this kind, and have supplied it in the best manner I am 
able. If I have been happy enough to be useful, or only 
so far useful as to induce some abler hand to undertake 
the subject, I shall think my labour amply rewarded. I 
shall still console myself with reflecting, that he who has 
produced a prior work, however inferior to those that sue* 
ceed it, is imder a very difierent predicament from him 
who produces an after-work inferior to those that have 
gone before. 



ADVERTISEMENT 

TO THE SECOND EDITION. 



The fevourable recepti<m of the first edition of this work 
has induced me to attempt to make it still more worthy of 
the acceptance of the Public, by the addition of several 
critical observations, and particularly by two Termina- 
tional Vocabularies of Greek and Latin, and Scripture 
Proper Names. That so much labour should be bestowed 
upon an inverted arrangement of these words, when they 
had already been given in their common alphabetical or- 
der, may be matter of wonder to many persons, who will 
naturally inquire into the utility of such an arrangement. 
To these it may be answered, that the words of all lan- 
guages seem more related to each other by their termina- 
tions than by their beginnings ; that the Greek and Latin 
languages seem more particularly to be thus related ; and 
classing them according to their endings seemed to ex- 
hibit a new view of these languages, both curious and 
useftil : for as their accent and quantity depend so much 
on their termination, such an arrangement appeared to 
^ve an easier and more comprehensive idea of their pro- 
nunciation than the common classification by their initial 
syllables. This end was so desirable as to induce me to 
spare no pains, however dry and disgusting, to promote 
it ; and, if the method I have taken has failed, my labour 
will not be entirely lost if it convinces future prosodists 
that it is not worthy of their attention. 

[The continued popularity of this work has induced the 
proprietors to make every exertion necessary for preserv- 
ing its claims to public approbation. This ninth Edition 
has been carefolly revised, and the utmost attention paid 
to the accuracy of the accentuation.] a 3 



CONTENTS OF THE WORK. 



Pap? 

Introdaction vii 

Rules for pronomiciiig the yowels of Greek and T^tin proper 

names 1 

Pronunciation of Greek and Latin proper name8->(Initial Voca- 
bulary) 4 • . . 15 

Terminational vocabulary of Greek and Latin proper names 126 
Itules for pronouncing Scripture proper names . . .195 
Pronunciation of Scripture proper names — (Initial Vocabulary) i06 
Terminational vocabulary of Scripture proper names . • 248 
Observations on the Greek and Latin accent and quantity, &c. 265 



CONTENTS OF THE INTRODUCTION. 



Pagfe 

I'he pronunciatidn of Greek and Latin not so difficult as that of 
our own language . * , . « . . .vii 

l*be ancient pronunciation of Greek and Latin, a subject of 
great controversy among the learned .... ib. 

The English^ however faulty in their pronunciation of Greek and 
Latin, pronounce them like other European nations, according 
to the analogy of their own language * • . . . viii 

Sufficient vestiges remain to prove that the foreign pronuncia- 
tion of the Greek and Latin letters is nearer to the ancient 
than the English — (Note) ib. 

Hie English pronunciation of Greek and Latin injurious to 
-quantity «..«..«.«. ix 

No sufficient reason for altering the present pronunciation on 
these accounts .«..«.««. xii 

bule for accenting Latin words xiii 

kule for accenting Greek proper names .... xiv 

Probable conjecture why the termination tia and tin in Greek 
appellatives have not the same sound as in Latin — (Note) . ib. 

Importance of settling the English quantity with which we pro* 
nounce Greek and Latin proper names^ and particularly that 
ttf the unaccented syllables « < • * , * « xvi 



INTRODUCTION. 



l^HE pronimciation of the learned languages is much more 
easily acquii:ed that that of our own. Whatever might 
have been the variety of the different dialects among the 
Greeks, and the different provinces of the Romans, their 
languages now being dead, are generally pronounced ac- 
cording to the respective analogies of the several lan- 
gU2^es of Europe, where those languages are cultivated, 
without partakmg of those anomalies to which the living 
languages are liable. 

Whether one general uniform pronunciation of the an« 
cient languages be an object of sufficient importance to 
bduce the learned to depart &om the analogy of their 
own language, and to study the ancient Latin and Greek 
phmundation, as they do the etjrmology, syntait, and 

rK)dy of those languages, is a question not very easy to 
decided. The question becomes still more difficult 
when we consider the Uncertainty we are in, respecting 
the ancient pronunciation of the Greeks and Romans, 
and how much the learned are divided among themselves 
about it *• Till these points are settled, the English may 



* Middle ton contends that the initial c before e and i ought to be 
proDoonced as the Italians now pronounce it ; and Uiat Cicero is nei- 
ther Sueroy as the French and English pronounce it, nor Kikero as 
Dr. Bentley asserts, but TchUehirOj as the Italians pronounce it at 
this day. This pronunciation, however, is derided by Lipsius, who 
affinns, that the c among the Romans had always the sound of k, 
iipsius says too, that of all the European nations, the British alone 
pronounce the t properly: but Middletou asserts, that of all nations 
tbey pronounce it the worst* Middleton De Lat. Liter » Pronun, Dissert. 

Lipsius, speaking of the different pronunciation of the letter G in 
different countries, says : 

Nos hodie (de liter& G loqnente) quam peccamus ? Italorum enim 
plerique ut Z exprimunt, Galli et Belgiae ut J" consonantem. Itaque 
iUorom est Lnere^ Fuzere; nostrum Leiere, Fuiere {Lejere^ Ft^ere). 



VIU INTEODUCTION. 

well be allowed to follow their own pronunciation of Greek 
and Latin, as well as other nations, even though it should 
be confessed that it seems to depart more from what we 
can gather of the ancient pronunciation, than either tlie 
Italian, French, or German*. For, why the English 



Omnia imperite, inepte. Germanos saltern aadite, qaorom sonus hic 
germanns, Legere, Tegere ; ut in Lego, Tego, nee nnquam variant: at 
nos ante, /, £, JE, Y, semper dicimasqne Jemmam, JcetvioSy Jit^ivam^ 
Jyrum; pro istis, Gemmam, Gcstulos, Gingmun, Gyrum, Mntemus 
aut vapulemus. — Lipsius De Red: Pron, Ling. Lot, p. 71, 

Hinc factnm est ut tanta in prouunciando varietas extiteret nt 
pauci inter se in iiterarum sonis consentiant Quod quidem mirum 
uon esset, si indocti tantum a doctis in eo, ac non ipsi etiam aUoqpi 
ernditi inter se magna contentione dissiderent. — Adolp* Meker» De 
Lin. Grac. vet Pronun, cap. ii. p. 15. 

* Monsieur Launcelot, the learned author of the Port-Royal Greek 
Grammar, in order to convey the sound of the long Greek vowel i§^ 
tells us, it is a sound between the e and the a, and that Enstathius, 
wlio lived towards the close of the twelfth century, says, that fin, fim, 
is a sound made in imitation of the bleating of a sheep ; and quotes 
to this purpose this verse of Cratinus, an ancient comic writer. 
*0 y nXi^Ms uff^rt^ vf^afottm, /3«, fin, X.iyvt fietii^u. 
Is fatuns perinde ac ovis, b^, b4, dicens, incedit. 
He, like a silly sheep, goes crying baa. 

Cauinins has remarked the same, Hellen. p. 26, E longnm, cujus 
sonus in ovium balatu sentitur, ut Cratinus et Varro tradiderunt. 
The sound of the e long may be perceived in the bleating of sheep, 
as Cratinus and Varro have handed down to us. 

Eustathius likewise remarks upon the 499 v. of Iliad I. that the 
word BXeyp t^'r}* i rtis icXtypv^^as ti^^oi fUfinrinSe xetra, rtus vretXetUug * fin 
t)^ti fMfAnffiv ^^ofiartn ^mns. K^tirtveg. BX«^^ est ClepsydrsB sonus ex 
imitatione secundum veteres; et fin imitatnr vocem ovium. Blops, 
according to the ancients, is a sound in imitation of the Clepsydra, 
as baa is expressive of the voice of sheep. It were to be wished that 
the sound of every Greek vowel had been conveyed to us by as faith* 
ful a testimony as the jjira ; we should certainly have had a better 
idea of that harmony for which the Greek language was so famous, 
and in which respect Quintilian candidly yields to it the preference 
above the Latin. 

Aristophanes has handed down to us the pronunciation of the 
Greek diphthong ai aS by making it expressive of the barking' of a 
dog in one of his comedies. This pronunciation is exactly like that 
preserved by nurses and children among us to this day in bow wow. 
This is the sound of the same letters in tbe Latin tongue ; not only in 
proper names derived from Greek, but in every other word where 
this diphthong occurs. Most nations in Europe, perhaps all but the 
English, pronounce audio and laudo, as if written owdio and lowdo ; the 
diphthoug sounding like ou in loud. Agreeable to this rule, it is pre- 
sumed that we formerly pronounced the apostle Paul nearer the 
origin than at present. In Henry the Eighth's time it was written 



INTBODUCTION. Mt 

dumld pay a ccmipliment to the learned languages, which 
is not done by any other nation in Europe, it is not easy 
to conceive; and, as the colloquial communication of 
learned individuals of difierent nations so seldom hap- 
pens, and is an object of so small importance when it does 
happen, it is not much to be regretted that when they 
meet they are scarcely intelligible to each other *. 

But the English are accused not only of departing 
from the genuine sound of the Greek and Latin vowels, 
but of violating the quantity of these languages more than 
the people of any other nation in Europe. The author 
of the Essay upon the Harmony of Language ^ves us a 
detail of the particulars by which this accusation is proved : 
wd this is so true a picture of the English pronunciation 
of Latin, that I shall quote it at length, as it may be of 
use to those who are obliged to learn this language with- 
out the aid of a teacher. 

St. Pmde^Sy and sermons were preached at Poule'8 Cro$$, The vulgar, 
generally the last to alter, either for the better or worse, still have 
a jingling proverb with this pronnnciation, when they say. As old Oi 
PimUs, 

The sound of the letter tc is no less sincerely preserved in Plantns 
in Menseeh. page 6212, edit. Lambin. in making use of it to imitate 

the cry of an owl 

*'M£N. £gon' dedi? PEN. Tn, Tu, utic, inqnam, vin' afferri 

Boctuam, 
^ Qnie tn, tu, usque dicat tibi ? nam nos jam nos defessi sumns." , 

" It appears here,** says Mr. Forster, in his defence of the Greek 
accents, page 129, ^' that an owFs crv was tu^ tu, to a Roman ear, as 
*' it is too, iooy to an English.*' Lambin, who was a Frenchman^ ob- 
serves on the passage, '^ AUudit ad noctuae vocem sen cantum, tu^ 
tu, seu tou, ton,** He here alludes to the voice or noise of an owl« 
It may be farther observed, that the English have totally departed 
irom this sound of the ti in their own language, as well as in their 
pronunciation of Latin ; [but it is preserved in all the continental 
languages, and more especially in Italian.] 

* -Erasmus se adfuisse olim commemorat cum die quodam solenni 
complores principum legati ad Maximilianum Imperatorem salutandl 
caosi advenissent ; singulosque Galium, Germanum, Danum, Scotnm, 
&c orationem Latinam, ita barbare ac vast^ pronunci&sse, ut Italia 
quibusdam, nihil nisi risum moverint, qui eos non Latin^ sed &\ik 
qoemque lingu&, locntos jur&ssent. — Middleton, De Lot. Lit, Pronun. 

[The story told by Erasmus is perhaps a little exaggerated, but 
almost every traveller is aware of the difficulty which Englishmen 
feel in maintaining a Latin conversation with foreigners. In fact it 
is some time before the speakers can persuade themselves that both 
are using the same language.] 



X INTEODUCTION. 

" The falsification of the harmony by English scholar! 
*' in their pronunciation of Latin, with regard to essenti^ 
" points, arises from two causes only : first, from a totaj 
^^ mattaition to the length of vowel sounds, making theQ 
" long or short merely as dbance directs ; and, secondly, 
^' from sounding double consonants as only one letter^ 
*^ The remedy of this last fault is obvious. With re^anJl 
" to the first, we have already observed, that each of oui; 
^^ vowels bath its general long sound, and its genial shor^ 
*' sound totally different. Thus the short sound rf e 
** lengthened is expressed by the letter a, and the shor^ 
** sound of i lengthened is expressed by the letter e : and 
'^ with all these anomalies usual in the application ot 
" vowel charactCTS to the vowel sounds of our own lan- 
'' guage, we proceed to the application of vowd sounds 
" to the vowel characters of the Latin. Thus in the first 
** syllable of sidus and mmien, which ought to be long; 
" and of miser and omcs^ which ought to be short ; we 
" equally use die common long sound of the vDwels; but 
** in the oblique cases, sideris, nominis^ miserly oneris, 
" &c., we use quite another sound, and that a idiort one. 
^' These strange anomalies are not in common to us 
*^ with our southern neighbours the French, Spaniards, 
^* and Italians. They pronounce sidus^ according to our 
'* orthography seedus^ and in the oblique cases preserve 
" the same long soimd of the i: nomen they pronounce 
" as we do, and preserve in the oblique cases the same 
" long sound of the o. The Italians also, in their own 
" language, pronounce doubled consonants as distinctly 
" as the two most discordant mutes of their alphabet 
" Whatever therefore, they may want of expressing the 
** true harmony of the Latin language, they certainly 
'^ avoid the most glaring and absurd faults in our manner 
** of pronouncing it, 

^* It is a matter of curiosity to observe with what regu- 
** larity we use these solecisms in the pronunciation of 
" Latin. When the penultimate is accented, its vowel, 
*^ if followed but 1:^ a single consonant^ is always loog, 
" as in Dr. Forster^s examples. When the antepenulti- 
** mate is accented, its vowel is, without any regard to the 
" requisite quantity, pronounced short, as in mirabiley 



HfTRODUCTIOK. XI 

^ frigULua ; except the vowel of the penultimate be fol- 
^* lowed by a vowel, and then the vowel of the antepen- 
^ ultunate is with as little r^ard to trae quantity pro- 
^^ noimced long, as in maneo, redetUy oditim, imperium* 
'^ Quantity is however vitiated to make i short even in 
^^ this case, as in oblivioj vineoy virivm. The only dif- 
'^ faience we make in pronunciation between vinea and 
" verda is, that to the vowel of the first syllable of the 
" former, which ought to be long, we give a short sound ; 
" to that of the latter, which ought to be short, we give 
^^the same sounds but lengthened, {/accented is al- 
^^ ways before a single consonant pronounced long, as in 
" humerus^ fttgiens. Before two consonants no vowel 
^^ sound is ever made long, except that of the diphthong 
^^ au ; so that whenever a doubled consonant occurs, the 
" preceding syllable is short *. Unaccented vowels we 
'^ treat with no more ceremony in Latin than in our own 
" language.'" Essay iipon the Harmony of Langua-ge^ 
page 224. Printed for Robson, 1774* 

This, it must be owned, is a very just statement of the 
case ; but though the Latin quantity is thus violated, it 
is not, as this writer observes m the first part of the quo- 
tation, merely a^ chance directs^ but, as he afterwards 
ol)8erves, regtUarly^ and he might have added according 
to the analogy of English pronunciation,, which has a 
genius of its own ; and which, if not so well adapted to 
the pronimciation of Greek and Latin as some other mo- 
dem languages, has as fixed and settled rules for pro- 
nouncing them as any other. 

The learned and ingenious author next proceeds to 
show the advantages of pronouncing our vowels so as to 
express the Latin quantity. " We have reason to sup- 
" pose,"" says he, " that our usual accentuation of Latin, 
" however it may want of many elegancies in the pro- 
^' nunciation of the Augustan age, is yet sufficiently just 

* TbU corraption of the trae <|aantity is not, however, peculiar to 
the English ; for Beza complains in his country : <* Hinc enim fit ut in 
Cineca oratione vel Dullnm, yel prorsns conruptura nnmerum intelligas, 
dom mnltae breves producnntnr, et contri plurimae longse corripiun- 
tar.*' Beza de Oerm. Pron. Graecae Linguse, p« 50.— [The modern 
Greeks have fallen into the same error.] 



XU INTRODUCTION. 

" to give with tolerable accuraqr that part of the general 
'^ harmony of the language of which accent is the efficient 
*^ We have also a pretty full information from the poetj 
*^ what syllables ought to have a long, and what a shorj 
" quantity. To preserve, then, in our pronunciation^ 
^' the true harmony of the language, we have only to tak^ 
^^ care to give the vowels a long sound or a short sounds 
^* as the quantity may require ; and when doubled con- 
" sonants occur, to pronounce each distinctly.**^ Ibid\ 
page 228 *. 

In answer to this plea for alteration, it may be observed^ 
that if this mode of pronoimcing Latin be that of foreign 
nations, and were really so superior to our own, we cer^ 
tainly must perceive it in the pronunciation of foreigners, 
when we visit them, or they us : but I think I may ap- 
peal to the experience of every one who has had an oppor- 
tunity of making the experiment, that so far from a super 
riority on the side of the foreign pronunciation, it seems 
much inferior to our own. I am aware of the power of 
habit, and of its being able, on many occasions^ to make 
the worse appear the better reason : but, if the harmony 
of the Latin language depended so much on a preserva^^ 
tion of the quantity as many pretend, this harmony w5uld 
surely overcome the bias we have to our own pronuncia- 
tion ; especially if our own were really so destructive of 
harmony as it is said to be. Till, therefore, we have a 
more accurate idea of the nature of quantity, and of that 

* By what this learned aathor has observed of our Yicious pronun- 
ciation of the vowels by the long and short sound of them, and from 
the instances he has given, he must mean that length and shortness 
which arise from extending and contracting them, independently of 
the obstruction which two consonants are supposed to occasion in 
forming the long quantity. Thut we are to pronounce Manm as if 
written and divided into Man-nus ; and Pannus as if written Paynus, 
or as we always hear the word Panis (bread); for in this sound of 
Pannus there seems to be no necessity for pronouncing the two con- 
sonants distinctly or separately, which he seems to mean by distinctly, 
because the quantity is shown by the long sound of the vowel : but 
if by distinctly he means separately, that is, as if what is called in 
French the sch^va or mute e were to follow the first consonant, this 
could not be done without adding a syllable to the word ; and the 
word Pannus would in that case certainly have three syllables, as if 
written Pan-eh-nus, — See Observations on ihe Greek and Latin Accent 
and Quantity, sect. 34. 



INTEODUCTION. xiU 

leauty and harmony of which it is said to be the efficient 
in the pronunciation of Latin, we ought to preserve a 
pronunciation which has naturally sprung up m our own 
toil, and is congenial to our native language. Besides, 
ui alteration of this kind would be attended with so much 
dispute and imcertainty as must make it highly impolitic 
to attempt it. 

The analogy, then, of our own language being the 
role for pronouncing the learned languages, we shall 
have little occasion for any other directions for the 
pronunciation of the Greek and Latin proper names, 
than such as are given for the pronunciation of Eng^ 
lish words. The general rules are followed almost 
without exception. The first and most obvious powers 
of the letters are adopted, and there is scarcely any diffi- 
culty but in the position of the accent ; and this depends 
so much on the quantity of the vowels, that we need only 
inspect a dictionary to find the quantity of the penul- 
timate vowel, and this determines the accent of all the 
Latin words ; and it may be added, of almost all Greek 
words likewise*. Now in our pronunciation of Latin 
wop^s, whatever be the quantity of the first syllable in a 
word of two syllables, we always place the accent on it : 
but in words of more syllables, if the penultimate be long, 
▼e place the accent on that ; and if short, we accent the 
antepenultimate. 

The Rules of the Latin Accentuation are comprised 
in a clear and concise manner by Sanctius within four 
hexameters : 

Accentum in se ipsll monosyllaba dictio ponit. 
Exacuit sedem dissyllabon omne priorem. 
Ex tribus, extoUit primam pennltima curta : 
Extollit seipsam quando est pennltima longa. 

These rules I have endeavoured to express in English 
verse: 



• That is, in the general pronunciation of Greek; for, let the writ- 
ten accent be placed where it will, the quantitcUive accent, as it may 
be called, foUows the analogy of the Latin. 



XIV INTEODUCTIOK* 

Each monosyllable has stress of conrse : 
Words of two syllables, the first enforce ; 
A syllable that's long, and last but one, 
Must have the accent upon that or none ; 
But if this syllable be short, the stress 
Must on the last but two its force express. 

The only difference that seems to obtain between ib^ 
pronunciation of the Greek and Latin Languages is, that 
m the Latin ti and ^, preceded by^ an accent, and fol^ 
lowed by another vowel forming an improper diphthong, 
are pronounced as in English, like sh or zhj as natioy 
nation; persuasioy persucmon, &c. ; and that in the 
Greek the same letters retain their pure sound, as ^t>^uTicc^ 
ayya<rta, v^oSaTiov^ ft, r. K* This difference, however. 



* " The Greek language,'' says the learned critic, " was happjr 
^' in not being understood by the Goths, viho would as certainly have 
" corrupted the t in etlritt, irUfy &c. into alvU, ««>/•», &c. as they did 
'' the Latin motio and doceo into moshio and dosheo,"^ This, however, 
may be questioned ; for, if in Latin words this impure sound of t 
takes place only in those words where the accent is on the preceding 
Yowel, as in natio, facio, &c. ; but not when the accent follows the t, 
and is on the following vowel, as in satietas, societasy &c. why should 
we suppose any other mode of pronunciation would have been adopted 
by the Goths in their pronouncing the Greek ? Now, no rule of pro- 
nunciation is more uniform in the Greek language than that which 
places an acute on the iota at the end of words, when this letter is 
succeeded by a long vowel ; and consequently if the accent be pre- 
served upon the proper letter, it is impossible the preceding t and s 
should go into the sound of sA; why, therefore, may we not suppose 
that the very frequent accentuation of the penultimate < before a final 
vowel, preserved the preceding r from going into the sound of shy as 
it was a difference of accentuation that occasioned this impure sound 
of t in the Latin language -, for though t at the end of words, when 
followed by a long vowel, or a vowel once long and afterwards con- 
tracted, had always the accent on it in Greek ; in Latin the accent 
was always on the preceding syllable in words of this termination : 
and hence seems to have arisen the corruption of t in the Gothic pro- 
nunciation of the Latin language. 

It is highly probable, that in Lupian's time the Greek r when fol- 
lowed by i and another vowel, had not assumed the sound of «■;) for 
the Sigma would not have failed to accuse him of a usurpation of her 
jpowers, as he had done of her character ; and if we have preserved 
the r pure in this situation when we pronounce Greek, it is, perhaps, 

f Ains worth on the Letter T. 
* i [The use of r for «■ which Lucian ridicules so humorously, seem^ 
however to prove that there was some similarity between the sounds 
of these letters.] 



INTRODUCTION. XV 

rith very few exceptions, does not extend to proper 
lames ; which, coming to us through, and being mingled 
ith, the Latin, fall into the general rule. In the same 
lanner, though in Greek it was an estabUshed maxim, 
bat if the last syllable was long, the accent could scarcely 
e higher than the penultimate ; yet in our pronunciation 
f Greek, and particularly of proper names, the Latin 
nalogy of the accent is adopted : and though the last 
yllable is long in Demosthenes^ Aristophanes^ Thera^ 
WMs^ and Deiphobe^ yet as the penultimate is short, 
he accent is placed on the antepenultimate, exactly as if 
hey were Latin *. 

As these languages have been long dead, they admit 
if no new varieties of accent like the living languages. 
The common accentuation of Greek and Latin may be 
een in Lexicons and Graduses ; and where the ancients 



"ather to be placed to the preserving power of the accented / in so 
^t a number of words, than any adherence to the ancient rules of 
^roDQociation, which invariably affirm, that the consonants had but 
)ne sound ; nnless we except the y before y, z, Xt ^i ^^ t^yyt^^os, 
k**fy •yxt^rtt, ». r. X. where the y is sounded like »: but this, says 
Henry Stephens, is an error of the copyists, who have a little extend- 
m1 the bottom of the », and made a 7 of it ; for, says he, it is ridicu- 
ODs to suppose that » was changed into y, and at the same time that 
r should be pronounced like ». On the contrary, Scaliger says, that 
ffbere we find a » before these letters, as «(yx(/^«, it is an error of the 
copyists, who imagined they better expressed the pronunciation by 
this letter ; which, as Vossius observes, should seem to demand some- 
thing particular and uncommon. 

It is reported of Scaliger, that when he was accosted by a Scotch- 
onn in Latin, he begged his pardon for not understanding him, as he 
liad never learned the Scotch language. If this was the case with 
^e pronunciation of a Scotchman, which is so near that of the Con- 
tinent, what would he have said to the Latin pronunciation of an 
^glishman ? 

* lliis, however, was contrary to the general practice of the Ro- 
■Dans : for Victorinus in his Grammar says, Gneca nomina, si iisdinn 
^eris proferuntur, (Latina versa) Gnecos accentus habebunt : nam cum 
Hcunos ThyoB, NaU, acntum habebit posterior accentum; et cum 
fhemisHoy Calypso^ TheanOf nltimam circnmflecti videbimns, quod 
Dtramque Latiims sermo non patitur, nisi admodum raro. '' If Greek 
" noons turned into Latin are pronounced with the same letters, they 
''hafe the Greek accent: for when we say Thyas^ NaUy the latter 
" syllable has the acute accent ; and when we pronounce -Themistioy 
** Colyp^o, TheanOf we see the last syllable is circumflexed ; neither of 
"which is ever seen in Latin words, or very rarely." — Servius^ Forg^ 

^' Reply f page 31, Notes 32, bott. 



XVI INTEODUCTION. 

indjilged a variety, and the moderns are divided in theiij 
opinions about the most classical accentuation of wordsj 
it would be highly improper,- in a work intended for gene^ 
ral use, to enter into the thorny disputes of the learned; 
and it may be truly said, in the rhyming adage, 

When doctors disagree, * 

Disciples then are free. 

This, however, has not been entirely neglected. Wher^ 
there has been any considerable diversity of accentuation 
among our prosodists, I have consulted the best authori- 
ties, and have sometimes ventured to decide : though, as 
Labbe says, " Sed his de rebus; ut aliis multis, malo 
" doctiorum judicium expectare, quam meam in medium 
" proferre sententiam.'^ 

But the most important object of the present work is 
settling the English quantity^ (see Rules 20, 2i, 22) 
with which we pronounce Greek and Latin proper names^ 
and the sounds of some of the consonants. These arc 
points in a state of great uncertainty; and are to be set- 
tled, not so much by a deep knowledge of the dead lan- 
guages, as by a thorough acquaintance with the analogies 
and general usage of our own tongue. These must, iii 
the nature of things, enter largely into the pronunciation 
of a dead language ; and it is from an attention to these 
, that the Author hopes he has given to the Public a work 
not entirely unworthy of their acceptance. I 



RULES 



PRONOUNCING THE VOWELS 



GREEK AND LATIN PROPER NAMES. 



1. EvEEY vowel with the accent on it at the end of a. 
syllable is pronounced as in English, with its first long 
open sound: thus Co' fo*, Philome' la. On' on, Pha' cion^^ 
Lu' cifer, &c. have the accented vowels sounded exactly^ 
as in the English words pa' per y me' tre, spi' der^ no' Ue, 
tu'tor^ &c. 

2. Every accented vowel not ending a syllable, but, 
PoUowed by a consonant, has the short sound as in the 
English ; thus Man' lius, Pen' theus^ Pin' darus^ Col'-, 
chis, Cur' tins, &c. have the short sound of the accented 
vowels, as in man' ner, plen' ty, prin' ter, col' lar, cur'- 
few, &c. 

3. Every final i, though unaccented, has the long open, 
sound : thus the final i forming the genitive case, as in- 
Magis' tri, or the plural number, as in De' cii, has the 
long open sound, as in tri'al; and this sound we give to 
this vowel in this situation, because the Latin i final in^ 
genitives, plurals, and preterperfect tenses of verbs, is 

* This pronmiciation of Colo, Plato^ Cleopatra, &c. has been but 
^tely adopted. Quin, and all the old dramatic school, used to pro- 
^oace the « is these and similar words like the a in father, Mr. 
Warrick, with great good sense, as well as good taste, brought in the 
present pronunciation, and the propriety of it has made it now uni- 
^sal. [Tbe old pronunciation, however, is still preserved in many 
Pms of bcotkind and Ireland.] 

B 



25 BULES FOE PRONOUNCING 

always long ; and consequently where the accented i 
followed by i final, both are pronounced with the Ion 
diphthongal i like the English noun eye^ — as Achtvi*. 

4. Every unaccented i ending a syllable not final, i 
that in the second of Alcibiades, the Hernici^ &c. is pn 
nounced like e, as if written Alcehiades^ the Hernec 
he. So the last syllable but one of the Fabii^ th 
Horatii, the Curiatii^ is pronounced as if written Fe 
be4^ Ho-TOrshe-i^ Cto-re-a-she-i; and therefore if the ue 
accented i and the diphthong cb conclude a word, the; 
are both pronounced like e, as Harpyice, Harpy' e-e. 

5. The diphthongs' ce and a?, ending a syllable witl 
the accent on it, are pronounced exactly like the lon| 
English e, as Ccesar^ (Eta^ &c. as if written Cee' sat 
E ta^ &c.; and like the short e when followed by a con 
sonant in the same syllable, as Dcedalus, CEdipus^ kc 
pronounced as if written Deddalus^ Eddipus^ &c. The 
vowels ei are generally pronounced like long if. — Foi 
the vowels, eu in final syllables, see the word Idome- 
neus : and for the vowels ou in the same syllables, se« 
the word Antinous^ and similar words, in the TerminaJ 
tional Vocabulary. 

6. Y is exactly under the same predicament as i. It ii 
long when ending an accented syllable, as Cy' rus; ox 
when ending an unaccented syllable if final, as ^' gy^ 
JE' py^ &c.; short when joined to a consonant in tW 
same syllable, as Lye' Idas; and sometimes long and 
sometimes short, when ending an initial syllable not 

* This is the true analogical pronunciation of this letter when 
ending an accented syllable ; but a most disgraceful affectation of 
foreign pronunciation ba& exchanged tliis full diphthongal sound for the 
meagre, squeezed sound of the French and Italian i, not only of 
almost every word derived from those languages, but in many which 
are purely Latin, as Faustinay Messalinay &c. Nay, words from the 
Saxon have been equally perverted, and we hear the i in Elfrida^ 
Edwina, 6cc, turned into Elfreeda^ Edweenay &c. It is true this is the 
iiound the Romans gave to their t; but the speakers here alluded to 
are perfectly innocent of this, and do not pronounce it in this manoer 
for its antiquity, but its novelty. [The evil of which Mr. W. complaiusj 
(if it be an evil) has been considerably augmented in consequence oi 
the increased intercourse with the Continent. In the Romish Church* 
the continental pronunciation is always used in performing the servici 
of the mass.] J 

t See Elegeia, Hygeta^ &c. in the Terminational Vocabulary <4 
Greek and Latin Proper Names. 



GREEK AKD LATIN PROPEE NAMES. 3 

pder the accent, as Ly^cur gus^ pronounced with the 
rst syllable like lie^ a falsehood; and Lysimachua^ with 
ie first syllable like the first of legion; or nearly as if 
ivided into Lys-im' a^htcs, &c. See Principles of En- 
lish Pronunciation prefixed to the Critical Pronouncing 
Hctionary, No. 11?, 118, &c. and 185, 186, 187- 

7. A^ ending an unaccented syllable, has the same ob- 
zaie sound as in the same situation in English words; 
ut it is a sound bordering on the Italian a, or the a in 
'a4her, as Dia'na^ where the difference between the 
ccented and unaccented a is palpable. See Principles of 
inglish Pronunciation prefixed to the Critical Pronounc- 
Qg Dictionary, No. 92, and the letter A. 

8- E final, either with or without the preceding conso- 
lant, always forms a distinct syllable, sls Penelope^ Hip* 
H)cren€j JEvoe^ Amphitritey &c. When any Greek or 
Latin word is anglicised into this termination, by cutting 
€ a syllable of the original, it becomes then an English 
rord, and is pronounced according to our own analogy : 
lius AcidaliuSj altered to Acidale^ has the final e sunk, 
md is a word of three syllables only : Proserpine^ from 
Proserpina^ undergoes the same alteration. Thebes^ and 
ithens, derived firom the Greek 0>ij9>j and AByivh and the 
Latin Thebce^ SLudAtherue^ are perfectly anglicised; the 
Ponner into a monosyllable, and the latter into a dissyl- 
lable: and the Greek Kf»jT» and the Latin Creta, have 
both sunk into the English monosyllable Cret^: Hecate^ 
likewise pronounced in three syllables when Latin, and in 
the same number in the Greek word *E*aT», in English is 
universally contracted into two, by sinking the final e. 
Shakspeare seems to have begun, as he has now con- 
firmed this pronunciation by so adapting the word in 
Macbeth : 

" Why how now, Hecaf ? yon look angerly." — Act IV, 

Perhaps this was no more than a poetical license to him: 
but the actors have adopted it in the songs in this 
tragedy : 

** He-cate, He-caie, come away" 

The play-going world, who form no small portion of 
^hat is called the better sort of people, have followed the 

b2 



% RULES FOS FEONOU^CIXG 

actors in this word: and the rest of the world have fi 
longed' them. 

- The Roman magistrate, named jEdilis^ is anglicial 
1)y pronouncing it in two syllables, M'dUe. The capi^ 
of Sicily, Syracusw^ of four syllables, is made three I 
the English Syr'oAsuse ; and the city of Tyrus, of t^ 
syllables, is reduced to a monosyllable in the Engli^ 
Tyre. 

Rules for pronouncing the Consonants of Gre^ a« 
Latin Proper Names. 1 

9. C and G are hard before a, o, and w, as Cato, C| 
mus^ Cures, Galba, Gorgon^ &c. — and soft before e, 
and y, as Cehes^ Scipio, Scylla, Cinna, Geryon^ Get^^ 
Gillies, Gyges, Gymnosophistce, &c.* 

10. T, S't and C, before ia, ie, ii, io, iuy and eu, pri 
ceded by the accent, in Latin words, as in English 
change into sh and %h, as Tatian, Statius, Porting 
Portia^ Social, Cadticeus, Acciu^, Helvetii, Mcssit^ 
Hesiody &c. pronoun<?ed Tashian, Stasheus, Porsheu\ 
Porsheay Sosheas^ Cadusheus, Aksheus, Helveshe^ 
Mezheay Hexheod, &c. See Principles of English Pr^ 
nunciation prefixed to the Pronoimcing Dictionary, Nj 
357, 450, 451, 459, 463. But when the accent is q 
the first of the diphthongal vowels, the preceding cons^ 
nant does not go into sh, but preserves its sound pure, ^ 
Miltiades, Antiates, &c. See the word Satiety in til 
Crit. Pron. Diet. 

11 . T and S, in proper names, ending in tia, sia, cyof\ 

* That this general rule should be violated by stnatterers in tli 
learned langnages in such words as Gymnastic^ Heterogeneous, &c. 
is not to be wondered at ; but that men of real learning, who do n^ 
want to show themselves off to the vulgar by such innuendoes of the 
erudition, should give into this irregularity, is really surprising. W 
laugh at the pedant:ry of the age of James the First, where there 
scarcely a page in any English book tliat is not sprinkled with twenl 
Greek and Latiii quotations; and yet do not see the similar podanti 
of interlarding our pronunciation with Greek and Latin sounds 
which may be affirmed to be a greater perversion of our langnag 
than the former. In the one case, the introduction of Greek an 
Latin quotations does not interfere with the English phraseology 
but in the other the pronunciation is di&tbrbed, and a nofly jarg'o 
of sounds introduced, as inconsistent with true taste as it is wit 
neatness and uniformity. 



GBEEK AXD LATIN P310PSE NAMES. 5 

nd aiofij pTieceded by the accent, change the t and s into 
ifc and xh. Thus Phodon, Sicyon, and Cercyan, are 
iroifeounced exacdy in our own snalogy, as if written 
?kaahe€tn^ Sishean^ and Sershean: Artemisia and ^«- 
M»ia sotiiid as if written Artemizbea and Aspazhea : 
G€UaHa^ AraMa^ AlotiUy and BaticLf as if written Gaki^ 
^ea^ Arashea^ Ahshea^ and Baahea : and if ^i6Mi, the 
town in Campania, is not so pronounced, it is to distin- 
l^ish it from Asia^ the eastern region of the world. But 
die termination tian (of whidi there are not even twenty 
examples in proper names throughout the whole Greek 
tnA Latin languages) seems to preserve the t from going 
Into sh^ as the last remnant <^ a learned pronuncia- 
tion; kdA to avoid, as much as possible, assimilating 
with 80 vulgar an English termination : thus, though 
JEsion^ Jtmon^ Dumysion^ change the s into jy, as if 
writaten, JEzkm^ Jaxum^ Dionizum^ the x does not be- 
tome xh; but PhiUstion^ Gration^ EuryHon^ Dotion^ 
Androtioriy Hippotion^ Iphition^ Ornytion, Metixm^ P^o~ 
iytiany Siraiwn^ Sction^ JSantion^ Palldniion, JEtum^ 
JSippocratian^ atnd Amphyction^ preserve the t in its 
true sound : Hep/ueatian^ however, from the frequency 
of appearing with Alexander, has deserted the small 
class of his Greek companions, and joined the English 
multitude, by rhyming with question ; and Tatian 
-Mid Theodotion seem perfectly anglicised. With very 
few exceptions, therefore, it may he concluded, that 
Gredc and Latin proper names are pronounced alike, 
and that both of them follow the analogy of English pro- 
nunciation. 

12. Ch. These letters before a vowel are always pro- 
souaced like A;, as Chabriasj Colchis^ &c. ; but when 
Aey come before a mute consonuit at the beginning of a 
▼wnd, as in Chthonia^ they are mute, and the word is 
pronounced as if written Thonia. Words beginning 
with Sche^ as Schedius^ Scheria^ &c. are pronounced as 
if writt^i, Skedius, Skeria, &c. and c before n in the 
Latin praenomen' <7net£«, or Cnasus^ is mute; so in 
Cnopus^ Cnosus, &c. and before t i^ Cteatus^ and g 
before n in Gwfdtt^,— pronounced NoptM^ Nosus^ Tea- 
tu8^ mad Nidtis, 

13. At the begiijjjing of Greek words we frequently 



b RULES FOR PRONOUNCING 

find the uncombinable consonants MiV, TM^ &c. i 
Mnemosyne^ Mnesidamus^ Mneus^ Mneateus^ Tmoltk 
&c. These are to be pronounced with the first consonai 
mute, as if written Nemosyne^ NesidamuSj Neus, JN^ei 
teus^ MoluSj &c. in the same manner as we pronound 
the words Bdellium^ Pneumatic^ Gnomon^ Mnemonia 
Sec. without the initial consonant. The same may \ 
observed of the C hard like JT, when it comes before T 
as Ctesiphon^ Ctesippus, &c. Some ofthese words we sti 
sometimes written with an e or i after the first consonanj 
as Menesteusy Timolusj &c. and then the initial const 
nant is pronounced. 

14. Ph^ followed by a consonant, is mute, as Phthia 
Phthiotis^ pronounced Thia^ Thiotis^ in the same man 
ner as the naturalized Greek word Phthisick pronounced 
Tisick. 

15. Ps: — p is mute also in this combination, as ii 
Psyche, Psammetichus, &c. pronoimced Syke, Sammeti 
CU8, &c. 

16. Pt, p is mute in words beginning with thes^ 
letters when followed by a vowel, as Ptolemy, Pterilas 
&c. pronounced Tokmy, Terilas, &c. ; but when fol 
lowed by Z, the t is heard, as in Tlepolemus: for thougl 
we have no words of our own with these initial conso- 
nants, we have many words that end with them, and thej 
are certainly pronounced. The same may be observed 
of the sf in Zmilaces. 

17. The letters S, X, and Z, require but little obser- 
vation, being generally pronounced as in pure English 
words. It may however be remarked, that «, at the end 
of words, preceded by any of the vowels but e, has its 
pure hissing sound ; as mas, dis, os, mus, &c. but when 
e precedes, it goes into the sound of j?r ; as pes, Ther- 
sites, vates, &c. It may also be observed, that when it 
ends a word and is preceded by r or n, it has the sound 
of z. Thus the letter s in mens. Mars, mors, &c. has 
the same sound as in the English words hens, stars, 
wars, &c. JT, when beginning a word or syllable is 
pronounced like % ; as Xerwes, Xenophon, &c. are pro- 
nounced Zerkxes, Zenophon, &c. Z is uniformly pro- 
nounced as in English words : thus the % in Zeno and 
Zeugma is pronounced as we hear it in xeal, zone, &c. 



GREEK AND LATIN PROPER NAMES. 7 

\Rule8 for ascertaining the English Qiutntity of Greek 
I and Latin Proper Names. 

18. It may at first be observed, that in words of two 
syllables, with but one consonant in the middle, what- 
ever be the quantity of the vowel in the first syllable in 
Greek or Latin/ we always make it long in English: 
thus Crates the philosopher, and crates a hurdle ; decus 
honour, and dedo to surrender or give up ; ovo to tri- 
umph, and ovimi an egg ; Numa the legislator, and 
Ntunen the divinity, have the first vowel always sounded 
equally long by an English speaker, although in Latin 
the first vowel in the first word of each of these pairs 
is short*. 

19. On the contrary, words of three syllables, with the 
accent on the first, and with but one consonant after the 
first syllable, have that syllable pronounced short, let the 
Greek or Latin quantity be what it will; thus regulus 
and remora^ mimicus and minium^ are heard with the 
first vowel short in English pronunciation, though the 
first word of each pair has its first syllable long in Latin : 
and the u in fumigo and fugito is pronounced long in both 
words, though in Latin the last u is short. This rule is 
never broken but when the first syllable is followed by e 
or i followed by another vowel : in this case the vowel in 
the first syllable is long, except that vowel be i: thus 
lamia, genius^ Libya, doceo, cttpio, have the accent on the 
first syllable, and this syllable is pronounced long in every 
word but Libya, though in the original it is equally 
short in alL 

20. It must have frequently occurred to those who in- 
struct youth, that though the quantity of the accented 
syllable of long proper names has been easily conveyed, 
yet that the quantity of the preceding unaccented sylla- 
bles has occasioned some embarrassment. An appeal to 
the laws of our own language would soon have removed 
the perplexity, and enabled us to pronounce the initial 
unaccented Syllables with as much decision . as the others. 
Thus every accented antepenultimate vowel but u, even 

* The only word occurring to me at present where this rule is not 
observed, i% Canon a Rule, which is always pronounced like the word 
Cannoriy a piece of ordnance. 



9 BULES FOK FBONOUNCING 

when followed by one consonant only is, in our "pjef 
nunciation of Latin, as well as in English, short : tbi. 
fabula, separoy diligOj nobilis^ cucumis, have the fin 
vowels pronounced as in the English words, capital^ c^l4 
brate^ simony ^ solihcde^ luculenty in direct opposition t 
ike Latin quantity, which makes every antepenultimo^t 
vowel in all these words but the last long ; and this ec? 
pronounce long, though short in Latin. But if a semi 
consonant ^diphthong succeed, then every such vowel i 
long but i in our pronunciation of both languages ; ar^t 
EuganeuSy Eugenia, filius^ folium^ dvhiaj have tin 
vowel in the antep^iultimate syllable pronounced exactly 
as in the En^ish words satiate, menial, delirious^ ^o 
torious, penurious ; though they are all short in Latir 
but the i, which we pronounce short, though in the Latix 
it is long. 

21. The same rule of quantity takes place in those 
syllables which have the secondary accent : fi>r as we 
pronounce lamentation, demonstration, diminution, do- 
mination, lucubration, with every vowel in the first sylla- 
iAe short but u, so we pronounce the same vowels in the 
^s^me manner in ^mentatio, demonstratio, diminutio, da^ 
minatio, and lucubratio : but if a semi-consonant diph- 
thong succeed the secondary accent as in Ariovistusy 
HeKodorus, Gahinianits, Herodianus, and Volusianus,^ 
every, vowel preceding the diphthong is long but i ; just 
as we should pronounce these words in the English words 
amiability, mediatorial, propitiation, eoffcoriation, cen- 
turiator, &c. For the nature of the secondary accent, 
see Principles prefixed to the Critical Pronouncing IHc- 
tionary, No. 544. 

22. But to reduce these rules into a smaller compass, 
that they may be more easily comprehended and remem- 
bered, it may be observed, that as we always shorten 
every antepenultimate vowel with the primary accent but 
u, unless followed by a semi-consonant diphthong, though 
this antepenultimate vowel is often long in Greek and 
Latdn, as JEschylus, Mschines, &c. and * the antepe- 
nultimate i, even though it be followed by such a diph- 
thong; as Eleusinia, Ocrysia, &c. — so we shorten the 
first syllable of ^sculapitcs, JSnobarbus, &c. because 
the first syllable of both these words has the secondary 



6REBK AND LATIN FROPER NAMES. 9 

iceeHt : but we pronounce the same vowels long in ^thU 
^pia^ Mgialeusj HaUartua^ &c. because this accent is 
bUowed by a semi-consonant diphthong. 

23. This rule sometimes holds good where a mute and 
liquid intervene, and determines the first syllable of 
4drian, Adriatic^ &c. to be long like at/^ and not short 
tike add: and it is on this analogical division of the words, 
N) little imderstood or attended to, that a perfect and a 
consistent pronunciation of them depends. It is this 
malogy that determines the first t^ to be long in stupidus, 
ind t£e y short in clypea, though both are short in the 
Latin ; and the o in the first sellable of Coriolanus^ which 
is short in Latin, to be long m English. 

24. The necessity of attending to the quantity of the 
vowel in the accented syllable has sometimes produced a 
division of words in the following vocabulary, that does 
not seem to convey the actual pronunciation. Thus the 
words StUpitiiis^ Anicium^ Artemisium^ &c. being di- 
vided into Sulpif l4M^ A-nic* i-uniy Ar-te-mis i-um^ &c. 
we fancy the syllable after the accent deprived of a con- 
sonant closely united with it in sound, and which, from 
such a union, derives an aspirated sound, equivalent to 
sh. But as the sound of /, c, or «, in this situation is so 
generally understood, it was thought more eligible to 
divide the words in this manner, than into SuUpi' ti-U6\ 
A-ni d-ufn^ Ar-^e-rm! si-uniy as in the latter mode the i 
wants its shortening consonant, and might, by some 
speakers be pronounced, as it generally is in Scotland, like 
ee. The same may be observed of c and g when they 
end a syllable, and are followed by e or i, as in A-celra' 
ttiBy Ac4-da! /i-a, Tig-eUli* nw«, Teg' y-ra^ &c, where the- 
c and g ending a syllable, we at first sight think they have 
their hiird sound ; but, by observing the succeeding vowel 
we soon perceive them to be soft, and only made to end 
a syllable in order to determine the shortness of the vowel 
which precedes, 

25. The general rule therefbre of quantity indicated by 
the syllalHcation adopted in the vocabulary is, that when 
a consonant ends a syllable, the vowel is always short, 
whether the accent be on it or not ; and that when a vowel 
ends a syllable with the accent on it, it is always long : 
that Ihe yow^l w, wh^n it end;5 9 syllable, is long, whether 

?3 



10 RULES FOR PRONOUNCING 

the accent be on it or not, and that the vowel i (3) (4) 
when it ends a syllable without the accent, is pronouncd 
like e; but if the syllable be final, it has its long opel 
sound, as if the accent were on it : and the same may h 
observed of the letter y. 

Rules for placing the Accent of Greek and Latit 
Proper Names. 

26. Words of two syllables, either Greek or Latin, 
whatever be the quantity in the original, have, ii 
English pronunciation, the accent on the first syllable : 
and if a single consonant come between two vowels, the 
consonant goes to the last syllable, and the vowel in the 
first is long ; as Cato^ Ceres, ComuSy &c. See Principles 
of English Pronunciation prefixed to the Critical Pro- 
nouncing Dictionary, No. 503, and the word Drama. 

27. Polysyllables, adopted whole from the Greek or 
Latin into English, have generally the accent of the 
Latin : that is, if the penultimate be long, the accent is 
on it, as Severus, Democedes, &c. ; if short the accent is 
on the antepenultimate, as Demosthenes^ Aristophanes^ 
Posthumusy &c. See Introduction. 

28. When Greek or Latin Proper Names are angli- 
cised, either by an alteration of the letters, or by cuttmg 
off the latter syllables, the accent of the original, as in 
appellatives under the same predicament, is transferred 
nearer to the beginning of the word. Thus Proserpina 
has the accent on the second syllable ; but when altered 
to Proserpine it transfers the accent to the first. The 
same may be observed of Homerus^ Virgilius^ Horatius, 
&c. when anglicised to Homer ^ Virgil^ Horace, &c. See 
the word Academy, in the Critical Pronouncing Dictionary. 

29. As it is not very easy, therefore, so it is not neces- 
sary to decide where Doctors disagree. When reasons lie 
deep in Greek and Latin etymology, the current pronun- 
ciation will be followed, let the learned do all they can to 
hinder it : thus after Hyperion has been accented by our 
best poets according to our own analogy, with the accent 
on the antepenultimate, as Shakspeare : — 

" Hypt'rion's curls, the front of Jove himself." — Hamlet, 

" that was to this, 

*• Hype' rion to a Satyr." Ibid, 



GEEEE AND LATIN PROPER NAMES. 11 



- next day aAer dawn, 



'' Doth rise and help Hyfef Hon to his horse. Henry Vth, 

So Cooke, in his translation of Hesiod^s Theogony, 
follows the accentuation of Shakspeare : 

Hyperion and Japhety brothers, join ; 

Tkea and Rhea of this ancient line 

Descend : and Themis boasts the source divine. 

The fruits of Thia and Hyperion rise, 
And with refulgent lustre light the skies. 

After this established pronunciation, I say, how hopeless, 
as well as useless, would it be to attempt the penultimate 
accentuation, which yet ought undoubtedly to be pre- 
served in reading or speaking Greek or Latin compo- 
sitions ; but which in reading or speaking English, must 
be left to those who would rather appear Teamed than ju- 
dicious. But Acnoriy Arion^ AmphUm^ Echion^ Orion, 
lanon^ Pandion^ Asum, Alphion^ jEriorij Ophion, Me- 
thiony Awion, Eion, Thlewion, and Sandiony preserve 
their penultimate accent invariably: while Ethalion, a 
word of the same form and origin, is pronounced with the 
accent on the antepenultimate, like Deucalion and Pyg- 
malion, 

30. The same difficulty of deciding between common 
usage and classical propriety appears in words ending in 
ia; as Alexandria, Antiochia, Seleucia, Samaria, Iphi- 
genia*, and several others, which were pronounced by 
our ancestors, as appears from their poetryy according to 
our own analogy, with the accent on the antepenultimate 
syllable ; and there is no doubt but every word of this 
form would have fallen into the same accentuation, if 
classical criticism had not stepped in and prevented it. 
A philosophical grammarian would be apt to think we 
are not much obliged to scholars for this interruption of 
the vernacular current of pronunciation : but as there is 
so plausible a plea as that of reducing words to their orir 
ginal languages, and as a knowledge of these languages 
will always be an honourable distinction among men, it 
is strongly to be suspected that these words will not long 

•Thus Pope, Iliad IX, 

** Laodic^ and Iphigenia fair, 
And bright Chrysothemis with golden hair," 



12 EtTLES FOE PBOKOITNCIKC 

continue in their plain homespun English dress. This 
critical correction, however, seems to have come too late 
for some words, which, as Pope expresses it, have " slid 
into verse '% and taken possession of our ears; and there^ 
fore, perhaps, the best way of disposing of them will be 
to consider them as the ancients did the quantity of cer- 
tain doubti^l syllables, and to pronounce them either way. 
Siome, however, seem always to have preserved the accent 
of their original language, as Thalia and Sophia : but 
Iphigenia^ Antiochia, Seleucia^ and Samaria, have ge- 
nerally yielded to the English antepenultimate accent ; 
and ErytMay Deidamia, Laodamia, Hippodamia, Apa- 
mia, Ilithyia, and Orythia, from tiheir seldom appearing 
in mere Englisli composition, have not often been drawn 
aside into plain English pronunciation. The same may 
be observed of words ending in nicus or nice: if they 
are compounded of the Greek vwu, the penultimate syl- 
lable is always long, and must have the accent, as Stror- 
tonicusj Berenice, &c.; if this termination be what is 
called a gentile, signifying a man, &c. of a particular 
country designated, the penultimate is short, and the ac- 
cent is on the antepenultimate; Macedordcus, Sardo- 
nicusy Britannicusy &c. See Andronicus. 

31. Thus we see many of these proper names are of 
dubious accentuation : and the authorities which may be 
produced on both sides sufficiently show us the inutility 
of criticising beyond a certain point. It is in these as in 
many English words : there are some which, if mispro- 
nounced, immediately show a want of education; and 
there are others which, though not pronounced in the 
most erudite manner, stamp no imputation of ignorance 
or illiteracy^ To have a general knowledge, therefore, 
of the pronunciation of these words, seems absolutely ne- 
cessary for those who would appear respectable in the 
more respectable part of society. Perhaps no people on 
earth are so correct in their accentuation (rf proper names 
as the learned among the English. The Port-Royal 
Grammar informs us, that, " notwithstanding all the tules 
*' that can be given, we are often imder the necessity of 
" submitting to custom, and of accommodating our pro- 
" nunciation to what is received among the learned, ac- 
" cording to the country we are in.'^ " So we pro- 



GEEEK AND LATIN PROPER NAMES. 13 

"nounce^, says the grammarian, ^' Aristo' bulusy Bc^ 
" si' liuSf Ido' lium^ with the accent on the antepenulti- 
" mate, though the penultimate is long, because it is the 
" custom : and, on the contrary, we pronounce Andre' as^ 
" ide' a, Mart' a, &c. with the accent on the penultimate, 
'^ though it is short, because it is the custom of the most 
" learned. The Italians'", he continues, " place the ac- 
" cent on the penultimate of antonomasi' a, harmoni' a, 
" phUmophi a, theologi' a, and similar words, according 
'' to the Greek accent, because, as Ricciolus observes, it 
" is the custom of their country. Alvarez and Gretser 
" think we ought always to pronounce them in this man- 
"ner, though the custom, not only of Germany and 
" Spain, but of all France, is against it: but Nebrissensis 
'^ authorizes this last pronunciation, and says, that it is 
" better to place the accent of these vowels on the ante- 
" penultimate syllable ; which shows,^** concludes the 
grammarian, " that when we once depart from the an- 
"cient rules, we have but little certainty in practice, 
'* which is so diflTerent in different countries.'*' 

But however uncertain and desultory the accentuation 
of many words may be, it is a great satisfaction to a 
speaker to know that they are so. There is a wide dif- 
ference between pronouncing words of this kind igno- 
rantly and knowingly. A person who knows that scholars 
themselves diflFer in the pronunciation of particular words, 
can always pronounce with security : but one who is un- 
acquainted with the state of the accent, is not sure that 
he is right when he really is so, and always pronounces 
at his peril. 



*^^* It is hoped the candid peruser of this tvork will 
make allowances for an occasional error in dividing a 
syllable^ or placing an accent^ when he reflects on the 
difficulty with which such a work must necessarily be 
attended. The Author flatters himself however^ that 
mch attention has been paid^ both to the compilation 
and the proof s^ that the fewest errors imaginable have 
escaped him. 



PRONUNCIATION 



or 



GREEK AND LATIN PROPER NAMES. 



INITIAL VOCABULARY. 



%* When a word is succeeded by a word printed in Italics, the 
latter word is introduced merely to spell the former as it onght to be 
proDonnced. Thns Abansheaa is the trne pronanciation of the pre- 
ceding word Abantias ; and so of the rest. 

%* The figures annexed to the words refer to the rules prefixed 
to the work. Thus the figure 3 after Achai refers to Rule the 3d, 
for the pronunciation of the final t; and the figure 4 after Abii refers 
to Rule the 4th, for the pronunciation of the unaccented t, not final ; 
and so of the rest. 

%* When the letters Eng, are put after a word, it is to shew that 
this word is the preceding word anglicised. Thus Lu'cany Eng. is 
the Latin word iMcaniUy changed into the English Lucan, 



AB 

*A'ba and A!bm. 
AbVa 
Ab'a-ba 
Ab-a-ce'ne, 8 
AVac-ga 
Ab'a-lus, 20 
fA-ba'na, 7 
A-ban'tes 
A-ban'ti-as, 10 



AB 

A-han'she-aa 
Ab-an-tiVdes, 1 
A-ban'ti-das, 4 
A-ban'tis 
Ab-ar-ba're-a, 7 
Ab'a-ri, 3 
A-bar'i-mon, 4 
Ab'a-ris, 7 
A-ba'ru8, 1 



AB 

A^as, 1 
A-ba'sa, 1, 7 
Ab-a-si'tis, 7? 1 
Ab-as-se'na, 1, ^ 
Ab-as-se'ni 
A-bas'sus, 7 
Ab'a-tos, 7 
Ab-da-lon'i-mus, 4 
Ab-de'ra, 1, 7 



* Every a ending a syllable, with the accent upon it, is pronounced 
Hke the a in the English words /a-vour, tamper, &c. See Role the 1st, 
prefixed to this Vocabulary. 

t Every unaccented a, whether initial, medial,* or final, ending a 
syllable, has an obscure sound, bordering on the a in father. See 
Rale the 7th, prefixed to this Vocabulary. 



16 AB 

Ab-de'ri-a, 1, 4, 7 
Ab-de-ri'tes, 1 
Ab-de'nis, 1 
A-be'a-tae, ^, 1, 5 
A-beHa, 7 
Ab-el-li'nus 
A'bU, 1, 4, 7 
A-ben'da, 7 
Ab'ga-rus 
A'bi-i, 4 
Ab'Ua, 4, 7 
A-bis'a-res, 7 
A-bis'a-ris, 7 
Ab-i-son'tes, 4 
Ab-le tes, 1 
A-bob'ri-ca, 4 
A-bo'bus 
A-boec'ri-tus, 5 
Ab-o-la'ni, 3 
A-bolus, 7^ 1 
Ab-on-i-tei'chos, 5 
Ab-o-ra'ca, 1, ^ 
Ab-o-rig'i-nes, 4 
A-bor'ras, 7 
Ab-ra-da'tas 
Ab-ra-da'fces 
A-bren'ti-us, 10 
A-broc'o-mas 
Ab-rod-i-ae'tus, 4 
A-bro'ni-us, 4 
A-bron'y-cus, 6 
Ab'ro-ta, ^ 
A-brot'o-num 
A-bryp'o-lis, 6 
Ab-se'us 



AC 

Ab-si'ma-vus 
Ab-sin'thi-i, 4 
Ab'so-rus . 
Ab-syr'tos, 6 
Ab-s)rr'tU8, 6 
Ab-u-li'tes, 1 
Ab-y-de'ni, 6 
Ab-y-de'nus, 6 
A-by'di, 6 
A-by'dos, 6 
A-by'du8 
Ab'y-la, 6 
Ab'y-loH, 6 
Ab-ys-si'ni, 1 
Ab-ys-sin'i-a, 6 
Ac-a-callis, 7 
Ac-a-ce'si-um, 10 
Ak-d-se'zhe-um 
A-ca'ci-us, 10 
A-ka'she-vs 
*Ac-a-de'mi-a, 7 
A-ca de'mi-ci 
Ac-a-de'mus 
Ac-a-lan'drus 
A-calle, 8 
A-ca-mar'chis, 7 
Ac'a-mas, 7 
A-camp'sis, 7 
A-can'tha, 7 
A-can'thus, 7 
Ac'a-ra, 7 
A-ca'ri-a, 7 
Ac-ar-na'ni-a, 7 
A-car'nas, 7 
A-cas'ta, 7 



AC 

A-cas'tus, 7 
Ac-a-than'tus, 7 
Ac'ci-a, 10, 7 
Ak'ahe-a 
Ac'ci-la, 7 
Ac'ci-us, 10 
Ak'she-us 
Ac cu-a, 7 
A'ce, 8 

Ac-e-di'ci, 3, 24 
Ac'eJa, 24 
Ac-e-ra'tus, 27 
A-cer'bas 
Ac-e-ri'na, 1 
A-cer'rae, 4 
Ac-er-sec'o-mes 
A'ces, 7 
A-ce'si-a, 10 
Ac-e-si'nes, 1 
Ac-e-si'nus, 1 
A-ce'si-us, 10 
A-ces'ta, 7 
A'-ces'tes 
A-ces'ti-um, 10 
A-ces-to-do'rus 
A-ces-tor'i-des 
A-ce'tes 

f Ach-a-by'tos, 12 
A-cbae'a, 7 
A-chae'i, 3 
A^jhae'i-um 
A^chaem'e-nes 
Ach-ae-me'ni-a 
A ch-ae-men'i-des 
A-chae'us 



* A place near Athens, where Plato taught his d6ctruies to great 
crowds of people ; and which occasioned his disciples to be called 

ACAOEMICl. 

t MluJiytw, — CA, in this and all the snbseqnent words, have the 
soiifid of h. Thus Achabytos, Aefkeay Achates^ Hic. are pronounced as 
if written Akabytosy Akaa, Akates, 6iC, See Rule the 12lh« 



AC 

A-cha'i-a, 7 

Ach'a-ra, 7 

Ach-a-ren'ses 

A-char'nae, 4 

A-cha'tes 

Ach-e-do'ru8 

Ach-eJo'i-des, 4 

Ach-e-lo'ri-um 

Ach-eJo'us 

A-cher'dus 

A-cher'i*mi, 3, 4 

Ach'e-ron 

Ach-e-ron'ti-a, 10 

Ach-e-ru'si-a, 11 

Ach-e-ru'si-as, 1 1 

A-che'tus 

A-chillas 

A-chine-us 

Ach-iUe'a, ^ 

Ach-il-lei-en'ses 

Ach-il-k'is 

A-chilles 

Ach-ilJe'um 

A-chi'vi, 4 

Ach-la-dae'us 

Ach-o-Ia'i, 3 

Ach-o-lo'e 

Ach-ra^'na 

Ac-i-cho'ri-us 

A(si-da1i-a, 8 

Ac-i-da'sa 

*A-ci-de'iius 

A-cill-a 

Ac-i-Ug'e-wa, 24 

A-ciri-us 

A-cUla, 7 

A'ci-na 

A-ciiiTdy'nus 

A'cis 



AC 

Ac'mon 

Ac-mon'i-des, 4 
A-ccB'tes 
A-co'nae, 4 
A-con'tes 
A-con'te-us 
A-con'ti-us, 10 
A-con-to-bulus 
A-co'ris 
A'cra 

Ac-ra-di'na, 7 
A'crae 
A-crae'a, 7 
A-craepb'ni-a, 7 
Ac-ra-gal-li'dae, 4 
Ac'ra-gas, 7 
A-cra'tus 
A'cri-as, 4 
Ac-ri-doph'a-gi, 3 
A-cri'on, 11 
Ac-ris-i-o'ne 
Ac-ris-i-o-ne'is 
Ac-ris-i-o-ne'us 
Ac-ris-i-o-ni'a-des 
A-cris'e-us, 10 
A-cri'tas, 1 
Ac-ro-a'thon 
Ac-ro-ce-rau'ni- 

um 
Ac-ro-ca-rin'thuB 
A'cron, 1 
Ac-ro-pa'tos 
A-crop'o-lis 
Ac'ro-ta 
A-crot'a-tus 
Ac-ro'tho-os 
Ac'ta, 7 
Ac-tae'a, 7 
Ac-tae'on, 4 



AD 17 

Ac-tae'us, 4 

Ac'te, 8 

Ac'ti-a, 10 

Ac'tis 

Ac-tis'a-nes 

Ac'ti-um, 10 

Ac'ti-us, 10 

Ac'tor 

Ac-tor'i-des 

Ac-to'ris 

•|-A-cu1e-o 

A-cu'phis 

A-cu-si^la'u8 

A-cu'ti-cus, M. 

A'da, 7 

A-dae'us 

Ad-a-man-tse'a, ^ 

Ad'a-mas 

Ad-a-mas'tus 

A-das'pi-i, 4 

Ad'a-tha 

A-de-an-tu-a'nus 

A-del-sta'nus 

Ad-de-pha'gi-a 

Ad'du-a, 7 

A-derphi-us 

A-de'mon 

A'des, or Ha'des 

Ad-gan-des'tri-us 

Ad-her'bal 

Ad-ber'bas 

Ad-i-an'te, 8 

A-di-at'o-rix 

Ad-i-man'tus 

Ad-i-me'te 

Ad-me'ta, 7 

Ad-me'tus 

A-do'ni-a 

A-do'nis 



* Reounciatns CoDsnl. De Orat. 195. 

t G.-^Kqiies Romamis, qui Ciceroois materteram diixit uxorenK 
Vide De Orat. p. 69- 



18 ^D 

Ad-ra-myt'ti-um 

A-dra'na, 7> 1 

A-dra'num 

A-dras'ta 

A-^dras'ti-a 

A-dras'tus 

A'dri-a, 23 

A-dri-a'num 

A-dri-afi-cum 

A-dri-an-op'o-lis 

A-dri-a'nus 

A'drUan (Eng.) 

Ad-ru-me'tum 

Ad-u-atl-ci, 4 

A-dyr-ma-chi'dae 

♦iE'a, 7 

iE-a-ce'a 

iE-ac1-das 

^-ac'i-des 

^'a-cus 

iE'ae 

uE-ae'a 

^-an-te'um 

^-an'ti-des 

^-an'tis 

jE'as 

.E'-a-tus 

^ch-mac'o-ras 

JEch'mis 

^-dep'sum 



.EG 

iE-des'sa 

iE-dic'u-la 

iE^diles, 8 

iE-dip'sus 

iE'don 

iE'du-i, orHed'u-i 

iE-ello 

iE-e'ta 

iEUe'ti-as, 10 

.E'ga 

iE-ge'as 

iE'gse, 5 

iE-gae'ae 

iE-gae'on 

iE-gae'um 

iE-gae'us 

iE-gale-08 

iE-ga'le-um 

iE'gan 

iE'gas, 5 

iE-ga'tes 

iE-gele-on 

iE-ge'ri-a 

iE-ges'ta 

iE-ge'us 

iE-gi'a.le 

iE-gi-ale-us, 22 

iE-gi-a1i-a, 22, 4 

-ffi-gi'a-lus 

iE-gi'des 



^G 

iE-gila 

iE-gil1-a 

iE-gim'i-us 

iEg-i-mo'rus 

iE-gi'na 

iEg-i-ne'ta 

iEg-i-ne'tes 

iE-gi'o-chus 

iE-gi'pan 

iE-gi'ra 

-^-gir-o-es'sa 

t^E'gis 

iE-gis'thus 

JE-gi'tum 

iE'gi-um 

iEg'les 

^g-le'tes 

iEg'lo-ge 

^-gob'o-Ius 

iE-goc'e-ros 

iE'gon 

iE'gos-pot'a-mos 

iEg-o-sa'gae 

-^-gos'the-na 

iE'gus 

^'gy, 6 

^Eg-y-pa'nes 

iE-gyp'sus 

JS-gyp'ti-i, 4, 10 



• yEa. — ^The diphthong is merely ocular, for the a has no share i 
the sound, though it appears in the type. Indeed as we pronounc 
the a, there is no middle sound between that letter and e, an 
therefore we have adopted the last vowel, and relinquish the firs 
This, among other reasons, makes it probable that the Greeks an 
Romans pronounce the a as we do in water, and the e as we hear 
in where and there; the middle or mixt sound would then be like n i 
father^ which was probably the sound they gave to the diphthong. 

t Mffis, — ^This aiphthong, though long in Greek and Latin, isi 
English pronunciation either long or short, according to the accei 
or position of it. Thus, if it immediately precedes the accent, as i 
jEgeu8, or with the accent on it, before a single consonant, in a woi 
of two syllables, it is long, as in Mgis; before two consonants it 
shortf as in Mgles ; or before one only, if the accent be on the ant 
penultimate, as JEropu$*—¥oT the exceptions to this rule, see Rule 2 



.EN 

jE-gyp'ti-um, 10 

iE-gyp'tus 

Jl'li-a 

iE-li-a'nus 

JEli-an (Eng.) 

Jl'li-usandiEai-a 

Jl-lu'rus 

iE.mil'i-a 

Jl-mil-i-a'nus 

Jl-mill-us 

J!m-iies'tus 

Jl'mon 

iEm'o-na 

.tmo'ni-a 

iE-mon'i-des 

JI'mus 

^myl'i-a 

^myl-i-a'nus 

iE-myri-i, 4 

iE-myri-us 

iE-na'ri-a 

iE-ne'a 

iE-ne'a^es 

iE-ne'a-dae 

iE-ne'as 

iE-ne'i-a 

iE-ne'is 

iE.ne1-des, 4 

iE-nes-i-de'mus 

iE-ne'si-us, 10 

.E-ne'tus 

Jl'm-a 

-^ni'a-cus 

Jl-mo-chi, 12 

iEn-o-bar'bus, 22 

.En'o-cles 



iES 

iE'nos 

iE'num 

iE-n/ra 

iE-oli-a 

JE-oli-ae 

iE-oli'-da 

iE-oll-des 

iE'o-lis 

iE'o-lus 

iE'o-ra 

iE-pali-us 

iE.pe'a 

iEp'uJo, 21 

iE'py, 6 

iEp'y-tus, 21 

iE-qua'na, 7 

iE'qui, 3 

-^quic'o-li 

iEq-ui-me'li-um 

^'ri-as 

A-er'o-pe, or ^r'o- 

^r'o-pus 

^s'a-cus 

jE-sa'pus 

iE'sar, oriE-sa'ras 

iEs'chi-nes, 22 

jEs'chi-ron, 12 

iEs-chy-li'des 

iEs'chy-lus, 21 

iEs-cu-la'pi-us, 22 

jE-se'pus 

JE-sePni-a 

JE-si'on, 11 

jE'son 

iE-son'i-des 



AG 19 

.ffi-so'pus 

^'8op (Eng.) 

-ffis'tri-a 

iEs'u-a 

-^sy'e-tes 

iEs-yra-ne'tes, 21 

^sym'nus 

^-thal'i-des 

iE-thi-opia, 22 

^th'li-u8 

iE'thra 
iE-thu'sa 
iE'ti a, 10 
-ffi'ti-on, 11 
*iE'ti-u8, 10, or 

A-e'tius 
^t'na 
iE-to'li-a 
iE-to1u8 
Afer 
A-fra'ni-a 
A-fra'ni-us 
Af ri-ca, 7 
Af-ri-ca'nus 
Af ri-cum 
A-gag-ri-a'nae 
Ag-a-Wses 
A-galla, 7 
A.gam'ma>t8e 
Ag-a-me'des 
Ag-a-mem'non 
Ag-a-mem-no'ni- 

us 
Ag-a-me'tor 
Ag-am-nes'tor 



* One of the Generals of Valentinian the Third ; which Labbe 
tells OS, ought properly to be written AetvuB; that is, withont the 
diphthong. We may observe, that as this word comes from the 
Greek, but is latinized, it is pronounced with the t like sA, as if 
written Mshim; but the preceding word Mtion^ being pure Greek, 
does not conform to this analpgy.-r-Scc Rule the 11th and 29th. 



20 AG 

Ag-a-nip'pe 

A-gan'za-ga 

Ag-a-pe'no 

Ag-a-re'ni, 3 

Ag-a-rifi'ta 

Ag'a-rus 

A-gas'i-des 

A-gas'sae 

A-gas'tbe-n^ 

A-gas'thus 

A-gas'tro-jAus 

Ag'atba 

Ag-ath-ar'chi-das 

Ag-ath^r'chi-des 

Ag-ath-ar'cu8 

A-ga'thi-as 

Ag'a-tbo 

A-gath-o-cle'a 

A-gath'o-clcs 

Ag'a-thoji 

A-gath-o-ny'ums 

A-ga-thosthe-nes 

Ag-a-th)^num 

Ag-a-tbyr'Bi, 3 

A-ga've 

A-gavl, 3 

A-ga'vuB 

Ag^es'tis 

Ag-e-e'na 

Ag^as'tus 

Ag-e-la'us 

Ag-e'li-a 

A-gen'a-tha 

Ag-en-di'cum 

A-ge'nor 

Ag-e-nor'i.des 

Ag-e-ri'nus 

Ag-e-san'der 

A-ge'si-as, 10 

Ag-es'i-la'us 

Ag-e-sip'o-lis 

Ag-e-sis'tra-ta 



AG 

Ag-e-sis'tra*tu8 

Ag-gram'mes 

Ag-gri'nae 

Ag^i-dae 

Ag-i-la'us 

A'gis 

Ag-la'i-a 

Ag-layfa (Eng.) 

Ag-la-o-ni'ce 

Ag-la'o-pe 

Ag-la-o-phae'na 

Ag-la'o-phon 

Ag-la-os'the-nes 

Ag-lau'ro6 

Ag-la'us 

Ag'na 

Ag'no 

Ag-nod'i-oe 

Ag'non 

Ag-non'i-des 

AgH)-na'li-a, and 

A-go'ni-a 
A-go'nes 
A-go'nis 
A-go'ni-us 
Ag-o-rac'ri-tu8 
Ag-o-ran'o-mi, 3 
Ag-o-ra'nis 
Ag-o-r«'a 
A'gra, 1 
A-pgrae'i, 3 
Ag'ra-gas 
A-graule 
A-grauli-a 
A-grau'los 
Ag-rau-o-ni'tae 
A-gn-a'nes 
A-grijc'o-la 
Ag-ri-gen'tum 
A-grinl-um 
Ag-ri'o-dos 
A-gri-o'ni-a 



AL 

A-gri'o-pas 

A-gri'o»pe 

A-griypa 

Ag-rip-pi'na 

A-gris'o-pe, 8 

A'gri-us, 1 

Ag'ro-las 

A'gron 

A-gro'tas 

A-grot'e-ra 

A-gyl'e-us, 5 

A-gylla 

Ag-yl-lae'us 

A-gy'rus 

A-gyr'i-um 

A-gyr'i-us 

A-eyr't(58 

A-hala, 7 

A'jax 

A-i-do'ne-us, 6 

A-im'y-l«s 

A-i'us Lo-cu'ti^us 

Al-a-ban'da 

Ara-bus 

A-lae'a 

A-lael, 3 

AJae'sa 

A-lae'us 

Al-a-go'ni-a 

A-lala 

Al-al-com^jC-nae 

A.la'U-a, 7 

Al-a-ma'nes 

Al-a-man'ni, or 

Al-e-man'ni 
A-la'ni 
Al'a-res 
Al-a-ri'cus 
Ald-ric (Eng.)' 
Al-a-ro'di-i, 3, 4 
A-las'tor 
1 Ala-zon 



AL 

Alba Syl Ti-us 

Ai-bft'iuHi 

Al-ba'nus 

ALbi'ci, 3, 4 

Al-bi-c'tee, 4 

Al-bi'ni, 3 

Al-bi-no-Ta'ntur 

Al-bin*te-meli-um 

Al-bi'nus 

Am-on 

♦Albis 

Al'bi-us 

Al-bu-cil'la 

Al'bu-Ia 

Al-bu'ne-a 

Al-bur'nus 

Al'bus Pa'gus 

Al-bu'ti-U8, 10 

Al-cae'us 

Al-cam'e-nes 

Al-can'der 

Al-can'dre 

Al-ca'Dor 

Al-cath'o-e 

Al-cath'o-ug 

Al'ce 

Al^e'nor 

Al-ces'te 

Al'ces'tig 

Al'ce-tas 



AL 

Al'chUas, 12 

Al-chim'a-cu8 

Al-ci-bi'ades, 4 

Al-cid'a mas 

Al-ci-da>me'a 

Al-ci-dam'i-das 

Al-cid'a-mus 

Al-ci'das 

Al-ci'des 

Al-cid'i-ce 

Al-cim'e-de 

Al-cim'e-doii 

Al-cim'e-nes 

Al'ci-mus 

Al-cin'o e 

Arci-nor 

•f-Al-cin'o-us 

Al-ci-o'ne-us, 5 

Ard-phron 

Al-cip'pe 

Al-cip'pu8 

Ards 

Al-cith'o-e 

Alc-mae'on 

Alc-mse-on'i-dae 

Alc'-man 

Alc-me'na 

Al-cy'o-ne 

Al-cy-o'ne-us, 5 

Al-cy'o-na 



AL 21 

Al-des'cug 

Al-duVbis 

Ale-a, 1, 7 

A-le'bas 

A-le'bi-on 

A-lec'to 

A-Wtor 

A-lec'try-on 

A-lec'tus 

+ A-lel-us Cam' 

pus 
Al-e-man'ni 
A-le'mon 
Al-e-mu'«i-i, 4 
Alens 
Ale-on 
A-le'se 
A4e'si-a, 10 
A-le'si-um, 10 
A-le'tes 
A-le'thes 
A-le'thi-a 
A-let'i-das 
A-le'tri-um 
A-le'tum 
Al-eu-a'dae 
A-le'us 
A'lex, 1 
A-lexa-me'mis 
§ Al-ex-an'dCT 



* Albis.-^Vide Proost in Cicer. p. 7, 

t Alcinous, — There are no words more frequently mispronounced by 
a mere English scholar than those of this termination. By such a one 
we sometimes hear Aleinous and Antinous pronounced in three syl- 
lables, as if written Al-ci-nouz^ and An-ti-nouZy rhyming with voios ; 
but classical pronunciation requires that tliese vowels should form 
distinct syllables. 
X Meius Cempus, 

Lest from the flying steed unrein'd (as once 
Bellerophon, though from a lower dime) 
Dismounted, on the Aleian field I fall, 
Erroneous there to wander, and fbiiorn. 

Milton's Par, Losty b. vii. v. 17. 
J il/tfxander.— This word is ts frequently pronounced with the^ 
accent on the first as on the third syllable. 



22 



AL 



Al-ex-an'dra 

Al-ex-an-dri'a, 30 

Al-ex-an'dri-des 

Al-ex-an-dri'na 

Al-ex-an-drop'o-lis 

Al-ex-a'nor 

Al-ex-ar'chus 

A-lex'as 

AJex'i-a 

A'lekfshe-a 

A-lex-ic/a-cus 

Al-ex-i'nus 

AJexl-o 

A'lekfshe-o 

Al-ex-ip'pus 

Al-ex-ir'a-es 

Al-ex-ir'ho-e 

A-lex'is 

A-lex'on 

Al-fa-ter'na 

Al-fe'nus 

Argi-dum 

A-li-ac'mon 

A-li-ar'tum 

A-li-ar'tus 

Al'i-cis 

A-li-e'nus, 21 

Al'i-fae 

AU-lae'i, 3, 4 

Al-i-men'tus 

A-lin'dse 

A-lin-do'i-a 

Al-i-phe'ri-a 

Al-ir-ro'tbi-us 

Al'li-a 

Al-li-e'nus 

Al-lob'ro-ges 

Al-lob'ry-ges 

A14ot'ri-ges 

Al-lu'ti-us, 10 

A-lo'a 

Al-o-e'us 



AM 

Al-o-i'dae 

Al-o-i'des 

A-lo'ne 

Aro-pe 

A-lop'e-ce 

x\-lop'e-ces 

A-lop-e-con-ne'sus 

A-lo'pi-us 

A-lo'rus 

AIos 

A-lo'ti-a, 10 

Al-pe'nus 

Al'pfes 

Alps (Eng.) 

Al-phe'a 

Al-phe'i-a 

Al-phe'nor 

Al-phe'nus 

Al-phe-si-bcB'a, 5 

Al-phe-si-bcB'us 

Al-phe'us 

Al'phi-us 

Al-phi'on, 28^ 

Al-pi'nus 

Arpis 

Arsi-um, 10 

Arsus 

Al-thse'a 

Al-thsem'e-nes 

Al-ti'num 

Artis 

A-Iun'ti-um, 10 

Alus, AVu-us 

A-ly-at'tes 

Aly-ba, 6 

Al-y-cae'a 

Al-y-cae'us 

A-lys'sus 

Al-yx-oth'o-e 

A-mad'o-ci, 3 

A-mad'o-cus 

Am'a-ge 



AM 

Am-al-thae'a 

Am-al-the'um 

Am'a-na 

A-man'tes 

Am-an-ti'ni, 3 

A-ma'nus 

A-mar'a-cus 

A-mar'di, 3 

A-mar'tus 

Am-bryllis 

Am-ar-yn'ce-us, 5 

Am-ar-yn'thus 

A'mas 

A-ma'si-a, 10 

Am-a-se'nus 

A-ma'sis 

A-mas'tris 

A-mas'trus 

A-ma'ta 

Am-a-the'a 

Am'a-thus 

A-max-am-pe'us 

A-maxl-a 

A-max'i-ta 

Am-a-ze'nes 

A-maz'o-nes 

Am'a^xons (Eng.) 

Am-a-zon'i-des 

Am-a-zo'ni-a 

Am-a-zo'ni-um 

Am-a-zo'ni-us 

Am-bar'ri, 3 

Am'be-nus 

Am-bar-vali-a 

Am-bi-a-li'tes 

Am-bi-a'num 

Am-bi-a-ti'num 

Am-bi-ga'tus 

Am-bi'O'rix 

Am'bla-da 

Am-bra'ci-a, 10 

Am-bra'ci-us, 10 



AM 

Am'bri, 3 

Am-bro'nes 

Am-bro'si-a, 10 

Am-bro'si-us, 10 

Am-bry'on 

Am-brys'sus 

Am-bulli, 3 

Am'e-les 

Am-e-na'nus 

Am-e-ni'des 

A-men'o-cles 

A-men-a 

* A-me-ri'nus 

A-mes'tra-tus 

A-mes'tris 

A-mic'las 

Ara-ic-lae'us 

A-mic-tae'us 

A-mic'tas 

A-mi'da, 3 

A-mircar 

Am'i-los 

A-mim'o-ne, or 

A-mym'o-ne 
A-min'e-a, or 

Am-min'e-a 
A-min'i-as 
A-min'i-us 
A-min'o-cI^s 
Am-i-se'na 
A-mis'i-as, 10 
A-mis'sas 
A-mi'sum 
A-mi'sus 
Am-i-ter'num 
Am-itha'on, or 

Am-y-tha'on 



AM 

Am-malo 

Am-mi-a'nus 

Am'mon 

Am-mo'ni-a 

Am-mo'ni-i, 3 

Am-mo'ni-us 

Am-mo'the-a 

Am'ni-as 

Am-ni'sus, 3 

Am-oe-bae'us, 5 

Am-o-me'tus 

A'mor, 1 

A-mor'ges 

A-mor'ffos 

Am'pe-lus 

Am-pe-lu'si-a 

Am-phe'a, 7 

Am-phi-a-la'u8 

Am-phi'a-nax 

Am-phi-a-ra'us 

Am-phUar'i-des 

Am-phic'ra-tes 

Am-phic'ty-on, 11 

Am-phic-le'a 

Am-phid'a-mus 

Am-phi-dro'mi-a 

Am-phi-ge'ni-a, or 

•f- Am-phi-ge-ni'a, 

29 
Am-phiro-chus 
Am-phil'y-tus 
Am-phim'a-chus 
Am-phim'e-don 
Am-phin'o-me 
Am-phin'o-mus 
Am-phi'on, 29 
Am-phip'o-les 



AM 23 

Ain-phip'o-lis 

Am-phip'y-rofi 

Am-phi-re'tus 

Am-phir'o-e 

Am'phis 

Am-phis-bae'na 

Am-phis'sa 

Am-phis-se'ne 

Am-pbis'sus 

Am-phis'the-nes 

Am-phis-ti'des 

Am-phis'tra-tus 

Am-phit'e-a 

Am-phith'e-mis 

Am-phith'o-e 

Am-phi-tri'te, 8 

Am-phifry-on 

Am-phit-ry-o-ni'a- 

des 
Am'phi-tus 
Am-phot'e-ru8 
Am-phry'sus 
Amp'sa-ga 
Am-pys'i-des 
Am'pyx 
Am-sac'tus 
A-mu'li-us 
A-myc'la 
A-myc'lae 
Am'y-cus 
Am-y-don 
Am-y'mo-ne 
A-myn'tas 
A-myn-ti-a'nus 
A-myn'tor 
A-my'ris 
A-myr'i-us 



* A'werinus* — [Cocnomen Roscii. a loco. Vide Not. in De Oiat. 
p. 170.] 

\ Amphigenia, — See Tphigehia, and Rule 30, prefixed to this Vo- 
tabularv. 



24 AN 

Am'y-rus 
A-mys'tis 
Am-y-tha'on 
Am'y-tis 
An'a-ces 
An-a-char'sis 
A-na'ci-um, 10 
A-nac're-on, or 

A-na'cre-on, 23 
An-ac-to'ri-a 
An-ac-to'ri-um 
* An-a-dy-om'e-ne 
A-nag'ni-a 
An-a-gy-ron'tum 
An-a-i'tis 
An'a-phe 
An-a-phlys'tus 
A-na'pus 
A-nar'tes 
A'nas, 1 
An'cho-ra 
A-nafo-le 
A-nau'chi-das, 12 
A-nau'rus 
A'nax, 1 
An-ax-ag'o-ras 
An-ax-an'der 
An-ax-an'dri-des 
An-ax-ar'chus, 12 
An-ax-ar'e-te 
An-ax-e'nor 
A-nax'i-as, 10 
An-ax-ib'i-a 
An-ax4c'ra-tes 
An-ax-i-da'mus 



AN 

A-nax'i-las 

A-nax-i-la'us 

An-ax-iri-des 

An-ax-i-man'der 

An-ax-im'e-iies 

An-ax-ip'o-lis 

An-ax-ip'pus 

An-ax-irr'ho-e 

A-nax'is 

A-nax'o 

An-cae'us 

An-ca-li'tes 

Anca'ri-us 

An-cha'ri-a, 7 

An-cha'ri-us 

An-chem'o-lus 

An-che-si'tes 

An-ches'mus 

An chi'a-la 

An-chi'a-le 

An-chi'a-lus ^ 

An-chi-mo'li-us 

An-chin'o-e 

An-chi'ses 

An-chis'i-a, 11 

An-chi'si'a-des 

An'cho-e 

An-chu'rus 

An-cile 

An'con 

An-co'na 

An'cus Mar'ti-us 

An-c/le 

An-cy'rae 

An'da 



AS 

An-dab'at \ 

An-da'ni-a 
An-de-ca'vi-a 
An'des 
An-docl-des 
An-dom'a-tis 
An-drae'mon 
An-dra-ga'thi-us 
An-drag'a-thus 
An-drag'o-ras 
An-dram'y-tes 
An-dre'as 
An'drew (Eng.) 
An'dri-clus 
An'dri-on 
An-dris'cus 
An^dro'bi-us 
An-dro-cle'a 
An'dro-cles 
An-dro-cli'des 
An-dro'clus 
An-dro-cy'des 
An-drod'a-mus 
An-dro'dus 
An-dro'ge-os 
An-dro'ge-us 
An-drog'y-nae 
An-drom'a-che 
An-drom-a-chi'dae 
An-drom'a-chus 
An-drom'a-das 
An-drom'e-da 
An'dron 

-)- An-dro-ni'cus, 
.27 



* This epithet from the Greek atinthumy emergens, signifying rising 
out of the water, is applied to the picture of Venus rising out of the 
sea, as originally painted by Apelles. I doubt not that some, who 
only hear this word without seeing it written, suppose it to mean 
Anno Dominiy in the year of our Lord. 

fAndronicus. — This word is uniformly pronounced by our prosodists 
with the penultimate accent : and yet so averse is an English ear to 



AN 

yi-dropVa-gi, 3 

bi-dro-pom'pus 

in'dros 

in-dros'the-nes 

^n-dro'tri-on 

^-e-lon'tis 

^-e-ras'tus 

An-e-mo'li-a 

An-e-mo'sa 

An-fin'o-mus 

An-geli-a 

An-ge'li-on 

An'ge-lu8 

An-gi'tes 

An'gli 

An'gli-a 

An'gras 

An-gu-ifi-a, 11, 

24 
A'ni-a, ^ 
An-i-ce'tus 
A-nic'i-a, 10 
A-nic'i-um, 24 
A-nic'i-us Gal'lus 
An1-gru8 
Ani-o, and A'ni- 

en 
An-i-tor'gis 



AN 

A'ni-U8 
An'na 
An-ni-a'nus 
An'ni-bal 
An'ni-bi, 3, 4 
An-nic'e-ris, 24 
An'non 
An-o-pae'a 
An'ser 
An-si-ba'ri-a 
An-tae'a 
An-tae'as 
An-tae'us 
An-tag'o-ras 
An-tarci-das 
An-tan'der 
An-tan'dro8 
An-ter-bro'gi-us 
An-te'i-us 
An-tem'nsB 
An-te'nor 
An-te-nor'i-des 
An'te-ros 
An-the'a 
An-the'as 
An-the'don 
An-thela 
I An'the-mis 



AN 



25 



An'the-mon 

An'the-mus 

An-the-mu'si-a, 10 

An-the'ne 

An-ther'miis 

An'thes 

An-thes-pho'ri-a 

An-thes-te'ri-a 

An'the-us 

An-thi'a 

An'thi-as 

An'thi-um 

An'thi-us 

An'tho 

An-tho'res 

An-thra'ci-a, 10 

An-thro-pi'nus 

An-thro-poph'a-gi 

An-thylla 

An-ti-a-ni' ra 

An'ti-as, 10 

An-ti-cle'a 

An'ti-cles 

An-ti-cli'des 

An-tic'ra-gus 

An-tic'ra-tes 

An-tic'y-ra 

An-tid'o-tus 



placing the accent on the penultimate i, that by all English scholars 
we hear it placed upon the ante-penultimate syllable. That this 
was the prononctation of this word in Queen Elizabeth's time, appears 
plainly from the tragedy of TUus Androniau^ said to be written by 
Shakspeare ; in which we every where find the antepenultimate pro- 
noDciation adopted. It may be indeed questioned, whether Shak- 
speare's learning extended to a knowledge of the quantity of this 
Graeco-Latin word ; but, as Mr. Steevens has justly observed, there 
is a greater number of classical allusions in this play than are scattered 
over all the rest of the performances on which the seal of Shakspeare 
h indnbitably fixed ; and therefore it may be presumed that the author 
coold not be ignorant of the Greek and Latin pronunciation of this 
word, but followed the received English pronunciation of his time ; 
and which by all but professed scholars is still contmued. — See So- 
flirnieus, 

C 



26 AN 

An-tid'o-mus 

An-tig'e-nes 

An-ti-gen'i-das 

An-tig'o-na 

An-tig'o-ne 

An-ti-go'ni-a 

An-tig'o-nus 

An-tirco 

An-ti-lib'a-nus 

An-tiro-chua 

An-tim'a-chus 

An-tim'e-nes 

An-ti-noel-a, 6 

An-ti-nop'o-lis 

An-tin'o-us 

An-ti-o'chi-a, or 

* An-ti-o-chi'a, 30 

An'ti^ch (Eng.) 

An-ti'o-chis 

An-ti'o-chus 

An-ti'o-pe, 8 

An-ti-o'rus 

An-tip'a-ter 

An-ti-pa'tri-a 

An-ti-pat'ri-das 

An-tip'a-tris 

An-tiph'a-nes 

An-tiph'a-tes 

An-tiph'i-lus 

An'ti-phoh 

An-tiph'o-nus 

An'ti-phus 

An7ti-poe'nus, 6 

An-tip'o-lis 

An-tis'sa 

An-tis'the-nes 

An-tis'ti-nus 



AP 

t An-tis'ti-us 

An-tith'e-u8 

An'ti-um, 10 

An-tom'e-nes 

An-to'ni-a 

An-to'ni-i, 3, 4 

An-to-ni'na 

An-to-ni'nu8 

An-to-ni-op'oJis 

An-to'ni-us^ M. 

An-tor'i-des 

A-nu'bis 

An'xi"U8 

An'xur 

An'xu-ms 

An'y-ta 

An'y-tus 

An-za'be, 8 

A-ob'ri-ga 

A-orii-us 

A'on 

A'o-nes 

A-o'ris 

A-or'nos 

A-o'ti 

A-pa'i-tae 

A-pa'ma, 7 

A-pa'me, 8 

Ap-a-me'a 

Ap-a-mi'a ' 

A-par'ni 

Ap-a-tu'ri-a 

Ap-e*au'ros 

A-pela 

A-pelles 

A-perii-<;on 

Ap-en-ni'nus 



AP 

A/per 

Ap-e-ro'pi-a 

Ap'e^sus 

Aph'a-ca 

A-phse'a 

A'phar 

Aph-a-re'tu» 

Aph-a-re'us 

A'phas, 1 

A-phel'lag 

Aph'e-sas ' 

Aph'e-tae 

Aph'i-das, 4 

A-phid'na 

A-phid'nus 

Aph-oe-be'tus 

A-phri'ces, 1 

Aph-ro-dis'i-a 

Aph-ro-di'sium, 

Aph-ro-di'te, 8 

A-phy'te, 8 

A'pi-a, 1, 4, 7 

A-pi-a'nus 

Ap-i-ca'ta 

A-pic'i-us, 24 

A-pid'a-nus 

Apl-na 

A*pi'o-la 

A'pi-on, 1 

A'pis 

A-pit'i-us, 24 

A-pol-li-na'res 

A-pol-li-na'ris 

Ap-ol-Knl-des 

A-porii-nis 

A-pol'lo 

Ap-ol-loc'ra-tes 



* Antiochia — For words of this termination, see fyhigeniay and No. 
30 of the Rules prefixed to this Vocabulary, 
t Marcus : De Orat 209. 



AP 

l-pol-lo-do'nis 

ip-ol-lo'ni-a 

ip-ol-lo'ni-as 

4p-ol-lo-ni'a-des 

^p-ol-lon-i'des 

Ap-ol-lo'ni-us 

ip-ol-loph'a-nes 

^-po-my-i'os 

i-po-ni-a'na, 7 

^-po'ni-us, M. 

4p'o-nu8 

\p-os-tro'phi-a 

^A-podi-e-o'ais 

dp-o-the'o-sia 

Ap'pi-a, VVa 

iVp-pi'a-des 

4p-pi-a'nus 

Ap'pi-i Forum 

Ap'pi-u8 

Ap'pu-la 

A'pri-es 

A'pri-us 

A^p-sin'thi-i, 4 

Ap'si-nus 

Ap'te^ra, 20 

A.pHirle'i-a 

Ap-u-le'i-us 



AR 

A-puli-a 
Ap-u-sid'a-mug 
A-qua'ri-u« 
Aq-ui-la'ri-a 
Aq-ui-le'i-a 
A-quiri-u8 
Aq-uil'li-a 
Aq'ui-lo 
Aq ui-lo'ni-a 
A-quin1-U8 
Aqui'num 
Aq-ui-ta'ni-a 
Ara, 17 
Ar-a-bar'ches 
A-ra'bi-a 
A-rabl-cus 
Ar'a-bis 
Ar'abs 
Ar'a-bus 
A-rac'ca, or 
A-rec'ca 
A-rach'ne 
Ar-a-cWsi-a 
Ar-a-cho't«e 
Ar-a-cho'ti 
A-rac'thMs 
Ar-a-cirium 



AR 

Ar-a-co'si-i, 4 
Ar-^-cyn'thus, 
Ar'a-dus 
A'rae, 17 
A'rar, 17 
Ar'a-rus 
Ar-a-thyr'e-a 
A-ra'tU8 
A-rax'es 
Ar-ba'ces, or 
t Ar'ba-ces 
Ar-be'Ia 
+ Ar'be-la 
Ar'bifi 

Ar'bi-ter, Pet. 
Ar-bo-ca'la 
Ar-bus'cu-la 
Ar-ca'di-a 
Ar-ca'di-us 
Ar-ca'num 
Ar'cas 
Ar'ce-na 
Ar'cens 
§ Ar-ces'iJas 
Ar-ces-i-la'us 
Ar-ce'si-us, 10 
Ar-chae'a 



27 



* Apotheosis, — When we are reading Latin or Greek,, this wonl 
onght to have tlie accent on the penultimate syllable ; but in pronoun-^ 
dng English we should accent the antepenultimate : 
Allots the prince of his celestial line 
An Apelhiosis a.nd rights divine. — Garth. 

f Arbaces. — Lerapriere, Gouldman, Ge&ner, and Littleton, acceuti 
this word on the first syllable, but Ainsworth and Holyoke on the 
secoiid ; and this is ao much more agreeable to the English ear, that !• 
ihookl prefer it, though I have, out of respect to authorities, in-, 
lerted the other, that the reader may choose which he pleases. Labbe 
has Dot got this word. 

tArbeki, the city of Assyria, where the decisive battle was fought 
between Alexander and Darius, and the city in Palestine of that n^me,- 
liave the accent on the penultimate ; but Arbela^ a town In Sicily, has 
the accent on the antepenultimate syllable. 

$VideDeOrat. 258, 

c2 



28 AR 

Ar-chae'a-nax 

Ar-cbe-at'i-das 

Arch-agVthus 

Ar-chan'der 

Ar-chan'dro8 

A/che, 12 

Ar-cheg'e-tes, 24? 

Ar-che-la'us 

Ar-chem'a-chu8 

Ar-chcin'o-rus 

Ar-chep'o-lis 

Ar-chep-tore-mus 

Ar-ches'tra-tus 

Ar-che-ti'mu8 

Ar-che'ti-us, 10 

Archi-a 

Ar'chi-as 

Ar-chi-bi'a-des, 4 

Ar-chib'i-us 

Ar-chi-da'mi-a, 30 

* Ar-chi-da'mus, or 

Ar-chid'a-mus 
Archi-das 
Ar-chi-de'mus 
Ar-chi-de'us 
Ar-chid'i-um 
Ar-chi-gallus 
Ar-chig'e-nes 
Ar-chil'o-cus 
Ar-chi-me'des 



AR 

Ar-chi'nus 

Ar-chi-pera-gus 

Ar-chip'o-lig 

Ar-chip'pe 

Ar-chip'pu8 ' 

Ar-chi'tis 

Ar'chon 

Ar-chon'te» 

Ar'chy-lus, 6 

Ar'chy-tas 

Ar-con-ne'sus 

Arc-ti'mis 

Arc-toph'y-lax 

Arc'tos 

Arc-to'us 

Arc-tu'ras 

Arda-lus 

Ar-da'ni-a 

Ar-dax-a'nus 

Ar'de-a 

Ar-de-a'tes 

Ar-de-ric'ca 

Ar-di-8B'i, 4 

Ar-do'ne-a 

Ar-du-en'na 

Ar-du-i'ne 

Ar-dy-en'ses 

Ar'dys 

A-re'a 

A-re-ac/i-dae 



AR 

A're-as 

A-reg'o-nis 

Ar-e-la'tum 

A-rel'li-iis 

Ar-e-mor'i-ca 

A'rc 

A-re'te 

A-ren'a-cum 

Ar-e-op-a-gi't« 

f Ar-e-op^a-gus 

A-res'tae 

A-res^tha-nas 

A-res-tor'i-des 

A're-ta 

Ar-e-tse'us 

Ar-e-taphl-la 

Ar-e-ta'les 

A-re'tes 

Ar-e-thu'sa 

Ar-e-ti'num 

Ar'e-tus 

A're-us 

Ar-gae'us 

Ayga-lus 

Ar-gath'o-na 

Ar-ga-tho'ni-us 

Ar'ge,9 

Ar-ge'a 

Ar-ge-a'thae 

Ar-gen'ti-um 



* Archidamus.—WnsyroTthj Gouldinan, Littleton, and Holyoke, 
place the accent on the antepennltimate syllable of this word, bnt 
Lempriere and Labbe on the pennltimate. I have followed * Lem- 
priere and Labbe^ though, in my opinion, wrong : for as every word 
of this termination has the antepeuuUimate accent, as Po/ydomtd, 
Theodonuts, &c. I know not why this shonld be different. Thougb 
Labbe teils ns, that the learned are of his opinion. 

f Areopagus, — Labbe tells us, tliat the penultimate syllable of this 
word is beyond all controversy short: — qnidquid nonnnlli in tanta 
Ince etiamnum cscutiant.— Some of these blind men are, Gonldmao, 
Holyoke, and Littleton ;— but Lempriere and Ainsworth, the best 
authorities, agree with Labbe. 



AR 

Ar'ges 

Ar-ges'tra-tus 

Ar-ge'us 

At gi, D, 3 

Ar-gi'a • 

Ar'gt-as 

Ar-gi-le'tum 

Ar-gil'i-Tis 

Ar-girhi8 

Ar'gi-lus 

Ar-gi-nu'sae 

Ar-gio-pe 

Ar-gi-phon'tes 

Ar-gip'pe-i, 3 

Ar-gi'va 

Ar-gi'vi, 3 

* Ar gives (Eng.) 

Aygi-us 

Ar'go 

Ar-goli cus 

Aygo-lis 

Ar'gon 

Ar-gonau'tae 

Ar-go'u8 

Afgvm 

Ar-gyn'nis 

A^gy-ra 

Ar-gy-ras'pi-des 

Ar'gy-re 

Ar-gyr'i.pa 

A'ri-a 

A-ri-ad'ne 

A-ri-fe'u8 



AR 

A-ri-a'ni, or 

A-ri-e'ni 
A-ri-an'tas 
A-ri-am'nes 
A-ri-a-ra'thes 
Ar-ib-bae'us, 6 
A-ric'i-a, 3, 4 
A-ri-ci'na 
Ai>i-dae'ii8 
A-ri-e'nis 
Ar-i-gae'um 
A-ril, 4 
Art-ma 
Ar-i-mas'pi, 3 
Ar-i-mas-pi'as 
Ar-i-mas'thse 
Ar-i-ma'zes 
Ayi-mi, 3 
A-riml-num 
A-riml-nus 
Ar-im-phae'i 
Ar'i-mus 
A-ri-o-bar-za'ne8 
A-ri-o-man'des 
A-ri-o-mar'dus 
A-ri-o-me'des 
A-rion, 29 
A-ri-o-vis'tus, 21 
A'ris 
A-ris'ba 
Ar-is-taen'e-tus 
Ar-is-tae'um 
x\r-is-taB'us 



AR 



29 



Ar-is-tag'o-ras 

Ar-is-tan'der 

Ar-is-tan'dro8 

Ar is tar'che 

Ar-is-tar'chus 

Ar-is-ta-za'nes 

A-ris'te-as 

A-ris'te-us 

A-ris'the-nes 

A-ris'thu8 

Ar-is-ti'bus 

Ar-is-ti'des 

Ar-is-tip'pus 

A-ris'ti-us 

A-ris'ton 

Ar-is-to-bu'la 

Ar-i8-to-bu1u8 

Ar-is-to-cle'a 

A-ris'to-cles 

A-ris-to-cli'des 

Ar-is-toc'ra-tes 

Ar-is-to'cre-on 

Ar-is-toc'ri-tus 

A-ris-to-de'mus 

Ar-is-tog'e-nes 

Ar-is-to-gi'ton 

Ar-is-to-la'us 

Ar-is-tom'a-che 

AMs-tom'a-chus 

Ar-is-to-me'des 

AM8-tom'e-ne« 

A-ris-to-nau'tae 



• Argivei, — I have observed a strong propensity in school-boys to 
prononnce the g in these words hard, as in the English word give. 
This is, nndoubtedly, because their masters do so ; and they will tell 
«i8,that the Greek ^amma should always be pronounced hard in words 
trom that langnage. What, then, must we alter that long catalogue 
«f words where this letter occurs, as in Genesis, genius, Diogenes, ^gyp- 
tMSf &c. i — ^The question answers itself. 



30 



AR 



Ar-is-to-ni'cu9 

A-ris'to-nus 

Ar-is-tonl-des 

Ar-is-ton'y-mus 

Ar-is-toph'a-nes 

A-ris-to-phi-li'des 

A-ris'to-phon 

A-ris'tor 

Ar-is-tort-des 

Ar-is-tofe-les 

Ar^iS'totle (Eng.) 

Ar-is-to-ti'mus 

Ar-is-tox'e-nus 

A-ris'tus 

Ar-is-tyllus 

A'ri-us 

Ayme-nes 

Ar-me'ni-a 

Ar-men-ta'ri-us 

Ar-milla-tus 

Ar-mi-lus'tri-um 

Ar-min'i-us 

Ar-mor'i-cae 

Ar'ne, 8 

Ar'ni, 3 

Ar-no'bi-us 

Ar'nus 

Ar'o-a 

Ar'o-ma 

Ar'pa-ni 

Ar'pi, 3 



AR 

Ar-pi'num 
Ar-rae'i, 3 
Ar-rha-bae'us 
Ar'ri-a 
Ar-ri-a'nus 
Ar'ri-us 

Ar-run'ti-us, 10 
Ar-sa'bes 
Ar-sa'ces, or 
♦Ar'sa-ces 
Ar-sac'idae 
Ar-sam'e-nes 
Ar-sam'e-tes 
Ar-sam-o-sa'ta 
Ar-sa'nes 
Ar-sa-ni'as 
Ar-se'na 
Ar'ses 
Ar'si-a 
Ar-si-dae'us 
Ay-sin'o-e 
Ar-ta-ba'nus 
Ar-ta-ba'zus 
Ar'ta-bri, 3 
Ar-ta-bri'tae 
Ar-ta-cae'as 
Ar-ta-cae'na 
Ar'ta-ce 
Ar-ta-ce'ne 
Ar-ta'ci-a 
Ar-tael, 3 



AR 

Ar-tag'e-ras 

Ar-ta ger'ses 

Ar-ta'nes 

Ar-ta-pher'nes 

Ar-ta'tus 

Ar-ta-vas'des 

Ar-tax'a 

Ar-tax'i-as 

Ar-tax'a-ta 

Ar-ta-xerx'es 

Ar-tax'i-as 

Ar-ta-yc'tes 

Ar-ta-yn'ta 

Ar-ta-yn'tes 

Ar-tem-ba'res 

Ar-tem-i-do'rus 

tAr'te-mis 

Ar-te-mis'i-a, 11 

Ar-te-mis'mvim 

JAr-te-mi'ta 

Ar'te-mon 

Arth'mi-us 

Ar-te'na 

Ar-tim'pa-sa 

Ar-toch'mes 

Ar-to'na 

Ar-ton'tes 

Ar-to'ni-us 

Ar-tox'a-res 

Ar-tu'ri-us 

Ar-ty'nes 



• Arsaces, — Goaldman, Lempriere, Holyoke, and Labbe, acceot 
this ¥rord on the first syllable, and unquestionably not without classi- 
cal authority ; but Ainsworth, and a still greater authority, general 
usage, have, in my opinion, determined the accent of tbis word on 
the second syllable. 

t Arlemis. — The sisters to Apollo tune their voice. 

And Artemis to thee whom darts rejoice. 

Cookers Hesiod, The9g. v» 17. 

X Ariemita, — ^Ainsworth places the accent on the antepenultimate 
syllable of this word ; but Lempriere, Gouldman, and Holyoke^ moi« 
correctly, in my opinion, on the pemUtimate. 



AS 

Ar-tyn'i-a 

Ar-tys'to-na 

Ar'u-ae 

A-ru'ci 

Ar-va'les 

A-ru'e-ris 

Ar-ver'ni 

Ar-vir'a-gus 

Ar-vis'i-um 

Ar-vi'su8 

A'runs, 1 

A-nin'ti-us, 10 

Ar-u-pi'nus 

Arx'a-ta 

Ar-y-an'des 

Ar'y-bas 

Ar-yp-tae'us 

A-san'der 

As-ba-me'a 

As-bes'tae 

As1)o-lu8 

As-bys'tae 

As-cal'a-phus 

As'ca-lon 

As-ca'ni-a 

As-ca'ni-u8 

As-cil, 3 

As-cle'pi-a 

As-cle-pi'a-des 

As-cle-pi-o-do'rus 

As-cle-pi-o-do'tus 

As-cle'pi-us 

As-cle-ta'ri-on 

As'clus 

As-co'U-a 

As-co'ni^us La'- 

be-K) 
As'cra 



AS 

As'cu-lum 

As'dni-bal 

A-seVli-6 

♦A-sel'lus 

A'si-a, 10, 11 

As-i-at'i-cus 

A-silas 

As-i-na'ri-a 

As-i-na'ri-us 

Asl-na 

Asl-ne 

As'i-nes 

A-sin'i-u8 Gal'his 

A'si-us, 11 

As-na'us 

A-so'phis 

A-so'pi-a 

As-o-pi'a-des 

A-so'pis 

A-so'phus 

As-pam'i-thres 

Ar-pa-ra'gi-um 

As-pa'si-a, 11 

As-pa-si'rus 

As-pas'tes 

As-pa-thi'nes 

As-pe'li-a 

As-pin'du8 

As'pis 

As-ple'don 

As-po-re'nus, 4 

As'sa 

As-sa-bi'nu8 

As-sar'a-cus 

As-se-ri'ni, 3 

As'so-ru8 

As'sos 

As-syrl«a 



AS 



31 



As'ta 

As-ta-coe'ni, 5 

As'ta-cus 

As'ta-pa 

As'ta-pu8 

As-tar'te, 8 

As'ter 

As-te'ri-a 

As-te'ri-on 

As-te'ri-U8 

As-te-ro'di-a 

As-ter'o pe 

A8 te-ro'pe-a 

As-ter-o-pae'us 

A8-ter.u'8i-us, 11 

A8-tin'o-me 

A8-ti'o-chu8 

As'to-mi, 3 ; 

As-trae'a 

As-tr8e'u8 

As'tu 

As'tur 

As'tu-ra 

As'tu-re8 

As t/a-ge 

As-ty'a-ges 

As-ty'a-lus 

As-ty'a-nax 

As-ty-cra'ti-a, 10 

As-tyd'a-mas 

As-ty-da-mi'a, 30 

As'ty-his 

As-tym-e-du'sa 

As-tyn'o me 

As-tyn'o-mi 

AsJtyn'o-us 

As-t/o-ehe 

As-ty-o-chi'a, 30 



* Claudivt, — Tbe enemy <^ Scipio ^milianiis. 
201, et Id uota. 



Vide De Orat. 



32 AT 

As-ty-pa-lse'a 

As-typh'i-lus 

As-ty'pon 

As'y-chis 

A-sjr'las , 

A-syllus 

A-tab'u-lus 

At-a-bjr'ris 

At-a-by-ri'te, 6 

At'a-ce, 8 

At-a-lan'ta 

At-a-ran'tes 

A-tar-be'chis, 11 

A-tar'ga-tis 

A-tar'ne-a 

A'tas, and A'thas 

A'tax 

Ate, 8 

A-tella 

At'e-na 

At-e-no-ma'rus 

Ath-a-ma'nes 

Ath'a-mas 

Ath-a-man-td'a- 

des 
Ath-a-na'si-us, 10 
Ath'a-nis 
A'the-as 
A-the'na 
A-the'nsB, 8 
Ath-e-nae'a 
Ath-e-nse'um 
Ath-e-nse'us 
Ath-e-Dag'o-ras 
Ath-e-na'is 
A-the'ni-on » 
A-then'o-cles 



AT 

Ath-en-o-do'rus 

Athe-os 

Ath'e-sis 

Ath-e-si*o-do'rus 

A'thos, 1 

Ath-rul'la 

A-thym'bra 

A-ti'a, 11 

A-tiri-a 

A-til'i-us 

A-tilla 

A-ti'na 

A-ti'nas 

A-tin'i-a 

At-lan'tes 

At-lan'ti-a-des 

At-lan'ti-des 

At'las 

A-tos'sa 

At'ra-ces 

At-ra-myfti-um 

At'ra-pes 

A'trax, 1 

At-re-bafae 

*At-re-ba'tes 

A-tre'ni 

Afre-us 

A-tri'dae 

A-tri'des 

A-tro'ni-u8 

At-ro-pa-te'ne 

At-ro-pa'ti-a, 11 

At'ro-pos, 19 

At'ta 

At-tali-a 

Afta-lus 

At-tar'ras 



p'i-td 



AU 

At-te'i-us Cap'i-t 

At'tes 

At'this 

At'ti-ca I 

At'ti-cus I 

At-ti-da'tes 

Afti-la 

At-till-us 

At-ti'nas 

At'tius Pe-lig'niu 

At-u-at'i-ci, 4 

Atu-bi, 3 

A-ty'a-dae 

Atys, 1 

Av-a-ri'cum 

A-vel'la 

Av-en-ti'nus 

A-ver'nus, or 

A-ver'na 

A-ves'ta 

Au-fe'i-a-A'qua 

Au-fi-de'na 

Au-fid'i-a 

Au-fid'ius 

Au'fi dus 

Au'ga, and Au'ge 

Au-ge'a 

Au'ga-nis 

Au'ge-OB 

Au'gi-as, and 

Au'ge-as 
Au'gi-lae 
Au'gi-nus 
Au'gu-res 
Au-gus'ta 
Au-gus-ta1i-a 
Au-gu8-ti'nus 



* Atrebates, — Ainsworth accents this word on the antepennltimate 
syllable; but Lempriere, Gouldman, Holyoke, and Labbe, on the 
penultimate -, and this is, in my opinion, the better pronunciation. 



AU 

Au'gus'tin (Eng.) 
Au gus'tu-lus 
Aa-gus'tus 
A-vid-i-e'nus 
A-vid-i'us Cas'si- 

us 
Av-i-e'nus 
A-vi'tus 
A'vi-um 
Au-les'tes 
Au-le'tes 
Au'lis 
Au'lon 
Au-lo'ni-us 
Au'lus 
Au'ras 
Au-re'li-a 
Aa-re-li-a'nus 
Avr-refli-aniJ^iig.) 
Au-reli-u8 
Au-re'o-lus 
*Au'ri-fex 
Au-ri'go 



AU 

Au-rin'i-a 

Au-ro'ra 

Au-run'ce, 8 

Au-run-cu-le'i-u8 

Aus-chi'sae, 12 

Aus'ci 

Au'ser 

Au'se-ris 

Au'ses 

Au'son 

Au-8o'ni-a 

Au-8o'ni-u8 

Au'spi-ces 

Aus'ter 

Aus-te'si-on 

Au-to-bulus, or 

At-a-bu'lus 
Au-ta-ni'tis 
Au-toch'tho-nes 
Au'to-cles 
Au-toc'ra-tes 
Au-to-cre'ne, 8 
Autol'o-laB 



AZ 



33 



Au-tory-cu8 

Au-tom'a-te 

Au-tom^e-don 

Au-to-me-du'sa 

Au-tom'e-nes 

Au-tom'o-li 

Au-ton'o-e 

Au-toph-ra-da'tes 

Au-xe'si-a, 11 

Ax'e-nu8 

Ax-i'o-chu8 

Ax-i'on, 29 

Ax-i-o-ni'cus, 30 

Ax-i-o'te-a 

Ax-i-o'the-a 

Ax'i-U8 

Ax'ur, or An'xur 

Ax'U8 

A'xan, 1 
A-zi'ris 
Az'o-nax 
A-zo'rus, 11 
A-zo'tus 



BA 

Ba-bil'i-us 

Babl-lus 

Bab'y-lon 

Bab-y-lo'ni-a, 

Bab-y-lo'ni-i, 4 

Ba-byr'sa 

Ba-byfa-ce 

Bac-a-ba'sus 

Bac'chae 

Bac-cha-na'li-a 

Bacf-chan'tes 



BA 

Bac'chi, 3 

Bac-chi'a-dae 

Bac'chi-des 

Bac'chis 

Bac'chi-um 

Bac'chi-U8 

Bac'chu8 

Bac-chyll-des 

Ba-ce'nis 

Ba'cis 

Bac'tra 



BA 

Bac'tri, and 

Bac-tri-a'ni, 4 
Bac-tri-a'na 
Bac'tros 
Bad'a-ca 
Ba'di-a 
Ba'di-us 
Bad-u-hen'nae 
Bae'bi-us, M. 
Bse'ti8 
Bae'ton 



• Vide De Orat 185. 



c3 



34 BA 

Ba-gis'ta-me 
Ba-gis'ta-nes 
Ba-go'as, and 

Ba-go'sas 
Bag-o-da'res 
Ba-goph'a-nes 
Bag'ra-da 
Bal-ae 
Bala 
Ba-la'cnis 
Bal-a-na'grae 
Ba-la'nus 
Ba-la'ri 
Bal-birius 
Bal-bi'nus 
Bal'bus 
Bal-e-a'res 
*Bal-e-a'ri-cus 
Ba-le'tus 
Ba'li-us 
Ba-Hs'ta 
Bal-lon'o-ti, 3 
Bal-ven'ti-u8, 10 
BaVy-ras 
Bam-u-ru'aB 
Ban'ti-ae, 4 
Ban'ti-us, L. 10 
Baph'y-rus, 6 
Bap'tae 
Ba-rae'i 
Bar'a-thrum 
Bar'ba-ri 
Bar-ba'ri-a 
Bar-bos'the-nes 
Bar-byth'a-ce 
Bar'ca 
Bor-cae'i, or 

Bar'ci-tse 



BA 

Bar'cfle 

Bar'cha 

Bar-deel 

Bar'di 

Bar-dyl'lis, 

Ba-re'a 

Ba're-as So-ra'nus 

Ba'res 

Bar-gu'si-i, 3 

Ba-n'ne 

Ba-ris'ses 

Ba'ri-um 

Bar'nu-us 

Bar-si'ne, and 

Bar-se'ne 
Bar-za-en'tes 
Bar-za'nes 
Bas-i-le'a 
Bas-i-li'dae 
Bas-i-li'des 
Ba-sil-i-o-pot'a- 

mos 
Basl-lis 
Ba-sill-us, 31 
Bas'i-lus 

Bas'sse 
Bas-sa'ni-a 
Bas-sa're-us 
BWsa-ris 
Bas'sus Au-fid'i-us 
Bas-tar'nae, and 

Bas-ter'nse 
Bas'ti-a 
Bata 
Ba-ta'vi 
Ba'thos 
Bath'y-cles 
Ba-thyllus 



BE 

Bat-i-a'tus 
Ba'ti-a, 11 
Ba-ti'na, and 

Ban-ti'na 
Ba'tis 
Ba'to 
Ba'ton 
Bat-ra-cho-my-o- 

machl-a 
Bat-ti'a-des 
Bafis 
Bat'tus 
Bafu-lum 
Bat'u-lus 
Ba-tyllus 
Ban'bo 
Bau'cis 
Ba'vi-us 
Bauli, 3 
Baz-a-en'tes 
Ba-za'ri*a 
Be'bi-us 
Be-bri'a-cum 
Beb'ry-ce, 6 
Beb'ry-ces, and 

Be-brycl-i, 4 
Be-brycl-a 
Bel-e-mi'na 
Bel-e-phan'tes 
Bere-sis 
Bergae 
Bel'gi-ca 
Bergi-um 
Bel'gi-us 
Bell-des, plural 
BeAi'deSfSingular 
Be-lis'a-ma 
Bel-i-sa'ri-us 



* Balearicus. — (Qoiotas. — Fillus Q. 
notam in Cic. De Orat. 201.) 



Metelli Macedonici. Vide 



BE 

Bel-is-ti'da 

Bel'i-tae 

Bel-ler'o-phon 

♦Bel-le'nis 

Bel-li-e'nus 

Bel-lo'na 

Bel-lo-na'ri-i, 4 

Bel-lov'a-ci 

Bel-lo-ve'sus 

Belon 

Belus 

Be-na'cu8 

Ben-e-didl-um 

Ben'dis 

Ben-e-ven'tum 

Ben-the-sic'y-me 

Be-pol-i-ta'nu8 

Ber1)i-caB 

Ber-e-cyn'thi-a 

Ber-e-ni'ce, 30 

Ber-e-ni'cis 

Ber'gi-on 

Ber-gis'te-ni 

Be'ris, and Ba'ris 

Ber'mi-us 

Ber'o-e 

Be-roe'a 

Ber-o-ni'ce, 30 

Be-ro'sus 



BI 

Ber-rhoe'a 

Be'sa 

Be-sid'i-ae 

Be-sip'po 

Bes'si, 3 

Bes'sus 

Bes'ti-a 

Be'tis 

Be-tu'ri-a 

Bi'a 

fBi-a'nor 

Bi'as 

Bi-bac/u-lus 

Bib'a-ga 

BiblU, and BiV. 

li-a 
Bib'lis 
Bib-li'na 
Bib'lus 
Bi-brac'tsB 
Bib'u-lus 
Bi'ces 
Bi'con 

Bi-cofni-ger 
Bi-cor'nis 
Bi-for'mis 
Bi'frons 
BUTri-lis 
Bi-ma'ter 



BL 



35 



Bin'gi-um 

Bi'on 

Bir'rhus 

Bi-sal'te 

Bi-sal'tes 

Bi-sartis 

Bi-san'the 

Bis'ton 

Bis'to-nis 

Bi'thus 

Bith'y-ae 

Bi-thyn'i-a 

Bit'i-as 

Bi'ton 

Bi-tul-tus 

Bi-tun'tum 

Bi-turt-ges 

Bi-tur'i-cum 

Biz'U 

Blae'na, 

Blse'si-i, 4 

Blse'sus 

Blan-de-no'na 

Blan-du'si-a 

Blas-to-phoe-ni'ces 

Blem'my-es 

Ble-ni'na 

Bliti-us, 10 

Blu'ci-um, 10 



♦ BeUerus.'^AW our lexicographers unite in giving this word the 
antepenultimAte accent: but Milton stems to have sanctioned the 
penoltiraate, as umch more agreeable to English ears, in his Ly.- 
cidas : — 

Or whether thou, to our moist tows denied, 

Sleep'st by the fable of BeUenu old. 
Though it must be acknowledged that Milton has in this word 
^rted the elassieal pronuiieiatioii, yet his authority is sufficient 
to make us acquiesce in his accentuation in the above-mentioned 
passage. 

t Bianor — Lempriere accents this word on the first syllable : but 
Labbe, Ainsworth, Gonldman, and Holyoke, on the second^ and 
these agree with Virgil, Eel. ix. v. 60. 



36 BO 

Bo-a-dic'e-a 

Bo'ae, and Bo'e-a 

Bo-a'gri-us 

Bo-ca'li-as 

Boc'car 

Boc'cho-ris 

Boc'chus 

Bo-du'ni 

Bo-du-ag-na'tus 

Boe-be'is 

Boe'bi-a 

Bo-e-dro'mi-a 

Boe-o-tar'chaB 

Boe-o'ti-a 

Boe-o'tus 

Boe-or-o-bis'tas 

Bo-e'thi-us 

Bo'e-tus 

Bo'e-us 

Bo'ges 

Bo'gus 

Bo'i-i, 3 

Bo-joc'a-lus 

Bola 

Bol'be 

Bol-bi-ti'num 

Borgi-us 

Bo-U'na 

Bol-i-nae'us 

Bo-lis'sus 

Bol-la'nus 

Bol-to'ni-a 

Bolus 

Bom-i-en'ses 

Bo-mircar 

Bom-o-ni'caB, 30 



BR 

Bo-no'ni-a 
Bo-no'si-us 
Bo-no' zhe-y^a 
Bo-o-su'ra 
Bo-o'tes 
Bo-o'tus, and 

Boe-o'tus 
Bo're-a 
Bo-re'a-des 
Bo're-as 
Bo-re-as'mi, 3 
Bore-US 
Bor'ges 
Bor-go'di 
Bor'nos 
Bor-sip'pa 
Bo'rus 

Bo-rys'the-nes 
Bos'pho-ru8 
Bot'ti-a 
Bot-ti-ae'is 
Bo-vi-a'num 
Bo-villse 
Brach-ma'nes 
Brae'si-a 
Bran-chi'a-des 
Bran'chi-dae 
Bran-chyl'li-des 
Bra'si-ae 
Brasl-das 
Bras-i-de'i-a 
Brau're 
Brau'ron 
Bren'ni, and 

Breu'ni 
Bren'nus 



BR 

Bren'the 

Bres'ci-a 

Bret'ti-i,3 

Bri-a're-us 

Bri'as 

Bri-gan'tes 

Brig-an-ti'nus 

Bri'mo 

Bri-se'is 

Bri'ses 

Bri-se'us 

Bri-tan'ni 

Bri-tan'ni-a 

Bri-tan'ni-cus, 30 

Brit-o-mar'tls 

Brit-o-ma'nis 

*Brifo-nes 

Brix-erium 

Brix'i-a 

Bri'zo 

Broc-u-be'ua 

Bro'mi-us 

Bro'mus 

Bron'tes 

Bron-ti'nus 

Bro'te-as 

Bro'the-U8 

Bnic'te-ri, 4 

Brulla 
' 3ru-ma'li-a 
' Jrun-du'si-um 
Bru-tid'i-us 
Bru'ti-i, 4 
Brufti-i 
Bru'tu-lus 
Brutus 



* Britones, — Labbe tells us, that this word is sometimes pro- 
nounced with the penultimate accent, but more frequently with the 
antepenultimate* 

t BruUa. (De Orat. 264.) 



BU 

BrfHs 

Bry-axls 

Br3r'ce 

Brv'ges 

Br^'gi, 3 

Bry'se-a 

Bu-ba-ce'ne 

Bu-ba'ces 

Bu'ba-ris 

Bu-bas-ti'a-€us 

Bu'ba-sus 

Bulwii 

Bu-ceph'a-la 

Bu-ceph'a-lu8 

Bu-coVi-ca 

Bu-cori-cum 

Bu-co'li-on 

Bu'co-lu8 

Bu'di-i, 3 

Bu-di'ni, 3 

Bu-do'rum 



BU 

Bu'lia 

Bul-la'ti-us, 10 

Bu'ne-a 

Bu'nus 

Bu'po-lus 

Bu'pha-gus 

Bu-pho'ni-a 

Bu-pra'si-um 

Bu'ra 

Bu-ra'i-cu8 

Bur'rhus 

Bur'sa 

Bur'si-a 

Bu'sae 

Bu-siris 

Bu'ta 

Bu'te-o 

Bu'tes 

Bu-thro'tum 

Bu-thyr'e-u8 

Bu'to-a 



BY 37 

Bu'tos 

Bu-tori-des 

Bu-tun'tum 

Bu'tU8 

Bu-zy'ges 
Byb-le'si-a, and 

By-bas'si-a 
Bybli-a 
Bybii-i, 4 
Byb1i8 
Byl-li'o-ne8 
Byr'rhus 
Byr'sa 
By-za'ci-um 
Byz-an-ti'a-ciw 
By-zan'ti-um 
By-zan'zhe-um 
Bjr'zas 
By-ze'nus 
Byz'e-res 
Byz'i-a 



CA 


CA 


CA 


Ca-an'thus 


Ca-bi'ri, 3 


Ca'di, 3 


Cab'a-des, 20 


Ca-bir'i-a 


fCad-me'a 


Cab'a-les, 20 


Ca-bu'ra, 7 


Cad-me'is 


Ca-bal'i-i, 4 


Cab'u-rus, 20 


Cad'mus 


Cab-al-li'num 


*Cab>le 


Ca'dra, ^ 


Cab-a-li'nus 


Ca'ca 


Ca-du'ce-us, 10 


Ca-bar'nos 


Cach'a-les, 20 


Ca-dur'ci, 3 


Ca-bas'sus 


Ca'cu8 


Ca-dus'ci 


Ca-berU-o, 4 


Ca-cu'this^ 


Cad'y-tis 


Ca-bi'ra 


Ca-cyp'a-ris 


C^'a, 7 



* Cabyle, (Thraciae pagns.) Demosthenes, 

t [According to the Greek form Cad-mei-a^ Cas-a-'rei-a, The sub- 
stitution of a single irowel for the Greek diphthong ei in these and 
similar words is an error that probably arose^ in the first instance, 
irom the ignorance or carelessness of copyists ; though it must be 
confessed, that the Romans seem to have had as absurd an inclination 



38 CA 

Cae'ci-as, 10 

Cae-ciri-a 

Cae-cil-i-a'nus 

Cae-cil'i-i, 4 

Caec'i-lus 

Cae-ciri-U8 

Cae-ci'na Tus'cus 

Caec'u-bum 

Caec'u-lus 

Cae-dic1-us, 10 

Cae'li-a 

Caeli-u8 

Ceem'a-ro 

Cse'ne 

Cae'ne-us 

Caenl-des 

Cae-ni'na 

Cae'nis 

Cae-nofro-pee 

Cae'pi-o 

Cae-ra'tus 

Cae're, or Cae'res 

Caer'e-si, 3 

Cae'sar 

*Caes-a-re'a 

Cae-sa'ri-on 

Cae-se'na 

Cae-sen'ni-as 

Cae-ce'ti-us, 10 

Cae'si-a, 10 

Cae'si-us, 10 

Cae'so 

Cae-so'ni-a 

Cae-so'ni-us 

Caefo-brix 



CA 

Caet'u-lum 
Cae'yx 

Ca-ga'co 

Ca-i-ci'nus 

Ca-i'cus 

Ca-i-e'ta 

Ca1-u8, and Ca'i-a 

Ca1-U8 

Carab-er, Q. 

Ca-la'bri-a 

CaVn-brus 

Cal-a-gur-rifa-ni 

CaVa-i8 

Ca-lag'u-tis 

Cal'a-mis, 20 

Cal-a-mi'sa 

Cal'a-mos 

Cara-mus, 20 

Ca-la'nus 

Cara-on 

Cara-ris 

Cal-a-tha'na 

Ca-la'thi-on 

Cara-tbus 

Cara-tes, 20 

Ca-la'ti-a 

Ca-la'ti-ae, 10 

Ca-la'vi-i, 4 

Ca-la'vi-us 

Cal-au-re'a, and 

Cal-au-ri'a 
CaVbis 
Carce 
Carchas 
Cal-che-do'ni-a 



CA 

Cal-chinl-a, 12 

Cal'dus Cae'li-us 

Gale 

Cal-e-do'ni-a 

Ca-le'nu8 

Gales 

Ga-le'si-u8, 10 

Ga-le'tae 

Gare-tor, 20 

Galex 

Gal-i-ad'ne 

Gal-i-ce'ni 

Ga-lidl-us, M. 

Ga-lig'u-la, C. 

Gal'l-pus 

Calls 

Gal-laes'chrus 

GaUal-ci, 4 

GaVlas 

Cal-la-te'bus 

Gal-la-te'ri-a 

Gal-le'ni 

Galli-a 

Gal-li'a-des 

Gal'li-as 

Gal-libl-us 

Gal-li-ce'rus 

Gal-lich'o-rus 

Garii-cles 

Cal-li-co-lo'na 

Gai-lic'ra-tes 

Gal-li-crat'i-das 

Gal-lidl-us 

Gal-lid'ro-mus 

Gal-li-ge'tus 



for 
them 



Latiniziog proper names as our neighbonrs, the French, for giving 
n a Gallic form. Several of our best modern writers have restored 
the original orthography of these and similar words ; but the error 
has been too general and too long continued to be corrected immedi- 
ately, if indeed it can ever be finally removed.] 
• [See preceding note.] 



CA 

CaUKm'a-chus, 12 

Cal4im'e-don 

Cal-lim'e-des 

Cal-li'nus 

Cal-li'o-pe, 8 

Cal-li-pa-ti'ra, 30 

Cal'li-phon 

Carii-phron 

Cal-lipi-dae 

Cal-lip'o-lis 

Calli-pus 

Cal-lip'y-ges 

Cal-lir'ho-e, 8 

Cal-Us'te 

Cal-lis-te'i-a 

Cal-lis'the-nes 

Cal-lis'to 

Cal-lis-to-ni'cus 

Cal-lis'tra-tus 

Cal-lix'e-na 

Cal-lix'e-nus 

Ca'lon 

Calor 

Cal'pe 

Cal-phur'ni-a 

Cal-phur'ni-us 

Cal-pur'ni-a 

Cal'vi-a 

Cal-vi'na 

*Cal-vi'niis 

Cal-vis'i-us, 10 

Cal-u-sid'i-us 

Cal-u'si-um^ 10 

Cal>be, 8 

Cal-y-cad'nus 



CA 

Cal'y-ce, 8 

Ca-lydl-um 

Ca-lyd'na 

Cary-don, 6 

Cal-y-do'nis 

Cal-y-do'ni-U8 

Ca-lym'ne 

Ca-lyn'da 

Ca-lyp'so 

Ca-man'ti-um, 10 

Cara-a-ri'na 

Cam-baules 

Cam'bes 

Cam'bre 

Cam-bu'ni-i, 4 

Cam-by'ses 

Cam^-la'ni, 3 

Cam-e-li'tae 

Cam'e-ra, ^ 

Cam-e-ri'nuip, and 

Ca-me'ri-um 
Cam-e-ri'nu8 
Ca-mer'ti-um 
Ca-mer'tes 
Ca-miria 
Ca-mirii, and 

Ca-miriae 
Ca-mirius 
Ca-mi'ro 
Ca-mi'rus, and 

Ca-mi'ra 
Cam-is-sa'res 
Cam'ma 
Ca-moe'nse 
Cam-pa'na Lex 



CA 



39 



Cam-pa'ni-a 

Cam'pe, 8 

Cam-pas'pe 

Carap'sa 

Cam pus Mar'ti-us 

Cam-u-lo-grnu8 

Ca'na 

Can'a-ce 

Can'a-che, 12 

Can'a-chus 

Ca'nae 

Ca-na'ri-i, 4 

Can'a-thus 

fCan'dace 

Can-da'vi-a 

Can-daules 

Can-di'o-pe 

Ca'nens 

Can-e-pho'ri-a 

Can'e-thum • 

Ca-nic-u-la'res 

di'es 
Ca-nid'i-a 
Ca-nidl-us 
Ca-nin-e-fa'tes 
Ca-nin1-u8 
Ca-nis'ti-u8, 10 
Ca'ni-ua 
Can'nae 
Ca-nopl-cum 
Ca-no'pna 
Can'ta-bra 
Can'ta-bri, 3 
Can-ta'bri-ae 

lacus, 4 



• Cafeintw.— (De Orat. 187.) 

t Candace. — ^Lempriere, Labbe, and A ins worth, accent this word 
OD the first syllable, but Gouldman and Holyoke on the last ; and I 
am much mistaken if the general ear has not sanctioned this latter 
pronunciation, and given it the preference. 



40 



CA 



Caii'tha-rus, 20 

Can'thus 

Can'ti-um, 10 

Can-u-le'i-a 

Can-u-lel-us 

Ca-nu'li-a 

Ca-nu'si-um, 10 

Ca-nu-si'nus 

Ca-nu'si-U8 

Ca-nu'ti-us, 10 

Cap'a-neus, 3 

sylL 
Ca-pel'la 
Ca-pe'na 
Ca-pe'nas 
Ca-pe'ni, 3 
Ca'per 
Ca-pe'tus 
Ca-pha're-us 
Caph^y-se? 4 
Ca'pi-o, 4 
Cap-is-se'ne 
Capl-to 
Ca-pit-o-li'nu8 
Cap-i-to'li-um 
Cap-pa-do'ci-a, 10 
Cap'pa-dox 
Ca-pra'ri-a 
* Ca-pra'ri-iis, C. 
Ca'pre-ae 
Cap-ri-cor'nus 
Cap-ri-fic-i-alis 
Ca-pri'na 
Ca-prip'e-des 
Ca'pri-us 
Cap-ro-ti'na 
Ca'prus 
Cap'sa 
Cap'sa-ge 



CA 

Cap'u-a 
Ca'pys 

Ca'pys Syl'vi-us 
Car-a-bac'tra 
Car'a-bis, 20 
Car-a-calla 
Ca-rac'a-tes 
Ca-rac'ta-cu8 
Ca'rae 
Ca-rae'us 
Car'a-lis 
Car'a-nus, 20 
Ca-rau'si-us, 10 
Car'bo 

Car-che'don, 12 
Car-ci'nus 
Car-da'ces 
Car-dam'y-le 
Car'di-a 

Car-du'chi, 12, 3 
Ca'res 
Car'e-sa 
Ca-res'sus 
Car-fin'i-a 
Ca'ri-a 
Ca'ri-as 
Ca-ri'a-te 
Ca-ri'na 
Ca-ri'nae 
Car-i'ne 
Ca-ri'nus 
Ca-ris'sa-num 
Ca-ris'tum 
Car-ma'ni-a 
Car-ma'nor 
Car'me 
Car-melus 
Car-men'ta, and 
Car-men'tis 



CA 

Car-men-taies 

Car-men-ta'lis 

Car'mi-des, 6, 20 

Car'na Car-din'e-l 

Car-na'si-iis, 10 

Car-ne'a-des 

Car-nei'a, 3 syll. 

Cami'on 

Car'nus 

Car-nu'tes 

Car-pa'si-a, 11 

Car-pa'si-um, 11 

Car'pa-thus 

Car'pi-a, ^ 

Car'pijs 

Car'po 

Car-poph'o-ra 

Car-poph'o-rus 

Car'rae, and Car' 

rhae 
Car-ri-na'tes 
Car-ru'ca 
Car-se'o-li^ 3 
Car-ta'li-as 
Car-thae'a 
Car-tha-gin-i-en' 

ses 
Car-tha'go 
Carthage, £ng. 
Car-tha'sis 
Car-tei'a, 3 syll. 
Car-vili-us 
Ca'rus 
Ca'ry-a, 6 ' 
Car-y-a'tae 
Car-y-a'tis 
Ca-rys'ti-us 
Ca-rys'tU8 
Ca'ry-um 



• Q. Metelli Macedonici Filiub. (Vide not. De Orat. 201.) 



CA 

Cas'ca 

Cas-cerU-us 
Cas-i-li'num 
Ca-si'na Ca-si' 

num 
Ca'si-us, 10 
* Cas-me'nse 
•Cas-mU'la 
Cas-pe'ri-a 
Cas-per'u-la 
Cas-pi-a'na 
Cas'pi-i, 4 
Cas'pi-um Ma're 
Cas-san-da'ne 
Cas-san'der 
Cas-san'dra 
t Cas-san'dri-a 
Cas'si-a, 10 
Cas-si'o-pe 
Ca-si-o-pe'a 
Cas-si-ter'i-des 
} Cas-si-ve-lau'nus 
Cas'si-us, C. 10 
Cas-so'ds 
Cas4ab'a-la 
Cas'ta-bus 
Cas-ta'li-a 
Ca&-ta'li-us fons 
Cas-tolus 
Cas-ta'ne-a 
Cas-ti-a-ni'ra 
Cas'tor and Pollux 
Cas-tra'ti-us, 10 
Cas'tu-lo 
Cat-a-du'pa 
Cat-a-men'te-les 
Cafa-na, 20 



CA 

Cat-a-o'ni-a 
Cat-a>rac'ta 
Cafe-nes 
Ca-thae'a 
Cath'a-ri, 3 
Ca'ti-a, 11 
Ca-ti-e'na 
Ca-ti-e'nu8 
Cat-i-li'na 
CafUHne, (Eng.) 
Ca-tilli, 3 
Ca'til-lus, or 

Cat1-lu8 
Ca-ti'na 
Ca'ti-us, 10 
Cat'i-zi, 3 
Ca'to, 1 
Ca'tre-U8 
Cafta 
Cat'ti, 3 
Cat-u-li-a'na 
Ca-tullus 
Cat'u-lus, 20 
Cav-a-rillus 
Cav-a-ri'nus 
Ciu'ca-sus 
Cau'con 
Cau'co-nes 
Cau'di, and 

Cau'di-um 
Ca'vi-i, 3 
Cau-lo'ni-a 
Cau'ni-U8. 
Cau'nus 
Cau'ros 
Cau'rus 
Ca'us 



CE 



41 



Ca-y^ci, 3, 6 
Ca-y'cu8 
Ca-ys'ter 
Ce'a, or Ce'os 
Ce'a-des 
Ceb-al-li'nu8 
Ceb-a-ren'ses 
Ce'bes 
Ce'bren 
Ce-bre'ni-a 
Ce-bri'o-nes 
Cec'i-das 
Ce-cill-us 
Cec/i-na 
Ce-cin'na, A. 
Ce-cro'pi-a 
Ce-cropl-des 
Ce-crop'i-d» 
Ce'crops 
Cer-cyph'a-lffi 
Ced-re-a'ti8 
Ce'don 
Ce-dru'si-i, 3 
Ceglu-sa 
Ce i, 3 
Cel'a-don 
Cel'a-dus 
Ce-lae'nae 
Ce-Wno 
Cd'e-ae, 4 . 
Ce-le'i-a,andCela 
Cel-e-la'tes 
Ce-len'drae 
Ce-len'dris, or 
Ce-len'de-ris 
Ce-le'ne-us 
Ce-len'na Ce-lae'na 



* [The more ancient forms of Camenas and Camilla.] 
t [According to the Greek analogy Cas-san-dreVa : see the note on 
Cadmeia.] 
t [Written also Cassibelaunas.] 



49 



CE 



Ce'ler 

Cel'e-res 

Cere-trum 

Cele-us 

Cel'mus 

Cero-nae 

Cel'sus 

Certae 

Cel-ti-be'ri 

Cel'ti-ca 

Cel'ti-ci 

Cel-tillus 

Cel-to'ri-i, 4 

Cel-to Scy'thae 

Cem'me-nus 

Cem'psi, 3 

Ce-nae'um 

Cen'chre-ae, 12 

Cen'chre-is 

Cen'chre-us 

Cen'chri-us 

Ce-nes'po-lis 

Ce-ne'ti-um, 10 

Ce'ne-us 

Cen-i-mag'ni 

Ce-ni'na 

Cen-o-ma'ni 

Cen-so'res 

Cen-so-ri'nus 

Cen'sus 

Cen-ta-re'tus 

Ceu-tau'ri, 3 

Cen-tau'rus 

Cen-tob'ri-ca 

Cen'to-res, 20 

Cen-tor'i-pa 

Cen-tri'tes 

Cen-tro'ni-us 



CE 

Cen-tum'vi-ri, 4 

Cen-tu'ri-a 

Cen-tu'ri-pa 

* Cen'tus 

Ce'os and Ce'a 

Ceph'a-las 

Ceph-a-le'di-on 

Ce-phaVlen 

Ceph-a-le'na 

Ceph-aUe'ni-a 

Ceph'a-lo 

Ceph-a-loe'dis, 6 

Ceph'a-lon 

Ceph-a-lofo-mi 

Ceph-a-lu'di-um 

Ceph'a-lus 

Ce-phe'us 

Ce-phe'nes 

Ce-phis'i-a,10,20 

Ceph-i-si'a-des 

Ce-phis-i-do'rus 

Ce-phisl-on, 10 

Ce-phis-od'o-tus 

Ce-phis'sus 

Ce-phi'sus 

Ce'phren 

Ce'pi-o 

Ce'pi-on 

CeiP'a-ca 

Ce-rac'a-tes 

Ce-ram'bus 

Cer-a-mi'cus 

Ce-ro'mi-um 

Cei/a-mus, 20 

Ce'ras 

Cer'a-sus 

Cei/a-ta 

Ce-ra'tus 



CE 

Ce-rau'ni-a 
Ce-rau'ni-i, 4 
Ce-rau'nus i 
Ce-rau'si-us, 10 
Cer-be'ri-on 
Cer'be-rus 
Cer'ca-phus 
Cer-ca-so'rum 
Cer-ce'is 
Cer-ce'ne 
Cer-ces'tes 
Cer'ci-des 
Cer'ci-i, 4 - 
Cer'ci-na 
Cer-cin'na 
Cer-cin'i-um 
Cer'ci-us, 10 
Cer-co'pes 
Cer'cops 
Cer'cy-on, 10 
Cer-cy'o-nes 
Cer-cy'ra, or 
Cor-cy'ra 
Cer-dyli-um 
Cer-e-a'li-a 
Ce'res 
Ce-res'sus 
Cer'e-tae 
Ce-ri-alis 
Ce'ri-i, 4 
Ce-ririum 
Ce-rin'thus 
Cer-y-ni'tes 
Cer-ma'nus 
Cer'nes 
Ce'ron 

Cer-o-pas'a-des 
Ce-ros'sus 



• Cmfus.— (Caius. De Orat. 209.) 



CH 

Cer'phe-res 

Cer-rbae'i, 3 

Cer-sob-lep'tcs 

Cer'ti-ma 

Cer-to'ni-um 

Cer-va'ri-us 

Cer'y-ces, 6, 20 

Ce-ryc'i-us 

Cer-y-mi'ca 

Cer-ne'a 

Ce-ryn'i-tes 

Ce-selli-us 

Ce-sen'ni-a 

Ces'ti-us, 10 

Ces-tri'na 

Ces-tri'nus 

Ce'tes 

Ce-the'gus 

Ce'ti-i, 4, 10 

Ce'ti-us, 10 

Ce'to 

Ce'us, and Cssfus 

Ceyx 

Cha'bes, Che'a *, 

12 
Cha-bi'nus 
Cha^ri-a 
Cha'bri-as 
Chabry-is, 6 
Chae-an'i-tae, 4 
Chaere-as 
Chaer-e-de'mus 
ChaB-re'mon 
Chaer'e-phon 
Chse-res'tra-ta 



CH 

Chae-iin'thus 
Chae-rip'pua 
Chse'ro 
Chae-ro'ni-a 
tChae-ro-ne'a, and 

Cher-ro-ne'a 
Cha-lae'on 
Chal-cae'a 
Chal'ce-a 
Cbal-ce'don, and 

Chal-ce-do'ni-a 
Chal-ci-de'ne 
Chal-ci-den'ses 
Chal-cid'e-u8 
Chal-cid'i-ca 
Chal-cidl-cus 
Chal-ci-ce'u8 
Chal-ci'o-pe 
Chal-ci'tis 
Chalcis 
ChaVco-don 
Chal'con 
Charcus 
Chal-dae'a 
Chal-dael, 3 
Chal-Wtra 
Chal-o-ni'tis 
Chary-bes, and 

Cal'y-bes 
Chal-y-bo-ni'tis 
Charybs 
Cha-ma'ni 
Cham-a-vi'ri, 4 
Cha'ne 
Cha'on 



CH 



43 



Cha'o-nes 

Cba-o'ni-a 

Cha-o-ni'tis 

Cha'os 

Char'a-dra 

Cha-ra'dros 

Char'a-drus 

Cba-rae'a-das 

Char-an-d«'i 

Cha'rax 

Cba-rax'es, and 

Cba-rax'us 
Cha'res 
Char'i-cles 
Char'i-clo 
Char-i-cli'des 
Cbar-i-de'mu8 
Charl-la 
Char-i-la'us, and 

Cha-rillus 
Cha-ri'ni, and 

Ca-ri'ni, 3 
Cha'ris 
Cha-ris'i-a 
Char'i-tes 
Charl-ton 
Cbar'mi-das, and 

J Char'ma-das 
Char'me, and 

Car'me 
Char'mi-dea 
Char-mi'nus 
8 Cbar-mi'o-ne 
Char'mis 
Char-mos'y-na 



• Cfcea.— The ch in this and all words from the Greek and Latin, 
finst be pronounced like k, 

t [See note on Cadmeia.] 

t Charmadas.-'A disciple of Plato, and chief of the Academicians. 

j Charmione.—Vryden, in his tragedy of All for L(n:e, h?iS Anglicised 
m word into Charmion ;— the ch pronounced as in charm. 



44 



CH 



Char'mo-tas 

Char'mus 

Cha'ron 

Cha-ron'das 

Char-o-ne'a 

Cha-ro'ni-um 

Cha'rops, and 

Char'o-pes 
Cha-ryb'dis 
Chau'bi, and 

Chau'ci 
Chau'la, ^ 
Chau'rus 
Chelae 
Cheles 
CheLi-do'ni-a 
Chel-i-do'ni-ae 
Che-lid'o-nis 
Chero-ne 
Chero-nis 
Chel-o-noph'a-gi 
Chel-y-do're-a 
Chem'mis 
Che'na, ^ 
Che'nae 
Che'ni-on 
Che'ni-U8 
Che'ops, and 

Che-os'pes 
Che'phren 
Cher-e-moc'ra-tes 
Che-ris'o-phus 
Cher'o-phon 
Cher'si-as, 10 
Cher-sid'a-mas 
Cher'si-pho 
Cher-so-ne'sus 



CH 

Che-rus'ci, 3 
Chid-nael, 3 
Chil-i-ar'chus 
Chil'i-us, and 

Chile-US 
Chilo 
Chi-lo'nis 
Chi-mae'ra 
Chim'a-ru8 
Chi-me'ri-um 
Chi-om'a-ra 
Chi'on, 1 
Chi'o-ne, 8 
Chi-on'i-des 
Chi'o-nis 
Chi'os 
Chi'ron 
Chit'o-ne, 8 
Chlo'e 
Chlo're-us 
Chlo'ris 
Chlo'rus 
Cho-a-ri'na 
Cho-as'pes 
Cho'bus 
Choer'a-des 
Choer'i-lus 
Choer'e-aB 
Chon'ni^s 
Chon'u-phis 
Cho-ras'mi, 3 
Cho-rin'e-us 
Cho-roe'bus 
Cho-rom-nae'i, 3 
Chos'ro-es 
Chre'mes 
Chrem'e-tes 



CH 

Chres'i-phon 

Chres-phon'tes 

Chres'tus 

Chromi-a 

Ohro'mi-os 

Chro'icis 

Chro'nii«us 

Chro'ni-U8 

Chro'nos 

Chry'a-sus 

Chry'sa, and 

Chry'se 
Chrys'a-me 
Chry-san'tas 
Chry-san'thi-us 
Chry-san'tis 
* Chry-sa'or 
Chrys-a-o're-us 
Chry-sa'6-ris 
Chry'sas 
Chry-se'is 
Chry-ser'mus 
Chry'ses 
Chry-sip'pe 
Chry-sip'pus 
Chry'sis 

Chrys-o-as'pi-des 
Chry-sog'o-nus 
Chrys-oJa'us 
Chry-8o'di-um 
Chry-sop'o-lis 
Chry-sor'rho-fle 
Chry-sor'rho-as 
Chry-sos'tom-us 
Chrys^os-tom 

(Eng.) 
Chrys-oth'e-mis 



* Chrysaor, — Then started ont, when yon began to bleed 
The great Chrysaory and the gallant steed. 



CooKE*s Hesiod. Theog* 



CI 

Chryx'us 

Chtho'ni-a, 12 

Chtho'ni-us, 12 

Chi'tnira 

Cib-a-ri'tis 

Cib'y-ra 

Cic'e-ro 

Cic'o-nes 

Ci-cu'ta 

Ci-lic'i-a, 10 

Ci-lis-sa 

Ci'Ux 

CU'la 

Giles 

Cil'lus 

Cil'm-us 

Cilo 

Cim'ber 

Cim-be'ri-us 

Cim'bri, 3 

Cim'bri-cum 

Cim'i-nu3 

Cim-me'ri-i, 4 

Cim'me-ris 

Cim-me'ri-um 

Ci-molis, and 

Ci-no'lis 
Ci-molu8 
Ci'mon 
Ci-nae'thon 
Ci-uar'a-das 
Cin'ci-a, 10 
Cin-cin-na'tus, 

L.Q. 
Cin'ci-us, 10 
Cin'e-as 
Ci-ne'si-as, 11 



CI 

Cin'e-thon 

Cin'ga 

Cin-get'o-rix 

Sin-gefo-ria? 

Cin'gu-lum 

Cin-i-a'ta 

Ci-nith'i-i, 4 

Cin'na 

Cin'na-don 

Cin'na-mus 

Cin-ni'a-na 

Cinx'i-a 

Ci'nyps, and 

Cin'y-phus 
Cin'y-ras 
Ci'os 
Cip'pus 
Cir'ce 

Cir-cen'ses lu'di 
Cir'ci-us, 10 
Cir'cus 
Ci'ris 

Cir-rae'a-tum 
Cir'rha, and 

Cyr'rha 
Cir'tha, and Cir'ta 
Cis-al-pi'na 

Garii-a 
Cis'pa 
Cis'sa 
Cis'se-is 
Cis-se'us 
Cis'si-a, 11 
Cis'si-ae, 11 
Cis'si-des 
Cis-sces'sa, 5 
Cis'sus 



CL 45 

Cis-su'sa 

Cis-taene 

Ci-thae'ron 

Cith-a-ris'ta 

Cith'y-ris 

Citl-um, 10 

Ci-vi'lis 

Ci'us * 

Ciz'y-cum 

Cla'de-U8 

Cla'nes 

Cla'nis 

Cla'ni-U8, or 

Cla'nis 
Cla'rus 
Clas-tidl-um 
Clau'di-a 
Clau'di-« 
Clau-di-a'nus 
Clau-di-op'o-lis 
Clau'di-us 
Clav-i-e'nu8 
Clav'i-ger 
Clau'sus 
* Cla-zom'e-nae, 

& Cla-zom'e-na 
Cle'a-das 
Cle-an'der 
Cle-an'dri-das 
Cle-an'thes 
Cle-ar'chus 
Cle-ar'i-des 
Cle'mens 
Cle'o 
Cle'o-bis 
Cle-o-bu'la 
Cle-ob-u-li'na 



* [By the modern Greeks, and some others, this word is pro- 
oooDced Clad'Som'ena,} 



46 



CL 



Cle-ob-ulus 

Cle-o-cha'res 

Cle-o-cha'ri-a 

Cle-o-dee'us 

Cle-od'a-mas 

Cle-o-de'mus 

Cle-o-do'ra 

Cle-o-dox'a 

Cle-og'e-nes 

Cle-o-la'us 

Cle-^m'a-chus 

Cle-o-man'tes 

Clo-om'bro-tus 

Cle-o-me'des 

* Cle-om'e-nes 

Cle'on 

Cle-o'nae, and 

Cle'o-na 
Cle-o'ne 
Cle-o-ni'ca 
Cle-o-ni'cus, 30 
Cle-on'nis 
Cle-on'y-mus 
Cle-op'a-ter 
•f- Cle-o-pa'tra 
Cle-op'a-tris 
Cle-oph'a-nes 
Cle-o-phan'thus 
Cle'o-phes 
Cle-oph'o-lus 
Cle'o-phon 
Cle-o-phylus 



CL 

Cle-o-pom'pus 

Cle-op-tore-mus 

Cle'o-pus 

Cle-o'ra 

Cle-os'tra-tus 

Cle-ox'e-nus 

Clep'sy-dra 

Cle^ri, 3 

Cles'i-des 

Cle'ta 

Clib'a-nus 

Cli-de'mus 

Clim'e-nus 

Cli'nas 

Clin'i-as 

Cli-nip'pi-des 

Cli'nus 

Cli'o 

Cli-sith'e-ra 

Clis'thernes 

Cli'tae 

Cli-tar'chus 

Cli-ter'ni-a 

Clit-o-de'mus 

Cli-tom'a-chus 

Cli-ton'y-mus 

Clit'o-pbon 

Cli'tor 

Cli-to'ri-a 

Cli-tum'nus 

Cli'tus 

Clo-a-ci'na 



CN 

Clo-an'thus 

Clo'dU 

Clo'di-us 

Cloe1i-a 

Cloe'li^, 4 

Cloeli-us 

Clo'nas 

Clon'di-cus 

Clo'ni-a 

Clo'ni-us 

Clo'tho 

Clu-a-ci'na 

Clu-en'ti-us, 10 

Clu'po-a, and 

Clyp'e-a, 23 
Clu'si-a, 11 
Clu-si'ni fon'tes 
Clu-si'o-lum 
Cju'si-um, 10 
Clu'si-us, 10 
Clu'vi-a 

Clu'vi-us KuTus 
Clym'e-ne 
Clym-en-e'i-des 
Clym'e-nu8 
Cly-son-y-mu'sa 
Clyt-em-nes'tra 
Cly t'i-a, or Clyf i-e 
Clyt'i-us, 10 
Cly'tus 

I Cna-ca'di-uin,30 
Cnac'a-lis 



• Cleomenes. — ^There is an unaccountable caprice in Dry den's ac- 
centnation of this word, in opposition to all prosody; for tliroogb the 
whole tragedy of this title he places the accent on the penultimate 
instead of the antepenultimate syllable. 

f Cleopatra, — ^The learned editor of Labbe tells us thist word ought 
to be pronounced with the accent on the antepenultimate, Cle-opa-tra, 
though the penultimate accentuation, he says, is the more common. 

J Cnacadium — C before iV, in this and the succeeding words, is 
niiit6; and they^must be prononnced as if written Nacadium, Na- 
caliSf &c. 



CO 

Cna'gi-a 

Cne'mus, 12 

Cne'us, or Cnse'us 

Cni-dinl-um 

Cni'dus, orGni'dus 

Cno'pus, 12 

Cnos'si-a, 11 

Cdo'sus 

Co'osy and Cos 

Co-a-ma'ni 

Co-as'trae, and 

Co-ac'trae 
Cob'a-res 
Coc'a4us 
Coc-ce'i us 
Coc-cyg'i-us 
Co cleg. Pub. 

Herat. 
Coc'ti-ae, and 

Cofti-ae 
Co-cy'tus 
Co-dom'a-nus 
Codri-dae 
Co^op'o-lis 
Co'dnis 
Coe-cil'i-us 
(Via 

Coe-lal'e-tae 
Ccel-e Syrt-a, and 

Coe^-lo Syrt-a 
CoB'li-a 

Coe-li-ob'ri-ga 
Cce'li-us 
CoB'lus 



CO 

Cce'nus 

Coer'a-nus 

Co'es 

Coe'us 

Cog'a-mus 

Cog-i-du'nus 

Co'hi-bus 

Co'hors 

Co-lae'nus 

Co-lax'a-is 

Co-lax'es 

Corchi, 12, 3 

Corchis, and 

Corchos 
Co-]en'da 
Co'li-as 
CoUa'ti-a 
Col-la-ti'nus 
CoUi'na* 
Col-lu'ci-a 
Co'lo 
Co-lo'nae 
Co-lo'ne 
Co-lo'nos 
f Co-lo-ne'us 
Col'o-phon 
Co-los'se, and 

Co-los'sis 
Co-los'sus 
J Col'o-tes 
Col'pe 
Co-lum'ba 
Col-u-mella 
Co-lu^hus 



CO 47 

Co-lyt'tus 

Com^a-ge'na 

Com-a-ge'ni 

Co-ma'na 

Co-ma'ni-a 

Com'a-ri, 3 

Com'a-rus 

Co-mas' tus 

Com-ba'bus 

Com'be 

Com'bi, 3 

Com-bre'a 

Com'bu-tis 

Co-me'tes 

Com'e-tho 

Co-minl-us 

Co-miti-a, 10 

Co'mi-us 

Com'mo-du8 

Co'mon 

Com-pi-tali-a 

Comp'sa-tus 

Com-pu'sa 

Co'mus 

Con'ca-ni, 3 

Con-cor'di-a 

Con'da-lus 

Con'da-te 

Con-do-cha'tes 

Con-dru'si, 3 

Con-dyri-a 

Co'ne, 7 

Con-e-to-du'^nus ' 

Con-fii'ci-us, 10 



* Colliiut, — Lempriere accents this word on the antepennltimate-i 
^QtAinsworth, Gouldman, and Holy oke, more properly on the penol- 
timate." 

t Cohneus, — (^dipqs.) * 

t Colotes Ainsworth and Lempriere accent this word on the 

intepenaltlmate syllable ; but Labbe, Gouldman, and Holyoke, more 
agreeably to the general ear, oh the penoltimtfte. 



48 



CO 



Con-ge'dus 

Co'ni-i, 3 

Con-i-sal'tus 

Co-nis'ci, 3 

Con-ni'das 

Co'non 

Con-sen'tes 

Con-sen'ti-a 

Con-sid'i-us 

Con-si-li'num 

Con'stans 

Con-stan'ti-a, 11 

Con-stan-ti'na 

Con-stan-ti-nop'o- 

lis 
Con-stan-ti'nus 
Confstanr-tine 

(Eng.) 
Con-stan'ti-us, 10 
Con'sus 
Con-syg'na 
Con-ta-des'dus 
Con-tu'bi-a, 7 
Co'on 
Co'os, Cos, Ce'a, 

and Co 
Co'pae 
Co-pa'is 
Co-ph(m'ti8 
Co'phas 
Co'pi-a, 7 
Co-pillus 
Co-po'ni-us 
Cop'ra-te8 
Co'pre-us 
Cop-tus, and 

Cop'tos 
Co'ra 



CO 

Cor-a-ce'si-um, & 
Cor-a-cen'si-um 

Cor-a-co-na'sus 

Co-rare-tae 

Co-ralli, 3 

Co-ra'nu8 

Co'ras 

Co'rax 

Co-rax'i, 3 

Coi/be-us 

Cordis 

Cor'bu-lo 

Cor-cy'ra 

Cor'du-ba 

Cor-du-e'ne, 8 

Core, 8 

Co-res'su8 

Cor'e-sus 

Cor'e-tas 

Cor-fin'i-um 

Co'ri-a, 7 

Co-rin'e-um 

Co-rin'na 

Co-rin'nus 

Co-rin'thus 

Co-ri-o--la'n us, 23 

Co-ri'o-li, and 
Co-ri-olla 

Co-ris'sus 

Cor'i-tus 

Cor'mus 

Cor'ma-sa 

Cor-neli-a 

Cor-ne'li-i, 4 

Cor-nic'u-lum 

Corn-ni-fic'i-U8, 
10 

Cor'ni-ger 



CO 

^ ' i 

Cor-nu'tus 

Co-roe'bus 

Co-ro'na 

* Cor-o-ne'a 

Co-ro'nis 

Co-ron'ta 

Co-ro'nus 

Cor-rha'gi-um 

Cor'si, 3 

Cor'si-ae 

Cor'si-ca, 7> and 

Cyr'nos 
Cor'so-te 
Cor'su-ra, 7 
Cor-to'nae 
Cor-vi'nus 
Cor-un-ca'ni-u8 
Co'rus 

Cor-y-ban'tes, 6 
Cor'y-bas 
Cor-y-bas'sa I 
Cor'y-bus 
Co-rycl-a, 24 
Co-ryc'i-des 
Co-ryc-i'us, 10 
Cor'y-cus, 6 
Cor'y-don 
Cory-la, and 

Cor-y-le'um 
Co-rym'bi-fer 
Cor'y-na 
Cor-y-ne'ta, and 

Cor-y-ne'tes 
Cor-y-pha'si-um 
Cor-y-then'ses 
Cor'y-thus 
Co-ry'tus, 6 
Cos 



* [See note on Cadmeia.] 



Ce'sa, and Cos'sa, 

or Co'sae 
Co8-co'ni-u8 
Co-sin'gas 
(Vsis 
Cos'mus 
Cos'se-a, 7 
Cos'sus; 
Cos-su'ti-L, 4 
Cos-t^boel, 3 
Co-sy'ra 

Cotes, and Cot'tes 
Co'thon 
Co-tho'ne-a, !J 
Cofi-iso 
Cot-to'nis 
Cofta 

Cof ti-ae Al'pes 
Cot'tus 

Cot-y-ae'um, 6 
Co-ty'o-ra 
Cot-y-lae'us 
Co-tyl'i-us 
Co'tys 
Co-tyfto 
Cra'gus 
Cram-bu'sa 
Cran'a-i, 3 
Cr^n'a-pes 
Cran'a-us 
Cra'ne 
Cra-ne'um 
Cra'ni-i, 4 
Cra'non, and 

Cran'non 
Cran'tor 

Cra-as-sifi-us, 10 
Cras'sus 
Cras-ti'nus 
Crafa-is 
Cra-t3B'u8 



CR 

Crater 

Crat'e-rus, 20 

Cra'tes 

Crat-es-i-cle'a 

Crat-e-sip'o-lis 

Crat-e-sip'pi-das 

Cra-te'vas 

Cra'te-us 

Cra'this 

Cra-ti'nus 

Cra-tip'pu8 

Craf y-lu8, 6 

Craifsi-ae, 11 

Crau'sis 

Cra-uxl-das 

Crem'e-ra 

Crem'ma 

Crem'my-on, and 

Crom'my-on 
Crem'ni, and 
• Crem'nos 
Cre-mo'na 
Cre-mu'ti-us, 10 
Cren'i-des 
Cre'on 

Cre-on-ti'a-des 
Cre-oph'i-lus 
Cre-pe'ri-u8 
Cres 

Cre'sa, and Cres'sa 
Cre'si-us, 11 
Cres-phon'tes 
Cres'sinus, 11 
Cres'ton 
Cre'sns 
Cre'ta 

Crete (Eng.) 8 
Cre-tae'us 
Cre'te, 8 
Cre'te-a, ^ 
Creates, and 



CR 



49 



Cre-ten'ses 
Cre-te'us 
Cre'the-is 
Cre'the-ns 
Cr^th'o-na 
Crefi-cu8 
Cres'sas 
Cre-u'sa, 7 
Cre-u'sis 
Cri'a-sus 
Cri-nip'pus 
Cri'nis 
Cri-ni'sus, and 

Cri-mi'sus 
Cri'no 
Cri'son 
Cris-pi'na 
Cris-pi'nus 
Crit'a-la 
Crith'e-is 
Cri-tho'te 
Crifi-as, 10 
Cri'to 

Crit-o-bu1us 
Crit-og-na'tus 
Crit*o-la'u8 
Cri'us 
Cro-bi'a-lus 
Crob'y-zi, 3 
Croc'a-le 
Cro'ce-ae 

Croc-o-di-lop'o-lis 
Cro'cus 
Croe'sus 
Cro-i'tes 
Cro'mi, 3 
Crom'my-on 
Crom'na 
Cro'mus 
Cro'ni-a, 7 
Cronl-des 



90 CU 

Cro'phi, a 
Cros-sse'a 
Crofa-los 
Cro'ton 
Cro-to'na^ 7 
Crot-o-ni'ftp-tis 
Cro-to'pi-as 
Cro-to'pu8 
Cru'nos 
Cru'sis 

Crus-tu-me'ri (4) 
Crus-tu-me'ri-a 
Crus-tu-me'ri-um 
Crus-tu-mi'num 
Crus-tu'mi-um 
Crus-tu'nis, and 
Crus-tur-ne'ni-us 
Cr/nis 
Cte'a-tud 
Ctem'e-ne, 13 
Cte'nos 
Cte'si-as, 13 
Cte-sib'i-us 
Ctes'i-cles 
Cte-sil'o-chus 
Ctesl-phon, 13 
Cte-sip'pu«, 13 
Ctim'e-ne 
Cula-ro 
Cu'ma, and Cu' 

Cu-nax'a, 7 

Cu-pa'vo 

Cu-pen'tU8 

Cu-pi'do 

Cu-pi-en'ni-us 



CY 

Cu'res 

Cu-re'tes 

Cu-re'tis 

Cu'ri-a 

Cu-ri-a'td-i, 4 

Cu'ri-o 

Cu-ri-o-sdl-tae 

Cu'ri-um 

Cu'ri-us Ben-ta' 

tus 
Cur'ti-a, 10 
Car-tillus 
Cur'ti-us, 10 
Cu-rulis 
Cus-seB'i, 3 
Cu-til'i-um 
Cy-am-o-so'ras 
C/a-ne, 6, 8 
Cy-a'ne-ae, 4 
Cy-an'e-e, and 

Cy-a'ne-a 
Cy-a'ne-us 
Cy-a-nip'pe 
Cy-a-nip'pus 
Cy-a-rax'esj or 

Cy-ax'a-res, 6 
Cy-be'be 
Cyb'e-la, and 

Cyb-e'la 
Cyb-ele 
Cyb'e-lus 
Cyb'i-ra 
Cy-ce'si-mn, 11 
Cych're-us, 12 
Cycla-des 
Cy'clops 
Cy-clo'pes 



Cf/'iOape (Eag.) 

Cyc'nus 

Cy'da, 6 

Cydl-aa 

Cy-dip'pe i 

Cyd'nus j 

Cy'don 

Cy-do'ni-a 

Cyd'ra-ra 

Cyd-ro-la'ua 

Cyg'nus 

CylVbug 

Cyl'i-ces 

Cy-lin'dus 

CyUab'a-rus 

Cylla-rus 

Cyl'len 

CyUe'ne 

Cyl-le-ne'i-us 

Cyl-lyr'H 3, 4 

Cylon 

Cy'ma, or Cy'm^ 

Cy-mod'o-cc 

Cy-mod-o-ce'a 

Cy-mod-o-oe'as 

Cy'me, and Cfu 

CymVlus, and 

Ci-mo'lus 
♦Cym-o-po-li'a 
Cy-moth'o-e 
Cyn'a-ra 
Cyn-ae-gi'rus 
Cy-nae'thi-um 
Cy-na'ne 
Cy-na'pes 
Cy-nax'a 
Cyn'e-as 



* See Ipliigenia, — Neptune, viho shakes the earth, his daughter gd\ 
Cymopoliaf to reward the brave. 

CooKE'ii Uesiod, Theog. v. 113^. 



CY 

Cy-ne'si-i, 4, and 

Cyn'e-tae 
Cyn-e-thus'sa 
Cyn'i-a 
Cynl-ci, 3 
Cy-nis'ca 
Cy'no, 6 
Cyn-o-ceph'a-le 
^-o-ceph'a-li 
Cyn-o-phon'tis 
C^-nor'tas 
Cy-nor'ti-on, 11 
Cy'nos 

Cyn-o-sar'ges 
Cyn-os-se'ma 
CynH>-8u'ra 
Cyn'o-sure (Eng.) 
Cyn'fchi-a 
Cyn'thi-U8 
Cyn'thus 
Cyn-u-ren'ses 
Cy'nus 



€Y 

Cjrp-a-ris'si, and 

Cyp-a-ris'si-ajll 
Cjrp-a-ris'sus 
C)rph'arra 
Cyp-ri-a'nu8 
Cy'pnw 
Cyp-seri-des 
Cyp'se-lus 
Cy-rau'nis 
Cy're 

Cy-re-nal-c» 
Cy-re-nal-ci, 3 
Cy-re'ne, 8 
Cy-ri'a-des 
Cy-ririu8 
Ci/Hl (Eng.) 
Cy-ri'nu8 
Cyr'ne 
Cyr'nus 
Cyr-rae'i, 3 
Cyr^rha-cte 
Cyr'rhes 



CV 51 

Cyr'rhus 

Cyr-ri-a'na, 7 

Cyr-fiilus 

Cy'rus 

Cy-rop'o-lig 

Cy'ta 

Cy-tae'is 

Cy-the'ra 

*Cyth-e-r8e'a, or 

Cyth-e-re'a 
+Cyth'e-ris 
Cy-the'ri-us 
Cy-the'ron 
Cy-the'nm 
Cyth'e-rus 
Cyth'nos 
Cy-tin'e-um 
Cyt-is-so'nis 
Cy-to'ru8 
Cyz-i-ce'ni 
Cyz'i-cum 
Cyz'i-cus 



DA 

DA'iE, Da'hflB 
Da'ci, and Da'cse 
Da'ci-a, 11 
Dac'ty-li, 3, 4 
Dadi-cae 



DA 



DA 



Daed'a-la 


Da'i-cles, 1 


Dae-da'li-on 


Dal-dis 


DsedVlus 


Da-im'a-chus 


Dae'mon 


Da-im'e-nes 


Dai, 4 


Dal-phron, 1 



* Cytheria. — Behold a nymph arise, divinely fair, 

Whom to Cythera first the surges bear; 
And Aphrvdite, from the foam, her name, 
Among the race of gods and men the same ; 
And Cy therea from Cythera came. 

Cooke's Besiod, Thiog. v. f 99. 

t Cytheris, Mere poetry 

Your Roman wits, your Gallns and Tibullns, 
Ha?e taught you this from Cytheris and Delia. > 

DRYDBNy AH for Lwe, 
d2 



52 DA 

Da-i'ra, 1 
Daldi-a 
Dal-ma'ti-a, 10 
Dal-ma'ti-us, 10 
Dam-a-ge'tiis 
DamVlis 
Da'mas, I 
Dam-a-sce'na 
Da-mas'ci-us, 10 
Da-mas'cus 
Dam-a-sip'pus 
Dam-a-sich'thon 
Datn-a-sis'tra-tus 
Dam-a-'sith'y-nus 
Da-mas'tes 
Da'mi-a , 
Da-mip'pus 
Da'mis 
Dam'no-rix 
Da'mo 
Dam'o-cles 
Da-moc'ra-tes 
Da-moc'ri-ta 
Da-moc'ri-tus 
Da'mon. 
Dam-o-phan'tus 
Da-m(^h'i-la 
Da-mophl-lus 
Dam'o-phon 
Da-mos'tra-tus 
Da-mox'e-nus . 
Da-myr'i-as 
Da'na, 7 
Dan'a-e 
Dan'a-i, 3 
Da-na'i-des, ,4 
Dan'a-Ia 
Dan'a-us 
Dan'da-ri, and 
Dan^su^'i-dae 



DA 

Dan'don 

Da-nu'bi-us 

Dan'uhe (Eng.) 

Da'o-chus, 12 

Daph'nse 

Daph-nae'us 

Daph'ne 

Daph-ne-pho'ri-a 

Daph'nis 

Daph'nus 

Dar'a-ba 

Da'raps 

Dar'da-ni, 3 

Dar-da'ni-a 

Dar-danl-des 

Dar'da-nus 

Dar'da-ris 

Da'res 

Da-re'tis 

Da-ri'a 

Da-ri'a-ves 

Da-ri'tae * 

Da-ri'us 

Das'con 

Das-cyl-i'tis 

Das'cy-lus 

Da'se-a 

Da'si-us, 11 

Das-sar'e-tae 

Das-sa-re'ni 

Das-sa-ri't8B 

Das-sa-ritl-i, 3, 4 

Dat'a-mes 

Dat-a-pher'nes 

Da'tis 

Da'tos, or Da'ton 

Dav'a-ra, 7 

Dau'lis 

Dau'ni, 3 

Dau'ni-a 



DE 

Dau'nus 
Dau'ri-fer, and 

Dau'ri-ses 
De-ceb'a-lus 
De-ce'le-um 
Dec'e-lu8 
De'cem-vi-ri, 4 
De-ce'tUa, 10 
De-cid'i-us Sax'a 
De-cin'e-us 
De'ci-us, 10 
De-cu'ri-o 
Ded-i-tam'e-nes 
Dej-a-ni'ra 
De-ic'o-on 
De-id-a-mi'a, 30 1 
De-i-le'on 
De-il'o-chus, 12 
De-im'a-chus 
Dej'o-ces 
De-i'o-chus 
De-i'o-ne 
De-i-o'ne-us 
De-i-o-pe'i-a 
De-jot'a-rus 
De-iph'i-la 
De-iph'o-be 
De-iph'o-bus 
De'i-phon 
De4-phon'tes 
De-ip'y-le, 6, 7 
De-ip'y-lus 
De-ip'y-rus 
Del'don 
Deli-a 
De-li'a-des 
Deli-um 
De'li-us 

Del-ma'ti-us, 10 
Del^min'i-um 



DE 

De'los 

•Delphi 

Derpni-cus 

Del-phin'i-a 

Del-phin'i-um 

Del'^us 

Del-phy'ne, 6 

Delta 

Dem'a-des 

De-maen'e-tus 

De-mag'o-ras 

Dem-a-ra'ta 

Dem-^a-ra'tuB 

De-mar'chus 

Dem-a-re'ta 

Dem-a-ris'te 

De'me-a 

De-me'tri-a 

De-me'tri-as 

De-me'tri-us 

De'mo 

B^-iHii^nas'sa 

Dem-o-ce'des 

De-moch^a-res 

Dem'o-cles 

De-mde'o-on 

De-moc'ra-^tes 

De-moc'ri-tus 

De-mod'i-ce, 4, 8 

De-mod'o-cus 

De-mole-us 

De-mole-on 

De'mon 

Dem-o-nas'sa 

De-mo'nax 

Dem-o-ni'ca, 1 



DI 

Dem-o-ni'cu8 

Dem-o-phan'tus 

De-mopVi-lu8 

Dem'o-phon 

De-moph'o-on 

De-^mop'o-lis 

De'mos 

De-mos'the- 

nes, 17 
De^mos'tra-tus 
Dem'y-lus 
De-od'a-tu8 
De-ols 
Der'bin:® 
Der'ce 
Der-cen'nuB 
Der'ce-to, and 

Der'ce-tes 
Der-cyrii-das 
Der-cyllus 
Der'cy-nus 
Der-sae'i, 3 
De-ru-si-aB'i, 3 
De-sud'a-ba 
Deu-ca'li-on, 29 
Deu-ce'ti-us, 10 
Deu'do-rix 
Dex-am'e-ne 
Dex-am'e-na8 
Dex-ip'pus 
Dex-ith'e-a 
Dexl-us 
Di'a, 1, 7 
Di-ac-o-pe'na 
Di-ac-tori-des 
fDia-de-ma'tujs 



M 



S3 



Di-aef'us 
Di-a-du-menai-a' 

nus 
Di'a-gon, and Di' 

a-gum 
Di-ag'o-ras 
D-ia'us 
Di-al'lus 

Di-a-mas-ti-go'sis 
Di-a'na, 7 
Di-an'a-sa 
Di-a'si-a, 11 
Di-cae'a 
Di-c»'us 
Dice, 8 
Dic-e-ar'chu8 
Di-ce'ne-us 
Dic'o-mas 
Dic'tae 
Die-tam'num 
Dic-tym'na, and 

Dyc-tin'na 
Dic-ta'tDr 
Dic-tid-i-en'sies 
Dic-tyn'na 
Dic'tys 

Did1-U8 

Dido 

Did'y-ma 

Did-y-mae'us 

Did-y-ma'on 

Did'y-me,6,8 

Did'y-mum 

Did'y-mus 

Di^n'e-ces 

Dines'pi-ter 



• Delphi. — ^This word was, formerly, universally written Delphos; 
till Mr. Cumberland^ a gentleman no less remarkable for his classical 
erudition than his dramatic abilities, in his Widow qf Delphi, rescued 
it from the'Tulfj^rity in which it had been so long involved. x 

t L. Q. Metelli Macedoniei filius. Apud notam in Cic deOrat. 201. 



fit 



DI 



Di-gen'ti-a, 10 

Dig'ma 

Dil, 3, 4 

Di-mas'sus 

Di-nar'chiis, 2 

*Din-dy-4ne'ne 

Di-noro-chus 

Dinl-ae, 4 

Din'i-as 

Din'Uh^ 12 

Di-noch'a^res 

Di-noc/ra-tes 

Di-nod'o-chu8 

Di-nom'e-ncs 

Di'non 

Di-nos'the-nes 

Di-nos'tra-tU8 

Di-o'cle-a 

Di'o-cles 

Di-o-ole^ti-^a'nus 

(Eng.) 
Di-o-do'ms 
Di-o'e-tas 
Di-og'e-Bes 
Di-o-ge'ni-a 
Di-og'e-nus 
Di-og-ne'tus 
Di-o-me'da 
tDi-o<ne'des 
]3i-o-me'don 
Di'cm, 8 
Di-o-nae'a 



ni 

Di-o'ne 

Di-o-nys'i-a, 11 
Di-o-ny-si'a-des 
Di-o-nys'i-aa, 11 
Di-o-nys'i-^des 
Di-o-nys-i-O'do' 

rus 
Di-o-nys'i-oii, 11 
Di-o-ny-sip'o-lis 
Di-o-nys'i-us, 11 
Di-oph'a-^ies 
Pi-o-phan'tUB 
Di-o-pi'tes 
Di-o-poe'nu8 
Di-op'o-lis 
Di-o'res 
Di-o-rjr'tiifl 
Di-o-scor^i-dfis 
tDi-os'co-inuB 
SIM-o-scu'fi, 3 
JDi-os'pa-ge 
Di-os'po-lis 
Di-o-ti'me, 1, 8 
Di-o-ti^mus 
Di-ofre-phes 
Di-K)x-ip'pe 
Di-ox-ip'pus 
Di-pae^ae 
Diph'i-las 
Diph'i-lus 
Di-phor'i-'dBS 
Di-poe'nae 
Dip'sas 



DO 

Di'r« 

Dir'ce 

Dir-cen'na 

Dir'phi-a 

Dis-cor^di-ft 

Dith-y-ramlnis 

Dif a-Bj, 3 

Div-i-ti'a-cus 

Di'vus Fidl-^Qs 

Di-yllus 

Do-be'ras 

Doc'i-lis 

Doc'i-miis, 34 

Do'cle-a 

Do-do'Ba 

Dod-(Mi8e^tt8 

Do-do'ne 

Do-don'i-des 

Do'i-i, 4 

Dol-a^bella 

Dol-i-cha'on 

DorUhe, 1, 12 

Do'li-ms 

Dol-o-'me^a 

Do'lon 

Do-lon'oi, 3 

Doro-pes 

Do-Io'|dii<Qn 

Do4o'pi-a 

Do'lape 

Dom-i.*du'cu8 

Do-minlH» 

Do-mit'i-a, 10 



• HOR. 

t Diomedes, — ^All words ending m edes have the same accetftna- 
tion; as Archimedes, JHomedes^ &c. The same may be ob t oryed 
of words ending in icles and ocle»: as Iphiclee, Damoclesy Androdety 
&c. — See the Terminational Vocabulary. 

t Dioecoris, — An heresiarch of the fifth century. 

$ Dtoscurt.— The name given to Castor and Pollus^ from the 
Greek Atif and K«v^ pro K^^^^ the sons of Jove, 



BO 

Do-mit-ira'BU6 
Do-mitfi-an 

(Eng.) 
D(nn4-til'la 
Do-mitl-ufi, 10 , 
Do-na'tus 
Don-i-la'iis 
Do-Bu'ca 
Do-n/sa 
Do-rac'le 
Do'res 

IWi^ca, 4, 7 
IWi-cus 
Do-ri-en'ses 
IWi-las 
Dor-i-la'u8 
Do'ri-ea 
D(/ris 
Do-ris'ciusi 
Do'ri-um , 
Do'ri-us 
Do-fos'to-nun 
Dor-sen'QU8 
Dor'so 
Do'nis 

Do-iya-sttg, 6 
Do-ry'dus 
Dor-y-he'um, and 

Dor-y4ae'u8 
Dor'y-las 
Dor-y-la'ns 
Do-rys'sus 
Do6'ci,3 
Do-8i'a^4e6 
Dos-se'aiis 



Dofa-4ai 

Do'to 

Do'tus 

Dox-^m'der 

Dra-oa'BUS 

Draco 

Dra-conHti'clef 

Dra'cus 

Dran'ces 

Dran-gi-a'BA, 7 

Dra'pes 

Drep'a-na, avid 
Drep'a-puin 

Drim'a-chus 

Dri-op'i-des 

Dri'os 

Dro'i,;^ 

Dro-mse'us 

Dron'^4u9 

Drop'i-ci, 4 

Dro'pi-on 

Dru-en'ti-ii6,aDd 
Dru-en'ti-a, 10 

Dru'ge-ri, 3 

Dnil-dsB 

Dru'ids (Eog') 

Dru-sil'la Liv'i-a 

Dru'so 

Dru'sus 

Dry'a-des 

Drf/ade (Eng.) 

Dry-an-ti'a-des 
^ Dry-an'ti-des 
j Dry-mae'a 

Dry'mo 



BY «ff 

Dry'mus 
Diyo-pe 
Dry-o-pe'i-a, 5 
Dry'o-pefl 
Ihyo-piB, and 
I)ry-op'i-*da 
Dry'ops 
Dryp'e-tig 
Dn-oe'tiHi^ 10 
Du-U'li-a 
Du-il'li-ugNe'f)ot 
Du-lichl-um 
Dum'no-rix 
Du'nax 

Du-ra'tiHw, 10 
Du'ri-ug 
Xhi-ro'ni-a 
•Du-ro'ni-uf 
Du-un'vi-ri, 4 
Dy-a-gon'dM 
Dy-ar-den'fies 
Dy'inae 
Dy.maB% 3 
D/mas 
D3rm'nus 
Dy-nam'e^ne 
Dynnsate 
r>y'ra«,6 
Dy-ra8'pc« 
Dyr-rach'i-um 
Dy-aw'ks 
Dyg-ci-ne'tui 
Dy-so'rum 
Dys-pon'ti-i, 4 



EA 



E-a'nus 



EA 

E-ar'i-nus 
E-a'si-um 



EB 

£b'do-me 
E-bor'a-cum 



* Marcos, vide Cicer, de Orat p. 204. 



56 



EG 



Eb-u-ro'nes 

Eb'u-8us 

Ec-a-me'da. 

Ec-bafa-na 

Ec-e-chip'i-a 

E-chec'ra-tes 

E'kekfrcb^es . 

Ecb-e-da'mi-a, 30 

E-cheFa-tus 

E-cheFta 

Ech'e4u8 

E-chem^bro-tu8 

E-che'mon 

Ech^e-mus 

Ech-e-ne'i» 

Ech'e-phron 

E-chep'o-lus 

E-ches'tra-tiis 

E-chev-e-then'ses 

E-chid'na 

Ech-i-do'rus • 

E-chin'a-des 

E-chi'non 

E-chi'nus 

Ech-i-^us'sa 

E-chi'on,29 

Ech-i-oh'r-des 

Ech-i-o'm-us 

Ech'o 

E-des'sa^ E^de'sa 

E-dis'«a 

E'don 

E-do'ni, 3 

E-dyll-us 

E-e'ti-on, 10 

E-gel'i-das 

E-ge'ri-a 



EL 

E-ges-a-re'tws \ 
Eg-e-si'nus 
E-ges'ta \ 

Eg-na'ti-a, 10 
Eg-na'ti^Uft, 10 
E-jo'ne-us 
E-i'onv 2» 
E-i'o-nes 
E-i-o'ne-u8' 
El.a-bon'ta& 
E-lfle'a 
E-lae'ns 

EI.a-ga*balu6', or 
El-a-gab'a-liis 
El-a-i'tes 
E-k'i-us 
El-a-phi-ae'a 
El'a-phus 
El-a-phe^bo'li^ 
EI-ap-tD'ni-us 
E-la'ra 
* El-a-te'a 
E-la'tus 
E-la'ver 
Ele-a 
t Ele^s 
E-le-a'tes 
E-lec'tra 
E-lec'trae 
E-lec'tri-des 
E-lec'try-on 
E-le'i 
El-e-le'us 
Ele-on 
El-e-on'tum 
El-e-phan'tis 
El-e-phan-toph'a-gi 
El-e-phe'nor 



EM 

El-e-po'ras 

Ele-us . 

E-leu'chi-a 

El-eu-^sin'i-a, 22 

E4eu(si8 

E-leu'thet 

E-leu'the-rae 

El-eu-thc'ri-a 

E-leu'tho 

E-leu'ther-o- 

Cill-ces 
E.liGl-us,10,2i 
El-i-€n'sis, and 

E-li'a-ca 
El-i-me'a 
Elis 

El-is-pha'si-i, 4 
E-lis'sa 
El-lo'pi-a 
E-lis'sus 
E-lo'rus 
Elos 
El-pe'nor 
El-pi-ni'ce 
El-u-i'na 
El'y-ces 
El-y-ma'isr 
EFy-mi, » 
El'y-mus 
El'y-rus 
E-lysl-um 
E-ma'thi-a 
E-ma'thi-off 
Em'ba-tum 
Em-bo-li'ma 
E-mer'i-ta 
E-mes'sa, and 

E-mis'sa 



* £In the Oreek EUa-tei'a^ see the note on Cadinea.]= 
f P. 40 in Cicerou.. 



EP 

Em-me'li-us 

E-mo'da 

£-mo'dus 

Em-ped'o-cles 

Em-pe-ra'mus 

* Em-pi'ri-cu8 

Em-po'dus 

Em-po'ri-a 

Em-pu'sa 

En-cerardus 

En^hele-ae, 12 

£n'de-is 

En-de'ra 

En-dym'i-on 

E-ne'ti 

En-gy'um 

En-i-en'ses 

En-i-o'pe-U8 

E-nip'e-U8 

E-nis'pe, 8 

En'na 

En'm-a 

En'ni-us 

En'no-mus 

En-jios-i-gae'us 

En'o-pe 

E'nops 

E'nos 

En-nOfsich'thon 

E-not-o-Qce'tae 

En-teVla 

En-teVlils 

En-y-a'H-us 

E-ny'o, 6 

E'o-ne 

Eos 

E-o'us 

E-pa'^s 



EP 

IB-pam-i-non'das 

Ep-an-tel'i-i, 4 

E-paph-ro-di'tus 

Ep'a-phus 

Ep-as-nac'tus 

E-peb'o-lus 

E-pe'i, 3 

E-pe'us 

Eph'e-sus 

Eph'e-tae 

Eph-i-al'tes 

Eph'o-ri, 3 

Eph'orrus 

Eph'y-ra, and 

Eph'y-re 
Ep-i-cas'te 
Ep-i-cer'i-des 
Ep.i-chal-4es 
E-pich'a-ris 
Ep-i-char'mua 
Epl-cles 
Ep-i-cli'des 
E-pic'ra-tea 
Ep-ic-te'tu8 
Ep-i-cu'ru8 
E-pic'y-des, 34 
Ep.i-dain'iiu& 
Ep-i-dapb'ne 
E-pi-daWri-a 
Ep-i-dau'rus 
E-pid'i-us 
Ep-i-do'tae 
E-pig'e-nes 
E-pig'e-us 
E-pig'o-ni, 3 
E-pig'o-nus 
E-pily a^d E-pe'i 
£-pira-ris 



EE 



57 



Ep-i-mell-des 

E-pim'e-nes 

Ep-i-menl-^es 

Ep-i-me'the-us 

Ep-i-me'this 

f E-pi-noml-des 

E-pi'o-chus, 12 

E-pi'o-ne, 8 

E-piph'a-net 

Ep-i-pha'ni-us 

E-pi'rus 

E-pis'tro-phus 

E-pifa-des 

E'pi-um 

Ep'o-na 

E-po'pe-u8 

Ep-o-red'o-rix 

Ep'u-lo 

E-pyt'i-des 

Ep'y-tua 

E-qua-jus'ta 

E-quic'o-lu8 

E-quuKi-a 

E-quo-tu'ti-cum 

Er'a-con 

E-r»'a 

Er-a-si'nus 

Er-a-sip'pus 

Er-a-sis'tra-tus 

Er'a-to 

Er-a-tos'the-nes 

Er-a-tos'tra-tUA 

E-ra'tu8 

Er-bes'sus 

Er'e-bus 

E-rech'the-ua 

E-rem'ri, 3. 

E-re'mus 



• Empiricns (SextnsX 
t JL>^ OraU Not. 242.. 



Vide Pearce m Cicer. p.^20. 

pa 



S8 Eft^ 

E-res'sR 

E-reoh'Aii-'deB 

E-re'sns 

E-re'tri-a 

E^ve'tum 

Er-eu-4ha11iH>ii,29 

Er'ga-ne 

Er-gen'/na 

Er'gi-BS 

Er-gi'nus 

Er-gin'nus 

Er-i-boe^a ' 

E-rib'o-tes 

Er-i-ce'tes 

E-rich'tfao 

Er-idi-tho'ni-us 

Er-i-cin'i-um 

Er-i-cu'«a 

• E-rid'a-nus 

E-rig'o-ne 

E-rig'o-iius 

Er-i-ffy'uB 

E-rillus 

E-rin'des 

E-rin'na 

E-rin'ny« 

E-ri'o-pis 

E-riph'a-oiis 

E-riph'i-das 

Er4-phy'le 

E'ria 

Er-i-sich'thon 



ES 

ErUbtts 
E-rix'^ 
E-ro'chu8 
E-ro'pus, and 

iEar'o-pag 
E'ros 

E-ros'tra-tiig 
E-ro'ti-a, 10 
Er-ru'ca 
Er'se 
Er'y-mas 
Er'xi-as 
E-ryb'i-um 
Er-y-ci'na 
Er-y-manthis 
Er-y-man'thiis 
E-rym'nae 
E-rym'ne-«s 
ErV-mus 
t Er-y-the'a 
Er-y-thi'ni, 4 
Er'y-thr» 
Er'y-thra 
E-ryth'ri-on 
E-ryth'ros 
E'ryx 
E-ryx'o 
E-ser'Dus 
Es-quill-ee 
Es-qui-li'nu8 
Es-sed'o-nes 
Es'su-i, 3 
Es'u-la 



Etl 

Es-ti-m'A, 7 

Et-€-ar'ch«w 

E-te'o-cles 

E-te'o-olii8 

Et-e-o-OTe^t« 

E-t6'cMie6 

E-te-o'ne^a3 

Et-e-o-m'cUB, 30 

E-te'si-ae, 11 

E-tha1i-<m, 99 

E-tbele-mn 

Etho-da 

E-the'mon 

E'ti-as, 10 

Etis 

E-tru'ri-a 

Et'y-lu8 

E-vad'ne 

Ev'a-ges 

E-vag'o-ras 

E-vag'o-re 

Evan 

E-van'der 

E-van'gc4u8 

Ev-an-gorl-dci 

E-van'thes 

E-var'chus 

Evas 

Evax 

Eu'ba-ges 

Eu-ba'tas 

Eu'bi-us 

Eu-boe'a, 7 



* EHdanus, — Alphetis and Eridanvs the strong. 

That rises deep ; and stately rolls along. 

C(K)KB's Henod. Theog. v. 520. 
t Erythetu^-^ChryM^r, Love the {n>>d^ Calltroe led, 
l>attghter of Ocean, to the ;geiiial l>ed, 
Whence Geryon sprang, fierce with his triple head ; 
Whom Hercales laid breathless on the ground 
In Ery^Uf wbtdi the waves Mtronnd. 

Cooiui^ i/«fiod. The9g. rt 525. 



Ea-boi-coB 

£ulx>-te 

EulK>-te8 

£u-bu1e, 8 

Eu-bn'Ii-des 

Eu-bu'liis 

Eu-ce'mt 

Eu-che'nor 

Eu'chi-des 

Eu-cli'des 

♦ EtifcUd (Eng.) 

Eu'dus 

Eu'cra-te 

Eu'cni-tes 

Eu'cii-tus 

Euc-te'num 

Euc-tre'fii-i, 4 . 

Ea-das'iBon 

Ea-dam'i-das 

Eu'da-mus 

Eu-de'mus 

Eu-do'ci-a 

Eu-doc'l-sms 

Eu-do'ra 

Eu-do'rus 

Eu-dox'i-a 

Eu-dox'ns 

E-verthon 

Eu-e-mert-das 

E-vem'e-rus 

E-ve'nus 



Ey-e-phe'nus 

Ev'e-re« 

lE-ver'gc-tae 

35-ver'ge^tefl 

Eu-ga'ne-i, 3 

Eu-geni-a, 30 

Eu-ge'ni*ug 

Eu'ffeon 

Eu-nem'e-nts 

Eu'hy-drum 

Euliy-us 

E-vip'pe, 8 

E-vip'pu8 

Eu-lim'e-iie 

Eu-ma'dii-fis, 12 

Eu-mse'iu 

Eii-me'des 

Eu-me'lis 

Eu-inelus 

Eu'me-lus (King) 

f Eu'roe-nes 

Eu-me'ni-a 

Eu-men'i-des 

Eu-me-nidl-a 

Eu-me'ni-us 

Eu-morpe 

Eu-morpi-dse 

Eu-morpuB 

Eu-mon'i-des 

Eu-nse'us 

Eu-na'pi-os 



3SU 08 

Eu-no'mi*a 
Eu'no-mus 
Eu^nus 
Eu'ny-mos 
Eu'o-ras 
Eu-pa'gi-um 
Eu-pal'a-mon 
Eu-para-mii8 
Eu'pa tor 
Eu-pa-to'ri-a 
Eu-pei'thet 
Eu'pha-es 
Eu-phan'ttts 
Eu-phe'me 
Eu-phe'mus 
Eu-phor'biis 
Eu.pho'ri-on 
Eu-phra'nor 
Euphra'tes 
Eu'phren 
Eu-phros'y^ie 
Euphu'^8 
Euplae'a, or 
Eu-ploe'a 
Eu'po-lis 
Eu-pom'pus 
Eu-ri-a-nas'sa 
Eu-rip'i-des 
Eu-ri'pus 
Eu-ro'mus 
Eu-ro'pa, 7 



* [The name in the English form is applied only to the author of 
the Elements of Geometry.] 

f Eumenes. — It is not a little surprising that so elegant a writer as 
Hughes should, throughout the whole tragedy of the Siege of Damas- 
cus, accent this word on tlie penultimate syllable; especially as there 
is not a single proper name of more than two syllables in the Ghreek 
er Latin languages of this termination which has the penultimate syl- 
lable long.--Lee has done the same in the tragedy 4>f^iea;ati<ier, which 
would lead us to sirppose there is something naturally repugnant to 
anShigltsh ear in the antepenultimate accentuation of these words, 
and soraetlttng agreeable in the penultimate. 



60 



EU 



Eu-ro-pee'us 

Eu'rops 

Eu'ro-pus 

Eu-ro'tas 

Eu-ro'to 

Eu'nw 

Eu ry'a-Je, 8 

Eu-ry'a-lus 

Eu-ryb'a-te» 

Eu-ryb'i-a 

Eu-ry-bi'a-des 

Eu-ryb'i-iis 

Eu-ry-cle'a 

Eu'ry-cles 

Eu-ry*cli'de8 

Eu-ryc'ra-tes 

Eu-ry-crat'i-das 

Eu-ryd'a-mas 

Eu-ryd'a-me 

Eu-ry-dam'i-das 

Eu-ryd'i-ce 

Eu-ry-ga'ni-a 

Eu.r/le-on 

Eu-ryro-chu» 

Eu-rym'a-chus 



EU 

Eu-rj^m'e-de 
Eu-rym'e-don 
Eu-rym'e-nes 
Eu-ryn'o-me 
Eu-ryn'o-mus 
Eu-rjr'o-iie 
Eu'ry-pon 
Eu-ryp'y-le 
Eu-ryp'y-lus 
Eu-rys'the-nes 
Eu-rys-thenl dae 
Eu-rys'irtie-us 
Eu'ry-te 
Eu-ryfe-» 
Eu-ryt'e-le 
Eu-ryth'e-mi8 
Eu-rythl-on, and 
Eu-ryf ion, 11 
Eu'ry-tus 
Eu'ry-tis 
Eu-se'bi-a 
Eu-se'bi-us^ 
Eu'se-pus 
Eu>sta'thiu& 
Eu-stoli-a 



EX 

Eu-sto'li-ur 

Eu-te'a, 7 

Eu-tel'i-das 

Eu-ter'pe 

* Eu-lha'li-« 

Eu-tha'li-tts 

Eu-thyc'ra-tes 

Eu-thyde'mus- 

Eu-thy'mus 

Eu-trap'e-lus 

Eu-tro'pi-a 

Eu-tro'pi-ua 

Eu'ty-cnes 

Eu-tychl-de 

Eu-tychi-deff 

Eu'ty-phron 

Eu-xan'thi-us^ 

Eux'e-niis 

f Eu-xi'nus 

Pon'tus 
Eu-xip'pe 
Ex-a'di-us 
Exae'thes 
Ex-ag'o-nus 
Ex-om'a-twB 



PA 



FA 



FA 



Fab'a-ris 
Fa'bi-a, ^ 
Fa-bi-a'ni, 
Fa'bi-i, 4 
Fa'bi-us 



Fab-ra-te'ri-a 
Fa-bricl-us, 24 
Fa-bul'la 
Fa'dus 
Faes'u-lae 



Fal-cid'U 
FaJe'ri-i, 4 
Fal-e-ri'na 
Fa-ler'nus 
Fa-lis'ci, 3 



* Euthalia. — Labbe observes, that this word does not come from 
the ninse Thalia, as some suppose, but from the masculine EuthaliuSf 
as Eiilatiaf Eumenim^ EustoHa, Eutropia, Emmelia, &c, which are pro- 
fessedly accented on the antepenultimate. — See Rule 29. 

f [At first this sea was called Ax-i'nus from « neg. and lius a 
stranger, because the inhabitants were unfriendly to those who visit- 
ed them. Subsequently the privative particle was remdved, and tv, 
which signifie8/avottra6/f, placed in its stead.] 



FI 

Fa-lis'cus 

Fa'ma 

Fan'ni-a 

Fan'ni-i, 4 

Fan'ni-us 

Far'fa-nis 

Fas'ce-lis 

Fas-cerii-na 

Fau-cu'i^ 

Fa-ven'ti-a, 10 

Fa-ve'ri-a 

Faula 

Fauna 

Fau-nali-a 

Fau'ni, 3 

Fau'nus 

Fa'vo 

Fau'sta 

Fau-sti'na, 3 

Fau'sti-tas 

Fau'stu-lus 

Faus'tus 

Feb'ru-a 

Fec-i-ales 

FeVgi-nas 

Fen-es-tel'la 

Fe-ra'li-a 

Fer-en-ta'num and 

Fe-ren'tum 
Fe-re'tri-us 
Fe-ro'ni-a 
Fes-cen'ni-a 
* Fes-cen-ni'nus 
Fes'tus 
Fi-bre'nus 



FO 

Fi-cul'ne-a 

Fi-de'na 

Fi-de'nae 

Fi-deli'ti-a 

Fides 

Fi-dic'u-lae 

Fi-gu'li-a 

Fim'bri-a 

Fir'mi-us 

Fis-cellus 

Fla-celli-a 

Flac'cus 

Fla-cilla iE'li-a 

Fla-minl-a 

Fla-min'i-us, or 

Flam^-ni'nus 
Fla'vi-a 
Fla-vi-a'num 
Fla-vinl-a 
Fla-vi-ob'ri-ga 
Fla'vi-us 
Flora 
Flo-rali-a 
Flo'rus 
Flo-ri-a'nus 
Flu-oni-a 
Fo'U-a 
Fon-tel-a, 5 
Fon-tel-us Cap'i- 

to 
For'mi-ae 
For-mi-a'num 
For'nax 
For-tu'na 
For-tu-na'tus 



FU 



61 



t For-tu-na-ti-a' 

nus 
For'u-li 

Fo'rum Ap'pi4 
Fran'ci, 3 
Fre-gel'la, ^ 
Fre-ge'nae 
Fren-ta'ni, 3 
Frig'i-dus 
Frisl-i, 4 
Fron'ti-nus 
Fron'to 
Fru'si-no 
Fu-ci'na 
Fu-ci'nus 
Fu-fid1-us 
Fu'fi-us Geml-nus 
Ful-gi-na'tes 
Ful-gi'nu8 
Furii-num, and 

Ful'gi-num 
Ful'vi-a 
Ful'vi-us 
Fun-da'nus 
Fundi, 3 
Fu'ri-a 
Fu'ri-ae 
Fu'ri-i, 4 
Fu-ri'na 
Fu-ri'nae 
Fu'ri-us 
Fur'ni-us 
Fus'cus 
Fu'si-a, 11 
Fu'si-us, 10 



GA 

Gab'a-les 
GaVa-za 



GA 

Ga-be'ne, and 
I Ga-bi-e'ne 



GA 

Ga-bi-e'nus 
Ga'bi-i, 4 



• F««cfiiiitfiiif. — Hor. 

t F^r^ufMUtaniM.— (Not. in Cicer. p. 20.) 



62 GA 

Ga-bi'na 
Ga-binl-a 
Ga-bin-i-a'nus, 30 
Ga-binl-us 
Ga'des, and 

Gad'i-ra 
Gad-i-Wnus 
Gse-sa'tae 
Gae-tu'li-a 
♦ Galus 
Ge-tu'li-cus 
Ga-la'bri-i, 4 
Gal-ac-to-ph'a-gi, 

3 
Ga-lae'sus 
Ga-lan'this 
Gal'a-ta, 7 
Gala-tae 
Gal-a^tse'a, and 

Gal-a-thae'a 
Ga-la'ti-a, 10 
Ga-laxl-a 
Gal^a 
Ga-le'nus 
Ga-le'o-lae 
Ga-le'ri-a 
Ga-Ie'ri-U8 
Ga-le'sus 
Gal-i-lae'a 
Ga-lin-thi-a'di-a 
GalOi, 3 
Gal'U-a 
Gal-li-ca'nus 
Gal-li-e'nus 
Gal-li-na'ri-a 
GaUip'o-lis 
Gal-lo-grae'ci-a 
Gal-lo'nirus 



GE 

Gallus 

Ga-max'u8 

Ga-meli-a 

Gan-da-ri'tae 

Gan'ga-ma 

Gan-gar'i-dfie 

Gan'ges 

Gan-uas'cu8 

Gan-y-me'de 

Gan-y-me'des 

Gan/y-mede 

(Eng.) 
Ga-rael-cum 
Gar-a^man'tes 
Gar-a-man'tis 
Gar'a-mas 
Gar'a-tas 
Ga-re'a-tae 
Ga-re-ath'y-ra 
+ Gar-ga'nus 
Gar-ga'phi-*a 
Gar'ga-ra, 7 
Gar'ga-ris 
Ga-ifi'i-us 
Gar-git'ti-us 
Gar-Vtes 
Ga-rum'na 
Gas'tron 
Gath'e-ae, 4 
Ga-the'a-tas 
•Gaulus, Gaule-on 
Gau'rus 
Ga'us, Ga'os 
Ge-ben'na, 9 
Ge-dro'si-a, 11 
Ge-ga'ni-i, 4 
Gela 
Ge-la'nor 



GE 

GerU-a 
Gelli-as 
Gerii-us 
Ge'lo, Gelon 
Ge'lo-i, 3 
Ge-lo'nes,Ge-lo' 

ni 
Gelos 
Ge-min'i-us 
Gemi-nu8 
Ge-na'bum 
Ge-nau'ni 
Ge-ne'na 
Ge-ni'sus 
Ge'ni-U8 
Gen'se-ric 
Gen'ti-us, 10 
Gen'u-a 

Ge-nu'ci-us, 10 
Ge-nu'su8 
Ge-nu'ti-a, 11 
Ge-or'gi-ca 
Geor'gics (Eng.) 
Ge-phy'ra 
Ge-phyr'aB4, 3 
Ge-ra'ni-a 
Ge-ran'thr»B 
Ge-res'ti-cu8 
'Ger'gi-thuin, 9 
Ger-golii-a 
Ge'ri-on 
Ger-ma'ni-a 
Ger-manl-cas 
Ger-ma'ni-i, 4 
Ge-ron'thrae 
Ger'rhae 
Ge'rus, and 

Ger'rfius 



* GaiiM.— (Cic. Be Orat.) 

f Gar^amtf .— And hish GargoMiu^ on the Appliao plain, 
Is mark'd by sailors from the distant main. 



CHL 

€r^'ry-«n, 9$ and 
Ge-iyo-nes 

Ges'sa-tse 

Ges'sus 

Ge'ta, 9 

Ge'tse 

Ge-tu'K-a 

Gi-^an'tes 

Gi-gar'tttm 

Gi'gk 

Gado 

Gillo 

Gin-da'nes 

Gin'des 

Gin'ge 

Gin-gu'num 

Gip'pi-us 

Gis'co 

Gla-di-a-to'ji4, 4 

Gla'nis 

Glaph'y-^, aioA 
Glaph'y-ra 

Glaph'y-nis 

Glau'ce 

♦Ghu'd-a 

GlausAp'pe 

Glau-dp'pus 

Glau'con 

Glau-con'o-me 

Glau-co'pis 

Glau'cus 

Glau'ti-as 

Gli'con 

Glis'sas 



GO 

Glyc'e-ra 

Glyce'ri-um 

Gly'con 

Glym'pes 

Gna'ti-a, 13, 10 

Gni'dus 

Gnos'si-a, 10 

Gnos'sis 

Gnos'sus 

Gob-a-nirt-o, 10 

Go'bar 

Gob'a^res 

Gob'ry-as 

Golgi 

Gom'phi 

Go-Da'tas 

Go-ni'a-des 

Go-nip'pus 

Go-noes'sa 

Go-nus'sa 

Gor-di-a'niw 

Gor'di-um 

Gor'di-us 

Gor-ga'suB 

Gor'ge, 8 

Gor'gi-as 

Gor'go 

Gor'go-nes 

Gor-go'ni-a 

Gor-go'ni-us 

Gor-goph'o-ne 

Gor-goph'o-ra 

Gor'guB 

Gor-gythl-on 



GY 



63 



Gor'tu-ae 

Gor'tyn 

Gor-ty'na 

Gor-tynl-a 

Gor'tys 

Got'thi, 3 

Grac'chus, 12 

Gra-di'vus 

Grae'ci, 3 

Grae'ci-a, 11 

Grse'ci-a Mag'na 

Gne-ci'nus 

Grae'cus 

Gra'i-us 

f Gra-m'cus, or 

Gran'i-cus 
Gra'ni-U8 
Gra'ti-8B, 10 
Gra-ti-a'Dii8 
Gra-tid'i-a 
J Gra-ti'di-a'nus 
Gra'ti-on, 11 
Gra'ti-us, 10 
Gra'vi-i, 4 
Gra-vis'cae 
Gra'vi-us 
Gre-go'ri*iM 
Grin'nes 
Gro'phus 
Gryllus 
Gry-ne'um 
Gry-ne'us 
Gry-ni'um 
G/a-rus, tmd 



• G/oiicio.— C. Ser/vilius. Vide not. io De Omt. p. 177. 

t Granicus, — As Alexander's passing the river Granicus is a common 
sobjectof history, poetry, and pain ting, it is not wonderful that the 
common ear ithoald liave given into a pronunciation of this word 
more agreeable to English analogy than the true classical accent on 
the penultimate syllable. The accent on the first syllable is now so 
fixed, as to make the other pronunciation savour of pedantry. S(ee 
Andronicui, 

X Gratfdiamu.'-iJye Orat. 197.) 



64 



GY 



G/a-ros 
G/as 
Gy-gae'us 
Gy'ge 
Gy'ges, 9, or Gy'es 
Gy-up'pus 



GY 

Gym-na'si-a, 11 
Gym-na'si-um, 11 
Gym-ne'si-se, 11 
Gym'ne-tes 
Gym-nos-o-phis' 
tae 



GY 

Jim-nos'ihphists 

(Eng.) 9 
Gy-nae'ce-as 
Gyn-se-co-thoe'nas 
Gyn'des 
Gy-the'um 



HA 

Ha'bis 

Ha-dri-a-nop'o-lis 

Ha-dri-a'nus, 23 

Ha-dri-at'i-cum 

Hae'mon 

Hae-mo'ni-a 

He'mus 

Ha'ges 

Hag'no 

Hag-nag'o-ra 

Ha-lae'sus, and 

Ha-le'sus 
Hal'a-la 
Hal-cy'o-ne, 8 
Hales 

Ha-le'si-u8, 11 
Ha'U-a 

Ha-li-ac'mon, 21 
Ha-li-ar'tus, 21 
Hal-i-car-nas'sus 
Ha-lic'y-se, 11, 24 
Ha-li'e-is 
Ha-lim'e-de 
Hal-ir-rho'ti-U8,10 
Hal-i-ther'sus 
Ha'U-us, 20 
Hal-i-zo'nes, 21 
Harmus 
Hal-my-des'sus 
Ha-loc'ra-tes 



HA 

Ha-lo'ne 

Hal-on-ne'su8 

Ha-lo'ti-a, 10 

Ha-lo'tus 

Ha'lus 

Hal-y-ae'tus 

Hal-y-at'tes 

Halys 

Ha-lyz'i-a, 11 

Ham-a-dry'a-des 

Ha-max'i-a 

Ha-mil'car 

Ham'mon 

Han^ni-bal 

Har'ca-lo 

Har-ma-te^li-a 

Har'ma-tris 

Har-mil'lus 

Har-mo'di-u8 

Har-mo'ni-a 

Har-mon'i-des 

Har'pa-gus 

Har-pall-ce 

Har-pa'li-on 

Har'pa-lus 

Har-pal'y-ce, 8 

Har-pary-cus 

Har'pa-sa 

Har'pa-sus 

Har-poc'ra-tes 



HE 

Har-p/i-ae, 4? 

Har'pies (Eng.) 

Ha-ru'spex 

Has'dru-bal 

Ha-te'ri-us 

Hau'8ta-nes 

Heb'do-le 

Hebe, 8 > 

He-be'sus 

He'brus 

Hec'a-le 

Hec-a-le'si-a 

Hec-a-me'de 

Hec-a-tae'us 

Hec'a-te, 8 

Hecfate (Eng.) 

Hec-a-te'si-a, 11 

Hec-a-tom-bol-» 

Hec-a-tom-pho*^ 

ni-a 
Hec-a-tom'po-lis 
Hec-a-tom'py-los 
Hec'tor 
Hec'u-ba 
Hedl-Ia 
He-don'a-cum 
Hed'u-i, 3 
He-dym'e-les 
He-gel'o-chus 
*He-ge'mon 



• Hegemon.^-QowXdoiwci and Holyoke accent this word on the 
antepenaltimate syllable^ bat Labbe and LemprUre more classically, 
on the penultimate. 



HE 

H^-e-si'nus 

H^-e-si'a-nax 

He-ge'si-as 

H^-e-sil'o-chu8 

Heg-e-sin'o-us 

H^-e-sip'pus 

H^-e-sip'y-le 

H^-eH5i^^a-tu8 

Heg-e-tort-des 

Hel'e-na, ^ 

He-le'ni-a 

He-le'nor 

Hd'e-nus 

He-ler^ni Lu'cus 

He-li'a-des 

He-li-as'tae 

Hel-i-ca'on 

Heli-ce 

HeWrCon 

Hel-i-co-ni'a-des 

Hd-i-cc/iiis 

He-li-o-do'rus, 21 

*He-li-o-ga-ba' 

lus 
He-li-op'o-lis 
He-lis'son 
He'li-us 
He-lix'u8 
Hel-lan'i-ce 
Hel-lan'i-cus 
Hel-la-noc'ra-tes 
Hel'las 
Helle, 8 



HE 

Hellen 
Hel-le'nes 
HeI-le-8pon'tU8 
Hel-lo'pi-a 
Hel-lo'ti-a, 10 
He-lo'ris 
He-lo'rum, and 
. He-lo'rus 
Helos 
He-lo'tse, and 

He-lo'tes 
Hel-ve'ti-a, 10 
Hel-ve'ti-i, 4 
Hel'vi-a 
Hervi-i, 4 
Hel-vi'na 
Hervi-118 Cin'na 
He'lum 
Hery-mu8 
He-ma'thi-on 
He-mith'e-a 
He'mon 
He'mus 
Hen'e-ti, 3 
He-ni'o-chi, 3 
He-phaes'ti-a 
He-phaes'ti-i, 4 
He-phaes'ti-o 
He-phaes'ti-on, 11 
Hep-ta-pho'nos 
Hep-tapWis 
Hep-ta£'y4o8 
He'ra 



HE 



65 



tap'] 



Her-a-cle'a 

Her-a-cle'i-a 

He-rac'le-um 

He-rac-le-o'tC8 

Her-a-cli'dae 

Her-a-cli'dia 

Her-a-di'des 

fHer-a-cli'tU8 

He-rac'li-us 

He-rae'a 

He-rae'um 

Her-bes'sus 

Her-ce'i-U8 

Her-cu-la'ne-um 

Her'cu-les, 

Her-cule-um 

Her-cule-us 

Her-cy'na 

tter-cjml-a 

Her-dp'ni-a 

Her-do'ni-us 

He-ren'ni-us, Se- 

ne'ci-o 
He're-U8 
He-rillu8 
Her'i-lus 
Her'ma-chiis 
Her'mae 
Her-mae'a 
Her-mae'um 
Her-mag'o-raB 
Her-man-du'ri 
Her-man'ni 



* HeUogabalus. — This word Is accented on the penultimate syllable 
by Labbe and Lerapriere ; but in my opinion more agreeably to the 
general ear by Ainswortb, Gouldman, and Holyoke, on the antepe- 
nultimate. 

f Heraclitus^-^lihia name of the weeping philosopher is so fre- 
qnently contrasted with that of Democritus, the laughing philosopher, 
that we are apt to pronounce both with the same accent ; but all our 
prosodists are uniform in giving the antepenultimate accent to the 
latter^ and the penultimate to the former word. 



as HE > 

Her-maph-To^li' 

tus 
Her-ma-^tlie'iia 
Her-me'as 
Her-mel-os 
Her'ines 
Her-me-8i'^sax 
Her-mi'as 
Her-min'i-us 
Her-mi'o-ne 
Her-mi'<WM-«e 
Her-mi-^m'i-cus 

Si'nus 
Her-mip'piis 
Her-moc'ra-tes 
Her-mo*do'rus 
Her-nH^e-»es 
Het-mo-k'u8 
Her-mo*ti'iiHis 
Her-mun-du'ri 
Her'miifi 
Herlni-*oi, 4 
He'ro 
He-ro'des 
He-ro-di-a^ns, 21 
He-To'di-an^ Eng. 
He-rodl-cu8 
He-rod'o-ttw 
Her'o-eg 
He-rols 
Heron 
He-roph'i-la 
He-roph'i4us 
He-ro8'iara-tU8 
Her'pa 
Her'se 



m 

Hcr-sil'i-a 
Her'tha, and 

Hereto 
Her'u-U 
He-ese'nus 
He-si'o-diis 

He-si'o-iie 

He8-pe'ri-a 

Hes^per'i-des 

Hes'pe-ris 

Hes-per'i-tis 

Hes'pesiw 

Hes'ti-a 

He8-ti-«'a, 7 

He'sus 

He-sych'i-4i 

He-sychl-us 

He-tric'U'Jum 

He-tru'ri-a 

Heu-rip'pa 

Hex-ap'y-lum 

Hi-ber'ni-a, and 

Hy-ber'ni-a 
Hi-bril'de8 
Hic-e*ta'<Hi, 24 
His-e-ta'en 
Hi-ce'tas 
Hi-emp'8al 
Hi'e-ra 
Hi-€-r«p'o4i8 
Hi'e-rax 
Hi'e-ro 

Hi-e-ro-ce'pi-a 
Hi-er'o-cle8 
Hi-e-ro-du'lum 



HI 

Hi-er-om'ne-flasoii 

Hi-e-ro-ne'aoB 

Hi-€-ron'i-ca, 36 

Hi-cr-on'i-*cus 

Hi-e-ron'y-mus 

Hi-e-rophUiis 

Hi-€HPo-sory-»ma 

H%<na'ti-a Vi'a 

Hi-la'ri^ 

Hi-la'ri-u8 

Hi-mel'la 

Him'e-ra 

Hi-mil'co 

Hip-pag^oHTM 

Hip-pal'd-mus 

Hip'pa-lns 

Hip-par'clri-^a, 12 

Hip-par'chus 

Hip-pa-rifnus 

Hip-pa'ri-on 

Hip'pa^«its 

Hip'pe-U8 

Hip^pi, 3 

Hip'pi-a 

Hip'pi-as 

Hip'pis 

Hip'pi-us 

Hip'po 

Hip-pob'o-tes 

Hip-pob'o*tcis 

Hip-rpo-Cen^tau'ri 

Hip-poc'o-on 

Hip-po-coc-ys'tes 

Hip-poc'ra-tes 

Hip-po-cra'ti-a, 11 

*Hip-po-qre'ne, 7 



* Hijppocrai^.—NothiDg can be better established than tbe pro- 
nnnciatioD of this word in ^ar syUables, according to its original ; 
and yet snch is the licence of English poets, that they nqt nnfre^ 
qiieatl^ contract it to three. Thus Qooke, HeHod. Thefig, ▼. 9 :-r- 



HI 

Hip-pod'a-mas 

Hip-pod'a-^me 

Hip-po-da-mi'a^ 

Hip-pod'a-^mus 

Hip-pod'i-ce 

Hip-pod'ro-mu8 

Hip'po-la 

Hip-poro-chus 

Hip-pory-te, 8 

Hip-pory-tus 

Hip-pom'a-chu8 

Hip-pom'e-don 

Hip-pom'^^ne 

Hip-pom'e-nes 

Hip-po-morgi 

Hip'pon, and 

Hip'po 
Hip-po'na 
Hip-po'nax 
Hip-po-ni'a*te8 
Hip-po'm-um 
Hip-pon'o-us 
Hip-pop'o-des 
Hip-pos'tra-tus 
Hip-pot'a-des 
Hm^po-tas, or 

Hip'po-tes 
Hip-poth'o-e 
Hip-poth'o-on 
Hip-poth*(M)ii'ti8 
Hip-poth'o-us 
lEp-po'ti-on, H 



HO 

IHip-pu'ris 

Hip'pns 

Hip'si-des 

Hi'ra 

Hir-pi'ni, 4 

Hir-pi'nus, Q. 

Hir'ti-a, 10 

Hir-ti'us Aulas 

Hir'tus 

HislMm 

His-pa'ni-a 

His-perium 

His'po 

His-pulla 

His-tas'pes 

His'ter Pa-cu'vi-us 

His-ti-ae'a 

His-ti-ee'o-tis 

Hifi-ti-tt'us 

His'tri-a 

Ho'di-us 

Horo-cron 

Ho-me'rus 

Ho'mer (Eng.) 

Hom'o-le 

Ho-mole-a 

Hom-o-lip'pus 

Hom-o-lo'i-des 

Ho-mon-a-den'ses 

Ho-no'ri-us 

Ho'ra 

Ho-rac'i-te, 24 



HY C7 

Howe 

Hor-a-poHo 

Ho-ra'ti-us 

Horace (Cog.) 

Hor'ci-as, 10 

Hor-rois'das 

Ho-ra'tu8 

Hor^ten'si-a, 10 

Hor-ti'num 

Hor-ten'ri-us, 10 

Hor-to'na 

Ho'rus 

Ho8-tiri-a 

Hos-tili-us 

Hun-ne-ri'cin 

Hun-ni'a-^es 

Hy-aHnn'tbi«a 

Hy-a-cin'thus 

Hya-des 

Hy-ag'nis 

H/a-la 

Hy-am'po-lii 

Hy-an'tnes 

Hy-an'ti8 

Hy-arltt-ta 

Hy'as 

mWa 

♦Hy-bre'as, or 

Hyb're-as 
Hy-bri'a-nes 
Hyc'ca-ra 
Hy'da, and Hy''de 



And now to Hippocrene resort the fair ; 
Or, Olmins, to thy sacred spring irepair. 
And a late translator of the Satires of Persias, Dr. Brewster, 
Never did I so much as sip, 
Or wet with tiippoerene a Up. 
This contraction is inexcusable, as it tends to embarrass pronuncia- 
tion, and lower the language of poetry. 

* ffy6recu.-^Len)priere accents this word on the pennltuniite 
syllable ; but Labbe, Gouldman, vfk^ Hplyoke, more properly, on 
tbe antepenultimate, 



68 



HY 



Hyd'a-ra 

Hy-dar'nes 

Hy-das'pes 

Hy'dra 

Hy-dra'mi-a, 30 

Hy-dra-o'tes 

Hy-droch'o-us 

Hy-dro-pho'ri-a 

Hy'drus 

Hy-dru'sa 

Hy'e-la 

Hy-emp'sal 

Hy-et'tU8 . 

Hy-ge'i-a 

Hy-gi-a'na 

Hy-gi'nus 

Hy'fi, and Hy'ks 

Hy-Wi-des 

Hy-lac'tor 

Hy'lae 

Hy-lae'us 

Hy'las 

Hy'lax 

HyFi-as 

HyUa'i-cus 



HY 

Hyllus 
Hy-lon'o-me 
Hy-loph'a-gi, 3 
Hym-e-nae'us, and 

Hy'men 
Hy-met'tus 
Hy-pee'pa 
Hy-pae'si-a, 11 
Hyp'a-nis 
Hyp-a-ri'nu8 
liy-pa'tes 
Hyp'a-tha 
Hy-pe'nor 
Hy-pe-ra'on 
Hy-per'bi-us 
Hyp-er-bo're-i 
Hy-pe're-a, and 

liy-pe'ri-a 
Hyp-e-re'si-a^ 11 
Hy-perl-des 
Hy-pe'ri-on, 29 
Hyp-erm-nes'tra 
Hy-per'o-chus 
Hy-per-och'i-des 
Hy-phae'us 



HY 

Hyp'sa 

Hyp-se'a 

Hypnse'nor 

riyp-se'us 

Hyp-si-cra-te'a 

Hyp-sic'ra-tes 

Hyp-syp'y-le 

Hyr-ca'ni-a 
Hyrrca'num ma're 
Hyr-ca'nus 
Hyr'i-a 
Hy-ri'e-us, and 

Hyr'e-us 
Hyr-mi'na 
Hyr'ne-to, and 

Hyr'ne-tho 
Hyr-nithl-um 
Hyr'ta-cus 
Hys'i-a, 11 
Hys'pa 
Hys'sus, and 

Hys'si, 3 
Hys-tas'pes 
Hys-ti-fe'us 



lA 



lA 



lA 



I'A 




I-am'e-nus 


* I-ap'e-tus 


I-ac/chus 




I-am'i-dae 


I-a'pis 


I-a'der . 




Ja-nic'u-liim 


I^pyg'i-a 


I-a-le'mus 




I-a-ni'ra 


I-a'pyx 


I-al'me-nus 




I-an'the 


I-ar'bas 


I-al'y-sus 




I-an'the-a 


I-ar'chas, and 


I-am'be 




Ja'nus 


Jar'chas 


I-am'bli-cus 




I-ap-e-ti-on'i-des 


I-ar'da-nus 


• lapeiu$. 


— Son of lapetiu, o*er-snbtle, 


go* 




1 And glory in thy artful the 


ft below. 








Cookers I^esiod. 



IC 



ID 



I-as'i-des , 


Ic'e-los 


I-a'si-on, 11, and 


I-ce'hi 


I-a'sUus 


Ic'e-tas 


Ja'son 


Ich'nae 


IVsus 


Ich-nu'sa: 


I-be'ii 


Ich-o-nu'phis 


I-be'ri-a 


Ich-thy-oph'a-gi, 3 


I-be'rus 


Ich'thys 


I'bi, 3 


I-Cill-U8 • 


n\s 


Ic'i-us 


Ib'y-cus 


I'cos 


I-ca'ri-a 


Ic-thy-ph'a-gi 


I-ca'ri-us 


Ic-ti'nus 


Ic'a-nis 


I'da 


Ic'ci-us, 10 


I-dae'a 



ID 69 

I-dae'us 
Ida-lus 
Id-an-thyr'sus 
I-dar'nes 
I'da9 

♦ Id e-a, 28 
I-des'sa 
I-dit-a-ri'sus 
Id'inon 
I-dom'e-ne, 8 
I-dom-e-riie'us, or 
•f- I-dom'e-neus 
I-do'the-a 
I-dri'e-us 
I-du'be-da 



* Idea, — This word, as a proper name, I find in no lexicographer 
but Lempriere. 

The English appellative, signifying an image in the mind, has uni- 
formly the accent on the second syllable, as in the Greek tiim in op- 
position to the Latin, which we generally follow in other cases, and 
which, in this word, has the pennltimate short, in Ains worth, Labbe, 
and our best prosodists ; and according to this analogy, ittea ought to 
have the accent on the first syllable, and that syllable short, as the 
first of idiot. But when this word is a proper name, as the daughter 
of Dardanns, I should suppose it ought to fall into the general analogy 
of pronouncing Greek names, not by accent, but by quantity; and, 
therefore, that it ought to have the accent on the first syllable ; and, 
according to onr own analogy, that syllable ought to be short, unless 
the pennltimate in (he Greek is a diphthong, and then, according to 
general usage, it ought to have the accent. 

f IdomeneuH. — The termination of nouns in eus was, among the 
ancients, sometimes pronounced as two syllables, and sometimes, as 
a diphthong, in one. Thus, Labbe tells us, that Achillevs^ Agylewy 
Pharaltiisy Apntteiisy are pronounced commonly in four syllables, and 
AVretis, Orpheus, Proteus, Tereiis, in three, with the penultimate sylla- 
ble short in all ; but that these words, when in verse, have generally 
the diphthong preserved in one syllable : 

Eumenidnm veluti demens videt agmina iPentheus.— Virg. 

He observes, however, that the Latin poets very frequently dis- 
solved the diphthong into two syllables : 

Naiadnm ccetu, tantum non Orpheiis Hebrum 
Poenaqne leSpectus, et nunc roanet Orpheiis in te. 

Tlie best rule, therefore, that can be given to an English reader, is, 
toprononnce words of this termination always with the vowels sepa- 
rated, except an English poet, in imitation of the Greeks, should 
preserve the diphthong : but, in the present word, I should prefer 
l-dome-neus to /-do»i-f«^«'«5, whether in verse or prose. » 



70 



IL 



I-du'me, and 

Id-u-me'a 
I^y^i-a 
Jenl-sus 
Je'ra 
Je-ro'mus, and 

Je-ron'y>mu8 
Je-ru'sa-lem 
I-e'tae 
Ig'e-ni 

Ig-na'ti-us, 10 
Il-a-i'ri 
irba 
Il-e-caVnes, and 

Il-e-ca-o-nen'ses 
I-ler'da 
iri-a, or Rhe'a 
I-li'a-ci Lu'di, 3 
I-li'a-cus 
I-li'a-des 
iri-as 
iri-on 
I-li'o-ne 
Il-Wne-us, or 

* I-li'o-neus 
I-lis'sus 
I-lith-y-i'a 
iri-um, or 

in.on 
Il-lib'e-<ris 
lUip'u-la 
Il-li-tur'gis 
Il-lyr'i-cum 
Illy-ris, and 



IN 

lUyr'U . 
Il-l3rr'i-cus Si'nus 
Il-lyr'i-us 
Il'u-a, 7 
IJyr'ffis 

I-man-u-en'ti-us, 

10 
•f- Im'a-us 
Im'ba-rus 
Im-brac'i-des 
Im-bras'i-des 
Iml)ra-sus 
Im'bre-us 
Im'bri-us 
Im-briv'i-um 
Im'bros 
In'a-chi, 3, 12 
I-na'chi-a 
I-nach'i-dae 
I-nach'i-des 
I-na'chi-um 
In'a-chus, 12 
I-nam'a-mes 
I-nar'i-me, 8 
In'a-rus 
In-ci-ta-tus 
In-da-thyr'sus 
In'di-a 
In-dig'e-tes 
In-dig'e-ti, 3 
In'dus 
I'no, 1 
1-no'a, 7 



IP 

I-no'pus 

I-no'us 

I-no'res 

In'su-bres 

In-ta-pher'nes 

In-te-ram'na 

In-ter-ca'ti-a, 11 

In'u-us 

I-ny'cus 

ro,i 

I-ob'ates, and 

Jo-ba'tes 
I'o-bes 
Jo-cas'ta 
I-o-la'i-a 
IVlas, or 

I-o-la'ua 
I-orcho8 
IVle, 1, 8 
I'on 

I-o'ne, 8 
I-o'nes 
I-o'ni-a 
I-o'pas 

I'o-pe, and Jop'pa 
I'o-phon 
Jor-da'nes 
Jor-nan'des 
I'os 
Jo-se'phus Fla'vi- 

us 
Jo-vi-a'nns 
Jclvi-an (Eng.) 
Ip'e-pae 



* See IdomeneuH. 

f /mat».~All our prosodists make tbe pennlUmate syllable of this 
word short, and consequently accent it on the antepenultimate ; but 
Milton, by a licence he was allowed to take, accents it on the penul- 
timate syllable : 

As when a vulture on Imaus bred, 

Whose snowy ridge the roving Tartar bounds. 



IP 

Iph-i-a-nas'sft 
Iph'i-clus, or 

Iph'i-^es 
I-pnic'ra-tes 
I-phid'a-mus 
Iph-i-de-Hii'a 
* Iph-i-ge-ni'a 



IP 

f Ipk^-meKti'a 

I-pnim'e^don 

Iph-i-me^u'sa 

I-phin'o*e, 8 

I-phm'o-u« 

I'phis 

I-phit'i'-on, 11 



nt 71 



Iphl-tus 

Iph'thi-me 

Ip-se'a, 2ft 

rra, 1, 7 

I-re'ne 

Ir-e-nae'ut 

I-re'8us 



* Ipkigenim, — The antepeDultimate syllable of this word had been 
in qoiet possession of the accent for more than a centnry, till some 
Greeklings of late have attempted to place the stress on the penulti- 
mate in compliment to the original spyitum. If we ask oor innovators 
on what principles they pronounce this word with the accent on the 
t, they answer, because the i stands for the diphthong m, which, heme 
loog, must necessarily have the accent on it : but it may be repUed^ 
this was indeed the case in the Latin language, but not in the Greek, 
where we find a thousand long penultimates without the accent. It 
is true, one of the vowels which composed a diphthong in Greek, 
when this diphthong was in the penultimate syllable, generally had 
an accent on it, but not invariably; for a long penultimate syllable 
did not always attract the accent in Greek, as it did in Latin. An 
instance of this, among thousands, is that ikmous line of dactyls in 
Homer's Odyssey, expressing the tumbling down of the stone of 
Sisyphus. 

Aung titurm wihf^t »vXivhT§ XZat Jtftui^. — Odyss. b. 11. 

Another striking instance of the same accentuation appears in the 
first two verses of the Iliad : 

OuX§fiiffi9f 9 /iv^i* *A;^a4o7s &Xyt l^ir»ff* 

I know it may be said, the written accents w<f see on Greek words 
are of no kind of authority, and that we ought always to give accent 
to penultimate long quantity, as the Latins did* Not here to enter 
iuto a dispute about the authority of the written accents, the nature 
of the acute, and its connexion with quantity, which has divided the 
learned of Europe for so many years — till we have a clearer idea of 
the nature of the human voice^ and the properties of speaking sounds, 
which alone can cleaT the difficulty — for the sake of uniformity, pep- 
baps it were better to adopt the prevailing mode of pronouncing 
Greek proper names like the Latin, by making the quantity of the 
penultimate syllable the regulator of the accent, though contrary to 
the genius of Greek accentuation, which made the ultimate syllable 
its regulator ; and if this syllable was long^ the accent could never 
rise higher than the penultimate. Perhaps in language as in laws, it 
is not of such importance that the rules of either should be exactly 
right, as that they should be certainly and easily known; — so tbeob^ 
ject of attention, in the present case, is not so much what ought to 
be done, as what actually is done ; and as pedantry will always be 
more pardonable than illiteracy ^ if we are in doubt about the pre- 
valence of cuKtom, it will always be safer to lean to the side of Greek 
or Latin than of our own language. 

t Iphimedia. — This and the foregoing word have the accent on tbe 



72 IS 

Iris 

I'rus 

Is'a-das 

I-sae'a, ^ 

I-sse'us 

Is'a-mus 

I-san'der 

I-sa'pis 

I'sar, and Is'a-ra 

Tsar, and I-sse'us 

I-sar'chus, 12 

I-sau'ri-a 

I-sau'ri-cus 

I-sau'rus 

Isehe'ni-a, 12 

Is-cho-la'us 

Is-com'a-chus 

Is-chop'o-lis 

Is'i-a, 13 

Is-de-ger'des 

Is-i-do'rus 

Is'i-dore (Eng.) 

I'sis 



IT 

Is'ma-rus, and 
Is'ma-ra 

Is-me'ne, 8 

Is-me'ni-as 

Is-men'i-des 
i Is-me'nus 
I I-soc'ra-tes 
I Is'sa, 7 
I Is'se, 8 
I Is'sus 
j Is'ter, and Is'trus 

Istlimi-a 
I Ist'hmi-us 
I Istlimus 
j Is-ti-8e'o-tis 
I Is'tri-a 
I Is-trop'o-lis 
1 1'sus 

1 1-ta'li-a, 7 
i/fa4y(Eng.) 

I-tal'i-ca 

I-tari-cus 

It'a-lus 



JU 

I-tar'gris 

If e-a, 20 

I-temVles 

IthWa 

I-thob'a-lus 

I-tho'me 

Ith-o-mal-a 

I-tho'mus 

Ith-y-phal'lus 

I-to'ni-a, 7 

I-to'nus 

It-u-rse'a 

I-tu'nim 

It'y-lus 

It-y-rael, 3 

I'tys 

Ju'ba 

Ju-dae'a 

Ju-gan'tes 

Ju-ga'ri-us 

Ju-gur'tha 

Juli-a, 7 

Ju-li'a-des 



same syllable, but f6r what reason cannot be easily conceived. That 
Iphigenia, halving the diphthong u in its pennltimate syllable, shonld 
have the accent on that syllable, thongh not the soundest, is at least 
a plausible reason ; but why should our prosodists give the same ac- 
cent to the ( in Iphimedia? which coining from Jpt and /ftf^iiw, has no 
such pretensions. If they say it has the accent in the Greek word, it 
may be answered, this is not esteemed a sufficient reason for placing 
the accent in Iphigenia; besides, it is giving up the sheet-anchor of 
modern prosodists, the quantity, as the regulator of accent. We know 
it was an axiom in Greek prosody, that when the last syllable inras 
long by nature, the accent could not rise beyoild the pennltimate ; 
but we know too that this axiom is abandoned in Demosthenes^ Aria^ 
totelesy and a thousand other words. The only reason therefore that 
remains for the penultimate accentuation of this word is, that this 
syllable is long in some of the best poets. Be it so. Let those 'who 
have more learning and leisure than I have, find it out. In the 
interim, as this may perhaps be a long one, I must recur to my advice 
under the last word ; though Ainsworth has, in my opinion, very pro- 
perly left the penultimate syllable of both these words short, yet 
those who affect to be thought learned will always find their account 
in departing as far as possible from the analogy of their own langnage 
in favour of Greek and Latin, i 



jir 

li-li-a'nus 

u'li-an (Eng.) 

n'li-i, 4 

a'li-o Ma'gus 

u-li-op'o-lis 

alia 

ifli-us C«sar 

-u'lus 

u'ni-a, 7 

u'no 



Ju-no-nali-a 
Ju-no'nes 
Ju-no'ni-a 
Ju-no'nis 
Ju'pi-ter 
Jus-ti'nus 
Ju8-ti-ni-a'nu8 
JuS'tini-an 
(Eng.) 



IX 



73 



Ju-tur'na 
Ju-ve-na'lis 
Ju've-nal (Eng.) 
Ju-ven'tas 
Ju-ver'na, or 
Hi-ber'ni-a 
Ix-ib'a-tse 
Ix-i'on 
Ix-i-onl-des 



LA 

•a-aio'der 

la-ar'cfaus 

•aVa-ris 

4d/da 

«aVda-cus 

«al/da-lon 

rfi'be-o 

•a-be'ri-us 

•a-bi'd, 4 

*a-bi'cum 

*a-bi-e'nu8 

^ab-i-ne'tus 

ia-bo'bi-iis 

ia-bob'ri-gi, 3 

'a-bo'tas 

'a-bra'de-us 

iab-y-rin'thus 

'a-cae'na 

-ac-^-dae'mon 

^ac-e-dae-mo'ni-i 

j^ac-e-daem'o-nes 

^dc-e-de-m&nU 



LA 

ans (Eng.) 
La-cer'ta 
Lach'a-res 
La'ches, 1, 12 
* Lach'e-8is 
Lac'i-das 
La-ci'des 
La-cinl-a 
La-cin-i-en'ses 
La-cin'i-um 
Lac'mon 
La'co, 1 
La-cob'ri-ga 
La-co'ni-a, and 

La-Gon'i-ca 
Lac'ra-tes 
Lac'ri-nes 
Lac-tan'ti-us, 13 
Lac'ter 
Lac'y-des 
Lac'y-dus, 24 
La'das 



LA 

Lade, 8 
La'des 
La'don 
Lae'laps 
Lseli-a 
Lae-li-a'nus 
Laeli-us, C, 
Lse'na, and 

Le-ae'na 
Lae'ne-us 
Lae'pa Mag'na 
La-er'tes 
fLa-er-ti'des 
La-er'ti-usDi-og'e- 

nes 
Laes-tryg'o-nes 
Lae'ta 
Lae-to'ri-a 
Lae'tus 
Lae'vi, 3 
Lae-vi'nus 
La-ga'ri-a 



Laehesia.' 



t laertides. 



-Chtho and Lachesia, who^e boundless sway. 
With Jtropoa, both men and gods obey. 

Cooke's Huwd, Theog. v. 355. 
(Ulysses,) 



7* LA LA 

Lam'pro-cles 
Lam'pru9 
Lamp'sa-cu8, and 

liamp'sa^hum 
Lamp-te'ri-a 
Lam'pus 
La'mus 
Lam'y-rus 
La-nas'sa 
Lan'ce-a, 10 
Lan'ci-a, 10 
Lan'di-a 
Lan'gi-a 
Lan-^o-bar'di, 3 
La-nu'vi-um 
La-o-bo'tas, or 

Lab'o-tas 
La-oc'o-on 
La-od'a-mas 
La-o-da'mi-a, ^0 
La-odl-ce, 8 
La-od-i-ce'a 
La-od-i-ce'ne 
La-od'o-chus 
La-og'o-nus 
La-og'o-ras 
La-og'o-re, 8 
*La-o-me-di'a, 30 
La-om'e-dou 
La-om-e-don'te-us 
La-om-e-don-ti'a- 

dae 
La-on'o-me, 8 
La-on-o-me'ne 



La'gi-a, 20 

Lag'i-des 

La^cin1-a 

La'gus 

La-gu'sa 

La^gy'ra, 6 

La-i'a-des, 3 

Lal-as 

Lais 

Lal-us 

Lal'a-ge 

La-Ias'sis 

Lam'a-chus 

La-marmon 

Lam-bra'ni, 3 

Lam'brus 

La'mi-a 

La-mi'a-cum bel' 

lum 
La'mi-ae 
La'mi-as iE'li-us 
La-mi'nis 
Lam'pe-do 
Lam-pe'ii-a, 10 
Lam'pe-to, aud 

Lam'pe-do 
Lam'pe-uS) and 

Lam'pi-a 
Lam'pon, Lam' 

pos, or Lam'pus 
Lam-po-ne'a 
Lam-po'ni-a, and 

Lam-po'ni-um 
Lam-po'ni-us 
Lam-pridl-us 



LA 

La-oth'o*«, 8 

La'o-us 

Lap'a-thus 

LapVri-a 

La-phys'ti-um. 

La-pid'e-i 

La-ptd'e-uB 

Lap'i-thsB 

Lap-i-tha^'imi 

Lap'i-tho 

Lapl-thus 

La'ra, or La-ran'd 

La-ren'tira^ and 

Lau'ren-d-a, li 
La'res 
Lar'ga 
Lar'gus 
La-ri'des 
La-ri'na. 
La-ri'num 
La-ris'sa 
La-ris'sus 
La'ri-us 
Lar'nos 
La-ro'ni-a 
Lar'ti-us Flo'rua 
Lar-tolfle^arm 
Lar'vae 
La-rym'na ' 
La-rys'irum, 11 
Las'si-a, 10 
Las'sus, or La'so 
Las'tbe-Des 
Las-tbe'ni-a, or 

f Las-the^ni'a 



• Lapmedia, — Evagore, Laomedia join^ 

And thoo, Poiynonie, the nom'rons line. 

Cookb's HegM. Theog^ v^ 399. 
See Iphigenia, 

f Idfstheiifiir^Ali ih» prosodUte I have consulted, except AinswortI 
accent this word on the penultimate syllable^ and though BiigliR 



it-e-ra'nusPlau' 

ta» 

Ei-te'ii'Um 

it-ti-a'lis 

gr^he-a'lis 

a-ti-a'ris 

Or-ahe-a^ris^ 

a-ti'ni, 3, 4 

atins (Eng.) 

A-tinl-us 

ift-ti'nus 

.a'ti-uni* 

*a-to'is 
«a-to'us 

ji^top'o-lis^ 
^'tre-us 
^u-do'Di-a 
.A-ver^na 
jau-fell* 
jftv-i-a'Da, 7 
-A-vin'i-a 
-A-vin'i-um, or 
La-^'num 



Ltt" 

Lau'ra 

Lau're-a 

Lau-ren-ta'li-a 

Lau-ren'tes a'gri 

Lau-ren'ti-a, 10 

Lau-ren-ti'ni, 4 

Lau-ren'tum 

Lau-ren'ti-us, 10 

Lau'ri-on 

Lau'ron 

La'us Pom-pe'i-a 

Lau'sus 

liau-ti'um, 10 

Le'a-des 

Le-ae'i, 3 

Le-8e'na 

Le-an'der 

Le-ati'dre 

Le-an'dri-as 

Le-ar'chus, 12 

Leb-a-de'a, or 

* Leb-a-dei'a 
Leb'e-dus, or 

Leb'c-dos 
Le-be'na 
Le-bin'thos, and 

Le-l^n'thos 
Le-chse'um 
Lec'y-thue, 24 



i;e 



/5 



Le'da 
Le-dae'a 
Le'dud 
Le'gi-o 
Le'i-tus, 4 
Le'laps 
Lel'e-ges 
Le'lex 
Le-man'nus 
Lem'nos 
Le-mo'vi-i, 3 
Lem'u-res 
Le-mu'ri-a, and 
Le-mu-ra'li-a 
Le-nae'us 
Len'tu-lu8 
Le'o 

Le-o-ca'di-a 

Le-o-co'ri-on 

Le-oc'ra-tes 

Le-od'a-mas 

Le-od'o-cus 

Le-og'o-ras 

Le'on 

Le-o'na 

f LeK)-na'tus 

X«e-onl-das 

Le-on'ti-um, and 
Le-on-ti'ni, 4 



Dalogy would prefer the accent on the antepenultimate, we mnst 
Bcessarily yield to such a decided superiority of votes for the penul* 
mate in a word, so little anglicised by use. — See Iphigenia, 
* [The modern Greeks have corrupted this tiame into Livadia; in 
any instances beside this they give b the sound of r.] 
t Leonmius, — In the accentuation of this word I hare foUowedi 
'be and Lempriere : the former of whoip says — '^ Quanquam de hue 
B amplius cogitandum cum eruditis viris existimem." — ^Till, then^ 
le learned men have considered this word, I think we may be 
>wed to consider it as formed from the Latin leo and natus^ lioa- 
I, and as the a in natus is long, no shadow of reason can be given[ 
it should not have the accent. This is the accentuation con<* 
itiy given to it in the play of Cymbeline, a^d is in my opinion the 
It •• • ■ ^ 



78 



LE 



Le-on-to Ceph'a- 

lus 
Le-on'ton, or 

Le-on-top'o-lis 
Le-on-tych'i-des 
Le'os 

XfC-os'the-nes 
Le-o-tych'i-des 
Lep'i-da 
Lep-i-dus 
Le-phyr'i-um 
Le-pi'nus 
Le-pon'ti-i, 4» 
Le'pre-o8 
Le'pri-um 
Lep'ti-nes 
Lep'tis 
Le'ri-a 
Le-ri'na 
Ler'na 
Le'ro 
Le'ros 
Les'bus, or 

Les'bos 
Les'ches, 12 
Les-tryg'o-nes 
Le-ta'num 
Le-thse'us 
Le'the 
Le'tus 
Zrc-va'na, 7 
Lefu'ca 
Leu'cas, and 

Leu'ca-te 
Leu-ca'tes 
Leu-ca'si-^n, 11 
Leu-cas'pis 
Leu'ce 
Leu'ci, 3 
ZrcU-cip'pe 
Leu-cip'pi-des 



LI 

Leu-cip'pus 
Leu'co-la 
Leu'con 
Leu-co'ne, 8 
Leu-co'nes 
Leu-con'o-e 
Leu cop'e-tra 
Leu'co-phrys 
Leu-cop'o-lis 
Leu'cos 
Leu-co'si-a, 11 
Leu-co-syr'i-i, 4 
Leu-coth'o-e, or 
Leu-co'the-a 
Leuc'tra 
Leuc'trum 
Leu'cus 
Leu-cy-a'ni-as 
Le-vi'nus 
Leu-tychl-deg 
Lex-o'vi-i, 4 
Li-ba'ni-us 
Lib'a-nus 
Lib-en-ti'na 
Liber 
Lib'e-ra, 20 
Lib-er-ali-a 
Liber'tas 
Li-be'thra 
Li-beth'ri-des 
Lib'i-ci, Li-be'ci-i 
Lib-i-ti'na 
Li'bo, 1 
Li'bon 

Lib-o Phoe-ni'ces 
Li-bri, 4 
Li-bur'na 
Li-bur'ni-a 
Li-bur'ni-des 
Li-bur'num ma're 
Li-bur'nus 



n 

Libs 
Lib'y^ 

Lib'y-cum m&'m 
Lib'y-cu8, and 

Li-bys'ds 
Li^ys 
Li-bys'sa 
Lic'a-tes 
Li'cha 
Li'chas, 1 
Li'ches 
Li-cinl-a 
Li-cin'i-us 
Li-ci'nus 
Li-cym'ni-us 
Li'de, 18 
Li-gaVi-us 
Li-ge'a 
Li'ger 

Li'ger, or Lig'e-cii 
Lig'o-ras 
Lig'u-res 
Li-gu'ria 
Lig-u-ri'nu8 
Li'gus, 18 
Lig'y-es 
Li-gyr'gum 
Li-lae'a 
Lil-y-bse'um 
Li-mse'a 
Li-me'ni-a 
Lim'nae 
Lim-nae'um 
Lim-na-tid'i-a 
Lim-ni'a-ce 
Lim-ni-o'tae 
Lim-no'ni-a 
Li'mon 
Lin-ca'si-i, 4 
Lin'dus 
Lin'go-nes 



LO 

Lin-ter'na palus 

Lin-ter'num 

Li'nus 

Li'o-des 

Lip'a-ra 

Lip'a-ris 

Liph'lum 

Lip-o-do'nis 

Li-qucn'ti-a 

Lir-cae^us 

Li-ri'o-pe 

Li'ris 

Li-sin'kas 

Lis'son 

Lis'sus 

Lit'a-brum 

Lit'a-na . 

Li-tav'i-cus 

Li-ter'num 

Lith-o-bo'li-a 

Li'thras 

Li-tu1>i-um 

Lit-y^r'sas 

LiVi-a Dru-sil'la 

Liv-i-ne'i-us 

Li-vUla 

Li'vi-u» 

JUi/y (Eng.) 

Lol)oa 



LU 

Lo'ce-ug, 10 
Lo'cha 
Lo'chi-as 
Lo'cri 
Lo'cris 
Lo-cus'ta 
Lo-cu'ti-us, 10 
LoHi-a Pau-li'na 
Lol-li-a'nus 
Lol'li-us 
Lon-di'num, or 
Lon-din'i-um 
Lon'don (Eng.) 
Lon-ga-re'nus 
Lon.gimVnu8 
Lon-gi'nus 
Lon-go-bar'di 
Lon'guJa 
Lon-gun'ti-ca 
Lor'^, 3 
Lor'y-ma 
Lo'tis, Of Lottos 
Lo-toph'a-gi^ 3 
Lo'us, and A'o-us 
Lu'a, 7 
Lu'ca 

Lu'ca-gus, 20 
Lu-ca'ni, 3 
Lu-ca'ni-a 
Lu-ca'ni-us 



LU 



77 



Lu-ca'nu8 
Lu'can (Eng.) 
Lu-ca'ri-a, or 
Lu-ce'ri-a 
Luc-ce'i-us 
Lu'ce-res 
Lu-ce'ri-a 
Lu-ce'ti-us, 10 
Lu-ci-a'nus 
Lu'ci-an (Eng.) 
Lu'ci-fer 
Lu-cil'i-us 
Lu-cilla 
Lu-ci'na 
* Lu'ci-a 
Lu'ci-us, 10 
Lu-cre'ti-a, 10 
Lu-crefi-lis 
Lu-cre'ti-u8, 10 
Lu-cri'num 
Lu-cri'nus 
Luc-ta'ti-us, 10 
Lu-culle-a 
Lu-cullus 
Lu'cu-mo, 20 
Lu'cus 
Lug-du'num 
Lu'na, 7 
Lu'pa 
f Lu-per'cal 



* Luda, — Labbe cries out loudly against those who accent this 
word OD the penultimate, which, as a Latin word, ought to have the 
accent on the antepenultimate syllable. If once, says he, we break 
through rules, why should we not pronounce Ammia, Anastasiuy Ce- 
cUui, Leocadia^ Natalia^ &c. with the accent on the penultimate, 
likewise ? — This ought to be a warning against our pronouncing the 
^est-India island St. Lu'cia as we sometimes hear \t-^St, Luci'a, 

t Lupercal. — ITiis word is so little interwoven with our Iknguage* 
that it ought to have its true Latin accent on the penultimate syllable. 
But wherever the aAtepenultimate accent is adopted in verse, as ia 
Shakespeare's Julius Caesar, where Antony says, 

You all did see that on the Lvfpercal 
I thrice presented him a kingly crown — 



76 L¥ 

Lu-per'ci, 3 
Lu-per'cus 
Lu'pi-as, or Lu' 

pi-^ 
Lu'pus 
JiU-si-ta'ni-a 
Lu-so'nes 
Lug^tri-cus 
Lu-ta'ti-us 
Lu-te'ri-us 
Lu-te'ti-a, 10 
Lu-to'ri-us 
Ly-«e'us 
Ly'bas 
Lyb'y-a, or 

Ly^s'sa 
Lyc'a-bas 
Lyc-a-be'tus 
Ly-cae'a 
Ly-cae'um 
Ly-cae'us 
Ly^cam'bes 
Ly-ca'on 
Lyc-a-o'ni-a 
Ly'cfw 
Ly-cas'te 
Ly-cas'tum 
Ly-cas'tus 
L/ce, 8 
L/ces; 
Ly-ce'um 
Lych-ni'des 
Iiiyc1-a, 10 
Lye'i-das 



LY 

Ly-cim'na 
Ly-cim'ni-a 
Ly-cis'c^s 
Lyc'i-us, 10 
Lyc-o-me'des, 20 
Ly'con 
Ly-co'ne, 8 
Lyc'o-phron 
Ly-cop'o-lis 
Ly-co'pus 
Ly-co'ri-as 
Ly-co'ris 
Ly-cor'-mas 
Ly-cor'tas 
Lyc-o-su'ra 
Lyc'tus 
Ly-cur'gi-des 
Ly-cur'gus 
Ly'cus 
Ly be, 8 
Lyd'i-a 
Lyd'i-as 
Lydl-us 
Ly'dus 

Lyg'da-miSj or 
I Lyg'da-mus 
LygfU, 4 
Ly'gus 
Ly-mi're 
Ly'maiK 
Lyn-ci'des 
Lyn-ces'tae 
Lyn-cee'tes 
Lu-per-ca'Ii-a 



Lyn-ees'ti-iw ^ 
Lyn-c -us 
Lyn'cus, Lj^n-cae?' 

us, or Lynx 
Lyn-ci'dae 
Lyr'cae 
Lyr-cae'us 
Lyr-ce'a 
Lyr'cus 
Lyr-nes'sus 
Ly-san'der 
Ly-san'dra 
Ly-sa'nUas 
L/se, 8 
Ly-si'a-des 
Lys-si-a-nas%a 
Ly-si'a-nax 
Lys i-as, U 
Lys'i-des 
Ly-sid'i-ce 
Ly-spa'a-KJhe 
Lys-i-ma'ehi-« 
Ly-siiQVcbu8 
Lys-i-mach'i-des 
Lyg4-m6li^ 
Ly-siiei''O-0, 8 
Ly-sip'pe 
Ly-sip'pus 
L/sif 

Ly-sis'tra-tus 
Ly-sith'o-us 
Ly'so 
Ly-tae'a 
Ly-za'ni-as 



we ought to preserve it. — Mr Barry, the actor, who was informed b> 
«ome scholar of the Latin pronunciation of this word, adopted it iii 
this place, ^nd pronounced it Luper'caly which grated every ear tbat 
heard- him. 



MA 

Ma'CJ! 

Ma'car 

Ma-cA're-os 

Ma-ca'ri-a 

Mac'a-ris 

♦ Ma>ca'-tu8 

Ma-ced'nus 

Mac'enlo 

Mac-e-do'ni-a 

Mao-enion'i-cus, 

30 
ftla-celOa 
Ma'cer ^-myW- 

us 
Ma^chae'ra 
Ma-climi'i-das 
Ma-cha'on 
Ma'cra 
Macii-a'Dus 
Ma-cri'nuB, M. 
Ma'cio 

Ma-cro1)i-i, 4 
Ma-cjra'bi-ug 
Mac'ro-dieir 
Makro*kiTe 
Ma-cro'nes 
Mac-to'ri-um 
Mac-u-lo'nus 
Ma-de'tes 
Mad'y-ea 
Ma-des^tes 
Mae-an'der 
Mae«n'dri-a 
Mae-ee'nas 
Mae'di, 3 
Mae'li-us 
Maem-ac-te'ri-a 
Maen'a-des 



MA 

Msen^-k 
Msen'a-lus 
Mas'ni-us 
Mse'non 
Mae-o'iii-8 
Mse-on'i-dfls 
Mae-on'i-des 
Mae'o-iiig ' 

Mae-o'tae j 

Maeo'tis pa'luB ' 
M»'si-a Syl'va, li 
Mae'vi-a 
Mae'vi-us 
Ma'gas 
Ma-gella 
Mag'e-tae 
Ma'gi 
Ma'gi-us 
Mag'na Grae'ci-a 
Mag-nen'ti-us, 10 
Mag'nes 
Mag^Csi-a, 11 
Ma'go 
Ma'gon 

Meg-on-ti'a-cum 
Ma'gus 
Ma-herTwd 
Ma'i-a 
Ma-jes'tas 
Ma-jo-ri*a'nii8 
Ma-jor'ca 
Mala For-tu'na 
MaFa-cha 
Ma-le'a 
Malho, or 
Ma'tho 
Ma'U-a 
Ma'Ii-i, 4 



MA 



79 



Ma'Iis 
Malle-a, or MaV 

U-a 
Marii-us 
Mallos 
Mal-thi'nus 
Mal-va'na 
Ma-ma'uB 
Ma-mer'cus 
Ma-mer'thes 
Mam-er-ti'na 
Mam-er-ti'ni, 4, 3 
Ma-miFi-a 
Ma-miri.i, 4 
Ma^miri-us 
Mam-mae'a 
Ma-mu'ri-u8 
Ma-mur'ra 
Ma-nas'ta-bal 
fMan'ci-a 
Man-ci'nus 
Man^a'ne, 8 
Man-da'nes 
Man*de1a 
Man-do'ni-u8 
Man'dro-cks 
Man-drocli-das 
Man'dron 
Man-du'bi-i, 4 
Man-du-bra'ti-Uj5 
Ma'nes 
Ma-ne'tho 
Ma'ni-a 
Ma-nil'i-a 
Ma-niU'Us 
Man'i-ini, 4 
Manli-a 
Manli-us Tor- . 



• ilfaca^iur.— (Liviiis : in notft, De Orat. 203.) 
t ilfancia.--(Helvia«.Vide De Oratore, p. 199.) 



80 



MA 



qua'tus 
Man'nus 
Man-sue'tus 
Man-ti-ne'a 
Man-ti-ne'us 
Man'ti-us, 10 
Man'to 
Man'tu-a 
Mar-a<-can'da 
Mar'a-tha 
Mar'a-thon 
Mar'a-thos 
Mar-cella 
Mar-cel-li'nu8 

Am-mi-a'nus 
Mar-cellus 
Mar'ci-a, 10 
Mar-ci-a'na 
Mar she- a' na 
Mar-ci-a-nop'o-Iis 
Mar-ci-a'nus, 10 
Mar'ci-us Sa-bi' 

nus 
Mar-co-man'ni 
Mar'cus 
Mar'di, 3 
Mar'di-a 
Mar-do'ni-us 
Mar'dus 
Mar-e-o'tis 
Mar-gin'i-a, and 

Mar-gi-a'ni-a 
Mar-gi'tes 
*Ma-ri'a, or, 

Ma'ri-a 
Ma-ri'a-ba 



MA 

Ma ri-am'ne 
Ma-ri-a'n© Fos'sae 
Ma-ri an-dy'num 
Ma-ri-a'nus 
Ma-ri'ca 
Ma-ri'ci, 3 
Marl-cus 
Ma-ri'na 
Ma-ri'ni» 
Ma'ry-on 
Ma'ris 
Ma-ris'sa 
Mar'i-sus 
Ma-ri'ta 
Ma'ri-U8 
Mar'ma'Ctis 
Mar ma ren'ses 
Mar-mar'i-ca 
Mar-mar^i-dae 
Mar-ma'ri-on 
Ma'ro, 1 
Mar-o-bud'u-i, 3 
Ma'ron 
Mar-o-ne'a 
Mar*pe'si-a, 10 
Mar-pes'sa 
Mar-pe'sus 
Mar'res 

Mar-ru'vi-um, or 
Mar-ru'bi-um 
Mars 
Mar'sa-la 
Mar-sae'us 
Mar'se, 8 
Mar's!, 3 
Mar-Big's!, 3 



MA 

Mar-qr'a-ba 

Mar'tha 

Mar'ti-a, lO 

Mar'she-a 

Marti a'lis 

Mar'ti-al (Eiig.)r 

Mar-ti-^a'nus 

Martian (Elng.) 

Mar^ti'na 

Mar tin-i-a'nus 

Mar-ti'nus 

Martin (Eng.y 

Mar'ti-us, lO 

Ma-rullus 

Mas ae Syl'i-i, 4 

Maa-i-nis'aa 

Mas'sa 

Mas'sa-ga 

Ma8-8ag'e^t8& 

Mas-sa'na, 7 

Mas-sa'ni, 3 

Mas'sL-cus 

Mas'sill-a^ 7 

Mas-sy[l«, 

fMas-ti'ra 

Ma-su'ri-«ft 

Ma'tho 

Ma-ti-e'ni 

Ma-ti'nus 

Ma-tis'co 

Ma-trali-a 

Ma-tro'na 

Mat-ro-na'li-ft 

Mat-ti'a-ci, 3 

Ma-tu'ta 

Ma'vors 



♦ Maria, — This word, says Labbe, derived from the Hebrew, lias 
the accent on the second syllable; but when a Latin word, Ibe 
feminine of Mar^'vs, it has the accent on the first. 

t Mastira, — (Thracae pagns.) Demosthenes.. 



ME 



ME 



ME 81 



Ma-vor'ti-a, 10 


Medo-bith'y-ni 


Mel'ane 


Mau'ri, 3 


Me-dob'ri-ga 


Me-la'ne-U8 


Mau-ri-ta'ni-a 


Me'don 


Melanl-da 


Mau'rus 


Me-don'ti-a8,10 


Me-la'ni-on 


Mau-ru'si-i, 4, 11 


Med-u-a'na 


Mel-a-nip'pe 


Mau-so'lus 


Med-ul-li'na 


Mel-a-nip'pi-des 


Max-en'ti-u8, 10 


Me'dus 


Mel-a-nip'pu8 


Max-im i-a'nu8 


Me-du'sa 


Mela-no'pus 


Max-i-mU-i-a'na 


Me-gabl-zi 


Mel-a-nos'y.ri 


Max-i-mi'nus 


Meg-a-by'ius 


Me-lan'thi-i, 4 


Maa/i-min (Eng.) 


Meg'acles 


Me-lan'thi-us 


Max'i-inus 


Me-gacli-des 


Me-lan'tho 


Maz'a-ca 


Me-gae'ra 


Me-lan'thus 


Ma-za'ces 


Me-ga1e-»5 


Melas 


Ma-zse'us 


Meg-a-le'si-a, 11 


Mel-e-a'ger 


Ma-za'res 


Me-ga'li-a 


Mel-e-a^ri-des 


Maz'e-ras 


Meg-a-loj/o-lis 


Mel-e-san'der 


Ma-ri'ces, and 


Meg-a-me'de, 8 


Me'les 


Ma-z/ges 


Meg-a-ni'ra 


Mere-se 


Me-cha'ne-us 


Meg-a-pen'thes 


Mel-e-sig'e-nes, or 


Me-cis'te-us 


♦Meg'a-ra 


Mel-e-sig'e-na 


Me-coe'nas, or 


fMeg-a-re'us 


Me'U-a 


Me-cse'nas 


Meg'a-ris 


Mel-i-boe'us 


Mec'ri-da 


Me-gar'sus 


Mel-i-cer'ta 


Me-de'a 


Me-gas'the-nes 


Mel-i-gu'nU 


Me-des-i-cas'te, 8 


Me'ges 


Me-li'na 


Me'di-a, ^ 


Me-gilla 


Me-li'nus 


Me'di-as 


Me-gis'ta 


Me-li'sa, 7 


Med'i-cu8 


Me'la Pom-po'ni- 


Me-Us'sa 


Me-di-o-ma-tri'ces 


us 


Me-Iis'sus 


Me-di-o-ma-tri'ci 


Me-gis'ti a 
Me-Iae'nse 


Mell-ta 


Me-di-ox'u-mi 


Mell-te 


Med-i-tri'na 


Me-lam'pus 


Mel-i-te'ne 


Me-do'a-cus, or 


Mel-anch-lae'ni 


Mell-tus, (Accu- 


Me-du'a-cus 


Me-lan'chrus 


ser of Socrates) 



• Megara."-! have in this word followed Labbe, Ainswortb, 
Oouldman, and Holyoke, by adopting the antepenultimate accent 
is opposition to Lempriere, who accents the penultimate syllable* 

t Megareut. — Labbe pronounces this word m four syllables, when a 
novn substantive: but Ainrwerth marks it as a trisyllable, when a 
proper name ; and in my opinion incorrectly*— ^ee Idvmeneut* 

e3 



:^ M£ 

Me'li-us 
Mel-ix4Ui'dni8 
♦Me-lob'o-sis 
Melon 
Me'los 
Merpi-a 
Mel-pom'e-ne 
Mel-tho'ne 
Me^mac'e-ni 
Mem'mi-a 
Mem'mi-us 
Mem'non 
Mem'phis 
Mem-phi'tis 
Me'na, or Me'nes 
Me'nal-cas 
Me-nal'ci-das 
Men-a-lif)'pe 
Men-a-lip'pus 
Me-nan'der 
Me-na'pi-i, 4 
Men'a-pis 
Me'nas 

Men-che'res, 12 
Men'des 
Me-nec'les 
Men-e-cli'des 
Me-nec'ra-tes 
Men-e-de'mus 
Me-neg'e-tas 
Men-eJa'i-a 
Men-e-la'us 
Me-^e'ni-us 
A-grip'pa 
Men'e-phron 
Me'nes 



ME 

Me-nes'te-us, or ? 
Me-nee'the-us, or 
Mnes'the-us, 13 

Men-eS'the'i Por' 
tus 

Me-nes'thi-us 

Men-e-tas 

Me-nip'pa 

Me-nip'pi-des 

Me7iup'pus 

Me'ni-U8 

Mea'nis 

Me-nod'o-tu8 

Me-noe'ce-us, 10 

Me-noe'tes 

Me-noe'ti-us, 10 

Me'non 

Me-noph'i-lu8 

Men'ta,orMin'th0 

Men'tes 

Men-tis'sa 

Men'to 

Men'tor 

Me-nyllus 

Me'ra 

Me'ra, or Moer'a 

Mer-cu'ri-u8 

Mer'cvrTy (Eng.) 

Me-ri'o-nes 

Mer'me-rus 

Merm'na-dae 

Mer'o-e, 8 

Mer'o-pe, 8 

Me'rops 

Me'ros 

Mer'u-la 



. ME I 

Me-sab'a-te9 
Me-sa'W-us 
Me-sa'pi-a 
Me-sau'bi-us 
Me-sem'lwri-a 
Me-se'ne 
Mes-o-me'de6 
Mes-o-po-ta'mi-a 
Mes-sala 
Mes-sa-li'a 
Mes-saJi'na, 3 
Mes-si^-li'nus 
Mes-sa'na, 7 
Mes-sa'pi-a 
Mes'sa-tk 
Mes'se, 3 
Mes-se'is, 5 
MesHse'ne, cmt 
MesHse'na 
Mes-se'ni-a 
Mes'tor 
Me-sula 
Mefa-bus 
Met-a-gifni-a 
Met-a-ni'ra 
Met-a-pon'tum 
Met-a-pon'tus 
Me-tau'ms 
Me-tella 
Me-terU, 3 
Me-thar'ma 
Me-thi'on, 29 
Me-tho'di-us 
Me-tho'ne, 8 
Me-thyd'ri-um 
Me-thym'na 



^- MelobosU, — ^^In this word I have giveD the preference to tb^ 
antepenultimate accent, with Labbe, Gouldman, and Kolyoke; 
though the penultimate, which Lemprlere has adopted, is more 
agreeable to the ear. 



Ml 

Me-ti-a-dii'sa, 21 

Me-tirU 

Me-tUl-i. 4 

Me-til'iMis 

Me-ti'o-clms 

Me'ti-oii, 11 

Me'tiB 

Me-tis'eus 

Me'ti-us, 10 

Me-toe'd-a, 10 

Me'ton 

Mef o-pe, 8 

Meftm 

Me-troliims 

MefnHdes 

Met-io^o'rus 

Me-troph'a-nes 

Me-trop'o-lis 

Mef ti^UB, 10 

Me-va'ni-a 

Me'vi-«8 

Me-zen'ti-us, 10 

Mi-ce'a 

Mi-cip'fia 

Mic'y^tts, 24 

Mi'das 

Mi-de'm of Arges 

Mid'e-a of Boeotia 

Mi4a'ni-<ni 

Mi-le'sU, 4, 11 

Mi-le'si-us^ 10 

Mi-le'ti-a, 10 

Mi4eli-um, 10 

Mi-le'tus 

Mil'ifiw 

MM-chus, 12 

Mi-li'nus 

Mil-i-o'ni-a 

Milo 

;Mi-lo'ni-us 

Mil-ti'a-des 



mr 

UiVto 

Mil'vi-ns 

Mil'y-as 

Mi-malle-nes 

Mi'mas 

Mim-ner'titms 

Mm'ci-iM, 10 

Min'da-^rus 

Mi-ne'i-dflB 

Mi-ner'va 

Min-%r-vali-a 

Minl-o 

Min-nae'i, 3 

Mi-nd'a 

Mi-nols 

Mi'nos 

MiiMKtau'nis 

Min'the 

Min-tur'nae 

Mi-nu'ti-a, 10 

Mi-nu'ti-us, 10 

Min'y-8B, 6 

Min'y-as 

Mm'y-au8 

Mi-ny'i^, 6 

Min'y-tufi 

Mir'a-ces 

Mi-se'num 

Mi-se'nus 

Mi-sith'e-us 

Mi'tfaras 

Mith-ra-da'tee 

Mt-thre'nes 

Mith-ri^a'tes 

Mith-rinda'tis 

Mith-ro-bar-za'nes 

Mity-le'ne, and 

Mit-y-le'nae 
Mi'tys 
Miz-ael 
Mna^isalces, IS 



mo as 

Mna'si-as, 11 

Mnas'i-cles 

Mna-fiip^pi-das 

Mna^p'pus 

Mna-sithVus 

Mna'soii, 13 

Mnansyr'i-uin 

Mne'mon 

Mne-inos'y.ne, 3 

Mne-sar'chus 

Mne-sid'a-mus 

Mnes-i-la'u8 

Mne-snn'a«che 

Mne-sim'a-dius 

Mncs'ter 

Mnes'the-U8, 13 

Mnes'ti-a 

Mnes'tra 

Mne'vis 

Mo-a-pher'ues 

Ma'di-a 

Moe'cU, 5, 10 

Moe'nus 

MoB-rag'e-tes 

Moeris 

M(B'di 

Moe'on 

MoB-on'i-des 

Moe'ra 

Moe'si-a 

Mo-gy'ni 

Mo-lel-a 

Mo-li'o-ne 

Molo 

Mo-loe'is 

Mo-Wchus, 12 

Mo-los'si, 3 

MoJos'si-a, or 

Mo-los'sis 
Mo^Wsus ' 



84 



MO 



Mol-pa'di^ 

Morpus 

Molus 

Mo-lyc'ri-on 

Mo-mem'phis 

Mo'mus 

Mo'na 

Mo-nae'ses 

Mo-ne'su8 

Mo-ne'ta 

Monl-ma 

Monl-mus 

Mon'o-dus 

Mo-noe'cus 

Mo-nole-us 

Mo-nophl-lus 

Mon-ta'nus 

Mo-nopb'a-ge 

Mon'y-cbus, 6, 12 

Mon'y-mus 

Ma'phis 

Mop'si-um, 10 

Mop-so'pi-a 

Mop'sus 

Mor-gan'd-um, 10 

Mor'i-ni 

Mor-i-tas'gus 

Mo'ri-us 

Mor'phe-us 

Mors 

Mo'rys 

Mo'sa 



MU 

Mos'chi, 3, 12 

Mos'chi-oii 

Mos'chus 

Mo-sel'la 

Mo'ses 

Mo-sych'liis 

Mos-y-me'ci, 3 

Mo-tno'ne 

Mo-ty'at 

Mu-ci-a'nu8 

Mu'ci-U8, 10 

Mu'crae 

Mul'ci-beir 

* Mu-lu'cha 

Mul'vi-us Pons 

Mum'mi-U8 

Mu-na'ti-u8> 10 

Mun'da 

Mu-ni'tus 

Mimych'i-a, 4 

Mu-rae'na 

Mur'ciw 

Mu-re'tus 

Mur-gan'ti-a, 10 

Mur-rhe'nu8 

Mur'ti-a, 10 

Mus 

Mu'sa An.to'm-u8 

Mu'sae 

Mu-s»'us 

Mu-so'ni-us Ru'fiis 

Mus-tela 



MY 

Mu.thullu9 
Mu'ti-a, 10 
Mu-till-a 
+ Mu'ti-na 
Mu-ti'ne8 
Mu-ti'nus, or 

Mu-tu'nu» 
Mu'ti-us, 10 
Mu-tus'ca^ 
My-i^ru8, or 

M/o-des 
+ Myc'a-le 
Myc-a-les'8ii» 
My-ce'nae 
Myc-e-ri'nus 
Myc-i-ber'na 
Mycl-thus 
My'con 
+ Myc'o-DC 
M/don 
My-ec'pho-ris 
My-e'nus 
Myg-don 
Myg-do'ni-a 
Myg'do-nus 
My-las'sa 
Mylc, or Mylas 
My'ks 
My-lit'ta 
Myn'dus 
Allies 
Myn'i-ae 



* Mulucha,— This word is accented on the antepenultimate syllable 
by Labbe, Lempriere, and Ainsworth; and on the pennhimate by 
Gouldman and Holyoke. Labbe, indeed, says ut volueris ; and I shall 
certainly avail myself of this permission to place the accent on the 
pe^naltimate ; for when this syllable ends with tt, the English have a 
strong propensity to place the accent on it, even in opposition to ety- 
molo8[y, as in the word Arhutw^ 

t Mycale and Mycone, — An English ear seems to have a strong pre- 
dilection for the penultimate accent on these. words; but all our pro- 
sodists accent them on the antepenultimate. The same may be 
observed of MuHna, — See note on Oryui, 



MY 

My-o'ni-a 

Myr-ci'nus 

My-ri'cus 

* My-ri'nus 

My-ri'na 

Myrt-as 

Myr-mec'i-des 

Myr-mid'o-nes 

+ My'ro 

My-ro-ni-a'nus 

My-ron'i-des 

My-ro'nus 



MY 

Myr'rha 
Myr'siJus 
Myr'si-nus, a City 
My-stall-des 
Myr'sus 

Myr'te-a, Venus 
Myr-te'a, a City 
Myr'ti-lus 
Myr-to'um Ma're 
Myr-tun'ti-um, 10 
Myr-tu'sa 
Myr'tis 



MY 



86 



Myr'ta-le 

Mjnr-to'us 

My-8ceriu8 

Mys'tes 

Mysl-a, 11 

My-so-ma-ced'cH 

nes 
My'son 
Myth'e-^jus 
Myt-i-le'ne 
M/us 



NA 

Nab-ar-za'nes 

Nab-a-thse'a 

Nalris 

Na-dag'a-ra 

Nae'ni-a 

Nae'vi-us 

Naeyo-lus 

Na-har'va-li, 3 

N*ai'a-de8 

Nals 

Na-p«'aB 

Naphl-lus 

Nar 

NarTx) 

Nar-bo-nen'sis 

Nar-cae'us 

Nar-cis'sus 

Nar'ga-ra 

Na-ris'ci, 3 

Nar'ni-a, orNar'na 



NA 

Nar-the'cis 

Na-ryc'i-a, 10 

Nar'ses 

Nas-a^mo'nes 

Nas'ci-o, orNa'ti-o 

Nasl-ca 

Na-sid-i-e'nus 

Na-sidl-us 

Na'so 

Nas'sus, or Na'sus 

Nas'u-a, 10 

Na-ta'lis 

Nat'ta 

Na-tali-a 

Na'va 

Nau'co-lus 

Nau'cles 

Nau'cra-tes 

Nau'cra-tis 

Na'vi-U8 Ac'd-us 



NE 

Naulo-chiis 
Nau-pac'tus, or 
Nau-pac'tum 
Nau'pli-a 
Nau'pli-U6 
Nau'ra 
Nau-sic'a 
Nau'si-cles 
Nau-sim'e nes 
Nau-sith'o-e 
Nau-sith'o-us 
Nau'tes, 17 
Nax'os 
Ne-ae'ra 
Ne-8e'thus 
Ne-al'ces 
Ne-al'i-ces 
Ne-an'thes 
Ne-ap'o-lis 
Ne-ar'chus 



* Myrinus — .Labbe is the only prosodist I have met with who ac- 
cents this wprd on the antepenultimate syllable ; and as this accent- 
nation is so contrary to analogy, I have followed Lempriere, Ains- 
worth, Gouldman, and Holyoke» with the accent on the penultimate^ 
See the word in the Terminatiaml VocalntUirif. 

t Myra, — Lordus. 



as N£ 

Ne-bro'des 
Ne-broph'o-noB 
Ne'choR 
Nec-ta-nelms, and 

Nec-tau'a-bis 
Ne-cjrsl-a, 10 
Nels 
Ne'le-us 
Nelo 
Ne-maefa 
Ne-me'a 

Ne-me-si-a'nus, 21 
Nem'e-sis 
Ne-me'si-us, 10 
Nem-<wra'li-a 
Nem'e-tes 
Ne-me'us 
* Ne-o-bule 
Ne-o-caes-a-re'a 
Ne-och'a-bis 
Ne'o-cles 
Ne-og'e-ues 
Ne-om'o-ris 
Neon 

Ne-bn-ti<chos, 12 
Ne-op-tore-mus 
f Ne'o-ris . 
Ne'pe 



Ne*phalwa 

Neph'e4e 

Neph-er-i^tes 

Ne'phus 

Ne'pi-a 

Ne'pos 

Ne-po-ti-a'nus, 12 

Nep'thys 

Nep-tu'ni-a 

Nep-tu'ni-um 

Nep-tu'ni-us 

Nep-tu'nu8 

Neptune (Eng.) 

Ne-re'i-des 

Nefre^ds (Eng.) 

Ne-re'i-us 

X Ne're-U8 

Ne-ri'ne 

Ner'i-phus 

Nert-tos 

Ne'ri-us 

Nero 

Ne-ro'ni-a 

Ner-to-brig'i-a 

Ner'va Coc-ce'i-us 

Ner'vi-i, 3 

Ner'u-lum 

Ne-sae'a 



Ne-sim'a-chus, 11 

Ne-si-o'pe 

Ne^he^'pe 

Ne-so^ 

Ne'sis 

Nes'sus 

Nes'to-cles 

Nes'tor 

Nes-to'ri-us 

Nes'tus, or Nes'd 

Ne'tttm 

Ne'u-ri 

Ni-cae'a 

Ni-cag'o-ras 

Ni-can'der 

Ni-ca^nor 

Ni-car'chus 

Nic-ar-thi'des 

Ni-ca'tor 

Nice, 8 

Nic-e-pho'ri-um 

Nic-e-pho'ri-us 

Ni-cefm'o-rus 

Nie-er-a'tus 

Ni-ce'tas 

Nic-e-teVi-a 

Niel-a, 10 

Nicl-as, 10 



* 2Vfo6«fe.--rLabbe, Ainsworth, Gonldman, Littleton, land Holyoki 
give this wordtlie peniiltimate acetfnt^and tberetbre I have preferre 
it to the antepennltirpate accent ,e;iven it by Lempriere ; not ool 
from the nnmber of authorities in its favonr, bat from its being moi 
agreeable to analogy. 

f Neoiis, — The authorities are nearly equally balanced between di 
penultimate and antepenultimate accent ; and therefore I may t$ 
as Labbe sometimes does, ut Tftlueris; but I am inclined rather to th 
an t epenu ltimate accent as more agreeable to analogy, though 1 tbinl 
tke penultimate more agreeable to the ear. 
t N$reu8> — Old Nereus to the sea was born of earth-* 
Nereus who claims the precedence in birth 
To their descendants ; him old god they call, 
Because sincere and affable to alt. 

Cooke's Hesied, llivog, ^ 35f . 



lli-cip'jie 

^i-cip'pus 

tfi'co 

Mic/o-cles 

^i-coch'ra-tes 

^li-co'cre-on 

Wc-o-de'mus 

Nic-o-do'ru8 

Ki-cod'ro-mus 

Nic-o-la'us 

^fi-ccHn'a-cha 

Ni^om'a-chas 

Nic-o-me'des 

Nic-o-me'di-a 

Ni'con 

Ni-co'ni-a 

Nic'o-phron 

Ni-cop'o-lis 

Ni-cos'tra-ta 

Ni-cos'tra-tus 

Nic-o-te'le-a 

Ni-cofe-les 

Ni'ger 

Ni-gid'i-us Fig'u- 

lus 
Ni-griftae 
Nile-us 
Ni'lus 
Nin'ni-us 
Nm'i-as 
Ni'nus 
Nin'y-as 
Ni'o-be 



NO 

Ni-phe'us 
Ni.pha'tes 
Ni'phe 
Nir'e-us 
Ni'sa 
Ni-sae'a 
Ni-sae'e 
Ni-ge'i-a 
Nis'i-bis 
Ni'sus 
Ni-sy'rog 
Ni-te'tis 
Ni-to'cris 
Nifri-a 
No'as 
Noc'mon 
Noc-tUu'ca 
Nola 

Nom-en-ta'nus 
Nom'a-des 
No'mae 
No-men'tum 
No'mi-i, 3 
No'mi-us 
* No-na'cris 
No'ni-us 
Non'ni-us 
No'pi-a, or 
Cno'pi-a 
No'ra 
No'rax 
Nor'ba 

Nor-ba'nus, C. 
Nor'i-cum 



NU 



«7 



Nor-^thip'pus 

Nor'd-a, 10 

No'thus 

No'nus 

No'ti-um, 10 

No'tus 

No-va'tu8 

No-vi-o-du'num 

No-vi-om'a-gum 

No'viHus Pns'cus 

Non'nus 

Nox 

Nu-ce'ri-a 

Nu-ith'o-nes 

Nu'ma Pom-piri- 

us 
Nu-ma'na 
Nu-man'ti-a 
Nu-man-ti'Da 
Nu-ma'nus Rem'it- 

lus 
Nu'me-nes 
Nu-me'ni-a, or 

Ne-o-me'ni-a 
Nu-me'ni-us 
Nu-me-ri-a'nus 
Nu-me'ri-us 
•|- Nu-mi'cu8 
Nu'mi-da 
Nu-mid'i-a 
Nu-mid'i-us 
Nu'mi-tor 
Nu-mi-to'ri-us 
Nu-mo'ni-us 



* Nonacri8.-^labbe, Ainsworth, Gouldman, and Holyoke, give this 
word the aotepenultimate accent ; but Lempriere, LittletOD, and the 
Gradoses, place the accent, more agreeably to aMiiogyy on the penul- 
Umate. 

t Numims, -^^ ^ —-Oiir fleet ApoUo sends 



Where Tuscan Tyber rolls with rapid force, 
And where Numicusopen hk holy soBrce— .1 



.Dryobr. 



88 NY NY 

• Ntun'mi-iifl Nyc-tim'e-nc 

Nun-co'Te-iu Nyc'd-mus 

f Nun'di-na Nym-bfls'tun 

Nun'di-nae Nym'phae 

Nur'gae Nymphs (Eng.) 

Nur^8ci-a Nym-ph»'um 

Nur'si-a, 19 Nym-phae'us 

Nu'tri-a Nym-phid'i-us 

Nyc-tel8 Nym'phia 

Nyo-te'li-u8 Nym-pho-do'rus 

Nyc'te-us Nym-pho-lep'tes 



NY 

Nym'phon 
Nyp'si-us I 

Ny sa, or Nys'saj 

Ny-88B'US I 

Njr'sas 
Ny-sel-U8 
Ny-si'a-des I 

Ny-sig'e-na | 
Ny-si'ros 
Nys'sa 



OC 

O'a-rus 

O-ar'ses 

O'a-sis 

O-axes 

O-ax'us 

Ob-ul-tro'ni-us 

O-ca'le-a, or 

O-ca'U-a 
J 0-ce'a-na 
O-cc-an'i-des, and 

0-ce-aii4ti-des 
0«ee'a«nu8 

Ocha 



OD 

O-che'si-us, 11 

O'chus, 12 

Oc'nus 

0-cric'u-lum 

0-crid'i-on 

0-cris'i-a 

Oc-ta-cilli-us 

Oc-ta'vi-a 

Oc-ta-vi-a'nus 

Oc-ta'vi-us 

Oc>toro-phum 

O-cy'a-lus 

O-cyp'e-te, 8 

O-cyr'o-e 

Od4-4ia'tiis 



(EB 

0-di'nu8 
O-di'tes 
Od-o-a'cer 
Od-o-roan'ti, 3 
Od'o-nes 
Od'ry-sffi 
0-dys'se-a 
Odfyssey (Eng.) 
§ (E-ag'a-rus, and 

(E'a-ger, 6 
(E-an'thse, and 

(E-anthi-a 
CE'ax,5 
(E.WU-a 
CEl/a-Ius, 5 
(El/a-res 



t ^ < ^^^ ^^ ^^^.'^.<^fH»w^ l^ltces tlie accest «i the peBohimate syl* 
kM^ ^^«l^ x^^riNl i iMt Ui^^^ CiiJiiMi, asad Holyoke, on the ante- 
y» W»U < N » n» K AMn^m^Mtli iMHk$ It In tlie saaw nuuier among the 
4^f^|fM^^K>i^ IN# <^Mi tli^K^ lt<^ «aT 4Miht af iu pnipnety. 

I ^^NNk'tN^ ^ y«N«ili^ M« tlti^ C^iik#i^ «• fanr theacccBt on the penul- 
I^MM^ y4'w^^»»( tlt^ t'tnniwfciiiai, tint urb scvtccIt erer hear the 

^WWFP^Rf^ *^^rMV4 ^M V^4H^^MIKVMK MI^MMVBkBS VvBCV«n9ea 

^ «>^iiirw>%ajk Y^ il^ l>^l^ l^ ^ | ^ lils^ «^ n ywa— rti as the single 
v^xr^^ liri»»i M W ^' > « »ai w f i i i i tt a i lii g tiifc tn — i rf^ was right, the 
^w>»»JN-^!>^^w»4 H I ^ <<»^li»»awiJ^ iaaUproba- 

l«#^\ W^ Vn« lili^ ^Niwtoi «r««r«liiaMi«rw— 6ce the word i£^ 



OE 

CE-cWli-a 

CE-cli'des 

nEc'le-us 

GEc-u-me'ni-us 

OEd-i-po'di-a 

GEd'i-pus, 5 

CE'me, 8 

CE-nan'thes 

CE'ne 

OE'ne-a 

CE'ne-us 

OS-ni'des 

[En'o-e 

CE-nom'a-us 

CE'non 

□E-no'na, 7 

OE-no'ne, 8 

CE-no'pi-a 

CE-nop'i-des 

CE-no'pi-on 

tEn'o-tri, 3 

OE-no'tri-a 

CE-nofri-des 

OEn'o-trus 

CE-nu'sae 

CE'o-nus 

CEr'o-e, 8 

(Eta, 7 

CEf y-lus, or 



OL 

CEfy-lum 
0-feriu8 
O'fi, 3 
Og-dol'a-pis 
Og-do'ru8 
Og'mi-us 
Og'o^a,; 
0-guVni-a 
* Og'y-ges 

Ogy'gi-des 

Og'y-ris 

0-ic'le-us 

O-il'e-us 

0-i-li'des 

Ola-ne, 8 

0-la'nus 

Orba,orOrbus 

om^a 

Ol'bi-us 
01-chinl-um 
O-le'a-ros, or 

Ol'i-ros, 20 
O-le'a-trum 
Olen 
Ol'e-nus, or 

Ore-num, 20 
OVga-sys 
01-i-gyr'tis 



ON 



80 



O-lin'thus 

Ol-i-tin'gi 

Orii-u8 

Ol-lov'i-co 

Ol'mi-us 

0-Un'i-8B 

Ol-o-phyx'us 

O-lym'pe-um 

O-lym'pi-a 

O-lym'pi-as 

0-lym-pi-o-do'ru9 

0-lym-pi-os'the- 

nes 
OJym'pi-us 
O-lym'pus 
Ol-ym-pu'sa . 
O-lyn'thus 
f 0-lyn'thi-ug , 
OJy'ras 
O-l/aon 
0-ma'ri-us 
Om'bi, 3 
Om'bri, 3 
Om'o-le 
Om-o-pba'gi-a 
J Om'pha-Ie 
Om'pha-lo8 
O-nse'um, or 

O-ae'ne-um 



* Ogyges. — This word is by all oar prosodiats accented on the iirat 
syllable, and consequently it mast sonnd exactly as if wiritten Odd^je^ 
fez; and this, however odd to an English ear, mast be complied with. 

t Olynthius. — (Aristotelis discipulus^ et consobrinas* Vide Not. 
in Cic. de Orat. p. 119.) 

t Omphale, — The accentuation which a mere English speaker would 
give to this word was experienced several years ago by a pantomime 
called Hercules and Omphale: when the whole town concurred in 
placing the* accent on the second syllable, till some c^ssical scholars 
)?ave a check to this pronunciation by placing the accent on the first. . 
This, however, was far from banishing the former manner, and dis- 
tnrbed the public ear without correcting it. Those, however, who 
would not wish to be numbered among the vulgar, must take care to 
avoid the penultimate accent. 



88 



NY 



• Num'mi-us 

Nun-co're-U8 

+ Nun'di-na 

Nun'di-nae 

Nur'sae 

Nur'sci-a 

Nur'si-a, 19 

Nu'tri-a 

Nyc-te'is 

NycNte'li-u8 

Nyc'te-us 



NY 

Nyc-tim'e-ne 

Nyc'ti-mus 

Nym-bae'um 

Nym'phae 

Nymphs (EDg.) 

Nym-phse'um 

Nym-phae'us 

Nym-phid'i-us 

Nym'phis 

Nym-pho-do'rus 

Nym-pho-lep'tes 



NY 

Nym'phon 

Nyp'si-us 

Ny sa, or Nys'sa 

Ny-sae'us 

Njr'sas 

Ny-se'i-us 

Ny-si'a-des 

Ny-siff'e-na 

Ny-si ros 

Nys'sa 



OC 

O'a-eus 

0-ar'ses 

O'a-sis 

0-ax'es 

O-ax'us 

Ob-ul-tro'ni-us 

0-cale-a, or 

0-cali-a 
X 0-ce'a-na 
0-ce-an'i-des, and 

0-ce-an-itl-des 
O-ce'a-nus 
0-ce'i-a 
O-cellus 
0-ce'lum 
O'cha 



OD 

0-che'si-us, 11 

O'chus, 12 

Oc'nus 

0-ciic'u-lum 

O-crid'i-on 

O-cris'i-a 

Oc-ta-cilli-us 

Oc-taVi-a 

Oc-ta-vi-a'nus 

Oc-ta'vi-us 

Oc-toro-phum 

0-cy'a-las 

0-cyp'e-te, 8 

O-cyr'o-e 

Od~e-na'tus 

O-des'sus 



(EB 

0-di'nus 
O-di'tes 
Od-o-a'cer 
Od-o-man'ti, 3 
Od'o-nes 
Od'ry-sae 
0-dys'se-a 
Od'yssey (Eng.) 
§ (E-ag'a-rus, and 

(E'a-ger, 6 
(E-an'thae, and 

CE-an'thi-a 
GE'ax, 5 
GE-bali-a 
GEb'a-lus, 5 
(Eb'a-res 



• iVtfmmtux.— (De Orat. 193, et in notft.) 

f ^undina.-^LeinpHere places the accent on the penultimate syl- 
lable of this word ; but Labbe, Gonldman, and Holyoke, on the ante- 
penultimate. Ainsworth marks it in the same manner among the 
appellatives, nor can there be any donbt of its propriety. 

t Oceana. — So prone are the English to lay the accent on the penul- 
timate of words of this termination, that we scarcely ever hear the 
famous Oceana of Harrington pronounced otherwise. 

§ CEagarus, — This diphthong, like <zr, is pronounced as the single 
vowel e. If the conjecture concerning the sound of a was right, tiie 
middle sound between the d and e of tbe ancients must, in all proba- 
bility, have been the sound of our a in toater^-^Hee the word JEa» 



;0E 

(E-cVli-a 

(E-cli'des 

GEc'le-us 

CEc-u-me'iii-us 

(Ed-i-po'di-a 

(Ed'i-pus, 6 

CE'me, 8 

(E-nan^thes 

(E'ne 

(E'ne-a 

CE'ne-us 

CE-ni'des 

CEn'o-c 

CE-nom'a-us 

(E'non 

CE-no'na, 7 

CE-no'ne, 8 

CE-no'pi-a 

CE-nopl-des 

(E-no'pi-on 

(En'o-tri, 3 

(E-no'tri-a 

CE-nofri-des 

OEn'o-trus 

(E-nu'sae 

(E'o-nus 

OSr'o-e, 8 

(E'te, 7 

(Efy-lus, or 



OL 

CEfy-lum 
0-feriu8 
O'fi, 3 
Og-dora-pis 
Og-do'rus 
Og'mi-us 

Og'o^a,; 
0-gul'ni-a 

O-gyg'i-a 

Ogy'gi-des 

Og'y-ris 

0-ic'le-us 

O-il'e-us 

0-i-li'des 

Ol'a-ne, 8 

0-la'nus 

Orba, or Ol'bus 

Orbi-us 
01-chin1-um 
O-le'a-ros, or 

Ori-ros, 20 
O-le'a-trum 
Olen 
Ore-nus, or 

OVe-num, 20 
OVga-sys 
Ol-i-gyr'tis 



ON 



80 



O-Iin'thus 

01-i-tin'gi 

Orii-U8 

Ol-lov'i-co 

Ol'mi-us 

O-lin'iae 

Ol-o-phyx'us 

O-lym'pe-um 

0-lym'pi-a 

O-lym'pi-as 

0-lym-pi-o-do'ru9 

0-lym-pi-os'the- 

nes 
0-lym'pi-us 
O-lym'pus 
Ol-ym-pu'sa 
O-lyn'thus 
f 0-lyn'thi-ug , 
O-ly'ras 
0-ly'aon 
0-ma'ri-us 
Om'bi, 3 
Om'bri, 3 
Om'o-le 
Om-o-pha^gi-a 
X Om'pha-ie 
Om'pha-lo8 
O-nae'um, or 

O-ae'ne-um 



* Ogygea. — ^Tbis word is by all oar prosodidts accented on the iirat 
syllable, and consequently it must sound exactly as if wiritten Odd'Jt" 
jez; and this, however odd to an English ear, must be complied with. 

t Olynthius. — (Aristotelis discipulus^ et consobrinns* Vide Not. 
in Cic. de Orat. p. 119.) 

t Omphale. — The accentuation which a mere English speaker would 
give to this word was experienced several years ago by a pantomime 
called Hercules and Omphale: when the whole town concurred in 
placing the' accent on the second syllable, till some classical scholars 
)?aye a check to this pronunciation by placing the accent on the first. . 
This, however, was far from banishing the former manner, and dis- 
tnrbed the public ear without correcting it. Those, however, who 
would not wish to be numbered among the vulgar, must take care to 
avoid the penultimate accent. 



W OP 

0-na'ru8 

O-nas'i-mas 

O-na'tas 

On-ches'tiis 

0-ne'i-on 

0-nes1-mu8 

On-e-sip'pus 

O-ne'si-us, 10 

On-e-tor'i-des 

On-e-sic'ri-tus 

O'ni-um 

On'o-ba, 10 

0-noch'o-nus 

On-o-toac'ri-tus 

On-o-mar'chus 

On-o-mas-tor^i-des 

On-o-mas'tus 

On'O-phas 

On'o-phis 

On-o-san'der 

On'y.tbes 

0-pa'li-a 

O-phe'las 

O-phel'tes 

O-plien'sis 

O'phi-a 

0-phi'6n, 29 

0-phi-o'ne-us 

0-phi*u'cus 

•0-phi«u'sa 

Op'i-ci 

O-pig'e-na 

O'pis 

0-piri-us 

Op'i-ter 

0-pim'i-u8 

Op-i-ter-gi'ni 

0-pi'tes 

Op'pi-a 



Oil 

Op-pi^a'nus 
Op-pi-an'i-cus 
Op-pi'di-us 
Op'pi-U8 
Ops 

Op-ta'tu8 
Op-ti'mi-us 
Opus 
O'ra, 7 
0-rac'u-lum 
O-rae'a 
Or'a-sus 
Or-be'lus 
Or-bil'i-us 
Or-bo'na 
Or'ca-des 
Or-chalis 
Or'cha-mus 
Or-chom'e-nus, or 
Or-chom'e-num 
Or'cus 
Or-cyn'i-a 
Or-des'sus 
O-re'a-des 
Ore-ads (Eng.) 
O're-as 
0-res^t8B 
0-res'tes 
0-res'te-um 
Or-es-ti'dae 
Or'e-taB 
Or-e-ta'ni, 3 
Or-e-tU'i-a 
0-re'um 

Or'ga, or Or'gas 
Or-ges'sum 
Or-get'o-rix 
Or'gi-a 
0-rib'a-sus 



OH 

Orf-cuflQ, or 

Or'i-cus 
O'ri-ens 
Ori-gen ' 

0-ri'go 
0-ri'nus 
O-ri-ob'a-tes 
Orion, 29 
0-ris'sus 

Or-i-sulla Liv'i-i 
O-ri'tae, 5 
O-rith-y-ta 
0-rifi-as, 10 
O-ri-un'dus 
Or'me-nus, 20 
Or'ne-a 
Or'ne-us 
Or-ni'thon 
Or'ni-<tus 
Or-nos'pa-des 
Or-nyt'i-oii, 11 
0-ro bi-a 
0-ro'des 
O-rae'tes 
0-rom'e-dbn 
O-ron'tas 
0-ron'tes 
Or-o-pher'nes 
O-ro'pus 
0-fo4i-iis, 11 
* Or'phe-us 
Or-sed'i-ce 
Or-sels 
Or-sillus 
Or-siro^chuB 
Or'si-nes, 4 
Or-sip'pus 
Or'ta-lus, M. 
Or^thag'o-ras 



* Orp/ie««.^See Idomeneus. 



OS 

Or'tlie, 8 

Or-thae'a 

CthU, 4, 7 

(Vthms 

Or-tyg'i-a 

Or-tyg'i-iis 

0-ry-an'der 

* 0-ry<us 

axyx 

Os-cho-plio'ri-a 

Os'ci, 3 

Os'ci-us, 10 

Os'cua 

O-sin'i-us 

O-si'rijs 

0-sis'iBi^i 

Os'phargus 

Os-iho-ene 



ov 

Os'sa 

Os-te-o'deB 

Os'ti-a 

Os-to'ri-us 

Os-tro'go-thi 

Os-y-man'dy-as 

Ot-a-cil'i-u8 

O-ta'nes 

Oth'ma-rus 

0'thQ,M.Sal'vi-ii6 

Oth-ry-o'ne-U8 

athrys 

0'tre-u8 

O-tri'a-des 

O-troe'da 

O tys 

O-vid'i-us 



02 91 

Ovid (Eng.) 

O-vin'i-a 

0-vin*i-U8 

Ox-ar*4es 

Ox-id'a-tes 

Ox'i-mes 

Ox-i'o-nsB 

Ox'us 

Ox-y'a-Tes 

Ox-y-ca'nu8 

Ox-yd'ra-c8B 

Ox'y-lus 

Ox-jm'thes 

Ox-yp'o^rus 

Ox-y-rin-<;hi't8B 

Ox-y-ryn'ohu8 

O-zi-nes 

Oz'oJee, or Oz'o-li 



PA 

Pa-ca^ti-a'i?us, 

21 
Pac'ci-us, 10 
Pa'ches, 12 
Pa-chi'jiiis 
Pa-eo^Bi-us* 
Pac'o-rus 
Pac-to'kis 
Pac'ty-as 
Pac'ty-es 
Pa-cu'vi-u8 
Pa-dae'i, 3 
Pad'u-a 



'PA 

Pa'dus 

Pa-du'sa 

Pae'an 

Pse'di-us 

Pse-ma'ni, 3 

Pae^oD 

Pee'o-nes 

Pee-o'ni-a 

Pae-on'i-des 

Pae'os 

Pae'sos 

Paes'tum 

Pae-to'vi-um 



PA 

Pae'tus Cae-cin'na 
Pag'a-sae, or 

Pag'a-sa 
Pag'a-sus 
Pa'gus 
Pa-la'ci-um, or 

Pa-la'ti-um, 10 
Pa-lae'a 
Pal-ae-ap'o-lis 
Pa-laB'mon, or 

Pal'e-mon 
Pa-laep'a-phos 
Pa-laBph'a-tus 



• Oryus. — ^And, at once, Broteas and Oryus slew: 
Oryus* mother, Myca!4, was known, 
Down from her sphere to draw the lab'rinjr moofi. 

Gakth'8 Otid. Mef, 



92 



PA 



Pa-laep'o-lis 
Pa-lKs'te 
Pal-ae-sti'na 
Pa-leS'ti'ne 

(Eng.) 
Pa-laB-8ti'nu8 
Pal-a-me'des 
Pa-lan'ti-a, 10 
Pa-lan'ti-um, 10 
Pal-a-ti'nus 
Pale-is, or Pa'lae 
Pales 

Pal fii'ri-us Su'ra 
Pa-li'ci, or Pa-lis'ci 
Pa-liri-a 
PaU-nu'rus 
Pal-i-sco'rum, or 

Pal-i-co'rum 
Pal'la-des 
PaUa'di-um 
Pal-la'di-us 
Pal-lan-te'um 
Pal-lan'ti-as 
Pal-lan'ti-des 
Pal-lan'ti-on, 28 
Pallas 
Pal-le'ne, 8 
Pal'ma 



PA 

* Pal-my'ra 

Pal-phu'ri-us 

Pal-mi'sos 

+ Pam'me-nes 

Pam'mon 

Pam'pa 

Pam'phi-lus 

Pam'phos 

Pam'phy-la 

Pam-phyFi-a 

Pan 

Pan-a-ce'a 

Pa-nse'ti-us, 10 

Pan'a-res 

Pan-a-ris'te 

Pan-ath-e-nae'a 

Pan-chae'a, or 
Pan-che'a, or 
Pan-cha'i-a 

Pan'da 

Pan'da-ma 

Pan-da'ri-a 

Pan'da-rus 

Pan'da-tes 

Pan-de'mus 

Pan'di-a 

Pan'di-on, 11 

Pan-do'ra 



PA 

Pan-do'si-a, 11 
Pan'dro-sos 
Pan'e-nus, or 

Pa-nae'us 
Pan-gae'us 
Pa-ni'a-sis 
Pa-ni-o'ni-um 
Pa'ni-us, 20 
Pan-no'ni-a 
Pan-om-phae'us 
Pan'o-jpe, or 

Pan-o-pe'a 
Pan'o-pes 
Pa-no'pe-us 
Pa-no'pi*on 
Pa-nop'o-lis 
Pa-nor'mus 
Pan'sa, C. 
Pan-tag-nos'tus 
Pan-ta'gy-as 
Pan-tale-on 
Pan-tau'chus 
Pan'te-us 
Pan'thi-des 
JPan-the'a 
X Pan'the-on 
Pan'the-us, or 

Pan'thus 



* Palmyra, — Nothinfc can be better fixed in an English ^r than 
the pennltimate accentuation of this word ; this pronanciation is 
adopted by Ainsworth and Lempriere. Oonldman and Holyokd seem 
to look the other way ; bnt Lalbbe says the more learned give this 
word the antepenultimate accent, and that this accent is more agree- 
able to the general rule. Those, however, must be pedantic cox- 
combs, who should attempt to disturb the received prommciation 
when in English, because a contrary accentuation may possibly be 
proved to be more agreeable to Greek or Latin. 

t Pammenes, — I find this word nowhere but in Lempriere, who ac- 
cents it on the penultimate ; but as all words of this termination have 
the antepenultimate accent, till this appears an exception I shall veo- 
ture to alter it. 

X Pantheon, — ^This word is universally pronounced with the accent 
on the second syllable in English, but in Latin it has its first syllable 



PA 

Pan-tho'i-des, 4 

Pan-ti-ca-pae'um 

Pan-tic'a-pes 

Pan-til'i-u8 

Pa-nya-sis 

Pa-ny'a-sus 

Pa-pae'us 

Pa-pha'ges 

Pa'phi-a 

Paph-la-go'ni-a 

Pa'phos 

Pa'phus 

Pa-pi-a'nus 

•Pa'pi-as 

Pa-pin-i-a'nus 

Pa-pin'i-us 

Pa-pir'i-a 

Pa-pir'i-us 

Pap'pus 

Pa-pjrr'i-us 

Par-a-bys'ton 

Par-a-di'sus 

Pa-raefa-C8B 

Par-8B-to'ni-um 

Par'a-li, 3 

Par'a-lus 

Pa-ra'si-a, 11 



PA 

Pa-ra'si-us, 11 
Par'cae 
Par'is 

Pa-ris'a-des 
Pa-ris'i-i, 4 
Part-sus 
Pa'ri-um 
Par'ma, 1 
Par-men'i-des 
Par-me'ni-o 
Par-nas'sus 
Par'nes 
Par-nes'sus 
Par'ni, 3 
Pa'ron 
Par-o-re'ia 
Pa'ros 

Par-rha'si-a, 10 
Par-rha'si-us, 10 
Par-tha-mis'i-ris 
Par-tha'on 
Par-the'ni-a 
Par-the'ni-ae, and 
Par-the'ni-i, 4 
Par-the'ni-des 
Par-the'Di-on 
Par-the'ni-us 



PA 93 

Par'the-non 

Par-then-o-pae'us 

Par-then'o-pe, 8 

Par'thi-a 

Par-thy-e'ne 

Pa-rys'a-de8 

f Par-y-sa'tis 

Pa-sar'ga-da 

Pa'se-as 

Pas'i-cles 

Pa-sic'ra-tes 

Pa-siph'a-e 

Pa-sith'e-a 

Pa-sit'i-gris 

Pas'sa-ron 

Pas-si-e'iras 

Pas'sus 

Pat'a-ra 

Pa-ta'vi-um 

Pa ter'cu-lus 

Pa-tiz'e-thes 

Pafmos 

Pa'trae 

Pa'tro 

Pa-tro'cU 

Pa-tro'cles 

{ Pa-tro'clus 



tccented ; and this accentuation makes so slight a difference to the 
ear, that it onght to have the preference. 

• Papias — This is the name of an early Christian writer, who first 
propa;;ated the doctrine of the Millennium ; and it is ^^nerally pro- 
nounced with the accent on the second syllable, but I believe cor- 
raptlvy since Labbe has adopted the antepenultimate accent, who 
most be well acquainted with the true pronunciation of ecclesiastical 
characters- 

t Parysatis, — Labbe tells ns that some prosodists contend that this 
word oaght to be accented on the antepenultimate syllable, and we 
find Lempriere has so accented it ; but so popular a tragedy as Alex« 
aoder, which every where accents the penultimate, has fixed this pro- 
nnociatidn ie our own country beyond a doubt. 

t Patroclus. — Lempriere, Ainsworth, Gouldman, add Holyoke^ 
accent the penultimate syllable of this word ; but Labbe the antepe- 
naltunate; onr gradnses pronounce it either way; but I do not 



m 



PE 



Pat-ro-di'des 
Pm'tron 
Patfro*u8 
Pa-tul'ci-ufl, 10 
Pau'la. 
Pau-li'na 
Pau-li'nus 
Pau'lus iE-myri- 

us 
Pa'vor 
Pau-sa'ni-as 
Pau'si-as, 11 . 
Pax 
Pax'os ; 
Pe'as 

Pe-da'ci-a, 10 
Pe-dae'us 
Pe-da'ni 
Pe-da'ni-us 
Paed'aHsus 
Pe-di'a-dis 
Pe-di'a-nus 
Pe'di-as 

Pe'di-us Blae'sus 
Pe'do 
Pe'dum 
Pe-gas'itJes 
Peg.'a-sis 
Peg'a-sus 
Peia-gon 
Pe-lar'ge 
Pe-las'gi, 3 
Pfe-las'gi-a, or 

Pe-las-gi'o-tis 
Pe-las'gus 
Pel-e-thro'ni-i, 4 



PE 

Pele'-us 

Pe-li'a-des 

Peli-as 

Pe-li'de» 

Pe-lig'ni 

Pe-lig-nus 

Pel-i-nse'us 

Pel-i-nae'um 

Peli-on 

Peli-um 

Pella 

PeUa'nae 

Pel-le'ne 

Pel-o-pe'a, or 

Pel-o-pi'a 
Pel-o-pe'i-a 
Pe-lop'i-das 
Pel-o-pon-ne'sus 
Pe'lops 
Pelor 
Pe-lo'ri-» 
Pe-lo'mna^ or 

Pe-lo'rus 
Pe-lu'si-um, 10 
Pe-na'tes 
Pen-da'li-um 
Pe-ne'i-a, Pen'e 
Pe-ne'li-us 
Pe-nero-pe 
Pe'ne-us, or 

Pe-ne'us 
Penl-das 
Pen-tap'o-lis 
Pen-the-si-le'a 
Pen'the-us 
Pen'thi-lus 



t-lS 



iPen'thy-lus 

Pep-ar-e'tlios 

Peph-te'do 

Pe-rae'a, 7 

Per-a-sip'pu8 

Per-co'pe, 8 

Per-co'si-us^ 11 

Per-co'te 

Per-dic'cas 

Per^dix 

Pe-ren'na 

Pe-ren'nis 

Pe're-u^ 

Per'ga 

Per'gJi'mus 

Per'ge, 8 

Per'gus 

Pe-ri-an'der 

Pe-ri-ar'chus 

Per-i-boe'a 

Per-i-bo'mi-us 

Per'i-cles 

Per-i-clym'e-nus 

Pe-rid'i-a 

Pe-ri-e-ge-tes 

Pe-ri-e'res 

Pe-rig'e-aes 

Pe-rig'oriie 

Per-i-la'us 

Per-i-le'u6 

Pe-rilla 

Pe-ririus 

Per-i-me'de, 8 

Per-i-mela 

Pe-rin'thus 

Per-i-pa-tet'i-ci, 3 



hesitate to prefer the pennltimate accent : and till some good reasoa 
}\e given for the contrary, I think Pairoclet the historian^ and Patroili 
a small island, ought to be pronounced with the same accentaatton as 
tli^ friend of Achilles. 



PE 

(Eng.) 
Pe-riph'anes 
Per'i-phas 
Pe-iipb^a-tu8 
Per-i-phe'mu8 
Per-pho-re'tu8 
Pe-]«E^a-4es 
Pe-ris'the-nes 
Pe-rifa-nus 
Per'i-tas , 
Per-i-to'ni-um 
Pe'ro, or Per'o-ne 
Per'o-e, 8 
Per-mes'sus 
Pei^o-la 

Per-pen'na, M. 
Per-pe-re'ne 
Per-ran'thes 
Per-AoB'bi-a 
Per'sa, or Per-sels 
Per'sae 
Per-sae'us 
Per-se'e 
Per-^e'is 
Per-seph'o-ne 
Per-sep'o-lis 
Per'se-us, or 

Per'ses 
Per'se-us 
Per'si-a, 10 
Per'sis 

Per'si-us FWcus 
Per'ti-nax 
Pe-ru'si-a, 10 
Pes-cen'ni-us 



PH 

Pes-si'nus 

Pe-ta'4i-a 

Pefa-lus 

Pc-te'li-a 

Pet-e-li'nu8 

Pe-te'on 

Pe'te-U8 

Pe-tili-a 

Pe-til'i-i, 3 

Pe-til'i-us 

Pet-o-si'ris 

Pe'tra 

Pe-trae'a 

Pe-trei'u8 

Pe-tri'num 

Pe-tro'ni-a 

Pe-tro'ni-us 

Pet'ti-us 

Peu'ce, 3 

Peu-ces'tes 

Peu-ce'ti-a, 10 

Peu-ci'ni, 4 

Peu-co-la'u8 

Pex-o-do'ru8 

Phaea 

Phae-a'ci-a, 10 

Phae'ax 

Phaedl-mus 

Phae'don 

Phae'dra 

Phae'dri-a 

Phae'drus 

Phaed'y-ma, 5 

Phae-mon'o-e 

Phaen-a-re'te 

Phae'ni-as 



PH 



g& 



Phasn'na 
Phaen'nis 
Phae-oc'o-mes- 
Phass'a-na 
Phaes'tum 
Pha'e-ton 
Pha-e-tcm-tl^'a-des 
Pha-e-tu'sa 
Phae'us 

Pha-ge'si-a, 10 
Pha'tae 
Pha-la^'cus 
Pha-lae'si-a, 11. 
Pha-lan'thua 
PhaVa-ris 
Pha'nas 
Phal'a-nis 
Phar^i-don 
Pha'le-as 
*Pha-le're-us 
Pha-le'ris 
Pha-k'ron, or 
Phare-rum 
Pha-le'rus 
Phali-aii 
Phalli -ca 
Pha-lys'i-ug, 10 
Pha-nae'us 
Fhanrarrae'^a 
Pha'nes 
Phati'o-cles 
Phan-o-de'iniis 
PhaIl.ta'si-4^ 10 
Pha'n^8 
Pha'on 
Pha'ra 



• PfcolCT-fiM.— There is some doubt ainong the learned whether 
thU word onght to be pronounced in three or four syllables ; that is, 
a^J^hal-etreusy or PhU'le^e-ut. The latter mode however, with the' 
accent on the antepenultimate^ seems to be the most eligible*. 



96 



PH 



Pha-rac'i-des, 24 
Pha-ri'a, and 

Phe'rse 
Pha-ras'ma-nes 
Pha'rax 
Pha'ris. 
Phar-me-cu'sa 
Phar-na-ba'zus 
Phar-na'ce-a 
*Phar-na'ces 
Phar-na-pa'tes 
Phar-nas'pes 
Phwr'nus 
Pha'ros 
Phar-sa'li-a 
Phar'te 
Pha'rus 
Pha-ru'si-i, or 

Pbau-ra'si-i, 4 
Pha'si-as 
Phar'y-bus 
Pha-ryc'a-don 
Pbar'y-^e 
Pba-se'us 
Pba-si-a'na 
Pha'sis 
Phas'sus 
Pbau'da 
Pbav-o-ri'nu8 
Pba-yllus 
Pbe'a, Or Pbei-a 
Pbe-ca'dum 
Pbfe'ge-us, or 

Phle'ge-us 
PberU-a 
Pberio-e 
Pbellus 



PH 

Phe'mi-us 
Pbe-mon'o-e, 8 
Pbe-ne'um 
Phe'ne-us (lacus) 
Pbe'rae 
Pbe-rae'us 
Pbe-raules 
Pbe-rec'lu8 
Pbe-rec'ra-tes 
Pber-e-cy'des 
Pbe-ren-da'tes 
Pber-e-ni'ce, 29 
Pbe'res 

Pbe-re'ti-as, 10 
Pber-e-ti'ma 
Pbert-num 
Pbe'ron 
Pbi'a-le 
Pbi-a'li-a, or 
Pbi-gali-a 
Phi'a-lus 
Pbic'o-res 
Pbid'i-as 
Pbid1-le 
Pbi-dip'pi-des 
Pbi^tl-a, 10 
Pbi'don 
Pbid'y-le 
Pbig-a'le-i 
Pbila 

Pbil-a-derpbi-a 
Pbil-a-derpbus 
Pbilae 
Pbi-lseni 
Pbi-lse'us 
Phi-lam'Hion 
Pbi-lar'cbus, 12 



PH 

Phi-le'mon 
Phi-le'ne, 8 
Pbi-le'ris 
Phil'e-ros 
Pbi-le'si-us, 19 
Pbil-e-tae'rus 
Phi-le'tas 
Pbi-le'ti-us, 10 
Pbill-das 
PbiH^es 
Pbi-lin'na 
Pbi-li'nus 
Pbi-lip'pe-i 
Pbi-lip'pi 
Pbi-lip'pi-des 
Pbi-lip'po-Iis 
Pbi-lip-pop'o-lis 
Phi-lip'pus 
Pbi-lis'cus 
Pbi-lis'ti-on, 11 
Pbi-lis'tus 
Pbirio 
Pbilo 

Pbil-o-boe'o-tU8 
Pbi-locb'o-rus 
Pbil'o-cles 
Pbi-loc'ra-tes 
Pbil-oc-te'tes 
Pbil-o-cy'prus 
Phil-o-da-me'a 
Pbil-o-de'mus 
Pbi-lod'i-ce 
Pbil-o-la'us 
Pbi-loro-gus 
Pbi-lom'a-cbe 
Pbi-lom'bro- 
tus 



. * .Pharnaces, — All oor prosodists accent the antepenultirnate sylla- 
ble of this word; bat an English ear is strongly. inclined to accent 
the pennltimate, as in Arbacea and Ar$ace»y which see. 



PH 

•PhU-o-me'di-a 

Phil-o-me'dus 

Phil-o-me'la 

PhU-o-me'lus 

Philon 

Phi-lon'i-des 

PhaVnis 

Phi-lon'o-e, 8 

Phi-lon'o-me 

Phi-lon'o-mus 

Phil'o-nus 

Phi-lop'a-ter 

PhilVphron 

Phil-o-poe'men 

Phi-Wo-phus 

Phi-log'tra-tus 

Phi-lotas 

Phi-lofe-ra 

Phi-lot'i-mus 

Phi-lo'tis 

Phi-lox'e-nus 

Phi-lyrU-us 

PhU'y-ra 

PhUy-res 

Phi-ljnr'i-des 

Phi-ne'us 

Phin'ta 

Phin'ti-as, 10 

Phla 

Phleg'e-las 

Phl^e-thon 

Phle'gi-as . 

Phle'gon 

Phle'gra 

Phle'gy-e, 6, 8 

Phle'gy-as 



PH 

Phli'as 

Phli'us 

Phloe'us 

Pho-be'tor 

Pho-cae'a 

Pho-cen'ses, Pho- 

cae'i, and Pho' 

ci-ci, 3, 10 
Pho-ciri-des 
Pho'ci-OD, 10 
Pho'cis 
Pho'cus 
Pho-cyll-des 
Phce1)e 
Phoe'be-um 
Phoeb'i-das 
Phoe-big'e-na 
PhoB'bus 
Phoe'mos 
Phoe-ni'ce, 29 
Phoe-nic'i-a, 10 
Phoe-nic'e-us 
Phoe-nic'i-des 
Phoe-ni'cus 
Phoe-ni-cu'sa 
Phoe-nis'sa 
Phoenix 
Phor(« 
Pholus 
Phor'bas 
Phor'cus, or 

Phor'cys 
Phor-cy'nis 
Phor'mi-o 
Phor'mis 
Pho-ro'ne-us 



PH 97 

Pho-ro'nig 

Pho-ro'ni-um 

Pho-ti'nus 

Pho'ti-u8, 10 

Phox'us 

Phra-a'teg 

Phra-afi-ces 

Phra-da'tes 

Phra-gan'de 

Phra-na'tes 

Phra-nic'a-tes 

Phra-or'tes 

Phras'i-cles 

Phrasl-mus 

Phra'si-us, 10 

Phra-ta-pher'nes 

Phri-a-pa'ti-us, 10 

Phrix'us 

Phron'i-ma 

Phron'tis 



Phni 



ri, 3 



Phry'ges, 6 

Phryg'i-a 

Phr/ne, 6, 8 

Phryn'i-cus 

Phrjr'nis 

Phiy'no 

Phi^x'us 

Phth-i'a, 14 

Phthi-o'tis 

Ph/a 

Ph/cus 

Phyra^e 

Phil'a-cus 

Phy-lar'chiis 

Phylas 



• PhUomedia, — Nor less by Philomedia known on earth; 

A name derived immediate from her birth. 

CooKB's Heaiody Tkeog, v. 31 1, 
F 



98 



PI 



Phy'le 
Phyre-is, 20 
Phy-le'ug 
Phyl'i-ra 
Phyl'la 
PhyUa'li-a 
Phyl-lel-us 
Phyllis 
PhyHi-us 
PhyUod'o-ce 
Phyllos 
Phyllus 
Phy-scel'la 
Phy-rom'a-chus 
Phys'co-a 
Phys'con 
Phys'cos 
Phys'cus 
Phy-tal'i-des 
Phyt'a-lus 
Phy'ton 
Phyx'i-um 
Pi'a, or Pi-a'li-a 
Pi'a-sus 
Pi-ce'ni, 3 
Pi-cen'ti-a, 10 
Pic-en-ti'ni, 4 
Pi-ce'num 
Pi'cra 

Pic'tae, or Pic'ti 
Pic-ta'vi, or 
Pict'o-nes 
Pic-ta'vi-um 
Pic'tor 
Pi'cus 
Pi-do'rus 
Pid'y-tes 
Pi'e-lus 
Pi'e-ra 
Pi-e'ri-a 
Pi-er'i-des 



PI 

Pi'e-ris 
Pi'e-rus 
Pi'e-tas 
Pi'gres 
Pi-lum'nufi 
Pim'pla 
Pim-ple'a 
Pim-ple'i-des 
Pim-ple'e-des 
Pim-pra'na 
Pin'a-re 
Pi-na'ri-us 
Pin'da-rus 
Pin'dar (Eng.) 
Pin'da-sus 
Pin-de-nis'sus 
Pin'dus 
Pin'na 
I^in'thi-as 
Pi-o'ni-a 
Pi-rae'us, or 
Pi-rae'e-us 
Pi-re'ne 
Pi-rith'o-us 
Pi'rus 
Pi'sa 
Pi'sae 
Pi-sae'us 
Pi-san'der 
Pi-sa'tesjor Pi-sae'i 
Pi-sau'rus 
Pi-se'nor 
Pk'e-us 
Pisl-as, 10 
Pi-si'di-a 
Pi-sid'i-ce 
Pi'sis 

Pis-is- tratl-dae 
Pis-is-trat'i-des 
Pi-sis'tra-tus 
Pi'so 



PL 

Pi-so'nis 

Pis'si-rus 

Pis'tor 

Pi'sus 

Pi-suth'nes 

Pit'a-ne 

Pith-e-cu'sa 

Pith'e-us 

Pi'tho 

Pith-o-la'us 

Pi-tho'le-on 

Pi'thon 

Pi'thys 

Pit'ta-cus 

Pit'the-a 

Pit'the-cus 

Pit-thels 

Pit'the-us 

Pit-u-a'ni-us 

Pit-u-la'ni, 3 

Pit-y-ae'a 

Pit-y-as'sus 

Pit-y-o-ne'sus 

Pit-y-u'sa 

Pla-cen'ti-a, 10 

Plac-i-de-i-a'nus 

Pla-cid'i-a 

Pla-cid'i-us 

Pla-na'si-a, 10 

Plan-ci'na 

Plan'cus 

Pla-tae'a 

Pla-tae'ae 

Pla-ta'ni-us 

Plato 

Plau'ti-a, 10 

Plau'ti-us 

Plau-ti-a'nus 

Plau-she-cdnus 

Plau-tiria 

Plau'tus 



PL 

Plei'a-des 

•lei'o-ne 

*lem-myr'i-um 

lem'ne-us, 29 

^leu-ra'tu8 

^leu'ron 

?lex-au're 

Plex-ip'pus 

Plinl-us 

Plin'y (Eng.) 

Plin-thi'ne 

Plis-tar'chus 

Plis'tha-nus 

Plis'the-nes 

Plis-ti'nus 



PL 

Plis-to'a-nax 

Plis-to'nax 

Plig-to-ni'ces, 30 

Plo'te 

Plo-ti'na 

Plot-i-nop'o-lis 

Plo-ti'nus 

Plo'ti-us, 10 

Plu-tar'chus 

Plu'tarch (Eng.) 

Plu'ti-a, 10 

Plu'to 

Plu-to'ni-um 

Plu'tus 

Plu'vi-us 



P(E 99 

Plyn-te'ri-a 

Pnig'e-us, 13 

Pob-lic'i-us, 24 

Pod-a-lirt-us 

Po-dar'ce, 8 

Po-dar'ces 

Po-da'res 

Po-dar'ge 

Po-dar'gus 

Poe'as 

Poec'i-le, 24 

Poe'ni, 3 

Poe'on 

Poe-o'ni-a 

Poe'us 



• Pleiades. 

When with their domes the slow.pac'd snails retreat. 

Beneath some foliage from the burning heat 

Of the Pleiades, your tools prepare ; 

The ripen'd harvest then deserves your care. 

Cooke's Hesiod, Works and Days* 
The translator had adhered strictly to the original nxmaitf, in 
making this word four syllables. Virgil has done the same : 
Ple'iadaSf Hyadas, claramque Lycaonis, Arcton. 

Georgic. I. 
Bot Ovid has contracted this word into three syllables : 
Pleiades incipinnt humeros relevare paternos. 

Fasti, iv. p. 169. 
The latter translators of the Classics have generally contracted this 
word to three syllables. Thus in Ogilby's translation of Virgirs 
Georgics, b. 1. 

First let the eastern Pleiades go down, 
And the bright star in Ariadne's crown. 
The Pleiades and Hyades appear; 
The sad companions of the turning year. 

Creech's Manilius. 
But Dryden has, to the great detriment of the poetical sound of 
this word, anglicised it, by squeezing it into two syllables. 
What are to him the sculpture of the shield. 
Heaven's planets, earth, and ocean's wat*ry field. 
The Pleiads, Hyads, less and greater Bear, 
Undipp'd in seas, Orion's angry star? 

Ovid's Met, b. 12. 

This unpleasant contraction of Dryden's seems not to have been 

much followed. Elegant speakers are pretty uniform in preferring 

the trisyllable ; but a considerable variety appears in the sound of 

the diphthong ei. Most speakers pronounce it like the substantive 

f2 



oan^»^€ 



100 PO 

Po'gon 

Po'la 

*PoVe-mo 

Pol-e-mo-cra'ti-a 

Pore-mon 

Po-le'nor 

Poli-as 

Po-li-or-ce'tes 

Po-lis'ma 

Po-lis'tra-tus 

Po-li'tes 

Pol-i-to'ri-um 

Pol4en'ti-a, 10 

Pol-lin'e-a 

Porii-o 



PO 

Porus 

Polli-us Felix 

PoUu'ti-a, 10 

Pollux 

Po-lo'ni-a 

Polus 

Po-lus'ca 

Pol-y-ee'nus 

Pory-nus 

Pol-y-ar'chus 

Po-lyM-das 

Po-lybl-us, or 

PoVy-bus 
Pol-y-boe'a 
Pol-y-boe'tes 



PP 

Pol-y-bo'tes 
Pol-y-ca'on 
Pol-y-car'pus 
Pol-y-cajs'te 
Po-lych'arTes 
Pol-y-cle'a 
Poly-cles 
Pol-y-cle'tu8 
Po-lyc'ra-tes 
Pol-y^Kjre'ta, or 
Pol-y-cri'ta 
Po-lyc'ri-tus 
Po-lyc'tor 
Pol-y-das'raon 
Po-lyd'a-mas 



eye ; and this pronunciation is defended by the common practice io 
most schools of sounding the diphthong u in this manner in appella- 
tives ; but though Greek appellatives preserve the oiiginal sound of 
their letters, as pXavrU, T^i^inoif^ », r. x. where the t does not slide 
into sh, as in Latin words ; yet proper names, which are transplanted 
into all languages, partake of the soil into which they are received, 
and fall in with the analogies of the language which adopts them. 
There isy therefore, no more reason for preserving the sound of u Id 
proper names, than for pronouncing the c like k in Pkocum^ Lace- 
dtsmon, &c. 

But perhaps it will be said, that our diphthong ei has the sound of 
eye as well as the Greek u. To which it may be answered, that this 
is an irregular sound of these vowels, and can scarcely be produced 
as an example, since it exists but in either^ neither, height, and steigkt. 
The two first words are more frequently and analogically pronounced 
eether, veetker; and height is often pronounced, so as to rhyme witb 
weight, and, would, in all probability, be always so pronojuiced, but 
for the false supposition, that the abstract must preserve the sound 
of the verb or adjective from which it is derived; and with respect 
to sleight, though Dr. Johnson says it ought to be written slight, as 
we sometimes see it, yet, if we observe his authorities, we shall find 
that several respectable authors spelt the word in this manner; and 
if we consult Junius and iSkinner, particularly the last, we shall see 
the strongest reason from etymology to prefer this spelling, as in all 
probability it comes from sly. The analogical pronunciation there- 
fore of the diphthong in our own language is eithjy as heard in t?ei», 
rein, <&c, or in perceive, receive, &c. The letter i$ adopted by manv 
speakers in the present word, as if written Pleeades; but Flyades, 
though less tinalogical, must be owned to be the more polite and 
literary pronfuoK^iation. — See note on Elegia in the Terminational 
Vocabulary. 

• Polemo Potius. (Vide de Orat. 257.) 



PO 

Pol-y-dam'na 

Pol-y-dec'tes 

Pol-y-deu-ce'a 

Pol-y-do'ra 

Pol-y-do'rus 

Pol-y-aB-mon'i-des 

Pol-y-gi'ton 

Po-lyg'i-us 

Pol-yg-no'tus 

Pol-y-hym'ni-a, 

and Fo-lym'ni-a 
Po-lyg'o-nu8 
Pol-y-id'i-us 
Pol-y-la'us 
Po-lym'e-nes 
Pol-y-me'de ' 

Po-l3rin'e-don 
Pol-y-me'la 
Pol-ym-nes'tes 
Pol-ym-nes'tor 
Pol-y-ni'ces 
Po-ljni'o-e 
Pol-y-pe'mon 
Pol-y-per'chon 
Pol-y-phe'mu8 
PoVy-phemey Eng. 
Pol-y-phon'tes 
Pory-phron 



PO 

Pol-y-poe'tes 

Po-lys'tra-tus 

Pol-y-tech'nus 

Pol-y-ti-me'tus 

Po-lyt'i-on, 10 

Po-lyt'ro-pus 

Po-lyx'e-na 

Pol-yx-en'i-das 

Po-lyx'e-nus 

Po-lyx'o 

Pol-y-ze'lus 

Pom-ax-se'thres 

Po-me'ti-a, 10 

Po-me'ti-i, 3 

Pom-e-ti'na 

Po-mo'na . 

Pom-pei'a, 5 

Pom-pei-a'nu8 

Pom-pei'i, or 

Pom-pei'um 
Pom-pei-op'o-lis 
Pom-pei'us 
Pom-piri-a 
Pom-piri-us Nu' 

ma 
Pom-pilus 
Pom-pis'cus 
Pom-po'ni-a 



PO 101 

Pom-po'ni-u8 

Pom*po-8i-a'ttus 

Pomp-ti'ne 

Pomp'ti^nus 

Pom'pus 

Pon'ti-a, 10 

Pon'ti-cum ma're 

Pon'ti-cus 

*Pon-tid'i-u8 

Pon-ti'na 

Pon-ti'nu8, 

Pon'ti-us, 10 

Pon'tus 

Pon'tus Eu-xi'nufi 

•f-Po-piFi-a8 

JPo-pil'i-us Lae' 

nas 
Pop-lic'o-la 
Pop-pae'a Sa-bi'na 
Pop-paB'u8 
Pop-u-lo'ni-a 
Por'ci-a, 10 
Por'ci-us, 10 
Po-red'o-rax 
Po-ri'na 
Por-o-8e-le'ne 
Por-phjrr'i-on 
Por-phyrl-us 



• Pon*tdn«.— (De Orat. 204.) 

f Popi2i<u.— (MatronaDobilis Romae, prima in funeribns laudationc 
publica hoQorata. Vide not. in Cic. de Orat. 178.) 

X Popilvus Ltpfuu. — ^Nothing can shew the dignity of the Roman 
commonwealth and the terror of its arms more than the conduct of 
this man. He was sent as an ambassador to Antiochiis, king of 
Syria, and was commissioned to order that monarch to abstain from 
hoetilittes against Ptolemy, king of Egypt, who was an ally of Rome. 
Antiochus, who was at the head of his army when he received this 
order, wished to evade it by equivocal answers ; but Popilius, with a 
stick which he had in his hand, made a circle ronnd him on the sand, 
and bade him, in the name of the Roman senate and people, not to go 
beyond it before be spoke decisively. This boldness intimidated 
Antiochns : he withdrew his garrison from £gypt, and no longer 
meditated a war against Ptolemy. 



102 PR 

Por'ri-ma 
Por-sen'na, or 

Por'se-na 
Por'ti-a, and 

Por'ti-us, 10 
Porfmos 
Por-tum-na'li-a 
Por-tiun'nus 
Po'rus 
Po-si'des 
Pos-i-de'um 
Pos-i-dei'on (Gr.) 
Po-si'don 
Pos-i-do'ni-a 
Pos-i-do'ni-us 
Po'si-o, 10 
Post-hu'mi-a 
Post-hu'mi-us 
Post-ver'ta 
Pos-tu'mi-u8 
Po-tam'i-des 
Pot'a-mon 
Po-thi'nus 
Po'thoB 
Pot-i-dae'a 
Po-ti'na 
Po-tit'i-us, 24 
Pofni-ae 
Prac'ti-um, 10 
Prae'ci-a, 10 
Prae-nes'te 
Prae'sos 
Prae'sti, 3 
Prae'tor 
Prae-to'ri-us 
Prae-tu'ti-um, 10 
Prat'i-nas 
Prax-ag'o-ras 
Prax'i-as 



PR 

Prax-id'a-mas 

Prax-id'i-ce 

Prax'i-la 

Prax-iph'a-nes 

Prax'is 

Prax-ife-les 

Prax-ith'e-a 

Pre-u'ge-nes 

Prex-as'pes 

Pri-am'i-des 

Pri'a-mus 

Pri-a'pu8 

Pri-e'ne 

Pri'ma 

Pri'on 

Pris-ciria 

Pris'cus 

Pris'tis 

Pri-ver'nus 

Pri-ver'nuin 

Pro'ba 

Pro'bus, M. 

Pro'cas 

Proch'o-rus 

Proch'y-ta 

Pro-ciHus 

Pro-ciria 

Pro-cillus 

Procle-a 

Pro'cles 

Proc'ne 

Pro-cli'dae 

Proc-on-ne'sus 

Pro-co'pi-us 

Pro'cris 

Pro-crus'tes 

Proc'u-la 

Proc-u-lei'us, 5 

Proc'u-lus 



PR 

Pro'cy-on 1 

Prod'i-cus 
Pro-er'na 
Proefi-des 
Proe'tus 
Prog'ne 
Pro-la'us 
Prom'a-chus 
Pro-math'i-das 
Pro-ma'thi-on 
Prom'e-don 
Prom-e-nae'a 
Pro-me'the-i 
Pro-me'the-us, 29 
Pro-me'this, and 
Prom-e'tbi-des 
Prom'e-thus 
Prom'u-lus 
Pro-napl-des 
Pro'nax 
Pron'o-e 
Pron'o-mus 
Pron'o-us 
Pron'u-ba 
Pro-per'ti-us 
Pro-poefi-des 
Pro-pon'tis 
Prop-y-le'a 
Pros-chys'ti-us,10 
Pro-ser'pi-na, 28 
Pros' er-pineyEng. 
Pros-o-pi'tis 
Pro-sym'na 
Pro-tag'o-ras 
Prot-a-gorl des 
Pro'te-iCo-lum'nae 
Pro-tes-i-la'us 
Pro'te-us 
*Pro-tho-e'nor 



Protkoenor, — The hardy warriors whom Boeotia bred, 
Peneleus, Leitus, Protho'enor led. 

Pope's Horn. Iliad. 



PT 

Pro'the-u8 

Proth'o-u8 

Pro'to 

Pro-to-ge-ne'a 

Pro-tog'e-nes 

*Prot-o-ge-m'a 

fPro-to-me-di'a 

Prot-o-medu'sa 

Prox'e-nus 

Pru-den'ti-us, 10 

Pnim'ni-des 

Pru'sa 

Pru-sae'us 

Pru'si-as, 10 

Prym'no 

Pryfa-nes 

Pryt-a-ne'xim 

Pryt-a-nei'on, Gr. 

Pryfa-nis 

Psam'a-the, 15 

Psam'a-thos 

Psam-me-ni'tus 

Psam-metl-chus 

Psam^mis 

Psa'phis 

Psa'pho, 15 

Pse'cas 

Pso'phis 

Ps/che, 12, 15 

Psych'rus 

Psylli, 3, 16 

Ptele-um, 16 

Pter-e-la'us 

Pte'ri-a 



PY 

Ptol-e-der'ma 
Ptol-e-mae'um 
Ptol-e-mae'us 
PtoVe-my (Eng.) 
Tol'eme, 16 
Ptol-e-ma'is 
Ptory-chus 
Pto'cus 

Pub-lic'i-us, 10 
Pub-lid-a, 24 
Pub-lic'o-la 
Pub'li-us 
Pul-che'ri-a, 12 
Pu'ni-cum bel' 

lum 
Pu'pi-us 
Pu-pi-e'nus 
Pup'pi-U8 
Pu-te'o-li, 3 
Py-a-nep'si-a, 10 
Pyd'na 
Pyg'e-la 
Pyg-mael, 29 
Pyg-ma'li-on 
Pyfa-des 
Pylae 

Py-laBm'e-nes 
Py-lag'o-rae 
Py-lag'o-ras 
Py-la'on 
Py-lar'tes 
Py-lar'ge 
P/las 
Py-le'ne 



PY 

Pyl'e-us 

Pyrie-on 

P/lo 

Pylos (Gr.) 

Py'lus 

Py'ra 

Py-rac'mon 

Py-rac/mos 

Py-raech'mes 

Pyr'a-mus 

Pyr-e-nael 

P)n:-e-nae'us 

Py-re'ne 

Pyr'gi,3 

Pyr'gi-on 

Pyr'go 

Pyr-gofe-les 

Pyr'gus 

Py-rip'pe 

P/ro 

Pyr'o-is 

Py-ro'ni-a 

Pyr'rha 

Pyr'rhi-as 

Pyr'rhi-ca 

Pyr'rbi-cus 

P)rr'rhi-daB 

Pyr'rho 

Pyr'rhus 

Pys'te 

17-thag'o-ras 

Pyth-a-ra'tus 

Pyth'e-as 

Py'thes 



103 



* See Iphiffenia, 

t Protomedia, — Nisaea and Aetna boast the same, 
Protomedia from the fruitfal dame, 
And Dorbp hoooor'd with maternal name. 

CooKE*s Henod. TKeog, v. 483. 

See Jphigenia. 



104 



PY 



Pyth'e-us 

Pyth'i-a 

Pyth'i-as 

Pythl-on 

Pythl-us 



PY 

Py'tho 

Py-thoch'a-ris 

Pyth'o-cles 

Pyth-o-do'rus 

Pyth-o-la'us 



PY 

Python 
Pyth-o-ni'ce, 30 
Pyth-o-nis'sa 
Pyfna 
Pyt-ta'lus 



QU 

Qua-dee'na 
Qua'di 
Qua-dra'tus 
Quad'ri-frons, or 

Quad'ri-ceps 
Quaes-to'res 
Qua'ri, 3 
Qua'ri-ns 
Quer'cens 
Qui-e'tiis 



QU 

Quinc-ti-a'nus, 10 
Quinc-tiri-a 
Quinc'ti-us, T. 
Quin-de-cem'vi-ri 
Quin-qua'tri-a 
Quin-quen-na'les 
Quin-que-v'iri 
Quin-til-i-a'nus 
Quin'tWi-an 
(Eng.) 



QU 

Quin-till-us Va' 

rus 
Quin-tiria 
Quin-til'lus, M. 
Quin'ti-us, 10 
Quin'tus Cur'ti-us 
Quir-i-na'li-a 
Quir-i-na'lis 
Qui-ri'nus 
Qui-ri'tes, 1 



RE 

Ra-bir'i-us 

Ra-cili-a 

Rae-sa'ces 

Ra-mi'ses 

Ram'nes 

Ran'da 

Ra'po 

Ra-scip'o-lis 

Ra-ven'na 

Rav'o-la 

Rau-ra'ci, 3 

Rau-ri'ci 

Re-ate, 8 

*Reb'i-lus 

Re-dic/u-lus 

Red'o-nes 



RH 

Re-giri« 

Re-gil-li-a'nus 

Re-girius 

Reg'u-lus 

Re'mi, 3 

Rem'u-lus 

Re-mu'ri-a 

Re'mus 

Re'sus 

Re-u-dig'ni, 3 

Rha'ci-a, 10 

Rha'ci-U8 

Rha-co'tis 

Rhad-a-man'thus 

Rhad-a-mis'tus 

Rha'di-us 



RH 

Rhae'te-um 

Rhae'ti, or Rae'ti 

Rhae'ti-fi, 10 

Rham-nen'ses 

Rham'nes 

Rham-^i-ni'tus 

Rham'nm 

Rha'nis 

Rha'ros 

Rhas-cu'po-rb 

Rhea 

Rhe'bas, or Rhe' 

bus 
Rhed'o-nes 
Rhe'gi-um 
Rhe-gus'ci, 3 



• Rebilus,—(C. Caninins. Vide in Ciceron. p. 35.) 



KH 

Rhffmh 3 

Rhe'ne 

Rhe'ni, 3 

Rhe'nus 

Rhe-o-mi'tres 

Rhe'sus 

Rhe-tog'e-iieg 

Rhefi-co 

Rhe-u'nus 

Rhex-e'nor 

Rhex-ib'i-us 

Rhi-a'nus 

Rhid^a^o 

Rhi-mot'a-cles 

Rhi'on 

Rhi'pha, or Rhi' 

phe 
Rhi-phae'i, 3 
Rhi-phe'us 
Rhi'um 
Rhod'a-nus 
Rho'de 
Rho'di-a 
Rhod-o-gy'ne, or 

Rhod-o-gu'ne 
Rho'do-pe, or 

Rho-do'pis 
Rho'dus 
Rliodes (Eng.) 
Rhoe'bus 
Rhoe'qus 
Rhoe'te-um 
Rhoe'tus 



RU 

Rho-sa'ces 

Rho'sus 

Rhox-a'na, or 
Rox-a'na 

Rhox-a'ni, 3 

Rhu-te'ni, and 
Rhu-the'ni 

Rhyn'da-cus 

Rhyn'thon 

Rhy'pae 

Ri-phael, 3 

Ri-phe'u8 

Rix-am'a-rae 

Ro-bi'go, or 
Ru-bi'go 

Rod-e-ri'cu8 

Ro'ma 

R(yme (Eng.) pro- 
nounced Room 

Ro-ma'ni, 3 

Ro-ma'nus 

Ro-mil'i-us 

Rom'u-la 

Ro-mu'li-d« 

Rom'u-lus 

Ro'mus 

Ros'ci-usj 10 

Ro-sil'la-nus 

Ro'si-us, 11 

Rox-a'na 

Rox-o-la'ni, 3 

Ru-belli-us 

Ru'bi, 3 



RU 1«6 

Rul)i-con 
Ru-bi-e'nus Lap' 

Ru-bi'go 

Ru'bra sa'xa 

Ru'bri-U8 

Ru'di-» 

* Ru-di'nus 

Ru'fie 

Ruf'fiis 

Ru-firiu8 

Ruf-fi'nus 

Ru-fi'nus 

Ru'fus 

Ru'gi-i, 4 

Ru'mi-nus 

Run-ci'na 

Ru-pil'i-u8 

f Rus'ca 

Rus'ci-U8, 10 

Ru8-co'ni-a 

Ru-sel'lae 

Rus'pi-na 

Ru-te'ni 

Ru8'ti-ciis 

Ruti-la 

Ru'ti-lus 

Ru-till-us Ru'fu$ 

Ru'tu-ba 

Ru'tu-bus 

Ru'tu-li, 3 

Ru'tu-pae 

Ru-tupi'nus 



SA 

Sa'ba 
Sab'a-chus, or 



SA 

Sab'a-con 
Sa1)aB 



SA 

Sa-ba'ta 
Sa-ba'zi-us 



♦ iJttdmiw.— (De Orat. 292.) 

t fty«ca.— (M. Pinarins. Vide de Orat 196.) 



f3 



106 SA 

Sabl)as 

Sa-bella 

Sa-belli, 3 

Sa-bi'na 

Sa-bi'ni, 3, 4 

Sa-bin-i-a'nus, 21 

Sa-bi'nus Aulus 

Sa'bis 

Sab'ra-cae 

Sa-bri'na 

Sab'u-ra 

Sab-u-ra'nus 

Sab'ra-ta 

Sa'bus 

Sac'a-das 

Sa'cae 

Sa'cer 

Sach-a-li'tes 

Sa-cra'ni 

Sa- era' tor 

Sa-cratl-vir 

Sad'a-les 

Sa'dus 

Sad-y-a'tes 

Sag'a-na 

Saga-ris 

Sa-git'ta 

Sa-gun'tum, or 

Sa-gun'tus 
Sa'is 
Sala 
Sara-con 
Sal-a-me'nes 
Sal-a-min'i-a 
SaVa-mis 



SA 

Sal-a-mi'na 
Sa-la'pi-a, or 

Sa-la'pi-8B 
Sal'a-ra 
Sa-la'ri-a 
SaJas'ci, 3 
Sa-lei'us, 6 
Sa-le'ni, 3 
Sal-en-ti'ni, 3 
Sa-ler'num 
Sal-ga'ne-us, or 

Sal-ga'ne-a 
Sali-i, 3, 4 
Sal-i-na'tor 
Sali-us 
Sal-lus'ti-us 
Sal'lust (Eng.) 
Sal'ma-cis 
Sal-mo'ne 
Sal-mo'ne-us 
Sal'mus 
Sal-my-des'sus 
Sa'lo 

Sa-lo'me, 8 
Salon 
Sa-lo'na, or 

Sa-lo'n«B 
Sal-o-ni'na 
Sal-o-ni'nus 
Sa-lo'ni-us 
Sal'pis 
Sal-vi-a'nas 
Sal'vi-an (Eng.) 
Sal-vid-i-e'nus 
Sal'vi-us 



SA 

Sa-ma'ri-a, 30 

Sam-bulos 

Sa'me, or Sa'mos 

Sa'mi-a 

Sam-ni'tas 

Sam-ni'tes 

Sarrinitea (Eng.) 

Sam'ni-um 

Sa-mo'ni-um 

Sa'mos 

Sa-mos'a-ta 

Sam-o-thra'ce, or 

Sam-o-thra'd-a 
Sa'mus 
Sa'na 
San'a-os 

San-cho-ni'a-thon 
* San-da'ce 
San-da'li-um 
San'da-nis 
San'da-nus 
San-di'on, 11 
San-dre-coftus 
San'ga-Ia 
San-ga'ri-us, or 

San'ga-ris 
San-guinl-us 
f San'ni 
San-nyr'i-on 
San'to-nes, and 

San'to-nse 
Sa'on 
Sa-pae1, or Sa- 

phaei 
Sa'por 



* Sundace. — A sister of Xerxes, which I find in no lexicographer 
but Lempi-iere, and in him with the accent on the first syllable; but 
from its Greek original l^aii^avxn it ought certainly to be accented od 
the second syllable. 

t <&i«/a.-^Populas Asiae, etc. De Orat. in notft, p. 189.) 



SA 

• Sa-po'res 

Sap'pho, or Sa'pho 

Sapti-ne 

Sa-rac'o-ri, 3 

Sa-ran'ges 

Sar-a-pa'ni, 3 

Sar'a-pus 

Sa]<a*sa 

Sa-ras'pa-des 

Sar-dan-a-palus 

Sar'di, 3 

Sar'des 

Sar-din'i-a 

Sar'dis, or Sar'des 

Sar-donl-cus, 30 

Sar-i-as'ter 

Sar-ma'ti-a, 10 

Sar-men'tus 

Sar'ni-us 

Sa'ron 

Sa-ron'i-cus Si'nus 

Sar-pe'don 

Sar-ras'tes 

Sar'si-na 

Sar-san'da 

Sanson 

Sas'si-a 

Sa-tas'pes 

Sa'ti-ae, 10 

Sat-i-bar-za'nes 

Sa-tic'uJa, and 

Sa-tic'u-lus 
Sa'tis 

Sat-ra-pe'ni 
Sa-tri'cum 
Sa-trop'a-ces 



sc 

' Safu-ra 
Sat-u-rei'um, or 

Sa-tu're-um 
Sat-u-rei'us 
Sat-ur-na'li-a 
Sa-tur'ni-a 
Sat-ur-Bi'nu8 
Sa-tur'ni-us 
Sa-tur'nus 
Sat'u-rum 
Safy-ru8 
Sav'e-ra 

Sau-fei'us Tro'gus 
Sa'vo, or Sav-o'i\a 
Sau-rom'a-tae 
Sau'rus 
Sa'vus 

Saz'i-ches, 12 
Scae'a 
Sefa 
Scae'va 
Se'va 
Scae'vo-la 
Se&o-la 
Scal'pi-um 
Sca-man'der 
Sca-man'dri-us 
Scan-da'ri-a 
Scan-di-na'vi-a 
Scan-ti-a'nus 
Scan-tiria 
Scap-tes'y-le 
Scap'ti-a, 10 
Scap'ti-us, 10 
Scap'u-la 
Scar'di-i, 3, 4 



SC 107 

Scar-phi'a, or 

Scar'phe 
Scau'ms 
Sced'a-sus 
Scel-e-ra'tU8 
f Scep'sis 
X Scep'si-U8 
Sche'di-a 

Sche'di-us, 12 
Sche'ri-a 
Schce'ne-us 
Schoe'nus, or 

Sche'no 
Sci'a-this 
SVa-thia 
Sci'a-thos 
Sci'dros 
SciVlus 
Sci'nis 
Scin'thi, 3 
Sci-o'ne 
Sci-pi'a-dae 
Scipl-o, 9 
Sci'ra, 7 
Sci-ra'di-um 
Sci'ras, 3 
Sci'ron 
Sci'rus 
Scolus 
Scom'brus 
Sco'pas 
Sco'pi-um 
Scor-dis'ci, and 

Scor-dis'cae 
Sco-tifnus 



* iSa/wr^s.— Tbis word, says Labbe, is by Gavantas and others^ 
ignorant of the Greek, accented on the first syllable^ 
I iScepAW.— (Urbs Illyriae Minoris. Vide de Orat. in nota, 23(>.) 
X *Scfp5tiM.— -(Metrodorns.) 



168 S£ 

Sco-tus'sa 

Scri-Wni-a 

Scri-bo-ni-a'nus 

Scri-Wni-U8 

Scyl-a-ce'um, 9 

Scylax 

Scylla 

Scyl-lae'um 

Scyl'li-as 

ScytHs 

Scyllus 

Scy-lu'rus 

Scyp'pi-ujBi 

Scy'ras 

Scy'ros 

Scy'thae 

Scy'thes, or 

Sc/tha 
Scyth'i-a 
Scythl-des 
Scy-thi'nus 
Scy'thon 
Scy-thop'oJis 
Se-bas'ta 
Se-bas'ti-a 
Seb-en-ny'tus 
Se-be'tus 



Se-bu-si-a'ni, or 

Se-gu-si-a'ni 
Sec-ta'nus 
Sed-i-ta'ni, or 

Sed-en-ta'ni, 3 
Se-du'ni, 3 
Se-du'si-i, 3 
Se-ges'ta 
Se-ges'tes 
Se-gob'ri-ga 
Seg'ni, 3 
Seg'o-nax 
Se-gon'ti-a, or 

Se-gun'ti-a, 10 
Seg-on-tiVci, 3 
Se-go'vi-a 
Se-gun'ti-um, 10* 
Se-ja'nus ^E'li-us 
Sei'us Stra'bo 
Se-lem'nus 
Se-le'ne 
Sel-eu-ce'na, or 

Se-leu'cis 
* Sel-eu'cU, 30 
Se-leu'ci-dae 
Se-leu'cis 
Se-leu'cus 



9C 

Sel'ge 
Se-lim'nus 
Se-li'nun$^ or 

Se-li'Hus 
Sel-la'si-a 
Sel-le'is 
SerU, 3 
Se-lym'bri-a 
Sem'e-le 
Sem-i Ger-ma'ni 
Sem-i-gmi'tus • 
Se-mir'a-mis 
Sem'no-nes 
Se-mo'nes 
Sem-o-sanc'tus 
Sem-pro'ni-a 
Sem-pro'ni-us 
Se-mu'ri-um 
Se'na 
Se-na'tus 
Sen'na, or Se'na 
Sen'e-cik 
Sen'o-nes . 
Sen'ti-us, 10 
Sep-te'ri-on 
Sep-tim'i-us 
Sep-ti-mu-lei'us 



* Seleucia, — Lempriere and Labbe accent this word oa.tfae peuul- 
tlmate ; but Ainsworth, Gouldman, and Holyoke, on the antepenelti- 
mate. As this word, according to Strabo, has lis penultimate formed 
of the diphthong m, :Stkso»tta, this syllable ought to have the accent; 
but as the antepenultimate accent is so incorporated into our tongae, 
I wQuld strongly recommen<l the pronunciation which an English 
scholar would give it at first sight, and that is placing the accent od 
the u: This is the accent Milton gives it : 

Eden stretchM her line 

From Auran eastward to the royal tow'rs 
Of great Seleucia^ built by Grecian kings. 

Par, Lost, b. 4. 
If, however, the English scholar wishes to shine in the classical pro- 
nunciation of this word, let him take care to pronounce the c like s 
only, and not like sh, which sound it necessarily has, if the accent be 
on the antepenultimate syllable.— See Rules 10 and 30. 



SE 

Sep'y-ra 

Seq'ua-na 

Seq'ua-ni 

Se-quin'i-us 

Se-ra'pi-o 

* Se-ra'pis 

Se'res 

Ser-bo'nis 

Se-re'na 

Se-re-ni-a'nu8 

Se-re'nu8 

Ser-ges'tus 

Ser'gi-a 

Ser'gi-us 

f Ser-gi'o-lus 

Se-ri'phus 

Ser'my-la 

Ser-ra'nus 

Se'ron 

Ser-to'ri-us 

Ser-vae'us 

Seivvi-a'nus 

Ser-vill-a 

Ser-vil-i-a'nus 



SI 

Ser-vil'i-us 

Ser'vi-us TuVli-us 

Ses'a-ra 

Se-sos'tris 

Ses'ti-us 

Ses'tos, or Ses'tus 

Se-su'vi-i, 3 

Set'a-bis 

Se'thon 

Se'ti-a, 10 

Se-ve'ra 

Se-ve-ri-a'nufi 

JSe-ve'rus 

Seu'thes 

Sex'ti-a 

Sex-til'i-a 

Sex-tiri-us 

Sex'ti-us 

Sex'tus 

Si-bi ni, 3 

Si-bur'ti-us 

Si-byria 

Si'ca 

Si-canfbrij.or 



SI 



iw 



Sy-gam'bri, 3 
Si-ca'ni, 3 
Si-ca'ni-a 
Sic'e-lis 
Si-cel'i*de8 
Si-chae'us 
Si-ciri-a 
Si-cin'i-us Den-ta' 

tus 
Si-ci'nus 
Sic'o-rus 
Sic'u-li, 3 
§Sic'u-lv^ 
Sic'y-on 
Siske-on 
Sic-y-o'ni-a 
Sish-e-o'ne-a 
Side, 8 
Si-de'ro 
Sid-i-ci'num 
Si'don 
Si-do'nis 
Si-do'ni-u8 
Si/ga 



* Serapis, — ^There is not a dissenting voice among our prosodists for 
the prononncing of this word with the accent on the pennltimate syl- 
lable ; and yet, to show the tendency of English pronunciation, when 
a ship of this name had a desperate engagement with one of the 
French, wMch attracted the attention of the public, every body pro- 
nounced it with the accent on the first syllable. Milton has done the 
same in bis sublime description of the grandeurs of Pandemonium: 

Not Babylon 

Nor great Alcairo such magnificence 
Equali'd in all their glories to enshrine 
Beius or Serapis their gods ,* or seat 
Their kings, when Egypt with Assyria strove, 
In wealth and luxury. 

Par, Lost^ b, i. v. 717. 
t Sergiolus. — I find this word in no dictionary but Lempriere's, 
and there the accent is placed upon the penultimate instead of the 
antepenultimate syllable. 

X Sev€ru8» — This word, like Serapia, is universally mispronounced 
by the mere English scholar with the accent on the first syllable. 
§ Siculus.-^iV'iodorvLs.) 



110 SI 

Si-jMe'am, or 

Si-ge'um 
Sig'ni-a 
Sig-o-ves'sus 
Si-gy'ni, Sig'u-nae 
Si-g)m'n8B 
Sila, or -S/la * 
Si-Ia'na Ju'li-a 
Si-la'nus 
Sira-ris 
SiJe'nus 
Sil-i-cen'ses 
Sil'i-us I-tal'i-cus 
Sil'phi-um 
Sil-va'nus 
Sim-briv'i-us, or 

Sim-bruv'i-us 
Si-me'thus, or 

Sy-me'thu8 
Sim'i-lae 
Sim'i-Iis 
Sim'mi-as 
Si'mo 
Si'mo-is 

Sim-o-is'i-us, 10 
Si'mon 
Si-monl-des 
Sim^lic'i-us, 24 
Sim'u-lus 
Si'mus 
Sym'y-ra 
Sin'di 
Sin-gael, 3 



SI 

Si'nis 

Sin'na-ces 

Sin'na-cha 

Sin'o-e 

Si'non 

Si-no'pe 

Si-no'pe-us 

Sin'o-rix 

Sin'ti-i, 3, 4 

Sin-u-es'sa 

Siph'nos 

Si-pon'tum, Si'pus 

Sip'y-lum, and 

Sip'y-lus 
Si-re'nes 
Sirens (Eng.) 
Si'ris 
Sir'i-us 
Sir'mi-um 
Si-sam'nes 
Sis'a-pho 
Sis'e-nes 
Si-sen'na 
Sis-i-gam'bis, or 

Sis-y-gam'bis 
Sis-o-cos'tus 
Sis'y-phus 
Si-taFces 
Sith'ni-des 
Si'thon 
Si-tho'ni-a 
Sitl-us, 10, 24 
Sit'o-nes 



SO 

Sme'nus 

Smer'dis 

Smi'lax 

Smi'Us 

Smin-djrr'i-des 

* Smin'the-us 

Smyr'na 

So-a'na 

So-an'da 

So-a'nes 

Soc'ra-tes 

Soe'mi-as 

Sog-di-a'na 

Sog-di-a'nus 

Sol'o-e, or So'li 

So-loe'is 

Solon 

So-lo'ni-um 

Solus 

Sol'y-ma, and 

Soly-maB 
Som'nus 
Son'chis, 12 
Son-ti'a-tes 
Sop'a-ter 
So'phax 
So-phe'ne, 8 
Soph'o-cles 
Soph-o-nis'ba 
So'phron 
f So-phron'i-cus 
Soph-ro-nis'cus 
So-phro'ni-a 



* Sinintheus, — ^This word, like Orpheus, and others of the same 
form, has the accent on the first syliabie ; bnt poets of:en contract 
the two last syltables into one ; as Pope — 

O, Smiuthen.% sprung from fair Latona's Kne, 
Thou guardian pow'r of Cilia the divine ! 
See Idomeueus, 

f Sopkronicus, — I find this word in no prosodist but T.abbe ; and he 
places the accent on the penultimate syllable, like most other words 
of this termination : unless, says he^ any one thinks it more likely to 



so 

So-phros'y-ne 
3op'o-lis 
So'ra 
3o-rac'tes, and 

So-rac'te 
So-ra'nus 
So'rex 

So-rit'i-a, 10 
So'si-a Galla, 10 
So-sib'i-us 
Sos'i-cles 
So-sic'ra-tes 
So-sig'e-nes 
So'si-i, 3, 10 
Sos'i-lus 
So-sip'a-ter 
Bo'sis 

So-sis'tra-tus 
So'si-us, 10 
Sos'the-nes 
Sos'tra-tus 
Sofa-des 
» So'ter 
So-te'ri-a 
So-ter'i-cus 



SP 

So'this 

So'ti-OD, 11 

So'ti-us, 10 

So'us 

Soz-o-me'nes 

Soz'o-men 

Spa'co 

Spar'ta 

Spar^ta-cus 

Spar'tae, or Spar'ti 

Spar-ta'ni, or 

Spar-ti-a'tae, 22 
Spar-ti-a'nus 
Spe'chi-a, 12 
Spen'di-U8 
Spen'don 
Sper-chi'us, 12 
Sper-ma-to-ph'a-gi 
Speu-sip'pus 
Sphac-te'ri-ae 
Sphe'rus 
Sphinx 
Sphi'o 
Spho'dri-as 
Sphra-gid'i-um 



ST 



111 



Spi-di'lus 

Spin'tha-nis 

Spin'ther 

Spi-tam'e-nes 

Spi-thob'a-tes 

Spith-ri-da'tes 

Spo-le'ti-um, 10 

t Spor'a-des, 20 

opu-ri'na 

Spu'ri-ns 

Sta-be'ri-us 

Sta'bi-ae 

Sta-gi'ra, 1 

t Sta-gy-ri'ta 

Stal-us 

Sta-le'nus 

Staph'y-lus 

Sta-san'der 

$ Sta'se-as 

Sta-sU'e-us, 29 

Sta-tiri-a 

Sta-tiri-us 

Stat'i-nae 

Sta-ti'ra 

Sta'ti-us, 10 



be derived from Sophron, than from victory ; that is, by uniting a 
general termination to the root of the uord, than by combining it 
with another word significant of itself; but as there is a Greek 
adjective ^at^^dviKot^ signifying ordained by nature to temperance ; it is 
much more probable that Sophronicvs is this adjective used sub- 
stantively, than that it should be compounded of :£o^^m and ftztf^ 
conquering temperance; and therefore tt.e antepenultimate accent 
seems preferable. 

♦ [The last syllable is usually sounded long, as if written tere ; but 
this preservation of the sound of n in English savours a little of 
affectation.] 

t Sporadts, — This word has the accent placed on the iii*st syllable 
by all our prosodists ; but a mere English ear is not only inclined to 
place the accent on the second sylla!)le, but to pronounce the word 
as if it were a dissyllable, Spo-rades; but this is so gross an error, that 
it cannot be too carefully avoided. 

t StagyrUa, or Stagyrites. — (Aristotle). 

§ Staseat,—{Cicer, in Orat. p. 40.) A peripatetic philosopher of 
Neapolis. 



112 ST 

Sta-sic'ra-tes 

Sta'tor 

SteUa'tes 

Stel'li^ 

Ste'na 

Sten-o-bcB'a 

Ste-noc'ra-tes 

Sten'tor 

Steph'a-na 

Steph'a-nus 

Ster'o-pe 

Ster'o-pes 

Ste-sich'o-rus 

Ster-tin'i-us 

Ste-sag'o-ras 

Stes-i-cle'a 

Ste-sim'bro-tus 

Sthen'e-le 

Sthen'e-lus 

Sthe'nis 

Sthe'no 

Sthen-o-boe'a 

Stil'be, or Stil'bi-a 

Still-cho 

Stirpo 

Stiml-con 

Stiph'i-lus 

Sto-bae'us 

Stoech'a-des 



SU 

Sto'i-ci 

Sto'ica (Eng.) 

Stra'bo 

Stra-tar'chas 

Stra'to, or Stra'ton 

Strat'o-cles 

Strat-o-Dice 

Stra-to-ni'cus, 30 

Stron'gy-le 

Stroph'a-des 

Stro'phi-u8 

Stru-thoph'a-gi 

Stru'thus 

Stry'ma 

Strym'no 

Stry'mon 

Stym-pha'li-a, or 

Stym-phalis 
Stym-pha1us 
Styg'ne 
Sty'ra * 
Sty'ms 
Styx 

Su-ar-dones 
Su-ba'tri-i, 3, 4 
Sub-lic'i-us, 24 
SuVo-ta 
Sub-ur'ra 
Su'cro 



sw 

Sua-dela j 

Sues'sa I 

Sues'so-nes 
Sue-to'ni-us 
Sue'vi 
Sue'vi-U8 
Suf-fe'nus 
Suf-fe'ti-us, or 

Fu-fe'ti-us 
♦Sui'dag 
Suill-us 
Sui'cMies 
Sul'chi 
Sul'ci-us ^ 
Sul'mo, or 

Sul'mo-na 
Sul-pif i-a 
Sul-pif i-us, or 

Sul-pic'i-us, 2 
Sum-ma'nus 
Su'ni-ci 
Su'ni-des 
Su'ni-um 
Su-o-vet-au-ril'iH 
Su'pe-rum ma're 
Su'ra iEmyl'i-us 
Su-re'na 
Sur-ren'tum 
Su'rus 



• jSuidffs.— This word is generally beard, even among the leamo 
in two syllables. Labbe, however, makes it three syllables, ai 
accents the first; although, says he, by what right I know not, it 
generally pronounced with the accent on the penultimate. It nil 
be observed, that if we place the accent on the first syllable, tl 
t in the second must be pronounced like e ; and that the geoer 
pronunciation which Labbe complains of, that of placing the a( 
cent on the second syllable, must, in our English pronunciation c 
Greek or Latin words, preserve the i in its long open sound, as i 
idle : if, therefore, we pronounce the t in this manner, it is a snfficieD 
proof that we place the accent on the penultimate syllable ; which 
though common, is, as Labbe observes, without good authority. 



SY 



SY 



^'sa 


Sylla 


ki'sa-Da 


Syllis 


lu-si-a'na, or 


Syro-es 


Su'sis 


Syro-son 


ru-sa'ri-on 


Syl-va'nus 


ki'tri-um 


Syl'vi-a 


ly-ag'rus 


Syl'vi-us 


lyb'a-ris 


Sy'ma, or Sy'me 


lyb-a-ri'ta 


Sym'bo-lum 


^yh'a^te (Eng.) 


Sym'ma-chus 


lyb'o-tas 


Sym-pleg'a-des 


Jy-cin'nus 


S)r'mu8 


}y'e-dra 


Syn-cerius 


5y'e-ne, 8 


Sy-ne'si-us, 10 


5y-e-ne'si-us, 10 


Sjm'ge-lus 


Jy-en-i'tes 


Syn'nas 


Jyg'a-ros 


Syn-na-lax'is 


Jy-le'a 


Syn'Dis 


Jyre-us 


Sy-no'pe 



SY 1113 

Syn'ty-che 

Sy'phax 

Sy-phaB'um 

Syr'a-ces 

Syr-a-co'si-a, 10 

Syr-a-cu'sae, 8 

Syr^fv-cuae (Eng.) 

Syr'i-a 

Sy'rinx 

Sjrr-o Phoe'nix 

Syr-o Phse-ni'ces 

Sy'ros 

Syr'tes 

Sy'rus 

Sys-i-gam'bis 

Sy-sim'e-thres 

Sysl-nas 

Sy-ne'ces 

Sy'thas 



TA 

Fa-au'tes 

Fab'ra-ca 

Fa-bur'nus 

Fac-fa-ri'nas 

Fa-champ'so 

Ta'chos, or Ta' 

chus 
Tac'i-ta, 24 
tac'i-tus, 24 
Tae'di-a 
Taen'a-rus 
Tae'ni-as 
Ta'ges 
Ta-go'ni-us 
Ta'gus 
Ta-la'si-us, 
TalVus 



10 



TA 

Ta-la'y-ra, 6 

TaVe-tum 

Tal-thybl-us 

Talus 

Tam'a-rus 

Ta'mos 

Ta-ma'se-a 

Tam'pi-us 

Tam'y-ras 

Tam'y-ris 

Tan'a-gra 

Tan'a-grus, or 

Tan'a-ger 
Tan'a-is 
Tan'a-quil 
Tan-tali-des 
Tan'ta-lus 



TA 

Ta-nu'si-us Ger' 
mi-nvis, 10 

Ta'phisB 

Ta'phi-us, or 
Ta-phi-as'sus 

Tap-rob'a-ne 

Tap'sus 

Tap>ri, 3 

Tar'a-nis 

Ta'ras 

Tar-ax ip'pus 

Tar-bel'li, 3 

Tar-che'ti us, 10 

Tar'chon 

Ta-ren'tum, or 
Ta-ren'tus 

Ta-ren-ti'nus 



114 TA 

Tar'nae 

Tar'pa 

Tar-pei'a, 6 

Tar-pei'us, 6 

Tar-quinl-a 

Tar-quin'i-i, 3 

Tar-quip'i-u8, 27 

Tar-quit'i-us 

Tar'qui-tus 

Tar-ra-ci'na 

Tar'ra-co 

Tar-ru'ti-us, 10 

Tar'sa 

Tar'si-us, 10 

Tar'suSjOrTar'sos 

Tar'ta-rus 

Tar-tes'sus 

Tar-un'ti-us 

Tas-ge'ti-us 

Ta'ti-an 

Ta-ti-en'ses 

Ta'ti-us, 10 

Tat'ta 

Tau-lan'ti-i, 3 

Tau'nus 

Tau-ra'Di-a 

Tau-ran'tes 

Tau'ri, 3 

Tau'ri-ca Cher-so 

ne'sus 
Tau'ri-ca, 7 
Tau-ri'ni, 3 
Tau-ris'ci, 3 



TE 

Tau'ri-um 
Tau-ro-min'i-um 
Tau'rus 
Tax'il^ 
Tax'i-lus, or 

Taxl-les 
Tax-i-maq'ui-lus 
Ta-yg'e-te, or 

Ta-y-ge'te 
* Ta-yg'e-tus, or 

Ta-yg'e-ta 
Te-a'num 
Te'a-rus 
Te-a'te-a, Te'a-te, 

or Te-ge'a-te 
Tech-mes'sa 
Tech'na-tis 
Tec'ta-mus 
Tec-tos'a-ges, or 

Tec-tos'a-gae 
Te'ge-a, or Te- 

gae'a 
Teg'u-la 
Teg'y-ra, ^ 
Te'i-us, 6 
Te'i-um, or Te'os 
Tera-mon 
Tel-a-mo-ni'a-des 
Tel-chi'nes 
Tel-chin'i-a 
Tel-chinl-us 
Terchis 
Te'le-a, 7, 19 



TE 

TeJeb'o-as 
Te-leb'o-», 

Te-leb'o-es 
Tel-e-bo'i-des 
Te-lecles, or 

Te-lec'lus 
Tel-e-cli'des 
Te-leg'o-nus 
Te-lem'a-chus 
Tere-mus 
Tel-e-phas'sa 
Tel'e-phus 
Te-le'si-a, 10 
Te-les'i-clas 
Tel-e-siria 
Tel-e-sin'i-cu8 
Tel-e-si'nus 
Tel-e-sip'pus 
Te-les'pho-rus 
Tel-e-stag'o-ras 
Te-les'tas 
Te-les'tes 
Te-les'to 
Tere-thus 
Tel-e-thu'sa 
Te-leu'ri-as 
Te-leu'ti-as 
Tel-la'ne 
Telli-as 
Teriis 
Teriu3 
Tel-mes'sus, or 

Tel-mis'sus 



* Taygetus and Taygete.-^AXX our prosodists bat Lerapriere accei 
these words on the antepenaltimate syllable, as if divided into Ta-ifi 
e-tva and Ta-yi^'e-te. I am, therefore, rather inclined to suppose tlJ 
quantity marked in his dictionary an error of the press. The Ium 
in Lilly's Qtus Genus will easily call to the recollection of every scbol: 
how early he adopted the antepenultimate pronunciation. 

Tartara, Taygetus, sic Toenara, Massica, et altus 

Gargarus. 



TE 

Felon 
rd-thu'sa 
relys, 26 
re-ma'the-a 
re-me'ni-um 
rem-e-ni'tes 
rem'e-nus 
rem-e-rin'da 
rem'e-sa 
rem'e-se 
lem'nes 
Pem^nos 
Pena'pe 
ren'e-do8 
lenes, 26 
ren'e-sis 
re'noa, 26 
Ten'ty-ra, Egypt 
Ten-orra, Thiace 
Te'os, or Te'i-os 
Te-re'don 
Te-ren'ti-a 
Te.ren-ti-a'nus 
Te-ren'ti-us 
Te-ren'tu6 
» Te're-U8 
Ter-ges'te, and 
Ter-ges'tum 
Te'ri-as, 19 
Ter-i-ba'zus 
Te-rid'a-e, 19 
Ter-i-da'tes 
Ter'i-gum 
Ter-men'ti-a, 10 
Ter-me'rus, 27 
Ter-me'sus, 27 



TH 

Ter-mi-na'li-a 
Ter-mi-na'lis 
Ter'mi-nus 
Ter'mi-sus, or 

Ter-mes'sus 
Ter-pan'der 
Terp-sich'o-re, 8 
Terp-sic'ra-te 
Ter-ra-ci'na 
Ter-ra-sid'i-us 
Ter'ti-a, 10 
Ter'ti-us, 10 
Ter-tul-li-a'nus 
Tertullian (Eng,) 
Te'thys, 26 
Te-trap'o-lis 
Tet'ri-cu8 
Teu'cer 
Teu'cri, 3 
Teu'cri-a 
Teuc'te-ri, 3 
Teu-mes'sus 
Teu'ta 
Teu-ta'mi-as, or 

Teu'ta-mis 
Teu'ta-mus 
Teu'tas, or 

Teu-ta'tes 
Teu'thras 
Teu-tom'a-tus 
Teu'to-ni, and 

Teu'to-nes 
Tha-ben'na 
Thais 
Thala 
Thara-me 



TH 115 

Tha-las'si-us 
Thales 
Tha-Ies'tri-a, or 

Tha-les'tris 
Tha-le'tes, 27 
Tha-li'a, 30 
Thal'pi-us 
Tham'y-ras 
Tham'y-ris 
Thar-ge1i-a 
Tha-ri'a-des 
Tha'rops, 26 
Thap'sa-cus 
Tha'si-us, or 

Thra'si-us, 10 
Tha'sos, 26 
Tha'sus 
Thau-man'ti-as, 

and Thau-man' 

tis 
Thau'mas 
Thau-ma'si-us 
The'a 

The-ag'e-nes 
The-a'ges 
The-a'no 
The-a'num 
The-ar'i-das 
The-ar'nus 
The-a-te'tes 
The bse, 8 
t Thebes (Eng.) 
Theb'a-is 
ITie'be, or The'bae 
The'i-a 
Thel-as, 5 



• Tertitf.— For words of this termination, see /([/oiii^nftt5. 

t rA(6fs.— Thebes in Egypt was called Hectom'pylos from having a 
hundred gates; and Thebes iu Greece HeptapyloSf from its seven 
gates. 



116 TH 

Thel-e-phas'sa 

Thel-pu'sa 

Thek-i'on, 29 

Thelx-i'o-pe 

The-me'si-OD, 11 

The'mis 

The-mis'cy-ra 

Them'e-nus 

Them1-8on 

The-mis'ta 

The-mis'ti-us 

ITie-mis'to-cles 

Them-i-stog'e-nes 

The-o-cle'a 

The'o-cles 

The'o-clus 

The-o-clym'e-nns 

The-oc'ri-tus 

The-od'a-mas, or 

Thi-od'a-mas 
The-o-dec'teg 
The-od*o-re'tus 
The-od'o-ret 

(Eng.) 
The-od-o-ri'tus 
The-o-do'ra 
The-o-do'ru8 
The-o-do'si-us, 10 
The-od'o-ta 
The-o-do'ti-on, 11 
The-od'o-tus 
The-og-ne'tes 
The-og'nis 
The-om-nes'tus 
The'on 
The-on'o-e, 8 



TH 

The'o-pe 

The-oph'a-ne 

The-oph'a-nes 

The-o-pha'ni-a 

The-oph1-lu8 

The-o-phras'tus 

The-o-pore-mu8 

The-o-pom'pu8 

The-o-phyJac'tus 

The-oph'y-lact 

^<^°?-) 

Tne-o'ri-u8 

The-o-ti'mits 

The-ox'e-na 

The-ox-e'ni-a 

The-ox-e'ni-us 

The'ra 

The-ram'bus 

The-ram'e-nes 

The-rap'ne, or 

Te-rap'ne 
The'ras 
The-rip'pi-das 
Ther'i-tas 
Ther'ma 
Ther-mo'don 
Ther-mop'y-lfle 
Ther'mus 
The-rod'a-mas 
The'ron 
Ther-pan'der 
Ther-san'der 
Ther-siro-chus 
Ther-sip'pus 
Ther-si'tes, 1 
Thes-bi'tes 



TH 

The-se'i-dae 

The-sels 

The'se-U8 

The-si'dae 

The-si'des 

Thes-moph-o'ri-a 

The8-moth'e-tffi 

Thes-pi'a 

The8-pi'a-daB 

Thes-pi'a-des 

Thes'pi-ae 

The8'pis 

The8'pi-us, or 

Thes'ti-u8 
Thes-pro'ti-a, 10 
Thes-pro'tus 
The8-8ali-a 
Thes-sali-on, 29 
Thes-sa-li'o-tis 
* Thes-saJo-ni'ca 

30 
The8'8a-lu8 
Thes'te 
The8'ti-a 
Thes-ti'a-de, and 

Thes-ti'a-des 
Thes'ti-as 
Thes'ti-us 
Thes'tor 
Thes'ty-Ug 
The'tis 
Theu'tis, or 

Teu'thi8 
Thi'a 
Thi;a8 
Thiin1)ron 



• T^walowica.— -This worti , like every other of a similar termination 
is sure to be pronounced by a mere English scholar with the accen 
on the third syllable ; but this must be avoided on pain of literar] 
excommunication. 



TH 

rhi-od^a-mas 

[Tiis'be 

rhis'i-as, 10 

rhis'o-a 

rho-an'ti-um, 10 

rho'as 

rho'e, 8 

rhomy-ris, 19 

fholus 

»Thon 

rho'nis 

rho'on 

rho'o-sa 

rhcM>'te8 

rho-ra'ni-u8 

rho'rax 

rho'ri-a 

rhor'nax 

rhorsus 

I'ho'us 

rhra'ce 

Thrace (Eng.) 

rhra'ces 

rhra'ci-a 

rhracl-dsB, 19 

Thra'cis 

rhra'se-as, 11 

Thra-sid'e-us 

Thra'si-us, 10 

Thra'so 

Thras-y-bulus 

Thras-y-dae'us 

Thra-syllus 



TH 

Thra-sym'a-chus 
Thras-y-me'des 
Thras-y-me'nes 
Thras-y-me'nus 
Thras-y'mus 
Thre-ic'i-u8, 24 
Thre-is'sa 
Threp-sip'pas 
Tbri-ara'bus 
Thro'ni-um 
Thry'on 
Thry'us 
Thu-cyd'i-des 
Thu-is'to 
Thule, 8 
Thu'ri-ae, or 
Thu'ri-um 
Thu'ri-nu8 
Thus'ci-a, 10 
Thy'a 
Thy'a-des 
Thy'am-is 
Thy'a-na 
Thy-a-ti'ra 
Thy-bar'ni 
Thy-es'ta 
Thy-ee'tes 
Thym'bra 
Thym-brae'us 
Thym'bris 
Thym'brcm 
Thym'e-le 
Thy-mi'a-this 



TI 117 

Thy-moch'a-res 

Thy-moe'tes 

Thy-od'a-mas 

Thy-o'ne 

Thy-o'ne-us 

Thy-o-ni-a'nus 

Thy'o-tes 

Thy're 

Thyr'e-a 

Thyye-us 

Thyr'i-on, 29 

Thyr-sag'e-taB 

Thys'sos 

Th/us 

Ti'a-sa, 1 

Tib-a-re'ni 

Ti-be'ri-as 

Tib-e-ri'nus 

Tib'e-ris 

Ti-be'ri-us 

Ti-be'sis 

Ti-bullus 

Ti'bur 

Ti-bur ti-us, 10 

Ti-bur'tus 

Tichl-us, 12 

Tic'i-da 

Ti-ci'nus 

Tidl-us 

Ti-es'sa 

Tifa-ta 

Ti-fer'num 

Tig'a-sis 



• T/iow, a physician of Egypt— Milton spells this word with the 
final e, making it one syllable only, and consequently pronouncing it 
so as to rhyme with tone. 

Not that Nepenthe, which the wife of TAom?, 
In Egypt, gave to Jove-born Helena, 

Is of such power to stir up- joy as this 

Comtta, 



:l3 



TI 



TI 










TR 

' Tle-prfe-mus, 16 

Tmains 

TBohis, 13 

Trocha-ri 

To^'ta 

Tolmi-des 

ToJo'sa 

To-bnn'inis 
. To bis 

ToHnae'am 

Toma-ms, 19 

Toml-sa 

To III06, or To'mis 

Tom'Y-ris, 19 

To'ne-a 

Too-gflK 

To-p«'aos 

Topi-ris, or 

Top'rus 
•Tari-ni, 3 
J To-fo ne 

Tor-i)iui'tU8 
Tor tor 

ToTOS 

Tory-ne 

' Tox-a-ridl-a, 19 
' Tox'e-os 

Touc'ra-4e 

Tnbe-« 

Tndi'a4iis, 12 

Timdus 

Trs-chin'i-a 

Tiach-o-ni'tis 

Tragus 

Traj-a-nop'o-lis 

Trs-janus 

Trajan (Enff.) 

Tialles 

Trwis-tib-er-i'na 

Ti»-pe'zas 



TB 

ra-sul'lus 

re-ba'ti-u8, 10 

re-belJi-a'nus 

re-bel-li-e'nus 

re-berii-iis 

re'bi-a 

rel>i-us 

re-bo'ni-a 

re-bo'ni-us 

reb'u-la, 19 

re'ruB 

rev'e-ri, 3 

ri-a'ri-a 

ri-a'ri-us 

ri-barii, 3 

rib'o-ci 

ri-bu'ni 

ric-as-ti'ni, 3 

ric'cae 

Wichfse 

ri-cla'ri-a 

ri-cre'na 

ri-e-tert-ca 

rif-o-li'nus 

ri-na'cri-a, or 

Trin'a-cris 

ri-no-ban'tes 

ri-oc'a-la, or 

Tri'o-cla 

ri'o-pas, or 

Tri'ops 

ri-phyFi-a 

ri-phillis, 1 

ri-phirus 



TR 

Trip'o-lis, 19 

Trip-tore-mus 

Triq'ue-tra 

Tris-me-gis'tus 

Trif i-a, 10 

Trit-o-ge-ni'a, 30 

Triton 

Tri-to'nis 

Tri-ven'tum 

Triv'j-a 

Triv'i-8B an'trum 

Triv'i-aB lu'cus 

Tri-vi'cum 

Tri-um'vi-ri, 4 

Tro'a-des 

Tro'as 

Troch'o-is, 12 

Troe-ze'ne 

Trog'i-lus, 24} 

Trog-lod'y-tsB 

Tro'gus Pom-pe'i- 

us 
Tro'ja 

Trmf (Eng.) 
* Tro'Ulus 
Trom-en-ti'na 
Troph'i-mus 
Tro-pho'ni-us 
Tros 

Tros'su-lus 
Trot'i-lum 
Tni-en'tum, or 

Tru-en-ti'num 
Tryph'e-nis 



TU 119 

Tryph-i-o'do-rus 
Ti^phon 
Try-pho'sa 
Tu'be-ro, 19 
Tuc'ci-a, 10 
Tukfshe-a 
Tu'ci-a, 10 
Tu'der, or 

Tu-der'ti-a,10 
t Tu-di-ta'nus 
Tu'dri,3 
Tu-gi'ni, or 

Tii-geni 
Tu-gu-ri'nu8, 22 
Tu-is'to 
Tu-lin'gi, 3 
Tulla 
Tul'li-a 
TuUio-la 
Tul'U-us 

Tu-ne'ta, or Tu'nis 
Tun'gri 
Tu-ra'ni-us 
Tur'bo 
Tur-de-ta'ni 
Tu-re'sis 
Tu-ri'ni 
Tu'ri-us 
Tur'nus 
Tu'ro-nes 
Tu-ro'ni-a 
Tur'pi-o 
Tu-rul'li-us 
Tus-ca'ni-a, and 



• Troilus. — This word is almost always heard as if it were two syl- 
>Ies only, and as if written Troy'lus, This is a corruption of the 
8t maguitnde: the vowels should be kept separate, as if written 
oe-lus, — See Zoilus, 

t Tuditanu8,—(y, Sempronius) Consul with M. C. Cethegus, in the 
ar U. C. 650. 



118 



TI 



Tig-el-li'nus, 24 

Ti-gel'li-us 

Ti-gra'nes 

Tig-ran-o-cer'ta 

Ti'gres 

Ti'gris 

Tig-u-ri'ni, 3 

Til-a-tael, 4 

Ti-mae'a 

Ti-mae'u8 

Ti-mag'e-nes 

Ti-mag'o-ras 

Ti-man'dra 

Ti-man'dri-des 

Ti-man'thes 

Ti-mar'chus, 12 

Tim-a-re'ta 

Ti-ma'si-on, 11 

Tim-a-sith'e-us 

Ti-ma'vus 

Ti-me'si-us, 11 

Ti-moch'a-ris, 12 

Tim-o-cle'a 

Ti-moc'ra-tes 

Ti-mo'cre-on 

Tim-o-de'mus 

Tim-o-la'us 

Ti-mole-on 

Ti-molus, 10 

Ti-mom'a-chus 

Ti'mon 

Ti-moph'a-nes 

Ti-mo'the-us 

Ti-mox'e-nus 

Tin'gis 

Ti'pha 

Ti'phys 

Tiph'y-sa 

Ti-re'si-as 

Tir-i-ba'ses 

Tir-i-da'tes 



TI 

Tins, 18 

Tiro 

Ti-ryn'thi-a 

Ti-ryn'thus 

Ti-sae'um 

Ti-sag'o-ras 

Ti-sam'e-nes 

Ti-san'dru8 

Ti-sar'chus, 12 

Ti-si'a-rus 

Tisl-as, 10 

Ti-siph'o-ne 

Ti-siph'o-nus 

Tis-sam'e-nus 

Tis-sa-pher'nes 

Ti-tae'a 

Ti'tan, Ti-ta'nus 

Tit'a-na 

Ti-ta'nes 

Ti'tans (Eng.) 

Ti-ta'ni-a 

Ti-tan'i-des 

Ti-ta'nus, a giant 

TitVnus, a river 

Tit-a-re'si-us, 10 

Tife-nus 

Tith-e-nid'i-a 

Ti-tho'nus 

Titi-a, 19 

Tit-i-a'na, 21 

Tit-i-a'Dus 

Tit'i-i, 3, 19 

Ti-thrau'tes 

Ti-thraus'tes 

Ti-tinl-us 

Tit'i-us, 10, 19 

Ti-tor'mus 

Ti-tu'ri-us 

Titus 

Tit'y-nis 

Tit'y-us, 19 



TR 

TIe-pore-mus, 16 

Tma'rus 

Tmo'lus, 13 

Troch'a-ri 

To-ga'ta 

Tormi-des 

ToJo'sa 

To-lum'nus 

Tolus 

To-mae'um 

Tom'a-rus, 19 

Tom'i-sa 

To'mos, or To'mis 

Tom'y-ris, 19 

To'ne-a 

Ton-girii 

To-pa'zos 

Top'i-ris, or 

Top'rus 
Tor'i-ni, 3 
To-ro'ne 
Tor-qua'ta 
Tor-qua'tus 
Tor'tor 
To'rus 
Tory-ne 
Tox-a-rid'i-a, 19 
Tox'e-us 
Tox-ic'ra-te 
Tra'be-a 
Trach'a-lus, 12 
Tra'chas 
Tra-chin'i-a 
Trach-o-ni'tis 
Tra'gus 

Traj-a-nop'o-lis 
Tra-ja'nus 
Tra'jan (Eng.) 
Tralles 

Trans-tib-er-i'na 
Tra-pe'zus 



TB 

ra-sul'Ius 

re-ba'ti-u8, 10 

re-belJi-a'nus 

re-bel-li-e'nu8 

re-berii-iis 

re'bi-a 

're'bi-us 

're-bo'ni-a 

're-bo'ni-us 

reb'u-la, 19 

WruB 

'rev'e-ri, 3 

'ri-a'ri-a 

'ri-a'ri-us 

'ri-bal li, 3 

'rib'o-ci 

'ri-bu'ni 

'ric-as-ti'ni, 3 

'ric'cae 

yickfse 

n-cla'ri-a 

'ri-cre'na 

n-e-ter'i-ca 

Vif-o-li'nus 

n-na'cri-a, or 

Trin'a-cris 
n-no-ban'tes 
n-oc'a-la, or 

Tri'o-cla 
no-pas, or 

Tri'ops 
n-phyFi-a 
n-phillis, 1 
n-phirus 



TR 

TripVlis, 19 

Trip-tore-mus 

Triq'ue-tra 

Tris-me-gis'tus 

Trif i-a, 10 

Trit-o-ge-ni'a, 30 

Triton 

Tri-to'nis 

Tri-ven'tum 

Triv'i-a 

Triv'i-8B an'trum 

Triv'i-ae lu'cus 

Tri-vi'cum 

Tri-iim'vi-ri, 4 

Tro'a-des 

Tro'as 

Troch'o-is, 12 

Troe-ze'ne 

Trog'i-lus, 24 

Trog-lod'y-tsB 

Tro'gus Pom-pe'i. 

us 
Tro'ja 

Troy (Eng.) 
* Trol'lus 
Trom-en-ti'na 
Troph'i-mus 
Tro-pho'ni-us 
Tros 

Tros'su-lus 
Trot'iJum 
Tni-en'tum, or 

Tru-en-ti'num 
Tryph'e-rus 



TU 119 

Tryph-i-o'do-rus 
Try'phon 
Try-pho'sa 
Tu'be-ro, 19 
Tuc'ci-a, 10 
Tukfshe-a 
Tu'ci-a, 10 
Tu'der, or 

Tu-der'ti-a, 10 
+ Tu-di-ta'DU8 
Tu'dri, 3 
Tu-gi'ni, or 

Tii-geni 
Tu-gu-ri'nu8, 22 
Tu-is'to 
TuJin'gi, 3 
Tulla 
TuHi-a 
TuHi'oJa 
Tul'li-us 

Tu-ne'ta, or Tu'nis 
Tun'gri 
Tu-ra'ni-us 
Tur'bo 
Tur-de-ta'ni 
Tu-re'sis 
Tu-ri'ni 
Tu'ri-us 
Tur'nus 
Tu'ro-nes 
Tu-ro'ni-a 
Tur'pi-o 
Tu-nirii-us 
Tus-ca'ni-a, and 



• Troilus. — This word is almost always heard as if it were two syl- 
bles only, and as if written Troy'lus, This is a corruption of the 
rst magnitude: the vowels should be kept separate, as if written 
^oe-lus, — See Zoilus, 

t Tuditanus.—^V. Sempronius) Consul with M. C. Cethegus, in the 
Ear U. C. 650. 



120 



TY 



Tus'ci-a, 10 
Tus'ci, 3 
Tus-cu-la'num 
Tus'cu-lum 
Tus'cus 
Tu'ta 
Tu'ti-a, 10 
Tu'ti-cum 
♦ Tutor 
Ty'a-na 
f Ty-a'ne-us, or 

Ty-a-ne'us 
Ty-a-ni'ds 
Tyhns 
Tyhm 
T/che, 12 
Ti/ke 

Tychl-us, 12 
Tych'i-cus, 12 



TY 

T/de 

* Tyd'e-us 

Ty-<ii'de8 

Ty-e'nis 

TymTjer 

Ty-molu8 

Tym-pa'ni-a 

Tym-phae'i, 3 

Tyn-dar'i-des 

Tyn'da-ris 

Tyn'da-ms 

Tyn'ni-chus 

Ty-phcE'us, or 

Ty-phae'os, sub. 
Ty-pho'e-us, adj. 
Ty'phon 
Ty-ran-m'on 
Ty-rau'nus 
T/ras, or Ty'ra 



TY 

Ty'res 

Tyr'i-i, 4 

Ty-ri'o-tes 

Tyro 

Ty-rog'ly-phus 

Tyros 

Tyr-rhe'i-dae 

^rr-] 

Tyr-i 

Tyr-: 
Tyr'i 

lyr'sis 

Tyr-tae'us 
Ty'rus, or Ty'roa 
Tyre (Eng.) 
Tys'i-as, 10 



lyr-; 
Tyr-rhe'i-des 

•1 

•1 
Tvr-rhi'dae 



Tvr-rhe'ni 

lyr- 
Tyrrhe^us 



^rr-rhe' 
Tvr-rhe'nus 



num 



• Tvtor. — De Orat. 104. | 

t Tyaneus, — ^This word is only nsed as ao adjective to ApolIoDio^ 
the celebrated PythagoreaD philosopher, and is formed from the tow 
of TyatuL, where he was bom. The natural formation of this adjej 
tive would undoubtedly be Tyauems, with the accent on the antepenol 
timate syllable. Labbe, at the word Tyana, says, ^ et inde dedactoi 
Tyaneus; quidquid sciam reclamare nonnnllos sed immerito, utsati 
norunt emditi/' 

The numberless anthorities which might be brought for prononm 
ing this word either way, sufficiently show how equivocal is its ai 
cent, and how little importance it is to which we give the prefereno 
My private opinion coincides with Labbe; but as we generally fio 
it written with the diphthong, we may presume the penultimate a( 
cent has prevailed, and that it is the safest to follow. . 

i Tydeus. — ^This word, like several others of the same terminatioi 
was pronounced by the Greeks sometimes in three^ and sometimes i 
two syllables, the eu considered as a diphthong. When it was pn 
nounced in three syllables, the penultimate syllable was long, and th 
accent was on it, as we find it in a verse of Wilkie's Epiffomad : 
Venus, still partial to the Theban arms, 
Tydeus* son seduced by female charms. 

But the most prevailing pronunciation was that with the antepei 
ultimate accent, as we generally find it in Pope's Homer. 
Next came Idomenens and Tydeus* son^ 
Ajax the less, and Ajax Telamon. 

pQPE's Horn. b. ii. t. 50. 
See Idomeneus. 



VA 

ac-cje'i, 3 

a-cu'na 

a'ga 

ag-e-dru'sa 

a-gel'li-us 

a-ge'ni, 3 

ala 

alens 

a-len'ti-a, 10 

al-en-tin-i-a'nus 

^a-len'tin'i-an 

(Eng.)' 
^ar-le'ri-a 
^a-le-ri-a'nus 
^Or-lefri-an (Eng.) 
^a-len-us 
/^al'e-rus 
/^al'gi-us 
/^an-dali-i, 3, 4 
Van' dais (Eng.) 
S^an-gi'o-nes 
l^an'ni-us 
/a-ra'nes 
/ar-dae'i 
' Var'guJa 
l^a'ri-a 
/a-ri'ni, 3 
if^a-ris'ti 
li'^a'ri-us 
i^ar'ro 
^a'nis 
i^as-co'nes 
^at-i-ca'nus 
i'a-tin'i-us 



VE 

Vat-i-e'nu8 

U'bi-i, 4 

U-cal'e-gon 

U'cu-bis 

Vec'ti-us, 10 

Ve'di-us PoUi-o 

Ve-ge'ti-u8, 10 

Ve'i-a 

Ve-i a'nus 

Ve-i-en'tes 

Ve-i-en'to 

Ve i i, 3 

Vej'o-vis 

Ve-la1}rum 

Va-la'ni-u8 

Ve'U-a 

Vel'i-ca 

Ve-li'na 

Ve-li'num 

Ve-li-o-cas'si, 3 

Vel-i-ter'na 

Ve-li'trae 

Vel'la-ri, 3 

Verie^la 

Vel-le'i-U8 

t Ve-lo'ci-us, or 

Ve-lo'ni-us 
\ Ve-na'fhim 
Ven'e-di 
Ven'e-li 
Ven'e-ti, 3 
Ve-ne'ti-a, 10 
VenUce (Eng.) 
Ven'e-tus 



VE 121 

Ve-niri-a 
Ve-no'ni-us 
Ven-tid'i-u8 
Ven'ti, 3 
Ven-u-lel-us 
Ven'u-lus 
Ve'nus 
Ve-nu'si-a, or 

Ve-nu'si-um, 10 
Ve-ra'gri 
Ve-ra'ni-a 
Ve-ra'ni-us 
Ver-big'e-nus 
Ver-ceTlae 
Ver-cin-gefo-rix 
Ver-e'na 
Ver-gil'i-a 
Ver-gas'il-lau'nus 
Ver-gel'lus 
Ver-giri-ae 
Ver-ginl-us 
Ver'gi-um 
Ver-go'bre-tus 
Ver'i-tas 

Ver-o-doc'ti-us, 10 
Ver-o-man'du-i 
Ve-ro'na 
Ve-ro'nes 
Ver-o-ni'ca, 30 
Ver-re-gi'num 
Ver'res, C. 
Ver-ri'tus 
Ver'ri-us 
§ Ver-ru'go 



* Vargtda, — (Arnicas CiceroDis : vide de Orat. p. 185 ) 
t VeUtdus, or VeUmius. —Qwinim^ (Vide de Orat. J63.) 
X Venqfntm, — Though the accent may be placed either on the ante- 
|>enuUiniate or the penultimate syllable of this word, the latter is by 
far the preferable, as it is adopted by Lempriere, Labbe, Gonldiiian, 
ind other good authorities. 
$ Vemtgo — I have given this word the penultimate accent with 



129 



VI 



Ver'ti-co 

Ver-ti-cor'di-a 

Ver-ris'cuB 

Ver-tum'nus 

Ver-u-la'nus 

Ve'rus 

Ves'bi-us, or 

Ve-su'bi-u^ 
Vesrci-a'nwn. 
* Ves'pa 
Ves-pa-si-a'nus 
Ves-pa'H-an 

(Eng.) 
Ves-cu-la'ri-us 
Veg'e-ris 
Ve-se'vi-us, and 

Ve-se'vus 
Vesta 
Ves-ta'lea 
Ves-ta'li-a 
Ves-tic'irus, 24 
Ves-till-us. 
Ves'tilJa 
Ves-ti'ni, 3 
Vesuti'ims 
Vei^'Vrlos, 
Ve-8U-vi-ufl 
Vefti-us 
Vet-to'ues 
Vet-u-lo'ni-a 
Ve-tu'ri-a 
Ve-tu'ri-iw 
Ve'tus 
U'fens 
Ufen-ti'na 
Vi-bidl-a 



VI 

Vi-bidl-uft 

Vib'i-U8 

Vi1>o 

Vib-u-le'm» 

Vi-bid/K-U8. 

Vi'caPc/ta 

Vi-cen'ta, or 

Vi-ce'ti-a, 10 
Vi-cerii-ua 
Vic'tor 
Vic-to'ri-a 
Vic-to'ri-u8 
Vic-to-ri'na 
Vic-to-ri'niw 
Vic-tum'vi-ae 
Vi-en'na 
f Vi-gel'li-us 
VillU 
VU'U-U8 
Vim-i-na'lis 
Vin-ceu'ti-us, 10 
Vin'ci-us 
Vin-da'li-us 
Vin-deri-ci, 4 
Vin-de-inWtor 
Vin'dex Ju'li-us 
Vin-dicl-us, 10 
Vin-do-nis'sa 
Vi-nic'i-us, 10 
Vi-nid'i-us 
Vin'i-us 
Vin'ni^us 
Vipsa'ni-a 
Virl)i-us 
Vir-giri-us 
Vir'gil (Eng.) 



VO 

Vir-gin'i-a 

Vir-gin'i-us 

Vir-i-a'thus 

Vir-i-dom'ar-Tus 

Vi-rip'Ia-ca 

Vir'ro 

Vir'tus 

Vi-serii-u8 

Vi-seWuB 

Vi-telli-a 

Vi-td'li-iis 

Vifi-a, 10 

Vifri-cus 

Vi-tru'vi-us 

VifuJa 

Ul-pi-a'iuis 

Ul'pi'-an (Eng.) 

tri-to'ni-a 

Ulu-brae 

U-lys'ses 

Um'ber 

Um'bra 

Um'bri-a. 

Um-brigl-us, 24 

Um1)ro 

Un'ca 

Un'chae 

Un-de-cem'Ti-rii 

U-nel'li, 3 

Unx'i-a 

Vo-co'ni-a 

Vo-co'ni-us 

Vo-con'ti-a, 10 

Voff'e-sus ■ 

Vota-gin'i-us 

Vo-la'na 



Lempiiere, in opposition to Ai)i8worth, who adopts the antepemill 

mate. 
• F<»«pa.--(Terentiu8. Clc. de Orat. p. 191.) 
t VigeUiu8^ M, — (Amicus Ciceronia. De Orat. 261,) 



vo 

ro-kurdum 

To-la-ter'ra 

Torcae, or Vol' gaB 

To-log'e-scs 

To-Iog'e-Bus 

foVsceoB 

foVsciy or Votci 

rol-sin'i-um 

rol-tin'i-a 

Tolu-ba 

ro-lum'nfie fs^num 

^o-liim'm-a 

To-Iumfnag 

fo-lurn'm^us 

fo-lup'tag, and 

Vo-lu'pi-a 
fol-u-se'BUs 
Wu-si-a'iius 
Fo-lu'si-us, 10 



US 

Voru-sus 

Vo'lux 

Vo-ma'mur^ 

Vo-no'nes 

Vo-pis'cus 

Vo-ra'niM 

Vo-ti-c'nu8, 22 

U-ra'ni-a 

U-ra'ni-i, or U'ri4 

U'ra-nus 

Ur-bic'u-a 

Ur'bi-cus 

U'ri-a 

U'ri-tes 

Ur-sid'i-iM 

Us'ca-na 

U-sip'e-tess or 

U-sip'i-ci 
Us-t^ca 



UZ 133 

U'ti-ca 

Vul-ca-na'li-a^ 

Vul-ca'ni 

Vul-ca'ni-us 

Vul-ca'nns 

VuVcan (Eng.) 

Vul-ca'ti-u8, 10 

Vul'so 

Vul'tu-ra 

Vul-tu-pe'i-u§ 

Vul-tu'ri-iMf 

Vul-tur'niiinf 

Vul-tur'nus 

Vul'si-nuMi 

Ux-eUo-du'imm 

Ux'U, 3 

Ux-is'a-ma 

U'zi-ta 



XE 

ILan'the, 17 

S^an'thi 

^an'thi-a 

^n^tfai-ca 

tan-thip'pe 

S^an-thip'pus 

^an'tiia 

^an-tho^pulus 

i^an'thus 

S^an'ti-cles 

X^an-tip'pe 

S^an-tip'pus 

Xe-nag'o-ras 

Xe-nar'chus 



XE 

Xen'a-res 

Xen'e-tus 

Xe'ne-us 

Xe'ni-a 

Xe-ni'a-des 

Xe-ni'u8 

Xen-o-cle'a 

Xen'o-cles 

Xea-o-cli'des 

Xe-noc'ra-tes 

Xe-nod'a-mus 

Xe-nod'i-ce 

Xe-nod'o-chus 



XY 

Xen-o-do'rus 

Xe-nod'o-tus 

Xe-noph'a-nes 

Xe*nophi-lu8r 

Xen'o-phon 

Xen-o-ph<m*ti^u8 

Xen-o-pi-thi'a 

Xerx'es, I7 

Xeu'xes 

Xu'thus 

Xy'chus 

Xynl-as 

Xyn-o-ich'i-a 



g2 



124. ZE 

Zab'a-tus, 19, 27 

Zab-di-ce'ne 

Za-bir'na 

Zab'u-lus 

Za-c)m'thus 

Za-gr»'us 

Za'grus 

Zal'a-tes,19 

Za-leu'cus 

Za'ma, or Zag'ma 

Za'me-is 

Za-morxis 

Zan'cle 

Zan'the-nes 

Zan'th-des 

Za'rax 

Zar-bi-e'nus 

Zar-i-as'pes 

Za-thes 

Ze-bi'na 

Ze'la,orZe'li-a 

Zeles 

Ze-lot'y-pe 

ZClus 



ZI 

Ze'no 

Ze-no'bi-a 

Zen'o-cles 

Zen-o-cli'des 

Zen-o-do'rus 

Zen-o-do'ti-a 

* Ze-nod'o-tus 

Ze-noth'e-mis 

Ze-noph'a-nes 

Ze-phyr'i-i 

Ze-phjrr'i-um 

Zeph'y-rus 

Zeph'y-rum 

Ze-r)m'thus 

Ze'tnes, or Ze'tus 

Zeu-gi-ta'na 

Zeug^ma 

Ze'us ^ 

Zeux-id'a-mus 

Zeuxl-das 

Zeu-xip'pe 

Zeu'xis 

Zeu'xo 

Zi-gi'ra 



ZY 

Zill-a, or Ze'lis 

Zi-m/ri 

Zi-ob'e-ris 

Zi-pae'tes 

Zmira-ces, 16 

t Zol-lus, 29 

Zo-ip'pus 

Zo'na 

Zon'a-ras 

Zoph'o-rus 

Zo-pyr'i-o 

Zo-pyr'i-on 

Zop'y-ru8, 19 

Zor-o-as'ter 

Zosl-mus 

Zosl-ne 

Zos-te'ri-a 

Zo-thraus'tes 

Zy-gan'tes 

Zyg'e-na 

Zyg'i-a 

Zy-gom'a-la 

Zy-gop'o-lis 

Zy-gri'tae 



* Zenodotus, — All onr prosodists but Lerapriere give this word tb< 
antepenultimate accent ; and till a good reason is given why it sbool^ 
differ from HerodotuSf I must beg leave to follow the majority. 

f ZoUus. — The two vowels in this word are always separated n 
the Greek and Latin, but in the English pronunciation of it they an 
frequently blended into a diphthong, as in the words oil^ boU, &c 
This, however, is an illiterate pronunciation, and should be avoided 
The word should have three syllables, and be pronounced as if writ 
ten Zoe-lus, 



( 125 ) 



By inspecting the foregoing Vocabulary, we see that not- 
withstanding all the barriers with which the learned have 
guarded the accentuation of the dead languages, still some 
words there are which despise their laws, and boldly adopt 
the analogy of English pronunciation. It is true th^ 
catalogue of these is not very numerous : for, as an error 
of this kind incurs the penally of being thought illiterate 
and vulgar, it is no wonder that a pedbEtntic adherence to 
the Greek and Latin should, in doubtAil cases, be gene- 
rally preferred. 

But as the letters of the dead languages have insensibly 
changed their sound by passing into the living ones, so 
it is impossible to preserve the accent from sli£ng some- 
times into the analogies of our own tongue ; and when 
once the words of this kind are fixed in the public ear, it 
is not only a useless, but a pernicious, pedantry to dis- 
turb them. Who could hear without pity of Alexander's 
passing the river Grani'cus^ or of his marrying the sister 
of Parysfatis f These words, and several others, must 
be looked upon as planets shot from their original spheres, 
and moving round another centre. 

After all the care, therefore, that has been taken to 
accent words according to the best authorities, some have 
been found so differently marked by different prosodists, 
as to make it no easy matter to know to which we should 
give the preference. In this case I have ventitted to give 
my opinion without presuming to decide, and merely as 
an 'HvwTixov, or Interim^ till the learned have pronounced 
the final sentence. 



PREFACE 



ffO 



THE TERMINATIONAL VOCABULARY. 



Taking a refaroepective view of language, or sui^eyiiM 
it in its terminations, affi>rds not only a new bat an af 
vantageous view of all languages. The necessity of tb» 
view induced me, several years ago, to arrange the whole 
English language according to its terminations ; and this 
arrangement I found of infinite use to me in consuldng 
the analogies of our tongue. A convicticm of its utOity 
made me desbous of arranging the Greek and Latin pro- 
per names in the same manner, and more particulariy as 
the pronunciation o£ these languages depends more on die 
termination of words than any other we are acquainted 
wil^. Of such utility is this arrangement su^osed to he 
in the Greek language, that the son of the famous Hoog- 
eveen, who wrote on the Greek particles, has actually 
printed such a dictionary, which only waits for a pre&oe 
to be published. The labour of such a selection and 
arrangement must have been prodigious ; nor is the task 
I have imdertaken in the present woric a slight one ; but 
the idea of rendering the classictd pronunciation of proper 
names still more easy, encouraged me to persevere in the 
labour, however dry and fatigumg. 

I flattered myself I had abready promoted this end, by 
dividing the proper names into syllables upon analogical 
principles ; but hoped I could still add to the facility of 
recollecting their pronunciation by the arrangement here 
adopted ; which, in the first place, exhibits the accent and 
quantity of every word by its termination. 

In the next place, it snews the extent of this accentua- 



FEEFACE TO TEBMIKATTONAL VOCAB0LAEY. 1^7 

tioii, 1^ producing, at one view, all the words differently 
ftcoented, by whidi means may be formed the rule and 
the exception. 

Thirdly^ when the exceptions are but few, and less apt 
to be regarded, — by seeing them contrasted with the rule, 
fchey are imprinted more strongly on the memory, and are 
the more easily recollected. Thus, by seeing that Sper- 
^hius^ Xenophontius^ and Darius, are the only words of 
that very numerous termination which have the accent on 
the p^iultimate ; we are at peifect ease about all the rest. 

Fourthly, by seeing that all words ending in ene^ have 
Eraiversally the antepenultimate accent, we easily recollect 
tiiat the pronunciation of Eimienes, with the accent on 
the penultimate, is radically wrong, and is only tolerated 
because adopted by some respectable writers. Thus, too, 
the numerous termination in (idea is seen to be perfectly 
aniiqienultimate ; and the amUguous termination in ides 
k freed in some measure from its intricacy, by seeing the 
extent of both forms contrasted. This contrast, without 
beii^ obliged to go to Greek etymologists, shows at one 
view when this termination has the accent on the penul- 
timate i, as in Tydides ; and when it transfers the accent 
to the antepenultimate, as in Thncgdides, which depends 
entirely on the quanti^ of the origin^d word from which 
these patronymics are fonned. 

And lastly, when the number of words pronounced with 
a different aec^it are nearly equal, we can at least find 
some way of recollecting their several accentuations better 
than if they were promiscuously mingled with all the rest 
of the words in the language. By frequently repeating 
them as they stand tc^ether, the ear will gain a habit of 
placing the accent properly, without knowing why it does 
so. In short, if Labbe'^s Catholici Indices, which is in 
the hands of all the learned, be usefiil for readily finding 
the accent and quantity of proper names, the present In- 
dex cannot fail to be much more so, as it not only asso- 
ciates them by their accent and quantity, but according 
to their termination also ; and by this additional associa- 
tion it must necessarily render any diversity of accent more 
easily perceived and remembered. 



128 PREFACE TO TEBMINATIOKAL VOCABULARY. 

To aU whicli advantages it may be added, that thi 
arrangement has enaUed me to point out the true soun 
of every termination ; by which means those who are to 
tally unacquainted with the learned languages will fini 
themselves instructed in the true pronunciation of th 
final letters of every word, as well as its accent ani 
quantity. 

It need scarcely be observed, that in the following iJ 
dex almost all words of two syllables are omitted : for, a^ 
dissyllables in the Greek and Latin languages are always 
pronounced with the accent on the first, it was needles^ 
to insert them. The same may be observed of such word^ 
as have the vowel in the penultimate syllable followed hj 
two consonants : for, in this case, uidess ^he former of 
these consonants was a mute, and the latter a liquid, the 
penultimate vowel was always long, and consequently al- 
ways had the accent. This analogy takes place in our 
pronunciation of words from the Hebrew, which, with the 
exception of some few which have been anglicised, such 
as Bethlehemite^ Naxarene^ &c. have the accent, like the 
Greek and Latin words, either on the penultimate or ante* 
penultimate syllable. 

It might have been expected that I should have con- 
fined myself to the insertion of proper names alone, with- 
out bringing in the gentile adjectives, as they are called, 
which are derived from them. This omission would, 
undoubtedly have saved me immense trouble ; but these 
adjectives being sometimes used as substantives^ made it 
difficult to draw the line ; and as the analogy of accentua- 
tion was, in some measure, connected with these adjec< 
tives, I hoped the trouble of collecting and arranging 
them would not be entirely thrown away. 



TERMINATIONAL VOCABULARY 

OF 

GREEK AND LATIN PROPER NAMES. 



AA 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 
Abaa *, Nausicaa. 

B A 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 

Ababa, Desudaba, Alaba, Allaba, Aballaba, Cillaba,^ 
Adeba, Abnoba, Onoba, Arnoba, Ausoba, Hecuba, Gel- 
duba, Corduba, Voluba, Rutuba. 

ACA ECA ICAf OCA UCA YCA. 

Accent the Penultimate, 

Cleonica, Thessalonica, Veronica, Noctiluca, Donuca. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Ithaca, Andriaca, Malaca, Tabraca, Mazaca, Seneca, 
Cyrenaica, Belgica, Georgica, Cabalica, Italica, Malti- 
lica, Bellica, Laconica, Leonica, Marica, Marmarica, 
Conimbrica, Merobrica, Mirobrica, Cetobrica, Anderica, 
America, Africa, Arborica, Aremorica, Armorica, Norica, 



* As the accent is never on the last syllable of Greek or Latin 
proper names, the final a most be pronounced as in English words 
of this termination ; that is, nearly as the interjection ah ! — See Rule 
7, prefixed to the Initial Vocabulary, 

t Of all the words ending in icay Cleonica, Veronica^ and Thesaa- 
hnica, are the only three which have the penultimate accent.-r-See 
Rule the :S29th prefixed to the Initial Vocabulaiy, and the words .47{-. 
inmicus and Sophronicus, 

c3 



130 TERMINATIONAL VOCABULAEY OF 

Tetrica, Asturica, Ill)rrica, Nasica, Esica, Corsica, Atha- 
tica, Boetica, Ceretica, Anaitica, Celtica, Salmantica, 
Cyrrhestiea, Ustica, Utica^ Engravica, Oboca, Amadoca, 
Aesyca, Mutyca. 

D A 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Abdeda, Hecameda, Diomeda, Amida, Actrida. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Aada, Adada, Symada, Bagrada, Suada, Idubeda, 
Andromeda, Ceneda, Agneda, Voneda, Caudida, Egida, 
Anderida, Florida ^, Pisida. 

M A 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Dicaea, Nicaea, and all words of this termination. 

E A 

Accent the Penultimate: 

Laodicea, Stratonicea, Cymodocea, Medea, Ligea, 
Argea, Amathea, Alphea, Erythea, Ethalea, Midea, 
Heraclea, Araphiclea, Theoclea, Agathoclea, Androclea, 
Euryclea, Penthesilea, AchiUea, Asbamea, Alcidamea, 
Cadmea, Elimea, iEnea, Mantinea, Maronea, Chaeronea, 
iEpea, Barea, Caesarea, Nieocaesarea, Cytherea, Ipsea, 
Hypsea, Galatea, Platea, Myrtea (a city). 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Pharnacea, Ardea, Tegea, iEthea, Dexithea, Leuco- 
thea, Alea, Doclea, Dioclea, Elea, Marcellea, Demea, 
Castanea, Aminea, Ficulnea, Albunea, Bo'ea, Clupea or 
Clypea, Abarbarea, Chaerea, Verrea, Laurea, Tnyrea, 
Rosea, Odyssea, Etea, Tritea, Myrtea (a name of Venus), 
Butea, Abazea. 



* Labbe tells us that some of the most learned men pronounce this 
part of America with the accent on the penultimate syllable. 



CmsKlC AK)» LATIN PftOPXE NAMES* 131 

CE A 

Accent the Penultimate, 
Melebcea, Eubcea, and all words of this tennination. 

GA 

Accent the ArUepenuUimate. 

Abi^a, Bibaga, Ampsaga, Aganzaga, Noe^, Ara- 
briga, Aobriga, Segc^iga, Coelioj^ga, Flaviobriga. 

HA 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

IVIalacha, Pyrrhicha, Adatha, Agatha, Badenatha, 
Abaratha, Monumetha. 

AI A 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Achaia *, Fanchaia, Aglaia, Maia. 

BI A 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 

Arabia, Trebia, Contrebia, Albia, Balbia^ Olbia, Co- 
rymbia, Zenobia, Comubia. 

CI Af 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 

Nicacia, Dacia, Salacia, Wormacia, Thaumacia, Con- 
nacia, Ambracia, Thracia, Samothracia, Artacia, Accia, 
Gallacia, Graecia, Voadicia, Vindelicia, Cilicia, Liby- 
phoenicia, Aricia, Chalcia, Francia, Provincia, Cappa- 



• The vowels in this terminatioii do not form a diphthong. The 
accent is upon the first a, the % is pronounced like y consonant in year, 
and the final a nearly like the a m father y or the interjection oA/— See 
Rule 7. 

f Words of this termination have the m pronounced as if written 
«Af^.— See Rule 10, prefixed to the Jnitiai Vocabulary. 



132 TERMINATIONAL VOCABULARY OF 

docia, Forcia, Muscia, Ascia, Iscia, Thuscia, Boruscia, 
Seleucia*, Tucia, Lycia. 

DI A 

Accent the Penultimate, 
Iphimedia f , Laomedia, Protomedia. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Badia, Arcadia, Leucadia, Media, Iphimedia, Nicome- 
dia, Polymedia, Eporedia, Corsedia, Suedia, Fordicidia, 
Numidia, Canidia, Japidia, Pisidia, Gallovidia, Scandia, 
India, Burgundia, Ebodia, Clodia, iSCrodia, LoDgobar- 
dia, Cardia, Verticordia, Concordia, Discordia, Herephor- 
dia, Claudia, Lydia. 

EI A 

Accent the Penultimate, 

Elegia J, Hygeia, Antheia, Cartheia, Aquileia, Pom- 
peia, Deiopeia, Tarpeia, Carteia. 

GI A 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 

Sphagia, Lagia, Athanagia, Cantabrigia, Ortigia, Nor- 
vigia, Langia, Eningia, Finningia, Lotharingia, Tuiin- 



* See Rnle 30, and the word in the Initial Vocabulary f 

f See Iphigenia in the Initial Vocabulary, 

I The ancients sometimes separated the vowels ei in this ter- 
mination, and sometimes prononnced them as a diphthong. The 
general mode of pronouncing them with ns is to consider them as a 
diphthong, and to pronounce it as long or double e; which from its 
squeezed sound, approaches to the initial y, and makes these words 
pronounced as if written El-e-jf yah, Hy-jS* yah^ «S:c. This is the 
pronunciation which ought to be adopted, but scholars who are fond 
of displaying their knowledge of Greek will be sure to pronounce 
ElegeiUj Hygeia, or rather Hygieiaf Antheia, and Deiopeia, with the 
diphthong like the noun eye; while Cartheia, or Carteia, Aguileiu, 
Pompeia, and Tarpeia, of Latin original, are permitted to have their 
diphthongs sounded like double e, or, which is nearly the same thing 
if the vowels are seperated, to sound the e long as in equal, and the i 
as y consonant, articulating the final ci. — See note on Achaia, 

For a more complete idea of the sound of this diphthong, see the 



GREEK AND LATIN PROPER NAMES. 133 

gia, Sergia, Orgia, Pelasgia, Fugia, Rugia, Ogygia, 
Jopygia, Phrygia, Zygia. 

HIA 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Sophia, Xenopithia, Anthia, Erythia. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Valachia,Lysimachia, Centauro-machia,Inachia, Xyn- 
sichia, Antiochia, Amphilochia, Munychia, Philadelphia, 
Apo8trophia, Scarphia, Acryphia, Emathia, iEmathia, 
Alethia, Hyacinthia, Carinthia, Tyrinthia, Cynthia, 
Tyrynthia, Parthia, Scythia, Pythia. 

LI A 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Thalia, Aristoclia, Basilia. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

(Ebalia, Fornicalia, Lupercaha, Acidalia, Vandalia, 
Podalia, Meealia, RobigaUa, Fugalia, (Echalia, West- 
phalia, iEthalia, Alalia, Vulcanalia, Pag:analia, Baccha- 
nalia, Tenninalia, Fontinalia, Vertumnalia, Portumnalia, 
Agonalia, Angeronalia, Saturnalia, Faunalia, Portunalia, 
Opalia, Liberalia, Feralia, Floralia, Lemuralia, Salia, 
Pharsalia, Thessalia, iEtalia, ItaUa, Compitalia, Car- 
iQontalia, Laurentalia, Castalia, Attalia, Pystalia, Mam- 
blia, -cElia, Caelia, Bella, Celia, Decelia, Agelia, HeUa, 
Cornelia, CloeUa, Aspelia, Cerelia, Aurelia, Velia, 
Anglia, Csecilia, Sicilia, jEgilia, Cingilia, Palilia, iEmi- 
lia, iEnilia, Venilia, Parilia, Basilia, Absilia, Hersilia, 
Massilia, Atilia, Anatilia, Petilia, Antilia, Quintilia, 
Hostilia, Cutilia, Aquilia, Servilia, Elaphobolia, Ascolia, 
Padolia, iEolia, Folia, Natolia, Anatolia, ^Etolia, Nau- 



word PleicuieSj in the Initial Vocabulary, To which observations we 
may add, that when this diphthong in Greek is reduced to the sin<;ie 
longi in Latin, as in Iphigenia, Elegiay&c. it is pronounced like single 
i, thut is, like the noun eye* 



134 TSEMINATIOKAL TOCABULAET OF 

pUa, Dauiis, Figulit, Julia, Apalia, Greetulia, Getuliii 
Triphylia, Pamphylia. 1 

MIA I 

Accent the Penultimate. 

* Deidamia, Laodamia, Hippodamia, Astydamia, ApaJ 
jnia, Hydramia. ^ 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Lamia, Mesopotamia, Cadmia, Academia, Archidemia, 
Eudemia, Isthmia, Holmia, Posthumia. 

NI A 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Amphigenia, Iphigenia *, Tritogenia, Lasthenia. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Albania, Sicania, Hyrcania, Arcania, Lucania, Dania, 
Codania, Dardania, Epiphania, Alania, Mania, Car- 
mania, Germania, Nonnania, Cinnania, Acamsma, 
Campania, Hispania, Fomerania, Afrania, Urania, Bafisa- 
nia, Actania, Edetania, Laletania, Occitania, Ossigitania, 
Mauritania, Lusitania, Titania, Sexitania, Alentania, 
Contestania, Mevania, Lithuania, Transilvania, Azania, 
iEnia, Actsenia, Aberdenia, Ischenia, Tyrrhenia, Par- 
thenia, Diogenia, Menia, Achaemenia, Armenia, Nenia, 
Noenia, Poenia, Cebrenia, Senia, Amagnia, Signia, 
Albinia, Lacinia, Dinia, Sardinia, Fulginia, Virgiiiia, 
Bechinia, Machlinia, Ciminia, Eleusinia, Tinia, Lavinia, 
Mervinia, Lamnia, Lycemnia, Polyhymnia, Alemannia, 
Britannia, Fescennia, Aonia, Lycaonia, Chaonia, Cata- 
lonia, Laconia, Glasconia, Adonia, Macedonia, Marce- 
donia, Caledonia, Mygdonia, Aidonia, Asidonia, Posido- 
nia« Abbendonia, Herdonia, Laudonia, Cydonia, Maeonia, 
Paeonia, Pelagonia, Paphlagonia, Aragonia, Antigonia, 
Sithonia, Ionia, Agrionia, Avalonia, AquiloniajApoUonia, 



• See Rule 30. 

t See this word in the Initial Vocabulary. 



GSBEK AND LATIN FBOFEft NAMES. 135 

CJcdoBta, Foloma, Populooia, Vetulonui, Babylonia, Ac- 
iiDiua, ^monia, Haemonia, Tremonia, Ammonia, Har- 
lumia, Codanonia, Simonia, Fannonia, Bononia, Lam- 
ponia, Foinponia, Cronia, Feronia, Sophronia, Fetronia, 
/bitronia, Duronia, Turonia, Caeisonia, Ausonia, Lato- 
lia, Tritonia, Boltonia, Ultonia, Hantonia, Vintonia, 
W^intonia, Bistonia, Flutonia, Favonia, Sclavonia, Livo- 
sia, Arvonia, Saxonia, Exonia, Sicyonia, Narnia, Sarnia, 
Dorobemia, Hibernia, Cliternia, Lindisfomia, Vigomia, 
Wigomia, Libumia, Calphiirnia, Satumia, Fomia, Dau- 
Qia, Ceraunia, Acroceraunia, Junia, Clunia, Neptunia, 
Ercynia, Bithynia, Macrynia. 

OIA 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Latoia. 

FIA 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Apia, Salopia, Manapia, Messapia, Asclipia, Lampia, 
Olympia, EUopia, Dolopia, CEnopia, Cecropia, Mopso- 
pia, Appia, La}^ia, Oppia, Duppia, Antuerpia. 

RIA 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Dana. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Aria, Baria, Fabaria, Columbaria, Barbaria, Caria, 
Ficaria, Calcaria, Sagaria, Megaria, Hungaria, Fharia, 
Salaria, Hilaria, AUaria, Mallaria, Sigillaria, Anguillaria, 
Samaria *, Palmaria, Planaria, Enaria, Maenaria, Galli- 
nari^Asinaria, Carbonaria, Chaunaria, Colubraria, Agra- 
ria, Diocaesaria, Fandataria, Cotaria, Nivaria, Antiqua- 



• For the accent of this word and Alexandria, see Rule 30, pre- 
fixed to the Itiitial Vocabulary. 



136 TBRMINATIONAL VOCABULARY OF 

ria, Cervaria, Fetuaria, Argentuaria, Calabria, Cantabri; 
Cambria, Sicambria, Mesembria, Fimbria, Umbria, Cun 
bria, Selymbria, Abobria, Amagetobria, Trinacria, Tei 
cria, Molycria, Adria, Hadria, Geldria, Andria, Scamai 
dria, Anandria, Cassandria, Alexandria*, iSria, Egerj 
Aeria, Faberia, Iberia, Celtiberia, Luceria, Nuceri 
-^geria, iEtheria, Eleutheria, Pieria, Aleria, Valeri 
Ameria, Numeria, Neria, Casperia, Cesperia, Hesperi 
Hyperia, Seria, Fabrateria, Compulteria, Asteria, Ai 
thesteria, Faveria, Lhoegria, Iria, Liria, Equiria, Osch 
foria, Daphnephoria, Thesmophoria, Anthesphoria, Chi 
moria, Westmoria, Eupatoria, Anactoria, Victoria, Prs 
toria, Arria, Atria, Eretria, Feltria, Conventria, Bod( 
tria, CEnotria, Cestria, Cicestria, Circestria, Thalestri; 
Istria, Austria, Industria, Tablustria, Uria, Calauri 
Isauria, Curia, Duria, Manduria, Furia, Liguria, Remi 
ria, Etruria, Hetruria, Turia, Apaturia, Bseturia, Beti 
ria, Asturia, Syria, Coele-syria, Coelo-syria, Leuco-syrii 
Ass)rria. 

SI At 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Asia, Chadasia, Lasia, Seplasia, Amasia, Aspasii 
Therasia, Agirasia, Austrasia, Anastasia, Arbsia, JE^ 
Cassia, Maesia, -3Edesia, Magnesia, Artemisia, Mcesi 
Merpesia, Ocresia, Euphratesia, Atesia, Suesia, Bisi 
Calisia, Provisia, Hortensia, Chenobosia, Leucosia, Pai 
dosia, Theodosia, Arachosia, Orthosia, Rosia, Thespn 
sia, Sosia, Lipsia, Nupsia, Persia, Nursia, Tolassii 
Cephissia, Russia, Blandusia, Clusia, Ampelusia, Anth( 
musia, Acherusia, Perusia, Bysia, Sicysia, Mysia, Dk 
nysia. 



• Portus Alexandria sapplex, 

Et vacuam patefecit aalam. Hor. 

t The 8 in this termination, when preceded by a vowel, ougl 
always to be sounded like zA, as it' written ^mozAia, Aspazhia^ ^< 
As'my Theodosia, and Sosiu, seom to be the only exceptions. — Se 
Principles of English Pronanciatiou, No. 45S, prefixed to the Critia 
Pvoamacing Dictionary of the English Language, 



GBESK AND LATIN PEOPEE NAMES. 137 

TI A 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Sebatia, Ambatia, Latia, Calatia, Galatia, Collatia, 
Dabnatia, Sannatia, Egnatia, Aratia, Alsatia, Actia, 
O'aetia, Rhsetia, Anaetia, Vicetia, Peucetia, Pometia, 
^netia, Clampetia, Lucretia, Cyretia, Setia, Lutetia, 
Helvetia, Uzetia, Phiditia, Angitia, Androlitia, Sulpitia, 
Varitia, Delgovitia, Baltia, Bantia^ Brigantia, Murgan- 
ia, Alinantia, Numantia, Aperantia, Constantia, Pla- 
»ntia, Picentia, Lucentia, Fidentia, Digentia, Morgen- 
ia, Valentia, Pollentia, Folentia, Terentia, Florentia, 
Laurentia, Consentia, Potentia, Faventia; Confluentia, 
Liquentia, Druentia, Quintia, Pontia, Acherontia, Ali- 
jontia, Moguntia, Scotia, Boeotia, Scaptia, Martia, Ter- 
tia, Sebastia, Bubastia, Adrastia, Bestia, Modestia, Se- 
;estia, Orestia, Charistia, Ostia, Brattia, Acutia, Minutia, 
Cossutia, Tutia, Clytia, Narytia. 

VIA 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 

Candavia, Blavia, Flavia, Menavia, Scandinavia, As- 

Evia, Moravia, Warsavia, Octavja, Juvavia, -^via, 
mdevia, Menevia, Suevia, Livia, Trivia, Urbesalvia, 
Sylvia, Moscovia, Segovia, Gergovia, Nassovia, Cluvia. 

XI A 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Brixia, Cinxia. 

YIA 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Ilitbyia *, Orithyia. 

* The vowels ia in these words must be pronounced distinctly in 
two syllables, as if written Il-ith^e'tdh, O'rUh-e'i'ah ; the penultimate 
syllable pronounced as in the noun eye. 



13S TE«MINATi0NAL rOCAmTLAllY </>• 

ZlA 1 

Accent Hhe jtrUepenuUimate. 
SdbaJia, AlyzU. 

ALA 

Acoerit the Penultimate. 
Ahalt) Messala. 

Accent the Antepen/uttimate, 

Abala, Gabala, Castabala, Onobala, Triocida, Crocalaj 
Abdala, Daedala, fiuoepbala, Abliala, Astyphala, M«' 
naky Avala. 

CLA 

Accent either the Penultimate or AntepenvZHmctie 
Syllable. 

Amicla. 

EL A 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Aitek Qn Persia), Acela, Adela, Suadek, Mutsdela, 
Pbjloin^, Amstela. • 

ELA 

Accent the Antepenultimate* 

Arbela (in Sicily). 

OLA 

Accent the Antepenultim<ite. 

Publicola, Anionicola, Junonicola, Neptunicola, Agri- 
cola, Baticola, Leucola, iEola, Arbrostda, Scaevola. 

UL A 

Accent the Antepenultim^ate. 

Abula, Trebula, Albula, Carbula, Callicula, Saticula, 
Adula, Acidula, ^Egula, Caligula, Artigula, Longula, 



eSEKK AXO LATIN ntOPSft NAMES. 139 

hrtopula, Merula, Caspenda, Asula, iGsula, Fcesula, 
iceptesula, Sceptensula, Insula, Vitula, Vistula. 

YLA 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Idyla, Massyk. \. 

Ae$ent the Aniepenultimmte, 
Abyla. 

AMA EMA IMA OMA UMA YMA 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Cynossema, Aroma, Narracustoma. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

FandamA, Abdenuna, Asama, Uxama, Aoema, Obri- 
lia, Perrima, Certima, Boreostoma, DeciUQa, IMdyma, 
Hierosolyma, MsyxasL. 

ANA 

Accent the Pemdtimmte. 

Albana, Fandana, Trajana, Marciana, Diana, Sog- 
liana, Drangiana, Margiana, Aponiana, Fomponiana, 
Irojana, Copiana, Mariana, Drusiana, Susiana, Statiana, 
Grlottiana, Yiana, Alana, Crococalana, Eblana, ^lana, 
Amboglana, Vindolana, Querculana, Querquetulana, A- 
mana, Almana, Comana, Mumana, Barpana, Clarana, 
Adrana, Messana, Catana, Accitana, Astigitana, Zeugi- 
tana, Meduana, Malyana, Cluana, Novana, Equana. 

ANA 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Abana, Fricana, Concana, Adana, Cispadana, Sagana, 
Achana, Leuphana, Hy^ana, Drepana, Barpana, Ecba- 
tana, Catana, Sequana, Cyana, Tyana. 



140 TEBMINATIONAL VOCABULARY OF 

ENA I 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Labena, Characena, Medena, Fidena,-Aufidena, Age^ 
na, Comagena, Dolomena, Capena, Caesena, Messena 
Artena. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Fhoebigena, Graphigena, Aciligena, Ignigena, JunoDi 
gena, Opigena, Nysigena, Boetigena, Trojugena, -iEgoe 
thena, Alena, Helena, Pellena, Porsena, Atena, Polyxena 
Theoxena, Callixena. 

IN A* 

Accent the Penultimate, 

Arabina, Acina, Cloacina, Tarracina, Cluacina, Coeci 
na, Ricina, Runcina, Cercina, Lucina, Erycina, Acra* 
dina, Achradina, iEgina, Bachina, Acanthina, Messalina^ 
Catalina, Fascelina, Mechlina, Tellina, Callina, Medul- 
Una, Cleobulina, Tutulina, Caenina, Cenina, Antonina 
Heroina, Apina, Cisalpina^ Transalpina, Agrippinat 
Abarina, Carina, Larina, Camarina, Sabrina, Phalacrinaj 
Acerina, Lerina, Camerina, Terina, Jamphorina, Ca^ 
prina, Myrina, Casina, Felsina, Abusina, Eleusina, 
Atina, Catina, Metina, Libitina, Maritina, Libentina, 
Adrumentina, Ferentina, Aventina, Aruntina, Potina, 
Palaestina, Mutina, Flavina, Levina. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Fascellina, Proserpina, Asina, Sarsina. 

ON A 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Uxacona, Abeona, Libisocona, Usocona, Saucona, Do- 
dona^ Scardona, Adeona, Aufona, Salona, Bellona, Dud- 



* Every word of this terminatioii with the accent on the peoalti' 
mate syllable, has the t pronounced as the noun eye. — See Rules ifS, 
and 4, prefixed to the Initial Vocabulary, 



GBEEK AND LATIN PROPER NAMES. 141 

ona, ^mona, Cremona, Artemona, Salmona, Homona, 
.'omona, Flanona, iEnona, Hippona, Narona, Aserona, 
Ingerona, Verona, Matrona, ^sona, Latona, Antona,^ 
[)ertona, Ortona, Cortona, Alrona, AxonsL. 

UNA 
Accent the Antepenultimate. 



Ituna. 

Aloa. 
Anehoa. 



OA 
Accent the Penultimate. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 



IPA OPA 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Argyripa, Europa, Catadupa. 

ARA 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Abdara. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Abara, Acara, Imacara, Accara, Cadara, Gadara, Ab- 
dara, Megara, Machara, Imachara, Fhalara, Cinara, 
Cynara, Lipara, Lupara, Isara, Patara, Mazara. 

CRA DRA 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Lepteacra, Charadra, Clepsydra. 

ERA 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Abdera, Andera, Cythera (^he island Cerigo, near 
Crete). 



14^ TJ^aMJ/SMTJOVkAh TOGABULART OF 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Libefa, Glycera, Acadara, Jadera, Abdeia, Anderai 
AUphera, Cythera (the city af Cyprus)^ Hiera^ Cremera^ 
Cassara. 

GRA 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Tanagra, Beregra. 

HRA 

Accent the Penultim^ate, 
Libethra* 

IRA 

Accent the Penultimate, 

Daira, Thelaira, Stagira, iSgira, Deianira, Metanira, 
Thyatira. 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 

Cybira. 

ORA 

Accent the Penultim>ate, 
Pandora, Aberdora, Aurora, Vendesora, Windesora. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Ebora. 

TRA 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Cleopatra. 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 
Excetra, Lucopetra, Triquetra. 

URA 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Cabura, Ebura, iEbura, Balbura, Subura, Pandura, 



GKJCEX AND LATIN FKOPEH JUAU^S. 143 

Baniura, Asura, Lesura, Isura, . Cynosura, Lactura, 
Astara. 

YRA 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Ancyra, Cercyra, Corcjrra, Lagyra, Palmyra*, Cosyra, 
Tentyra. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Laphyra, GlajAyra, Philyra> Cebyra, Anticyrai 
ASA 
Accent the Antepenultimate, 
Abasa, Banasa, Dianasa, Harpasa. 
ESA ISA OSA 
Accent the Penultimate. 

Ortogesa, Alesa, Halesa, Namesa^ Alpesa, Bernesa^ 
Mentesa, Amphisa, Elisa, Tolosa, iErosa, Dertosa, Cor- 
tuosa. 

USA YSA 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Pharmacusa, Pithecusa, Nartecusa, Phoenicusa, Cela- 
dusa^ Padusa, Lopadusa, Medusa, Eleusa, Crenaa, La- 
gusa^ Elaphusa, Agathusa, Marathusa, iEthusa, Phoe- 
thusa, Arethusa, Ophiusa, Elusa, Cordilusa, Drymusa, 
Eranusa, Ichnusa, Colpusa, Aprusa, Cissusa, Scotusa, 
Dryusa, Donysa. 

ATA 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Braccata, Adadata, Khadata, Tifata, Tiphata, Croto- 
niata, Alata, Amata, Acmata, Comata, Sarmata, Na- 
pata, Demarata, Quadrara, Grata, Samosata, Armosata, 
Congavata, Artaxata. 



Pa/myra.— See this word in the Jnitial Vocabulary. 



144 TERMINATIONAL VOCABULAEY OF 

ATA 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Chserestrata. 

ETA ITA OTA UTA 

Accent the Penultimate, 

iEta, Caieta, Moneta, Demareta, Myrteta, Herbita, 
Areopagita, Melita, Abderita, Artemita, Stagirita, U- 
zita, Phthiota, Epirota, Contributa, Cicuta, Aluta, Ma- 
tuta. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Damocrita, Emerita. 

AVA EVA IVA 

Accent the Penultimate, 

Clepidava, Abragava, Calleva, Geneva, Areva, At- 
teva, Luteva, Galliva.. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Batava. 

U A 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Accua, Addua, Hedua, Heggua, Annua, Capua, Fe- 
brua, Achrua, Palatula, Flatua, Mantua, Agamzua. 

Y A 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Libya, Zerolibya, ^thya, Carya, Marsya. 

AZA EZA OZA 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Abaraza, Mieza, Baragoza. 

AE 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Nausicae, Pasiphae. 



GBBEK AND LATIN PROPER NAMES. 145 

BM CM 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Maricae. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Colubae, Vaginiacse, Carmocae, Oxydracse, Gallicse, 
Hieronicae, Corigae, Anticae, Odrycae. 

ADM 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
^neadae, Bacchiadae, Scipiadae, Battiadae, Thestiadae. 

IBM VBM 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Proclidae, Basilidae, Orestidae, Ebudas or ^budae. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Labdacidae, Seleucidae, Adrymachidae, Branchidae, 
Pyrrhidae, Basilidas, Romulidae, Numidae, Dardanidae, 
Borysthenidae, AusonidaB, Cecropidae, Gangaridae, Mar^ 
maridae, Tyndaridae, Druidae. 

2I?3? Ta? T?ZI? /^ZI? XJZI? 

Accent the Penultim^ate. 
Achaeae, Plataeae, Napaeae, AUifae. 

Accent the Antepenultim>ate. 

Diomedeae, Cyaneae, Cenchreae, Capreae, Plateau,, 
Callifae, Latobrigae, Lapithas. 

IM* 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Baiae, Graiae, Stabiae, Ciliciae, Cerciae, Besidias, Ru- 
diae, Taphiae, Versaliae, Ficeliae, Encheliae, Cloeliae, Cu- 
tiliae, Esquiliae or Exquiliae, Formiae, Volcaniae, Araniae, 
Araieniae, Britanniae, Boconiae, Chelidoniae, Pioniae, 
Gemoniae, Xjmiae, EUopiae, Herpiae, Caspiae, Cunicula- 

• See Rule 4 of the Iniiiti^ Vocabulary. 



146 TEEMINATIONAL VOCABULARY OF 

riae, Canariae, Purpurariae, Chabrise, Feriae, Ltaboriae^ 
Emporiae, Caucasiae, Vespasiae, Corasias, Prasiae, Itha- 
cesiae, Gymnesiae, Etesiae, Gratiae, Venetiae, Piguntiaej 
Selinuntias, Sestias, Cottiae, LandaviaB, Harpyiae. 

LJE MJE , 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 

Pialae, Agagaraalae, Apsilae, Apenninicolae, .^Equi- 
colae, Apiolae, Epipolae, Bolbulae, Anculae, Fulftdae, 
Fesulae, Carsulae, Latulae, Thermopylae, Acrocomae, 
Achomae, Solymae. 

ANiE EN^ 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Africanae, Clodianae, Valentinianae, Marianae, Valen- 
tianae, Sextianae, Cumanae, Adiabenas, Mycenae, Fre- 
genae, Sophenae, Athenae, Hermathenae, Mitylenae, Ace- 
samenae, Achmenae, Classomenae, Camoenae, Convenae. 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 
Apenninigenae, Faunigenae, Ophiogenae. 

INM ONiE UNiE ZO^ 
Accent the Penultimate. 

Salinae, Calaminae, Agrippinae, Cannae, Taurinae, 
Philistinae, Cleonae, Vennonae, Oonae, Vacunae, Andro- 
gunae, Abzoaj. 

IV M WM 
Accent the Antepenultimate, 
Centuripae, Rutupae. 

ARM ERiE UBRiE YTHRiE ORM ATR^ 
ITRM 

Accent the Penultimate, 
Adiabarae, Andarae, Ulubrae, Budorae, Alachorae, Co- 
atrae, Velitrae. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Eleutherae, Bliterae, Erythrae, Pylagorae. 



GBEEX AND LATIN PBOPER NAMES. 147 

AS^ TS,SM VSM 
Accent the Penultimate, 
Syracusse, Pithecusae, Pityusae. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Pagasae, Acesse. 

AT^ ET^ 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Mseatae, Abrincatae, Lubeatae, Docleatae, Pheneatae, 
Icapeatae, Magatae, Olciniatae, Crotoniatae, Galatae, 
belatae, Hylatae, Amatae, laxamatae, Dalmatae, Exo- 
aatae, Alrinatae, Fortunatae, Asampatae, Cybiratae, Vasa- 
K, Circetae, -^symnetae, Agapetae, Aretae, Diaparetae. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Sauromatae, Thyroagetae, Massagetae, Aphetae, Den- 
eletae, Coeletae, Demetae. 

ITJE OTJE UTiE YTiE 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Ascitae, Abraditae, Achitae, Aboniteichitae, Accabacoti- 
hitae, Arsagalitae, Avalitae, Phaselitae, BruHitae, Hiera- 
lolitae, Antoniopolitae, Adrianapolitaej Metropolitae, 
3ionysopolitae, Adulitae, Elamitae, Bomitae, Tomitae, 
Jcenitae, Pionitae, Agravonitae, Agonitae, Sybaritae, Da- 
itae, Opheritae, Dassaritae, Nigritae, Oritae, Aloritae, 
rentyritae, Galeotae, Limniotae, Estiotae, Ampreutae, 
llutae, Troglodytae, or Troglod'ytae. 

lYM OYM VM YM* 
Accent the Penultimate. 
Durcabrivae, Elgovae, Durobrovae. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Mortuae, Halicyae, Phlegyae, Bithyae, Ornithyae, Mi- 
yae, Minyae. 

• The termination ofya, with the accent on the preceding syllable, 
nust be prononnced as two similar letters; that is, as if spelt 
Halic'e-e^ Mine-e, &c, — See Rule 4 of the Initial Vocabulary. 

h2 



148 TERMINATIONAL VOCABULAEY OF 

OBE 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Deiphobe, Niobe. 

ACE ECE ICE OCE YCE 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Phoenice, Berenice, Aglaonice, Stratonice. — See Rul 
30. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Candace, Phylace, Canace, Mirace, Artace, AUebea 
Alopece, Laodice, Agnodice, Eurydice, Pyrrhice, H< 
lice, Gallice, Illice, Demodice, Sarmatice, Erectice, & 
tice, Cymodoce, Agoce, Harpalyce, Eryce. 

EDE 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Agamede, Perimede, Alcimede. 

Accent the Penultimate- 
iEaee. 

NEE AGE 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Cyanee, Lalage. 

ACHE ICHE YCHE. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Ischomache, Andromache, Canache, Doliche, Eii 
tyche. 

PHE THE 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Anaphe, Psamathe. 



GREEK AND LATIN PROPER NAMES. 149 

IE 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Gargaphie*, Ur^ie, Meminie, Asterie, Hyrie, Par- 
hasie, Clytie. 

ALE ELE ILE OLE ULE YLE 
Accent the Penultimate. 
Neobule, Eubule, Cherdule, Eriphyle. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Acale, Hecale, Mycale, Megale, Omphale, -ffithale, 
Novendiale, ^giale, Auchiale, Myrtale, Ambarvale, 
Hyale, Euryale, Cybele, Nephele, Alele, Semele, Peri- 
mele, PcBcile, Affile, GEmphile, lole, Omole, Homole, 
Phidyle, Strongyle, Chthonopfayle, Deipyle, Eurypile. 

AME IME OME YME 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Apame, Inarime, Ithome, Amymome, CEnome, Am- 
phinome, Laonome, Hylonome, Eurynome, Didyme. 

- ANE 

Accent the Penultimate, 

Mandane, ^ane, Anthane, Achriane, Anane, Drepa* 
ne, Acrabatane, Eutane, Roxane. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Taprobane, Cyane, Pitane. 

ENE 

Accent the Penultim^ate. 

Acabene, Bubacene, Damascene, Chalcidene, Cisthene, 
Alcisthene, Parthiene, Priene, Poroselene, Pallene, Tel- 



* The t in the penoltimate syllables of the words, not having the ac- 
cent, must be pronounced like e. This occasions a disagreeable 
hiatus between this and the last syllable, and a repetition of the 

same sound; but at the same t^me is strictly according to rule See 

Rale 4 of the InitiiU Vocabulary, 



150 TEBMINATIONAL VOCABULAEY OF 

lene, Cyllene, Pylene, Mitylene, iEmene, Laonomene^ 
Ismene, Dindymene, Osrhoene, Troene, Arene, Autc^- 
crene, Hippocrene, Pirene, Cjrrene, Pyrene, Capissene, 
Atropatene, Corduene, Syenc. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Helene, Dynamene, Depamene, Nyctimene, Idomene, 
Melpomene, Anadyomene, Armene. 

INE 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Sabine, Carcine, Trachine, Alcanthine, Neptunine, 
Larine, Nerine, Irine, Barsine, Bolbetine. 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 

Asine. 

ONE YNE 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Methone, Ithone, Dione, Porphyrione, Acrisioiie, 
Alone, Halone, Corone, Torone, Thyone, Bizone, Del- 
phyne. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Mycone, Erigone, Persephone, Tisiphone, Deione, 
Pleione, Chione, Ilione, Hermione, Herione, Commone, 
Mnemosyne, Sophrosyne, Euphrosyne. 

O E (in two syllables) 
Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Amphirrhoe, Alcathoe, Alcithoe, Amphithoe, Nau- 
sithoe, Laothoe, Leucothoe, C)rmothoe, Hippothoe, Alyx- 
othoe, Myrioe, Pholoe, Soloe, Sinoe, iBnoe, Arsinoe, 
Lysinoe, Antinoe, Leuconoe, Theonoe, Philonoe, Phae- 
monoe, Autonoe, Polynoe, Beroe, Meroe, Peroe, Ocyroe, 
Abzoe. 

APE OPE 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
lotape, Rhodope, Chalciope, Candiope, iEIthiope, Cal 



GREEK AND LATIN PROPER NAMES. 151 

iiope, Liriope, Cassiope, Alope, Aslope, Penelope, Par- 
ihenope, Sinope, JSrope, Merope, JDryope. 

ARE IRE ORE YRE 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Becare, Tamare^JSnare, Terpsichore, Zephyre, Apyre. 

ESE 

Accent the Antepen/ultimate. 
Melese, Temese. 

ATE ETE ITE OTE YTE TYE 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Ate, Reate, Teate, Arelate, Admete, Arete, Aphro- 
dite, Amphitrite, Atabyrite, Percote, Pactye. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Hecate, Condate, Automate, Taygete, Nepete, Anax- 
arete, Hippolyte. 

AVE EVE 

Accent the Penultimate. 



Agave. 
Nineve. 

Acholai. 
PanaL 



Accent the Antepenultimate. 

LAI* NAI (in two syllables) 
Accent the Penultimate. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 



BI 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Acibi, Abnobi, AttubL 

* For the final i in these worda, see Rule the 4th of the tnitial Vo- 



162 TEEMINATIONAL VOCABULARY OF 

ACI 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 
Segontiaci, Mattiaci, Amaci, ^naci, Bettovaci. 

ACI ICI OCI UCI 

Accent the Penultimate, 

Raurad, Albici, Labici, Acedici, Palici, Marici, Me- 
domatrici, Raurici, Arevici, Triboci, Aruci. 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 

Callaici, Vindelici, Academici, Arecomici, Hemici, 
Cynici, Stoici, Opici, Nassici, Adautici, Atuatici, Peii- 
patetici, Cettici^ Avantici, Xystici, Lavici, Triboci, 
Amadoci, Bibroci. 

ODI YDI 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Borgodi, Abydi. 

Ml 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Sabsei, Vaccaei, and so of all words which have a 
diphthong in the penultimate syllable. 

E I (in two syllables) 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 

Lapidei, Candei, Agandei, Amathei, Elei, Canthlei, 
Euganei, (Enei, Mandarei, Hjrperborei, Carastasei, 
Pratei. 

GI 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 

Acridophagi, Agriophagi, Chelanophagi, Andropo- 
phagi, Antluropophagi, I^tophagi, Struthophagi, Ich- 
thyophagi, Decempagi, Novempagi, Artigi, Alostigi. 

CHI THI 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 
Heniochi, ^nochi, Henochi, Ostrogothi. 



GREEK AND LATIN PROPER NAMES. 153 

II* 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 
Abii, Gabii, and all words of this termination. 

ALI ELI ILI OLI ULI YLI 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 

Abali, Vandali, Acephali, Cynocephali, Macrocephali, 
Ittali, Alontegeceli, Garoceli, Monosceli, Igilgili, JSqui- 
»li, Carseoli, Puteoli, Corioli, Ozoli, Atabuli, Craeculi, 
Pediculi, Siculi, Puticuli, Anculi, Barduli, Varduli, 
rurduli, Foruli, Gsetuli, Bastuli, Rutuli, Massesyli, 
Dactyli. 

AMI EMI 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Apisami^ Charidemi. 

OMI UMI 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 

Cephalatomi, Astomi^ Medioxumi. 

ANI 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Albani, Cerbani, JEcam, Sicani, Tusicani, &c., and 
11 words of this termination, except Choani, and Sequani, 
T such as are derived from words terminating in anusy 
riith the penultimate short ; which see. 

ENI 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Agabeni, Adiabeni, Saraceni, Iceni, Laodiceni, Cyzi- 
leni, Uceni, Chaldeni, Abydeni, Comageni, Igeni, Quin- 
«ni, Cepheni, Tyrrheni, Rutheni, Labieni, Alieni, 
^ileni, Cicimeni, Alapeni, Hypopeni, Tibareni, Agareni, 
lufireni, Caraseni, Volseni, Bateni, Cordueni. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Origeni, Apartheni, Antixeni. 



* See Rule 3 and 4 of the Initial Vocabularjft 

h3 



164 TEBMINATIOKAL VOCABtJLARY OP 

INI* 

Accent the Penultimate, 

Gabini, Sabini, Dulgibini, Basterbini, Pencini, Mam 
cini, Lactucini, Otadini, Bidini, Udini, Caudini, Budin 
Rhegini, Triocalini, Triumpilini, Magellini, Entellin 
Canini, Menanini, Anagnini, Amiternini, Satumini, Ca 
turipini, Paropini, Irpini, Hirpini, Tibarini, Carin 
Cetarini, Citanni, Illiberini, Acherini, Elorini, Assorin 
Feltrini, Sutrini, Eburini, Tigurini, Cacjrrini, Agjrrin 
Halesini, Otesini, Mosini, Abissini, Mossini, Clusin 
Arusini, Reatini, Latini, Calatini, Colladni, Calactin 
Ectini, iEegetini, Ergetini, Jetini, Aletini, Spoletin 
Netini, Neretini, Setini, Bantini, Mur^antini, Pallantin 
Amantini, Numantini, Fidentini, S^uentmi^ Colentin 
Carentini, Verentini, Florentini, Consentini, Potentin 
Faventini, Leontini, Acherontini, Saguntini^ Haluntini 
iEgyptini, Mamertini, Tricastini, Vestini, Faustini, A 
brettini, Enguini, Inguini, Lanuvini, Ephesini. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Lactucini, Gemini, Memini, Morini -f-, Torrini. 

ONI UNI YNI 
Accent the Penultimate. 

Edoni, Aloni, Nemaloni, Geloni, Aqueloni, Abron 
Gorduni, Mariandyni, M agyni, Mogyni. 

Accent the Antepenultim^ate, 
Epigoni) Theutoni. 



* When the accent is on the penultimate syllable, the t in the t« 
last syllables is pronounced exactly like the noun eye; but when tl 
accent is on the antepenultimate, the first i is pronounced exact 
like e, and the last like eye. — See Rule 3 and 4 of the Initial Vocak 
lary. 

t Extremique hominum Morini, Rhenusque bicornis. 

ViRG. Mn. vlii. 7«7. 
The Danes* unconqner'd offspring, mareh behind ; 
Aud Morini, the last of human kind. 

Dryuen. 



GBXEZ XSJ> LATIN PBOPEK NAMES. 155 

UPI 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Catadupi. 

ARI ERI IRI ORI URI YRI 

Accent the PentUtimate. 

Babari, Chomari, Agactari, Iberi, Celtiberi, Doberi, 
Algeri, Palemeri, Monomeri, Hennanduri, Dioscuri, 6a- 
niiri, Paesuri, Agacturi, Zimyri. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Abari, Tochari, Acestari, Cavari, Calabri, Cantabri, 
Dieeri, Dnigeri, Eleutheri, Crustumeri, Teneteri, Brue- 
ten, Suelteri, Treveri, Veragri, Treviri, Ephori, Pasto- 
phori. 

USI YSI 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Hermandusi, Condrusi, Nerusi, Megabysi. 

ATI ETI OTI UTI 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Abodati, Capellati, Ceroti, Thesproti, Camuti. 

Accent the Antepenultimate., 
Athanati, Heneti, Veneti. 

AVI EVI IVI AXI UZI 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Andecavi, Chamavi, Batavi, Pictavi, Suevi, Argivi, 
Achivi, Coraxi, Abruzi. 

UI 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Abascui, iEdui, Hedui, Vermandui, Bipedimui, Inui, 
Castrum-inui, Essui, Abrincatui. 

IBAL UBAL NAL QUIL 

Accent the PentUtimate 
Promonal. 



156 TEBHIKATIONAL VOCABULABY OF 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Annibal, Hannibal, Asdrubal, Hasdmbal, Tanaquil. 

AM IM UM 

Accent the Penultimate, 
^ Adulam, ^Egipam, Aduram, Gerabutn. 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 

Abarim. 

UBUM ACUM ICUM OCUM 

Accent the Penultim^e, 

Comacum, Tomacum, Baracum, Camericum, Labi- 
cum, Avaricum, Antricum, Trivicum, Nordovicum, Lon- 
govicum, Verovicum, Norvicum, Brundsvicum. 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 

Csecubum, Abodiacum, Tolpiacum, Bedriacum, Ges- 
soriacum, Magontiacum, Mattiacum, Argentomacum, 
Olenacum, Arenacum, Bremetonacum, Eboracum, Ebu- 
racum, Lampsacum, Nemetacum, Bellovacum, Agedi- 
cum, Agendicum, Glyconicum, Canopicum, Noricum, 
Massicum, Adriaticum, Sabenneticum, Balticum, Aven- 
ticum, Mareoticum, Agelocum. 

EDUM IDUM 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 
Manduessedum, Algidum. 

MUM 

Accent the Penultimate, 
Lilybaeum, Lycaeum, and all words of this termination. 

EUM 

Accent the Penultimate, 

Syllaceum, Lyceum, Sygeum, Amatheum, Glytheum, 
Didymeum, Prytaneum, Palanteum. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Heracleum, Herculeimi, Rataneum, G)rineuin5 Aqui- 
heiun, Dictytmeum, Panticapeum, Rhoeteiun. 



Ga££K AKD LATIN FBOPER NAMES. 15? 

AGUM IGUM OGUM 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Nevioinagum, Nivomaguin, Adrobigum, Dariorigum, 
AUobrogum. 

lUM 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Albium, Eugubium, Abrucium, and all words of this 
termination. 

ALUM ELUM ILUM OLUM ULUM 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Anchialum, Acelum, Ocelum, Corbilum, Clusiolum, 
Oraculum, Janiculum, Comiculum, Hetriculum, Uttri- 
culum, Asculum, Tusculum, Angulum, Cingulum, Apu- 
lum, Trossulum, Batulum. 

MUM 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Amstelodamum, Amstelrodamum, Novocomum, Cado- 
mum. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Lygdamum, Cisamum, Boiemum, Antrimmn, Auxi- 
mum, Bergomum, Mentonomum. 

ANUM 

Accent the Penultimate, 

Albanum, Halicanum, Arcanum, iEanum, Teanmn, 
Trifanum, Stabeanum, Ambianum, Pompeianimi> TuUi- 
anum, Formianum, Cosmianum, Boianum, Appianum, 
Bovianum, Mediolanum, Amanum, Aquisgranum, Tri- 
gisanum, Nuditanum, Usalitanum, Ucalitanum, Acole- 
tanum, Acbaritanum, Abziritanum, Argentanum, Horta- 
num, Anxanum. 

Accent the Antepenultim^ate. 

Apuscidanum, Hebromanum, Itanum. 



168 TEEMINATIONAL VOCABTILAEY OP 

ENUM 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Picenum, Calenum, Durolenum, Misenum, Volsenum, 
Darvenum. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Olenum. 

INUM 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Urbinum, Sidicinum, Ticinum, Pucinum, Tridinum, 
Londinum, Aginum, Casilinum, Crustuminum, Appen- 
ninum^ Sepinum, Arpinum, Aruspinum, Sarinum, Ocri- 
num, Lucrinum, Camerinum, Laborinum, Petrinum, 
Taurinum, Casinum, Nemosinum, Cassinum, Atinuin, 
Batinum, Ambiatinum, Petinum, Altinum, Salentinum, 
ToUentinum, Ferentinum, Laurentiniun, Abrotinum, 
Inguinum, Aquiniun, Nequinum. 

ONUM 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Cabillonum, Gananonum, Duronum, Cataractonum. 

Accent the Antepenultim>ate. 
Ciconum, Vindonum, Britonum. 

UNUM YNUM 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Segedunum, Lugdunum, Maridunum, Moridunum, 
ArcaMunum, Rigodunum, Sorbiodunum, Noviodunum, 
Melodunum, Camelodunum, Axelodunum, Uxellodunum, 
Brannodunmn, Carodunum, Caesarodunum, Tarodunum, 
Theodorodunum, Eburodunum, Nemantodunum, Belu- 
iiiun, Antematunum, Andomatunum, Maryandynum. 

OUM OPUM YPUM 
Accent the Penultimate. 
Myrtoum, Europum, 



GEEEX AUD LATIN PEOPeA NAMES. 159 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Pausilypum. 

ARUM 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Agarum, Belgarum, Nympharum, Convenarum, Ro- 
sarum, Adulitarum, Celtarum. 

ABRUM UBRUM 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Velabrum, Veraodubrum. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Artabrum. 

BRUM 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Caucoliberum, Tubemm. 

AFRITM ATHRUM 
Accent the Penultim^ate. 
Venafirum. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Barathrum. 

I R U M 
Accent the Penultimate. 

Muzirum. 

ORUM 
Accent the Penultimate. 
Cermorum, Ducrocortorum. 

Accent the AntepeniUtim^ate. 
Dorostorum. 

ETRUM 

Accent either the Penultimate or Antepenultimate. 
Celetrum. 



160 TEBMINATIONAL VOCABULARY OF 

URUM 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Alaburum, Ascurum, Lugdurum, Marcodunim, Lac- 
todurum, Octodurum, Divojurum, Silurum, Saturum. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Tigurum. 

ISUM OSUM 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Alisum, Amisum, Janosum. 

ATUM ETUM ITUM OTUM UTUM 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Atrebatum, Calatum, Argentoratum, Mutristratum, 
Elocetum, Quercetum, Caletum, Spoletum, Vallisoletum, 
Toletum, Ulmetum, Adrumetum, Tunetum, Eretum, 
Accitum, Durolitum, Corstopitum, Abritum, Neritum, 
Augustoritum, Naucrotitum, Complutiim. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Sabbatiim. 

AVUM IVUM YUM 

Accent the Penultimate, 

Gandavum, Symbrivum. 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 

Coccyuin, Engyum. 

AON MIN ICON 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Helicaon, .Lycaon, Machaon, Dolichaon, Amithaoo^ 
Didymaon, Hyperaon, Hicetaon. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Salamin, Rubicon, Helicon. 

ADON EDON IDON ODON YDON 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Calcedon, Chalcedon, Carchedon, Anthedon, Asple- 
don, Sarpedon, Thermodon, Abydon. 



GREEK AKD LATIN PRpPEE NAMES. 161 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Celadon, Alcimedon, Amphimedon, Laomedon, Hip- 
K)inedon, Oromedon, Antomedon, Armedon, Eurymedon, 
^alydon, Amydon, Corydon. 

EON EGON 
Accent the Penultimate* 
Pantheon, Deileon, Achilleon, Aristocreon. 
Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Aleon, Pitholeon, Demoleon, Timoleon, Anacreon, 
rimocreon, Ucalegon. 

APHON EPHON IPHON OPHON 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Agalaphon, Chaerephon, Ctesiphon, Antiphon, Colo- 
phon, Demophon, Xenophon. 

THON 
Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Agathon, Acroathon, Marathon, Phaethon, Phlege- 
thon, Pyri-phlegethon, Arethon, Acrithon. 

ION 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Pandion, Sandion, Echion, Alphion, Amphion, Ophi- 
bn, Methion, Arion, Oarion, iErion, Hyperion, Onon, 
Asion, Metion, Axion, Ixion. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Albion, Phocion, Cephaledion, iEgion, Brigion, Ado- 
bo^on, Brygion, Moschion, Calathion, Emathion, Ame- 
thion, Anthion, JBrothion, Pythion, Deucalion, Daedalion, 
Sigalion, Ethalion, Ereuthalion, Pigmalion, Pygmalion, 
Cemelion, Pelion, Ptelion, Ilion, Bryllion, Cromion, 
Endymion, Milanion, Athenion, Boion, Apion, Dropion, 
Appion, Noscopion, Aselelarion, Acrion, Chimerion, 
Hyperion, Asterion, Dorion, Euphorion, Porphyrion, 
Thyrion, Jasion, iSsion, Hippocration, Stration, Action, 
£tion, Metion, iEantion, Pallantion, Dotion, Theodo- 
tion, Erotion, Sotion, Nephestion, Philistion, Polytion, 
Omytion, Eurytion, Diomzion., 



162 TSEMINATIONAL VOCABULARY OF 

LON MON NON OON PON RON PHRON 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Philemon, Criumetopon, Caberon^ Dioscoron, Caci- 
pron. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Ascalon, Abylon, Babylon, Telamon, Ademon, iEge- 
mon, Polemon, Ardemon, Hieromnemon, Arteiiion< 
Abarimon, Oromenon, Alcamenon, Tauromenon, Deic- 
coon, Democoon, Laocoon, Hippocoon, Demophoon^ 
Hippothoon, Acaron, Accaron, Paparon, Acheron, Apte 
ron, Daiptoron, Chersephron, Alciphron, Lycophronj 
Euthyphron. 

SON TON YON ZON 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Theogiton, Aristogiton, Polygiton, Deltoton. 
Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Themison, Abaton, Aciton, Aduliton, Sicyon, Cei' 
cyon, iEgyon, Cremmyon, Cromyon, Geryon, Alcetryoni 
Amphitryon, Amphictyon, Acazon, Amazon, OUzon, 
Amyzon. 

ABO AGO ICO EDO IDG 
Accent the Penultimate. 
Lampedo, Cupido. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Arabo, Tarraco, Stilico, Macedo. 
BEO LEO TEO 
Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Labeo, Aculeo, Buteo. 

AGO IGO UGO 
Accent the Penultimate. 
Carthago, Origo, Verrugo. 

PHO THO 
Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Clitipho, Agatho. 



GREEK AND LATIN PROPER NAMES. 163 

BIO CIO DIO GIO LIO MIO NIO RIO SIO 
TIO VIO XIO 

Accent the AntepenultimcUe. 

Arabic, Corbio, Navilubio, Senecio, Diomedio, Regio, 
Phrygio, BambaUo, Ballio, Caballio, Ansellio, PoUio, 
Sinnio, Fonnio, Phormio, Anio, Parraenio, Avenio, Gla- 
brio, Acrio, Curio, Svllaturio, Occasio, Vario, Aurasio, 
Secusio, Verclusio, Natio, Ultio, Deventio, Versontio, 
Divio, Oblivio, Petovio, Alexio. 

CLO ILO ULO UMO 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 

Chariclo, Corbilo, Corbulo, iEpulo, Bsetulo, Castulo, 
Anumo, Lucomo. 

ANO ENO INO 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Theano, Adramitteno. 

^Accent the AntepentUtimate. 

Barcino, Ruscino, Fruscino. 

APO IPO 

Accent the Antepenultimate* 

SLsapo, Olyssipo. 

ARO ERO 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Vadavero. 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 

Bessaro, Civaro, Tubero, Cicero, Hiero, Acimero, 
Cessero. 

ASO ISO 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Carcaso, Agaso, Turiaso, Aliso, Natiso. 
ATO ETO ITO YO XO 

Accent the Penultimate, 
Enyo, Polyxo. 



164 TERMINATION AL VOCABULARY OF 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Erato, Derceto, Capito, Siccilissito, Amphitryo. 

BER FER GER TER VER 

Accent the Penultimate, 

Meleager, Elaver. 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 

Calaber, Mulciber,Noctifer,Tanager, Antipater, Mars* 
pater, Diespiter, Marspiter, Jupiter. 

AOR NOR POR TOR ZOR 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Chrysaor, Alcanor, Bianor, Euphranor, Alcenor, Age- 
nor, Agapenor, Elpenor, Rhetenor, Antenor, Anaxenor, 
Vindemiator, Rhobetor, Aphetor. 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 

Marcipor, Lucipor, Numitor, Albumazor or Albuma- 
zar. 

BAS DAS EAS GAS PHAS 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Alebas, Augeas, (king of Elis,) iEneas, Oreas, 83011- 
plegas. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Dotadas, Cercidas, Lucidas, Timaichidas, Alcidami- 
das, Charmidas, Leonidas, Aristonidas, Felopidas, Mna- 
sippidas, Thearidas, Dia^oridas, Dipboridas, Antipatri- 
das, Abantidas, Suidas, Qraiixidas, ^deas, Augeas, (the 

?)et,) Eleas, Cineas, C3rnea8, Boreas, Broteas, Acragas, 
eripbas, Acyphas, 

IAS 

Accent the PenuUim<ite. 

Opbias. 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 

Csecias, Nicias, Cepbalsedias, Phidias, Herodias, Cy- 
dias, Epbyreas, Pleias, Minyeias, Pelasgias, Antibaccbias, 
Acrolocbias, Arcbias, Adarcbias, Arcatbias, Agatbias, 



GREEK AND LATIN PROPER NAMES. 165 

Pythias, Pelias, Ilias, Damias, Soemias, Arsanias, Pau- 
sanias, Olyinpias, Appias, Amppias, Chabrias, Tiberias, 
Terias, Lycorias, Pelorias, Demetriad, Dioscurias, Aga- 
sias, Phasias, Acesias, Agesias, Hegesias, Tiresias, Cte- 
sias, Cephisias, Pausias, Prusias, Lysias, Tysias, iEtias, 
Bidas, Critias, Abantias, Thoantias, Phaethontias, Phse- 
stias, Thestias, Pboestias, Sestias, Livias, Artaxias, 
Loxias. 

LAS MAS NAS 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Acilas, Adulas, Maecenas, Moecenas, (or, as Labbe 
says it ou^ht to be written, Mecoenas,) Fidenas, Arpinas, 
Larinas, Atinas, Adunas. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Amiclas, Amyclas, Agelas, Apilas, Arcesilas, Acylas, 
Dorylas, Asylas, Acamas, Alcidainas, Iphidamas, Cher- 
sidamas, Fraxidamas, Theodamas, Cleodamas, Theroda- 
mas, Thyodamas, Astydamas, Athamas, Garamas, Dico- 
roas, Sarsinas, Sassinas, Pitinas. 

OAS PAS RAS SAS TAS XAS YAS 
Accent the Penultimate. 

Bagoas, Canopas, Abradaras, Zonaras, (as Labbe 
contends it ought to be,) Epitheras, Abradatas, Jetas, 
Fhiletas, Damoetas, Acritas, Eurotas, Abraxas. 

' Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Teleboas, Chrysorrhoas, Agriopas, Triopas, Zonaras, 
Oyaras, Chrysoceras, Mazeras, Chaboras, Orthagoras, 
Pythagoras, Diagoras, Fylagoras, Demagoras, Timago- 
ras, Hermagoras, Athenagoras, Xenagoras, Hippagoras, 
Stesagoras, Tisagoras, Telestagoras, Protagoras, Evago- 
ras, Anaxagoras, Fraxagoras, Ligoras, Athyras, Thamy- 
ras, Cinyras, Atyras, Apesas, Fietas, Felicitas, Libera- 
litas, Lentulitas, Agnitas, Opportunitas, Claritas, Veritas, 
Faustitas, Civitas, Archytas, Fhlegyas, Milyas, Mar- 
syas. 



166 TEEMINATIONAL VOCABULAEY OP 

BES 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Chalybes, Armeno-chalybes. 

CES 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Arbaces, Pharnaces, Samothraces, Arsaces, Phoenices 
Libyphoenices, Olympionices, Plistonices, Polynices, Oi 
devices, Lemovices, Eburovices. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Axiaces, Astaces, Derbices, Ardlces, Eleutherocilices 
Cappodoces, Eudoces, Bebryces, Mazyces. 

A D E S 

Accent the Antepenultim^ate. 

Icades, Olcades, Arcades, Orcades, Carneades, Sym^ 
plegades, Gorgades, Stcechades, lichades, Strophades, 
Laiades, Naiades, Alcibiades, Pleiades, Branchiades^ 
Deliades, Heliades, Peliades, Oiliades, Naupliades, Ju- 
liades, Memmiades, Cleniades, Xeniades, Hunniades, 
Heliconiades, Acrisioniades, Telamoniades, Limoniades, 
Acheloiades, Asclepiades, Asopiades, Crotopiades, Ap- 
piades, Thespiades, Tbariades, Otriades, Cyriades, Scy- 
riades, Anchisiades, Dosiades, Lysiades, Nysiades, Dio- 
nysiades, Menoetiades, Miltiades, Abantiades, Atlantia- 
des, Dryantiades, Laomedontiades, Phaetontiades, 
Laertiades, Hephaestiades, Thestiades, Battiades, Cy- 
clades, Pylades, Demades, Nomades, Maenades, Echi- 
nades, Cispades, Chqerades, Sporades, Perisades, Hippo- 
tades, Sotades, Hyades, Thyades, Dryades, Hamadrya- 
des, Othryades. 

EDES 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Democedes, Agamedes, Palamedes, Archimedes, Nico- 
medes, Diomedes, Lycomedes, Cleomedes, Ganymedes, 
Thrasymedes. 



GBEEK AND LATIN PROPEa NAMES. 167 

IDES 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Alcides, Lyncides, Tydides, ^gides, Promethides, 
Lcarthides, Heraclides, Teleclides, Epiclides, Anticli- 
s, Androclides, Meneclides, QEclides, Cteseclides, 
enoclides, Chariclides, Patroclides, Aristoclides, Eu- 
ides, Euryclides, Belides, (singular,) Basilides, Nelides, 
elides, iEschylides, iEnides, Antigenides, CEnides, 
ychnides, Amanoides, Japeronides, Larides, Abderides, 
trides, Thesides, Aristides. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Epichaides, Danaides, Lesbides, Labdacides, ^aci- 
5s, Hylacides, Phylacides, Pharacides, Imbracides, 
lyrmecides, Phoenicides, Antalcides, Lyncides, Ando- 
ides, Ampycides, Thucydidea, Lelegeides, Tyrrheides, 
impleides, Clymeneides, Mineides, Scyreides, Minyei- 
es, Lagides, Harpagides, Lycurgides, Ogygides, Ina- 
liides, Lysiraachides, Agatharchides, Timarchides, 
^eulychides, Leontychides, Leotychides, Sisyphides, 
irechthides, Crethides, Scythidefe, (Ebalides, iEthalides, 
Dantalides, Castalides, Mystalides, Phytalides, Belides, 
plural,) Sicelides, Epimelides, Cypselides, Anaxilides, 
bolides, Eubulides, Phocylides, Priamides, Potaroides, 
I^nemides, .^imides, Tolmides, Cbarmides, Dardanides, 
^ceanides, Amanides, Titanides,01enide8, Acbaemenides, 
^chimenides, Epimenides, Pannenides, Ismenides, Eu- 
nenides, Sithnides, Apollinides, Prumnides, Aonides, 
Dodonidesj Mygdalonides, Calydonides, Moeonides, CEdi- 
>odionides, Deionides, Cbionides, Echionides, Sperchi- 
>iiides, Ophionides, Japetionides, Ixionides, Mimallon- 
ides, Pbilonides, ApoUonides, Acmonides, ^monides, 
Polypemonides, Simonides, Harmonides, Memnonides, 
Cronides, Myronides, ^sonides, Aristonides, Praxoni- 
des, Libumides, Sunides, Teleboides, Pantboides, Ache- 
Ibides, Pronopides, Lapides, Callipides, Euripides, Dri- 
opides, CEnopides, Cecropides, Leucippides, Philippides, 
Arg3rraspides, Clearides, Taenarides, Hebrides, Timan- 



168 TERMINATIONAL YOCABULART OF 

drides, Anaxan^rides, Epicerides, Pierides, Hesperides. 
Hjrperides, Cassiterides, Anterides, Peristerides, Libe 
thrides, Dioscorides, Protogorides, Methorides, Agenor 
ides, Antenorides, Actorides, Diactorides, Polyctorides 
Hegetorides, Onetorides, Antorides, Acestorides, Thes 
torides, Aristorides, Electrides, CEnotrides, Smindyrides. 
Philyrides, Pegasides, lasides, Imbrasides, Clesides 
Dionysides, Cratides, Propoetides, Proetides, Oceanitides 
iEantides, Dryantides, Dracontides, Absyrtides, Aces 
tides, Orestides, Epytides. 

ODES UDES YDES 

Accent the Penultimate, 

^gilodes, Acmodes, Nebrodes, Herodes, Orodes, Hae 
budes, Harudes, Lacydes, Pherecydes, Androcydes. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Sciapodes, CEdipodes, Antipodes, Hippopodes, H^ 
mantopodes, Pyrodes, Epycides. 

. AGES EGES IGES OGES YGES 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Theages, Tectosages, Astyages, Leleges, Nitiobriges 
Durotriges, Caturiges, AUobroges, Antobroges, Ogyges 
Cataphryges, Sazyges. 

ATHES ETHES YTHES lES 

Accent the Penultim>ate. 

Ariarathes, Alethes. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Onythes, Aries. 

ALES 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Novendiales, Geniales, Compitales, Arvales, 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Carales. 



GREEK AND LATIN PROPER NAMES. 169 

ACLES ICLES OCLES 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Daicles, Mnasicles, Iphicles, Zanthicles, Cbaricles, 
rhericles, Pericles, Agasicles, Pasicles, Phrasicles, Ctesi- 
les, Sosicles, Nausicles, Xanticles, Niocles, Empedocles, 
rheocles, Neocles, Eteocles, Sophocles, Pythocles, Dio- 
les, Philocles, Damocles, Democles, Phanocles, Xeno- 
les, Hierocles, Androcles, Mandrocles, Patrocles, Me- 
rocles, Lamprocles, Cephisocles, Nestocles, Themisto- 
les. 

ELES ILES OLES ULES 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Ararauceles, Hedymeles, Pasiteles, Praxiteles, Pyrgo- 
eles, Demoteles, Aristoteles, Gundiles, Absiles, Noven- 
oles, Pisatiles, Taxiles, iEoles, Autololes, Abdimonoples, 
Hercules. 

AMES OMES 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Priames, Datames, Abrocomes. 

AN ES 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Jordanes, Athamanes, Alamanes, Brachmanes, Acar- 
Qanes, iEgipanes, Tigranes, Actisanes, Titanes, Ariobar- 
Eanes. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Diaphanes, Epiphanes,Periphanes, Praxiphanes,Dexi- 
phanes, Lexiphanes, Antiphanes, Nicophanes, Theo* 
phanes, Diophanes, Apollophanes, Xenopbanes, Aristo- 
phanes, Agrianes, Pbarasmanes, Prytanes. 

ENES* 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Timagenes, Metagenes, Sosigenes, Epigenes, Melesi- 
genes, Antigenes, Theogenes, iJiogenes, Oblogenes, Her- 

* All the words of this termination have the accent on the Ante- 
pennltimate. See Eumenea in the Initial VocAbulary, 

I 



170 TBRMINiATIONAI. VOCABULARY OF 

mogenes, RheV>0eoiegy Tkemislc^eiies^ Zaiithenes, Agasi 
thenes, Lasth^nes, CUstheues, CaUisthenes, Peristhenea 
Cratisthenes, Antisth^nes, Barbosthenes^ Leosthenesi 
Demostheues, Dinosthenes, Posthenes, An^osthenesj 
Eratosthenes, Borysthenes, Alcamenes, Theramenes, Ti« 
samanes, Deditamenes, Spitamenes, Pylemenes, Althei 
menes, Achsemenes, Philopoemenes, Daimene?, Nausimei 
nes, Numene% Antimenes, Anaximenes, Cleomenes, Hip 

?>nxenes, Heromenes, Arlotomenes, Eumenes, Numenesj 
olymenes, Geryenes. 

INES 

Accent the Pentiltimate. 

T«lchi»es, Acesines. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Aborigines, iEschines*, Asines. 

ONES 

Accent the Penultimate, 

Calucones, Agones, Autochtones, Tones, Helleviones, 
Volones, Nesimones, Verones, Centrones, Eburones, 
Grisones, Auticatones, StatiHies;, Vectones, Vetones, Aci- 
tavones, Ingoevones, Ist^vones, Axones, iExones, Hali- 
sones. 

Accent the Antepenultim>ate, 

Lycaones, Chaones, Frisiabones, Cicones, Vemicones, 
Francones, Vascones, Mysoraacedones, Rhedones, Esse- 
dones, Myrmidones, Pocones, Paphl^ones, Aspagones, 
Laestrigones, Lingones, Lestrygones, Vangiones, Nui- 
thones, Sithones, Baliones, Hermiones, Biggeriones, Me- 
riones, Suiones, Mimallones, Senones, Memnones, Pan- 
nones, Ambrones, Suessones, Ansones, Pictones, Teuto- 
nes, Amazones. 



♦ Labbe says, that a certain anthologist, forced by the necessity 
of his verse, has pronounced this word with the accent on the penal- 
tiraate. 



GESEK AND LATIN P&OPE& NAMES. I7I 

OES 

Accent the PenuUimate. 

X'Xdocs* 

Accent the AntepentUtimate, 

Chorsoes, Chosroes. 

APES OPES 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Cynapes, Cercopes, Cydi^pes. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Panticapes, Crassipes, Esubopes, iEthiopes, Hellopes, 
Dolo]>es, I^anopes, Steropes, Diyopes, Cecropes. 

ARES ERES IRES ORES URES 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Cabsres, Balcares, Apollinares, Saltuares, Ableres, 
Byzeres, Bechires, Diores, Azores, Silures. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Leochares, i^lmochares, Demochares, Abisares, Cava- 
res, Insubres, Luceres, Pieres, Astabores, Musagores, 
Centores, Limures. 

ISES 

Accent the PemUtimate. 
Anchises. 

. ENSES 
Accent the Penultimate. 

Ucubenses, Leonicenses, and all words of this termina- 
tion. 

YSES 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Cambyses* 

AXES 

Accent the Penultim^ate. 

Phraates, Atrebates, Comacates, Ceracates, Adunica- 
tes, Nisicates, Barsabocates, Leucates, Tiridates, Mith- 

i2 



172 TERMINATION AL VOCABULARY OF 

ridates, Attidates, Osquidates, Oxydates, Ardeates, Elea- 
tes, Bercoreates, Caninefates, Casicenufates, Mgates, 
Achates, Niphates, Deciates, Attaliates, Mevaniates, 
Cariates, Quariates, Asseriates, Euburiates, Antiates, 
Spartiates, Celelates, Hispjellates, Stellates, Suillates, 
Albulates, Focimates, Auximates, Flanates, Edenates, 
Fidenates, SufFenates, Fregenates, Capenates, Senates, 
Coesenates, Misenates, Padinates, Fulminates, Merinates, 
Alatrinates, i^sinates, Agesinates, Asisinates, Sassina- 
tes, Sessinates, Frusinates, Atinates, Altinates, Tollenti- 
nates, Ferentinates, Interamnates, Chelonates, Casmona- 
tes, Amates, Tifemates, Infemates, Privernates, Oroates, 
Euphrates, Orates, Vasates, Cocosates, Tolosates, Antua- 
tes, Nahtuates, Sadyates, Caryates. 

* Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Spithobates, Eurybates, Antiphates, Trebiates, Zala- 
tes, Sauromates, Attinates, Tomates, Hypates, Menecra- 
tes*, Pherecrates, Iphicrates, Callicrates, Epicrates, 
Pasicrates, Stasicrates, Sosicrates, Hypsicrates, Nicocra- 
tes, Halocrates, Damocrates, Democrates, Cheremocrates, 
Timocrates, Hermocrates, Stenocrates, Xenocrates, Hip- 
pocrates, Harpocrates, Socrates, Isocrates, Cephisocrates, 
pJaucrates, Eucrates, Euthycrates, Polycrates. 

ETES ITES OTES UTES YTES YES ZES 

Accent the .Penultimate* 

Acetes, Ericetes, Cadetes, iEetes, Mocragetes, Cale- 
tes, Philocletes, iEgletes, Nemetes, Cometes, Ulmanetes, 
Consuanetes, Gymnetes, iEsymnetes, Nannetes, Serretes, 
Curetes, Theatetes, Andizetes, Odites, Belgites, Mar- 
gites, Memphites, Ancalites, Ambialites, Avalites, Cario- 
suelites, Polites, Apollopolites, Hermopolites, Latopoli- 
tes, Abulites, Stylites, Borysthenites, Teraenites, Syeni- 
tes, Carcinites, Samnites, beiopites, Garites, Centrites, 
Therdtes, Narcissites, Asphaltites, Hydraotes, Heracle- 
otes, Boeotes, Helotes, Bootes, Thootes, Anagnutes, Ari- 
xnazes. 

* AH words ending in crates have the accent on the antepennlti 
mate syllable. 



GBEEK AMD LATIN PROPER NAMES. 173 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Dercetes, Massagetes, Indigetes, Ilergetes, Evergetes, 
Auchetes, Eusipetes, Abalites, Charites, Cerites, Pree- 
stites, Andramytes, Dariaves, Ardyesv Machlyes, Blem- 
myes- 

AIS 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Achais, Archelais, Homolais, Ptolemais, Elymais*. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Thebais, Phocais, Aghds, Tanais, Cratais» 

BIS CIS DIS 
Accent the Penultimate. 
Berenices, Cephaledis, Lycomedis. 

Accent the Antepenultim^ate. 

Acabis, Carabis, Setabis, Nisibis, Cleobis, Tucrobis, 
Tisobis, Ucubis, Curubis, Sahnacis, Acinacis, Brovonacis, 
Atbracis, Agnicis, Carambucis, Cadmeidis* 

EIS* ETHIS ATHIS 

Accent the Penultimate* 

Medeis, Spercheis, Pittheis, Crytheis, Nepheleis, Ele- 
leis, Achilleis, Pimpleis, Cadmeis, ^Gneis, Schoeneis, 
Peneis, Acrisioneis, Triopeis, Patereis, Nereis, Cenchreis, 
Tbeseis, Briseis, Perseis, Messeis, Chryseis, Nycteis, 
Sebtheis, Epimethis. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Tbymiatbis. 

ALIS ELIS ILIS OLIS ULIS YLIS 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Andabalis, CercaUs, Regalis, Stymphales, Dialis, 
Latialis, Septimontialis, Martialis, Manalis, Juvenalis, 
QuirinaUs, Fontinalis, Junonalis, Avemalis, Vacunalis, 

* These vowels form distinct syllables. — See the termination £IUS. 



174 TSBHtNATIOVAL TOCAJMTLABT OF 

Abrupalis, Floralis, Quietaik, Emndk^ PhaseUs, Eiipi- 
lis, Quincidlis, Adulis. 

Accent the AntepenuUimate. 

(Ebalis, Hannibalis, Asdrubalis, Acacalis, Fomicalis, 
Androcalis, Lupercalis, Vahalis, Ischalis, Caralis, Thes- 
sails, Italis, Facelis, Sicelis, Fascelis, Vindelis, Nephelis, 
BibUis, Incibilisy Lucretilis, Myrtilis, Indivilis, ^eolis, 
Argolis, Cimolis, Decapolis, Neapolis, and all words 
en£iig in polis. Hercolis, Thestylis. 

AMIS EMIS 

' Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Calamis, Salamis, Seminunis, Thyamis, Artemis. 

ANIS ENIS INIS ONI8 YNIS 

Accent the Pentdtmate. 

Mandanis, Titanis, Bacenis, Mycenis, Fhilenis, Cyl- 
lenis, Ismenis, Cebrenis, Adonis, Edonis, .S)doni&, The- 
donis, Sidonis, Dodonis, Calydonis, Agonis, Alin^nis, 
Colonis, Corbulonis, Cremonis, Salmonis, Jimonis, Ciceiro- 
nis, Scironis, Coronis, Phoronis, Turonis (in Gknnany), 
Tritonis, Phorcynis, Gortynis. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Sicanis, Anticanis, Andanis, Hypanis, Tainnis, Ftjrta- 
nis, Poemanis, Eumenis, Lycaoms, Asoonis, Mae<Hiis, 
Paeonis, Sithonis, Memnonis, Pannonis, Turonis (in 
France), Bitonis, Geryonis. 

OIS* 
Accent the Penultimate. 
Minois, Herois, Latois. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Symois, PyrtMS. 

APIS OPIS 
Accent the Penultimate. 
lapis, Colapis, Serapisf, Isapis, Asopis. 

• These vowels form distinct syllables. 

f Serapis, — See the word in the Initial Vocabulary, 



GBEEK AHD LATION PBOPEE NAMES. 17^ 

Accent thB JiniepctuitltiMate, 
Acapiis, Minapis, Oeicircrphi, Mero^is. 

/IRIS ACRIS ATRIS £RIS IGRIS IRIS ITRIS 
ORIS URIS YRIS 

Accent the PcnuUimdte. 

Balcarisy Apollinaris, Nonacris, Cimmeris, Aciris, 
Osiris, Petosiffis^ BuBiris^ Lycoris^ Caiaguris, Gracchu- 
ris, Hippuris. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Abaris, Fabaris, Sybaris, leans, Andaris^ Tyndaris, 
Sagans, Angaris, Phalaris, Elans, Caularis* Tsenaris, 
Lipans, Araris, Biasaris, Coesaris, Atffiaris, Acbisaris, 
Bassaris, Melam, Autaris^ Trinacris, IlliberiS) Tiberis, 
Zioberis, Tyberis, Nepheris, Cytheris, Pieris, Trieris, 
Auseris, Pasitigris, Cbbotis, Sicdrfs, Keoris, Peloris, 
Antipatris, Absitris, Pacyrii^ Ojgytis, Poq^ym, AAy- 
ris, Thamyris, Thomyris, Tomjna, 

ASIS ESIS ISIS 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Amasis, Magnesis, Tuesis. 

Jccmt the Ant^penultifnat^. 

Bubasid, Pegarfs, Panrfea^is, Paniadis, Ac^tnSisis, En- 
gonasis, Grsecostasis, Ladbesis^ Athesis, Thamesis, Ne- 
mesis, Tibisis. 

ENSIS 

Accent the PentttttJtMifi^. 

Genubensis, CWdub^sis, and all words of this termi- 
nation. 

osis trsis 

Acteht the Pefiuttimate. 
Diamastigosis, Enosis, Eletteil. 

AXIS ETIS ms OTIS YTIS 
d&oent th6 I^mutHmaie. 
Tegeatis, Sarmatis^ Caryatis, Miletis, Liini^lk, Cu- 



176 TKEMINATIONAL VOCABULAEY OF 

retis, Acervitis, Chaldtis, Mempbitis, Sophitis, Arbelitis, 
Fascelitis, Dasc^litis, Comitis, iBanitis, Can^nitis, Cir- 
cinitis, Sebennitis, Chaonitis, Trachonitis, Chalonitis, 
Sybaritis, Daritis, Calenderitis, Zeph3rritis9 Amphaadtis, 
Rhacotis, Estiseotis, Moeotis, Tracheotis, Maleotis, 
Phthiotis, Sandaliotis, Elimiotis, Iscariotis, Casiotis, 
Philotis, Nilotis. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Atergatis, Calatis, Anatis, Naucratis, Dercetis, Eai- 
rytis. 

OVIS UIS XIS 

Accent the Penultimate* 
Amphaxis, Oaxis, Alexis, Zamolxis, Zeuxis. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Vejovis, Dijovis, Absituis. 

ICOS EDOS ODOS YDOS 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Abydos. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Oricos, Lebedos^ Macedos, Tenedos, Agriodes. 

EOS 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Spercheos, Achilleos. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Androgeos, Egaleos, -SEgaleos, Hegaleos. 

IGOS ICHOS OCHOS OPHOS 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Melampigos, Niontichos, Machrontichos. 

Accent the Antepenultim>ate^ 
Nerigos, iBgiochos, Oresitrophos. 



OEEEK AND LATIN FBOPE& NAMES. l77 

ATHOS ETHOS ITHOS lOS 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Sebetbos. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Sciatho8, Arithos, Ilios, Ombrios, Topasios. 

LOS MOS NOS POS 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Stympbalos, iEgilos, Pachinos, Etheonos, Eteonos, 
Heptapnonos. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Haegalos, iEgialos, Ampelos, Hexapylos, Sipylos, 
Hecatompylos, rotamos, ^gospotamos, Olenos, Or- 
chomenos, Anapauomenos, Epidicazomenos, Heautonti- 
morumenos, Atropos. 

ROS SOS TOS ZOS 

Accent the Penultim^ate. 
Melea^os, Hecatoncheros, iEgimuros, Nisyros, Pity- 
onesos, Hieronesos, Cephesos, Sebetos, Haliseetos, Mile- 
tos, Polytimetos, Aretos, Butbrotos, Topazos. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Sygaros, iEgoceros, Anteros, Meleasros, Myiagros, 
Absoro8, Amyros, Pegasos, Jalysos, Abatos, Aretos, 
Neritos, Acytos, 

IPS OPS 

Accent the Penultimate. 
iEgilips, ^thiops. 
LAUS MAUS NAUS RAUS (in two syllables.) 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Archelaus, Menelaus, Aglaus, Agesilaus^ Protesilaus, 
Nicolaus, lolaus, Hermolau3, Critolaus, Aristolaus, 
Dorylaus, Amphiaraus. 

I 3 



178 TXBMINATIOKAL TOCABULABT OF 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Imaus*, Emmaus, ([Enoinaiui, Danaus. 

BUS ^^ 

Accent the Penultimate, f^^ ^^ ^^ 

A^abus. Alabu8, Arabus, Melabus, Setabus, Erebus, 
Ctesibus, Deiphobus, Abubus, Polybus. 

ACU S 
Accent the Penultimate. 
Abdacus, Labdacus, Rhyndacus, iEacus, Ithacus 

lACUSf 

Accent the Penultimate. 

lalciacus, Phidiacus, Alabandiacus, Rbodiacus, CaL 
chiacus, Corinthiacus, Deliacus, Peliacus, Iliacus, Nilia- 
cus, Titaniacus, Armeniacus, Messeniacus, Salaminiacus, 
Lemniacus, loniacus, Sammoniacus, Tritoniacus, Grorty- 
niacus, Olympiacus, Caspiacus, Mesembriacus, Adriacus, 
Iberiacus, Cytheriacus, Siriacus, Gessoriacus, Cytoria- 
cus, Syriacus, Pbasiacus, Megalesiacus, Etesiacus, Isia- 
cus, Gnosiacus, Cnossiacus, Tausiacus, Amatbusiacus, 
Pelusiacus, Prusiacus, Actiacus, Divitiacus, Byzantia- 
CU8, Thennodoiitiacus, Propontiacus, Hellespontiacus, 
Se8tiacus. 

LACUS NACUS OACUS RACUS SACUS 
TACUS 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Benacus. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Ablacus, Medoacus, Armaracus, Assaracus, .^acus^ 
Lampsacus, Caractacus, Spartacus, Hyrtacus, Pittacus. 



* Jmaitt— See the word in the Initial Vocabulary. 
\ All words of thit termiDation have the accent on the t, pronooncf d 
like the noun eye. 



fiftX&X Allf9 LATIK PftOPXE XAME8* 179 

ICUS 

Aeeeni the Penultimate. 

Caicus, Numicus, Demonicus, Gramcus, Andronicus, 
Stzatonicus, Callistonicus, Aristonicus, Ala^cus, Alberi- 
CUB, Rodericus, Rudericus, Romericus, Hunnerlcus, Vic- 
toricus, Amatricus, Henricud^ Theodori<ms, Ludovicus, 
Grenovicus, Varvicus. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Thebaicud) PhocRicus, ChaWaicus, Barbalcus, Judai- 
cus, Achmcus, Lechaicus, Panchalcus, Thermaicus, NJu- 
cus, Panathenaicus, Cyrenaicus, Arabicus, Dacicus, Sa- 
mothracicus^ Turcicus, Arcadicus, Sotadicus, Threicidi- 
cus, Chalcidicus, Alabandicu^^ Judicus, Clondicus, G)r- 
nificus, Belgicus. AUobrogicus, Oeorgieus, G)lchicus9 
Delphicus, Sapphicus^ Parthicus, Scytfaicus, Pythicus, 
St}nnphalicU8, Tharsalicus, Thessalicua, Italicus, Attali- 
cus, Gallicus, Sabellicus, Tarbellicus, Argolicus, Getulu 
cus, Camicus, Ceramicus^ Academicus, Graecanicus, Co- 
canicus, Tuscanicus, .^^atiicus, Hellaniciis^ Glaniciis^ 
Atellanicus, Amanicus, Romanicus, Germanicus, His> 
panicus, Aquitanicus, Sequanicus, Poenicus, Alemanni- 
cus, BritanBicus, Laconicus, Leuconicus, Adonicus, 
Macedonicus, Sardonicus, lonicus, Hermionicus, Baby- 
lonicus, Samonicus, Pannonicus, Hieronicus, Platonicus, 
Santonicus, Sophronicus, Teutonicus, Amazonicus, Her- 
nicos, Libumicus, Euboicus, Troicus, Stoicus, Olympi- 
CU8, iEthiopicus, Pindaricus, Balearicus, Marmaricus, 
Bassaricus, Cimbricus, Andricus, Ibericus, Trietericus, 
Trevericus, Africus, Doricus, Pythagoricus, Leuctricus, 
Adgandestricus, Istricus, IsaUricus, Centauricus, Bituri- 
CU8, Ill3rricu8, Syricus, Pag^sicus, Moesicus, Marsicus, 
Persicus, Corsicus, Massicus, Issicus, Sabbaticus, Mi- 
thridaticus, Tegeaticus, Syriaticus, Asiaticus, Dalma- 
ticus, Sarmaticus, Cibyraticus, Rhseticus, Geticus, Gan- 
geticus, JEgineticus, Rhoeticus, Creticus, Memphiticus, 
Sybariticus, Abderiticus, Celticus, Atlanticus, Garaman- 
ticus, Alenticus, Ponticus, Scoticus, Mseoticus, Boeoti- 
CU8, Heracleoticus, Mareoticus, Phthioticus,^ Niloticus, 



180 TEEMINATIONAL VOCABULABY OF 

Epiroticus, Syrticus, Atticus, Alyatticus^ Halyatticus, 
Mediastuticus. 

OCUS UCUS YCUS 
Accent the Penultimate. 
Ophiucus, Inycus. 

Accent the AntepeniUtimate, 

Lauodocus, Amodocus, Amphilociis, Ibycus, Libycnsy 
Besbyeus, Autolycus, Amycus, Glanycus, Corycus. 

ADUS EDUS IDUS ODUS YDUS 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Congedus, Alfredus, Aluredus, Emodus, Androdus. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Adadus, Enceladus, Aradus, Antaradus, Anfidas, 
Algidus, Lepidus, Hesiodus, Commodus, Monodus, 
Lacydus, Polydus. 

MVS CEUS 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Niobaeus, Meliboeus, and all words of these termina- 
tions. 

EUS* 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Lycambeus, Thisbeus, Bereniceus, Lynceus (the bro- 
ther of Idas)^ Simonideus, Euripideus, Pherecydeus, 
Piraeeus, Phegeus, Tegeus, Sigeus, Ennosigeus, Argeus, 
Baccheus, Motorcheus, Cepheus, Ripheus, Alpheus, Or- 
pheus (adjective), Erechtheus, Prometheus (adiective,) 
Cleantheus, Rhadamantheus, Erymantheus, Pantheus 



* It may be observed, that words of this termination are sometimes 
both substantives and adjectives. When they are substantives, Ihev 
have the accent on the antepenultimate syllable, as ye'leusy Pronuf- 
theus, Salmi/neiiSy &c. ; acd when adjectives on the penultimate, as 
NeleuSf Promethe'uSf Salmone'vs, Sec. Thus, CEneus^ a king of Caly- 
donia, is pronounced in two syllables ; the adjective CEneuSf which is 
formed from it, is a trisyllable j and (En'eius, another formation from 



GREEK AND LATIN PROPER NAME9. 181 

(adjective), Daedaleus, Sophocleus, Themistocles, Eleus, 
Neleus (adjective), Oileus (adjective), Apelleus, Achil- 
leus, Perilleus, Luculleus, Agylleus, Pimpleus, Ebuleus, 
Asculeus, Masculeus, Cadmeus, Aristophaneus, Cana- 
neus, CEneus (adj. 3 sylL), CEneus (sub. 2 syll.), Ido- 
meneiis, Schoeneus, Peneus, Phineus, Cydoneus, Andro- 
geoneus, Bioneus, Deucalioneus, Acrisioneus, Sahnoneus 
(adjective), Maroneus, Antenoreus, Phoroneus (adjec- 
tive), Thyoneus, Cyrneus, Epeus, Cyclopeus, Penelo- 
Sfus, PhillippetXs, Aganippeus, Menandreus (adjective), 
ereus, Zagreus, Boreus, Hyperboreus, Polydoreus, 
Atreus (adjective), Centaureus, Nesseus, Cisseus, (Ete- 
us, Rhoeteus, Anteus^ Abanteus, Phalanteus, Thero- 
damanteus, Polydamanteus, Thoanteus, Hyanteus, Aeon- 
teus, Laomedonteus, Thermodonteus, Phaethonteus, 
Phlegethonteus, Oronteus, Thyesteus, Phryxeus. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Gerionaceus, Menoeceus, Lynceus (adjective), Dor- 
ceus, Caduceus, Asclepiadeus, Paladeus, Sotadeus, 
Tydeus, Orpheus (substantive), Morpheus, Tyrrheus, 
Prometheus (substantive), Cretheus, Mnesitheus, Dosi- 
theus, Pentheus (substantive), Smintheus, Timotheus, 
Brotheus, Dorotheus, Menestheus, Eurystheus, Pittheus, 
Pytheus, Dsedaleus, ^Egialeus, Maleus, Tantaleus, Hera- 
cleus, Celeus, Eleleus, Neleus, Peleus, Nileus, Oileus 
(substantive), Demoleus, Romuleus, Pergaraeus, Euga- 
neus, Melaneus, Herculaneus, Cyaneus, Tyaneus, Cene- 
us, Dicaneus, Pheneus, CEneus, Cupidineus, Apollineus, 
Enneus, Adoneus, Aridoneus, Gorgoneus, l)eioneus, 
Uioneus, Mimalloneus, Salmoneus (substantive), Acro- 
neus, Phoroneus (substantive), Albuneus, Enipeus, Sino- 

it, is a word of four syllables. Bat these words, when formed into 
English adjectives, alter their termination with the accent on the 
pennltimate : 

With other notes than to the Orphean lyre. — Milton. 

The tuneful tongue, the Promethean band.^'AKENSiOE. 

And sometimes on the antepenultimate, as — 

The sun, as from Thyettian banquet, turned 
His coarse intended. — Milton. 



182 TEEMINATIOMAL VOCABULART OF 

peuB^ Hippeu8| Aristippeus, Ai*eus^ Macareug, Tjiadg^ 
reus, MegAreus (gubstantiye), Cwhareus (substantive), 
Briareus, ^sareus, Patareus^ dytheteus, Phalereus, 
Nereus (substantive), Tereus, Adoreus, Mentoreus, Ne6- 
toreus, Atreus (substantive), Caucaseus, Pegaseus, The^ 
seus, Perseus, Nicteus, Argenteus^ Brcmteus, Pioteus,, 
Agyeus. 

AGUS EGUS IGUS OGUS 
Accent the Penultimate. 
Cethegus, Robigus, Rubigus. 

Accent the Antepenultimate^ 

Sarcophagus*, ^gophagus, Osphagus, Neomagus^ 
Rothomagus, Niomagus, Noviomagus, Caesaromagus, 
Sitomagus, Areopagus, Harpagus, Arviragus, Uragus, 
Astrologus. 

ACHUS OCHUS UCHUS YCHUS 

Accent the Penultimate* 

Daduchus, Ophiuchus. 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 

Telemachus, Daimachus, l)eimachus> Alcimachus, 
Callimachus, Lysimachus, Antimachus, Symmachus, 
Andromachus, Clitomachus, Aristomachus, Euryma- 
chus, Inachus, lamblichus, Demodochus, Xenodochus, 
Deiocbus, Antiochus, Deilochus, Archilochus, M ne^o^ 
chus, Thersilochus, Orsilochus, Antilochus, Naulochus, 
Eurylochus, Agerochus, Polyochus, Monychus, Abrony- 
chus. 

APHUS EPHUS IPHUS OPHUS YPHUS 
Accent the Penultimate. 

J.08ephus, Seriphus. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Ascalaphus, Epapbus, Palaepaphus, Anthropographus^ 
Telephus, Absephus, Agastrophus, Sisyphus. 

* Though not strictly within the scope of this work, yet its adop- 
tion into the English language, renders its iiuertion equally propei and 
deserving. 



OEESK AND LATIN PROPEE NAMES. 18S 

ATHUS iETHUS ITHUS 
Accent the Penultimate, 
Simaethus. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Archagathus, Amathus, Lapathus, Carpathus, My- 
^hithus. 

AIUS 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 

Cmus, Laius, Graius. — See Achaia, 

ABIUS IBIUS OBIUS UBIUS YBIUS 

Accent the Antepenultimate* 

Fabius, Arabius, Baebius, Vibius, Albius, Amobius, 
Macrobius, Androbius, Tobius, Virbius, Lesbius, Eu- 
bius, Danubius, Marrhubius, Talthybius, Polybius. 

CIUS 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Acacius, Ambracius, Acracius, Thracius, Athracius, 
Samothracius, Lampsacius, Arsacius, Byzacius, Aceius, 
Sicciiis, Decius, Threicius, G)rnificius, Cilicius, Numi- 
cius, Apicius, Sulpicius, Fabricius, Oricius, Cincius, 
Mincius, Marcius, Circius, Hircius, Roscius, Albucius, 
Lucius, Lycius, Bebrycius. 

DIUS 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Leccadius, Icadius, Arcadius, Palladius, Tenedius, 
Albidius, Didius, Thucydidius, Fidius, Aufidius, Eufi- 
dius, iEgidius, Nigidius, Obsidius, Gratidius, Brutidius, 
Helvidius, Ovidius, Rhodius, Clodius, Harmodius, Gor- 
dius, Claudius, Rudius, Lydius, Dius. 

EIUS* 

Accent the Antepenultim^ate. 
Daneius, Cpcceius, Lyrceius, ^Eacideius, Lelegeius, 

* Almost all the words of this termination are adjectives, and in 
the vowels ei form distinct syllables ; the others, as Cocceiw, SaUiut, 



184 TEBMINATIONAt VOCABULARY OF 

Sigeius, Baccheius, Cepheius, Typhoeeius, Cretheins^ 
Pittheius, Saleius, Semeleius, Neleius, Stheneleius, Pro- 
culeius, Septimuleius, Canuleius, Venuleius, Apuleius, 
Egnatuleius, Sypyleius, Priameius, Cadmeius, Tyaneius, 
J^Lneius, Clymeneius, (Eneius, Autoneius, Schoeneius^ 
Lampeius, Rhodopeius, Dolopeius, Priapeius, Pompeius, 
Tarpeius, Cynareius, Cy thereius, Nereius, Satureius, Vul- 
tureius, Cinyreius, Nyseius, Teius, Hecateius, Elateius, 
Rhoeteius, Atteius, Minyeius. 

GIUS 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Valgius, Belgius, Catangius, Sergius, Asceburgius, 
Oxygius. 

CHIUS PHIUS THIUS 
Accent the Penultimate. 
Sperchius. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Inachius^ Bacchius, Dulichius, Telechius, Munychius, 
Hesychius, Tychius, Cyniphius, Alphius, Adelphius, 
Sis)rphius, Einathius, Simaethius, Acithius, Mclanthius, 
Erymanthius, Corinthius, Zerynthius, Tirynthius. 

ALIUS ^LIUS ELIUS ILIUS ULIUS YLIUS 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 

(Ebalius, Idalius, Acidalius, Palaephalius, St)rmpha- 
lius, Maenalius, Opalius, Thessalius^ Castalius, Publius, 
Heraclius*, ^Elius, Caelius, Laelius, Delias, Melius, 



ProculHuSy Canuleius, Apuleiua, Egnatuleiut, Shameius, Lampeins, Vul- 
tunius, AtteivSf and Minyeius, are substantives ; and which, thongh 
sometime.s prononnced with tlie ei forming a diphthong, and soaoded 
like the noun eye, are more generally heard like the adjectives; so 
that the whole list may be fairly Included under the same general 
rule, that of sounding the e separately, and the i like y consonant, as 
in the similar terminations in eia and id. This is the more necessary 
in these words, as the accented e and unaccented i are so much alike 
as to require the sound of the initial or consonant y, in order to pre- 
vent the hiatus, by giving a small diversity to the two vowels. — See 
Achaia, 

* Labbe places the accent of this word on the penultimate, i, as in 
Heraclitus, and Heraclid€e ; bat the Roman emperor of this name is 



GREEK AND LATIN PROPER NAMES* 186 

Cornelius, Coelius, CIselius, Aurelius, Nyctelius, Praxi- 
telius, Abilius, Babilius, Carbilius, Orbilius, Acilius, 
CaeciUus, LuciUus, iEdilius, Virgilius, iEmilius, Mani- 
lius, Pompilius, Turpilius, Atilius, Basilius *, Cantilius, 
Quintilius, Hostilius, AttiUus, Rutilius, Duilius, Sterqui- 
lius, Carvilius, Servilius, Callius, Trebellius, Cascelhus, 
Gellius, Arellius, Vitellius, Tullius, Manlius, Tenolius, 
Nauplius, Daulius, Julius, Amulius, Pamphylius, Pylius. 

MIUS 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Samius, Ogmius, Isthmius, Decimius, Septimius, 
Rhemmius, Memmius, Mummius, Nomius, Bromius, 
Latmius, Posthumius. 

ANIUS ENIUS INIUS ENNIUS 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Anius, Libanius, Canius, Sicanius, Vulcanius, Asca- 
nius, Dardanius, Clanius, Manius, Afranius, Granius, 
iBnius, Maenius, Genius, Borysthenius, Lenius, Vale- 
nius, Cyllenius, Olenius, Memus, Achaemenius, Arme- 
nius, Ismenius, Poenius, Sirenius, Messenius, Dossenius, 
Polyxenius, Troezenius, Gabinius, Albinius, Licinius, 
Sicinius, Virginius, Trachinius, Minius, Salaminius, 
Flaminius, Eliminius, Anninius, Herminius, Caninius, 
Tetritinius, Asinius, Eleusinius, Vatinius, Flavinius, 
Tarquinius, Cilnius, Tolumnius, Annius, Fannius, Elan- 
nius, Ennius, Fescennius, Dossennius. 

ONIUS UNIUS YNIUS OIUS 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Aonius, Lycaonius, Chaonius, Machaonius, Amythao- 
nius, Trebonius, HeUconius, Stiliconius, Asconius, Ma- 
cedonius, Chalcedonius, Caledonius, Sidonius, Alchan- 



80 geDerally pronoanced with the antepenultimate accent, that it 
wonld sa?oar of pedantry to alter it. Nor do I understand the rea- 
son on which Labbe founds his accentuation. 

* This word, the learned contend, ought to have the accent on the 
penultimate ; but that the learned frequently depart from this pro- 
DQDciation, by placing the accent on the antepenultimate, may be 
leen, Rule SI, prefixed to the Initial Vocabulary, 



186 TXBMINATIOHAL TOCABITLAEY OF 

donius, Dodonius, Mandonius, Mardonius^ Cydomusy 
Gdydonius, Mseonios, Paeonius, Agonius, GxNrgonii%| 
Lsettrygoniusy LestrygoBius, Trophotuus, Sa^oniasJ 
jM araoicaiias, Si^honius, Erichthonius, Aphthonius, Ai^ 
ganthonius, Tithonius, lonius, CEidipodionius, EchiouiuJ 
Ixionius, Salonius, Milonius, Aj>oll0nius, Babyloniu^ 
^monitts, Lacedaemonius, Hsemonius, Palsemonius, Anu 
monius, Stiytnonius, Nonius, Memnonius, Agamemadil 
nius, Crannonius, Vennonius, Junonius, Pomponius, A-i 
cronius, Sophronius, Scironius, Sempronius, AntroniusJ 
^sonius, Ausonius, Latcmius, Suetonius, Antonius, Bis- 
toiiius, Phitonius, Faronius, Amazonius, Eseraius, Cal^ 
phumius, Satumius, Daunius, Junius, Neptunius^ GrOI^ 
tynius, Typhoius, Acheloius, Minoius, TVoius. 

APIUS OPIUS IPIUS 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Agapius, .^^(Cidapius, iBsapaus, Messapius, Grsmpius, 
Procopius, CEno{>iuS| Cecropius, Eutropius, .^EIsojhub, 
Mopsopius, Gippius, Puppius, Caspius, Thespus, Cis- 
pius. 

ARIUS ERIUS IRIUS ORIUS URIUS YRIUS 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Darius* 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Anus, Icarius, Tarcundarius, Ligarius, Sangarius, 
Corinthiarius, Larius, Marius, Hierosolymarius, ^na- 
nus, Tsenarius, Asinarius, Isinarius, Varius, Januarius, 
Aquarius, Februarius, Atuarius, Imbrius, Adriud, Kstbxi- 
dnus, Laberius, Biberius, Tiberius, Celtiberius, Vmde 
rius, Acherius, Valerius, Numerius, Hesperius, A||tius, 
CEli^P^us, Cenchrius, Rabirius, Podalirius, Sirius, Viriusj 
Bosphorius, Elorius, Florius, Actorius, Anactorius, Ser- 
torius, Caprius, Cyprius, Arrius, Feretrius, (Enotrius, 
Adgandestrius, Cay«trius, Ejudaurius, Curius, Mercu- 
rius, Durius, Funus, Palfurius, Thurius, Mamuritis, 
Purius, Masurius, Spurius, Veturius, Asturius, Ataby. 
rius, Scyrius, Porphyrius, Assyrius, Tyrius, Cbiomua. 



GftfiSX AlfTD LATik nOPER MAttES. 187 

ASIUS ESIUS ISIUS OSIUS USIUS YSIUS 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Asius, Caaius, Thasiug, Jasius, iBsius, Acesius, Cora- 
esius, Arcediis Mendecdus, Chesius, Ephesius, MilesiuB, 
Tbeumesius, Teumesius, ^Ekiesiis, Magnesius, Prooon- 
esius, Chersonesius^ Lymesius, Marpesios, AcaseuuB, 
ileCtesius, Adylisins, Amisius, Artemisiue, Simoisius^ 
^harisius, Acrisius, Hortensius, Syracosius, Theodosius, 
irnosiiis, Sosius, Mopsius, Cassius, Tbalassius, Lymes- 
ius, Cressius, Tartessius, Syracusius, Fueius, Agusius, 
bnathusius, Ophiusiiis, Ariusius, Vclusius, Selmusius, 
Lcherusius, MMirisiuB, Lysius, Elyuus, Dumysius, O. 
Irysius, Amphrytius, Othiysius. 

ATIUS ETIUS ITIUS OTIUS UTIUS 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Xenoplioatius. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Trebatius, Catius, Volcatius, Achatius, Latius, Csese- 
lauus, Ematius, Gratius, Horatius, Tatius, Luctatius, 
Statiusy Acdus, Vectius, Quincdus^ Aetius, ^tius, Pa- 
isedus, Praedus, Cetius, Caeetius, Vegetius, Metius, 
ffoenetius, Lucretius, Helvetius, Saturnalitius, Florali- 
ios, Compitalidus, Domidus, Beiidus, Neridus, Crassi- 
iusy Tidus, Polidus, Abimdandus, Pseandus, Taulan- 
ius, Acamandus, Teuthrandus, Lactandos, Hyandus, 
Syzandus, Terendus, Cluendus, Maxendus, Mezendus, 
Juindus, Acondus, Vocondus, Laomedondus, Leondus, 
Rondos, Hellespondus, Acherondus, Bacundus, Opun- 
ius, Arundus, Maeodus, Thesprodus, Sciqpdus, ^gyp- 
iusy Mardus, La&dus, Properdus, Hiitius, MaTordus, 
riburdus, Curdus, Thesdus, Themisdus, Canisdus, 
^allusdus, Crusdus, Carysdus, Hjrmetdus, Brutdus, 
Urndus, Ebudus, ^budus, Albudus, Acudus, Locudus, 
Stercudus, Mudus, Minudus, Pretudus, Cly this, Bavitm^ 
Plavius, Nayius, Evius, MseTius, Naevius, Ambivius, 
LiviuB, Mihdus, Fulvius, Sylvius, Novius, Servius, 
i^esviuB, Pacuvius, Vitruvius, Vesuyius, Azius, Naxius, 
fUezius, Izius, Sabazius. 



188 TERMINATIOMAL VOCABULAET OF 

ALUS CLUS ELUS ILUS OLUS ULUS YLUJ 

Accent the Penultimate. ' 

Stymphalus, Sardanapalus, Androclus, Patroclus, Do 
ryclus, Orbelus, Philomelus, Eumelus, Phasaelus, Phi 
selus, Crysilus, Cimolus, Timolus, Tmolus, Mausolm 
Pactolus, iEtolus, Atabulus, Praxibulus, Cleobolui 
Critobulus, Acontobulus, Aristobulus, Eubulus, Thrasj 
bulus, Getulus, Bargylus, Massylus. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Abalus, Heliogabalus, Corbalus, Bubalus, Cocalus 
Daedalus, Idalus, Acidalus, Megalus, Trachalus, Cephii 
lus, Cynocephalus, Bucephalus, Anchialus, Mssaski 
Hippalus, Harpalus,Bupalus,Hypalus,Thes8alus, Italui 
Tantalus, Crotalus, Ortalus, Attalus, Euryalus, Dor; 
clus, Stiphelus, Sthenelus, Eutrapelus, Cypselus, BaU 
lus, Dipnilus, Antiphilus, Pamphilus, Theophilus, Dij 
raophilus, Troilus, Zoilus, Choerilus, Myrtilus, JBgobo 
lus, Naubolus, Equioclus, iE)olus, Laureolus, Anchemo 
lus, Bibulus, Bibaculus, Caeculus, Grseculus, Sicultu 
Saticulus, .^Equiculus, Paterculus, Acisculus, Regulm 
Romulus, Venulus, Apulus, Salisubsulus, Vesulus, Ca 
tulus, Gaetulus, Getulus, Opitulus, Lentulus, Rutulus 
.^chylus, Deiphylus, Demylus, Deipylus, Sipylus, Em 
pyus, Cratylus, Astylus. 

AMUS EMUS IMUS OMUS UMUS YMUS 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Callidemus, Charidemus, Pethodemus, Philodemuf 
Phanodemus, Clitodemus, Aristodemus, Polyphemiu 
Theotimus, Hermotimus, Aristotimus, Ithomus* 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Lygdamus, Archidamus, Agesidamus, Apusidamui 
Anaxidamus, Ze^damus, Androdamus, Xenodamui 
Cogamus, Per^amus, Orchamus, Priamus, Cinnamui 
Ceramus, Abdiramus, Pyramus, Anthemus, Telemui 
Tlepolemus, Theopolemus, Neoptolemus, Phsedimui 
Abdalonimug, Zosimus, Maximus, Antidomus, Amph 



GEEEK AND LATIN PROPER NAMES. 189 

mxuBy Nicodromus, Didymus,. Dindymus, Helymus, 
olymus, Cleonymus, Abdalonymus, Hieronymus, Euo- 
jrmus, ^symus. 

ANUS 
Accent the Penultimate, 

Artabanus, Cebanus, Thebanus, Albanus, Nerbanus, 
^erbanus, Labicanus, Gallicanus, Africanus, Sicanus, 
^aticanus, Lavicanus, Vulcanus, Hyrcanus, Lucanus, 
Transpadanus, Pedanus, Apidanus, Fundanus, Codanus, 
i^inus, Oarganus, Murhanus, Baianus, Trajanus, Fabia- 
Lus, Accianus, Priscianus, Roscianus, Lucianus, Seleucia- 
lus, Herodianus, Claudianus, Satureianus, Sg'anus, Car^ 
eianus, ^lianus, Afflianus, Lucilianus, Virgilianus, 
Petilianus, Quintilianus, Catullianus, Tertullianus, Juli- 
knus, Ammianus, Memmianus, Formianus, Diogenianus, 
Scandinianus, Papinianus, Valentinianus, Justinianus, 
Frophonianus, Otnonianus, Pomponianus, Maronianus, 
A.pronianu8, Thyonianus, Trojanus, Ulpianus, iEsopi- 
inus, Appianus, Oppianus, Marianus^ Adrianus, Ha- 
irianus, Tiberianus, Valerianus, Papinianus, Vespasianus, 
Hortensiamis, Theodosianus, Bassianus, Pelusianus, Dio- 
eletianus, Domitianus, Antianus, Scantianus, Terentia- 
Dus, Quintianus, Sestianus, Augustianus, Sallustianus, 
Pretutianus, Sextianus, Flavianus, Bovianus, Pacuvianus, 
Alanus, Elanus, Silanus, Fregellanus, Atellanus, Regil- 
lanus, LucuUanus, Sullanus, Syllanus, Carseolanus, 
Pateolanus, Coriolanus, Ocriculanus, ^sculanus, Tus- 
culanus, Carsulanus, Fassulanus, Querquetulanus, Aina> 
nus, Lemaniis, Summanus, Romanus, Rhenanus, Ame- 
nanus, Pucinanus, Cinnanus, Campanus, Hispanus, Sacra- 
nus, Venafranus, Claranus, Ulubranus, Seranus, Latera- 
nus, Coranus, Soranus, Serranus, Suburranus, Gauranus, 
Ancyranus, Cosanus, Sinuessanus, Syracusanus, Satanus, 
Laletanus, Tunetanus, Abretanus, Cretanus, Setabitanus, 
Gaditanus, Tingitanus, Caralitanusi^Neapolitanus, Anti- 
politanus, Tomitanus, Taurominitanus, Sybaritanus, 
Liparitanus, Abderitanus, Tritanus, Ancyritanus, Luci- 
tanus, Pantanus, Nejentanus, Nomentanus, Beneventa- 

nus, Montanus, Spartanus, Paestanus, Adelstanus, Tuta- 



190 TSBMINATIOKAl YOCABULAaT OF 

nus, Sylvanus, AlbmovamiSy Adeantmoius, Mtntoamis 
Voranus. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Libanus, Clibanus, Antilibanos, Oxycanus, Eridanut 
Rhodanus, Dardanus, Oceanus, Longimanus, Idumanus 
Dripanus, Caranus, Adranus, Coeranus, Tritauus, Paiv 
tanus, Sequanus. 

ENUS 

Accent the Penultimate* 

Characenus, Lampsacenus, Astacenu8,Piceiiiis,D«ma- 
8cenu8, Suffenus, Alfeniis, Alphenus, Tyrrhentis^ 6abi& 
nuBy Labienus, Avidenus, Amenus, Pupienus, GrarienuSj 
Cluvienus, Calenus, Galenus, Silenus, Pergamenus, Alexa* 
menus, Ismenus^ Thrasymenus, Trasymemis, Diopo^ 
nus, Capenus, Cebrenus, Fibrenns, Serenus, Palmyraius, 
Amasenus, Tibisenus, Misenus, Evenus, Byzenus. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Ambenus, Helenus, Olenus, Tissawenus, Dexamenus, 
Diadumenus, Clymenus, Periclymenus, Axenus, Callixe- 
nus, Fhiloxenus, Timoxenus, Aristoxenus. 

INUS 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Cytainus, Gabinus, Sabinus, Albinus, Sidicmus, Aii- 
cinus, Sicinus, Ticinus^ Mancinus, Adminocinus, Card- 
nus, Coscinus, Mamicinus, Erycinus, Acadinus, Caudi- 
nus, Rufinus, Rheginus, Erginus, Opiturginus, Augjnus, 
Hyginus, Pachinus, Echinus, Delphinus, Myrrhinus, 
Potninus, Facelinus, Velinus, Stergilinus, Esquilinus, 
iEsquilinus, Caballinus, Marcellinus, Tigellinus, Sibylli- 
nus, Agyllinus, Solinus, Capitolinus, Gerainus*, mm- 
minus, Crastuminus, Anagninus, Signinus, Theoninus, 
Saloninus, Antoninus, Amiteminus, Saturninus, Priapi- 
nus, Salapinus, Lepinus, Alpinus, Inalipinus, Arpinus, 



* This is the name of a certain astrologer mentioned by Peta?iiUi 
which Labbe says would be pronounced with the accent on the ante- 
penaltimate by those who are ignorant of Greek. 



GEBEK AH9 LATIN PSQtXR NAMBTS. 191 

ifirpinus, Crispinus, Rutupiiius, Lagarinus, Charinus, 
^ocharmus, Nonacrinus^ Fibrinus, Lucrinus, Leandri- 
lus, Alexandrinus, Iberinus, Tiberinus^ Tianstiberinus, 
Imermus, iEserinus, Quirimis, Censorinus, Assorinus, 
^avorinus, Phavorinus, Taurinus, Tigurinus, Thurinus, 
iemuiinus, Cyrinus, Myrinus, Gelasinue, Exasinus, Ace- 
inuB, HalesinuB, Telesinus, Nepesinus, Brun4isinus, 
^ursinus, Narcissinus, Libyssinus, FiKcinus^ Clusiiuis, 
l^enusinus, Perusinus, Susiuus^ Ardeatinus, Reatinus, 
ftiiitiatmus, Latinus, Collatinus, Cratinus, Soractinus, 
^tinusy Arretinus, Setinus, Bantinus, Murgantinus, 
Phalantiuus, Numantmus, Trtdentinus,^ Ufentuius^ Mur- 
;^itinus, Salentmus, PoUentinuB, PoleiitmuB, Tarenti- 
ims, Teraitiaus, Suirentuius^ Luirentmiis, Aventittusy 
Truentinus, Leontmus, Pontinus, Metapontinus, Sagun- 
dnus, Martinus, Mamertinus, Tibertinus, Crastinus, 
Palsestinus, Prsenestinus, Atestdnus, Vestinus^ Ai^sti- 
Qus, Justmus, Lavinus, Pataviaus, Acuinus, Elvinus, 
Corvinus, Lanuvinus, Vesuvinus, Euxinus. 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 

PhainuS) Acinus, AlcinuB^ Fucinus, -^Bacidiaus, Cytei'- 
nus, Barchinus, Morinus*) Myrrhinius, Terminusr, Rumi- 
mis, Earinus, Asmus, Apsinus, Myrsinus, Pometinus, 
Agrantinus* 

ONUS UNUS YNUS 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Drachonus, Onochonus, Ithonus, Tithonus, Myronus, 
Neptunus, Portunus, Tutunus, Acmd)nius, Bithynus. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Exagonus, Hexagonus, Telegonus, Epigonus, Erigo- 
nus, Tosigonus, Antigonus, Laogonus, Chrysogonus, 
Nebrophonus, Aponus, Carantonus, Santonus, Aristonus, 
Dercynus, Acindynus. 

* The singular of Morini, See the word. 

As the i in the foregoing selection has the accent on it, it ought to 
be pronounced like the noan eye; while the unaccented i in the 
selection should be pronounced like e» — See Rule 4th prefixed to the 
Initial Vcfiitbuiary, 



192 TEKMINATIONAL VOCABULARY OF 

ous 

Accent the Penultimate 

Aous, Laous, Sardoiis, Eoiis, Geloiis, Acheloiis, InoUs, 
Minous, Naupactous, Arctoiis, Myrtous. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Hydrochoiis, Aleathoiis, Pirithous, Nausithoiis, Alci- 
noiis, Sphinoiis, Antinous. 

APUS EPUS IPUS OPUS 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Priapus, Anapus, iEsapus, Messapus, Athepus, iEse- 
pus, Euripus, Lycopus, Melanopus, Canopus, Inopus, 
Paropus, Oropus, Europus, Asopus, iSsopus, Crotopus. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Sarapus, Astapus, CEdipus^ Agriopus, iEropus. 

ARUS ERUS IRUS ORUS URUS YRUS 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Cimarus, x'Esarus, Iberus, Doberus, Homerus, Seve- 
rus, Noverus, Meleagnis, (Eagrus, Cjmaegms, Camirus, 
Epirus, Achedorus, Artemidorus, IsidoruSjDionysiodoras, 
Theodorus, Pythodorus, Diodorus, Tryphiodorus, Helio- 
dorus, Asclepiodorus, Athesiodorus, Cassiodorus, Apollo- 
dorus, Demodorus, Hermodorus, Xenodorus, Metrodorus, 
Polydorus, Alorus, Elorus, Helorus, Pelonis, iEgimonis, 
Assonis, Cytorus, Epicurus, Palinurus, Arctunis. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Abarus, Imbanis, Hypobarus, Icarus, Pandarus, Pin- 
dams, Tyndarus, Teams, Farfams, Agams, Abgarus, 
Gargams, Ophams, Canthams, Obiams, Uliams, Silarus, 
Cyllarus, Tamams, Absimarus, Comams, Vindomarus, 
Tomams, Ismams, Ocinams, Pinams, Cinnams, Absa- 
rus, Bassams, Deiotarus, Tartarus, Eleazarus, Artabrus, 
Balacrus, Charadrus, Cerberus, Bellems, Mennerus, 
Hesperus, Cratems, Ictems, Anigms, Glaphirus, Debo- 
rus, Pacoms, Stesichoms, Gorgophorus, Telespbonis, 
Bosphorus, Phosphorus, Heptapoms, Euporus, Anxurus, 
Deipyms, Zopyrus, Leucosyms, Satyms, Tityrus. 



GEEEK AND LATIN PROPEE NAMES. 193 

ASUS ESUS ISUS OSUS USUS YSUS 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Pamasus, Galesus, Halesus, Volesus, Termesus, Theu- 
nesus, Teumesus, Alopeconnesus, Proconnesus, Arcon- 
lesus, Elaphonnesus, Demonesus, Cherronesus, Cherso- 
lesus, Arctennesus, Myonnesus, Halonesus, Cephalone- 
jus, Peloponnesus, Cromyonesus, Lyrnesus, Marpesus, 
ritaresus, Alisus, Paradisus, Amisus, Paropamisus, Cri- 
(UBus, Amnisus, Berosus, Agrosus, Ebusus, Amphrysus. 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 

Oribasus, Bubasus, Caucasus, Pedasus, Agasus, Pega- 
sus, Tamasus, Harpasus, Imbrasus, Cerasus, Doryasus, 
Vogesus, Vologesus, Ephesus, Anisus, Genusus, Ambry- 
sus. 

ATUS ETUS ITUS OTUS UTUS YTUS 
Accent the Penultimate. 

Rubicatus, Bseticatus, Abradatus, Ambigatus, Viriatus, 
Elatus, Pilatus, Catugnatus, Cincinnatus, Odenatus, 
Leonatus, Aratus, Pytharatus, Demaratus, Acratus, Cera- 
tus, Sceleratus, Serratus, Dentatus, Duatus, Torquatus, 
Februatus, Achetus, Polycletus, ^Egletus, Miletus, Ad- 
metus, Tremetus, Diognetus, Dyscinetus, Capetus, Aga- 
petus, Acretus, Oretus, Hennaphroditus, Epaphroditus, 
Heraclitus, Munitus, Agapitus, Cerritus, Bituitus, Po- 
lygnotus, Azotus, Acutus, fetercutus, Comutus, Cocytus, 
Berytus. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Deodatus, Palsephatus, Inatus, Acratus, Dinocratus, 
Echestratus*, Amestratus, Menestratus, Amphistratus, 
Pallistratus, Damasistratus, Erasistratus, Agesistratus, 
Hegesistratus, Pisistratus, Sosistratus, Lysistratus, Nico- 
stratus, Cleostratus, Damostratus, Demostratus, Sostra- 
ras, Philostratus, Dinostratus, Herostratus, Eratostratus, 
rolystratus, Acrotatus, Taygetus, Demsenetus, lapetus, 



* All words ending in stratw have the accent on the antepenult!- 
late syllable. 

K 



194« TEBMINATIONAL VOCABULARY OF, ETC. 

Tacitus, Iphitus, Onomacritus, Agoracritils, Onesicritusj 
Cleocritus, Damocritus, Democritus, Aristocritus, Anti- 
dotus, Theodotus, Xenodotus, Herodotus, Cephisodo' 
tus, Libanotus, Leuconotus, Euronotus, Agesimbrotus* 
Stesjmbrotus, Theombrotus, Cleombrotus, Hippolytusj 
Anytus, iEpytus, Eurytus. 

AVUS EVUS IVUS UUS XUS YUS ZUS XYS ij 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Agavus, Timavus, Saravus, Batavus*, Versevus, Sii^ 
vus, Gradivus, Argivus, Briaxus, Oaxus, Araxus, Eudox^ 
us, Trapezus, Charaxys. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Batavus, Inuus, Fatuus, Tityus, Diascoridu. 

DAX LAX NAX RAX RIX DOX ROX 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Ambrodax, Demonax, Hipponax. 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 

Arctophylax, He^esianax, Hermesianax, Lysianaxj 
Astyanax, Agonax, Hierax, Csetobrix, Eporedorix, Deu 
dorix, Ambiorix, Dumnorix, Adiatorix, Orgetorix, Bittt 
rix, Cappadox, Allobrox. 



* This word is pi'onoanced with the accent either on the penaiti 
mate or antepenultimate syllable ; the former however is the mo^ 
g[eneraly especiaHy among the poets. 



RULES 



PRONUNCIATION 



or 



SCRIPTURE PROPER NAMES. 



k2 



ADVERTISEMENT. 



The trae pronunciation of the Hebrew language, as Doctor Lowth 
observes, is lost. To refer us for assistance to the M asoretic points, 
would be to launch us on a sea without shore or bottom : the only com- 
pass by which we can possibly steer on this boundless ocean, is the 
Septuagint version qf the Hebrew Bible ; and as it is highly probable 
the translators transfused the sound of the Hebrew proper names into 
the Greek,4t gives us something like a clue to guide us out of the 
labyrinth. But even here we are often left to guess our way: for 
the Greek word is frequently so different from the Hebrew, as scarcely 
to leave any traces of similitude between them. In this case custom 
and analogy must often decide, and the ear must sometimes solve the 
difficulty. But these difficulties relate chiefly to the accentuatum of 
Hebrew words ; and the method adopted in this point will be seen 
in its proper place. 

I must here acknowledge my obligations to a very learned and use* 
ful work — the Scripture Lexicon of Mr. Oliver. As the first attempt 
to facilitate the pronunciation of Hebrew proper names, by dividing 
them into syllables, it deserves the highest praise : but as I have often 
differed widely from this gentleman in syllabication, accentuation, 
and the sound of the vowels, I have thought it necessary to give my 
reasons for this difference, which will be seen under the Rules : of 
the validity of which reasons the reader will be the best judge. 

N.B. As there are many Greek and Latin proper names in Scrip- 
ture, particularly in the New Testament, which are to be met with 
in ancient hbtory, some of them have been omitted In this selection ; 
and therefore if the inspector does not find them here, he is desired 
to seek for them in the Vocabulary of Greek and Latin Names. 



RULES 

FOR PRONOUNCING 

SCRIPTURE PROPER NAMES. 



1. In the pronunciation of the letters of the Hebrew pro- 
per names, we find nearly the same rules prevail as in 
those of Greek and Latin. Where the vowels end a syl- 
lable with the accent on it, they have their long open 
sound, as Na'baly Je'hu^ Si'rachj Go'sheriy and Tu'baL 
(See Rule 1st prefixed to the Greek and Latin Proper 
Names.) 

2. When a consonant ends 1;he syllable, the preceding 
Vowel is short, as Sam'u-ely Lem^tc-eiy Sint'e-on^ Solo- 
mon^ Su&cotkj Syn'a-gogue. (See Rule 2d prefixed to 
the Greek and Latin Proper Names.) I here d^er widely 
from Mr. Oliver ; for I cannot agree with him that the e 
in Abdiel^ the o in Arnon^ and tne u in Ashur^ are to be 
pronounced like the ee in seen^ the o in tone^ and the u 
in tune^ which is the rule he lays down for all similar 
words. 

3. Every final i forming a distinct syllable, though 
miaccented, has the long open sound, as A'i^ A-risfa-4. 
(See Rule the 3d prefixed to the Greek and Latin Pro- 
per Names.) 

4. Every unaccented i, ending a syllable not final, is 
pronounced like e, as A'ri-el^ AVdl-el; pronounced -4 Ve-e/, 
Ab'de-eL (See Rule the 4th prefixed to the Greek and 
Latin Proper Names.) 

6. The vowels ai are sometimes pronounced in one 
syllable, and sometimes in two. As the Septuagint ver- 
sion is our chief guide in the pronunciation of Hebrew 
proper names, it may be observed, that when these letters 
are pronounced as a diphthong in one syllable, like our 



198 BULES FOB PBONOUKCING 

English diphthoi^ in the word daily, they are either a 
diphthong in the Greek word, or expressed by the Greek 
e on, as Ben-aiah, Bavaia; Hu'ehai, Xoucri; Hu'rai^ Ovgl^ 
&c. ; and that when they arepronounced in two syllables, 
as Skam'tna-iy Shaah'aA, Ser-O'i'ah, it is because the 
Greek words by which they are translated, as la/Aau, Usais, 
Bsgoita make two syllables of these vowels. Mr. Oliver 
has not always attended to this distinction ; he makes 
Sinfa-i three syllables, though the Greek make it but two 
in ^ivaL That accurate prosodist Labbe, indeed, makes 
it a trisyllable ; but he does the same by Aaron and Ca- 
naan, which our great classic Milton, uniformly reduces 
to two syllables, as well as Sinai. If we were to pro- 
noimce it in three syllables, we must necessarily make the 
first syllable short, as in Shim'e-i ; but this is so contrary 
to the best usage, that it amounts to a proof that it ought 
to be pronounced in two syllables with the first i long, as 
in Shi'nar. This, however, must be looked upon as a 
general rule only: these vowels in Isaiah, Graecised by 
'Ho-cua^, are always pronounced as a diphthong, or, at 
least with the accent on the a, and the i like y, articu- 
lating the succeeding vowel ; in Caiaphas likewise the ai 
is pronounced like a diphthong, though divided in the 
Greek Katct^as ; which division cannot take place in this 
word, because the i must then necessarily have the accent, 
and must be pronounced as in Isaac, as Mr. Oliver has 
marked it ; but I think contrary to universal usage. The 
only point necessary to be observed in the sound of this 
diphthong, is the slight difference we perceive between 
its medial and final position ; when it is final it is exactly 
like the English ay without the accent, as in holyday, 
roundelay, galloway; but when it is in the middle of a 
word, and followed by a vowel, the i is pronounced as if 
it were y, and as if this y articulated the succeeding 
vowel : thus Ben-ai'ah is pronounced as if written Sen- 
a'yah. 

6. Ch is pronounced like k as Chebar, Chemosh, Enoch, 
8^. pronounced Kebar, Kemosh, Enoch, &c. Cherubim^ 
and Rachel seem to be perfectly anglicised, as the ch in 
these words is always heard as in the English cheer, child^ 
riches, &c, (See Rule 12 prefixed to the Greek and Latin 



SCaiPTH&E PROPER NAMES. 199 

Proper Names.) The same may be observed of Cherub, 
signifying an order of angels ; but when it means a city 
of the Babylonish empire, it ought to be pronounced 
Kerub. 

7. Almost the only difference in the pronunciation of 
the Hebrew, and the Greek and Latin proper names, is 
in the sound of the g before e and i : in the two last Ian- 
guages this consonant is always soft before these vowels, 
as Gelliusy Gippius, &c., pronounced Jellius, Jippius^ 
&c. and in the first it is hard : as Gera, Gerizim, Gideon, 
GUgal, Megiddo, Megiddon, &c. This difference is with- 
out all foimdation in etymology; for both g and c were 
always hard in the Greek and Latin Languages, as well 
as in the Hebrew, but the latter language being studied 
so much less than the Greek and Latin, it has not under- 
gone that change which familiarity is sure to produce in 
all languages : and even the solemn distance of this lan- 
guage has not been able to keep the letter c from sliding 
into 8 before e and i , in the same manner as in the Greek 
and Latin : thus, though Gehazi, Gideon, &c. have the 
g hard, Cedrom, Cedron, Ciaai, and Cittern, have the c 
soft, as if written Sedrom, Sedron, 8ec. The same may 
be observed of Igeabarim, Igeal, Nagge, Shage, Pagiel, 
with the g hard; and Ocidelus, Ocina, and Pharacion, 
with the c soft like «. 

8. Gentiles, as they are called, ending in ines and 
ites, as Philistines, Hivites, Hittites, &c. being angli- 
cised in the translation of the Bible, are pronounced like 
formatives of our own, as Philistines, Whitfieldites, Ja^ 
cobites, &c. 

9. The unaccented termination ah, so frequent in He- 
brew proper names, ought to be pronounced like the a in 
father. The a in this termination, however, frequently 
falls into the indistinct sound heard in the final a m Africa, 
^tna, &c. ; nor can we easily perceive any distinction 
iu this respect between Elijah and Elisha : but the final 
h preserves the other vowels open, as Colhozeh, Shiloh, 
&c. pronounced Colhoxee, Shilo, &c. (See Rule 7 Pre- 
fixed to the Greek and Latin Proper Names.) The diph- 
thong ei is always pronounced Hke ee : thus Sa-mei'us 
is pronoimced as if written Sa^mee'us. But if the accent 



200 BULKS FOB PBONOUNCINa 

be on the ah^ then the a ought to be pronounced like the 
a m father ; as TaKe^ra, Tah'pe-nes, &c. 

10. It may be remarked that there are several Hebrew 
proper names, which, by passinj^ through the Greek of 
the New Testament, have con&rmed to the Greek pro- 
nunciation ; such as Aceldama^ Genassarethy Bethphage, 
kc. pronounced Aaeldcmha, Jenaxareth, Bethphaje^ he. 
This is, in my opinion, more agreeable to the genetal 
analogy of pronouncing these Hebrew Greek words than 
preserving the c and g hard. 

Rules for ascertaining the English Quantity of the 
Vowels in Hebrew Proper Names, 

11. With respect to the quantity of the first vowel in 
dissyllables, with but one consonant in the middle, I have 
followed the rule which we observe in the pronunciation 
of such dissyllables when Greek ot Latin words : (see 
Rule 18 prefixed to the Greek and Latin Proper Names:) 
and that is, to place the accent on the first vowel, and to 
pronounce that vowel long, as JTo'raA, and not Kor'ah^ 
Mo'loohj and not Mol'ochj as Mr. Oliver has divided 
them, in (position both to analogy and the best usage. 
I have observed the same analogy in the penultimate of 
polysyllables ; and have not divided Balthasar into Bal- 
thas'ar^ as Mr. Oliver has done, but into Bal-tholsar. 

12. In the same manner, when the accent is on the 
antepenultimate syllable, whether the vowel end the syl- 
lable, or be followed by two consonants, the vowel is 
always short, except followed by two vowels, as in Greek 
and Latin proper names. (See Rules prefixed to these 
names, Nos. 18, 19, 20, &c.) Thus Jehosaphat has the 
accent on the antepenultimate syllable, according to Greek 
accentuation by quantity, (see Introduction to this work,) 
and this syllable, according to the clearest analogy (rf Eng- 
lish pronunciation, is short, as if spelt Je-Ao«'a-^a/. The 
secondary accent has the same shortening power in Otho- 
niaSy where the primary accent is on the third, and the 
secondary on the first syllable, as if spelt Oth-o-ni'as: 
and it is on these two Aindamental principles of our pro- 
nunciation, namely, the lengthening power of the penul- 
timate, and the shortening power of the antepenultimate 



SCRIPTtlEE FKOPEB l^AMBS. 201 

accent, that I hope I have been enabled to regulate and 
fix many of those sounds which were floating about in 
uncertainty; and which, for want of this guide, are dif- 
ferently marked by different orthoepists, and often differ- 
ently by the same orthoepist. See this fully explained 
and exemplified in Principles of English Pronunciation, 
prefixed to the Critical Pronouncing Dictionary, Nos. 
547, 530, &c. 

Rules for placing the Accent on Hebrew Proper Names. 

13. With respect to the accent of Hebrew words it 
cannot be better regulated than by the laws of the Greek 
language. I do not mean, however, that every Hebrew 
word which is Graecised by the Septuagint, should be ac- 
cented exactly according to the Greek rule of accentua- 
tion ; for if this were the case, every word ending in el^ 
would never have the accent higher than the preceding 
syllable; because it was a general rule in the Greek 
language, that when the last syllable was long, the accent 
coidd not be higher than the penultimate : nay, strictly 
speaking, were we to accent these words according to the 
accent of that language, they ought to have the accent on 
the last syllable, because ACJ/iix and Icrpijx, Ahdiel and 
Israel^ have the accent on that syllable. It may be said, 
that this accent on the last syllable is the grave, which, 
when on the last word of a sentence, or succeeded by an 
enclitic, was changed into an acute. But here, as in words 
purely Greek, we find the Latin analogy prevail ; and be- 
cause the penultimate is short, the accent is placed on the 
antepenultimate, in the same manner as in Socrates^ Sos^ 
thenes^ &c., though the final syllable of the Greek words 
Zw*^aT>if, 2«crd€v>jf, &c. is long, and the Greek accent on 
the penultimate. (See Introduction prefixed to the Rules 
for Pronouncing Greek and Latin Proper Names.) It is 
this general prevalence of accenting according to the Latin 
analogy that has induced me, when the Hebrew word has 
been Graecised in the same number of syllables, to prefer 
the Latin accentuation to what may be called our own. 
Thus, Cathuay coming to us through the Greek Kado«/i, I 

k3 



202 JIULES FOB FRONOUKCINa 

have accented it on the penultimate, because the Latiii^ 
would have placed the accent on this syllable, on account 
of its being long, though an English ear would be better 
pleased with the antepenultimate accent. The same rea- 
son has induced me to accent Chaseba on the antepenul- 
timate, because it is Grsecised into Xa<TiQa, But when 
the Hebrew and Greek word does not contain the same 
number of syllables, as Mesfo^h, Mea-aCia^ Id'u-ely 
iJbi/nxof, it then comes under our own analogy, and we 
neglect the long vowel, and place the accent on the ante- 
penultimate. The same may be observed of Mordecai^ 
from MafhxM^og, 

1 4. As we never accent a proper name from the Greek 
on the last syllable, (not because the Greeks did not ac- 
cent the last syllable, for they had many words accented 
in that manner, but because this accentuation was con- 
trary to the Latin prosody :) so if the Greek word be ac- 
cented on any other syllable, we seldom pay any regard to 
it, unless it coincide with the J^atin accent. Thus in the 
word Gadefrah I have placed the accent on the penulti- 
mate, because it is Graecised by FaJjj^a, where the accent 
is on the antepenultimate ; and this because the penulti- 
mate is long, and this long penultimate has always the ac- 
cent in Latin. (See this farther exemplified. Rule 18, 
prefixed to the Greek and Latin Proper Names, and Intro- 
duction near the end.) Thus, though it may seem at first 
sight absurd to derive our pronunciation of Hebrew words 
from the Greek, and then to desert the Greek for the Latin; 
yet since we must have some rule, and, if possible, a learn- 
ed one, it is very natural to lay hold of the Latin, because 
it is nearest at hand. For as language is a mixture of rea- 
soning and convenience, if the true reason lie too remote 
from common apprehension, another more obvious one is 
generally adopted ; and this last, by general usage, be- 
comes a rule superior to the former. It is true the analogy 
of our own language would be a rule the most rational ; but 
while the analogies of our own language are so little under- 
stood, and the Greek and Latin languages are so justly 
admired, even the appearance of being acquainted with 
them will always be esteemed reputablcj and infallibly lea4 



SC&IPTU&E PROPER NAMES. 

OS to an imitation of them, even in such points as are not 
only insignificant in themselves, but inconsistent with our 
▼emacular pronunciation. 

15. It is remarkable that all words ending in ias and 
iah have the accent on the i, without any foundation in the 
analogy of Greek and Latin pronunciation, except the very 
vague reascm that the Greek word places the accent on this 
syllable. I call this reason vague, because the Greek accent 
has no influence on words in ael, ielj ial^ &c. as Ic^ahK 
A€^iij\ Bfx/atx, M. T. K 

Hence we may conclude the impropriety of pronouncing 
Messias with the accent on the first syllable according to 
Labbe, who says we must pronounce it in this manner, if 
we wish to pronounce it like the French with the 08 rotun- 
dum et facundum^ and, indeed, if the i were to be pro- 
Xiounced in the French manner like e, placing the accent on 
the first syllable seems to have the bolder sound. This 
may serve as an answer to the learned critic, the editor of 
Labbe, who says, " the Greeks, but not the French, pro- 
nounce ore rotundo ;^ for though the Greeks might place 
the accent on the i in Mea-a-tag, yet as they certainly 
pronounce this vowel as the French do, it must have the 
same slender sound, and the accent on the first syllable 
must, in that respect, be preferable to it ; for the Greek i,. 
like the same letter in Latin, was the slenderest of all the 
vowel sounds. It is the broad diphthongal sound of the 
English i, with the accent on it which makes this word 
sound so much better in English than it does in Frencb,^ 
or even in the true ancient Greek pronunciation. 

16. The termination aim seems to attract the accent on 
the a, only in words of more than three syllables : as Eph'- 
ra-im and Miz'raHm have the accent on the antepenulti- 
mate ; but Hb'TO-na'im^ Ram-^-tha'im, &c. on the pe- 
nultimate syllable. This is a general rule ; but if the 
Greek word has the penultimate long, the accent ought 
to be on that syllable, as Phar-va'im^ ^a^oit/A,^ &c. 

17. Kemuel^ Jemxtel^ Nemuel, and other words of die 
same form, having the same number of syllables- as the 
(jreek word into which they are translated, ought to have 
the accent on the penultimate, as that syllable is- long in 
Greek ;, but Emanuely Samuely, and Lemuel^ are irreco- 



204 E0Li:s FOE mo^owci^a 

verably fixed in the antepenultimate accentuation, aikf 
show tne true analogy of the accentuation of our own lan- 
guage. 

18. Thus we see what has been observed of the tendency 
of Greek and Latin words to desert their original accent 
and to adopt that of the English, is much more observable 
in words from the Hebrew. Greek and Latin words are 
fixed in their pronunciation^ by a thousand books written 
expressly upon the subject, and ten thousand occasions of 
using them ; but Hebrew words, from the remote anti- 
quity of the language, from the paucity of books in it, 
from its being originally written without points, and the 
very different style of its poetry from that of other lan- 
guages, afford us scarcely any criterion to recur to for 
settUng their pronunciation, which must therefore often 
be irregular and desultory. The Septuagint, indeed, 
gives us some light, and is the only star by which we can 
steer ; but this is so frequently obscured, as to leave us in 
the dark, and to force us to pronounce according to the 
analogy of our own language. It were to be wished, in- 
deed, that this were to be entirely adopted in Hebrew 
words, where we have so little to determine us ; and that 
those words which we have worn into our own pronun- 
ciation were to be a rule for all others of the same form 
and termination ; but it is easier to bring about a revolu- 
tion in kingdoms than in languages. Men of learning 
will always form a sort of literary aristocracy ; they will 
be proud of the distinction which a knowledge of language 
gives them above the vulgar ; and will be fond of showmg 
this knowledge, which the vulgar will never fail to admire 
and imitate. 

The best we can do, therefore, is to make a sort of com- 
promise between this ancient language and our own ; to 
form a kind of compound ratio of Hebrew, Greek, Latin, 
and English, and to let each of these prevail as usage has 
permitted them. Thus Emmanuel^ Samuel, Lemtielj 
which, according to the Latin analogy and our own, have 
the accent on the antepenultimate syllaWe, ought to re- 
main in quiet possession of their present pronunciation, 
notwithstanding the Greek ^fA.fAavovr\\ I^a/AouriXf Ae/Aouiix; 
but Elishua, Esdreloriy Gaderah, may have tbe^^ accent cm 



SCRIPTURE PROPER NAMES. 205 

;lie penultimate, because the Greek words into which they 
ure translated, E'\i<rous, Ecr3jpnx«/A, Vi^^a, have the penul- 
timate long. If this should not appear a satisfactory me- 
thod of settling the pronunciation of these words, I must 
entreat those who dissent from it to point out a better ; a 
wrork of this kind was wanted for general use ; it is ad- 
dressed neither to the learned nor the illiterate, but to 
that large and most respectable part of society who have 
a tinctiu'e of letters, but whose avocations deny them the 
opportunity of cultivating them. To these a work of this 
kind cannot fail of being useful ; and by its utility to these 
the author wishes to stand or fall. 



PRONUNCIATION 



OF 



SCRIPTURE PROPER NAMES. 1 



INITIAL VOCABULARY. 



%* When a word is sacceeded by a word printed in Italics, this 
latter word is merely to spell the former as it ought to be pronounced. 
Thus Ast-fa is the true pronunciation of the preceding word Acfufha; 
and so of the rest. 

%* The Fignres annexed to the words refer to the Rules prefixed 
to the Vocabulary. Thus the figure (3) after Ab'di refers to Rule the 
3d, for the pronunciation of the final t; and the figure (5) after 
A'bMa-i^ refers to Rule the 5th, for the pronounciation of the uu- 
accented at : and so of the rest. 

%* For the quantity of the vowels indicated by the syllabicatioD, 
tee Nos. t8 and 19 of the Rules for Greek and Latin Pioper Names. 



AB 

A'a-lar 
*A'a-ron, 5 
Ab 
Ab'a-cuc 



AB 

Ab'a-dah 
A-bad'don 
Ab-a-di'as, 15 
A-bag'tha 



AB 

A'bal 

Ab'a-na, 9 
-f-Ab'a-rim 
Ab'a-ron 



* Aaron, — ^This is a word of three syllables in Labbe, who says it 
is used to be pronounced with the accent on the penultimate : bat tlif 
general pronunciation of this word in English is in two syllables, 
with the accent on the first, and as if written A'ron. Milton uniformly 
gives it this svllabication and accent. 

Till by two brethren (those two brethren call 
Moses and Aaron) sent by God to claim 
His people from enthrahnent — Par. Lost, b. xii. t. 170. 
t Ahanm, — This and some other words are decided in their acceiitu> 
ation by Milton in the following verses: 

From Aroer to Nebo, and the wild 

Of sonthmost Abarim in Hesebon, 

And Horonaim, Seon*8 realm, beyond 

The flow'ry dale of Sibma« clad with vines, 

And Eleal^ to th* AsphalUc pool Par. Lost, b. i. v. 407. 

Yet 



AB 

.b1>a, 9 

.b'da 

ibdi, 3 

Lb-di'as, 15 

Lb'di-el, 4, 13 

Lb'don 

L-bed'ne-go 

L'bel, 1 

L'bel Beth-ma'a- 

cah 
n>el Ma'im 
LTjel Me-holath 
L'bel Mis'ra-iin, 

16 
LTjel Shif tim 
^b'e-san, 11 
Ib'e-ear, 13 

Ibga-rus, 12 
V'bi, 3 
\.-bi^a, or 
A-bi'ah 
V-bi-arbon, 12 
\.-bi'a-saph 
\-bi'a-thar 
I'bib 

^-bi'dah, 9 
ibl-dan 
i^i-el, 4, 12 



AB 

A-bi-e'zer, 12 

A-bi-ez'rite 

Ab'i-gail 

Ab'i'gal 

Ab-i-ha'il 

A-biliu 

A-bi'hud 

A-bi'jah, 9 

A-bi'jam 

Ab-i-le'ne 

A-bim'a-el, 13 

A-bim'e-lech, 6 

A-bin'a-dab 

A-bin'o-am 

A-bi'ram 

A-bi'rom 

A-bis'a-i, 6 

Ab-i-se'i 

Ab'i-shag 

A-bish'a-i, 5 

A-bish'a-har 

A-bish'a-lom 

A-bish'u-a, 13 

Abi-shur 

Ab'i-sum 

Abl-tal 

Abi-tub 

A-bi'ud 

Ab'ner 



AC 207 

♦ A'bram, or 

A'bra-ham 
Ab'sa-lom 
A-bu'bu8 
Ac'cad 
Ac'a-ron 
Ac'a-tan 
Ac'ca-ron 
Ac'cho, 6 
Ac/cos 
Ac'coz 

A-cel'da-ma, 10 
A'Sel'dd-ma 
A'chab, 6 
A'chad 
A-cha'i-a, 6 
A-cha'i-cus 
A'chan, 6 
A'char 
A'chaz, 6 
Ach'bor 
A-chi-ach'a-rus 
A'chim, 6 
A-chim'eJech, 6 
A'chi-or 
A-chi'ram 
A'chish 
Achl-tob, or 

Acbl-tub 



— Yet his temple high 

Rear*€l in Azotas, dreaded through the coast 

Of Palestine, in Gathand Ascalon, 

And Aceanm and Gaza's frontier honods. Par. Lost, b. i. ▼. 463. 
* Abram or Abraham. — The first name of two syllables was the 
matriarch's original name, bHt God increased it to the second, of 
hree syllables, as a pledge of an increase in blessing. The latter 
lame, however, from the teebleness of the h in onr pronnnciation of 
t, and from the absence of the accent, is liable to such an hiatus, 
Vom the proximity of two similar Towels, that in the most solemn 
)ronunciation we seldom hear this name extended to three syllables, 
ttilton has but once pronounced it in this manner, but has six times 
nade it only two syllables: and this may be looked upon as the 
general pronunciation. 



208 AD 

A-chifo-phel 

A-kito-fel 

Ach'me-tha 

A'chor 

Ach'sa, 9 

Ach'shaph 

Ach'zib, 6 

Ac'i-pha 

As'e-fa^ 7 

Ac/i-tho 

A-cu'a, 13 

A'cub, 11 

A'da 

A'dad 

Ad'a-da, or 

Ad'a-dah, 9 
Ad-ad-e'zer 
Ad-ad-rim'mon 
A'dah 

Ad-a-i'ah, 9, 15 
Ad-a-U'a, 15 
Ad'am 
Ad'a-maj or 

Ad'a-mah 
Ad'a-mi, 3 
Ad'a-mi Ne'keb 
A'dar, 1 
Ad'a-sa^ 9 
Ad'a-tha, 9 
Ad'be-el> 13 
Ad'dan 
Ad'dar 
Ad'di, 3 
Ad'din 
Ad'do 



Ad'dus 
A'der, 1 
Ad'i-da 
A'di-el, 13 
A'din 
Ad'i-na, 9 
Ad'i-no 
Ad'i-nus 
Ad'i-tha, 9 
Ad-i-tha'im, 16 
Adla-i, 5 
Ad'maii 
Ad'ma-tha 
Ad'na, 9 
Ad'nah, 9 
*Ad'o-nai, 5 
Ad-o-ni'as, 15 
A-do-ni-be'zek 
A-don-i'jah, 15 
A-donl-kam 
A-don-i'rain 
A-don-i-ze'dek 
A-do'ra, 9 
Ad-o-ra'im, 16 
A-do'ram 
A-dram'e-lech 
A'dri-a, 2, 9, 12 
A'dri-el, 13 
A-dud, 13 
A-duriam 
A-dum'mim 
A-e-di'as, 15 
^'gypt 

^-ne'as. — Virgil. 
iE'ne-as. — Acts, 9 



AH 

iE'nos 

Ag'a-ba 

Ag'a-bus 

A'gag, 1,11 

A'gag-ite 

A'gar 

Ag-a-renes' 

Ag'e-e, 7 

Ag-ge'us, 7 

Ag-noth-ta'bor 

A'gur 

A'hab 

A-har'ah, 9 

A-har'al 

A-has'a-i, 5 

A-has-'U-e'rus 

A-ha'va 

A'haz 

A-haz'a-i, 5 

A-ha-zi'ah, 15 

Ah'ban 

A'her 

A'hi, 3 

A-hi'ah 

A-hi'am 

A-hi-e'zer 

A-hi'hud 

A-hi'jah 

A-hi'kam 

A-hilud 

A-him'a-az 

A-hi'man 

A-him'e-lech 

A-hinit'e-lek 



* Adonai. — Labbe, says his editor, makes this a word of three syllables 
ouly; which, if once admitted, why, says he, should he dissolve the He- 
brew diphthong in iSadm\ Sinai, Tolmm, i!kc.,and at ^he same time make 
two syllables of the diphthong in Caslcu^ which are commonly united 
into one f In this, says he, he is inconsistent with himself. See Swii- 



AD 

^-hi'moth 
V-hin'a-dab 
^-hin'o-am 
V.-hio 
^.-hi'ra, 9 

V-hi'ram-ites, 8 

\.-his'a-inach, 6 

1-hish'a-hur 

^-hi'sham 

\.-hi'shar 

l-hi'tob 

Au-hifo-phel 

A.-lii'tub 

AJilah 

AJi'lai, 6 

A-ho'e, or A-ho'ah 

A-ho'ite, 8 

A-ho'lah 

A-horba 

A-hol'bah 

A-ho'li-ab 

A-holi-bah, 9 

A-ho-lib'a-mah 

A-hu'ma-i, 5 

A-hu'zam 

A-huz'zah 

Al,3 

A-i'ah, 15 

A'i-ath 

A.i'ja 

A-iJah 

Ai'ja-lon 

Adja-lon 

Aij'e-leth Sha'har 

Adfje-leth 



AM 

Ain, 5 

A-i'oth 

A-i'ru8 

Ak'kub 

Ak-rab'bim 

AJam'e-lech, 6 

Ara-meth 

Ara-moth 

Ard-mus 

Al'e-ma 

A-le'meth 

Al-ex-an'dri-a 

Al-ex-an'dri-on 

AUe-lujah 

Al'le4u'yahy 5 

A-li'ah 

A-li'an 

Allom 

Allon Bac'huth 

Al-mo'dad 

Al'mon, Dib-la- 

thalm, 16 
Arna-than 
Aloth 
Alpha 
Al-phe'us 
Al-ta-ne'us 
Al-.tas'chith, 6 
Arte-kon 
Al'vah, or Al'van 
A'lush 
A'mad 
A-mad'a-tha 
A-mad'a-thus 
A'mal 
Amal'da 
Am'a-lek 



AN 



209 



Am'a-lek-ites, 8 

A'man 

Am'a-na 

Am-a-ri'ah, 15 

A-ma'sa 

A-mas'a-i, 5 

Am-a-shi'ah, 15 

Am-a-thels 

Am'a-this 

Am-a-zi'ah 

♦A'men' 

A'mi, 3 

A-min'a-dab 

A-mit'tai, 5 

A-miz'a-bad 

Am'mah 

Am-mad'a-tha 

Am'mi, 3 

Am-mid'i-oi, 4 

Am'mi-el, 4 

Am-mi'hud 

Am-i-shad'da-i, 5 

Am'mon 

Am'mon-ites 

Am'non 

A'mok 

A'mon 

Am'o-rites, 8 

A'mos 

Am'pli-as 

Am'ram 

Am'ram-ites, 8 

Am'ran 

Am'ra-phel 

Am'zi, 3 

A'nab 

Ana-el, 13 



* Amen, — The only simple word in the language which has neces^ 
sarily two successive accents. See Critical Pronouncing Dictionary ^ un- 
der the word. 



210 AN 

A'nah 

An-a-ha'rath 

An-a-i'ah, 5, 15 

A'nak 

An'a-kims 

An'a-mim 

A-nam'e-lech, 6 

A'nan 

An-a'ni 

An-a-ni'ah, 15 

An-a-ni'as 

A-nan'i-el, 13 

A'nath 

*A-nath'e-ma 

An'a-thoth 

An'drew 

A'nem, or A'nen 

A'ner 

A'nes 

A'neth 

An'a-thoth-ite, 8 

A'ni-am 

A'nim 

An'na, 9 

An'na-as 

An'nas 

An-nu'us, 13 

A'nus 

An-ti-lib'a-nus 

An'ti-och, 6 

An-ti'o-chis 

An-ti'o-chus 



AR 

An'ti-pas 

An-tip'a'tris 

An'ti-pha 

An-to'ni-a 

An-to-thijah, 16 

An'toth-ite, 8 

A'nub 

Ap-a-me'a 

Aph-a-ralm, 16 

A-phar'sath-chites 

A-phar'sites, 8 

A'phek 

A-pheltah 

A-pher'e-ma 

A-pher'ra 

A-phi'ah, 16 

Aph'rah. 

Aph'ses 

A-poc'a-lypse 

A-poc'ry-pha 

A-pollos 

A-poriy-on 

A'poVyon 

Ap'pa-im, 15 

Ap'phi-a, 4 

Aphfe-a 

Ap'phus 

Apkua 

Aq'ui-la 

Ar 

A'ra 

A'rab 



AB 

Ar'a-bah 

Ar-a-bafti-ne 

A-ra'bi-a 

A'rad 

A'rad-ite, 8 

Ar'a-dus 

A'rah, 1 

A'ram 

A'ran 

Ar'a-rat 

A-rau'nah 

Ar'ba, or Ar'bah 

Ar'bal 

Ar-bat'tis 

Ar-be'la, in Syrii 

Ar-bella 

Ar'bite, 8 

Ar-bo'nai, 5 

Ar-che-la'us 

Ar-ches'tra-tU8 

Ar'che-vites, 8 

Ar'chi, 3 

Ar-chi-af a-roth 

Ar-chip'pus 

Arch'ites, 8 

Ard 

Ar'dath 

Ard'ites, 8 

Ar'don 

A-re'li, 3 

A-re'lites 

A-re-op'a-gite, 8 



* Anathema. — ^Those who are not acquainted with the profound re< 
searches of verbal critics would be astonished to observe what waste 
of learning has been bestowed on this word by Labbe, in order to 
show that it ought to be accented on the antepenultimate tyliabie* 
This pronunciation has been adopted by English scholars ; though some 
divines have been heard from the pulpit to give it the penultimate ac- 
cent, which so readily unites it in a trochaic pronunciation with Moina^' 
ihAy 10 the first Epistle of St. Paul to the Corinthians : << If any man 
love not the Lord Je&us Christ, let him be Anathema maranatha.^ 



AR 


AS 


Lre-op'a-gua 


Ar'o^UjS 


nres 


Ar^o-er 


r-e'tas 


A'rom 


jre'us 
Kgob 


Ar'pad, or Ar'phad 
Ar'sa-ces 


^gol 


Ar-phax'ad 


i-nd'a-i, 5 


Ar'te-mas 


L-rid'a-tha 


Ar'vad 


L-ri'eh, 9 


Ar'vad-ites, 8 


L'ri-el, 4, 12 


Ar'u-both 


ir-i-ma-thea 


A-ru'mah, 13 


L'ri-och, 4 


Ar'za 


L-ris'a-i, 5 


Asa 


ijr-is-to-bulu8 


As-a-di'as 


krk'ites 


As'a^l, 18 


Ir-ma-ged'don 
Vr-mi-i»iad'a-i 


AsVhel 
As-a-i'ah, 6, 16 


Vr'mon 


As'a-na - 


Ir'nan 


A'saph 


(^r'ne-pher 


As'a-phar 


A.r'non 


As'a-ra 


A.'rod 


A-sar'e-el, 18 



AS 



211 



Ag-a-relah 

As-baz'a-reth 

As'ca-lon 

A-se'as 

As-e-bi'a 

A-seb-e-bi'a, 15 

As'e-nath 

A'ser 

A-se'itir 

Ash-a-bi'ah, 15 

A'shan 

Ash'be-a 

Ash'bel 

Asb'bel-ites, 8 

Ash'dod 

Ash'doth-ites, 8 

Ash'doth Pis'gah 

A'she-an 

Ash'er 

Ash'i-math 

Ash'ke-naz 

Ash'nah 



* Areopagug. — ^There is a strong propeosity in English readers of the 
^ew Testament to pronounce this word with the accent on the pennlti- 
nate syllable ; and even some foreign scholars have contended that it 
raght to be so pronounced, from its derivation from 'A^nr vraykf the Do: 
ic dialect for myiift the fountain of Mars, which was on a hill in Athens, 
nther than from 'Afus r^»f, the hill of Mars. But Labbe very justly 
lespises this derivation, and says, that of all the ancient writers none 
lave said that the Areopagvs was derived from a fountain, or from a 
:onntry near to a fountain ; but all have confessed that it came from 
I hill, or the summit of a rock, on which this famous court of judicature 
vas bnilt. Vossius tells us, that St. Augustine, De Civ. Dei, 1. x.cap. 
0, calls this word pa^m Mortis, the village of Mars, and that he fell 
nto this error because the Latin word pagua, signifies a village or street; 
mt, says he, the Greek word signifies a hill, which, perhaps, was so 
tailed from ir»ya or itnyht (that is, fountain,) because fountains usually 
ake their rise on hills. — Wrong, however, as this derivation may be, he 
ells us it is adopted by no less scholars than Beza, Budwus, and SigO'^ 
lius. And this may show us the uncertainty of etymology in language, 
nd the security of general usage ; but in the present case both etymo- 
3gy and usage conspire to place the accent on the antepenultimate syU 
able. Agreeably to this usage we find the prologue to a play observe^ 
bat 

The critics are assembled in the pit. 

And form an Areopagus of wit. 



212 



AS 



A'shon 

Ash'pe-naz 

Ash'ri-el, 13 

AsVta-roth 

Ash'te-moth 

Ash'ta-roth-ites, 8 

A-shu'ath 

Ash'ur 

A-fihu'rim, 13 

Ash'ur-ites, 8 

A'isi-a 

As-i-bi'as, 16 

A'si-el, 13 

As'i-pha 

As'ke-lon 

*As'ma-dai5 5 

As'ma-veth 

As-mo-de'us 

As-mo-ne'ans 

As'nah 

As-nap'per 

A-so'cnis, 6 

A'som 

As'pa-tha 

As'phar 

As-phar'a-sus 

As'ri-el, 13 

As-sa-bi'as, 15 



AT 

As-saVi-moth 

As-sa-ni'as, 16 

As-si-de'ans, 13 

As'sir 

As'sos 

As'ta-roth 

Ash'ta-roth 

As-tar'te 

As'tath 

A-sup'pim 

A-syn'cri-tus 

A'tad 

At'a-rah 

A-tar'ga-tis 

At'a-roth 

Ater 

At-e-re-zi'as, 16 

Athack 

Ath-a-i'ah, 16 

Ath-a-li'ah, 16 

Ath-a-ri'as, 16 

Ath-e-no'bi-us 

Ath'ens 

AtMai, 6 

At'roth 

At'tai, 6 

At-ta-li'a, 16 

Afta-lus 



AZ 

At-thar'a-tes 

Ava 

Av'a-ran 

A'ven 

Au'gi-a, 4 

A'vim 

A'vims 

A'vites, 8 

Avith 

Au-ra-ni'tis 

Au-ra'nus 

Au-te'us 

Az-a-elus 

Azah 

Azal 

Az-a-li'ah, 15 

Az-a-ni'ah, 15 

A-za'phi-on 

Az'a-ra 

A-za're-el 

Az-a-ri'ah, 15 

Az-a-ri'as, 15 

A'zaz 

-f- A-za'zel 

Az-a-zi'ah, 15 

Az-bazVreth 

Az^uk 

A-ze'kah, 9 



* Asmadai, — ^Mr. Oliver has not ioserted thb word, but we have it 
in Milton : 

— On each wing 
Uriel and Raphael his vaunting foe, 
Though huge, and in a rock of diamond arm'd, 
Yanquish'd, Adramelech and Asmadau 

Par, Lost, b. vi. v. 365. 

whence we may gness the poet's pronunciation of it in three syllables; 
the diphthong, sounding like the ai in daiiy.— See Rule d, and the words 
Sinai and Adonai, 

t AzazeU — ^This word is not in Mr. Oliver's Lexicon; bat Milton 
makes use of it, and places the accent on the second syllable : 
— that proud honour claim'd 
Azazel as his right ; a cherub tall. 

Par. Loit, b. i. v. 534. 



AZ 



AZ 



AZ 



213 



zel 

zem 

s-e-phu'rith 

zer 

•ze'tas 

B'gad 

-zi'a, 15 

-zi'e-i 



Azi-el, 13 


Az'ri-kam 


A-zi'za 


A-zu'bah 


Az'ma-veth 


Azur 


Az'mon 


Az'u-ran 


A/noth Tabor 


Az'y-mites . 


Azor 


Az'zah 


A-zo'tus 


Az'zan 


Az'ri-el, 13 


Az'zur 



BA 

AAL, or Bel 
a'al-ah 
a'al-ath 
a'al-ath Be'er 
a'al Be'rith 
a'al-le 
a'al Gad' 
a'al Ham'on 
ia'al Han'an 
la'al Ha'zor 
ia'al Her'non 
!a'al-i, 3 

Ba'al-im. — Mil- 
ton. 
(a'al-is 
la'al Me'on 
la'al Pe'or 
Ja'al Per'a-zim 
^a'al Shal'i-sha 
^a'al Ta'mar 
Ja-al Ze'bub 
Ja-al Ze'phon 
)a'a-na 
)a'a-nah 
)a'a-nan 
k'a-nath 



BA 

Ba-a-ni'as, 15 

Ba'a-ra 

Ba'a-sha, 9 

Ba'a-shah 

Ba-a-si'ah, 15 

Babel 

Ba'bi, 3 

Baby-Ion 

Ba'ca 

Bach'rites, 8 

Bac-chu'rus 

Bach'uth Al'lon 

Ba-go'as 

Bag'o-i, 3, 5 

Ba-ha'rum-ite, 8 

Ba-hu'rim 

Ba'jith 

Bak-bak'er 

Bak'buk 

Bak-buk-i'ah, 15 

Bala-am, 16 

\Ba'lam 

Bara-dan 

Balah, 9 

Ba'lak 

Bal'a-mo 



BA 

Bal'a-nus 

Bal-tha'sar, 11 

Ba'mah 

Ba'moth 

Ba'moth Ba'al 

Ban 

Ba'ni, 3 

Ba'nid 

Ban-a-i'as, 15 

Ban'nus 

Ban'u-as 

Ba-rab'bas 

Bar'a-chel, 6 

Bar-a-chi'ah, 15 

Bar-a-cbi'as 

Ba'rak 

Bar-ce'nor 

Bar'ffo 

Bar-nu'mites, 8 

Bari'ah, 15 

Bar-je'sus 

Bar-jo'na 

Bar'kos 

Bar'na-bas 

Ba-ro'dis 

Bar-sa'bas 



• The Hebrew plaral of Baal, 
f S^e Canaan, Aaron, and Israel* 



214 BE 

Bar'ta-cus 
Bar-thoro-mew 
Bar-ti-me'u8 
Ba'ruch, 6 
Bar-ziVla-i, 5 
Bas'ca-ma 
Ba'shan, or 

Bas'san 
Ba'shan Ha'voth 

Fair 
Bash'e-math 
Baslith 
Bas'math 
Bas'sa 
Bas'ta-i, 5 
Bafa-ne 
Bath 

BathVloth 
Bath-rabl>im 
Bath'she-ba 
Bath'shu-a, 13 
Bav'a-i, 5 
Be-a-Uah, 16 
Be'a-loth 
Be'an 
Beb'a-i, 5 
Be'cher 
Befker, 6 
Bech-o'rath 
Bech'ti-leth 
Be'dad 

Bed-a-i'ah, 15 
Be-el-i'a-da 
Be-el'sar-rus 
Be-el-teth'mus 
Be-erze-bub 
Be'er 
Be-e'ra 
Be-e'rah, or Be'rah 
Be-er-elim 
Be-e'ri, 3 



BE 

Be-er-la-hal-rm 

Be-e'roth 

Be-e'roth-ites, 8 

Be-er'she-ba 

Be-esh'te-rah 

Be'he-moth 

Be kah, 9 

Be'la 

Be'lah 

Bela-ites, 8 

Bere-mus 

Belga-i, 5 

BeOi-al, 13 

Berma-im, 16 

Bermen 

Bel-shaz'zer 

Bel-te-shaz'zar 

Ben 

Ben-ai'ah, 5 

Ben-am'mi, 3 

Ben-eb'e-rak 

Ben-e-ja'a-kam 

Ben'ha-dad 

Ben-ha'il 

Ben-ha'nan 

Ben'ja-inin 

Benla-mite, 8 

Ben'ja-mites 

Ben'i-nu 

Ben-u'i, 3, 14 

Be'no 

Be-no'ni, 3 

Ben-zo'heth 

Be'on 

Be'or 

Be'ra 

Ber'a-chah, 6, 9 

Ber-a-chi'ah, 15 

Ber-a-i'ah, 15 

Be-re'a 

Be'red 



BE 

Be'ri, 3 
Be-ri'ah, 15 
Be'rites, 8 
Be'rith 
Ber-ni'ce 
Be-ro'dach BaFa- 

dan 
Be'roth 
Ber'o-thai, 5 
Be-ro'thath 
Ber'yl 
Ber-zelus 
Be'zai, 5 j 

Bes-o-dei'ah, 9, ll 
Be'sor 
Be'tah 
Be'ten 
Beth-abVra 
Beth-abVrah, 9 
Beth'a-nath 
BethVnoth 
Beth'a-ny 
Beth'a-ne 
Beth-ar'a-bah, 9 
Beth'a-ram 
Beth-atTbel 
Beth-a'ven 
Beth-az'ma-yetli 
Beth-ba-al-me'on 
Beth-ba'ra 
Beth-ba'rab, 9 
Beth'ba-si, 3 
Beth-bir'e-i, 3 
Beth'car 
Beth-da'gon 
Beth-dib-la-tha'im 
Beth'el 
Beth'eUte 
Beth-e'mek 
Be'ther 
Beth-es'da 



BE 

Bth-e'zel 

eth-ga'der 

eth-sa'mul 

eth-nac'ce-rim, 7 

eth-hakf^ser-im 

eth-ha'ran 

eth-hog'lah, 9 

eth-ho'ron 

►eth-jes'i-moth 

ieth-iel/a^th 

lethle-hem 

tethle-hem Eph' 

ra-tah 
(ethle-hem Ju' 

dah 
tethle-hem-ite, 8 
teth-lo'mon 
)eth-ina'a-cah, 9 
teth-mar'ca-both 
ieth-me'on 
ieth-nim'rah, 9 
5eth-o'ron 
^th-palet 
ieth-paz'zer 
Seth-pe'or 
^Beth'pha-ge, 12 
Beth'/a-je, 10 
Beth'phe-let 
Beth'ra-bah, 9 
Beth'ra-pha, 9 
Beth're-hob 
Beth-sal-da, 9 
Beth'sa-mos 
Beth'shan 



BI 

Beth-she'an 

Beth'she-mesh 

Beth-shif tab, 9 

Beth'si-mos 

Beth-tap'pu-a 

Beth-su'ra, 14 

Be-thu'el, 14 

Bethul 

Beth-u-li'a, 5 

Beth'zor 

Beth'zur 

Be-to'li-U8 

Bet-o-mes'tham 

Befo-nim 

Be-ulah 

Be'zai, 5 

Be-zal'e-el 

Bezek 

Be'zer, or Boz'ra 

Be'zeth 

Bi'a-tas 

Bich'ri, 3, 6 

Bidkar 

Big'tha 

Big'than 

Big'tha-na 

Big'va-i, 6 

Bildad 

Bire-am 

BUgah, 9 

BU'ga-i, 5 

BUha, or Bil'hah 

Birhan 

Birshan 



BU 215 

Bim'hal 

Bin'e-a, 9 

Bin'nu-i, 3, 14 

Bir'sha 

Bir'za-vith 

Bish'Iam 

Bi-thi'ah, 15 

Bith'ron 

Biz-i-jo-thi'ah, 5 

Biz-i-jo-thi'jah 

Biz'tha 

Blas'tus 

Bo-a-ner'ges 

Bo'az, or Bo'oz 

Boc'cas 

Boch'e-m, 6 

Bo'chim, 6 

Bo'han 

Bos'cath 

Bo'sor 

Bos'o-ra 

Bos'rah, 9 

Bo'zez 

Boz'rah 

Brig'an-dine 

Buk'ki, 3 

Buk-ki'ah, \5 

Bui, rhymes dull 

Bu'nah 

Bun'ni, 3 

Buz 

Bu'zi, 3 

Buz'ite, 8 



• Bethphuge* — This word is generally prononnced by the illiterate 
in two syllables, and without the second A, as if written Betf^page. 



216 CA 

Cab 

Cablx)!! 

Cab'ham 

Ca'bul.— See Bui. 

Cad'dis 

Cades 

Ca'desh 

Cai'a-phas, 5 

Cain 

Ca-i'nan 

Cai'rites, 8 

Calah 

CaFa-mus 

Cal'col 

Cal-dees' 

Caleb 

Caleb Eph'ra-tah 

Cal'i-tas 

Cal-a-mora-lus 

CaVneth 

CaVno 

Cal'phi, 3 

Carva-ry 

Cal'va-re 

Ca'mon 

Ca'na 

*Ca'na-an 

Ca'na-an-ites, 8 

Can'nan-ites 



CA 

Can'neh, 9 

Can'nee 

Can'veh, 9 

Can'vee 

fCa-per'na-um, 16 

Caph-ar-sara-ma 

Ca-phen'a-tha, 9 

Ca-phi'ra, 9 

Caph'tor 

Caph'to-rim 

Caph'to-rims 

Cap-pa-do'ci-a 

Cap^pa^do'she-a 

Car-a-ba'si-on 

Car-a-ba'ze-on 

Car'cha-mis, 6 

Car'che-mish, 6 

Ca-re'ah, 9 

Ca'ri-a 

Car'kas 

Car-ma'ni-ans 

Car'me 

Car'mel 

Car'mel-ite, 8 

Car'mel-i-tes 

Car'mi, 3 

Car'mites 

Car'na-im, 15 

Car'ni-on 



CH 

Car'pus 
Car-she'na 
Ca-siph'i-a 
Cas'leu 
Cas'lu-bim 
Cas'phor 
Cas'pis, or 
Cas'phin 
Ca-thu'ath, 13 
Ce'dron, 7 
Ceilan 
Ce-le-ini'>a, 9 
Cen'cre-a, 6 
Cen-de-be'us 
Cen-tu'ri-on 
Ce'phas 
Ce'ras 
Ce'teb 
Cha'bris, 6 
Cha'di-as 
Cbae're-as 
Charce-do-ny 
Charcol 
Chal-de'a 
Cha'nes 
Chan-nu-ne'us 
Char-a-ath'a-lar 
Char'a-ca 
Char'a-sim 



• Canaan, — This word is not iiiifrequently pronounced in three syl- 
lables, with the accent on the second. But Milton, who in his Para- 
dise Lost has introduced this word six times, ^as constantly made it 
two syllables, with the accent on the first. This is perfectly agreeable 
to the syllabication and accentuation of Isaac and Balaam^ which are 
always heard in two syllables. This suppression of a syllable in the 
latter part of these words arises from the absence of accent : an ac- 
cent on the second syllable would prevent the hiatus arising from the 
two vowels, as it does in Baal and Baalim, which are always heard in 
two and three syllables respectively, — See Adonai. 

t Capernaum,— This word is often, but improperly, pronoanced with 
the accent on the penultimate. 



CH 



CL 



CY 217 



'har'cus 


Chet'tim, 6 


Cle'o-phas 


lia're-a 


Che'zib 


Clo'e 


lar'mis 


Chi'don 


Cni'dus 


Jhar'ran 


Chirie-ab 


Nidus 


aias'e-ba, 13 


Chi-li'on 


Col-ho'zeh, 9 


:hel>ar, 6 


Chirmad 


Corii-us 


Jhed-er-la'o-mer 


Chim'ham 


Co-Ios'se 


:helal 


Chisleu, Casleu, 


Co-los'si-ans 


)hel'ci-as 


or Cis'leu 


Co'loshe-ana 


^et'she-as 


Chislon 


Co-ni'ah, 15 


:heriub 


Chisloth Tabor 


Con-o-ni'ah 


:heaod 


Chit'tim 


Cor 


:he1ub 


Chi'un 


Cor'be 


:herii-an8 


Chlo'e 


Cor1)an 


Melius 


Cho'ba 


Core 


ae-lu'bai, 5 


Cho-ra'sin, or 


Cor'mth 


:aie-lu'bar 


Cho-ra'shan, or 


Co-rin'thi-ans 


uhem'a-rims 


Cho-ra'zin 


Co'sam 


Che'mosh 


Cho8-a-me'u8 


Cou'tha 


Che-na'a-nah, 9 


Cho-ze'ba 


Coz 


Chen'a-ni, 3 


Christ 


Coz'bi, 3 


Chen-a-ni'ah, 15 


Chub, 6 


Cres'cens 


Che'phar Ha-am' 


Kvb 


Crete 


mo-nai, 5 


Chun 


Cre'tans 


Cheph-i'rah, 6, 9 


Chu'sa, or Chu'za 


Cretes 


Che'ran 


Chush'an Rish-a- 


Cre'ti-ans 


Che're-as 


tha'im, 15 


Crefshe-ans 


Cher'eth-ims 


Chu'si, 3 


Cu'bit 


Cher'eth-ites, 8 


Cin'ner-eth, or 


Cush 


Che'rith, or 


Cin'ner-oth 


Cu'shan 


Che'rish 


Cir'a-ma 


Cu'shan Rish- 


Cher'ub, 6 


Ci'sai, 5 


tha'im, 15 


•Cher'u-bim, [and 


Cis'leu 


Cu'shi, 3 


Cherubin,] 6 


Cith'e-rus 


Cuth, or Cuth'ah 


Ches'a-lon, 6 


Cit'tims 


Cu'the-ans 


Che'sed 


Clau'da 


Cy'a-mon 


Che'sil 


Cle-a'sa 


Cy-re'ne 


Che'sud 


Clem'ent 


Cy-re'ni-us 


Che-sulloth 







[Tiie Hebrew plural of Cherab.] 



218 DA 


DI 


DU 


Dab'a-reth, 9 


David 


Dile-an 


Dab'ba-sheth 


De'bir 


Dim'nah 


Dab'e-rath 


♦Deb'o-rah 


Di'mon 


Da'bri-a 


De-cap'o-lis 


Di-mo'nah, 9 


Da-co'bi, 3 


De'dan 


Dinah, 9 


Dad-de'us 


Ded'a-nim . 


Di'na-ite6, 8 


Da'gon 


Ded'a-nhns 


Din'ha-bah, 9 


Dai'san, 5 


De-ha'vites, 8 


Di-ot're-phes 


Dal-a-i'ah, 5 


De'kar 


Di'shan 


Dari4ah 


Del-a-i'ah, 5 


Di'shon 


Dal-ma-nu'tha 


Del'iJah 


Diz'a-hab 


Darphon 


De-mas 


Do'cus 


Dam'a-ris 


Der'be 


Dod'a-i, 5 


Dam-a-scenes' 


Des'sau 


Dod'a-nim 


Dan 


De-u'el, 17 


Dod'a-vah, 9 


Danltes, 8 


Deu-tcr-^oo'o-my 


Dodo 


Dan-ja'an 
Dan'i-el, 13 


Dibla-im, 16 


Do'eg 


Diblath 


Dophlcah, 9 


Dan'nah 


Di'b(m 


Dor 


Dan'o-brath 


Di'bon Gad 


Dora 


Da'ra 


Dib'ri, 3 


Dor'cas 


Darda 


Dib'za-hab, or 


Do-rym'e-nes 


Da'ri-an 


Diz'a-hab 


Do-sith'e-tis 


Dar'kon 


Di'drachm 


Do'tha-im, or 


Dathan 


Didram 


Do'than, 16 


Dath'e-mah, or 


Did'y-mus, 6 


Du'mah, 9 


Dath'mah 


Diklah^orDil'dah 


Du'ra 


EB 


EB 


EB 


E'a-nas^ 


E'bed 


Eb-en-e'zer 


E'bal 


E-bed'me-lech 


E'ber 



* Deborah. — The learned editor of Labbe tells us, that this ivoni 
has the penultimate long, both in the Greek and Hebrew; and yet be 
observes, that our clergy, when reading the Holy Scriptares to the 
people in £nglish, always pronounce it with the accent on the iin( 
syllable ; '* and why not," «ays he, *♦ when they place the accent oi 
the first syllable of orator, auditor, and successor? *' " But," continued 
he, *' I sappose they accent them otherwise, when they speak LatiB.1 
Who doabU it ? 



EL 

H-bia-saph 

iUbro^nah 

il-ca'nus 

Sc-bafa-na 

Sc-cle-si-as'tei 

Sc-cle-si-as'li-ciis 

5d 

2'dar 

S'den 

2'der 

E'des 

E'di-as 

Ed'na 

E'dom 

E'dom-ites, 8 

Ed're-i, 3 

Eg'lah 

Eg'la-im, 16 

Eglon 

Egypt 

E'hi,3 

E'hud 

E'ker 

Ek're-bel 

Ek'ron 

Ek'ron-ites, 8 

Ela 

Era^h 

Elah 

E'lam 

ETam-ites, 8 

ElVsah, 9 

Elath 

El-beth'el 

El'd-a 

Elshe-a 

El'da-ah 

Eldad 

E'le-ad 

E-le-aleh. 9 

E'le-afle*- Milton 



EL 

E4e'a-sah, 9 
E-le-a'z^ 
E-le-a-zu'nn 
EUeWlie Is'ra-^l I 
E-leu'the-ni6 
El-eu-za'i, 3, 5 
El-ha'nan 
E'U,3 
E-liab 
E-li'a<[a 
E-li'a-dah 
E-Ii'a-dun 
E-li'ah, 9 
E-Ii'ah-ba, 9 
E-Ii'a-kim 
E-li'a-li, 3 
E-li'am 
E-li'as, 15 
E-li'a-saph 
E-li'a-shib 
E-li'a-sis 
E-Ii'a-tha, or 
E-U'a-thah 
E-li-a'zar 
E-li'dad 
E'li-el, 13 
E-Ii-e'na-i, 5 
E-li-e'zer 
E-Ii'ha-ba 
El-i-hoe'na-i, 5 
El-i-ho'repJi 
E-li'hu 
EJi'as, 15 
E-li'jah, 9 
Ell-ka 
Elim 

E-Iim'e-ledi, 6 
E-li-oe'na-i, 5 
E>li.o'nas 
El'i-phal 
E-liph'a-leh, 9 



EM 219 

EH-phaz 

E-liph'e-let 

E-lis'a-betli 

El-i-88B'U8 

E-li'sha, 9 
E-li'shah 
E-Iish'a-ma 
E-Iish'a-mah 
E-lish'a-phat 
E-lish'e-ba 
El-i-shu'a, 13 
E-lisl-mus 
E-li'u 
E-li'ud 
E-Iiz'a-phan 
El-i-se'us 
E-Ii'zur 
Erka-nab 
El'ko-shite, 8 
El'la-sar 
Ermo-dam 
Elna-am 
EFna-than 
E'lon 

Elon^tes, 8 
E'lon Beth'ha-nan 
Eloth 
lU'pa^l 
El'pa-let 
El-pa'ran 
Erte-keh, 9 
Erte-keth 
El'teJion 
Erto-Iad 
Elul 

E-lu'za-i, 5 
El-y-ma'is 
Ery-mas 
EVza-bad 
Erza-phaR 
Em-al-cu'el, 17 
l2 



220 EP 

E-man'u-el, 17 

E'mims 

*Em'ma-us 

Em'mer 

E'mor 

E'nam 

E'nan 

En'dor 

En-eg-la'im, 16 

En-e-mes'sar 

E-ne'ni-as 

En-gan'nim 

En'ge-di, ^ 

En-had'dah, 9 

En-hak'ko-re 

En-ha'zor 

En-mish'pat 

E'noch, 6 

E'noek 

E'non 

E'nos 

E'nosh 

En-rim'mon 

En-ro'gel, 13 

En'she-mesh 

En-Iap'pu-ah, 9 

Ep'a-phras 

E-paph-ro-di'tus 

E-pen'e-tus 

E'phah 

E'phai, 5 

E'pher 

E'phes-dam'inim 

Ephlal 

Ephod 

E'phor 

Eph'pha-tha 

E'phra-im, 16 



ES 

E'phra-im-ites, 8 

Eph'ra-tah 

Eph'rath 

Eph'rath-ites, 8 

Ephron 

Er 

E'ran 

E'ran-ites, 8 

E-ras'tus 

E'rech, 6 

E'ri, 3 

E'sa 

Esal-as, 6 

E'sar-had'don 

E'sau 

Es'dras 

Es-drelon, 13 

Es'e-bon 

E-se'bri-as 

E'sek 

Esh'ba-al 

Esh'ban 

Esh'col 

E'she-an 

E'shek 

Esh'ka-lon 

Esh'ta-ol 

Esh'tau-lites, 8 

Esh-tem'o-a 

Esh'te-moth 

Esh'ton 

Es'li, 3 

Es-ma-chi'ah, 15 

E-8o'ra 

Es'ril 

Es'rom 

Es-senes', 8 

Est'ha-ol 



EZ 

Esther 

Es'ter 

E'tam 

E'tham 

Ethan 

Eth'a-nim 

Eth'ba-al 

Ether 

Eth'ma 

Eth'nan 

Eth'ni, 3 

Eu-as'i-bus 

Eu-bulus 

Eve 

E'vi, 3 

E'vil mer-o'dach 

Eu'na-than 

Eu-ni'ce 

Eu-o'di-as 

Eu-pore-mus 

Eu-rocly-don 

Eu'ty-chus 

Ex'o-dus 

E'zar 

Ez'ba-i, 3, 5 

Ez'bon 

Ez-e-chi'as 

Ez-e-ki'as 

E-ze'ki-el, 13 

E'zel 

E'zem 

Ezer 

Ez-e-ri'as, 15 

E-zi'as, 15 

E-zi'on Ge'bar, or 

Ezi-on-ge'ber 
Ez'nite, 8 
Ez'ra 



• fmtnaii^.— This word ia very improperly pronounced io two syt 
lablesy as if divided into Em'maus, 



EZ 



EZ 



EZ 221 



Ez'ra.hite, 8 


Ez-ri-el, 13 


Ez'ron, or Hez'ron 


Ez'ri, 3 


Ez'ril 


Ez'ron-ites, 8 


GA 


GE 


GE 


Ga'al 


Gash'mu 


Ge-ne'zar, 13 


Ga'ash 


Ga'tam 


Ge-nes'areth, 7 


Gabs 


Gath 


Gen'e-sis 


Gafa-el, 13 


Gath He'pher 


Jen'e-sis 


Gab'a-tha 


Gath Rirn'mon 


Gen-ne'us 


Gai/lm,5 


Gau'lan 


Gen-u'bath 


Gat/ba-tha 


Gau'lon 


Gen'tiles, 8 


Ga'bri-as 


Gaza 


JenftUea 


Ga'bri-el, 13 


Gaz'a-bar 


Ge'on 


Gad 


Ga-za'ra 


Ge'ra 


Gad'a-ra 


Ga'zath-ites, 8 


Ge'rah, 9 


Gad-a-renes', 8 . 


Gazer 


Ge'rar 


Gad'des 


Ga-ze'ra, 13 


Ger'a-sa, 9 


Gad'di-el, 13 


Ga'zez 


Ger'ga-shi, 3 


Ga'di, 3 


Gaz'ites, 8 


Ger'ga-shites, 8 


Gad'ites, 8 


Gaz'zam 


Ger-geHsenes', 8 


Galiam 


Ge'ba.Y 


Ger'i-zim, 7 


Ga'har 


Ge'bal 


Ger'rin-i-ans 


Gsl-us 


Ge'bar 


Ger-rae'ans 


Gafyus 


Geljer 


Ger'shom 


Gala-dad 


Ge'bim 


Ger'shon 


Ga'lal 


Ged-a-li'ah, 15 


Ger'shon-ites, 8 


Gal'e-ed 


Ged'dur 


Ger'shur 


Gal'ga-Ia 


Ge'der 


Ge'sem 


Gal'i-lee 


Gede'rah, 14 


Ge'shan 


Gal'lim 


Ged'e-rite, 8 


Ge'shem 


Gal'U-o 


Ge-de'roth, 13 


Ge'shur 


Gam'a-el, 13 


Ged-e-roth-a'im, 


Gesh'u-ri, 3 


Ga-ma'li-el, 13 


16 


Gesh'u-rites, 8 


Gam'ma-dims 


Ge'dir 


Ge'thur 


Ga'mul 


Ge'dor 


Geth-o-li'as, 15 


Gar 


Ge-ha'zi, 7, 13 


Geth-sem'a-ne 


Ga'reb 


Geli-loth 


Ge-u'el, 17 


Gar'i-ziin 


Ge-marii, 3 


Ge'zer 


Gar'mites, 8 


Gem-a-ri'ab, 15 


Ge'zer-ites, 8f 



GI 

GiblHir 
Giblie-thon 
Gib'e-a, 9 
Gil/e-ah, 9 
Gil/e-ath 
Gib'e-«i> 
Gib'e-ea-kes^ 8 
Gib'lites, 8 
Gid-dal'ti, 3 
Gid'del 
Gid'e-(m, 7 
Gid-e-cv'ni, 3 
Gi'dom 
Gi'er Ea'gle 
Jf/er Eagle 
Gi'hon 
GU'a-lai, 5 
GU'bo-a. 
GU'e-ad 
GiTe-ad4te, 8 
GiFgal,7 



GO 

GO'oh, g 

Gilo-nite, 8 

Gim'zo 

Gi'nath 

Gin'ne-dia 

Gin'ne-thon 

Gir'ga-shi, 3 

Gir'ga-shites, 8 

Gis'pa, 9 

Gif tab He'pfcer 

Git'ta4m, 15 

Git'tite 

Giftites, 8 

Git'tith 

Gi'zo-nite, 8 

Glede 

Gni'dtt^ 

Nidus 

Go'atb 

Gob 

Gog 



6U 

Golam 
Gorgo-th» 
Go-li'ah, a 
Go-Ii'atb 
Go'mer 
Go-mor'rah 
Go'pher-wo«d 
Goi?gi-as 
Gor^je-as 
Gor'ty-Ha 
Go'shen 

Go-thoWi-el, 13 
Go'zan 
GraTja 
Gre'ci-a, 9 
Gre'she-a 
Gud'go-di^ 
jGi/ni, 3 
jGu'nites, 8 
Gur 
iGur-ba'al 



HA 

Ha-a-ha«h^ta-bi 

Ha-bai'ab, 5 

Hab'a-kuk 

Hab-a-zi-niTak, 15 

Ha-ber'ge-dH' 

Ha'bor 

Hach-a-li'ab, 15 

Hachl-Iab 

Haehmo-my^ 

Hach'mo-nite, 8 

Ha^da 

Hadad 

Had-ad-c'zcfr 

Ha'dad Rim'moiv 

Ha'dar 



HA 

Had'a-shab 
; Ha-das'sa, 9 
' Ha-das'sab 
Ha-dat'tah, 9 
Ha did 
.Had1»-i, 6 
IHa-do'mm 
Ha'dnrcb, 6 
Ha'gab 
Ha^a-bah, 9 
Hag'a-i, 5 
Ha'jgar 

Ha-gar-enes', 8 
Ha'gar-ites, 8 
Hag'ga.ri, 3 



HA 

Hag'ge-ri, 3 
Hag'gi, 3 
Hag-gi'ah, 15 
Hag'gites^ 8 
Hag'gith 
Ha'i, 5 
Hak'ka-tanr 
Hak&oz 
Ha-ku'fdta, 13 
Halab, 9 
Ha'lac 
Hallul 
Hali, 3 
Hal-le-lu5ab 
IIal-le4t/yak 



HA 

HaUo'esh 
Ham 
Ha'man 
Ha'math, or 
He'matlv 
Ha'math-ite, 8 
Ha math ZoOiah 
Ham'math 
Ham-med'a-t^ 
Ham'e-lech, 6 
Ham'i-tal 
Ham-moVe4[eth 
Ham'mon 
Ham'o-nah 
Ha'mon Gog 
Ha'mor 
Ha'motb 
Ha'moth Dor 
Ha-mu'd, l^ 
Ha'mul 
Ha'miO-itei, 8 
Ha-mu'tal 
Ha-nam'e^ 13 
Hainan 

Ha-nan'e-elyl3 
Han'a-ni, 3 
Han-a-ni'ah, 15] 
Ha'nes 
Hanl-el, 13 
Hannah, 9 
Han'na-thon 
Han ni-el, 18 
Ha'noch 
Ha'noch4tes9 8 
Ha'nun 

Haph-a-rafiiB, 15 
Ha'ra 

Har'a^h, 9 
Har-a-i'ahy 15 
Ha'ran 
Ha'ra-ritoy 8 



HA 

Har-bo'na 

Har-bo'nah 

Ha'reph 

Hareth 

Har'haff 

Har'ha-ta^d 

Harliur 

Ha'rnn 

Ha'rii^ 

Har'ne-pher 

Ha'rod 

Ha rocUrite, 8 

Har'o-eh, 9 

Ha'ro-ite, 8 

Har'o-aheth 

Har'sha, 9 

Ha'rum 

Ha-ru'maph 

Ha-ru'phite^ 8 

Ha'ruz 

Has-a-di'ah^ 15 

Has-e-nu'ahy 13 

Hash-a4)i ah, 15 

Hash-al/nah, 9 

Hash-ab-ni'ah, 15 

Hash-bad'a-na, 9 

Ha'shem 

Hash-mo'nah, 9 

Ha'shum 

Ha-shu'pha, 9 

Has'rah 

Has-se-na^ahy 9 

Ha-su'pha, 9 

Ha'tach, 6 

Ha'tack 

Ha'thath 

Hafi-ta 

Haftil 

Hat-ti'pha 

Haftush 

Havi'Jah, 9 



HE 



223 



Ha'voth Ja'ir 
Hau'ran 
Haz'a-^l, 13 
Ha-zai'ah, 5 
Ha'zar Ad'dar 
Ha'zar E'nan 
Ha'zar Gad'dah 
Ha'zar Hat'ti-con 
Ha'zar Ma'veth 
Ha-za'roth 
Ha'zar Shu'el 
Ha'zar Su'sah 
Ha'zar Su'sim 
Ha'zelEl-pa'M,3 
Ha-ze'rim 
Ha-ze'roth 
Ha'zer Shu'sfan 
Haz'e-aon Ta'mar 
Ha'ai-el, 13 
Hazo 
Ha'zor 
Haz'u-bah,9 
Hel)er 
He'bear-ites^ 8 
He'brews 
He'br(Mi 
He'bron-ites, 8 
Heg'a4,5 
He'ge, 7 
He'lah, 9 
He'lam 
Hel'bah, 9 
Hel'bon 
HeUhi'ah,16 
Hel'da-i, 5 
He'leb 
He'led 
He'lek 

He'lek-ites, 8 
He'lem 
He'leph 



224 HE 

Helez* 
Heli, 3 
Htl'ka.i,5 
Hel'kath 
Hel'kath Haz'zu- 

rim 
Hel-ki'as, 16 
He'lon 
He'man 
He'math, or 

Ha'math 
Hem'dan 
Hen 
He'na, 9 
Hen'a-dad 
He'noch, 6 
He'pher 
He'pher-ites, 8 
Heph'zi-bah, 9 
He'ram 
He'res 
He'resh 
Her'mas 
Her-mog'e-ne 
Her'mon 
Her'mon-ites, 8 
Her'od 
He-ro'di-ans 
He-ro'di-as 
He-ro'di-an 
He'seb 
He'sed 
Hesh'bon 
Hesh'mon 
Heth 
HetMon 
Hez'e-ki, 3 
Hez-e-ki'ah, 15 
He'zer, or He'zir 
He-zi'a 
He'zi-on 



HO 

Hez'ra-i, 16 
Hez'ro 
Hez'ron 
Hez'ron-iteSy 8 
Hid'da-i, 6 
Hid'de-kel 
Hi'el 

Hi-er'e-el, 13 
Hi-er'e-moth 
Hi-er-i-e'lus 
Hi-er'mas 
Hi-er-on'y-mus 
Hig-gai'on, 6 
Hnen 

Hil-ki'ah,16 
Hillel 
Hin 

Hin'nom 
Hi'rah 
Hi'ram 
Hir-ca'nus 
His-ki'jah, 16 
Hif rites, 8 
Hi'vites, 8 
Ho'ba, or Ho'bah 
Ho'bab 
Hod 

Hod-a-i'ah, 15 
Hod-a-vi'ah, 15 
Ho'dish 
Ho-de'va, 9 
Ho-de'vah, 9 
Ho-di'ah, 16 
Ho-dijah, 16 
Hog'lah 
Ho'ham 
Holen 
Hol-o-fer'nes 
Holon 
Ho'man, or 
He'mah 



HIT 

Ho'mer 

Hoph'ni, 3 

Hoph'rah 

Hor 

Ho'ram 

Ho'reb 

Ho'rem 

Hor-a-gid'dad 

Ho'ri, 3 

Ho'rims 

Ho'rites, 8 

Hor'mah 

Hor-o-na'im, 15 

Hor'o-nites, 8 

Ho'sa, or Has'ah 

Ho-san'na 

Ho-se'a, 9 

Ho'Xefa 

Hosh-a-i'ah, 15 

HosVa-ma 

Ho-8be'a, 9 

Ho'tham 

Ho'than 

Ho'thir 

Huk'kock 

Hul 

Hul'dah,9 

Hum'tah 

Hu'pham 

Hu'pham-ites, 8 

Hu'pah 

Hup'pim 

Hur 

Hu'rai, 5 

Hu'ram 

Hu'ri, 3 

Hu'shah, 9 

Hu'shai, 6 

Hu'sham 

Hu'shath-ite, 8 

Hu'shim 



HU 

Hu'shub 
Hu'shu-bah, 9 
Hue 



HY 

Hu'zoth 
Huz'zab 
Hy-das'pes 



HY 

Hy-e'na, 9 
Hy-men-e'us 



225 



JA 

Ja'a-kan ' 

Ja-ak'o-bah, 9 

Ja-ala 

Ja-alah, 9 

Ja-alam 

Ja'a-nai, 5 

Ja-ar-e-or'a-gim 

Ja-as-a-ni'a 

Ja^a-sau 

Ja-a'si-el, 13 

Ja-a'zah, 9 

Ja-az-a-ni'ah, 15 

Ja-a'zar 

Ja^-zi'ah, 15 

Ja-a'zi-el; 13 

Jabal 

Jab'bok 

Ja^besh 

Ja'bez 

Jalbin 

Jab'ne-el, 13 

JaVneh, 9 

Ja'chan 

Ja'chin 

Ja'chin-ites, 8 

Ja'cob 

Ja-cu'bus, 13 

Ja'da 

Jad-du'a, 9 

Ja'don 

Ja'el 

Ja'gur 

Jah 

Ja-hale-el, 13 



JA 

Ja-hare-ld, 13 
Jaliath 
Ja'haz 
Ja-ha'za 
Ja-ha'zah, 9 
Ja-ha-zi'ah, 15 
Ja-ha'zi-el, 13 
Jah'da-i, 5 
Jah'di-el, 13 
Jah'do 
Jahle-el 
Jah'le-el-ites, 8 
Jah'ma-i, 6 
Jah'zah, 9 
Jah'ze-el, 13 
Jah'zi-el, 13 
Jah'ze-el-ites, 8 
Jah'ze-rah, 9 
Jair 

Ja'ir-ites, 8 
Jal-rus, Ja'e-rua 
Ja'kan 
Ja'keh, 9 
Ja'kim 
Jak'kim 
Jalon 
Jaml)res 
Jam'bri, 3 
James 
Ja'min 
Ja'min-ites, 8 
Jamlech, 6 
Jam'na-an 
Jam'ni-a, 9 



JA 

Jam'nites, 8 

Jan'na, 9 

Jan'nes 

Ja-no'ah, 9 

Ja-no'hah, 9 

Ja'num 

Ja'phet 

Ja'pheth 

Ja-phi'ah, 15 

Japblet 

Japhle-ti, 3 

Ja'pho 

Jar 

Ja'rah, 9 

Ja'reb 

Ja'red 

Jar-e-si'ah, 15 

Jar'ha, 9 

Ja'rib 

Jar'muth 

Ja-ro'ah, 9 

Jas'a-el, 13 

Ja'shem 

Ja'shen 

Ja'sher 

Ja sho'be-am 

Jash'ub 

Jash'u-bi Le'hem 

Jash'ub-ites, 8 

Ja'si-el, 13 

Ja-su'bus 

Ja'tal 

Jath'ni-el, 13 

Jat'tir 

L 3 



2S6 JE 

Ja'van 
Ja'zar 
Ja'zer 
Ja'zi-el, 13 
Ja'ziz 
Ib'har 
Ible-am 
Ib-nei'afa, 9 
Ib-ni'jah, 9 
Ib'ri, 3 
Ib'zan 
Ich'a-bod 
I-co'ni-um 
Id'a-lan, 9 
Id'bash 
Id'd<> 
Id'u-el, 13 
Id-u-mae'a, 9 
Id-u-mse'aiM 
Je'a-rim 
Je-at'e-rai, 5 
Je-ber-e-chi'ab, 
Je'bus 
Je-btt'ffl, 3 
Jeb'u-sites, 8 
Jec-a-mi'ah, 15 
Jec-o-li'ah, 15 
Jec-o-ni'ah, 15 
Je-dai'a, 5, 9 
Je-dai'ah, 5 
Jed-de'us 
Jed'du 
Je-dei'ab, 9 
Je-di'a-el, 13 
Jed'i-ali 
Jed-e-di'ab, 16 
Je'di-el, 13 
Jed'-u-tbun 
Je-e'li, 3 
Je-e'acr 
Je-e'zer-ites, 8 



16 



JE 

Je'garSa-ha-do^dia 

Je-hale-el, 13 

Je-bare-d, 13 

Je-ha'zi-lel, 13 

Jeb-dei'ab, 9 

Je-hei'd, 9 

Je-bez'e-kel 

Je-hi'ab, 9 

Je-hi'el 

Je-hi'e-li, 3 

Je-hish'a-i, 5 

Je-hi»-k?ah, 15 

Je4io'af-dab 

Je-bo^addan 

Je-bo'a-baz 

Je-ho'ash 

Je-bo'ba-dab, 9 

Je-bo'ha-nan 

Je-hoi'a-chfai, 6 

Je-hoi'a-da 

Je-boi'a-kim 

Je-hoi^a-nb 

Je-h(m'a-dab 

Je-bona^faan 

Je-bo-'ram 

Je-bo-sbab'e-atb 



Je-bosh'a-pkat, 12 Je-ri'jab, 15 



Je-hosh'u-a 
Je-ho'vah 
Je-ho'vah Ji'retb 
Je-bo'vab Nis'si 
Je-ho'vab SbaFlom 
Je-ho'vab Sham' 

mab 
Je-bo'vab Tsid'ke- 

nu 
Je-bou'a-bad 
Jehu 
Je-hub'bah 
Je'hu-cal 



JE 

Je'hud 

Je-kfdr, 3, 13 
Je-bu-di'jah, JS 
Je'hush 
Je-iel 

Je-kabTze^l, 13 
Jek-a-me'am 
Jek-a-m?ahr, 15 
Je-ku'thi-d, 13 
Jem'i-inab 
Jem-u'd, 17 
Jeph'tbah 
Je-pbiufiwlr 
Je^rah 

Je-ralnn'c-d, 13 
Je-rabm'e-d-ites 
Jer'e-diiMr, 6 
Je'red 
Jer'e-mai, 5 
Jep-e-mi'ah, 15 
Jer'e^-math 
Jer'eHBOQth 
Je-ri'ab, 15 
Jert-bai, 5 
Jert-cho, 6 
Je'ri-d, 13 



Jert-moth 

Je'ri-oth 

Jer'o-don 

Jer'o-ham 

Jer-o-bo'am 

Je-rub'ba-al 

Je-rttb'e-shetb 

Jer'u-el, I7 

Je-ni'saJem 

Je-ru'sha, 13 

Je-sai'ab, 5 

Jesb-a-i'ab, 5 

Jesh'a-nah 

Jesh-ar'e-Iah 



JI 

Jesli-eVe-ab 

Jesh-el/e-ab, 9 

Je'sher 

Jeshl-mon 

Je-shish'a-i, 5 

Jesh-o-ha-i'ah, 15 

Jesh'u-a, 13 

JesVu-run 

Jend'ah, 15 

Je-sim'i-el 

Jes'se 

Jes'u-a, 13 

Jes'u-i, 3 

Je'sus 

Je'ther 

Je'theth 

Jethlah 

Je'thro 

Je'tur 

Je'u-d, 13 

Je'ush 

J&uz 

Jew'rie 

Jez-a-ni'ah, 16 

Jez'a-bel 

Je-zelus 

Je'zer 

Je'zer-ites, 8 

Je-zi'ah, 15 

Je'zi-el, 11 

Jez-li'ah, 15 

Jez'o-ar 

Jez-ra-hi'ah, 15 

Jez're-el, 13 

Jez're-el-ite, 8 

Jez're-el-i-tess 

Igal 

Ig^a-li'ah, 15 

Ig-e-ab'a-rim, 7 

Ig'e-al, 7 

Jib'sam^ 



JO 

Jidlaph 

Jim 

Jimla, or Im'la 

Jim'na, or Jim'iiah 

Jim'nitea, 8 

rjon 

Jiph'tah 

Jiph'thah-el 

Iklcesh 

Ilai, 5 

Im 

Im lah, 9 

Im'mah, 9 

Im-man'u-el, 17 

Im'mer 

Im'na, or Im'nah 

Im'rah 

Im'ri, 3 

Jo'ab 

Jo'a-chaz 

Jo-a-da'nus 

Jo'ah 

Jo'a-haz 

Jo'a-kim 

Jo-an'na. 

Jo-an'nan 

Jo'ash 

Jo'a-tham 

Jo-a-zab'dus 

Job 

Jobe 

Jo'bab, 6 

Joch'e-bed, 6 

Jo'da, 9 

Joed 

Joel 

Jo-elah, 9 

Jo-e'zer 

Jog'be-ah 

Jog'li 

Jo'ha, 9 



JO 227 

Jo-ha'nan 

John 

Jon 

Joi'a-da, 9 

JoiVkim 

Joi'a-rib 

Jok'de-am 

Jo'kim 

Jok'me-an 

Jok'ne-am . 

Jok'shan 

Jok'tan 

Jok'the-el, 13 

Jo'na, 9 

Jon'a-dab 

Jo'nah) 9 

Jo'nan 

Jo'nas 

Jon'a-than 

Jo'nath Elim 

Re-cho'chim, 6 
Jop'pa 
Jo'ra 
Jo'ra-i, 5 
Jo'ram 
Jor'dan 
Jor'i-bas 
Jo'rim 
Jor'ko-am 
Jos'a-bad 
Jos'a-phat 
Jos-a-phi'as, 15 
Jo'se 

Jos'e-dech, 6 
Jo'se-el, 13 
Jo'seph 
Jo'ses 
Josh'a-bad 
Jo'shah, 9 
Josh'a-phat 
Josh-a-vi'ah, 15 



228 IR 

Jo8h-bek'a-sha 

Josli'u-a, 9 

Jo-si'ah, 16 

Jo-si'as 

Jo8-i-bi'ah, 16 

Jos-i-phi'ah 

Jo-si'phus, 12 

I-o'ta, 9 

Jof bah, 9 

Jot'bath 

Jot'ba-tha 

Jo'tham 

Joz'a-bad 

Joz'a-char, 6 

Joz'a-dak 

Iph-e-dei'ah, 15 

Ir 

I'ra 

Trad 

I'ram 

rri, 3 

I-rijah, 15 

Ir'na-hash 

I'ron 

Ir'pe-el, 13 



IS 

Ir-she'mish 
I'm 
I'sa-ac 
Tzak 
I-sai'ah, 6 
Is'cah 
Is-car'i-ot 
Is'da-el, 13 
Ish'bah, 9 
Ishbak 
Ish'bi Be'nob 
Ish'bo-sheth 
I'shi, 3 
I-shi'ah, 15 
I-shi'jah, 16 
Ish'ma, 9 
Ish'ma-el, 13 
Ish'ma-el-ites, 8 
Ish-ma-i'ah, 16 
Ish'me-rai, 6 
Tshod 
Ish'pan 
Ish'tob 
Ish'u-a, 9 
Ish'u-ai, 6 



JU 

Is-ma-chi'ah, 15 

Is-ma-i'ah, 15 

Is'pah 

*l8'ra-el 

Is'ra-el-ites, 8 

Is'sa-char 

Is-tal-cu'nis, 13 ' 

Is'u-i, 8, 13 

Is'u-ites, 8 

Ith'a-i, or If a-i, 5 

It'a-ly 

Ith'a-mar 

Ithl-el, 13 ^ 

Ith'mah, 9 

Ith'nan 

Ith'ra, 9 

Ith'ran 

Ith're-am 

Ith'rites, 8 

It'tah Ea'zin 

If ta-i, 5 

It-u-re'a, 13 

Tvah 

Ju'bal 

Ju'cal 



* IsraeU—Thisvrord in colloquially pronouoced in two syUable8,-and 
not nnfrequently heard in the same manner from the pulpit. The tend- 
ency of two vowels to unite, where there is no accent to keep tbeni 
distinct, is the cause of this corruption, as in Canaan, Isaac, &c,; but as 
there is a great difficulty in keeping separate two unaccented vowels ot 
the same kind, so the latter corruption is more excusable than the for> 
mer ; and therefore, in my opinion, this word ought always in public 
pronunciation, especially in reading the Scripture, to be heard in three 
syllables. Milton introduces this word four times in his Paradise Lost, 
and constantly makes it two syllables only. But those who understand 
English Prosody know that we have a great number of words which 
have two distinct impulses, that go for no more than a single syllable 
in verse, such as heaven, given, Sic. : higher ?Lnd dyer are always consi- 
dered as dissyllables ; and hi'-e and dire, which have exactly the same 
quantity to the ear, but as monosyllables. Israel, therefore, ought al- 
ways, in deliberate and solemn speaking, to be heard in three syl- 
lables. The same may be observed of Raphael and Michael. 



JU 



IZ 



IZ 



229 



u'dah 


Ju'ni-a 


Iz-ra-hi'ah, 16 


u'das 


Ju-shabheHsed 


Iz'ra-hite 


ude 


JWtus 


Iz-ra-i'ah, or 


u-dffi'a 


Jut-tah, 9 


Is-ra-i'ah, 9 


u'dith 


Iz'e-har, 13 


Iz're-el, 13 


u'el 


Iz'har 


Iz'ri, 3 


u'U-a 


Iz har-ite, 8 


Iz'rites, 8 



E£ 

s;ab 

Kab'ze^l, 13 
Ca'des 
ta'desh, or Ca'- 

desh 
Ca'desh Bar'ne-a 
Kad'mi-el, 13 
K.ad'mon-ites, 8 
Cal'la-i, 5 
Ca'nah, 9 
Ka-re'ah, 9 
Kar'ka-a, 9 
Kar'kor 
Kar'na-im, 16 
Kar'tan 
Kar'tah, 9 
Ke'dar 

Ked'e-mah, 9 
Eed'emoth 
Ee'desh 

Ke-hera-thah, 9 
Kei'Iah, 9 
Ke-lai'ah, 5 
Keri-ta 

Eerkath-ha-zu'rim 
Kem'u-el, 13, l^ 
Ke'nah, 9 



EI 

Ee'nan 

Ee'nath 

Ee'naz 

Een'ites, 8 

Een'niz-zites 

Eer-en-hap'puch 

Ker-en-happuk 

Ee'ri-oth 

Ee'ros 

Ee-tu'ra 

Ee-tu'rah, 9 

Ee-zi'a, 1, 9 

Ee'ziz 

Eib'roth Hat-ta'a- 

vah 
EibWim, 16 
Eid'ron 
Ei'nah, 9 
Eir 

Eir-har'a-seth 
EirTie-resh 
Eir'i-eth or 

Eir'jath 
Eir'jath Ar'ba 
Eir^ath A'im 
Eir'jath A'riip 
Eir'jath A'ri-us 



EU 

Eir'jath Ba'al 

Eir^th Hu'ioth 

Eir'jath Je'a-rim 

Eir'jath San'nah 

Eir'jath Se'pher 

Eir'i-oth, 4 

Eish 

Eish'i, 3 

Eish'i-on, 4 

Ei'shon, or Ei'son 

Eith'lish 

Eit'ron 

Eit'tim 

Eo'a, 9 

Eo'hath 

Eo'hath-ites 

Eol-a i'ah, 16 

Eo'rah, 14 

Eo'rah-ites, 8 

Eo'rath-ites 

Eor'hite 

Eor'hites 

Eorltes, 8 

Eo're 

Eoz 

Eush^i'ah, 6 



230 LE 

La'a-dah, 9 

La'a-dan 

La'ban 

LaVa-na, 9 

La'chish 

La-cu'nus, 13 

La'dan 

La'el 

La'had 

La-hai'roi 

Lah'man 

Lah'mas 

Lah'mi, 3 

Laish 

La'kum 

La'mech, 6 

Lapl-doth 

La-se'a, 9 

La'sha 

La-sha'ran 

Las'the-nes 

Laz'a-rus 

Le'ah, 9 

Leb'a-nah, 9 

Lel/a-non 

Leb'a-oth 



LO 

Leb-be'us, 13 

Le-bo'nah, 9 

Le'chah 

Lelia-bim 

Le'hi 

Lem'u-el, l^ 

Le'shem 

Leftus 

Le-tu'shim 

Levi, 3 

Le-vi'a-than 

Le'vis 

Le'vites, 8 

Le-vifi-cu8 

Le-um'mim 

Lib'a-nus 

Lib'nah, 9 

Lib'ni, 3 

Lib'nites, 8 

Lib'y-a, 9 

Lig-naroes 

Li'gure, 1 

Lik'hi, 3 

Lo-am'mi, 3 

Lod 

Lod'e-bar 



LY 

Log 

Lois 

Lo Ru'ha-mah 

Lot 

Lo'tan 

Loth-a-su'bus, 13 

Lo'zon 

Lu'bim 

Ln'biins 

Lu'cas 

Lu'ci-fei 

Lu'ci-us 

Lud 

Lu'dim 

Lu'hith 

Luke 

Luz 

Lye-arH/ni-a 

Ly(/ca 

Lyd'da 

Lyd'i-a 

Ly-sa'ni-as 

Lys'i-a, 9 

Lizh'e-a 

Lys'i-as 

Lys'tra 



MA 

Ma'a-cah, 9 
Ma'a-chah, 6 
Ma-ach'a-thi, 3 
Ma-achVthites, 8 
Ma-ad'ai, 5 
Ma-a-di'ah, 15 
Ma-a'i, 5 
Ma-aVeh A-crab' 

bim 
Ma'a-nai, 5 
Ma'a-rath 



MA 

Ma-a-sei'ah, 9 

Ma-a-si'ah, 15 

Ma'ath 

Ma'az 

Ma-a-zi'ah, 15 

Mab'da-i, 5 

Mac'a-lcm 

Mae'ca-bees 

Mac-ea-bae'us 

Mach'be-nah 

Mach'be-nai, 5 



MA 

Mach-he'loth 
Ma'chi, 3, 6 
Ma'chir 
Ma'chir-ites, 8 
Mach'mas 
Mach-na-de'bai,5 
Mach-pe'lah^ 6 
Ma'cron 
Mad'a-i, 5 
Ma-di'a-bun 
Ma-di'ah, 15 



MA 

Ma'di-on 
Mad-man'Bsb 
Ma^don 
Ma^lus, 13 
Mag^ish 
M^da-la, 9 
Mag'da-len 
Mag-da-le'De 
Mag'di-el, 13 
Ma'gog 

Ma'gar MWsaAAl 
Mag'pi-asb, 4 
Ma'ha-lah, 9 
Ma'ha-Iath 
Le-an^noth 

Ma'ha-lath 
Mas'chil, 6 

Ma-hale-d, 13 

Ma'ha-B, 3 

Ma-ha-nalm, 16 

Ma'ha-neh Dan 

Ma-ha-nem 

Ma-har'a-i, 6 

Ma'nath 

Ma'ha-vites, 8 

Ma'haz 

Ma-ha'zi-oth 

Ma^her-sbaFal- 
hash'baz 

Mahlah 

Mah'li, 3 

Mahlites, 8 

Mahlon 

Mai-an'e-as 

Ma'kas 

Ma'ked 

Mak-e'loth 

Mak-ke'dah, 13 

Mak'tesh 

MaFa-chi, 3, 6 

MaFcham 



MA 

Mal-chi'ah, 15 
Mai chi^I, 13 
MaVchi-el-ites, 8 
Mal-cbfjafc 
Mal-chi'ram 
Mal-chMhu'ab,12 
Marcbom 
MaFcbus, 6 
Mallas 
Mal'Io-tbi, 3 
Mallncb, 6 
Ma-mai'as, 5 
Mam'mcm 
Mam-ni-ta-nai" 

mus 
Mam're 
Ma-mu'cus 
Man'a-en 
Man'a-batb 
Man'a-bem 
Ma-na'beth-ites, 8 
Man-as-se'as, 12, 
Ma-nas'8ch, 9 
Ma-nas'sites, 8 
Ma'neh, 9 
Man-ba-naira, 16 
Ma'ni, 3 
Maifna 
Ma-iK/ah 
Ma'och, 9 
Ma'on 

Ma'on-ites, 8 
Ma'ra, 9 
Ma'rah, 9 
Mar'a-lab 
Mar-a-nath'a 
Mar-do^cbe'us, 6 
Ma-reshah 
Mark 

Mar'i-sa, 9 
Mar'motb 



ME 931 

Ma'roth 

Mar're-kab, 9 

Mar'se-na, 9 

Mar'te-n« 

Mar'tba 

Ma'ry 

Mas'cbil, 6 

Mas'e-loth 

Masb 

Ma'sbal 

Mas'man 

Mas'motb 

Mas're-kab, 9 

Ma'sa^ 9 

Mas'sab, 9 

Mas-si'as, 15 

Ma'tred 

Ma'tri, 3 

Mat'tan 

Mat'tan-ab 

Mat-tan-i'ab 

Mat'ta-tba 

Mat-ta-tbi'as 

Mat-te-na i, 5 

Mat'tban 

Mat'tbat 

Mat-tbe'las 

Matthew 

Mat-tbi'as, 15 

Mat-ti-thi'ab, 15 

Maz-i-ti'aa, 15 

Maz-za'roth 

Meab 

Me-a'ni, 3 

Me-a'rab 

Me-bu'nai, 5 

Mecb'e-ratb, 13 

Mech'e-rath-ite, 8 

Me'dad 

Med'a lab, 9 

Me'dan 



232 ME 

Med'e-ba, 9 

Medes 

Me'di-a 

Me'di-an 

Me-e'da 

Me-gid'do, 7 

Me-gid'don, 7 

Me-ha'li, 3 

Me-hefa-bel 

Me-hi'da 

Me'hir 

Me-horath-ite, 8 

Me-hu'ja-el, 13 

Me-hu'man, 6 

Me-hu'nim 

Me-hu'nims 

Me-jar'kon 

Mek'o-nah, 9 

Mel-a-ti'ah, 16 

Merchi, 3, 6 

Mel chi'ah, 6, 9 

Mel-chi'as, 16 

Merchi-el, 13 

Mel-chis'e-dek 

Mel-chi-shu'a, 13 

Me-le'a 

Melech, 6 

Melli-cu 

Mel'i-ta 

MeFzar 

Mem'phis 

Me-mu'can, 13 

Men'a-hem 

Me'nan 

Me'ne 

Me'nith 

Men'o-thai, 5 

Me-on'e-nem 

Meph'a-ath 

Me-phib'o-sheth 

Me'rab 



ME 

Mer-a-i'ah, 15 
Me-rai'oth, 5 
Me'ran 
Mer'a ri, 3 
Mer'a-rites, 8 
Mer-a-tha'im, 16 
Me'red 
Mer'e-moth 
Me'res 
Mertbah, 9 
Mer'i-bah Ka'desh 
Me-rib'ba-al 
Mer'i-moth, 4 
Me-ro'dach 

BaVa-dan, 11 
Me'rom 

Me-ron'o-thite, 8 
Me'roz 
Me'ruth 
Me'sech, 6 
Mefsek 
Me'sha 
Me'shach, 6 
Me'shech, 6 
Mefshek 
Mesh-el-e-mi'ah 
Mesh ez'a-bel 
Mesh-ez'a beel 
Mesh-iHa'mith 
Mesh-il'le-moth 
Me-sho'bah, 9 
Me-shuriam 
Me-shul'le-mith 
Mes'o-bah, 13 
Mes'o-ba-ite, 8 
Mes-o-po-ta'mi-a 
Mes-si^h, 16 
Mes-si'as, 16 
Me-te'rus, 13 
Me'theg Am'mah 
Meth're-datb 



MI 

Me-thu'sa^l 
Me-thu'se-lah, 9 
Me-thu'se-la 
Me-unim, 13 
Mez'a-bah 
Mi'a-min 
Mib'har 
Mib'sam 
Mib'zar 
Mi'cah, 9 
Mi-cai'ah, 6 
Mi'cha, 9 
Mi'cha-el, 16 
Mi'chah, 9 
Mi.chai'ah 
Michel 
Mich'mas, 6 
Mikmas 
Mich'mash 
Mich'me-thab, 9 
Mich'ri, 3 
Mich'tam 
Mid'din 
Mid'i-an 
Mid'i-an-ite«, 8 
Mig'da-lel 
Mig'dal Gad 
Mig'dol 
Migron 
Mii'a-min 
Mikloth 
Mik-nei'ah, 9 
MU-a-la'i, 5 
Mil'cah, 9 
MU'chah, 9 
Mil'cha, 9 
Mircom 
Millo 
Mi'na, 9 
Mi-ni'a-min 
Mm'ni, 3 



MI 

Min^nith 
Miph'kad 
Mirt-am 
Mir'raa, 9 
Mis'gab 

Mish'a-el, 13, 15 
Mi'shal, 3 
Mi'sham 
Mi'she-al 
Mish'ma, 9 
Mish-man'na 
Mish'ra-ites, 8 
Mis'par 
Mis'pe-reth 
Mis'pha, 9 
Mis'phah, 9 
Mis'ra-im, 16 
Mis're-photh-ma' 

im, 16 
Mith'cah, 9 
Mith'nite, 8 
Mith'ri-dath 
Mi'zar 



MO 

Miz'pah, 9 

MiaTpeh, 9 

Miz'ra-im, 16 

Miz'zah,9 

Mna'son 

Na'son 

Mo'ab 

Mo'ab-ites, 8 

Mo-a-di'ah, 15 

Mock'mur 

Mock'ram 

Mo'din 

Mo'eth 

Mol'a-dah, 9 

Molech, 6 

Mo'lek 

Mo'U, 3 

Mo'Ud 

Moloch, 6 

Mdlok 

Mom'dis 

Mo-o-si'as, 13 



MY ^233 

Mo'rash-ite, 8« 
Mo'ras-thite 
Mor'de-cai, 5, 13 
Mo'reh, 9 
Mor'esh-ethGath 
Mo-ri'ah, 15 
Mo-se'ra, 9 
Mo-se'rah, 9 
Mo-so'roth 
Mo'ses 

Mo'XBB 

Mo-sol'lam 

Mo-sul'la-mon 

Mo'za, 9 

Mo'zah 

Mup'pim 

Mu'shi, 3 

Mu'shites, 9 

Muth'lab-ben 

Myn'dus 

My'ra, 9 

Myt-e-le'n^ 



NA 

Na'am 
Na'a-mah, 9 
Na'a-man, 15 
Na'a-ma-thite, 8 
Na'a-mites, 8 
Na'a-rah, 9 
Na'a-rai, 5 
Na'a-ran 
Na'a-rath 
Na-ash'on 
Na'a-thus 
Na'bal 
Nab-a-ri'as 
Na-ba-the'ans 



NA 



NA 



Na'bath-ites, 8 


Na'hath 


Na'both 


Nah'bi, 3 


Na'chon, 6 


Na'ha-bi, 3 


Na'chor, 6 


Na'hor 


Na'dab 


Nah'shon 


Na-dab'a-the 


Na'hum 


Nag'ge,; 


Nal-dus, 6 


Na-hali-el, 13 


Nairn 


Na-hal'lal 


Nain 


Na'ha-lol 


Nai'oth, 6 


Na'ham 


Na-ne'a, 9 


Na-ham'a-ni, 3 


Na'o-mi, 3 


Na-har'a-i, 5 


Na'pish 


Na'hash 


Naphl-si, 3 



234 NE 


NE 


NY 


Naph'tluOi, 3 


Ned-a-bi'ali, 15 


Ne-zi'ah, 15 


Naph'thar 


Ne-e-mi'as 


Ne'zib 


Nan)}i'tu4iim, 11 


Neg'i.Both, 7 


NiblMlS 


Nas'bas 


Ne-hera-mhe 


iNib'shan 


Na'sboit 


Ne-he-ini'ah,9, 15 


Nic-o-de'mo» 


Na'sith 


Ne-he-ini'a» 


Nic-o-Ial-taneB 


Na'sor 


Ne'hum 


Nic'o-la« 


Na'than 


Ne-husht%9 


Nim'rah 


Na-than'a^l, 13 


;Ne.hu8h'tah 


Nim'rim 


Nath-a-ni'as, 15 


Ne-husb'tav 


Nim'rod 


Nathan Me'lech,6 


Ne'i-el, 13 


Nim'shi, 3 


Na've 


Ne'keb 


Ninfe-ve 


Na'um 


Ne-ko'da 


Nin'e-veh, 9 


Naz-a-renc' 


Nem-nH 13^ 17 


Nin'e-vitcs, 8 


Naz-a-renes', 8 


Nem-u'd-itea^ 8 


Ni'san 


Naz'a-retb 


Ne'pheg 


Nis'roch^e 


Naz'a-rite, 8 


Ne'phi, 3 


Nis'tok 


Ne'ah 


Ne'phis 


No-a^ah,15 


Ne-a-riah, 15 


Ne'phish 


No'ah or No'c 


Neb'a-i, 5 


Ne-phish'eHsiin 


Nob 


Ne-bai'oth, 5 


Neph'tha.H,3 


No'bahjft 


Ne-ba'ioth 


Nep^tho^ 


Nod 


Ne-bahat 


Nepth'tu-im 


No'dab 


Ne'bat 


Ne-phu'sim, 13 


No'e-ba, 9 


Ne'bo 


Ner 


No'ga, or No'gali 
No'Lh, 9 


Neb-u-chad-nez' 


Ne're-us 


zar 


Ner'gal 


Nom 


Neb-u-chod-on'o- 


Ner'gal Sha-rc'acr 


Nom'a-des 


sor 


Ne'ri, 3 


Non 


Neb-u-chad-tez' 


Ne-ri'ab, 15 


Noph 


zar 


Ne-than'e-el, 13 


Noff 


Neb-u-chaa^ham 


Neth-a-ni'ah 


No'phah, 9 


Neb-u-zar'a^n 


Neth'i-niros 


No-me'm-u» 


Ne'chi-loth 


Ne-to'phab, 9 


Nun, tbe fittfaer of 


Ne'cho, 6 


Ne-toph'a-thi, 3 


Joshua 


Ne-co'dan 


Ne-toph'a-thites 


Nym'phas 


OB 


OB 


OB 


Ob-a-di'ah, 15 


O'bed 


O'beth 


Obal 


abed E'dom 


Cbil 



OM 

Oboth 

Odii-«l,13 

Oc-i-de'lus, 7 

Os-i-deflus 

Oc'i-na, 7 

Os'i-na 

Oc/ran 

Oded 

O-dol'lam 

Od-on-artefi 

Og 

Ohad 

Ohel 

Ora-mns 

0-]ym'pbas 

Om-a-e'nisy IS 

O'mar 

O-me'ga, 9 

Omer 

Om^ri, 3 



OR 



OZ 235 



On 


0-ri'oti 


Onam 


Or'nan 


Onan 


Or'phah, 9 


O-nes'i-rauB 


Offa 


On-e-siphVrus 


Or-th(Mi'a«, 15 


O^ii'a-res 


O-sai'asy 6 


O-ni'as, 15 


O-se'aB 


O'no 


asee 


Onus 


Oebe* 


O-ny'as 


Os'pray 


On'y-cha 


Os'si-frjWB 


On'e-ka 


Oth'ni, 3 


Onyx 
aphel 


Oth'ni^, 4, 13 


Oth-o-ni'as, 15 


O'pher 


Ozem 


O'phir 


O-zi'as, 15 


Oph'ni, 3 


O'zi-el, 4, 13 


iOph'rah 


Oz'ni,3 


O'reb 


Oz'nites, 8 


O'ren, or Cnra 


O-zo'ra, 9 



PA 

Pa'a-bai^ 5 
Pa'<fan 

Pa'dan A'laoi 
Pa'don 

Pagi-d, 7, 13 
Pa'hath Mo'ab 
Pa'i, 3, 6 
Pa'kl 
Pal'es-tine 
Pallu 

Pallu-ites, 8 
Pal'ti, 3 
Pal'ti-el, 13 
Pal'tite, 8 
Pan'nag 
Par'a-dise 
Pa'rah 



PA 

Pa'ran 

Par'bar 

Par-maeh'ta 

Par^me-naa 

Par'nath 

Par'nach, 6 

Pa'rosh 

Par-shan'da-tha 

Par'u-ah 

Par-va'im, 5, 16 

Pa'sach, 6 

Pas-dam'min 

Pa-se'ah, 9 

Pash'ur 

Pass'o-ver 

Pafa-ra 

Pa-te'o-li 



PE 

Pa-the'us, 13 

Path'ros 

Path-ra'sim 

Pafro-bas 

Pa'u 

Paul 

Ped'a-hd, 13 

Ped'ah-zur 

Ped-ai'ah, 5 

Pe'kah, 9 

Pek-a-hi'rfi 

Pe'kod 

Pel-a-i'ah, 5 

Pel-a-li'ah 

Pel-a^ti'ah, 15 

Pdeg 

Pe'let 



236 PH 

Pe'leth 

Peleth-ites, 8 
Pe-li'as, 16 
Pelo-nite, 8 
Penid, 13 
Pe-nin'nah 
Pen'ni-nab 
l^en-tap'o-lis 
Pen'ta-teudi, 6 
Pen'ta-teuk 
Pen'te-cost 
Pefnfte^oast 
Pe-nud, 13 
Pe'or 
Per'a-zim 
Pe'resh 
Pe'rea 

Pe'rez Uz'za 
Per'ga, 9 
Per'ga-mos 
Pe-n'da, 9 
Per'iz-zites, 8 
Per'me-nas 
Per-u'da, 9, 13 
Peth-a-hi'ah, 15 
Pe'thor 
Pe-thu'el, 13 
Pe-ul'thai, 5 
Phac'a-reth 
Phai'sur, 5 
Phal-dai'us, 5 
Pha-le'as, 11 
Phaleg 
Phallu 
PhaVti, 3 



PH 

PhaVti-el, 13 

Pha-nu'el, 13 

Phar'a-cim, ^ 

Pha'ra-oh 

^Fa'ro 

Phar-a-tho'ni, 3 

Pha'rez 

Pha'rez-ites, 8 

Phar'i-sees 

Pharosh 

Phar'phar 

Phar'zites, 8 

Pha'se-ah, 13 

Pha-selis, 13 

Phas'i-ron 

Phe'be 

Phe-ni'ce, 13 

Phib'e-seth 

Phi'col 

Phi-lar'ches 

Phi-le'mon, 11 

PhiJe'tus, 11 

Phi-lis'ti-a 

Phi-lis'tim 

Phi-lis'tines, 8 

Filisftine 

Phi-loro-gus 

Phil-o-me'tor 

Phin'e-as 

Phin'e-has 

Phi'son, 1 

Phle'gon 

Pho'ros 

Phul, rhymes dull 

Phur 



PY 

Phu'rah 

Phut, rhymes nut 

Phu'vah 

Phy-gellus 

Phy-kc'te-ries 

Pi-ha-hi'roth 

Pilate 

PU'dash 

Pire-tha 

PU'tai, 5 

Pi'non 

Pi'ra 

Pi'ran 

Pir'a-tho-ite, 8 

Pir-a'thon 

Pis'gah 

Pi'son, 1 

Pis'pah 

Pi'thon, 1 

Poch'e-reth, 6 

Pon'ti-us, Pilate 

Por'a-tha, 9 

Pofi-phar 

Po-tiph'e-ra 

Proch'o-rus 

Pu'a, or Pu'ah 

Pu'dens 

Pu'hites, 8 

Pul, rhymes dull 

Pu'nites, 8 

Pu'non 

Pur, or Pu'rim 

Put, rhymes nut 

Pu'ti-el, 13 

Py'garg 



[This word is made a trissyllable by a modern poet : 
** Over Pharaoh's crown of gold. 
The lond-tiiundering billows roU*d." Milm0nJ] 



RA 

Ia'a-mah, 9 

la-a-mi'ah, 15 

ita-am'ses 

rtab'bah 

■lab'bath 

Etab'bat 

Etab'bi, 3 

Etabbith 

R,ab-bo'ni, 3 

El^b'mag 

Eiab'sa-ces 

Eiab^sa-ris 

RaVsha-keh, 9 

Ra'ca, or Ra'cha 

Ra'cab, 6 

Ra'cal 

Ra'chab, 6 

Ra'chel, 6 

Rad'da-i, 5 

Ra'gau 

Ra'ges 

Rag'u-a 

Ra-gu'el, 13 

Ra'hab 

Ra'ham 

Ra'kem 

Rak'kath , 

Rak'kon 

Ram 

Ra'ma, or Ra'mah 

Ra'math 



RE 

Ra-math-a'im, 16 
Ram'a-them 
Ra'math-ite, 8 
Ra'math Le'hi 
Ra'math Mis'peh 
Ra-me'ses 
Ra-mi'ah, 15 
Ra'moth 

Ra'moth Gil'e-ad 
Ra'pha 

»Ra'pha^l,13,15 
Rafphel 
Ra'phah, 9 
Raph'a-im, 16 
Ra'phon 
Ra'phu 
Ras'sis 

Rath'u-mus, 12 
Ra'zis 
Re-a-i'ah, 5 
Re'ba, 9 
Re-bec'ca, 2 
Re'chab, 6 
Re'chab-ites, 8 
Re'chah, 9 
Refka 

Re-el-ai'ah, 5 
Re-el-i'as, 15 
Ree-sai'as, 5 
Re'gem, the g hard^ 
Re-gem'me-lech I 



RE 



237 



Re'gom 

Re-ha-bi'ah, 15 

Re'hob 

Re-ho-bo'am 

Re-ho'both 

Re'hu 

Re'hura 

Re'i, 3 

Re'kem 

Rem-a-li'ah, 15 

Re'meth 

Rem'mon 

Rem'mon Meth'o- 

ar 
Rein'phan 
Rem'phis 
Re'pha-el, 13, 15 
Re'phah 
Reph-a-i'ah, 15 
Reph'a-im, 16 
Reph'a-ims 
Reph'i-dim 
Re'sen 
Re'sheth 
Re'u 
Reuben 
Re-u'el, 13 
Reu'mah 
Re'zeph 
Re-zi'a, 15 
Re'zin 



• Raphael — This word has uniformly the accent on the first syllable 
throughout Milton, though Graecised by *Pct^»vfiK ; but the quantity is 
not so invariably settled by him : for in his Paradise Lost he makes 
it four times of three syllables, and twice of two. What is observed 
under Israel is applicable to this word. Colloquially we may pronounce 
it in two, as if written Uaphael; but in deliberate and solemn speaking 
or reading, we ought to make the two last vowels to be heard 
separately and distinctly. The same may be observed of Michael, 
which Milton, in his Paradise Lost, uses six times as a word of three 
syllables, and eighteen times as a word of two only. 



288 RI 



RO 



RO 



Re'zon i 


Rlin'mon Pa'rez 


Ro'i-mu8 


Rhe'gi-tnn 


Rin'nah, 9 


RoHnam-ti-e'ser 


Refje-um 


Riphadi 


Rosh 


Rhe'sa 


Ry'faih 


Ruby 


Re'sa 


Ris'sah, 9 


Ru'fiis 


Rho'da 


Rithmah 


Ru'ha-mah 


Rhod'o-cus 


Ris'pah 


Ru'mah 


Ri'bai, 5 


Ro-gelim, 7, 13 


Rus'ti-cus 


Riblah 


Roh'gah, 9 


Ruth 


Rim'mon 


Ro'ga 


Rooth 


SA 


SA 


SA 


*Sa-bac-tha'ni 


Sab'te-cha, 6 


Sal-a-sad'a-i, 5 


fSab'a-oth 


Sa'car 


Sa-Wthi-el, 13 


Sa'bat 


Sad-a-mi'as, 15 


SaVcah, 9 


Sab'a-tus 


JSa'dai 


SaVchah 


Sab'ban 


Sa'das 


Salem 


Sabbath 


Sad-de'us 


Salim 


Sab-ba-the'us 


Sad'duc 


SaVla-i, 5 


Sab-be'us 


Sad'du-cees 


Sariu 


Sab-de'us 


Sa'doc 


Sal'lum 


Sab'di, 3 


Sa-ha-du'tha 3e' 


Sal-lu'mus, 13 


Sa-be'ans 


gar 


Sal'ma, or Sal'mah 


Sa'bi, 3 


Sa'la 


SaVmon 


SaVtah, 9 


Salah, 9 


Sal-mo'ne, 13 



• Sabacthani, — Some, says the editor of Lal>be, place the accent on 
the antepenultimate syllable of this word, aad others on the penulti- 
mate; this last pronunciation, he says, is most agreeable to the 
Hebrew w6rd, the pen nl t i mate of which is not only long, but accented : 
and as this word is Hebrew, it is certainly the preferable pronuncia- 
tion. [Sabacthani is rather a Syriae corruption of t^ Hebrew Gna- 
zaph-tha'ni.] 

f Sdbetoth. — This word should not be confonnded in its pronuncia- 
tion with Salfbath, a word of so <lf0ereirt a signification. Sabaotk 
ought to be heard in three syllables by keeping the a and o separate 
and distinct. This, it must be confessed, is not v«ry easy to do, but 
is nbsolutely necessary to prevent a very gross confusion of idea», 
and a perversion of the sense. [Sabaoth is the Hebrew plural of 
Saba or rather Tzaba n host,'] 

t [See Sinai.'i 



SA 

ia-lo'ne, 13 
;alu 
ialum 
iam'a^I, 13 
k-mai'as, 5 
^a-ma'ri-ft, or 
Sam>a-ri'a 
^a-mar'i-tans 
$am'a-tus 
Ja-mei'us, 9 
Sam'gar Ne'bo 
Sa'mi, 3 
Sa'mis 
Samlah, 9 
Sam'mus 
Samp'sa-mes 
Sam'son 
Sam'u-el, 13, 17 



SA 

San-a-bas'sa-ros 

San'a-sib 

San-ballat 

Sanhe-drim 

San san'nah 

Saph 

Sa'phat 

Saph-a-ti'a8, IS 

Saphlr 

Sa'pheth 

Sap-phi'ra, 9 

Sap'phire 

Sar-a-bi'as, 15 

Sa'ra, or Sa'rai, 6 

Sar-a-i'ah, 5 

Sa-rai'as, 5, 13 

Sa-ram^anel 

Sar'a-mel 

Sa'raph 



SA 239 

Sar-ched'0i4iuB, 6 

Sar'de-us 

Sar'dis 

Sar'dites, 8 

Sar'di-iw 

Sar'dine 

Sar'do-nyx 

Sa're-a 

Sa-rep'ta 

Sar'con 

Sa'nd 

Sa'ron 

Sa-ro'thi, 3 

Sar-se'chim, € 

Sa'ruch, 6 

*Sa'tan 

Sath-ra-baz'nes 

Sath-ra-bou-za'nes 

Sav'a-ran 



* Sfttan. — ^There is some dispute among tlie learned about tbe 
^antity ot' the tecoBd syllable of this werd wben Latin or Greek, 
is may be seea in Labbe, but none aboat the first. This is acknow- 
ledged to be short, and this has tndaoed those critics who have 
^eat knowlediere of Latin, and very little of their own language, to 
pronounce the first syllable short in EngHsb, as if written S^an, If 
these gentlemen have not perused the Principles of Pronunciation, 
|»refix^ to the Critical Pronouncing Dictionary, I would take the 
liberty of referring them to what is there said, for full satisfaction for 
•vhatever relates to deriving English quantity from the Latin. But 
Rsr those who have not an opportunity of inspecting that work, it may, 
perhaps, be sufficient to observe, that no analogy is more universal 
than that which, in a Latin word of two syllables with but one con- 
sonant in the middle, and the accent on the first syllable, leads ns to 
pronounce that sylhible long. This is, likewise, the genntne pro- 
nunciation of English words of the same form ; and where it has been 
counteracted we "find a miserable attempt to follow the Latin quantity 
in the English word, whidi we entirely neglect in the Latin itself, 
(see Introduction.) Cuto and Plato are instances where we make 
the vowel a long in the English, where it is short in Latin ; and 
caligo, and cogito, where we make the a and o in the first syllable 
short in English, when it is long in Latin. Thus, if a word of two 
syllables with one coa«onant in the middle and the accent on thefirsi, 
which, according to our own vernacular analogy, we should pronounce 
as we do Cato and Plato with the first vowel long ; if this word, I say, 
happens to be derived from a word of three syllables in Latin, with 



240 SE 

Sa'Ti-a8, 15 

Saul 

Sce'va 

Sefva 

Sche'chem, 6 

Skefkem 

Scribes 

Scyth'i-ans 

Syth'i-ans 

Scy-thop'o-lis 

Scy th-o-poll-tan s 

Se'ba , 

Se'bat 

Sec'a-cah 

Sech-e-ni'as, 15 

Se'chu 

Sed-e-ci'as, 15 

Sed'C'sias^ 7 

Se'^b 

Se'ir 

Se'i-rath 



SE 

Sela 

Se'la Ham-mah-le' 

koth 
Se lah, 9 
Seled 

Sel-e-mi'as, 15 
Sem 

Sem-a-chi'ah, 15 
Sem-a-i'ah, 15 
Sem-a-i'as, 5 
Sem'e-i, 3 
Se-mel'le-us 
Se'mis 
Sen'a-ah 
Se'neh, 9 
Se'nir 

Sen-a-che'rib, 13 
Sen'u-ah 
Se-o'rita 
Se'phar 
Seph'a-rad * 



SH 

Seph-ar-va'im, !• 
Se'phar-vites 
Se-phela 
Se'rah 
Se-ra-i'ah, 5 
♦Ser'a-phim [and 

Ser'a-phin] 
Se'red 
Se'ron 
Se'rug 
Se'sis 
Ses'thel 
Seth 
Se'thar 
Se'ther 
Sha-al-ab'bin 
Sha-aVbim 
Sha-arbo-nite, 8 
Sha'aph 
Sha-a-ra'im, 16 
Shar'a-im 



the first short ; this is looked upon as a good reason for shortening 
the first syllable of the English word, as in fii^'c, placid^ tepid, &c., 
though we violate this rule in the pronunciation of the Latin words 
ealigo, cogito. Sec, which, according t& this analogy, ought to be 
cak-i'go, coge-i'to. Sec, with the first syllable long. 

This pedantry, which ought to have a harsher title, has considerably 
hurt the sound of our language, by introducing into it too many short 
vowels, and consequently rendering it less flowing and sonoroo?. 
The tendency of the penultimate accent to open and lengthen the 
first vowel in dissyllables, with but one consonant in the middle, id 
some measure counteracts the shortening tendency of two cod* 
sonants, and the almost invariable shortening tendency of the antepe- 
nultimate accent. But this analogy, which seems to be the genuine 
operation of nature, is violated by these ignorant critics, from the 
pitiful ambition of appearing to understand Latin. As the first 
syllable, therefore, of the word in question has its first vowel pro- 
nounced short for such miserable reasons as have been shown, and 
this short pronunciation does not seem to be general, as may be seen 
under the word in the Critical Pronouncing Dictionary, we ought 
certainly to incline to that pronunniation which is so agreeable to 
the analogy of our own language, and which is, at the same time, so 
much more pleasing to the ear. — See Principles prefixed to the 
Critical Pronouncing Dictionary, No. 5i3, 544, &c., and the words 
Drama and Satire, 

* [The Hebrew plural of Seraph.] 



SH 

Sia-ash'gas 

»hab-beWa-i, 5 

Jhachl-a 

Jhad'da-i, 6 

iha'dracb 

Jha'ce, 7 . 

Jha-haz'i-inath, 13 

$halle-cheth 

Shalem 

Sha'lim 

Shail-sha 

Shallum 

Sharma-i, 5 

3Iial'inaii 

Shal-ma-ne'ser 

Sha'ma 

Sham-a-ri'ah, 16 

Shammed 

Sha'mer . 

Sham'gar 

Sham'Buth 

Sha'mir 

Sham'ma, 9 

Shain'mah, 9 

Sham'ma-i, 5 

Sham^'motb 

Sham-mu'a, 9 

Sham-mu'ah, 9 

Sham-she-ral^ 5 

Sha'pham 

Sha'phan 

Sha'phat 

Sha'pher 

Shai?a-i, 5 

Shar'ina-im, 16 

Sha'rar 

Sha-re'zer 

Sha'ron 

Sha'ron-ite, 8 

Sha-ru'hen 

Shash'a-i, 6 



SH 

Sha'shak 

Sha'veh, 9 

Sha'veth 

Sha'ul 

Sha'ul-ites, 8 

Sha-u'sba 

She'al 

She-al'ti^l, 13 

She-a-ri'ah, 16 

She-^-ja'shub 

Sbe1)a, or Shel)ah 

She'bain 

Sbeb-a-ni'ab, 16 

Sheb'a-rim 

She'bat 

Sbe1)er 

Sheb'na 

Sheb'u^l, 13 

Shec-a-ni'ah 

She'chem, 6 

Sbe'ch6m-ites 

Shech'i-nah 

Shekfe-nah 

Sbed'e-ur 

She.ha-ri'ah, 16 

She'kel 

She'lab 

Sbelan-ites, 8 

Shel-e-mi'ah, 16 

Sbeleph 

She'lesh 

Shero-mi, 3 

Shero-mith 

SbeVo-motb 

Sbe-lu'mi-el, 13 

Shem 

Sbe'ma 

Sbem'a-ab 

Sbem-a-i'ah, 6 

Shem-a-ri'ab, 16 

Shem'e-ber 



SH 241 

Sbe'mer 

She-mi'da, 13 

Shem'i-nitb 

Sbe-mir'a-inoth 

She-mu'el, 13, 17 

Shen 

She-na'2ar 

She'nir 

She^pham 

Sheph-a-ti'ah, 16 

She'pbi, 3 

Sbe'pbo 

She-phu'phan, 11 

She'rah 

Sher-e-bi'ab, 16 

She'resh 

She-re'zer 

She'shack 

Sbe'sbai, 6 

She'shan 

Shesh-baz'zar 

Shetb 

She'thar 

She'tbar Boz'na-i 

Sbe'va 

Sbib'bo-letb 

Sbib'mab, 9 

Sbi'cbron 

Sbig-gai'on, 6 

Sbi'on 

Sbi'hor 

Sbi'bor Lib'nath 

Shi-i'im,3,4 

She4'im 

Sbillii, 3 

ShUliim 

SbUlem 

Shiriem-ites, 8 

Sbi1ob,orShno,9 

Sbi-lo'ab, 9 

Sbi-lo ni, 3 

M 



242 SH 

Shi-lo'nites, 8 

Shir^hah,9 

Shim'e-a 

Shim'e-ah 

Shim'e-am 

Shim'e-ath 

Shim'e-ath-ites 

Shim'e-i, 3 

Shim'e-on 

Shim'hi, 3 

Shi'mi, 3 

Shim'ites, 8 

Shim'ma, 9 

Shi'mon 

Shim'rath 

Shim'ri, 3 

Shim'rith 

Shim'ron 

Shim'ron*ites, 8 

Shim'ron Me'ron 

Shim'shai, 5 

Shi'nab 

Shi'nar 

Shi'phi, 3 

Shiph'mite 

Shiph'ra, 9 

Shiph'rath 

Ship'tan 

Shi'sha, 9 

Shi'shak 



SH 

Shit'ra-i, $ 
Shit'tah, 9 
Shit'tim Wood 
Shi'za, 9 
Sho'a, 9 
Sho'ah, 9 
Sho'ab 
Sholmch, 6 
Sho1)a4, 5 
Sho^al 
Sho'bek 
Sho'bi, 3 
Sho'cho,6 
Sho'choh, 9 
Sho'ham 
Sho'mer 
Sho'phach, 6 
Sho'phan 
Sho-shan'nim 
Sho-shan'nim 

E'duth 
Shu'a, 9 
Shu'ah, 9 
Shu'al 

Shu'ba-el, 13 
Shu'ham 
Shu'ham-ites, 8 
Shu'hites 
Shulam-ite 
Shu'math^ites, 8 



St 

Shu'nam4te 

Shfu'nem , 

Shu'ni, 3 

Shu'nites, 8 

Sbu'pham 

Shu'pham-ke 

Shup'piiii 

Shur 

Shu'shan 

Shu'shan E'dirth 

Sbu'the-laTi, 9 

Shu'tbal-ites, 8 

Si'a, 1 

Si a-ka, 1, 9 

Si'ba 

Sib'ba-chai, 5 

Sib'bo-leth 

Sib'mah, 9 

Sib'ra-im, 16 

Si'chem, 1, 6 

Siddim 

Si'de 

Si'don 

Si-gi'(Mioth, 7 

Si'ha, 9 

Si'hon 

Si'hor 

Silas 

Silla, 9 

*Sil'o-a 



* SUoa, — This word, according to the present general rnle of ( 
nouncin'g these 'words, ought to have the accent on the second syH 
as it is Grafeched by XiXwa ; but Mtlt&n, -who understood its d€rlv 
aji well as the pl^esetit race of critics, h&s givein it the antepenultiiii 
accent, as more agreeable to the general analogy of accenting Engli^ 
words of the "saihe form : 



-OriifSionhill 



Deligbt thee more, or 'Siittu's brbok that flow'd 
Fast by the oracle of God — 



1 



If criticism ought not to overturn seltled usages, sanAy^i^llQi 1l 
nsage is sanctioned by snch a poet as ^Milton, it onght toot to belooM 



SI 


SO 


SU 248 


»iro-»s 


Sis'e-ra,* 9 


So'ta-i, 5 


iiFoah, or 


Si-sin'nes 


Sta'chys, 6 


Siro-am 


Sifnah 


Sta'keea 


il'o^, 9 


Si'van 


Stac'te 


ii-mal-cu'e 


So 


Steph'a-nas 


lim'e-on 


So'choh, 6, 9 


Steph'a-na 


»im'e-on-ite8, 8 


S(/ko 


Ste'phen 
Su'ah, 9 


Ji'mon 


So'coh, 9 


)im'ri, 3 


So'ko 


Su'be 


iin 


So'di, 3 


Su'ba-i, 5 


^i'nai, 6 


Sod'om 


Suc'coth 


Ji'nim 


Sod'oin-ites 


Suc'coth Be'noth 


Jin'ites, 8 


Sod'o-ma 


Su-^a'ath-ites 


ii'on 


Sol'o-mon 


Sud 


Jiph'Tnoth 


Sop'a-ter 


Su'di-as 


iip'pai, 5 


Soph'e-reth 


Suk'ki-ims, 4 


Si'rach, 1, 6 


So'rek 


Sur 


Si'rah, 9 


So-sip'a-ter 
Sos'the-nes, 13 


Su'sa 


5irl-on 


Su'san-chites, 6 


5is-am'a-i, 5 


Sos'tra-tus, 13 


Su-san'nah, 9 



ipoD as a licence, bnt an aathority. With respect to the quantity of 
the first syllable, analos^y requires that, if the accent be on it, It 
(hoold be short.~-(See Rules prefixed to die Greek and Latin Proper 
yiames, rule 19.) 

* Sinai, — If we pronounce this word after the Hebrew, it is three 
^llables ; if after the Greek, X<ya, two only ; though it must be con< 
essed that the liberty allowed to poets of increasing the end of a line 
vith one, and sometimes two syllables, renders their authority, in this 
^ase, a litlle equivocal. Labbe adopts the former pronunciation, but 
general usage seems to prefer the latter : and if we almost universally 
bllow the Greek in other cases, why not in this? Milton adopts the 
Sreek. 

Sing, heav*nly Muse ! that on the secret top 
Of Oreb, or of Sinaiy didst inspire 

That shepherd 

God, from the mount of Sinai, whose gray top 
8hall tremble, he descending, will himself, 
In thunder, lightning, and loud trumpets' sound. 
Ordain them laws. — Par, Lost, b. xii, v. 227. 

R^e ought not, indeed, to lay too much stress on the quantity of Milton, 
bhich is often so different in the same word ; but these are the only 
po passages in his Paradise Lost where this word is used ; and as he 
■8 made the same letters a diphthong in Asnta^ai, it is highly pro- 
lible be judged that Sinai ought to be pronounced in two syllables. — 
Bee Rules prefixed to this Vocabulary, No. 5.) 

m2 



244 SY 

Su'si, 3 
Syc'a-mine 
Sy-ce'ne 
Sy'char, 1, 6 



SY 

Sy-e'lus, 12 
Sy-e'ne 
Syn'a-gogue 
Syn'a-gog 



SY 

Syn'ti-che, 4, 6 
Syrt-a Ma'a-cah 
Syr'i-on 
Sy-ro-phe-nic'i-a 



TA 

Ta'a-nach, 5 

Ta'anach Shi'lo 

Tab'ba-oth 

Tab'bath 

Ta'be-al 

Ta'be^l, 13 

Ta-berii-U8 

Tab'e-ra, 9 

Tabl-tha 

Tabor 

Tab'ri-mon 

Tach'mo-nite 

Tad'mor 

TaTian 

Ta-han-ites, 8 

Ta-haph'a-nes 

Ta-hap'e-nes 

Ta'hath 

Tah'pe-nes, 9 

Tah're-a, 9 

Tah'tim Hod'shi 

Tal'i-tha Cu'mi 

Tal'mai, 5 

Tal'mon 

Tal'sas 

Ta'mah 

Ta'mar 

Tain'muz 

Ta'nach, 6 

Tan'hu-meth 

Ta'nis 

Ta'phath 

Taph'e-nes 



TE 

Taph'nes 
Ta'phon 
Tap'pu-ah, 13 
Ta'rah, 9 
Tar'a-lah, 9, 13 
Ta're-a, 9 
Tar'pel-ites, 8 
Tar'shis 
Tar'shish 
Tar-shi'si, 3 
Tar'sus 
Tar'tak 
Tar'tan 
Tat'na-i, 5 
Te'bah, 9 
Teb-a li'ah, 15 
Te'beth 
Te-haph'ne-hes 
Te-hin'nah 
Te'kel 
Te ko'a, or 
Te-ko'ah 
Te-ko'ites, 8 
Td'a-bib 
Telah, 9 
Tera-im, 16 
Te-las'sar 
Telem 
Tel-ha-re'sha 
Tel-har'sa, 9 
Terme-la, 9 
Tel'me-lah, 9 
Tenia, 9 



TH 

Te'man 

Tem'a-ni, 3 

Te'man-ites, 8 

Tem'e-ni, 3 

Te'pho 

Te'rah, 9 

Ter'a-phim 

Te'resh 

Ter'ti-us 

Ter'she-us 

Ter-tullus 

Te'ta 

Tet'rarch, 6 

Thad-de'us, 12 

Tha'hash 

Tha'mah, 9 

Tham'na-tha 

Tha'ra, 9 

Thar'ra, 9 

Thar'shish 

Thas'si, 3 

The'bez 

The-co'e 

The-las'ser 

The-ler'sas 

The-oc'a-nus 

The-od'o-tu8 

The-oph'i-lus 

The'ras 

Ther'me-leth 

Thes-sa-lo-ni'ca 

Theu'das 

Thim'na-thath 



TI 

This'be 
rhom'as 
Tiym'as 
Thom'o-i, 3 
Thra-se'M 
Thum'mim 
Thy-a-ti'ra, 9 
Tib'bath 
Tl-be'ri-as 
Tib'ni, 3 
Ti'dal 

Tig'Iath Pi-le'ser 
Tik'vah, 9 
Tik'vath 
Ti'lon 

Ti-me'lu8, 13 
Tim'na, 9 
Tim'nath, 9 
Tim'na-thah 
Tim'nath He'res 
Tim'nath Se'rah 
Tim'nite, 8 
Ti-mo'the-us 
Tim'O'thy (Eng.) 



TO 

Tip'sah, 9 
Ti'ras 

Ti'rath-ites, 8 
Tir'ha-kah, 9 
Tir'ha-nah 
Tir'i-a, 9 
Tir'sha-tha 
Tir'zah, 9 
Tish'bite 
Ti'van 
Ti'za 
Ti'zite,8 
To'ah 
To'a-nah 
Tob 

To-bi'ah, 16 
To-bi'as, 15 
To'hy (Eng.) 
To'bi-el, 4, 13 
To-bi'jah, 15 
To'bit 
To'chen, 6 
To-gar'mah 
To'hu 



TY 245 

Tol, 3 

Tola, 9 

To'lad 

Tola-ites, 8 

Torba-nes 

Tol'mai, 5 

To'phel 

To'phet 

To'u 

Trach-o-ni'tis, 12 

Trip'o-lis 

Tro'as 

Tro-gyrii-um 

Trophl-mus 

Try-phe'na, 12 

Try.pho'sa, 12 

Tubal 

Tu'bal Cain 

Tu-bi'e-ni, 3 

Ty-be'ri-as 

Tych'i-cus 

Tyre, one syllable 

Ty-ran'nns 

Ty'rus 



UN 

Va-jez'a-tha, 9 

Va-ni'ah, 9 

Vash'ni, 3 

Vash'ti, 3 

U'cal 

U'el 

U'la-i, 5 

U'lam 

Ulla, 9 

Um'mah, 9 

Un'ni, 3 



UT 

Voph'si, 3 
U'phaz 
U-phar'sin 
Ur'ba-ne 
U'ri,3 
U-ri'ah, 9 
U-ri'as, 15 
U'ri-el, 4, 14 
U-ri>h, 9, 15 
U'rim 
U'ta, 9 



UZ 

U'tha-i, 6 
U'thi, 3 
U'za-i, 5 
U'zal 
Uz'za, 9 
Uz'zah, 9 
Uz'zen She'rah 
Uz'zi,3 
Uz-zi'ah, 15 
Uz-zid,13, 15 
I Uz-zi'el-ites, 8 



346 XA 

Xa'gus 
Xan'thi-cus 



XE 

Xe'ne-as 
Xer-o-pha'gi-a 



XY 

IXe-rory-be 

IXys'tus 



ZA 

Za-a-na'im, 16 

Za'a^man 

Za-a-nan'nim 

Za'a-van 

Zabad 

Zab-a-dse'ans 

Zab-a-dai'as, 5 

^ab'bai, 5 

Zab'ud 

Zab-de'us, 12 

Zab'di, 3 

Zab'di-el, 11 

Za-bi na, 9 

Za'bud 

*Zab'u-lon 

Zac'ca-i, 5 

Zac'cur 

Zac-a-ri'ah, 15 

Za'cher, 6 

Za'ker 

2ac-che'u8j 12 

Zak'kefus 

Za'dok 

Za'ham 

Za'ir 

Zaiaph 

Zarmon 



ZA 



9 



Zal-mo'nah, 
Zal-mun'nah 
Zam'bis 
Zam'bri, 6 
Za'moth 
Zam-zum'mims 
Za-no'ah, 9 
Zaph-nath-pa-ne' 

ah 
Za'phon 
Za'ra 
Zar'a-ces 
Za'rah 

Zar-a-i'as, 16 
Za're-ab 
Za're-ath-ites, 8 
Za'red 
Zar'e-phath 
Zar'e-tan 
Za'reth Sha'har 
Zar'hites, 8 
Zar'ta-nah 
Zar'than 
Zath'o-e 
Za-thu'i, 3, 11 
Zath'thu 
Zaftu 



ZE 

Za'van 

Za'za 

Zeb-a-di'ah) 16 

Ze'bah, 9 

Ze-ba'im, 13, 16 

Zeb^e-dee 

Ze-bi'na ' 

Ze-bo'im, 13 

Ze-bu'da, 13 

Ze'bul 

Zeb'u-lon 

Zeb'u-lon-ites, 8 

Zech-a-ri'ah, 15 

Ze'dad 

Ze-de-ki'ah, 16 

Zeeb 

Zelah, 9 

Zelek 

Ze-lo'phe-ad 

Ze-lo'tes, 13 

ZeFzali 

Zem-a-ralm, 16 

Zem'a-rite, 8 

Ze-mi'ra 

Ze'nan 

Ze'nas 

Ze-or'im, 13 



* ZahuUm.--^ Notwithstanding,** says the editor of Labbe, " thi* 
word iuOreekyZaCovAiw^, has the penultimate long, yet in our cbnrcbes 
we always hear it pronounced with the acute on the antepenaltliiiate. 
Those who thus pronounce it plead, that in Hebrew the pennltiinate 
Yowel is short ; but in the word Zorobabel, z«f 0i3«CfX, they follow a 
different rule ; for though the penultimate in Hebrew is long, they 
pronounce it with the antepenultimate accent.*' 



ZI 

Zepb-a-ni'ah, 15 

Ze'pliath 

Zeph'a-thah 

Ze'phi, or Ze'pho 

Ze'phon 

Zeph'on-it^s, Q 

Zer 

Ze'rah, 9 

Zer-4i-hi'ah, 16 

Zer-a-i'a, 5 

Ze'rau 

Ze'red 

Zer'e-da 

Zer'e-dah 

Ze-ted'a-thah 

Zer'e-rath 

Ze'resh 

Ze'reth 

Ze'ri, 3 

Ze'ror 

Ze-ru'ah, 13 

Ze-nib'ba-bel 

Zer-u-i'ah, 15 

Zer-vi'ah, 16 

Ze'tham 

Ze'than 

Ze'thar 

Zi'a,9 

Zi'ba, 9 



ZI 

Zib'e-on 
Zibl-on 
Zich'ri, 3 
ZikfH 
Zid'dim 
Zid-kijahj 16 
Zi'don, or Si'don 
Zi-do'ni-ans 
Zif 

Zi'ha, 1, 9 
Zik'lag 
Zil lab, 9 
Zil'pah, 9 
ZU'thai, 5 
Zijn'mah 
Zim'ram, or 

Zim'rfta 
Zim'ri, 3 
Zin 

Zi'na, 1, 9 
Zi'on, or Si-on, 1 
Zi'or, 1 
Ziph 

Zi'phah, 1 
Ziph'Un, a 
Ziph'it^s, 8 
Zi'pbron, I 
Zlp'por 



Zip-po'rah, 13, 16 2iu'zims 



ZU 247 

Zitb'ri, 3 
Ziz 

Zi'za, 1, 9 
Zi'zah, 1, 9 
Zi'na, 1, 9 
Zo'an 
Zo'ar 
ZH)'ba, or 
Zo'bah 
Zo-be'bah, 9, 13 
Zo'har 
Za'he-leth 
Zon'a-ras 
Zo'peth 
Zo'phah 
Zo'phai, 5 
Zo'phar 
Zo'pbim 
Zo'rah 

Zo'rath-ites, 8 
Zo're-ah, 9 
Zorites, 9 
*Zo-robVbel 
Zu'ar 
Zuph 
Zur 

Zu'ri-el, 13 
Zu-ri-shad'da-i, 5 



• Zorobabel. — See Zabulon. 



TERMINATIONAL VOCABULARY 



OP 



SCRIPTURE PROPER NAMES. 



EBA* 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Bathsheba, Elisheba, Beersheba. 

ADA IDA 

Accent the Penultimaie. 

Shemida. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Eliada, Jehoida, Bethsaida, Adida. 

EA EGA ECHA UPHA 

Accent the Penultim<ite, 

Laodicea, Chaldea, Judea, Arimathea, Idutnea, Caesa- 
rea, Berea, Iturea, Osea, Hosea, Omega, Hasupha. 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 

Cenchrea, Sabtecha. 

ASHA ISHA USHA 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Elisha, Jerusha. 

* For the pronuDciation of the final a in this selection, see Rale 
the 9th. 



SCUIPTURE PEOPEK KAMES. 249 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Baasha, Shalisha. 

ATHA ITHA UTHA 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Jegar-Sahadutha, Dahnanutha. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Gabatha, Gabbatha, Amadatha, Hammedatha, Par- 
shandatha, Ephphatha, Tirshatha, Admatha, Caphe- 
Hatha, Poratha, Achmetha, Tabitha, Golgotha. 

lA 

(Pronounced m two syllables.) 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Seleucia*, Japhia, Adalia, Bethulia, Nethania, Che- 
nania, Jaazania, Jamnia, Samaria, Hezia. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Achsua, Arabia, Thracia, Samothracia, Grecia, CilicU, 
Cappadocia, Seleucia, Media, India, Pindia, Claudia, 
Phry^a, Antiochia, Casiphia, Philadelphia, Apphia, 
Igdaha, Julia, Pamphyha, Mesopotamia, Armenia, Ly- 
caonia, Macedonia, ApoUonia, Junia, Ethiopia, Samaria, 
Adria, Alexandria, Celosjrria, S)rria, Assyria, Asia, Per- 
sia, Mysia, Galatia, Dalmatia, Philistia. 

IKA 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

EUka. 

ALA ELA ILA AMA EMA IMA 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Ambela, Arbela, Macphela. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Magdala, Aquila, Aceldama, Apherema, Ashima, Je- 
mima. 



* For this word and Samaria, Antiochia, and Alexandria, see the Ini- 
tial Vocabulary of Greek and Latin Proper Names. Also Rule SOih 
prefixed to the Initial Vocabulary, 

m3 



260 TEEMINATIONAL VOCABULAEY OF 

ANA E]<A INA ONA 
Accent the Penultimate, 
Diana, Tryphena, Hyena, Palestitia, Barjona. 

Accent the AntepemUtimate, 
Abana, Hashbadana, AnmiMt, Ecbatana. 
OA 
Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Gilboa, Tekoa, SUoa, Eshtemoa. 

ARA ERA IRA URA 
Accent the Penultimate. 
Guzara, Ahira, Sapphira, Thyatira, Bethsura. 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 
Baara, Bethabara, Patara, Potiphera, Sisera. 
ASA OSA 
Accent the Penultimate, 
Cleasa, Tryphosa. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Adasa, Amasa. 

ATA ETA ITA 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Ephphata, Achmeta, Melita, Hatita. 

AVA UA AZA 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Ahava, Malchishua, Elishua, Shamua, Jaliaza. 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 
Jeshua, Abishua, Joshua. 

AB IB OB UB 

Accent the Penultimate, 

Eliab, Sennacherib, IshH-Benob, Ahitob, Abitub. 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 
Abinadab, Aminadab, Jehonadab, Jonadab, Chileab, 



SCRIPTURE PROPS& NAMES. 251 

AJioliab, Magor-MssaUb, Aminadab, Elia3lub> Baal- 
zebub, B^litebub* 

AC UC 
Accent the Antepenultimate.. 
Isaac, jSyriac, Abacuc, Habbacuc. 

AD ED ID OD UD 
Accent the Penultimate. 
Almodad, Arphaxad, EUhu^, Ahihud, Ahiud, Ahilud. 
Accent the Antepenultimate^ 

Galitad, Josabad, Benhadad, Gilead, Zelophead, Zelo- 
phedad, Jochebed, Galeed, Icabod, Ammihud, Abiud. 

CE DEE LEE MEE AGE YCHE OHE ILE 

AME OME ANE ENE OE OSSE VE 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Phe^ice, Bernice, Eunice, Elelohe, Salome, Magda- 
lene, Abilene, Mitylene, C)nrene, Syene, Colosse, (Naza- 
rene, pronounced in three syllables, with the accent on. 
the last). 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Zebedee, Galilee, Ptolemee, Bethphage, Syntyche, Su- 
bile, Apame, Gethsemane, Siloe, Nineve. 

ITE* (in one syllable.) 
Accent the Penultimate. 

Thisbite, Shuhite, AWezrite, Gittite, Hittite, Hivite, 
Buzite. 

Accent the Antepenultimate* 

Harodite, Agagite, Areopi^te, Gergashite, Morashite, 
Haruphite, Ephradite, B^thelite, Carmelite, Hamulite, 

♦ Words of this termination have the acce;;it of the words from which 
they are formed, and on this account are sometimes accented even on 
the preantepennltimate syllable ; as BethUhemiU from Bethlehem^ and so 
of others. Words of this termination, therefore, of two syllables, have 
the accent on the penultimate syllable; and words of three or more 
on the same syllable as th^ir primitives.. See Rule the 8th, page 209.. 



2S2 TEBMINATIONAL VOCABTtLAAT OF 

Benjamite, Nehelamite, Shulamite, Shimataite, £doinite, 
Temanite, Gilonite, ShDonite, Horonite, Amorite, Jebu- 
site. 

Accent the Preantepenultimate. 

Naamathite, Jezreelite, Bethlehemite, Ephraimite, 
(Canaanite, generally pronounced in three syllables, as 
if written Can-an-ite). 

AG OG 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Abishag, Hamongog. 

BAH CAH DAH EAH CHAH SHAH THAH 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Zobazibah, Makkedah, Abidafa, Elishah. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Dinhabath, Aholibath, Meribath, Abelbetbmacah, 
Abadah, Moladah, Zeredah, Jedidah, Gibeah, Shimeah, 
Zaphnath-Paaneah, Meachah, Berachah, Baashah, Ella- 
than. 

AIAH EIAH 

{Ai and ei pronounced as a diphthong in one syllable.) 

Accent the Penultimate. 

*Micaiah, Michaiah, Benaiah, Isaiah, Iphedeiah, 
Maaseiah. 

{Ai pronounced in two syllables.) 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Adaiah, Pedaiah, Semaiah, Seraiah, Asaiah. 

lAH 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Abiah, Rheabiah, Zibiah, Tobiah, Maadiah, Zebadiah, 
Obadiah, Noadiah, Jedidiah, Ahiah, Pekahiah, Jezra- 
hiah, Barachiah, Japhiah, Bithiah, Hezekiah, Helkiah, 
Zedekiah, Adaliah, GedaUah, Igdaliah, Athaliah, Hack- 

• For the pronunciation of the two last syllables of these words, see 
Role 5th/ prefixed to Scripture Proper Names. 



SCRIPTURE PROPER NAMES. 253 

aliah, Remaliah, Nehemiah, Shelemiah, Meshelemiah, 
Jeremiah, Shebaniah, Zephaniah, Nethaniah, Chenaniah, 
Hananiah, Coniah, Jeconiah, Sheariah, Zachariah, Zec- 
hariah, Amariah, Sbemariah, Azariah, Neariah, Moriah, 
Uriah, Josiah, Messiah, Shephatiah, Pelatiah, Ahaziah, 
Amaziah, Asaziah, Uzziah. 

JAH 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Aijah, Abijah, Jehidijah, Ahijah, Elijah, Adonijab, 
Irijah, Tobadonijab, Unjah, Hallelujah, Zerujah. 

KAH LAH MAH NAH OAH RAH SAH TAH 
VAH UAH 

Accent the Penultimate, 

Rebekab, Azekah, Macbpelah, Abolab, Abel-meholab^ 
Beulab, Elkanah, Hannah, Kirjatb-sannab, Harbonah, 
Hashmonah, Zabnonah, Shiloah, Noah, Manoah, Za- 
noah, Uzzen-sherah, Zipporah, Keturah, Hadassab, Mal- 
chishuab, Shummuab, Jehovah, Zeruab. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Marrekah, Baalab, Shutbelab, Telmelab, Methuselah, 
Hachilab, Hackilah, Dalilah, Delilah, Havilab, Raamah, 
Aholibamah, Adamah, Elisbamab, Rubamah, Loru- 
bamab, Kedemah, Ashimah, Jemimah, Penninab, Baa- 
rah, Taberab, Deborah, Ephratab, Paruab. 

ACS ECH OCR 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Merodach, Evil-merodacb. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Abisamach, Ebed-melecb, Abimelech, Abimelech, Eli- 
melecb, Alammelecb, Anammelecb, Adrammelech, Re- 
gemmelecb, Natban-melech, Arioch, Antiocb. 

KEH LEH VEH APH EPH ASH ESH ISH 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Elealeh, Eliorepb, Jehoasb. 



254 TERHINATIONAL VOCABULARY OF 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Rabshakefa, Nmeveh, Ebiasaph, Bethghemesh, Enshc 
mesh, Carchemish. 

ATH ETH ITH OTH UTH 

Accent the PentUtimate. 

Goliah, JehoYah-jireth, Hazar-maYeth, Baal-beiitli 
Rehoboth, Arioth, Nebaioth*, Naioth, Moseroth, Haze 
roth, Pihahiroth, Mosoroth, Allon-bachuth. 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 

Mahalath, Bashemath, Asenath, Daberath, Elisabedi 
Dabbasheth, Jerubbeshetb, Ishbosheth, Mephibosheth 
Harosheth, Zoheleth, Bechtileth, Shibboleth, Tanhu 
meth, Genesareth, Asbazareth, Nazareth, Mazzareth. 
Kirharaseth, Shelomith, Sheminith, Lapidoth, Anathoth, 
Kerioth, Shemiramoth, Kedemoth, Ahemoth, Jerimoth, 
Sigionoth, Ashtaroth, Mazzaroth. 

AI 

(Pronounced as a diphthong in one syllable.) 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Chelubai, Asmadai, Sheshai, Shimshai, Hushai, Zil- 
thai, Berothai, Talmai, Tolmai, Sinai, Talnai, Arbonai, 
Sarai, Sippai, Bezai. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Mordecai, Sibbachai, Chephar-Hammonai, Paarai. 

AI 

(Pronounced in two syllables.) 
Accent the Penultimate. 
Ai. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Zabbai, Bab^, Nebai, Shobai, Subai, Zaccai, Shaddai, 
Amishaddai, Aridai, Heldai, H^ai, Haggai, Belgm, 
Bilgai, Abishai, Uthai, Adlai, Barzillai, IJM, Sisamai, 



* The ai in this and the next word form one syllable.— See Rile 5 
prefixed to Scripture proper names. 



SCRIPTURE PBOPER XAMES. 255 

^halmai, Shammai, Eliaenai, Tatnai, Shether-boznai, 
Sahara!, Sharai, Shamsherai, Shitrai, Arisai, Bastai, 
Bavai, Bigvai, Uzai. 

DI EI LI MI NI OI PI RI UI ZI. 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Areli, Loammi, Talithacumi, Gideoni, Benoni, Haze- 
eponi, Philippi, Gehazi. 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 

Engedi, Simei, Shimei, Edrei, Bethbirei, Alnsei, 
Baali, Naphthali, Nephthali, Pateoli, Adami, Naomi, 
Hanani, B^erlahairoi, Mehari, Haahashtari, Jesui. 

EK UK 

Accent the PentUtim>ate. 
Adonizedek, Adonibezek. 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 
Melchizedek, Amalek, Habakkuk. 

AAL EAL lAL ITAL UTAL 
Accent the Penultimate. 
Baal, Eirjath-Baal, HamutaL 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Meribbaal, Eshbaal, Ethbaal, Jerubbaal, Tabeal, Belial, 
Abital. 

AEL ABEL EBEL 
Accent the Penultimate, 
Jael, Abel. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Gabael, Michael, Raphael, Mishael, Mehujael, Abi- 
mael, Ishmael, Ismael, Anael, Nathanael, Israel, Asael, 
Zerubbabel, Zerobabel, Mehetabel, Jezebel. 

EEL OGEL AHEL ACHEL APHEL OPHEL 
ETHEL 

Accent the Penultimate, 

Enrogel, Rachel, ElbetheL 



256 TEBMIKATIONAL VOCABULARY OF 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Tabeel, Abdeel, Japhaleel, Mahaleel, Bezaleel, Hana- 
meel, Jerahmeel, Uananeel, Nathaneel, Jabneel, Jezreel, 
Hazeel, Asahel, Barachel, Amraphely Achitophel. 

lEL KEL 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Peniel, Uzziel. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Abiel, Tobiel, Adiel, Abdiel, Gaddiel, Pagiel, SaU- 
thiel, Ithiel, Ezekiel, Gamaliel, Shelumiel, Daniel, 0th- 
niel, Ariel, Gabriel, Uriel, Shealtiel, Putiel, Haziel, 
Hiddekel. 

UEL EZEL 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Deuel, Raguel, Bethuel, Pethuel, Hamuel, Jemuel, 
Eemuel, Nemuel, Phanuel, Penuel, Jeruel, Bethezel. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

^Samuel, Lemuel, Emanuel, Immanuel. 

AIL 

(Pronounced in two syllables.) 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Abihail. 

AIL 
(Pronounced as a diphthong in one syllable.) 
Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Abigail. 

OL UL 
Accent the Penultimate. 
Bethgamul* 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Eshtaol. 

♦ See Rule the 17th prefixed to Scripture Names. 



SCftlPTUBE PEOPEB NAM£S. 257 

ODAM AHAM lAM IJAM IKAM 

Accent the Penultimate, 
Elmodam, Abijam, Ahikam. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Abraham, Miriam, Adonikam. 
OAM 
Accent the Penultimate, 
Rehoboam, Roboam, Jeroboam. 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 
Siloam, Abinoam, Ahinoam. 

ARAM IRAM ORAM. 
Accent the PentUtimate. 

Padanaram, Abiram, Hiram, Adoniram, Adoram, Ha> 
loram, Jehoram. 

AHEM EHEM ALEM EREM 
Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Menahem, Bethlehem, Jerusalem, Beth-ha cerem. 
A I M* 
Accent the Penultimate. 

Chusan-Rishathaim, Kiijathaim, Bethdiblathaim, Ra* 
aathaim^ Adithaim, Misrephothmaim, Abelmaim, Maha- 
laim, Manhanalm, Horonaim, Shaaraim, Adoraim, 
Sepharvaim. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Rephaim, Dothaim, !%laim, Camaim, Sharaim, Eph- 
aim, Beth-ephraim, Miztaim, Abel-mizraim. 

BIM CHIM PHIM KIM LIM NIM RIM ZIM 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Sarsechim, Zeboim, Eiijatharim, Bahurim, Eelkath- 
laxurim. 



* In this selection the at form distinct syllables. — See Rule 16 
irefixed to Scripture proper names. 



2Sa TEBJCINATIOKAL VOCABUXJkBT OF 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 

Cherubim, Lehabim, Rephidiai, S^aphiin, Teraphim, 
Eliakim, Jehoiakim, Joiakim, Joakim, Baalim, DedaimB, 
Ethanim, Abarim, Bethhaccerim, Eirjath-jearim, Haze- 
rim, Baal-perazim, Gerizim, Gazizim. 

DOM LOM AUM lUM NUM RUM TUM 

Accent the Penultimate, 

Obededom, Appii-fonim, Miletum. 

Accent the Antepenultimate^ 

Abishalom, Absalom, Capernaum, Rhegium, Trogyl- 
lium, Iconium, Adramyttium^ Galbanum. 
AAN CAN DAN EAN THAN IAN MAN NAN 
Accent the Penultimate. 

MemucMi, ChaUean, Abiman> Elhauan^ Jobsnan, 
Haman. 

Accent the AntepenuUimate. 
Canaan, Chanaan, Merodach-baladan, Nebuzaradan, 
Elnathan, Jonathan, Midian, Indian, Plurygian, ItaUan, 
Macedonian, Ethiopian, Syrian, Assyrian, Egyptian, 
Naaman. 

AEN VEN CHIN MIN ZIN 

. Accent the Penultimate. 

Manaen, Bethaven, Chorazin. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Jehoiachin, Beiyamin. 

EON AGON EPHON ASHON AION ION ALON 

ELON ULON YLON MON NON 

RON YON THUN RUN 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Baal-meon, Beth-dagon, Baal-zephon, Naashon, Hig- 
gaidn, Shiggaion, Chilion, Orion, Esdrelon, Baal-hamon, 
Philemon, Abiron, Beth-horpn. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Gibeon, Zibeon, Gedeon, Gideon^ Simeon, Pirathon, 



SCRIPTURK PROPER NAMES. 359 

rlerodion, Carnion, Sirion, Ascalon, Ajalon, Askehm, 
^bulon, Babylon, Jeshimon, Tabrimon^ Solomon, Leba- 
lon, Aaron, Apollyon, Jeduthun, Jeshurun. 

EGO ICHO HIO LIO 

Accent the Penultimate, 
Ahio. 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 
Abednego, Jericho, Gallio. 

AR ER IR OR UR 

Accent the Penultimate, 

Ahisar, Baal-tamar, Balthasar, Eleazar, Eziongeber, 
Figlath-pileser, Shalmaneser, Hadadezer, Abiezer, Ahi- 
?zer, Eliezer, Romantiezer, Ebenezer, Joezer, Sharezer, 
Havothjair, Asnoth-tabor, Beth-peor, Baal-peor, Nica- 
lor, Fmlometor. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Issachar, Potiphar, Abiathar, Ithamar, Shemeber, Lu- 
dfer, Chedorlaomer, Aroer, Sosipater, Sopater, Achior, 
^}ebuGhodonosor, Eupator, Shedeur, Abishur, Pedah- 
mr. 

\AS BAS EAS PHAS IAS LAS MAS NAS OAS 
PAS RAS TAS YAS 

Accent the Penultimate, 

Oseas, Esaias, Tobias, Sedecias, Abadias, Asadias, Ab- 
iias, Barachias, Ezechias, Mattathias, Matthias, Ezekias, 
hfeemias, Jeremias, Ananias, Assanias, Azarias, Ezerias, 
fosias, Ozias, Bageas, Aretas, Onyas. 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 

Annaas, Barsabas, Patrobas, Eneas, Phineas, Caiaphas, 
Uleopbas, Herodias, Euodias, Georgias, Amplias, Lysa- 
lias, Gabrias, Tiberias, Lysias, Nicolas, Artemas, Ely- 
aas, Parmenas, Siloas, Antipas, Epaphras. 



TEEMIlJATIONAL VOCABULARY OF 

CES DES EES GES HES LES NES SES TES 
Accent the Penultimate. 
Gentiles^, Rameses, Mithridates, Euphrates. 
Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Rabsaces, Arsaces, Nomades, Phinees, Astyages, Dio- 
trephes, Epiphanes, Tahapanes, Hermogenes, Taphenes, 
Calisthenes, Sosthenes, Eumenes. 

ENES andINES 

(In one syllable.) 
Accent the Ultimate. 
Gadarenes, Agarenes, Hagarenes. 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Philistines, (pronounced like Philistins). 
ITES 
(Pronounced in one syllable.) 

(Words of this termination liave the accent of the words 
from which they are formed, which sometimes occasions 
the accent to be placed even on the preantepenultiniate syl- 
lable, as Gileadites from Gilead, and so of others. Words 
of this termination therefore, of two syllables, haVe the 
accent on the penultimate syllable ; and words of three or 
more on the same syllable as their primitives.) 
Accent the Penultim>ate. 

Gadites, Kenites, Jammites, Levites, Hittites, Hivites. 
Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Rechabites, Moabites, Gergeshites, Nahathites, Koha- 
thites, Pelethites, Cherethites, Uzzielites, Tarpelites, 
Elamites, Edomites, Reubenites, Ammonites, Hermon- 
ites, Ekronites, Hagarites, Nazarites, Amorites, Geshu- 
rites, Jebusites, Ninevites, Jesuites, Perizzites. 



• Gentiles. — This may be considered as an English word, and should 
be pronounced in two syllables, as if written Jen-tiles, the last syllable 
as the plural of tile. 



SCRIPTURE PROPER NAMES. 261 

Accent the Preanfepenultimate. 

Gileadites, Amalekites, Ishmaelites, Israelites, Midian- 
ites, Gibeonites, Aaronites. 

OTES 
Accent the Penultimate. 



Zelotes. 



Elimais. 



IS 

Accent the Penultimate. 



Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Antiochis, Amathis, Baa]is,Decapolis, NeapoIis^Hiera- 
polis, Persepolis, Amphipolis, Tripolis, NicopoKs, Scytho- 
polls, Salamis, Damans, Vabsaris, Antipatris, Atargatis. 

IMS 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Biniins, Zamzummims, Zuzims. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Rephaims, Gammadims, Cherethims, Anakims, Nethe- 
nims, Chemarims. 

ANS 
Accent the Penultimate. 

Sabeans, Laodiceans, Assideans, Galileans, Idumeans, 
Epicureans. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Arabians, Grecians, Herodians, Antiochians, Corinthi- 
ans, Parthians, Scythians, Athenians, Cyrenians, Macedo- 
nians, Zidonians, Babylonians, Lacedemonians, Ethiop- 
ians, Cyprians, Syrians, Assyrians, Tyrians, Ephesians, 
Persians, Galatians, Cretians, Egyptians, Nicolaitans, 
Scythopolitans, Samaritans, Lybians. 

MOS NOS AUS BUS CUS DUS 
Accent the Penultimate. 
Archelaus, Menelaus, Abubus, Andronicus, Seleucus. 



26s TERMINATIONAL TOCABULAEY OF 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 

Fergamos, Stephanos, Emmaus, Agabus, BartacusJ 
Achaicus, Tychicus, Aradus. 

EUS 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Daddeus, Asmodeus, Aggeus, Zaccheus, Ptolemeus, 
Maccabeus, Lebbeus,Cendebeus, Thaddeus, Mardocheus, 
Mordocheus, Alpheus, Timeus, Bartimeus, Hjoneneus, 
Elizeus. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Dositheus, Timotheus, Nereus. 

GUS CHUS THUS 
Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Areopagus, Philologus, Lysimachus, Antiochus, Euty- 
chus, Amadathus. 

lUS 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Darius. 

Accent the Antepenultim^ate. 
Gaius, AthenobiUs, Cornelius, Numenius, Cyrenius, 
Apollonius, Tiberius, Demetrius, Mercurius, Dionysius, 
Pontius, Tertius. 

LUS MUS NUS RUS SUS TUS 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Aristobulus, Eubulus, Nicomedus, Ecanus, Hircanus, 
Auranus, Sylvanus, Ahasuerus, Assuerus, Heliodorus, 
Arcturus, Bar-jesus, Fortunatus, Philetus, Epaphroditus, 
Azotus. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Attalus, Theophilus, Alcimus, Trophimus, Onesimus, 
Didymus, Libanus, Antilibanus, Sarenedonus, Acheaca- 
rus, Lazarus, Citherns, Elutherus, Jairus, Prochorus, 
Onesiphorus, Asapharasus, Ephesus, Epenetus, Asyncri- 
tus. 



SCRIPTURE PROPER NAMES. 263 

AT ET OT 1ST OST 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Ararat, Eliphalet, Gennesaret, Iscariot, Antichrist, 
Pentecost. 

EU HU ENU EW MY 

Accent the Penultimate, 
Casleu, Chisleu, Abihn, Andrew. 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 
Jehovah-Tsidkenu, Bartholomew, Jeremy. 

BAZ GAZ HAZ PHAZ 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Mahar-shalal-hash-baz, Sbaash-gaz, Eliphaz. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Jehoahaz. 



OBSERVATIONS 

OK TBE 

GREEK AND LATIN 

ACCENT AND QUANTITY: 

WITH SOME 

PROBABLE CONJECTURES 

ON THE METHOD 



FREEIKG THEK FROM THE OBSdTRITY AKD COKTRADICTIOIT 

IK WHICH THEY ARE INVOLVED, 

BOTH BY THE AKCIEKTS AND MODERNS. 



' Nullius addictns jarare in verba magistri.*' — Horace* 



ADVERTISEMENT. 



After the many learned pens which have been employed 
on the subject of the following Observations, the Authoi 
would have been much ashamed of obtruding his humble 
opinion on so delicate a point, had he not nattered him- 
self that he hi^ taken a Material circumstance into tbe 
acjcount, which had been entirely overlooked by almost 
every writer he had met with. 

It is not a little astonishing,^ that when the nature of 
the human voice forms so great a part of the inquiry into 
accent and quantity, its most marking distinctions should 
have been so little attended to. From a perusal of every 
writer on the sabgect *, one would be lead to suppose that 
high and low, loud and soft, and quick and slow, were the 
only modifications of which the voice was susceptible ; 
and that the inflexions of the voice, which distinguish 
speaking from singing, did not exist. Possessed, there-l 
fore, of this distmction of sounds, the Author at least| 
brings something new into, the inquiry : and if, even with 
this advantage, he should fail of throwing light on the 
subject, he is sure he shall be entitled to the indulgence 
of the learned, as they fvDy understand 6he difficulty of 
the question. 



* The only exception to this general assertion is Mr. Steele, tbe 
author of Prosodia Rationdlis; but the design of this gentleman is not 
so much to illustrate the accent and quantity of the Greek language 
as to prrove the possibility of forming a notation of speaking sounds 
for our own, and of reducing them to a musical scale, and accompaDy- 
ing them with instruments. The attempt is undoubtedly laudabk^ 
but no farther useful than to shew the impossibility of it by the veir 
method he has taken to explain it; for it is wrapped up in such ai 
impenetrable cloud of music as to be unintelligible to any but musi- 
cians ; and the distinctions of sound are so nice and numerons as tt 
discourage the most persevering student from labouring to under 
stand him. After all, what light can we expect will be thrown oi 
this subject by one who, notwithstanding the infinitesimal distini 
tions he makes between similar sounds, says, that the ti in uglif, 
the e in met and get, are diphthongs ; and the a in may is long, 
the same letter in nation short ; and that the u in you, use^ &€, is 
ways acute-grave, and the i in idle, try, ike, grave-acute ? 



CONTENTS. 



PREPARATORY OBSERVATIONS. 

Page 
rhe different states of the voice . . . 270 

\ definition of accent 2fJ2 

Ml the different modifications of the voice exempli- 
fied 273 

OBSERVATIONS ON THE GREEK AND LATIN 
.ACCBNT AND QUANTITY. 

The necessity of understanding the accent and quan- 
tity of our own language before we attempt to 
settle the accent and quantity of the Greek and 
Latin . 276 

What English quantity is ... . 277 

That it is entirely independent on accent . . ib. 

Mr. Sheridan^s erroneous opinion of English accent 278 

His definition of accent applicable (mly to singing in 
a monotone . . . •. . . ib. 

The true distinction between singmg and speaking 
laid down 279 

Singing and speaking tones^ as essentially distinct 
as motion and rest ib. 

Recitative is real sin^g, and not a medium between 
singing and speakmg ib. 

The true definition of English accent . . 280 

Mr. Forster^s error with respect to the nature of the 
English and Scotch accent — (Note) . . 281 

The true difference between the English and Scotch 
accent 284 

Some attempts to form a precise idea of the quantity 

. of the Greek and Latin langui^es . . . ib. 

Dr. Gally's idea of Greek and Latin quantity ex- 
amined • 286 

n2 



268 CONTENTS. 

Page 

If quantity in these languages consisted in length- 
ening or shortening the sound of the Towel, it 
necessarily rendered the pronunciation of words 
very different, as they were differently arranged 288 

Opposite opinions of learned men concerning the na- 
ture of tne Greek and Latin accent . . 289 

The definition which the ancients gave of the acute 
accent unintelligible, without having recourse to 
the system of theinflexions of the speaking voice 290 

An attempt, to reconcile the accent and quantity of 
the ancients, by reading a passage in Homer and 
Virgil, according to the ideas of accent and quan- 
tity here laid down 294 

The only four possible ways of pronouncing these 
passages without singing .... 295 

The only probable method pointed out . . ib. 

This method renders the reading very monotonous ; 
but this must necessarily be the case, let us adopt 
what system we will ib. 

The definition of the circumflex accent, a confirma- 
tion of the system here adopted . . . 297 

The monotony of the Greek and Latin languages 
not more extraordinary than the poverty of their 
music, and the seeming absurdity of their dramatic 
entertainments ..••.. 298 

Probable causes of the obscurity and confiision in 
which this subject is involved, both among the 
ancients and modems 302 



PREPARATORY OBSERVATIONS. 



As a perusal of the Observations on Greek and Latin 
Accent and Quantity requires a more intimate acquaint- 
ance with the nature of the voice than is generally brought 
to the study of that subject, it may not be improper to lay 
before the reader such an explanation of speaking sounds, 
as may enable hira to distinguish between high and loud, 
soft and low, forcibleness and length, and feebleness and 
shortness, which are so often confounded, and which con^ 
4sequently produce such conAision and obscurity among our 
best prosodists. 

But as describing such sounds upon paper as have no 
definite terms appropriated to them, like those of music, 
is a new and difficult task, the reader must be requested 
to give as nice an attention as possible to those sounds and 
inflexions of voice, which spontaneously annex themselves 
to certain forms of speech, and which, from their fa- 
miliarity, are apt to pass unnoticed. But if experience 
were out of the question, and we were only acquainted 
with the organic formation of human sounds, we must ne- 
cessarily distinguish them into five kinds: namely, the 
monotone, or one sound continuing a perceptible time in 
one note, which is the case with all musical sounds; a 
sound beginning low and sliding higher, or beginning 
high and sliding lower, without any perceptible intervals, 
which is essential to all speaking sounds. The two last 
may be called simple slides or inflexions ; and these may 
be so combined as to begin with that which rises, and end 
with that which falls, or to begin with that which falls, 
and end with that which rises : and if this combination of 
different inflexions be pronounced with one impulse or ex- 
plosion of the voice, it may not improperly be called the 



270 PBEPAEATOBY 0B8EBVATI0KS. 

circumflex or compound inflexion j and this monotone, tbe 
two simple and the two compound inflexions, are the only 
modifications, independent on the passions, of which the 
human voice is susceptible. 

The different States of the Voice. 

The modifications of the voice which have just been 
enumerated may be called absolute ; because they cannot 
be converted into each other, but must remain decidedly 
what they are ; while difierent states of the voice, as high 
and low, loud and soft, quick and slow, are only compa- 
rative terms, since what is high in one case may be low in 
another, and so of the resj;. Beside, therefore, the mo- 
difications of voice which have been described, the only 
varieties remaining of which the human voice is capable, 
except those produced by the passions, are high, low, loud, 
soft, quick, slow, forcible, and feeble. Though high and 
loud, and low and soft, are frequently confounded, yet, 
-when considered distinctly, their difference is easily un- 
derstood ; as if we strike a large bell with a deep tone, 
.ihough it gives a very loud tone, it will stiU be a low one : 
and if we strike a small bell with a high tone, it will still 
be a high tone, though the stroke be ever so soft ; a ^uick 
toni^ in music is that in which the same tone continues 
but a short time, and a slow tone where it continues long- 
er ; but in speaking, a quick tone is that when the slide 
rises ftom low to high, or from high to low, in a short 
time, and a slow tone the reverse ; while forcible and fee- 
ble seem to be severally compounded of two of these sim- 
ple states ; that is, force seems to be loudness and quick- 
ness, either in a high or low tone also ; and feebleness 
seems to be softness and slowness, either in a high or a 
low tone likewise. As to the tones of the passions, which 
are so many and various, these, in the opinion of one of 
the best judges in the kingdom, are qualities of sound oc- 
casioned by certain vibrations of the organs of speech, in- 
dependent on high, low, loud, soft, quick, slow, forcible, 
or feeble : which last may not improperly be called dif- 
ferent quantitie>8 of sound. 

It may not, perhaps, be unworthy of observation, how 
few are those principles which, by a different combination 



PREPARATORY OBSERVATIONS. ^T^ 

witB each other, produce that almost unbounded ▼ariety 
of nrhich human speech consists. The different quanti- 
ties of sound, as tnese different states of the voice may be 
called, may be combined so as to fonn new varieties with 
any other that are not opposite to them. Thus high may 
be combined with either loud or soft, quick or slow ; that 
is, a high note may be sounded either in a loud or soft 
tone, and a low note may be sounded either in a loud or 
a soft tone also, and each of these tones may be pro- 
nounced either in a longer or a shorter time ; that is, more 
slowly or quickly ; while forcible seems to imply a degree 
of loudness and Quickness, and feeble, a degree of softness 
and slowness, eitner in a high or a low tone. These com- 
binations may, perhaps, be more easily conceived by class- 
ing them in contrast with each other : 

High, loud, quick. 
Low, soft, slow. 

Forcible may be high, loud, and quick ; or low, loud, and 

quick. 
Feeble may be high, soft, and slow ; or low, soft, and slow. 

The different combinations of these states may be thus 
t^epresented : 

Higb^ loud, quick, f<nreible. Low, loud, quick, forcible. 

High, loud, slow. Low, loud, slow. 

High, soft, quick. Low, soft, quick. 

High, soft, slow, feeble. Low, soft, slow, feeble. 

When these states of the voice are comMned with the 
five modifications of vf»ce above-mentioned, the varieties 
become ei(ceediii^ numerous, but far ftom being incalcu- 
lable : perhaps they may amount (for I leave it to arith- 
meticians to red^ou them exactly) to that number into 
which the ancients distinguished the notes of music, which, 
if I remember right, were about two hundred. 

These different states of the voice, if justly distinguish- 
ed and associated, may serve to throw some light on the 
nature of accent. If, as Mr* ISberidan asserts, the ac- 
cented syllable is only louder and not higher than the 
other syUables, every polysyllable is a perfect monotone. 
If the accented syllable be higher than the rest, which 



272 ?BEPAEATORY OBSERVATIONS* 

is the general opimon both among the ancients and mo- 
derns, this is true only when a word is pronounced alone, 
and without reference to any other word ; for when sus- 
pended at a comma, concluding a negative member fol- 
lowed by an affirmative, or asking a question beginning 
with a verb; if the unaccented syllable or syllables be 
the last, they are higher than the accented syllable, thoujgh 
not so loud. So that the true definition of accent is this ; 
If the word he pronounced alone, and without any refer- 
ence to other words, the accented syllable is both higher 
and louder than the other syllables either before or after 
it ; but if the word be suspended, as at the comma, if it 
end a negative member followed by an affirmative, or if 
it conclude an interrogative sentence beginning with a 
verb, in each case the accented syllable is louder and 
higher than the preceding, and huder and lower than 
the succeeding syllables. This will be sufficiently exem- 
plified in the following pages. In the mean time it may 
be observed, that if a degree of swiftness enters into thi 
definition of force, and that the accented syllable is the 
most forcible, it follows that the accent does not necessa- 
rily lengthen the syllable, and that if it falls on a long 
vowel, it is only a longer continuation of that force wito 
which it quickly or suddenly commenced ; for as the voice 
is an efflux of air, and air is a fluid like water, we may 
conceive a sudden gush of this fluid to continue either a 
longer or a shorter time, and thence form an idea of long 
or short quantity. If, however, this definition of force, 
as applied to accent, should be erroneous or ima^ary, 
let it be remembered it is an attempt to form a precise 
idea of what has hitherto been left in obscurity ; and that, 
if such an attempt should fail, it may at least induce some 
curious inquirer to shew where it fails, and to substitute 
something better in its stead. 

If these observations are just, they may serve to show 
how ill-founded is the opinion of that infinite variety of 
voice of which speaking sounds consist. That a wonder- 
ftil variety may arise from the key in which we speak, 
from the force or feebleness with which we pronounce, and 
from the tincture of passion or sentiment we infiise into 
the words, is acknowledged : but speak in what key we 



PREPARATORY OBSERVATIONS. 273 

will, pronounce with what force or feebleness we please, 
and in&se whatever tincture of passion or sentiment we 
can imagine into the words, still they must necessarily be 
pronounced with one of the foregoing modifications of the 
voice. Let us go into whatever twists or zig-zags of tone 
we will, we cannot go out of the boundaries of these inflex- 
ions. These are the outUnes on which all the force and 
colouring of speech is laid ; and these may be justly said 
to form the first principles of speaking sounds. 

Exemplificatwn of the different Modifications of the 
Voice. The Monotone^ the Rising Infleanon^ the FalU 
ing Inflewion, the Rising CircvrnfleWy and the Fall- 
ing Circurnflex. 

Though we seldom hear such a variety in reading or 
speaking as the sense and satisfaction of the ear demand, 
yet we hardly ever hear a pronunciation perfectly mono- 
tonous. In former times we might have found it in the 
midnight pronunciation of the Bellman^s verses at Christ- 
mas ; and now the Town crier, as Shakspeare calls him, 
sometimes gives us a specimen of the monotonous in his 
vociferous exordium — " This is to give notice ! **' The 
clerk of a court of justice also promulgates the will of the 
court by that barbarous metamorphosis of the old French 
word Oi/ez ! Oyez I Hear ye ! Hear ye ! into O yes ! O yes ! 
in a perfect sameness of voice. But however ridiculous 
the monotone in speaking may be in the above-mentioned 
characters, in certain solemn and sublime passages in poe- 
try it has a wonderful propriety, and, by the uncommort- 
ness of its use, it adds greatly to that variety with which 
the ear is so much delighted. 

This monotone may be defined to be a continuation or 
sameness of sound upon certain words or syllables, ex- 
actly like that produced by repeatedly striking a bell : 
such a stroke may be louder or softer, but continues in 
exactly the same pitch. To express this tone, a hori- 
zontal line may be adopted ; such a one as is generally 
used to signify a long syllable in verse. This tone may 
be very properly introduced in some passages of Aken- 
side^s Pleasures of Imagination^ where he so finely de- 

n3 



27* PEEPARATORY OBSERVATIONS. 

scribes the tales of horror related by the Tillage matron 
to her in&nt audience 

Breathing astonishment ! of witching rhymes 
And evil spirits; of the death-bed call 
To him who robb'd the widow, and devour'd 
The orphan's portion ; of unquiet souls 
Ris'n from the grave to e^e the heavy gnilt 
Of deeds in life concealed ; of shapes that walk 
At dead of night, and clank their chains, and wave 
The torch of hell around the murdVer's bed. 

If the words " of shapes that walk at dead of night '' 
are pronounced in a monotone, it will add wonderfiiUy to 
the variety and solemnity of the passage. 

The rising inflexion is that upward turn of the vdice 
we generally use at the comma, or in asking a question 
beginning with a verb, as No, say you ; did he say No ? 
This is commonly called a suspension of voice, and may 
not improperly be marked by the acute accent thus ('). 

The falling inflexion is generally used at the semicolon 
and colon, and must necessarily be heard in answer to the 
former question : He did : he said No. This inflexion, 
in a lower tone of voice, is adopted at the end of almost 
every sentence, except the definite question, or that which 
begins with the verb. To express this inflexion, the 
grave accent seems adapted, thus C)- 

The rising circumflex begins with the falling inflexion, 
and ends with the rising upon the same syllable, and seems 
as it were to twist the voice upwards. This inflexion 
may be exemplified by the drawling tone we give to some 
words spoken ironically ; as the word Clodius in Cicero's 
Oration for Milo. This turn of voice may be marked in 
this manner (v) : 

" But it is foolish in us to compare Drusus Africanus 
and ourselves with ClSdius ; all our other calamities were 
tolerable, but no one can patiently bear the death of Clo- 
dius;' 

The falling circumflex begins with the rising inflexion, 
and ends with the falling upon the same syllable, and 
seems to twist the voice downwards. This inflexion seems 
generally to be used in ironical reproach ; as on the word 
you in the following example : 

" So then you are the author of this conspiracy against 



FBEFABATOBT OBSERVATIONS. 275 

me ? It. is to you that I am indebted for all the mischief 
that has befallen me."*^ 

If to these inflexions we add the distinction of a phrase 
into accentual portions, as 

Prosperity | gains friends | and adversity | tries them, | 

and pronounce friends like an unaccented syllable of 
gains ; and like an unaccented syllable of adversity ; and 
them Uke an unaccented syllaUe ei tries ; we have a clear 
idea of the relative forces of all the syllables, and ap- 
proximate closely to a notation of speaking sounds. 

For farther information respecting this new and curious 
analysis of the human voice, see Elements of Elocution^ 
se(x>nd edition, page 62 ; and Rhetorical Chrammar^ third 
edition, page 143. 



OBSERVATIONS 

ON THE 

GREEK AND LATIN ACCENT, 

ETC. 



1. In order to form an idea of the Accent and Quantity 
of the dead languages, it will be necessary first to under- 
stand what we mean by the accent and quantity of our 
own language* : and as quantity is supposed by some to 



* It is not sarprising that the accent and quantity of the ancients 
should be so obscure and mysterious, when two such learned men of 
our own nation as Mr. Forster and Dr. Gaily differ about the very exist- 
ence of quantity in our own language. The former of these gentle- 
men maintains, that '^ the English have both accent and quantity, and 
that no language can be without them," but the latter asserts, that, 
*' in the modem languages, the pronunciation doth not depend apon 
a natural quantity, and therefore a greater liberty may be allowed in 
the placing of accents.*' And in another place, speaking of the 
northern languages of Europe, he says, that '* it was made impossible 
to think of establishing quantity for a foundation of harmony in pro- 
nunciation. Hence it became necessary to lay aside the consideration 
of quantity, and to have recourse to accents. In these and some 
other passages, that writer,*' says Forster, ** seems to look upon ac- 
cents as alone regulating the pronunciation of English, and quantity 
as excluded from it." — Forater's Essay on Accent and Qvantity^ page 28. 

As a farther proof of the total want of ear in a great Greek scholar- 
Lord Monboddo says, ** Our accents differ from the Greek in two 
material respects : First, they are not appropriated to particular syl- 
lables of the word, but are laid upon different syllables, according to 
the fancy of the speaker, or rather as it happens : for I believe no 
man speaking English does, by choice, give an accent to one syllable 
of a word different from that which he gives to another." 

*^ Two things, therefore, that in my opinion constitute our verse, 
are the number of syllables, and the mixture of loud and soft, accord- 
ing to certain rules. As to quantity, it is certainly not essential to 
our verse, and far less is accent." — See Steele's Prosodia ReUionalUf 
page 103, 110. 



OBSERVATIONS, ETC. 277 

regulate the accent in English as well as in Greek and 
Latin, it will be necessary first to inquire, whaf^we mean 
by long and short vowels, or, as some are pleased to term 
them, syllables. 

2. In English, then, we have no conception of quantity, 
arising from any thing but the nature of the vowels, as 
they are pronounced long and short. Whatever retard- 
ation of voice in the sound of a vowel there might be in 
Greek or. Latin before two consonants, and those often 
twin consonants, we find every vowel in this situation as 
easily pronounced short as long ; and the quantity is found 
to arise from the length or shortness we give to the vowel, 
and not from any obstruction of sound occasioned by the 
succeeding consonant. Thus the a in banish^ banner^ 
and banter J is short in all these words, and long in paper ^ 
taper y and vapour : the i long in nmer^ minor^ and mitre^ 
and short ift misery, middle, and mistress : and so of the 
rest of the vowels ; and though the accent is on the first 
syllable of all these words, we see it perfectly compatible 
with either long or short quantity. 

3. As a farther proof of this, we may observe, that un- 
accented vowels are frequently pronounced long when the 
accented vowels are short. Thus the o in Cicero, in En- 
glish, as well as in Latin pronunciation, is long, though 
unaccented : and the i short, though under the accent. 
The same may be observed of the name of our English 
poet Lillo. So in our English words cdnclave, riconcile, 
chamomile, and the substantives c6nfine, perfume, and a 
thousand others, we see the first accented syllable short, 
and the final unaccented syllable long. Let those who 
contend, that the acute accent and long quantity are in- 
separable, call the first vowels of these words long, if they 
please ; but to those who make their ear, and not their eye, 
the judge of quantity, when compared with the last vow- 
els, they will always be esteemed short*. 



* A late very learned and ingenious writer tells ns, that our accent 
and quantity always coincide ; he objects to himself the yiords signify ^ 
inagnifyf qualify, &c. where the final syllable is longer than the ac- 
cented syllable ; but this he asserts, with the greatest probability, was 
not the accentuation of our ancestors, who placed the accent on the 



278 OBSEBTAttONS ON THE 

4. The next olnect of iiK}uiry is, What is the nature of 
English accent ? Mr. Sheridan*, with his usual decision, 
tells us, that accent is only a greater force upon one syl- 
lable than another, without an^ relation to the elevation 
or depression of the voice ; while almost every other wri- 
ter on the subject, makes the elevation or depression of 
the voice inseparable from accent. When words are pro- 
nounced in a monotone, as the bellman repeats bis verses, 
the crier pronounces his advertisement, or the clerk of a 
church gives out the psalm, we hear an icttcs or accentual 
force upon the several accented syllables, which distin- 



last syllable, which is natarally the longest. But this suffidentlj 
proves, that the accent does not necessarily len^hen the syllable it 
falls on ; that is, if length consists in pronouncing the vowel long, 
which is the natnral idea of long qaantity, and not the daratioo of 
the voice upon a short vowel occasioned by the retardation of sooiul- 
ing two succeeding consonants, which is an idea, though sanctioned 
by antiquity, that has no foundation in nature ; for who, that is not 
prejudiced by early opinion, can suppose the first syllable of elb0w 
to be long, and the last short ? — See Esaay on Greek and Latin Pro- 
sodies. 

♦ The term (accent) with us has no reference to inflexion of the 
voice or musical notes, but only means a peculiar manner of dis- 
tinguishing one syllable of a word from the rest. — Lectures on EUcu^ 
tioUf quarto edition, page 41. 

To illustrate the difference between the accent of the ancients and 
that of ours, (says Mr. Sheridan,) let us suppose the same movements 
beat upon the drum, and sounded by the trumpet. Take, for instance, 
a succession of words, where the accent is on every second syllable, 
which forms an Iambic movement ; the only way by which a drum (as 
it is incapable of any change of notes) can'mark that movement, is by 
striking a soft note first, followed by one more forcible, and so in 
succession. Let the same movement be sounded by the trumpet in 
an alternation of high and low notes, and it will give a distinct idea of 
the difference between the English accent and those of the an- 
cients. — Art of Reading J page 75. 

I am sorry to find one of the most ingenious, learned, and candid 
inquirers into this subject, of the same opinion as Mr. Sheridan. The 
authority of Mr. Nares would have gone near to shake my own opi- 
nion, if I had not recollected that this gentleman ctmfesses he eannot 
perceive the least of a diphthongal sound in the % in sti-ikey which Dr. 
Wallis, he observes, excludes from the simple sounds of the vowels. 
For if the definition of a vowel sound be, that it is formed by one posi- 
tion of the organs, nothing can be more perceptible than the double 
position of them in the present case, and that the noun eye, which is 
perfectly equivalent to the pronoun /, begins with the sound of a in 
father^ and ends in that of e in eqtiaL — See Nares's English Orthoepv. 
pages, 144. 



GREEK AND LATIN ACCENT. 279 

guishes them from the others, but no more variety of tone 
than if we were to beat the syllables of the same words 
upon a drum, which may be louder or softer, but cannot 
be either higher or lower ; this is pronouncing according 
to Mr, Sheridan's definition of accent: and this pro- 
nunciation certainly comes under the definition of singing ; 
it is singing ill, indeed, as Julius Caesar said of a bad 
reader, — but still it is singing, and therefore essentially 
different from speaking: for in speaking, the voice is con- 
tinually sliding upwards or downwards ; and in singing it 
is leaping^ as it were, from a lower to a higher, or from 
a higher to a lower note : the only two possible ways of 
varying the hiunan voice with respect to elevation or de- 
pression : so that when we are told by some writers on this 
subject, that the speaking of the ancients was a kind of 
singing, we are led into the error of supposing, that sing- 
ing and speaking differ only in degree, and not in 
kind ; whereas they are just as different as motion and 
rest*. 

5. Whenever in speaking we adopt a singing tone, 
(which was formerly the case with Puritan preachers,) it 
differs essentially from speaking, and can be pricked down 
upon paper, and be played upon a violin : and whenever 
in singing we adopt a speaking tone, the slide of this tone 
is so essentially distinct from singing as to shock the ear 
like the harshest discord. Those, therefore, who rank 
recitative as a medium between singing and speaking, are 
utterly ignorant of the nature of both. Recitative is just 
as much singing as what is called air, or any other species 
of musical composition. 

6. If we may have recourse to the eye, the most dis- 
tinct and definite of all our senses, we may define musical 

* It is not denied, that the slides in spealcin^ may sometimes leap, 
as it were, from a low to a high, or from a hi^h to a low note ; that is, 
that there may be a very considerable interval between the end of 
one of those slides and the beginning of another ; as between the high 
note in the word no in the question, Did he say No 7 and the low note 
which the same word may adopt in the answer, No, he did noU But 
the sound which composes the note of speaking, as it may be called, 
and the sound which composes the note of singing, are essentially dis- 
tinct ; the former is in continual motion, while the latter is for a given 
time at rest. — ^See Note to sec. 23. ' 



280 OBSERVATIONS ON THE 

notes to be horizontal lines, and speaking tones obliqne 
lines ; the one rises from low to high, or falls from high 
to low by distinct intervals, as the following straight lines 

to the eye — — ; the other slides upwards or down- 




wards, as the following oblique lines / \ nor is the one 

more different to the eye than the other is to the ear. Those, 
therefore, who gravely tell us, that the enunciation of the 
ancients was a kind of musical speaking, impose upon us 
with words to which we can annex no ideas ; and when 
they attempt to illustrate this musico-speaking pronuncia- 
tion, by referring us to the Scotch and other dialects, 
they give us a rhetorical flourish instead of a real example ; 
for however the Scotch and other speakers may drawl out 
the accent, and give the vowel a greater length than the 
English, it is always in an oblique, and not in a straight 
line ; for the moment the straight line of sound, or the 
monotone is adopted, we hear something essentially dis- 
tinct from speaking. 

7. As high and low, loud and soft, forcible and feeble, 
are comparative terms, words of one syllable pronounced 
alone, and without relation to other words or syUables, 
cannot be said to have any accent*. The only distinction 
to which such words are liable, is an elevation or depres- 
sion of voice, when we compare the beginning with the end 
of the word or syllable. Thus a monosyllable, considered 
singly, rises from a lower to a higher tone in the question 
No ? which may therefore be called the acute accent, and 

* How the ancients conld make every monosyllable accented, (that 
is, according to their definition of accent, prononnced with an eleva- 
ted tone of voice,) without telling us how this elevation happened, 
"Whether it was an elevation of one part of the syllal)le above the other, 
or the elevation of one word or syllable above other words or syl- 
lables, — ^liow these distinctions, I say, so absolutely necessary to a 
precise idea of accent, should never be once mentiqned, can be re* 
solved into nothing but that attachment to words without ideas, &nd 
that neglect of experiment, which have involved the modems in the 
same mist of ignorance and error. 



GREEK AND LATIN ACCENT. 281 

alls firoin a higher to a lower tone upon the same word in 
he answer iVo, which may therefore be called the grave. 
Jut when the accented word or syllable is associated with 
inaccented words or syllables, the acute accent is louder 
md higher than the preceding, and louder and lower than 
he succeeding syllables, as in the question, Satisfactorily 
lid he say ? and the grave accent both louder and higher 
ban either the precemng or succeeding syllables in the 
inswer — He said satisfactorily. Those who wish to see 
his explained more at large may consult Elements of 
^locutum^ page 183; or Rhetorical Grammar ^ 3d. edit. 

>age77-. 

8. This idea of accent is so evident upon experiment, 
ts to defy contradiction ; and yet, such is the general 

Saorance of the modifications of the voice, that we find 
ose who pretend to explain the nature of accent the 
nost accurately, when they give us an example of the 
kccent in any particular word, suppose it always pro* 
loiinced affirmatively and alone*; that is, as if words 

* That excellent scholar Mr. Forster famishes an additional in- 
tance of the possibility of uniting a deep and accurate knowledge of 
vhat is called the prosody of the ancients, with a total ignorance of 
he accent and quantity of our own language. After a tlionsand ex- 
imples to shew how the English is susceptible of every kind of metre 
unoog the ancients (though in all his examples he substitutes £ng« 
ish accent for Greek and Latin quantity) be proceeds to shew the 
iifference between the English, the Irish, and the Scotch pronuncia- 
ion. 

'^ The English join the acute and long time together, as in ISfberty; 
' y short. The Scotch observe our quantity, and alter our accent, 

* W)^rty'; y short. When I say they observe our quantity, I mean 
' they pronounce the same syllable long which we do, but they make 
' it longer. In respect to the circumflex, with which their pronun* 

* elation abounds, it may be remarked, that it is not formed as the 
' Greek, Latin, and English, of an acute and grave, but of a grave 
' and acute, fiif, n6s, r6und, English; rotind, Scotch. 

*' The Irish observe our quantity and accent too, but with a greater 
'*• degree of spirit or emphasis, which Scaliger calls afflatio in lutitu- 
' dine^ giving to most syllables an aspiration." — Essay on Accent and 
Quofitity, page 75. 

Mr. Forster falls exactly into the mistake of Mr. Sheridan, though 
tie has a quite different idea of accent. He supposes liberty always 
pronounced by an Englishman in one manner, and that as a single 
word, or at the end of a sentence : he has not the least notion of the 
different inflexion the same word may have accordingly as the accent 
is differently inflected, as we may plainly perceive in the following 



282 OB8EBYATIOK8 ON THX 

were alwsji pronotmced with one inflexion of vok^^ mm 
as if there were no difference with respect to llie natvq 
of the accent, whether the word is an affirmation or I 
question, in one part of the sentence, or in another ; wha 
nothing can be more palpable to a correct ear than thai 
the accents of the word volimtary in the following' sei^ 
tences are essentially different : 

His resignation was vdltmtary. 
He made a v6luntary resignation. 

In both, the accent is on the first syllable* In the fira 
sentence, the accented syllable is higher and louder thai 

qnefttioo: Is it Hbei'ty or licentioasness yon plead for? where tb 
Knglish raise the voice on the latter syllables, as the Scotch too frc 
qacDtly do. With respect to the quantity of the first syllable, -vrinci 
Mr. Forster says the Scotch preserve in this word, I must dissen 
from him totally ; for they preserve the accent, and alter the qoantitv 
by pronoancing the first syllable as if written leeberty. If Mr. For 
Bter calls this syllable long in the English pronunciation of it, I shook 
be glad to be told of a shorter accented syllable than the first of liber 
ty: if he says the accent being on it renders it long ; I suiswer tht 
tfobverts his whole system; for, if accent falling on any vowel, make 
it long, the quantity of the Greek and Latin is overtamed, and etm^ 
in the first line of the ^neid, must be a spondee. 

This is the consequence of entering on the discnssion of a difficol 
point, withont first defining the terms ^nothing but confiuion am 
contradiction can ensue. 

But I must give this writer great credit for his sayinp; the Scotd 
pronunciation abounds with the circumflex; for this is really the 
case ; and the very circumflex opposite to the Greek and Latin, be* 
ginning with the grave and ending with the acute. I am not, how- 
ever, a little astonished that this did not shew him how deficient the 
ancients were in this modification of the voice, which, though used 
too frequently in Scotland, is just as much in the human voice aa the 
other circumflex ; and may be and is often used in England, with the 
titmost propriety. With respect to the common circumflex on Greek, 
Latin, and some French words, the accentual use of it is quite un- 
known, and it only stands for long quantity ; but both these circmn- 
^exes are demonstrably upon the human voice in speaking, and may 
-be made as evident by experiment as the stress of an accented sylla- 
ble by pronouncing the word on which it is placed. — See Rhetorical 
Grammar^ third edition, page 80. 

I must just take notice of the inaccuracy of Mr. Forster in saying 
the last syllable of liberty is short, and yet that it has the circnmflex 
accent x this is contrary to all the prosody of antiquity, and contrary 
to the truth of the case in this (instance ; for it is the length of the 
first syllable, arising from the circumflex on it, which dUtingaishes 
the Scotch from the English pronunciation. 



CBJEIEK AND LATIN ACCETNT. 28^ 

le Other syUables ; and in the second, it is louder and 
nwer than the rest. The same may be observed of the 
blowing question : 

, TVas his resignation v6hmtary or \nvoluntaryf 

rhere the first syllable of the word voluntary is louder 
nd lower than the succeeding syllables ; and in the word 
nvolv/ntary it is louder and higher. Those who have 
lot ears sufiiciently delicate to discern this difference, 
night never to open their lips about the acute or grave 
Iccent, as they are pleased to call them : let them speak 
if accent as it relates to stress only, and not to elevation 
)r depression of voice, and then they may speak intelli* 
!?bly. 

9. A want of this discernment has betrayed Mr. For- 
mer into obscurity and contradiction. To say nothing of 
bis asserting that the English, Irish, and Scotch accents 
differ, (where accent cannot possibly mean stress, for then 
)£nglish verse would not be verse in Ireland and Scot- 
land,) what shall we think of his telling us, that in Eng- 
land we pronounce the word majesty* with an acute 
accent, and long quantity upon the first syllable, and the 
(two last syllables with a grave accent and short quantity; 
^nd that in Scotland this word is pronounced with a grave 
accent, and long quantity on the first syllable, and with 
an acute accent and short quantity on the last ? Now, 
if by accent is meant stress, nothing is more evident than 
that the English and Scotch, with the exception of very 
^few ^rds, place the accent on the same syllable ; but if 
elevanon be included in the idea of accent, it is as evi- 
dent that the English pronounce the first syllable louder 
and higher than the two last when they pronounce the 
word either singly, or as ending a sentence ; as 

He spoke against the king's majesty : 



♦ Would not anyone suppose, from Mr. Eorster's prodncing this 
word as an example of the English accent, that the £nglish always 
pronounced it one way, and that as if it ended a declarative sentence P 
This is exactly like the mistake of Priscian in the word No^uia-^ee 
sect. 20, in the Notes. • . 



284 OBSERVATIONS ON THE 

and louder and lower than the two last when it is the lal 
accented word but one in a sentence, as i 

He spoke against the majesty of the king : 

or when it is the last word in asking a question, beginning 
with a verb, as 

Did he dare to speak against the king'^s majesty? 

10. Where then is the difference, it will be asked, be 
tween the English and Scotch pronunciation ? I answei 
precisely in this ; that the Scotch are apt to adopt th 
rising circumflex and long quantity where the English us 
the simple rising inflexion and short quantity. Thus ii 
the word majesty, as well as in every other of the sam 
form, they generally adopt the rising inflexion, as in th 
two last sentences, whether it ends a question begimiinj 
with a verb, as, " Is this the picture of his majesty f^ o 
whether it ends an afiirmative sentence, as, ^^ This is th 
picture of his majesty.'*'^ And it is the prevalence of thi 
long quanti^ with the rising inflexion that forms tb 
principal diference between the English and Scotch pre 
nunciation. 

11. Having thus endeavoured to ascertain the accei 
and quantity of oiur own language^ let us next inquire int 
the nature of the accent and quantity of the ancients *. 

* So mnch are the critics pnzzled to reconcile the tragic and coini 
verses of the ancients to the laws of metre, that a learned writer i 
the Monthly Review^ for May, 1762, speaking of the corrections of Di 
Heath, in his notes or readings of the old Greek tragedians, says— 

<< These Emendations are much more excusable than such as ar 
** made merely for the sake of the metre, the rules of which are s 
^' extremely vague and various, as they are laid down by the roetrici 
*' critics, that we will venture to gay any chapter in Robinson Crust 
'< might be reduced to measure by them. This is not conjecture ; th 
'< thing shall be proved. 

'< As I was rummaging about her, lambiais dimeter hypercatalectMs 
"^ I found several ..... Dochmaicua 
'' Things that I wanted, • . . Dactylicus dimeter 
^* A tire shovel and tongs, . • . Dochmaicua ex epitrilo quarto < 

ayllaba 
<' Two brass kettles, .... Dochmaicua 
'* A pot to make chocolate, . • Periodua brachycafalectua 
<< Some horns of fine glazM powder, Euripideua 
'* A gridiron and seve- . . • Dactylica penihimimeris 
** -Ral other necessaries. . . . Baaia anapaatica cum syllaba,** 



GREEK AKD LATIN ACCENT. 285 

12. The long quantity of the ancients must arise either 
rom a prolongation of the sound of the vowel, or from 
hat delay of voice which the pronunciation of two or 
nore consonants in succession is supposed naturally to 
•equire. Now vowels were said to be either long by na- 
lire or long by position. Those long by nature • were such 
is were long, though succeeded by a single consonant, as 
lie u in natura^ and were a sort of exception to the 
^neral rule ; for a vowel before a single consonant was 
ximmonly short, as in every u in the word tumulus. 
Those vowels which were long by position were such as 
were succeeded by two or more consonants, as the first o 
in sponsor : but if the long and short quantity of the 
ancients was the same distinction of the soimd of the vowel 
as we make in the words cadence and magicj calling the 
first a long, and the second short, then the a in mater 
and pater -f must have been pronounced like our a in 
later and latter ; and those vowels which were long by 
position, as the a in Bacchus and campusy must have 
been sounded by the ancients as we hear them in the 
English words bake and cane. 

13. If therefore the long quantity of the ancients was 
no more than a retardation of voice on the consonants, or 
that duration of sound which an assemblage of consonants 
is supposed naturally to produce without making any 
alteration in the sound of the vowel, such long quantity 
as this an English ear has not the least idea of. Unless 
the sound of the vowel be altered, we have not any con- 
ception of a long or short syllable ; and the first syllables 



• If the long qnantity of the Greek and Latin arose natorally from 
the retardation of sound occasioned by the succeeding consonants, 
the long vowels in this situation onght to have been termed long by 
nature^ and those long vowels virhich come before single consonants 
should have been called long by custom : since it viras nothing but cus- 
tom made the vowel e in decus (honour) short, and in dedo (to give^ 
long: and the vowel o in otmrn (an egg) long, and in ovo (to triumph) 
short. 

f I do not here enter into the question concerning the ancient sound 
of the Latin a which I am 'convinced was like our a in water; but 
whether it was like the a in paper y father ^ or water, is not of any im- 
portance in the present question ; the quantity is the same, supposing 
it to have been any one of them. 



286 OBSE&VATIONS ON THE 

of baniahj banner, and banter, have, to our ears, exacdy 
the same quantity. 

14. But if the long quantity of the anei^its arose na^ 
turally from the obstruction the voice meets with in the 
pronunciation of two or more consonants, how does it 
nappen that the preceding consonants do not lengthen 
the vowel as much as those which succeed ?* Dr. Gaily 
tells us, the reason of this is, ^^ that the vowel bding the 
^^ most essential part of the syllable, the voice hastens to 
^.^ seize it ; and, in order to do this, it slurs over all the 
^^ consonants that are placed before it, so that the voice 
" suffers little or no delay, but the case of the consonant 
^^ that follows is not the same : it cannot be slurred over, 
" but must be pronounced full and distinct, otherwise it 
" would run into and be confounded with the foUowii^ 
" syUable. By this mean the voice is delayed more in 
" the latter than in the former part of the syllable, and 
" oT is longer than ctt^o, and wv longer than S^rXJi/' 

I must own myself at a loss to conceive the force of this 
reasoning. I have always supposed the consonant, when it 
forms part of a syllable, to be as essential to its sound as 
the vowel : nor can I conceive why the latter consonants 
of a syllable may not be pronounced as rapidly as the 
former, without running the former syllable into the lat- 
ter, and thus confounding them together ; since no such 
confusion arises when we end the first syllable with the 
vowel, and begin the following syllable with the conson- 
ants, as pro-crastino, pro^tratios, &c. as in this case there 
is no consonant to stop the first syllable, and prevent its 
running into the second : so that Dr. Gaily seems to have 
slurred over the matter rather than to have explained it : 
but as he is the only writer who has attempted to account 
for the manner in which quantity is produced by conson- 
ants, he is entitled to attention. 

15. In the first place, then, in words of more than one 
syllable but one consonant can belong to the preceding 
vowel, as the others must necessarily be considered as 
belonging to the succeeding vowel, and according to Dr. 

* *' Dissertation against pronouncing the Greek Language accord- 
ing to Accents.*' — Dissert, ii. page 50, second edition 



GREEK AND LATIN ACCENT. 287 

S-ally, must be hurried over, that the voiee may seize its 
avourite lettar. As one consonant therefore does not 
laturally produce long quantity, where is the delay if the 
itber consonants are hurried over? and, consequently. 
Inhere is the long quantity which the delay is supposed to 
produce ? This is like adding two nothings together to 
produce a something. 

16. But what does he mean by the necessity there is of 
pnmauncing the latter consonant fiiU and distinct, that it 
oaay not run into and be confounded with the following 
syllable ? Must not every ccmsonant be pronounced fuU 
and distinet, irfiethcr we pronounce it rapidly or slowly, 
whether before or after the vowel ? Is not the sir in etra^ 
men pronounced as full and distinct as the same Letters in 
castra^ castrametor, &c. ? I know there is a shadow of 
difference by pronouncing the vowel in our short English 
manner so as to unite with the «, as if written cass ; but 
if vire make the preceding vowel long, as in cdse^ and ac- 
cording to the rules of syllabication laid down by Ramus, 
Ward, and the Latin grammarians, carry the consonants 
to the succeeding syllable, as if written cay-stray^ we find 
these consoniuits pronounced exactly in the same manner : 
and this leads us to suppose that double consonants were 
the signs only, and not the efficients of long quantity \ 
and that this same long quantity was not simply a dura- 
tion of sound upon the consonants, but exactly what we 
call long quantity — a lengthening of the sound by pro- 
nouncing the vowel open, as if we were to pronounce the 
a long in mater ^ by sounding it as if written mayter : 
and 'die same letter short in pater, as if it were written 
patter*, 

* What exceedingly corroborates this idea of quantity is, the com- 
mon or doubtful vowels as they are called ; that is, such as come before 
a mnie and a liquid ; as the first a in patria, the e in refluo^ &c. ; as in 
these words the vowel preceding the mute or liquid is either long or 
short, at the writer or speaker pleases to make it. But if the conso- 
nants naturally retard the sound of the syllable, so as to make it long, 
howconid this be? If the syllable was to be made long, did the 
speaker dwell longer on the consonants, and if it was to be made 
short, did he hurry them over? And did this make the difference in 
the quantity of these syllables?— The ntter impossibility of conceiving 
, this to have been the case renders it bighly probable that the long or 
short qnantity.lay only in the vowel. 



288 OBSERVATIONS ON THE 

17. The reason of our repugnance to admit of thtf 
analogy of quantity in the learned languages is, that a 
diametrically opposite analogy has been adopted in the 
English, and, I believe, in most modem tongues — an 
analogy which makes the. vowel long before one conson- 
ant, and short before more than one. 

18. If, however, the Quantity of the ancients lay only 
in the vowel, which was lengthened and shortened in 001 
manner by altering the sound, how strange must have 
been their poetical language, and how different from the 
words taken singly ! Thus the word nec^ which, taken 
singly, must have been pronounced with the vowel short, 
like our English word neck ; — ^in composition, as in the 
line of Virgil, where it is long, 

" Fulgura, nee diri toties arsere cometae, 

must have been pronounced as if written neek ; just as 
differently as the words proper, of mankind, is, and man^ 
in the line of Pope, would be pronounced by the same 
rule, 

^* The proper study of mankind is maa ; 

and as if written, 

" The propeer study ove mane-kind ees mane."** 

When to this alteration of the quantity by the means oi^ 
succeeding consonants, we add that rule — 

" Finalem caesura brevem producere gaudet,^ 

which makes the short or doubtful vowel long, that either 
immediately precedes the caesura, or concludes the hexa- 
meter verse— what must be our astonishment at this very 
different sound of the words, arising merely from a dif- 
ferent collocation of them, and at the strange variety and 
ambiguity to the ear this difference must occasion* ! 



* See this idea of the different sound of words, when taken siDgly, 
and when in composition, most excellently treated by the anthor of 
the Greek and Latin Prosodies, attributed to a late Bishop of St. 
Asaph^ page 101. 



GEEEK AND LATIN ACCENT. 289 

1 9. But if this system of quantity among the ancients 
appears strange and unaccountable, our wonder will not 
be diminished when we inquire into the nature of their 
accent. 

20. From what has been said of accent and quantity 
in our own language, we may conclude them to be essen- 
tially distinct and perfectly separable : nor is it to be 
doubted that they were equally separable in the learned 
languages : instances of this from the scholiasts and com> 
mentators are innumerable ; but so loose and indefinite 
are many of their expressions, so little do they seem ac- 
quainted with the analysis of the human voice, that a 
great number of quotations are produced to support the 
most opposite and contradictory systems. Thus Vossius, 
Henninius, and Dr. Gaily, produce a great number of 
quotations which seem to confound accent and quanti^, 
by making the acute accent and lon^ quantity signify the 
same ; White, Michaelis, Melanchthon, Forster, Pnmat, 
and many other men of learning, produce clouds of wit- 
nesses from the ancients to proye that accent and quan- 
tity are essentially different*. The only thing they seem 
to agree In is, that the acute accent always raises the 
pliable on which it is placed higher than any other in 
the wordf . This is certainly true, in English pronun- 
ciation, if we pronounce the word singly, and terminate 



* Is it not astonishiDg that learned men will wrangle with each 
other for whole pages abont the sense of a word in Dionysius of Hali- 
camassns, upon the difference between singing and speaking sounds, 
when this difference is jnst as open to them by experimenters it was 
to him ? Who can sufficiently admire the confidence of Isaac Vossius, 
who says — " In cantu latius evagari sonos, quam in recitatione aut 
'^ commnni sermone, utpote in quo vitiorum habeatur, si vox ultra 
" diapente sen tres tonos et semitonium, acuatur.'' In singing, the 
sound has a larger compass than in reading or common speaking, in> 
somuch that in common discourse^ whatever is higher than the diapente 
is held to be extremely vicious. 

f Thus Priscian. '^ In nnaquaque parte orationis arsis et thesis 
*' sunt velut in hac parte natura : ut quando dico natu, elevatnr vox 
" et est arsis in tu : quando vero ra, deprimitur vo* et est theHs,*' 
Any one would conclude from this description of the rising and fall- 
ing of the voice upon this word, that it could only be pronounced one 
way, and that there was no difference in the comparative height of the 
vowel ti in the two following sentences 



290 OBSEBVATIONS ON THE 

it as if no other were to follow : but if we pronounce it in 
a sentence, where it is the last accented word but one, or 
where it is at the end of a question banning with a verb 
when we suspend the voice in expectation of an answer, 
we then find the latter syllables of the word, though un- 
accented, are pronounced higha: than the accented 
syllable in the former part of the word. See No. 7- 

21. But what are we to think of their saying, that 
every monosyllable is either acuted or circumflexed ?* If 
the acute accent signifies an elevation of voice, this, with 
respect to words of one syllable, must mean elevated above 
some other word either preceding or succeeding, since 
elevation is a mere comparative word ; but this is not 
once mentioned by them ; if it has any meaning, there- 
fore, it must imply that the acute accent is the monc^L 
lable, pronounc^ with, what I should call, the rising 
infiewionj or upward slide ; and then we can compre- 
hend how a monosyllable may have the acute accent 
without reference to any other word ; as when we b^in 
a syllable low, and slide it higher, or begin it high, and 
slide it lower, it may be said to be acute or grave of it- 
self ; that is, when it is px>nounced alone, and inde^nd- 
ent of other wovds* Unless we adopt this definition of 
the acute and grave, it will be impossible to conceive 
what the old grammarians mean when they speak of a 
monosyllable having the grave or the acute accent. Thus 
Diomedes says on some words changing their accent— 
*' Si, post adverbium cum gravi pronunciatur accentu, 
" erit praepositio ; si acuto erit adverbium, ut longo post 
*^ tempore vemJ" 

22. It was a canon in the prosody of the Greeks and 



Lucretius wrote a book De Rerum Natnra. 
Lucretius- wrote a book De Natura Rerum, 

Whereas it is evident that the word natura is susceptible of two dif- 
ferent pronuDciatious : in the first sentence the syllable tu is louder 
and higher than the last ; and in the second it is louder and lower 
than the last; and this confounding of lond with high, and soft 
with low, seems to be the great stumbling block, both of ancients 
and moderns.-^ee No. 7, 8, &c. 

* £a veio quae sunt syliabae nnins ernnt acuta max flexa ; ne sit 
aliqua vox sine acuta, — Quinct, lib. i. c 5. 



6BBEK AND LATIN ACCSNT* 391 

RomaiiB, that words of more than one syllable o^st Imve, 
either an acute or a drcumflei; accent ; and that the other, 
syllables, without an accent, were to be accounted grave : 
but if this be so, what are we to think of those numerous 
monosyllables, and the final Syllables of those dis3yllables, 
that we see marked with the grave accent, as Mev, ^r^o, 
<TuVy 0«of, 'Avijf, ;». T. A ? " Why these words ^ says Mr. 
Forster, *^ whatever Dr. Oally may conceive, had cer- 
^^ tainly their elevation on the last syllable:^ and this 
opinion of Mr. Forster'^s is supported by some ^ the most 
respectable authorities*. 

23. With respect to the power of the accent in both. 
the Greek and Latin Languages nothing can be better- 
established by the ancient grammarians than that the' 
acute accent did not lengthen the syllable it fell upon ;] 
and that short syllables, remaining short, had often the- 
acute accent. This opinion has been irrefutably main- 
tained by Mr. Forsterf, and the author of Observations 



* The seemiiifr impossibility of reconciling accent and quantity 
made Herman Vanderharit, the author of a small treatise, entitled^ 
*' Aramum Aeeentuum Grteeorum,*' consider the marks of Greek ac-' 
centnatiott as referring not to syllabic, but oratorical accent. But, 
as Mr. Forster observes, '^ if this supposition were true, we should 
^* not meet with the same word constanUy accented in the same man<^ 
•* ner as we see it at present. A word's oratorical accent will vary 
** according to the general sentiment of the passage wherein it occurs ; 
** but its syllabic accent will be invariably the same, independent o^ 
** its connexion with other words in the same sentence, except in the 
*' case of enclitics and a few others." — Essay on Accent and Quantity f 
page Sd. 

f But when Mr. Forster endeavours to explain how this is to be 
done, he has recourse to music. 

" Notwithstanding the reluctance of Vossius, Henninius, and thou^ 
^* sands after them, to admit the acute as compatible with a short 
^' time, if I could have them near me with a flute in ray hand, or 
** rather with an organ before w, I would engage to convince them 
'< of the consistency of these two. I would take any two keys next 
^* to each other, one of which v^nld consequently give a sound lower 
** than the other : suppose the word Huh before us, or i^mt^y both . 
^' which words Vossius would circumflex on the peuuUimate, instead 
'* of giving an acute to the first, according to our present marks : I 
^ would conformably to these marks jnst touch the bisher key for the 
<< initial «f, and take my finger off immediately ; and then touch the 
** lower key, on which I would dwell longer than I did on the higher, 
<< and that would give me a grave, with a long time for the syllable 
<< M, the same lower key I would just touch again, and instantly leave 

o2 



292 OBSERVATIONS ON THE 

on the Greek and Latin Prosodies ; though as strCTn- 
oosly denied by Dr. Gaily*, Isaac Vossius, and Hemii- 
nios ; and these last seem to have been persuaded of the 
inseparable concomitancy of the acute accent and l<Mig 
quantity, from the impossibility they suppose there was 
of separating them in any language. But if we make 
our ears, and not our eyes, judges of quantity, can any 
thing be more palpable than the short quantity of the 
accented syllables of prdselytCy Anodyne^ tribune^ and 
inmate ; and the long quantity of the final syllables of 

*< it, which would give me a grave, with a short time for ^t : muk. 
'^ Now if this can be done on a wind instrument within the narrow 
^' compass of two notes, it may be done by the organs of hnman 
'< speech, which are of the nature of a wind instrument, in ordinary 
^ pronunciation. For the sounds of our voice in common speech 
<< differ from those of such musical instruments, not in quality, hot 
<^ in arithmetical discrete quantity, or number only, as hath been 
<< observed before, and as confirmed by the decisive judgment of that 
'' nice and discerning critic, Dionysius of Halicamassus. Here then 
'^ is, to demonstration, an acute tone consistent with a short time, 
" and a grave tone with a long one." P. 342, 343. — ^To this I may 
add the observation made by the author of the Essay an the Harmony 
qf Language. *^ Strange it seems, that the author of this passage 
<< should maintain an opinion so contrary to truth, so repugnant to 
^ his own purpose, so belied by daily and hourly experience, as that 
'< the union of the acute tone, with a short quantity, seldom occurs 
^' in English pronunciation, and is hardly practicable by an English 
^< voice." And still more strange, I may add, is it, that these two 
authors should not see that the experiment which is called a demon- 
stration, has nothing to do with the point in question. It regards 
tones that rise or fall by perceptible intervals, and not snch as rise 
or fall by slides or imperceptible ones. Let it once be allowed that 
the Greeks and Romans sung their language instead of speaking it, 
and then the acute or grave accent, with long or short quantity, are 
easily conceived ; but it is not about musical, but speaking tones that 
we inquire ; and though the authority of Dionysius of Halicamassus 
is cited for the nature of the speaking voice as distinct, in degree 
only and not in kind, from singing, I boldly assert that this is not 
matter of authority, but of experiment, and that singing and speaking 
are as distinct as motion and rest. It is true some motion may be so 
slow as not to be perceived : but then it is not to be considered as 
rest : as a curve may approach so near to a right lioe as not to be 
distinguishable from it : but in these cases, where the senses, and not 
the understanding, are addressed, things are to be estimated for just 
what the senses value them at. — De non apparentibus, et de noo 
existent! bus, eadem est ratio. 

* If the acute accent or stress, as Dr. Gaily calls it, made the short 
syllable long, what becomes of the metre of verse ? How will he scan 
** Arma virumque cauo " ? * 



6EEEK AND LATIN ACCENT. 293 

these words ? And when we pronounce the Greek and 
Latm words, a^aXKn^ faih^ a/AfUy amboy nothing can be 
more evident than the long quantity of the final yowd 
though without the accent, and the short quantity of the 
initiiu and accented syllable. 

24. As to the Ions quantity arising from the succession 
of two consonants, which the ancients are uniform in as- 
serting, if it did not mean that the preceding vowel was 
to len^hen its sound, as we should do by pronouncing 
the a m scatter as we do in skater ^ (one who skates) I 
have no conception of what it meant * ; for if it meant 
that only the time of the syllable was prolonged, the vow- 
el retaining the same sound, I must confess as utter an 
inabihty of comprehending this source of quantity in the 
Greek and Latin as in English. Banish^ banner j and 
banter, have to our ears the first syllable equally short : 
the same may be observed of senate, seminary, sentence, 
and sentiment: and if, as an ingenious critic f has as- 
serted, the ancients pronounced both the consonants in 
callidtcs, fallo, &c., that is, finishing one I by separating 
the tongue from the palate before the other is begun, such 
a pronunciation must necessarily augment the number of 
syllables, nearly as if written ea/eZidt^, /a/eto, &c., and 
is, therefore, contrary to all the rules of ancient prosody ; 
nor would this pronunciation to our ears give the least 
length to the preceding vowel, any more than the suc- 
ceeding mute does in sentence and senate. 

* If the doable consooanU naturally made a syllable long, I should 
be fflad to know how there could be exceptions to this rule ? How 
comd Ammonius say that the second syllable of »iir«y^ was long, when 
the word was used in one particular sense, and short in another ? And 
how could Cicero say, that the first letter of tnelytua was short, and 
the first of iiuanui and It^elix long, if two succeeding consonants na- 
turally lengthened the syllable ? Dr. Forster, indeed, attempts to re- 
concile this contradiction, by observing that Cicero does not say, the 
first gyllable ofinclfftus is short, but the first letter; but it may be de- 
manded, what is it that makes the syllable long or short but the length 
or shortness of the vowel? If the double consonants necessarily re- 
tard the sonnd of the vowel, the second syllable of >Uir»y/A» and the fir^t 
of inelytu8f could not possibly be pronounced short ; and particularly 
the latter word could not be so pronounced, as it has the accent on 
the first syllable. See sect. 16, in the note. 

f Essay iipon the Harmony of Language^ page 228, 253. RoBsoir, 
1774. 



294 OBSEBTATIONS ON THE 

26. When these observations on the accent and quan- 
tity of the ancients are all put tog^her, shall we wonder 
that the learned and ingenious author of Elements of 
Criticum * should go so far as to assert, that the dactyls 
and spondeesof hexameterverse, with respect to {nronuncia- 
tion, are merely ideal, not only with us, but thAt they 
were so with the ancients themselves? Few, however, 
win adopt an opinion which will necessarily imply that 
the Greek and Latin Critics were utterly i^Orant of the 
nature of their own language : and every admirer of those 
excellent writers will rather embrace any explanation of 
accent and quantity, than give up Dionysiiis of Hali- 
camassus, Cicero, Quintilian, and LoHginus. Suppose 
then, ias a last reftige, we were to try to read a Greek or 
Latin verse, both by accent and quantity in the manner 
they have prescribed, and see what such a trial will pro- 
duce. 

26. By quoAtitfy let us suppose the Vowel lengthened 
to express the long quantity ; and by the acute accent the 
rising inflexion as explained above. 

Tityre, tu patulse r&ubans sub tegmine figi, 
Sylvestrem tcnui musam meditdri^ avena* 

TityrS, tu patulse rScubans sub tegminS fagi, 
Sylvestrem tSnui musam meditaris avena. 

Teetyre tod patulee r^cubanes sodb tegmine fdgi, 
Seelveestreem tenui modsame meditaris aveena. 

Mriviv aeiBe Qea JIijXrfldBeai 'Ax^i^os 
0{fkofuprjv, fj fivpL* 'AxtMOty SXye* €3fjK€, 

^rjvXv a€m Oca n^^lodceS "AxiX^of 
OvXofJuivfjv, Tj fivpC dxalois oXye* €6rjice. 

Mean-in a-eye-de The-ay Pea-lea-e-d-dyo A-kil-lea-ose 
Ow-lom-men-een hee moo-re a-kay-oes ail-ge ^th-ee-ke. 

27- Now there are but four possible ways of pronounc- 



• Elements of Criticism, vol. ii. page 106. See also Uie Essay iipoii 
the Harmony qf Language, page 234. 



6BEBK AND LATIN ACCENT. 396 

ing these verges without gmng into a perfect song* : one 
is, to pronounce the accented syllable with the falling in- 
flexion, and the unaccented syllaUe with the same iimex- 
ion in a lower tone, which is the way we pronounce our 
own words when we give them the accent with the falling 
inflexion; the second is, to pronounce the accented syl- 
lable with the rising inflexion, and the imaccented syl- 
lables with the same inflexion in a lower tone, which we 
never hear in our own language : the third is, to pronounce 
the accented syllable with the falling inflexion, and the 
unaccented syllables with the rising, in a lower tone : and 
the fourth, to pronounce the accented syllable with the 
rising inflexion, and the unaccented with the falling, in a 
lower tone. None of these modes, but the first and last, 
do we ever hear in our own language : the second and 
third seem too difficult to permit us to suppose that they 
could be the natural current of the human voice in any 
language. The first leaves us no possible means of ex- 
{daining the circumflex, but the last, by doing this, gives 
us the strongest reason to suppose that the Greek and 
Latin acute accent was the rising inflexion, and the grave 
accent the falling inflexion, in a lower tone. 

28. But if the reader were sufficiently acquainted with 
these inflexions of voice, or could be present while I ex- 
emplified them to him, I doubt not that he would imme- 
diately say, it was impossible so monotonous a pronunci- 
ation could be that of the Greeks and Romans f : but 



* ThtSy I may be bold to say, is coming to the point at once, with- 
out hiding our ignorance, by supposing that the ancients had some 
mysterious way of pronouncing which we are utterly incapable of 
conceiving. Mr. Sheridan tells us, that " the ancients did observe 
the distinction of accents by an elevation and depression of voice ; 
but the manner in which they did it roust remain for ever a secret to 
us : for, with the living tongue, perished the tones also ; which we in 
vain endeavour to seek for in their visible marks." — Lectures on ElocU' 
iUmf 4to edition, page 39. — From these and similar observations in 
many of our vtrriters, one would be tempted to imagine, that the or^ns 
of speaking in ancient Oreece and Rome were totally different from 
those of the present race of men in Europe. 

t Dr. Bnmey tells us, that Meibomius, the great and learned 
Meibomius, when prevailed upon at Stockholm to sing Greek 
strophes, set the whole court of Christina in a roar; as Naod^ did 
in executing a Roman dance. And Scaliger observes, that if the 



996 OBSERVATIONS ON THK 

when we consider the monotony of the Scotch, WeUi, 
or Irish, why should we wonder that other nations should 
be as monotonous ? Let us view the Greek and Latin 
pronunciation on which side we will, we must, to be con- 
sistent with their own rules, feel them to be extremely 
monotonous. According to the laws of ancient prosody, 
every unaccented sellable must be lower than that whidi 
is accented ; and if so, a most disagreeable monotony 
must necessarily ensue ; for as every word in Latin, and 
almost every word in Greek, of more than one syllable, 
ended with the grave accent, that is, in a lower tone than 
the preceding syllables, almost every word in those lan- 
guages ended with the same tone, let that tone have been 
what it would*. 

29. I am supported in this conjecture, notwithstanding 
all the fine things f the ancients, and many of the mo- 



nice tonical pronanciation of the ancients could be expressed by a 
modern, it would be disagreeable to our ears. 

* This is certainly too general an assertion, if we consider the real 
pronunciation of the Oreek language according to accent ; as it must 
be allowed, that a great number of Greek words were accented with 
the acute or circumflex on the last syllable. But when we consider 
the modem pronunciation of Greek, which confounds it with the 
Latin, we shall not have occasion to recall the assertion. To which 
we may add, that those words in Greek that were circnmficfxed on 
the last syllable may very properly be said to end with the grave 
accent; and that those which had a grave upon the final syllable 
altered the grave to an acute only when they were pronounced alooe, 
when they came before an enclitic, or when they were at the end of 
the sentence. 

t The Grecian sage (says Dr. Burney), according to Gravina, was 
at once a philosopher, a poet, and a musician. '^ In separating these 
** characters," says he, " they have all been weakened ; the system of 
^' philosophy has been contracted ; ideas have failed in poetry, and 
'* force and energy in song. Truth no longer subsists among mankind : 
^* the philosopher speaks not at present through the medium of poetry ; 
** nor is poetry heard any more through the vehicle of melody.**— 
" Now to my apprehension," says Dr. Burney, " the reverse of all 
" this is exactly true : for, by being separated, each of these profes- 
*^ sions receives a decree of cultivation, which fortifies and renders it 
** more powerful, if not more illustrious. The music of ancient phi- 
*^ losophers, and the philosophy of modern musicians, I take to be 
** pretty equal in excellence.** — History qf Muaicy vol. i. page 162.— 
Here we see good sense and sound philosophy contrasted with the 
blind admiration and empty flourish of an overgrown school-boy con- 
eluding his theme. 



GSESK AND LATIN ACCENT. 297 

derns, say of the Ysriety and harmony of the Greek and 
Latin hmguages, by the definition which they give of 
the circumflex accent ; which is, that it was a combina- 
tion of the acute and grave upon the same syllable. 
This is so incomprehensible to modem ears, that scarcely 
any one but the author of the present Observations has 
attempted to explain it by experiment. It stands for 
nothing but long quantity in all oiur schools ; and, con- 
trary to the clearest testimonies of anti(]uity, it has, by 
Dr. Gaily*, and a late respectaUe writer on the Greek 
and Latin Prosodies, been explained away into nothing 
more than the acute accent. But if it means a raising 
and felling of the voice upon the same syllable, which is 
the definition the ancients uniformly ^ve of it, it is just 
as easy to conceive as raising and fallmg the voice upon 
successive syllables, or, in other words, as going from a 
lower tone to a higher upon one syllable, and from a 
higher to a lower upon the next : and this consideration 
leads me to conjecture, that the acute accent of the an- 
cients was really the rising inflexion, or upward slide of 
the voice ; for this being once supposed, nothing is so 
easy as to demonstrate the circumflex in our own lan- 
guage ; which, without this clew, it will be impossible to 
do in the ancient languages ; and even with it, we must 
be astonished that they had but one circiunflex ; since it is 
just as easy to fall and raise the voice upon the same 
syllable, as to raise and fall it f. 



* Dissertation against Greek Accents, page 53. 

f To add to our astonishment, that the Greek and Latin languages 
had but one circumflex, what can be more wonderful, than that 
among so many of the ancients who have written on the causes of 
eloquence, and who have descended to »nch trifling and childish ob- 
servations upon the importance of letters and syllables, we should 
not find a single author who has taken notice of the importance of 
emphasis on a single word i Our modern books of elocution abound 
with instances of the change produced in the sense of a sentence by 
changing the place of the emphasis : but no such instance appears 
among the ancients. Not one poor Will you ride to twm to»day ! 

Our wonder will increase when we consider that the ancients fre« 
quently mention the different meaning of a word as it was differently 
accented ; that is, as the acute or circumflex was placed upon one 
tyUable or another ; but they never hint that the sense of a sentence 
U altered by an emphasis being placed upon different words. The 

o a 



298 OBSERVATIOl^S ON THE 

30. But our wonder at these peculiarities of the Greek 
and Latin languages will cease, when we turn our 
thoughts to the dramatic performances of the people who 
spoke these languages. Can any thing astonish us more, 
than that all tneir tragedies and comedies were set to 
music, and actually accompanied by musical instru- 
ments ? How is our laughter, as well as our wonder, 
excited, when we are told, that sometimes one actor ges- 
ticulated, while another recited a speech, and that the 
greater admiration was bestowed upon the former ! Nay, 
to raise the ridicule to the highest pitch, we are informed 
that actors in their speeches, and the chorus in their 
songs, accompanied the performances by dancing ; that 
the actors wore masks lined with brass, to give an echo- 
ing sound to the voice, and that these masks were marked 
with one passion on one side, and with a contrary pas- 
sion on the other ; and that the actor turned that side to 
the spectators which corresponded to the passion of the 
speech he was reciting. These extraor^nary cbcum- 
stances are not gathered &om obscure passages of the 
ancients, picked up here and there, but are brought to us 
by the general and united voice of all antiquity ; and 
therefore, however surprising, or even ridiculous, they 
may seem, are undoubtedly true. 

ambiguity arising from the same words bein^ differently accented b 
so happily exemplified by the author of the Greek and Latin Pro- 
sodies, that I shall use his words. " Alexander Aphrodisiensis illos- 
'* trates this species of sophism, by a well-chosen example of a law, 
" in which the sense depends entirely upon the accuracy of accentu- 
*' ation. *ET<ti^a ;^^(/«-/i» u ^o^oin ^tifiifta t^ru. The word infit^f*», with the 
*^ acute accent upon the antepenult, is the neater nominative plural, 
** in apposition with ;^^(/r/». And the sense is, ' If a courtezan wear 
" golden trinkets, let them (viz. her golden trinkets) be forfeited to 
*^ the public use.' But if the accent be advanced to the penult, the 
'< word, without any other change, becomes the feminine nominative 
*' singular, and must be taken in apposition with irai^a. And thus 
** the sense will be, * If a courtezan wear golden ringlets, let her be- 
" come public property.* This is a very notable instance of the po- 
" litical importance of accents, of written accents in the Greek lan- 
*' guage. For if this law had been put in writing without any accent 
^< upon the word inftotrta there would have been no means of decidiog 
" between two constructions ; either of which, the words, in this 
** state, would equally have admitted : and it must have remained an 
*< inexplicable doubt, whether the legislator meant, that the poor 
" woman should only forfeit her trinkets, or become a public slave." 



GREEK AND LATIN ACCENT. 299 

31. Perhaps it will be said, is it possible that those 
who have left us such proofs of their good sense and ex- 
quisite taste in their writings, statues, medals, and seals, 
could be so absurd in their dramatic representations.^ 
The thing is wonderfiil, it may be answered; but not 
more so than that they should not have seen the use of 
stirrups in riding, of the polarity of the loadstone in 
sailing, and of several other modem discoveries, which 
seem to have stared them fiill in the face without their 
perceiving it*. But is there any thing more common 
than to find, not only individuals, but a whole people, 



* We have the strongest proof in the world, that the ancient 
Greeks made use only of capital letters, that they were utterly ig- 
norant of punctuation, and that there was not the least space between 
words or sentences, but that there was an equal continuation of 
letters, which the reader was obliged to decipher, without any assist- 
ance from points or distances. Without the clearest evidence, could 
we suppose, that, while composition had reached the perfection it 
had done in Greece, orthography was in a state of barbarity worthy 
of the Cape of Good Hope ? 

Can any thing give us a more ludicrous idea, than the practice of 
the ancients in sometimes splitting a word at the end of a line, and 
commencing the next line with the latter part of the word ? This 
roust have been nearly as ridiculous as the following English verses 
in imitation of this absurd practice. 

Pyrrhus, you tempt a danger high. 
When you would steal from angry li- 
Oness her cubs, and soon shall fly 

inglorious. 

For know tlie Romans, yon shall find 
By virtue more and generous kind- 
Ness, than by force or fortune blind, 
victorious. 

Notwithstanding the hackneyed epithet of Gothic barbarity applied 
to verse in rhyme, is it not wonderful that a species of versification, 
approved by Italy, France, and England, in their best periods of 
poetry, should never once have been tried by the Greeks and 
Romans? — that they should never have straggled, either by chance, 
or for the sake of change, into so pleasing a jingle of sounds ? They 
who would write poems, and so lengthen or shorten the lines, as to 
form axes, wings, and altars, might, without any imputation on their 
taste, have, now and then, condescended to rhyme. In short, that 
the ancients should never have slid into rhyme, is a circumstance 
which would never have been believed, had it been possible to doubt 
it ; and 1 fear it must be classed with that long catalogue of unac- 
countables, with which their prosody, their rhetoiic, and their drama 
abound* 



300 OBSERVATIONS ON THE 

who, though remarkably excellent in some things, are 
surprisingly deficient in others ? So true is the observa- 
tion of Middleton, who, speaking of those who have 
written on the pronunciation of the Greek and Latin 
languages, says : " Ab illis vero scriptoribus etsi plurima 
" ingeniose atque erudite disputata sint, nonnulla tamen 
*^ deesse, multa dubie, quaedam etiam falso posita animad- 
" verti ; idque hac in causd accidisse, quod in caeteris 
" plerisque solet, ut mortalium nemini detur rem inve- 
" nisse simul et perfecisse." De Lat, Lit. Pronun. 

32. That singing a part in a tragedy should seem so 
unnatural* to us, arises chiefly from our being so little 



* Perhaps onr unwillingness to believe that the ancient dramas 
were set to music, arises from a very mistaken notion we have of 
their skill in that art. It is true we have not the same materials for 
judging of their music as we have of their poetry and sculpture ; but 
their ignorance of counterpoint, and the poverty of their instruments, 
sufficiently show what little progress they had made in it. Those 
very few remains of their music which have reached us, confirm ns 
in this conjecture ; and it is to the indefatigable pains of so good a 
scholar and so excellent a musician as Dr. Burney, that we are m- 
debted for an illustration of it. 

** At the end of a Greek edition of the astronomical poet, Aratos, 
** called Phaenomena," says Dr. Burney, " and their Scholia, pnb- 
*^ lished at Oxford in 176S ; the anonymous editor, supposed to be 
'^ Dr. John Fell, among several other pieces, has enriched the volume 
** with three hymns, which he supposed to have been written by a 
*■< Greek poet called Dionysius; of which the first is addressed to the 
'* muse Calliope^ the second to Apollo, and the third to Nemesis \ 
^*- and these hymns are accompanied with the notes of ancient music 
" to which they used to be sung. 

'* I know not whether justice has been done to these melodies ; all 
^* I can say is, that no pains have been spared to place them in the 
*< clearest and most favourable point of view ; and yet, with all the 
'^ advantages of modern notes and modern measures, if I had been 
*^ told that they came from the Cherokees or the Hottentots, I should 
** not have been surprised at their excellence. 

" I have tried them in every key and in every measure that the 
'^ feet of the verses would allow ; and as it has been the opinion of 
" some, that the Greek scale and music should be read Hebrew-wise, 
'' I have even inverted the order of the notes, but without being able 
^ to augment their grace and elegance. The most charitable snp- 
'' position that can be admitted concerning them is, that the Greek 
'* language, being itself accentuated and sonorous, wanted less as- 
'^ sistance from musical refinements than one that was more harsh 
'' and rough ; and music being still a slave to poetry, and wholly 
" governed by its feet, derived all its merits and effects from the ex- 
*' cellence of the verse^ and sweetness of the voice that sung or rather 



GBieSK AND LATIN ACCENT. 301 

accustomed to it. Singing in the pulpit seems to the 
ftill as extraordinary ; and yet this song was so powerftd 
about a century or two ago, and lator in Scotland*, as to 
make mere speaking, though with the utmost energy, 
appear flat and insipid. Let the human voice be but m 
a fine tone, and let this tone be intensely impassioned, 
and it will infallibly, as Milton expresses it. 



take the prison'd soul, 



And lap it in Elysium 

33. What may tend to reconcile us still more to this 
dramatic music, is the singsong manner, as it is called, 
of pronouncing tragedy, which very generally prevailed 
before the time of Mr. Garrick, and which now prevails 
among some classes of speakers, and is preferred by them 
to, what we call, the more natural manner. This drawl- 
ing, undulating pronunciation, is what the actors gene- 
raUy burlesque by repeating the line, 

Tum ti tum ti, tum ti tum ti tum ti : 

'^ recited it : for mellifloons and affecting voices nature bestows from 
** time to time on some gifted mortals in all the habitable regions of 
*^ the Earth ; and even tiie natural effusions of these must ever have 
'' been heard with delight. But as music, there needs no other proof 
*^ of the poverty of ancient melody, than its being confined to long 
** and short syllables. We have some airs of the most graceful and 
** pleasing kind, which will suit no arrangement of syllables to be 
'* found in any poetical numbers, ancient or modern, and which it is 
'' impossible to express by mere syllables in any language with which 
** I am at all acquainted/' 

Dr. Burnejr's conjecture, that the Oreek music was entirely sub- 
servient to verse, accounts for the little attention which was paid to 
it in a separate state ; it accounts for the effects with which their 
music was accompanied, and for the total uselessness of counterpoiDt. 
Simple melody is the fittest music to accompany words, when we 
wish to understand what is sung ; simple melody is the music of the 
great bulk of mankind; and simple melody is never undervalued, till 
3ie ear has been sufficiently disciplined to discover the hidden me- 
lody, which is still essential to the most complicated and elaborate 
harmony. 

* The Rev. Mr. Whitfield was a highly animated and energetic 
preacher, without the least tincture of that tone which is called amt' 
ing. When he went to Scotland, where this tone was in high estima- 
tion, though his doctrine was in perfect unison with that of his audi- 
tors, his simple and natural, though earnest manner of speaking, 
was looked upon at first as a great defect. He wanted^ they said, the 
holy tone. 



302 OBSEEVATIONS ON THE 

and though this mode of declamatioii is now so much de- 
spised, it is highly probable that it was formerly held in 
estimation* 

34. Now, if we suppose this jdrawling p^nunciation, 
which, though very sonorous, is precisely speakings and 
essentially different from singing : if we suppose this to 
have been the conversation pronunciation of the Greeks 
and Romans, it may possibly throw some light upon the 
manner in which they pronoimced by accent and quantity 
at the same time : for though we can sufficiently conceive, 
that in common speaking in our own language we can 
make the accented syllable short, and the unaccented 
syllable long, as in the words qualify ^ specify^ elboWy 
inmate^ ice. ; yet in the drawling pronunciation we have 
been speaking of, the long unaccented vowels in these 
words are ibade much longer, and consequently more 
perceptible. 

35. But, if the accent of our language is so different 
from that of the Greek and Latin, our pronunciation 
must necessarily be very different likewise. The acute 
accent of the ancients being iilways higher than either 
the preceding or succeeding sylls^bles, and our accent, 
though always higher than the preceding, being some- 
times lower than the succeeding syllables, (see sect, vii.) 
there must certainly be a wide difference between our 
pronunciation and theirs. Let us, however, explain the 
Greek and Latin accent as we will, — let it be by singing, 
drawling, or common speaking, — it will be impossible to 
tell how a monotony could be avoided, when almost every 
word of more than one syllable in these languages must 
necessarily have ended in the same tone, or, if you will, 
with the same grave accent"|*. ^ 

* This cant, which, thoogh disgustful now to all but mere rustics, 
on account of its being out of fashion^ was very probably the favou- 
rite modulation iti which heroic verses were recited by our ancestors. 
So fluctuating are the taste and practices of mankind! But whether 
the power of language has received any advantage from the change 
just mentioned (namely, pronouncing words in a more simple manner) 
will appear at least very doub^ul, when we recollect the stories of 
its ibnner triumphs, and the iilherent charms of musical sounds.— 
The Art of delivering Written Language^ page 73. 

f Where was all that endless variety with which the modems puff 



GAEEK ANJ) LATIN ACCENT. 303 

36* After all, that the Greeks and Romans, in ex- 
plaining the causes of metrical and prosaic harmony, 
should sometimes descend to such minute particulars^ as 
app&ur to us trifling and imaginary, and at the same time 
neglect things whidi appear to us so essential ; that they 
should be so dark, and sometimes so contradictory in 
their account of accent and quantity, as to furnish oppo- 
site systems among the modems, with ample quotations 
in favour of each ; — is this more wonderful than that Mr. 
Sheridan-f", who was so good an actor, and who htfd spent 
so miidi time in studying and writing on elocution, should 
say that accent was only a louder pronunciation of the 
accented syUable, and not a higher ? But as this same 
Mr. Sheridan, in his Art of Readings has excellently 

off the Greek language, when it had bnt one circnmflex ? The human 
Toice is just as. capable of falling and rising upon the same syllable 
as rising and billing ; and why so palpable a combination of sounds 
as the rormer should be utteriy unknown to the Greeks and Latins, 
can be resolved into nothing but (horresco referens) their ignorance 
of the principles of human speech; 

* Nee illi (Demostheni) turpe videbatur vel optimis relictis ma- 
gistris ad canes se conferre, et ab illh ^ literae vim et naturam petere, 
illorumque in sonando, quod satis esset, morem imitari— .ild. Meker, 
de vet, et reet, Pron, Ling, Graca^ page 14. 

It it an observation of Chambers, author of the Cyclopaedia, that 
nonsense sounds worse in the English than in any other language : 
let us try the experiment by transiting the above passage.--^* Nor 
^' did Demosthenes think it below him to leave the company of the 
'^ most respectable people of Athens, and go to the dogs, in order to 
« learn <fro^^ them the nature of the letter r, and, by observing the 
<^ sound they gave it, to imitate, as much as was necessary, their 
*< manner of pronouncing it." 

What encomiums do we meet with in Cicero, of the delicacy of the 
ears even of the common people of Rome ; who, if an actor on the 
stage made the least error in accent or quantity, were immediately 
sensible of it, and would express their disapprobation. But' I am 
apt to thinky that an English actor, who should pronounce thedtre^ 
sendtor, or c(mqu4ftf with the accent on the second syllable, would 
not escape better than the Roman. 

f " The Scotchman utters the first syllable of battle, borrow , hahity 
^* in the middle tone, dwelling on the vowel ; and the second with a 
** sudden elevation of the voice, and short : as ba-ilef 6au-r5, hd-bit, 
^* The Englishman utters both Syllables without any perceptible 
*' change of tone and in equal time, as batftle, bor'row^ hoffit.** — Art of 
Reading, page 77. — ^The smallest degree of attention might have 
taught Mr. Sheridan, that though this is the prevailing, it is not the 
invariable, pronunciation of a Scotchman ; and that this elevation of 
voice, though more perceptible in a Scotchman from bis drawling 



304 OBSERVATIONS ON THE 

observed, that our perception of Latin quantity is ima« 
ginary, and arises not from the ear, but only from assot 
ciation, like spelling; so it maybe observed, thattha 
confrision and obsoirity which reign among all cue 
writers on accent and quantity seem to arise from an ideal 
perception of long quantity produced by double conson^ 
ants ; from confounding stress and quantity, which aroj 
so totally different; and from mistaking loud for high,! 
and soft for low, contrary to the clearest definitions of 
each*. 

37. But till the human voice, which is the same in aH 
ages and nations, is more studied and better understood, 
and till a notation of speaking sounds is adopted, I 

out his tones, is no less real in an Englislinian, who pronounces them 
quicker, and uses them less freqnently ; that is, he mixes the down- 
ward inflexion with them, which produces a variety. Bat these two 
inflexions of voice Mr. Sheridan was an utter stranger to. — See Ele- 
ments of Elocution, part II. page 183. 

* Nothing is more fallacious than that perception we seem to have 
of the sound of words being expressive of the ideas, and becoming, 
as Pope calls it, an echo to the sense. This coincidence, as Dr. John- 
son observes in one of his Ramblers, seldom exists any where but in 
the imagination of the reader. Dryden, who often wrote as carelessly 
as he thought, and often thought as carelessly as he lived, began a 
commendation of the sweetness and smoothness of two lines of Den- 
ham in praise of the Thames— 

** Thongh deep yet clear, though gentle yet not dull ; 
" Strong without rage, without overflowing fall." 

and this commendation of Dryden's has been echoed by all snbse- 

anent writers, who have taken it for granted that there is a flow in 
tie lines similar to that of the object described ; while the least atten- 
tion to those stops, so necessary on the accented and antithetic words, 
will soon convince us, that, however expressive the lines may be, 
they are as rugged and as little musical as almost any in the language. 
A celebrated critic observes — " I am apt to think the harmony of 
** the verse was a secret to Mr. Dryden, since it is evident he was not 
** acquainted with the caesural stops, by which all numbers are har- 
** monised. Dr. Bentley has observed, the beauty of the second 
«( verse consists in the t^^iis that sounds on the first syllable of the 
** Terse, which, in English heroics, should sound on the second ; for 
*^ this verse is derived from the Trimeter liunbic Brachycatdleetie.**'-' 
Manwaring*8 Stichoiogy, page 71. ^ 

When I read such profound observations in such learned terms, it 
brings to my mind the Mock Doctor in the farce, who shines away 
to the illiterate knight by repeating Propria qua maribus, &c.y and 
makes him most pathetically exclaim-^Ofc, why did I neglect my 
stufiiesl 



GREEK AND LATIN ACCENT. 305 

despair of conveying my ideas of this subject with suffi- 
cient clearness upon paper. I have, however, marked 
Buch an outline as may be easily filled up by those who 
study speaking with naif the attention they must do 
music. From an entire conviction, that the ancients had 
a notation of speaking sounds, and firom the actual expe- 
rience of having formed one myself, I think I can foresee 
that some Aiture philosophical inquirer, with more learn- 
ing, more leisure, and more credit with the world than I 
have, will be able to unravel this mystery in letters, 
which has so long been the opprobrium et cruw gram- 
maticorumj the reproach and torment of grammarians. 



THE END. 



G. Woodfall, Printer, Angel Court, Skinner Street, London. 



,i^ 



MAY 9 - 1056