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I i \< - < >> ! II ! s | V I 1 ( >| 



V ! \ J '. \ \ I \ 



STATE OF ALABAMA' 

Department of archives and history 



Alabama Official 

^Statistical 

Register 



1907 



* • • • 

* • . . * 



COMPILED BY 

THOM4S M. Owen, LL. D m Director 



Montgomery, Ala. 
Brown Printing Co., State Printer* and Binders 

1907 



• » 

• . • • • 



*tu.iJ~. 






PREFATORY NOTE. 

This volume is prepared under the authority, contained in Section 
live (5) of the Act of February 27, 1901, directing the publication, 
as follows : 

"An official and statistical register of the State of Alabama shall 
be compiled every two years by the Director, to contain (1) brief 
sketches of the several State officials, the members of Congress from 
Alabama, the Supreme Court Judges, the members of the Senate and 
House of Representatives of the State of Alabama; (2) rosters of 
all State and County officials; (3) lists of all State institutions, with 
officials ; (4) State and County population and election statistics, and 
(5) miscellaneous statistics; and said register shall be published in 
an edition of one thousand copies for free distribution, the printing 
and binding to be paid for as other printing and binding hereinbefore 
provided." 

The greatest possible care has been exercised in the effort to se- 
cure accuracy in all statements. No questionable facts have, so far 
as known, been included. The very latest facts and statistics have 
been given as far as obtainable. As an official compilation, therefore, 
it is hoped that it will be of every day use and value. 

Montgomery, Alabama, 1907. 



CONTENTS. 



Title page I 

Prefatory note 3 

Contents 5 

State Song — Alabama -^ 6 

Introduction 7 

I. State Executive Offices, Departments, Commis- . 

sions, and Boards io 

II. Senators and Representatives in Congress from 

Alabama . - 35 

III. Judicial Department 40 

IV. Legislative Department 55 

V. State Institutions 121 

VI. , Alabama National Guard 141 

VII. United States Officials in Alabama 151 

VIII. County Officers , 159 

IX. Population of Alabama by Counties and by Minor 

Civil Divisions 187 

X. Alabama Election Statistics, 1904 and 1906; and 

Statistics of Political Parties 230 

XI. Benevolent Institutions in Alabama 288 

XII. Newspapers and Periodicals Published i'n Alabama 290 

XIII. Alabama Agricultural and Industrial Statistics 297 

XIV. Physical Geography, Geology and Climate of Ala- 

bama , 324 

XV. Brief Classified Bibliography of Alabama - 352 

XVI. Miscellaneous Statistics 359 

Addenda 402 

Index 409 



ALABAMA. 
By Miss Julia S. Tutwiler. 

OUR STATE SONG — ADOPTED BY THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS OF THE 
STATE. 



AIR — HARWELL, OR THE AUSTRIAN NATIONAL HY.^N. 

1 ' " 4 * " ' 



Alabama, Alabama, 

We will aye be true to thee, 

From thy Southern shore where 

groweth, . ... 
By the sea thy orange tree, 
To thy Northern vale where flow- 

eth, 
Deep and blue thy Tennessee, 
Alabama, Alabama, 
We will aye be true to thee! 



From thy quarries where the mar- 
ble 
White as that of Pa ros gleams 
Waiting till thy sculptor's chisel, 
Wake to life thy poet's dreams; 
For not only wealth of nature, 
Wealth of mind hast thou in fee, 
Alabama, Alabama, 
We will aye be true to thee! 



Broad the Stream whose name thou 

bearest; 
Grand thy Bigbee rolls along; 
Fair thy Coosa — Tallapoosa; 
Bold thy Warrior, dark and strong ; 
Goodlier than the land that Moses 
Climbed lone Nebo's Mount to see, 
Alabama, Alabama, 
We will aye be true to thee! 



8 



From thy prairies broad and fertile, 
Where the snow-white cotton shines, 
To the hills where coal and iron 
Hide in thy exhaustless mines, 
Strong-armed miners — sturdy far- 
mers ; 
Loyal hearts whate'er we be, 
Alabama, Alabama, 
We will aye be true to thee! 



Where the perfumed 6outh-wind 

whispers, 

' Thy magnolia groves among, 

Softer than a mother's* kisses, 

Sweeter than a ; mother's song ; ■ 

Where the gplden jasmine trailing, 

Woos the treasure-laden bee, 

Alabama, Alabama, ' 

. We will aye, be true to thee ! 
■ t 

6 " ' 

» • . • • • • • . . > .»..-- 

Brave and pure thy men and wo- 
men, * 
Better this than corn and wine, 
Make us worthy, God in heaven, 
Of this goodly land of thine; 
Hearts as open as our doorways, 
Liberal lands and spirits free, 
Alabama, Alabama, 
We will aye be true to thee! 



Little, little, can I give thee, 

Alabama, mother mine; 

But that little — hand, brain, spirit, — 

All I have and am are thine, 

Take, O take the gift and giver, 

Take and serve thyself with me, 

Alabama, Alabama! 

I will aye be true to thee. 



INTRODUCTION. 



THE STATE NAME— ALABAMA. 

' . • • • \ 

The etymology of the word or name Alabama has evoked much discus- 
sion among American philological students. It was the name of a. noted 
Southern Indian tribe,' whose habitat, when first known to Europeans, was 
in central Alabama. The greatest river In the State received its name from 
this tribe, and from the river, in turn, the name of the State was derived, 
The tribal name Alabama is spelled in various ways ,by the early chron- 
iclers, Spanish, French and English, some of which forms are herd given: 
Alabama, Albania, Alebamon, Alibama, Alibamo, Allbamou, Alibamon, 
Alabamu, Allibamou. . The name first occurs in three of the chronicles of 
De Soto's expedition, of 1540, written Alibamo by La Vega, Alimamu by the 
Knight of Elvas, and Limamu by Iianjel, in the last form the initial vowel 
is dropped, and in both, the last two, the. first "m" is used for "b," an inter- 
change of these two consonants being common in Indian languages. The 
name as recorded by these chroniclers, In this case, was the name of a sub- 
division of the Chickasaws, not the historic Alabamas of later timea 

The popular belief, which is engrafted in a number of current histories 
and geographies, is that Alabama signifies, "Here we rest." This very 
pleasing etymology can be traced to the late Judge A. B. Meek, of Mobile. 
In. 1855, Judge Meek published his noted poem, The Red. Eagle, in which 
occurs the following passage: 

"Till over Alabama's verdant breast 

Her eagled hills and deer crooped dells 

in pride the free-born Indian dwells 

As when of yore, he styled it, 'Here we rest.' " 

Soon after the publication of this book, Judge Meek was asked by a 
friend, Judge W. C. Richardson", of Tuscaloosa, what authority he had for 
translating Alabama, "Here we rest." 'The reply was, None whatever— 
that it was merely a poetical figment of his own. That rest rhymed with 
breast and that was all of it. This statement of Judge Meek should be 
considered filial and authoritative. And yet in his Romantic Passages in 
Southern Western History, published in 1857, two years later, Judge Meek 
in a foot note referring to the Chickasaw fortress ot Alibamu, writes: 
"This is no doubt the original of the word Alabama, which is said to sig- 
nify in the Muscogee tdngue — "Here we rest." This foot note of 1857 can 
not be reconciled with the statement of 1855. But Judge Meek was by ho 
means consistent in his belief: In the same work just cited, in attempting 
to show that the Hillabees were identical with the Alabamas, he dogmati- 
cally assumes that "the soft word Alabama, whose derivation has been 
much disputed, is compounded of Alaba, the name of the tribe, and the 
guttural ejaculation ma or me, so commonly used by the natives iu conver- 
sation." Judge Meek lived before scientific Indian philology had been de- 
veloped, otherwise, he would have known that the suffix ma, upon which 
he lay's so much stress, is, in Choctaw, a compelldtive contradistinctive, 
use4 in a direct address to a person or thing, somewhat corresponding to 
our English interjection "Oh," and hence can never form part or 
parcel of a tribal name. From these inconsistencies, it can be plainly seen 
that Judge Meek, though the inventor of the beautiful legend, "Here we 
rest," was evidently in doubt as to the etymology of Alabama. 

As to the Muscogee origin of the name, thorough experts in that dialect 
have confessed their inability to find in it any word or phrase similar to 
Alabama and meaning "here we rest" 

(7) 



8 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

But the problem is not hopeless. According to the recent investigations 
of Indianologists, the tribal name, Alabama, must be sought in the Choc- 
taw tongue, as it was not uncommon for tribes to accept, as a national or 
tribal name, an appellation bestowed upon them by some contiguous tribe. 
The late Rev. Allen Wright, a highly educated Choctaw, translates the 
name as "Thicket-clearers," compounded of Alba," a thicket or n\ass of veg- 
etation, and "amo," to clear, to collect, to gather up. 

H. S. Halbert,' by independent study, about the same time, arrived at the 
same conclusion as that given by Mr. Wright, and translates the name as 
"Vegetation-gatherers," that is, gatherers of vegetation in clearing land for 
agricultural purposes. The word "alba" means such small vegetation as 
herbs, plants, shrubs and bushes, which were gathered in clearing land, 
and the word can be applied collectively to a thicket* Hence the transla- 
tion as given by the Rev. Allen Wright and that of Mr. Halbert practically 
agree. The passive voice of amo is almo. In elaborating his views in de- 
fense of his position, Mr. Halbert gives two examples of Choctaw local 
names, "Kantak almo" and "Oski almo," meaning respectively, China brier 
there gathered, and Cane there gathered. If the tribes or clans living at 
these localities had received special names from their avocations, they 
would have been known as Kantakamo and Oskamo, just as the noted Indian 
tribe in the pre-hlstorlc past could Well have received the, name, Alba amo, 
by fusion of vowels Albamo, from, some neighboring Choctaw-speaking 
tribe, not yet emerged from the hunting into the agricultural state. 

It is an interesting fact that the late Dr. Albert S. Gatschet in his Creek 
Migration Legend, p. 85, accepts the etymology of Rev. Allen Wright as 
above set forth. 

Dr. Wm. S. Wyman, of Tuscaloosa, one of the best known students of the 
State, inclines to the belief that the word means Mulberry people. He says 
that on the oldest French maps the Alabama river is called "Coussa," from 
which he conjectures that the name 'Alabama was first given to it by the 
French, after they built Fort Toulouse in 1714. He says further that in 
Tristan de Luna's time (1559) the river was sometimes called "Olibahali", 
or "Ullibali," which is pretty close to the French form, "Alibamon," or "Al'a- 
bamo." In the language of the Alabama tribe he says that "Ullebehalli" 
means Mulberry people. 

Inquiry among the early Indians themselves appears to have been with- 
out results as to the meaning of the word. Gen. Thomas S.. Woodward in 
his fascinating book of Reminiscences of the Creek or Muscogee Indians, 
p. 12, says : "I had heard Col. Hawkins say in his time, that he had made 
every inquiry in his power to ascertain if Alabama had any other meaning 
than the mere name of an Indian town, but never could, unless the name — 
as it was possible — might be the Indian corruption of the Spanish words 
for good water, though he doubted that." 

Discarding, then, "Here we rest" as something philologically untenable, 
but retaining it as something that may hold its own in the realm of poetry 
and romance, we may look forward with confidence to the investigations 
of scholars which may fully solve the mystery of the name. And until sup- 
planted by something upon which not a shadow of doubt may rest, we 
may for the present be content with the "Vegetation-gatherers," who, in 
their aboriginal field-making, were surely and necessarily "Thicket-clear- 
ers." 

Note. — Since the foregoing was written, a paragraph was found in the 
Southern Advocate, Huntsville, Jan. 22, 1851, which contains apparently 
the earliest explanation of the legendary meaning of the State name. 
Although it is somewhat in conflict with the text above, it is given in full 
for the information of students and others. 

" 'Alabama' signifies, in the Indian language, 'Here we rest/ A story 
is told of a tribe of Indians who fled from a relentless foe to the trackless 
forest of the Southwest. Weary and travel-worn, they reached a noble 
river, which flowed through a beautiful country. The chieftain of the 
band struck his tent-pole in the ground and exclaimed, 'Alabama! Ala- 
bama!' (Here we rest! Here we rest!) 



, »» 



INTRODUCTlbN. 9 

GREAT SEAL OF STATE. 

The original State seal consisted of a circular disk, on which was a map 
of Alabama, displaying the principal rivers. This design was, in 1818, 
suggested by Governor William Wyatt Bibb, for the use of Alabama Ter- 
ritory, and when the constitution of 1819 was adopted, it was provided 
(Sec. 12, Art. IV) that "the present seal of the territory shajl be the seal 
of the State, until otherwise directed by the General Assembly." This seal 
remained in use until changed by act of Dec. 29, 1868, — Acts, 1868, p. 77. 

This act, descriptive of the present State seal, carried forward, through 
successive revisions, to the Code of 1896, vol. I, is as follows: 

"3727 (18). Great Seal of State.— The seal shall be circular, and the di- 
ameter thereof two and a quarter inches ; near the edge of the circle shall 
be the word "Alabama," and opposite this word, at the same distance from 
the edge, shall be the words "Great Seal." In the center of the seal there 
shall be a representation of an eagle and a shield, and upon such part of the 
seal as the governor may direct, there shall be the words "Here we rest." 
The seal shall be called the "Great Seal of the State of Alabama." 



STATE FLAG. 

The State flag is displayed, in colors, as a frontispiece to the present 
volume. It was adopted by act of Feb. 16, 1895, introduced into the Gen- 
eral "Assembly by John W. A. Sanford, Jr., then a member of the House ot 
Representatives from Montgomery county. — (Acts, 1894-95, p. 719). The 
description, from the Code of 1896, Vol. i. is as follows: 

"3751. Flag of the State.— The flag of the State of Alabama shall be a 
crimson cross of St. Andrew on a field of white. The bars forming the 
cross shall not be less than six inches broad, and must extend diagonally 
across the flag, from side to side. 

"3572. When displayed.— The flag of the State shall be hoisted on the 
dome of the capitol when the two houses of the General Assembly are in 
session and shall be used by the State on all occasions when it may be nec- 
essary or customary to display a flag, except when, in the opinion of the 
governor, the national flag should be displayed." 



STATE FLOWER. 

No State flower. 

However, some years ago, in a number of the schools of the State the 
pupils voted in favor of the selection of the golden rod. As an index of 
the feeling of the State on the subject the following resolution, approved 
Feb. 18, 1893, recognizing this flower as "national," is given : 

"Resolved, By the House of the Representatives, the Senate concurring, 
that the wild flower, known as the Golden Rod, is hereby recognized as the 
national flower of the United States of America."— A cts, 1892-93. 



I. STATE EXECUTIVE OFFICES, 
PARTMENTS, COMMISSIONS, 

AND BOARDS. 



CHIEF EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT. 

(Code of Alabama, Vol. i, Sec. 1953 et seq. t and Constitution, Article V.) 

Governor. — His Excellency Braxton Bragg Comer, of Birmingham. 
Lieutenant-Governor. — Henry Bramlette Gray, of Birmingham. 
Private Secretary. — William Edwards Fort, of Birmingham. 
Recording Secretary. — James Howell Nunnelee, of Selma. 
Stenographer. — Miss Katherine Watts Collins, of Montgomery. 
Keeper of the Capitol. — Wm. E. Fort, ex-offtcio. 
Capitol Watchmen. — Wm. H. Crusius, of Montgomery. 

Jesse Hamilton, of Greensboro. 

Wm, J. Reynolds, of Montgomery. 

Thomas Taylor, of Montgomery. 

Harrison C. Yelverton, of Ozark. 
Garower.-^Adolph Dietrich, of Montgomery. 

Capitol Servants. — Kelly Adams, George W. Doak, Walter Grant and Tom 

Shorter, (all colored.) 

BRAXTON BRAGG COMER, Governor of Alabama, was born Nov. 7, 
1848, at old Spring Hill, Barbour county. He- te the ftrortfr *on-of John 
Fletcher and Catherine (Drewry) Comer, and the grandson of Hugh Moss 
Comer, and John and Elizabeth (Wallace) Drewry. The Comers are of 
English and Irish stock, early seated in Virginia, and it is an interesting 
co-incidence*that the family is related to the family of Clement Comer Clay, 
a native of Virginia, and Governor of Alabama, 1835-37. It is related that 
the first Comer ancestor to locate in the old Dominion was a Cromwellian. 
Hugh Moss Comer, in the early years of the nineteenth century left Vir- 
ginia, and located in Jones county, Georgia. Here he prospered and reared 
his family, living the life of a Southern planter. The Drewrys are also 
of Virginia ancestry, bat resided in Jones county, Ga. John F. Comer had 
held judicial position in this county, and in his after life he was always 
called "Judge." After his marriage he followed a brother to Alabama, and 
located at Spring Hill, in Barbour county. This was in 1837, almost co- 
incident w.kn'the removal of the Indians from the State. At Spring Hill 
his bratlier had built a home and a water mill. Securing his property, 
John'F. Comer planted his household gods, and here spent the remainder 
of a useful life. He was a progressive citizen, his plantation area wid- 
-^ued, he built a steam grist mill to take the place of the crude water mill, 
and in 1853-54 he represented Barbour county in the Legislature. He died 
at the early age of forty-seven. His old estate has been kept intact^-and 
is now the property of -his son, the Governor. Governor Comer spent his 
childhood in ySfe/ healthy environment y j nst deoepibed, and as soon as he 
was of sufficient age he was put to siich work as he could perform. At 
ten years of age he began his school lrfo. His teacher,- under whom he 
studied for eight years^was. Prof. E. N. Brown, a noted pedagogtterftndftf- 
t flrwarHs fitnto Sonainr -from Russell teotmty. In 1864 he was sent 
to the State University at Tuscaloosa, put in the spring of 1865 his 
college career was cut short with the burning of the University build- 

(10) 



\ 



STATE EXECUTIVE OFFICES. U 

lngs by Gen. John T. Croxton. Ofrrnmor H n inln i n 1 1 ri d re r all rr tim i 

o f the exciting caporionoca of April 4 , 1865 , wh a n tha cad e ts wwa hu r- 
riedl y mar ch e d to»»^--*h*-*»rh*~»h» finwnn glnro nf tho hurling hnilriingq 

lighting; their way for a- krag- di s tanc e . — Thft tifttintri w a r e (U n h e e de d at Mn 
rinn and Mp i Comer w alked hom e . ■ After another year on the farm, he 
entered the University of Georgia but he was compelled to leave on account 
of his health. He then entered Emory and Henry College, Va., where he 
took his A. B. degree in 1869. He therefore enjoys the unique distinction 
of being an alumnus of three institutions, although only a graduate of one. 
At Emory and Henry he took college honors, and won a medal for special 
proficiency in natural science. After graduation Mr. Comer returned to 
Spring Hill, and to the task and problems of plantation management under 
new and trying conditions. In 1872 he married, and leaving the old place, 
he erected a spacious home at Comer Station on the Eufaula railroad. 
Until 1885 he led the life of planter here, his Interests growing and his 
character maturing. Determining upon a wider career In business, in 1885, 
with his family he removed to Anniston, where under the firm name of 
Comer & Trapp (^£3kf£rapp), he conducted a wholesale grocery and com- 
mission business. Five years later he located in Birmingham, where he 
has since continuously resided. There he* became president of the City Na- 
tional Bank, and at the same time manager of the Birmingham Cotton 
Mills. Leaving the active management of the bank, he has in recent years 
devoted his time to cotton manufacturing, together with farming and corn 
milling. He has never disposed of his plantation in Barbour county, but 
on the contrary, has constantly improved his farming opportunities. While 
a planter in Barbour county, Mr. Comer was a member of the commission- 
ers court of that county, serving from 1874 to 1880. The holding of this 
minor, though important office, did not indicate any political tendencies or 
aspirations on the part of Mr. Comer, and he held no other office until 
1904 when he defeated Hon. John V. Smith for re-election as president of 
the State Railroad Commission. In entering this race Mr. Comer sought 
thereby to place himself in position to secure certain reforms in the man- 
agement of public service corporations. His convictions on the subject 
date back twenty years, and his race for Governor in which he defeated 
Lieutenant-Governor Russell M. Cunningham for the nomination on Aug. 
27, 1906, in the Democratic primary, was predicated on the hope that in the 
larger position he could better realize these convictions. On Nov. 6, 1906, 
he was elected by a vote of 61,223 to 9,976 for Asa E. Stratton, Republican, 
and 417 for J. N. Abbott, Socialist. During his whole life Governor Comer 
has been loyal and true to Democratic principles, although he has never 
served on the committees of the party. For more than thirty years he has 
been an active church worker, serving as Sunday-school superintendent 
at Comer, and also as such in the First Methodist Episcopal church in 
Birmingham, and also as a steward and a trustee. He is a member of 
Masonic fraternity. On Oct. 1, 1872, at Cuthbert, Ga., he was married to 
Eva Jane, daughter of John and Sally (Bailey) Harris, one of the promi- 
nent families of Randolph county, Ga. 

HENRY BRAMLETTE GRAY, of Birmingham, was born Feb. 8, 1867, 
at Calhoun, Gordon county, Ga. He is the son of Zachary Thompson and 
Hannah Elizabeth (Kiker) Gray, and the grandson of John and Chloe 
Gray, and of Evan Alexander and Jane (Smith) Kiker. His father, Z. T. 
Gray, was a native of Stone Mountain, Ga., enlisted in Co. "G." 2nd. Georgia 
Volunteers, C. S. A., and rose to the rank of captain in that Co. The pa- 
ternal grand-parents of the lieutenant-governor resided at Summerville, 
while his maternal grandparents lived at Calhoun, Ga. Mr. Gray received 
a good common school education in the public schools of Calhoun and 
Atlanta, Ga. In 1885 he entered upon a newspaper career in the service 
of the Atlanta Constitution. Removing in 1887 to the city of Birmingham, 
he was on the staff of the Age-Herald from that year until 1892. He was 
elected a member of the board of aldermen of Birmingham in 1896, and of 
the board of education in 1897, positions he still retains. In 1900 he was 



1 2 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

elected by the people treasurer of Jefferson county. In which position he 
served for four years. He served as inspector general of rifle practice with 
the rank of colonel, on the staff of Gov. William D. Jelks from 1901 to 1906. 
He was a member of the Jefferson County Democratic executive commit- 
tee, 1896 to 1900, and was chairman of the campaign committee, 1898. 
He is a member of St. Mary's on the Highlands (Protestant Episcopal) 
Church; and is also a member of the Masons. Knights Templar, Shriners, 
Knights of Pythias, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and the Benevolent 
Protective Order of Elks. Since 1895 Col. Gray has been President of the 
Peoples Savings Bank & Trust Co., one of Jefferson county's most reliable 
financial institutions. For some years, as a representative of the Sons .of 
Veterans, he was an aid on the staff of Gen. John B. Gordon, Commander- 
in-Chief, U. C. V. In the primary election of 1906 he was nominated to 
the position of lieutenant-governor over Messrs. D. J. Meador, of Myrtle- 
wood, and Emmet A. O'Neal, of Florence. On April 15, 1891, in Birming- 
ham, he was married to Bessie, daughter of Col. Alburto and Louise 
(Mudd) Martin, and granddaughter of John Martin and of Judge William 
S. and Florence (Earle) Mudd, all of old and distinguished families of 
Jefferson County. 

WILLIAM EDWARDS FORT, of Birmingham, private secretary to 
the Governor, was born April 8, 1875, near Keyser, in the county of Robe- 
son, N. C, and is the son of James Wilson and Mary Elizabeth {Mima) 
Fort, both natives of Darlington county, South Carolina, and the grand- 
son of Josiah Albert and Anue (Kirven) Fort, and of Rev. James Ses- 
sions and Sarah (Mclver) Mims. James Wilson Fort is a planter, mer- 
chant and manufacturer, served during the last two years of the War 
of Secession in the military branch of the service from South Carolina, 
and has successively resided in Darlington, S. C, Keyser and Fayetteville, 
N. C, and Blakely, Ga. Prof. Mims was long prominent as a leading min- 
ister of the Baptist denomination, and was at one time a teacher in the 
Southern Theological Seminary. Mrs. Sarah (Mclver) Mims was a half 
sister of Chief Justice Mclver of the Supreme Court of S. C. Mr. Fort 
was educated in the public schools, was a student in the Mercer Univer- 
sity, Macon, Ga., 1892 to 1894, where he won prizes for general excellence 
and oratory in his junior year. He graduated in 1896 with the LL. B. 
degree from the Washington University after a two years course, 
winning the first debaters' prize medal. He located in Dallas, Tex., 
where he practiced law 1896 to 1898, serving for a time as assistant 
county attorney; and removed to Birmingham in 1899, where he has con- 
tinuously practiced his profession. He has never held public office other 
than his present position. Mr. Fort is a Democrat, and in 1906 served as vice 
chairman of the State Democratic campaign committee. He has taken 
a prominent, part in the local politics of Jefferson county, serving as cam- 
paign manager for W. E. Weir, present chief of police of Birmingham, 
and also of the late John J. Altman, chancellor of the N. W. chancery 
district cf Alabama. He was president of the Comer Rate Reform Club, 
and served as manager, in Jefferson county, for Governor B. B. Comer in 
1906. He is a member of the Protestant Episcopal Church; the Masons, 
the Knights of Pythias, and the Red Men. On Oct. 22, 1904, at Baltimore, 
Md., he was married to Mary Adele, daughter of George Roberts and Mary 
Adele (Robertson) Brooks, and the granddaughter of Prof. Nathan and 
Mary (Oobrecht) Brooks, all of Md. 

JAMES HOWELL NUNNELEE, of Selma. recording secretary, was born 
January 26, 1858, at Eutaw, Greene county, and is the son of Stephen 
Franklin and Mary Amanda (Murphy) Nunnelee, and the grandson of 
Howell Nunnelee and of James Murphy. The Nunnelee family is Welsh, 
locating first in Virginia, whence descendants removed to Georgia, where 
Howell Nunnelee was born. Removing to Alabama he located at Morgan's 
Hill. The Murphys are Scotch-Irish and removed from York District, S. 
G, to Greene county, Ala. Stephen F. Nunnelee, at the time of his death 



STATE EXECUTIVE OFFICES. 13 

In 1907, was one of the oldest newspaper publishers In the State, having 
resided at Eutaw, Pleasant Ridge, Carrollton and Tuscaloosa, and he was 
a Confederate soldier. J. H. Nunnelee was educated in the common 
schools of Greene county, and at Archibald institute, Pleasant Ridge. Bte 
entered a printing office at the age of twenty, and has continuously been a 
printer and editor to the present time. He was a member of the State 
Senate from Dallas county, 1898-1900, and had held no other public office 
until his appointment to his present position of recording secretary to the 
governor. He is a Democrat; a Presbyterian; and a Mason. During his 
journalistic career he has edited and published the following papers : Tus- 
caloosa Gazette, 1878-88; Anniston Evening News, 1888-92; and Selma 
Morning Times, 1892-1907. His wife is Emma Leonard, daughter of Leon- 
ard B. and Maria (Williams) Neal, and the granddaughter of Judge Mar- 
maduke and Agnes {Payne) Williams, of Tuscaloosa. 



OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF STATE. 

Secretary. — Frank Newsum Julian, of Tuscumbia. 
Deputy Insurance Commissioner. — Albert Campbell Sexton, of Cull- 
man county. 
Chief Clerk. — Cyrus Billingslea Brown, of Birmingham. 
Stenographer. — Miss Mamie Lacey Offutt, of Montgomery. 

' FRANK NEWSUM JULIAN, of Tuscumbia, was born June 18, 1872, in 
that town, and is the son of William Reese and Elizabeth Melissa 
{Croxton) Julian, and the grandson of George Irvin and Martha Lavinia 
{Reese) Julian, and of Elijah and Eleanor Johnson {Scott) Croxton, the 
latter couple living in S. C." The Croxtons are descended from John 
Croxton, an Irish peer; while Mrs. E. J. Croxton was a first cousin of 
Gen. Winfleld Scott. The father, Wm. R. Julian, was born near Moulton, 
in Lawrence county; served with gallantry in the Mexican War under Col. 
Jefferson Davis, was the first soldier over the walls of Monterey and was 
promoted to a sergeantcy; commissioned as lieutenant of artillery by 
A. B. Moore, Governor of the "Independent State of Alabama," Jan. 31, 
1861; entered the cavalry branch of the service and was under Generals 
Forrest and Roddy; and was the first sheriff of Colbert county, to which 
office he was twice re-elected. Frank Julian was educated in the common 
schools. In May, 1885, when only thirteen years of age, he entered the 
printing office of the 'North Alabamian, at that time owned by Capt. A. H. 
Keller, father of Helen Keller, where he remained until 1889. After 
three years of clerical work he spent a year, 1892, on the St. Louis Post- 
Dispatch; returned to weekly newspaper work in 1893, in which business 
he has since engaged. Mr. Julian early took an interest in political af- 
fairs, serving six years as secretary of the Democratic executive com- 
mittee of Colbert county; was clerk of the committee on corporations, 
Alabama Legislature, 1896-97; elected assistant clerk of the House of 
Representatives, 1898, re-elected for extra session of 1899, and for the 
regular session of 1900-01 ; elected secretary of the Constitutional Con- 
vention of Alabama, 1901 ; and elected clerk of the House of Representa- 
tives, 1903. In 1902 he was defeated for nomination as Secretary of State, 
but in 1906 he was successful. He is a Presbyterian. He is a member of 
the United Sons of Confederate Veterans, the Woodmen of the World, and 
the Knights of Maccabees. At Tuscumbia. Dec. 18, 1895, he was married 
to Eva Josephine, daughter of Hugh J. and Mary E. (Smith) Stephenson, 
of Leighton, Ala. 



14 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

OFFICE OF THE STATE AUDITOR. 

Auditor. — Wm. Woodward Brandon, of Tuscaloosa. 

Chief Clerk. — John T. Cook, of Montgomery. 

Warrant Clerk. — Charles Brooks Smith, of Laneville, Halo county. 

General Book-keeper. — Edward Wiley Hausman, of Tuscaloosa. 

Land Clerk. — John Richmond McCain, of Llnevllle. 

Filing Clerk.— Wm. B. Griffin, of Cullman. 

Pension Clerk and Stenographer. — Miss Allene Nabors, of Tuscaloosa. 

WILLIAM WOODWARD BRANDON, of Tuscaloosa, was born June 5, 
1868, at Talladega, and is the son of Rev. Frank T. J. and Carrie (Wood- 
ward) Brandon, and the grandson of Francis L. Brandon, and wife, who 
was a Miss Haynie. His mother and the wife of Gen. Wm. H. Forney were 
sisters, both daughters of E. L. Woodward, a merchant of Calhoun county. 
Rev. F. T. J. Brandon is the oldest preacher in the North Alabama Confer- 
ence, now In the active ministry. Gen. Brandon was educated at the Cedar 
Bluff institute, and the Tuscaloosa high school. At the age of thirteen 
he went to work for himself. In 1891 he took the law course at the Uni- 
versity of Alabama, and in 1892 located in Tuscaloosa for the practice. 
In 1891 he was elected clerk of the city of Tuscaloosa, and in the same 
year was appointed a justice of the peace. In 1896 he was chosen to the 
House of Representatives, and in 1898 and 1900 he was re-elected. In the 
House he had leading committee assignments and took a prominent part 
in legislative affairs. In military affairs his service has been conspicuous. 
He has served as lieutenant and captain of the Warrior Guards, major 
in the 3rd Alabama Volunteer Infantry Regiment, Spanish-American War; 
was appointed adjutant-general of Alabama, 1899, and re-appointed In 1901, 
serving until 1906. As adjutant-general he successfully reorganized the 
Alabama National Guard. In 1906 he was nominated for State Auditor in 
the Democratic primary, and In the general election was overwhelmingly 
elected. In 1892 he published a military journal at Tuscaloosa entitled 
The Citizen Soldier. In 1901 he was reading clerk of the Constitutional 
Convention. He is a Democrat, has seen service on the party committees, 
and has taken a conspicuous part in all recent campaigns. He Is a Meth- 
odist. His wife was Mrs. Elizabeth (Andrews) Nabors, daughter of the 
late Dr. Allen S. Andrews. 



OFFICE OF THE STATE TREASURER. 

(Code, 1896, Vol. i, Sec. 2018 et seq.) 

Treasurer. — Walter Dudley Seed, Sr., of Tuscaloosa. 
Chief Clerk.— Charles E. Boyd, of Montgomery. 
Clerk. — Ralph Garner, of Ozark. 
Clerk. — Thomas W. Bradford, of Centre. 
Stenographer. — Miss Sarah Watson, of Riverside. 

WALTER DUDLEY SEED, SR., of Tuscaloosa, was born in that place, 
June 26th, 1864, and is the son of Charles Clinton and Mattie Cordet 
(White) Seed, and grandson of Charles and Mary (Jenkins") White, 
the latter of Camden, Ark. Charles C. Seed, Sr., was born in Weimar, 
in the Grand-duchy cf Saxe- Weimar, one of the Thuringian States of the 
German Empire, and was brought to America by his parents when only six 
months of age. The family for generations has been prominent in politi- 
cal, clerical and social affairs in the old world, and descendants in Amer- 
ica have many rare autographs and family heirlooms. The White family 
Is of Irish stock, John White locating In South Carolina, three miles from 
Chester, on lands now in the possession of the family in the seventh genera- 
tion. In Mrs. Ellett's Women of the Revolution will be found a thrilling 



STATE EXECUTIVE OFFICES. 15 

sketch of Jane, wife of John White, their sons serving in the Revolutionary 
army. Charles C. Seed, during a long life, resided in Monroe, Mich., Louis- 
ville, Ky., Memphis, Tenn., and Tuscaloosa, Ala. In the last named place he 
located in 1861 or 1862, and engaged in cloth manufacture. In 1865 his fac- 
tory was burned. Later he was a cotton merchant. He never held any office 
other than alderman of Tuscaloosa. Walter D. Seed, Sr., received his 
early education under the best teachers of Tuscaloosa. He entered the 
University of Alabama, from which he took his A. B. degree in 1883; 
was president of the Philomathic Literary Society; one of the editors of 
the University Monthly; was lieutenant quartermaster, in the Corps of 
Cadets; and was one of the six honor men, thereby being privileged to 
deliver an oration on Commencement Day. While devoting himself strict- 
ly to his business interests he has taken a positive stand in all matters 
of a political nature affecting his county and State. In 1898 he was a 
strong factor in defeating the Populist party in Tuscaloosa county. He 
was treasurer of that county from 1896 to 1900. In 1906 he was nomina- 
ted as State Treasurer over Mr. Charles A. Allen. Mr. Seed is a Method- 
ist; and also a member of the Masons, the Council, the Knights Templar, 
the Woodmen of the World, the Knights of Pythias and the Mystic Circle. 
He was married on Sept. 21, 1887, in Foster's Settlement, to Ellen E., 
daughter of J. Luther and Rebecca (Thornton) Foster. The Foster fam- 
ily located in Tuscaloosa county at an early day, and it had many repre- 
sentatives prominent in the State. 



OFFICE OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 

(Code 1896, Vol i» Sec. 2027 et seq. t and General Laws, 1907, pp. 46, 64.) 

Attorney-General.— Alexander Michael Gafber, of Talladega. 
Assistant Attorney-General. — Thomas W. Martin, of Montgomery. 
Stenographer. — Miss Lucia B. McQueen, of Montgomery. 

ALEXANDER MICHAEL GARBER, of Talladega, was born at "Chess- 
land," the country home of his parents near Livingston, Sumter county, 
and is the son of Dr. Alexander Menzies and Anna Maria (Rhodes) Gar- 
ber, the grandson of Richard and Margaret (Smith) Garber, and of Col. 
James and Elizabeth (Komegay) Rhodes, and the great-grandson of 
Michael and Magdalene Garber, of Maj. Thomas and Agnes (Cunningham) 
Smith, and of James Rhodes and wife Anna, only child of Dr. Andrew 
Bass, a Revolutionary patriot of Dobbs county, N. C. The Garbers came 
from Holland to Pa., and thence to Staunton, Va. In the last named place 
lived also the Smiths and Cunninghams. The Rhodes family were early 
settlers in N. C. Maj. Thomas Smith commanded a battalion from Augusta 
county, Va., in the Revolutionary War, and Capt. John Cunningham, the 
father of the wife of Thomas Smith, was a private in the French and 
Indian War and the builder of the first house in Staunton. Col. Garber 
was educated in the primary schools, and at the Livingston Male Acade- 
my; entered the University of Alabama in 1883, graduated with the A. B. 
degree and as Capt. of Co. "A," Alabama Corps of Cadets in 1886; re- 
ceived the honorary degree of A. M., 1889; taught school at Aberdeen, 
Miss., 1888, and at Livingston, 1889; studied law and partially completed 
the course of the law department of the University of Virginia; practiced 
law in Sumter and Hale counties, 1891, in which year he removed to Talla- 
dega where he has since resided. He was Capt. of the Talladega Rifles, 
1894 to 1896, when he was appointed to the staff of Gov. Jos. F. Johnston as 
inspector-general with the rank of colonel. Upon the establishment of 
the city court of Talladega in 1893, he was appointed solicitor, elected 
by the General Assembly in 1898, and again without opjwsition in 
a primary in his county in 1904. He made an unsuccessful race for At- 
torney-General in 1902, but in 1906 he was nominated without opposition. 



16 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

i 

t 

He is a Democrat; vestryman in the Protestant Episcopal Church; is a 
member of the Elks; and has been grand chancellor of the Alabama Grand 
Lodge, Knights of Pythias. On June 14, 1906, at Bowling Green, Ky., he 
was married to Margaret Louise, daughter of Keenan and Margaret (Long) 
Hurst, of Cincinnati. The Hurst and Long families are of distinguished 
origin. 

THOMAS WESLEY MARTIN, of Montgomery, was born in Scottsboro, 
Jackson county, Aug. 13, 1881, and is the son of William Logan and Maggie 
(Ledbetter) Martin, late of Montgomery (for full sketch see infra) and 
wife Maggie Ledbetter. Mr. Martin was educated in the Scottsboro college 
and normal school, the public schools of Montgomery, and Prof. J. M. 
Starke's university school; attended the academic department of the Uni- 
versity of Alabama; and graduated from the law department of that insti- 
tution with the A. B. degree in 1900. He began the practice with his father, 
at Montgomery, Dec. 5, 1901, and continued with him until the death of the 
latter, March 3, 1907. In Jan. 1903 he was appointed assistant in the 
office of Massey Wilson, attorney-general, serving four years; and In 1907 
was appointed by Alexander M. Garber,. attorney-general, to the newly 
created position of assistant attorney-general. Mr. Martin is a Democrat: 
a deacon in the First Presbyterian church in Montgomery; a Mason and 
a Knight of Pythias. He is not married. 



OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF EDUCATION. 

• 
Superintendent. — Harry Cunningham Gunnels, of Montgomery. 
Chief Clerk. — Wm. Francis Feagin, of Marshall county. 
Cleric. — Wm. Cleburne Swanson, of Barbour county. 
Clerk. — James Newton Gunnels, of Oxford. 
Stenographer. — Miss Maggie Pierce, of Greenville. 
President State Board of Teachers 9 Examiners. — Harry C. Gunnels, 

ex-offlcio. 
Secretary of Board, etc. — Henry Jones Willingham, of Wetumpka. 
Member of Board, etc. — Miss Sarah M. Clark, of Montgomery county. 
Stenographer to the Board. — Miss Susie Offutt, of Montgomery. 

HARRY CUNNINGHAM GUNNELS, of Montgomery, was born Oct. 
1, 1868, at Oxford, Calhoun county, Ala., and is the son of Daniel Perry 
and Susan E. (Cunningham) Gunnels, and the grandson of Nathan and 
Nancy (Hunt) Gunnels, and of Wm. Newton and Nancy (Pratt) Cun- 
ningham. The Gunnels family came from Bold Spring, Franklin county, 
Ga., while the Cunningham family was among the early settlers of Benton, 
now Calhoun county. Harry C. Gunnels was educated in the common 
schools of his native place, and in 1886, he took his A. B. degree from 
Oxford College. He took a special course at Vanderbilt University; and 
in 1891 graduated at the University of Alabama with the degree of LL. B. 
Although graduating in the law, his entire life has been given over to edu- 
cational work, excepting one term as a member of the Alabama Legisla- 
ture, 1900-01. In Oct. 1886 he began teaching as co-principal of the. 
Ashland High School; was later professor of Natural Sciences and History 
in Oxford College for two years; principal of the Anniston High School; 
Superintendent Anniston City Schools, 1896-98; Chief Clerk in the Depart- 
ment of Education, 1899-1902; was appointed State Superintendent of 
Education, July 1, 1902, to succeed Dr. John W. Abercrombie, who was 
elected President of the University of Alabama; again appointed Chief 
Clerk Jan. 1903, serving until Jan. 1907, when he entered upon a full term 
as Superintendent of Education by election. During his legislative term 
of 1900-01, he served as a member of the House committee on education, 
and he was the author of the bill providing for five months free school. 
He was chairman of the committee on legislation of the Alabama Educa- 



STATE EXECUTIVE OFFICES. 17 

tional Association, 1905-6; member and secretary of the Alabama Edu- 
cation Committee; and Director for Alabama of the Southern Educational 
Association. He was successively 1st lieut. and captain of Co. "I," 2nd 
Inf. Regt., Ala. National Guard; and from 1896 to 1906 was Inspector with 
rank of major, on the stafT of Brig. Gen. L. V. Clark, A. N. G. Maj. Gun- 
nels is a democrat; a Methodist; 32° Scottish Rite Mason; Shriner; and 
Knight of Pythias. His wife, to whom he was married Nov. 25, 1895, was 
Sadie Emily, daughter of William and Louise (Carithers) Goss, of 
Commerce, Go. 



COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE AND INDUSTRIES. 

(Code, 1896, Vol. i, Bee. 368 et seq.) 

Commissioner. — Joseph A. Wilkinson, of Autaugavllle. 
Chief Clerk.— William Frith Wilkinson, of Prattville. 
Clerk. — Charles H. Billingsley, of Tallassee. 
Stenographer. — Mrs. M. F. Williams, of Montgomery. 

JOSEPH ABSALOM WILKINSON, of Autaugavllle, was born Oct. 23, 
1851, near that place, and is the son of Joseph Brady Wilkinson, a native of 
Maryvllle, Tenn., and wife Elizabeth Ann, daughter of James and Mary 
(Stone) Nicholson, who lived near Prattville, and later at Tuskegee. 
The parents of Joseph Brady Wilkinson were English and Scotch. He 
came to this State in 1836, merchandised at Old Vernon on the Alabama 
Rive?, and removed to Autaugavllle as one of Its founders in 1844. James 
Nicholson was an early Alabama pioneer, and the son of Harrison Nich- 
olson, a Revolutionary soldier, buried in Tuskegee, Ala. — See Transaction* 
Alabama Historical Society, Vol. iv, p. 557. Joseph A. Wilkinson was edu- 
cated in the schools in Autaugavllle and vicinity, and entered Emory 
and Henry college, Va., but was not graduated. He was in the mercantile 
business for ten years at Selma, but left it to engage in farming in Autau- 
ga county. He is a Democrat and a Knight of Pythias. He has been a mem- 
ber of the M. E. Church, South, for many years, an officer in his local 
church for twenty-five years, has been county superintendent of the Union 
Sunday-school, and also a local Sunday-school superintendent; and has 
been a delegate to both the annual and general conferences of his church. 
While in Selma he was a member of the city council, 1886-1892, and took 
a leading part in the financial rescue of the city from the debt left by the 
radical government. Mr. Wilkinson has been married three times: (1) 
to Medora. daughter of Dr. C. M. Howard; (2) to Nellie, daughter of 
Judge P. G. Wood; and (3) to Rebecca, daughter of Dr. C. <3. Howard. 



OFFICE OF THE ADJUTANT-GENERAL. 

(General Laws, 1898-99, pp. 186-152, and General Laws, 1907, pp. 44-46.) 

Adjutant-General. — Bibb Graves, of Montgomery. 
Chief Clerk. — David W. Mclver, of Montgomery. 

governor's staff. 

Inspector General. — Robert F. Ligon, Montgomery. 
Quartermaster General. — Barry L. Holt, Montgomery. 

(Each with rank of Bripadier-General). 
Judge Advocate General. — W. C. Crumpton, Evergreen. 
Surgeon-General. — Wyatt Hell in, Birmingham. 

2 



18 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

Chief of Engineers.— W. H. Kettig, Birmingham. 
Chief of Ordnance. — Frank Inge, Mobile. 
Paymaster General. — L. Y. Dean, Eufaula. 

Commissary General of Subsistence. — M. V. Joseph, Birmingham. 
Assistant Adjutant General. — W. Lewellen Pitts, Uniontown. 
Assistant Inspector General. — E. Hamiter Graves, Eufaula. 
Assistant Quartermaster General, — Winston Garth, Huntsville. 
Chaplain. — J. M. Dannelly, Opelika. 

(Each with rank of Colonel of Cavalry.) 
Aide-de-camp. — Thomas E. Knight, Greensboro. 
, Aide-de-Camp. — R. A. Mitchell, Alabama City. 
Aide-de-Camp. — Thomas E. KIlby, Anuiston. 
Aide-de-Camp. — Fleetwood Rice, Northport. 

(Each with the rank of Colonel of Cavalry.) 
Aide-de-Camp. — J. B. Brown, Cullman. 
Aide-de-Camp. — Charles Pulley, Limestone. 
Aide-de-Camp. — Dawson E. Laslie. 

DAVID BIBB GRAVES, of Montgomery, was born April 1, 1873, at Hope 
Hull, Montgomery county, and Is the son of David and Mattie (Bibb) 
Graves, and the grandson of Russell Graves, and of Richard J. and Eliza- 
beth (Spivey) Bibb, the latter a granddaughter of Aaron Spivey,, a Revo- 
lutionary soldier from N. C, who died in Elmore county, Ala. Mr. R. J. 
Bibb is a member of the well known family of that name ,all decendants of 
Benjamin Bibb, a native of Wales, who came to America in Colonial times. 
David Graves lived for some years at Hope Hull, but much of his life was 
spent In Texas. General Graves was educated In the public schools of 
Texas; attended the University of Alabama, from which he graduated In 
1893 as B. E.; took the law course in the University of Texas, 1893-94; 
and in 1896 graduated from the law department of Yale University with 
the LL.B. degree. In March, 1897, he entered upon the practice of his 
profession In Montgomery, and has resided here since that date. He was 
a member of the House of Representatives, 1898-99, and 1900-01. He was a 
cadet captain, Alabama Corps of Cadets, 1892-93; has been an aide-de-camp 
on the staff of Brigadier-General Louis V. Clark, with rank of captain, 
and assistant adjutant-general under the same officer, with rank of ma- 
jor ; and was appointed Adjutant-General of Alabama by Gov. B. B. Comer, 
in January, 1907. He is a Democrat; and a member of the Christian 
Church. On Oct. 10, 1900, he was married to Dixie, daughter of Peyton 
and Isabel (Thorpe) Bibb, of Montgomery. 



RAILROAD COMMISSION. 

(Code, 1896, Vol. i, Sec. $481 et seq. t and General Laws, 1907, pp. 49-62, 

68-101, 142, 145-160, 161-172, 225-280.) 

President. — Charles Henderson, of Troy. 
Associate. — John Gideon Harris, of Akron. 
Associate.— William D. Nesbitt, of Birmingham. 
Clerk. — Samuel P. Kennedy, of Anniston. 
Stenographer. — Miss Ruth E. Belser, of Montgomery. 

CHARLES HENDERSON, of Troy, was born at Henderson, Pike county, 
April 26, 1856, and is the son of Jeremiah Augustus and Mildred (Hill) 
Henderson, and the grandson of James Eli Henderson and of Wm. Murray 
and Martha (Ward) Hill (of Burke county, Ga., and Pike county, Ala.), 
and great-grandson of Nathaniel Henderson, who early removed from 



STATE EXECUTIVE OFFICES. 19 

North Carolina to Clarke county, Ga. Wm. Murray Hill served in the 
Mexican War, and enlisted in the War of Secession, but was relieved on 
account of his health. Jeremiah A. Henderson was a delegate from Pike 
county in the Alabama secession convention, 1861, and later served as a 
member of Capt. A. P. Love's Co. in the Jeff Davis Legion. Charles Hen- 
derson was educated in the common schools of Pike county, and in How- 
ard College, but he did not graduate. Leaving college on the death of 
his father, he did not return. He is a merchant and a banker. He has 
served as mayor of Troy six terms, 1886 to 1891, and 1901 to 1906. He 
was assistant inspector general on Gov. Wm. J. Samford's staff, and aid 
on the staff of Gov. Wm. D. Jelks. Mr. Henderson is a Democrat, a Mason 
and a Knight Templar. In 1906 he was nominated as one of the candi- 
dates for the Railroad Commission. At Raleigh, N .C, Nov. 7, 1888 he was 
married to Laura, daughter of Thomas Anthony and Sarah (Dowtin) 
Montgomery. . 

JOHN GIDE§N HARRIS, of Akron, Hale county, Ala., was born March 
1, 1834, on a farm twelve miles north of Greensboro, then in Greene, now 
in Hale county. He is the son of Page and Mary (Williams) Harris, and 
the grandson of John and Nancy Harris, and of David and Martha Wil- 
liams. Page Harris was born near Raleigh, Wade county, N. C, and in 
1818 came out to Ala. with relatives. His parents and the parents of his 
wife likewise came to Alabama, and located in what was then Greene 
county. The several lines of his ancestry have been largely farmers by 
occupation. John G. Harris received his education in the private schools 
of the county of his birth, and ended his school career as a student in the 
celebrated Greene Springs School, conducted by Dr. Henry Tutwiler and 
Dr. Carlos G. Smith as co-principals. Entering the law department at 
Cumberland University, Lebanon. Tenn., in May, 1858, he graduated with 
his LL. B. degree. He at once located in Greensboro for the practice of 
the law, and at the breaking out of hostilities in 1861, he was a law 
partner of Judge Thomas W. Coleman, Sr. He had in 1856 been elected 
a justice of the peace. On Jan. 15, 1861, was sent to Fort Morgan as a 
private in the Greensboro Light Artillery Guards, but after a service of 
a few months, he returned home and raised a Co., of which he became 
the capt., and which, Sept. 16, 1861, joined the 20th Alabama Infantry 
Regiment. In 1863 he was promoted major, with which rank he served 
until the end came in 1865. After the war he resumed the legal profession; 
in 1885 was appointed by President Grover Cleveland register of the land 
office at Montgomery; in 1890 was elected State superintendent of edu- 
cation, and re-elected in 1892; and in 1896, with Charles Henderson, was 
elected a member of the State railroad commission. While at the head 
of the educational interests of the State, he did much to arouse public 
opinion to the needs and importance of better schools and larger appro- 
priations. Among other things he instituted a series of popular educa- 
tional rallies. For forty years he has been active as a Mason and has 
served as Grand Master of the Grand Lodge, and Grand High Priest of 
the Grand Chapter. Maj. Harris has delivered many speeches and lectures 
on educational, religious and masonic topics, and these he has compiled 
for publication. He is a Democrat, and of well known party loyalty. In 
1870 he was the nominee to lead a forlorn hope in the 4th Congressional 
district against Charles Hayes, Republican; and he was on the electoral 
ticket in the Tilden, Hancock and Cleveland presidential campaigns. He 
is a Missionary Baptist, and, 1890-93, was president of the International 
Sunday-school Convention. On Jan. 3, 1861, near Sumterville, Ala., ho 
was married to Mary Jane, daughter of John Evander and Mary Jane 
Brown, a Baptist family of South Carolina who early migrated to Ala. 

WILLIAM DUNCAN NESBITT, of Birmingham, was born March 1, 
1869, at Savannah, Ga., and is the son of Robert Taylor and Rebecca La- 
nier (Saffold) Nesbitt, and the grandson cf Hugh O'Keefe and Martha De- 
loney (Berrien) Nesbitt, and of Wm. Oliver and Mary Louisa (Harris) 



2 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

SaffoW. H. O. Nesbitt, the son of Hugh and Eleanor (O'Keefe) Nesbitt, 
Scotch immigrants from Ireland to America, was a graduate of Princeton, 
and also a graduate of the Philadelphia Medical School. Wm. O. Saffold 
was the son of Adam Saffold, the son of Wm. Saffold a soldier in the War 
of the Revolution from Virginia. Mrs. Mary L. (Harris) Saffold is de- 
scended from the Washington-Lanier family. Through the Berriens the 
family is descended from John Rolfe and Pocahontas. Other families 
with which the Nesbitts are connected by direct descent are the Hunts, 
Carters, Boilings, Porters, Harris', Waltons, and Watsons. Commissioner 
Nesbitt was educated In the schools of Marietta, Ga., and prepared for col- 
lege by a tutor ; attended the University of Ga., and later took a business 
course in Atlanta. In September, 1888. he entered the service of S. N. 
Inman & Co., remaining with them until Sept. 1897, when he began business 
on his own account as a cotton buyer and warehouseman in Birmingham. 
In 1907 he was appointed to his present position on the Alabama Railroad 
Commission by Gov. B. B. Comer to succeed Charles Henderson, 
promoted. Mr. Nesbitt takes great interest in amateur athlet- 
ics, and municipal play-grounds and parks; was chairman of the 
finance committee during the building of the Birmingham Athletic 
Club, 1902-03, afterwards serving both as vice-president and president of 
this organization ; since 1904 he has been president of the Southern Asso- 
ciation of the Amateur Athletic Union of America ; was commissioner from 
the U. S. to the Olympic games, Athens, Greece, 1906, and is appointed 
commissioner from the United States to the games in London, England, 
in 1908. He is a Democrat, and is now a member of the State executive 
committee. He is a Presbyterian. At Annlston, Dec. 12, 1895, he was 
married to Anne, daughter of Thomas Green and Alberta (William) Bush, 
who now reside in Birmingham . Mrs. Bush is descended from Roger Wil- 
liams, and from the Hollises of Massachusetts. 



BOARD OF INSPECTORS OF CONVICTS. 

(Code, 1896, Vol. it, See. US1 et acq, General Laws, 1901, pp. 284-35.) 

President — J. Craig Smith, of Selma. 

Physician Inspector. — Dr. Wm. Arthur Burns, of Sheffield. 

Associate Inspector. — Hugh McCalla Wilson, of Opelika. 

Chaplain. — Rev. S. R. Emerson, of Birmingham. 

Chief Clerk. — Daniel G. Trawick, of Abbeville. 

Clerk. — Paul W. Stewart, of Selma. 

Stenographer. — Miss Lucile Burgess, of Montgomery. 

Purchasing Agent. — J. H. McCary, of Birmingham. 

Wardens. — W. O. Robbins, of Wetumpka. 

W. H. King, of Spelgners. 

Thomas C. Dawson, of Flat Top. 

O. J. Moore, of Pratt City. 

J. A. Dudley, of Dolive. 

E. P. Cannon, of Wallace. 

S. F. Mills, of Lowry. 

Lewis Willis, of River Falls. 

W. F. Claughton, of Dunham. 

JAMES CRAIG SMITH, of Selma, was born September 13, 1859, 
at Orrville, in Dallas county, and is the son of Frederick H. Smith, 
a native of Hancock county, Ga., and wife Margaret Alice, daughter 
of Wm. Hamlin Quarles, a native of Edgefield district, S. C, and wife 
Catherine Bozeman, both of whom resided in Dallas county. His paternal 
grandparents are Horace Smith and w T ife Jane Horten, of Hancock county, 
Ga. His father. F. H. Smith, was a merchant and planter, and State 
treasurer of Alabama from 1883 to 1888. Mr. Smith attended the village 



STATE EXECUTIVE OFFICES. 21 

schools, and later the University of Alabama, 1876-77, and Vanderbilt Uni- 
versity. He is an extensive cotton planter. He was a member of the 
House of Representatives, 1890-91. and 1896-97; and State treasurer, 
1892-96, being re-elected in 1900 and again in 1902. He is a Methodist. 
He is a Democrat, and in 1906 was chairman of the State campaign com- 
mittee of the party. On March 1, 1907 he entered upon his duties as 
president of the Board of Convict Inspectors. He has been twice married: 
(1) On September 3, 1894, he was married to Eloise, daughter of Dr. 
M. P. and Louise (Jones) LeGrand, of Montgomery, and (2) to Mignon, 
daughter of Gov. Braxton B. and Eva J. (Harris) Comer. 

DR. WILLIAM ARTHUR BURNS, of Sheffield, was born June 3, 1870, 
four miles north of Vernon, Lamar coilnty, and is the son of George Ca- 
ruthers and Margaret (Rush) Burns, and the grandson of George Lasley 
and Nellie (Enloe) Burns, and of William Phillip and Emily (Coons) 
Rush. All ancestors are of S. C. stock, except Mrs. Rush, who was a 
native of Tenn. George L. Burns served in the War of 1812, and was the 
son of a Revolutionary soldier. George C. Burns was bcrn in Tenn., but 
now lives at Vernon, of which place he was the first settler. Dr. Burns 
was educated in the common schools of Lamar county; and took his M. D. 
degree in the Memphis Hospital Medical College, 1891. He at ence 
opened an office in Vernon where he practiced until 1895. He then spent 
a year, 1895-96, at Ravenden Springs, Ark., after which he returned to 
Vernon. In 1898 he located at Sheffield, where he now lives. He was an 
alderman of the town of Vernon 1892; city physician of Sheffield, May 
1899 to March 1907; and a member of the Alabama National Guard, 1889 
to 1894. He was appointed physician inspector of the convict board, March, 
1907. He is a Democrat; a Methodist; and also a member of the Knights 
of Pythias and the Woodmen of the World. On Jan. 23, 1894, at Vernon, 
he married Anna Desire, daughter of Rev. Wm. A. and Margaret E. (Ro- 
per) Montgomery, the former an itinerant Methodist minister for over 
half a century. 

HUGH McCALLA WILSON, of Opelika, was born at the home of his 
parents, March 31, 18G0, in Talbot county, Ga., where his father, Hiram 
Morgan Wilson, and his grandfather, Joseph Madison Wilson, resided until 
the removal of the former to Tallapoosa county, Ala., in the winter of 1860. 
The father, H. M. Wilson, served four years as a private in the C. S. A. 
His wife was Amanda Elmira, daughter of Hugh McCalla, of Harris 
county, Ga. He was educated in the common schools of his native county; 
taught school 1878 and 1879; was in Texas 1879-80; returned to Talla- 
poosa county where he farmed; studied law and was admitted to the prac- 
tice, in which he engaged 1888 and 1889, when he entered upon a permanent 
newspaper career. In 1886, having bought out the Dadeville Democrat, 
he founded the Tallapoosa New Era, which he owned until 1870 when he 
sold this property, and removed to Opelika where, in connection with C. 
H. Greer, he founded the Opelika News.. In March 1895 he oecame one of 
the founders and the business manager of the Birmingham Daily State, in 
1896 was managing editor of the Birmingham State-Herald, and in 1897 
returned to Opelika. He and W. T. Wear are the proporietors of the 
Opelika News. He held the office of circuit court clerk of Lee county, 
1898, was reappointed in 1901, and again in 1906. He was appointed reg- 
ister in chancery of Lee county in 1898, and reappointed in 1905. He is a 
Democrat; was chairman of the Lee county executive committee, 1898- 
1900; and member of the State executive committee, 1899 and 1900. He 
is a Presbyterian; a Royal Arch Mason, an Odd Fellow, a Knight of Py- 
thias, and a member of the Elks. On May 12, 1891, in Atlanta, Ga., he 
married Mrs. Ada (Herren) Hicks, daughter of James W. and Matilda 
Herren, of Dadeville. 



22 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

THE MEDICAL ASSOCIATION OF ALABAMA. 

THE STATE BOARD OF HEALTH. 

{Code, 1896, vol. i, Sec. 2423 et seq, and General Laws, 1907, p. 298.) 

State Health Officer.— Wm, H. Sanders, M. D., of Mobile. 
Chief Clerk. — Walter R. Brassell, of Montgomery. 

WILLIAM HENRY SANDERS, of Mobile, State Health Officer, was 
born in Tuscaloosa county, July 9, 1838, and is the son of Dr. Charles Peak 
and Elizabeth Ann (Thompson) Sanders, of Charleston, S. C, and the 
grandson of William and Martha {Bit more) Sanders, and cf Dr. Matthew 
and 'Arabella (Keys) Thompson. His paternal grandfather, a native of 
England, emigrated to Charleston, S. C; and his maternal ancestors re- 
sided in Anderson district, S. C. His father removed from Tuscaloosa 
county to Clinton, Greene county, and from this point he matriculated in 
the University of Alabama, 1850, and from which institution he graduated 
with the A. B. degree in 1858. Having entered the Jefferson Medical 
College, he graduated with the M. D. degree in 1861. On June 11, 1861, 
he enlisted in Co. "C," 11th Alabama Infantry Regiment, C. S. A.; was 
appointed assistant surgeon of the regiment in Sept. 1861; and promoted 
as surgeon of the command, March 6, 1863, by the Confederate States War 
Department. Sometime alter the War of Secession he located in the city 
of Mobile, where he practiced his profession. He served as President of 
the State Medical Association, 1890-91. In 1897, on the death of Dr. Je- 
rome Cochran, Dr. Sanders was chosen by the State Medical Association 
to succeed him as State Health officer, a place he still holds. Dr. Sanders 
is a Democrat; and is unmarried. 



STATE TAX COMMISSION. 

(General Laws of Alabama, 1904, PP- 372-385; 284-297.) 

Chairman of the Commission. — John Jackson Mitchell, of Florence. 
Associate Commissioner. — Harvey Ellis Jones, of Mobile. 
Associate Commissioner. — John Boiling Powell, of Greenville. 
Secretary. — Wm. Robert Lloyd, of Guntersville. 

JOHN JACKSON MITCHELL, of Florence, was born in the town of 
his present residence Sept. 15, 1854, and is the son of Rev. Wm. H. Mitchell, 
an able Presbyterian clergyman, the son of James and Mary (Nelson) 
Mitchell, all of county Monoghan, Ireland. Rev. Mr. Mitchell was pastor 
of the Presbyterian Church at Wetumpka, 1843 to 1850, at Florence, 1850 
to 1871, and president of the Florence Synodical College, 1848 to his death 
Oct. 3, 1872. During the War of Secession, he was imprisoned and 
cruelly treated by Federal soldiers. His wife was Martha, daughter of 
James and Sarah (Moore) Jackson, of Florence. James Jackson was a na- 
tive of Ballabay, county Monaghan, Ireland, but early came to the U. S., 
locating first at Nashville, Tenn., and later at Florence in 1818. He was 
a large planter, slave owner, importer and breeder of race horses; and 
for several terms a member of the Alabama State Senate from Lauderdale 
county. John J. Mitchell was educated in the private schools of Florence, 
the Florence Wesleyan University, and the University of Mississippi, but 
did not graduate. He took his degree of bachelor of laws in June, 1874, 
from the law department of Cumberland University, Lebanon, Tenn. 
For about ten years he was a journalist, owning and editing the following 
papers: Chilton County Courier, 1875-76, Florence Gazette, 1876-1882, and 
the Florence North Star, 1884-85. Elected probate judge of Lauderdale 
county in Nov. 1886 he served out a six year term to Nov. 1892, and he 
again served in the same position, Jan. 26, 1900 to Nov. 1904. He was 



STATE EXECUTIVE OFFICES. v 23 

member of the House of Representatives, 1896-97, which session passed the 
tax commission law of which he was the author. He was again In the 
House of Representatives, 1898-99, being chairman of the committee on 
ways and means. In each he served on the special revenue committee, 
the last session as chairman. He was chairman of the Lauderdale county 
Democratic executive committee in 1884, and was elected a member of 
the State Democratic executive committee, 1906. He is both a deacon and 
an elder in the First Presbyterian church at Florence; and is also a mem- 
ber of the Benevolent and Protective order of Elks. His wife is Etoile 
Hurd, to whom he was married in Prattville, Ala., June 25, 1879. She is 
the daughter of Joseph and Mary (Abbott) Hurd, natives of New Jersey, 
but residents of Prattville. Mr. Hurd served through the War of Seces- 
sion as a Confederate soldier, and at its close entered upon the business 
of druggist in his adopted town. 

HARVEY ELLIS JONES, of Mobile, was born April 28, 1842, at Tus- 
caloosa, and is the son of George L. Jones, of Tuscaloosa, (son of Fred- 
erick Jones, of Hillsboro, N. C, son of another Frederick Jones, the Royal 
Chief Justice of N. C.) and wife Madeline Clitherall, daughter of Dr. 
George Clitherall, U. S. army, and wife Caroline Burgwin, of the "Hermi- 
tage," near Newbern. He was educated in the private schools, at St. 
James College, Hagerstown, Md., and at the University of Alabama, but 
did not graduate. At the age of nineteen years Mr. Jones entered the 
Confederate army, April 28, ^861, as 2nd sergeant Co. "E," 3rd Alabama 
Regiment, Infantry, C. S. A.; and was promoted captain, and assistant 
Adjutant-General of Grade's Alabama brigade. On March 31, 1865, he 
lost a leg in battle at White Oak Road, Va. He engaged in various bus 
iness occupations until he was appointed recording secretary to Governor 
Thomas G. Jones, serving from 1890 to 1894. He was private secretary 
to Governor Wm. C. Oates, 1894-96; member of the Railroad Commission 
1895-99; and Adjutant-General of the State, 1894-96, and served as State 
Tax Commissioner from 1901, succeeding William J. Wood, to its ab- 
olition by acts of March 7, 1907. On the creation of the State Tax Com- 
mission, he was named as an associate member. He has been Adjutant 
General of the Alabama Division, United Confederate Veterans, since the 
organization of the Division. He is a Democrat, and a member of the Prot- 
estant Episcopal Church. On November 24, 1869, Mr. Jones was married at 
Spring Hill, near Mobile, to Marion, daughter of Right Reverend R. H. 
Wihner, Bishop of the Diocese of Alabama, and wife Margaret Brown, of 
Albermarle county, Va., daughter of Alexander Brown, of Perth, Scotland, 
arid wife Lucy Shandon Rives, sister of William Cabell Rives, the Virginia 
statesman. 

JOHN BOLLING tOWELL, of Greenville, Butler county, was born in 
that place, August oi, 1862, and is the son of Jonathan Louis and Lucinda 
Elizabeth (Boiling) Powell, and the grandson of William and Mary (Yel 
dell) Powell, and of Samuel Jackscn and Mary (Ewing) Boiling, all of But- 
ler county. The Powells came from S. C, and the Boilings from Va. Jona- 
than L. Powell was a lawyer in Greenville, and served in the War first as a 
private, then as a lieutenant in a company commanded by Captain T. J* 
Burnett, in 17th Alabama Infantry Regiment, C. S. A. Commissioner Pow- 
ell received his primary education in the public schools of Greenville; at- 
tended Howard College, 1878-79; and the University of Alabama, 1879-80. 
He studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1890; located first in Es- 
cambia county for a few months then became a partner with Hon. Jesse F. 
Stallings in Butler county. In 1894, on account of ill health, he retired 
from the practice and entered the real estate business. He is a Democrat ; 
a member of the Protestant Episcopal Church in Greenville ; and a Knight 
of Pythias. He was married Dec. 21, 1881, at Greenville, to Virginia 
Laura, daughter of Archibald and Elizabeth (Herbert) Reid. 



24 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

DEPARTMENT OF ARCHIVES AND HISTORY. 
(General Laws of Alabama, 1900-1901, pp. 126-181 and 1907, pp. 259-260.) 

Trustees : 1st District—Peter J. Hamilton, Mobile. 

2nd District — J. M, Falkner, Montgomery. 

3rd District. — Wm. Dorsey Jelks, Eufaula. 

4th District — J. H. Johnson, Talladega. 

5th District — Wm. L. Lancaster, Wetumpka. 

6th District — Henry B. Foster, Tuscaloosa. 

7th District — Oliver D. Street, Guntersville. 

8th District— T>v. W. H. Biake, Sheffield. 

9th District.— Samuel Will John, Birmingham. 
Director. — Thomas McAdory Owen, of Montgomery. 
Secretary to the Director. — Miss Dolly W. Owen, of Bessemer, Ala. 

Created by act of the General Assembly, approved February 27, 1901, 
to be located in the State Capitol; organized March 2, 1901, and on that 
date the Director was elected and entered upon his duties. On March 26, 
1907, the Director was re-elected for another term. Government vested 
in a board of nine trustees; but its managing head is a Director, elected 
by the board for a term of six years. 

THOMAS McADORY OWEN, of Montgomery, was born at the residence 
of his maternal grandfather, near new Jonesboro (two miles below Bes- 
semer), Jefferson county, December 15, 1866, and is the son of Dr. William 
M. Owen and wife Nancy L. McAdory, both of whom now reside near Bes- 
semer. Dr. Wm. M. Owen is a native of Tuscaloosa, and is the son of Judge 
Thomas Owen and Dolly Payne Williams of that place, while his wife 1b 
the daughter of Major Thomas McAdory and wife Emily Owen of Jefferson 
county; he was a Confederate soldier, serving in the State troops, 1861, 
and later as a lieutenant in the 36th Ala. Infantry Regiment, C. S. A. Dr. 
Owen, the Director, received his education in the common schools, and 
at the academy of Professor I. W. McAdory, Pleasant Hill, Jefferson 
county. He graduated at the University of Alabama in 1887, taking the 
degrees of A. B. and LL. B.; and received the honorary degree of A. M., 
1893, and LL. D., 1904. He practiced law at Bessemer, 1887-1894, Carrollton, 
1897-1900, and Birmingham, 1900-1901. He was city solicitor of Bessemer, 
1890-93, assistant solicitor of Jefferson county, 1892, and chief clerk, division 
of P. O. inspectors, P. O. Department, Washington, 1894-97. He was chair- 
man of the Democratic executive committee of Jefferson county, 1890-92. Dr. 
Owen has for years taken a deep interest in all forms of historical work 
and enterprise ; he has been the secretary of the Society of the Sons of the 
Revolution in Alabama since its organization, April 16, 1894; was one 
of the founders of the Southern History Association at Washington, 
April 24, 1896; and has been secretary of the Alabama Historical Society 
since its re-organization June 21, 1898; was the commander of the Ala- 
bama Division, United Sons of Confederate Veterans, and Commander-in- 
Chief of that organization two terms, 1905-07. He has published 
several books and pamphlets of an historical character. As 
chairman of the Alabama History Commission he prepared its Report, 
which stimulated the establishment of the Department of Archives and 
History of Alabama, of which he was elected first director, March 2, 1901, 
for a term of six years, and re-elected March 26, 1907, for a like term. 
He was one of the founders of the Gulf States Historical Magazine, and 
edited its first volume, 1903-04. He was the founder of the Alabama Li- 
brary Association, Nov. 21, 1904, and has been its president since that 
date by successive elections. On April 12, 1893, at Fayette, Ala., he was 
married to Marie Susan, daughter of Hon. John Hollis Bankhead, U. S. 
Senator from Alabama, and wife Tallulah Brockman. 



STATE EXECUTIVE OFFICES. 25 

DEPARTMENT OF INSURANCE. 

(Code, 1896, vol. i, Sec. 2575 et seq.) 

Insurance Commissioner ex-officio. — Frank* N. Julian, Secretary of 

State. 
Deputy Commissioner. — Albert Campbell Sexton, of Cullman County. 

ALBERT CAMPBELL SEXTON, of Cullman County, was born July 12, 
1870, at Chatham Hill, Smyth County, Virginia, and is the son of Charles 
McDonald and Emily Bradley (Campbell) Sfexton, and the grandson oi 
John Gatewood and Sarah {McDonald) Sexton and of Spotswood M. Camp- 
bell. Charles M. Sexton enlisted in Co. "D." Fourth Virginia Infantry 
Regiment, April 4, 1861, aud served in the Army of Northern Virginia until 
the surrender at Appomattox, and now resides at Chatham Hill. Albert C. 
Sexton was educated in the common schools of his native county, and was 
graduated from Marion Academy, Smyth county. He came to Alabama in 
1894, settling first in Cleburne and afterwards in Cullman county. He was 
appointed chief clerk in the office of the Secretary of State, Oct 22, 1900, 
by Robert P. McDavid, and served until January 19, 1903 ; was re-appointed 
by J. Thomas Heflin, and served until May 1, 1904; was re-appointed by 
E. R. McDavid, and served until July 16, 1906; when he was appointed 
deputy insurance commissioner (succeeding H. R. Shorter, resigned), and 
was re-appointed by Frank N. Julian, on' January 13, 1907. In 1903 he was 
appointed aide-de-camp, with the rank of captain, on the staff of Briga- 
dier-General Louis V. Clark, A. N. G. ; and re-appointed to the same posi- 
tion in 1907. He was elected adjutant of Camp Jloltzclaw, U. S. C. V., May 
20, 1905, and has been annually re-elected ; was appointed adjutant of 
Alabama Div., U. S. C. V., 1905; on May'l, 1906, was appointed Adjutant- 
General and Chief of Staff, U. S. C. V. f by Dr. Thos. M. Owen, Commander- 
in-Chief ; and on June 4, 1907, was appointed Commander of the Ala. Div. 
He has always taken an active interest in Democratic work since his ad- 
vent into the State in 1894, and was a member of the Cullman County 
executive committee in 1900-01. He is a member of the Episcopal Church; 
and a Knight of Pythias. He is the author of the Alabama Official Direc- 
tory, 1902, 1903 and 1905; the Alabama Insurance Report, 1906; Prelimi- 
Mry Report of the Insurance Department, 1907; List of Foreign Corpora- 
tions, 1903; and Semi-annual Statement, Department of Insurance, 1907. 
On April 15, 1901, he was married, in Birmingham, to Catherine Baigrie, 
daughter of John J. and Euphemia (Baigrie) Carnduff, who were natives 
of Scotland, the former a minister in the Christian Church. 



STATE LAND AGENT. 

(Qerieral Laws, 1898-,99, pp. 116-17.) 

Agent. — Robert William Manning, of Lineville. 

ROBERT WILLIAM MANNING, of Lineville, Clay county, was born 
in that town on Jan. 17, 1864, and is the son of Henry Allen Manning, a 
native of Marietta, Ga., and wife, Martha, daughter of John Burrough, 
of Clay county. He was educated at the high school in Ashland, Ala., 
He entered upon the mercantile business at Ashland in 1885, continuing 
until 1903, when he established a life and fire Insurance agency at Line- 
ville, which he conducted until 1907. He served as postmaster at Ash- 
land, 1885-89, and '1894-97. In 1907 he was appointed to his present posi- 
tion, succeeding John R. McCain. He is a Democrat; a steward in the 
Methodist church ; a member of .the Masons and the Knights of Pythias. 
His wife is Eldorado, daughter of Benjamin F. and Amelia Holdridge, of 
Ashland. 



26 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

EXAMINERS OF ACCOUNTS. 

(Code, 1896, vol. i, Sec. 1876 et seq. and General Laws, 1907, pp. 10-11) 

Examiner. — John Purifoy, of Montgomery. 

Assistant Examiner. — Henry Fitzhugh Lee, of Eufaula. 

Assistant Examiner. — Hadley Yerby Brooke, of Luverne. 

JOHN PURIFOY, of Montgomery, was born March 21, 1842, near Min- 
ter, Dallas county, and is the son of Francis Marion and Lucinda (Thig- 
pen) Purifoy, of Dallas and Wilcox counties, and the grandson of John 
and Nancy (Williams) Purifoy, and of John and Susanna (Scott) 
Thigpen. The Purifoys and Thigpens were early settlers in 
N. C, whence they came to Ga., and other Southern States. He was 
educated in the common schools of Wilcox county, and at the Tennessee 
University, Knoxville, which institution he left in April, 1861, to enter 
the Confederate army. He enlisted in the Jeff Davis Artillery, and served 
through all the campaigns of the Army of Northern Virginia. After the 
war he taught school for several years; engaged in farming; and in 1880 
he was elected probate judge of Wilcox county serving until 1886. In 
1890 he was elected a member of the House of Representatives from 
Wilcox county; and in June, 1902, he was appointed by Gov. Thomas G. 
Jones to fill the unexpired term of Cyrus D. Hogue as State Auditor, and 
in Nov. of that year was elected for a full term, and re-elected in 1894. 
For a few months in 1897 he served as State deputy tax commissioner, 
and examiner of accounts, 1897-1900. From 1900 to 1907 he has acted as 
a special expert accountant, and in the latter year was again named as 
examiner of accounts by Gov. B. B. Comer. On Dec 6, 1865, he was mar- 
ried to Elizabeth a., daughter of Wm. P. and Sarah (Watts) Routan, of 
Greenville, Butler county. 

HENRY FITZHUGH LEE, of Eufaula, was born Aug. 31, 1874, at Clay- 
ton, and is the son of Alto V. and Lillie (Lawrence) Lee, and the grand- 
son of Lovard and Susan B. (Lovelace) Lee, and of Wm. Haywood and 
Lucy (Anthony) Lawrence. (For further facts see the sketch of Law- 
rence Haywood Lee, infra.) He was educated at the male academy in 
Clayton, and complet€d his school work at Massey's business college, 
Columbus, Ga. From Nov. 1, 1898, to Nov. 3, 1904, he was assistant pro- 
bate judge and assistant circuit clerk of Barbour county, having charge 
of the Eufaula branch of each office. In Sept. 1896, he was appointed 
to his present position. He is a Democrat; a Methodist; a Mason; and 
a Knight of Pythias. On Jan. 6, 1896, at Clayton, he was married to 
Wyllame, daughter of Judge Wm. H. and Ann (Browder) Pruett, and 
granddaughter of James M. Pruett and Isham C. Browder, both of whom 
were in the Creek Indian War of 1836. 

HADLEY YERBY BROOKE, of Luverne, was born in Wash- 
ington, D. C, and is the son of John Marshall and Fannie (Yerby) 
Brooke, and the grandson of Robert and Harriet Brooke, and of William 
and Martha Yerby. The Brookes have long been seated in Fauquier 
county, Va., where John M. Brooke was born. He served in the Confed- 
erate army in a cavalry company of which his cousin, James Edward Mar- 
shall was captain. Hadley Y. Brooke is a direct descendant of Judith 
Marshall, who married George Brooke. She was the daughter of Col. 
Thomas Marshall, and the sister of Chief Justice John Marshall. He was 
educated in Catholic parochial schools, but never attended 3chool after 
he was twelve years of age. At this age he entered the service of the 
Mobile Register, and learned the printer's profession. He was for about 
nine years in the Government Printing Office at Washington, D. C, and 
while there was color sergeant of the Washington Light Infantry Corps. 
He has served as tax commissioner and tax collector of Crenshaw county. 
He is a Democrat, and has served three terms as chairman of the executive 



STATE EXECUTIVE OFFICES. 27 

committee of his county. He Is a member of the Knights of Pythias. On 
July 28, 18D0, he was married to Sadie, daughter of Wm. W. and Francis 
Ingalls, by Bishop Edward P. Allen in the Catholic Cathedral at Mobile. 



GEOLOGICAL SURVEY. 

Post Office: University. Express Office: Tuscaloosa. 

(Code, 1896, vol. i, Sec. 2246 et seq.) 

State Geologist. — Eugene Allen Smith, Ph. D., ex-officio. 
Chief Assistant.— Wm. F. Prouty. Ph. D. 
Assistant in Museum. — James A. Anderson. 
Chemist. — Robert S. Hodges. 

The professor of mineralogy and geology in the University of Alabama, 
is ex-officio, State Geologist. The officials of the survey reside at the 
University. 

EUGENE ALLEN SMITH, of the University of Alabama, was born at 
Washington, Autauga county, October 27, 1841, and is the son of Sam'l 
Parrish Smith of that place, and wife Adelaide Julia Allen. He was edu- 
cated in the schools of Prattville until 1855, in which year he was sent 
for a three years course at Philadelphia, Pa., but in 1859 he returned to a 
private school at Prattville. He entered the University of Alabama in 1860 
and graduated with the degree of A. B. in 18G2. In 1865 he entered the Uni- 
versity of Berlin, subsequently he was at the University of Goettingen, 
and the University of Heidelberg, receiving the degree of Ph. D. from the 
latter in 1868. Mr. Smith on his return was assistant State Geologist of 
Mississippi, 1868-71. In 1871 he was made professor of geology in the 
University of Alabama, and in 1873 was appointed State Geologist, still 
retaining his chair in the faculty of the University. A3 State Geologist 
he has performed permanent and invaluable work in the exploration of the 
vast and varied mineral resources of the State. His voluminous official 
as well as his fragmentary reports and writings for the press have given 
to the world proof of the mineral wealth of the State never before known. 
Dr. Smith was honorary commissioner from Alabama to the Paris Expo- 
sition, 1878; special agent of the tenth census on cotton culture in Ala- 
bama and Florida, 1880; member of the American committee of the Inter- 
national Geological Congress of 1884-1889; member of the council of the 
Geological Society of America, 1892-1895; member of the jury of awards 
at the Atlanta Exposition of 1895, and of the National Centennial of 
1897; and delegate to the International Mining Congress in Boise City, 
Idaho, 1901. When Mr. Smith left the State University in 1862, he en- 
listed in the 33rd Alabama Regiment, Infantry, and became 2nd lieut- 
enant in Company "K." Mr. Smith is a Democrat. He is an Episcopal- 
ian. On July 10, 1872, he married Jane Henry Meredith, daughter of Dr. 
Landon Cabell Garland. 



STATE CHEMIST. 

{Code, 1896, vol. i, Sec. S93 et seq.) 

State Chemist. — Bennett B. Ross, cx-officio, Alabama Polytechnic Insti- 
tute, Auburn. 

BENNETT BATTLE ROSS, of Auburn, was born December 25, 1864, 

at Tuskegee, and is the son of Rev. Bennett Battle and Charlotte Augusta 

{Walker) Ross, and grandson of James and Sandal Lile (Fort) Ross, 



28 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

and of William and Mary (Tullis) Walker. The Ross family lived near 
Raleigh, N. C, and the Walkers near Abbeville, C. H., S. C. . Rev. B. B. 
Ross was a graduate of old LaGrange College, 1847, a Methodist minister 
and professor of English literature at the East Alabama Male College 
and its successor, the A. ft M. College (A. P. I.) Auburn, until his death 
in 1878. Prof. Ross, Jr., was educated in the public schools of Tuskegee, 
Huntsville and Auburn; graduated at the A. ft M. College, with A. B 
degree, 1881, and with the postgraduate degree of M. S. 1886; took an ex- 
tended course in the Universities of Goettingen and Berlin, 1901 ; was pro- 
fessor of chemistry in the University of Louisiana, 1887-93, and at the 
Alabama Polytechnic Institute, 1893, to date; in 1896 was president of 
the Association of Official Agricultural Chemists; has written many 
scientific theses for leading journals; is the author of a number of 
Bulletins of the Alabama agricultural experiment station; and became 
State Chemist by virtue of his position as professor of chemistry in the 
A. P. I. He is a Methodist; a Democrat; and a Knight of Pythias. His 
wife is Letitia Roane, daughter of Wm. Crawford and Elizabeth Caroline 
(Thomas) Dowdell, and granddaughter of Lewis Dowdell, of Harris 
county, Ga., and of Wm. Callahan Thomas. Mrs. Ross is a first cousin 
of the late Gov. Wm. J. Samford. 



STATE BANK EXAMINER. 

(General Laws, 1903, pp. 483-487.) 

Examiner. — Thomas J. Rutledge, of Montgomery. 

THOMAS JEFFERSON RUTLEDGE, of Montgomery, was born in Ma- 
rion, Perry county, on Oct. 16, 1852. His father, Berry W. Rutledge, was 
nearly related to the distinguished family of that name in S. C. His 
mother was Amelia Shepherd. He was educated in the common schools 
and at Howard College, Marion, but he did not graduate, having left that 
institution to engage in teaching. About 1871 he came to Montgomery; 
read law in the office of Hon. Walter L. Bragg; and was admitted to the 
bar in 1874. He was one of the clerks of the Democratic and Conservative 
committee, which in 1874, under Capt. Bragg and his associates, redeemed 
the State from Republican rule; was clerk of the Supreme Court, 1875- 
1880; was recorder of Montgomery for two terms; was claim agent for 
the old Alabama Midland Railroad for a number of years; on March 1, 
1903, appointed assistant examiner of public accounts; on Jan. 1, 1904, 
was commissioned first State bank examiner, and re-commissioned Jan. 
23, 1907. He was married on Oct. 16, 1878, to Rebecca Warren, daughter 
of Alexander R. and Rebecca M. (Howard) Bell, of Montgomery. 



STATE GAME AND FISH COMMISSION. 

(General Laws, 1907, pp. 12-27, 46-48.) 

Commissioner. — John H. Wallace, Jr., of Huntsville. 

JOHN HENRY WALLACE, JR., was born Dec. 12, 1874, at Center Star, 
Lauderdale county, and is the son of John Henry and Mary Sue (Ingram) 
Wallace, who lived near Leighton, Lawrence county, the grandson of John 
Henry and Henrietta Wallace of Leighton, and of Henry and Mary Ingram, 
of Center Star. The Wallaces were from N. C. and the Ingrams from Va., 
both families having representatives In the Revolutionary War. John H. 
Wallace, the second, enlisted at Helena, Ark., for service in the Confeder- 



STATE EXECUTIVE OFFICES. 29 

ate army, and rose to the rank of captain. Commissioner Wallace was 
educated in the common schools of his native county, and took a three 
year course in the State Normal College, Florence. Was admitted to the 
bar, May 10, 1896, since which date he has practiced his profession in 
Huntsville. He was a member of the House of Representatives from Madi- 
son county, 1898-99, 1900-01; and was elected State Game and Fish Com- 
missioner by the State Legislature, Feb. 20, 1907. To Mr. Wallace is large- 
ly due the credit of stimulating public opiricn to the importance of legis- 
lation on State game and fish preservation, resulting In the establishment 
of the office which he has been called upon to organize and administer. 
The law creating the new department was drawn by Mr. Wallace. 
Since fifteen years of age he has been a frequent contributor to magazines 
and newspapers on fox hunting and field sports. In 1904 he published The 
Senator from Alabama, a romance treating of the disfranchisement of the 
negro, and including a scathing arraignment of the White House social 
equality policy. (12 mo., pp. 283). He is a Democrat, and has taken part 
in many campaigns. He is a Methodist; a Mason, a Knight of Pythias, an 
Odd Fellow, and a member of the Junior Order of American Mechanics. 
He is unmarried. 



ALABAMA BUREAU OF COTTON STATISTICS. 

(General Laws, 1907, pp. 217-219.) 

Director. — Wm. Henry Seymour, of Montgomery. 

WILLIAM HENRY SEYMOUR, of Montgomery, was born Dec. 29, 1867. 
near Pushmataha, Choctaw county, and is the son of Robert Henry and 
Leah Ann (Harris) Seymour, and the grandson of Henry and Margaret 
(Stallworth) Seymour, and of John Robert and Mary Ann (Miller) Har- 
ris. Henry Seymour, the son of William Henry Seymour and wife, who 
was a Miss Rose, of Brunswick county, Va., married in Greene county, 
Ala., and went at once to live in St. Tammany, La. There R. H. Seymour 
was born, but when an infant, the family returned to Greene county, and 
thence to Choctaw county, Ala. The Harris family came from near Ral- 
eigh, N. C, while the Millers and the Stall worths were from South Caro- 
lina. Wm. H. Seymour was educated in the common schools, and the Liv- 
ingston male academy. He attended the University of Alabama, 1884-85, 
and the United States Naval Academy, 1885-88. He read law but never 
applied for admission to practice. His present business interests are fann- 
ing, saw-milling and timber. From 1888 to 1890 he was principal of the 
Livingston Male Academy, and 1890-92, he was chief clerk in the Alabama 
State Department of Education. He was a member of the House of Rep- 
resentatives from Sumter county, 1892-93, and 1898-99; U. S. Consul to 
Palermo, Italy, 1893-98; and he is now the Director of the Alabama Bu- 
reau of Cotton Statistics, receiving the appointment in April, 1907. Mr. 
Seymour has been president of the Alabama Division of the Southern Cot- 
ton Association since its organization in 1904; was elected first president 
and organizer of the Mississippi-Alabama Lumber Exchange, both of these 
Associations being organizations which seek to obtain or secure better 
prices for producers. Since his appointment as Director, he proposed 
the plan, readily adopted by the U. S. Department of Agriculture, whereby 
the Federal Government will, without cost, allow the Alabama Bureau of 
Cotton Statistics to use the paid correspondents of the former to collect 
data for the benefit of the State. He is a Democrat; a Baptist; a Knight 
of Pythias, and an Elk. On Oct. 5, 1892, he was married to Mamie, daugh- 
ter of Capt. Miles H. and Lena (Lee) Amerine, of Montgomery. 



30 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

INSPECTOR OF JAILS, ALMSHOUSES AND COTTON MILLS. 

{General Lowe, 1907,pp. 277-281.) 

Inspector. — Dr. SWrley Bragg, of Montgomery. 

DR. SHIRLEY BRAGG, of Montgomery, was born near Lowndesboro, 
Lowndes county, on November 3, 1S53, and }s the son of John Bragg, late 
of Mobile, long in public life in Alabama, and wife Mary Frances, 
daughter of William B. Hall and wife Dorian Bonnell . The Bragg family 
is from Warren county, N. C, and Gen. Braxton Bragg is a brother of 
John Bragg. Dr. Bragg was educated at Spring Hill College, and St. Louis 
University, taking the degree of A. B. at the latter in 1872. He took his 
degree of M. D. at the Alabama Medical -College in 1875. He was adjunct 
professor of surgery at the Atlanta Medical College, 1875-76, and after 
the latter year practiced his profession in Lowndes county, until March, 
1896, since which time he has practiced in Montgomery. He has teen 
health officer of Lowndes and Montgomery counties. He is a member of 
the Protestant Episcopal church, and a Knight of Pythias. He has never 
held public office until his appointment in March, 1901, as physician in- 
spector of the convict board. On Oct. 15, 1905, he became president of 
this board; and in 1907 was appointed to his present position. On Feb- 
ruary 7, 1878, at Hayneville, he was married to Isabella Norvelle, daughter 
of John and Mary (Spann) Murray, both of whom came from Statesburg, 
S. C, to Lowndes county. 



STATE HORTICULTURIST. 

Horticulturist. — R. S. Mackintosh, of Auburn. 

ROGER SHERMAN MACKINTOSH, of Auburn, was born February 18, 
1872, at Lincoln, Middlesex ccunty, Mass., and is the son of Wm. and Eliza- 
Jane (Tuttle) Mackintosh, and the grandson of Gideon and Nancy (Sher- 
man) Mackintosh, and of David and Pattle (Smith) Tuttle, of Lexington, 
Mass. Nancy Sherman was the daughter of John, the oldest son of Roger 
Sherman .of Connecticut, a signer of the Declaration of Independence. 
Gideon Mackintosh was the son of Gideon, the son of Col. William Mack- 
intosh, a Revolutionary soldier. He was educated at Lincoln, Mass., and 
Langdon, Minn. ; graduated in 1900 from the Minnesota School of Agricul- 
ture, St. Anthony Park; in 1902 from the College of Agriculture, Univer- 
sity of Minn., with the B. Agr. degree; and in 1906 from the School of 
Agriculture, University of Illinois. He was assistant in horticulture of the 
experiment station, University of Minnesota, 1897-1903 ; and has been pro- 
fessor of horticulture, Alabama Polytechnic Institute, 1903 to date; and 
State Horticulturist since 1903. He is a Unitarian; a member of the Ma- 
sons and of the Knights of Pythias. He was instrumental in forming the 
Alabama State Horticultural Society, has been secretary since its organi- 
zation in 1903, and the editor of its Reports and other publications. At 
Cottage Grove, Minn., Se L ")t. 18, 1901, he was married to Laurie Belle, 
daughter of Edward Wright. 



STATE LIVESTOCK SANITARY BOARD. 

(General Laws, 1907, pp. 359-36.',.) 

Chairman. — J. A. Wilkinson, Com. Agriculture and Industries, ex- 

officio. 
Secretary. — Charles A. Cary, of Auburn, State Veterinarian, ex ■officio. 



STATE EXECUTIVE OFFICES. 31 

Dr. Wm. H. Sanders, State Health Officer, ex-officio. 
Professor of animal industry, Alabama Polytechnic Institute, ex- 
officio. 



STATE VETERINARIAN. 

{General Laws, 1907, pp. $59-86}.) 

Veterinarian. — Charles Allen Cary, of Auburn, professor of veterinary 
science, Alabama Polytechnic Institute, ex-officio. 

CHARLES ALLEN CARY, of Auburn, was born Nov. 27, 1861, at Mil- 
lersburg, Iowa, and Is the son of William and Lucy Ellen (Ohara) Cary, 
and the grandson of Daniel Morris and Dorcas (Price) Cary. The Carys are 
of old English stock, seated in the Massachusetts Bay Colony as early as 
1634. His maternal grandfather was a Scotch-Irish lawyer, whose wife 
was a McGowan. Dr. Cary was educated in the county schools and in 
the high school at Millersburg, Iowa. In 1885 he graduated from the 
Iowa State College at Ames, with the degree of B. S.; and in 1887 tie 
graduated as a doctor of veterinary medicine from the same institution. 
In 1892 he spent nine months in Germany engaged in the study of med- 
icine. He practiced as a veterinarian at Keokuk, Iowa, 1887-89; was as- 
sistant State veterinarian of Iowa in 1888; was professor of veterinary 
science and veterinarian at the South Dakota A. & M. College, 1889-1891 ; 
and since 1893 he has been professor of veterinary science and physiology 
and veterinarian at the Alabama Polytechnic Institute. Dr. Cary is the 
director of farmers' institutes and the director of the A. P. I. summer 
school for farmers ; is a member of the American Veterinary Medical Asso- 
ciation; member of the National association for the study and preven- 
tion of tuberculosis; aided in bringing, about meat and milk inspection 
in Montgomery, Birmingham and Mobile; and has been president of the 
Alabama Live Stock Association since 1900. The writings of Dr. Cary 
in the literature of his profession are numerous. They are to be found 
principally in the publications of the A. P. I. experiment station. He 
is a Democrat; an elder in the Presbyterian church; and a member of 
the Masons, the Knights Templar, and the Knights of Pythias. At 
Nauvoo, 111., Nov. 27, 1890, he was married to Emma, daughter of Wm. 
E. and Margaret Heck, of German origin. 



IMMIGRATION BOARD. 

(General Laws, 1907, pp.25^-257.) 

Chairman. — Braxton B. Comer, Governor, ex-officio. 
Member. — J. A. Wilkinson, Com. Agriculture and Industries, ex-officio. 
Immigration Commissioner (temporary). — R. H. DeHoll, of Birming- 
ham. 



ALABAMA COMMISSION FOR THE JAMESTOWN TERCENTENNIAL 

EXPOSITION. 

(General Laws, 1907, pp. 260-26S.) 

Commissioners. — Braxton B. Comer, Governor, ex-officio. 

Wm. H. Taylor, of Uniontown. 

Rufus N. Rhodes, of Birmingham. 

George H. Malone, of Dothan. 

Thomas H. Hobbs, of Athens. 
Secretary.— John B. Ward* of Abbeville. 



32 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

JOINT COMMITTEE OF THE LEGISLATURE, APPOINTED TO READ 
AND REVISE THE MANUSCRIPT OF TltB CODE 
PREPARED BY JAMES J. MAYFIELD. 

(General Laws, 1907, pp. 42-44.) 

Chairman. — Samuel Will John, of Birmingham. 
Lay) Clerk. — Lawrence E. Brown, of Scottsboro. 
Stenographer. — Pat McGauley, of Montgomery. % 

Senator 8. — John A. Lusk, of Guntersyille. 
Henry P. Merritt, of Tuskegee. 
Luclen D. Gardner, of Troy. 
Representatives. — Sam'l Will John, of Birmingham. 

John Manly Foster, of Tuscaloosa. ' 

O. C. Maner, of Montgomery. 

Archibald H. Carmichael, of Tuscumbia. 

Henry Steagall, of Ozark. 



BOARD OF APPOINTMENT OF REGISTRARS OF ELECTORS. 

(State Constitution, Sec. 188.) 

Braxton B. Comer, Governor, ex-offlcio. 

Wm. Woodward Brandon, Auditor, ex-officio. 

James A. Wilkinson, Com. agriculture and Industries, ex-offlcio. 



ALABAMA CAPITOL BUILDING COMMISSION. 

(General Laws, J 90S, pp. 57-59.) 

Braxton B. Comer, Governor, ex-offlcio. 

Walter D. Seed, Treasurer, ex-officio. 

Wm. W. Brandon, Auditor, ex-offlcio. 

Frank N. Julian, Secretary of State, ex-officio. 

Alexander M. Garber, Attorney-General, ex-officio. 

Thomas M. Owen, Director Dept. of Archives and History, Secretary. 

The chief justice and the associate justices of the Supreme Court, in 
case of the erection of a new building or in case of extensive alterations' 
in the capitol for the accommodation of the Supreme Court and library, 
are to be a part of the Commission. 



STATE TEXT BOOK COMMISSION. 
(General Laws, 190S, pp. 167-181.) 

Braxton Bragg Comer, Governor, ex-officio. 

Harry C. Gunnells, Secretary. Supt. of Education, ex-offlcio. 

John W. Abercrombie, president of the University of Alabama, Uni- 
versity P. O. ' * 

Charles C. Thach. president of the Alabama Polytechnic Institute, 
Auburn. 

Dr. Francis M. Peterson, Montevallo. 



STATE EXECUTIVE OFFICES. 33 

AGENT OF SALT SPRINGS AND SALT LANDS. 
(Code, 1896, vol. i, Sec. 2696 et seq.) 
Agent. — W. H. Cherry, of Jackson. 



ATTORNEY AND AGENT STATE SWAMP AND OVERFLOWED 

LANDS. 

{9 U. S. Statutes at Large, p. 519, and 10 U. S. Statutes at Large, p. 634; 
Acts of Alabama, 1818-79, p. 198, and of 1886-87, pp. 73-7}.) 

Agent, etc. — Wm. M. Byrd, of Birmingham. 



INSPECTORS OF COAL MINES. 

(Code, 1896, vol. i, Sec. 2899 et seq.) 

Chief Mining inspector. — John M. Gray, of Birmingham. 
Assistant. — James Hillhouse, Sr., of Birmingham. 
Assistant. — Edward Flynn, of Birmingham. 



EXAMINERS OF MINE .BOSSES. 

(Code, 1896 vol i, Sec. 2899 et seq.) 

Chief Mining Inspector. — John M. Gray, of Birmingham, chairman 

ex-officio. 
g Thomas H. Tinney, Hargrove. 

Geo. Barbour, Pratt City. 
P. J. Rogers, Pratt City. 
James F. Beattie, Dora. 



• STATE BOARD OF ASSESSMENT. 

(Code, 1896, vol. i, Sec. 396G ct seq.) 

Fresident. — Braxton B. Comer, Governor, ex-officio. 
President, pro. tern. — Thomas L. Sowell, Auditor. 
Frank N. Julian, Secretary of State, ex-officio. 
Walter D. Stcd, Treasurer, ex-officio. 



STATE BOARD OF PENSION EXAMINERS. 

(General Laws of Alabama, 1898-99, pp. 226 et seq.) 

Elbert S. Starr, of Selma. 

R. J. Reynolds, of Abbeville. 

Dr. R. D. Jackson,, of Birmingham. 



34 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

BOARD OF PARDONS. 

(Constitution, Section 12k.) 

Alexander M. Garber, Attorney General, ex-officio. 
Frank N. Julian, Secretary of State, ew-officio. 
Wm. W. Brandon, Auditor, ex-offlcio. 



BOARD OF PHARMACY. 

{Code, 1896, vol i, Sec. 3248 et seq.) 

President.— P. C. Candidus, of Mobile. 
Secretary. — John L. Parker, of Birmingham. 
E. P. Gait, of Selma. 



BOARD OF DENTAL EXAMINERS. 
(Code, 1896, vol. i, Sec. 1U4 et seq.) 



President. — J. A. Hall, Collinsville. 
Secretary. — T. P. Whitby, Selma. 

R. B. Chapman, of Troy. 

P. R. Tunstall ,of Mobile. 

W. E. Proctor, Sheffield. 



STATE BOARD OF EMBALMING. 

(Code, 1896, vol. i, Sec. 1704 et seq.) 

President. — Perry B. Dixon, of Mobile. 
Secretary. — George A. Thomas, of Montgomery. 

John Angwine, of Ensley. 

Tilford F. Leak, of Montgomery. 



i 
< i 



/ 



COMMISSIONERS TO CONFER WITH LIKE COMMISSIONERS OF 
FLORIDA LOOKING TO ANNEXATION OF WEST 

FLORIDA TO ALABAMA. 

(General Laws of Alabama, 1900-1901, pp. 192-3.) 

William L. Martin, of Montgomery.* 
Samuel Blackwell, of Decatur. 
Richard C. Jones, of Camden. 

*Now deceased. 



II. SENATORS AND REPRESENTA- 
TIVES IN CONGRESS FROM 

ALABAMA. 



SENATORS. 

JOHN T. MORGAN, Democrat, of Selma, was born at Athens, Tenn., 
June 20, 1824; is the son of George Morgan, a merchant, and wife. Frances 
Irby, a relation of the Tyler family of Virginia; received an academic 
education chiefly in Alabama, to which State he emigrated when nine 
years old, and where he has since resided; studied law, was admitted to 
the bar in 1845, and practiced until his election to the United States Sen- 
ate; was a presidential elector in 1860 for the State at large and voted for 
Breckenridge and Lane; was a delegate in 1861 from Dallas county to the 
Alabama State convention which passed the ordinance of secession; joined 
the Confederate army in May, 11861, as a private in Company "I." Cahaba 
Rifles, and when that company was assigned to the Fifth Alabama Regi- 
ment, under Colonel Robert E. Rodes, he was elected major, and after- 
wards lieutenant-colonel of that regiment; was commissioned in 1862 as 
colonel and raised the Fifty-first Alabama Regiment; was appointed brig- 
adier-general in 1863 and assigned to a brigade in Virginia, but resigned 
to join his regiment, whose colonel had been killed in battle; November 
16, 1863, he was again appointed brigadier-general and assigned to an 
Alabama brigade which included his regiment; after the war he resumed 
the practice of his profession at Selma; was chosen a presidential elector 
for the State at large in 1867, but having been elected senator, he resigned; 
was a member of the commission appointed to prepare a system of laws 
for the Hawaiian Islands; was elected to the United States Senate to suc- 
ceed George Goldthwaite, Democrat; took his seat March 5, 1877; was 
re-elected in 1882, in 1888 and in 1894; was nominated by a caucus of the 
Democratic party, and also by a meeting of the Republican and Populist 
parties, who differed with him politically, and on November 17, 1900, was 
chosen by the unanimous vote of the General Assembly of Alabama for a 
fifth term in the Senate. At the State Democratic primary, August 27, 1906, 
Senator Morgan was nominated as his own successor without opposition, 
receiving 81,795 votes. On Jan. 23, 1907, he was unanimously re-elected 
by the Legislature for the term ending March 7, 1913.* His wife was Cor- 
nelia Willis, of Talladega county, Alabama. 

EDMUND WINSTON PETTUS, Democrat, of Selma, was born in Lime- 
stone county, Alabama, July 6, 1821 ; is the youngest child of John 
Pettus and Alice Taylor, daughter of Capt. Anthony Winston, of Virginia, 
a Revolutionary soldier; was educated at the common schools in Alabama 
and at Clinton College, in Smith county, Tennessee, studied law in the 
office of William Cooper, then the leader of the bar in North Alabama; 
was admitted to the bar in 1842 and commenced the practice of law at 
Gainesville, Ala., was the partner of Turner Reavis; in 1844 was elected 



•Senator Morgan died in Washington City on the evening of June 11. 
1907, and was interred in Live Oak Cemetery, Selma, Ala., June 15, 1907. 

(35) 



{ 



36 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

solicitor for the seventh circuit ; served as lieutenant in the Mexican War ; 
tn 1849 resigned the office of solicitor and went ,with a party of his neigh- 
bors on horseback to California; was elected judge of the seventh circuit 
after his return to Alabama in 1855, but resigned that office in 1858 and 
removed to Dallas county, where he now resides; resumed the practice of 
law as a member of the firm of Pettus, Pegues ft Dawson; in 1861 went 
into the Confederate army as major of the Twentieth Alabama Infan- 
try, and soon afterwards was made lieutenant-colonel of that regiment; 
was made a brigadier-general of infantry, September 18, 1863, and served 
till the close of the war, and was in many battles; after the war returned 
to his home and to the practice of law, which he has continued to this 
time; ever since he became a voter has been a member of the Democratic 
party; in November, 1896, was nominated by that party, and elected by 
the General Assembly of Alabama United States Senator for the term 
commencing March 4, 1897; after his nomination the opposition to his 
election was merely nominal; received the entire vote of his party, and 
more; was re-elected in 1903; had never before been a candidate for any 
political office; has been a delegate to all of the Democratic national 
conventions, except the first and last, since the war, and when delegate, 
was chairman of the Alabama delegation. At the State Democratic pri- 
mary, Aug. 27, 1906, Senator Pettus was nominated as his own successor 
without opposition, receiving 78,343 votes. On Jan. 23, 1907, he was unan- 
imously re-elected by the Legislature of Alabama for a six year term, 
March 4, 1909, to March 4, 1915.* His wife was Mary L., daughter of Judge 
Samuel Chapman, late of Sumter county, Alabama. 



REPRESENTATIVES. 



FIRST DISTRICT. 

Counties. — Choctaw, Clarke, Marengo, Mobile, Monroe, and Washington 
(6 counties). V 

GEORGE WASHINGTON TAYLOR. Democrat, of Demopolis, Marengo 
county, Ala., was born January 16, 1849, in Montgomery county, Ala.; is 
the son of Edward F. Taylor and wife Anne S. Trezevant, both natives of 
Columbia, S. C; was educated at the South Carolina University, Colum- 
bia, S. C; is a lawyer, and was admitted to practice at Mobile, Ala., 
November, 1871; entered the army as Confederate soldier at the age of 
fifteen years, in November, 1864, being then a student at an academy in 
Columbia, S. C; served a few weeks with the South Carolina State troops 
on the coast near Savannah, and then enlisted as a private in Company "D", 
First Regiment ,South Carolina Cavalry, and served as a courier till the 
end of the war; left the South Carolina University at eighteen, having 
graduated in Latin, Greek, history, and chemistry; taught school for sev- 
eral years, and studied law at the same time; was elected to the House of 
Representatives of the State of Alabama in 1878, and served one term 
as a member from Choctaw county ; in 1880. was elected solicitor for the 
first judicial circuit of Alabama, and was re-elected in 1886; declined a 
third term; was elected to the Fifty-fifth, Fifty-sixth, Fifty-seventh, Fifty- 
eighth, Fifty-ninth Congresses, and re-elected to the Sixtieth Congress with- 
out opposition, receiving 3,592 votes. In January, 1881, he was married 
to Margarita, V. T., daugher of E. II. and Mary J. Metcalf, of Montgomery. 



♦Senator Pettus died at Hot Springs, N. C, on the evening of July 27, 
1907, and was interred in Live Oak Cemetery, Selma, Ala., July 30, 1907. 



SENATORS AND REPRESENT ATIVBS. 37 

SECOND DISTRICT. 

Counties. — Baldwin, Butler, Conecuh, Covington, Crenshaw, Escambia, 
Montgomery, Fike, and Wilcox (9 counties). 

\ ARIOSTO APPLING WILEY, Democrat, of Montgomery, was born in 
Barbour county, and reared in Pike county, Ala.; is the son of Judge 
James McCaleb Wiley and wife Cornelia Ann Appling, of Troy; graduated 
at Emory and Henry College, Virginia; in 1872 he located in the city of 
Montgomery and engaged in the practice of the law; was several terms a 
member of the Alabama Legislature, serving in both the House and Sen- 
ate; in June, 1S98, was commissioned lieutenant-colonel of the Fifth Reg- 
iment United States Volunteer Infantry, one of the ten regiments organ- 
ized by special act of Congress, and served an enlistment of several 
months at Santiago de Cuba, acting a greater part of the time as General 
Lawton's chief of staff; was elected to the Fifty-seventh, Fifty-eighth and 
Fifty-ninth Congresses, and re-elected to the Sixtieth Congress, receiving 
6,000 votes, to 751 for J. C: Fonville, Independent. On November 6, 1877, 
he was married to Mittie A. Noble, of Montgomery, Alabama. 

THIRD DISTRICT. 

Counties. — Barbour, Bullock, Coffee, Dale, Geneva, Henry, Houston, Lee, 
and Russell (9 counties). 

I HENRY D. CLAYTON, Democrat, of Eufaula, was born in Barbour 
county, Ala., February 10, 1857; is the son of Major Gen. Henry D. Clay- 
ton and wife Victoria V., daughter of Gen. John L. Hunter, of Eufaula, 
Ala.; is a lawyer by profession; is now and has been since 1888 the Ala- 
bama member of the Democratic national committee; has served one 
term in the Alabama Legislature, being chairman of the judiciary commit- 
tee; was a United States district attorney from May, 1893, to October, 
1896; was a Democratic presidential elector in 1888 and 1892; was elected 
to the Fifty-fifth, Fifty-sixth, Fifty-seventh, Fifty-eighth and Fifty-ninth 
Congresses, and re-elected to the Sixtieth Congress, without opposition, re- 
ceiving 6,922 votes. Mr. Clayton's wife, now deceased, was a daughter 
of the late Gen. Wm. Wirt Allen, of Montgomery, Ala. 

FOURTH DISTRICT. 

Counties. — Calhoun, Chilton, Cleburne, Dallas, Shelby and Talladega (G 
counties.) 

WILLIAM BENJAMIN CRAIG, of Selma, Dallas county, was born at 
his present place of residence, November 2. 1877, and is the son of George 
H. and Alvina (White) Craig, of Selma, and the grandson of James D. 
and Elvira S. (Berry) Craig, of S. C, and Miss., and of John Finley and 
Mary J. (Finley) White, and the great-grandson of John White, a mem- 
ber of the Alabama Supreme Court, 1825-32. Mr. Craig was educated in 
the schools of Selma; and from 1893 to 1897 served an apprenticeship as 
a machinist in the shops of the E. T. V. ft Georgia Railway Company, at 
Selma. In 1897 he entered the law school of the Cumberland University, 
Lebanon, Tenn.. and In 1898 graduated with the degree of LL. B. He was 
admitted to the practice June 29, 1898; has been referee in bankruptcy, 
August, 1898, to December, 1901, and United States Commissioner, 1901; 
State Senator, 1903; and elected to the Sixtieth Congress without opposi- 
tion, receiving 5,783 votes. He is a Democrat, and a Presbyterian. He is 
unmarried. 

FIFTH DISTRICT. 

bounties. — Autauga, Chambers, Clay, Coosa, Elmore, Lowndes, Macon, 
Randolph and Tallapoosa (9 counties). 



38 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

» 

* JAMES THOMAS HEFLIN, of Lafayette, Chambers county, was born 
April 9, 1869. at Louina, Randolph county, and is the son of Dr. Wilson 
Lumpkin Heflin, a native of Fayette, Fayette county, Ga:, and his wife 
Lavicie Catherine, daughter of Harrington and Sophia Phillips, of Louina. 
His grandfather, Wyatt Heflin, a native of Orange county, N. C, was one 
of the early settlers in Randolph county, which county he represented in 
the legislature, 1841, 1843 and 1845. Mr. Heflin was educated at the "Old 
Liberty School house" at Louina, under different teachers. He matricu- 
lated at the Southern University, and thence entered the A. and M. Col- 
lege, Auburn. He left that institution at the end of the junior year, and 
began the study of law at Lafayette. He was two terms mayor of La- 
fayette, 1893-95; register in chancery of Chambers county from 1895 to 
1896; in 1896 elected representative from Chambers . county in the Gen- 
eral Assembly and in 1898 was re-elected. In 1901. he was elected dele- 
gate to the Constitutional Convention of that year. He is a Democrat, 
and was a member of the State executive committee in the period when the 
new constitution was pending at the polls for ratification. Mr. Heflin 
was elected to the office of secretary of State in November, 1902, the 
first general election held under the new constitution ; resigned that of- 
fice May 1, 1904; was elected May 19, 1904, to fill the unexpired term 
of Charles W. Thompson, deceased, in the Fifty-eighth Congress; 
elected November 8, 1904, to the Fifty-ninth Congress; and re-elected 
to the Sixtieth Congress, without opposition, receiving 6,940 votes. He is 
a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. On December 18, 
1895, he was married at Lafayette to Minnie Kate, daughter of Zach and 
Ida Schuessler, of that place. 

SIXTH DISTRICT. 

Counties. — Fayette, Greene, Hale, Lamar, Marion, Pickens, Sumter, Tus- 
caloosa and Walker (9 counties.) 

t RICHMOND PEARSON HOBSON, Democrat, of Greensboro, Hale coun- 
ty, was born in that town Aug. 17, 1870, and is the son of James Marcellus 
and Sarah Croom (Pearson) Hobson. He was educated in the private 
schools of his native place, and at the Southern University, 1882-85; grad- 
uated at the U. S. Naval Academy, 1889; and later a student in Ecole 
National Superieur des Mines and Eoole d'Application du Genie Maratime. 
Paris. As a midshipman he was on a cruise with White Squadron in Med- 
iterranean and South Atlantic waters, 1889-90; on duty Navy Department, 
1894-5; on United States flagship New York, with North Atlantic squadron, 
summer, 1895; Navy Yard, New York, 1895-6; at Newport News in con- 
struction of battleships, 1896-7. Organized and conducted post-graduate 
course for officers destined for construction corps, at United States Naval 
Academy, 1897-8. To sea with North Atlantic squadron, taking post-grad- 
uate students, March, 1898. Served as constructor with fleet; principal 
work on stability and fire systems of vessels in action, on flagship New 
York, in blockade duty, in bombardment of Mantanzas, in expedition 
against San Juan de Puerto Rico. Commanded collier Merrimac and 
sunk her in Santiago harbor. Prisoner in Spanish fortress, June 3 to 
July 6, 1898. Inspector of Spanish wrecks; in charge of operations to save 
same; success with Teresa; on duty in far East, 1899-1900; directed re- 
construction at Hong-Kong of three Spanish gunboats — Isla de Cuba 
Isla de Luzon, and Don Juan de Austria ; in charge of construction depart- 
ment, Cavite, P. I. Special representative of Navy Department Pan-Amer- 
ican Exposition, 1901, Charleston Exposition, 1901-2; superintending naval 
construction, Crescent Shipyard, Elizabeth, N. J., May-June, 1902; resigned 
from United States Navy, February 6, 1903. In a primary, April 23, 1906. 
he defeated Hon. John H. Bankhead for nomination 1& representative 
from the 6th Congressional district, and Nov. 6, 1906, was elected without 
opposition, receiving 8,308 votes. His wife was Miss Griselda Hull, of New 
York. 



SENATORS AND REPRESENTATIVES. 39 

SEVENTH DISTRICT. 

Counties.— Cherokee, Cullman, DeKalb, Etowah, Franklin, Marshall, St. 
Clair, and Winston (8 counties). 

JOHN LAWSON BURNETT, Democrat, of Gadsden, Etowah county, 
Alabama; was born at Cedar Bluff, Cherokee county, Alabama, 
January 20, 1854,; was educated in the common schools of the county, 
at the Wesleyan Institute, Cave Springs, Ga., and Gaylesvllle high school, 
Gaylesville, Ala., studied law at Yanderbilt University, and was admitted 
to the bar in Cherokee county, Ala., in 1876; was elected to the Alabama 
House of Representatives in 1884, and to the State Senate in 1886; was 
elected to the Fifty-sixth, Fifty-seventh, Fifty-eighth and Fifty-ninth Con- 
gresses, and re-elected to the Sixtieth Congress, receiving 8,265 votes to 
4,914 for C. B. Kennamer, Republican, and 10 scattering. Mr. Burnett is 
the son of W. E. J. Burnett and wife Mary Brandon. 

EIGHTH DISTRICT. 

Counties. — Colbert, Jackson, Lauderdale, Lawrence, Limestone, Madison, 
and Morgan (7 counties). 

WILLIAM RICHARDSON, Democrat, of Huntsville, is a native of 
Limestone county, Ala.; is the son of William Richardson, of Limestone 
county, and wife, who was a daughter of Nicholas Davis, Sr., of the same 
county; was in the Confederate army; was a judge of the court of probate 
and county court of Madison county, Ala., from 1875 to 1886; was Demo- 
cratic elector for the State at large in 1888; was a member of the Alabama 
General Assembly from Limestone county in 1865-1867; was nominated 
by acclamation on the 3d of July, 1900, for an unexpired term in the Fifty- 
sixth Congress; elected to the Fifty-seventh, Fifty-eighth and Fifty-ninth 
Congresses ; and re-elected to the Sixtieth Congress, receiving 5,873 votes to 
317 votes for John T. Masterson, Republican. 

NINTH DISTRICT. 

Counties. — Bibb, Blount, Jefferson, and Perry (4 counties). 

OSCAR W. UNDERWOOD, Democrat, of Birmingham, was born in 
Louisville, Ky., May 6, 1862, is the son of Eugene Underwood and wife 
Catherine R. Thompson, of Kentucky; was educated at Rugby School, 
Louisville, Ky.. and the University of Virginia; commenced the practice 
cf law at Birmingham, Ala., September, 1884; was chairman of the Demo- 
cratic executive committee of the ninth district in the campaign of 1892, 
was elected to the Fifty-fourth, Fifty-fifth, Fifty-sixth, Fifty-seventh, Fifty- 
eighth, and Fifty-iinth Congresses, and re-elected to the Sixtieth Congress, 
without opposition, receiving 7,864 votes. 



III. JUDICIAL DEPARTMENT. 



SUPREME COURT. 

Chief Justice. — John R. Tyson, of Montgomery; elected Nov. 6, 1906, 
for four years, to serve out unexpired term of Chief Justice McClellan ; but 
actually succeeded Chief Justice Samuel D. Weakley, who had been ap- 
pointed on the death of Judge McClellan to serve until the next general 
election in 1900. 

Associate Justice. — Jonathan Haralson, of Selma; elected Nov. 8, 
1904, and assigned to class for term of four years. 

Associate Justice. — James R. Dowdell, of Lafayette; elected Nov. 6, 
1906, for six years, to succeed himself. 

Associate Justice. — N. D. Denson, of Lafayette; elected Nov. 8, 1904. 
and assigned to class for term of six years. 

Associate Justice. — John C. Anderson, of Demopolls; elected Nov. 8, 
1904, assigned to class for term of six years. 

Associate Justice. — Robert T. Simpson, of Florence; elected Nov. 8, 
1904, and assigned to class for term of four years. 

Associate Justice. — Thomas C. McClellan, of Athens; elected Nov. 6, 
1906, for a term of six years, to succeed Judge John R. Tyson. 

Clerk. — Robert F. Ligon, of Montgomery. 

Reporter. — Lawrence H. Lee, of Gadsden. 

Marshal and Librarian. — Junius M. Riggs, of Montgomery. 

Assistant Librarian. — Robert G. Thorington. 

Secretary. — Leon McCord, of Guntersville. 

Secretary. — Robert Harvey Greene, of Montgomery. 

Assistant to the Clerk. — Porter McKay, of Montgomery. 

Stenographer to the Reporter. — Miss Lena Faber, of Montgomery. 



CHANCELLORS. 

(Elected Nov. 8, 1904, for a term of six years.) 

Northern Chancery Division. — Wm. H. Simpson, of Decatur. 
Northeastern Division. — William W. Whiteside, of Anniston. 
Northwestern Division. — Alfred H. Benners, of Birmingham; elected 
Nov. 6, 1906, to succeed John J. Altman, deceased. 
Southeastern Division. — W. L. Parks, of Troy. 
Southwestern Division. — Thomas H. Smith, of Mobile. 



CIRCUIT COURT JUDGES. 

(Elected Nov. 8, 1904, for a term of six years.) 

At Large. — A. H. Alston, of Clayton. 
First Circuit. — John T. Lackland, of Grove Hill. 
Second Cir&uit. — J. C. Richardson, of Greenville. 
Third Circuit. — A. A. Evans, of Clayton. 
Fourth Circuit. — B. M. Miller, of Camden. 
Fifth Circuit. — S. L. Brewer, of Tuskegee. 
Sixth Circuit. — S. H. Sprott, of Livingston. 



(40) 



JUDICIAL DEPARTMENT. 41 

Seventh Circuit. — John Pelham, of Anniston. 
Eighth Circuit. — D. W. Speake, of Decatur. 
Ninth Circuit. — W. W. Haralson, of Fort Payne. 
Tenth Circuit. — A. A. Coleman, of Birmingham. 

A. O. Lane, of Birmingham. 
Eleventh Circuit. — Charles P, Almon, of Tuscumbia. 
Twelfth Circuit. — H. A. Pearce, of Dothan. 
Thirteenth Circuit. — Samuel B. Browne, of Mobile. 
Fourteenth Circuit. — J. J. Ray, of Jasper. 
Fifteenth Circuit. — Walter W. Pearson, of Montgomery. 
Sixteenth Circuit. — John W. Inzer, of Ashville. 



CIRCUIT COURT SOLICITORS. 

(Elected Nov. 8, 1904, for a term of six years.) 

First Circuit, — Oscar L. Gray, of Butler. 
Second Circuit. — Charles R. Bricken, of Luverne. 
Third Circuit. — C. A. L. Samford, of Opelika. 
Fourth Circuit. — Jasper F. Thompson, of Centerville. 
Fifth Circuit.— W. B. Bowling, of Dadeville. 
Sixth Circuit.— William B. Oliver, of Tuscaloosa. 
Seventh Circuit. — Borden H. Burr, of Talladega. 
Eighth Circuit. — David C. Almon, of Mgulto'u. 
Ninth Circuit.- — Richard Hunt, of Scottsborc. 
Tenth Circuit. — John McQueen, of Birmingham. 

Eleventh Circuit. — R. T. Simpson, Jr., of Florence, to succeed W. H. 
Sawtelle, of Tuscumbia. 

Twelfth Circuit.— R. H. Parks, of Troy. 
Thirteenth Circuit. — James N. Grenade, of St. Stephens. 
Fourteenth Circuit. — William C. Davis, of Jasper. 
Fifteenth Circuit. — D. D. Askew, of Wetumpka. 
Sixteenth Circuit. — George W. Darden, of Oneonta. 



JUDGES OF INFERIOR COURTS OF LAW AND EQUITY. 

Anniston City Court. — Thomas W. Coleman, Jr., of Anniston. 

Bessemer City Court. — Wm. M. Jackson, of Bessemer. 

Birmingham City Court. — Charles A. Senn, Senior Judge of Birming- 
ham; Charles W. Ferguson, of Birmingham : Christopher C. NeSmith, of 
Birmingham; Henry A. Sharpe, cf Birmingham. 

City Court of Andalusia. — B. H. Lewis, of Andalusia. 

Criminal Court of Jefferson County. — Daniel A. Green, Senior Judge, 
of Birmingham: Samuel L. Weav«r, of Birmingham. 

Criminal Court of Pike County. — A. H. Owens, of Troy. 

Qadsden City Court. — John H. Disque, of Gadsden; Alto V. Lee, Sr., 
of Gadsden. 

Lee County Court of Law and Equity. — Albert E. Barnett, of Opelika. 

Law and Equity Court of Madison County. — Tancred Betts, of Hunts- 
ville. 

Mobile City Court. — Oliver J. Semmes, of Mobile. 

Mobile Law and Equity Court. — Saffold Berney, of Mobile. 

Mobile Inferior Criminal Court. — Jules E. Alford, of Mobile. 

Morgan County Law and Equity Court. — Thomas W. Wert, of Decatur. 

Montgomery City Court. — A. D. Sayre, of Montgomery; Wm. H. 
Thomas, of Montgomery. 

Selma City Court. — J. W. Mabry, of Selma. 



42 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

Talladega City Court.— Q. K. Miller, of Talladega. 
Tuscaloosa County Court. — Henry B. Foster, of Tuscaloosa. 
Walker County Law and Equity Court. — Thomas L. Sowell, of Jas- 
per; successor to Peyton L. Norvell. 



SOLICITORS INFERIOR COURTS, ETC. 

Anniston City Court. — Wiley C. Tuns tall, Jr., of Anniston. 

Bessemer City Court. — L. D. Godfrey, of Bessemer. 

City Court of Andalusia. — L. H. Brassell, of Florala. 

Criminal Court of Jefferson County. — Harrington P. Heflin, of Bir- 
mingham. 

Gadsden City Court. — W. J. Boykin, of Gadsden. 

Law and Equity Court of Madison County. — James H. Pride, of Hunts- 
ville. 

Lee County Law and Equity Court. — C. A. L. Samford, of Opellka. 

Mobile City Court.-— James H. Webb, of Mobile. 

Montgomery City Court. — Hugh Dent, of Montgomery; W. Temple 
Seibels, of Montgomery, assistant. 

Selma City Court. — R. H. Mangum, of Selma. 

Talladega City Court. — Marion H. Sims, of Talladega. 

Tuscaloosa County Court. — Charles B. Verner, of Tuscaloosa. 

Walker County Law and Equity Court. — Sheriff Lacy, of Jasper. 



SKETCHES OF JUDGES AND OF THE OFFICERS OF THE 

SUPREME COURT. 

JOHN RUSSELL TYSON, of Montgomery, chief justice, was born Nov- 
ember 28, 1856. in Lowndes county, and is the son of John Adams Tyson, 
a native of North Carolina, who lived at Fort Deposit, and wife Martha 
Matilda Warren.. His paternal grandparents are Shem and Lucretia 
(Adams) Tyson, both of whom lived in Pitt county, N. C. Judge Tyson 
was educated in the country schools; and at Harvard College 1877, took 
the degree of A B. He attended Washington and Lee University, and in 
1879 took the degree of LL. B. He at once entered the profession of the 
law at Hayneville. In 1880 he was elected representative from Lowndes 
county in the General Assembly. He changed his residence to Montgom- 
ery, continuing the practice tEere as a member of the firm of Lomax & 
Tyson. In 1889-1892, he was president of the city council of Montgomery; 
from 1892 to 1898 he was judge of the second judicial circuit; in the lat- 
ter year he was elected associate justice; and in the Democratic primary 
election of Aug. 27, 1906, was nominated for chief justice, his opponent 
being Samuel D. Weakley, who had succeeded to the position on the death 
of Chief Justice Thomas N. McClellan; and on Nov. 6, 1906, was over- 
whelmingly elected. Judge Tyson is a Democrat, and a Baptist. On Octo- 
ber 20, 1879, he was marrjed at Lexington, Va., to Mary Dossie, daughter 
of Dr. James R. and wife Martha (Sloan) Jordan. 

JONATHAN. HARALSON, of Selma, associate justice, was born October 
18, 1830, in Lowndes county, and is the son of William Browning Haralson 
(son of Jonathan Haralson and wife Clara Browning, of Greene county, 
Ga.,) an early settler from Georgia in Lowndes county, and wife Temper- 
ance Martin, daughter of John Dunklin and wife Temperance Martin 
Hamilton, who early emigrated from Greenville district, S. C, to Butler 
county, Ala. Judge Haralson attended the country academies, and was 
graduated from the University of Alabama in 1851 with the degree of A. 
B., receiving the degree of A. M., from the same institution in 1854. After 
receiving his degree of LL. B., from the University of Louisiana in 1853, 



JUDICIAL DEPARTMENT. 43 

he entered upon the practice of the law at Selma. During the War of 
Secession he was the agent, at Selma, of the Nitre and Mining Bureau of 
the Confederate States. In 1876 he was appointed, by Governor George S. 
Houston, judge of the city court cf Selma, which office he held until 1892, 
when he was elected associate justice. To the latter position he was re- 
elected in 1898 and again in 1904. He was for many years a trustee of How- 
ard College, and also of Dallas Academy. He was from 1876 to 1906, a trus- 
tee of the A. & M. College (Alabama Polytechnic Institute) at Auburn. Mer- 
cer University, Macon, Ga., conferred on him the honorary degree of LL. D. 
in 1892. He is a Democrat. He was president of the Alabama Baptist Con- 
vention, 1874-1891, inclusive ; and president of the Southern Baptist Conven- 
tion 1887-1898, Inclusive. He married (1) April 9, 1859, Mattie Ellen, 
daughter of John W. Thompson, near Columbus, Ga. ; and (2) May 20, 
1869, Lida J., daughter of Robert H. McFadden, of Greensboro, Ala. 

JAMES RENDER DOWDELL. of Lafayette, associate justice, was born 
in Chambers county, April 2, 1847, and is the son of James Ferguson 
Dowdell and wife Sarah H., daughter of James Render, of Georgia. James 
F. Dowdell was a member of Congress, member of the Alabama Secession 
Convention, 1861, and colonel of the 37th Alabama Infantry Regiment. 
Judge Dowdell was educated in the commcn schools of the towns of La- 
fayette and Auburn; was at the University of Alabama, 1864-65; and was 
graduated from the East Alabama Male College, Auburn, with the degree 
of A. B. in the class of 1867. He began the practice of the law at Opelika 
in 1870; was solicitor of the ninth judicial circuit for four years, 1876 to 
1880; judge of the fifth circuit; chancellor of the North- 
eastern Division, and in 1898 was elected asscciate justice; re-elected in 
1904; and again in 1906; Judge Dowdell is a Democrat, and a member of 
the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. On December 12, 1878, he was 
married to Ella May Ware, at Lafayette, Chambers county. 

ROBERT TENNENT SIMPSON, of Florence, was born June 5 r 1837, at 
Florence, and is the son of Jchn Simpson, a native of County Tyrone, 
Ireland, who came to Florence in 1818, and wife Margaret, daughter of 
William Patton and Miss Tennent, of Belfast, Ireland. Both the Simpson 
and Patton branches of his family are Scotch-Irish. Judge Simpson re- 
ceived his early education in the schools of Florence; graduated from 
Princeton College in 1857 with the degree of A. B., and received from his 
Alma Mater, in 1887, the honorary degree of A. M. He graduated in 1859 
from the law department of the Cumberland University with the degree 
of LL. B.. and went to Des Arc, Ark., to practice. After 1865 he practiced 
law in Camden, Ala., thence returned to Florence where he continued the 
practice. In April, 1861, soon after the beginning of hostilities, he enlisted 
in the Fourth Alabama Infantry Regiment; commissioned second lieut- 
enant, First Alabama Battalion Artillery, September, 1861, in which he 
was later promoted first lieutenant; adjutant of post at Fort Morgan; ad- 
jutant general of Liddell's brigade; captain in Sixty-third Alabama Infan- 
try Regiment; and captured with the last named command at Blakeley, 
April 9, 1865, taken to Ship Island, and paroled at Meridian, Miss., May 
10, 1865. In 1S82 he represented Lauderdale county in the General Assem- 
bly ; in 1884 was elected State Senator and was chairman of the judiciary 
committee in that body. In 1890 Mr. Simpson was appointed to the 
board of convict managers, serving four years, and at the general election 
of 1902 was elected to the Legislature. On Nov. 8, 1904, he was elected 
an associate justice of the Supreme Court. He is a Democrat ; and an elder 
in the Presbvterian church. At Florence, on September 2, 1861, he mar- 
ried Mat tie, daughter of Wyatt Collier and wife Janet Douglas Walker, 
the latter a native of Scotland. 

JOHN CRAWFORD ANDERSON, of Demopolis, was born Aug. 5, 1863, 
at Burton's Hiil, Greene county, and is the son of Dr. John Crawford and 
Elizabeth (Mc Alpine) Anderson, and the grandson of James Mason and 



44 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

and Mary (Miller) Anderson, and of William A. and Ann (Watson) Mc- 
Alpine, and the great-grandson of Major David Anderson, who held both 
civil and military office under the Colonial government In Spartanburg 
district, S. C. Both of his grandfathers were soldiers from Alabama in 
the Indian wars. His maternal great-grandfathers, Solomon McAlpine and 
John Watson, were among the first settlers of that part of Alabama now 
embraced in the counties of Greene and Hale. Judge Anderson was edu- 
cated in the public schools and academies of Greene county, and the Uni- 
versity of Alabama, but he did not graduate in the academic department. 
He took a course in the law department of the University, from which 
he graduated in 1883, with the LL. B. degree. He practiced his profession 
in Linden and Deinopolis, 1886 to 1895; appointed and served as judge of 
the first judicial circuit, 1895 to 1904; and elected associate justice of the 
Supreme Court in 1904 for six years. He is a Democrat; was a member 
of the executive committee of Marengo county for four ye*fs; and alter- 
nate presidential elector in 1892. He is a deacon in the Presbyterian 
church; and a member of the Knights of Pythias. On February 24, 1897, 
at Tuscaloosa, he was married to Mary-Bird, daughter of Capt. E. B. and 
Julia (Glasscock) Martin, of San Marcos, Texas. Mr. Martin was a cap- 
tain in the Confederate army. 

NIMROD DAVIS DENSON, of Lafayette, Chambers county, associate 
justice, was born June 20, 1857, near Uchee, Russell county, and is the son 
of Augustus Russell and Elizabeth (Ivey) Denson, and the grandson of 
John Eley and Frances (Hillsman) Denson, and Barn a Franklin and Alcey 
(Davis) Ivey, and the great grandson of Wm. Denson, of English ancestry. 
The Densons came from Virginia to North Carolina, thence to Sparta, Ga., 
and later to Russell county, Alabama. Judge Denson was educated in the 
old field schools of Russell county, with two years at the A. A M. College, 
Auburn. After reading law in the office of his brother, Wm. H. Denson, he 
was admitted to the bar, and began the practice. in 1877. He was intendant 
of the town of Lafayette, 1882-84 ; member of the State Senate, 1884-5, and 
1886-87; member of the House of Representatives, 1888-89, from Cham- 
bers county ; Judge of the fifth judicial circuit for twelve years, 1892-1905, 
in which year he was elected an associate justice of the Supreme court 
bench for a term of six years. He is a Democrat; President of the Ala- 
bama State Baptist Convention ; a Mason, a Knight of Pythias, and an Odd 
Fellow. On Dec. 19, 1883, at Cusseta, Ala., he was married to Carrie Eu- 
genia, the daughter of John McHughs and Fannie (Frederick) Vernon. The 
Vernon family came from North Carolina to Georgia, thence to Alabama. 

THOMAS COWAN McCLELLAN, of Athens, Limestone county, 
associate justice, was born January 11, 1873, at his present 
place of residence, and is the son of Robert A. and Aurora 
(Pryor) McClellan, and the grandson of Thomas J. and Mar- 
garet (Beat tie) McClellan, and of Luke- and Isabella Virginia (Harris) 
Pryor. The father, R. A. McClellan, was a lieutenant in the 7th Alabama 
Cavalry Regiment, C. S. A. ; a lawyer; member of the Alabama Constitu- 
tional Convention, 1875; and a member of the State Senate, 1875. Luke 
Pryor, the father of Mrs. R. A. McClellan, was a lawyer ; member Alabama 
House of Representatives, 1855-56 ; U. S. Senator from Alabama, 1880 ; mem- 
ber of 48th Congress, 1883-85; and a strong advocate of railroad develop- 
ment. Judge McClellan was for two years a student of the University of 
Alabama, 1890-92, but he did not graduate. He is a lawyer; was mayor 
of Athens for two years ; and a trustee of the University of Alabama, 1899 
to date. In 1906 he was elected an associate justice of the Supreme Court. 
On December 20, 1894, he was married to Emily Horton, daughter of Judge 
James E. and Emily (Donelson) Horton, of Athens. His second wife was 
Miss Sue Ruth Fhillips, of Pulaski, Tenn. 

ROBERT FULWOOD LIGON, Jr., clerk of the Supreme Court, was born 
a i Tuskegee, September 24, 1864, and is the son of the late Lieutenant- 



JUDICIAL DEPARTMENT. 45 

Governor R. F. Ligon, of that place, and later of Montgomery, and wife 
Emily, daughter of Edward Paine, a lawyer, and wife Matilda Brinton, of 
Ga. His paternal grandparents are Robert Ligon, a lawyer, and wife Wil- 
helmina Fulwood, of Halifax county, Va., who removed to Watkinsville, 
Clarke county, Ga., where they died. He was educated at the Park high 
school. Tusk 6 gee, preparatory to entrance at the A. & M. College, Auburn, 
where he took the degree of A. B. in 1882. In September, 1886, he was 
admitted to the bar, and in 1888 he took the summer law course at the 
University of Virginia. From 1886 to 1888 he was mayor of Tuskegee. In 
1889 he entered into a law partnership with Gen. George P. Harrison, at 
Opelika; and In 1892 removed to Montgomery where he became a law- 
partner of the late Tennant Lomax. In 1898 he was elected clerk of the 
Supreme Court of Alabama; re-elected in 1904; and in 1900 was appointed 
a trustee of the Alabama Polytechnic Institute. Mr. Ligon has' been the 
commanding officer of the Tuskegee Light Infantry, and lieut.-col. and 
aid-de-camp on the staff, respectively, of Gov. Jones and Gov. Dates. He 
was adjutant-general of Alabama from Dec. 16, 1896, to Mar. 1, 1899, dur- 
ing the period of the Spanish- American war. Mr. Ligon is a Mason, a 
Knight of Pythias; a member of the State Bar Association, and has been 
president of the Alumni society of the Alabama Polytechnic Institute. He 
is a Methodist; and a Democrat. His wife, to whom he was married Jan- 
uary 31, 1895, is Aileen, daughter cf Dr. Thomas A. Means and wife Anna 
Powell, late of Montgomery. Dr. T. A. Means was the son of Dr. Thomas 
Alexander Means, long president of Emory College, Oxford, Ga. 

LAWRENCE HAYWOOD LEE, of Gadsden, was born August 2, 1867, at 
Clayton, Barbour county, and is the son of Alto V. and Lillian (Latvrence) 
Lee, and the grandson of Lovard and Susan B. {Lovelace) Lee, and of 
William Haywood and Lucy (Anthony) Lawrence, of Tuscaloosa, and the 
great-grandson of Needham and Lydia (Phyor) Lee, a native of Georgia 
who early moved to Southeast Alabama, and of Josiah Lawrence (whose 
wife Mas u daughter of Colonel Wm. Haywood and wife, Charity Ha»*e, 
the former a Revolutionary soldier in North Carolina) , and of Henry Tato 
Anthony, who built the first frame house in Tuscaloosa. Needham Leo 
was a vereinn of the Indian wars of 1836; and his grandson Alto V. Lee, 
now judge of the city court of Gadsden, is a veteran of the War of Seces- 
sion. Luwiencf H. Lee was educated in the common schools at Clayton; 
and graduated at the University of Alabama as a bachelor of arts in 1887. 
In 1888 he took his LL. B. degree from the law department, University of 
A label mn; entered upon the practice of the law at Clayton in July, 18S9, 
where he lived until Sept. 1, 1901, when he removed to Gadsden, where he 
continued the practice until Dec. 1, 1905. He was alderman of the town 
or Clayton, 1896-97; solicitor of Barbour county, 1890-92; member House 
of Representatives from the same county, 1898-99; and city attorney of 
Gadsden, 11)02-04. In Dec. 1905, he was appointed supreme court reporter 
to succeed Phares Coleman. Under his direction Volumes 144 and 145 of the 
Reports of the Supreme Court have been issued. He is a Democrat, and has 
served as chairman of the executive committee of Etowah county. He is a 
Methodist; a master Mason, and a member of the chapter, council and com- 
mandery, and is at present junior grand warden of the Grand Lodge of Ala- 
bau a. On October 29, 1889, at Clayton, he was married to Augusta, 
daughter of # Judge Augustus H. and Anna (Ott) Allston. (See infra for 
sketch of Judge Alston.) > 

JUNIUS MOORE RIGGS, of Montgomery, marshal and librarian of the 
Supreme Court, was born at Montgomery, November 29, 1851, and is the 
son of Joel Riggs, and wife Georgena, daughter of Junius A. Moore and 
wife Eliza Inglis Clitherall. His paternal grandparents are Zadock Riggs 
and wife Nancy Fleming, of North Carolina. Mr. Riggs received a coir- 
mon school education. He has been marshal and librarian since 1874. He 
*s past grand chancellor, Knights of Pythias, past dictator, Knights of 
Honor, and a member of the National Union and the Fraternal Union. He 



46 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

is a Democrat; and a member of the Protestant Episcopal Church. Mr. 
Riggs is the compiler of the Catalogues of the Supreme Court Library and 
of the State Library (1902; 8vo. p. 301.) On April 11, 1888, at Selma, be 
married Elizabeth Harris, daughter of John iempleton Green and wife 
Elizabeth Harris, of Vicksburg, Miss., the former being the son of Thomas 
M Green, Ji., and wife Mary Templeton. 



SKETCHES OF CHANCELLORS. 

WILLIAM HENRY SIMPSON, of New Decatur, chancellor of the north- 
ern div.sjon, was born July 15, 1857, at Danville, Morgan county, and is 
the sen of Stephen and Malinda (S to vail) Simpson, and the grandson of 
Mopes and Nancy Simpson, and of Drewry and Margaret Stovall, all of 
Morgan ctfunty. Stephen Simpson was a merchant of Danville, and one 
of the pioneers in the cause of education in his county. Chancellor Simp- 
son received his education at the Danville high school; and in 1879 took 
hia LL. B. degree at the University of Alabama. He entered upon the 
practice of the law in Oct. 1879. He was a member of the House of Rep- 
resentatives, 1886-87. In Feb. 1889, Gov. Thomas Seay appointed him 
judge of the newly established city court of Decatur; elected in 1892 for 
a six] year term; on the abolition of the city court in 1895 and the crea- 
tion of the new northern chancery division, was appointed chancellor by 
Gov. Wm. C. Oates; re-elected in 1898 and 1904, all elections being with- 
out opposition. He is a Democrat; and a deacon in the Missionary Bap- 
tist Church. On March 26, 1882, he was married to Mary Daniel, daughter 
of Daniel and Carrie L. Johnson. Mr. Johnson was a Confederate soldier, 
and was killed at the battle of Shiloh. 

ALFRED HATCH BENNERS, of Birmingham, chancellor of the north- 
western division, was born Feb. 22, 1849, at Greensboro, in Greene (now 
Hale) county, and is the son of Augustus and Jane (Hatch) Benners, and 
the grandson of Lucas Jacob and Frances (Batchelor) Benners, and of 
Alfred and Elizabeth {Vail) Hatch. Augustus Benners came of Huguenot 
ancestors, who had migrated from France to the West Indies, where the 
family resided from 1709 to 1780, whence members came to Newbern, N. 
C. He removed to Alabama; practiced law at Greensboro, 1840-1885; and 
was a member of the House of Representatives, 1853-54, 1861 and 1863. 
The Hatch family lived at Areola, Ala. Chancellor Benners was educated 
'*» the schools of Greensboro, and graduated, witb an A. B. degree in 1868, 
from the Southern University. He practiced law at Greensboro, i870-74; 
Dallas, Tex., 1875-85; again at Greensboro, 1885-90; and in 1890 removed 
to Birmingham, where he has since resided. In 1888-89 he was a member 
of the House of Representatives from Hale county. On Jan. 26, 1905, he 
wa& appointed chancellor of the N. W. division to succeed John J. Alt- 
man, deceased, and on November 8, 1906, he was elected. He is a Dem- 
ocrat; and a member of the Protestant Episcopal Church. On Feb. 2, 
1371. he married Margaret Chadwick, daughter of Allen Cadwallader and 
Khlhtrine (Erwin) Jones. Allen C. Jones was lieut.-col. of the 5th Ala- 
lama Infantry Regiment; and John Erwin, father of Mrs. Jones, was long 
proriiin+nt in Alabama public life. 

WILLIAM LYCAN PARKS, of Troy, chancellor of the southeastern 
division, was born Aug. 22, 1861, in Troy, Pike county, and is the son of 
Wm. Hayne and Catherine (Benbow) Parks, the grandson of Wm. N. and 
Eliza {Hayne) Parks, and of Richard and Nancy Benbow, and the great- 
grandson of Capt. Hugh Parks, a Revolutionary soldier from N. C. Mrs. 
Eliza (Hayne) Parks was the granddaughter of Isaac Hayne, a Revolu- 
tionary patriot executed near Charleston, S. C, by the British. Wm. H. 
Parks removed from Mecklenburg county, N. C, to Alabama in 1855, was 
admitted to the bar in 1859, practiced law until appointed judge of the 



JUDICIAL DEPARTMENT. 47 

criminal court of Pike county, was State Senator, 1872 to 1876 from that 
county, and is now register in chancery of Montgomery county. Chan- 
cellor Parks received his education in the schools of Troy, and at the law 
school of the University of Alabama. He is a Democrat, and was a dele- 
gate to the Chicago convention of 1896, which nominated Bryan for the 
presidency. He is a member of the Methodist church. On Aug. 1, 1898, 
he was elected chancellor, and on Nov. 8, 1904, was re-elected. He has 
been twice married: (1) to Vernon Hilliard, and (2) to Susan, daughter 
of Walter and Fannie Coleman. 

THOMAS HERNDON SMITH, of Mobile, chancellor of the southwest- 
ern division, was born in Mobile, and is the son of John Little and Vir- 
ginia A. (Herndon) Smith, the grandson of Robert Hardy and Elizabeth 
{Gregory) Smith and of Thomas H. and Emma S. (Toulmin) Herndon, 
the great-grandson of Joseph Smith and his wife, who was a daughter of 
Robert Hardy. The Smith and Hardy families were long prominent at 
Edenton, N. C. The Herndons were from Fredericksburg, Va., and the 
Gregorys from Suffolk. Mrs. Herndon was the daughter of Judge Harry 
Toulmin, appointed superior court judge for the Washington district, 
Mississippi Territory, in 1804, and in which position he served until the 
admission of Alabama into the Union in 1819. John Little Smith was one 
of the most distinguished lawyers at the Alabama bar. Coming to Ala- 
bama in the forties with his brother, Col. Robert H. Smith, they practiced 
their profession at Livingston and later at Mobile. Chancellor Smith was 
educated at the University cf the South, Sewanee, Tenn., and at the Uni- 
versity of Alabama. He located in Mobile for the practice of the law and 
has since resided there. He was a member of the House of Representa- 
tives, 1804-95, and cf the State Senate, 1896-97. In 1898 he was elected 
chancellor of the S. W. division, a position which he has since held. His 
wife is Lily, daughter of John and Mary (Purvis) Goldthwaite, and the 
grand-daughter of Judge Henry Goldthwaite, late of Mobile. 

WILLIAM WALLACE WHITESIDE, of Anniston, chancellor of the 
northeastern division, was born in Calhoun county, Feb. 13, 1858, and is 
the don of Josiah Whiting ton and Elizabeth Jane (Small) Whiteside, the 
grandson of John Underwocd and Rutha {Hemphill) Whiteside and of 
Mathew and Nancy (Buchanan) Small, and the great-grandson of John 
Whiteside, a member of Captain Robert Porter's company, Tyron 
county, N. C, troops, commanded by Gen. Ruth-erf crd in the Revolutionary 
War. Chancellor Whiteside was educated in the "old field schools" of Cal- 
houn county, and at Oxford College, Oxford, Ala., from which he received 
the A. B. degree in 1879. After a year's preliminary reading, he entered 
the law department of the Cumberland University,* graduating in 1881, 
with the LL. B. degree. He entered upon his profession in Oxford, in Sep- 
tt coer, 1881, and did a general practice until 1904 when he was elected 
chancellor of the northeastern chancery division. He was a member of the 
House of Representatives from Calhoun county, 1884-85; a member of the 
Constitutional Convention from the same county, 1901; and a member of 
the public school board at Oxford for several years. He was a member 
cf the Calhoun county Democratic executive committee, 1882-J896. He is 
an e'uer in the Presbyterian church (formerly Cumberland); an active 
Sunday-scheol worker; and a Mason. At Alexandria, Calhoun county, 
Pec. 24, 1884, he was married to Alice, daughter of Wm. Phillip and Eliza- 
beth {Cameron) Cooper. Mrs. Whiteside is a descendant of Robert Cooke, 
a Revolutionary soldier who was with Washington at Valley Forge, and 
of Thomas CantreU. who saw Revolutionary service as a member of Lieut. 
Lytle's command, from Caswell county, N. C. 



48 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

SKETCHES OF CIRCUIT COURT JUDGES. 

AUGUSTUS HOLMES ALSTON, is a native of Bibb county, Ga., and was 
born Nov. 17, 1844. His parents, Willis and Elizabeth Alston, were na- 
tives of Georgia and South Carolina, respectively, and of English descent. 
Willis Alston was born in Hancock county, Ga., in 1806; married at 
Georgetown, S. C, in 1823, to Elizabeth Howard, and died in Texas, in the 
year 1S46. Mrs. Alston was the daughter of Rev. John Howard of North 
Carolina, for many years a distinguished minister of the Methodist Church, 
and her death occurred near Decatur, Ga., in January, 1866. Judge Als- 
ton's paternal grandfather was Robert Alston, who moved in an early day 
from Halifax. N. C, to Hancock county, Ga., thence later to Fla., but subse- 
quently returned to Georgia, and died at Thomasville, that state. Judge 
Alston is a native of Georgia, but came to Alabama immediately after 
the war. He served a short time as a member of Co. "C." Ninth Tenn. 
Cavalry, Duke's Brigade, Gen. John H. Morgan's command; was captured 
at Mt. Sterling, Ky., and remained a prisoner of war at Rock Island, 111., 
until the close of the war. He read law under Cato Baker at Eufaula; 
married Miss Anna M. Ott, daughter of Col. Edward S. and Amanda A. 
Ott, of Barbour county; served two terms as judge of probate, having 
first been appointed ana afterwards elected by a very large majority. 
Has served as chairman of the Democratic executive committee of the 
3d district, and as chairman of the Democratic executive committee or 
Barbour county. Is a Mason and a member of the M. E. Church, South. 
When the office of supernumerary judge was created in 1899 he was elect- 
ed by the Legislature to fill the office, and in 1904 he was without oppo- 
sition re-elected by the people of the State at large. He resides at Clayton, 
Barbour county. 

JOHN T. LACKLAND, of Grove Hill, judge of the first judicial circuit, 
Clarke county, was born in Virginia about fifty-five years ago; removed 
to Alabama when a young man; was admitted to the bar at Eutaw; lo- 
cated in Grove Hill for the practice; was for a number of years alone, then 
formed a partnership with Massey Wilson, which continued until the elec- 
tion of the latter as attorney-general, 1902; and was elected circuit judge 
in 1904 for a term of six years. 

JULIUS CAESAR RICHARDSON, judge of the second judicial circuit 
was born April 18. 3852, on the island of Key West, Fla., and is the son 
of Rev. Simon Peter Richard Eon, D. D., a distinguished Methodist min- 
ister, and wife, Mary Eliza Arledge, and grandson of Peter and Katherine 
(Horning) Richardson, and of Cullen Earp and Mary Judith (Breaker) 
Arledge. The Richardsons are Virginia stock, while other branches of 
the family were of South Carolina ancestry. Judge Richardson was 
educated at the East Alabama Male College, Auburn, the Institute at Sum- 
merfleld, and the Southern University, Greensboro. He taught school 
two years. In Dec. 1873 he took his LL. B. degree at the law depart- 
ment- of Cumberland University. On Jan. 4, 1874 he opened an office in 
Greenville, Ala., where he entered upon a successful practice. Elected 
to the Staty; Senate in 1886, lie served as a member of the joint commit- 
tee on the revision of the Code of Alabama. In November 1898, he was 
elected judge of the second judicial circuit, and in 1904 he was re-elected. 
He is a Democrat; a Methodist: and a Knight of Pythias. At Greenville, 
Nov. 22, 1874, he was married to Bettie, daughter of D. T. and Martha 
(Cook) McCall, of Scotch and English stock. He resides at Greenville, 
Butler county. 

AURELIUS AUGUSTUS EVANS, of Clayton, Barbour county, was born 
December 24, 1862, near Seale, Russell county, and is the son of John 
Quincy and Frances Elizabeth (Collier) Evans, and the grandson of 



JUDICIAL DEPARTMENT. 49 

John Evans, and of Vines and Sarah Collier. The Collier family came 
to Upson county, Ga., from Virginia. John Q. Evans was born in Edge- 
field District, S. C, came to 6a., and lived in Greene and Monroe coun- 
ties until the winter of 1859 when he moved to Russell county, Ala., 
where he lived until his death in 1883. Judge Evans was educated 
in the common schools of Russell county, and at the University of Ala- 
bama, from which he graduated in 1885, with the A. B. degree; received, 
the honorary degree of master of arts in 1888 from the same institution; 
taught school for four years immediately folic wing his graduation, read- 
ing law in the meantime; was admitted to the bar on November 1, 
1889, after an examination in open court by Chancellor John A. Foster, 
and has since practiced in Clayton. He was a member of the town coun- 
cil of Clayton for several years; mayor of the same place, 1896-98; 
elected Judge of the third judicial circuit in 1898, and re-elected in 
1904. He is a Democrat, and has served as a member of his county ex- 
ecutive committee, of the State conventions of his party, and of the Dem- * 
ocratic national convention of 1904. He is a member of the Methodist 
church; and a Mason. On December 27, 1888, at Opelika, Ala., he was 
married to Celeste Victoria, daughter of Judge George H. and Celeste 
Roberta Waddell, of Crawford, Russell county. Judge Waddell was at one 
time Probate Judge of Russell county, and was killed at Columbus, Ga., , 
while the Federal troops were occupying that city in 1865. Mrs. Evans 
is the great-great-granddaughter of Gen. Francis Nash, a Revolutionary 
patriot from North Carolina, and she is a cousin of the late James 
Iredell Waddell. commander of the Shenandoah during the War of Se- 
cession. 

BENJAMIN MEEK MILLER, of Camden, Wilcox county, was born 
March 13, 1864, at Oak Hill in that county, and is the son of Rev. Dr. 
John and Sarah {Pressly) Miller, and the grandson of Joseph and Nancy 
Barnette (Neely) Miller, and of Dr. Samuel and Elizabeth {Hearst) 
Pressly, and the great-grandson of David and Jane {Patterson) Pressly, 
of Scotch-Irish stock early seated in South Carolina from Nprth Ireland. 
The Millers are also Scotch-Irish, early settlers in York District, S. C 
Dr. John Miller was a graduate of Erskine college, South Carolina, and was 
for many years president of Wilcox Female Institute of Camden. At the 
age of thirty-three years he was elected president of his alma mater but ' 
declined. He was pastor of the congregation at Oak Hill for thirty-one 
years. On December 19, 1862, the "Wilcox True Blues" presented him a 
Bible for services as chaplain of that company in the 1st Alabama Infan- 
try Regiment. Judge Miller was educated at Oak Hill and Camden, and 
was graduated from Erskine College, with the A. B. degree and class 
honors in 1884, and graduated from the law department of the Univer- 
sity of Alabama in 1888. * Admitted to the practice in 1888, he continued 
his professional labors until elected judge of the fourth judicial circuit 
in 1904; was a member of the House of Representatives from Wilcox 
county 1888-89; and was a lieut. In the Wilcox Mounted Rifles, 1887-89. 
He is a Democrat, and has served as a member of his county executive 
committee and of the State executive committee. He is a member of the 
Associate Reformed Presbyterian Church ; a member of the Kappa Alpha • 
fraternity; and a Knight of Pythias. At Birmingham, Sept. 21, 1892, 
he was married to Margaret Otis, daughter of Thomas and Nancy (Sta- 
ton) Duggan, of Mobile. 

SAMUEL LOUIS BREWER, of Tuskegee, Macon county, was born near 
that town August 3, 1864, and is the son of William George and Mary 
{Attawau) Brewer, and the grandson of Willis Brewer and wife, who was 
a Miss Walpole, and of Isaiah and Mary Attaway. The- Brewers were 
from Virginia. Wm. G. Brewer lived for a number of years near Aber- 
deen, Miss., but in 1852 removed to Macon county. Isaiah Attaway was 
of South Carolina stock, but lived in Twiggs county, Ga., until 1840, 
when he moved to Macon county. Judge Brewer was educated in the Park 

4 



50 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

high school in Tuskegee. For some years he was employed in printing 
offices in Opelika and Tuskegee; and in the early eighties was one of the 
teachers in Barton Academy Mobile. He read law In 1888; was admit- 
ted to the bar in 1889; and took a summer course in the law department 
of the University of Virginia, 1901. He was elected solicitor of the fifth 
judicial circuit, 1892; re-elected in 1898; and -elected judge of the same 
circuit in 1904, to succeed Judge N. I). Denson. He is a Democrat ; a steward 
in the Methodist church ; a trustee o* the Alabama Conference Female Col- 
lege; and a member of the Masons and the Knights of Pythias. On De- 
cember 7, 1892, at Bagdad, Fla., he was married to Charlie Belle, daughter 
of Charles Patrick and Mary Ellen (Townsend) Walker. Mrs. Brewer is 
a direct descendant, on her father's side, cf Jamas Wilson, one of the 
signers of the Declaration of Independence. 

SAMUEL HENRY SPROTT, of Livingston, Sumter county, was born 
near Gaston in that county, June 24, 1840, and is the son of Robert and 
Mary (Bothwell) Sprott, and the grandson of Janres and Margaret Sprott, 
and of Arthur and Mary Bothwell. His grandparents on each side resided 
in County Down, Ireland. His great-grandfathers were Scotch, of the 
Clan Douglass, and were both at the battle of Culloden on the side of 
x Charles Edward, the Pretender. After the battle they made their escape 
to the North of Ireland. Robert Sprott came to America in 1838, and 
located in Sumter county in 1840 as a farmer. Judge Sprott was edu- 
cated in. the old field schools of Sumter county. He entered the Confed- 
erate service in March. 1862, and served successively as 1st lieut. Co. 
"A," and capt. Co. "B," 40th Alabama Infantry Regiment. After the war, 
he studied law in the office of the late Chancellor Thomas Cobbs, was 
admitted to the bar in 1867, practiced continuously in Livingston until 
his appointment as judge of the sixth judicial circuit on March 13, 1883. 
He has held this position by successive re-elections until the present 
time. He is a Democrat; a ruling elder in the Presbyterian church; and 
a Mason. Judge Sprott has taken an active interest in historical work, 
and, among other things, has prepared a history of the 40th Alabama In- 
fantry Regiment, C. S. A. On December 23, 1868, at Livingston, he was 
married to Nonie, daughter of Dr. Augustus E. and Martha E. (Horn) 
Btock way, the latter the daughter of Jacob and Mary Horn, both natives 
of North Carolina. Dr. Brockway was a native of Connecticut, and a 
graduate of the medical department of the Transylvania University, 
Lexington, Ky. 

JOHN PELHAM, of Ann is ton, Calhoun county, was born August 23, 
18*>5, at Alexandria in that county, and is the son of Judge Charles and 
Margaret Louise (Johnston) Pelham, and the grandson of Dr. Atkin- 
son and Martha (McGhee) Pelham, and of Judge George and Margaret 
(Talmadge) Johnston, the latter couple of Louisville, Ky., Judge Charles 
Pelham was. a member of Congress from Alabama in 1871, and the brother 
of "the gallant' 1 John Pelham, so much distinguished in the War of Se- 
cession. Dr. Pelham was from Ky. to Ala. in 1837, while his wife's fam- 
ily came from Person county, N. C, to Calhoun (then Benton) county 
about 1832. Judge Pelham was educated at the Presbyterian school in 
Talladega, Ala.; and in 1888 graduated from the law department of the 
Columbian University (now George Washington University) with the 
degrees of B. L. and M. L. Admitted to the bar in 1888, he practiced con- 
tinuously at Anniston until elected judge of the seventh judicial circuit 
in 1904. At Max Meadows, Va., Oct. 10, 1895, he married Ellen, daughter 
of George W. and Rebecca (Austin) Miles, of Marion, Va. 

DANIEL W. SPEAKE, of Decatur, Morgan county, was born July 8. 
1856, at Oakville, Lawrence county, and is the son of James B. and Sarah 
Brooks (Lindsey) Speake, and the grandson of John Speake, and of Den- 
nis and Jennie Lindsey. The Speakes first located in Maryland, but John 
Speake resided in Washington county, Ky. James B. Speake lived at 



JUDICIAL DEPARTMENT. 51 

Oakville, as did also his wife and her parents; was a teacher, farmer, 
county superintendent of education, twice a member of the Legislature, 
and a member of the constitutional convention of 1865. Judge Speake re- 
ceived his education in the old fields schools of Lawrence ,ccunty, and at 
the University of Alabama, from which he graduated in 1878, with the A. 
M. degree, and in 1879 with the LL. B. degree. He began the practice of 
law at Moulton in September, 1879; removed to Jackson county where he 
was solicitor, 1885-89; appointed judge of the eighth judicial circuit, 
July 23, 1904. and re-elected in November cf that year. He is a Democrat; 
and a deacon in the Presbyterian church. His wife is Caro, daughter of 
Major R. C. and Margaret E. McCalla, to whom he was married Dec. 
14, 1881, at Tuscaloosa, Ala. Mr. McCalla was a Major of engineers in 
the C. S. A., and was long a distinguished civil engineer in Alabama. 

WILLIAM WALLACE HARALSON, of Fort Payne, DeKalb county, 
Ala., was born January 11, 1861, at Lebanon in that county, and is the 
son cf William Jehu and Cornelia Jane (Macfarlane) Haralson, and the 
grandson of Peter Bennett and Louise (Humphreys) Haralson, and of 
William Wallace and Letitia Elizabeth (Beeson) Macfarlane, of Fort 
Payne, Ala. His paternal grandparents resided in Monroe county, Tenn., 
and William J. Haralson was born at Tellico Plains. He was a captain 
in the Confederate army, and for many years a circuit judge of the fifth 
judicial circuit. Judge W. W. Haralson was educated in the common 
schools of DeKalb county, and at the Cumberland University, Lebanon, 
Tenn., from which he graduated in 1882, with the degree of B. S. He 
graduated from the law department of the University of Alabama with 
the LL. B. degree in 1884; at once admitted to the practice, locating in 
Fort Payne; member State Senate, 1888-89 and 1890-91; member of the 
House of Representatives, 1900-01; and elected judge of the ninth judi- 
cial circuit November 8, 1904. He is a Democrat, and has served as a 
member of the county, Congressional and State executive committees; 
is an elder in the Cumberland Presbyterian Church; and a member of the 
Masonic fraternity. His wife, Fannie Campbell, to whom he was married 
in Fort Payne November 26, 1902, is the daughter of Andrew Lewis and 
Cordelia {Lyons) Campbell, and the granddaughter of Lewis and Mary 
Campbell, who came from Va. to Ala. in 1860. 

AUGUSTUS AURELIUS COLEMAN, of Birmingham, was born May 
21, 1825 in Camden, Kershaw District, S. C, and is the son of Dr. James 
Brown and Louise (Simpson) Coleman, and the grandson of Robert and 
Elizabeth Coleman, and of Jacobus and Louise Simpson. The Colemans 
are of English ancestry, and early settlers in Virginia. Jacobus Simp- 
son was a native cf France, professor of languages in Lisle University, 
was the interpreter of Bonaparte on many of his campaigns, and on the 
fall of his chief, he tied from France to America, locating in Charleston, 
S. C. James Brown Coleman was a graduate of the Charleston Medical 
College, class of 1824, and was a successful physician. Judge Coleman 
was educated in the commen schools at Camden, S. C, and at Marion 
Junction, Ala. In 1840 he entered Yale College, and graduated in 1844 
after a full four years course with the A. B. degree. Immediately after 
graduation he went to Cahaba, Dallas county, where he read law in the 
office of Charles G. Edwards and William Hunter, two of the most suc- 
cessful and profound lawyers of the period. He was licensed to practice 
in 1846; married in 1848; located in Livingston, Sumter county, and 
formed a partnership with B. W. Huntington. He was a justice of the 
peace at Cahaba, 1847-48; in January 18T>8. appointed by Governor A. B. 
Moore, as judge of the seventh judicial circuit; elected to the position 
in May 1858, and re-elected in 1864. In 1866 he removed from Living- 
ston to Greensboro, Ala., and from the latter point in 1888 to Birmingham. 
In 1896 he was elected judge of the tenth judicial circuit, and re-elected 
in 1904. He was unanimously elected as one of the delegates to the Ala- 
bama Secession Convention of 1861; and was a member of the house of 
representatives from Hale county in 1884. He was one of the founders 



52 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

and Incorporators of the Southern University at Greensboro. On May 16, 
1862 he was elected colonel of the 40th Alabama Infantry Regiment, 
which he commanded in parts of the Vicksburg campaign late in 1862 
and in the early days of 1863. In 1863 he resigned his command, and re- 
turned to the bench. He is a Democrat, raised in the political school of 
Wm. L. Yancey and John C. Calhoun. He is a member of the Methodist 
Church; and also a member of the Masons and the Odd Fellows. He has 
been twice married: first, Oct. 5, 1848, to Amanda Alvina, daughter of 
John Cuthbert and Elizabeth (Monette) Phares, of North Carolina stock, 
and secondly, on April 28, 1892, to Mary Stuart, daugnter of Dr. Wil- 
liam Thornton Stuart, of a well known Virginia family. 

ALEXANDER OSCAR LANE, of Birmingham, was born Oct. 29, 1848. 
in Macon county, Ala., and Is the son of Dr. Alexander and Mary E. (Phil- 
lips) Lane, both natives of Georgia. He received a liberal education, and 
was for a short time principal of a boys' high school at Clayton. He read 
law under Chancellor John A. Foster, was admitted to the bar in 1869, and 
began the practice at Ozark. In 1873 he located in Birmingham; formed 
a law partnership with John T. Terry in 1874; in 1885, when Mr. Terry 
retired, he practiced with E. T. Taliaferro and B. H. Tabor, the name of the 
firm being Lane, Taliaferro and Tabor. Later and for some years he was 
associated in the practice with Frank S. White. In 1880 Mr. Lane was ed- 
itor of the Iron Age; was elected mayor of Birmingham in 1882, and re- 
elected in 1881 and 1886. He was again elected mayor in 1890. Since the 
expiration of his term of office in 1892, he has continuously practiced his 
profession. He takes great interest in education, and is president of the Bir- 
mingham school board. He is a Democrat, and served* on the commit- 
tees of his party, but has held no other official position than that of mayor 
of Birmingham, until his appointment as associate judge of the tenth 
judicial circuit, provided by act of 1907. He is a Presbyterian ; and a mem- 
ber of the Knights of Pythias. In May 1875, he was married to Minnie, 
daughter of Col. John T. Terry, a native of Chester District, S. C, and 
wife Elizabeth, daughter of William Kerr, of Sumter county, Ala. 

CHARLES P. ALMON, of Russellville, Franklin county, was born at 
Moulton, Lawrence county, July 19, 1872, and is the son of William Micher 
and Bettie (Waason) Almon, and the grandson of George W. and Nancy 
Almon, and of Calvin and Nancy Was son. The Almons are North Caroli- 
nians. Judge Almon was educated in the public schools, and at the South- 
ern University, Greensboro. He read law at Moulton, and was admitted 
to the practice on May 3, 1893; practiced at Moulton until Sept. 1,899; re- 
moved to Hamilton, where he remained until Sept. 1904, when he located 
in Russellville. He was a member of the House of Representatives in 
1903. He is a Democrat; a steward in the Methodist church; and a member 
of the Masons, the Knights of Pythias, the Odd Fellows, the Woodmen of 
the World, and the Golden Cross. His wife, to whom he was married at 
Booneville, Miss., Dec. 27, 1894, is Mattie Lou, daughter of Lewis and 
Sallie (Davenport) Greene, and the granddaughter of Robert Davenport, 
long Sheriff of old Tishomingo county, Miss. 

HENRY ALLEN PEARCE, of Dothan, Houston county, was born near 
Milton, Santa Rosa county, Fla., March 1, 1861, and is the son of Samuel 
A. and Anna A, (Yonge) Pearce, and the grandson of Edmond A. and 
Eliza Pearce, originally from Virginia, and of Henry A. and Mary Yonge, 
of Geneva, Ala. Edmond A. Pearce was probate Judg« of Macon county, 
Ala., prior to 1861. Judge Pearce was educated at Abbeville in the public 
schools. Admitted to the bar, he has practiced at Abbeville, Columbia and 
Dothan; was mayor of Dothan in 1895, and again, 1900-1901; and elected 
Judge of the twelfth Judicial circuit November 8, 1904. He is a Democrat; 
member of the Knights of Pythias; and is unmarried. 



JUDICIAL, DEPARTMENT. 53 

SAMUEL BARNETT BROWNE, of Mobile, was born September 18, 1844, 
at Mount Vernon, Mobile county, and is the son of Phreandius P. and 
Cornelia Josephine (Evnng) Browne, and the grandson of George and Marie 
(Rucker) Browne, and cf Thomas and Susanna (Barnett) Ewing, 
who resided near Augusta, Ga. The Brownes are of English stock, the 
father of George Browne migrating from England and settling in Kentucky, 
where he married, his wife being the daughter of a Frenchman, who par- 
ticipated in the French Revolution, and who was compelled to escape to 
America. P. P. Browne first located in Tuscaloosa, Ala. in 1830, removed 
to New Orleans, finally located in Mobile in 1840, where he engaged in the 
mercantile business; and about 1850 went to Texas, where he died of yel- 
low fever in 1853. Judge Browne was educated in the common schools of 
the country, and at the classical schools of Forkland and Pleasant Ridge, 
Ala. He was a private in Co. "B," "Greene County Greys," 11th Alabama 
Infantry Regiment, was in several battles of the Army of Northern Virgi- 
nia until June 30, 1862, when he lost his right leg in the battle cf Frazier's 
farm, while charging a battery. Although disabled, he afterwards served 
in the Tennessee campaign with Gen. Hood. He studied law and was ad- 
mitted to the bar in 1867; located in Eutaw; in 1870 removed to Butler; 
and in the same year removed to Mobile. Before leaving Greene county 
he served as tax assessor 1865-68. He is a Democrat; a believer in the 
Catholic faith; and a member of the Knights of Honor. In November 
1904, he was elected judge of the thirteenth judicial circuit. On January 
4, 1883, he was married to Zulieka, daughter of George L., and Pernicia 
Elizabeth (Malone) Boice, and the granddaughter of Abram and Lois 
(Knickerbocker) Boice, of New York, and of William and Patience (Har- 
kins) Malone, early settlers of Alabama. 

JAMES JASPER RAY, of Jasper, was born July 31, 1857 near Pilgrim 
P. O. Fayette county, and is the son of Elijah and Lucy Ann (Wright) 
Ray, both natives of Va., but emigrants to Fayette county, and the grand- 
son of Jessie and Elizabeth Wright. Judge Ray was educated in the com* 
mon schools, and graduated at the University of Alabama with the LL. B. 
degree in 1881. In that year he was admitted to the practice In Fayette 
where he resided until his removal to Jasper. He was register in chan- 
cery, July 16, 1883 to November 10, 1900; State senator from the twelfth 
district, 1900-01. He is a Democrat. On February 25, 1907, he was ap- 
pointed judge of the newly created fourteenth judicial circuit He has 
been twice married: (1) On October 14, 1884, at Newtonville, Ala., to 
Ida J., daughter of Dr. W. W. Jones; and (2) May 1, 1890 to EllaE. 
daughter of John M. Edney, at Fayette. 

WALTER WASHINGTON PEARSON,, of Montgomery, was born near 
Hackney vi lie, Tallapoosa county, January 16, 1862, is the son of George 
Washington and. Amanda Almira (Veazey) Pearson, and the grandson of 
Thomas Gilmcre and Susan Holloway (Martin) Pearson, and of John 
Hart and Elizabeth (Thomas) Veazey. His parents and grandparents re- 
sided in Tallapoosa county. The Pearsons came from Westmoreland coun- 
ty, Va., to Raleigh, North Carolina, thence to Jasper county, Ga., and later 
to Tallapoosa county, Ala. His great-grandfather, Allen Pearson, whose 
wife was Mary Gilmore, was a Revolutionary soldier, and in early life 
was a schoolmate of George Washington. George W. Pearson was unfit for 
field service, but after examination by a Medical board, he was appointed 
commissary of Camp Watts, in Macon county, Ala., where he remained un- 
til the close of the war. Judge Pearson was educated in the common schools 
of Tallapoosa county; graduated from the A. & M. College, Auburn, 1882. 
He read law under Wm. D. Bulger at Dadeville, was admitted to the prac- 
tice in 1886 in that town; and after a year at Tuskegee in 1887, came to 
Montgomery, where he has since resided. On March 7, 1907 he was ap- 
pointed judge of the newly created fifteenth judicial circuit. He is both 
a trustee and a steward in the Court Street Methodist church, Montgom- 
ery; and a member of the Knights of Pythias. At Montgomery, he was 



54 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

married to Lavinia Tarrant, daughter of Julius Bigelow and Sarah Glnd- 
rat (Bugbee) Trimble, and grand-daughter of Judge Francis and Lavinia 
(Tarrant) Bugbee, and of James and Clara Ann (Bigelow) Trimble, all 
of Montgomery. 

JOHN W. INZER, of Ashville, St. Clair county, was born in Gwinnett 
county, Ga., Jan. 9, 1834, and is the son of Rev* Henry White and Phoebe 
Hardin (Reid) Inzer, of Abbeville District, S. C, and the grandson of John 
and Mary (Dowdy) Inzer. John Inzer was a native of England who came 
to Maryland pi ior to the Revolution, moved to N. C. and served in a regi- 
ment from that state in the Revolutionary army, married in Moore county, 
N. C, and removed to Hall county, Ga., where tie died. Judge Inzer was 
educated in his native state, but removed with his parents in 1854 to Ala- 
bama; read law in the office of A. J. Walker and John T. Morgan at 
Talladega; was licensed to practice in 1855 ami located in Ashville; ap- 
pointed Judge of Probate of St. Clair county in 1859 by Gov. A. B. Moore; 
and represented that county in the Secession Convention. of 1861. He en- 
tered th« service as a private, and rose by successive promotions to the 
office of lieutenant-colonel of the 58th Alabama Infantry Regiment, C. 
S. A.; was captured at Mission Ridge, and imprisoned at Johnson's Island 
until the end of the war. After the close of hostilities, be returned to 
Ashville, was appointed probate judge of St. Clair county in 1865, but 
served only a few weeks; in 1866, elected to the same office over C. G. 
Beeson, but in 1867 was removed by the military authorities. He was a 
member of the Constitutional Convention, 1875; and member of the State 
Senate, 1874-76, 1890-91, and 1892-93. He is a Democrat, and has served 
on county, district and State committees. His wife was Sarah Elizabeth, 
daughter of Wiley H. and Sarah Pope. 



IV. LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 



REPRESENTATION. 



The legislative power of this State shall be vested in a Legislature, which 
shall consist of a Senate and a House of Representatives. — Constitution, 
Sec. 44. 

Until the Legislature shall make an apportionment of Representatives 
among the several counties, as provided in the preceding section, the coun- 
ties of Autauga, Baldwin, Bibb, Blount, Cherokee, Chilton, Choctaw, Clay, 
Cleburne, Coffee, Colbert, Conecuh, Coosa, Covington, Crenshaw, Cullman, 
Dale, DeKalb, Escambia, Fayette, Franklin, Geneva, Greene, Lamar, Law- 
rence, Limestone, Macon, Marion, Marshall, Monroe, Pickens, Randolph, 
St. Clair, Shelby, Washington, and Winston, shall each have one Repre- 
sentative; the counties of Barbour, Bullock, Butler, Calhoun, Chambers, 
Clarke, Elmore, Etowah, Hale, Henry, Jackson, Lauderdale, Lee, Lowndes, 
Madison, Marengo, Morgan, Perry, Pike, Russell, Sumter, Talladega, Talla- 
poosa, Tuscaloosa, Walker, and Wilcox, shall each have two Representa- 
tives ; the counties of Dallas and Mobile shall have each three Representa- 
tives; the county of Montgomery shall have four Representatives; and the 
county of Jefferson shall have seven Representatives. — Ibid. Sec. 202. 

Until the Legislature shall divide the State into Senatorial districts, as 
herein provided, the Senatorial districts shall be as follows: 

First district, Lauderdale and Limestone; Second district, Lawrence 
and Morgan; Third district, Blount, Cullman and Winston; Fourth district, 
Madison; Fifth district, Jackson and Marshall; Sixth district, Etowah and 
St. Clair; Seventh district, Calhoun; Eighth district, Talladega; Ninth 
district, Chambers and Randolph; Tenth district, Tallapoosa and Elmore; 
Eleventh district, Tuscaloosa; Twelfth district, Fayette, Lamar and Wal- 
ker; Thirteenth district, Jexerson; Fourteenth district, Pickens and Sum- 
ter; Fifteenth district, Autauga, Chilton and Shelby; Sixteenth district, 
Lowndes; Seventeenth district, Butler, Conecuh and Covington; Eigh- 
teenth district, Bibb and Perry; Nineteenth district, Choctaw, Clarke and 
Washington; Twentieth district, Marengo; Twenty-first district, Baldwin, 
Escambia and Monroe; Twenty-second district, Wilcox; Twenty-third dis- 
trict, Dale and Geneva; Twenty-fourth district, Barbour; Twenty-fifth 
district, Coffee, Crenshaw and Pike; Twenty-sixth district, Bullock and 
Macon; Twenty-seventh district, Lee and Russell; Twenty-eighth district, 
Montgomery; Twenty-ninth district, Cherokee and DeKalb; Thirtieth dis- 
trict, Dallas; Thirty-first district, Colbert, Franklin and Marion; Thirty- 
second district, Greene and Hale; Thirty-third district, Mobile; Thirty- 
fourth district, Cleburne, Clay and Coosa; Thirty-fifth district, Henry. — 
Ibid, Sec. 203. 

The county of Houston was created by act of the Legislature, approved 
Feb. 9, 1903. Under the operation of section 50 of the Constitution of 1901, 
the county was allowed one representative, making a total membership of 
one hundred and six In the Legislature of 1907. The new county is included 
in the 35th Senatorial district. 

(55) 



56 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

ALPHABETICAL ROLL OF SENATORS AND 

MEMBERS OF THE HOUSE OF 

REPRESENTATIVES, 

I907 



SENATORS. 

W. W. Barbour, Fort Payne; 29th District. 

O. O. Bayles, Monroeville; 21st District. 

Frederick Leonard Blackmon, Anniston; 7th District. 

P. B. Davis, Chancellor; 23rd District. 

H. S. Doster, Prattvilk; 15th District. 

B. A. F&rrester, Cowarts; 35th District. 
Lucien Gardner, Troy; 25th District. 

E. H. Glenn, Seale; 27th District. 
Norman Gunii, Thomas ville; 19th District. 
Max Hamburger, Jr., Mobile, 33rd District. 
Ed. D. Hamner, Attalla; 6th District. 
Wm. N. Hayes, Mooresville; 1st District. 
J. W. Heacock, Talladega; 8th District. 
Evans Hinson, Hayneville; 16th District. 
Amos H or ton, Pleasant Ridge; 32nd district. 
William Clarence Jones, Camden; 22nd District. 
J. J. King, Consul; 20th District. 

M. L. Leith, Jasper; 12th District. 
W. T. Lowe, Decatur; 2nd District. 
J. A. Lusk, Guntersville; 5th District. 
G. T. McWhorter, Riverton; 31st District. 
H. P. Merritt, Tuskegee; 26th District. 
N. L. Miller, Birmingham, 13th District. 

F. S. Moody, Tuscaloosa, 11th District. 
J. W. Overton, Wedowce; 9th District. 
H. F. Reese, Selma; 30th District. 

C. E. Reid, Andalusia; 17th District. 

H. E. Reynolds, Centerville; 18th District. 
Robert Elias Spragins, Huntsville; 4th District. 
J. W. Strother, Dadeville; 10th District. 

C. B. Teasley, Montgomery; 28th District. 
Elias Perry Thomas, Clayton; 24th District. 

D. M. White, Goodwater; 34th District. 
John F. Wilson, Oneonta; 3rd District. 

G. B. Wimberly, Reform; 14th District. 



MEMBERS OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. 

J.^R. Alford — Geneva, Geneva County. 

w! A. Altman — York, Sumter County. 

James Armstrong — Scottsboro, Jackson County. 

Joseph J. Arnold — Jacksonville, Calhoun County. 

R. H. Arrington — Enterprise, Coffee County. 

W. R. Avery — Wehadkce, Randolph County. ' 

Eugene Ballard — Prattville, Autauga County. 

H. W. Ballard— Milo, Pike County. 

W. B. Baltzell — Eutaw, Greene County. 

W. M. Barton — Double Springs, Winston County. 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 57 



H. Graham Benners — Greensboro, Hale County. 
James A. Benson — Langston, Jackson County. 
Sol. D. Bloch — Camden, Wilcox County. 
J. A. Brown — Bell Mills, Cleburne County. 
Thomas L. Bulger — Dadeville, Tallapoosa County. 
S. L. Burney — Lanette, Chambers County. 
W. M. Cannon — Fayette, Fayette County. 
J. D. Carmichael — Mellow Valley, Clay County. 
A. H. Carmichael — Tuscumbia, Colbert County. 
Jesse A. Coleman — Mt. Willing, Lowndes County. 
W. M. Coleman — Albertville, Marshall County. 
Wm. H. Cooper— Oxford, Calhoun County. 
J. H. Cranford — Jasper, Walker County. 

D. F. Crum — Farmersville, Lowndes County. 
J. D. Doyle — Salltpa, Clarke County. 

W. B. Doyle — Dixon's Mill, Marengo County. 

H. R. Dudley — Seale, Russell County. 

Perry Edwards — Escatawpa, Washington County. 

W. H. Elrod— Fort Payne, DeKalb County. 

J. M. Foster — Tuscaloosa, Tuscaloosa County. 

Jerome T. Fuller — Centreville, Bibb County. 

John T. Glover — Birmingham, Jefferson County. 

R. T. Goodwyn — Montgomery, Montgomery County. 

Gaston Gunter — Montgomery, Montgomery County. 

L. J. Haley, Jr. — Birmingham, Jefferson County. 

J. H. L. Henley — Bradley, Escambia County. 

F. O. Hoffman — Mobile, Mobile County. 

John L. Hughston — Florence, Lauderdale County. 

S. C. Jenkins — Bay Minette, Baldwin County. 

Sam Will John — Birmingham, Jefferson County. 

J. W. Johnson — Rockford, Coosa County. 

W. J. Jones — Butler Springs, Butler County. 

H. A. Killen — Green Hill, Lauderdale County. 

Jere C. King — Birmingham, Jefferson County. 

A. D. Kirby — Huntsville, Madison County. 

R. R. Kornegay — Selma, Dallas County. 

S. C. Lacy — Vale Grande, Dallas County. 

E. R. Lacy — Jasper, Walker County.. * 
W. L. Lancaster — Wetumpka, Elmore County. 
J. H. Lawson — Talladega, Talladega County. 

R. M. Lee — Clio, Barbour County. 

Alto V. Lee, Jr. — Gadsden, Etowah County. 

W. L. Lee— Columbia, Houston County. 

W. H. Lindsey — Butler, Choctaw County. 

J. Lee Long — Greenville, Butler County. 

Wm. H. Long, Jr. — Decatur, Morgan County. 

R. F. Lovelady — Pratt City, Jefferson County. 

A. S. Lyons^— Mobile, Mobile County. 

J. W. Malone — Abbeville, R. F. D., Henry County. 

O. C. Maner — Montgomery, Montgomery County. 

•W. L. Martin, Montgomery, Montgomery County. 

Peter B. Mastin, Montgomery, Montgomery County. 

J. O. Middletcn — Clanton, Chilton County. 

C. E. Mitchell — Hamilton, Marion County. 

J. W. Moore — Coal City, St. Clair County. 

J. D. McCrory — Evergreen, Conecuh County. 

John McDuffie — River Ridge, Monroe County. 

Lee McMillan — Gastonburg, Wilcox County. 

Joseph Norville — Mobile, Mobile County. 

E. M. Oliver — Lafayette, Chambers County. 

•Died March 3, 1907. 



58 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

George A. Parker — Cullman, Cullman County. 
Hosea Pearson — Columbiana, Shelby County. 

B. B. Peete — Athens, R. F. D., Livingston County. 
A. D. Pitts — Selma, Dallas County. 

W. u. Pitts, Sr. — Unidntown, Perry County. 

N. B. Powell — Union Springs, Bullock County. 

A. R. Powell — Andalusia, Covington County. 

T. D. Power — Opelika, Lee County. 

J. M. Pratt — Reform, Pickens County. 

W. J. Price — Girara, Russell County. 

Isaac Pugh— Grove Hill, Clarke County. 

M. C. Rag3dale — McCalla, Jefferson County. 

S. P. Ramer — Union Springs, Bullock County. 

Charles Rattray — Jamestown, Cherokee County. 

Fleetwood Rice — Tuscaloosa, Tuscaloosa County. 

N. M. Rowe — Triana, Madison County. 

M. W. Rushton — Luverne, Crenshaw County. 

J. R. Sample — Hartselle, Morgan County. 

J. T. Sanders — Goshen, Pike County. 

J. B. Sanford — Sylacauga, Talladega County. 

R. L. Seale — Livingston, Sumter County. 

C. M. Sherrod — Courtland, Lawrence County. 

Lamar C. Smith — Tallassee, R. F. D., Elmore County. 

H. P. Smith— Gadsden, Etowah County. 

Benjamin Smith — Newburg, Franklin County. 

R. C. Smith — Opelika, Lee County. 

H. B. Steagal! — Ozark, Dale County. 

E. W. Thompson — Tuskegee, Macon County. 

A. M. TunstalJ — Greensboro, Hale County. 

J. F. Turner— Dadeville, Tallapoosa County. 

W. E. Urquhart — Birmingham, Jefferson County. 

J. R. Vann — Abbeville, R. F. D., Henry County. 

W. A. Weaver — Oneonta, Blount County. 

C. W. White — Millport, Lamar County. 

George P. White — Marion, Perry County. 

J. S. Williams — Clayton, Barbour County. 

S. G. Woolf — Demopolis, Marengo County. 



STATE SENATORS. 



OFFICERS OF THE SENATE, 1907. 

Lieutenant-Governor, ex-officio President. — Henry B. Gray, of Birming- 
ham. 

President pro tern. — E. P. Thomas, of Clayton. 

Secretary. — James A. Kyle, of Jackson county. 

Assistant Secretary. — Wm. J. Conniff, of Montgomery. 

Engrossing and Enrolling Clerk. — Mrs. Mary A. Gesner, of Montgomery. 

Comparing Clerk. — Mrs. Laura Johnston Alley, of Montgomery. 

Doorkeeper. — Wm. B. Kemp, of Monroe. 

Messenger. — Joe Wilkinson, of Prattville. 

Pages. — C. C. Deming, of Evergreen; Armistead Gayle, of Montgomery; 
Thomas Hayes, of Athens; J. K. Jackson, Jr., of Montgomery. 




LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 59 

SENATE STANDING COMMITTEES. 

1. Judiciary. — To consist of nine members: Messrs. Lusk, Miller, 
Overton, Reid, Leith, Gunn, Merritt, Strother, Gardner. 

2. Revision of Laws. — To consist of nine members: Messrs. Bayles, 
Lowe, Gardner, Hamner, Hayes, White, Wilson, Reese, Spragins. 

3. Constitution and Constitutional Revision and Amendment. — To 
consist of seven members: Messrs. Hayes, Merritt, Bayles, Forrester, 
Reese, Blackmon, Spragins. 

4. Finance and Taxation. — Including Accounts and Claims, Fees and 
Salaries, and Contingent Fund, to consist of eleven members: Messrs. 
Miller, Reynolds. Lowe, Barbour, Hamner, Hamburger, Horton, Teasley, 
Gunn, Davis, Wimberly. 

5. Banking and Insurance. — To consist of five members: Messrs. 
Hamner, Overton, Hamburger, Hayes, Wimberly. 

6. Penitentiary, Prisons and Punishment. — To consist of seven mem- 
bers: Messrs. Gunn, Leith, Bayles, Doster, Reid, King, Blackmon. 

7. Corporations. — To consist of severi members: Messrs. Doster, 
Reid, Miller, Strother, Davis, Gunn, Thomas. 

8. Local Legislation.-— To consist of seven members: Messrs. Mer- 
ritt, Lowe, Hamner, Reynolds, Miller, Wimberly, Teasley. 

9. Education. — To consist of seven members: Messrs. Reynolds, Bar- 
bour, Hamburger, Merritt, Wimberly, Gardner, Doster. 

10. Commerce and Common Carriers. — To consist of seven members: 
Messrs. Overton, Strother, Reynolds, Lusk, Merritt, Gunn, Reid. 

11. Mining and Manufactories. — To consist of seven members: 
Messrs. Wilson, Reynolds, White, AicWhorter, Leith, Moody, Spragins. 

12. Agriculture. — To consist of seven members: Messrs. Horton, 
Hayes, Wilson, King, Glenn, Jones, Thomas. 

13. Municipalities and Municipal Organizations, including Charitable 
Institutions. — To consist of five members: Messrs. Strother, Hamburger, 
White, Leith, Lowe. 

14. County and County Boundaries. — To consist of five members: 
Messrs. White, McWhorter, Miller, Moody, Glenn. 

15. Immigration and Industrial Resources. — To consist of seven mem- 
bers: Messrs. Reid, Davis, Horton, Doster, Barbour, Thomas, Hinson. 

16. Public Buildings and Grounds. — To consist of five members: 
Messrs. Lowe, Bayles, Teasley, Jones, Hinson. 

17. Privileges and J5fecfion*.-^Including Grievances, Disabilities and 
Registration, to consist of seven members : Messrs. Davis, Jones, Heacock, 
Glenn, Blackmon, Hinson, Kin^. 

18. Printing. — To consist of three members: Messrs. Barbour, , T ones, 
Thomas. 

19. Public Health. — To consist o*. seven members: Messrs. Wimberly, 
McWhorter, Horton, Lusk, Heacock, Reese, Glenn. 

20. Military. — To consist of three members: Messrs. Hamburger, 
Merritt, Blackmon. 

21. Temperance. — To consist of seven members: Messrs. McWhorter, 
Wilson, Heacock, Mocdy, Reese, Teasley, King. 

22. Engrossed Bills. — To consist of three members: Messrs. Spragins, 
Hinson, Heacock. 

23. Enrolled Bills. — To consist of three members: Messrs. Moody, 
Thomas, Forrester. 

24. Revision of Journal. — To consist of five members, whose duty it 
shall be of examine in reference to -each bill or resolution finally passed by 
the Legislature, and report whether the Journal contains the entries in 
reference thereto required by the Constitution: Messrs. Leith, Teasley, 
Forrester, Glenn, Reese. 

25. Rules. — To consist of five members, with the right to report at 
any time: Messrs. Gardner, Stroither, Overton, Miller, Lusk. 

26. Game, Fish and Forestry Preservation. — To consist of seven mem- 
bers: Messrs. King, Spragins, Hamburger, Bayles, Hinson, Hays, Black- 
mon. 



60 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

RULES OF THE SENATE, 1907. 

Rule 1. The president having taken the chair, and a quorum being 
present, the journal of the preceding day shall be read to the end, that 
any mistake may be corrected that shall be made in the entry. 

2. Every senator, when he speaks, shall address the chair, standing in 
his place, and, when he has finished, shall sit down. 

3. No senator shall speak more than twice on any question under de- 
bate, and shall not consume more than one hour at each time, without 
leave of the senate; but the originator of the pending question, or chair- 
man of the committee reporting the measure, shall have the right to con- 
clude the debate, the originator of the pending question to have prece- 
dence. 

4. When two or more senators rise at the same time, the president shall 
name the senator who is to first speak. 

5. When a senator shall be called to order by the president, or a sena- 
tor, he shall sit down; and every question of order shall be decided by the 
president, without debate, and subject to an appeal to the Senate, and the 
president may call for the sense of the Senate on any question of order. 

6. If a senator be called to order by a senator for words spoken, the 
exceptional words shall immediately be taken down in writing by the sec- 
retary, that the president may be better enabled to judge of the matter. 

7. No senator shall absent himself from the service of the senate, for 
as long as one day, without leave of the Senate first obtained. In case a 
less number than a quorum of the Senate shall convene, they are hereby 
authorized to send the dcor-keeper, or any person by them authorized, 
for any or all absent senators, as the majority of such senators present shall* 
agree, at the expense of such absent senator unless such excuse for non- 
attendance shall be* made, as a quorum of the Senate shall judge sufficient, 
in which event the expense of securing the attendance of such senator 
shall be paid out of the* contingent fund. 

8. When a motion shall be made, it shall be reduced to writing, if de- 
sired by the piesident, or any senator, delivered at the table, and read, be- 
fore the same shall be debated. 

9. When a question is under debate, no motion shall be received but — 

To adjourn, 

To adjourn to a day certain, 

To lay on the table, 

To postpone 'indefinitely, 

To postpone to a certain day, 

To commit, or 

To amend; 
which several motions shall have precedence, in the order they stand ar- 
ranged, and th» motion for adjournment shall always be in order, and be 
decided without debate. 

10. If the question in debate contains several points, any senator may 
vote for a division, but on a motion to strike out and insert, it shall not 
be in order to move for a division of the question; but the rejection of a 
motion to strike out and insert one proposition, shall not prevent a motion 
to strike out and insert a different proposition, nor prevent a subsequent 
motion, simply to strike out, nor shall the rejection of a motion simply to 
strike out, prevent a subsequent motion to strike out and insert. 

11. In filling up blanks, the largest sum and longest time shall be first 

put. 

12. When the reading of any paper is called for, and the same is ob- 
jected to by any senator, it shall be determined by a vote of the Senate, 
and without debate. 

13. The unfinished business in which the Senate was engaged at the 
last preceding adjournment, shall have the preference in the special orders 
of the day. 

14. When the yeas and nays shall be called for by one-tenth of the sena- 
tors present, each senator called upon shall, unless for special reasons he 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 61 

be excused by the Senate, declare openly, and without debate, his assent 
or dissent to the question. In taking the yeas and nays, and upon the call 
of the Senate, the names of the senators shall be called alphabetically. 

15. When the yeas and nays shall be taken upon any question, in pur- 
suance of the above rule, no senator shall be permitted, under any circum- 
stances whatever, to vote after the decision is announced from the chair. 

16. All motions to go into executive session shall be decided without 
debate. 

17. All joint resolutions, except those which require immediate action, 
shall lie over one day, before they shall be considered by the Senate. 

18. No motion shall be deemed in order to admit any person whomso- 
ever within the doors of the sepate chamber, to present any petition, me- 
morial or address, or to have any such read. 

19. When a question has been made and carried in the affirmative or 
negative, it shall be in order for any senator of the majority* to move for 
the reconsideration thereof; but no motion for the reconsideration of any 
vote shall be in order after a bill, resolution, message, report, amendment 
or motion, upon which the vote was taken, shall have gone out of the pos- 
session of the Senate, announcing its decision; nor shall any motion for 
reconsideration be In order, unless made on the same day on which the vote 
was taken, or by 12 o'clock next day. 

20. All questions shall be put by the president of the Senate, and the 
senators shall signify their assent or dissent, by answering their aye or 
no. 

21. The president of the Senate shall have the right to name a senator 
to perform the duties of the chair, but such substitution shall not extend 
beyond adjournment. 

22. After reading the journal, business shall be called in the following 
order: 

1st. Signing bills by president. 

2nd. Call of districts. 

3rd. House messages. 

4th. Report from standing committees. 

5th. Reports from select committees. 

6th. Motions and resolutions. 

7th. Bills on third reading. 

8th. Regular order of the day at 12 M. 

9th. Miscellaneous business. * 

The committees on enrolled and engrossed bills, and on journal, may re- 
port at any time. 

This order of business cannot be set aside, except by a majority vote 
of the Senate, upon a resolution, previously considered and reported by 
the committee on rules. 

When reports of standing committees are in order, the committee 
shall be entitled to the floor, last occupying it when the reports were in 
order. 

These rules shall not interfere with special orders for particular days, 
or special orders for the Senate. 

Special orders shall be called at the hour of 12 o'clock, unless specially 
set. for some other hour; and a motion for a special order, if objected to, 
shall first be referred to and reported from the committee on rules. 

Under all of the districts, only bills, petitions, memorials, or resolutions 
which are to be referred to a committee, shall be introduced, and every bill, 
petition, memorial of other paper shall upon the first reading there- 
of, be referred by the president to the standing committee having the 
subject matter thereof under consideration unless the Senate by a major- 
ity vote order otherwise. And before any petition, or memorial addressed 
to the Senate, shall be received and read at the table, a brief statement 
of the contents of the petition or the memorial shall be made verbally by 
the introducer. 

23. Every bill shall receive three readings previous to Its being pissed; 
and the president shall give notice at each whether it be the first, second 



62 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

or third, which readings shall be on three different days. And no bill 
shall become a law until it shall have been referred to a standing commit- 
tee, acted upon by such committee in session, and returned therefrom, 
which fact shall affirmatively appear upon the journal of the Senate, and 
upon its final passage read at length, and the vote taken by yeas and nays, 
and the names of the senators voting for and against the same be entered 
on the journal. 

24. The presiding officer of the Senate shall in the presence of the 
Senate sign all bills and joint resolutions passed by the Legislature, after 
the same shall have been publicly read at length immediately before sign- 
ing, and the fact of reading and signing shall be entered upon the journal ; 
but the reading at length may be dispense^ with by a two-thirds vote of a 
quorum present, which fact shall also be entered on the journal. And all 
the resolutions proposing amendments to the constitution or to which the 
approbation or signature of the president may be requisite or which may 
grant money out of the contingent fund shall be treated in all respects in 
the introduction and form of proceedings thereon in the Senate in a similar 
manner with bills. 

25. Bills on first reading shall be committed, and shall be read a sec- 
ond time when returned from the committee on any subsequent day. 

26. The final question, upon the third reading of every bill, resolution, 
constitutional amendment, or motion originating in the Senate, and requir- 
ing three readings previous to its being passed, shall be, "whether it shall 
be engrossed and read a third time?" and no amendment shall be received 
for discussion after the third reading of any bill, resolution, amendment 
or motion, unless by unanimous consent of the members; but it shall at 
all times be in order, before the final passage of any such bill, resolution, 
constitutional amendment or motion, to move its commitment, and if such 
commitment take place and any amendment be reported by the committee, 
the said bill, resolution, constitutional amendment or motion shall be again 
read a second time, and then the aforesaid question shall be again put. 

27. The special order of the day shall not be called by the chair before 
12 o'clock, unless otherwise directed by the Senate. 

28. The titles of bills and such parts thereof only as shall be effected 
by proposed amendments, shall be inserted on the journals. 

29. The proceedings of the Senate, when not in committee of the whole, 
shall be entered on the journal as concisely as possible, care being taken 
to detail a true anft accurate account of its proceedings; but every vote 
of the Senate shall be entered on the journal, and a brief statement of the 
contents of each petition, memorial or paper presented to the Senate, shall 
also be inserted on the journal. 

30. The president of the Senate shall appoint the chairman and mem- 
bers of the standing committees, and he shall appoint all other commit- 
tees of the Senate, both special and joint. 

31. When motions are made for reference of the same subject to a select 
committee, and to a standing committee, the question on reference to the 
standing committee shall be first put. 

32. That all executive messages be considered with open doors unless 
otherwise requested in said message. 

33. The committee on rules may at any time report a special rule that 
debate on a pending measure shall cease at a certain hour, and a vote be 
taken on the measure. The consideration of such special rule shall not ex- 
ceed thirty minutes, when a vote shall be taken thereon. 

34. When any question may have been decided by the Senate, in which 
two-thirds of the senators present are necessary to carry the affirmative, 
any senator who votes on that side which prevailed in the question, may 
be at liberty to move for a reconsideration, and a motion for a reconside- 
ration shall be decided by a majority of votes. And every bill, question 
or measure may be considered at any time before 12 o'clock of the suc- 
ceeding day, that no motion to table a motion to reconsider shall be in or- 



I LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 63 

• 

der, if made on the same day the proposition proposed to 'be reconsidered, 
was carried, and no motion to take from the table a motion to reconsider 
shall be in order, without giving one day's notice. 

35. Messages shall be sent to the House of Representatives by the sec- 
retary, who shall previously endorse the final determination of the Sen- 
ate therefrom. 

36. Messages may be introduced in any stage of business, except while 
a question, is being put, while the yeas and nays are being called, or while 
the ballots are being counted. 

37. The reporters shall be placed on the floor of the Senate by the sec- 
retary, or under his direction. 

38. The presiding officer of the Senate shall have the regulation and 
control of such parts of the capitol, and of its passages, as are or may be 
set apart for the use of the Senate and its officers. 

39. Persons admitted to the floor of the Senate chamber while the 
Senate is in session; members of the Legislature, officers and employes of 
the two Houses, the governor and his secretary,, representatives of the 
press, other persons to whom the Senate by unanimous vote may extend 
the privileges of its floor. 

No smoking shall be allowed in, the Senate chamber. 

40. The time of meeting of the Senate each day shall be 10:30 o'clock 
a. m., except on Monday, on which it shall convene at 12 o'clock noon; 
and in all cases, upon the adjournment of the Senate, the secretary shall 
enter on the journal the hour of adjournment, and the name of the mem- 
ber on whose motion the adjournment was had. 

41. To aid in the dispatch of business, there shall be twenty-three 
standing committees, upon the following subjects, and to consist of the 
number herein named: 

(1) On the judiciary, to consist of nine members. 

(2) On revision of laws, to consist of nine members. 

(3) On constitution and constitutional revision and amendments, to con- 
sist of seven members. 

(4) On finance and taxation, including accounts and claims, fees and 
salaries, and contingent fund, to corisist of eleven members. 

(5) On banking and insurance, to consist of five members. 

(6) On penitentiary, prison and prison punishment, to consist of seven 
members. 

(7) On corporations, to consist of seven members. 

(8) On local legislation, to consist of seven members. 

(9) On education, to consist of seven members. 

(10) On commerce and common carriers, to consist of seven members. 

(11) On mining and manufactories, to consist of seven members. 

(12) On agriculture, to consist of seven members. 

(13) On municipalities and municipal organization, including charitable 
institutions, to consist of five members. 

(14) On county and county boundaries, to consist of five members. 

(15) On immigration and industrial resources, to consist of seven mem- 
bers. 

(16) On public buildings and grounds, to consist of five members. 

(17) On privileges and elections, including grievances, inabilities and 
registration, to consist of seven members. 

(18) On printing, to consist of three members. 

(19) On public health, to consist of seven members. 

(20) On military, to consist of three members. 

(21) On temperance, to consist of seven members. 

(22) On engrossed bills, to consist of three members. 

(23) On enrolled bills, to consist of three members. 

(24) On revision of the journal, to consist of five members, whose 
duty it shall be to examine in reference to each bill or resolution finally 
passed by the General Assembly and report whether the journal contains 
the entries in reference thereto required by the constitution. 

(25) On rules, to consist of five members, with the right to report at 



64 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

• 

any time. # 

42. Bills on third reading postponed to a day certain, shall take pre- 
cedence on such day, and from day to day thereafter until disposed of, 
of bills on third reading, and the precedence of such postponed bills shall 
be In the order of their postponement respectively. 

43. No discussion or debate shall be allowed while a vote is being 
taken, except by unanimous consent of the Senate. 

44. A motion to lay on the table any amendment or substitute shall not 
carry with it the original bills, resolution or proposition. 

45. The secretary of the Senate is required to furnish daily to the 
members of the Senate a printed calendar of all the bills and resolutions in- 
tended to have the force of laws on third reading, in the order in which 
they are entitled to consideration. 

46. When a committee has decided adversely to any bill or resolution, 
such action sha*i be endorsed thereon under rule 49, and said bill forth- 
with delivered to the secretary of the Senate who shall note the unfavor- 
able report on the register or docket of bills. Any senator may, after one 
day's written notice, on the day named in said notice after the call of 
standing committees move the second reading of such bill or resolution 
when the same may, by a majority vote of the Senate, be read by its 
title a second time and placed on the calendar. Only 60 minutes to the 
side shall be allowed for the discussion of such motion — which may be di- 
vided as the Senators favoring and opposing the same may agree for 
their respective sides. / 

47. No motion to suspend, modify or amend any rule or any part 
thereof, shall be in order except on one day's notice in writing, specifying 
precisely the rule, or part thereof, proposed to be suspended, modified or 
amended and the purpose thereof; and before any vote shall be taken on 
such motion, it shall be first referred to the committee on rules, and the 
said committee must report thereon; but any rule may be suspended by 
unanimous consent of the Senate, and alterations of the rules shall be de- 
cided by a majority vote. 

48. All resolutions shall be referred to and reported from the committee 
on rules before consideration by the Senate; provided, that this shall not 
apply to resolutions requiring immediate consideration. 

49. All bills acted upon by a committee shall be endorsed as follows: 

"This bill was acted upon by the committee on 

in session and (here insert the action of the committee)," and said en- 
dorsement shall be dated and signed by the chairman or acting chairman of 
the committee. 



JOINT RULES OF THE TWO HOUSES OF THE LEGISLATURE 

OF ALABAMA, 1907. 

1. Upon the reception of a message from either House notifying the 
other of the originating and passing of bills, the secretary or clerk, as 
the cat>e may be. shall, immediately after the message is read, proceed to 
read the bills by their titles, unless the reading be called for by some mem- . 
ber, In which event the bill shall be read at length, and referred to a com- 
mittee. The House or Senate, as the case may be, shall then proceed with 
the business upon which it was engaged when the message was received; 
Provided, that messages from one House to the other shall take precedence 
over all other questions. 

2. When House or Senate bills are signed by the presiding officer of 
the House or Senate, thereupon the clerk or secretary, as the case may 
be, shall notify the other House and request the signature of the presiding 
officer to the same; and as soon as the message is read, the presiding of- 
ficer shall immediately sign the bills In the presence of the House or Sen- 
ate, as prescribed by the constitution. 

3. That no local or special bill shall be introduced into either House 
unless the member who introduces it discloses at the time the fact that 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 65 

the notice required by the constitution and laws has been given, and sub- 
mits one original and two exact copies of proof thereon with the bill. 

.4. All bills for amendment to any section or part of the code, in which 
the subject matter is stated In the title by reference to the section or other 
subdivision of the code, must contain on the back of the bill, Immediately 
below the title, a brief statement of the general subject to which such sec- 
tion or subdivision relates. 



SKETCHES OF SENATORS. 
FIRST DISTRICT. 

LAUDERDALE AND LIMESTONE COUNTIES. 

WILLIAM N. HAYES, of Mooresvilte, Limestone county, was born April 
17, 18.39, at Petersburg, Lincoln county, Tenn., and is the son of John N. 
and Mary J. (Blake) Hayes, and the grandson of Charles and Elizabeth 
(Howze) Hayes, of Warren ton, N. C, and of John W. and Mary A 
(Morgan) Blake, of Petersburg, Tenn. Senator Hayes was educated in 
the common schools of Petersburg, Tenn., and Athens, Ala., and at the 
Cumberland University, Lebanon, Tenn., 1856-57. During the War of 
Secession he was employed as a railroad conductor and telegraph opera- 
tor. From 1865 to 1872 he practiced law at Athens, and was solicitor of 
Limestone county, 1866-1870; State Senator, 1888-89, 1890-91, and again in 
1906. He is a Democrat, having served on his county executive commit- 
tee; and is a Royal Arch Mason. On July 1, 1863. at Athens, he was mar- 
ried to Mary E., daughter of Dr. Elijah M. and Mary A. (Thach) Hussey, 
of Mooresville, and grandaughter of Thomas H. Thach, whose wife was 
a Miss Peete. 



SECOND DISTRICT. 

MORGAN COUNTY. 

WILLIAM THOMAS LOWE, of Decatur, Morgan county, was born Sep- 
tember 14, 1860, at Reform, Pickens county, Ala., and is the son of Marcus 
Wilburn and Susan (Shelton) Lowe, and the grandson of John Franklin 
and Patsy (Alunday) Lowe, and of Crispen and Susan Shelton, all of Pick- 
ens county. Marcus W. Lowe served in the War of Secession as 2nd lieut- 
enant. He was educated In the common schools, and at the Florence Nor- 
mal College, where he was graduated in 1884. From 1887 to 1904, Senator 
Lowe practiced law at Moulton ; was elected from Lawrence county to the 
Constitutional Convention of 1901, serving on the committee on the leg- 
islative department and on amending the constitution and miscellaneous 
provisions of that body; in November, 1902, he was elected to the Legisla- 
ture from that county; and in 1904 he removed to Decatur, where he now 
lives. He is a Democrat ; and a Knight of Pythias. On December 5, 1888, 
at Moulton, he was married to Sarepta, daughter of W. D. Irwin and wife 
Frances L. {Lynch) Irwin, of Moulton. 



THIRD DISTRICT. 

BLOUNT, CULLMAN AND WINSTON COUNTIES. 

JOHN FRANKLIN WILSON, of Oneonta, Blount county, was born Sept 
17, 1858, at Arkadelphia, Blount (then Walker) county, and Is the son 
of Washington and Margaret Taylor (Gamble) Wilson, the former of An- 
derson, South Carolina, and the grandson of Wm. and Sarah (Hawthorn) 

5 



66 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER, 



• 



Wilson, and of Rev. John R. and Jane (Mills) Gamble, of Walker county, 
and the grandson of Robert Gamble and James Mills, both of whom were 
Revolutionary soldiers. Washington Wilson was too old for the Confed- 
erate service, but during the War held the position of commissioner of 
Walker county for a time. Senator Wilson was educated in the common 
schools, and at the Birmingham district high school. He read law and 
was admitted to the bar in 1801, practiced in Blount and Jefferson coun- 
ties, residing at Bangor and later at Oneonta. He was solicitor of Blount 
county, 1898-1904; mayor of Warrior, 1893; and elected to the State Sen- 
ate in November, 1906. He is a Democrat, and has served as a member of 
the executive committee of Blount county and of the ninth Congressional 
district. He is a Methdoist; a Mason; and a Knight of Pythias. He has 
been twice married: (1) On Jan. 21, 1883, to Kate, daughter of Rev. Frank 
A. and Luclnda (Brake) Hewitt; and (2) on March 30, 1898, to Mrs. Leota 
(Hendricks) Hartley, daughter of Wm. Holland and Mary Jane (Black- 
burn) Hendricks, of Murphree's Valley, Blount county. 



FOURTH DISTRICT. 

MADISON COUNTY. 

ROBERT ELIAS SPRAGINS, of Huntsville, Madison county, was born 
October 14, 1861, in that town, and is the son of Robert Stith Spragins, and 
Sarah Agnes (Crutcher) Spragins. The early education of Senator Spra- 
gins was received in the private school of Prof. Charles O. Shepherd In 
his native town; and he was graduated from the University of Alabama 
with the degree of M. A. in the class of 1880. In 1883 he entered upon 
the practice of law at Huntsville. He was a district delegate to the Con- 
stitutional Convention of 1901, serving on the committees on militia, and 
order, consistency and harmony in that body ; at the general election in 
November, 1902, was elected to the State Senate, and re-elected in 1906. 
He is a Democrat; and a Presbyterian. He was married December 28, 
1886, to Susan Patton, daughter of William H. Echols, of Huntsville, a 
graduate of West Point, and wife Mary B., daughter of Dr. Charles H. 
Patton. 



FIFTH DISTRICT. 

JACKSON AND MARSHALL COUNTIES. 

JOHN ALEXANDER LUSK, of Guntersville, was born at Salem, Pick- 
ens district (now Oconee district) S. C, Nov. 29, 1859, and is the son of 
Erastus Capehart and Eleanor Swafford (Alexander) Lusk, and the grand- 
son of Nathan and Rosanna (Capehart) Lusk, and of Garlington and Mary- 
Ann (Swafford) Alexander, all of old Pickens district, S. C. E. C. Lusk 
was a member of the First South Carolina Cavalry Regiment, Hampton's 
brigade, C. S. A., and in 1866 removed to Guntersville, where he became a 
merchant and farmer, until his death in 1901. Senator Lusk was educated 
in the public schools ; was admitted to the bar in 1877 ; practiced until 1883 
in Blount county except a year of travel in the West; and since 1883 he 
has practiced In Guntersville. He was appointed circuit solicitor in 1885, 
and elected in 1886. He was a member of the House of Representatives 
from Marshall county, 1903, and elected to the State Senate in Nov. 1906. 
He is a Democrat; and a Presbyterian. On October 27, 1887, he married 
Leila, daughter of Robert Feara and wife Eliza Coles, of Marshall county. 
The Fearns are intermarried with the Lee family of Va.; and the first an 
cestor of the Coles family was John Coles, who came from Ireland to 
America. 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 67 

SIXTH DISTRICT. 

ETOWAH AND ST. CLAIR COUNTIES. 

EDWARD DELAMAR HAMNER, of Attalla, Etowah county, was born 
near Abbeville, and is the son of the late Rev. Daniel T. Hamner, a native 
of Marion county, Ga., but who resided in Attalla at the time of his death, 
and wife Demaris M. Miller, and the grandson of Wesley and Mary 
(James) Hamner, and of George and Temple (Hilliard) Miller. His grand- 
parents resided near Greenville, Butler county. The Hamners are of Welsh 
descent, the first American ancestor of the family being Nicholas Hamner, 
who settled in Virginia. From him is also descended Rt. Rev. Nicholas 
Hamner Cobbs, first Episcopal Bishop of the Diocese of Alabama. Rev. 
D. T. Hamner at the time of his death was the head of the Congregational 
Methodist Church in Alabama. Senator Hamner was educated at Hiwassee 
College in Tenn., from which he received the degree of A. B., 1885, and In 
1888 the honorary degree of A. M. ; and studied law at Georgetown Univer- 
sity, Washington, D. C, receiving the degrees of LL. B. and LL. M., 1889. 
He has taught school ; was a clerk in the United States Pension Office, 
Washington, D. C, 1886-1892, and a special pension examiner, 1892-1897; 
and is now a practicing lawyer at Attalla, with mercantile and other bus- 
iness interests. In 1898 for a short time he was editor and proprietor of 
the Atlanta Journal. He was elected to the Legislature in 1902 as a Dem- 
ocrat; and to the State Senate in November, 1906. He was a member of the 
Democratic State convention, 1904 ; affiliates with the Baptist Church ; and 
is a Knight of Pythias. He is unmarried. 



SEVENTH DISTRICT. 

CALHOUN COUNTY. 

FREDERICK LEONARD BLACKMON, of Anniston, Calhoun county, 
was born in Polk county, Ga., September 15, 1873, and is the son of Dr. Au- 
gustus Young and Sallie Ann (Ross) Blackmon, of Bowdon, Ga., and the 
grandson of James and Sarah Ann Blackmon, and of Frederick and Nancy 
A. (Scurry) Ross, of Calhoun county, Ala. The Blackmons were long res- 
idents of Scriven county, Ga.; while the Ross family came from Scotland 
to Edgefield, S. C. Dr. Blackmon was a practicing physician in Gwin- 
nett county, Ga., and during the War of Secession he had charge of pow- 
der manufacture for the Confederate government Senator Blackmon was 
educated in the public schools, the State Normal school at Jacksonville, 
1888-89; the Douglasville College, Georgia 1890; at the Mountain city bus- 
iness college, Chattanooga, Tenn.; and the law school of the University ot 
Alabama, where he graduated June 20, 1894. He at once, entered upon the 
practice of his profession in association with Hon. John B. Knox; and is 
now a member of the firm of Knox, Bowie and Blackmon at Anniston. 
From November 1, 1898 to 1903 he was attorney for the city of Anniston ; 
in 1900 was elected to the State Senate, and re-elected In 1906. He is a 
Democrat, and has been a member of the Democratic Congressional com- 
mittee for the Fourth district since 1900, and also a member cf the city 
Democratic executive committee of Anniston for six years. He is a Bap- 
tist; and a member of the Knights of Pythias, the Elks, and the Junior 
Order of American Mechanics. He is unmarried. 



EIGHTH DISTRICT. 

TALLADEGA COUNTY. 

JOHN WILLIAM HEACOCK, of Talladega, was born December 1, 1837, 
at Wewoka, in that county, and is the son cf Joseph Davis and Rachel M. 
(Garner) Heacock, and the grandson of Jonathan and Hannah (Davis) 



68 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

■ 

Heacock, from Chester county, Pa., and of John Garner, who migrated in 
the early history of the State from Virginia to near Meridlanvllle, Mad- 
ison county. The Heacock family came from Staffordshire, England, to 
America in 1711, and settled in Pa. Senator Heacock was educated in the 
common schools of the country. After four years service in Co. "E," 10th 
Alabama Infantry Regiment, In which he rose from the rank of private 
to captain, he returned home, read medicine, and graduated from the Med- 
ical Department, University of Louisiana, 1867-68. He at once entered up- 
on the practice of medicine in Talladega county, where he has since re- 
sided. He has served three terms in the Legislature, 1878-79, 1890-01 and 
1900-01. He is a Democrat; a Baptist; and a Mason. He has been twice 
married: (1) to Miss Julia A. Riser, and (2) to Miss Lou E. Riser, both 
daughters of George and Paralee (McLeroy) Riser, the former of whom 
came to South Carolina in 1833 and settled in Wewoka. 



NINTH DISTRICT. 

CHAMBERS AND RANDOLPH COUNTIES. 

JOHN WILLIAM OVERTON, of Wedowee, Randolph county, was born 
Sept. 3, 1875, at Lineville, Clay county, and is the son of Reuben Oakley 
and Mary E. (Arnett) Overton, and the grandson of John B. and Maria 
Overton, and of William P. and Elizabeth (Wilson) Arnett. His grand- 
father died while a soldier in the Confederate army. Senator Overton was 
educated in the public schools of Clay county ; graduated in 1894, with the 
degree of B. S. from Lineville College, and in 1895 with the degree of 
A. B. from the same institution. He read law under Chancellor Kelly of 
Annlston, and with Judge Stell Blake, at Wedowee. He was admitted to 
the bar in 1898, and has since practiced In Randolph and adjoining coun- 
ties. He was county solicitor of Randolph county, 1898-1904; mayor of 
Wedowee, 1901-03; and Democratic elector In the 5th Congressional dis- 
trict in 1904. He is a Democrat, and has served as chairman of his county 
executive committee; he is a member of the Missionary Baptist Church; 
and also a member of the Knights of Pythias. He is unmarried. 



TENTH DISTRICT. 

ELMORE AND TALLAPOOSA COUNTIES. 

JAMES WILLIAM STROTHER, of Dadeville, Tallapoosa county, was 
born about forty, years ago near Mi 11 town, Chambers county, and is the 
son of George M. Strother, of that place, and wife Elizabeth M., daughter 
of James M. and Elizabeth A. (Bland) Hardy. G. M. Strother, his father, 
was a Confederate soldier, and died a prisoner of war at Camp Chase, 
Ohio, February 27, 1865. Senator Strother was educated in the common 
schools of Chambers county and the Mllltown Institute. After teaching 
school for some years, he was admitted to the bar and began the practice 
in 1890 at Dadeville, where he has since resided; was attorney for Talla- 
poosa county, 1893-1900; a Democratic presidential elector for the 5th 
District In 1900; was for a number of years a member of the Democratic 
executive committee of the 5th Congressional district, and of Tallapoosa 
county; was elected a member of the Legislature in November, 1902, and 
elected to the State Senate in 1900. On February 0th,- 1887, he was married 
to Mattie D., daughter of Davis W.and Annie E. (Whitlow) Gardner, who 
reside near Lafayette, Ala. 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 69 

ELEVENTH DISTRICT. 

TUSCALOOSA COUNTY. 

FRANK SIMS MOODY, of Tuscaloosa, Tuscaloosa county, was born 
October 29, 1849, in that town, and is the son of Washington and Jane Ham- 
ilton (Sims) Moody, and the grandson of Francis and Anna (Hester) 
Moody, from Mecklenburg, Va., to Columbia, Tenn., and thence to Tusca- 
loosa, and of Edward ai\d Sarah (Banks) Sims, of Tuscaloosa. The 
Moody family is of English stock, and was early seated in Virginia, in the 
vicinity of Richmond. Washington Moody was a lawyer, long one of the 
most prominent citizens of Tuscaloosa, took a leading part in the organi- 
zation of the First National Bank there in 1871, and was its president un- 
til his death. Senator Moody's great-grandfather, Ralph Banks, was a 
Revolutionary soldier, and his great-great-great-grandfather, James Jones, 
was a captain in the North Carolina troops during the Revolution. Senator 
Moody was educated in the private schools of Tuscaloosa, and by special 
permission, during the latter part of the War, attended lectures at the Uni- 
versity of Alabama. In 1867 he entered Washington College, later Wash- 
ington and Lee University, where he graduated with the A. B. degree in 
1870. In 1871 he became cashier of the First National Bank of Tusca- 
loosa; in 1873 took his degree of bachelor of laws in the first class to grad- 
uate from the law department of the University of Alabama; began the 
practice of law about the beginning of 1875 ; served as solicitor of Tusca- 
loosa county; and on the death of his father in 1879 was made president 
of the First National Bank. He served In the State Senate in 1894, in 
1896-1900, and re-elected in November, 1906. He is a Democrat, and has 
been the chairman of the Democratic executive committee of the sixth 
Congressional district since 1892. He has consistently advocated primary 
elections for the nomination of all officers. Senator Moody has, since 1881, 
been an ardent advocate of temperance reform, and from that time has 
consistently done all In his power to further the cause whether as an ad- 
vocate of prohibition, regulation by dispensary, or other means looking to 
the eradication of the whiskey evil from the land. He is a member of the 
Baptist Church, and a teacher in the Sunday-school. On Jan. 5, 1876, at 
Tuscaloosa, he was married to Mary Farley, daughter of Thomas H. and 
Susan (Farley) Maxwell, the former an immigrant from the northern part 
of England in 1839, and the latter from Ipswich, Mass. 



TWELFTH DISTRICT. 

FAYETTE, LAMAR' AND WALKER COUNTIES. 

MARTIN LUTHER LEITH, of Jasper, Walker county, was born Feb. 
19, 1868, near Corona, in the same county, and is the son of Mitchell Por- 
ter and Ceceline (Chilton) Leith, and grandson of George Leith and of 
Richard Chilton. The Leiths lived in Bibb and Walker coun- 
ties, while the Chiltons resided in the latter county, and were 
substantial farmers and business men. Senator Leith was ed- 
ucated in the public schools of Walker county. Until nine- 
teen years of age he labored on a farm, after which for about 
six years he worked in the ocal mines. After having accumulated 
by hard work, the means necessary to gratify his ambition, he read law 
under Thomas L. Sowell, Esq., was admitted to the bar in December, 1897, 
and has continuously practiced in Walker county since that date. In Novem- 
ber, 1906, he was elected to the State Senate. He is a Democrat; a mem- 
ber of the Methodist Episcopal Church,; and a member of the Woodmen of 
the World. In 1891 he was married to Clelie, daughter of John Guthrie, 
of Townley, Walker county. 



70 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

THIRTEENTH DISTRICT. 

JEFFEBSON COUNTY. 

NATHAN LEE MILLER, of Birmingham, was born March 6, 1866, at 
Danville, Morgan county, and is the son of Nathan and Elizabeth (Tor- 
rence) Miller and the grandson of Benjamin and Elizabeth (Hobbs) Mil- 
ler and of Adam Torrence of Lawrence county, and wife, who was a 
Mathews. Nathan Miller, Sr., was born in Limestone county, grew to 
manhood in Lawrence county, took the degree of M. D. in Nashville, Tenn., 
practiced his profession at Danville, Ala., whence he removed to Birming- 
ham. His son, Senator Nathan Lee Miller, was educated in the high school 
at Danville, the State Normal College a,t Florence, and the Bellevue Acad- 
emy in Birmingham. He was city clerk and register of the city court of 
Birmingham from 1888 to 1898; studied law in Birmingham, and was ad- 
mitted to the bar in 1897 ; and in 1904 formed a partnership with Judge 
H. A. Sharpe under the name of Sharpe and Miller. He was lieutenant of 
Co. "K" ( Birmingham Rifles), Alabama State Troops, 1889 to 1891. He 
is a Democrat, and was secretary of the Jefferson county executive com- 
mittee from 1890 to 1896 ; secretary of the State Democratic executive com- 
mittee from 1894 to 1898, and of the State campaign committee for the same 
period. He is a steward and Sunday-school superintendent in the Metho- 
dist Episcopal Church, South. ; a 32 degree Mason, and a Knight of Pythias. 
On February 8, 1899, he was married to Sarah Rogan, daughter of Lafay- 
ette and Ellen J. (Hunt) Rogan. 



FOURTEENTH DISTRICT. 

PICKENS AND SUMTER COUNTIES. 

GILBERT WIMBERLY, M. D., of Reform, Ala., was born December 
12, 1871, at Fayette, Fayette county, and is the son of Louis Monroe and 
Dorcas T. (Reynolds) Wimberly, and the grandson of Thomas and Mahala 
(Irvin) Wimberly, and of Alva Morgan and Matilda (Brewer) Reynolds, 
the great-grandson of Wm. and Susan Irwin, from Ireland, and Eli and 
Drusie (Morgan) Reynolds, and of Wm. and Dorcas (Churchtcell) Brew- 
er. Thomas Wimberly, with two brothers, was an immigrant from Ireland. 
Louis M. Wimberly was captain of company "G," 26th Alabama Infantry 
Regiment, C. S. A., was tax collector of Fayette county for many years 
prior to the War; and after the War was treasurer and superintendent of 
education of Lamar county, until his death in 1901. Senator Wimberly 
was educated in the public schools of Fayette and Lamar counties, and in 
the Vernon institute; was graduated from the Memphis Hospital Medical 
College in 1891, with the degree of M. D. ; and from the Medical College of 
Alabama with the same degree in 1892. He was mayor of Reform, 1895 to 
1900; member of the city council since 1900; was a member of the Ala- 
bama National Guard, and served in the war between the U. S. and Spain. 
He is a Democrat, and served as member of the Pickens county Democratic 
executive committee, 1893 to 1906, and has been its secretary since 1894; 
has also been a member of the State Democratic executive committee from 
the 6th district since 1902. He is a member of the Baptist Church; is a 
Mason; an Odd Fellow; a member of the Woodmen of the World and of 
the B. P. O. E. He was married at Carrollton in 1895, to Elizabeth Rob- 
ertson, daughter of William G. and Sarah Elizabeth Robertson. His sec- 
ond marriage, 1906, was to Marion Matthews, daughter of Dr. Emmet A. 
and Belle Matthews, of Clanton, Ala.* 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 71 

■ FIFTEENTH DISTRICT. 

AUTAUGA, CHILTON AND SHELBY COUNTIES. 

HOWARD SLATON DOSTER, of Prattville, Autauga county, was born 
at that place In 1870, and is the son of Charles S. G. and Caroline E. 
(Slaton) Doster, and the grandson of Absalom and Sarah (Alexander) 
Doster, from Mecklenburg county, N. C, to Georgia, and thence to Autauga 
county, Ala., and of John and Nancy (Harris) Slaton, of Autauga county, 
and the great-grandson of James and Lydia Doster, and of Edmond and 
Mary Alexander. Senator Doster was educated at the Prattville Male and 
Female Academy; took his B. S. degree at the A. & M. College, Auburn; 
and later took a course at Vanderbilt University. He is a journalist, law- 
yer, farmer and manufacturer. He was a member of the House of Repre- 
sentatives from Autauga county, 1898-99, 1900-01 ; and elected State Senator 
in 1906. He is a Democrat ; and>a steward in the Methodist Church. He is 
unmarried 



SIXTEENTH DISTRICT. 

LOWNDES COUNTY. 

EVANS HINSON, of Hayneville, Lowndes county, was born October 4, 
1875, at Mt. Willing Lowndes county, and is the son of Joseph Lemuel and 
Martha Ellen (Daniel) Hinson, and the grandson of John and Mary (Wall) 
Hinson and John and Hulda (Hill) Daniel, all of Mt. Willing. Joseph 
Lemuel Hinson was 1st It. of Co. "M," 6th Alabama Regiment, C. S. A., 
was wounded in the left thigh at Seven Pines, lost his right leg at Win- 
chester, and was in captivity at Fort Delaware when Gen. Lee surrendered. 
Senator Hinson was educated at the Mt. Willing High school, Marion Mili- 
tary Institute, and Howard College, at East Lake, and from the latter insti- 
tute he graduated in 1894, with the degree of B. S. He studied law in Bir- 
mingham, was admitted to the bar in Dec. 1895, and in the January fol- 
lowing, commenced the practice at Hayneville. He was county solicitor, 
November, 1897 to November, 1898; was general administrator for Lown- 
des county, 1898 ; and delegate from that county to the Constitutional Con- 
vension, 1901. He is a Democrat; a member of the Baptist Church; and a 
Mason. On December 25, 1904, at Hayneville, he was married to Ernes- 
tine Cloud, daughter of Edward Daniel and Annie Elizabeth (Bell) Poole. 



SEVENTEENTH DISTRICT. 

BUTLER, CONECUH AND COVINGTON COUNTIES. 

CLIVE ESKELLE REID, of Andalusia, Covington county, was born 
near Mt. Willing, Lowndes county, January 8, 1867, and is the son of Geo. 
Edward and Laura Olivia (Harris) Reid, and the grandson of Alexander 
and Nancy (Cook) Reid, and of Buckner and Sarah Marian (McKeithen) 
Harris. George Edward Reid was born at Ft. Deposit; was a lieutenant 
in Co. "F," 23rd Alabama Infantry Regiment, C. S. A.. Senator Reid's 
early education was received In the county schools, and later in the Ft. 
Deposit high school. He has been a book-keeper, a teacher, and a railroad 
agent. He read law and was admitted to the bar in 1897; and in 1888, 
1889, and 1894, was a member of the Lowndes county rifles. He was elected 
to the State Senate in November, 1906. He is a Democrat, a steward in the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, South, a Mason, and a Knight of Pythias. He 
has been married three times: (1) in 1890, to Joseph Tennille, daughter 



72 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

of Joseph C. and Mary E. {Douglas) A vent; (2), in 1900, to Rose, daughter 
of W. W. Drane, of Hayneville; and (3), in 1903, to Mary Charlotte Cum- 
ming, daughter of S. M. and Sallie E. (Frierson) Cumming. 



EIGHTEENTH DISTRICT. 

BIBB AND PERRY COUNTIES. 

HERBERT E. REYNOLDS, of Centerville, Bibb county, was born at 
Montevallo, Shelby county, Oct. 8, 1860, and is the son of Henry Clay and 
Mary J. (Boyd) Reynolds, and the grandson of Elisha and Nancy (Petty) 
Reynolds, and of Hugh and Mary J. Boyd of Selraa. Henry Clay Reynolds 
was born in Warren county, Tenn., and has lived at Selma and Monte- 
vallo. He was noted as a captain of Wheeler's scouts, and the Federal 
General, Kilpatrlck, set a price on his head; was captured three times by 
the enemy, but escaped each time; and was often sent by Gen. Joseph 
Wheeler into the enemy's lines to secure special information. He was the 
first president of the Alabama Girls* Industrial School at Montevallo, and 
secured a donation of 25,000 acres of mineral lands for it. Senator Rey- 
nolds received his elementary education in the Montevallo school. He then 
attended the State University, at which he took the degree of A. B. in 
1889, and the degree of bachelor of laws in 1890. He then took a law 
course at University of Virginia, 1890-1891; from 1891 to 1894 practiced 
law at Columbiana ; was mayor of Centreville, 1900 to 1904 ; and was, for 
some time, a member of the county board of education. He is a Democrat ; 
and a member of the Baptist Church. On October 20, 1896, in Birmingham, 
he was married to Nora Woodruff, daughter of Judge John and Frances 
(Woodruff) Leeper, of Shelby county. 



NINTEENTH DISTRICT. 

CHOCTAW, CLARKE AND WASHINGTON COUNTIES. 

NORMAN GUNN, of Thomasville, Clarke county, was born June 28, 1868, 
in Clarke county, Miss., and is the son of Henry Sabert and Margaret Dicy 
(Oriffin) Gunn, of Mississippi, and the grandson of John and Willery 
(Snellgrove) Gunn, of N. C., and of John and Harriett (Connor) Grif- 
fin, who came from Georgia to Greene county, Miss. Henry Sabert Gunn 
was a Methodist preacher, and during the War of Secession was 1st lieut- 
enant of his company, and was wounded in the battle of Atlanta. Senator 
Gunn received his early education principally at home, having attended pub- 
lic and private schools only fourteen months. He attended the Normal 
College at Lexington, Miss., for one year, and graduated from that insti- 
tution with the degree of B. S. in 1892 ; and in 1896, he graduated from the 
University of Alabama, with the degree of LL. B. He taught school at 
Thomasville, 1892-95 ; and in 1896 began, there, the practice of law, a pro- 
fession which he still follows. He was twice mayor of Thomasville, 1896- 
1898; county solicitor from 1904 to the present time. He is a Democrat, 
served as a member of the county executive committee from 1902 to 1906; 
is a steward in the Methodist church ; and a Mason. He is unmarried. 



TWENTIETH DISTRICT. 

MARENGO COUNTY. 

JOHN JONES KING, of Consul, Marengo county, was born February 
19, 1855, at McKinley, in that county, and is the son of Dr. Shubal Starnes 
and Lucy Elizabeth (Crawford) King and the grandson of Colonel Henry 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 73 

and Nancy (Wellborn) King and of Stephen Gibson and Lucy (Bridges) 
Crawford, and the great-grandson of Charles King, of N. C, a first-cousin 
of Vice-President William R. King. Dr. Shubal King was born in Madison 
county, in 1823; studied medicine in Tuscaloosa, and was graduated from 
the Medical College of Louisville, Ky., and became a well-known physician 
in Marengo county, where he died in 1808. He served four years in the 
Confederate army, and was wounded at Shiloh. Senator King, his son, 
never attended college, but was educated by competent teachers at private 
schools in Marengo county. He has been a planter and a farmer on an 
extensive scale all his life. He has always been a Democrat, and was a 
member of the House of Representatives, 1884-1885; was collector of cus- 
toms at Port of Mobile during President Cleveland's second term, having 
been appointed by him ; was a member from Marengo of the Constitutional 
Convention of 1901. He has been a member of the. Marengo county exec- 
utive committee continuously for the last 20 years; was its chairman from 
1894 to 1896 ; -was a member from 1st district of the State executive com- 
mittee from 1902 to 1906. He is a Royal Arch Mason, and a Knight of 
Pythias. In May, 1884, at Livingston, Ala., he was married to Fannie Julia, 
daughter of Col. Isaiah Chapman and Mary Anne (Bestor) Brown. 



TWENTY-FIRST DISTRICT. 

BALDWIN, ESCAMBIA AND MONROE COUNTIES. 

OSCAR OTTIMUS BAYLES, of Monroeville, was born Sept. 17, 1875, 
at River Ridge, Monroe county, and is the son of Travis Polk and Louella 
(Mellard) Bayles, and the grandson of Jeremiah and Clarissa (Wiggins) 
Bayles. His maternal grandmother was Margaret L. (Farish) Mellard, 
who ljyed at Gullett's Bluff, Wilcox county. The Bayles family came from 
Edgefield district to Alabama about 1819. Travis P. Bayles was a successful 
planter until his death in 1903 in Monroe county. Senator Bayles was edu- 
cated in the public schools of Monroe county, took a business course at the 
Southern Normal University, Huntington, Tenn., graduating in 1894; and 
from the law department of the same institution in 1896, with the LL. B. 
degree. He began the practice of the law March 1, 1897, at Monroeville, 
and his practice has since been continuous at this place. He was a member 
of the Legislature, 1898-99; deputy solicitor of Monroe county since 1898, 
and elected a senator in 1906 without opposition. He is a Democrat ; a Mis- 
sionary Baptist ; and both a master and a chapter Mason. At River Ridge, 
Feb. 23, 1896, he was married to Mary Elizabeth, daughter of Allen and 
Rebecca (Norwood) Wiggins. 



TWENTY-SECOND DISTRICT. 

WILCOX COUNTY. 

WILLIAM CLARENCE JONES, of Camden, Wilcox county, was born 
November 9, 1845, at Oak Hill, in the same county, and is the son of Jos. 
Clarke and Julia (McReynolds) Jones and the grandson of Wm. and Phoebe 
McReynoIds, of Wilcox county. Senator Jones was prepared for college 
in the country schools, matriculated in the University of Alabama in 1863 ; 
and was graduated from the University of North Carolina, at Chapel Hill, 
in 1868. He also attended the law school of Cumberland University. For 
fifteen years he taught school in Wilcox county. He then entered upon the 
practice of the law. He never held public office until elected to the State 
Senate in November, 1902; and in November, 1906, was re-elected to the 
same position. In 1864 he left the University of Alabama to enlist in 
Company "D," 3rd Alabama Regiment, Cavalry. , He is a Democrat ; and a 



74 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

member of the Reformed Presbyterian Church. His wife is Annie Bonner, 
daughter of Robert H. and Sal lie Hines, who came from South Carolina 
to Alabama. 



TWENTY-THIRD DISTRICT. 

DALE AND GENEVA COUNTIES. 

PRESTON BROOKS DAVIS, of Chancellor, Geneva county, was born 
February 15, 1857, at Bostlck, S. C, and is the son of Henry and Mary E. 
(Bo8tick) Davis and the grandson of Bunyan and Sarah Bostlck, all of 
South Carolina. The Davis family lived in what is known as Welsh Neck, 
S. C. His father, Henry Davis, was an ardent Secessionist; was too old 
to bear arms, but contributed liberally to the cause; died at the age of 
sixty-two in the second year of the War. Senator Davis received his early 
education in the little log school houses near the place of his nativity; ow- 
ing to the strenuous times of reconstruction, he was unable to take a col- 
lege education, but at an immature age, shouldered the responsibility of a 
man. He has followed farming and the turpentine business successfully. 
In 1885, he removed to Geneva county, where he has since resided; has 
been postmaster at Chancellor for the last five years. He is a Democrat, 
and has been a member of the executive committee of his county; is a 
Methodist; and a Mason. On Dec. 22, 1881, he married Florence A., daugh- 
ter of Hilliard D. and Susan A. Hamlter, who resided near Bookman's, S. 
C, the former a capt. of Co. "G," 24th S. C. Infantry Regiment. 



TWENTY-FOURTH DISTRICT. 

BARBOUR COUNTY; 

ELIAS PERRY THOMAS, of Eufaula, Barbour county, was born Aug- 
ust 26, 1872, in Henry county, and is the son of Elias Hugh Thomas and 
Nancy A. (Hays) Thomas, the former a native of Talbotton, Ga., who re- 
moved to Henry county, and the grandson of Hugh Thomas and of Alexan- 
der and Nancy (Harris) Hays, who lived at Cedar Springs, Ga. E. H. Thom- 
as was a member of Company "I," 3rd Alabama Battalion of Reserves, and 
had previously served in the Creek Indian War of 1836. Senator Thomas 
was educated in the common schools, and at the Southeast Alabama Agri- 
cultural School, Abbeville. In 1891 he entered the junior class of the Uni- 
versity of Alabama ; and having finished that year's course, he entered upon 
the study of law at Clayton, and began the practice in 1893. He was elected 
mayor of Clayton in 1899, and re-elected in 1901. In November, 1902, ha 
was elected to the State Senate, and re-elected In Nov. 1906. He is a Dem- 
ocrat, and a Baptist. On April 18, 1900, he was married to Little Nell, 
daughter of Dr. Edward Hill and wife Elizabeth (Swanson) Pritchett, of 
Hayneville, Ala. 

TWENTY-FIFTH DISTRICT. 

« 

COFFEE, CRENSHAW AND PIKE COUNTIES. 

LUCIEN DUNBIBBEN GARDNER, of Troy, Pike county, was born Nov. 
28, 1876, at Troy, Pike county, and is the son of John Dunbibben and Julia 
Isabella (Starke) Gardner and the grandson of Benjamin and Catherine 
(Collins) Gardner, and of Bowling and Eliza Gregory (New) Stark. The 
parents of Benjamin Gardner were Scotch immigrants, who settled in Wil- 
mington, N. C, after the Revolutionary War, the father being a Methodist 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 75 

preacher. Benjamin Gardner was a lawyer and for some years prior to 
the War of 1861 was editor of the Alabama Journal, then published in 
Montgomery. In 1872 he was elected Attorney General of the State, and 
served one term; and died November, 1903, In Palestine, Texas. His son, 
John Dunbibben Gardner, was born at Florence; was educated in the old 
field schools ; lived at Troy ; in 1861 was elected 1st it. of Co. "F," in 1st 
Ala. Cavalry Regiment, and left the army at the close of the war with the 
rank of captain. Senator Gardner received his primary education in the 
public schools of Pike county ; June, 1804, was graduated from State Nor- 
mal College at Troy with degree of B. A. ; June; 1896, from State Univer- 
sity with the degree of B. A. : in June, 1897. from the law department with 
the degree of LL. B.. In 1897, entered upon the practice of law at Troy ; 
in 1898 was appointed by Chancellor W. L. Parks register in chancery at 
Troy; resigned in 1903; has been for several years president of the Alumni 
of State Normal College at Troy; April, 1907, was elected Commandant 
of Camp Sanford, No. 385, Troy, Ala., U. S. C. V. He is a Democrat, and 
a member of the Democratic executive committee of the 12th judicial dis- 
trict. He is a member of the Baptist Church; and a Knight of Pythias. On 
December 26, 1900, was married to Henriette, daughter of Henry Clay and 
Ophelia (Worthy) Wiley, and the grand-daughter of James McCaleb Wi- 
ley. Henry Clay Wiley served as a private in the 8th Texas Cavalry, C. S. A. 



TWENTY-SIXTH DISTRICT. 

BULLOCK AND MACON COUNTIES. 

HENRY P. MERRITT, of Tuskegee, was born near Old Spring Hill, Bar- 
bour county, and is the son of M. C. and Margaret Elizabeth (Owens) Mer- 
ritt, and the grandson of Henry Clinton and Jackie (Green) Merritt, and of 
William Howard and Margaret Elizabeth (Owens) Owens, who lived first 
at Palmyra, Ga., and afterwards in Texas. M. C. Merritt was born in Henry 
county, Ga., removed to Barbour county, Ala., and served two years as a 
Confederate soldier. Senator Merritt was educated in the common schools 
of Barbour and Bullock counties, and attended one year at the Southern 
University, Greensboro. After leaving college he entered the law depart- 
ment of the University of Va., where he took one year's course, and also 
a summer course; admitted to the bar Nov. 30, 1893, but did not actively 
enter upon the practice until 1896, when he removed from Bullock county 
to Tuskegee. He is a Democrat; and has served as chairman of the Macon 
county executive committee; is a Methodist; a member of the Masons, of 
the Knights of Pythias and of the Red Men. On Nov. 14. 1894, in Marion. 
Ala., he married Annie Scay, daughter of William H. and Martha King. 



TWENTY-SEVENTH DISTRICT. 

LEE AND RUSSELL COUNTIES. 

EUGENE HERNDON GLENN, of Seale, Russell county, was born Oct. 
26, 1843, at GlennvJIIe, Barbour county, and is the son of Massilon Mc- 
Kendree and Barbara W. (Herndon) Glenn, and the grandson of James 
E. and Elizabeth (Robinson) Glenn, and of Stephen and Sarah (Conner) 
Herndon, who lived at Cokesbury, Abbeville district, S. C. James E. Glenn 
emigrated from Abbeville district, S. C, to Randolph county. Ga., thence to 
Alabama. He. was a Methodist preacher in Barbour and adjoining countlos 
from 1834 to his death in 1852. The town of Glennville bears his name. 
His son, Massilon M. Glenn, born, in Abbeville, S. C, lived at Glennville 
from 1834 to his death in 1889 ; was in the Creek War of 1836-7, serving on 
the staff of Gen. Winfleld Scott, and was a member from Barbour county to 



76 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

the State convention of 1865. Senator Glenn's early education was at the 
Glennville collegiate and military institute. He was at the State Univer- 
sity in 1861-62, and reached the junior class; in June, 1862, was detailed 
with other cadets by Gov. Shorter to drill Confederate soldiers; was ap- 
pointed drill-master of 45th Alabama Infantry Regiment, organized in June, 
1862 and afterwards was sergeant major and adjutant of that regiment; was 
adjutant of the 1st Alabama Regiment at the surrender of Gen. Johnston at 
Greensboro, and formed the regiment on its colors for its surrender to the 
Federal officer ; from 1876 to 1886 was chairman of the Democratic execu- 
tive committee of the county; for some years was a member of the Con- 
gressional committee, and served three times at intervals as a member df 
the State executive committee ; is a Methodist, has been steward and trus- 
tee in that church for twenty years; and is a Royal Arch Mason. He was 
married Feb. 8, 1877. at Villula, Russell county, to Sarah Virginia, daugh- 
ter of John T. and Frances Elizabeth (Collier) Evans. The Evans family 
formerly lived in Harris county, Ga., and in 1859 emigrated to Russell 
county, Ala. 



TWENTY-EIGHTH DISTRICT. 

MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 

CHARLES BUNTEN TEASLEY, of Montgomery, was born August 31st, 
1872, at Pine Level, in Montgomery county, and is the son of Robert Dan- 
iel and Lucy (Nail) Teasley, and grandson of James and Frances Teasley, 
who resided in Colbert county, Georgia, and of Martin M. and Mary Ann 
Nail, who live at Troy. Robert B. Teasley was a native of Colbert county, 
Georgia, but spent practically his entire life in the present town of Pugh, 
twenty-one miles south of Montgomery; and he was a Confederate soldier, 
serving as a member of the Montgomery Mounted Rifles, 1st Alabama Cav- 
alry. Senator Teasley was educated in the common schools at Pine Level; 
and later took a business course at the Eastman Business College, Pough- 
keepsie, N. Y. He is a business man and a farmer. He has never held a 
public office until his election to the State Senate in 1906. He is a Demo- 
crat; and is a member of the Masons, Odd Fellows, the Red Men and the 
Elks. On January 26th, 1899, he was married to Mary, a daughter of 
Thomas Elliot and Sarah Overton (Gilmer) Hannon of Montgomery. 



TWENTY-NINTH DISTRICT. 

CHEROKEE AND DEKALB COUNTIES. 

W. W. BARBOUR. — (For sketch, see Addenda.) 



THIRTIETH DISTRICT. 

DALLAS COUNTY. 

HENRY FONTAINE REESE, of Selma, Dallas county, was born near 
Demopolis, Marengo county, and is the son of Henry Winston and Julia 
Malvina (Winn) Reese, and the grandson of Herod and Frances Winston 
(Walker) Reese, who lived in Buckingham county, Va , and of Capt. Asa 
B. Winn and his wife, a Miss Schwartz, who lived in Marengo county. 
Senator Reese received his primary education from a governess, Miss Rose 
Pendleton, daughter of Gen. W. N. Pendleton, C. S. A.; afterwards he at- 
tended Howard College for three years ; then entered the State University 
from which he was graduated in 1883 with the degree of A. B. : was grad- 
uated from the law department of Georgetown University, 1885, with the de- 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 77 

gree of LL. B., and from the same department in 1888 with the degree of LL. 
M. ; was admitted to the bar of the supreme court of the District of Colum- 
bia in 1886; practiced in Washington, D. C., from Jua"!, 1889, to Dec., 1889. 
when he removed to his present residence in Selma; and for five years has 
been president of the bar association of Dallas county. He was law clerk 
in the U. S. Treasury Department, 1884 to 1889; represented Dallas county 
in the Constitutional Convention of 1901 ; served on the committees on edu- 
cation, legislative department, and State and county boundaries; was the 
author of and responsible for the constitutional provisions providing for 
private trials in rape cases, of provision fixing property basis of repre- 
sentation in Legislature, and also of an ordinance providing for an election 
of railroad commission ; and was a member of the committee of the conven- 
tion which prepared an address to the people of Alabama, advising the 
adoption of the present constitution. In November, 1006. he was elected 
to the State Senate. He is a Baptist; and a Royal Arch Mason. He was 
married in Selma, Dec. 8, 1886, to Kate, daughter of Dent and Elizabeth 
(La to) Lamar. 



THIRTY-FIRST DISTRICT. 

COLBERT, FRANKLIN AND MARION COUNTIES. 

GEORGE TILGHMAN McWHORTER, of Riverton, Colbert r-nunty, was 
born, April 11, 1849, at this place, and is the son of George* Washington and 
Elvira Caroline (Tucker) McWhorter and the grandson of Hanpell Mc- 
Whorter and of John Tucks r, who lived at Bexar, Ala. Hansell McWhcr- 
ter was one of the early emigrants to Madison county, and later lived in 
Lawrence county. His son, George W. McWhorter, lived in Lawrence county 
in his boyhood; afterwards was a merchant in Tuscumbla; and in 1836 
was 1st It. of a rifle company commanded by Capt. Tom Cooke that served 
that year In the Seminole War. John Tucker was the son of Georce Tucker, 
an English immigrant to Virginia, later to North Carolina, and was the 
father of Governor Tilghman M. Tucker of Miss. Senator McWhorter's 
early education was received in the schools of East Port, Miss. ; his acad- 
emic education in the Caledonia high school in Lowndes county, Miss., 
and his medical education was received in the Medical College of Louis- 
ville, Ky. in 1872-1873. For 34 years has practiced medicine in Riverton; 
served as representative from Colbert county in the Legislature from 1884 to 
1886; is vice-president of the Tennessee River Medical Association; and in 
1905 was president of Colbert county branch of Southern Cotton Association; 
and is now Senator from the thirty-first senatorial district of Alabama. 
He is a Democrat, and has served on various committees of the party ; is 
also a Mason. As an author he nas published many monographs on dif- 
ferent diseases. On April 2, 1882, was married to Susan, daughter of 
Kibble and Mary Anne (Marchbanks) Terry. 



THIRTY-SECOND DISTRICT. 

GREENE AND HALE COUNTIES. 

AMOS HORTON, of Pleasant Ridge, Greene county, was born at that 
place Sept. 16, 1847, and is the son of William and Marcia (Ford) Horton, 
and the grandson of Jesse and Sailie (Chamblee) Horton and of John and 
Jennie (Kirkpatrick) Ford. The ancestors of the Horton family In Amer- 
ica came to this country in the ship, Swallow, between the years 1633 and 
1638. The father of Jesse Horton, Capt. Amos Horton, served in the Rev- 
olution under Gen. Francis Marion. William Horton, born near Raleigh, 
N. C, emigrated from N. C, to Alabama with his father, Jesse Horton, 
who lived three years in North Alabama, then settled In Greene county, 



78 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

where he died. Senator Horton received his early ducation at Pleasant 
Ridge; attended the State University two years, 1864 and 1865, and was, 
at the time, a member of the Alabama corps of cadets, and served a short 
time at Mobile in the winter of 1864-65, and was in the engagement with 
Gen. Croxton at Tuscaloosa in April, 1865. He was a member of the State 
Senate, 1898 to 1902; is a merchant and a farmer; a Democrat and a 
Knight of Pythias. He was first married to a Richardson; and, secondly: 
on Oct. 7, 1903, at Mi 1 ledge vi lie, Ga., he was married to Carrie A., daughter 
of Capt. K. R, and Melissa Foster. 



THIRTY-THIRD DISTRICT. 

MOBILE COUNTY. 

MAX HAMBURGER, JR., of Mobile, Mobile county, was born Feb. 7, 
1876, at Whistler, in the same county, and is the son of Max Hamburger, 
and the grandson of Max and Temple (McKenzie) Hamburger, of Mobile, 
and of Matthew and Caroline (ZaWren) Gaston. The grand-father, Max 
Hamburger, a native of Germany, having lost his wife, went to the gold 
fields of California in 1849. Nothing was heard from him after 1853. His 
son, born in 1849, at Burnt Corn, lived in Blakely, and in 1865, entered 
the Confederate service. Senator Hamburger, the youngest of the name, 
was taught in the public schools of Whistler for six years ; attended Bar- 
ton Academy in Mobile, graduating in the class of 1890-91. He has been a 
newspaper worker since 1894 ; in 1895, became telegraph editor of Mobile 
Register; for past ten years has been manager and owner of Mobile 
Daily Herald ; has been president of Mobile jury commission since 1M)2 ; 
chairman Alabama battleship commission, 1900; from 1893 to 1898 was 
honorary member Mobile Rifles; president Mobile press club, 1900-04; and 
president Mobile commercial club, 1902-1907. He is a Democrat, having 
been secretary of several Democratic organizations ; is a Baptist ; a Mason ; 
a Knight Templar and Shriner, and a member of several Mobile Mystic 
Societies. 



THIRTY-FOURTH DISTRICT. 

CLEBURNE, CLAY AND COOSA COUNTIES. 

DAVID MARION WHITE, of Goodwater, Coosa county, was born Dec- 
ember 21, 1855, in Newton county, Ga., and is the son of William Darling 
and Sarah Ann (Oreen) White and the grandson of William and Sarah 
Ann White and of William Green, of Virginia. William D. White was a 
native of South Carolina, and lived at Ashland, Clay county, Alabama. His 
son, Senator White, was educated in the common schools of Clay county. 
He was for twelve years mayor of Goodwater, Ala. ; for eight years a mem- 
ber of the State Democratic executive committee, and for twenty-five years 
a member of congressional, senatorial, and county committees. He is a 
steward in the Methodist Church; a Mason, and a Knight of Pythias. At 
Goodwater, April 14, 1893, he was married to Annie, daughter of Dr. Charles 
Mercer and Ann (Haseltine) Pope. 



THIRTY-FIFTH DISTRICT. 

HENRY AND HOUSTON COUNTIES. 

BENJAMIN ALBERT FORRESTER, of Cowarts, Houston county, was 
born April 28, 1843, in Beaufort county, S. C, and is the son of Henry 
Allen and Lucy A. (Knight) Forrester, both natives cf Beaufort, S. C. Sen- 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 79 

ator Forrester enlisted in April, 1861, and served as a private in the 37th 
Alabama Infantry Regiment, C. S. A. He was a member of the Legisla- 
ture of 1898-1899, and has been postmaster at Cowarts for twenty years. 
He was elected to the State Senate in November, 1906. He is a Democrat ; 
and a deacon in the Baptist Church. On December 4, 1865, in Henry 
county, he was married to Rebecca Ann, daughter of Emanuel and Marga- 
ret ( Crosby) Antley. 



REPRESENTATIVES 



OFFICERS OF THE HOUSE. 

Speaker. — Hon. Wm. L. Martin, of Montgomery. 

Hon. A. H. Carmichael, of Colbert; elected after the death 

of Mr. Martin. 
Clerk. — Cyrus B. Brown, of Montgomery. 
Assistant-Clerk. — Wm. F. Herbert, of Marengo. 
Enrolling Clerk. — John V. Denson, of Chambers. 
Engrossing Clerk. — Frank A. Gamble, Jasper. 
Doorkeeper. — Robert Hasson, of Calhoun. 
Assistant Doorkeeper. — T. W. Deiainbert, oi Monison try. 
Doorkeeper of the Gallery. — Joel Barnett, of Montgomery. 
Messengers. — Edmund Dent, Wallace McGowan, and Sam Donaldson. 
Pages. — Claud Adams, Charles Alley, Ellis Cranford, Berry Groins, John 
Green*, and Cecil Stubbs. 



HOUSE STANDING COMMITTEES, 1907. 

Judiciary: John, Chairman, Foster, Tunstall, King, Steagall, Haley, 
Parker, Bulger, Smith (of Lee), Lee (of Etowah), Seale, Arnold, Gunter, 
Goodwyn, Sanford, Sample (of Morgan), Lacy (of Walker), Fuller, Bal- 
lard (of Autauga), Woolf, Maner. 

Revision of Laws: Pitts (of Dallas), Chairman, Weaver, Rushton, 
Oliver, Jenkins, Sherrod, Arrlngton, Glover, Mitchell, Urquhart, Power, 
Lee (of Houston), Lindsay, Hoffman. Long (of Morgan), Rice, Williams, 
Benners, McDuffee, Powell (of Covington), Middleton. * 

Ways and Means: Woolf, Chairman, Maner, Bloch, Powell (of Bullock), 
Lovelady, Lee (of Houston), White (of Perry), Rushton, Sample, Cran- 
ford, Rowe, Elrod, Smith (cf Etowah), Turner, Dudley, Kornegay, Hugh- 
ston, Rice, McDuffle. 

Privileges and Elections: Arnold, Chairman, Glover, Sherrod, Gunter, 
Weaver, Avery, Lyons, Bulger, Lancaster, Moore, Lacy (of Dallas), Rice, 
Vann, Altaian, Coleman (of Lowndes), Cranford, Hughston, Jones, Barton. 

Education: Lee (of Etowah), Chairman, Arnold, Bloch, Jenkins, Power, 
Mitchell, Lacy (of Walker), Rattray, Lovelady, Kirby, Lindsay, McMillan, 
Ballard (of Pike), Lacy (of Dallas), Pratt, Smith (of Franklin), Mc- 
Duffle, Pearson, Benson. 

Commerce and Common Carriers: Long (of Butler), Chairman, John, 
Maner, Glover, Sample, Smith (of Lee), Ballard (of Autauga), Smith (of 
Elmore), Powell (of Bullock), Kornegay, Kirby, Rattray, Norvell, Mitchell, 
Cannon, Sanders, Baltzell. Rushton, Steagall. 

Agriculture: Pitts (of Perry), Chairman, Henley, Johnson, Coleman 
(of Marshall), Power, Rattray, Ragsdale, Doyle (of Marengo), Ballard 
(of Pike), Crum, Doyle (of Clarke), Lacy (of Dallas), Brown, Elrod, Lee 
(of Barbour), Sanders, McDuffie, Carmichael (of Clay), Seale. 



\ 



80 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

Temperance: Ballard (of Autauga), Chairman, Lovelady, Rowe, Fuller, 
Lyons, McMillan, Killen, Goodwyn, Smith (of Elmore), Seale, Parker, 
Jones, Cannon, Doyle (of Clarke), Peete, Edwards, Pitts (of Perry), Smith 
(of Franklin), Kornegay. 

Local Legislation: Haley, Chairman, Tunstall, Goodwyn, Ragsdale, 
White (of Perry), Moore, Altman, Coleman (of Marshall), Smith (of Eto- 
wah), Pearson, Burney, McCrory, Pugh, White (of Lamar), .Cooper, Ben- 
son, Thompson, Pratt, Sanders. 

Appropriations: Lyons, Chairman, Rowe, Bloch, Tunstall, Smith (of 
Lee), Killen, Ragsdale, Smith (of Elmore), Rainer, Doyle (of Marengo), 
Ballard (of Pike), Avery, Brown, Cooper, Long (of Butler). 

Corporations: Maner, Chairman, Oliver, Haley, Arrington, Steagall, 
Foster, Lee (of Houston), Seale, Power, King, Fuller, Dudley, Weaver, 
Sample, Lee (of Etowah). 

Penitentiary and Criminal Administration: Foster, Chairman, King, 
Sherrod, Lacy (of Walker), Sanford, Jenkins, Lindsay, Armstrong, Ma- 
lone, Edwards, Henley, Powe.ll (of Covington), Pugh, Crum, Mastin. 

Municipal Organization: Gunter, Chairman, Urquhart, Foster, King. 
Pitts (of Dallas), Long (of Morgan), Cooper, Cranford, Kirhy, Woolf, Bul- 
ger, Williams, Hoffman, Lancaster. Lee (of Houston.) 

Banking and Insurance: Rushton, Chairman, Arrington, Cranford, 
Moore, Gunter, McMillan, Price, Ballard (of Pike), Parker, Hoffman, Glo- 
ver, Lancaster, Rainer, Long (of Morgan), Dudley. 

Labor and Immigration: Kirby, Chairman, Norvell, Urquhart, Lee (of 
Barbour), Burney, Baltzell, Powell (of Covington), Jones, Alford, Cooper, 
Carmichaei (of Clay), Killen, Benson, Edwards, Peete. 

Public Roads and Highways: Smith (of Elmore), Chairman, White 
(of Perry), Smith (of Lee), Henley, Turner, Avery, Rainer, Coleman (of 
Lowndes), Benners, Peete, Jones. Malone, McCrory, Price, White (of La- 
mar). 

Mining and Manufacturing: Bloch, Chairman, Fuller, John, Oliver, 
Moore, Smith (of Etowah), Pearson, Smith (of Franklin), Cooper, Arm- 
strong, Lawson, Carmichaei (of Clay), Turner, EIrod, Lancaster. 

Counties and County Boundaries: Jenkins, Chairman, King, Lacy (of 
Walker), Altman, Pitts (of Dallas), Fuller, Powell (of Bullock), Pearson, 
Malone, Pratt, Price, Pugh, Doyle (of Marengo), Lee (of Barbour), Law- 
son. 

Public Health: Ragsdale, Chairman, Vann, Lovelady, Maner, Johnson, 
Cooper, Lawson, Alford, Benners, Coleman (of Lowndes), Thompson, Nor- 
vell, Doyle (of Clarke). 

Military: Long (of Morgan), Chairman, Goodwyn, Haley, Woolf, Nor- 
vell, Arrington, • Parker. Hughston, Williams, Benson, Coleman (of Mar- 
shall), Thompson, Smith (of Franklin). 

Public Buildings and Institutions: Goodwyn, Chairman, Vann, McCrory, 
Benners, Armstrong, Alford, Baltzell, Cannon, Brown, Burney, Crum, Mid- 
dleton, White (of Lamar). 

Capitol Grounds: Lee (of Houston), Chairman, Gocdwyn, Cranford, 
Tunstall, John, Avery, Hoffman, Johnson, Powell (of Bullock), Rice, Sher- 
rod, Benson, Thompson. 

Claims and Fees: Mitchell, Chairman, King, Oliver. Lindsay, Pugh, 
Hughston, Mastin. 

Public -Printing : Armstrong, Chairman, Benners, Williams, Lancaster, 
Glover, Killen, Dudley. 

Game, Fish and Forestry Preservation: Lindsay, Chairman, Maner, 
Sherrod, John, Lee (of Houston), Long (of Butler), Fuller, White (of 
Lamar), Thompson, Vann, Mastin, Norvell, Steagall. 

Engrossed Bills: Lacy (of Walker), Chairman, Power, Lacy (of Dal- 
las), Ballard (of Autauga), Fuller. 

Enrolled Bills: Williams, Chairman, Smith (of Franklin), Benson, 
Pratt, Powell (of Covington). 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 81 

Revision of Journal: Steagall, Chairman, Glover, Rainer, Smith (of 
Lee), Rice. 

Federal Relations: Bulger, Chairman, Pitts (of Dallas), Foster, Weav- 
er, Maner, Tuustall, Woolf, Arnold. John. 

Rules: Speaker, John, Maner, Tunstall, Long (of Butler), Foster, Stea- 
gall. 



RULES OF THE HOUSE, 1007. 

Rule 1. — The speaker shall take the chair every day at the hour fixed 
on the preceding adjournment; shall immediately call the members to or- 
der, and on the appearance of a quorum, cause the Journal of the preced- 
ing day to be read. 

2. He shall preserve order and decorum; may speak to points of order 
in preference to other members, rising from his chair for that purpose. He 
shall decide questions of order, subject to an appeal to the House, at the 
request of any member; which appeal shall be decided without debate. 

3. He shall rise to put a question, but may state It sitting. All questions 
shall be distinctly put In this form, viz.; "Those in favor (as the ques- 
tion may be) say aye," and after the affirmative voice Is expressed, 
"Those opposed to the motion say No." If the speaker doubts, or a divis- 
ion is called for before a division is announced, they shall divide. Those 
in the affirmative of the question shall rise from their seats; and after- 
wards those In the negative^ 

4. He shall have a right to name any member to perform the duties of 
the chair, but such substitution shall not extend beyond an adjournment. 
Whenever he is sick, or otherwise providentially unable to attend, or nec- 
essarily absent, the House shall elect a speaker pro tern, who shall dis- 
charge the duties of speaker till his return, and no longer. 

5. Fifteen members shall have power to send for absent members or 
to move a call of the House; but no call of the House shall be made except 
on the concurrence of a majority of the members present. A majority of 
the House shall be a quorum to transact business. 

6. When any member Is about to speak or deliver any matter to the 
House, he shall rise from his seat and respectfully address himself to the 
speaker. 

7. If any member, in speaking or otherwise, transgress the rules, the 
speaker shall, or any member may, call him to order; in which case the 
member so called to order shall immediately sit down, unless permitted 
to explain; and the House shall, if appealed to. decide on the case without 
debate. If the decision be in favor of the member so called to order, he 
shall be at liberty to proceed ; If otherwise, and the case require It, he shall 
be liable to censure of the House. 

8. When two or more members happen to rise at the same time, the 
speaker shall name the person who is first to speak. 

9. No member shall speak more than twice to the same question without 
leave of the House, unless he be the mover or chairman of the committee 
proposing the matter pending. In which case he shall be permitted to speak 
in reply, but not until every member choosing to speak shall have spoken. 

10. Upon the call of the House for taking the ayes and noes on any 
question, names of the members shall be called alphabetically, and each 
member shall answer from his seat. 

11. When any question Is taken by ayes and noes, and a mentber who 
has been absent returns before the question Is decided, he shall be privil- 
eged to make inquiry of the subject before the House, and record his vote 
without discussion. 

12. When a motion is made, it shall be stated by the speaker; or if in 
writing, shall be read aloud by the clerk; and every motion shall be re- 
duced to writing if the speaker or any member request it. 

6 



82 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

13. Any member may call for a division of the question when the sense 
will admit of it. 

14. Members shall particularly forbear personal reflections; nor shall 
any member name another in argument or debate. 

15. After a motion is stated by the speaker, or read by the clerk, it 
shall be deemed in possession of the House, but may be withdrawn by 
leave of the House, at any time before decision. 

16. When a question is before the House, motions may be received in 
the following order, to-wlt : First, to fix the time to which the House shall 
adjourn; second, to adjourn; third, to lay on the table; fourth, for the 
previous question; fifth, to postpone to a certain day, not beyond the prob- 
able duration of the session ; sixth, to commit ; seventh, to amend ; eighth, 
to indefinitely postpone. 

17. A motion to adjourn shall always be in order, even in the absence 
of a quorum. 

18. When a vote has passed, except on the previous question, or on 
motion to lay on the table, or to take from the table, it shall be In order 
for any member who voted with the majority to move for a reconsidera- 
tion thereof on the same day, or within one hour after reading the Journal 
on the succeeding day, and such motion, if made on the same day, shall 
be placed first on the orders of the day, for the day succeeding that en which 
it is made; unless the mover desires present consideration; but if first 
moven on such succeeding day, it shall be forthwith considered; and when a 
motion for a reconsideration is decided, that decision shall not be reconsid- 
ered, and no question be twice reconsidered; Provided, however, that a mo- 
tion to reconsider a vote, upon any incidental or subsidiary question, shal! 
not remove the main subject under consideration from the House, but shal? 
be considered at the time when it is made. 

19. No bill or joint resolution of this House shall be sent to the Senate 
(unless by special order of the House) until the time allowed for the last 
preceding rule for reconsideration shall have passed. 

20. The previous question shall be in the following form : "Shall the 
main question be now put?" If demanded by a vote of a majority of the 
members present, its effect shall be to cut off all debate and bring the 
House to a direct vote, first upon the pending amendments, if there are any, 
in their order, and then on the main question, but the mover of the ques- 
tion, or the chairman of the committee having charge of the bill or resolu- 
tion, shall have the right to close the debate, after the call of the previous 
question has been sustained, for not more than fifteen minutes. 

21. The speaker shall appoint a reading clerk for the House whose pay 
shall be the same as that of the assistant clerk of the House. The speaker 
shall also appoint all committees unless otherwise directed by the House; 
Provided, however, a majority of each committee shall constitute a quo- 
rum. And the following shall constitute the standing committees of the 
House : 

Rules, of which the speaker shall be the chairman, and which committee 
shall have the right to report at any time and to be composed of seven 
members. 

The following to be composed of 21 members: 

1. Judiciary. 

2. Revision of Laws. 

The following to be composed of 19 members : 

3. Ways and Means. 

4. Privileges and Elections. 

5. Education. 

6. Commerce and Common Carriers. 

7. Agriculture. 

8. Temperance. 

9. Local Legislation. 

The following to be composed of 15 members : 
10. Appropriations. 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 83 

11. Corporations. 

12. Penitentiary and Criminal Administration. 

13. ' Municipal Organization. 

14. Banking and Insurance. 
15: Labor and Immigration. 

16. Public Roads and Highways. 

17. Mining and Manufacturing. 

18. County and Copnty Boundaries. 

The followtng to be composed of 13 members : 
10. Public Health. 

20. Military. 

21. Public Buildings and Institutions. 

22. Capitol and Grounds. 

The following to be composed of 11 members : 

23. Game, Fish and Forestry Preservation. 
The following to be composed of 9 members : 

24. Federal Relations. 

The following to be composed of 7 members : 

25. Claims and Fees. 

26. Public Printing. 

The following to be composed of 5 members : 

27. Engrossed Bills. 

28. Enrolled Bills. 

29. Revision of the Journal. 

• 22. The following committees shall be entitled to clerks to be appointed 
by the respective chairmen of the committees whenever in the discretion 
of the chairmen of said committees it may be necessary : 

Judiciary, Revision* of Laws, Privileges and Elections, Municipal Organ- 
ization, Ways and Means, Agriculture, Education. Local Legislation, Cor- 
porations, Commerce and Common Carriers, Appropriations, Banking and 
Insurance. Public Roads and Highways, Temperance, Labor and Immigra- 
tion, Penitentiary and Criminal Administration. Mining and Manufac- 
turing, Revision of the Journal, Rules, Enrolled Bills, Engrossed Bills and 
Public Health. 

23. All resolutions before they are voted on shall be referred to and 
reported from the Committee on Rules. 

24. In the appointment of a committee to visit any public institution of 
the State, no representative who is a resident of an adjoining county shall 
be appointed on such committee. 

25. Every member may be required to vote on any question before the 
House. When the ayes and noes are desired, the speaker shall be first 
called, and if the House be equally divided, the question shall be lost. 

26. No member shall absent himself from the session of the House, un- 
less he may have leave, be sick, or unable to attend. 

27. The following shall be the order of business In the House : 

1. Report of the Committee on Revision of the Journal. 

2. Reports of Committees on Engrossed and Enrolled Bills, but these 
committees may report at any time. 

3. Reports of standing committees, of bills which they have reported 
favorably which shall be forthwith read by their title a second time and 
entered on the calendar In the order in which they were read a second 
time. In the call of committees the speaker shall call thein in their 
order. If the speaker shall not get through the call of committees before 
the House passes to other business, he shall resume next call where he left 
off. 

4. Senate messages provided that whenever any message is received, 
notifying the House of the passage of Senate bills, the clerk shall, imme- 
diately after the message is read, proceed to read the bills by their title, 
(unless the reading be called for by seme member, in which event the bill 
shall be read at length), and referred forthwith to a committee. The House 
shall then proceed with the business upon which it was engaged when the 
message was received. 



84 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

5. The unfinished business in which the House was engaged at its last 
adjournment. 

6. The call of counties in alphabetical order for bills, resolutions, me- 
morials, and petitions. If in any one day the call has not been completed 
by the hour of 12 m. f the speaker shall begin on the next day, where he left 
off the preceding day. 

When the hour of 12 m., arrives or before that hour if the call of 
counties has been completed, business shall proceed in the following order : 

1. Executive messages shall have priority over other business, and as 
soon as received they shall be read by the clerk, and a proper disposition be 
made of them ; and the House shall thereupon proceed with the business 
engaged in when interrupted by the executive message. 

2. If there are any bills on the calendar they shall be taken up at 1 
p. m., on each day, unless reached earlier, and no bill on the calendar shall 
be taken up out of its order, except by a vote of two-thirds of the members. 

3. Miscellaneous business. 

28. Any matter may, by a vote of the majority of the members present, 
be made the special order for nuy hour, which shall take the precedence, 
at that hour, of any ether business except a motion to reconsider; provided 
that motions to make a bill a special order shall give the number and title 
of the bill; Provided, further, that no bill be set for a special order or con- 
sideration except by a resolution first referred to Committee on Rules. 

29. When a committee has decided adversely to any bill or resolution, 
such action shall be reported to the House and the bill or resolution shall 
forthwith be placed on the adverse calendar. Any member may move that 
the said bill shall be taken from the adverse calendar and referred to a 
committee of the whole House, and by a majority vote such reference shall 
be made. If the committee of the Whole consider' favorably the bill 
or resolution, then it shall be reported back to the House, read a second 
time and placed on the regular calendar. Should the committee of the 
Whole consider unfavorably the bill or resolution then said action 
shall be reported to the House and the further consideration of the bill or 
resolution shall be indefinitely postponed. 

29 1-2. Motions to take bills or resolutions from the adverse calendar 
may be made immediately after the reports of the standing committees 
are made; provided, that one day's notice of such motion shall be given. 

30. Upon the introduction of any bill, or when senate bills are first acted 
on, the same shall be read by title unless the reading be called for by some 
member, when it shall be read at length, and upon such reading at length, 
or by its title, the bill so read shall be referred to a standing committee. 

31. Bills, motions and reports may be recommitted at the pleasure of 
the House. 

32. Every bill shall on its first reading be referred to a standing commit- 
tee, but reference to one shall not preclude the recommitment to another 
and on* recommitment it shall be open to amendment. 

32 1-2. Upon a vote of a majority of the House any standing committee 
may be directed to act on any bill, which shall have been referred to such 
committee, and to report the same to the House at its next sitting, in de- 
fault of which such committee, or any of its members, shall be subject to 
such censure as the House may impose. 

33. No special committee shall report but upon leave granted by a vote 
of the House, except committees of Inquiry, which may report at any time. 

34. All bills should be dispatched in order as they are introduced, un- 
less when the House otherwise directs. 

35. When a bill shall pass it shall be certified by the clerk, noting the 
date of its passage at the foot thereof. 

36. The House may resolve itself into a committee of the Whole when 
deemed necessary; and the rules of proceeding in the House shall be ob- 
served in committees, as far as may be applicable, except that number of 
times of speaking and putting the previous question shall not be applicable 
in committee. 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 85 

37. In forming a committee of the' whole House, the speaker shall leave 
his chair, and a chairman to preside in committees shall be appointed by 
the speaker. 

38. Upon a bill being committed to a committee of the whole House, 
the same shall be first read throughout by the Clerk, and then again be read 
and debated by clauses, leaving the preamble to be the last considered. 
After the report the bill shall be again subjected to debate and amendment 
by clauses, before the question of engrossing be taken. 

39. On all questions of filling blanks, the largest sum and most remote 
day shall be put. 

40. Whenever it shall be necessary for a communication to be made 
from the House of Representatives to the Senate, it shall be under the sig- 
nature of the clerk. 

41. No committee shall sit during the sitting of the House without 
special leave. 

42. No bill or joint resolution shall be received, unless written on an 
entire sheet of paper, with the caption endoised. 

43. After a vote has been ordered upon any question no member shall 
be permitted to explain his vote without the unanimous consent of the 
House. 

44. When House bills are signed by the speaker, thereupon the clerk 
must, by message, notify the Senate and request the signature cf the presi- 
dent of the Senate to said bills. 

45. The name of a member who introduces a bill or joint resolution shall 
be by him endorsed upon the same, and shall be inscribed by the clerk upon 
the engrossed and enrolled copies when transmitted to the Senate or the 
governor. 

46. In appointing a committee from the several sub-divisions of the 
State, the speaker shall designate who shall be chairman of such com- 
mittee. 

47. No person shall be allowed to smoke within the House, lobby or 

gallery- 

48. All bills for amendment to any section or part of the code, in which 
the subject-matter is stated in the title by reference to the section or other 
sub-division of the code, must contain on the back of the bill, immediately 
below the title, a brief statement of the general subject to which such sec- 
tion or sub-division relates. 

49. The speaker shall, whenever he deems it necessary for the speedy 
dispatch of business, order the calendar printed for the use of members. 

50. When the chairman of a committee is sick or absent, the member 
whose name appears second on the committee shall, during the absence of 
the chairman, become chairman, and have power to call together the com- 
mittee for consideration of bills. 

51. No rule shall be rescinded or amended without one day's notice of 
the motion thereof being given; and a violation of either of them may be 
punished by such censure as a majority of the House may direct. 

52. The tabling of an amendment or subsidiary motion shall not have 
the effect of carrying with it the original bill or proposition. 

53. That the rules of the House shall not be suspended, except by a 
four-fifths vote of every member present, provided a quorum must vote. 

54. No member shall speak more than ten minutes at any time, except 
as provided In rule 9. 

55. When a bill is reported favorably to the House, and a minority re- 
port accompanies the favorable report, the minority report shall be con- 
sidered an amendment and the bill shall be read a second time; and said 
bill and minority report shall be placed on the calendar and be considered 
on the third reading of the bill. 

56. All bills acted upon by committees shall be endorsed as follows: 

This bill was acted upon by the Committee on 

in session and ordered returned to the House, and reported "favorably" or 
"adversely" or "otherwise," as the case may be. And said endorsement 
shall be signed by the chairman of such committee. 



86 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

57. The doorkeeper shall, ten minutes before the hour fixed for the 
meeting of the House, clear the House of all persons not entitled to the 
floor, and it shall be the duty of the doorkeeper to see that all persons not 
entitled to the privilege of the floor are, at all times, excluded therefrom. 

58. The clerk, when in the opinion cf the chairmen of the several stand- 
ing committees of the House, it will facilitate the business of the House, to 
have a bill printed, upon the filing of a request by the chairman of any 
standing committee, shall have printed for* the use of the House said bill 
or bills. 



SKETCHES OF MEMBERS. 

AUTAUGA COUNTY. 

WALTER EUGENE BALLARD, of Prattville, was born July 25, 1876, 
at Milo, near Troy, Pike county, and is the son of Thomas Weldon and 
Jane Catherine (Simmons) Ballard, and the 'grandson of John J. and 
Nancy (McKnight) Ballard, and. of Isaac and Elizabeth (Fowler) Sim- 
mons, who emigrated about 1817 from North Carolina to Dallas county, 
and thence to Pike county. John J. Ballard's .heme was at Fayetteville, 
Georgia, until 1854, when he emigrated to Pike county, Alabama. He 
served eighteen months in the Army of Northern Virginia, and died of 
fever in Richmond. Thomas Weldon Ballard, his son, was born in Fayette- 
ville, Georgia, and in 1854 moved with his father to Pike county, Alabama. 
He also served in the Confederate army and lost his leg from a wound 
received in the battle of Murfreesboro, Tenn. ; and was tax collector of 
Pike county for two terms. The Bal lards are of Scotch descent, the first 
ancestor setting in N. C. Eugene Ballard received his elementary educa- 
tion in the common schools of Pike county ; graduated from the State Nor- 
mal College at Troy in 1898 ; and was admitted to the bar in 1901. tie is a 
Democrat; and a member of the Baptist Church. He married at Hayne- 
vllle, Alabama, 1902, Laura Adele (McGaugh), daughter of William 
Thomas and Margaret V. (McLetnorc) McGaugh, who lived in Montgomery, 
Alabama. 



BALDWIN COUNTY. 

SAMUEL CALHOUN JENKINS, of Bay Mlnette, Baldwin county, was 
born in Wilcox county in 1870, and is the son of Lucy Walker and Ellen 
Shaw (Nettles) Jenkins, and the grandson cf Rev. John and Fannie 
(Durham) Jenkins, and of John Nettles, who lived at Blacks Bend, Wilcox 
county. Joseph Jenkins, his great-grandfather, wa3 a soldier in 
the Revolutionary War under Gen. Marion, while his wife who was a 
Miss Lewis, was the daughter of Josiah Lewis, a leading Tory 
in the war. These ancestors lived in Horry district, S. C. 
Rev. John Jenkins was a pioneer Methodist preacher, and in 1813 was in 
Fort Mims a few days before the massacre; at the clcse of the Creek War 
he went up the Alabama river and settled in what afterwards became Wil- 
cox county ; he was one of the commissioners appointed to select the county 
site of that county, and to contract for the buildings. Canton, on the Ala- 
bama river, was selected. Lucky Walker Jenkins, his son, was born at 
Allenton, Wilcox county, and lived during the greater part of his life at 
Camden, where he was a practising physician until his death in 1888. He 
served in the War of Secession in the company of his brother, Captain 
Thomas F. Jenkins. Samuel Calhoun Jenkins received his preparatory 
education at Camden; and graduated at the University of Alabama in 
1889, receiving the degree of A. B. ; *n 1890 he received the honorary degree 
of A. M. from the same institution. He taught school three years, then 
studied law, and graduated from the University in 1897 with the degree 
of bachelor of laws. He began the practice of law in October, 1894, while 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT.' 87 

superintendent of education of Wilcox county, which office he held from 
1892 to 1896; was a member of the House of Representatives, 1896-98; a 
member of the State Senate, 1898-1900; and was a member of the Consti- 
tutional Convention of 1901 ; and removed to Baldwin county, F«b. 1902. He 
is a Democrat; a member of the Methodist Protestant Church; also of the 
Knights of Pythias; and is unmarried. 



BARBOUR COUNTY. 

ROBERT MONROE LEE, of Clio, Barbour county, was born at Louis- 
ville, in the same county, Aug. 19, 1846, find is the son of Needham and 
Eniillne(Letcto) Lee and the grandson of Needham and Lydia (Pryor) 
Lee, and of Elvy Lewis. His Lee ancestors came from England to Va., in 
the 16th century. Needham Lee, father of Robert M. Lee, was a native of 
Augusta, Ga., and did service In the Indian War, 1836. Robert M. Lee was 
educated in the common schools of his native town ; is a farmer, a Demo- 
crat, a member of the M. E. Church, South, and a Mason. He enlisted in 
the Confederate service March 10, 1862, In Co. "A," 45th Ala. Inf. Reg. ; 
was in the battle of Murfreesboro, and in all subsequent battles of the 
Western Army until July 22, 1864, at which time he was captured; was 
carried to Camp Chase, Ohio, as a prisoner of war, and paroled March 2, 
1865. He married January 19, 1881, Annie T., daughter of Dr. J. A. and 
Sarah Elizabeth (Hucy) Reynolds, of Louisville, Ala. 

JUDGE STERLING WILLIAMS, of Clayton, Barbour county, was born 
there on March 26, 1874, and Is the son of Jere N. and Mary Elizabeth 
(Screw*) Williams, and grandson of J. S. and Effie (McNeill) Williams, 
and of Benjamin and Mourning (Drake) Screws, and the great-grandson 
of John Screws, of Nash county, N. C, and of James Drake, an early Ala- 
bama settler, who was killed by the Indians. His father was a major in 
the Confederate army, later a member of the State Legislature, a member 
of the Constitutional Convention, 1901, a member of Congress from the 3rd 
district, and chancellor of the S. E. chancery division. Representative 
Williams obtained his early education In the common schools of Clayton; 
graduated with the degree of A. B. at the University of Alabama, 1892; 
read law in his father's office, and was admitted to the bar, by examina- 
tion, at Union Springs; and has since practiced continuously in Clayton. 
He was made mayor of Clayton for an unexpired term in 1896, elected in 
1902, and still holds the position ; was three times enrolling clerk of the 
Legislature of Alabama, to which body he was elected a member in Nov. 
1906. He is a Democrat, having for four years been a member of his 
county executive committee. He is a Methodist; a^iasoh; and is unmar- 
ried. 



BIBB COUNTY. 

JEROME THEODORE FULLER, of Centreville, Bibb county, was born 
October 21, 1874, in that place, and is the son of Nelson and Hannah Me- 
nettle (Rice) Fuller, and the grandson of Martin Jeremiah and Hannah 
(Afenettie) Fuller, and of Henry and Margaret (Elmore) Rice. Martin J. 
Fuller was born In Marlborough county, S. C, and soon after his marriage 
removed to Alabama, and settled near Centreville in 1819. The Rices and 
Elmores resided in Marion, S. C. Nelson Fuller enlisted as a Confederate 
soldier in 1861, and continued actively in the service until Lee's, surrender 
in 1865; was a member of fne Alabama legislature, 1892-93, and 1894-5; 
was elected treasurer of Bibb county in 1900, and re-elected in 1904, and 
now resides In Centreville. Representative Fuller was educated at the 
Centreville male and female college. He read law in the office of Hogue 
and Lavendar ; was admitted to the bar September 6, 1896 ; and Is now a 
member of the law firm of Logan- Vandegraaff & Fuller at Centreville. He 



88 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

has been city attorney of Centreville for eleven terms; and was elected a 
member of the Legislature in November, 1900. He is a Democrat ; a deacon 
in the Presbyterian church ; and a member of the Knights of Pythias. On 
April 21, 1808, at Centreville, he was married to Margaret Kate, daughter 
of James W. and Margaret Elizabeth (Gardner) Owen, of Centreville. Her 
father, J. W. Owen, was clerk of the circuit court of Bibb county for twen- 
ty years. 



BLOUNT COUNTY. 

WILLIS A. WEAVER, of Oneonta, Blount county, was born at Ander- 
sonville, Sumter county, Georgia, October 23, 1878, and is the son of James 
H. and Emily Melissa (Brown) Weaver, and the grandson of Thomas and 
Louisa (Freeman) Weaver, and of Edward and Pulchera (Jenkins) 
Brown. His grandparents on both sides lived at Amerlcus, Georgia. James 
H. Weaver served in company "B,* 11th Georgia Battalion C. S. A., and 
was paroled at Lincolnton, N. C, in April, 1865. Willis A. Weaver re- 
ceived his elementary education at the Avondale public school, and after- 
words attended Wake Forest College, N. C, and the University of Alabama, 
graduating from the law department of the latter in 1003 ; and in the same 
year began the practice of law at Oneonta. He Is a Democrat, and during 
the last two campaigns was secretary of his county executive committee; 
is a Baptist ; a Mason ; and a Knight of Pythias. He married, September 
8, 1905, at Oneonta, Augusta Lewis, daughter of Jesse W. and Elizabeth 
(Montgomery) Ellis, who lived at Blountville. 



BULLOCK COUNTY. 

NORBORNE BERKELY POWELL, of Union Springs, was born at Chun- 
nennuggee, Macon (now Bullock) county, November 30, 1849, and is the 
son of Richard Holmes Powell, a lawyer of Union Springs, and wife Mary 
Ann Blackmon. He was educated at the Union Springs schools. He is a 
merchant ; was city clerk of Union Springs, 1881-1880 ; was a member of 
the general assembly from Bullock county, 1888-89, 1890-91, 1900-01, 1903, 
and was again elected in Nov., 1907. He is a Democrat, and has been a del- 
egate to the several State and district conventions of his party. He is a 
Methodist; and is unmarried. The senior Mr. Powell was the son of Nor- 
bcrne B. Powell, of Monticello, Ga.. and was lieutenant-colonel of the Third 
Alabama Infantry Regiment, C. S. A. Mrs. R. H. Powell- is the sister of 
Colonel Homer Blackmon, late of Bullock county. 

STERLING PRICE' RAINER, of Union Springs, Bullock county, was 
born January 24, 1859, at Bruceville in the same county, and is the son 
of Joel Herron and Roxana (Ellin) Rainer, and the grandson of Jarvies 
and Hannah (Wood) Rainer and of Isaac H. and Betsy (Alford) Ellis, who 
lived near Pine Level, Montgomery county. Joel Herron Rainer came to 
Alabama from Sampson county, North Carolina. In 1800, he represented 
Pike county in the Legislature; enlisted September 15, 1801, as a private 
in company "I," 17th Alabama Infantry Regiment, C. S. A. ; was elected 
first lieutenant after the battle of Shiloh; was soon afterward made cap- 
tain, on Gen. George D. Johnson's staff, a position in which he remained 
until he surrendered at Greensboro, N. C, at the close of the war. He 
farmed until 1809, when he moved to Union Springs and entered the mer- 
cantile business which he followed many years; is now president of the 
merchants' and farmers' bank of that place. S. P. Rainer received his 
early education in the common schools of his county, afterwards entered 
the Eastman Business College, Poughkeepsie, N. Y., and graduated in 1878. 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 89 

For many years he has been largely interested in mercantile and agricul- 
tural pursuits. He is a Democrat, and for more than twelve years has 
been chairman of the 3rd Congressional district committee, and a member 
of the county executive committee; is now a member of the city council of 
Union Springs and a director In the merchants' and farmers' bank. He 
married, March 12, 1884, at Union Springs, Minnie Lee, daughter of Col. 
Issac Ball and Sarah (Hall) Feagan. Col. Feagan was one of the colonels 
of the 15th Alabama Infantry Regiment, and lost a leg during the war; 
served as sheriff of Barbour and Bullock counties after the war; and in 
1880 was elected probate judge of the latter county. 



BUTLER COUNTY. 

WILLIAM JOSEPH JONES, of Butler Springs, was born at Allenton, 
Wilcox county, Sept. 20, 1801, and is the son of William Bonner and Laura 
Alice (Walthall) Jones, and grandson of Joseph and Mary Jones and of 
William and Sarah Walthall. His father's family emigrated from South 
Carolina to Missouri in 1815, and from there to Wilcox county, Ala., four 
years later. His mother's family came to Allenton from Virginia. His 
early education was obtained at Oak Hill, Ala. He afterwards attended the 
University of Alabama, 1880-01; and in 1883 graduated from the Sadler 
Bryant and Stratton Business College, Baltimore, M. D. He is owner and 
proprietor of the Butler Springs Hotel, and is a farmer and a merchant. He 
is a Democrat; a Missionary Baptist; a Mason, and a Knight of Pythias. 
He married Rosa Eleanor, daughter of Joseph B. and Mary Rosanna McWil- 
llams of Oak Hill. 

JOHN LEE LONG, of Greenville, Butler county, was born in that town 
January 12, 18G8, and is the son of John T. Long who lived in Greenville, 
and his wife who was a Miss Thagard. In early life representative Long 
clerked in a store, and then went into business himself as a cotton buyer. 
He has served his city several times as a councilman, treasurer, or as a 
member of the school board; has been chairman of the board of revenue 
for Butler county; has served his county as chairman of the Democratic 
executive committee, and was for some time a member of the State execu- 
tive committee, and also Chairman of the Congressional executive commit- 
tee. He was a member of the Constitutional Convention of 1901. When 
Gov. Joseph F. Johnston was elected Mr. Long was appointed a member 
of his staff, with the rank of lieutenant-colonel. He is a Democrat; and 
is a member of the Episcopal Church. On May 23, 1900, he was married 
to Miss Sal lie Dickerson, of Greenville. 



CALHOUN COUNTY. 

JOSEPH JOHNSTON ARNOLD, of Jacksonville, Calhoun county, was 
born at that place July 27, 1809, and is the son of Dr. James Davis and 
Laura Evelyn (Mc Adams) Arnold, the grandson of Lemuel N. and Sarah 
Walker (A'fcr) Arnold, and of Robert E. W. and Catherine (Tcagtte) Mc- 
Adams, and the great-grandson of Capt. Wm. Arnold, a Revolutionary sol- 
dier who lived in the later years of his life at Elberton, Ga. The McAdams 
and Teague families lived in Abbeville district, S. C. Mr. Arnold attended 
the common schools; and was graduated from the State Normal College 
at Jacksonville in 1887. He was admitted to the bar in 1890; was mayor 
of Jacksonville for three terms, 1892, 1893, and 1894; was elected repre- 
senate in the General Assembly, 1900; re-elected in 1902 and again in 1906. 
He is a Democrat and a Methodist. On January 21, 1903, at Jacksonville, 
Ala., he was married to Gertrude, daughter of Dr. Wm. B. and Mary A. 
Arbery. 



90 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

WILLIAM HENRY COOPER, of Oxford, Calhoun county, was born at 
Benton, Tenn., Jan. 10, 1898, and is the son of William Philip and Elizabeth 
(Cameron) Cooper, and the grandson of Henry and Eliza (Cooke) Cooper, 
and the great-grandson of Philip and Clerinda (Freeman) Cooper^ Mr. 
Cooper's ancestors came to America with Oglethorpe on his second trip in 
the good ship "Phoenix," landing at Charleston, S. C. Robert Cooke, the 
father of Eliza (Cooke) Cooper, served under Washington at Valley Forge 
in 1777, and as a member of the "Ranger of frontiers," in 1778. Through 
his mother, Elizabeth (Cameron) Cooper, Mr. Cooper traces his descent 
from Clan Cameron of Scotland. He was educated In the common schools 
of Ga., at Alexandria academy, Calhoun county, Ala., and at Howard Col- 
lege, Marion, Ala., giaduating in the class of 1878 with the degree of B. S. 
After graduation he assisted in the supervision of his father's farm, inci- 
dentally trading in stock and buying cotton. In 1886 he became a travel- 
ing salesman, continuing so occupied until 1897. After engaging in the 
mercantile business in Oxford for several years, he entered into a brok- 
erage and commission business in Anniston, in which he is now engaged. 
He is a Democrat ; a Baptist ; a Mason ; and has in the past been actively 
associated with the orders of Elks, Knights of Pythias and Red Men. He 
married. May 2, 1898, Frances Estelle, daughter of Chaney Johnson, and 
Ada (Harlinft) Dodd. 



CHAMBERS COUNTY. . 

SYLVANUS LEONIDAS BURNEY, of Lanette, Chambers county, was 
born Aug. 27, 1844, at Forsyth, Forsyth county, Ga., and is the son of James 
Harvey and Caroline Elizabeth (Berry) Burney, who lived at Forsyth. 
Sylvanus L. Burney served in the Western Army from 1861 to 1865. He 
entered upon a farmer's life after the war, in which he has been successful. 
He has affiliated with both the Democratic and Populist parties, and has 
served as a committeeman at various times in each party. He is a steward 
in the Methodist Church; a Royal Arch Mason; and a Knight of Pythias. 
On December 23, 1869, he married Sallie Walker, daughter of William 
Alexander and Elizabeth (Cathron) Jarratt. 

ERNEST McCARTY OLIVER, of Lafayette, Chambers county, was born 
Oct 11, 1856, in that county, and is the son of Samuel Clarke and Mary A. 
E. (Wise) Oliver.. He received his elementary education in the common 
schools of Tallapoosa county : and from 1872 to 1876 attended the A. & M. 
College at Auburn, receiving the degree of A. B. He read law with Oliver 
and Garrett at Dadeville; was admitted to the bar in 1876; and practiced 
law at Rockford till 1877, when he removed to Lafayette, where he has 
since resided. He represented Chambers county in the Legislature, 1900-01 : 
is a Democrat ; and a steward and trustee in the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, South. He married at Auburn, January 9, 1878, Nannie E., 
daughter of Isaac B. Williamson, of Pike county, Georgia. 



CHEROKEJE COUNTY. 

CHARLES RATTRAY, of Jamestown, Cherokee county, was born at Up- 
ham Parish, Kings Province, New Brunswick, British America, on March 
19, 1833, and is the son of James Rattray, who was born at Dunkeld, Perth- 
shire, Scotland. The genealogy of the Rattray family dates back to the 
11th century. They were reformers and were defenders of King Malcolm. 
Mr. Rattray's mother was Lldla Ganter, daughter of William Ganter of 
Sussex Vale, N. B. The Ganters were Dutch, and the Rattrays were 
Highland Scotch. Mr. Rattray's early education was obtained in Upham 
Parish. In 1852 he removed with his father to Illinois, where his education 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 91 

was continued in private schools. He was. a farmer until 1861, at which 
time he enlisted as a private in Co. "I," 12th 111. Inf. Regiment, U. S. A. 
At the expiration of his three months' service, he re-enlisted as 1st ser- 
geant. He was commissioned captain in 1862, and later major and lieut. 
col.; was brevetted col. by U. S. Senate; mustered out of service, July, 
1865, at Ridgeway, Ky. In 1868 be came to reside in Alabama and estab- 
lished himself as a farmer and a contractor. He served In <the Legislature 
cf Ala., 1888-89, and voted, among other things, for an appropriation to erect 
a monument commemorative of the valor of Confederate dead. For forty 
years he has been a Democrat. During the political strife of Reconstruc- 
tion days Mr. Rattray spoke in nine counties against the crimes of the 
party in power. He is an Odd Fellow. In 1873, at Gaylesville, he married 
Theodora, daughter of Dr. Abbott Milton and his wife Mahala Jane (Da- 
vis) McWhorter. 



CHILTON COUNTY. 

JOHN OSMOND MIDDLETON, of Clanton, Chilton county, was born 
Sept. 25, 1882, in Montgomery county, and is the son of William Armstrong 
and Catherine Hunter (Colvin) Middleton, and grandson of Augustus 
Washington and Eliza (Oause) Middleton. His maternal grand-parents 
were Col. Robert and- Catherine (Hurst) Colvin. William Armstrong Mid- 
dleton was a Confederate soldier, being a captain in the 23rd Ala. Battalion. 
Grade's Brigade. Among the other distinguished relatives of Mr. Middle- 
ton may be mentioned Arthur Middleton, signer of the Declaration of Inde- 
pendence, Augustus Washington Middleton who was in the war of 1812, 
and the Indian War of 1836. Col. Charles Henry Colvin of the cavalry 
service in the C. S. A., and William Rufus King, U. S. Senator, and Minister 
to Spain, and Vice-President of the U. S. Mr. Middleton received his early 
education at Clanton ; In June, 1903, he graduated with the degree of LL. 
B. at the State University. In the same year, he entered upon the practice 
of law at Clanton. In 190* he was made mayor of that place, and in 1905 
was elected solicitor of Chilton county. He Is a Republican; a Methodist; 
and a member of the Signa Alpha Epsilon fraternity. He is unmarried. 



CHOCTAW COUNTY. 

WALLACE HENRY LINDSEY, of Butler, Choctaw county, was born 
Oct. 8, 1872, at Gaston, Sumter county, and is the son of Henry Thompson 
and Martha Jane Lindsey. His grandparents were Bills and Martha Lind- 
sey and Daniel and Jennie Wallace. The Wallaces were of Irish stock. 
Henry T. Lindsty was a lieut. In Co. "C," 54th Ala. Infantry Regiment, and 
served in the Confederate army from 1861 to 1865. Wallace H. Lindsey 
was educated in the common schools of Choctaw county, and at Chapel Hill 
Academy, DeSotoville. In 1905 he began the practice of the law at Butler, 
having prepared himself in this profession by reading while clerk of the 
circuit court of Choctaw county, to which office he was elected in 1898, and 
re-elected In 1904. In 1905, he resigned this position to enter upon the 
practice of the law. He is a Democrat; a Methcdist; a Knight of Pythias; 
a Woodman of the World ; and a Royal Arch Mason. He taught in the 
public schools of Choctaw county from 1891 to 1898. In 1904, he married 
Maggie, daughter of William B. and Janie Gilmer, of Butler. 



CLARKE COUNTY. 

JOHN DANIEL DOYLE, of Salitpa, Clarke county, was born May 1, 
1854, near Thomasvlile, Clarke county, and is the son of Bartlett Smith 
and Eliza S. (Bonier) Doyle, and the grandson of Jesse and Mary Jane 



92 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

(Barr), all of Clarke county; and of John W. and Mary (Abney) Bouler, 
from S. C, to Clarke county. Bartlett Smith Doyle served in the Confede- 
rate army. John D. Doyle received his education in the country schools of 
Clarke county. In 1802 he was elected one of the board of county commis- 
sioners, and as such served several years. He is a Democrat and has been 
a member of the Democratic county committee for twenty-five years; is a 
clerk in a Missionary Baptist Church; and a member of the Masonic frater- 
nity. On December 26, 1878, he married Irene Elizabeth, a daughter of 
Samuel David and Mary Miller, who lived near Coffeeville. 

ISAAC PUGH, of Grove Hill, Clarke county, was borri January 10, 1868. 
near his present residence, and is the son of Jesse Pickens and Sophia 
Melissa (Bettis) Pugh, natives of Clarke county, and the grandson of Isaac 
and Hannah Pugh, and Zack and Elizabeth Bettis, who lived at Grove Hill. 
Mr. Pugh was educated at King Institute, Grove Hill; was connected with 
the Clarke County Democrat for several years ; in 1900 retired to his farm ; 
in 1898 was made chairman of the Clarke county Democratic executive 
committee, and served also on the first Congressional district executive com- 
mittee of his party; in 1902 he was chosen to represent Clarke county in 
the Legislature, and re-elected in 1906. He wa3 a United States commis- 
sioner frcm 1901 to 1902.. He is a Democrat, and a Missionary Baptist. 
He is now a merchant at Grove Hill. He is not married. 



CLAY COUNTY. 

JOHN DUNCAN CARMCHAEL, of Meadow, was born December 18, 
1845, at Brownsville, Ala., and is the son of Daniel and Margaret (Monroe) 
Carmlchael. His paternal grandfather was John Carmichael, who lived 
at Madison, Fla., and his mother's father was Duncan Monroe of Talladega 
county. Mr. Carmichael is of Scotch and Welsh ancestry. His education 
was obtained in the common schools. He is a farmer ; a Methodist ; and a 
Democrat. For several terms he served his party as a member of the 
county executive committee; was justice of the peace for twelve years; 
county commissioner from 1896 to 1900, and a member of the legislature 
for the sessions of 1882-3 and 1900-01, and again in 1907. During the war 
he served as a private in Co. "B," 62nd Ala. Infantry Regiment. He mar- 
ried in 1870, Lucy Olivet, daughter of Chilton A. and Mary Williams, of 
Meadow, Ala. 



CLEBURNE COUNTY. 

JOHN ALEXANDER BROWN, of Bell Mills, was born October 20, 1863, 
near Buchanan, Haralson county, Ga., and is the son of Seaborn Solomon 
and Martha Finch (Atkinson) Brown, natives of Georgia, and grandson of 
Archibald and Martha Atkinson, of Henry county, Ga. Mr. Brown at- 
tended the common schools and the college at Bowdon, Georgia, but did 
not graduate. He is now engaged in merchandising, milling and farming. 
He is a stockholder in the Bank of Heflin, and is the largest individual tax 
payer in the county. He is a Democrat, and was elected a representative 
to the Legislature in November, 1902, and re-elected in November, 1906. He 
Is a Missionary Baptist. On December 25, 1880. he was married to Lillian,* 
daughter of Richard and Mollle Vance, of Graham, Ala. 



COFFEE COUNTY. 

RICHARD HENRY ARRINGTON, of Enterprise, Coffee county, was born 
Nov. 20, 1872, near Montgomery, and is the son of Judge Thomas 
Mann and Mary R. (Goldthicaite) Arrington, a native of Nash county, N. 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 93 

C, and grandson of Sam L. and Eliza (McKalson) Arlington, who 
came from N. C, to Montgomery, Ala., and of Judge (and U. S. Senator) 
George and Olivia (Wallach) Goldthwaite of Montgomery. Judge Ar- 
rington was lieutenant-colonel Thirty-first Alabama Regiment, C. S. A., and 
after the War was long judge of the city court of Montgomery. Mr. 
Arrington attended the public schools of Montgomery and Dr. Hall's high 
school at Culpepper, Va. He was admitted to the bar at Montgomery in 
April, 1896, but located in Elba to practice. In 1809 Mr. Arrington was 
nominated as a delegate to the proposed Constitutional Convention of that 
year. Since 1898 he has been a member of the Democratic State executive 
committee, and in 1900 was elected to the Senate from the twenty-flfth dis 
trict. On February 17th, 1903, at Timmonsville, Florence county, S. C, 
he was married to Pauline Seabrook, daughter of Robert Alfred and Flor- 
ence Elizabeth (Cole) White, of Chesterfield, S. C. 



COLBERT COUNTY. 

ARCHIBALD HILL CARMICHAEL, of Tuscumbia, Colbert county, Ala- 
bama, was bom June 17, 18(54, at Sylvan Grove, Dale county, and is the 
son of Jesse M. and Amanda J. (Smith) Carmichael, and grandson of Dan- 
iel and Martha A. {Colerrtan) Carmichael, and of Wesley and Margaret 
Smith, who lived at Columbus, Georgia. Jesse M. Carmichael was a na- 
tive of Macon county, Georgia, served in the Confederate army; has been 
a member of both houses of the Alabama Legislature ; and has been State 
auditor, judge of the 3rd circuit; president Board of Convict Inspectors, 
and probate judge of Dale county. Archibald H. Carmichael received his 
primary education in the common schools of Dale county; attended the 
University of Alabama, from which he was graduated in 1886, with the 
degree of A. B. and LL. B. He has been solicitor of the district court of 
Colbert and Lauderdale counties, solicitor of the 11th judicial circuit, 1894- 
8, and was a member of the Constitutional Convention of 1901. He is a 
Democrat and for many years has been chairman of his county committee; 
is a steward in the Methodist Episcopal Church, South ; and is a Mason 
and a Knight of Pythias. He married January 21, 1890, at Tuscumbia. 
Annie, daughter of Thomas Herbert and Mary E. Sugg. 



CONECUH COUNTY. 

JESSE D. McCRORY, of Bowles, Conecuh county, was bcrn 
August 11th, 1866, near Butler Springs, Butler county, Alabama, 
and is the son of William M. and Mary Ella (Wttgnon) McCrory. 
and the grandson of Thomas McCrory, and of William C and Jane Wag- 
non. William M. McCrory was born in South Carolina; and served three 
years and six months in the War of Secession; was captured at Mobile 
and kept prisoner at Ship Island three months, guarded by negro soldiers; 
now lives near Stallings, Alabama. William C. Wagnon was also a Con- 
federate soldier. Jesse D. McCrory was educated in the common schools 
of the county. He has been a farmer and a mill man all his life; and 
during the last six years has been the agent of the Mutual Life Insurance 
Company of New York. He is a Democrat, having served as a committee- 
man of the party. He is a member cf the Baptist Church; and a member 
of the Masonic Lodge in Evergreen. On October 28, 1886, near Bowles, he 
was married to Fannie D., daughter of George and Lucindie Kyser. George 
Kyser was born in S. C. July 23, 1815, and, in 1836, served in the Indian 
War; was also a Confederate soldier, and still lives near Bowies, hale and 
vigorous at the age of ninety-two. 



94 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

COOSA COUNTY. 

JOHN WILLIS JOHNSON, cf Lauderdale] Coosa county, was born No- 
vember 19, 1846, near Nixburg, Coosa county, and is the son of George John- 
son, a native of Edgefield, S. C, and wife Elizabeth, daughter of Jesse and 
Sallie Suttle, of Cer.treville, Bibb county. Mr. Johnson was educated in 
Pine Grove, Fishpond, and Woodland academies in Coosa county ; was clerk 
In a dry goods store 1870-71, and later became a farmer. He was a justice 
of the peace 1880-1892. He enlisted in the Alabama Reserves, Company 
"C," 62nd Alabama Regiment, Infantry, C. S. A., was engaged in the bat- 
tles of Spanish Fort and Blakely; was captured in the latter April 9, 1865, 
and imprisoned for a month on Ship Island. He is a Democrat; and a Prim- 
itive Baptist. He was married (1) on March 14, 1872, to Elizabeth MatiMa, 
daughter of William L. and Louisa Thompson, of Nixburg, Coosa county; 
and again, Dec. 1, 1903, he was married to Alice, daughter of Albert and 
Sarah Thomas. 



COVINGTON COUNTY. 

ABNER RILEY POWELL, of Andalusia, was born at that place. Dec- 
ember 12, 1875, and his father, N. B. Powell, was a Georgian by birth. His 
mother was the daughter of John Smith, of Andalusia, but a native of Geor- 
gia. Mr. Powell's education was obtained in the common schools of his 
native town. He studied law at the University of Alabama. His profes- 
sion, prior to his adoption .of the law, was journalism. In 1895 he assumed 
the editorship of the Covington Times, and in 1897 be and M. S. Carmichael 
established the Elba Clipper. Seven years later he returned from Elba 
to Andalusia, where he now practices law. He is a Democrat ; a Mason, 
and a Knight of Pythias. He is unmarried. 



CRENSHAW COUNTY. 

MADISON WEBSTER RUSHTON, of Luverne, was born. October 5, 1858, 
in Montgomery county, and is the son of Basil Manly Rushton, a native 
of Edgefield district, S. C, who resided at Dublin, Montgomery county, and 
wife Sarah Elizabeth, daughter of Rev. Norman Urquhart, who lived at 
the same place. Mr. Rushton attended the common schools of Montgomery 
county, and was graduated from the law department of the University of 
Alabama, 1886, with the degree of LL. B. He began the practice at Rut- 
ledge, but removed in 1893 to Luverne; was county solicitor for Crenshaw 
from 1886-1898; was appointed register in chancery for that county in L887 
and held the place until 1898; was a councilman of Luverne from 1899 for 
two years ; has been city attorney of that town since 1901 ; was elected rep- 
resentative in the legislature in 1902, and re-elected in November, 1906. He 
is one of the directors and also cashier of the Bank cf Luverne. He is a, 
deacon in the Baptist Church, and superintendent of the Luverne Church 
Sunday-school. He is unmarried. 



CULLMAN COUNTY. 

GEORGE HENDERSON PARKER, of Cullman, was born September 17, 
1852, at Cincinnati, and Is the son of Thomas Henderson Parker, a native 
of Dorchester, Mass., and wife Mary Johanna, daughter of Daniel and 
Alice Eliza Cheever, of Providence, R. I., and Wrentham, Mass. Mr. Parker 
was educated in the common schools of Highland county, Ohio; at Wash- 
ington Street public school at Roxbury, Mass., and at Roxbury High School. 
He was admitted to the bar at Hillsboro, Ohio, in 1873, and at Blountsville, 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 95 

• 

Ala,, in 1875; he began the banking business at Cullman in 1884 as the 
senior member of the firm of Parker & Co. ; was clerk of the city court 
of Cullman 1875-77, and mayor 1889-97, being re-elected in 1901. He was 
a delegate to the constitutional convention of 1901 from the third senato- 
rial district, was chairman of the committee on State and county bounda- 
ries, and a member of the committee on suffrage and elections In that 
body; at the November election of 1902, was elected representative in the 
Legislature, and re-elected in November, 1906. He is a Democrat and an 
Episcopalian. . On June 16, 1874, at Hillsboro, Ohio, he was married to Cora 
Alice, daughter of Dr. George and Sarah (West) Heidelberg, of that town. 



DALE COUNTY. 

HENRY BASCOM STEAGALL, of Ozark, Dale county, was born at 
Clopton, in that county, May 19, 1873, and is the son of William Colins- 
worth and Mary Jane (Peacock) Steagall, and the grandson of Ivey Finch 
and Sidney (Purifoy) Steagall, and of Alex and Harriet Peacock. Mr. 
Steagairs father Is a physician ; has been a State senator ; enlisted in the 
cavalry branch of the Confederate service under W. T. McCall In 1861, but 
did not serve. His grandfather, Ivey F. Steagall, was a Methodist minis- 
ter in the Georgia conference, coming to that State from Virginia, and, 
originally, from Great Britain. One of his paternal ancestors was fatally 
wounded during the Revolutionary War at Charleston. Henry Steagairs 
education was obtained in the common schools of his county and at the 
Scutheast Alabama Agricultural School, at Abbeville, where he graduated 
in June, 1892. He is also an alumnus of the law school of the University of 
Ala., having graduated there, June, 1893. He was admitted to the bar at Un- 
ion Springs in the summer of the same year, and has since that time prac- 
ticed his profession at Ozark. In 1898 he was appointed county solicitor 
which position he still holds. He has always been an active Demccrat. 
serving his party both on county and State committees. He is a Method- 
ist; is a member of the Masonic order, and of the Si$ma Nu fraternity, 
On Dec. 27, 1900, he married Sal lie Mae, daughter of William Philip and 
Mary (Jordan) Thompson, of Tuskegee, Ala. Mr. Thompson was a Con- 
federate soldier. 



DALLAS COUNTY. 

ROBERT RUTLAND KORNEGAY, of Selma, Dallas county, was born 
July 28, 1863, at Van Dorn (near Demopolls) and Is the son of Charles 
and Flora Louise (Rutland) Kornegay, who lived on a canebrake planta- 
tion. "Van Dorn," and the grandson of Bryan and Margaret (Williams) 
Kornegay, of Goldsboro, N. C, and of Ben and Mary (Pickett) Rutland, 
who removed to Mobile from North Carolina. Mrs. Mary Pickett Rutland 
was a first <»ousin of Col. Albert J. Pickett, the Alabama historian. Mr. 
Kornegay, through his mother, is a direct descendent of one of the Dukes 
of Rutland. Mr: Kornegay was educated in private schools in Demopolls, 
at Harvard College. Marion, and at Moore's business college, Atlanta. He 
Is engaged in the mercantile, brokerage and commission business, and has 
been a member of the city council of Selma for two terms. He is a Dem- 
ocrat; a Baptist; and an Elk. His wife, to whom he was married July 30, 
1889, is Mamie, daughter of Robert and Mary Daniel (Montague) Bates, 
of Perry county. Mary Daniel Montague Is a direct descendent of Drago 
de Montague, who figured conspicuously in the service of William. Duke 
of Normandy, in his conquest of England in the eleventh century. 

SAMUEL CHAPMAN LACY, of Valegrande, Dallas county, was born 
In that county, August 5, 1#79, and Is the son of Theophilus and Mary 



96 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

4 

Newell (Pettus) Lacy, and the grandson of Theophilus and Fannie (Bin- 
ford) Lacy, and of Edmund Winston and Mary Lucinda (Chapman) Pet- 
tus, who lived at Selma. Theophilus Lacy, Sr., lived at Huntsville. His 
son, Theophilus, was born in Huntsville, but when grown, moved to Dal- 
las county, where he became a planter. He served in the 4th Alabama 
Cavalry Regiment, C. S. A., from November, 1864, to April, 1865. Samuel 
C. Lacy's great-great-grandfather, Lacy, was an emigrant from England, set- 
tling first In Virginia, then in North Carolina ; his maternal ancestors, the 
Pettuses, Chapmans and Winstcns, also came from England and set- 
tled in Virginia. Many of the members of these were men of distinction. 
Gen. Edmund W. Pettus, his grandfather, was one of the most gallant brig- 
adiers in the Confederate army, and is now United States Senator from 
Alabama. (See sketch supra.) Samuel Chapman Lacy received his pri- 
mary education in the common country schools. In January, 1897, he en- 
tered the Marion Military Institue, but did not graduate. Since leaving 
school he has followed the occupation of farming, almost continuously. He 
Is a Democrat. On January 23, 1901, he was married at Jones' Switch, 
Autauga county, to Evelyn Furnlss, daughter of Alexander Preston and 
Pallie Letitia (HarviUe) Hogg, the former a lineal descendant of James 
Hogg, the "Ettrick Shepherd." 

ALEXANDER DAVIDSON PITTS, of Selma, Dallas county, 
was born Feb. 4, 1851, at Uniontown, Perry county. His father 
was Philip Henry Pitts, who moved to Alabama, from Virginia 
in 1833, and his mother was Mary Margaret, daughter of John 
Howard and Martha (Caldwell) Davidson. His paternal grand- 
parents were Thomas Daniel and Mary (Gray) Pitts. The Pitts 
family came from England, and settled in New York, but removed 
to Essex county, Va., before 1700. The Grays came from Scotland to. Vir- 
ginia. John Davidson, an ancestor of Alexander D. Pitts, moved from 
Pennsylvania to Mecklenburg county, N. C. His son was a signer of the 
Mecklenburg Declaration cf Independence, and he himself was a nnjor 
in the Revolutionary War. The Caldwells came from Scotland to N. C, 
and were conspicuous in the Revolution. Representative Pitts attended 
the common schools in Uniontown. and was prepared for college by chat 
famous educator, Henry Tutwiler, at Greene Springs. He entered Davidson 
College, N. C, in the fall of 1868, and graduated there in 1872; in 1879 was 
admitted to the bar at Uniontown, where he practiced until 1893, when he 
removed to Selma, where he now resides. In 1875, he was appointed tax- 
assessor for Perry county; and he represented that county in the Legisla- 
ture of 1888-9. He is a Democrat, having served his party as county chair- 
man during the Joues-Kolb gubernatorial campaign. He is a Presbyterian; 
a Mason; and a Knight of Pythias . On Feb. 24th, 1886, at Eutaw, Greene 
county, he married Juliet, daughter of Jchn Samuel and Alice (Coleman) 
Merriwether. 



DeKALB COUNTY. 

WILLIAM HARVEY ELROD, of Ft. Payne, DeKalb county, was born 
Sept. 24, 1855i. at Golden Springs, S. C, and Is the son of David Daniel, 
and his wife Jane (Oiren) Elrod, and the grandson of Philip and Temple 
Elrod, of South Carolina, and Lewis and Dorcas Owen of the same State. 
William H. Elrod was educated in the common schools of his county. He 
was postmaster at Ft. Payne from 1880 to 1904. He is a Democrat, and was 
a member of the Democratic State executive committee of 1892. He is a 
Methodist; a Mason, and a Knight of Pythias. On Jan. 12. 1879, at South 
Hill, DeKalb county, he married Martha G., daughter of Philip and Annie 
Gilbert, formerly of N. C. 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 97 

ELMORE COUNTY. 

WILLIAM LYCURGUS LANCASTER, of Wetumpka, Elmore county, was 
born near Tallassee, in the same county, March 4, 1869, and is the son of 
the late Judge John Austin and Frances Aldora (Lett) Lancaster, of We- 
tumpka, and grandson of R. P. and Minerva (Ramsey) Lett, of Elmore 
county. He was educated in the common schools of Elmore county, at the 
United States Naval Academy, Annapolis, Md., but resigned, owing to phys- 
ical disability, before graduation. Mr. Lancaster farmed in Wilcox and 
Marengo counties two years; merchandised in Wetumpka eight years; and 
organized the Bank of Wetumpka, of which he is now the cashier and man- 
ager. He still has farming and stock raising interests in Elmore county. 
He has served as a member of the Democratic executive committee of El- 
more county, and of the fifth congressional district ; has been alderman and 
city treasurer of Wetumpka ; is a trustee of the Southern University, 
Greensboro; and a member of the Methodist Epispocal Church, South. On 
April 20, 1892, at Kellyton, Ccosa county, he was married to Bessie, daugh- 
ter of Ben Lloyd and Mary (Hester) Gaddis of that place. • 

LAMAR CANTALOU SMITH, of Tallassee, was born Feb. 12, 1871, at 
Montgomery, and is the son of James Monroe and Narcissa (Douglas) 
Smith, and the grandson of George Wr*ght and Mary (Campbell) Smith, 
of Wetumpka, and of William and Mary Elizabeth (Small) Douglas, who 
lived at Wetumpka, but were natives of Edinburgh, Scotland. James Smith 
was a citizen of \vetumpka practically his whole life; was a commission 
merchant; and served in the War of Secessien as a courier in the 3rd Ala- 
Infantry Regiment. His son, Lamar Cantelou Smith, was educated in the 
public schools of Wetumpka ; is a merchant and a farmer ; was clerk of 
circuit court of Elmore county from 1898 to 1902; was post-master at We- 
tumpka from 1893 to 1899 ; is a Democrat and a member of the county exe- 
cutive committee. He is a Presbyterian ; an Odd Fellow, and a Red Man ; 
and belongs to the Farmers' Union. He was married at Wetumpka in April, 
1892, to Sarah Evans, daughter of George Bernard and Sarah (Webb) 
Judkins, of Macon county. 



ESCAMBIA COUNTY. 

JOSEPH HENRY LEE HENLEY, of Bradley, Escambia county, was born 
June 21, 18G4, at Macon, Bibb county, Ga. His father, Abraham S. Henley, 
was a native of Randolph county, N. C. His paternal grand-parents were 
Henry and Nancy Henley, also of N. C; and his mother was Martha 
Angeline (King) Henley, daughter of Joseph and Mary King, of Hender- 
sonville, N. C. Mr. Henley's father served as a lieutenant in the War of 
Secession. Representative Henley was educated in the common schools. 
He is a farmer; a Democrat; a Missionary Baptist; and a Mason. He was 
in the Legislatures of 1896. and 1900. His wife, to whom he was married 
Oct. 28, 1886, is Mary Matilda, daughter of Darby and Mary Swinney, of 
Bradley, Ala. Mr. Swinney was a Confederate soldier. 



ETOWAH COUNTY. 

ALTO VELO LEE, JR., of Gadsden, was born July 28, 1876, at Clyaton, 
Barbour county, and is the son of Alto Velo and Lillian (Lawrence) Lee, 
and the grandson of Lovard and Susan B. (Lovelace) Lee and of William 
Haywood and Lucy (Anthony) Lawrence. (See sketch of L. H. Lee supra, 
for furtner data.) The early education of Alto V. Lee, Jr., was received 
in Clayton academy. He was graduated from the State University in 1897 



98 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

with the degree of A. B. ; was appointed a fellowship student in 1898 : grad- 
uated with the M. A. degree, 1899 ; was elected commandant of the Univer- 
sity 1902, 1903, and received the degree of LL. B. in 1893 ; was principal of 
Clio public school, 1897-1898; principal of Attalla public school, 1899-1902. 
Since 1902 he has been a practicing attorney in Gadsden. He is a Democrat 
and was secretary of the campaign committee of Etowah county, 1904. He 
is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South ; and a Mason and an 
and Anna Lavinia (Hudspeth) Frost. 

HENRY PAYNE SMITH, of Keener, Etowah county, was born July 11, 
1867, near the place at which he now resides. His father, Thomas Fielding 
Smith, a native of Newberry, S. C„ was a Confederate soldier, having en- 
listed under Capt. Edwards in Co. "G," 49th Alabama Infantry Regiment. 
His mother was Cinderella Florence, daughter of Jehu and Mary Coats, of 
S. C, the former a school teacher. Mr. Smith was educated at the country 
schools in his county, and at Walnut Grove college, from which institution 
he graduated in 1893. . His education, both in the elementary schools and 
At college, was obtained chiefly through his own industry in farm labor 
and in teaching. He is a farmer, and a merchant; was appointed census- 
taker 1880; and a member of the board of education of Etowah county, 
1893. He is a Democrat; a Missionary Baptist; a Mason, a Knight of 
Pythias, and an Odd Fellow. On June 27, 1895, he married Ida Jane, 
daughter of Green B. and Mary J. Guest, of Keener, but natives of Georgia. 



FAYETTE COUNTY. 

WILLIAM MORROW CANNON, of Fayette, Fayette county, was born 
at New Lexington, Tuskaloosa county, March 15, 1865. His parents were 
Thomas Sidney and Mary Ellen (Morrow) Cannon. His grand-parents 
were Isaac and Sarah (Barbee) Cannon of Tuscaloosa county, and Jas. 
Morton and Catherine White (Paden) Morrow, of Fayette county." His 
paternal grand-father and both his grand-mothers were South Carolinians 
by birth. His maternal grand-father came from N. C, to Fayette county, 
and served as sheriff of that county for a term. Thomas S. Cannon was a 
Confederate soldier. Representative Cannon received his education at the 
Fayette high school, and thereafter followed the occupation of farming un- 
til he became a merchant. He served on the board of education of Fayette 
for three years, 1901-3. He is a Democrat, and a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, South. On November 29. 1892, he was marri€d to Mary 
Jane, daughter of Lewis Porter and H. J. (Moore) Humber of Fayette. 



FRANKLIN COUNTY. 

BENJAMIN HARRIS SMITH, of Newburg, Franklin county, was born 
March 8, 1883, at that place, and is the son of James Wm. Clark and his 
wife Elizabeth Caroline (Knight) Smith. His father was captain of Co. 
"H," 16th Alabama Infantry Regiment, receiving a wound at Knoxvilie, 
Tenn., which caused blindness for the remainder of his life. His grand- 
parents w re James and Nancy (M aliens) Smith, and Carlisle Woodson and 
Caroline Cordelia (Jackson) Knight, who lived at Mt. Pleasant, Tenn. Mr. 
Smith's great-grandfather, Matthew Smith, served in the Revolutionary 
War, and was at the battle of King's Mountain. James Smith, the grand- 
father of Benjamin Smith, served in the War of 1812, under Gen. Andrew 
Jackson. Mr. Smith has two brothers who are surgeon in the U. S. N., one 
of them being Dr. Reginald K. Smith, who serv€d on the Baltimore in the 
battle of Manila Bay, and who dressed the wounds of the Americans 
woundefl in that battle. Representative Smith's education was obtained 
in the common schools of his native town; and he is at present (1907) 
studying law. For the past six years he has been teaching in Franklin 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 99 

county. He is a Democrat, having served as a member of his county com- 
mittee; and was a member of the State convention, 1904. He is a member 
cf the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. On December 27, 1905, he was 
married to Laura Effie, daughter of William and Laura Frances (Henly) 
Sugg of New burg. 



GENEVA COUNTY. 

JOHN McRAE ALFRED, of Hartford, was born at Carolina, Marlon 
county, S. C, Sept. 21, 1861. His father was Paisley Alford who served 
In the Confederate army at Charleston, and his mother was Martha 
(McRae) Alford. His grandparents were Sion and Catherine (McPhaul) 
Alford and John and Mary (Mclnnis) McRae, of Richmond county, N. C. 
Representative Alford's education was obtained in the common schools of 
S. C, and at the Wallace high school, Wallace, N. C. His earliest vocation 
was farming, but he has since become largely interested in banking and 
mercantile interests. He is a Democrat; a Presbyterian; a Mason, and a 
Knight of Pythias. On Feb. 18, 1894, at Claxton, Ga., he married Lelia, 
daughter of Mitchel J. and Annie Jane (Beasley) Green. 



GREENE COUNTY. 

WILLIAM BULLOCK BALTZELL, of Greene county, Alabama, was 
born at Union in that county August 6, 1849, and is the son of Thomas and 
Panthea Mary (Bullock) Baltzeil and the grandson of Thomas and Cath- 
erine Baltzell and of Wliliam and Panthea Coleman (Burchett) Bullock, 
of Petersburg, Va. Thomas Baltzell, Sr., was an emigrant to Pennsylva- 
nia from Alsace-Lorraine. His son, Thomas, was born in Waynesboro, 
Green county, Pennsylvania. He became a physician. When about 22 
years old he emigrated South, and finally, after many years, settled in 
Greene county. The Bullock family were of Scotch descent, and originally 
settled in Granville county, N. C. Representative Baltzell was educated 
in the country schools of his county. lie is a merchant and farmer. He 
is a Democrat ; but has never sought or held office until elected to the Leg- 
islature of 1907. He is a member of the Knights of Pythias; and is un- 
married. 



HALE COUNTY. 

HAMILTON GRAHAM BENNERS, of Greensboro, Hale county, was 
born at that place May 8, 1868. His father was Augustus Benners, a law- 
yer, who was at one time a member of the Legislature from Greene county. 
His paternal grandparents were Lucas Jacob and Fanny Benners of N. C. 
Mr. Benners' mother was Jane, daughter of Alfred and Elizabeth (Vail) 
Hatch, of Areola, Marengo county. Representative Benners was educated 
in Greensboro, graduating in 1888 with the degree of A. M. from the South- 
ern University. He located In Greensboro; studied law and was admitted 
to the bar in 1890; became editor of the Alabama Beacon in 1892, a po- 
sition he still retains. He is a Democrat; and an Episcopalian. He 
married Feb. 25, 1897, Annie LeVert, daughter of Charles Augustus and 
Mary (LcVcrt) Poellnltz, of Greensboro. 

ALFRED MOORE TUNSTALL, of Greensboro, was born at that place, 
October 2. 1863, and is the son of Wiley C. and Augusta Elizabeth (Hob- 
son) Tunstall, also of Greensboro, and the grandson of James L. and Eliza 
Ann (Croom) Tunstall, and of Matthew and Elizabeth (Mungcr) Hobson, 
of Greensboro, and the great-grandson of Wiley J. Croom, of the same 
place. The Tunstall family came from King William county, Va., to Hale 



100 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

county (then Greene). Representative Tunstall was educated in the schools 
of Greensboro, and at the Southern University. Later he entered the Uni- 
versity of Alabama and graduated with the degree of B. E M 1883, and LL. 
B., 1884. He is a practicing lawyer in Greensboro. He has been a mem- 
ber of the Legislature of Alabama, 1896-97, 1898-99, 1900-1901. 1903, and in 
November 1906, was re-elected. During the session of 1900-1901, after the 
death of Hon. Francis L. Pettus, Mr. Tunstall was elected speaker pro tern; 
and at the session of 1903 he was speaker. He is a Democrat, and is un- 
married. 



HENRY COUNTY. 

JULIUS WILLIAM MALONE. of Abbeville, Henry county, was born 
March 18, 1832, at Pennfleld, Greene county, Georgia, and is the sou of 
Young Gressom and Mary (Price) Malone. and the grandson of 
Ephriam Price, who lived in Greene county, Georgia. He was educated 
in the country schools of Greene, Butts and Randolph counties, Georgia; 
and served four years in the War of Secession. In 1874, he entered the 
Baptist ministry, and has since served a number of churches in Southeast 
Alabama and Southwest Georgia ; and has also been interested in farming. 
He is a Democrat. In 1857, near Abbeville, he was married to Narcy Ann, 
daughter of Peter M. and Martha Ann Thomas, of Henry county, Alabama. 

J. R. VANN, of Headland (R. F. D. No. 3), Henry county, was born near 
Abbeville, Sept. 9, 1871, and is the son of W. C. H. and Martha (Kennedy) 
Vann and the grandson of William Wesley and Ruth (Kennedy) Vann and 
of Robert and Martha (Gamble) Kennedy. Robert Kennedy was an Irish 
immigrant. The Gamble and Vann families are of Scotch-Irish descent. 
W. C. H. Vann served as a private soldier in the Confederate army; was 
captured at Mobile, and held as a prisoner of War for several months at 
Ship Island. Representative Vann attended the Southeast Alabama Agri- 
cultural school, and afterwards the A. P. I. at Auburn until his junior year. 
In 1896 entered the Medical Department of the University of Alabama, 
from which he was graduated in 1899. Since graduation has been con- 
tinuously in the practice of medicine at Brown's Cross Roads; is also 
largely interested in mercantile and farming interests. Dr. Vann is a Ma- 
son and a Knight of Pythias. 



HOUSTON COUNTY. 

WILLIAM LOVARD LEE, of Columbia, Houston county, was born April 
17, 1873, at Clayton, Barbour county. He is the son of Alto V. Lee, so- 
licitor of the 3rd judicial circuit for 18 years, and captain in the Confeder- 
ate army, and of Llllie (Lawrence) Lee. (For further ancestral facts see 
sketch of his brother L. H. Lee supra). His early education was obtained 
in the public schools of Clayton. Later, he entered the University of Ala- 
bama where, in 1892, he graduated. He read law with Lee & Lee, of 
Clayton, and entered upon the practice of his profession, Dec. 28, 1895, at 
the town in which he now resides. He was city attorney, 1897-99; mayor, 
1899-1903 ; and is member of the Legislature, 1907. He is a Democrat, hav- 
ing served his party as a member of the executive committee of Henry 
county, 1896-98, 1901-03 ; as chairman of same, 1898-99 ; and as member and 
secretary of executive committee, Houston county, 1903 to 1906. He is a 
Methodist; a Mason, and a Knight of Pythias. In 1896, he married Ellen 
daughter of Peter F. and Ellen (Caasady) Thomas, of Lawrenceville, Ala., 
the former a Confederate soldier. 






LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 101 

JACKSON COUNTY. 

JAMES ARMSTRONG, of Scottsboro, Jackson county, was born at Hllls- 
boro, Lawrence county, Sept. 7, 1855, and is the son of James and Mrs. 
Lucy (McKissick) Campbell Armstrong, and the grandson of Arthur and 
Jane Armstrong, and of Col. A. and Susan McKissick, who lived in Missis 7 
sippi. The Armstrongs were related to the famous Harrison family of 
Virginia which gave to the country two presidents; while the McKissicks 
were relatives of Gen. Winchester of the Revolutionary War. Represen- 
tative Armstrong was educated in the common schools of Scottsboro, and 
at the East Tennessee University at Knoxville, Tenn. He established the 
Scottsboro Citizen in 1877, and has published it continuously since. He 
was elected to the Legislature in November, 1906. During the 53rd and 59th 
Congresses he held a government position in Washington. He is a Demo- 
crat ; a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church ; a Knight of Honor, and 
a Knight of Pythias. On May 18, 1880, he was married, at Decatur, to 
Ma lie, daughter of Phil H. and Lizzie N. Henderson. 

JAMES STOCKTON BENSON, of Langston, Jackson county, was born 
on Oct. 4, 1883, in the town where he now resides, and is the son of Newton 
Wesley and Susan (Middleton) Benson. His paternal grandparents were 
James and Susan Benson. Mr. Benson's early education was obtained in 
the public schools of his native town. At the age of seventeen, he entered 
the State Normal college at Jacksonville, remaining there three years. 
After leaving school, he taught for one year, and then engaged in the 
mercantile business. He is a Democrat ; a Presbyterian ; a Mason ; and a 
Woodman of the World. On June 5, 1906, he was married to Mary Ethel, 
daughter of John and Mary Downey, of Jackson county. 



JEFFERSON COUNTY. 

JOHN THOMAS GLOVER, of Birmingham, was born at Richmond, 
Twiggs county, Ga., May 14, 1864, and is the son of John Thomas and Cleo- 
patra Victoria (Strozer) Glover and the grandson of Thomas and Eliza- 
beth Pittman Glover and of Peter Jacob and Rhoda Glover Strozer, of Al- 
bany, Ga. The Glover families are of Irish descent. Thomas Glover, of 
Nash county, N. C, emigrated in 1820 to Twiggs county, Ga., where he be- 
came an extensive cotton planter. His son, John Thomas, Sr., born in 
1837, was a lawyer in Albany and Dawson, Ga., successively. In 1892, he 
enlisted in Co. I., 6th Ga. Regiment, as a private; was promoted to a lieu- 
tenancy in his company, and afterwards was made adjutant of the regi- 
ment. He was twice wounded. After the War, resumed the practice of 
his profession in Twiggs county, Ga. His son, John Thomas, Jr., received 
his education in the ordinary village schools of the county; studied law 
and was admitted to the bar in Birmingham in 1896, where he has since 
continuously practiced his profession. He is a member of the Elks and of 
the Knights of Pythias; was married at Lithia Springs, Ga., August 3 
1890, to Jennie Ensley, daughter of Thomas and Mattie (Couch) Arnall. 
She died March 14, 1907, in Philadelphia, Pa. 

LITTLEBERRY JAMES HALEY, JR., of Birmingham, was born Nov- 
ember 22, 1865, at Elk Creek, Louisa county, Virginia, and is the son of 
Littleberry James and Mary Elizabeth (Long) Haley, and the grandson 
of William Argyle and Elizabeth (Allen) Haley, and of James and Emily 
(Lipscomb) Long. The grandfather, William A. Haley, was the son of 
Meredith Haley, of Caroline county, Va. Elizabeth (Allen) Haley was 
the daughter of Littleberry Allen, of Henrico county, Va. On his mother's 
side, the subject is related to the Longs, Lipscombs, Days, Appersons, and 
other Virginia families. His father, Littleberry James Haley, Sr., is a 
graduate of Richmond College and University of Virginia ; received the de- 



102 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. # 

gree of D.D. from Richmond College; was superintendent of schools of 
Louisa county for twelve years, and was elected a member of the Vir- 
ginia Legislature for session of 1905-07 ; has been pastor of Baptist churches 
in Louisa county since 1856, except for three years when he was pastor 
of churches in North Hampton county, Va. Representative Haley was edu- 
cated in the common schools of his native county and by a tutor in his 
father's family; matriculated at Richmond College in 1883, from which he 
was graduated in 1886, with the A. B. degree; and while in college was 
editor of the Richmond College Messenger. Since 1889 he has been a 
lawyer at the Birmingham bar; elected to the Legislature, 1902, and again 
in 1906. He is a Democrat; and a Baptist. On November 27, 1889, he 
married Leila, daughter of Captain William M. and wife Lizzie Ella 
(Billingsley) Byrd, who first lived at Selma, but now in Birmingham. Her 
grandfather on her father's side was Judge W. M. Byrd, of the Supreme 
Court of Alabama. 

SAMUEL WILLIAMSON JOHN, of Birmingham, was born June 29, 1845, 
at Union town, Perry county. His father was Joseph Reid John, a native 
of Mecklenburg, N. C, who emigrated to Ala., in 1839; was a representa- 
tive in the Alabama Legislature, 1847-48 ; mayor of Selma, 1862 ; and chan- 
cellor of the middle chancery division, 1863-5. His paternal grandparents 
were Abel and Isabella (Reid) John, of Providence Church, Mecklenburg 
county, N. C. His mother was Rosa Jane, daughter of David and Sarah 
(Black) Smith, of Mecklenburg county. His early education was acquired 
in the schools of Selma. He was a student at the University of Alabama, 
1862-5; read law under his father, and was admitted to practice in the 
Supreme Court of Alabama, June 28, 1866. He was solicitor of Dallas 
county, 1891-2; member of city council of Selma, 1874-76; representative 
in the Legislature from Dallas county, 1882-83, 1884-85, 1886-87 ; from Jef- 
ferson county, 1894-95, and re-elected in 1906. He was a private in Co. 
"F.," 3rd Ala. Cavalry Regiment, C. S. A., 1861-62 ; and the first col. of the 
3rd Regiment, Alabama state troops, 1885-88. He was chairman of the 
committee on privileges and elections, 1882-83; chairman of the committee 
of commerce and common carriers, 1884-85 ; chairman of judiciary commit- 
tee, 1886-87, 1894-95; chairman of joint committee on code, 1896; and a 
member of the commission to devise a new convict system, 1894. As a 
legislator he drew the employer's liability act, Code 1896, Sec. 1749, the act 
providing for the examiners of public accounts, the acts establishing agri- 
cultural experiment stations at Auburn and Uniontown, the act to punish 
the taking of rebates, the acts requiring all school funds to be paid 
into the State treasury, and thence direct to teachers, and the "Dallas 
jury law." As chairman of the committee, he reported the railroad commis- 
sion bills to the House of Representatives in 1884-85 and ardently urged 
their passage. He is a Democrat; a Methodist; a Mason, and a Knight 
Templar. On June 1, 1897, he married Rosa, daughter of John and Emily 
(Hughes) Clisby, of Montgomery. 

JERE CLEMENS KING, of Birmingham, was born February 13, 1870, 
near Greenville, Butler county, and is the son of Thomas Carter and Mary 
J. (Grant) King, and the grandson of John and Mary King and James 
Grant and wife, who lived at Hickory Fiat, Chambers county, Ala. The 
grandfather, John King, lived at Three Rivers, Butler county. Allen King, 
his father was an Englishman, who settled Goldsboro, N. C. Thomas 
King was born in Dallas county ; was 1st sergt. and later lieut in Company 
"K," 17th Alabama Infantry Regiment, C. S. A., serving two years in the 
army ; lived 15 years at Ft. Deposit ; afterwards at his present home Green- 
ville; and was a member of the Legislature from Butler county in 1888-89. 
Representative King received his early education in the common schools 
of the county; afterward attended the Ft. Deposit institute, Ft. Deposit 
school, the Highland Home college, and spent one year, 1890-91, at the A. 
& M. College at Auburn ; in 1892, was elected clerk of circuit court, Butler 
county ; served four years ; and in 1896 attended lectures at the law school 



•s 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 103 

of University of Virginia. He was admitted to practice in the Supreme 
Court of Alabama, Jan. 24, 1897, and in the Supreme Court of the United 
States, March 6, 1901; practiced at Houston, Texas, 1897; at Huntsville, 
Ala., 1898 to 1903, and was there a member of the firm of King and Bank- 
head two and one-half years. He is a Democrat; a member of the First 
Presbyterian church in Birmingham; is a member of the Knights of Py- 
thias, of the American Guild, and the Model Puritans. On Dec. 5, 1900, at 
Franklin, Kentucky, he was married to Martha, daughter of Henry and 
Mary (Summers) Munford, of Glasgow, Ky. 

ROBERT FRANKLIN LOVELADY, of Pratt City, was born August 24, 
18G5, at Danville, Morgan county, and is the son of Clark C. and Martha 
Jane (Sherrell) Lovelady, fend the grandson of William H. and Eliza 
(M alone) Lovelady, and of Wiley B. Sherrell and wife, who lived at 
Danville, Ala. William H. Lovelady, was an emigrant from England, a 
soldier in the Revolutionary War, and an early settler of Danville, Ala- 
bama. Representative Lovelady was educated in the common schools at 
Danville, studied pharmacy at home and passed examinations of State 
Board of Pharmacy, May 17, ^.887 ; and entered the drug business the next 
year at Pratt City. He was alderman in Pratt City, 1897-1904. He is a 
member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, in which he has been 
a steward for twenty years. He is a Democrat; and is a member of the 
Masons, the Shriners, and the Knights Templar. On October 20, 1887, he 
was married to Henrietta, daughter of Alonzo L. Haralson, and grand- 
daughter of Col. W. B. Haralson, of Selma. 

MILTON CLAY RAGSDALE, of McCalla, Jefferson county, was born 
March 29, 1847, in Philadelphia, Monroe county, Tenn., and is the son of 
Sterling and Sarah Alice (Hicks) Ragsdale, of Tennessee, the former 
being the son of Edward and Ruth (Farris) Ragsdale, of Madi- 
sonville, Tennessee, who was the son of Harrison Ragsdale, of Vir- 
ginia, a son of Hubbard, Ragsdale, an emigrant from England. Mil- 
ton Clay Ragsdale moved with his mother's family to Jackson 
county, Ark., in November, 1860. In May, 1862, he joined the Confederate 
army, Co. "H," 32nd Infantry Regiment, Ark., volunteers, and was in the 
battles of Helena, Ark., Pleasant Hill, and Sanders' Fe^ry, Ark.; was pa- 
roled at Marshall Texas, in April, 1865. He studied medicine and began 
practice in Independence county, Ark., in 1869; removed to Tuscaloosa, 
Ala,, in 1871; and to McCalla in Jauuary, 1873, where he has since lived. 
On December 20, 1871, he was married to Louisa E., daughter of Rev: 
Robert and Louisa (Hill) Oldham, of Bibb county, Ala. He was again 
married, Aug. 25, 1892, to Alice, daughter of A. W. and Rachel (Miller) 
Varnon. 

WALTER ELSWORTH URQUHART, of Birmingham, was born in 
Mobile, December 29, 1869, and is the son of Henry and Missouri Ann 
(Phillips) Urquhart, and the grandson of Elan and Mary Ann (Ethridge) 
Phillips. Henry Urquhart was born at Ramer, Montgomery county; was 
a Methodist minister, and lived at various places in the State. W. E. 
Urquhart's great-grandfather Ethridge emigrated from S. C, to Alabama 
about 1813; and he and family were inmates of Fort Mims, but left the 
place three days before the massacre, going to Mobile in a batteau, travel- 
ing by night, and lying along shore by day. Walter E. Urquhart's early 
education was received at the Greenville collegiate institute, at Auburn 
Female College, and at a private school in Eufaula; and from 1886 to 1888, 
he was a student in the Southern University at Greensboro. He was admit- 
ted to the bar at Mobile in 1897; was commissary captain 1st Ala. Regt. 
National Guard in 1898, and served as 1st Sergeant, Co. "C," 2nd Ala. Vol. 
Inf., in Spanish-American War. He is a Democrat; is a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, South, a 14th degree Mason, an Odd Fellow, 
and a Knight of Honor. On February 16, 1904, at Verbena, he married 
Alma, daughter of Rev. C. E. Crenshaw. 



* 






104 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

LAMAR COUNTY. 

CHARLES WILLIAM WHITE, of MiHport, Lamar county, was born July 
17, 1856, at Conyers, Newton county, Georgia, and is the son of David Thom- 
as and Susanna (Plunket) White. David T. White, of Irish parentage, was 
born in Buncombe county, N. C; and in early life emigrated to Georgia. 
During and after the war, he represented Newton county \n the Georgia 
Legislature. The mother of Charles W. White was a native of S. C, emi- 
grating with her parents in early life to Georgia; and her father was a 
native of Ireland. C. W. White received his education in the common 
schools of Conyers; was engaged for twenty years in the business of rail- 
way construction; and for the last eight years has been engaged in mer- 
chandising. In 1905 he was mayor of Millport; has always vpted the 
straight Democratic ticket; is a Methodist; and an Odd Fellow. He was 
for five years local editor of the ConyeYs (Ga.) Weekly. On August 20, 
1887, at Conyers, he married Georgia^ daughter of John William and Mil- 
dred Langford. 



LAUDERDALE COUNTY. 

JOHN LEE HUGHSTON, of Florence, was born, July 13, 1878, near Mt. 
Hope, Lawrence ccunty, and is the son of Thomas Porter and Leonora 
Clem (Dial) Hughs ton, and the grandson of Lee Roy and. Savannah 
(McCord) Hughston, and of John and Sallie (Thompson) Dial. Thomas 
P. Hughston enlisted as a private in Company "B", 16th Alabama Infantry 
Regiment, C. S. A., in 1861, and served through the four years of the War. 
John Lee Hughston received his early education in the public schools of 
Leighton; and graduated from the State Normal School, at Florence, in 
1901. He was admitted to the bar, by examination, in Oct., 1903, and has 
since followed that profession. Mr. Hughston is a Democrat; a member, 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South; a Mason, a Knight of Pythias, 
and a Woodman of the World. He is unmarried. 

HENRY ALEXANDER KILLEN, of Green Hill, was born January 31, 
1837, in Lauderdale county, and is the son of John Killen, a native of 
Averysboro, N. C, and wife, Susan, daughter of John and Catherine 
(Stubbs) Richardson, of Lauderdale county. His paternal grandparents 
were James and Nancy (McDougal) Killen. The Killen family is Irish, 
and the Richardson, Scotch. Mr. Killen had limited education in country 
schools; is a farmer and a merchant; was elected county commissioner in 
1874, and served two terms; was elected to the House of Representatives 
of Alabama in 1896, in 1898, and in 1902, and re-elected in 1906. He en- 
listed in the Twenty-Seventh Ala. Infantry Reg. in 1861, and was elected 
first lieutenant of Company "E." He served through the War and sur- 
rendered at Greensboro, N. C. He is a Democrat; and a Mason. In 1860 
he married Mary Allen, of Lauderdale county. She died; and on July 26, 
1866, he married Sallie A., daughter of John Robinson, of the same county. 



LAWRENCE COUNTY. 

CHARLES MORGAN SHERROD, of Courtland, Lawrence county, was 
born October 1, 1860, at this place, and is the son of William C. and 
Amanda (Morgan) Sherrod, and the grandson of Benjamin and Tabitha 
(Qoode) Sherrod and of Samuel D. and Matilda Morgan, who lived in 
Nashville, Tenn. Benjamin Sherrod emigrated from North Carolina to 
Lawrence county in 1818, and settled four miles north of Courtland near 
an Indian village, known as "Gourdtown." He largely built, and was the 
first president of the Tuscumbia and Courtland Railway, now a part of 
the Memphis division of the Southern Railway. Charles W. Sherrod re- 



• • • • • 
* . • •• 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 105 

ceived his early education at Town Creek and Courtland; attended the 
A. & M. College at Auburn, 1879; and graduated in the Law School at 
Lebanon, Tenn., June, 1880. He began the practice of law at Courtland 
in 1884; went to Moulton in 1886, where he practiced until 1894; spent the 
five years following in Texas, where he was appointed Judge of the dis- 
trict court, Wichita county, 1896. He was maycr of Courtland from 1902 
to 1906. He was chairman of the Democratic committee, Lawrence county, 
from 1890 to 1894, and delegate to the State conventions, 1890-1894, 1900 
and 1906. He is a member of the Knights of Pythias. Mr. Sherrod was 
editor of the Courtland Enterprise, a weekly newspaper, 1899 and 1900, 
and of the Franklin Times, 1901. He was married September 24, 1890, to 
Helen, daughter of .ohn Rush and Lou (Foster) Gates. Mrs. Gates is re- 
lated to the well known Foster family of Tuscaloosa county, Alabama. 



LEE COUNTY. 

THEODORE DWIGHT POWER, of Opelika, was born March 20, 1862, in 
Cobb county, Georgia, and is the son of George Abner and Winifred 
(Copeland) Power, and the grandson of Joseph and Isabella {Ballon) 
Power and of Eliza and Sallie (Jett) Copeland, who lived in DeKalb 
county, Georgia. Joseph Power in 1804, in Laurens district, S. C, was 
married to Isabella Ballou, a cousin of Pres. James A. Garfield's mother. 
His son George Power was born in -Laurens district, and lived in Franklin, 
Fulton, and Cobb counties, Ga. The first American ancestor, John Power, 
father of Joseph Power, was born and educated in Ireland, emigrated, 
about 1760, with an uncle and settled in Maryland. He served in the Rev- 
olutionary War and was present at the surrender at Yorktcwn. Theodore 
D. Power received his elementary education in the country schools of 
Cobb and ^uiton counties, Ga.; he then attended the University of Geor- 
gia three and a half years, where in 1886 he was graduated with the degree 
of B. Ph. ; was admitted to the bar in 1889, at Marietta ;' removed to Ope- 
lika, Ala., where he was a member of the city council, from April, 1899, 
to April, 1901, and April, 1905, to date. He is a Democrat, and was chair- 
man of the city executive committee of Opelika, April, 1903, to April, 1905; 
is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South ; a Mason, a Knight 
of Pythias, an Odd Fellow, and an Elk. On December 14, 1892, at West 
Point. Ga., he was married to Fannie, daughter of George Ware and 
Nancy Poole (Ward) Houston, who resided in Harris Co., Ga. 

ROBERT CLANTON SMITH, of Opelika, was born April 13, 1872, at 
Cusseta, Chambers county, Alabama, and is the son of Lawrence and Susan 
Elizabeth (Harrell) Smith, and the grandson of Asa and Mary Smith and 
of Alfred and Mahala Harrell, who lived at Cusseta, Ala. Lawrence Smith 
was born near Madison, Morgan county, Ga., where he lived until grown; 
attended college at Maryville, Teiin., afterwards studied medicine, and 
graduated from the Medical Department of the University of Georgia, at 
Augusta; during the War was surgeon of the 37th Alabama Infantry Reg- 
iment, C. S. A.; and continued the practice of his profession at Cusseta 
after the War. The ancestors of Robert C. Smith on both sides were 
English; he received his primary education in the common schools of 
Chambers county; graduated at the Alabama Polytechnic Institute, Au- 
burn, June, 1891, with the degree of B. Sc. ; at the University of Alabama, 
1893, with the degree of LL. B. ; and has practiced law at Opelika since 
September, 1893. He is a Democrat; a Methodist; and an Odd Fellow. 
On Oct. 19,* 1895. he married Odile O., daughter of Garrett Newton 
and Ida (Lucas) Hudmon, of Opelika, Ala. 



LIMESTONE COUNTY. 

BENJAMIN BLOUNT PEETE, of Athens, Limestone county, was born 
April 4, 1861, near Greenbrier, in that county, and is the son of Benjamin 



106 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

Clemens and Jennie (Mahone) Peete, and the grandson of Benjamin 
Blount and Darthula (English) Peete, and of William and Jane {Ward) 
Mahone, all of Limestone county. The Peete family are of English de- 
scent, and the grandfather of this sketch emigrated from Sussex county, 
Virginia, in 1818, and settled in Morgan county, Ala. Benjamin C. Peete 
was a Confederate soldier, serving in Capt. George Mason's company, 9th 
Ala. Cavalry Regiment, Col. James C. Mahone commanding. Represent- 
ative B. B. Peete has been a farmer all his life, except for two years, which 
were passed in the real estate business. He is a Democrat; an Odd Fel- 
low; and a member of the Baptist Church. He has always taken an active 
part in the prohibition movement. He was married at East Lake, Ala., 
Feb. 14, 1906, to Edna Earl, daughter of Henry and Sarah Brown, of Lime- 
stone county. 



LOWNDES COUNTY. 

JESSE ALBERT COLEMAN, of Mt. Willing, was born June 17, 1872, 
near that place, and is the son cf Thomas Livingston and Mary (Ray) 
Coleman, and the grandson of Abraham and Mary Coleman, and of Albert 
J. Ray. Jesse A. Coleman's primary education was received in the coun- 
try schools around Mt. Willing; he afterwards attended Howard College, 
five and a half months, where he took a business course. At the age of 
twenty-one, he entered the mercantile business, which he followed for 
seven years ; then resumed the life of a farmer. He is a Democrat ; a deacon 
in the Baptist Church at Mt. Willing; and is also a member of the Masons. 
On May 19, 1898, he was married, at Mt Willing, to Mary, daughter of 
Capt. Joseph Lemuel and Martha Ellen Hinson cf that place. 

DANIEL FLOYD CRUM, of Farmersville. was born October 22, 1854, at 
that place, and is the son of Samuel Daniel and Eren Ellen (Hays) Crum, 
natives of Orangeburg, S. C. t who removed to Farmersville, and the grand- 
son of Jacob and Mary Crum, and of Green Berry and Sue Anna Hays, of 
Butler county. Mr. Crum had limited advantages of education. He has 
been a merchant's clerk and merchant, and is now a farmer. He was elected 
to the Legislature in 1902, and re-elected in 1906. He is a Democrat, and 
served ten years as a member of the Lowndes county executive committee. 
He is a Methodist. On November 21, 1878, he was married, at Farmers- 
ville. to Nettie Frances, daughter of David Lee Bozeman, of Lowndes 
county, a captain in the 44th Alabama Infantry Regiment, C. S. A., and 
wife, Mary Ingram Lee. 



MACON COUNTY. 

ERNEST WALTON THOMPSON, of Tuskegee, Maccn county, Alabama, 
was born in tjiat town, September 2, 1881, and is the son of Charles Win- 
ston and Estelle (Alley) Thompson, and the grandson of William 
Philip and Mary (Jordan) Thompson and of William and Nancy 
Jane (Walton) Alley, who lived at Tuskegee, Alabama. Charles 
Winston Thompson was born at LaPlace, Macon county; was superintend- 
ent of education of that county, State senator, Congressman and banker; 
and died March 20, 1904. Ernest W. Thompson's elementary education 
was received in the private schools of Tuskegee ; he afterwards attended the 
Alabama military institute from which he was graduated in June, 1906; 
and he also attended a year and a half at Auburn. He was editor Tuskegee 
News from September, 1903, to April, 1904. He is a Democrat; a Mason, 
a Knight Templar, a Knight of Pythias, and a Knight of Khorassin. On 
April 20, 1904, he was married to Placide Earl, daughter of Francis and 
Margaret (Nichols) Philips, of Marianna, Florida. 






• 



••• 

• • • • 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 107 

MADISON COUNTY. 

ATTICUS DICKSON KIRBY, of Huntsville, was born June 16, 1868, at 
Summerville, Chattooga county, Ga., and Is the son of Francis Andrew and 
Harriet Ann (Shopshire) Kir by, and the grandson of Francis and Mary 
Barry (Lawson) Kirby and of Wesley and Nancy (Stoanson) Shropshire, 
who lived in Chattooga county; the great-grands en of Spencer and Frances 
{Pollard) Shropshire, the former the son of an English clergyman, Wing- 
field Shropshire, who came first to Boston, thence to Halifax county, Va. ; 
was admitted to the bar; served in the Legislature, 1854-1860; in 1868 and 
1870 was judge of the supreme ccurt of the Rome circuit; and resigned 
this position to take a position in Washington City, which he had to give 
up on account of his health. Having lost the use of his right arm in his 
childhood from an accident, he never saw any service in the Confederate 
army. Atticus Dickson Kirby received his primary education in the Sum- 
merville schools; attended Emory college, 1889-90; was town councilman 
at Summerville, 1901; a travelling salesman, 1893 to 1901; when he entered 
upon the mercantile business in West Huntsville. He is a Democrat; and 
a member of the Odd Fellows and of the Elks. On April 2, 1901, he was 
married to Zaida, daughter of Jesse Edward and Virginia E. (Wood) 
Brown, of Scottsboro, the former a soldier in the C. S. A., and the latter a 
grand-daughter of Jeremiah and Mary A. (Williams) Brown. 

NATHAN MATSON ROWE, of Madison, (R. F. D., No. 3) Madison 
county, was born May 1, 1847, in Limestone county, and is the son of Wil- 
liam and Nancy (Gooch) Rowe, and the grandson of John and Sarah 
(Anderson) Rowe, and of Roland and Elizabeth (McOhee) Gooch, who 
lived in Va. until they emigrated to Madison Co., Alabama, in 1819. John 
Rowe also emigrated from Virginia to Madison county in 1819. His sen 
William, was born in Louisa county, Va., September 1, 1792; served in the 
War of 1812; and emigrated to Madison county with his parents. Repre- 
sentative Rowe was educated in the public schools at Triana, Madison 
county, and the high school at Pettusville, Limestone county. He has been 
a farmer all his life; served in the Alabama Legislature, 1894-5, serving 
as chairman of the temperance committee; is a Democrat and has served 
on various committees of his party. Mr. Rowe has been a steward in the 
Methodist Church for forty years, a delegate to the district conference for 
thirty-five years without a break; a delegate to the North Alabama Con- 
ference for twenty-five years consecutively, and to the general conference 
four times,— sessions 1890, 1898, 1902, and 1906. On October 26, 1875, near • 
Triana, he was married to Alice Cornelia, daughter of Caleb and Margaret 
(Miller) Toney. 



MARENGO COUNTY. 

WILLIAM BOWLES DOYLE, of Dixon's Mills, Marengo county, was 
born August 27, 1839, at Clarksville, Clarke county, and is the son of Bart- 
lett Smith and Eliza S. (Bowles) Doyle, and the grandson of Jesse and 
Jane (Barr) Doyle, who lived at Clarksville, Ala., and of John W. and 
Mary (Abney) Bowles, who lived at Choctaw Corner, Alabama. Jesse 
Doyle with his wife emigrated frcm South Carolina to Clarke county, and 
bought the lands upon which Uniontown is situated. John W. Bowles and 
wife were also emigrants from S. C, to Clarke county. Mr. Bowles was 
sheriff of the county for several terms. William B. Doyle was educated 
in the country schools cf Clarke county; has been a farmer in Clarke and 
Marengo counties; he was member of Company "A," 43rd Alabama Reg- 
iment, C. S. A., and served with this conumand until the surrender. He 
is a Democrat; a clerk in the Baptist Church; and a Mason. His wife is 
Lillie Ann., daughter of Joel B. and Jane (Dunning) Dixon, of Dixons 
Mills. 



1 08 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

<SAMUEL GHOLSON WOOLF, of Demopolis, was born at Linden, Ma- 
rengo county, May 20, 1853, and is the son of Henry Ashby and Frances 
(Oholaon) Woolf, and the grandson of James Woolf who came to Marengo 
county from Kentucky. Educated in the common schools of Linden, he 
attended Kentucky University, at Lexington, 1869 to 1871, but did not 
graduate. Representative Woolf began the practice of law at Linden in 
1881; in 1892 was elected probate judge; was elected to the Legislature in 
1888, again In 1900; to the State Senate in 1902; and re-elected to the 
House of Representatives In 1906. He is a Democrat ; and a Baptist. His 
first wife was Fanny Pickering, to whom he was married January 8, 1879, 
and his second, Mrs. Sadie (Henley) Lyon, the marriage taking place 
August 26, 1896, at Demopolis. Mr. Woolf s father was a native of Woolf 
county, Ky.; practiced Jaw at Demopolis; and represented Marengo county 
in the Alabama Constitutional Convention of 1875. 



MARION COUNTY. 

CHARLEiS ERASTUS MITCHELL, of Hamilton, Marion county, was 
born in that place, Sepr. 2, 1868, and is the sen of Andrew D. and Lourilda 
E. Cagle (Mitchell), who was the daughter of Lloyd Cagle of Winston 
Co., Ala. Charles Erastus Mitchell received his primary education at 
Thorn Hill, Alabama, and was graduated from/ the Florence Normal Col- 
lege in June, 1890. Since 1893 he has practiced law in Hamilton; was a 
member cf the board of aldermen of Hamilton, 1896-1900; was superin- 
tendent of education of Marion county, 1896 to 1898, and 1900 to 1904; and 
was Democratic nominee for Marion county to the proposed constitutional 
convention in the spring of 1898. From 1904 to 1906 was chairman of the 
Democratic executive committee. He is a Mason, an Odd Fellow, and a 
Woodman of the World. On Nov. 25, 1896, at Hamilton, he was married to 
Leota, daughter of Jason Parks and Adallne (Weatherford) Ford, all of 
Marlon county. 



MARSHALL COUNTY. 

WILLIAM MADISON COLEMAN, of Albertville, was born March 2, 1860, 
near Quntersville. Marshall county, and is the son of John Crawford and 
• Mary Jane (Critcher) Coleman and the grandson of Thomas A. and Mary 
(McCrary) Coleman, and of James and Jina E. (Roden) Critcher. Both 
grandfathers lived for many years in Marshall county. James Critcher, 
born in N. C, in 1809, was once a representative from Marshall county in 
the House of Representatives, and once a State senator from the 5th sena- 
torial district. John Crawford Coleman was 1st t sergeant, 4th Alabama 
Cavalry, C. S. A. William M. Coleman was educated in the common schools 
of Marshall county; was a representative from that county in 1892-3; and 
in 1894-5, and re-elected in 1906. He is a Democrat ; a Methodist ; a Mason, 
an Odd Fellow, a Knight of Pythias, and a Knight of Honor. In 1880, he 
was married in Marshall county to Nancy Catherine, daughter of Hiram 
and Edith Bailey. 



MOBILE COUNTY. 

FRANCIS OTEY HOFFMAN, was born at Mobile, March 4, 1870. and is 
the son of Samuel J. Hoffman, and wife Emma Elizabeth, daughter of 
Charles Pierce, of Salem, Mass., and wife Emma Swain, of Devonshire, 
England. Samuel J. Hoffman was a native of Bedford county. Va., and his 
mother was Frances, daughter of Captain John Otey, of the Revolutionary 
War. Mr. Hoffman was educated at Barton academy, Mobile; became a 
court stenographer at Mobile in 1889; was admitted to the bar in 1894; in 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 109 

the same year appointed official stenographer for the courts of Mobile 
county, and has held that position since. He was elected to the Legislature in 
1902, and re-elected in 1906. He is a Democrat; and a Presbyterian. On 
May 5, 1891, he was married, to Annie B., daughter of Samuel and Martha 
Elizabeth ( Edwards) Chapman, both of Marengo county. 

ALBERT SIDNEY LYONS, of Mobile, was born February 22, 1864, at 
Mobile, and is the son of Mark Lyons, of that city, and wife Amelia Horsier, 
the former a native of New York. Mr. Lyons was educated at Pollard, 
Ala,, followed by five years at St. Joseph's College, Spring Hill. He went 
into business at Mobile in 1882; from 1891 to 1894 he was councilman of 
the City of Mobile; an alderman from 1897 to the present time; was elected 
to the State Senate from the Mobile district in 1898; and was elected to 
the House of Representatives, 1902, and re-elected 1906. He is now (1907) 
chairman of the general council, and mayor pro tem, of the City of Mobile. 
He was chief of ordnance and lieutenant-colonel of cavalry on the staff 
of Major General J. W. Whiting of the State troops, 1892-94, and chief of 
engineers and colonel cf cavalry on the staff of Governor Johnston, 1896- 
1900. He is a Democrat. 

JOSEPH HENRY NORVILLE, of Mobile, was born June 23, 1862, at 
Navy Cove, Baldwin county, and is the son of William Thomas and An- 
nie {O'Connor) Norville and the grandson of William James Rukard and 
Mary Anne {Seymour) Norville, cf Baltimore, Md., and of Brian and An- 
nie {O'Neil) O'Connor, who lived at Wexford, Ireland. Wm. J. R. Norville, 
born in Virginia, was a navigator and sailed three times around the globe, 
visiting almost every seaport of renown; commanded government trans- 
port vessels during the War of Secession ; was a Scottish rite Mason, also 
member of French lodge in Havre; was also an Odd Fellow. His son Wm. 
T. Norville, born in Baltimore, was pilot in Mobile bay and bar for more 
than forty years. While piloting a Confederate blockade runner to sea in 
January, 1864, he was captured by Federal warship, Colorado, taken to 
Fort Warren, Mass., and uept until Feb., 1865. Aquila Norville, the 
great-grandfather of Joseph H. Norville, was sergeant in the 7th and 11th 
Virginia Regiments, Continental Army, 1776-1779. Representative Norville 
was educated in a private school at Navy Cove and in Mobile; was pilot 
in Mobile bay and bar, receiving license to pilot September 15, 1891; was 
elected alderman of Mobile, in 1903; re-elected in 1906; and was at one 
time captain of Battery "A." 1st Artillery, A. N. G. he is a Democrat; a 
member of the Protestant Episcopal Church; and a Knight of Pythias. On 
November 25, 1897, was married in Mobile to Sarah Estelle, daughter of 
John Alexis and Sarah B. (Broughton) Tardy. 



MONROE COUNTY. 

JOHN McDUFFIE, of River Ridge, Monroe county, was born September 
25, 1883, at that place, and is the son of John Mc Duffle and Virginia Ma- 
rion {Lett) McDuffie and the grandson of Archibald and Nancy M. 
(Johnson) McDuffie and of James Edward and Elizabeth Boykin {Hunter) 
Lett. William McDuffie, the father of Archibald McDuffie, was born in 
Scotland, where he was married to Mary Murphy. About 1800. he and his 
wife emigrated to America and settled in New Hanover county, N. C. About 
1827, his son, Archibald McDuffie, emigrated from N. C. to Monroe county, 
Alabama, where he married Nancy M., daughter of John Seawright and 
Mary {Leslie) Johnson, whq were emigrants from Ireland. Representative 
McDuffie received his elementary education under a governess. He attend- 
ed Southern University at Greensboro for one session ; and the Polytechnic 
Institute at Auburn, where he was graduated with the degree of B. S. in 
June, 1904, as class orator. At present (1907) he is a planter and a law 



HO OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

student. He is a Democrat, having been a member of the county executive 
'committee; is a Baptist; a Knight of Pythias; and a member of the Alpha 
Tau Omega Fraternity. He is unmarried. 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 

ROBERT TYLER GOODWYN, of Montgomery, was born Nevember 4. 
1871, in Montgomery county, Ala., and .is the son of Albert Taylor and 
Priscilla Cooper (Tyler) Goodwyn, of Robinson Springs, Autauga county; 
and the grandson of Dr. Albert Gallatin and Harriet (Bibb) Goodwyn, and 
of Robert Tyler and Priscilla (Cooper) Tyler of the city of Montgomery. 
Mr. Goodwyn was graduated from the University of Alabama with the de- 
gree of A. B. in the class of 1891. He was co-principal of the Cuba acad- 
emy, 1891-92, clerk of the circuit court of Elmore county, November 4, 
1892, to November 4, 1898. In 1899 he removed to Montgomery to practice 
his profession; on December 1, 1901, was unanimously elected mayor of 
the suburban town of Highland Park; and at the general election of 1902 
was elected to the Legislature from Montgomery county, and re-elected in 
1906.. Mr. Goodwyn is a Democrat; and a member of the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church, South. On November 21, 1895, at Wetumpka, he married 
Jessie Dora, daughter of Judge J. A. Lancaster and wife Dora, daughter of 
R. Pinckney Lett, of Elmore county. 

GASTON GUNTER, of Montgomery, was born November 7, 1874, in 
Montgomery, and is the son of William Adams and Ellen Florence 
(Poellnitz) Gunter and the grandson of Charles G. and Eliza (Adams) 
Gunter and of Charles Augustus and Mary L. J. (Peay) Poellnitz. Charles 
G. Gunter, from N. C, was one of the early settlers of Montgomery county; 
after the War of Secession he went to Brazil, South America. His son, 
William A. Gunter, born in Montgomery county, was a Confederate soldier, 
and has represented Montgomery county in the Legislature of Alabama 
Charles Augustus Poellnitz came to Alabama from S. C; was the son of 
Julius Von Poellnitz and Elizabeth Rogers, daughter of Col. Benj. Rogers 
of S. C. Julius Von Poellnitz was the son of Baron Charles Hans Frederick 
Bruno von Poellnitz, who came to this country in 1777 with Steuben and 
Kosciusko to render service In the Revolution, and settled in Darlington 
district in S. C. Representative Gunter was educated in the public schools 
of Montgomery; at the Stevens School, Hoboken, N. J.; and in the Shef- 
field Scientific School of Yale University, from which he was graduated 
in 1893 with the degree of Ph. B. Mr. Gunter received his legal education 
in the law office of his father. W. A. Gunter, in Montgomery, and at the 
Univer3ity of Virginia; was admitted to the bar in 189b: was alderman of 
the city council of Montgomery, Oct. 1901-1906; elected president of the 
council, Oct., 1905. Was captain of company "K," 3rd Alabama Infantry, 
Spanish- American War, June, 1898, to March, 1899. He is a Democrat; 
and is a member of the Masonic Order, and the Order of Beavers. He is 
unmarried. 

OLIN CONNOR MANER, of Montgomery, was born October 23, 1873, at 
Allendale, Barnwell county, S. C, and is the son of Samuel Perry Maner, 
of Rcbertville. *S. C, but whose home was at Allendale, and Emma Jane, 
daughter of David L. Connor, who lived at Connors, Orangeburg county, 
S. C. Mr. Maner was educated in the common schools of his native county, 
and at Woftord College, Spartanburg, S. C, but did not graduate. He was 
admitted to the bar at Montgomery, Ala., June, 1897, by the Supreme Court, 
and has practiced his profession there since. In November, 1902, he was 
chosen to the Legislature, and re-elected in 1906. He is a Democrat and a 
member, of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. He married on Decem- 
ber 5, 1900, at Montgomery, Sallie Nicholson, daughter of A. P. Tyson and 
wife Ellen Arrington. Mr. Maner's grandfather, John S. Maner, was for 
thirty years a member of the South Carolina Legislature, and his great- 
grandfather, Wm. Maner, was a Revolutionary soldier. 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. HI 

WILLIAM LOGAN MARTIN, was born November 3, 1850, at Union 
Chapel, Madison county, Alabama, and Is the son of Thomas Wesley and 
Elizabeth Jane (Horton) Martin, and the grandson of Jesse Martin and 
Jchn B. Horton, both of Madison county. The Martin and Horton families 
were both of English descent, the ancestors of the former settling in Vir- 
ginia, and of the latter in South Carolina. Frank Martin, the father of Jesse 
Martin, served in the War of the Revolution, and in 1808 emigrated from 
Virginia to Madison county, Alabama. His son Jesse served in the War 
of 1812. Jesse's son, Thomas Wesley Martin, father cf William Logan 
Martin, was born in Madison county in 1814; was first a teacher and later 
a farmer and merchant. William Logan Martin was educated in the com- 
mon schools of Madison county; was graduated from the law school of 
the Cumberland University, Lebanon, Tenn., in 1873; and the same year 
began the practice cf law in Scottsboro, practicing alone until 1889, then 
forming a partnership with Virgil Bouldin, with whom he practiced untii 
1902, under the firm name of Martin and Bouldin. Mr. Martin was register 
in chancery for Jackson county from 1878 to 1885; attorney-general of 
Alabama from 1889 to 1894; and code commissioner, 1896. He is a Demo- 
crat, and was several times chairman of Democratic executive committee 
of Jackson county. He is a member of the Knights of Honor, and also ot 
the Knights of Pythias. He married Margaret, daughter of Joel P., and 
Jane C. Ledbetter, of Jackson ccunty. Mr. Martin was elected speaker of 
the House of Representatives at the organization of that body Jan. 7, 1907.* 



MORGAN COUNTY. 

WILLIAM HENRY LONG, JR., of Decatur, Morgan county, was born 
April 15, 1877, near Uniontown, Perry county, and is the son of William 
Henry and Nannie Lane ( Thompson) Long, and "the grandson of Dr. Dan- 
iel and Mary (Billingsley) Long and of John Simpson and Nancy Lane 
(Bryan) Thompson. Dr. Daniel Long, of Irish descent, was a graduate of 
the Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia ; was assistant surgeon under 
Col. Alston of S. C. in the War of 1812 : and came to Alabama in 1818. His 
father was a Revolutionary soldier. John Simpson Thompson was the son 
of Samuel Alexander Thompson and was born on Wordmelow Island, S. C. 
His mother was Jane McMean, and when he was 15 years old his parents 
emigrated to Washington county, Ala. The father of Mrs. John Simpson 
Thompson was a member of the Continental Congress of 1799. The Thomp- 
sons and Bryans were of English descent, the latter from Westmoreland 
county, Va. Wm. H. Long, Sr., enlisted, April 25, 1861, at Uniontown, in 
company "D," 4th Alabama Infantry Regiment, C. S. A., in which he served 
until the end of the war. He now lives in Decatur. Representative Long 
was educated in the public schools of the counties in which he spent his 
boyhood; was admitted to the bar, March 22, 1906, and follows his profes- 
sion in Decatur; and he has held many offices in the Alabama National 
Guards. He is a Democrat, and has served as a member of the county ex- 
ecutive committee; and is a member of the B. P. O. E., and the Jr. O. U. 
A. M., of Decatur. 

JOHN ROBERT SAMPLE, of Hartselle, was born February 6, 1875, neai 
Somerville, Morgan county, and is the son of Robert Hamilton and Josie 
Ann (Smith) Sample, and, on the maternal side, is the grandson of Arm- 
stead Lafayette and Mary Jane (Quarles) Smith. John R. Sample's ele- 
mentary education .was received in the common schools of his county; his 
higher education at the Morgan county college at Somerville, where he 



•Near the close of the spring session of the Legislature, March 3, 1907, 
Mr. Martin died after a short illness of pneumonia. At a special election, 
May 7, 1907, Peter B. Mastin was elected his successor. See Addenda for 
sketch. 



112 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

graduated with the degree of B. S. In June, 1896. He attended the law 
school of the 'State University six months in 1897-98; was admitted to the 
har Nov. 25, 1897; and began the practice of his profession at New Decatur 
October 1, 1898. He moved to Hartselle, September 15, 1900. He is a Dem- 
ocrat; a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South; and a member 
of the Knights of Pythias. He is not married. 



PERRY COUNTY. 

WILLIAM LEE PITTS, of Uniontown, was born near that place in Perry 
county, December 7, 1849, and is the son of David William and Eliza Violet 
(Campbell) Pitts, and the grandson of Thomas Daniel and Mary (Gray) 
Pitts, and of William and Eliza (McLean) Campbell. Thomas Daniel 
Pitts was a captain in the War of 1812, Virginia troops; and his ancestors 
came from England and settled in Va. His wife was also of English de- 
scent William Campbell was a Scotch emigrant to S. C, but afterwards 
moved to N. C, where he married Eliza, daughter of William McLean. D. 
W. Pitts was born in Essex county, Va.; was educated at William and 
Mary College, Va., and Davidson College, N. C; became a planter at Un- 
iontown, Ala.; entered the Confederate service as lieutenant of company 
"D," 4th Alabama Infantry Regiment, and was killed in first battle of 
Manassas. Representative Pitts was educated in the common schools about 
Uniontown, at Prof. Tutwiler's school at Greene Springs, at Davidson Col- 
lege, N. C, and at Andrews Military College, Statesville. N. C. He is a 
planter in Perry county; was deputy collector of internal revenue during 
Cleveland's first administration; appointed U. S. internal revenue agent 
in Cleveland's second term ; continued in office during the first administra- 
tion of President McKinley, and then resigned. He is a Democrat; and has 
been a member of the county Democratic committee for several years: is 
a deacon in the Presbyterian Church ; a Mason, a Knight of Pythias, and 
a Knight of Honor. On November 14, 1871, he was married, at Selma, to 
Mattie Llewellyn, daughter of Dr. Lleyellyn and Polly Ann (Home) 
B levins. 

GEORGE PHILLIPS WHITE, of Marion, was born July 20, 1847. near 
Uniontown, Perry county, and is the son of George M. and Nancy McDavid 
(Morgan) White, and the grandson of Joshua White and of William M. 
and Margaret (Cunningham) Morgan of Laurens district, S. C. Joshua 
White, the son of George W T hite, lived and died in Granville county, N. C. 
His son. George M. White, was born in the same county, and when a young 
man emigrated to Perry county, where he lived until his death. The Mor- 
gan family lived in Laurens district, S. C, until they moved to Perry county. 
George Phillips White was educated in the old field schools, and then at- 
tended the Southern University at Greensboro one session. He is a farmer, 
and a cotton buyer; was tax collector of Perry county, 1880-1888, and repre- 
sented that county in the Legislature, 1890-1 and 1892-3; and was county 
commissioner, 1896-1900. He served in Selden's Battery in the War of 
Secession and was paroled at Meridian, Miss., in May, 1865. He is a Dem- 
ocrat and a member of the Democratic executive committee of his county ; 
and is an elder in the Presbyterian Church; and a Mason. On May 5. 1870, 
at Marion, he was married to Mary Elizabeth, daughter of James Francis 
and Ellen Amanda (Moseley) Bailey. As a second wife, Mr. White mar- 
ried Mrs. Nannie (Ezelle) Bates, daughter of Robert L. Ezelle and his 
wife, Annie Morris, of Clarke county. 



PICKENS COUNTY. 

JACKSON McPHERSON PRATT, of Reform, Pickens county, was born 
in February, 1881. at Palmetto, in the same county, and is the son of 
James Madison and Jane Lee Dorcas (Valentine) Pratt, and the grandson 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. U3 

of James Pratt and Elizabeth. (Brooks) Pratt, of Newberry, S. C, and of 
Joel Kennedy, and Hester (McPherson) Valentine, of Anderson district, 
S. C. James K. Valentine was a bugler in Co. "G" of General Martin's Bri- 
grade, C. S. A. ; and after the War was a teacher In Vann's Valley academy, 
Rome, Ga. James Madison Pratt served nine months in the Confederate 
army; and now resides in Pickens county. Representative Pratt's early 
education was received in the public schools of Pickens county; and he was 
graduated from the State Normal School, at Florence, 1905. Mr. Pratt 
taught at Reform and at Carrollton; established the Pratt library at the 
Carrollton academy, in 1906; started an agitation for local taxation for 
Pickens county, which was successful in 1905; and started a movement in 
Pickens county fcr better school houses, which resulted in the re-building 
of half the houses of the county. He is a Democrat; a Mason; an Odd Fel- 
low; and a Knight of Pythias. He is not married. 



PIKE COUNTY. 

HERBERT WELDON BALLARD, of Troy, Pike county, was born at 
Milo in that county, April 8, 1873; and is the son of Thomas Weldon and 
Jane C. (Simmons) Ballard, and the grandson of John J. and Nancy 
{McK night) Ballard, and of Isaac and Elizabeth (Fowler) Simmons, who 
emigrated about 1817 from North Carolina to Dallas county, and thence to 
Milo, Pike county. John J. Ballard lived at Fayetteville, Georgia, until 
1854, when he removed to Milo, Pike county; and served eighteen months 
in the Army of Northern Virginia and died of a fever in Richmond. Thomas 
Weldon Ballard, his son. was born in Fayetteville, Georgia, and moved in 
1854 with his father to Milo. He also served eighteen months in the Con- 
federate army; lost a leg from a wound received in the battle of Mur- 
freesboro, Tenn.; and was tax collector of Pike county for two terms. The 
Ba Hards are of Scotch descent, the first ancestor settling in N. C. Herbert 
W. Ballard received his elementary education in the common schools of 
Pike county ; and attended the State Normal School at Troy two years, fin- 
ishing his junior year in 1894; in 1895 he took a course in the Atlanta 
Business College, but was compelled to leave on account of eye trouble, 
from which, however, he ultimately recovered. In the spring of 1901 he en- 
tered upon the life insurance business, in which work he canvassed all the 
adjacent counties. Mr. Ballard has for years taken an active interest in 
agricultural pursuits. He is a Democrat; and is unmarried. 

JOHN THOMAS SANDERS, cf Goshen, Pike county, was born August 
26, 1862, at Troy, in that county, and is the son of John Randolph and 
Mel i ssa Rebecca (Bryan) Sanders, and the grandson of Isaac and Naomi 
(Cadenhead) Sanders, of Georgia, and of John and Elizabeth (Gibson) 
Bryan, of South Carolina. John Sanders was lieutenant in the 37th Ala- 
bama Infantry Regiment. John T. Sanders was educated in the common 
schools of the county; and now follows the occupation of farming and 
merchandising. He is a Democrat, and was a member of the executive 
committee of Pike county, 1896-1900. He is a deacon in the Baptist Church. 
On December 25, 1887, he was married to Miss Cora Harvill, daughter of 
William Nathan and Martha (Carlisle) Harvill, of Milo. 



RANDOLPH COUNTY. 

WILLIAM RICHARD AVERY, of Wehadkee, Randolph county, was 
born October 8, 1848, in Chambers county, Alabama, and is the son of John 
Walton and Elizabeth (Tomme) Avery and the grandson of Needham and 
Martha (Walton) Avery, and of Joseph and Zilpha Tomme, of Putnam and 

8 



114 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

Troup counties, Ga. The Avery family, (name formerly spelled "Avera") 
are of Welsh descent, the first emigrants of the name founding, in the sev- 
enteenth century, the little town of Averysboro in N. C. John W. 
Avery was born in Lincoln county, Ga. ; emigrated In 1846 to Chambers 
county, Alabama, and in 1850 to Randolph county. The ancestors of the 
Tomme family emigrated from Holland to Pennsylvania prior to the Rev- 
olutionary War; and after the war settled In Ga. W. R. Avery was edu- 
cated in the common country schools. He is a farmer; and a Democrat. In 
1872 he was one of a committee appointed by the leading Democrats of 
Randolph county to ascertain the political status of every voter in the 
county, the result of which was a complete Democratic victory. He Is a 
Primitive Baptist, entering the ministry of that church in 1882; is the 
pastor of the Wehadkee church and moderator of the Beulah Baptist Asso- 
ciation. On December 15, 1870, he was married in Randolph county to 
Mary A., daughter of William and Mary {Knight) Jackson of Randolph 
county. On January 19, 1896, he was married to his second wife, Martha 
Alice Lee, of the same county. 



RUSSELL COUNTY. 

HOMER ROSWELL DUDLEY, of Seale, Russell county, was born in that 
county, February 4, 1862. and is the son of Charles Hammond and Hen- 
rietta Clay % (Jackson) Dudley and the grandson of William and Rachel 
Dudley, and of Thomas and Arabella Jackson, of Harris county, Ga. The 
father of Homer R. Dudley was a native of Harris county, Georgia, and 
when ten years of age, went with his parents to Russell county, Alabama, 
where he still resides. Homer R. Dudley was educated in the public and 
private schools at Columbus, Ga. He began the mill business at Fort Mitch- 
ell, Alabama, in 1880; removed to Union Springs, 1883, where he lived for 
five years, and where he built a handle factory; and he then moved to 
Russell county, where he is still in the mill business. He is a Democrat, 
and was the secretary of the Democratic executive committee of Bullock 
county in 1885. He is a Mason ; an Odd Fellow ; and a member of the Red 
Men; and of the Elks. He was married at Union Springs to Christiana, 
daughter of William and Hubertina Gertrude Rosenstihl. 

WILLIAM JONES PRICE, of Girard, Russell county, Alabama, was born 
October 24. 1850, at Glennville, Barbour county, and is the son of William 
Edward Price, who was born in Charleston, S. C. Mr. Price entered the 
ministry of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, in December, 1879 ;- but 
is now in the superannuate relation. At present he is employed in a bank 
at Girard. He is a Mason ; and an Odd Fellow. His wife is Caroline Eliza- 
beth, a daughter of William and Harriet Espy. 



ST. CLAIR COUNTY. 

JOHN WASHINGTON MOORE, of Coal City, St. Clair county, was 
born May 12, 1857, near Lawreueeville, Gwinnett county, Ga., and is the 
son of David Benjamin and Mary Caroline (Inzer) Moore, and, on the ma- 
ternal side, is the grandson of Henry White and Phoebe Jane Inzer. John W. 
Moore was educated in the common schools of St. Clair county, to which 
county his father had moved in the son's childhood. He entered the mer- 
cantile business in 1875, and was a coal operator from 1887 to 1898; has 
been mayor, councilman, secretary and treasurer of Coal City. He is a 
Democrat, a member of the county executive committee; and a member of 
the county board of education; is a clerk in the Baptist Church; an Odd 
Fellow; and a Knight of Pythias. His wife is Fannie Elizabeth, daughter 
of George W. and Julia F. Daughdrille, of Mobile, Ala. 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 115 

SHELBY COUNTY. 

HOSEA PEARSON, of Shelby, Shelby county, was born in Talladega 
county, and is the son of William Jasper and Elizabeth Brasher (Hosey) 
Pearson, of Shelby county, Ala., the grandson of Jonathan Pearson and of 
Jesse and Dell la (Brasher) Hosey, of Russell's Valley, Tenn. Hosea Pear- 
son was educated in the common schools of the county; is a farmer; and 
has been a justice of the peace. He is a Democrat, and is a member of the 
county executive committee; and is a member of the Masonic fraternity. 
On July 13, 1879, he was married to Lucy Frances, daughter of Wiley and 
Frances (Mason) Merrell, of Shelby county, Alabama. 



SUMTER COUNTY. 

WILLIAM ALFRED ALTMAN, of York, Sumter county, was born March 
9, 1846. in that county, and is the son of John William Altman, and grand- 
son of John and Olivia Altman, all of Marion district, S. C. William Al- 
fred Altman served in the Confederate army from March, 1862, to the sur- 
render, in 1865. He was a member of the constitutional convention in 
1901; and for sixteen years, until 1900, was on the committee of roads and 
revenues of Sumter county. He is a Democrat, and has for several years 
served on the Democratic executive committee of Sumter county. He is a 
member of the Baptist Church ; is a Mason, and Knight of Pythias. He was 
irairied three times; first, to Roxie Curl; second, to E. S. Brown; third, 
to Loula Brown. 

ROBERT LEE SEALE. of Livingston, was born May 13, 1867, at Gaston, 
Sumter county, and is the son of Thomas Franklin Seale, of Greensboro, 
and wife Mary Eliza, daughter of John and Anna (Stewart) Lockard, of 
Gaston. Mr. Seale was educated in the common schools of his native coun- 
ty. He received a thorough preparation for the bar, and was admitted to 
the practice in Livingston, 1807. He has continuously practiced there since 
that date. In 1894 he was elected to the Legislature, and in J902 was re- 
elected. He was again elected at the general election in 1906. He is a 
Democrat; and a Baptist. He is unmarried. 



TALLADEGA COUNTY. 



• 



JAMES HENRY LAWSON, of Talladega, was born Sept. 27, 1848. at that 
place, and is the son of James and Mary (Elliott) Law son, and the grand- 
son of Robert and Martha (Nickles) Lawson, and of Capt. Thomas and 
Elizabeth Elliott. Robert Lawson and wife lived at Sevierville, Tenn., and 
at Talladega. His son James was born at Sevierville, and afterwards lived 
at Ashville, St. Clair county, then in Talladega, of which he was the first 
post-master. Representative Lawson received his education in Talladega. 
He was a private in company "A," Hardie's Battalion of Reserves, State 
Troops, in the War of Secession; was county surveyor twelve years; public 
school trustee for 18 years; and is now a member of the county board of 
education. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South; and 
of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. On December 31, 1873, at Talla- 
dega, he was married to Alice E., daughter of Col. Thomas J. and Eliza 
Cross of that place. 

JAMES B. SANFORD, of Sylacauga, Talladega county, was born Nov- 
ember 12, 1870, in that county, and is the son of James B. and Lula (Mob- 
erly) Sanford, and the grandson of Charles and Polly (Scott) San- 
ford, and of Ichabod and Mary Moberly. James B. Sanford, Sr., was 
born in Meriweather county, Ga. The Moberly family lived in Talladega 
county. James B. Sanford, Jr., received his elementary education in Syla- 
cauga, and was for two years a student at Howard College, at East Lake. 



116 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

In 1896 he was admitted to the bar in Talladega; was a member of the 
city council of Sylacauga, 1902-04, and elected to the legislature, 1906. He 
is a Democrat, and a member of the executive committee of Talladega 
county; and a Baptist. On February 26, 1896, he was married to Pollie 
L. f daughter of Ephriam and Lucy Led better, of Sycamore. 



TALLAPOOSA COUNTY. 

THOMAS LAFAYETTE BULGER, of Dadeville, Tallapoosa county, was 
born August 16, 1855, in that place, and is the son of Michael Jefferson and 
Mary Elizabeth (Boseman) Bulger, the grandson of M. J. Bulger, Sr., 
and of Nathan and Harriet Bozeman. Michael J. Bulger was born De- 
cember 20, 1799, in Edgefield, S. C. ; was a brigadier-general in the Con- 
federate States army; died at Dadeville, Sept. 4, 1901, aged 100 years, 8 
months, and 15 days. The father of General Bulger was a soldier in the 
army of the Revolution. Representative Bulger's early education was re- 
received in the common country schools ; later he attended the Roanoke Col- 
lege in Virginia four years: and went thence to the U. S. Military Academy 
at West Point. Since 1877, Mr. Bulger has been a practicing lawyer at 
Dadeville; was a member of the State Senate in the session beginning 
November 9, 1886, also a member of the House of Representatives in ses- 
sions beginning November 9, 1898, and November 13, 1900; was a mem- 
ber of the Constitutional Convention of 1901. He is a Democrat, and a 
member of the State executive committee ten years; was a Bryan presi- 
dential elector. He is the superintendent of a Sunday-school in the Metho- 
dist Church, in which he was at one time steward for fifteen years. In 
December, 1880, he was married, at Wetumpka, to Mollie Cade, a daugh- 
ter of Col. John G. Bass. 

JAMES FLETCHER TURNER, of Dadeville, Tallapoosa county, was 
born near that place in 1854, and is the son of Jesse Morgan and Sarah 
Page (Vaughan) Turner, and the grandson of Bartholemew and Sarah 
(Morgan) Turner, and the grandson of James and Sarah Vaughan. Jesse 
M. Turner was born in Georgia, but removed to Tallapoosa county, where 
he resided for many years prior to his death. The Vaughan family also 
lived near Dadeville. Representative Turner received his education in the 
county schools near Dadeville. He is a farmer; an active member of the 
Democratic executive committee of his county; a member of the Presbyte- 
rian church ; and a Knight of Pythias. In 1873, he married May, a daugh- 
ter of Carrol M. and Elizabeth Sims, of Tallapoosa county. 



TUSCALOOSA COUNTY. 

JOHN MANLY FOSTER, of Tuscaloosa, was born at Foster's Tusca- 
loosa county, November 5, 1860, and is the son of Rev. John Collier and 
Georgia A. (Mahorry) Foster, and the grandson of James and Mary Ellen 
Foster, and Joseph and Mary Ann Mahorry. The Foster family spring 
from an English ancestor who early settled in Southampton county, Va. 
John Foster, father of James Foster, was a Revolutionary soldier. The 
Mahorry family came from New York to Augusta, Ga. Representative 
Foster was educated in the country schools; graduated at Howard col- 
lege with the degree of A. B. in 1880; and at the University of Alabama 
with the degree of LL. B. In 1883. Mr. Foster began the practice of law 
at Anniston in 1885, and after one year removed to Tuscaloosa, where he 
has since pursued his profession. He was elected a member of the Legis- 
lature in 1890; solicitor for Tuscaloosa law and equity court in 1897 and 
again in 1901 ; was elected to the Constitutional Convention of 1901, serv- 
ing as chairman of the committee on amending constitution and miscella- 
neous business, and a member of the committee on order, consistency and 
harmony in that body; elected to the Legislature in November, 1902, and 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 117 

again in 1906. Mr. Foster is a Democrat, and a Baptist. His first wife 
was Kathleen Mary Clarke, to whom he was married April 19, 1893, and 
his second, Mabel Radford Clarke, to whom he was married October 12, 
1898, both daughters of Hon. Richard H. Clarke, of Mobile, and wife Mary 
Kate Burke. 

•<% 
FLEETWOOD RICEj of Northport, Tuscaloosa county, was born Decem- 
ber 3, 1875, in Fayette county, and is the son of Tolbert Alexander and 
Sarah Elizabeth (Shelton) Rice, and the grandson of James and Mariah 
T. Rice, who lived in Fayette county, and of Joseph and Jane 
(Chancellor) Shelton, who lived in Tuscaloosa county. James Rice was 
born in Anderson District, S. C, and came to Tuscaloosa with his father, 
Orthonville Rice, in the early settlement of the State. Fleetwood Rice 
received his early education in the common schools of Tuscaloosa county, 
and in the preparatory department of Howard college. East Lake, Ala., 
He entered the Freshman class in the University of Alabama 1894, and 
was graduated in 1898 with the degree of bachelor of science; and from 
the same institution in 1903, with the degree of bachelor of laws. He is 
now practicing law at Tuscaloosa ; and in 1907 was appointed aid-de-camp 
with rank of colonel on Governor Comer's staff. He is a Democrat; is a 
deacon in the Baptist Church; and a member of the Benevolent and Pro- 
tective Order of Elks. On September 19, 1899, he was married, at Midway, 
to Josephine Tait, daughter of S. O. Y. and Josephine Ray. 



WALKER COUNTY. 
i 

JOHN HARVEY CRANFORD, of Jasper, Walker county, was born 
March 12, 1855, near Jasper, and is the son of Chesley Hardy and El- 
martha (Morris) Cranford, and the grandson of John and Elizabeth Cran- 
ford, and of John Harvey and Catherine Morris. C. H. Cranford has 
lived all his life on the farm on which he was born; and saw four years' 
service in the War of Secession. His son, John H. Cranford, was educated 
in the country schools of Walker, in 1875, began teaching, which profes- 
sion he followed for five years; and was then for a while, a clerk in a 
store. He is now president of the first national bank of Jasper, president 
and principal stockholder of the Cranford mercantile company, president 
of the Jasper water, light and power company, and of the Cranford coal 
company. He was once mayor of Jasper, being nominated by acclamation 
and elected without opposition ; is a Democrat ; a member of the Christian 
Church; and a Mason. Mr. Cranford was married October 18, 1892, at 
San Antonio, Texas, to Annis Eleanor, daughter of John and Elizabeth 
Lyon, who lived at Barnesville, Ga. 

ERNEST RENFROE LACY, of Jasper, Walker county, was born in 
Talladega county, Oct. 11, 1877, and is tha son of Sheriff and Mary (Mc- 
Cullough) Lacy, and the grandson of Abner Wise and Martha Ann Lacy, 
of Ashville, and of John Marion and Ruth McCullough. Sheriff Lacy was 
a native of Randolph county and lived at different times in Randolph, St. 
Clair, and Talladega counties, until 1882, when he moved to Jasper, where 
he is now practicing law. John M. McCullough lived in Macon county, 
Alabama; he enlisted in the Confederate army and was killed at the bat- 
tle of Peach Tree Creek, in July, 1864. The Lacy family came from Va., 
and the McCullough family from S. C. Ernest R. Lacy attended Howard 
College in 1894-95; attended the University of Alabama law school during 
the session of 1899-1900 ; graduating with the degree of LL. B. ; began the 
practice of law at Jasper, January 15, 1902, and is now junior member of 
the firm of Lacy & Lacy. He is a Democrat; a member of the Baptist 
Church; and a member of the Knights of Pythias. On November 3, 1903, 
at Jasper, he was married to Gaye Musgrove, daughter of John B. and 
Zou Long. 



118 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

WASHINGTON COUNTY. 

PERRY EDWARDS, of Escatawpa, Washington county, was born 
■near Maplesville, In Bibb (now Chilton) county, and is the son 
of John Sandford and Mary Ann (Cox) Edwards and the grand- 
son of Isaac Edwards and his wife who was the daughter 
of Benjamin Lawley, and also of Mathew and Nancy (Law- 
ley) Cox. The families of both grandparents lived near Maplesville. The 
father of Isaac Edwards, William Edwards, was an English emigrant, 
settling in N. C. John S. Edwards was born in Randolph county, N. C, 
but removed to Tyler, Texas, where he taught school and served as a 
justice of the peace for many years. Perry Edwards was educated by his 
father in Texas up to his fourteenth year; and after this, he attended 
country schools. He served iu Co. "F," 11th Alabama Infantry Regiment, 
C. S. A., and was, in all the principal battles of the army of Northern 
Virginia until the surrender at Appomattox. Mr. Edwards is a Democrat ; 
and is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. He married 
Mrs. Julia A. Turner, near Louisville, Miss., daughter of Joel Green and 
wife, who was a Miss Baxter. 



WILCOX COUNTY. 

SOLOMON DANIEL BLOCH, of Camden, Wilcox county, was born in 
that town January 16, 1855, and is the son of Daniel W. and Janette 
(Kahn) Bloch, and the grandson of Wolf Samuel Bloch of Floss, Bavaria, 
and of Solomon and Agatha Kahn, of Gfrossbockenhelm, Bavaria. Daniel 
W. Bloch was born in Floss, Bavaria ; migrated to the United States, and 
was one of the first settlers in Camden ; was a merchant and planter, noted 
for his energy and public spirit; and served in the War of Secession in 
the 2.3rd Alabama Infantry Regiment, C. S. A., and later on the staff of 
Gen. B. Y. Ramsey. Representative Block received his early education in 
Camden, and later attended the Barton Academy in Mobile. He afterwards 
studied law, and was admitted to the practice, but his large and varied 
business interests required his time so completely that he was compelled 
to relinquish the law for an active business career. He served two terms 
as mayor of Camden, in 1882 and 1884 ; served for some time as county 
commissioner of Wilcox county, and is now and has been many terms, an 
alderman of Camden. In the Alabama State troops he served as a captain 
on Major James T. Beck's staff until 1902. Representative Bloch has al- 
ways been a Democrat; has served on the Wilcox county executive com- 
mittee almost continuously since 1880; was a member of the Democratic 
State committee, 1888, 1890 and 1892; and in 1880 he was a member of 
the Democratic central executive committee, and is now again a member 
of that body. In 1892, while a senator from Wilcox county, Mr. Bloch pre- 
pared and introduced the bill establishing the Alabama Girls' Industrial 
School, which after some opposition, became a law ; in 1890, Senator Bloch 
was appointed one of the first trustees, a i>osition which he has held un- 
der every successive administration to the present time. He was chairman 
of the finance committee for eight years, and aided in bringing the school 
through its financial troubles, but would accept no compensation for his 
services as trustee and as financier. In recognition of these services, 
however, the board of trustees ordered that his life size portrait be per- 
manently displayed on the walls of the chapel of the school at Montevallo. 
Senator Bloch is recognized as the founder of the school, and takes a con- 
stant interest in its welfare. He is a member of the national geographic 
society, Washington, D. C. ; is a member of the State good roads associa- 
tion ; was the prime mover in the Montgomery, Hayneville and Camden 
Railroad, a projected road from Atlanta and Montgomery to New Orleans, 
and is its president. The parents of Representatives Bloch were Israelites, 
and while he has never connected himself with any congregation or church, 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 119 

« 

he 1b a regular attendant upon all temple and church services. He is a 
Mason, and a Knight of Pythias. He is the founder of the Wilcox Progress, 
and from 1887 until 1897, when he sold the paper, he was its editor and 
proprietor. He is a member of Camp I. G. W. Steedman, U. S. C. V., at 
Camden, and was. elected Camp historian, a position which he now holds. 
He is unmarried. 

LEE McMILLAX, of Gastonburg, Wilcox county, was born January 12, 
1865, at Gee's Bend, in that county, and is the son of James A. and Emma 
Jane (Heath) McMillan. Both parents were from Virginia. The father 
was born in Didwiddie county, and came to Gee's Bend in early life. 
Representative McMillan was educated in the old town of Rehoboth, in 
Wilcox county, Alabama; has been a successful fanner, merchant, and 
banker; from 1890 to 1892 was editor of the Wilcox Progress, at Camden; 
was a member of the Legislature, 1900-01; member of the Constitutional 
Convention, 1901; mayor of Gastonburg, 1901 to 1905; is at present a 
member of the county board of education, and re-elected to the Legisla- 
ture, 1906. He is a Democrat and, for fifteen or twenty years, served as 
a member of the county executive committee; also has been a delegate to 
several State conventions. Mr. McMillan is a Methodist; and a Mason. 
On October 18, 1886, at Rehoboth, he was married to Pearl Omega, 
daughter of John H. and Fannie (Moss) Malone. 



WINSTON COUNTY. 

WILLIAM MARION BARTON, of Lynn, Winston county, was born 
August 17, 1856, at Gainesville, Hall county, Ga., and is the son of Jona- 
than Bartow and his wife, who was a Miss Blackstock. His grandparents 
were Willis and Peggie Barton and Daniel and Patsy Blackstock, all of 
Hall county, Ga. Jonathan Barton lived at Gainesville, Ga., until 1858, 
when he moved to Winston county, Ala. He served one year in the 1st 
Alabama Regiment, Federal army. William M. Barton was educated in 
the common schools of Winston county. He is a Republican; a member 
of the Christian Church; an Odd Fellow, and a Mason. He was married 
at Haley, Marion county, to Martha J., daughter of William and Martha 
Lambert. 



V. STATE INSTITUTIONS. 



UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA. 

University, Tuscaloosa County. 

(Code, 1896, Vol. i, Sec. S661 et sea.; General Laws, 1898, pp. 69-74; 1900-01, 
p. 198; 1903, pp. 109, 2*9, S08, 289; and 1907, pp. 18S, 282, 900, 367.) 

President. — John W. Abercrombie, LL. D., University. 

Bursor-Registrar. — G. Herbert Jones, University. 

Secretary to the Board of Trustees. — Robison Brown, of Tuscaloosa. 

Treasurer. — James H. Fitts, of Tuscaloosa. 

Land Commissioner. — Robison Brown, of Tuscaloosa. 

Trustees. — Braxton B. Comer, Governor, ex-offlcio. 

Harry C. Gunnel Is, Supt. of Education, ex-offlcio. 

1st District — Thomas M. Stevens, of Mobile; term expires 

1919. 
2nd District — M. P. LeGrand, of Montgomery; term ex- 
pires 1911. 
3rd District — Eugene H. Glenn, of Seale; term expires 1918. 
4th District — J. H. Johnson, of Talladega; term expires 

1919. 
5th District— Daniel Pratt, of Prattville; term expires 1911. 
6th District — Thomas W. Coleman, of Eutaw ; term expires 

1919. 

Henry B. Foster, of Tuscaloosa; term ex- 
pires 1918. 
7th District — Hubert T. Davis, of Gadsden; term expires 

1911. 
8th District — Thomas C. McClellan, of Athens; term ex- 
pires 1918. 
9th District — Hugh Morrow, of Birmingham ; term expires 

1911. 

JOHN WILLIAM ABERCROMBIE. University, P. O., was born 
May 17, 1866, near Kelly's Creek, St. Clair county, and is the son of 
Henry Monroe and Sarah Anne (Kendrick) Abercrombie, and the grand- 
son of Isaac and Nancy (Dowdy) Abercrombie, and of Andrew Jackson 
Kendrick. The Abercrombies, Dowdys and Kendricks have for many years 
been residents of St. Clair county. Henry Monroe Abercrombie was a 
private in the Confederate army, and after the War conducted a farm 
and country store at Kelly's Creek. Dr. John W. Abercrombie was educated 
in the country schools, and at Oxford College, Oxford, Ala., from which he 
graduated with the A. B. degree in 1886. He graduated with the LL. B. de- 
gree from the University of Alabama, 1888. His career in educational 
work has been continuous since 1888 as follows: President Ashland Col- 
lege, 1886-87; principal Cleburne Institute, 1888-89; president Bowdon 
(Ga.) College, 1889-90; superintendent public schools, Anniston, 1890-97, 
and president Anniston College for Young Ladies, 1897-98. He served as 
mayor of Edwardsvilte, 1889-90, and as a member of the State Senate 
from Calhoun and Cleburne counties 1896-97, and 1898-99. He was elected 
State superintendent of education In 1898 and served until 1902, during 
which time he did much work in developing a greater Interest in the public 
schools of Alabama. In 1902 he was chosen to the presidency of the State 

(120) 



STATE INSTITUTIONS. 121 

University, a position which he now holds. In 1006, under his direction, 
the University celebrated its 75th anniversary. He is a Democrat; a dea- 
con in the Missionary Baptist Church at Tuscaloosa; and a member of 
the Knights of Pythias. He is the author of the Reports and publications 
of the State department of education, issued during his term, and he is 
also the author of several addresses, booklets and documents on educa- 
tional subjects. In addition to his political service in the State, he has 
been active in the larger field of educational effort, having served as 
president of the Southern Educational Association, 1905-06, as vice-presi- 
dent of the department of superintendents of the National Educational 
Association, 1903, and as a member of the board of directors of the N. 
E. A., 1900-1903. On January 8, 1891, at Edwardsville, he married Rosa, 
daughter of James Benjamin and Elizabeth (Faver) Merrill. 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT OF THE UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA. 

Mobile, Mobile County. 

Dean. — Rhett Goode, M. D., of Mobile. 
Secretary. — T. H. Frazer, M. D., of Mobile. 

RHETT GOODE, M. D., of Mobile, Dean of the Medical College, was born 
in Mobile, Dec. 5, 1852, and is the son of Garland and Frances (Burns) 
Goode, and the grandson of Philip and Caroline (Williams) Goode. Gar-> 
land Goode was a native of South Carolina, emigrated to Conecuh county, 
Ala,, and prior to 1840 be located in Mobile; was a major in the Florida 
war; was a man of large means, and noted for his contributions to the 
Confederate cause. He was a descendant of John Goode, who emigrated 
from England and settled an estate which he called "Whitby," near Rich- 
mond, Va., where he died in 1709. Dr. Rhett Goode received his elemen- 
tary education at home under a governess; afterwards entered Spring Hill 
College, which he left before graduating; and graduated from the Medical 
College of Alabama in April, 1871. He at once began the practice of his 
profession, and fcr thirty-six years has resided in Mobile. In that period, 
he has also been Councilman, Alderman, Mayor pro tern of the city, 
health officer, county physician, and president of Quarantine Board of 
Mobile Bay. He was assistant instructor of anatomy in his alma mater 
from the time of graduation, until 1885, when he became instructor; in 
1891 was elected to the office of professor of anatomy and chemical sur- 
gery which position he still holds; in 1906, on the death of Dr. George A. 
Ketchum, he was elected dean by the faculty; and in the spring of 1907 
when the College, by act of the Legislature, became the Medical Depart- 
ment of the Uniyersity of Alabama, the trustees confirmed his position 
as dean. He is a member of the Medical Association of Alabama and one 
of its board of counsellors; and he is also a member of the American Med- 
ical Association. In the yellow fever epidemic of 1882, Dr. Goode worked 
night and day as one cf the physicians of the Can't-Get-Away Club, a local 
organization that took care of all yellow fever patients, who were without 
a regular physician or unable to provide for themselves. In every epi- 
demic since the time he began the practice cf medicine, he has taken a 
prominent part in the extermination of that dread disease. Dr. Goode is 
a member of the International Association of Southern Railway Surgeons; 
is chief surgeon of the Mobile and Ohio Railway Company, the Southern 
Railway in Mississippi, and the Mobile, Jackson and Kansas City Railway 
Company. In 1906, Dr. Goode was a delegate from the United States to 
the Pan American Medical Congress which was held in the City of Mex- 
ico. He has likewise been appointed one of the three representatives from 
the United States to the Pan American Congress to be held in the City of 
Mexico in December, 1907. Dr. Goode is a Democrat, and a member of 
the Democratic executive committee of Mobile county, of which he has 



|22 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

served as chairman; is a Baptist; and a Mason. He is the author of a 
number of papers on medical and surgical subjects which have been pub- 
lished in pamphlet form, and in the medical journals. On October 28, 
1886, Dr. Goode was married to Mabel Wiley, daughter of William H. H. 
and Maria (Marfield) Hutton, the former a surgeon in the U. S. marine 
hospital service. 



ALABAMA POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE. 

Auburn, Lee County. 

(Code, 1896, Vol. i, Sec. 398, and 8686 et scq.; and General Laws, 1908, pp. 

66, 1H0, 228, 259, 885; 1901, pp. 178-174, 283.) 

President. — Charles Coleman Thach, LL. D., of Auburn. 

Secretary to Board of Trustees. — R. W. Burton, of Auburn. 

Treasurer. — Miss M. A. Glenn, of Auburn. 

Surgeon. — Dr. J. H. Drake, of Auburn. 

Trustees. — Braxton Bragg Comer, Governor, cx-offlcio. 

Harry C. Gunnells, Supt. of Education, cx-offlcio. 

1st District — Rev. J. S, Frazer, of Mobile; term expires 

1905. 
2nd District — R. F. Ligon, of Montgomery; term expires 

1911. 
3rd District — Harry L. Martin, of Ozark; term expires 1915. 

R. B. Barnes, of Opelika; term expires 1915. 
4th District — A. W. Bell, of Annlston; term expires 1919. 
5th District — N. D. Denson, of Lafayette ; term expires 1919. 
Oth District — W. C. Davis, of Jasper ; term expires 1911. 
7th District — Wm. F. Feagin, of Gadsden; term expires 

1919. 
8th District — Tancred Betts, of Huntsville ; term expires 

1911. 
9th District — Wm. K. Terry, of Birmingham ; term expires 
1915. 

CHARLES COLEMAN THACH, of Auburn, Lee county, was born March 
15, 1860, at Athens. Limestone county, and is the son of Robert Henry and 
Eliza Lockhart (Coleman) Thach, of Mooresville, Limestone county, and 
the grandson of William Thomas and Frances Anne (Sandifer) Thach, 
of Mooresville, and of Daniel and Elizabeth Lockhart (Peterson) Coleman, 
of Athens, and the great-grandson of Daniel Coleman, a colonel in the Rev- 
olutionary War from Virginia, aud wife Martha, daughter of Hartwell 
Cocke, a member of the Virginia House of Burgesses. The Petersons are 
from North Carolina. Robert H. Thach was a graduate of Emory and 
Henry College, Va., was a soldier in the army of Northern Virginia, C. 
S. A., and a practicing lawyer at the Athens bar. Dr. Thach was educated 
in the private academies of Athens; and at the Agricultural and Me- 
chanical College (now the Alabama Polytechnic Institute), Auburn, from 
which he graduated in 1877 with a degree of B. E. Later Dr. Thach took 
a special course at the Johns Hopkins University. He received the honor- 
ary degree of A. M.; and in 1904 he was given the honorary degree of doctor 
of laws by the University of Alabama. He taught in Major O. J. Fer- 
rell's private academy at Hopkinsville', Ky., 1877; was professor of mod- 
ern languages, Austin College, Texas, 1881-82; professor of English at the 
Alabama Polytechnic Institute, 1885 to date; and on the death of Dr. 
William Leroy Broun was made president of that institution, June 9, 1902. 
Dr. Thach is a member of the Alabama Educational Association, the South- 
ern Educational Association, the National Educational Association, and the 
American Economic Association, before all of which he has presented pa- 
pers. He was a member of the Alabama History Commission, appointed 



STATE INSTITUTIONS. 123 

In 1899, by Governor Joseph F. Johnston, and a member of the Alabama 
Text Book Commission, appointed, 1903, by Governor Wm. D. Jelks. ' He 
is first vice-president of the National Association of Agricultural Colleges 
and Experiment stations. He was one of the organizers of the Alabama 
Library Association in 1904, and has since that date served as one of its 
vice-presidents. He is a steward in the Methodist Church, and a mem- 
ber of the Knights of Pythias. At Auburn, Nov. 11, 1885, he was married 
to Ellen Stanford, daughter of Dr. Otis David and Antoinette (Howell) 
Smith, the former a lineal descendant of Jonathan Smith of Revolutionary 
fame, eulogized by Daniel Webster, and the latter a descendant of the Bur- 
well family of Virginia. Dr. O. D. Smith was a gallant member of the 
6th Alabama Infantry Regiment, C. S. A., and long professor of mathe- 
matics in the A. P. I. 



ALABAMA GIRLS' INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL. 

Montevallo, Shelby County. 

(General Laws, 1892-98, pp. 1002; 189Q-99, pp. 70, 75, 222 ; 1900-01, pp. 56, 
182; 1903, pp. 54, 1S5, 236; and 1907, pp. 135-136, 172-173.) 

President. — Thomas Waverly Palmer, LL. D., of Tuscaloosa. 
Vice-President. — J. Alex Moore, of Montevallo. 
Treasurer. — Frank S. Moody, of Tuscaloosa. 
Trustees. — Braxton B. Comer, Governor, cx-offfcio. 

Harry C. Gunnells, Supt. of Education, ex-offlcio. 

State at Large — H. S. D. Mai lory, term ending Jan. 12, 1909. 

State at Large — Virgil Bouldin, term ending Jan. 12, 1909. 

1st District — Huriosco Austill, of Mobile; term ending 

January 12, 1909. 

2nd District — Sol D. Bloch, of Camden; term ending Jan- 
uary 12, 1909. 

3rd District — A. H. Alston, of Clayton; term ending Jan- 
uary 12, 1911. 

4th District — Rev. J. T. Mangum, of Tallassee; term end- 
ing January 12, 1913. 

5th District — M. A. Graham, of Prattville; terra ending 

January 12, 1911. 

6th District 4 — W. E. W. Yerby, of Greensboro; term ending 

January 12, 1913. 
• 7th District — W. W. Haralson, of Ft. Payne; term ending 

January 12, 1913. 

8th District — J. C. Kumpe, of Moulton; term ending Janu- 
ary 12, 1913. 

9th District — Sam'I Will John, of Birmingham ; term ending 

January 12, 1911. 

THOMAS WAVERLY PALMER, of Montevallo, was born May, 19. 
1860, at Snow Hill (now Furman) Wilcox county, and is the son of Dab- 
ney and Martha (Simpson) Palmer, and the grandson of Stephen and Ju- 
liet (Hartwell) Palmer, and of Thomas W. and Civility (Jackson) Simp- 
son, of Belleville, Conecuh county. Stephen Palmer was born in Halifax 
county, Va., but early removed to Wilcox county, Ala. The father of 
Thomas W. Simpson was a native of Scotland. Dabney Palmer resided in 
Wilcox and Washington counties, and was a member of the Constitutional 
Convention of Alabama, 1901. Dr. Palmer was educated at the country 
schools; was at Howard College, Marion, 1877-78; and gnuluated at the 
University of Alabama, with the A. M. degree, 1891. Dr. Palmer was the 
first student to enroll in the engineering department of the University, 
from which he graduated in 1882 with the B. E. degree. He was a gradu- 
ate student of the summer school of the University of Chicago, 1897, 1898, 



124 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

and 1899. He was instructor of mathematics, University of Alabama, 
1881-82; associate professor of mathematics 1882-83; professor of mathe- 
matics, 1883-1907; and dean of the academic faculty, 1905-1907. In May, 
1907, he was elected president of the Alabama Girls' Industrial School to 
succeed Dr. Francis M. Peterson, who resigned on account of ill health. 
Dr. Palmer is a member of the Baptist Church. In 1901 he published' a 
Register of the officers and students of the University of Alabama, 1831- 
1901. From 1898 to 1907 he was secretary of the Society of the Alumni 
of the University. On December 22, 1886, at Union Springs, he was mar- 
ried to Lulu, daughter of Capt. Joel Herron and Roxana (Ellis) Rainer. 
The Rainer family is closely related to the family of Governor Kenneth 
Rainor, of North Carolina. 



ALABAMA STATE NORMAL COLLEGE AND MODEL TRAINING 

SCHOOL. 

Florence, Lauderdale County. 

President. — Prof. Marshall C. Wilson, of Florence. 

Treasurer. — T. R. Powers, of Florence. 

Trustees. — Braxton B. Comer, Governor, ex-offlcio. 

Harry C. Gunnells, Supt. of Education, ex-officio. 

Archibald H. Carmichael, of Tuscumbia ; term expires 1909. 

John F. Proctor, of Scottsboro; term expires 1909. 

George P. Jones, of Florence; term expires 1911. 

John B. Weakly, of Birmingham; term expires 1911. 

Dempsey M. Powell, of Greenville; term expires 1913. 

J. Kirkman Jackson, Secretary, of Montgomery; term ex- 
pires 1913. 

MARSHALL CLARK W r ILSON, of Florence, was born January 20, 1855, 
at Russell v Hie, Franklin county, and is the son of Bryce and Mary Ann 
(Edwards) Wilson, and the grandson of Alexander and Clementina 
(McQuiston) Wilson, of Knock Brex, town of Newtcn Stewart, county Gal- 
loway, ocotland, and of James G. and Lucinda (Nooe) Edwards of Paris, 
Ky., and Russellville, Ala. Bryce W T ilson came from Scotland to America, 
and resided in Bolivar, Tenn., and Russellville, Ala. His father, Alexander 
Wilson, was the grandson of Thomas Wilson who was driven out of Scot- 
land by Archbishop Laud, on account of his refusal to conform to the 
practices of the English Church. James G. Edwards was the grandson of 
James Garrard, the first governor of Kentucky, and his wife, Lucinda Nooe, 
was the granddaughter of Governor Slaughter, of Virginia. Prof. Wilson 
was educated in a classical school in Franklin county, and also in the home 
of his parents. He graduated from the University of Virginia in 1876, 
with the C. E. degree; and later studied two years in the Harvard sum- 
mer school. He has taught in the public schools of Franklin and Colbert 
counties; has held the chair of natural science. State Normal College, 
1881-97; and elected president of the same institution in July of the last 
named year. He is a Democrat, and a vestryman in the Episcopal Church. 
He was married September 5, 1895, to Alice Christie, daughter of David 
Hamilton and Rebecca (Lord) De Voe, of Lyons, N. Y. The De Voes are 
French Huguenots, but intermarried with the celebrated Adams family of 
Massachusetts. 



STATE NORMAL COLLEGE. 

Troy, Pike County. 

President. — Edward M. Shackelford, Ph. D., of Troy. 
Treasurer. — L. H. Bowles, of Troy. 



STATE INSTITUTIONS. 125 

Trustees. — Braxton B. Comer, Governor, ex-offtcio. 

Harry C. Gunnel Is, Supt. of Education, ex-offlcio. 

J. Thomas Heflin, of Lafayette ; term expires May 23, 1909. 

C. P. Rogers, of Letohatchie; term expires May 23, 1909. 
W. W. Lavender, of Centreville; term expires May 23, 1909. 
O. C. Wiley, of Troy; term expires May 23, 1911. 

Dr. Glenn Andrews, of Montgomery; terav expires May 

23, 1911. 
Charles Henderson, of Troy ; term expires May 23, 1911. 
Dr. S. S. Pugh, of Mobile; term expires May 23, 1913. 

D. S. Bethune, of Union Springs ; term expires May 23, 1913. 
P. B. Davis, of Chancellor; term expires May 23, 1913. 

EDWARD MADISON SHACKELFORD, of Troy, was born February 1, 
1863, at Pintlala, Montgomery county, and is the son of Madison and So- 
phronia Jane (Ledbetter) Shackelford, of Montgomery county, and Is the 
grandson of George and Annettie {Jeter) Shackelford, and David E. and 
Pallie Harrison (Smith) Ledbetter, of Morgan vi lie (now Tyson), Ala. 
The Shackelfords came from Edgefield, S. C, in 1818, and settled in Mont- 
gomery county, while the Jeters were from Georgia, and the Ledbetters 
from Petersburg, Va. Prof. Shackelford obtained his education in the rural 
schools of his native county; and the University of Alabama from which 
he graduated, with the A. B. degree, in 1885. He began teaching in Troy, 
in 1885; was assistant in the male high school there two years; was pro- 
fessor of English and Civics in the State Normal College for twelve years, 
and since 1900 has been president of that institution. He has served as 
captain of the Oates Rifles, Co. "B," 2nd Regiment, Alabama State troops, 
and also as captain of the Troy Rifles, Co. "H" 1st Regiment. He is a 
Democrat ; a deacon in the First Baptist Church at Troy ; and is a member 
of the Knights of Pythias. He has taken an intense interest in educational 
work and has for twenty years been a regular attendant upon the meet- 
ings of the Alabama Educational Association, for which he served as sec- 
retary two years. His wife is Rosa Lee Brantley, to whom he was married 
February 1, 1886, the daughter of Thomas Kirven and Sarah (Hill) Brant- 
ley, of Troy. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

Jacksonville, Calhoun County. 

President. — Clarence Wm. Daugette, M. S., of Jacksonville. 
Treasurer. — George P. Ide, of Jacksonville. 
Directors. — Braxton B. Comer, Governor, ex-offlcio. 

Harry C. Gunnells, Supt. of Education, ex-offlcio. 

I. L. Brock, Center; term ending March 13, 1909. 

A. A. Hurst, Edwardsville; term ending March 13, 1909. 

W. W. Hames, of Jacksonville; term ending March 13, 1911. 

Jno. C. Fcrney, Birmingham; term ending March 13, 1911. 

Wat T. Brown, of Ragland; term ending March 13, 1913. 

John D. McNeel, of Talladtga; term ending March 13, 1913. 

CLARENCE WILLIAM DAUGETTE, of Jacksonville, was born October 
14, 1873, at Bell's Landing, Monroe county, and is the son of Thomas Wil- 
liam and Clara Janet (Rankin) Daugette, from Clarke county, Ga., to 
Burnt Corn, Ala., and the grandson of Chatham and Matilda (Campbell) 
Daugette, and of Hugh and Clarissa Janet (Abnep) Rankin, and the great- 
grandson of Duncan and Janet Rankin, and of Captain Henry Lark and 
Martha Abney. The Rankins were of Scotch origin, while the Abney's 
came from South Carolina, — all to South Alabama. Thomas W. Daugette 
served for four years in the Confederate army, and was a member of Co. 
"H," 2nd Alabama Cavalry Regiment. Prof. Daugette was educated at 



126 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

the Monroeville Academy, and at the Alabama Polytechnic Institute, gradu- 
ating, 1893, with the degree of B. S., and with M. Sc. degree In 1894. He 
was an assistant at the A. P. I., 1893-94. He first taught school at Repton, 
Ala., in 1887, and afterwards at Range and Kent> taught science in the 
State Normal School, 1894 to 1898, when he was elected president, a posi- 
tion he still retains. He is a Democrat; a vestryman in the Protestant Epis- 
copal Church,; and a member of the Masons and the Woodmen of the 
World. He has been a member of the Alabama Educational Association 
since 1896, and has served as first vice-president, secretary, and as a mem- 
ber of its executive committee. He is editor of the Normal School Bulle- 
tin, a magazine for teachers, issued quarterly by the school of which he 
is president. At Jacksonville, Ala., Dec. 22, 1897, he was married to An- 
nie Rowan, daughter of John Horace and Septima Sexta Middleton (Rut- 
ledge) Forney, of Calhoun county. General Forney was a graduate of 
West Point, 1852, and a major general in the C. S. A. 



ALABAMA NORMAL COLLEGE FOR GIRLS. 

Livingston, Sumter County. 

PreHden t.-r- Miss Julia S. Tutwiler, of Livingston. 
Secretary of Faculty. — George W. Brock, of Livingston. 
Treasurer. — W. S. Nichols, of Livingston. 
Trustees. — Braxton B. Coiner, Governor, cx-offlcio. 

Harry C. Gunnells, Supt. of Education, ex-offleio. 

W. S. Nichols, of Livingston; for two years. 

B. B. Barnes, of Eutaw; for two years. 

John C. Webb, of Demopolis; for four years. 

Henry Fitts, of Tuscaloosa; for four years. 

P. B. Jarman, of Livingston ; for six years. 

E. M. Elliott, of Moundvllle; for six years. 

MISS JULIA STRUDWICK TUTWILER, of Livingston, is the daughter 
of the distinguished educator, Dr. Henry Tutwiler and wife Julia Ashe, 
daughter of Paoli Pascal and Elizabeth (StruduHck) Ashe, of Tuscaloosa. 
Dr. Tutwiler was a native of Harrisonburg, Rockingham county, Va. The 
Ashes and Strudwicks are of North Carolina stock. Miss Tutwiler was 
trained by her father ; attended school for two winters in Philadelphia ; 
and was for a year at Vassar College. She afterwards taught for a num- 
ber of years, partly in Greensboro, but principally at her father's high 
school at Green Springs. During a year's rest, she took private lessons 
in Greek and Latin from the professor of those languages in Washington 
and Lee University. Later she traveled on the continent of Europe, studied 
for a year in a Normal Seminary and afterward resided for nearly two 
years in and near Berlin, where she both studied and taught. During five 
years after her return from Germany she taught in the Tuscaloosa Female 
College, with the exception of one scholastic year, most of which was 
spent in Paris. Of numerous applicants she was selected as th3 represen- 
tative of the National Journal of Education, Boston, at the Paris Exposi- 
tion, 1878. Miss Tutwiler has been an active member of tho National 
Educational Association, before which she has presented papers on educa- 
tional subjects, and in 1891-92 she was president of one the departments 
of the Association. She was invited to attend three of the World's con- 
gresses which met in Chicago during the summer of 1893. was a member 
of the Congress of Representative Women of the World, the International 
Congress of Charities and Corrections, and was also apiwinted to read 
an article in the Assembly Hall of the Woman's Building. She was sec- 
retary for Alabama of the International Congress of Charities and Cor- 
rections, and one of the vice-presidents of the International Congress of 
Education. She was appointed by the governor to represent Alabama at 



STATE INSTITUTIONS. 127 

the casting of the new Liberty Bell. She was also appointed one of the 
judges of the Department of Liberal Arts of the World's Fair, in 1893, and 
in this capacity remained during the summer in Chicago. As a result of 
her efforts largely, the University of Alabama was opened to the girls of 
the State in October, 1898, and the building occupied by the girl students 
is known as the "Julia S. Tutwiler Annex." She has also labored long 
for prison reform in Alabama. For many years she has been the president 
of the Alabama Normal College, at Livingston. She is a contributor to va- 
rious periodicals and to the public press; and is the author of numerous 
songs, including "Alabama," "Dixie Now," and "The Southern Yankee 
Doodle," which are used in the public schools of the State. 



NORMAL SCHOOL FOR THE EDUCATION OF WHITE TEACHERS. 

Daphne, Baldwin County. 

(General Laxcs, 1907, pp. 268-272.) 

Trustees. — Braxton B. Comer, Governor, ew-offlcio. 

Harry C. Gunnells, Supt. of Education, ex-officio. 

J. A. B. Lovett, President of the School, ex-officio. 

Oscar O. Bayles, of Monroeville. 

Rev. D. A. Planck, of Mobile. 

J: R. Dixon, of Daphne. 

It. E. Blount, of Sunflower. 

J. II. L. Henley, of Bradley. 



DISTRICT AGRICULTURAL SCHOOLS AND EXPERIMENT STATIONS. 

{Code. vol. i. 1M6, Sec. hQ) et seq., and note.) 

Braxton- B. Comer, Governor. 

Harry C. Gunnells, Supt. of Education. 

J. A. Wilkinson, Com. Agriculture and Industrie*. 

All ex-officio members of the several boards of control named 
below. 
Secretary-Treasurer of the Board of Control. — tVin. F. Feagin, office 

of Superintendent of Education, Montgomery. 

FIRST DISTRICT. 

President. — W. F. Monk, of Jackson. 
Local Board. — G. W. Powe, of Jackson. 

S. A. Adams, of Jackson. 

SECOND DISTRICT. 

President. — W. W. HaJI, of Evergreen. • 
Ijocal Board. — W. C. Cruinpton, of Evergreen. 

C\ P. Iteming, of Evergreen. 

THIRD DISTRICT. 

President. — Clarence J. Owens, LL. I)., of Abbeville. 
Local Board. — M. V. Capps, of Abbeville. 

N. B. Crawford, of Dothan. 



128 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 



FOURTH DISTRICT. 

President. — T. C. Moore, of Sylacauga. 
Local Board. — C. A. Hall, of Sylacauga. 

John C. Williams, of Talladega. 

FIFTH DISTRICT. 

President. — L. L. Vann, of Wetumpka. 
Local Board. — Morris Hohenberg, of Wetumpka. 

J. M. Jenkins, of Wetumpka. 

/ 4 SIXTH DISTRICT. 

President. — H. O. Sargent, of Hamilton. 
Local Board.^- W. H. Carpenter, of Hamilton. 

James Terry Johnson, of Hamilton. 

SEVENTH DISTRICT. 

President. — J. B. Hobdy, of Albertville. 
Local Board. — W. W. Haralson, of Ft. Payne. 

S. W. Riddle, of Albertville. 

EIGHTH DISTRICT. 

President. — J. M. Atkinson, of Athens. 
Local Board. — Theo. Westmoreland, of Athens. 

N. M. Rowe, of Triana. 

NINTH DISTRICT. 

President. — E. A. Miller, of Blountsville. 
Local Board. — Rev. Jos. I. Williams, of Ensley. 

A. E. Fields, of Blountsville. 



CANEBRAKE AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION. 

Uniontown, Perry County. 

(Code, 1896, vol. i, Sections 398-403.) 

Station Staff. — J^. F. Duggar, Director, of Auburn. 

J. M. Richeson, Asst. Director in charge, of Uniontown. 
J. F. Connor, V. M. D., Veterinarian, of Uniontown. 
Board of Control. — J. A. Wilkinson, Commissioner of Agriculture and 

Industries, ex-officio. 
Wm. Mumford, of Uniontown. 
Dr. J. Huggins, of Newbern. 
W. H. Tayloe, of Uniontown. 
R. A. Hardie, of Uniontown. 
J. B. Garber, of Laneville. 



STATE INSTITUTIONS FOR THE DEAF, DUMB AND BLIND. 

Talladega, Talladega County. 

(Code, 1896, Vol. i, Sec. 3698 et seq.; and General Laics, 1903, p. 353 ; and 

1901, p. 281.) 

Principal. — Joseph Henry Johnson, of Talladega. 



STATE INSTITUTIONS. 129 

Trustees. — Braxton B. Comer, Governor, ex-officio. 

Harry C. Gunnel Is, Supt. of Education, ex-offlcio. 

1st District. — J. C. Webb, Demopolis; term expires Nov. 

28, 1008. 
2nd District. — W. W. Screws, Montgomery; term expires 

Nov. 28, 1908. 
3rd District. — -J. B. Lyons, Opelika; term expires Nov. 

28, 1908. 
4th District. — J. H. Hicks, Talladega;, term expires Nov. 

28, 1908. 
5th District. — H. P. Merritt, Tuskegee; term expires Nov. 

28, 1910. 
6th District. — M. B. Cameron, Eutaw; term expires Nov. 

28, 1910. 
4th District. — J. B. McMillan, Talladega ; term expires Nov. 

28, 1910. 
7th District. — W. J. Boykin, Gadsden; term expires Nov. 

28, 1912. 
8th District. — T. M. Hobbs, Athens; term expires Nov. 

28, 1912. 
9th District. — S. E. Greene, Birmingham ; term expires Nov. 

28, 1912. 
4th District. — G. A. Joiner, Talladega; term expires Nov. 

28, 1912. 

JOSEPH HENRY JOHNSON, of Talladega, was born May 13, 1864, in 
that town, and is the son of Joseph Henry and Emily Ann (Darden) John- 
son, and the grandson of Seaborn Jones and Minerva Elizabeth (Fannin) 
Johnson, and of Abner and Nancy (Morris) Darden., Joseph H. Johnson, 
Sr., was a native of Madison, Morgan county, Ga. ; removed to Talladega ; 
was principal of the Alabama School for the Deaf and Blind, 1858-1893; 
and during the War of Secession was captain of the Alabama Rifles, 1st 
Alabama Infantry Regiment, 1861-62. Prof. Johnson, the son, was educated 
in the common schools of Talladega, and at the University of Alabama, 
A. B. 1881, and A. M. 1882. In September, 1882, he began teaching in the 
Alabama School for the Deaf, continuing this position until 1884; taught 
in the Kentucky School for the Deaf, 1884-88 ; was assistant principal of 
the Alabama Schools for Deaf and Blind; and on the death of his father, 
1893, he succeeded him as principal, a position he still holds. In 1884 he 
was captain of the Talladega Rifles, Alabama State troops. He is a Demo- 
crat, and has served as chairman of the Talladega county executive com- 
mittee, and has been a delegate to many State conventions of his party. 
He is a steward in the Methodist Church. On July 9, 1884, at Tuscaloosa, 
Ala., he was married to Nellie Guild, daughter of Dr. John Edward and 
Virginia (Guild) Hall, and the grand-daughter of Dr. James and Mary 
(Williams) Guild, and the great-granddaughter of Marmaduke and Agnes 
(Payne) Williams, all of Tuscaloosa. 



ALABAMA INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR WHITE BOYS. 

East Lake, Jefferson County. 

(General Laics, 1808-99, pp. 158-163; and 1907, pp. 182-8S, 307-08.) 

Directors. — Braxton B. Comer, Governor, ex-officio. 

Alexander M. Garber, Attorney-General, ex-officio. 
J. A. Wilkinson, Com. of Agriculture and Industries, ex- 
officio. 
President. — Mrs. Robert D. Johnston, of Birmingham. 
Vice-President. — Mrs. Erwin Craighead, of Mobile. 
9 



130 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

Treasurer. — Mrs. T. G. Bush, of Birmingham. 
Secretary. — Mrs. A. W. Nelson, of Birmingham. 
Mrs. Milton Humes, of Huntsville. 
Mrs. Thomas M. Owen, of Montgomery. 
Mrs. L. G. Woodson, of Birmingham. 
Mrs. Thomas H. Moulton, of Birmingham. 
Superintendent. — D. M. Weakley, of East Lake. 



CONFEDERATE SOLDIERS HOME. 

Mountain Creek, Chilton County. 

(General Laws, 1903; and 1907, pp. 190-191, 283-281.) 

Commandant. — James M. Simpson. 

Resident Physician. — Dr. John Payne Ellsberry. 

• » 

BOARD OF CONTROL. 

State at Large. — W. D. Westcott, of Montgomery. 

C. L. Ruth, of Montgomery. 
John W. A. Sanford, Sr., of Montgomery. 
1st District. — A. C. Danner, of Mobile. 
2nd District. — J. B. Stanley, of Greenville. 
8rd-District.—S. T. Frazer, of Union Springs. 
4th District. — H. Clay Reynolds, of Montevallo. 
5th District. — W. A. Hand ley. of Roanoke. 
6th District.— A. Y. Glover, of Forkland. 
7th District.— L. B. Stone, of Farill. 
8th District. — Samuel Blackwell, of Decatur. 
9th District.— Wm. C. Ward, of Birmingham. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL FOR COLORED STUDENTS. 

Montgomery, Montgomery County. 

President. — Wm. Burns Patterson, of Montgomery. 
Treasurer. — Wm. B. Jones, of Montgomery. 

Trustees.— Wm. B. Jones, of Montgomery; term ending May 29, 1909. 
J. M. Davison, of Evergreen; term ending May 29, 1909. 
H. S. D. Mai lory, of Selma ; term ending May 29, 1911. 
Rev. Neal L. Anderson, of Montgomery; term ending May 

29, 1911. 
J. Klrkman Jackson, of Montgomery; term ending May 

29, 1913. 
Rev. Charles A. Stakely, of Montgomery ; term ending May 
29, 1913. 



TUSKEGEE NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL INSTITUTE. 

(For Negroes.) 

Tuskegee Institute, Macon County. 

Principal. — Booker T. Washington, LL. D., of Tuskegee. 
Treasurer. — Warren Logan. 



STATE INSTITUTIONS. 131 

« 

Trustees. — Robert C. Ogden, President, of New York, N. Y. 

Rev. Robert C. Bedford, Secretary, of Beloit, Wis. 

Warren Logan, Treasurer, of Tuskegee Institute, Ala. 

Charles W. Hare, of Tuskegee, Ala. 

Booker T. Washington, LL. I)., of Tuskegee Institute, Ala. 

John C. Grant, LL. D., of Chicago, 111. 

Rev. George A. Gordon, D. D., of Boston, Mass. 

Rev. Charles F. Dole, D. D., of Jamaica Plains, Mass. 

J. G. Phelps Stokes, of New York City, N. Y. 

Robert O. Simpson, of Furman, Ala. 

Hugh H. Hanna, of Indianapolis, Ind. 

George Foster Peabody, of New York, N. Y. 

Paul M. W T arburg, of New York, N. Y. 

Wright W. Campbell, of Tuskegee, Ala- 
Andrew J. Wilborn, of Tuskegee, Ala. 

Seth Low. LL. D.. of New York City, N. Y. 

William M. Drennen, of Birmingham, Ala. 

Victor H. Tukine, of Montgomery, Ala. 
State Commissioners. — C. W. Hare, A. J. Wilborn, and W\ W. Campbell, 

all of Tuskegee. 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE OF ALABAMA 

FOR NEGROES. 

Normal, Madison County. 

President. — W. H. Council, of Normal. 
Treasurer. — A. S. Fletcher, of Huntsville. 
Trustees. — S. J. Mayhew, Chairman, of Huntsville. 
David A. Grayson, of Huntsville. 



THE ALABAMA INSANE HOSl iTALS. 

Tuscaloosa and Mt. Vernon. 

(Code, 1896, Vol i, See. 2oU et ^eq.; and General Laws, 1908, p. 577.) 

OFFICIALS. 

Trustees. — J. B. Gaston, of Montgomery. 

Samuel Will John, of Birmingham. 
J. Manly Foster, of Tuscaloosa. 
Dr. W. G. Somerville, Tuscaloosa. 
Dr. J. L. Williamson, of Tuscaloosa. 
E. M. Robinson, of Mobile. 
Dr. E. D. Bondurant, of Mobile. 

Superintendent. — Dr. James T. Searcy, of Tuscaloosa. 
Treasurer.— Dr. John Little, of Tuscaloosa. 
Steward. — W. C. Harris, of Tuscalcosa. 
Book-keeper. — Mrs. Mary V. Perkins, Tuscaloosa. 

THE BBYCE HOSPITAL. 

First Assistant Physician (For Women.)— Dr. W. D. Partlow, of Tus- 
caloosa. 
First Assistant Physician (For Men.) — Dr. C. M. Rudulph. 
Second Assistant. — Dr. Joseph Leland. 

Dr. T. F. Taylor. 
Outside Department. — C. C. Kilgore. 



132 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

THE MT. VEBNON HOSPITAL. 

Senior Assistant Physician. — Dr. E. L. McCafferty, of Mt. Vernon. 
Second Assistant. — Dr. J. H. Somerville. » 
Outside Department. — S. C. Naylor. 

JAMES THOMAS SEARCY, of Tuscaloosa, was born December 10, 1839, 
In that town, and is the son. of Dr. Reuben and Abby (Fitch) Searcy, and 
the grandson of Thomas and Ann (Martin) Searcy, of Rockingham County, 
N. C, and of James and Lydla (Clay) Fitch, of Putney, Vermont Dr. Reu- 
ben Searcy was born at Chapel Hill, Orange county, N. C, was a gradu- 
ate of the Medical Department of the Transylvania University, Lexington, 
Ky., removed to Tuscaloosa, Ala., about 1830, and was for thirty years 
president of the board of trustees of the Alabama Insane Hospital. Dr. 
James T. Searcy was educated in the common schools of Tuscaloosa ; and 
graduated from the University of Alabama with the A. B. degree, In the 
class of 1859. He graduated in medicine from the Medical Department of 
the University of New York in 1867, and entered upon the practice of his 
profession in that year In association with his father. He received the 
honorary degree of A. M. from the University of Alabama in 1878. In 
1887 he became president of the board of trustees of the Alabama Insane 
Hospital, and In 1892, after the death of Dr. Peter Bryce, he was elected 
superintendent of the Alabama Bryce Insane Hospital, and in 1901 was 
elected superintendent of the Alabama Insane Hospitals. Dr. Searcy is 
a member of the Alabama Medical Association, of which he served as 
president, and he is prominent in other medical and scientific societies. 
He has been a frequent contributor to medical journals. In December, 
1861, he enlisted as a private in Lunden's Battery; was transferred in 
1862 to a reserve battalion of artillery, and served as sergeant major of 
this command until the close of the War of Secession. He is a Democrat; 
and a ruling elder in the First Presbyterian Church at Tuscaloosa. In 
January, 1868, at Tuscaloosa, he was married to Annie, daughter of Cap- 
tain Walter and Ann Rosa Captain Ross was a quartermaster in the 
Creek War under General Jackson. 

STATE AND COUNTY CABE OF THE MENTALLY DEFICIENT AND DEFECTIVE CLASSES, 

There are two institutions In this State devoted to the care of the insane. 
They are united under the corporate name of "The Alabama Insane Hos- 
pitals ;" one, The Bryce Hospital, located near Tuscaloosa ; the other, The 
Mt. Vernon Hospital at Mt. Vernon, about thirty miles north of Mobile, 
near the Mobile river, on the Mobile & Birmingham Railroad. The Bryce 
Hospital is devoted to the care of the white insane, with a few negro pa- 
tients; the Mt. Vernon Hospital is exclusively devoted to the negroes. 

The exceptional feature, in the control of The Alabama Insane Hos- 
pitals Is, they are under one management; that is, under one Board of 
Trustees, and have the same Superintendent, the same Treasurer, and the 
same Steward. In other states, there is a tendency nowadays, to place 
such institutions under the care of a single Board of Control; In this 
State that feature is carried further, so that they have the same executive 
officer's as far as that can be carried out. I think this centralization of 
management works well. It removes rivalry, harmonizes methods, and 
makes the Hospitals mutually contributory. Other similar institutions, 
such as an Epileptic Colony, an Inebriate Hospital, a School for the Feeble- 
Minded, might with advantage, when established by the State, be kept un- 
der the same control ; in part, at any rate. 

State care of the Insane in Alabama dates back to the year 1852, when 
an Act passed the Legislature to establish a Hospital, setting apart five 
per cent of the State's income for that purpose. The completion of the 
buildings dragged along through eight years, and it was not until 1861, 
that patients were received. 

The following table shows the gradual growth of the numbers under 
State care since this work was first begun: 



&TATE INSTITUTIONS. 



133 



NUMBER AND CLASSIFICATION OF PATIENTS, SINCE 1861. 



1861 

April 

5, 

1861 
Sept. 

30 

1861 
1862 



1862 
1863 



1863 
1864 



1864 
1865 



1865 
1866 



1866 
1867 



1867 
1868 



1868 
1869 



1869 
1870 



Admitted . 
Discharged 

Died 

Remaining 



Admitted 

Discharged _. 
Died 

Remaining _„. 

Admitted 

Discharged .. 

Died — 

Remaining 



Admitted _ 
Discharged 

Died 

Remaining 

Admitted . 
Discharged 

Died 

Remaining 



Admitted _ 
Discharged 

Died 

Remaining 

Admitted _ 
Discharged 

Died 

Remaining 

Admitted . 
Discharged 
Died — _— 
Remaining 

Admitted _ 
Discharged 

Died 

Remaining 

Admitted . 
Discharged 

Died 

Remaining 






® S 

H 



5 

o 



9. « 

r—t S 



7? ° 

8* 



o 



14 


4 


18 


1 





1 


13 


4 


17 


40 


17 


57 


14 


2 


16 


2 




2 


24 


15 


39 


69 


31 


100 


30 


5 


35 


6 


3 


i 9 


33 


23 


56 


100 


45 


145 


44 


9 


53 


13 


10 


23 


43 


26 


69 


113 


51 


164 


55 


15 


70 


19 


15 


34 


39 


21 


60 


129 


64 


193 


66 


21 


87 


23 


15 


38 


40 


28 


68 


171 


87 


258 


77 


30 


107 


33 


19 


52 


61 


38 


99 


218 


117 


335 


86 


39 


125 


47 


.27 


74 


85 


51 


136 


258 


153 


411 


105 


49 


154 


64 


30 


94 


89 


74 


163 


301 


182 


483 


123 


55 


178 


78 


40 


118. 


100 


87 


187' 



4 
1 
1 
2 

4 2 

2 1 
1 

2 _._1 



5 
2 
1 
2 

5 
2 
1 
2 

7 
2 
1 
4 

11 
4 
1 
6 

<23 
6 
6 

11 

26 
9 
8 
9 

33 
9 
9 

15 



3 

2 
1 



3 
2 
1 



7 
4 
1 
2 

15 
4 
1 

10 

80 

11 

2 

17 

38 

17 

2 

19 

47 

18 

9 

20 



5 
1 
1 
& 

6 

3 

16 

2 

8 
4 
2 
2 

8 
4 
2 
2 

14 
6 
2 
6 

26 

8 

2 

16 

53 

17 

8 

28 

64 
26 
10 

28 

80 
27 
18 
35 



II 

OH 



18 

1 



17 



62 

17 

3 

42 

106 
38 
10 
58 

153 
57 
25 
71 

172 
74 
36 
62 

207 
93 
40 

74 

284 

115 

54 

115 

388 

142 

82 

164 

475 
180 
104 
191 

563 
205 
136 
222 



134 



OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 



Number and Classification of Patients, since 1861 — Continued. 



1870 
1871 



1871 
1872 



1872 
1873 



1873 

1874 



1874 
1875 



1875 
1876 



1876 
1877 



1877 
1878 



1878 
1879 



1879 
1880 



Admitted - 
Discharged 

Died 

Remaining 

Admitted - 
Discharged 

Died 

Remaining 

Admitted _ 
Discharged 

Died 

Remaining 

Admitted _ 
Discharged 

Died 

Remaining 

Admitted _ 
Discharged 

Died 

Remaining 

Admitted _ 
Discharged 

Died 

Remaining 

Admitted _ 
Discharged 
Died 



Admitted „ 
Discharged 

Died 

Remaining 

Admitted _ 
Discharged 

Died 

Remaining 

Admitted . 
Discharged 

Died 

Remaining 



£a 






a 

© 






"2 fl 

3* 



a 

o 



2 * 

u o 
OH 



362 

148 

89 

125 

426 
175 
102 
149 

465 
202 
118 
145 

517 
233 
131 
153 

552 
249 
146 
157 

595 
278 
155 
162 

626 
294 
160 
Remaining 172 



662 
314 
164 
184 

698 
349 
172 
177 

747 
381 
189 
177 



226 
69 
47 

110 

281 
94 
56 

131 

307 

113 

60 

134 

344 

135 

67 

142 

375 

155 

79 

141 

415 

178 

86 

151 

443 

201 

94 

148 

478 
220 
103 
155 



588 
217 
136 
235 

707 
269 

158 
280 

772 
315 

178 
279 

861 
368 
198 
295 

927 
404 
225 

298 

1010 
456 
241 
313 

1069 
495 
254 
320 

1140 
534 
267 
339 



513 1211 
2501 599 



111 
152 



283 
329 



561 1308 
283 664 
122 311 
156 333! 



47 
13 
10 
24 

61 
17 
13 
31 

67 
26 
18 
23 

75 
31 
21 
23 

79 
34 
22 
23 

83 
37 
23 
23 

89 
39 
23 
27 

100 
42 
27 
31 



32 
31 

125 
53 
36 
36 



67 
22 
16 
29 

80 
29 
24 
27 

88 
32 



96 
37 
32 
27 

104 
40 
33 
31 

112 
43 
38 
31 

118 
45 
41 
32 

123 
46 
44 
33 



111 131 

48 52 



45 
34 

142 
59 
50 
33 



114 
35 
26 
53 

141 
46 
37 

58 

155 

58 



28 46 

28 51 



171 
68 
53 
50 

183 
74 
55 
54 

195 
80 
61 
54 

207 
84 
64 
59 

223 

88 
71 
64 

242 

100 
77 
65 

267 

112 

86 

69 



702 
252 
162 
288 

848 
315 
195 
338 

927 
373 
224 
330 

1032 
436 
251 
345 

1110 

•478 

280 

352 

1205 
536 
302 
367 

1276 
579 
318 
379 

1363 
622 
338 
403 

1453 
699 
360 
394 

1575 
776 
397 
402 



I 



STATE INSTITUTIONS. 



135 



Number and Classification of Patients, since 1861 — Continued. 



1880 
1881 



1881 
1882 



1882 
1883 



1883 
1884 



1884 
1885 



1885 
1886 



1886 
1887 



1887 
1888 



1888 
1889 



1889 
1890 



White 
Men. 


White 
Women 


3 

o 


Colored 
Men. 


Colored 
Wbmlen 


3 

o 
K 



Admitted 

Discharged ^ 

Died 

Remaining 

Admitted 

Discharged 

Died 

Remaining 

Admitted 

Discharged _ 

Died 

Remaining , 

Admitted 

Discharged 

Died _^ 

Remaining 

Admitted 

Discharged ~ 

Died 

Remaining 

Admitted 

Discharged - 

Died* 

Remaining 

Admitted 

Discharged 

Died 

Remaining 

Admitted 

Discharged 

Died 

Remaining 

Admitted ■- 

Discharged 

Died 

Remaining 

Admitted 

Discharged 

Died 

Remaining 



802 


630 


1432 


137 


420 


337 


757 


60 


202 


128 


330 


44 


180 


165 


345 


33 


849 


681 


1530 


150 


456 


373 


829 


73 


214 


144 


355 


48 


179 


167 


346 


29 


958 


730 


1688 


169 


481 


408 


889 


80 


232 


149 


381 


52 


245 


173 


418 


37 


1051 


871 


1922 


187 


526 


442 


968 


90 


255 


160 


415 


58 


270 


269 


539 


39 


1152 


974 


2126 


194 


565 


498 


1063 


94 


290 


174 


464 


60 


297 


302 


599 


40 


1256 


1080 


2336 


200 


639 


561 


12.00 


100 


305 


188 


493 


62 


312 


331 


643 


38 


1370 


1190 


2560 


207 


696 


638 


1334 


103 


324 


220 


544 


64 


350 


332 


682 


40 


1485 


1320 


2805 


253 


758 


689 


1447 


105 


350 


236 


586 


i 71 


377 


395 


772 


77 


1597 


1446 


3043 


288 


827 


785 


1612 


113 


391 


266 


657 


79 


379 


395 


774 


96 


1732 


1562 


3294 


321 


897 


862 


1755 


130 


421 


301 


722 


93 


414 


399 


813 


98 



149 
59 
51 
39 

155 
62 
51 
42 

165 
70 
53 



181 
75 
54 
52 

192 
83 
56 
53 

201 
91 

58 
52 

204 
93 
59 
52 

271 
94 
69 

108 

318 

107 

85 

126 

367 

126 

98 

143 



OtH 



286 

119 

95 

72 

305 

135 

99 

71 

334 
150 
105 



42 79 



368 

165 

112 

91 

386 

177 

116 

93 

401 

191 

120 

90 

411 

196 

123 

92 



1718 
876 
425 

417 

1835 
964 
454 

417 

2022 

1039 

486 

497 

2290 

1133 

527 

630 

2512 

1240 

580 

692 

2737 

1391 

613 

733 

2971 

1530 

667 

774 



524 3329 
199 1646 
140; 726 
185 957 

GOG 3649 
220 1832 



164 
222 



821 
996 



688 3982 
256 201P 
191 91> 
24li 1054 



136 



OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 



Number and Classification of Patients, since 1861 — Continued. 



1890 
1891 



1891 
1892 



1892 
1893 



1893 
1894 



1894 
1895 



1895 
1896 



1896 
1897 



1897 
1898 



1898 
1899 



1899 
1900 



3 



9 A 



* 



3 

o 



1 






§1 



o 



21 

OH 



Admitted - 
Discharged 

Died 

Remaining 

Admitted _ 
Discharged 

Died 

Remaining 

Admitted - 
Discharged 

Died 

Remaining 

Admitted - 
Discharged 

Died 

Remaining 

Admitted _ 
Discharged 

Died 

Remaining 

Admitted - 
Discharged 

Died 

Remaining 

Admitted _ 
Discharged 

Died 

Remaining 

Admitted _ 
Discharged 

Died 

Remaining 

Admitted - 
Discharged 

Died 

Remaining 

Admitted _ 
Discharged 

Died 

Remaining 

• 



1826 
946 
454 
426 

1918 
1014 

476 

428 

2011 
1095 

495 

421 

2130 
1162 

522 

446 

2229 
1218 

544 

467 

2381 
1301 

585 

495 

2534 
1394 

623 

517 

2669 

1484 
667 
518 

2853 
1564 

730 

559 

3013 2801 5814 

1658 1593 3251 

786 5881374 

569 6201189 



16533479 376 

905 1851 ! 138 

325 779, 111 
423 84$ 

1745 3663 413 

9681982: 156 

345 821 123 

432 860 134 

1827 383* 
1051 214* 

368 8fr 

408 82* 

1940 4070 494 

1098 2260i 202 

388 910| 145 

454 900 147 

i 

2046 4275; J 533 

1173 2391 ' 222 

413 957 164 

460 927 147 

2166 4547 585 

1248 2549 253 

455 1040 185 

463 958 147 

2318 4852' 641 

1322 2716J 272 

486 1109 200 

510 1027 169 



403 

135 

114 

127 154 



2458 

1418 

515 



5127 
2902 
1182 



525 1043 



2616 5469 
1498 
542 



576 



781 
3062! 321 
1272| 254 
1135 206 



856 
362 
284 
210 



435 
149 
132 
154 



442, 474 
180 177 
135 153 
127 144 



524 
191 
170 
163 

573 
214 

189 
170 

632 
238 
1215 
179 

702 
265 
234 
203 

748 
286 
253 
209 

811 
310 
273 

228 

874 
331 
302 
241 



706 
297 
230 
179 



779 
273 
225 
281 

848 
305 
255 

288 

916 
357 
288 
371 

1018 
393 
315 
310 

1106 
436 
353 
317 

1217 
491 
400 
326 

1343 
537 
434 
372 

1454 
583 
483 

388 

1592 
631 
527 
434 

1730 
693 
586 



4258 
2124 
1004 
1130 

4511 
2287 
1076 
1148 

4754 
2503 
1151 
1100 

5088 
2653 
1225 
1210 

5381 
2825 
1310 
1244 

5764 
3040 
1440 
1284 

6195 
3253 
1543 
1399 

6581 
3485 
1665 
1431 

7061 
3693 
1799 
1569 

7544 
3944 
1960 



4511 1640 



STATE INSTITUTIONS. 



137 



Number and Classification of Patients, since 1861 — Continued. 



"a 



f* 



® a 



o 






■8 s 

Si* 



s 

o 



§5 

u o 
OH 



1900 
1901 



1901 
1902 



1902 
1903 



1903 
1904 



1904 
1905 



1905 
1906 



Admitted - 
Discharged 

Died 

Remaining 

Admitted _ 
Discharged 

Died 

Remaining 

Admitted . 
Discharged 

Died 

Remaining 

Admitted - 
Discharged 

Died 

Remaining 

Admitted _ 
Discharged 

Died 

Remaining 



Admitted — — 

Discharged 

Died 

Remaining on books. 



On trial at home ~_. 

In the two Hospitals. 



3201 

1765 

842 

594 

3412 

1872 

913 

627 

3640 

2018 

989 

633 

3851 

2169 

1041 

641 

4067 

2299 

1096 

672 

4300 

2428 

1180 

692 



88 
604 



2961 

1702 

632 

627 

3143 

1794 

695 

654 

3362 

1915 

758 

689 

3581 

2032 

822 

727 

3774 
2144 



6162 
3467 
1474 
1221 

6555 
3666 
1608 
1281 

7002 
3933 
1747 
1322 

7432 
4201 
1863 
1368 

7841 
4443 



8751971 
755 1427 



3959 

2261 

963 

735 



62 
673 



8259 
4689 
2143 
1427 



150 
1277 



914 
391 
307 
216 

1005 
435 
352 
218 

1145 
488 
427 
230 

1223 
517 
461 
245 

1314 
556 
488 
270 

1429 
584 
536 
309 



28 
281 



9391853 
353 744 



331 

255 

1025 
392 
382 
251 



2460 
988 
937 
535 



1149 2294 
434| 922 
445 
270 

1237 
471 
476 
290 

1322 
503 
516 
303 

1415 
532 
572 
311 



8015 
4211 
2112 
1692 

8585 
4493 
2342 
1750 

9296 

4855 

872 2619 

500 1822 



638 
471 

2030 
827 
734 
469 



9892 
5189 
2800 
1903 



19 
292 



263610477 

1059 5502 

1004; 2975 

5731 2000 



2844 
1116 
1108 



11103 
5805 
3251 



620i 2047 



47 197 
573 1850 



TBUSTEES SINCE 1857. 

Dr. Reuben Searcy 1 Tuscaloosa county '57 to '87 

Dr. James Guild Tuscaloosa county '57 to '73 

Dr. A. G. Mabrya Dallas county '57 to '74 

Capt. R. T. Nott Greene county '57 to '67 

Judge A. B. Clitheral ..—Pickens county '57 to '61 

Hon. J. C. Spencer Tuscaloosa county '57 to '59 

Hon. Porter King Perry county '57 to '78 

Rev. B. Manly Tuscaloosa county '59 to '68 

Hon. M. L. Stansel Pickens county '61 to '63 

Capt. R. T. Nott Greene county , '61 to '67 

Hon. J. W. Payne Pickens county '63 to '67 

Dr. B. M. Moren Bibb county '65 to '73 

Judge Wm. Miller Tuscaloosa county '70 to '75 

Hon. E. F. Jennings Lawrence county '70 to '74 

Hon. J. DeF. Richards Wilcox county '70 to '72 

Hon. E. F. Bouchelle Greene county '70 to '71 

Hon. A. F. Given Montgomery county . '72 to '75 

Hon. O. Berry * Tuscaloosa county '73 to '75 

Hon. N. H. Browne Tuscaloosa county '76 to '9»0 

Hon. W. S. Mudd Jefferson county '76 to '77 

Hon. H. M. Somerville Tuscaloosa county '76 to '93 



138 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

Dr. J. J. Dement Madison county '76 to '91 

Dr. J. C. Hamilton Mobile county -_ '76 to '87 

Hon. J. W. Inzer St. Clair county '78 to '00 

Dr. Geo. D. Norris Madison county J78 to '90 

Dr. J. T. Searcy Tuscaloosa county '87 to '92 

Dr. J. B. Gaston Montgomery county '87 to * 

Dr. Elisha Young Greene county '90 to '98 

Hon. A. C. Hargrove Tuscaloosa county '90 to '96 

Hon. R. T. Simpson Lauderdale county *92 to '05 

Dr. Wm. G. Somerville Tuscaloosa county '93 to * 

Prof. Alonzo Hill Tuscaloosa county '93 to '94 

Mr. B. Friedman Tuscaloosa county '94 to '96 

Hon. J. Manly Foster ' Tuscaloosa county '96 to * 

Dr. J. L. Williamson ^Tuscaloosa county *96 to * 

Hon. Sam Will John Jefferson county '99 to * 

Hon. E. M. Robinson Mobile county 1900 to * 

Dr. E. D. Bondnrant ____Mobile county '02 to * 

MEDICAL OFFICERS SINCE 1860. 

Superintendents. 

Dr. Peter Bryce, Superintendent 1860 to 1892 

Dr. J. T. Searcy, Superintendent 1892 to 

Dr. E. D. Bondurant, Assistant Superintendent 1892 to 1896 

Assistant Physicians. 

Dr. J. H. Murfee 1867 to 1869 

" John Little — 1869 to 1875 

\ R. P. Huger 1872 to 1880 

" H. P. Cochrane 1875 to 1881 

B. L. Wyman 1881 to 1884 

F. H. Sims 1882 to 1889 

E. D. Bondurant 1885 to 1892 

W. G. Somerville 1889 to 1892 

R. A. Wright 1890 to 1896 

W. B. Hall 1891 to 1893 

P. T. Vaughan 1892 to 1894 

H. B. Wilkinson I—. 1893 to 1897 

J. S. Mushat 1893 to 1896 

Burgett Woodcock 1894 to 1896 

C. W. Hilliard 1895 to 1895 

S. J. Purifoy _ 1895 to 1895 

Sydney Leach - 1896 to 1903 

Wm. M. Faulk . 1896 to 1902 

Hardee Johnston . 1896 to 1896 

J. B. Klllebrew 1896 to 1896 

J. E. Wiley 1 1897 to 1898 

Geo. R. Rau 1899 to 1899 

G. C. Boudousque 1898 to 1900 

W. S. Sowell 1899 to 1900 

M. L. Winn 1899 to 1899 

M. L. Molloy . 1900 to 1900 

T. F. Huey 1901 to 1901 

C. M. Rudulph 1900 to 

W. D. Partlow 1901 to 

George H. Searcy 1901 to 1905 

R. D. Spratt 1901 to 1902 

Joseph Leland — 1902 to 

S. G. Carden - * 1902 to 1902 

L. McCafferty -,- 1902 to : 

M. Dupree , 1902 to 1903 

A. Lanford 1904 to 1905 

F. Taylor _._ 1905 to 

H. Somerville 1006 to 



« 

i< 
i< 
«t 

44 
it 
<« 
u 

44 
44 
44 
44 
44 
44 
44 
44 
41 
44 
44 
44 
44 
44 
44 
44 
44 



44 


E. 


44 


W 


44 


J. 


44 


T. 


44 


J. 



* Now in office. 



STATE INSTITUTIONS. 



139 



Table showing the number of patients from each county in "The Bryce 
Hospital," (white) for the year ending Sept. 30, 1906. 





• 




• 

0) 


% 


• 


■M 


o 


a 


xi 




■♦-> 


is 


o 
O 


© 







6 


1 


xi 


V 


* 


6 



© 



Autauga 
Baldwin 
Barbour _ 

Bibb 

Blount __ 
Bullock - 
Butler __ 
Calhoun _ 
Chambers 
Cherokee 
Chilton _ 
Choctaw 
Clarke _- 

Clay 

Cleburne 
Coffee __ 
Colbert _ 
Conecuh _ 

Coosa 

Covington 
Crenshaw 
Cullman 
Dallas __ 

Dale 

DeKalb _ 
Elmore •_ 
Escambia 
Etowah _ 
Fayette _ 
Franklin 
Geneva _ 
Greene __ 

Hale 

Henry _. 
Houston 



I -I 




16 


9 


1 


10 


17 


1 


18 


17 


1 


18 


17 


_ _ 


17 




2 


9 


20 


2 


22 


39 


1 


40 


21 


1 


22 


26 




26 


14 


M> s> *• M> 


14 


7 


mm mm mm mm 


7 


15 


1 


16 


13 





13 


18 


1 


19 


7 


, | B , 


7 


18 


2 


20 


9 


1 


10 


7 


^ mm mm mm 


7 


5 


. . mmt mmmm 


5 


13 




13 


27 





27 


17 


2 


19 


1G 





16 


31 


1 


32 


15 


2 


17 


8 





8 


32 


1 


33 


18 




18 


23 





<>«? 

•»«j 


13 


_ i» mm a. 


13 


3 


3 


6 


10 




JO 


11 


1 


12 


11 


: 


11 



Jackson 

Jefferson __ 

Lamar 

Lauderdale 
Lawrence _ 

Lee 

Limestone _ 

Lowndes 

Macon 

Madison 

Marengo ._ 

Marion 

Marshall 

Mobile 

Monroe 

Montgomery 

Morgan* 

Perry 

Pickens 

Pike 

Randolph _ 

Russell 

St. Clair ._ 

Shelby 

Sumter 

Talladega _ 

Tallapoosa 

Tuscaloosa 

Walker 

Washington 

Wilcox 

Winston 

Penitentiary 
Louisiana _ 

Total ___ 



34 

135 

16 

30 

18 

24 

21 

8 

9 

30 

19 

27 

27 

116 

13 

57 

22] 

9 

11 

20 

22 

8 

14 

15 

7 

24 

15 

62 

35 

13 

8 

6 

1 

1 



5 
1 



1427 



7 
1 
3 
1 
6 

1 
1 



2 
3 

7 

2 

1 
»> 



76 



34 

110 

17 

37 

18 

24 

21 

8 

10 

31 

19 

27 

27 

123 

14 

60 

23 

15 

11 

21 

23 

8 

14 

15 

9 

27 

15 

6$) 

37 

14 

10 

6 

1 

1 



1503 



Table showing the number of patients from each county in "The Mt. 
Vernon Hospital," (Negro) for the year ending Sept. 30, 1906. 



Autauga 4 

Baldwin 2 

Barbour 9 

Bibb 6 

Blount ^ 2 

Bullock 10 

Butler 4 

Calhoun 10 

Chambers 4 

Cherokee 3 



Chilton 3 

Choctaw 4 

Clarke 10 

Clay 2 

Cleburne 

Coffee 

Colbert 15 

Conecuh 3 

Coosa : 5 

Covington 1 



140 



OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 



MT. VERNON HOSPITALr-Continued. 



Crenshaw 2 

Cullman 

Dale —- - 1 

Dallas 20 

DeKalb ! 3 

Elmore , 7 

Escambia 4 

Etowah 8 

Fayette 1 

Franklin 2 

Geneva '. 6 

Greene 10 

Hale 1 

Henry 5 

Houston 5 

Jackson 1 

Jefferson 48 

Lamar 1 

uauderdale 8 

Lawrence : 1 

Lee 15 

Limestone 8 

Lowndes 5 

Macon 6 

Madison 21 



Marengo 17 

Marion 2 

Marshall 

Mobile 64 

Monroe 5 

Montgomery . 34 

Morgan '. 6 

Perry ;, 13 

Pickens 7 

Pike 5 

Randolph — 4 

Russell 8 

Shelby 7 

St. Clair 2 

Sumter 43 

Talladega 10 

Tallapoosa 8 

Tuscaloosa 31 

Walker 1 

Washington 1 

Wilcox 16 

Winston 

Total 545 



VI. ALABAMA NATIONAL GUARD. 



Revised to December 31, 1906, and shows names, post office addresses, and 

dates of first commissions. 

Commander-in-Chief. — Braxton B. Comer, of Birmingham. 
Adjutant-General. — Bibb Graves, of Montgomery. 
Inspector General. — Robert F. Ligon, of Montgomery. 
Quartermaster General. — Barrie L. Holt, of Montgomery. 

Each with rank of Brigadier General. 

Judge Advocate General. — W. C. Crumpton, of Evergreen. 
Surgeon General. — Wyatt Heflln, of Birmingham. 
Chief of Engineers. — W. H. Kettlg, of Birmingham. 
Chief of Ordnance. — Frank Inge, of Mobile. 
Paymaster General. — L. Y. Dean, of Eufaula. 

Commissary General of Subsistence. — M. V. Joseph, of Birmingham. 
Assistant Adjutant General. — W. Lewellen Pitts, of Uniontown. 
Assistant Inspector General. — E. Hamiter Graves, of Eufaula. 
Assistant Quartermaster General. — Winston Garth, of Huntsville. 
Chaplain. — Rev. J. M. Dannelly, of Montgomery. 
Each with rank of Colonel of Cavalry, 

Aides-de-Camp. — Thomas E. Knight, of Greensboro. 

R. A. Mitchell, of Alabama City. 
Thomas E. Kilby, of Anniston. 
Fleetwood Rice, of Northport. 
Each with the rank of Colonel of Cavalry. 

Aides-de-Camp. — J. B. Brown, of Cullman. 

Charles Pulley, of Limestone. 

Dawson E. Laslie, of Tuskegee. 

Floyd Powell, of Tuskegee. 

Each with the rank of Lt. Colonel of Cavalry. 

STATE MILITARY BOARD. 

Adjutant General, ex-officio. — Bibb Graves. 
Inspector General, ex-officio. — Robert F. Ligon. 
Quartermaster General, ex-officio. — Barrie L. Holt. 

STAFF OF BRIGADIER GENERAL. 

Brigadier General.— Louis V. Clark, of Birmingham, April 21, 1901. 
Asst. Adjutant General. — Major Charles A. Jones, July 18, 1902. 
Inspector. — Major H. C. Gunnells, of Montgomery, April 24, 1901. 
Judge Advocate. — Major R. S. Teague, of Montgomery , April 24, 1901. 
Quartermaster. — Major D. M. Scott, of Selma, April 24, 1901. 
Asst. Judge Advocate General. — Major E. D. Smith, of Birmingham. 
Commissary of Subsistence. — Major H. W. Haden, of Demopolis, April 

24, 1901. 
Ins. of R. P.— Major W. F. Tebbetts, of Mobile, December 10, 1902. 
Surgeon. — Major J. E. Dedman, of Birmingham , September 5, 1904. 
Ordnance Officer. — Major J. T. Yeatman, of Birmingham, Aug. 23, 1904. 
Chaplain. — Major W. C. Hearn, of Talladega , August 22, 1904. 
Aide-de-Camp. — Captain D. W. Mclver, of Montgomery , March 16, 1903. 
Aide-de-Camp. — Capt. A. C. Sexton, of Montgomery , July 15, 1903. 

(141) 



142 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

FIRST SQUADRON OF CAVALRY. 

HEADQUARTERS AT 8ELMA, ALA. 

Major V. B. Atkins, Selma, December 19, 1903. 
Captain Benjamin F. Noble, Montgomery, Adjutant, May 12, 1906. 
Captain I. L. Rosendorf, Commissary, Selma, January 16, 1904. 
Captain D. B. Jones, Quartermaster, Camden, January 22, 1904. 
Captain Oscar Hayes, Surgeon, Birmingham, August 3, 1899. 

Troop A, Montgomery. 

Captain W. F. Lee, July, 1906. 

First Lieutenant, Gaston Gunter, March 30, 1904. 

Second Lieutenant, E. M. Noble, September 29, 1906. 

Troop B, Camden. 

Captain J. D. Jenkins, June 10, 1902. 

First Lieutenant O. P. Speer, June 10, 1902. 

Second Lieutenant L. D. Bryan, Jr., August 22, 1905. 

Junior Second Lieutenant L. J. Hayes, Aug. 22, 1905 to Feb. 18,1907. 

Troop C, Selma. 

Captain G. C. Phillips, Nov. 15, 1906. 

First Lieutenant F. L. Milhous, May 25, 1905. 

Second Lieutenant M. L. Calhoun, May 6, 1906. 

Junior Second Lieutenant F. H. Merkel, May 25, 1905, to Feb. 18, 1907. 

• 

Troop \j, Birmingham. 

Captain C. S. Price, Jan. 18, 1905. 

First Lieutenant W. L. Metcalfe, Jan. 18, 1905. 

Second Lieutenant U. U. Stewart, Jan. 18, 1905. 

Junior Second Lieutenant E. R. Withers, Jan. 18, 1905, to Feb. 18. 1907 



FIRST BATTALION OF ARTILLERY. 

HEADQUARTERS AT MONTGOMERY. 

Major S. T. Westcott, Montgomery, July 25, 1899. 

Captain and Adjutant, W. R. Greene, Dothan, July 16, 1906. 

Surgeon W. B. Westcott, Montgomery, July, 1906. 

Quartermaster, vacant. 

Captain John F. Powers, Commissary, Mobile, July, 1904. 

Battery A, Motui.k. 

Captain Y. W. Pringle, July 3, 1905. 

First Lieutenant E. K. Nelson, July 3, 1905. 

Second Lieutenant L. W. Carrington, July 3, 1905. 

Battery B, Montgomery. 

Captain Samuel Roswald. Nov. 23, 1903. 

First Lieutenant, J. F. Rembert, July 21, 1906. 

Second Lieutenant, George II. Todd, Jr., July 17, 1906. 



ALABAMA NATIONAL GUARD. 143 

1 Batteby C, Selma. 



Captain I. N. Eddy, May 10, 1901. 
First Lieutenant J. H. Weafer, June 9, 1904. 
Junior First Lieutenant T. A. Kineey, June 9, 1904. 
Second Lieutenant A. B. Butler, June 9, 1904. 

Batteby D, Birmingham. 

Captain J. Q. Smith, Sept. 16, 1905. 

First Lieutenant L. S. Dorrance, Feb. 20, 1906. 

Second Lieutenant J. D. Carlisle, Feb. 20, 1906. 



FIRST INFANTRY REGIMENT. 

HEADQUARTEBS AT MOBILE. 

Colonel R. B. DuMont, Mobile, July 15, 1899. 
Lieutenant Colonel J. G. Hubbard, Troy, July 15, 1899. 
Major A. L. Williams. Dothan, June 23, 1902. 
Major F. P. Folmar, Troy, May 13, 1904. 
Major John D. Hagan, Feb. 2, 1906. 
Major W. Oates, Surgeon, Mobile, May 12, 1902. 
Captain and Adjutant, F. M. Maddox, Sept. 30, 1905. 
Captain G. M. Vanlieu, Quartermaster, Mobile, July 16, 1899. 
Captain E. A. White, Commissary, Mobile, July 3, 1905. 
Captain A. C. Harte, Chaplain. Mobile, July 16, 1899. 
Captain W. E. Mickle, Jr., I. R. P., Mobile, July 1, 1902. 
Captain J. N. McLean, Assistant Surgeon, Uniontown. 
Captain J. M. Watkins, Asst. Surgeon, July 9, 1905. 

Company A, Mobile. 

Captain Thad Partridge, Jr., Aug. 28, 1905. 
First Lieutenant J. R. Ennis, April 24, 1905. 
Second Lieutenant Patrick Byrnes, July 21, 1905. 

Company B, Mobile. 

Captain Thomas F. McKay, September, 1904. 
First Lieutenant A. V. B. Gilbert, March 9, 1906. 
Second Lieutenant W. J. McGowan, Jr., March 9, 1906. 

Company C, Geneva. 

Captain J. F. Johnson. April 29, 1905. 

First Lieutenant D. G. Roach, June 6, 1905. 

Second Lieutenant A. L. Campbell, Dec. 21, 1901. 

Company D, Fobt Deposit. 

Captain C M. Davis, Oct. 23, 1905. 

First Lieutenant H. L. Bryan, Oct. 23, 1905. 

Second Lieutenant V. H. Bell, Jr., Oct. 23, 1905. 

Company E, Mobile. 

Captain J. D. Hagan, Major Commanding. 
First Lieutenant H. W. Hakeman, June 7, 1904. 
Second Lieutenant W. W. Dowd, June 7, 1904. 



X44 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

Company F, Dothan. 

Captain A. E. Pace, Feb. 1, 1905. 

First Lieutenant C. J. Morris, January 25, 1906. 

Second Lieutenant J. J. Crary, January 25, 1906. 

Company G, Bbewton. 

Captain D. B. Hays, February 14, 1904. 
First Lieutenant, vacant 
Second Lieutenant, vacant 

Company H, Troy. 

Captain W. H. Wiley, August 22, 1904. 

First Lieutenant W. H. Bower, August 22, 1904. • 

Second Lieutcuant Jamis M \V. !••>», August 30, 1904. 

Company I, Enterprise. 

Captain R. H. Arlington, July 2, 1904. 
First Lieutenant A. Holloway, July 2, 1904. 
Second Lieutenant E. A. Chapman, June 16, 1905. 

Company K, Evergreen. 

Captain P. M. Bruner, Jr., May 6, 1903. 
First Lieutenant J. A. Smith, May 19, 1903. 
Second Lieutenant H. S. Haygood, Jan. 16, 1906. 

Company L, Uniontown. 

Captain W. J. Vaiden, April 14, 1904. 

First Lieutenant A. W. Stewart, April 12, 1905. 

Second Lieutenant J. T. Harwood, April 14, 1904. 

Company M, Mobile. 

Captain John S. Callahan, June 12, 1901. 

First Lieutenant Harry S. Rubira, May 22, 1903. 

Second Lieutenant George L. Mountain, Feb. 10, 1906. 



SECOND INFANTRY REGIMENT. 

HEADQUARTERS AT MONTGOMERY. 

Col. C. R. Bricken, Luverne, Nov. 3, 1905. ' 

Lieutenant Colonel J. E. Carter, Selma, April 2, 1906. 

Major G. O. Dickey, Luverne, Feb. 19, 1906. 

Major E. F. Baber, Jr.. Montgomery, April 14, 1906. 

Major Carl H. Seals, Birmingham, June 9, 1906. 

Major M. L. Kirkpatrick, Surgeon, Montgomery, Nov. 23, 1905. 

Captain Wm. W. Brame, Jr., Adjutant Montgomery, Nov. 2, 1905. 

Captain J. Hunt Taylor, Montgomery, Commissary, Dec. 1, 1905. 

Captain J. A. Holmes, Jr., Ins. of Guard, Wetumpka. Nov. 2, 1905. 

Captain Frank G. Taylor, Quartermaster, Montgomery. June 21. 

Captain B. M. Kendrick, Assistant Surgeon, Luverne, Nov. 23. 

Captain B. S. Chapman, Asst. Surgeon, Montgomery, June 21, 1906, 1005 

Captain W. A. Collier, Ordnance, Tuscaloosa, Nov. 15, 1906. 

Captain H. B. Peacock, Opelika, Ins. R. P., Nov. 23, 1905. 

Captain J. T. Mangum, Tallassee, Nov. 23, 1905. 



ALABAMA NATIONAL GUARD. 



146 



Company A, Montgomery. 

Captain E. H. Jackson. Dec. 8, 1905. 

First Lieutenant A. M. MeNeel. Dec. 8, 1905. 

Second Lieutenant Thos. C. Locke, Dec. 8, 1905. 

Company B, Birmingham. 

Captain Chase Perkins, June 25, 1906. 
First Lieutenant Mell D. Smith, June 25, 1906. 
Second Lieutenant Walter D. Harper, June 25, 1906. 
Junior 8econd Lieutenant W. H. Soper, July 16, 1904. 

Company C, Selma. 

Captain E. M. Cothran, Mar. 24, 1906. 

First Lieutenant B. R. Howard, March 24, 1906. 

Second Lieutenant J. M. Long, June 18, 1904. 




Company D, Montgomery. 

Captain W. F. Weiss, April 14, 1906. 
First Lieutenant W. E. Dow, Nov. 27, 1906. 
Second Lieutenant B. A. Taylor, Nov. 27, 1906. 



Company E, Union Springs. 



Captain A. H. Feagln, Mar. 7, 1906. 

First Lieutenant W. S. Chllds, March 7, 1906. 

Second Lieutenant G. M. Edwards, March 7, 1906. 



Company F, Tuscaloosa. 

Captain J. F. Walker, June 27, 1906. 

First Lieutenant C. A. Wynian. Nov. 15, 1906. 

Second Lieutenant Ernest H. Hagler, January 17, 1905. 

Company G, Eufaula. 

Captain K. B. McKenzie, July 17, 1905. 

First Lieutenant A. M. McDowell, July 17, 1906. 

Second Lieutenant K. A. Snpp, April 24. 1903. 



Company H, Opelika. 

Captain C. P, Stowe, Feb. 26, 1900. 

First Lieutenant T. A. Ward. April 14, 1906. 

Second Lieutenant John H. Powell, May 14, 1906. 

Company I, Luverne. 

Captain W. Ralph Routon, July 4, 1004. 

First Lieutenant W. II. Stoddard, June 14. 1906. 

Company K, Tuskegee. 

Captain G. W. Griffin. May 12, 1903. 

First Lieutenant B. W. Grimmet, August 6, 1906. 

Second Lieutenant J. C. Smith, Aug. 17, 1905. 

10. 



146 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

.Company L, Girabd. 

Captain Martin C. Ballon, Oct. 18, 1905. 
First Lieutenant C. W. Pittman, Oct. 18, 1905. 
Second Lieutenant Hugh Waldrop, Oct. 18, 1905. 

Company M, Demopolib. 

Captain B. W. Wilson, April 15, 1901. 

First Lieutenant Walter Griffith, December 3, 1906. 

Second Lieutenant, L. R. Wilson, Dec. 3, 1906. 



THIRD INFANTRY REGIMENT. 

HEADQUARTERS AT ANNISTON. 

Colonel W. H. McKleroy, May 8, 1905. v 

Lieutenant Colonel Hughes B. Kennedy, Birmingham, Nov. 2, 1904. 

Major G. L. Ledbetter, Birmingham, July, 1904. 

Major D. Houston Smith, June 21, 1906. 

Major W. H. Long, Jr. 

Major M. J. Williams, Surgeon, June 21, 1906. 

Captain W. F. Johnston, Jr., Adjutant, Anniston, May 26, 1905. 

Captain H. L. Francis, Commissary, Birmingham. 

Captain C. B. Bui lard, Ordnance Officer, Birmingham. 

Captain Earle G. Evans, Ins. of Guard, Birmingham, May 22, 1905. 

Captain Arthur Welborn, Quartermaster, Anniston, June 10, 1905. 

Captain W. L. McCaa, I. of R. P., Anniston, June 12, 1905. 

Company A, Woodlawn. 

Captain J. B. Scully, August 22, 1905. 

First Lieutenant Frank Morgan, August 22, 1905. 

Second Lieutenant S. Earl Posey, August 22, 1905. 

Company B, Florence. 

Captain J. E. Gullette, June 12, 1902. 
First Lieutenant J. T. Cook, Feb. 19, 1906. 
Second Lieutenant E. W. Cole, July 14, 1904. 

Company C, Gadsden. 

Captain L. B. Rainey, May 16, 1905. 

First Lieutenant Willburn Hill, May 16 ,1905. 

Second Lieutenant A. R. Brindley, May 16, 1905. 

Company D, Anniston. 

Captain C. M. Woodruff, November 22, 1906. 
First Lieutenant W. A. Parder. 
Second Lieutenant B. R. Sawyer. 

Company E, Decatub. 

Captain R. C. Horton. 

Second Lieutenant R. R. Brown, August 29, 1906. 

Company F, Albertville. 

Captain John C. Coleman, October 6, 1906. 
First Lieutenant A. M. Espy, October 6, 1906. 



ALABAMA NATIONAL GUARD. J 47 

Company 6, Birmingham. 



Captain J. Hugh Miller, Feb. 1, 1906. 
First Lieutenant S. N. Matson. 
Second Lieutenant W. M. Perdue. 

Company H, Alexander City. 

Captain N. S. Walker, August 28, 1906. 

First Lieutenant W. E. Bare, August 28, 1906. 

Second Lieutenant R. Gowan Roberts, June 21, 1906. 

Company I, Oxford. 

Captain P. M. Eichelberger, June 21, 1906. 

First LLeutenant William G. Bullard. June 21. 1906. 

Second Lieutenant R. Gowan Roberts, June 21. 1906. 

Company K, Birmingham. 

Captain Lueien C. Brown, May 6, 1902. 

First Lieutenant C. B. Ballard. August 24, 1905. 

Second Lieutenant R. V. Mabry, Aug. 24, 1905. 

Company L, Talladega. 

Captain John S. Daniel, May 7, 1906. 

First Lieutenant, Postelle Lewis, June 8, 1906. 

Second Lieutenant, vacant. 

RETIRED OFFICERS. 

J. K. Warren, Major, June 28, 1904. 

F. P. McConnell, Lieut. Colonel, September 27. 1904. 

H. T. Herlong, First Lieutenant, June 26. 1905. 

Howard Gaillard, Major, October 11, 1905. 

R. L. Gregory, Captain, August 16, 1905. 

R. S. Teague, Major, February 22, 1906. 

D. C. Williamson, Captain, February 22, 1906. 

E. J. MeCrossin. Captain, February 22. 1906. 
W. F. Aycock, Jr., Captain, February 22, 1906. 
Charles F Anderson, Major. January 15. 1900. 
John D. Elliott, Major. May 6, 1906. 

LINEAL RANK OF OFFICERS. 

Atkins, Victor B., Major, Selma, Dec. 19, 1903, No. 7. 

Arrington, Richard H., Captain, Enterprise, July 2. 1904, No. 20. 

Ballou. Martin C. 2nd Inft., Captain. Girard, Oct. 18, 1905, No. 41. 

Bare, W. E., 1st Lieut., Alexander City, Oct. 18, 1906, No. 35. 

Baber, Eugene F.. Jr., 2nd Inft.. Major, Montgomery, April 14, 1906, No. 19. 

Ballard, Clarence B., 3rd Inft., Captain, Birmingham. April 14, 1906. 

Bell, V. H., Jr., 1st Inf.. 2nd Lt., Ft. Deposit, Oct. 23, 1905. No. 20. 

Bower, W. H., 1st Inf.. 1st Lt. Troy Aug. 22, 1904, No. 8. 

Brame, Wm. W., 2nd Inf., Captain, Montgomery. Nov. 2, 1905, No. 43. 

Bricken. Chas. R., 2nd Inf., Colonel. Montgomery, Nov. 23, 1905, No. 9. 

Bruner, P. M., Jr., 1st Inf., Captain, Evergreen, May 6, 1903, No. 11. 

Brindley. A. R., 3rd Inft., 2nd Lieut., Gadsden, May 16, 1905, No. 10. 

Brown, Lueien C, 3rd Inf.. Captain. Birmingham May 6, 1902, No. 6. 

Bryan, H. L., 1st Inf., 1st Lieut., Ft. Deposit, Oct. 23, 1905, No. 20. 

Bryan, L. D„ Jr., 2nd Lieut., Camden, Aug. 22, 1905, No. 15. 

Bullard, Wm. G., 3rd Inf., 1st Lieut., Oxford, June 21, 1906, No. 23. 



148 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

Butler, A. B., 1st Art., 2nd Lieut., Selma, June 9, 1904, No. 5. 
Byrnes, Patrick, 1st Inf., 2d Lt.. Mobile, July 21, 1905, No. 14. 
Carter, J. E., 2nd Inf., Lt. Col., Sehna, April 2 1906, No. 7. 
Calhoun, M. L., 1st Cav.. 2nd Lt., Selma, May 6, 1906, No. 29. 
Carrington, L. W., 1st Art., 2nd Lt., Mobile, July 3, 1905, No. 13. 
Carlisle, J. D., 1st Art, 2nd Lt., Birmingham, Feb. 20, 1906, No. 25. 
Campbell, A. L., 1st Inf.. 2nd Lt., Geneva, Dec. 21, 1901, No. 2. 
Callaghan, John S., 1st Inf., Captain, Mobile, June 12, 1901, No. 5. 
Chapman, E. A., 1st Inf., 2nd Lt., Enterprise, June 16, 1905, No, 12. 
Chapman, B. S., 2nd Inf., Captain, Montgomery, June 21, 1906, No. 62. 
Clark, Louis V., Brig. Com.. Brig. Gen., Birmingham, April 21, 1901, No. 1. 
Crary, J. J., 1st Inf., 2nd Lt., Dothan, Jan. 25, 1906, No. 23. 
Childs, W. D., 2nd Inf., 1st Lt., Union Springs, March 7, 1906, No. 26. 
Collier, Wm. A., 2nd Inf., Captain, Tuscaloosa, Nov. 15, 1906, No. 45. 
Cole, E. W., 3rd Inf., 2nd Lieut., Florence, July 14, 1904, No. 6. 
Coleman, Jno. C, 3rd Infantry, Captain, Albertville 1906, No. — . 
Cook, J. T., 3rd Infantry, 1st Lieutenant, Florence, Feb. 19, 1906, No. 24. 
Cothran, E. M., 2nd Infantry, Captain, Selma, March 24, 1906, No. 55. 
Davis C. M., 1st Infautry, Captain, Ft. Deposit, Oct. 23, 1905, No. 42. 
Daniel, John S., 3rd Infantry, Captain, Talladega, May 7, 1906, No. 57. 
Dedman, James E., Major, Birmingham, Sept. 5, 1905, No. 11. 
Dean, L. Y., Colonel, Eufaula, July 1, 1901, No. 2. 
Dickey, G. O., 2nd Infantry, Major, Luverne, Feb. 19, 1906, No. 18. 
Dorrance, L. S., 1st Artillery, 1st Lieutenant, Birmingham, Feb. 20, 1906, 

No. 25. 
Dorr, W. E., 2nd Infantry, 2nd Lieutenant, Montgomery, April 14, 1906, 

No. 28. 
Dowd, W. W., 1st Infantry, 2nd Lieutenant, Mobile, June 7, 1904, No. 4. 
DuMont, Robt. B., 1st Infantry, Colonel, Mobile, July 15, 1899, No. 1. 
Eddy, I. N., 1st Artillery, Captain, Selma, May 10, 1901, No. 4. 
Edwards, G. M., 2nd Infantry, Union Springs, Mar. 7, 1906, No. 26. 
Eichelberger, P. M., 3rd Infantry, Captain, Oxford, June 21, 1906, No. 59. 
Ennis, J. R.. 1st Infantry, 1st Lieutenant. Mobile, April 24, 1905, No. 10. 
Espy, A. M., 3rd Infantry, 2nd Lieutenant, Albertville, Sept. 28, 1905, No. 

18. 
Evans, Earle G., 3rd Infantry, Captain, Birmingham, June 12, 1905, No. 29. 
Feagin, A. H., Captain, Union Springs March 7 1906 No. 54. 
Folmar, Frank P., 1st Infantry, Major, Troy, May 13, 1904, No. 7. 
Francis, H. L., 3rd Infantry, Captain, Birmingham, June 11, 1905, No. 30. 
Gilbert, A. V. B., 1st Infantry, 1st Lieutenant, Mobile, March 9, 1906, No. 27. 
Greene, W. R., 1st Artillery, Captain Headland 1906, No. — . 
Griffith, Walter, 2nd Lieutenant, Demopolis, June 1, 1901, No. 1. 
Griffin, Geo. W., 2nd Infantry, Captain, Tuskegee, May 12, 1903, No. 12. 
Gullette, J. E., 3rd Infantry, Captain, Florence, June 12, 1902, No. & 
Gunnels, Harry C, Major, Montgomery April 24 1901, No. 2. 
Hagan, John D., 1st Infantry, Major, Mobile, Feb. 2, 1906 No. 13. 
Hays, D. B., 1st Infantry, Captain, Brewton, Feb. 14, 1904, No. 22 
Hays, Oscar, Captain, Birmingham, Aug. 3, 1902, No. 10. 
Hayes, L. J., Junior 2nd Lieutenant, Camden, Aug. 22, 1905, No. — . 
Harte, A. C, 1st Infantry, Captain, Mobile, July 16, 1899, No. 2. 
Hagler, Ernest H., 2nd Infantry, Tuscaloosa, Jan. 17, 1905, No. 8. 
Haygood H. S., 1st Infantry, 2nd Lieutenant, Evergreen, Jan. 16. 
Harwood, J. T., 1st Infantry, 2nd Lieutenant, Uniontown, April 14, 1904, 

No. 35. 
Harkman. W. W., 1st Infantry, 1st Lieutenant, Mobile, June 7, 1904, No. 5. 
Harper, Walter D., 2nd Infantry, 2nd Lieutenant Birmingham, June 25, 

1906, No. 32. 
Hill, Wellburn, 1st Lieutenant. Gadsden, May 16, 1905, No. 11. 
Hearn, William C, Major, Talladega, Aug. 22. 1904, No. 9. 
Holt, Barrie, Brig.-Gen., Montgomery, March 28, 1885, No. 4. 
Holloway, Asa, 1st Infantry, 1st Lieutenant, Enterprise July 2,. 1904, No. 7. 
Horten, Ray, 3rd Infantry, 1st Lieutenant, Decatur 1906, No. 38. 



ALABAMA NATIONAL GUARD. 149 

Holmes, J. A. Jr., 2nd Infantry, Captain, Wetumpka, Nov. 2, 1905, No. 49. 
Howard, Ben R., 2nd Infantry, 1st Lieutenant, Selma, March 24, 1906, No. 

28. 
Hubbard, G. J., 1st Infantry, Lt. Colonel, Troy, July 15, 1899, No. 1. 
Jackson, E. H., 2nd Infantry, Captain, Montgomery, Dec. 8, 1905, No. 51. 
Jenkins, J. D„ Captain, Camden, June 10, 1902, No. 7. 
Johnston, W. F., 3rd Infantry, Captain, Gadsden, May 26, 1905, No. 24. 
Johnson, J. F., 1st Infantry, Captain, Geneva, April 29, 1905, No. 23. 
Jones, C. A., Brig. Staff, Major, Birmingham, July 19, 1902, No. 5. 
Jones, D. B., 1st Cavalry, Captain, Camden, Jan. 22, 1904, No. 16. 
Kendrick, B. M., 2nd Infantry, Captain, Luverne Nov. 23, 1905, No 47. 
Kennedy, H. B., 3rd Infantry, Lt. Colonel, Birmingham Nov. 2, 
Kirkpatrlck, M. L., 2nd Infantry, Major, Montgomery, Nov. 23, 1905, No. 12. 
Kincey, T. A., 1st Artillery, Jr. 1st Lieutenant, Selma, June 9, 1904, No. — . 
Lee, W. F., Captain, Montgomery, July July 5, 1906, No. 60. 
Ledbetter, Chas. L., 3rd Infantry, Major, Birmingham, July 1904, No. 8. 
Lewis, Postelle, 3d Infantry, 1st Lieutenant, Talladega, June 8, 1906, No. 31. 
Ligon, Robert F., Brig.-Gen., Montgomery, Sept. 27, 1887, No. 3. 
Locke, Thos. C, 2nd Lieutenant, Montgomery, Dec. 8, 1905, No. 21. 
Long, J. M., 2nd Infantry, 2nd Lieutenant, Selma, June 18, 1904, No. 6. 
Long, W. H., Jr., 3rd Infantry, Major, Decatur, 1906, No. 20. 
Mabry, Jt. V., 3rd Infantry, 2nd Lieutenant, Birmingham, Aug. 24, 1905, 

No. 17. 
Matson, S. N., 3rd Infantry, 1st Lieutenant, Birmingham, No. 23. 
Maddox, F. M., 1st Infantry, Captian, Mobile, Sept. 30, 1905, No. 40. 
McCaa, W. L., 3rd Infantry, Captain, Anniston, June 12, 1905, No. 32. 
McDowell, A. M., 2nd Infantry, 1st Lieutenant, Eufaula, July 17, 1905, 

No. 17. 
McCowan. W. J., Jr., 1st Infantry, 2nd Lieut., Mobile, March 9, 19'J6, No. 27. 
Mclver, David W., Captain, Montgomery, March 16, 1903, No. 13. 
McKay, Thos. P., 1st Infantry, Captain, Sept. 1, 1904, No. 38. 
McKleroy, Wm. H., 3rd Infantry, Colonel, Anniston, May 8, 1905, No. 8. 
McLear, J. N., l«t Infantry, Captain, Uniontown, No. — . 
McKenzie, K. B., 2nd Infantry, Captain, Eufaula, July 17, 1905, No. 34. 
McNeel, A. M., 2nd Infantry, 1st Lieut., Montgomery, Dec. 8, 1905, No. 21. 
Mangum. J. T., 2nd Infantry, Captain, Tallassee, Nov. 23, 1905, No. 46. 
Metcalf, W. L., 1st Cavalry, 1st Lieutenant, Birmingham, Jan. 18, 1905, 

No. 15. 
Merkle, F. H., 1st Cavalry, Jr. 2nd Lieutenant, Selma, May 25, 1905, No. — . 
Mickle, William E., Jr., 1st Infantry, Captain, Mobile, July 1, 1902, No. 9. 
Mllhous, Frank L., 1st Cavalry, 1st Lieutenant, Selma, May 25, 1905, 

No. 12. 
Miller, J. Hugh, 3rd Infantry, Captain, Birmingham, Feb. 1, 1906, No. 52. 
Morgan, Frank, 3rd Infantry, 1st Lieutenant, Woodlawn, Aug. 22, 1905, 

No. 18. 
Morris, C. J., 1st Infantry, Dothan, Jan. 25, 1906, No. 22. 
Mountain, Geo. L., 1st Infantry, Mobile, Feb. 10, 1906, No. 24. 
Noble, Benjamin F., Captain, Montgomery, May 2, 1906, No. 38. 
Nelson, E. K., 1st Artillery, 1st Lieutenant, Mobile, July 3, 1905, No. 16. 
Oates, William, 1st Infantry, Major, Mobile, May 12, 1902, No. 3. 
Palmer, Jos., 3rd Infantry, 2nd Lieutenant, Anniston, June 12, 1905, No. 11. 
Partridge, Thad., 1st Infantry, Captain, Mobile, Aug. 28, 1905, No. 35. 
Pace, A. E. f 1st Infantry, Captain, Dothan, Feb. 1, 1905, No. 21. 
Peacock, H. B., 2nd Infantry, Captain, Opelika, Nov. 23, 1905, No. 48. 

Pelham, Sam C, 3rd Infantry, Captain, Anniston, May 23, 1904, No. 17. 
Perdue, W. M., 3rd Infantry, 2nd Lieutenant, Birmingham, 1906, No. 33. 
Perkins, Chase, 2nd Infantry, Captain, Birmingham, June 25, 1906, No. 61. 
Phillips, G. C, 1st Cavalry, Captain, Selma. Nov. 15, 1905," No. 44. 
Pittman, C. W., 2nd Infantry, 1st Lieutenant, Girard, Oct. 18, 1905, No. 19. 
Powell, John H., 2nd Lieutenant, Opelika, May 14, 1906, No. 30. 
Powers, John F., Captain, Mobile, July 6, 1904, No. 19. 
Posey, S. E., 3rd Infantry, 2nd Lieutenant, Woe d lawn, Aug. 22, 1906, 

No. 16. 
Price, C. S., 1st Cavalry, Captain, Birmingham, Jan. 18, 1905, No. 28. 
Pringle, Y. W., 1st Artillery, Captain, Mobile, July 3, 1905, No. 27. 



150 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

Raiuey. L. B., 3rd Infantry, Captain, Gadsden, May 16, 1905, No. 26. 
Rembert, J. F. f 1st Artillery, 1st Lieutenant, Montgomery, 1906, No. 36.' 
Richbourg, E. M., 2nd Infantry, 1st Lieutenant, Montgomery, April 14, 

1906, No. 29. 
Roach, I). G., 1st Infantry, 1st Lieutenant, Geneva, June 6, 1905, No. 13. 
Roberts, R. G., 3rd Infantry, 2nd Lieutenant, Oxford, June 21, 1906, No. 31. 
Rosendorf. I. L., Captain, Selnia, January 16, 1904, No. 18. 
Roswald, Samuel, 1st Artillery, Captain, Montgomery, Nov. 23, 1903, No. 15. 
Routon, Ralph, 2nd Infantry, Captain, Luverne, July 4, 1905, No. 65. 
Rubira, Harry S., 1st Infantry, 1st Lieutenant, Mobile, May 22, 1903, No. 4. 
Sapp, K. A., 2nd Infantry, 2nd Lieutenant, Eufaula, April 24, 1903, No! — . 
Sexton, Albert C, Captain, Montgomery. July 15, 1903, No. 14. 
Seals, Carl H., 2nd Infantry, Major, Birmingham, June 9, 1906, No. 16. 
Sheehan, William T.. Lt. Col., Montgomery, May 28, 1906, No. 8. 
Scott, David M., Major, Selma, April 24, 1901, No. 2. 
Stewart, A. W., 1st Infantry, 1st Lieutenant, Uniontown, April 12, 1905, 

No. 9. 
Stoddard, W. H., 2nd Infantry, 1st Lieutenant, Luverne, June 14, 1906, 

No. 32. 
Scully, J. B., 3rd Infantry. Captain, Woodlawn, Aug. 22, 1905, No. 36. 
Simmons, H., 2nd Infantry, 1st Lieutenant, Demopolis, April 4, 1903, No. 2. 
Smith, D. H., 3rd Infantry, Major, Oxford, June 21, 1906, No. 15. 
Smith, E. I)., B. S., Major, Birmingham, April 21, 1905, No. 10. 
Smith, J. A., 1st Infantry, 1st Lieutenant, Evergreen, May 19, 1903, No. 3. 
Smith, J. C, 2nd Infantry, 2nd Lieutenant, Tuskegee, Aug. 17, 1905, No. 16. 
Smith, J. O., 1st Artillery, Captain, Birmingham, Sept. 16, 1905, No. 39. 
Smith, M. D., 2nd Infantry, 1st Lieutenant, Birmingham, June 25, 1906, 

No. 34. 
Speer, O. P., 1st Lieutenant, Spring Hill, June 10, 1902, No. 1. 
Stewart, U. U., 1st Cavalry, 2nd Lieutenant, Birmingham, Jan. 18, 1905, 

No. 9. 
Soper, W. H., 2nd Infantry, Jr. 2nd Lieutenant, Birmingham, July 16, 1904, 

No. — . . 

Stokely, T. P., Captain, Birmingham, April 21, 1905, No. 25. 
Stowe, C. J., 2nd Infantry, Captain, Opelika, Feb. 26, 1906, No. 53. 
Tebbetts, William F., Major, Mobile, Dec. 10. 1902, No. 6. 
Taylor* J. Hunt, 2nd Infantry, Captain, Montgomery, Dec. 1, 1905, No. 50. 
Taylor, Frank G., 2nd Infantry, Captain, Montgomery, June 21, 1906, No. 63. 
Todd, Geo. H., Jr., 1st Artillery. 2nd Lieutenant, Montgomery, 1906, No. 34. 
Throckmorten, A. R., Captain, Decatur, not commissioned. 
Vaiden, Wm. J., 1st Infantry, Captain, Uniontown, April 14, 1904, No. 16. 
Van Lieu, G. M., 1st Infantry, Captain, Mobile, July 16, 1899, No. 1. 
Watkins, J. M., 1st Infantry, Captain, Troy, July 9, 1905, No. — . 
Walker, N. S.. 3rd Infantry, Captain, Alex. City, 1906, No. — . 
Ward, T. A., 2nd Infantry, Opelika, April 14, 1900. No. 30. 
Waldrop, Hugh, 2nd Infantry, Girard, Oct. 18, 1905, No: 19. 
Walker, J. F., 2nd Infantry, Captain, Tuscaloosa, June 27, 1906, No. 64. 
Weiss, W. F., 2nd Infantry, Captain, Montgomery, April 14, 1906, No. 56. 
Weafer. J. H., 1st Artillery, 1st Lieutenant, Selma, June 9, 1SHM, No. 6. 
Westcott, S. T., 1st Artillery, Major, Montgomery, July 25, 1899, No. 1. 
Welborne. Arthur, 3rd Infantry, Captain, Anniston, June 10, 1905, No. 31. 
Wiley, W. H., 1st Infantry, Captain, Troy, Aug. 22, 1904, No. 37. 
Wiley, James M., 1st Infantry, 2nd Lieutenant, Troy, Aug. 30, 1904, No. — . 
Williams, A. L.. 1st Infantry, Major, Dothan, June 23, 1902, No. 4. 
Westcott, W. B., 1st Artillery, Captain, Montgomery, 1906, No. — . 
Williams, M. J., 3rd Infantry, Major, Oxfcrd, June 21, 1906, No. 17. 
Withers. E. R., 1st Cavalry, Jr., 2nd Lieutenant, Birmingham, Jan. 18, 

1905, No. — . 
White, E. A., 1st Infantry, Captain, Mobile, July 3,' 1905, No. 33. 
Wilson, B. G., 2nd Infantry, Captain, Demopolis, April 15, 1901, No. 3. 
Woodruff. C. M., 3rd Infantry, 1st Lieutenant, Anniston, June 12, 190&, 

No. 14. 
Wyman, Chas., 2nd Infantry, 1st Lieutenant, Tuscaloosa, 1906, No. 37. 
Yeatman, John T., Major, Birmingham, Aug. 23, 1904, No. 9. 



VII. UNITED STATES OFFICIALS IN 

ALABAMA. 



FOREIGN CONSULAR OFFICIALS RESIDENT IN ALABAMA. 

The names of the respective governments, names of the consuls, and the 
dates of their exequaturs are given. 

' Birmingham. 

France. — Simon Klotz, consular agent, August 17, 1894. 

Mobile. 

Argentine Republic. — Manuel S. Macias, vice consul, April 18, 1906. 

Lloyd D. Batre, vice consul, Jan. 18, 1895. 
Austria-Hungary. — W. F. Stoutz, consul, April 8, 1878. 
Belgium. — Robert B. duMont, consul, March 15, 1893. 
Brazil. — Luiz Moraguez, vice consul, August 27, 1901. 

T. G. McGonigal, commercial agent, Jan. 14, 1903. 
Columbia. — Juan L. Marty, consul (temp, recog.), March 10, 1905. 
Costa Rico. — Paul E. Rapier, consul, Nov. 10, 1900. 
Cuba. — Leopoldo Dolz y Araugo, consul, Sept. 27, 1902. 
Denmark. — Louis Donald, vice consul, July 29, 1902. 
France. — G. A. Riviere, consular agent, Oct. 3, 1905. 
Germany. — E. Holzborn, consul, January 24, 18&9. (For Alabama and 
Florida.) 
Great Brltian. — Edmund Joshua Seiders, vice counsel, Oct. 15. 1904. 
Guatemala. — Dr. Luis Puig, consul, Jan. 12, 1906. 
Haiti. — Jean Marquez, vice consul, December 9, 1895. 
Honduras. — Ramon Vlada, consul, March 18, 1904. 

Luis M. Moraguez, vice consul, Jan. 7, 1902. 
Italy.— Giovanni Iverlich, consular agent, Jan. 13, 1905. 
Japan. — William Peter Hutchison, honorary consul, May 20, 1902. 
Liberia. — George W. Lovejoy (colored) consul, February 25, 1899. 
Mexico. — Alfonso Jimenez, vice consul, Oct. 10, 1905. 
Netherlands. — A. Proskauer, honorary vice consul, January 20, 1902. 
Nicarauga. — Luis M. Moraguez, consul, June 8, 1900. 
Norway — Louis Donald, vice consul, May 22, 1906. 
Panama. — Juan de Divo Amador, vice consul, Jan. 25, 1906. 
Paraguay. — Elliott K. RIckarby, vice consul, December 18, 1901. 
Russia. — Murray Wheeler, vice consul, October 4, 1892. 
Spain. — Luis M. Moraguez, honorary vice consul, June 27, 1902. 
Sweeden. — Louis Donald, vice consul, June 3, 1902. 
Uruguay. — Luis M. Moraguez, vice consul, February 13, 1894. 



UNITED STATES LAND OFFICE. 

Montgomery. 

Register. — Robert Daniel Johnston, of Birmingham; May 19, 1906. 
Receiver. — Nathan H. Alexander (colored*) /of Montgomery; Jan. 16, 1906. 

(151) 



152 ' OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

Clerks. — Joseph W. Booth, of Montgomery ; March 7, 1881. 

• Frank Coleman, of Huntsville; July 12, 1894. 

The terms of the register and receiver are four years from the dates 
of their appointments as above* Terms of the clerks are limited to the 
period in which their services are required. 



MARINE HOSPITAL SERVICE. 

Mobile. 

•Edward Francis, Passed Assistant Surgeon. 

E. S. McGulre, Pharmacist. 

Robert Gaines, Attendant. 

Eugene W. Brunson. Attendant. 

Willis Flemings, Attendant. 

Chas. Schnauder, Attendant. 

Manuel Rodrigues, Attendant. 

Otto F. Hanson, Attendant. 

James C. Callarke, Attendant. 

Kennedy May, Attendant. 

Harry Kelley, Attendant. 

Armstead Wallace, Attendant. 



ASSISTANT CUSTODIAN AND JANITOR SERVICE. 

ANN1ST0N, ALA., POST-OFFICE. 

Salary. 
Newman G. O'Neil, Janitor $ 660 00 

Carlos E. Songer, Fireman-Watchman . 600 08 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA., COURT-HOUSE AND POST-OFFlCE. 

Ulysses G. Nelson, Engineer-Janitor 1,000 00 

Henry A. Draper, Watchman-Fireman 660 00 

Norman Thornton, Elevator Conductor : 600 00 

Charles W. Smith, Laborer ._.__' 500 00 

John Birdeoax, Laborer 500 00 

Calvin C. Harvey, Laborer 1 500 00 

William A. Holland, Laborer 500 00 

HUNTSVILLE, ALA., COURT-HOUSE AND POST-OFFICE. 

Ellas Patton, Janitor 660 00 

Charles B. Brickell, Laborer 540 00 

MONTGOMERY, ALA., COURT- HOUSE AND POST-OFFICE. 

Oscar G. Irwin, Engineer-Janitor 1,000 00 

George A. Lewis, Elevator Conductor 600 00 

Aaron T. Timothy, Laborer 500 00 

James O. Holmes, Laborer 500 00 

Dennis D. Pfeiffer, Laborer 500 00 

Addie Smith, Charwoman 250 00 

Mary E. Motley, Charwoman 250 00 

Mattie Williams, Charwoman * 250 00 



UNITED STATES OFFICIALS IN ALABAMA. 153 

CUSTOMS SERVICE. 

Mobile. 

Salary. 

William F. Tebbetts. Collector, per annum $ 250 00 * 

Frank F. Conway, Deputy Coll'r. and Clerk, per annum 1,800 00 

John S. Callaghan, Deputy Coir r. and Clerk, per annum 1,400 00 

Simeon Y. Locke, Cashier, per annum 1,200 00 

Walter H. Dodd, Clerk, per annum 1,095 00 

George Cottin, Inspector and Clerk, per annum 1,000 00 

Henry G. Turner, Inspector and Clerk, per annum 1,000 00 

Edwin N. Winters, Inspector, per day 3 00 % 

Edward W. Goss, Clerk and Inspector, per annum ^ 900 00 

Joachim Davis, Inspector, per day 2 50 

Frank T. Penny, Inspector, per day 2 50 

Albert M. Palmes, Inspector, per day 2 50 

John R. Goubil, Inspector, per day ^__ 2 50tt 

Isaac H. Hyde, Inspector, per day 2 50ft 

Alexander N. Spear, Night Inspector, per day 2 00 

Lawrence J. Cullen, Night Inspector, per day. 2 00 

James C. Banks, Clerk and Stenographer, per annum 720 00 

Lemuel O. Davis, Boatman, per annuiru . 480 00 

John E. Wilson, Boatman, per annum t 480 00 t 

Sid A. Ladnier, Boatman, per annum, 480 00 % 

* Fees and commissions, maximum $3,000 per annum. 

t When employed. 

t Temporarily, pending establishment of eligible register. 



INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DISTRICT OF ALABAMA. 

Birmingham. 

Collector. — Joseph O. Thompson : Fees. 

Storekeeper-Ganger. — Thomas 8. Woods .Fees. 

W. F. Nabers ___^ Fees. 

Henry R. Jordan Fees. 

% Coly M. Finley Fees. 

William B. Green Fees. 

Henry H. Stewart Fees. 

John B. Simpson Fees. 

Tom C. Williams _Fees. 

Samuel T. Fowler Fees. 

Joel D. Fowler Fees. 

Robert D. Hunt Fees. 

Hugh A. Carson Fees. 

Griffin Tatum Fees. 

Andrew P. Laughlin : Fees. 

W. J. Harris i__Fees. 

Samuel C. Dunn Fees. 

Sidney J. Petree '. Fees. 

Lorenzo E. Johnson Fees. 

Christopher B. Nichols *. .Fees. 

Henry L. Foshee Fees. 

E. N. Abbott Fees. 

S. M. Murphy Fees. 

Elijah J. Lavender! Fees. 

Edward B. Beason Fees. 

William T. Porter Fees. 

William O. Robertson Fees. 



154 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

UNITED STATES COURTS. 
Cibcuit Court of Appeals. 

Alabama U. 8. Courts form a part of the Fifth Circuit. — Courts are held 
on the 3rd Monday of October, at Montgomery, Ala. 

U. 8. Supreme Court Justice assigned to Fifth Circuit. — Edward D. 
White, Washington, D. C. 

Circuit Judges— Don A. Pardee, Atlanta, Ga., Andrew P. McCormick, 
Dallas, Texas,- and David P. Shelby, Huntsville, Ala. 

Clerk — Charles H. Lednum, New Orleans, La. 

Northern District. 
Birmingham and Huntsville. 

Time and place of holding courts — Circuit and district courts for north- 
ern division: First Tuesday in April and second Tuesday in October, at 
Huntsville. 

Circuit and district courts for Southern pivision: First Tuesdays in 
March and November, at Birmingham. 

Counties in the district — Northern division: Colbert, Cullman, Frank- 
lin, Jackson, Lauderdale, Lawrence, Limestone, Madison, Marion, Morgan 
and Winston. 

Southern division: Bibb, Blount, DeKalb, Fayette, Greene, Hale, Jeffer- 
son, Lamar, Pickens, St. Clair, Shelby, Sumter, Tuscaloosa and Walker. 

Eastern division: Calhoun, Cherokee, Clay, Cleburne, Etowah, Talla- 
dega. 

Circuit and district courts for Eastern division : At Anniston, first Mon- 
days in May and November. 

District Judge — Thomas G. Jones, Montgomery, appointed Dec. 17, 1901; 
salary $6,000.00. 

Circuit and* District Court Clerk — Charles J. Allison, Birmingham; 
appointed Sept. 30, 1899; fees. 

United States District Attorney — Oliver D. Street, GuntersviUc. 

Assistant United States District Attorneys — N. L. Steele, Birmingham, 
Nov. 18, 1902; $1,500.00; Win. H. Standifer, Birmingham, Sept. 10, 1900; 
$1,300.00. 

Clerk to U. S. Attorney — Grace R. Berry, Birmingham, Oct. 1, 1906; 
$900.00. 

United States Marshal — Pope M. Long, Birmingham, Jan. 14, 1906; 
$4,000.00. 

U. S. Commissioners — H. A. Wilson ; W. K. Cornish ; George B. Ran- 
dolph, Anniston; Edwin Pickard, Gadsden; J. H. Sloss; Ed. E. Greenleaf, 
Huntsville; C. P. Lunsford, Hamilton; G. L. Malone; John B. Shields, 
Jasper ; E. M. Lewis, Anniston ; Allen J. Roulhac, Sheffield ; A. C. Birch, 
Birmingham. 

Middle District. 

Montgomery. 

Time and place of holding courts — Circuit Court of Appeals: First Mon- 
day in September, at Montgomery. Circuit and District Courts: First 
Tuesdays in May and December, at Montgomery. Under special rules a 
session of the District court is also held on the first Monday of each month. 

Counties in the District — Autauga, Barbour, Bullock, Butler, Chilton. 
Chambers, Coffee, Coosa, Covington, Crenshaw, Dale, Dallas. Elmore, 
Geneva, Henry, Houston, Lee, Lowndes, Macon, Montgomery, Perry, Pike, 
Randolph, Russell and Tallapoosa. 

District Judge — Thomas G. Jones, Montgomery. 

Private Secretary to Judge — E. L. May, Montgomery. 



UNITED STATES OFFICIALS IN ALABAMA. 155 

* 

Circuit and District Court Clerk — Joseph W. Dimmick, Montgomery. 

United States District Attorney — Erastus J. Parsons, Montgomery. 

Assistant U. 8. District Attorney — Emmitt S. Thigpen, Montgomery. 

Clerk to U. 8. District Attorney — Miss Eunice A. Semmes, Montgomery. 

U. 8. Marshal — James H. Judkins, Montgomery. 

U. 8. Commissioners — John A. Elmore, Montgomery ; L. H. Dawson, Jr., 
Montgomery; C. S. Tutwiler, Troy; Thomas D. Samford, Opelika; A. B. 
Long, Greenville; W. B. Craig, Selma. 

Southern District. 

Mobile, 

Time and place of holding courts — Circuit and district courts: Fourth 
Monday in November and first Monday in May at Mobile. 

Counties in the district — Baldwin, Choctaw, Clarke, Conecuh, Escambia, 
Marengo, Mobile, Monroe, Washington and Wilcox. 

District Judge — Harry T. Toulmin, Mobile. 

Circuit and District Court Clerk — Richard Jones, Mobile. 

V. 8. District Attorney— Wm. H. Armbrecht, Mobile. 

Clerk to U. 8. Attorney— R. M. Smith, Mobile. 

V. 8. Marshal— Gilbert B. Deans, Mobile. 

XL 8. Commissioners — Geo. H. Dunlap, Jr., Mobile; Francis W. Hare, 
Monroeville ; John E. Hecker. Linden ; E. G. Rlckarby, Mobile ; John M. 
Rabb, Brewton; W. D. Wilccx, Butler. 



SKETCHES OF FEDERAL JUDGES IN ALABAMA. 

THOMAS GOODE JONES, judge of the northern and middle districts 
of Alabama, and a resident of Montgomery, was born, Nov. 26, 1844, at 
Macon, Ga., and is the son of Samuel G. and Martha Ward (Goode) Jones 
and the grandson of Dr. Thomas Williamson and Mary Armistead (Goode) 
Jones of Inverness, Mecklenburg county, Va., and of Dr. Thomas and Mary 
Aim (Knox) Goode, of Bath county. Va. The Jones' were of Welsh, the 
Goodes, of English descent. Samuel G. Jones, born in Va., passed most of 
his life In Montgomery. He was one of the pioneer railroad builders of 
the South, and was noted for his donations to schools and to the Episcopal 
church, of which he was a devout member. He died in Winchester, Tenn., 
in 1886. Judge Thomas G. Jones received his primary and academic edu- 
cation in the schools of Montgomery, and afterwards attended the schools 
of Dr. Charles Minor and Prof. Gesner Harrison, near Charlotte, Va. In 
1859, he entered the Virginia Military Institute, from which he graduated 
in 1862; entered the Confederate army, serving as a private, and as a 
staff officer under Gen. John B. Gordon, attaining the rank of major; and 
was wounded four times during the war; studied law while in winter 
quarters in the army, and after the war, pursued his studies in the law 
office of John A. Elmore, and was one of a class taught by Chief Justice 
A. J. Walker of Alabama ; and was admitted to practice In 1866. In addi- 
tion to his law study and practice, he was a planter from 1866 to 1870, 
with the exception of 1868 when he was editor of the Daily Picayune in 
Montgomery. From 1870 to 1880 he was the reporter cf the Supreme 
Court of Alabama; In 1876 was admitted to practice in Supreme Court of 
the United States ; was alderman of the city of Montgomery, 1876 to 1884, 
devoting much time to municipal problems; was orator on Confederate 
memorial day at Montgomery in 1876; was a member of the House of 
Representatives, 1884 to 1888, and speaker for term of 1886 to 1888; was 
governor of Alabama, 1890 to 1894; was orator at unveiling of soldiers' 
monument at Montgomery In 1898; was a member of the Alabama Con- 
stitutional Convention of 1901 ; and was orator at the memorial services 
at Grant's tomb in N. Y. in 1902. Since 1901, he has been United States 



156 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

District Judge for the northern and middle districts of Alabama. In pol- 
itics he has always stood for Democratic principles, including therein his 1 
support of Palmer and Buckner; and was a delegate from the State at 
large to the Indianapolis convention which nominated them. He was at 
one time a member of the Montgomery county Democratic committee, and 
for four years was a member of the State executive committee. He is a 
member of the Protestant Episcopal church, St. John's Parish, Montgom- 
ery, is one of the trustees of the Bishop's fund of the diocese of Alabama, 
and was trustee of the old Ha inner Hall school for girls. He is a Knight 
of Pythias, and an Elk. He is author of eighteen volumes of the Alabama 
Supreme Court Reports, 1870 to 1880; a pamphlet entitled Last Days of 
Army of Northern Virginia; and also the author of the Code of Ethics of 
the Alabama State Bar Association. He was married Dec. 20, 1866, in 
Montgomery to Georgena C, daughter of Dr. Marshall and Carrie (Jfoore) 
Bird, of Montgomery. 

HARRY T. TOULMIN. of Mobile, Judge of the southern district of Ala- 
bama, was born in Mobile county, March 4, 1838, and is the son of Gen. 
Theophilus L. and Amante (Juzan) Touhnin, and the grandson of Judge 
Harry Toulmin, one of the superior court Judges of the Mississippi Terri- 
tory. Judge Harry T. Toulmin was educated in the University of Ala- 
bama, and the University of Virginia, completing a partial court of law 
in the latter institution. He then attended one course of lectures in the 
law department of the University of Louisiana. He was admitted to the 
bar and in 1860 began the practice of his profession in Mobile. On April 
23, 1861, he enlisted as a private soldier in the Third Alabama Infantry 
Regiment, C. S. A. In September following he was* promoted to the first 
lieutenancy of Company U H," Twenty-second Alabama Infantry, and soon 
afterwards was promoted to the captaincy of his company, which he com- 
manded in the battles of Shiloh, Perryville and Murfreesboro. During the 
progress of the battle of Chickamauga he was made major of his regiment, 
commanding it to the close of the battle. His offi6ial report of the part 
borne by his regiment fn this battle Is of intense interest, and viewed as a 
literary composition describing the details of a battle it has scarcely a 
parallel among the numerous official battle reports of the war. Two 
months later Major Toulmin was prompted to the lieutenant colonel of his 
regiment, and in July, 1864, he was made its cclonel. He served as Colonel 
until the close of the war, but had command of his brigade during a great 
portion of the time. F}e surrendered with Gen. Johnston at Greensboro, 
N. C. In the fall of 1865 Col. Toulmin resumed the practice of law in 
Mobile and soon rose to the front rank among the leading lawyers of 
the city. He was* elected to the State legislature in the fall of 1870. Dur- 
ing his term of service he was admitted to practice before the Supreme 
Court of the State. While a member of the legislature be served as chair- 
man of the committee on judiciary and was also a member of the commit- 
tee on corporations. In November, 1874, he was elected judge of what 
was then the sixth judicial circuit of Alabama, for a term of six years, and 
In 1880 he was re-elected without opposition, the circuit in the meanwhile 
having been changed from the sixth to the first, and much extended. In 
1882 he resigned the office and resumed the practice of law, but in De- 
cember, 1886, he was appointed by President Cleveland United States Judge 
for the southern district of Alabama. Judge Toulmin is a member of the 
Trinity Protestant Episcopal Church. He was married May 4, 1869, to 
Mary Montague Hehshaw, a niece of Hon. David Ilenshaw, who was sec- 
retary of the navy under President Tyler's administration. 

OSCAR RICHARD HUNDLEY, cf Birmingham, judge of the 
northern district of Alabama, was born in Limestone county. Alabama, 
October 30. 1854, and is the son of Orville M. and Mary E. {Holding) Hund- 
ley and the grandson of John Henderson and Melinda Hundley, and of 
Richard and Mattie Holding of Madison county, Alabama. John Hender- 
son Hundley emigrated from Virginia to Alabama in 1818. His son Or- 



UNITED STATES OFFICIALS IN ALABAMA. 157 

vllle M. lived in Huntsville until .his death in 1903. During the war, he 
was a colonel in Wheeler's Cavalry. Oscar Richard Hundley's early educa- 
tion was received in the schools of Huntsville. In 1871-72 he prepared for 
college at Phillips Exeter Academy, Exeter, N. H.; In 1873-4, attended 
Marietta College, Marietta, Ohio; was graduated from Vander- 
bilt University with the degree cf B. L., 1877. June 12, 1907, received the 
honorary degree of LL. D., from Marietta College. He began the practice 
of law in Huntsville in 1878; was city attorney, 1882-1884; Division coun- 
sel Nashville, Chattanooga & St. X^ouis Railway 1888 to 1907; was a mem- 
ber of the Legislature, 1886-7; again In 1888-9; member of Alabama Sen- 
ate, 1890-91, 1892-93. 1894-95, 1896-97. He was appointed by President Har- 
rison national commissioner to the World's Columbian Exposition at Chica- 
go in 1893. He was a Democrat until 1896, When he became a Republican, 
making a race for Congress as nominee of that party in 8th Alabama dis- 
trict; was defeated by Gen. Joe Wheeler; April 9, 1907 he was appointed 
United States district judge, Northern district of Alabama. He is a mem- 
ber of the Catholic church; is author of "Code of Ordinances of the city 
of Huntsville. Alabama." On June 24, 1897, he was married in Birming- 
ham to Bossie, daughter of Frank P. and Indiana H. O'Brien. 

WEATHER SERVICE. 

Section Director. — Frank P. Chaffee., of Montgomery. 

Assistant Observers — Edgar C. Horton, of Montgomery; William S. 
Brotzman, of Montgomery. 

NORTHERN DISTRICT. 

Observer. • Location. County. 

Weather Bureau -Anniston Calhoun. 

Geo. It. Cather Ashville St. Clair 

Weather Bureau Birmingham Jefferson. 

Miss Maggie Rinkle Bridgeport 

H. C. Martin Calera__ ... 

H. Yancey, Jr _ J.-Cedar Bluff Cherokee 

Scott Maxwell Cordova Walker 

Eron B. Wallace ^ Cullman Cullman 

Ernest A. Carriger Decatur Morgan 

G. H. Smith Florence Lauderdale 

Prof. D. P. Goodhue Gadsden 1 Etowah 

Mrs. Florence Deignan Goodwater -Coosa 

L. S. Long Guntersville Marshall 

H. O. Sargent Hamilton Marion 

Fred Huron Lahusage DeKalb 

R. W. Tuck Lock No. 4 Talladega 

Albert KHsh Madison Madison 

Mrs. A. L. Awbrey Maple Grove Cherokee 

Aquilla J. Ketchum Oneonta Blount 

E. R. Nelles Riverton Colbert 

Miss Irene Caldwell... Seottsboro Jackson 

Prof. W. S. Goss Talladega -Talladega 

W. S. Wyman Tuscaloosa Tuscaloosa 

Samuel Moore Tuscumbia Colbert 

Dr. E. P. Nicholson Valley Head DeKalb 

A. L. Boone Vienna Pickens 



.Jackson 
.Shelby 



/ 



\' 



/ 



158 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

SOUTHERN DISTRICT. 

Observer. Location. County. 

Jas. L. Willis ..Alaga . Houston 

Jas. T. Anderson r Auburn .Lee 

S. T. Prultt Benton Lowndes 

M. J. Morris Bermuda Conecuh 

E. F. Bouchelle Boligee Greene 

J. A. Rampey Burkville Lowndes 

Dr. Lyman Ward Camp Hill Tallapoosa 

Dr. J. G. Michael Citronelle Mobile 

Wallace C. Edler -Clanton Chilton 

Miss Stella Gladney Dadeville Tallapoosa 

John H. Young Daphne Baldwin 

Geo. E. Pegram Demopolis Marengo 

Dr. J. B. Whltlock Eufaula Barbour 

Robert L. Whitcomb Evergreen Conecuh 

T. J. Farrls - — Flomaton : Escambia 

J. L. Parish Fort Deposit Lowndes 

W. E. W. Yerby Greensboro Hale 

E. M. Lewis Greenville Butler 

Prof. Samuel Jordan Highland Home Crenshaw 

C. P. Rogers, Jr Letohatchie Lowndes 

Robt. L. King 1 Livingston Sumter 

A. L. Crosby Lucy Houston 

Miss Annie L. Higgins Marlon Perry 

H. F. Bryan Milstead Macon 

Weather Bureau Mobile Mobile 

Section Center Montgomery Montgomery 

Dr. J. Huggins Newbern Hale 

A. H. Read, Jr -Opelika Lee 

J. T. Crawford Ozark Dale 

Jos. W. Bell Prattville Autauga 

E. A. Carr „ Pushmataha Choctaw . 

C. F. Brislin Selma Dallas * 

J. B. Frankhauser, S. J Spring Hill Mobile 

P. A. Noble Tallassee-— , Elmore 

J. G. Forster__, Thomasville Clarke 

Prof. Geo. W.^arver Tuskegee Macon 

P. L. Cowan Union Springs Bullock 

Prof. J. M. RIcheson Unlontown Perry 

J. Callaway Wetumpka Elmore 



YLII. COUNTY OFFICERS. 



AUTAUGA COUNTY. 

Judge of Probate. — G. S. Livingston, Prattville. 

Clerk of Circuit Court.— T. W. Smith, Prattville. 

Sheriff. — Joe A. Chambliss, Prattville. 

Tax Assessor. — J. H. Howard, Mulberry. 

Tax Collector. — R. B. Jones, Autauga ville. 

Tax Commissioner. — Thomas B. Love, Statesville. 

Treasurer. — G. C. Speigener, Prattville. 

Superintendent of Education. — H. A. Askins, Billingsley. 

County Commissioners. — M. A. Graham, Prattville; J. W. P. Jones, Mul- 
berry; W. A. Gandy, Billingsley; W. D. Sanford, Rollins. 

Register in Chancery. — Z. Abney, Prattville. 

Surveyors. — C. A. Pickett, Autaugaville ; E. E. Todd, Plantersville. 

Registrars. — H. M. Poole, Prattville; Geo. Houston, Mulberry; J. M. 
Thompson, Autaugaville. 

Pension Examiners. — Dr. Clarence Rice, Prattville; L. A. Chambliss, 
Prattville. 

Health Officers.— Br. J. E. Wilkinson, Chairman, Prattville; Dr. M. D. 
Smith, Prattville; Dr. C. M. Rice, Prattville; Dr. R. M. Gholson, Prattville; 
Dr. R. M. Davis, Prattville. 

Game and Fish Warden. — D. J. McCord, Prattville. 



BALDWIN COUNTY. 

Judge of Probate. — J. II. H. Smith. Bay Minette. 

Clerk of Circuit Court. — James M. Voltz, Bay Minette. 

Sheriff. *— Thomas A. Booth, Bay Minette. 

Tax Assessor. — Gus B. Stapleton, Barnwell. 

Tax Collector. — Henry H. Cooper, Bay Minette. 

Tax Commissioner. — T. C. Hand, Bay Minette. 

Treasurer. — Chas. E. Wilkins, Daphne. 

Superintendent of Education. — J. S. Lambert, Bay Minette. 

County Commissioners. — Frank Bryars, Latham ; O. E. McMillan, Bay 
Minette ; Thos. J. Holnian, Muscogee, Fla. ; Patrick Jennings Cooney, Mar- 
low. 

Register in Chancery. — Chas. K. Holt, Mobile. 

Surveyors. — N. L. Durant, Bromley; Paul C. Boudousquie, Point Clear. 

Registrars. — W. E. Bryant, Stockton; Marion Bryars, Stockton; W. T. 
Kee, Lillian. 

Pension Examiners. — D. C. Byrne, Bay Minette; G. L. Lambert, Bay 
Minette. 

Board of Health.— Dr. V. McR. Schowalter, County Health Officer, Point 
Clear; Dr. J. C. McLeod, Ass't. Co. Health Officer, Bay Minette. 

Coroner. — N. G. McKenzie, Daphne. 

Game and Fish Warden. — Wilton A. Cooper, Bay Minette. 



HARBOUR COUNTY. 

Judge of Probate. — Thos. D. Grubbs, Clayton. +- 
Clerk of Circuit Court.— B. Caleb Cox, Clayton. 
Sheriff.— W. M. Teal, Clio. 

(159) 



160 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

Tax Assessor. — R. Malcolm McEachern, Eufaula. 

Tax Collector.— Bob T. Roberts, Clayton. 

Tax Commissioner. — Virgil Crawford, Eufaula. 

Treasurer. — Chas. Capel, Clayton. % 

Superintendent of Education. — Chas. S. McDowell, Jr., Eufaula. 

Coroner. — Geo. C. Vaughn, Eufaula. 

County Commissioners. — C. F. Massey and C. A. Locke, Eufaula ; W. M. 
Teal, Clio; J. A. Baxter, Louisville; J. J. S. Willis, Mt. Andrew; A. Col- 
lins, — ston ; C. W. Fenn, Clayton. 

Register in Chancery. — A. M. McLendon, Eufaula. 

Registrars. — B. F. Long, Comer ; J. E. Gillis, Clayton. 

Pension Examiners. — Edgar R. Qulllin, Clayton; Jas. J. Winne, Clayton. 

Game and Fish Warden. — N. B. Coles, Clayton. 

Board of Health. — Dr. W. H. Robertson, Chairman, Clayton ; Dr. W. S. 
Britt, Eufaula; Dr. W. P. McDowell, Eufaula; Dr. W. P. Copeland, Eu- 
faula ; Dr. B. F. Bennett, Louisville. 



BIBB COUNTY. 

Judge of Probate.— W '. L. Pratt, Centreville. Is 

Clerk of Circuit Court. — R. L. Avery, Centreville. 

Sheriff.— J. G. Oakley, Centerville. 

Tax Assessor. — T. C. Wallace, West Blocton. 

Tax Collector. — J. S. Gardner, Centreville. 

Tax Commissioner. — N. H. Thompson, Centreville. 

Treasurer.— Nelson Fuller, Centreville. 

Superintendent of Education. — R. H. Pratt, Six Mile. 

Coroner. — W. B. Williams, Centreville. 

County Commissioners. — B. J. Murphy, Eoline; W. T. riteele, Centreville; 
W. H. Cleveland, Centreville; W. H. Thomas, Ashby. 

Register in Chancery. — L. H. Nunnelee, Centreville. 

Surveyors. — L. P. Wallace, Blocton; Alex Clark, Centreville. 

Registrars. — D. J. Frazier, Centreville; H. D. Tominie, Eoline; R. J. 
Jones, Centreville. 

Pension Examiners. — Dr. J. S. Moore, Centreville ; N. P. Langston, Bloc- 
ton. 

Game and Fish Warden. — C. L. Cleveland, Centreville. 



BLOUNT COUNTY. 

Judge of Probate. — John F. Kelton, Oneonta. 

Clerk of Circuit Court. — H. C. McPherson, Oneonta. 

Sheriff. — W. E. Graves, Oneonta. 

Tax Assessor. — M. C. Allgood, Chepultepec. 

Tax Collector. — Richard Nation, Blountsville. 

Tax Commissioner. — George W. Darden, Oneonta. 

Treasurer. — S. C. Allgood, Oneonta. 

Superintendent of Education. — O. A. Steele, Oneonta. 

County Commissioners. — W. V. Copeland, Blountsville; R. U. Alldredge, 
Brooksville: A. L. Glasscock, Blount Springs; J. M. Yarbrough, Tidwell. 

Register in Chancery. — E. B. Roberts. Oneonta. 

Surveyors. — M. P. Brittain, Summit; J. N. Davidson, Cleveland. 

Registrars. — D. M. Malone, Blountsville; A. M. Hood, Blount Springs: 
W. B. Roberts, Cleveland. 

Pension Examiners. — J. H. Berrier, Oneonta; H. L. Martin, Oneonta. 

Board of Health. — Dr. D. S. Moore, Chairman, Clarence; Dr. Geo. W. 
Self, Selfville; Dr. Geo. W. Baker, Snead; Dr. Jesse Brown, Oneonta; Dr. 
S. T. Shepard, Lehigh. 

Game and Fish Warden. — J. B. Sloane, Oneonta. 





t 

COUNTY OFFICERS. 161 

BULLOCK COUNTY. 

Judge of Probate. — A. E. Singleton, Union Springs. 

Clerk of Circuit Court. — Henry Stlnson, Union Springs. 

Sheriff. — G. J. Carmichael, Union Springs. 

Tax Assessor. — W. J. Cowart, Union Springs. 

Tax Collector. — N. H. Frazer, Union Springs. 

Tax Commissioner— \X . P. Hufham, Fitzpa trick. 

Treasurer. — A. B. Strickland, Union Springs. 

Superintendent of Education. — D. S. Bethune, Union Springs. 

County Commissioners. — J. P. Penick, Three Notch; Geo. F. Carlisle, 
Union Springs; D. A. J. Blue, Perote; J. O. Griswold. 

Register in Chancery. — Andrew W. Beverly, Union Springs. 

Surveyor. — M. E. Pruett, Midway. 

Registrars. — R. F. Sellers, Union Springs; C. G. Stovall, Union Springs; 
E. P. Hassland, Perote. 

Pension Examiners. — C. II. Franklin, Union Springs; J. H. Rainer, 
Union Springs. 

Board of Health. — Dr. C. H. Franklin, Chairman, Union Springs; Dr. T. 
J. Dean, Union Springs; Dr. C. M. Franklin, Union Springs; Dr. W. A. 
Sellers, Inverness; Dr. J. L. Bowman, Union Springs. 

Game and Fish Warden. — J. C. Hough, Inverness. 



v BUTLER COUNTY. 

Judge of Probate. — H. D. Lainpley. Greenville. \r 

Clerk of Circuit Court.— W. J. Nicholson, Greenville. 

Sheriff.— W. S. Watson, Greenville. 

Tax Assessor. — A. W. Metcalf, Greenville. 

Tax Collector. — R. E. Peagler. Greenville. 

Tax Commissioner. — H. P. Dohrmeir, Greenville. 

Treasurer. — J. P. Reynolds, Greenville. 

Superintendent of Education. — C. II. Lewis, Greenville. 

County Commissioners. — J. N. Cook, Pigeon Creek ; J. E. Helms, Green- 
ville; J. I). Poole, Pine Flat; J. W. Darby, Garland. 

Register in Chancery. — H. B. Pilley, Greenville. 

Surveyors. — M. G. Hammonds, Greenville: Robert Mills, Georgiana. 

Registrars. — W. H. Shanks, Forest Home; T. J. Judge, Greenville. 

Pension Examiners. — M. G. Hammonds, Greenville; John A. Kendrick, 
Greenville. 

Board of Health,— Dr. R. E. Smith, Greenville; Dr. J. A. Kendrick, 
Greenville; Dr. J. L. Perdue, Greenville. 

Game and Fish Warden. — W. F. Sirinond, Saucer. 



CALHOUN COUNTY. 

Judge of Probate. — Emmett F. Crook, Anniston. 

Clerk of Circuit Court. — I. E. Watson, Aunlston. 

Sheriff. — Wm. C. I^eGrand, Anniston. 

Tax Assessor. — Dave Cowden, Anniston. 

Tax Collector. — D. Z. Goodlett, Anniston. 

Tax Commissioner. — John S. Mooring, Anniston. 

Treasurer. — H. B. Glover, Anniston. 

Superintendent of Education.— II. T. Persons, Anniston. 

Coroner. — J. L. Murphy, Anniston. 

County Commissioners.— W. F. Hanna, President, Oxana; M. B. Well- 

11 



162 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

born, Anniston; C. D. Martin, Jacksonville; J. S. Webster, Duke;; A. J. 
Tarvin, Ohatehie. 

Register in Chancery. — Wm. M. Hames, Jacksonville. 

Surveyors. — B. G. McClellan, Alexandria; W. P. Howell, Iron City. 

Registrars. — Percy C. Patterson, Anniston; D. F. Shuford, Oxford; 
W. H. Nunnelly, Ohatehie. 

Pension Examiners. — Dr. J. F. Walker; Anniston; John H. Allen, Pied- 
mont. 

Board of Health. — Dr. J. M. Whiteside, chairman, Anniston; Dr. A. A. 
Greene, Anniston ; Dr. A. N. Steele, Anniston ; Dr. W. H. Kinnebrew, Pied- 
mont; Dr. W. B. Arberry, Jacksonville. 

Game and Fish Warden. — G. J. Bryant, Alexandria. 



CHAMBERS COUNTY. 

Judge of Probate. — A. J. Driver, Jr., Lafayette. ^ 

Clerk of Circuit Court.— J. A. Williams, Lafayette. 

Sheriff. — J. M. Walton, Lafayette. 

Tax Assessor. — Jas. A. Wise, Wise. 

Tax Collector. — James B. Barrow, Lafayette. 

Tax Commissioner. — D. T. Greene, Lafayette. 

Treasurer. — 0. L. Griffin, Lafayette. 

Superintendent of Education. — W. T. Hollingsworth, Lafayette. 

County Commissioners. — J. Howard Wallace, Lafayette; T. Wesley Wal- 
lace, Lafayette; R. C. Germany, Lafayette; John II. Dunn, (no address.) 

Register in Chancery. — J. A. Williams, Lafayette. 

Surveyor. — Selman C. Knight, Waverly. 

Registrars. — W. H. Webb, Lafayette; S. A. Jordan, Lafayette; W. A. 
Williams, Cusseta. 

Pension Examiners. — R. J. Moore, Lafayette; Dr. W. D. Gaines, La- 
fayette. 

Board of Health. — Dr. Z. T. Grady, County Health Officer, Lafayette. 

Game and Fish Warden. — G. W. Howard, Lanette. 



CHEROKEE COUNTY. 

Judge of Probate. — Joe L. Savage, Centre. 

Clerk of Circuit Court. — I. L. Brock, Centre. 

Sheriff.— J. P. Miller, Centre. 

Tax Assessor. — James M. Wilder, Centre. 

Tax Collector. — Geo. Y. Blackburn, Centre. 

Tax Commissioner. — Stewart Hudson, Gaylcsville. 

Treasurer. — A. S. Johnson, Centre. 

Superintendent of Education. — A. O. Williams, Centre. 

Coroner. — Claud M. Hall, Lawrence. 

County Commissioners. — G. P. Smith, Centre; J. T. Clark, Broomtown; 
L. A. Daniel, Round Mountain ; J. K. Richardson, Key. 

Register in Chancery. — Jos. L. McConnell, Centre. 

Surveyor. — W. W. Ward, Centre. 

Registrars. — J. A. Nance, Leonard; W. E. Ringer, Congo; T. H. Shrop- 
shire, Centre. 

Pension Examiner's. — W. H. McElrath, Centre ; Dr. S. G. Cardon, Centre. 
. Board of Health. — Dr. S. C. Tatum, chairman, Centre; Dr. R. L. Mc- 
Whorter, Gaylesville ; Dr. J. P. Farill, Farill ; Dr. Wm. S. McElrath, Cedar 
Bluff; Dr. Arthur C. Shamblin, Gaylesville. 

Game and Fish Warden. — Ed. R. White, Centre. 



COUNTY OFFICERS. 163 

CHILTON COUNTY. 

Judge of Probate. — L. H. Reynolds, Clanton. lr 

Clerk of Circuit Court— Sam W. Collins, Clanton. 

Sheriff. — J. S. Catts, Verbena. 

Tax Assessor. — L. B. Pounds, Thorsby. 

Tax Collector. — T. J. Hubbard, Jeniison. 

Tax Commissioner. — J. P. VanDerveer, Clanton. 

Treasurer. — W. T. Callen, Clanton. 

Superintendent of Education. — J. W. Moore, Clanton. 

County Commissioners. — W. H. Conway, Jeniison; S. P. Waldrop, Jemi- 
son ; Moses Robinson, Verbena, R. F. D. No. 1 ; R. P, Kennedy, Pletcher. 

Register in Chancery. — Mrs. S. A. Stewart, Clanton. 

Surveyors. — A. P. R. Dahl, Calera ; R. F. Sims, Maplesville. 

Registrars. — R. H^Gaiues, Jeniison; P. M. Moore, Clanton; B. L. Jones, 
Clanton. ' 

Pension Examiners. — H. W. Caffey, Verbena; H. B. Rodgers, Verbena. 

Board of Health. — Dr. P. I. Hopkins, chairman, Clanton ; Dr. R. B. Mc- 
Neill, Jeniison ; Dr. J. P. Hayes, Clanton ; Dr. A. J. L. Dennis, Verbena ; 
Dr. E. A. Matthews, Clanton. 

Game and Fish Warden. — J. W. E. Gul ledge, Verbena. 



CHOCTAW COUNTY. 

Judge of Probate.— Charles E. McCall, Butler, l^ 

Clerk of Circuit Court.— Walter L. Gray, Butler. 

Sheriff.— \Y. D. Wilcox, Butler. 

Tax Assessor. — Eugene Knighton, Pushmataha. 

Tax Collector. — Thomas A. Littlepage, Mt. Sterling. 

Tax Commissioner. — J. Wesley Johnsou, Butler. 

Treasurer. — Frank L. Barefleld, Butler. 

Superintendent of Education. — William J. Dausby. Silas. 

County Commissioners. — J. Arthur Ward. Bevill; William H. Ford, 
Pushmataha; Moses Slay, Silas; Walter S. Powe, Womack Hill. 

Register in Chancery. — Walter L. Gray, Butler. 

Surveyors. — John R. Phillips, Yantley; D. Coleman Williamson, Isney. 

Registrars... Thomas B. Bennett, Butler; Gross A. Turner, Mt. Sterling; 
B. B. Bush, Ararat. 

Pension Examiners.— Dr. Dan T. McCall, Butler; E. T.' Ezell, Mt. Ster- 
ling. 

Board of Health. — Dr. Sam Alman, chairman, Melvin; Dr. W. H. Chris- 
topher, Jachin; Dr. Dan T. McCall, Butler. 

Game and Fish Warden. — J. G. Horn. Pushmataha. 



CLARKE COUNTY. 

Judge of Probate. — Clayton Foscue, Grove II iH. \s 
Clerk of Circuit Cvurt.—J. W. Cunningham, Grove Hill. 
Sheriff.— D. C. Garrett, Thomasville. 
Tax Assessor. — J. B. Doyle, Thomasville. 
Tax Collector. — W. M. Mobley, Suggsville. 
Tax Commissioner. — L. L. McLeod. Grove Hill. 
Treasurer. — J. M. Agee, Grove Hill. 

Superintendent of Education. — R. C. Heard, Grove Hill. 
County Commissioners.— K. M. McLeod, Grove Hill; W. B. Danzey, Ala- 
meda; M. W. Cravey, Winn; L. E. McLeod, Jackson. 
Register in Chancery. — J. F. Gillis, Grove Hill. 
Surveyors.— A. Y. Rodgers, Grove Hill; B. F. Finch, Walker Springs. 



V\ 



164 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

Registrars. — C. A. Coate, Clarksville; E. H. Frank, Gainestown; L. L. 
McLeod, Grove Hill. ' 

Pension Examiners. — Dr. J. W. Armistead, Grove Hill; F. B. Watkins, 
Grove Hill. 

Game and Fish Warden. — W. M. Moulton, Salitpa. 




CLAY COUNTY. 

Judge of Probate. — F. J. Ingram, Ashland. 

Clerk of Circuit Court. — S. Y. Lamberth, Ashland. 

Sheriff*— J. B. Miller, Ashland. 

Tax Assessor. — A. S. Bell, Ashland. 

Tax Collector. — J. L. Carpenter, Ashland. 

Tax Commissioner. — H. L. Black, Ashland. 

Treasurer. — Wm. J. Green, Ashland. 

Superintendent of Education.— A. S. Horn, Ashland. 

Coroner. — D. H. Carpenter, Ashland. 

County Commissioners. — R. O. Overton, Lineville; W. M. Striplen, Ash- 
land; W. A. Worthy, Mellow Valley; M. 'M. Sumners, Chandler Springs. 

Register in Chancery. — Mrs. Dora A. Speer, Ashland. 

Surveyor. — T. S. Warren, Lineville. 

Registrars.-r-J. B. Luker, Goodwater, R. F. D. No. 2; J. L. Fulbrlght, 
Mellow Valley; H. W. Garrett, Lineville, R. F. D. No. 1. 

Pension Examiners. — Dr. W. A. Campbell, Flat Rock; A. G. Beck, Ash- 
land. 

Board of Health. — Dr. S. J. Gay, chairman, Lineville; Dr. J. W. Wood, 
Ashland ; Dr J. M. Barfleld, Lineville, R. F. D. No. 2 ; Dr. J. T. Manning, 
Lineville; Dr. J. W. Jordan, Ashland. 

Game and Fish Warden.— Q. J. Bruce, Lineville. 



CLEBURNE COUNTY. 

Judge of Probate. — A. E. Car ruth, Edwardsville. 

Clerk of Circuit Court. — Joe M. Evans, Edwardsville. 

Sheriff.— r Alex Rowell, Jr., Hen" in. 

Tax Assessor. — Wm. Harper, Edwardsville. 

Tax Collector. — J. Tom Boyd, Edwardsville. 

Tax Commissioner. — W. A. Porter, Heflln. 

Treasurer.— G. M. Coggln, Edwardsville. 

Superintendent of Education. — A. H. Glasgow, Heflln. 

County Commissioners. — G. W. Roberts, Fruithurst R. F. D. No. 1; J. 
W. Bennett, Fruithurst R. F. D. No. 1; J. M. Jones, Hightower; J. R. Bain, 
Eudora. * ' 

Register in Chancery. — Joe L. Groover, Edwardsville. 

Surveyor. — Geo. O. Jones, Shoal Creek. 

Registrars. — J. L. Roberts, Fruithurst R, F. D.'No. 1; A. M. Turner, 
Fruithurst R. F. D. No. 3; W. M. Striplin, Heflin, R. F. D. No. 4. 

Pension Examiners. — J. H. Johnson, Edwardsville. 

Jury Commissioners. — J. W. Davis, Borden Springs; S. S. Grizzard, 
Kemps Creek; J. M. Jones, Ranborne; L. T. Reason, Heflin, ( 

Court House Commissioners. — W. G. Porter, Heflin ; Rev. W. U. Almon. 
Heflin, J. T. Bennett, Edwardsville. 

Board of Health. — Dr. T. J. Johns, chairman, Edwardsville; Dr. S. L. 
B.' Blacke, Fruithurst; Dr.-W. H. Lindsey, Fruithurst; Dr. L. R. Wright, 
Heflin; Dr. J. M. Lindsey, Hightower. 

Game and Fish Warden. — W. G. Melligan, Heflin. 

County Judge. — T. A. Johnson, Edwardsville. 

County Solicitor. — Walter B. Merrill, Edwardsville. 



COUNTY OFFICERS. 165 

COFFEE COUNTY. 

Judge of Probate. — S. N. Rowe, Elba. ^ 

Clerk of Circuit Court.— n. A. King, Elba. 

Sheriff. — James B. Knight, Elba. 

Tax Assessor. — J. D. Lee, Elba. 

Tax Collector. — B. F. Connor, Elba. 

Tax Commissioner. — John J. Farrls, Elba. 

Treasurer. — W. T. Everette, Elba. 

Superintendent of Education.— -C. W. Simmons, Enterprise. 

County Commissioners. — B. D. Donaldson,, S. W. D., Elba ; J. E. Pittman, 
S. E. D., Enterprise; J. M. Folsom, N. E. D., Clintonville R. F. D. No. 1; 
J. M. Dyess, N. W. Dist, Rodney. 

Register in Chancery. — M. S. Carmichael, Elba. 

Surveyors. — D. McKennon, Elba ; W. D. Dawk ins, Brockton. 

Registrars. — C. M. Cox, Elba ; H. B. Crook, Jack ; John Law, Clintonville. 

Pension Examiners. — Dr,. W. H. Coston, Elba; T. J. Carlisle, Enterprise. 

Board of Health. — Dr. P. T. Fleming, chairman, Enterprise; Dr. W. A. 
Lewis, Enterprise; Dr. W. H. Coston, Elba; Dr. J. C. McLeod; Dr. A. T. 
Col ley, Enterprise. 

Game and Fish Warden. — L. P. Hutchison, Enterprise. 



COLBERT COUNTY. 

Judge of Probate.^-Osc&r G. Simpson, Tuscumbia. 

Clerk of Circuit Court— Charles A. Simpson, Tuscumbia. 

Sheriff. — A. F. McClesky, Tuscumbia. 

Tax Assessor. — D. L. Spangler, Tuscumbia. 

Tax Collector.— T. W. Williams, Tuscumbia. 

Tax Commissioner. -r-Chas. F. Hogue, Sheffield. 

Treasurer. — Goodloe M. Drisdale, Tuscumbia. 

Superintendent of Education. — John W. Johnson, Sheffield. 

Coroner. — H. P. Looney, Sheffield. 

County Commissioners. — J. N. Thompson, Tuscumbia; John L. Tomp- 
kins, Tuscumbia ; George T. Horton, Dickson ; James L. Blackburn, Alls- 
boro. 

Register in Chancery. — Amos L. Moody, Tuscumbia. 

Sutveyor. — W. H. Gilliam, Tuscumbia. 

Registrars. — Thomas S. Grisham, Jr., Dickson; E. C. Downs, Sheffield; 
J. H. Spangler, Leighton. 

Pension Examiners. — Dr. J. T. Haney, Tuscumbia ; Shelby Grisham, Tus- 
cumbia. 

Board of Health. — Dr. C. R. Palmer, chaifman, Tuscumbia; Dr. S. J. 
Cooper, Health Officer, Tuscumbia; Dr. H. W. Blair, Sheffield. 

Game and Fish Warden.— Charles E. Meyer, Tuscumbia. 



CONECUH COUNTY. / 

/ 

Juage of Probate. — F. J. Dean, Evergreen. *^ 

Clerk of Circuit Court. — S. L. Tisdale, Evergreen. 

Sheriff. — John F. Irwin, Evergreen. 

Tax Assessor. — S. P. Dunn, Evergreen. 

Tax Collector. — -W. S. Oliver, Repton. 

Tax Commissioner. — W. B. James, Evergreen. 

Treasurer. — M. B. Salter, Evergreen. 

Superintendent of Education. — G. M. Harper, Herbert. 

Coroner. — G. W. Salter, Jr., Evergreen. 

County Commissioners.— C. G. Albreast, Castleberry; W. T. Wiggins, 



166 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

Evergreen; H. R. Betts, . Betts ; W. H. Robson, Evergreen. 

Register in Chancery. — J. C. Travis, Evergreen. 

Surveyors. — Sol. Castleberry, Castleberry; M. A. Travis, Crete. 

Registrars. — II. M. King, Evergreen; John Cunningham, Evergreen; N. 
T. Aarons, Herbert. 

Pension Examiners. — Dr. A. A. McKIttrick, Evergreen; M. B. Salter, 
Evergreen. 

Board of Health. — Dr. W. F. Betts, President, Evergreen; Dr. A. A. 
McKittrick, Evergreen; Dr. M. McCreary, Secretary, Evergreen. 

Game and Fish Warden. — John Cunningham, Sr., Evergreen. 




COOSA COUNTY. 

j udge of Probate. — J. A. Crawford, Rockfofd. 

Clerk of Cireuit Court— \S. E. Bailey Rockford. 

Sheriff. — W. R. Walker, Goodwater. 

Tax Assessor. — T. II. Jones, GoOd water. 

Tax Collector. — T. P. Crawford, Goodwater. 

Tax Commissioner. — J. C Kelly, Equality. 

Treasurer. — F. H. Ellis, Equality. 

Superintendent of Education. — J. II. Johnston, Speed. 

Coroner. — L. A. Grogan, Goodwater. 

County Commissioners. — J. G. Jacobs, Hanover ; B. F. Brown, Bentley- 
ville; J. P. Arant, Speed; Elias Lindsey, Equality. 

Register in Chancery. — John W. Batson, Rockford. 

Surveyors. — H. W. Pond, Jr., Rockford; J. J. Green, Stewartsville. 

Registrars. — S. A. Thomas. Nixburg; R. S. B. Penton, Speed; Robert 
Lauderdale, Kellyton. 

Pension Examiners. — Dr. Julius Jones, Rockford; S. M. Suttle, Rockford. 

Board of Health. — Dr. J. O. Cousins, chairman, Equality; Dr. Eugene 
Argo, Goodwater; Dr. Julius Jones, Rockford; Dr. W. A. Holloway, Lau- 
derdale; Dr. A. J. Peterson, Goodwater. R. F. D. No. 3, 

Game and Fish Warden. — S. A. Thomas, Nixburg. 



COVINGTON COUNTY. / 

Judge of Probate. — J. M. Robinson, Jr., Andalusia. 

Clerk of Circuit Court. — W. H. Jones, Andalusia. 
. Sheriff. — W. T. Prestwood, Andalusia. 

Tax Assessor. — A. I. Adklson, Florala. 

Tax Collector.— \\. W. Walter, Loango. 

Tax Commissioner. — Wiley J. Hodges, Andalusia. 

Treasurer. — W. F. Simmons, Andalusia. 

Superintendent of Education. — W. J. Merrill, Andalusia. 

Coroner. — J. M. Thomas, Andalusia. w 

County Commissioners. — D. I. Straughu. Haygood : J. L Williams, Rose 
Hill; P. J. Gautt, River Falls; J. N. McLean, Florala. 

Register in Chancery. — A. Whaley, Andalusia. 

Surveyors. — D. M. Acree. Andalusia ; J. W. Miller, McRae. 

Registrars. — W. O. Shields, Chester ; A. L. Pierce, Red Level ; David Bat- 
san, Green Bay. 

Pension Examiners. — Dr. W. Bean, Andalusia ; J. W. Davis, Andalusia. 

Board of Health. — Dr. T. E. Dalton, chairman, Opp; Dr. G. L. Gresham, 
Andalusia ; Dr. T. Q. Ray, Andalusia ; Dr. P. B. Spear, Florala ; Dr. J. E. 
Terry, Red Level. 

Game and Fish Warden. — J. N. Barron, Andalusia. 



COUNTY OFFICERS. 167 

CRENSHAW COUNTY. 

Judge of. Probate. — F. M. T. Tankersley, Luverne V^ 

Clerk of Circuit Court. — Mark L. Black, Luverne. 

Sheriff. — W. L. Tatum, Luverne. 

Tax Assessor. — J. J. Walker, Luverne. 

Tax Collector. — J. M. Horn, Luverne. 

Tax Commissioner. — M. Tucker, Luverne. 

Treasurer. — A. J. Solomon, Luverne. 

Superintendent of Education. — C. K. Sharp, Highland Home. 

County Commissioners. — Geo. W. Turner, Luverne; W. Frank Stough, 
Coleman; S. D. Clark, Dozier; J. A. Hooks, Luverne. 

Register in Chancery. — A. B. Brooks, Luverne. 

Surveyor. — S. J. Townsend, Troy. 

Registrars. — D. C. Roach, Luverne; W. M. Black well, LaPine; B. F. 
Colquett, Brantley. 

Pension Examiners. — G. N. Buchanan, Luverne; J. E. Kendrick, M. D., 
Luverne. 

Board of Health. — Dr. J. R. Horn, chairman, Luverne; Dr. S. W. May, 
Brantley; Dr. J. C. Ford, Bradleyton; Dr. J. B. Moxley, Brantley. 

Game and Fish Warden. — J. D. Cook, Luverne. 



CULLMAN COUNTY. 

Judge of Probate. — R. I. Burke, Cullman. 

Clerk of Circuit Court.— A. B. Fuller, Cullman. 

Sheriff. — A. J. Casey, Cullman. 

Tax Assessor. — E. E. Matthews, Cullman. 

Tax Collector. — John J. Fowler, Cullman. 

Tax Commissioner. — Wm. E. O'Brien, Vinemont. 

Treasurer. — J. A. McConnell, Cullman. 

Superintendent of Education. — Dave V. Smith, Cullman. 

Coroner. — Albert Hoepner, Cullman. 

County Commissioners. — Wm. Murphy, Hanceville; W. T. Tucker, Crane 
Hill; G. T. Bowden, Clarkson ; J. B. Dodson, Holly Pond. 

Register in Chancery. — A. E. Hewlett, Cullman. 

Surveyors. — John A. Nesmith, Logan; J. D. Wilhite, Lacon. 

Registrars. — James Holland* Hanceville; Wm. Self, Cullman, R. F. D. 
No. 3; Carl Pinehardt, Cullman. 

Pension Examiners. — S. M. Foust, Walter; J. H. Olden, Vinemont, R. 
F. D. 

Board of Health. — Dr. G. Hartungj chairman, Cullman ; Dr. Jesse I. Arm- 
strong, Cullman; Dr. J. W. Culpepper, Crane Hill; Dr. Luther Hays, Cull- 
man, Dr. C. E. Herrin, Trimble. 

Game and Fish Warden. — C. C. Connally, Cullman. 




DALE COUNTY. 

Judge of Probate. — W. P. Windham, Ozark. 
Clerk of Circuit Court. — J. R. Levy, Ozark. 
Sheriff. — B. L. Andrews, Ozark. 
Tax Assessor. — John A. McLeod, Ozark. 
Tax Collector. — T. J. Fain, Ozark. 
Tax Commissioner. — Frank P. Martin, Ozark. 
Treasurer. — S. L. Dowllng, Ozark. 
Superintendent of Education. — W. M. Head, Pinckard. 
Coroner. — J. L. Williams, Ozark. 

County Commissioners. — L. A. Helms, Newton; Qurtis Byrd, Jr., Crit- 
tenden's Mill ; B. F. Faust, Ozark ; E. H. Godwin, Skipperville. 



168 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

Register in Chancery. — J. W. Corbett* Ozark. 

Surveyor. — E. A. Thompson, Daleville. 

Registrars. — John Carroll, .Ozark ; J. C. Seay, Ariton ; G. W. Reynolds, 
Newton. 

Pension Examiners. — T. J. Ki Hebrew, Newton ; Pr. H. C. Sinlsson, Ozark. 

Board of Health. — Dr. E. B. Ard, chairman, Ozark; Dr. S. M. C. Howell, 
Midland City; Dr. A. J. Morris, Newton; Dr. F. B. Cullen, Ozark; Dr. W. 
P. Mixson, Skipperville. 

Game and Fish Warden. — B. S. Brown, Ozark. 



DALLAS COUNTY. . 

Judge of Probate.— P. II. Pitts, Selma. ^ 

Clerk of Circuit Court. — Theo. Lacy, Selma. 

Sheriff. — James R. Doherty, Selma. 

Tax Assessor. — J. H. Lumpkin, Selma. 

Tax Collector. — C. P. Morrison, Selma. 

Tax Commissioner. — Thomas W. Barker, Selma. 

Treasurer. — City National Bank, Selma. 

Superintendent of Education. — D. M. Calloway, Selma. 

Coroner. — Jud Brislin, Selma. 

County Commissioners. — Julien Smith, Selma; A. J. Martin, Marten; 
Wm. C. Phillips, Vale Grand ; J. A. Minter, Tyler. 

Register in Chancery. — Chambliss Keith, Selma. 

Surveyors. — W. O. Crissman, Selma; E. E. Todd, Plantersville. 

Registrars. — D. B. Edwards, Selma, R. F. D. No. 1 ; Gilbert S. Nicholson, 
Selma; W. L. Sheppard, Safford. 

Pension Examiners. — Dr. T. G. Howard, Selma; E. M. Byrne, Selma. 

Board of Health. — Dr. S. G. Gay, chairman, Selma ; Dr. W. W. Harper, 
Selma ; Dr. C. Ritter, Selma ; Dr. W. M. Pitts, Selma ; Dr. J. M. Donald, 
Marion Junction. 

Game and Fish Warden. — W. H. Craig, Selma. 



DEKALB COUNTY. 

Judge of Probate. — J. A. Croley, Ft. Payne. 

Clerk of Circuit Court. — J. G. Deshields, Ft Payne. 

Sheriff. — Thomas L. Downs, Ft. Payne. 

Tax Assessor. — N. T. Hawkins, Lydia. 

Tax Collector.— Wall Cain, Collinsville. 

Tax Commissioner. — H. R. Allen, Ft. Payne. 

Treasurer. — A. C. Copeland, Fort Payne. 

Superintendent of Education. — N. J. Callan, Fort Payne. 

Coroner. — Dr. P. B. Green, Fort Payne. 

County Commissioners. — James W. Tidmore, Collinsville, R. F. D. No. 1;. 
Thomas S. Stewart, I'ortersville R. F. D. No. 1 ; Joel F. Baker, Fort Payne 
R. F. D. No. 1 ; F. M. Davenport, Valley Head. 

Register in Chancery. — Earl Cochran, Fort Payne. 

Registrars— B. Killian, Collinsville; E. P. Rucks, Crosville R. F. D. No. 
1; Wallace Wright, Battelle. 

Pension Examiners. — Dr. W. E. Quinn, Fort Payne; John R. Jones, Col- 
linsville R. F. D. No. 1. 

Board of Health. — Dr. W. E. Quinn, chairman, Fort Payne; Dr. H. P. 
McWhorter, Collinsville; Dr. W. S. Duff, Fort Payne; Dr. T. H. Appleton, 
Collinsville; Dr. E. P. Nicholson, Valley Head. 

Game and Fish Warden. — A. B. Greene, Fort Payne. 



COUNTY OFFICERS. 169 

ELMORE COUNTY. 

Judge of Probate. — H. J. Lancaster, Wetumpka. is 

Clerk of Circuit Court. — Mel). Cain, Wetumpka. 

Sheriff. — James W. Weldon, Wetumpka. ^ 

Tax Assessor. — G. W. Davis, Titus. 

Tax Collector. — W. J. L. Welch, Wetumpka. 

Tax Commissioner. — T. L. Austin, Wetumpka. 

Treasurer. — C. K. McMorris, Wetumpka. 

Superintendent of Education. — W. C. Cousins, Eclectic. 

Coroner. — W. P. Ward, Wetumpka. 2 — 

County Commissioners. — G. W. Wpfflj/ Titus; W. D. Smith, Tallassee; R. 
F. D. No. 2 ; A. J. Langley, Claud ; Q. M. Strock, Deatsville. 

Register in Chancery. — Marcus D. btill, Wetumpka. 

Surveyors. — L. P. Mclnnish, Irma; M. F. Berry, Deatsville. 

Registrars. — John Howie, Wetumpka ; J. P. Real, David ; A. P. Collins, 
Eclectic. 

Pension Examiners. — H. H. Robison, Wetumpka; Dr. J. A. Howie, Ec- 
lectic. 

Board of Health. — Dr. J. M. Austin, chairman, Wetumpka; Dr. W. M. 
Gamble, Wetumpka ; Dr. J. A. Howie, Eclectic ; Dr. E. P. Moon, Wetumpka ; 
Dr. O. C. Powell, Riddle. 

Game and Fish Warden. — A. H. Chrietzberg, Eclectic, R. F. D. 



ESCAMBIA COUNTY. 

Judge of Probate. — Millard F. Brooks, Brewton. r 

Clerk of Circuit Court.— Charles F. Rankin,' Brewton. 

Sheriff. — G. K. Fountain, Brewton. 

Tax Assessor. — Malcoin R. McLellan, Brewton. 

Tax Collector. — Wm. J. Holland, Brewton. 

Tax Commissioner. — J. D. Travis, Brewton. 

Treasurer. — Wm. J. Jackson, Herrington. 

Superintendent of Education. — John B. O'Bannon, Brewton. 

Coroner. — L. M. McLendon, Brewton. 

County Commissioners. — William A. Parker, Roberts; Edwin M. Love- 
lace, Brewton ; James L. Jordan, Sardine ; Andrew J. Hall, Canoe. 

Register in Chancery. — Charles F. Rankin, Brewton. 

Surveyors. — John D. Travis, Brewton; Douglas S. Sowell, Wallace. 

Registrars. — Thomas S. Sowell, Sr., Brewton ; T. J. Stevens, Brewton ; 
Coleman O'Gwynn, Flomaton. 

Pension Examiners. — Dr. L. M. McLendon, Brewton; John Z. Strong, 
Brewton. 

Board of Health. — Dr. P. H. M. Tippin, chairman, Brewton; Dr. J. E. 
Martin, Herrington ; Dr. W. L. Abernethy, Flomaton ; Dr. M. Foshee, Brew- 
ton; Dr, E. T. Parker, . 

Game and Fish Warden. — W. H. O'Bannon, Brewton. 



ETOWAH COUNTY. 

Judge of Probate. — J. W. Penn, Gadsden. 

Clerk of Circuit Court.— S. C. McDaniel, Gadsden. 

Sheriff. — B. M. Pike, Gadsden. 

Tax Assessor. — E. L. Hurst, Gadsden. 

Tax Collector. — A. H. Barnes, Gadsden. 

Tax Commissioner. — John F. Adams, Gadsden. 

Treasurer. — L. L. Herzberg, Gadsden. 

Superintendent of Education. — J. E. Williams, Gadsden R. F. D. No. 3. 



170 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

Coroner. — E. G. Woodliff, Gadsden. 

County Commissioners. — C. S. Ward, Gadsden ; Dave W. Sturkie, Gads- 
den, R. F. D. No. 1 ; J. B. Washburn, Attalla, R. F. D. No. 2 ; J. E. Gilli- 
land, Attalla R. F. D. No. 1. 

Register in Chancery. — R. A. D. Dunlap, Gadsden. 

Surveyor.— F G. Lee, Attalla R. F. D. No. 2. 

Registrars. — R. A. D. Dunlap, Gadsden; M. Cornelius, Walnut Grove; 
D. N. Jelks, Gadsden. 

Pension Examiners. — Dr. J. C. Slackland, Gadsden; Dr. M. E. Pentecost, 
Sr., Gadsden. 

Board of Health. — Dr. E. S. Jones, chairman, Gadsden ; Dr. H. L. Apple- 
ton, Gadsden; Dr. C. L. Gulce, Gadsden; Dr. J. P. Stewart, Attalla; Dr. 
W. H. Acton, Alabama City. 

Game and Fish Warden. — D. A. Hughes, Attalla. 

Solicitor City Court.— W. J. Boykin, Gadsden. 



FAYETTE COUNTY. 

Judge of Probate. — Thomas E. Goodwin, Fayette. 

Clerk of Circuit CouYt.—D. O. McConnell, Fayette. 

Sheriff. — James H. Oswalt, Fayette. 

Tax Assessor.— G.. W. Coggin, Fayette. 

Tax Collector. — R. P. Caine, Fayette. 

Tax Commissioner. — B. F. McClure, R. F. D. No. 2, Fayette. 

Treasurer. — W. F. Smith, Fayette. 

Superintendent of Education. — J. W. Barnard, Fayette. 

Coroner. — D. T. Jones, Berry. 

County Commissioners. — B. Henry, Fayette; F. S. Kuykendall, Gallilee; 
J. D. Sheerer, Rhine; J. Thomas McCracken, Berry. 

Register in Chancery. — H. B. Propst, Fayette. 

Registrars. — W. T. Musgrove, Mt. Calm; J. M. Smith, Hugent; J. F. Ash- 
craft, Loco. 

Pension Examiners. — R. G. Jones, Fayette; W. A. Graham, Fayette. 

Board of Health.-r-Dr. J. D. Young, chairman, Fayette; Dr. J. G. Smith, 
Bankston; Dr. J. S. Hollis, Covin; Dr. W. A. Graham, Fayette; Dr. C. B. 
Blackburn, Fayette. 

Came and Fish Warden. — 



FRANKLIN COUNTY. 

Judge of Probate. — R. J. Moody, Russellville. 

Clerk of Circuit Court. — David A. Malone, Russellville. 

Sheriff. — W. D. Lowery, Russellville. 

Tax Assessor. — C. C. Sparks, Frankfort. 

Tax Collector. — R. O. Sibley, Spruce Pine. 

Tax Commissioner. — E. R. Richeson, Waco. 

Treasurer. — A. T. Petree, Russellville. 

Superintendent of Education. — L. S. McRight, Russellville. 

Coroner. — W. H. Burfield, Rockwood. 

County Commissioners. — W. J. Wasson, Newburgh; Thomas Nix, Travis; 
G. A. Britten, Sr., Shingle ; A. W. Patterson, Red Bay. 

Register in Chancery. — W. H. Austin, Russellville. 

Surveyors. — John A. Benson, Bel green ; J. W. Creel, Eatenton. 

Registrars. — J. H. Malone, Russellville; A. W. Smith, Belgreen ; J. R 
Weaiherford, Burleson. 

Pension Examiners. — Dr. John K. Clarke, Russellville; C. F. Fleming, 
Russellville. 

Game and Fish Warden. — A. C. Frederick, Russellville. 



COUNTY OFFICERS. 171 

GENEVA COUNTY, y 

Judge of Probate. — P. C. Black, Geneva. ^ 

Clerk of Circuit Court. — J. W. Draughon, Geneva. 

Sheriff. — J. D. Jenkins. 

Tax Assessor. — Alvin McEacbern, Geneva. 

Tax Collector. — F. J. Ward, Geneva. 

Tax Commissioner.— 3. M. Fulford, Hartford. 

Treasurer. — D. W. Gllehirst, Geneva. 

Superintendent of Education. — J. M. Lammons, Hartford. 

Coroner. — G. A. Winslow, Geneva. 

County Commissioners. — E. H. Saunders, Malvern ; I. H. Alberson, Hart- 
ford ; J. T. Martin, Eunola ; V. L. Maloy, Samson. 

Register in Chancery. — H. H. Foster, Geneva. 

Surveyor. — J. B. Albritton, Eunola. 

Registrars. — R. J. Purvis, Geneva ; H. C. Yarbrougb, Geneva ; W. C. 
Campbell, Bellwood. 

Pension Examiners. — Dr. R. L. Justice, Geneva ; G. W. Brooks, Geneva. 

Board of Health. — Dr. A. R. Chapman, chairman, Geneva; Dr. L. L. Dis- 
muke, Geneva; Dr. W. F. Matheney, Chancellor; Dr. C. B. Powell, Hart- 
ford; Dr H. P. Treadwell, Hartford. 

Game and Fish Warden. — 

County Solicitor. — C. D. Carmichael, Geneva. 

Judge of County Court. — P. N. Hickman, Geneva. 



GREENE COUNTY. 

» 

Judge of Probate. — Amand P. Smith, Eutaw. 

Clerk of Circuit Court. — Radford E. Mobley, Eutaw. 

Sheriff. — Janie$ H. May, Eutaw. 

Tax Assessor. — George F. Hardy, West Greene. 

Tax Collector. — Frank D. Parham, Mt. Hebron. 

Tax Commissioner. — Holly F. Grubbs, riutaw. 

Treasurer. — Byron B. Barnes, Eutaw. 

Clerk and Register, City Court. — Joseph B. Evans, Selma. 

Superintendent of Education. — W. P. Archibald, Knoxville. 

County Commissioners. — Lewis Y. Lanford, Eutaw; George H. David, 
Tishabee ; James A. Flanagan, Pt. Ridge ; Thomas W. Cobb, Union. • 

Register in Chancery. — Edwin Wilson, Eutaw. 

Surveyors. — Martin T. Sumner, Boligee; J. McKee Gould, Boligee. 

Registrars. — James C. Coleman, Eutaw; Joel T. McLemore, Boligee; 
Ashley D. Tuck, Union. 

Pension Examiners. — Wm. P. Brugh. Eutaw; G. A. Moore, Eutaw. 

Board of Health. — Dr. M. L. Malloy, chairman, Eutaw ; Dr. K. Thetford, 
Boligee; Dr. S. G. Hamilton, Knoxville; Dr. W. W. Deal, Mantua; Dr. T. 
W. Smith, Union. 

Qame and Fish Warden. — W. W. Holly, Eutaw. 



HALE COUNTY. y 

Judge of Probate. — W. C. Christian, Greensboro. If 
Clerk of Circuit Court. — Cad Garrett, Greensboro. 
Sheriff. — E. E. Gewin, Greensboro. 
Tax Assessor. — Edwin S. Jack, Greensboro. 
Tax Collector. — John H. Turpin, Newbern. 
Tax Commissioner. — Ernest V. Otts, Greensboro. 
Treasurer. — Charles Stollenwerck, Greensboro. 
Superintendent of Education. — J. A. Ellerbe, Greensboro. 



172 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

County Commissioners. — J. J. Stivender, Akron ; John E. Ramey, Greens- 
boro; R. N. Ervln, Newbern; W. A. Redding, Cedarville. 

Register in Chancery. — Cad Jones, Greensboro. 

Surveyors. — L. F. Cooper, Baker; Jas. L. Davis, Phipps. 

Registrars. — J. A. Ellerbe, Greensboro ; J. C. Wyatt, Ingram. 

Pension Examiners. — W. L. Fagan, Havana; Dr. E. P. McCollum, 
Greensboro. 

Board of Health. — Dr. H. G. Perry, chairman, Greensboro; Dr. E. N. 
Driver, Newbern; Dr. R. J. Griffin, Moundville; Dr. R. F. Monette, 
Greensboro; Dr. J. Hugging, Newbern. 

Game and Fish Warden. — C. C. Gewin, Greensboro. 



HENRY COUNTY. y 

Judge of Probate. — John B. Ward, Abbeville. 

Clerk of Circuit Court.— T. H. Blacklidge, Abbeville. 

Sheriff. — J. D. Howerton, Abbeville. 

Tax Assessor. — J. E. Searcy, Abbeville. 

Tax Collector.— W. J. Whitehead, Abbeville. 

Tax Commissioner. — Bert B. Hays, Abbeville. 

Treasurer. — W. Y. Carr, Abbeville. 

Superintendent of Education. — Sam Davis, Abbeville. 

County Commissioners. — W. O. Ayres, Headland; J. T. Griffin, Newville; 
W. J. Parish, Abbeville; R. F. Sowell, Lawreneeville. 

Register in Chancery. — J. R. Espy, Abbeville. 

Surveyors. — Geo. T. Roberts, Shorterville ; W. P. Saunders, Abbeville. 

Registrars. — Wesley W. Peebles, Abbeville; J. D. Hay, Headland; O. G. 
Hardwick, Hardwieksburg. 

Pension Examiners. — M. V. Capps, Abbeville; A. S. S tea gall, Abbeville. 

Board of Health. — Dr. L. Hendrlck, chairman, Abbeville ; Dr. L. T. Htitts, 
Newville; Dr. W. A. Bird, Headland; Dr. J. R. Vann, Abbeville R. F. D. 
No. 1 ; Dr. Q. F. Sporman, Headland. 

Game and Fish Warden. — W. C. H. Vann, Abbeville. 



HOUSTON COUNTY. / 

Judge of Probate. — George Leslie, Dothan. 

Clerk of Circuit Court. — W. A. Brown, Dothan. 

Sheriff.— T. W. Butler, Dothan. 

Tax Assessor. — W. M. Rhodes, Dothan. 

Tax Collector. — W. C. Granger, Cottonwood. 

Tax Commissioner. — R. W. Liseuby, Dothan. 

Treasurer. — W. H. Helms, Dothan. 

Superintendent of Education. — J. B. Dell, Dothan. 

Coroner. — Kin Knight, Ashford. t 

County Commissioners. — A. J. Sellers, Cottonwood; N. S. Fellows, Cow- 
arts; Y. L. Bracken, Jelico; D. G. Hudspeth, Kincy. 

Register in Chancery. — J. M. Cody, Dothan. 

Surveyors. — Will Crawford, Ashford; J. R. Merritt, Dothan. 

Registrars. — T. P. McGriff, Columbia; J. T. Edmondson, Dothan; C. B. 
Register, Taylor. 

Pension Examiners. — F. M. McArthur, Dothan; W. II. Williams, M. D., 

Dothan. 

Board of Health. — Dr. S. O. Carlisle, chairman, Dothan ; Dr. R. p. Black- 
sher, Dothan; Dr. C. E. Grauberry, Gordon; Dr. W. II. Williams, Dothan; 
Dr. W. M. Ryals, Cowarts. 

Game and Fish Warden. — T. L. Bryan, Dothan. 



COUNTY OFFICERS. 173 

/ 

JACKSON COUNTY. 

Judge of Probate. — W. W. McCutchen, Scottsboro. 

Clerk of Circuit Court. — J. M. Swain, Scottsboro. 

Sheriff. — John L. Staples, Scottsboro. 

Tax Assessor. — W. A. J. Wann, Wannville. 

Tax Collector. — W. D. Rorex, Pisgah. 

Tax Commissioner. — J. H. Gregory, Scottsboro. 

Treasurer. — J. W. Ashmore, Scottsboro R. F. D. No. 1. 

Superintendent of Education. — W. T. Cooper, Scottsboro. 

County Commissioners. — D. L. G. Wilson, Stevenson; Milton Roach, 
Pisgah ; J. P. McClendon, Scottsboro, R. F. D. No. 1 ; C. R. Horton, Prince- 
ton. 

Register in Chancery. — James A. Kyle, Scottsboro. 

Surveyors. — C. W. C. Hall, Bridgeport; J. J. Williams, Section. 

Registrars. — J. L. Hackworth, Bridgeport; Ben Stringer, Section; J. P. 
Harris, Larkinsville. 

Pension Examiners. — Dr. E. R. Smith, Section ; S. H. McMahan, Steven- 
son. 

Board of Health. — Dr. W. C. Maples, chairman, Scottsboro; Dr. J. W. 
Boggess, Woodville ; Dr. Hugh Boyd, Scottsboro ; Dr. J. W. Knowlton, Paint 
Rock ; Dr. T. J. Bouldln, Hollywood. 

Game and Fish Warden. — Harry M. Henderson, Scottsboro. 

County Solicitor. — John F. Proctor, Scottsboro. 



JEFFERSON COUNTY. 

Judge of Probate. — Samnel E. Greene, Birmingham. 

Clerk of Circuit Court. — W. K. McAdory, Birmingham. 

Sheriff. — E. L. Higdon, Birmingham. 

Tax Assessor. — F. A. Hewitt Jr., Birmingham. 

Tax Collector. — George B. Tarrant, Birmingham. 

Tax Commissioner. — B. A. Thompson, Birmingham. 

Treasurer. — H. C. Miller, Birmingham. 

Superintendent of Education. — I. W. McAdory, Birmingham. 

Coroner. — W. D. Paris, Birmingham. 

County Commissioners. — John G. Reed, Huffman; H. W. Crook, Bessemer; 
Charles K. Dickey, Birmingham ; Job Going, Pratt City ; Hugh McGeever, 
Birmingham. 

Register in Chancery. — John W. Altman. Birmingham. 

Surveyors. — P. S. Milner, Birmingham; Louis Salter, Elyton. 

Registrars. — M. P. Lewis, Birmingham ; R. G. Hewitt, Birmingham ; Pal- 
mer P. Daugette, Birmingham. 

county Auditor. — Robert A. Morris, Birmingham. 

Pension Examiners. — R. G. Hewitt, Birmingham ; Dr. W. P. McAdory, 
Birmingham. 

Board of Health. — Jos. D. Heacock, County Physician, Birmingham ; W. 
P. McAdory, County Physician, Birmingham. 

Police Commission Bessemer. — H. J. Palmer, Bessemer; P. P. Moore, 
Bessemer; E. A. Little, Bessemer; F. A. Adams, Bessemer; Sam Lefkovits, 
Bessemer. 

Game and Fish Warden. — Jnq. B. Rosenstihl, Birmingham. 

Senior Judge of Criminal Court. — Daniel A. Greene, Birmingham. 

Associate Judge of Criminal Court. — S. L. Weaver, Birmingham. 

Supervisor of Public Roads and Bridges. — Joseph II. Hill. 



LAMAR COUNTY. 

Judge of Probate. — R. L. Bradley, Veruon. 
Clerk of Circuit Court. — R. E. Bradley, Vernon. 



174 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

Sheriff.— John T. Hill, Vernon. 

Tax Assessor. — J. T. Allen, Vernon. 

Tax Collector.— W. B. White, Vernon. 

Tax Commissioner. — John F. Barker, Slzemore. 

Treasurer. — O. F. Holly, Vernon. 

Superintendent of Education. — E. R. Harris, Vernon. 

Coroner. — Jesse Sisson, Melborne. 

County Commissioners. — R. H. McNees, Vernon; B. W. Evans, Sulllgent; 
J. J. Weeks, Pharos; R. N. Waldrop, Sr., Millport. 

Register in Chancery. — J. S. Shields, Vernon. 

Surveyors. — Jas. M. Morton, Kennedy; T. D. Jackson, Sulllgent. 

Registrars.— 3. T. Clark, Detroit; W. O. Pennington, Baxter; E. F. Miller, 
Millport. 

Pension Examiners. — Dr. D. W. Box, Vernon ; Samuel Jernigan, Vernon. 

Board of Health. — Dr. W. W. Seay, chairman, Kingville; Dr. T. B. Woods, 
Bell; Dr. J. C. Boohelen, Sulligent; Dr. M. R. Seay, Fernbank; Dr. R. H. 
Redden, Sulligent. 

Game and Fish Warden. — A. J. Guyton, Vernon. 



-r 



LAUDERDALE COUNTY. 



' Judge of Probate. — Geo. W. Porter, Florence. 

Clerk of Circuit Court. — John L. McClure, Florence. 

Sheriff. — Cal. W. Young, Florence. 

Tax Assessor. — J. A. Hill, Florence. 

Tax Collector. — T. E. Jones, Florence. 

Tax Commissioner. — C. P. Anderson, Florence. 

Treasurer. — II. P. Davis, Florence. 

Superintendent of Education. — J. F. Koonce, Florence. 

County Commissioners. — S. R. Cooper, Rogersville; T. B. Killen, Green 
Hill; A. J. Smith, Florence; W. P. Rice, Smithsonia. 

Register in Chancery. — R. E. Simpson, Florence. 

Surveyors. — E. S. Gregory, Florence; G. C. Thigpen, Atlas. 

Registrars. — H. J. Burns, Waterloo; J. C. Ott, Florence; B. F. Williams, 
Center Star. 

Pension Examiners. — C. W. Lemay, Florence; W. M. Price, Florence. 

Board of Health. — Dr. L. W. Desprez, chairman, Florence ; Dr. W. J. 
Kernachan, Florence; Dr. P. I. Price, Florence; Dr. H. L. Stutts, St. 
Joseph; Dr. C. M. Watson, Florence. 

Game and Fish Warden. — Jesse A. Dowdy, Florence. 



LAWRENCE COUNTY. 

Judge of Probate. — J. C. Kumpe, Moulton. 
Clerk of Circuit Court. — R. M. Byars, Moulton. 
Sheriff. — James C. Cannon, Moulton. 
Tax Assessor. — W. C. Hamilton, Mt. Home. 
Tax Collector.— H. D. Bracken, Pitt. 
Tax Commissioner. — W. N. Almon, Moulton. 
Treasurer. — A. W. Henderson, Moulton. 
Superintendent of Education. — H. G. Almon, Town Creek. 
Coroner. — T. J. Coffey, Moulton. 

County Commissioners. — John N. Sheets, Caddo; W. V. Pruitt, Town 
Creek; F. M. Carruth, Mt. Hope; Jackson Windham, Kimo. 
Register in Chancery. — D. C. Goodlett, Moulton. 
Surveyors. — D. B. Lester, Crow ; N. G. Delashaw, Moulton. 
Registrars. — J. R. Howell, Mt. Hope; W. R. Harris, Mehama. 
Pension Examiners. — N. G. Delashaw, Moulton; F. D. Gibson, Moulton. 



COUNTY OFFICERS. 175 

Board of Health. — Dr. J. W. Fennell, chairman, Sandersville ; Dr. T. H. 
Irwin, Moulton: Dr. J. N. Jackson, Mt. Hope; Dr. D. C. Walker, Hlllsboro; 
Dr. T. G. Burke, 

Game and Fish Warden. — W. D. Gilchrist, Courtland. 



LEE COUNTY. 

Judge of Probate. — J. B. Lyons, Opelika.^* 

Clerk of Circuit Court.— S. S. Black, Opelika. 

Sheriff. — S. L. Moon, Opelika. 

Tax Assessor.— W. T. Andrews, Gold Hill. 

Tax Collector. — W. M. Bass, Opelika. 

Tax Commissioner. — Lloyd Robertson, Opelika. 

Treasurer.— T. J. Stevens, Opelika, R. F. D. No. 1. 

Superintendent of Education. — D. M. Banks, Opelika. 

Coroner. — Q. P. Siler, Opelika. 

County Commissioners.— W. B. Tucker, Opelika R. F. D. No. 3; E. C. 
Jackson, Auburn; C. T. Griffin, Opelika, R. F. D. No. 1; .W C. Hays, 
Smith's Station. 

Register in Chancery. — S. S. Black. 

Surveyors. — B. G. Peterson, Opelika ; J. N. Johnson, Smith's Station. 

Registrars— L. R. Wheelis; Phenix City ; T. J. Tillery, Opelika R. F. D. 
No. 1 ; R. D. Nunn ; Loachapoka. 

Pension Examiners. — R. Y. Jones, Opelika ; Dr. A. H. Reade, Opelika. 

Board of Health.— Br. A. II. Reade, Opelika ; Dr. J. P. Watkins, Opelika ; 
Dr. I. N. Stone, Opelika. 

Game and Fish Warden. — Russell L. Cole, Opelika. 



LIMESTONE COUNTY. 

Judge of Probate. — Geo. Ma lone, Athens. 

Clerk of Circuit Court.— 3. E. Clem, Athens. 

Sheriff. — Henderson Legg, Athens. 

Tax Assessor. — W. R. Bailey, Athens. 

Tax Collector. — W. H. Sandlin, Athens. 

Tax Commissioner. — 

Treasurer. — Walter McWilllams, Athens. 

Superintendent of Education. — W. H. McClellan, Athens. 

Coroner. — Robert Johnston, Athens. 

County Commissioners. — J. D. Hatchett, Elkmont; Ed S. Daly, Aster; 
W. W. Todd, Athens ; N. D. French, Athens. 

Register in Chancery. — Miss Bessie Davis, Athens. 

Surveyor. — J. E. Gray. Athens. 

Registrars. — R. F. Colbert, Athens ; J. W. Proctor, .Athens ; R. M. Clem, 
Athens. 

Pension Examiners. — Theo. Westmoreland, M. D., Athens; Thomas J. 
Jones, M. D.. Athens. 

Board of Health. — Dr. G. R. Hoffman, chairman, Athens;* Dr. W. J. Ho- 
gan, Athens; Dr. J. S. Crutcher, Athens; Dr. J. A. Pettus, Athens; Dr. T. 
C. Jones, Athens. 

Game and Fish Warden. — 



LOWNDES COUNTY. 




Judge of Probate. — J. C. Wood, Hayneville. 
Clerk of Circuit Court. — A. Douglas, Hayneville. 



176 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

Sheriff. — W. Et Haynes, Hayneville. 

Tax Assessor.— W. H. Lee, Mt Willing. 

Tax Collector.— R. M. Caffey, Hayneville. 

Tax Commissioner. — J. B. Rudulph, Hayneville. 

Treasurer. — J. D. Reese, Hayneville. 

Superintendent of Education. — Geo. E. Gordon, Hayneville. 

Coroner. — John Spann, Hayneville. 

Board of Revenue. — C. P. Rogers, Letohatchie ; S. W. Holloday, Gordons- 
ville; W. P. McQueen, Sandy Ridge; E..S. Searbrough, (chairman) Mt. 
Willing; J. A. Tell, Macedonia. 

Register in Chancery. — A. W. Hall, Hayneville. 

Registrars. — F. M. Black, Fort Deposit; W. P. McGough, Hayneville; J. 
M. Lee, Mt Willing. 

Pension Examiners. — L. A. Collier, Fort Deposit; ai. H. Hagood, M. D., 
Mt. Willing. 

Board of Health. — Dr. M. II. Haygood, chairman, Mt. Willing ; Dr. W. P. 
Russell, Hayneville; Dr. C. E. Marlette, Hayneville; Dr. N. G. James, 
Hayneville; Dr. M. M. Strickland, Braggs. 

Game and Fish Warden. — J. W. Dickson, Letohatchie. 



MACON COUNTY. 



/ 



Judge of Probate. — M. B. Abercrombie, Tuskegee. 

Clerk of Circuit Court. — W. A. Cloud, Tuskegee. 

Sheriff. — W. E. Huddleston, Tuskegee. 

Tax Assessor. — W. M. Hendon, Tuskegee. 

Tax Collector. — J. S. Drakeford, Tuskegee. 

Tax Commissioner. — C. B. Gibson, Tuskegee. 

Treasurer. — J. B. Bilbro, Tuskegee. 

Superintendent of Education. — W. G. Stevenson, Tuskegee. 

County Commissioners. — M. E. Akin, Tuskegee; R. M. Hall, Downs; E. 
W. Harris, Notasulga ; Robert Jennings, Tuskegee. 

Register in Chancery. — W. A. Cloud, Tuskegee. • 

Surveyor. — W. W. DuBose, Tuskegee. 

Registrars. — G. T. Bryant, Notasulga; C. G. Howard, Shorter; R. G. 
Williams, Shorter. 

V-^Pension Examiners. — W. H. Hart, Tuskegee; Dr. L. W. Johnston, Tuske- 
gee. 

Board of Health. — Dr. L. W. Johnston, chairman, Tuskegee; Dr. P. M. 
Lightfoot, Shorter; Dr. J. B. Letcher, Shorter; Dr. F. M. Letcher, Shorter; 
Dr. J. S. Lightfoot, Shorter. 

Game and Fish Warden. — W. C. Daniel, Tuskegee. 



MADISON COUNTY. 

Judge of Probate.-^W. T. Lawler, Huntsville. 

Clerk of Circuit Court. — H. B. Roper, Huntsville. 

Sheriff.— William Mitchell, Huntsville. 

Tax Assessor. — John W. Garner, Huntsville. 

Tax Collector. — J. E. Gardner, Huntsville. 

Tax Commissioner. — Henry P. Turner, Huntsville. 

Treasurer. — F. G. Hereford. New Market. 

Superintendent of Education. — S. R. Buttes, Huntsville. 

Coroner. — E. B. Stewart, Huntsville. 

County Commissioners. — R. S. Pulley, Huntsville; J. A. Watkins, Madi- 
son ; R. M. Spivey, New Hope ; D. B. Jacks, New Market ; John W. Bartes, 
Toney. 

Register in Chancery. — Miss F. S. Cabaniss, Huntsville. 



COUNTY OFFICERS. 177 

surveyors.— T. M. Hooper, Geo. T. Motz, Huntsville; G. W. Jones, Gurley 
R. F. D. No. 2. 

Registrars. — J. M. Hampton, Merldianville; J. M. Massengale, Maysville; 
J. M. Robinson, Huntsville. 

PenMon Examiners.— W. I. Spivey, Berksley ; W. C. Wheeler, Huntsville 

Board of Health.— Vr. F. E. Baldridge, chairman, Huntsville; Dr. T. E 
Dryer, Huntsville; Dr. W. C. Wheeler, Huntsville; Dr. T. I,. Mastin, Hunts- 
ville; Dr. E. O. Williamson, Gurley. 

Game and Fish Warden. — C. O. Robinson, Huntsville. 

Dispensary Board. — S. L. Terrey, Huntsville. 



v 



MARENGO COUNTY. 




Judge of Probate. — A. L. Hasty, Linden. 

Clerk of Circuit Court. — Chas. Bowman, Cleveland. 

Sheriff.— William A. Grant, Linden. 

Tax Assessor. — Tom W. Grayson, Linden. 

Tax Collector. — Quintus S. Adams Linden. 

Tax Commissioner. — E. C. Coats, Linden. 

Treasurer. — W. L. Brasfield. Linden. 

Superintendent of .Education. — §. W. Compton, Myrtlewood. 

County Commissioners. — S. L. Strickland. Vineland; Frank M. Norris, 
Nanafalia ; Morris Ely, Demopolis; C. D. Walker, Faunsdale. 

Register in Chancery. — John Ephriam Meeker, Linden. 

Surveyors. — J. D. Jones, Shi loh; W. R. Qulnney, Sweetwater. 

Registrars. — H. C. Dismuke, Shiloh; Joe C. Bailey, Linden; Goodman G. 
Griffin, Demopolis. 

Pension Examiners. — W. K. McDuffle, Myrtlewood; E. L. Carter, Myrtle- 
wood. 

Board of Health. — Dr. W. L. Kimbrough, chairman. Linden ; Dr. W. C. 
Loekhart, Dayton ; Dr. A. B. Stone, Linden ; Dr. A. P. McArthur, Rembert ; 
Dr. J. D. Jones, Sweetwater. 

Game and Fish Warden. — Millard Lipscomb. Demopolis. 



MARION COUNTY. 

Judge of Probate. — Mack Pearce, Hamilton. 

Clerk of Circuit Court. — A. R. Burleson, Hamilton. 

Sheriff. — Rufus A. Baird, Hamilton. 

Tax Assessor. — J. W. Roberson,' Pearce's Mills. 

Tax Collector. — W. T. Burleson, Stinson. 

Tax Commissioner. — R. N. Terrell, Hamilton. 

Treasurer. — W. I. Halcomb, Hamilton. 

Superintendent of Education. — H. W. McKinzie, Hamilton. 

Coroner.— 1L. F. Hill, Brilliant. 

County Commissioners. — B. P. Cantrell, Hackleburg; J. E. Rell, Detroit 
R. F. D. No. 1 ; E. A. Williams, Bear Creek ; P. E. Candle, Guln. 

Register in Chancery.— B. F. Fite, Hamilton. 

Surveyors. — W. H. Whitehead, Bexar. 

Registrars.— Y. R. White, Hamilton; R. W. Cashion, Hamilton; G. W. 
Wates, Ur. 

Pension Examiners.— Dr. J. C. Johnson, Hamilton; S. M. Davis, Shots- 

ville. 

Board of Health.— Dr. J. C. Johnson, chairman, Hamilton; Dr. K. B. 
Goggan, Hackleburg; Dr. W. J. McCrary, Guln; Dr. G. W. Mixon, Hackle- 
burg; Dr. M. S. White, Hamilton. 

Game and Fish Warden. — , 

12 



178 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

MARSHALL COUNTY. 

Judge of Probate.— J. H. Carter, Guntersville. 

Clerk of Circuit Court— Thomas J. Hinds, Guntersvllle. 
. Sheriff, — John Lewis, Guntersvllle. 

Tax Assessor. — J. D. Fletcher, Albertville. 

Tax Collector. — Mat Edmonds, Cottortville. 

Tax Commissioner. — Thomas M. Pa tteson, Guntersville. 

Treasurer. — W. R. McNaron, Albertville. 

Superintendent of Education. — J. Mabry, Ilorton. 

Coroner. — A. B. Jones, Albertville. 

County Commissioners. — Peter Allen, Cottonville; R. R. McClesky, Boaz; 
M. P. Bodine, Sidney; J. B. Shumate, Oleander. 

Register in Chancery. — Wm. C. Rayburn, Guntersville. 

Surveyor.— W. C. Goodwin, Street. 

Registrars. — John H. Wood, Guntersville; J. B. Stearnes, North; Geo. 
M. Rains, Albertville. 

Pension Examiners. — Dr. J. M. Jackson, Guntersville; T. B. Parkhlll, 
Cottonville. 

Board of Health. — Dr. P. B. Lusk, chairman, Guntersville; Dr. D. A 
Morton, Boaz; Dr. E. H. Couch, Union Grove; Dr. J. J. McGahay, Colum- 
bus City; Dr. M. G. Shipp, Albertville. 

Game and Fish Warden. — J. G. Pittman, Albertville. 



MOBILE COUNTY. 

Judge of Probate. — Price Williams, Jr., Mobile. 

Clerk of Circuit Court.— Sextus H. Smith, Mobile. 

Sheriff. — Frank Ca'zales, Sr., Mobile. 

Tax Assessor. — E. D. LaUrendine, Mobile. 

Tax Collector. — Phelan B. Dorlon, Mobile. 

Tax Commissioner. — H. M. Friend, Mobile. 

Treasurer. — George E. Stone, Mobile. 

Superintendent of Education. — S. S. Murphy, Mobile. 

Coroner.— n. P. Hirshfield, Mobile. 

County Commissioner 8. — John Cowley, Mobile ; John Simmons, Citronelle ; 
F. P. Andrews, Coden; John T. Bauer, Mobile; John D. Hagan, Mobile. 

Register in Chancery. — Carl Holzborn, Mobile. 

Surveyors. — L. R. Bart, Mobile; R. B. Stewart, Whistler. 

Registrars.— Finley McFadyn, Whistler; B. F. McMillan, Mobile; J. P. 
Wilson, Mobile. 

Pension Examiners. — Wm. E. Mickle, Mobile; J. Grey Thomas, Mobile. 

Board of Health. — Dr. C. A. Mohr, chairman, Mobile; Dr. V. P. Gaines, 
Mobile; Dr. T. H. Frazer, Mobile; Dr. C. N. Owen, Mobile; Dr. D. G. 
Campbell, Mobile. 

School Commissioners. — L. D. Holt, Mobile; John E. Michael, Mobile; 
Dr. William H. Sledge, Mobile. 

Jury Commissioners. — Max Hamburger, Mobile; W. L. Stewart, Mobile; 
J. E. McNamara, Mobile. 

General Administrator. — N. E. Stallworth, Mobile. 

Judge Inferior Criminal Court. — J. E. Alford, Mobile. 

County Solicitor.^. M. Webb, Mobile. 

Game and Fish Warden. — A. Sid Gill, Mobile. 



MONROE COUNTY. 

Judge of Probate. — I. B. Slaughter, Monroeville. 
Clerk of Circuit Court. — John M. Croxwell, Monroeville. 



COUNTY OFFICERS. 179 

Sheriff. — M. M. Fountain, Monroeville. 

Tax Assessor. — John Rawls, Mexia. 

Tax Collector. — John L. Marshall, Purdue Hill. 

Tax Commissioner. — G. W. Broughton, Monroeville. 

Treasurer. — D. D. Mims, Monroeville. 

Superintendent of Education. — John D. Forte, Buena Vista. 

County Commissioners. — W. S. Bowden, Nero ; Win. Besreen, Burnt Corn ; 
J. E. Fore, Turkestan ; W. E. Jones, Natchez. 

Register in Chancery. — Wm. G. McCorrey, Monroeville. 

Surveyors, — Thomas A. Rumbly, Burnt Com ; G. W. Broughton, Tekoa. 

Registrars. — R. E. Barnes, Eliska; D. K. Smith, Monroeville; W. R. 
Maxwell. Tunnel Springs. 

Pension Examiners. — Dr. T. M. McMillan, Monroeville; Thomas S. Wig- 
gins, Monroeville. 

Tax Commissioner. — S. W. Yarbrough, Monroeville. 

Board of Health.— Dr. D. D. Cole, chairman, Mt. Pleasant; Dr. S. B. Mc- 
Millan, Jones Mill; Dr. G. II. Harper, Manistee; Dr. R. A. Smith, Nada- 
wah. 

Game and Fish Warden. — J. T. Moore, Perdue Hill. 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 

Judge of Probate. — J. B. Gaston. Montgomery. 

Clerk of Circuit Court. — David Johnston, Montgomery. 

Clerk of City Court. — Henry W. Hughes, Montgomery. 

Sheriff. — Horace Hood, Sr.. Montgomery. 

Tax Assessor. — A. H. Eubanks. Montgomery. 

Tax Collector. — Geo. W. Hails, Montgomery. 

Tax Commissioner. — W. M. Blakey, Montgomery. 

Treasurer. — John J. Cochran, Montgomery. 

Superintendent of Education. — G. W. Covington, Montgomery. 

Coroner. — W. H. Tice, Montgomery. 

County Commissioners. — II. H. Barnes, Myrtle; Charles Mathews, Mont- 
gomery ; W. D. Brown, Montgomery ; Dr. Thomas Duncan, Fleta ; M. B. 
Houghton. Montgomery. 

Register in Chancent- — W. H. Parks, Montgomery. 

Surveyors. — S. E. Washburn, Montgomery ; W. II. Garrett, Montgomery. 

Registrars. — Charles B. Teasley, Montgomery ; W. A. Gunter, Montgom- 
ery; J. J. Johnson, Pine Level. 

Pension Examiners. — Benjamin S. Chapman, Montgomery; J, H. May, 
Montgomery: I>r. R. N. Pitts, Montgomery. 

Board of Health. — Dr. Glenn Andrews, chairman. Montgomery; Dr. W. 
M. Wilkeraon, Montgomery; Dr. J. L. Gaston. Montgomery; Dr. S. Bragg, 
Montgomery ; Dr. Robert Goldthwaite, Montgomery. 

Game and Fish Warden. — A. Campbell Jones. Montgomery. 

Board of Revenue. — J. S. Edson, Montgomery ; M. B. Houghton, Mont- 
gomery; N. J. Greil, Montgomery; A. L. Tyson, Montgomery; W. H. Law- 
son, : — ; Samuel J. Guy, . 



MORGAN COUNTY. 

Judge of Probate. — Wm. E. Skeggs, Decatur. 

Clerk of Circuit Court. — James S. Fowler, Decatur. 

Sheriff. — Thomas R. Shipp, Decatur. 

Tax Assessor. — Frank J. Troup, New Decatur. 

Tax Collector.— W. H. Drinkard, Danville. 

Tax Commissioner. — W. C. Preston. Decatur. 

Treasurer. — Joseph D. Epperson, Decatur. 



180 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

Superintendent of Education. — Philip A. Oden, Stringer. 

Coroner. — A. B. Lampkin, New Decatur. 

County Commissioners. — William E. Skeggs, Judge, Decatur; 1st Dis- 
trict, A. A. Hard age, New Decatur; 2nd District, S. P. Lovelady, Danville; 
3rd District, Abe Ryan, Eva, R. F. D. No. 1; 4th District, John D. Mc- 
Clanahan, Hartselle. 

Register in Chancery. — D. F. Green, Decatur. 

Surveyor. — W. H. McClure, New Decatur. 

Registrars. — Geo. G. Roop, Trinity; J. M. Jackson, Leesdale; W. R. 
Frazier, Hartselle. 

Pension Examiners.— &&m Blackwell, New Decatur; Dr. R. L. Stephen- 
son, New Decatur. 

Board of Health. — Dr. F. P. Pettey, chairman,' Hew Decatur; Dr. H. C. 
McRee, Hartselle; Dr. R. L. Penn, Danville R. F. D. No. 1; Dr. W. A. 
Barclift, Hartselle; Dr. E. J. Conyngton, Detfatur. 

Game and Fish Warden. — W. M. Grubbs, Decatur. 



PERRY COUNTY. 

Judge of Probate. — J. B. Shivers, Marion. ^ 

Clerk of Circuit Court.— W. T. Harris, Marion. 

Sheriff. — S. A. Nelins, Marion. 

Tax Assessor. — E. E. Howell, Walthall. 

Tax Collector.— E. E. King, Marion. 

Tax Commissioner'— 3. B. Cosby, Perryvllle. 

Treasurer. — C. L. Barker, Marion. 

Superintendent of Education. — W. G. Hoover, Marion. 

Coroner. — E. M. Blackburn, Marion. 

County Commissioners. — J. R. W. Nichols, Marion ; Wm. C. Ivey, Sprotts ; 
Val Taylor, Uniontown; John T. Curb, Curbville. 

Register in Chancery. — Thomas Curry, Marlon. 

Surveyors. — T. D. Kemp, Marion; W. D. McAuley, Uniontown. 

Registrars. — J. C. Pope, postofflce ;W. J. Vaiden, Union- 
town; James M. Richardson, Radfordsville. 

Pension Examiners. — J. C. Moore, Marion ; O. L. Shivers, Marion. 

Board of Health. — Dr. O. L. Shivers, chairman. Marion; Dr. E. Swann, 

Sprotts; Dr. J. B. Hatchett, Marion; Dr. J. N. McLean, ; 

Dr. R. C. Hanna, Marion. 

Game and Fish Warden. — I. B. Hendon, Marion. 



PICKENS COUNTY. 

Judge of Probate. — L. C. Hiudgins, Carrollton. 

Clerk of Circuit Court. — J. F. Hodge, Carrollton. 

Sheriff. — R. B. Burgin, Carrollton. 

Tax Assessor. — J. W. Hanson, Carrollton. 

Tax Collector. — T. M. Keasler, Carrollton. 

Tax Commissioner. — Frank S. Baker, Carrollton. 

Treasurer. — S. H. Hill, Carrollton. 

Superintendent of Education. — W. II. Storey, Carrollton. 

County Commissioners. — J. H. Coleman, Pickensville; M. I. Harper, Re- 
form ; J. A. Goss, Benevola ; T. J. Hancock, Ethelville. 

Register in Chancery. — W. G. Robertson, Carrollton. 

Surveyors. — J. W. Hanson, Olney ; D. W. Davis, Gordo. 

Registrars. — B. G. Robison, Carrollton; I. M. Nolaud, Carrollton; T. K. 
Glass, Gordo. 

Pension Examiners. — S. H. Hill, Carrollton; H. B. Latham, Carrollton. 



COUNTY OFFICERS. 181 

Board of Health.— Dr. G. B. Wimberly, chairman, Reform ; Dr. R. O. Pat- 
ton, Temple; Dr. H. W. Hill, Carrollton; Dr. D. W. Glass, Pickensville ; 
Dr. J. L. Davis, Gordo." 

Game and Fish Warden, — E. E. Cox, Carrollton. 



PIKE COUNTY. 

• Judge of Probate. — A. C. Edmondson, Troy. \r 

Clerk of Circuit Court.— Charles Cox, Troy. 

Sheriff.— W. C. Carroll, Troy. 

Tax Assessor. — C. T. Spradley, Troy. 

Tax Collector. — V. A. Gibson, Troy. 

Tax Commissioner. — A. S. McLeod, Orion. 

treasurer. — J. G. Key, Troy. 

Superintendent of Education. — James Sanders, Troy. 

County Commissioners. — M. J. Enzer, Troy; E. Pittman, Banks; J. A. 
Anderson, Milo; D. R. Weldon, Ansley. 

Register in Chancery. — A. C. Worthy, Troy. 

Surveyors. — S. J. Townsend, Troy; S. E. Washburn, Montgomery. 

Registrars. — J. L. Long, Troy; Thomas Nunnelee, Troy; T. H. Brown, 
Troy. 

Pension Examiners. — Dr. J. S. Beard, Troy; T. J. Youngblood, Troy. 

Board of Health.— Dr. C. W. Hilliard, Troy; Dr. Hamp Weedon, Troy; 
Dr. J. S. Beard, Troy. 

Game and Fish Warden. — R. 3. McBride, Troy. 



RANDOLPH COUNTY. 

Judge of Probate. — John T. Kaylor, Wedowee. , 

Clerk of Circuit Court. — Wilson L. Stewart, Wedowee. 

Tax Assessor. — Charles W. Elchelberger, Roanoke. 

Tax Collector. — M. F. Ussery, Wedowee. 

Tax Commissioner. — F. P.. Nichols, Roanoke. 

Treasurer. — W. M. Matthews, Wedowee: 

Superintendent of Education. — J. N. Word, Lamar. 

County Commissioners. — S. D. Lewis, Wehadkee; H. M. Mickle, Roan- 
oke; T. C. Wilson, Wedowee; A. K. Brooks, Delta. 

Register in Chancery. — J. W. Stewart, Wedowee. 

Surveyor. — W. E. Currie, Corrinth. 

Registrars. — R. N. Ledbetter, Wedowee; Harvey M. Jones, Rock Mills; 
Olen Moody, Roanoke. 

Pension Examiners. — Dr. J. R. Hood, Wedowee; T. J. East, Roanoke. 

Board of Health. — Dr. W. W. Stevenson, chairman. Roanoke; Dr. J. 

C. Swann, ; Dr. H. B. Dlshervon, Roanoke; Dr. W. G. 

Floyd, Roanoke; Dr. P. E. Dean, Wedowee. 

Game and Fish Warden. — J. J. Huckebee, Wedowee. 



RUSSELL COUNTY^/'- 



Judge of Probate. — H. T. Benton, Seale 
Clerk of Circuit Court.— T. W. Perry, Seale. 
Sheriff. — P. M. Daniel, Columbus, Ga. 
Tax Assessor. — A. H. Vann, Girard. 
Tax Collector.— H. B. Pitts, Pittsview. 
Tax Commissioner. — 
Treasurer. — C. O. Martin, Seale. 



182 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

Superintendent of Education.— Frank M. deGraffenreid, Seale. 

Coroner.— \V. H. Pitts, Pittsview. 

County Commissioners. — D. C. Foster, Girard; G. W. Gullatt, Marvyii; 
T. S. Davis, Hurtsboro ; M. A. Bush, Heard. 

Register in Chancery. — R. H. Holland, Seale. 

Surveyor. — J. N. Johnson, Smith Station. 

Registrars. — W. A. L. Tucker, Seale; R. W. Johnson, Uchee; J. H. Wat- 
son. Girard. 

Pension Examiners. — Dr. W. B. Prather, Seale; S. S. Brinson, Seale. 

Board of Health. — Dr. G. D. Paschal, chairman, Hurtsboro; Dr. T. J. 
Pruett, Hurtsboro ; Dr. M. Davis, Hatchechubbee ; Dr. W. T. Joiner, Pitts- 
vllle; Dr. W. B. Prather, Seale. 

Game and Fish Warden. — S. R. Boykin, Seale. 



ST. CLAIR COUNTY. 

Judge of Probate. — W. S. Forman, Ashville. 

Clerk of Circuit Court.. — J. M. Garrett, Ashville. 

Sheriff.— W. H. Crow, Ashville. 

Tax Assessor. — F. M. Morris, Ragland. 

Tax Collector.— W. E. Henry, Springvi lie. 

Tax Commissioner. — N. A. Hood, Ashville. 

Treasurer. — C. D. Alverson, Eden. 

Superintendent of Education. — B. S. Hodges, Eden. 

Coroner. — Ed. L. Todd, Springvi lie. 

County Commissioners. — S. J. Hare, Ashville; J. C. Caldwell, Caldwell ; 
F. H. Lathrop, Riverside; Sumter Cogswell, Pell City. 

Register in Chancery. — M. M. Fulyhum, Ashville. 

Surveyors. — T. E. Smith, Coal City; J. B. Robertson, Springvllle ;. 

Registrars. — N. A. Hood, Ashville ; J. M. Pressley, SpringVille ; G. P. Aus- 
tin, Sedden. 

Pension Examiners. — J. H. Ensley, ; Charles W. Allisou, 

Springville. 

Board of Health. — Dr. J. O. Gray, chairman, Pell City; Dr. J. P. Turner, 
Cropwell; Dr. J. T. Robertson, Riverside; Dr. E. C. Harris, Coal City; Dr. 
C. C. Brown, Odenville. 

Game and Fish Warden. — C. B. Alverson, Pell City. 



SHELBY COUNTY. 

Judge of Probate. — A. P. Longshore, Columbia. 

Clerk of Circuit Court.— John R. Dyke, Columbia. 

Sheriff.— James H. Fuller, Columbiana. 

Tax Assessor. — John S. Pitts, Columbiana. 

Tax Collector. — W. A. Brusher, Columbiana. 

Tax Commissioner. — Dr. C. C. Oliver, Calera. 

Treasurer. — Win. E. Harrison, Columbiana. 

Superintendent of Education. — J. O. Dorough, Columbiana. 

Coroner. — J. F. Atkinson, Columbiana. 

County Commissioners. — John E. Dykes, Columbiana; Pleasant Shaw. 
Montevallo ; R. J. Griffin, Helena ; R. B. Posey, Harpersville. 

Register in Chancery. — J. R. White. Columbiana. 

Registrars. — Spright Dowell, Columbiana; Calvin Weldon, Wilsonvllle; 
T. A. Gunn, Calera. 

Pension Examiners. — Dr. W. S. DuBose, Columbiana; S. H. Gist, Calera. 

Board of Health.— Dr. J. R. Morgan, Shelby Springs; Dr. E. G. Givan, 
Montevallo. 

Game and Fish Warden. — Geo. W. Morgan, Montevallo. 



\ 



COUNTY OFFICERS. 183 

SUMTER COUNTY. 

Judge of Probate. — P. B. Jarman, Livingston, y 

Clerk of Circuit Court.— W. K. Pickens, Livingston. 

Sheriff. — James R. Jackson, Livingston. 

Tax Assessor. — E. M. Shaw, Cuba. 

Tax Collector. ^-O. C. Thomas, Gainesville. 

Tax Commissioner. — E. A. Shaw, Cuba. 

Treasurer. — W. G. Little, Livingston. 

Superintendent of Education. — R. B. Calloway, Livingston. 

Coroner. — W. G. McDaniel, Cuba. 

County Commissioners.— *H; D. Long, Gainesville; P. Willingham, Sum- 
terville ; W. E. McGowen, Cuba ; Robert Campbell, Whitfield. 

Register in Chancery. — W. W. Hopkins, Livingston. 

Surveyor. — M. T. Sumner, Bollgee. 

Registrars. — T. F. Seale, Livingston; Gray Ellis, Gainesville; J. W. 
Phares, Belmont. 

Pension Examiners. — R. H. Hale, York; T. M. Long, Gainesville. 

Beard of Health. — Dr. D. S. Brockway, chairman, Livingston; Dr. W. J. 
McCain, Livingston ; Dr. A. L. Vaughan, Cuba ; Dr. R. E. Harwood, Gaines- 
ville; Dr. J. P. Seales, Coatopa. 

Game and Fish Warden. — B. C. Hunter, Livingston. 



TALLADEGA. 

Judge of Probate. — J.E. Camp, Talladega. * r - 

Clerk of Circuit Court.— John D. McNeel, Talladega. 

Sheriff.— W. R. Middieton, Talladega. 

Tax Assessor. — D. M. Mallory, Talladega. 

Tax Collector.-^- J. A. Woodward, Talladega. 

Tax Commissioner. — John R. Barrett, Talladega. 

Treasurer. — S. H. Henderson, Talladega. 

Superintendent of Education. — J. C. Williams, Talladega. 

Coroner. — R. Heine, Talladega. 

County Commissioners. — T. F. Elliott, Talladega; J. A. .Harris, Easta- 
boga: W. B. Campbell, Fayetteville; A. F. Jones, Renfroe. 

Register in Chancery. — J. W. Vandiver, Talladega. 

Surveyors.— J. H. Lawson, Talladega; B. E. Ogletree, Talladega. 

Registrars. — A. R. Stroud, Munford ; C. S. Hancock, Talladega; D. Mat- 
tison, Silver Run. 

PenstQn Examiners. — M. Jackson, Talladega; A. G. Sims, Renfroe. 

Board of Health.— Dr. S. W. Welch, chairman, Talladega; Dr. B. B. 
Sims, Talladega; Dr. Geo. A. Hill, Winette; Dr. A. G. Sims, Renfroe; Dr. 
W. R. Bishop, Talladega. 

Game and Fish Warden. — E. L. Miller, Lincoln. 

Solicitor City Court. — Marion H. Sims, Talladega. 



TALLAPOOSA COUNTY. 

Judge of Probate. — G. J. Sorrell, Dadeville. ^ 
Clerk of Circuit Court. — J. L. Reeves, Dadeville. 
Sheriff. — R. L. Johnson, Dadeville. 
Tax Assessor. — W. H. Green, Dadeville. 
Tax Collector. — Max Adams, Dadeville. 
Tax Commissioner^ — J. A. Rowe, Dadeville. 
Treasurer. — J. S. Knox, Walnut Hill. 
Superintendent of Education. — J. P. Oliver, Dadeville. 



184 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

County Commissioners. — W. A. Roberson, Dadeville; S. M. Whittle, Camp 
Hill; W. H. Price, Daviston; W. W. Hardy, Alex. City. 

Register in Chancery. — H. O. Garrett, Dadeville. 

Surveyors. — R. R. Slaughter, Tohopeka ; James Walker, Alex. City. 

Registrars. — A. I). Thompson, Daviston; J. R. Umpress, Susanna; W. 
H. Pinwell, Camp Hill. 

Pension Examiners. — W. L. Rowe, Dadeville; Dr. R. V. Solomon, Dade- 
ville. 

Board of Health. — Dr. J. A. Goggans, chairman, Alexander City; Dr. A. 
L. Harlan, Alexander City ; Dr. H. T. Hamner, Camp Hill ; Dr. S. H. New- 
man, Dadeville) Dr. J. W. McClendon, Dadeville. 

Game and Fish Warden. — W. R. Dawson, Camp Hill. 




TUSCALOOSA COUNTY. 

Judge of Probate. — James C. Brown, Tuscaloosa. 

Clerk of Circuit Court. — B. B. Cooper. Tuscaloosa. 

Sheriff. — Edgar A. Latham, Tuscaloosa. 

Tax Assessor. — J. P. Park, Tuscaloosa. 

Tax Collector. — S. D. McGee, Tuscaloosa. 

Tax Commissioner. — A. B. McEachin, Jr., Tuscaloosa. 

Treasurer. — W. A. Leland, Tuscaloosa. 

Superintendent of Education. — P. B. Hughes, Tuscaloosa. 

Coroner. — J. H. Fair, Tuscaloosa. 

County Commissioners. — R. E. Hobson, Snider; J. W. Robertson, Romu- 
lus; W. S. Patton, Tuscaloosa; M. B. Scott, Tuscaloosa; W. N. Lunceford, 
Tuscaloosa. 

Register in Chancery. — G. W. VanHoose, Tuscaloosa. 

Surveyors. — R. K. Bell, Elrod; J. M. Levin, Ralph. 

Registrars. — M. T. Ormond, Tuscaloosa; J. N. Norris, McConnells; J. M. 
Lallar, Oregonia. 

Pension Examiners. — H. H. Cribbs, Tuscaloosa; A. B. C. Nicbolls, Tus 7 
caloosa. 

Board of Health. — Dr. Robert J. Hargrove, chairman, Tuscaloosa ; Dr. J. 
H. Ward, Tuscaloosa; Dr. S. F. Mayfield, Tuscaloosa; Dr. Alston Fitts, 
Tuscaloosa ; Dr. G. H. Searcy, Tuscaloosa. 

Carrie and Fish Warden. — Hawkins Williamson, Tuscaloosa. 

Board of Public Works. — Henry T. Burks, Tuscaloosa; H. P. Walker, 
Tuscaloosa ;VJ£L Banks Thompson. 



WALKER COUNTY. 

Judge of Probate. — James W. Shepherd, Jasper. 

Clerk of Circuit Court. — Ed. W. Long, Jasper. 

Sheriff. — T. O. Long, Jasper. 

Tax Assessor. — Charles W. Stubblefield, Jasper. 

Tax Collector. — W. R. Richardson, Jasper. 

Tax Commissioner. — L. W. Lollar, Jasper. 

Treasurer. — Hugh II. Morrow, Jasper. 

Superintendent of Education. — T. J. Lamar, Jasper. 

Coroner. — Mose Newberger, Jasper. 

County Commissioners. — J. R. Kllgore, Jasper; John F. Anderson, Car- 
bon •Hill; Henry A. Roberts, Coal; J. M. Lovell, Mary Lee. 

Register in Chancery. — F. A. Gamble, Jasper. < 

Surveyors. — Tom Williams, Jasper; J. C. Williams, Jasper. 

Registrars. — Leander Gabbert, Jasper; W. F.. Stubblefield, Eldridge; S. 
S. Shones, Jasper. 



COUNTY OFFICERS. 185 

Pension Examiners. — D. H. Comack, M. D. ( Jasper; James Rutledge, 
Oakman. 

Board of Health. — Dr. J. A. Goodwin, chairman, Jasper; Dr. A. M. Sto- 
vall, Jasper ; Dr. J. M. Miller, Cordova ; Dr. C. B. Jackson, Horse Creek ; 
Dr. W. M. Cunningham, Corona. 

Game and Fish Warden. — C. C. Smith, Jasper. 

County Auditor. — A. S. Preston, Jasper. 

Judge of Late and Equity Court. — T. L. Sowell, 'Jasper. 



WASHINGTON COUNTY. 

,1/ 






. Judge of Probate. — Daniel J. Long, St. Stephens. 

Clerk of Circuit Court — Frank C. Turner, St. Stephens. 

Sheriff. — W. W. Warren, St. Stephens. 

Tax Assessor. — M. L. Smith, St. Stephens. 

Tax Collector. — Warren S. Pugh, Frankville. 

Tax Commissioner. — James B. Rawls, St. Stephens. / 

Treasurer. — W. H. Harris, St. Stephens. 

Superintendent of Education. — R. E. Blount, Hawthorne. 

County Commissioners. — John W. Gordy, St. Stephens; L. W. McRea, 
Calvert ; Alex Williams, State Line, Miss. ; M. J. Knight, Healing Springs. 

Register in Chancery. — B. D. Turner, St. Stephens. 

Surveyor. — B. D. Turner, St. Stephens. 

Registrars. — E. M. Slaughter, St. Stephens; W. H. Keeth, Sunflower; J. 
H. Blount, Koenton. 

Commissioners of County Seat Election. — H. M. Piatt, Escatawpa; J. A. 
Brown, Escatawpa, chairman ; T. H. Roberts, Carson. 

Pension Examiners. — Dr. W. E. Kimbrough, _^ B. D. Turner, 



Board of Health. — Dr. F. A. Webb, chairman, Calvert; Dr. A. J. Wood, 
Frankville; Dr. John Chason, Chatom ; Dr. .L. L. Duggar, Fairford. 
Game and Fish Warden. — C. E. Harold, Sunflower. 



WILCOX COUNTY. 

Judge of Probate. — Jonathan N. Stanford, Pineapple. Is 

Clerk of Circuit Court. — P. M. Dannelly, Camden. 

Sheriff. — S. D. Moore, Sr., Camden. 

Tax Assessor. — O. H. Spencer, Sal He. 

Tax Collector. — H. Van de Voort, Sunny South. 

Tax Commissioner. — Thomas F. Neville, Camden. 

Treasurer. — W. A. Dexter, Camden. 

Superintendent of Education. — W. M. Cook, Camden. 

Coroner. — W. H. Holt, Camden. 

County Commissioners. — A. C. McNeill, Fatama ; P. E. Wallace, Acker- 
ville ; S. M. Catheart, Alberta ; Thomas B. Farish, Nellie. 

Surveyor. — W. D. Boyd, Camden. 

Registrars. — J. A. McClurkin, Caledonia; J. H. Malone, Gastonberg; J. 
D. Jenkins, Camden. 

Pension Examiners. — W. W. McConnico, Allenton ; J. C. Benson, Camden. 

Board of Health. — Dr. L. E. Starr, chairman, Camden; Dr. R. H. Kil- 
patrick, Camden ; Dr. Earnest Bonner, Camden ; Dr. James G. Donald, Pine 
Apple; Dr. R. O. Semmes, Camden. 

Game and Fish Warden. — W. H. Boykin, Camden. 



186 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

WINSTON COUNTY. 

Judge of Probate.— John S. Curtis, Double Springs. 

Clerk of Circuit Court. — Rufus I. Dodd, Double Springs. 

Sheriff.— W. T. Williams, Double Springs. 

Tax Assessor. — J. B. \veaver, Deer. 

Tax Collector. — J. M. Tingle, Mellville. 

Tax Commissioner. — CI D. Hudgins, Double Springs. 

Treasurer. — T. P. Sutherland, Haleysville. 

Superintendent of Education. — Z. McVay, Double Springs. 

Coroner. — B. F. Neely, Double Springs. 

County Commissioners. — S. McCallum, Double Springs; O. B. Norris, 
Lynn ; W. C. Tidwell, Houston ; H. V. West, Guin Pond. 

Surveyors. — J. S. Phillips, Tavern; B. F. Steele, Moreland. 

Registrars. — B. J. Cowart, Double Springs; H. J. Wilson, Mellville. 

Pension Examiners. — W. R. Bonds, Double Springs, J. T. Millican, Double 
Springs. 

Board of Health. — Dr. W. R. Bonds, chairman, Double Springs; Dr. W. 

E. Howell, Haleyville; Dr. C. A. Olivett, .; Dr. J. D. Lee, Ha- 

leyville; Dr. J. C. Taylor, Haleyville. 

Game and Fish Warden. — Fred M. Wilson, Elk. 



IX. POPULATION OF ALABAMA BY 

COUNTIES AND BY MINOR 

CIVIL DIVISIONS.* 



TABLE 1.— POPULATION OF ALABAMA: 1820 TO 1900. 



CENSUS YEABS. 



1900 
1890 
1880 
1870 
1860 
1850 
1840 
1830 
1820 





INCBEASE. 


Population. 






Number. 


Per ceut 


1,828,697 


315,680 


20.9 


1,513,017 


250,512 


19.8 


1,262,505 


265,513 


26.6 


996,992 


32,791 


3.4 


964,201 


192,578 


25.0 


771,623 


180,867 


30.6 


' 590,756 


281,229 


90.9 


309,521 


181,626 


142.0 


127,901 







Alabama was organized as a territory March 3, 1817, and admitted as 
a State December 14, 1819. In 1800 Washington county, then in the terri- 
tory of Mississippi, but subsequently included in the territory of Alabama, 
had a population of 1,250. In 1810 the counties of Bajdwin, Madison, and 
Washington, then in the territory of Mississippi, but subsequently included 
in the territory of Alabama, had a population of 9,046. Table 1 shows the 
population of Alabama at each census from 1820 to 1900, inclusive, to- 
gether with the increase by number and per cent during each decade. 

The population of the State in 1900 w,as 1,828,697, as against 1,513,017 
in 1890, representing an Increase since 1890 of 315,680, or 20.9 per cent. 
This rate of increase is slightly greater than that for the decade from 1880 
to 1890, when it was 19.8 per cent, but somewhat less than that for the 
decade from 1870 to 1880, when it was 26.6 per cent. From 1820 to 1830, 
the first decennial period in the history of the State, its population In- 
creased 142 per cent, and in the following decade 90.9 per cent, but subse- 
quently the rate of increase declined until the decade from 1860 to 1870, 
when it was only 3.4 per cent. 

The population of Alabama in 1900 is more than fourteen times as large 
as the population given for 1820, the first census taken after its organiza- 
tion as a State in 1819. 

The total land surface of Alabama is, approximately, 51,540 square miles, 
the average number of persons to the square mile at the censuses of 1890 
and 1900 being as follows : 1890, 29.4 ; 1900, 35.5. 

Table 2 shows the population of Alabama by counties at each census from 
1820 to 1900, inclusive, while table 3, which immediately follows, shows, 
for each county, the increase (or decrease) by number and per cent during 
the 10 years from 1890 to 1900. 

•The data here given in reference to population of Alabama is taken 
from the Twelfth Census of the United States, Volume I, Population, Part 1. 

(187) 



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POPULATION OF ALABAMA. 



191 



TABLE 3— INCREASE IN POPULATION OF ALABAMA BY COUNTIES. 

1890 TO 1900. 



The following territorial changes have been made in the counties of Ala- 
bama since 1890:, Part of Colbert has been annexed to Franklin; part of 
Jefferson has been annexed to Walker; part of Lawrence has been an- 
nexed to Colbert ; part of Talladega has been annexed to Clay ; and parts 
of Henry, Dale and "Geneva have been formed into Houston county. 

Of the 67 counties in the State all but 2 have increased in population 
during the decade, the counties showing more than 50 per cent of the in- 
crease being Covington, 103.6 per cent; Geneva, 78.6 per cent; Coffee 72.3 
per cent ; Jefferson, 58.7 per cent ; Walker, 56.5 per cent ; and Franklin, 
54.6 per cent. Jefferson county shows the largest numerical increase 
(51,919), but nearly one-fourth of this increase is due to the increase in 
population of the city of Birmingham. 

The 2 counties showing a decrease in population are Cleburne and Law- 
rence. 





# 




• 

Counties 


Increase 




Number 


Per cent 



The State 315,680 

Autauga 4,585 

Baldwih 4,253 

Barbour 254 

Bibb 4,674 

Blount 1,192 

Bullock 4,881 

Biktier '_ 4,120 

Calhoun 1.039 

Chambers 6,235 

Cherokee : 637 

Chilton 1,973 

Choctaw 610 

Clarke 5,166 

Clay 1,334 

Cleburne 12 

Coffee 8,802 

Colbert 2,152 

Conecuh 2,920 

Coosa 238 

Covington 7,810 

Crenshaw 4,243 

Cullman 4,410 

Dale 3,964 

Dallas 5,307 

Dekalb 2,452 

Elmore 4,367 

Escambia 2.654 

Etowah 5,435 

Fayette 1,309 

Franklin 5,&30 

Geneva 8,406 

Greene 2,175 

Hale 3,510 

Henry 11,300 

Jackson 1 2,482 

Jefferson 51,919 



20.9 



34.4 
47.6 

0.7 
33.8 

5.4 
18.0 
19.0 

3.1 
23.7 

3.1 
13.6 

3.5 
22.8 

8.5 

0.1 
72.3 
10.7 
20.0 

1.5 
103.6 
27.5 
32.8 
23.0 
10.8 
11.6 
20.1 
30.6 
24.8 
10.2 
54.6 
78.6 

9.9 
12.8 
45.5 

8.9 
58.7 



192 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

TABLE 3— INCREASE IN POPULATION OF ALABAMA BY 

COUNTIES— Continued. 



Counties. 



Increase 



Number Per cent 



Lamar 1,807 13.4 

Lauderdale 2,820 11.9 

Lawrence — ^ 601 2.9 

Lee 3,132 10.9 

Limestone 1,186 5.6 

Lowndes , 4.101 13.0 

Macon , 4,687 25.4 

Madison 5,583 14.6 

Marengo u 5,220 15.8 

Marlon 3,147 27.7 

Marshall __ 4,354 23.0, 

Mobile 11,153 21.6 

Monroe 4,676 24.6 

Montgomery ^ 15,875 28.3 

Morgan 4.731 19.6 

Perry 2,451 8.4 

Pickens 1,932 8.6 

Pike - 4,749 19.4 

Randolph 4,428 % 25.7 

Russell - 2,990 12.4 

St. Clair 2,072 11.9 

Shelby • 2,798 13.4 

Sumter 3,136 10.6 

Talladega 6,427 21.9 

Tallapoosa 4,215 16.6 

Tuscaloosa 5,795 19.1 

Walker 9.084 56.5 

Washington 3,199 40.3 

Wilcox 4,815 15.6 

Winston 3,002 45.8 



POPULATION OF ALABAMA. 193 

TABLE 4.— POPULATION OF ALABAMA BY MINOR CIVIL* DIVIS- 
IONS: 1800 AND 1900. 

Table 4 shows the population of Alabama by minor civil divisions, so far 
as it was separately returned at the censuses of 1890 and 1900. 



minor civil divisions. 1900 1890 



Autauga county 17,915 13,330 

Precinct 1 Prattville, including Prattville town 4,679 3,143 

Prattville town 1,929 724 

Precinct 2, Washington 1,611 1,037 

Precinct 3, Autaugaville ^ 2,273 2,025 

Precinct 4, Mulberry 1,211 1.318 

Precinct 5, Days Bend •_ 499 44S 

Precinct 6, Milton 972 1,231 

Precinct 7, Bethel's '_, 1,061 639 

Precinct 8, Big Springs _*_ 841 360 

Precinct 9, Independence 1,228 892 

Precinct 10, Liberty 1,804 1,235 

Precinct 11, Mountain Creek 961 1,002 

Precinct 12. Statesville 775 



Baldwin county 13,194 8,941 

Precinct 1, Montgomery Hill 2,268 2,035 

Precinct 2, Stockton . 1,387 943 

Precinct 3, Perdido Station 1,075 470 

Precinct 4, Bay Minette 1,593 1,022 

Precinct 5, Halmons 632 492 

Precinct 6, Sibleys Mill 939 294 

Precinct 7, Courthouse . 1,099 641 

Precinct 8. Battles Wharf 1,837 1,314 

Precinct 9, Lowell - 696 506 

Precinct 10, Helton 490 346 

Precinct 11, Shell Bank 7(59 310 

Precinct 12, Camp Powell 409 568 

Barbour county 35,152 34,898 

Precinct 1, Hawkinsville 3,873 1,871 

Precinct 2, Spring Hill 2,728 3,317 

Precinct 3, Mt. Andrew 1,406 1,283 

Precinct 4, Fort Browder, including Batesville town 

and White Oak Springs village 2,062 2,223 

Batesville town — 337 

White Oak Springs village 475 

Precinct 5, Eufaula, including Eufaula city 7,972 8.217 

Eufaula city 4,532 4,394 

Ward 1 576 

Ward 2 1.079 

Ward 3 — _. 1,595 

Ward 4 1,282 

Precinct 6, Williamsons 1.446 1,448 

Precinct 7, Clayton, Including Clayton village 4,101 4,075 

Clayton village 998 997 

13 



194 



OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 



MI NOB CIVIL DIVISIONS. 



1900 



1890 



Precinct 8, Starr Hill 

Precinct 9, Louisville, including Louisvile town. 

Louisville town 

Precinct 10, Coxs Mills 

Precinct 11, Richards 

Precinct 12, Reeders Mill 

Precinct 13, Faulks, including Clio town 

Clio town 

Precinct 14, Cotton Hill 

Precinct 15, Grants 

Precinct 16, Belcher , 



1,318 

2,713 

416 

1,654 

1,131 

1,418 

3,095 

326 

486 

849 

900 



Bibb county 18,498 

Precinct 1, Kingdom 3,297 

Precinct 2, Scottsville 1,452 

Precinct 3, Hallman 862 

Precinct 4, James 2,166 

Precinct 5, Centerville, including Centerville town 2,099 

Centerville town 422 

Precinct 6, Six Mile 828 

Precinct 7, Randolph 1,891 

Precinct 8, Ashby 1,168 

Precinct 9, River Bend 224 

Precinct 10, Blocton 3,823 

Precinct 11, McGraws 688 



1,104 
2,534 
288 
1,434 
1,082 
1,228 
2,570 

~~656 
904 
892 



13,824 

1,880 
1,220 

789 
1,580 
1,553 

239 

959 
1.326 
1,418 

390 
2,709 



Blount County 23,119 



Precinct 1 
Precinct 2 
Precinct 3 
Precinct 4 
Precinct 5 
Precinct 6 
Precinct 7 
Precinct 8 
Precinct 9 
Precinct 10 
Preicnct 11 
Precinct 12 
Precinct 13 
Precinct 14 
precinct 15 
Precinct 16 
Precinct 17 
Precinct 18 
Precinct 19 
Precinct 20 
Precinct 21 
Precinct 22 
Precinct 23 
Precinct 24 
Precinct 25 
Precinct 26 



Blount Springs 

Gum Springs 

Hanceville 

Pocahontas 

Blpuntsville 

Brooksville 

Summit 

Campbell 

Hood 

Hardwlck 

Chepultepec 

Cleveland 

Whites 

Remlap 

McMurrys 

Selfville 

Thompson Crossroads 

Gambles 

Walkers 

Bangor 

Joy 



Rays 

Nectar 

Arkadelphia 
Reid Gap __ 
Doss Creek 



962 
749 
757 
427 

1,016 
677 
743 

1,162 
437 
478 
720 

L,062 
696 
388 
162 
576 
379 
713 
617 
507 
260 

1,008 
398 
918 
658 
422 



21,927 



683 

530 

532 

1.021 

1.107 

904 

958 

860 

554 

1,479 

858 

Y.167 

im 

537 

381 
687 
466 
286 



350 

1.173 

597 

367 



POPULATION OF ALABAMA. J95 



MINOR CIVIL DIVISIONS. 1000 1890 



Precinct 27, Garden City 286 295 

Precinct 28, Thompsons 396 - 

Precinct 29, Calverts 510 

Precinct 30, Compton 544 ■_ 

Precinct 31, Cornelius 232 201 

Precinct 32, Burgetts 435 356 

Precinct 33, Liberty 963 742 

Precinct 34, Concord 443 

Precinct 35, Harmony 392 342 

Precinct 36, Oneonta, including Oneonta town 1,254 

Oneonta town - 583 

Precinct 37, Dailys '_ 322 

Precinct 38, Bright Star 450 



Bullock county 31,944 27,063 

Precinct 1, Midway, including Midway town.-.: 3,874 3,953 

Midway town 430 612 

Precinct 2, flnon 1,409 1,468 

Precinct 3, Union Springs, including Union Springs 

town 6,940 5,834 

Union Springs town 2,634 2,049 

Precinct 4, Ridgely 1.867 1,880 

Precintc 5, Indian Creek 1,479 1,240 

Precinct 6, Perote 2,194 L808 

Precinct 7, Inverness 1,655 1,171 

Precinct 8, Greenwood, including Fitzpatrick and 

Thompson towns 5,510 4,251 

Fitzpatrick town 447 357 

Thompson town 145 

Precinct 9, Bruceville 1,884 1,390 

Precinct 10, Farriorville 1,521 1,217 

Precinct 11, Union Church 4 1.&54 1,483 

Precinct 12, Suspension 1,897 1,3(58 

Butler county 25,761 21,641 

Precinct 1, Starlington 1,209 623 

Precinct 2. Shell 836 884 

Precinct 3, Oaky Streak 565 591 

Precinct 4, Dock 430 538 

Precinct 5. Daisy 778 622 

Precinct 6, Yellow Shanks 397 563 

Precinct 7, Spring Hill 1,417 1,269 

Precinct 8, Dead Fall 1,200 1.321 

Precinct 9, Manningham 1,886 1,538 

Precinct 10, Monterey 1,479 1,271 

Precinct 11, Forest Home and Butler Springs 1,720 1,573 

Precinct 12, Greenville, including Greenville city 6,341 5.372 

Greenville city 3,162 2,806 

Precinct 13, Garland 1,450 1.449 

Precinct 14, Georgiana, Including Georgiana city 2,793 2,265 

Georgiana city 567 456 

Preicnct 15, Mt. Olive 447 380 

Precinct 16, Rocky Creek 1,018 . 865 



196 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 



MI NOB CIVIL DIVISIONS. 1900 1890 



Precinct 17, Pigeon Creek — ^ 693 517 

Precinct 18, Boiling, including Boiling town! 735 

Boiling town 175 

Precinct 19, Lumber Mills 367 

Calhoun county 34,874 33,835 

Precinct 1, Jacksonville, including Jacksonville town__ 2,230 2,420 

Jacksonville town 1,176 1,237 

Precinct 2, Alexandria 2,019 2.498 

Precinct 3, Weavers l 967 1,164 

Precinct 4, Coldwater, including part of McFall town 1,769 1,795 

McFall town (part of) 338 

Total for McFall town, in precinct 4, Calhoun 

county, and precinct 2, Talladega county 820 

Perclnct 5, Polkville 600 802 

Precinct 6, Peeks Hill 583 886 

Precinct 7, Hollingsworth 1 777 971 

Precinct 8, Green's Schoolhouse - 806 1,086 

Precinct 9, Piedmont, including Piedmont village 2,331 1,677 

Piedmont village 1,745 711 

Precinct 10, Rabbit town 961 929 

Precinct 11, White Plains 1,232 1,300 

Precinct 12, Iron City , 1,208 1,326 

Precinct 13, Oxford, including Hobson city and Oxford ' 

town r 2,712 2,528 

Hobson oity — _ 292 

Oxford town 1,372 1,473 

Precinct 14, Sulphur Springs 882 857 

Precinct 15, Anniston, including Anniston city 11,008 10,918 

Anniston city 9,695 9,998 

Ward 1 2,683 

Ward 2 i 3,631 

Ward 3 1,634 

Ward 4 1,747 

Precinct 16, Ladiga i 693 631 

Precinct 17, De Armanville 1,181 1 168 

Precinct 18, Ohatchee 813 879 

Precinct 19, Duke 897 

Precinct 20, Oxanna, including Oxanna town 1,205 

Oxanna town 1,184 748 



Chambers county 32,554 26,319 

Precinct 1, Hickory Flat 2,268 2,206 

Precinct 2, Bloomingdale 1,733 1,663 

Precinct 3, Milltown 2,276 1,743 

Precinct 4, Trammells Crossroads - 1,850 % 1,737 

Precinct 5, Hamburg 2,672 2,353 

Precinct 6, Fredonia 2,033 2,146 

Precinct 7, Lanett, including Lanett town 4,455 1,975 

Lanett town 2.909 777 

Precinct 8, Lafayette, including Lafayette town 3,929 3,047 

Lafayette town 1,629 1,369 

Precinct 9, Ridge Grove 1,945 1,590 

Precinct 10, New Harmony 2,038 1,788 

Precinct 11, Oak Bowery 1,705 1,546 



POPULATION OF ALABAMA. 



197 



MINOR CIVIL DIVISIONS. 



1900 



1890 



Precinct 12, Cusseta 1,765 

Precinct 13, Bethlehem _!._ 3,885 

Cherokee county 21,096 

Precinct 1, Mud Creek 1,266 

Precinct 2, Rock Run 1,229 

Precinct 3, Tecumseh 1,312 

Precinct 4, Trammells Crossroads 1,85Q 

Precinct 5, Spring Creek 1,092 

Precinvt 6, Center, including Center town 1,903 

Center town 282 

Precinct 7, Coloma 933 

Precinct 8, Ballplay 900 

Precinct 9, Dixon 1,190 

Precinct 10, Round Mountain 1,069 

Precinct 11, Brindleys 679 

Precinct 12, Cedar Bluff 1,146 

Precinct 13, Gaylesville, including Gaylesville town 492 

Gaylesville town 1 266 

Precinct 14, Waterloo 945 

Precinct 15, Broointown , 731 

Precinct 16, Paden ; 886 

Precinct 17, Cedar Springs 862 

Precinct 18, Sterling 861 

Precinct 19, Stafford 607 

Precinct 20, Ellis ^ 605 

Precinct 21, Lewis 607 * 

Precinct 22, Leesburg 447 

Chilton county . 16,522 

Precinct 1, Mineral Springs 1,266 

Precinct 2, Jemison, including Jemison town : 1,512 

Jemison town __1 245 

Precinct 3, Benson 1,209 

Precinct 4, Clanton, including Clanton town '. 2,728 

Clanton town 611 

Precinct 5, Cooper 3,076 

Precinct 6, Kincheon 1,529 

Precinct 7, Maplesville 1,500 

Precinct 8, Stanton 2,396 

Precinct 9, Strasburg 1,306 

ChoctAw county 18,136 

Precinct 1 2,043 

Precinct 2 1,442 

Precinct 3 1,164 

Precinct 4 1,322 

Precinct 5 2,511 

Precinct 6 1,585 

Precinct 7 1,995 

Precinct 8 i 985 



1,736 
2,789 



20,459 

1,277 

1,229 

1,145 

1,737 

1,105 

1,909 

347 

938 

925 

1,439 

1,142 

473 

1,143 

591 

~T,127 
812 
786 
852 
985 
461 
716 



14,549 

1,078 
2,079 

"Y,590 
3,018 

623 
3,025 
1,038 

947 
1,774 



17,526 

1,747 
1,508 
1,203 
1,463 
2,885 
1,333 
2,098 
897 



198 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 



MINOR CIVIL DIVISION 8. 1900 1890 



Precinct 9 1,257 1,256 

Precinct 10 l 2,019 1,964 

Precinct 11 1,327 1,172 

Precinct 12 486 



Clarke county 27,790 22,624 

Precinct 1, Gainestown 2,231 1,518 

Precinct 2, Salt Works 1,747 1,717 

Precinct 3, Jackson, including Jackson village * 1,962 1,160 

Jackson village 1,039 

Precinct 4, Walker Springs 1,014 996 

Precinct 5, Suggsville 1,142 1,105 

Precinct 6, Gosport 882 721 

Precinct 7, McLeods 688 533 

Precinct 8, River Hill .__ 1,047 876 

Precinct 9, Good Springs 567 537 

Precinct 10, Grove Hill 2,859 2,163 

Precinct 11, Andersons 938 732 

Precinct 12, Gates 825 613 

Precinct 13,. Coffeeville 2,548 2,287 

Precinct 14, Clarkesville 810 621 

Precinct 15, New Prospect 321 387 

Precinct 16, Tallahatta Springs 598 607 

Precinct 17, i ane Creek 987 942 

Precinct 18, Pleasant Hill, including Fulton town 965 624 

Fulton town 140 

Precinct 19, Campbell 1,533 1,214 

Precinct 20, Bashi 767 859 

Precinct 21, Choctaw Corner, including Thomasville 

village 3,359 2,412 

Thomasville village 686 291 



Clay county 17,099 15,765 

Precinct 1, Delta 1,134 1,153 

Precinct 2, Copper Mine 817 

Precinct 3, Fox Creek 1,494 1,218 

Precinct 4, Wcsobulga 9(55 792 

Precinct 5, Cojeta 490 608 

Precinct 6. Ashland, including Ashland town 2,891 2,848 

Ashland town 422 635 

Precinct 7, Hollins, including Hollins town 759 873 

Hollins town 238 422 

Precinct 8, Brownville 818 . 718 

Precinct 9, McConathy 1,098 1,254 

Precinct 10, Wicker 1,358 1,238 

Precinct 11, Almond 1,102 1,096 

Precinct 12, Mountain 346 

Precinct 13, Lineville. including Lineville town 1,636 1,549 

Lineville town 211 234 

Precinct 14, Pinckneyville 939 929 

Precinct 15, Union 402 391 

Precinct 16, Bowden 255 

Precinct 17, Horse Creek 113 — 

Precinct 18, Poll Bridge -. 482 



POPULATION OF ALABAMA. 199 



MINOR CIVIL DIVISIONS. 1900 1890 



Cleburne county 13,206 13,218 

• 

Precinct 1, Borden 823 692 

Precinct 2, Oak Level 1,163 1,310 

Precinct 3, Muscadine, including Muscadine town 953 1,210 

Muscadine town 132 100 

Precinct 4, Courthouse, including Edwardsville town— 1,381 1,837 

Edwardsville town 448 446 

Precinct 5, Shoal Creek 229 264 

Precinct 6, Heflin, Including Heflin town 1,407 1,226 

Heflin town 460 383 

Precinct 7, Bells Mills 1 748 610 

Precinct 8, Abernathy •_ . 1,348 1,364 

Precinct 9, Lost Creek 1,734 1,309 

Precinct 10, Arbacoochee 896 1,046 

Precinct 11, Pine Knot 554 681 

Precinct 12, Chulaflnnee, including Chulafinnee town 1,040 1,465 

Chulafinnee town 34 

Precinct 13, Buckhorn 228 204 

Precinct 14, Kentuck 79 -- 

Precinct 15, Fruithurst, including Fruithurst town 623 — 

Fruithurst town 374 



Coffee county 1 , 20,972 12,170 

Precinct 1, Oldtown 478 425 

Precinct 2. Dannelly Crossroads 625 447 

Precinct 3, Brannen 801 632 

Precinct 4, Childersville 512 439 

Precinct 5. Tillnians Mill 468 352 

Precinct 6, Elba, including Elba town 2,144 1,285 

Elba town «_ 635 285 

Precinct 7, Peacock 2,035 1,152 

Precinct 8, Grant 1,458 828 

Precinct 9, Clintonville 2,099 864 

Precinct 10. Victoria 1,725 1,172 

Precinct 11. Simmons Mill 1,088 692 

Precinct 12, Centerville 1,177 857 

Precinct 13, Haw Ridge 280 195 

Precinct 14, Holley 690 373 

Precinct 15, Deanville 1,099 724 

Precinct 16, Kimmeys Mill 410 227 

Precinct 17, Enterprise, including Enterprise town 2,316 920 

Enterprise town 610 

Precinct 18, Paul 438 274 

Precinct 19, Carpenter 405 312 

Precinct 20, Parker 724 

Colbert COUNTY r 22,341 20,189 

Precinct 2, Tuscumbia, including Tuscumbia city 4,295 3,455 

Tuscumbia city 2,348 2,491 

Precinct 3, Barton 888 1,214 

Precinct 4, Cherokee, including Cherokee town 1,903 • 1,811 

Cherokee town 261 



200 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 



MI NOB CIVIL DIVISIONS. 1900 1890 



Precinct 5, Chickasaw 1,012 1,033 

Precinct 6, Dickson _ 841 998 

Precinct 7, Rock Creek 515 490 

Precinct 8, Srygley 328 446 

Precinct 9, Wheeler 844 853 

Precinct 10, Poplar Creek ^___ 516 1,294 

Precinct 11, Leighton, including Leighton town 2,700 1,018 

Leighton town 506 

Precinct 12, Camp Smith 317 652 

Precinct 13, Prides 582 627 

Precinct 14, Spring .Valley 986 1,051 

Precinct 15, Allsboro 651 725 

Precinct 16. Sheffield, including Sheffield city- 4,285 2,976 

Sheffield city 3,333 2,731 

Precinct 17, Alexander 742 

Precinct 18, Brickvllle . 936 



Conecuh County 17,514 14,594 

Precinct 1, Mixons 1,357 1,200 

Precinct 2, Fork of Sepulga 871 921 

Precinct 3, Mill 1,657 1,876 

Precinct 4, Bellville 1 1,938 1,460 

Precinct 5, Brushy Creek 753 745 

Precinct 6, Castleberry, including Castleberry town 1,415 1,738 

Castleberry town 167 

Precinct 7, Brooklyn 1,366 957 

Precinct 8, Jamestown 1,056 436 

Precinct 9, Oldtown 2,150 1,548 

Precinct 10, Gravella 1,192 1,494 

Precinct 11, Evergreen, including Evergreen town 2,458 1,783 

Evergreen town i 1,277 1,783 

Precinct 12, Sparta 174 173 

Precinct 13, Repton, including Repton town 598 263 

Repton town 170 _ 

Precinct 14, Callihan 529 __ ., 



Coosa county 16,144 15,906 

Precinct 1, Brooksville 1,048 943 

Precinct 2, Nixburg 1,527 1,392 

Precinct 3, Socapatoy 1,247 1,285 

Precinct 4, Goodwater, including Goodwater town 1,679 1,570 

Goodwater town 728 589 

Precinct 5, Mt. Olive 690 754 

Precinct 6, Hanover > 645 587 

Precinct 7, Rockford 1,547 1,691 

Precinct 8, McCords 763 813 

Precinct 9, Concord 565 817 

Precinct 10, Flint Hill 295 372 

Precinct 11, Weogufka 1,038 818 

Precinct 12, Jordan 771 682 

Precinct 13, Marble Valley 884 881 

Precinct 14, Lewis 549 480 



POPULATION OF ALABAMA. 201 



MINOR CIVIL DIVISIONS. 1900 1890 



Precinct 15, Travelers Rest 1376 1,295 

Precinct 16, Crews 578 504 

Precinct 17, Lauderdale _, 942 1,022 

• 

Covington county 15,346 7,536 

Precinct 1, Andalusia, including Andalusia town 2,051 1,371 

Andalusia town 551 270 

Precinct 2, Fairfield 1,036 583 

Precinct 3 Hallton 1.012 534 

Precinct 4, Rose Hill 940 1,293 

Precinct 5, Shirley 487 653 

Precinct 6, Loango ^ 622 356 

Precinct 7, Watkins 491 288 

Precinct 8, Davis Shop 694 290 

Precinct 9, Hughes 762 179 

Precinct 10, Hart 948 533 

Precinct 11, Westover 861 476 

Precinct 12, Red Level 783 643 

Precinct 13, Green Bay 748 337 

Precinct 14, Copperas Head '___ 924 

Precinct 15, Hamptonville 688 

Precinct 16, Straughns Schoolhouse 676 

Precinct 17, Williams 374 

Precinct 18, River Falls 286 

Precinct 19, George 423 

Crenshaw county 19,668 15,425 

Precinct 1, Surles 1,351 1,168 

Precinct 2, Danielville 867 645 

Precinct 3, Bradleyton . 1,688 1,130 

Precinct 4, Honoraville 931 906 

Precinct 5, Fullers Crossroads 1,226 1,141 

Precinct 6, Rutledge and Roberson, including Rutledge 

village ■ . 2,855 3,007 

Rutledge village 346 314 

Precinct 7, Dorman and Vidette 1,378 1,197 

Precinct 8, Leon 1,054 1,033 

Precinct 9, Mt. Ida, including Brantley town 1,607 800 

Brantley town 390 ,___ 

Precinct 10, New Providence 998 922 

Precinct 11, Bullock 1,509 1,402 

Precinct 12, Aiken 1,122 994 

Precinct 13, Saville 1,269 1,080 

Precinct 14, Luverne, including Luverne village 1,094 

Luverne village 731 451 

Precinct 15, Dozier 719 



Cullman county 17,849 13,439 

Precinct 1, Cullman, including Cullman city._ . 2,971 1,982 

Cullman city 1,255 1,017 

Precinct 2, Glasscock 558 427 



202 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 



MINOB CIVIL DIVISIONS. 1900 1890 



Precinct 3, Holly Pond, including Holly Pond town 1,842 896 

Holly Pond town 144 

Precinct 4, Pleasant Hill 781 1,223 

Precinct 5, Trimble 1,060 985 

Precinct 6, Livingstons 1,074 647 

Precinct 7, Dermids 900 658 

Precinct 8, Wilhites 791 728 

Precinct 9, Hunters , .. 785 470 

Precinct 10, Ebenezer _• 795 711 

Precinct 11, Holmes Gap ' 1,127 842 

Precinct 12, Brindleys .868 592 

Precinct 13, Baileyton 1,197 1,037 

Precinct 14, Dagnalls, Including Joppa town 1,181 1,038 

Joppa town j 130 *- 

Precinct 15, Boyds 623 531 

Precinct 16, Bremen 631 672 

Precinct 17, Bavars 665 



Dale county ■ 21,189 17,225 

Precinct 1, Ozark, Including Ozark village ^ 2,777 3,067 

Ozark village ^ 1,570 .1,195 

Ward 1 407 

Ward 2 188 

Ward 3 255 

Ward 4 436 

Ward 5 284 

Precinct 2, Westville 903 874 

Precinct 3, Daleville 2,540 1,786 

Precinct 4, Newton, including Newton and Pinckard 

towns 2,871 2,144 

Newton town 457 520 

Pinckard town ,— 711 

Precinct 5, Gilleys 1,385 935 

Precinct 6, Brannan Stand 1,395 990 

Precinct 7, Rocky Head 1,251 1,175 

Precinct 8, Midland City, including Midland City vil- 
lage — 1,572 1,241 

Midland City village _.__- 304 ,___ 

Precinct 9, Echo 1,446 1,525 

Precinct 10, Clopton 444 840 

Precinct 11, Skippervllle 1J40 1,552 

Precinct 12, Barnes Crossroads 1,411 1,096 

Precinct 13, Bells Schoolhouse 583 

Precinct 14, Ewells 871 

Dallas county 54,657 49,350 

i 

Precinct 1, Plantersville 860 674 

Precinct 2, Summerfield — 1,202 1,255 

Precinct 3, Woodlawn 1,309 994 

Precinct 4, Valley Creek 4,516 3,125 

Precinct 5, Harrells - 718 507 

Precinct 6, Dublin 700 601 

Precinct 7, Martins 2,376 1,797 



POPULATION OF ALABAMA. 203 



MINOR CIVIL DIVISIONS. 1900 1890 



Precinct 8, Orrville i 2,034 1,467 

Precinct 9, Lexington 2,444 1,873 

Precinct 10, River 2,109 1,848 

Precinct 11, Pine Flat 1,461 1,426 

Precinct 12, Oldtown 1,827 1,673 

Precinct 13, Pleasant Hill 1,633 1,687 

Precinct 14, Richmond 1,221 1,080 

Precinct 15, Portland 1,042 1,053 

Precinct 16, Cahaba 1,552 1,548 

Precinct 22, Burnsville 1 1,987 1,893 

Precinct 23, Union 2,614 2,613 

Precinct 24, Pences ___ : 1,261 1,332 

Precinct 25, Liberty Hill _^ 1,759 1,641 

Precinct 26, Bells 276 >__ 

Precinct 27, Vernon 1,299 992 

Precinct 28, Marion Junction 950 907 

Precinct 29, Browns ^ 1,766 2,341 

Precinct 30, Kings 1 1,202 1,473 

Precinct 31, Smyly 794 669 

Precinct 32, Elm Blnff 625 669 

Precinct 33, Carlowville 1,018 925 

Precinct 34, Boykins _-_ 916 794 

Precinct 35, Mitchells 2,473 2,348 

Precinct 36, coextensive with Selma city 8,713 7,622 

Selma city: 

Ward 1 1,949 

Ward 2 1,798 

Ward 3 1,350 

Ward 4 1,871 

Ward 5 1,745 



DeKalb county 23,558 21,106 

Precinct 1, Brlndleys 614 474 

Precinct 2, Walkers Chapel • 888 595 

Precinct 3, Brandon 199 227 

Precinct 4, Hendrixville 298 379 

Precinct 5, Van Buren 915 984 

Precinct 6, Collinsville, including Collinsville town 960 912 

Collinsville town ^ 524 367 

Precinct 7, Lebanon 824 716 

Precinct 8, Hudsons Mill 182 315 

Precinct 9, Fort Payne, including Fort Payne city 1.772 3,510 

Fort Payne city 1,037 2,698 

Precinct 10, Collins 425 448 

Precinct 11, Valley Head 692 644 

Precinct 12, Phillips 527 520 

Precinct 13, Sulphur Springs 733 612 

Precinct 14, Deerhead 748 608 

Precinct 15, Pine Grove 1,088 695 

Precinct 16, Blue Pond 1,007 802 

Precinct 17, Grahams 1.545 1,135 

Precinct 18, Lathamville 2,848 1,845 

Precinct 19, Poplar Springs 730 628 

Precinct 20, Moors 622 750 

Precinct 21, Ellisons 425 585 



204 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 



MINOB CIVIL DIVISIONS. 1900 1890 



Precinct 22, Portersville 400 394 

Precinct 23, Cnimleys 1,334 963 

Precinct 24, Whitons 1 955 756 

Precinct 25, Corinth 892 571 

Precinct 26, Lydia 067 385 

Precinct 27, Johnsons 934 653 

Precinct 28, Fishers Mill 334 

Elmore county 26,099 21,732 

Precinct 1, oolemans r 1,656 1,486 

Precinct 2, Channahatchee v 1.250 1,100 

Precinct 3, Tallassee 4,178 2,867 

Precinct 4, Mitchells Mill 1,219 938 

Precinct 5, Sandtuck 944 845 

Precinct 6, Central , 1472 976 

Precinct 7, Buyck T 1.189 1,213 

Precinct 8, Wetumpka, including part of Wetumpka 

city ^ 3,207 4,536 

Wetumpka city (part of) 62 

Total for Wetumpka city in precincts 8 and 18 562 619 

Precinct 9, Cold Spring ^ 2,009 1,389 

Precinct 10, Robinson Springs 769 638 

Precinct 11, Knights Mill 583 474 

Precinct 12, Weoka 1.W8 951 

Precinct 13, Good Hope 1450 847 

Precinct 14, New Hope 417 382 

Precinct 15, Eclectic 1.178 1,056 

Precinct 16, Edgewood 1.207 1,066 

Precinct 17, Elmore i. 215 ww 

Precinct 18, West Wetumpka, including part of We- 
tumpka city 1»JJJ0 

Wetumpka city (part of) -.— 500 

Escambia county i. 11,320 8*666 

Precinct 1, Pine Grove 843 690 

Precinct 2, Parker T 1»<*>3 1,029 

Precinct 3, Brewton, including Brewton town 3,240 A*wo 

Brewton town J.382 1,115 

Precinct 4, Pollard, Including Pollard village 1,639 1,469 

Pollard village 267 389 

Precinct 5, Owen l^J* JJJj 

Precinct 6, Jack Springs *«» «£ 

Precinct 7, Canoe UjgJ «» 

Precinct 8, Wilsons j**7 wz 

Precinct 9, Macedonia 285 

Etowah county : 27,361 21,926 

Precinct 1, Gadsden, including Gadsden town 4,753 6.056 

Gadsden town 4 '282 2,901 

Precinct 2, Phillips °lo 7/1 

Precinct 3, Kansas **° i£i 



POPULATION OP ALABAMA. 205 



MINOB CIVIL DIVISIONS. 1900 1890 



Precinct 4, Hokes Bluff 1,385 1,246 

Precinct 5, Ballplay 692 541 

Precinct 6, Turkeytown 1,006 1,202 

Precinct 7, Brocks 639 498 

Precinct 8, Fairview 386 445 

Precinct 9, Keener 449 419 

Precinct 10, Duck Springs — _ 1,054 969 

Precinct 11, Coxs 911 932 

Precinct 12, Chandler 522 496 

Precinct 13, Aurora ^ 963 707 

Precinct 14, Walnut Grove, including Walnut Grove 

town 1 587 698 

Walnut Grove town < 251 

Precinct 15, Clear Creek 463 914 

Precinct 16, Gum Springs 893 929 

Precinct 17, Attalla, including Attalla town 1,972 1,897 

Attalla town j__1 1,692 1,254 

Ward 1 293 

Ward 2 294 

Ward 3 358 

Ward 4 248 

Ward 5 499 

Precinct 18, Hoppers 377 290 

Precinct 19, Reaves 527 403 

Precinct 2a, Warriors 342 380 

Precinct 21, Short Creek 1,164 517 

Precinct 22, Howelton 366 419 

Precinct 23, Reese 369 520 

Precinct 24, Union 518 

Precinct 25. Keysburg 914 i_ 

Precinct 26, East Gadsden 768 

Precinct 27, Hollis 1,017 

Precinct 28, Gilberts . 695 

Precinct 29, Alabama City, including Alabama City 

town 2,429 

Alabama City town 2,276 

Ward 1 —_ 463 

Ward 2 586 

Ward 3 883 

Ward 4. 344 



Fayette county 14,132 12,823 

Precinct 1, Fayette, including Fayette town 2,098 1,737 

Fayette town 452 

Precinct 2, Ridge 447 490 

Precinct 3, North River __^ 697 &59 

Precinct 4, Berrys 421 641 

Precinct 5, Russell 974 879 

Precinct 6, Coles 599 655 

Precinct 7, Hico 768 761 

Precinct 8, Collins 500 500 

Precinct 9, Holly Springs, including Berry Station 

town 717 651 

Berry Station town 245 

Precinct 10, Lee 766 658 



206 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 



MINOB CIVIL DIVISIONS. 1900 1890 



Precinct 11, Browns 861 827 

Precinct 12, Websters 672 651 

Precinct 31, Boley Springs 482 513 

Precinct 13, Gilpin 861 691 

Precinct 15, Clear Creek 341 503 

Precinct 16, Thompsons 824 659 

Precinct 17, Stonewall 628 554 

Precinct 18, Bylor 651 594 

Precinct 19, *ords 482 

Precinct 20, Georges Creek 343 



Franklin county , 16,511 10,681 

Precinct 1, Newburg 1,656 1,227 

Precinct 2, Russellville, including Russellville town.. 5,122 2,988 

Russellville town - 1,602 920 

Ward 1 417 

Ward 2 315 

Ward 3 377 

Ward 4 493 

Precinct "3, Frankfort 777 825 

Precinct 4, Pleasant Site 1,024 924 

Precinct 5, Bear Creek 654 602 

Precinct 6, Burleson 920 480 

Precinct 7, Belgreen 1,565 1,833 

Precinct 8, Coles Mill 1,067 442 

Precinct 9, Mountain Springs 1,300 676 

Precinct 10, Isbell 1,058 684 

Precinct 11, Hills 342 

Precinct 12, Stouts 1,026 



Geneva county 19,096 10,690 

Precinct 1, Branton '__ 1,569 

Precinct 2, Garrards 1,261 

Precinct 3, Center _— 1,785 

Precinct 4, Wrights Creek _— 1,497 

Precinct 5, Dundee, including Dundee town 1,694 

Dundee town 249 

Precinct 6, Turners Mill 1,149 

Precinct 7, St. Paul, Including Hartford town 1,582 

Hartford town 382 

Precinct 8, Noblins 1,101 

Precinct 9, Campbells 1,050 

Precinct 10, Geneva, including Eunola and Geneva 

towns 2,111 

Eunola town 132 

Geneva town 1,032 637 

Precinct 11, Beaver Dam 774 

Precinct 12, Marl 418 

Precinct 13, Piney Grove 1,001 

Precinct 14, Gilmores 336 

Precinct 15, Elton 542 

Precinct 16, Hardys Bridge 886 

Precinct 17, Cowans 340 



POPULATION OF ALABAMA. 207 



MINOR CIVIL DIVISIONS. 1900 1890 



Greene county 1 , 24,182 22,007 

Precinct 1, Eutaw, including Eutaw town 3,995 3,344 

Eutaw town •- 884 1,115 

Precinct 2, Forkland t 2,944 3,359 

Precinct 3, Tishabee 1,820 1,684 

Precinct 4, Boligee 2,994 1,618 

Precinct 6, Mt. Hebron 1,629 1,663 

Precinct 7, Clinton 2,682 2,199 

Precinct 8, Pleasant Ridge 1,291 1,184 

Precinct 9, Mantua 1,448 1,166 

Precinct 10, Union 1,423 1,237 

Precinct 11, Knoxville 1,311 1,187 

Precinct 12, Springfield 1,404 1,060 

Precinct 13, West Greene - 1,241 1,119 

Hale county ^___ 31,011 27,501 

Precinct 1, Havana 1,048 1,950 

Precinct 2, Akron 1,090 1,028 

Precinct 3, Harrison 920 664 

Precinct 4, Greensboro, including Greensboro town_ 6,737 5,144 

Greensboro town _ 2,416 1,759 

Precinct 5, Newbern, Including Newbern town 1,628 2,509 

Newbern town , _ 564 

Precinct 6, Hollow Square „ 1,146 2,973 

Precinct 7, Cedarville 3,070 3,009 

Precinct 8, Gallion - 3,316 3,524 

Precinct 9, Laneville ' 2,305 2,931 

Precinct 10, Warrens Store 1,070 1,132 

Precinct 11, Five Mile 779 768 

Precinct 12, Moundville _^ 1,907 1,241 

Precinct 13, Phipps 400 331 

Precinct 14, Geddie 300 297 

Precinct 15, Whitsett 1,485 

Precinct 16, Stewarts Station 1,067 

Precinct 17, Monettes 2,410 __ _^ 

Precinct 18, Ingrems 333 

Henry county 36,147 24,847 

Precinct 1, Gordon, including Gordon village 2,028 1,545 

Gordon village 356 

Precinct 2, Cottonwood 1,836 1,114 

Precinct 3, Dothan, Including Dothan town 4,669 2,815 

Dothan town 3,275 247 

Ward 1 568 

Ward 2 720 

Ward 3 1,099 

Ward 4 888 

Precinct 4, Columbia, including Columbia town 3,763 3.774 

Columbia town 1,132 960 

Precinct 5, Hardwicksburg 1,311 1,436 

Precinct 6, Headland, including Headland and Kin- 

sey villages 2,970 1,980 



208 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 



MINOB CIVIL DIVISIONS. 1900 1890 



Headland village 602 

Kinsey village 342 

Precinct 7, Curetons 434 412 

Precinct 8, Capps 1,195 920 

Precinct 9, Abbeville, Including Abbeville town 2,639 1,826 

Abbeville town *. 889 465 

Precinct 10, Shortersville 1,684 1,886 

Precinct 11, Centervllle 1,348 1,303 

Precinct 12, Lawrenceville 1,142 1,283 

Precinct 13, Edwin 787 797 

Precinct 14, Granger and Crosby 1,641 1318 

Precinct 15, Levin 514 523 

Precinct 16, Balkum 1300 1,111 

Precinct 17, Fowlers Mill 1,419 804 

Precinct 18, Halesburg 873 

Precinct 19, Ashford, including Ashford village 1,521 

Ashford village ~— 286 __ 

Precinct 20, Cowarts _ 1,884 

Precinct 21, Newvllle 1,189 

Jackson county 30,508 28,026 

Precinct 1, Bridgeport, including Bridgeport town 1,936 1,131 

Bridgeport town 1,247 

Precinct 2, Bolivar 990 1,034 

Precinct 3, Stevenson, including Stevenson town 1,532 1,451 

Stevenson town 500 586 

Precinct 4, Carpenter 668 695 

Precinct 5, Kash : 943 943 

Precinct 6, Fackler T -~ 1,228 931 

Precinct 7, Bass 1.081 1,021 

Precinct 8, Cave Spring 648 533 

Precinct 9, Allison 560 477 

Precinct 10. Hollywood, including Hollywood town 1,868 1,519 

Hollywood town 168 

Precinct 11, Pisgah 1,082 772 

Precinct 12, Langston, including Langston town 676 

Langston town — 270 

Precinct 13, Tupelo 818 1,025 

Precinct 14, Larkinsville 1,236 1,157 

Precinct 15, Hunts Store 512 545 

Precinct 16, Woodville 773 i 819 

Precinct 17, Trenton — 729 502 

Precinct 18, Collins 853 1,160 

Precinct 19, Bishop 550 681 

Precinct 20, Kyle Spring 955 703 

Precinct 21, Scottsboro, including Scottsboro town 2,918 2,984 

Scottsboro town 1,014 959 

Precinct 22, Sanders 248 287 

Precinct 23, Paint Rock, including Paint Rock town 1,247 1,429 

Paint Rock town 394 

Precinct 24, Section 876 707 

Precinct 25, Harmony 419 395 

Precinct 26. Garth 486 520 

Precinct 27, Holly Tree 426 551 

Precinct 28, Button 1,146 764 



POPULATION OF ALABAMA. 209 



MINOR CIVIL DIVISIONS. 1900 1890 



Precinct 29, Gross Spring _ 058 586 

Percinct 30, Halgwood (549 

Precinct 31. Holly Spring 121 161 

Precinct 32, Llmrock ____ 1,161 1,244 

Precinct 33, Ha mbrick 178 

Precinct 34, Princeton 337 



Jefferson county 140,420 88,501 



Precinct 1 774 739 

Precinct 2 3,209 1,952 

Precinct 3 3,236 1.677 

Precinct 4 528 391 

Precinct 5 337 247 

Precinct 6 - 604 482 

Precinct 7 2.031 2,352 

Precinct 8 3.357 1,844 

Precinct 9 i - 7.227 4.570 

Precinct 10 2,400 2,079 

Precinct 11 1.597 1,424 

Precinct 12 1,358 1,218 

Precinct 13, including Trussvllle town 1,471 1,401 

Trussvl lie town 742 462 

Precinct 14 , 783 737 

Precinct 15 1.322 1,285 

Precinct 16. including Morris town 1.014 972 

Morris town 187 156 

Precinct 17, including Warrior town 2,533 3,968 

Warrior town 1.018 

Precinct 18, including Brookside and Cardiff towns 5,050 2,277 

Brookside town 658 380 

Cardiff town •_ 562 203 

Precinct 19 ^- 734 455 

Precinct 20, including part of Irondale town 1.8<>4 1.965 

Irondale town (part of) 498 

Total for Irondale town. In precincts 20 and 36 525 

Precinct 21, exclusive of part of Birmingham city 1,054 

Precinct 22 3.232 1,339 

Precinct 23 604 393 

Precinct 24 419 346 

Precinct 25 1,105 997 

Precinct 26 351 342 

Precinct 27 418 444 

Precinct 28 751 805 

Precinct 29, including Pratt City town 10.076 5.621 

Pratt City town 3,485 1,946 

Ward 1 877 

Ward 2 1,134 

Ward 3 611 

Ward 4 863 

Precinct 30 314 428 

Precinct 31 762 573 

Precinct 32 5(12 608 

Precinct 33, including Bessemer town 11,239 5.782 

Bessemer town 6.358 4,544 

Ward 1 1.023 

14 



210 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 



MINOR CIVIL DIVISIONS. 1900 1890 



Ward 2 „__. 2,492 

Ward 3 1,629 

Ward 4 1,214 

Precinct 34, Including Avondale and Woodlawn towns 8,989 4,957 

Avondale town 3,060 1»642 

Woodlawn town 2,848 1,506 

Precinct 35 681 542 

Precinct 36, including part of Irondale town 908 658 

Irondale town (part of) 27 

Precinct 37, exclusive of part of Birmingham city 1,716 

Precinct 38, including Graysville town 2.627 1.097 

Graysville town 319 

Precinct 39 2.241 

Precinct 40 1,509 

Precinct 41 343 ^ 

Precinct 42 3,126 

Precinct 43 •__ 247 ,. 

Precinct 44 757 „ 

Precinct 45, including Ensley City *_ 6,515 __. 

Ensley city 2,100 

Birmingham city 38,415 26,178 

Ward 1 4,842 

Ward 2 5,450 

Ward 3 1,986 

Ward 4 2,015 

Ward 5 6,«88 

Ward 6 2,949 

Ward 7 5,093 

Ward 8 5,260 

Ward 9 4,032 



Lamar county 16,084 14,187 

Precinct 1, Vernon, including Vernon town • 1,417 1,281 

Vernon town 291 192 

Precinct 2, Lawrence 984 805 

Precinct 3, SIzemore , 701 538 

Precinct 4, Brown 620 635 

Precinct 5, Goode 358 353 

Precinct 6, Henson 450 467 

Precinct 7, Mlllville 696 790 

Precinct 8, Pine Springs 607 509 

Precinct 9, Moscow, including Sulligent town 2,092 1,778. 

Sulligent town 303 

Precinct 10, Military Springs 800 716 

Precinct 11, Betts 851 869 

Precinct 12, Trulls 993 759 

Precinct 13, Vail — 714 613 

Precinct 14. Millport, including Millport town 815 710 

Millport town 357 244 

Precinct 15, Steen, including Kennedy town 754 736 

Kennedy town | 166 

Precinct 16, Strickland 1,113 998 

Precinct 17, Wilson 899 784 

Precinct 18, Ridge 895 846 

Precinct 19, Bell 325 



POPULATION OF ALABAMA. 211 



MINOR CIVIL DIVISIONS. 1900 1890 



Lauderdale county 26,559 23,739 

Precinct 1. Mitchells . 738 615 

Precinct 2, Rogersville 2,128 1,496 

Precinct 3, Lexington 935 940 

Precinct 4. Crossroads 1,347 1.106 

Precinct 5, Greenhill 1,535 1,486 

Precinct 6, Center Star l f 096 1,679 

Percinct 7, Poplar Springs 1,001 

Precinct 8, Blackburn ■ 840 1.020 

Precinct 9, St. Florian 718 

Precinct 10, Florence, including Florence city 8,265 8.310 

Florence city •„ 6,478 6,012 

Ward 1 481 

Ward 2 986 

Ward 3 652 

Ward 4 879 

Ward 5 1,267 

Ward 6 '_ 957 

Ward 7 1.256 

Precinct 11, Rawhide 1,339 1,481 

Precinct 12, Oakland 1.250 2,139 

Precinct 13, Woodland 1,222 

Precinct 14, Chapel '. 637 

Precinct 15, Gravelly Springs 845 1,961 

Precinct 16, Cave Springs 713 

Precinct 17, Waterloo 1,314 1,506 

Precinct 18, Spains 636 



Lawrence county 20,124 20,725 

Precinct 1, Hillsboro, including Hillsboro town 1,576 2,505 

Hillsboro town __— 256 .__ 

Precinct 2, Courtland, including Courtland town 2,720 3,284 

Courtland town 488 579 

Precinct 2V,. Town Creek, including Town Creek town 2,086 1988 

Town Creek town 280 201 

Precinct 3. Red Bank 831 1,544 

Precinct 4. Mountain Home 1,671 

Precinct 5, Wolf Spring 1,463 1,589 

Precinct 6. Mt. Hope 2.001 2,086 

Precinct 7, Moulton, including Moulton town 3,303 2,925 

Moulton town 290 

Precinct 8, Pinhook 1.503 1,273 

Precinct 9, Oakville 2,024 2,109 

Precinct 10, Morris Chapel 946 

Lee county 31,826 28,694 

Precinct 1. Beulah 1,094 1.274 

Precinct 2, Opelika, including Opelika city 7,790 6.875 

Opellka city 4,245 3,703 

Precinct 3, Ridge Grove 1,627 1,402 

Precinct 4, Bethels 1,062 957 

Precinct 5, Loachapoka 1,684 1,032 

Precinct 6, Auburn, including Auburn village 3,615 3,001 



212 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 



MINOR CIVIL DIVISIONS. 1900 1890 



Auburn village 1,447 1.440 

Precinct 7, Pierce Chapel 2.013 1.984 

Precinct 8, Salem „ 2,071 1,999 

Precinct 9, Meadows Crossroads __-l 1.230 1,007 

Precinct 10. Phoenix, Including Phoenix city M37 5,117 

Phoenix city 4,103 3,700 

Ward 1 N ____1.466 

Ward 2 746 

Ward 3 450 

Ward 4 874 

Ward 5 627 

Precinct 11, Wacoochee 1,203 1,251 

Precinct 12, Sears Crossroads 1,022 1.016 

Precinct 13, Floyds Mill *_ 1.167 . 1,119 

Precinct 14, Smiths Station 1,781 



Limestone county _ 22,387 21,201 

Precinct 1, Athens, including Athens town 3.333 3,099' 

Athens town 1,010 940 

Precinct 2, Shoalford 1.443 1,198 

Precinct 3, Sand Springs _i 1,091 1.237 

Precinct 4, Pettusville 1 1,159 2,498 

Precinct 5, Gllbertsboro 1,298 . 1,621 

Precinct 6, Wickham 1,419 1,242 

Precinct 7, Pleasant Grove 1,244 1,263 

Precinct 8, Big Creek 1.262 1.244* 

Precinct 9, Georgia 1.590 1,482 

Precinct 10. Slough 1.763 1,444 

Precinct 11, Mooresvllle, including Mooresvllle town-- 1,711 1,664 

Mooresville town 150 143 

Precinct 12, Richland 1,024 950 

Precinct 13, Greenbrier 1,209 1,049 

Precinct 14, Quid Nunc . 1.358 1,210 

Precinct 15, Elkmont, Including Elkmont town 1,483 

Elkmont town 174 



Lowndes county 35,651 31,550 

Precinct 1, Benton 1,094 942 

Precinct 2, Church Hill 1,240 1.034 

Precinct 3, Collirene 1,882 1,794 

Precinct 4, Gordonsvllle 1 2,391 2,087 

Precinct 5, Farmersville 634 903 

Precinct 6, Braggs Store 770 1,136 

Precinct 7, Hickory Hill 998 719 

Precinct 8, Hopewell 1 1,140 709 

Precinct 9. Mt. Willing . : 2,072 1,862 

Precinct 10, Fort Deposit, including Fort Deposit town 2,963 ' 2,573 

Fort Deposit town 1,078 518 

Precinct 11, Sandy Ridge 2,873 2.317 

Precinct 12, Brooks 2,421 1,905 

Precinct 13, Prairie Hill • 804 814 

Precinct 14, Hayneville 2,289 2,242 

Precinct 15, Letohatchie 1,981 1,638 

Precinct 16, Steep Creek 1,518 1,432 



/ 



POPULATION OF ALABAMA. 213 



MINOR CIVIL DIVISIONS. 1900 1890 



Precinct 17, Pintlala 2.172 2,037 

Precinct 18, Lowndesboro 2.618 2,983 

Precinct 19. St. Clair 1,392 1,277 

Precinct 20, White Hall 1,174 1,146 

Precinct 21, Wyndham 1,159 



i 



Macon county 23,126 18,439 

Precinct 1, Tuskegee, including Tuskegee town 5,737 4,600 

Tuskegee town 2,170 1,803 

Precinct 2, Little Texas 797 524 

Precinct 3. Society Hill 1.896 1.748 

Precinct 4, Warrior Stand 3,127 2,700 

Precinct 5. Cotton Valley 2,775 1,910 

Precinct 0. Honey Cut, including Hardaway village.- 1,957 1,279 

Hardaway village 200 

Precinct 7. Cross Keys 2,040 1,726 

Precinct 8, Franklin 1,178 947 

Precinct 9, Notasulga 2,568 2,120 

Precinct 10, La Place _„ 1,051 885 

Madison county 43,702 38,119 

Precinct 1. Huntsvllle, including Huntsville town 14,642 9,196 

Huntsvllle town 8.008 7,995 

Ward 1 - 1,878 

Ward 2 2.758 

Ward 3 1,409 

Ward 4 2,023 

Precinct 2. Newmarket 1.497 1,887 

Precinct 3, Maysville 1,963 2,682 

Precinct 4. Colliers 1.353 1,009 

Precinct 5, Vienna, including New Hope town 1.426 1,283 

New Hope town 208 

Precinct 6, Whltesburg 2.247 2.059 

Precinct 7, Triana 1,736 1,823 

/Precinct 8, Madison, including Madison town 1,862 1,619 

Madison town 412 

Precinct 9, Cluttsville 1.872 1,775 

Precinct 10, Madison Crossroads l 1.039 1,257 

Precinct 11, Merldianville 2,747 2,893 

Precinct 12. Hazel Green 1.550 2,158 

Precinct 13. Poplar Ridge 1.004 980 

Precinct 14. Wells 319 336 

Precinct 15, Gurley, including Gurley town 1,628 1,248 

Gurley town 831 570 

Precinct 16, Deposit 1,045 1,510 

Precinct 17, Plevna 595 632 

Precinct 18, Clouds Cove 258 308 

Precinct 19, Owens Crossroads 1,073 961 

Precinct 20. Monrovia ' 1.703 1.479 

Precinct 21. Hurricane 1.071 

Precinct 22, Sulphur Springs 952 •— 



2H OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 



MINOR CIVIL DIVISIONS. 1900 1890 



Marengo county 38,315 33,095 

Precinct 1, Macon 2,258 1,968 

Precinct 2, Demopolis, including Deinopolis city 5,130 4,023 

Demopolis city 2,606 1,898 

Precinct 3, Jefferson 2,054 2,523 

Precinct 4, Spring Hill 1,899 2,599 

Precinct 5, Dayton, including Dayton village 3,151 2,891 

Dayton village 427 412 

Precinct 6, Faunsdale, including Faunsdale village 3,575 3,020 

Faunsdale village 333 211 

Precinct 7, McKinley - 2,129 3,173 

Precinct 8, Linden — 2,612 2,454 

Precinct 9, Hills 1,976 1,745 

Precinct 10, Nanafalia 1,333 1,050 

Precinct 11, Dlxons Mills 1,237 1,148 

Precinct 12, Shiloh 2,397 2,006 

Precinct 13, 'Hamden 1,536 933 

Precinct 14, Horse Creek 777 787 

Precinct 15, Pineville 1,175 881. 

Precinct 16. Sweetwater 1,521 1,124 

Precinct 17, Hoboken 843 770 

Precinct 18, Jacksons Store 964 

Precinct 19, Thoinastou 1,748 

Marion county - 14,494 11,347 

Precinct 1, Hamilton, including Hamilton town 1,667 1,525 

Hamilton town . 235 

Precinct 2, Rye 709 562 

Precinct 3, Camp 338 362 

Precinct 4, Bexar . 907 882 

Precinct 5, Shottsville 683 579 

Precinct 6, Reids 831 429 

Precinct 7, Haekleburg 1,142 782 

Precinct 8, Goddard 906 603 

Precinct . 9, Kimbro 814 491 

Precinct 10, Howells 643 545, 

Precinct 11, Pearces Mills 659 578 

Precinct 12, Clarks 586 498 

Precinct 13, Baccus 825 691 

Precinct 14, Winfleld, including Winfleld town 2,016 1,205 

• Winfleld town 316 

Precinct 15, Guin, including Guin town 1,151 1,048 

Guin town 249 

Precinct 16, Pikeville 617 567 

Marshall county 23,289 18,935 

Precinct 1. Guntersville, including Guntersville and 

Wyeth City towns 1 1,240 1,277 

Guntersville town 618 471 

Wyeth City town 299 

Precinct 2, Crossroads 374 311 

Precinct 3, Big Spring 274 262 



POPULATION OF ALABAMA. 215 



MI NOB CIVIL DIVISIONS. 1900 1890 



Precinct 4, Albertvllle 2,479 1,388 

Precinct 5, Jay Bird . 651 495 

Precinct 6, Wakefield - 620 742 

Precinct 7, Claysville 622 656 

Precinct 8, Bosharts 517 851 

Precinct 9, Kennamers 500 • 613 

Precinct 10. Honeycomb . — 424 373 

Precinct 11, Paint Rock 723 745 

Precinct 12, Oleander 1,884 1,523 

Precinct 13, Rock Spring 1,040 755 

Precinct 14, WaTreuton 1,386 1,266 

Precinct 15, Red Hill 491 450 

Precinct 16, Friendship 1,787 1,361 

Precinct 17, Kirbys . 1,006 1,079 

Precinct 18. Thompsons 1,278 1,159 

Precinct 19, Bucksnort 576 567 

Precinct 20, Red Apple, including Boaz town ^— 1,444 988 

Boaz town 253 — , 

Precinct 2% Crawford 1,536 1,238 

Precinct 22, Reed Brake 1,061 836 

Precinct 23, Wrights 498 

Precinct 24, Hooper 878 

Mobile county 62,740 51,587 

Precinct 1, Citronelle, including Citronelle village 1,800 1,228 

Citronelle village 696 

Precinct 2, >It. Vernon 1,277 1,918 

Precinct 3, Beaver Meadow . 586 500 

Precinct 4, Andrew Malones 444 344 

Precinct 5, Creola , 459 331 

Precinct 6. Mauvilla 728 867 

Precinct 7, Albrittons 454 853 

Precinct 8, Carvers 620 565 

Precinct 9, Whistler „_ 3,432 2,363 

Precinct 10, Kosters 1,465 1,195 

Precinct 11, Napoleonville 1,281 897 

Precinct 12, Spring Hill 699 802 

Precinct 13, Wheelerville 601 872 

Precinct 14, McGills 204 339 

Precinct 15, Grand Bay 578 661 

Precinct 16, St. Elmo 456 370 

Precinct 17, Theodore 759 744 

Precinct 18, Bayou Le Batre 551 501 

Precinct 19, Heron Bayou and Dauphin Island 622 458 

Precinct 20, Henry Malones -- 205 285 

Precinct 21, Red Store 1,244 1,081, 

Precinct 22, Bairds Mill 325 2^0 

Precinct 23, Alonzo Thomas Store 455 157 

Precinct 24, Henry Pierces _ 400 — 

Precinct 25, Coden 332 __ 

Precinct 26, Crawfords -— 427 — . 

Precinct 27, Garritys 1»046 

Precinct 28, Howells 328 

Mobile city 38,469 31,076 

Ward 1 4,670 

Ward 2 876 



216 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 



MINOR CIVIL DIVISIONS. 1900 1890 



Ward 3 811 

Ward .4 . 1,656 

Ward 5 3,436 

Ward 6 7,245 

W T ard 7 9,390 

Ward 8 10,385 

Not included In precincts 2,493 1,648 



Monroe county 



Precinct 1, Mt. Pleasant 

Precinct 2, Claiborne 

Precinct 3. Monroeville, Including Monroeville village. 

Monroeville village 

Precinct 4, Burnt Corn 

Precinct 5, Kempville 

Precinct 6, Ridge 

Precinct 7, McKinleys 

Precinct 8, Bells Landing 

Precinct 9, Germany 

Precinct 10, Pinevllle 

Precinct 11, Old Texas 

Precinct 12, Midway 

Precinct 13 



23,666 


18,990 


1,348 


830 


2,745 


2,802 


3,394 


2,286 


422 . 




1,006 


812 


1,962 


634 


1,101 


993 


2,252 


2,009 


1,887 


1,639 


1,837 


1,717 


1,963 


1,620 


999 


1,110 


1,340 


1,369 


1,832 . 





Montgomery county 72,047 56,172 

Precinct 1, comprising ward 1, Montgomery city 4,026 

Precinct 2, comprising ward 2, Montgomery city 6,437 

Precinct 3, comprising ward 3, Montgomery city 3,029 

Precinct 4, comprising ward 4, Montgomery city 8.424 _: 

Precinct 5, comprising ward 5, Montgomery city 5,070 

Precinct 6. comprising ward 6, Montgomery city 2,760 

Total for Montgomery city, coextensive with pre- 
cincts 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 30,346 21,883 

Ward 1 4,026 

Ward 2 6,437 

Ward 3 3,629 

Ward 4 8.424 

Ward 5 5,070 

Ward 6 2,7(50 

Precinct 7, Pike Road 3,100 

Precinct 8, Dooley 2,305 

Precinct 9, McGehee 3,562 

Precinct 10, Killpugh 3,039 

Precinct 11, Robertson Crossroads 3,089 

Precinct 12, Porters 3.4(55 

Precinct 13, Pine Level 1,039 

Precinct 14, Dublin 1.842 

Precinct 15, Tuckers 2.857 

Precinct 16, Union Academy 2,077 

Precinct 17, Highland Park, coextensive with Highland 

Park town 407 

Precinct 18, Old Elam 3,484 

Precinct 19, Kendall 4,237 



\ 



POPULATION OF ALABAMA. 



217 



MINOR CIVIL DIVISIONS. 



1900 



1890 



Precinct 20, Walkers 3,226 

Precinct 21, Mount Meigs 3,252 

Morgan county 28,820 

rrecinct 1, Decatur, Including Decatur city 4,159 

Decatur city 3,114 

Precinct 2, Lanes 691 

Precinct 3, Danville X130 

Precinct 4, Cedar Plains 1.159 

Precinct 5, Falkville, including Falkville town 2,548 

Falkville town 343 

Precinct 6, Lawrence Cove (544 

Precinct 7, Apple Grove 492 

Precinct 8, Valhermosa Springs 2,051 

Precinct 9, Somerville 2,109 

Precinct 10, Hartsell, including Hartsell town 2,563 

Hartsell town 070 

Precinct 11, Trinity, including Trinity town 1,440 

Trinity town 191 

Precinct 12, Carters 883 

Precinct 13, Flint, including Flint town 1,092 

Flint town 229 

Precinct 14, Xunns Mill 436 

Precinct 15, Wolf 599 

Precinct 16, Shady Grove 729 

Precinct 17, Eva 396 

Precinct 18, Ryans Crossroads . 470 

Precinct 19, New Decatur, including New Decatur city 5,169 

New Decatur city 4,437 

Ward 1 414 

Ward 2 : 1,615 

Ward 3 1,309 

Ward 4 1,099 

Perry county . 31,783 

Precinct 1, Marion, Including Marion town 5,078 

Marlon town 1.698 

Precinct 2, Hamburg 2,145 

Precinct 3, Unioutown, including Uniontown town 4,504 

Uniontown town 1 1,047 

Precinct 4, Scotts 3,086 

Precinct 5, Cleveland 817 

Precinct 6, Brush Creek 854 

Precinct 7, Oldtown 1,967 

Precinct 8, Severe 1,300 

Precinct 9, Pinetucky 1,020 

Precinct 10, Heards 599 

Precinct 11, Perryville 1,300 

Precinct 12, Radfordville 1.380 

Precinct 13, Oak Grove 1.265 

Precinct 14, Cunningham 1,937 

Precinct 15, Walthall* 2.323 

Precinct 16, Popes 2,208 



24,089 

6,903 
2,705 
599 
1,037 
1,237 
2,172 

"523 

945 

1,836 

"2,192 

596 

1,443 

"949 
963 



485 
641 
237 



3,565 



29,332 

5,289 
1,982 
1,702 

"""854 

2,746 

726 

874 

1.659 

1,091 

874 

695 

1.210 

1,044 

1.180 

1,732 

1,811 



218 



OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 



MINOR CIVIL DIVISIONS. 



JL900 



1890 



Pickens county 24,402 



Precinct 1, Shelton 

Precinct 2, Palmetto 

Precinct 3, Vail 

Precinct 4, Providence 

Precinct 5, Henry 

Precinct 6, Yorkville — 

Precinct 7, Beard 

Precinct 8, Reform, including Reform town 

Reform town 

Precinct 9, Corrs - 

Precinct 10, Gordo 

Precinct 11, Bostic 

Precinct 12, Spring Hill 

Precinct 13, Pickensville, including Pickensville town. 

Pickensville town , 

Precinct 14, Carrollton, including Carrollton town 

Carrollton town 

Precinct 15, Speeds Mills 

Precinct 16, Raleigh 

Precinct 17, Pleasant Grove 

Precinct 18, Olney 

Precinct 19, Franconia 

Precinct 20, Memphis 

Precinct 21, Fairfield 

Precinct 22, Vienna, including Vienna town 

Vienna town 

Precinct 23, Bethany 

Precinct 24, Pine Grove *. _ 

Precinct 25, Whitten 



715 
610 
594 
499 

1,502 

1,219 
818 

1,240 
198 
902 

1,345 
832 
611 

2,010 
241 

1,565 
278 
586 
754 
231 
800 

2,013 
784 

1,296 

745 

74 

1,173 
578 
980 



22,470 

587 
507 
600 
456 
1,230 
1,139 
722 
733 

~716 

931 

556 

1,254 

1,782 

T.415 

""480 
628 
221 
847 
1,947 
594 
3,187 
817 

T,121 



Pike county 29,172 24,423 



Precinct 1, Troy, including Troy city 

Troy city 

Ward 1 1,026 



Ward 
Ward 
Ward 
Ward 



2 
3 
4 
5 



875 
553 
673 
612 



Ward 6 — 358 

Precinct 2, Orion 

Precinct 3, China Grove 

Precinct 4, Oates Crossroads 

Precinct 5, Monticello 

Precinct 6, Tanyard, including Banks town 

' Banks town 

Precinct 7, Dixon, including Brundidge town 

Brundidge town 

Precinct 8, Grimes 

Precinct 9, Darbys 

Precinct 10, Goshen Hill 

Precinct 11, Mitchells 

Precinct 12, Josie 

Precinct 13, Linwood 



6,767 
4,097 



5,156 
3,449 



1,966 


1,829 


899 


892 


1.472 


1,373 


1,091 


978 


1,352 


1,164 


198 . 




3,385 


2,967 


537 . 




1,495 


1,198 


2,177 


1,855 


1,681 


1,351 


1,446 


1.157 


1,472 


1,290 


769 


585 



POPULATION OF ALABAMA. 219 



MI nor "civil DIVISIONS. 1900 1890 



Precinct 14, Spring Hill 1,721 1,527 

Precinct 15, Indian Branch 1,479 1,101 



* 



Randolph county 21,647 17,219 

Precinct 1, Saxons 800 1,147 

Precinct 2, Morrisons 1.005 1,073 

Precinct 3, Rockdale — — 1,411 1,047 

Precinct 4, Lamar 2,472 1,772 

Precinct 5, Bnrsons 2,115 1,769 

Precinct 6, Wedowee 2,997 2,093 

Precinct 7, Fox Creek 981 822 

Precinct 8, Flat Rock 1,157 985 

Precinct 9. Louina _. — 1,510 1,377 

Precinct 10, Roanoke, including 'Roanoke town 3,007 1,901 

Roanoke town 1.155 631 

Precinct 11, Rock Mills, including Rock Mills town 1,505 1,333 

Rock Mills town 420 385 

Precinct 12, Bacon Level 1,031 1,093 

Precinct 13, Halpins 752 807 

Precinct 14, Pine Hill 904 

Russell county 27,083 24,093 

Precinct 1, Girard, including Girard city 6,440 5,486 

Girard city 3,840 — 

Ward 1 923 

Ward 2 — 600 

Ward 3 594 

Ward 4 519 

Ward 5 612 

Ward 6 592 

Precinct 2, Crawford — - 1.783 2,129 

Precinct 3, Marvyn 2,216- 2,412 

Precinct 4, Uchee 1,740 1,786 

Precinct 5, Hurtsboro, including Hurtsboro town 2,331 1,913 

Hurtsboro town 407 433 

Precinct 6, Hatchechubbee 1,493 1,569 

Precinct 7, Seale, including Seale town 4,358 3,126 

Seale town 386 299 

Precinct 8, Oswichee 2,695 1.926 

Precinct 9, Jernigan 1.699 1,589 

Precinct 10, Glennville 2,328 2,157 

St. Claib county 19.425 17,353 

Precinct 1, Ashville, including Ashville town 2,446 2,017 

Ashville town > — 362 

Precinct 2, Oldtown 719 613 

Precinct 3, Brauchville 1,278 1,047 

Precinct 4, Springville, Including Springville town 2,210 1,058 

Springville town 496 

Precinct 5, Slate 466 410 

Precinct 6, Steels Depot 944 796 

Precinct 7, Ferguson : — 356 344 

Precinct 8, Greensport 704 817 

Precinct 9, Ragland, including Ragland town — — 1,135 1,422 



220 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 



MINOR CIVIL DIVISIONS. 1900 1890 



Ragland town 309 

Precinct 10, Coal City, including Coal City town 1,527 1,290 

Coal City town 509 

Precinct 11, Seddon, Including Seddon town 540 1,549 

Seddon town 229 _-.. 

Precinct 12, Easonvllle 1,129 1,314 

Precinct 13, Kellys Creek 649 599 

Precinct 14, Dunlap 435 404 

Precinct 15, Eden, including Eden and Pell City towns— 868 » 886 

Eden town 177 

Pell City town 98 

Precinct 16, Cooks Springs 498 564 

Precinct 17, Moody __' 811 805 

Precinct 18, Caldwell 634 518 

Precinct 19, Cropwell 811 

Precinct 20, Riverside, including Riverside town 892 

Riverside town 300 

Precinct 21, Fairview 373 

• 

Shelby county r 23,684 20,886 

Precinct 1, Columbiana, Including Columbiana town — 3,502 3,295 

Columbiana town 1,075 654 

Precinct 2, Spring Creek 770 994 

Precinct 3, Calera, including Calera town 1,703 1,923 

Calera town _•____. 770 753 

Precinct 4, Montevallo 3,308 2,477 

Precinct 5, Tylers 420 991 

Precinct 6, Helena 1,495 1.307 

Precinct 7, Elliottsville 1,931 1,144 

Precinct 8, Yellowleaf 1.174 1,101 

Precinct 9, Wilsonville, including Wilsonville town 2,192 1,706 

Wllsonville town . 1.095 

Precinct 10, Harpersville 2,080 1,921 

Precinct 11, Spearmans 769 601 

Precinct 12, Highland - 444 484 

Precinct 13. Bold Springs 1 418 354 

Precinct 14, Vandiver 550 1,373 

Precinct 15, Sterrett 727 

Precinct 16, Kellys Creek, including Vincent town 1.348 722 

Vincent town 765 __ 

Percinct 17, Pelham — ^ 602 493 

Precinct 18, Dunnavant 351 

Sumter county __^ 32,710 29,574 

Precinct 1. Blacks Bluff 1,091 916 

Precinct 2, Gaston 647 601 

Precinct 3, Thornville 911 881- 

Precinct 4, Earbees 974 946 

Precinct 5. Intercourse 934 823 

Precinct 6, York, including York town 2,243 1,886 

York town 528 415 

Precinct 7, Livingston, including Livingston town 3,389 3,418 

Livingston town : 851 850 



POPULATION OF ALABAMA. 221 



MI NOB CIVIL DIVISIONS. 1900 1890 



Precinct 8. Brewersville — , 2,293 1,973 

Precinct 9, Belmont . 1,888 1,970 

Precinct 10, Bluffport 835 711 

Precinct 11, Jones Bluff, including Epes town 2,417 2,554 

Epes town 331 

Precinct 12, Sumterville -J-' 2,735 2.495 

Precinct 13, Payneville 1,118 1.046 

Precinct 14. Gainesville, Including Gainesville town 2,620 2,262 

Gainesville town 817 1,017 

Precinct 15, Lacey _ 1,951 1,569 

Precinct 16, Preston 1,497 1,167 

Precinct 17. Hares 1,169 847 

Precinct 18. Cuba, including Cuba town i 1,419 1,189 

Cuba town 384 265 

Precinct 19, Warsaw 2,059 1,811 

Precinct 20, Cotohaga 520 509 



Talladega county 35,773 29,346 

Precinct 1, Blue Eye 2,811 2,354 

Precinct 2, Estaboga, including Estaboga town and 

part of McFall town 1,675 1,359 

Estaboga town 398 

McFall town (part of) 482 

(For total, see precinct 4, Calhoun county.) 

Precinct 3, Silver Run 1 1,571 2,427 

Precinct 4. Chinnabee, including Ironaton town : _ 1,738 

Ironaton town 735 5<>2 

Precinct 5. Talladega, including Talladega city 6,897 5,350 

Talladega city 5,056 2,063 

Precinct 6, Alpine 1,308 1.546 

Precinct 7, Cast, including Renfroe village 1,231 1,346 

Renfroe village 180 202 

Precinct 8, Kymulga 1,573 1,701 

Precinct 9, Wewoka 1,700 1.730 

Precinct 10, Fayetteville .__ 2,532 2,234 

Precinct 11, Sylacauga, Including Sylacauga town 4,055 2,618 

Sylacauga town 880 464 

Precinct 12. Childersburg, including Childersburg town 1,993 2,157 

Childersburg town . 372 777 

Precinct 13, Emauhee _. 1,344 634 

Precinct 14. Chandler Springs 689 

Precinct 15, Kentuck :„ 193 537 

Precinct 16, Mardisville 1.049 327 

Precinct 17, Howell Cove - 1,433 948 

Precinct 18, Munford, including Jenifer town 1,981 

Jenifer town 331 323 



Tallapoosa county 29,675 25,460 

Precinct 1. Gold Branch 1.990 1,880 

Precinct 2. Alexander, including Alexander city 3,822 3,146 

Alexander city 1,061 679 

Precinct 3, Hackneyville 2,071 1.812 

Precinct 4, Poplar Springs 1,237 1,063 



222 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 



MI NOB CIVIL DIVISIONS. 1900 1890 



Precinct 5, New Site 1,468 1,123 

Precinct 6, Eagle Creek 1,519 1,340 

Precinct 7, Dadeville, including Dadeville town 2,869 2,336 

Dadeville town 1,136 873 

Precinct 8, Oakfuska 406 371 

Precinct 9, Red Ridge 815 756 

Precinct 10, Eufaula 657 605 

Precinct 11, Walnut Hill = _«_. 639 607 

Precinct 12, Reeltown 3,137 1,747 

Precinct 13, Church Hill 721 720 

Precinct 14, Rome 1,654 1,479 

Precinct 15. Camp Hill, including Camp Hill village 1,921 1,459 

Camp Hill village 686 366 

Precinct 16, Dudleyville 1.790 1,551 

Precinct 17, Daviston 1,940 2,470 

Precinct 18, Jacksons Gap 1,019 995 



Tuscaloosa county . 36,147 30,352 

Precinct 1, Windham Springs 728 496 

Precinct 2, New Lexington 547 768 

Precinct 3, Moores Bridge 692 612 

Precinct 4, Marcumville 1,163 939 

Precinct 5, Ackers 425 347 

Precinct 6, Hassell 496 414 

Precinct 7, Cowden (or Dodson) 917 909 

Precinct 8, Mitchell 457 381 

Precinct 9, Hughes 1,009 916 

Precinct 10, Northport, including Northport town 2,666 2,462 

Northport town 424 413 

Precinct 11, Brookwood 2,510 473 

Precinct 12, Parsons 1,367 632 

Precinct 13, Vance 712 728 

Precinct 14, Jones (or Smiths) 433 867 

Precinct 15, Cottondale 1,990 2,248 

Precinct 16, Courthouse, including Tuscaloosa city 9,194 7,436 

Tuscaloosa city 5,094 4,215 

Ward 1 1,089 

Ward 2 798 

Ward 3 384 

Ward 4 311 

Ward 5 290 

Ward 6 2,222 

Perinct 17, Hickmans 1,029 994 

Precinct 18, Friersons _ 1,627 1,438 

Precinct 19, Blockers * 1,221 1,024 

Precinct 20, Crossland , 1 637 523 

Precinct 21, Romulus 706 616 

Precinct 22, Fosters 1,368 1,270 

Precinct 23, Koeppell 309 567 

Precinct 24, Reese 809 602 

Precinct 25, Mulenax 449 380 

Precinct 26. Coker 1.076 911 

Precinct 27, Taylorville 1,178 1,399 

Precinct 28, McDuff 432 



POPULATION OF ALABAMA. 



223 



MI NOB CIVIL DIVISIONS. 



1900 



1890 



Walker county 25,162 16,078 

Precinct 1, Jasper, Including Jasper town 3,088 2,334 

Jasper town 1,661 780 

Precinct 2, South Lowell — 445 388 

Precinct 3, Zion 764 621 

Precinct 4, Oagles 1,119 606 

Precinct 5, Carbon Hill, including Carbon Hill town 3,798 1,799 

Carbon Hill town . 8S0 568 

Precinct 6, Townly, including Townly town 1,122 719 

Townly town 124 

Precinct 7, Beach Grove — 499 584 

Precinct 8, Pleasant Grove 537 716 

Precinct 9, Oakman, including Oakman town 2,032 1,406 

Oakman town 503 421 

Precinct 10, High Hill * 849 769 

Precinct 11, Good Springs 839 632 

Precinct 12, Cordova, including Cordova town 2,007 702 

Cordova town 567 ,__ 

Precinct 13, Horse Creek, including Horse Creek town 2,010 1,399 

Horse Creek town 385 

Precinct 14, Bartonville 768 583 

Precinct 15, Bryan 551 401 

Precinct 16, Dorris 793 641 

Precinct 17. Turpentine 793 432 

Precinct 18, Corona, including Deer Creek town ,. 2,332 1,346 

Deer Creek town 332 

Precinct 19. Alabama 213 

Precinct 20, i leasant Field _ 339 

Precinct 21, Ebenezer .. 264 

Washington county 11,134 

Precinct 1, St. Stephens 1,506 

Precinct 2, Thompson 194 

Precinct 3, Frankville 989 

Precinct 4. Koenton 760 

Precinct 5. Healing Springs 1,284 

Precinct (\ Grantsboro 410 

Precinct 7, Yellow Pine 911 

Precinct 8, Reeds . 247 

Precinct 9, Escatawpa 406 

Precinct 10. Deer Park 829 

Precinct 11, Sims Chapel 520 

Precinct 12, Fairford 480 

Precinct 13, Malcolm 312 

Precinct 14, Mcintosh 950 

Precinct 15, Sunflower 1,336 

Wilcox county 35,631 30,816 

Precinct 1, Camden, including Camden town 2,139 2,624 

Camden town 478 545 



} 
} 



7,935 



1,909 



1,603 



1,743 



2,680 



224 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 



MINOR CIVIL DIVISIONS. 1900 1890 



Precinct 2, Canton 1,876 1,487 

Precinct 3, Rehoboth 1,311 1,134 

Precinct 4, Prairie- Bluff 2,114 1,676 

Precinct 5, Clifton 2,702 2,408 

Precinct 6, Bethels 2,851 2,741 

Precinct 7, Lower Peachtree 2,414 2,309 

Precinct 8, Black Bluff 1,688 1,311 

Precinct 9, Allenton 1,982 2,109 

Precinct 10. Bonham 772 853 

Precinct 11, Pineapple, Including Pineapple town 2,210 2,200 

Pineapple town * 623 . 520 

Precinct 12, Snow Hill, including Furman town 3,119 3,236 

B'urman town 184 195 

Precinct 13, Mims 941 891 

Precinct 14, Fox Mills 1,354 951 

Precinct 15, Sedan 857 782 

Precinct 16, Boiling Springs 1,659 1,415 

Precinct 17, Gees Bend 1,169 1,078 

Precinct 18. Mt. Hope 1,525 1,611 

Precinct 19, Ackerville ^ 1,376 

Precinct 20, Possum Bend 1.124 

Precinct 22, Awin 448 



Winston county 9,554 6,552 

Precinct 1, Double Springs 1,143 787 

Precinct 2, Biler Road, Including Haleysville town 1,573 1,443 

Haleysville town 165 

Precinct 3, Black Swamp 1,232 1,148 

Precinct 4, Black Pond* 726 626 

Precinct 5, Dismal 899 909 

Precinct 6, Houston 584 502 

Precinct 7, Looney Tavern 1,488 845 

Precinct 8, Morgan 468 292 

Precinct 9, Crossroads 612 

Precinct 10, Delmar _j 829 



TABLE 5.— POPULATION OF THE INCORPORATED CITIES, TOWNS 
AND VILLAGES OF ALABAMA : 1890 AND 1900. 

There are 203 incorporated cities, towns and villages in Alabama, for 
which the population in 1900 is separately returned, and these incorporated 
places are presented in table 5 in alphabetical order, being abstracted" from 
table 4, In which they are presented In detail under the counties in which 
they are severally situated. 



citib:s, towns, and villages. 



POPULATION. 

1900 1890 



Abbeville town 889 4& r > 

Alabama City town 2,276 

Alexander City town 1,061 673 

Andalusia town *-_ 551 270 

Annlston city 9,695 . 9,998 



POPULATION OF ALABAMA. 



225 



CITIES, TOWNS, AND VILLAGES. 



Ashford village __. 

Ashland town 

Ashville town 

Athens town 

Attalla town 

Auburn village 

Avondale town 

Banks town 

Batesville town __. 
Berry Station town 



POPULATION. 



1900 

286 

422 

362 

1,010 

1,602 

1,447 

3,060 

198 

137 

245 



Bessemer town 6,358 

Birmingham city 38,415 

Boaz town 253 

Boiling town — 175 

Brantley town 390 

Brewton town ^ 1,382 

Bridgeport town 1,247 

Brookside town : 658 

Brundidge town 537 

Calera town 770 

Camden town 478 

Camp Hill village 686 

Carbon Hill town 830 

Cardiff town 562 

Carrollton town 1 278 

Castleberry town 167 

Center town 282 

Centerville town 422 

Cherokee town : 261 

Childersburg town 372 

Chulaflnnee town ^ 34 

Citronelle village 696 

Clanton town 611 

Clayton village 998 

Clio town 326 

Coal City town 509 

Collinsville town — - 524 

Columbia town 1,132 

Columbiana town !- 1,075 

Cordova town - ' 567 

Courtlaud town . 488 

Cuba town 384 

Cullman city 1,255 

Dadeville town 1,136 

Dayton village r — 427 

Decatur city 3,114 

Deer Creek town 332 

Demopolis city 2,606 

Dothan town , 3,275 

Dundee town 249 

Eden town 177 

Edwardsville town 448 

Elba town 635 

Elkmont town 174 

Ensley city 2,100 

Enterprise to^wn — 610 

Epes town 331 

15 



1890 



635 



940 
1,264 
1,440 
1,642 



4,544 
26,178 



1,115 
"~380 



753 
545 
366 
568 
203 



347 
239 



777 



623 
997 



367 
960 
654 



579 
265 

1,017 
873 
412 

2,765 



1,898 
247 



446 
285 



22(5 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

CITIES. TOWNS, AND VILLAGES. 

POPULATION. 

1900 1890 

Estaboga town 398 

Eufaula city 4,532 4,394 

Eunola town 132 

Eutaw town 884 1,115 

Evergreen town 1,277 1,783 

Falkvtlle town - 343 

Faunsdale village 333 211 

Fayette town 452 

Fitzpatrick town 447 357 

Flint town 1 229 

Florence city 6,478 6,012 

Fort Deposit town 1,078 518 

Fort Payne city — 1,037 2,698 

Fniithurst town = 374 

Fulton town 140 

Furman town 184 195 

Gadsden town 4,282 2,901 

Gainesville town 817 1,017 

Gaylesville town 266 

Geneva town 1A32 &37 

Georgiana city 567 456 

Girard city 3,840 

Goodwater town 728 589 

Gordon village 356 

Graysville town 319 

Greensboro town 2,416 1,759 

Greenville city 7 3,162 2.806 

Guin town 249 

Guntersville town 618 471 

Gurley town 831 570 

Haleysville town 165 ^ 

Hamilton town 235 

Hardaway village 200 

Hartford town 382 

Hartsell town 670 596 

Headland village 602 

Heflln town 460 383 

Highland Park town 467 

Hiilsboro town 256 

Hobson city 292 

Hollins town 238 422 

Holly Pond town 144 — 

Hollywood town 168 

Horse Creek town 385 _-• 

Huntsville town 8,068 7,995 

Hurtsboro town 407 433 

Ironaton town 735 562 

Irondale town 525 

Jackson village 1,039 •. 

Jacksonville town 1,176 1,237 

Jasper town 1,661 780 

Jeniison town 245 

Jenifer town 331. 323 

Joppa town 130 

Kennedy town 166 

Kinsey village 342 

Lafayette town 1,629 1.369 

Lanett town 2,009 777 

Langstown town 270 



POPULATION OF ALABAMA. 227 



CITIES, TOWNS, AND VILLAGES. 



Leighton town 

Linevllle town 

Livingston town : 

Louisville town 

Luverne village 

McFall town 

Madison town 

Marion town 

Midland City village __• 

Midway town 

Millport town 

Mobile city 38,460 

Monroeville village 

Montgomery city 30,346 

Mooresville town 

Morris town - 

Moulton town 

Muscadine town 

Newbern town . 

New Decatur city 

New Hope town 

Newton town 

Northport town 

Oakman town - 

Oneonta town 

Opelika city 

Oxanna town __1 

Oxford town ^__ 

Ozark village' 

Paint Rock town 

Pell City town 

Phoenix city 

Picken8ville town 

Piedmont village 

Pinckard town 

Pineapple town 

Pollard village . 

Pratt City town 

Prattville town '. 

Ragland town 

Reform town 

Renfroe village 

Repton town 

Riverside town 

Roanoke town 

Rock Mills town : — 

Russellville town 

Rut ledge village 

Scottsboro town 

Seale town 

Seddon town 

Selma city 8,713 7,622 

Sheffield city 3,333 2,731 

Springville town . 496 

Stevenson town 560 586 

Sulligent town 303 

Sylacauga town _ 880 464 



POPULATION. 


1900 


1890 


506 




211 


234 


851 


850 


416 


288 


731 


451 


820 . 




412 




1,698 


1,982 


304 . 




430 


612 


357 


244 


38,460 


31,076 


422 




30,346 


21,883 


150 


143 


187 


156 


290 . 




132 


100 


564 




4,437 


3,565 


208 




457 


520 


424 


413 


503 


421 


583 




4,245 


3,703 


1,184 


748 


1.372 


1,473 


1,570 


1,195 


394 




98 . 




4,163 


3,700 


241 




1,745 


711 


711 . 




623 


520 


267 


389 


3.485 


1,946 


1,929 


724 


309 . 


__^_ 


198 . 




180 


202 


170 . 




300 . 




1,155 


631 


420 


385 


1,602 


920 


346 


314 


1,014 


959 


386 


299 


229 . 





228 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER, 

CITIES, TOWNS, AND VILLAGES. 

POPULATION. 

* 1900 1890 

Talladega city 5,056 2,063 

Thomasvllle village 686 291 

Thompson town 145 

Town Creek town 280 201 

Townly town 124 

Trinity town 191 

Troy city 4,097 3,449 

Trussville town 742 462 

Tuscaloosa city 5,094 4.215 

Tuscumbia city 2,348 2,491 

Tuskegee town 2,170 1,803 

Union Springs town 2,634 2,049 

Uniontown town 1,047 854 

Vernon town 291 192 

Vienna town 74 

Vincent town r - 765 

Walnut Grove town 251 

Warrior town 1,018 

Wetumpka city 562 619 

White Oak Springs village—^ 475 

Wilsonvllle town 1,095 

Winfleld town ^ 316 

Woodlawn town 2,848 1,506 

Wyeth City town 299 

York town 528 415 

• 

Of the above named 203 incorporated places there are only 32 that had 
a population in 1900 of more than 2,000 and of these only 9 had a popu- 
lation In excess of 5,000. 



TABLE 6.— POPULATION OF BIRMINGHAM, MOBILE, AND MONT- 
GOMERY: 1820 TO 1900. 

Birmingham, Mobile and Montgomery are the only cities in Alabama that 
had a population in 1900 of more than 25,000, and for these cities a sum- 
mary is presented in table 6, showing the population of each from the first 
year, in which it is separately stated in the census report, to 1900, inclusive, 
together with the increase and decrease by number and per cent during each 
of the ten-year periods. 

BIRMINGHAM. 

census years. Population. 

Number. Per cent. 

1900 38,415 12,237 46.7 

1890 26,178 23,092 748.3 

1880 •— 3,086 

1870 

1860 

1850 

1840 J 

1830 

1820 - * 



POPULATION OF ALABAMA. 



229 



MOBILE. 



CENSUS YEABS. 



1900 
1890 
1880 
1870 
1860 
1850 
1840 
1830 
1820 



Population. 

38,469 
31,070 
29,132 
32,034 
29,258 
20,515 
12,672 
3,194 



Number. Per cent. 

7,393 23.8 

1,944 6.7 

2,902 9.1 

2,776 9.5 

8,743 42.6 

7,843 61.9 

9,478 296.7 



MONTGOMEBY. 



CENSUS YEABS. 



1900 

1890 
1880 
1870 
1860 
1850 
1840 
1830 
1820 



Population. 

30,346 

21,883 

.16,713 

10,588 

8.843 

8,728 

2,179 



Number. Per cent 



8,463 
5,170 
6,125 
1,745 
115 
6,549 



38.7 
30.9 
57.8 
19.7 
1.3 
300.6 



According to this summary, the population of Birmingham increased from 
3,086 in 1880 to 26,178 in 1890, or 748.3 per cent ; and from 26,178 in 1890 
to 38,415 in 1900, or 46.7 per cent. Mobile increased in population from 
1880 to 1890 only 6.7 per cent, but in the last decade 23.8 per cent. The 
population of Montgomery increased from 1880 to 1890 at the rate of 30.9 
per cent, but in the decade Just closed, at the rate of 38.7 per cent. The 
greatest numerical increase and the greatest percentage of increase during 
the last ten years have occurred in the city of Birmingham. 



ALABAMA. 

Estimated Population: 1901-1906. 



1901 



1902 



1903 



1904 



1905 



1906 



State 

City 

Anniston __ 
Birmingham 
Huntsville _ 

Mobile 

Montgomery 
Selma 



1,860,227 



1,891,757 



1,923,287 



1,954,817 



1,986,347 



2,017,877 



9,665 


10,863 


10,877 


10,891 


10,905 


39,639 


40,863 


42,087 


43,411 


44,040 


8,075 


8,082 


8,089 


8,096 


8,103 


39,208 


39,947 


40,080 


41,425 


42,104 


31,192 


32,038 


32,884 


38,730 


39,769 


11,322 


11,467 


11,612 


11,757 


11,902 



10,919 
45,869 
8,110 
42,903 
40,808 
12,047 



X. ALABAMA ELECTION STATISTICS, 
1904 AND 1906; AND STATISTICS 
OF POLITICAL 



REGISTRATION. 



Counties. 



Autauga 

Baldwin 

Barbour 

Bibb 

Blount 

Bullock 

Butler 

Calhoun 

Chambers __. 
Cherokee __. 

Chilton 

Choctaw 

Clarke ._ __. 

Clay 

Cleburne 

Coffee 

Colbert 

Conecuh 

Coosa 

Covington __. 

Crenshaw 

Cullman 

Dale 

Dallas 

DeKalb 

Elmore 

Escambia __ 

Etowah 

Fayette 

Franklin 

Geneva 

Greene 

Hale 

Henry 

Houston 

Jackson 

Jefferson __. 
Lamar __ __. 
Lauderdale . 
Lawrence — 

Lee 

Limestone _. 



Prior to Jan. 1, '03. 



White. Col. 



Total.. 



Registration, 1904. 



White. 



Col. 



Total. 



1,4G5 
1,117 
2,595 
2,343 
3,445 
1,225 
2,681 
4,612 
3,032 
3,089 
2,635 
1,409 
2.174 
.3,204 
2,111 
2,925 
2,020 
1,911 
2,270 
2,563 
2,782 
4,173 
3,235 
2,326 
4,645 
3,061 
1,418 
4,199 
2,477 
2,312 
2.422 
698 
1.227 
4,778 



37 

196 

36 

48 

"16 
i 

122 
28 
37 
4 
19 
62 



4,356 
16.104 
2,360 
3,167 
2,231 
2,445 
2,399 



27 
2 
1 
3 

1 
11 
59 

50 
34 
25 

11 

90 
20 



m 

146 

7 

75 

21 

4 

10 



1,502 
1,313 
2,631 
2,391 
3,445 
1,235 
2,682 
4,734 
3,060 
3,126 
2,639 
1,428 
2,236 
3,204 
2,111 
2,925 
2,047 
1,913 
2,271 
2,566 
2,782 
4,174 
3,246 
2,385 
4,645 
3,111 
1,452 
4,224 
2,477 
2,323 
2,422 
788 
1,247 
4,778 



4,424' 
16,250 
2,367 
3,242 
2,252 
2,449 
2,409 



1,554 


35 


1,390 


206 


2,846 


46 


2,725 


59 


3,182 


^ «■ «._ 


1,291 


14 


2,739 


2 


4,892 


130 


3,098 


"28 


3,004 


27 


2,970 


1 


1,496 


29 


2,485 


158 


3,501 


- m - r IM mm 


2,280 


„ ^^ „ 


3,334 


— — — « 


2,233 


22 


2,049 


7 


2,134 


— «»•-« 


2,857 


3 


2,982 


.» _• M W 


4,641 


4 


3,021 


11 


2,419 


52 


4,388 


— — » — — 


3,030 


54 


1,676 


46 


4,186 


39 


2,563 


7 


2,600 


12 


2,873 


30 


739 


104 


1,362 


92 


2,072 




2,757 




4,704 


73 


18.315 


352 


2,356 


7 


3,305 


76 


2,367 


49 


2,652 


12 


2,722 


28 



1,589 
1,596 
2,892 
2,784 
3,182 
1,305 
2,741 
5,022 
3,126 
3,031 
2,971 
1,525 
2,643 
3,501 
2,280 
3,334 
2,255 
2,056 
2,134 
2,860 
2,982 
4,645 
3,032 
2,471 
4,388 
3,084 
1,722 
4,225 
2,570 
2,612 
2,903 
843 
1,454 
2,072 
2,757 
4,777 
18,667 
2,363 
3,381 
2,416 
2,664 
2,750 



(230) 



ALABAMA ELECTION STATISTICS. 



231 



REGISTRATION— Continued. 



Counties. 



Lowndes 

Macon 

Madison 

Marengo 

Marion 

Marshall _. 

Mobile 

Monroe - 

Montgomery 

Morgan 

Perry 

Pickens 

Pike 

Randolph __ 

Russell 

Shelby 

St. Clair ___ 

Sumter 

Talladega . 
Tallapoosa _ 
Tuscaloosa 

Walker 

Washington 

Wilcox 

Winston 



Prior to Jan. 1, '03. 



White. 



Col 



Total. 



Registration, 1904. 



White. Col. Total. 



1,061 44 1,105 1,085 57 1,142 

958 65 1.023 917 65 982 

4,413 122 4,535 4,479 112 4,591 

1.880 302 2,182 2,043 302 2,345 

2,404 25 2,429: 2,698 25 2,723 

4,012 4,012 4,251 4,251 

7,104 183 7,287 7,295 193 7,488 

1,742 40 1,782 2,178 40 2,218 

4,507 47 4,554 4,995 53 5,048 

3,908 38 3,940 4,506 60 4,566 

1,492 86 1,578 1,659 90 1,749 

2,106 127 2.233 2,217 111 2,328 

3,148 19 3,167 3,126 26 3.152 

3,209 16 3,225 3,363 13 3,376 

1,083 196 1,279 1,170 191 1,361 

3,192 14 3,206 3,712 19 3,731 

2,713 25 2,738 3,340 50 3,390 

1,178 54 1,232 1,244 57 1,301 

3,183 73 3,256 3,303 81 3,384 

4,006 2 4,008 4,166 33 4,199 

3.710 166 3,876 4.153 165 4,318 

4,334 4,334 4.894 1 4,895 

1,082 36 1,118 1,339 53 1,392 

1,649 35 1,684 1,522 41 1,563 

1,777 1,777 1,833 1 1.834 

Total I 191,492|2980| 194^72 j | 2057278 1 3654 1 "208,932 



VOTE IN ALABAMA FOR PRESIDENT AND VICE-PRESIDENT, 

NOVEMBER 8, 1904. 



Counties. 





CO 










M 




• 






a 




t 




ker 
vis. 


0) u 


m 

a 


"3 


. 00 


£Q 


o 35 
c • 


o 

'SI 


fc 

w 


Q 


k'o 


«£ 


£ 


m 


> 




• ■ 

HO 


m 


m 


H 


Dem. 


Rep. 


Pop. 


Pop. 


Soc. 



Autauga . 
Baldwin . 
Barbour . 
Bibb ___. 
Blount _. 
Bullock . 
Butler _. 
Calhoun . 
Chambers 



733 


73 


454 


126 


1,356 


49 


1,085 


155 


1,383 


910 


726 




805 


83 


1,556 


287 


1,421 


74 



9 

9 

29 

48 

117 
o 

<5 
57 
59 




Total. 



816 

614 

1,442 

1.306 

2,426 

72S 

955 

1 sm 

1,565 



232 



OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 



VOTE FOR PRESIDENT AND VICE-PRESIDENT, NOV. 8, 1904.— Cont'd. 



Counties. 





i 




■ 




ii 






o 


• 
CO 


Park 
. Dav 


8^ 


g 

CO 
03 


as 

0Q 


* 

Q 


rio 


tt£ 


* 


o- 


► 


^a • 


• • 

HO 


ft 


od 


H 


Detn. 


. Rep. 


Pro. 


Pro. 


Soc. 



Cherokee — 

Chilton 

Choctaw 

Clarke 

Clay 

Cleburne __ 

Coffee 

Colbert 

Conecuh 

Coosa 

Covington _ 
Crenshaw - 
Cullman — 

Dale 

Dallas 

DeKalb 

Elmore 

Escambia _ 

Etowah 

Fayette 
Franklin _. 

Geneva 

Greene 

Hale 

Henry 

Houston — 
Jackson ... 
Jefferson — 

Lamar 

Lauderdale 
Lawrence - 

Lee 

Limestone . 
Lowndes — 

Macon 

Madison __. 
Marengo — 

Marion 

Marshall — 

Mobile 

Monroe 

Montgomery 

Morgan 

Perry 

Pickepa 

Pike 

Randolph . 



005 


502 


£32 


738 


648 


257 


558 


45 


22 


1,131 


79 


9 


1,345 


990 


44 


701 


414 


33 


1,106 


226 


380 


936 


203 


3 


739 


106 


18 


9& 


472 


106 


907 


310 


110 


1,077 


180 


93 


1,497 


1,238 


240 


997 


345 


73 


1,472 


36 


4 


1,716 


1,237 


100 


1,226 


151 


35 


627 


83 


3 


1,431 


823 


230 


712 


599 


177 


767 


668 


65 


743 


473 


288 


477 


17 




723 


27 


3 


701 


104 


105 


1,248 


384 


74 


1,641 


666 


43 


6,424 


1,090 


54 


848 


215 


8 


1,269 


316 


4 


909 


410 


8 


1,348 


40 


18 


1,053 


187 


13 


697 


32 


3 


562 


51 


7 


2,119 


182 


6 


1,149 


56 


9 


1,224 


635 


4 


1,336 


966 


294 


3,283 


325 


9 


836 


46 


8 


2,49z 


50 


3 


1,437 


416 


42 


799 


47 




866 


105 


Tt 


1,544 


29 


38 


1,518 


| 695 


60 



15 
6 
4 

13 



:\\ 
7 
5 
1 
7 
6 
4 
40 
11 



10 

3 

4 

22 

19 



16 
3 



1 

16 

6 

68 

3 

10 

5 

3 

4 



1 

7 

20 

2 

2 

32 

47 

13 

2 

5 



:;8 
8 
l 

4 



15 
1 
5 
1 
5 
3 



11 
6 



2 
10 
12 

7 



1 
386 
2 
7 
2 
19 



6 
38 



8 
70 
47 
1 
1 
2 



Total. 



1,692 
1.657 

630 
1,236 
2,379 
1.J52 
1,719 
1,162 

865 
1,523 
1,334 
1,359 
3,018 
1,426 
1,523 
3,069 
1,415 

719 
2,516 
1,519 
1,507 
1,520 

497 

753 

911 
1,722 
2,356 
8,022 
1,076 
1,616 
1,334 
1,418 
14257 

732 

620 
2,313 
1,214 
1,864 
2,609 
3,675 

892 
2,555 
1,997 

940 
1,062 
1,614 
2,280 



ALABAMA ELECTION STATISTICS. 



233 



VOTE FOR PRESIDENT AND VICE-PRESIDENT, NOV. 8, 1904.— Cont'd. 



Counties. 



Russell 

Shelby __... 
St. Clair 

Sumter 

Talladega . 
Tallapoosa 
Tuscaloosa 
Walker ___. 
Washington 
Wilcox __'-. 
Winston — 

Totals '. 




• 




* 




© 






00 


03 


JD 




0> 


• 


• 

> 


00 


• 


Pro. 


fifoc. 



ToteJ. 



558 


21 


9 


1 


4 


' 1,106 


679 


614 


31 


8 


908 


593 


425 


9 


6 


883 
1,264 


16 
252 






7 


36 


13 


1,791 


234 


84 


15 


6 


1,405 


132 


25 


5 


26 


1,639 


1,024 


3 


14 


22 


443 


54 


9 


3 


2 


912 


2 


5 


2 


1 


602 


789 


36 




2 



79,857| 22,472| 5,051 1 612| 853 



593 
2,438 
1,941 

906 
1,565 
2,130 
1,593 
2,702 

511 

922 
1,429 

108,845 



ALABAMA ELECTORS FOR PRESIDENT AND VICE-PRESIDENT 

NOVEMBER 8, 1904. 

DEMOCRATIC. 

At Large. 

Richmond P. Hobson, of Hale, Greensboro. 
William H. Samford, of Pike, Troy. 

Districts. 

First District — Edward B. McCarty, of Marengo ; Demopolis. 
Second District — Samuel C. Jenkins, of Washington ; Bay Minette. 
Third District — Ernest L. Blue, of Bullock; Union Springs. 
♦Fourth District — W. B. Browne, of Shelby; Columbiana. 
Fifth District — J. W. Overton, of Randolph; W r edowee. 
Sixth District— W. C. Davis, of Walker; Jasper. 
Seventh District — Joseph R. Rosson, of Cullman; Cullman. 
Eighth District— Wm. B. Bankhead, of Madison; Huntsville. 
Ninth District— G. W. Darden, of Blount ; Oneonta. 



REPUBLICAN. 



At Large. 



Joseph H. Montgomery, of Jefferson ; Birmingham. 
W. W. Wadsworth, of Autauga ; Wadsworth. 



♦Mr. Browne being unable to attend, the vacancy was filled by the elec- 
tion of H. W. Laird, of Birmingham. 



234 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL. REGISTER. 

ELECTORS FOR PRESIDENT, NOV. 8, 1904— Continued. 

Districts. 

First District— John W. Schell, of Mobile; Grand Bay. 
Second District — John M. Green, of Washington; Bay Minette. 
Third District— Archibald C. Walter, of Barbour ; Eufaula. 
Fourth District — George H. Craig, of Dallas ; Selma. 
Fifth District— Y. C. Barfield, of Clay: Barfield. 
Sixth District — Charles P. Luusford, of Marion; Hamilton. 
Seventh District — Thomas B. McNaron, of Marshall ; Albertville. 
Eighth District — A. G. Negley, of Lauderdale; Florence. 
Ninth District — John T. Blackmore, of Jefferson; Birmingham. 



POPULIST. 

At Large. 

Albert T. Goodwyn. of Elmore; Robinson Springs. 
Milford W. Howard, of DeKalb ; Ft. Payne. 

Districts. 

First District— G. B. Wilson. 

Second District — J. C. Fonville, of Crenshaw ; Luverne. 

Third District— W. J. Hicks, of DeKalb; Fort Payne. 

Fourth District— John H. Wilson. 

Fifth District— E. W. Galloway, of Clay ; Ashland. 

Sixth District— J. S. Hollls. 

Seventh District — J. A. Hurst, Etowah: Walnut Grove. 

Eighth District — Thomas B. Parks, of Jackson ; Eula. 

Ninth District — Graten B. Crowe, of Jefferson; Birmirr •• :« 



PROHIBITION. 

At Large. 



W. T. Daniel, Hackneyville. 
Adam Horn, Thorsby. 



Districts. 



First District— W. L. Ilaskeld, Dickinson. 
Second District — R. O. Simpson, Furman. 
Third District — J. M. Commander, Coffee Springs. 
Fourth District — J. O. P. Treadaway, Jacksonville. 
Fifth District— ,7. W. Shores, Prattville. 
Sixth District— J. W. Ballenger, Carbon Hill. 
Seventh District — J. W. Lawley. Branchville. 
Eighth District— O. E. Comstock, Sr., Sheffield. 
Ninth District— D. II. McXeal, Woodstock. 



SOCIALIST. 

At Large. 

John C. Maxwell, of Montgomery ; Montgomery. 
John Philip, of Morgan; Decatur. 



ALABAMA ELECTION STATISTICS. 235 

ELECTORS FOR PRESIDENT, NOV. 8, 1904— Continued. 

Districts. 

First District — Robert Browning, of Mobile; Mobile. 
Second District — Clement L. Coleman, of Baldwin ; Fairhope. 
Third District— W. J. Vickery, of Lee; Phoenix City. 
Fourth District — John A. Lindqulst, of Chilton; Thorsby. 
Fifth District— Wiiliam W. Sanford, of Tallapoosa; Dadeville. 
Sixth District— Sidney H. McDuff, of Walker; Patton. 
Seventh District— Henry T. Jones, of Cherokee ; Cedar Bluff. 
Eighth District — Andrew L. Cole, of Lauderdale; Florence. 
Ninth District — Joseph C. Kiser, of Jefferson ; Bessemer. 



VOTE FOR MEMBERS OF THE UNITED STATES HOUSE OF REP- 
RESENTATIVES, NOVEMBER 8, 1904. 

1st District : G. W. Taylor. 

Choctaw 641 

Clarke 1,191 

Marengo 1,164 

Mobile 3,368 

Monroe 850 

Washington 472 



7,686 

2nd District: A. A. Wiley. J. C. Maxwell. 

Baldwin 486 

Butler 888 

Conecuh 780 

Covington 1,018 

Crenshaw 1,311 

Escambia 700 

Montgomery 2,491 

Pike 1,593 1 

Wilcox 910 



10,177 1 

3rd Distrist: H. D. Clayton. C. J. Hammett 

Barbour 1,149 1 

Bullock 734 

Coffee 1,300 39 

Dale 1,177 17 

Geneva 915 92 

Henry 890 3 

Lee 1,3(50 

Russell 581 

Houston — 1,460 11 



9,836 163 

4th District : S. J. Bowie. J. W. Kitchens. 

Calhoun 1,673 183 

Chilton "_ 767 636 

Cleburne 746 340 

Dallas 1,428 31 

Shelby 1,149 789 

Talladega 1,324 222 

7,087 2,201 



236 



OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 



VOTE FOR CONGRESSMAN, NOV. 8, 1904.— Continued. 

, 5th District : J. Thomas Heflln. B. W. Walker. J. R. Caldwell. 

Autauga 715 82 24 

Chambers 1,325 160 

Clay 1,356 1,014 

Coosa 933 552 *8 

Elmore 1,213 174 7 

Lowndes 712 28 

Macon 537 67 

Randolph 1,504 750 

Tallapoosa 1,810 268 9 

10,105 3,095 48 

6th District: J. H. Bankhead. S. R. Crumpton. 

Fayette 731 684 

Greene 489 2 

Hale 726 24 

Lamar 856 200 

Marion 1,213 632 

Pickens 890 87 

Sumter 882 14 

Tuscaloosa 1,419 125 

Walker 1,667 950 

8,873 - 2,718 

1th District : J. L. Burnett T. W. Powell. 

Cherokee 1,137 601 

Cullman 1,601 1,362 

DeKalb 1,739 1,277 

Etowah 1,534 827 

Franklin 785 714 

Marshall 1,447 1,223 

St. Clair 941 968 

Winston 635 784 

9,819 7,756 

8th District : Wm. Richardson. J. W. Roberts. 

Colbert 984 154 

Jackson ^ 1,706 588 

Lauderdale 1,334 275 

Lawrence 962 373 

Limestone 1,126 

Madison 2,181 150 

Morgan 1,605 306 

9,898 1,846 

9th District : O. W. Underwood. J. T. Blakemore. * F. X. Waldhorst. 

Bibb 1,140 93 13 

Blount 1,354 844 3 

Jefferson 6,322 838 361 

Perry 799 

9,615 1,775 377 



ALABAMA ELECTION STATISTICS. 237 

VOTE FOR MEMBER OF U. S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, 4TH 
DISTRICT, IN SPECIAL ELECTION, MAY 9, 1904. 

oth District : J. T. Heflin. C. B. Nichols. J. L. Carwlle. B. W. Walker. 

Autauga 349 1 

Chambers 646 

Clay 421 10 1 

Coosa 381 

Elmore 400 

Lowndes 344 

Macon 367 

Randolph , 455 

Tallapoosa 702 

Total 4,065 10 1 1 



VOTE FOR MEMBERS OF THE U. S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, 

NOVEMBER 6, 1906. 

Ut District : George W. Taylor. 

Choctaw 416 

Clarke 720 

Marengo 728 

Mobile 939 

Monroe - 473 

Washington _ 316 



3,592 

2nd District : A. A. Wiley. J. C. Fonville. 

Baldwin 246 30 

Butler 623 • 134 

Conecuh 387 83 

Covington 926 139 

Crenshaw 796 159 

Escambia 357 50 

Montgomery ,. 1,318 37 

Pike 772 .84 

Wilcox — 576 35 



6,001 751 

3rd District : Henry D. Clayton. 

Barbour 953 

Bullock 432 

Coffee 1,671 

Dale '- 877 

Geneva 826 

Henry 513 

Houston _ 643 

Lee 670 

Russell 337 



6,922 



4th District : Wm. B. Craig. 

Calhoun 1,334 

Chilton 724 

Cleburne 1,155 

Dallas 739 



238 



OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 



VOTE FOR U. S. REPRESENTATIVES, NOV. 6, 1906— Continued. 

Shelby 995 

Talladega 836 

5,783 

5th District : J. Thos. Heflin. 

Autauga 802 

Chambers 934 

Clay _ 1,063 

Coosa 821 

Elmore 932 

Lowndes 473 

Macon 301 

Randolph 582 

Tallapoosa : 1,032 

6,940 

6th District: R. P. Hobsou. I. Greene. 

Fayette — i 1,021 

Greene 371 

Hale 517 

Lamar 856 

Marion 858 

Pickens 721 1 

Sumter 532 

Tuscaloosa 1,317 

Walker 2,115 

8,308 1 

7th District : Jno. L. Burnett. C. B. Kennamer. Chas. Kenophy. 

Cherokee 1,042 240 8 

Cullman 1,319 834 

DeKalb 1,289 672 

Etowah 1,440 548 

Franklin 713 458 1 

Marshall ~ 1,084 863 1 

St. Clair 82(3 521 

Winston 552 778 

8,265 4,914 10 

8th District: W'm. Richardson. Jno. T. Masterson. 

Colbert 549 58 

Jackson 848 88 

Lauderdale 848 27 

Lawrence 567 71 

Limestone 772 12 

Madison . 1307 22 

Morgan 982 39 

5,873 317 

9th District: Oscar W. Underwood. 

Bibb 569 

Blount 1.140 

Jefferson 5,694 

Perry 46 1 

7,864 



ALABAMA ELECTION STATISTICS. 



239 



VOTE FOR PRESIDENT OF RAILROAD COMMISSION, CHIEF JUS- 
TICE OF SUPREME COURT, AND SUPERNUMERARY 

JUDGE.— NOVEMBER 8, 1904. 



COUNTIES. 



Pres. R. R. 
Commission. 



o 

o a 

fflQ 



Autauga 

Baldwin * 

Barbour 

Bibb 

Blount 

Bullock 

Butler 

Calhoun '. 

Chambers 

Cherokee 

Chilton 

Choctaw 

Clarke 

Clay 

Cleburne 

Coffee 

Colbert 

Conecuh 

Coosa , 

Covington 

Crensharw 

Cullman 

Dale 

Dallas 

DeKalb 

Elmore 

Escambia 

Etowah 

Fayette 

Franklin 

Geneva 

Greene 

Hale 

Henry 

Houston 

Jackson 

Jefferson 

Lamar 

Lauderdale 

Lawrence 

Lee 

Limestone 

Lowndes 

Macon 

Madison 

Marengo 

Marion 



776 

493 

1,424 

1,165 

1,319 

732 

927 

1,675 

1,474 

1.058 

775 

506 

1,180 

1,382 

702 

1.253 

980 

790 

1.011 

1,067 

1,221 

1,712 

1,052 

1,471 

1,740 

1,259 

702 

1.372 

787 

794 

940 

490 

723 

822 

1,489 

1,725 

6,532 

765 

1,315 

937 

1,364 

1,135 

711 

579 

2.160 

1,154 

1,216 



u 



Chief Justice 
Supreme Court. 



16 
2 

11 
4 



7 
1 
35 
8 
4 
1 



42 



o 

9 



11 

25 



12 

10 

9 



1 
381 
2 
6 
3 



13 






a 
o ^ 

»-3 



767 

487 

1,393 

1,095 

1,366 

715 

878 

1,289 

1,471 

949 

764 

559 

1,179 

1,356 

710 

1,090 

950 

777 

983 

996 

1,201 

1.572 

987 

1,425 

1,743 

1,250 

659 

1,353 

696 

773 

843 

487 

719 

801 

1,434 

1,708 

6,541 

777 

1,282 

940 

1,344 

1,141 

695 

578 

2,161 

1,154 

1,215 



17 

11 
58 



129 

1 

75 

as 

4 
1 



42 
4 
2 
4 
4 



11 
25 



12 

12 

9 



1 
356 
2 
6 
2 
19 



5«~ 

a>& a 

2 o>~ 



776 

510 

1.420 

1,150 

1,402 

731 

883 

1.(551 

1.459 

1.052 

763 

595 

1,180 

1,358 

700 

1,132 

979 

767 

956 

1,006 

1,243 

1,565 

1,092 

1,472 



694 

1,356 

7i5 

773 



489 

724 

765 

1.589 

1,755 

6,674 

751 

1,371 

937 

1,366 

1,135 

679 

578 

2 170 

1,159 

1,212 



240 



OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 



VOTE FOR PRESIDENT OF RAILROAD COMMISSION, CHIEF JUS- 
TICE OF SUPREME COURT, AND SUPERNUMERARY 
JUDGE— NOVEMBER 8, 1904.— Cont'd. 



COUNTIES. 



! Pres. R. R. 
Commission. 



•r*- 



U 



0) 

fa Q* 
O 

n'tf 



Chief Justice 
Supreme Court 







gK S 



&. 



Marshall 

Mobile 

Monroe 

Montgomery 

Morgan 

Perry 

Pickens 

Pike 

Randolph _. 

Russell 

Shelby 

St. Clair — 

Sumter 

Talladega — 
Tallapoosa . 
Tuscaloosa 

Walker 

Washington 

Wilcox 

Winston __ - 

Totals 



7 
37 



9 
72 



1 
2 
4 



25 

17 

8 

1 

6 

25 

45 



1,427 

3,338 

848 

2,459 

1,468 

799 

884 

1,513 

1,524 

541 

1,123 

931 

885 

1,305 

1,823 

1,428 

1,676 

473 

913 

613 



7 
30 



6 
55 



21 

16 

9 

1 

4 

25 

78 

1 



1,426 

3,281 

848 

2,489 

1,541 

799 

907 

1,572 



568 



926 
884 
1,315 
1,882 
1,411 
1,677 
468 



616 



883 1 1 81,224| 1,053| | • 75,344 



VOTE FOR ASSOCIATE JUSTICES OF THE SUPREME COURT, 

NOV. 8, 1904. 



COUNTIES. 



(All Democrats.) 



s 



©■8 

© 

►-a 



Autauga . 
Baldwin . 
Barbour . 
Bibb 

Blount _. 
Bullock _ 
Butler — 
Calhoun . 
Chambers 
Cherokee 



a 
Q 



fc 



tig 

9? 



a _ 

a # 
o ** 

►"3 



1 

a 

m 

H 



o 
00 



757 


770 


769 


762 


761 


483 


482 


483 


. 4841 


483 


1,411 


1,411 


1,411 


1,411 


1,412 


1,141 


1.141 


1,143 


1.142 


1,142 


1,402 


1,402 


1,402 


1,396 


1,401 


715 


715 


715 


715 


715 


875 


874 


872 


871 


872 


1,636 


1,635 


1,635 


1,635 


1,636 


1,473 


1,490 


1,475 


1,465 


1,465 


962 


964 


963 


963 


962 



»-8 



761 

483 

1,411 

1,140 

1,402 

715 

875 

1,634 

1,463 

962 



ALABAMA ELECTION STATISTICS. 



241 



VOTE FOR ASSOCIATE JUSTICES OF THE SUPREME COURT, 
NOVEMBER 8, 1904.— Con tinned. 



COUNTIES. 



(All Democrats.) 

Chilton 

Choctaw 

Clarke 

Clay 

Cleburne 

Coffee 

Colbert 

Conecuh 

Coosa 

Covington 

Crenshaw 

Cullman 

Dale 

Dallas 

DeKalb 

Elmore 

Escambia 

Etowah i 

Fayette 

Franklin 

Geneva 

Greene 

Hale 

Henry ^ 

Houston 

Jackson - 

Jefferson 

Lamar 

Lauderdale 

Lawrence 

Lee 

Limestone 

Lowndes 

Macon 

Madison 

Marengo 

Marion 

Marshal] 

Mobile 

Monroe 

Montgomery 

Morgan __ 

Perry 

Pickens 

Pike 

Randolph 

Russell 

Shelby 

St. Clair 

16 






G 

s 
s 

ft 

Q 

m 






£ 



© 

►"9 



A, 

B 

. g 

05 



pi 



767 

605 

1,180 

1,354 

721 

1,129 

971 

771 

1,000 

998 

1.184 

1,557 

1,006 

1.471 

1,735 

1,349 

640 

1,355 

715 

771 

812 

489 

723 

790 

1.417 

1.707 

(3,540 

775 

1,300 

938 

1.360 

1,133 

712 

577 

2,155 

1.155 

1.213 

1,410 

3,275 

848 

2.461 

1,506 

799 

887 

1,539 

1,530 

571 

1,118 

925 



772 

593 

1,179 

1,355 

722 

1,129 

971 

771 

1,014 

998 

1,184 

1,550 

1,055 

1,471 

1,734 

1,348 

a37 

1,356 

714 

771 

812 

489 

723 

791 

1,411 

1,708 

6,542 

778 

1,301 

939 

1,362 

1,133 

714 

593 

2,154 

1,154 

1,212 

1,408 

3,260 

848 

2,460 

1,504 

799 

854 

1,539 

1,545 

571 

1.119 

924 



768 

594 

1,179 

1,354 

722 

1.129 

971 

771 

1.005 

997 

1,184 

1,551 

1,057 

1,471 

1,734 

1,349 

641 

1.356 

715 

771 

812 

489 

722 

791 

1,411 

1,717 

6,541 

773 

1,300 

939 

1,362 

1,133 

714 

583 

2,153 

1,154 

1,212 

1,409 

3,311 

848 

2,460 

1,506 

799 

887 

1,539 

1.535 

571 

1,119 

925 



767 

594 

1,179 

1,354 

721 

1,130 

971 

771 

1,001 

997 

1,184 

1,551 

1,055 

1,471 

1,734 

1,349 

638 

1,356 

714 

771 

812 

489 

722 

791 

1,410 

1,717 

6,539 

768 

1,300 

938 

1,363 

1,133 

714 

579 

2,154 

1,154 

1,212 

1,410 

3,312 

848 

2,460 

1,505 

799 

887 

1.539 

1,530 

571 

1,119 

925 



767 

595 

1,179 

1,353 

721 

1,130 

972 

771 

1,001 

997 

1,184 

1,550 

1,056 

1,470 

1,734 

1,348 

«39 

1,356 

716 

772 

812 

489 

722 

791 

1,411 

1,705 

6,539 

777 

1,304 

939 

1,364 

1,133 

714 

578 

2,156 

1,154 

1,212 

1,408 

3,314 

848 

2.461 

1,509 

799 

887 

1,539 

1,531 

571 

1,119 

925 



768 

594 

1,179 

1,355 

689 

1.130 

971 

771 

1,002 

1,009 

1,189 

1,550 

1,059 

1,471 

1,734 

1,349 

639 

1,356 

715 

771 

813 

489 

722 

791 

1,410 

1,706 

6,543 

779 

1,300 

938 

1,364 

1,133 

713 

577 

2,155 

1,154 

1,212 

1,408 

3,311 

848 

2.462 

1,507 

799 

886 

1,543 

1.525 

571 

1,119 

. 925 



242 



OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 



VOTE FOR ASSOCIATE JUSTICES OF THE SUPREME COURT, 

NOVEMBER 8, 1904.— Continued. 



COUNTIES.. 
(All Democrats.) 


• 

a 
8 

a 

•"3 

885 

1,305 

1,878 

1,416 

1,676 

435 

914 

816 

~81.986 


N. D. Denson. 


James R. 
Dowdell. 


• 
GO 

offi 

o 
•-s 

883 

1,302 

1,882 

1,415 

1,678 

435 

915 

618 

81,980| 


R. T. Simp- 
son. 


J. R. Tyson. 


Sumter 


883 

1,302 

1,884 

1,414 

1,617 

435 

912 

618 

81,980 1 


883 

1,303 

1,884 

1,415 

1,677 

435 

913 

618 


884 

1,300 

1,879 

1,415 

1,677 

435 

915 

618 

81,994 


884 


Talladega 

Tallapoosa 

Tuscaloosa 

Walker 


1,301 

- 1,880 

1,416 

1,678 


Washington — 

Wilcox 


435 
918 


Winston 


618 






Totals | 


82,030| 


1 81,987 





















VOTE FOR CHANCELLORS, NOV. 8, 1904. 



NORTHERN DIVISION. 

W. H. Simpson. 

County. Votes. 

Colbert 990 

Cullman 1,568 

DeKalb 1,723 

Franklin 774 

Jackson 1,743 

Lauderdale 1,322 

Lamar 859 

Limestone 1.135 

Lawrence 940 

Madison 2,168 

Marion 1,214 

Marshall 1.424 

Morgan 1,581 

Total 17,441 

NORTHEASTERN DIVISION. 

W. W. Whiteside. 

County. Votes. 

Autauga 774 

Calhoun l,ft37 

Chambers 1,454 

Cherokee 1,035 

Chilton 767 

Clay - ,-_- 1,360 

Cleburne 740 

Coosa 961 

Elmore 1,224 

Etowah 1,357 

Lee 1,363 

Randolph 1.522 



Shelby 1,096 

St. Clair 928 

Talladega .1,322 

Tallapoosa 1,87^ 

4 

Total 19,418 

NORTHWESTERN DIVISION. 

John J. Altman. 
County. • Votes. 

Blount 1.401 

Favette 723 

Jefferson 6,546 

Tuscaloosa 1,448 

Walker 1,676 

Winston 

Total 11.794 

SOUTHEASTERN DIVISION. 

W. L. Parks. 
County. Votes. 

Barbour 1,426 

Bullock 732 

Butler 893 

Coffee 1,191 

Conecuh 769 

Covington 1,022 

Crenshaw 1,295 

Dale 1,110 

Escambia 694 

Geneva 952 

Henry 897 

Houston 1,465 

Lowndes 714 



ALABAMA ELECTION STATISTICS. 



243 



VOTE FOR CHANCELLORS, NOVEMBER 8 t 1904.— Con tin ued. 



Macon 578 

Montgomery 306 

Pike — 1,590 

Russell 575 



Total 16,215 

SOUTHWESTERN DIVISION. 

Thomas H. Smith. 
County. Votes. 

Baldwin 519 

Bibb 1,201 

Choctaw 642 



Clarke 1,182 

Dallas 1,474 

Greene 489 

Hale 644 

Marengo 1,153 

luobile 3,342 

Monroe 

Perry 799 

Pickens 906 

Sumter 884 

Washington 486 

Wilcox — _ 914 



Total 14,635 



VOTE FOR CIRCUIT JUDGES AND SOLICITORS, NOV. 8, 1904. 

CIRCUITS. JUDGE. SOLICITOR. 

1st Circuit : J. T. Lackland. * Oscar L. Gray. 

Choctaw 645 641 

Clarke 1,181 1,182 

Marengo 1,103 1,163 

Monroe 853 875 

3,839 3.801 

2nd Circuit : J. C. Richardson. C. R. Bricken. 

Butler 941 941 

Conecuh 802 807 

Crenshaw 1,317 1,285 

Escambia 735 718 

Lowndes 714 715 

4,509 4.466 

3rd Circuit: A. A. Evans. C.A. L. Samford. 

Barbour 1,435 1,428 

Bullock 041 585 

Dale _-J 1,073 1,110 

Lee 1.363 1,363 

Russell 505 576 

5,077 5,062 

J,th Circuit : B. M. Miller. J. F. Thompson. 

Bibb U94 1,183 

Dallas 1,477 1,476 

Hale 726 726 

Perry 799 799 

Wilcox 016 912 

5,112 5,096 

r,th Circuit : S. L. Brewer. W. B. Bowling. 

Chambers 1,491 1,482 

Coosa 1*005 1,007 

Macon 015 585 

Randolph 1502 1,532 

Tallapoosa 1.012 1.901 

6,585 6,507 



244 



OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 



VOTE FOR CIRCUIT JUDGES AND SOLICITORS.- 

Judge. 
6th Circuit : S. H. Sprott 

Fayette ^ 801 

Greene 491 

Lamar 860 

Pickens 819 

Sumter 885 

Tuscaloosa 1,458 



-Continued. 

Solicitor. 
W. B. Oliver. 
809 
490 
862 
926 
885 
1,462 



5,414 

7th Circuit : John Pelham. 

Calhoun — 1 1,668 

Cleburne - 743 

Clay 1,3&3 

Shelby - 1,138 

St. Clair 933 

Talladega 1,325 



5,434 

B. H. Butt. 
1,649 

434 
1,360 
1,125 

931 
1,337 



7,170 

8th Circuit : D. W. Speake. 

Cullman 1,601 

Lawrence 963 

Limestone 1,139 

Madison 2,187 

Morgan 1,606 



6,837 

D. C. Almon. 
1,603 
961 
1,138 
2,176 
1,567 



7,496 

9th Circuit: 

, Judge. , 

W. W. Haralson. B. H. Nicholson. 

Blount 1,417 931 

Cherokee 1,283 388 

DeKalb 1,847 1,158 

Etowah 1,397 959 

Jackson , L—1,791 504 

Marshall 1,707 955 



7,475 



t 
Sollcitor.- 



R. C. Hunt. J. B. Sloan. 
1,383 1,005 

1,283 386 

1,719 1,224 

1,372 956 



1,560 



9,442 4,952 7,317 

10th Circuit : A. A. Coleman. 
Jefferson* 6,729 

11th Circuit-. E. B. Almon. 

Colbert 994 

Franklin 780 

Lauderdale 1,322 

Marion 1,213 



1,025 

4,596 

John McQueen. 
6,711 

W. H. Sawtelle. 

992 

778 
1,324 
1,212 



4,309 



4,306 



♦For Judge of the Tenth Judicial Circuit. Hon. A. A. Coleman received 
605 votes In Winston county, and 62 votes in Walker county. Hon. John 
McQueen, for Solicitor of the Tenth Judicial Circuit, received 608 votes in 
Winston county, and 184 votes in Walker county. These two counties were 
not a part of the Tenth Circuit at the time the vote was certified in, for 
which reason the Board of Election Supervisors did not include these votes 
in the total of the votes received by said officers in the Tenth Circuit. 
Since that time the Fifteenth Circuit, comprising the counties of Walker 
and Winston, has been declared unconstitutional, which counties, therefore, 
revert to the Tenth Circuit, where they originally belonged. 



ALABAMA ELECTION STATISTICS. 245 

VOTE FOR CIRCUIT JUDGES AND SOLICITORS.— Continued. 

* Judge. Solicitor. 

12th Circuit : H. A. Pearce. R. H. Parks. 

Coffee 1,454 1,191 

Covington 1,058 1,038 

Geneva 970 957 

Henry . 902 907 

Houston 1,707 1,586 

Pike 1,607 1,595 

7,998 7,294 

13th Circuit : S. B. Browne. J. N. Granade. 

Baldwin 527 522 

Mobile 3,414 

Washington _« 501 506 

4,442 1,028 

H4th Circuit : Sheriff Lacey. R. L. Blanton. 

Walker 1,708 1,696 

Winston 715 737 

2,423 2,433 

tl5th Circuit: T. Scott Sayre. J. M. Holley. 

Autauga 787 792 

Chilton 7G6 767 

Elmore — , 1.316 1,309 

Montgomery 2,942 

5,361 2,868 



VOTE FOR GOVERNOR, LIEUTENANT-GOVERNOR AND ATTORNEY 

GENERAL, NOVEMBER 6, 1906. 



1 


Governor. 


Lieut. 


-Governor. 


Attorney-Genera I. 


COUNTIES. 


• 

u 

a 

c 


• 

■ d 

o 

+j 
+j 
d 
u 
■*-> 

Xil 


• 
Q 

A 
< 

• 

55 


• 

>> 

OS 
u 

O 


• 

/•» 
•— i 

C 

© 


O 

O 


• 

u 

% 

u 
03 

O 

■ 

3 


d 
o 


• 

a 
© 

8 

M 




2Q 


Hi 

< 


• 
>-3 


H 


• 




& 


^ 


• 

»-9 


cd 


Autauga 


810 


21 




807 


20 




803 


20 




Baldwin 


265 


4 


16 


257 


4 


19 


255 


4 


18 


Barbour 


969 


4 


, „ w - — 


967 


4 


_ *• _ — 


965 


4 


, 


Bibb 


570 
1,147 


30 
577 


3 


569 
1,114 


26 

578 


4 


569 
1,093 


25 
616 


2 


Blount . 




Bullock 


433 






434 






435 






Butler 


810 




6 


798 




9 


766 




6 


Calhoun 


1,378 


84 


6 


1,343 


89 


7 


1.344 


91 


7 


Chambers 


1.002 


12 


, ^ ._ 


968 


10 


1 


964 


11 


1 


Cherokee — _ 


1,205 


110 


32 1 


1,018 


105 


32 


969 


123 


33 



tActs creating these circuits declared unconstitutional by the Supreme 
Court 



246 



OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 



VOTE FOR GOVERNOR, LIEUTENANT-GOVERNOR AND ATTORNEY- 
GENERAL, NOVEMBER 6, 1906.— Continued. 



COUNTIES. 



Governor. 






• 

a 






o 




■ 


£ 




u 


a 


■*-» 


CL> 


u 


■♦J 


a 


0Q 


& 


c 




.o 


O 


h 


< 


« 


rt 


m 




00 




«' 


<1 


• 



Lieut.-Governor. 



Chilton 

Choctaw 

Clarke „__ 

Clay __. 

Cleburne 

Coffee 

Colbert 

Conecuh 

Coosa 

Covington 

Crenshaw 

Cullman 

Dale 

Dallas 

DeKalb 

Elmore 

Escambia 

Etowah 

Fayette 

Franklin 

Geneva 

Greene 

Hale 

Henry 

Houston 

Jackson 

Jefferson 

Lamar 

Lauderdale 

Lawrence 

Lee 

Limestone 

Lowndes 

Macon 

Madison 

Marengo 

Marion 

Marshall 

Mobile 

Monroe 

Montgomery — 

Morgan 

Perry 

Pickens 

Pike 

Randolph 

Russell 







• 










03 






• 

>> 


per. 


© 


U 


« 


U 

• 


8 


• 


O 

• 


03 
O 

GO 


« 


fc 


fc 


s 


« 


S3 


• 


£ 


< 


^ 



Attorney-General. 



d 
o 



S 

s 



754 

418 

720 

1,092 

1,242 



534 
457 
870 
969 
946 

1,490 
900 
736 

1,344 
946 
402 

1,434 
968 
736 
904 
373 
522 
514 
715 
847 

6,874 
845 
848 
576 
658 
774 
539 
296 

1,304 
728 
851 

1,458 
9(57 
470 

1.365 
976 
457 
723 
847 
580 
338 



828 


5 


4 




454 


, , , , 


91 


3 


56 


24 


5 


2 


228 




50 


3 


12 


4 


737 


o 


36 


_ « B. «■ 


2 


1 


617 


4 


43 


•mm, mm. ^ mm, 


6 


3 


500 


10 


334 


8 


416 


17 


63 


2 


3 





9 


1 


4 


mm. mm> mm, mm. 


91 


1 


273 


136 


175 


1 


28 


1 


55 


3 


17 


mm. mm> mm, mm. 


13 
6 
5 


1 


""I 


21 


12 


2 





195 


, M „ ^ 


476 


4 


59 


7 


5 





21 


9 


37 
1 
9 


23 


___. 


9 


I 


79 


m , |, .. 


3 






721 

415 

720 

1,041 

1,159 



532 
442 

824 
902 
926 

1,316 
860 
737 

1,267 
928 
398 

1,378 

• 844 
694 
807 
372 
519 
508 
705 
839 

6,305 
814 
840 
556 
664 
768 
532 
300 

1,272 
726 
842 

1,238 
923 
473 

1,365 
965 
461 
715 
849 
572 
338 



833 



4 
454 

98 



56 

5 

227 

62 

10 

791 

42 

2 

629 

43 

9 

503 

347 

438 

56 

3 

1 

4 

5 

93 

282 

181 

27 

61 

14 

15 

3 

5 

22 

2 

199 

510 

59 

5 

17 

37 

1 

11 



m*£% 

in 



18 
6 
4 
4 
4 
7 

1 
4 

~2 
11 

5 
13 

2 



717 

415 

718 

1,036 

1,133 



1 

135 

1 

~~3 



12 



4 
7 

_ 8 
23 



533 

429 
813 
862 
920 

1,278 
863 
738 

1,289 
924 
391 

•1,283 
815 
691 
793 
373 
518 
508 
702 
834 

6,360 
803 
.838 



661 
769 
543 
298 

1,259 
726 
840 

1,199 
923 
472 

1.372 
964 
332 
710 
838 
576 
337 



828 



4 

454 

98 



54 

6 

227 

58 

12 

800 

43 



635 

41 

6 

498 

339 

439 

58 

3 

1 

5 

• 4 

93 

262 

177 

27 

53 

13 

13 

3 

5 

21 

2 

197 

516 

57 

5 

15 

40 

1 

10 

3 

76 

3 



1 
3 



17 
6 
4 
4 
4 
5 

"l 
4 



11 
5 

12 
3 



1 
134 

1 

~~4 
2 
1 



11 



5 
6 

~8 
23 



ALABAMA ELECTION STATISTICS. 



247 



VQTE FOR GOVERNOR, LIEUTENANT-GOVERNOR AND ATTORNEY- 
GENERAL, NOVEMBER 6, 1906.— Continued. 



COUNTIES. 



Shelby — 

St- Clair 

Sumter 

Talladega L.- 
Tallapoosa 

Tuscaloosa 

Walker 

Washington ___ 

Wilcox 

Winston 

~Totai Trr_~.iT 



Governor 




Lieut. 


-Governor. 




■ 


§ 




• 


* 


• 


0) 


o 


OS 


a 

u 




u 


O 

O 


s 


m 


; fc 


k 


X 


m 


$ 




1,103 


774 


7 


1,054 


779 


1 
7 


1,052 


780 


983 


416 


9 


830 


426 


9 


784 


429 


535 




4 


520 




5 


533 




829 


50 


w M __ __ 


824 


47 


1 


833 


44 


1,031 


17 


6 


1,032 


8 


16 


1,029 


17 


1,319 


16 


5 


1,305 


20 


5 


1,306 


16 


2,047 


1,015 


19 


1,945 


1,011 


19 


1,887 


1,004 


312 


6 


__ __■ — — -_. 


309 


t 


— — — ■ ^ __ 


305 


7 


612 
556 






614 
527 






613 
523 


769 


767 


3 


768 


5 



7 
9 
4 

~7 

5 

19 



61,223| 9,976| 417|| 58,616 1 10. 147 1 428|| 57,680 1 10,083 



4 
410 



VOTE FOR STATE AUDITOR, SECRETARY OF STATE AND STATE 

TREASURER, NOVEMBER 6, 1906. 



COUNTIES. 



State Auditor 


a 




o 




T3 


t* 





03 


C« 


— • « 


l-t 


•— « 


« 


3 


• 


4> 




*>» 


a 


o 


£ 


• 

»-9 



Sec. of State. 



a 



a 

as 
fa 



a 
o 

a 

« 
o 



State Treas. 



I ' 



0Q 






& 

8 



Autauga 
Baldwin 
Barbour 

Bibb 

Blount __ 
Bullock .. 
Butler _. 
Calhoun _ 
Chambers 
Cherokee 
Chilton - 
Choctaw , 
Clarke __ 

Clay 

Cleburne 
Coffee __. 
Colbert — . 
Conecuh 



802 


21 


800 


20 


803 


258 


4 


259 


4 


259 


965 


4 


965 


4 


966 


572 


26 


566 


26 


569 


1,104 


578 


1,105 


577 


1,105 


434 




433 




434 


797 




796 




799 


1,341 


92 


1,324 


113 


1,330 


972 


11 


967 


11 


966 


1,019 


108 


965 


108 


962 


715 


833 


718 


832 


717 


416 




416 




416 


717 


4 


717 


4 


717 


1,042 


453 


1,037 


452 


i,o&3 


1,131 


97 


1,133 


100 


1,136 


541 


54 


547 


54 


540 


432 


6 


430 


5 


436 



20 
4 
4 

25 
570 



98 

12 

114 

832 

4 
453 

99 

_____ 

54 
6 



248 



OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 



VOTE FOR STATE AUDITOR, SECRETARY OF STATE AND STATE 
TREASURER, NOVEMBER 6, 1906.— Con tin ued. 



COUNTIES. 



Coosa 1 

Covington — 
Crenshaw _. 
Cullman ... 

Dale 

Dallas . 

DeKalb ___. 

Elmore 

Escambia _. 
Etowah ___. 

Fayette 

Franklin __. 

Geneva 

Greene 

Hale 

Henry 

Houston __. 

Jackson 

Jefferson __. 

Lamar 

Lauderdale . 
Lawrence .. 

Lee 

Limestone _. 
Lowndes __. 

Macon 

Madison __. 
Marengo __. 

Marion 

Marshall ... 

Mobile 

Monroe 

Montgomery 

Morgan _, . 

Perry 

Pickens 

Pike 

Randolph _. 

Russell 

Shelby 

St. Clair — 

Sumter 

Talladega — 
Tallapoosa . 
Tuscaloosa . 

Walker 

Washington 

Wilcox 

Winston __. 



a 

© 

a 

a 



816 
867 
915 

1,300 
861 
737 

1,261 
930 
393 

1,311 
879 
698 
796 
373 
518 
507 
693 
832 

6,279 
807 
838 
551 
662 
7<i9 
543 
299 

1,222 
728 
840 

1,214 
923 
472 

1,369 
964 
460 
715 
846 
574 
337 
973 



i i i 

531 

826 

1,027 

1,306 

1,907 

306 

613 

526 



u 



5 

>-3 



228 

58 

12 

816 

40 



619 

42 

8 

489 

338 

430 

56 

3 



6 

4 

89 

301 

175 

27 

55 

13 

13 
2 

5 

22 

2 

194 



59 

5 

15 

37 

1 

8 

2 

78 

3 

741 

423 



46 

17 

17 

1,000 

7 



767 



Sec. of State. 


State Treas. 


• 


• 

.a 






fl 


a 


• 




oa 


© 


1 


• 

tm 


P 


*m 


OB 


0) 




3 


i « 


>> 


M 


M 






a 


• 


■M 


u 


oa 

u 


s 


od 


8 


fc 


© 


£ 


c 


810 


227 


813 


227 


859 


54 


871 


53 


. 914 


12 


915 


11 


1,282 


802 


1,216 


917 


858 


41 


859 


40 


738 




738 




1,257 


622 


1,261 


546 


923 


41 


924 


42 


393 


8 


390 


8 


1,281 


487 


1,291 


490 


817 


341 


815 


340 


701 


430 


696 


429 


798 


54 


803 


50 


374 


3 


373 


3 


521 


mm mm mm mm mm mm 


521 




506 


5 


508 


6 


692 


4] 


695 


4 


831 


87 


836 


90 


6,340 


264 


6348 


275 


803 


176 


806 


177 


843 


27 


837 


27 


565 


54 


558 


56 


662 


13 


660 


13 


773 


13 


768 


14 


541 


4 


543 


2 


300 


5 


299 


5 


1,258 


22 


1,250 


20 


728 


2 


728 


2 


841 


195 


842 


193 


1,206 


513 


1,226 


514 


928 


58 


926 


57 


472 


O 


472 


5 


1,369 


16 


1,367 


V* 


959 


36 


960 


41 


460 


1 


459 


1 


707 


9 


711 


8 


842 


3 


844 


2 


574 


77 


572 


77 


337 


3 


337 


3 


1,043 


780 


1,050 


777 


775 


426 


776 


423 


532 




531 




823 


47 


825 


45 


1,027 


17 


1,027 


17 


1,306 


17 


1,310 


17 


1,899 


1,002 


1,893 


• 1,000 


305 


m> 
t 


306 


7 


614 




614 




525 


768 


521 


771 



total — | 58,150| 10,004 1 1 58,087 1 10,089|| 58,079| 10,215 



ALABAMA ELECTION STATISTICS. 



249 



VOTE FOR SUPERINTENDENT OF EDUCATION AND COMMISSION- 
ER OF AGRICULTURE AND INDUSTRIES, NOV. 6, 1906. 





Supt 


. of Education 


Com. of Agriculture & Ind. 


COUNTIES 


• 
© 

• 

O 


o 

« 

• 
8 

o 


a 

s 

6 


a 
S 

£ 
3 

< 

1-9 « 


■ 

B 


a 

"5 

2 


Autauga 


800 
254 
967 
557 

1,108 
434 
791 

1,351 
962 
959 
717 
416 
717 

1,036 

},132 


20 

4 

3 

25 

576 


18 
2 


807 
255 
967 
588 

1,104 
434 
791 

1,335 
961 
947 
721 
415 
717 

1,037 

1,130 


21 

* 3 

4 

25 

577 




Baldwin 


20 


Barbour 




Bibb 


2 


Blount 




Bullock - 




Butler 


1 

90 

11 

110 

830 


7 
7 
1 
61 
5 


94 

11 

113 

829 


6 


Calhoun 


6 


Chambers 

Cherokee 

Chilton 


1 

33 

6 


Choctaw 




Clarke - 


4 

453 

99 


3 


4 

451 

97 




Clay 


1 


Cleburne 


7 


Coffee 




Colbert 


537 
435 
815 
860 
923 

1,273 
864 
738 

1,253 
924 
391 

1,283 
812 
693 
800 
373 
519 
505 
692 
834 

6,340 
808 
837 
558 
660 
769 
543 
299 

1,255 
728 
842 

1,197 


54 

5 

199 

54 

11 
803 

41 

629 

41 

8 

492 

329 

429 

56 

3 


16 

7 

4 
4 
3 
5 

1 
' 4 

3 
8 
6 
12 
1 


535 
434 
816 
855 
912 

1,268 
863 
737 

1,259 
932 
393 

1,289 
809 
693 
797 
373 
521 
504 
689 
836 

6,295 
814 
838 
563 
661 
772 
543 
299 

1,247 
727 
842 

1,202 


53 

5 

229 

56 

11 

812 

38 

629 

32 

8 

408 

343 

450 

50 

3 


6 


Conecuh 


4 


Coosa 


4 


Covington 

Crenshaw 

• 

Cullman 


5 
4 
5 


Dale - 




Dallas 


1 


DeKalb 


3 


Elmore 




Escambia 

Etowah 


3 
9 


Fayette 


5 


Franklin 


12 


Geneva 


4 


Greene 




Hale 




Henry 


6 

5 

84 

251 

175 

26 

54 

13 

15 

2 

5 
23 

2 
194 
514 


1 

143 
1 

3 
2 

1 

10 
3 

4 


7 

4 

99 

251 

176 

27 

55 

13 

14 

2 

5 

23 


1 


Houston 




Jackson 




Jefferson 

Lamar 


125 


Lauderdale 

Lawrence 

Lee 


4 
2 


Limestone 

Lowndes 


1 


Macon 




Madison 


10 


Marengo - 




Marion 


197 
512 




Marshall 


6 



250 



OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 



VOTE FOR SUPERINTENDENT OF EDUCATION AND COMMISSION- 
ER OF AGRICULTURE AND INDUSTRIES, NOV. 6. 1906.— Cont'd. 



COUNTIES 



Mobile 

Monroe 

Montgomery 

Morgan 

Perry r _ 

Pickens ____ 

Pike 

Randolph — 
Russell - T -_ 
Shelby _— - 
St. Clair — 

Sumter 

Talladega — 
Tallapoosa _ 
Tuscaloosa - 

Walker 

Washington 

Wilcox 

Winston 



Supt. of Education 



9 

O 
O 



4> 

O 
at 



s 






Com. of Agriculture & Ind. 




M 



a 



a 
2 

QQ 



924 
472 

1,367 
961 
460 
708 
841 
574 
337 

1,052 

773 

530 

826 

1,025 

1,305 

1,865 

305 

614 

519 



58 

5 

15 

39 

1 

8 

2 

78 

3 

779 

419 

4 

46 

17 

16 

1,004 

7 



770 



6 



7 
23 



10 

~3 
11 



1 
7 
5 

18 



919 

473 

1,367 

955 

461 

707 

845 

576 

337 

994 

779 

530 

821 

1,033 

1,307 

1,888 

303 

614 

522 



57 
5 

15 

38 
1 
8 
2 

75 

3 

749 

428 



51 

17 

17 

1,000 

6 



767 



Total | 57,987| 10,034 



SCATTERING VOTE. 

For Governor. 

Madison County. — J. S. Gilbert, 3 votes. 

For State Treasurer. 

Jackson County. — F. X. Waldhorst, 1 vote. 



6 

••"^ 

7 

24 



6 
11 

4 
.2 

7 

5 
15 



440|| 57,956| 10,775| 482 



RECAPITULATION. 
For Governor. 

B. B. Comer— 61,223 

Asa E. Stratton 9;976 

J. N. Abbott 417 

For Lieutenant Governor. 

Henry B. Gray 58,616 

Daniel N. Cooper —10,147 

W. F. McGowan 428 



ALABAMA ELECTION STATISTICS. 

RECAPITULATION— Conftrwfd. 

For Attorney General. 

Alexander M. Garber 57,680 

J. B. Sloan 10,083 

James Beeson 410 

For State Auditor. 

Wm. W. Brandon 58,150 

J. Clyde Millar 10,004 

For Secretary of State. 

Frank N. Julian 58,087 

George B. Randolph— 1 10,089 

For State Treasurer. 

Walter D. Seed 58,079 

George Beyer 10,215 

For Superintendent of Education. 

Harry C. Gunnell8 i 57,987 

George L. Malone 10,034 

G. H. Bean 440 

For Commissioner of Agriculture and Industries. 

J. A. Wilkinson -. 57,956 

Wm. Cook 10,775 

W. S. Baldwin 482 



251 



VOTE FOR CHIEF JUSTICE AND ASSOCIATE JUSTICES OF THE 

SUPREME COURT, NOV. 6, 1906. 



COUNTIES. 



Chief Justice of 
Supreme Court. 



© 
& 

• 

o 
a 

>-3 



CO 

c 
a 

GO 






Associate Justices of the 
• Supreme Court. 



Autauga 
Baldwin 
Barbour 
Bibb ___ 
Blount __ 
Bullock _ 
Butler — 
Calhoun 
Chambers 



802 
252 
905 
569 

1,108 
433 
810 

1.340 
973 



20 

6 

4 

22 

537 



88 
11 



o 
Q 

»"9 



807 
258 
966 
562 

1.104 
433 
788 

1,332 
982 



5 

m 









799 


20 


21 


255 


4 


4 


961 


4 


4 


559 


25 


25 


1,104 


573 


578 


433 






788 


1 




1,336 


94 


92 


969 


10 


10 



252 



OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 



VOTE FOR CHIEF JUSTICE AND ASSOCIATE JUSTICES OF THE 

SUPREME COURT, NOV. 6, 1906.— Continued. 





Chief Justice of 
Supreme Court. 


Associate Justices of the 
Supreme Court 


COUNTIES. 


1 

• 


S. S. Pleasants. 


• 

o 
Q 

• 
»-9 


• 

P 

• 
• 


k 

% 

GQ 


£ 

QQ 
QQ 

< 


Cherokee 

Chilton 


983 
722 
415 
718 

1,049 

1,154 

1,610 
539 
448 
823 
895 
909 

1,270 
833 
738 

1,198 
928 
394 

1,292 
812 
693 
808 
373 
522 
509 
706 
833 

6,349 
809 
442 
561 
663 
770 
542 
301 

1,233 
728 
842 

1,205 
926 
472 

1.369 
951 
461 
709 
838 


108 
827 

4 

453 

97 

7 

55 

5 

228 

53 

12 

905 

38 

627 

41 

7 

486 

• 342 

428 

51 

3 

6 
4 

91 

258 

175 

27 

53 

13 

14 

1 

5 

52 

2 

194 

510 

81 

5 

14 

38 

1 

8 

3 


940 
718 
416 
718 

1,040 

1,197 

1,569 
535 
430 
825 
851 
912 

1,263 
845 
738 

1,218 
927 
387 

1,274 
800 
690 
789 
373 
521 
505 
663 
830 

6,251 
809 
840 
556 
661 
769 
541 
301 

1,244 
728 

1,179 
919 
472 

1,368 
957 
460 
706 
838 


888 
717 
415 
717 
981 
983 

1,102 
538 
435 
820 
843 
905 

1,239 
845 
732 

1,238 
927 
390 

1,266 
796 
694 
789 
374 
521 
504 
699 
834 

6,235 
795 
842 
556 
660 
769 
542 
300 

1,207 
728 
839 

1,185 
927 
472 

1,365 
957 

. 461 

, 703 

83< 


112 
827 


98 

825 


Choctaw 




Clarke 


4 

454 

101 

6 

53 

5 

228 

63 

14 

808 

39 

1 

621 

33 

8 

484 

337 

430 

55 

3 

1 

6 

7 

95 

255 

175 

27 

53 

15 

14 

3 

5 

23 

2 

195 

507 

56 

5 

17 

35 

1 

8 

4 


4 


Clay 


442 


Cleburne 


101 


Coffee 


6 


Colbert 


51 


Conceuh 


5 


Coosa 


226 


Covington 

Crenshaw 

Cullman 


53 
13 

798 


Dale 


39 


Dallas 


1 


DeKalb 


615 


Elmore 


32 


EJscambla 

Etowah 


7 
477 


Favette 


312 


Franklin 

Geneva 


427 
52 


Greene 


3 


Hale 




Henry 


5 


Houston 


5 


Jackson 


81 


Jefferson 

Lamar 


222 
175 


Lauderdale 


26 
43 
13 


Limestone 

Lowndes 


12 
1 


Macon 


5 


Madison 


22 


Marenso 


2 


Marion 


194 


Marshall — . 

Mobile 


506 
56 


Monroe 


1 


Montgomery 

Morgan 


14 
33 




1 


Pickens - - 


5 


Pike 


3 



ALABAMA ELECTION STATISTICS. 



253 



VOTE FOR CHIEF JUSTICE AND ASSOCIATE JUSTICES OF THE 
SUPREME COURT, NOV. 6, 1906.— Continued. 



COUNTIES. 



Chief Justice of 
Supreme Court. 



s 

p 

o 



00 





2* 

s 

GQ 



Associate Justices, of the 
Supreme Court 



o 



I 






QQ 
QQ 



Randolph - 

Russell 

Shelby 

St. Clair _. 

Sumter 

Talladega - 
Tallapoosa 
Tuscaloosa 
Walker ___ 
Washington 
Wilcox _— 
Winston __ 

Total — 



577 

336 

999 

781 

532 

824 

1,037 

1,310 

1,901 

303 

614 

520 



75 

3 

756 

427 



45 

17 

17 

990 



769 



579 

337 

993 

762 

530 

824 

1,032 

1,307 

1,861 

307 

613 

519 



559 

337 

994 

944 

531 

825 

l,0ol 

1,305 

1,814 

300 

613 

517 



7b 

3 

741 

422 



45 

16 

19 

991 

6 



59,7811 10,0641[ 59,311| 58,344 



768 
107013 



75 

3 

735 

411 



45 

17 

16 

991 

5 



765 

"9,811 



VOTE FOR ASSOCIATE RAILROAD COMMISSIONERS, 

NOVEMBER 6, 1906. 



COUNTIES. 



Associate Railroad Commissioners. 



a 
8 






Autauga 
Baldwin 
Barbour _ 

Bibb 

Blount _. 
Bullock - 
Butler __ 
Calhoun . 
Chambers 
Cherokee 
Chilton . 
Choctaw 
Clarke „ 

Clay 

Cleburne 
Coffee — 
Colbert - 
Conecuh 






a- 



■8 

a 



32 



9* 

0) 



<* 



50 



801 


799 


21 


22 


252 


255 


3 


3 


966 


957 


4 


4 


563 


566 


24 


20 


1,106 


1,106 


575 


574 


432 
793 


430 
783 








1 


1,309 


1,324 


89 


93 


957 


958 


11 


11 


962 


946 


105 


97 


711 


716 


826 


825 


416 
717 


416 
717 






4 


4 


1,031 


1.035 


453 


452 


1,137 


1,144 


96 


88 


1,657 


1,600 


6 


7 


531 


531 


53 


52 


438 


415 


5 


6 



£ 

o _ 

a* 



18 
3 



5 
8 
1 
33 
5 



1 
3 
1 
17 
6 



254 



OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 



VOTE FOR ASSOCIATE RAILROAD COMMISSIONERS, 

NOVEMBER 6, 1906.— Continued. 



• 


Associate Railroad Commissioners. 




• 

a 
o 

CO 








• 




b) 








9° 




O 






• 


u 


COUNTIES. 


s 


• 


• 

0) 


Leonard 
ep.) 


o _^ 

.-5 CO 




B^s 


b^ 


a 


ess 




si 




ad "~* 

Si • 

w 5* 


.8 




SB 


d£ 


fctf 


<* 


XQQ 




.a 




• 


■ 


• 




u 


^ 


O 


00 


fa 



Coosa 

Covington _. 
Crenshaw _. 
Cullman _-. 

Dale 

Dallas 

DeKalb — 

Elmore 

Escambia _. 

Etowah 

Fayette 

Franklin __. 

Geneva 

Greene >_. 

Hale 

Henry 

Houston __. 

Jackson 

Jefferson ■__. 

Lamar 

Lauderdale . 
Lawrence _. 

Lee 

Limestone _. 
Lowndes __. 

Macon 

Madison 
Marengo 

Marion 

Marshall _-. 

Mobile 

Monroe 

Montgomery 

Morgan 

Perry 

Pickens 

Pike 

Randolph _ 

Russell 

Shelby 

St. Clair __. 

Sumter 

Talladega _ 
Tallapoosa 
Tuscaloo«a 
Walker ___ 
Washington 

Wilcox 

Winston __ . 

'"Total ' __"_ " 





810 
909 
920 

1,268 
864 
738 

1,281 
925 
390 

1,258 
799 
690 
806 
373 
521 
506 
698 
826 

6,185 
808 
839 
550 
663 
767 
518 
297 

1,240 
72S 
840 

1,189 
896 
472 

1.362 
903 
460 
700 
859 
574 
.337 
993 
754 
531 
825 

1.027 

1,304 

1.840 
302 
611 
524 


816 
888 
914 

1,258 
863 
732 

1,256 
929 
393 

1,269 
830 

, 696 
798 
374 
520 
506 
681 
818 

6,187 
800 
840 
556 
661 
767 
518 
300 

1,231 
728 
838 

1,177 
903 
471 

1,359 
958 
460 
702 
£46 
572 
337 
997 
75X 
532 
824 

1,027 

1,309 

1,847 
298 
603 
518 

50,165 


227 

58 

12 

804 

39 

027 

43 

7 

472 

338 

430 

51 

3 

1 

6 

5 

90 

245 

174 

28 

58 

13 

15 

1 

5 

33 

2 

196 

5lS 

61 

5 

14 

38 

1 

9 

3 

77 

3 

747 

425 


226 

52 

11 

795 

38 

1 

628 

42 

7 

476 

314 

430 

49 

3 


4 




4 




5 




4 








1 




3 








3 


1 


9 




6 




13 




4 












6 

5 

83 

245 

173 

27 

52 

13 

10 

1 

5 

20 


1 




1 








138 












3 




2 




1 












9 








196 

506 

110 

5 

14 

35 

1 

8 

2 

71 

3 

736 

410 






6 




6 








7 




23 




_ 
















. 




8 




7 




4 




45 

17 

17 

• 1,000 

6 


44 

15 

16 

992 

6 


1 




7 




5 




17 












773 


769 
9,910 


3 




59,320 


10,012 


405 



ALABAMA ELECTION STATISTICS. 



255 



VOTE FOR JUDGE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, NOV. 6, 1903. 



Charles P. Almon, Judge. 

Colbert 522 Lauderdale 

Franklin 705 Marion 



846 
843 



Total .. 2,016 



VOTE FOR CHANCELLOR N. W. CHANCERY DIVISION, NOV. 6, 1S06. 

A. H. Benners, Chancellor. 

Fayette — — 802 Walker 1,339 

Jefferson 5,390 Winston 520 

Tuscaloosa 1,313 



Total 10,364 



VOTE FOR STATE SENATORS, NOVEMBER 6, 1906. 



1st District.- 



-Limestone 
Lauderdale 



W. N. Hayes 
773 . 
. 841 



1,614 



2nd District. — Lawrence 

Morgan __ 



W. T. Lowe 

571 
997 



1,568 



John F. Wilson. 

.?rd District.— Blount 1,091 

Cullman _. 1,271 

Winston 531 



2,893 



M. M. Davidson. 
629 
850 
768 



2,247 



4th District. — Madison 



5th District. — Jackson 

Marshall 



6th District. — Etowah 

St. Clair 



R. E. Spragins 
1,261 

John A. Lusk. 
850 
1,223 



2,073 



E. D. Hamner. 
1,127 
807 



1,934 



J. R. Gayle. 
25 
258 



283 

E. H. Cross. 
826 
592 



1,418 



1th District. — Calhcun 



F. L. Blackmon. 
1,263 



E. M. Lewis. 
164 



256 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

VOTE FOR STATE SENATORS, NOVEMBER 6, 1*06.— Continued. 

J. W. Heacock. Thomas Cross. 

8th District— Talladega — 837 1 

J. W. Overton 
9th District. — Chambers 927 

Randolph 562 

1,489 

J. W. Strother 

10th District— Elmore 916 

Tallapoosa 1.031 

1,947 

Frank S. Moody ' 

11th District.— -Tuscaloosa 1,317 

M. L. Lelth. S. R. Crumpton. 

12th District.— Lamar 800 181 

Fayette 776 402 

Walter 1,831 1,059 

3,407 1,642 

Nathan L. Miller. 
13th District. — Jefferson 6,192 

G. B. Wimberly 

14th District.— Pickens 689 

Sumter 629 

1,218 

H. S. Doster. W. W. Wadsworth. 

15th District.— Autauga 807 73 

Chilton 707 905 

Shelby 1,043 1,068 

2,557 2,046 

Evans Hinson 
16th District.— Lowndes 509 

C. E. Reid. 

17th District.— Butler - 800 

Conecuh 440 

Covington 922 

2,162 

H. E. Reynolds 
18th District.— Bibb 572 

Perry 460 

1,032 

Norman Gunn 

10th District. — Choctaw 415 

Clarke 721 

Washington — 311 

1,447 



ALABAMA ELECTION STATISTICS. 257 

VOTE FOR STATE SENATORS, NOVEMBER G, 1906.— Continued. 

John J. King 
20th District.— Marengo 724 

O. O. Bayles 
21st District.— Baldwin 235 

Escambia 387 

Monroe 467 

1.089 

W. C. Jcnes 
22nd District.— Wilcox 611 

P. B. Davis. Thomas Gully. 

23rd District.— Dale 853 79 

Gsneva 816 246 

1,669 325 

E. P. Thomas 
2)th District.— Barbour 970 

Lucien D. Gardner 

2-~>th District.— Coffee 1.569 

Crenshaw 934 

Pike 856 

3,359 

Henry P. Merritt 

2Gth District.— Bullock 432 

Macon - 302 

734 

E. H. Glenn 

21th District.— Lee 668 

Russell 338 

1,006 

Charles B. Teasley 
2Sth District.— Montgomery 1,345 

W. W. Barbour R. L. Lee. 

29th District.— Cherokes 937 34 

DeKa'b 1,274 

2,211 34 

Henry F. Reese 
30th District.— Dallas 734 

G. T. MeWhorter 

31st District.— Colbert 549 

Franklin 698 

Marion 847 

2,094 

* 17 



258 



OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 



VOTE FOR STATE SENATORS, NOVEMBER 6, 1906.— Continued. 



32nd District. — Greene — 

Hale 



35th District.— Henry _. 

Houston 



Amos Horton 
3*74 
522 



896 

Max Hamburger, Jr. 
33rd District— Mobile 878 

D. M. White 

S4th District.— Clay 1,076 

Cleburne 1,114 

Coosa 820 



3,010 



B. A. Forrester 
515 
689 



1,204 



VOTE FOR REPRESENTATIVES IN THE LEGISLATURE, 
, NOVEMBER 6, 1906. 

In the following list the vote for each candidate is given, those receiving 

the highest number being nominees. 



Counties. 

Autauga 

Baldwin 

Barbour 

Bibb 

Blount 

Bullock 

Butler 

Calhoun 

Chambers — 

Cherokee 

Chilton 

Choctaw 






l 
l 

2 

1 
1 



Names. 



Eugene Ballard 

Samuel C. Jenkins. _ 

II. M. Lee 

J. S. Williams 

Jerome T. Fuller __ 

W. A. Weaver 

Julius B. Cooper 

E. C. Hall 

N. B. Powell 

S. P. Rainer 

W. J. Jones 

John Lee Long 

Jos. J. Arnold 

Wm. II. Cooper 

T. L. Harvey 

L. T. Smith 

S. L. Burney 

E. M. Oliver 

Wm. E. Bosworth __ 

Martin V. Maley 

Chas. Rattray 

L. E. Camp 

J. Osmond Middleton 

F. A. Gulledge 

Wallace H. Lindsey. 
D. C. McCaskey" 




800 
264 
968 
969 
577 

1,062 

637 

20 

• 433 
426 
810 
784 

1.306 

1,320 
150 
112 
769 
765 
441 
448 

1,034 

52 

898 

723 

411 

1 



ALABAMA ELECTION STATISTICS. 



259 



VOTE FOR REPRESENTATIVES IN THE LEGISLATURE, 

NOVEMBER 6, 1906.— Continued. 



Counties. 



0/ o 

C2* 



Clarke — 

Clay 

Cleburne 

Coffee 

Colbert __ 
Conecuh 
Coosa 

Covington 

Crenshaw* 
Cullman 

Dale 

Dallas __ 

DeKalb _ 

Elmore __ 

Escambia 
Etowah _ 

Fayette _ 

Franklin 

Geneva - 

Greene __ 
Hale 

Henry __ 

Houston 
Jackson - 

Jefferson 



Lamar — 
Lauderdale 

Lawrence 
Lee 



1 

1 



1 
1 

1 



1 
1 

1 
3 



1 
2 



1 
2 



1 



Names. 



1 
2 

1 
2 



Isaac Pugh 

J. D. Doyle 

J. D. Carmichael 

John A. Brown 

A. A. Hurst 

R. II . Arrington 

J. A. Carnley 

A. H. Carmichael __. 

J. D. McCrory 

John W. Johnson 

J. J. Green •_. 

A. R. Powell 

J. P. Phillips 

Madison W. Rush ton. 
George H. Parker __. 
George W. Hanlin __. 

H. B. Steagall 

Robert R. Kornegay . 

Samuel C. Lacy 

Alexander D. Pitts _. 

W. II. Elrod 

Dr. A. H. Bailey 

Lamar C. Smith 

W. L. Lancaster 

J. B. Hannon - 

John A. Robinson __. 

J. H. L. Henley 

Alto V. Lee, Jr. 

H. P. Smith 

W. H. Fostei 

A. D. Thompson 

\». M. Cameron 

F. S. Jenkins _______ 

Ben H. Smith 

J. R. Brown 

J. R. Alford 

W. S. Boswell 

W. B. Baltzell 

H. Graham Benners . 
Alfred M. Tunstall __. 

J. W. Malone 

J. R. Vann 

W. L. Lee 

James Armstrong __. 

Coulson 

James S. Benson 

John T. Glover 

L. J. Haley 

Sam Will John 

Jere C. King 

R. F. Lovelady 

M. C. Ragsdale 

\v\ E. Urquhart 

C. W. White 

John L. Hughston __. 

II. A. Killen 

C. M. Sherrod 

T. D. Power 

R. C. Smith 



8*8 

o o 

721 

722 

1,050 

843 

723 

1,163 

840 

549 

456 

813 

323 

863 

145 

913 

1,209 

1,025 

877 

735 

731 

732 

1,212 

695 

908 

911 

61 

50 

398 

1,357 

1,262 

504 

566 

919 

427 

706 

486 

792 

258 

374 

524 

517 

516 

518 

643 

852 

63 

870 

6,460 

6,372 

6,420 

6,467 

6,455 

6,451 

6,326 

825 

859 

840 

563 

669 

640 



260 



OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 



VOTE FOR REPRESENTATIVES IN THE LEGISLATURE, 

NOVEMBER 6, 1906.— Continued. 



Counties. 




Limestone 
Lowndes . 



Macon - 
Madison 



Marengo 

Marion _ 
Marshall 

Mobile . 



Monroe — 
Montgomery 



Morgan 
Perry _ 



Pickens 
Pike ._ 



Randolph 
Russell ^ 



St. Clair . 
Shelby — 
Sumter __ 
Talladega 
Tallapoosa 
Tuscaloosa 
Walker __ 



Washington 

Wilcox 

Winston 



1 
2 

1 
2 



1 
1 



1 
4 



1 
2 

1 
2 



2 



Names. 



3 



o o 



E. 
A. 

N. 
R. 



2 



B. B. Peete 

J. A. Coleman 

D. F. Crura' 

W. Thompson 

D. Kirby 

M. Rowe 

E. Smith 

J. W. Grayson 

W. B. Doyle 

S. G. Woolf 

C. E. Mitchell 

•W. M. Coleman 

David A. Morton 

Francis O. Hoffman 

Albert Sidney Lyons 

Joseph II. Norville 

Eyre W. Damer 

John McDuffie 

R. Tyler Goodwyn 

( T aston Gunter 

W. L. Martin* 

O. C. Maner 

William H. Long, Jr 

John R. Sample 

W. L. Pitts, Sr 

C. P. White 

W. F. Hogue 

R. A. Wynne 

J. M. Pratt 

II. W. Ballard 

J. T. Sanders 

W. R. Avery 

Homer R. Dudley 

William J. Price 

J. W. Moore 

J. S. E. Robinson 

Hosea Pearson 

W. F. Aldrich 

W. A. Altman __ 

Robert L. Seale 

J. H. Lawson 

J. B. Sanford 

Thomas L. Bulger 

J. Fletcher Turner 

J. M. Foster 

Fleetwood Rice 

J. M. Sherer* 

Lacy 

Ilaney 

Studdard 

Edwards 

Turner 

Bloch 

Lee McMillan 

J. W. Maxwell 

W. M. Barton 



E. R. 
Q. D. 
S. L. 
Perry 
B. I). 
S. D. 



775 

511 

511 

290 

1,219 

1,222 

1 

1 

728 

727 

859 

1,128 

751 

922 

901 

876 

40 

473 

1,367 

1.370 

1.370 

1,370 

974 

979 

460 

460 

1 

1 

705 

842 

846 

587 

338 

338 

843 



1,072 

1,070 

531 

535 

837 

841 

1,03:* 

1.031 

1,325 

1,318 

1.647 

1,898 

1,271 

1,102 

300 

1 

601 

608 

581 

752 



lei 



♦Died March 3, 1907, and succeeded by Peter B. Mastin, May 7, 1907. 
♦Resigned and succeeded by J. Hi Cranford, Jan. 5, 1907. 



ALABAMA ELECTION STATISTICS. 



261 



VOTE FOR REPRESENTATIVE IN LEGISLATURE FROM MONT- 
GOMERY COUNTY. 

Special election to elect successor to Wm. L. Martin, (dec), May 7, 1907. 

Peter B. Mastin ^— '. 377 



VOTE FOR REPRESENTATIVE IN THE LEGISLATURE FROM WAL- 
KER COUNTY. 

Special election to elect successor to J. M. Sherer (resigned), Jan. 5, 1907. 

J. H. Cranford 849 

W. H. Brassfleld 232 



DEMOCRATIC STATE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE, 1907. 



Name 



H. S. D. Mai lory. 



W. A. Carter- 
Bibb Graves __. 
J. E. Foy 

T. A. Crumpton. 
A. J. Driver— — 

W. C. Davis 

T. R: Williams-. 
Virgil Bculdin . 
W. D. Nesbitt— . 



J. N. Grenade--. 

C. L. Hybart 

Chaa. H. Miller. 
R. T. Ervin 



J. B. Loyd 

G. R. Farnham. 
John Gambit — 
A. L. Tyson 



N. P. Renfro _ 
N. B. Powell— 

W. L. Lee 

H. B. Steagall. 

J. B. Goodwyn. 
E. A. Turner—. 

J. W. Oden 

L. E. Jeffries.. 



J. Calvin Wood- 
G. S. Livingston 
Ed. Whatley „_ 
W. M. Lackey 



Address 



Selma 

State at . Large 

Thomasville 

Montgomery 

Eufaula 

Maplesvillc 

La Fayette 

Jasper 

Russellville 

Scottsboro 

Birmingham __ „ . 
First District 

St. Stephens 

Monroeville . 

Miller — _• 

Mobile 

Second District 

Pineapple 

Evergreen _. 

Troy 

Montgomery 

Third District 

Opelika 

Union Springs 

Columbia __. 

Ozark 

Fourth District 

Anniston 

Calcis __ 

Talladega 

Selma 

Fifth District 

Hayneville _. 

Prattville 

Ashland 

Dadeville 



County 



Dallas, Chairman 

Clark 

Montgomery 

Barbour 

Chilton 

Chambers 

Walker 

Franklin 

Jackson 

Jefferson 

Washington 
Mcnroe 
Marengo 
Mobile 

Wilcox 
Conecuh 
Pike 
Montgomery 

Lee 
Butler 
Houston 
Dale 

Calhoun 
Shelby 
Talladega 
Dallas. 

Lowndes 
Autauga 
Clay 
Tallapoosa 



262 



OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 



DEMOCRATIC STATE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE, 1907— Con tinned. 



• 

Name 


Address 


County 




Sixth District 




M. T. Ormond 


Tuscalocsa 

Greensboro _ 


Tuscaloosa 


Ed. DeGrafflnried 


Hale 


Amos Horton _ 


Pleasant Ridge 

Vernon _. 

Seventh District 


Greene 


J. C. Milner 


Lamar 






J. B. Brown 


Cullman 


Cullman 


H. H. White ._ 


Centre 


Cherokee 


J. L. Herring 




St. Clair 


R. A. Mitchell—, 


Alabama City 

Eighth District 


Etowah 


C. N. Robinson _. 


Moulton 


Lawrence 


J. H. Pride 


Huntsvllle __ 


Madison 


J. J. Mitchell 


Florence __ 


Lauderdale 


W. R. Walker _ 


Athens _ _ _ 

Ninth District. 


Limestone 


E. K. Campbell 


Birmingham . . 


Jefferscn 


B. A. Thompson _ _ _ 


Birmingham 


Jefferscn 


L. H. Nunnellee__ 


Centreville _ . . 


Bibb 


M. C. Allgcod _ 


Oneonta _ 


Blount 



PLAN FOR PRIMARY ELECTION ADOPTED BY DEMOCRATIC 
STATE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE, JAN. 9, 1906. 

Be it resolved, by the State Executive Committee of the Democratic and 
Conservative Party of Alabama : 

First — That a primary election of the Democratic and Conservative Party 
of the State of Alabama for the nomination of candidates for the offices of 
governor, lieutenant governor, secretary of state, treasurer, auditor, attor- 
ney-general, superintendent of education, commissioner of agriculture and 
industries and two associate railroad commissioners, of the State of Ala- 
bama, and for the choice by the voters and recommendation by them to the 
Legislature and governor of Alabama, respectively, of candidates for elec- 
tion or appointment as United States Senator from the State of Alabama, 
be and the same is hereby called to be had and held in the various precincts 
and voting places in the several counties of the State of Alabama on Mon- 
day the 27th day of August, 1900. 

Second — That such primary election be held under the rules and regula- 
tions prescribed by the act of the Legislature of Alabama, approved October 
1, 1903, entitled, "An act to regulate primary elections in the State of Ala- 
bama." — (General Acts of Alabama. 1903, pp. 356-305. inclusive.) 

Third — Be it further resolved, that all white voters who are qualified 
electors under the law of this State, and who are Democrats, shall have 
the right to vote in such primary election, provided, however, that no person 
who opposed the nominees of the Democratic party in the last State and 
congressional elections or voted against any of them, shall have the right 
to vote in said primary. 

Fourth — Resolved further, that each and every person voting in such pri- 
mary, shall by the act of so voting and participating therein, stand as 
pledged, and in honor bound, to support all the nominees of such primary 
in the election and for the offices for which such nominees are nominated 
therein. 

Fifth — Resolved further, that the Democratic congressional committee of 
the respective congressional districts in this State, may and they are 



ALABAMA ELECTION STATISTICS. 263 

hereby authorized and allowed, If they see fit so to do, to provide by proper 
resolutions for the nominations of candidates for Congress or the Demo- 
cratic party in their respective districts, in the primary herein called, and 
to adopt such primary and the rules and regulations governing the same 
and the qualifications of voters therein, as herein prescribed, and in that 
event, such respective congressional committee shall certify such fact to 
the chairman of this committee at least thirty days prior to the holding of 
said primary herein called, and furnish to the chairman of this committee, 
the names of all persons desiring to become candidates for the Democratic 
nomination for Congress in such districts, at least fifteen days prior to the 
date of such primary election, in order that the same may be printed upon 
the tickets to be used by the voters in said primary in such congressional 
district. 

Sixth — Be it further resolved, that the several county committees of the 
Democratic and Conservative party of this State, be and they are hereby 
authorized, empowered and instructed to appoint the inspectors and man- 
agers of said primary election in their respective counties under the pro- 
visions cf said primary election law above mentioned, provided, further 
that each and every candidate in such primary shall have the right to have 
one person was selected by him as his representative in each respective vot- 
ing place as watcher, if he so desires, or such other representative as is pro- 
vided for in said primary election law. 

Seventh — Resolved further, That in such primary election, each county 
shall elect the number of delegates to which it is entitled on the basis 
of representation as fixed by the last State convention of the Democratic 
and Conservative Party of this State; to a convention of the Democratic 
and Conservative Party of the State of Alabama, which is hereby called to 
meet in the city of Montgomery on to-wit: Monday, the 10th day of Sep- 
tember, 1906, at twelve o'clock noon. 

Eighth — Be it further resolved, that the executive committees of the 
Democratic Party of the various and respective counties in this State may 
and they are hereby authorized, if they see proper so to do, to adopt the 
primary election herein called under the rules and regulations and quali- 
fications of voters herein prescribed, for the nomination of Democratic can- 
didates for the various and respective county offices in such county and 
members of the Legislature from said county, and to provide for the nomi- 
nation of such respective county officers either by a plurality of the votes 
cast in such primary or by requiring a majority of such votes, and to re- 
quire a second primary as between the two highest candidates for any 
county officers or members of the Legislature where no candidate therefor 
has received a majority of the votes cast at such primary for such officers, 
as said respective county committees may determine. And the Democratic 
executive committee of any senatorial district or judicial circuit of this 
State, may, if they see proper so to do, adopt the. primary election herein 
called and the rules, regulations and qualifications of voters herein pre- 
scribed, for the nomination of nominees of the Democratic party to the Sen- 
ate of Alabama or as judge from their respective districts, and may provide 
for such nomination by a majority or plurality vote as they deem best, and 
may call a second primary if a majority of the votes be required by them 
to nominate, and such second primary become necessary. Provided, 
however, that nothing herein contained shall be considered or construed 
as in any way prohibiting such county and senatorial or judicial executive 
committees from providing for the nomination of Democratic candidates 
for county officers and members of the Legislature from such county, and 
for nominating candidates or judges, or to the State Senate in such res- 
pective counties, judicial circuits and senatorial districts, by conventions 
or primaries or any mode they see proper at an earlier date than that here- 
in fixed for the State primary; and that such Democratic executive com- 
mittees of the respective counties, judicial circuits or senatorial districts 
may provide for such nominations either by conventions or primaries as 
they deem best. 

Ninth— That the returns of said primary shall be made, signed and cer- 



264 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

tifled by the inspectors and officers of each election precinct and voting 
place in the respective counties in this State, and returned to the chairman 
of the Democratic executive committee of such county on or before Satur- 
day, the 1st day of September, 1900, and that on said day, to-wit, Satur- 
day, the 1st day of September, 1900, the Democratic executive cominitteees 
ct each of the counties in this State are hereby required to assemble at the 
county seat of such county and to canvass said returns, and when said re- 
turns have been so canvassed by such respective county committees, the 
results of said primary elections for candidates for each of said above 
named State offices, delegates to said State convention, and for candidates 
for election to the United States Senate, and of candidates for appointment 
to the United States Senate, in case of any vacancy or vacancies, as here- 
inafter provided, shall be tabulated and certified by the chairman of this 
committee on or before the 7th day of September, 1906; and that a meet- 
ing of this committee be and it is hereby called to assemble in the city 
of Montgomery at 12 o'clock noon, on the 7th day of September. 1906, at 
which time all of said returns shall be canvassed and the results of said 
primary election for the nominations of the Democratic and and Conserva- 
tive Party of Alabama, for the various State offices and of delegates to said 
State convention, voted for in said primary, and of choice and instructions 
for election of United States Senators, and of choice for appointment to 
the United States Senate, in case of any vacancy or vacancies, as herein 
provided, be ascertained and declared by this committee. That any can- 
didate for any of the respective State offices hereinbefore named (in para- 
graph one) who shall have received the highest number of votes in said 
primary for nomination for such office shall be declared the nominee of the 
Democratic and Conservative Party of Alabama, for such office, in the next 
ensuing State election, and at such meeting this committee shall also ascer- 
tain and declare from said returns, the results of such primary for instruc- 
tions to the members of the House of Representatives and Senate coinjws- 
ing the Legislature of Alabama, for candidates for election to the United 
States Senate, in each of the several counties and senatorial districts of 
this State, as hereinafter provided for, and the two candidates for elec- 
tion to such office who shall have received the highest number of votes for 
election thereto in each several county or senatorial district, shall be de- 
clared as the choice for election to such office cf the Democrats of such res- 
pective county and senatorial district, and the members of the Legislature 
from said county, and of the Senate of Alabama from said senatorial dis- 
trict, respectively, be declared as instructed by the Democracy of their 
county and senatorial district respectively to vote for such candidates in 
the Democratic legislative caucus for nominations for United States Sena- 
tor, or in case no caucus be held for their election to the Senate of the 
United States by the Legislature, as hereinafter provided, and also to as- 
certain and declare the delegates elected from the several counties to the 
State convention hereinbefore called, the persons receiving the highest num- 
ber of votes in such primary for delegates to said convention up to the num- 
ber of delegates to which such county is entitled, upon the basis of repre- 
sentation fixed by the last State convention, shall be declared as prima 
facie elected as such delegates and entitled to seats as such in said State 
convention upon its preliminary organization. 

Tenth — Resolved further, That said respective county committees at their 
meeting on September 1st, 1906, shall ascertain and declare the results of 
said primary in their respective counties from said returns, as to all county 
offices, members of the Legislature, from such county, or State Senator for 
the district composed of said county, or of which it is a part, if said pri- 
mary be adopted for nominating candidates for comity offices, members of 
the Legislature from such county or of the State Senate. And in the event 
said county be a part of any State senatorial district, the chairman and 
acting secretary of said county committee shall at once certify the result 
of said primary in their said county as to candidates for nomination for 
State Senator to the chairman of the Democratic senatorial committee for 
such district, and the chairman of such senatorial district committee shall 



ALABAMA ELECTION STATISTICS. 265 

before September loth/ 1906, call a meeting of his said committee to meet 
at such place in the district as he may name, not later than September 21st, 
1906. to canvass such returns as to the votes in such primary for candidates 
for State Senator, and ascertain and declare the results thereof, and to 
take steps necessary and proper for certifying any nomination to the State 
Senate. 

Eleventh — Resolved further, That in the event any of the congressional 
district committees shall adopt the primary provided for herein, the re- 
turns of the votes for candidates for the Democratic nomination for Con- 
gress in such respective county committees of the counties composing said 
congressional districts, at their said meeting, and the results certified by 
the chairman and acting secretary of such committees to the chairman of 
the Democratic congressional committee of said district, who shall within 
fifteen days after the receipt of said returns, call a meeting of such con- 
gressional committee at such time and place as he deems proper, not ex- 
ceeding thirty days from August 27th, 1906, to canvass such returns and to 
declare the result of such primary as to candidates for the Democratic 
nomination for Congress in such district, provided further, that such con- 
gressional committee may, if they see fit, require a majority nomination, 
and provide that a second primary in such congressional district be held to 
determine such nomination as they may deem proper. 

Twelfth — Be it further resolved. That the State convention of the Dem- 
ocratic and Conservative Party herein called to meet in Montgomery, Ala., 
at 12 o'clock, noon, on Monday, September 10th, 1900, shall nominate two 
candidates of the Democratic and Conservative Party for associate justices 
of the supreme court of Alabama, to be elected in November, 1906, and shall 
elect the members of the State executive committee of the Democratic and 
Conservative Party to serve for the ensuing term of four years. 

Thirteenth — Be it further resolved. That in all Democratic primaries for 
nomination of Democratic candidates for Congress and any county office or 
for members of the House of Representatives and State Senate of Ala- 
bama, held during the current yeaV, the qualifications of Democratic voters, 
in this primary as hereinbefore prescribed and defined shall govern in all 
such Democratic primaries or beat meetings; and shall be adopted by all 
Democratic congressional, .senatorial and county committees, calling such 
primary or beat meeting, whether the same be held before or after the State 
primary herein called. 

Fourteenth — Be It further resolved. That, whereas the office of a Senator 
of the United States is one of the most important in our government and is 
a position of great honor, dignity and power, entitling the holder thereof 
to a seat In the most powerful legislative body in the world ; and Is one in 
which the people feel an interest, second only to that of the office of pres- 
ident of the United States; it Is the sense of this committee and we deem 
It but just, fair and proper that some means be afforded to the people of 
Alabama of expressing their choice of candidates for this most important 
position. 

Therefore, be it resolved, that, in the primary herein ordered, all Dem- 
ocratic voters participating herein shall have the right and they are hereby 
authorized to vote for two (2) candidates for the office of Senator of the 
United States from the State of Alabama; and the two (2) candidates for 
such office of United States Senator, receiving the highest number of votes 
in such .primary for said office in any of the respective counties In this 
State, snail stand and be considered as having received the endorsement 
and recommendation of the Democratic voters of the said county for elec- 
tion by the Legislature of Alabama to that office ; and the members of the 
Legislature of the State of Alabama from such resj>ective counties, who are 
elected as nominees of the Democratic party, shall be considered as having 
been instructed by the Democratic voters of their said respective counties 
to vote for such candidates as the nominees of the Democratic and Con- 
servative Party of the State of Alabama for such office of United States 
Senator from the State of Alabama, in any Democratic caucus of the next 
Legislature of Alabama for the Democratic nomination of a candidate or 



266 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

candidates for such office ; and in the event that no such Democratic caucus 
shall be held and no nominations are made by any such Democratic caucus, 
then, and in that event, such Democratic members of the Legislature of 
Alabama shall stand as instructed by the Democratic voters of their res- 
pective counties and be required as Democrats to vote for the two (2) can- 
didates for such office so receiving the highest number of votes in their 
county in said primary, in the election of United States Senators from the 
State of Alabama, in any joint session of the State Senate and House of 
Representatives, composing the Legislature of Alabama, by the said Legis- 
lature. 

And also that the Democratic State Senators in the Senate of Alabama, 
shall stand as being instructed to vote for United States Senator from 
Alabama in like manner and under the same circumstances as members 
of the House of Representatives are instructed as above provided, in ac- 
cordance with the vote in such primary election for candidates for election 
to the office of United States Senator from Alabama, in their respective 
senatorial districts. 

Be it further resolved, That in said primary election herein called each 
voter shall have the right to vote for two candidates for appointment to 
fill any vacancy in the office of United States Senator from Alabama, by the 
governor of Alabama, or lieutenant-governor acting as governor. 

And the person receiving the highest number of votes in said primary 
election, throughout this State for such appointment as Senator of the 
United States from Alabama, to fill any vacancy in such office shall stand 
and be considered as having received the endorsement and recommendation 
of the Democratic voters of Alabama, for appointment to the position of 
Senator of the United States from Alabama by said governor or acting 
governor of Alabama ; and in case of a second vacancy, in such office of 
United States Senator, the person receiving the next highest number of 
votes in said primary throughout the State for appointment to the position 
of United States Senator from Alabama, shall stand and be considered as 
having received the endorsement and recommendation of the Democratic 
voters of Alabama for appointment to fill such second vacancy by the said 
governor of Alabama, or lieutenant-governor of Alabama acting as governor. 
And that persons desiring to become candidates for election to the office 
of United States Senator, and for the endorsement of the Democratic voters 
of the several counties and senatorial districts, for election to such office, 
as herein provided, shall file their names with the chairman of this com- 
mittee and pay to him the pro rata part of the expenses of such primary 
assessed to such candidates, by the sub-committee hereinafter provided for ; 
and that persons desiring to become candidates in said primary for the en- 
dorsement and recommendation of the Democratic voters of this State 
for appointment to the position of Senator of the United States from Ala- 
bama by the governor or acting governor of Alabama, shall file their names 
with the chairman of this committee as candidates for such endorsement 
and recommendation for appointment to fill any such vacancy, by the gover- 
nor of Alabama, or acting governor, as above provided, and pay the pro rata 
part of the expenses assessed against such candidates by said sub-com 
mittee of this committee, within thirty days before said primary, in order 
that their names may be printed on the tickets used in such primary. 

Fifteenth — And be it further resolved, that any person nominated, In the 
Democratic primary herein called and provided for, for the office f of gov- 
ernor or lieutenant governor of Alabama and who shall be electedVto such 
respective offices, or either of them, shall by virtue of such nomination in 
the said primary and by becoming a candidate for such office in the said 
primary, pledge himself and be In honor bound to obey the recommendations 
and instructions of the Democratic voters of the State of Alabama as ex- 
pressed in such primary and as above provided, in making any appointment 
or appointments as Senator of the United States from Alabama to fill any 
vacancy that may occur in such office, whether such vacancy, occurs before 
or after the election of Senators by the Legislature of Alabama. 
And each of said candidates for the Democratic nomination for governor 



ALABAMA ELECTION STATISTICS. 267 

4 

of Alabama, or lieutenant-governor of Alabama, in said State pri- 
mary, shall on or before the 27th day of July, 1906, pledge him- 
self, in writing, signed by him and addressed as a letter or com- 
munication to the chairman of this committee to abide by the recom- 
mendation of the voters of the United States from Alabama, to fill any 
vacancy that may occur in such office, as herein provided; and if' any can- 
didate fail or refuse to make such pledge, in substance, in a communication 
to the chairman of this committee as herein provided, his name shall not be 
printed on the official tickets to be voted in said State primary, and any 
money he may have paid for the expenses of such primary shall be returned 
to him. 

Sixteenth — Be it further' resolved, that the chairman of this committee 
shall appoint a committee of live (5), of which he shall be ex-officio chair- 
man, which sub-committee shall fix and prescribe the amounts to be assessed 
against each respective candidate for nomination for choice of United 
States Senators, to be paid by the said candidates in order to have their 
said names placed upon the tickets to be voted on in said primary, and 
which assessments shall be tabulated and published by the chairman of this 
committee, as chairman of the said sub-committee at least sixty (60) days 
befcre the said primary, and the names of said candidates together with the 
amounts of the said assessments must be furnished and paid to the chair- 
man of this committee at least thirty (30) days before the said primary 
and the said sub-committee shall provide for the printing of tickets to be 
used in the said primary for said respective office, and said sub-committee 
shall have control of all the details of the said primary, and said sub-com- 
mittee shall have full power and authority to do all things necessary to 
carry out this plan. Respectfull submitted, 

C. C. Whitson, Chairman. 
T. M. Stevens, 
Edward B. Almon, 
William H. Samford, 
J. G. Moore. 



PLATFORM OF THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY OF ALABAMA, 

ADOPTED IN CONVENTION, SEPT. 10, 1906. 

We, the Democrats of Alabama, in convention assembled, rejoice that 
the true principles of Democracy are gaining ground In State and nation. 
We congratulate the people of this State on their splendid achievement in 
wrenching the political control of this State from the domination of foreign 
railroads; and we declare on behalf of all good Democrats in Alabama the 
following principles and policies of our party: 

First — That we have not forgotten the Declaration of Independence, writ- 
ten by the great founder of our party, but adhere to the same in letter and 
spirit. We believe in equal and exact justice between man and man, and 
between man and corporation. ^ 

Second — That we endorse all essential principles and policies advocated 
by Democracy's great leader, William Jennings Bryan, especially his ar- 
raignment of trusts, private monopolies, and the abuses of public service 
corporations. We proclaim him the greatest Democrat of our time, and be- 
lieve in his overwhelming election as president of the United States. We 
endorse him as the standard bearer of our party in 1908. 

Third — In line with the policies of our leader we favor the complete con- 
trol and regulation of all corporations and the annihiliation of trusts by 
national and State government acting within their respective spheres, and 
demand the absolute divorcement of railroad and trust influences from 
national and State affairs. 

Fourth — That we have unlimited confidence in our fearless leader, Hon. 
B. B. Comer, the nominee of the Democratic party for governor, and un- 
qualifiedly endorse his able, untiring and successful fight for lower freight 



268 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

rates, equitable car service rules, and prompt settlement of claims by com- 
mon carriers, as well as the regulation by law of express, telegraph, tele- 
phone, and other public service corporations. We pledge him our hearty 
support in carrying out these policies. 

Fifth — That we recognize that railroads and public service corporations 
are entitled to just returns from their investments in this State, provided 
extortionate rates are "not required of our people. In all their legitimate 
interests such cori>orations are entitled to protection by law. We recognize 
the right of all corporations, which conform to our laws, to do business in 
this State; their rights and privileges will be protected in the same meas- 
ure as the rights and privileges of private citizens and private corporations, 
and we pledge the faith of the Democratic party of Alabama to the full 
protection of all corporations in the proper exercise of their lawful func- 
tions. 

Sixth — We condemn without qualification the practice of other States in 
exploiting the State of Alabama by granting corporate franchises to be ex- 
ercised in this State contrary to our laws; and we demand legislation re- 
quiring all foreign corporations, before doing business in this State, to be- 
come domestic corporations in accordance with our laws, and recommend 
that suitable and liberal laws for their domestication be enacted. 

Seventh — We denounce the offense of lobbying as a direct attack upon the 
welfare of Alabama. We demand legislation which will clearly define and 
prohibit this offense in any form. 

Eighth — That we demand the enactment of a law requiring any and all 
employed agents, attorneys or representatives of special interests who desire 
to present their views, or the views of their principal or clients in regard 
to pending or anticipated legislation, to register in special books to be kept 
by the clerk of the House of Representatives, and the clerk of the Senate 
for that purpose — which book or books shall at all times be kept open to 
inspection by any person — the following statement of facts concerning them- 
selves and their employment, viz. : 1. The name and residence of said agent, 
attorney or representative. 2. The name and principal business office or 
address of the person, partnership or corporation represented, together with 
the business or occupation of said person, partnership or corporation. 3. 
The legislation In which the person, partnership or corporation thus repre- 
sented by him is interested. 4. The compensation paid, or agreed to be 
paid to or received by said agent, attorney or representative for his ser- 
vices in behalf of said person, partnership or corporation. 

Ninth — That we demand effective legislation enforcing the prompt ad- 
justment of claims of the people by the State against railroads and other 
public service corporations for lost or damaged freight, and for damages for 
the nonperformance of their duties and contracts. 

Tenth — That we further demand legislation fixing a maximum freight 
rate not to exceed, the present freight rate in this State and the establish- 
ment by law of a freight rate on all the articles of common manufacure, 
production, consumption, and use not to exceed the present classification 
and rate of such articles in the State of Georgia — which rates shall not be 
Increased, but may be reduced by the railroad commission of this State, 
or by the carriers themselves. 

Eleventh — That we demand legislation guaranteeing equitable car service 
rules and shipping regulations, which shall impose charges and penalties 
against common carriers for delay in furnishing cars and delivering freight 
at least equal to the charges imposed on shippers for delay in loading or 
unloading cars, or receiving freight: 

Twelfth — That we demand legislation requiring common carriers to sup- 
ply shippers without discrimination with adequate facilities for the prompt 
moving of their freight and the imposition of such penalties on said carriers 
as will force them to supply such means of transportation and prevent dis- 
crimination. 

Thirteenth — That we demand legislation requiring common carriers in 
this State to submit their books, papers and records to the inspection of the 
railroad commission or other proper authority, and also to submit their 



ALABAMA ELECTION STATISTICS. 269 

agents to an examination under oath by said railroad commission or other 
proper authority, for the purpose of determining the actual amount of cap- 
ital hrvested in their properties in this State as well as their ernings and 
expenses in operating their lines within our borders. We further demand 
that the railroad commission of Alabama, or other authority, charged with 
this investigation, shall be supplied with ample means out of the revenues 
of this State for making said inspection and examination. 

Fourteenth — That we demand laws prohibiting the increase of capital 
stock or securities by railroads and other public service corporations doing 
business in this State, unless the proposed increase of said stock or secu- 
rities be first submitted to the railroad commission of the State or other 
proper authority and approved by said commission or authority. 

Fifteenth — That we demand legislation requiring all railroads and pub- 
lic service corporations, before issuing stock or securities for the purpose 
of constructing, enlarging or extending their lines or plants in this State, 
to submit to the railroad commission of this State, or other proper author- 
ity, a full statement of the proposed construction, enlargement or extension ; 
and that said railroads and corporations shall obtain from said commission, 
or other proper authority, its consent before issuing said stock or securi- 
ties. 

Sixteenth — That, recognizing in the Port of Mobile and the waterways of 
this State one of the greatest assets of the State, and that these assets are 
now throttled by the railroads, we demand that all railroads operated in 
this State give said port and waterways the recognition their importance 
deserves; and that said railroads be required by law to make them basing 
points for fixing rates into and through this State. We further demand that 
the railroad commission of this State enforce the proper observance of this 
requirement rind all legislation made in pursuance thereof. 

Seventeenth — That we demand legislation imposing adequate penalties 
on common carriers and other public service corporations for the issuance 
of free passes of every character and for the giving by said carriers and 
corporations of free service of any kind to any person or persons, except 
actual bona fide employes of. said carriers or corporations, or to members 
of their families. We further demand that proper penalties be imposed on 
any person or persons accepting or using such passes or free service issued 
by such carriers or corporations. 

Eighteenth — That we demand legislation giving to the railroad commis- 
sion of this State plenary powers that said commission may accomplish the 
purposes for which it was created. We further demand ttyat said commis- 
sion be provided with ample means from the treasury of the State to carry 
out said powers and purposes. 

Ninteentli — That we demand legislation giving to employes of common 
carriers in this State rights and remedies equal to those given by the recent 
act of Congress to employes of interstate carriers. 

Twentieth — We demand that railroad properties in this State shall be as 
sessed for taxation at a valuation in proportion to the values placed by said 
railroads on said property for the purpose of fixing freight rates on the 
people of this State. 

Twenty-first — That we demand legislation requiring railroad corporations 
to observe the Sabbath day by prohibiting them from operating freight 
trains in this State on the said day, except for the transportation of per- 
ishable freight. 

Twenty-second — That we favor legislation regulating the employment of 
child labor in the mines and factories of this State, prohibiting the employ- 
ment of children of tender years in such mines and factories, and requiring 
children so employed to attend school for a reasonable time during every 
year. 

Twenty-third — That we favor the abolition and extermination of bucket 
shops, wire brokerage houses and every other form of gambling in the State 
of Alabama. 

Twenty-fourth — We favor laws establishing and governing the privilege 
of local option for the sale of intoxicating liquors in this State. 



270 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

Twenty-fifth — That we favor immigration, but demand the enactment of 
laws prohibiting the importation of cooley or other cheap foreign labor. 

Twenty-sixth — That we favor increased facilities for education among all 
classes of our people, particularly in the rural districts ; and to that end we 
urge the next Legislature to make as liberal appropriations for all our 
schools as the finances of the State will allow. 

Twenty-seventh — That recognizing the deep and lasting obligation the 
people of this State owe to the heroes who fought for the South in the dark 
days of our Civil War, we favor the most liberal appropriations for the sup- 
port of disabled and infirm Confederate veterans, consistent with the rev- 
enues and resources of the State. 

Twenty-eighth — That we disapprove the action of the late Democratic 
executive committee of this State in requiring candidates for governor to 
pledge themselves In advance of their election to make appointments to fill 
anticipated vacancies in tlje office of United States Senators, otherwise than 
under the obligation of their oaths of office as required by law. 

We recommend that the governor who shall be elected in November, 1906, 
fill any vacancies occurring in the office of United States Senator from this 
State, after his induction into office, by appointing to fill the first vacancy 
thus occurring the person who received in the late Democratic primary the 
highest number of votes for alternate Senator, and by appointing to fill the 
next vacancy thus occurring the person who received in said primary the 
next highest number of votes for alternate Senator — said appointment or 
appointments to continue and be effective only until the meeting of the next 
regular or extraordinary session of the Legislature. 

Twenty-ninth — We favor an amendment to the constitution of the United 
States requiring United States Senators to be elected by a direct vote of 
the people. 

Thirtieth — We favor the nomination of United States Senators and all 
State and county officers by a plurality vote in primary elections. 

Thirty-first — We favor holding a primary election for the nomination of 
United States Senators, Congressmen, and all State and county officers on 
the same date, to-wit. on the third Monday in August of each year preceding 
every election at which said officers are to be elected. 
• Thirty-second — We favor the enactment of laws providing for the holding 
of primary election in this State at which election all political parties may 
nominate their candidates — the expenses of said primary to be paid by the 
State. 

Thirty-third — We demand legislation prohibiting corporations from con- 
tributing to campaign fluids, and from the employment by corporations of 
their servants or agents to work in political contests. 

Thirty-fourth — We demand legislation prohibiting all persons who may 
be hereafter employed for political purposes from engaging in the work of 
said employment until they shall first register their names in a book to be 
kept for that purpose in the probate office of the county, or counties, in 
which Aey are employed, for what they are employed, and the compensa- 
tion they are receiving or expect to receive for such employment. 

We submit the foregoing declarations and policies to the candid and im- 
partial judgment of the people of Alabama. 



ALABAMA DEMOCRATIC PRIMARY ELECTION, AUGUST 27, 1907. 

(Names of Candidates, With a Summary of the Votes Cast, Aug. 27, 

1907.) 

The following are the total votes cast for the different candidates at the 
State Democratic primary. «s given out in the official canvass of the State 
Democratic Executive Committee, the names starred (*) being those re- 
ceiving the nominations : 

Governor— *Ctm\cv, . r >8,033; Cunningham, 36,028. 



ALABAMA ELECTION STATISTICS. 



271 



Lieutenant-Governor—- ♦Gray, 36,823; Meador. 18,414; O'Neal, 31,391. 

Attorney General — ♦Garber, 76,793. 

State Auditor— ♦Brandon, 40,536; Hood, 22,507; Smith, 23,083. 

Secretary pf State— * Julian, 52,988; McGehee, 15,691; Sorsby, 9,421. 

State Treasurer— *Seed, 52,554 ; Allen, 28,757. 

State Superintendent of Education — ♦Gunnels, 72,132. 

Commissioner of Agriculture and Industries — Adams, 12,874; Crook, 
10,345 ; Lovett, 12,396 ; Selden, 10,669 ; Ward, 15,943 ; ♦Wilkinson, 23,935. 

Associate , Railroad Commissioner — Compton, 20,728; ♦Harris, 29,800; 
♦Henderson, 33,172; Lowe, 20,447; McElderry, 17,769; Skeggs, 16,800; 
White, 20,267. 

Chief Justice of the Supreme Court — *Tyson, 45,363; Weakley, 41,714. 

Associate Justices— Bilbro, 33,719^; Coleman, 25,976; ♦Dowdell, 35,657; 
♦McClellan, 35,930; Parke, 23,982. 

United States Senators— Morgan, 81,795 ; Pettus, 78, 343. 

Alternate U. S. Senators—* Bankhead, 48,362 ; Clarke, 15,977 ; Fitts, 10,852; 
♦Johnston, 36,107 ; Knox, 25,861 ; Oates, 14,524 ; Stallings, 18,668. 



Detailed Vote, by Candidates and Counties, Aug, 27, 1907. 



For 
Governor. 



COUNTIES. 



u 

B 

© 

a 
a 
a 



Autauga _ 
Baldwin _ 
Barbour 

Bibb 

Blount __ 
Bui look _ 
Butler ___ 
Calhoun _ 
Chambers 
Cherokee 
Chilton „ 
Choctaw _ 
Clarke __ 

Clay 

Cleburne 
Coffee — 
Colbert _, 
Conecuh _ 

Coosa 

Covington 
Crenshaw 
Cullman _ 

Dale 

Dallas — 



B 

ja 

to 
fl 

'3 
a 

S3 

o 



OS 



For Lt. Governor. 




u 

© 

at 
a 

3 




O 
< 



668 


224 


434 


171 


263 


350 


322 


324 


32 


257 


1,016 


479 


737 


131 


584 


834 


508 


813 


121 


285 


743 


343 


490 


38 


489 


399 


407 


319 


331 


137 


776 


523 


556 


404 


224 


805 


803 


563 


265 


715 


315 


392 


452 


170 


69 


1,189 


221 


504 


131 


593 


405 


189 


202 


155 


225 


486 


440 


251 


507 


91 


509 


581 


518 


492 


180 


556 


449 


495 


178 


248 


328 


270 


336 


36 


163 


1,292 


944 


561 


305 


958 


467 


411 


161 


25 


679 


604 


397 


536 


210 


131 


617 


395 


313 


261 


389 


1.206 


541 


631 


179 


693 


925 


369 


700 


135 


357 


605 


367 


404 


73 


415 


990 


366 


621 


243 


441 


923 


514 


544 


673 


195 



o 



272 



OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 



Detailed Vote, by Candidates and Counties, Auo. 27, 1907. — Continued. 



COUNTIES. 



DeKalb 

Elmore 

Escambia 

Etowah 

Fayette 

Franklin 

Geneva 

Greene ____ 

Hale 

Henry 

Houston 

Jackson 

Jefferson 

Lamar 

Lauderdale 

Lawrence 

Lee 

Limestone 

Lowndes 

Macon 

Madison 

Marengo _, 

Marjon 

Marshall 

Mobile . 

Monroe 

Montgomery 

Morgan 

Perry 

Pickens 

Pike 

Randolph 

Russell 

Shelby 

St. Clair 

Sumter 

Talladega 

Tallapoosa 

Tusca loosa 



Walker 

Washington 

Wilcox 

Winston 



For 
Governor. 


For Lt 


. Governor. 


Atty. 
Gen. 


• 


• 

a 










— 


03 










*-; 

















1 u 


u 


• 


u 






O 


o 


s 


Si 


-a 


3 


PQ 


03 
0> 






' O 


o 




Z 


o 


O 


"' ffl 


a 




m 

1-9 


< 


m 

2 






0> 






/ 


m 


pi 


ffl 


Q 


H 


< 



Supt. 
of 
Edu. 



1,149 


220 


011 


. 87 


501 


1,074 


1,234 


747 


857 


575 


445 


1,740 


430 


409 


378 


184 


144 


018 


1,080 


527 


681 


121 


059 


1,307 


712 


154 


334 


80 


447 


744 


387 


300 


51 


21 


000 


586 


515 


547 


228 


184 


501 


855 


324 


207 


219 


124 


177 


497 


018 


395 


278 


238 


405 


942 


830 


545 


394 


50 


739 


1,076 


1,206 


587 


448 


602 


514 


1,419 


933 


003 


037 


124 


701 


1,352 


5,022 


4,132 


3,959 


2,037 


2,942 


7,636 


501 


409 


259 


170 


448 


803 


1,349 


307 


204 


94 


1,309 


1,309 


008 


501 


173 


122 


751 


816 


1,035 


584 


848 


479 


127 


1,345 


024 


249 


315 


5 


550 


783 


547 


257 


311 


225 


227 


728 


384 


210 


349 


102 


53 


491 


1,847 


804 


900 


107 


1.413 


1,770 


837 


023 


590 


974 


70 


1.289 


1,003 


203 


010 


24 


584 


1,119 


1,383 


224 


040 


75 


584 


1,001 


1,411 


1,710 


1,127 


382 


1,213 


2,152 


500 


335 


301 


133 


391 


774 


1,252 


1.225 


880 


010 


877 


2,243 


1,280 


1,047 


887 


199 


901 


1,023 


005 


302 


525 


258 


224 


901 


099 


390 


420 


122 


701 


1,001 


1.294 


825 


1,145 


379 


285 


1,542 


1,000 


431 


083 


174 


383 


1,147 


347 


285 


185 


142 


219 


497 


355 


374 


154 


224 


322 


656 


580 


243 


409 


144 


157 


617 


414 


321 


303 


290 


125 


697 


780 


823 


530 


500 


392 


1,500 


1,200 


1.094 


1.14(5 


543 


434 


1„957 


l t «74 


1.03(5 


1,177 


942 


357 


2,079 


1.455 


1,052 


1,295 


289 


033 


1,792 


303 


270 


123 


348 


140 


505 


085 

1 


408 


210 


400 


443 


1,070 



m 

*o5 
a 

§ 



1,112 

1,668 

592 

1,203 

630 

570 

845 

480 

940 

1,028 

1.358 

1,282 

7,361 

754 

1,242 

813 

1.265 

779 

717 

477 

1.000 

1,257 

1.106 

1,040 

1.887 

780 

2.178 

1,548 

820 

1,026 

1,466 

1,126 

487 

616 

562 

647 

1.305 

1,850 

1,969 

1,591 

528 

1,054 



Totals __. -__-__| 5N.033| 36,(28 1| 36 f 823| 18,414| 31,391|| 76,793| 72,132 



ALABAMA ELECTION STATISTICS. 273 

Detailed Vote, by Candidates and Cointieh, Arc. 27, 1906. — Continued. 



COUNTIES. 



1 

I Auditor 

i 


• 


Lsecretai 


1 






| 


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1 


6 


o 


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V 


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w 


• 


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1 


£ 


Mm 


J 


1 fe 



Treasurer. 



Autauga 

Baldwin 

Barbour 

Bibb 

Blount 

Bullock 

Butler 

Calhoun 

Chambers 

Cherokee 

Chilton 

Choctaw 

Clarke 

Clay 

Cleburne ___ 

Coffee 

Colbert 

Conecuh 

Coosa 



Covington * 

Crenshaw 

Cullman 

Dale 

Dallas 

DeKaib 

Elmore 

Escambia 

Etowah 

Fayette 

Franklin 

Geneva 

Greene 

Hale *— 

Henry 

Houston 

Jackson 

Jefferson 

Lamar 

Lauderdale 

Lawrence 

Lee 

Limestone 

Lowndes 

Macon 

Madison 

Marengo 

Marion 

18 



193 
135 
337 
802 
600 
188 
284 

1,050 

430 

1,103 
104 
340 
193 
785 
431 
28!) 
548 
222 

• 474 
275 
274 
728 
202 
782 

1.000 
700 
337 
945 
827 
404 
105 
230 
308 
18S 
012 
070 

5,077 
4(50 
797 
. w >09 



401 
215 
314 
1,372 
435 
763 



451 
348 
731 
208 
218 
.338 
433 
145 
231 

09 
302 

55 
437 

35 

45 
<>00 

74 
240 

08 
357 
700 

90 
071 
494 

01 
905 
100 



204 
120 
394 
218 
194 
2M 
480 
318 

21 
102 
105 
452 
408 
118 

(80 
955 
228 
392 
390 
754 
179 

93 
410 
142 
200 
285 
207 
315 



13 


<i3 


115 


125 


307 


400 


198 


39 


270 


419 


500 


400 


210 


081 


294 


448 


1,087 


2,119 


220 


184 


180 


470 


104 


301 


709 


118 


190 


257 


490 


70 


19(5 


07 


175 


080. 


(52 


912 


139 


314 



447 
442 

1,080 
812 
534 
393 
517 
224 
481 
018 
431 
523 
775 
733 
388 
908 
833 
408 
715 
817 
870 
73.3 
814 

1,087 
095 

1,400 
540 
700 
010 
017 
(507 
204 
008 
091 
981 

1,117 

4,4H4 

409 

1,228 

935 

890 

711 

557 

439 

1,718 

1,090 

980 



3 

o 



< 



200 

40 
441 
180 
290 
215 
L13 
1,200 
177 
308 

73 
109 

90 
108 
103 
470 

13 

240 

137 
•>»>»> 

190 
92 
320 
121 
274 

ian 

75 
314 
117 

30 
148 

79 
119 
215 
304 
107 
1,337 
183 

77 

32 
397 
100 

91 

92 
230 
101 
104 



GO 
U 

o 



112 

82 

125 

116 

134 

152 

389 

55 

20 

139 

59 

80 

140 

45 

14 

190 

27 

02 

58 

110 

04 

42 

100 

93 

108 

127 

25: 

140 

21 

13 

103 

100 

137 

97 

84 

137 

2,750 

84 

103 

14 

50 

12 

82 

18 

138 

14(5 

73 



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< 



O 



200 
291 
309 
344 
383 
202 
409 
431 
204 
409 
195 
230 

OOT 

*•«* l 

192 
74 
723 
192 
200 
240 
451 
800 
239 
307 
361 
369 
670 
258 
390 
202 
177 
137 
73 
95 
402 
520 
482 
3,413 
258 
661 
323 
317 
327 
365 
180 
098 
424 
020 






652 
290 

1,064 
840 
600 
498 
770 
962 
468 
652 
382 
506 
812 
695 
388 
884 
602 
621 
673 
871 
381 
596 
945 
982 
823 

1,171 
403 
987 
578 
455 
704 
435 
94 
635 
892 
831 

4,797 
542 
696 



1,097 
491 
400 
355 

1,248 
845 
516 



274 



OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 



Detailed Vote, by Candidates and Counties, Aug. 27, 1906. — Continued. 



COUNTIES. 



Marshall 

Mobile 

Monroe 

Montgomery 

Morgan 

Perry 

Pickens 

Pike 

Randolph 

Russell 

Shelby 

St Clair 

Sumter 

Talladega 

Tallapoosa 

Tuscaloosa 

Walker 

Washington 

Wilcox 

Winston __> . 



Auditor. 



Secretary of State. 



Treasurer. 



a 
o 

S 

u 



s 

a 

8 

a 

© 



S 
m 





fa 



X! 

C 



fa 



I 

o 



509 


439 


325 


906 


153 


83 


1,142 


1,206 


240 


1,344 


686 


240 


45 


523 


259 


615 


133 


61 


301 


1,821 


334 


1,556 


516 


77 


874 


279 


708 


1,396 


234 


162 


449 


269 


304 


756 


149 


63 


1,043 


94 


118 


787 


171 


75 


564 


419 


453 


1,224 


231 


70 


823 


191 


295 


881 


207 


77 


122 


169 


307 


368 


101 


40 


359 


175 


146 


416 


158 


86 


428 


94 


158 


430 


114 


72 


181 


45 


497 


475 


195 


59 


724 


190 


609 


644 


643 


141 


1,005 


488 


473 


1,361 


339 


209 


2,287 


123 


157 


1,452 


591 


196 


928 


145 


1,089 


1,468 


225 


217 


84 


181 


322 


421 


123 


21 


491 


376 


264 


763 


163 


146 



8 

< 

m 

Q 



252 
983 
392 
1,822 
806 
232 
242 
893 
654 

79 
166 
295 
129 
382 
700 
400 
637 

92 
411 



00 



963 

1,253 

422 

582 

885 

743 

936 

755 

556 

531 

513 

367 

568 

1,058 

1,274 

2,120 

1,365 

506 

626 



Total | 40,536| 22,507| 23,083|| 52,988| 15,691| 9,421|| 28,757 1 62.554 



Detailed Vote, by Candidates and Counties, Aug. 27, 1906. — Continued. 



COUNTIES. 




Commissioner of Agriculture. 



Autauga 
Baldwin 
Barbour 
Bibb — 
Blount 
Bullock 
Butler _ 
Calhoun 



PQ 

9 



g 



a 





• 




a 


•2 


£ 


0* 


d 


* 


M 


ri 


* 


2 


•< 


© 

»-9 


m . 

*-> 



86 


31 


6 


33 


56 


92 


12 


247 


94 


10 


88 


33 


19 


39 


1,122 


397 


44 


78 


34 


48 


102 


127 


619 


5 


43 


67 


49 


18 


80 


271 


144 


138 


63 


66 


513 


67 


1,259 


39 


39 


29 



646 
117 
182 
652 
144 
295 
245 
148 



ALABAMA ELECTION STATISTICS. 



275 



Detailed Vote, by Candidates and Counties, Aug. 27, 1906. — Continued. 



COUNTIES. 



Chambers _ 
Cherokee __. 

Chilton 

Choctaw 

Clarke 

Clay 

Cleburne __ 

Coffee 

Colbert 

Conecuh 

Coopa 

Covington _ 
Crenshaw __. 

Cullman 

Dale 

Dallas 

DeKalb 

Elmore 

Escambia — 

Etowah 

Fayette — 
Franklin __ 

Geneva 

Greene 

Hale 

Henry 

Houston — 
Jackson — 
Jefferson __ 

Lamar 

Lauderdale 
Lawrence — 

Lee 

Limestone _ 
Lowndes — 

Macon 

Madison — 

Marengo 

Marion 

Marshall — 

Mobile 

Monroe 

Montgomery 
Morgan — 

Perry 

Pickens 

Pike __ , 

Randolph — 





Commissioner of Ag 


ricultui 




• 
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a 
•a 


§ 

hi 


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w 


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PQ 

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s 

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B 


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109 
120 
419 
301 
214 
106 

33 
197 

39 



179 
188 

89 
108 
227 
115 
112 
252 

38 
139 
199 
.52 

63 

97 
134 

42 

56 

265 

1,286 

213 

338 

50 
102 
242 

92 

77 
153 
272 
161 
166 
561 

62 
246 
358 
183 
391 
564 

89 



46 

312 
29 

110 

110 
74 

268 
68 
35 
85 

129 
48 
38 
32 
14 
69 

160 

108 
54 

534 
34 
60 
16 
83 

276 

7 

20 

156 
1,285 

148 
76 
16 

123 

22 

87 

8 

124 
32 

142 
69 

359 

220 

380 
97 
58 

127 
31 

119 



8 

318 

15 

16 

118 

23 

7 

21 

266 

151 

34 

50 

7 

670 

6 

13 

419 

17 

257 

243 

69 

247 

12 

22 

19 

4 

6 

427 

2,533 

72 

115 

595 

35 

84 

22 

7 

1,156 

1 

216 

347 

103 

229 

21 

975 

44 

84 

6 

31 



79 

8 

4 

124 

193 

10 

120 

287 

323 

32 

31 

67 

97 

16 

34 

350 

28 

65 

32 

36 

8 

29 

28 

173 

345 

" 15 

107 

177 

1,245 

32 

194 

52 

230 

144 

57 

124 

341 

934 

25 

219 

1,186 

29 

986 

143 

256 

94 

104 

46 



154 

225 

33 

7 

41 

28 

11 

1,019 

116 

220 

83 

877 

545 

10 

945 

55 

216 

67 

171 

294 

115 

50 

686 

36 

13 

1,211 

1,348 

123 

660 

89 

78 

14 

601 

114 

66 

143 

239 

17 

153 

169 

98 

79 

334 

91 

19 

72 

711 

95 






* 

288 
204 

83 
251 
568 
668 

75 
320 

46 
210 
480 
208 
429 
139 
102 
828 
209 
1,322 
309 
260 
369 
156 
, 158 

87 
207 

19 
128 
256 
1,781 
286 
514 
279 
289 
267 
444 
207 
255 
154 
483 
282 
215 
219 
433 
234 
459 
409 
419 
885 



276 



OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 



Detailed . Vote, by Candidates and Counties, Aug. 27, 1906. — Continued. 



COUNTIES. 



Russell 

Shelby 

St. Clair 

Sumter 

Talladega . 
Tallapoosa . 
Tuscaloosa 

Walker 

Washington 

Wilcox 

Winston — ._ 



Commissioner of Agriculture. 



• 


m 




• 

c 


•d 


• 

c 
o 


CO 


£C 


V 


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a 

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£ 




< 


8 

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< 


• 

B 






w 


»-9 


• 
»-9 


£ 


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»-9 


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87 


146 


47 


18 


144 


53 


134 


67 


35 


21 


121 


146 


237 


55 


47 


64 


75 


19 


221 


32 


123 


487 


23 


67 


194 


645 


183 


29 


77 


143 


534 


726 


188 


121 


277 


485 


186 


408 


255 


328 


67 


20 


125 


67 


31 


155 


49 


18 


104 


30 



147 
389 
118 
389 
631 
936 
547 
398 
294 
755 



Totals | 12,874| 10,345| 12,396| 10,609| 15,t>43| 23,935 



Detailed Vote, by Candidatks and Counties. Am. 27, 1906. — Continued. 



COUNTIES. 



Railroad Commissioner. 



Autauga . 
Baldwin _ 
Barbour . 

Bibb . 

Blount _-. 
Bullock _. 
Butier _.. 
Calhoun . 
Chambers 
Cherokee 
Chilton _. 
Choctaw . 
Clarke 

Clay 

Cleburne . 
Coffee 
Colbert _. 
Conecuh . 
Coosa 



CO 



o 




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a 




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c 

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S 

CO 

Si 
a 

O 



o 



426 


314 


459 


34 


104 


361 


139 


96 


88 


265 


753 


597 


181 


577 


371 


2(55 


86 


464 


464 


265 


241 


171 


5.84 


115 


92 


401 


905 


128 


388 


542 


406 


583 


121 


320 


405 


245 


319 


539 


399 


328 


329 


234 


153 


81 


188 


638 


233 


276 


291 


669 


408 


262 


116 


376 


254 


66 


139 


164 


107 


263 


131 


389 


809 


184 


95 


142 


47 


108 


108 


392 


440 


80 


77 


502 


396 


143 



>* 

u 

u 



K 

o 



6 



.119 

SO 

71 

359 

124 

17 

566 

535 

92 

235 

126 

38 

81 

526 

261 

63 

79 

223 

456 



i-8 *3 



50 

bo 
tfc 

o 



< 



162 
177 

42 
184 
469 

<J3 

23 
25S 
128 
240 
126 

39 

96 
218 

19 
201 
2VA 

62 
196 



169 
165 

mo 

3;"V4 
169 
341 
120 
280 
44 
95 

87 
144 
237 
102 

63 
447 
749 
250 
101 



ALABAMA ELECTION STATISTICS. 



277 



Detailed Vote, by Candidates and Counties, Aug. 27, 1906. — Continued. 



COUNTIES. 



Covington . 
Crenshaw . 
Cullman _. 

Dale 

Dallas 

DeKalb --. 
Elmore - . - 
Escambia . 
Etowah __. 
Fayette __. 
Franklin _. 
Geneva _ _ . 
Greene __. 

Hale 

Henry 

Houston _. 
Jackson __. 
Jefferson . 

Lamar 

Lauderdale 
Lawrence . 
Lee 



Limestone _. 
Lowndes __. 

Macon 

Madison __. 
Marengo __. 

Marion 

Marshall __. 

Mobile 

Monroe 

Montgomery 

Morgan 

Perry 

Pickens 

Pike 

Randolph _. 

Russell 

Shelby 

St. Clair _.. 

Sumter 

Talladega _. 
Tallapoosa . 
Tuscaloosa . 
Walker __.. 
Washington 

»/llcox 

Winston __. 

"Totals __. 







Railroad Commissioner. 








• 
















£ 




■ 




<v 


• 


£ 


u 

0> 




u 

14 


u 


3 






1 


o 
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GO 


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© 


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O 


an 




a 


W 


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5 


V 


a 

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9 


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03 

O 


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289 
120 

77 

474 

102 

374 

1,073 

75 
279 
380 

88 

94 

40 
189 
791 
759 
5G7 
1,998 
321 
430 
390 
105 

84 

31 
141 
729 
737 
575 
459 
0(>4 
244 
305 
001 

08 
307 
307 
281 

49 
103 

30 
103 
233 
074 
9S2 
1,017 
13S 
498 



393 

590 
218 
200 
393 
525 
713 
500 
452 
430 
417 
204 
277 
711 
144 
244 
440 

2,420 
311 
349 
480 
515 
214 
194 
90 
423 
732 
409 
277 
487 
341 
950 
524 
530 
538 
350 

. 615 

m 

114 
301 
339 
713 
989 
581 
401 
502 



1,249 

1,035 
393 
932 
729 
333 
500 
405 
380 
217 
120 
005 
274 
320 
397 
911 
201 

2,171 
192 
288 
124 
847 
309 
627 
423 
393 
538 
<>3 
140 
538 
430 

1,401 
345 
610 
477 

1,847 
554 
352 
221 
292 
290 
441 
931 
349 
451 
113 
498 
21 



47 


230 


55 


71 


269 


108 


243 


377 


361 


151 


113 


121 


541 


446 


165 


328 


313 


470 


154 


355 


338 


113 


67 


61 


449 


201 


221 


157 


237 


63 


103 


59 


362 


243 


49 


196 


65 


184 


17 


89 


39 


176 


131 


56 


105 


307 


57 


272 


285 


275 


652 


4,023 


1,584 


2,289 


260 


330 


54 


158 


111 


553 


64 


234 


599 


197 


582 


338 


224 


79 


610 


199 


213 


65 


94 


233 


94 


1,224 


92 


1,351 


252 


136 


141 


193 


486 


175 


113 


459 


768 


1.216 


311 


535 


163 


199 


18 


502 


215 


270 


345 


221 


1,368 


124 


284 


70 


157 


576 


61 


18 


48 


99 


100 


301 


389 


230 


134 


28 


99 


270 


104 


192 


263 


213 


209 


150 


23 


120 


1,283 


384 


314 


399 


619 


508 


553 


234 


772 


441 


3(52 


254 


15 


44 


277 


98 


150 


238 


91 


78 



173 
249 

79 
523 
209 
109 
570 

65 
501 
149 

94 
359 
122 
454 
729 
497 
301 
1,670 
181 
762 
149 
167 
110 
207 

70 
184 
235 
363 
143 
795 
193 
878 
289 
270 
198 
365 
188 
148 

85 
169 
103 

88 

325 

933 

' 543 

90 
161 
109 



| 20,728| 29,800| 33,172| 20,447| 17,769| 18,800| 20,207 



278 



OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 



Detailed Vote, by Candidates and Counties, Aug. 27, 1906.— Continued. 



COUNTIES. 



Autauga 
Baldwin _ 
Barbour _ 

Bibb 

Blount __ 
Bullock __ 
Butler ___ 
Calhoun _ 
Chambers 
Cherokee 
Chilton „ 
Choctaw _. 
Clarke — 

Clay 

Cleburne . 

Coffee 

Colbert __. 
Conecuh _. 

Coosa 

Covington . 
Crenshaw . 
Cullman _. 

Dale 

Dallas 

DeKalb _.. 
Elmore 
Escambia . 
Etowah ___ 
Fayette — 
Franklin — 

Geneva 

Greene 

Hale 

Henry 

Houston __ 

Jackson 

Jefferson _. 

Lamar 

Lauderdale 
Lawrence _ 

Lee 

Limestone 

Lowndes 

Macon 



Chief 
Justice. 



a 

o 
a 



M 
03 



a 

03 

m 



Associate Justice. 



o 
hi 

m 



u 
»-» 

a 

03 

§ 

5 



0) 

© 



357 
329 
697 
792 
605 
403 

1,070 
805 
424 
374 
291 
323 
471 
486 
171 

1,489 
349 
584 
451 

1,228 

1,006 
321 
791 
706 
702 

1,218 
538 

1,016 
321 
223 
571 
245 
861 
884 
999 
978 

2,969 
335 
220 
558 
900 
616 
657 
126 



484 

305 

732 

424 

394 

368 

134 

721 

264 

778 

289 

504 

580 

460 

327 

279 

500 

292 

496 

273 

246 

563 

499 

692 

509 

640 

214 

531 

481 

390 

371 

275 

117 

311 

713 

552 

5,721 
527 

1,279 
394 
544 
242 
121 
450 



236 
230 
731 
220 
968 
270 
147 
695 
142 
1,184 
139 
535 
634 
501 
213 
297 
126 
254 
392 
194 
144 
728 
446 
181 
1,218 
854 
342 
1,356 
129 
265 
272 
96 
523 
241 
476 
1,328 
4,227 
.165 
210 
519 
496 
64 
272 
464 



212 
162 
150 
579 
170 
107 
578 
1,375 
62 
149 
105 
507 
392 
164 
386 
150 
367 
176 
103 
147 
99 
109 
149 
764 
147 
231 
113 
172 
450 
245 
99 
321 
419 
141 
161 
238 
2,335 
476 
503 
360 
154 
221 
156 
49 



757 

231 

401 

896 

322 

399 

250 

284 

664 

364 

487 

230 

467 

715 

239 

441 

305 

170 

778 

236 

345 

257 

271 

805 

204 

1,403 
163 
510 
226 
148 
385 
117 
589 
282 
735 
255 

3,508 

228 

422 

76 

1,235 
385 
394 
461 



a 




03 




**+ 




**+ 




0> 




mm 




• 


a 


U 


• 


8* 


• 


O 


s 
is 



233 

306 

382 

380 

394 

197 

433 

335 

175 

207 

228 

207 

348 

306 

130 

216 

707 

409 

413 

334 

541 

566 

178 

773 

459 

922 

289 

287 

549 

458 

218 

320 

330 

368 

579 

830 

4,282 
478 

1,054 
737 
669 
724 
228 
14 



187 
117 
1,062 
116 
59 
443 
801 
34 
293 
104 
140 
63 
373 
37 
21 
1,691 
62 
474 
166 
1,229 
1,116 
30 
1,062 
129 
110 
130 
346 
115 
94 
88 
717 
109 
45 
1,050 
1,419 
214 
1,122 
102 
325 
54 
84 
48 
416 
125 



ALABAMA ELECTION STATISTICS. 



279 



Detailed Vote, bt Candidates and Counties, Aug. 27, 1906. — Continued. 



COUNTIES. 



Madison — 

Marengo 

Marion 

Marshall __- 

Mobile 

Monroe 

Montgomery 

Morgan 

Perry + 

Pickens 

Pike 

Randolph _ 

Russell 

Shelby 

St. Clair _._ 

Sumter 

Talladega — 
Tallapoosa _ 
Tuscaloosa _ 

Walker 

Washington 

Wilcox 

Winston __ •. 



Chief 


1 


Justice. 






• 

>> 






o 




a 


M 

c3 


■ 

O 
u 


tf 




PQ 


• 

o 


a 


< 


a 
*-> 


03 
OS 


* 1 



Associate Justice. 



u 

* 

d 

a 

V 

o 





3 






1 




o 


■ 


Q 


O 


oi 


a* 

o 




A 


*-i 


H 



935 


1,338 


672 


654 


387 


1,710 


610 


792 


550 


825 


467 


562 


205 


954 


360 


413 


418 


749 


627 


609 


826 


302 


246 


697 


1,542 


1,394 


308 


1,353 


857 


1,416 


537 


293 


258 


359 


289 


365 


2,052 


335 


235 


638 


1,623 


615 


677 


1,326 


822 


561 


354 


1,053 


574 


442 


383 


352 


571 


498 


272 


881 


210 


776 


308 


536 


750 


1,106 


376 


94 


414 


161 


658 


588 


676 


86 


1,262 


293 


243 


336 


244 


31 


477 


143 


366 


320 


265 


346 


416 


228 


222 


489 


604 


308 


273 


131 


248 


450 


472 


484 


110 


226 


605 


912 


410 


712 


824 


430 


1,459 


712 


633 


314 


1,731 


944 


1,169 


1,262 


585 


979 


896 


1,050 


1,061 


1,100 


670 


1,536 


616 


814 


117 


531 


182 


156 


310 


337 


776 


343 


565 


312 


631 


570 


198 


225 


339 


231 


68 


121 



a* 



• 

I 



490 

200 

143 

114 

394 

309 

1,441 

321 

117 

132 

1,712 

133 

261 

40 

27 

74 

331 

208 

564 

277 

74 

84 

14 

Totals — - | 45,363| 41,714| 33,719| 25,976| 35,657| 35,930| 23,982 



Detailed Vote, by Candidates and Counties, Aug. 27, 1906. — Continued. 



COUNTIES. 



U. S. 
Senator. 



© 
3 



00 

P 



Alternate Senator. 



a 

M 



M 
u 

03 

**+ 

O 



60 



« 



a 
o 

a 

© 



H 

O 

a 



Autauga 
Baldwin 
Barbour 
Bibb — 
Blount . 



8 

O 



a 



888 


809 


377 


126 


94 


473 


185 


154 


590 


562 


436 


117 


66 


233 


173 


65 


1,368 


1,332 


804 


301 


30 


702 


398 


323 


1,153 


1,078 


470 


318 


254 


434 


654 


84 


992 


952 


746 


97 


130 


464 


292 


149 



292 
161 
286 
186 
129 



280 



OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 



Detailed Vote, by Candidates and Counties, Aug. 27, 1906. — Continued. 



U. 8. 
Senator. 



COUNTIES. 



Bullock — 

Butler 

Calhoun 

Chambers _ 
Cherokee __ 
Chilton ___ 
Choctaw __ 

Clarke 

Clay 

Cleburne __ 

Coffee 

Colbert ___ 
Conecuh __ 

Coosa 

Covington _ 
Crenshaw _ 
Cullman __ 

Dale 

Dallas 

DeKalb __. 

Elmore 

Escambia - 

Etowah 

Fayette 

Franklin — 
Geneva — 

Greene 

Hale 

Henry 

Houston __ 
Jackson — 
Jefferson __ 

Lamar 

Lauderdale 
Lawrence _ 

Lee 

Limestone _ 

Lowndes . 

Macon 

Madison — 
Mareugo __ 

Marion 

Marshall _- 

Mobile 

Monroe 

Montgomery 
Morgan — 

Terry 

Pickens — 



if 

© 



733 

1.127 

1.490 

673 

1.052 

571 

S4S I 

1,045 

1)24 

524 

1.457 

834 

$18 

904 

1,343 

1,130 

802 

1,021 

1,387 

1,238 

1,791 

091 

1,419 

790 

034 

877 

510 

975 

728 

1,415 

1,404 

8,112 

842 

1,4(53 

954 

1.332 

824 

743 

407 

2.212 

1,404 

1,178 

1,140 

2,405 

813 

2,331 

1,913 

1.003 

1,227 



Alternate Senator. 



00 



720 
1,001 
1.458 

608 
1.0O4 

555 

81 2 i 
1,0231 

902! 

492 
1,392 

811 

738 



1,242 

1,000 

708 

959 

1.389 

1,152 

1,747 

041 

1,249 

752 

012 

840 

504 

953 

1,070 

1,311 

1,400 

7,891 

813 

1,300 

887 

1.287 

814 

7.*18 

445 

2,032 

1,300 

1,142 

1,071 

2,142 

802 

2,300 

1,7051 

987 
1,031 












4< 








• 










c 






• 











06 


or' 


00 

a 

X! 


• 

O 

e 


00 

03 


O 


k 


^ 


tt 


C 



279 
302 
; >• >b 
507 
729 
278 
070 
882 
700 
341 
011 
052 
018 
750 
588 
440 
405 
457 
059 
944 
803 
401 
013 
521 
555 
521 
317 
540 
547 

1,093 
952 

4,022 
020 

1,211 
077 
479 
009 
411 
170 

1,049 
787 
778 
497 
928 
498 

1.203, 

1,043! 
4<>0 
082 



228 

199 
350 
113 
418 
110 
440 
213 
120 

187 

58 

t < 
129 
193 
179 

24 
139 
348 
180 
291 
104 
2(51 
155 

40 

89 
102 
139 

99 
32(5 

94 

1,090 

1(59 

153 

58 
558 

90 
13(5 

57 
202 
470 

85 

(54 
1,705 
212 
(537 
289 
257 
378 



31 


355 


314 


28 


218 


488 


52 


010 


880 


9 


204 


258 


144 


214 


310 


01 


250 


1(59 


35 


131 


334 


309 


383 


2(J8 


15 


43(5 


297 


9 


127 


431 


257 


811 


335 


10 


495 


218 


181 


222 


200 


29 


441 


306 


185 


394 


317 


73 


0(58 


255 


251 


510 


189 


85 


803 


107 


37 


505 


894 


27 


571 


264 


434 


1,128 


368 


47 


223 


172 


108 


538 


654 


83 


428 


141 


43 


198 


380 


120 


300 


261 


30 


252 


130 


39 


574 


566 


41 


018 


150 


77 


401 


20(5 


120 


710 


554 


917 


4,144 


2,(520 


29 


359 


179 


15 


827 


382 


94 


35(5 


302 


44 


(598 


321 


85 


349 


124 


80 


404 


179 


240 


317 


293 


1.092 


705 


480 


123 


389 


728 


' 29 


750 


261 


574 


725 


80 


1,172 


854 


195 


29 


327 


250 


199 


820 


800 


318 


707 


608 


28 


5(51 


313 


282 


582 


83 



229 
126 
253 
17«| 

3151 

164 

•*»• 
01 

52 

53 

74 

357 

150 

127 

116 

246 

204 

158 

400 

137 

396 

292 

216 

354 

100 

39 

311 

49 

53 

577 

675 

352 

974 

26 

157 

253 

143 

191 

120 

58 

285 

103 

243 

137 

143 

67 

685 

787 

174 

239 



K 

G 



05 



97 
(549 
125 

112 



111 

50 

65 

58 

75 

042 

53 

325 

101 

898 

596 

197 

598 

154 

50 

435 

204 

176 

103 

35 

197 

72 

34 

368 

330 

225 

2.858 

313 

86 

74 

571 

224 

191 

31 

358 

196 

183 

574 

429 

246 

346 

214 

261 

52 



ALABAMA ELECTION STATISTICS. 



281 



Detailed Vote, by Candidates and Counties, Ara. 27, 1906. — Continued. 



COUNTIES. 



u. 


s. 


Senator. 


• 

a 


• 


ed 


GO 


Ml 


3 


Sm 


•«-» 


o 


4-» 

0, 



Pike 

Randolph _. 

Russell 

Shelby 

St. Clair __. 

Sumter 

Talladega _. 
Tallapoosa . 
Tuscaloosa . 

Walker 

Washington 

Wilcox 

Winston __. 



3 

S3 





Alternate Senator. 







• 










a 










o 






co 


' 09 


03 

C 

o 


K 

O 


CO 
0) 

CO , 


a 


fc 


*-z 


tad 


o i 



1,010 


1,485 


1 800 


234 


1,202 


1,205 


1.138 


122 


533 


537 


290 


87 


690 


079 


341 


100 


082 


030 


392 


87 


709 


094 


434 


• 273 


1,4483 


1.440 


087 


304 


2,114 


2.008 


1,213 


201 


2.234 


2,108 


1.902 


434 


1,890 


1,780 


1,574 


487 


020 


590 


420 


333 


1,100 


1,000 


493 


252 


408 


370 


397 


8 



32 
15 

108 

33 

108 

37 

24 

250 

583 

241 

110 

485 

13 



890 


008 


345 


(W0 


537 


110 


419 


244 


02 


272 


393 


147 


419 


300 


171 


144 


300 


171 


514 


949 


195 


901 


024 


290 


<HW 


33!) 


293 


083 


512 


208 


113 


| 173 


23 


359 


| 312 


(58 


HiO 


| 174 


23 



09 
tfi 

a 



CO 

-4-4 

OG 



038 

27 

02 

07 

48 

48 

200 

574 

175 

171 

40 

320 

19 



Totals 181.7951 78,343148,3021 15,9771 10.S52 1 30. 107 125,801 1 14,5241 18,(508 



EXPENSE ACCOUNTS OF CANDIDATES IN THE DEMOCRATIC PRI- 
. MARY ELECTION, AUG. 27. 1907: AND THE CONGRESSIONAL 
PRIMARIES OF 1900, FROM THE STATEMENTS ON 
FILE IN THE OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY 

OF STATE. 

• 

Governor. 

Braxton B. Comer $8,499.90 

R. M. Cunningham .1,501.08 

Lieutenant-Governor. 

Henry B. Gray : 3.190.00 

Emmet O'Neal 2,289.09 

Attorn ey-( i k n era i«. 
Alex M. Garber 182.40 

Secretary of State. 

Frank N. Julian _ 410.30 

A. F. McGhee 308.00 

W. E. Sorsby 404.72 

Superintendent of Education. 
Harry C. Gunnels 210.00 

State Auditor. 

Wm. W. Brandon 1,030.45 

C. B. Smith 1,543.80 

Horace Hood 359.45 

Stat e Tre a s i ■ re r. 

Walter D. Seed G75.20 

Charles A. Allen 105.50 



282 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 



Commissioner of Agriculture and Industries. 

J. A. Wilkinson 1,549.70 

J. A. B. Lcrvett 481.50 

Samuel M. Adams 624.15 

Wm. M. Selden 3U0.U0 

John B. Ward 459.50 

James Crook 325.00 

Associate R. R. Commissioner. 

Charles Henderson 2,763.53 

John G. Harris 3,005.00 

Robert J. Lowe ^ 1,890.18 

H. C. Compton - 2,997.60 

H. A. Skeggs, Jr. 4,215.85 

Walter A. White 884.35 

G. T. McElderry 915.40 

Chief Justice. 

John R. Tyson ^ 458.75 

Samuel D. Weakley 5,371.13 

Associate Justice. 

Thomas C. McClellan 576.10 

J. R. Dowdell 434.69 

J. A. Bilbro 313.37 

Wm. L. Parks 885.00 

Thomas W. Coleman 989.28 

U. S. Senators. 

E. W. Pettus 70.00 

John T. Morgan 60.00 

Alternate U. S. Senator. 

J. H. Bankhead 3,267.75 

Joseph F. Johnston 1,597.00 

John B. Knox : 3,671.99 

Wm. C. Oates 891.50 

William C. Fitts 1,220.25 

Chancellor N. W. Chancery Division. 
Alfred H. Benners 30.75 

Judge of Eleventh Judicial Circuit. 

Charles P. Almon 559.22 

Paul Hedges 347.75 

Isaac Orme 282.69 

Members of the U. S. House of Representatives. 

First District, Aug. 27, 1906. 
George W. Taylor -^ 188.90 

Second District, March 19, 19C6. 
A. A. Wiley - 1,549.40 

Third District, April 21, 1906. 

Henry D. Clayton 2,106.20 

H. L. Martin ^191.45 

Fourth District, Aug. 27, 1906. 
Wm. B. Craig 1,378.12 

Fifth District, April 21, 1906. 
J. Thomas Heflin 800.00 



ALABAMA ELECTION STATISTICS. 283 



Sixth District, April 23, 1906. 

R. P. Hobson -. 6,945.00 

J. H. Bankhead 1,696.00 

Seventh District, Aug. 27, 1906. 
John L. Burnett 104.80 

Eighth District, April, 1906. 
Wm. Richardson 000.00 

, Ninth District, Aug. 27, 1906. 
Oscar W. Underwood 107.00 



PLATFORM OF THE REPUBLICAN PARTY IN ALABAMA. 
Adopted by the State Convention at Birmingham, May 11, 1904. 

The Republicans of Alabama in convention assembled, resolve and declare 
their unwavering loyalty to the principles of the Republican party of the 
nation as expressed in its platform — their approval of its policies as de- 
veloped by the acts of the present administration — and their firm belief 
that the best interests of all sections of the country and all classes of its 
citizenship will be best observed by the nomination and election of Theo- 
dore Roosevelt to the presidency of the United States, and the continuation 
of Republican control in all branches of the general government. To that 
end the delegation from this State to the Republican national convention 
is instructed and directed to cast its vote solidly for Theodore Roosevelt 
as our nominee for President ; and all citizens who place principles above 
party, and who love their country's welfare more than sectional aggran- 
dizement, are exhorted to unite with us in placing Alabama where she 
properly belongs, foremost in 'the states in material prosperity and at the 
head of the Republican column. 

After four years of Democratic misrule, during which national finances 
were mismanaged, causing a deficit, and requiring the necessity of issuing 
new bonds to protect the credit of the government, the industries of the 
country paralyzed, labor neglected, wages reduced and the agricultural 
interests ignored, the people, seeking relief from these errors, again invoke 
the protection of a Republican administration. With the inauguration of 
the foremost American of his time — William McKinley, and the restoration 
to power of a party pledged to the encouragement of domestic activity, and 
an honest and unwavering system of finance, and the expansion of our 
commercial interest, these conditions have been reversed and under the 
guidance of that other great American, Theodore Roosevelt, the social and 
industrial advancement so auspiciously inaugurated has been maintained, 
and will remain steady and permanent. 

PANAMA CANAL. 

We endorse the President's action touching the Panama Canal, by which 
the American flag will float forever over a great inter-oceanic water-way, 
long desired and daily sought by the great commercial nations, bringing to- 
gether in closer relations our great centers of commerce and forging a link 
that brings our eastern and western coasts into neighborly communication. 
a commercial gain in time of peace, and an American necessity in time of 
war. 

PROTECTIVE TARIFF. 

Under a protective tariff this city in which we are now assembled 
was born and under a protective tariff has become the foremost city in 



284 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

commercial prosperity In the South. We stand squarely by the principles 
that a protective tariff is required to maintain the highest scale of # Ameri- 
can wages, and the supremacy of the American workshop. 

MANHOOD SUFFRAGE. 

The permanency of a Republican government is based upon a pure and 
free ballot. We are opposed to either its corruption or its limitation by 
depriving any citizen of the United States anywhere of the right to de- 
posit his vote, except for causes permitted by the constitution. To this 
end we demand the protection and permanency of all civil and political 
rights of our citizens, without discriminaion as to race or color. 

RAILROAD COMMISSION. 

The railroads, and other instruments of development and adjuncts of com- 
merce ,shon1d be encouraged and fostered, but not in sacrifice of the rights 
of the public. Such questions are not within themselves political and we 
depreciate and condemn the injection into the political arena in this State 
of any question tending to disturb the peaceful relations hitherto existing 
between our people and these great arteries of trade, and aids to civili- 
zation. We favor the election of no man for president of the railroad com- 
mission whose interests, public or private, tend to place uim In the posi- 
tion of having prejudged any question upon which he may he called to pass 
judicially. 

As one of the foremost Republicans of today we favor as our candidate 
for vice-president, Hon. C. W. Fairbanks, of Indiana, and our delegates to 
the national Republican convention are instructed to vote for him for this 
place and to use all honorable means to secure his nomination. 



REPUBLICAN STATE COMMITTEE. 

Elected May 11, 1904. 

Jos. O. Thompson, Chairman Birmingham. 

N. L. Steele, Secretary Birmingham. 

First District. 

P. D. Barker Mobile. 

James M. Peterson Mobile. 

A. N. Johnson Mobile. 

G. B. Deans Mobile. 

Second District. 

W. C. Starke -> Troy. 

II. F. Irwin Montgomery. 

Julius Sternfeldt Montgomery. 

B. S. Perdue Greenville. 

Third District. 

Byron Trammell Dothan. 

C. M. Cox __Ozark. 

W. S. Mullins Elba. 

Thomas Tennelle _-, Eufaula. 

Fourth District. 

J. H. Bingham -__' „ - Talladega. 

F. O. Dudley— 1 Clanton. 

W. F. Aldrich Aldrich. 

John Hollingsworth Lincoln. 



ALABAMA ELECTION STATISTICS. 285 

Fifth District. 

Hiram Gibson , „ ^ Roanoke. 

W. V, Chambliss- Tuakegee. 

J. (V Manning •_-._ Alexander City. 

G. N. King— _ Edwardsvllle. 

Sixth District.. 

D. N. Cooper Hamilton. 

H. T." Nations —Cordova. 

J. D. Fowler Dobbs. 

W. II. Chapman Livingston. 

Seventh District. 

R. E. Anderson .__ Ft. Payne. 

C. B. KenntMunr v + Guntersville. 

J. W. Porter . Center. 

J. R. Curtis _ _^ ——Double Springs. 

Eighth District. 

J. A. Steele _. Huntsville. 

A. N. Holland- Scottsboro. 

v». O. Chenanlt Moulton. 

C. E. Hutehens ,_____HuntsviIle. 

Ninth District. 

J. I. Armstrong * Double Springs. 

N. C. Fuller Centerville. 

J. W. Clayton— : Ensley. 

J. W. Hughes Birmingham. 



SUMMARY OF THE PLATFORM OF THE REPUBLICAN STATE CON- 
VENTION SEPT. 2, 1906. 

The report of the committee on platform touched upon the following 
points : 

The national platform as endorsed by the last Republican national con- 
vention was endorsed. 

The present state administration of the laws was condemned as weak 
and inefficient and as leading to mob violence and other infractions of 
the law. 

The platform opposes tampering with the tariff laws, recommending that 
"well enough be let alone." 

The action of President Roosevelt in enforcing the eight hour laws was 
endorsed. 

President Roosevelt was called upon to sink his personal desires and 
yield to the wishes if the party and stand for a third term. 

Favored a better educational system in the State, condemning the present 
system as inadequate and discriminating against the rural districts. 

The platform called for better roads, and the enactment of laws that 
will permit every community to. tax itself for the purpose of raising funds 
for educational and good roads purposes. 

Local option was favored. 

The endorsement of anti-child labor laws endorsed. 

The platform favors the enactment of legislation which will regulate 
the railroads and public service corporations, to an extent that will give all 
a square deal, but not to a degree that, will injure legitimate enterprise. 

Lynch law and mob violence strongly condemned. ii 



286 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

A SECOND REPUBLICAN STATE COMMITTEE. 

The names below constitute another Republican State Committee, elected 
Sept. 2, 1906, by a Convention which met in Birmingham, and which also 
put out a State ticket headed by Asa E. Stratton, for Governor. 

State at Large. 

J. W. Davidson, Birmingham, Chairman. 
R. E. S. Rives, Birmingham, Secretary. 

T. H. Aldricb, Birmingham. W. I. Wellman, Huntsville. 

F. G. Bromberg, Mobile. John Towers, Birmingham. 

J. W. Hughes, Birmingham. John Standi fer, Alabama City. 

John H. Wilson, Oxford. Charles Alexander, Attalla. 

T. B. Morton, Birmingham. J. I. Armstrong, Cullman. 

J. B. Shields, Jasper. B. H. Nicholson, Attalla. 

W. H. Smith, Birmingham. Geo. F. Jackson, Birmingham. 

D. C. Dinwiddle, Bay Minette. W. C. Elder, Clanton. 

From Congressional Districts. 

First. — A. J. Spencer, Mobile. 
S. A. Leonard, Mobile. 

Second. — A. E. Stratton, Montgomery. 
W. S. Reese, Montgomery. 

Third— D. B. Dyer, Opelika. 

Fourth.— W. F. Aldrich, Aldrich. 

J. C. Hollingsworth, Lincoln. 

Fifth.— P. E. Alexander, Prattville. 

S. H. Carlisle, Alexander City. 

Sixth. — D. N. Cooper, Lunsford. 

James M. Cranford, Jasper. 

Seventh. — Geo. T. Beyer, Cullman. 

R. E. Anderson, Fort Payne. 

Eighth. — J. R. Looney, Sheffield. 

Ninth.— J. Clyde Miller, Birmingham. 
F. M. Johnson, Bessemer. 



PLATFORM OF THE SOCIALIST PARTY OF ALABAMA. 

Adopted July 4, 1906. 

The Socialist Party of Alabama, in convention assembled, hereby declares 
allegiance to the principles of International Socialism, and' the principles 
and platform of the Socialist Party of America, and submit our platform 
and candidates to the consideration of the workers of the State, whether in 
field, shop, mine or office; farmers, laborers, skilled mechanics or profes- 
sionals. 

We advocate: 

I. The abolition of the poll tax. Since its Intent and effect is to dis- 
franchise the poor and is a source of political corruption, it is subversive 
of every principle of political honor and equality. 



ALABAMA ELECTION STATISTICS. 287 

2. All private property to be assessed at Its full value, and all corporate 
property to be assessed at its capitalized^ value, and a sufficient per centage 
of such tax to be set aside for school building and the maintenance of pub- 
lic schools. 

3. Education to be free to all, and compulsory to all children under 14 
years of age ; text books to be printed by the State and furnished free to all 
public schools. 

4. That employment of children under 14 years of age in mines, factories 
and shops be prohibited by statutory law, violations to be punishable by 
fine and imprisonment. 

5. The enactment of a statute fixing the hours of toil, not more than 8 
hours In 24 to constitute a legal day's work in all mines, mills, factories and 
State works. 

6. The abolition of the check system, and all wages to be paid weekly 
in United States currency. • 

7. That all employers, private individuals and corporations, be held re- 
sponsible for the death or injury of any employee, through lack of safety ap- 
pliances or other causes, while in their employment. 

8. The reformation of our penal system and abolishment of the lease 
system and employment of the convicts by the State, under State super- 
vision, in producing their food, clothing and other necessities, and all not 
so occupied to be employed in building, improving and maintaining a sys- 
tem of public roads throughout the State. 

9. The election of all public officers by direct vote of the people, and the 
right of recall of any officer who fails to carry out any pledge made to his 
constituency. 

10. The submission of all laws to the people for their ratification or re- 
jection before becoming operative — the Initiative and referendum. 

11. That all incorporated towns and cities be assured the fullest measure 
of local self-government, the will of the people to be supreme, with full 
power to issue bonds and to own and operate public utilties, and everything 
they may think proper to own collectively. 

12. That all printing of the State of Alabama bear the Typographical 
Union label. 

Finally, we ask: Has any other political party proposed any measure 
that will afford the same relief from the oppression now afflicting the peo- 
ple of Alabama? 

SOCIALIST PARTY IN ALABAMA. 

Thomas N. Freeman, Secretary Fairhope, Ala. 



XI. BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS IN 

ALABAMA. 

Hillman Hospital, founded, 1903; maintained as a private corporation." 

St. Vincent's Hospital, founded, 1900; supervised and maintained by 
the Sisters of Charity. 

Mebcy Home, founded, 1892; supervised and maintained by the Women's 
Christian Temperance Union of Birmingham; for the care of friendless 
women and children. 

CULLMAN. 

Odd Fellows' Orphanage, founded 1907; supervised and maintained by 
the Alabama Grand Lodge, I. O. O. F. for the care and training of orphans; 
both sexes to be admitted. Not yet opened. 

EAST LAKE. 

East Lake Orphans' Home, founded, 1903; supervised and maintained 
by the Sisters of Charity; for the care of homeless orphans; both sexes 

admitted. 

Alabama Boys' Industrial School, founded, 1899; maintained by the 
State of Alabama; for the care and training of youthful prisoners. 

EVERGREEN. 

Louise Short Baptist Home, founded, 1893: maintained by the Baptist 
Church of Alabama; for the care and training of indigent orphans*; both 
sexes admitted. 

HUNTSVILLE. 

County and City Hospital, founded. 1891; maintained by Madison coun 
ty and city of Huntsville; for small-pox patients. 

MOBILE. 

Church Home, founded, 1860; maintained by the Episcopal Diocese of 
Alabama; fcr the training of children fcr citizenship; both sexes admitted. 

St. Mary's Industrial School and Orphanage, founded, 1847; super- 
vised and maintained by the Brothers of the Sacred Heart; for the care 
and training of orphan boys. 

Protestant Orphan Asylum, founded, 1839; maintained by the Protest- 
ant Orphan Asylum Society; for the care of indigent orphans; both sexes 
admitted. 

St. Mary's Female Orphan Asylum, founded, supervised and main- 
tained by the Sisters of Charity; tor the care of orphan girls. 

City Hospital of Mobile, founded, 1830; supervised and partly main 
tained by the Sisters of Charity. 

Providence Infirmary, founded, 1855; supervised and maintained by the 
Little Sisters of the Poor; for the care of the aged poor. 

U. S. Marine Hospital, founded 1843; maintained by U. S. Public Health 
and Marine Hospital Service; for American merchant seamen. 

The Benevolent Home, founded, 1897; supervised and maintained by 
the Mobile Female Benevolent Society; for aged and infirm women. 

(288) 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS OF ALABAMA. 289 

Colored Old Folks and Orphan Home, founded, 1897; supervised and 
maintained by the Colored Old Folks and Orphan Home Society; for tho 
care of homeless colored men, women, and children. 

Home, fob the Aged, founded, 1901; supervised and maintained' by (the 
Little Sisters of thePdor; for the care cf the aged poor. 

St. Anthony's/Academy, supervised and maintained by the Bisters of 
St. Francis. 

MONTGOMERY. 

St Margaret's Hospital, founded, 1902; supervised and . maintained by 
the Sisters of Charity. 

City Infirmary; supervised and maintained by the Infirmary Aid As- 
sociation. 

Hale Infirmary, (negro), founded, 1889; supervised and maintained by 
a city federation of negro citizens. 

The Working Women's Home, founded,' 1881; supervised and maintain 
cd by the Working Women's Home Association; for the benefit of indigent 
working women. 

St. Joseph's College for Negro Catechists; supervised and maintained 
by the Josephite Fathers; for the instruction of negro young men. 

West End Neighborhood Home ; supervised and maintained by St. John's 
Episcopal Church; fcr the instruction and care of young children of work- 
ing women; both sexes admitted. 

MOUNTAIN CREEK. 

\ 
Confederate Soldier's Home, founded, 1901 ; maintained by the State of 

Alabama ; for indigent Confederate veterans. 

MOUNT VERNON. 

Mt. Vernon Hospital; maintained by the State of Alabama; for the care 
of the negro insane; under the same management as the Alabama Bryce 
Insane Hospital at Tuscaloosa. 

SELMA. 

Selma Infirmary, founded, 1890; maintained by the Society of Unite** 
Charities. 

Selma Hospital, founded, 1889; maintained by the Society of United 
Charities; for negro patients. 

SUMMERFIELD. 

Alabama Methodist Orphanage, founded, 1890; maintained by the Ala- 
bama Methodist Episcopal Church, South; for the care and training of 
orphan children ; both sexes admitted. 

TALLADEGA. 

Presbyterian Orphans' Home, founded, 18<>8; maintained by the Synod 
of Alabama ; for the support of destitute children ; both sexes admitted. 

Alabama Schools for the Deaf and Blind, founded, 18G0; and enlarged, 
1882, and 1892; maintained by the State of Alabama; for deaf and blind 
children ; the administration and conduct of schools and buildings for races 

separate. 

TUSCALOOSA. 

Alabama Bryce Insane Hospital, founded, 1852; maintained by the 
State of Alabama ; for the care of the insane. 

Stillman Institute, supervised and maintained by the Southern Presby- 
terian Church ; for the instruction of negro divinity students. 

19. 



XII. NEWSPAPERS AND PERIODICALS 
PUBLISHED IN ALABAMA. 



Abbreviations : — w.— weekly ; d.— daily ; m. — monthly ; s. m. — 
semi-monthly ; qr. — quarterly ; D.— Democrat ; R,— Republican ; Ind. 
— Independent. 

Abbeville. — Times, w. D. 

News. w. D. 
Albertville. — Marshall Banner, w. D. 
Alexander City. — Outlook, w. D. 
Andalusia. — News. w. D. 

Times, w. D. 
Anniston. — Evening Star. d. D. 

Hot Blast, d. Ind. D. 
Republic, w. D. 
Times, w. Ind. D. 
Baptist Leader. (Negro.) w. 
Ashland. — Standard, w. D. 
Ashville. — Southern Aegis, w. Ind. 
Athens. — Alabama Courier, w. D. 

Limestone Democrat, w. D. 
Atmore. — Spectrum, w. D. 
Attalla. — Mirror, w. Ind. 
Auburn. — Orange and Blue. m. College. 
Avondale. — Budget, w. Non-partisan. 
Bay Minette. — Baldwin Times, w. D. 
Bayou La Batre. — Seaside Whistler, w. D. 
Bessemer. — Bessemer Weeklv. w. Ind. D. 

Journal, w. D. 
Workman, w. D. 
Birmingham. — Advance, m. 

Age-Herald, d. and w. D. 
Alabama Baptist, w. 
Alabama Christian, m. 
Alabama Christian Advocate, w. 
Alabama Citizen, s. m. 
Alabama Medical Journal, m. 

Alabama White Ribbon, m. 
(290) 



NEWSPAPERS AND PERIODICALS. 291 

Birmingham. — Continued. 

Blade, w. 

Boys' Banner, s. m. School. 

Budget, w. 

Christian Hope. (Negro.) w. 

Courier (German), w. Ind. 

Dixie Home. m. 

Dixie Manufacturer, s. m. 

Educational Exchange, m. 

Endeavor of Alabama, m. 

Eye. (Negro.) w. R. 

Farmers Union Guide, w. 

Fisherman, m. 

Jones Valley Times, w. D. 

Labor Advocate, w. 

Ledger, d. D. 

Mineral Belt Gazette, w. Ind. R. 

Negro Enterprse. (Negro.) s. m. 

News. d. D. 

North Birmingham Comet,, w. 

Odd Fellows Home Companion. 
. Republican, w. 

Silent Eye. w. D. 

Southern Farmer, m. 

Times, w. R. 

Truth. (Negro.) w. 

Union Educator and Diversified Farmer, 
s. m. 

Wide- Awake. (Negro.) w. R. 
BoAz.^-Sand Mountain Record, w. Non-partisan. 
Brewton. — Pine Belt News. w. D. 

Standard, w. D. 
Bridgeport. — Alabama White Ribbon, m. 

Record, w. Non-political. 
Brundidge. — News. w. D. 
Butler. — Choctaw Advocajte. w. D. 
CALERA.-^-New Era. w. 
Camden. — Wilcox Banner, w. D. 

Wilcox Progressive Era. w. D. 
Camp Hill. — Times, w. D. 
Carbon Hill. — Enterprise-Democrat, w. 
Carrollton. — Alabamian-Herald. w. D. 
Centre. — Cherokee Harmonizer. w. D. 

Coosa River News. w. D. 
Centreville. — Press, w. D. 

ClTRONELLE. — Call. W. 



292 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

Clanton. — Banner, w. Ind. D. 

Union, w. R. . 
Clayton. — Record, w. D„ 
Clio. — Free Press, w. 
Collin&ville. — Courier, w. 
Columbia. — Breeze., w. D. 
Columbiana. — People's Advocate, w. Populist. 

Sentinel, w. D. 
Shelby Chronicle, w. D. 
Cordova. — News. w. 
Cullman. — Democrat, w. D. 

Tribune; w. D. 
Dadeville. — Spot Cash. w. D. 

Tallapoosa Courier, w. D. 
Daphne. — Baldwin Countv Whistle, w. 

Standard, w. Ind. D. 
Decatur. — News. w. D. 
Demopolis. — Times, w. D. 
Dothan. — Eagle, w. D. 

Home-Journal, w. D. 
Siftings. d. D. 
Wire-Grass Sittings, w. D. 
Double Springs. — New Era Herald, w. D. 
East Lake. — Howard Collegian, m. 
Edwardsville. — Enterprise, w. D. 
Elba. — Clipper, w.. D. 
Ensley. — Enterprise, w. 

Herald, w. Ind. 
Sun. w. D. 
Enterprise. — People's Ledger, w. D. 
Eppes. — Sumter Countv Call. w. D. 
Eufaula. — Times, d. D. 

Times and News. w. D. 
EuTaw. — Greene Countv Democrat, w. D. ' 
Western Guide. (Negro.) s. m. R. 
Whig and Observer, w. D. 
Evergreen. — Connecuh Record. ♦ w. Ind. 

Courant. w. D. 
Fayette. — Banner, w. 
Florala. — News. w. D. 
Florence. — Herald, w. D. 

Times, w. D. 
Fort Deposit. — Methodist Protestant Telephone, s. m. 
Fort Payne. — De Kalb Record, w. D. 

Journal, w. D. 



NEWSPAPERS AND PERIODICALS. 293 

Fruitdale. — Herald, w. Ind. 
Gadsden. — Evening Journal, d. D. 

Times-News. s. w. D. 
Girard. — Chattahoochee Workman, w. 
GooDWATER.-^-Enterprise. w. D. 
GoRDo.^-Messenger* w. 
Greensboro. — Alabama Beacon. ,w. D. 

Record, w. D. 

Review and Bulletin of the Southern Uni- 
versity. Bi-Monthly. 

Watchman, w. D. 
Greenville.— Advocate, w. D. 

Living Truth, w. D. 

St. Joseph Defender. (Negro.) s. m. 
Grove Hill.— Clarke County Democrat, w. D. 
Guntersville: — Democrat, w. D. 
Gurley. — Herald, w. D. 
Hamilton. — Marion County News. w. D. 
Hanceville.— Hustler, w. D. 
Hartford. — Advocate. w» 

Times-Herald, -s. w. D. 
Hartsrlle. — Enquirer, w. D. 
Hayneville.— Citizen-Examiner, w. D. 
Headland. — Post. w. D. 
Heflin.— New Era. w. D. 
Huntsville. — Democrat, w. D. 

Evening Banner, d. D. 

Herald, w. D. 

Journal. (Negro.) w. Ind. Rep. 

Mercury, d. and w. D. 

Tribune, d. and w. R. 
Jackson.— South Alabamian. s. w. D. 
Jacksonville. — Record, w. 
Jasper. — Mountain Eagle, w. D. 
Lafayette. — Sun. w. D. 
Leighton. — News. w. D. 
Linden. — Marengo Democrat, w. D. 

Reporter, w. D. 
Lineville. — Headlight, w. D. 
Livingston. — Our Southern Home. w. D. 

Sumter County Sun. w. D. 
Luverne. — Crenshaw County Critic, w. Ind. D. 

Journal, w. D. 
Madison Station. — Sun. (Negro.) w. Non-partisan. 



294 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

Marion. — Democrat, w. D. 
Standard, w. D. 
Mobile. — Alabama Staats-Zeitung (German), w. Ind. 
Announcer, w. (Negro.) 
Baptist Banner, w. (Negro.) 
Baptist Leader, w. (Negro.) 
Belfry, m. 

Farm and Floral World, w. 
Herald, d. D. 
Item. d. Ind. 

Medical and Surgical Journal, m. 
Press. (Negro.) w. R. 
Register, d. and w. D. 
Sentinel, w. Ind. 

Southern Commercial and Industrial Record, w. 
Southern Watchman. (Negro.) w. Ind. 
Unionist, w. 
Y. W. C. A. Journal, m. 
Monroeville. — Monroe Journal, w. D. 
Montgomery. — Advertiser, d. D. 

Alabama Outlook, w. R. 

Alabama Times, w. D. 

Baptist Woman's Era. (Negro.) m. 

Religious. 
Bulletin Alabama Department of Agricul- 
ture and Industries, qr. 
Colored Alabamian. (Negro.) w. 
Church Record, m. Religious. 
Gleaner. (Negro.) m. 
Helping Hand. (Negro.) w. 
Josephite. (Negro.) qr. Religious. 
Journal, d. D. 
Negro Messenger, w. 
Southern Odd Fellow, s. m. 
Times, d. D. 
Moulton. — Advertiser, w. D. 
New Decatur. — Advertiser, w. D. 

Morgan County Times. S. W. 
Twin City Record. (Negro.) w. Non- 
partisan. 
Newton. — Progress, w. Non-political . 
Normal. — Normal Index. (Negro.) w. 
Northport. — West Alabama Breeze, w. D. 
Oneonta. — Southern Democrat, w. D. 
Opelika. — News. d. D. 

Post. w. D. 



NEWSPAPERS AND PERIODICALS. 295 

Opp. — Homespun, w. 

Hustler, w. 
Ozark. — Dale County News. w. D. 
' Southern Star. w. D. 
Tribune, w. 
Pell City. — Farmers' Union Guide, w. 

St. Clair Herald, w. Ind. 
Times, w. D. 
Piedmont. — Inquirer, w. D. 
Prattville. — Progress, w. D. 
Roanoke. — Leader, w. D. 
Rockford. — Coosa Argus, w.. D 
Russellville. — Franklin Times, w. D. 
St. Stephens. — Washington County News. w. .D. 
Samson. — Ledger, w. D. 
Scottsboro. — Citizen, w. D. 

Progressive Age. w. D. 
Seale — Russell Register. 
Selma. — Journal, d. D. 
Mirror, w. D. 

Missionary Search-Light.' (Negro.) s. m. 
Morning Times, d. and w. D. 
People's Observer. (Negro.) w. R. 
Sheffield. — Reaper, w. D. 

Standard, w. D. 
Tri-Cities Daily, d. D. 
Slocomb. — News. w. D. 
Springville. — Item. w. 
Stevenson. — Chronicle, w. D. 
Sylacauga. — Progress, w. D. 
Talladega. — Our Mountain Home. w. D. 

Reporter, w. D. 
Messenger, m. College. 
Tali,assee.— Tri-Countv Weekly, w. Ind. Dem. 
Vhomaston. — Post. w. D. 
Thomasville. — Echo. w. D. 
Troy. — Herald, w. Ind. 
Messenger, d. D. 
Messenger, w. D. 
Tunnel Springs. — Eagle, s. m. R. 
Tunnel Springs. — Eagle, s. m. R. 
Tuscaloosa. — Times-Gazette, d. and w. D. 
Tuscumbia. — American Star. (Negro.) s. m. 

Alabamian-Dispatch. w. D. 



£96 



OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

Tuskegee. — Messenger. (Negro*) w. 

News Letter. (Negro.) w. 
.News. w. D. 
Union Springs. — Bullock County Breeze, s. w. D. 

Headlight. (Negro.) w. 

Herald, w. D. 
Uniontown. — Canebrake Herald. ; w. D. 
University. — Crimson-White, w* College. 
Vernon. — Lamar Democrat, w. D. 
Warrior. — Breeze, w. D. 
Wedowee. — Randolph Star. w. D. 
Wetumpka. — Herald, w. D. 
Yantley.— Racial Endeavors, s. m. R. 



XIII. ALABAMA AGRICULTURAL AND 
INDUSTRIAL STATISTICS. 



COTTON GINNED FROM CROPS GROWN IN 1906, 1905, 1904, 1903, 
AND 1902, IN ALABAMA, ARRANGED BY COUNTIES. 



COUNTY. 



-• 


RUNNING BALES. 


i 


s 

to 


• 


i 


' H5 


•d 

08 


5 


a 


eg 

3 


& 


"3 


8 


. o 
H 


. 3 


2 


■ 

4> 


© 








a& 



The State 



Autauga 



Baldwin 



Barbour 



Hlb\> 



Blount 



Bullock 



1906 
1905 
1904 
1903 
1902 

1906 
1905 
1904 
1903 
1902 

1906 
1905 
1904 
1903 
1902 

1906 
1905 
1904 
1903 
1902 

1906 
1905 
1904 
1903 
1902 

1906 
1905 
1904 
1903 

1902; 

1906 1 
1905 
1904 
1903! 
1902 



>i 



1,253,367 
1,242,326 
1, 461*990 
1,023,959 
1,011,325 

14^40 
14,166 
18,693 
15,202 
12,000 

1,924 

1,288 

1,686 

1,098 

803 

25,383 
30,793 
- 34,360 
25,309 
27,510 

6,431 
6,099 
8,277 
5,960 
5,000 

10,793 
9,898 

11.976 
8,256 
6,988 

26,965 
32,992 
36,201 
23,727 
32,296 



1,228,899 

1,213,674 

1,440,734 

950,488 

919,711 

14,340 
14,166 
18,633 
14,596 
10,799 

1,924 
1,288 
1,686 
1,098 
803 

25,383 
30,793 
33,631 
24,680 
26,294^ 

6,431 
6,099 
8,277 
5,960 
5,000 

10,793 
9,898 

11,976 
8,256 
6,988 

26,477 
32,512 
35,823 
21,793 
28,236 



24,468 
28,652 
21,256 
73,471 
91,614 



60 

606 

1,291 



729 

629 

1,216 



488 

480 

378 

1,934 

4,000 



g*3 



H S. 



1,261,522 
1,238,574 
1,448,157 

986,221 
956,215 

14,653 
14,761 
18,176 
15,334 
11,326 

2,001 
1,291 
1,696 
1,091 
794 

25,144 
30,978 
32,787 
24,918 
26,648 

6,713 
6,416 
8,691 
6,020 
4,945 

10,482 
9,443 

11,085 
7,843 

6,911 

27,224 
33,644 
38,375 
23,261 
29,955 

(297) 



298 



OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 



COTTON GINNED FROM CROPS GROWN IN 1906, 1905, 1904, 1903, AND 
1002, IN ALABAMA, ARRANGED BY COUNTIES— Continued. 



COUNTY. 



u 
4) 



i 



Running Bales. 



I 



U 

a 

S 



© 



I 

[53 

i 






£& 



Butler 



Calhoun 



Chambers 



Cherokee 



Chilton 



Choctaw 



Clarke 



Clay 



Ctabiirne 



1906 
19051 
1904 ' 
1903! 
1902 

19061 
1905! 
1904! 
1903 
1902 

1906 
1905 
1904 
19031 
1902 

1906 
1905 
1904 
1903 
1902 

1906 
1905 
1904 
1903 

1902 

i 

1906 ! 
1905 i 
1904| 
1903 
1902 

1906 
1905 
1904 
1903 
1902i 
I 
1906 
1905 
1904 
1903 
1902 

1906 
1905 
1904 
1903 
1902 



28,244 
27,134 
30,738 
24,243 
25,051 

14,525 
14,236 
18,527 
10,300 
8,811 

30,435 
29,049 
-81,851j 
20,553 J 
18,690 

14,043! 

14,219! 

16,163: 
9,153, 
8,356! 

12,992 
13,286 
16,952 
12,644 
9,325 

15,476 
16,442 
20,711 
15,088 
12,072 

21,803 
20,330 
24,763 
19,708 
18,179 

12,587 

12,627 

12,408 

8,115 

8,592 i 

6,543 
7,358 
7,947 
4,620 
4,687 1 



21,960 
19,431 
23,054 
14,883 
16,273 

14,525 
14,236 
18,527 
10,300 
8,811 

30,435, 
29,049 
31,851' 
20,553 
18,690 
t 

14,043' 

14,219! 

16,163i 

9,143 

8,231 

12,992 
13,286! 
16,920' 
11,124 
8,459 

15,476 
16,442 
20,711 
15,088 
12,072 

21,803 
20,330 
24,763 
19,152 
16,867 

12,587 

12,627 

12,408 

8,115 

8,592 

6,543 
7,358 
7,947 
4,620 
4,687 



6,264 
7,703 
7,684 
9,360 

8,778 



10 
125 



32 

1,520 

866 



556 
1,312 



26,309 
22,677 
26,453 
20,474 
20,486 

14,618 
14,122 
17,864 
10,160 
8,714 

30,100 
29,049 
31,661 
20,183 
18,484 

14,023 

18,167 

15,872 

8,863 

8,205 

18,184 
13,313 
16,680 
11,766 
8,834 

15,522 
16,639 
21,705 
15,510 
11,939 

22,601 
20,411 
27,809 
19,428 
17,387 

12,131 

11,895 

11,366 

7,709 

8,497 

5,960 
6,784 
7,423 
4,130 
4,635 



AGRICULTURAL AND INDUSTRIAL STATISTICS. 



299 



COTTON GINNED FROM CROPS GROWN IN 1906, 1905, 1904, 1903, AND 
1902, IN ALABAMA, ARRANGED BY COUNTIES— Continued. 



COUNTY. 



S 



o 

u 



RUNNING BALES. 



O 



GO 



Coffee 



Colbert 



Conecuh 



Coosa 



Covington 



Crenshaw 



Cullman 



Dale* 



Dallas 



1906 
1905 
1904 
1903 
1902 

1906 
1905 
1904 
1903 
1902 

1906 
1905 
1904 
1903 
1902 

1906 
1905 
1904 
1903 
1902 

1906 
1905 
1904 
1903 
1902 

1906 
1905 
1904 
1903 
1902 

1906 
1905 
1904 
1903 
1902 

1906 
1905 

1904 
1903 
1902 

1906 
1905 
1904 
1903 
1902 



24,698 
21,576 
26,565 
18,097 
20,691 

12,007 
14,114 
13,638 
9,652 
12,755 

13,168 
14,224 
16,651 
12,676 
12,648 

12,322 
13,959 
14,321 
10,707 
10,613 

14,970 
10,556 
14,496 
9,296 
10,340 

24,137 
23,312 
26,024 
15,934 
19,313 

16,782 
16,793 
20,770 
15,787 
14,886 

19,922 
19,518 

25,487 
17,047 
21,466 

43,384 
39,124 
50,050 
37,467 
32,646 



24,698 
21,576 
26,565 
17,010 
20,335 

11,951 
14,029 
13,638 
8,286 
11,436 

11,469 

11,929 

14,546 

9,361 

9,748 

12,322 
13,959 
14,321 
10,707 
10,613 

14,578 
9,177 

13,008 
7,122 
8,349 

24,137 
23,312 
26,016 
15,835 
18,363 

16,782 
16,460 
20,770 
12,554 
11,506 

19,922 
19,518 

25,487 
15,947 
20,234 

43,384 
39,124 

50,050 
37,467 
32,646 



o 



1,087 
356 

56 
85 



1,366 
1,319 

1,699 
2,295 
2,105 
3,315 
2,900 



392 
1,379 
1,488 
2,174 
1,991 



8 

99 

950 



333 



3,233 
3,380 



1,100 
1,232 





a 

■ 

o 

Gft 



3* 

Si. 



a 



23,937 
20,627 
24,921 
17,038 
20,261 

12,481 
14,866 
14,292 
8,549 
11,970 

12,752 
13,683 
15,717 
11,004 
11,091 

11,819 
13,429 
13,835 
10,086 
10,496 

14,284 
9,635 

13,270 
7.925 
9,312 

24,576 
23.018 
26,332 
16,074 
18,636 

16,819 
16,791 
20,605 
13,815 
13,135 

19,783 
19,284 

22,796 
16,093 
20,631 

45,857 
40,533 
49,851 
37,242 
32,287 



300 



OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 



COTTON GUNNED FROM CROPS GROWN IN 1006, 1905, 1904, 1908, AND 
1902) IN ALABAMA, ARRANGED BY COUNTIES— Continued. 



COUNTY. 



u 

S 



o 
O 



RUNNING BALES. 



$ 

O 



2 

s 



o 



i 



DeKalb 



Elmore 



Escambia 



Etowah 



Fayette 



Franklin 



Geneva 



Greene 



Hale 



1906 
1905 
1904 
1903 
1902 

1906 
1905 
1904 
1903 
1902 

1906 
1905 
1904 
1903 
1902 

1906, 
1905! 
1904' 
1903; 
1902; 

1906 
1905 
H904 ! 
1903 
1902 
1906 
1905 
1904 
1903 
1902 

1906 
1905 
1904 
1903 
1902 

1906 
1905 
1904, 
1903; 
1902 

1906 
1905 
1904; 
1903; 
1902 



18,771 

14,453 

14,711 

9,273 

9,744 

26,504 
25,249 
28,763 
19,626 
17,832 

7,223 
4,963 
6,376 
3,543 
2,565 

11,945 

10,991 

13,825 

8,178 

8,268 

11,145 
9,797 

11,280 
7,019 
8,054 
9,190 
9,815 
9,913 
6,618 
6,893 

17,618 
14,133 
18,553 

11,576 
13,989 

22,869 
18,165 
27,834 
20,083 
14,761 

23,607 
20,898 
28,199, 
21,126 
17,593 



18,771 

14,453 

14,711 

9,273 

9i744 

26,304 
25,249 
28,763 
18,941 
17,876 

7,223 
4,363 
6,376 
8,543 
2,565 

11,945 

10,991 

13,825 

8,178 

8,268 

11,145 
9,797 

11,280 
7,019 
8,054 
9,190 
9,815 
9,913 
6,618 
6,893 

17,618 
14,133 
18,553 
10,200 
11,625 

22,391 
18,165 
27,834 
19,521 
14,254 

23.607 
20,898 
28,199 
21,126 
17,593' 



685 
456 



1,376 
2,364 

478 



562 
507 






8*3 



18,575 

14,077 

13,940 

8,772 

9,637 

26,551 
25,249 
26,857 
19,584 
17,413 

7,512 
5,171 
6,402 
3,543 
2,537 

11,969 

10,771 

13,633 

7,769 

8,177 

11,745 

10,228 

11,547 

7,047 

7,965 

9,526 

10,286 

9,913 

6,592 

6,817 

17,646 
13,963 
18,367 
10,678 
12,679 

28,920 
18,710 
27,667 
20,502 
14,351 

23,267 
20,396 
28,872 
21,126 
17,399 



AGRIOUI/TURAL AND INDUSTRIAL STATISTICS. 



301 



COTTON GINNED FROM CROPS GROWN IN 1906, 1905,' 1994, 1903, AND 
1902, IN ALABAMA, ARRANGED BY COUNTIES— Continued. 



COUNTY. 



u 



o 
u 

O 



RUNNING BALES. 



O 



CO 



o 



i 
s* 

&G 



.2 J 

o 



£ 



Henry' 



Houston' 



Jackson 



Jefferson 



Lamar 



Lauderdale 



Lawrence 



Lete 



Limestone 



1906 
1905 
1904 
1903 
1902 

1906 
1905 
1904 
1903 

1906 
1905 
1904 
1903 
1902 

1906 
1905 
1904 
1903 
1902 

1906 
1905 
1904 
1903 
1902 

1906 
1905 
1904 
1903] 
1902 
1906 
1905 
1904 
1903 
1902 

1906 
1905 
1904 
1903 
1902 

1906 
1905 
1904 
1903 
1902 



20,241 

20,81T 

24,612 

18,438 

35,457 

20,390 
18,422 
24,286 
17,703 

8,813 
9,031 
9,792 
6,877 
5,093 

6,579 
6,745 
7,593 
5,288 
4,671| 

13,364 

11,197 

15,488 

9,806 

9,008 

15,092 
14,537 
15,038 
10,570 
14,222 
15,141 
15,581 
15,715 
13,009 
13,705 

24,913 
26.238 
27,291 
18,044 
20,937 



14,827! i 

17.408! 
21 .224 j! 
15,299: 
15,178i 



20,241 
20,817 
24,612 
18,438 
25,105 

19,366 
18,422 
24,036 
13,528 

8s813 
9,031 
9,792 
6,877 
5,093 

6,579 
6,745 
7,593 
5,288 
4,671 

13,364 

11,197 

15,488 

9,806 

9,008 

15,042 
14,537 
15,038 
9,300 
11,314 
15,141 
15,411 
15,715 
10,431 
10,913 

24,913 
26,238, 
27,291 j 
18,044, 
20,937 

14,827 
17,408 
21,224 
15.299 
14,993 



10352 
1,024 



250 
4,175 



50 



1,270 
2,908 f 



170 



2,578 
2,792 



1851 



19379 
20,942 
24,021 
18,217 
29,841 

19;778i 
18,127 
23,726 
15,597 

9,113 
9,537 
9,675 
7,170 
5,037 

6,778 
6,812 
7,289 
5,087 
4,620 

13,703 

11,421 

15,181 

9,747 

8,909 

15,491 
15,002 
15,098 
9,781 
12,760 
15,971 
16,591 
16,496 
11,855 
12.273 

25,232 
26.500 
26,856 
17,683 
20,707 

15,773 
18,627 
21.224 
15,574 
14,921 



^♦Houston, county organized from Dale, Henry and. Geneva in 1903. 



302 



OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 



COTTON GINNED FROM CROPS GROWN IN 1906, 1905, 1904, 1903, AND 
1902, IN ALABAMA, ARRANGED BY COUNTIES— Continued. 



COUNTY. 



8 

o 



RUNNING BALES. 



a 

© 



U 

§ 

S 



2 



| 



GO 



gal 



£& 



Lowndes 



Macon 



Madison 



Marengo 



Marlon 



Marshall 



Mobile 



Monroe 



Montgomery 



19061 
1905' 
1904 
1903; 

1902 j 

i 

1906 
1905 
1904 
1903 
1902, 

I 
1906! 
1905 
1904 
1903 
1902 

1906 
1905 
1904 
1903 
19021 

1906 
1905 1 
1904; 
1903 1 
1902 1 

1906 
1905 
1904 
1903 
1902 

1906J 
1905 
1904 
1903 
19021 

1906 
,1905 
1904 
1903 
1902 

1906 
1905 
1904 
1903 
1902, 



38,445 
41,543 
47,082, 
33,723 
34,583 

26,636 
29,722 
31,254 
18,647 
22,832 

23,053 
22,623 i 
28,495 1 
22,661! 

20,290 

i 

40,865 
33,870 
44,638 
35,023 
31,294 

10,190< 

10,138 

10,074 

6,983 

7,083 

19,178 
20,006 
24,399 
16.497 
15.079 

183 

110 

205 

69 

6 

22,479 
23.579 
28,438 
21,584 
19,439! 

48,711 
59,877 
55,651 
42,896 
45,306 



36,635 
38,647 
44,577 
28,571 
27,170! 

26,636 
29,722 
31,254 
18,647 
22,378 

23,053 
22,623 
28,495 
18,792 
17,139 

38,492 
32,270 
44,638 
28,888 
26,908 

10,190 

10,138 

10,074 

6,983 

7,083 

18,571 
18,565 
21,987 
13.907 
13,123 

183 

110 

205 

69 

6 

22,479 
23,579 

28,438 1 . 
21,5841 

19,4391 

i 

42.430 1 
51,679, 
52,574 
32,798 
32,803, 



1,810 
2,896 
2,505 
5,152 
7,413 



454 



3,869 
3,151 

2,373 
1,600 



6,13* 
4,386 



607 

1,441 

2,412 

2,590 
1,956 



6,281 

8,198 

3,077 

10,098 

12,503 



39,174 
42,002 
46,554 
31,124 
30,578 

26*727 
29,781 
31,817 
18,461 
22,341 

24,556 
23,890 
29,742 
21,273 
18,611 

40,587 
33,033 
43,211 
32,160 
28,882 

10,716 

10,442 

10,154 

7,067 

7,005 

18,655 
18,536 
22,674 
14,829 
13,918 

184 

110 

205 

69 

6 

23,571 
24,664 
28.836 
21,886 
19,225 

47,073 
55*445 
54,113 
38.787 
39.2^7 



AGRICULTURAL AND INDUSTRIAL STATISTICS. 



303 



COTTOtf GINNED FROM CROPS GROWN IN 1906, 1905, 1904, 1903, AND 
1902, IN ALABAMA, ARRANGED BY COUNTIES— Continued. 



COUNTY. 



u 

S 

© 

u 
O 



BUN NINO BALES. 



a 

o 
H 









GO 



Si 







Morgan 



Perry 



Pickens 



Pike 



Randolph 



Russell 



St. Clair 



Shelby 



Sumter 



1906 
1905 
1904 
1903! 
1902! 
• I 

1906 
1905 
1904 
1903 
1902 

1906 
1905 
1904 
190? 
1902 

1906 
1905 
1904 
1903 
1902 

1906j 
1905 

1904 i 
|1903| 
1902, 

1906 

1905 i 
1904 
1903 
1902 

1906 
1905 
1904 
1903 
1902 

1906 
1905 
1904 
1903! 
1902 
I 
1906 
1905 
1904 
1903 
1902 



15,820 
15,661 
19,649 
12,615 
11,059 

31,243 
30,047 
35,973 
26,690 
25,611 

21,536 

17,123 

24,483 

16,577 
15,892 

34,144 
36,017; 
41,152 
27,626 
32,843 

17,595 
18,897 
19,134 
13,395 
14,400 

22,828 
27,850 
30,804 
19,678 
24,743 

8,582 
8,205 
10,976 
5,726 
5,332 

10,708 

10,878 

12,716 

8,441 

8,182 

23,880 
21,026 
27.918 
23,707 
14,945 



15,820 
15,661 
19,649 
11,164 
11,059 

31,243 
30,047 
35,973 
26,690 
24,349 

21,536 
17,123 
24,483 
16,577 
15,892 

34,144 
36,017 
41,152 
25,919 
26,240 

17,595 
18,897 
19,134 
13,395 
14,400 

22,828 
27,850 
30,804 
19,678 
24,743 

8,582 
8,205 
10,976 
5,726 
5,332 

10,708 

10,878 

12,716 

8,441 

7,919 

23,880 
21,026 
27,918 
23,707 
14,945 



1,451 



1,262 



1,707 
6,603 



263 



16,500 
14,878 
19.649 
11,928 
10 937 

33*230 
32.090 
39.343 
27,22 i 
24,69? 

21,738 
17,431 
23,800 
16.47S 
15,717 

34,533 
36,737 
42,400 
27,076 
29,112 

16,307 
17,914 
17,305 
12,993 
14,242 

22,737 
27,460 
31,170 
19,599 
24,471 

8,937 
8,189 
11,459 
5,921 
5,273 

10,918 

11,139 

12,158 

8.441 

7,937 

24,339 
21,026 
28,476 
24,560 
14,781 



304 



OFFICIAL AND 8TATI8TICAL REGISTER. 



COTTON GINNED FROM CROPS GROWN IN 1906, 1905, 1904, 1903, AND 
1902, IN ALABAMA, ARRANGED BY COUNTIES— Continued. 



COUNTY. 



© 

u 
O 



BUNWING BALES. 



© 



g 

8j 
P 



3 

O 



■3 



8j 









Talladega 



Tallapoosa 



Tuscaloosa 



Walker 



Washington 



Wilcox 



Winston 



1906 
1905 
1904 
1908 
1902 

1906 
1905 
1904 
1903 
1902 

1906 
1905 
1904 
1903 
1902 

1906 
1905 
1904 
1903 
1902 

1906 
1905 
1904 
1903 
1902 

1906 
1905 
1904 
1903 
1902 

1906 
1905 
1904 
1903 
1902 



27,834 
27,093 
30,114 
18,592 
16,780 

28,000 
28,780 
29,98« 

21,368 
17,230 

26,229 
21,315 
25,905 
10,068 
14,855 

5,405 
5,281 
6,930 
3,353 
3,697 

3,083 
3,236 
4,828 
2,628 
2,584 

34.497 
32,417i 
46,131 
32,662 : 
31,635 

5,357 
5.490 
5,807 
4.035 
3,847 



27,834 
27,093 
30,114 
18,592 
16,780 

28,000 
28,780 
29,832 
18,909 
16,882 

23,498 
19,993 
25,766 
14,893 
12,770 

5,405 
5,281 
6,930 
3,353 
3,697 

3,083 
3,236 
4,328 
2,628 
2,584 

34.282 
31,667 
45,896 
31,462 
30,285 

5,357 
5,499 
5,807 
4,035 
3.847 



154 
2,459 

848 

2,731 
1,322 
139 
1,175 
2,085 



215 

750 

235 

1,200 

1,350 



-J. 



27,762 
26,985 
30,655 
18,443 
16,595 

27,810 
28.147 
28,657 
19,296 
16,626 

25,T40 
21,543 
25,836 
15,565 
13,742 

5,494 
5,366 
7,124 
3,333 
3,656 

3,176 
3,268 
4,518 
2,628 
2,556 

35,687 
33,002 
46,468 
32,245 
30,678 

5,465 
5,730 
5,807 
3,995 
3,805 



COTTON MILLS IN ALABAMA. 



Alabama City. — Dwight Mfg. Co. 
Alexander City. — Alexander Cotton Mills, 
Anniston. — Adelaide Mills. 
Anniston. — American Net & Twine Co. 



AGRICULTURAL AND INDUSTRIAL STATISTICS. 305 

An piston. — Anniston Cordage Co., 

Anniston. — Anniston Mfg. Co. 

Anniston. — Anniston Yarn Mills, 

Anniston. — Woodstock Cotton Mills, 

Athens. — Athens Cotton Mill Co. 

Birmingham. — Avondale Mills. 

Columbia. — Columbia Cotton Mills. 

Columbia. — A. D. Woods Cotton Mill, 

Cordova. — Indian Head Mills of Alabama. 

Cottondale. — Tuscaloosa Mills, 

Demopolis. — Bessie Minge Mfg. Co. 

Ellawhite. — Ellawhite Cotton Mills, 

Enterprise. — Enterprise Cotton Mills, 

Eufaula. — Chewalla Cotton Mills, 

Eufaula. — Eufaula Cotton Mills, 

Florence. — Ashcraft Cotton Mills, 

Florence. — Cherry Cotton Mills, 

Girard. — Girard Cotton Mills, 

Huntsville. — Abingdon Mills, 

Huntsviixe. — Dallas Mfg. Co., 

Huntsville. — Huntsville Cotton Mills. 

Huntsville. — Lowe Mfg. Co., 

Huntsville. — Merrimack Mfg. Co. 

Huntsville. — West Huntsville Cotton Mills, 

Jacksonville. — Ide Cotton Mills, 

Livingston. — Livingston Mfg. Co., 

Mobile. — Barker Cotton Mills Co., 

Mobile. — Mobile Cotton Mills. 

Montgomery. — Cordage Co., 

Montgomery. — Montgomery Cotton Mills, 

Montgomery. — People's Cotton Factory, 

Opelika. — Opelika Cotton Mills, 

Oxford. — N. S. Perkins. 

Pell City.— Pell City Mfg. Co., 

Piedmont. — Coosa Mfg. Co.. 

Prattville. — Prattville Cotton Mills, 

Roanoke. — W. A. Handley Mfg. Co., 

Rock Mills. — Wehadkee Yarn Mills, 

Selma. — Cawthoni Cotton Mill Co., 

Selma. — Estelle Cotton Mills Co., 

Silubia. — Siluria Cotton Mill Co. 

Speigner. — Alabama Cotton Mills, 

Stevenson. — Broadus Cotton Mills. 

Sycamore. — Sycamore Mills, 

Sylacauga. — Central Mills, 

Talladega. — Chinabee Cotton Mills, 

Talladega. — Highland City Mills, 

Talladega. — Talladega Cordage Co., 

Talladega. — Talladega Cotton Factory," 

Tallassee. — Tallassee Falls" Mfg. Co., 

Tuscaloosa. — Rope & Yarn Milis, 

Tuscaloosa. — Sanders Cotton Mills, 

Union Springs. — Union Springs Cotton Mills Co., . 

Uniontown. — Ellawhite Cotton Mills. 



NURSERY CERTIFICATES ISSUED DURING THE NURSERY YEAR, 

1906-7. 

Alabama Certificates, 1906-07. 

1. Chase Nursery Co., Huntsville. 

2. Alabama Nursery Co., Huntsville. 

20. 



306 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

3. Huntsville Wholesale Nurseries, Huntsville. 

4. J* O. Kelly & Sons, Jeff. 

5. The Fraser Nursery, Huntsville. 

6. C. W. C. Hall, Bridgeport. 

7. C. A. Hughes, Getup. 

8. Carter H. Rice, New Market. 

9. Oak Lawn Nursery, Huntsville. 

10. W. H. Dougherty, Athens. 

11. A. E. Welch, Madison Station. 

12. Samuel Palmer, Madison Station. 

13. B. Crawford, New Decatur. 

14. J. M. Crutchfleld & Son, Cullman. 

15. J. H. Parker, Vinemont. 

16. Jacob Graf, Cullman. 

17. T. Mautor, Cullman. 

18. J. F. Musgrove, Bangor. 

19. D. S. Jones, Odenville. 

20. J. W. Bagley, Taff. 

21. Mrs. T. M. Elliott, Taff. 

22. W. H. Tallent, Jamestown. 

23. H. T. Heath, Jamestown. 

24. Slone Nursery Co., Fort Payne. 

25. N. W. Chitwood, Chavies. . 

26. H. F. Shigley, Fort Payne. 

27. E. York, Fort Payne. 

28. W. G. Joiner, Ashland. 

29. W. L. Owen, Ashland. 

30. Schoggins & Perry, Ashland. 

31. Fort Payne Nursery Co., Chavies. 

32. Joiner & Greeg, Napoleon. 

33. J. B. Earnest, Roanoke, Route 4. 

34. John L. Winslow, Thorsby. 

35. W. F. Probst, Oakman. 

36. Gravlee Nursery Co., Newtonville. 

37. E. Day, Birmingham. 

38. J. T. Bowen, Potash. 

39. J. J. Waldrep, Roanoke. 

40. W. N. Gladney, Roanoke. 

41. G. W. Lipp, Roanoke. 

42. W. T. Kent, Roanoke. 

43. J. J. Colmant, Birmingham. 

44. Biggers Bros., Joppa. 

45. Waver ly Nurseries, Waverly. 

46. W. L. Morris, Oakbowery. 

47. F. P. Davis, Mobile. 

48. H. P. Loding, Mobile. 

49. Industrial School, Mobile. 

50. A. II. Davies, St. Elmo. 

51. J. B. Williamson, Joppa. * 

52. J. D. Mitchell, Spring Valley. 

53. St. Clair Nursery Co., Steele. 

54. Hugh Seales, Birmingham. 

55. A. Hauge, Birmingham. 

56. T. L. Ligon, Spring Valley. 

57. D. M. Stott, Jink. 

58. B. F. Page, Evergreen. 

59. Etheridge Strawberry Co., Evergreen. 

60. L. T. Rhodes, Evergreen. 

61. A. H. Vann, Greenville. 

62. C. Ravier & Sons, Mobile. 

63. J. M. Stover, Bay Minette. 

64. S. B. Stern & Co., Montgomery. 



AGRICULTURAL AND INDUSTRIAL STATISTICS. 3Q7 

65. Joseph Pfingstl, Montgomery. 

66. Rosemont Gardens, Montgomery. 

67. J. O. & T. E. Wefch, Chunchula. 

68. John C. Carter, Montgomery. 

Dealers* Certificates, 1906-07. 

1. C. R. Long, Andalusia. 

2. A. M. Preston & Son, Cullman. 

3. W. F. Probst, Oakman. 

4. J. J. Holmes & Co., Montgomery. 

5. John B. Stroud, Mobile. 

6. J. A. Ligon, Spring Valley. 

7. M. M. Dawson, Montgomery. 

8. E. M. Rnmph & Co., Red Level. 

9. A. Swift, Fairhope. 

Nurserymen Outside the State, 1906-07. 

1. W. N. Scarff, New Carlisle, Ohio. 

2. M. L. Spivy, Lynville, Tenn. 

3. Tennessee Wholesale Nurseries, Winchester, Tenn. 

4. Southern Nursery Co., Winchester, Tenn. 

5. Hoopes Brothers & Thomas, West Chester, Pa. 

6. Cedar Hill Nursery & Orchard Co., Winchester, Tenn. 

7. Franklin County Nursery Co., Winchester, Tenn. 

8. Pike County Nurseries, McElveen & McLendon, Concord, Ga. 

9. Glenn Cliff Nursery, J. Marvin Miller, Winchester, Tenn. 

10. Upson Nurseries, A. D. Williams, Prop., Yatesville, Ga. 

11. Concord Nurseries, Concord, Ga. 

12. Continental Plant Co., Kittrell, N. C. 

13. Pebble Hill Fruit Farm and Nurseries, Winchester, Tenn. 

14. Stark Brothers Nurseries & Orchards Co., Louisiana, Mo. 

15. The Nut Nursery Co., Monticello, Fla. 

16. T. S. Hubbard Co., Fredonia, N. Y. 

17. George S. Josselyn. Fredonia, N. Y. 

18. P. J. Berckmans, Augusta, Ga. 

19. Miller & Gossard, Summit Nurseries, Monticello, Fla. 

20. Wild Brothers Nursery Co., Sarcoxie, Mo. 

21. J. Van Lindley Nursery Co., Pomona, N. C. 

22. Ellwanger & Barry, Rochester, N. Y. 

23. C. F. Barber, Turkey Creek Nursery, Macclenny, Fla. 

24. B. N. Summerour, Sandy Plains Nursery, Marietta, Ga. 

25. Commercial Nursery Co., Winchester, Tenn. 

26. P. B. Simmons, Columbia Nurseries, Columbia, Tenn. 

27. Giles County Nursery, Pulaski, Tenn. 

28. Wheelock & Clark, Fredonia, N. Y. 

29. Arcadia Nurseries, Monticello, Fla. 

30. Gibson County Nursery Co., Humboldt, Tenn. ' 

31. Griffin Bros. Co., Macclenny, Fla. 

32. H. C. Hastings & Co., Kittrell, N. C. (P. O. Atlanta, Ga.) 

33. Franklin Davis Nursery Co., Baltimore, Md. 

35. T. V. Munson & Son, Denison, Texas. 

36. W. W. Thomas, Anna, 111. 

37. Storrs & Harrison Co., Painsville Nurseries, Palnsville, Ohio. 

38. Brown Brothers. Rochester, N. Y. 

39. Jackson & Perkins Co., Newark, N. J. 

40. Chattanooga Nursery Co., Chattanooga, Tenn. 

41. Morey & Son, Dansville, N. Y. 

42. H. N. Nelson, Aspen Hill, Tenn. 

43. G. H. Miller & Son, Rome, Ga. 

44. Thomas Meehan & Sons, Inc., Dreshertown, Pa. 



308 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

45. Jas. Cureton, Cureton Nurseries, Austell, Ga. 

46. Thornton & Pebbles, Fayetteville, Ga. 

47. Lewis Roesch, Fredonia, N. Y. 

48. Peter Henderson & Co., Jersey City, N. J. 

49. Knoxville Nursery Co., Knoxville, Tenn. 

50. Alexander Seed Co., (P. O. Augusta, Ga.), Kittrell, N. C. 

51. Co-Opera the Nursery Co., Olga, N. C. 

52. Thomas Meehan & Sons, Germantown, Pa. 

53. F. W. Meneray, Crescent Nursery Co., Council Bluffs, Iowa. 

54. The Doualdson Co., Warsaw, Ky. 

55. Glen Saint Mary Nurseries, Glen Saint Mary, Fla. 

56. C. P. Turner, Carroll County Nurseries, Carrollton, Ga. 

57. Henry A. Dreer, Inc., Dreer Nurseries, Riverton, N. J. 

58. Wm. Anderson, Temple, Ga. 

50. J. G. Harrison & Sons, Berlin, Md. 

150. J. R. Murphy, Fayette County Nurseries, Fayetteville, Ga. 

01. T. J. Anderson, Temple, Ga. 

62. J. B. Wright, Cairo, Ga. 

63. Oakland Nurseries, Columbia, Tenn. 

64. W. W. Twitty, Blanche, Tenn. 

65. Heikes-Biloxi Nurseries, Biloxi, Miss. 

66. G. F. Moore, Rome, Ga. 

67. John A. Young, Greensboro Nurseries, Greensboro, N. C. 

68. Andorra Nurseries, Chestnut Hill, Pa. 

69. Y'oung Brothers, Smithville, Tenn. 

70. Winchester Nursery & Orchard Co., Winchester, Tenn. 

71. J. H. H. Boyd, Forest Nursery Co., McMinnville, Tenn. 

72. R. A. Wilkes, Culleoka, Tenn. 

73. Mt. Olive Nurseries, Smithville, Tenn. 

74. W. T. Wood & Co., Old Dominion & Virginia Nurseries, Richmond, Va. 

75. L. R. Taylor & Sons. Topeka and Rossville, Kans. 

76. Texas Nursery Co., Sherman, Texas. 

77. F. L. & G. W. Westbrooks, Westbrooks Nursery, Draketown, Ga. 

78. C. Forkert, Ocean Springs, Miss. 

79. H. M. Simpson & Sons, Vincennes, Ind. 

80. C. A. Cantrell. Kelteuburg Nursery, Keltonburg, Tenn. 

81. Estes Bros., Caney Fork Nursery Co., Smithville, Tenn. 

82. Win. C. Geraty (P. O. Young's Island, S. C), Kittrell, N. C. 

83. J. W. Adams & Co.. Springfield, Mass. 

84. J. J. Coalson, Temple, On. 

85. Easterly Nursery Co., Cleveland, Tenn. 

86. Sneed & Wood. Tyler, Texas. 

87. The Home Nursery, Kicks & Cantrell Bros., Smithville, Tenn. 
SH. James A. Bear, Palatka. Fla. 

89. The American Rose & Plant Co., Springfield, Ohio. 

90: Will A. Vick, Smithville, Tenn. 

91. John Lightfoot, East Chattanooga, Tenn. 

92. Stinson Nursery Co., Meridian, Miss. 

93. The Prosperity Nursery. Smithville, Tenn. 

94. S. W. Peck, Hartwell, Ga. 

95. G. M. Bacon. Pecan Cc, DeWitt. Ga. 

96. B. W. Stone & Co., Thomasville. Ga. 

97. Bobbink & Atkins, Rutherford, N. J. 

98. Ocean Springs, Pecan Co.. Chas. E. Pabst, Prop., Ocean Springs, Miss. 

100. R. E. Downer, Bowling Green, Ky. 

101. Levavasseur & Sons, Ussy. France. 

102. Howell Nurseries. Knoxville, Tenn. 

103. Holbert's Fig Nursery, Arcadia, Texas. 

104. A. C. Coles. Peachwood Nurseries, State Line, Miss. 

105. Stuart Pecan Co., Ocean Springs, Miss. 

106. J. A. Cox, Roswell, Ga. 



S 



AGRICULTURAL AND INDUSTRIAL STATISTICS. 



309 



107. 
108. 
109. 
110. 
111. 
112. 
118. 
114. 
115. 
lit*. 
117. 
U.S. 
119. 
120. 
121. 
122. 
123. 



Vincent Le Breton, Angers, France. 

Carl Sonderegger, German Nurseries, Beatrice, Neb. 

Steckler Seed Co., New Orleans, La. 

The Mount Arbor Nurseries, E. S. Welch, Prop., Shenandoah, Iowa. 

Kennesaw Wholesale Nurseries, Marietta, Ga. 

Lake View Nursery Co., Sheridan, N. Y. 

R. A. Eubank, Prospect, Tenn, 

C. C. Batey-Southern Nut Tree Nurseries, Thomasville, Ga. 

Cooper & Monerief-Wintield Nurseries, W T iufleld, Kansas. 

C. J. Wright, Gordon County Nursery, Calhoun, Ga. 
Baldesian Nurseries, Bostic, N. C. 

Southern Floral Nursery Co., Buckatunna, Miss. 

D. McNallie Plant and Fruit Co., Sarcoxie, Mo. 
Baltimore Nurseries, Baltimore, N. C. 
Augustine & Co., Normal, 111. 

A. C. Oelschig & Son, Savannah. Ga. 
Sheerin's Wholesale Nurseries, Dausville, N. Y. 



PRODUCTION OF IRON ORE, COAL, COKE AND PIG IRON IN 

ALABAMA.* 






1870 
1871 
1872 
1873 
1874 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1880 
1887 
1888 
1889 
18JK) 
1891 
1892 
1803 
1894 
1895 
1890 



1898 
1899 
1900 
1901 
1902 
1903 
1904 
1905 



Iron Ore. 

Tons of 

2,240 lbs. 



Coal. 
Tons of 
2,000 lbs. 



Coke. 

Tons of 

2,000 lbs. 



Pig Iron Tons of 
2.240 lbs. 



Coke. 



Charcoal. 



Total. 



"11,350 



22,000 

39.000 

58,000 

44,000 

44,000 

70,000 

75,000 

90,000 

171,139 

220.000 

250,000 

385,000 

420,000 

505,000 

050.000 

075,000 

1,000,000 

1,570,000 

1,897,815 

1,980,830 

2,312,071 

1,742,410 

1.493.0X0 

2,199.390 

2.041,793 

2.050.014 

2,202,158 

2,027,000 

3,095,400 

2,881,51)3 

3,574,474 

3.0X4,900 

3.099.S.S1 

3,782.831 



13.200 

2O,0a) 

30,000 

44,800 

50,400 

67,200 

112,000 

190,000 

224.000 

280,000 

380.000 
420,000 

806.000 
1.508,000 
2,240,000 
2,492,000 
1,800,000 
1.950,000 
2.900,000 
3,572,983 
4,090.409 
4,759,781 
5,529.312 
5.1 30.935 i 
4.397.17Xi 
5,093,775 
5.745,017 
5,S93,771 
0,509.223 
7,4X4,703 
8.5(4,327 
S.970.617 
10.329,479 
11,700.753 
11,273,151 
11,900.153 



00,781 

109.033 

152,940 

217.531 

244,009 

301,180 

375.054 

325.020 

508.511 

1,030.510 

1,072,942 

1.282.490 

1.501,571 

1.10X.OX5 

923,817 

1.444,339 

1.089,703 

1,395,252 

1,390,254 

1,798.012 

1,992,501 

2.180,025 

2,210,735 

2.w:i,497 

2.284.095 
2.750,098 



1,202 

14.043 

15,615 

15,937 

35.232 

48.107 

51.093 

102.750 

110,204 

133,808 

180,1X3 

170.374 

317.289 

008,034 

718,383 

717,087 

835.840 

059,725 

550,314 

892,3X3 
932,918 



1,172.202 
1,411,077 



1,42:5.021 
1.57X.514 



11,171 
19,895 

29,342 
22,4 IX 
20,818 
22,1X0 
21,422 
2X.503 
33.093 
39.483 
49.590 
51.237 
53.07X 

09,201 
73,312 
85.020 
84.(41 
9X.595 
98,528 
77,985 
79.450 
07.1(13 
30.078 
18.810 
29.787 
14,913 



53,010 
00,534 



30.492 
25,548 



11.171 

19,895 

29,343 

22,418 

22,080 

36,823 

37,037 

44,500 

68.925 

87,590 

100,0X3 

153,987 

109,342 

203,069 

253,445 

261,394 

401 ,330 

700.629 

816,911 

795,072 

915,296 

720.X88 

592.3! >2 

854,6(57 

922,170 

947,831 

1,020,459 

1.0X3,«H)5 

1.155,5X3 

1 225 212 

1.472,211 

1.501,398 

1,453.513 

1,604,002 



•Compiled by Dr. Eugene A. Smith, State Geologist. 



310 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

FURNACES AND ROLLING MILLS IN ALABAMA. 
(From James M. Swank's Iron Statistics, 1903) 

Coke Fubnaces. 
Number: 43 Completed stacks, 2 stacks building, and 3 stacks projected. 

Alabama Steel and Wire Company, Birmingham, Furnace at Gadsden, 
Etowah county. One stack, 90x20, built in 1902-3, and first blown in Jan- 
uary 17, 1904; four 2-pass stoves; fuel, coke; ore, red from Cherokee 
county, Alabama; product, basic and foundry pig-iron; annual capacity, 
110,000 tons. Brand, "Schuler." Three additional furnaces of the same 
size are projected. One Heyl & Patterson pig-iron casting machine is con- 
nected with the furnace; also 200 coke ovens with an annual capacity of 
146,000 net tons; also a gray iron foundry and a machine shop. First 
Mourn in January n, 1904. 

Alice Furnaces, Birmingham, Jefferson county, Ala. Two stacks, No. 
1, 75x15, built in 1879-80 and put in blast November 23, 1880; raised to 
present height in 1890; three Gordon-Whitwell-Ccwper stoves. No. 2, 
75x18, built in 1883 and put in blast July 24, 1883 ; rebuilt in 1902 ; three 
Whitwell stoves. Fuel, Pratt coke made in the company's ovens; ores*, 
red and brown from the company's mines; product, basic and foundry pig 
iron; total annual capacity, 105,000 tons. Brand, "Alice." Active in 1903. 

Bessemer Furnaces, Bessemer, Jefferson county. Alabama. Five stacks, 
Nos. 1 and 2, each 75x17, built in 1886-7 ; No. 1 put in blast in 1888 and 
No. 2 in 1889 ; eight Whitwell stoves. Nos. 3 and 4, each 75x17, built in 
1889-90, and No. 3 rebuilt in 1900; eight Whitwell stoves. No. 5, or Lit- 
tle Belle, 60x12, built in 1889-90; three Whitwell stoves. Fuel, Pratt and 
Blue Creek coke made in the company's ovens ; ores, red and brown from 
the company's mines; product, foundry and forge pig-iron and spiegeleisen 
and ferromanganese; total annual capacity, 288.000 tens. Brand "DeBar- 
deleben." Active in 1903. 

Central Iron and Coal Company, 116 Nassau St., New York city. 
Furnace at Tuscaloosa, Tuscaloosa county, Alabama. One stack, 85x18, 
built In 1901-3 and first blown in August 4. 1903; four Foote stoves, each 
17x85 feet; fuel, coke; ores, local red and brown; product, foundry pig 
iron; annual capacity, 60.000 tons. Brand, "Tuscaloosa."' Connected with 
the furnace are 164 bee-hive coke ovens and 40 by-product ovens. Active 
in 1903. 

Clifton Furnaces, Ironaton, Talladega county, Alabama. Two stacks, 
No. 1, 70x17 1-6, built to use charcoal in 1884 and blown in on that fuel 
on April 16, 1885; changed to coke in 1895: rebuilt in 1896-7; four Whlt- 
well-Cowper stoves. No. 2, 75x16, built in 1889-90 to use charcoal and 
blown in on that fuel in 1891; changed to coke in 1900; rebuilt in 1902; 
four Whitwell-Cowper stoves. Fuel, Alabama coke; ore, local brown he- 
matite; product, foundry pig-iron; total annual capacity, 100,000 tons. 
Brand, "Clifton." Active in 1903. 

Ella Furnace, Lacey-Buek Iron Company. Birmingham. Furnace at 
Tmissville, Jefferson county. One stack, 80x17 1-2, built in 1887-9 and 
blown in in April, 1889; rebuilt in 1901 and 1903: five Whitwell stoves; 
fuel, Alabama coke made in the company's ovens from coal mined on the 
furnace property; ores, red hematite from the company's mines at Cru- 
dup, Alabama, and brown ore from the company's mines In Georgia: 
product, foundry pig-iron; annual capacity, 70,000 tons. Brand, "Truss- 
ville." Connected with the furnace are 300 coke ovens with an annual 
capacity of 125,000 net tons.— Active in 1903. 

Ensley Furnaces, Ensley, Jefferson county, Alabama. Five completed 
stacks and one stack building. Completed stacks, four 80x20, built in 1887, 
1888. and 1889, and one. 80x18, built in 1S99-1900; No. 1 blown in March 
19, 1889, and rebuilt in 1901 ; No. 2 blown in December 1, 1888, No. 3, June 
5, 1888, No. 4 April 9, 1888, and No. 5. October 12. 1900 ; four Gordon- 
Whitwell-Cowper stoves to each furnace; fuel. Pratt coke from the com- 
pany's ovens and Semet-Solvay coke from ovens at Ensley; ores, red and 
brown from the company's mines ; product, foundry, forge, and basic pig- 



AGRICULTURAL AND INDUSTRIAL STATISTICS. 31 1 

iron; total annual capacity, 315,000 tons. Brand, "Ensley." One Uehlln 
pig-iron casting machine. Ground for the building furnace, which will be 
known as No. 6, was broken on May 30, 1903 ; it will be 85x20 and will have 
four Kennedy two-pass stoves, each 93x21; basic pig iron will be made; 
estimated annual capacity, 100,000 tons; furnace will probably be comple- 
ted in September, 1904. Active in 1903. 

Gadsden- Alabama Furnaces, Gadsden, Etowah county, Alabama. Two 
stacks: No. 1, 75x18, built in 1887-8 and first blown in October 14,1888; 
idle ; stove equipment and blowing engines used in equipping furnace No. 2 ; 
and No. 2, 86x19, built in 1902-3 and blown in August 22, 1903; four Whit- 
well stoves, each 85x20; fuel, coke; ores, local red and brown hematite; 
product, foundry pig-iron; total annual capacity, 100,000 tons. Brand, 
"Etowah." No. 1 idle; No. 2 active in 1903. 

Mattie Ensley Furnace, Sheffield, Colbert county, Alabama. One stack, 
75x17, built in 1887 and first put in blast December 31, 1887 ; remodeled in 
1900 and rebuilt in 1903; four Whitwell stoves; fuel, coke; ore, local brown 
hematite; product, foundry pig-iron; annual capacity, 70,000 tons. Brand, 
"Sheffield." Active in 1903. 

Jenifer Furnace Company, J. W. McQueen, Trustee, Birmingham. Fur- 
nace at Jenifer, Talladega county. One stack, 75x16, built in 1901 and 
first put in operation September 26, 1901 ; one improved Whitwell and two 
Hugh Kennedy stoves; fuel, Alabama coke; ore, local brown hematite from 
the company's mines ; product, foundry and gray forge pig-iron ; annual 
capacity, 50,000 tons. Brand, "Jenifer." Connected with the furnace are 
200 coke ovens with an annual capacity of 50,000 net tons. Active in 1903. 

Lady Ensley Furnace, Sheffield, Colbert county, Alabama. (Operated 
by the North Alabama Furnace Company, two-thirds of the stock of which 
is owned by the Sloss- Sheffield Steel and Iron Company.) One stack, 
75x17, built in 1887-9 and first blown in April 25, 1889 ; remodeled in 1900-1 ; 
four Whitwell stoves ; fuel, coke ; ore, local brown hematite ; product, foun- 
dry and mill pig-iron; annual capacity, 70,000 tons. Brand, "Lady Ens- 
ted in September, 1904. Active in 1903. 

Lookout Mountain Iron Company, Battelle, DeKalb county. One stack, 
85x19, built in 1903-4, and not put in blast down to June 10, 1904 ; four 4- 
pass Whitwell stoves, each 20x80; fuel, coke made in ovens owned by the 
company; ore, red hematite obtained from the company's mines which are 
located about one-half of a mile from the furnace; product, foundry pig- 
iron ; annual capacity, 100,000 tons. Brand, "Battelle." Connected with the 
furnace are 150 coke ovens with an annual capacity of 75,000 net tons ; 150 
additional ovens are to be erected. To be blown in about July 1, 1904. 

Oxmoor Furnaces, Oxmoor, Jefferson county, Ala. Two stacks: No. 1, 
75x17, completed in July, 1877, and rebuilt and blown in in December, 1885; 
again rebuilt in 1902 ; No. 2, 75x17, first blown in in March, 1876 ; rebuilt in 
and blown in in August, 1886; again rebuilt in 1899; seven Whitwell stoves; 
fuel, Pratt and Blue Creek coke made in the company's ovens; ores, red 
and brown from the company's mines ; product, foundry and forge pig-iron ; 
total annual capacity, 122,500 tons. Brand, "Eureka." Active in 1903. 

Philadelphia Furnace, Florence, Lauderdale county, Alabama. One 
stack, 75x17, commenced by the W. B. Wood Furnace Company in 1887 and 
completed by the Florence and Cotton Iron Company in 1890-1 ; remodeled 
in 1900 and rebuilt in 1903; four Whitwell stoves, each 70x20, fuel, coke; 
ore, brown hematite from the company's mines in KusBellville, Franklin 
county, Alabama; product, foundry pig-iron; annual capacity, 70,000 tons. 
Brand, "Florence." Active in 1903. 

Pioneer Furnaces, (operated by the Pioneer Mining and Manufacturing 
Company), Thomas, Jefferson county, Alabama. Office, Birmingham, Ala- 
Three stacks, each 5)0x18 1-2; No. 1 built in 1886-8; blown in May 15,1888; 
rebuilt and remodeled in 1903 ; No. 2 built in 1889-90 and blown in Febru- 
ary 22, 1890; rebuilt and remodeled in 1903; No. 3 built in 1901-2 and 
blown in June 13, 1902; eight Whitwell and six Massicks & Crooke stoves ; 
fuel, Alabama coke from the company's ovens; ores, red and brown hema- 
tite from the company's mines; product, foundry and mill pig-iron; total 
annual capacity, 270,000 tons. Brand, "Pioneer." Active in 1903. 



312 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

Sheffield Fubnaces, Sheffield Coal and Iron Company, 907 Maritime 
Building, No. 8 Bridge St., New York. Furnaces at Sheffield, Colbert 
county, Alabama. Three stacks, each 75x18, built in 1887-8; No. 1 blown in 
in September, 1888 ; No. 2 blown in in October, 1889, and No. 3 blown in in 
April, 1896; No. 1 rebuilt in 1900 and Nos. 2 and 3 remodeled in 1897; all 
remodeled and reconstructed in 1903 ; twelve Whitwell-Cowper stoves ; fuel, 
Stonega coke from Virginia : ores, Alabama and Tennessee brown hematite 
obtained from the company's mines; product, foundry pig-iron; total an- 
nual capacity, 210,000 tons. Brand, "Sheffield." Active in 1903. 

Sloss Furnaces, Birmingham, Jefferson county, Alabama. Four stacks; 
No. 1, 82 1-2x18, built in 1881-2, put in blast April 12. 1882 and rebuilt in 
1895 and 1901 ; No. 2, 73x18, built in 1882 and rebuilt in 1902; No. 3, 
73x17, built in 1.887-8, blown in in October, 1888. and rebuilt in 1901; No. 4, 
73x17, built in 1887-9. blown in in February, 1889, and rebuilt in 1901; 
five Whitwell, eight Gordon-Whitwell-Cowper, and three two-pass 18x70 
and two new four-pass stoves; fuel, coke; ores, red fcssiliferous, hard and 
soft, and brown hematite; ores and coal mined on the company's property 
within ten to fifteen miles of the furnaces; product, foundry and mill pig- 
iron ; total annual capacity, 225,000 gross tons. Brand /'Sloss." Four fur- 
naces active in 1903. 

Talladega Furnace, Northern Alabama Coal, Iron and Railway Compa- 
ny, 25 Broad st, New York. Furnace at Talladega, Talladega county, Ala- 
bama. One stack, 72x18, built in 1889 and blown in October 5, 1889; re- 
modeled in 1900-1; three Whitwell stoves, each (12x20; fuel, Alabama coke; 
ores, local brown and red hematite: product, foundry and forge pig-iron; 
annual capacity, 40,000 tons. May be enlarged in 1904. Connected with 
the furnace are 182 coke ovens. Active in 1903. 

Vanderbilt Furnace, Tutwiler Coal, Coke and Iron Company, Birming- 
ham, Jefferson county. Furnace at Boyles. Jefferson county. One stack. 
75x15 3-4; commenced building February 9, 1890; blown in August 23. 1890; 
remodeled in 1897 and rebuilt in 1899 and 1901 ; four Massicks & Crooke 
stoves; fuel, Alabama coke; ores, brown and red hematite; product, soft 
foundry and gray forge pig-iron; annual capacity, 54,000 tens. Brand, 
"Vanderbilt." Coke ovens with an annual capacity of 105,000 net tons are 
connected with the furnace. Active in 1903. 

Williamson Furnace, Williamson Iron Company. Birmingham, Jeffer- 
son county. One stack, 65x14 3-4, built in 188*5 and first blown in in Octo- 
ber, 1886 ; three Massicks & Crooke stoves ; fuel, coke ; ores, red fossil and 
brown hematite; product, foundry pig iron; annual capacity, 20,000 tons. 
Brand, "Williamson." An iron foundry with an annual capacity of 2,000 
tons is connected with the furnace ; also a machine shop. Active in 1903. 

Woodstock Furnaces, The Woodstock Iron Works, Anniston, Calhoun 
county. Two stacks, No. 3, 82x20, built in 18S7-9, blown in October 10, 
1889, and rebuilt in 1901-2; No. 4, 75x17, built in 1887-9, blown in June 12, 
1892, aud rebuilt in 1896 and 1903; each furnace has four 2-pass stoves; 
fuel, Alabama coke; ore, local brown hematite; product, foundry and forge 
pig-iron; total annual capacity, 150,000 tons. Brand, "Woodstock (W. I. 
W.)" Connected with the furnaces are 374 coke ovens With an annual ca- 
pacity of 155,000 net tons. Active in 1903. 

Woodward Iron Company, Woodward, Jefferson county. Two completed 
stacks and one stack building. Completed stacks, Nos. 1 and 2, each 75x17, 
one built in 1882-3 and put in blast in August. 1883, and the other built in 
1886 and put in blast in January, 1887: ten Whitwell stoves; fuel, coke 
made from the company's coal; ore. red fossil if erous mined within three 
miles of the furnace; specialty, foundry pig-iron; total annual capacity, 
125,000 tons. Building furnace, to be known as No. 3. will be 85x20 feet and 
will be equipped with four Whitwell stoves, each 20x80; it will produce 
foundry and pig-iron. Brand, "Woodward." Active in 1903. 

Number of coke furnaces in Alabama: 43 completed stacks, 2 stacks 
building, and three stacks projected. 



AGRICULTURAL AND INDUSTRIAL STATISTICS. 313 

Charcoal Furnaces. 

Number: Six stacks. 

Attalla Furnace, Eagle Iron Company, Chattanooga, Tennessee. Fur- 
nace at Attalla, Etowah county, Alabama. One stack, 55x11, built in 1888-9 
and blown In June 15, 1889; Iron stoves; ores, red and brown hematite from 
Etowah and Cherokee counties; product, car-wheel pig-ire n; annual capci- 
ty, 18,000 tons. Brand. "Rome." Active in 1903. 

Coosa Furnace, Gadsden, Etowah county. Alabama. One stack, 64x12, 
built in 1882 with material from the Vigo Iron Company's No. 1 Furnace 
at Terre Haute, Ind. ; first blown in May 30, 1883 ; abandoned in 1898 ; re- 
vived and again blown in in 1902; hot blast; fuel, charcoal; ores, local red 
and brown hematite; product, pig-iron for car-wheel and foundry purposes; 
annual capacity. 15,000 tons. (Formerly called Gadsden Furnace.) Active 
in 1903. 

Rock Run Furnace, The Bass Foundry and Machine Company, Rock 
Run, CheTokee county. One stack, 54 1-2 x 11 1-2, built in 1873-4, enlarged 
in 1881 and 1892, and rebuilt In 1894 ; warm blast ; ore, local brown hema- 
tite; product, plg.iron for car wheels and strong castings; annual capacity, 
15.000 tons. Brand, "Rock Run." Active in 1903 . 

Round Mountain Furnace. Round Mountain Iron and Wood Alcohol 
Company, Round Mountain, Cherokee ccunty. One stack, 45x9 1-2, built in 
1853, rebuilt in 1874. and remodeled in 1888 ; cold blast ; ore, red fossilifer- 
ous; product, low-phosphorus and high grade car-wheel pig-iron; annual 
capacity, 0,500 tons. Brand. "Round Mountain." Connected with the fur- 
nace are charcoal pits and kilns; company exj>ects to make wood alcohol 
and acetate of lime in the fall of 1904. Active in 1903. 

Shelby Furnaces, Shelby Iron Company. Shelby, Shelby county. Two 
stacks; Nob. 1 and 2, each <J0xl4, built in 1803 and 1873; No. 1 rebuilt in 
1889; warm blast; ore. brown hematite obtained on the furnace property; 
product, car-wheel pig-iron; total annual capacity, 40,000 tens. Brand, 
"Shelby." The company makes about 1,000,000 bushels of charcoal an- 
nually. Active in 1903. 

Number of charcoal furnaces in Alabama : stacks. 

Total number of furnaces in Alabama : 49 completed, 2 building, and 3 
projected. Of these 43 use coke, 2 coke stacks are being built, 3 coke stacks 
are project ed, and stacks use charcoal. 

Rolling Mills and Steel Works. 

Number : 13 completed ; 1 building. 

Alabama Steel and Wire Company, Birmingham. Two works, one at 
Ensiey, Jefferson county, and one at Gadsden. Etowah county. Ensley 
Works, built in 1899-1900 and first put in operation in March, 1900; 2 direct 
fire heating furnaces, 2 annealing furnaces. 18 trains of rolls, (four 9, three 
10, four 12 and seven 10-inch >, 173 wire-nail machines, and 219 wire-draw- 
ing blocks; product, small billets, wire rods, wire nails, plain, barbed and 
galvanized wire, fence staples, and field fencing; annual capacity, 100,000 
tons of rods. 130,000 tons of wire, and 1.000.000 kegs of wire nails; fuel, 
coal ; a galvanizing plant is connected with the works. Gadsden Works, 
built in 1903-4 and first put in operation in June. 1904; four 50-gross-ton 
basic open-hearth steel furnaces and one 30-inch blooming mill ; product, 
blooms and billets; annual capacity, 120,000 tons of ingots and 300,000 tons 
of blooms and billets; fuel, coal. 

Alabama Tube and Iron Company, Birmingham Trust and Savings Com- 
pany, Trustee, Birmingham. Works at Helena. Shelby county. Started in 
March, 1873 ; enlarged in 1889 ; acquired in 1901 by the present company ; 
one double and 11 single puddling furnaces, one rotary squeezer, three 4- 
door reverbatory heating furnaces, 2 hammers, and 3 trains of rolls (one 
2-hlgh 18-inch muck with separate roughing and finishing rolls, one 3-high 
8-inch guide mill with 4 stands of rolls) ; product, muck bar, skelp, and 
merchant bars; annual capacity, not given. Fuel, bituminous coal. A plant 



314 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

for the manufacture of wrought iron pipe is connected with the works; 
sizes, from 1-4 of an inch to 2 inches; annual capacity, 15,000 tons. Fuel, 
bituminous Coal and producer gas. A galvanizing plant and a machine shop 
are also connected with the works. Plant idle; company may be reorgan- 
ized. 

Alabama Works, Gate City, Jefferson county, Alabama. Established in 
1887-8; put in operation in February, 1888; Since remodeled; 23 single pud- 
dling furnaces, 2 gas heating furnaces, and 3 trains of rolls (18 inch muck 
and 8 and 16-inch bar) ; product, bars, bands, hoops, light T rails, angles 
from 1 to 2 1-2 inches, and light channels; annual capacity, 24,000 tons. 
Fuel, coal In puddling furnaces and producer gas in heating furnaces. 

Anniston Works, The Illinois Car and Equipment Company, Rookery 
Building, Chicago. Works at Anniston, Calhoun county, Alabama. Built 
in 1884 and enlarged in 1888-9 and 1803 ; 12 single and 6 double puddling 
furnaces, 6 heating furnaces, one scrap furnace, 3 trains of rolls, (one 18- 
inch muck, one 19-inch bap, and one 10-inch merchant and guide,) and 4 
hammers (one 0,000-lb., two 4,000-lb., and one helve) ; product, iron and 
steel car axles and merchant bar iron ; annual capacity, 9,000 tons of forged 
and 30.000 tons of rolled products. Fuel, coal. Plants for the manufacture 
of cast-iron car and locomotive wheels, bolts, rivets, lag screws, and light 
and heavy iron and steel forgings are connected with the the works; also 
a plant for building wocden freight cars. 

Bessemer Rolling Mills, Bessemer, Jefferson county, Alabama. Built 
in 1887-8 and put in operation in September, 1888; 24 single puddling fur- 
naces, 6 heating furnaces, one annealing furnace, 5 trains of rolls, (one 20 
inch muck, and one 8-inch guide, one 16-inch bar, one 22-inch sheet, and one 
2G-inch plate,) 9 Siemens gas producers, 2 plate straighteners, 3 rail straight 
eners, and one angle straightener ; product, bar, guide, and light and heavy 
plates up to 65 inches wide; annual capacity, 60,000 tons. Fuel, coal and 
manufactured gas. 

Birmingham Rolling Mills, (operated by the Birmingham "Rolling Mill 
Company,) Birmingham, Alabama. Established in 1880; first put in oper- 
ation in July, 1880 ; since enlarged and recently remodeled ; 11 double and 
24 puddling furnaces, one scrap gas furnace, 7 gas, 4 box annealing, 2 pair, 
and 4 sheet heating and annealing furnaces, 10 trains of rolls, (one 8-inch 
guide, one 12 and one 16-inch bar, two 18-Inch forge, two 24-inch sheet, one 
26-inch plate, and one 24-inch finishing, all hot, and one coW sheet train.) 
and 2 spike machines. Open-hearth steel department, containing 2 Siemens 
30-gross-tou basic furnaces, built in 1897; first steel made July 22, 1897; 
annual capacity. 35,000 tons of ingots. Product, iron and open-hearth steel 
bars, plates, sheets, angles, round-edge tire, small T rails, fish-plates, rail- 
read spikes, etc.; annual capacity, 70,000 tons of rolled material and 2,400 
tens of spikes. Fuel, coal and producer gas. 

Birmingham Steel and Iron Company, Birmingham. Commenced build- 
ing one 10-gross-ton basic open-hearth steel furnace in the spring of 1904 ; 
will probably be completed- in September, 1904 ; product, to be general ma- 
chinery castings; estimated annual capacity, 6,000 tons. Fuel, producer 
gas. This company succeeds the Hood Machine Company and now makes 
car wheels, car axles, forgings, etc. ; it also does general foundry and ma- 
chine work. 

Eclipse Rolling Mill and Manufacturing Company, East Birmingham, 
Jefferson county,. Built in 1904 and first put in operation on May 1, 1904 ; 
3 heating furnaces, 4 trains of rolls, 2 spike machines, and 2 hammers (50 
and 75-lb.) ; product, bar iron, spike iron, railroad spikes, washer iron, 
drift bolts, harrow teeth, cut washers, fence iron, bedstead iron, angles, 
cotton-ties, and buckles; annual capacity, 12,000 tons of rolled products and 
20,000 kegs of spikes. Fuel, coal and coke. 

Jefferson Steel Works, Birmingham, Alabama. Built in 1889-90;. one 
15-gross-ton basic open-hearth steel furnace; first steel made April 24, 1890; 
product, steel ingots ; annual capacity, 8,100 tons. Fuel, manufactured gas. 
Brand, "Jeft'erson." (This furnace takes the place of an experimental Hen- 
derson open-hearth steel furnace built in 1887-8 and which first made steel 



AGRICULTURAL AND INDUSTRIAL STATISTICS. 315 

on February 27, 1888. Hawkins steel was experimentally produced at these 
works in 1897.) (The works were formerly owned by the Union Steel and 
Chain Company.) 

Sheffield Rolling Mill, Sheffield Rolling Mill Company, Sheffield, Col- 
bert county. Built in 1897-8 and first put in operation in October, 1898; 12 
double puddling furnaces, 6 heating furnaces, and 4 trains of rolls (one 
3-hlgh 18-Inch muck and billet, one 3-high 16-inch bar, one 10-inch guide, 
and one 10- inch hoop and cotton tie) ; product, bar, rod, and band iron and 
steel; also iron and steel hoops, cotton-ties, cotton-tie buckles, and railroad 
and boat spikes; annual capacity, 30,000 tons. Fuel, bituminous ccal. May 
add two 25-gross-ton basic open-hearth steel furnaces. 

Steel Casting Department, Ensley, Jefferson county, Alabama. Built 
in 1900; one 10_gross-ton basic open-hearth steel furnace; first steel made 
August 31, 1900; product, car couplers, gears, rolls, engine parts, and other 
steel castings; annual capacity, 12,000 tons. Fuel, producer gas. (Works 
owned by the Alabama Steel and Shipbuilding Company and operated un- 
der lease by the Tennessee Coal, Iron, and Railroad Company.) 

Steel Works Division, Ensley, Jefferson county, Alabama. Built in 1898 
9; first heat poured November 30, 1899; ten 50-gross-ton basic open-bearth 
furnaces (9 tilting and one stationary) with an annual capacity of 350,000 
tons of ingots; one reheating coal furnace, four 4-hole soaking pits, and one 
44-inch blooming mill ; product, blooms, billets, and slabs ; also one 27-inch 
rail train equipped for the production of either steel rails, splice bars, small 
billets, sheet bars. I beams, channels, or angles; first steel rail rolled Nov- 
ember 14, 1902 ; estimated annual capacity, from 150,000 to 300.000 tons of 
rails or billets. Fuel, producer gas. Connected with the works are one 
250-gross-ton rolling aeidlined primary furnace and one 15-gross-ton Bessem- 
er converter for desiliconizing and decarburizing molten metal for the open- 
hearth steel furnaces, the molten metal being obtained from the Ensley 
Furnaces; primary furnace first put in operation February 14, 1904, and 
Bessemer converter February 17. 1904 ; lining of primary furnace may be 
changed from acid to basic. (Works owned by the Alabama Steel and Ship- 
building Company and operated under lease by the Tennessee Coal, Iron, 
and Railroad Company.) 

Welleb Rolling Mill and Forge Company, Anniston, Calhoun county. 
Built in 1890-1; 13 single puddling furnaces, 2 large heating furnaces, 2 
trains or rolls, (one 3-high 20-inch muck and one 3-high 12-inch finishing,) 
and 2 spike machines; product, merchant iron and steel, light T rails, spec- 
ial shapes, and all sizes of railroad spikes; annual capacity, 12,000 tons of 
rolled material. Fuel, bituminous coal. (Formerly called the Anniston 
Rolling Mills and operated by the Anniston Rolling Mill Company.) 

Number of rolling mills and steel works in Alabama : 13 completed and 
one building. Of these one has a Bessemer converter, 5 have open-hearth 
steel plants, one open-hearth steel plant is being built, and one open-hearth 
steel plant is projected. 



TIMBER RESOURCES OF ALABAMA. 
By C. L. Hill, U. S. Forest Service. 

By reason both of the wide extent from north to south and the diversi- 
fied topography of the state, the flora of Alabama is one of unrivaled rich- 
ness. The number of plants which attain the dimensions of trees in the 
state is alone about one hundred and seventy-five. Of these thirty-one are 
evergreens, of which six are pines, and the remainder are the so-called 
hardwoods, or broadleafed trees, including twenty-four species of oak, nine 
of hickory, eight of maple and four of elm, besides representatives of a 
large number of other kinds. 

Only a small proportion of this number are at present of commercial 
value. The principal commercial trees are longleaf pine (including the 



316 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

true longleaf, and the Cuban pine), the lobolly pine, and the true shortleaf 
pine. The other chief commercial tree of the pine family is the Cypress. 
The Cedar is also of commercial importance, though the amount of it an- 
nually cut is not large. The chief commercial hardwoods, in the order of 
their importance in this state, are oak, tulip poplar, red or sweet gum. 
tupelo gum, hickory, ash, chestnut, cotton wood, elm, beech. There are 
others which, as the scarcity of the better kinds becomes more acute, will 
doubtless come into commercial use. Some are already in use, in quantities 
so limited that they are not now reported in the figures of production. 
Among such woods may be mentioned the inferior oaks and hickories, black 
gum, buck-eye and some of the magnolias. 

Its magnificent timber resources form one of Alabama's greatest sources 
of material wealth. The timber area of the state is estimated at about 
24,500,000 acres. The exact distribution of this area between the pines and 
the hardwoods is difficult to determine, especially since in many cases they 
overlap or intermingle. But the largest porportion of this forest area is un- 
doubtedly occupied by the yellow pine, which makes also over nine-tenths 
of the annual cut, or over 900 million feet in 1906. 

The startling way in which our national timber resources are being ex- 
hausted is seldom appreciated by anyone who has not given the matter 
serious attention. Specific statements are difficult to make because of the 
lack of any complete knowledge of the timber still standing in the country. 
But against this annual cut in Alabama of nearly a billion feet of pine it 
is significant that the remaining pine stumpage of this state was estimated 
in 1903, four years ago, to be only 11 billion feet. In the hardwoods, statis- 
tics show that in spite of an industrial expansion w T hich every year demands 
more wood, the cut of elm in the United States has decreased over .50 per 
cent, in seven years, of poplar 38 per cent., of oak 36.5 per cent, and the 
total hardwood cut of Alabama has in that period decreased from 105 mil- 
lion to 66 million of feet. These facts are ominous of the future. 

The inevitable crisis will be deferred somewhat in the case of the coni- 
ferous woods by the developing supplies on the Pacific coast. Growth will 
also add something to the supply, even under neglect and abuse. 
But the United States has come to the time when she must 
begin to handle her forests en a different basis than that of 
immediate and final exploitation and destruction which we have followed 
as a people in the past. This is being recognized by increasing numbers of 
people. And the important influence exerted by the forests in the conserva- 
tion of moisture and the regulation of stream flow, which are of funda- 
mental importance to the economic health of the nation, are coming to be 
increasingly understood. In Alabama a very general movement has begun 
for forest preservation. Many lumbermen would now gladly hold their 
cut over lands for the growth of future crops, if they could be relieved from 
the burden of taxation which now compels them to relinquish them 
as soon as the timber is removed. It is hoped that Alabama may soon have 
on her statute books laws which will provide for an intelligent and pro- 
gressive public policy toward the magnificent forest resources of her peo- 
ple. 

Statistics of the Production of Lumber, Lath, and Shingles in Ala- 
bama, by Species, 1900, 1905 and 1904. 

The statistics below set forth the production of lumber, lath and shin- 
gles in the State, by species for the years 1906, 1905 and 1904. They are 
condensed from a broadside issued by the Forest Service, United States 
Department of Agriculture, under date of July 19, 1907. The figures are in 
thousand feet, board measure. 



AGRICULTURAL AND INDUSTRIAL STATISTICS. 



317 



1906 



Yellow pine 

White pine 

Oak 

Cypress 

Poplar 

Red gum 

Chestnut 

Bass wood 

Cedar . 

Cottonwood . 

Beech 

Elm 

Ash 

Hickory 

Tupelo 

Walnut 

All other timbers 

Lath 

Shingles 



936,493 

961 

32,976 

5,880 

12,270 

8,436 

1,340 



40 
1,330 

35 

429 

2,377 

1,360 

5,835 



21 
74,406 
57,546 



1905 



1904 



744,192 



33,225 

7,529 

37,808 

9,524 

305 



420 



32 
1,471 
1,005 
6,362 



2,024 
26,256 

285,080 



1,116,118 



50,588 

21,518 

35,206 

13,678 

400 

— 8 

70 

390 



2,641 
2,790 



6 

575 

24,569 

112,093 



Miscellaneous Lumber Statistics. 

The figures which follow are condensed from a 1905 Timber Bulletin 
of the U. S. Census Bureau. 



Total number of timber establishments 

Capital __ 

Number of men employed 

Wages __ 

Value of products 

Other timber products 

Total value lumber and timber products 

Average stumpage value M. feet B. M 

Rank of Alabama 

Number establishments 

Capital 

Value products 

Saw Mills 

Sawing 50—1,000 M. feet B. M 

Sawing 1,000—10,000 feet B. M 

Sawing over 10,000 M. feet B. M 

Total __ 



1905 



590 

$ 12.625,688 

14,682 

$ 5,032,139 

15,939,813 

4,217,649 

$ 20,157,462 

$ 1.55 

8 
12 
13 

323 

189 

36 

548 



1900 



796 

7,855,629 

14,450 

3.478,482 

12,522,423 



$ 12,522,423 
$ 1.20 

8 
13 
19 

514 

202 

22 

738 



318 



OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 



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XIV, PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY, GEOL- 
OGY AND CLIMATE OF ALABAMA. 



I. PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY AND NATURAL DIVISIONS. : 

Georgraphic position. — Alabama is situated between the eighty- 
fifty and eighty-ninth meridians of west longitude and mainly be- 
tween the thirty-first and thirty-fifth parallels of north latitude. The 
total area thus included is, according to the latest estimates. 52,251 
square miles, of which 51,540 square miles constitute the land surface- 

Surface Configuration and Grand Diznsion. — Apart from the mi- 
nor inequalities and the relatively small area of .the Talladega Moun- 
tains, the surface of the State may be considered as an eroded or 
dissected plain, whose mean elevation above the sea level is not much 
less than 600 feet. To the north and east the surface rises above 
this elevation and to the south and west it sinks below it. A curv- 
ing line drawn from the northwest corner of the State through Tus- 
caloosa and Montgomery to Columbus, Georgia, would mark approx- 
imately the southern boundary of the area whose altitude is abov^ 
600 feet. This elevated land is the Southwestern terminus of the 
great Appalachian region, and forms the Appalachian Dwision of 
this report. 

The line along which the highest altitudes occur — i. e., the axis 
of elevation of this' area — runs in a northeast-southwest direction 
nearly along the northern boundaries of Coosa, Clay, and Cleburne 
counties. The altitude increases toward the northeast, and as a con- 
sequence the general slope of the surface is away from this elevated 
area toward the northwest, west, southwest, south, and southeast. 
The mountains of the State all rise 1200 to 1600 feet above the high- 
land, or 2000 to 2400 feet above sea level. The rest of the State, 
whose general altitude is less than 600 feet, constitutes the Coastal 
Plain Diznsion. The surface of this area slopes, approximately one 
foot to the mile, south and west toward the Gulf of Mexico and the 
Mississippi Valley. The elevation decreases from about 600 feet 
where it touches the Appalachian division to 200 to 300 feet in the 
highlands overlooking the Gulf in the two coast counties. Into the 
materials of this gently sloping plain the rivers and other streams 
have sunk their channels, leaving between them the remnants of the 
original mass which constitute the hills of this section of the State. 

♦Prepared by Dr. Eugene Allen Smith, State Geologist, and published 
by him in his invaluable work entitled Underground Water Resources of 
Alabama, (1907), and reprinted here by permission. 

(324) 



PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY, GEOLOGY AND CLIMATE. 325 

Another point of difference between the two great divisions, readily 
seen by an inspection of the map, is the prevailing northeast-south- 
west direction of the minor subdivisions of -the Appalachian area and 
the approximately east- west trend of such subdivisions in the Coastal 
Plain area. Some other important differences" between the two sec- 
tions will be discussed below. 

River systems. — In general terms, two factors have been mainly 
instrumental in determining the direction of the drainage systems of 
Alabama. These are, first, the slopes toward the northwest and 
southeast away from the Appalachian axis of elevation, and second, 
the more general slope of the surface of the State, taken as a whole, 
south westward toward the Mississippi Valley. The latter factor has 
greatly outweighed the former in fixing the direction of the water- 
courses, the result being that the whole drainage system of the State 
has a general southwesterly direction, with the single exception of 
the Tennessee river. 

In the southeastern half of the Appalachian area, while the natural 
fall is to the southeast and south, most of the streams, especially the 
minor ones, are also influenced bv the northeast-southwest trend of 
the valleys and ridges and make their way toward the Coastal Plain 
in a zigzag course, alterating between southeast and southwest. In 
the northwestern half of the Appalachian area, the two branches of 
Black Warrior river follow in general the troughs or basins of the 
Warrior coal .field, which pitch toward the southwest, while the •Ten- 
nessee, entering the State near its northeastern corner, follows a lime- 
stone valley southwestward to Guntersville, and then turns north- 
westward down the slope from the axis of the Appalachian highlands. 

In the central part of the Appalachian area the dependence of mi- 
nor ridges and valleys on the geologic structure is most clearly seen. 
They all have a northeast-southwest trend, parallel to the strike of 
the outcropping edges of the folded strata. The valleys are cut into 
the limestones and other easily eroded rocks, while the harder rocks 
form the ridges. 

In the Coastal Plain area the main or trunk streams have south- 
erly or southwesterly courses, determined by the general slope of the 
surface ; while their minor tributaries together with attendant ridges 
and valleys, are controlled in location and direction by the geologic 
structure and by the character of the materials of the geological for- 
mations. 

Throughout the Coastal Plain the constituent beds of sand, clay, 
limestone, and marl, have "a dip in the same general direction as the 
surface of the country, but at a more rapid rate — on an average about 
35 or 40 feet to the mile. W r hile the main (consequent) streams 
have cut across the edges of these slightly inclined beds, the smaller 
streams run roughly parallel to them. The result is that the land- 
ward or in-facing slopes of the minor stream valleys' are abrupt, 
while the slopes facing gulfward are very gentle, often hardly to be 
distinguished from horizontal. Thus, while the adjustment of the 



326 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

Mountains and table-lands. — As has been intimated above, the 
mountainous region of the State is confined to the Appalachian di- 
vision, the two halves of which (divided by a northeast-southwest 
line) show important differences. In the southeastern half the strata 
have been greatly folded and plicated and in part metamorphosed, 
and are always much indurated. As a consequence the mountains 
of this section, illustrated by the Talladega Mountain range, the 
mosf elevated in the State, are often sharp-crested and serrated, but 
alwavs with uneven summits. In the northwestern half th^ strata 
are in wide, open waves or folds, and the mountains, exemplified by 
the Cumberland Plateau, are merely the remnants of an elevated 
tableland, with steep slopes toward the bordering valleys. Between 
the principal members of this mountain system are great valleys 
which are carved in the main from limestones interstratified with 
harder and more durable beds of sandstone and chert. The harder 
beds from northeast-southwest minor ridges which flute the great 
valley areas. 

There are no mountains properly so called in the Coastal Plain 
The hills, like those of the Cumberland Plateau, are merely rem- 
nants carved from the original mass. 

Sub-Divisioiis. — The sub-divisions of the Appalachian area, based 
on the topographic and geologic features, are : ( j ) The Talladega 
Mountains and Ashland Plateau, of igneous and metamorphic rocks : 
(2) the Appalachian valleys of Paleozoic rocks below the Coal Meas- 
ures, (Pennsylvanian) ; (3) the coal fields of the Pennsylvanian Se- 
ries; and (4) the Tennessee Valley, of the Mississippian Series. 
(Lower Carboniferous.) 

The Coastal Plain has two great basal systems, the Cretaceous 
and Tertiary, and two blanket formations, the Grand Gulf and La- 
fayette. The Coastal Plain is best adapted to general agriculture 
and is noted for its extensive forest growths. 

In both these great divisions of the State the topographic and 
other distinctive characters of the minor subdivisions are so inti- 
mately dependent on the geologic structure that it is desirable to 
discuss these features in connection with the geologic formations. 

II. GEOLOGY OF THE STATE. 

The subjoined table shows the chronological sequence of the geol- 
ogic formations represented in Alabama. It may be added that the 
existence of certain late Tertiarv marine" formations in the lower 
counties of the State has been revealed by deep borings, while their 
outcrops have not as yet been observed at the surface, a circumstance 
that is partly explained by the presence in that section of two super- 
ficial formations, the Grand Gulf and the Lafayette, beneath which 
these marine deposits lie in places deeply buried, 
smaller streams of the Coastal Plain to the geologic structure is not 
so striking, it is in places quite as complete as in the Appalachian 
area. 



Quaternary 



Tertiary 



PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY, GEOLOGY AND CLIMATE. 327 

GEOLOGIC FORMATIONS OF ALABAMA. 

r Soils 
First bottom deposits and recent alluvium 
Second bottom deposits 
Columbia sands 
Lafayette 

Pliocene I Grand Gulf 
1 nocene— j Pa8cagou j a 

Miocene — Chattahoochee (Alum Bluff, Oak Grove, etc.) 

St. Stephens limestone 

{Gosport greensand 
Lisbon beds 
Tallahatta buhrstone 



Eocene 



'Chickasaw 
or Wilcox 
(Lignitic) 



Midway 



Hatchetigbee 
Bashi (Woods Bluff) 
Tuscahoma (Bells Landing) 
Nanafalia (Coal Bluff) 

Noheola (Matthews Landing) 
Sucarnochee clay 
Clayton limestone 



Cretaceous < 



Ripley marl 
Selma chalk 
Eutaw sand 
Tuscaloosa formation 



Pennsylvanian Series 
(Coal measures) 



Carboniferous- ' ( Bangor limestone 

/Mississippian Series ^ I Oxmoor formation 

I (Low r er Carboniferous) j 1 Tuscumbia limestone 
\ [ Lauderdale chert 

Devonian — Chattanooga black shale 

Silurian — Red Mountain formation (Clinton) 

•w^ .t~-« ( Pelham limestone (Trenton) 

Ordovician j Knox Dolomite 



Cambrian < 



f Coosa shale 
Montevallo formation 
Aldrich limestone 
Weisner sandstone 



Contempo- 
raneous. 
Ft. Payne 
chert. 



'Talladega slates 1 Metamorphic Paleozoic strata; 

Talladega slates } Pennsylvanian in part 



part 



Metamorphic 

and 
Igneous rocks 



Ashland mlcha shtsts \ Metamorphic sediments of undetermined 

( age, probably Paleozoic 

Ieneous rocks __ f Granites, diorites, gneisses, etc., of several 

s _| ageg (pre-Cambrian and Paleozoic) 



328 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL, REGISTER. 

Appalachian Division. 

The main characteristics of the Appalachian area have already 
been sketched. Its four subdivisions will now be taken up more in 
detail, especially as regards the topography and geologic structure, 
the discussion of the relation of these to the circulation of the under- 
ground waters being left to another chapter. 

Talbadcga Mountains and Ashland Plcateau, (igneous and meta- 
morphic rocks.) — These two sections correspond with the Blue 
Ridge and the Piedmont plateau of Georgia and the States to the 
northeast. They make up the southeastern half of the Appalachian 
division, embracing part or all of Cleburne, Talladega, Clay, Coosa. 
Chilton. Elmore, Tallapoosa, Randolph, Chambers, Lee, and Macon 
counties. The rocks are all more or less crystalline in texture and 
fall into two general classes : ( I ) massive or dike rocks of igneous 
origin, such as granite, diorite, and diabase; and (2) metamorphic 
or schistose rocks. The latter class is likewise divided into two 
divisions according to origin: (a) those derived from igneous 
rocks, such as the gneisses, the hornblende schists, the Hillabee 
green schists, etc.. (b) and those derived from sediments, such as 
the feebly crystalline phyllites of the Talladega Mountains, . which 
are now known to be, at least in part, of the age of the Pennsylva- 
nian series, (Coal Measures) ; the more fully cystalline mica-schists 
of the Ashland Plateau ; and the quartzites and crystalline marble* 
and. dolomites'. 

The planes of schistosity of these rocks, which may or may not 
coincide with original bedding planes, have in Alabama an almost 
universal dip to the southeast, giving a general northeast-southwest 
direction to all those topographic features which are due to the dif- 
ferential weathering of their outcropping edges. 

The Talladega Mountains, form the northwestern part of this sub- 
division. They are high, generally sharp-crested ridges with nar- 
row, often gorgelike valleys between. These mountains have' an 
altitude of 2400 feet above sea level and are the highest peaks in 
the vState. From this elevated land the country falls off rapidly />n 
the west toward the great Coosa Valley, and on the east to the Ash- 
land Plateau. The latter has an average elevation above the s*ea 
of 1000 feet. The plain-like character of this plateau is evidently 
the result of erosion — "base-leveling" — and is not due to the hori- 
zontal position of the rocks, as is the case with the Cumberland Plat- 
eau, presently to be described. The surface of the Ashland Plateau 
is made up (if beveled-off edges of the steeply dipping schists, and 
the present topographic features are due to the subsequent eleva- 
tion of this baseleveled plain and the dissection of its mass by the 
watercourses. 



PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY, GEOLOGY AND CLIMATE. 329 

The recent discovery of Carboniferous fossils on the eastern flank 
of the Talladega Mountain range where it merges into the Ashland 
Plateau, is evidence that some, at least, of these metamorphic rocks 
are of Paleozoic age. The southeastern half of the Plateau is in part 
made up of gneisses and micaschists' which are apparently older than 
the schists above mentioned. This may be due, however, simplv to 
a greater degree of alteration. Dikes of granite, diorite, gabbro. 
and other types of rock generally considered to be of unquestioned 
igneous origin are sometimes intruded between the schists, and fre- 
quently across them. 

In the western part of the Ashland Plateau these dikes intersect 
the Paleozoic schists and are, therefore, of Paleozoic or later age. 
In the eastern part, the dikes are intruded into schists of possible 
prc-Cambrian age. A kind of metamorphosed trap rock or green- 
stone of peculiar, character has been traced in an irregular line of 
outcrop from Chilton County, Alabama, into Georgia. This has been 
called the Hillabee Schist. It has been observed in Alabama onlv 
along the eastern base of the Talladega Mountain range, generally 
separating the slates of the Talladega Mountains from the mica- 
schists of the Ashland Plateau. 

Appalachian V'alleys (Paleozoic formations below the Penns\l- 
vanian.) — The wide valley wjth prevailing calcareous soils lying be- 
tween the Talladega Mountains on the east and Lookout Mountain 
and the Coosa coal field on the west has received the name of Coosa 
Vallev, from the river which drains it. It is the continuation and 
terminus of the Valley of East Tennessee and the Great Valley of 
Virginia. Cahaba Valley lies' between the Coosa and Cahaba coal 
fields ; Wills Valley occupies the country between Lookout and Rac- 
coon mountains. Roth of these valleys merge into the Coosa Valley 
between the end of Lookout Mountain and the Cahaba coal field. Be- 
tween the Warrior and Cahaba coal fields are Shades and Jones Val- 
leys, the latter at its north end branching into Coosa Valley on the 
one hand and Murphrees Valley on the other. Farther west, lying 
between Raccoon Mountain on the east and the Cumberland Plateau 
on the west, is Browns or Blount Springs Valley, the prolongation 
in Alabama of the Sequatchee Valley of Tennessee. In structure 
all these vallevs are anticlinal — that is, thev have been eroded out of 
the crests of the long, narrow folds into which the strata have been 
bent by the compressing force acting from the southeast. W r ith the 
exception of Murphrees Valley, these folds were lapped over toward 
the northwest and so have their steeper slopes on that side, while 
the gentle slope is toward the southeast. In Murphrees Valley the 
reverse is the case, the steeper slope being on the southeast side. The 
erosion to which these arches have been subjeted has removed their 
crests, leaving only the remnants of the upbent strata to show by 
their position the original structure. 



330 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

In the Coosa Valley the structure is more complex. It is not a 
single anticlinal fold, but rather a series of folds, closely compressed, 
overlapping toward the northwest, and complicated by faulting and 
over-riding of the broken parts. Most of the present strata are the 
remnants of these folds. They have in consequence a very general 
dip toward the southeast. In the other valleys the structure is morj? 
simple, since there is but a single arch, which is nearly always, 
broken or faulted on the northwest side, (on the southeast side in 
Murphrees Valley.) 

The steep dips above alluded to are always on the faulted side. 
By reason of the faulting, some of the strata are cut out and do not 
appear as they should in a normal anticline. 

The geologic formations occurring in these valleys range from 
the lowest Cambrian up to the Pennsylvanian series, the latter, how 
ever, affecting the valley making only in the sense that it makes the 
summits of the bordering mountains. The most prominent of these 
formations is the Knox dolomite, a massive calcareous rock which 
generally occupies the central portions of the valleys. There are a!su 
other important limestones and calcareous shales, of Cambrian age, 
which form the floors of parts of these valleys, especially of the 
Coosa. All these limestones are interbedded with sandstones and 
chert which stand out as subordinate ridges that diversify all the 
valleys. The Coosa Valley is thus a great trough, 30 miles wide, 
fluted with scores' of parallel smaller valleys and ridges. The other 
valleys mentioned are of similar nature, but have less of these minor 
features. 

The Weisner sandstone occurs, so far as the writer has observed, 
in the Coosa Valley region only. It is a veritable mountain-making 
formation, appearing most prominently in the range that extends 
from Alpine Mountain, near Coosa River, northeastward by Talla- 
dega, Oxford, and Anniston and on part Jacksonville into Georgia. 
The sandstones of the Red Mountain (Clinton) formation, as well 
as those of Mississippian series (Lower Carboniferous,) in the south- 
western part of the Coosa Valley, form a number of well-defined 
ridges. The siliceous or cherty parts of two of the limestone forma- 
tions' — the Knox dolomite and the Lauderdale make prominent flint 
ridges' in all the valleys ; the Lauderdale also caps the Red Mountain 
(Clinton) ridges of the smaller valleys. A great body of calcareous 
shales and shaly limestones, appears in the "Flatwoods" of the Coosa 
Valley, extending from the Georgia line on both .sides of the river 
down to Gadsden and thence farther southwestward toward the north 
end of the Cahaba coal field. These are the Coosa and Montevallo 
shales of Cambrian, age. 

The Pelham (Trenton) and Bangor limestones are of less import- 
ance in the valley making, though each is found in the subordinate 



PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY, GEOLOGY AND CLIMATE. 331 

troughs of the greater valleys. Shades Valley, which has been 
formed mainly out of the Bangor limestone, lies between Red Moun- 
tain, east of Birmingham, and Shades Mountain, the western es- 
carpment of the Cahaba coal field, and forms a very important topo- 
graphic feature of that section. 

These great valley regions are of extreme importance to Alabama 
from the fact that they contain the iron ores, bauxites, limestones, 
shales and clays, all of which have played a prominent part in the 
development of the State. 

Coal fields (Pennsylvanian series.)- — The coal fields are four in 
number — the Coosa, Cahaba, Lookout Mountain, and Warrior. They 
are separated from one another by long, narrow . anticlinal valleys 
above described. Structurally they are troughs or synclines* between 
these anticlines. In a general way it may be remarked that the syn- 
clinal troughs were much wider than the anticlinal ridges, and that, 
away from the immediate vicinity of these uplifts, the strata of the 
coal fields are far less disturbed than are those of the adjacent val- 

' leys, retaining in general their original nearly horizontal position. 
By reference to the geological map it will be noticed that the expanse 
of nearly horizontal strata of the coal becomes gradually wider and 
wider to the west and that the upward-bent wrinkles of the valleys 
are correspondingly narrower and farther apart. In the Coosa and 
Cahaba fields the syncline is unsymmetrical. Its axis lies close 
to its southeastern edge, in consequence of which the strata on the 
western side of the synclinal axis", embracing the greater, part of th° 
field, have a gentle southeasterly dip. On the eastern side they are 
sharply upturned, at times vertical, and give to these fields the ap- 
pearance of being monoclines. Cross folds of minor character divide 
both these fields into several smaller basins. Lookout Mountain is a 
shallow synclinal trough well elevated above the valleys on each 
side of it. The same may be said of Raccoon Mountain, which forms 
the northern and northeastern parts of the Warrior field. Raccoon 

■ Mountain is capped by the Pennsylvanian rocks and presents steep 
escarpments to the bordering valleys. That part of these fields in , 
which the flat-topped summits of the highlands are capped with 
Pennsylvanian rocks, has been called the "plateau region." Across 
Tennessee River, in the northeast corner of the State, these plateaus 
are known as the spurs of the Cumberlands. In the southwestern 
part of the Warrior field, however, the strata of the Pennsylvanian 
series are found at levels ranging from that of the general drainage 
to far below it. This part of the field has been called the "basin re- 
gion." It is evident that in the plateau region only the lower strata 
of the Pennsylvanian series are present, while in the basin region 
we may have, and in its southwest end do have, the entire thickness 
of these rocks. The principal coal-mining districts are thus to be 



332 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

found in the western or southwestern parts of these fields', especially 
in the Warrior and Cahaba, and less conspicuously in the Coosa. The 
Lookout field is wholly in the plateau region. 

Valleys of the Tennessee, (Mississippian series.) — The area in- 
cluded under this head is naturally divisible into two parts, the first 
including the region east of Huntsville, bordered by the Cumberland 
mountains on the one side and Sand Mountain on the other. The 
second part embraces the valley west of Huntsville to the Mississippi 
State line. 

From the northeast corner of the State down to Guntersville, the 
river is confined to a long narrow trough, known in Tennessee as 
the Sequatchee Valley, and in Alabama as Browns or Big Spring 
Valley. Below Guntersville the river flows in a northwest direction 
along a narrow, often gorge-like valley through the Cumberland 
Plateau to about the Meridian of Huntsville. It here emerges into 
the broad and open valley which is usually referred to as the Valley 
of the Tennessee. 

The geologic formations of this lower stretch of the river are the 
Bangor (Chester) limestone with its interstratified sandstones, lying 
in general south of the river, while the country to the north is made 
by the siliceous limestones of the Tuscumbia (St. Louis'), the Laud- 
erdale, and other members of the Mississippian series below the Ban- 
gor. These strata, while almost horizontal, have yet a perceptible 
dip to the south. The river crosses them nearly at a right angle, to the 
dip, giving «. Coastal Plain, type of topography. The river itself oc- 
cupies a broad trough in the Tuscumbia limestones, while on both 
sides are erosion ridges, with steep northward-facing slopes and gen- 
tle structural slopes on the south. North of the river these ridges 
are formed by the siliceous parts of the limestones. On the south 
the principal east-west ridge, known as Little Mountain, owes its 
existence to one of the intercalated sandstones in the Bangor lime- 
stone. Moulton Valley lies' between Little Mountain and Raccoon 
Mountain. The Tennessee Vallev, like the Coos*a Vallev, is a com- 
plex trough fluted with narrow parallel ridges and subordinate val- 
levs. Back from the river the red residual soils form some of the 
finest farming lands in the State. The cherty portions of the lime- 
stone from which these soils are derived remain as low rocky knolls 
which support a fine growth of oaks. The houses of the planters 
are usually located on these knolls. In the more broken part of the 
valley, between the immediate lowlands of the river and the northern 
boundary of the State, the large proportion of siliceous matter in 
the limestones makes the soils' in general inferior to those of the 
river plain. 

The two fundamental systems of the Coastal Plain are the Creta- 
ceous and Tertiary. They consist of interstratified beds of sand, 



PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY, GEOLOGY AND CLIMATE. 333 

clay, limestone, and marls, with their admixtures. These beds have 
an average dip toward the Mississippi embayment and the Gulf of 
Mexico, ranging from 30 to 40 feet to the mile. The surface of the 
Coastal Plain as a whole falls away in the same direction, but at a 
much less rapid rate — about 1 foot to the mile— so that in going 
southward from the Appalachian area we pass in succession over the 
beveled edges of these formations from the oldest to the newest. 
Each of these formations, with the exception of some of the Miocene 
and Pliocene, occupies the surface in a belt proportional in width to 
its thickness and running approximately east and west across the 
State. 

After the close of Tertiary time there was deposited a blanket for- 
mation which is of great importance in the Coastal Plain. It is 
known as the Lafayette formation, and is a mantle of reddish and 
light-colored loams and sands', with frequent beds of waterworn 
pebbles in the lower parts. It has an average thickness of 25 to 30 
feet and formerly covered the entire area of the Coastal Plain. It 
rests unconformabiy on the older formations following the topo- 
graphy in general very closely, though in many large areas it has 
been in great part removed by erosion. As a consequence this 
formation makes perhaps four-fifths of the cultivated soils of the 
whole plain, and its significance in relation to the underground wa- 
ters, which appear in springs and shallow wells, cannot well be over- 
estimated. 

The characteristics of the several divisions of the Cretaceous, Ter- 
tiary, and Quaternary systems will here be reviewed in a generai 
way, many details being left for consideration in connection with 
their relations to the underground water supply. 

The combined thickness of the Cretaceous formations in Alabama 
has been estimated to be about 2500 feet ; that of the Tertiary for- 
mations classed as Eocene in the table, about 1800 feet. The thick- 
ness of the post-Eocene strata can not yet be stated with much cer- 
tainty, though in some deep borings at Mobile, Miocene shells are 
found at a depth of over 1 500 feet. 

CRETACF.OUS. 

The Cretaceous system in Alabama includes four formations 
which are, in ascending order: 

( 1 ) The Tuscaloosa, a formation of freshwater origin, made 110 
in the main of sands and clays in many alternations. 

(2) The Eutaw, a formation of marine origin, composed of sands 
and clays more or less calcareous, but nowhere showing beds of hard 
limestone. 

(3) The Sclma Chalk, likewise of marine origin, a ^reat calcar-. 



334 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

eous formation of the nature of chalk, with varying admixtures of 
clay and other impurities. 

(4) The Ripley, also a marine formation in which the calcareous 
constituents generally predominate, but in parts containing sandy or 
clayey beds. 

None of these formations greatly affects the topography or has 
marked lithologic characters except the Selma chalk. This under- 
lies a belt entering the State from Mississippi and extending east- 
ward with an average width of 20 to 25 miles, to a short distance be- 
yond Montgomery, where its distinctive characters are lost or merged 
into those of the "blue-marl region/' to be more particularly treated 
later. The somewhat uniform composition of the Selma chalk has 
caused it to be more deeply and evenly wasted by erosion and solu- 
tion than the more sandy formations north and south of it. As a 
consequence, its outcrop is in the shape of a trough, with a gently 
undulating, almost unbroken surface except where remnants of the 
once continuous Lafayette mantle have protected the underlying 
limestone from erosion and have thus formed knobs and ridges 
capped with its loams and pebbles. 

In this belt, more than in anv other of the Coastal Plain, the soils 
show their residuary character. They are, as a rule, highly calcar- 
eous clays and, where much mixed with organic matters, of black 
color. Throughout this section are areas originally destitute of trees 
and hence known as "prairies". From the agricultural point of 
view, the Selma chalk or black belt is the most highly favored part 
of the State and, apart from the cities, holds the densest population. 

The Eutaw and Tuscaloosa formations outcropping north of tEe 
prairie or Selma chalk belt, show no marked topographic features. 
The relatively broken and uneven topography of the Tuscaloosa area 
results largely from the preponderance of loose or slightly indurated 
sands with subordinate beds of plastic clay in the formation. The 
general absence of lime and phosphate from the strata causes com- 
paratively poor soils. The most important features of some parts of 
this territory are, or rather were, the grand forests of long-leaf pine, 
now practically exhausted. The surface of the Eutaw belt is gen- 
erally smoother than that of the Tuscaloosa, and the calcareous char- 
acter of many of the sandy and clayey beds insures greater fertility. 

The Ripley formation, south of the Selma area, has many features 
in common with the Eutaw. and while prevalently sandy, it yet con- 
tains a very considerable proportion of limestone and calcareous 
clavs. ' 

As has been intimated above, the Selma chalk seems to give out a 
short distance east of Montgomery, and the whole marine Cretaceous 
section takes on a very uniform lithologic character, being composed 
in the main of a bluish sandy marl in which scales and flakes of mica 



PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY, GEOLOGY AND CLIMATE. 335 

are numerous. The lower beds of the blue marl might perhaps be 
discriminated from the rest by the presence of certain fossils of the 
Eutaw horizon. In the eastern part of the State, however, the three 
marine Cretaceous formations, so clearly distinct in the western part, 
are represented by a series of beds of rather uniform lithologic char- 
acter, though perhaps sufficiently distinct in their fossils. 

TERTIARY. 

Eocene. 

In the western half of the State, in the vicinitv of Alabama and 
Tombigbee rivers, the succession and thickness of the strata from the 
base of the Tertiary up to the top of the St. Stephens limestone, have 
been ascertained with a considerable degree of accuracy. Eastward 
to the Chattahoochee, less work has been done, but the formations 
have been fairly well studied and their succession and thickness along 
the Chattahoochee are also very well established, chiefly by the work 
of Mr. D. W. Langdon. These strata, which are usually classed as 
Eocene, have a thickness of about 1800 feet and present the following 
characteristics : 

MIDWAY GROUP. 

Clayton limestone. — At the base of the Tertiary is found an im- 
pure limestone, thin and inconspicuous in western Alabama, but 
thickening to the east until on Chattahoochee river it includes fully 
,200 feet of alternating calcareous sands and limestones. This for- 
mation is called the Clayton limestone. 

Sucarnochee cay. — Next above the Clayton there is, along Tom- 
bigbee river, a series of black or dark-brown clays at least 100 feet 
thick. This formation is also well exposed at Black Bluff on Tom- 
bigbee, and on Sucarnochee river, and has been called Sucarnochee. 
At Black Bluff and sparingly at a few other points these clays are 
fossiliferous. While nearly devoid of lime in the Tombigbee drain- 
age, except in the lower-most strata, the clays' become more and 
more calcareous to the east, and in Wilcox county, east of Alabama 
river, they form the basis of some fine black prairie lands. The for- 
mation east of Wilcox county, has not been traced. 

Naheola formation {Matthews Landing.) — Next above the Sucar- 
nochee clays is the Naheola formation, embracing 150 feet or more 
of gray sandy clays', with some beds of dark sandy glauconitic clay 
containing marine fossils near the base. To the east this formation 
appears to die out and it is not found exposed on Chattahoochee 

CHICKASAW ( WILCOX ) GROUP. 

Between the top of the Sucarnochee clay and the base of the Talla- 



330 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

hatta buhrstone lies a group which Dr. Hilgard, in his report on the 
Geology of Mississippi, called the Lignitic. 

The term LaGrange was used by Dr. Safford of Tennessee, to in- 
clude a ^portion of the beds originally termed Lignitic by Hilgard. 
LaGrange is a locality name and would doubtless have stood but 
for the fact that Safford included in it the Lafayette (Orange Sand), 
and a portion of the Cretaceous. The name Lignitic being also deemed 
inadmissible, because descriptive, the term Chickasaw, from 
the Chickasaw Bluffs near Memphis, was proposed by Dr. 
Hilgard and Prof. Dall as a substitute, to include the beds 
grouped by Hilgard under the terms Lignitic, excluding 
what he termed the Flatwoods belt. In this* sense the 
name was duly accepted by the geologists and has been 
used by Prof. Dall and others since 1895. Some objection 
seems to have arisen to this name also, and in a recently published 
report, by Messrs. Eckel, Crider and Johnson, on the Underground 
Water Resources of Mississippi* the term Wilcox, from Wilcox 
county, Alabama, where these beds are characteristically developed, 
is substituted for Chickasaw, and embraces the N ana f alia, the Tus- 
cahoma, the Bashi, and the Hatchetigbee formations. In the present 
Report the accepted term Chickasaw is retained for this group with 
the alternative of Wilcox in case the objection to the former name 
proves to be well founded. 

This is the most massive of these divisions, having a thickness 
which is probably not less than 900 feet. It also presents a great 
variety in lithologic character and in fossil contents. In the most, 
general terms the Chickasaw or Wilcox strata are cross-bedded 
sands, thin-bedded or laminated sands, laminated clays, and clayey 
sands, with beds of lignite and lignitic matter which merely colors 
the sands and clavs. With these are found interbedded at several 
horizons strata containing marine and estuarine fossils. The fossil- 
bearing beds form the basis for the separation of this group into four 
formations, given in some detail below. 

Nana f alia formation (Coal Bluff.) — The Nanafalia overlies the 
Xaheola, and maintains a tolerablv uniform thickness of about 200 
feet entirely across the State. These beds are mostly sandy, but con- 
tain great numbers of the shells of a small oyster, Gryphoea thirsae. 
Near Alabama River and for a short distance to the east, a gray 
siliceous clay with a tendency to indurate into a tolerably firm rock 
resembling very closely some of the strata of the Tallahatta buhr- 
stone of the Claiborne group, presently to be described, is a char- 
acteristic feature of the whole section. At the base of the oyster- 
shell beds there arc. at certain localities, other fossiliferous beds 
containing a great variety of forms. 

♦Water Supply Paper, No. 159, U. £j. Geological Survey. 



PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY, GEOLOGY AND CLIMATE. 337 

At the bottom of the Nanafalia formation there is a bed of lignite, 
5 to 7 feet thick, which may be traced across the country from Tom- 
bigbee river into Pike county, where it is well exposed near Glen- 
wood station, not far from Troy.' 

The Nanafalia sands will be considered again in another chapter 
in connection with the underground water supply of some parts oi 
the State. 

Tuscahoma fonnation (Bells Landing.) — These beds are about 
140 feet thick and consist mainly of gray and yellow cross-bedded 
sands and sandy clays, generally poor in fossils except at one horizon, 
which is typically exposed at the localities from which the two names 
above have been taken. 

Bashi formation (Wood's Bluff.) — Above the Tuscahoma is the 
Bashi which averages perhaps 80 feet in thickness. It is composed 
of the sands and sandy clays common in the Tertiary. It is distin- 
guished by a characteristic bed of highly fossiliferous greensand with 
associated beds of lignite immediately below it. By* these features 
the Bashi may be easily identified across the width of the State. — The 
best exposure of the fossiliferous green sands of this formation is 4 
at Wood's Bluff on Tombigbee river. 

Hatchetigbee formation. — The uppermost formation of the Wilcox 
group is composed of beds of brown, purple, 'and gray laminated 
sandy clays and cross-bedded sands abounding in characteristic fos- 
sils. It is about 175 feet thick in the vicinity of Tombigbee River, 
but it thins to the east, though otherwise maintaining its distictive 
character. These beds have been named Hatchetigbee, from a bluff 
on Tombigbee River. They will be referred to again in the discus- 
sion of the underground waters'. 

CLAIBORNE GROUP. 

Between the Chickasaw group and the base of the St. Stephens 
limestone lie the strata of the Claiborne group easily divisible in 
Alabama, into three formations, the lower being the Tallahatta Buhr- 
stone. the middle being the Lisbon formation and the upper, the 
Gosport Greensand. 

Tallahatta buhrstone. — In the western part of the State the most 
prominent rocks of this formation are aluminous sandstones or silic- 
eous claystones. They vary slightly in composition, but are always 
poor in fossils except the microscopic siliceous shells of marine dia- 
toms and radiolaria. To the east the percentage of clay decreases, 
the rocks become more calcareous, and the fossils are more abund- 
ant, and in place of the silicified shell casts of the Tombigbee and 
Alabama drainage basins are extensive beds of shells', mostly oyster 

22 



338 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

shells. The thickness of the buhrstone varies from 400 feet in the 
western part of the State to 200 feet in the eastern part. In the west- 
ern part of Alabama and still more in Mississippi, beds of fossilifer- 
ous green sand are abundant in both the Tallahatta and in the Lisbon 
strata of the Claiborne. The decay of the greensands has in many 
places given rise to the accumulation of deposits of brown iron ore 
which may some day have a commercial value. The Tallahatta Buhr- 
stone as here defined is the equivalent of the Siliceous Claiborne of 
Hilgard. 

The Lisbon Formation. — Between the Buhrstone and the base of 
the Gosport greensand are the Lisbon beds consisting of about 115 
feet of calcareous cleyey sands and sandy clays generally fossilifer- 
ous. 

The lower half of these beds contains a great number and variety 
of well preserved shells; in the upper half of the shells of ostrea 
sellaeformis and several species of pecten greatly preponderate over 
other forms. The most characteristic exposures in Alabama of these 
beds, which are the equivalents of Hilgard's Calcareous Clairborne, 
are at the Clairborne and Lisbon Bluffs on the Alabama river. 

The Gosport Greensand. — This division, which, so far as yet 
known, does nqt appear in any other of the Gulf States, embraces the 
strata of the Clairborne group lying between the top of the Lisbon, 
and the base of the St. Stephens. The beds are in general highly 
glauconitic sands about thirty feet in thickness at the Clairborne and 
Gosport bluffs* and include the fossiliferous greensands which have 
made the name Claiborne famous, and which have furnished the 
greater part of the Claiborne fossils described and figured by Con- 
rad and Lea. While this division, as above mentioned, is not known 
in Mississippi, Louisiana or Texas, yet its importance in Alabama, 
from the historical point of view and because of the great number 
and variety and beautiful state of preservation of its fossils, is such 
as to compel mention and a distinct name. This member of the Clai- 
borne group has been observed at a number of localities in Monroe, 
Clarke, Choctaw and Washington counties. The name is from 
Gosport a landing on the Alabama river a few miles below the Clai- 
borne Bluff. 

St. Stephens limestone. — Above the Claiborne, and constituting 
the uppermost member of the Eocene in Alabama, is the St. Stephens 
limestone, equivalent in part to the Vicksburg limestone and in part 
to the Jackson limestone of Mississippi. In Alabama these two forma- 
tions blend so completely that it has been impossible to draw clearly 
the line of demarkation between them, and the St. Stephens is there- 
fore intended to include the Alabama representatives' of both. Im- 
mediately overlying the Claiborne fossiliferous sands, at many points 
in Clarke, Choctaw, and Washington counties, is an argillaceous 



PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY, GEOLOGY AND CLIMATE. 339 

limestone closely resembling the Selma chalk and like it giving rise 
to rich black limy soils. The fossils of this bed show that it is prob- 
ably of Jackson age, but the great mass of the St. Stephens forma- 
tion, between 200 and 300 feet thick, consists of a limestone of a 
considerable degree of purity in which the ever present fossil is a 
nummulitic shell, Orbitoides lyelli. Other shells also abound, but • 
this is characteristic. This limestone shows many variations, being 
in some cases hard, almost crystalline, capable of a high polish, of a 
pleasing variety of color, and hence probably well adapted for orna- 
mental construction. Commonly, however, the rock is soft and easily 
cut with a saw, axe, or plane when fresh from the quarry, and it is 
much used in the construction of chimneys* and pillars to houses. On 
this account it is \yell known from Texas to Florida as the "chimney 
rock." In the southeastern part of the State and in Georgia this 
limestone has frequently become silicified, and great masses of it 
appear to have all of the limje replaced by silica. The bones, par- 
ticularly the vertabrae, of an extinct whale, Zeuglodon, are in some 
localities abundant in the lower (Jackson) division. 

Topographic features of the Eocene. — In general it may be said 
that the part of the State in which the Eocene strata occur is a gently 
sloping plain into which the streams have sunk their valleys, leaving 
between them remnants of the original mass as hills. Two or three 
formations of the groups impress themselves on the soils and the to- 
pography more forcibly than the others. The first of these is the 
great bed of black clays of the Sucarnochee horizon, underlying a 
belt of country known west of Alabama River as the "Flatwoods" 01 
"Post Oaks." East of this river these clays are strongly calcareous 
and give rise to black prairie soils. The Flatwoods proper constitute 
a sort of trough 5 or 6 miles wide, badly drained and little culti- 
vated, with a heavy growth of small post-oaks and short-leaf pine. 
During wet weather the Flatwoods have all the characteristics of 
a swamp. Along the northern border of this belt the clays are often 
highly calcareous, and the transition from the limy Cretaceous for- 
mations to the tough plastic clays of the genuine Flatwoods is very 
gradual. 

The next member of topographic importance is the Nanafalia es- 
pecially in that part of the State west of the drainage area of Ala- 
bama river. In this section there is a considerable thickness of in- 
durated clayey sands — sandstones, in fact — overlying the oyster- 
shell'bed. This gives rise to a very broken and hilly country, as show 
in the Grampian Hills of Wilcox County. In the eastern part of the 
State there are many "sinks" and big springs in the Nanafalia terri- 
tory. 

Farther south the outcrop of the Tallahatta buhrstone, especially, 
in the western half of the State, makes veritable mountains, often 



340 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

rising with steep northwardfacing slopes 200 feet or more above the 
adjacent lowlands; In Clarke and Choctaw counties, and in still 
greater degree in Mississippi, these buhrstone mountains, with their 
rocky slopes, remind one of the Appalachian region. 

In the eastern counties the Clayton limestone acquires exceptional 
thickness, 200 feet or more, and shows the characteristics of lime- 
stone terranes such as caves, lime sinks, and "big springs." The St: 
Stephens limestone also gives rise to broken country with character- 
istic caves and other features. Along the northern edge of this (St. 
Stephens) outcrop the strong, limy, black soils formed by the clayey 
limestone resemble the black prairie soils of the Selma chalk, but 
the topography of the country offers strong contrast — in the. chalk, 
softly undulating, almost level lands ; in the lower St. Stephens, ex- 
ceedingly broken and deeplv eroded lands, justifying the name "lime 
hills/* 

As has been indicated above, the trunk streams of the Alabama 
Coastal Plain flow across the outcropping strata, while their tribu- 
taries flow in general parallel to the strike of these outcrops. In the 
gradual sinking of the beds of these tributary streams the charact- 
eristic Coastal Plain topography is developed ; the infacing slopes of 
the hills are precipitous, while the gulfward slopes are gentle. The 
streams have their place generally at the base of the steep infacing 
slopes. 

Miocene. 

chattahoochee series. 

In 1889 Mr. D. W. Langdon of the Alabama Geological Survey, 
discovered on Chattahoochee River a new series of marine calcar- 
eous formations of Miocene age, overlying the Vicksburg limestone. 
This series he called the Chattahoochee from the town and landing 
of that name. 

With the exception of some sandy clays on Conecuh River, which 
hold a few poorly preserved fossils of the Chattahoochee horizon, 
none of these beds has up to the present time been found to outcrop 
in Alabama, for the reason that the section of the state in which 
these outcrops would norma 1 ly occur is covered with a thick mantle 
of two superficial formations, the Grand Gulf and the Lafayette. In 
addition to this that portion of the region contiguous to Mobile 
river in which we. should expect to find the outcrops, is of the nature 
of a delta with low alluvial banks. It is safe, however, to say that 
these Chattahoochee formations underlie the southern part of the 
State beneath the superficial deposits mentioned, for deep borings 
in Mobile and Baldwin counties have demonstrated their existence 
at depths between £00 and T5S0 feet, by means of the shells char- 
acteristic of the several horizons brought up by the drills. 



PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY, GEOLOGY AND CLIMATE. 341 

Pliocene, 
pascagoula. 

In 1889, Mr. L. C. Johnson, also of the AJabama Survey, discov- 
ered on Chickasawhay river in Mississippi a few miles above its 
confluence with Leaf river to form the Pascagoula*, a highly fossil- 
iferous marine or estuary deposit to which he gave the name Pasca- 
goula. This bed has as yet been seen in outcrop only at the type locali- 
ty and, accordirfg to Mir. Dall, kt Shell Bluff on the Pascagoula river. 
At the type locality it underlies strata of the Grand Gulf formation. 
Most of the shells of this bed are of a new species, (Rangia John- 
soni) ; but along with these are numerous shells of Ostrea Virginica, 
by Mr. Dall's determination. As this latter species is not known to 
occur in strata older than Pilocene, the Pascagoula is placed in this 
formation in our classification. 

In the artesian wells at Mobile shells characteristic of the Pasca- 
goula horizon are brought up from depths of about 700 feet. We 
inj?v therefore be reasonably certain that this formation, like the 
Chattahoochee, underlies the lower part of the State though its out- 
crop for reasons given, has not yet been discovered. 

GRAND GULF FORMATION. 

This name was given in Mississippi to a series of sands and clays 
of varying character and varying degree of induration, overlying 
directly and unconformably the Vicksburg limestone, and, together 
with the next overlying Lafayette beds, forming the surface of the 
Coastal Plain of that state down to within ten miles of the Gulf of 
Mexico. More specifically the strata are thin-bedded and massive 
clays of colors varying from white through shades of red and brown 
to black, interstratified with sands, the latter in many places indu- 
rated to form sandstones, with aluminous or siliceous cement. Oc- 
casionally these rocks are even quartzitic, as at the type locality and 
in a number of places in Georgia and Alabama, but as a rule they 
are only slightly coherent. The clays" also in part are indurated into 
mudstones, and in part are more or less plastic. The presence of 
lignitic matters and of gypsum is also locally characteristic of the 
clays, many of which are quite meager because of intermixture with 
fine grained sand. In Alabama the prevailing materials are massive 
clays of reddish to brown colors or mottled gray to red and lami- 
nated clays interbedded with sands varying in coherence from loose 
sands to firm sandstones and aluminous or siliceous' cement. The 

•This may be the same as the type locality, which is also called Shell 
Bluff.— E. A. Smith. 



342 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

aluminous sandstones pass by insensible gradations into meager 
clavs which are themselves often indurated into mudstones as com- 
pact as some of the sandstones. 

While the induration of the sands is common in Mississippi along 
the bolder of the river valley from Grand Gulf down to the Louis- 
iana line, and thence eastward beyond Brandon, it is by no means 
confined to those bounds as some are disposed to believe. In Geor- 
gia in all parts of the Altamaha Grit region, occasional occurrences 
of the exceedingly hard, sometiines quartzitic, sandstones are known 
down to within a few miles of the Atlantic coast. It may be here 
remarked that the excessive silicification, often resulting in the com- 
plete obliteration of the original texture of the rock, as is the case 
in one of the sandstone ledges at the type Grand Gulf locality, is by 
no means confined to that locality nor, indeed to the rocks of the 
Gi and Gulf formation, for in the southeastern parts of Alabama and 
southwestern of Georgia adjacent, much of the Vicksburg limestone 
has been so completely petrified by silica that not a trace of lime 
remains, and manv of the masses of Miocene corals so common in 
Southewestern Georgia are completely silicified, being interior'y a 
mass of amorphous silica devoid of all trace of organic structure. 
These remarks are made in connection with a proposition to restrict 
the name Grand Gulf to the quartzitic sandstone occurring at the 
type locality. 

While the inner or landward border of the Grand Gulf mantle is 
in contact with the Vicksburg limestone in Mississippi and with the 
St. Stephens in western Alabama, from Covington county in the lat- 
ter state eastward it is found lapping successively over the older 
Tertiary formations', and about Clayton and Eufaula and in adja- 
cent parts of Georgia, even over the Ripley beds of the Cretaceous. 
On the map accompanying this report only this landward margin of 
the formation is attempted to be shown. Below or southward of 
this line its strata cover partially the outcrops of the upper Creta- 
ceous and older Tertiary beds, while those of the newer Tertiary. 
Chattahoochee and Pascagoula, with the exception of the exposure 
on the Conecuh river above mentioned, seem to be completely hidden 
by it and the closely associated Lafayette. Along the Chattahoo- 
chee river south of the Alabama line, however, the whole series of 
these newer Tertiary beds (possibly excepting the Pascagoula,) is 
clearly exposed, with the Grand Gulf and Lafayette beds overlying 
them. In Alabama as vet we have only the evidence afforded bv the 
deep borings in Mobile and Baldwin counties, to prove that below • 
the surface occupied by the Grand Gulf and Lafayette beds, all the 
Miocene and Pliocene marine Tertiarv formations above mentioned 
are reached at depths between 200 and 1550 feet. All the facts de- 
rived from observations in Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, and Flo- 



PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY, GEOLOGY AND CLIMATE. 343 

rida seem to show that the Grand Gulf formation cannot be older 
than upper Pliocene, since it overlies often by an interval of many 
feet, the Pascagoula shell bed with Ostrea Virginica. In these states 
no formation older than the Lafayette is known to overlie it. 

It is impossible to give with certainty the thickness of the Grand 
Gulf strata. The dip in some parts of its territory seems to be no great- 
er than the general slope of the land surface ; in this respect it resem- 
bles the Lafayette. In Mobile and Baldwin counties the thipkness 
above sea-level is at least 150 feet, and in .the borings mentioned 
a greater but undetermined thickness is found. The absence of fos- 
sils, except plant remains and a few fresh water unios, makes the 
fixing of the exact age of the formation difficult; in this also it re- 
sembles the Lafayette. 

In the lower counties of the State the Grand Gulf is one of the 
most important formations in relation to underground waters, and 
more detailed mention of it will be made later. 

QUATERNARY. 

LAFAYETTE FORMATION. 

The surface distribution of this great mantle formation, or rathet 
its landward limit, will be seen by the map. In general it consists of 
a red sandy loam, usually devoid of stratification in the upper part, 
with cross-bedded sands and irregular beds of water-worn pebbles 
in the lower part. 

Th$ thickness does not often exceed 25 feet, and it follows the 
contours of the surface very closely, being a veritable blanket, some- 
times completely washed away, but varying very little in thickness 
whether on the high level interstream plateaus or along the slopes 
which break away from them. 

It overlies with uncomfortable contact every formation in Ala- 
bama from the oldest up to the Grand Gulf inclusive. 

Since all the high table lands, remnants of the plain into which the 
streams have worn their valleys, are covered by the red loam of this 
formation its importance as a soil former is obvious. In yet another 
particular its importance cannot be overestimated, namely, in its 
relations to the underground waters. Its loam and pebble beds are 
storage reservoirs of countless springs and shallow wells over the 
entire Coastal Plain. Other details will be given in connection with 
the discussion of the underground water distribution. 

LATER FORMATIONS. 

The later formations, Columbia, Second Bottom deposits. First 
Bottom and other recent alluvial deposits, and soils, may be here 



344 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

passed over with mere mention, and with the remark that no sure 
identification of the Columbia has been made in Alabama, though 
some gray and white sands frequently seen overlying the Lafayette 
are probably of this age. 

III. SOILS OF THE STATE.* 

It would obviously be out of place in a document like the present 
to attempt to give an account of the many soil varieties of the State 
and their adaption to various crops. This subject has been treated 
somewhat in detail in our Agricultural Report, 1881-2. 

But inasmuch as the soils constitute the most recent of our geo- 
logical formations, they must be included among our mineral re- 
sources, and certainly no one of these mineral resources' can be com- 
pared with them in importance and interest to every citizen of the 
State. 

A general discussion of the soils, from the point of view of their 
geological relations seems, therefore, to be called for here. 

Since the soils have been derived from the disintegration and decay 
of the older rocks, a geological map might, to a certain extent, serve 
also as a soil map, but these products of decomposition now rarely 
rest upon the parent rock, but have been removed more or less re- 
motely from their place of origin, and after various admixtures have 
been redeposited upon foreign terraces with which they have no 
connection ; again, many of the parent rocks of now existing soils 
have themselves been deposited as sediments, compacted, elevated 
and again disintegrated and decomposed into soils. These are some 
of the difficulties which we meet with when we attempt to trace a 
soil back to its origin. 

Another difficulty comes from the fact that soils from various sour- 
ces have often very similar composition, for all soils are essentially the 
insoluble residues left from the weathering of older rocks, and these 
insoluble residues, from whatever parent rock derived, are mixtures 
in varying proportions of sand and clay, with small amounts of the 
soluble salts derived from these rocks and not yet completely leached 
out of the resulting soils. It follows, therefore, that soils from what- 
ever source derived, will differ from each other mainlv in the rela- 
tive proportions of the sandy or siliceous and the clayey constituents. 

It should be borne in mind, further, that in consequence of the 
highly absorptive and retentive qualities of clay, the relative propor- 
tions of lime and of the elements of plant food in the soils, such as 
potash, phosphates and the like, will in great measure depend upon 
the amount of the clayey constituent, so that the classification of 



•Reprinted by permission from Index to Mineral Resources of Alabama 
(1904), issued by Dr. E. A. Smith, State Geolcgist. 



PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY, GEOLOGY AND CLIMATE. 345 

soils into sandy and clayey carries with it far more than this pri- 
mary distinction. 

As a broad generalization, it may be said that residual soils, i. e., 
those which have not been far removed from the parent rock, ex- 
hibit the widest variations, while the transported or drifted soils 
are more uniform in composition. And furthermore, the greater 
the distance the transported soils have been carried from their place 
of origin, and the oftener they have been taken up and redeposited, 
the more complete is the separation of the clayey constituents from 
the sand, and the more complete is the leaching out of the soluble 
salts upon which in great measure the fertility is dependent. All this 
is illustrated in the changes to be observed in the soils, as one goes 
from inland towards the coast. 

For convenience in the discussion of its soils, the State mav be di- 
vided into two parts, approximately coextensive with the Mineral 
District and the Agricultural District, respectively. 

In the first, the soils are in the main, residual, i. e., they have been 
derived from the rocks upon which they now rest, and show, there- 
fore, more or less close relationship to them. In the second, the Coas- 
tal Plain or Agricultural District, the Cretaceous and Tertiary for- 
mations have been overspread with a mantle of sandy loam and peb- 
bles, transported from elsewhere, and the soils are in great measure 
made from these materials, modified, however, locally by admixtures 
with the disintegration and decomposition products of the underlying 
older rocks. 

THE MINERAL DISTRICT. 

As before stated, the soils of the Mineral District are mostlv res- 
idual in their nature, and while the parent rocks are sandstones, shales 
and limestones, each of these is varied bv admixtures with the others, 
and to such a degree as to give rise to a great variety in the resulting 
soils. The three principal varieties are here given, but it will be un- 
derstood that they grade into each other in such a way that the ac- 
tual number is far greater. 

1. Sandy loams, in part slightly calcareous. — These are derived, 
from the sandstones and siliceous shales of the Coal Measures, the 
Weisner Quartzite, and the Talladega Slates; from the cherty or 
more siliceous parts of the Knox Dolomite, and of the Lower Car- 
boniferous Limestones ; and from some of the Montevallo Shales. 
Naturally these soils are less fertile than the others, but on the other 
hand, they lie well, are easily cultivated and responsive to fertilizers. 
Perhaps, 10,000 square miles of the Mineral region have soils of this 
kind. 

2. Calcareous Sandy Loams. — In these the proportion of clay and 
by consequence, of lime, is greater than in the preceding class; the 



346 OFFICIAL ANP STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

soils are inherently more fertile, and quite as easy of cultivation and 
as responsive, and hence form the most desirable farming lands of 
this section. They cover about 4,000 square miles of territory and 
are the residual soils from the slightly siliceous* limestones of the 
Tuscumbia Division of the Lower Carboniferous, the Fort Payne 
Chert, the lower beds of the Knox Dolomite, and the more calcareous 
of the Monte vail o Shales, and the rocks of the Red Mountain group. 
The fine red lands of the Tennessee Valley, those of parts of the great 
Coosa Valley, and belts in the other anticlinal valleys are of this char- 
acter. 

3. Highly calcareous clayey soils. — These occupy some 2,500 
square miles of area, and are derived from the purer limestones of 
the Lower Carboniferous, and of the Trenton, and from the cal- 
careous shales of the Flatwoods. The parent rocks appear along 
steep hillsides or else in flat, badly drained valleys, and the soils arc 
in consequence generally too rocky or too wet for cultivation; and 
while essentially fertile, they are of comparatively little value as 
farming lands. 

THE COASTAL PLAIN. 

The upland soils of the Coastal Plain, as has been intimated, are in 
the main based on the materials of a single formation, the La Fayette, 
which as a mantle of sandy loam and pebbles has been spread over 
the entire district with an. average thickn'ess of 25 ft. When unmod- 
ified by admixtures with the underlying country rock these Lafay- 
ette soils are at their best highly siliceous loams, usually of deep red 
color from iron oxide. They are well drained, well situated and 
among the most desirable of our farming lands, because of these 
qualities and of the ease of working and capability of improvement. 
At the other extreme they are very sandy and comparatively infer- 
tile in the natural state, yet some of the most valuable truck farms 
of Southern Alabama have soils of this class. 

While the Coastal Plain formations, Cretaceous and Tertiary, con- 
sist prevalently of sands and clays in many alternations, yet there 
are two great limestone formations intercalated, viz : the Selma Chalk 
and the St. Stephens Limestone, the former of Cretaceous, the latter 
of Tertiary age. 

The Selma Chalk is about 1,000 feet in thickness, is a rather soft 
chalky rock carrying from 10 per cent, to 50 per cent, clayey matters, 
the middle third of the formation holding from 10 per cent to 25 per 
cent of clay, while the upper and lower thirds contain larger amounts. 

The St. Stephens Limestone, in its lower part, is also an argilla- 
ceous clayey limestone much like the Selma Chalk, but the upper 
part is a purer rock containing only on an average about 10 per cent 
of insoluble matters. 



PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY, GEOLOGY AND CLIMATE. 347 

Now in those parts of the Coastal Plain where the underlying 
country rocks are sands and clays, the resulting soils from these do 
not differ essentially from the surface loams of the Lafayette itself, 
and needs therefore no special mention. 

But in those belts on the other hand, where the limestones of the 
Selma Chalk and of the St. Stephens underlie and constitute the 
country rocks, the soils show marked departure from the prevailing 
type of Coastal Plain sandy loams. From these areas the Lafayette 
sands have often been in great part swept away by erosion, and the 
soils are in a measure residual, being the insoluble clayey residues 
from the decay and disintegration of the limestones. 

Like all clayey soils derived from limestone, they are of exceptional 
fertility, and make the very best farming lands of the State. Such 
are the soils of the great Black Beld or Canebrake Belt of Central 
Alabama, and those of the Lime Hills, and Hill prairies of the south- 
ern part of the State. Remnants of the Lafayette mantle occur at in- 
tervals through all these regions, and admixtures of the red loams 
of this mantle with the native marly soils, give rise to many varie- 
ties, such as the Red Post Oak soils, the Piney Woods Prairie soils, 
etc. 

Another departure from the prevailing Coastal Plain sandy loams 
is caused by the great clay formation of the Lower Tertiary, which 
gives origin to the Post Oak Flatwoods of Sumter and Marengo 
counties. East of the Alabama River in Wilcox and Butler coun- 
ties, these clays hold much lime and form regular "prairie" soils, 
characteristically developed along Prairie Creek in Wilcox. 

Besides the above, there are small areas of marly soils: in the Ter- 
tiary, due to the shell beds which occur at intervals in the lower or 
lignitic division of this formation. Of this kind are the celebrated 
Flat Creek lands of Wilcox, marled by the outcrop of the Woods 
Bluff greensand shell bed, which is also responsible for fertile lands 
on Beaver Creek, the same county, on west side of river, and on 
Bashi Creek in Clarke county. 

The Nanafalia shell bed or marl also is responsible for many tracts 
of fertile limy soils in Marengo and Wilcox. 

In the lower counties of the State the materials' of the Lafayette 
are in general more sandy than is the case further north, and we find 
in this section also another surface mantle, viz., the Grand Gulf, 
underlying the Lafayette, and like it consisting mainly of sands with 
some beds of laminated clay intercalated. 

By reason of this double mantle the thicness of the sandy surface 
beds is much increased, so that the Miocene limestones, which are 
known to underlie this section, seldom if ever come to the outcrop 
and influence the soils except along the immediate banks of the' 
Chattahoochee and possibly of some of the smaller streams. In all 



348 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

this region which is gently rolling or nearly flat, shallow ponds, pine 
barren swamps, and open savannahs are characteristic of the land • 
scape, due, so far as we can make out, to the uneven surface of the 
Grand Gulf clays which underlie the Lafayette sands at shallow 
depths'. These beautifully situated, high, level lands are characteris- 
tic of parts of Baldwin and Mobile counties, and are destined to be- 
come valuable fanning lands when lumbering turpentining shall cease 
to give chief occupation to the population, and this, from present 
prospects, will soon happen since the pine has been cut off or de- 
stroyed by fire over very much of the territory. 

Bottom Soils. — Along all the larger streams of the Coastal Plain 
region we find developed normally three well defined terraces. The 
•first terrace or bottom is subject to overflow and its soils are the sands 
and other materials periodically deposited by the stream, and are the 
most recent perhaps of the formations. A few feet above the high 
water mark and consequently not subject to overflow except in tlu* 
depressions caused by erosion, are the second bottoms. w f ith very 
characteristic soils, yellowish srilty loams increasing in sandiness 
from above downwards. The second bottoms are on an average per- 
haps a mile in width, and are always choice farming lands. Upon 
this terrace are many of the great plantations of ante bellum days. 

About ioo feet above the second bottom we find a third terrao; 
averaging some three miles in width, the soils of which are of the 
usual Lafayette type, red sandy loam underlaid by pebbles. On this 
terrace are situated most of the river towns such as Tuscaloosa, 
Selma, Cahaba, Claiborne, St. Stephens, Jackson, Columbia, etc. Tlv 
soils on this terrace are not essentially different from the Lafayette 
soils elsewhere, unless possibly they are a trifle more sandy. Above 
this third terrace at varying elevations are the broad level uplands 
making the interstream country of the Coastal Plain, and it is upon 
these uplands that we find the most characteristic and widely dis- 
tributed of the soils of this region based upon the red sandy loam cf 
the Lafayette. 

IV. CLIMATE.* 

GENERAL FEATURES. 

In the preparation of this climatic summary, reference has been 
made to the reports of the Smithsonian Institution and of the United 
States Signal Service, now the Weather Bureau ; to Bulletin No. 
18 oi* the Agricultural Experiment Station at Auburn, Ala.; and to 



*Revised and recast from an article by Mr. Frank P. Chaff ee„ Section 
Director, U. S. Weather Bureau, Montgomery, originally prepared for the 
Climatological Division, U. S. Department of Agriculture, and later used 
in Underground Water Resources of Alabama, (1907). Published by per- 
mission. 



PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY, GEOLOGY AND CLIMATE. 349 

the reports of the various voluntary observers in Alabama co-operat- 
ing with the Weather Bureau. 

In its distance from the equator, elevation above sea level, configu- 
ration of its mountain chains, proximity to the sea, and prevailing 
winds, Alabama is favorably situated for a temperate and compara- 
tively unform climate. In the extreme south-western portion, 
washed by the water of the Gulf of Mexico, the climate approaches 
the subtropical, while the climate in the highlands of the northeast 
is similar to that of regions of less elevation much farther north. 
Extremes of temperature are rare. Over the southern half of the 
States the heat of the summer is tempered by the prevailing winds 
from the Gulf, and in the more northern counties the elevation se- 
cures immunity from excessively high temperature. Freezing tem- 
peratures do not often continue longer than 24 to 48 hours. Snow 
rarely falls, except in the northern counties, where it occurs on an 
average of about twice each winter and seldom remains on the ground 
for more than 48 hours. The rivers do not freeze. With the excep- 
tion of the country along the Gulf Coast, where the precipitation i* 
heavy, the rainfall is well distributed. The growing season is so 
long that often two and sometimes three minor crops are raised on 
the same ground in one year. 

TEMPERATURE. 

The average temperature of the entire State is 63 degrees ; for the 
southern portion, 66 degrees; middle portion, 64 degrees; northern 
portion, 60 degrees. Highest average, 67 degrees, in Baldwin and 
Mobile counties; lowest average, 60 degrees, in DeKalb county. 
The average by seasons is as follows : Winter, 46 degrees ; spring, 
63 degrees ; summer, 79 degrees ; autumn, 63 degrees. The average 
summer maximum is 90 degrees and the average winter minimum 35 
degrees. The absolute maximum, 109 degrees, occurred at Lock No. 
4 (Lincoln), Talladega county, July 7, 1902; the absolute minimum 
17 degrees below zero at Valley Head, DeKalb county, February 13, 
1899. Average number of days per year with temperature above 90 
degrees, 62 ; average number of days per year with temperature be- 
low 32 degrees, 35. The temperature seldom falls below zero, the 
above extremely low reading being recorded during the severe cold 
wave of February 12-13, 1899, which gave the coldest weather ever 
recorded or remembered in this section.* 

Kilting Frost. — The average dates of last killing frost in spring 
are as follows: northern district, April 6th; middle district, March 
23rd; southern district, March 9th; for the state, March. 2nd. Av- 

♦Since preparing this article a temperature of 18° below zero cccurred at 
Valley Head, DeKalb county, February 14, 1905. F. P. C. 



350 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

erage dates of first killing frost in autumn : northern district, Octo- 
ber 20th; middle district, November 5th, southern district, November 
17th; for the state. November 4th. This gives average growing sea- 
sons as follows ; northern district, 197 days ; middle district, 227 days ; 
southern district, 253 days ; for the state, 226 days. The latest kil- 
ling frost known, May 2nd, 1897, at Oneonta, Blount Co. ; with this 
exception, the latest on record, was April 30th, at Valley Head, De- 
Kalb county. The earliest killing frost of which there is official re- 
cord was October 2nd, at Decatur, Morgan county, but the volun- 
tary observer at Oneonta reports that there is a record of killing frost 
having occurred at that place, September 4th, 1866. Over the middle 
counties, the last killing frost, as 1 a rule, occurs during the first half 
of April, and where the last frost is recorded- in March, the records 
show its formation during the early part of April was prevented by 
cloudy weather or fresh to brisk winds. The first killing frost usually 
occurs over the middle counties during the last half of October. When 
the first frost occurred in November, the records show that at the 
same time during the last half of October the temperature was low 
enough for frost, the formation of which was prevented by conditions 
mentioned above. 

PRECIPITATION. 

Annual precipitation for the State as a whole, 52 inches ; for north- 
ern district, 52 inches; middle district, 51 inches; southern district, 
55 inches. The distribution of precipitation is shown by the accom- 
panying chart. The greatest annual average — from 62 to 63 inches — 
is in the southwestern counties, bordering on the Gulf of Mexico. 
Another region of heavy precipitation is found over the moun- 
tainous (north-central and north-eastern) portions, where it ranges 
from 47 to 54 inches per annum. The region of least precipitation 
is near the center of the State, where the annual average is about 
46 inches. The precipitation is practically all rain. Snow occurs 
on an average twice each winter in the northern half of the State 
and about once a winter in the southern counties ; it varies from very 
light in the southern district to moderately heavy (about 8 to 14 
inches) in the north-central and northern counties. It is not common 
for a winter to pass without snow enough to cover the ground in 
any portion of the State. The precipitation is well distributed 
throughout the growing season, especially in the middle and most 
important agricultural counties, and the autumns are, as a rule, fa- 
vorable for the maturing and gathering of the staple crops. 

Fog. — Dense fog seldom occurs, and then generally in the winter 
or spring months, and is mostly confined to the coast district. 

Hail. — This occurs occasionally during the spring and summer 
months, though really destructive hailstorms are rare in this section. 



PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY, GEOLOGY AND CLIMATE. 35 \ 

Thunderstortns. — These occur in some portions of the State during 
every month of the year, being most frequent during the summer 
months. The most severe thunderstorms occur along the Gulf coast, 
and in the west central counties. 

» 

WINDS. 

The prevailing direction for the year is south; for winter, north; 
spring* south ; for summer, south ; for autumn, north. Average hour- 
ly velocity, (computed from records at Mobile and Montgomery 
only), 7 miles. The highest velocity ever recorded, was 72 miles 
from" southeast at Mobile October 2nd, 1893. Winds of 40 miles 
per hour or more have occurred as follows: Mobile (record from 
1885 to 1893 inclusive) 23 times, or on an average of a little more 
than once a year. Montgomery, (record from 1875 to 1903 inclu- 
sive), 12 times, or an average of about once in three years. 

During the passage of general storms over and to the north of this 
region, destructive wind storms or tornadoes have occurred as fol- 
lows: Year of greatest frequency, 1884, with 19 storms; average 
yearly frequency 1.6 storms; year in past twenty-three with no report 
of storms, none ; month of greatest frequency, March ; day of great- 
est frequency, January nth; hours of greatest frequency, 6 to 8 p. 
m. ; months without such storms, July, August, September, and Oc- 
tober ; prevailing direction of storm movement, southwest to north- 
east ; region of greatest frequency, north central portion. 



XV. BRIEF CLASSIFIED BIBLIOG- 
RAPHY OF ALABAMA. 



In 1898 the compiler published "A Bibliography of Alabama," in the 
Report of the American Historical Association for 1897 (Washington, 1898; 
8vo. pp. 472), in which was listed over five thousand books and pamphlets 
relating to the State, or to the territory included therein, from the earliest 
times, with extended descriptive notes as to contents, editions, value, 
etc. Much of the large body of material there listed is out of print, or is 
inaccessible, or little known. However, the available materials for a 
study cf the State, its institutions and public men is quite large. In order 
that students may have the advantage of the principal authorities, a brief 
classified bibliography has been condensed from the compiler's larger work. 
It will at least be of suggestive value. It makes no pretense to complete- 
ness. 

I. EARLY EXPLORATION, ABORIGINAL AND INDIAN HISTORY. 

James Adair's "History of the American Indians" (1775) ; D. G. Brin- 
ton's "National Legend of the Chahta-Muskokee Tribes" (1870) ; Drake's 
"Aboriginal Races of North America" (1880); "Narratives of the Career 
of De Soto in the Conquest of Florida as Told by a Knight of Elvas and 
in a Relation by Luys de Biedma," translated by Buckingham Smith (1866) 
— there are several editions of these narratives; "Narratives of Alvar Nu- 
nez Cabeca de Vaca," translated by Buckingham Smith (1851); B. F. 
French's "Historical Collections of Louisiana," 7 vclumes, passim (1846- 
1875) ; A. S. Gatschet's "Migration Legend of the Creek Indians," 2 volumes 
(1884-1888); Benj. Hawkins* "Sketch of the Creek Country" (1848); Col. 
C. C. Jones' "Antiquities of the Southern Indians" (1873) ; Du Pratz* "His- 
toire de la Louisiane" (1758, 1763, 1774); J. H. McCullch's "Researches, 
Concerning the Aboriginal History of America" (1829); McKenney's "Me- 
moirs; with Sketches of Travels Among the Northern and Southern In- 
dians" (1846); McXenney and Hall's "History of the Indian Tribes of 
North America," 2 volumes (1854); Wm. Roberts' "First Discovery and 
Natural History of Florida" (1763); Bernard Romans' "Concise Natural 
History of East and We3t Florida" (1775) ; Walter B. Scaife's "America, Its 
Geographical History, 1492-1892" (1892); Barnard Shipp's "History of 
De Soto and Florida, from 1512 to 15r K S" (188.1) ; Squier and Davis' "An- 
cient Monuments of Mississippi Valley'* (1848); Terneaux-Compans' "Voy- 
ages, Relations et Memolres Originaux pour Servir a l'Histoire de la De- 
couverte de 1'Amerique" (1841); Cyrus Thomas' "Catalogue of Prehistoric 
Works East of Rocky Mountains" (1891) ; "History of the Conquest of Flor- 
ida," by Garcilasso de la Vega (in Shipp's "History of De Soto and Florida" 
— only English version) ; Wm. M. Willett's "Narrative of the Military 
Actions of Col. Marinus Willett" (1831); Thomas S. Woodward's "Remin- 
iscences of the Creek Indians" (1859). 

In Justin Winsor's "Narrative and Critical History of America," 8 vol- 
umes, and in Margry's "Decouvertes et Etablisements des Francais dans 
l'Ouest et dans le Sud de l'Amerique Septentrionale," 6 volumes, will be 
found a vast fund of references and material. 

(352) 



BRIEF CLASSIFIED BIBLIOGRAPHY. 353 

II. GENERAL WORK BEARING ON THE HISTORY OF THE STATE. 

J. G. Baldwin's "Flush Times of Alabama and Mississippi" (1853, 1889); 
N. W. Bates' "History and Civil Government or Alabama" (1892); Saffold 
Berney's "Handbook of Alabama" (1878, 1892); H. M. Brackenridge's 
"History of the Late War Between the United States and Great Britain" 
(1817); Brant and Fuller's "Memorial Record of Alabama, a Concise Ac- 
count of the State's Political, Military, Professional and Industrial Pro- 
gress, with Personal Memoirs," 2 volumes (1893) ; Willis Brewer's "Ala- 
bama: Her History, Resources, War Records, and Public Men, from 1540 
to 1872" (1872); R. L. Campbell's "Historical Sketches of Colonial Flor- 
ida" (1892); A. H. Chappell's "Miscellanies of Georgia" (1874); J. F. H. 
Claiborne's "Mississippi, as a Province, Territory and State" (1880); N. H. 
Claiborne's "Notes on the War in the South" (1819); W. G. Clark's "His- 
tory of Education in Alabama" (1889); Culver's "Alabama's Resources, 
etc.," (1897); Darby's "Emigrant's Guide" (1818); Darby's "Geographical 
Description of Louisiana, Southern Part of Mississippi, and Territory of 
Alabama" (1817); T. C. DeLeon's "Creole Carnivals" (1890); G. R. Fair- 
banks' "History of Florida" (1871); Flint's "History and Geography of 
the Mississippi Valley" (1832); George S. Gaines' "Reminiscences of Early 
Times in the Mississippi Territory" (in the Mobile Register, June-July, 
1872) ; Wm. Garrett's "Reminiscences of Public Men in Alabama for Thirty 
Years" (1872) ; H. S. Halbert and T. H. Ball's"Creek War of 1813 and 1814" 
(1895); James Hall's "Brief History of the Mississippi Territory" (1801); 
John Haywood's "Natural and Aboriginal History of Tennessee" (1823), 
and "Civil and Political History of Tennessee" (1823, 1891); Joseph 
Hodgson's "Alabama Manual" (1869, 1870, 1871, 1875), and "The Cradle of 
the Confederacy; or, The Times of Troup, Quitman and Yancey" (1876); 
Maj. A. Latour's "Memoir of the War in West Florida and Louisiana in 
1814-15" (1816) ; B. J. Lossing's "Pictorial Field Book of the War of 1812" 
(1896), Hugh McCall'^ "History of Georgia," 2 volumes, (1811, 1816); T. 
C. McCorvey's "Government of the People of Alabama" (1895); F. X. Mar- 
tin's "History of Louisiana" (1882); A. B. Meek's "Romantic Passages in 
Southwestern History" (1857) ; John T. Milner's "Alabama: As it Was, As 
It is, and As It Will Be" (1876); J. W. Monette's "History of the Valley 
of the Mississippi," 2 volumes (1848); Thomas M. Owen's "Bibliography 
of Alabama," supra (1898), and also "Transactions of the Alabama His- 
torical Society," Volume ii, 1897-98, to Volume v, 1906, edited by 
him; Albert J. Pickett's "History of Alabama" (2 volumes, 1851; 1 vol- 
ume, 1896); A. W. Putnam's "History of Middle Tennesse" (1859); J. G. 
Ramsey's "Annals of Tennessee" (1860); Paul Ravesies' "Scenes and Set- 
tlers of Alabama" (1886); Miss M. L. Robbins' "Alabama Womea in Lit- 
erature" (1895); Smith and DeLand's "Northern Alabama, Historical and 
Biographical" (1888); Wm. R. Smith's "Reminiscences of a Long Life, 
Historical, Political, Personal and Literary" (1889); J. T. Sprague's "Ori- 
gin, Progress and Conclusion of the Florida War" (1848); James M. 
Swank's "History of the Manufacture of Iron in All Ages" (1892); George 
White's "Historical Collections of Georgia" (1854) ; Bishop R. H. Wilmer's 
"Reminiscences" (1887); and Andrew Ellicott's "Journal" of the running 
of the Southern boundary of the U. S. (1803). 

The publications of the Alabama Historical Society, consisting of seven 
pamphlets (1850-1895), the Historical Reporter (29 numbers, 1879-1885), 
and two volumes of "Transactions" (Volume ii, 1897-98, to Volume v. 
1898-1906) contain valuable historical contributions. Some recent books 
are DuBose's "Sketches of Alabama History" (1901); Brown's "History 
of Alabama" (1900); Miller's "School History of Alabama"; Beverly's 
"History of Alabama" (1901); McCorvey's "Government of the People 
of Alabama" (1902); Scott's "Mobilians" (1898); and the "Alabama Of- 
ficial and Statistical Register," editions of 1903 and 1907, edited by Thos. 
M. Owen. 

23 



354 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

' III. TRAVEL. 

Francis Bailey's "Tour in Unsettled Parts of North America in 1796 and 
1797" (1856) ; William Bartram's "Travels Through North and South Caro- 
lina, Georgia, East and West Florida," etc., (several editions) ; Basanier's 
"L'Histoire Notable de la Floride situee en Indes Occidentales, Contenant 
les Trois Voyages," etc., (1853); Baudry de Lozieres' "Voyage a la Louis- 
lane 1794 a 1798" (1802); Bcssu's "Nouveaux Voyages aux Indes Occiden- 
tales" (1768. 1771, 1777); J. S. Buckingham's "Slave States of America" 
(1842); F. Cuming's "Tour to the Western Country" (1810); Lorenzo 
Dow's "Writings, Experience and Travels" (1856); G. W. Featherston- 
augh's "Excursions Through the Slave States" (1844); P. H. Gosse's 
"Letters from Alabama" (1859); Basil Hall's "Travels in North America 
in 1827 and 1828" (1S29); Adam Hodgeson's "Letters from North Ameri- 
ca" (1824) ; Edward King's "Great South: a Record of Journeys in Ala- 
bama" (1875); Charles Lanraan's "Adventures in the Wilds of the U. S." 
(1856); Charles Lyell's "Second Visit to the U. S." (1849); Perrin du 
Lac's "Voyages dans les Deux Louisianes" (1805, 1807); John Pope's 
"Tour Through the Southern and Western Territories" (1792); Mrs. Anne 
Royall's "Sketches of History, Life and Manners in the U. S." (1826); 
Saxe-Weimar Eisenach's "Travels Through North America, during 1825 
and 1826" (1828); James Stuart's "Three Years in North America," 2 vol- 
umes (1833) ; J. T. Towbridge's "The South: a Tour of its Battlefields 
and fcuined Cities" (1866). 

IV. COUNTY HISTORIES. 

Short histories, with statistics, will be found in the following general 
works: Berney's "Handbook of Alabama" (1878, 1892); Brewer's "Ala- 
bama"; Riley's "Alabama As It Is" (1887, 1888, and ,1893); and Smith and 
DeLand's "Northern Alabama." 

Rev. T. H. Ball's "Clarke County, and its Surroundings, 1540 to 1877" 
(1882); W. H. Cather's "History of St. Clair County" (in the Southern 
Aegis, Ashville, July 1, 1897, et seq.)\ "Marshall County," by E. O. Neely 
(in the Guntersville Democrat, souvenir edition, November, 1895); J. B. 
Little's "History of Butler County, Ala.. 1815 to 1885" (1885); R. A. Mc- 
Clellan's "Early History of Limestone County, Ala." (in the Athens Post, 
June-September, 1881); Gecrge Powell's "History of Blount County," (in 
Transactions Alabama Historical Society, 1855); B. F. Riley's "History of 
Conecuh County, Ala." (1881); W. G. Robertson's "Recollections of Early 
Settlers of Montgomery County," (1892); Col. J. E. Saunders' "Early Set- 
tlers of Lawrence County. Alabama" (1899); N. F. Smith's "History of 
Pickens County" (1856); V. G. Snedecor's "Directory of Greene County, 
1855-6" (1856); T. J. Taylor's "History of Madison County" (in the Hunts- 
ville Independent, 1883 and 1884) ; Teople and Smith's "Jefferson County 
and Birmingham, Historical and Biographical" (1887); W. C. Tharin's 
"Directory of Marengo County, 1860-61," (1861.) 

V. TOWN HISTORIES. 

In Berney's "Handbook of Alabama," and Brewer's "Alabama" are a 
number of short sketches. Smith and DeLand's "Northern Alabama" con- 
tains valuable histories of the following towns: Anniston, Attalla, Au- 
burn, Birmingham, Cullman, Decatur. Florence, Gadsden. Greensboro, Gun- 
tersville, Helena, Huntsville, Jacksonville, Jasper, Livingston, Marion, 
Montgomery, Opelika, Selma, Sheffield, Talladega, Troy, Tuscumbia and 
Tuscaloosa. W. W. Screws contributed sketches of a number of towns to 
the Advertiser, January, February, March and April. 1898. 

"History of Bailey Springs, Lauderdale County" (1860); J. W. Beeson's 
"Demopolis" (in Demopolis Express, January 24 to April 4, 1895); M. P. 
Blue's "History of Montgomery" (1878); H. M. Caldwell's "History of the 
Elyton Land Company and Birmingham" (1892); J. W. .DuBose's "Min- 



BRIEF CLASSIFIED BIBLIOGRAPHY. 355 

eral Wealth of Alabama and Birmingham," Illustrated (1886); Peter J. 
Hamilton's "Colonial Mobile, an Historical Study, largely from Original 
Sources, of the Alabama-Tombigbee Basin from the discovery of Mobile 
Bay in 1519 until the Demolition of Fort Charlotte in 1821" (1897); John 
Hardy's "Selma: Her Institutions and Her Men" (1879); E. T. Wood's 
"Sketch of Mobile" (in his Mobile Directory for 1844); Bernard Rey- 
nold's "Sketches of Mobile," (1868) ; S. A. Townes' "History of Marion, Per- 
ry County, Ala." (1844). x 

VI. BIOGRAPHY. 

Collected. There are a number cf general works which contain impor- 
tant biographical data. The principal of these are: Brewer's "Ala- 
bama," Garrett's "Public Men in Alabama;" "Memorial Record of Ala- 
bama" (2 Vols.); Smith and DeLand's "Northern Alabama," and Teeple 
and Smith's "Jefferson County and Birmingham." The following also con- 
tain brief biographies: Clark's "History of Education in Alabama,". 
French's "Historical Collections of Louisiana" (7 vols.) ; Hardy's "Selnia; 
Her Institutions and Her Men," S. F. Miller's "Heads of the Alabama Leg- 
islature" (1842-3); Nail's "Dead cf the Synod of Alabama;" "Representa- 
tive Men of the South" (1880); Robertson's "Recollections of Montgomery 
County;" Smith's "Reminiscences of a Long Life," and H. S. Focte's 
"Bench and Bar of the Scuth and Southwest," (1876); T. W. Palmer's 
"Register of the University of Alabama" ; and "Notable Men of Alabama," 
edited by Joel C. DuBose (1004), 2 vols. 

Individual. G. W. Agee's "Rube Burrow, King of Outlaws" (1890); Ru- 
fus Anderson's "Memoir of Catherine Brown, a Christian Indian" (1825); 
W. O. Baldwin's "Tribute to James Marion Sims" (1884) ; William Birney's 
"Life of James G. Birney" (1884); Wm. A. Bowles' "Authentic Memoirs" 
(1791) ; P. H. Brittian's "Veto Messages of Gov. J. A. Winston, with Me- 
moir" (1856); J. F. H. Claiborne's "Life and Times of Gen. Sam Dale" 
(1860); Daniel Clark's "Proofs of the Corruption of Gen. James Wilkin- 
son" (1809); David Crockett's "Narrative of His Life" (1834); and also 
"Life of" (1860), written by himself; J. L. M. Curry's "Francis Strother 
Lyon as Commissioner and Trustee cf Alabama" (1889); .Tiffany's "Life 
cf Dorothea Lynde Dix" (1891); Benj. Drake's "Life of Tecumseh and 
of his Brother, the Prophet" (1852); Maj, James D. Dreisbach's "Weather- 
ford, the Red Eagle," (in Alabama Historical Reporter, Febru- 
ary, March, April, 1884); J. W. DuBose's "Life and Times of William 
Lowndes tfancey; a History of Political Parties in the United States, 1834 
to 1864, especially as to the Origin of the Confederate States" (1892); 
Eaton's "Life of Andrew Jackson" (1817, 1824); G. C. Eggleston's "Red 
Eagle and the Wars with the Creek Indians of Alabama" (1878); John 
Fulton's "Memoirs of F. A. P. Barnard" (1896); E. J. Harden's "Life of 
George M. Troup" (1859); W. L. Hawley's "Life of Detective A. J. Sulli- 
van" (1888); "Memorial Addresses on Life of Thomas H. Herndon" (1884) 
."Memoria] Addresses on Life of George S. Houston" (1880); Crawford M. 
Jackson's "Brief Biographical Sketch of Col. Albert J. Pickett" (1859); P. 
W. Jones' "James Taylor Jones, Sketch" (189(5) ; "Obituary Addresses on 
the Death ci Hon. William R. King" (1854); "Memorial Addresses on Life 
cf Win. M. Lowe" (1883) ; A. B. Meek's "Red Eagle, a Poem of the South;" 
P. H. Mell's "Life of Patrick H. Mell, Sr." (1895); Le Clerc Milfort's "Me- 
moire ou Coup d'Oeil Rapide sur Mes Differens Voyages et Mon Sejour 
Dans la Nation Creek" (1802) ; James Purtoii's "Life of Andrew Jackson" 
(1861); T. W. Price's "Life of Himself" (1877); B. H. Riggs' "Biographi- 
cal Sketch cf A. G. Mfcbry. M. D." (1878); R. H. Rivers' "Life of Robert 
Paine. D. D." (1884); E. C. Tracey's "Life of Jeremiah Evarts" (1845); 
Rev. Gieenough White's "Saint of the Southern Church," the Life of Bish- 
op N. H. Cobbs (1898); James Wilkinson's "Memoirs of My Own 
Times," 4 volumes (1.81*5) ; Mrs. S. F. H. Tarrant's "Daniel Pratt, a Biog- 
raphy" (1904); and Helen Keller's "Story of My Life" (1905.) 



356 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

VII. CHURCH HISTORY. 

i 

i 

D. W. Andrews' "Short History of the North River Association" (1885); 
W. C. Bledsoe's "History cf East Liberty Baptist Association" (1886); M. 
P. Blue's "Churches of the City of Montgomery" (1878) ; T. H. Clark's "Re- 
ligious History of Alabama" (in Memorial Record of Alabama, volume II.) 
Rev. E. P. Davis' "Golden Anniversary of First Presbyterian Church of 
Montgomery" (1897); Hosea Holcombe's "History of the Baptists of Ala- 
bama" (1840); John G. Jones' "History of Methodism as Connected with 
the Mississippi Conference, from 1799 to 1817" (1887); B. W. McDonald's 
"History of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church" (1888); "The Baptist 
Churches of Mobile," (1879); "Year Book of the Parish of Christ Church, 
Mobile, for 1883, and Reminiscences of the History of the Parish from its 
Foundation" (1884); "Sketch of St. Francis Street Baptist Church" (in 
Ravesies' Scenes and Settlers) ; Robert Nail's "Dead of the Synod of Ala- 
bama" (1851); B. F. Riley's "History of the Baptists cf Alabama" (1895); 
Josephus Shackleford's "History of Muscle Shoals Baptist Association. 1820 
to 1890" (1891); J. G. Shea's "Catholic Missions" (1854), and also "His- 
tory of the Catholic Church within the U. S.," 4 volumes (1886-1892) ; Rev. 
Anson West's "History cf Methodism in Alabama" (1893); Rev. W. C. 
Whitaker's "History of the Protestant Episcopal Church in Alabama" • 
(1898); and Anne Bozeman Lyon's "Early Missions of the South" (1894). 

( 
VIII. THE WAR BETWEEN THE STATES, AND RECONSTRUCTION. 

C. C. Andrew's "History of the Campaign of Mobile" (1867); Mrs. JiHin- 
nie A. Beers' "Memories" (1889); "War Record of Alabama" (in Brewer's 
Alabama 1872) ; Jeremiah Clemens' "Tobias Wilson, a Tale of the Great 
Rebellion" (1865); John Esten Cooke's "Wearing of the Gray" (1867); 
Miss Mary Ann Cruse's "Cameron Hall: a Story of the Civil War" (1867) ; 
Miss Kate Cumming's "Journal of Hospital Life" (1866); T. C. DeLeon's 
"Four Years in Rebel Capitals" (1892) ; DeLeon's "John Holden, Unionist, a 
Romance of the Days of Destruction and Reconstruction" (1893); W. L. 
Fagan's "Southern War Songs" (1890); J. J. Garrett's "Forty-Fourth Ala- 
bama Regiment" (in Transactions Alabama Historical Society, 1897-98. 
Volume II) ; A. T. Goodloe's "Rebel Relics from the Seat of War" (1893) ; 
Parthenia A. Hague's "Blockaded Family: Life in Southern Alabama Dur- 
ing the Civil War" (1888) ; Jesse Hawes' "Cahaba, a Story of Captive Boys 
in Blue" (1888); H. A. Herbert's "Why the Solid South? or, Reconstruc- 
tion and its Results" (1890); M. B. Hurst's "History of the Fourteenth 
Regiment, Alabama Volunteers" (1863); W. F. Hutchinson's "Sketch of 
the Battle of Mobile Bay" (1879) : Thomas Jordon and J. P. Pryor's "Cam- 
paigns of Forrest" (1868); T. C. McCorvey's "Sketch of the Capture of 
Tuscaloosa and the Burning of the University of Alabama" (in the Centu 
ry Magazine, November, 1889); A. T. Mahan's "Navy in the Civil War. — 
III. The Gulf and Inland Waters" (1883), and also "Admiral Farragut" 
(1892) ; Wm. C. Oates* "Sketch of the Companies of the Fifteenth Alr.bama- 
Regiment" (in the Montgomery Advertiser, May, June, July, 1897, and 
January and February, (1898); F. A. Parker's "Battle of Mobile Bay" 
(1878); E. W. Pettus' "Sketch of Pettus' Brigade" (in Transactions Ala- 
bama Historncal Society, 1807-98,' Volume II) ; D. D. Porter's "Naval Histo- 
ry of the Civil War" (1880) ; A. C. Roach's "Prisoner of War, Containing a 
History of Col. Streight's Expediticn. 1863" (1865); J. T. Scharf's "His- 
tory of the Confederate States Navy" (1894); L. W. Shaver's "History of 
the Sixtieth Alabama Regiment" (1867); William R. Smith's "History 
and Debates of the Convention of Alabama begun the seventh of January, 
1861" (1861); Smith's "History of Company K. First Alabama Regi- 
ment;" R. S. Tharin's "Arbitrary Arrests in the South" (1863); "Twenty- 
Fourth Alabama Commemorative Association Memorial Tribute" (1882); 
A. H. Whetstone's "P'ifty-Third Alabama Regiment" (in Montgomery Ad- 
vertiser, October 10, 17, 1907); "Inside of Rebeldom," by J. P. Cannon, late 
27th Alabama (1900); Dr. John A. Wyeth's "Life of Forrest" (1899); Jos- 



BRIEF CLASSIFIED BIBLIOGRAPHY. 357 

eph Wheeler's "Military History of Alabama" (in Memorial Record of Ala- 
bama, Volume I); and C. M. Wilcox's "Sketch of Wilcox's Brigade" (in 
Transactions Alabama Historical Society, 1898-99, Volume III.) "The Of- 
ficial War Records" (1880-1900), a U. S. Government Publication, 
contains a vast fund of information in reference to Alabama commands, as 
well as many local references. Later Works are Wm. C. Oates' "War be- 
tween the Union and the Confederacy" (1905) ; Walter L. Fleming's "Civil 
War and Reconstruction in Alabama" (1905) ; and McMorries' "First Ala- 
bama Infantry Regiment, C. S. A." (1904.) w 

IX. GENEALOGY. 

M. P. Blue's "Genealogy of the Blue Family" (1886); D. H. Cram's 
"Scott Genealogy" and also his "James Family;" Dr. and Mrs. P. H. Mell's 
"Genealogy of the Mell Family in the Southern States," (1897); Thomas 
M. Owen's 'Genealogy of the Lacey Family" (1900) ; also of the. "Kelly 
Family" (1900), also of the "Stansel Family" (1900); R. D. Webb's "The 
Webb Family" (1894); Wheeler's "American Ancestors of the Children of 
Joseph and Daniella Wheeler" (1896); Col. J. E. Saunders' "Early Set- 
tiers of Lawrence County, Alabama," contains genealogies more or less 
complete of the following families of Alabama, prepared by Mrs. Wm. C. 
Stubbs, viz.: Banks, Bankhead, Bibb, Billups, Blair, Cantzon, Clay, Cole- 
man, Cox, DuBose, Dudley, Dunn, Elliot, Flint, Foster, Fry, Gholson, 
Goode, Gray, Harris, Hill, Hopkins, Lanier, Ligon, Lowe, Manning, Maclin, 
McGehee, Maury, Moore, Oliver, O'Neal, Phelan, Poellnitz, Roy, Richard- 
son, Saunders, Shelton, Sherrod, Shorter, Speed, Swope, Tait, Taliaferro, 
Thompson, Tillman, Urquhart, Walthall, Watkins, Webb, Weeden, Wells, 
White, Withers, Wyatt. Yates and Young. A Genealogy of the Fitts fam- 
ily (1897) has been published by James H. Fitts, of Tuscaloosa; and a 
Genealogy of the Reese Family (1903) ; by Miss Mary E. Reese. 

1 

X. PUBLISHED REPORTS OF THE ALABAMA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY. 

Owing to their current practical value, the following list of the published 
Reports of the Alabama Geological Survey is given in full, as compiled 
by Dr. Eugene A. Smith, State Geologist, University P. O.. Ala. 

1. Repcrt of progress for 1874; on the Metamorphic Region of Ala- 
bama. Eugene A. Smith, 139 pages. Out of print. 

2. Report of Progress for 1875. Paleozoic Formations of Coosa Valley ; 
Eugene A. Smith. On Coal Mining in Alabama, T. H. Aldrich. 220 pages. 
Postage, 5 cents. 

3. Repcrt of Progress for 1867. Paleozoic Formations of Roups', Jones', 
and Cahaba Valleys; Eugene A. Smith, with map; Fresh* Water and Land 
Shells, Lewis. 100 pages. Out of print. 

4. Report of Progress for 1877-78; on the Tennessee Valley, Brown'e 
Valley, and Warrior Coal Basin; 4 county maps; Eugene A. Smith. 159 
pages. Out of print. 

5. Report of Progress for 1879-80. Resources of the Warrior Coal 
Field, between Tuscaloosa and Sipsey Fork. 2 maps. Eugene A. Smith. 
Tennessee Valley North of the River; Henry McCalley. 158 pages. Out of 
print. 

6. Report for the years 1881-82. Agricultural Features of Alabama; 
maps and illustrations; Eugene A. Smith. 615 pages. Out of print. 

7. Report on the Warrior Coal Field, 1S86; Henry McCalley. 571 pages. 
Out of print. 

8. Bulletin No. 1, Fossils of the Tertiary Formation; T. H. Aldrich and 
O. Meyer, 1886; 9 plates. Out of print. 

9. Fresh Water and Marine Crustacea of Alabama; 8 plates; 56 pages, 
1888; C. L. Herrick. Out of print. 

10. Report on the Cahaba Coal Field; Joseph Squire. Appendix, Geology 
of Adjacent Valleys; Eugene A. Smith. Maps, 6 plates and many cuts; 
colored sections; 189 pages; cloth, 1890. Postage, lie. 



358 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

11. Coal Measures of the plateau Region of the Warrior Field; H. Mc- 
Calley; A. M. Gibson; map and colored sections; 238 pages, 1891. Post- 
age, 5 cents. 

12. Bulletin No. 2; on the phosphates and marls of Alabama; Eugene A. 
Smith; 82 pages, 1892. Edition exhausted. 

13. Bulletin No. 3; on the Lower Gold Belt; Wm. B. Phillips; map and 
illustrations; 97 pages, 1892. Edition exhausted. 

14. Bulletin No. 4; ueology of Northeast Alabama and adjacent parts 
of Georgia and Tennessee; C. W. Hay«s; map and illustrations; 85 pages; 

1892. Postage, 3 cents. 

IB. Report on Murphree's Valley; A. M. Gibson, one section; 132 pages; 

1893. Postage, 3 cents. 

16. Coal Measures of Blount Mountain; A. M. Gibson; map and sections 
80 pages; 1893. Edition exhausted. 

17. Geological may of Alabama with Explanatory Chart ; 1903. Edition 
exhausted. 

18. Geology of the Coastal Plain of Alabama ; Eugene A. Smith, L. C. 
Johnson, D. W. Langdon and others; many sections and other illustra- 
tions; 760 pages; 1894. Postage, 18 cents. 

19.- Report on the Coosa Coal Field; A. M. Gibson; with section; 143 
pages; 1895. Postage, 4 cents. 

20. Bulletin No. 5; on the Upper Geld Eelt; W. M. Brewer; wich notes 
on the most ini]M>rtant Rock Varieties; E. A. Smith, G. W. Hawes, J. M. 
Clements, and A. H. Brooks; 202 pages; 1896. Postage, 5c. 

21. Report on Iron Making in Alabama; Wm. B. Phillips; 164 pages; 
18§6. Edition exhausted. 

22. The Valley Regions of Alabama; Henry McCalley. 

Part I. On the Tennessee Valley Region ; 430 pp ; 1890 ; p. 10c. 
Part 11. On the Coosa Valley Region; 802 pages; 1897; p. 20c. 

23. Report on Iron Making in Alabama; Second Edition; Wm. -B. Phil- 
lips. 380 pages. 1898. Edition exhausted. 

24. Warrior Basin Report and Map; Henry McCalley; $1.00. Map in sep- 
arate envelope. Numerous folding sections. 327 pages. 1900. Postage, 16 
cents. / 

25. Bulletin No. 0; Preliminary Report on the Clays of Alabama, with 
Chemical analyses and Physical tests of some of the more important; Dr. 
Heinrich Ries. 220 pages. 1900. Postage, 8 cents. 

26. The Plant Life of Alabama; an account cf the distribution, modes 
of association, and adaptions of the Flora of Alabama; together with a 
systematic catalogue of the plants growing in the State wjthout cultiva- 
tion, by Charles Mohr, Ph. D. Cloth. Map and two portraits. 921 pages. 
1901. Postage, 33 cents. 

27. Bulletin No. 7; Preliminary Report on a part of the Water Powers 
of Alabama, B. M. Hall. Maps and illustrations. 188 pages. 1903. Post- 
age, 6 cents. 

28. Bulletin No. 8; Preliminary Report on the Cement Resources of 
Alabama ; Eugene A. Smith. Postage, — . 

29. Bulletin No. 9; Preliminary Report on the Artesian and Other .Under- 
ground Waters of Alabama ; Eugene A. Smith. Postage. — . 

30. Index to the Mineral Resources cf Alabama. E. A. Smith and 
Henry McCalley. Maps and Illustrations; 79 pages. Postage, 3 cents. 

These publications are mailed, free of charge; (except No. 24, price 
$1.00,) to Libraries and individuals who may wish to possess them; but 
applicants should, in each case, forward the amount of postage needed 
for mailing the Report desired, addressed to the State Geologist, Univer- 
sity, Ala. 



XVI. MISCELLANEOUS STATISTICS. 



ALTITUDE OF SUNDRY PLACES IN ALABAMA. 

Akron — 149 

Alexander * City 742 

Alpine — w 470 

Ambeson _ _J 702 

Ashly - ^ -456 

Attalla • . 602 

Athens 707 

Bangor _ 466 

Barclay - ., 509 

Barton 498 

Batesville 280 

Battles _ 152 

Beaver Meadow 136 

Bellefonte 639 

Belleview _ 160 

Bibb Mills 446 

Birmingnam _ 596 

Blount Springs 432 

Blue Mountain 791 

Boligee _ 123 

Boyle _- 522 

Brandon _ 896 

Brierfleld 388 

Brocks 562 

Brownsboro 631 

Brown's Cut 244 

Burnsville . 182 

Cahaba Mines 598 

Calera •_ 1 i 500 

Calvert _ 57 

Camp Hill 733 

Carson i *._ 54 

Carthage . 176 

Centerville _ 252 

Chastang _ , 43 

Chehaw 252 

Childersburg . 416 

Chunehula - 78 

Citronelle 317' 

Clantcn : 1 594 

Clays 193 

Clear Creek 538 

Clements 419 

Cleveland __ 15 

Coosada _ - 183 

Cold Creek 34 

Collinsville _ 738 

Columbiana _ 535 

Columbus 262 

Coopers _ , 456 

(359) 



360 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

Ooosa Station 447 

Cottondale 273 

Courtland • 560 

Coxe's . 373 

Creola _ 23 

Cross Plains 69Y 

Cuba _ — 219 

Cullman . 800 

Cunningham _ 438 

Curry's 540 

Dadeville _ 755 

Deatsville 298 

Decatur 575 

Deer Park _*_ 148 

Dickson 488 

Dixie _*_ 282 

Elkmont 796 

Elmore _ 197 

Epes . -_— i 129 

Eufaula 200 

Eureka _ 979 

Eutaw 189 

Falkville 601 

Fitzpatrick's 262 

Flint 566 

Foot's 646 

Fort Deposit 520 

Fort Payne 883 

Gardner's __ 542 

Gilmer 536 

Gold Hill 765 

Goldsby 183 

Goodwater __ fc67 

Green Pond 491 

Greenwood _ 691 

Griffith's Mills 691 

Hampden _ 180 

Harpersville . 186 

Harrall's X Roads ___! . 192 

Harris i 562 

Hartselle 671 

Hays Mills 751 

Helena 398 

Holliman's 937 

Hull's . 141 

Huntsville 612 

lronaton — 650 

Jackson 459 

Jackson's Gap 690 

Jacksonville _ 628 

Xemison __ 704 

Jonesboro _ 527 

Jones Station 209 

Kellyton 800 

Kymulga 426 

Ladiga '_ 671 

Larkinsville - 620 

Lary's 160 

Leighton 563 

Leona - u4 

Livingston - 144 

Logan . 134 



MISCELLANEOUS STATISTICS. 361 

Lomax 623 

McCalla 485 

McDonald 683 

Madison 573 

Maplesville . 356 

Marion 253 

Mathews _ 262 

Maxwell 176 

Midway 506 

Milner 838 

Miner Station 119 

Mitchell I 252 

Mobile _ ■ 6 

Mobile Signal Station 69 

Montevallo 469 

Montgomery __ 162 

Montgomery Signal Station 219 

Morris _ 406 

Mountain Creek 540 

Mount Vernon ; 49 

Munford 621 

Nebo Mount, tunnel at grade 330 

Nebo Mount, summit of mount *. 449 

Oak Grove 226 

Olmstead 288 

Opelika 812 

Oxford — - 653 

Patona _- 689 

Peeples 213 

Pelham 425 

Pensacola Junction 1 68 

Phelan __ • 790 

Pike Road 295 

Plantersville __ 241 

Plateau 37 

Pollard 67 

Randolph 548 

Reese _ 599 

Reid . 591 

Scottsboro 652 

Selma _ 122 

Selma. N. E. bank Alabama river 110 

Selma Junction, Western R. R r 108 

Selma Crossing, S. R. & D. R. R 112 

Selma Depot, Broad street : 122 

Selma crossing, N. O. & S. R. R 121 

Sepulga . 200 

Shade's Creek 610 

Shelby Springs 529 

Silurla _ T «- 462 

Silver Run 630 

Slado's _ 54 

Smallwood's _ 429 

Spring Hill 312 

Springville 727 

Standiford _ 574 

Steele's 610 

Stevenson , 602 

Stewart's 159 

Sturdevant 497 

Sunflower _ 28 

Sword's Mills 741 



362 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

Talladega 561 

Tannehill 485 

Taylor's _ 173 

Tensas 8 

Thompson's . 289 

Three-Notch Road 492 

Town Creek 560 

Trinity ; 634 

Trussville r 1 702 

Tuscaloosa ". 181 

Tuscumbia __ 488 

Union Springs, M. & C. R. R. crossing 494 

Uniontown, Ala., Central Railroad crossing 274 

Uniontown Depot 282 

Valley Head 1,031 

Vance's _ 514 

Verbena _ 448 

Veto 160 

Warrior _ 547 

Waverley . 805 

West Point 417 

Wetumpka _ 183 

Whistler 41 

Whiting _ 553 

Whitney .._ 613 

Wilhite ' 606 

Williams' Cross Roads 514 

Wllscnville 427 

Woodstock . . 519 

Woodville . . 596 

York . _ 159 



BANK DEPOSITARIES. 
(General Laws, 1907, pp. 219-ll' t .) 

No. Name. Place. Amount. 

1. Alexander City Bank Alexander City $ 10,000 

2. 1st National Bank Alexander City __._ 10,000 

3. 1st National Bank Anniston _ 10,000 

4. City National Bank Anniston 20,000 

5. Anniston National Bank Anniston _ 10,000 

6. Citizens Bank - Athens 10,000 

7. 1st National Bank Athens 10,000 

8. 1st National Bauk Andalusia 10,000 

9. Bank of Andalusia .Andalusia . 10,000 

10. Clay County Bank Ashland 10,000 

11. 1st National Bank ■__» Abbeville _ 10,000 

12. Bank of Henry Abbeville _ 10,000 

13. Attalla Bank ^Attalla 10,000 

14. Bank of Albertville Albertville . . 10,000 

15. 1st National Bank Birmingham 150.000 

1<5. Birmingham Trust & Sav. Co.— Birmingham 100,000 

17. American Trust & Savings Bank_Birmingham ~ 30,000 

18. Peoples Savings Bank & Trust 

Co _ Birmingham 30,000 

10. Traders National Bank Birmingham . L__ 20,000 

20. Commercial State Bank Birmingham 10,000 

21. Steiner Brothers Birmingham 10,000 



MISCELLANEOUS STATISTICS. 363 

No. Name. Place. Amount. 

22. Central Mortgage and Trust Co.Birmingham 10,000 

23. Bessemer National Bank Bessemer _ 15,000 

24. 1st National Bank Brantley 10,000 

25. 1st National Bank — Brundidge i0,000 

26. Farmers & Merchants Bank Boaz . 10,000 

27. Peoples Savings Bank Clanton _ 10,000 

28. Clanton Bank Clanton . 10,000 

29. Farmers & Merchants Bank Collinsville 10,000 

30. 1st National Bank Columbia . 10,000 

31. Manufacturers Bank Columbia _ 10,000 

32. Columbiana Savings Bank Columbiana _ 10,000 

33. Cherokee Couttty Bank Centre 10,000 

34. Bank of Carrollton Carrollton 10,000 

35. Camden National Bank__^ Camden _ 10,000 

30. Robertson Banking Co Demopolis 10,000 

37. City Bank & Trust Co Demopolis 20,000 

38. Marx Banking Co. Demopolis 10,000 

39. 1st Naticnal Bank Decatur 10,000 

40. Merchants Bank Decatur _ 60,000 

41. 1st National gank Dothan 10,000 

42. Dothan National Bank Dothan 10,000 

43. Peoples Bank Evergreen _ 10,000 

44. Merchants & Farmers Bank Eutaw . 10,000 

45. 1st National Bank Eutaw _ 20,000 

46. 1st National Bank Elba 10,000 

47. 1st National Bank Enterprise 10,000 

48. Enterprise Banking Co. Enterprise 10,000 

49. Bank of Ensley Ensley . 10.000 

50. 1st National Bank Florence . 20,000 

51. Ala. Trust & Savings Bank Florence _ 10,000 

52. Inter-State Bank Florala 10,000 

53. Bank of Florala Florala 10,000 

54. Fort Deposit Bank Fort Deposit 10,000 

55. Bank of Greenville Greenville 10,000 

56. 1st National Bank Greenville 10.000 

57. 1st National Bank Gadsaen 20,000 

58. Gadsden National Bank Gadsden 20,000 

59. Queen City Bank Gadsden 10,000 

60. Farmers & Merchants Bank Gocd water _ 10,000 

61. 1st Naticnal Bank Geneva _ 10,000 

62. Bank of Guin Guin 10,000 

63. Butler County Bank Georgiana _ 10,000 

64. 1st National Bank Greensboro _ 10,000 

65. Bank cf Guntersville Guntersville _ - 10.000 

66. 1st National Bank Hartford 10,000 

67. Bank of Heflin Heflin 10,000 

68. Farmers & Merchants Bank Headland _ 10,000 

09. 1st National Bank Headland _ IO.ojO 

70. 1st National Bank Huntsville 20,000 

71. Huntsville Bank & Trust Co Huntsville 20,000 

72. W. R. Rison Banking Co Huntsville 20.000 

73. 1st National Bank Jasper 10,000 

74. James & Midway Banking Co.— James _ 10,000 

75. Bank of Lafayette Lafayette 10.000 

76. Bank of Luverne Luverne 10,000 

77. 1st National Bank Luverne : 10,000 

78. Merchants & Planters Bank Luverne 10,000 

79. Lineville National Bank Lineville 10,000 

80. Bank of Sumter Livingston 10,000 

81. Marion Central Bank Marion 10,000 

82. Mcnroe County Bank Monroeville _ 10,000 



364 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

v 
i 

No. Name. Place. Amount 

83. Morgan County National Bank-New Decatur 10,000 

84. 1st National Bank Opelika - 1 20,000 

85. Bank of Opelika Opelika _ 10,000 

86. Ozark City Bank Ozark 10,000 

87. Planters & Merchants Bank Ozark 10,000 

88. 1st National Bank Oxford _ 10,000 

89. 1st National Bank nedmont 10,000 

90. Phoenix-Girard Bank Phoenix 10,000 

91. Bank of St. Clair County Pell City 10,000 

92. 1st National Bank Opp • 10,000 

93. 1st National Bank Sylacauga 10,000 

94. Merchants & Planters Bank Sylacauga 10,000 

95. Slocomb National Bank Slocomb 10,000 

96. 1st National Bank oiocomb 10,000 

97. 1st National Bank Samson „ 10,000 

98. 1st Bank of Red Level Red Level 10,000 

99. Talladega National Bank Talladega _ 20,000 

100. Peoples Savings Bank Tallassee _ 10,000 

101. Troy Bank & Trust Co Troy _ 10,000* 

*02. 1st National Bank , Troy ___* 10,000 

103. Farmers & Merchants National 

Bank. iroy _ 20,000 

104. City National Bank Tuscaloosa _ 10,000 

105. 1st National Bank Tuscaloosa , 20,000 

106. Tuscumbia Bank & Trust Co Tuscumbia _ 10,000 

107. Merchants Bank & Trust Co Tuscaloosa 10,000 

108. Bank of Tuskegee Tuskegee 10,000 

109. Macon County Bank -—Tuskegee 10,000 

110. Farmers Bank & Trust Co Thomasville _ 20,000 

111. (Not issued.) 

112. Planters & Merchants Bank Uniontown 10,000 

113. 1st National Bank Union Springs 10,000 

114. 1st National Bank Wetumpka 10,000 

115. Bank of Wetumpka. Wetumpka 10,000 

116. Bank of Wedowee Wedowee 10,000 

117. 1st National Bank Montgomery 100,000 

U8. 4th National Bank Montgomery 100,000 

119. Exchange National Bank Montgomery. 50.000 

120. Montgomery Bank & Trust Co__ Montgomery _ 40,000 

121. New Farley National Bank Montgomery . 20,000 

122. Union Bank & Trust Co Montgomery _ 10,000 

123. Merchants Bank Mobile 50,000 

124. Peoples Bank Mobile _ —: 30,000 

125. 1st National Bank Mobile . 20,000 

126. City Bank & Trust Co Mobile _ ^ 20,000 

127. Selma National Bank Selma 25,000 

128. City National Bank Selma 30,000 

129. Bank of Mobile (N. B. A.) Mobile 10,000 



BONDED DEBT OF ALABAMA. 

(State Treasurer's Report, 1906, pp. 122-123.) 

After the ratification of this Constitution, no new debt shall be created 
against, or incurred by this State, or its authority, except to repel in- 
vasion or suppress insurrection, and then only by a concurrence of two- 
thirds of the members of each House of the Legislature, and the vote 
shall be taken by yeas and nays and entered on the Journals; and any 
act creating or incurring any new debt against this State, execpt as 



MISCELLANEOUS STATISTICS. 365 

herein provided for, shall be absolutely void; provided, the Governor may 
be authorized to negotiate temporary loans, never to exceed three hundred 
thousand dollars, to meet the deficiencies in the Trasury, and until the 
same is paid no new loan shall be negotiated; provided further, that this 
section shall not be so construed as to prevent the issuance of bonds for the 
purpose of refunding the existing bonded indebtedness of the State. — Con- 
stitution, 1901, Sec. 213.- 

Detailed Statement. 

The entire bonded debt of the State of Alabama amounts to nine mil- 
lions fifty-seven thousand dollars, and is composed of bonds of the classes 
and descriptions following, to-wit: 

Description. Amt. at Issue. Annual Interest. 

Class A. Renewal Bonds, issued July 1, 1906, 
due July 1, 1950 for $1,000 each, under an 
act approved Feb. 18, 1895, and an act 
amendatory thereof approved February 10, 
1899, and validated by the Constitution of 
the State of Alabama, Nov. 28, 1901, with 
coupons attached for interest payable semi- 
annually to-wit: on Jan. 1, and July 1, at 
the rate of 4 per cent, per annum. Both 
bonds and coupons payable at the Financial 
Agency of the State of Alabama in the city 
of New York in coin of the standard value 
of the United States of America. Said bonds 
are numbered 1 to 5382 inclusive and 
5384 to 7138, both inclusive, being a total 
of 7137 bonds at $1,000 each. Bond No. 
5383 was spoiled by misplacement of of- 
ficial signatures and was therefore de- 
stroyed and never issued $7,137,000 00 $285,480 00 

Class C. Renewal Bonds, issued Jan. 1, 1906 
due January 1, 1956, by authority of same 
acts as that of Class A described above, 
with coupons for interest payable semi- 
annually, January 1, and July 1, at the rate 
of 3% per cent, per annum, payable at 
the Financial Agency in New York in coin 
as in the case of Class A. Said bonds 
are numbered 1 to 966, making 966 of 
$1,000 each 966,000 00 33,810 00 

Four per cent. Funding Bonds (In redemp- 
tion of 5 per cent, bonds), issued under 
act of Feb. 27, 1887, and amended Feb. 
27, 1889, and dated Jan. 1, 1890, interest 
payable semi-annually, January 1, and 
July 1, in New York or State Treasury, 
numbered 1 to 854 of $1,000, $854,000.00; 
1 to 200 of $500.00 $100,000.00 954,000 00 38,160 00 



Total $9,057,000 00 $357,450 00 



366 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

CONFEDERATE PENSIONS. 

(State Auditor's Report: 1006.) 

Statement of the Condition of the Pension Fund at the Close of the 

Year, September 30, 1906. 

Oct. 1, 1905! By balance tc credit of fund $320,334 31 

By special appropriation under an act 

approved September 22, 1903 150.000 00 

By special tax for 1905 327,832 67 

By special tax for former years 215 44 

By special tax for insolvents 41 02 

By special tax on lands redeemed 63 26 

By amounts refunded by Judges of Pro- 
bate 1 64 57 

By warrants returned to Auditor and 

cancelled 15,814 43 

To warrants issued this day : 

127 1st class, at $60.00 each 7,020 00 

142 2nd class, at $50.00 each 7,100 00 

168 3rd class, at $40.00 each 6.720 00 

14,709 4th class, at $30.00 each 441,270 00 

1 4th class, at $22.65 22 65 

To warrants to State Board of Examiners.. 129l 98 
Warrants to Co. Board of Examiners 27 00 
Warrant for postage and expressage__ 35 00 
Warrants to tax collector for overpay- 
ment on taxes 638 32 

Amount reverted to general fund 7,001 66 

Sept. 30, 1906. To balance to credit of fund— 343,201 06 

$814,305 67 $814,365 67 

Note. — The above statement shows a balance in the treasury to the 
credit of the Pension Fund of $343,201.06. A special appropriation of 
$150,000.00 under Act approved September 30th, 1903. is to be added to 
above, making a total for distribution on .October 1st, 1900, of $493,201.06. 

Appropriations for the Belief of Needy Confederate Soldiers in 

Alabama, 1876-1905. • 

Act approved March 8, 1876 $ 5,000 00 

Act approved February 8, 1877 5,000 00 

Act approved February 13, 1870 1,800 00 

Act approved February 13. 1870 10,000 00 

Act approved March 1, 1881 15,000 00 

Act approved February 23, 1883 15,000 00 

Act approved February 17, 1885 25,000 00 

Act approved February 25, 18S7 30,000 00 

Act approved February 28, 1880 50,000 00 

Act approved February 31, 1S91, a tax of one-half mill on the 
dollar was levied, and under said Act the following dis- 
tributions have been made: 

In 1802 : 132,533 66 

In 1803 125,326 95 

In 1804 123,155 51 

In 1805 117,770 93 

In 1806 116,532 42 

In 1897 116,784 98 

In 1898 . 130,624 78 

In 1899 115,088 97 



AlISCELLANEOUS STATISTICS. 



367 



Under the Act approved February 10, 1899, a tax of one mill 
on the dollar was levied, and the following distributions 
have been made thereunder: 

In 1900 A . 251,439 21 

In 1901 258,828 19 

In 1902 27.3,099 85 

In 1903 T 335,937 70 

Under Act approved September 23, 1903, in addition to the 
amount received from the one-mill tax, there was appro- 
priated for the rear ending September 30, 1904. $50,000.00 
and for the year ending September 30, 1905,$ 150,000.00, 

and for said years there was distributed as follows 

In 19<M 358,222 15 

In 1905 462,732 05 



COUNTIES IN ALABAMA. 



Name. 



Autauga 

Baldwin 

Barbour 

Bibb* 

Blount 

Bullock 

Butler 

Calhounf 

Chambers 

Cherokee 

Chilton 1 1 • . 

Choctaw 

Clarke 

Clay 

Cleburne 

Coffee 

Colbert 

( 'onecuh 

Coosa 

Covington** 

Crenshaw 

Cullman 

Dale 

Dallas 

DeKalb 

Elmore 

Escambia 

E to want 



Date. 



Nov. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec, 
Jan. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Nov. 
Jan. 
Dec. 
Feb. 
Jan. 
Feb. 
Dec. 
Dec. 



21, 

21, 

18, 

7, 

7, 

5, 

13, 

18, 

18, 

9, 

30, 

29, 

10, 

7, 

6, 

29, 

0. 

ia, 

18, 

7, 
24, 
24, 
22 

"5! 

9, 
15, 
10, 

7. 



Origip of Names. 



1818 

1809 

1832 

1818 

1818 

1866 

1819| 

1832 

1832 

1836 

1868 

1847 

1812 

1866 

1866 



1867 
1818 
1832 
1821 
1866 
1877 
1S24 
1818 
1836 
1866 
18<S8 
1866 



Indian name 

Senator Abraham Baldwin, of Gn., . 

Gov. James Barbour, of Va 

Gov. William W. Bibb, of Ala 

Gov. Willie G. Blount, of Tenn 

Col. E. C. Bullock, of Ala 

Capt. William Butler, of Ala 

Senator John C. Calhoun, of S. C 

Senator Henry C. Chambers, of Ala 

Indian tribe 

Judge Wm. P. Chilton, of Ala 

Indian tribe 

Gov. John Clarke, of Ga 

Senator Henry Clay, of Ky 

Gen. Pat. II. Cleburne, of Ark ^ 

(Jen. John Coffee, of Ala 

George and Levi Colbert 

Indian name 

Indian name 

Gen. Leonard W. Covington, of Md 

Judge Anderson Crenshaw, of Ala 

John G. Cullman, of Ala 

Gen. Sam Dale, of Ala i_, 

A. J. Dallas, Esq.. of Pa 

(Jen. DeKalb, of the American Revolution 

Gen. John A. Elmore, of Ala 

Escambia River 

Indian name 



County Seats. 



Prattville. 

Bay Minctte. 

Clayton. 

Centreville. 

Oneonta. 

Union Springs. 

Greenville. 

Jacksonville. 

Lafayette. 

Centre. 

Clanton. 

Butler. 

Grove Hill. 

Ashland. 

Edwardsville. 

Elba. 

Tuscumbia. 

Evergreen. 

Rockford. 

Andalusia. 

Rut ledge. 

Cullman. 

Ozark. 

Selma. 

Ft. Payne. 

Wetumpka. 

Brewton. 

Gadsden. 



♦Originally "Cahaba ;" changed to present name Dec. 4, 1820.— Acts, 18^0, p. 63. 

fOriginally "Benton" for Senator Thomas II. Benton, of Mo. ; changed to present name 
Jan. 29, 1858.— Acts. 1857-58, p. 318. 

||Originally "Baker," for Albert Baker, of the county; changed to present name Dec. 17, 
1874.— Acts, 1874-75, pp. 179-180. 

Abolished Nov. 29, 1867. by the Constitutional Convention (Acts, 1868, p. 163:) re-es- 
tablished Dee. 9, 1869.— Acts, 1869-70, p. 6. 

**Name changed to "Jones" Aug. 6, 1868; and Oct. 10, 1868. changed to original and 
present name. — Acts, 1868, pp. 84, 257. 

^Originally "Baine," for Col. D. W. Baine, of Lowndes county; abolished Dec. 3, 1867, 
by the Constitutional Convention; re-established with present name by Act. Dec. 1, 
1868.— Acts, 1868, pp. 178, 359-361. 



368 



OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 



COUNTIES IN ALABAMA.— Continued. 



Name. 



Fayette 

Franklin 

Geneva 

Greene 

Hnle 

Henry 

Houston 

Jackson ! 

Jefferson 

Lamar ! ! ! 

Lauderdale 

Lawrence 

Lee 

Limestone 

Lowndes 

Macon 

Madison 

Marengo 

Marlon 

Marshall 

Moblle9 

Monroe 

Montgomery 

Morgan||| 

Perry 

Pickens 

Pike 

Randolph 

Russell 

St. Clair 

Shelby 

Sumter 

Talladega 

Tallapoosa 

Tuscaloosa 

Walker 

Washington 

Wilcox 

Winstongi§ 



Date. 



Dec. 


20, 


1824 


Feb. 


6, 


1818 


I>ec. 


26. 


1868. 


Dec. 


13, 


1819 


Jan. 


30, 


1867 


Dec. 


13. 


1819 


Feb. 


9, 


1903 


Dec. 


13. 


1819 


Dec. 


13. 


1819 


Feb. 


4. 


1867 


Feb. 


6, 


1818 


Feb. 


6, 


1818 


Dec. 


5, 


1866 


Feb. 


6, 


1818 


Jan. 


20, 


1830 


Dec. 


18. 


1832 


Dec. 


13, 


1808 


Feb. 


6, 


1818 


Feb. 


13, 


1818 


Jan. 


9, 


1836 


Aug. 


1, 


1812 


June 


29, 


1815 


Dec. 


6, 


1816 


Feb 


6, 


1818 


Dec. 


13, 


1819 


Dec. 


19, 


1820 


Dec. 


7, 


1821 


Dec. 


18, 


1832 


Dec. 


18, 


1832 


Nov. 


20, 


1818 


Feb. 


7, 


1818 


Dec. 


18, 


1832 


Dec. 


18, 


1832 


Dec. 


18, 


1832 


Feb. 


7, 


1818 


Dec. 


26, 


1823 


June 


4, 


1800 


Dec. 


13, 


1819 


Feb. 


12, 


1850 



Otigin of Names. 



Gen. Lafayette 

Benj. Franklin, of Pa. 

County town 

Gen. Nathaniel Greene, of Ga. _J 

Stephen F. Hale, of Ala 

Gov. Patrick Henry, of Va 

Gov. George S. Houston 

Gen. Andrew Jackson, of Tenn 

Pres. Thomas Jefferson, of Va. 

L. Q. C. Lamar, of Miss 

Col. James Lauderdale, of Tenn. 1 — 

Capt. James Lawrence, of Vt. f U. S. N 

Gen. Robert E. Lee, of Va. 

Creek of that name 

Wm. Lowndes, of S. C 

Senator Nathaniel Macon, of N. C . — 

President James Madison, of-Va 

French name 

Gen. Francis Marion, of S. C ,— 

Judge John Marshall, of Va 

See note . 

Pres. James Monroe, of Va . 

Lt. L. P. Montgomery, of Tenn 

Gen. Daniel Morgan, of Va._ 

Commodore O. H. Perry, of R. I._ 

Gen. Andrew Pickens, of S. C : — 

Z. M. Pike, of N. J. 

Senator John Randolph, of Va ^ 

Col. Gilbert C. Russell, of Ala 

Gen. Arthur St. Clair, of Penn 

Gov. Isaac Shelby, of Ky._ 

Gen. Thomas Sumter, of S. C 

Indian name 

Indian name 

Indian name 

Senator John W. Walker, of Ala 

Geo. Washington, of Va. 

Lt. Jos. M. Wilcox, U. S. Army 

Gov. J. A. Winston, of Ala 



County Seats. 



Fayette. 

Belgreen. 

Geneva. 

Eutaw. 

Greensboro. 

Abbeville. 

Dothan. 

Scottsboro. 

Birmingham. 

Vernon. 

Florence. 

Moulton. 

Opelika. 

Athens. 

Hayneville. 

Tuskegee. 

Huntsville. 

Linden. 

Hamilton. 

Guntersville. 

Mobile. 

Monroeville. 

Montgomery. 

Somerville. 

Marion. 

Carrollton. 

Troy. 

Wedowee. 

Seale. 

Ashville. 

Columbiana. 

Livingston. 

Talladega. 

Dadeville. 

Tuscaloosa. 

Walker. 

St Stephens. 

Camden. 

Double Spgs. 



!"Decatur" county was created Dec. 7, 1821 (Acts, 1821, p. 72) but was abolished in 1824, 
and its territory given to Madison and Jackson ; Marshall county now has a portion 
of it. Woodville, in Jackson, was the co.unty seat. 

!!!Originally "Jones." for E. P. Jones, of Fayette county; abolished Nov. 13, 1867, by the 
Constitutional Convention; re-established Oct. 8, 1868, as "Sanford," for H. C. San- 
ford, of Cherokee county (Acts 1868, p. 216) ; changed to present name Feb. 8, 1877. — 
Acts, 1876-77, p. 232. 

§ Named for the town, river and bay. It is the "Mauvila," or "Mobiia" of the Spanish and 
the "Mobile" of the French. 
Originally "Cotaco," of Indian origin; changed to present name June 14, 1821. — Toul- 
mln, p. 85. 

JgOriginally "Hancock," for Gen. John Hancock, of Mass. ; changed to preaen* name Jan. 
22, 1858.— Acts, 1857-58, p. 327. 



MISCELLANEOUS STATISTICS. 369 

EDUCATION. SCHOOL FUND AT THE CLOSE OF THE YEAR, 

SEPTEMBER 30, 1906. 

(State Auditor's Report, 1906.) 

Oct. i; 1905. By balance to credit of fund $1,009,959 36 

By amount certified to the Superintendent 
of Education for apportionment for 
the scholastic year 1904-5, less amount 
included in above balance 156,496 25 

By special tax, 1905, for school purposes 983,078 72 

Special tax, former years 413 68 

Special tax, insolvencies 124 08 

Special tax or lands redeemed 178 27 

Special poll taxes, 1905 117,688 95 

Fees on examination of teachers 6,067 53 

Escheats 237 70 

Retail liquor dealers license for Eufaula 

school district __ 1 1,846 50 

Fees for registration of dogs 53 08 

Amount refunded by Supt. of Education 

of Lee county 100 00 

Amount refunded by Supt. of Education 

of Wilcox county 316 55 

Amount refunded by Supt. of Education 

of Greene county 245 23 

To warrants issued as follows: 

State Board of Examiners, per diem 2,530 00 

State Board of Examiners, expenses 1,636 85 

County Boards 1,320 00 

To warrants issued for public schools, as follows: 

junties 1,030,424 77 

Special Districts 142,468 30 

Normal Schools 54,500 00 

Contingent fund 1,000 00 

To warrants to tax collector for overpayments: 

Special tax 1,460 56 

Poll tax — - 122 50 

Sept. 30, 1906. To balance to credit of fund 1,041,342 92 

$2,276,805 90 $2,276,805 90 



24 



370 



OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 



EDUCATION. ONE MILL SCHOOL TAX. 

(Report Superintendent of Education, 1906.) 

Counties and amount of tax levied. Only the names starred (*) have 

voted the tax. 

' ■ a** 

all 

° ~ 8 
tM 9 2 



COUNTIES. 




Autauga* _ 
Baldwin* _ 
Barbour __ 

Bibb* 

Blount* — 
Bullock — 
Butler* __ 
Calhoun* _ 
Chambers* 
Cherokee . 
Chilton* - 
Choctaw* 
Clarke* — 

Clay* 

Cleburne - 
Coffee* — 
Colbert 
Conecuh* _ 

Coosa* 

Covington 
Crenshaw* 
Cullman* . 

Dale 

Dallas 

DeKalb 

Elmore* — 
Escambia _ 
Etowah* __ 
Fayette* — 
Franklin* 
Geneva — 
ureene* — 

Hale 

Henry 

Houston _- 
Jackson __ 
Jefferson* 
Lamar* _. 
Lauderdale 
Lawrence 

Lee 

Limestone 
Lowndes _ 

Macon 

Madison* - 



595 
,591 
920 
622 
752 
609 
769 
636 
590 
582 
703 
912 
.213 
694 
563 
677 
581 
831 
671 
,029 
612 
595 
654 
982 
782 
631 
968 
533 
647 
689 
588 
681 
726 
532 
455 
,163 
,059 
606 
702 
642 
(531 
600 
747 
615 
806 



40 
60 
55 
56 
67 
26 
65 
55 
48 
60 
66 
52 
81 
65 
49 
69 
46 
62 
47 
79 
61 
78 
80 
35 
90 
50 
70 
60 
60 
65 

•68 
26 
30 
35 
61 
96 

152 
62 
30 
47 
32 
60 
23 
26 
67 



3,339 47 
4.197 86 
4,412 03 
3,086 97 
2,697 87 
4,065 82 
3,710 49 
9,332 17 
3,849 70 
2,833 01 
2,871 43 
1,972 79 
3,619 .02 
1,605 55 
1,548 92 
2,539 17 
5,489 34 
2,884 34 
1,577 64 
4,339 72 
2.061 92 
3,101 41 
2.862 69 

10.345 98 
3,131 02 
3.348 43 
4,336 51 
7,659 60 
i;930 67 
2,485 19 
2,892 79 
3,037 69 
3,049 24 
1.783.25 
3,840 10 
4,916 08 

53,388 87 
1,855 61 
4,600 21 
2,222 45 
4,969 14 
3,732 99 
3,933 96 
3,396 79 
8,47,1 15 



MISCELLANEOUS STATISTICS. 



371 



ONE MILL SCHOOL TAX.— Continued. 



COUNTIES. 






0> 
hi 



OS 

8 



£ 



02 £ 

hi 

©is 

o w 



"3 5 §2 

2£§g 

© O 08 Q 

^ 3 > 



Marengo* _ 

Marion* 

Marshall* _ 

Mobile 

Monroe* 

Montgomery 

Morgan* 

Perry* 

Pickens* __ 

Pike 

Randolph* _ 

Russell 

Shelby* _— 
St. Clair* ._ 

Sumter 

Talladega* 
Tallapoosa* 
Tuscaloosa* 
Walker* ___ 
Washington* 

Wilcox 

Winston* 



978 
744 
590 

1,278 

1,037 
809 
589 
758 
937 
084 
579 
652 
829 
050 
896 
677 
759 

1,371 
8(50 

1,050 
914 
634 



58 
75 
70 
19 
70 
35 
80 
36 
56 
59 
59 
28 
65 
66 
35 
44 
78 
91 
80 
55 
51 
64 



5,235 02 
1,840 13 
2,571 16 

26,347 67 
2,994 51 

23,533 27 
5,997 35 
3,628 vO 
2,048 03 
4,305 20 
2,006 35 
2,828 56 
4,775 22 
2,955 37 
4,452 47 
7,600 77 
3,187 44 
7,341 56 
6.246 15 
2,652 44 
3,369 78 
966 52 



EDUCATION. APPROPRIATIONS FOR RURAL SCHOOL HOUSES. 
(From figures and tables supplied by the State Department of Education.) 



For the year beginning October 1, 1907, there will be available out of 
the treasury of the State the sum of $67,000 with which to aid in the build- 
ing of rural school houses. Under the law each school district is allowed 
as much as $200 on its putting up as much and giving land for the site. 
The funds for this appropriation are derived from the sale of fertilizer tags. 

For the last fiscal year the law did not become effective until March 2, 
1907, the date of its approval, and there was left of the tag tax then $32,- 
714.16, which has been expended. This would have given each county $488.27. 
Some were allowed to go over. But those which went over the $488.27 will 
be reduced the amount of that excess in the sums available for them the 
present year, 1907. 

The law was in effect 212 days, up to Sept. 30, 1907. During that time 
124 new school houses were built and sixty-seven repaired, one for each 
day of the time, leaving out the Sundays. As a result of the building the 
counties expended at least, with the aid of the State, $100,000 in this 
laudable work. It is expected that for the next year, 1907-08, there will 
be almost full use of the entire amount. A list of the counties with 
amounts used last year and amounts available this year is as follows : 



372 



OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 



APPROPRIATIONS FOR RURAL SCHOOL HOUSES.— Con tinned. 



Autauga 
Baldwin 
Barbour 
Bibb 



Counties. 



Blount 

Bullock 

Butler 

Calhoun 

Chambers — 
Cherokee ... 

Chilton 

Choctaw — . 

Clarke 

Clay 

Cleburne ... 

Coffee 

Colbert 

Conecuh 

Coosa 

Covington .. 
Crenshaw _. 

Cullman 

Dale 

Dallas 

DeKalb 

Elmore 

Escambia — 

Etowah 

Fayette 

Franklin ... 

Geneva 

Greene 

Hale 

Henry 

Houston 

Jackson 

Jefferson N __. 
Lamar .___. 
Lauderdale . 
Lawrence _. 

Lee 

Limestone _ 
Lowndes __. 

Macon 

Madison 

Marengo 

Marion 

Marshall ... 

Mobile 

Monroe 

Montgomery 
Morgan 



a 
Q 
o <r> 

a° 



400 00 
500 00 



400 00 
250 00 
100 00 
500 00 
000 00 



150 00 
925 00 
300 00 



800 00 
720 00 
800 00 



200 00 
667 00 
350 00 

1,000 00 
200 00 
700 00 
300 00 
200 00 
700 00 

1.000 00 
600 00 
250 00 
550 00 

1,000 00 
200 00 
200 00 



525 00 
500 00 



800 00 

1,000 00 

550 00 



900 00 



1,000 00 
600 00 
550 00 

1.000 00 
800 00 



675 00 
300 00 
400 00 



52 



§2 



27 
27 
27 
27 



1,088 27 

988 27 

1,488 27 

1,088 27 

1,238 27 

1,388 27 

988 27 

888 27 

1,488 27 

1,338 27 

563 27 

1,188 27 

1,488 27 

088 27 

768 27 

688 27 

1,488 27 

1.288 

821 

1,138 

488 

1,288 27 

788 27 

1,188 27 

1.288 27 

788 27 

488 27 

8S8 27 

1 238 27 

928 27 

488 27 

1,2?8 27 

1.288 27 

1,488 27 

963 27 

988 27 

1.488 27 

688 27 

488 27 

938 27 

1,488 27 

588 27 

1,488 27 

488 27 

888 27 

938 27 

488 27 

688 27 

1,488 27 

813 27 

1,188.27 

1,088 27 



MISCELLANEOUS STATISTICS. 



373 



APPROPRIATIONS FOR RURAL SCHOOL HOUSES.— Con tinned. 



Perry 

Pickens 

Pike 

Randolph __ 

Russell 

Shelby 

St. Clair _- 
Sumter _•___ 
Talladega __ 
Tallapoosa . 
Tuscaloosa 

Walker 

Washington 

Wilcox 

Winston 



Counties. 



u 

Q 

O CO 



300 00 
150 00 
925 00 
1,137 16 
200 00 



400 00 

850 00 

1,000 00 

940 00 



1,000 00 

650 00 

1,000 00 



$32,714 16 




1,188 
1,338 

563 

351 
1,288 
1,488 
1,488 
1,088 

638 

488 

548 
1.488 27 

488 27 

838 27 

488 27 



27 
27 
27 
11 
27 
27 
27 
27 
27 
27 
27 



$67,000 00 



EDUCATION. APPORTIONMENT OF SCHOOL FUNDS, 1907. 

1 

(From Figures and Tables Supplied by the State Department of 

Education.) 

The per capita appropriation for 1907 is $2.07, the largest that Alabama 
has ever had, and is over 50 cents more than for 1906, the per capita appro- 
priation being $1.56 for that year. 

The apportionment made by the State Superintendent of Education, 
giving the number of children and the amount in each county, is as fol- 
lows: 



Counties. 



• 


• 

g 


u £ 


o 

•** 


g* 




§2 


O (=3 
ft® 


2o 


ft S 


fc 


< 


6,714 


$13,897 98 


5,722 


11,248 04 


11,867 


24,564 69 


6,555 


13.568 85 


7,568 


15,665 76 


11,855 


24.539 85 


11,809 


24.444 63 


14,273 


29,545 11 


13,644 


28,243 08 


6,400 


13,248 00 


6,847 


14.173 29 


6,697 


13,862 79 



Autauga . 
Baldwin _ 
Barbour . 

Bibb 

Blount -. 
Bullock _ 
Butler __ 
Calhoun . 
Chambers 
Cherokee 
Chilton - 
Choctaw . 



374 



OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 



APPORTIONMENT OF SCHOOL FUNDS, 1907.— Con tinned. 



Counties. 



Clarke* 

Clay 

Cleburne 

Coffee 

Colbert 

Conecuh 

Coosa 

Covington i 

Crenshaw 

Cullman 

Dale 

Dallas '_ 

DeKalb ^ 

Elmore : 

Escambia 

Etowah 

Fayette 

Franklin 

Geneva 

Greene . — 

Hale 

Henry T 

Houston 

Jackson : 

Jefferson 

Lamar 

Lauderdale 

Lawrence 

Lee 

Limestone 

Lowndes 

Macon 

Madison 

Marengo 

Marion 

Marshall 

Mobile 

Monroe 

Montgomery 

Morgan 

Perry 

Pickens 

Pike 

Randolph 

Russell 

Shelby 

St. Clair 

Sumter 

Talladega 

Tallapoosa 

Tuscaloosa 

Walker 

Washington 

Wilcox 

•Winston 

Total 

•Including $800.00 special appropriation. 




9,120 

6,471 

4,793 

9,601 

8,969 

6,265 

5,983 

8,067 

7,671 

8,911 

7,116 

20,433 

9,047 

9,141 

7,128 

11,574 

5,130 

6,492 

8,246 

7,241 

11,294 

6,259 

9,785 

10,985 

57,419 

5,516 

9.314 

7,016 

12,186 

8,507 

17,585 

8,049 

16.192 

14,276 

5,911 

9,431 

20,753 

8,666 

27,080 

11,860 

13,368 

8,237 

12,223 

8,091 

10,571 

8.087 

7,403 

12,521 

11,165 

11,469 

13,220 

9.783 

4264 

13,030 

3,968 



702,834 



18,878 40 
13,394 97 
9,921 51 
19,874 07 
18,565 83 
12,968 55 
12,384 81 
16,698 69 
15,878 97 
18,445 77 

• 14.730 12 
42,296 31 
18,727 29 
18,921 87 
14,754 96 
23,958 18 
10,619 10 
13,438 44 
17,069 22 
15,005 90 
22,978 58 
12,723 88 
19.856 95 
22.558 95 

118.857 33 
11,418 12 
19,279 98 
14,523 12 
25.225 02 
17.609 49 
36,400 95 
16,661 43 
33,517 44 
29,551 32 
12,233 77 
19,522 17 
42,958 71 
17,936 62 
56,055 60 
24,550 20 
27,641 01 
17,050 59 
25 301 61 
16,748 37 
21,881 97 
17,145 46 
15,324 21 
25,918 47 
23,111 55 
23,740 83 
27,365 40 
20,250 81 
9.826 48 
26,972 10 
9.013 76 



$1,454,251 28 



MISCELLANEOUS STATISTICS. 375 

The apportionment to Normal schools and to the educational contingent 
fund is as follows : 

Florence Norman $ 15,000 00 

Jacksonville Normal 15,000 00 

Livingston Normal 15,000 00 

Troy Normal — .. 15,000 00 

Montgomery Normal 7.500 00 

Huntsville Normal 4,000 00 

Tuskegee Normal 3,000 00 

Total _.__ . $ 74,500 00 

Educational contingent fund $ 1,000 Oo 

RECAPITULATION. 

State Normal Schools $74,500 00 

Educational contingent fund 3,000 00 

Winston County 800 00 

Apportioned to counties exclusive cf $800 Winston special 1,453.451 28 

Unapportioned balance 4,756 59 

Total certified by Auditor $1,534,507 87 

CHILDREN IN SPECIAL DISTRICTS. 

Alabama City 1,211 

Albertville 659 

Anniston __^ 4,680 

Attalla . „ 684 

Avondale 1,161 

Bessemer , 3,246 

Birmingham ^ 13,858 

Brewton 950 

Bridgeport ., 501 

Calera 288 

Carrollton — _ 292 

Columbiana -1 250 

Cullman 542 

Decatur ___• 1,471 

East Lake 1,021 

Eufaula 1,893 

Faunsdale 1,030 

Florence ., 2,108 

Gadsden 2,544 

Gordo A 398 

Greensboro 1,989 

Greenville 1,523 

Huntsville 2,440 

Jemison 141 

Lafayette 1,395 

Leighton 582 

Montgomery J 9,820 

Newberne 1,168 

Northport 543 

Opelika 1,830 

Phoenix City - 1,453 

Pratt City 1,495 

Prattville 539 

Russellville 867 

Salem . 362 

Selma 4,436 

Sheffield 1,550 



376 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

Smith Station 407 

St. Stephens 199 

Thomasville 677 

Troy -_ 2,606 

Tuscaloosa 2,943 

Tuscumbia 1,211 

Uniontown . 3,401 

Vincent 367 

Wetumpka 1,063 

Wilsonville 340 

17-16 659 



Total 84,793 



GAME AND FISH WARDENS. 

Statk Game and Fish Commissioner — John H. Wallace, Jr., Montgomery. 

Autauga County, — D. J. McCord. Prattville. 

Baldwin, — Wilton A. Cooper, Bay Minette. 

Barbour, — N. B. Coles. Claytcn. 

Bibb,— C. L. Cleveland, Centreville. 

Blount, — J. B. Sloan, Oneonta. 

Bullock, — J. C. Hough, Inverness. 

Butler, — W. F. Sirmand, Saucer. 

Calhoun, — G. J. Bryant, Alexandria. 

Chambers, — G. W. Howard, Lanette. 

Cherokee, — Ed. R. White, Center. 

Chilton, — J. W. E. Gulledge, Verbena. 

Choctaw, — J. G. Horn, Pushmataha. 

Clarke, — W. N. Moulton, Salipta. 

Clay, — O. J. Bruce, Lineville. 

Cleburne, — W. G. Milligan, Heflin. 

Coffee, — L. P. Hutchison, Enterprise. 

Colbert, — Chas. E. Meyer, Tuscumbia. 

Conecuh, — John Cunningham, Sr., Evergreen. 

Coosa, — S. A. Thomas, Nixburg. 

Covington, — J. N. Barron, Andalusia. 

Crenshaw, — J. D. Cook, Luverne. 

Cullman, — C. C. Connally. Cullman. 

Dale,--B. S. Brown, Ozark. 

Dallas, — W. H. Craig, Selma. 

DeKalb, — A. B. Green. Ft. Payne. 

Elmore, — A. H. Creitchberg, Eclectic. 

Escambia, — W. H. O'Bannan, Brewton. 

Etowah, — D. A. Hughes, Attalla. • 

Fayette, — Not filled. 

Franklin, — A. C. Frederick, Russellville. 

Geneva, — Not filled. 

Greene, — W. W. Holly, Eutaw. 

Hale, — C. C. Gewin, Greensboro. 

Henry,— W. C. H. Vann, Abbeville. 

Houston, — T. L. Bryan, Dothan. 

Jackson, — Harry M. Henderson, Scottsboro. 

Jefferson, — John B. Resenstihl, Birmingham. 

Lamar, — A. J. Guyton, Vernon. 

Lauderdale. — Jesse A. Dowdy, Florence. 

Lawrence, — W. D. Gilchrist, Courtland. 

Lee, — Russell L. Cole, Opelika. 

Limestone, — Net filled. 



MISCELLANEOUS STATISTICS. 377 



Lowndes, — J. W. Dickson, Letohatchie. 
Macon, — W. C. Daniel, Tuskegee. 
Madison, — C. O. Robinson, Huntsville. 
Marengo, — Millard Lipscomb, Demopolis. 
Marion, — Not filled. 

Marshall, — J. G. Pittman, Albertville. 
Mobile,— A. Sid. Gill, Mobile. 
Monroe, — J. T. Moore, Perdue Hill. 
Montgomery, — A. Campbell Jones, Montgomery. 
Morgan, — W. M. Grubbs, Decatur. 
Perry, — I. B. Hendon, Marion. 
Pickens, — E. E. Cox. Carrollton. 
Pike,— R. B. McBride, Troy. 
Randolph, — J. J. Huckebee, Wedowee. 
Russell, — S. R. Boykin, Seale. 
Shelby, — George W. Morgan, Montevallo. 
St. Clair, — C. B. Alverson, Pell City. 
Sumter, — B. C. Hunter, Livingston. 
Talladega, — E. L. Miller, Lincoln. 
Tallapoosa, — W. R. Dawson, Camp Hill. 
Tuscaloosa, — Hawkins Williamson, Tuscaloosa. 
Walker. — C. C. Smith, Jasper. 
Washington, — C. E. Harold, Sunflower. 
Wilcox, — W. H. Boykin, Camden. 
Winston, — Fred M. Wilson, Elk. 



INSURANCE COMPANIES DOING BUSINESS IN ALABAMA. 

The following is a list of the names of Insurance Companies authorized 
to transact business in Alabama, until December 31, 1907. The list indi- 
cates the pos toff Ice address of each company, and gives, so far as has been 
obtainable, the name of the party representing each company, in Alabama 
as general, or special agent, or manager, with postoffice address of such 
representative. 

Alabama Fire Insurance Companies. 

Factors and Traders Insurance Co., Mobile, Ala. 
Stonewall Insurance Co., Mobile, Ala. 

Fire, and. Fire and Marine Insurance Companies of Other States. 

Aetna Insurance Co., Hartford, Conn., Prioleau Ellis; Atlanta Ga. 
Agricultural Insurance Co., Watertown, N. Y., W. J. Dangaix, G. A., 
Birmingham, Ala. 
Alliance Insurance Co., Philadelphia, Pa.. Edward S. Gay, Atlanta, Ga. 
American Ins. Co., Newark, N. J.", Olin J. Pattillo, S. A., Atlanta, Ga. 
American Central Insurance Co., St. Louis, Mo. 

Citizens Insurance Co., St. Louis, Mo., Eggleston & Prescott, G. A., At- 
lanta, Ga. 

Columbia Insurance Co., Jersey City, N. J., W. K. P. Wilson & Son, 
Mobile, Ala. 

Connecticut Fire Insurance Co., Hartford, Conn. 

Continental Insurance Co., New York City, N. Y., Jas. H. Hard, G. A., 
Birmingham, Ala. 

Cosmopolitan Fire Insurance Co., New York City, N. Y., A. Loeb & Sons, 
G. A., Chicago, 111. 

Dixie Fire Insurance Co., Greensboro, N. C, Otis A. Murphy, S. A., At- 
lanta, Ga. 



378 OFFICIAL AND STATISTICAL REGISTER. 

Eagle Fire Co., New York City, N. Y. f Geo. N. Hunt, G. A., Atlanta, Ga. 

Fidelity Fire Insurance Co., New York City, N. Y.. James H. Hard, G. 
A., Birmingham, Ala. 

Fire Association, Philadelphia; Pa., W. E. Chapin, Manager, Atlanta, 
Ga.; W. W. Graves, S. A., Montgomery, Ala. 

Fireman's Fund Insurance Co., San Francisco, Cal., Edgar S. Wilson, 
Manager, Macon, Ga. 

Florida Home Insurance Co., Mariana, Fla., F. B. Clark, Birmingham. 

Georgia Home Insurance Co., Columbus, Ga., F. W. Buckner, S. A., 
Jackson, Miss. 

German Alliance Insurance Co., New York City, N. Y., W. L. Reynolds, 
G. A., Atlanta, Ga. 

German American Insurance Co., New York City, N. Y., W. L. Reynolds, 
G. A., Atlanta, Ga. 

Germania Fire Insurance Co., New York City, N. Y., R. C. Patterson, 
S. A., Columbus, Ga. 

Glens Falls Insurance Co., Glens Falls, N. Y., Edwin G. Seibels, Man- 
ager, Columbia, S. C. 

Globe & Rutgers Fire Insurance Co., New York City, N. Y. 

Hanover Fire Insurance Co., New York City, N. Y., F. A. McCarroll, 
Atlanta, Ga. 

Hartford Fire Insurance Co., Hartford, Conn., Eggleston & Prescott, G. 
A., Atlanta, Ga. 

Home Insurance Company, New York City, N. Y., Kalford Keith, State 
Agent, Birmingham, Ala. 

Insurance Company cf North America, Philadelphia, Edward S Gay, 
Mgr., Atlanta, Ga. 

Jefferson Fire Insurance Co., Philadelphia, Hughs & Yates, G. A., At- 
lanta, Ga. 

Liverpool & London & Globe Insurance Company, New York City, Clar- 
ence F. Low, General Agent, New Orleans, La.; B. H. Abrams, State Agent, 
Atlanta, Ga.; L. Y. Dean, S. A., Eufaula, Ala. 

Michigan Commercial Insurance Co., Lansing, Mich, Rhodes Brown & 
Co., Columbus, Ga. , 

Milwaukee Mechanics' Insurance Co., Milwaukee, Wis., Edwin G. Seibels, 
Manager So. Department, Columbia, S. C. 

National Fire Insurance Co., Hartford. 

National Union Fire Insurance Co., Pittsburg, W. A. Drennen, S. A., At- 
lanta, Ga. 

New Hampshire Fire Insurance Co., Manchester, N. H., Edwin G. Seibels, 
Manager, Columbia, S. C; Prentiss B. Reed, S. A., Montgomery, Ala. 

Niagara Fire Insurance Co., New York City, B. E. Dryden, S. A., At- 
lanta, Ga. 

North State Fire Insurance Co., Greensboro, N. C, Otis A. Murphy, S. A., 
Atlanta, Ga. 

Orient Insurance Co., Hartford, R. . A. Hancock, G. A., Atlanta, Ga.; 
Albert J. Brapie, S. A., Montgomery, Ala. 

Pennsylvania Fire Insurance Co., Philadelphia, W. W. Graves, S. A., 
Montgomery. Ala. 

Phenix Insurance Co., Brooklyn, N. Y., H. C. Stockdell, G. A., Atlanta, 
Ga. ; E- K. McDowell. S. A., Birmingham. 

Phoenix Insurance Co., Hartford, J. S. Raine, Atlanta, Ga. 



MISCELLANEOUS STATISTICS. 379 

Providence Washington Ins. Co., Providence, Thames & Batre, G. A., 
Mobile, Ala. 

Queen Insurance Co., of, America, New York City, S. Y. Tupper, Manager 
So. Department, Atlanta, Ga. 

Rochester-German Insurance Co., Rochester, N. Y., Edwin G. Seibels, 
Manager, Columbia, S. C. 

St. Paul Fire & Marine Insurance Co., St. Paul, Minn., J. W. Cunning- 
ham, S. A., Birmingham, Ala. 

Shaw