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Full text of "Alberta, past and present : historical and biographical"




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ALBERTA 

PAST AND PRESENT 

HISTORICAL AND 
BIOGRAPHICAL 

31 u.^j ^l^n 




VOLUME II 
ILLUSTRATED 



CHICAGO, ILL. 
PIONEER HISTORICAL PUBLISHING CO. 

1924 






MADE IN U.S.A. 



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BIOGRAPHICAL 



HON. ALEXANDER CAMERON RUTHERFORD, K. C, LL. D. 

Hon. Alexander Cameron Rutherford, first Premier of the province 
of Alberta and a member of the senate of the University of Alberta since 
1907, is the senior partner in the firm of Rutherford, Jamieson, Ruther- 
ford & McCuaig, barristers and solicitors, which maintains offices in the 
McLeod building of Edmonton and in the Imperial Bank Chambers of 
Edmonton South. His birth occurred at Osgoode, Carleton county, On- 
tario, on the 2d of February, 1857, his parents being James and Elizabeth 
Rutherford. He received his early education in the public and high schools 
of Metcalfe, Ontario, continued his studies in Woodstock College of Wood- 
stock and prepared for a professional career in McGill University. The 
Hon. Dr. Rutherford engaged in law practice in Ottawa, Ontario, from 
1885 until 1895 and then came west to Strathcona (South Edmonton), 
Alberta. Here he has remained an active representative of the bar to the 
present time, now practicing as senior member of the firm of Rutherford, 
Jamieson, Rutherford & McCuaig. He is also a factor in business circles 
as director of the Canada National Fire Insurance Company, director of 
the Imperial Canadian Trust Company and director of the Great West 
Permanent Loan Company. He is a member and one of the founders of 
Local No. 1 of the United Farmers of Alberta. 

Dr. Rutherford was a member of the Ottawa Inter-Provincial Con- 
ference in 1906, vice president of the Dominion Lord's Day Alliance in 
1907 and also delegate to the Imperial Conference on Education in London, 
England, in the latter year. He was presented to the late King Edward 
and was specially invited to the Royal Garden Party at Windsor Castle 
in 1907. His public career has been of a varied and highly important 
character. He was elected to the legislative assembly of the Northwest 
Territories for Strathcona constituency in 1902 and three years later was 
elected to the legislative assembly of Alberta, to which he was reelected 
in 1907. On the formation of the province he was selected its first 
Premier by Lieutenant Governor Bulyea and was called to form a ministry 
on the 2d of September, 1905. He served as Premier, minister of educa- 
tion and provincial treasurer during the period between 1905 and 1910 
and resigned the Premiership on the 26th of May, of the latter year, 
owing to dissension in the ranks of Liberal members in the legislature. 
Under his regime as premier of Alberta the Normal College and Pro- 
vincial University were founded and all the institutions and machinery 
of government were established as in other -provinces of Canada. The 
Hon. Dr. Rutherford is an ardent supporter of high educational standards 



6 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

and is responsible more than any other man in Alberta for the found- 
ing of a state-controlled University and for keeping degree-granting power 
in the hands of the Provincial University. He was the first exponent of 
railway expansion for Alberta by guarantee of bonds and he encouraged 
agriculture, coal mining, judicious labor legislation, and state control of 
telephones. 

In 1888, in Ottawa, Ontario, the Hon. Dr. Rutherford was united 
in marriage to Miss Mattie Birkett, daughter of the late William Birkett. 
They are the parents of a son and a daughter, namely : Cecil, who served 
with the artillery in France and is a member of his father's law firm; 
and Hazel, the wife of Stanley H. McCuaig, of the firm of Rutherford, 
Jamieson, Rutherford & McCuaig. 

The Hon. Dr. Rutherford has been a Liberal-Conservative in politics 
since 1911, prior to which time he was a Liberal. He is a Baptist in 
religious faith. He is a fellow of the British Association for the Advance- 
ment of Science and the Royal Colonial Institute of London, England, 
honorary colonel of the One Hundred and Ninety-fourth Battalion of 
the Canadian Expeditionary Forces and was director of National Service 
for Alberta of the National Service Commission during the period of the 
Great war. The Montreal Herald referred to him as "a man of fine 
ability," while the Toronto Globe characterized him as "an honest, up 
right figure in politics. A big man physically and mentally with a radiant 
humor in his eyes, and lines of stubborn strength finely blended in his 
genial face." 



HERBERT GREENFIELD. 



In the person of Hon. Herbert Greenfield, Premier of Alberta, are 
combined the capacity for leadership and a knowledge of the agricultural 
situation in western Canada which qualify him preeminently for the posi- 
tion of official spokesman and political chief for the organized farmers* 
movement of this province. Mr. Greenfield is what is known in news- 
paper parlance as a "dirt" farmer. Nearly twenty years ago he came 
west to Alberta to take up a homestead, on which he has made his home 
ever since, developing it into one of the finest and most scientifically 
operated farms in this region and accomplishing this result by his own 
untiring efforts. Therefore he can speak of agricultural methods and 
problems with the calm assurance of the man who has tested out the 
former and employed ail of his mental and physical resources in the 
solution of the latter. He knows what the farmer in western Canada 
needs today, for he needs those very things himself. But the conscious- 
ness of a situation that needs remedying is only the first step in social 
and political reform. Once the diagnosis is properly made the remedy 
must be accurately prescribed if the condition is to be permanently im- 
proved. It is just here that Premier Greenfield stands out from the ranks 
of other men who have made a marked success of agriculture in Alberta. 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 7 

An early business experience in England gave him an insight into mer- 
chandising and marketing methods and practices possessed by few men 
in the agricultural field, a knowledge that enables him to test out proposed 
measures for the distribution of farm products and discard those that are 
not practicable in the world of affairs as they are. Moreover, wide study 
along these lines has familiarized him with every phase of the agricul- 
tural situation and brought to his attention plans that have been tried 
out in other countries to better the condition of this particular industry. 
He is, therefore, one who can devise and put into successful operation 
plans for advancing the interests of the industry he represents along lines 
that will be helpful to everyone concerned, farmer, middle man and ulti- 
mate consumer. As Alberta is as yet largely an agricultural region it is 
but natural that the organized farmers' movement should be a dominant 
force in the political life of the province, where in the high tide of its 
success it has put one of its own leaders into the office of premier. The 
Hon. Herbert Greenfield, a farmer of northern Alberta, was selected for 
the post and sworn in on the 13th of August, 1921. His course in the 
ensuing period has vindicated the position of the United Farmers As- 
sociation that there were men within the ranks of that organization who 
were entirely capable of assuming and effectively discharging the duties 
of the highest political offices in the provincial government. 

Premier Greenfield is an Englishman by birth. He was born in 1869 
in Winchester, and as a youth moved to the great city of London, with 
his parents, who took up their residence there. His early education, 
obtained in the common schools, has been supplemented in later years 
by extensive reading along general lines and serious study of those sub- 
jects that are of especial interest to him. When still a boy, however, he 
went to work in London in order to help his father and mother solve the 
problem of the family budget in a household of growing children. This 
early experience in office work was later to be invaluable to him. At 
the age of twenty-three Herbert Greenfield left his native land and set 
sail for Canada. In the Dominion he found employment at first with a 
farmer in Middlesex county, Ontario, and later went on to a farm in 
Lambton county in the same province, in this manner mastering the prac- 
tical features of agricultural life in Canada. 

It was in 1906 that Mr. Greenfield and his wife first came to Alberta. 
Here he located on a homestead a few miles south of the present town of 
Westlock that is still his home farm. While Mr. Greenfield was thus ad- 
vancing his own fortunes, he was helping in the development of the region 
with which he had cast his lot as a homesteader. All the public move- 
ments for government, schools, and the other things that make a modern, 
enlightened community had his support and cooperation. For years he 
was secretary and treasurer of the local school board in his district. Be- 
fore and since his election as premier he has taken a vigorous part in 
municipal public health affairs, working with particular zeal to procure 



8 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

municipal hospitals for the province. He was a Liberal in political views 
up to the time the farmers went into politics as an organized body and was 
a leader in the local party organizations from the first of the Pembina con- 
stituency. Meanwhile the agricultural societies were gaining in strength 
and reaching out in the scope of their activities. For years Mr. Green- 
field headed the Westlock Agricultural Society as president, while with 
the organization of the United Farmers Association and United Farm 
Women's Association he stepped into a place of political leadership as a 
spokesman for his own industry. To his wise counsel and able guidance 
this group owes much of its political success in the province. Cautious 
and conservative, even in the first flush of victory, he pointed out to his 
more enthusiastic associates the danger of assuming greater responsibili- 
ties than the newly formed organizations could bear, thus shaking the 
confidence of their own members as well as of the general public. As 
the associations grew in strength and their leaders became more experi- 
enced in political ways, he gave his support to the cause of the farmer in 
politics without reserve, throwing the whole weight of his personal influ- 
ence on that side of the contest in the political arena. The assistance he 
rendered the party contributed enormously to its success in public life 
in those early days of experimentation ; thus when the time came for one 
of its men to be chosen candidate for the premiership of the province, 
Herbert Greenfield had the solid backing of these two organizations. A 
successful canvass resulted in the election of the agricultural ticket and 
Mr. Greenfield was duly sworn in as premier. 

As a speaker Premier Greenfield is very effective. His oratory, while 
convincing, is not that of a political demagogue, but rather the forceful 
and clear expression of the ideas and views of a man who has thought 
his way through problems after looking at them from all sides and test- 
ing them with a remarkably keen intellect. He has a good grasp of 
politics, comprehends all phases of a situation quickly and acts with de- 
cision. His methods are always fair and aboveboard, while his charac- 
ter as a man is impeccable, a consideration not to be overlooked when 
selecting public leaders. 

In 1900 Mr. Greenfield was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth 
Harris of Adelaide, Ontario, who accompanied her husband to Alberta 
in 1906 and shared with him the fortunes and misfortunes of a home- 
steader's life. A wedded life that had extended over a period of more 
than twenty years was terminated by the death of Mrs. Greenfield, who 
passed away on the 10th of January, 1922. 



HON. ALEX ROSS. 



When the present Premier of Alberta, the Hon. Herbert Greenfield, 
formed his ministry on the 13th of August, 1921, the Hon. Alex Ross of 
Calgary was asked to accept the portfolio of minister of public works. At 
that time Mr. Ross had had a comparatively short career in the political 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 9 

arena of this province as member of the legislature from his district, to 
which office he was first elected in 1917. He came to the front in public 
life as a representative of labor and as its spokesman and leader defend- 
ed its interests in the legislative halls with a loyalty and ability that won 
him the whole-hearted approval of his constituents and the admiration 
of the leaders of the labor and farmer movement elsewhere in the prov- 
ince. It was, therefore, with general approbation that the news of his 
inclusion in the Greenfield ministry was received by the public. 

Alex Ross is a Scotchman by birth and spent his youth and early 
manhood in his native land. The son of James and Jessie (Thompson) 
Ross, he was born at Premnay, on the 15th of January, 1880. He was 
educated at Oyne, Aberdeenshire, following which he learned the trade of 
a stone mason. It was at the age of twenty-six that he set sail for 
America in 1906, and chose Canada as his future home. Here he con- 
tinued to work along the lines of stone masonry and in Calgary, which 
is his home city, he rose to a place of leadership among the laboring men 
that resulted in his entering politics on the labor ticket. He stood for 
election to the Alberta legislature as labor candidate in the general elec- 
tions of 1917 and was returned to that body for the first time. Four 
years later he was reelected to the office by acclamation on the 9th of 
December, 1921. As a member of the Greenfield ministry he has sup- 
ported the policies of his chief consistently and loyally and has stood out 
as one of the men whose interests were inseparably bound up in the labor 
cause. The duties of his office have been discharged promptly and with 
ability, the department of public works holding an excellent record for 
effective and constructive work in its branch of the public administration. 
The principles and platforms of Mr. Ross's party are too well known in 
the province to need explanation. It is sufficient to point out that Mr. 
Ross is one of those men whose public and personal career has been such 
that he has served to inspire the general public with confidence in the 
great industrial-political movement he represents. 



HON. CHARLES WILSON CROSS. 

Hon. Charles Wilson Cross, a member of the Edmonton bar and for a 
number of years prominently connected with the political history of the 
province, being still a member of the provincial legislature, was born at 
Madoc, Hastings county, Ontario, on the 30th of November, 1872, and 
comes of Scotch ancestry. His father, Thomas Cross, was a native of 
Aberdeen, Scotland, while his mother, who in her maidenhood was Miss 
Maria Mouncey, was born in Canada but of Scotch parentage. Thomas 
Cross became a prominent merchant of Madoc and a leading man in the 
life of that community. 

Reared under the parental roof, Charles W. Cross acquired his more 
advanced education in the Upper Canada College, in Toronto University 



10 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

and in Osgoode Hall, and after this thorough and complete equipment 
for his professional career, he decided to put his knowledge to the test in 
the west, as he felt that the opportunities in that section of the country 
were superior to those of the more thickly settled east. In 1897, there- 
fore, he made his way to Alberta and opened an office in Edmonton, where 
he at once entered upon the practice of law. Before long he had become 
a partner in the well known and prominent law firm of Short, Cross, 
Biggar & Ewing and almost from the beginning of his professional career 
he has enjoyed an extensive and growing practice, increasingly important 
as the years have passed by. His analytical mind enables him readily to 
understand the salient features of a case and his presentation of his cause 
before the courts is always clear, logical and convincing. 

From his arrival in the province he has taken an active interest in 
politics and in the fall of 1905 was elected a member of the provincial 
parliament in the Edmonton constituency. He was immediately appoint- 
ed attorney-general in the cabinet under Hon. A. C. Rutherford — a most 
distinguished honor for so young a man, but he proved adequate to the 
demands made upon him and his party never regretted having trusted 
the interests of the province in his hands. The public had the assurance 
that the rights of all would be protected and his course justified the faith 
that was reposed in him. He made a splendid record as attorney-general, 
his course constituting a most creditable chapter in the history of legal 
procedure in the province. Mr. Cross is still a member of the legislature 
but is not as active in politics as formerly, preferring* to devote his at- 
tention to the private practice of law. 



JOSEPH H. ROSS. 



Joseph H. Ross is well known in educational circles of Alberta, and as 
acting principal of the Calgary Institute of Technology & Art he is 
doing valuable and important work. He was born in Menstrie, Scotland. 
October 30, 1887, of the marriage of James and Elizabeth (Lindsay) 
Ross, who were also natives of that country. The father operated a mill 
in Scotland and remained in his native land until 1890, when he migrated 
to Canada. For a considerable period he was connected with the Ogilvie 
Mills at Montreal in the capacity of millwright and later organized the 
Laurentian Sand & Gravel Company at Melocheville, Quebec, successfully 
conducting that business until called to his final rest. His demise oc- 
curred in June, 1912, when he was fifty-four years of age. The mother 
is now residing in Calgary. 

Joseph H. Ross acquired his early education in the public schools of 
Beauharnois, Quebec, and afterward became a student at Shortell Acade- 
my at Montreal. After completing his course in that institution he became 
connected with electrical engineering, engaging in general construction 
work until 1911, when he came to Calgary as electrical inspector for 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 11 

the city which he had visited in 1906. For five years he filled that posi- 
tion and in 1916 he became an instructor at the Institute of Technology, 
being thus employed until 1918, when he enlisted for service in the World 
war He joined the Flying Corps and was stationed at the Engine Repair 
Park in Toronto, Ontario, until the close of the war. On his return to 
this city he took charge of the Calgary Retraining Center, now the In- 
stitute of Technology, which in 1920 was taken over by the provincial 
government, and he is now acting principal of that institution. He has 
been very successful as an instructor, imparting clearly and readily to 
others the knowledge he has acquired, and he is actuated by a spirit of 
progress that takes cognizance of all improved educational methods. 

On the 10th of October, 1911, Mr. Ross was united in marriage to 
Miss Grace Simpson and they have become the parents of two children: 
Sarah H., who was born on Christmas day of 1913; and Joseph, Jr., born 
April 9 1916 Mr. Ross reserves the right to vote independently, sup- 
porting' all movements and projects which he believes will advance the 
interests of good government. In religious faith he is a Presbyterian and 
his fraternal relations are with the Masons and the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows. He served as president of the International Brotherhood 
of Electrical Workers of Alberta in 1912 and for three years was presi- 
dent of the local branch of that organization. He is a member of the 
National Association of Electrical Contractors & Dealers and an associ- 
ate member of the Engineering Institute of Canada. He is much inter- 
ested in the agricultural development of Alberta and owns and operates 
a productive farm. He is conscientious and efficient in the discharge of 
his professional duties and holds to high standards in his educational 
work, in which connection he is doing effective public service. 



HARRY AUSTIN DRIGGS. 

Harry Austin Driggs has had an active, useful and eventful life, 
making each moment count for the utmost, and as warden of the provin- 
cial jail at Fort Saskatchewan he occupied a position of trust and re- 
sponsibility, which he capably filled for the past nine years, or until July 
1, 1923, when he was transferred to Lethbridge. Mr. Driggs is a native 
of the United States. He was born in Adrian, Michigan, July 13, 1872, 
a son of Edwin B. and Maggie (Hastings) Driggs, the former a native 
of the state of South Carolina and the latter of Scotland. The father was 
a farmer and stock raiser, following those pursuits in Michigan and Texas 
and gaining a position of leadership in his chosen line of activity. He 
specialized in pure bred stock and was the first breeder of Hereford cattle 
in the Wolverine state, securing his stock in England. 

Harry A. Driggs secured his education in Michigan, graduating from 
the Palmyra high school in 1891, and he afterward became a student at 
the Orchard Lake Military Academy, which he attended for two years. 



12 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

Subsequently he came to Canada, reaching Lethbridge, Alberta, in 1896, 
and for the next two years he worked as a cow-puncher. In 1898 he re- 
turned to the States and enlisted in the Thirty-first Michigan Volunteer 
Infantry, for service in the Spanish-American war, being stationed in 
the south until the cessation of hostilities. In 1899 he again made his way 
to Alberta and in the fall of that year engaged in ranching near Grassy 
Lake, in the Taber district. He held that property until 1908, when he 
disposed of it in order that he might give his attention to his other in- 
terests. In 1907 he had established a private bank at Grassy Lake and 
continued its operation until 1913, also conducting a general store dur- 
ing that period. In the spring of 1914 he was appointed warden of the 
new provincial jail at Fort Saskatchewan, in the Victoria district, and 
filled that position with efficiency and conscientiousness until he trans- 
ferred from Fort Saskatchewan prison on July 1, 1923, to Lethbridge. 
He has also done important work as a civil engineer, assisting in survey- 
ing the townsites for Magrath, Sterling, and Grassy Lake, of which he 
was first president, also first reeve of Eureka municipality, and he was 
likewise engaged by the Lethbridge Irrigation Company in survey work on 
their canal, remaining with them until the work was completed. 

Mr. Driggs was married in Michigan, on the 21st of February, 1900, 
to Miss Clara Anne Mitchell, a native of that state. He has attained the 
thirty-second degree in Scottish Rite Masonry and is an exemplary rep- 
resentative of the craft. He is faithful to the trust reposed in him and 
thoroughness and devotion to duty are his outstanding characteristics. 
He is regarded as a man of high moral character and substantial worth 
and the respect which is accorded him is well deserved. 



GEORGE WILLIAM KERBY, B. A., D. D. 

There are certain men who, without self-seeking, by the vigor and sin- 
cerity of their expressed convictions, draw to themselves an approving 
public attention. When to this magnetic quality of sensible candor they 
add a cheerful willingness to strive for the realization of their ideals, they 
become a powerful force for good. Such a man is Dr. George W. Kerby, 
author, minister, lecturer and educator, who for the past twelve years 
has been president of Mount Royal College of Calgary. He was born in 
Sombra township, in the province of Ontario, a son of Nelson and Hester 
Ann Kerby, and after completing a course in the Sarnia high school, at- 
tended the Cobourg Collegiate Institute. He is an honor graduate in arts, 
of Victoria University, affiliated with the University of Toronto, and at 
the convocation of 1911 received from the former institution the degree 
of Doctor of Divinity. Following his ordination to the ministry of the 
Methodist church he occupied prominent pulpits in Woodstock, Hamilton, 
St. Catharines and Brantford, Ontario, and at Montreal, Quebec. 

In July, 1903, Dr. Kerby came to Alberta and for twenty years he 




GEORGE W. KERBY, D. D. 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 15 

has been a resident of Calgary, serving for eight years of that period as 
pastor of Central church, which was built under his ministry and is one 
of the largest institutional churches in the Dominion, with an overflowing 
cosmopolitan congregation. In 1911 he became the founder of Mount 
Royal College, of which he has been president since its beginning, and 
through his untiring efforts a splendid coeducational institution, doing 
vital work for the young people of western Canada, has been developed. 
Dr. Kerby is the possessor of literary ability of a high order and is 
the author of several publications and magazine articles, including 
"The Broken Trail," a story of the west. It is filled with stirring inci- 
dents, graphically related and dramatically presented. It is a book with 
a mission, containing a message for the times, and should find a place in 
the library of every home in western Canada. His other publications 
are: "Keep a Grip on Harry"; "A Study in Faces"; "The Birds"; "The 
Cavan Blazers" ; "Religion and Education — a New Rennaissance Needed" ; 
"Difficulties in Western Education"; "The Boy and His Father"; "The 
New Age and the Spirit of Unrest" ;"The New Canadianism" ; "Religion 
and Business" ; "The Parting of the Ways" ; and a series of eleven articles 
on schools, colleges and universities in the United States, published in 
the Daily Albertan of Calgary. He is an eloquent and impressive speaker 
and has become well known as a lecturer, appearing before chambers of 
commerce in many cities and before young people's gatherings, being a 
recognized leader in work for young men. An address on "International 
Comradeship," which he delivered before the Chicago Association of Com- 
merce, was published in full in the Chicago Journal of Commerce and 
the British American of that city, as well as in several Canadian papers. 
The late George Sutherland, editor of the British American, made the 
following comment on the speech : "Dr. Kerby delivered the finest ad- 
dress ever given before the Chicago Association of Commerce. The big 
banquet hall of the La Salle Hotel was packed by Chicago leaders of in- 
dustry. The audience cheered again and again through the delivery of 
the speech and at its conclusion rose in a body, waving handkerchiefs 
and cheering Dr. Kerby for fully five minutes. As the luncheon broke 
up, hundreds rushed forward to the speaker to shake his hand and warmly 
congratulate him." Dr. Kerby has traveled extensively in the British 
Isles and on the European continent. On his return to Canada he deliv- 
ered a series of addresses on his travels, in which connection the follow- 
ing comments were made by the press of the city of Calgary: "Rarely 
if ever in Canada has there been such absorbing interest in a series of 
lectures. Every nook and corner of the big auditorium was filled, even 
to the choir gallery. Large numbers of people with their money in their 
hands had to be turned away." "He has certainly discovered the golden 
secret of capturing and holding the ears and hearts of the people. Ter- 
ribly in earnest himself and throwing into all his work and words a won- 
derful electrical energy, he inspires his listeners to a degree excelled by 
few living Canadian orators." Dr. Kerby has also written several poems 
of merit, which have appeared in various publications, a partial list of 



16 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

his contributions being as follows: "They Blazed the Trail For Us"; 
"Brotherhood"; "Abraham Lincoln"; "A Reverie"; "The Master Mind"; 
"Friendship's Garden"; and "Pauline Johnson's Grave." 

Dr. Kerby was largely instrumental in starting ten Methodist churches 
in this city and has become known as "The Father of Methodism" in 
Calgary. He was also the father and founder of the "Men's Own," and 
was recently elected fraternal delegate from the Methodist church of 
Canada to the Methodist Episcopal church, South, in the United States. 
He is a member of the church union committee and in 1906-7 was presi- 
dent of the Alberta Methodist conference, while from 1910 until 1917 he 
was assistant secretary of the General Conference of the Methodist 
church of Canada. 

Dr. Kerby is still in the prime of life and is an enthusiastic Canadian, 
with an international vision of world problems. He takes a great interest 
in community and national affairs and from 1914 until 1917 was a trustee 
of the Calgary public schools. He was chairman, of the local board of 
education in 1915-16 and has also been a trustee of the Calgary General 
Hospital, and is chairman of the local committee of the National Council 
of Education. He is a member of the Calgary Board of Trade and has 
been honored with the presidency of the Rotary Club. He is also con- 
nected with the Canadian Club and the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows and is prominent in Masonry. He is a past master of Zetland Lodge, 
No. 83, A. F. & A. M., and from 1915 until 1918 served as grand chaplain 
of the Grand Lodge of Alberta. During the World war he was chief 
recruiting officer in Military District, No. 13, and district representative 
under the military service act. He holds the honorary titles of major 
and chaplain and is also president of the local chapter of the Red Cross 
Society. He is serving as vice president of the Canadian National Au- 
thors Society and is chairman of the Calgary branch of that organization. 

Dr. Kerby is a frequent speaker before the Provincial Teachers' and 
Trustees' Association, of both eastern and western Canada. 

Of his address at the Ontario Educational Association, and the Cana- 
dian National Conference on Education and Citizenship, the Toronto 
Globe says: "It is encouraging to have so broadly a Canadian deliverance 
from an educational leader in the west, and so pronounced a repudiation 
of local, religious and racial sectionalism." While the Mail and Empire 
said: "Dr. Kerby of Calgary pronounced perhaps the greatest oration 
that the association has heard in some years. His gibbeting of the rural 
reactionary will contribute not a little to a forward movement." 

The press in general speaks of Dr. Kerby's Chautauqua address on 
"The Task of a Nation", given in the leading centers of Ontario and 
the west, as a real contribution to our Canadian national life and ideals. 
He is described as "The embodiment of the Canadian Spirit — a fervent 
idealist who believes in education as the means of developing the Cana- 
dian boy and girl, the greatest of all our resources." 

On October 11, 1888, Dr. Kerby married Miss Emily Spencer, a daugh- 
ter of the Rev. James Spencer, M. A., deceased. Dr. and Mrs. Kerby 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 17 

have become the parents of two children: Mrs, Arthur J, Cowan, B. A., 
of Vancouver, British Columbia; and H. Spencer Kerby, B. A., S. C, of 
the Royal Air Service of Great Britain. Dr. Kerby has never been an idle 
sentimentalist, but a worker, and the lofty ideals which he cherishes find 
embodiment in practical effort for their adoption. Fine personal gifts 
are his and he has spared no labor to make full use of his powers, which 
have been unselfishly devoted to the service of others. He is a broad- 
gauged man and every possible moment of his life has been given to ad- 
vancing the interests of humanity along the line of charitable thought 
and action, that there may be a recognition of the ties of brotherhood 
and appreciation of each other. 



COLONEL FREDERICK CHARLES JAMIESON. 

High on the roll of the leading representatives of the Alberta bar 
appears the name of Colonel Frederick Charles Jamieson of Edmonton, 
nor is interest in his personal history confined to what he has accom- 
plished as a representative of the legal profession, for there is also a 
most interesting military chapter, while a public-spirited devotion to the 
general good is one of his marked characteristics. A native of Carleton 
county, Ontario, he was born May 18, 1875, and is a son of James and 
Mary Ann (Craig) Jamieson. His mother is a native of the north of 
Ireland but was brought to Canada in her infancy and is now living at 
Edmonton with her son. Dr. A. E. Jamieson. The father, who has de- 
parted this life, was born in Carleton county, Ontario, and for many 
years devoted his life to the cultivation of the old homestead which his 
father had taken up from the government in 1820, the family having 
been one of the first to settle in that part of Canada, and with the pioneer 
development of the region the representatives of the name were actively 
and helpfully identified. 

Frederick Charles Jamieson pursued his education in the schools near 
his father's home and at Kemptville, Ontario, and then took up the pro- 
fession of teaching, which he followed for two years in his native prov- 
ince. It was in 1895, when twenty years of age, that he heard and heeded 
the call of the west. Recognizing the opportunities that were offered 
in this unsettled but rapidly developing section of the country, he came 
to Alberta and secured a homestead at Lacombe, on which he remained 
for two years. In January, 1896, he removed to Edmonton and began 
the study of law under the direction and in the office of A. C. Rutherford, 
while later his preceptor was S. S. Taylor, K. C. He also studied for a 
time with Judge H. C. Taylor and thus his training was thorough and 
comprehensive. On the 1st of August, 1899, he entered upon the active 
practice of his profession in connection with Hon. A. C. Rutherford, with 
whom he has been associated to the present time, the firm now being Ruth- 
erford, Jamieson, Rutherford & McCraig. Mr. Jamieson has an extensive 



18 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

clientele both in Edmonton and the surrounding- country and is notably 
successful in the handling of cases, being regarded as a most wise coun- 
selor as well as an able advocate. 

Early in his professional career interruption came in the shape of mili- 
tary service, for Mr. Jamieson is one of the Canadian veterans of the 
South African war. In 1900 he joined the Canadian Mounted Rifles 
under the command of Lieutenant Colonel T. D. B. Evans and spent a 
year in military duty. He returned in 1901 and resumed practice with 
Mr. Rutherford but throughout the intervening period has always mani- 
fested active interest in the local militia and in 1906 organized a squadron 
of Mounted Rifles at Strathcona, which organization is now included in 
the Nineteenth Alberta Dragoons, which Colonel Jamieson commanded 
for a term of five years. At the formation of the First Canadian Divi- 
sion, Colonel Jamieson was given command of Divisional Mounted troops, 
with which he served overseas until July, 1916, with the rank of lieuten- 
ant colonel. During the remainder of the war he was on staff duty in 
Canada and the United States. In September, 1918, he was appointed 
to the command of the Two Hundred and Sixtieth Battalion which formed 
part of the Canadian Expeditionary Forces to Siberia. He retains his in- 
terest in military affairs as colonel of the Twenty-ninth Infantry Brigade, 
Canadian Militia. 

In the year following his return from military service in South Africa, 
Colonel Jamieson was married to Miss Ann V. C. MacLeod of Edmonton 
and they have one son, Kenneth. Fraternally Colonel Jamieson is a 
Mason and is a member of the Loyal Orange Association. In politics he is 
a Conservative. He has held few public offices but for a period of six 
years was city solicitor for the city of Strathcona prior to its amalgama- 
tion with Edmonton, his professional ability making his service in this 
connection of marked value to the municipality. 



PERCY W. ABBOTT. 



Percy W. Abbott, senior partner of the firm of Abbott & McLaughlin, 
barristers and solicitors of Edmonton, his highly developed capability 
bringing him to a notable place in professional circles, was born in Lucan, 
Ontario, on the 29th of April, 1882, his parents being Thomas and Alice 
Maria (Powe) Abbott. His youthful days were largely devoted to the 
acquirement of his preliminary education in the public and high schools 
of Lucan, after which he attended the Regina Normal School and thus 
laid a broad and substantial foundation upon which to build the super- 
structure of professional knowledge. Having determined upon the prac- 
tice of law as a life work, he began reading with the firm of Taylor & 
Boyle and was admitted to the bar in 1909. Opening' an office in Edmon- 
ton in the same year, he has continued in active and successful practice 
here and he entered upon his present partnership relation in 1917, the 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 19 

firm of Abbott & McLaughlin holding enviable place at the Alberta bar, 
as indicated in the court records in the many favorable verdicts which 
they have won. 

In 1908 Mr. Abbott was married to Miss Margaret Louise Pearl Mc- 
Intyre of Edmonton and they have become parents of three daughters, 
namely: Winifred Margaret, Doris Loraine and Madeline Claire. 

Mr. Abbott is a leading member of the Edmonton Club, and he be- 
longs also to the Edmonton Golf & Country Club. He likewise has mem- 
bership with the Independent Order of Foresters and is past high chief 
ranger. He is identified with the Ancient Order of United Workmen and 
with the Masonic fraternity and the nature of his interests and the rules 
that govern his conduct are further indicated in the fact that he has mem- 
bership relation with the Young Men's Christian Association. In 1920-21 
he served as alderman of his city, and in 1921-22 he was president of 
the Edmonton Board of Trade, and at all times he manifests an active and 
helpful interest in everything that pertains to the welfare and upbuilding 
of the municipality or tends to advance its material, intellectual, social 
and moral progress. 



HON. P. EDMOND LESSARD. 

Hon. P. Edmond Lessard, who has left the stamp of his genius and 
ability upon the development of the Northwest and who is a citizen of 
whom Edmonton has every reason to be proud, was born at Cranbourne, 
in Dorchester county, Quebec, on the 3d of February, 1873, his parents 
being Jean P. and Annie Campbell (Davidson) Lessard. The father is 
a native of St. Joseph, Beauce county, Quebec, and his birth occurred 
on the 4th of August, 1838. He is now living with his son in Edmonton, 
at the advanced age of eighty-four years. In his early life he was a 
contractor and later became a successful farmer. He was a son of Leger 
Lessard, who was also born at St. Joseph and who passed away many 
years ago but lived to celebrate his golden wedding anniversary some time 
before his demise. The mother of P. Edmond Lessard was born in Quebec 
and was left an orphan when but three years of age. She passed away 
in Cranbourne, in the province of Quebec, in October, 1910, when she 
had reached the age of seventy years. 

At the usual age P. Edmond Lessard became a pupil in the public 
schools of Cranbourne, passing through consecutive grades and thus 
qualifying for entrance into Mount St. Louis College of Montreal, in which 
he pursued a commercial and scientific course, being graduated with the 
class of 1902. When his college days were over he turned to the business 
world and secured a position as bookkeeper in a mercantile house, devot- 
ing his attention to that line of activity in the east until 1898, which year 
witnessed his arrival in Edmonton. Throughout the intervening period 
he has been closely associated with the development and progress of this 



20 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

section of the country. Here he became a bookkeeper for the firm of 
Gariepy & Chenier. After two years the junior partner sold his interest 
in the business to Mr. Brosseau and at that time Mr. Lessard was made 
manager for the firm, occupying the position for two years, when he pur- 
chased the interest of Mr. Brosseau and thus entered into partnership 
with Mr. Gariepy. The business was successfully conducted until 1910, 
when they sold all of their interests save one store in the country and Mr. 
Lessard turned his attention to real estate, insurance, loans and the under- 
writing stock business. The same thoroughness and close application 
which had characterized his work in former years now constituted a dis- 
tinct source of success in this connection. He carefully systematized and 
organized his interests and his wise management and thoroughly reliable 
methods brought to him many clients, which made his business one of 
substantial proportions and of gratifying profit. A man of broad business 
vision, Mr. Lessard, however, did not confine his attention solely to one 
line but became interested in various other enterprises which have been 
contributing factors to the growth and upbuilding of this section. He 
was sole proprietor of two stores in the country and he and his partner, 
Mr. Gariepy, became extensively interested in Edmonton realty. Asso- 
ciated with Senator Roy, Mr. Lessard established the weekly "Le Courier 
de L'Ouest" and built up the business until there was a circulation of eight 
thousand copies of this paper, with Mr. Lessard as the managing director 
of the business. He also became interested in and was elected to the 
directorate of the Western Garment Company, Limited, of Edmonton, 
manufacturing shirts and overalls for the northern trade and enjoying an 
extensive patronage almost from the beginning. These various activi- 
ties of Mr. Lessard have constituted most important elements in the 
steady business development and material growth of the province. At 
all times he has readily discriminated between the essential and the non- 
essential in business affairs and has manifested marked ability in co- 
ordinating seemingly unrelated interests into a harmonious whole. He 
enjoys an unassailable reputation for integrity as well as progressiveness 
and his marked executive ability has enabled him to carry forward to 
successful completion whatever he has undertaken. In addition to his 
other interests he is president of the Imperial Agencies, which are doing 
a general brokerage and loan business, and he is now devoting much of 
his time to this undertaking, in association with M. A. Boileau and Leo 
Savard. He is also president of St. Paul Mercantile, Limited, St. Paul, 
Alberta. 

In November, 1900, occurred the marriage of Mr. Lessard and l^Iiss 
Helen Gariepy of Edmonton and they have become parents of five chil- 
dren : Albertine, Arthur, Alice, Bertha, and Paul. The social position of 
the family is an enviable one and Mr. Lessard has also figured promi- 
nently in connection with church activities and public affairs. He was 
president of St. Jean Baptist Society for one term and he is interested in 
all that has to do with civic interests and activities. For two terms he 
was a trustee of the separate schools and the cause of education has al- 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 21 

ways found in him a stalwart champion. He has been vice president of 
the Board of Trade and was a member of the provincial leg:islature in 

1909, while in October of that year he was made minister without port- 
folio of the Rutherford cabinet, resigning his position, however, in May, 

1910, at the time that Premier Rutherford resigned. Mr. Lessard is still 
a member of the provincial parliament for the constituency of St. Paul 
and his devotion to the public welfare, combined with the splendid quali- 
ties that he has shown in other directions, make him a splendid repre- 
sentative of Canadian manhood and chivalry. 



JOSEPH J. DUGGAN. 



Joseph J. Duggan is numbered among those who typify the spirit of 
progress in Edmonton and during the period of his residence here he has 
made his influence count as a forceful factor in advancing the interests 
of the city along many lines. He was born in Radnorshire, Wales, in 
1873, and his parents, Thomas and Frances (Williams) Duggan, were 
also natives of that country. The father was the proprietor of a noted 
summer resort frequented by many of Great Britain's most distinguished 
men. ex-Premier Lloyd George often being entertained there. Mr. and 
Mrs. Duggan were active and helpful members of the Baptist church and 
in politics he was a Liberal. His public spirit found expression in effective 
service for his community and he was a member of the city council and 
also acted as chairman of the school board. He was the father of four- 
teen children, seven sons and seven daughters, the subject of this review 
being the eldest member of the family residing in Canada. H. O. Duggan 
lives at Medicine Hat, Alberta, where he is engaged in the real estate 
business, and D. M. Duggan is mayor of Edmonton. The seventh daugh- 
ter married Gilbert Blackstock, a prominent representative of the legal 
profession and also a resident of Medicine Hat. 

Joseph J. Duggan acquired his education in the public schools of 
Wales and on starting out in the business world he entered the field of 
merchandising, successfully following that business in his native land 
for fifteen years. In 1912 he arrived in Edmonton, where he opened a 
real estate office, and in the intervening period of eleven years he has 
negotiated many important realty transfers, conducting his operations on 
a large scale. His judgment is rarely at fault concerning the value of 
property and its possible rise or diminution in price and his investments 
are proving a profitable source of income. 

In 1904 Mr. Duggan was united in marriage to Miss Bessie Evans, 
also a native of Wales, and a vocalist of unusual ability. At the Chicago 
World's Fair in 1893 she won first prize as a contralto soloist and she also 
sang at the White House before Mrs. McKinley. She likewise appeared 
at Brooklyn Tabernacle and later made a three months' tour of the United 
States, winning favor with the public and laudatory notices from mu- 



22 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

sical critics. After visiting the States, Mrs. Duggan had the honor of 
singing before England's queen and she is now a successful teacher of 
voice in Edmonton. She was a pupil of the noted vocal instructor. Madam 
Clara Novello Davies, now a resident of New York city, and she is a 
medalist of the Royal Academy of Music, London. In musical circles of 
Edmonton she occupies a position of leadership, being president of the 
Ladies' Musical Club. Mr. and Mrs. Duggan have a son, Kenneth, who 
is a student at Alberta College. 

Mr. Duggan is a member of the Presbyterian church and his political 
views are in accord with the platform and principles of the Liberal party. 
The cause of education finds in him a strong champion and he has served 
as chairman of the finance committee of the Edmonton School Board, 
while in 1921 he was vice chairman of the Edmonton Hospital Board. 
He is a Master Mason and is also a member of the Edmonton Board of 
Trade. He possesses the initiative, self-reliance and foresight which have 
always characterized the men who have established important business 
enterprises and is one of the best known and most reliable realtors in 
Edmonton. His interests and activities have been directed along those 
lines which have for their object public improvement and the advance- 
ment of the general welfare and his course has at all times marked him 
as a citizen of worth. 



REV. JAMES MCCAFFREY. 

Rev. James McCaffrey, a priest of the Catholic faith at Lethbridge, 
was born in Lowell, Massachusetts, a son of James and Mary (Gallagher) 
McCafi'rey, both of whom were natives of Ireland, in which country they 
were reared and married. They crossed the Atlantic and took up their 
abode in the United States in the '40s and there the father followed the 
trade of wool sorting, to which business he devoted his life. He was a 
son of James McCaffrey, who engaged in farming in Ireland. The mother 
was a daughter of John Gallagher, who passed away on the old family 
homestead in the Green Isle of Erin. To James and Mary McCaffrey were 
born eleven children, five of whom are living. Father McCaffrey of this 
review being the eighth in order of birth. The family adhered faithfully 
to the Catholic church and the father was also identified with the Ancient 
Order of Hibernians, while his political allegiance was given to the dem- 
ocratic party. 

His son and namesake, James McCaffrey, obtained his early educa- 
tion in the parochial schools of Lowell, Massachusetts, and then attended 
the Holy Angels College at Buft'alo, New York, where he studied in prep- 
aration for the priesthood and was ordained in 1906. His ordination 
took place in Saskatchewan and he was assigned to his first charge at 
Prince Albert. There he remained for twelve years as assistant and as 
priest and he also had charge of the orphanage before being appointed to 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 23 

the position of assistant priest. In 1916 he came to Lethbridge, where 
he took charge of St. Patrick's church. The parish has three hundred 
families and there are about five hundred pupils in the two schools, which 
are connected with the parish. 

Father McCaffrey belongs to the Knights of Columbus. He became a 
naturalized citizen of Canada in 1904 and he has exerted considerable in- 
fluence over public thought and action here. He is at the head of St. 
Patrick's church, with three assistant priests under his direction, Father 
Cazanet being the first assistant, with Father Hermes as missionary and 
Father Bedeault also as missionary. The last named, however, is now 
in France. Under the guidance of Father McCaffrey the work of the 
church is steadily growing and it is his plan to erect a house of worship 
for the parish. 



ARTHUR H. RUSSELL, K. C. 

Arthur H. Russell, King's Counsel, is one of the most prominent crimi- 
nal lawyers in the province of Alberta, and is a resident of Red Deer, 
where he has lived since 1911. He was born in' Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, 
on the 27th of May, 1884, a son of Benjamin and Louise E. (Coleman) 
Russell, likewise natives of Nova Scotia, the former well known in legal 
circles. He was engaged in the practice of law on his own account until 
he was appointed to the bench in Nova Scotia, and he is still serving on 
the bench. He is an authority on contracts, bills, notes and cheques, 
and he is associate editor of an important legal work published under the 
name of the English and Empire Digest. Mr. Justice Russell until re- 
cently lectured in the Dalhousie Law School. He received his early educa- 
tion in Halifax and was graduated with the M. A. degree from Mount 
Allison University, Nova Scotia. He immediately became prominent in 
legal circles and later was a dominant factor in political circles. He was 
a member of parliament from Halifax and Hants counties for eight years, 
from 1896 to 1904. He has always been a stanch supporter of the Liberal 
party. 

In the acquirement of his early education Arthur H. Russell attended 
the Mount Allison Academy and University and in 1908 was graduated 
from the Dalhousie Law School. He immediately began practice, locating 
in Shelburne, Nova Scotia, but he remained there only six months, at the 
termination of which time he came to the province of Alberta and settled 
in Vegreville. He was admitted to the bar in this province in 1910 and 
in the same year became associated with F. A. Morrison, now judge of 
the district court, for the practice of law. That partnership was main- 
tained one year and in 1911 Mr. Russell came to Red Deer as crown prose- 
cutor. He resigned that position some time later and since that time has 
devoted most of his time and attention to criminal law. He has won well 
merited success in this branch of the profession and is readily conceded 



24 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

to be one of the representative criminal lawyers in the province. On 
the 4th of February, 1919, Mr. Russell was appointed King's Counsel. 
He devotes his entire time and attention to his profession, of which he is 
a constant student, and he has a fine library. 

In 1911 was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Russell to Miss Kathleen 
Gertrude Roberts, a daughter of John and Jessie (Porter) Roberts of 
Seaforth, Ontario. Mrs. Russell was educated in that community and 
lived there until her marriage. To the union of Mr. and Mrs. Russell 
three children have been born: Frances Louise, Benjamin, and Kathleen. 

In his political views Mr. Russell is a stanch Liberal and he maintains 
an active interest in party affairs, being well informed on all important 
questions and issues of the day. Fraternally he is identified with the In- 
dependent Order of Odd Fellows. 



SAMUEL H. ADAMS, B. A., K. C. 

For thirteen years Samuel H. Adams has successfully practiced law 
at Calgary and civic affairs have also occupied much of his attention. 
He is now serving for the second term as mayor of his city and has also 
filled other public offices of trust and responsibility, the duties of which 
he has ably discharged. He was born at West Flamboro, Ontario, Sep- 
tember 3, 1879, a son of Samuel and Mary J. (Loughery) Adams, natives 
of County Tyrone, Ireland, the mother having been brought to Canada 
by her parents when she was five years of age. The father emigrated to 
the Dominion when a young man of nineteen years, locating at West 
Flamboro, in the province of Ontario, where he acquired a farm, which 
he continued to cultivate until his demise in 1909. The mother is still 
living and has reached the advanced age of eighty-five years. They were 
the parents of six sons and one daughter, five of whom survive. 

In the acquirement of an education Samuel H. Adams attended the 
public school of West Flamboro and the high school at Dundas, Ontario, 
and during 1898 he was a student in the Normal School at Winnipeg, 
Manitoba. The next three years were devoted to teaching school at Sper- 
ling, Manitoba, and in 1902 he entered Manitoba University, from which 
he was graduated in 1906, with the degree of Bachelor of Arts. While 
attending that institution of learning he taught for two summer ses- 
sions at Russell and Strathclair, Manitoba, and in the fall of 1906 he 
came to Calgary, Alberta, taking up the study of law in the offices of 
Bernard & Bernard and Jones & Nichols. He completed his course in 
1909 and then became a member of the firm of Jones, Rescod & Adams, 
with which he was identified until 1917, when the partnership was dis- 
solved. He practiced alone until 1920, when he became associated with 
I. F. Fitch, and the firm of Adams & Fitch has been continued, a liberal 
clientele being accorded them. Mr, Adams has been created a King's 
Counsel and is a talented representative of his profession. Thorough- 



* M>i > a fi Mi im w «s^g > y L 'ff ^ ^y^ iigr^T te gyir^^ ^ ^ WBSffiH ^ J p^l'^gg^^^ ?trg«fw> r =» TOg ^^ '^S' i^ ^yagCTOgt 




SAMUEL H. ADAMS, K. C. 



V^ 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 27 

ness is one of his outstanding characteristics and it is manifest in the 
preparation of his cases, while in his presentation of a cause he seems to 
lose sight of no point that has a bearing upon the interest of his client. 

On December 27, 1910, Mr. Adams was united in marriage to Miss 
Margaret N. Ross, a daughter of David F. and Margaret Ross, natives of 
Owen Sound, Ontario, The father was a pioneer missionary, working 
for the spiritual uplift of the Indians. His demise occurred in 1921. Mr. 
and Mrs. Adams have four children : Jesse V. M. M., Muriel, Fanny L. 
and Ruth. Mr. Adams has always taken an active interest in political 
matters and for five years was president of the Calgary Liberal Associa- 
tion, while he has also served the East Calgary Federal Association and 
the North Calgary Provincial Association in a similar capacity. He has 
never been neglectful of the duties of citizenship and for five years was a 
member of the board of aldermen of Calgary, while since 1921 he has 
filled the office of mayor. The welfare of the city is his first concern and 
he is exerting every effort to give to the municipality a good, clean gov- 
ernment, standing at all times for progress, reform and improvement. 
In this connection the following excerpt from one of the local papers will 
no doubt prove of interest to the readers of this volume: "It will be 
remembered that the present mayor of Calgary several years ago first 
saw the city from the hurricane deck of his trusty bicycle. It was a 
Whittington-like entrance for the twice mayor of this great city, but it 
was not chronicled at that time, for bicycling was very common." Mr. 
Adams is a member of the Presbyterian church and since 1911 has been 
chairman of the board of managers of Hillhurst Presbyterian church. 
He is identified with the Calgary Bar Association and his fraternal rela- 
tions are with the Knights of Pythias, the Benevolent Protective Order 
of Elks and the Loyal Orange Association, while the nature of his recrea- 
tion is indicated by his connection with the St. Andrew's Golf Club. En- 
dowed by nature with a keen intellect, he has used his powers not only 
to further his individual interests but also to advance the general welfare, 
and his is a well rounded development. 



STEPHEN DILLINGHAM. 

Since 1920 Stephen Dillingham has been editor of the Macleod Times 
and Weekly News. He is one of the many business men of modern times 
who base their success on special efficiency, and he is achieving well- 
merited success. He was born near Lindsay, Ontario, on the 1st of June, 
1872, a son of Sidney and Sarah Jane (Smith) Dillingham, the former a 
native of Toronto and the latter of Belleville, Ontario. The father was 
engaged in the lumber business for many years. He operated a mill in 
Ontario for some time and later entered the retail lumber business in 
Wawanesa, Manitoba. His demise occurred at the age of sixty-five years, 
and his wife died at the age of sixty-two. She was a member of the 



28 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

Quaker church. To Mr. and Mrs. Dillingham four children were born, 
one of whom died in infancy. The living children are : H. C, who is a 
printer and publisher at Innisfail, Alberta ; Stephen, whose name intro- 
duces this review; and Esther, who is the wife of Ernest Reeves of Win- 
nipeg. 

In the acquirement of his education Stephen Dillingham attended the 
public schools of his birthplace and was graduated from the high school 
at Minden, Ontario. In 1886 he removed to Manitoba and for four years 
lived on and farmed the homestead of his father. In 1890 he began to learn 
the printing trade, working on the Brandon Times at Brandon, Manitoba, 
for three years. In 1898 he established the Brandon Independent and 
published it for two years, at the termination of which time he sold it. 
He then went to the United States and was foreman on various papers 
throughout the country. He was manager of the Grand Forks Plaindealer 
of Grand Forks, North Dakota, for one year, and in 1907 he returned 
to Canada, locating in Saskatchewan. He was editor of the Langham 
Times and published a paper at Aberdeen in 1909. He then established 
the Biggar World, which he published for one and one-half years and for 
a like period he was publisher of the Saskatchewan Herald. For some 
time thereafter Mr. Dillingham worked at the mechanical end of the 
trade. On the 9th of March, 1920, he established the Macleod Times and 
Weekly News and is manager and editor of this sheet, which has a cir- 
culation of twelve hundred. In connection with the printing of the paper 
Mr. Dillingham handles much job printing. He is a man of high prin- 
ciples and deserves the support of his fellow townsmen. 

On September 22, 1898, Mr. Dillingham was married to Miss Clara 
Jane Bayne, a native of the vicinity of Windsor, Ontario. To their union 
eight children have been born, all of whom are living: Virginia, who is 
the wife of P. A. McFarquahar, is residing near Macleod ; the others 
are: John, Neil, Clara, Hope, Alice, Faith and Charity. 

Mr. Dillingham follows an independent course in politics and his paper 
is independent. He takes an active interest in local affairs and through 
the Times has rendered Macleod substantial aid. His religious faith is 
that of the Church of England. 



JOHN DARLEY HARRISON, M. D. 

For more than thirty years Dr. John Darley Harrison has engaged in 
the practice of medicine and surgery in Edmonton. During the latter 
part of this period he has largely specialized in surgery and has gained a 
place of notable distinction and prominence in this field. Back of his 
success lies comprehensive and thorough college training, supplemented 
by later investigation, research and reading, whereby he has kept in touch 
with the latest theories and discoveries of the profession. His life work 
has indeed been of value and service to his fellowmen and his entire 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 29 

record reflects credit and honor upon the profession, of which he is a 
representative. He was born in Horton Landing, Nova Scotia, on the 
27th of August, 1866. Dr. Harrison's father was the chancellor bf the 
University of New Brunswick and there the son pursued his advanced 
education after completing his preliminary work in the public schools. 
Following his graduation from that university he entered upon prepara- 
tion for the practice of medicine in McGill University at Montreal and 
completed his medical course as a member of the class of 1891. He was 
then appointed house surgeon of the Montreal General Hospital, where 
he continued until the spring of 1892, gaining that valuable knowledge 
and experience which is never so quickly acquired in any other way as 
in hospital practice. 

In June of the latter year Dr. Harrison left the east and came to Al- 
berta, settling at Edmonton, where he has remained. Here he continued 
in general practice for an extended period but during the last few years 
has concentrated his attention and efl'orts largely upon surgery. He took 
postgraduate work in Europe in 1906 and has been a constant student of 
the science of medicine. He belongs to the Academy of Medicine and 
is also a fellow of the American College of Surgeons. 

Dr. Harrison is likewise one of the board of governors of the Uni- 
versity of Alberta. He belongs to the Rotary Club and to the Elks lodge, 
and his activities and interests are broad and varied. He has ever been 
actuated by a most generous spirit that has prompted his ready assist- 
ance to individuals or causes that he deems worthy of help. No project 
for the welfare or benefit of his adopted city seeks his aid in vain and 
his influence has constituted an example that many have followed. Every- 
where he is spoken of in terms of the highest respect and regard and with- 
out invidious distinction he may well be classed as one of the most honored 
and representative men of Edmonton. 



H. SPENCER KERBY, D. S. C, A. F. C. 

Canada may well be proud of the heroism and bravery exhibited by 
her sons in the World war, and the nation of tomorrow will be composed 
of stalwart men who have been forged in the fires of experience and have 
come forth ready to bear the heaviest burden of citizenship. One of the 
outstanding figures in that memorable conflict was Squadron Comman- 
der H. Spencer Kerby, whose feats of courage and daring will live for- 
ever in the history of the nation and have won for him an enduring place 
in the hearts of his countrymen. He is a son of the Rev. Dr. George W. 
Kerby, president of Mount Royal College of Calgary and a man of scholar- 
ly attainments, whose biography is published elsewhere in this volume. 

H. Spencer Kerby acquired his early education in the grammar and 
high schools of this city and in 1914 was graduated in mechanical engi- 
neering from Toronto University, soon afterward receiving the appoint- 



30 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

merit of hydrographer for the Dominion government in the North Calgary- 
district. Feeling that the nation needed his assistance, he went to Eng- 
land during the early stages of the World war, for the purpose of enlist- 
ing in the Royal Naval Air Service and successfully passed the required 
examination. He and his friend, John Turner-Bone, were the first Ca- 
nadians accepted for that branch of service and were congratulated by 
the British Admiralty on the fact. After six weeks of training at Hen- 
don he received a commission as flight sub-lieutenant and upon obtaining 
a pilot's license was sent to Chingford as one of the guard against Zep- 
pelin raids, becoming a staff officer of the naval air station at that place. 
About six weeks later he was ordered to the Dardanelles and served 
under Commander Samson, for whose capture, dead or alive, the Germans 
offered the sum of twenty-five thousand dollars. Lieutenant Kerby was 
shot in an air attack during that campaign and fell into the sea, with his 
machine in flames. He was picked up by a trawler after being in the 
water for an hour and brought to the barren island on which the aero- 
drome was located. As a result of exposure and climatic conditions he 
developed enteric fever and was first taken to a Malta hospital, later 
being sent to a hospital at Gosport, England. When partially recuperat- 
ed he was honorably discharged and returned to Canada, in April, 1916. 

In order to effect a sure recovery Lieutenant Kerby went to the Peace 
River district of Alberta, where he spent about three months in survey- 
ing, and in September of the same year he returned to England. He 
was again accepted for service and was sent to the Cramwell Naval Air 
Station in Lincolnshire, acting for a short time as pilot instructor at the 
large aerodrome at Sleaford. Following this he was ordered to the west 
front and for six and a half months fought on the Somme without respite, 
accounting during that time for the destruction of many Hun machines. 
The six surviving members of the squadron received special congratula- 
tions from the officer in command and were granted a ten days' leave in 
London. They were presented to the king, the prince of Wales and chief 
of the admiralty on the war front. 

Lieutenant Kerby was in Belgium and Flanders during the heavy 
bombardment in the early part of the summer of 1917, and after spending 
six months on this front, was transferred to the Royal Naval Air Station 
at Walmer on the coast of Kent, where Hun raids were in progress. He 
was made commanding officer and in the first raid encountered eight 
enemy planes, driving one of them into the sea. The official admiralty's 
report is as follows: 

"The pilot who destroyed the Gotha and who was flying a land ma- 
chine, reports that he first pursued an enemy aeroplane, flying twelve 
thousand feet from the North Foreland to about fifteen miles off Zee- 
brugge, where he lost the hostile aircraft. Returning to the mouth of the 
Thames he observed anti-aircraft fire bursting in the vicinity of Southend, 
and flew in that direction, climbing. He then observed eight Gotha aero- 
planes followed by four British machines, steering northeast. The enemy 
machines were about two thousand feet above him when he got beneath 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 31 

them. He pursued climbing to eighteen thousand feet and attacked with- 
out result when about thirty miles out to seaward. At this moment he 
saw a single hostile machine four thousand feet below the enemy forma- 
tion, but flying with it. He attacked from the front, and drove the enemy 
down into the water, where he observed him to turn over, and saw one 
of the occupants hanging onto the tail. Thereupon he threw him his life 
belt, and did two or three circuits around him before returning to Eng- 
land. While returning he endeavored to communicate the position of the 
hostile machine to British destroyers." 

"The point of the whole story," says the London Sketch, "being that 
this young man was flying a land machine. Had his engine failed him, of 
course, or been driven down by enemy fire, he was done — except for his 
life belt. This he threw to the Hun who was struggling in the water. 
I don't know if that is war, but it is something a great deal finer than 
war." 

Lieutenant Kerby received a special wire from the admiralty congrat- 
ulating him on this act of heroism, and later was summoned to Buck- 
ingham Palace, where he was decorated with the Distinguished Service 
Cross. The leading publications of Great Britain made prominent men- 
tion of the feat, depicting Lieutenant Kerby in the act of saving his 
enemy's life. Four days afterward, in a raid made by ten enemy ma- 
chines, he brought down a large German Gotha, which contained three 
men and fell within three hundred yards of the shore at Margate, the 
battle being witnessed by thousands of spectators. The machine was 
drawn out of the sea and was the first Gotha which the British had an 
opportunity to photograph. 

Lieutenant Kerby remained as officer in command at this station until 
November, 1917, when he was given a month's leave in Canada. He re- 
turned to London on New Year's day of 1918 and was made flight com- 
mander, being ordered to report to the firing line in France within three 
days. However, this order was rescinded and instead he was sent as 
special instructor to the naval aerodrome at Cramwell. He had charge 
of the work of training air men for the warships and Prince Henry, the 
kings' son, was a member of the same staff. In April, 1918, he was ad- 
vanced to the rank of squadron commander and placed in charge of the 
aerodrome at Frieston, on the Lincolnshire coast. This is a special aero- 
drome for training in aerial gunnery, and for the final preparation of air 
men for the front. For exceptional service at this station he received 
the Air Force Cross — all these achievements before he attained his 
twenty-fourth year. 

After the signing of the armistice he was given a commission in the 
permanent air force and appointed commander of the aerodrome at 
Halton Camp Bucks, where he had some four thousand young men under 
him, in training as aeroplane mechanics, for the upkeep of His Majesty's 
air fieet. In April, 1922, he was one of eighteen selected to form the 
first Royal Air Force Staff College at Andover, completing his course in 
April, 1923, when he was slated for the foreign service in the autumn. 



32 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

He exemplifies in his life the highest qualities of manhood and citizen- 
ship, and judging by his past record the future holds for him great possi- 
bilities. 

He was married in London, England, on September 12, 1921, to Miss 
Muriel Finch Roberts, daughter of Dr. and Mrs. G. Roberts of "The 
Gables," Lindslafe, Bucks. 



WALTER HUCKVALE. 



Among the prominent and progressive citizens of Medicine Hat is 
Walter Huckvale, now filling the office of mayor. His public record is 
characterized by marked devotion to duty and a progressiveness that 
manifests itself in the discharge of all the duties that devolve upon him 
in this connection. Mr. Huckvale is a native of England, his birth having 
occurred in Oxfordshire in 1861, his parents being William and Ellen 
(Evans) Huckvale, who were also natives of that country, where they 
spent their lives. The father devoted his attention to farming from early 
manhood until his life's labors were ended in death, thus following in the 
business footsteps of the family, who for generations had been tillers of 
the soil. The grandfather of Walter Huckvale in the maternal line was 
John Evans, who operated one of the first steam flour mills in the middle 
section of England. In the family of Mr. and Mrs. William Huckvale 
were nine children, four of whom are living, Walter having been the 
seventh in order of birth. The parents were members of the Baptist 
church and politically Mr. Huckvale was a Liberal. 

Walter Huckvale obtained his education in private schools of his 
native country and there received his initial business training, spending 
five years in a wholesale hardware office at Birmingham. In 1882 he 
came to Canada and traveled over this country and the United States for 
some time before settling down. In September, 1882, he made his way 
to Qu'Appelle, Saskatchewan, and there worked in connection with the 
construction of the telegraph line, for a time serving as foreman of the 
work. He afterward went to Edmonton and to Calgary and was in Cal- 
gary in 1883 when the first passenger train made a trip over the road. 
Mr. Huckvale began ranching near Kipp and engaged in that business 
for nine years, after which he removed to Manyberries creek, south of 
Medicine Hat, He has gone through all of the experiences, hardships, 
trials and privations of frontier life. His home was twenty miles from 
his nearest neighbor but with resolute purpose and unfaltering industry 
he continued his work and remained on the ranch until 1916. when he 
sold out and removed to Medicine Hat, here taking up his permanent 
home, having maintained a home for his family here since 1908. In the 
meantime his labors had wrought a marvelous change in the district in 
which he lived. The work of settlement had been carried steadily for- 
ward and no longer was his residence an isolated home. Neighbors were 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 33 

near him and the countryside had been made to bloom and blossom as the 
rose. Mr. Huckvale is now living retired, in the enjoyment of the fruits 
of his former toil, his competence being sufficient to supply him with all 
of the comforts and many of the luxuries of life. 

In 1898 Mr. Huckvale was married to Miss Jane Evans, who was born 
in Bolton, Ontario, a daughter of Robert Evans, who was quarantine 
officer for western Canada for a number of years, after which he engaged 
in the hotel business at Macleod in 1896. Later he retired and his last 
days were spent in Toronto. Mr. and Mrs. Huckvale have become par- 
ents of four children : Eleanor, who is case recorder in a hospital at 
Medicine Hat; Evans, a law student at Calgary, who was graduated from 
the Royal Military College at Kingston; Cuthbert, a rancher in Alberta; 
and Sidney, who is in school at Toronto. Mrs. Huckvale and her children 
are members of the Anglican church. He is an honorary member of the 
Sons of England and belongs also to the Order of Moose. In politics he 
is a Conservative and in 1921 was elected mayor of Medicine Hat, in which 
position he is now serving for the second term, devoting his entire time 
and attention to the duties and responsibilities of the office. Since 1916 
he has been president of the local branch of the Canadian Red Cross 
Society at Medicine Hat, which did more war work than any other branch 
of the order per capita in Alberta. Mr. Huckvale was also at one time 
president of the Western Stock Growers Association, a position which he 
occupied for a number of years and he has been closely associated with the 
irrigation activities of southern Alberta. His life work has been along 
the line of ranching and farming and he has done much to promote agri- 
cultural standards and to advance actual labor in the matter of reclaiming 
the wild lands of the west for the purposes of civilization. 



WILLIAM GRANT CARPENTER. 

William Grant Carpenter, superintendent of the city schools of Ed- 
monton and widely and prominently known in the educational circles of 
Alberta, came to his present position thoroughly equipped by preliminary 
training and previous experience. Through a period of ten years he has 
labored to develop and promote the school system of Edmonton and his 
efforts have been far-reaching and resultant. Mr. Carpenter was born 
in Ontario, April 19, 1877, and is a son of Gideon B. and Catherine 
(Errett) Carpenter, who spent their lives in Ontario, where the father 
engaged in business as an agent in handling notions and other merchan- 
dise. Like his son, he also devoted a considerable period to teaching in 
the public schools and proved himself a capable educator, imparting 
clearly and readily to others the knowledge that he had acquired. Both 
he and his wife were active and consistent members of the Baptist church 
and in his political views he was a Liberal. 

William Grant Carpenter was educated in the public schools of Brock- 



34 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

ville, Ontario, where he completed a high school course and then entered 
the Brockville Collegiate Institute, from which he was graduated with 
the class of 1896. He afterward took up the profession of teaching, 
which he followed for four years, and later attended a training school 
of Ontario — the Normal College at Hamilton. He next matriculated in 
McMaster University of Toronto, from which he was graduated with the 
class of 1905, subsequent to which time he taught in Bowmanville, On- 
tario, for three years, that period being devoted to high school work 
there. He was also identified as a teacher with the Hamilton Collegiate 
Institute for a year and, removing to the west, was for two years a 
teacher in the high school at Calgary. He was then appointed principal 
and later was transferred to the Calgary Normal School, with which he 
was connected for a year. At the end of that time he was transferred to 
the position of principal of the high school at Edmonton, in which ca- 
pacity he continued for two years, and in 1914 was made superintendent 
of the Edmonton city schools, which has been his relation with the educa- 
tional system of the city since that time. He holds to high ideals in his 
service to the public and is constantly studying to improve his methods 
and render the work of the schools more effective in preparing the young 
for the practical and responsible duties of life. 

In 1906 Mr. Carpenter was united in marriage to Miss Mary Margaret 
Webster, who was born in Ontario, and they have become parents of two 
children, Margaret and John, aged, respectively, thirteen and twelve 
years. Mr. Carpenter is identified with the Board of Trade in Edmonton, 
is a member of the Rotary Club and of the Canadian Club and also be- 
longs to the Baptist church. In these associations are found the nature 
of his interests and the rules that govern his conduct, making him a 
worthy representative of the high ideals of manhood and citizenship. 



EDWIN A. McBAIN. 



Edwin A. McBain, recognized as a strong business executive, forceful 
and resourceful in all that he undertakes, is now president of the Lake- 
side Coals, Limited, of Edmonton. Without special advantages at the 
outset of his career, he has advanced steadily, step by step, until he 
occupies a prominent position as a representative of corporation interests 
in this section of the dominion. He was born in Conestogo, Ontario, 
November 7, 1872, and spent the period of his boyhood and youth at 
Palmerston and Chesley, Ontario, where he pursued his education in the 
public schools and enjoyed only such advantages as most lads of the period 
received. When twenty years of age he started out in the business world 
in connection with the lumber trade and for ten years he was on the road 
as a commercial salesman. He was ambitious to engage in business on 
his own account, however, and afterward established a hardware and 
lumber business at Reston, Manitoba, where he remained for nine years. 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 35 

On the expiration of that period he sold his interest there and for one 
year thereafter was at British Columbia. In 1912 he came to Edmonton, 
where he has since made his home and through the intervening period of 
a decade he has won a place in the foremost ranks of the representative 
business men of this city. Here he established a wholesale lumber busi- 
ness, which he carried on most profitably until 1916. He then sold his 
interest therein and took over the business of the Lakeside Coals, Limited, 
which at that time practically had an undeveloped field. The firm's hold- 
ings are situated fifty miles west of Edmonton, where it has approxi- 
mately thirty million tons of coal and it is now mining three hundred tons 
daily. This is domestic coal and the product finds a ready sale. The 
business is steadily growing and developing under the wise guidance and 
capable management of Mr. McBain, who is a man of broad vision and 
sound judgment and whose commercial record has at all times measured 
up to the highest business ethics and standards. 

On the 5th of August, 1903, Mr. McBain was united in marriage to 
Miss Jeannette H. Stark and they have four children: Pauline, Dorothy, 
William Allen and Beatrice. The social position of Mr. and Mrs. McBain 
is an enviable one and the hospitality of their home is greatly enjoyed by 
an extensive circle of friends. Mr. McBain is well known as a member 
of the Canadian Club, while his religious faith is that of the Methodist 
church. He has a wide acquaintance and his course throughout his life 
has ever been such as to make him a man whom to know is to esteem and 
honor. 



ERNEST W. COFFIN, B. A., PH. D. 

Ernest W. Coffin, principal of the Provincial Normal School at Cal- 
gary, is a man of high intellectual attainments, and broad experience as 
an educator well qualifies him for the responsible duties which devolve 
upon him. He was born in Prince Edward Island, in February, 1875, a 
son of Edwin and Jessie (Stewart) Coffin, also natives of that island, 
where the father still resides. He was a farmer and shipbuilder through- 
out the period of his active connection with business aflfairs. He died in 
March, 1923, at the age of eighty-nine years. The mother passed away in 
1915, when seventy-seven years of age. 

Reared in Prince Edward Island, Ernest W. Coflfin there attended the 
public schools and later went to the States, continuing his studies in Con- 
necticut. Returning to Prince Edward Island, he entered the Prince of 
Wales College at Charlottetown and was graduated with the class of 1893. 
He spent the next five years as a public school teacher and then enrolled 
as a student at Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia, from which 
he received the B. A. degree in 1902, winning a medal for high scholar- 
ship in the classics. He was then sent by the Presbyterian mission to 
the British West Indies, acting as high school instructor and teacher of 
training work at San Fernando, on the island of Trinidad, from 1902 



36 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

until 1905. In the latter year he took up the study of psychology and 
education at Clark University of Worcester, Massachusetts, his instruc- 
tors being G. Stanley Hall, the noted educator, and Professors Burnham 
and Sanford. He was teacher of psychology and education in the Normal 
School at Winona Lake, Indiana, for a year and in 1909 became vice 
principal of the Provincial Normal School at Calgary. He filled that 
position until 1911, when he was made principal, and has since served 
in that capacity. He keeps in touch with the most advanced thought of 
the day along educational lines and his services have been very valuable 
to the institution, which through his cooperation has acquired additional 
prestige. During the summer of 1922 he was instructor in educational 
psychology and educational principles at the University of Indiana and 
is regarded as an authority on those subjects. 

In June, 1912, Dr. Coffin married Miss Susie M. Baillie, a daughter of 
A. C. and Jane (Wilson) Baillie. Her father was a prominent merchant 
of Pictou, Nova Scotia, and there passed away in 1910. Mrs. Baillie is 
still living. To Dr. and Mrs. Coffin have been born three children : Edwin 
Lewis and Alexander Stewart, born in 1913 and 1917, respectively; and 
Dorothy Jean, born in 1922. Dr. Coffin is a member of the Knox Presby- 
terian church and for several years served on its board of managers. He 
is an independent Liberal in politics and fraternally he is identified with 
the Masonic order, belonging to Ashlar Lodge, A. F. & A. M. He is also 
a member of the Young Men's Christian Association. He is a man of 
scholarly attainments, deeply interested in those things which are of cul- 
tural value, and his influence has become a potent force in promoting 
the educational advancement of the province. 



KENNETH A. McLEOD. 



Kenneth A. McLeod has been a witness of the development of Ed- 
monton from an early pioneer period to the present era of progress and 
prosperity. He has seen it grow from a small trading post to a city of 
large commercial importance, with its ramifying trade interests reach- 
ing out to many sections of the Dominion, and at all times he has borne 
his share in the work of general improvement and upbuilding. He is the 
builder and owner of the McLeod building, the finest office structure in 
the province and he is today one of the prosperous men of Edmonton. 
His life story is a most interesting one, for he arrived here a penniless 
young man at a day when the most farsighted could scarcely have dreamed 
what the future would bring to the city. 

Kenneth A. McLeod was born at Port Elgin, Bruce county, Ontario, 
September 7, 1858. In the spring of 1870 the father, with the family, 
removed to Kansas, casting in his lot with the pioneer settlers of that 
state. There the father homesteaded land near Solomon City and the 
family lived on the frontier for three years, meeting with all of the hard- 



aijEiij .' 







KENNETH A. McLEOD. 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 39 

ships and experiences of pioneer life. At the end of that time they re- 
turned toward the Atlantic seaboard and settled on a farm in the vicinity 
of Lynchburg, Virginia, where they remained until the fall of 1876. At 
that date they returned to Ontario, and there the father operated a 
sawmill. 

Kenneth A. McLeod was a youth of about eighteen years at the time 
of the family's return to his native province. He had acquired his educa- 
tion in the frontier schools of the districts in which the family had lived 
and he had been trained to business interests and activities by his father. 
He worked in the sawmill until the fall of 1877 and then went into the 
lumber camps of northern Michigan, where he spent one winter. In the 
spring, however, he returned to Ontario, and soon afterward he took up 
railroad work on the Credit Valley Railroad, which was being built from 
Trenton to Picton, connecting with the Grand Trunk at Trenton. In the 
following spring he went to Winnipeg, arriving there in March, 1879, 
and later he proceeded to Rat Portage, where he was with a construction 
gang engaged in building bridges for the Canadian Pacific. He continued 
in that work for two years, or until 1881, after which, he followed his 
trade of carpentry in Winnipeg for a time. 

On the 5th of August, 1881, Mr. McLeod left that city in company 
with a partner, James Gore, and two other young men. Mr. McLeod 
and Mr. Gore, however, owned the outfit, consisting of three ox carts and 
one cart drawn by a pony. These were heavily loaded with their camp 
outfit, including a barrel of sugar, a barrel of dried apples, a barrel of 
flour and a keg of nails. Mr. McLeod and his partner walked all the 
way from Winnipeg to Edmonton, camping wherever night overtook 
them and were ninety-three days in making the trip. Game was very 
plentiful and their guns supplied them with meat, which thus supple- 
mented what might otherwise have been a very meagre meal. On the 
3d of November, 1881, Mr. McLeod arrived in Edmonton, which was then 
a small village, with a population of about four hundred. Soon after 
their arrival James Gore decided to return home and so the partners 
divided their outfit, Mr. McLeod taking as a part of his share the oxen 
and carts. He had no money at the time of his arrival, having paid out 
his last thirty-five cents for crossing the outfit at Fort Saskatchewan 
ferry before reaching the village. At that time the Hudson's Bay Com- 
pany had just completed the survey of the original townsite west of 
First street, and Mr. McLeod purchased two lots from the company, mak- 
ing the first payment of eighteen dollars with money received from the 
sale of a hundred pounds of sugar to Hon. Frank Oliver. This sugar he 
packed on his back from his camp in a clump of willows, which stood 
about where the Journal building is now standing. After securing his 
lots he built a shack thereon, in which to spend the winter, obtaining 
the lumber from the Hudson's Bay Company in exchange for his three 
oxen. A little later he obtained carpenter work with the Hudson's Bay 
Company. In the spring of 1882 there was quite a boom in Edmonton. 
He then sold his lots and his little cabin for seven hundred dollars and 



40 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

began building and contract work on his own account. He continued in 
that line of business here until 1888, when, because of dullness in building 
operations at this point, he left for what is now the state of Washington. 
There he continued to work at carpentry for two years, after which he 
returned to Edmonton, where he again took up building and contracting. 
Since that time he has been a prominent factor in the business circles of 
the city and his building operations have constituted a most important 
feature in the improvement of Edmonton. In 1893 he erected the first 
sash, door and planing mill in the city and this he operated in connec- 
tion with his building and contracting business, both lines proving very 
successful. In 1900 he sold his mills to the W. H. Gushing Company. 
Since then with the passing years he has made large investments in city 
real estate and in farm lands. In the spring of 1913 he began the erection 
of the McLeod building, the finest building in the Alberta province and 
one that would be a credit to any city of any size. His knowledge as a 
contractor now stood him in good stead. He was able to select the best 
material and to see that the best workmanship went into the construc- 
tion of the building, which, however, on account of war conditions was 
not completed until the 1st of January, 1915. It is a nine-story structure, 
one hundred and eighteen by one hundred feet, having steel frame and 
tarrezo and marble floors throughout. The outside finish is white pressed 
brick and terra cotta. No wood has been used in the construction of 
the building except for doors, sash and window trim, all of white oak, 
and the windows are all of plate glass. The entrance and the hallway are 
of Italian marble of the finest quality and the corridors and staircases 
throughout are also of marble. The McLeod building was completed at 
a cost of about six hundred thousand dollars and this investment indi- 
cates that the owner had faith in Edmonton and the province where he 
has lived since the city was a mere trading post, and in the development 
of which he has taken active part. There are about three hundred offices 
in this building and he now gives much of his attention to the manage- 
ment of the property, in connection with which he has operated farms 
quite extensively. He also owns coal lands in the province, his holdings 
in this particular being quite large. His business investments have been 
most judiciously made, indicating his sound judgment and his unfaltering 
enterprise. 

Not only has Mr. McLeod been closely associated with the material 
development and building operations of Edmonton but also with its gov- 
ernment, for he was a member of the first city council, and several times 
served as a trustee of schools, and for several terms as a member of the 
Board of Trade council. Mr. McLeod belongs to the Masonic fraternity 
and is a past master of his lodge, while in his life he fully exemplifies 
the beneficent spirit and objects of the craft. The major part of his time 
and attention, however, have been concentrated upon his business affairs. 
In his vocabulary there is no such word as fail. He has always formu- 
lated his plans carefully and has executed them promptly and in carry- 
ing on his business interests he has never failed to reach his objective, 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 41 

while the methods that he has employed have ever been such as would 
bear the closest investigation and scrutiny. Today Edmonton honors him 
as one of her pioneer and foremost citizens. 

Mr. McLeod was married on March 19, 1894, to Miss Amie Logan 
Lauder, and there are nine children by this marriage, namely: John F., 
James Kenneth, Archibald Norman, Jean Katherine, Roderick Lauder, 
Kenneth Nelson, Kathleen Mary, Margaret Hellen, Stuart Donald. John 
was overseas with the Forty-ninth Battalion, and James K. and Archi- 
bald N. were with the One Hundred and Thirty-eighth Battalion. James 
Kenneth was severely wounded and invalided home shortly before the 
armistice was signed. Roderick, at the age of seventeen, joined the navy 
as a cadet on the Patrol Boat Galliano and was lost when the vessel 
foundered, about the 30th of October, 1918, off Cape St. James, on the 
Pacific coast, with the entire crew — forty-seven in all. 



HON. WILLIAM ASBURY BUCHANAN. 

Hon. William Asbury Buchanan, journalist and statesman, now editor 
and publisher of the Herald at Lethbridge, is a son of the Rev. William 
and Mary (Pendrie) Buchanan, and was born at Fraserville, Ontario, 
July 2, 1876. His education was acquired in the schools of Trenton, 
Brighton and Norwood. He was a youth of seventeen years when he 
entered upon the work that eventually led him into the field of journal- 
ism, for in 1893 he secured a position on the Peterboro Examiner, with 
which he was identified for three years. He was on the editorial staff 
of the Peterboro Review from 1893 until 1898 and then became city editor 
of the Toronto Telegram, occupying that position until 1903. In the lat- 
ter year he became managing director of the journal published at St. 
Thomas, there remaining until 1905, when he came to Alberta and estab- 
lished the Lethbridge Herald. He continued the publication of the paper 
as a weekly only until 1907, when he established a daily and has since 
been editor and owner of the paper, which is regarded as one of the strong 
and influential factors in molding public opinion in Alberta. 

It was also Mr, Buchanan who organized the first Alberta legislative 
library, opened in Edmonton in 1907 and it was after completing this im- 
portant work that he returned to Lethbridge and established the daily 
edition of his paper. Throughout the period of his residence in this sec- 
tion of the Dominion he has been prominent in public affairs. He was 
quartermaster of the Twenty-fifth Regiment at St. Thomas, Ontario, for 
two years and thus wrote the military chapter into his life history. He 
has likewise been a councilor of the local Board of Trade and has been 
president of the Lethbridge Liberal Association. In 1909 he was elected 
for Lethbridge to the Alberta legislative assembly and was appointed a 
member of the provincial cabinet without portfolio. In December, 1909, 
he resigned from the ministry, owing to differences with the govern- 



42 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

ment on the railway policy. In August, 1911, he was elected to the house 
of commons for Medicine Hat and was reelected at the general election 
in 1917. In 1912 he was made a member of the special committee on old 
age pensions and was a member of the special redistribution committee 
in 1913. 

In 1904 Mr. Buchanan was married to Miss Alma Maude Freeman, a 
daughter of E. B. Freeman, J. P., of Burlington, Ontario. They have 
two sons: Donald, who is in school; and Hugh. Mrs. Buchanan was edu- 
cated in the Hamilton Ladies' College of Ontario. She is a member of 
the Imperial Daughters of the Empire and of the Ladies Golf Club and is 
also identified with different church societies, both Mr. and Mrs. Bu- 
chanan having membership in the Methodist church at Lethbridge. Mr. 
Buchanan belongs to the Alberta and Eastern British Columbia Press 
Association, of which he was on two occasions president, and he also oc- 
cupied the presidency of the Canadian Club, while formerly he was chair- 
man of the Alberta Amateur Association, and secretary of the Ontario 
Hockey Association. He belongs to the Chinook and the Lethbridge Coun- 
try Clubs, the Ontario Club of Toronto and the Laurentian, Club of Ot- 
tawa, and finds his recreation largely in golf, turning to this when leisure 
permits. 

In 1921 Mr. Buchanan retired from parliament and is now concentra- 
ting his efforts and attention upon journalistic affairs and is interested in 
oil development work. Alert and enterprising, he keeps in touch with the 
vital questions and problems of the day and has done much to mold public 
thought and action. 



MRS. EMILY FERGUSON MURPHY. 

Mrs. Emily Ferguson Murphy, known throughout the literary world 
by her pen name of Janey Canuck and acknowledged one of the twelve 
greatest living Canadian women, holds the position of police magistrate 
and judge of the juvenile court in and for the province of Alberta. "Of 
all its women," said the Edmonton Journal, "Mrs. Murphy is the one 
whom all Alberta and the west delight to honor and of whom they are 
preeminently proud." She was born at Cookstown, Ontario, to Isaac and 
Emily (Gowan) Ferguson and acquired her education in the Bishop 
Strachan School. She is the wife of Arthur Murphy, M. A., and the 
mother of two daughters. The year 1904 witnessed her arrival in west- 
ern Canada. By His Majesty King George she was decorated a Lady of 
Grace of the Order of St. John of Jerusalem. She has won wide and en- 
during fame as the author of "Janey Canuck in the West," which was 
published by Cassell & Company in 1910 and by J. M. Dent & Sons in 
the Wayfarers Series of 1917 ; "Open Trails," published by Cassell & 
Company in 1912 and by J. M. Dent & Sons in 1920; "Seeds of Pine," 
published by Hodder & Stoughton in 1914 and by the Musson Book Com- 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 43 

pany of Toronto in 1922; "The Black Candle," published by Thomas 
Allen in 1922; and "Little Canadian Cousins of the Great North- West 
Provinces," published by Page & Company of Boston in 1923. "The Black 
Candle," a book on the narcotic drug traffic and its menace, has been 
declared by the reviewers to be an epoch-making one and the first com- 
prehensive study of the subject yet made. Mrs. Murphy is also a con- 
tributor to Canadian, English and American magazines and since 1920 
has been honorary president of the Canadian Women's Press Club, of 
which she served as president from 1913 until 1920. She was honorary 
secretary for Canada of the Society of Women Journalists of England 
from 1913 until 1924, served as a member of the Imperial Press Confer- 
ence in 1920, acted as councillor of the Canadian Authors Association 
from 1921 until 1922, and as a member of the executive board from 1923 
to 1924. She was chosen vice president of Edmonton branch of the 
Canadian Author's Association for the years 1923 and 1924. 

As police magistrate and judge of the juvenile court in and for the 
province of Alberta, Mrs. Murphy is making a splendid record, being 
particularly well fitted for this important and responsible position. She 
has the honor of being the first woman in the British Empire to be ap- 
pointed a police magistrate. She occupied the presidency of the Federated 
Women's Institutes of Canada from 1919 until 1921 ; served as vice 
president of the National Council of Women of Canada from 1918 until 
1923 ; was vice president of the Canadian Association of Child Protection 
Officers in 1921 and 1923; director of the Child Welfare Association of 
Canada, 1923-24; vice president of the Social Service Council of Canada 
from 1920 until 1924; vice president of the Canadian Committee of Social 
Hygiene from 1918 until 1924; member of the board of directors of the 
Canadian Committee of Mental Hygiene from 1918 until 1924; member 
of the War Conference of Women held at the invitation of the War Com- 
mittee of the Dominion Cabinet in 1918 ; member of the general commit- 
tee of the Canadian Society of the League of Nations for the years 1923 
and 1924; and member of the White Cross Association, executive com- 
mittee, Seattle, United States of America, for the years 1923 and 1924. 

B. B. Cooke, writing under the caption "Some Canadian Women," 
says of Mrs. Arthur Murphy : "Two women of peculiarly big calibre has 
Canada given to literature. One was the late Agnes Dean Cameron of 
Victoria, British Columbia ; the other is Mrs. Arthur Murphy of Edmon- 
ton. There are other women writers in Canada, many of them distin- 
guished and artists in their particular line of work, but Agnes Deans 
Cameron and her friend, Emily Ferguson Murphy, are of a type by 
themselves — women with great hearts and great minds, women who have 
the mother instinct in writing which gives them a point of view and a 
sympathy with the subjects they handle, such as others, not possessing 
this instinct in such marked degree, cannot command. Agnes Deans 
Cameron is dead ; her name remains a big and glorious memory to all 
who knew her and to thousands who had met her only in the most casual 
manner or heard her talking in her writings. Mrs. Arthur Murphy, per- 



44 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

haps a more humorous woman, is very much alive in her writing prime, 
and bubbling- over with enthusiasm for Canada, for Alberta, for the 
country she knows and loves. In her, as in Agnes Deans Cameron, is a 
certain 'humanness' which makes her writings strike straight into the 
heart of the person who reads them. It has made her friends in almost 
every city or town in the Dominion, from Grouard to Toronto, Victoria, 
Halifax and in some places that lie far outside Canada." 

The Bookman of London, England, in its August number, has placed 
Mrs. Arthur Murphy of Edmonton in its "Gallery" and has given three 
pages to discuss her philosophy, which it describes as having "literally 
sung its way through the Dominion." "Her work," says The Bookman, 
"has the optimism of the true lyric ; the song of the open road. The 
refrain of the windswept spaces was never set to a better tune . . . 
It is not style that matters in the work of 'Janey Canuck' any more than 
it matters in the work of Walt Whitman — a kindred philosopher. She 
comes scattering seeds of gladness in our midst, and lo ! our gloom is 
gone like a black cloud that breaks before the April sun. She is the 
philosopher of gladness and content and common sense, a philosophy as 
durable as Bergonism. The whole thing is a garland of gladness spark- 
ling with the dews of a clean, fresh philosophy — a crown of rest for the 
tired brows. What patron saint, we wonder, bends over 'Janey Canuck' 
when she is weaving her bright fancies ... Of all 'Janey Canuck's' 
books, commend me to 'Open Trails.' It is a rubric — a book that makes 
you want to go and bury your face in the cool brooks, to hear blackbirds 
and robins piping against the clear skies; to be the brother to the wind, 
the lover of the stars; to breathe the freedom of the sun-washed spaces 
and to follow the trail through the fragrant pine woods and 'winding 
mossy ways.' It is as refreshing as a bunch of spring flowers . . . 
What then is the charm of 'Janey Canuck' that has set all the critics 
raving on the other side of the Atlantic and has taken us captive? We 
cannot analyze it any more than could Emerson analyze the charm of 
the Rhodora of the woods. When you hear the thrush singing his song 
in the green tree you do not ask what makes it sing; you are content to 
listen. So is it with the author of 'Open Trails'." 



WILFRED B. BROWNE. 



Wilfred B. Browne is one of the successful and representative busi- 
ness men of Warner. He was born in Powasson, Ontario, on the 24th of 
March, 1883, a son of Alonzo and Eliza Caroline (Patterson) Browne, 
both natives of Ontario. The paternal grandfather, Daniel Browne, was 
born in Belfast, Ireland, and came to the Dominion of Canada at the age 
of five years. He took up the study of medicine in early life and practiced 
for many years in the province of Ontario, passing away at the age of 
seventy-two years. The maternal Grandfather Patterson spent the 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 45 

greater part of his life in Ontario. He served as sheriff of Atlanta dis- 
trict for some years, and lived to be eighty-six years of age, Alonzo 
Browne received his education in the public schools of Ontario and in 
early life engaged in farming. He owned considerable land in Ontario 
and followed agricultural pursuits there until 1891, when he came to 
Alberta. He landed at Innisfail with fifty cents in his pockets and a 
return trip ticket to his home in Ontario. He disposed of the ticket for 
ten dollars and filed a claim on some land, which he later proved up on, 
and brought it to a highly cultivated state and the following year he sent 
for his family. Aside from farming he engaged in contracting and build- 
ing for many years. Mr. Browne now owns a fine half section of land 
and for the past few years has specialized ia the breeding of Holstein 
cattle. He is one of the foremost men of the community in which he 
resides, is a Liberal in politics, taking an active interest in all civic affairs, 
and his religious faith is that of the Presbyterian church. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Browne four children were born : Eliza, who is the wife of H. W. 
Shaw of Victoria, British Columbia; Wilfred B., whose name introduces 
this review; Lucy, who is living at Ottawa, Ontario; and Elmer, who is 
living at home. 

In the acquirement of his education Wilfred B. Browne attended the 
common schools of Innisfail and later entered a business college in Leth- 
bridge. After putting his textbooks aside he engaged in cow-punching 
and riding the range for the Glenbo, Bow Chase, Bar N and R. G. Robin- 
son ranches. Later he took up the study of steam engineering and was 
given a certificate. For some time thereafter he was employed as an 
engineer in the power house and machine shop of the Canadian Pacific 
Railroad mines at Bankhead, also at Coleman. In 1913 he came to 
Warner and entered the business world on his own account, establishing 
an implement store here, the value of which was estimated at about forty- 
five thousand dollars and he won success in this enterprise. He suffered 
a loss in 1918, however, when much of his stock was destroyed by fire. 
He purchased a garage here, which also was destroyed by fire in 1920, and 
for some time he was associated in business with Walter Munday. Later 
Mr. Browne rebuilt the garage and is now conducting it, together with 
the implement store and a real estate and insurance business. In the 
development of his various enterprises Mr. Browne has met with the 
success won by well organized methods, intelligently and capably exe- 
cuted, and he fully merits the esteem and respect accorded him by his 
fellow townsmen. 

Mr. Browne gives his political allegiance to the Liberal party and takes 
an active interest in all local affairs. He was a member of the city coun- 
cil in 1918 and 1919. His religious faith is that of the Presbyterian 
church and fraternally he is identified with the Masons, holding member- 
ship in Warner Lodge, No. 100, and he is a past master in the local lodge. 
He is also affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, having 
been a member of the order for eighteen years. He has held all chairs 
in that order up to the office of vice grand. Mr. Browne represents the 



46 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

type of citizen who is regarded as an acquisition to any community, for- 
warding its development by his diligence and enterprise in matters of 
business, and promoting its general progress by maintaining a high 
standard of citizenship and cooperating in every commendable public 
movement. 



WILLIAM DUNCAN LIVINGSTON HARDIE. 

William Duncan Livingston Hardie has occupied the position of mayor 
of Lethbridge since 1913 and his entire administration of public affairs 
has been marked by progressiveness that has been most resultant. His 
efforts have been of great benefit to the city along many lines of improve- 
ment and upbuilding and the record that he has made is highly satis- 
factory to his fellow townsmen. A native of Scotland, he was born near 
Edinburgh, on August 17, 1862, and is a son of William and Agnes (Liv- 
ingston) Hardie, who are also natives of the land of hills and heather. 
Coming to the new world about 1863 they made their way to Youngstown, 
Ohio. The father was a son of William Hardie, a native of Scotland, 
where he was a mine manager and where he spent his life. The grand- 
father in the maternal line was Duncan Livingston, likewise a mining 
man. After removing to the United States William Hardie was also a 
mine manager, continuing to act in that responsible position to the time 
of his retirement. Both he and his wife still survive, the former having 
reached the venerable age of eighty-five years, while his wife is now 
eighty years of age. They have long been consistent and faithful mem- 
bers of the Presbyterian church. Mr. Hardie gives his political alle- 
giance to the republican party, while fraternally he is a Mason. 

William D. L. Hardie pursued his education in the public schools of 
his native country and in an academy, while later he entered the Uni- 
versity of Glasgow. His early business experience came to him through 
a four years' apprenticeship at mining engineering and for a long period 
he directed his labors in that field. The year 1889 witnessed his arrival 
at Lethbridge, Alberta, and he secured the responsible and onerous posi- 
tion of superintendent of the Alberta Railway & Coal Company, in which 
capacity he continuously and acceptably served for twenty years. Since 
his retirement from the business he has concentrated his efforts and 
attention upon official duties. He was first elected mayor of Lethbridge 
in 1912, to serve for the year 1913 and for one year he was on duty in 
connection with the aldermanic government. In 1914 Lethbridge adopted 
the commission form of government and Mr. Hardie has since been mayor, 
continuously filling the position now for a decade. He has contributed 
much to the development, upbuilding and improvement of the city and he 
employs the most practical and resultant methods in the attainment of 
high ideals of municipal service and progress. 

In April, 1885, Mr. Hardie was married to Miss Margaret Jane 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 47 

Kirtley, who was born at Newcastle, England, a daughter of Thomas and 
Sarah Kirtley. Her father was also a mining man and on coming to the 
new world settled in Pennsylvania. Mr. and Mrs. Hardie have become 
parents of five children : lanthe, now the wife of J. S. Jones, manager 
of the Montreal Bank at Medicine Hat; Agnes, the wife of W. E. Murphy, 
an electrician of Minneapolis, Minnesota; E. W. Gladson, who for nearly 
five years was in service during the World war, being shot through the 
shoulder and badly wounded in battle, after which he was invalided 
home ; Jesse M. 0., who was also in the service and was twice gassed and 
once wounded, being three times at the front during his service of four 
years; and Inzola, who married J. Laird Thompson, a bond broker of 
Toronto. 

Mr. Hardie and his family attend the Presbyterian church and fra- 
ternally he is a Mason, loyal to the teachings of the craft. He has served 
as master of his lodge and is at all times actuated by the highest prin- 
ciples in everything that he undertakes. In politics he maintains an 
independent course. He is now commissioner of finance and public safety 
and Lethbridge has benefited greatly by his devotion to the highest stand- 
ards of citizenship and of municipal welfare. 



JOSEPH E, GILLIS, B. A. 

Joseph E. Gillis, formerly a successful educator, is now engaged in 
the practice of law at Blairmore, and although devoted to his profession, 
he has also found time to participate actively in civic affairs, his influence 
being at all times on the side of progress, reform and improvement. He 
was born in Prince Edward Island, February 23, 1881, and is a son of 
Stephen and Catherine (McNeil) Gillis, also natives of that island. To 
their union were born fourteen children, of whom eleven survive, and 
the subject of this review was the only member of the family to come 
to Alberta. 

The public schools of his native island afforded Joseph E. Gillis his 
early educational opportunities and when nineteen years of age he be- 
came a teacher in the schools there, being thus occupied from 1900 until 
1905. He spent the following year as an instructor in the normal depart- 
ment of the Prince of Wales College and from 1906 until 1908 he attended 
St. Dunstan's University, Charlottetown, of which he is an honor graduate, 
receiving the Bachelor of Arts degree on the 30th of November of the 
latter year. From 1908 until 1913 he was a student in the law office of 
Chief Justice J. A. Mathieson and on the expiration of that period he 
came to this province, opening an office in Blairmore, where he has since 
followed his profession with ever-increasing success. In April, 1922, Mr. 
Gillis formed a law partnership with Donald G. Mackenzie and their 
clientele is a large and representative one. 

Mr. Gillis married Miss Josephine McAree, also a native of Prince 



48 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

Edward Island, and they have become the parents of two sons: Donald 
Edward and Allan Frederick. They are communicants of the Catholic 
church and Mr. Gillis is also identified with the Knights of Columbus. 
He is a stanch Liberal in his political views and in 1921 was the candidate 
of that party for the house of commons for the riding of Macleod, but 
failed to win the election. He has filled important municipal offices, serv- 
ing on the school board, and for two years was councilman of his town. 
He was also a member of the financial board of Blairmore for some time, 
being connected therewith until 1921. He has a thorough understanding 
of the principles of jurisprudence and correctly applies his knowledge to 
the points in litigation. He wins a large percentage of his cases and 
whatever he does is for the best interests of his clients and for the honor 
of his profession. 



ALEXANDER HANNAH. 



Alexander Hannah is one of the talented members of the Calgary bar, 
whose ability in the field of corporation law has placed him with the fore- 
most barristers of the Dominion. He was born at Whithorn, Wigtown- 
shire, Scotland, April 13, 1877, a son of Henry R. and Hannah Anderson 
(Gibson) Hannah, also natives of that country. His father, who was 
well known as an agriculturist, died in 1899. His mother is still living. 

The subject of this article was educated privately in Scotland and 
at an early age he was articled to John Campbell Maclullich, S. S, C. and 
crown prosecutor for Argyllshire, afterward completing his articles with 
George F. Bryce, W. S., Edinburgh, Scotland. Mr. Hannah became a 
law student in the University of Edinburgh, being fully qualified in 1899. 
In the following year he became identified with the firm of Mitchell & 
Campbell, solicitors, Perth, Scotland, and in 1901 was admitted to prac- 
tice before the courts of Scotland. In 1905 he commenced practice in 
Glasgow, Scotland, and continued to do so until September, 1911, when 
lured by the call of the west, he left his native land and came to Canada. 
Believing that the western part of the Dominion would afford him better 
opportunities for advancement, he made his way to Calgary, Alberta, 
and became associated with the firm of Lougheed, Bennett & Company, 
and while with them was admitted to the Alberta bar. In September, 
1912, Mr. Hannah became a senior member of the firm of Hannah, Stir- 
ton & Fisher, with which he was connected until the dissolution of the 
firm in 1919. In 1920 he rejoined the firm of Lougheed, Bennett & Com- 
pany, being thus connected until the formation of the present firai of 
Bennett, Hannah & Sanford. The firm stands high in professional circles 
and is conducting an extensive and lucrative practice. Mr. Hannah is 
well versed in all branches of jurisprudence but has given particular at- 
tention to corporation law, being regarded as an expert in this branch 




ALEXANDER HANNAH. 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 51 

of the profession, and in addition to his practice he acts as lecturer on 
this subject to the University of Alberta. 

On the 27th of May, 1914, Mr. Hannah was united in marriage to 
Helen Archibald, a daughter of the late A. R. Archibald of Aberfeldy, 
Perthshire, Scotland. Mr. and Mrs. Hannah have two children : Richard 
Henry and Nancy Anderson, aged, respectively, seven and five years. 

Mr. Hannah has not confined his activities to his professional work; 
for some time he acted as secretary to the Liberal Unionist Association 
of the Central Division of Glasgow. In Canada he is an adherent of the 
Conservative party. In religious faith he is a Presbyterian. He is iden- 
tified with the Masonic order and finds recreation in golf, fishing and 
shooting. He has been honored with the presidency and vice presidency 
of the Calgary Bar Association. Among other activities it may be 
mentioned that Mr. Hannah has served with the Volunteer Regiments of 
Princess Louise's Brigade of the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, the 
Royal Scots Brigade (Queen's, Edinburgh) and the Scottish Horse. He 
is deeply interested in the Boy Scout movement — an epoch-making ad- 
venture in character building and a strong power for civic righteousness, 
and while in the old country was president of the western district of 
Glasgow and in Alberta has served as provincial commissioner and as 
assistant commissioner of the Alberta organization. He studies broadly 
and thinks deeply and has always been a patient and diligent inquirer 
after the truth. Whatever he does is for the best interests of his clients 
and for the honor of his profession, and no man brings to either a more 
unqualified allegiance nor riper ability. 



CHARLES R. MORRISON. 

It has been said that one who enters the newspaper field is never 
content to leave it, for there is a fascination in thus keeping in touch 
with the thought and activity of the world from which one cannot escape, 
and this statement finds exemplification in the career of Charles R. Mor- 
rison, managing editor of the Edmonton Journal, who has devoted his 
life to work of this character. He was born in the city of Edinburgh, 
Scotland, in 1872, a son of Charles and Effie (Sterhng) Morrison, also 
natives of that country. In 1873 they went to New Zealand, where they 
resided for a number of years, and then came to Canada, establishing 
their home in Toronto, Ontario. The father was educated for the law 
but journalism made a greater appeal to him and for a considerable 
period he was connected with the Globe and Mail of Toronto. He was an 
earnest and helpful member of the Presbyterian church, as was also his 
wife, and in Masonry he attained the thirty-second degree, while he was 
also an honorary member of the Caledonian Society. Both Mr. and Mrs. 
Morrison passed away in San Francisco, California, in 1922. They had 
a family of three children, two of whom survive: Charles R. and Albert 



52 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

J., the latter being a member of the theatrical profession and a resident 
of New York city. 

In the acquirement of an education Charles R. Morrison attended the 
grammar and high schools of New Zealand and Otago University, after 
which he came to Canada and took up the study of pharmacy. His initial 
newspaper experience was obtained in the office of the Toronto Mail, later 
the Mail and Empire, in which he worked for nine years, rising to the 
position of city editor. On severing his connection with that paper he 
went to New York city and for a time was employed by the publishers 
of McClure's Magazine. He then went to the Pacific coast, becoming 
identified with the San Francisco Chronicle and Examiner, and he was 
also one of the staff of the Oakland Tribune. Leaving California, he 
made his way to Spokane, Washington, where he assumed the duties of 
managing editor of the Inland Herald. The year 1911 witnessed his 
arrival in Edmonton and he assisted in the reorganization of the Evening 
and Morning Journal, which was converted into an evening paper. He 
is now the assistant general manager and managing editor of the Ed- 
monton Journal, being also a member of the board of directors. The 
Journal is conducted along the lines of modern newspaper education, 
being well organized not only in the department of its management, but 
also in the corps of its writers and in its mechanical department. It is 
a daily of high standing, with a large circulation, and in his editorial 
and managerial capacities Mr. Morrison has been instrumental in pro- 
ducing a paper of much interest and value to the city and district. 

In 1901 Mr. Morrison married Miss Lorena M. Smith, who was born 
at Auburn, California, and there obtained her education. They have be- 
come the parents of three daughters : Gwendolyn, Lorena and Muriel. 
The first named has followed her father in the profession of journalism, 
while the other two children are still in school. Mr. and Mrs. Morrison 
are members of the Knox Presbyterian church of Edmonton. He has 
been a director of the Edmonton Exhibition, is connected with the Ed- 
monton Board of Trade, is a member of the Mayfair Golf & Country Club 
and of the Rotary Club, being a former director of the last named organ- 
ization. He is an able exponent of journalism and a man of broad views 
and modern standards, whose interests have ever been of that uplifting 
character which develops the citizenship and promotes the civilization of 
a community. 



ADAM H. ESCH. 



Commercial enterprise at Edmonton finds a worthy and prominent 
representative in Adam H. Esch, president of the Esch Company, Limited, 
which also controls one of the finest stationery stores in Alberta. A 
representative business man, Mr. Esch has steadily worked his way up- 
ward from a humble position in commercial circles, and the business of 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 53 

which he is now the head would be a credit to a city of much larger size 
than Edmonton. 

Adam H. Esch was born in St. Paul, Minnesota, August 4, 1875, and 
there spent the period of his boyhood and youth, acquiring his educatioa 
in the public and high schools. He lived in St. Paul until 1902, when at 
the age of twenty-seven years he removed to Kaslo, British Columbia, 
where he conducted a stationery store for a year. He then went to Cal- 
gary, Alberta, where for eight years he was identified with the stationery 
store of D. J. Young. In 1911 he came to Edmonton, where he established 
the present store, and has one of the finest stationery stores in Alberta, 
carrying an extensive and well selected stock of commercial and fancy 
stationery, together with ofl^ce desks, books, kodaks and photographic 
supplies. Close application, indefatigable energy and business ability 
have been the noncomitant elements in his success and he is regarded as 
one of the representative young merchants of this city. 

On the 18th of June, 1901, Mr. Esch was married to Miss Isabelle Mary 
McDonald and they ha\e five children: Florence, Kathleen, Dorothy, 
Hubert and Marion, aged, respectively, nineteen, seventeen, thirteen, 
seven and three years. The religious faith of the family is that of the 
Catholic church and Mr. Esch is identified with the Knights of Columbus. 
He is also a member of the Rotary Club and stands stanchly in support 
of that organization, which is looking ever to the benefit of the city in 
its commercial relations and to its upbuilding along the lines of civic 
virtue and civic pride. 



JAMES HOSSACK WOODS. 

James Hossack Woods, one of the representative newspaper men of 
Canada, has devoted the greater part of his life to journalism and for the 
past fifteen years has been editor and managing director of the Calgary 
Daily Herald. He was born in the city of Quebec, Canada, July 12, 1867, 
and his parents, Alexander and Elizabeth Woods, were representatives of 
eld and prominent families of that place. For many years the father was 
chairman of the finance committee of Quebec and he also held other pub- 
lic offices of trust and responsibility. He was a member of the Dominion 
Board of Trade and was the first commissioner sent by Canada to Aus- 
tralia to promote trade relations between the two countries. 

James Hossack Woods obtained his early education in private schools 
of Quebec, where he also attended high school and he was a student at 
Morrin College. Later he entered Manitoba University and also com- 
pleted a course in McGill University at Montreal, which conferred upon 
him the degree of Associate in Arts. As a young man he went to British 
Columbia, where for a time he engaged in prospecting and mining, but 
his attention has since been concentrated upon the profession of journal- 
ism, and he has been very successful in this field of activity. He was 



54 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

city editor of the Toronto Mail & Empire and later become editor of the 
Montreal Herald. He also acted as business manager of the Toronto 
News and likewise established the Woods-Norris Advertising Agency of 
that city. Since 1907 he has been editor and managing director of the 
Calgary Daily Herald, which ranks with the leading newspapers of west- 
ern Canada, and under his able management it has become both the 
leader and mirror of public opinion. It is carefully edited and well or- 
ganized not only in the department of business management but also in 
its corps of writers and in its mechanical department. His standing in 
newspaper circles of the Dominion is indicated in the fact that he has 
been honored with the presidency of the Canadian Press Association and 
he is now director for Alberta of the Canadian Press in its various 
branches of activity. He was also chairman of the party of representa- 
tive newspaper men of Canada who visited Great Britain and the front 
in 1918, at the invitation of the British government. 

Mr. Woods was married at Toronto, June 7, 1900, to Miss Leonora 
Christine Eby, a daughter of J. F. Eby, the owner of one of the large 
wholesale mercantile establishments of that city, and they have become 
the parents of a daughter, Eleanor Carson. Mr. Woods is independent 
in his political views, standing for principle and for clean politics rather 
than for the blind following of party leaders, and he has never entered 
public life except in connection with hospital work. He is a member of 
the Knox Presbyterian church, in the work of which he is deeply inter- 
ested, and he has been chairman of its board of managers, also filling 
other offices in connection therewith. Fraternally he is identified with 
the Masonic order and his appreciation of the social amenities of life 
finds expression in his membership in the Ranchmen's Club of Calgary, 
the Calgary Golf & Country Club, the Royal Canadian Yacht Club of 
Toronto, the Edmonton Club of Edmonton and various other organiza- 
tions of a similar nature. He takes an intelligent interest in public 
affairs and never uses his influence to support an unworthy cause. He 
bases his support of Calgary upon a comprehensive knowledge of its op- 
portunities and resources and has made his paper the champion of every 
movement calculated to upbuild the city and promote the development of 
the surrounding district. 



CLEMENS H. GRUNERT, V. S. 

For seven years Dr. Clemens H. Grunert has engaged in the practice 
of veterinary surgery at Fort Saskatchewan and his success is the reward 
of conscientious effort and a thorough understanding of the scientific 
principles underlying his profession. Dr. Grunert comes from Switzer- 
land. He was born April 10, 1884, and is a son of Clemens and Marie 
Grunert, of German descent, the father being a retired merchant. 

Dr. Grunert completed a course in a veterinary school of Switzerland 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 55 

and afterward attended the universities at Leipzig and Dresden, Germany. 
He remained in his native land until he reached the age of twenty-nine 
years and in 1913 emigrated to Canada. Upon arriving in the Dominion 
he entered the service of the Canadian Pacific Railroad Company, 
with which he was identified until 1915, and in September of that year 
he established himself in Fort Saskatchewan as a veterinarian. He has 
a modern surgical hospital, supplied with complete equipment for veter- 
inary work, and a well-merited reputation for professional skill has 
brought to him a large and lucrative practice. 

Dr. Grunert was married May 16, 1920, to Miss Bertha Giger, also 
a native of Switzerland, and they have one child, Marlis. Dr. and Mrs. 
Grunert attend the Presbyterian church, and fraternally he is identified 
with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. His clientele comes not only 
from Fort Saskatchewan but also from the surrounding region, and dur- 
ing the period of his residence in this community he has gained the esteem 
and friendship of many. 



FRANK W. RUSSELL. 



Following in the professional footsteps of his father, Frank W. Rus- 
sell has chosen the practice of law as his life work and has proven a 
worthy son of a distinguished sire. He has been a resident of Vegreville 
for the past twelve years and is the oldest practicing barrister in the 
town. He was born near Halifax, Nova Scotia, October 16, 1873, and is 
a son of Hon. Benjamin and Louise (Coleman) Russell, both natives of 
that province. The father was graduated in law from Dalhousie Uni- 
versity and has devoted his life to the legal profession, practicing in the 
city of Halifax, in which he is widely and favorably known. He is an 
eminent jurist, presiding over the supreme court of Nova Scotia, and in 
governmental affairs he has also played an important part. In 1896 he 
was elected a member of parliament from Halifax, serving until 1900, 
and in that year was chosen to represent Hants, Nova Scotia, in that 
legislative body, continuing in office until 1904. During his younger days 
he was official reporter of the assembly and he was also reporter of the 
supreme court of Nova Scotia. To Judge and Mrs. Russell were born 
eight children, seven of whom survive. Of these four are living in this 
province, namely: A. H., a barrister and solicitor of Red Deer; B. W., 
who resides in Calgary and is doing engineering work for the govern- 
ment; Mrs. E. B. Roach of Calgary; and Frank W. 

After completing his public school training Frank W. Russell became 
a student in the law department of Dalhousie University, finishing his 
course in 1894. He then went to the States and took postgraduate work 
in law at Cornell University at Ithaca, New York, leaving that institution 
in 1895, well equipped for his profession. Entering his father's office 
in Halifax, he became a member of the firm of Russell & Ross, with 



56 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

which he was connected until 1902, when he went to Dartmouth, Nova 
Scotia, and opened an office. He remained in practice there for eight 
years and throughout that period acted as town magistrate, while for 
a time he also served as assistant reporter of the supreme court of Nova 
Scotia. In 1910 he came to this province, selecting Vegreville as the 
scene of his professional activities, and he has had no reason to regret 
his choice, for a liberal clientele has been accorded him. He is well 
versed in all branches of jurisprudence and conducts his law business 
with ability, carefully preparing his cases and presenting them with 
clearness and force. 

Mr. Russell married Miss Elvie R. Dillman, a native of Nova Scotia, 
and they have become the parents of eight children, the firstborn being 
Marjorie L., who is a graduate nurse. The others are: Norma, Mary, 
William B., Hugh M., Barbara M., Bruce D. and Jean. Mr. Russell has 
always taken a keen interest in civic affairs, being particularly- active in 
promoting the cause of education, and from 1913 until 1922 was a mem- 
ber of the Vegreville Board of Education. He is identified with the 
Masonic order and exemplifies in his life the beneficent teachings of the 
craft. He possesses a keen mentality and is fitted by natural ability and 
by training for the legal profession, in which he has gained a gratifying 
measure of success. However, his interests are not confined to the law 
and he is recognized as a broad-minded, public-spirited citizen, whose in- 
fluence is at all times on the side of progress, reform and improvement. 



HON. JEREMIAH W. HEFFERNAN, K. C, M. P. P. 

Possessing all of the requisites of an able barrister, Hon. Jeremiah W. 
Heffernan has established his position among the leading representatives 
of the Edmonton bar, and he also figures prominently in public affairs 
as a member of the Alberta legislature. A native of Canada, he was 
born at Picton, in the province of Ontario, January 4, 1884, and is a son 
of John J. and Ellen (Naughton) Heffernan, both of whom are natives 
of Ireland. The father was born in Limerick and the mother in Kilfinun 
and they are now residents of Picton, Ontario. 

In the public schools of his native town Jeremiah W. Heffernan mas- 
tered the elementary branches of learning and afterward became a stu- 
dent at Ottawa University, from which he was graduated in 1905. He 
next entered Osgoode Hall at Toronto, Ontario, in which he received his 
professional training, completing his course in 1910. He began the prac- 
tice of law at Toronto, where he maintained an office for three years, 
and since 1912 has successfully followed his profession in Edmonton. He 
has a large clientele, which he conducts with ability, carefully preparing 
his cases and presenting them with clearness and force. Recognition of 
his legal acumen has led to his selection for public office and in 1914 he 
acted as prosecuting attorney for Edmonton, while from 1914 until 1919 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 57 

he served as crown prosecutor for Alberta, making a highly commendable 
record in both offices. In 1921 he was created King's Counsel and in the 
same year he was chosen to represent his district in the provincial par- 
liament of Alberta, being elected for a term of five years. He discharges 
his legislative duties with fidelity and ability and his attitude toward 
any measure is determined by his belief in its efficacy as a factor in good 
government. Mr. Heffernan has also become well known as a journalist, 
being the editor of the Western Catholic, one of the leading religious 
publications of Canada. 

On the 8th of January, 1913, Mr. Heffernan was married in Toronto to 
Miss Margaret McCormick. He is a communicant of the Catholic church 
and is also affiliated with the Knights of Columbus, the Benevolent Pro- 
tective Order of Elks, the Edmonton Club and the Edmonton Golf & 
Country Club. He is a strong adherent of the Liberal party and served 
for five years as president of the West Edmonton Liberal Association. 
He is a broad-minded man, looking at significant questions from a ra- 
tional standpoint and reaching his conclusions after hard and logical 
thinking. In all the relations of life he has conformed his conduct to 
high standards and his pronounced ability has won for him a position 
of distinction in the ranks of his profession. 



JAMES F. ADAMSON, M. D. 

Dr. James F. Adamson has made the practice of medicine his life 
work and experience and study have broadened his field of usefulness, 
enabling him steadily to advance until he now ranks with Edmonton's 
leading physicians. He was born in Ontario, in 1877, and his parents, 
Alfred and Sarah (Blain) Adamson, were also natives of that province, 
in which they spent their lives. The father was born in 1832 and his 
attention was given to the cultivation and development of a well im- 
proved farm in Ontario. Success attended his labors because his opera- 
tions were intelligently conducted, for he was a well educated man of 
broad and liberal views. He was a member of the Anglican church and 
his political support was given to the Conservative party. His father, 
Dr. Joseph Adamson, and his uncle. Dr. Peter Adamson, were physicians 
of high standing and in 1820 they were sent to Canada by the British 
government to minister to the physical welfare of their subjects in the 
Dominion. Dr. Joseph Adamson was also active in military affairs, 
serving throughout the Napoleonic wars with the rank of colonel. The 
maternal grandfather, John Blain, was a native of Ireland and as a young 
man migrated to Canada, where he became connected with milling opera- 
tions. His daughter, Mrs. Adamson, was born in 1837, and passed away 
in 1913, when seventy-six years of age, and Mr. Adamson died in 1910, 
at the age of seventy-eight. They reared a family of eleven children, all 
of whom are living. 



58 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

James F. Adamson, the ninth in order of birth, obtained his profes- 
sional training in Trinity Medical College of Toronto, Ontario, from 
which he was graduated with the class of 1904, and afterward went to 
the northern part of the province, where he remained for about six 
months. In 1906 he came to the west, locating in Edmonton, which has 
since been his home, and the passing years have brought him a large 
practice, for he has a thorough understanding of the principles of medical 
science and correctly applies his knowledge to the needs of his patients. 

Dr. Adamson is a veteran of the World war. He enlisted in the 
Medical Corps of the Royal Army in August, 1915, and was commissioned 
a lieutenant. In the same month he was sent overseas and won a cap- 
taincy during the second year of the war. He was released from mili- 
tary duty in 1919 and returned to Edmonton, where he has since followed 
his profession uninterruptedly. 

In April, 1908, Dr. Adamson was united in marriage to Miss Agnes 
Mackerow, who was born, reared and educated in the city of Toronto, 
and they have three children: Grace, Robert and Peter. Politically the 
Doctor adheres to the Conservative party and his religious views are in 
accord with the doctrines of the Anglican church. His fraternal connec- 
tions are with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Foresters. 
He has taken postgraduate work in New York city and has never lost the 
attitude of a student toward his profession, in which he has made con- 
tinuous progress, winning a well-merited reputation as an able and con- 
scientious physician. 



WILLIAM LAURIE. 



William Laurie, a prominent barrister of Cardston, was born at Owen 
Sound, Ontario, on the 28th of September, 1856, a son of Patrick Gammie 
and Mary Eliza (Carney) Laurie, the former born in Scotland, in 1833, 
and the latter born in Barrie, Ontario, in the same year. The paternal 
grandfather William Laurie, was born in Scotland and emigrated to 
Ontario in 1843. He was well educated for his day, being a graduate of 
the Mareschal College in Aberdeen, Scotland, and he taught school and 
engaged in farming until his demise in 1879. The maternal grandfather, 
Richard Carney, who emigrated to Ontario in 1833, from London, Eng- 
land, was sheriff of the Algoma district of Ontario for many years. His 
death occurred in 1885. Patrick G. Laurie located in Ontario in 1843, at 
the age of ten years. He learned the newspaper business in Toronto 
and worked on various papers there, and later became manager and editor 
of the Owen Sound Times, subsequently establishing and managing the 
Essex Record, at Windsor, Ontario. In 1869 he went to Winnipeg as 
an employe of the Nor'wester, then owned by Sir John Schultz, and he 
was connected with various papers in Winnipeg until 1878. At that time 
he located in Battleford, Saskatchewan, and established the Saskatchewan 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 59 

Herald, the first newspaper ever published west of Winnipeg. It is still 
in existence and is now owned and managed by his son, Major R. C. 
Laurie. Mr. Laurie devoted practically all of his life to newspaper 
work and he was widely known in that connection. He was Queen's 
Printer for the Northwest Territories from 1878 to 1883. He was an 
inspector of schools in the early days and also served as a coroner for 
some time. His political allegiance was given to the conservative party 
and his religious faith was that of the Anglican church. His wife was 
a member of the Methodist church. Mr. Laurie's demise occurred in 
1903, and his widow died in 1912. To their union eleven children were 
born, six of whom are living: William, whose name introduces this re- 
view; Major Richard C. ; Mabel, the wife of John A. Reid, who served as 
Alberta representative to England ; Minnie, the widow of P. V. Gauvreau, 
first agent of the Dominion lands at Edmonton ; Effie, the widow of 
Lieutenant J. H. Storer, who was killed in action in France in 1917. Mrs. 
Storer is now a member of the staff of the Moose Jaw Times ; and Jessie, 
the wife of J. C. DeGear of Battleford, Ontario. 

In the acquirement of his education William Laurie attended Mani- 
toba College at Winnipeg and later began the study of law in that city. 
He was admitted to the territorial bar in 1895. He was engaged in civil 
service work from 1884 to 1890 in Battleford, and from 1890 to 1897 in 
Regina, Saskatchewan. He worked in a law office in Lethbridge for some 
time, having located there in 1897, and in 1901 he came to Cardston and 
established offices for the practice of law. In 1914 he went to Battleford, 
Ontario, where he served as mayor for two and one-half years. He re- 
turned to Cardston in 1918 and resumed his practice, and he is a promi- 
nent and highly esteemed barrister and has an extensive clientele. Mr. 
Laurie is a veteran of the Northwest Rebellion of 1885. He joined the 
Royal Northwest Mounted Police as special constable and was active in 
the battle of Duck Lake. 

Mr. Laurie has been twice married. His first wife was Elizabeth 
Herbert, a native of Warwick, Ontario. They were married in 1892 and 
her death occurred in the same year. In 1894 he was married to Ilia 
Humphries, a native of Strathroy, Ontario, and to them two children 
have been born : William T. joined the Princess Pat Regiment for service 
in the World war and went overseas. He was wounded at Vimy Ridge, 
on the 9th of April, 1917, and upon recovery he was transferred into 
the air service, and was flying in France when the armistice was signed. 
He entered service in 1916 and was overseas almost three years. He is 
now living at Tampa, Florida, where he is engaged in the banking busi- 
ness; Douglas C. M. joined the Princess Pat Regiment in 1915 and was 
wounded on the 8th of October, 1916. He was sent to England to con- 
valesce and in June, 1917, returned to France, and was with the Old 
Regiment at Mons when the signing of the armistice closed hostilities. 
He is now a clerk in the Union Bank at Cardston. 

Mr. Laurie is a consistent member of the Presbyterian church, while 
his wife is a member of the Evangelical church. His political allegiance 



60 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

is given to the Conservative party and he was town solicitor for nine 
years. He has also been school trustee. Fraternally Mr. Laurie is iden- 
tified with the Knights of Pythias. He is a man of high intellectual 
attainments and possesses a genial and pleasing personality, which has 
won for him many friends. 



NORMAN MONTAGUE PLUMMER. 

Born and educated in England, Norman Montague Plummer, a bar- 
rister of Calgary, came to Alberta at the age of twenty-seven to seek his 
fortune in the Canadian Northwest. After a somewhat varied experi- 
ence in the work of the Dominion government and a period of service in 
the Great war, he took up the study of law and is now practicing inde- 
pendently and successfully. 

At Swindon, Wiltshire, Norman Montague Plummer was born on the 
5th of September, 1882, his parents being Alfred and Caroline Elizabeth 
(Brown) Plummer. The father was a merchant, dealing in wines and 
spirits throughout his life, his death occurring in 1911. Norman M. 
Plummer never knew the joys of a mother's care, for his mother died 
when he was a baby. His education was acquired at All Saints' School 
at Bloxham, which is affiliated with Magdalene College, Oxford, and is 
one of the links in the Woodward system of public schools. In 1901 he 
passed the necessary examinations to qualify to act as an auctioneer, 
surveyor and valuer. Upon leaving school he was articled to Thomas 
Lavington, an auctioneer, for four years and upon completing his ap- 
prenticeship engaged in that business until 1907. In this line of activity, 
however, he saw little chance of fulfilling his ambitions, so like many 
another young Englishman, he turned to the colonies for a larger oppor- 
tunity. 

In 1907 he came out to Edmonton, where he took up the study of 
accounting and later entered the government service at Grouard, Alberta. 
In the organization of this village he took a leading part and was its first 
secretary and treasurer. He stayed there with the Dominion Land de- 
partment until trouble with his eyes made it impossible for him to carry 
on his work. Edmonton, whence he had come, was far away to the 
south and upper Alberta was locked fast in the grip of an Arctic winter, 
but the young man set out on foot for his four hundred mile journey 
southward and walked the entire distance on the ice. Happily he arrived 
safely, suffering no ill effects from this adventuresome trip, and soon 
obtained a transfer to the Land Titles office in Calgary, where he continued 
in the government service for several years. In 1914 he passed his ex- 
aminations for the office of deacon in the Anglican church, with the in- 
tention of being ordained subsequently as one of the regular clergy, and 
for some time following he was connected with the activities of this 
church. On the 22d of June, 1918, he joined the Fifteenth Light Horse 




NORMAN M. PLUMMER. 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 63 

Regiment, but was transferred to the post of secretary to the assistant 
director of chaplain services, which he held until he was honorably dis- 
charged on the 31st of July, 1919. 

Starting at the bottom again in civilian life, upon his return to Cal- 
gary, Mr. Plummer entered a law office as a law student and having suc- 
cessfully passed his examinations was called to the bar in May, 1922, and 
during the same month he was granted the degree of Bachelor of Laws 
by the University of Alberta. He was in partnership with Mr. C. F. 
Adams until the end of February, 1923, when the firm was dissolved and 
he is now practicing on his own account. Mr. Plummer is a man of 
strong character, has a well trained mind and possesses marked initia- 
tive. The public will do well to watch him, for he gives every promise 
of making a brilliant record of his legal career. 

Mr. Plummer was married to Miss Elizabeth Leard, on the 6th of 
November, 1912. She was the daughter of Robert Leard, a native of 
Prince Edward Island, as was her mother also. Both parents are now 
deceased, and Mrs. Plummer died on March 2, 1923, at Calgary. 

As a lover of outdoor sports Mr. Plummer is well known in Calgary. 
He belongs to the Canadian Club, was secretary and treasurer of the Cal- 
gary Cricket Club for nine years and of the Calgary District Cricket 
League. He likewise is secretary-treasurer of the Calgary Lawn Bowling 
Club and is a life member of the Newbury Guildhall Club, one of the 
prominent clubs in the south of England. Politically he follows an inde- 
pendent course and he is a member and an honorary lay reader of the 
Anglican church. In connection with his legal interests he maintains 
membership in the Alberta Law Society, the Calgary Bar Association and 
the Canadian Bar Association. 



THEODORE BRANDLEY. 

The history of Stirling would be incomplete without the record of 
Theodore Brandley, pioneer merchant and stock raiser. He was born in 
Zurich, Switzerland, on the 7th of December, 1851, a son of Henry and 
Anna (Meier) Brandley, likewise natives of Zurich. The father was a 
machinist by trade, serving three years' apprenticeship, during which 
time he received only his board. In 1872 he came to this country, bring- 
ing with him his family, and he immediately located in Salt Lake City. 
He followed his trade there for many years, building up a reputation as 
an expert latheman. His demise occurred in 1893, at the age of sixty-four 
years. Mrs. Brandley died in 1874, when forty-two years of age. To 
their union four children were born: Theodore, whose name introduces 
this review; Henry, who is living in Salt Lake City and is a deputy 
sheriff of Salt Lake county; Carl, who died in 1920, at the age of fifty- 
six years. He was a prominent solicitor of Salt Lake; and Anna, who 
is the wife of Joseph Coullard, a retired mining engineer of Montreal. 



64 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

Throughout his life Mr. Brandley was a stanch supporter of the republi- 
can party and for some years he was a consistent communicant of the 
Protestant church. Later, however, he became a member of the Church 
of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and he was an elder in the church at 
Salt Lake. 

In the acquirement of his education Theodore Brandley attended the 
public schools of Switzerland and after putting his textbooks aside he 
became an apprentice in the baker's trade for two years. Upon the com- 
pletion of his apprenticeship he worked in a bakery for another two years 
and subsequently came to the United States with his parents. He located 
with them in Salt Lake City and resided there until 1875, when he moved 
to Richfield, Utah. He farmed there for four years, at the termination 
of which time he entered the general mercantile business, his stock in- 
cluding hardware and furniture. He achieved substantial success in the 
conduct of that enterprise but he disposed of his interests in May, 1899, 
and came to Alberta, locating at Stirling. He bought four hundred acres 
of raw prairie land here, which he set about to bring to a high state of 
improvement and he engaged in general farming and stock raising. He 
likewise built a small store in Stirling and established a mercantile busi- 
ness. The business grew to such extensive proportions that he was com- 
pelled to build a larger store and he is now conducting the business under 
the name of Theo. Brandley. He is well known in Stirling by reason of 
his success in business affairs and he is accounted one of the active 
workers and progressive farmers of this locality, having the unqualified 
confidence and esteem of the entire community. 

Mr. Brandley has been married three times. In 1872 he was married 
to Miss Mary E. Nagely, a native of Switzerland. To their union the 
following children were born : Mary, who died in infancy ; Theodore, who 
was born in 1874, and died in January, 1922. He engaged in the meat 
business in Stirling for a time, being a butcher by trade, and he also 
worked in the mines in British Columbia; Joseph S., who is engaged in 
farming near Stirling; Rulon, who was attending the University of Utah 
at the time of his demise in 1892; Albert, who is engaged in farming 
near Stirling; Anna, who is the wife of H. Ostlund, a well known barrister 
of Lethbridge; and Reinhard, who died in infancy. Mr. Brandley was 
married the second time to Miss Marguerite Keeler, a native of Utah. 
Her demise occurred in 1910, when forty-five years of age. To them the 
following children were born : Louis, who is a graduate of Brigham Young 
University of Provo, Utah, is engaged in farming near Stirling; Myrtle 
is the wife of E. Burgomaster, a salesman at Salt Lake; Wilford is en- 
gaged in farming near Stirling; Harold, who is a graduate of the 
Brigham Young University, is a resident of Salt Lake; Marie is the wife 
of John Willardson, a successful lumberman of Elsinore, Utah; Emma is 
the wife of Ben Peterson, who is farming near Raymond ; and Grace is 
the wife of Paul Redd, who is in educational work in Raymond. Mr. 
Brandley's third wife was Eliza Zaugg and to their union four children 
have been born : Alma, Theodora, Noel and Delight, all living at home. 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 65 

Mr. Brandley is a communicant of the Church of Jesus Christ of 
Latter-day Saints and he is councilor to H. S. Allen, president of the 
Taylor Stake. He was one of the organizers of the local church. In his 
political views he is a Liberal and he is an active member of the party. 
He is now serving his ninth year as a member of the school board. While 
a resident of Utah he was a member of the constitutional convention of 
that state in 1904 and he served three terms as mayor of Richfield, and 
was chairman of the republican central committee in the county. 



CHARLES W. LEONARD. 

Charles W. Leonard, an alert and enterprising business man, who 
has advanced steadily toward the goal of success, is now president of 
the Western Transfer & Storage, Limited, at Edmonton. He was born 
near Woodford, Ontario, on the 7th of January, 1872, and was reared on 
a farm. He acquired his education in the public schools and at the Owen 
Sound Collegiate Institute in Ontario, and at the age of sixteen years he 
started out to provide for his own support. It was through his individual 
labor that he gained the money that enabled him to pursue his college 
course, after which he took up the profession of teaching, which he fol- 
lowed for a few years. In 1899 he removed westward to Saddle Lake, 
Alberta, where he became a teacher among the Cree Indians, thus con- 
tinuing his labors for eight years. On the expiration of that period he 
removed to Edmonton and was employed in the auditing department of 
the Provincial government for three years. 

Mr. Leonard next became identified with the company of which he is 
now the president. It was a small concern at the time, having only two 
teams and one single-horse wagon to take care of all its transfer busi- 
ness of that period. The business was then carried on under the name 
of the Western Cartage Company. Through the intervening years and 
under the capable guidance of Mr. Leonard, the patronage has steadily 
increased and the business constantly developed until this is now one of 
the largest transfer companies in the province. In addition to conduct- 
ing a general transfer business the company has had the contract since 
1912 as carters' agent for the Canadian Pacific Railroad and secured a 
similar contract with the Canadian Northern Railroad. In 1915 the 
corporation name was changed to the Western Transfer & Storage, Lim- 
ited. In 1920 the company became carters' agents for the Grand Trunk 
Pacific Railroad, handling all business for the company in the way of 
hauling and transfer work in the city of Edmonton. In fact the Western 
Transfer & Storage, Limited, is today cartage agents .for all the railroads 
entering the city, has several subsidiary companies operating in the city 
and is also the owner of the "Chinook" Coal Mine, and of the Western 
Warehouses, Limited, which is conducted as a subsidiary concern. The 
business is indeed one of mammoth proportions and in the upbuilding of 
(5) 



66 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

it Mr. Leonard has figured most prominently and successfully. He is like- 
wise secretary and treasurer of Sturrochs', Limited, a dry goods com- 
pany. His judgment is sound, his enterprise unfaltering and his pro- 
gressiveness has long been accounted one of the most forceful factors in 
his career. 

Notwithstanding the extent and importance of his commercial inter- 
ests Mr. Leonard has always found time for activity in other fields and 
for the enjoyment of the social pleasures of home and of friendship. He 
wedded Nettie Wilcox and they have three children : Howard, Marchmont 
and Dorothy. Mr. Leonard is a member of the Council of the Board of 
Trade, also of the Rotary Club and the Fifteen Hundred Club and thus 
manifests an earnest and effective interest in the city's growth and prog- 
ress and its civic development. He is also president of the Northern 
Alberta Coal Operators' Association. Nor is he neglectful of the higher, 
holier duties of life, but takes an active interest in the moral progress 
of the community. He is president of the Young Men's Christian Asso- 
ciation, of which he was treasurer, and he has been treasurer and chair- 
man of the finance committee of the McDougall Methodist church, taking 
an active interest in the various branches of the church work and doing 
everything in his power to promote its growth and extend its influence. 
He assisted in organizing and was the first president of the Canadian 
Warehousemen's Association, the organization of which took place in his 
office. This association has attained a national reputation and its name 
has been changed to the Canadian Storage and Transfermen's Associa- 
tion. 



EPHRAM HARKER. 



Farming in its most progressive and modern aspects finds a worthy 
representative in Ephram Harker of Cardston. He was born in Salt 
Lake, Utah, in 1854, a son of Joseph and Susanna (Sneath) Harker, 
extended mention of whom is made in the sketch of Levi Harker, appear- 
ing elsewhere in this work. 

Ephram Harker had little opportunity for an education. He herded 
sheep for his father as a boy of sixteen years and subsequently engaged 
in sheep raising with his father on shares. Later he ran sheep on his 
own account on an open range, and in 1876 he went with his sheep to 
Wyoming and located near Evanston, on the Green river. He remained 
there until the spring of 1889, when he came to Alberta and settled near 
Cardston. He had traded his sheep in Wyoming for cattle here and he 
made the trip overland with a team and covered wagon. When he came 
to Cardston there was not a wire fence between Cardston and Leth- 
bridge, very little ground was plowed, and Cardston had just a few log 
cabins. In 1891 he trailed a band of sheep from Montana here and in 
1893 trailed another band here. At one time he ran ten thousand sheep 
and later bought ten thousand more, ranging twenty thousand at one 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 67 

time. He was very successful until 1908, when he lost a great many- 
sheep in the May blizzard. When the homesteaders began to come into 
this section of the country Mr. Harker disposed of his land and invested 
in land in the Cochrane country. At one time he owned three thousand 
acres there, two thousand acres being located on the Milk river, and one 
thousand acres were under cultivation. He ran his last band of sheep 
at the Milk River Ranch and also engaged in cattle raising there. Subse- 
quently he returned to the family home at Cardston and is now devoting 
his entire time and attention to general farming. Mr. Harker was one 
of the organizers and builders of the first flour mill here, which was 
operated by water power. Floods washed out the mill and after they 
moved the machinery and rebuilt in town Mr. Harker sold his interest. 

Mr. Harker has been twice married. His first wife was Alice Ben- 
nion, who was born in Salt Lake county, Utah, and to them six children 
were born : Mary is teaching school at Mountain View ; Susan is the wife 
of Rufus E. Pilling; Ralph is living in Boise, Idaho, where he is a suc- 
cessful business man; Evelyn is the wife of James McMahon of Boise, 
Idaho ; Edith, who is deceased, was the wife of Henry Walburger of Milk 
River; and Samuel is living on the Cochrane ranch. These children are 
consistent communicants of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day 
Saints. In 1889 Mr. Harker married Miss Elizabeth Carter, who was 
born in St. George, Utah, and to them eleven children have been born : 
Rose, the eldest member of the family, is deceased ; Joseph, who is living 
at Raymond, served on a two-year mission in the State of Oregon ; Winni- 
fred is the wife of Seymour Smith of Mountain View; Irene is the wife 
of 0. Berry of Cardston; and Elizabeth, Rex and Marjorie are living at 
home. The other children died in infancy. 

Mr. Harker is an active worker in the Church of Jesus Christ of 
Latter-day Saints and he is a member of the high council, to which he 
belonged when the temple was constructed here. Mr. Harker gives his 
political allegiance to the Conservative party and he is active in the 
furtherance of any movement for the benefit of the community. He has 
always been a hard working man of earnest purpose and honest methods 
and fully merits the success that has come to him. He is favorably 
known in his community and numbers among his neighbors and fellow 
townsmen many stanch friends. 



REGINALD CUMBERLAY DAY, B. A. 

Reginald CumlDerlay Day, engaged in law practice at Edmonton, is 
recognized as an able advocate and a counselor whose judgment can be 
relied upon, and studiousness, combined with the habit of thoroughness, 
has brought him success and prominence in his profession. A native of 
Canada, he was born at Bradford, in the province of Ontario, on the 10th 
of May, 1886, and his parents were Isaac and Jeane (Caswell) Day, the 



68 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

former of whom was born at Creemore, Ontario. In 1910 Mr. Day was 
graduated from Queen's University of Ontario, which bestowed upon 
him the B. A. degree, and he was afterwards admitted to the bar at 
Edmonton, becoming a member of the law firm of Mustard & Day in 
1912. In 1921 John R. Boyle became senior member of the firm, which 
is now known as Boyle, Mustard & Day, and the list of their clients is an 
extensive and representative one. At the outset of his career Mr. Day 
learned the necessity for thorough preparation and never enters the court- 
room without being fully prepared to present his cause in the strong, clear 
light of sound reasoning, based upon the law and the facts in the case. 
He readily combats the opposing counsel in legal battle and his standing 
before the court is an enviable one. 

On the 12th of June, 1912, Mr. Day was united in marriage to Miss 
Helen Frame and they have four children : Margaret Elizabeth, Fred- 
erick George, Helen Jane and John Craig. Mr. Day is a Liberal in his 
political views and in religious faith he is a Presbyterian. He is a mem- 
ber of the Edmonton Club and his cooperation can be counted upon to 
further any movement for the benefit of his city. His attention is con- 
centrated upon his profession, in which he has made continuous progress, 
and while devoted to the interests of his clients, he never forgets that 
he owes a still higher allegiance to the majesty of the law. 



BRIGADIER GENERAL JOHN SMITH STEWART. 

Brigadier General John Smith Stewart is now engaged in the practice 
of dentistry at Lethbridge, having qualified for the profession in 1902. 
He was born at Brampton, Ontario, May 18, 1878, and is a son of John 
and Mary (Armstrong) Stewart, both of whom were of Canadian birth. 
He acquired his early education in the schools of his native town, where 
he passed through consecutive grades to his graduation from the high 
school. He afterward attended the Royal College of Dental Surgeons at 
Toronto, and is an honor graduate of Trinity University. In 1896 he 
became a resident of Alberta, settling at Edmonton, and commenced to 
study dentistry there, remaining at Edmonton until 1902, when he re- 
moved to Lethbridge and for some years was associated with his brother- 
in-law. Dr. McClure. He has since followed the practice of dentistry 
here, save for the period when he was engaged in military service during 
the World war. He was appointed officer in command (major) of the 
Twenty-fifth (Militia) Battery in February, 1908, and he served as a 
private of Strathcona's Horse in South Africa in 1900-1, winning the 
Queen's medal with four clasps. He raised the Twentieth Battery, Ca- 
nadian Field Artillery, for overseas service in November, 1914. He was 
appointed officer in command of the Seventh Brigade, Canadian Field 
Artillery, on the 10th of March, 1915, and in January, 1916, went to 
France, where he was twice wounded. In March, 1917, he was trans- 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 69 

ferred to the command of the Fourth Brigade, C. F. A,, in France, and 
won the D. S. O. and C. M. G. He was also twice mentioned in dispatches 
and was awarded the French Croix de Guerre. In December, 1917, he 
was promoted to the rank of brigadier general, C. R. A., of the Third 
Canadian Division, which divisional artillery he commanded during the 
anxious time in March, 1918, and the advances made from August, 1918, 
onward. 

General Stewart was married on the 25th of September, 1907, to Miss 
Jean Chesney McClure, a daughter of Dr. William McClure of Hamilton, 
Ontario. In politics he is a Conservative and in 1911 and again in 1913 
he was elected to the legislative assembly for Lethbridge, while once 
more he was chosen for legislative honors in 1917 and 1921. He dis- 
charges his political duties with the same sense of fidelity that marked 
his service on the battle fields of the World war and it is characteristic 
of Dr. Stewart that he is loyal to any cause which he espouses. 



HON. NICHOLAS DU BOIS DOMINIC BECK. 

There are certain men who without self-seeking, by the strength of 
their intellectual powers and the force of their personality, draw to them- 
selves an approving public attention. Such an one is Hon. Nicholas D. D. 
Beck of Edmonton, who for fifteen years has served as puisne judge of 
the supreme court of Alberta, and while he has attained a position of 
preeminence in his profession, he has also been a most important factor 
in advancing the educational standards of his province. He was born 
at Cobourg, Ontario, May 4, 1857, a son of Rev. J. W. R. and Georgina 
(Boulton) Beck, the latter a daughter of Hon. G. S. Boulton, M. L., now 
deceased. For many years the father was rector of the Anglican church 
of Peterboro, Ontario. 

In the acquirement of an education Nicholas Du Bois Dominic Beck 
attended private schools and the Collegiate Institute of Peterboro, after- 
ward becoming a student in the law department of the University of 
Toronto, from which he won the LL. B. degree in 1881. He had been 
called to the bar of Ontario in 1879 and began his professional career in 
Peterboro, where he maintained an office until 1883. He then came to 
the west, locating at Winnipeg, Manitoba, where he followed his profes- 
sion for six years. While in that city he entered the field of journalism, 
becoming editor of the Northwest Catholic Review, of which he was for 
a time also the owner, and this publication is continued as a medium of 
expression for the opinions of the English-speaking Catholics of western 
Canada. On leaving Winnipeg he came to Alberta, choosing Calgary as 
the scene of his professional activities, and from 1889 until 1891 he was 
a member of the law firm of Lougheed, McCarthy & Beck. He then 
removed to Edmonton, where he has since resided, taking a deep interest 
in the larger aspects of the political, legal, moral and educational advance- 



70 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

ment of the Northwest Territories, now represented by the provinces of 
Alberta and Saskatchewan. It was not long before his ability became 
recognized and he was made crown prosecutor for the Edmonton district, 
serving in that connection from 1891 until 1907. From 1892 until 1907 
he was solicitor for the city of Edmonton and in 1893 he was created 
Queen's Counsel. In 1907 still greater honors came to him in his appoint- 
ment to high judicial office in the province, that of puisne judge of the 
supreme court of Alberta, and in 1921 he was appointed a member of 
the appellate division of that court. He brought to the office the judicial 
temperament, the fine poise, the instinctive love of justice, the breadth of 
mind, the integrity and the sympathy for mankind which constitute the 
ideal jurist and his course upon the bench has received the highest en- 
dorsement. In 1905 he was retained by the Dominion government as one 
of its legal advisers upon the autonomy bills of Alberta and Saskatche- 
wan. For a time he was editor of the Territorial and Alberta Law Re- 
ports. He was a bencher of the Territorial Law Society from the time of 
its organization and became its president, and on the organization of the 
Alberta Law Society he continued as a bencher and as president of that 
society until his appointment to the bench. 

No man in Alberta has worked more earnestly and effectively to pro- 
mote educational advancement in western Canada than has Mr. Justice 
Beck. He was a member of the council of public instruction for the terri- 
tory and Alberta and later a member of the senate of the University of 
Alberta, of which he is now ex-officio member and vice chancellor. As 
a result of the respective positions of the Conservative and Liberal parties 
upon the educational clauses of the autonomy bills, the former opposing 
any and the latter ready to accord some, though in his opinion a too 
meager guarantee of the continuance of separate schools, Mr. Justice 
Beck thenceforward, until his elevation to the bench, attached himself to 
the Liberal party, both in provincial and dominion politics. 

Mr. Justice Beck has been married twice. His first union was with 
Miss Mary Ethel Lloyd, whom he wedded in 1886, and they became the 
parents of four children. The two daughters are Mrs. H. Milton Martin 
of Edmonton, and Mrs. John C. Landry, the wife of one of the leading 
barristers of this city. The sons are Cyril L. and H. Austin Beck, The 
former followed in the professional footsteps of his father. Soon after 
the outbreak of the World war he enlisted for military duty, was com- 
missioned a lieutenant, and was sent to France, where he was shell 
shocked but remained in the service until the close of hostilities. The 
other son also defended his country in its hour of need and was made a 
sergeant. He was rendered unfit for further active service, but until the 
armistice did excellent work in the United States for the United States 
government. Both are now residents of Los Angeles, California. For 
his second wife Judge Beck married Miss Louisa Teefy, in 1906. 

The Judge became a Catholic in 1883 and he is one of the governors 
of the Catholic Church Extension Society of Canada. He is a member of 
the Edmonton Club but is not identified with any fraternal organizations. 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 71 

He is leaving the impress of his individuality in notable measure upon the 
legal history of the province and the record of no public official of Alberta 
has been more faultless in honor, fearless in conduct nor stainless in 
reputation. For thirty-one years he has been a resident of Edmonton and 
his record is one which reflects honor and distinction upon the city. 



BARNEY W. COLLISON. 

Barney W. Collison is a barrister and solicitor of Banff, commissioner 
of the Dominion police and police magistrate, having jurisdiction in all 
Dominion parks, and secretary of the Banff Winter Carnival. He was 
born in Dundas district, Ontario, on the 27th of December, 1880, a son of 
James and Katherine (McNulty) Collison, the former a native of On- 
tario and the latter of Ireland. For many years the father followed agri- 
cultural pursuits in this province but is now retired, residing in Iroquois. 
Mrs. Collison's death occurred in August, 1885. 

In the acquirement of his education Barney W. Collison attended the 
public schools of Ontario and after graduating from high school took up 
the study of law in Cornwall, under the preceptorship of R. A. Pringle 
Kile, deceased. Later he enrolled in Osgoode Hall, Toronto, and he was 
graduated from that institution with the LL. B. degree in the class of 
1905. In September of that year he was called to the Ontario bar and in 
the same year came west to Calgary and commenced the practice of his 
chosen profession. He devoted his entire time and attention to his law 
practice until October, 1916, when he received his appointment as com- 
missioner of the Dominion police and police magistrate. Subsequently 
he removed to Banff and since coming here he has been a dominant figure 
in civic affairs. To him belongs the credit for the Banff Winter Carnival, 
which was held for the first time in February, 1917, and which proved 
such a success that it has continued to be a yearly event, and is usually 
in full sway from the 24th of February to the 5th of March, Mr. Colli- 
son is secretary of the carnival and James I. Brewster is president. Among 
its many events and attractions are curling, art skating, figure skating, 
skating races, swimming races, hockey matches, snowshoe races, ski 
jumping, long distance ski races, toboggan races, dog races, snowshoe 
tramps, tobogganing, trap shooting, swimming in hot sulphur springs, 
the illuminated Ice Palace, skijoring, ladies' hockey matches, sleighing, 
dancing, etc., and the buffalo barbecue. This Winter Carnival has been 
widely advertised throughout the province and the attendance is increas- 
ing each year. 

In June, 1914, Mr. Collison was married to Miss Marie Payne, the 
ceremony being performed in Calgary, and to their union four children 
have been born: John Bennett, eight years of age; Helen P., seven years 
of age; Katherine E., four years of age; and Ola E., who is three. 

In his political views Mr. Collison is a Conservative and he is never 



72 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

too busy to lend his aid in the furtherance of any movement for the 
benefit of the community at large. He has always been interested in 
outdoor sports and for some time was manager of the lacrosse and 
hockey teams of Calgary. He is a member of the Banff Golf Club and of 
the Banff Curling Club. His religious faith is that of the Anglican 
church. Fraternally he is identified with the Benevolent Protective Order 
of Elks, having been instrumental in locating the lodge here. He was 
made first exalted ruler of the lodge and still holds that position. He 
retains his membership in the Dominion, Alberta and Calgary Bar As- 
sociations. 



ROBERT A. MAITLAND COOK, M. D. 

With thorough professional training and constantly broadening ex- 
perience, Dr. Robert A. Maitland Cook has won for himself a very envi- 
able position as a representative of the medical fraternity in Calgary. 
He specializes in surgery and keeps in close touch with the advancement 
continually being made in the profession, being ever most careful to con- 
form his practice to the highest standards of professional ethics. Dr. 
Cook was born in Grey county, Ontario, on the 8th of February, 1880, a 
son of Thomas and Margaret Marie (Maitland) Cook, the former a na- 
tive of Quebec and the latter of Ontario. Their marriage was celebrated 
in Ontario and Mr. Cook followed agricultural pursuits in the province 
for many years, winning financial independence. He is living retired at 
the present time in Markdale, where he and his wife are prominent and 
highly esteemed citizens. They are active members of the Methodist 
church and the father is identified with the Canadian Order of Foresters. 
He gives his political allegiance to the Conservative party and maintains 
an active interest in civic affairs. To the union of Mr. and Mrs. Cook 
three children were born : Ella, the wife of John Love, a farmer in Sas- 
katchewan ; Robert A. Maitland, whose name introduces this review; and 
John, a retired farmer of Meaford, Ontario. 

In the pursuit of his education Robert A. Maitland Cook attended the 
country schools in the vicinity of the home farm and subsequently gradu- 
ated from the high school at Owen Sound. In early life he developed a 
great liking for the medical profession and therefore, upon the comple- 
tion of his literary education, he entered Trinity Medical College at 
Toronto, from which institution he was graduated in 1903. He began prac- 
tice at Milestone, Saskatchewan, and remained there until 1914, when he 
came to Calgary. In 1915 he entered the Canadian Army Medical Corps 
as an officer for service in the World war, and went overseas in 1916, 
returning to this country in 1917. Prior to entering active service Dr. 
Cook was medical officer for the Eighty-ninth Battalion and after he 
returned to Canada he was assistant deputy in the A. D. M. S. When 
the government started conscription the Doctor was medical examiner for 



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ROBERT A. M. COOK, M. D. 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 75 

the province, Military District No. 13, and examined over forty thousand 
men. In due time he received his honorable discharge from the army 
and in May, 1919, resumed his practice here. He specializes in surgery 
and has become widely known in that connection throughout the province. 
He takes postgraduate work every two years in Chicago and Rochester, 
Minnesota, and in that way keeps in close touch with the continual advance- 
ment being made in the profession. Aside from his profession the Doc- 
tor's hobby is raising chickens and he has produced a number of prize 
winners. 

In 1905 was celebrated the marriage of Dr. Cook to Miss Anna May 
Glenn, a native of Owen Sound, Ontario. To their union one daughter 
was born: Marguerite, who is a student in the local high school. Mrs. 
Cook's death occurred on the 29th of October, 1922. She was a woman of 
culture and refinement and for many years was prominent in the club and 
social circles of this city. She was also a member of the Methodist church 
and a zealous worker in its behalf. Her death came as a severe blow to 
her family and many friends here and in the place of her nativity. 

Dr. Cook and his daughter are consistent members of the Methodist 
church. He is fraternally identified with the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows and socially is a member of the Regal Golf Club and president 
of the organization. He finds his greatest recreation in outdoor sports 
and he is an enthusiastic golfer. 



J. A. CARSWELL. 



J. A. Carswell, owner and editor of the News, is one of the enterpris- 
ing citizens of Red Deer. He was born in Oshawa, Ontario, in September, 
1856, a son of Henry and Hannah (Orr) Carswell, the former a native 
of London, England, and the latter of Cornwall, England. They both 
came to Canada as young people and were married in Ontario. For many 
years the father was in the wholesale bakery and confectionery business. 
The last few years of his life, however, he devoted his entire time and at- 
tention to various city positions to which he had been called. He was a 
consistent member of the Church of England, while his wife was a mem- 
ber of the Methodist church. Both were zealous workers in the interests 
of their respective churches. To the union of Mr. and Mrs. Carswell ten 
children were born, J. A., whose name introduces this review, being the 
fourth in order of birth. Six sons are living, two of them in Alberta, J. 
A. and L. J., the latter being a successful agriculturist. 

In the acquirement of his education J. A. Carswell attended the public 
schools of his birthplace and after graduating from high school went into 
a newspaper office. He worked as an apprentice for some time, familiar- 
izing himself with every phase of the printing trade and in 1881 he pur- 
chased the Colburn Express, which he ran with great success for one 
year. He then returned to Oshawa and purchased the Oshawa Vindica- 



76 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

tor, which he published for ten years. He disposed of that paper because 
of poor health and in 1890 he moved to near Red Deer, where he took up 
a homestead and resided thereon for some fifteen years. The out-of-doors 
life afforded him on the farm soon brought back his health and in 1906 
he moved into Red Deer and reentered the newspaper business. He 
purchased the News, which had been established but one year, and he has 
since published it. It is one of the most up-to-date papers in the district 
and province and enjoys a circulation of over fifteen hundred. In addi- 
tion to printing the paper Mr. Carswell conducts a large job printing 
business. When he first came to Red Deer it was a very small community 
and he has seen it develop into a thriving metropolis, being now the fifth 
largest town in Alberta. He has contributed in a marked degree to this 
development, for he has ever wielded a great influence for good in this 
community. 

In 1883 occurred the marriage of Mr. Carswell and Miss Augusta 
Lemon, who was born in Lundy's Lane, Ontario. To their union six chil- 
dren have been born, five of whom are living : The eldest daughter married 
A. Wood, who is a prominent citizen and is in the mercantile business 
in this province; J. Arthur graduated from the Alberta University with 
the Bachelor of Science degree, and is now engaged in surveying in 
the southern part of Alberta. He is a veteran of the World w^ar, having 
served with the Princess Pat Regiment and later with the Flying Corps ; 
Cecil Henry is employed in his father's printing office, having learned the 
printer's trade upon the completion of his education and is now a linotype 
operator. He is also a veteran of the World war, having enlisted in the 
Eighty-ninth Infantry and volunteered for machine gun service. He 
was twice wounded ; Charles F., a progressive and representative attor- 
ney at Rimbey, received his education in the University of Alberta. He 
was likewise overseas with the Princess Pat Regiment and was so seri- 
ously wounded in the arm at the battle of Vimy Ridge that the arm will 
be crippled for life ; and Kate is attending the University of Alberta, hav- 
ing graduated from high school and taught for two years prior to enter- 
ing the University. 

In his political views Mr. Carswell is a Conservative. For thirty 
years he has been a justice of the peace and he is one of the oldest holders 
of that office in the province. For two years he was a member of the city 
council and he was mayor of Red Deer during 1915 and 1916, giving to 
this community a progressive and prosperous administration. For several 
years he was a member of the local school board and was its chairman 
for one year. He has taken an active part in all farmer's movements 
and was prominent in the organization of an association in the early 
days of his residence here, and also assisted in the organization of 
a creamery association. He was chairman for over thirteen years of the 
county school board in the early days. Mr. Carswell is a consistent mem- 
ber of the Church of England and is a zealous worker in its interests. He 
was a delegate to the synod and was minister's warden for a period of 
from ten to twelve years. Fraternally he is identified with the Masons, 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 77 

holding membership in the Ancient Free & Accepted Masons and the 
Royal Arch Masons, and was treasurer of the blue lodge for a time. Along 
the lines of his business he is identified with various press associations 
and he was formerly secretary of the Alberta Press Club. For recrea- 
tion Mr. Carswell turns to outdoor sports, and for a number of years he 
devoted a great deal of his spare time to curling and was president of the 
Curling Club. Mr. Carswell has proven to be a business man of ability 
and his genial and pleasing personality have won for him many friends. 
He is readily conceded to be one of Red Deer's most essential and leading 
citizens. 



WILLIAM N. CONDELL, M. D. 

Dr. William N. Condell is one of the pioneer medical practitioners of 
Edmonton and the success which he now enjoys is well merited, for he is 
a self-educated, self-made man, who has worked his way upward in his 
profession through indomitable perseverance and the utilization of every 
available opportunity for advancement. He was born at Ventnor, On- 
tario, October 30, 1866, and his parents, William and Eliza (McFadden) 
Condell, were also natives of that province. The father devoted his life 
to the occupation of cabinetmaking, becoming a skilled artisan, and his 
death occurred in Ontario. The mother is now residing at Brandon, in 
that province. She is a member of the Methodist church and Mr. Condell 
was a Baptist in religious faith. They had a family of three sons : Milton, 
William N. and Angus, the last named being one of the leading physi- 
cians of Brandon. The paternal grandfather, William Condell, was a 
native of Ireland and as a young man he came to Canada, settling in the 
province of Ontario, where he followed agricultural pursuits, also work- 
ing as a cabinetmaker. The maternal grandfather, Benjamin McFadden, 
was likewise a native of the Emerald isle and migrated to Canada, cast- 
ing in his lot with the early settlers of Ontario, where he engaged in the 
occupation of farming. 

The public schools of his native province afforded William N. Condell 
his early educational advantages, but his textbooks were soon laid aside 
and he began learning the trade of a carriage maker and woodworker. 
Impelled by the spirit of adventure, he started for California as a young 
man and aided in building some of the first street cars operated in Sacra- 
mento. For seven years he continued to follow his trade in that city, 
carefully saving his earnings in order that he might continue his educa- 
tion, and he then returned to Ontario, where he entered high school. 
After completing his course he became a student in the medical depart- 
ment of Queen's University at Kingston, Ontario, and was graduated with 
the M. D. degree with the class of 1899. He engaged in general practice 
at Spencerville, Ontario, for five years and then went abroad for further 
study, taking postgraduate work in Edinburgh, Scotland, and London, 



78 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

England. On returning to Canada he spent six months in Brockville, 
Ontario, and in 1906 came west, locating in Edmonton, where he has 
since successfully followed his profession. He concentrates his attention 
upon diseases of the eye, ear, nose and throat, of which he has a thorough 
knowledge, and has built up an extensive practice, owing to his expert 
skill, being the first member of the profession in the city to devote his 
time exclusively to those branches of medical science. 

In 1900 Dr. Condell married Miss Abigail Edith Blow, a native of 
South Mountain, Ontario, and a daughter of Robert H. Blow, a pioneer 
carriage maker of the province. To this union was born a son, Arthur 
Blow, who died in 1910, at the age of five. Dr. Condell is the owner of 
an attractive home at No. 10009 One Hundred and Fifth street in Ed- 
monton, in addition to which he has acquired other realty here, thus dem- 
onstrating his faith in the future of the city. He stands for all that is 
progressive in citizenship and is a strong champion of the good roads 
movement, cooperating heartily in every project seeking the improvement 
of his community and district. He attends the Presbyterian church and 
fraternally is identified with the Masonic order, in which he has gained 
high standing. He is a past master of the blue lodge and thrice puissant 
master of the Scottish Rite Consistory, in which he has attained the thirty- 
second degree. He is a member of the Edmonton Academy of Medicine 
and the Alberta Medical Society and is also a Fellow of the American 
College of Surgeons. He is a man of marked strength of character who 
has fought life's battles unaided, never faltering in his purpose to reach 
the goal for which he set out, and the years have brought him success and 
prominence in his profession, while his sterling qualities of heart and 
mind have won for him the respect, admiration and sincere regard of all 
who have the honor of his acquaintance. 



ALBERT W. ERASER. 



Albert W. Eraser, mayor of Vegreville, is also a wide-awake, energetic 
and progressive business man, dealing in real estate and insurance, and 
in winning individual prosperity he has also contributed substantially to 
the improvement and upbuilding of his community. He was born in 
Halifax, Nova Scotia, August 7, 1876, and his parents, Robert and Jean- 
nette (Munro) Eraser, were also natives of that province. Mr. Eraser 
was a sea captain. He and his wife were parents of twelve children. 

The only member of the family who came to Alberta was Albert W. 
Eraser. He was graduated from the Halifax high school and remained 
in his native province until he reached his majority. In 1897 he went to 
Winnipeg, Manitoba, and entered the employ of the Hudson's Bay Com- 
pany, with which he was connected for six years. In 1903 he came to this 
province, entering business circles of Eort Saskatchewan, in the Victoria 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 79 

district, where he remained for three years. In 1906 he removed to 
Vegreville and six years later embarked in the real estate and insurance 
business, with which he has since been identified. In the conduct of his 
interests he displays enterprise, foresight and sound judgment and as the 
years have passed his business has enjoyed a continuous and healthful 
growth, having now assumed profitable proportions. 

Mr. Eraser was married at Winnipeg, Manitoba, in 1901, to Miss 
Georgia Johnson, a native of the province of Ontario, and they have be- 
come the parents of three children : Margaret, Carroll and Robert Nich- 
olas. Mrs. Eraser is affiliated with the Church of England and Mr. Eraser 
is a Presbyterian in religious faith. He is a strong Conservative in his 
political views and an active worker in the ranks of the party. He has 
also taken a prominent part in municipal affairs and is now mayor of 
the town. His standing in local business circles is indicated in the fact 
that he has been chosen president of the Vegreville Board of Trade, which 
office he is now filling. He is a member of the Community Club and the 
Curling Club and is president of the latter organization. Fraternally he 
is identified with the Masonic order and has been made grand master of 
his lodge. His interests and activities are evenly distributed and his is a 
well-rounded development. He has always been found thoroughly reliable 
in business matters and his even-paced energy has carried him steadily 
forward to the goal of success. He is deeply interested in the welfare 
and advancement of his community and is prominent among those whose 
enterprise and initiative typify the spirit of progress in Vegreville. 



W. DIXON CRAIG. 



W. Dixon Craig, of the Edmonton bar, is a man of versatile talents 
who has won success in the field of mining engineering as well as in the 
legal profession, and during the period of his residence in, this city he 
has gained a wide and favorable acquaintance. He was born at Toronto, 
Ontario, and his parents were Thomas Dixon and Annie (Girvin) Craig, 
the former a native of London, England. The father was prominent in 
public affairs, serving for several years as a member of parliament. Both 
Mr. and Mrs. Craig are deceased. 

W. Dixon Craig acquired his elementary training along educational 
lines in the public schools of his native city and afterward became a 
student at the University of Toronto, taking the B. A. degree and the 
Cawthorne Medal. He also completed a course in mining engineering 
and from 1899 until 1913 successfully followed that profession in eastern 
Canada. Attracted by the legal profession, he came to Edmonton in 
1913 to take up the study of law and since 1917 he has been a member 
of the firm of Woods, Sherry, Macalister & Craig. They occupy a suite 
of offices on the ninth floor of the McLeod building and conduct a large 
and constantly increasing law practice. Mr. Craig is well read in the 



80 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

minutiae of the law, is able to base his argument upon a knowledge of and 
familiarity with precedents and to present a case upon its merits, never 
failing to recognize the main point at issue and never neglecting to give 
a thorough preparation. He is also on the faculty of law at the Uni- 
versity of Alberta. 

In Ontario, Canada, on the 4th of June, 1902, Mr. Craig was married 
to Miss Grace E. Redmond, a daughter of W. L. Redmond, deceased, and 
they have become the parents of two children : Carmen Dixon and Doro- 
thy Dixon. Mr. Craig is affiliated with the Anglican church and is deeply 
and helpfully interested in its work, being a member of the vestry of 
Holy Trinity church and also of the synod of the diocese of Edmonton. 
He is a Conservative in his political views and his social nature finds ex- 
pression in his identification with the Edmonton Club and the Mayfair 
Golf & Country Club. He is serving on the board of governors of the 
latter organization and is also a member of the Canadian Institute of 
Mining & Metallurgy and the Association of Professional Engineers of 
Alberta. He possesses a vigorous mentality and his marked ability has 
won for him high standing in the legal profession and also in the profes- 
sion of mining engineering. His interests and activites are evenly bal- 
anced and he is recognized as a broad-minded, public-spirited citizen, 
whose influence is at all times on the side of progress, reform and im- 
provement. 



JOHN F. FOWLER. 



Unremitting energy, constantly applied toward the achievement of 
success, has enrolled John F. Fowler among the substantial business men 
of the Wetaskiwin district. He has been living retired in Wetaskiwin 
since 1921. Mr. Fowler was born in New Brunswick in 1860, a son of 
Stephen H. and Mary Jane (Miller) Fowler, the latter a native of Nova 
Scotia, and the former a native of New Brunswick, where their marriage 
was celebrated. For many years Mr. Fowler was in the lumber business 
there and also in western Ontario, the Rainy River country. In 1902 he 
and his family came to Wetaskiwin, some time prior to which date he 
had retired from active business. He was well educated for his day and 
took an active and prominent part in all civic affairs, and was a stanch 
supporter of the Conservative party. Both Mr. and Mrs. Fowler were 
members of the Methodist church. To their union eight children were 
born, John F., whose name introduces this review, being the sixth in order 
of birth, and the only one now living. Mr. and Mrs. Fowler were highly 
respected and esteemed citizens of this community. 

In the acquirement of his education John F. Fowler attended school 
in Ontario and Quebec. He was graduated from the Collegiate Institute 
in Ontario and his first position after putting his textbooks aside was as 
bookkeeper in a lumberyard in New Ontario. He kept books and clerked 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 81 

for some twenty-three years, being thus employed in Winnipeg when he 
determined to come west and start in business on his own account. He 
arrived in Wetaskiwin in 1902 and with two other men, opened a general 
store. They maintained the partnership for a number of years, building 
up a prosperous business, and subsequently Mr. Fowler bought all inter- 
ests and conducted the enterprise as sole owner until 1921, when he closed 
out and retired from active business life. During the past year, however, 
he built two store buildings in this city. His success is attributed to hard 
work. Like all self-made men he has enjoyed the struggle for success 
and without doubt, finds his greatest satisfaction in the thought that he 
is indebted to no one for the position he occupies in the esteem of his 
fellowmen or the prosperity he is enjoying. 

In 1888 was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Fowler to Miss Kate 
Heavysege, a daughter of Charles Heavysege, the poet. She was born 
in Montreal and there reared to young womanhood. Mr. and Mrs. Fowler 
have a daughter, Edith, who attended the schools of Wetaskiwin from 
kindergarten through high school and later taught school in Gwynne dis- 
trict. She married, in May, 1923, Mr. C. F. Freeman of Gwynne district. 

Mr. Fowler has always given his political support to the Conservative 
party and he maintains an active interest in party aifairs. For eight 
years he was chairman of the local school board and for three terms he 
held the office of mayor of Wetaskiwin. During his administration he 
inaugurated and brought to completion many movements for the benefit 
of the community at large, and he is now a member of the education coun- 
cil of the province of Alberta. He is an upright and honorable man, 
interested in the advancement of the public welfare, and has won the 
confidence and regard of his neighbors, both as a successful business man 
and as a useful citizen. 



JOSEPH WARD TURNER. 

Joseph Ward Turner, since 1913 the efficient and valued superintend- 
ent of the Edmonton waterworks, has had broad, valued and interesting 
experiences throughout his life, being called to many sections of the world 
and gaining that wide experience which extensive travel and foreign resi- 
dence brings. He was born in Shropshire, England, August 10, 1872, 
and when he was but twelve years of age his father sent him to Jamaica, 
West Indies, for the benefit of his health, where he joined an older brother, 
who was living on the island, engaged in missionary work. For four 
years Joseph W. Turner remained in Jamaica, during which time he was 
instructed by a private tutor. He then returned to his native country 
and entered upon an apprenticeship in mechanical and steam engineering, 
serving a four-year term of indenture. On the expiration of that period 
he went to South Africa and for six months he was identified with the 
Cape government, engaging in railroad work. He afterward went to the 
(6) 



82 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

Transvaal, where he was active in the work of installing machinery in the 
gold mines for four years and subsequently he spent a year in England, 
after which he returned to Jamaica, where other members of the family 
were living. In fact, the Turners had large interests on the island. 

While it was not necessary for Mr. Turner to follow his profession 
when he again went to Jamaica, he nevertheless accepted a government 
position, largely equivalent to that of a magistrate in Canada. He con- 
tinued to reside on the island until 1905, when he made his way northward 
to Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, and there became identified with the city 
government, continuing thus to serve from 1905 until 1907. In the latter 
year he located at Strathcona and was there superintendent of water and 
sewer, until the amalgamation of the city with the greater Edmonton, 
at which time he became superintendent of the water system of the united 
cities, the city waterworks in diiferent sections becoming united under 
one management. Since 1913, therefore, Mr. Turner has been superin- 
tendent of the Edmonton waterworks and has been the prime mover in 
promoting the splendid system that the city now enjoys. His thorough 
understanding of civil and mechanical engineering, his familiarity with 
the scientific principles which underlie his work and his close application 
and indefatigable energy are the dynamic forces which have made his 
career a piosperous one and given him high position in connection with 
the city interests of Edmonton. 

Fraternally Mr. Turner is connected with the Masons and also is a 
member of the Board of Trade, while his religious faith is that of the 
Baptist church. His life has ever been actuated by high and honorable 
principles and the sterling worth of his character is attested by all with 
whom he has come into contact. 



VINCENT I. STEWART. 

One of the pioneer settlers of the Cardston district is Vincent I. Stew- 
art of Cardston. He was born in Ogden, Utah, on the 3d of May, 1865, 
a son of Isaiah L. and Elizabeth (Hatch) Stewart. He was born in Ala- 
bama on the 15th of February, 1837, and she was born in Nauvoo, Illinois, 
on the 2d of June, 1843. Their marriage was celebrated at Ogden, Utah, 
on the 16th of December, 1862. Mr. Stewart went with his mother to 
Ogden, Utah, in the early '50s. They had joined the Church of Jesus 
Christ of Latter-day Saints in Alabama. Isaiah L. Stewart attended the 
public schools in Ogden and in due time established a mercantile store 
there and also took up some land near that place. Aside from farming 
and merchandising he was engaged in mining and was considered an ex- 
cellent judge of ore. In 1886 he removed to Rockland, Idaho, homestead- 
ed and bought land there and specialized in raising live stock, horses and 
cattle, being one of the most successful men of his day. His death at 
Rockland, on the 29th of October, 1899, was the direct result of an injury 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 83 

he received in a mine accident. Mrs. Stewart died in October, 1916. 
They were both zealous workers in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter- 
day Saints and Mr. Stewart was a Seventy in the church at the time of his 
demise. To their union the following children were born: Vincent L, 
whose name introduces this review; Evelyne and Eleomina, twins, both 
of whom have passed away ; George L., who is engaged in farming near 
Ogden, Utah ; Emma, who was born on the 3d of December, 1868, and died 
on the 25th of September, 1879 ; Virgil A., who was born on the 26th of 
February, 1872, and died on the 8th of June, 1892; Lawrence, who is a 
railroad man and is located at Pocatello, Idaho; William W., who was 
born on the 17th of August, 1876 and died on the 1st of September of that 
year; Lydia A., who was born on the 22d of October, 1877, and died 
on the 10th of September, 1878 ; Noah W., who was born on the 21st of 
November, 1879, and is engaged in farming near Ogden, Utah; Nina B., 
who was born on the 21st of October, 1882, and is the wife of Andrew 
Draper of American Falls, Idaho; John D., who was born on the 28th of 
April, 1885, and who is engaged in the taxi business in Lethbridge; and 
Maude R., who as born on the 9th of July, 1889, and died on the 21st 
of September, 1891. Throughout his life the father was a stanch sup- 
porter of the republican party. 

In the acquirement of his education Vincent I. Stewart attended the 
public schools of Ogden, Utah, and he worked on the home farm after 
putting his textbooks aside. When his parents went to Idaho he went 
with them and homesteaded one hundred and sixty acres of land, there en- 
gaging in farming and stock raising. In November, 1892, he came to 
Cardston and purchased land on which there was a log house, but which 
was otherwise unimproved. The following summer he made a trip to 
Idaho and trailed some cattle through to his new home, his wife driving 
the wagon while he took care of the cattle. Later he homesteaded some 
land near Mountain View, Alberta. At that time the land was raw prairie 
and he helped put it under cultivation and assisted in laying out the pres- 
ent town of Mountain View. He built a log house on the land and was 
obliged to do his freighting from Lethbridge. From time to time he 
added more land to his original farm and at one time owned three- 
quarters of a section and also property in Mountain View. The first 
house he built in Mountain View is still standing. He followed farming 
and ranching with great success and was bishop of the Mountain View 
ward of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints for nineteen 
years. Subsequently he was called by the church to the Glenwood ward 
at Glenwood, Alberta, and he disposed of his interests in Mountain View. 
He was bishop of the Glenwood ward for two years and during that time 
bought property there and built a four thousand dollar home, and set out 
many trees. At one time he owned two thousand acres of well improved 
land near there, but now owns only seven hundred. In 1914 Mr. Stewart 
came to Cardston and has since resided here, where he is a highly es- 
teemed and respected citizen. 

On the 21st of November, 1888, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. 



84 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

Stewart to Miss Ann Mary Webb, a native of Gloucester, England. To 
their union five children have been born : Lester C, who is engaged in 
farming, served on a mission for the church for two and one-half years 
in the central States ; Nellie M. is the wife of Eddie Savage of Lethbridge ; 
George V. is a farmer; and Melba A. and Zina M. are living at home. 

Mr. Stewart continues to devote a great deal of his spare time to the 
church and is now holding the office of high council. He has served one 
term on the Cardston Hospital board and while a resident of Glenwood 
he was a member of the town council for three terms. He is interested 
in all lines of progress and improvement and his cooperation can be 
counted upon to further the material, intellectual and moral upbuilding 
of the community. 



JOHN WALTER. 



John Walter could well be classed as one of Edmonton's builders and 
promoters. He resided in the city for a half century and was a potent 
force in promoting its growth and progress along many lines. He aided 
in advancing the work of pioneer times and in the later period of progress 
and improvement and the worth of his labors can scarcely be over- 
estimated. 

John Walter was born at Stenness, in the Orkney Islands, August 12, 
1849, and in the year in which he attained his majority he joined the 
service of the Hudson's Bay Company and sailed from his native town 
in the Hebrides to York Factory on Hudson Bay. He traveled westward 
by way of Norway House on Lake Winnipeg and the Saskatchewan river 
to Edmonton, proceeding by York boat until, when the river was frozen 
over, the journey had to be continued by dog train. Before leaving his 
native country Mr. Walter had learned the boat builder's trade and it 
was at Edmonton that a large number of the York boats from the Hud- 
son's Bay Company were built. These had a cargo capacity of five tons 
and the boats were sharp at both ends. These boats could carry sail 
when circumstances permitted and for nearly a century they were used 
by the company as a means of transportation on the rivers through 
Canada. About the time of Mr. Walter's arrival there was a change in 
the method of transportation from York boats to team and wagon across 
the plains, while later steamers on the rivers were utilized and in the 
'80s railways supplanted the earlier methods of transportation. Buffalo 
robes constituted the principal source of trade of the Hudson's Bay post 
when Mr. Walter came and buffalo meat largely supplied the larder. It 
was not until four years later that the mounted police force established 
the authority of Canada in the western country. Mr. Walter bore his 
part in the work of early development and improvement and met unfalter- 
ingly the hardships and privations of pioneer life. One of the local papers 
at the time of his death said of him : "Mr. Walter fitted into the scheme 




JOHN WALTER 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 87 

of thing-s throughout all the changes that took place. Quiet, unobtrusive, 
efficient, reliable, never assuming to lead but always well to the front 
in the march of progress, he bore his part at all times in the work that 
brought about the transformation of this country." Because of his light 
hair he was known by the Indians as Wapstiquan, meaning whitehead. 

For five years Mr. Walter remained in the service of the Hudson's 
Bay Company and at the end of that time took up his abode on the river 
flat on the south side opposite the Hudson's Bay fort, now known as 
Walterdale, there continuing to reside until his death. He established 
the first cable ferry across the Saskatchewan at that point and he was 
also engaged in boat building at Edmonton and at Athabasca Landing. 
For a time he was associated in the enterprise with John Irvine but later 
the partnership was dissolved. When Mr. Walter removed to the west 
he brought by cart from Wininpeg one of the first coal stoves ever used 
in Edmonton and at that time it was an open question as to whether 
Edmonton coal was useful for fuel. With the building of the railroad to 
the south side of the river in 1891 Mr. Walter recognized his opportunity 
for the development of his business and established a sawmill in Walter- 
dale, being associated in this undertaking with William Humberstone of 
the Humberstone coal mine. Mr. Walter also opened a coal mine on the 
property in the rear of Walterdale and he made considerable investments 
in real estate in what was then the town of Strathcona, now a part of 
Edmonton, erecting there a number of dwellings and business houses. 
He continued to develop and expand his lumber operations with the 
growth and settlement of this section of the province, building a second 
sawmill on Ross Point on the north side of the river. He likewise built 
a steamboat on the Saskatchewan and he was actively interested in pros- 
pecting for oil in the Pelican Rapids. His entire course was marked by 
constructive business methods and his efforts constituted an important ele- 
ment in the steady growth and progress of the city, as well as in the up- 
building of his own fortune. He suffered considerably in the collapse of 
the boom in 1912 but the hazardous financial blow came to him with the 
flood of 1915, which carried away a large stock of sawn lumber piled at 
the mill on Ross Point and in the flood the mill itself was destroyed. 
Although he was no longer able to continue his lumber manufacturing 
business he retained a valuable equity in his large interests and never was 
his reputation for honest dealing, foresight and determination questioned. 

On the 21st of October, 1886, Mr. Walter was united in marriage to 
Miss Elizabeth Newby, who went to Morley, Canada, in 1884, as assistant 
matron at the Indian Orphanage and afterward became a guest at the 
Hardisty home at Edmonton, Mr. Hardisty being chief factor of the Hud- 
son's Bay Company. In the big house of the chief factor the marriage 
of Mr. Walter and Miss Newby was celebrated and they traveled life's 
journey happily together for more than a third of a century, until death 
separated them on the 25th of December, 1920, Mr. Walter passing away 
at that date and leaving two sons: John William and Stanley, who are 
engaged in farming. His life was indeed an active and useful one. He 



88 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

was a member of the first city council of Strathcona, thus serving for six 
years and he declined to become mayor of the city. He ever stood for 
progress and improvement in everything that pertained to the material, 
intellectual, social and moral v^elfare of the community and his life record 
constitutes an integral chapter in the annals of Edmonton. When he 
passed away Harry W. Laughy, an old-time friend, under the caption of 
"Rest in Peace," wrote the following poem to the memory of John Walter : 

"Today we break the sacred sod 
That grows above our old-time dead; 
Another one would join the host 
That long our early conquest led. 
While herald angels sang on high 
He laid aside his load of care 
And faced the last, long, sunset trail, 
To meet the others, waiting — there. 

"Old friend — tried friend of back-flung years — 
Whose hand was ever wont to give. 
Thou 'rt dead today, they'd have me think, 
But long thy kindly works shall live. 
The settler's child, in years long past. 
Oft knelt to bless thy hand that gave; 
That settler's child — a way-worn man — 
Shall kneel today beside thy grave. 

"Thou 'rt passed, thy just reward to claim, 
In realms beyond the set of sun; 
Thy monument — already reared — 
A thousand kindly deeds well done ; 
Upon the stone that marks thy grave — 
Oft blessed by friendship's un-shed tear — 
May hands of Love inscribe the words : 
'Here sleeps a whole-souled pioneer.' " 



DAVID BURTON EMENO. 

D. B. Emeno, assistant district superintendent of the Bank of Mon- 
treal, in Alberta, has been identified with this well known financial insti- 
tution for eighteen years. He was born at Lunenburg, Nova Scotia, 
November 19, 1887, and his parents. Captain Alexander and Annette 
Emeno, were also natives of that province. The father was a seafaring 
man and followed maritime pursuits until he was about fifty years of 
age, when he retired, making his home in Lunenburg during the re- 
mainder of his life. At the time of the World war he acted as inspector 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 89 

on the American shipping board. In October, 1918, he was killed in an 
automobile accident. He is survived by the mother, v^ho still lives in 
Lunenburg. 

After completing his public school training as a student in Lunen- 
burg Academy, David Burton Emeno entered the employ of the Bank of 
Montreal in the capacity of junior clerk, in 1904. In 1912 he became an 
accountant in the branch at Edmonton, Alberta, and in the following 
year was made manager of the Cardston establishment, remaining there 
until 1919, when he was placed in charge of the Lethbridge branch. In 
1921 he was appointed one of the western inspectors and in the following 
year he was made manager of the Calgary branch, assuming his present 
duties in January, 1923. 

Mr. Emeno has been married twice. In September, 1916, he wedded 
Miss Helen Harrington, who passed away in February, 1920, leaving two 
sons, Lionel B. and William S. In August, 1922, he married Miss Frances 
Pennefather. He is a member of the Anglican church, the Ranchmen's 
Club, the Calgary Golf and Country Club and the Gyro Club, while fra- 
ternally he is identified with the Masonic order. 



GEORGE C. M. BOOTHE. 

Although one of the younger members of the legal fraternity of Ed- 
monton, George C. M. Boothe has made rapid progress in his profession, 
readily mastering the intricacies of the law, and he has already attained 
a clientele and a reputation that many an older practitioner might well 
envy. He was born at Brandon, in the province of Manitoba, Canada, in 
1890, of the marriage of George C. M. and Susannah (Welch) Boothe, 
both natives of Ontario. The father died at Bagot, Manitoba, in 1908, 
and the mother is now a resident of Portage la Prairie, Manitoba. 

George C. M. Boothe obtained his high school and college education 
at Portage la Prairie, where he also studied law, and in 1913 he was ad- 
mitted to the bar at Winnipeg, Canada. In the same year he came to 
Edmonton and in 1913 he joined William Morrow in a law partnership, 
becoming senior member of the firm, which has since enjoyed a prosper- 
ous existence, an extensive and representative clientele being accorded 
them. Mr. Boothe believes in the maxim: "There is no excellence with- 
out labor" and follows it closely. He has much natural ability but is 
withal a hard student and is never content until he has mastered every 
detail of his cases. He has a comprehensive understanding of legal prin- 
ciples and correctly applies his knowledge to the points in litigation. 

In Portage la Prairie, Manitoba, on August 3, 1913, Mr. Boothe was 
united in marriage to Miss Grace D. Lyall, a daughter of William L. 
Lyall. Mr. Boothe is a member of the First Presbyterian church and his 
political views are in accord with the tenets of the Liberal party, while 
through his connection with the Edmonton Golf & Country Club he ob- 



90 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

tains needed relaxation from professional cares. He also belongs to the 
Kiwanis Club. He is a young man of marked energy and determination, 
whose ambition, industry and ability are carrying him steadily forward 
in his chosen vocation, and in his law practice whatever he does is for 
the best interests of his clients and for the honor of his profession. 



ALFRED J. N. TERRH^L. 

Alfred J. N. Terrill, editor and owner of the Medicine Hat News, was 
born at Hamilton, Ontario, December 3, 1869, a son of Joseph John Gur- 
ney and Euphemia (McGann) Terrill, who were natives of Ontario and 
of Ireland, respectively. They were married in Ontario, where the Ter- 
rill family has long been represented. The grandfather was Esli Terrill, 
who was born in Ontario and belonged to a family of Loyalists, his par- 
ents having come from the United States to Canada during the Revolu- 
tionary war. They were given property here by the British government 
in recognition of their allegiance to the crown. The grandfather of 
Alfred J. N. Terrill in the maternal line was John Barrett McGann, who 
was born in Ireland and was a highly educated man, having received 
liberal opportunities in Dublin. He was the pioneer educator for the deaf 
and dumb of Canada and all of his sons and daughters became instruc- 
tors of the same unfortunate class as did four of his grandchildren. 

The death of Joseph J. G. Terrill occurred in Ontario. The mother 
is now making her home at Whitby, Ontario. Joseph J. G. Terrill was 
also a teacher in a school for the deaf and dumb. He was graduated from 
Toronto University and taught to the time of his demise, becoming most 
efficient in the matter of instructing those to whom speech and hearing 
had been denied. He held membership in the Church of England, to 
which Mrs. Terrill also belongs and his political allegiance was given to 
the Liberal party. His death occurred in 1870, and his widow has con- 
tinued her residence in Ontario throughout the intervening period. In 
their family were two children : Edith, the wife of Dr. J. M, Forster, who 
is superintendent of the Ontario Hospital at Whitby, Ontario ; and Alfred 
J. N. 

Alfred J. N. Terrill was educated at Belleville, Ontario, where after 
attending the public and high schools he continued his education in On- 
tario College. He started out in the business world in the employ of the 
Grand Trunk Railroad Company, with which he remained for a year and 
then went to the home of an uncle in Cumberland, Maryland, where he 
began work on a newspaper. He remained with his uncle for two years, 
largely acquainting himself with the business during that period and then 
secured a position on the Baltimore (Md.) Herald, acting in a reportorial 
capacity for two years. He next returned home and soon afterward ob- 
tained a position on the Toronto World. Later he went to Woodstock 
and was employed on the Sentinel Review of that city for two years, 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 91 

while for six or seven years thereafter he occupied a position on the 
Peterboro Examiner. He also for a time was associated with the Barrie 
Advance, spending one year as editor of that paper and later he pur- 
chased an interest in the St. Catharines Journal. In 1904 he came to 
Medicine Hat and here entered the employ of Fred Forster but later or- 
ganized a company and purchased the paper and the plant. He then 
began issuing a daily known as the Medicine Hat News and has since con- 
ducted the paper with good success. It is an interesting journal devoted 
to the dissemination of general and local news and to the discussion of 
all questions vital to the community and to the province. 

In December, 1908, Mr. Terrill was united in marriage to Miss Mary 
Mitchell, who was born in Scotland but during her infancy was brought 
to the west by her parents, Mr. and Mrs. James Mitchell, her father be- 
coming a cattle rancher near Medicine Hat, in pioneer times. He con- 
ducted his ranching interests on an extensive scale not only in Canada 
but afterward in the Argentine. Mr. and Mrs. Terrill have a daughter, 
Patricia, who entered high school at the age of eleven years and may 
enter the university at the age of fourteen if her parents so desire. 

Both Mr. and Mrs. Terrill are members of St. John's Presbyterian 
church and he is well known in club and social circles. He has member- 
ship in the Cypress Club, of which he was formerly president and he 
also belongs to the Golf & Country Club. He is likewise the president 
of the Byng Baseball Club and at one time was president of the Medicine 
Hat-Redcliff Football League. He has always enjoyed athletics, in which 
he has taken an active interest but he allows nothing to interfere with 
the faithful performance of his duties in relation to his business and de- 
votes the major part of his time to the newspaper, of which he is the man- 
ager, editor, secretary and treasurer. The company built and owns a 
splendid two-story building with fifteen foot basement and not only pub- 
lishes the Medicine Hat News but also conducts an excellent job printing- 
department in connection therewith. Mr. Terrill has devoted practically 
his entire life to newspaper work and one of the strong elements of 
his success is undoubtedly the fact that he has not dissipated his ener- 
gies over a wide field but has concentrated his efforts along the line in 
which he embarked as a young tradesman. Thus he has continually pro- 
moted his knowledge of journalistic work and his efficiency, and he is 
today one of the well known editors and newspaper publishers of this 
section of the province. 



W. W. GOULD. 



W. W. Gould, an auditor of highly developed efl^ciency in his chosen 
profession, has made his home in Edmonton since 1905. In the educa- 
tional field he was previously active for a number of years and then, 
concentrating his attention in another direction, he became a chartered 



92 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

accountant and since 1912 has been well known in this section of the prov- 
ince as an auditor. He was born in the village of Wooler, Ontario, June 
4, 1870, and there spent the period of his boyhood and youth, supplement- 
ing his early education by a high school course in the Colborne and Tren- 
ton high schools. When a young man of nineteen years he took up the 
profession of teaching, which he successfully followed for twelve years, 
imparting readily and clearly to others the knowledge which he has ac- 
quired and making for himself an enviable position in educational circles. 
In 1905 he came to Edmonton, where he entered the employ of the de- 
partment of education, becoming chief clerk, so serving for seven years. 
He then qualified as a chartered accountant and has since been active in 
this line of duty. In 1912 he opened offices in the Tegler building as an 
auditor and his patrons are now many, for he has attained a high degree 
of efficiency in this field. For two years he was lecturer on accountancy 
in the university and here his early teaching experience served him in 
good stead, enabling him to make most thorough the work of the depart- 
ment under his guidance. 

Mr. Gould is identified with the Kiwanis Club and is interested in all 
of those forces which make for civic righteousness and progress in the 
community. He belongs to the McDougall Methodist church, in which he 
is recording steward and he does all in his power to further the work 
of the church and extend its influence, while his standards of personal 
conduct are high. 



JAMES B. CORBET. 



James B. Corbet, superintendent of the Alberta branches of the Cana- 
dian Bank of Commerce, is well fitted by training and experience for a 
position of this responsibility and the consensus of public opinion places 
him with the leading financiers of Calgary and the province. He was 
born in County Down, Ireland, in November, 1875, and is a son of James 
and Margaret (Morrison) Corbet, also natives of the Emerald isle. They 
are now residing in the States, making their home in Seattle, Wash- 
ington. 

James B. Corbet was reared and educated in Ireland, remaining in his 
native land until 1889, when he started for the new world, being but 
fourteen years of age when he came to Canada. After starting out in. 
the business world he entered the employ of R. G. Dun & Company and 
was with that agency for ten years, being connected with its offices at 
Seattle and Tacoma, Washington, during that period. In 1901 he joined 
the Canadian Bank of Commerce, with which he has since been identi- 
fied, working his way steadily upward as he proved his worth and ability. 
In 1908 he was made auditor of its Winnipeg bank, filling that position 
for three years, and later he became assistant inspector, subsequently 
winning promotion to the office of inspector. On the 1st of October, 1920, 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 93 

he was appointed superintendent of the Alberta branches, in which capac- 
ity he is now serving, with headquarters in Calgary, and his ability is 
proving a potent element in advancing the interests of his house in this 
province. 

On the 8th of June, 1910, Mr. Corbet was married to Nora Secord, a 
daughter of Major Villers, deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Corbet have four 
children: Nancy, Campbell, James and Villers. Mr. Corbet is a Presby- 
terian in religious faith but the family attend St. Stephen's Anglican 
church, of which Mrs. Corbet is a member. Mr. Corbet is connected 
with the Ranchmen's Club of this city, the Calgary Golf & Country Club 
and the Manitoba Club of Winnipeg. With keen insight into business 
affairs and situations and a thorough understanding of every phase of 
banking, he is ably directing the interests entrusted to his charge, and 
Calgary regards him as a valuable addition to its citizenship. 



SIMPSON JAMES SHEPHERD, K. C. 

Simpson James Shepherd, K. C, one of the leading barristers of the 
province, now successfully engaged in law practice at Lethbridge, is the 
third oldest barrister of the city in years of continuous connection- with 
the bar here. He was born in Uttoxeter, Lambton district, Ontario, Feb- 
ruary 6, 1877. His parents, James and Mary (Dowler) Shepherd, were 
substantial farming people of that locality, but both are now deceased. 

Simpson J. Shepherd obtained his early education in the public schools 
of his native town and attended high school at Forest, Ontario. At the 
age of twenty years, or in the spring of 1897, he removed to western 
Canada and established his home at Saskatchewan, living principally at 
Maple Creek until the fall of 1903. From there he entered McGill Uni- 
versity, in preparation for a legal career and was there graduated with 
the B. C. L. degree in 1906. His proficiency in his studies in the uni- 
versity brought him a MacDonald scholarship and after his graduation 
at Montreal he spent a year in France, perfecting himself for his chosen 
career. He then devoted several months to travel through the west and 
in January, 1908, located at Lethbridge, where today, with two exceptions, 
he is the oldest member of the bar engaged in active practice. For a time 
he was associated with Judge W. C. Simmons, first as a student for a little 
more than a year, and following his admission to the bar of Alberta in 
the spring of 1909 he became a partner of Judge Simmons. This relation- 
ship was maintained until the appointment of Mr. Simmons to the supreme 
court of Alberta in October, 1910, after which Mr. Shepherd practiced 
alone until May, 1911, when he became associated with A. E. Dunlop 
of the Nova Scotia bar. He enjoys a large and growing practice and 
his experience and talent have gained him prestige among the repre- 
sentatives of the legal profession in this part of Canada. He is a member 
of the Alberta Law Society and also of the Lethbridge Bar Association. 



94 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

He is now senior partner in the firm of Shepherd, Dunlop & Rice, recog- 
nized as one of the strongest combinations among the representatives of 
the Lethbridge bar. 

On the 7th of September, 1910, Mr. Shepherd was married to Miss 
Ethel M. S. Dixon, a daughter of John Dixon, who was at the time of his 
death a resident of Maple Creek. They have three daughters : Marjorie, 
in school; Nancy; and Joan. Mrs. Shepherd was educated at Havergal 
College in Toronto and she is an active member of the Daughters of the 
Empire. 

Mr. Shepherd was in charge of the first Victory Loan campaign in 
Lethbridge and was president of the local board. A Liberal in politics, he 
has been active in political circles for a considerable period and has held 
the offices of president of the Liberal Association of Lethbridge and presi- 
dent of the Liberal Association of the Federal Riding of Medicine Hat. 
He regards nothing as foreign to himself which has to do with the prog- 
ress and upbuilding of city or province and has been closely associated 
with community affairs on the side of development and successful achieve- 
ment. For some time he was a member of the Alberta Returned Soldier 
Commission. Fraternally he is a Mason, being a member of North Star 
Lodge, No. 4, A. F. & A. M., and religiously he is connected with the 
Methodist church, while socially he has membership with the Chinook 
Curling and Golf Clubs. He is fond of all outdoor sports, including shoot- 
ing and golf and turns to these for recreation when leisure permits. 



WILLIAM MONTGOMERY CHANDLER. 

As superintendent of the Alberta branches of the Union Bank of 
Canada, William M. Chandler is a forceful figure in financial circles of 
Calgary and of the province and thirty-two years' experience have given 
him an expert knowledge of this branch of business activity. He was 
born in Toronto, Ontario, June 26, 1872, and is a son of John and Eleanor 
(Montgomery) Chandler, the former a native of England and the latter 
of Ireland. In 1862 the father emigrated to Canada, settling in Toronto, 
where he has since resided, being numbered with the honored pioneers 
of that city. He is still active in business affairs, although he has reached 
the age of eighty-two years, acting as manufacturers' agent, and he also 
owned and operated a factory. He is one of the best known cricketers in 
Canada and has ^never lost interest in the sport. The mother is now 
seventy-eight years of age, and they have many friends in the city which 
has so long been their home. 

William M. Chandler was reared and educated in Toronto, attending 
the public schools and the Upper Canada College, from which he was 
graduated in 1890. His initial experience along financial lines was gained 
as junior clerk in the Canadian Bank of Commerce, with which he re- 
mained for twelve years, and he then became associated with the United 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 95 

Empire Bank, which was afterward absorbed by the Union Bank. He 
has since been identified with the latter organization, which he served 
as bank manager at various points in the east, and later was made as- 
sistant inspector of their eastern branches. In 1913 he was appointed 
inspector of their establishments in Saskatchewan, afterward becoming 
western inspector, with headquarters at Winnipeg, Manitoba, and while 
stationed there was made superintendent of the Alberta branches. He 
remained in Winnipeg until May, 1922, when he transferred his office to 
Calgary, and the extent of his responsibilities is shown in the fact that 
he has sixty-eight banks under his jurisdiction. He efficiently discharges 
the duties of his office and his course has amply justified the trust re- 
posed in his ability. His success in banking indicates that he has chosen 
the field best suited to his talents and his activities therein have taken 
him to every part of the Dominion, to the Yukon Territory and to the 
cities of New York and Seattle, in the States. 

Mr, Chandler was married June 12, 1902, in Paris, Ontario, to Miss 
Jean Munn and they have become the parents of two children : Gordon 
Montgomery, who was born October 27, 1904; and Frances Margaret, 
born May 14, 1907. Mr. Chandler is aflfiliated with the Anglican church 
and in Masonry he has taken the chapter degree. He is also a member 
of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Ranchmen's Club and the 
Calgary Golf & Country Club. He is fond of all outdoor sports, being 
especially interested in lacrosse, hockey and golf, which afford him need- 
ed recreation and diversion. In his earlier years he was a member of the 
Canadian Militia, serving as lieutenant of a company composed mostly of 
Indians, who made him chief of their tribe. He has never dissipated 
his energies over a broad field, but has devoted his life to the banking 
business, gaining that specialized knowledge which makes him an author- 
ity in matters pertaining thereto. Like all men who have achieved success 
in the best sense of the term, he has been a tireless worker and what he 
has accomplished represents the fit utilization of his innate powers and 
talents. 



CAVALLO W. RICKERD. 



Cavallo W. Rickerd, a prominent business man and influential citizen 
of Edmonton, is the possessor of that quality which has been termed the 
commercial sense. He has energy, enterprise, initiative and administra- 
tive ability and is thus successfully controlling the interests under his 
guidance. He is a native of the state of Minnesota and completed his 
education in a seminary at Eau Claire, Wisconsin. At an early age he 
entered the business world, first serving an apprenticeship to the machin- 
ist's trade, after which he turned his attention to the lumber industry, 
with which he was identified for a period of thirty-five years, operating 
in the states of Wisconsin and Minnesota. He would float the logs down 
the river and cut them in his mills, having about six in operation, and his 



96 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

activities in the lumber business were attended by a substantial degree 
of success. Hoping that a change of climate would prove beneficial to 
his health, which had become somewhat impaired, Mr. Rickerd came to 
western Canada, intending to take a much needed rest, and in 1912 he 
arrived in Edmonton. However, the habit of industry was too strong 
for him to resist and he at once became an important factor in the com- 
mercial activity of the city, purchasing a transfer business, which he 
conducted independently for a time. Subsequently he entered into a 
partnership with Charles W. Leonard, who had managed to secure all of 
the local transfer business from the railroads entering the city, and they 
consolidated the Western Cartage Company and the Standard Express 
Company. Later the business was incorporated under the present style of 
the Western Transfer & Storage Company and Mr. Leonard assumed the 
office of president, while Mr. Rickerd became secretary-treasurer, which 
offices they are now filling. Their business has kept pace with the develop- 
ment of the city and they are conducting their operations on a large scale, 
occupying a position of leadership in this line. In 1917 they extended 
their efforts into another field, acquiring the Chinook coal mine, which 
has proven a very profitable investment, and their interests therein are 
conducted under the name of the Edmonton Collieries, Ltd., of which 
Mr. Rickerd is the president. Thirty-five thousand tons of coal are taken 
from the mine annually and all of their output is sold in Edmonton. 

Mr. Rickerd divides his time equally between the two industries, both 
of which are in a very prosperous condition, and his business associ- 
ates have the utmost confidence in his judgment, foresight and integrity. 
He is a York Rite Mason and while residing in the States was master of 
his lodge. He is a man of marked business ability who recognizes the 
difficulties, the possibilities and the opportunities of a situation. Energy 
and perseverance are brought to cope with the former and tact and re- 
sourcefulness utilize the latter in the accomplishment of his well defined 
purposes, and his efforts have ever been of a character that contributed to 
public progress and prosperity, as well as to the attainment of individual 
success. 



EDWARD N. BARKER. 



Edward N. Barker, provincial magistrate with headquarters at Leth- 
bridge, has had an interesting career with varied experiences that have 
called him to many sections of the North American continent. His entire 
life has been one of activity and usefulness and at the present writing 
he is devoting his entire attention to the faithful discharge of his official 
duties. A native of England, he was born in Spilsbury, Oxfordshire, on 
the 25th of August, 1859, his parents being T. C. and Margaret (Neal) 
Barker. He traces his ancestry back through several generations. His 
great-grandfather was at one time mayor of Wakefield, England, and his 
grandfather, Thomas Barker, was a Yorkshire man. His father, the 




EDWARD N. BARKER. 



(7) 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 99 

Rev. T. C. Barker, was born near Leeds, Yorkshire, England, and was 
head boy of the Shrewsbury school, winning the medal that was given 
to the best scholar. He afterward attended Oxford and took his degree 
at Christ's Church College. He became a clergyman of the Church of 
England and was rector of Spilsbury for thirty-one years. In the winter 
of 1874 he went to Rome to place the English church on a substantial 
basis in that city. He started the first Protestant church within the walls 
of Rome, after which he returned to England and in 1886 removed to his 
old home in Yorkshire, remaining there until advanced age prevented 
his further active work in the ministry. He then took up his abode in 
Hampshire, where his last days were passed. He was a Conservative in 
political views and was a deep student of all matters of vital interest as 
well as of things strictly ecclesiastical in nature. He possessed splendid 
oratorical ability and he was also widely known through his writings, 
being the author of two works, one on Aryan civilization. He was also 
examiner in religious knowledge for many years. His wife was born in 
Norfolk, England, and they became the parents of seven children. 

Edward N. Barker, the third in order of birth, was educated in King 
Edwards School at Bromsgrove, Worcestershire, and Kings School in 
Canterbury and later he entered upon an apprenticeship to learn agri- 
culture. He spent two years on the farm of Lord Chesham, who was a 
leading agriculturist and later he went to Rossett in North Wales, being 
employed on a farm five miles south of Chester. Still later he returned 
home and then in 1882 crossed the Atlantic to the new world, making his 
way to Sioux City, Iowa, where he remained until April, 1883, there work- 
ing on a cow ranch. At that date he went to Billings, Montana, and 
was there employed on a cow ranch for a year, at the end of which time 
he and three companions started for Lethbridge, traveling on horseback 
and by prairie schooner. Mr. Barker proceeded to the Cochran ranch, 
where he put up h,ay during the first summer. In 1885 he enlisted in 
the Rebellion as a member of the Rocky Mountain Rangers and for a 
time was at Medicine Hat, receiving his discharge from the service in 
August of that year. 

When his military experience was over Mr. Barker returned to the 
farm and in the fall of the year took up a claim near Cardston. There 
he built a cabin, living upon his claim until May, 1891. In the year 1887 
the Mormons settled in that locality and began farming, occasioning con- 
siderable trouble in the district. 

In October, 1889, Mr. Barker was united in marriage to Miss Clara 
Dusenbury, who was born at Hannawa Falls on the Hudson, and they 
went to the state of New York for the winter of 1891-2. In the latter 
year they removed to Georgia and for two years afterward were on the 
Shellstone farm. In 1894 Mr. Barker took up his abode at Newburgh 
on the Hudson, where he had a farm and engaged in the breeding of 
fancy chickens, there remaining until 1900, when because of illness he 
went to England and spent a year in recuperating his health in his native 
country. With his return to the new world he settled at Albany, New 



100 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

York, and in connection with a friend engaged in the publication of a 
paper for a year, while subsequently he was employed on a paper in 
New York city — "The Field and Fancy." He continued in the eastern 
metropolis until the spring of 1905, when he returned to Cardston. He 
owned a quarter section of land here but afterward sold it and for a time 
engaged in the real estate, loans and insurance business at Cardston, 
where he made his home until January, 1922. 

It was in the year 1909 that Mr. Barker was called upon to mourn 
the loss of his wife, after which he went to Edmonton and spent that 
year in a newspaper office. In 1907 he was made justice of the peace and 
served in the position for a number of years. He was first made police 
magistrate at Cardston in 1917 and in 1920 was made traveling magis- 
trate. He removed his headquarters to Lethbridge in January, 1922, and 
now devotes his entire attention to the duties of the office, which he is 
discharging with credit to himself and satisfaction to the general public. 

Mr. Barker has always been deeply interested in agricultural progress 
and about 1905 he assisted in organizing the Alberta Farmers Associa- 
tion. He has many times served as judge of dogs, poultry and flowers 
at various fairs and exhibits throughout North America and has written 
largely upon such subjects. He likewise manifested considerable interest 
in dry farming at an earlier day and his broad experience along agricul- 
tural lines enables him to speak with authority upon questions relating 
to the development and cultivation of the land. 

Mr. Barker is a member of the Church of England and fraternally he 
is a Mason, active and prominent in the order. He was district deputy 
grand master of District No. 11 in 1919 and 1920 and has ever been a 
loyal follower of the teachings and high principles of the craft. He is 
also a member of the Red Cross and Patriotic Fund and was on the mili- 
tary tribunal. He took active part in furthering the interests of the 
government throughout the World war period and his aid and influence 
have ever been on the side of progress and improvement. He has always 
kept well informed on politics, too, and while living at Cardston he was 
president and secretary of the Board of Trade. Anything that tends to 
advance the interests of community or country receives his allegiance 
and support and throughout his life he has been actuated by a most pro- 
gressive spirit. 



REV. DAVID G. McQUEEN, D. D., LL. D. 

Rev. David G. McQueen, pastor of the First Presbyterian church of 
Edmonton, has held this charge for thirty-six years and his religious in- 
struction has proven a potent force for good in the city in which he has 
so long resided. He was born at Kirkwell, in Wentworth county, On- 
tario, on Christmas day, 1854, of the marriage of James and Catherine 
Goldie (Hewitson) McQueen, both natives of Scotland. They resided 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 101 

in that country until 1833, when they emigrated to Canada, settling in 
Ontario at an early period in the history of the province, and the father 
hewed a farm out of the wilderness. He was well educated and was ac- 
counted the best informed man in his district. Appreciative of the best 
in literature, he became the possessor of a valuable library and on start- 
ing for Canada he brought with him all of his books, regarding them as 
his greatest treasures. He was an earnest and conscientious member of 
the Presbyterian church and a Liberal in his political views. His fellow 
townsmen, recognizing his worth and ability, called him to public office 
and for a number of years he served as justice of the peace. Both Mr. 
and Mrs. McQueen passed away on their farm in Ontario and the prop- 
erty is now owned by one of their grandchildren. The paternal grand- 
father, Robert McQueen, was a native of Scotland and his entire life was 
passed in the land of hills and heather. He pursued a course in theology 
but never entered the ministry. The maternal grandfather, Thomas 
Hewitson, was also one of Scotland's sons and his occupation was that 
of a shepherd. To James McQueen and wife were born ten children, 
six sons and four daughters, and six of the family have passed away. 

David G. McQueen, the youngest of the family, attended the public 
school of Kirkwell, Ontario, and the high school at Watertown and after 
receiving a teacher's certificate he devoted a year to educational work. He 
then matriculated in the University of Toronto and was graduated in 
1884, winning honors in mathematics. He then took up the study of 
theology in Knox College, completing his course in 1887, and in June 
of that year he took charge of the First Presbyterian church of Edmon- 
ton, of which he has since been pastor. In 1905 he received from Knox 
College the degree of Doctor of Divinity and Alberta University has be- 
stowed upon him the Doctor of Laws degree. His church is the largest 
in the city, having a membership of a thousand, and his labors have been 
effective and resultant factors in promoting the spiritual welfare of those 
who have come under his guidance. He gives his whole heart to his chosen 
life work and his sincere devotion to the cause of Christianity has won 
for him the affection of the members of his congregation and the high 
regard of those of other religious creeds. He stands high in the councils 
of the church and served as moderator of the General Assembly of the 
Presbyterian church in Canada in 1912. 

On September 23, 1890, Dr. McQueen married Miss Catherine Robert- 
son, a native of Strabane, Ontario, and a daughter of Alexander S. Robert- 
son, an agriculturist of that province. His brother, William A. Robertson, 
served throughout the period of the Civil war in the United States and is 
now living in Victoria, British Columbia. Dr. and Mrs. McQueen have 
become the parents of seven children, of whom James is the eldest. He 
is an engineer for the local government at Hanna, in the Edmonton dis- 
trict; Alexander enlisted in the Princess Patricia Canadian Artillery for 
service in the World war, and was killed in action on the 4th of June, 
1916, during the third battle of Ypres, having been wounded three times 
on the day preceding his death; Marjorie Gordon, the next of the family, 



102 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

is teaching in the schools of this province ; Robert received from Alberta 
University the degrees of Bachelor and Master of Arts, having taken a 
postgraduate course in King's College, London, England. He is now 
engaged as lecturer on economics in the University of Saskatchewan, 
During the progress of the war with Germany he was in training in the 
Flying Corps but was not sent overseas ; Christina Catherine and Jean are 
both graduates of Alberta University and follow the profession of teach- 
ing; Helen Agnes, the youngest of the children, has completed her fresh- 
man year at the University of Alberta. 

Dr. McQueen takes the interest of a progressive citizen in public af- 
fairs and soon after coming to this city he was made school inspector for 
the Edmonton district, capably discharging the duties of that position for 
four years. A man of scholarly attainments, he gives to his church the 
full service of a finely tempered mind and by example as well as precept 
has pointed out to others the higher course in life. 



EDWARD H. MAUNSELL. 

For many years Edward H. Maunsell was the most extensive rancher 
in the province of Alberta. He is now practically retired from active 
life, although he continues to ranch on a small scale. He was born in 
County Limerick, Ireland, on the 14th of October, 1854, a son of Fred- 
erick and Louise (Herbert) Maunsell, the former a native of Limerick 
county and the latter of Kerry county. The Maunsells are an old and 
honored family and Mr. Maunsell has in his possession a history of the 
family, dating back to 1066. Frederick Maunsell was engaged in agri- 
cultural work throughout his active life and he achieved susbstantial 
success in that connection. Both he and his wife died in Ireland. They 
were consistent communicants of the Church of England. To their union 
nine children were born, Edward being the fourth in order of birth. 
The oldest son, George W., who was a member of the Royal Northwest 
Mounted Police for some years and likewise engaged in farming near 
Macleod, is deceased ; the second son, Henry, came to Alberta in 1881. 
He is engaged in ranching at the present time, his ranch being known as 
the "Ivy ranch." 

In the acquirement of his education Edward Maunsell was under the 
instruction of tutors in his early years and later attended a finishing 
school in Limerick, Ireland. He came to Canada in 1874, locating in 
the province of Manitoba, where he joined the Royal Northwest Mounted 
Police and came to what is now Macleod. He was among the first troops 
in this country at that time, serving under Colonel French, and they 
patroled the country from the Swan river valley to Manitoba. In 1876 
he was stationed at the barracks in Macleod and was with the Mounted 
Police until 1877, when his term of service expired. During the time he 
patroled the country buffaloes were running wild. After leaving the 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 103 

police force he went home to Ireland on a short visit. Upon his return 
Mr. Maunsell took out squatter's rights, together with his brother, and 
they started cattle ranching. They had one hundred cows to start with, 
bringing the cattle through from Montana. After six months time the 
Indians had killed half of the herd and the brothers trailed the remainder 
of the cattle into the mountains, where they left them until 1881, when 
the Indians were put on the reservations. Mr. Maunsell proved to be a 
very successful rancher. From time to time he and his brother extended 
their land holdings and at one time they leased from the government two 
hundred thousand acres of land, which they operated in addition to their 
original land holdings. At that time their herd numbered some seven- 
teen thousand head of cattle. Another brother entered into partnership 
and the three brothers, G. W., H. F., and Edward continued to operate 
the ranch until 1887, when G. W. withdrew from the partnership. Ed- 
ward and H. F. continued the partnership, however, and for years con- 
ducted the Ivy Ranch, on which H. F. still resides. The Ivy Ranch was 
named from their brand, the brand being the Roman numeral IV. As 
settlers commenced to emigrate into this section of Alberta, the brothers 
lost a good deal of their grazing land. In 1900 they leased the Piegan 
Indian reservation of one hundred and fifteen thousand acres, an acreage 
covering sixty-five miles, and they enclosed all of this land with fencing. 
For many years the Maunsells were on friendly terms with the Indians 
and Edward Maunsell was made a chief in the Piegan tribe and was 
named "Sa-Sas-Ke." In 1906 the Maunsell brothers leased two hun- 
dred thousand acres of land from the government, which they operated 
in addition to their original land holding, and they also purchased the 
herd belonging to the late Senator Cochrane. For some time the Maunsell 
brothers were the largest ranchers in the province of Alberta. In 1897 
they purchased a number of sheep but were unsuccessful in that venture, 
the sheep becoming infected, so that a large number of them had to be 
slaughtered and the remainder were sold. The names of Edward Maun- 
sell and his brother appear frequently in a book written by a Mr. Kelly, 
which is a book of information on ranchmen and ranches. Although Mr. 
Maunsell is now practically retired from active life, he still engages in 
ranching on a small scale. 

On August 10, 1866, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Maunsell 
and Miss Jeannette Ryan, a native of Tipperary. To their union three 
children were born : The eldest child, Jeannette Louise Clair, is the wife 
of E. L. Buckwell of Macleod; F. W. E. was a student at the University 
of Alberta when war with Germany was declared and he at once put all 
personal interests aside and took an intensive course in training at the 
university. He was qualified for a commission, though he did not wait 
for it, but enlisted in the Sixty-third Battalion, Canadian Infantry, and 
landed in England in June, 1916. He was there drafted into the Tenth 
Battalion, Canadian Infantry, and went to the front. He served on the 
Somme and participated in many important engagements. He was killed 
at the battle of Vimy Ridge on the 9th of April, 1917, and was buried 



104 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

where he fell ; the youngest member of the Maunsell family is Antoinette, 
who is living at home. 

The religious faith of Mr. Maunsell is that of the Episcopal church. 
Politically he is a stanch Liberal and in 1919, at the request of his many 
friends, he became a contestant in the election for the Macleod constitu- 
ency in the provincial house, as a supporter of the Sifton government. 
He was defeated, however, by a small majority. Mr. Maunsell belongs 
to that class of substantial and representative citizens who constitute the 
best portion of any community by reason of their business activity, their 
loyalty in citizenship and their honor and integrity in private life. 



THOMAS H. WHITELAW, B. A., M. B. 

Dr. Thomas H. Whitelaw, who for fourteen years has been health offi- 
cer of Edmonton, is well and favorably known to the residents of this 
city, in which he has made his home for twenty-four years, and he has 
therefore been a witness of practically the entire growth and development 
of the municipality. He was born at Guelph, Ontario, September 23, 1867, 
of the marriage of William and Isabella (Henderson) Whitelaw, both of 
whom were natives of Scotland, whence they emigrated to Canada. The 
father was an unusually well informed man and in the public life of the 
province he took a prominent part, serving as warden of Wellington 
county at the time the Prince of Wales — the late King Edward — visited 
the Dominion. He was a stanch Liberal in his political views and a leader 
in the ranks of his party. He was a progressive agriculturist and a self- 
made man, whose success was the merited reward of industry, persever- 
ance and ability. He was an earnest and consistent member of the Pres- 
byterian church, with which his wife was also affiliated. They became 
the parents of nine children, all of whom reside in the province of On- 
tario except the subject of this review, who was the eighth in order of 
birth. The paternal grandfather was George Whitelaw. 

After completing the curriculum of the public schools Thomas H. 
Whitelaw attended the Collegiate Listitute at Guelph, Ontario, and after- 
ward became a student at the University of Toronto, from which he re- 
ceived the Bachelor of Arts degree in 1890. while four years later that 
educational institution conferred upon him the degree of Bachelor of 
Medicine. He began his professional career at Guelph and remained in 
that vicinity until 1898, when he came to this province, opening an office 
in Edmonton, where for ten years he engaged in the general practice of 
medicine, winning a large clientele. In 1908 his ability led to his selec- 
tion for the position of health officer, of which he is now the incumbent, 
and his long retention therein is indisputable proof of his efficiency and 
the quality of service which he is rendering the city. He is thoroughly 
cognizant of the grave responsibilities which devolve upon him in this 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 105 

connection and takes every precaution to safeguard the health of Edmon- 
ton's citizens. 

On the 6th of January, 1900, Dr. Whitelaw was married to Miss Mary 
Laidlaw, a native of Toronto and a daughter of George Laidlaw, a citizen 
of Toronto since its early days, when it was known as ''Muddy York." 
Dr. and Mrs. Whitelaw have a son, Alexander Whitelaw, now twenty-one 
years of age. He is a graduate of the Edmonton high school, after which 
he attended the University of Alberta for a year, and he is now pursuing 
a course in forestry at the University of Toronto, being in his junior 
year. Dr. Whitelaw is a member of the Presbyterian church and his 
political support is given to the Liberal party. His professional relations 
are with the Alberta and Canadian Medical Associations and he is also 
a member of the Canadian and American Public Health Associations. He 
is a self-educated man and the strength of character which he displayed 
in securing his medical training has been manifested throughout his 
career, bringing him to a most desirable position in his profession, of 
which he is an able exponent. 



A. CLARK BURY. 



Olds numbers among her foremost citizens A. Clark Bury, well known 
barrister and solicitor. He was born in Lancashire, England, on the 5th 
of December, 1882, a son of William and Esther (Clark) Bury, likewise 
natives of that country. The father, who is deceased, was an architect 
during the business part of his life and achieved substantial success, retir- 
ing at the age of thirty-six years. Mrs. Bury is living and continues to 
reside in England. 

A. Clark Bury received his education in the public schools of England 
and in early life took up the study of law. In 1903 he came to Canada and 
for five years was a member of the Royal Northwest Mounted Police. In 
1908 he went into the north country, around the Peace and Yukon rivers 
and remained there two years. In 1915 he returned to the province of 
Alberta and in the fall of that year was admitted to the bar. In 1916 
he came to Olds and has since engaged in practice, having built up an 
extensive and lucrative clientele. He is assisted by his wife who studied 
law in his office and was admitted to the bar in January, 1923. Mr. Bury 
is a constant student of his profession and well merits the confidence and 
esteem accorded him. Prior to locating in Olds he was magistrate of 
Coronation and before 1911 he was townsite agent for the Canadian 
Northern Railroad at Hanna. Aside from his private practice Mr. Bury 
is solicitor for the Bank of Commerce and the Bank of Montreal, both 
institutions located in Olds. 

In 1911 was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Bury to Miss Gertrude 
Elizabeth Richardson of Collingwood, Ontario. To their union two chil- 
dren have been born : William Haworth and Douglas C. 



106 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

In his political views Mr. Bury is a Liberal and he maintains an active 
interest in party affairs. He was organizer of the Boy Scouts of Olds 
and is now scoutmaster. Fraternally he is identified with the Masons 
and his religious faith is that of the English church. 



HON. JOHN A. JACKSON. 

Hon. John A. Jackson of Lethbridge, judge of the district court, was 
called to the bench in March, 1913, and his record as a jurist throughout 
the intervening period of ten years is one which reflects credit and honor 
upon the judicial history of the province. John A. Jackson was born in 
Seaforth, Canada, March 25, 1875, his parents being George E. and Els- 
peth (Waugh) Jackson. The former was a son of Alexander Jackson, 
who was born in Ireland and in 1846 came to Canada, where he spent his 
remaining days. The Jackson family assisted materially in the substan- 
tial upbuilding of that city. One of the sons of Alexander Jackson was 
Captain T. R. Jackson, lately of El Cajon, California, now at Seaforth, 
Ontario. He was for a number of years instructor of the Northwest 
Mounted Police, located at Macleod, where he assisted in establishing 
the barracks. He is the oldest living officer of the original Northwest 
Mounted Police. George E. Jackson, brother of Captain Jackson, was 
born in Dublin, Ireland, and came to Canada with his parents in 1846, 
devoting the greater part of his life to merchandising in Seaforth. He 
was born July 19, 1834, and passed away in 1919. His wife, who was 
born near London, Ontario, in 1842, died in 1893. They were married 
in London, Ontario, and Mrs. Jackson was a daughter of Robert Waugh, 
who was of Scotch descent and on coming to the new world settled in the 
vicinity of London, Ontario, many years ago. There he engaged in busi- 
ness as a farmer and miller. He was a man of most friendly disposition, 
always keeping open house and when j)eople would come to his mill to 
have their grain ground he would entertain them in his own home. It 
was his daughter, Elspeth, who became the wife of George E. Jackson and 
to them were born seven children : Margaret, living at Seaforth, Ontario ; 
George Alexander, a railway contractor, residing at Montreal ; Robert 
Edward, a hide merchant of Calgary ; Henry M., a broker of Toronto ; 
John A,, of this review ; Thomas T., a merchant of Seaforth ; and Franklin 
C, who was a member of the Canadian Railway Troops during the World 
war and went overseas, serving for three years and winning the M. C. 
The religious faith of the parents was that of the Episcopal church and 
in politics Mr. Jackson was a Conservative. On one occasion he was a 
candidate for member of parliament but met defeat. Throughout Canada 
he was widely known as chess champion of the country. 

John A. Jackson was largely educated in his native city, where he 
attended the public schools and received collegiate training. Later he 
entered Toronto University, from which he was graduated with the Bache- 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 107 

lor of Arts degree in 1897. He prepared for law practice at Osgoode Hall, 
Toronto, and entered upon the active work of the profession in Blyth, 
Ontario, where he continued in active practice until 1903. He then re- 
moved to Ponoka, Alberta, where he practiced for a decade and in March, 
1913, he was appointed to the bench and removed to Lethbridge, since 
which time he has been numbered among the jurists of this province. 
While practicing before the court his preparation of his cases was always 
thorough and comprehensive and since going upon the bench his rulings 
have been strictly fair and impartial, "winning him golden opinions from 
all sorts of people." 

In 1904 Judge Jackson was married to Miss Sarah J. Emigh, who 
was born in Blyth, Ontario, and there pursued her education. She is a 
daughter of John Emigh, who was a merchant of Blyth. By her marriage 
she has become the mother of two children : Ethel Lillian, who is attend- 
ing the Brankson Hall School of Toronto; and James T., also in school. 
The Judge and his wife are members of the Episcopal church and fra- 
ternally he is a Scottish Rite Mason. He has served as junior deacon and 
junior warden in his lodge, also as grand junior deacon and grand senior 
warden, as well as grand master in the Grand lodge. He has ever 
loyally upheld the teachings and purposes of the craft, exemplifying in his 
life the beneficent spirit which underlies the order. His political endorse- 
ment was given to the Conservative party and in early manhood he filled 
the position of town clerk of Ponoka. He was also a candidate for parlia- 
ment in 1905 but was defeated by a small majority. His recreation is 
largely found in golf and athletics and he belongs to the Golf Club of 
Lethbridge and is also a member of the Chinook Club and the Amateur 
Athletic Union of Canada, of which he is the president. While the social, 
fraternal and political activities of his career are sufficient to make his a 
well-rounded character the major part of his time and attention is given 
to his professional interests. He never lightly regards the duties nor re- 
sponsibilities of his office and the fairness and impartiality of his rulings 
have ranked him with the ablest jurists who have sat upon the district 
bench. 



FRANK G. STANLEY. 



Financial interests of Calgary find an able representative in Frank G. 
Stanley, who is supervisor for the Alberta and Saskatchewan branches 
of the Standard Bank of Canada, and has been identified with this large 
financial institution for a period of sixteen years, rising to his present 
office through tenacity of purpose, untiring industry and the strength of 
his mental endowments. He was born at Lucan, Ontario, November 6, 
1889, and his parents, James and Marie (Fox) Stanley, were also natives 
of that province. The father successfully engaged in the insurance busi- 
ness at Lucan and he was also interested in agricultural pursuits, owning 



108 ■ ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

and operating several farms in Ontario. He passed away in January, 
1919, and is survived by the mother, who still resides at Lucan. 

In the acquirement of an education Frank G. Stanley attended the 
grammar and high schools of his native town and also completed a course 
in the Lucan Collegiate Institute. When seventeen years of age he en- 
tered the service of the Standard Bank of Canada at Lucan and for five 
years was connected with its branch in that locality. On the expiration 
of that period he was sent to its Edmonton establishment as accountant 
and his excellent work in that connection led to his promotion to the posi- 
tion of manager of the bank's interests at Leader, Saskatchewan. Later 
he returned to Edmonton as manager and was next advanced to the posi- 
tion of inspector of the Saskatchewan and Alberta branches. He was thus 
occupied until 1921, when he was made supervisor of the branches in the 
provinces of Alberta and Saskatchewan, in which capacity he is now 
serving. He thus has jurisdiction over forty-four banks, twenty-four of 
which are located in this province and the remainder in Saskatchewan. 
Close study and broad experience have made him thoroughly familiar 
with the complex problems of modern finance and he is regarded as one 
of the most capable and valuable representatives of the large banking 
institution with which he is connected. 

In December, 1919, Mr. Stanley was married to Miss Florence Eleanor 
Elliott and they have two daughters, Marion Eleanor and Martha Joan 
Elliott. Mr. Stanley is a member of St. Stephen's Anglican church. 



JOHN WILLIAM HUGILL, K. C, D. C. L., LL. B. 

In no profession does advancement depend more entirely upon individ- 
ual merit and ability than in the law. Close application, keen analysis, 
clear mental perception and most careful preparation are indispensable 
elements in the life of every man who attempts to gain prominence in 
this arduous calling. That John W. Hugill is lacking in none of these 
requisites is indicated in the fact that he is numbered among the leading 
barristers of Calgary, and throughout his career he has maintained the 
highest standards of professional ethics. 

A native of England, John William Hugill was born at West Hartle- 
pool, County Durham, October 3, 1881, and his parents were John Henry 
and Hannah (Plebron) Hugill. He was a day boarder at the City of 
London School at London, England, and came to Halifax, Nova Scotia, 
in 1896, completing his matriculation studies at King's Collegiate School 
of Windsor, Nova Scotia, and was entered as a matriculant of the old 
University of King's College at the end of the summer term in 1898. 
The ensuing five years were spent in the offices of Furness-Withy & Com- 
pany, Limited, at Halifax, Montreal and London, England, learning the 
steamship business. From 1904 until 1907 he was a political agent in 
London and from 1907 until 1910 he read law with Hon. J. S. Hall, K. C, 




JOHN W. HUGILL, K. C. 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 111 

and R. B. Bennett, K. C. In 1910 he was called to the Alberta and Sas- 
katchewan bars and until 1911 was identified with the law firm of 
Lougheed, Bennett, Allison & McLaws, well known barristers of Calgary. 
In 1911 he was an assistant solicitor in the law department of the Cana- 
dian Pacific Railroad Company and in 1912 was appointed the assistant 
solicitor on the Alberta division of that corporation. Since April, 1920, 
he has engaged in a general law practice and is vice consul for The Neth- 
erlands. He is now senior member of the firm of Hugill & O'Keefe and 
in July, 1921, was created a King's Counsel. He holds the degree of 
LL. B. from Manitoba University and B. C. L. from the University of 
King's College, subsequently receiving the degree of D. C. L, (in course). 
His is a natural discrimination as to legal ethics and he is so well read in 
the minutiae of the law that he is able to base his arguments upon a 
thorough knowledge of and familiarity with statute and precedent and 
to present a case upon its merits, never failing to recognize the main 
point at issue and never neglecting to give a thorough preparation. 

On July 10, 1913, Mr. Hugill was united in marriage to Miss Eelen 
Cameron Templeton, daughter of Allan Templeton of Smith's Falls, On- 
tario, and Ayr, Scotland, and they have three children : John T., Eelen 
T. and Jean. Mr. Hugill is a Conservative in his political views and served 
a two-year term as alderman in the city of Calgary, while he has twice 
served as acting mayor. He is a member of the Anglican church and 
fraternally is identified with the Masonic order. He is also a member 
of the Calgary Board of Trade, the Ranchmen's Club and Polo Club of 
this city, the Calgary Golf & Country Club, the Edmonton Club and the 
British Empire Club of London, England. He holds the rank of major 
in the First Calgary Highlanders. He is also the possessor' of literary 
talent, writing under the nom, de plume of John Harker, and is a past hon- 
orary treasurer of the Calgary branch of Canadian Authors. He is a 
member of the law societies of Alberta, British Columbia and Saskatche- 
wan and finds recreation in golf, polo and in hunting big game. His 
activities and interests have covered a wide range and he is recognized 
as a broad-minded, public-spirited citizen, whose influence is at all times 
on the side of progress, reform and improvement, and as an exponent of 
all that is highest and best in his profession. 



JOHN MACKENZIE. 



A representative citizen of Strathmore is John Mackenzie, who is edi- 
tor and proprietor of the Strathmore Bow Valley Standard, He was 
born in Rothesay, Scotland, on the 1st of February, 1887, a son of Mur- 
doch and Mary Mackenzie, also natives of Scotland. The father is a news- 
paper man, spending the greater part of his life in that work, and now 
owns and edits a newspaper at Rothesay. To Mr. and Mrs. Mackenzie 
five children were born: John, whose name introduces this review; Mur- 



112 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

doch, who served in the inteHigence department during the World war 
and died in 1918; Donald A., who served with the British Balkan Ex- 
peditionary Forces for two years and met his death on active service ; 
and Marian and Jessie, who are living at home. Mr. and Mrs, Mackenzie 
were consistent communicants of the Presbyterian church and generous 
contributors to its support. 

In the acquirement of his education John Mackenzie attended the 
Rothesay Academy and after leaving school he worked in his father's 
newspaper office. He learned the business from the ground up and in 
1909 came to Canada and located in Calgary, accepting a position on the 
staff of the Albertan. He reported on that paper for three months, at 
the termination of which time he came to Strathmore and assisted in the 
establishment of the Strathmore Bow Valley Standard, which he man- 
aged for one year. He then bought out the others interested in the sheet 
and has since been sole publisher. He has installed modern machinery, 
intertype, cylinder press, etc. Aside from the publication of the paper 
Mr. Mackenzie does much commercial printing, and he devotes his entire 
time and attention to the paper and wields a great influence for good in 
this community. The value of the local newspaper in the upbuilding of 
the best interests of any community is universally conceded. The rule is 
that good papers are found in good towns, inferior journals in towns of 
stunted growth and uncertain future. It is not so much a matter of size 
as of excellence and adaptability to the needs of its locality. These condi- 
tions given, in an appreciative and progressive community, the size of the 
paper will take care of itself in a way mutually satisfactory to publishers 
and patrons. The Strathmore Bow Valley Standard, being located in 
a progressive community, enjoys a large and ever-increasing circulation 
and Mr. Mackenzie well merits the confidence and esteem in which he is 
held by his fellow citizens. 

Mr. Mackenzie is a veteran of the World war, having enlisted in the 
Eighty-ninth Battalion in 1915, and received his training at Red Deer. 
In May, 1916, he went overseas to England, and was sent to France in 
November of that year as a member of the Tenth Battalion. He was 
severely wounded at Vimy Ridge on the 9th of April, 1917, receiving a 
bullet wound in the leg, and head injuries. He was invalided to England, 
where he remained in a hospital for some time. In January, 1919, he 
returned to Alberta and received his honorable discharge, with the rank 
of lieutenant. 

In 1912 was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Mackenzie to Miss Helen 
McKinnon Donaldson, a native of Scotland, To their union one child has 
been born : Mary Helen, who is living at home. Mrs. Mackenzie is a 
woman of culture and refinement and she is prominent in the club and 
social circles of Strathmore. 

The family are consistent members of the Presbyterian church. Fra- 
ternally Mr. Mackenzie is identified with the Masons and he is a past 
master of Lodge No. 53, at Strathmore. He is a member of the local 
school board and a stanch advocate of education. Along newspaper lines 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 113 

he is identified with the Alberta Press Association, of which he is presi- 
dent and he was the first president of Strathmore G. W. V. A. Mr. 
Mackenzie is justly accorded a place among the prominent and repre- 
sentative citizens of Strathmore, for he belongs to that class of men 
whose enterprising spirit is used not alone for their own benefit — he 
also advances the general good and promotes public prosperity by his ably 
managed individual interests. 



THOMAS P. GREENTREE. 

The history of Drumheller would be incomplete without the record 
of Thomas P. Greentree, who from the earliest founding of the town has 
been a prominent factor in its substantial growth and improvement. For 
some time he was a ranchman, but he now devotes his entire time and 
attention to the implement, insurance and real estate business. He was 
born in England, a descendant of an old and honored family, on the 26th 
of May, 1870, a son of Doveton D. and Mary (Craigie) Greentree. On 
the maternal side he is of Scotch descent, his mother having been a native 
of that country. The father was born in Gloucester, England, and served 
in the English army during the Prussian and Chinese wars, having had 
the distinction of serving as secretary to the Duke of Cambridge when 
that nobleman was in command of the British army. Mr. Greentree's 
demise occurred in his native country in 1876. To Mr. and Mrs. Green- 
tree four children were born, Thomas P. being the eldest member of the 
family. 

Thomas P- Greentree received his early education in the public schools 
of his native country and in 1884, at the age of fourteen years, he came 
to Canada and located at Hamilton, Ontario. He worked out on farms 
near there for some time and subsequently engaged in farming on his 
own account. In 1896 he went to Calgary, where he was a cow- 
puncher and worked on railroads for a time. He then became a ranch- 
man and was active in that connection in the vicinity of Calgary until 
1902, when he came to where Drumheller now stands. He brought his 
cattle with him to this country, arriving here a long time before the 
country was even surveyed. Braving all the trials and hardships of 
pioneer life Mr. Greentree homesteaded a large tract of land and set 
about to bring it to a highly cultivated state. Most of his trading he was 
forced to do at Calgary. In 1907 he homesteaded the original site of 
Drumheller, filing his claim on the land the day it was surveyed. In 
1911, when Drumheller was being organized, he disposed of a part of his 
land, assisted in laying out the town, and had his original holdings divided 
into town lots. He retired from cattle ranching in 1910 and since that 
time has been in the implement, real estate and insurance business. In 
the years which have passed since he first located in the district of Drum- 
heller, Mr. Greentree has not only witnessed a most wonderful trans- 
(8) 



n4 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

formation but has largely aided in the labors which have transformed 
the wild tract into a splendid commonwealth. He mined the first coal in 
the valley, where the Newcastle mine is now located. He was one of the 
original applicants for the first school district and served on the first 
school board and he has always been a stanch advocate of education. The 
school was started with an enrollment of seven children, five of whom 
were his. He was one of the charter members of Carbon municipality, 
No. 278, and served as councilor of that body until the incorporation of 
the town of Drumheller. 

Mr. Greentree married Miss Clara Louise Roberts, a native of Lan- 
caster, Ontario. To their union ten children have been born : Beryl is 
the wife of Charles N. Paris of Drumheller; George D. was killed in 
Ypres, France, on his birthday, the 26th of September, 1916, while in 
the service of his country. He enlisted in the army at Drumheller the 
first day of the war and was sent to Calgary for training as a member of 
the Tenth Battalion. His loss to the community is keenly felt, for he 
was a most popular young man ; Henry H. is living in Drumheller ; Thomas 
died in an accident, at the age of eleven years ; and William J., Charles 
E., Gladys, Reta, Richard and Reginald are all living at home. 

The family are consistent communicants of the Church of England 
and Mr. Greentree was a dominant factor in establishing the church in 
Drumheller, and has served on the church board since organization, being 
now rector's warden. The success Mr. Greentree has achieved in life 
may be attributed to honest toil and perseverance, guided by sound judg- 
ment. Laudable ambition has led the way and as the years have passed 
he has advanced until success in a large measure is his and his example 
should serve to inspire and encourage others who must start out in life 
practically empty-handed. 



J. A. BLEZARD, M. D., C. M. 

Dr. J. A. Blezard, physician and surgeon of Edmonton, with offices in 
the Empire building, was born in Warkworth, Ontario, on the 17th of 
May, 1888. His boyhood and youth were spent on his father's farm to 
the age of seventeen years and he supplemented his early educational 
training by a high school course. He then entered business college, in 
which he studied for a year, after which he made his initial step into the 
commercial world by becoming identified with a mercantile enterprise at 
Maganatawan, Ontario. There he remained from 1907 until 1913, but 
in the meantime, or in 1910, he took up the study of medicine, becoming 
a student in Queen's University. He pursued the regular four-year 
course and was graduated with the class of 1914. He likewise spent one 
year in postgraduate work in New York city. In the summer of 1915 he 
became surgeon for the Edmonton, Dunvegan & B. C. Railroad at Ed- 
monton, after which he practiced at Warkworth, Ontario, for a number 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 115 

of months. In October, 1916, he entered the army with a captain's com- 
mission and was in overseas service until August, 1919, being connected 
with base and stationary hospitals and field ambulance. In the fall of 
the latter year he came to Edmonton, where he opened an office, and in 
the practice of his profession he has specialized in anaesthesia and ob- 
stetrics. He displays highly developed skill and efficiency along these 
lines and has been a close and constant student of the profession, keenly 
interested in everything that tends to bring to man the key to the complex 
mystery which we call life. He is a member of both the Alberta and 
Canadian Medical Societies and through the proceedings of these bodies 
keeps in touch with the trend of modern professional thought and prog- 
ress. He is a Licentiate of the Medical College of Canada and at all times 
has earnestly striven to uphold the highest standards and ethics of the 
profession. Fraternally he is a Mason and in his life exemplifies the 
beneficent spirit of the craft. His sterling worth is acknowledged by 
all who know him and his colleagues and contemporaries in the profes- 
sion attest his power and ability in the performance of the onerous and 
responsible duties that devolve upon him through his daily practice. 



CHARLES LAVELLE WILLIS. 

Charles Lavelle Willis is well known in journalistic circles of Alberta 
as the publisher of the Stettler Independent, which he has edited continu- 
ously during the past fifteen years or since he took charge in June, 1908. 
His birth occurred at Seaforth, Ontario, on the 10th of June, 1882, his 
parents being Robert and Luanna Willis, both of English lineage. In the 
acquirement of an education he attended the public schools and the Col- 
legiate Institute of his native city, while subsequently he matriculated in 
Toronto University, where he studied mathematics and physics, English 
and history, and was graduated with the degree of Bachelor of Arts. 
Before turning his attention to newspaper work he taught school for a 
period of three years, in Manitoba and Saskatchewan. As above stated, 
he has published the Stettler Independent since June, 1908, building up 
a large subscription as well as advertising patronage. The paper is de- 
voted to the dissemination of local and general news and has been a factor 
in moulding public thought and action in the community. 

On the 27th of January, 1913, in Regina, Saskatchewan, Mr. Willis 
was united in marriage to Miss Mary McPheeters, a lady of Scotch and 
Irish descent, and they have become the parents of three children. 

Mr. Willis has Liberal political views, never allowing partisan preju- 
dice to enter into his consideration of the qualifications and capability of 
a candidate for office. He has served as school trustee for ten years and 
the cause of education has ever found in him a stanch champion. Fra- 
ternally he is identified with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, while 
his religious faith is that of the Presbyterian church. He is in all re- 



116 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

spects a loyal and public-spirited citizen and brings to his various duties 
in life a keen mind and a broad intelligence, which are the basis of his 
success. 



HON. ANDREW ROBERT McLENNAN, M. P. P. 

Hon. Andrew R. McLennan, one of Edmonton's substantial business 
men, has also made his influence felt in civic, political and governmental 
affairs and is now serving as a member of the Alberta legislature. He 
was born at Walkerton, Ontario, in 1871, and his parents, Thomas and 
Barbara (Little) McLennan, were both natives of Scotland. In early life 
they came to Canada, settling in the province of Ontario, where the father 
acquired a farm and aided in developing the agricultural resources of 
that section of the Dominion. He had received an excellent education 
and through judicious reading was constantly increasing his store of 
knowledge. He was an influential factor in political affairs, serving as 
president of the Liberal Association, and his religious views embraced the 
teachings of the Presbyterian church. Mr. and Mrs. McLennan both 
passed away in Bruce county, Ontario. They had a family of twelve 
children, ten of whom survive, the subject of this review being the 
eleventh in order of birth. 

Andrew Robert McLennan attended the public schools and later com- 
pleted a course in a business college and on starting out in life he took up 
the occupation of farming but soon afterward embarked in the lumber 
business at Kenora, Ontario, where he engaged in the manufacture of 
lumber from 1897 until 1905. He next made his way to the province of 
Saskatchewan, locating at Abernathy, where he remained until 1912, 
when he came to Alberta and opened a lumberyard in Edmonton. He has 
since conducted a general retail business as a member of the firm of 
Pray & McLennan, Ltd., of which he is manager. 

In June, 1903, Mr. McLennan married Miss Annette L. Pray, a daugh- 
ter of his business associate, William H. Pray, who was born in the state 
of New York and has now reached the age of eighty-two years. Mr. and 
Mrs. McLennan have two daughters : Harriet Little, a high school pupil ; 
and Mary H., who is attending grammar school. 

Mr. McLennan has always taken a deep interest in political matters 
and formerly served as president of the Liberal Association. As a candi- 
date of that party he was chosen to represent his district in the Alberta 
legislature at the last general election and he is recognized as one of the 
able members of that body. For three years he was an alderman of Ed- 
monton, in which capacity he rendered effective service to the city, and 
he has also been honored with the presidency of the Edmonton Exhibition 
Association, having filled that office for two terms, while in 1920 he w^as 
president of the Curling Club. He is a Royal Arch Mason and a Presby- 
terian in religious faith. All the days in his career have not been equally 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 117 

bright, but he has never allowed obstacles and difficulties to discourage 
him, realizing the fact that advancement goes hand in hand with energy, 
enterprise and determination, and success has crowned his efforts. He is 
imbued with the spirit of progress along all lines which lead to municipal 
and provincial development and combines in his character all of the quali- 
ties of a useful and desirable citizen. 



JOHN THOMAS BATEMAN. 

In the passing of John Thomas Bateman, Cardston lost a prominent 
and substantial citizen. He was one of the most successful ranchmen of 
his day and was a self-made man in the truest sense of the word. He 
was born in Salt Lake City, Utah, on the 19th of July, 1866, and his 
demise occurred at Cardston on the 11th of December, 1910. He was a 
son of Thomas and Mary (Bateman) Bateman. His father was born 
in England and went to Utah with his parents. The Batemans settled in 
Salt Lake Valley about 1850. The grandfather returned to England after 
two years and his death occurred at sea. His widow spent the remainder 
of her life in Utah, and died in her eightieth year. 

In the acquireme»nt of his education John Thomas Bateman attended 
the public schools of his birthplace and subsequently enrolled in the 
Brigham Young University at Provo, Utah. His parents died when he 
was a mere lad and he was thrown upon his own resources at an early 
age. He worked out for wages until he reached the age of nineteen, when 
he engaged in the sheep business for himself. He went into Wyoming and 
ran sheep there with good success. When he sold out his interests he 
owned some four thousand head of sheep. In 1897 he came to Cardston, 
making the journey as far as Lethbridge by train, and the remainder of 
the trip was by stage. He homesteaded some land at Hight river, which 
was at that time raw prairie, and he immediately set about to break it 
and bring it to a highly cultivated state. He had to trade at Hight River 
City, a distance of forty miles. Mr. Bateman specialized in stock raising 
and he had great success with his Durham cattle. At the time of his death 
he owned and controlled nine hundred and sixty acres of land, in addi- 
tion to the original homestead. His early life was filled with hardships 
and reverses which were faced with confidence and borne with courage. 
Step by step he made his way in the world until he attained a position 
among Cardston's substantial farmers and most highly respected citizens. 

In Salt Lake City, on the 11th of October, 1898, was celebrated the 
marriage of Mr. Bateman and Miss Marguerite (Bateman), who was born 
in Salt Lake and was a daughter of Joseph and Mary E. (Allen) Bate- 
man. Her parents were natives of Salt Lake City and the father en- 
gaged in farming in Salt Lake Valley for many years, and was a membei* 
of the police force in Salt Lake City for ten years. His demise occurred 
in 1889, when fifty-four years of age. Mrs. Bateman is making her home 



118 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

in Salt Lake at the age of seventy-nine years. The paternal grandparents 
of Mrs. John Thomas Bateman, were Thomas and Mary (Street) Bate- 
man, natives of England. They emigrated to the United States at an 
early day and went across the plains to Salt Lake Valley in 1850. They 
were pioneers in that country and resided there until death. To the union 
of Mr. and Mrs. John Thomas Bateman five children were born : Mary, 
the wife of Samuel Walburger of Mountain View, was a school teacher 
previous to her marriage; John T., Ephram A., Graydon B. and Zelda, 
are living at home with their mother. 

Mr. Bateman was a lifelong member of the Church of Jesus Christ of 
Latter-day Saints and he was a teacher in the church. He was a man 
of great generosity of heart, contributing liberally and cheerfully of his 
means toward the relief of suffering, where he beheld it. The record of 
his well spent and useful life is one to which his descendants should refer 
with pride. 



RALPH VICTOR BELLAMY, M. A. 

Although advancement at the bar is proverbially slow, Ralph V. Bel- 
lamy has made rapid progress since entering upon his professional career, 
and the consensus of public opinion names him with the leading bar- 
risters of Edmonton, where he has resided since he was twelve years of 
age. A native of Canada, he was born at Port Hope, in the province of 
Ontario, August 26, 1880, a son of Thomas and Lora (Davis) Bellamy, 
also natives of Ontario. The father was born at Newcastle in 1852 and 
in 1892 he came with his family to Edmonton. 

After completing his public school course Ralph V. Bellamy entered 
McMaster University at Toronto, from which he received the B. A. de- 
gree, and later went to Oxford University as the first Rhodes scholar 
from Alberta. He was admitted to the bar in 1917 and has since prac- 
ticed in this city. 

At Aylmer, Ontario, on the 6th of October, 1908, Mr. Bellamy married 
Miss Mabel Clark and they have four children : Eleanor, Dorothy, Thomas 
and Elizabeth. Mr. Clark is a Unitarian in religious faith and his politi- 
cal support is given to the Liberal party. He has the enthusiasm for Ed- 
monton characteristic of its citizens and his loyalty and public spirit have 
found expression in effective efforts for the good of his city. He is now 
serving as school trustee of Edmonton, having been elected to that office 
in December, 1921, for a term of two years. Fraternally he is identified 
with the Masonic order, having membership in Jasper Lodge, No. 14, A. 
F. & A. M., of which he is a past master. He is widely and favourably 
known in Edmonton, in which he has spent practically his entire life, 
and has ever been deeply and helpfully interested in those projects which 
are basic elements in the growth and development of his city. Early 
recognizing the fact that industry and perseverance are indispensable 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 119 

elements in the attainment of success, along those lines he has sought 
advancement, and wisely and conscientiously utilizing the talents with 
which nature has endowed him, he has won an enviable position in the 
field in which he has directed his efforts. 



SAMUEL B. FERRIS. 



Through sheer force of merit and ability Samuel B. Ferris has worked 
his way steadily upward, winning new honors and assuming larger re- 
sponsibilities, until he is now superintendent of the Edmonton land de- 
partment and recognized as one of the representative residents of that 
city. A native of Ontario, he was born in Shelburne, on the 18th of De- 
cember, 1885, and his youthful days were spent on a farm, where he early 
became familiar with the best methods of tilling the soil, his time being 
divided between the duties of the schoolroom, the pleasures of the play- 
ground and the work of the fields. He pursued his education in the public 
and high schools and in a business college and for five years thereafter he 
was active along mercantile lines in his home town. 

In the year 1906 Mr. Ferris left Ontario and made his way westward 
to Manitoba. Proceeding to Daysland, Alberta, he there went into the 
mercantile business. On the 18th of September, 1906, however, he ar- 
rived in Edmonton and entered the employ of the city on the 27th of the 
same month. Here he has since put forth his efforts in connection with 
the city government, save for one year. He started in a clerical position 
in the electric light department and later was identified with the water 
department. Subsequently he was transferred to the treasurer's depart- 
ment as cashier and so continued from 1909 until 1912, when he engaged 
in the real estate business. He was assistant assessor and tax collector 
from July, 1913, until 1918, at which time Edmonton collected its first in- 
come tax. A new department was established to handle this work and 
Mr. Ferris was placed at the head, so continuing until 1920. The city 
had become owner of so much property through tax sales that in 1921 
it was found necessary to open a new department, called the land depart- 
ment, to inspect and place a valuation upon this land in order to make 
disposition thereof through sale or lease. Today in the land department 
there is carried on a business as extensive in the handling of property as 
that of any three real estate firms in the city and Mr. Ferris in control is 
displaying splendid business and executive ability and farsightedness in 
connection with property valuation. In 1920 the province of Alberta 
formed an assessment equalization board of five members and Mr. Ferris 
became one of that number. He has become very conversant with the 
value of property and land throughout the province and can speak with 
authority upon any question relative thereto. 

In 1912 Mr. Ferris was united in marriage to Miss Bessie E. Hosford 
of Newcastle, New Brunswick, and they have one child, Eileen. The 



120 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

religious faith of the family is that of the Methodist church and their 
social position is an enviable one. They have many friends throughout 
this section of the province and Mr. Ferris occupies a prominent position 
by reason of the high place which he has attained in the government 
service, as well as through his personal qualities and attributes. 



DAVID HORTON ELTON. 

David Horton Elton, a prominent and successful representative of 
the bar at Lethbridge, was born in Worcester, England, January 12, 
1877, and is a son of John and Isabelle Amelia (Horton) Elton, who were 
also natives of that country and both representatives of prominent old 
Anglo-Saxon families. The grandfather in the maternal line was Richard 
Horton, whose people figured prominently in England for many years. 
Both Mr. and Mrs. John Elton were members of the Church of Jesus 
Christ of Latter-day Saints. The father died in England, after which 
the mother came to the new world, making her way to Salt Lake City, 
Utah, in 1890. Mr. Elton had been in the service of the Great Western 
Railroad and had thus provided for the support of his family of twelve 
children, of whom six sons and two daughters are living. The eldest 
son, John, M^as for fifteen years in the British military service and was 
with Lord Roberts in the Afghan war. He is now a resident of Los 
Angeles, California. 

David H. Elton, who was the tenth child and seventh son in his par- 
ents' family of twelve children, was educated in the schools of Worcester, 
England, and in the high school of Salt Lake after the arrival of the 
family in the new world. He won his professional degree — that of Bach- 
elor of Laws — in the Alberta School of Law, being a graduate of its 
first class. Before preparing for a professional career, however, he had 
served five years' apprenticeship at the stonecutter's trade in Salt Lake 
and for three years had been on a mission of the Church of Jesus Christ 
of Latter-day Saints without pay, in the southern states. He edited the 
Southern Star at Chattanooga, Tennessee, a religious paper, and with 
the completion of his mission work he returned to Salt Lake City in 1901. 
There he resumed work at the stonecutter's trade, but later in the same 
year he came to Alberta, settling at Cardston, where he edited the Alberta 
Star for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and also served 
on the executive staff of the Alberta Press Association. In company 
with Colonel C. G. Porter and Bob Edwards, J. J. Young and Fred Simp- 
son, he organized the Alberta and Eastern British Columbia Press As- 
sociation and was prominently known as a representative of journalistic 
interests in this part of the country. He remained in Cardston from 
1901 until 1908, when he removed to Lethbridge and entered upon the 
study of law under the direction of W. C. Ives, with whom he continued 
his reading until 1913, when he was admitted to the bar. Since that 




DAVID H. ELTON. 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 123 

time he has engaged in practice and has been commissioned K. C. His 
knowledge of the law is comprehensive and exact and in the preparation 
of his cases he is most thorough and painstaking, while in his presenta- 
tion of a cause he is always clear, cogent and logical in his reasoning. 
He belongs to both the Lethbridge and Canadian Bar Associations and 
devotes the major part of his time to his professional duties, his allegiance 
to his clients' interests being proverbial. 

In 1901 Mr. Elton was married, in the Temple at Salt Lake, to Miss 
Afton Hauser, who was born in Ogden, Utah, but was educated in Chat- 
tanooga, Tennessee, where she lived until her marriage. She is a daugh- 
ter of Charles M. Hauser, who was educated for the Methodist ministry 
at Trinity College, in North Carolina, but afterward became identified with 
the Baptist church and preached the gospel according to its teachings 
for a number of years. Later, however, he was converted to the faith of 
the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. To Mr. and Mrs. Elton 
five children have been born : Viva, a musician, was educated in Salt Lake 
City and in New York, studying under Friedheim, who was one of the 
pupils of Franz Liszt ; Ursula, Hauser and Earl Kitchener are all in school ; 
John Dalton, two years of age, completes the family. 

Mr. and Mrs. Elton are consistent members of the Church of Jesus 
Christ of Latter-day Saints and he presides over the Young Men's Mutual 
Association of the Lethbridge Stake of Zion. He is an active worker of 
the stake organization covering twelve wards, and their slogan for the 
current year is: "We stand for a pure life through clean thought and 
action." Mr. Elton belongs to the Chinook Club and also to the Authors' 
Club of London, England, being the composer of considerable patriotic 
verse. He served as city police magistrate of Lethbridge for six years 
and was sub-agent of Dominion lands while at Cardston. In politics he 
is a Liberal and he takes an active part in all political and public interests, 
his aid and influence ever being strongly felt on the side of progress, re- 
form and improvement. He possesses splendid oratorical ability and is 
frequently heard on the public platform, addressing audiences on many 
vital questions. Mr. Elton deserves much credit for what he has accom- 
plished. He was but three years of age when his father died, leaving the 
mother with a family of twelve children and in straitened financial cir- 
cumstances. With the utmost care, however, she reared her family and, 
though they lacked many of the so-called comforts of life, they were 
thoroughly trained in habits of industry, integrity and honor and were 
taught the basic principles of Christianity. Thus it was that Mr. Elton 
came to have firm faith in Christ and His teachings and has devoted his 
life to the work of the Savior. He is largely indebted to his own efforts 
for the educational opportunities which he enjoyed. He attended high 
school when it was too cold to work at his trade and throughout the 
intervening years he has improved every chance to broaden his knowledge 
and thus promote his eflficiency as a factor in the world's work. He won 
his degree of LL. B. while studying in the oflflce of a barrister and v^hen 
he located for practice in Lethbridge he was without capital. Laudable 



124 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

ambition and indefatigable energy, however, constituted the foundation 
of his success, and while he has steadily advanced along professional 
lines, being now recognized as one of the ablest members of the Leth- 
bridge bar, he has at the same time been fully cognizant of his duties 
and obligations in other connections and has done much to uphold the 
civic and moral standards of his community. 



ROBERT BENJAMIN BURLAND. 

Among those who have aided in establishing Calgary's financial pres- 
tige is numbered Robert B. Burland, who for eight years has been local 
manager for the Home Bank of Canada, and in business circles of the 
city he occupies an enviable position. He was born in Rapid City, Mani- 
toba, the oldest town west of the Great Lakes, April 29, 1881, and is a 
son of James R. and Setma (Basler) Burland, the former a native of 
Quebec and the latter of the province of Ontario. In 1878 or thereabouts 
the father came to Manitoba, settling at Rapid City, where he still resides. 
For a number of years he engaged in pioneer farming but latterly moved 
to town and went into the furniture business, which he still conducts. He 
ranks with the leading merchants of the town and for many years has 
been president of the Rapid City Lacrosse Team, becoming widely known 
in this connection. In 1922 he took his team to Winnipeg, Manitoba, to 
compete for the national championship and although sixty-eight years of 
age he is still actively interested in Canada's national game. The mother 
has reached the age of fifty-eight years. Her father passed away at 
Rapid City when eighty-four years of age, while her mother is still living 
and has reached the advanced age of eighty-nine years. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Burland five children were born : Robert Benjamin ; Gertrude, who mar- 
ried Dr. J. T. Mulvey of Rapid City ; Russell James, who resides at Re- 
gina, Saskatchewan, and is connected with the Canadian Pacific Railroad 
Company; George Stanley, who died January 7, 1920, when twenty-nine 
years of age; and William Frederick, who is employed as an accountant 
in the Home Bank of Canada at Vancouver, British Columbia. 

Robert B. Burland was reared on a farm near Rapid City and the 
nearest school was three miles distant from his home. Later the family 
moved into the town and he completed his education in the Rapid City 
school, afterward teaching school for a term. He then entered the private 
bank of D. A. Hopper of Rapid City, offering to work for a year without 
compensation in order to gain experience in financial affairs, but was paid 
a salary and remained with that institution until it was absorbed by the 
Union Bank of Canada three years later. He was with the latter organ- 
ization for a number of years and acted as manager of one of its branches, 
resigning to enter the furniture business with his father, but he did not 
find merchandising a congenial occupation, and a year later he resumed 
his connection with financial interests. In March, 1908, he became an as- 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 125 

sistant accountant in the Winnipeg establishment of the Home Bank of 
Canada and in March, 1911, was placed in charge of its branch at Nee- 
pawa, Manitoba. He remained there until September 7, 1914, when he 
was sent to Calgary to open a bank, and has since been its manager. He 
is well versed in the details of modern finance and has promoted the suc- 
cess of the institution by able, systematic work, tempering aggressiveness 
with a safe conservatism. 

On December 24, 1910, Mr. Burland was married to Miss Mary Essie 
Porter, a daughter of David and Elizabeth (Chambers) Porter, both of 
whom are deceased. The father was a prominent lumberman and was 
also active in legislative affairs, serving as a member of parliament from 
Bruce county, Ontario. Mr. and Mrs, Burland have two children : James 
Porter and Mary Elizabeth, aged, respectively, ten and four years. Mr. 
Burland was reared in the faith of the Anglican church but is now a 
member of the Presbyterian church. His fraternal connections are with 
the Masons and the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks of Newfound- 
land and the Dominion of Canada and he is also a member of the Cana- 
dian Club. Like his father, Mr. Burland is much interested in the game 
of lacrosse and is an expert player. In 1907 he trained a team of boys 
at Rapid City, Manitoba, all being natives of the town, and won the la- 
crosse championship of that province. His career has been marked by 
continuous advancement and his success is attributable to his tireless 
industry, his close attention to detail, his probity and courage. He stands 
high in the regard of those with whom business or social relations have 
brought him into contact and exemplifies in his life the spirit of progress 
characteristic of the west. 



T. GILBERT ONSUM. 



One of the most enterprising and progressive citizens of Innisfail is 
T. Gilbert Onsum, who is manager of the Sunny Alberta Land Company 
and also handles insurance. He was born in Minnesota, about one hun- 
dred and sixty miles northwest of Minneapolis, on the 7th of February, 
1887. His parents, who are deceased, were natives of that state and the 
father engaged in agricultural pursuits there and in Montana. 

T. Gilbert Onsum was reared on a farm in Minnesota and received his 
education in the public schools there. On reaching man's estate he went 
to Montana, where he worked on a farm for some time. Later he located 
in Great Falls, Montana, being there employed by a milling and packing 
company for a few years. Subsequently he determined to enter business 
life on his own account and in looking for a suitable location for the ven- 
ture, decided upon Alberta. On the 11th of May, 1903, he arrived in Cal- 
gary and then came immediately to Innisfail, where he has since resided. 
He established his present real estate and insurance business here on a 
small scale and today it is one of the most successful enterprises in the 



126 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

community. The Sunny Alberta Land Company enjoys an extensive busi- 
ness which is due to the ability and management of Mr. Onsum. 

Mr. Onsum married Miss Rose M. Schilling and to their union one 
child was born, who is deceased. 

Although the greater part of Mr. Onsum's time and attention has 
been devoted to the furtherance of his business interests, he is public- 
spirited and has always maintained an active interest in civic affairs. He 
was a member of the town council for one term, from 1909 to 1910, and 
he was formerly secretary and treasurer of the Rink Association. Fra- 
ternally he is identified with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and 
the Woodmen of the World. For some time he was secretary and treas- 
urer of the local fire brigade, which won two cups in competition at Cal- 
gary. Mr. and Mrs. Onsum are consistent members of the Presbyterian 
church. In both public and private life Mr. Onsum has manifested the 
general business sagacity and foresight which have brought him such 
notable success in the direction of his interests and have served to number 
him among the representative citizens of his community. 



JOHN KEITH. 



For seventeen years John Keith has been identified with Edmonton's 
growth and development and as superintendent of the Revillon-Freres 
Fur Company he occupies a position of large responsibility, to which he 
has risen through merit and ability. He was born in Aberdeenshire, Scot- 
land, June 29, 1879, and was reared on a farm, attending the public 
schools in the vicinity of his home. He was connected with agricultural 
pursuits until he reached the age of twenty-one, when he took up the 
study of commercial bookkeeping at Aberdeen, remaining in that city for 
four and a half years. Believing that better opportunities for advance- 
ment could be secured in a newer country, he came to Canada, arriving 
in Edmonton in 1905. He secured a position in the fur department of the 
Revillon-Freres Company and the efficiency with which he discharged 
the tasks allotted to him led to his advancement to the office of post man- 
ager, which he capably discharged for two years. In December, 1912, he 
was promoted to the position of superintendent, in which capacity he is 
now serving, having charge of the western district. He combines a de- 
tailed knowledge of the business with initiative and executive ability and 
under his able supervision the interests of the firm in this section of the 
Dominion have been materially advanced. 

On November 11, 1908, Mr. Keith was united in marriage to Miss 
Elvira McKernan and they have become the parents of two daughters: 
Mary and Jessie. Fraternally Mr. Keith is identified with the Masonic 
order and in religious faith he is a Presbyterian, while his deep interest 
in the business development of the city is evinced by his membership in 
the Edmonton Board of Trade. However, he subordinates all other mat- 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 127 

ters to the demands of his business and brings to his duties in that con- 
nection a broad mind and a keen intelligence, which are the basis of his 
success. 



JAMES RAE, SR. 



James Rae, Sr., of Medicine Hat, who is filling the office of police mag- 
istrate and is identified with agricultural interests in that locality, was 
born in Lannert county, Ontario, August 28, 1852, and comes of Scotch 
ancestry. He is a grandson of John and Mary (McKenzie) Rae, the latter 
dying in Scotland, after which the grandfather brought his family to 
Canada, making his way to Ontario in 1821. He had been a very promi- 
nent citizen in Glasgow and at one time was well-to-do. He had the first 
steam sawmill in the city and built up a business of substantial propor- 
tions but afterward formed a partnership with a man who completely 
disorganized and ruined the business. Accordingly, he was in limited 
financial circumstances when with his family he crossed the Atlantic and 
took up his abode in Ontario. There his splendid business ability and en- 
terprise, however, asserted itself and again he won prosperity. His son, 
James McKenzie Rae, was born in Glasgow, Scotland, and when he accom- 
panied his father and the family to the new world he was a youth of 
fourteen years. He assisted his father in the arduous task of clearing 
the land and building the first house and performed other such work as 
was incidental to the development of a new farm on the frontier. After 
reaching manhood he wedded Mary Bremner, who was born in Dundee, 
Scotland, and was a daughter of Charles Bremner, who was also a native 
of the land of hills and heather and came to the new world about 1821, 
settling in Ontario, where he hewed out a farm in the midst of the forest, 
converting a wild tract of land into rich and productive fields. He con- 
tinued to occupy the old homestead throughout his remaining days. His 
daughter, Mary, by her marriage to James McKenzie Rae, became the 
mother of nine children, eight of whom are living, the following being 
residents of Alberta: John Knox and William, who are farmers near 
Veteran; and James of this review. The parents were members of the 
Presbyterian church and Mr. Rae gave his political support to the Liberal 
party. 

James Rae, Sr., whose name introduces this record, was the third in 
order of birth in his father's family. He pursued his education at Bennie 
Corners, Ontario, but was obliged to quit school when only eleven years 
of age and start out to provide for his own support. His father was 
crippled in 1912 and unable to do any more work, so that he could not 
support the family. This burden largely devolved upon his young son and 
thus from early life James Rae has been forced to face life's duties and 
its responsibilities. In 1881 he came to Manitoba, where he took up a 
homestead, a preemption claim, living on this until 1890, when he removed 



128 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

to the town of Boissevain, Manitoba. He was there clerk of the court 
and was also engaged in the implement business. He likewise filled the 
office of municipal clerk and treasurer and was reeve of the municipality 
of Morden in 1896. He also successfully conducted an implement store 
from 1890 until 1896 and in the following year he moved to Medicine Hat. 
Here he turned his attention to ranching, obtaining a tract of land and 
stocking it with cattle. He was on that ranch for two years and then 
sold out, after which he returned to Medicine Hat and purchased a hard- 
ware business and continued in the hardware trade until 1910, when he 
disposed of his store. In the meantime he had invested in property until 
he became the owner of a thousand acres of land, to which he gave his 
supervision and thereon engaged in raising cattle and horses. He has 
continued active in connection with ranch life and his sound business 
judgment is manifest in all that he undertakes. In 1913 he was appointed 
police magistrate and has since filled that position, covering a period of a 
decade, his official record being one over which there falls no shadow of 
wrong nor suspicion of evil. His ranch property is one of the beautiful 
farms near Medicine Hat and on this he runs a large bunch of horses. 
His farm is splendidly irrigated and he rents one hundred and eighty- 
seven acres of it for two thousand dollars per annum. 

On the 28th of September, 1875, Mr. Rae was united in marriage to 
Miss Ellen Henderson, a native of Ontario and a daughter of Robert Hen- 
derson, who was a woolen manufacturer at Appleton and at Blakeney, 
Ontario. Mr. and Mrs. Rae became the parents of seven children : Janet 
Mcintosh, who is now the wife of William Nelson Kelly, a railroad man, 
living at Medicine Hat ; James, who is in the hardware business at Medi- 
cine Hat; Ellen Henderson, who married Kenneth Dunphy, an engineer 
on the Canadian Pacific Railroad, residing at Souris, Manitoba; Mary 
Bremner, the wife of William Hay, superintendent of schools at Medi- 
cine Hat; Catherine Elizabeth, the wife of Mervin Brown, formerly 
mayor of Medicine Hat and now at the head of the irrigation department 
of government service at Winnipeg; Margaret Evaline, a music teacher 
of Medicine Hat; and Marjorie Winnifred, a trained nurse now in Ed- 
monton. The wife and mother passed away August 30, 1910. On the 
11th of October, 1916, Mr. Rae was again married, his second union being 
with Catherine Weatherhead Wilson, who was born in Brandon, Mani- 
toba, a daughter of James Wilson, formerly recorder of Edmonton, and 
Agnes (Wilson) Wilson. To this union two children have been born: 
William Wilson and Robert John. 

Since age conferred upon him the right of franchise Mr. Rae has been 
a supporter of the Liberal party but is not active in politics as an oflice 
seeker. He belongs to the Presbyterian church, in which his wife also 
has membership and he is prominently known in Masonic circles, having 
attained the Knight Templar degree in the York Rite and the thirty- 
second degree of the Scottish Rite. He served as master of the blue lodge 
in Boissevain, Manitoba, in 1891, and has also held office in the Royal Arch 
chapter. In fact, he was grand superintendent of the chapter in 1907 and 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 129 

during his incumbency in the office visited every chapter in Alberta. He 
does all in his power to promote the cause of Masonry and is in hearty 
sympathy with the high purposes and beneficent spirit upon which this 
order rests. 



SAMUEL ARCHIBALD DICKSON. 

Samuel Archibald Dickson has broad experience as a legal practitioner 
and during the period of his residence in Edmonton he has gained a wide 
and favorable acquaintance. While he has won substantial success in his 
chosen profession, his interests are not confined to the law and he is rec- 
ognized as a broad-minded man and public-spirited citizen, whose influ- 
ence is at all times on the side of progress, reform and improvement. He 
was born at Seaforth, Ontario, February 19, 1876. His father, Samuel 
Dickson, also a native of that province, was born in 1841, and when 
twenty-six years of age, in 1867, he was married in Ontario to Nancy 
Anna Hannah. He passed away in Seaforth, Ontario, in 1916. The 
mother is now residing at Fort Saskatchewan, Alberta. 

The public schools of his native town afforded Samuel A. Dickson his 
early educational advantages and his academic training was received at 
Toronto University, from which he was graduated in 1899. He next took 
up the study of law at Osgoode Hall in that city, completing his course 
in 1902, and in November of that year he located for practice in Edmon- 
ton. Soon afterward he went to Fort Saskatchewan, where he remained 
for two years, returning to Edmonton in 1905, and he has since made his 
home in this city. He is now senior member of the firm of Dickson & 
Paterson and they have built up a large clientele, being recognized as able 
advocates and wise counselors. Mr. Dickson possesses a comprehensive 
understanding of the law and displays marked skill in its exposition. In 
a discussion he has the gift of seizing the gist of the matter and the 
knack of setting it in correct perspective and has won the victory in many 
a notable forensic combat. 

In 1908, in Hamilton, Ontario, Mr. Dickson was married to Miss Eve- 
lyn Hannah Ward, a daughter of Alfred and Margaret Jane (Hadley) 
Ward. Her father is deceased. Her mother still lives in Hamilton. 
Mr. and Mrs. Dickson have three children: Archibald Hadley; and Mar- 
garet Evelyn and Anna Elizabeth, twins. 

Mr. Dickson gives his political support to the Conservative party and 
in religious faith he is a Presbyterian. He has been chairman of the 
board of managers of the First Presbyterian church of Edmonton and 
contributes liberally of his time and means toward its support, doing all 
in his power to promote its influence. In 1916 he organized the Edmon- 
ton Rotary Club, of which he was made director, filling that position for 
four years, and he has served in a similar capacity with the Young Men's 
Christian Association. He is a Master Mason and also belongs to the 
Mayfair Golf & Country Club. His life has never been a self -centered one 
(9) 



130 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

and his interests have reached out broadly to his fellowmen. He early- 
recognized the fact that advancement at the bar is won only through 
individual effort and merit and that there is no profession more open to 
talent. He therefore closely applied himself to the mastery of legal prin- 
ciples and has steadily advanced until he now ranks with Edmonton's 
leading barristers. 



THOMAS C. MILNES. 



A farmer, rancher and real estate dealer of Claresholm, Alberta, Can- 
ada, is Thomas C. Milnes, who was born near Columbus, Indiana, on the 
31st of March, 1870, a son of Thomas and Louisa (Hamblen) Milnes, the 
former a native of near Halifax, Yorkshire, England, and the latter of 
near Nashville, Indiana. The father emigrated to the United States as a 
small boy with his parents and they located in Indiana. Upon attaining 
man's estate he engaged in farming in Brown county, Indiana, where he 
was one of the pioneer settlers. He was a stanch supporter of the demo- 
cratic party and was treasurer of the county for some time. Later he 
removed to Bartholomew county, near Columbus, Indiana, and on retir- 
ing from active life he moved to near Fowler, Indiana, where he was 
living at the time of his demise in 1900, at the age of sixty-nine years. 
Mrs. Milnes died in 1889. To their union four children were born : John, 
whose death occurred at the age of five years; William, who is living at 
Swayzee, Indiana ; George W., whose death occurred at the age of twenty- 
one years; and Thomas C, whose name introduces this review. Mr. and 
Mrs. Milnes were consistent members of the Methodist Episcopal church 
and highly respected citizens of the communities in which they resided. 

The public schools of Bartholomew county afforded Thomas C. Milnes 
his early education and after putting his textbooks aside he engaged in 
farming rented land, near Fowler, Indiana, where he also conducted a 
grocery business. Later he entered the real estate business in Fowler 
and sold land throughout the Yazoo and Mississippi valley, in which ven- 
ture he won success. In 1905 he came to Claresholm, Alberta, Canada, 
arriving here on the 5th of March, and he immediately rented office space 
and resumed his real estate business- He also bought a homestead right 
and lived first in a shack, later in a tent and a granary, while he was 
bringing the land to a highly improved state. From time to time he in- 
creased his land holdings until he now has two thousand four hundred 
acres under cultivation in one body of land and a seven thousand acre 
well improved stock ranch. He has between twenty-five and thirty thou- 
sand dollars worth of improvements on the land. He engages in general 
farming and ranching, raising Aberdeen Angus cattle and Berkshire hogs, 
and he also conducts his real estate and insurance business, and his dili- 
gence and enterprise have won for him the confidence and respect of all 
who know him. 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 131 

On the 23d of October, 1890, Mr. Milnes was united in marriage to 
Miss Maud E. Newby, who died January 4, 1892. To this union one son 
was born, Carl L., who attended a business college of Edmonton, and is 
now engaged in farming in association with his father. On August 9, 
1893, Mr. Milnes was married the second time, Miss Jeanette Burnette 
becoming his wife. She died September 4, 1895, leaving a daughter, 
Blanche L., who attended Okenagan College at Summerland, British 
Columbia, and is now the wife of W. LeRoy Stebbins of Claresholm, who 
is in the garage business. 

On the 8th of June, 1898, Mr. Milnes married Miss Emma McCleary, 
and to this union two children have been born: Maude, who is the wife 
of Harold S. Kendrick of Los Angeles, California, is a graduate of the 
University of Southern California, and she has the distinction of being 
the first woman to graduate with the Civil Engineering degree from that 
university; Marian is living at home and attends the Claresholm high 
school. 

Mr. Milnes gives his political allegiance to the Liberal party and for 
some time he was mayor of Claresholm, giving to this community a pro- 
gressive and businesslike administration. For the past two years he has 
been the member for the legislative assembly in the province of Alberta, 
representing the Claresholm constituency. He has attained the third de- 
gree in the Masonic order and is likewise a member of the Knights of 
Pythias. Mr. Milnes represents the type of citizen who is regarded as 
an acquisition to any community, forwarding its development by his dili- 
gence and enterprise in matters of business, and promoting its general 
progress by maintaining a high standard of citizenship and cooperating 
in every commendable public movement. 



ALEXANDER GILLESPIE, M. D. 

Thorough training well qualified Dr. Alexander Gillespie for the oner- 
ous duties and responsibilities that devolve upon members of the medical 
profession and he is now successfully practicing in Edmonton, his ability 
being widely recognized, particularly in the field of surgery, in which he 
specializes. Dr. Gillespie is a native of Ontario, his birth having occurred 
on the 5th of February, 1854. There his boyhood and youth were spent 
on a farm with the usual experiences of the farm bred, boy and at the reg- 
ular age he entered the country schools, completing the work of various 
grades until he became a high school pupil. When his course there was 
completed he reviewed the broad field of business with the purpose to 
select a life work and in 1880 he entered the Trinity Medical College, in 
which he pursued the regular four years' course, being graduated with 
honors as a member of the class of 1884. He then left for Edinburgh, 
Scotland, where he took postgraduate work, receiving the degree of L. R. 
C. P. Later he settled at Manilla, Ontario, where he practiced success- 



132 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

fully for eleven years, and in 1895 he removed to Lindsay, there residing 
for eleven years, or until 1906, and then came to Edmonton, and has here 
since followed his profession, with the exception of a period of one year 
which he again spent in Scotland, taking postgraduate work. He has 
given the major part of his time and attention to surgical practice since 
taking up his abode in Edmonton and is recognized as one of the most 
skillful and eminent surgeons in this part of the Dominion, He is a con- 
stant student of his profession, keeping in touch with the onward trend 
of thought and investigation, and his methods are thoroughly modern 
and scientific in every particular. He belongs to both the Alberta and the 
Canadian Medical Associations. 

On the 6th of October, 1885, Dr. Gillespie was married to Miss Sarah 
Campbell and they have become the parents of three children : Allister 
Campbell ; William Fulton, who is a physician now doing postgraduate 
work in Toronto; and Annie, the wife of C. I. Grierson, who is in the 
employ of the Imperial Oil Company of Toronto. 

Fraternally Dr. Gillespie is connected with the Masons and the In- 
dependent Order of Odd Fellows and is a most loyal follower of the teach- 
ings and high purposes of these organizations. He also belongs to the 
Presbyterian church. In politics he maintains an independent attitude, 
nor has he ever been an aspirant for public office, preferring to devote his 
entire time and attention to his professional duties and in that field, 
through merit and ability, he has risen to distinction. 



ALPHONSUS LANNAN, B. A., LL. B. 

In a profession demanding keen mental perception and more than 
ordinary ability Alphonsus Lannan has made exceptionally rapid prog- 
ress, readily mastering the principles of jurisprudence, and within a com- 
paratively short period he has gained a well established position among 
the leading members of the Alberta bar. His ancestors formerly came 
from the south of Ireland, but his great-grandfather was a native-born 
Canadian and one of the first white settlers in Prince Edward Island, 
then called the Isle of St. John. It was there that the subject of this 
sketch was born, on the 14th day of July, 1883, and his parents were 
Andrew and Annie (Keoughan) Lannan, the former of whom followed 
the occupation of farming. He was the second son in a family of seven 
children, all of whom graduated from the Provincial University and for a 
time followed the profession of public school teachers. 

Alphonsus Lannan received his early education at St. Dunstan's Col- 
lege, Prince Edward Island, and later attended Laval University at Mon- 
treal, Quebec, from which he was graduated in 1903, with the B. A. 
degree. In 1904 he came to what was then known as the Northwest Terri- 
tories and in that year passed through the Territorial Normal School at 
Regina, Saskatchewan. Taking up educational work, he taught in the 




ALPHONSUS LANNAN. 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 135 

public schools of various places throughout the Northwest and in the 
newly formed provinces of Alberta and Saskatchewan until 1914, when 
he became a law student in the office of Reilly & Lunney, barristers at 
Calgary. He completed the arduous law course in a period slightly over 
two years and won the Carswell prize by taking the second highest stand- 
ing in the province of Alberta in the final law examinations. At the same 
time Mr. Lannan graduated from the University of Alberta, with the de- 
gree of Bachelor of Laws, and was admitted to the bar in 1917. He then 
became a member of the firm of Lunney & Lannan, with which he has 
since been associated, and a liberal and representative clientele has been 
accorded them. 

In 1906 Mr. Lannan married Miss Kathleen Brown, a daughter of 
John H. Brown, who formerly resided in the States and removed from 
Minnesota to western Canada, becoming one of the pioneer ranchers of 
northern Alberta. To this union have been born five children, three sons 
and two daughters, all of whom are at home with their parents. Politi- 
cally Mr. Lannan was always a follower of Sir Wilfred Laurier and still 
adheres to the old liberal standard. He is a member of the Catholic 
church and of the Calgary Council of the Knights of Columbus. He has 
a thorough knowledge of legal principles, which he correctly applies to 
the points in litigation. He is an earnest and conscientious student, 
deeply interested in his profession, and judging from what he has already 
accomplished, his future career will be well worth the watching. 



JOSEPH ANDREW CLARKE. 

For fourteen years Joseph Andrew Clarke has resided in Edmonton, 
during which period he has established his position among the successful 
and representative members of the legal fraternity of the city, and in 
municipal affairs he has also taken an active and prominent part, being 
recognized as a man of sound and well balanced judgment, who has 
worked earnestly and effectively to promote the public welfare. He was 
born at Osnabruck Center, in the province of Ontario, Canada, Septem- 
ber 20, 1869, a son of Captain James Clarke, a native of Beragh, Ireland. 
The father was born in 1828 and when thirty-seven years of age, in 1865, 
he emigrated to Canada. He was married in Ontario to Miss Margaret 
Adams. Both have passed away. 

Joseph A. Clarke pursued his education in the schools of Prescott and 
Brockville, Ontario, and afterward completed a course in law at Osgoode 
Hall in Toronto. He was admitted to the bar in 1906 and two years later 
located for practice in Edmonton, where he has since successfully fol- 
lowed his profession. As the years have passed his clientele has steadily 
increased and he conducts his law business with strict regard for the 
highest standards of professional ethics. 

Mr. Clarke was married in this city on the 9th of October, 1911, to 



136 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

Miss Gwendolen Asbury, whose father was an English minister. Mr. 
and Mrs. Clarke have become the parents of three children: Gwendolen 
Mary, Muriel Asbury and Bennett Winthrop. Mr. Clarke is a Protestant 
in religious faith and politically he is a Liberal with radical views. He 
is an active and influential worker in the ranks of the party and has 
been called to public offices of trust and responsibility. During 1903 
and 1904 he served on th'e Yukon council of Yukon Territory and from 
1912 until 1915 he was a member of the city council of Edmonton. His 
excellent record as councilman led to his election to the mayoralty in 
1919 and he was reelected after filling the office for one term, giving to 
the municipality a most active and progressive administration. Frater- 
nally he is identified with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. He 
has always found time for participation in matters relating to the general 
welfare and has ever I'ecognized and fully met the duties and obligations 
of citizenship. Possessing an analytical, well trained mind, he is thor- 
oughly alive to the important duties of his profession and is deserving 
of the high esteem in which he is held by his fellowmen. 



CRAMMOND R. MORTON. 

Crammond R. Morton, an enterprising hardware merchant of Vegre- 
ville, possesses that quality which has been termed the commercial sense, 
for he has energy, initiative and business acumen and he has therefore 
won a gratifying measure of success. He was born in the province of 
Manitoba, April 11, 1882, of the marriage of Edward and Jeannette 
(Watson) Morton, natives of the province of Ontario. The father arrived 
in Vegreville in 1912 and has since assisted the subject of this review in 
the conduct of his store. The mother is deceased. 

In 1905 Crammond R. Morton came to this province, reaching here 
before the Canadian Northern Railroad Company extended its line from 
Manitoba to Alberta. He came to Vegreville as manager of the Merchants 
Bank and held that position for one and a half years, when he embarked 
in business on his own account, opening the Morton hardware store in 
1906. He has since conducted the establishment, which now ranks with 
the leading mercantile enterprises of the town. His stock is complete 
and of high grade, and his reasonable prices, unfailing courtesy to patrons 
and thorough reliability have drawn to him a large trade. He is also 
interested in agricultural pursuits, owning a valuable ranch three miles 
north of Vegreville, on which he raises thoroughbred cattle. 

Mr. Morton married Miss Effie Doran, a native of the province of 
Ontario, and they have become the parents of a son, John. They are 
members of the Union church and Mr. Morton is an adherent of the 
Liberal party. He takes an active interest in civic affairs and has served 
for a year as a member of the town council. Fraternally he is identified 
with the Knights of Pythias and he is also a member of the Community 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 137 

Club. For seventeen years he has been a resident of Vegreville and has 
thoroughly identified his interests with those of his community, whose 
welfare and advancement are to him matters of deep concern. To the 
work of development and upbuilding he has contributed his full share 
and his fellow townsmen entertain for him high regard. 



WILLIAM C. MacKAY. 



The progressive spirit of the west finds exemplification in the career 
of William C. MacKay, to whom the recognition of opportunity has ever 
been equivalent to the accomplishment of a task, and his name now figures 
prominently in business circles of Edmonton in connection with the coal 
industry. He was born and reared in Prince Edward Island, there at- 
tending the public schools and also completing a course in a business 
college. His first position was that of clerk in a mercantile establishment 
of Charlottetown, and in 1907 he came to the west, selecting Edmonton 
as his place of residence. He secured employment in a coal office and sub- 
sequently became manager for the Standard Coal Company, filling that 
office for several years. Ambitious to have a business of his own, he or- 
ganized the MacKay Coal Company, Ltd., in 1915, and his success in that 
venture led him to expand the scope of his activities. In 1917 he formed 
the Fraser-MacKay Collieries, Ltd., which took over a group of mines, 
and their output now amounts to five hundred tons of coal per day. Each 
enterprise has enjoyed a continuous and healthful growth since its in- 
ception and the business has become one of large and profitable propor- 
tions. Broad experience and careful study have given Mr. MacKay a 
comprehensive knowledge of the coal industry and his business methods 
have commended him to the confidence and support of the public. 

Mr. MacKay was united in marriage to Miss Blanche Down and they 
have become the parents of two children : Gordon and Eleanor. He serves 
as president and manager of the organizations with which he is connected 
and two of the leading coal firms in the city stand as monuments to his 
initiative spirit and his powers of organization and administration. He 
has constructed his own success and in winning prosperity has also gained 
the esteem and goodwill of all with whom he has been associated. 



CHARLES E. K. COX. 



With public activities and official duties at Edmonton, Charles E. K. 
Cox has been closely associated for a number of years, much to the benefit 
of the city. He is now filling the position of city clerk and in many lines 
his labors have been of direct benefit and value to the community. He 
was born in London, England, August 25, 1861, and was educated in 



138 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

the national schools of his country. There in young manhood he served 
as a member of one of the legislative bodies. As a vestryman for the 
borough of Camberwell in the London district, a municipal body equiva- 
lent to our city councils, governing a population of two hundred and 
seventy thousand. He served on the finance committee of this body and 
there he received his training for municipal official duties. In 1907 he 
came direct from England to Edmonton and soon afterward was ap- 
pointed city auditor of Strathcona, filling that position until the 1st of 
January, 1910, when he was called to the oflfice of secretary and treasurer. 
He continued to act in that capacity until the amalgamation of the two 
cities, which occurred in February, 1912. Since then he has been city 
clerk and secretary of various committees, also returning officer for the 
city of Edmonton. He is most conscientious in the performance of all of 
his public duties, his mental alertness, his recognition of public needs and 
his devotion to the general welfare combining to make him most efficient 
in the discharge of his duties. 

Mr. Cox is a member of the English church and he is also prominently 
known in musical circles. He has done much to stimulate a love of 
music and promote musical progress in Edmonton and has been a mem- 
ber of the Albert Festival Committee since 1908, serving as its president 
in 1914 and 1915. He was the founder of the Strathcona Choral Society, 
of which he acted as conductor from 1908 until 1915, and he has been 
choirmaster of the Metropolitan Methodist church, the First Presbyterian 
church and Holy Trinity church. While thus active in musical circles 
he won three shields in competition. His interest has largely centered 
in things of cultural value to the community, as well as those affairs 
which promote material progress and he is today accounted one of the 
substantial and valued residents of his adopted city. 



WALTER STUART GALBRAITH, M. D., C. M. 

Dr. Walter Stuart Galbraith, who has attained to eminent rank as a 
physician at Lethbridge and is also well known in financial circles as a 
director of the British Canadian Trust Company, was born in Guelph, On- 
tario, August 1, 1866, and is a son of Francis William and Jane Elizabeth 
Galbraith. He is indebted to the public school system of the country for 
his preliminary educational opportunities and he later attended the Col- 
legiate Institute at Guelph. From 1881 until 1895 he was a pharmacist, 
coming to Alberta in 1891, after which he entered upon preparation for 
his professional career as a student in McGill University, there winning 
the M. D. and C. M. degrees in 1899. He has practiced continuously in 
Lethbridge since 1899 and was a member of the firm of Mewburn & Gal- 
braith from 1902 until 1907. Since the latter year he has followed his 
profession independently and has made steady advance, being recognized 
as one of the leading physicians and surgeons of the province. By broad 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 139 

reading and study he has kept in constant touch with the trend of profes- 
sional thought and scientific investigation and his ability is widely recog- 
nized. He was senator of the University of Alberta from its incorporation 
until 1921 and in the latter year accepted the presidency of the Alberta 
Medical Association. He was also president of the council of the College 
of Physicians and Surgeons of Alberta in 1917 and again in 1923, 
and has left unimproved no opportunity to promote the standing of the 
profession. 

In 1901 Dr. Galbraith was married to Miss Matilda Gallinger and they 
have become parents of three children : Ruth Eleanor, who has completed 
her education ; Francis 0., and Jean Alexandra, both in school. 

Fraternally Dr. Galbraith is connected with the Masons and with the 
Canadian Order of Foresters, while his religious faith is that of the Meth- 
odist church. He has ever manifested a deep and helpful interest in 
public affairs and in 1912 was chairman of the Lethbridge school board, 
and was a member of the board of trustees for nine years. He also served 
as mayor of the city in 1907, giving to Lethbridge a public-spirited and 
progressive administration, characterized by needed reforms and im- 
provements. His entire career has been marked by the spirit of advance- 
ment, whether in his professional efforts or in public connection and his 
labors have at all times been of signal service and benefit to his fellow- 
men. 



REGINALD HARRY BRETT, M. D. 

Dr. Reginald Harry Brett, prominent physician and surgeon of Can- 
ada and medical superintendent of the Brett Hospital at Banff, was born 
at Arkona, Ontario, on the 5th of May, 1879, a son of Lieutenant Governor 
Robert G. and Louise (Hungerford) Brett, extended mention of whom is 
made in the sketch of them to be found on another page of this work. 

In the pursuit of his education Reginald Harry Brett attended the 
schools of Banff and was a student in the Winnipeg and Calgary high 
schools. Subsequently he enrolled in St. John's College, Winnipeg, and 
was graduated from that institution with the B. A. degree in 1898. His 
earliest ambition was to enter the medical profession and he enrolled in 
the Manitoba Medical College, which conferred the M. D. degree upon him 
in 1902. He went to Vienna, Austria, and London, England, for post- 
graduate work, remaining abroad during 1906 and 1907, and he also 
took postgraduate work in New York and at the Mayo Brothers' Sani- 
tarium in Rochester, Minnesota. He commenced the practice of his chosen 
profession in Banff, where he has remained, and he ranks among the fore- 
most physicians and surgeons of the province. He is medical health offi- 
cer for Rocky Mountain Park, coroner, a member of the council of the 
College of Physicians and Surgeons of Alberta, and was president of the 
council in 1920. For some years he has been surgeon for the Canadian 
Pacific Railroad in this district, including the Banff Springs Hotel in 



140 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

Banff, and until the closing of the mines at Bankhead he acted as physi- 
cian and surgeon there. Dr. Brett is now medical superintendent of the 
Brett Hospital in Banff, which institution was erected in November of 
the year 1911, and which is one of the foremost institutions of its kind 
in the Dominion. 

For the past thirty-six years Banff has been a haven for countless 
sufferers from rheumatism and gout, for which the curative properties 
of the mineral water here are well established. The water has also 
proven efficacious in the treatment of sciatica, neuritis, kidney and blad- 
der troubles, torpidity of the liver, and functional digestive disorders, 
skin diseases, neurasthenia and alcoholism. The Brett Hospital, while 
accepting cases of any kind except tuberculosis, is especially well equipped 
to take care of the above-mentioned conditions; the building is three 
stories high and has accommodations for sixty patients, mostly in private 
wards, several of which have private bath and toilet, though there are a 
few two-bedded rooms. Four large sun rooms afford ample space for 
recreation. The institution is steam-heated and thoroughly modern in 
every respect and a sufficient staff of nurses is always maintained to insure 
every attention that may be required. On one corner of the main build- 
ing is an up-to-date bathing establishment, which is supplied with water 
from the main mineral spring on Sulphur Mountain, by a special pipe- 
line. Plunge, tub, shower and sitz baths are given, together with dry 
heat and steam room treatments, according to what each case requires. 
The men's baths, which are on the ground floor, are presided over by a 
competent masseur, and the ladies' baths, which are on the second floor, 
are given a specially trained masseuse. The electrical room in the insti- 
tution is equipped with all the necessary apparatus for giving treatments 
and also has an X-ray plant, both for treatments and pictures. The 
hospital pays special attention to the matter of diet, which is such an im- 
portant one in the treatment of the conditions mentioned, and this depart- 
ment is in charge of a trained and most efficient dietitian. The climate of 
Banff is unexcelled — in summer the days are warm and the nights cool, 
and in winter extreme cold is rare and the days are mostly clear and 
bright. At all times the air is dry and very exhilarating, and the moun- 
tain scenery is unsurpassed in any part of the world. While patients can- 
not go out of doors as freely in the winter as in the summer, a course of 
baths is quite as efficacious. A great many of the guests at the hospital 
have really nothing wrong with them but come here for a rest and change 
and while here avail themselves of the opportunity to take a course of 
baths. For the more robust cases during the summer there is golf, ten- 
nis, boating, swimming and horseback riding; while in the winter there 
is curling, skating, snowshoeing, tobogganning and skiing. Dr. Brett 
devotes the greater part of his time and attention to the hospital and has 
won widespread prominence in this connection. Dr. Brett is owner of 
the Banff Pharmacy & National Park Drug Company and the Brett fam- 
ily owns considerable property in and around Banff. 

On the 24th of February, 1912, was celebrated the marriage of Dr. 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 141 

Brett to Miss Helen M. Fleming-. She is a woman of charming person- 
ality and is prominent in the club and social circles of Banff. 

Since attaining his majority Dr. Brett has given his political allegiance 
to the Conservative party and the principles for which it stands. He has 
never sought nor desired political preferment but he is essentially public- 
spirited and is never too busy to give his aid in the furtherance of any 
movement for the benefit of the community at large. His religious faith 
is that of the Anglican church. Fraternally he is identified with the In- 
dependent Order of Odd Fellows, the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks 
and the Masons. Along strictly professional lines he holds membership 
in the Alberta Medical Association. Socially he is identified with the 
Banff Golf & Curhng Clubs. 



CURT P. M. SMITH. 



There is no doubt as to the popularity of Curt P. M. Smith in Wetas- 
kiwin. For many years engaged in the hotel business, he has been a 
vital and forceful element in bringing about the present progress and 
prosperity of Wetaskiwin, and his two hostelries, the Driard and the 
Criterion, are second to none. Curt P. M. Smith was born in Saxony, on 
the 29th of November, 1882, and is a naturalized British subject. His 
sister Frieda is married to Mr. Guest, druggist at Prince George, British 
Columbia; his brother Alfred is connected with the Dairy Supply Com- 
pany of Edmonton. 

In the acquirement of his education Curt P. M. Smith attended school 
in Leipzig and spent four years in a commercial college. In early life 
he determined to enter the hotel business and subsequently became an 
apprentice and attended the Hotel University for two years. He was 
associated with his father thereafter and then traveled throughout Ger- 
many, Russia, Austria, Switzerland, France, Brussels, Holland and the 
Isles of North Germany. In 1902 he arrived in London, England, and 
for two years was identified with some of the largest hotels in that city. 
He then associated with the North British Railroad Company, with whom 
he remained six years in Glasgow, after which he became manager of the 
Glasgow Garden Club. His business brought him into association with 
many prominent men. 

Mr. Smith came to Edmonton in 1912. Although he was an experi- 
enced hotel man in the old country, he was unfamiliar with the methods 
used in the conduct of hotels in Canada, but soon gained the requisite 
knowledge. In 1913 he came to Wetaskiwin to take over the Driard Hotel 
and manage it for a company. In 1916 he went to live on his farm. After 
prohibition came in Alberta he bought the Criterion and Driard Hotels 
and concentrated his attention upon their improvement. The Driard 
Hotel is used mainly for the traveling tra»nsient public and the Criterion 
has suites for steady residence, and both hotels are up-to-date in every 



142 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

respect. He has won more than local repute for the quality of the food 
served in his restaurant. 

In 1913 the marriage of Mr. Smith and Miss Mary Masterson was 
celebrated in Edmonton. Mrs. Smith was born in Glasgow and educated 
there. A son was born to Mr. and Mrs. Smith on the 22nd of August, 

1917. 

Mr. Smith is a member of the United Farmers' Association, is president 
of the Good Roads Association and a director in the Hotel Association 
of Alberta, and he is president of the local Hockey Club and chairman 
of the Hospital Board. 



REV. HENRY GOUTIER. 

Father Henry Goutier wields a great influence for good in the city 
of Vermilion, where he has been in charge of the Catholic church since 
1909. He was born in France, on the 17th of April, 1880, a son of Jules 
and Marie (Vanhoucke) Goutier, likewise natives of that country. In 
1907 they came to Canada and the father farmed and ranched near Innis- 
fail for a time. When their son was transferred to Vermilion they ac- 
companied him and are now following agricultural pursuits in this 
vicinity. 

Henry Goutier received his education in Calais, France, where he was 
born, and in the schools of Lille and Amiens. His first charge was at 
Corbie, France, when he was but twenty-four years of age. He remained 
there three years and in 1907 came to Canada with his parents. His 
first charge in the Dominion was at Innisfail, Alberta, from 1907 to 1909, 
in which latter year he was sent to Vermilion, and for the last fourteen 
years he has been in charge of the Catholic church here and under his 
guidance the church has enjoyed substantial growth. He has found it 
necessary to rebuild the church three times in order to accommodate the 
increased congregation. 

Father Goutier is a kindly man, with a genial and pleasing person- 
ality. He is unselfish in his devotion to his church and is never too busy 
to give his cooperation in the furtherance of any movement for the de- 
velopment and improvement of the community. 



A. BLAIR PATERSON, LL. B. 

Although not yet thirty years of age, A. Blair Paterson has already 
won a well established position at the Edmonton bar, and industry, ability 
and tenacity of purpose are carrying him rapidly to the front in his pro- 
fession. He was born in Glasgow, Scotland, May 8, 1893, a son of Adam 
Paterson, whose birth occurred in Innerleithen, Scotland, in 1852. He 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 143 

married Margaret Robinson, a daughter of Captain James Robinson of 
the British navy, and in 1910 they established their home at Edmonton. 

In the public schools of his native country A. Blair Paterson acquired 
his early education and his professional training was obtained in Alberta 
University, which conferred upon him the LL. B. degree. He also studied 
law in the office of Samuel A. Dickson, with whom he is now associated in 
practice as a member of the firm of Dickson & Paterson, and their pro- 
fessional standing is indicated by the large and representative clientele 
accorded them. Mr. Paterson has proven his ability to cope with the in- 
tricacies of the law and to arrive at clear deductions from the facts at 
hand. His mind is analytical and logical in its trend and in his presenta- 
tion of a case he is always fortified by a comprehensive understanding of 
the legal principles applicable thereto. 

In Edmonton, on the 23d of September, 1918, Mr. Paterson was united 
in marriage to Miss E. Jean Skinner, a daughter of Alexander Skinner, 
a native of Scotland, who was killed in the Boer war. Mr. Paterson is 
much interested in amateur sports and is a familiar figure on the links 
of the Mayfair Golf & Country Club, of which he is secretary, while he 
is also serving on its board of governors. He is a member of the Liberal 
party and his religious views are in accord with the doctrines of the 
Presbyterian church. He exemplifies in his life the sterling qualities of 
the Scotch race and his professional associates and the general public 
unite in bearing testimony as to his high character and substantial worth. 



G. L. WILLIAMSON, M. D. 

Dr. G. L. Williamson, physician and surgeon of Edmonton, comes to 
Alberta from the province of Ontario, his birth having occurred in Peter- 
boro, on the 17th of March, 1884. There the days of his boyhood and 
youth were passed and he completed his public school education by a 
course in the high school at Port Hope, Ontario. He initiated his business 
career when twenty years of age by securing employment in a drug store 
and it was this that awakened his interest in the practice of medicine and 
led him eventually — in 1906 — to enter the University of Toronto as a 
medical student. There he pursued the regular four years' course and 
was graduated with the class of 1910. He afterward spent a year in hos- 
pital and general work, being identified with Browning Hospital in 1911- 
12 and gaining that valuable training and experience which can never be 
so quickly acquired in any other way as in hospital practice. In the fall 
of 1912 he decided to seek a location westward and came to Edmonton, 
where he has been engaged in general practice throughout the interven- 
ing period. He is a member of the Alberta Medical Society and is serving 
on the executive committee of the Edmonton Academy of Medicine. He 
puts forth every effort to advance his knowledge and promote his effi- 



144 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

ciency in his chosen calling and his course has been marked by a steady 
progress that has brought him continuously to the front. 

In his fraternal relations Dr. Williamson is known as a Mason, loyally 
following the teachings and purposes of the craft, and he attends the 
Presbyterian church. His fellow townsmen speak of him in terms of 
high regard as a man, as a citizen and as a physician. 



JOHN CALLAGHAN. 



John Callaghan, a construction engineer of notable ability, has devoted 
his life to railroad work and the nature of the projects with which he 
has been connected indicates most clearly his high professional standing. 
He is now serving as general manager of the Alberta & Great Western 
and the Lacombe & Northwestern Railways, while he also acts as deputy 
minister of railways and telephones, with offices at Edmonton. A native 
of Iowa, he was born May 4, 1868, a son of Michael and Elizabeth (Mc- 
Gee) Callaghan, and acquired his education in that state. After com- 
pleting an engineering course he entered upon the work of his profession 
and from 1889 until 1894 he was connected with the work of locating 
various projected railways in Oregon, Washington and British Columbia, 
including the location and construction of the Seattle Terminal Railway 
& Elevator Company, the Seattle, Lake Shore & Eastern Railroad and the 
Everett & Monte Cristo Railway. In 1895 he was employed in a profes- 
sional capacity by the Canadian Pacific and the Kaslo & Slocan Railroad 
Companies in connection with the building of their lines in British Co- 
lumbia and during 1896 and 1897 he was engaged in locating and con- 
structing the Columbia & Western Railway from Robson to Trail and 
Rossland, British Columbia. In the following year he was engaged on 
the location and construction of the Canadian Pacific Railroad from Rob- 
son to Midway and on the location of the line from Midway to Spence's 
Bridge, British Columbia. In 1900 he was on location and construction 
for the Canadian Pacific in the provinces of Ontario and Manitoba and 
in 1901-02 was employed by the Crows Nest Southern Railway, a branch 
of the Great Northern, to locate and construct a line from Jennings, Mon- 
tana, to Morrissey Junction, British Columbia. He spent the year 1903 
in similar work for the Great Northern at Vancouver, British Columbia, 
and vicinity and in 1904 was engaged on reconnaissance and location 
work for the Grand Trunk Pacific and Canadian Pacific Railroads. From 
1905 until 1909 he had charge of location and construction for the western 
lines of the Canadian Pacific west of Winnipeg and in 1910 was with 
the firm of Foley, Welch & Stewart, directing the execution of their con- 
tracts with the Canadian Pacific and Canadian Northern Railway Com- 
panies. In 1911 he had charge of the location and construction of the 
Mountain division of the Grand Trunk Pacific from Edmonton to Fort 
George and from 1912 until 1918 he was chief engineer of the P. G. E. 




JOHN CALLAGHAN. 



(10) 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 147 

Railway. In June, 1918, he became chief engineer for the Calgary & 
South Western Railway and a year later accepted the position of super- 
intendent of the firm of Stewart & Welch, railway contractors, with offices 
at Calgary, Alberta, remaining with them until August, 1921. In Sep- 
tember of that year he was appointed deputy minister of railways and 
telephones for the province of Alberta and general manager of the Al- 
berta & Great Waterways and the Lacombe & North Western Railways, 
with headquarters at Edmonton. He brought to his responsible duties 
ripe experience, technical skill of a high order and marked executive 
force and has clearly demonstrated his ability to direct important public 
utilities. 

Mr. Callaghan is a communicant of the Roman Catholic church and 
finds diversion in hunting game. He is a member of the Vancouver, 
Terminal City and Manitoba Clubs and his professional connections are 
with the American and Canadian Societies of Civil Engineers. He has 
attempted important things and completed what he has undertaken. 
Holding to high ideals, he has made his work a dynamic force in accom- 
plishing results which have been factors in an advancing civilization, and 
his name is inseparably associated with the development and upbuilding 
of the Canadian Northwest. 



WILLIAM HENDERSON. 



A prominent and popular official of Cardston is William Henderson, 
police magistrate. He was born in Scotland, on the 11th of February, 
1851, a son of Robert and Mary (Ross) Henderson, likewise natives of 
Scotland. The paternal great-grandfather was twice married. His first 
wife was Jeanette Lumsden and his second wife was Elizabeth Weir; the 
maternal great-grandfather, William Hogg, married Catherine Wilson; 
the paternal grandfather, James Henderson, was born in Leadhills, Scot- 
land, and he married Christina Dalzell, and both died in the land of their 
birth ; the maternal grandfather, Peter Ross, married Marion Hogg. All 
of these ancestors were natives of Scotland. Mr. and Mrs. Henderson, 
the parents of William Henderson, joined the Church of Jesus Christ of 
Latter-day Saints in 1852 and came to America in 1863. They came direct 
to Logan, Utah, by ox-team, the journey taking eight weeks. They se- 
cured land and engaged in general farming and stock raising near Logan. 
Later he disposed of his land and devoted his entire time and attention to 
work in the church. He was active in the Temple at Logan and was 
holding the office of high priest at the time of his demise, at the age of 
sixty-five years. When he first joined the church he did some mission 
work in Scotland and he was president of the branch church in his birth- 
place. Mrs. Henderson died in her sixty-eighth year. To them nine chil- 
dren were born, two of whom are living: William, of this review; and 
Jeanette, the wife of Andrew Anderson. The following have passed 



148 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

away: James; Catherine, who was the wife of William Ellis; Christina, 
who was the wife of Andrew Nyman ; Mary, who was the wife of Anthony 
Anderson; Eliza, who died in girlhood; Thomas; and Robert, who died on 
board ship. 

In the acquirement of his education William Henderson attended the 
Free Church School at Tranent, Scotland, and came to the United States 
with his parents in 1863. He crossed the plains with them, driving an 
ox team, and after locating near Logan he attended the schools in that 
community for a short time. Subsequently he homesteaded some land 
near Robin, Idaho. Previous to this he worked in the mountains, getting 
timber. He arrived in Idaho in 1875 and farmed and raised stock for 
some time, achieving substantial success from the start. He was one of 
the organizers of the Cooperative Company at Arimo, Idaho, and he man- 
aged the store for some two years. In 1885 he was called on a mission by 
the church and he went to Scotland, where he remained two years. At 
the termination of that time he returned to Idaho and resumed farming 
until he came to Alberta in 1898, and located at Mountain View. He 
made the trip with horses and a covered wagon and he homesteaded some 
one hundred and sixty acres of raw prairie land near Mountain View. 
He hauled logs from the mountains to make his home and he made trips 
to Lethbridge and Macleod for supplies. He broke part of his land and 
specialized in raising cattle and horses, of which he had as many as two 
hundred head. He was one of the founders of the Mountain View Trading 
Company and managed the store successfully for some time. From 1915 
to 1917 he served as Park ranger near Mountain View and in the winter 
of 1917 he was called to California on missionary work. He remained 
there until 1918, when he returned to Alberta and located at Cardston, 
where he built a home and has since resided. He has been police magis- 
trate for two years, in which position he is satisfactorily discharging the 
many duties devolving upon him. 

Mr. Henderson has been married three times. His first wife was 
Martha Pearson, who was born in Farmington, Utah, and to their union 
eight children were born : Mary, the wife of George Allen of Ogden, 
Utah ; Catherine, who is deceased ; Josephine, the wife of Joseph Tippets 
of Ogden, Utah; Janett, whose demise occurred in infancy; William, 
who is living in Ashton, Idaho ; Robert, who is living in Idaho ; Christina, 
who is the wife of Abel Larsen of Ashton, Idaho ; and Albert G., who is 
a resident of Mountain View. Mr. Henderson's second wife, Keziah Ca- 
pell, was born in Lancashire, England, in 1882. To their union five chil- 
dren were born : Orsen E., who is living in Idaho ; Jane, whose demise 
occurred in infancy; Clara, who is deceased, was the wife of Ben Hudson; 
Thomas Joseph is a resident of Salt Lake City, and served on a mission 
in the southern states, most of the time in Georgia, from 1916 to 1917. 
He is a veteran of the World war, having served with the United States 
Marines ; and Ross, who is living at Robin, Idaho. Mr. Henderson's third 
wife was Eliza Easthope, a native of Bountiful, Utah. 

Mr. Henderson gives his political allegiance to the Conservative party 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 149 

and is quite active in local affairs. He is essentially public-spirited and is 
never too busy to give his aid in the furtherance of any movement for 
the benefit of the community at large. He devotes a great deal of his 
spare time to the church and is clerk of the second ward of Cardston, 
secretary of the High Priest Quorum of the Alberta Stake representative 
of the Genealogical Society, 



CARLETON G. SHELDON. 

Actuated by a most enterprising and progressive spirit, Carleton G. 
Sheldon has steadily advanced in the business world and the steps in his 
orderly progression are easily discernible. He is today the district man- 
ager of the Coal Sellers Company, Limited, of Edmonton, the main office 
of the company being at Calgary. Mr. Sheldon was born across the 
border, his birth having occurred near Springboro, Pennsylvania, on the 
14th of April, 1880. His early experiences were those of the farm bred 
boy. He supplemented his early educational training by a high school 
course and later entered the State Normal School at Edinboro, Penn- 
sylvania, while subsequently he became a student in Bucknell University 
of Lewisburg, Pennsylvania. In young manhood he began teaching and 
imparted readily and clearly to others the knowledge that he had ac- 
quired. In this profession he made continuous progress, teaching school 
at Springboro, Pennsylvania, and later he was school superintendent at 
Trumbull, Ohio. On the expiration of that period he entered commercial 
life by becoming an employe of the National Cash Register Company of 
Dayton, Ohio, with which he was there connected from 1903 until 1906. 
In the latter year he went to Toronto, Canada, as representative of the 
company, being made office manager in the purchasing and stock depart- 
ment. There he remained until September, 1913, when he came to Ed- 
monton and took charge of the "Western Foundry & Machine Company as 
general manager. During the World war period this company engaged 
in the manufacture of eighteen-pound high explosive shells for the Do- 
minion government. Mr. Sheldon remained with the company until 
March, 1916, when he became secretary and commercial manager of the 
Humberstone Coal Company, Limited. He has proven himself well quali- 
fied to fill positions of administrative direction and executive control and 
under his guidance the business of the company was the largest in its 
history. He is now district manager of the Coal Sellers Company, 
Limited. 

Mr. Sheldon finds time for cooperation in many public interests of 
benefit to the community, is a member of the Board of Trade and is 
interested in all those agencies which are looking to the upbuilding of 
the city and the benefit of the province at large. He belongs to the Ki- 
wanis Club, is a member of the Institute of Mining and Metallurgy, has 
membership in the Masonic fraternity and is a member of the Interna- 



150 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

tional Fuel Association. His religious faith is that of the Baptist church. 
While ever advancing toward high ideals, he employs the most practical 
methods and thus he achieves his purposes and reaches his objective. 



PETER M. CAMPBELL, M. D. 

For more than a quarter of a century Dr. Peter M. Campbell of Leth- 
bridge has been engaged in the practice of medicine, and the record of 
his efforts is written in terms of success. He is recognized as one of the 
most able physicians and surgeons of this part of the country and today 
enjoys an extensive practice of a distinctively representative character. 
Dr. Campbell is a native of Admaston, Ontario, born on the 9th of Febru- 
ary, 1872. His parents, John and Jane (Connery) Campbell, were also 
of Canadian birth but the Campbell family is of Scotch lineage, the grand- 
father, Peter Campbell, having been born in the land of hills and heather, 
whence he came to the new world with his parents when a lad of seven 
years, the family home being established in this country. He devoted his 
entire life to farming. The grandfather in the maternal line was a native 
of Ireland and also arrived in Canada in early life. John Campbell de- 
voted his life to agricultural pursuits and lived for many years on one 
place, there passing away in 1921. His widow is seventy-eight years of 
age and is still a resident of Ontario. They were the parents of eight 
children, six of whom are living. Mrs. Campbell's religious faith is that 
of the Presbyterian church, to which Mr. Campbell also belonged, and 
his political views were in accord with the principles of the Conservative 
party. 

Peter M. Campbell, the eldest of the family of eight children, pursued 
his education in the Renfreff high school and afterward took an art 
course in Queen's University at Kingston, Ontario, and then in prepara- 
tion for his chosen profession he matriculated as a medical student at 
Queen's and was graduated with the M. D. degree in 1896. Immediately 
afterward he began practice in Beachburg, Ontario, where he remained 
until 1900, when he made his way westward, with Cardston as his desti- 
nation. For six years he was a representative of the profession in that 
place and in 1906 he removed to Lethbridge, where he has since made 
his home. Here he at once opened an office and through the intei-vening 
period of seventeen years he has steadily advanced in his profession and 
has rendered most valuable aid to his fellow townsmen, by reason of his 
highly developed skill and his comprehensive understanding of the scien- 
tific principles of medicine and surgery- 

In 1904 Dr. Campbell was united in marriage to Miss Esther Scott, 
who was born in Paisley, Ontario, and there pursued her education. 
They have one child, Jean, who was born in 1908 and is now in school. 
The parents hold membership in the Presbyterian church and Dr. Camp- 
bell is also a member of the Masonic fraternity, loyally following the teach- 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 151 

ings of the order as he goes in and out among his fellowmen. His real 
recreation comes from mountain climbing and he gets the greatest enjoy- 
ment out of making the difficult ascent of the Rocky mountains. The 
major part of his time and energy, however, is given to his profession. 
He has taken postgraduate w^ork in New York and in Rochester, Minne- 
sota, and further keeps in touch with advanced professional thought and 
progress through his membership in the Alberta Medical Society and the 
Canadian Medical Association. Thoroughness has ever characterized his 
study and he is keenly interested in everything that tends to bring to 
man the key to the complex mystery which we call life. 



CAPTAIN FREDERICK L. SHOULDICE. 

In reviewing the prominent members of the Calgary bar mention 
should be made of Captain Frederick L. Shouldice, M. C, who began his 
professional career in this city in 1913, and experience, study and ability 
have brought him to the front in his chosen calling. He was born at 
Chesley, Ontario, in April, 1883, and is a son of James and Mary Mar- 
garet (Perdue) Shouldice, who are represented elsewhere in this volume. 
He attended the grammar and high schools of Chesley and completed his 
high school training at Regina, Saskatchewan, being also a student in 
the normal school of the latter city. He afterward devoted two years to 
teaching and then followed ranching for a similar period. In 1901 he 
came to the west with his parents and for two years taught school near 
Calgary, Alberta. In the fall of 1907 he began studying law in the office 
of Walsh & McCarthy and was admitted to the bar in January, 1913, at 
which time he became a partner in the law firm of Clark, McCarthy, 
Carson, Macleod & Company, with offices in the Canada Life building in 
Calgary. This connection was maintained until January, 1921, when he 
joined Leonard W. Brockington, now city solicitor of Calgary, and later 
John Boyd was admitted to the firm, which has since been conducted 
under the style of Shouldice, Brockington & Boyd. The partners are all 
men of high professional standing and theirs is one of the strongest law 
firms in the city. Of a family conspicuous for strong intelligence and in- 
domitable energy, Mr. Shouldice entered upon the practice of law and 
success has come to him because of his close reasoning, his keen and logi- 
cal argument and his ability to present his contention in the strongest 
possible light. Like his father, he is deeply interested in agricultural 
pursuits and has operated two farms. 

Captain Shouldice is a veteran of the World war. In May, 1916, he 
enlisted for military duty and was commissioned captain of the Eighty- 
ninth Battalion. Later he reverted to the rank of lieutenant and was sent 
overseas, joining the Princess Patricia Canadian Light Infantry in 
France. He participated in the operations at Vimy in April, 1917, where 
he was wounded. In December, 1917, he returned to Canada on leave of 



152 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

absence, going back to England in April, 1918, and in September of that 
year he rejoined his company. He took part in the Cambrai offensive and 
won the Military Cross at the capture of Tilloy. After an attack which 
continued for four days Captain Shouldice and twenty-six other men 
were the only remaining members of their unit who escaped without being 
wounded, with the exception of the headquarters staff. He was released 
from active service in March 1919, but is still on the officers' reserve 
list and is subject to call at any time. 

In December, 1915, Captain Shouldice was united in marriage to Miss 
Jessie B. Riddell, a native of Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, and a graduate 
of Saskatoon University. Her parents were Robert H. and Jessie B. 
(McDougall) Riddell, natives of the province of Ontario. Her father 
devoted his life to the occupation of farming and became one of the 
pioneers of the Moose Jaw district of Saskatchewan. Captain and Mrs. 
Shouldice have two children : James Robert and Joan Patricia. 

Captain Shouldice is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church 
and politically he is an adherent of the Conservative party and is at pres- 
ent president of the Calgary Conservative Association. He is public- 
spirited and progressive in matters of citizenship and during 1920 and 
1921 served as alderman of Calgary. He belongs to the Zetland Lodge 
of the Masonic order and is also a member of the Calgary Board of Trade, 
the Rotary Club of this city, of which he is president for the years 1923- 
1924, the Calgary Golf & Country Club and St. Andrew's Golf Club. He 
supports all worthy public enterprises and high ideals have actuated him 
at all points in his career, bringing him to an enviable place in the regard 
of his fellowmen, as well as in professional service. 



E. N. HALLOCK. 



Among the important business enterprises which have featured in the 
commercial upbuilding of Edmonton is that of Hallock & Son, wholesale 
lumber dealers, of which organization E. N. Hallock is the senior member. 
Opportunity has ever been to him a call to action and one to which he has 
made ready response. He was born in Crawford county, Pennsylvania, 
August 29, 1852, and was reared in the little town in which his birth 
occurred, enjoying the advantages offered by its public school system and 
thus qualifying for life's responsibilities and duties. In 1873 he went into 
the oil fields of Pennsylvania and afterward became identified with the 
lumber trade in his native state. He continued his activities there in 
connection with the lumber business until 1910, when he made his way 
to the far Northwest, settling at Three Valley, British Columbia, where 
he was manager for a lumber company until October of that year. He 
then came to Edmonton and accepted the position of manager of the Globe 
Company, having charge of its retail yards until January 1, 1912, when 
he embarked in the wholesale lumber business. In January, 1913, he 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 153 

formed a partnership relation under the style of Hallock & Smith, of which 
he was the senior partner, and which continued until December 1, 1922, 
when Mr. Smith withdrew and Charles S, Hallock, Mr. E. N. Hallock's son, 
took Mr. Smith's place, and the firm name became Hallock & Son. They 
conduct a general lumber business, selling entirely to the wholesale trade, 
and the growth of the enterprise has been continuous through the past 
decade, making theirs one of the large and important lumber concerns of 
Edmonton, The development of the business is attributable in consider- 
able measure to the close application, the indefatigable energy and the 
keen business judgment of Mr. Hallock, whose powers have developed 
through the exercise of effort and whose diligence and determination have 
brought him to the front in commercial circles. 

Mr. Hallock is a member of the Board of Trade and he contributes to 
and attends St. Paul's church. His interest centers in those activities 
which make for the material, intellectual, social and moral progress of the 
community and Edmonton regards him as a valuable asset in her 
citizenship. 



WALTER RAMSAY. 



Among the energetic and progressive business men of Edmonton is 
numbered Walter Ramsay, a well known florist here. His trade has as- 
sumed extensive proportions under his capable guidance and management 
and the business is today a very substantial one. Mr. Ramsay came to 
Alberta from the province of Ontario, his birth having occurred near Ham- 
ilton, in 1870. His parents were John and Helen (Mackay) Ramsay, the 
former a native of Scotland, while the latter was born in the state of 
New York, where their marriage was celebrated. Mr, Ramsay, who has 
passed away, was a farmer by occupation and he was also active in pub- 
lic affairs, serving for several years as a member of the town council. 
His political endorsement was given to the Conservative party and his 
religious faith was that of the Presbyterian church. The mother is still 
living in Ontario, at the advanced age of eighty-five years. Their family 
numbered eight children, six of whom are living. 

Walter Ramsay, who was the sixth in order of birth, obtained a high' 
school education in St. Mary's, Ontario, and afterward took up the pro- 
fession of teaching, which he followed successfully for thirteen years, 
proving most capable in imparting to others the knowledge he had ac- 
quired. In 1898 he came to Alberta and taught for seven years in the 
west after having had six year's previous experience in Ontario. Li 
1906, however, he entered commercial circles by turning his attention to 
the florist business, opening a small establishment. As his trade has in- 
creased he has developed his business plant until he now utilizes an en- 
tire acre of ground, with a store in the down-town district, while his 
shipments are sent throughout central Alberta. He devotes practically 



154 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

his entire time to his business and produces large quantities of rare and 
beautiful flowers. His business methods have at all times been prog- 
ressive and thoroughly reliable and these qualities have brought him 
substantial success. 

In 1901 Mr. Ramsay was united in marriage to Miss Lucy McRae, 
who was born in Belleville, Ontario, a daughter of Walter McRae, a mer- 
chant. Mr. and Mrs. Ramsay have become parents of two children: 
Donald, a student in the Alberta University ; and Helen, attending the 
public school. Mr. Ramsay has always been a stalwart champion of the 
cause of education and served as a member of the school board for a 
number of years. He is also a member of the Board of Trade and mani- 
fests a keen and helpful interest in many progressive public measures. 
In politics he is a Conservative. He belongs to the Rotary Club and his 
interest in civic affairs has been manifest in many tangible ways. He 
finds his recreation largely in curling and motoring, but allows no out- 
side interests to interfere with business or his duties along other lines. 
Fraternally he is a Mason, and the religious faith of Mr. and Mrs. Ram- 
say is that of the Presbyterian church, in the work of which they take 
active and helpful interest, Mr. Ramsay now serving as clerk of the 
session. His sterling worth commands for him the respect and high 
esteem of all with whom he has been brought into contact. 



JAMES SHOULDICE. 



James Shouldice, one of the pioneer agriculturists of Alberta, is liv- 
ing in the Bow Valley about five miles west of Calgary, and owns a large 
farm on the Blackfoot Reservation, where he is conducting his operations 
on an extensive scale, and he has also found time for active participation 
in public affairs. He was born near Ottawa, Ontario, in November, 1850, 
and when three years of age was taken by his parents to Bruce county, 
Ontario. There he acquired his education and on starting out in life for 
himself he turned his attention to agricultural pursuits, which he followed 
in that locality for thirty-five years. He always took an active part in 
politics and in 1897 he was elected warden of Bruce county. In 1901 he 
came to the west, leasing a tract of fifteen thousand acres at Namaka, 
Alberta, which he operated for five years. He then purchased a farm six 
miles west of Calgary and in 1906, in cooperation with a neighbor, A. S. 
McKay, he donated one hundred acres of land to the city for park pur- 
poses, also giving a fifty-acre tract to Mount Royal College. At the pres- 
ent time he owns and operates three sections of land on the Blackfoot 
Reservation, south of Cluny, Alberta, and has one of the finest farms in 
this part of the province. He carries on his labors scientifically and brings 
to his occupation a true sense of agricultural economics. His land is rich 
and productive, owing to the care and labor which he bestows upon it, 
and he has equipped his farm with the most improved labor-saving ma- 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 155 

chinery. He was one of the first men in Alberta to breed Hereford cattle 
and from 1901 until 1905 exhibited his stock at most of the western fairs. 
He brings to his pursuits an intelligent, open and liberal mind and as agri- 
culture progresses as a science he advances with it. 

In 1880 Mr. Shouldice married Mary Margaret Perdue, a native of the 
province of Ontario, and they became the parents of ten childre»n, nine 
of whom survive. All were accorded a liberal education and one of the 
sons, Dr. E. E. Shouldice, is one of Toronto's leading surgeons, and an- 
other, Captain F. L. Shouldice, is practicing law in Calgary. Four of Mr. 
Shouldice's sons served in the World war and a daughter also served over- 
seas. Mr. Shouldice is a strong Conservative in his political views and his 
public spirit has prompted him to put forth earnest and effective effort 
for the general good. For the past six years he has been counselor for 
the Marquis district and for fifteen years he served Bruce county in a 
similar capacity. In 1906 he received the nomination for the Alberta 
legislature, but met defeat at the polls, and was also an unsuccessful can- 
didate for the Ontario legislature. He is a member of the Methodist 
church and has been a liberal contributor to all worthy public projects and 
institutions, exemplifying in his fife the true spirit of Christianity. His 
labors have been beneficially resultant and although seventy-two years of 
age he is still an active factor in the world's work. His activities have 
been directed along those lines which have for their object public improve- 
ment and the advancement of the general welfare and he has contributed 
in notable measure to the agricultural development of one of Canada's 
greatest provinces. His life has been an exemplary one in all respects and 
commands for him the unqualified esteem of all with whom he has been 
associated. 



WILLIAM ALEXANDER WELLS, B. A. 

William A. Wells is recognized as a prominent and able member of 
the Edmonton bar and his success has its root in untiring application 
and a thorough understanding of legal principles. He was born at White 
Haven, in the province of Nova Scotia, November 10, 1884, and his father, 
John Shelley Wells, was also a native of that section of the Dominion, his 
birth occurring in 1856. In 1880 he was married at Gloucester, Massa- 
chusetts, to Miss Mary Ann Munroe, who passed away August 26th, 1917, 
while his demise occurred on March 3, 1921. 

After completing his course in the high school at Guysborough, Nova 
Scotia, Mr. Wells entered the St. Francis Xavier College at Antigonishe, 
from which he was graduated in 1906, with the B. A. degree. He spent 
the ensuing year as a teacher in the schools of Nova Scotia and then 
went to Boston, Massachusetts, securing a position with a building con- 
tractor, in whose service he remained for a year. In May, 1908, he ar- 
rived in Edmonton, and taking up the study of law, he was admitted to 



156 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

the bar in October, 1913. In 1919 he formed a partnership with J. C. 
McDonald and A. G. McKay, the latter of whom passed away in 1920, but 
the firm is still conducted under the style of McKay, McDonald & Wells 
and has been accorded a liberal clientele. Mr. Wells is careful in analysis, 
clear in his reasoning and logical in his deductions and is well qualified 
to take care of important litigated interests. 

Mr. Wells is a veteran of the World war. In March, 1916, he enlisted 
at Edmonton as a private in the Two Hundred and Eighteenth Battalion 
and in May of the same year received a commission as lieutenant of No. 
2 Company of that battalion, of which he was appointed adjutant in the 
following July. In February, 1917, he was sent overseas and became a 
member of the Eighth Battalion of Canadian troops, formed by uniting 
the Two Hundred and Eighteenth and Two Hundred and Eleventh Battal- 
ions. In April, 1917, he left England and served in France as adjutant 
of the Eighth Battalion until February, 1919. He was often exposed to 
the enemy's fire, but fortunately escaped injury and in May, 1919, re- 
turned to Halifax, Nova Scotia, where he was demobilized. On the 2d 
of June, 1919, he reached Edmonton and has since followed his profession 
uninterruptedly in this city. 

Mr. Wells is a Conservative in his political views and in religious faith 
he is a Catholic. He is identified with the Knights of Columbus and also 
has membership relations with the Canadian Club. Devotion to duty is 
one of his outstanding characteristics and his life has been an exemplary 
one in all respects, winning for him the unqualified esteem of those with 
whom he has been associated. He is an earnest and diligent student of 
his profession and thoroughness characterizes all of his efforts. To his 
chosen life work he gives his undivided attention and concentrated eff"ort. 
Persistency of purpose and laudable ambition have enabled him to make 
continuous progress in a most exacting profession. 



P. F. SMITH, M. D. 



Dr. P. F. Smith, who has been identified with the medical fraternity 
of Camrose since 1910, is a native of Prince Edward Island, where his 
birth occurred on the 25th of March, 1873. He was reared on the home 
farm and received his early education in the public and high schools in 
that vicinity. As a lad his earliest ambition was to enter the medical 
profession and subsequently he enrolled in the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons, graduating with the class of 1906. Immediately after receiv- 
ing his degree he located in Birmingham, Alabama, where he practiced 
until June, 1910, when he came to Alberta. In August of that year he 
took up residence at Camrose and has since resided here, enjoying an ex- 
tensive and important practice. Dr. Smith has met with more than an 
average degree of success and for some years has occupied a position of 
prominence among the representative physicians of the district. His 




p. F. SMITH, M. D. 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 159 

medical preparation was thorough and as he keeps in close touch with 
the progress of medical science through the medium of the various jour- 
nals and periodicals issued for the benefit of the profession, he has 
continued to advance. Although he is progressive, he is not given to experi- 
menting on his own responsibility and never lays aside an old, well tried 
method of treatment for a new one until assured beyond all question, of 
its superior efficacy. As he is most conscientious in his devotion to his 
patients, and closely observes the ethics of the profession, he is held in 
high respect by his fellow practitioners and the community at large. Dr. 
Smith has been a member of the school board and of the health board and 
he was one of the organizers and president of the Horticultural Society. 
For some time he has been coroner of the Camrose district and is now 
medical inspector of the Camrose school, which has enrolled some one 
thousand students. 

In 1910 was celebrated the marriage of Dr. Smith to Miss Blanche 
Johnson of Memphis, Tennessee. To their union three children have been 
born : Franklin, Margaret and Christopher. 

Fraternally the Doctor is a Mason and along strictly professional lines 
he holds membership in the Alberta Medical Society and the Canadian 
Medical Society. Dr. and Mrs. Smith are both widely known in this dis- 
trict, where they have many friends, and they are popular in local social 
circles. The Doctor's hobby is horticulture and flowers, and his reputa- 
tion in this art is far-reaching. This year he took first prize for the best 
exhibit of flowers at Edmonton during the Horticultural Exhibition, his 
exhibit being composed of dahlias and gladioli. 



HEBER S. ALLEN. 



Heber S. Allen is one of the leading men of Raymond and his promin- 
ence has come to him by virtue of his identification with important enter- 
prises. He was born in Hyrum, Utah, on the 26th of December, 1864, a 
son of Simeon F. and Boletta M. (Johnson) Allen, the former a native of 
Lansing, Michigan, and the latter of Norway. The father received his 
education in the public schools of his birthplace and in 1855 emigrated 
to Utah, going overland with oxen. He homesteaded some land in Cache 
county, Utah, and farmed for some time. He was also active in railroad 
construction work, being a contractor for the Southern Pacific, Utah & 
Northern and North Pacific Railroads, between Helena and Butte. In 
1883 he assisted in the construction of the Canadian Pacific Railroad in 
the province of Alberta, also the Great Northern during 1886 and 1887. 
Simeon F. Allen and his brother, Joseph S. Allen, founded a mercantile 
business in Hyrum, Utah, which was conducted under the name of Allen 
Brothers, in which enterprise they achieved success, and the business is 
still in the hands of the family. In 1888 Mr. Allen came to Alberta and 
located at Cardston. Subsequently he homesteaded land near Mountain 



160 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

View, which he brought to a highly cultivated state, and also raised live 
stock. He was likewise active in mercantile circles in Cardston, and lived 
in this district for some years, but later disposed of his interests and 
returned to his old home in Utah. His death occurred as the result of an 
accident at the age of sixty years. Mrs. Allen made the trip to the United 
States with her parents when but a child and came with them to Cache 
county, Utah. She is living on the old home place, at the age of seventy- 
eight years. To them eight children were born, seven of whom are living; 
Heber S., whose name introduces this review; George W., who is farming 
near Hyrum, Utah ; Reuben, who is in the real estate business at Logan, 
Utah ; Alvin, who is teaching school at Hyrum, Utah, and is also a fruit 
grower; Luella, the wife of Warren Wright of Hyrum, Utah; Lavina, 
the wife of Joseph Rose of Malad, Idaho; and Jennie, the wife of Irsen 
Israelson, professor in the Agricultural College in Utah. The family was 
reared in the faith of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and 
the father devoted a great deal of his spare time to church work. He 
was an elder in the church for many years and was likewise superin- 
tendent of the Sunday school. 

In the acquirement of his education Heber S. Allen attended the com- 
mon schools of his birthplace and subsequently entered the Brigham 
Young College and later the Brigham Young University and the Univer- 
sity of Utah. After putting his texbooks aside he engaged in railroad 
construction work with his father, acting as bookkeeper accountant and 
manager of the commissary department. Mr. Allen had been granted 
a teacher's license upon graduating from school and in 1888-1889 he 
taught school during the daytime, and taught a bookkeeping class at night. 
He received twenty dollars per month for his labors, being partly paid in 
wheat, and out of that he had to board himself. Later he entered the 
employ of the Cardston Mercantile Company, working directly under the 
employ of Charles O. Card, founder of Cardston and there he acquired 
valuable business training and for four years managed the store. Later 
he associated with his father in the mercantile business, carrying a com- 
plete line of general merchandising, and operating under the name of H. 
S. Allen & Company, and at the end of five years he became sole owner. 
In 1911 Mr. Allen closed out, selling the building to W. H. Steed, but he 
moved the goods to Raymond, where he had formerly purchased a con- 
trolling interest in the Raymond Mercantile Company. He now owns 
practically all of the stock in the company, which is one of the largest 
mercantile companies in southern Alberta, and carries a complete line of 
building material and everything required on the ranch or farm. In 1903 
the company was incorporated. In 1899 Mr. Allen built the Cardston 
Roller Mills, which were located fifty miles from the railroad and were 
operated by water power, the capacity being one hundred and fifty barrels. 
In 1902 the buildings were damaged by a flood and again in 1906, at which 
time the mills were transferred to Cardston and rebuilt on the railroad. 
They later incorporated the enterprise as the Cardston Milling Company. 
Subsequently these mills were merged with those of the Ellison Milling 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 161 

Company and Mr. Allen is now vice president of and a director in this 
company at Lethbridge. He is still president of H. S. Allen & Company, 
which has been transformed from a mercantile enterprise into a company 
for the promotion of agricultural interests in the province of Alberta. 
The company owns a beautiful ranch, known as the Grandview Farm, 
where it engages in mixed farming, raising hogs, cattle, pure-blooded 
Percheron horses and sheep and also wheat and oats. 

On the 2d of April, 1889, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Allen to 
Miss Amy Leonard, a native of Utah, To them seven children have been 
born. The eldest daughter, Maralda M., is the wife of William M. McKay, 
who is concluding a course in medicine at the University of Chicago. Mrs. 
McKay received her education in the schools of Raymond and later 
attended the Latter-day Saints University at Salt Lake City ; Viola is the 
'widow of Guy B. Alexander, who was one of the first three American sold- 
iers to be killed in the World war. Mrs. Alexander is a woman of culture, 
having received her education in the schools of Raymond and likewise 
attended the Latter-day Saints University and the Agricultural College 
in Utah and received a degree in general arts and sciences in July, 1923. 
She is the mother of one child; Heber F., the third member of the Allen 
family, was educated in the Raymond public schools and attended the 
Latter-day Saints University in Salt Lake, the Chicago University and 
the Columbia University at New York. He was in line to receive the 
degree of Bachelor of Commercial Science at Columbia University, but 
withdrew from the university before the completion of his course; Hazel 
L. Allen, who is living at home, is a graduate of the Raymond high school, 
the Latter-day Saints University at Salt Lake and she received the B. S. 
degree from the State Agricultural College. She holds a first-class 
teacher's certificate in Alberta and is teaching domestic science in the 
Raymond high school ; Lucile is a graduate of the Raymond high school 
and graduated from the Utah Agricultural College with the class of 1923 ; 
John L. is a graduate of the Raymond public schools and is now on a mis- 
sion for the church in New York and throughout the eastern states ; 
Irving LeRoy died in infancy. 

Mr. Allen gives his political allegiance to the Conservative party and 
he is active in party affairs. He was the first postmaster of Cardston, 
holding that position for several years. Mr. Allen was president of the 
Knight Academy, which was erected at Raymond at a cost of fifty thous- 
and dollars, and which for ten years was supported by the Church of 
Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Later it became the Raymond high 
school. Mr, Allen is a prominent figure in church circles and is now presi- 
dent of the Taylor stake, succeeding Charles 0. Card in 1902. In 1903 
the Alberta stake was divided into two stakes, the Taylor and Alberta 
stakes. Mr. Allen was asked to come to Raymond to assist in the coloniza- 
tion of this stake and has since been president. He is public-spirited and 
is never too busy to give aid in the furtherance of any movement for the 
benefit of the community at large. He was school trustee and a member 
of the town council of Cardston for a number of years and' has also served 
(11) 



162 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

as a member of the Raymond council for many years. He is trustee of the 
Southern Irrigation district, of which he was one of the organizers, and 
he also assisted in the organization of the Raymond Opera House Com- 
pany, of which he is a director. Preeminently an organizer and promoter, 
he has been successful in the handling of large affairs and has proven his 
power to coordinate and develop the various phases of modern industrial 
life. An unusual prosperity has resulted from unusual ability and has 
made the name of Heber S. Allen synonymous with activity and accom- 
plishment. 



LEVI WEBSTER. 



Levi Webster is conducting a blacksmith shop in Cardston. He was 
born in Lestershire, England, on the 14th of September, 1876, a son of 
Samuel and Eliza (Smith) Webster, both natives of England. The pa- 
ternal grandfather, John Webster, was born and died in England. He 
married Sarah Ann Southwell and after his demise she came to the 
United States and located in Utah, one year after Levi Webster had 
come to Canada. Her demise occurred in Utah, in 1904, in her seventieth 
year. The rr\aternal grandfather, James Smith, was likewise a native 
of England, where he died. Mr. and Mrs. Webster arrived in the United 
States in 1882 and made their way immediately to Utah, locating at 
Coalville. The father had followed mining in his native country and 
worked in the mines at Coalville for a time. Later he took up land in 
Star Valley, Wyoming, and resided there until 1893, when he settled at 
Mountain View, Alberta. He homesteaded some land near Mountain 
View and constructed his first home of logs, which he hauled from the 
mountains. He still resides on this homestead and with his sons owns 
a section and a half of well improved land, whereon graded live stock is 
raised. He devotes the greater part of his time to his duties on the 
ranch and is enjoying the best of health, at the age of sixty-eight years. 
Mrs. Webster is sixty-six years of age. Mr. Webster was among the 
first to join the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in England 
and he devotes a great deal of his spare time to the church. He served 
in England on a mission of two years and is now a Seventy in the church. 
He has been very active in public life and while a resident of Mountain 
View held the office of justice of the peace for a number of years and 
was likewise a member of the school board. To Mr. and Mrs. Webster 
ten children have been born: Levi, whose name introduces this review; 
Alice, who is the wife of Fred Neville of Mountain View; J. W., who is 
engaged in ranching near Mountain View; Sarah, who is the wife of 
Thomas Burr, a barber of Lethbridge; Eliza, who is the wife of Bert 
Kelly of Mountain View; James, who is engaged in ranching in Moun- 
tain View; Burton, who is an inspector in an aeroplane factory at Salt 
Lake, having also held that position during the World war; Neoma, Who 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 163 

is the wife of John West of Mountain View; Mattie, who is the wife of 
Carl Praker of Mountain View ; and Samuel, whose death occurred at the 
age of four years. Mr. and Mrs. Praker expect to leave soon on a mis- 
sion for the church to the Samoa Islands. 

In the acquirement of his education Levi Webster attended the 
schools of Utah and Wyoming- and remained with his parents until he 
was married. He then learned the carpenter's trade and in 1893 came 
to Cardston and followed that trade in Cardston, Ferney, Morrisey and 
Bankhead, for some time, having assisted in erecting some of the first 
buildings in the latter community. Subsequently he learned the trade 
of a blacksmith and made his initial step in that capacity in Mountain 
View, where he built a shop and conducted business until 1909. In that 
year he went to Glenwood, Alberta, and operated a shop there until 1915, 
when he came to Cardston, and purchased a blacksmith shop and has 
conducted a general blacksmith and auto and wagon shop since that 
time. He is a man of practical methods, good judgment and general 
business sagacity and he is held in high confidence and esteem by all 
who know him. 

In 1900 was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Webster to Miss Mary 
Ann Nelson, who was born in western Idaho. To their union ten chil- 
dren have been born: Edith M. is the wife of Leech Thompson of Cards- 
ton ; Alice A, is the wife of Merritt Dondle of Cardston ; Ethel E., Samuel 
N. and Myrtle L. are living at home; Ruth I. died at the age of one and 
one-half years ; and Neoma, Imogene, Gerald and Cora are living at home. 

While a resident of Mountain View Mr. Webster served on the town 
council and since coming to Cardston has contributed in a great degree 
to the development and improvement of this community. He devotes a 
great deal of his spare time to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day 
Saints and is now a Seventy in the church. 



A. GLADSTONE VIRTUE. 

A. Gladstone Virtue, member of the bar at Lethbridge, trying all kinds 
of cases and trying them well, was born at Beachburg, Ontario, on the 
14th of November, 1891, and is a son of William and Annie Louise 
(Mitchell) Virtue. He is descended in the paternal line from Irish an- 
cestry, his grandfather being James Virtue, who was bom in County Fer- 
managh, Ireland, whence, coming to the new world, he cast in his lot with 
the pioneer settlers of Ontario, where he followed the occupation of farm- 
ing. His son, William Virtue, was born at Smith's Falls, Ontario, in 1847, 
and in early Hfe learned the builder's trade, which he followed in the em- 
ploy of others for a number of years and then began contracting and 
building on his own account. About 1901 he removed with his family to 
Lethbridge, where he is still living. Here he continued to engage in 
building operations until 1910, when he retired from active life and is 



164 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

now spending his days in the enjoyment of a well-earned rest. He mar- 
ried Annie Louise Mitchell, who was born in Pembroke, Ontario, in 1860, 
and who passed away in 1917, She was a daughter of Henry Mitchell, a 
native of Canada. To Mr. and Mrs. William Virtue were born eight chil- 
dren, six of whom are living, A Gladstone being the sixth child. Mr. 
Virtue is a member of the Baptist Church and his political allegiance has 
long been given to the Liberal party, with progressive leanings. 

A. Gladstone Virtue obtained his early education in the public schools 
of Ontario and of Lethbridge, having been a lad of ten years when the 
family home was established in this city, where he was graduated from 
the high school with the class of 1908. He then initiated his business 
career by entering the office of W. C. Simmons, under whose preceptor- 
ship he pursued the study of law. He afterward continued his studies in 
Osgoode Hall at Toronto, later returning to Alberta and was graduated in 
law in 1913, leading his class each year and becoming a gold medalist of 
the Law Society- He gained his LL. B. degree upon graduation from the 
University of Alberta in 1913, and in the fall of that year he located for 
practice in Lethbridge, where he devoted his attention to professional in- 
terests until the fall of 1915. The world having become involved in the 
great international strife, he then trained for his commission at the Royal 
School of Artillery at Kingston, and enlisted in April, 1916, in the Sixty- 
first Battery. With his command he went to France and was for fifteen 
months in front line service. He had the rank of lieutenant and was 
awarded the military cross. With his return to Canada, in June, 1919, he 
resumed the private practice of law, in which he is now engaged and has 
made for himself a most creditable position in the ranks of the legal pro- 
fession. He displays marked ability in the trial of his cases, which he 
prepares with great thoroughness and care, and his presentation of a 
cause before the courts is always clear and logical. 

On the 25th of June, 1919, Mr. Virtue was married to Miss Edith Tor- 
rance, who was born in Clinton, Ontario, and was educated in the Clinton 
Collegiate School. She is a daughter of John and Joanna Torrance, also 
natives of Ontario, where they still reside, the father having retired from 
active work some years since. Mr. and Mrs. Virtue became parents of 
two daughters, Joan and Edith. The wife and mother passed away on 
the 8th of February, 1922, in the faith of the Presbyterian church, of 
which she was an active and consistent member. Her many good quali- 
ties of heart and mind endeared her to all who knew her, so that her 
death was deeply regretted by many friends, as well as by her immediate 
family. 

Mr. Virtue has membership in the Baptist church and is an earnest 
worker in all branches of church service, being superintendent of the Sun- 
day school and vice president of the Alberta conference of his denomina- 
tion. He is an earnest and active supporter of the Young Men's Christian 
Association, of which he is serving as a director, and is chairman of the 
boys' work committee. He also belongs to the Lethbridge Bar Associa- 
tion and his time is wisely divided between his professional interests and 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 165 

duties and his labors for the benefit of his fellowmen and of the city at 
large. In politics he is a Progressive and he stands at all times for those 
interests which mean advancement for the individual and for the province. 
He is an ardent prohibitionist. 



ARTHUR W. CHALLAND. 

Arthur W. Challand, manager for the J. J. McLaughlin Company, 
bottlers of mineral water at Edmonton, is an alert, energetic and repre- 
sentative business man, whose course has ever been marked by a steady 
progress that has brought him to his present place of responsibility and 
importance in commercial circles. Mr. Challand was born in Yorkshire, 
England in 1862, and is a son of William and Hannah (Winterbottom) 
Challand, who were also natives of England, where they spent their lives, 
the father conducting business as a grain merchant there and winning a 
substantial measure of success. He and his wife were members of the 
Congregational church and his political endorsement was given to the 
Liberal party. 

Arthur W. Challand was the second in order of birth in a family of 
three children. He enjoyed the educational advantages offered in a pri- 
vate school and when his textbooks were put aside he received his initial 
business training under the direction of his father, working in connection 
with the grain trade for two years. On the expiration of that period he 
bade adieu to friends and native land and sailed for the new world, making 
his way to Hamilton, Ontario, in 1896. He was there associated with the 
Hamilton Steam Rolling Mills Company for a period of two years, after 
which he entered the employ of the Diamond Park Mineral Water Com- 
pany near Hamilton, filling the responsible position of manager. He next 
became associated with the McLaughlin Company in Toronto and con- 
tinued in the office at that point for a period of ten years. Later he 
established a branch for the J. J. McLaughlin Company in Edmonton and 
here is in control of the business, which is that of bottling all kinds of 
mineral water. At the same time, for a period of six years, he was in 
control of the business of the McLaughlin Motor Company in Edmonton, 
but is now devoting his entire time and attention to the management of 
the bottling plant. He is thorough and systematic in everything that he 
undertakes and his capability has brought him to a responsible position in 
business circles. 

Mr. Challand was married in England, in 1892, to Miss Edith Mary 
Payne, who was born in that country and there pursued her education. 
They are members of Christ church (Anglican) and Mr. Challand is a 
Mason and also a member of the Canadian Order of Foresters. In these 
associations are indicated the rules which govern his conduct and shape 
all the relations of his life. He holds to high ideals in public service and 
was the first president of the Rotary Club in Edmonton. He was also 



166 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

president of St. George's Society for a year. He is an active member of 
the Board of Trade and a supporter of all those measures and activities 
which are a matter of civic virtue and civic pride. He enjoys all forms of 
manly outdoor sport, especially a game on the links, and is a member of 
the Golf and Country Club. Cheer and friendliness are among his marked 
characteristics and he is familiarly known as "Pop" Challand, a name in- 
dicative of the warm regard and friendship entertained for him by all who 
know him. He is classed today with the most popular men in Edmonton. 



RICHARD A. PILLING. 



Richard A. Pilling, a successful rancher of the Cardston district, is one 
of Cardston's most progressive citizens. He was born in Kaysville, Davis 
county, Utah, on the 14th of September, 1857, a son of Richard and Cath- 
erine (Adams) Pilling, the former a native of England and the latter of 
Illinois. The paternal grandfather, John Pilling, was born in England and 
was the first member of his family to join the Church of Jesus Christ of 
Latter-day Saints. After coming to the United States he located in Utah, 
in 1853, and engaged in farming and there his death occurred. He mar- 
ried Peggy Bank. The maternal grandfather was Elias Adams, who 
joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in the United 
States and at an early day emigrated to Utah, where he also followed 
agricultural pursuits. He fought in the War of 1812, between England 
and the United States. Richard Pilling, the father of Richard A. Pilling, 
joined the church in England and removed to America with his parents 
about 1850. They lived in Nauvoo, Illinois, until 1853, when they crossed 
the plains with their oxen and located at Salt Lake. He had received his 
early education in England and when a young man he took up land near 
Salt Lake and engaged in farming. He worked for a man one day in order 
to pay for the use of a yoke of cattle for one day with which to work his 
land. He achieved success as a farmer but during the period when the 
crickets infested the country, he lost most of his crops. Misfortune did 
not weaken his determination, however, and he later acquired more land 
and continued farming and stock raising until he emigrated to Cardston 
in 1889. He made the trip overland and trailed some stock through with 
him. He homesteaded some raw prairie land on the St. Mary's river and 
he was the first to take water from that river for irrigation purposes. 
He built a house of logs hauled from the mountains and was a stock 
raiser and general farmer until his death in 1903, at the age of seventy- 
three years. His widow is eighty-four years of age. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Pilling ten children were born: Richard A., whose name introduces this 
review; John, who is a resident of Cardston; Joseph, who is residing in 
Kimball ; Mary, who is the wife of Edward Morgan of Layton, Utah ; 
Elias, who is living at Leavitt, Alberta; George E., who is deceased; 
Marguerite, the wife of James E. Nelson of Cardston; James and Rufus 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT , 167 

E., who are residents of Cardston; and Elizabeth C, the wife of Charles 
T. Marsden of Cardston. Mr. Pilling devoted a great deal of his spare 
time to the church and he was the first bishop of Etna, and was ^ mem- 
ber of the high council at the time of his death. His political allegiance 
was given to the Liberal party. 

Richard A. Pilling received his education in the public schools of 
Kaysville, Utah, and he lived with his parents until he became of age. 
He then started farming near his native town, proving up on some land, 
and resided thereon until he came to Cardston in 1892. He homesteaded 
land on the St. Mary's river and broke part of it. This he sold and later 
bought other land, which he brought to a highly improved state and on 
which he, raised live stock. For the past few years he has bought and 
sold live stock and is making a success in this connection. In 1913 he 
moved into Cardston, where he is held in high confidence and esteem by 
all who know him. 

On the 31st of December, 1879, occurred the marriage of Mr. Pilling 
to Miss Amanda Penrod, who was boruiiin Cedar county, Utah. To them 
eleven children were born: Richard W. is engaged in the oil business; 
Elijah L. is living in Long Beach, California; Amanda died at the age 
of seventeen years ; Laura is the wife of Joseph J. Marsden of Cardston ; 
Elias and John L. died ii^' childhood ; Frank L. is living in Poison, Mon- 
tana ; Valentine, Ivan H. and Lyle are^ living in Cardston ; and Morris 
died in infancy. ' 

Mr. Pilling is a citizen of Cardston who stands for progress along 
all lines of activity and the success he has achieved may be attributed 
to honest toil and perseverance guided by sound judgment. He spends a 
great deal of time in the interests of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter- 
day Saints and he is ^now holding the important position of high priest. 
He served on a mission in Connecticut and New York from 1911 to 1913. 



' PHILIP QUESNEL, M. D.> 

Dr; Philip Quesnel, engaged successfully in the practice of medicine 
and surgery at Edmonton, was born in the province of Quebec, on the 
10th of December, 1879. He was but five years of age when left an 
orphan, after which he was reared by his guardian. He supplemented his 
early education by a commercial course and later entered Montreal Uni- 
versity, where he began the study of medicine in 1899. He completed 
the regular course and was graduated in 1903, opening an office in the 
province of Quebec, where he remained until 1906. In that year he lo- 
cated at Morinville, and there resided until 1908, engaged in the private 
practice of medicine, but in the latter year he took up hospital work, thus 
continuing until. 1912. He came to Edmonton, which place offered an 
open field, and entered into active association with Dr. A. Blais for the 
practice of medicine. Here he has remained and has largely specialized in 



168 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

obstetrics. He has particularly qualified himself for professional work 
of that character and his ability is recognized by the profession through- 
out this section of the province. During the World war Dr. Quesnel 
was in overseas service from 1915 until 1917, holding a captain's commis- 
sion, and was attached to a regiment. 

It is characteristic of Dr. Quesnel that he loyally supports any plan 
or project for the general good. He is a member of the Catholic church 
and along strictly professional lines has membership in the Alberta Med- 
ical Society and the Canadian Medical Association. In this way he keeps 
in touch with the trend of modern professional thought and progress 
and also by wide reading and study adds to his knowledge and ability, 
so that he is steadily advancing to a place in the front rank of the mem- 
bers of the medical profession in this section of the province. 



JOHN MONTGOMERIE-BELL. 

Studiousness, combined with the habit of thoroughness, has brought 
John Montgomerie-Bell to a position of prominence at the Calgary bar 
and he conducts his law practice with strict regard for the highest ethical 
standards of the profession. He was born in the city of Edinburgh, Scot- 
land, June 18, 1879, and his parents, Mathew and Jane (Cockburn) Mont- 
gomerie-Bell, were also natives of that country. The father was one of 
the leading barristers of Edinburgh, where he successfully followed his 
profession for many years. His death occurred in that city in February, 
1917, while the mother passed away in September, 1897. 

The public schools of his native city afforded John Montgomerie-Bell 
his early educational advantages and he afterward became a student at 
Edinburgh Academy and Edinburgh University, graduating from the 
latter institution on the completion of a course in law, it being his desire 
to follow in the professional footsteps of his father. In 1904, when a 
young man of twenty-five, he severed home ties and started for the 
States, making his way to the Pacific Northwest. For two years he op- 
erated a fruit ranch in the celebrated Yakima valley of Washington and 
in 1906 crossed the border into Canada, locating in Calgary, Alberta. 
In the following year he returned to Edinburgh and entered a law office 
of that city, in which he remained until 1911, when the lure of the new 
world brought him back to Canada. He spent a short time in Vancouver, 
British Columbia, and in September, 1912, returned to Calgary, entering 
the law offices of Lougheed & Bennett. He continued with that firm until 
1916, when he enlisted for service in the World war, and was later com- 
missioned a lieutenant. He went overseas with the Fiftieth Battalion 
and participated in several major operations on the western front. He 
was wounded on January 18, 1918, and returned to Canada in October, 
receiving his discharge in December, 1918. For two years thereafter he 
had charge of the information and service branches of the Soldiers' Civil 




JOHN MONTGOMERIE-BELL. 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 171 

Reestablishment bureau and on the expiration of that period he devoted 
a year to agency work. In November, 1921, he resumed the practice of 
law, remaining alone until July, 1922, when he was joined by C. W. Coole, 
who received the LL. B. degree from Cambridge University of England 
and is now a member of the firm, which has taken its place with the 
foremost in the city. 

In April, 1913, Mr. Montgomerie-Bell married Miss Jean Macleod, 
the youngest daughter of Colonel James F. and Mary (Drever) Macleod, 
the former of whom died in 1894. The mother survives and is now a resi- 
dent of Winnipeg, Manitoba. Two daughters have been born to Mr. and 
Mrs. Montgomerie-Bell : Helen Rothnie, whose birth occurred in Decem- 
ber, 1914; and Roma Macleod, born in June, 1920. Mr. Montgomerie-Bell 
adheres to the teachings of the Anglican church and is one of the vestry- 
men of Christ church of that denomination at Elbow Park, a suburb of 
Calgary. His political support is given to the Conservative party, and 
while he has never sought nor held public office, he is deeply interested in 
all that pertains to the welfare and progress of his adopted city. He is 
a member of the Calgary Golf & Country Club and during his student 
days took an active part in athletic sports, in which he excelled, being 
particularly well known for his prowess as a football player. At the out- 
set of his professional career he learned the necessity for thorough prepa- 
ration and never enters a courtroom without being fully prepared to 
present his case in the strong, clear light of sound reasoning, based upon 
the fact and the law. He is thoroughly alive to the dignity and responsi- 
bility of his profession and has gained the respect and esteem of his fellow 
practitioners and the confidence of the general public. 



WALTER G. ROSS. 



No resident of the Victoria district of Alberta is better known nor 
more highly esteemed than Walter G. Ross, who for over forty years has 
been intimately connected with the development and upbuilding of Fort 
Saskatchewan, enduring all of the hardships and dangers of pioneer life 
and sharing in many of its exciting episodes. He was born in Ottawa, 
Ontario, June 5, 1853, a son of Patrick and Elizabeth (Gordon) Ross, both 
of whom are deceased. The mother was a native of Scotland and the 
father was born in India, being of Scotch parentage. They had a family 
of seven children, of whom six survive, Anna being the firstborn. Frances 
married John Forbes and they reside in Vancouver, British Columbia. 
The others are: Walter G., of this review; William, a native of the capital 
city of the Dominion; John B., whose home is in Vancouver, British 
Columbia; and George, who is Hving in Prince Rupert, in that province. 

William Ross, brother of Walter G. Ross, was born June 1, 1855, and 
when twenty years of age he came west to Alberta. In 1877 he entered 
a homestead in the province and proved up on his claim, engaging in 



172 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

general farming for six years, when he also took up stock raising, being 
thus occupied until 1900. He then turned his attention to mercantile 
pursuits, opening a general store at Star, near the town of Lamont, in 
the Victoria district, which he conducted for five years, being associated 
with his brother Walter. He has since been a reside^nt of Fort Saskatche- 
wan, although he has made frequent business trips to the other provinces 
of the Dominion, and makes his home with the subject of this review, 
with whom he is still associated in business, their attention now being 
devoted to real estate operations. He is numbered among the substantial 
business men and leading citizens of his community and is highly re- 
spected by all who have the pleasure of his acquaintance. 

It was in 1873 that Walter G. Ross came to Alberta, at which time 
he was a member of the Royal Northwest Mounted Police, and was sta- 
tioned at the old Hudson's Bay fort at Edmonton until the expiration of 
his three-year term of service. In 1877 he located at Fort Saskatchewan, 
being one of the earliest settlers in this locality, and the country was at 
that time inhabited chiefly by the redskins. For about sixteen years he 
engaged in trading with the Indians, with whom he always maintained 
friendly relations, acquiring a valuable fund of knowledge in regard to 
their language and customs. From 1884 until 1896 he served as post- 
master of the town and in 1880 he had taken up a government claim. 
On his withdrawal from public office he joined his brother William in 
the conduct of a general store at Star, Alberta, of which they remained 
the owners until 1900. They then entered the real estate and insurance 
business in Fort Saskatchewan and for twenty-two years have continued 
therein, gradually increasing the scope of their operations. The pros- 
perity which they now enjoy is well merited, for it has been gained 
through hard work and fair dealing, and their labors have also been of 
material advantage to the locality in which they reside. 

Mr. Ross' public spirit finds expression in his service as a member 
of the town council, in which capacity he is doing everything in his power 
to promote the welfare of his town, standing at all times for constructive 
measures and progressive methods. He is a member of the Presbyterian 
church, with which his brother is also affiliated, and both participated in 
the work of quelling the rebellion of 1885. They have manifested in 
their lives the sterling qualities of the Scotch race — thrift, integrity and 
steadfastness of purpose — and have made the name of Ross an honored 
one in the district in which they have so long resided. 



W. J. BARTLETT. 



W. J. Bartlett, who conducts the best equipped printing office in the 
pass, is well and favorably known in journalistic circles of Alberta as 
the owner and publisher of the Blairmore Enterprise, a weekly of high 
standing. A native of Newfoundland, he was born May 15, 1880, of the 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 173 

marriage of Isaac William and Elizabeth Anne (Bishop) Bartlett, who 
are still living on that island. The father was formerly a member of the 
Newfoundland Imperial Police and is now living retired on a pension, 
having reached the age of seventy-two years. Mr. and Mrs. Bartlett 
reared a family of seven children, all of whom are residing in Newfound- 
land except the subject of this review. 

The public schools of his native island afforded W. J. Bartlett his 
educational privileges and in 1909, when twenty-nine years of age, he 
came to this province, entering the newspaper field at Blairmore, in the 
Rocky Mountain district. At that time two papers were being published 
here and Mr. Bartlett purchased both plants, which he suppHed with 
the most modern presses and other equipment necessary for the conduct 
of a first-class printing establishment. He has since issued the Blairmore 
Enterprise and is producing a paper of much interest and value to the 
district which it serves. Its news is authentic and its pages are filled 
with good reading matter, attractively set forth. The Enterprise now 
has a large circulation and owing to the high quality of his work Mr. 
Bartlett is also conducting a profitable business in job printing. 

Aside from the power which he exercises in his editorial capacity 
Mr. Bartlett has done effective public service along educational lines, 
serving on the school board from 1912 until 1920, and from 1913 until 
1920 he was a member of the town council. Fraternally he is connected 
with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and he is also a member of 
the S. 0. E. and the K. of P. He is of the progressive type, both as a 
journalist and as a citizen, and through the columns of his paper en- 
courages every movement looking to the upbuilding and prosperity of 
his community, district and province. 



DAVID RITCHIE. 



David Ritchie, chief of police of Calgary, has devoted practically his 
entire life to this branch of municipal service and has risen to his present 
office through proven ability. He was born in Cumberland, England, 
February 12, 1882, and his parents were James and Fanny (Graham) 
Ritchie, the former a native of Scotland, while the latter was also born 
in Cumberland. The father devoted his life to the occupation of farming 
and has always resided in his native land. The mother passed away in 
1887. 

Reared on his father's farm, David Ritchie acquired his education in 
the pubhc schools of Annen, Scotland, and when not busy with his studies 
he assisted in the cultivation of the land. For a short time he followed 
railroading and when eighteen years of age became a member of the 
Dumfriesshire Constabulary of Scotland, with which he was connected 
for twelve years. Attracted by the lure of a new country, he came to 
Canada, reaching Calgary, Alberta, on the 29th of April, 1911. On June 



174 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

22 of that year he joined the Calgary police force in the capacity of con- 
stable and was appointed a detective on November 24, 1911, He contin- 
ued to fill that position until December 1, 1915, when he enlisted for 
service in the World war, and was commissioned a lieutenant in the One 
Hundred and Thirty-seventh Battalion. In February, 1916, he won pro- 
motion to the rank of captain and on August 12, 1916, was ordered 
overseas. His battalion was broken up in January, 1917, and he was trans- 
ferred to the One Hundred and Sixteenth Battalion from central Ontario, 
then commanded by Lieutenant Colonel Samuel Sharp, deceased. On 
February 11, 1917, they landed in France, Captain Ritchie being at that 
time second in command of a company, and in July of the same year he 
was placed at its head. He was with the One Hundred and Sixteenth 
Battalion until the battle of Amiens, on August 8, 1918, when he was 
wounded and was sent back to England for hospital treatment. He 
remained in the mother country until November, being on sick leave at 
the time the armistice was signed, and returned to Calgary, December 
24, 1918. He received his discharge on the 7th of January, 1919, and 
then resumed his duties as detective, acting in that capacit^^ until Sep- 
tember 15 of that year, when he was made chief of police of Calgary to 
succeed Alfred Cuddy, who had tendered his resignation to accept a posi- 
tion with the provincial police at Edmonton, Alberta, This is a memor- 
able date in Captain Ritchie's history, for on the day of his appointment 
to his present office he was decorated by the Prince of Wales with the 
Mihtary Cross, which he had won on the battle fields of France, receiving 
the following citation: "Near Domart, during the attack on August 8, 
Captain Ritchie was in charge of the leading company. He handled his 
company with great skill and daring and his actions were a great in- 
spiration to men under his command. He was wounded in the jumping- 
off trench and again on the objective, but still continued to carry on until 
again wounded. He set a fine example to all ranks during the active en- 
gagement." Broad experience has well qualified him for the responsi- 
bilities which devolve upon him and he has thoroughly systematized the 
department, bringing it up to a high standard of efficiency. He is bend- 
ing every effort to maintain law and order and under liis regime the 
criminal element has found Calgary a most undesirable place of resi- 
dence. He is also a poultry fancier and specializes in the raising of pure 
bred White Wyandotte chickens. 

On September 27, 1901, Mr. Ritchie was married to Miss Margaret 
Hutton, a daughter of David and Mary (Tait) Hutton, natives of Scot- 
land. The mother is still living but the father met an accidental death. 
Mr. Ritchie is a member of the Hillhurst Presbyterian church and his 
social nature finds expression in his connection with the Canadian and 
Rotary Clubs of this city. He is a strong advocate of clean amateur 
athletics, in which he has taken an active part as a wrestler and boxer, 
also playing soccer and handball. He is now serving for the second year 
as president of the Alberta branch of the Amateur Union and also as 
head of the Caledonian Games Society. He has the courage of his con- 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 175 

victions and exemplifies in his life the sterling qualities of the Scotch 
and English races, being recognized as a man of strict integrity whom 
neither fear nor favor can swerve from the course which he believes 
to be right'. He is loyal to the trust reposed in him and is discharging 
his duties as a public oflScial in such a manner as to win high encomiums 
from Calgary's citizens. 



DONALD C. McEACHERN. 

Donald C. McEachern, who for an extended period has been identified 
with educational interests and is now attendance oflficer for the province 
of Alberta, making his home in Edmonton, was born in Ontario, April 
12, 1875, and is a son of Neil and Ann (Campbell) McEachern, the former 
a native of Argyleshire, Scotland, while the latter was born in North 
Carolina, where her parents resided for a short time. The marriage of 
Mr. and Mrs. Neil McEachern, however, was celebrated in Ontario and 
both passed away in that province, where the father had for many years 
engaged in farming. They were consistent and loyal members of the 
Presbyterian church and in politics Mr. McEachern was a Liberal. To 
him and his wife were born fourteen children, eleven of whom are living, 
Donald C. being the twelfth in order of birth. 

Spending his youthful days under the parental roof, Donald C. Mc- 
Eachern obtained his education in the Owen Sound Collegiate Institute, 
from which he was graduated with the class of 1897. He then took up 
the profession of teaching, which he followed for eighteen months in 
Ontario, and in December, 1898, he arrived in Strathcona, Alberta, where 
the following year he again became actively identified with pedagogic 
work. He taught for ten years at Strathcona and Leduc, being principal 
of the schools at the latter place for four and a half years. From the 
beginning he displayed marked ability in educational work and his own 
zeal and enthusiasm inspired teachers and pupils under him. After re- 
tiring from the position of principal at Leduc he filled the position of 
accountant in the Dominion land office for about seven years, at the end 
of which time he became identified with the educational department of 
the province and is now chief attendance officer of Alberta. He has occu- 
pied this position since 1916 and his six years of service have been highly 
satisfactory to the general public and especially to all who are keenly 
interested in the welfare and progress of the schools. 

In 1904 Mr. McEachern was united in marriage to Miss Grace Martin, 
who was born in North Dakota, and they have become the parents of a 
son, Donald* Stewart, who was born in 1908 and is now attending the 
pubhc schools. Mr. McEachern is a member of the Canadian Order of 
Foresters and his political support is given to the Liberty party. He and 
his wife have membership in the Presbyterian church and they are highly 
esteemed by reason of their sterling worth and many excellent traits of 



176 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

character. Mr. McEachern has done most effective work along educa- 
tional lines and has ever labored to introduce the highest standards and 
to make his service of the utmost value in promoting the interests of the 
schools. 



MICHAEL HOGAN. 



Michael Hogan, mayor of St. Albert, is giving to this community a 
progressive and businesslike administration and he enjoys the confidence 
and esteem of all who know him. He is also engaged in the real estate 
and insurance business, in which he has achieved substantial success. 
He was born in Park Hill, Ontario, on the 16th of August, 1872, a son 
of Michael and Bridgett (Heenan) Hogan, natives of Ireland. They came 
to Canada at an early date and the father engaged in farming in Ontario 
province, where they resided the remainder of their days. 

In the acquirement of his education Michael Hogan attended the public 
schools of Ontario and in due time was graduated from high school. He 
engaged in teaching and in farming until 1900, when he came to Alberta. 
He located in Strathcona and taught there for a time. Subsequently he 
came to St. Albert and followed his career as an educator until 1910, 
when he entered the real estate and the insurance business. He was suc- 
cessful from the start, conducting his business on the highest and most 
honorable principles. In 1919 he was elected mayor, and has since been 
active in this office, having inaugurated and brought to completion many 
movements for the development and improvement of St. Albert. He 
was police magistrate from 1917 to 1921 and served on the town council 
a number of years. Mr. Hogan has always been a stanch supporter of 
the Liberal party and has wielded much influence in party affairs. 

Mr. Hogan is a consistent communicant of the Catholic church and 
has membership with the Knights of Columbus. 



WILLIAM SHORT. 



William Short, a member of the prominent law firm of Short, Cross, 
McLean & McBride of Edmonton, has been King's Counsel since 1907. 
He was born in the province of Ontario, in 1866, a son of William and 
Mary (Faulkner) Short, the former a native of England and the latter 
of Ireland. 

In the acquirement of his education William Short attended the pub- 
lic high schools of Ontario and subsequently enrolled in Toronto Uni- 
versity. His boyhood ambition was to study law and he studied for that 
profession in Calgary, Alberta. He was admitted to the provincial bar 
in 1894 and immediately started into practice. He brought to the pro- 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 177 

fession thorough training and innate ability and achieved success from 
the start and in 1907 he was made King's Counsel. He is a member of 
the prominent firm of Short, Cross, McLean & McBride and enjoys an 
extensive and important clientele, handling much important litigation 
before the courts. Mr. Short is actively interested in many enterprises 
and is one of Edmonton's most substantial citizens. 

On the 7th of February, 1900, in Milton, Ontario, was celebrated the 
marriage of Mr. Short to Miss Henrietta McMaster, a daughter of the 
late James McMaster. To the union of Mr. and Mrs. Short two children 
have been born: William Allan, whose birth occurred on the 15th of De- 
cember, 1900; and Ruth, who is hving at home. 

In his political views Mr. Short is a Conservative and he maintains 
an active interest in civic affairs. He has served four terms as mayor 
of Edmonton and one term as president of the Board of Trade of this 
city. Fraternally Mr. Short is identified with the Masons, being a Knights 
Templar, and socially he holds membership in the Edmonton Golf & 
Country Club. His religious faith is that of the Presbyterian church. 
One of Mr. Short's favorite forms of recreation is traveling and he has 
traveled extensively throughout North America and Europe. 



JOHN HERRON. 



John Herron is now living retired at Pincher Creek, after years of 
earnest, persistent labor, which brought to him a handsome competencii. 
He engaged in ranching for many years and still retains some of his 
land. He was born in Ontario, on the 15th of November, 1853, a son of 
John and Marguerite (Crane) Herron, the former a native of Ireland and 
the latter of Scotland. The father was a farmer and came to Ontario at 
the age of twenty-one years. He owned much land in that province ar.rl 
lived retired for some time prior to his death, which occurred when he 
was ninety years of age. Mrs. Herron died in her sixtieth year. To Mr. 
and Mrs. Herron twelve children were born, John being the third in order 
of birth. One son, Peter, came to Alberta in the latter part of the '80s 
and homesteaded some land near Pincher Creek, on which he resided 
until his death. John Herron, Sr., was a consistent member of the Pres- 
byterian church throughout his life and was an Orangeman. . 

John Herron attended the common schools of Ashton, Ontario, until 
he was twelve years of age, at which time he hired out, working in the 
woods of Ontario and Quebec for six dollars per month. At the age of 
sixteen years he began to leara the trade of a blacksmith and in 1874 
he joined the Royal Northwest Mounted Police, as blacksmith for the 
police at Winnipeg. The following spring he came to Alberta with the 
Northwest Mounted Police, as escort of Major General Snipe. From 
Calgary they moved on to Macleod and thence into Montana. Subse- 
quently he returned to Calgary with the same party. Later he went 

(12) 



178 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

through the mountains to Walla Walla, Washington, and finding it too 
late to make his way back through the passes Mr. Herron went on to 
Salt Lake City, where he bought a pack horse and made the journey to 
Calgary by way of Macleod, arriving there at Christmas time. He was 
stationed at Calgary until he received his honorable discharge from the 
Royal Northwest Mounted Police, in May, 1878. He then returned to 
Ottawa, Ontario, by the way of Fort Walsh and there embarked in the 
grocery and liquor business. Later he entered the firm of Bate & Herron, 
which association was maintained until 1881, when he withdrew and came 
back to Pincher Creek. He organized a cattle company in this district, 
which was known as the Stewart Ranch Cattle Company and he ob- 
tained a lease of about forty thousand acres between Pincher Creek and 
South Fork. He became local manager of the ranch and he deserves great 
credit for what was accomplished. He engaged in breeding Clydesdale 
horses and imported several stallions. At one time he put one thousand 
head of horses, which he had brought from Idaho, in the Crowsnest Pass 
for the winter and he never lost a horse. When Mr. Herron determined 
to dispose of his interests and retire he held a large sale and averaged 
better than one hundred and eighty dollars per head. Aside from ranch- 
ing he has done some experimental farming, and he owns a half section 
of land. He retired from active life in 1908. 

Mr. Herron married Miss Ida Lake of Lindsay, Ontario. To their 
union three children have been born: The eldest child, Georgia C, is 
the wife of E. G. Ambrose, a successful farmer; Kate is the wife of J. L. 
Jenison, superintendent of the Canadian Pacific Railroad at Edmonton; 
the youngest member of the family is Edith Maude, who is the wife of 
George Hunter, manager of the Union Bank at Lethbridge. 

Mr. Herron gives his political allegiance to the Conservative party and 
he was elected to parliament at Ottawa in 1904 and again in 1908. Fra- 
ternally he is identified with the Masons, being past master of the Royal 
Arch Masons, and he is also an Orangeman. Mr. Herron deserves great 
credit for what he has accomplished, for he started out in life empty- 
handed, met difficulties cheerfully and bravely, overcame obstacles, and 
by energy and perseverance worked his way upward to success. His 
friends throughout Macleod district are legion and he is held in high con- 
fidence and esteem. 



HENRY AUSTIN CHADWICK. 

Henry A. Chadwick has chosen the practice of law as his life work, 
and holding to high ideals, he has steadily advanced in the field of pro- 
fessional service until he now occupies a position of prominence at the 
Calgary bar. He was born at Guelph, Ontario, April 15, 1883, and his 
parents, Austin Cooper and Caroline C. (Nicholson) Chadwick, were also 
natives of that province. The father was a distinguished jurist and for 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 179 

almost half a century presided over the county court of Wellington 
county, Ontario, holding- ofRce for a longer period than any other judge 
in the province, and it is doubtful if this record has been surpassed in 
the Dominion. The mother is living but the father passed away in June, 
1921. 

Henry A. Chadwick attended Upper Canada College at Toronto and 
prepared for his profession at Osgoode Hall in that city, graduating in 
law with the class of 1907. He first located for practice at Perth, On- 
tario, forming a partnership with the late the Hon. J. A. Stewart, and 
remained at that place until 1914, when he came west to Alberta, estab- 
lishing his home in Calgary. He entered the law office of Lougheed, Ben- 
nett & McLaws, in which he spent fifteen months, and then became a 
member of the firm of Savary, Fenerty & Chadwick, with which he has 
since been connected. 

In September, 1907, Mr. Chadwick married Miss Mary Helena Sandi- 
lands, a daughter of George Sandilands, who was one of the leading 
bankers of Guelph, Ontario, but is now deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Chadwick 
have one child, Caroline Isabella, born in June, 1909, Mr. Chadwick is a 
member of the Anglican church and his political support is given to the 
Conservative party, while fraternally he is identified with the Canadian 
Order of Foresters. 



JAMES MAY. 



One of the pioneer citizens of Cardston who for many years was close- 
ly associated with the agricultural and stock raising interests of this 
district, was James May, whose death occurred on the 28th of March, 
1910, a son of George and Hannah (Hobbs) May, both natives of Eng- 
land. Mr. and Mrs. George May joined the Church of Jesus Christ of 
Latter-day Saints in England and subsequently left their native country 
for the United States. On the way across the plains Mr. May's demise 
occurred, and his widow and children continued the journey. 

James May, with his mother and the other members of the family, 
made the trip overland to Utah in the early '50s, it taking several weeks 
to make the journey. For some time he located at Bountiful, Davis 
county, where he engaged in farming and subsequently he removed to 
near Calls Fort, and there secured some land. He farmed with great 
success in Utah until 1888, when he came to Alberta and located at what 
is now Cardston, there being at that time but seven log houses here. He 
homesteaded some land five miles south of Cardston and, hauling wood 
from the mountains, a trip covering two days, he erected a log house with 
a dirt roof. He had to do his freighting of supplies from Lethbridge. 
After much hard work Mr. May got his land broken and under cultiva- 
tion, and from time to time he purchased more land until he had three 
hundred and twenty acres. He was in the truest sense of the word a 



180 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

self-made man. Earnest and persistent work was the source of his suc- 
cess and he well-merited the confidence and esteem in which he was held 
by all who knew him. His friends in this district were legion and his 
demise in 1910 was deeply regretted. 

In 1877 Mr. May married Miss Rhoda A. Lang, a native of Salt Lake 
and a daughter of William and Mary (Pugsley) Lang. Her parents were 
both born in England, where they joined the Church of Jesus Christ of 
Latter-day Saints, and after coming to the United States, emigrated to 
Salt Lake in 1852. They made the trip overland with oxen, experiencing 
the many trials and tribulations of that early day and they located near 
Salt Lake, where the father followed agricultural pursuits. Later they 
were called by the church to assist in the colonization of St. George and 
both Mr. and Mrs. Lang died there. To Mr. and Mrs. May eleven chil- 
dren were born: The eldest son, William L., died when he was seven 
years of age; Mary A. is the wife of William Cleveland of Twin Falls, 
Idaho ; Jane died in infancy ; Artamissia is the widow of Fred Best of 
Cardston ; Ben H. is a veteran of the World war, having enlisted at Card- 
ston with the Thirteenth Mounted Rifles and received his training at 
Medicine Hat and Calgary. Subsequently he was sent to France, where 
he remained eight months. He participated in several engagements in- 
cluding that at Vimy Ridge, and later received a lieutenant's commission 
and was transferred to the Cavalry; Agnes is the wife of James McLain 
and they are living in Missouri ; Eunice is married to Claude A. Fergu- 
son of Cardston. Zina died at the age of four years and Alice died at the 
age of six; Sterling I. is now living in Cardston. He was on a mission 
for the church five years in Tonga, one of the group of islands known as 
the Friendly Islands; Ross R. is an accountant in the Bank of Montreal 
at Calgary. Since 1920 Mrs. Fred Best and Mrs. C. A. Ferguson have 
successfully conducted the Model Millinery Store in Cardston. The May 
family are consistent members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter- 
day Saints. 

Although Mr. May devoted the greater part of his time and attention 
to farming and stock raising he was an active worker in the Church of 
Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and was holding the office of high priest 
at the time of his demise. He served as bishop's councilor at Calls Fort, 
Utah, and also filled a mission in the eastern states. 



SALTON McGIBBON, M. D. 

As a specialist in diseases pertaining to the eye, ear, nose and throat 
Dr. Salton McGibbon has built up an enviable reputation and during the 
period of his residence in Edmonton he has gained a large practice in 
recognition of his professional ability. He was born in Arkona, Ontario, 
in 1878, and is of Scotch lineage in both the paternal and maternal lines. 
His father, Donald McGibbon, was born in the town of Killin, Perthshire, 




SALTON McGIBBON, M. D. 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 183 

Scotland, in 1832 and when he was but fourteen months old was taken by 
his parents to Canada. He was married in Ontario to Isabella Cameron, 
of Scotch parentage. Her death occurred in 1908, while he passed away 
in 1921, when he had reached the advanced age of eighty-nine years. 

Salton McGibbon acquired his medical training in McGill University 
at Montreal, Quebec, from which he was graduated in 1902. He spent 
the years 1912 and 1913 abroad in perfecting his professional knowledge, 
studying diseases of the eye, ear, nose and throat. He was in Vienna, 
Austria, the greater part of the time, and the balance of it was spent in 
London, England, and Berlin, Germany. Previous to that time he was 
engaged in hospital work in Mexico. He returned to Canada on Decem- 
ber 25, 1913, locating in Edmonton, where he has since limited his prac- 
tice to those branches of medical science in which he specializes, and 
his professional activities have been rewarded by well merited success, 
for he is very skillful and conscientious in his work. 

While pursuing his studies in Vienna, Dr. McGibbon was married, in 
1913, to Miss Berta Gottlieb and they have become the parents of a 
son, Ralph Wilfred, whose birth occurred in 1914. Dr. McGibbon is an 
adherent of the Presbyterian church and in politics he reserves the right 
to vote independently, standing for all that is most progressive in mat- 
ters of citizenship. Fraternally he is identified with the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows and the Manchester Unity Order of Odd Fellows 
and his professional connections are with the Edmonton Academy of 
Medicine and the Alberta Medical Association, He is constantly promot- 
ing his efficiency through study and investigation and his pronounced 
ability and high standards of personal honor have won him the respect 
of his professional associates and the confidence of the laity. 



GEORGE BLIGH O'CONNOR, K. C. 

George B. O'Connor has gained a position of distinction at the Edmon- 
ton bar and he enjoys in large measure the confidence and respect of 
his professional colleagues and associates. He was born at Walkerton, 
Ontario, in 1883, and his parents were Frederick S. and Maria I. (Ham- 
ilton) O'Connor, also natives of that province. Both are deceased, the 
former, passing away in 1901 and the latter in 1911. 

Reared in Walkerton, George Bligh O'Connor there attended the pub- 
lic high schools and afterward became a student at Osgoode Hall in To- 
ronto, Ontario, from which he was graduated in 1905, on the completion 
of a law course. In the same year he came to Edmonton, where he en- 
tered upon his professional career, becoming a member of the firm of 
Griesbach, O'Connor & Company, with which he has since been identified. 
In 1913 he was created King's Counsel, and in 1920 he was honored with 
the presidency of the Edmonton Bar Association, filling that office for a 



184 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

year. He also has business interests, being one of the directors of the 
Sterhng Coal Company. 

At Kingston, Ontario, on the 26th of October, 1913, Mr. O'Connor 
was married to Miss Hannah Margaret Fairlie, a daughter of Rev. John 
and Hannah Fairlie, the former a native of Scotland and now deceased. 
Mr. and Mrs. O'Connor are the parents of a daughter, Margaret Isabel, 
who was born September 12, 1915. Mr. O'Connor is a member of the 
Anglican church and is serving as one of the vestrymen of Christ church. 
He is a Master Mason and the nature of his recreation is indicated by 
his connection with the Edmonton Golf & Country Club, while his politi- 
cal support is given to the Liberal party. 



EUGENE E. CHANDLER. 

Eugene E. Chandler, clerk of the district court, is one of the leading 
citizens of Wetaskiwin. He was born in Vermont, on the 30th of October, 
1866, a son of Roswell Henry and Mary (Leland) Chandler, likewise 
natives of Vermont. Mr. Chandler, who was one of the most successful 
business men of his day, was a commission merchant and farmer in 
Vermont for some time and in 1879 removed to Kansas, where both he 
and his wife resided until death. Throughout his life the father was a 
stanch supporter of the republican party and the principles for which 
it stands, and he was a member of the Kansas legislature from 1892 to 
1896. Mr. and Mrs. Chandler were consistent members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. To their union six children were born, four of whom 
are living, Eugene E. whose name introduces this review, being the third 
in order of birth. One sister, Mamie, who is a music teacher and dress- 
maker, lives with Eugene E. 

In the acquirement of his education Eugene E. Chandler attended 
the public schools of Kansas and was graduated from high school in 
Janesville, Wisconsin, and also took a commercial course there. Later he 
learned telegraphy and he was active in that connection for the Santa 
Fe Railroad in Kansas until 1893, when he came to Wetaskiwin. After 
coming here he homesteaded and proved up on considerable land in this 
district and lived on it three years, at the end of which time he moved 
into Wetaskiwin, where he clerked in stores and did other odd jobs in 
order to make ends meet, until 1902, when he became farm instructor 
on the Hobbema Indian Reservation. In 1905 he accepted a clerkship 
in an implement house and after resigning that position he became a 
clerk in the Dominion Land Office, so serving until December, 1906. In 
1907 he was made assistant clerk of the supreme court, in 1912 he became 
acting district clerk, and clerk of the district court in 1917. He has 
since held this important office and is creditably discharging the many 
duties devolving upon him. When Mr. Chandler came to Wetaskiwin 
he had but fifteen cents to his name. The success which has crowned his 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 185 

efforts is the more creditable to him by reason of the fact that he started 
out in hfe empty-handed and by indomitable industry and unfaltering 
energy, worked his way upward to the position he now occupies among 
the prosperous and enterprising citizens of Wetaskiwin. 

In 1888 was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Chandler to Miss Lydia 
Kolb, a native of Ontario. To their union nine children have been born, 
eight of whom are living: Edwin is a newspaper man in Albany, Oregon; 
Roswell Herbert is clerking in a store in Wetaskiwin; Mildred is the wife 
of James A. Horn, who is in the milk business at Rocky Mountain House ; 
Levi is teaching school ; Richard is clerking in the Imperial Bank ; How- 
ard is clerking; and Victor and Stanley are students in the local schools. 

In his political views Mr. Chandler is a Liberal. He has always main- 
tained an active interest in party affairs and is well informed on all im- 
portant questions and issues of the day. Mr. Chandler was overseer of 
the village of Wetaskiwin from 1899 to 1902 and he was a member of the 
town council from 1905 to 1908. He is now serving as pohce magistrate. 
His religious faith is evidenced in his membership in the Methodist 
church and fraternally he is identified with the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows. He has passed through all of the chairs in the local lodge 
and has likewise held all chairs in the grand encampment. Mr. Chandler 
is a man of strong individuality and marked character and these qualities 
have been developed in him by his independent and self-reliant life. 



R. G. DOUGLAS, M. D. 



Through the past decade Dr. Roy G. Douglas has been engaged in 
the practice of medicine and surgery in Edmonton and has made steady 
advancement along the line of his chosen profession as he has demon- 
strated his skill and ability to cope with the intricate and involved prob- 
lems that are continually confronting the physician. He was born in 
Ontario, on the 2d of December, 1884, and his youthful experiences were 
those of the farm bred boy who divides his time between the work of 
the schoolroom, the pleasures of the playground and the duties assigned 
him by parental authority. A high school course supplemented his early 
training in the common branches of study, and after reviewing the broad 
field of business, with its limitless opportunities along the lines of agri- 
cultural, commercial, industrial and professional life, he determined to 
devote his attention to the practice of medicine. With this end in view 
he matriculated in Toronto University as a medical student and was 
graduated with the class of 1911. He afterward did postgraduate work 
and obtained valuable practical experience in Toronto hospitals for two 
years. 

The opportunities of the growing west attracted Dr. Douglas and in 
1913 he made his way to Edmonton, where he opened an office and has 
since engaged in general practice. Here he soon came into favor through 



186 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

his capability in the Hne of his chosen profession, and as the years have 
passed he has enjoyed a large and growing practice. 

Dr. Douglas belongs to the Presbyterian church and he is interested 
in many forces which make for the moral progress of the community 
and for the advancement of those activities which are a matter of civic 
virtue and of civic pride. He has little time for public work, however, and 
confines his attention to his profession. He belongs to both the Alberta 
and Canadian Medical Associations and thus keeps abreast with the trend 
of modern professional thought and progress. 



REV. R. LORNE McTAVISH. 

Rev. R. Lome McTavish, pastor of the McDougall Methodist church 
at Edmonton, accepted the call to his present charge in 1918 and has here 
since Hved and labored, doing splendid work in the further upbuilding 
of what was the first Protestant church of the city. A native of Ontario, 
he was born in Perth district, August 29, 1879, and is a son of Douglas 
and Annie (McGregor) McTavish, the latter a native of Scotland, while 
the father was born in Perth district, where their marriage was cele- 
brated. He was educated in the public schools of Perth district and in 
Toronto and became a successful teacher. He and his wife were members 
of the Presbyterian church in early life but after the death of his wife 
Mr. McTavish united with the Methodist church. He was also a member 
of the Home Circle and of the Royal Templars and in these associations 
were indicated the rules that governed his conduct and shaped his re- 
lations with his fellowmen. In politics he was a Liberal. His family num- 
bered eight children, six of whom are living. 

R. Lome McTavish, the youngest of five sons, acquired his early edu- 
cation in the public schools near his father's home and afterward attended 
Victory College at Toronto and also the Wesleyan College at Win- 
nipeg. In the latter institution he qualified for the work of the ministry 
and was ordained in 1905. Since that time he has devoted his attention 
to this holy calling and his labors have been far-reaching and resultant. 
Following his ordination he was appointed pastor of the Methodist church 
at Fort Frances, Ontario, where he continued his labors for a year and 
then accepted a call to St. John's Methodist Episcopal church at Norwood. 
He also served seven years as pastor of the Young church at Winnipeg 
and afterward filled the pastorate of Zion church at Moose Jaw, Sas- 
katchewan, where he remained for three years. On the expiration of 
that period he was assigned to the pastorate of the United church at 
Wolseley, Saskatchewan, there serving for a year and then filled the 
pulpit of the Fifth Avenue church at Medicine Hat, Alberta, for two 
years. He next came to Edmonton, arriving in 1918 and through the 
intervening period of five years he has been identified with the McDougall 
church, which was the first Protestant church established in Edmonton. 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 187 

The original house of worship was built in 1871 and since that time two 
other church edifices have been built, the congregation now having a 
most attractive church home. Under the guidance of Rev. Mr. McTavish 
the work of the church has been splendidly organized and is being car- 
ried steadily forward. There is a membership of between seven and 
eight hundred people and the church building has the largest seating 
capacity in the city. The auditorium is well filled at the various church 
services and Mr. McTavish is regarded as a most earnest, fluent and 
convincing speaker. He is also chairman of the western Edmonton dis- 
trict for the Methodist church and his work in that connection claims a 
considerable portion of his time, while his specific duties in his home 
church are many, making his life a very busy and useful one. He is re- 
garded as a strong factor in the moral progress and development of Ed- 
monton and the cause of Protestantism is making steady advancement 
under his leadership. 

In 1908 Mr. McTavish was married to Miss Eva Houston, who was 
born in Stratford, Ontario, and they have become parents of three 
daughters: Grace, Edith and Isabel, all now in school. In politics Mr. 
McTavish is an independent voter, supporting men and measures rather 
than party. He became a charter member of the Rotary Club at Medi- 
cine Hat and was elected vice president at its organization. He attended 
the national meeting of Rotarians as a delegate from his club at Kansas 
City and he is ever interested in projects promoted for the uplift of 
mankind and the benefit of the community at large. His indefatigable 
energy declines no call to labor or to service and his eff'orts have been 
highly resultant as an influential factor for moral progress in the lives 
of many. 



NORMAN R. BLUE. 



Although his connection with the Vegreville bar covers a compara- 
tively brief period, Norman R. Blue has already won a liberal clientele 
and his business in the courts is constantly increasing in volume and in 
importance. He was born in Chesley, Ontario, September 7, 1889, and 
more extended mention of his family is made in the biographical record 
of his brother, John Blue, which is published elsewhere in this work. 
He attended Owen Sound College and completed his professional training 
in the university at Edmonton, and in 1912 he began as a student of law 
at North Battleford, Saskatchewan, being at that time twenty-two years 
of age. He remained at that place for one and a half years and then 
came to this province, with the late A. G. Mackay, locating in Edmonton, 
where he resided from 1914 until 1918. The next ten months were spent 
in Mundare, Alberta, and in 1919 he removed to Vegreville, where he 
has since successfully followed his profession. He has been entrusted 
with important litigated interests and is devoted to the interests of his 



188 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

clients. He has a comprehensive knowledge of the principles of juris- 
prudence, which he correctly applies to the points in litigation, and his 
logical deductions constitute forceful elements in winning favorable ver- 
dicts. 

In 1919 Mr. Blue married Miss Anna B. MacLennan, a native of the 
province of Quebec. He has always been an indefatigable worker and 
an earnest student and is never content until he has mastered every 
detail of his cases. He has won an enviable degree of success, although 
he has not yet reached the zenith of his powers, and his ability and en- 
terprise will undoubtedly carry him steadily forward in his profession. 



JOHN M. MILLER. 



On the list of Calgary's public officials appears the name of John M. 
Miller, who for eleven years has served as city clerk, his long retention 
in the office being proof of his ability and the trust reposed in him by 
his fellow citizens. He was born in Winnipeg, Manitoba, February 3, 
1887, and is a son of Robert and Mary (Morton) Miller, natives of Scot- 
land. In 1886 they emigrated to Canada, establishing their home in 
Winnipeg, Manitoba, and the father entered the employ of the gas com- 
pany in the capacity of blacksmith, having followed that trade in Scot- 
land. He also served as engineer and recognition of his ability and fidelity 
came in his promotion to the position of manager. He remained with 
that corporation for several years but is now retired and he and his wife 
are living in Winnipeg. 

John M. Miller was reared and educated in his native city, attending 
the grammar and high schools and the Winnipeg Business College. After 
completing his course he became stenographer and bookkeeper in the 
office of the city clerk of Winnipeg, where he was employed from 1902 
until 1907, when he was appointed private secretary to the mayor. He 
ably discharged the duties of that position for four years and in Decem- 
ber, 1911, became city clerk of Calgary, in which capacity he has since 
been retained. His work is performed in an efficient and systematic man- 
ner and his services are very valuable to the public. 

In April, 1912, Mr. Miller was united in marriage to Miss Edna Thomp- 
son Buchan, a daughter of Alexander and Margaret (Smith) Buchan, 
natives of Scotland. In 1883 the father came to Canada, settling in Win- 
nipeg, Manitoba, where he has since resided, and for many years he has 
filled the office of district fire chief. Mr. Miller is a member of the Knox 
Presbyterian church and through his connection with the Calgary Curl- 
ing Club and the Municipal Golf Club he obtains needed recreation and 
diversion. Fraternally he is identified with Elks Lodge, No. 4, at Calgary, 
the Canadian Order of Foresters, and the Masonic order, belonging to 
Ashlar Lodge, No. 28, A. F. & A. M. He has always endeavored to dis- 
charge his duty according to the best of his ability and his advance- 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 189 

ment has been won through industry and merit. He stands for progress, 
reform and improvement in municipal affairs and has made a highly 
creditable record as a city official, exemplifying in his life the sterling 
characteristics of the Scotch race. 



WILLIAM E. BRYANS, M. D. 

Numbered among the alumni of Trinity Medical College of Toronto 
and further qualified for onerous and important professional duties by 
wide reading and scientific investigation, Dr. William E. Bryans is now 
successfully practicing as a member of the firm of Campbell, Roy, Bryans 
& Shillington at Lethbridge. The duties that devolve upon him he most 
conscientiously discharges and at all times he has held to the highest 
professional standards and ethics. 

William E. Bryans was born in Ontario, in 1878, and is a son of Ed- 
ward and Mary (Gallaher) Bryans. His grandfather in the paternal life 
was Edward Bryans, who came from County Fermanagh, Ireland, to 
the new world, settling in Ontario, where he followed the occupation of 
farming and reared his family. His son, Edward Bryans, was born 
in Fermanagh, in 1842, and he, too, turned to agricultural pursuits as a 
life work, retaining his residence in Ontario from the time of his arrival 
in the new world until his demise. He was there married in 1873 to 
Miss Mary Gallaher, who was born in Huron county, Ontario, in 1855, 
and is a daughter of John Gallaher, a native of Ireland, who settled in 
Ontario in pioneer times and there devoted his attention to the work of 
tilling the soil. Mrs. Bryans is still making her home in Ontario, but 
Mr. Bryans passed away in the year 1914, at the age of seventy-two. He 
was a member of the Anglican church and in politics was a Conservative, 
holding some local political offices. He served as a councilor for a number 
of years and at one time was a director of a fire insurance company for 
a considerable period. To him and his wife were born seven children. 

Dr. Bryans, the third in order of birth, pursued his education in the 
Listowel high school, from which he was graduated about 1897. He 
then took up the profession of teaching, which he followed for three 
years, but regarded this merely as an initial step to other professional 
labor, using teaching as a means of earning the money that would enable 
him to pursue his medical education. He entered Trinity Medical College 
at Toronto in 1902, and was graduated therefrom in 1906. He spent two 
years as interne in the Western Hospital at Toronto and thus gained 
that broad and valuable experience which can never be so quickly acquired 
in any other way as in hospital practice. Later he removed westward, 
taking up his abode in southern Alberta. He practiced at Carmangay 
for nine years and in 1918 came to Lethbridge, where he joined the 
firm of DeVeber, Campbell, Roy & Cragg. Following the retirement of 
the last named the firm became Campbell, Roy, Bryans & Shillington 



190 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

and in this connection Dr. Bryans continues in active practice, his service 
being of marked value and benefit to his fellowmen, by reason of his 
highly developed skill in his chosen calling. He has pursued three post- 
graduate courses, two in the Post Graduate School of New York and one 
in the Northwestern University at Chicago. He also studied for three 
months under Dr. J. B. Murphy, eminent surgeon of that city. He de- 
votes practically his entire time to his profession and his ability is pro- 
nounced. 

In 1913 Dr. Bryans was married to Miss Mabelle Shouldice, who was 
born at Owen Sound, Ontario, and they have become parents of one son, 
Manley, eight years of age, now in school. Dr. Bryans and his wife are 
members of the Methodist church and fraternally he is a Mason. He 
has filled all of the chairs in the lodge and is a past master and he also 
belongs to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. In politics he is a 
Conservative and while residing at Carmangay served as mayor. He 
belongs to the Chinook Club and is appreciative of the social amenities 
of life but concentrates his efforts and attention upon his professional 
interests and duties and his membership along strictly professional lines 
is with the Alberta Medical Association and the Canadian Medical Asso- 
ciation. He thus keeps abreast with the advanced thought and purposes 
of the profession and his colleagues and contemporaries in the practice of 
medicine and surgery, as well as the general public, attest his ability and 
his high standing as a physician and surgeon. 



FRANCIS STACY McCALL. 

Among the forces which are proving most effective in the intellectual 
and moral progress of Edmonton is the Alberta College North, of which 
Francis Stacy McCall is the principal. His equipment for the high service 
to which he has dedicated his life is most thorough and comprehensive 
and since his college days were over he has done most effective work in 
behalf of the uplift of his fellowmen through his teaching in both the 
schoolroom and the pulpit, bringing to those who have come under his 
influence a wider vision of effective service in the world's work. Mr. Mc- 
Call was iDorn at St. Williams, Ontario, May 10, 1881, and is a son of F. 
A. and Elizabeth (Killmaster) McCall, both of whom were natives of 
Ontario and the father is still living at St. Williams. He was a merchant 
and fruit man in early life. He is descended from Scotch ancestry, while 
his wife was of Pennsylvania Dutch lineage. He belongs to the United 
Empire Loyalist stock and his political allegiance has always been given 
to the Conservative party. He is an Orangeman and has long been a 
devoted member of the Methodist church. For a time he resided in the 
United States and during that period served as deputy clerk of Douglas 
county, Oregon. His business position for a time was that of fruit in- 
spector while a resident of Oregon. 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 191 

Francis Stacy McCall was the seventh in order of birth in a family 
of eight children, four of whom are living. He obtained his education 
in the public schools of St. Williams and also the high school at Port 
Rowan, while later he became a student in the Simcoe Model School for 
Teachers. He then took up the profession of teaching, which he followed 
for three years as principal of his home school and for two years he was 
a student in the Normal College at Ottawa. On the expiration of that 
period he secured the position of principal of the Port Rowan schools, 
where he remained for two years, after which he volunteered for mission 
work in northwestern Canada. He was stationed in southern Alberta 
at Macleod for a time, where he did real pioneer work. The country was 
then but sparsely settled, railroads were comparatively few and even 
wagon roads had not been developed to any great extent. He rode ten 
thousand miles on horseback through the territory, in which he con- 
tinued his missionary labors and his teachings were recognized as a 
strongly effective force for good in this frontier country. Later he re- 
turned east, going to Toronto, where he pursued a theological course in 
Victoria University. He then again came to the west as a teacher and 
was offered a position in the college at Edmonton. For a time he taught 
in Alberta College, attending college as a student in the morning sessions, 
while teaching through the afternoon period. He was the first student 
to register in the University of Alberta and was graduated with first class 
honors in English in the first class that completed the work of that in- 
stitution — the class of 1912, receiving the summa cum laude. He also 
won other honors during his university days in making a splendid record 
by his high scholarship. He afterward pursued a theological course, 
which he completed by graduation in 1913, winning the gold medal for 
his efficiency in the school work. He was then appointed principal of 
Alberta College North, in 1913, and has remained in this position con- 
tinuously, covering a full decade. The college has trebled in registration 
during this period and today there are thirty-five teachers under his 
leadership, while instruction is given in both public and high school 
courses, also in commercial courses and in music. High standards are 
being maintained in connection with the work of the school and Rev. Mr. 
McCall is actuated by advanced ideals in all of his work concerning the 
instruction of the young in preparation for life's practical and responsible 
duties. 

In 1914 Mr. McCall was married to Miss Olive Steele Todd, who was 
born in Meaford, Ontario, and there pursued her education in the public 
schools and in the Toronto Conservatory, while later she attended the 
Currie School of Expression at Boston, U. S. A., and became a teacher 
of expression in St. Hilda's College at Calgary. She is a lady of innate 
refinement and culture and has been of much assistance to her husband 
in his work. They have become parents of three children : Elsie, who is 
in school ; Hugh ; and Francis. 

Both parents are members of the Methodist church, in which Mr. 
McCall is now an ordained minister and throughout his educational work 



192 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

it has been his high purpose to train pupils not only along the lines of 
intellectual development but in those moral concepts which make for the 
growth of character as well. Fraternally he is a thirty-second degree 
Mason and also a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He 
was the first worthy patron of the Eastern Star in Edmonton chapter 
and belongs to the Edmonton Kiwanis Club, in connection with which he 
has served as lieutenant governor of the Western Canada district for two 
years. He was also a member of the library board for a year and presi- 
dent of the social service council for two years. His interest has always 
centered in those channels through which flow the greatest and most 
permanent good to the greatest number. He has sought every oppor- 
tunity to promote intellectual, cultural and moral progress and he has 
traveled quite extensively over the province in the interest of the college 
which he represents. He spent one summer at Crowsnest and there as- 
sisted in organizing Knox Methodist church, the first church of this name 
in the province of Alberta. A man of broad vision, actuated by high 
purposes, his labors have indeed been an eff'ective force in promoting 
intellectual and moral progress. What he has done represents the fit 
utilization of his innate powers and talents, wisely directed by high ideals. 



FATHER LOUIS C. WALRAVENS. 

One of the most popular and highly esteemed citizens of Wetaskiwin 
is Father Louis C. Walravens, who has had charge of the Sacred Heart 
church here since 1904. He was born in Antwerp, Belgium, on the 2d 
of February, 1870, a son of Francis and Phillipina (De Keersmaecker) 
Walravens, both natives of Belgium. The father was a commissioner and 
a leading and influential citizen of the community in which he resided. 
He achieved substantial success in life and retired in 1889. He passed 
away in 1905, and Mrs. Walravens is making her home in Antwerp. To 
their union five children were born, Louis C. Walravens of this review 
being the only member of the family living in Canada. 

The schools of Antwerp afforded Louis C. Walravens his early edu- 
cation and later he entered Notre Dame Jesuit College there. Upon the 
completion of a scientific course he enrolled in the theological department 
of Louvain University, from which institution he was graduated in 1895, 
having been ordained on the 28th of September, 1894. His first charge 
was the abbey of Grimberghen, Belgium, near Brussels, and for five years 
he remained there as lecturer on theology and philosophy. At the termina- 
tion of that time he became parish priest at Pont Brule, where he served 
from 1900 until July, 1904, when he came to Canada and on the 6th of 
August, 1904, he arrived in Wetaskiwin, and since that time has been in 
charge of the Sacred Heart church. He has a congregation consisting 
of seventy families and he is dearly beloved by them. He has a separate 
school, taught by sisters who came to Wetaskiwin in 1910, the school hav- 




FATHER LOUIS C. WALRAVENS. 



(13) 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 195 

ing seven grades and an enrollment of some seventy pupils. Father Wal- 
ravens is probably the oldest priest, in point of service, in the province of 
Alberta. In 1911 he built a fine brick church in this city, and he still lec- 
tures from time to time in various cities in the province and is widely 
and prominently known. 

During the World war Father Walravens took an active part in the 
furtherance of all worthy causes. He is a man of high intellectual attain- 
ments and he takes a leading part in the musical circles of Wetaskiwin. 
He has attained the fourth degree in the Knights of Columbus. 



THOMAS LONGWORTH. 



Thomas Longworth is one of the leading and prosperous business men 
of Lethbridge. He was born in Chorley, Lancashire, England, on the 
20th of September, 1883, a son of Robert and Marguerite Alice (Morris) 
Longworth, also natives of England. The father has followed mining 
for many years in his native country. He is a consistent communicant 
of the Church of England and a member of the R. A. 0. B., L. 0. L., and 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows. To Mr. and Mrs. Longworth the 
following children were born : Thomas, the eldest of the family, is the 
subject of this review; Elijah L. is living in Montreal ; Flora is the wife of 
John Rothwell, who is connected with the Montreal shipyards; John is 
engaged in mining in Lethbridge. He is a veteran of the World war, 
having served with the Second Tunneling Company of Engineers. He 
was a prisoner of war from the 2d of June, 1916, until after the signing 
of the armistice; James served as a member of the Fourth and Fifth 
Battalions, Royal North Lancashires and was killed at Amiens, in Feb- 
ruary, 1918. He enlisted in England and served as a corporal; Robert 
enlisted in the Tenth Battalion, Royal North Lancashires in 1916. He 
was wounded in 1917 and confined in a hospital until the armistice was 
signed and he received his honorable discharge in 1920; Bella; and Lilly, 
who is living with her parents in England. 

Thomas Longworth attended school in his native community and like- 
wise became a student at the Exton Grammar school. After putting his 
textbooks aside he engaged in mining, which he followed until he left 
his native home in 1908, and went to Coal Creek, British Columbia. Soon 
after arriving in British Columbia he resumed mining and in 1910 started 
work at the Royal Collieries. Subsequently he removed to Commerce and 
was driver boss from 1912 to 1913. In the latter year he removed to 
Frank, Alberta, and in December, 1914, joined the Canadian Expedition- 
ary Forces. He was stationed at Medicine Hat until June, 1915, and then 
went overseas, remaining at Shorncliffe, England, until September, 1915, 
when he left for France. He was with the Second Battalion at Ypres in 
1916 and was gassed during that engagement, after which he was sent 
to England to a hospital and subsequently returned to Canada. In Jan- 



196 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

uary, 1917, he became superintendent of Mine Rescue Station, No. 1, at 
Lethbridge and he was active in that connection until 1919. At that time 
he was transferred to the employment department, where he is now 
serving. Since 1917 he has been president of the G. W. V. A. of Leth- 
bridge. In April, 1922, he was elected one of the advisory commissicciers 
of the city of Lethbridge, his term of service to expire in 1925. 

In 1907 Mr. Longworth was married to Miss Ellizebeth Alice Thral- 
fall, a native of Farrington, England. To their union one child has been 
born: Jack, whose birth occurred at the Royal Collieries, on the 18th of 
February, 1912. He is a student in the local schools. 

The family are consistent communicants of St. Mary's Parish at Leth- 
bridge. Mr. Longworth is affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, holding membership in Mizpah Lodge, No. 72; Lodge No. 1616, 
L. 0. L. of Lethbridge; and Moose Lodge, No. 379, of Lethbridge. Mr. 
Longworth is an intelligent and capable business man, of broad views 
and practical ideas, and is well informed on all current subjects. 



WILLIAM C. WOOD. 



William C. Wood, one of the well known and highly respected public 
officials of Calgary, is ably discharging the duties of city comptroller and 
for fourteen years has been the incumbent in that office. He is a native 
of the United States, his birth having occurred in Denver, Hancock 
county, Illinois, on the 10th of April, 1874, and his parents. Dr. Ezra B. 
and Martha Elizabeth (Thompson) Wood, were also natives of that state. 
The father was a successful physician and devoted his life to the practice 
of medicine. His death occurred at Carthage, Illinois, in 1877, and was 
caused by a kick from a horse. He is survived by the mother, who is now 
residing in Alberta. 

At the time of his father's death William C. Wood was but three years 
old and in 1880 his mother re-married, her second union being with Adam 
Simonton, an agriculturist. William C. Wood attended the public schools 
of Nebraska until he was eleven years of age and in 1885 went to western 
Kansas, where his stepfather operated a large ranch. After spending 
some time there he went to live with his uncle, Levi 0. Dodge, who w'as 
then serving as postmaster of Shickley, Nebraska, and attended high 
school at that place. He completed his high school course at Lawrence, 
Kansas, teaching school during vacation periods, and afterward entered 
the State University in that city, where he completed his course in 1896. 
In the same year he came to western Canada, joining his mother and 
stepfather, who were residing at Leduc, in central Alberta. There he 
taught school for two years, during 1897 and 1898, and he attended the 
normal school at Edmonton in 1898. He embarked in the grocery and 
drug business at Leduc but at the end of two years disposed of his in- 
terests in that town and opened a dry goods store in Edmonton, conduct- 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 197 

ing that enterprise for two years. He next removed to Strathcona, in 
the Stony Plain district of Alberta, and established a men's furnishing 
store, which he operated for two years. He then went to Fernie, British 
Columbia, and became the owner of a general store, which was destroyed 
by fire a year and a half later, and in 1903 he returned to Alberta. The 
next three years he spent as a traveling salesman, representing a cloth- 
ing house of Montreal, and from 1906 until 1909 he engaged in the real 
estate business in Calgary, also doing auditing. On July 1, 1909, he be- 
came assistant city assessor and on the 1st of July of the following year 
he was appointed city comptroller, which office he has since filled. In 
December, 1921, he became a chartered accountant and his ability in this 
line has been of great assistance to him in his work, which is promptly, 
systematically and accurately done. 

In 1898 Mr. Wood was united in marriage to Miss Victoria S. Douglas 
and they have three children: Ruby Youla, who is attending the Univer- 
sity of Alberta; Terence Douglas, a machinist; and Earl Wayne, who is 
engaged in teaching. Since February, 1922, Mr. Wood has been a member 
Ox the Alberta Society of Chartered Accountants. He is an adherent of 
the Knox Presbyterian church and his political support is given to the 
Liberal party. He is in the best sense of the word a self-made man. Self- 
reliance, a hopeful disposition, intelligence and ambition were his youth- 
ful patrimony and with these he has worked and won. Thoroughness, 
conscientiousness and devotion to duty are his outstanding characteristics 
and he is giving to the city efficient and faithful service. He regards a 
public office as a pubhc trust and no trust reposed in William C. Wood 
has ever been betrayed in the slightest degree. 



JOHN COLLISON, M. D. 



Dr. John CoUison, a leading representative of the medical fraternity 
at Red Deer, has here practiced his profession continuously for the past 
two decades and during the latter half of this period has specialized in 
ophthalmology, otology, rhinology and laryngology. He is also serving 
for the third term as mayor of the town, which under his leadership has 
made substantial progress along civic lines. His birth occurred at Dixon's 
Corners, Ontario, on the 2d of January, 1873, his parents being James 
and Katherine (McNulty) Collison, who were likewise natives of that 
province. John Collison, the paternal grandfather of Dr. Collison of this 
review, was of New England Loyalist stock and spent his life in Ontario, 
there taking up land in pioneer times. The maternal grandfather, a 
native of Ireland, also became a resident of Ontario at an early period 
in the development of that province. James Collison, the father of the 
Doctor, became a pioneer agriculturist of Ontario, where he still makes 
his home, being numbered among the prominent and influential citizens 
of his locahty. He served as president of the Board of Trade for thirty 



198 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

years and has also been reeve of the township of Matilda. His political 
support has always been given to the Conservative party, while his re- 
ligious faith is indicated by his membership in the Methodist church. His 
wife belonged to the Catholic church. They became the parents of five 
children, four of whom survive, namely: John, whose name introduces 
this review; H. M., a medical practitioner of Rugby, North Dakota; B. 
W., a practicing attorney of Banff, Alberta, who served as police magis- 
trate for some time ; and Nellie, who makes her home with her father. 

Dr. John Collison supplemented his preliminary education by a course 
of study in the high school at Iroquois, Ontario, and afterward followed 
the profession of teaching for three years, imparting readily and clearly 
to others the knowledge that he had acquired. He regarded this, how- 
ever, merely as an initial step to other professional labor and entered 
upon preparation for medical practice as a student in McGill University, 
which institution conferred upon him the degree of M. D. in 1901. Dur- 
ing the two succeeding years he was engaged in hospital work and in 
1903 he came west to Alberta, locating for practice at Red Deer, where 
he has remained throughout the intervening period of twenty years. 
After devoting his attention to the general practice of medicine and 
surgery for a decade he went abroad for postgraduate work in Vienna 
and London in 1913 and 1914, and since his return to Alberta has special- 
ized in the treatment of diseases of the eye, ear, nose and throat, in 
which branch of the profession he has displayed particular skill, as is 
attested by his extensive and gratifying patronage. 

In 1903 Dr. Collison was united in marriage to Miss Ella Beatty, who 
was born, reared and educated in Parry Sound, Ontario, and studied music 
and art in Toronto. They have become parents of a son, David Beatty, 
who is now a high school pupil. 

Dr. Collison is a Conservative in his political views and has been an 
active factor in affairs of local government. He has been a member of 
the city council for eight years and is now serving for the third term 
as mayor of Red Deer, giving to the city a most progressive and business- 
like administration that has brought about many needed reforms and 
improvements. In religious faith he is a Presbyterian and fraternally 
is a Scottish Rite Mason, being past master of his lodge. His life has 
been actuated by high principles in every relation and he enjoys the un- 
qualified confidence, respect and esteem of his professional brethren, as 
well as of the general public. 



JAMES STANLEY KIRKHAM. 

James Stanley Kirkham of Lethbridge, well known representative of 
the bar, was born July 21, 1888, in the city which is still his home, his 
parents being Thomas F. and Martha (Lougheed) Kirkham, both of 
whom were natives of Ontario. The father was a son of Thomas Kirk- 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 199 

ham, a native of England, whence he came to the new world and secured 
a homestead in Lanark county, Ontario, whereon he spent his remaining 
days. His father was also named Thomas Kirkham. The grandfather 
had a family of nine children, all of whom secured land in the neighbor- 
hood of the old homestead. The maternal grandfather of James S. Kirk- 
ham was James Lougheed, a native of Ireland, who on coming to the new 
world settled in Ontario and thence moved west to Manitoba, where he 
met death in a street car accident. 

Thomas F. Kirkham on leaving Ontario, journeyed by steamboat and 
ox cart to Manitoba, casting in his lot with the early settlers of that 
section of the country. He was a tinsmith by trade and at the age of 
twenty years was in charge of twenty men. He married Martha Loug- 
heed, at Winnipeg. In 1885 he took up his abode in Lethbridge, where 
he established a hardware store, occupying the first frame building that 
was erected on Third avenue. South. He worked for some time for other 
firms before he began business on his own account and he continued 
actively in the hardware trade until 1902, when he retired from business. 
He was one of the first men to buy irrigated land, making his first pur- 
chase of eighty acres at ten dollars per acre and later selling it for one 
hundred dollars per acre. He was very progressive in all that he under- 
took and won substantial success in the conduct of his business affairs 
and in the placing of his investments. There were but few white women 
in this district when Mrs. Kirkman arrived here and the family in the 
early days met all of the experiences and hardships of pioneer life. They 
lived to witness remarkable changes as the years passed by and at all 
times contributed their full share to the material, intellectual and moral 
growth of the community. Both parents were members of the Presby- 
terian church and Mrs. Kirkham still takes a very active part in its work. 
Mr. Kirkham was a member of the Knights of Pythias and of the Inde- 
pendent Order of Foresters and his entire life was actuated by high 
and honorable principles that made him a man whom to know was to 
respect and esteem. He served as a member of the school board and 
withheld his support from no plan or project which he believed would 
prove beneficial to the community at large. His death occurred in the 
year 1905. To him and his wife were born three children: Thomas Earl, 
who is assistant weights and measures inspector at Calgary ; J. Stanley 
and Norman Phillip. The last named was in the Canadian service as a 
member of the Eighty-second Regiment, was transferred to the One 
Hundred and Thirteenth and was afterward drafted for the One Hundred 
and Sixteenth. He was wounded at Vimy Ridge and lost the use of his 
right arm. He left the service with the rank of lieutenant and is now 
traveling for the Imperial Oil Company, making his home at Medicine 
Hat. 

Reared under the parental roof, J. Stanley Kirkham attended the 
public schools of Lethbridge and after putting aside his textbooks became 
a stenographer for the Bentley Company, with which he remained for 
three or four years. He studied law under W. S. Ball and was admitted 



200 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

to the bar in 1920, after which he remained with his former preceptor 
as a partner until September, 1921, when he opened an office independ- 
ently. He has made an excellent record during the comparatively brief 
period of his association with the bar and the thoroughness with which 
he undertakes every task promises well for the future. Already he has 
gained a good clientage and is making steady progress in his chosen call- 
ing. 

In 1911 Mr. Kirkham was married to Miss Jessie Florence Walton, 
who was born in Belleville, Ontario, a daughter of George A. and Hannah 
(Huffman) Walton, the former owner of a planing mill in Ontario. Mrs. 
Kirkham was educated in Belleville and by her marriage has become the 
mother of six children: Thomas Walton, James Stanley, Ruby Margaret, 
George Phillip, Donald Ewen and Phillips. Mr. and Mrs. Kirkham are 
members of the Presbyterian church and he also has membership with 
the Masonic fraternity and with the Lethbridge Golf Club and the Leth- 
bridge Curling Club. Of both of these clubs he has served as secretary 
for several years and president of the Golf Club in 1923, and he has 
always taken an active interest in manly outdoor sports. He allows 
nothing, however, to interfere with the faithful performance of his pro- 
fessional duties, and his close application, his thorough understanding of 
the principles of jurisprudence and his developing ability are gaining for 
him an enviable place among the younger representatives of the Leth- 
bridge bar. 



HARRY HAVELOCK ROBERTSON, K. C. 

For more than a quarter of a century Harry H. Robertson has en- 
gaged in the practice of law at Edmonton and his legal acumen and 
allegiance to high standards of personal honor have firmly established 
his position in professional circles of the city. A »native of Seaforth, 
Ontario, he was born in 1868, of the marriage of Walter S. and Harriett 
Rebecca (Doty) Robertson, the former of whom was born at Grand Lake, 
in the province of New Brunswick. They removed to Edmonton in 1883, 
and the mother is still residing here. The father's demise occurred in 
this city in 1915. 

In the acquirement of an education Harry H. Robertson attended the 
public schools of Edmonton and afterward took up the study of law in 
the offices of S. S. and H. C. Taylor, being admitted to the bar in 1895. 
He has since followed his profession in this city with gratifying success 
and in 1918 was made King's Counsel. He has a thorough knowledge of 
statute and precedent and is noted for the precision of his briefs, the logic 
of his arguments and his ability to cope with intricate and involved legal 
problems. His assiduous and unrelaxing attention to all the details of 
his cases and the careful regard evinced for the interests of his clients, 
have brought him much practice and made him very successful in its 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 201 

conduct. He also has important business connections and is interested in 
many of the city's leading commercial enterprises. 

At Gretna, Manitoba, in July, 1901, Mr. Robertson was married to 
Miss Margaret Helen Winkler and they have become the parents of six 
children: Margaret Harriett, Scott, Jean Alice, MacRobertson, Harry H., 
Jr., and Nell May. Mr. Robertson is a member of the Presbyterian church 
and in politics he is independent, reserving the right to vote according to 
the dictates of his judgment. He spends much of his leisure in the open 
and is keenly interested in all sports. He is a Mason and is also identified 
with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and the Edmonton Club. 
He has never been content with mediocrity, but holding to high ideals, he 
has steadily worked his way upward to a position of prominence in a 
profession which calls for superior ability and requires constant applica- 
tion, good judgment and an ever widening comprehension of the relations 
and responsibilities which go to make up civilized society. 



WILLIAM GEORGE NIBLOCK. 

William George Niblock, collector of customs at Medicine Hat, was 
born in York county, province of Ontario, March 16, 1860, and is a son 
of James and Hannah (Webster) Niblock. The father, who was born in 
Ireland, in 1815, passed away in 1912, while the mother, whose birth oc- 
curred in Ontario county, province of Ontario, in 1816, died in the year 
1889. They were married in Ontario, where Mr. Niblock followed the oc- 
cupation of farming and they were still residents of that province when 
Mrs. Niblock passed away. The father afterward removed to Medicine 
Hat and later took up his abode at Fort William but subsequently returned 
to Medicine Hat, where his last days were passed. He was a member of 
the Presbyterian church and was an Orangeman, while his wife was a 
member of the Church of England. In politics he was a Conservative. In 
the family of Mr. and Mrs. Niblock were four children, two of whom are 
living: Lydia, now the wife of R. T. Herd, who is in the coal business at 
Aurora, Illinois ; and William George of this review. One son, John Nib- 
lock, came to Medicine Hat in 1887, and was superintendent with the 
Canadian Pacific Railroad here for a number of years. He left Medicine 
Hat, however, in 1899, and resided in Calgary until 1910. His death oc- 
curred in Victoria, in 1914. 

Spending his youthful days under the parental roof William G. Nib- 
lock pursued his education in the schools of Park Hill, Ontario, and started 
out in life as a farmer. In 1881 he took up his abode in Winnipeg and was 
there employed in connection with construction work, driving a team for 
a year. He became a brakeman on the Canadian Pacific Railroad in 1882 
and thus spent ten months, at the end of which time he was promoted to 
the position of conductor and was thus employed until 1914. He was very 
active in labor circles while with the Canadian Pacific. In that year he 



202 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

became collector of customs at Medicine Hat and through the intervening 
period has occupied this position, to which he devotes his entire time and 
attention, so that the duties of the office are most faithfully, efficiently, 
promptly and capably performed. 

On the 16th of September, 1891, Mr, Niblock was married to Miss 
Sibyl Burns, who was born in Bowmanville, Durham county, province of 
Ontario, a daughter of William Burns, w'ho was a miller by occupation, 
and in 1880 removed to Manitoba, where he located on a farm, spending 
his remaining days there. Mr. and Mrs. Niblock have become parents of 
four children: Nora, at home; Webster, a barrister of Medicine Hat, who 
is practicing as a member of the firm of Laidlaw, Blanchard, Delf & 
Niblock, and who is also a veteran of the World war; Dorothy, who is 
engaged in teaching music; and Marjorie, a teacher in the public schools. 

The religious faith of the family is that of the Church of England and 
fraternally Mr. Niblock is a Knights Templar Mason. He has passed 
through all of the chairs of the chapter and of the commandery and is a 
most loyal and exemplary follower of the teachings of the craft. He like- 
wise belongs to the Orangemen and to the Railway Conductors and he was 
very active in the ranks of the Conservative party before accepting public 
office. For several years he was president of the Conservative Club and 
served on the city council and as a member of the school board. He has 
at all times discharged his public duty with marked capability and fidelity 
and his record as an official is most commendable. 



AMBROSE B. SINGLETON, M. D. 

No history of the medical fraternity in the Calgary district would be 
complete without mention of Dr. Ambrose B. Singleton, who in the eleven 
years of his practice in Calgary has proven effectively his unusual skill 
in his profession by the excellent results which have attended his labor. 
Dr. Singleton is also an agriculturist and stockman. He was born in 
Leeds district, Ontario, in 1870, a son of Thomas and Sarah (Henderson) 
Singleton, both natives of Ontario. The father died in 1913 and his widow 
survived him until the 1st of January, 1922. In early life the father en- 
gaged in the cheese business and was president of the cheese board at 
Brockville for a number of years. He was a man of splendid business 
ability and achieved substantial success in life. In his political views he 
was a Conservative and was very active in party aff'airs, being a dominant 
factor in the promotion of every movement for the benefit of the com- 
munity. Fraternally he was identified with the Masons and his religious 
faith was that of the Methodist church, of which Mrs. Singleton was also 
a consistent member. To them five children were born, three of whom 
are living, Ambrose B., whose name introduces this review, being the 
fourth in order of birth. 

In the acquirement of his early education Ambrose B. Singleton 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 203 

attended the public schools at Belleville and upon the completion of his 
literary education enrolled in the Medical College of Toronto, from which 
institution he was graduated in 1893. He immediately began practice in 
Leeds district and was located at Westport for some time. In 1912 he 
came to Calgary and he is enjoying an extensive and lucrative patronage. 
He has accomplished many excellent results and has become widely known 
as a skillful and able physician and surgeon. The Doctor is prominent 
in agricultural and stock raising circles. He bought a stock farm near 
Ogden, Alberta, a number of years ago and one of the main reasons for 
his removal to Calgary was that he might better superintend his interests 
there. The Doctor also owns a fourth interest in the Penn Mine at Ed- 
monton. 

On the 25th of March, 1895, Dr. Singleton was married to Miss Minnie 
Tabor, a native of Leeds district. To them two children have been born : 
Howard, who is working in the Penn Mine at Edmonton; and Fred, a 
student in the local schools. 

The religious faith of the family is that of the Methodist church. 
Fraternally the Doctor is identified with the Royal Arch Masons and in 
his political views he is a Conservative. Although he has never sought 
nor desired political preferment, he is essentially public-spirited and his 
aid can always be counted upon in the furtherance of any movement for 
the benefit of the community. 



FRED A. KEILLOR, M. D. 

Dr. Fred A. Keillor, a veteran of the World war, now practicing medi- 
cine and surgery in Edmonton, was born in Elgin district, Ontario, in 
1883, and is a son of Albro and Ada (Green) Keillor, who were also na- 
tives of Ontario, where they still reside. The father was for many years 
engaged in the manufacture of cheese and butter but is now living re- 
tired, enjoying in well earned rest the fruits of his former toil. The 
family numbered six sons and two daughters and with one exception all 
are living. A son, Sidney, was killed during the World war in the spring 
of 1918, while serving as a corporal on the western front. The parents 
are consistent members of the Methodist church and in politics Mr. Keil- 
lor has ever maintained an independent course, voting for men and meas- 
ures rather than for party. 

Fred A. Keillor, who was the second in order of birth in his father's 
family, pursued his education in the Dutton high school and in the West- 
ern University at London, Canada, from which he was graduated with the 
class of 1908. He then began the practice of his profession in Raymond, 
Alberta, and there remained for five years, proving his capability in find- 
ing correct solution for the intricate and involved problems which con- 
tinually confront the physician. He located in South Edmonton in 1913 
and devoted his attention to a growing practice here until June, 1915, 



204 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

when he went overseas as a member of the Royal Army Medical Corps. 
He was sent to the Dardanelles, but contracted typhoid fever and was in 
a hospital in Egypt for four months. In liilG he went to France, being 
on active duty there until 1917, when he returned home. He then served 
with the Canadian Army Medical Corps until after the signing of the 
armistice. His rank was that of captain and his military experiences were 
indeed varied and if extremely arduous were also interesting, taking 
him into various sections of the world. 

In 1909 Dr. Keillor was married to Miss Lillian Lyons, who was born 
in Ontario and pursued a high school education there. They have become 
parents of three children: Kathleen, twelve years of age, now in school; 
Lois, aged eight years, also in school; and Margaret, a little maiden of 
three summers. The religious faith of the parents is that of the Metho- 
dist church, both being consistent followers of its teachings and interested 
in its growth. Dr. Keillor is also a member of Acacia Lodge, A. F. & A. 
M., of South Edmonton and he is a past Noble Grand of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows. He is a loyal follower of the high purposes of the 
organization and is popular with his brethren of these fraternities. The 
only public office he has held is that of coroner of the Edmonton district. 
The major part of his time and attention has been given to his profes- 
sional interests and his efficiency has been promoted through his wise 
use of every opportunity to increase his knowledge. He has taken post- 
graduate work in New York, Chicago and in London, England, and he is 
a member of the local medical society, the Alberta Medical Association 
and the Canadian Medical Association. He continues in general practice, 
not confining his attention to any particular line, and does excellent work 
in all branches of the profession, for he is most careful in the diagnosis 
of his cases and seldom at fault in his judgment concerning the outcome 
of disease. 



GEORGE M. GIBSON, M. D. 

Since 1918 Dr. George M. Gibson has practiced medicine in Drum- 
heller and he enjoys an extensive and lucrative patronage. He was born 
in Perth, Ontario, on the 23d of November, 1874, a fon of William and 
Jeanette (Miller) Gibson, both natives of Ontario. The father engaged 
in farming for many years but is now retired, and he and his wife are 
now living at Lacombe, Alberta, on land which he purchased in 1899. 
To their union nine children have been born : Helen, who is deceased, was 
the wife of Dr. Gibson of North Dakota ; John, who is a machinist of 
Saskatchewan ; Dr. Gibson, whose name introduces this review ; Murray ; 
Marguerite, who is living at home ; Robert, who is farming near Lacombe ; 
Harold, who is prosecutor for the Crown at Fort Saskatchewan ; Jeanette, 
the wife of Dr. Robert Little, Vv^ho is practicing at Veteran, Alberta; 
and Bertram, who served three years with the Canadian troops in Europe 




GEORGE M. GIBSON, M. D. 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 207 

during the World war and is now with the Soldiers' Civil Reestablishment 
of Edmonton. Murray enlisted at Calgary upon the outbreak of the 
World war and trained in England with the One Hundred and Ninety- 
fourth Battalion. He was active in the second attack on Vimy Ridge and 
met his death at Passchendaele. Mr. and Mrs. Gibson are consistent 
communicants of the Presbyterian church and are held in high confidence 
and esteem by all who know them. 

George M. Gibson received his education in the public schools of 
Perth, Ontario, and spent some time in the Collegiate Institutes at Perth 
and Renfrew. After putting his textbooks aside he established five fac- 
tories in Renfrew district for the manufacture of cheese and operated 
them with substantial success for a time. His earliest ambition, however, 
was to enter the medical profession and subsequently he enrolled in Queen's 
University of Medicine and was graduated in 1910, with the M. D. degree. 
He immediately came to Alberta and located at Munson, where he opened 
an office and practiced until 1918, when he came to Drumheller, and has 
since here engaged in general practice and minor surgery, enjoying an 
extensive and representative patronage. He ranks high among the fore- 
most physicians and surgeons of this province. Dr. Gibson was one of 
the organizers of the Gibson Collieries and he has other interests of an 
important nature. 

On September 17, 1902, was celebrated the marriage of Dr. Gibson to 
Miss Ida Marjorie McNab, a native of Glengarry, Ontario, the ceremony 
being performed in Douglas, Ontario. To their union four children have 
been born : Alexander Murray, Donald Campbell, Marjorie Elizabeth, 
and George Gordon. 

Although Dr. Gibson has had little time to devote to political affairs, 
he is essentially public-spirited and is never too busy to give his aid in 
the furtherance of any movement for the development of the community. 
Fraternally he is identified with the Masons, holding membership in the 
lodge of Perfection at Calgary and in the local blue lodge and he has 
attained the fourteenth degree in the Scottish Rite. He is also affiliated 
with the Knights of Pythias, holding membership in its local lodge. His 
religious faith is that of the Presbyterian church. For some time Dr. 
Gibson served on the board of management of Drumheller and he is now 
coroner. He has the genius for making and keeping friends and his 
sterling character and true personal worth have won for him the con- 
fidence and esteem of all with whom he associates. 



W. J. HUNTINGFORD. 



One of the most successful and prominently known newspaper men in 
the province of Alberta is W. J. Huntingford, editor and publisher of the 
Wainwright Star. He was born i»n North Wales, on the 24th of March, 
1874. His parents are deceased. 



208 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

For some thirty-two years Mr. Huntingford has engaged in newspaper 
work in the provinces of Alberta and Saskatchewan. He founded the 
Biggar (Saskatchewan) Independent in 1913 and sold it the latter part of 
the same year, realizing substantial profit on the transaction. In 1913 he 
also established the Lloydminster Review, in Alberta, and disposed of that 
sheet in August, 1914. After his discharge from the army in 1916 he 
located in Wainwright and was manager of the Wainwright Star until he 
purchased it in 1920. He has been very successful in the conduct of this 
sheet, which was founded in 1907 by a Mr. Cummer. The circulation of 
the paper was then some four hundred copies a week. It now covers a 
home territory of some forty by sixty miles, and the average circulation 
of the paper is close to eighteen hundred copies. Mr. Hunting-ford also 
does an extensive book, job and commercial printing business, acid is one 
of the best known publishers in this province. Aside from his newspaper 
connection he is secretary and treasurer of the Alberta Royalty Holding 
Company. 

Mr. Huntingford has had an enviable war record. Originally a reserve 
officer in the British army, he served with distinction throughout the 
South African war and he was in active service during the World w^ar 
from 1914 to 1916. 

On the 23d of August, 1913, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Hunt- 
ingford to Miss Nellie May Isteed and to their union a son has been born. 
Mr. Huntingford has always given his political allegiance to the Liberal 
party and he maintains an active interest in party affairs. He is chairman 
of the finance commission of the town council and has been a dominant 
factor in the promotion of many movements for the benefit of the com- 
munity at large. The religious faith of Mr. Huntingford is manifest in his 
membership in St. Andrew's Presbyterian church, where he is con- 
ductor of the choir. Fraternally he is identified with the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, being an officer of the Grand Lodge of that order 
in Alberta. Along strictly business lines he is identified with the Alberta 
Press Association and was for three years president of that organization. 
He is a director in the C. W. N. A. Both as a business man and as a 
private citizen Mr. Huntingford is held in high regard by his neighbors 
and fellow townsmen. 



RIGHT REV. CLEMENT HOYLER. 

Right Rev. Clement Hoyler, bishop of the Moravian church in western 
Canada, has lived in Edmonton since 1914, but for more than twenty 
years previous had devoted his labors to upbuilding the cause of Christian- 
ity among men, having been ordained to the ministry in 1892. He was 
then a young man of twenty years, his birth having occurred in Laketown, 
Carver county, Minnesota, on the 12th of May, 1872, his parents being 
Jacob and Emily (Ruepprecht) Hoyler, both of whom were natives of 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 209 

Germany, but crossed the Atlantic to the United States in young manhood 
and womanhood. They became residents of New Jersey, in which state 
they were married and in 1868 they removed westward to Minnesota. 
The father was a missionary in the east, laboring for a time as city mis- 
sionary in Philadelphia and after his removal to the west he took charge 
of the Moravian church, first as an unordained minister, while in 1873 
he was ordained. He devoted his remaining days to the work of the min- 
istry, passing away in 1890, near Watertown, Wisconsin. He had taught 
school for two years during the early period of his residence in Minnesota 
and thus he was closely associated with the intellectual and moral progress 
of that state. His political allegiance was given to the republican party. 
To him and his wife, who died in 1923, near Philadelphia, at the age of 
eighty-eight years, were born four children, three of whom are living, 
Bishop Hoyler being the youngest; Emanuel G., the eldest, is now a busi- 
'ness man of Philadelphia and is also interested in the operation of a stone 
quarry at Ferkasie, Pennsylvania; Elizabeth, the second of the family, 
is the wife of the Rev. WiUiam Strohmeier, a retired minister of the 
Moravian church, living at Coopersburg, Pennsylvania. 

Clement Hoyler pursued his early education in the public schools of 
Watertown, Wisconsin, where his father was stationed as a preacher of the 
gospel for twelve years. Later he attended the Lutheran College at Water- 
town, Wisconsin, for a year and on the expiration of that period entered 
the Moravian College at Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, in 1886. He completed 
a course in the Theological Seminary at Bethlehem as a graduate of the 
class of 1892 and was ordained to the ministry when but twenty years of 
age. For three years he occupied the pastorate of the Moravian church 
at Elizabeth, New Jersey, and was then called to Canada to take charge 
of the mission near Edmonton. This was in January, 1896. He remained 
in the country until the summer of 1909 and then went to Dundurn, 
Saskatchewan, where he continued his pastoral labors for five years. He 
was next sent as a delegate to Herrnhut, Saxony, Germany, to represent 
his church in the synod, which is held ccily every ten j^ears, it being the 
general synod of the Moravian church of the world. The meeting was 
held in 1914 and following its conclusion Bishop Hoyler came to South 
Edmonton, where he arrived in the month of August. He had been con- 
secrated a bishop in Lititz, Pennsylvania, on the 13th of September, 1908, 
and he assumed charge of the bishopric of the Moravian church in Alberta 
and Saskatchewan, at the same time acting as pastor of the local church 
at South Edmonton. With unfaltering zeal and courage he is laboring 
for the upbuilding of the cause and m all lines of church work has taken a 
most helpful and effective interest. He is now on the executive board 
of the Bible Society in Edmonton and the North Alberta Auxiliary. 

In August, 1902, Bishop Hoyler was united in marriage to Miss Mary 
C. Gersden, who was born in Laketown, Minnesota, a daughter of Henry 
Gerdsen, one of the pioneer settlers of that section, where he followed 
farming and fruit growing. He became prominently known as an apple 
raiser of that district, in which he located in 1858. He lived there through 
(14) 



210 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

the period of Indian trouble and aided in reclaiming the region for the 
purposes of civilization. To Bishop Hoyler and his wife have been born 
two children: Cyril N., eighteen years of age, is a graduate of the Ed- 
monton Normal School and now a teacher; and Mabel, who is in school. 

Bishop Hoyler is a Liberal in his political views but has had no time 
nor inclination to take active part in politics, his church work making 
full demand upon his attention and his energy. Earnest and forceful, his 
utterances ofttimes carry conviction to the mind of his hearers and his 
teaching has been a far-reaching influence in the moral growth of the 
province. During the earlier years of his residence in Canada he fre- 
quently was called on to assist the Moravian colonists in Alberta in select- 
ing their homesteads, establishing new settlements and post offices, 
organizing school districts and congregations, building churches and par- 
sonages and in a general way acting as their counselor and adviser in 
secular as well as spiritual matters. At the same time he found oppor- 
tunity to devote some time to the study of the natural history of Alberta 
and has made interesting and valuable collections of the plants and insects 
of the Edmonton district. 



HAROLD HARGREAVES. 

Harold Hargreaves, the efficient postmaster of Calgary, has been con- 
nected with this department of the Canadian government fo^ two decades, 
and starting at the bottom of the ladder, he has climbed steadily upward 
through hard work and faithful service. He was born at Bacup, Lanca- 
shire, England, in 1880, a son of George and Elizabeth (Ashworth) Har- 
greaves, also natives of the mother country. George Hargreaves was 
manager of a mill at Bacup, devoting his life to that line of activity, and 
his father was an expert weaver, operating four hand looms at the same 
time. 

Harold Hargreaves was reared in Bacup, England, and when ten years 
of age began working in a cotton mill, in which he spent the morning 
hours, attending school in the afternoon. His time was thus occupied 
until he reached the age of thirteen, when he became a pupil in a technical 
school, in which he applied himself to learning cotton spinning and weaving 
and also shorthand, typewriting and bookkeeping. He was an earnest 
and industrious student and spent many hours with his books, often con- 
tinuing his efforts until three o'clock in the morning. He obtained a 
position as stenographer with Hampton Brothers, accountants with offices 
at Buxton, and six months later severed his connection with that firm to 
became bookkeeper at the Regent mill in Rochdale, Lancashire, England, 
where he remained for a year. He next entered the employ of Bentham 
Brothers, wholesale grocers of Bacup, and later migrated to the States, 
arriving in New Bedford, Massachusetts, in December, 1901. For a year 
he worked in a cotton mill in that city and then crossed the border into 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 211 

Canada, going first to Valley Field, Quebec, but left there at the end of 
two months. In 1902 he joined the postal service at Vancouver, British 
Columbia, as relief letter carrier, the lowest position in the department. 
He soon proved his worth and ability and as his experience increased he 
was entrusted with more important duties, at length becoming supervisor 
of city mail delivery and subsequently supervisor of mails despatch. He 
was retained in that capacity until November, 1919, when he was trans- 
ferred to Calgary as assistant postmaster, and on April 1, 1921, he received 
his present appointment. He obtained his training under F. E. Harrison, 
who was Calgary's first postmaster and is now at the head of the Van- 
couver office. He also worked under R. G. Macpherson, late postmaster of 
Vancouver, and has been connected with almost every department in the 
post office since he entered the service, being therefore thoroughly familiar 
with its functions. He has two hundred and forty employes under his jur- 
isdiction and since assuming office he has thoroughly reorganized the post 
office, instituting new systems in the city delivery and also in the dispatch 
and registration departments, which have greatly facilitated the handling 
of the mails in this city. He is a very capable executive and has secured 
splendid results within a short space of time, bringing his office up to a 
standard of efficiency equalled by few and unsurpassed by any in the 
Dominion. 

On August 4, 1900, Mr. Hargreaves was united in marriage to Miss 
Elizabeth Gregory and they have four children: Harold Frederick, who 
is eighteen years of age and is employed as clerk in the Calgary Ba»nk of 
Commerce ; Alice May and George, aged, respectively, twelve and six years ; 
and Florence Elizabeth, who is but a few months old. Mr. Hargreaves 
possesses musical talent and is a violinist in the orchestra of the local 
branch of the Young Men's Christian Association. His religious views 
are in accord with the doctrines and teachings of the Baptist church, of 
which he is an earnest and sincere member. From his earliest boyhood 
he has given evidence of the possession of those sterling traits of industry 
and perseverance which in the long run spell success and is recognized 
as a man of substantial worth, honor and integrity being the keynote of 
his character. He is making a notable record in the field of public service 
and the worth of his work is widely acknowledged. 



GEORGE E. HAYWARD. 



There is perhaps no record in this volume that more clearly typifies 
the spirit of the west and exemplifies the growth and progress of this 
section of the Dominion, than does that of George E. Hayward, the presi- 
dent and general manager of the Hayward Lumber Company, which is 
operating plants throughout Alberta and has extended its operations as 
far west as the Pacific coast, but makes its headquarters at Edmonton. 
To this city George E. Hayward came in 1905, when a young man of 



212 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

twenty-three years, his birth having occurred at Fredericton, New Bruns- 
wick, April 26, 1882. He was reared on a farm in that vicinity and there 
completed his education in the public schools. When a youth of eighteen 
he left his native place and made his way westward to Manitoba, where he 
was associated with the Hanbury Manufacturing Company. Later he was 
transferred to a branch business in British Columbia, where he remained 
until 1905, and then came to Edmonton and established his present busi- 
ness, which has grown steadily from a small beginning to one of mammoth 
proportions. The enterprise was founded in 1905, when at Vermilion, 
Alberta, Mr. Hayward began selling lumber from a tent. Thus he con- 
tinued his sales for eight months, at the end of which time he had so 
prospered as to be financially able to erect a frame structure. With the 
growth and settlement of the west he advanced his business in keeping 
with the spirit of the times, studying the needs and demands of the pub- 
lic and so arranging, directing and managing at all times that he was able 
to meet these demands and give to his patrons the kind and amount of 
lumber and building material which they desired. Steadily the business 
grew and developed, until today the company is operating branch yards 
throughout Alberta. The parent plant is at Edmonton, and it is one of 
the most modern and best equipped lumber manufacturing plants of the 
west. 

Back of the success of the undertaking stand the indefatigable 
efforts, the close application, the determined purpose and the broad busi- 
ness vision of Mr. Hayward and his associates. From the beginning he 
recognized the fact that satisfied patrons are the best advertisement and 
he put forth every effort to please his customers through prompt service 
and thorough reliability. The name of Hayward has been a guaranty of 
an adequate return for money invested and at all times the company 
methods have measured up to the highest commercial ethics. Quality 
and service became the slogan of the company and upon this foundation 
the success of the undertaking has been built. With the steady trend of 
emigration westward and the continuous growth of the towns and the 
provinces the Hayward Lumber Company has been able to meet the pub- 
lic demand for building material by extending its branches and keeping 
in advance of the growing settlement. In 1915 what was known as the 
old plant at Edmonton was purchased from the oflficial assignee of the 
Northern Lumber Company, which concern was in liquidation. Following 
this in the spring of 1916 the head office was removed from Vermilion to 
Edmonton, where better facilities were offered for the development and 
extension of the business. Due to a tremendous increase in trade, it was 
found, in 1919, that with the facilities at hand it was impossible to meet 
the demands and the company decided to erect a larger plant. With this 
idea in view an entire block adjoining the old property was purchased and 
additional siding accommodations were arranged for with the railroad 
company. Early in May, 1920, a fine new pressed brick building was be- 
gun, the main structure being two stories in height and one hundred and 
sixty-two by sixty-six feet in dimensions. It is of pressed brick with steel 
sash, wired window glass and fireproof doors. The building is steam- 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 213 

heated, supplied with the most modern plumbing and all facilities to pro- 
mote sanitation and to render the structure as fireproof as possible, thus 
creating a large saving in the way of the insurance premium. The equip- 
ment of the plant is strictly modern in every particular and all of the 
drive is overhead, which makes for the convenience and safety of the 
workers. The entire plant is operated by electricity, with individual 
motors supplying energy for each machine and a suction system is con- 
nected with each unit. This is operated by a sixty horsepower motor 
and is effective in keeping the machines and the building clear of sawdust 
and shavings, which are later elevated to the top of the building, the air 
extracted and the material fed to the boilers, which supply the necessary 
heat for the drying kilns. A noteworthy feature of the factory is that 
it is flooded with light from windows on all sides, making much better 
working conditions, resulting in the highest standard in the production 
of the company's product. There is a complete saw-filing and machine 
room, in which all necessary repairs and alterations are made on the 
numerous machines and the saws are filed and kept in excellent condi- 
tion. There are also large rooms devoted to the manufacture of wooden- 
ware of various kinds turned out by the Hayward Lumber Company, 
and there are separate departments for glazing, glueing and erecting, 
as well as the glass and packing rooms. Sash, doors and all interior fin- 
ish are being turned out in large quantities and the business is steadily 
growing, its sales extending throughout the northern portions of the 
province. The plant is equipped for making all class of mill work, store 
fixtures and office equipment, including special house and office cabinets. 
In addition, building suppHes are also handled and every requisite for a 
building can be obtained from the Hayward Company, from the interior 
finish to the paint for the exterior. A patron could say, "Send me every- 
thing for a house", and the order could be filled. The hum of industry is 
constantly heard in this great plant, where the work is carried on unin- 
terruptedly through every week-day. The saws, framing machines, plan- 
ers, stickers, boring machines and lathes occupy most of the main floor, 
the machines being footed in concrete. On the same floor there is also a 
modern lunch room for the accommodation of employes. On the second 
floor, which is especially constructed for strength, with laminated floor- 
ing, are saws, shapers, tenoners, stickers, panel raisers, band saws, 
clamps, triple drums, sanders, planters, ripsaws, trimming saws and 
joiners. There are specially fitted benches on this floor, on which a flood 
of daylight falls, so that the most intricate fitting can be accomplished 
under natural conditions. An electric elevator is operated between the 
two floors, this being of sufficient capacity to handle loads of lumber in 
full length. The power house is constructed of solid brick and concrete, 
fitted with a fireproof shavings vault, sixteen by thirty feet, with a depth 
of twenty-six feet. By the utilization of the shavings for fuel the com- 
pany is able to operate large drying kilns at a low cost. These kilns are 
of the most modern construction of any west of Winnipeg, being known as 
the Grand Rapids dry kiln and by the use thereof the company is able to 



214 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

guarantee any special order to be free from shrinkage, checking, etc. It 
also enables the company to turn out showcases, store fixtures, etc., which 
are equal to any imported from eastern manufacturers. The old factory 
building is now being used for storage and warehouse purposes, the lum- 
ber being there kept out of the weather and ready for immediate use. 

In addition to the city business and the trade handled by the different 
yards of the company in various parts of the province, an extensive whole- 
sale business has been built up and from this modern manufacturing plant 
are shipped orders as far west as British Columbia and as far east as the 
Saskatchewan border, while to the south the company's trade extends to 
Calgary and to the north as far as settlement has been made. The com- 
pany issues a large catalog and also a series of illustrated plan books, out- 
lining desigTis for dwellings and farm buildings. In addition to furnishing 
plans for city and farm homes the Hayward Lumber Company studies 
the needs of the dairy industry and the opportunities for development 
along that line, and is now handling a new form of silo, which insures 
soft food for the milk producers the year around. This silo is built par- 
ticularly to meet the requirements of the northern climate. Thus through 
the efforts, enterprise and ambition of George E, Hayward and his asso- 
ciates has been built up one of the largest productive industries of Al- 
berta, constituting a forceful factor in the development of Edmonton, as 
well as a source of gratifying profit to the stockholders. 

While his business interests make heavy demands upon his time and 
energy Mr. Hayward has always found opportunity to cooperate in public 
affairs that are of vital importance to the community and his aid and in- 
fluence are always on the side of progress and improvement. He is a 
Knights Templar Mason and member of the Mystic Shrine, having long 
consistently followed the teachings and purposes of the craft. He is also 
a member of the Board of Trade council. He belongs to the Baptist 
church, in which he is serving as chairman of the finance board. He is 
likewise a member of the Kiwanis Club and is a director of the Y. M. C. A, 
and chairman of its finance board. He is also a member of the Edmon- 
ton Golf and Country Club. The interests and activities of his life are well 
balanced and have brought him prominently to the front, not only as a 
leader in business circles but as a supporter of all those forces which 
make for advancement and improvement in his city and province. 



WILLIAM J. JACKSON. 



Industrial activity at Edmonton finds a substantial and prominent rep- 
resentative in William J. Jackson of the firm of Jackson Brothers, pro- 
prietors of the Edmonton Foundry. A life of activity and enterprise has 
brought him steadily forward a»nd his business record is now written 
in the tenns of success. A native of Ontario, he was born at Lucan, in 
the district of Middlesex, in 1867, his parents being John and Sarah Jack- 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 215 

son, both of whom were natives of Ireland, where they were reared and 
married. Soon afterward they crossed the Atlantic to Canada, settling in 
Exeter, Ontario, where the father engaged in the foundry business, and 
was active along that line in Ontario throughout his remaining days. To 
him and his wife were born seven children, five of whom are living 
three being residents of South Edmonton. One of these is John Jackson, 
a partner in the firm of Jackson Brothers, foundrymen. He was born 
August 17, 1862, in Exeter, Ontario, was educated at Lucan and was 
married in Trenton, Ontario, December 21, 1893, to Loula Genevieve Lock- 
lin, by whom he has three children : John, who operates a filling station at 
Strathcona, was one of the first Canadian troopers to go to France and 
one of the last to be returned, serving with the Nineteenth Dragoons ; 
Watson, who is city traveler for the Motor Car Supply Company of Cana- 
da, Limited, was also in the overseas service as a member of the Two 
Hundred and Second Battalion, his duties demanding his stay in England 
throughout the period in which he was on European soil; and Genevieve, 
who is connected with the library of the Alberta University, has the 
Bachelor of Arts degree from that institution. John Jackson, the father 
of the three children above named, is a member of the Presbyterian 
church and is an Orangeman, while his political allegiance is given to the 
Conservative party. 

Anna, the second member of the family of John and Sarah Jackson, 
is now the wife of Harry Wilson, who was formerly a merchant and 
broker but is now living retired from business at South Edmonton; the 
third member of the family is William J., of this review. The parents 
were loyal and active members of the Presbyterian church and the father 
was also an exemplary follower of the teachings of Masonry. His political 
support was given to the Conservative party. 

William J. Jackson pursued his education in the schools of Lucan and 
started out in the business world as an employe in a store, in which he 
remained for a short time. He then entered his father's foundry and 
there learned the business in which he has since been engaged. He came 
to South Edmonton in 1894 and the same year established a foundry 
here that is today one of the oldest foundries in the province. Li this 
business he was associated with his brother, John Jackson, and the part- 
nership has continuously been maintained. They do all kinds of foundry 
work, having a splendidly equipped plant, and their patronage is today one 
of gratifying proportions. 

On the 9th of December, 1892, William J. Jackson was married to Miss 
Daisy Summerfield, of Toronto, and their family now numbers four chil- 
dren: Willie entered the service as a member of the One Hundred and 
Fifty-first Regiment and afterward served with the Seventy-eighth of 
Winnipeg. He was killed only a short time before the amiistice, meeting 
death in August, 1918. He had been very active in many engagements 
prior to the time when he was called upon to make the supreme sacrifice ; 
Annie is the wife of A. C. Tidsbury, a resident of Edmonton; and Mar- 
jorie is the wife of Ed Aseltine, also of Edmonton ; Joe is in school. 



216 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

Mr. Jackson greatly enjoys hunting and frequently goes on a trip into 
the forest for game. Since attaining his majority he has given his 
political support to the Conservative party. Fraternally he is a Mason 
and his religious faith is that of the Presbyterian church. His interest 
has always centered in those agencies which make for uplift and progress 
and in business he has directed his efforts along the lines of honor and in- 
defatigable energy to a point where prosperity in substantial measure is 
now his. Both brothers are widely known in South Edmonton, where 
their factory is located, and both are highly respected. 



GEORGE B. MACKAY. 



George B. Mackay is a capitalist of Lethbridge and many and varied 
are the business interests which at different times have claimed his atten- 
tion and energies. His plans have always been carefully formulated and 
promptly executed and he has carried forward to successful completion 
whatever he has undertaken. Moreover, his course has been guided by 
a laudable ambition and the intelligent direction of his labors has brought 
him to the goal of success. Born in Montreal, on the 9th of July, 1874, 
he is a son of Senator Robert and Janet (Baptist) Mackay. The father 
was a native of Wick, Scotland, born in 1839, and his death occurred in 
1916. He was a son of Robert Mackay, a native of Scotland, in which 
country he spent his life, following the occupation of farming. It was 
at Three Rivers, Quebec, that Janet Baptist was born in 1850, her father 
being George Baptist, who was a millwright by trade and who established 
a lumber business at Three Rivers. He operated lumber mills all over 
that section of the country and by reason of his capably controlled busi- 
ness affairs had become very wealthy ere his demise. It was his daughter 
Janet who in Three Rivers became the wife of Senator Robert Mackay. 
She was educated in Montreal and it was in that city that she met her 
future husband, Mr. Mackay there engaging in the wholesale dry goods 
business. He followed that trade for an extended period and his sound 
judgment and progressive methods were at all times manifest in the 
success that attended his undertakings. His wife died in the year 1912, 
while his death occurred in 1916. He had always been a Liberal in politics 
and he served as a member of the senate. He belonged to the Presbyterian 
church, as did his wife, and they had a family of nine children, five of 
whom are living. 

George B. Mackay was the third in order of birth and is the eldest 
among the survivors. He obtained his education through attendance at 
the John Williamsons School, a private institution of learning, and 
through two years' study in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
at Boston, Massachusetts. When his textbooks were put aside he secured 
employment in the Quebec Bank, where he remained for six years and 
was afterward associated with the firm of James W. Pyke & Company,. 



•jj.K««iK«>K»»s3Bfs^i©»i'»ra7»;!«'« 'i&nx-i '''<'iv^m'xmm':m>'<m.imm!9it 




GEORGE B. MACKAY. 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 219 

dealers in railway supplies, for a period of two years. In 1901 he en- 
tered the South African war and through that and the following year 
served with the army, holding the rank of lieutenant of the Second Ca- 
nadian Mounted Rifles. He participated in several engagements and was 
three times wounded. 

In January, 1903, Mr. Mackay arrived in Lethbridge and through the 
intervening period to the present time, covering two decades, has resided 
in this section of the Dominion. He spent one year on a ranch and then 
entered the employ of the Alberta Coal & Irrigation Company, with 
which he remained for seven years. He next bought an interest in the 
Western Canada Agency, now the Western Canada Hardware Company. 
This was in 1910 and he soon worked his way upward until he became the 
active head of the business and built up one of the largest wholesale 
hardware enterprises in western Canada and the south. He owns valu- 
able land and city property and also has property and business interests 
in Montreal. His judgment has been notably sound and his discrimina- 
tion keen and throughout his life he has displayed marked ability in co- 
ordinating seemingly diverse interests into a unified and harmonious 
whole. 

In 1906 Mr. Mackay was united in marriage to Miss Laura Higin- 
botham, who was born in Guelph, Ontario, a sister of J. D. Higinbotham, 
mentioned elsewhere in this work. Mr. and Mrs. Mackay have become 
parents of four children: Allan Oliver, now in school; Margaret Jean, 
Robert George and Helen Mary, who are also attending school. 

Mr. Mackay and his family are members of the Presbyterian church 
and he belongs to the Chinook Club and to the Montreal Hunt of Montreal. 
He likewise has membership with the United Commercial Travelers. In 
politics he is a Liberal and was president of the Liberal organization in 
Lethbridge for a time. He served on the school board for two years and 
the cause of education has ever found in him a stalwart champion. In 
many ways he has proven his loyalty to those interests which are vital to 
the community and its welfare and at the same time he has most wisely 
and carefully managed his business affairs and his investments until he 
stands today among the men qf affluence at Lethbridge. His life record 
should serve to inspire and encourage others, showing what can be ac- 
complished through individual effort when there is a will to dare and to do. 



ERNEST VICTOR ROBERTSON. 

The public and the profession accord Ernest V. Robertson a position 
of prominence in the ranks of the legal fraternity of Calgary and by close 
study and earnest effort he is constantly enlarging his field of usefulness. 
He was born at Saline, Fifeshire, Scotland, November 23, 1887, and his 
parents, Robert and Helen (Hoey) Robertson, were also natives of that 
country. The father was a successful educator and his life was devoted 



220 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

to the profession of teaching. His death occurred in December, 1918. 
The mother is now a resident of Calgary. 

After his graduation from the DunfermHne high school Ernest V. 
Robertson entered Edinburgh University and in 1911 completed a course 
in law in that noted educational institution. Believing that a newer coun- 
try would offer greater opportunities for advancement, he migrated to 
Canada and in 1911 arrived in the city of Toronto. For eighteen months 
he was identified with the firm of Beaty, Snow & Nasmith and then came 
to this province, choosing Calgary as the scene of his professional activ- 
ities. For six months he was associated with P. J. Nolan, K. C, now 
deceased, and has since practiced alone, opening an oflfice in the Herald 
building in February, 1913. He is thoroughly familiar with the principles 
of jurisprudence and a liberal clientele has been accorded him in recogni- 
tion of his legal acumen. He conducts his law practice with ability, 
carefully preparing his cases and presenting them with clearness and 
force. 

On October 23, 1918, Mr. Robertson was united in marriage to Miss 
Minnie J. Iredale and they have a son, John Maxwell, born January 1, 1920. 
In religious faith Mr. Robertson is a Presbyterian and his political views 
are in accord with the platform and principles of the Conservative party. 
He is a member of the Calgary and Canadian Bar Associations and the 
nature of his recreation is indicated by his connection with the Victoria 
Curling Club and the Calgary & Country Club. He has proven him- 
self an able advocate in the temple of justice, and while devoted to the 
interests of his clients, he never forgets that he owes a still higher alle- 
giance to the majesty of the law. 



WILLIAM G. WAY. 



William G. Way, secretary of the municipality, is engaged in ranching 
near Strathmore, in association with his son. He was born in Portland, 
England, on the 18th of February, 1865, a son of George B. and Emma 
(Power) Way, likewise natives of England. The father learaed contract- 
ing and building in young manhood and followed that line of work in 
England until 1871, when he came to Canada and located in Mitchell, 
Ontario. He engaged in contracting and building there until 1881, when 
he removed to Cartwright, Manitoba, and homesteaded some land. He has 
brought the land to a highly cultivated state and is now living there, at 
the age of eighty-four years. Mrs. Way died in 1875, when thirty-four 
years of age. To their union five children were born, William G. being the 
eldest. Mr. Way is a consistent member of the Methodist church and in 
politics he is a Liberal. He is a highly esteemed and respected citizen in 
the community in which he resides. 

In the acquirement of his education William G. Way attended the 
public schools of Mitchell, Ontario, and after putting his textbooks aside 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 221 

engaged in farming, later following the same occupation in Manitoba and 
for some time he served as justice of the peace at Cartwright. In 1905 
he went to Vancouver Island, British Columbia, continuing in agricultural 
pursuits, and specializing in dairying. In 1909 he came to Strathmore, 
Alberta, and purchased some barren prairie land in this vicinity, and also 
homesteaded a quarter section which he brought to a highly improved 
state. He owns today, in partnership with his son, seven hundred acres 
of fine land. They specialize in dairying, do general farming and raise 
Aberdeen and Angus cattle. Soon after coming to Strathmore Mr. Way 
identified himself with the pubhc life of the community and his genial and 
pleasing personality won for him many friends. Subsequently he was 
elected councilor of the local improvement district and upon the formation 
of the municipality in 1912, he was appointed secretary. He has since 
held this position and he is satisfactorily discharging the many duties 
devolving upcci him. 

Mr. Way has been twice married. His first wife was Ellen McKelvey, 
a native of Stratford, Ontario. Their marriage was celebrated in Cart- 
wright and to their union three children were born : Emma, wife of W. J. 
Welch, who is farming in British Columbia; Mabel, the wife of A. J. 
Newman, a farmer residing near Auburndale; and Clifford E., who is 
farming near Stratmore. Mrs. Way's demise occurred in 1902, when 
thirty-four years of age. She was a member of the Methodist church. 
Mr. Way's second marriage was to Miss Amelia Pratt, a native of Strat- 
ford, Ontario. To their union one son has been born, Percy, who is living 
at home. 

Mr. Way follows an independent course in politics, giving his support 
to the man he thinks best fitted for the office without regard to party 
principles. Fraternally he is identified with the Caciadian Order of For- 
esters and has held all chairs in that order. Thoroughness is one of the 
marked characteristics of Mr. Way and it has been a dominant factor in 
his continued success. He has seen the work of progress and development 
carried steadily forward and at all times has borne his part, especially 
alcng the line of agricultural improvement. His worth as a man and 
a citizen is widely acknowledged, for he measures up to high standards 
in both connections. 



JOHN D. HIGINBOTHAM, J. P. 

John D. Higinbotham enjoys the distinction of being the oldest mer- 
chant in Lethbridge in years of continuous connection with the business 
interests of the city. Moreover, he has always maintained his place in 
the front rank of representative business men, by reason of his progres- 
siveness and enterprise. His name is also inseparably interwoven with 
the history of the city because of the many important public positions 
which he has filled and the active part which he has taken in furthering 



222 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

every plan and project for the general good. He comes of ancestry that 
has long been connected with public interests. His father, Lieutenant 
Colonel Nathaniel Higinbotham, was at one time a member for North 
Wellington, Ontario, in the house of commons and after his retirement 
from politics he became registrar of Wellington county. His mother was 
in her maidenhood Margaret Allan, a daughter of David Allan, Esquire, 
a prominent citizen of Guelph, Ontario. 

John D. Higinbotham was born at Guelph, Ontario, November 23, 1864, 
and acquired his early education in the Guelph Academy, while later he 
attended the Guelph Collegiate Institute and Dr. Tassie's famous school 
at Gait, Ontario. He next entered the Ontario College of Pharmacy at 
Toronto and after the completion of a thorough course, which well quali- 
fied him for a business career, he came to Lethbridge in 1884 and here 
established business as a druggist and chemist, being today the oldest 
merchant of the city. He opened both a wholesale and retail house, which 
is still conducted under his name and with the passing years the business 
has grown to substantial and gratifying proportions. Not only has he 
contributed to the material development of Lethbridge but with the 
growth of the city and province he has been called upon to fill many im- 
portant offices, the duties of which he has discharged with marked fidelity 
and ability. He was postmaster of Lethbridge from 1886 until 1910, or 
for almost a quarter of a century. He is now a juvenile commissioner of 
Alberta, a senator of Alberta University, a ^governor of the Alberta 
Ladies' College and has likewise been chairman of the Lethbridge school 
board. He was also vice-president of the Board of Trade, is president of 
the Citizens' League, -and along commercial lines his executive power has 
been called forth in his election to the presidency of the Alberta Phar- 
macal Association. He is a supporter of the union government and is a 
Liberal in politics. While active and prominent along these various lines 
Mr. Higinbotham has never neglected the higher, holier duties of life. He 
belongs to the Presbyterian church and in all branches of the church 
work has taken a deep and helpful interest, being now president of the 
Alberta Sunday School Association and a director of the Young Men's 
Christian Association. In 1885, when but twenty-one years of age, he 
organized the Knox church Sunday school in Lethbridge and has been 
continuously its superintendent from that time to the present. He is a 
man of scholarly tastes and habits and has written many articles for dif- 
ferent publications, including "The Week," which was founded by Gold- 
win Smith, "Grip," the once famous comic weekly, and the "Westminster 
Magazine." 

In the year 1889 Mr. Higinbotham was married to Miss Anna Tor- 
rance, a daughter of the Rev. R. Torrance, D. D., of Guelph, Ontario, who 
was moderator of the Presbyterian General Assembly. The children of 
Mr. and Mrs. Higinbotham are as follows: Lieutenant Harold Torrance 
Higinbotham, born in 1894, a member of the Thirteenth Battalion; Nor- 
man Lindsay, born in 1900, a student in McGill University of Montreal ; 
Helen Phyllis, born in 1890, who won the Bachelor of Arts degree from 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 223 

Toronto University, the degree of Registered Nurse from Johns Hopkins 
University Training School at Baltimore, and the Master of Arts degree 
from Columbia University, New York; Marjorie, who was born in 1899 
and was a student in Havergal Ladies' College at Toronto ; and Mary Mew- 
burn and Muriel Dryden, twins, born in 1904. 

Mr. Higinbotham has always found delight in travel and is well known 
as an antiquarian and art connoisseur. His outdoor recreation includes 
lawn tennis, golf and cricket and he is the president of the Lethbridge 
Lawn Tennis Club and a member of the Aquatic Country Club. He also 
belongs to North Star Lodge, A. F. & A. M., and was district deputy grand 
master in 1897. He has recently been appointed one of the three lay mem- 
bers for Alberta of the Lord Strathcona Trust. He is interested in all 
those forces which make for the uplift of manki»nd and in his relations 
with the public has ever displayed a most progressive spirit, his labors at 
all times being highly resultant and beneficial. 



• J. D. AND H. N. STEPHENS. 

J. D. and H. N. Stephens, owners of the Stephens Department Store, 
are pioneer merchants of Vermilion. They were both born at Glencairn, 
in the province of Ontario, sons of Marshall N. and Margaret (Frame) 
Stephens. The father was a native of Ontario, while the mother was born 
in Scotland. Both parents are deceased. For many years Mr. M. N. 
Stephens engaged in the lumber business in his native province. He was 
a successful business man and enjoyed well-merited success. 

J. D. Stephens was born on the 18th of March, 1857, and received his 
early education in private schools and later enrolled in the Upper Canada 
College. In 1899 he went to Manitoba and engaged in the conduct of a 
general mercantile business at Swan River until 1909. In the meantime 
his brother, H. N. Stephens, had established a mercantile business in 
Vermilion, in which he had an interest. After disposing of his store in- 
terests at Swan River in 1909 he moved to Vermilion and has since been 
active in the conduct of the Stephens Department Store in that town. 
Mr. Stephens married Miss Grace M. Rioch, of Hamilton, Ontario. He 
was for five years chairman of the local school board and is a zealous sup- 
porter of the Church of Christ. 

H. N. Stephens was born on the 7th of September, 1863, and received 
his early education in the public schools of the province of Ontario and 
was graduated from the Upper Canada College. He married Miss Jean 
R. Wilson, a native of Ontario, and they are parents of several children, 
the oldest son being lecturer in chemistry at the State University of 
Minnesota. Mr. Stephens held the office of mayor of Vermilion for a 
two-year term and during his administration gave to this community 
efficient and businesslike service, inaugurating and bringing to completion 
many movements for the development and improvement of the com- 



224 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

munity at large. He and his family are likewise members of the Church 
of Christ and active workers in its support. 

The Stephens brothers are held in high confidence and esteem by all 
who know them. They devote their entire time and attention to the 
store, which was established here in 1904 on a very small scale. They 
located here some time before the railroad was extended to this place, 
traveling by rail as far as possible, then by water on the Saskatchewan 
river as far as Lea Park, Alberta, and thence by team to Vermilion. They 
brought with them enough supplies for the establishment of their store 
and this was the first enterprise of its kind in Vermilion. For some time 
they were located in a frame building but that was burned to the ground 
in the fire which destroyed the Vermilion district in 1918. Today they 
occupy quarters in a handsome brick building which has all up-to-date 
improvements, etc. They handle a complete and high-grade line of stock, 
covering every department of general merchandise and they enjoy an ex- 
tensive and important patronage. The Stephens brothers represent that 
type of citizen who is regarded as an acquisition to any community, for- 
warding its development by their diligence and enterprise in matters of 
business, and promoting its general progress by maintaining a high stand- 
ard of citizenship and cooperating in every commendable public move- 
ment. 



JOSEPH HARE MERCER. 

Calgary takes justifiable pride in its public officials, who have proven 
themselves to be men of ability, integrity and marked civic loyalty. Of 
this number is Joseph H. Mercer, who for the past nine years has filled 
the office of city treasurer, and throughout the period of his service he has 
been actuated by an unselfish spirit of devotion to the general good. He 
wai born in Watford, Hertfordshire, England, June 7, 1872, and his par- 
ents were James Duncan and Elizabeth (Rogers) Mercer, the former a 
native of Glasgow, Scotland, and the latter of England. For many years 
the father was identified with educational interests in England, residing 
in the mother country until about 1900, when he came to Canada, Making 
his way to the west, he took up a homestead claim in the province of 
Saskatchewan and continued to make his home on that property until his 
death, which occurred in the fall of 1918, when he was eighty-three years 
of age. He is survived by the mother, who is now living in Victoria, Brit- 
ish Columbia. 

The public schools of Worcester and Winchester, England, afforded 
Joseph H. Mercer his educational privileges and his initial experience 
along financial lines was gained in the London County Bank of London, 
England. On reaching Canada he joined the British Bank of North 
America, now known as the Bank of Montreal, and remained in the ser- 
vice of that institution for five years, during which he was employed in 
its branches at Halifax, Nova Scotia, and St. John, New Brunswick. He 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 225 

next became connected with Tilden, Gurney & Company, Limited, of 
Winnipeg-, Manitoba, in the capacity of manager and afterward left that 
firm to take charge of the office and financial affairs of the Hanbury Hard- 
ware Company, Limited, wholesale dealers at Brandon, Manitoba. P. 
Burns & Company, Limited, of Calgary, later secured his services as office 
and credit manager and he continued with that firm until 1914, when he 
was called to public office. He has since been city treasurer of Calgary 
and broad experience in financial affairs has made him exceptionally well 
qualified for the responsibilities which devolve upon him. He has proven 
a faithful custodian of the public funds and the work of his department 
is characterized by a high standard of efficiency. For a number of years 
he took an active part in the proceedings of the Credit Men's Associa- 
tions of Calgary and Winnipeg and is a fellow of the Institute of Municipal 
Treasurers and Accountants. 

In March, 1904, Mr. Mercer married Miss Annie Mabel Scott, a daugh- 
ter of Mr. and Mrs. Easton Scott, of Winnipeg, Manitoba, the latter of 
whom is deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Mercer became the parents of two chil- 
dren, both of whom died in infancy. Mr. Mercer is a member of the An- 
glican church and is also identified with the Knights of Pythias and the 
Gyro Club. He utilizes every available opportunity to promote the wel- 
fare of his city and exploit its resources and advantages, being enthusi- 
astic in his support of western Canada, which he regards as a country of 
great possibilities. He stands as a high type of manhood and Calgary has 
greatly benefited by his citizenship. 



LEIGHTON C. CONN, M. B., C. M., F. A. C. S. 

Dr. Leighton C. Conn enjoys a well-merited reputation as an able phy- 
sician and skillful surgeon and since coming to Edmonton he has won 
the respect and esteem of his professional associates and the confidence 
and support of the general public. He was born in Ontario in 1886 and 
is a son of Hugh J. Conn. His early education was obtained in the public 
schools of St. Catharines, Ontario, and he afterward became a student 
at McGill College in Montreal, from which he was graduated in 1909, win- 
ning- the degrees of Bachelor of Medicine and Master in Surgery. He 
then spent four years as an interne at the Royal Victoria Hospital in 
Montreal, thus gaining valuable practical experience, and in 1913 he came 
to Edmonton, where he has since made his home. Exceptionally thorough 
preparation well qualified him for his professional duties and his practice 
has steadily grown as he has had opportunity to demonstrate his ability 
and skill in the treatment of disease. He devotes the greater part of his 
attention to surgical work and is instructor in surgery at the University 
of Alberta. He is deeply interested in the scientific and humanitarian 
phases of his profession and utilizes every possible opportunity to broaden 
his knowledg-e and promote his efficiency. He is a fellow of the American 
(15) 



226 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

College of Surgeons and his professional standing is indicated in the fact 
that he has been called to the presidency of the Edmonton Academy of 
Medicine. He is also a member of the Alberta and Dominion Medical 
Associations. 

On the 19th of September, 1914, Dr. Conn was married to Miss 
Marjorie Gilmore and they have two children: William G. and Marjorie S. 
He is an active and earnest member of the Anglican church. He has a 
thorough knowledge of anatomy and the component parts of the human 
body and his comprehensive technical training, combined with the sure- 
ness and precision of his work in surgical cases, has gained him recogni- 
tion as one of the foremost exponents of the medical profession in this 
city. 



BENJAMIN F. OLSEN. 



Among the progressive and enterprising agriculturists of Cardston 
district must be mentioned Benjamin F. Olsen, who is living in Cards- 
ton and is operating a section of land near here. He was bom in St. 
Louis, Missouri, in 1862, a son of Bank Benson and Wilhelmina (Wilhem- 
beck) Olsen, the former a native of Sweden and the latter of Denmark. 
The father emigrated from his native country to the United States and 
located at St. Louis, where he lived for a few years and where he was 
married. In 1862 he crossed the plains to Utah, making the journey in an 
old prairie schooner, and he located at Salt Lake. He took up some land 
near there and engaged in farming for many years. Mr. Olsen was an 
active worker in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, which 
he joined in Sweden and was the first of his family to become affiliated 
with it. He devoted a great deal of his spare time to the church and was 
holding the office of high priest at the time of his demise. Mrs. Olsen 
was twice married. Her first husband was Mr. Hansen and they were 
parents of two children: Charlie, who is living in Plain City, Utah; and 
one whose demise occurred in infancy. To her marriage to Mr. Olsen 
three children were bom: Benjamin F., whose name introduces this re- 
view; Joseph, who is living at Brigham City, Utah, and who has served on 
a mission to Sweden; and Margaret, who is the wife of William Cowley 
of Layton, Utah. 

Benjamin F. Olsen acquired his education in the public schools of Salt 
Lake and after putting his textbooks aside engaged in the ranging of 
cattle in Idaho and later in Tooele county, Utah. He operated but a 
small ranch and ran graded cattle. In 1895 he came to Alberta and home- 
steaded some land in Cardston district, on the St. Mary's river. The land 
was barren prairie and he erected a log house on it, hauling the timber 
from the mountains, a distance of sixteen miles. He made the trip over- 
land from Utah and trailed through with him one hundred sixty-five head 
of cattle, taking just two and one-half months to make the trip from 
Helena, Montana. Mr. Olsen's diligence, united with constant application, 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT • 227 

finally resulted in bringing his tract of prairie land under cultivation and 
from time to time he increased his holdings and specialized in stock rais- 
raising. Subsequently he disposed of the homestead. He now owns one 
section of land, whereon he engages in general farming and stock raising. 

On the second of April, 1889, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. 01- 
sen and Miss Emily Clark, who was born in Grantsville, Utah. To their 
union nine children have been born: The eldest daughter, Vere, is the 
wife of Ralph Garner of Hill Springs, Alberta; Florence is the wife of 
Orsen Anderson, a successful farmer of Cardston ; Fra-nk is farming near 
Glenwood, Alberta ; Clarke is a farmer residing near Glenwood ; Vivian is 
now Mrs. Jesse Woolf ; Walter has been secretary of the Glenwood munici- 
pality and served on a mission in Denver, Colorado, for two years, for the 
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints; Ray, Edith and Jesse are 
living at home. 

The family are members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day 
Saints and Mr. Olsen devotes a great deal of his spare time to the church, 
in which he is an elder. In 1909 Mr. Olsen built a beautiful home in 
Cardston and has resided there since. He is public-spirited and although 
he does not seek to figure prominently in public life, he performs his daily 
duties faithfully and efficiently, is considerate of the rights of others and 
never neglects his obligations to his fellowmen nor to the community in 
which he lives. 



EDWIN H. JONES. 



Edwin H. Jones of the firm of Jones, Scott & Carswell, is the oldest 
barrister in Lacombe in point of years of active practice. He is a native 
of England, his birth having occurred at Manchester, England, in 1871. 
His parents were Edwin and Elizabeth (Ambrose) Jones, likewise natives 
of England, in which country they died. The father was one of the lead- 
ing barristers of his day and was judge of the county court for ten years. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Jones three children were born, Edwin H. being the only 
one now living. A brother, William Ambrose Jones, was a prominent bar- 
rister in England. Throughout his life the father gave his political sup- 
port to the Conservative party and he was a member of the Anglican 
church. 

In the acquirement of his early education Edwin H. Jones attended the 
Manchester grammar school and subsequently enrolled in Victoria Uni- 
versity. In February of 1895 he was admitted as a member of the In- 
corporated Law Society of England and he practiced at Bury, England, 
for eighteen years. In 1912 he came to Alberta and on the 29th of August 
of that year he was admitted to the Alberta bar. On the 14th of Febru- 
ary, 1919, Mr. Jones was made King's Counsel, and for a few years he 
was Crown Prosecutor at Stettler, Alberta. He has two partners in the 
practice of his profession — H, G. Scott, M. A,, LL.B., and C. F. Carswell, 



228 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

B. A. The firm name is Jones, Scott & Carswell, and they are known 
throughout the district and province for their success in handUng all 
kinds of litigation 

Fraternally Mr. Jones is identified with the Ancient Free & Accepted 
Masons. His religious faith is indicated by his membership in the An- 
glican church. For recreation Mr. Jones turns to yachting and motoring 
and aside from his profession that is his principal hobby. 



ALFRED FLETCHER CARROTHERS. 

Alert, energetic and determined, Alfred F. Carrothers has made good 
use of his time, talents and opportunities and the years have marked his 
progress along lines which lead to success. For eleven years he has been 
identified wtih the business development of Edmonton and is now num- 
bered among the leading investment bankers of the city, while he is also 
prominently connected with the coal industry. He was born in Strathroy, 
Ontario, in 1887, and comes of English lineage in the maternal line, while 
his paternal ancestors were natives of Ireland. His father, John Car- 
rothers, was born in London, Ontario, in 1836, and passed awa}' at Regina, 
Saskatchewan, in 1918, when eighty-two years of age. He was married 
in his native city, in 1858, to Harriet Bratt, who was also born in London, 
Ontario, and her death occurred at Regina in 1907. 

Alfred F. Carrothers was graduated from the high school at Strath- 
roy, Ontario, in 1904, and afterward enrolled as a student at the Colle- 
giate Institute at that place, which he attended for a year. In 1905 he 
came west, first locating at Winnipeg, Manitoba, but soon afterward went 
to Regina, Saskatchewan, where he secured a position as traveling sales- 
man, continuing to act in that capacity until 1908, He then entered the 
general supply business in partnership with H. W. Laird, now a member 
of the Dominion senate, and this association was maintained until 1911, 
when Mr. Carrothers came to Edmonton, where he has since engaged in 
the general investment and bond business with gratifying success. He 
is well informed on all matters pertaining thereto and has so directed 
his efforts as to gain the confidence and support of the public, which has 
ever found him thoroughly reliable in all business matters. He has also 
extended his eflforts into other fields and is secretary-treasurer of the 
Brookdale Collieries, Ltd., being a stockholder in the company, which 
specializes in steam coal, while he is likewise a director and stockholder 
of the Kingsdale Mining Corporation of British Columbia. 

Mr. Carrothers was married at Regina, in the province of Saskatche- 
wan, on July 1, 1908, to Edith Avarne-Walkeden of Birmingham, Eng- 
land, and they have become the parents of three sons : Alfred T., whose 
birth occurred at Birmingham in 1910; Elmer B., who was born in Ed- 
monton in 1913; and Ronald Cavell, whose birth occurred in this city in 
1916. Mr. Carrothers is a strong Conservative in his political views and 




ALFRED F. CARROTHERS. 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 231 

in religious faith he is a Methodist. He is essentially a member of the 
class of doers, gifted with initiative and quick resolve, and his success is 
the result of unabating industry, self-confidence and a readiness to assume 
responsibility. He is highly regarded in business circles of Edmonton and 
has many friends, whose esteem he has won and retained by reason of 
his high principles and fine personal qualities. 



GROVER CLEVELAND DUNCAN. 

Grover Cleveland Duncan, editor and manager of the Drumheller Mail, 
is one of this community's most substantial business men. He was born in 
Holt, Clay county, Missouri, on the 6th of January, 1885, a son of John W. 
and Mary E. (Nance) Duncan, both natives of Missouri. The father has 
farmed for the greater part of his life and he and his vdfe are now resid- 
ing on the home place near Holt. To their union eleven children have 
been born, Grover Cleveland being the fourth in order of birth. All of the 
children with the exception of four are living in Missouri. Mr. and Mrs. 
Duncan are consistent communicants of the Christian church. Mr. Duncan 
has been a member of the local school board for years and is one of the 
representative citizens of the community in which he resides. 

The public schools of his native county afforded Grover Cleveland Dun- 
can his early education and at the age of twenty years he left the parental 
roof and went to North Dakota, making his initial step into newspaper 
circles. He was an apprentice of the Sherwood Journal of Sherwood, North 
Dakota, for one and one-half years and in 1907 came to Alberta and 
acquired a position on the advertising staflf of the Edmonton Journal 
He likewise followed the occupation of farming, having homesteaded some 
raw prairie land nine miles south of Halkirk. For a time he worked for 
the Canadian Pacific Railroad as assistant agent at the Pincher Station 
and subsequently he removed to Castor, where he worked on the Advance 
for two and one-half years, or until September, 1911. He was manager 
of the News Review at Coronation until January, 1912, when he went to 
Munson and worked on the Munson Mail. That paper was established in 
January, 1912, and Mr. Duncan purchased an interest in it a short time 
afterward. In 1914 he bought out his partner and edited and managed 
the sheet until April, 1918. In that year he moved the plant to Drum- 
heller. He has a most up-to-date plant here, equipped with the latest 
machinery and he was the first to install typesetting machines. He is 
editor and manager of the Drumheller Mail and enjoys the confidence and 
esteem of his fellow citizens. Aside from publishing the newspaper he 
carries on an extensive commercial printing business. 

In July, 1917, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Duncan to Miss Seeta 
Florence Douglas, a native of Winnipeg. She is a woman of culture and 
refinement and is a consistent member of the Presbyterian church, in the 
interests of which she is a zealous worker. 



232 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

Fraternally Mr. Duncan is identified with the Knights of Pythias, be- 
longing to Coal City Lodge, No. 54, and he is past chancellor commander 
in the order. He is likewise affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, being past grand of Drumheller Lodge, No. Ill ; and he is a mem- 
ber of Drumheller Lodge, No. 34, Be»nevolent Protective Order of Elks and 
has attained the Black Knight's degree in the Orangemen. Along strictly 
business lines he is afl^liated with the Canadian and Albert Press Asso- 
ciations and he attended the meeting of the Canadian Press Associa- 
tion at Vancouver, British Columbia, in 1920. Alert and determined, he 
quickly recognizes an opportunity and in its utilization has promoted 
public interests as well as individual prosperity. 



JOHN McGregor campbell. 

John M. Campbell is manager at Calgary of the Royal Bank of Canada — 
Third Street, West, branch — one of the substantial moneyed institutions 
of the city, and he is well qualified for this responsible office, for his atten- 
tion has been concentrated upon financial matters from the age of sixteen 
years. He was born in Manitou, Manitoba, October 11, 1883, and is a son 
of Donald D. and Christina (McGregor) Campbell, natives of the province 
of Ontario. Coming to the west, the father entered a homestead in Mani- 
toba and proved up on his land, which he converted into a productive farm. 
For a number of years he continued to cultivate his property and then 
removed to Manitou, accepting a position with the firm of Gordon & Iron- 
side, dealers in live stock and grain. Subsequently he took over the busi- 
ness, which he operated under his own name for a number of years. He 
is now acting as claim agent for the Winnipeg Grain Exchange, to which 
position he was first appointed by the government, but of late years has 
operated independently. Although seventy-three years of age, he is still 
an active factor in the world's work, and Mrs. Campbell has reached the 
age of seventy-one. 

Their son, John M. Campbell, acquired his education in the rural schools 
near his father's farm in Manitoba and the public schools of Manitou, 
and in August, 1899, he made his entry into the financial world, becoming 
junior clerk in the Bank of Hamilton in that city. He readily mastered 
the duties assigned him, winning promotion to the position of accountant, 
and later was transferred to the Grain Exchange branch at Winnipeg, 
where he acted in that capacity from 1903 until 1906. In the latter year 
he was assigned the task of opening a branch at Francis, Saskatchewan, 
this being one of the earliest banks established i^n that part of the country, 
and for six months he was its manager. He then severed his connection 
with that financial institution and joined the Northern Crown Bank at 
Winnipeg. Soon afterward he was made manager of its interests at Long- 
ham, Saskatchewan, and a few months later was placed in charge of its 
bank at Balcarres, in the same province, where he remained for a year. 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 233 

In December, 1908, he was transferred to High River, Alberta, and was 
there stationed for three years, on the expiration of which period he was 
sent to Red Deer, acting as manager of that branch from 1911 until !Feb- 
ruary, 1920. In 1918 the holdings of the Northern Crown Bank were 
acquired by the Royal Bank of Canada, with which he has since been 
identified, and in 1920 Mr. Campbell was appointed manager of its Calgary 
Third Street, West, branch, in which capacity he is now serving. Broad 
practical experience has given him a detailed knowledge of the complex 
problems of modern finance and in controlling the institution he manifests 
keen sagacity and marked executive force. It has greatly prospered under 
his able administration and his employers have the utmost confidence in his 
judgment, foresight and honesty. 

On October 15, 1907, Mr. Campbell was united in marriage to Miss 
Isabelle V. Dynes, a daughter of William and Sarah M. (Wilson) Dynes, 
natives of Ontario. For many years the father operated a farm near 
Orangeville, in that province, and in 1906 he came to the west, settling in 
Saskatchewan, where he and his wife now reside and where he is following 
agricultural pursuits. He has one of the best improved and most pro- 
ductive farms in his district. Mr. a»nd Mrs, Campbell have three children : 
Donald Dynes, who was born February 11, 1909 ; Wilson McGregor, whose 
birth occurred on the 31st of January, 1911; and Jean Margaret, born 
November 22, 1913. 

Mr. Campbell is a member of the Presbyterian church and in his polit- 
ical views he is an independent Liberal. He has never been neglectful of 
the duties of citizenship and while residing at Red Deer, Alberta, he 
served for three terms on the town council. He is identified with the 
Masonic order, belonging to Kenilworth Lodge, No. 29, A. F. & A. M., at 
Red Deer, of which he is a past master, and also to Keystone Chapter, 
No. 12, R. A. M., at that place. He is fond of hunting and takes a deep 
interest in all kinds of athletic sports, maintaining an even balance between 
work and play. He is president of the St. Andrew's Golf Club and a 
member of the Calgary Curling Club and probably no man in the province 
is better known in connection with the latter sport. He has found that 
the field of opportunity is open to all who have the courage to persevere 
therein and industry and ability have brought him to the front in his chosen 
line of activity. His opinions carry weight in financial circles of the city 
and he is recognized as a man of integrity, whose word is always to be 
relied upon. 



TILLEY STRANG TUPPER, M. D. 

Conspicuous among the ranchers of the Claresholm district. Alberta, is 
Dr. Tilley Strang Tupper, who engaged in the active practice of his profes- 
sion for some years and is now a consulting physician, devoting the greater 
part of his time and attention to the ranch. He was born near Fredericton, 



234 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

New Brunswick, a son of Charles Austin and Emeline (Cliff) Tupper, the 
former a native of Nova Scotia and the latter of New Brunswick. The 
father engaged in farming and at the same time conducted a contracting 
business for lumber supplies and bridge work. He spent most of his life 
in New Brunswick, where his death occurred in 1907, at the age of sixty- 
one years. Thoughout his life Mr. Tupper was a stanch supporter of the 
Conservative party. Mrs. Tupper is still living in Fredericton, at the age 
of seventy-four years. To them three children were born : Tilley Strang, 
whose name intoduces this review ; Lalia, who is the wife of George Hazen, 
of the Hazen, Twiss Company, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan ; and Ada, who 
is the wife of Charles McVey, a civil engineer in the employ of the govern- 
ment at New Brunswick. Mrs. McVey taught cwie of the first schools in 
Claresholm, and later served as principal here. 

Upon attaining school age Tilley Strang Tupper entered the public 
schools of Fredericton and in due time was graduated from the Collegiate 
Institute. His earliest ambition was to enter the medical profession and 
upon the completion of his literary education he enrolled in the medical 
department of McGill University at Montreal, from which institution he 
was graduated with the M. D., C. M. degrees in 1896. He immediately 
returned to Fredericton and established offices for the practice of his pro- 
fession, where he remained for a time and then removed to Amherst, later 
going to Medicine Hat and Lethbridge. He made his initial step as a 
rancher after arriving at Medicine Hat, buying some cattle which he 
ranged on Bow river and working for various ranchmen in the vicinity as a 
cow-puncher. In 1902 he homesteaded one hundred and sixty acres of 
barren prairie land on Willow creek, near Claresholm, and ranched until 
1904, when he moved into Claresholm and concentrated on his profession 
for four years. At the termination of that time he heeded the call of the 
ranch and returned to it, and he is now raising pure-blooded Holstein cattle 
and also operates a small dairy. He continues active in his profession 
only as a consulting physician. In 1906 Dr. Tupper established the Clares- 
holm Pharmacy, conducting that enterprise until 1907, when he disposed 
of it. 

In New Brunswick was celebrated the marriage of Dr. Tupper to Miss 
Mabel Moore, a native of that territory. To their union five children 
have been born, all of whom are living at home : Neil, Marian, Anna, 
Charles and Hibbert. 

Dr. Tupper is a Progressive in politics and he is active in party affairs. 
He was the first overseer of Claresholm and a member of the first town 
council. He is now a member of the Provincial Medical Association. Upon 
the outbreak of the World war Dr. Tupper answered his country's call 
and during the early part of the war he was a medical officer on the Blood 
Indian reservation. Subsequently he received a captain's commission and 
went overseas with the C. E. F., being in active service there for two 
years, and he spent some time on hospital ships, crossing the Atlantic 
ocean fourteen times. He occupies a prominent place among the foremost 
members of his profession in this district and as a consulting physician 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 235 

he has won distinction. As a rancher he has also won success and his 
general personal worth, his active life and his high principles have com- 
mended him to the goodwill, trust and respect of all with whom he has 
been associated. 



CLYDE A. HOOK. 



Well known in the business circles of Edmonton, is Clyde A. Hook, the 
president of the Hook Signs, Limited. Actuated by a progressive spirit, 
he has steadily developed his business along this line and today enjoys 
an extensive patronage that makes his undertaking one of substantial 
profit. Born in the United States, he is a native of Gladerun, Warren 
county, Pennsylvania, and his natal day was November 24, 1881. He re- 
mained at the place of his birth until about seven years of age, when his 
parents moved with the family to Great Falls, Montana, and there on the 
western frontier he was reared to manhood, pursuing his education in the 
pubhc and high schools. In young manhood he started in business, be- 
coming identified with sign painting at Spokane, Washington, where he 
resided until 1907. In that year he removed to Edmonton and established 
a business of similar character in this city, organizing a company known 
as the Hook Sign Company, in which he had as partners George L. Bor- 
ton and E. L. Crumm. The present business was organized in 1913 by 
Mr. Hook and M. L. Brown and they own in connection therewith a two- 
story brick building. They confine their attention exclusively to signs 
used in outdoor advertising and their business has now assumed large and 
gratifying proportions. They employ a number of sign painters and their 
initiative and originality enables them to produce most attractive work 
that claims the attention of every passer-by. In upbuilding his organiza- 
tion, too, Mr. Hook has shown marked executive ability and is widely ac- 
counted one of the forceful and resourceful business men of his adopted 
city. 

Fraternally Mr. Hook is identified with the Benevolent Protective Or- 
der of Elks and he belongs to the Kiwanis Club, being in hearty sympathy 
with the purposes of that organization in upholding high standards of citi- 
zenship, as well as in promoting business enterprises and improving busi- 
ness conditions. 



FATHER THOMAS P. MURPHY. 

Father Thomas P. Murphy, a priest of the Catholic church and teacher 
in St. John's College at Edmonton, was born in Ontario, March 14, 1867. 
His parents, Timothy and Ann (Meagher) Murphy, were natives of Ireland 
but crossed the Atlantic in early life and were educated, reared and married 



236 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

in Ontario. They had a family of eleven children, eight of whom are 
living, the Rev. Thomas P. Murphy being the eldest. Another son. Rev. 
Michael Murphy, is a priest of Lethbridge, and a third son, Stephen, is a 
representative of the priesthood at Cranbrook, British Columbia. The 
father devoted his life to farming and became the owner of considerable 
real estate, having made judicious investments in property. He was in 
the United States during the Civil war period and helped do Christian work 
for the northern soldiers. 

Thomas P. Murphy was educated in St. Michael's College at Toronto, 
which he attended for four years, and in Ottawa University, where he won 
his Bachelor of Arts degree at his graduation with the class of 1888. He 
then entered Montreal Seminary, in which he further prepared for the 
priesthood, and was ordained in Ottawa in 1893, Throughout the inter- 
vening period he has devoted his attention to the work of the church 
and to educational labor. His first charge was in Ottawa University as a 
teacher and after two years there, he went to Buffalo, New York, and 
there taught in a college for four years. Later he was assigned to duty 
at Lowell, Massachusetts, where he acted as pastor of the Sacred Heart 
church for four years. He then returned to St. Joseph's church at Ottawa, 
and continued in charge of the parish for eight years, and in 1911 he came 
to Edmonton. He began teaching in St. John's College and has been 
identified with the school throughout the intervening period. Through 
his educational work and as parish priest he has done an effective service 
in the upbuilding of the cause and is today recognized as one of the able 
educators of the province. 

Father Murphy is a member of the Knights of Columbus and served 
as chaplain of the local council for a year. From early boyhood he has 
been actuated by the high purpose of upbuilding the cause of Catholicism 
in various localities to which he has been assigned. He was assisted to 
gain an education by his great-uncle, Rev. Michael Mackay, who was an 
uncle of his mother and who for many years was parish priest at Marys- 
ville, Ontario. The influence of this good man was a potent force in the 
life of Father Murphy and in his decision to enter the priesthood, and 
both in the educational world and in the direct work of the church his 
labors have been a far-reaching force. 



ROBERT TAYLOR TELFORD. 

Robert Taylor Telford, who is living retired in Leduc, has been a 
prominent factor in the substantial growth and improvement of this dis- 
trict. He was born in Shawville, Quebec, on the 19th of June, 1860, a son 
of Robert and Anne (Pratt) Telford. His parents were born in Ireland 
and came to Canada, locating in Quebec, at an early date. The father 
secured a homestead near Shawville, where he farmed until his demise. 
Mrs. Telford is also deceased. To their union seven children were born, 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 237 

three daughters and four sons, Robert Taylor, whose name introduces 
this review, is the only member of the family who located in Alberta. 

Robert Taylor Telford received his education in the public schools of 
his birthplace and came to Alberta during the Rebellion of 1885. He 
arrived in Calgary in May of that year and worked as a carpenter there 
until the following July, when he enlisted in the Royal Northwest Mounted 
Pohce, remaining in that service for four years. In 1889 he homesteaded 
some land, on a portion of which the business section of the town of Leduc 
now stands. Mr. Telford was among the earliest settlers here and he ran 
the first stopping place before the railroad came through. For about four 
years he was also engaged in the conduct of a general store and subse- 
quently he started a lumberyard, which he operated for some twenty-five 
years, selling out in 1919, and he is now living practically retired. Mr. 
Telford has attained a position of affluence in the province and as a self- 
made man is accorded the confidence and esteem of his fellow townsmen. 
His early years in Alberta brought him many unusual experiences, involv- 
ing innumerable hardships and privations. He was not easily discouraged, 
however, and he clung to his purpose with the tenacity and determination 
which invariably means ultimate victory. 

In the spring of 1890 was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Telford and 
Miss Belle Howard, who was born in the state of Wisconsin, Mr. and 
Mrs. Telford adopted two children: Raymond and Lome. Raymond 
enlisted in Edmonton at the beginning of the World war and went over- 
seas in the early part of 1916, He was a member of the Fifty-first Bat- 
talion and was killed in active service in June, 1916. 

Mr. Telford has always been a stanch supporter of the Liberal party 
and has wielded a great influence in party affairs in this district. He was 
the first member of the Alberta legislature in 1905 and has held the offices 
of mayor and alderman. He is now a member of the school board and has 
the distinction of being the first to hold the office of justice of the peace 
in Leduc, so serving for some thirteen years. Fraternally he is identified 
with the Masons. During the World war Mr. Telford was active in all 
drives and gave generously of his time and money in the furtherance of 
the government's interests. He owns a number of business buildings in 
Leduc and has considerable real estate, which brings him in a substantial 
income, so that he is practically retired from active business life. 



JAMES P. Mccormick, m. d. 

Dr. James P, McConiiick, a representative of the medical profession 
at Edmonton and prominently known as a urologist, was born in Ottawa, 
Ontario, on the 31st of March, 1881, There he spent the period of his 
boyhood and youth, pursuing his early education in the public schools 
and passing through consecutive grades to his graduation from the high 
school. Later he matriculated in Queen's University, where he entered 



238 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

upon the medical course, and was there graduated with the class of 1906, 
at which time his professional degi'ee was conferred upon him. He after- 
ward pursued postgraduate work in Hahnemann Medical College at Chicago 
for a year, and later was in the employ of the Dominion government as 
medical inspector of the Hudson Bay and James Bay Indians for a year and 
a half. In 1908 he came to Edmonton, where he opened an office and 
through the intervening period has been engaged in practice here, specializ- 
ing in urology, although he is well informed on all branches of the medical 
science and continues in general practice to a considerable extent. His 
skill and efficiency are widely acknowledged and he is making steady prog- 
ress along professional lines. He was medical examiner of the American 
army during the World war and he belongs to the Alberta and Quebec 
Medical Societies and also to the Canadian Medical Association. 

Dr. McCormick was united in marriage to Miss Margery D. Moth, and 
they have two children: James P. and Alan. Dr. McCormick is a mem- 
ber of the Masonic fraternity. He has always taken a great interest in 
athletics and during his college days was a leader in the college games and 
sports and the various athletic events. He always enjoyed boxing, hockey 
and football and developed considerable skill along those lines. He has 
ever recog-nized the value of outdoor exercise as a means of keeping phys- 
ically fit and through that avenue has further qualified for the onerous 
and responsible duties of his profession. 



MALCOLM CAMPBELL McCANNEL, C. A. 

Malcolm Campbell McCannel is known in business circles of Edmonton 
and throughout the province of Alberta as a chartered accountant, and in 
his chosen field of activity he has gained that position of leadership which 
follows superior ability and concentrated efl'ort. He was born at Port 
Elgin, in the province of Ontario, March 16, 1883, and is a son of Alexan- 
der McCannel, a native of Scotland. The father came to Canada as a boy 
and in 1870 he was married in Ontario to Miss Sarah Campbell, also a 
native of that province, in which they are still living. The McCannel 
family is one of the oldest in Scotland, the ancestral line being traced back 
for many generations. 

The public schools of Port Elgin afforded Malcolm C. McCannel his 
early educational opportunities and he afterward became a student at 
the Owen Sound Collegiate Institute, from which he was graduated in 
1901. The ensuing year was spent in teaching school and on the expira- 
tion of that period he took a course in a business college of Toronto. He 
devoted three years to bookkeeping and then secured a position in the 
office of a chartered accountant of Toronto, remaining in his employ for 
two years. He next went to Detroit, Michigan, and for two years was 
with a chartered accountant of that city. He then returned to Toronto 
and two years later received the degree of C. A. In 1912 he formed a 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 239 

partnership with his brother, Donald A., also a well known chartered 
accountant, and this association has been continued, under the name of 
McCannel Brothers & Company. In July, 1913, Malcolm C. McCannel 
came to Edmonton and took charge of this ofRce, which he is now success- 
fully conducting-, being recognized as an expert in the line in which he 
specializes. The firm has ever borne an unassailable reputation for integ- 
rity, reliability and efficiency and its services are in constant demand, 
owing to the high character of its work. 

In Edmonton, on the 8th of May, 1918, Mr. McCannel was united in 
marriage to Miss Eileen Campbell and they have become the parents of 
two sons, Malcolm Gordon, who was born May 9, 1920 ; and Donald Gilbert 
Alexander, born July 7, 1923. Mr. McCannel's deep interest in the welfare 
and advancement of his adopted city finds expression in his identification 
with the Chamber of Commerce and the Board of Trade and his cooperation 
is regarded as a valuable asset in promoting the activities of those organi- 
zations. He is a Liberal in politics and his religious views are in accord 
with the doctrines of the Baptist church. In matters of citizenship he has 
always been loyal, patrotic and public-spirited. His high standing in his 
chosen vocation in life is indicated in the fact that he has been honored 
with the presidency of the Alberta Institute of Chartered Accountants, 
his term of oflSce expiring in May, 1923, and he was also a member of 
the senate of the University of Alberta, during that period. His aim is 
high, his purpose unfaltering and his determination of the quality that 
never recognizes defeat. As a result each year has marked an advance in 
his career and he ranks today with the foremost chartered accountants of 
Western Canada. 



FREDERICK M. OLDHAM. 



One of the most popular public officials of Innisfail is Frederick M. Old- 
ham, mayor, who is also a barrister and solicitor. He was born in England, 
on the 29th of March, 1863, a son of Frederick J. and Esther (Mountfort) 
Oldham, likewise natives of England. Mr. Oldham was one of the repre- 
sentative barristers of his day and both he and his wife lived in England 
all of their lives. To the union of Mr. and Mrs. Oldham eight children 
were born, six of whom are living. 

In the acquirement of his education Frederick M. Oldham attended 
the public schools of his native country and in early life took up the study 
of law. He practiced in England for a short time and then came to 
Canada and located in the southern part of of the province of Alberta, and 
worked on a cattle ranch, remaining in the south for about five years. In 
1896 he came to Innisfail and resumed the practice of his profession. He 
handles much important litigation before the courts, and although he is 
sincerely devoted to his profession he does not allow it to take all of his 
time and attention. He has held many town offices and is now serving 



240 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

as mayor. He is giving to this community a businesslike and progressive 
administration and has inaugurated and brought to completion many move- 
ments for the benefit of the community at large. For many years he has 
been a member of the local school board and has also been town solicitor. 
Fraternally he is identified with the Masons and is readily conceded to be 
an exemplary member of the craft. A man of high principles, a genial 
nature and pleasing personality, Mr. Oldham is very popular in business, 
professional, and social circles in Innisfail. 



GILBERT M. ATKIN, M. D. 



A prominent physician and surgeon of Banff is Dr. Gilbert M. Atkin, 
who was born in Perth county, Ontario, on the 11th of July, 1877, a son 
of John and Janet (Drummond) Atkin, the former a native of England 
and the latter of Scotland, The father was born in 1835 and came to 
Canada with his parents, who located at Toronto when it was called Muddy 
York. Upon attaining man's estate he followed agricultural pursuits, suc- 
cessfully operating a farm in Queen's Bush, Perth county, for many years. 
His death occurred in March, 1919, at the age of eighty-four years. Mrs. 
Atkin is making her home at Milverton. 

In the acquirement of his education Gilbert M. Atkin attended the pub- 
lic schools of Milverton and the high schools at Newcastle and Stratford, 
Ontario, after which he taught school from 1897 to 1899 at Brocksden. 
In 1898 he determined to take up the study of medicine and enrolled in 
the medical department of the University of Toronto, graduating from 
that institution with the class of 1902. From that year until 1905 he 
was an interne and took postgraduate work in the Brooklyn Hospital, 
Brooklyn, New York. In 1905 he came to the province of Alberta and 
located at Calgary, where he practiced three or four months before locat- 
ing in Banff, in which city he has since resided. He brought to the pro- 
fession thorough training and innate ability and has built up an extensive 
and important patronage in Banff, ranking among the foremost phy- 
sicians and surgeons in the province. Dr. Atkin is a veteran of the World 
war, having in 1916 enlisted in the Canadian Army Medical Corps and 
received a captain's commission. He served overseas one and one-half 
years and received his honorable discharge in the fall of 1918. 

In October, 1911, Dr. Atkin was married to Miss Eva Maude Henning, 
and they have the following children : Ethel Evelyn, born in September 
of the year 1912; Janet Drummond, born in February, 1914; and Gladys 
Mcintosh, born in October, 1915. Mrs. Atkin is a woman of culture and 
refinement and she is prominent in the club and social circles of Banff. 

In his political views Dr. Atkin is a Liberal and he is a firm believer 
in the principles of that party as factors in good government. His re- 
ligious faith is that of the Presbyterian church. Fraternally he is a 
Mason, a Knight Templar and a Shriner, and he is also a member of the 




GILBERT M. ATKIN, M. D. 



(16) 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 243 

Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Benevolent Protective Order of 
Elks. Along strictly professional lines he holds membership in the Al- 
berta Medical and Dominion Medical Associations, and he also belongs to 
the Great War Veterans and the Banff Golf Club. 



WILLIAM H. RIPLEY. 



William H. Ripley, of the Western Transfer Company of Lethbridge, 
is thus identified with one of the important business enterprises of the 
city, the corporation not only handling an immense transfer business, but 
also owning the ice business of the town. Alert and enterprising, Mr. 
Ripley is ready for any emergency and for any opportunity and his inde- 
fatigable energy declines no call to labor or to service. A native of Nova 
Scotia, he was born at Oxford, March 14, 1877, and is of English lineage, 
his grandfather, William Ripley, having been a native of England, whence 
he crossed the Atlantic to Nova Scotia at an early day, there following 
the occupation of farming. His son, Robert Ripley, was born in Nova 
Scotia, in June, 1846, and was married there to Miss Nancy Angus, who 
was born in 1856, a daughter of William Angus, who was born in Nova 
Scotia but was of Scotch descent. In 1855 Robert Ripley came to Leth- 
bridge, where he remained for two and a half years and then returned to 
Nova Scotia for the purpose of bringing his family out. He was home- 
stead inspector at Lethbridge for four or five years and he worked for 
the Canadian Pacific Railroad for a number of years. Before its line was 
extended here he hauled supplies to Lethbridge and thus early became 
identified with the pioneer development of this region. He was also weigh- 
man for the mines for a number of years and for some time was connected 
with an immigration company. His last position was that of homestead 
inspector and he is now living retired, enjoying in well earned rest the 
fruits of his former toil. His wife passed away in 1919. They were the 
parents of five children, namely: William H., of this review; Angus B., who 
died of influenza in 1918 ; Blair, who was overseas with the first railway 
construction unit, organized the company at Toronto and remained with 
the army until after the close of the war, when he was mustered out with 
the rank of lieutenant colonel ; Leland, who is city salesman for the Lin- 
coln Woods Company at Edmonton ; and Alvin, who was a captain of the 
Twentieth Battery and went overseas in the fall of 1915, being killed in 
action on the 2d of May, 1917. The parents were both members of the 
Presbyterian church and Mr. Ripley was identified with the Independent 
Order of Foresters for a number of years. His political support has al- 
ways been given to the Conservative party. 

William H. Ripley pursued his education in the schools of Lethbridge, 
being a young lad at the time of the removal of the family to this city 
and after completing his high school work he started out in the business 
world as weigher at the mines and later acted as outside foreman at the 



244 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

mines for eight years. He afterward turned his attention to ranching- in 
connection with his brothers and success attended their efforts. Mr. Rip- 
ley later engaged in the transfer business and in addition thereto owns 
a farm and gives some of his time and attention to agricultural pursuits. 
He is identified with the Western Transfer Company, in which he is asso- 
ciated with Thomas and Oliver T. Long. They conduct the transfer 
business at Lethbridge, handling all the freight for the Canadian Pacific 
Railroad Company and they also cultivate a section of irrigated land and 
are owners of the ice business in Lethbridge, putting up sixty-five hundred 
tons of ice annually. The business, owing to capable management and 
wise control, has steadily grown and developed and is now one of the 
important commercial interests of this section of the province. 

In 1912 Mr. Ripley was married to Miss Edith Pearl Lloyd, who was 
born in Calgary, a daughter of Cyrus Lloyd, who removed from Ontario 
to Calgary, later took up his abode at Edmonton, and still later returned 
to Ontario, while at the present he is in New York State. He was a manu- 
facturer of baby carriages. To Mr. and Mrs. Ripley were born four chil- 
dren: Margaret Benson, now in school; Herbert Angus, also in school; 
Blair Lloyd; and Charles Farrar, The parents are members of the Pres- 
byterian church and fraternally Mr. Ripley is connected with the Masons. 
He has never been active in politics, preferring to devote his time to his 
business affairs, which, wisely and capably managed, have brought to 
him a gratifying measure of success. 



H. G. HOARE, D. D. S. 



Dentistry may be said to be almost unique among other occupations, 
as it is at once a profession, a trade and a business. Such being the case, 
it follows that in order to attain the highest success in it one must be 
thoroughly conversant with the theory of the art, must be expert with 
the many tools and appliances incidental to the practice of modern den- 
tistry and must possess business qualifications adequate to dealing with 
the financial side of the profession- In all of these particulars Dr. H. G. 
Hoare is well qualified and therefore has attained prestige among the 
able representatives of dentistry in Wetaskiwin, where he has followed his 
profession during the past two decades. 

H. G. Hoare was born in Toronto, Ontario, in 1877, his parents being 
John and Annie (Bagust) Hoare, who were natives of England but estab- 
lished their home in Ontario, Canada, in 1872. The father, who was ac- 
tively identified with business interests as the secretary of an oil and soap 
concern, passed away in the province of Ontario, where his widow still 
resides. He gave his political support to the Liberal party, while his re- 
ligious faith was indicated by his membership in the Anglican church, to 
which Mrs. Hoare also belongs. They became the parents of four chil- 
dren, three of whom are living. 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 245 

H. G. Hoare, the youngest member of his father's household, began 
his education in the schools of Toronto and continued his studies in a high 
school in the state of Kansas, while his professional training was received 
as a student in the dental department of the Northwestern University of 
Chicago, from which he was graduated in 1898. The following year he 
was graduated from the Royal College of Dental Surgeons of Toronto and 
he then began practice in Ontario, where he remained until 1903, when he 
came west to Alberta. Through the intervening period of twenty years 
he has resided at Wetaskiwin and has been accorded an extensive and 
gratifying practice in recognition of his superior skill and ability in the 
line of his chosen calling. He has done considerable postgraduate work 
to keep abreast with the most modern methods of dental surgery, pursu- 
ing a course in Columbia University of New York in the year 1919. His 
high standing in professional circles is indicated in the fact that he was 
chosen to the presidency of the Alberta Dental Association in the years 
1912 and 1913. He spent nearly two years in World war service in Eng- 
land. 

In politics Dr. Hoare is a Conservative and he has served as a member 
of the school board, the cause of education ever finding in him a stalwart 
champion. In religious belief he is a Methodist, belonging to the church 
of that denomination at Wetaskiwin, while fraternally he is identified with 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and with the Masons. He has 
served as master of his lodge and is also a member of the Royal Arch 
chapter and the Knights Templar commandery. His chief sources of recre- 
ation are golf and shooting. He has gained many warm friends during 
the period of his residence in Wetaskiwin, his salient characteristics being 
such as have made for popularity in both professional and social circles. 



FATHER HENRY GRANDIN. 0. M. I. 

Father Henry Grandin, who labored uninterruptedly in the cause of 
the Catholic church in Edmonton from 1875 until the time of his death, 
was born in France, May 19, 1853, and was a son of Florend and Modest 
(Morin) Grandin, both of whom spent their lives in France. The father 
was a butcher by trade and followed that business throughout his active 
life. His family numbered seven children, three of whom are living. 
Father Henry Grandin was the eldest. Three of the sons entered the 
priesthood, the others being Father Vital of France, who has been in one 
parish for thirty-three years, and Father Augustin Grandin, who is also 
a priest of France and who served as a chaplain in the army during the 
World war. 

Henry Grandin acquired his early education in the local schools of his 
native country and afterward attended the seminary at LeMans. He 
completed his studies in Lachine at Montreal, where he pursued his course 
for a year, and was then ordained in St. Albert, in 1875, by his uncle. 



246 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

Bishop Grandin. He was first assigned to duty at Edmonton, where he 
arrived in 1875. From that date he had charge of the whole Order of 
Oblates in Alberta and northern Saskatchewan, traveling most of the time 
in the performance of his churchly duties. He devoted his life to the 
cause to which he dedicated himself in young manhood and at the time of 
his death he had supervision over one hundred priests and had leadership 
over forty-eight missions. He was one of the oldest priests in the prov- 
ince, there being few active teachers of the Christian religion in Alberta 
when he arrived here, the number being altogether about five. There 
are but four priests living who have been in the province for a longer 
period than was Father Grandin. He never held a pastorate but always 
had charge of the missions for the Oblates Order and went back and forth 
throughout the country, directing the development of the work of the 
church and organizing its forces to reach out along constantly broadening 
lines for the upbuilding of the Catholic cause. 



OWEN WILLIAMS. 



A man of high intellectual attainments is Owen Williams, inspector of 
schools and a representative citizen of Cardston. He was born near Castle 
Harlech, Wales, on the 23rd of February, 1886, a son of Hugh and Mar- 
guerite (Jones) WilHams, both natives of Wales. The father has en- 
gaged in mining for many years and is now living at Blaenau Festiniog, 
Wales, at the age of fifty-nine years. Mrs. Williams died in 1892. 

In the acquirement of his education Owen Williams attended the com- 
mon schools of his birthplace and subsequently entered the University of 
North Wales at Bangor. He received the degree of B. A. from that in- 
stitution in 1908 and immediately engaged in educational work. For one 
year he taught in the schools at Trawsfynydd, Wales. In 1919 he came 
to the United States and toured the country with the Moelwyn Royal 
Male Choir. While in England Mr. Williams and other members of the 
choir had the honor of appearing before King Edward VII. Prior to leav- 
ing his native land Mr. Williams had corresponded with the Alberta de- 
partment of education and upon the completion of his tour he accepted 
a position as a teacher in the Willard school district near Gleason, Alberta, 
and he remained there for three months. Then for one year he taught 
the Magic school near Ponoka and subsequently he became vice-principal 
of the Ponoka town schools, which position he held a year and a half, 
when he was made principal of the schools, serving in that important 
capacity for four years. For two years he was principal of the schools at 
Claresholm and in 1919 he came to Cardston. He was appointed inspector 
of schools in that year and has since discharged the duties of this office 
to the complete satisfaction of all concerned. In his territory there are 
eighty-seven schools, one hundred and thirty-five public school depart- 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 247 

merits and fifteen high school departments, each of which he attempts to 
visit at least twice a year. He has three distinct divisions under his con- 
trol, the western, central and eastern, and also has seven Mennonite 
schools. Since coming to Cardston, Mr. Williams has devoted his entire 
time and attention to educational work and is readily conceded to be one 
of the most progressive educators in the province of Alberta. 

On the 22d of April, 1916, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Wil- 
liams to Miss Lillian Albright, a native of Nebraska, and a daughter of 
George A. Albright, who is conducting a marble business in Edmonton. To 
Mr. and Mrs. Williams two children have been born: Gwendolen and 
Douglas. 

Mr. Williams is a very public-spirited man, manifesting an active and 
helpful interest in all that tends to develop the community and promote 
its progress along lines leading to permanent advancement. Fraternally 
he is identified with the Masons and he holds membership in the blue 
lodge and in the Chief Mountain Lodge of Cardston, in which he is a 
junior warden. Being a man of fine education and of high intellectual 
attainments, Mr. Williams finds his greatest recreation in his library and 
he has two volumes of Welch manuscript, one dated 1346 and the other 
1148, among his many rare editions. 



MAURICE L. BROWN. 



One of the substantial men of Edmonton is Maurice L. Brown, who has 
worked his way steadily upward in the business world until he is now 
secretary and treasurer of the Hook Signs, Limited, and judged by the 
past his future career will be well worth watching. He was born at Wind- 
sor, Berkshire, England, May 22, 1895, a son of Stephen and Fannie (Ex- 
cell) Brown, who were also natives of that country and are now residents 
of Vancouver. They came to Canada about 1880 and the father was for 
many years engaged in the grocery business, but is now living retired, en- 
joying in well earned rest the fruits of his former toil. He and his wife 
are members of the Church of England. They became parents of six chil- 
dren, four of whom are living: Harold P., who is visual instructor at 
the University of Alberta ; Elsie, the wife of E. F. Peacock, a contractor of 
Los Angeles, California; Kathleen, the wife of A. J. Keel, an accountant 
of Vancouver; and Maurice L. 

Maurice L. Brown pursued his education in the schools of Windsor 
and of eastern Canada and became a newsboy in Kingston, Ontario, at a 
very early age, since which time he has provided for his own support. 
He arrived in Edmonton in 1912, when a youth of seventeen and here 
studied accounting, after which he followed the business for a short time. 
He then became connected with the Hook Signs, Limited, and working 
his way upward with the corporation was eventually elected secretary 
and treasurer of the company, which does a very large sign painting busi- 



248 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

ness. The excellence of its work and the probity of its business methods 
have secured for the firm an extensive patronage and its work is found 
in various parts of the province. The firm belongs to the Outdoor Ad- 
vertising Association of Canada and the United States and has widely dis- 
tributed outdoor painting displays for Edmonton. 

In 1916 Mr. Brown was married to Miss Luella Catherine Clyde, who 
was born in Valleyfield, Quebec, They have one child, Phyllis Luella, who 
is three years of age. The parents are members of the Presbyterian 
church and take an active and helpful interest in its work. Mr. Brown 
belongs to the Edmonton Beard of Trade and to the Edmonton Rotary 
Club and of the latter he is now a director, while for two years previous 
he was chairman of the entertainment committee. He finds recreation in 
golf and tennis but the major part of his time and attention is devoted to 
his business, which is steadily growing in volume and importance. His 
course has ever been a forward one since he started out to earn his living 
as a newsboy and as the years have passed he has advanced step by step 
until his position in commercial circles is a most creditable one. 



HUGH B. BROWN. 



Hugh B. Brown, one of the rising young barristers of the Lethbridge 
bar, was born in Salt Lake City, Utah, October 24, 1883, and is a son of 
Homer M. and Lydia (Brown) Brown, who are also natives of that city. 
The former is a son of Homer Brown, who was of that band of followers of 
the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints who settled Salt Lake 
City and in that locality he followed the occupation of farming. The 
mother is a daughter of James S. Brown, who was born in the New Eng- 
land states and removed to Salt Lake City many years ago, making the 
long and arduous trip across the hot, sandy plains to his destination in the 
year of 1847, traveling with one of the Mormon companies that sought to 
plant the faith in Utah. He made the first test of gold found in Cali- 
fornia. He spent seventeen years of his life in mission work among the 
Indians and the natives of the South Sea Islands. He was a very fluent 
speaker and accomplished much good for the cause which he represented. 
Mr. and Mrs. Homer M. Brown continued residents of Salt Lake City 
until 1900, when they removed to Cardston, Alberta, where the father 
followed the occupation of farming for a number of years. He is now liv- 
ing retired, however, and has returned to Salt Lake City, where he and 
his wife make their home. They had a family of fourteen children, seven 
sons and seven daughters. 

Hugh B. Brown, who was the fifth child and second son of the family, 
pursued his education in the public schools of his native city and in the 
high school at Logan, Utah, while later he pursued a course of study in 
the University of Utah, completing his work there in 1912. He after- 
ward came to Lethbridge, where he entered upon the study of law, to 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 249 

which he devoted five years, and in 1921 he was admitted to the bar. 
Here he began practice in connection with Hjalderman Ostlund, under the 
firm style of Ostlund & Brown, and although one of the younger repre- 
sentatives of the bar he has a nice practice and is regarded as one of the 
leading young solicitors of the city. He was married and had a family of 
three children when he began preparation for the profession, neverthe- 
less he managed to pursue his course of study and has steadily advanced 
in his chosen life work, his capability being now widely recognized. 

In 1908 Mr. Brown was united in marriage to Miss Zina Young Card, 
a daughter of Charles 0. Card, who was the founder of the town of Cards- 
ton. Her mother, Zina (Young) Card, is still living and is a daughter of 
Brigham Young, long leader of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day 
Saints. Mr. and Mrs. Brown have become parents of six children: Zina, 
Zola and LaJune, all in school; and Mary, Hugh and Charles M., who have 
not yet reached school age. The parents are members of the Church of 
Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and Mr. Brown is president of the Stake 
of Zion at Lethbridge. The stake includes the territory north of the city 
of Lethbridge with nine wards and four organized branches, and Mr. 
Brown has entire supervision over the stake. There are two councilors 
and twelve men to act in the council and under his guidance the work of 
the church is steadily growing and developing. Politically he is a repre- 
sentative of the union party. During the World war he volunteered for 
service in October, 1915, and organized a squadron of Mounted Rifles at 
Cardston, which formed part of the Thirteenth Overseas Mounted Rifles. 
With this command he went overseas in 1916 and was advanced to the 
rank of major, serving for three and a half years. After the close of his 
military experience he returned to Lethbridge and resumed the practice 
of law, to which he is now giving the major part of his time and attention. 
He has always been active in church work, however, and spent the years 
1904 and 1905 on a mission in England. He has done considerable public 
speaking, possessing excellent oratorical power, and he ever presents his 
cause in a clear and convincing way, whether it be a matter for the benefit 
of the church or the support of a client's interests before the court. 



WILLIAM PEARCE. 



William Pearce is a civil engineer of broad experience and superior 
ability who has been a most important factor in securing the develop- 
ment and utilization of the great resources of the Canadian Northwest. 
He is now in the service of the Canadian Pacific Railroad Company and 
for the past six years has been statistician to the department of coloniza- 
tion and development, with headquarters in Calgary, Alberta. He was 
born in Dunwich township, Elgin county, Ontario, February 1, 1848, and 
his parents were John and Elizabeth (Moorehouse) Pearce. He attended 
the county grammar school at St. Thomas, Ontario, and afterward became 



250 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

a student at Toronto University, in which he completed a course in civil 
engineering. He was engaged on private and railway surveys until 1873 
and from 1874 until 1881 had charge of the work of surveying standard 
meridians and parallels in Manitoba and the Northwest. In 1882 he was 
appointed Inspector of agencies and served on the Dominion Lands Board 
until 1884, when he was made superintendent of mines. In this connec- 
tion it was his duty to investigate, report and make recommendations on 
all claims to land, of which the greater part were made by half-breeds, in 
the district extending from the Red river to the Rocky mountains, and 
from the forty-ninth to the fifty-sixth parallel of latitude ; also all con- 
flicting claims to land by settlers or arising out of the confliction of vari- 
ous large interests. Ninety-nine per cent of these claims were settled 
in accordance with Mr. Pearce's recommendations and from 1898 until 
1901 he was largely occupied in adjusting railway land grants. For the 
next three years he was chief inspector of surveys and in 1904 he volun- 
tarily left the service of the government. He has since been connected 
with the administration of irrigated and other lands, and the lands in 
British Columbia for the Canadian Pacific Railway. He has also been 
largely engaged in reporting on the probable resources of many districts 
in Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta and British Columbia, particularly the 
drainage of the Athabasca and Peace rivers, and was the first person to 
direct attention to irrigation in Canada east of the Rocky mountains. 
Since October, 1916, he has been statistician to the department of coloni- 
zation and development of the Canadian Pacific Railway and his services 
are valued highly by that corporation. His work represents the highest 
degree of efficiency in his line and the nature of the projects with which 
he has been connected indicates most clearly his high professional 
standing. 

In September, 1881, Mr. Pearce was united in marriage to Miss Mar- 
garet A. Meyer, a daughter of L. G. Meyer, deceased, who was num- 
bered among the prominent residents of Seaforth, Ontario. Mr. Pearce 
is a member of the Anglican church and his political allegiance is given 
to the Conservative party. He is a member of the Manitoba Club of Win- 
nipeg and the Ranchmen's Club of Calgary and travel affords him his 
chief source of recreation. His contribution to the world's work has been 
one of great value and importance and entitles him to classification with 
the empire builders of the Canadian Northwest. That work, however, is 
not completed ; it is going on and on. It is said that every man has a 
hobby, and Mr. Pearce's hobby is a centralized board of research. His 
wide study, his broad experience, his comprehensive understanding of 
conditions in western Canada, have made him a firm believer in its future, 
its possibilities and its resources. To the end that all resources may be 
used wisely and well, he believes in the organization of a centralized 
board of research that shall carve out plans and institute methods for 
the wise use of the great natural resources of this section of the country, 
which he has studied from the period of its early settlement and de- 
velopment to the present-day era of progress and prosperity. He feels, 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 251 

however, that western Canada is yet in its infancy in comparison with 
what the future has in store for it if vision, judgment and intelhgently 
directed labor are allowed to play a part in the work of future growth. 



H. MILTON MARTIN. 



H. Milton Martin, insurance and financial agent and Belgian consul 
at Edmonton, is a man of varied talents and in the many fields in which 
he has operated his broad mind and strong personality have placed him 
in the vanguard, while his actions have at all times been characterized by 
a fidelity of purpose born of the desire to have every duty well done. He 
was born in Clintonville, New York, June 6, 1872. His parents, Francois 
Xavier and Azilda (Lafontaine) Martin, are both deceased. In the ac- 
quirement of an education H. Milton Martin attended Plateau Academy 
of Montreal and the College of Joliette at Joliette and entered business 
life at Vancouver, British Columbia, in 1887, filling clerical positions in 
that city until 1890. He then assumed the duties of assistant paymaster 
for the Columbia & Kootenay Railway during its construction, and in 
1891 he was made accountant and manager for the firm of Lowenberg- 
Harris & Company of New Westminster. He remained with that house 
until 1893 and then engaged in mining in the Kootenay district, being thus 
occupied until 1897. From 1898 until 1906 he was in the service of the 
government and during that period he filled various positions, the last 
being justice of the peace and Crown timber and land agent for the Yukon 
territory, in which he spent eight years. In 1906 he established his pres- 
ent business as an insurance and financial broker and he is now serving 
as president of the Mance Farming Company, Limited, while he is also the 
chief executive officer of St. Leonard's, Limited. He displays keen sagac- 
ity and marked administrative ability in the control of his business 
affairs and is now at the head of important interests. He also acts as 
consul for Belgium and is ably serving the interests entrusted to him, 
discharging his duties with efficiency, conscientiousness and tact. 

Mr. Martin's activities have touched the general interests of society 
to their betterment and he is a dominant force in any movement with 
which he is associated. From 1909 until 1914 he was a trustee of the 
separate schools and in 1912 he was chosen president of the Edmonton 
Board of Trade and was chairman of the civic interest committee of that 
organization from 1913 until 1918. He was chairman of the relief com- 
mittee of the North Alberta branch of the Canadian Patriotic Fund, from 
its organization meeting to the termination of its activity and is public 
administrator and official guardian for the North West Territories and 
commissioner of the Alberta subdivided properties act. From 1914 until 
1918 he was president of the Edmonton Insurance Agents Association and 
in 1917 and 1918 he served as president of the Canadian Club of this city. 
In political affairs he takes an active and prominent part and is recognized 



252 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

leader in the local councils of his party. In 1911-12 he was president of 
the Edmonton Association of Liberals and he has also served as alderman 
of the city during three years, completing his term of office in 1920. Dur- 
ing the World war he served as captain of the One Hundred and First 
Regiment of Edmonton Fusiliers and is now on the "Reserve of Officers". 
In 1908 Mr. Martin married Miss Beatrice Beck, a daughter of Hon. 
Mr. Justice N. D. Beck, and they have become the parents of four chil- 
dren, a son and three daughters. Mr. Martin is a Roman Catholic and 
also is a member of the Knights of Columbus, the Edmonton Club, the 
Kiwanis Club and the Edmonton Golf and Country Club, of which latter 
he was elected president for 1924; also vice president of the Alberta Golf 
Association for 1924-1925. He is imbued with the spirit of progress and 
has become widely known because of his public service, which has been of 
a most helpful character. Strong and purposeful, his efforts have been di- 
rected along constantly broadening lines of greater usefulness, and Ed- 
monton numbers him among its foremost citizens. 



DAVID JOHNSON GRIER. 



David Johnson Grier is one of the leading men of Macleod and his 
prominence has come to him by virtue of his identification with important 
enterprises and his activity in political life. He was born in Griersville, 
Ontario, on the 15th of January, 1857, a son of James and Mary (John- 
son) Grier, the former a native of Ireland and the latter born in the 
province of Ontario. The father came to this country in early life and 
emigrated to Ontario when eighteen years of age. He purchased land 
in St. Vincent township and engaged in farming there for twenty-five 
years. Subsequently he moved to Wireton, Ontario, where he was engaged 
in farming. In 1883 he came to Macleod and he followed agricultural 
pursuits here until his death on the 4th of July, 1918, at the age of ninety- 
four years. His wife died in February, 1918, when eighty-seven years of 
age. To their union seven children were born, six of whom are living: 
Jennie is the widow of John Steinhoff of Macleod; Mary Charlotte is the 
widow of Solan W. Cross of Ontario; Lillie J. is the widow of D. W. Davis, 
who was the first federal member of Alberta. Mrs. Davis resides in Mac- 
leod ; Marguerite L. is the wife of William Dunbar of Vancouver, British 
Columbia; David Johnson is the subject of this sketch; James P. was 
engaged in farming near Macleod, but he passed away in 1918, in his 
fifty-sixth year; and Curan is engaged in farming near Macleod. The 
father was an Orangeman and his political allegiance was given to the 
Conservative party. His religious faith was that of the Church of England. 

David Johnson Grier received his education in the public schools of 
his birthplace and after putting his textbooks aside entered the service of 
the Royal Northwest Mounted Police. He came to Macleod for three 
years and for one year was in the Indian department of the government. 




DAVID JOHNSON GRIER. 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 255 

Subsequently Mr. Grier homesteaded some land and ran cattle from Mon- 
tana to his ranch. He now owns two sections of well improved land 
near Macleod. In 1912 he assisted in the organization of The Spec- 
tator and in 1915 he bought the paper, becoming sole owner, and con- 
ducting it for some time. Later he leased it, and it is now known as the 
Macleod Times & Weekly News. He built the Empire Hotel in Macleod 
and still owns a half interest in the enterprise, and he also built the Union 
Bank building, which he sold. The upbuilding of Macleod has received 
a valuable impetus through his constructive activities. 

Mr. Grier has been twice married. His first wife was Laura Jones, a 
native of Ontario. She died in 1905, leaving four children : Roy V. is an 
employe in the freight department of the Canadian Pacific Railroad at 
Calgary, and is a veteran of the World war. He enlisted in the British 
army, was assigned to the motor transport service and saw active service 
overseas; Norman J. is engaged in farming near Macleod; James F. en- 
listed in the British army at Calgary and served overseas ; and William 
F., who was likewise in the service during the World war, but did not 
get overseas. Mr. Grier was married to Miss Clara C. Bingham, a native 
of England, in 1910 and they have four children : May C, David J., Mary 
Mona and Nina, all at home. 

Mr. Grier is a consistent communicant of the Church of England. Po- 
litically he is a stanch Conservative and for ten years he served as mayor 
of Macleod. In 1905 Mr. Grier was the Conservative candidate for the 
legislature for the Macleod constituency but was defeated by a small 
majority. He bears an unsullied reputation for honesty and ability in 
office and he enjoys the confidence and esteem of all who know him. 



ALEXANDER H. GOODWIN, D. D. S. 

Entering upon the practice of dentistry thirty-three years ago, Dr. 
Alexander H. Goodwin has acquired that skill which is the result of broad 
experience and conscientious effort and during the period of his residence 
in Vegreville he has gained a well established position in local professional 
circles, while his reputation also extends to the surrounding district. He 
was born in the province of New Brunswick, February 18, 1868, of the 
marriage of Cyrus N. and Elizabeth (Wells) Goodwin, also natives of that 
region. The father is deceased but the mother still resides in New Bruns- 
wick and has reached the venerable age of ninety-three years. To their 
union were born six children, five of whom are living, the subject of this 
review being the only member of the family to come to Alberta, except 
his brother, Rev. H. A. Goodwin. 

Alexander H. Goodwin obtained his early education in the public 
schools of New Brunswick and secured his professional training in the 
States, being graduated in 1889 from the College of Dental Surgery at 
Baltimore, Maryland. Two years later he came to this province, opening 



256 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

an office in Edmonton, where he successfully followed his profession until 
1903. In that year he removed to Vegreville, entering a homestead claim, 
and proved up on that property. In 1906 he organized the Vegreville 
Land Company and conducted that business until 1916, since which time 
he has engaged in the practice of dentistry. His thorough knowledge of 
the underlying principles of his profession is supplemented by marked 
mechanical skill and ingenuity and his services are in constant demand, 
leaving him little time for outside interests. 

Dr. Goodwin married Miss Selena Taylor, a native of the province of 
Ontario, and they have become the parents of four children, but the 
youngest, Jean, is deceased. Those who survive are: Elinor B., Lillian 
A. and William T. Dr. and Mrs. Goodwin attend the Union church and 
he is an adherent of the Liberal party. He has served as mayor of Vegre- 
ville, making a highly creditable record in that office, and fraternally he 
is identified with the Masonic order. He has the enthusiasm for Vegre- 
ville characteristic of its citizens and has witnessed much of the growth 
and development of the town, to which he has contributed his full quota. 
His professional activities have brought him a wide acquaintance and he 
is accorded the esteem of his fellow practitioners and also of the general 
public. 



REV. ALEXANDER McTAGGART. 

Rev. Alexander McTaggart, pastor of the Presbyterian church of St. 
Andrews, has the distinction of being the only minister who has ever been 
a member of the city council of Calgary. He was born at Burgoyne, Bruce 
district, Ontario, and comes of sturdy Scotch-Canadian stock. 

In the acquirement of his early education Alexander McTaggart at- 
tended the public schools of his birthplace and subsequently entered the 
University of Toronto, where natural ability was supported and supple- 
mented by a long course of training, followed by a theological course at 
Knox College, Toronto, which latter institution of learning has had the 
honor of being the Alma Mater of many famous divines. In 1903 he com- 
pleted his training and was ordained. A short time afterward he started 
west and Carnduff, Saskatchewan, was the first town of his ministry. For 
three years he remained there and in August, 1907, he located in Winni- 
peg as pastor of the Robertson Memorial church. During the seven years 
of his ministry there Mr. McTaggart not only built up a church, but he 
accomplished the harder task of making that church stand for unselfish 
service to the community. He did not regard the community about him 
as simply existing for his church, but he had the larger vision of his 
church existing for the community. Therefore he more readily gained 
the community for his church and notwithstanding the difficulties of the 
neighborhood, succeeded in building up a church with a membership of 
about three hundred and fifty and a Sunday evening attendance of about 
the same number. To some such a record may not seem particularly am- 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 257 

bitious, but when one considers the district that Hes around the Robertson 
Memorial church, the mass of varied and genuinely serviceable work car- 
ried on in connection with the institute is exceedingly creditable. The 
activities of the institute were not designed to bring glory to the church. 
Directly their aim was the good of the people and there they succeeded. 
Mr. McTaggart has always been enthusiastic about his work. The one 
activity that has always aroused his greatest interest, however, is the 
work among children. While pastor of the Robertson Memorial he set 
aside one Sunday of each month for a children's service. On that day the 
children chose the text of the sermon and there was a children's choir and 
child soloists. Mr. McTaggart was held in high confidence and esteem by 
all of his fellowmen and Winnipeg lost one of her most enterprising citi- 
zens when he resigned as pastor of the Robertson Memorial and came to 
Calgary, where the past nine years he has been pastor of the St. Andrew's 
Presbyterian church. 

Although Mr. McTaggart has devoted much of his time to his min- 
isterial duties, he has been active in public life and for six years served the 
city of Calgary as an alderman, during which time he made a very careful 
study of all civic problems and acquired a mass of very valuable informa- 
tion from his years of experience. A man of literary ability, he con- 
tributed a series of articles on municipal affairs to the Morning Albertan, 
which were of very great value. In welfare matters he is an authority 
perhaps unexcelled in the province. Mr. McTaggart has another distinc- 
tion in that he belongs to neither of the dominant parties. He is neither 
A. C. G. A. nor A. D. L. P. The fact that he broke through two such 
strong combinations is evidence of his strong personality and strength of 
character. Because of this unusual position he occupied a dominating 
place in the council. He was responsible neither to labor nor to the C. 
G. A. He was a representative of all the people all the time and when he 
believed a thing to be right, he did it, asking leave of no one. 



NORMAN T. BEEMAN, M. D. 

Dr. Norman T. Beeman has made the practice of medicine his life work 
and as owner of the Bellevue Hospital he is operating one of the most 
modern and complete institutions of the kind in southern Alberta. He was 
born in Essex county, Ontario, July 29, 1882, and his parents, Sebia and 
Emma (Fox) Beeman, were also natives of that province, in which the 
father spent his life, concentrating his attention upon the occupation of 
farming. The mother is still living in Ontario. 

Dr. Beeman first came to Alberta in 1890, when eight years of age, 
but soon afterward returned to Ontario, and in the public schools of that 
province he obtained his preliminary education. In 1910 he was graduated 
from the medical department of the University of Toronto and then started 
for the west, beginning his professional career at Diamond City, in the 
(17) 



258 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

Lethbridge City district of Alberta, where he remained until 1912, when 
he removed to Mag-rath. He maintained an office there until the outbreak 
of the World war in 1914 and then enlisted in the government medical 
service. In the following year he was sent overseas, remaining abroad 
until 1919, in which year he located at Bellevue, in the Rocky Mountain 
district of Alberta, where he has since made his home. He purchased 
Bellevue Hospital, which at that time was operated under very inefficient 
management, and at once set about the task of converting it into a modern 
institution. He has supplied it with the most complete surgical equip- 
ment and installed other needed improvements, expending about sixty 
thousand dollars upon the building. He acts as superintendent of the 
hospital, which ranks with the best in this part of the province and is a 
credit to Bellevue and the surrounding district, standing as a monument 
to his enterprising spirit and progressive management. 

Dr. Beeman married Miss Nellie Rusk, who is a graduate nurse, and 
her parents were natives of the province of Ontario. To this union has 
been born a son, John S. Before locating in Bellevue, Dr. Beeman was 
connected for a time with the mounted police in northern Alberta in a 
professional capacity and the success which he now enjoys is the reward 
of untiring effort and that ability which is acquired through broad experi- 
ence and close study. He stands high in his profession and Bellevue has 
greatly benefited by his citizenship. 



REV. E. PIERCE GOULDING. 

Rev. E. Pierce Goulding, rector of All Saints church at Edmonton and 
a well known divine of the Anglican faith in Alberta, was born in Dublin, 
Ireland, in 1883, his parents being Walter and Elizabeth (Pierce) Gould- 
ing, both of whom were natives of Wexford county, Ireland. They were 
married in Dublin and the father engaged in business in his native country 
as a timber merchant. There he passed away in 1912. He is survived by 
his widow, who still makes her home in Dublin. They were members of 
the Church of England and Mr. Goulding belonged to the Order of For- 
esters and to the Masonic fraternity. In politics he was a unionist. 

E. Pierce Goulding was the eldest in a family of six children, five of 
whom are living. He acquired his education in St. Patrick's grammar 
school of Dublin and in Trinity University of that city, while his theolog- 
ical studies were pursued in Emmanuel University at Saskatoon, Saskatch- 
ewan, where he was graduated with the class of 1910. In the same year 
he was ordained to the ministry and was appointed assistant to Christ 
church at Saskatoon. He afterward became rector of St. Paul's church 
at Fort Williams, Ontario, and was called to All Saints cathedral at Edmon- 
ton, in 1918, when he became rector and in 1922 was made canon residen- 
tiary. He is a fluent, earnest and convincing speaker and his public 
addresses carry conviction to the minds of his hearers. Mr. Pierce Gould- 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 259 

ing had considerable business experience before he entered upon prepara- 
tion for the ministry, being in his father's office in Dublin for a number 
of years. He also taught in St. George's College for one year and in 1907 
he came to Canada under Bishop Lloyd, making his way to Saskatchewan 
to do missionary work. Since that time he has given his service to the 
church and he is a member of both the provincial and general synod of the 
Church of England in Canada. He inspires his parishioners with much of 
his own zeal and interest in the cause and his labors have been far- 
reaching and resultant. 

In 1912 Mr. Pierce Goulding was married to Miss Ina Smith of Dublin, 
Ireland, where she was reared and educated. They have two children: 
Enid and Terence, aged seven and four years, respectively. He is well 
known in Masonic circles, was chaplain of Royal Lodge, A. F. & A. M. 
at Fort Williams, and is now serving as the chaplain of the Irish Protestant 
Association at Edmonton. He belongs to the Rotary Club at Fort Williams 
and is now a member of the Gyro Club of Edmonton. He also sei"ved for 
two years as a member of the school board at Fort Williams and as vice 
president of the British Empire Alliance. His cooperatio»n is given to all 
projects and causes which he believes will prove of public benefit, or which 
act as uplift agencies and he is now a member of the boys work board 
of Alberta, in which he is closely studying the problem of the young with 
the purpose of safeguarding the youth of the land in every possible way, 
in order to develop the highest standards of manhood and citizenship. His 
labors are indeed an effective force in the moral uplift of the province. 



LESLIE C. COX. 



Leslie C. Cox, barrister and solicitor, is a man of high intellectual 
attainments and is prominently known in both educational and professional 
circles in this province. He was born in Bowmanville, Ontario, on the 
26th of April, 1890, a son of Christopher and Lillian (Hill) Cox, both of 
whom are living in Bowmanville, where the father is a successful agricul- 
turist. Mr. and Mrs. Cox are the parents of five children, Leslie C, whose 
name introduces this review, being the eldest. Leslie C. and a sister, 
Mrs. C. C. Hartman of Olds, are the only members of the family living in 
the province of Alberta. Mrs. Hartman's husband is a physician and 
surgeon of Olds. 

In the acquirement of his education Leslie C. Cox attended the public 
schools of his native community and in due time was graduated from the 
Bowmanville high school. He graduated from the University of Toronto 
in 1913, with the B. A. degree and subsequently entered Johns Hopkins 
University, where he was a student from 1914 to 1917, and that institution 
conferred the Ph. D. degree upon him in the latter year. He was a holder 
of the Rogers Fellowship while at Johns Hopkins. From 1917 to 1918 
he acted as assistant professor of Latin at Hamline University, St. Paul, 



260 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

Minnesota, and from 1918 to 1919 he was professor of Latin at that school. 
In 1919 he determined to take up the study of law and entered the offices 
of MacKay, McDonald & Wells at Edmonton, one of the best law firms in 
the province. Later he was associated with Friedman & Lieberman, and 
on the 25th of September, 1922, he was admitted to the Alberta bar, and 
he is now a member of the firm of Mackenzie & Cox, Mr. Cox takes care 
of the practice in Wainwright, while his partner looks after the clientele 
at Chauvin and they enjoy an extensive patronage in both towns. Although 
he has engaged in active practice but a short time Mr. Cox has won a 
position for himself among the members of the Alberta bar and a suc- 
cessful career is predicted for him by his many friends. 

Mr. Cox was married to Helen M., eldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
C. E. Smith of Edmonton, on the 11th of August, 1923. 



JOHN McNeill. 



A forceful and resourceful business man is John McNeill, who is con- 
ducting his interests under the name of the Twin City Transfer Company. 
In this connection he has built up a business of large and gratifying pro- 
portions that stands as a visible evidence of his enterprise, determina- 
tion, close application and progressiveness. Mr. McNeill was born in 
Glasgow, Scotland, on the 27th of January, 1871, and is a son of William 
and Elizabeth (Bryce) McNeill, who were also natives of the land of hills 
and heather, where they spent their lives. The mother passed away in 
1892, while the father, surviving for five years, was called to his final 
rest in 1897. He was a wholesale provision merchant and met with sub- 
stantial success in the conduct of his business affairs. Both were mem- 
bers of the Presbyterian church and Mr. McNeill was a Conservative in 
his political views. To him and his wife were born six children, five of 
whom, all sons, are living. 

John McNeill, the third child in order of birth, pursued his education 
in the schools of his native city and following his father's death assumed 
the management of the provision business, which he carried on for about 
twenty years, taking charge thereof when a youth of but eighteen. He 
prospered in his undertaking, building up a very substantial trade but 
with the desire to come to Canada he sold the business to his brother in 
1910. It was his intention to engage in farming here, having come with 
a Canadian Pacific Railroad colony of about one hundred people, including 
Scotch, English and Irish. The people from Scotland traveled together 
and first made their way to Strathmore, where some of the number set- 
tled, while others went to look over the Canadian Pacific Railroad land 
twenty-four miles south of Sedgewick and there took up their abode. Mr. 
McNeill purchased a thousand acres of land at thirteen dollars per acre 
on the ten-year payment plan. He built thereon a house and barn and 
fenced a portion of his tract. In connection with a neighbor he purchased 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 261 

a big gasoline engine to furnish motor power for the farm work. Up to 
this time he had never seen a gasoline engine, but he took charge thereof 
and broke two hundred acres of land for himself and an equal amount 
for his partner, after which he broke land for other Scotchmen, plowing 
altogether twelve hundred acres in the summer of 1910. In September 
of that year two men drove to his house late at night and asked to be 
directed to Caster. He put them on their way but two hours later 
these same men returned and again asked the way to Caster. Mr. Mc- 
Neill took them in, keeping them all night. He showed them over his 
farm and they seemed so well pleased with it that they offered to pay 
him fifteen dollars per acre and also pay him for the breaking and im- 
provement that he had placed thereon. Thus it was that he came into 
possession of his first Canadian money. He was given a week in which 
to make arrangements to move and he went to Sedgewick but found that 
there was nothing to be rented there save a small two-room shack. He 
then took an option on a half section of land south of Sedgewick, for 
which he was to pay twenty-three dollars per acre and to hold it he paid 
fifty dollars for the option. He then tried to get the sale papers ready 
but solicitors could not do the work then and because of the illness of 
his baby and the fact that the local doctor could not tell the trouble Mr. 
McNeill brought his family to Edmonton in order to get medical aid here. 
The hospitals being full, he rented a house on Ross street and arranged 
for a doctor to care for the little one. Pleased with Edmonton and its 
prospects he decided to remain here. He had a team and wagon left 
from the sale of his farm, so with these he brought to Edmonton the 
little furniture that he had and has since made his home in this city. 
Everything argued well for the future. His baby improved at once 
on getting to Edmonton and Mr. McNeill found immediate employment 
by answering an advertisement in a window for a man to haul coal. He 
hauled two loads and quit but this opened up to him a line of business, 
for on the 1st of November, 1910, he purchased the Twin City Transfer 
business, which then consisted of two horses and a little shack, ten by 
sixteen feet. His business grew very rapidly and in 1912 he built half 
of his present building, twenty-five by seventy feet, and increased the 
number of his horses to twenty. In 1914 he doubled the capacity of his 
barns and increased his horses to thirty. Today he is utilizing in his 
business thirty head of horses, eight auto trucks, fifteen McLaughlin 
automobiles and has a storage warehouse on One Hundred and Third 
street, while six months ago he took over the old Marshall Wells build- 
ing for a storehouse. Both warehouses have trackage and his equipment 
is thoroughly modern in every particular. In 1918 he purchased a large 
building on Fourteenth street, thus securing a brick garage and in Octo- 
ber, 1922, he rented a large garage, one hundred by one hundred and 
fifty feet. He employs fifty-three men, being today the largest individual 
employer of labor in Edmonton. The Twin City Transfer Company has 
exclusive privileges with all railway companies entering the city, so far 
as taxi service is concerned. It is also baggage agent for the Canadian 



262 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

National Railroad, the Grand Trunk Pacific and the Alberta & Great 
Waterways Railroad. It also has the contracts for moving all the scenery 
for the local theatres and does a large business in packing and crating 
furniture, while pool cars are made up for all points east and west of 
Edmonton. The business is today one of the largest of the kind in west- 
ern Canada and stands as a visible evidence of the indefatigable enter- 
prise and progressive spirit of Mr. McNeill, who is sole proprietor. He 
handles all the business for the MacDonald Hotel and several other of the 
hotels of the city and he makes a specialty of piano moving, having the 
patronage of all the piano houses of Edmonton and keeping a crew of 
men for this particular work. The company has handled one hundred 
and forty-five pianos in two weeks. There is also a crew of men for 
crating and hauling furniture. Many interesting and some weird ex- 
periences have come to Mr. McNeill in the course of his business. In 
1911 three strangers came to his office and each stored two trunks. On 
Mr. McNeill's arrival at his office early one morning one of these men was 
waiting to get in and said he wished to open one of his trunks. Mr. Mc- 
Neill admitted him and was then called into the front office. When he 
finished his business there he returned to the back and saw the fellow 
lying on the floor. Examining him he found that he had taken a revolver 
from the trunk and had blown his head off. The fellow had a letter in 
his pocket saying that he had come there for the purpose of suicide and 
told whom to notify. On another occasion a young fellow, twenty years 
of age, visited Mr. McNeill and said he was broke and wished to borrow 
ten dollars on his trunk. Mr. McNeill told him to open the trunk that he 
might see what was in it. And he did so. On top was a Bible and a 
photograph of the boy's parents. Mr. McNeill recognized the parents as 
old friends of his in Scotland and asked the boy why he was here. The 
answer was that he had run away from home two years before and Mr. 
McNeill told him to sit down and write a letter to his mother, w^hich 
he did, whereupon Mr. McNeill gave him twenty dollars and a job. The 
boy continued in his employ for some time and is now a substantial busi- 
ness man of Edmonton. Throughout his life Mr. McNeill has extended 
a helping hand to those in need. On one occasion his wife advertised 
for a servant and three girls applied, one of whom was Scotch and she 
was given the preference. She did not come, however, after being en- 
gaged and the following week Mr. McNeill met her on the street and 
asked her why she didn't come. She said that she had a better job but 
the following week he was called to the hospital and found the girl there 
dead. He had known her parents in Scotland also and he buried the girl 
and notified her father and mother. These are but a few of the many 
incidents where he has extended assistance and aid in an hour of need. 
On two occasions Sir Harry Lauder visited Edmonton and on both visits 
has been entertained by Mr. McNeill. He also drove the Prince of Wales 
in one of his taxis in his visit to Edmonton in 1921. The Prince left his 
hat in the taxi and Mr. McNeill has it as a souvenir of the visit of His 
Royal Highness to this city. 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 263 

On the 27th of June, 1893, Mr. McNeill was married to Miss Jennie 
Cuthbert McKenzie of Glasgow, Scotland, and to them have been born 
five sons and a daughter: Mary, who is the wife of Donald Moore, who 
conducts a store of ladies' ready-to-wear goods in Edmonton; William, 
who is at the head of his father's taxi business ; John, who conducts the 
Lines garage at Edmonton; Hugh, who is operating the garage on Four- 
teenth street in Edmonton; Alexander, who is employed in the transfer 
office; and Guy, in school. Mr. and Mrs. McNeill are members of the 
Presbyterian church and he belongs to the Masonic fraternity. In these 
associations are found the rules which govern his conduct and shape 
his relations with his fellowmen. He is also a member of the Kiwanis 
Club. He is not interested in politics and takes no active part therein 
but devotes all of his time to his business and to the good work that he 
can do in the world, for the spirit of brotherhood is strong within him. 



ALBERT L. WOOD. 



Albert L. Wood, one of the enterprising merchants and highly re- 
spected citizens of Taber, is a member of a family which for nearly thirty 
years has been closely and prominently identified with the upbuilding 
of Southern Alberta, experiencing all of the hardships and privations 
of life on the frontier and rejoicing in the transformation that has been 
effected as the work of development has been carried forward. A native 
of the United States, Albert L. Wood was born at Salt Lake City, Utah, 
June 21, 1880, a son of William Wood, who came to Canada in 1893. He 
settled near Cardston, Alberta, during the formative period in the history 
of that district and engaged in the raising of cattle. He opened the first 
meat market in Cardston and his success in that venture led him to es- 
tablish similar enterprises at Raymond and Macleod. He thus became 
the owner of three of the leading meat markets in this part of the prov- 
ince and was also extensively interested in the coal industry, being a 
most important factor in securing the development of the mines in this 
section of Alberta. He was a man of broad vision and aided in laying 
the foundation upon which has been built the present prosperity and 
greatness of western Canada. Since her husband's death Mrs. Wood has 
made her home in Salt Lake City, Utah. 

In 1893, when thirteen years of age, Albert L. Wood accompanied his 
parents on their journey to Canada and after completing his education 
he joined his father in the meat business, assisting him in its operation 
until 1904. He then entered the field of general merchandising and was 
associated with his father-in-law for a time. In 1906 he formed a part- 
nership with his brother-in-law, Byard Smith, and the firm of Wood & 
Smith has been successfully continued. They carry a large stock of gen- 
eral merchandise, handling the best the market affords, and have ever 
made it a point to give to their patrons full value for the amount expended. 



264 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

Consequently their business has enjoyed a continuous and healthful growth 
and theirs is the pioneer establishment of Taber. They occupy an enviable 
position in business circles of the district and their store is modern and 
up-to-date in every particular and a credit to the community. 

In 1904 Mr. Wood was united in marriage to Miss Evelyn Probert, a 
daughter of William Probert, who was one of the early settlers of this 
district and owned and operated the first mercantile establishment in 
Taber. He was born in Yorkshire, England, and his wife was also a 
native of that locality. Mr. and Mrs. Wood have become the parents of 
six children but the second in order of birth died in infancy. Those who 
survive are: Holly, Fay, Dell, Isabelle and Evelyn. Mr. Wood is well 
known as an alert, energetic and capable business man whose word can 
always be relied upon, and his public spirit has prompted his earnest co- 
operation in every movement seeking the welfare and improvement of 
the community in which he has so long resided. 



HJALDERMAR OSTLUND, K. C. 

Hjaldermar Ostlund, member of the Lethbridge bar, was born in Elsi- 
nore, Utah, December 14, 1878, and is a son of Jonas and Bertha (An- 
strum) Ostlund, both of whom were natives of Sweden. The father, who 
was born in March, 1840, is still living, but the mother, whose birth oc- 
curred in 1837, passed away in November, 1915. They were married in 
Minnesota, having crossed the Atlantic to the United States in 1860. After 
living for some time in Minnesota they removed to Utah and there the 
father was engaged in merchandising at Elsinore, conducting his store 
with success at that place for about a quarter of a century. He has now 
retired from business and is spending the evening of his days in the 
enjoyment of well-earned rest. He is a member of the Church of Jesus 
Christ of Latter-day Saints and his political support has long been given 
to the republican party. To him and his wife were born nine children, 
five of whom are living: Albin, who is a farmer of Wrentham, Alberta; 
Hjaldermar ; Daniel, who follows farming at New Dayton, Alberta ; Hulda, 
the wife of Lonzo Nelson, a farmer of Stirling, Alberta; and Clarence, a 
school teacher at Barnwell. 

In his youthful days Hjaldermar Ostlund was a pupil in the public 
schools of Elsinore, Utah, and afterward attended the Brigham Young 
University at Provo, that state. He was graduated there with the Bach- 
elor of Arts degree and later took up the study of law at Osgoode Hall in 
Toronto, where he completed his course in 1911. He was admitted to the 
bar in Alberta in February, 1914, and began practice at Lethbridge, 
where he has continued. He entered upon the work of the profession 
independently but is now associated with Hugh B. Brown. He was the 
first representative of the Mormon faith to be made King's Counsel in 




HJALDERMAR OSTLUND. 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 267 

the British empire. His ability has brought him prominently to the front 
as a member of the bar and his entire career reflects credit and honor 
upon the profession which he has chosen as his life work. 

On the 16th of November, 1902, Mr. Ostlund was married to Miss 
Anna M. Brandley, who was born in Richfield, Utah, and was educated 
in her native state. She is a daughter of Theodore Brandley, a merchant 
of Richfield. Mr. and Mrs. Ostlund have become parents of five chil- 
dren : Mary, Anna, Theodora and Dow, all in school ; and Raymond, who 
is but two years of age. 

Mr. Ostlund has always been a member of the Church of Jesus Christ 
of Latter-day Saints and has served as second councilor to George W. 
Green for seven years. He is now a member of the state high council. 
Politically he is a Liberal but finds little time for activity along political 
lines, preferring to devote his entire attention to his professional interests 
and duties. He now has a large clientage and his devotion to his clients' 
interests has become proverbial. 



LEVERETT GEORGE DeVEBER, M. D. 

Dr. Leverett George DeVeber is numbered among the pioneer physi- 
cians of Alberta. He makes his home in Lethbridge and for many years 
was extensively and successfully engaged in the active practice of medicine 
and surgery in this part of the province but at the present time has largely 
put aside all business cares, although he is still sei-ving as health officer 
of this city. He is also giving much attention and valuable aid to govern- 
ment affairs and is recognized as one of the political leaders of this section. 
His life has ever been actuated by motives leading to constructive work, 
whether in relation to civic and government interests or his profession, 
and he is today one of the most valued and honored residents of Lethbridge. 

Leverett George DeVeber was born in St. John, New Brunswick, on the 
10th of February, 1849, and is a representative of one of the old and 
honored families of that section of the country. His great-grandfather 
was Colonel Gabriel DeVeber, who won his rank while serving in the 
British army at the time the American colonies gained their independence. 
After the war was over he was given a large grant of land in New Bruns- 
wick, on which he settled and there spent his remaining days. His son, 
L. H. DeVeber, born in New Brunswick, devoted his life to the wholesale 
dry goods, hardware and grocery business, which he established and 
conducted to the time of his demise and which was then taken over by 
his son, Richard S. DeVeber. The latter was born in St. John, in 1820, 
and for years was at the head of the largest wholesale business of that 
kind in the province, the interests being conducted under the firm style 
of L. H. DeVeber & Son. He was married in St. John to Miss Caroline 
Beer, who was born in England, a daughter of Thomas Beer, who was also 
born in England and became a captain in the English navy. He married 



268 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

a Miss Leonard and subsequently purchased a splendid farm at Sussex, 
New Brunswick, there spending- the remainder of his days. R. S. DeVeber 
was a relative of Mrs. Sarah Boies Penrose, mother of United States 
Senator Penrose, who died recently. To Richard S. and Caroline (Beer) 
DeVeber were born five children, three of whom are living-, the Doctor 
being the eldest. Mrs. Creighton, a sister, lives in Brantford, Ontario, 
and a brother, Lebaron B., is manager of the Bank of Montreal at Nelson, 
British Columbia. The parents were members of the Church of E»ngland, 
and in politics the father was a Liberal. He passed away in 1892, being 
then seventy-two years of age. 

Leverett George DeVeber pursued his education in the schools of Kings- 
ton, New Brunswick, and of St. John and later attended the Collegiate 
Institute and also King's College at Windsor, Nova Scotia. He began 
preparation for his professional career as a student at Hai'vard College, 
where he studied for a year and then went to England, where he entered 
Bartholomew Hospital of London, being graduated in medicine there with 
the class of 1870. Subsequently he pursued further study for a year in 
Philadelphia, where he was graduated from the University of Pennsyl- 
vania. With his return to St. John he entered upon the practice of medi- 
cine, remaining there for six years, after which he removed to the west and 
joined the Royal Northwest Mounted Police, being associated therewith for 
a number of years and being made staff surgeon. He then entered upon 
the practice of his profession at Macleod, Alberta, remaining there until 
1890. In that year he removed to Lethbridge, where he has since made his 
home. There were few physicians in the province at the time of his 
arrival and he is therefore classed with the pioneer representatives of the 
profession. He continued in the active practice of medicine and surgery 
from 1882 until 1915, when he retired. In the meantime his practice had 
reached extensive proportions, as the public recognized his superior ability 
in coping with the ravages of disease. For a number of years he has been 
health officer of Lethbridge and still fills the position. 

In 1887 Dr. DeVeber was married to Miss Rachael Ann Ryan, who 
was born in Melbourne, Victoria, a daughter of John and Ann Ryan, then 
living in Australia. The father was in the British army for a number 
of years and served all through the Indian mutiny. To Dr. and Mrs. 
DeVeber two children were born : Marion Frances, now the wife of Fran- 
cis Dunn, who is engaged in shipbuilding in the north of England ; and 
Leverett Sandys, who is in the Bank of Montreal at Toronto. 

Dr. DeVeber belongs to the Episcopal church, while his wife is of the 
Roman Catholic faith. He also has membership in the Canadian Order 
of Foresters. In politics he is a Liberal and was appointed to the house 
of Regina in 1898 by acclamation, remaining a member of that body for 
fifteen years, entering upon his third term at the foundation of the prov- 
ince. He became a member of the first cabinet and in 1905 was chosen 
for senatorial honors. Since that time he has been a member of the 
senate and throughout the intervening years he has given his aid and 
influence on the side of development, progress and constructive legisla- 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 269 

tion. He has been greatly interested in health affairs and has exercised 
his official prerogatives to support wise and just laws in regard to every- 
thing that in any way influences health. He still belongs to the Provincial 
and to the Canadian Medical Associations and while he does not engage 
in active practice at the present time he is interested in all that has to 
do with the advance work of the profession. In young manhood he took 
active part in all kinds of sports, especially rowing, and was very promi- 
nent in this connection in New Brunswick. He also played cricket and 
baseball and participated in shooting, fishing and hunting events. His 
life has ever been one of normal development, actuated by high purposes 
and lofty ideals, and at all times in his career he has been the exponent of 
the most advanced standards of manhood and of service to his fellowmen. 



WILLIAM E. HAY. 



Ranking high in the educational circles of the province of Alberta is 
William E. Hay, superintendent of the city schools of Medicine Hat. He 
has devoted his life to the profession and his progress has been continuous, 
his developing powers enabling him to solve more and more accurately 
the problems that continually confront the teacher. Mr. Hay is of Scotch 
descent, although born in Ontario, his birth having occurred in Listowel, 
on the 27th of August, 1880. His grandfather, William Hay, was born 
in Scotland, and crossing the Atlantic, he became a pioneer settler of 
Fergus, Ontario, where, in the midst of the forest, he cleared a tract of 
land and developed a farm, bringing his field under a high state of cultiva- 
tion and improvement. His son, Andrew Hay, was born at Fergus, Ontario, 
and became a contractor and builder. In 1910 he removed to Calgary, 
where he is still at the head of a large and substantial business, although 
seventy-five years of age, for he is a man of great physical strength and 
endurance. His religious faith in that of the Presbyterian church and 
fraternally he is connected with the Canadian Order of Foresters. In 
politics he is a Liberal and keeps well informed on the vital questions and 
issues of the day, being also a well informed man on many general topics 
outside of politics. He wedded Mary McMillan, also a native of Ontario, 
in which province their marriage was celebrated. She is a daughter of 
Walter McMillan, who was a native of Scotland and was a sailor in early 
life, becoming first mate on vessels that sailed the Great Lakes. He also 
farmed for a time in Ontario, To Mr, and Mrs, Andrew Hay one child 
was born, William E. Hay of this review. 

In the public schools of his native province William E. Hay pursued 
his education until graduated from the high school at Listowel, with the 
class of 1899. He obtained his first professional certificate at Elora, 
Ontario, and he also attended the Normal School at London, Ontario, in 
1903. At intervals before completing his education he taught school, 
being a teacher at Maplewood, Ontario, from 1900 until 1903. After com- 



270 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

pleting his Normal School training he came to Alberta, settling at Strath- 
cona, where he received an appointment under D. S. McKenzie. He taught 
at Strathcona until 1906, and then went to Medicine Hat and was principal 
of the Montreal Street school until September, 1908, when he became 
principal of the Practice school of the new Normal School opened in Cal- 
gary, being the first to fill the position of principal there. He remained 
there until 1911, and then accepted the position of principal of the high 
school and supervisor of schools at Medicine Hat. A little later he was 
advanced to the position of superintendent of schools in this city. He was 
made the first school superintendent here and under his administration the 
educational system of the city has been steadily developed. There is now 
a staff of seventy-five teachers, with twenty-six hundred pupils, who are 
housed in eight substantial school buildings. Under his guidance, too, the 
methods of instruction have been advanced and improved and the school 
system of the city is one of which his fellow townsmen have every reason 
to be proud. He holds to high ideals in all of his work and throughout his 
life has embraced every opportunity for personal advancement in his 
chosen calling. He has taken two degrees from Queen's University at 
Kingston, Ontario, that of Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Pedagogy, and 
he is now filling the position of member of the board of governors of the 
University of Alberta. His ideals are high and he constantly endeavors to 
reach their level. 

In 1908 Mr. Hay was united in marriage to Miss Mary Rae, who was 
born in Boissevain, Manitoba, a daughter of James Rae, mentioned else- 
where in this work. Mr. and Mrs. Hay have become the parents of four 
children: Robert, Gordon, Stewart and Cameron, aged, respectively, 
twelve, ten, eight and seven years. The religious faith of the family is 
that of the Presbyterian church, in which both parents are active. Mr. 
Hay is a member of the session or elders of the church and is acting clerk 
of the session. He has also been superintendent of the Sunday school 
since 1913 and every branch of church work finds in him a generous and 
loyal supporter. He is likewise a member of the Rotary Club and co- 
operates in all plans and measures of that organization for the benefit and 
upbuilding of the city, the extension of its trade relations and the adoption 
of high standards of civic service. He is a Liberal in politics but is not an 
aspirant for office, prefering to concentrate his entire time and attention 
upon his professional interests and duties. 



HOWARD HAVELOCK HEPBURN, M. D., C. M. 

Dr. Howard H. Hepburn, physician and surgeon of Edmonton, pos- 
sesses those qualities through which success comes as a natural se- 
quence, and deep and continued interest in his profession has led to the 
acquirement of broad knowledge and skill. He was born at Hillview, in 
the province of Manitoba, in 1885, and is a son of William Hepburn, a 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 271 

native of Morewood, Ontario, born in 1857, and married in Rapid City, 
Manitoba, in 1881, to Miss Margaret McLean, and they now reside in 
Edmonton. 

Howard Havelock Hepburn acquired his early education in the public 
schools of Manitoba and later attended the Collegiate Institute at Bran- 
don, after which he obtained a teacher's license. He then completed 
a course in the Regina Normal School, and taking up educational work, 
he spent two years as a teacher in the public schools of Assiniboia. In 
the latter part of 1905 he came to Edmonton and soon afterward filed 
on a homestead forty miles north of the city, intending to teach school 
in that locality. But the schoolhouse was not erected, and abandoning 
his claim. Dr. Hepburn returned to Edmonton. In the fall of 1906 he 
went to Montreal and became a medical student at McGill University, 
from which he was graduated in 1910, with the degrees of M. D. and C. M. 
He was then made interne at the Montreal General Hospital and acted 
in that capacity for nearly three years, when he received an appointment 
from the Siamese government. He remained in the medical service of 
that country for about one and a half years, when ill health compelled 
him to abandon his duties, and while recuperating he visited Egypt, later 
going to Germany. He took postgraduate courses in Berlin and Hei- 
delberg, specializing in surgery and in the study of the brain and nervous 
system, and was in Germany's capital when war was declared between 
that country and the triple entente. He was under police supervision, 
with other foreigners, for two weeks, when with a companion he escaped 
to Holland and soon afterward secured passage to England. He was 
placed in the English secret service, with which he was connected until 
August 22, 1914, when he was commissioned a lieutenant in the Medical 
Corps of the Royal Army. He was assigned to Stationary Hospital, No. 
12, at Chatham, England, and went with that unit to France, landing at 
Havre, August 25, 1914. For five years he was in active service and 
during that period acted in practically every capacity possible to a medi- 
cal officer in the field. Fbr three years he had charge of the surgical di- 
vision of a field hospital and in 1917, on the inauguration of the drive for 
Passchendaele, Dr. Hepburn was wounded and was confined in a hospital 
in England for about three months. On recovering he returned to France 
and was detailed to General Hospital No. 4 at Camiers, which was sup- 
plied with eighteen hundred beds, and he was later placed in command 
of the hospital. In 1918 he moved this hospital unit to Dunkirk, France, 
close to the Belgian front, there remaining until August, 1919, when he 
received his papers of repatriation and went to England. On September 
15, 1919, he sailed from Liverpool for Montreal on the Megantic and came 
to Edmonton to visit relatives. In the latter part of that month he was 
demobilized and has since followed his profession uninterruptedly in this 
city. 

Dr. Hepburn has been in many parts of the world, and being a keen 
observer and the possessor of a retentive memory, he has gained a wide 
fund of information. During the period from 1913 until 1919 he visited 



272 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

Japan, China, Assan, the Straits Settlements, S:am, Ceylon, Egypt, Italy, 
Monte Carlo, France, Switzerland, Germany, Holland, England, Scotland 
and Wales. He is a member of the Edmonton Club and the Mayfair Golf 
and Country Club and in religious faith he is a Presbyterian, while his 
political support is given to the Liberal party. In 1919 he received a fellow- 
ship in the Royal College of Surgery at Edinburgh, Scotland, and in the 
following year he was made a fellow in the American College of Surgeons. 
He is secretary of the Alberta Medical Association and is also treasurer of 
the Edmonton Academy of Medicine, of which he served as secretary in 
1921. In July, 1917, Dr. Hepburn received the Military Cross in recogni- 
tion of his gallant service on the field of battle and loyalty, patriotism and 
devotion to duty are his outstanding characteristics. Life has brought 
to him varied experiences, from which he has derived valuable lessons, 
and wisely utilizing the talents with which nature has endowed him, he 
has reached a position of distinction in his profession, while his genuine 
personal worth has won for him the unqualified esteem of all with whom 
he has been associated. , 



JOHN A. REID, M. D. 



Dr. John A. Reid is recognized as one of the representative physicians 
in Calgary, engaged in the practice of medicine and surgery and he en- 
joys an extensive and important patronage. He was born in Chesley, 
Ontario, in 1885, a son of Adam and Effie (Macmillan) Reid, the former 
a native of Ontario and the latter of Scotland. They were married in 
Ontario and are now living in Pinkerton. The father has followed agri- 
cultural pursuits all of his life and won success in that connection. His 
father, John Reid, came to Ontario in the early '50s from Belfast, Ireland. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Reid five children have been born: John A., whose name 
introduces this review ; Angus, who is conducting a shoe business in Sas- 
katoon ; Ernest, who was a lieutenant in the Fifty-fourth Battalion and 
was killed in active service in the World war, on the 16th of September, 
1916, when twenty-two years of age; Melville, who is teaching school and 
lives at home; and Alma, who is a nurse in the Grace Hospital. The 
family were reared in the faith of the Presbyterian church, and Mr. 
Reid is a member of the Canadian order of Foresters. In his political 
views he is a Conservative and maintains an active interest in party af- 
fairs. 

In the acquirement of his education John A. Reid attended the public 
schools of his birthplace and was graduated from the Paisley high school 
in 1902. His earliest ambition was to enter the medical profession and 
upon graduation from high school he taught for four years, thereby earn- 
ing enough to defray the expenses of his medical education. In 1906 he 
enrolled in the Toronto College of Medicine and was graduated in 1911, 
with the M. D. degree. He immediately began active practice, locating 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 273 

north of Edmonton. In 1912 he came to Calgary and practiced his profes- 
sion in association with Dr. Mackid. In 1915 Dr. Reid put all personal 
interests aside and enlisted for service in the World war. He became a 
captain in the Eighth Field Ambulance, Canadian Army Medical Corps, 
and went into active service in France in March, 1916. He served with 
that unit and with the Princess Pat Regiment and received his honorable 
discharge in May, 1919. He was in the employ of the Department of Sol- 
diers' Civil Reestablishment for some three years and in June, 1922, he 
entered private practice in Calgary and is winning well-merited success. 
His ability as a physician and surgeon is effectively proved by the results 
he has obtained and he has gained an enviable position among the leading 
representatives of the medical profession in Calgary and the district. 

In 1913 Dr. Reid was married to Miss Barbara G. McCrea, who was 
born in Macleod, a daughter of Samuel McCrea. Her father was a mem- 
ber of the Royal Northwest Mounted Police for many years and is now 
retired. Mrs. Reid received her education in the public schools of Macleod 
and she is a woman of culture and refinement, and is prominent in the 
club and social circles of this city. 

In his political views Dr. Reid is a Conservative although he has 
had little time for political affairs, he is actively interested in every move- 
ment for the benefit of the community and his cooperation in promoting 
any enterprise for the good of the people can always be counted upon. 
Fraternally he is a Scottish Rite Mason and is also affiliated with the In- 
dependent Order of Odd Fellows and the Canadian Order of Foresters. 
Although Dr. Reid's preparation was thorough he keeps in close touch 
with the progress of medical science through the medium of the various 
journals and periodicals issued for the benefit of the profession and he has 
continued to advance. He is sincerely devoted to his work, holding to the 
highest ethics of the profession at all times, and he well merits the respect 
and esteem accorded him by his fellow practitioners and the community 
at large. 



FRANK BROWN. 



One of the popular and efficient public officials of Cardston is Frank 
Brown, who since 1919 has been active in the office of bailiff. He was 
born in Salt Lake City, Utah, on the 26th of November, 1870, a son of 
Homer and Sarah Ann (Woolf ) Brown. The father was born in New York 
state on August 9, 1830, and the mother was born in New York city, on 
the 2d of July, 1834. The paternal grandfather, Benjamin Brown, emi- 
grated from New York state to Utah and engaged in farming and garden- 
ing. He was the first member of his family to join the Church of Jesus, 
Christ of Latter-day Saints, and devoted much time to the church, being 
bishop of the fourth ward of Salt Lake at one time. His demise occurred 
in that city. The maternal grandfather was John Anthony Woolf, who 
was born in New York city, on the 31st day of July, 1805, and died on 
(18) 



274 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

the 7th of November, 1881. He was one of the pioneer settlers of Utah 
and he farmed at Hyde Park, Cache county, Utah. Homer Brown w^ent 
to Jackson county, Missouri, with his parents and thence to Illinois, where 
they resided for a short time before emigrating to Salt Lake. He was a 
young man when he reached that city, arriving there in 1847, and he im- 
mediately started freighting from the Missouri river to Salt Lake, later 
going into Montana and freighting for the mines. He was one of the set- 
tlement at Fort Bridges. Later he took up land in Salt Lake valley and 
followed general farming, stock raising and gardening, marketing all of 
his products in Salt Lake valley. To Mr. and Mrs. Brown ten children 
were born: Homer M., who is living in Salt Lake; Cordelia S., deceased, 
who was the wife of Frank Lutz; Walter H., who is living in Salt Lake; 
Mary E., who is the wife of a Mr. Hall of Salt Lake; Sarah F., whose 
demise occurred at the age of one year; Harriett, whose death occurred 
when eight years of age; Phoebe, who is the wife of Louis Bringhurst of 
Taylorville, Utah; Andrew, whose death occurred at the age of ten years; 
Frank, whose name introduces this review; and Charles S., who is living 
in Tucson, Arizona. Mrs. Brown passed away October 14, 1911. Some 
time later Mr. Brown married Miss Hannah E. Woolf, a sister of his first 
wife, and a native of New York, who is now living in Idaho. To their 
union the following children were born: Orsen; Solon, who is deceased; 
Arthur, Byron, William, Claude, Lydia, Ethel and Josephine. 

In the acquirement of his education Frank Brown attended the public 
schools of Salt Lake City and subsequently entered the Brigham Young 
College. He started to work on the home farm at the age of sixteen years 
and later bought some land near Taylorville, where he engaged in general 
farming on his own account until the 15th of June, 1897, when he came 
to Cardston, making the trip overland with a covered wagon and taking 
six weeks to make the journey. He homesteaded some barren prairie land 
about seven miles south of Cardston and after much labor broke a portion 
of it and erected a two-room log house thereon, with a shingle roof. He 
was obliged to do his trading at Lethbridge, fifty miles distant. For 
seven years Mr. Brown specialized in raising and ranging cattle and in 
dairying, and at the termination of that time, in 1904, he rented his place 
and moved into Cardston. He worked in the Cardston Implement Store 
for a time, and eventually purchased an interest in the company and man- 
aged the store for four years. Later he was associated with the Cardston 
Mercantile Establishment and subsequently he bought an interest in the 
Cardston Coal & Oil Company, which retails coal and flour. He disposed 
of his interests in that enterprise and in January, 1919, was elected bailiff 
of Cardston. He is discharging the many duties of this ofl^ice with justice 
and efficiency and is readily conceded to be one of Cardston's most popular 
public officials. Mr. Brown has always been a Liberal in politics and for 
some time he served as justice of the peace and was a member of the 
town council. 

On the 4th of March, 1891, occurred the marriage of Mr. Brown to 
Miss Harriett Amelia Little, a native of Salt Lake, where her birth oc- 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 275 

curred on the 31st of March, 1869. To their union twelve children have 
been born : Frank died at the age of four years ; Newell S., whose home is 
in Salt Lake, and who has taught school for about seven years, is filling 
a mission for the church in New Zealand ; Hattie L. was formerly a school 
teacher but is now the wife of Cleveland Nelson, a successful farmer of 
Woolford; Nora L. is now the wife of Guy Neilson, a farmer living near 
Cardston; Ethel taught school for two years and is now attending the 
Normal School at Calgary; Walter E. has been teaching school for five 
years in Cardston ; Clara V. is attending the local high school ; Alma, Lisa- 
dore and Heber J. are attending the Cardston high school ; Eva is a student 
in the public schools; and Hattie died in infancy. 

Mr. Brown devotes a great deal of his spare time to the church and 
is now senior president of the Seventies Quorum. He has been closely 
identified with Cardston in its upbuilding and its prosperity for a number 
of years and is justly accounted one of its most representative citizens. 
He is a man of genial and pleasing personality and his friends are legion. 



REV. CHRISTOPHER CARRUTHERS. 

Rev. Christopher Carruthers, rector of Holy Trinity Anglican church 
at Edmonton, was born in Quebec in 1876, a son of Atchison and Elizabeth 
(Molyneux) Carruthers, who were natives of Canada and of Ireland, re- 
spectively, their marriage being celebrated on this side of the Atlantic. 
The father was a lumberman, who won a substantial measure of success 
in the conduct of his business. He always gave his political allegiance 
to the Conservative party and both he and his wife were loyal and helpful 
members of the Anglican church. Their family numbered fourteen chil- 
dren, eleven of whom are living. 

Christopher Carruthers, the second son, was educated in the Normal 
and high schools at Montreal and then entered McGill University of that 
city, from which he was graduated on the completion of a classical course 
in 1901, at which time the Bachelor of Arts degree was conferred upon 
him. He also pursued his theological course in Montreal and there won 
the L. T. H. degree in 1905. The same year he was ordained and was 
made curate at St. Stevens church, Montreal, while later he was for a year 
at Lacolle, Quebec. In 1906 he came west, making his way to Lloydminster 
and for six years was chaplain of the All British Colony. In 1912 he 
established his home at Edmonton and took charge of the Holy Trinity 
Anglican church, which has three hundred famihes in the parish with a 
membership of about twelve hundred. Under his guidance the work of 
the church has steadily developed and Mr. Carruthers is regarded as one 
of the strong and forceful religious teachers of the province. His untiring 
zeal and indefatigable efforts are manifest in the splendid results which 
have attended his labors and the church under his direction is recognized 



276 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

as one of the potent forces in Edmonton for the moral upbuilding of the 
city. 

In 1906 Mr. Carruthers was married to Miss Louisa Cunningham, who 
was born in Montreal, and they have become parents of two daughters: 
Olive and Ruth, both of whom are in high school. 

In his fraternal relations Mr. Carruthers is connected with the Masons, 
as a member of Acacia Lodge, A. F. & A. M., of Edmonton, and with the 
Canadian Order of Foresters. In 1916 he became chaplain of the One 
Hundred and Fifty-first Battalion and was with the milftary forces of 
the Dominion for three years. He was transferred to the position of 
chaplain of a corps in England and was in the head office for a time. Later 
he was sent to the Ontario Military Hospital at Orpington, England, and 
in the spring of 1917 was sent to France, where he was chaplain of the 
Canadian Cavalry Brigade. He was invalided out and afterward was at- 
tached to the Eye and Ear Hospital at Folkestone, England, w^hence he 
was sent to the Granville General Hospital at Buxton. While with the 
army he was under fire for twelve months and he witnessed all of the 
phases of modern warfare, passing through many thrilling and dangerous 
experiences and carrying comfort at all times to the troops through his 
cheeriness, while his words of moral wisdom brought courage and strength 
to many of the boys on the western front. In June, 1919, he returned to 
Canada and resumed his duties at Edmonton. He is now a member of 
the executive staff of the diocese of Edmonton and is also canon of the 
diocese. His church work makes heavy demands upon his time and energy. 
His sympathetic nature and the earnest purpose that actuates him prompt 
him to put forth untiring effort for the benefit of his fellowmen and the 
upbuilding of the cause of the church in this community. He is a man 
of broad vision as well as of lofty ideals and his experiences have enabled 
him readily to understand human nature, so that his labors are of real 
practical benefit in the uplift of his fellowmen. 



GEOFFREY G. LAFFERTY. 

Geoffrey G. Lafferty, barrister and solicitor of Calgary and a partner 
in the firm of Lafferty & Gillespie, is a native of Ontario, as were his 
parents. He was born in Pembroke, July 14, 1882, the son of Dr. James 
D. and Jessie P. (Grant) Lafferty. Dr. Lafferty was a man of unusual 
attainments and made a remarkable success both in his profession and 
in the banking business which was a sort of avocation with him. After 
practicing medicine in Ontario for some time he moved in 1881 to Winni- 
peg, where he practiced until 1885, when he came to Calgary. Here he 
practiced until his death in August, 1921, at the age of sixty-eight years. 
As a physician he was widely known throughout the Canadian west, as 
he was long the chief surgeon for the Canadian Pacific Railway, and also 
the president of the Alberta College of Physicians and Surgeons. In addi- 




GEOFFREY G. LAFFERTY. 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 279 

tion to his large practice Dr. Lafferty established and operated a system 
of private banks that extended from Winnipeg to the Pacific coast, which 
was a very successful financial enterprise. At one time he held the office 
of mayor in Calgary, and at all times proved himself a citizen of true 
public spirit. 

Geoffrey G. Laflferty was reared and educated in Toronto and Calgary. 
When he completed his school work he secured a position in the Canadian 
Bank of Commerce and had several years' experience in the banking busi- 
ness. He was not entirely satisfied with the opportunities he saw before 
him, however, and decided to take up the study of law. Accordingly, he 
returned to Calgary in 1905 and entered the offices of James Short to read 
law and prepare for his examinations. He was called to the bar in 1910, 
but continued to work with Mr. Short until 1914, when he broke this asso- 
ciation to enter the army. For a year after receiving his discharge from 
the army in 1920, Mr. Lafferty practiced by himself, then formed a part- 
nership with Thomas Gillespie. This new firm has made a particularly 
auspicious beginning and Mr. Lafferty's friends are expecting of him a 
distinguished career in his chosen profession. 

Mr. Lafferty is modest about his war record, which is a most creditable 
one. Enlisting in 1914, soon after the outbreak of the Great war, he was 
given a commission as first lieutenant and went overseas very shortly. 
He was abroad in the military service for nearly six years, not returning 
to the Dominion until August, 1920, when he received an honorable dis- 
charge. When he was released from the service he was holding the rank 
of captain. 

While he was overseas, in July, 1918, Mr. Lafferty was married to 
Miss Ethel Roome. They are the parents of a son, James D., born in 
May, 1919. Mr. Lafferty is a member of Knox Presbyterian church and his 
political affiliations are with the Liberal party. He also belongs to the 
Army and Navy Veterans Association, the Calgary Golf & Country Club 
and the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. In connection with his pro- 
fessional interests he holds membership in the Alberta Bar Society and 
the Calgary Bar Association. From his father's estate Mr. Lafferty inher- 
ited a large amount of real estate in Calgary, the management of which 
consumes no inconsiderable share of his time and attention. 



SAMUEL AUGUSTUS GORDON BARNES. 

For twenty years Samuel Augustus Gordon Barnes has been a well 
known and prominent figure in insurance circles, now occupying the posi- 
tion of provincial manager for The Mutual Life Insurance Company of 
New York. While his business career has ever been directed along the 
line of success, indicative of his earnest purpose and close application, he 
has at the same time found opportunity for cooperation in public affairs 



280 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

and few have been more deeply interested in or manifested a more helpful 
relation toward education in the province than he. 

Samuel Augustus Barnes was born in the county of Lambton, Ontario, 
in 1875. His father, Samuel David Barnes, was a native of the county of 
Brant, Ontario, born in 1843, and he was married in that province in 1870, 
to Miss Lois Hagle, whose birth occurred in Oxford county, Ontario, in 
1848. She was a descendant of one of the United Empire Loyalist families 
that fought for the king in all the English wars for two hundred years, 
thus manifesting a most patriotic devotion to the crown. Her death oc- 
curred in 1895, while Mr. Barnes survived until 1910. 

S. A. Gordon Barnes was reared in Lambton county, where he re- 
ceived his primary education, while later he attended Strathroy Collegiate 
Institute in the adjoining- county of Middlesex. In 1893 he secured honor 
matriculation standing and entered the teaching profession. He attended 
the Forest Model School and later the Toronto Normal School, and in 1897 
he secured a first-class teachers' license and followed the profession for 
about seven years, making a most creditable record in his ability to impart 
clearly and readily to others the knowledge that he had acquired. To fur- 
ther equip himself in the teaching profession he took an art course in 
Manitoba University and graduated in 1903. He was also a first-class 
honor man and medalist of the university and in his liberal educational 
training laid the foundation for his success. The major part of his life 
has been devoted to the insurance business. For nearly twenty years he 
has been active in this field, his course marked by a steady progress that 
is indicative of his persistency of purpose, his thoroughness and inde- 
fatigable energy. He has been associated with The Mutual Life Insur- 
ance Company of New York for five years and is now provincial manager 
at Edmonton, in which connection he has thoroughly organized and sys- 
tematized the work, carefully directing the activities of the various agents 
under his control, so that the business has been one of steady expansion. 

On the 17th of September, 1904, in Woodstock, Ontario, Mr. Barnes 
was married to Miss Florence Shaver, a graduate with specialist standing, 
of the University of Manitoba, with the degree of Bachelor of Arts. Their 
children are: Fred Shaver; Edith Lois Lavinia; Herbert Gordon, who was 
born October 14, 1913, and died May 4, 1914; Albert Charles; and Isabel 
Florence Betty. 

Mr. Barnes is a member of the Quarter Million Club of the Mutual 
Life of New York, an organization of insurance men. In politics he has 
always been affiliated with the Liberal and Labor parties and in 1921 was 
president of the Labor party of Edmonton. He has long been deeply and 
helpfully interested in the cause of public education and is now serving 
for the tenth year as a member of the Edmonton school board, in which 
connection he closely studies the possibilities for the development of the 
schools of the city and utilizes the most practical methods in the attain- 
ment of ideals. He is also a member of the official board of the McDougall 
Methodist church and a member of the General Conference of the Meth- 
odist church of Canada, and is appointed by that body as one of the six 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 281 

members to represent Alberta in the first general council of the proposed 
united church. In a word, his activities have always been directed along 
lines which make for the intellectual and moral progress of the individual 
and the community, as well as for its material development, and the 
interests and activities of his life are well balanced, making him a potent 
force for good in the community in which he makes his home. 



DICK A. TAYLOR, M. D. 

For twenty-two years Dr. Dick A. Taylor has been a representative of 
the medical profession and in recent years has specialized in the treatment 
of diseases of the eye, ear, nose and throat. To this end he has thor- 
oughly qualified by extensive and comprehensive courses of study and his 
ability is widely recognized. Lethbridge therefore numbers him among 
the valued representatives of the profession practicing within her borders. 

Dick A. Taylor was born in Kings county. New Brunswick, in 1876, 
and is a son of Robert and Mary (Wilmot) Taylor, the former a son of 
John Taylor, a pioneer resident of New Brunswick, while the mother is a 
daughter of Samuel Wilmot, who was born in New Brunswick and for a 
long period was in the employ of the government, acting as crown land 
surveyor for many years. Robert Taylor was a contractor and builder, 
following that business for a number of years, but passed away in 1887, 
at the age of sixty-eight. He is survived by his wife, who still makes her 
home in New Brunswick. He was a Conservative in his political belief and 
his religious faith was that of the Methodist church. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Robert Taylor four children were born, of whom two are living, the elder 
being William Burt, a farmer of New Brunswick. 

Dick A. Taylor pursued his early education in the Pictou Academy of 
Nova Scotia and later attended the Mount Allison College of New Bruns- 
wick, subsequent to which time he entered McGill University at Montreal 
and was there graduated on the completion of a course in medicine, with 
the class of 1901. He afterward located for practice in Londonderry, Nova 
Scotia, where he remained for a period of six years, and later he took 
postgraduate work in Boston and in New York. He came to Lethbridge 
in December, 1908, and has since specialized on the treatment of diseases 
of the eye, ear, nose and throat. His postgraduate studies were along 
that line during the period which he spent in New York in 1907 and he 
also did further postgraduate work in Montreal in 1921. He has thus kept 
thoroughly informed concerning the advancement made in his chosen pro- 
fession and at all times is abreast of the latest scientific researches and 
discoveries. He employs the most modern methods in his practice and in 
his chosen profession has made steady and substantial advance. For nine 
years he was physician to the Royal Canadian Mounted Police in Leth- 
bridge and for a number of years he has served as medical instructor of 



282 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

schools. He belongs to both the Alberta Medical Society and the Canadian 
Medical Society. 

Dr. Taylor has been married twice. He first wedded Miss Edna Louise 
Price of New Brunswick, who passed away leaving two children, Mary 
Elizabeth and Robert Burt, who are now eleven and seven years of age 
respectively, and are attending school. Dr. Taylor's second marriage was 
to Mary Ethel Dawson of Peterboro, Ontario. They are devoted and con- 
sistent members of the Episcopal church, in the work of which the Doctor 
takes an active and helpful part. Fraternally he is a Knight Templar 
Mason and a Mystic Shriner and is a past master and past first principal. 
Politically he is a Conservative. Golf and curling afford him his chief 
sources of recreation and he belongs to the Chinook Club and also to the 
Rotary Club. 



CHARLES EDWARD SHAW. 

For fifteen years Charles E. Shaw has been closely and prominently 
identified with the business development of Vegreville, concentrating his 
attention upon the drug trade, and throughout the period he has enjoyed 
an unassailable reputation for integrity, enterprise and reliability. He 
was born in Toronto, Ontario, October 31, 1869, and his parents were Dun- 
can Robertson and Sarah (Martin) Shaw, the former a native of Scotland 
and the latter of England. They emigrated to Canada and the father 
became one of the prominent lumbermen of Toronto, continuing in that 
business until his death. He is survived by the mother, who still resides 
in that city. To their union three children were born, the subject of this 
review being the only member of the family to come to this province. 

The public schools of his native city afforded Charles E. Shaw his edu- 
cational opportunities and in 1907 he came to Alberta, locating first at 
Mundare, where he engaged in the drug business for a short time. In 
the fall of 1907 he removed to Vegreville, where he opened a drug store, 
which he has since conducted. He carries a large stock of drugs and drug- 
gists' sundries, which he displays to good advantage, and his trade has 
enjoyed a steady growth, keeping pace with the development of the com- 
munity. He has a thorough understanding of the business and his store 
is a credit to the town, being conducted along the most modern and pro- 
gressive lines. He is also the owner of a highly productive farm in this 
vicinity, which is managed by his son. 

Mr. Shaw married Miss Mary Elizabeth Jago and they have become 
the parents of eight children : Mrs. T. A. Morton of Vegreville ; W. Floyd, 
who operates his father's farm; Herbert, deceased; A. W., an accountant; 
Mrs. J. F. Leach of Vegreville; and Helen, Elizabeth and Catherine, who 
are at home. Mr. and Mrs. Shaw are members of the Union church and 
he is a Conservative in his political views. Fraternally he is identified with 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and during the World war he was 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 283 

active in supporting- the various measures promulgated by the govern- 
ment. He is broad-minded and pubUc-spirited, standing for all those things 
which count for most in the upbuilding of his community. He is highly 
regarded in business circles of Vegreville and has many friends, whose 
esteem he has won and retained by reason of his fine personal qualities. 



JOSEPH MONTALBETTI. 

Coming to Alberta in pioneer times, Joseph Montalbetti has resided 
within the borders of the province for nearly a quarter of a century and 
for about half of that period he has been an influential factor in business 
circles of Blairmore, in connection with the hardware trade. He is one of 
Italy's sons, his birth having occurred near Switzerland, in Italy, on the 
1st of October, 1866, and his parents, Charles and Giavanina (Cunati) 
Montalbetti, spent their lives in that country. 

In company with his brother Felix, Joseph Montalbetti emigrated to 
Canada in 1888, making his way to the province of Ontario, in the eastern 
part of the Dominion. He secured employment with the Canadian Pacific 
Railroad Company, working at a point two hundred miles east of Winni- 
peg, Manitoba, and for five years he was a member of the section gang, 
at the end of which time his ability won him promotion to the position 
of foreman of that crew of men. After acting in that capacity for five 
years he came to this province, and in 1898 assisted in constructing the 
Canadian Pacific line through Crowsnest pass, continuing in the service of 
that corporation until 1901. In October, 1909, he opened a furniture 
establishment at Blairmore and in the intervening period he has built 
up a large trade through careful management, earnest effort and honest, 
straightforward dealing, being accounted one of the leading merchants of 
the town. 

Mr. Montalbetti is married and has two children. He is a faithful com- 
municant of the Catholic church and his identification with public affairs 
covers service on the town council. He does all in his power to further 
the interests of his community along the lines of normal and healthful 
development and in the improvement of civic conditions, and Blairmore 
numbers him among its progressive business men and useful citizens. 



REV. JOSEPH LeBRIS. 



Rev. Joseph LeBris, father superior of St. John's Oblates College at 
Edmonton, was born in Brittany, France, April 16, 1885, a son of John 
and Marianna (LeNours) LeBris, who are still residents of France, where 
they have spent their lives. The father was a railroad man but is now 
living retired. They are the parents of seven children, five of whom sur- 



284 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

vive, but none are residents of Canada save Rev. Joseph LeBris of this 
review. 

Joseph LeBris was educated in the schools of Brittany, attending the 
Litte Seminary and he pursued his course in philosophy at Nantes, France. 
He then went to Belgium, where he joined the Oblates order, pursuing a 
course in theology at Liege, that country. He was ordained in February, 
1908, and in the following year came to Edmonton. He next was in a sem- 
inary at St. Albert and in 1911 became connected with St. John's College 
at Edmonton, with which institution he has since been associated and in 
1920 was advanced to the position of father superior. 

In September, 1914, Father LeBris went overseas and was with the 
armed troops, being connected with the ambulance bearers for the first 
twenty months. He then entered the infantry and took part in the first 
battle at Ypres. He was also in the Vosges campaign and other impor- 
tant engagements on the western front, remaining with the military forces 
until after the signing of the armistice. In June, 1919, he returned to 
Canada and resumed his duties at St. John's College, where he is now 
laboring, his high standards being manifest in the work of the institution. 



ANDREW MICHELSEN. 



Unremitting energy, intelligently and constantly applied toward the 
achievement of success, has enrolled Andrew Michelsen among the sub- 
stantial and prosperous agriculturists of the Taber district. He was born 
in Sleth, Denmark, on the 20th of September, 1857, a son of Rasmus and 
Carrie Maria (Michelsen) Michelsen, likewise natives of Denmark. The 
mother came to the United States with the family in 1882 and settled in 
Salt Lake, and Mr. Michelsen came to this country the following year. 
He was a farmer by occupation and was successful in that connection 
while living in his native country. He lived retired in Salt Lake until 
1901, when he returned to Denmark, where his demise occurred in 1904, 
at the age of seventy-eight years. His wife died in Salt Lake in 1886, 
when sixty-two years of age. To their union nine children were born: 
Lena, whose death occurred in Denmark; Mary, who died in Salt Lake; 
Christina M., who is the widow of C. P. Renow and lives in Monroe, Utah; 
Nels Michael, whose death occurred in Chicago; Andrew, whose name in- 
troduces this review; Nels, a resident of Monroe, Utah, who is a millwright 
by trade but is now operating a hardware store; Carrie, who was wife 
of Kanude Rasmussen, now deceased; Rasmussen, who is a traveling sales- 
man with headquarters in Salt Lake ; and Anna, who is the widow of Henry 
Jensen of Raymond. Mr. Michelsen was throughout his life a consistent 
communicant of the Lutheran church, while his wife was a member of the 
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. 

In the acquirement of his education Andrew Michelsen attended the 
public schools of his native country and after putting his textbooks aside 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 285 

engaged in farming for several years. Subsequently he enlisted as a private 
in the Danish army and served for three years in the Field Artillery. After 
receiving his honorable discharge he worked in the harbors of his native 
city, loading ships, for two years. In 1882 he came to Salt Lake with his 
mother and later removed to Monroe, Utah. There he engaged in farm- 
ing on shares for two or three years and then bought a small piece of 
land and engaged in farming on his own account. He likewise worked in 
the woods and freighted for mines. In 1893 he took a contract for an 
irrigation canal on the Utah and Wyoming line and also built several moun- 
tain roads in Utah. In 1900 he came to Stirling, Alberta, and the first 
summer worked on irrigation canals and railroads. He then purchased 
eighty acres of raw prairie land at three dollars per acre, broke it and 
brought it to a highly cultivated state. In 1903 he homesteaded one hun- 
dred and sixty acres east of Stirling and still owns that land. Altogether 
he owns six hundred and forty acres of well improved farm land, and 
devotes his entire time and attention to farming and is enjoying well earned 
success. 

In October, 1879, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Michelsen and 
Miss Marie Knudson, likewise a native of Denmark. To them eight chil- 
dren have been born : Lena is the wife of James Austin, a resident of Kahle, 
Montana ; Andrew is residing on the home farm ; Anna is the wife of Ervin 
Young, a prominent stockman near Stirling; Carrie is the wife of Alvin 
Hirschi, a well known farmer of Stirling; Hulda died in Utah; Nels is re- 
siding on the home farm ; Rasmus D. is a veteran of the World war, having 
enlisted in Lethbridge in the Canadian Infantry, and served overseas one 
year, being in England at the time of the signing of the armistice ; Soaran 
is living at home and is engaged in farming. 

The Michelsens are consistent communicants of the Church of Jesus 
Christ of Latter-day Saints and Mr. Michelsen has been an elder in the 
church since coming here. He is accorded the esteem and respect of a 
large circle of acquaintances, having manifested in every relation in life 
those qualities which have won for him the regard and confidence of those 
with whom he has had either social or business relations. 



HENRY GEORGE MORRIS. 

Henry G. Morris, engaged in the real estate and insurance business in 
Edmonton, is a man of determined puriDose whose plans are well defined 
and carefully executed, and he has built his success upon the foundation 
of industry, abihty and integrity. He was born at Rodney, Ontario, in 
1883, and his parents, Samuel B. and Kate (Bannard) Morris, were also 
natives of that province, the birth of the father occurring in 1852. They 
were married in Ontario. The mother passed away in April, 1922. 

In the public schools of Rodney, Ontario, Henry G. Morris obtained 
his early education and afterward became a student at the St. Thomas 



286 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

Collegiate Institute, leaving- that institution in 1900. He then went to 
Detroit, Michigan, and entered the employ of the Michigan Malleable Iron 
Company in the capacity of accountant, remaining with that concern for 
three years. On the expiration of that period he returned to Canada, and 
making his way to the province of Alberta, he established his home in 
Edmonton, where he has since engaged in the real estate and insurance 
business as a member of the firm of Morris, Legge & Newman, of which 
he is president. He is also the chief executive officer of Locators, Ltd., 
and both enterprises have prospered under his capable administration. He 
displays keen sagacity in placing his investments and has negotiated many 
important real estate transfers, while he also writes a large amount of 
insurance annually. 

At Lashburn, in the province of Saskatchewan, Mr. Morris was mar- 
ried on April 7, 1907, to Miss Edyth Jane Brandon, a daughter of John- 
ston Brandon, a leading merchant of that place, and they have become 
the parents of four sons: Gordon Brandon, wiiose birth occurred in 1913; 
Harold Johnston, who was born in 1916; Harry Rodney, born in 1919; and 
Fred Samuel, born in 1922. 

Mr. Morris is a member of the Conservative party and in religious faith 
he is an Episcopalian. He is a member of the Edmonton Club and fra- 
ternally is identified with the Masonic order, in which he has filled several 
offices, being an exemplary representative of the craft. In 1921 he acted 
as junior warden of Edmonton Lodge, No. 7, A. F. & A. M., and he is now 
serving as first principal of Norwood Chapter, R. A. M. He is also con- 
stable of the Edmonton Preceptory of Knight Templars and is likewise a 
member of the Scottish Rite Consistory and the Mystic Shrine. He is an 
astute business man whose spirit of initiative has constituted an import- 
ant feature in the city's development and improvement, and among those 
with whom commercial or social relations have brought him into contact 
he is held in the highest regard, for he has never deviated from the course 
sanctioned by his conscience and good judgment. 



HARRY CLINTON YUILL. 

Harry Clinton Yuill, prominently identified with the manufacturing 
and commercial interests of Medicine Hat, is now president of the Alberta 
Clay Products Company and is thus active in control of one of the large 
productive enterprises of this section of the country. He deserves much 
credit for what he has accomplished, as his success is the direct result 
of earnest purpose intelligently directed and his business, too, has ever 
been of a character that has contributed to public progress and prosperity, 
as well as to individual success. He has long resided in this province and 
has been closely associated with the growth and improvement of Medicine 
Hat and this section of the country. He was a young man of twenty-two 
years when he came to the Northwest and here he eagerly embraced the 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 287 

opportunities which were offered in a new and growing section of the coun- 
try. A contemporary writer has said of him: "Mr. Yuill came to the 
Northwest when a young man and has steadily worked his way upward 
until he has few peers in the business circles of the province. What he 
has accomplished in the world of commerce and industry cannot be told 
in words. It is certainly not asserting too much to say of one who can 
direct and control such a variety of interests as those with which he is 
connected that his must be a master mind, that he must possess aside 
from commercial foresight and sagacity the happy faculty of reading and 
judging men, combined with unusual powers of executive ability, and yet 
if one will seek in his career the causes of his success he will find them 
due to the same old reasons of honesty, fair dealing, promptness and per- 
severance." Mr. Yuill is a native of Nova Scotia, his birth having occurred 
in Truro, on the 16th day of July, 1863, his parents being Joseph M. and 
Charlotte Amelia (Corbett) Yuill, both of whom were born in Nova Scotia, 
Canada, and afterward resided in Great Village, near Truro, where the 
father followed the occupation of farming. Both have passed away. 

Harry C. Yuill obtained his education in the public schools of Nova 
Scotia and afterward learned the carpenter's trade, serving a period of 
apprenticeship prior to the spring of 1885, when he removed to Alberta, 
establishing his home in Medicine Hat, at that time a new but growing 
town on the western frontier. He worked for the Canadian Pacific Rail- 
road Company for three months and then took up contracting on his own 
account. This he followed until 1904, since which time various business 
enterprises claimed his attention and energy. In 1900 he built a flour 
mill in Medicine Hat, which he operated under the name of the Medicine 
Hat Mill Company and of which he was the president until it was sold to 
the Lake of the Woods Milling Company. He is the president of the 
Alberta Clay Products Company, was a director of the Alberta Linseed 
Oil Company, Limited, until sold, and was half owner and president of 
the Alberta Foundry & Machine Company, Limited, until it also was sold. 
He occupies the presidency of the Medicine Hat Land & Improvement Com- 
pany, Limited, and is the owner of ten thousand acres of farm lands, 
together with much town property. Whatever he undertakes he carries 
forward to successful completion, for in his vocabulary there is no such 
word as fail. 

In 1892 Mr. Yuill was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth M. Price, a 
daughter of John Price of St. John, New Brunswick. Mr. and Mrs. Yuill 
have become the parents of four children : John Woodman, the eldest, was 
in military service from the States for a short time during the World war, 
but never went across. He is a chemist of Chicago and during the war 
period, in his professional capacity, was engaged in making nitro-glycerin ; 
Joseph Harlan, the second son, now in his father's office, was connected 
with the Aviation Corps during the war, but he, too, was denied the op- 
portunity of going overseas; Willard Clinton works in his father's plant; 
and Marjorie Amelia, the youngest, is at home. 

Mr. Yuill is well known in Masonic circles, having membership in Medi- 



288 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

cine Hat Lodge, No. 2, A. F. & A. M., of which he was worshipful master 
in 1898. He is also a member of Keith Chapter, R. A. M,, of Truro, Nova 
Scotia, and of Malta Preceptory of Truro and of Luxor Temple, A. A. 0. 
N. M. S., of St. John, New Brunswick. He likewise belongs to the Inde- 
pendent Order of Foresters and is a loyal follower of the high teachings 
and purposes of these organizations. In politics he is a Liberal and he 
served as a member of the first city council of Medicine Hat, continuing 
in the office for several terms, during which he exercised his prerogatives 
in support of all plans and measures which he deemed beneficial to the city. 
He attends the Presbyterian church and his entire life has been actuated 
by high and honorable principles, which have made him a man whom to 
know is to respect and esteem. In his business career he has reached out 
along lines which have been of direct and substantial benefit to the com- 
munity, ncr has he at any time neglected his duties and obligations in 
other relations but has made his life count for good to the community, 
proving a dynamic force in all that makes for general welfare and progress. 



AUSTIN DE B. WINTER. 



The prominent position of Austin de B. Winter, barrister and solici- 
tor in the Calgary legal profession is indicated by his membership in the 
well known firm of Macleod, Robertson, Smith & Company. He has 
been associated with Calgary court and legal work for twenty years and 
for the last fifteen has been a successful practicing barrister and solicitor. 
In addition to his professional work Mr. Winter is an enthusiastic sports- 
man and has more than a local reputation as an exponent of game preser- 
vation and propagation. 

Mr. Winter may fairly be said to have inherited his profession, for he 
is the son of a successful and well known jurist of Calgary, Judge W, 
Roland Winter. Judge Winter was born and educated in England, where 
he was admitted to the bar and practiced until 1892, when he came to this 
city. After practicing law in Alberta for some time he became police 
magistrate and later registrar of land titles. In 1906 he was appointed 
judge of the district court of Calgary. W. Roland Winter and Miss Lydia 
M. Case were married in England, where, on the 28th of February, 
1882, their son Austin de B. Winter was born. The boy spent his child- 
hood in his native country and was educated in the public schools. He 
started his study of law in London, but in 1903 came to Calgary, where 
he was made deputy clerk in the supreme court, an office he continued to 
hold until 1910. At the same time he reported court proceedings for 
the Alberta Law Reports, his duties in this connection extending from 
1905 to 1909. Meanwhile he had been continuing his reading of law and 
passed his examinations, gaining admittance to the bar in 1909. 

The next year, in 1910, he went into partnership with W. P. Taylor. 
Three years later he severed this connection to join the old law firm of 




AUSTIN DE B. WINTER. 



(19) 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 291 

Clarke & McCarthy, with whom he was associated for eight years. In 
1921 he became a member of his present firm, Macleod, Robertson, Smith 
& Company. During these years Mr. Winter has been favorably known 
for his thorough and painstaking work in connection with the prepara- 
tion of his cases. Entirely familiar with the principles of law, he pos- 
sesses a real grasp of economic and business methods as well, that enables 
him to arrive quickly at the true source of the difficulty in most civil 
disputes. 

In the month of September, 1911, Mr. Winter was married to Miss 
Grace Leavenworth Jaynes, daughter of J. R. and Frances Jaynes, na- 
tives of Ontario. Mr. Jaynes makes his home in this city. He is a 
widower, his wife having been killed in an automobile accident in 1914. 
Mr. and Mrs. Winter are the parents of two little children : A son, 
Laurence A., born December 11, 1918; and Grace, born July 22, 1921. 

Mr. Winter's religious faith is that of the Anglican church, and in 
politics he pursues an independent course, not being affiliated with any 
of the great parties. In connection with his professional work he main- 
tains a membership in the Alberta Law Socety and the Calgary, Sas- 
katchewan and Dominion Bar Associations. An ardent advocate of all 
outdoor sports, Mr. Winter personally devotes much time to golf, cricket, 
shooting and fishing. Shooting and fishing are his favorite recreations 
and he has done a great deal to promote these sports in the province. 
With Fred J. Green he was instrumental in introducing into Alberta the 
Hungarian partridge and European pheasant. He is also a fancier of 
bird dogs and keeps English setters, formerly breeding them with great 
success. Like all true sportsmen Mr. Winter is deeply interested in the 
preservation and propagation of game, working chiefly through the 
agency of the Alberta Fish and Game Protective Association, of which 
he is secretary and treasurer. He also writes for the press on sporting 
and game subjects and has become a sort of sporting consultant, a widely 
recognized authority on these subjects. Recently he was invited by the 
American Game and Protective and Propagation Association to read a 
paper on the Hungarian partridge, with which he has had so much ex- 
perience in Alberta. 



HOWARD B. MACDONALD. 

Howard B. Macdonald, one of Calgary's enterprising business men and 
public-spirited citizens, has made insurance the ladder by which he has 
climbed to success and his influence is one of broadening activity and 
strength in the field in which he is operating. He was born in Nova Scotia, 
in July, 1885, and his parents, Samuel and Elizabeth (Crockett) Macdonald, 
were also natives of that province. The father passed away in October, 
1921, but the mother's demise occurred in December, 1920. 

In the acquirement of an education Howard B. Macdonald attended 



292 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

the public schools of Nova Scotia, also completing a course in a business 
college, and his initial experience along commercial lines was obtained as 
clerk in a general store. He remained in his native province until 1910, 
when he came to Alberta, locating in Calgary, where he has since resided. 
He entered the real estate and insurance office of Geddes & Sheffield and 
three years later took over their insurance business, organizing the United 
Assurance Company, of which he is president and managing director. The 
company writes hail and fire insurance in the provinces of Alberta and 
Saskatchewan and the subject of this review also conducts a general in- 
surance business, operating under the name of H. B. Macdonald, Limited. 
He combines a detailed knowledge of the business with energy and initia- 
tive and through untiring effort and capable management has succeeded in 
building up a profitable undertaking, writing a large amount of insurance 
annually. He has also made investments in farm lands, which he leases, 
likewise deriving a good income from this source. 

In October, 1919, Mr. Macdonald was united in marriage to Miss Ella 
Webster and they reside in an attractive home at No. 4236 Sixth street. 
West. Mr. Macdonald is a member of the Knox Presbyterian church and 
has served as its treasurer since 1916. He is independent in his political 
views, supporting the candidate whom he considers best qualified for of- 
fice, regardless of party affiliations. He is a member of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows and St. Andrew's Golf Club and his deep interest 
in the welfare and progress of his city is indicated by his connection with 
the Calgary Board of Trade. Opportunity has ever been to him the call 
to action and what he has undertaken he has accomplished, for he pos- 
sesses the spirit of self-reliance, combined with sound judgment and execu- 
tive ability. His business methods have always balanced up with the 
principles of truth and honesty and his fellow citizens entertain for 
him high regard. 



RICHARD WALLACE. 



Richard Wallace, city assessor and tax collector for the city of Calgary, 
is one of this community's most substantial citizens and popular public 
officials. He was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, on the 3d of April, 1882, a 
son of Richard and Janet (Gibson) Wallace, natives of Scotland. For the 
greater part of her life the father has engaged in contracting and build- 
ing in Edinburgh and has won widespread prominence in that connection. 
He is now living retired in that city. Mrs. Wallace died on the 3d of April, 
1920. 

Richard Wallace received his education in the public schools of Edin- 
burgh and after graduating from high school he engaged in quantity 
surveying for four years. At the termination of that time he was in the 
contracting and building business in association with his father and that 
connection was maintained until 1904. In that year Mr. Wallace came to 
Canada and located in Calgary, working on a farm for the first year and 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 293 

on the 6th of January, 1905, he went to work for the city as clerk in the 
assessor's department. In the spring of 1909 he was appointed city as- 
sessor and has since been active in that position. In 1915 he was made 
tax collector and he is now active in both offices. He devotes his entire 
time and attention to the many duties devolving upon him, discharging 
them with an efficiency that commands the respect of all, and he is readily 
conceded to be one of the most popular public officials in Calgary. 

In September, 1905, occurred the marriage of Mr. Wallace and Miss 
Edith Maude Hann, a daughter of Captain Henry and Emma (Brann) 
Hann, natives of England. Mrs. Wallace's father was in the service of 
England for forty-two years and she was born while he was stationed in 
Rangoon, India, on the 25th of March, 1884. Captain Hann died on the 
22d of February, 1909. His widow resides in Portsmouth, England. To 
the union of Mr. and Mrs. Wallace three children have been born : Richard, 
Jr., was born on the 29th of January, 1907 ; Harry Valentine was born on 
the 14th of February, 1909 ; and Eva Muriel was born on the 25th of Feb- 
ruary, 1912. Mrs. Wallace is a woman of culture and refinement and she 
is active in the club and social aff"airs of Calgary. 

Fraternally Mr. Wallace is identified with the Masons and he holds 
membership in Perfection Lodge, No. 9, of Calgary. His religious faith is 
that of the Anglican church. For recreation he turns to outdoor sports 
and is particularly fond of golfing and fishing. 



MICHAEL JOSEPH GALLAGHER. 

One of the retired ranchers of Macleod is Michael Joseph Gallagher, 
who was born in County Mayo, Ireland, on the 7th of December, 1850, a 
son of Bartholomew and Mary (Gallagher) Gallagher, both natives of 
Ireland, where the father was a weaver by trade and likewise engaged 
in farming. Mr. Gallagher died in Ireland. They were consistent com- 
municants of the Roman Catholic church. To their union six children 
were born, Michael Joseph being the youngest member of the family. 

In the acquirement of his education Michael Joseph Gallagher attended 
the public schools of his birthplace and at the age of twenty-two years 
came to Canada. In July, 1875, he joined the Royal Northwest Mounted 
Police at Ottawa, Ontario, and was sent to old Fort Macleod, arriving there 
in September, and serving for three years. In 1881 he homesteaded some 
land, which he brought to a highly cultivated state and he engaged in 
farming and cattle raising. He ran several hundred head of cattle and was 
quite successful until the blizzards of 1886 and 1887, at which time he 
lost seventy-five per cent of the herd. After that he turned his attention 
to wheat raising, and later homesteaded some two and one-half sections 
more of land and bought a half section of railroad land. His farms were 
among the finest in this section of Alberta and he disposed of them at a 
substantial profit. He retired from active life in 1910. All that he 



294 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

possesses has been won through his energy and perseverance and he is 
today one of the most deservedly successful men of this community. 

In 1872 was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Gallagher and Miss Helen 
Macdonald, who was born in County Cork, Ireland, and died in 1918, at 
the age of seventy-four years. To their union six children were born: 
Mary, who married Robert Gunn, died in her fortieth year, leaving three 
children ; Kate is the widow of Frank Levaseur of Pincher Creek, Alberta ; 
Anne is the wife of Alfred Robbins of Blairmore ; Nellie is the wife of Dr. 
George S. Mills of Macleod ; Joe died at the age of thirty-two years ; and 
Bartholomew died in infancy. 

The religious faith of Mr. Gallagher is that of the Roman Catholic 
church. Politically he is a stanch supporter of the Liberal party. He is 
well known in the Macleod district as one of the substantial citizens and 
prosperous farmers who owes his advancement in life entirely to his own 
perseverance and well-directed labor. His many friends hold him in high 
confidence and esteem by reason of his many trustworthy characteristics, 
his integrity in business and his loyalty in all matters of citizenship. 



AUBREY S. TUTTLE, D. D. 

Dr. Aubrey S. Tuttle, principal of the Alberta College, South, at Ed- 
monton, devoting his life to educational work as a teacher and preacher, 
was born in Pugwash, Nova Scotia, October 2, 1874, and is a son of Mill- 
edge and Julia (Fulton) Tuttle, who spent their hves in Nova Scotia, the 
father having followed the occupation of farming as his life work. He 
was a son of Elijah Tuttle, who was born in New England but came to 
Canada. He was a member of a Loyalist family and was not in sympathy 
with the attitude of the American colonies toward Great Britain at that 
period. The grandfather in the maternal line was Stephen Fulton, who 
was born in the north of Ireland and came to Canada in early life. He 
was a running mate of the Hon. Joe Howe, when they were opposing can- 
didates to Charles Tupper and Hon. Mr. McFarland, who was later a sena- 
tor and continued active as a political leader to the time of his demise. 
Milledge Tuttle gave his political support to the Liberal party and he filled 
the office of school trustee but had no ambition for political service. He 
belonged to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and both he and his 
wife were consistent members of the Methodist church. Mrs. Tuttle was a 
woman of marked literary taste and read broadly and discriminatingly. 
Their family numbered ten children, seven of whom are living. 

Aubrey S. Tuttle was the fourth in order of birth in the family and 
pursued his early education in the village schools, while later he attended 
a boys' school — Acacia Villa — at Horton Landing. He next became a stu- 
dent in Mount Allison University at Sackville, New Brunswick, where he 
was graduated in 1905, with the Bachelor of Arts degree, while in 1907 
the Master of Arts degree was conferred upon him and in 1919 his Alma 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 295 

Mater bestowed upon him the degree of Doctor of Divinity. Long before 
he had completed his education, however, he had entered upon the active 
work of the Methodist ministry. He entered upon this holy calling in 1897 
and served for three years on probation before taking up his college course. 
In 1905 he came to Edmonton and for four years was pastor of Grace Meth- 
odist church of this city. Later he accepted the pastorate of the Wesley 
Methodist church at Calgary, where he labored for four years and then 
went to Medicine Hat, in which place he spent a similar period in preaching 
the gospel. With his return to Edmonton he was pastor at McDougall's 
church for two years and then became connected with Alberta College, 
South, as principal, in the year 1919. This is a theological institution 
affiliated with the university and also cooperates with the Robertson Pres- 
byterian College. There are four teachers in the department of theology 
and eight in the other department. There is also maintained a young 
ladies' college in connection with the school under a most prominent and 
competent lady principal. 

In 1910 Dr. Tuttle was united in marriage to Miss Mary Anna Johnson, 
who was born in Barton, Nova Scotia, and supplemented her high school 
training by a course of study in Arcadia University of Nova Scotia, from 
which she was graduated in 1905. She afterwards taught for two years 
in the Mount Allison Ladies' College. By her marriage she has become 
the mother of five children: Morley, Julia, Aubrey, George and Ruth, de- 
ceased. 

In politics Dr. Tuttle maintains an independent course, voting for men 
and measures rather than party. His entire time and attention is devoted 
to his work as principal of the school and as a minister of the gospel. He 
spends about three-fourths of his time out in the province, preaching in 
different places and he also does missionary work in the interest of the 
college. He was president of the Methodist conference in 1918 and during 
the past twelve years has been a member of each General Conference. 
He was also elected recently to the general council of the Proposed United 
Church of Canada. In 1921 he was appointed representative from the 
Alberta Methodist conference to the Ecumenical Conference at London, 
England, where he delivered an address on "The Future, Its Great Tasks." 
He is a strong and forceful speaker, possessed of splendid oratorical power, 
and he is making every effort to translate the teachings of the Bible con- 
cerning the brotherhood of man and the love of the Creator into the com- 
mon terms of daily life. 



RICHARD PARSONS, M. D. 

Dr. Richard Parsons, whose skill and ability as a surgeon entitles him 
to representation among the prominent members of the medical profes- 
si<in in the province of Alberta, is accorded an extensive and gratifying 
patronage in Red Deer and vicinity where he has practiced since 1903, 



296 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

with the exception of time spent overseas in the service of his country. 
Dr. Parsons was born near Toronto, Ontario, in June, 1875, a son of Richard 
and Isabella (McGregor) Parsons, the former a native of Canada and the 
latter of Scotland. Their marriage was celebrated in Ontario, where the 
father engaged in farming for many years and he and his wife resided 
on the home farm until death. To their union five children were born, 
four of whom are living, Dr. Parsons being the youngest of the family. 
Throughout his life Mr, Parsons gave his political support to the Liberal 
party and both he and his wife were consistent members of the Methodist 
church and active workers in its interest. 

Richard Parsons received his early education in the public schools near 
the home farm and in due time was graduated from the Weston high 
school. His earliest ambition was to enter the medical profession and 
subsequently he enrolled in the Trinity Medical College at Toronto, from 
which institution he was graduated in 1901. He spent one year in work 
under Dr. Ball at Singhampton, Ontario, and for one year he was a mem- 
ber of the staff of the General Hospital at Toronto. In 1903 he came to 
Red Deer and opened offices for the practice of his profession, having an 
extensive and lucrative patronage when the World war broke out. In 
April, 1916, he put all personal interests aside and enrolled in the Canadian 
Medical Corps, and in the same year was sent overseas, arriving in Lon- 
don in June. For some time he was stationed at a hospital in Shornecliff, 
England, and later he was with the Eighty-ninth Battalion, being attached 
to No. 1, General Canadian Hospital, in France. Dr. Parsons received his 
honorable discharge in June, 1918, and immediately returned to Red Deer 
and resumed his practice. He has taken postgraduate work in New York, 
Edinburgh, Scotland, London and Chicago. He specializes in surgery and 
is widely known for his surgical work throughout the province. He is a 
fellow of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of England and he 
is likewise a fellow of the American College of Surgeons. In addition to 
his private practice the Doctor is a member of the staff of the local hos- 
pital. 

On the 11th of October, 1905, Dr. Parsons was married to Miss Marcia 
Ella Bull, a native of Brampton, and a daughter of V. H. Bull, who was 
one of the big Jersey breeders in the province of Ontario. Mrs. Parsons 
died on the 18th of November, 1918, leaving four children: Richard Mc- 
Gregor, sixteen years of age; William Bull, thirteen years of age; Ella 
Duncan, ten years of age ; and Margaret Isabelle. Mrs. Parsons was a 
consistent member of the Methodist church, and was very popular in this 
community, where her death caused profound sorrow. On the 13th of 
September, 1920, Dr. Parsons was married to Annie Nelson Forbes, who 
was at that time matron of the hospital at Red Deer. She is a native of 
Nova Scotia and a woman of culture and refinement. Both Dr. and Mrs. 
Parsons are active members of the Methodist church in Red Deer. 

Although Dr. Parsons is inclined to be independent in politics, he gives 
his support for the most part to the Liberal party and maintains an active 
interest in party affairs, being well versed on all important questions and 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 297 

issues of the day. He has been trustee on the pubhc school board. Fra- 
ternally he is identified with the Royal Arch Masons and along- strictly 
professional lines he holds membership in the Canadian Medical Associa- 
tion and the Alberta Medical Association. The Doctor devotes his entire 
time and attention to his profession and well merits the position he has 
attained among the foremost physicians and surgeons in the province. 



ARTHUR CHARLES LEWIS ADAMS, LL. B. 

Although advancement at the bar is proverbially slow, Arthur Charles 
L. Adams has already gained an enviable reputation for ability in his 
chosen profession, notwithstanding the fact that he has just reached his 
thirtieth milestone on life's journey, and in legal circles of Edmonton he 
occupies a well established position. He was born at Toronto, Ontario, in 
1893, and is a son of Arthur A. and Kate (Daw) Adams, the latter a 
native of England. The father was born in Toronto, in which city his 
marriage occurred, and he and his wife are now residents of Edmonton. 

In the acquirement of an education Arthur C. L. Adams attended the 
grammar schools of Toronto and the high school at Kenora, Ontario, after 
which he turned his attention to the real estate and insurance business, 
operating along those lines in Winnipeg, Manitoba. In 1911 he came to 
Alberta, locating at Edmonton, where he entered the same field of activity, 
and also engaged in merchandising. In 1915 he took up the study of law 
and five years later he was graduated from the University of Alberta, 
winning the LL. B. degree. He at once began the practice of his profes- 
sion in this city, first under the firm name of McCullough & Adams and 
since the summer of 1922 by himself. His list of clients is constantly in- 
creasing, as he is aff'orded an opportunity to demonstrate his ability to 
cope with the intricacies of the law. Mr. Adams is an earnest and dis- 
criminating student, thoroughly familiar with the principles of jurispru- 
dence, and in the preparation of his cases he is careful and painstaking. 
He has never feared that laborious effort which must precede ascendency 
in any line of endeavor and has always borne in mind the maxim: "The 
harder the conflict, the greater the triumph," which has served to 
strengthen his courage, enabling him to overcome all difficulties and ob- 
stacles in his path. 

Mr. Adams is a veteran of the World war. In February, 1916, he en- 
listed as a private in the Alberta Company of the Western Universities 
Battalion, with which he was sent overseas, and after reaching France he 
was attached to the Forty-sixth Battalion. He was wounded in the battle 
of Vimy Ridge and was invalided to England. He was recommended for 
and was given a commission and after being gazetted was sent to India. 
As a member of the Indian Army he saw service in the rebellion of 1919 
and later in that year took part in the war with Afghanistan, being sta- 
tioned on the Afghan frontier. He was discharged from the service in 



298 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

England, in December, 1919, after a most creditable military record, and 
returned to Edmonton in January, 1920. He is a member of the Anglican 
church and gives his political support to the Liberal party. Professionally 
he is identified with the Edmonton and Canadian Bar Associations and 
he is also a member of the Edmonton Automobile Club, the Edmonton 
Saddle Club, and the Canadian Club of this city, he being elected secretary 
of the latter club in 1923. He is also an associate member of the Royal 
Colonial Institute of London, England. He gives his best efforts to any 
task that he undertakes and exemplifies in his life the highest standards of 
manhood and citizenship. His time and attention are chiefly given to his 
law business and in a profession demanding mental alertness and untiring 
application he is steadily coming to the front. 



ERNEST A. SHARMAN. 



Ernest A. Sharman is closely connected with business interests of 
Lethbridge as owner of the E. A. Sharman Company, a well known imple- 
ment concern. He was born in Northamptonshire, England, on the 14th of 
September, 1876, a son of Thomas S. and Amelia (Colpman) Sharman, 
both natives of Northamptonshire. The father was an extensive farmer 
and sheep raiser and his death occurred in England in 1901, at the age 
of seventy-three, while Mrs. Sharman died in 1883, at the age of forty- 
five years. Mr. Sharman was twice married. His living children are: 
Percy George is engaged in farming in Pierson, Manitoba ; Arthur E. S. is 
a successful general farmer in Bradwardine, Manitoba, having located 
there in 1880 and homesteaded quite an extensive acreage; Thomas Wil- 
liam is living at Croft, where he is associated with John Martin Sons, in 
the conduct of a brewery; and Ernest. Mr. Sharman was a consistent 
communicant of the Church of England. 

In the acquirement of his education Ernest A. Sharman attended the 
common schools of his birthplace and was graduated from Harborough 
College. After putting his textbooks aside he went into the ofiice of a 
building contractor in Leicester, and in 1892 came to Canada, locating in 
Manitoba. He worked on a farm there for a year, at the termination of 
which time he came to Lethbridge, where he conducted a dray and express 
line for three years and was connected with the Northwest Jobbing & Com- 
mission Company of Lethbridge for eleven years. Later Mr. Sharman 
opened a real estate and insurance business, handling land throughout Al- 
berta, and all kinds of insurance. This enterprise he is still conducting, 
under the style of the E. A. Sharman Agency. In 1916 he entered the im- 
plement business under the name of the E. A. Sharman Company and he 
has been successful in this venture. He carries a complete and high grade 
stock of heavy and light farm implements, ditching and grading machin- 
ery, twine, and sacks. 

In October, 1898, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Sharman and 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 299 

Miss Charlotte Mary McNaughton, a native of Ontario, Canada. Both Mr. 
and Mrs. Sharman are members of the Church of England and for two 
years he was a warden in the church. Fraternally he is identified with the 
Masons and the United Commercial Travelers, and has served as chap- 
lain of the former body. He is also a member of the U. F. A. at Leth- 
bridge. His political endorsement is given to the Conservative party, and 
in matters of citizenship he is public-spirited and can be depended upon to 
cooperate in forwarding all worthy enterprises. As a citizen and business 
man he enjoys the confidence and esteem of his fellowmen and he is readily 
conceded to be one of the representative business men of Lethbridge. 



JOHN STANLEY WRAY, M. D. 

Dr. John Stanley Wray, a World war veteran who since June, 1919, has 
engaged in the practice of medicine at Lethbridge, was born in Linwood, 
Ontario, October 28, 1882, a son of George and Ann (Allingham) Wray, 
both of whom were natives of Ireland. The grandfather, James Wray, was 
commissioner in the Royal Irish Constabulary. The Wray family is of 
English origin, representatives of the name removing from England to 
Ireland in 1600, coming from Lincolnshire. Representatives of the family 
remained in Ireland until the grandfather of Dr. Wray emigrated to 
Canada. His grandfather in the maternal line was also born in Ireland 
and was of Scotch descent. Both families were founded in Ontario at 
an early day and there was celebrated the marriage of George Wray and 
Ann Allingham. The father devoted his life to the occupation of farming 
for many years and passed away in 1906, at the age of seventy-two. The 
mother survives and is now living in Millbank. They were members of 
the Methodist church and in politics Mr. Wray voted with the Conserva- 
tive party. 

John Stanley Wray is the youngest of a family of six children. He was 
educated in Public School No. 21 in Wellesley township, Waterloo district, 
Ontario, and later he attended the Kitchener high school and the Edmon- 
ton high school. He there acquired a license to teach and devoted about 
three years to the profession of teaching in and near Edmonton but re- 
garded this merely as an initial step to other professional labor. He then 
entered the medical school of the University of Toronto in Toronto, Canada, 
in 1905, and by reason of the steady progress that he made in his studies 
was there graduated in 1909. He then located for practice at Raymond, 
Alberta, where he continued for six years, when the need for aid in con- 
nection with the World war led him to join the army as a member of the 
Canadian Army Medical Corps, with the rank of captain. He served in 
Calgary until March, 1917, when he was attached to the One Hundred and 
Ninety-first Battalion in the medical department and went overseas. He 
served in England with reserve battalions and in hospitals and was for a 
time a member of a traveling medical board, thus continuing in active 



300 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

duty until May, 1918, when he went to France and was attached to the 
Third Canadian Ambulance Corps. Later he was identified with the First 
Canadian Field Artillery and was in the battle of Amiens in August, 1918. 
Later he returned to England with a broken arm and was discharged 
from the Canadian army on the 27th of April, 1919. At the breaking of 
the Hindenburg line on the 1st and 2nd of September, 1918, he was 
on duty with the Third Field Ambulance. Following his return home 
he located at Lethbridge for the practice of medicine in June, 1919, and 
has here remained. 

On the 15th day of July, 1913, Dr. Wray was married to Miss Marion 
Neilson, B. A., who was born in Proton, Ontario, and was educated in the 
University of Toronto, being graduated in 1911. She is a daughter of 
R. A. Neilson, who was a farmer and lumberman of Ontario throughout 
his life. By her marriage she has become the mother of two children: 
Margaret Alice and Phyllis Neilson. Dr. and Mrs. Wray are members of 
the Presbyterian church and he belongs to the Veterans Club and to the 
Masonic fraternity. In politics he follows an independent course, voting 
for men and measures rather than party. He belongs to the Rotary Club 
and is one of the active supporters of all those plans and projects which 
are looking to the public good. He is now serving as one of the managers 
of Knox church and is a director of the Young Men's Christian Association. 
Naturally the major part of his time and attention is given to professional 
interests and he is now a member of the Lethbridge Medical Society, of 
which he is serving as secretary. He has made steady advance in his pro- 
fession and his ability has placed him in the front rank among the younger 
physicians and surgeons of his adopted city. 



RT. REV. HENRY ALLEN GRAY, D. D. 

Right Rev. Henry Allen Gray, first bishop of Edmonton, is one of the 
pioneer ministers of the province and for twenty-seven years he has 
worked earnestly, untiringly and effectively to promote the success of 
the Anglican church and broaden its influence. His undoubted sincerity, 
his marked public spirit and his scholarly attainments have gained him 
the esteem of his fellow citizens, irrespective of their religious affiliations, 
and his personal friends, who are found in all walks of life, hold him in 
the highest regard. He was born in London, England, in July, 1863, a 
son of Henry and Fanny (Clark) Gray, the latter also a native of that 
city. The father was likewise of English birth and his education was 
acquired in the Christ Church school, London, commonly known as the 
"Bluecoat School." He became an officer in the Royal Navy, with which 
he was connected throughout his life, and served on the flotilla that 
escorted Great Britain's first ambassador to China in 1858. His father 
was also a naval officer and for three hundred years members of the fam- 
ily have contributed their quota toward making England the greatest 
naval power in the world. The ancestral record is traced to Sir Walter 




RT. REV. HENRY ALLEN GRAY, D. D. 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 303 

Raleigh, whose crest is now borne by Bishop Gray. Henry Gray was a 
Royal Arch Mason and a member of the Anglican church. His death 
occurred at Shanghai, China, in 1864. The mother has reached the age 
of eighty-two years and is residing with the subject of this review. 

Henry Allen Gray was the only child of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Gray. 
He attended several preparatory schools and the Chatham House private 
boarding school and afterward spent two years in Germany, returning 
to England in 1881. He then entered the office of a relative, in which 
he was employed for five years, and then came to Canada with his mother, 
arriving in Calgary, Alberta, on the 2d of June, 1886. A friend of the 
family had started a small cattle ranch at Elbow River, in the Calgary 
Center district of Alberta, and the Bishop there spent six years in riding 
the range, thus becoming intimately acquainted with the adventurous life 
of a cowboy and also experiencing the hardships and privations of pioneer 
times. Owing to impaired health his mother returned to England in 
1892 and in that year he took up the study of theology in St. John's Col- 
lege at Winnipeg, Manitoba, from which he was graduated in 1895, hav- 
ing been a lay reader under the bishop of Calgary for three years previous 
to entering that institution of learning. In June, 1895, he was ordained 
by the bishop of Calgary and appointed the incumbent of Holy Trinity 
church in South Edmonton, as it was then known. In July, 1896, he was 
admitted to the priesthood and in March of the following year was chosen 
by the congregation of All Saints church of Edmonton as its priest, re- 
taining that charge until 1914, when he was elected first bishop of the 
Edmonton diocese, in which connection he has ninety congregations under 
his control. He was also appointed rural dean, filling that office for a 
year, and in 1907 was made archdeacon. He is devoting every effort 
toward strengthening and developing the important ecclesiastical inter- 
ests entrusted to his care and his efforts have been beneficially resultant. 

Bishop Gray is a representative of that class of modern thinkers who 
recognize the fact that religion has to do with the every day things of life 
and is not merely a matter of pulpit teaching. His activities have there- 
fore reached out to the general interests of society. He is head of the 
Edmonton Boy Scouts and each year holds a badge as a newsboy and 
bootblack. He was the first commissioner of the juvenile court and still 
holds that position. His work in that connection has been productive of 
much good and he has also been chaplain of the Nineteenth Alberta Dra- 
goons, while for three terms he served as a member of the Edmonton 
School Board. 

In December, 1918, Bishop Gray was united in marriage to Miss 
Georgina Wibby, a daughter of William Williams Wibby, one of the 
pioneer settlers of Toronto. She was ordained a deaconess in 1914 and 
came west to take her first charge, which was in Edmonton. She was 
married in Winnipeg and has a daughter, Frances Marion, now three 
years of age. For thirty-six years Bishop Gray has resided in Alberta, 
during which period a marvelous transformation has been wrought as 
the work of civilization has been carried forward, and in years of service 



304 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

he is the second oldest minister in Edmonton. He is a broad-gauged man 
who possesses the true spirit of Christianity, and his powers and talents 
have been a leavening force in making high ideals a tangible asset in 
the affairs of daily life. 



CECIL ETHELBERT RACE. 

Cecil Ethelbert Race, registrar of the University of Alberta, was born 
at Port Hope, Ontario, in 1876, the oldest son of George Robert and Emma 
(Davis) Race. The father was born in Durham county, England, and the 
mother in Castleton, Ontario. The father was a dairyman in Ontario, but 
in 1908 removed to the west, where he and his youngest son took up the 
building business, erecting several residences in Edmonton, thus contribut- 
ing to the growth and development of the city. His family numbered three 
children : Cecil E. ; Clarence, engaged in the hardware business ; and For- 
rest, of the Hamly Printing Press, all of whom, with their father, are resi- 
dents of Edmonton. The mother's death occurred in 1918. 

Cecil E. Race, having completed the work of the public and high schools 
schools of Port Hope, entered the University of Toronto, where he pursued 
a mathematical course, winning the Bachelor of Arts degree in 1897. He 
then attended the Normal College in Hamilton, Ontario, obtaining in 1898 
his license to teach in the high schools of Ontario as a specialist in mathe- 
matics. Out of a class of three hundred he was one of four to receive 
honors in practice teaching. The next five years were spent in high school 
work in Ontario, where he won his high school principal's certificate and 
also his commercial specialist's certificate in 1900. 

From Cobourg Collegiate Institute Mr. Race was appointed in 1903 to 
join Dr. Riddell in Edmonton, in the opening of Alberta College. Here 
he remained as first assistant and head of the commercial and mathema- 
tical departments until 1909. Meantime he studied higher accounting, and 
in 1907 passed his final examinations as a chartered accountant for the 
province of Manitoba. He practised then as a chartered accountant for 
about three years, but during the last year of that period gave a part of his 
time to the University of Alberta, which had been organized in 1908. In 
1911 he came into the university, devoting all of his time thereto as regis- 
trar and bursar, and has since occupied that position, doing most efficient 
work for the institution. 

In 1903 Mr. Race was married to Miss Annie Ashwell, a native of 
Strathroy, Ontario, and a graduate of the University of Toronto. They 
have two children : Marjorie Ashwell, who is now a sophomore in the 
University of Alberta ; and Winfield Davis, attending high school. The 
family are Methodists, being members and ofiice bearers in McDougall 
church. Mr. Race is also a Mason, has served as senior warden in his 
lodge, and belongs to the lodge quartet. He is a member and past presi- 
dent of the Institute of Chartered Accountants of Alberta, and has served 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 305 

as secretary thereof since 1912. He was also secretary of the Dominion 
Association of Chartered Accountants in 1917. He lectures in the uni- 
versity on business administration and accounting', and has done post- 
graduate work in Chicag-o and Alberta leading to the degree of M.A., 
which was conferred upon him by the latter university in May, 1923. 

Mr. Race has always taken a prominent part in athletics and is presi- 
dent of the Alberta Provincial Basket Ball Association, a member of the 
board of governors of the Alberta Amateur Union, and the first president 
of the Canadian Basket Ball Association. He assisted largely in starting 
the work of erecting a building- for the Young Men's Christian Association 
in Edmonton, having been chairman of the committee which collected the 
first funds and purchased the site, and he has always been a strong sup- 
porter of that institution. He also manifests a keen interest in civic 
afi'airs and is an active member of the Board of Trade. There is no pro- 
ject nor cause instituted for the benefit and upbuilding of the city along 
material, intellectual, civic and moral lines that does not receive his sup- 
port and cooperation. 



SAMUEL S. DUNHAM. 



Samuel S. Dunham, clerk of the supreme and district courts at Leth- 
bridge and actively identified with agricultural interests in this province, 
was born in Macon county, Missouri, April 14, 1867, and is a son of James 
and Nannie (Hughes) Dunham. The grandfather, Samuel Dunham, was 
a native of New Brunswick and devoted his life to farming and milling. 
The grandfather in the maternal line was Wilburn Hughes, a native of 
Virginia, who removed to Kentucky and thence to Missouri, where he 
followed agricultural pursuits. James Dunham, the father of Samuel S. 
Dunham, was born at Moores Mills, New Brunswick, and in 1858 went to 
Missouri, where he married Nannie Hughes, who was a native of that 
state. There they resided, and there Samuel S. Dunham, the subject of 
this sketch, was reared and educated. James Dunham followed the occu- 
pation of farming and was also at one time mine inspector for the state. 
The family attended the Congregational church, there being no Presby- 
terian church at the place of their residence. There were five children: 
Samuel S., the subject of this review; Thomas B., a farmer living at Leth- 
bridge. Alberta; Albert and Charles 0., who follow farming in Macon 
county, Missouri; and Mrs. J. J, Leffler, residing at Coaldale, Alberta. 

In the public schools of his native county Samuel S. Dunham pur- 
sued his early education and afterward attended the State Normal School 
at Kirksville, Missouri. He was superintendent of the public school at 
Bevier, Missouri, for six years, after which he entered the University of 
Missouri, from which he was graduated with the LL. B. degree in 1898. 
He practiced law in his native county and was state's attorney for two 
terms. Coming to Alberta in 1905, he purchased irrigated land near Coal- 
(20) 



306 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

dale, Alberta, which he still owns. In 1909 he removed his family to 
Lethbridge. From the first he gave his attention to the management of 
his farm Mid also was loan manager for the Imperial Life Insurance Com- 
pany. The farm interests still claim his attention and in much that he 
has undertaken he has won success. Mr. Dunham joined the United 
Farmers of Alberta as far back as 1912 and is a life member. He was 
elected provincial vice president in 1915 and reelected in 1916 and 1917. 
He was the first man to call attention to the matter of organizing for 
wheat marketing and in 1917 secured Sanford Evans to address the con- 
vention at Edmonton on the question. He was one of the first practical 
farmers to institute the movement for wider irrigation in southern Al- 
berta and was the first to suggest the sale of bonds for that purpose. He 
still owns two good irrigated farms — one of four hundred and twenty- 
six acres and the other of one hundred and sixty acres — of which he enjoys 
the management. But farming is but one of Mr. Dunham's occupations. 
He was not satisfied out of his profession and was admitted to the bar 
of Alberta in 1914 and practiced law at Lethbridge until January, 1922, 
when he accepted the position of clerk of the district and supreme courts. 

Mrs. Dunham, to whom Mr. Dunham was married in 1894, w^as Miss 
Frances Walker, daughter of W. G. Walker, one of the pioneer residents 
of Macon county, Missouri, farmer and civil engineer. Mr. and Mrs. 
Dunham became parents of three children : Aileen, who graduated with 
honors from the University of Alberta, with first rank in history, in 
1920, won her Master of Arts degree on the McKenzie fellowship and 
graduated from the University of Toronto at Toronto, Ontario, in 1921. 
In the fall of the same year she entered the University of London, Eng- 
land, as a postgraduate student and is specializing in colonial and con- 
stitutional history. She will secure the degree of Ph. D. during 1923 ; 
Walker Dunham, the second of the family, was graduated from the high 
school at Lethbridge and won a scholarship to Queen's College. He was 
graduated from the University of Alberta in 1920 and was appointed to 
the Rhodes scholarship the same year, entering Oxford University on 
the 1st of January, 1921 ; Lloyd, the youngest of the family, is in high 
school. The wife and mother passed away February 17, 1922, while 
Aileen and Walker were both at school in Europe. 

Mr. Dunham has ever stood for those progressive movements which 
have been most forceful in the material, intellectual and moral progress 
of the community. He was instrumental in bringing the Chautauqua 
to Canada and was the first man in Canada to sign a Chautauqua con- 
tract. This was in 1916 and the Chautauqua has had a wonderful growth 
in the Dominion since that time. At the present writing he is the vice 
president of the Lethbridge Constituency, U. F. A. Mr. Dunham was 
opposed to the U. F. A. going into politics as an organization, but when 
the organization did decide to go into politics he remained loyal. In 
politics a free trader, he might best be described as an Independent Lib- 
eral. In religious faith he is an unorthodox Presbyterian. He is a lover of 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 307 

shooting, and he likes to curl — curling, shooting, gardening and farming 
affording him his recreation. His entire life has been actuated by a 
most progressive spirit that has resulted in constant advancement along 
lines not only for the upbuilding of his own fortunes but for the benefit 
of the community as well, and Lethbridge has ever regarded him as a 
most valuable asset in her citizenship. 



JOHN M. MILLAR. 



In educational circles the name of John M. Millar is well known. 
Principal of Robertson College, he is bending every energy and effort to 
the upbuilding of the institution and under his guidance the work has 
steadily developed and standards have been constantly advanced. Prin- 
cipal Millar is a native of Ontario, his birth having occurred in Kin- 
cardine, in 1865. His parents were William and Barbara (McLeod) 
Millar, natives of Scotland and of Goderich, Ontario, respectively. They 
were married in Ontario. The mother passed away in 1907 and his 
father died in 1923, in his ninetieth year. He had made farming his life 
work and was a self-educated and self-made man, whose life was crowned 
with a substantial measure of success because of the wise and timely 
use he made of his opportunities. His political endorsement was given 
to the Liberal party. Fraternally he was a Mason and he belonged to the 
Presbyterian church, of which his wife was also an active member. In 
the work of the church he had taken a most helpful interest and was 
serving as one of the elders at the time of his death. 

John M. Millar is the second in order of birth in a family of nine 
children, six of whom are living. He enjoyed liberal educational ad- 
vantages, attending the Queen's University at Kingston, Ontario, from 
which he was graduated with the Bachelor of Arts degree in 1890, while 
in 1891 his Alma Mater conferred upon him the Master of Arts degree 
and in 1905 that of Bachelor of Divinity. He was made Doctor of Di- 
vinity at Westminster Hall at Vancouver in 1913, in recognition of the 
superior service which he had rendered to the cause of education and 
religion. 

Mr. Millar was ordained to the ministry of the Presbyterian church in 
1895 and his first pastorate was at Norwich, Ontario, where he remained 
for six years. He then went to British Columbia and accepted the 
pastorate of the church at Phoenix and also was pastor at Nanaimo on 
Vancouver island. His connection with British Columbia covered a resi- 
dence of nine years and during his last year of residence there he was 
moderator of the Presbyterian synod of that province. In 1909 he 
arrived in Strathcona, Alberta, where he took charge of the Knox Pres- 
byterian church, remaining as minister at that place for two and a half 
years. He then became identified with Robertson College, a Presbyterian 
theological school, at Strathcona. He first occupied a professorship but 



308 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

in 1919 became principal and has continued at the head of the institu- 
tion through the intervening period, his labors constituting a potent force 
in its development. Throughout his life he has put forth every effort 
to make his service of the greatest possible benefit to his fellowTnen. To 
this end he did postgraduate work at Halle, Germany, in 1899, and he 
also attended the Hartford School of Religious Pedagogy at Hartford, 
Connecticut, and the University of Chicago, Wide reading and study 
have constantly broadened his knowledge in addition to his training in 
the schools and universities of this and other countries, and he has ever 
been actuated by the highest standards in his work, while at all times 
his enthusiasm is contagious. In 1923 Dr. Millar was elected moderator 
of the Synod of Alberta. 

In December, 1901, Dr. Millar was married to Miss Belle Malcolm, 
who was born near London, Ontario, and educated in Norwich. They 
have one child, Jean, who is now a student in the University of Alberta. 
Dr. Millar is well known in Masonic circles and has served as senior 
warden and also as chaplain of his lodge. He is a Liberal in his political 
views and is conversant with the vital questions and issues of the day 
but without political ambition. He has always been interested in manly 
outdoor sports and belongs to the Granite Curling Club, of which he is 
chaplain. He withholds his aid from no civic project which he deems 
vital to the community and during the election of 1917 he spoke fre- 
quently on behalf of the proposed union government as the best means 
of meeting the crisis of the hour. His indefatigable energy has declined 
no call to labor or to service and his scholarly attainments have enabled 
him to translate high ideals into practical efforts for his fellowmen. 



ARTHUR MELVILLE SCOTT, B. A., Ph. D. 

Arthur M. Scott, a self-educated man of scholarly attainments, is recog- 
nized as one of the foremost educators of western Canada and for the . 
past sixteen years he has been superintendent of schools at Calgary. He 
was bom at Caistorville, Ontario, in April, 1869, a son of Michael G. and 
Lucretia M. (Horning) Scott, the former a native of Ireland but of Scotch 
descent, while the latter was born in the province of Ontario. In 1857 
the father came to Canada, settling at Caistorville, Ontario, and for some 
time he there followed the profession of teaching. He was one of the 
foremost men of his community, serving for many years as postmaster of 
Caistorville, while he also filled the office of township clerk. He died in 
May, 1870, at the comparatively early age of forty years. The mother 
long survived him, passing away in February, 1918, when eighty-one years 
of age. 

The public schools of Caistorville afforded Arthur M. Scott his early 
educational opportunities and when but fifteen years of age he was granted 
a teacher's certificate. He attended the Model school at Hamilton, Ontario, 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 309 

and when a young man of seventeen began his career as an educator, spend- 
ing three years as a teacher in the pubhc schools of London and vicinity. 
In 1890 he entered the Toronto Normal School, from which he received a 
gold medal at the age of twenty-one, and in 1892 he graduated from the 
Parkdale Collegiate Institute of that city, winning the Edward Blake 
scholarship in Mathematics and Classics. He then entered the University 
of Toronto, having but twenty dollars capital, and worked his way through 
that institution, from which he was graduated in 1896, with the B. A. 
degree. He was awarded the McDonald and Aberdeen gold medals for pro- 
ficiency in his studies and also received the 1851 exhibition scholarship, 
which credited him with one hundred and fifty pounds a year for two 
years. Being desirous of still further increasing his knowledge, he at- 
tended the University of Goettingen, Germany, for two years and in 1898 
the degree of Doctor of Philosophy was conferred upon him. Returning 
to Toronto, he acted for a year as substitute for Professor J. C. McLennan, 
and among his pupils who graduated at that time was Dr. J. S. Plaskett, 
who has since gained distinction as an astronomer. In 1899 Dr. Scott was 
called to the University of New Brunswick at Fredericton as professor 
of physics and electricity and for seven years was connected with that 
institution, during which period he was secretary of the faculty, and for 
a portion of the time he also acted as secretary of the University Senate. 
In March, 1906, he received the appointment of superintendent of the pub- 
lic schools of Calgary, on the recommendation of Dr. D. Mclntyre, the office 
coming to him unsolicited, and his long retention therein is proof of his 
ability as an educator and the esteem in which he is held by Calgary's citi- 
zens. He has ever been actuated by a spirit of progress that takes cog- 
nizance of all improved educational methods and under his guidance the 
schools of the city have attained a high standard of excellence, ranking 
with the best in the Dominion. His education was acquired by hard work 
and the exercise of self-denial and the strength of puiijose thus early dis- 
played has been manifest throughout his career, constituting a most im- 
portant factor in the attainment of his present success in the educational 
field. The number of pupils now attending high school exceeds the total 
enrollment of Calgary's public schools in 1906, thus indicating the rapid 
growth of the city in the past sixteen years. 

In July, 1900, Dr. Scott married Miss E. Bertha Howson, B. A., a daugh- 
ter of Dr. Joseph and Rebecca A. (Jeff"ers) Howson, the latter a native of 
the province of Ontario and of Irish descent. The father was born in 
Barnard Castle, England, and as a young man emigrated to Canada, be- 
coming one of the pioneer physicians of Toronto. He continued to engage 
in the practice of medicine in that city until his death, which occurred in 
1873, and the mother passed away in 1912. Dr. and Mrs. Scott have be- 
come the parents of two children: Arthur Wycliffe, born in June, 1901, and 
now a student at the University of Toronto; and Juliet Jeffers, who was 
born in November, 1902, and is attending a school for librarians at Toronto. 

Dr. Scott is an earnest, conscientious and helpful member of the Metho- 
dist church, of which he has been a Jocal preacher for thirty-four years. 



310 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

and for an extended period he has been a member of the official board. He 
has thrice been chosen to attend the General Conference of the church and 
for thirteen years was superintendent of the local Sunday school. He is 
independent in his political views and fraternally is identified with the In- 
dependent Order of Foresters. He is also a member of the Rotary Club and 
his interest in the commercial development of the city is indicated by his 
connection with the Calgary Board of Trade. He is chairman of the library 
board, on which he has served for ten years, and is a member of the Cana- 
dian and Alberta Educational Associations, being a past president of the 
last named organization. He belongs to that class of men whose every 
faculty must be excited to achieve distinction through the stimulating fric- 
tion of battling with difficulties, and his career is proof of the fact that it is 
under the pressure of necessity that the best and strongest in the indi- 
vidual are brought out and developed. Life has been to him purposeful and 
resultant and his work has been a potent and beneficial factor for good. 



JOHN JAMES DUNN. 



As chief sanitary and food inspector for Calgary, John J. Dunn holds a 
most important public office, the duties of which he has ably discharged 
for the past twelve years, and the worth of his work is widely acknowl- 
edged. He was born in Durham county, England, in September, 1875, and 
his parents, John and Margaret (Davis) Dunn, were also natives of the 
mother country. The father was a steel puddler, devoting his hfe to that 
work. His demise occurred in 1907, and the mother passed away two years 
later. 

Reared in his native county, John J. Dunn there attended the public 
schools and afterward completed a course in marine engineering. For two 
and a half years he was connected with a marine engine works in England 
and in 1905 he received a diploma from the Royal Sanitary Institute of 
London. Four years later he left England for Canada, making his way to 
the western part of the Dominion. He arrived in Calgary in 1909 and in 
the following year was appointed chief sanitary and food inspector for the 
city, in which capacity he has since served. Thorough preparation and 
practical expesience well qualified him for the responsibilities of the office 
and he has always taken the utmost precaution to safeguard the health 
of Calgary's citizens, never overlooking the slightest detail which would 
tend to endanger the welfare of the public. 

In November, 1898, Mr. Dunn was united in marriage to Miss Helen 
Pearson and they have become the parents of four children: Rita and 
Lillian, who are employed as stenographers by law firms of the city; and 
Winnie and Raymond, who are attending school. During the World war 
Mr. Dunn joined the Canadian Engineers, organized for home defense, and 
served with that organization for three years. He is a member of the 
Anglican church and his professional connections are with the Engineering 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 311 

Institute of Canada and the Sanitary Association of Canada, and of the 
latter society he sei-ved as president for two years. He has attained a 
position of distinction in his profession and in all matters of citizenship he 
is loyal, progressive and public-spirited. His course as a public official has 
won for him high commendation and the service which he is rendering- to 
the city is one of great value. 



JAMES H. HADFIELD. 



One of the most successful ranchers of Cardston is James H. Hadfield, 
who was born in Smithfield, Cache county, Utah, on the 21st of Novem- 
ber, 1871, a son of James B. and Marguerite (Gardner) Hadfield, both 
natives of England. The paternal grandfather, John Hadfield, was born 
in England, as was the maternal grandfather, John Gardner. The ma- 
ternal grandfather emigrated to the United States from England and in 
the middle part of the '60s made the trip overland to Utah. He was a 
weaver by trade and followed that trade in Smithfield, Utah, for many 
years. He married Martha Dunlap and they resided in Smithfield until 
their demise. James B. Hatfield served his apprenticeship at the weaver's 
trade in England, and after coming to the United States located in 
Philadelphia, where he followed the same occupation for a time. In 
1867 he went by trail overland to Salt Lake City and for some time he 
was employed in the construction of the Utah Northern Railroad. Subse- 
quently he obtained some land in the Cache valley and followed agricul- 
tural pursuits. He burned lime in Smithfield, being among the first, to 
construct kilns there, and later he homesteaded some additional land in 
Malad Valley, spending the greater part of his life in farming, in which 
he won success. He was justice of the peace while a resident of Smith- 
field. His demise occurred in 1914, at the age of seventy-seven years. 
His widow, who was born May 30, 1844, is living in Smithfield, at the age 
of seventy-nine years. Mr. Hadfield joined the Church of Jesus Christ 
of Latter-day Saints while living in England, and served as an elder in 
the church for several years. To Mr. and Mrs. Hadfield eight children 
were born : Sarah, the wife of H. P. Mack, a resident of Pleasant Grove, 
Utah ; James H., whose name introduces this review ; Martha F., the wife 
of Frank Pratt of Preston, Idaho; John G., a resident of Smithfield, 
Utah ; William J., who is living in Malad City, Utah ; Maggie, the widow 
of George Bingham of Smithfield, Utah; Violet M., the wife of John 
Pilgrim of Malad Valley, Utah; and Joseph E. of Malad Valley, Utah. 

In the acquirement of his education James H. Hadfield attended the 
district schools of Smithfield and subsequently entered the Utah Agricul- 
tural College at Logan, Utah. After putting his textbooks aside he re- 
mained with his parents on the home farm and learned how to burn 
lime. Later he was sent to Holland on a mission for the church and he 
resided in that country for two and one-half years, returning in 1895. 



312 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

In 1899 he arrived in Cardston, coming by train as far as Lethbridge, and 
he homesteaded some one hundred and sixty acres of raw prairie land 
near Taylorville. He built a granary on the land and lived in that for 
a short time, until he built a frame house, sixteen by tv^enty feet. From 
time to time he increased his holdings until today he ovi^ns eleven hundred 
and twenty acres of fine farm land, and he engages in general farming 
and stock raising, making a specialty of pure-blooded Berkshire hogs. In 
April, 1918, Mr. Hadfield was one of the organizers of the Cardston 
Farming Company, Incorporated, of which he is manager. The company 
owns eighteen hundred and ten acres, with seventeen hundred and ten 
of them under cultivation. Mr. Hadfield devotes his entire time and 
attention to his farming interests and well merits the success he has 
achieved and the esteem and confidence in which he is held by all who 
know him. 

On the 4th of January, 1899, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. 
Hadfield to Miss Mary J. Moorehead, who was born in Smithfield, Febru- 
ary 17, 1872. To their union six children have been born : Bernice is 
living at home with her parents ; Harold is engaged in ranching and lives 
at home ; Gerald is living in Montana ; and Koven, Lorraine and Thelma 
are living at home. 

Mr. Hadfield is an active worker in the interests of the Church of 
Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and he is a Seventy of the One Hun- 
dred and Twenty-first Quorum of the church. He has resided in the 
Cardston district for over twenty-four years and during that time has 
witnessed many changes as the work of advancement and improvement 
has been carried on. He has made good use of his time and opportunities 
and as the years have gone by has gained prosperity, while his friends in 
this community are legion. 



LORING HARRISON PUTNAM. 

Loring H. Putnam of Blairmore, Alberta, the oldest practitioner in 
that town, having resided there since July, 1911, has displayed marked 
skill in the solution of intricate legal problems, especially in criminal 
law. During his ten years' practice he has acted in the defense in all 
of the leading criminal cases in the district, and he enjoys in a large 
measure the confidence and respect of his professional colleagues. 

A native of Maitland, Hants county, Nova Scotia, the home village 
of the highly esteemed Joseph Howe, premier of Nova Scotia prior to 
confederation, Mr. Putnam was born June 14, 1886, of the marriage of 
Capt. William and Elizabeth (Carr) Putnam. The father and mother 
are now deceased, his father having died in December, 1896, and his 
mother in October, 1922. His father will be remembered by the old- 
timers as being the master of the ship "Sovereign," which was lost in 
the Bristol Channel in 1882, the vessel being one which was built by 




LORING H. PUTNAM 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 315 

himself and making the quickest voyage from New York to Liverpool. 
His father will also be remembered as being adrift in the Atlantic ocean 
on a plank and ladder and having been picked up by fishermen off the 
Lahave islands, and on account of no telephone or telegraphic communi- 
cation at that time he was given up for dead, as no word was received 
from him for over eight years. At that time he lost his wife, Margaret 
MacAulay, from Cow Bay, Cape Breton. Surviving them is a half-sister, 
Margaret. The father subsequently married Elizabeth Carr of the place 
now known as Mount Rose, Colchester county, Novia Scotia, and they 
became the parents of seven children, three of whom are living, the 
subject of this review being the only member of the family to come to 
Alberta and also the first person by the name of Putnam to reside in this 
province. 

Mr. Putnam is a direct descendant of the famous General Israel Put- 
nam of the United States, and he has in his possession the silver slippers 
which General Israel Putnam's sister wore at the time of her marriage, 
which he treasures very highly. He also has in his possession a grant 
which was given to his forefathers for the lease occupied by them at 
Maitland, Hants county, which was then known as the township of 
Douglas. 

Mr. Putnam is one of the direct descendants of the United Empire 
Loyalists. He is a Protestant in religion and an ardent Conservative, 
although the Liberal member for Colchester county is a descendant from 
the same branch. This was on account of confederation when in Hants 
county when one branch of the family settled on one side of the Shube- 
nacadie river known as Maitland, and the other branch settled on the 
other side known as Onslow. 

In the year 1902 Mr. Putnam entered Horton Academy, known as 
Acadia Collegiate School, being the academic training school for Acadia 
University. After three years' training in the Collegiate School Mr. 
Putnam entered Acadia University, where he took his arts course. Then 
he entered Dalhousie University in the class of 1910, and subsequently 
passed the law examination of the Nova Scotia bar, and was admitted as 
a barrister and solicitor on April 1, 1911. 

During his student days he maintained a high standing in his classes 
and also displayed athletic prowess, being commonly known as "straight- 
armed Putnam." On account of his athletic activities he now carries a 
sprained thumb. He participated in all college sports and played with 
the All-Canadian Football Team as a representative of his Alma Mater 
in 1907. He also played in the Eastern Canada Championship Team. 

He was articled to James A. MacLean, K. C, of Bridgewater, Nova 
Scotia, where he received his training as a criminal lawyer. After he 
was admitted to the bar he was associated with William Lormier Hall, 
K. C, who is at present leader of the Conservative party in Nova Scotia. 
In 1911 he came to the province of Alberta, opening an office at Blair- 
more on July 7th of that year, and there remained until the outbreak of 
the World war, when he enlisted and served in the Canadian Militia for 



316 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

three years, and then returned to his practice at Blairmore. As time 
has passed his practice has continuously increased, as he has had oppor- 
tunity to demonstrate his legal knowledge. 

He has also been called to public office, having served as town councilor 
and member of the school board after the village was incorporated and 
received a charter as a town. He subsequently resigned from those posi- 
tions to accept a position of town solicitor, which he has retained ever 
since. 

Mr. Putnam, as before mentioned, is a veteran of the World war, hav- 
ing enlisted in 1916 as a private in the One Hundred Ninety-first Bat- 
talion, commanded by Col. W. C. Bryan, now commissioner for the 
Provincial Police of the province of Alberta. On the 23d of May he 
received a commission as lieutenant and was sent overseas. He remained 
in service until the close of the war, was released from military duties on 
February 1, 1919, then returned to Blairmore, where he has since followed 
his profession. 

Mr. Putnam was married on May 3, 1911, to Inez Morse, who was 
born in Bridgewater, Nova Scotia, her parents being natives of that 
province and descendants of the Empire Loyalists. She being a Metho- 
dist and Mr. Putnam a Baptist, they now attend the Union church. 

Mr. Putnam is a Royal Arch Mason, a Black Knight of the Loyal 
Orange lodge and an independent Odd Fellow, and he has held prominent 
positions in the different orders. He has steadily advanced and his in- 
dustry and ability have won for him a position of prominence in a most 
exacting profession. 

In recognition of Mr. Putnam's services the provincial government 
has seen fit to appoint him a K. C, and now he is entitled to wear a 
silk gown. 



REV. MICHAEL J. O'GORMAN. 

Rev. Michael J. O'Gorman, representative of the Catholic priesthood, 
who on the 2d of December, 1921, was appointed to take charge of Sacred 
Heart church in Edmonton, was born in Renfrew, Ontario, in 1891, his 
parents being John K. and Mary (Dixon) O'Gorman, who were also 
natives of Ontario. There the father passed away in 1896. The mother 
is still living in that province. John K. O'Gorman was a school teacher 
in early life and afterward turned his attention to merchandising, which 
he followed to the time of his demise. The family has always adhered 
to the teachings of the Catholic church and in his political views Mr. 
O'Gorman was a Liberal. The family numbered nine children, seven sons 
and two daughters, of whom eight are living. Of these John Robert is 
the eldest of the family and he is parish priest at Cobalt, Ontario. 

Michael J. O'Gorman, the eighth in order of birth in the family, was 
educated at Renfrew, Ontario, where he attended the high school, or 
Collegiate Institute. He was there graduated in 1907 and afterward 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 317 

entered the Ottawa University, in which he completed his classical studies 
with the Bachelor of Arts degree in 1911. In the following year he 
entered Grand Seminary in Montreal and at the conclusion of a three 
years' period of study was ordained to the priesthood there in August, 
1915. His first charge was at Douglas, Ontario, where he was curate 
and later he went to Fort Coulonge, Quebec, and afterward to Mattawa, 
Ontario, where he remained for four months. In December, 1917, he 
went overseas. He was unattached and joined the artillery in England. 
He also did hospital work in that country and in France he was chaplain 
of the railway troops and also of the Fourth Brigade of Engineers. 

In September, 1919, Father O'Gorman returned home and was assist- 
ant priest at Renfrew for a time, after which he became locum tenens of 
a priest of Calabogie, Ontario, who was then in Europe. Father O'Gor- 
man served there for four months and was then given a parish at Wylie, 
Ontario, where he continued until 1921. On the 2d of December of that 
year he arrived in Edmonton, where he has continued as priest of the 
Sacred Heart church at No. 10821 Ninety-sixth street. The parish has 
three hundred families and a large school is maintained in connection 
with the church. In fact, there are three schools in the parish, over which 
Father O'Gorman has supervision. He is a member of the Knights of 
Columbus and is infinitely interested in all that pertains to the welfare of 
his people and the advancement of his church. 



WALTER EDWARD PITCHER. 

Among the farmers and ranchers who have won notable success in 
the Cardston district is Walter Edward Pitcher, who is now operating 
seven quarter sections of land near Cardston, and has lived in his present 
home for eighteen years. He was born in Farmington, Cache county, 
Utah, on the 13th of July, 1871, a son of Edward and Susan (Everett) 
Pitcher, both natives of England, where they were married. The pa- 
ternal grandfather, John Pitcher, an Englishman by birth, left his native 
land at an early age and went to the United States. In 1870 he crossed 
the plains to Utah and homesteaded some land in Cache valley. He 
married Miss Rebecca Ladle, also a native of England, and they were the 
first members of the Pitcher family to join the Church of Jesus Christ 
of Latter-day Saints. The grandfather followed farming until his demise 
in 1898, at the age of eighty-two years. Mrs. Pitcher died in 1893, in 
her seventy-third year. Edward Pitcher joined the Church of Jesus 
Christ of Latter-day Saints in England, and after emigrating to the 
United States he went immediately to Utah and homesteaded land in the 
Cache valley, engaging in general farming and in buying and selling 
live stock. About 1908 he came to Cardston and bought land here, con- 
tinuing his former occupations. He farmed a section of land here at 
one time but has now turned it over to his sons. He has achieved sub- 



318 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

stantial success in life and is living in Cardston, at the age of eighty-three 
years. Mrs. Pitcher died in 1877. To them four children were born: 
Clara, who is the wife of William Toleman ; Walter Edward, whose name 
introduces this review; Arthur, who is engaged in farming and stock 
raising, specializing in the breeding of pure blooded Belgian horses, at 
Woolford; and Mae, who is deceased. She was the wife of William 
Blackner and the mother of three children : Allen, Lorane and Kenneth, 
and she died in 1907, at the age of thirty years. Mr. Pitcher's second 
marriage was to Mary Ann Olsen, a native of Cache valley, Utah, and 
to the second union nine children were bom : Rilla, the wife of Joseph 
Hammond ; David, who is farming in Woolford, Alberta ; Pearl, the wife 
of Jack Hall of Salt Lake; Hazel, the wife of David Howland; Ira, who 
is farming at Cardston; Inus, the wife of Andrew Stratton, a farmer 
located near Cardston; Ruby, the wife of Eugene Williams, a farmer of 
Cardston; Neoma, who is living in Cardston; and Wanda, a resident of 
Cardston. Mr. Pitcher is an elder in the church. 

In the acquirement of his education Walter Edward Pitcher attended 
the public schools of Cache valley. He was reared by his grandfather, 
John Pitcher, and remained with him until he was twenty-three years 
of age. He took charge of his grandfather's farms in Cache valley until 
1895, when he came to Cardston, making the trip overland with a cov- 
ered wagon, and taking one month to make the journey. He homesteaded 
one hundred and sixty acres of barren prairie land in township 3, 
range 4, section 22. There was no fencing in this section of the country, 
all of the land being open as far as Lethbridge. His first work was to 
build a log cabin out of timber hauled from the mountains, a distance of 
twenty-six miles. He then set about to break his land and put it under 
cultivation and from time to time he increased his holdings. Today he 
owns seven quarter sections of land, whereon he specializes in raising 
Clydesdale horses. He has imported a number of horses and now has 
about forty head, mostly pure blooded, on the land. He likewise has some 
pure-blooded Durham cattle and keeps from two to three hundred head of 
cattle on the ranch the year around. Aside from stock raising he is 
engaged in general farming, and out of seven hundred acres he has two 
hundred in crops. Mr. Pitcher established a meat market, in association 
with R. W. Reeder, known as the Reeder & Pitcher Meat Market and 
they conducted that enterprise for ten years, during that time buying 
and shipping live stock. He was one of the founders of the Central 
Garage Company, Incorporated, which was organized in 1918 and he is 
president of the company. He is now active as vice president of the 
Cardston Creamery Company, of which he was likewise one of the or- 
ganizers. Mr. Pitcher organized the Cardston Farming Company to 
operate the Indian reserve just north of Cardston. This comprises 
eighteen hundred acres, all in one block and all sowti to wheat. The com- 
pany is incorporated for twenty thousand dollars and Mr. Pitcher owns 
two-fifths of the stock. This is perhaps one of the largest farm com- 
panies in the province. 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 319 

On the 29th of October, 1894, Mr. Pitcher was married to Miss Nellie 
Hinman, who was born in Farmington, Davis county, Utah, a daughter 
of Morgan and Rhoda (Chase) Hinman, natives of New York state. 
The paternal grandfather of Mrs. Pitcher, Lyman Hinman, was born in 
New York and was the first member of the family to join the Church 
of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, having emigrated to Utah in early 
life, where his death occurred. The maternal grandfather, Isaac Chase, 
was a native of New England. He married Phoebe Ogden, who was also 
a native of the New England states, and they emigrated to Utah and 
built the first grist mill in Salt Lake City, where their death occurred 
some years afterward. The parents of Mrs. Pitcher joined the Church 
of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints while residents of New York state 
and in 1849 they crossed the plains to Utah with oxen. They were mem- 
bers of the same prairie train and they were married in Farmington, 
Utah. Mr, Hinman was a carpenter by trade, and followed that trade 
in Utah until the latter part of the '80s, when he came to Cardston, and 
homesteaded some land here. His death occurred in 1890, at the age of 
seventy-one years. Mrs. Hinman drove a team from Utah to Cardston 
two different times. She passed away in 1919, at the age of ninety-one 
years. To Mr. and Mrs. Hinman four children were born : Clara M. and 
Rhoda, whose deaths occurred in infancy; Frank, who was born in 1872 
and died in 1892; and Mrs. Pitcher, who was born in 1877. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Pitcher eleven children have been born : Susan H. is the wife of 
Warren L. Smith, a farmer of Levett, Alberta; Rhoda H. is the wife of 
Henry Smith of Champion, Alberta, a successful farmer; Morgan H, is 
now serving on a mission of two years in Manitoba ; Frank H. and Nellie 
H. are living at home ; Everett H. died in 1920, at the age of twelve years ; 
and June H., Walter H., Callis H., Kate H., and Ruth H. are living at 
home. 

Mr. Pitcher is public-spirited and his aid can always be counted upon 
in the furtherance of any movement for the benefit of the community. 
He was a member of the city council for nine years and served as mayor 
of Cardston three terms. He devotes his spare time to working in the 
interest of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and he is a 
high priest and first councilor in the bishopric. 



LIEUTENANT COLONEL DANIEL LEE REDMAN, LL, B. 

Lieutenant Colonel Daniel Lee Redman, one of Calgary's young bar- 
risters, has successfully followed his profession in this city for nine 
years, and legislative affairs have also occupied his attention. He was 
born in Oil City, Ontario, October 14, 1889, of the marriage of D. B. and 
Annie M. Redman, and his high school training was received at Petrolia. 
He received the LL. B. degree from Manitoba University and also was a 
student at King's College and Inns of Court in London, England. Com- 



320 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

ing to Calgary in 1906, he read law with Messrs. Lougheed, Bennett, 
McLaws & Company and was called to the Alberta bar in 1913. He was 
admitted to a partnership in the firm, this association being maintained 
until 1922, when the present style of Lougheed, McLaws, Sinclair & 
Redman was adopted. They have been connected with a number of im- 
portant law cases and their clientele is a large and representative one. 
Since 1910 Lieutenant Colonel Redman has been a member of the One 
Hundred and Third Regiment of Calgary Rifles. On the 7th of August, 
1914, he enlisted for overseas service and was commissioned a lieutenant. 
He was wounded in April, 1915, and received his discharge in 1916. He 
is a Conservative in his political views and at the general election of 
1917 was elected to represent East Calgary in the Dominion parliament. 
He is a member of the Ranchmen's Club. 



ISAIAH WILLIS McARDLE. 

Choosing the practice of law for the exercise of his powers, Isaiah W. 
McArdle has made continuous progress in his profession and his ability 
has placed him with Calgary's representative barristers. A native of Hope- 
ville. Grey county, Ontario, he was born October 15, 1867, of the marriage 
of Joseph and Nancy (Kerr) McArdle, the latter of whom was also born in 
that province. The father was a native of Ireland and during his boyhood 
came to Canada with his parents, who established their home near the 
city of Toronto. During his remaining years Joseph McArdle followed 
the occupation of farming in the province of Ontario and his demise oc- 
curred on December 23, 1920, when he had reached the venerable age of 
ninety-four years. The mother passed away May 20, 1904, when seventy 
years of age. 

Isaiah Willis McArdle obtained his early education in the grammar 
school at Hopeville, Ontario, and his high school training was received at 
Mount Forest and Orangeville, in that province. After devoting three 
years to teaching he became a law student at Osgoode Hall of Toronto and 
was graduated with the class of 1898. He was admitted to the bar at Mark- 
dale, Ontario, and served his professional novitiate with Hon. I. B. Lucas, 
former attorney-general of Ontario, with whom he was associated until 
April, 1910. Coming to the west he opened an office in Calgary, Alberta, 
and for two years practiced independently. He then formed a partnership 
with W. S. Davidson, now police magistrate of the city and the firm of 
McArdle & Davidson has since been continued. They control a large and 
representative clientele and their business in the courts is constantly in- 
creasing in volume and importance. 

Mr. McArdle is an adherent of the Conservative party and in religious 
faith he is a Presbyterian. He is grand master of the Alberta Associa- 
tion of Orangemen and also has membership with the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows. He has a thorough knowledge of the principles of juris- 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 321 

prudence and is recognized as a wise counselor and an able advocate. For 
twelve years he has been identified with the Calgary bar and in a pro- 
fession which requires thorough preparation, constant effort and clear 
mental perception, he has won an enviable degree of success. 



FATHER IVOR J. E. DANIEL. 

As priest and as missionary Father Ivor J. E. Daniel has labored earn- 
estly in behalf of the Catholic church in Edmonton and in the western part 
of the Dominion and at the present writing he is in Aberystwyth, Wales, 
where he is engaged in collegiate work. Born in London, England, in 1883, 
he is a son of William and Hannah (Hughes) Daniel, the former a native 
of London, while the latter was born in Liverpool. They were both of 
Welsh descent but were married in London. The father was solicitors 
managing clerk, occupying a position of that character for a long period. 
He held membership in the Wesleyan Methodist church, while his wife 
was a Congregationalist and in his political views the father was a Liberal. 
Both have passed away. They had a family of four children. The others 
are: Glynne, who is now an insurance manager at Calcutta, India; Emyrs, 
a banker of Liverpool ; and Hubert, a paper merchant of Manchester, 
England. 

Ivor J. E. Daniel cf this review is the eldest of the family. He at- 
tended the Kent grammar school and afterward was a student in Landover 
College in South Wales, from which he was graduated in 1898. He at- 
tended the Ottawa University in 1906 but his education was not continu- 
ous. Removing to the west, he spent one year in the Edmonton district, 
where he homesteaded, followed merchandising and engaged in other lines 
of business. At length, having qualified for the priesthood, he was or- 
dained at Ottawa, in 1913, and was assigned to duty as assistant priest 
at St. Joachim's church on Tenth street in Edmonton. There he continued 
his labors until August, 1915, after which he became chaplain of the Fifty- 
first Battalion and so continued to serve until August, 1916. He was then 
transferred to the Eleventh Brigade, with which he remained until April, 
1917, after which he was connected with the Canadian engineers until No- 
vember of that year. He was then in charge of a London area until No- 
vember, 1918, when he was sent to the Buxton discharge depot and there 
continued his labors until January, 1919, when he became senior chaplain 
at Rhyl, there remaining until July. 

Father Daniel returned to Edmonton in September, 1919, and was 
assistant at St. Joseph's church until October, 1921, when he was assigned 
to missionary duty along the Grand Trunk Line between Entwistle and 
Lucerne, British Columbia, there continuing his labors until he returned to 
Wales for collegiate work. He has filled the office of justice of the peace 
since 1914 and has acted as juvenile court judge. He is the translator of 
the "Appendix to the Roman Ritual," a work ordered by the plenary coun- 
(21) 



322 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

cil of Quebec in 1921. He also is the author of a volume entitled "Travel- 
ing for Christ," and a series of missionary sketches, which appeared in 
the Catholic Register in 1922. 



CLIVE A. STAPLES, M. D. 

Dr. Clive A. Staples is one of the foremost physicians and surgeons in 
Stettler. He was born in Collingwood, Ontario, on the 9th of June, 1870, a 
son of Charles and Frances (Wilcox) Staples. 

In the acquirement of his education Clive A. Staples attended the public 
schools of Stillwater, Minnesota, and later Carleton College, Northfield, 
Minnesota, obtaining the degree of B. Sc. He subsequently became a 
student in McGill University at Montreal, and received the M. D. C. M. 
degree from that institution in 1896. Following his graduation he was 
attached to the Royal Victoria Hospital in Montreal and later removed to 
British Columbia and practiced in Cumberland until 1906. In the fall of 
that year he came to Stettler and has since practiced here. He enjoys 
an extensive and important patronage and is readily conceded a place 
among the foremost members of the profession in the district. Upon the 
outbreak of the World war the Doctor was quick to put all personal inter- 
ests aside and enlist in the army. From 1916 to 1919 he was stationed at 
Calgary as officer commanding the Army Medical Corps No. 13. In 1919 
he went overseas and was appointed private commissioner in Jugo Slavia, 
for the Allied Welfare Missions of America and was active in that ca- 
pacity until 1920, when he returned to Stettler and resumed his practice. 

In 1912 was celebrated the marriage of Dr. Staples and Miss Duglas 
Taylor. To their union two children have been born : Clive M. and Frances 
Wilcox. Dr. Staples devotes the greater part of his time and attention to 
his professional interests, although he is public-spirited and his aid can 
always be counted upon in the furtherance of any movement for the bene- 
fit of the community at large. He is now active as president of the local 
Board of Trade and a member of the school board. Fraternally he is iden- 
tified with the Masons. 



WALTER F. MONKMAN, D. D. S. 

Dr. Walter F. Monkman, engaged in the practice of dentistry at Vegre- 
ville, has chosen a field of great usefulness and his efi'orts have been pro- 
ductive of much good to his fellowmen, as well as a source of individual 
prosperity. He is a native of the province of Ontario and a son of John 
and Catherine (Foster) Monkman, also natives of that part of Canada. 
For several years the father successfully engaged in the making of car- 
riages at Watford, Ontario, and he is now living retired in Vegreville, 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 323 

Alberta. The mother also survives and they have a large circle of friends 
in that city. 

Walter F. Monkman acquired his preliminary education in Ontario and 
after completing a course in the Watford high school he went to the 
States, taking up the study of dentistry in the University of Michigan, at 
Ann Arbor, from which he was graduated in 1901. He began his profes- 
sional career at Vermontville, Michigan, remaining there until 1907, when 
he returned to Canada, and in the same year opened an office at Vegreville, 
Alberta. Thorough preparation well qualified him for his profession, and 
that he is progressive and enterprising is manifest by the modern methods 
which he employs and his well appointed office, supplied with every ap- 
pliance necessary for the successful practice of dental surgery. He is deft 
and skillful and his work has always given satisfaction ; hence his practice 
has steadily grown and his clientele is a large one. 

Dr. Monkman was united in marriage to Miss Jean Batty, also a native 
of the province of Ontario, and they have become the parents of four chil- 
dren: Eileen, Dorothy, Clover and Herbert. They are members of the 
Union church and the Doctor is also identified with the local Community 
Club and is serving on the Vegreville School Board. He stands high in 
Masonry, being connected with Edmonton Consistory and the Shrine at 
Calgary, Alberta, and he is also a Forester. Natural talent, broad experi- 
ence and continued study have enabled him to win success in his profes- 
sion and his public spirit has found expression in effective work in behalf 
of his community, in which he is well known and highly esteemed. 



WILLIAM MATHER. 



William Mather, proprietor of the Bow River Boat House & Skating 
Rink of Banff, is one of its substantial citizens. He was born in Eagles- 
ham, Scotland, in October, 1867, a son of John and Janet (Picken) Mather, 
natives of Scotland. In 1880 the Mather family came to Canada and lo- 
cated in Ontario, and the father has since engaged in farming in that 
province. He is now eighty-six years of age and is enjoying the best of 
health. Mrs. Mather died in March, 1920. 

In the acquirement of his education William Mather attended the pub- 
lic schools of his native land and was thirteen years of age when his par- 
ents came to this country. For the first two or three years he worked in 
the lumber camps and in 1887 went to Calgary, where he continued in the 
lumber business for four years. In 1891 Mr. Mather came to Banff and 
for three or four years worked for the owner of the business of which he 
is now the proprietor, eventually purchasing the enterprise. This is his 
twenty-seventh year as proprietor of the boathouse, which is the best and 
largest in the Northwest country. His boathouse equipment includes 
launches, motor boats, row boats and canoes. 

In July, 1896, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Mather to Miss Mar- 



324 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

garet Curren and they have the following children : Jennie, born on the 
4th of May, 1897; Leslie, born in June, 1898; Allan, born in November, 
1899 ; and Plazel, whose birth occurred in March, 1908. 

In his political views Mr. Mather is a Conservative. For fifteen years 
he has been secretary and treasurer of the school district and he is an 
active member of the Citizens Council. His religious faith is that of the 
Presbyterian church. For recreation he turns to boating and curling and 
he has been a member of the Banff Curling Club for twenty years. 



THE MOST REV. HENRY JOSEPH O'LEARY, D. D., J. C. D., 

Ph. D., LL. D. 

The Most Rev. Henry Joseph O'Leary, who is the second archbishop of 
Edmonton, was born in Richibucto, New Brunswick, March 13, 1879, 
being the only son of Henry and Mary O'Leary of that place. After com- 
pleting his early education in the grammar schools of his native town 
he entered the University of St. Joseph at Memramcook. There he made 
a brilliant record in the classics and was graduated with the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts in 1897. After a year of special study at the Seminary 
of Philosophy in Montreal he entered the Grand Seminary of that city, 
to begin his study in theology. He made a very brilliant record, being 
easily leader of his class and some of his professors remarked, even at 
that time, that the young seminarian had all the qualities necessary to 
become a distinguished prelate of the church. 

Having completed the ordinary curriculum of ecclesiastical studies 
Henry Joseph O'Leary was ordained to the holy priesthood in the parish 
church of his native town, on September 21, 1901. He was then sent to 
Rome to take postgraduate work in various branches and in one year's 
study at the University of the Propaganda he completed the usual two 
years' postgraduate course in philosophy, and obtained his doctorate in 
that science. Later he spent some months in France, taking a special 
course in the French language at the Sorbonne. Returning to Rome he 
completed the postgraduate course in theology, receiving after two years' 
study the degree of Doctor of Divinity. He spent still another year in 
the Eternal City at this time, completing his course of canon law and 
receiving his doctorate in that subject from the University of the Ap- 
polonaris. Thus in four years Dr. O'Leary not only followed most suc- 
cessfully those postgraduate courses which usually require six years of 
study but also found time to spend some months in the study of French. 

Upon his return to the diocese of Chatham, for which he was ordained, 
his Grace was sent as assistant and later as pastor to the parish of 
Bathurst. He also had at various times charge of the parishes of Bathurst 
village and Jaquet river. In 1908 he was sent to Rome as vicar general 
of the diocese of Chatham and procurator of the archbishop and bishops 
of the ecclesiastical province of Halifax. On his return he resumed his 
duties as pastor of Bathurst, from which post he was called to the 




RT. REV. HENRY JOSEPH O'LEARY 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 327 

bishopric of Charlottetown. He was consecrated on the 22d of May, 1913, 
at Bathurst, by the Most Rev. Francis P. Stagni, D. D., then apostolic 
delegate to Canada and Newfoundland. 

During the interval between his nomination and consecration the 
bishop-elect received word of the disastrous fire in his episcopal city, by 
which not only was the Cathedral totally destroyed but the bishop's resi- 
dence so badly damaged that it required almost complete renovation. 
Installed in his Episcopal See on May 26, the new bishop at once set to 
work with wise direction and indomitable energy to restore both build- 
ings. Within a short time the bishop's house was rebuilt, enlarged and 
remodeled. In 1919 the new St. Dunstan's cathedral was completed and 
now stands, a gem of architectural beauty, unsurpassed by any church 
of its size in Canada. During his episcopate in Charlottetown a new and 
spacious orphanage was built and a new residential building, Dalton Hall, 
was added to the diocesan institution of learning, St. Dunstan's, which 
he found a college and left a university. After seven years of fruitful 
labor in Prince Edward Island, on September 7, 1920, Bishop O'Leary 
was promoted by Pope Benedict XV to the Archepiscopal See of Edmonton, 
left vacant by the death of Archbishop Legal. 

On December 7, 1920, his Grace arrived in the capital city of Alberta 
and on the following day, the feast of the Immaculate Conception, was 
duly installed as archbishop of the ecclesiastical province of Edmonton. 
Citizens of all classes and creeds joined in welcoming the new metropoli- 
tan, a civic address of welcome having been tendered him by Mayor 
Joseph Clark. During the two years of his stay in Alberta he has won 
the affection and loyalty of his own subjects and the respect and admira- 
tion of all classes of his fellow citizens. Not only is he a brilliant pulpit 
orator but also a most capable platform speaker, ever ready to raise his 
voice in the interest of better citizenship or of any cause beneficial to 
the province or community. His deep interest in education was recog- 
nized by the University of Alberta, when, at the commencement exercises 
of 1922, he was invited to deliver the convocation address and received 
the degree of Doctor of Laws from that institution. 



JOHN CRAIG BROKOVSKI, LL. B., K. C. 

John Craig Brokovski, member of one of the pioneer families of 
Canada, has had broad experience along professional lines and his legal 
acumen has won for him recognition as one of the talented representatives 
of the Calgary bar. He was born at Coldwater, Ontario, June 18, 1867, a 
son of Edwin F. T. and Elizabeth (Craig) Brokovski, the latter a native of 
Craighurst, Ontario, which was named in honor of her grandfather. 
Edwin F. T. Brokovski was born in London, England, October 1, 1838, 
and received his education in that city and also at Newcastle-on-Tyne. 
In 1857, when nineteen years of age, he migrated to Canada, and for 



328 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

several years was a teacher in the pubHc schools of Ontario, being the 
founder of the Public School Cadets. In 1870 he removed to the west, 
making his way to Fort Garry and for about six years conducted a news- 
paper known as the Manitoba Gazette. He returned to Ontario as public- 
ity agent for the Manitoba government, serving in that capacity until 
1881, when he again came to the west, and for some time followed the 
profession of civil engineering. He was the first acting sheriff of the 
Northwest Territories and filled that office for a considerable period. 
Later he was employed by the government to settle land claims and in 
1886 was appointed Dominion land agent at Battleford, Saskatchewan, 
and for twelve years held that position. He continued to make his home 
at Battleford until his death, which occurred in December, 1916, and for 
many years had survived the mother, who passed away in 1868. The 
maternal granduncle of the subject of this review erected the courthouse 
at Craighurst, Ontario, in the '30s and there the official business has 
since been transacted by members of the family, who for three successive 
generations have served as court clerks. 

Reared in the atmosphere of that courthouse, John C. Brokovski 
attended the public school at Craighurst and the high schools at Oakville 
and Weston, Ontario. He was also a student at the Barrie Collegiate 
Institute. Being articled with the late H. H. Strathy, K. C, he completed 
a course in law at Osgoode Hall, Toronto. 1897 he was called to the 
Ontario bar and began his professional career at Coldwater, being retained 
as local counsel by the Canadian Pacific Railroad Company in the construc- 
tion of the Toronto-Sudbury and the Georgian Bay & Seaboard branches. 
For thirteen years he remained in Coldwater and during the mining boom 
went to northern Ontario, purchasing the townsite of Gowganda. On dis- 
posing of his holdings there he came to Alberta, practising in Macleod, 
where he resided for three years. In 1913 he established his home in Cal- 
gary and in the following year received from Alberta University the 
degree of LL. B. He became a member of the law firm of Lougheed, Ben- 
nett & Company, with which he was identified until that firm was broken 
up in 1922. His office is in the Royal Bank Chambers, where he carries 
on his professional partnership with Mr. V. H. Green. He is noted for 
the precision of his briefs and the logic of his arguments and a liberal 
clientele has been accorded him. He is an able exponent of his profession 
and was created King's Counsel in 1919. While not seeking but avoiding 
publicity, he has been engaged from time to time in both civil and criminal 
cases of the most complicated and serious nature, and his career has been 
marked by the small number of cases allowed to be brought to trial in 
which he has not achieved complete success. 

On November 11, 1903, at Trinity church, New York city, Mr. Brok- 
ovski was united in marriage to Miss Anne Noble, a Canadian and a 
daughter of David and Margaret (Williams) Noble. In the maternal 
line Mrs. Brokovski is a descendant of Roger Williams, the founder of 
Rhode Island and one of the outstanding figures in early American history, 
and her forefathers were New England Loyalists. Mr. Brokovski is 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 329 

independent in his political views and his religious faith is indicated by his 
membership in the Anglican church, of which he is a vestryman and 
warden. He has been honored with the presidency of the Calgary Bar 
Association. Fraternally he is identified with the Masonic order. As 
a young man he took an active part in athletic sports, Association Football 
especially, and has never lost his interest therein. While devoted to his 
profession he has never allowed it to monopolize his attention and is 
ever ready to give his support to measures for the promotion of the pub- 
lic welfare. In 1886 he made his first public speech advocating the 
reforestation of the cut-over lands of the province of Ontario, taking 
the initiative in this project, and recently the government has followed 
his advice in taking steps toward the reforestation of the province. A man 
of well balanced intellect, possessed of comprehensive general information, 
he undertakes only those things which are of significance in the world's 
work, and his eflforts have been beneficially resultant. 



HUGH CALAIS MACDONALD, K. C, LL. B. 

Hugh C. Macdonald, a member of one of the honored pioneer families 
of Canada and a worthy scion of his race, has chosen the practice of law 
as his life work, and that his choice was a wise one is indicated by the suc- 
cess which has marked his eff'orts, for he now ranks with Edmonton's most 
talented barristers. He was born at Parry Sound, Ontario, October 19, 
1881, and is of pure Highland Scotch ancestry in both the paternal and 
maternal lines, his parents being Duncan Fraser and Isabella (George) 
Macdonald. Immediately after the battle of Culloden Moor in 1745 repre- 
sentatives of the Macdonald family came to Canada, settling in Wellington 
county, in the province of Ontario. The name figures prominently in con- 
nection with the military history of Canada, Captain Macdonald of the 
Fraser Highlanders, an ancestor of the subject of this review, being the 
first British officer to scale the Heights of Abraham at the time of Wolfe's 
historic night attack upon Montcalm. 

Hugh Calais Macdonald attended the grammar and high schools of 
Parry Sound and the Guelph Collegiate Institute and was articled as a law 
student to the Hon. Hugh Guthrie, K. C, M. P., from 1902 until 1905. In 
the latter year he became a law student at Osgoode Hall of Toronto, win- 
ning his LL. B. degree in 1908, and he at once entered upon the active 
work of his profession in that city as a partner of James Walter Curry, 
K. C, with whom he was associated until 1914. Three years later he came 
to this province, locating at Edmonton, and was identified with the firm 
of Short, Cross, McLean & Macdonald as counsel from 1917 until October, 
1919, when he became a member of the firm of Robertson, Winkler, Mac- 
donald & Howe, with which he continued until July 1, 1922. He was ap- 
pointed King's Counsel in 1921 and is recognized as an able minister in the 
temple of justice. In the trial of cases committed to his care he has won 



330 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

many favorable verdicts, his success coming' to him because of his close 
reasoning, his logical argument, his correct application of legal principles 
and his ability to present his contention in the strongest possible light. He 
possesses marked oratorical ability and since 1904 has been in great de- 
mand as a platform speaker, delivering addresses at public gatherings in 
the provinces of Ontario, Saskatchewan and Alberta. 

At Guelph, Ontario, on the 2d day of August, 1910, Mr. Macdonald was 
married to Miss Mary Pringle, a daughter of George D. Pringle, Mr. and 
Mrs. Macdonald have three children: Eraser Pringle, who was born in 
Toronto and has reached the age of ten years; and Hugh Patrick and 
Allisther Keith, both natives of Edmonton, the former three years of age, 
while the latter is but a year and a half old. Mr. Macdonald is a member 
of the Presbyterian church and his political allegiance is given to the Lib- 
eral party. He is connected with the Masonic order, Delta Chi, a legal 
fraternity, the Edmonton Club, the Edmonton Golf and Country Club, the 
Scarborough Club of Toronto and the Ontario Club of that city, being a 
charter member of the last named organization. He is loyal to all those 
interests which make for honorable manhood and progressive citizenship 
and exemplifies in his life the sterling characteristics of the Scotch race. 
Merit has gained him advancement and his fellow practitioners and the 
general public accord him, a position of distinction in his profession. 



OLIVER BOYD, M. D. 



Dr. Oliver Boyd, a physician and surgeon of Medicine Hat, was born in 
Russell, Ontario, in 1873, his parents being Robert and Ann (Carscadden) 
Boyd, both of whom were natives of Ireland but came to the new world in 
early life and were married in Ontario, The father crossed the Atlantic 
in 1844 and was a son of Robert Boyd, who brought his family to Canada 
in that year, spending the remainder of his life in the province of On- 
tario. The maternal grandfather of Dr. Boyd was Thomas Carscadden, 
who was also a pioneer settler of Ontario, having emigrated from Ire- 
land to the new world in early life. Robert Boyd, the father of Dr. Boyd, 
followed the occupation of farming as a life work in the province of 
Ontario, where both he and his wife spent their remaining days. They 
were members of the Presbyterian church and Mr. Boyd was a Liberal 
in his political views. In their family were eleven children, seven of 
whom are living. 

Oliver Boyd, who was the tenth in order of birth in this large family, 
received his early education in the Felton public school at Russell, On- 
tario, and was graduated from the Collegiate Institute at Morrisburg, 
Ontario, with the class of 1894. He then took up the profession of 
teaching, which he followed for four years, but regarded this merely as 
an initial step to other professional labor. It was a means that he utilized 
to earn the money that would enable him to pay his way through medical 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 331 

school and after four years of teaching he entered McGill University at 
Montreal in 1899 and was graduated in 1903. He afterward engaged in 
active practice at Lumsden, Saskatchewan, for two years and on the 
expiration of that period came to Medicine Hat in 1906. Here he opened 
an office and has since followed his profession. He was successful from 
the first and has succeeded in building up a large and lucrative practice. 
He has never confined his attention to a specialty but engages in general 
practice and is the family physician in many of the best households of 
Medicine Hat. He is also serving on the medical staff of the hospital 
and devotes all of his time to his professional duties, which he discharges 
with a marked sense of conscientious obligation. He belongs to the local 
medical society, of which he has served as president, and he also has 
membership in the Alberta Medical Society. 

In 1905 Dr. Boyd was united in marriage to Miss Jennie A. Wallace, 
who was born at Carleton Place, Ontario, a daughter of a pioneer farmer 
of that province. They have three children : Wallace and Doris, who are 
in high school ; and Norma, who is still in the grades. The religious faith 
of the family is that of the Presbyterian church and in the social circles 
of the city they occupy an enviable position. Dr. Boyd is a Mason and in 
his political views is a Liberal. He takes an active part in politics and 
was Dominion candidate for the legislature in 1917. He was also the 
Liberal Dominion candidate at the last provincial election but, like many 
other representatives of his party, was defeated. He is now serving on 
the school board and for two years he filled the office of alderman, exer- 
cising his official prerogatives in support of all plans and measures that 
he believes to be for the public good. The major part of his attention, 
however, is concentrated upon the practice of medicine and in his chosen 
calling he has made steady progress, now ranking with the representative 
physicians and surgeons of the province. 



REV. CANON W. G. JAMES. 

Rev. Canon James, rector of St. Stephen's Anglican church in Calgary, 
is one of this city's most representative and substantial citizens. He 
was born in Nova Scotia, in 1877, a son of Horatio and Nancy (Denni- 
son) James, both natives of Nova Scotia, where they are living at the 
present time. For many years the father was engaged in the mercantile 
business and he is now postmaster of Lawrencetown. Mr. and Mrs. James 
are consistent members of the Anglican church and the father gives his 
political allegiance to the Conservative party. To Mr. and Mrs. James 
five children have been born, four of whom are living. Canon James being 
the third in order of birth. 

In the acquirement of his early education Canon James attended the 
public schools of his birthplace and later enrolled in the University of 
Toronto, from which institution he was graduated in 1904, with the B. A. 



332 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

degree. In that same year he was graduated in theology from WycHffe 
College, Toronto, His first charge was at Millarville, Alberta, and after- 
ward he was located at Pincher Creek for three and one-half years. For 
one and one-half years he was curate at St. Andrew's church at Prince 
Rupert, British Columbia, and in December, 1911, he came to Calgary and 
took charge of St, Stephen's Anglican church in this city. He was made 
canon on the 14th of June, 1914, Canon James is a man of high intellec- 
tual attainments and genial and pleasing personality and he is held in high 
confidence and esteem by all who know him. His congregation numbers 
one thousand people and he has a large and progressive Sunday school. 

In 1908 was celebrated the marriage of Canon James and Miss Frances 
Esther How, a native of Toronto. She received her education in the 
public schools of that city and was a student in the Jarvis Street Col- 
legiate Institute. To their union one daughter has been born, Helen 
Denison, who is a student in St. Hilda's College, Calgary. 

Fraternally Canon James is identified with the Ancient Free & Ac- 
cepted Masons. He has been diocesan secretary for Sunday schools for 
several years and is a member of the board of St. Hilda's Ladies College 
and also of the Emmanuel College of Saskatoon. Although Rev. Canon 
James devotes the greater part of his time and attention to his church, 
he is essentially public-spirited and his aid can always be counted upon 
in the furtherance of any movement for the benefit of the community at 
large. 



HON. GEORGE HEDLEY VICARS BULYEA, B. A., LL D. 

Hon. George H. V. Bulyea, one of the foremost men in public affairs 
in western Canada, has filled many public offices of trust and responsibility 
and is now serving as chairman of the board of public utilities com- 
missioners for the province of Alberta, in which capacity he has been 
retained for the past seven years, with residence in Edmonton. He was 
born at Gagetown, New Brunswick, February 17, 1859, and his parents 
were Albert R. and Jane (Blizzard) Bulyea. The father was also a native 
of that province. The mother's demise occurred in 1910. 

George Hedley Vicars Bulyea attended the public schools of Queen's 
county, in his native province, and in 1878 was graduated from the Uni- 
versity of New Brunswick, with the B. A. degree, winning scholarships in 
mathematics and in French. In 1908 his Alma Mater conferred upon him 
the honorary degree of LL. D. and in the same year he also received that 
degree from Alberta University. Following his graduation he took up the 
profession of teaching and from 1878 until 1882 was principal of Sheffield 
Academy, in Sunbury county, New Brunswick. In 1882 he went to the 
province of Manitoba, locating at Winnipeg, where he spent a year, and 
in 1883 he removed to Qu'Appelle, Saskatchewan, where he engaged in 
business until 1907. In 1892 he was an unsuccessful candidate to the 
Northwest assembly for South Qu'Appelle, winning the election in 1894, 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 333 

and in 1898 and in 1902 he was reelected. In 1896 he became a member 
of the first Executive Council of the Northwest Territory, which admin- 
istered the affairs of the territory comprising Yukon, Alberta and Sas- 
katchewan, and in 1898 he was appointed special commissioner to the 
territory, serving in that capacity until it was separated into provinces. 
He was made commissioner of agriculture and territorial secretary in 
1898, under the Haultain government, and in the following year was 
chosen commissioner of public works. He was the first lieutenant governor 
of Alberta, entering upon the duties of that office on the 1st of September, 
1905, and on October 10, 1910, he was sworn in for a second term, which 
terminated in 1915. On November 20, 1915, he was appointed to his 
present position as chairman of the board of public utilities commissioners 
for Alberta and in his official service he displays integrity, single-minded- 
ness of purpose and executive force. In handling public problems he 
looks beyond the exigencies of the moment to the opportunities and pos- 
sibilities of the future and his course has received wide commendation 
throughout the province. 

Mr. Bulyea was married at Gagetown, New Brunswick, in January, 
1885, to Miss Annie Blanche Babbitt, a daughter of Robert C. Babbitt, 
who served as registrar of deeds for Queen's county, with office at Gage- 
town. Mr. Bulyea is a member of the Edmonton Club and the Edmonton 
Golf & Country Club, and in religious faith he is a Baptist, while driving 
and traveling are his chief sources of recreation. His identification with 
public affairs forms the chief interest of his life and he has always been 
faithful to every trust reposed in him. Long a leader of public thought 
and action, he has left the impress of his individuality in notable measure 
upon the history of the province and his work has been of far-reaching 
importance and most beneficial in its effects. 



JOHN W. EVANS. 



Agricultural interests and business interests in the district around 
Raymond find a worthy representative in John W. Evans, who was born 
in Lajrton, Utah, on the 15th of August, 1875, a son of Hyrum and Annie 
(King) Evans, the former a native of Wales and the latter born in Eng- 
land. The paternal grandfather, Thomas Evans, was born in Wales and 
joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in that country. 
After coming to the United States he emigrated straight to Utah and his 
demise occurred some two years later. While residing in his native 
country Mr. Evans worked in the shipyards. The maternal grandfather, 
James King, was born in England and never came to this country. His 
widow did, however, and her death occurred soon after she took up her 
home in Utah. Mr. and Mrs. Hyrum Evans came to this country with 
their parents when children, the former being six years of age at the 
time and the latter, two years old. Their parents went overland to Utah 



334 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

as members of a hand cart company and located in Salt Lake valley. 
Hyrum Evans received his education in the common schools near the home 
farm but he put his textbooks aside at an early age. He lived near Kays- 
ville for a number of years and later homesteaded some land in Salt Lake 
valley. He brought this raw prairie land to a highly cultivated state and 
devoted many years to farming and stock raising. He retains his original 
land holdings and is still living there. His wife died in 1910, at the age 
of fifty-four years. To them twelve children were born, seven of whom 
are living: Eliza, the wife of T. W. Harris of Taber, Alberta; John W., 
whose name introduces this review; F. R. and George A., who are residing 
at Layton; Alvin K., engaged in farming near Thatcher, Utah; Iva, the 
wife of L. A. Watts of Stirling, Idaho ; and Glen, who is living at Layton. 
Five of the children died in early life. Mr. Evans is seventy-two years of 
age and has been a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day 
Saints for many years, having been reared in that faith, and he has served 
as an elder in the church. His political allegiance is given to the dem- 
ocratic party and the principles for which it stands. 

In the acquirement of his education John W. Evans attended the public 
schools of Davis county, Utah, the University of Utah and the Utah 
Agricultural College. After putting his textbooks aside he engaged in 
teaching school for four years in Davis county and for two years he filled 
a mission in California. Subsequently he returned to Utah, where he 
again taught school for two years and in May, 1903, he came to Alberta, 
locating in Raymond. For some time he worked for the Knight Sugar 
Company as farm foreman. At the termination of that time he entered 
the sugar factory as foreman. His innate ability and close application to 
the thing at hand won for him constant promotion and in due time he 
became office manager of the company, and held that important position for 
seven years. In 1915 he entered the mercantile business with the Hub 
Company of Raymond and on the 16th of July, 1921, he ventured into the 
implement business, becoming associated with the Massey-Harris Imple- 
ment Company, handling a complete line of farm implements, twine and 
flour. Mr. Evans owns over half a section of fine improved land and 
engages in general farming. When he took over this land it was raw 
prairie and now it is partially irrigated and is considered one of the finest 
pieces of land in this section of Alberta. 

On the 7th of June, 1899, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Evans 
and Miss Phoebe Longstroth, a native of Mendon, Utah. To their union 
nine children have been born : Charlotte Anna and Phoebe are attending 
the Normal School ; Alice is a student in the Raymond high school ; 
George W., John L. and Ruth are attending the public schools ; and Alma 
Gill, Paul H. and Garth D. are not yet of school age. 

Mr. Evans is a prominent member of the Church of Jesus Christ of 
Latter-day Saints. He is bishop of the Raymond second ward of the 
Taylor Stake and has held all minor offices, devoting a great deal of his 
spare time to the church. He is public-spirited and for two terms served 
as mayor of Raymond, during his administration inaugurating and bring- 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 335 

ing to completion many movements for the benefit of the community at 
large. He was a member of the city council for several years and is now 
chairman of the local school board. He is president of the Raymond Opera 
House Company, of which he was one of the organizers, and is secretary 
of the Southern Irrigation District. He is vice president of the Raymond 
Cooperative Credit Society, a director in the local body of the United 
Grain Growers Association and is a member of the Board of Trade. In 
the development of his interests he has met with such success as is usually 
won by the man of persistent effort and diligent methods. Honest in his 
transactions, upright in his principles and thoroughly reliable in every 
respect, Mr. Evans is accorded the esteem and respect of his fellow citi- 
zens, among whom he numbers many friends. 



JOHN PILLING. 



One of the progressive and prosperous ranchers of Cardston is John 
Pilling, who was born in Layton, Davis county, Utah, on the 5th of Jan- 
uary, 1860, a son of Richard and Catherine (Adams) Pilling, extended 
mention of whom is made in the sketch of a brother, Richard Pilling, to 
be found on another page of this review. 

John Pilling attended the public schools of Davis county in the winter 
months and during the summers worked on the home farm. He remained 
on the parental homestead until 1889, when he came to Cardston, making 
the trip overland with a horse team and covered wagon. He likewise 
trailed some cattle through and it took him some three months to make 
the trip. He first located on St, Mary's river, where he homesteaded one 
hundred and sixty acres and took a preemption claim of one hundred and 
sixty acres. At that time the land was barren prairie and Mr. Pilling 
built a log house, hauling the timber from the mountains, and doing his 
trading at Lethbridge. After much labor he succeeded in breaking his 
land and specialized in raising wheat and cattle. For some five years 
prior to starting into the business on his own account he had worked on 
a ranch for the church. He was successful from the start and from time 
to time increased his land holdings, owning at one time fifteen hundred 
acres, on which he ran two hundred head of cattle. In 1910 Mr. Pilhng 
rented his land and came to Cardston, and is now practically retired from 
active life. 

In October, 1883, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Pilling and Miss 
Harriet E. Higgs, who was born in Davis county, Utah, a daughter of 
David and Eliza (Dodwell) Higgs, natives of England. Mr. and Mrs. 
Higgs joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in England 
and after emigrating to the United States, crossed the plains to Salt 
Lake, being among the pioneer settlers there. Mr. Higgs took up farming 
near Kaysville and prospered as an agriculturist. He was the first member 
of the Higgs family to become identified with the Church of Jesus Christ 



336 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

of Latter-day Saints and he devoted a great deal of his spare time to the 
church. His demise occurred on his old homestead. 

Mr. Pilling gives his political allegiance to the Liberal party and 
although he has never sought nor desired political preferment he is 
public-spirited and his aid can be counted upon in the furtherance of any 
movement for the benefit of the community at large. He is a consistent 
and active member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and 
served as bishop at Etna. He is now holding the important position of 
high priest. Mr. Pilling's efforts along agricultural lines have been 
crowned with a gratifying measure of success, which is the direct result 
of his progressive methods and his unremitting work. His life has been 
active, useful and honorable and his genuine personal worth has gained 
for him the high place which he occupies in the regard of those who know 
him. 



HAROLD GRANT MAVESYN NYBLETT, M. D. 

A representative member of the medical profession in Calgary is Dr. 
Harold Grant Mavesyn Nyblett, a specialist in orthopedic surgery and in 
electric methods of diagnosis and treatment. He was born in London, 
England, on the 10th of February, 1871, a son of Dr. Alfred Newson, M. A. 
F. R. G. S. & F. S. L. The mother was Isabelle (Grant) Nyblett. Dr. A. 
N. Nyblett was born in England, while his wife was a native of Scotland. 
He was one of the foremost educators of his day and was for many years 
headmaster of schools in London. His death occurred in December, 1871, 
and Mrs. Nyblett died in November of the year 1877. 

Harold Grant Mavesyn Nyblett was born in London and received his 
early education in the private schools of his native country. On the 17th 
of May, 1888, he came to Canada and entered the Trinity Medical Col- 
lege in 1892, graduating from that institution with the M. D., C. M., F. T. 
M. C, degrees in 1896. Prior to entering Trinity Medical College the 
Doctor taught school and worked at other jobs, teaching near Brandon 
for some time. After receiving his M. D. degree he went to Michigan and 
practiced in that state one year. At the termination of that time he re- 
turned to Canada and located in Manitoba, where he enjoyed an extensive 
practice from 1897 to 1901. From 1901 to 1908 he practiced in Saskatch- 
ewan and in the latter year moved to Macleod, Alberta, where he was 
residing at the time of the outbreak of the World war. He was one of the 
first to put all personal interests aside and enlist in the service of his 
country. He came to Calgary and recruited the Seventeenth Cavalry 
Field Ambulance, taking them to Quebec, where they were disbanded. 
Dr. Nyblett, however, went overseas as a captain in the First Contingent. 
Subsequently he was promoted to the rank of major and was given com- 
mand of No. 1, Advanced Depot of Medical Stores. During November 
and December, 1915, he was on convoy duty at sea with the wounded and 
in January, 1916, he went to France with the Third Division and served 




HAROLD G. M. NYBLETT, M. D. 



(22) 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 339 

on the Ypres, Somme and Arras fronts. In 1917 he returned to England, 
being appointed officer in charge of the school of Instruction in Remedial 
Gymnastics. He had charge of certain phases of the work and was twice 
recommended to the lieutenant colonel for his aptitude and success in this 
work, of which he made a complete and thorough study. In the summer of 
1918 he returned to Canada and held various positions in Military Dis- 
trict, No. 13, until demobilized on the 31st of January, 1919. In that year 
he began practice in Calgary and has since resided here. He specializes 
in orthopedic surgery and is a convert to Dr. Abram's electric methods 
of diagnosis and treatment. Dr. Nyblett has taken postgraduate courses 
in London, England, and San Francisco. During 1910, while a resident 
of Macleod, the Doctor was medical health officer of the city. In 1903, 
1904, 1905 and 1906 he was examiner of obstetrics in the College of Phy- 
sicians and Surgeons of the Northwest Territories. 

In November, 1905, Dr. Nyblett was married to Miss Janie Clinton 
of Wellington, Ontario. To their union three children have been born : 
Ronald L. C. was born on the 12th of August, 1906 ; Margaret Ella's birth 
occurred on the 16th of March, 1908; and Eileen Isabelle was born on the 
28th of August, 1912. 

Since attaining his majority Dr. Nyblett has followed an independent 
course in politics, giving his support to the man he thinks best fitted for 
the office without regard to party principles. Although the greater part 
of his time is devoted to his profession he is public-spirited to a degree, 
giving his cooperation to every movement which tends to promote the 
moral, intellectual and material welfare of the community. The religious 
faith of the Doctor is that of the Anglican church and he is a zealous 
worker in its behalf. Fraternally he is identified with the Masons and 
along strictly professional lines he is affiliated with the Alberta Medical 
Association and the Calgary Medical Association. He has gained recog- 
nition as one of the able and successful specialists in the province and by 
his labors, his high professional attainments and his sterling character- 
istics has justified the respect and confidence in which he is held by the 
medical fraternity and the local public. 



RIGHT REV. THOMAS MARIE. 

Right Rev. Thomas Marie, a priest of the Franciscan monastery at 
Edmonton, was born in Quebec, on the 18th of June, 1879, and his parents, 
Alphonse and Mary (Vigeant) Marie, were also born there. The father 
was a director of newspapers throughout his life, save for the period of 
his military service, when he was a lieutenant colonel in the Canadian 
militia, as a member of the Eighty-fourth Regiment, participating in 
the Fenian war. A man of liberal education and well informed at all 
times on the questions and issues of the day, he exerted a widely felt 



340 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

influence over public thought and action. He passed away in 1910 and 
is survived by his wife, who still makes her home in Quebec. 

Thomas Marie was the second in order of birth in a family of four 
children, and, accorded liberal educational privileges, he attended St. 
Hyacinth's College in the province of Quebec, where he won his Bachelor 
of Arts degree in 1902. He joined the Franciscan order in the same year 
and entered the Franciscan College at Montreal, where he pursued his 
studies for three years. He was ordained to the priesthood in 1907 and 
r.fterward engaged in preaching in missions in the province of Quebec. 
His first charge was as superior at Three Rivers in 1911 and there he 
remained for four years. He then went to Dorchester College at Montreal 
as assistant in the monastery, and there labored for two years, or until 
1917, when he was appointed superior in the city of Montreal monastery. 
In May, 1920, he came to Edmonton and took charge of St. Francis church 
at North Edmonton, having a membership of one hundred and eighty 
families. A separate school is maintained with an enrollment of one 
hundred and fifty pupils, this being under the direction of the Franciscan 
Sisters. It is a French and English mission, in which both languages are 
used. Father Marie is superior of the church and has charge of both the 
church and the school. 



EDWARD AINSLIE BRAITHWAITE, M. D., L. M., C. C. 

Dr. Edward A. Braithwaite, honorary surgeon for the Royal North 
West Mounted Police at Edmonton, has been a resident of Edmonton 
for thirty years and has become widely recognized as a man of high 
professional attainments and substantial worth. He was born in York- 
shire, England, February 16, 1862, and his parents were Rev. William 
B. and Laura Elizabeth (Pipou) Braithwaite. The father was an Epis- 
copal minister. His death occurred in Yorkshire in 1873. The mother 
passed away at Winchester, England, in 1916. 

In the acquirement of an education Edward Ainslie Braithwaite at- 
tended King's school at Bruton, Somerset, Victoria College of Jersey, 
the United Service College at Westward Ho and completed his profes- 
sional training at King's College Hospital in London, England, receiving 
the M. D. degree in Manitoba, 1890. Coming to Canada in 1884, he 
joined the Royal North West Mounted Police, of which he was made 
hospital surgeon, and for eight years acted in that capacity. In 1892 he 
came to Edmonton, where he has since made his home, although he re- 
tains his connection with the Mounted Police, and was acting assistant 
surgeon until 1911, when he was made honorary surgeon, which permits 
him to conduct a private practice. He has been local surgeon for the 
Canadian National Railway since the first sod was turned for the con- 
struction of the Edmonton, Yukon & Pacific Railroad and was formerly 
health officer of Edmonton. He is coroner for Alberta and no other 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 341 

member of the profession in the province has held the office for so long 
a period. His high professional standing is indicated in the fact that 
he has been chosen to represent the province of Alberta in the Dominion 
Medical Council. 

Dr. Braithwaite has been married twice. On November 30, 1892, 
he wedded Miss Jennie E. Anderson, a daughter of T. A. Anderson. Her 
death occurred in 1914. On the 2d of June, 1915, Dr. Braithwaite was 
married to Miss Ruth Somersall, at Viking, Alberta. Dr. Braithwaite 
is a member of the Anglican church and he exercises his right of fran- 
chise in support of the men and measures of the Conservative party. He 
is a member of the Edmonton Club and a Mason in high standing, the 
honorary thirty-third degree having been conferred upon him in 1911 
and the active thirty-third degree in 1918, in recognition of his services 
in behalf of the order. He is deputy of the supreme council for the 
province of Alberta, and in 1903 was grand master of Manitoba, which 
then comprised Manitoba, Alberta, Assiniboia and Yukon. He is also 
a Noble of the Mystic Shrine. His studies have been thorough, bringing 
him a comprehensive knowledge of the most advanced methods, dis- 
coveries and theories of the science of medicine and surgery, and through 
broad practical experience he has gained the skill that brings to his work 
the utmost possibility of accuracy in results. He has won that position 
of leadership in his profession, which results from untiring application 
and ability of a high order and no member of the medical fraternity in 
western Canada is better known nor more highly respected. 



LOUIS A. ROY, M. D. 



Dr. Louis A. Roy, a veteran of the World war, now engaged in the 
practice of medicine and surgery in Lethbridge, was born in Moosomin, 
Saskatchewan, January 30, 1888, his parents being David and Annie 
(Morrison) Roy, both of whom were born near Guelph, Ontario, and were 
married in that province. The former was a son of James Roy, of Scotch 
descent, one of the early settlers of Ontario. In the year 1882 David Roy 
removed westward to Saskatchewan and purchased land, casting in his 
lot with the pioneer settlers of the region. He now makes his home in 
the town of Moosomin, having put aside the active cares of farm life. 
In politics he is a Liberal and his religious faith is that of the Presbyterian 
church. 

Louis A. Roy was educated in the public schools, attending the Hill- 
burn country school and the high school at Moosomin. He afterward 
pursued both the arts and medical courses in the University of Toronto, 
winning his B. A. degree in 1909 and his professional degree in 1911. 
His training was thus thorough and comprehensive, well qualifying him 
for the important, onerous and responsible duties of the profession. He 
afterward devoted two years to practice in the Royal Victoria Hospital 



342 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

at Montreal, thus gaining that broad and valuable experience which can 
never be so quickly acquired in any other way as in hospital practice. 
In June, 1913, he came to Lethbridge to assist Dr. DeVeber and Dr. P. 
M. Campbell and in 1915 was admitted to a partnership. Through the 
intervening years he has continued to practice successfully here, save 
for the period of his service in the World war. He enlisted in July, 1918, 
as a member of the Canadian Army Medical Corps and was placed in 
charge of the laboratory at Orington, England, there remaining through- 
out the period of his enlistment. He returned in January, 1919, and 
resumed practice here. He keeps abreast of the trend of modern profes- 
sional thought and scientific investigation and is thoroughly alert to the 
opportunities of the profession and the responsibilities that devolve upon 
the physician. He has made steady progress in his chosen life work and 
is regarded as one of the capable young physicians of southern Alberta. 
Dr. Roy married Miss Therese de Grosbois and they became parents 
of a son, Douglas, who is four years of age. The wife and mother passed 
away February 6, 1920, and Dr. Roy has since married Blanche Prieur 
and there is one child of this union, Donald, who is in his first year. Mrs. 
Roy is a member of the Roman Catholic church. Dr. Roy has never been 
a club man, but devotes his entire time and attention to his professional 
interests and duties, which he discharges with a sense of conscientious 
obligation. He belongs to both the Alberta and the Canadian Medical 
Associations. 



A. BLAIS, M. D. 



Dr. A. Blais of Edmonton, who has attained to eminence as a surgeon, 
being one of the most skilled representatives of that branch of the medi- 
cal profession in Alberta, comes to the west from the province of Quebec, 
where his birth occurred on the 16th of October, 1875. He was reared 
to farm life, and all the experiences of tilling the soil and caring for the 
crops early became familiar to him. At the usual age he entered the 
country schools, thus pursuing his education until he reached the age of 
ten years, when he entered the Catholic College of Quebec and in due 
time was graduated therefrom. During his college days he took a very 
active interest in athletics and was a member of the college football team 
and also excelled at handball. At length he determined upon the practice 
of medicine as a life work and in preparation therefor entered the 
medical department of the Laval University of Quebec, in which he com- 
pleted his course as a member of the graduating class of 1899. He after- 
wards pursued special work in surgery in Paris, France, for two years, 
and there are few men who equal him in knowledge of the component 
parts of the human body, the onslaughts made upon it by disease, or in 
the ability which he displays when in case of emergency it is necessary 
to resort to surgery for cure. In August, 1901, he arrived in Edmonton, 
where he has been engaged in practice to the present time, although in 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 343 

1911 he again went abroad for further postgraduate work in surgery in 
Paris. His broad study and wide experience have developed his skill to 
a point of efficiency that ranks him with the eminent surgeons of the 
country, and when his aid was needed for the military forces engaged in 
the World war he responded to the call to the colors in 1916 and enlisted, 
being commissioned captain. He was in overseas service, stationed at the 
Duchess of Connaught Hospital on the Cliveden estate, England, for a 
few months, while afterward he was sent to the Eleventh Field Am- 
bulance and attached to the Fourth Divisional Train. His next assign- 
ment was to No. 8 Base Hospital at St. Cloud, where he continued to the 
end of the war. In the meantime he was advanced to the rank of major 
and was thus discharged. With his return to Edmonton at the close of 
the war Dr. Blais resumed the private practice of medicine and by rea- 
son of his pronounced ability his practice is now most extensive. He is 
serving on the staff of the General Hospital and also holds clinics before 
the Alberta University students. He is a fellow of the American Col- 
lege of Surgeons and he belongs to both the Alberta Medical Society and 
the Canadian Medical Association. His religious faith is that of the 
Catholic church. 



HENRY A. MEREDITH. 



Henry A. Meredith, one of Vegreville's leading merchants, has had a 
life of varied experiences and the success which he now enjoys has been 
won through hard work and the utilization of every legitimate oppor- 
tunity for advancement. A native of England, he was born June 17, 
1880, and is a son of William Thomas and Georgina (Hellsten) Mere- 
dith, who have always resided in that country, the father being employed 
in the manufacture of organs. 

The only member of the family to emigrate to Canada was Henry 
A. Meredith and in the spring of 1901 he arrived in Edmonton, Alberta. 
In 1902 he took up a homestead near the city and in the same year entered 
the military service of his country, enlisting in the Canadian Rifles. He 
saw service in the South African war and in 1904 returned to Canada, 
making the journey by way of England. He proved up on his home- 
stead and later accepted a clerical position with the Vermilion Trading 
Company. He removed to Vegreville during the formative period in its 
history, first living on the original site of the town and removing to its 
present location with the advent of the railroad. For a year he was 
employed as clerk in the general store owned by the firm of McKenzie & 
Eraser, pioneer merchants of Vegreville, and then went to Crowsnest 
Pass, Alberta, being in the service of the Trites Wood Company. In the 
following spring he returned to Vegreville and with H. L, Cunningham, 
organized the Globe Land Company, and later sold his interest to Mr. 
Cunningham. He next entered the general store operated by Clements, 



344 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

Limited, and was with that firm until July, 1917, when he established a 
small grocery store. From this modest beginning he has developed a 
large general store and is now at the head of one of the mercantile 
establishments in the town. He is very careful in the selection of his 
stock and closely studies the needs and wishes of the public, so that he 
is always ready to supply their demands. He has adopted the most 
modern methods of merchandising and through capable methods and 
strict integrity has won a large patronage. 

In 1908 Mr. Meredith married Miss Mabel Adams, also a native of 
England, and they have two daughters: Lillian Mabel, the older, is eleven 
years of age. For three years she has been a pupil in the primary depart- 
ment of the University of Toronto and has won first class honors as a 
piano student; Verna L., the younger daughter is six years old. Mr. and 
Mrs. Meredith are members of the Anglican church and he is identified 
with the Masonic fraternity and has occupied all of the chairs in St. 
John's Lodge No. 25 at Vegreville. He is broad-minded, progressive and 
public-spirited, ready at all times to support those movements promoted 
for the benefit of Vegreville and its citizens, and for a number of years 
he served on the board of health and also the town council. He had no 
advantages to aid him at the outset of his career but realized that energy, 
determination and honest dealing are indispensable concomitants in the 
attainment of success and through the employment of these agencies he 
has pressed steadily forward to the goal of his ambition. 



HARRY G. TAYLOR, M. D. 

Many progressive features in the life of Calgary have felt the stimulus 
of the cooperation of Dr. Harry G. Taylor, who is one of the foremost 
physicians and surgeons of this district and province. He was born in 
Toronto, Ontario, on the 7th of February, 1876, a son of Alfred and 
Caroline (Hodson) Taylor, both natives of Toronto. The paternal grand- 
father, Watson Taylor, was born in Nova Scotia, located in Ontario at 
an early age, and was one of the first merchants in Toronto, following 
that line of business for many years. The maternal grandfather, Joseph 
Hodson, was born in Canada, and he also was a merchant. Alfred Taylor 
followed in his father's footsteps in business circles of Toronto, as a 
merchant for many years. In politics he was a Conservative and al- 
though he was active in party aff'airs he never sought nor desired political 
preferment. His religious faith was that of the Methodist church. Mr. 
and Mrs. Taylor both died in London, Ontario. To their union seven 
children were born, six of whom are living, Harry G., whose name intro- 
duces this review, being the sixth in order of birth. 

Harry G. Taylor received his early education in the public schools 
of his birthplace and upon the completion of his literary training ap- 
prenticed himself to the lithographing trade. He worked at that trade 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 345 

six years, during that time saving enough money to enable him to pur- 
sue a medical course, his earliest ambition having been to become a 
physician and surgeon. Subsequently he enrolled in the Western Medical 
University and was graduated in 1904, with the M. D. degree. He imme- 
diately began practice at Brunswick, Michigan, and remained there two 
years, achieving success from the start. In the fall of 1906 he located in 
Bankhead, Alberta, and he was associated in practice with Dr. R. G. 
Brett of that city for five years. In 1911 he came to Calgary and opened 
offices for the practice of his profession, and has since resided here, 
occupying a prominent position among the foremost physicians and sur- 
geons of the city, district and province. Although the Doctor enjoys a 
large general practice he specializes in surgery and stands high among 
the representative members of that particular branch of medical science. 

In October, 1905, was celebrated the marriage of Dr. Taylor to Miss 
Josephine McGarvey, a native of Alliston, Ontario, who received her 
education in the public schools of her birthplace and is a graduate nurse, 
having completed a course in the Western Hospital at Toronto. To the 
union of Dr. and Mrs. Taylor four children have been born : Barney is 
a student in the local high school ; Mary Josephine, Caroline Alberta and 
Robert are all students in the grammar schools. 

Since attaining his majority Dr. Taylor has followed an independent 
course in politics, giving his support to the man he thinks best fitted for 
the office without regard to party principles. Although the greater part 
of his time and attention is devoted to his profession, he is essentially 
public-spirited and is never too busy to give his aid in the furtherance 
of any movement for the development and improvement of the com- 
munity at large. The religious faith of the family is that of the Metho- 
dist church. Although well grounded in the rudiments of his profession 
when receiving his degree, the Doctor has done much postgraduate work 
and has attended several of the Mayo Brothers Clinics at Rochester, 
Minnesota. He is a member of various medical societies in the district 
and province and is a fellow of the American College of Surgeons. For 
recreation from his many duties the Doctor turns to the great outdoors 
and he is a stanch advocate of athletics in all forms. He goes on hunt- 
ing trips each year and in that way gains the mental and physical rest 
required to fit him for his many strenuous professional duties during the 
remainder of the year. The success Dr. Taylor has achieved is the 
result of his own intelligently directed efforts and laudable ambition. 



ALFRED L. BESSEY. 



Alfred L. Bessey, a well known real estate man, conducting business as 
senior partner in the firm of Bessey & Bagley at Edmonton, began 
operations in this field in 1911 and through the intervening period has 
built up a business of substantial and gratifying proportions, the firm 



346 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

now having many clients. Mr. Bessey is a native of Ontario, his birth 
having occurred in St. Catharines, on the 19th of September, 1882, his 
parents being Leonard S. and Catherine (Secord) Bessey, both of whom 
were born in Ontario, where the mother passed away. The father 
was a son of James H. Bessey, also a native of Ontario, where he died in 
1907, at the advanced age of eighty-five years. The maternal grand- 
father was Orson Secord, who was likewise born in Ontario and who 
devoted his life to agricultural pursuits. Leonard S. Bessey was a farmer 
in young manhood but afterward sold his farm property. He has been 
clerk and treasurer of the township of Grantham, Ontario, for forty 
years and his long continuance in the office stands in incontrovertible 
proof of his capability and fidelity to duty. Politically he was a Conserva- 
tive and religiously he is connected with the Church of England, in the 
work of which he has taken active and helpful part. He now makes his 
home at the place where his father was born, being a representative of 
one of the old, substantial and honored pioneer families of that section. 
To him and his wife were born four children: Henry 0., who is engaged 
in farming at Gadsby, Alberta ; Alfred L. of this review ; Mrs. James 
Watson, whose husband is a merchant tailor of St. Catharines, Ontario ; 
and Mrs. Russell Hawke, whose husband is engaged in the grocery busi- 
ness in St. Catharines. 

Alfred L. Bessey was educated in St. Catharines, where he attended 
the public schools and the Collegiate Institute. His youthful days were 
spent on the home farm and he came to the west in 1903, when a young 
man of twenty years. He made Edmonton his destination and soon 
afterward he homesteaded at Gadsby, Alberta, seventy-five miles from 
the railroad. In the early days he accepted a position with the North- 
west Territorial government and later was with the provincial govern- 
ment until the spring of 1911. At that date he established a real estate 
and insurance business in Edmonton and through the intervening period 
has continued active along this line. He handles both farm lands and 
city property and has negotiated many important realty transfers. In 
1913 he admitted J. E. Bagley to a partnership, under the firm style of 
Bessey & Bagley and as senior partner in this firm he continues his 
operations, having won a prominent place among the realtors of Ed- 
monton. 

In February, 1911, Mr. Bessey was married to Miss Laura E. Trumm, 
who was born in Grantham, Ontario, a daughter of William H. Trumm, 
a seed merchant who is still living at Grantham. Mr. and Mrs Bessey 
are members of the Church of England and fraternally he is connected 
with the Masons and with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. In 
these associations are indicated the nature of his interest and the rules 
which govern his conduct. In an earlier period he took active part in 
athletics and outdoor sports and was a member of the Rugby football 
team that won the championship of the province of Alberta in 1913, Mr. 
Bessey being at that time thirty-one years of age. He is now concen- 
trating the greater part of his time and attention upon business affairs 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 347 

and as a real estate dealer has thoroughly informed himself concerning 
values in both city and farm property, while the number of his clients is 
constantly increasing because of his recognized progressiveness, ability 
and trustworthiness. 



CECIL STANLEY MAHOOD, M. D. 

Dr. Cecil S. Mahood, an able physician, has devoted his professional 
skill to public service and for eleven years has occupied the position of 
medical officer of health of Calgary. He was born in Huron county, On- 
tario, in July, 1882, and his parents were Joseph and Elizabeth (Damm) 
Mahood, the latter also a native of that province. The father was of 
Irish birth and when seven years of age accompanied his parents on their 
journey to Canada. The family home was established in Ontario and in 
the schools of that province Joseph Mahood obtained his education. On 
starting out in life for himself he chose the occupation of an agricultur- 
ist and operated a productive farm in Huron county, Ontario, until he 
reached the age of seventy. His remaining years were spent in the en- 
joyment of a well-earned rest and his death occurred in July, 1914, at the 
age of eighty-three. He had long survived the mother, who passed away 
in 1891, when fifty-three years of age. 

The public schools of his native county afforded Cecil Stanley Mahood 
his early educational privileges and this was followed by a two years' 
collegiate course in the University of Toronto. He then began the study 
of medicine and in 1908 received from that institution the M. D. degree, 
afterward devoting a year to postgraduate work in Chicago, Illinois. 
Going to Denver, Colorado, he was connected with the public health 
department of that city for two years and returned to Canada on the expi- 
ration of that period, opening the Queen Alexandra Sanatorium in Lon- 
don, Ontario. He was superintendent of the institution until the spring 
of 1911, when he came to the west, locating in Calgary, where he has 
since resided. After practicing for a few months he was appointed medi- 
cal officer of health for the city, in which capacity he is now serving, and 
his efforts have been productive of much good. He is deeply interested in 
the scientific and humanitarian phases of his profession and conscien- 
tiously utilizes his knowledge to preserve the health of Calgary's citizens. 

On the 20th of May, 1911, Dr. Mahood was married to Miss Ina Hodg- 
ins of London, Ontario, a daughter of I. G. and Henrietta Hodgins, who 
were natives of Ireland and emigrated to Canada in early life. Her 
father has passed away, but Mrs. Hodgins survives and is now a resident 
of Vancouver, British Columbia. Mrs. Mahood died August 25, 1922, 
after an attack of influenza which resulted in pneumonia. By her mar- 
riage she had become the mother of two children, Alan and Gwendolyn, 
aged, respectively, seven and three years. The Doctor is identified with 
the Masonic fraternity and the Rotary Club and he adheres to the teach- 



348 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

ings and doctrines of the Methodist Episcopal church, of which he is a 
member, while his professional relations are with the Calgary Medical 
Association and the College of Physicians & Surgeons. He has devoted 
much time to study and investigation and utilizes every opportunity to 
broaden his knowledge and promote his ability. Actuated by the spirit 
of progress, he has gained high standing in his profession and his work 
as a public official is deserving of strong commendation. 



JOHN PERRIE. 



John Perrie of Edmonton, deputy minister of municipal affairs for 
Alberta, who passed away in December, 1919, had been in the govern- 
ment service since 1902. There are few men in the province who have 
rendered such efficient aid in public affairs, or have been actuated by a 
more devoted spirit of loyalty and fidelity. He w^as actuated at all times 
by the highest sense of honor and by the utmost devotion to the welfare 
and progress of the province. He had, too, those personal qualities which 
strongly endeared him to all with whom he came into contact, and thus 
his passing was a matter of deepest regret to a legion of friends. 

John Perrie was born in the Grey township, Huron district, Ontario, 
in 1873, and partially acquired his education at Brussels but completed his 
high school course at Calgary. He then took up the profession of teach- 
ing, which he followed at Canmore and in 1902 entered the government 
service of the Northwest Territory. His first position was that of clerk in 
charge of the local improvement branch of the public works at Regina 
and with the organization of the province in 1905 he received appoint- 
ment to a similar position under the Alberta government at Edmonton. 
The year 1908 brought him appointment to the position of tax commis- 
sioner of the local improvement branch for this province and on the for- 
mation of the department of municipal affairs in 1911 he was appointed 
deputy minister. In this position he continued to serve until called to his 
final rest. His superior in the department said : "Mr. Perrie was an 
ideal deputy minister, absolutely accurate, thoroughly reliable, courteous 
at all times to everybody. He was of inestimable value to this depart- 
ment. Historically he understood every phase of municipal work and all 
changes as to legislation and the reasons for such changes. He enjoyed 
the complete confidence of all municipal ollicials throughout the province 
and of the members of a somewhat large departmental staff. Having 
exercised a guiding hand in the evolution of Alberta's municipal system, 
having an accurate knowledge of its every detail it will be easily under- 
stood how difficult it will be to fill his place. He was a most reliable man, 
thoroughly conscientious and painstaking with reference to every detail 
of his work. His passing is a distinct loss to the community and to the 
province generally." 

On August 15, 1905, Mr. Perrie was united in marriage to Miss Minna 




JOHN PERRIE 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 351 

Armstrong at Regina, a daughter of the late Thomas Armstrong of 
Guelph township, Ontario. Mr. and Mrs. Perrie had three children : Alex, 
Donald and Jean. In 1905 Mr. Perrie proceeded to Edmonton, where 
he afterward made his home. About one month prior to his demise he 
made his way to the Pacific coast because of ill health and then returned 
to St. Paul with the intention of going on to Rochester, Minnesota, and 
having an operation performed by the Mayo Brothers. An acute condi- 
tion of peritonitis and appendicitis, produced by gastric ulcer which per- 
forated the stomach, caused him to be operated on in St. Paul and he there 
passed away, being only forty-six years of age. He was a very active, 
prominent and valuable member of the First Presbyterian church, was a 
member of the session and was superintendent of the east side Sunday 
school. His endorsement and cooperation could at all times be counted 
upon to further every plan or project for the material, intellectual, social 
and moral progress of the community. When he was laid to rest the 
funeral services were attended by many men of distinction throughout the 
province and by hundreds of friends in Edmonton and in other cities. 
His government service brought him a very wide acquaintance and wher- 
ever he was known expressions of deepest regret were heard at his pass- 
ing. His record of government service is indeed well worthy of emulation 
and he stood as a most splendid example of manhood and chivalry. 



JOSEPH LITTLE. 



Joseph Little, one of the honored pioneers of the Rocky Mountain dis- 
trict of Alberta, has devoted practically his entire life to prospecting and 
no man in the province has done more to develop and exploit its rich and 
valuable coal deposits. He was born in the province of Ontario, April 
25, 1852, a son of Benjamin and Jane Little, both of whom are deceased. 
The father was married twice, having five children by the first union 
and four by the second. 

After laying aside his textbooks Joseph Little started out in life for 
himself and in 1878 he made his way to the west, with Manitoba as his 
destination. After prospecting in that section of the Dominion for a time 
he went to the States, operating in Washingon and Montana, and later 
returned to Canada, reaching Alberta in 1890. He ran the first train 
over the railroad into Lethbridge, the line being at that time privately 
owned. He also aided in constructing the Canadian Pacific line from 
Great Falls, Montana, to the Northwest and remained in the employ of 
that road for about five years. From Lethbridge he traveled by the 
Dougney trail to what is now Blairmore, coming to the Rocky Mountain 
district for the purpose of prospecting in the coal fields, and was the first 
man to locate in this section of Alberta. He has held every coal mining 
claim in this region with the exception of the Frank mine, which is not 
in operation at the present time, and sold mining claims which are now 



352 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

known as the Green Hill, Belleview, Hill Crest, McGillivray and Interna- 
tional mines. He is active in the management and operation of the last 
named property and is also a stockholder in the McGillivray Creek mine. 
He resides on a homestead just outside of the corporation limits of Blair- 
more and is regarded as an authority on matters pertaining to coal min- 
ing, occupying a position of leadership in this field. 

Mr. Little was united in marriage to Miss Mary Durkin, who passed 
away in 1894. He is a member of the Church of England, but is not 
identified with any fraternal or social organizations, subordinating all 
other interests to the demands of his business. He has endured all of the 
dangers, privations and hardships of frontier life and none can grudge 
him the success which he now enjoys, for it has been worthily won. He 
has witnessed many changes in this section as the work of development 
and improvement has been carried forward and his memory forms a 
connecting link between the primitive past and the progressive present. 
His labors have been crowned by the successful accomplishment of valu- 
able results and the nature and importance of his work entitles him to 
classification with the empire builders of the Canadian Northwest. 



CHARLES EGAN. 



Charles Egan is conducting a hardware business in Warner and is 
likewise a member of the real estate firm of Leffingwell & Egan. He was 
born in Henderson, Minnesota, on the 11th of February, 1864, a son of 
James and Mary (Foley) Egan, both natives of Ireland. The paternal 
grandfather, Dominick Egan, lived and died in Ireland. The maternal 
grandfather, Charles Foley, left Ireland in later life and emigrated to 
the United States. His wife, who was Alice Mulligan, was also a native 
of Ireland. She lived in Minnesota until her death, which occurred at 
the age of one hundred years. James Egan came to the United States 
when twenty years of age and first located at Monticello, New York, 
securing work on a railroad. He remained there until 1856, when he 
removed to Henderson, Minnesota, and bought railroad land, on which 
stood much timber. He had to clear this land and put it under cultivation 
and after much hard work he was ready to engage in general farming. 
He was a man of unremitting zeal and although he met with the obstacles 
and apparently insurmountable difficulties that confront the pioneer, he 
met with success in every undertaking and for many years farmed two 
hundred acres of the finest land in Minnesota. He lived retired for some 
time prior to his demise, which occurred in 1914, when ninety-three years 
of age. Mrs. Egan died in 1916, at the age of seventy-five years. To 
them the following children were born: John, who is deceased; Ellen; 
Sarah; Charles, whose name introduces this review; Anna; Elizabeth; 
Mary; James; Thomas; Belinda; and Bridget, who is deceased. Through- 
out his life Mr. Egan was a stanch supporter of the democratic party. 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 353 

He served for one year in the Union army, belonging to a Minnesota 
regiment, during the Civil war. The religious faith of Mr. and Mrs. Egan 
was that of the Catholic church. 

The public schools of Minnesota afforded Charles Egan his early edu- 
cation and at an early age he started out into the business world. For 
some years he worked for wages and then entered the livery business at 
Foley, Minnesota, in the conduct of which he was successful for ten years. 
In September, 1906, he came to Warner, Alberta, and fifteen minutes after 
arriving here bought a half section of barren railroad land. He soon dis- 
posed of that land, realizing a substantial and fair profit on the deal and 
since that time he has been active in buying and selling land. Subse- 
quently he formed a partnership with Frank S. Leffingwell, extended men- 
tion of whom is made on another page of this work, in the conduct of a 
real estate business and the firm is known as Leffingwell & Egan. Mr. 
Egan farms one section of land near Milk river on his own account and 
he has been very successful in raising live stock. He was one of the or- 
ganizers of the Farmers Elevator Company and for three years was chair- 
man of that organization. In 1907 he established a hardware business 
in Warner, erecting a fine building, and he has since conducted that enter- 
prise. Mr. Egan's career and achievements should be an inspiration to 
every enterprising and ambitious youth, as it is additional proof that suc- 
cess is a matter of capably directed energy and well-defined purpose rather 
than a fortunate combination of favorable circumstances. 

Politically Mr. Egan supports the Liberal party and he has the distinc- 
tion of being the first mayor of Warner. He was one of the organizers of 
and assisted in laying out the town, and he was one of the men who organ- 
ized the first consolidated school in Alberta and for ten years was a mem- 
ber of the school board. During the World war he served as a member 
of the local exemption board. Although the greater part of Mr. Egan's 
time and attention is taken up by his extensive business interests, he is 
thoroughly appreciative of the social amenities of life and is an active 
member of the Knights of Columbus Lodge at Lethbridge. He is also a 
consistent communicant of the Catholic church. Mr. Egan is unmarried. 



JOHN WALTER McDONALD, K. C. 

A successful member of the Macleod bar is John Walter McDonald, 
who is serving as King's Counsel, to which position he was appointed in 
1919, and he is also mayor of Macleod. He was born near Toronto, On- 
tario, on the 21st of May, 1879, a son of Donald and Flora (McDonald) 
McDonald, who were natives of the community in which their son was 
born. The father was a successful farmer and construction carpenter. 
His death occurred in 1919, at the age of eighty-nine years, and Mrs, 
McDonald died in 1921, when seventy-four years of age. To them four 
children were born, John Walter being the second in order of birth. The 
(23) 



354 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

eldest son, William, is living in Toronto, retired; Anna, the third member 
of the family, is the wife of Edward Hall of Toronto ; and Norman is 
employed in the post office in that city. The family were reared in the 
faith of the Presbyterian church. 

In the acquirement of his education John Walter McDonald attended 
the schools of his birthplace and subsequently was graduated from the 
Richmond Hill high school. In 1905 he was graduated from the Univer- 
sity of Toronto with the LL.B. degree, and in that same year the B. C. L. 
degree was conferred upon him by the Osgoode Hall Law School. He 
practiced in Toronto until 1907, having an extensive general clientele and 
he then came to Macleod, associating with the late Malcolm McKenzie for 
three years, after which he formed a partnership with D. G. McKenzie 
and they later took into the firm, T. B. Martin, and are now practicing 
under the style of McDonald, Martin & McKenzie. In 1919 Mr. McDonald 
was appointed King's Counsel and he was made Crown prosecutor in the 
same year. He was prosecuting attorney for the Basoff murder case in 
1920 and for the Zitto murder case in 1921, and he has won widespread 
recognition for the success he has achieved in handling criminal cases. 
In 1923 he was elected mayor of Macleod, by acclamation and well merits 
the honor thus conferred upon him. 

In 1907 was celebrated the marriage of Mr. McDonald to Miss Mar- 
garet Somerville, a native of Ontario, and a daughter of Dr. Somerville. 
To their union two children have been born : Jack and Audrey, both liv- 
ing at home. 

The religious faith of Mr. McDonald is that of the Presbyterian church. 
In politics he maintains an independent course, giving his support to the 
man he thinks best fitted for the olfice without regard to party princi- 
ples. Along the lines of his profession he is a member of the Dominion 
and Macleod Bar Associations and he is president of the latter body and 
president of the Macleod Board of Trade. Both as a representative of 
his profession and as mayor Mr. McDonald is held in high regard in Mac- 
leod, as in all of the relations of life he has manifested qualities which 
entitle him to the respect and esteem of his fellow townsmen. 



PATRICK HARCOURT-O'REILLY, B. A. 

Patrick Harcourt-O'Reilly is a well known and highly respected bar- 
rister and solicitor of Calgary. He was born in Dublin, Ireland, in De- 
cember, 1879, and is a son of Phillip O'Reilly, J. P., and Mary (Barnes) 
O'Reilly, who are still residents of Dublin. In the acquirement of an 
education he attended Belvidere and University colleges in his native 
city, taking his degree B. A., in mental and moral science at the Univer- 
sity of Ireland, and also studied in Paris and Berlin. He then spent sev- 
eral years in the teaching profession, and in 1911, when a young man of 
thirty-two, emigrated to Canada, locating first at Brandon, Manitoba. 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 355 

Three months later he came to Alberta and began the study of law in 
the offices of Walsh, McCarthy & Carson, leading barristers of Calgary. 
He was called to the bar of the province in 1914 and throughout the in- 
tervening decade has successfully followed his profession here. 

In October, 1911, Mr. Harcourt-O'Reilly married Miss Lillian Crosby 
Harcourt, daughter of Dr. William Lyon and Fanny (Crosby) Harcourt. 
Her father, who died in May, 1921, long represented the Hamilton Provi- 
dent & Loan Society as general manager for Manitoba and Saskatche- 
wan. He was born in York, Haldimand county, Ontario, September 26, 
1846, a son of Michael Harcourt, M. P., for Haldimand, and Ellen (Weir) 
Harcourt. Following his graduation from the University of Michigan 
he entered Rush Medical College for professional training and from 1871 
until 1886 was a physician and surgeon of Chicago, Illinois, while during 
the succeeding nine years he practiced in Hamilton, Ontario. In 1895 
he made his way westward to Brandon, Manitoba, where he spent the 
remainder of his life. He served as vice president of the board of gov- 
ernors of the Brandon General Hospital and likewise took a prominent 
part in public affairs, being made president of the Liberal Association 
of Brandon in 1906. He also acted as alderman of the city and as a 
member of the school board. For gallant service with the York Rifles 
during the Fenian raid he was awarded a medal. He held membership in 
the Brandon Club and also belonged to the Masonic fraternity, while his 
religious faith was that of the Anglican church. His widow is now a 
resident of Los Angeles, California. Mr. and Mrs. Harcourt-O'Reilly are 
the parents of three children : Margaret Elizabeth, who was born No- 
vember 12, 1912 ; William Brefni, whose birth occurred in July, 1915 ; and 
Patricia, born August 20, 1920. 

Politically Mr. Harcourt-O'Reilly maintains an independent attitude. 
At present he is serving as chairman of the Separate school board. In 
religious faith he is a Catholic and fraternally is identified with the 
Knights of Columbus. 



JOHN H. FLEETWOOD. 



John H. Fleetwood, secretary and treasurer of the Lethbridge schools, 
and maintaining the highest standards in his service to the educational 
system of the city, is a native of Lincoln, England, born in 1859, his 
parents being James and Elizabeth (Griffith) Fleetwood, who were also 
natives of England. The mother died in that country and the father after- 
ward crossed the Atlantic to live with his son, John H., in Lethbridge. 
He arrived in 1914 and here passed away in 1918, at the very venerable 
age of ninety-one years. They were both members of the Church of 
England and politically Mr. Fleetwood was a conservative. During his 
active business life he followed the machinist's trade. To him and his 
wife were born nine children, four of whom are living : John H. ; Fred, 



356 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

a machinist of Lincoln, England ; Thomas, a brushmaker, also of Lincoln, 
and Lucy, the wife of William T. Oldershaw, who is engaged in the paint- 
ing business at Lincoln. 

John H. Fleetwood pursued his education in the schools of his native 
city, attending the Wesleyan school and then made his initial step in the 
business world in connection with the bookbinding trade. He entered 
the army as a member of the Thirteenth Hussars and with that command 
went to India, where he served with the military forces of the country for 
four years, the greater part of that time being spent in the Far East. 
With his return home he resumed work at the bookbinding trade but in 
1885 determined to try his fortune in the new world, and crossed the 
Atlantic to Winnipeg, where he was employed in various ways for about 
three months. He then obtained a position on the Bell farm at Indian 
Head, acting as teamster there for about six months. Later he was sec- 
tion foreman for the Canadian Pacific Railroad, remaining in the employ 
of that corporation from 1886 until 1889. On the 15th of November of the 
latter year he came to Lethbridge and worked in the mines at No. 1 shaft 
for the Northwest Coal & Irrigation Company. Later he was connected 
wuth the railway department until 1896, when he entered the employ of the 
city as superintendent of the waterworks and was thus engaged until 
1912, or for a period of eighteen years. He then became secretary of 
the schools and has since occupied this position. His long incumbency in 
the office indicates both his capability and his reliability, the cause of 
education ever finding in him a stalwart champion. He has served on the 
school board since 1900 and was chairman thereof from 1906 until the 
close of the year 1911. He is now secretary and treasurer of the Leth- 
bridge school district No. 51. He has also filled other public offices, having 
been elected to the city council in 1900 and serving until 1906. He has 
ever discharged his duties with marked fidelity, working for the best 
interests of the public, and his course has at all times been commendable. 

In 1891 Mr. Fleetwood was married to Miss Jane M. Cagill, who was 
born in Suffolk, England, and they have become parents of eight children, 
six of whom are living: William, who is in the post office at Edmonton; 
Thomas, secretary and treasurer of the city of Lethbridge ; Elizabeth, the 
wife of W. J. Glass, a farmer of Calgary ; Lucy, the wife of G. M. McLean, 
engaged in the transfer business at Lethbridge ; Maisie, who married 
James Donnald, an expressman of Lethbridge ; and Ernest, who is engaged 
in the plumbing business at Lethbridge. 

Mr. and Mrs. Fleetwood hold membership in the Church of England 
and fraternally he is connected with the Masons. He has served as master 
of his lodge and also as district deputy grand master. He likewise belongs 
to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Independent Order of 
Foresters and is ever loyal to the teachings and high purposes which under- 
lie these organizations. In politics he maintains an independent course, 
with leanings toward the Conservative side. His interest always centered 
in those channels through which flow the greatest and most permanent 
good to the greatest number. No one has been connected with the schools 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 357 

of Lethbridge for so long a period as Mr. Fleetwood and no one has been 
more untiring in efforts to advance the welfare of the schools and make the 
educational system of the greatest possible service in preparing the young 
for the duties of citizenship and the responsibilities of life. 



JONATHAN E. BAGLEY. 

Jonathan E. Bagley, engaged in the real estate and insurance business 
in Edmonton as a partner in the firm of Bessey & Bagley, entered into 
this connection in 1913 and through the intervening period of ten years 
has concentrated his efi'orts and attention upon the duties of a rapidly 
growing business. He comes to Alberta from the province of Quebec, 
where he was born, in 1878, his parents being William and Esther (Free) 
Bagley, also natives of Quebec, where they were reared and married and 
still make their home. The father has always devoted his attention to 
the occupation of farming and still resides on the old home place, his 
energies being yet given to the task of tilling the soil and caring for the 
crops. Both he and his wife are members of the Church of England, in 
which they have taken active and helpful part. In politics he is a Liberal 
and was councillor for his district for a number of years. He has been 
very active in support of his friends who have sought political honors 
and emoluments and assisted to elect Sir Wilfrid Laurier as Premier of 
Canada. To Mr. and Mrs. William Bagley were born five children, all of 
whom are living: May, the wife of Leonard Gale, a general merchant of 
Quebec ; Jonathan E. ; William Sidney, who is engaged in drilling for the 
Imperial Oil Company at Nanton, Alberta ; Walter, who is a farmer at 
the old home in Quebec ; and Howard, floor manager for the Universal 
Motors Company at Calgary, Alberta. 

Jonathan E. Bagley pursued his early education in the country schools 
near his father's farm, but deciding that he did not care to follow agri- 
cultural pursuits as a life work, he began learning the carpenter's trade. 
He was afterward employed in a pulp mill and his ability and fidelity en- 
abled him to win promotion to the position of mill superintendent. In 
April, 1905, he removed to Edmonton for the benefit of his health and 
here he turned his attention to the wholesale grocery and produce busi- 
ness, in which he continued for six years, or until 1911. At that date he 
became interested in the real estate business and soon afterward entered 
the firm of Bessey & Bagley, with which he has since been identified. 
Success has attended their efforts and they now have a large clientage, 
making their business one of a distinctively representative character. 
They handle both farm and city property and have intimate and accu- 
rate knowledge of realty values throughout this section of the Dominion. 

In February, 1910, Mr. Bagley was united in marriage to Miss Clare 
E. Seward, who was born in Lincolnshire, England, a daughter of Fran- 
cis Seward, who came to Edmonton in 1902. He followed carpentering 



358 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

for some time but is now devoting his attention to farming. Mr. and 
Mrs. Bagley are well known in Edmonton, where they have many warm 
friends. They hold membership in the Church of England and Mr. Bag- 
ley is a valued representative of the Masonic fraternity and of the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows, having filled all of the chairs in the local 
lodge of the latter. He votes with the Liberal party on many occasions, 
yet is inclined to an independent course in politics. He is interested in 
the Board of Trade, also has membership in the Young Men's Christian 
Association and in the Kiwanis Club. He has long been interested in 
athletics and manly sports and in 1912 he won the all-round champion- 
ship of the province for throwing weights. The following year he was 
on the Rugby football team which won the championship of Alberta and 
he took active part in gaining the victory, although he was thirty-five 
years of age at the time. There is no phase of public life which is of 
concern to the law-abiding and the progressive citizen that does not claim 
his interest and cooperation, as he stands at all times for those projects 
which are looking to the public good. He has also made for himself a 
creditable position in business circles and his progress toward the goal 
of success has resulted from close application, indefatigable energy and 
firm purpose. 



DR. A. T. TURNER. 
DR. G. C. WAGNER. 



For some time Dr. Alfied T. Turner and Dr. George C. Wagner have 
engaged in the practice of medicine, in partnership, and they are among 
the prominent physicians and surgeons of Innisfail. 

Alfred T. Turner was born in Carlingford, Ontario, on the 25th of 
August, 1887, a son of Luther F. W. and Elizabeth (Thompson) Turner, 
the former a native of Cornwall, England, and the latter of Ontario. 
They were married in the province of Ontario, where Mr. Turner engaged 
in agricultural pursuits with gratifying success. 

In the acquirement of his education Alfred T, Turner attended the 
public schools of Ontario and was graduated from Western University at 
London in May, 1913, with the M. D. degree. While attending college he 
played professional baseball dui-ing the summer months at Red Deer. 
Upon the completion of his medical training he immediately began prac- 
tice and located in Bowden, Alberta, where he remained for about three 
months. At the termination of that time he went to Toronto and obtained 
his dominion council, and then returned to Alberta and located in Innis- 
fail. He began practice here on the 3rd of November, 1913, and has built 
up an extensive patronage. He practices in association with Dr. Wagner 
and aside from his private practice is director of the General Hospital 
here. 

Dr. A. T. Turner married Miss Agnes Pattei^son and to their union 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 359 

one child has been born: Audrey Patricia. Fraternally the Doctor is 
identified with the Masons, belonging to the Royal Arch Keystone Chapter 
in Red Deer; and with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 

George Cleveland Wagner was born in Delaware, Ontario, oii the 
16th of November, 1884, a son of George and Emma (Parse) Wagner, 
both deceased. The father was a painter, decorator and contractor in 
Prince Albert, Saskatchewan, until his demise. 

In the acquirement of his education George Cleveland Wagner attended 
the public schools of his birthplace and in 1912 was graduated from 
Western University, with the M. D. degree. The following year he took 
postgraduate work at the German Hospital in Buffialo, New York, and 
then came west and worked on railroad construction, extending the 
Grand Trunk out of Edmonton. In the spring of 1915 he determined to 
practice his profession and located in Innisfail. He was enjoying well- 
merited success upon the outbreak of the World war and in the spring of 
1918 he enlisted for service. He was sent overseas at once and was sta- 
tioned in a hospital in Cooden Beach, remaining in active service until 
the 25th of September, 1919. After receiving his honorable discharge 
he returned to Canada and resumed his practice in Innisfail. He and 
Dr. Turner have an extensive patronage and rank among the foremost 
physicians and surgeons in the district and province. In April, 1920, 
Dr. Wagner married Miss Margaret Blizard and to their union one child 
has been born, Margaret Mary. Dr. Wagner is town medical officer, 
in which position he is giving satisfactory service. Fraternally the Doc- 
tor is a Royal Arch Mason and a Noble of the Mystic Shrine. 

Both Dr. Turner and Dr. Wagner have continued constant students of 
their calling and they hold membership in many professional organiza- 
tions, in that way keeping in touch with the advance being made by promi- 
nent physicians and surgeons throughout the country. They are essentially 
public-spirited and no movement for the development and improvement 
of the general welfare seeks their aid in vain. 



PETER J. BREEN. 



Possessing a strong, self-reliant nature, Peter J. Breen became self- 
supporting at an early age and in the school of life he has learned many 
valuable lessons which have broadened his knowledge and promoted his 
efficiency. He has "roughed it" as a miner in various parts of the country, 
but for nearly two decades has been a resident of Calgary, coming here in 
1891, and is one of its best known public officials, having held the position 
of superintendent of the city water department for the past twelve years. 
A native of Ireland, he was born in May, 1865, and his parents, Peter and 
Frances (Roche) Breen, were also natives of the Emerald isle. When he 
was but a year old they emigrated to the United States, establishing their 
home in Virginia, and both passed away in that state in 1876. Their son, 



360 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

Peter J. Breen, was reared in the Old Dominion and attended the public 
schools of that state until he reached the age of fourteen, when he became 
a wage earner. In 1880 he went to Colorado and was employed in the 
mines of that state until 1887. He then crossed the Canadian border and 
worked as a miner near Vancouver, British Columbia, for some time. In 
1898 he went to the Yukon Territory and engaged in mining near Dawson 
and in other localities until 1904, when he came to Alberta. For a short 
time he followed farming in the vicinity of Calgary and in 1905 he became a 
city employe. He readily mastered the tasks assigned him and was rapidly 
advanced to positions of greater importance and responsibility. In 1910 
he was appointed superintendent of the city water department and has 
since been retained in that office, discharging his duties with efficiency and 
fidelity. 

In June, 1895, Mr. Breen was united in marriage to Miss Victoria E. 
Moore and they have three children: Margaret Francis, Peter J., Jr., 
and James Victor. Mr. Breen is a member of the Catholic church and its 
teachings guide him in his daily life. He is a man of strong purpose and 
indefatigable energy, who has proven his ability to meet and master situa- 
tions, and he combines in his character all the qualities of a useful and 
desirable citizen. 



ASA H. GIBSON. 



For many years Asa H. Gibson was actively identified with banking 
in Canada. He is now, however, a prominent figure in mining circles, 
being president, manager and director of the Gibson Collieries. He was 
born in Newcastle, Ontario, on the 6th of August, 1892, a son of Hugh 
and Mina (Samis) Gibson, likewise natives of Ontario. The father was 
a successful farmer. 

Asa H. Gibson received his education in the public schools of New- 
castle and in due time was graduated from the local high school. He then 
entered banking circles, becoming a clerk in the Standard Bank in New- 
tonville, Ontario. In 1912 he came to the province of Alberta and located 
at Calgary, where he took over the management of the Standard Bank 
at the Crescent Heights branch, filling that position for four years. On 
the 4th of March, 1915, he came to Drumheller as manager of the Stand- 
ard Bank, which was the first bank established in this community. Mr. 
Gibson served as manager of that bank until 1920, and during that time 
he had acquired an interest in the Premier Coal Company, of which he 
is now president. In 1921 he determined to enter the mining business 
and he assisted in the organization of the Gibson Collieries, Limited. He 
is president, manager and director of the collieries, which have holdings 
of about four thousand acres, all of which are under development. The 
mines are equipped with the latest in machinery and are operated on an 
efficient and profitable basis. 




ASA H. GIBSON 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 363 

The religious faith of Mr. Gibson is manifest in his membership in 
the Church of England. Fraternally he is identified with the Ancient 
Free & Accepted Masons, in which order he has attained the fourteenth 
degree in the Scottish Rite and he holds the highest degree in the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows. Mr. Gibson devotes his entire time and 
attention to his business. In the development of his interests he has met 
with success won by well organized methods, intelligently and capably 
executed, and he fully merits the esteem and respect accorded him by his 
fellow townsmen, as his career has been pursued in an honorable and up- 
right manner. 



EDWARD WINDHAM BURLEY. 

Gifted with practical ability, keen business insight and a broad grasp 
of affairs, Edward W. Burley is well qualified for the important duties of 
provincial auditor of Alberta, which he has capably discharged for the 
past seventeen years, and despising all unworthy or questionable methods 
to secure advancement, he has arisen to his present high office through the 
force of his personality and the strength of his mental endowments. He 
was born in Prince Edward county, Ontario, in 1856 and his father, 
Joseph Burley, was also a native of that county, born in 1830. In 1855 
the father was married in Ontario to Miss Christina Powers, a native of 
that province, and there his demise occurred in 1908. The mother was 
born May 26, 1833, and still resides in the old home in Ontario, having 
reached the advanced age of eighty-nine years. 

The public schools of Prince Edward county afforded Edward Wind- 
ham Burley his educational opportunities and in 1885 he went to the 
state of Colorado, where he spent two years, finding the climate of that 
section of the country very beneficial in the restoration of his health. He 
returned to Canada and in 1891 came to Alberta, settling in Calgary, 
where he engaged in the real estate and insurance business, with which 
he was connected until 1900. Meanwhile, in 1896, he had been appointed 
chief clerk in the land office at Calgary and in 1900 he was transferred 
to the land office at Regina, Saskatchewan, holding that position until 
November, 1901. He next became identified with the treasury depart- 
ment of the Northwest Territory, remaining in Regina until 1905, and 
when the provinces of Alberta and Saskatchewan were formed Mr. Burley 
was appointed provincial auditor for Alberta. He has since served in that 
capacity and his long retention in the office is conclusive proof that his 
services are thoroughly appreciated. He is thorough, systematic and 
efficient in the discharge of his important duties and his work has been 
highly commended. 

On the 15th of June, 1880, in Prince Edward county, Ontario, Mr. 
Burley was married to Miss Antoinette Wright, a daughter of Edward W. 
Wright, who followed agricultural pursuits and also served as justice of 



364 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

the peace, passing away in 1886. Mr. and Mrs. Burley have two sons: 
Ralph Joseph, the elder, was born July 29, 1881, and completed his educa- 
tion in the University of Toronto, from which he was graduated in 1904. 
He became assistant director of the reclamation service and chief engineer 
of the drainage division of the department of the interior and was holding 
those positions at the time of his death, on the 14th of April, 1921 ; Arnold 
.Edward was born September 30, 1883, and in 1921 was graduated from 
the University of Alberta with the degree of LL. B. He was admitted 
to the bar at Edmonton in the same year and is now following his pro- 
fession in this city. He was married in Edmonton in March, 1913, to 
Miss Martha Haviland, whose father is a retired farmer residing at 
Chatham, Ontario. Mr. and Mrs. A. E. Burley have a son and a daughter, 
Mary Antoinette and Edward Haviland. 

Mr. E. W. Burley is a member of the McDougall Methodist church and 
is serving on its official board. He is a Liberal in his political views and 
fraternally is identified with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He 
early came to a realization of the fact that the sources of our power lie 
within ourselves and that upon his own ability and effort must depend 
his success. His well developed capacities and powers have brought him 
prominently before the public, and in the bright light, which all that is of 
good repute ever invites, his name and character stand revealed and secure. 



JOSEPH E. HODGSON. 



Joseph E. Hodgson, well known in educational circles as superinten- 
dent of schools at Lethbridge, was born near Caledonia, Ontario, on the 
25th of April, 1875, and is of English lineage. His grandfather, John 
Hodgson, a native of England, crossed the Atlantic to Ontario about 1849 
and spent his remaining days there. In his native country he had fol- 
lowed mining but in the new world he turned his attention to farming. 
His son, Thomas Hodgson was but seven years of age when the family 
home was established in Ontario. He was reared to the occupation of 
farming, which he made his life work. At all times he took an interest in 
the welfare and progress of his community and served as a member of 
the school board. His political endorsement was given to the Liberal 
party and his religious faith was manifest in his membership in the Meth- 
odist church. He wedded Mary Elder, who was born near Caledonia, 
Ontario, a daughter of Peter Elder, a native of Scotland, who took up his 
abode in Ontario in early life. He was a stone mason in his native country 
but after coming to the new world turned his attention to agricultural pur- 
suits. To Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Hodgson seven children were born, six 
of whom are living. 

Joseph E. Hodgson, the third in order of birth, is indebted to the 
public school system of Ontario for the educational opportunities which 
he enjoyed. After mastering the work of the grades he attended the 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 365 

high school at Caledonia and later entered the Toronto University, from 
which he was graduated in 1896. He was a student in the School of 
Pedagogy and afterward began teaching in Ontario. In 1911 he came to 
Lethbridge and was appointed principal of the high school. On August 1, 
1915, he was with the government as inspector for Macleod, occupying 
the position until December 31, 1917. He was then with the Medicine 
Hat inspectorate from January, 1918, until November of that year, after 
which he removed to Edmonton and was in the government service as 
supervisor of consolidated schools for the province of Alberta, there con- 
tinuing until August 31, 1920. At that date he came to Lethbridge as 
superintendent of schools and principal of the high school. The city has 
four school buildings for the grades and one high school, and there are 
forty-nine public school teachers under his supervision and nine assistant 
high school teachers. There is a total enrollment of 2,300 pupils and under 
the guidance of Superintendent Hodgson the schools are making steady 
progress. He inspires both teachers and pupils under him with much of 
his own zeal and interest in the work and he has ever held to the highest 
professional standards, while his initiative has enabled him to introduce 
various improved methods into the school. 

On the 21st of August, 1899, Mr. Hodgson was married to Miss Maude 
Beatrice Whitside, who was born in Delhi, Ontario, and there pursued her 
early education, while later she attended the Simcoe high school at Simcoe, 
Ontario. Mr. and Mrs. Hodgson have two children : John, who is now in 
school ; and Douglas, not yet of school age. The religious faith of the 
parents is that of the Presbyterian church and fraternally Mr. Hodgson is 
connected with the Masons, having taken the degrees of both lodge and 
chapter. He is a member of the Rotary Club and is the treasurer of the 
Children's Aid Society. He is interested in all those problems which 
affect the political, sociological and economic history of the Dominion and 
his aid and influence are ever on the side of right and progress. He 
devotes the major part of his time to his school work and in the educational 
field has made a creditable name and place for himself. 



PERCY L. SANFORD. 



Although one of the younger members of the Calgary bar, Percy L. 
Sanford has already gained an enviable reputation for legal acumen and 
has won a measure of success which many an older practitioner might 
well envy. He was born at Berwick, Nova Scotia, April 25, 1891, and his 
parents, Fred and Mary (Illsley) Sanford, were also natives of that prov- 
ince, in which they always resided. The father concentrated his atten- 
tion upon the cultivation of the soil and his death occurred in 1905, while 
the mother passed away in 1903. 

Reared in his native province, Percy L. Sanford there attended the 
public schools and afterward matriculated at Queen's University of Kings- 



366 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

ton, Ontario, from which he was graduated in 1914, with the B. A. de- 
gree, winning class honors. He then entered upon educational work, teach- 
ing in the schools of Saskatchewan and Manitoba, and in 1915 he became a 
law student in the offices of Dunn & Spotton at Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan. 
He next became connected with the firm of Lougheed, Bennett & Company 
at Calgary and completed his studies in 1917, passing the final examination 
in the following year. He won second place in the province and was 
awarded the Carswell prize. Soon after his admission to the bar he be- 
came a partner in the firm of Lougheed, Bennett & Company, with which 
he was connected until its dissolution, and has since been a member of the 
firm of Bennett, Hannah & Sanford, which ranks with the leading law- 
organizations of the city, numbering among its clients many of Calgary's 
prominent business men. 

In August, 1919, Mr. Sanford was united in marriage to Miss Mary Min- 
shull and they have a daughter, Margaret Joan, born April 29, 1921. He 
is a member of the Anglican church and his political support is given to the 
men and measures of the Conservative party. His professional connections 
are with the Calgary Bar Association and the Alberta Law Society and the 
nature of his recreation is indicated by his identification with the Calgary 
Golf & Country Club. He is a loyal supporter of his city because of his 
belief in its opportunities and is an earnest and valued member of the Cal- 
gary Board of Trade. He has much natural ability but is withal a hard 
student and is never content until he has mastered every detail of his cases, 
while in their presentation he is logical, forceful and convincing. His up- 
right policy has gained for him the confidence and respect of his fellow 
practitioners and his ability, enterprise and determination will undoubtedly 
carry him far in his profession. 



CHARLES BROUGHTON BOWMAN. 

In the progress and upbuilding of the city of Lethbridge during the past 
two decades no citizen has taken a more active and helpful part than 
Charles Broughton Bowman. With the history of this period his name is 
inseparably interwoven, associated through connection with many affairs 
that have been conspicuous features in the development and substantial 
improvement of this region. A native of Nova Scotia, he was born in 
Windsor, on the 14th of August, 1867, and is a son of Maynard and Ann 
E. (Eraser) Bowman, who are now residing in Halifax. The son was 
reared and educated in the east, there remaining to the age of twenty-two 
years, when in 1889 he made his way westward to Alberta, settling in 
Lethbridge in August of that year. For a year or more thereafter he en- 
gaged in various lines of work but in 1891 established a real estate and in- 
surance office, which was the first enterprise of the kind in the city, save 
that of the Alberta Railway & Irrigation Company. Since that time Mr. 
Bowman has figured most conspicuously and honorably in connection with 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 367 

all that has meant progress and improvement for Lethbridge. In 1909 in 
connection with L. M. Johnstone he erected the big Acadia building, in 
which his offices are located. As the years have passed his business has 
steadily increased in volume and importance. He is thoroughly familiar 
with realty values and has negotiated many important property transfers. 
At the same time the insurance department of his business has reached 
most gratifying proportions and the story of his efforts may well be writ- 
ten in the terms of success. 

From 1897 until 1907 inclusive Mr. Bowman was secretary and treas- 
urer of the city, making a most creditable record by his prompt and capable 
discharge of the duties that devolve upon him. In the latter year, 
however, he resigned the position in order to give his entire attention to 
his large and growing business. At other periods he has rendered valu- 
able service to the city, having been a member of the council from 1907 
until 1912, with the exception of the year 1908 and in 1909 he was acting 
mayor of Lethbridge. He also filled the position of city assessor from 
1897 until 1907 and for ten years he was secretary of the Board of Trade, 
while from 1896 until 1901 he was secretary of the Agricultural Society. 
In the succeeding year he became president of the society and under his 
wise direction steady progress was made. Since 1903 he has been one of 
the managers of the Gait Hospital and for a number of years he was secre- 
tary of the school board. The extent and variety of his public activities 
show his deep interest in the general welfare and to all who know Mr. 
Bowman it is a recognized fact that his business and executive ability have 
been made to play an important part in the general advancement of the 
community. 

In June, 1899, Mr. Bowman was married to Miss Florence Miller and 
they have become parents of the following named : Catherine May, Ronald 
Eraser and Gwendoline Marguerite. Mr. Bowman and his family are mem- 
bers of the Church of England and politically he is independent. Fra- 
ternally he is identified with North Star Lodge No. 4, A. F. & A. M., and 
with Shekinah Chapter, R. A. M. He is one of the best known citizens of 
the province and his personal qualities make for popularity wherever he is 
known. It would be difficult to determine just how far-reaching have been 
his efforts and his influence in public affairs but all who know aught of the 
history of Lethbridge attest the value of his labors in this connection. 



MILES KENNEDY. 



Miles Kennedy, extensive landowner and successful farmer, whose 
progressive spirit is manifest in the excellent condition of his property in 
the St. Albert district, is now living retired in St. Albert, while his sons 
look after his extensive farming interests. He was born in the province 
of Ontario, on the 18th of May, 1850, a son of John and Christine (Mil- 
Ian) Kennedy, likewise natives of that province. The father was a farmer 



368 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

for many years and won success as an agriculturist. Mr. and Mrs. Ken- 
nedy are deceased. 

Miles Kennedy received his education in the public schools of his 
birthplace and in 1894 came to Alberta and located in the St. Albert dis- 
trict, purchasing fine farm land. Since that time he has devoted his 
entire time and attention to its improvement and development, his spe- 
cialties being mixed farming and cattle raising, and he has become one 
of the most successful and affluent agriculturists in the district. 

At St. Raphael's, in 1882, was celebrated the marriage of Miles Ken- 
nedy to Catherine McDonald, both of Glengarry. To their union twelve 
children have been born : Alexander is on his own farm in Killam district, 
Alberta; Angus is looking after his fathers' interests; Marguerite served 
as nurse for three years overseas during the World war, and is now 
married and living at Winnipeg; Hughie is married and is working in a 
large department store at St. Albert; Christine is married and now liv- 
ing in the States ; John, who was a sergeant in the World war, was killed 
in action at the battle of Vimy Ridge, April 9, 1917. He enlisted July 4, 
1915, with the Sixty-sixth but served in the Forty-ninth; Donald died of 
wounds in the battle of the Somme, December 26, 1916. He enlisted 
November 8, 1915, with the Sixty-sixth but served in a unit overseas. 
Both brothers were decorated for bravery and extreme heroism ; Belle is 
at home ; Albert enlisted in the World war but did not see active service, 
getting only as far as England on his way to the front. He is now work- 
ing on his father's farm ; Elizabeth is nursing at the University Hos- 
pital ; Andrew is at home ; and Catherine is telephone operator in town. 
The Kennedy children are consistent members of the Catholic church and 
Mr. and Mrs. Kennedy are zealous workers in its behalf. 



HENRY DICKIE, M. A., D. D. 

Dr. Henry Dickie, pastor of the Robertson Presbyterian church at Ed- 
monton, was born near Truro, Nova Scotia, November 15, 1862, and is a 
son of James Edward and Harriett (Tupper) Dickie, who were also natives 
of Nova Scotia. The family has been represented in Canada for more than 
a century and a half, the first of the name in this country arriving in 1765, 
settling in that section made famous as the scene of Longfellow's beautiful 
poem "Evangeline." The Dickie family is related to the late Senator Barrie 
Dickie of Amherst and the late Hon. Arthur Dickie, minister of Canada, 
also to Hon. John B. Dickie, who was speaker of the house of Nova Scotia. 
The father, James Edward Dickie, was a leading merchant at Upper Ste- 
wiacke. Nova Scotia, being located in a big timber country, making large 
sales to the timbermen of that region. He was very successful in the man- 
agement of his business and ranked with the representative merchants of 
that section of the Dominion. His political allegiance was given to the Lib- 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 369 

eral party and his religious faith was that of the Presbyterian church, in 
the work of which he took active and helpful part, serving for twenty-five 
years as one of the elders. To him and his wife were born eight children, 
six of whom are living : Alfred, a resident of Halifax who is now chairman 
of the board of education, was formerly a prominent lumber merchant and 
in fact occupied a commanding position among the lumber dealers of 
Canada at one time ; the second of the family is Mrs. R. F. Carter, whose 
husband is a minister of the gospel and is now at the head of the Play- 
grounds Association in the state of Washington ; Dr. Henry Dickie, of this 
review, is the third in order of birth ; the fourth is Mrs. H. V. Kent, whose 
husband is a practicing physician of Truro, Nova Scotia; Edwin Dickie is 
a commission merchant of Vancouver; and Laura, the youngest of the 
family, is the wife of Dr. D. M. MacKay, a practicing physician of Van- 
couver. 

Having mastered the branches of learning taught in the public schools 
of Ontario, Dr. Henry Dickie continued his education in the Dalhousie Uni- 
versity at Halifax, there winning his Bachelor of Arts degree with the 
class of 1883. He afterward studied theology at Princeton, New Jersey, 
from 1883 until 1886, and then went to Edinburgh, Scotland, where he 
took postgraduate work at the New College, specializing in the Old Testa- 
ment, after which he studied for a year at Heidelberg, Germany, and again 
specialized in Old Testament study. He was also for a year a student in 
the Berlin University and spent a summer session in the College de France 
in Paris. On the expiration of that period he returned to Canada and took 
charge of the church at Summerside, Prince Edward Island. He was or- 
dained to the ministry on the 7th of November, 1888, and for five years re- 
mained in his first charge. He then went to Chicago, where he won his 
Master of Arts degree upon graduation from the University of Chicago in 
1894. In that year he was called to St. John's church at Windsor, Nova 
Scotia, where he labored for ten years, and during that period the house of 
worship was destroyed by fire and he was instrumental in erecting a beau- 
tiful new church there, of which Mrs. Dickie was chosen to lay the corner- 
stone. Ever desirous of gaining knowledge that would promote his effi- 
ciency in his holy task of advancing the salvation of the world. Dr. Dickie 
has improved every opportunity for study and on leaving St. John's 
church he attended the University of Cambridge in England in order to 
qualify for the Doctor's degree. However, changing his plans, he re- 
turned to Canada and took his Doctor's degree at Montreal, for which he 
had to write a thesis on "Idolatry in Israel in the eighth century, B. C." 
He took his ten examinations and received the Doctor's degree in 1906. 
He was then called to Chalmers church at Woodstock, Ontario, where he 
remained for four years and then accepted a call to the First Presbyterian 
church at Chatham, in September, 1909, laboring zealously and untiringly 
for the upbuilding of the cause in that locality for a period of eleven years. 
On the 1st of August, 1920, he came to Edmonton, taking charge of the 
Robertson Presbyterian church, which has a membership of six hundred. 
Here he has since labored and his efforts are far-reaching and resultant, 
(24) 



370 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

Under his guidance the work of the church has been thoroughly organ- 
ized and its different societies are making steady progress. 

On the 2d of June, 1897, Dr. Dickie was married to Miss Helen Q. 
Gordon, a daughter of the Rev. D. S. Gordon, formerly a prominent divine 
of Canada. She was educated in Truro and in Halifax and taught school 
in Nova Scotia for a number of years prior to her marriage. Her father 
was pastor at Bridgetown and Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia, and her 
home training qualified her for the duties which she assumed on becom- 
ing the wife of a minister. Four children have been born to Dr. and Mrs. 
Dickie: Edward Gordon, the eldest, trained for artillery service during 
the World war but changed to the aviation branch of the army, being 
with the last force that went to England for training. He was a lieuten- 
ant in the artillery and later served with the same rank in the Flying 
Squadron. He had been just a month in France when he was killed at 
the battle of Cambrai, on the 30th of November, 1917, — one of that great 
army of noble young men who made the supreme sacrifice in order to 
protect the high ideals of democracy; Wilfrid Chipman, also a member 
of the Flying Corps, was in training at Beamsville, Ontario, when the 
armistice was signed. He was ready for college and entered the Uni- 
versity of Toronto, from which he received his Bachelor of Arts degree 
on the completion of a course in political science. He was an honor man 
each year and is now a law student in the oflSce of his uncle, Alfred Whit- 
man, at Halifax, Nova Scotia; Margaret Crompton is a student in the 
Alberta University; and George Henry, the youngest, is attending the 
public schools. 

Dr. Dickie is not only known as a minister but is also a popular 
lecturer. He has lectured a number of times on the Passion Play and on 
other subjects of wide interest, but the major part of his attention is 
given to his pastoral duties and he attacks each task with an enthusiasm 
that is contagious. While a man of broad scholarly attainments, he pos- 
sesses, too, that keen human sympathy that enables him to translate for 
his hearers the truths of divine love and spiritual vision into the terms 
of practical life. 



J. E. LAMBERT. 



J. E. Lambert has engaged in the general mercantile business in St. 
Albert since 1921 and is one of this community's foremost business men. 
He was born on the 31st of August, 1880, in New Glasgow, Quebec prov- 
ince, a son of L. J. A. Lambert and Theresa (Carey) Lambert, who were 
natives of that province. The father died in 1910. Mrs. Lambert is 
making her home in St. Albert. 

In the acquirement of his education J. E. Lambert attended the public 
schools of his birthplace. He came to Alberta in 1899, and moved into 
Edmonton in 1907, where he engaged in the conduct of a horse emporium 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 371 

until 1917. He has been a member of the Horse Breeders' Association 
since 1915 and has won more than local repute for the success he has 
achieved as a breeder of horses. In 1917 he purchased a farm in the 
Vicking district. Between 1917 and 1921 he was on the road and was in 
several small undertakings. In 1921 he came to St. Albert, and has 
here conducted a general store since that time. He carries a complete 
and high grade line of goods and enjoys an extensive and ever-increasing 
patronage. Mr. Lambert's success is the result of his innate ability, close 
application to the thing at hand and laudable ambition. 

In 1919 Mr. Lambert was married to Miss M. Kiwit and to their 
union two children have been born: Marcel and Lucien. 

Mr. Lambert is public-spirited and is ever ready to cooperate in the 
furtherance of any movement for the development and improvement of 
the community. He is a consistent member of the Catholic church. 



ALEXANDER SCOTT DAWSON, B. A. Sc. 

A. S. Dawson, a man of high professional attainments, is chief engi- 
neer for the Canadian Pacific Railway Company, in charge of the Depart- 
ment of Natural Resources, with headquarters at Calgary, and for twenty- 
five years has been in the service of this corporation. He was born at 
Pictou, Nova Scotia, September 6, 1871, a son of Robert Smith and Jane 
Dawson, and there acquired his academic education. He afterward en- 
tered McGill University at Montreal and was graduated with the class of 
1894, winning the degree of Bachelor of Applied Science. He began his 
professional career in the United States, devoting three years to hydraulic 
work in Massachusetts, and in 1898 he joined the maintenance-of-way 
staff of the Canadian Pacific Railway Company at Winnipeg, Manitoba. 
He was connected with that departnient until 1903, rising to the position 
of chief engineer of the western division, and then transferred his activi- 
ties to irrigation work. He has since been chief engineer of the Depart- 
ment of Natural Resources, in which connection he has had charge of the 
construction of all of the company's irrigation systems in Alberta, and 
his labors have been a most important factor in promoting the agricul- 
tural development of this great province. He has made a broad study of 
irrigation development and is regarded as an authority on matters per- 
taining thereto. 

On February 17, 1898, Mr. Dawson was married at Baltimore, Mary- 
land, to Miss Martha Elenora Bonn, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. H. R. 
Bonn of Richmond, Virginia, and to this union has been born a son, 
Gerald Stewart, who is studying in applied science at the University of 
Alberta. Mr. Dawson has recently been elected to the senate of that 
institution as representative of the Association of Professional Engineers 
of Alberta. Since 1895 he has been a member of the Engineering Insti- 
tute of Canada, while his identification with the American Society of Civil 



372 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

Engineers dates from 1912. He also takes an active interest in educa- 
tional and civic affairs, and at various times has served on the Calgary- 
school board. He was likewise a member of the executive board of West- 
ern Canada College, the Calgary Automobile Club and the Alberta Good 
Roads Association, in addition to which he served on the council of the 
Calgary Board of Trade, and as a member of the board of directors of 
the Young Men's Christian Association. He is also a member of the 
Ranchmen's Club and the Calgary Golf & Country Club, and belongs to 
the Anglican church. His interests have reached out broadly to his fel- 
lowmen and he ranks with the foremost representatives of his profession 
for his work has been of far-reaching effect and importance and most 
beneficial in its results. 



EVERETT HOBART REED, M. D. 

Dr. Everett Hobart Reed has an extensive surgical practice in Calgary. 
He was born in Whitman, Massachusetts, on the 23d of December, 1879, 
a son of Calvin and Cora M. (Beal) Reed, natives of Massachusetts. The 
father was an industrial engineer, following that line of work with great 
success throughout his life. His death occurred in September, 1918. Mrs. 
Reed is residing at Whitman. 

In the acquirement of his early education Everett Hobart Reed at- 
tended the public schools of Whitman and was graduated from the high 
school there, with the class of 1895. He then enrolled in the Burdette 
Business College at Boston in 1896 and upon the completion of his course 
entered business circles. He was out in the business world for about 
seven years and then entered a private preparatory school, subsquently 
enrolling in the medical department of McGill University at Montreal, 
and graduating therefrom in 1910, with the M. D. and C. M. degrees. For 
the following year and a half he was house surgeon at the Royal Victoria 
Hospital, Montreal, but in 1912 resigned that position and came to Cal- 
gary, where he has since practiced, with the exception of the years 1918 
and 1919, when he served overseas with the American army. He was 
commissioned a captain and was stationed at Base Hospital, No. 91 at 
Commercy, France. He had charge of most of the brain and plastic sur- 
gery work. Prior to that he was in the Canadian army, being in charge 
of the Ogden Home one year and in command of the Seventeenth Cavalry. 
He was chief of recruiting work in Calgary for the Seventeenth Canadian 
Field Artillery and held the rank of major in the Canadian army. He 
received his honorable discharge from the American army in 1919, and 
immediately returned to Calgary and resumed his practice. He is a con- 
stant student of his profession and is held in high confidence and esteem 
by all of the eminent physicians and surgeons in the district and province. 
Aside from his profession the Doctor is interested in agriculture and has 
extensive land interests in this province. 




EVERETT H. REED, M. D. 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 375 

In November, 1907, in Quebec, was celebrated the marriage of Dr. 
Reed and Miss Anna M. Gilmore of Huntington, Quebec, a daughter of 
John H. and Annie (White) Gilmore, natives of that province. Her 
parents now reside at Windsor, Ontario. 

Fraternally the Doctor is affiliated with the Benevolent Protective 
Order of Elks and along strictly professional lines he holds membership in 
the Alberta Medical Association and the Calgary Medical Society. He is 
also a member of the American Legion. For recreation the Doctor turns 
to the great outdoors and he is expert at hunting, fishing, horseback rid- 
ing and swimming. During 1903 and 1904 he was a member of the life 
guards and swimming instructor at Revere Beach, Boston, Massachu- 
setts. That Dr. Reed is a skilled and competent representative of his pro- 
fession is evidenced by the excellent record he has made during the period 
of his residence here and his lucrative practice. He is a man of high prin- 
ciples, genial nature and pleasing personality and is very popular in pro- 
fessional, business and social circles in Calgary, where he has many 
friends. 



NORMAN E. CARRUTHERS. 

One of the most efficient and popular public officials of Lacombe is 
Norman E. Carruthers, secretary and treasurer and also active in other 
offices. He was born in Prince Edward Island in 1872, a son of Robert 
W. and Hannah (McWilliams) Carruthers, likewise natives of that island, 
in which they are now living. The paternal grandfather came from Ayr- 
shire, Scotland, and located in Prince Edward Island at an early day and 
the maternal grandparents were natives of Scotland. For many years 
Robert W. Carruthers was a farmer. He cleared his first farm land, 
achieved substantial success in agricultural pursuits, and is now living re- 
tired. Mr. and Mrs. Carruthers were married in 1865. To their union 
seven children have been born, six of whom are now living, Norman E. 
being the fourth in order of birth. Mr. and Mrs. Carruthers are consistent 
members of the Church of Scotland and the father is a Conservative in 
politics. 

Norman E. Carruthers received his early education in the public 
schools of his birthplace and was graduated from high school at Center- 
ville. He took a normal course after leaving high school, in the Prince 
of Wales College & Normal School at Charlottetown. He taught in 
eastern schools from 1890 to 1901 and is a past president of the Edu- 
cational Association of Prince Edward Island. In the spring of 1902 he 
came to Lacombe and taught in the country schools here for four months. 
He then took a special course in the Regina Normal School, following which 
he taught for six months at Innisfail. At the termination of that time 
he returned to Lacombe and was principal of the Lacombe schools from 
1903 to July, 1917, with the exception of four months when he taught in 
White Horse, Yukon. He was secretary-treasurer of the Alberta Educa- 
tional Association for several years. In 1917 he became city secretary 



376 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

and treasurer and electric light commissioner. He has since been active 
in those important capacities and is now also holding the office of police 
magistrate, having been appointed in the fall of 1922. He was appointed 
justice of the peace under the old government in 1904 and has since held 
that office. He is a man of keen executive ability and foresight and de- 
votes his entire time and attention to his official duties. 

In 1909 was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Carruthers to Miss Lydia 
J. Boyd, who was born and educated in Quebec, and has studied to be a 
nurse. To Mr. and Mrs. Carruthers four children have been born : Helen 
M. and Robert Boyd, who are attending school; Norman E., Jr.; and 
Thomas J., three years of age. 

In his political views Mr. Carruthers has always favored the Con- 
servative party and he wields much influence in party affairs. His 
religious faith is manifest in his membership in the Presbyterian church 
and fraternally he is identified with the Masons, having attained the thirty- 
second degree in the Scottish Rite. He is Junior Grand Warden of the 
Grand Lodge of the province of Alberta and has held all chairs in the 
blue lodge. He has passed through all chairs in the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows and is a past patron of the Order of the Eastern Star. 
Mr. Carruthers is accorded the esteem and respect of a large circle of 
acquaintances in the municipality, having manifested in both his public 
and private life those qualities which have won for him the regard and 
confidence of those with whom he has had either social or business re- 
lations. 



JOHN EDWARD BROWNLEE. 

Possessing those qualities through which success comes as a natural 
sequence, John E. Brownlee has rapidly advanced since his admission 
to the bar, and although yet a young man, his superior professional quali- 
fications have led to his selection for the important office of attorney gen- 
eral of the province of Alberta, in which connection he is now serving. 
He was born at Port Ryerse, Ontario, in 1884, and is a member of one of 
the old families of the Dominion. His paternal grandfather, Edward 
James Brownlee, was a native of the north of Ireland and in early man- 
hood he came with his wife to Canada. His son, William J. Brownlee, was 
born at Port Ryerse in 1862 and was there married in 1882, when twenty 
years of age, to Miss Catharine Shaw. Both Mr. and Mrs. Brownlee are 
living. 

The public schools of Lambton county, Ontario, afforded John E. 
Brownlee his early education and after completing a course in the Sarnia 
high school he attended the Model school of that city. He then spent 
three and a half years as a teacher at Bradshaw and in 1904 enrolled as 
a student at the University of Toronto, from which he was graduated in 
1908 with the B. A. degree. He was regarded as a student with great 
possibilities and during his course held many important offices in college 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 377 

life and society. After a year devoted to traveling throughout the "Prai- 
rie Provinces" he decided to take advantage of the great field of oppor- 
tunity presented to an ambitious, energetic young man in the Canadian 
Northwest and articled as a student in the firm of Lougheed & Bennett 
of Calgary, Alberta, both of whom were cabinet ministers in the Meighen 
government. Later he continued his studies with the firm of Muir, Jep- 
son & Adams and in September, 1912, was admitted to the bar. In 1914 
he joined the firm of Muir, Jepson & Adams as junior partner and his 
activities in this connection brought him into contact with the United 
Grain Growers, Ltd., of Winnipeg, and when it decided to establish a 
legal department of its own in 1917 Mr. Brownlee was selected as its 
general counsel and he then withdrew from the firm of Muir, Jepson & 
Adams in order that he might give his undivided attention to the interests 
of this gigantic organization, whose annual business transactions total 
several millions of dollars. For five years he continued to represent that 
body in a professional capacity and the legal acumen which he displayed 
in the management of its interests brought him prominently before the 
public, resulting in his selection on August 15, 1921, by the United Farm- 
ers of Alberta as their attorney-general, which office he is now filling. 

Mr. Brownlee was married at Toronto, on the 23d of December, 1912, 
to Miss Florence Agnes Edy, a graduate of McMaster University of that 
city and a daughter of James Edy, who there passed away January 31, 
1890. Mr. and Mrs. Brownlee have become the parents of two sons : 
John Edy, who was born December 14, 1915; and Alan Marshall, born 
September 10, 1917. Mr. Brownlee maintains a progressive attitude in 
politics, supporting all movements calculated to advance the interests of 
good government, and his religious faith is in accord with the doctrines 
of the Methodist church. He is a Master Mason and a member of the 
Edmonton Board of Trade, the Edmonton Golf & Country Club, the 
Kiwanis Club of this city, St. Andrew's Golf Club and the Browness 
Golf Club of Calgary. His viewpoint of life is broad and concerning the 
vital questions which affect the political, economic and sociological con- 
ditions of the country he is always well informed. His advancement along 
professional lines has been continuous, bringing him to a position of 
notable and enviable distinction, and no man has a higher conception of 
the dignity and responsibility of his calling. 



J. E. CARMICHAEL, M. D. 

Dr. J. E. Carmichael, a representative of the medical profession in 
Edmonton, comes to this city from Ontario, his birth having occurred in 
Grenville county, that province, on the 3d of November, 1884. There he 
remained to the age of fourteen years, when he went to Strathcona with 
his parents, arriving in 1899. He continued his education, begun in the 
schools of the east, by further study in the Strathcona high school, after 



378 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

which he took up the profession of teaching, which he successfully fol- 
lowed for four years. He regarded this, however, merely as an initial 
step to other professional labor, for it was his desire to enter upon the 
practice of medicine and it was by teaching that he earned the funds 
necessary to meet the expenses of a college course. When his own labor 
had made this possible he entered Queen's University of Ontario, matric- 
ulating in the fall of 1905, and there he won two degrees — one on the 
completion of a course in the science of sanitary engineering, and in 1911 
he received the M. D., C. M. degree. He then spent one year in post- 
graduate work in New York city, after which he returned and secured a 
license to practice in Alberta in 1912. For three months he was con- 
nected with Dr. R. G. Brett in the hospital at Banff and then opened an 
office in Edmonton, where he continued in active general practice until he 
went into the World war. 

In 1915 Dr. Carmichael enlisted for service in the World war, joining 
the Imperial army, and was commissioned lieutenant in the Royal Medical 
Coi^ps. Later he was advanced to the rank of captain in the Canadian 
Army Medical Corps and was on active duty until November, 1919, when 
he was demobilized and returned to South Edmonton. At once he re- 
sumed the private practice of medicine, in which he has met with grati- 
fying success. 

In 1914 Dr. Carmichael was married to Miss Margaret May Lyons 
of Lucknow, Ontario, and they have become parents of three children: 
Jessie L. ; and twin boys, John David and James Ernest. The religious 
faith of Dr. and Mrs. Carmichael is that of the Presbyterian church and 
they are interested in all that pertains to the general welfare and to public 
progress. Dr. Carmichael, however, has never figured prominently in 
connection with civic or political affairs, owing to the heavy demands 
made upon him for professional service. He now belongs to both the 
Alberta and Canadian Medical Associations. 



WILLIAM A. HAMILTON. 

William A. Hamilton of Lethbridge, engaged in the produce business 
and in farming, belongs to that class of citizens whose aid and influence are 
•ever on the side of advancement and improvement and who thus constitute 
a most valuable and substantial element in the community. Mr. Hamil- 
ton was born in Simcoe district, Ontario, in the year 1867, and traces his 
ancestry back to Ireland, where occurred the birth of his grandfather, 
William Hamilton, who at an early day established his home in Quebec, 
becoming a resident there about 1830. He followed the occupation of farm- 
ing and after some years spent in Quebec removed to Ontario, where his 
death occurred. He was the father of John Hamilton, who was born in 
Quebec, near the shrine of Ste. Anne. He started west when a youth of 
.sixteen years, with western Ontario as his destination and he and his 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 379 

brother James walked, carrying their tools, from Toronto through the 
woods to the claim which they took up. In the midst of the forest John 
Hamilton made a clearing and built a little cabin, becoming one of the 
earliest of the pioneers in that region. His brother remained only until 
his shack was built, after which he left John alone for the winter. The 
latter continued the work of clearing, developing and cultivating his land 
and became one of the substantial agriculturists of that region. He wedded 
Mary Tupper, who was born in Ontario, a daughter of Archelaus Tupper, 
who was a native of Maine but in early life removed to Quebec and after- 
ward to Ontario. Following their marriage Mr, and Mrs. Hamilton con- 
tinued to reside in that province to the time of their demise and reared 
a family of four children : William A. ; J. F.. who is a civil engineer and 
farmer, living at Lethbridge ; Mary, the wife of Albert Taylor of Fore- 
most, Alberta ; and Margaret, also a resident of Foremost. The parents 
were consistent and faithful members of the Methodist church and Mr. 
Hamilton was an Orangeman. In politics he was a Conservative and for 
many years served in the council in the township of Ospria and in the 
district council of Grey and Simcoe. He took a helpful interest in every- 
thing that pertained to the public welfare and his aid and influence were 
ever on the side of right, reform and progress. 

William A. Hamilton was accorded good educational privileges in prep- 
aration for life's practical and responsible duties. After mastering the 
work of the grades he continued his studies in the high school at Colling- 
wood, Ontario, and afterward entered the Ontario Normal College at Ham- 
ilton. Later he took up the profession of teaching at Bruce Mines, On- 
tario, there remaining for five years and in 1899 he became identified with 
the educational interests of Lethbridge, devoting sixteen years to teach- 
ing in this city. He came to Lethbridge as assistant principal, and later 
was made principal of the schools of this city and subsequently superin- 
tendent. His labors in the educational field were continued until 1915 and 
then he turned his attention to farming and continued in that work through 
the World war period. He still owns land in the vicinity of Lethbridge. 
He is now in business as a member of the Farm Products Company, Lim- 
ited, with which he has been identified since July, 1919. This company 
was formed by farmers of Alberta for the purpose of marketing their pro- 
duce and their orgnization has enjoyed success by reason of their enter- 
prising and progressive methods. 

In April, 1895, Mr. Hamilton was united in marriage to Miss Mary 
Metheral, who was born in Ontario, near Collingwood, a daughter of 
Thomas Metheral, who was a pioneer settler of Ontario. Mr. and Mrs, 
Hamilton have become parents of four children but they lost their first- 
born, John H., who was killed overseas, while serving in the Great war, 
on the 19th of November, 1917. He was a member of the Thirty-ninth 
Battery, Tenth Brigade, Canadian Field Artillery, and became a ser- 
geant. He met death in action at Passchendaele; Thomas F., the second 
son, educated in the Lethbridge public and high schools and in the Alberta 
University, was overseas as a member of the Seventy-eighth Battery and 



380 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

later was with the Thirty-first Battery, remaining in the service for three 
years and winning the rank of sergeant. Mary Enid, educated in the 
schools of Lethbridge and in the Calgary Normal, is now a teacher in the 
city schools ; Alan, who completed the high school course, is on his father's 
farm, 

Mr. and Mrs. Hamilton are members of the Wesleyan Methodist 
church, Mr. Hamilton having served as one of the trustees for about 
twenty years. He belongs to the Masonic fraternity and to the Canadian 
Order of Foresters and in politics he is a Progressive. He has held official 
position in connection with the farmers' movement and became district 
director of the Lethbridge Constituency of the United Farmers of Alberta. 
He has always taken an active interest in everything pertaining to progress 
along agricultural lines and he was one of the pioneer sheep men of this 
section of the Dominion. He assisted in forming a company that engaged 
in sheep raising and was manager thereof, the company running from 
three to five thousand head of sheep through a five-year period from 1905 
until 1910. Mr. Hamilton now devotes practically his entire time to the 
produce business, his farming interests and his duties in connection with 
the school board, of which he has been a member for two years. He is also 
the secretary of the United Farmers Association of the Lethbridge district, 
and he is constantly reaching out along the lines of progress and improve- 
ment. 



GEORGE B. DAVIES. 



George B. Davies, veteran of the World war, is managing director of 
the Lethbridge Iron Works at Lethbridge. He was born at Londonderry, 
Nova Scotia, on the 8th of August, 1895, a son of Edward and Elizabeth 
(Neil) Davies, both natives of Nova Scotia, born near Londonderry. The 
father is a substantial farmer. To Mr. and Mrs. Davies nine children 
were born, George B. being the youngest of the family. Mr. and Mrs. 
Davies are consistent communicants of the Presbyterian church. 

In the acquirement of his education George B. Davies attended the 
public schools of Londonderry, Nova Scotia, and subsequently entered 
high school in Quebec and in Boston, Massachusetts. After putting his 
textbooks aside Mr. Davies entered the employ of the Canada Iron Cor- 
poration at Three Rivers, Quebec, determining to learn the business from 
the ground up. For two and one-half years previous to the outbreak of 
the World war he was employed in the Alberta Foundry & Machine Com- 
pany, Limited, at Medicine Hat, Alberta. In December, 1914, Mr. Davies 
put all personal interests aside and enlisted in the 3d C. M. R. Regiment 
at Medicine Hat. He received his training there and left for England on 
the 15th of June, 1915, and the following year went to France. In the 
latter part of 1917 he entered the flying corps, receiving a captain's com- 
mission. He served as an instructor during the last twelve months of the 
war, being stationed at Reading and Yatesbury, England. During the 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 381 

first six months of 1917 he was a flyer at the front. In May, 1919, Mr. 
Davies returned to Medicine Hat and received his honorable discharge. 
Prior to the war he was a first lieutenant in the 21st Alberta Hussars. 
Immediately after receiving his discharge Mr. Davies accepted a position 
as assistant superintendent of the Alberta Foundry at Medicine Hat, oc- 
cupying that position until March, 1921, when he came to Lethbridge as 
managing director of the Lethbridge Iron Works, Limited. This plant 
was founded in 1902 and in 1922 was incorporated at one hundred thou- 
sand dollars. The officers of the works are: J. E. Davies of Medicine 
Hat; C. A. McGrath of Ottawa; C. B. McGrath of Ottawa; E. G. Stern- 
dale of Bennett and George B. Davies. As a business man Mr. Davies is 
held in high respect and regard in his community because of his trust- 
worthy methods and honest transactions. He has been quick to take ad- 
vantage of every opportunity that has come his way and the success he 
enjoys is the result of his own intelligently directed efforts. 

On the 25th of August, 1917, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. 
Davies and Miss May C. Martin, a native of England. To their union 
two children have been born : Donald and Marjorie. 

Mr. Davies is public-spirited, and he is interested in all movements 
or organizations which have for their purpose the protection or promo- 
tion of the interests of the business man and he is an active member of 
the Rotary Club. 



RICHARD DUTHIE. 



From 1917 until the time of his death in October, 1922, Richard 
Duthie lived retired in Pincher Creek. He was born in New Richmond, 
Quebec, on the 14th of November, 1848, a son of Samuel and Ann (Beers) 
Duthie, the former a native of the vicinity of New Richmond and the 
latter born in Manchester, England. The paternal grandfather, John 
Duthie, was born in Scotland, while the maternal grandfather, Jonathan 
Beers, was born in Ireland. The father was a lumberman for many 
years, working in the camps and loading ships. Later he farmed. He 
and his wife both died in Quebec. To Mr. and Mrs. Duthie nine children 
were born, Richard being the only one to come to Alberta- 
Richard Duthie received his education in the common schools of the 
Province of Quebec and at the age of seventeen years went into the Alle- 
ghany mountains in Pennsylvania and worked in lumber camps for five 
years. At the termination of that time he returned to his old home and 
farmed. 

In 1880, while engaged as canoeman for Princess Louise, whose hus- 
band, the Marquis of Lome, was at that time governor general of Canada, 
Mr. Duthie was persuaded by Colonel De Winton, a member of the Marquis 
of Lome's household, to go out west and engage in ranching. He went by 
rail to Fort Benton and from there by stage and horseback, eventually 



382 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

arriving in Calgary in 1881. To gain experience in ranching he hired out 
with the Cochrane Ranche Company. The following year the Alberta 
Ranche Company was formed, having as shareholders : Colonel Sir Francis 
De Winton, F. F. MacKenzie, H. J. Hanson, E. M. Wilmot, Hon. Henry 
Boyle and Richard Duthie. The company purchased the Brecon Ranche, 
near Calgary, at the present site of De Winton and started out, at first as 
sheep ranchers, bringing in their sheep from Montana. Later they leased 
some 22,000 acres south of Pincher Creek, where they engaged in cattle 
and horse raising. The site of the home ranch, known as the Alberta 
Ranche, was purchased from a man named LeGrandeur. With LeGran- 
deur's claim they also obtained about three hundred head of horses, which 
were considered some of the finest horses in the district at that time. The 
company operated both ranches for a time, but having the true cowman's 
distaste for sheep they soon sold the Brecon Ranche and confined their 
attentions to cattle only. 

They operated the Alberta Ranche for eighteen years and then sold 
the cattle, amounting at this time to some three thousand head, to E. H. 
Maunsell. Mr. Duthie was engaged as foreman of Maunsell's 1. V. Ranche 
until 1907. He retained some 2,000 acres of the old Alberta Ranche, where 
he was occupied in ranching until he retired in 1917, and moved into Pin- 
cher Creek. 

On the 18th of October, 1885, Mr. Duthie was married to Miss Theresa 
Clarke, a daughter of Alexander Clarke. To their union four children 
were born : Beatrice is the wife of Alexander McMurdo, who is connected 
with Fraser & McRoberts, merchants of Pincher Creek; Clarke is con- 
nected with the department of agriculture at Edmonton ; Ethel is the wife 
of Frank McLaughlin, a prominent farmer of Spring Ridge ; and Grant is 
living at home and is a teller in the Canadian Bank of Commerce. Mrs. 
Duthie is a consistent member of the Presbyterian Church. 

Mr. Duthie was independent in politics, giving his support to the man 
best fitted for the office without regard to party principles. He was also a 
Master Mason. His life was such as to merit the respect of his fellowmen 
and by his honesty, integrity and industry he contributed much toward the 
upbuilding of the community in which he was a representative citizen. 



JOSEPHUS F. PHILP. 



Josephus F. Philp, city ticket agent for the Canadian National Rail- 
road at Edmonton, is a native of Port Hope, Ontario, born in 1874, his 
parents being Joseph and Elizabeth Jane (Couch) Philp, both of whom 
were natives of Cornwall, England, whence they came to Canada about 
1854. The father followed the sea in England and after coming to the 
new world was a lake captain. He sailed the Great Lakes from Canadian 
ports, having his own vessel, and followed maritime pursuits throughout 
his life. Both he and his wife passed away in Ontario. They were mem- 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 383 

bers of the Wesleyan Methodist Church and Captain Philp was a Liberal 
in his political views. 

Josephus F. Philp was the eighth in order of birth in a family of nine 
children, four of whom are living. He was educated in the schools of Port 
Hope, Ontario, and initiated his business career by securing employment 
in the ofhce of the Grand Trunk Railway, where he served as chief clerk in 
the local accounting office at Montreal. In 1911 he came to the west, set- 
tling in Calgary, making the trip on leave of absence. In 1908 he became 
identified with the Grand Trunk Pacific line, then under construction. For 
a number of years he was traveling agent, taking charge of express and 
passenger business, and when the road reached Edmonton he opened the 
office at this place. In 1920 the road was merged into what is now the 
Canadian National and Mr. Philp remains as city ticket agent at Edmon- 
ton for the latter corporation. He is a courteous and obliging official and 
one who most capably represents the company in handling the business at 
this point. 

In 1899 Mr. Philp was married to Miss Florence Evelyn Brown, who 
was born in Midland, Ontario, where she pursued her education. They 
have two children : Donald, who was graduated from the University of 
Alberta, and is now attending the Ontario College of Art at Toronto ; and 
Clarence W., a student in the University of Alberta. 

Mr. and Mrs. Fhilp are members of the Methodist church and in 
social circles occupy an enviable position. Their sterling worth of char- 
acter is attested by all and the personal qualities of Mr. Philp also make 
him a popular member in the clubs to which he belongs. He is identified 
with the Edmonton Club, the Mayfair Golf Club, the Capital Curling Club 
and is also a member of the Rotary Club, of which he has served as secre- 
tary and treasurer for four years. He was a real pioneer on the Grand 
Trunk Pacific, continuing with that line as it was extended into the west- 
ern frontier. He rode in a car, cooked in a car and in fact, lived in a car, 
for one entire year. He witnessed the development of the line into a great 
railroad system and watched the growth and progress of the towns which 
sprang up along the route. When the road entered Edmonton the city took 
on new life and with the growth and progress here Mr. Philp has since 
been identified, the office being opened in 1912. He has been active in 
civic and community affairs, is a member of the Board of Trade and is a 
cooperant factor in all those forces which make for public progress and 
improvement. 



HON. JAMES DUNCAN HYNDMAN. 

Hon. James Duncan Hyndman is judge of the supreme court of Alberta 
and a resident of Edmonton. Mr. Justice Hyndman is a native of Prince 
Edward Island, his birth having occurred at Charlottetown, July 29, 1874, 
his parents being Charles Augustus and Catherine (Macdonald) Hynd- 



384 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

man. His education was acquired in Prince of Wales College, Charlotte- 
town, and in early manhood he turned his attention to the study of law, 
reading under the direction of A. A. McLean, K. C. and M. P. of Queens. 
He was called to the bar in 1899 and soon afterward made his way west- 
ward to Winnipeg and to Portage la Prairie. There he entered into part- 
nership with his uncle, now the Hon. Mr. Justice Macdonald, judge of the 
king's bench at Winnipeg. This association was maintained from 1899 
until 1903 and in the latter year Mr. Justice Hyndman came to Edmon- 
ton, where he has since made his home and through the intervening 
period has given his attention to professional interests and duties. The 
fairness of his rulings, based upon a comprehensive knowledge of the prin- 
ciples of jurisprudence and his wise interpretation of the law, has gained 
him distinction as a representative of the legal profession in Alberta and 
has eventually brought him to high judicial preferment. 

Five years after taking up his abode in Edmonton, Mr. Justice Hynd- 
man was the unsuccessful candidate of the Conservative party for the 
house of commons from the Edmonton district. This was in 1908 and 
in 1913 he was an unsuccessful candidate for the Alberta legislature for 
Sturgeon. In 1910 he was chosen alderman of Edmonton, filling the po- 
sition for two years, and in 1910 he was also made a member of the hos- 
pital board. The year 1914 brought him appointment to the position of 
justice of the Alberta supreme court and through the intervening period he 
has served on the bench. 

In 1902 Mr. Justice Hyndman married Miss Ethel Davies, a daughter 
of Sir Louis Davies, minister of marine and fisheries in the first Laurier 
government and now chief justice of the supreme court of Canada. The 
children of this marriage are four sons and one daughter. The family 
residence is on Seventh street, Edmonton. Mr. Justice Hyndman is a 
member of the Anglican Church and fraternally is connected with the 
Masons. He also belongs to the Edmonton and Ranchmen's Clubs and 
his personal qualites make for popularity wherever he is known. 



G. FRANK BUTLER. 



A leading and esteemed citizen of Strathmore is G. Frank Butler, 
mayor, and manager of the Strathmore Trading Company. He was born 
in King township, Ontario, on the 26th of July, 1880, a son of John and 
Sarah (Davis) Butler, the former a native of Yorkshire, England, and 
the latter of Ontario. The paternal grandfather, Joseph Butler, was born 
in Yorkshire and came to Canada at an early day. He located in Ontario 
and was one of the pioneer settlers of the district in which he made his 
home. His demise occurred in Toronto. Clayton Davis, the grandfather 
on the maternal side, was born in Scotland, and he was one of the pio- 
neers of Ontario, engaging in farming there for many years, and also 
worked at his trade as a blacksmith. He was hidden during the Rebellion. 




G. FRANK BUTLER 



(25) 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 387 

His death occurred on the old home place. John Butler passed his third 
birthday on the ocean, as he was at that time on his way to Canada with 
his parents. He received his education in the common schools of King 
township, Ontario, and subsequently engaged in farming. Later he con- 
ducted a mercantile business at Temperanceville, Ontario, where he 
remained for three years. For some time he was in the real estate busi- 
ness in Toronto and later entered the employ of Brown Brothers of To- 
ronto. His demise occurred in 1915, at the age of sixty-one years. His 
widow is making her home in Toronto. To their union four children 
were born: Charles A., who is a Ford dealer in Penticton, British Co- 
lumbia ; G. Frank, whose name introduces this review ; Lillian Louise 
Gertrude, who is the wife of M. M. Downey, a government inspector of 
Edmonton ; and T. E. C, who is a successful dentist in Toronto. 

In the acquirement of his education G. Frank Butler attended the 
common schools of his birthplace and the Palmerston School, the Huron 
Street school and the Harvard Street Collegiate School, all of Toronto. 
Upon the completion of his education he entered the printing business 
in that city for six months, at the termination of which time he became 
associated with the John McDonald Company, a wholesale dry goods 
concern, and remained with that company for five years. When nine- 
teen years of age he was sent by this company to Winnipeg, as its repre- 
sentative under William Ruff, and made an assorting trip between 
Winnipeg and Edmonton, carrying with him twenty-two trunks of mer- 
chandise. Later he returned to Toronto on a special trip to acquire dress 
goods. After resigning his position with the McDonald company, Mr. 
Butler became associated with the R. J. Whitlaw Company, traveling for 
them for about five years — throughout the west on the main railroad 
lines but on coming to Edmonton he drove from Edmonton to Fort 
Saskatchewan, there being no railroads here at that day. In 1908 he as- 
sisted in the formation of the Penngally-Askitt, Limited, a jewelry busi- 
ness located on Eighth avenue, Calgary. In February, 1910, he came 
to Strathmore and organized the Strathmore Trading Company, of which 
he is manager. The company was organized with a capital of six thou- 
sand dollars, which has increased to twenty thousand dollars. It carries 
a general and high grade line of merchandise and is one of the lead- 
ing business enterprises in Strathmore. Mr. Butler is not only the man- 
ager of the company but he owns the building and has erected his own 
lighting plant. In the development of his business he has met with the 
success won by well organized methods, intelligently and capably exe- 
cuted, and he fully merits the esteem and respect accorded him by his 
fellow townsmen, as his career has been pursued in an honorable and 
upright manner. Mr. Butler has always been active in public life and 
he was a member of the city council from 1913 to 1918. In 1920 he was 
elected mayor of Strathmore and he is satisfactorily discharging the many 
duties devolving upon him. 

On the 18th of December, 1907, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. 
Butler and Miss Eva May Metcalfe, who was born in Burford, Ontario. 



388 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

To their union four children have been born : Marguerite Gwendolyn ; 
Edna May Francis; John Frederick Metcalfe and Gloria Vivian Rhea. 

Fraternally Mr. Butler is identified with the Masons and since 1914 
he has been a member of Cyprus Lodge, No. 33, of Calgary, and is a 
Noble of the Mystic Shrine. He is past master of Strathmore Lodge, No. 
53, and past district deputy of the Grand Lodge of Alberta. He was one 
of the organizers of the Strathmore Chapter, No. 21, Royal Arch Masons 
and was first sitting principal. He is likewise past grand registrar of the 
Grand Chapter of Alberta. Mr. Butler is past Noble Grand and past 
district deputy grand master of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows 
and past district deputy grand master of the Rebekahs of Alberta at 
Strathmore. He is a member of the executive committee of the Board of 
Trade, and socially is identified with the Strathmore Golf Club and he was 
one of the promoters of the Curling Club, He is an outdoor man and is 
skilled in many sports, being particularly fond of baseball and golf. Mr. 
Butler is a dog fancier, specializing in Airedales and English brindle 
bulldogs. He is an expert rifleman and does all kinds of fancy shooting. 
He is a self-made man in the truest sense of the word. A man of well 
balanced capacities and powers, he occupies a central place on the stage 
of action, for out of the struggle with small opportunities he has come 
into a field of broad and active influence and usefulness. 



THOMAS S. GREGSON. 



Thomas S. Gregson is one of the leading and prosperous business men 
of Cardston, where he is conducting a garage and has other interests. He 
was born in Haslingden, Lancashire, England, on the 29th of July, 1870, 
a son of John and Rosanna (Sinnott) Gregson, natives of Lancashire, Eng- 
lad. The paternal grandfather, Robert Gregson, married Marguerite 
Stephenson. They were both born in Lancashire and she was related to 
George Stephenson, the inventor of the locomotive. Robert Gregson was 
the first of his family to join the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day 
Saints, becoming connected therewith in 1837 at Preston, England. He 
was a spinner by trade and was very successful. He lived in England 
throughout his life and was an elder in the church at the time of his 
demise. The maternal grandfather was John Sinnott, who was in military 
training the greater part of his life and his death was caused by a bullet 
wound received at the battle of Waterloo. John Gregson and his fam- 
ily emigrated to the United States in later life and in 1886 went to Utah. 
He was also a spinner, having learned the trade in his native country, but 
after locating in Utah he devoted the greater part of his time and atten- 
tion to farming and stock raising. For some time he farmed near Layton, 
Utah, and in 1889 he came to Cardston, homesteading one hundred and 
sixty acres of land four miles east. His sons also homesteaded some land 
and together the family acquired four hundred and eighty-eight acres. 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 389 

The land was barren prairie land and Mr. Gregson hauled logs from the 
mountains, a distance of twenty-six miles, for the first house he built on it. 
He did his trading and buying at Lethbridge and Macleod, following a trail 
and fording many streams. He broke a portion of his land after much 
hard labor and he became one of the prosperous farmers and stockmen 
in the district. His demise occurred in 1911, at the age of eighty-four 
years. Mrs. Gregson died in 1905, when sixty-three years of age. To 
them the following children were born: John, whose death occurred in 
infancy; Robert, who died in 1920, was a resident of Cardston for many 
years ; James, who is farming at Cardston ; Andrew, who is engaged in the 
conduct of a confectionery store at Conrad, Montana ; Elizabeth, who died 
in infancy; Mary, the wife of James Sherwood of California; Thomas S., 
whose name introduces this review ; John, who died in infancy ; Alexander, 
who is engaged in farming at Glenwood ; twins, who died in infancy ; Rach- 
ael, who is the wife of Thomas Archibald of Glenwood, a successful farmer ; 
and Lillie, the widow of Michael Archibald of Glenwood. Formerly the 
family were members of the Methodist church but for many years have 
been affiliated with the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Mr. 
Gregson was an elder in the church at the time of his demise. 

The public schools of his native country afforded Thomas S. Gregson 
his early education and after locating in Utah with his parents, he entered 
the Brigham Young University at Provo. In 1889 he came to Canada 
with his parents and homesteaded one hundred and sixty acres of land 
twelve miles southeast of Cardston. He built on the land a log house, with 
a shingle roof and then set about to bring the prairie to a highly cultivated 
state. He was very successful and from time to time increased his land 
holdings, buying railroad land near the original homestead. He engaged 
in general farming and stock raising and at one time ran five hundred 
head of cattle. Mr. Gregson was one of the organizers of the Etna Cream- 
ery Company of Etna and for three years was manager and director of that 
enterprise. In 1919 he retired from farm life and in association with J. F. 
Nielsen built the Grand Garage in Cardston, a store fifty by one hundred 
feet. It has well appointed salesrooms and a well equipped repair shop, 
and handles a complete line of Fords, Fordson tractors and Ford trucks. It 
carries a full line of automobile accessories and also represents the Inter- 
national Harvester Company in Cardston, the Minneapolis Steel & Machine 
Company and the Twin City Tractor Company. 

In 1897 Mr. Gregson was married to Miss Anna Benson, who was born 
in Union, Utah, and to their union eleven children have been born : Thomas 
T., Harold, Percy, Anna, Leland, Lloyd, June, Winston and Mae, all of 
whom are living at home ; and two others who died in infancy. 

In his political views Mr. Gregson is a Conservative and he maintains 
an active interest in party affairs. At the present time he is serving as 
justice of the peace of the Province of Alberta and for six years was a 
member of the school board at Etna. He is an active worker in the Church 
of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, being a member of the high council of 
the church, holding the position of high priest, and he presided at Kim- 



390 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

ball, Alberta, as bishop of Kimball for three years. From 1906 to 1908 he 
served on a mission in England and was stationed at Liverpool, and while 
there presided over the Liverpool conference. Mr. Gregson is prominently 
known in Cardston and Cardston district as one of the substantial citizens 
and prosperous business men who owes his advancement in life entirely 
to his own perseverance and well directed labor. His many friends hold 
him in high esteem and confidence, by reason of his trustworthy charac- 
teristics, his integrity in business and his loyalty in all matters of citizen- 
ship. 



WILLIAM THOMAS OGDEN. 

Among the enterprising and public-spirited men of Stirling is William 
Thomas Ogden, who was born in Enterprise, Utah, on the 16th of May, 
1870, a son of William G. and Sarah (Harris) Ogden, natives of Eng- 
land. They came to this country in 1853 and emigrated overland with 
oxen to Utah in 1853. The paternal grandfather, Edward Ogden, died on 
the trip and was buried in Wyoming. He was a native of Cheshire, Eng- 
land, and a son of Isaac Ogden, who was a son of Thomas Ogden. After 
settling in Utah William G. Ogden purchased some land from the Pacific 
Railroad and he was a pioneer in the community in which he took up his 
home. In later years he removed to Morgan county. Throughout his life 
he was a consistent member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day 
Saints and for many years he was an elder in the church. His political 
allegiance was given to the republican party and he was active in civic 
affairs. Mr. Ogden died in 1898, at the age of seventy-six years and his 
first wife died in 1877, in her twenty-eighth year. To their union six chil- 
dren were born : William Thomas, whose name introduces this review ; 
Sarah A., who is the wife of H. Jackson of Ogden; Joseph H., who resides 
in Slaterville, Utah; Nephi, who is engaged in the mercantile business in 
Ogden ; Daniel H., who was born in 1876 and died at Ogden in 1884 ; and 
Alice E., whose death occurred in infancy. Mr. Ogden was married the 
second time. Miss Jane McKibben, a native of Scotland, becoming his wife. 
They were parents of one child, who died in infancy. 

In the acquirement of his education William Thomas Ogden attended 
the common schools of Ogden and in due time was graduated from high 
school. After putting his textbooks aside he engaged in farming and 
bricklaying and subsequently came to Stirling, arriving here at midnight 
of June 8, 1899. He worked on an irrigation canal for some time after 
his arrival and subsequently purchased some land at three dollars per 
acre, bring it to a highly improved state. When Mr. Ogden came to this 
section of Alberta there were but six houses here and he used a box car to 
sleep in the first night. He became successful as a farmer and he now owns 
some two hundred and twenty acres. In 1919 he built a fine home, modern 
in every respect, at a cost of fifteen thousand dollars. Mr. Ogden has 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 391 

done much to make the surrounding country beautiful and he has set out 
more trees than any other resident in Stirhng. 

Mr. Ogden married Miss Elmyra L. Watson, a native of Dekalb 
county, Tennessee, and to them five children have been born : the eldest 
child, Stirling, was born in Stirling and is now engaged in mission work 
for the church in Tennessee; Alice A. and John W. are living at home; 
Katie May died at the age of three years, and Warren H. died at the age 
of three months. The mother died in September, 1908. On the 15th of 
July, 1909, Mr. Ogden married Nettie May Eaves, who was born in 
Peterson, Clay county, Iowa. She was the widow of Robert 0. Eaves and 
has three children by that marriage — Valentine, William and Merlin A., 
all residing at home. To her marriage with Mr. Ogden four children have 
been born: Thomas T., Gladys B., May U., and Roy A., likewise living at 
home. 

Mr. Ogden is very public-spirited and he takes an active interest in 
civic affairs. For six years he has been a member of the school board 
and has served as village overseer and justice of the peace for two terms 
and was constable for two terms. He has been collector of the village and 
was elected assessor and watermaster in 1921. He has been secretary- 
treasurer of the Literary and Debating Society for two years. He is like- 
wise president of the Stirling Brass Band. Since 1906 Mr. Ogden has been 
bishop councilor in the Taylor Stake and he has been an elder in the Church 
of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints since 1894. He was on a mission in 
Tennessee from 1894 to 1897. Mr. Ogden is held in high esteem in this 
community, toward the development of which he has substantially con- 
tributed through his able management of his own affairs no less than 
through his active cooperation in promoting various public movements 
which have for their object the betterment of local conditions. 



WILLIAM VICTOR NEWSON, B. A., M. Sc. 

William V. Newson is a man of scholarly attainments who looks at 
life from a broad viewpoint and he is therefore well qualified for the 
office of deputy provincial treasurer of Alberta, in which he has been 
retained for a period of twelve years. He was born in Charlottetown, in 
Prince Edward Island, October 17, 1877, and his parents were John and 
Elizabeth Ann (Hutcheson) Newson. The father was also a native of 
that island, where he spent his life. He occupied a prominent position 
in his locality, attaining distinction as an antiquarian, historian and man- 
ufacturer. He was born in Cornwall in 1840, and his death occurred in 
1916, when he was seventy-six years of age. The mother was born in 
Guysborough, Nova Scotia, in 1841, and is now residing in Charlotte- 
town. 

In the acquirement of an education William Victor Newson attended 
the West Kent school, the Prince of Wales College at Charlottetown, 



392 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

Prince Edward Island, the McGill Normal School and McGill University 
at Montreal, from which latter institution he was graduated in 1900, 
with the B. A. degree. In 1901 he completed a postgraduate course in 
the last named institution, which conferred upon him the degree of M. Sc, 
and on March 19 of that year he was awarded a fellowship in geology 
by the University of Chicago, while in 1908 he received from the Uni- 
versity of Alberta the degree of A. B. ad eundem. Liberally equipped 
by thorough collegiate training, he turned his attention to educational 
work and from 1901 until 1905 was principal of the West Kent school 
at Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island. He spent the scholastic year of 
1905-6 as science master at Alberta College, Edmonton, and then en- 
tered the government service as assistant to the provincial auditor at 
Edmonton, filling that position until 1911, when he received his present 
appointment as deputy provincial treasurer, while since 1912 he has 
acted as superintendent of insurance. His course has won high com- 
mendation, for he is systematic, efficient and conscientious in the dis- 
charge of his responsible duties and is doing effective service for the 
public good. 

Mr. Newson was married in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, 
on December 6, 1910, to Miss Mary Ethel Hughes, a daughter of Hon. 
George E. Hughes, and they have three sons and two daughters : William 
Kitchener, David Hughes, Frank Major, Helen Patricia and Ruth Gor- 
don. Mr. Newson is a Methodist in religious faith. His success as an 
educator is indicated in the fact that he was honored with the presi- 
dency of the Charlottetown Teachers' Association, serving in that capacity 
during 1903 and 1904. Fraternally he is identified with the Knights of 
Pythias and for recreation he turns to tennis. He regards a public office 
as a public trust and has never used his talents unworthily nor sup- 
ported a dishonorable cause. His entire career has been actuated by a 
spirit of progress that has been productive of substantial results and 
he is a man whom to know is to esteem and admire. 



WILLIAM JAMES LOGGIE. 

William James Loggie, a member of the Wetaskiwin bar, was born 
in New Brunswick in 1867, a son of Robert and Grace (Hierlihy) Loggie, 
who were also natives of New Brunswick, where the father died in 1917, 
but the mother still makes her home there. Robert Loggie engaged in 
the lumber business throughout his life and was a member of the Pres- 
byterian church and of the Masonic fraternity. 

William J. Loggie is the eldest of a family of ten children, eight of 
whom are living. He pursued his education in the grammar schools of 
Chatham, New Brunswick, and afterward attended Dalhousie University 
at Halifax, from which he was graduated in 1896, with the LL. B. degree. 
He entered upon the practice of his chosen profession in Chatham, New 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 393 

Brunswick, where he remained until 1904 and then opened an office in 
Wetaskiwin, Alberta, in which city he still resides. He is a King's Coun- 
sel and also a bencher and he practices in all of the courts. In politics 
he has maintained an independent course and in 1917 he served as mayor 
of Wetaskiwin, He attends the Presbyterian church. 



BERTRAM S. SMITH. 



Bertram S. Smith, one of Calgary's leading citizens, has been in the 
service of the Canadian Pacific Railway Company for sixteen years and 
through ability and devotion to duty has steadily advanced until he now 
fills a position of large responsibility as superintendent of the develop- 
ment branch of the department of natural resources. He was born in 
Leeds, England, February 7, 1875, and his parents, John and Ann (Nut- 
tall) Smith, were also natives of the mother country. The father was 
business representative in Lancashire for Stuart McDonald of Glasgow, 
Scotland, and his death occurred in 1910, when he was sixty-five years 
of age. He is survived by the mother, who is living in Rochdale, Eng- 
land. 

Bertram S. Smith was reared in Yorkshire and pursued his studies 
in the Woodhouse Grove school of that locality. He was afterward ar- 
ticled to the builder's trade and for seven years was with the contracting 
firm of W. A. Peters & Sons. He then took up surveying with the firm 
of Rualt & Young of London and for eight years was in its employ. In 
1908, when thirty-one years of age, he came to Canada and accepted a 
position in the land office of the Canadian Pacific Railway ('ompany at 
Winnipeg, Manitoba. In 1907 he was transferred to the irrigation de- 
partment at Calgary and in the same year was made chief draughtsman 
for the engineering branch. Later he became assistant engineer, in 
charge of architectural townsite and right of way, and in 1913 assumed 
the duties of assistant superintendent of the development branch of the 
department of natural resources. In the following j^ear he was promoted 
to the position of superintendent of that branch, in which connection it 
is his task to make provision for all permanent improvements on the 
company's developed lands. Their faith in his ability has been amply 
justified and he performs the work assigned him with efficiency and con- 
scientiousness. 

In September, 1919, Mr. Smith was united in marriage to Edith Isa- 
bella Harding Thompson and they have two sons : John Stanley and 
David Stewart. For a number of years Mr. Smith was connected with 
the Canadian Militia and from 1915 until the close of the World war he 
served as a lieutenant in the One Hundred and Third Regiment of Cal- 
gary Rifles. He was made honorary secretary of the Calgary branch of 
Patriotic Friends and is loyal, progressive and public-spirited in all mat- 
ters of citizenship. He is nonpartisan in his political views, reserving the 



394 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

right to vote according to the dictates of his judgment. As a member 
of the Calgary Board of Trade he is working for the industrial expan- 
sion of his city and through his connection with St. Andrew's Golf Club 
he obtains recreation and diversion. His labors have been of a construc- 
tive nature, directed into those channels through which flows the greatest 
and most permanent good to the greatest number, and he is recognized 
as a man of substantial worth, thoroughly trustworthy and dependable 
in every relation of life. 



BERNARD R. MOONEY, M. D. 

The practitioner of medicine must, according to public demand, be 
ever genial and sympathetic, as well as learned in the science which forms 
the basis of his professional service. Dr. Bernard R. Mooney fully meets 
the requirements of the profession and since establishing his office in 
Fort Saskatchewan success has attended his efforts. He was born in 
Windsor, Ontario, February 11, 1885, of the marriage of Edward D. and 
Margaret (Dixon) Mooney, both natives of that province. The father 
has passed away. The mother still makes her home in Windsor. They 
were the parents of six children, three of whom met death in a railroad 
accident in Ontario. Those who survive are: The subject of this review 
and two sisters who reside in Windsor. 

Bernard R. Mooney obtained his preliminary education in the public 
schools of his native city and afterward took up the study of medicine, 
entering the Western University of Ontario, from which he was gradu- 
ated in 1910. Believing that the west afforded a better field for his pro- 
fessional labors, he started for this province in the same year and first 
located in Calgary, remaining in that city for four years. In 1914 he 
removed to Fort Saskatchewan, in the Victoria district of Alberta, and 
continued to practice here until March, 1916, when he enlisted for service 
in the World war, joining the One Hundred and Fifty-first Battalion. 
He was sent overseas and was wounded on November 4, 1917, being sent 
to a hospital for treatment. He did not return to the front, but is still 
on the reserve list and subject to call should the country have need of 
his services. On returning to Canada he resumed his professional activi- 
ties at Fort Saskatchewan and a liberal practice has been accorded him 
in recognition of his skill in battling with disease. In 1922-23 the Doctor 
took postgraduate work in New York, Chicago, Detroit and Winnipeg. 
In June, 1923, he moved to Edmonton and opened offices in the Teglar 
building, specializing in X-ray diagnosis and treatment. 

Dr. Mooney married Miss Elizabeth Ouellette, also a native of the 
province of Ontario, and they have become the parents of nine children, 
eight of whom are living, namely: Margaret, Bernard, Edward John, 
Alma Loretta, Martha Marie, Wilfrid Laurier and Laura, twins, Eliza- 
beth and Francis. Dr. and Mrs. Mooney are communicants of the Cath- 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 395 

olic church and he is also a member of the Knights of Columbus. He 
is deeply interested in his profession and close study, careful analysis, 
natural talent and acquired ability have placed him with the leading 
medical practitioners of his district. 



GEORGE H. HUTTON. 



George H. Hutton, superintendent of agriculture and animal hus- 
bandry for the Canadian Pacific Railway, with offices at Calgary, is fully 
equal to the demands of this responsible position and the company was 
fortunate in securing the services of a man of his ability and experience. 
He was born in Granville county, Ontario, February 18, 1878, a son of 
George and Eliza (Hall) Hutton, who are also natives of that province. 
George Hutton has devoted many years to agricultural pursuits, taking 
over his father's farm, which he operated for twenty-seven years, and 
afterward came to this province. He located at Lacombe, Alberta, where 
he still resides, and the mother is also living. 

Reared in his native province, George H. Hutton there attended the 
public schools and a business college, afterward enrolling as a student 
at the Ontario Agricultural College from which he was graduated in 
1900. He then took charge of the operation of the family home farm while 
he also cultivated his own adjoining land, and later accepted the position 
of manager of the Dominion experimental station at Lacombe, Alberta, 
which had just been established, this being the smallest station in Can- 
ada at that time. Mr. Hutton supervised the erection of all of the build- 
ings and this is now the largest station in the Dominion. Starting with 
one hundred acres, it is operating five hundred acres at present and 
carries a thousand head of live stock. The credit for its development 
is due to Mr. Hutton, who was in control of the station for thirteen years, 
from 1906 to 1919. His success in that connection drew to him much 
favorable attention and the government offered him the position of di- 
rector of experimental farms for the Dominion, but he decided to enter 
the service of the Canadian Pacific Railway Company and has since been 
superintendent of agriculture and animal husbandry. Scientific training 
and ripe experience well qualified him for so important an office and he 
also has the executive force necessary to direct the labors of those under 
him. He has supervision of the farms at Chancellor, Tilley, Coaldale, 
Chin and Strathmore, Alberta, in addition to other farms that may be 
developed from time to time in various parts of the west. The main 
object in establishing the farms was to provide high quality products for 
the hotels conducted by the company and for its dining car service. The 
live stock operations of the department have included the sale of cattle 
to settlers in irrigated areas and the business in this connection has to- 
taled approximately one million dollars, the percentage of loss being very 
light, thus indicating the . stability of the live stock market. The com- 



396 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

pany maintains the largest herd of pure-bred Holsteins in Canada, with the 
object of building up the dairy industry in the west, and its surplus 
stock is available to settlers at reasonable prices. Large areas of land 
are seeded to alfalfa each year for the purpose of demonstrating the 
feasibility of growing this crop and economic benefits are resulting there- 
from. The strongest single phase of the operation of any of these farms 
is the definite information obtainal;le as to the cost of production of any 
product marketed therefrom, and the work which Mr. Hutton is direct- 
ing is of inestimable value in promoting the upbuilding and development 
of one of the richest agricultural sections in the world. In addition to 
the discharge of these duties he is also operating a farm of four hun- 
dred acres in the Lacombe district of Alberta, on which he grows seed 
grain, also raising pure-bred shorthorn cattle and Yorkshire hogs. 

In June, 1903, Mr. Hutton was united in marriage to Miss Annie 
M. Coon and they have four children : Herbert H., Wilfred, Walter Lloyd 
and Dorothy E., aged, respectively, fifteen, twelve, seven and four years. 
Mr. Hutton is a member of the Central Methodist Episcopal church and 
his deep interest in the welfare and progress of his city has led to his 
connection with the Calgary Board of Trade. He is a Scottish Rite Ma- 
son and also has membership in the Rotary Club. He is president of the 
Western Canada Live Stock Union, an organization composed of the 
representatives of practically all societies of this character in the four 
western provinces, and is serving the Alberta Cattle Breeders' Associa- 
tion in a similar capacity. He is a director of the Calgary Exhibition, 
of the Alberta Sheep and Swine Breeders' Association, and also of the 
Commercial Life Insurance Company of Edmonton, Alberta. He has de- 
voted his life to the science of agriculture, of which he has acquired a 
highly specialized knowledge, and his contribution to the world's work 
has been one of utmost value and importance. 



EDGAR WILLIAM ALLIN, M. D., C. M. 

Dr. Edgar William Allin, who enjoys an enviable reputation as one 
of the leading surgeons of Edmonton and western Canada, was born in 
Bowmanville, Ontario, on the 14th of September, 1875, a son of Samuel 
and Jane (Elford) Allin, representing an old family of Devonshire, Eng- 
land, which for many generations owned land south of Bideford. The 
father, whose birth occurred near Holsworthy, Devonshire, in 1832 and 
who devoted his attention to farming and stock breeding throughout his 
active career, passed away at Bowmanville, Ontario, at the advanced age 
of eighty-six years. The mother, who was born in the vicinity of Bow- 
manville, Ontario, in 1839, is still living and makes her home at that 
place. 

In the acquirement of an education Edgar W. Allin attended the Bow- 
manville high school, while his professional training was received in 




EDGAR W. ALLIN, M. D. 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 399 

Trinity Medical College of Toronto, which in 1902 conferred upon him 
the degrees of M. D., C. M. The following year he became a member of 
the Royal College of Surgeons (England), and Licentiate of the Royal 
College of Physicians (London). After taking his examination in Lon- 
don, he spent four years in hospital resident work, ending with a year 
— 1906-07 — at the Prince of Wales Hospital in London, and from 1908 
until 1910 he acted as surgeon for the Toronto Orthopedic Hospital. The 
year 1909 witnessed his arrival in Alberta. He has displayed marked 
skill as a surgeon and has become widely recognized as one of the fore- 
most specialists in this field not only in Edmonton but throughout west- 
ern Canada. In 1915 he became a fellow of the American College of 
Surgeons. His high standing in professional circles is indicated in the fact 
that he was honored with the vice presidency of the American College of 
Surgeons in 1916, served as president of the Edmonton Academy of Medi- 
cine in 1917 and is now vice president of the Alberta Medical Association. 
Extensive and important as have been his professional interests, he has 
found time for activity along other lines. He occupies the vice presidency 
of the Commercial Life Insurance Company of Edmonton, also deals in 
farm mortgages and is a stockholder of the Canadian Pacific Railroad. 

In Stroud, Gloucestershire, England, in 1907, Dr. Allin was united in 
marriage to Miss Rose Mary Kember, daughter of Charles Kember, Esq., 
of London, England, and Durban, South Africa, who was manager of the 
London & South African Bank at Durban and lost his life in the Zulu up- 
rising of 1879. Dr. and Mrs. Allin have five children, namely : Eardley, 
Leila, Marjorie, Rosalynd and Dorothy. Dr. Allin is a popular member 
of the Edmonton Golf & Country Club, the Mayfair Golf Club and the 
Granite Curling Club — associations which indicate the nature of his rec- 
reation and relaxation. 



MARION L. STODDARD. 

In the passing of Marion L. Stoddard, Cardston lost a pioneer citizen, 
one who contributed to a great degree in the development and improve- 
ment of this district. He was born in Centerville, Utah, on the 8th of 
September, 1852, a son of Judson Stoddard, who crossed the plains to 
Utah with the early pioneers of that state. The father was a member 
of Brigham Young's company. He was born in upper Canada in 1823 
and first located in Missouri, later removing to Nauvoo, Illinois. In 
1849 he moved to North Canyon, Utah, later to Centerville and finally 
to Farmington. He was the owner of one of the first sawmills in that 
territory. His demise occurred on the 7th of January, 1870. 

In the acquirement of his education Marion L. Stoddard attended 
the public schools of Utah until he reached the age of fifteen years. At 
that time he put his textbooks aside and engaged in freighting, driving 
a string of mules. He freighted from Omaha, Nebraska, to Utah, until 



400 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

Indians stole his mules. He then began to buy and sell cattle at Farm- 
ington, incidentally raising some live stock, and subsequently he moved 
into the state of Idaho, near St. Anthony, where he took up land and 
became one of the most extensive ranchers of that day, devoting his 
entire time and attention to his stock interests. In 1892 he came to Cards- 
ton, making the trip overland and bringing with him a number of horses, 
and he homesteaded one hundred and sixty acres of raw prairie land, ten 
miles south of Cardston. There were no fences on the land at that time, 
and his first house was built of logs which he hauled from the mountains, 
and Lethbridge, sixty-six miles distant, was his nearest base of supplies. 
There were no roads, only trails, and many streams had to be forded in 
making the journey. After proving up on the homestead Mr. Stoddard 
purchased more land and bought and sold live stock and also raised 
horses and cattle. He owned more than one thousand acres of well im- 
proved land in this district at one time. Mr. Stoddard kept his family 
in Cardston in order to give his children better educational advantages, 
and subsequently he became associated with Mark Spencer, in the estab- 
lishment of the Spencer & Stoddard Mercantile Company in Cardston. 
They also erected the Spencer Hotel, which they later leased, and after 
several years of successful partnership, Mr. Stoddard withdrew and re- 
tired from active life. His demise occurred on the 4th of September, 
1916. 

On September 26, 1872, Mr. Stoddard married Harriett Stoddard, who 
was born in California December 8, 1856, a daughter of Arvin M. Stod- 
dard, who was born in Toronto, Canada, on the 1st of September, 1826. 
In 1847 he went with pioneers to Salt Lake valley where he took up his 
residence in Salt Lake, but later went back to California, whence he had 
gone during the gold excitement. In 1872 he removed to Milford, locating 
a homestead where the town of Milford now stands. He was one of the 
pioneer settlers of Utah and farmed and also conducted a hotel and was 
one of the most deservedly successful men in his community. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Marion L. Stoddard the following children were born ; Effie, who 
is the wife of James Hansen, a prominent farmer of Cardston ; Marion, 
whose demise occurred in infancy; Lola, who is the wife of Brigham 
Lamb, a successful merchant of Cardston ; Hattie, deceased, who was 
the wife of S. M. Woolf ; A. J., further mention of whom will be made 
below; Rhoda, deceased, who was the wife of F. W. Woolf; Leo, deceased; 
George 0., engaged in the brokerage business in Los Angeles, California; 
Alta, the wife of V. V, Spencer, a merchant of Cardston; Wynona, the 
wife of Frank McMillen, a salesman with headquarters in Edmonton ; 
Mabel, who is teaching school in Cardston ; and Douglas, who is a farmer. 
Mrs. Stoddard continues to make her home in Cardston. The family are 
all members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Mr. 
Stoddard was a stanch supporter of the Liberal party throughout his 
life, and he was actively and helpfully interested in all matters relative 
to the progress and improvement of this section, giving his support to 
many measures for the public good. As a business man he was thor- 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 401 

oughly reliable and his honesty in all the relations of life was one of 
the important factors in his substantial success. 

Arvin J, Stoddard was born in Georgetown, Idaho, in 1882. He re- 
ceived his education in the public schools of Cardston, where he came 
with his parents in childhood, and after putting his textbooks aside he 
bought and sold cattle on his own account. He now owns and operates 
seven hundred and twenty acres of land, following general farming and 
he also owns the Spencer Hotel in Cardston. Like his father, he has 
always been straightforward and reliable in his business dealings and 
he commands the full confidence of those with whom he is associated. 

Arvin J. Stoddard married Miss Eva Layton, a daughter of James 
A. Layton, a prominent farmer of Cardston. To their union two children 
have been born : Marion H. and Leon C, both of whom are living at 
home. They are all members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day 
Saints and Mr. Stoddard devotes a great deal of his spare time to the 
church. Since 1919 he has conducted the Odeon Dance Hall in Cardston 
and is making a success of the venture. He is public-spirited and no 
movement for the development and improvement of the community seeks 
his aid in vain. 



NORMAN K. LUXTON. 



Norman K. Luxton's life has been one of varied activity and interest- 
ing experiences. As a resident of Banff he has contributed in a great de- 
gree to the development and improvement of various enterprises and no his- 
tory of the province of Alberta would be complete without extended men- 
tion of him. He is a native son of Canada, his birth occurring in Winni- 
peg, on the 2d of November, 1876. He is a son of William Fisher and 
Sarah (Edwards) Luxton, the former a native of Devonshire, England, 
and the latter of Ontario. The father was about four or five years of age 
when his parents brought him to this country, and upon reaching man's 
estate he engaged in the newspaper business, founding the Manitoba Free 
Press at Winnipeg, which he conducted for thirty years and then retired. 
He lived in Winnipeg until his death on November 15, 1907. He was a 
man of genial and pleasing personality and won the confidence and esteem 
of all with whom he came into contact, and his death was lamented by 
many friends as well as his immediate family. Mrs. Luxton survives her 
husband and is residing in St. Paul. 

In the pursuit of his education Norman K. Luxton attended the public 
schools of Winnipeg and subsequently entered the Collegiate Institute. 
Upon the completion of his literary education he became an apprentice to 
the printing trade, starting in the printing office of his father's news- 
paper. He worked his way up from the very bottom and in 1897 went 
to Calgary and accepted a position as business manager for the Calgary 
Herald, where he served one year and then started for the Klondike. 
(26) 



402 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

He stopped at Peace river and in partnership with John J. Young pub- 
lished the Brand Book, one of the largest and most important publications 
of its kind in Canada, being of especial interest to the ranchers. Sub- 
sequently Mr. Luxton went to Vancouver and there published the Koote- 
nay and Klondike Guide, which is being published at the present time. 
Mr. Luxton then headed an organization of business men and published 
the Town Topics of Vancouver and the Black and White at Victoria. No 
subscriptions were solicited for these publications but from nine to ten 
thousand copies of them were sold each week on the streets. Town Topics 
sold for ten cents a copy. 

Mr. Luxton inherited more or less of a roving disposition and he was 
fond of adventure. In 1899, with Captain John Voss as his only com- 
panion, Mr. Luxton made a trip across the Pacific ocean in the "Tilikum," 
which was fashioned from a huge red cedar log and had a capacity of 
two and one-half tons. Mr. Luxton paid eight dollars for the craft and 
it cost him eleven hundred and fifty dollars to outfit it for its sea-going 
trip. The "Tilikum" was a trim little craft with a twenty-eight foot keel, 
boasted a six-foot cabin and carried three sails. Mr. Luxton and the 
Captain landed at forty-two islands during their trip and covered four- 
teen thousand miles, though they met with much bad weather and the 
boat was twice wrecked. Mr. Luxton left the boat at Australia and Cap- 
tain Voss went on to England. Mr. Luxton worked his way back to this 
country on a Canadian Pacific Railroad Company's boat and as soon as 
he landed in Canada came immediately to Banff to regain his health, and 
soon afterward he bought the Crag & Canyon from Dr. White and has 
since published it successfully and has a most modern plant. Aside from 
his newspaper interests Mr. Luxton built and owns the Luxton business 
block and is part owner of the Hotel Edward, a well known hostelry here. 

In November of the year 1904 Mr. Luxton was married to Miss Georgia 
E. McDougall, a daughter of David and Annie (McKenzie) McDougall, 
the latter a native of Ontario. In 1862 Mr. McDougall came to Alberta 
and has the distinction of being the oldest white man in this province, 
his residence now being in Calgary. During his active life he was a 
rancher and trader and he owns a ranch fifteen or sixteen miles in radius. 
Mr. and Mrs. Luxton have one child : Eleanor Georgia, whose birth oc- 
curred in July, 1908, and who is a student in the local high school. 

Since attaining his majority Mr. Luxton has given his political allegi- 
ance to the Liberal party, maintaining an active interest in party affairs, 
and was elected in 1923, for three years, to Banff town council. His re- 
ligious faith is that of the Baptist church. Mr. Luxton is essentially 
public-spirited and he has been a dominant factor in the furtherance of 
many movements for the development and improvement of Banff and the 
province. For seventeen years he fought for a town council here and 
eventually succeeded, through Senator Lougheed, who was at that time 
minister of the interior, and could see Mr. Luxton's point of view. He 
was an active factor in the organization of the Citizens' Council and to- 
gether with B. W. Collison, extended mention of whom is made on an- 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 403 

other page of this work, he organized the famous Banff Winter Carnival 
that has brought visitors here from every section of the v^orld. Mr. 
Luxton is a member of the Banff Golf Club and the Curling Club and also 
of the Banff Gun Club, which latter body he organized. He is a self-made 
man in the truest sense of the word and as such he is accorded the con- 
fidence and esteem of all who know him. He possesses a most genial and 
pleasing personality and his friends throughout the Dominion are legion. 



EVERETT THOMAS LOVE. 

Everett Thomas Love of Edmonton has long been prominently identi- 
fied with the dairy industry and perhaps there is no one in this province 
better able to speak with authority upon questions relating thereto. His 
advancement has been continuous by reason of his broad study and wide 
experience and he has been a most important factor in the development 
of the dairy interests in this section of Canada. Mr. Love is a native of 
the United States, his birth having occurred in St. Clairsville, Belmont 
county, Ohio, September 25, 1886, his parents being Thomas Rusk and 
Euphemia Elinda (Morgan) Love. He is descended from Irish ancestry, 
his great-grandfather and grandmother having emigrated from Ireland 
to the United States about 1790, at which time settlement was made in 
Pennsylvania, while later a removal took the family to Ohio. This Mr. 
Love was a merchant trader, plying boats on the Ohio and Mississippi 
rivers. He contracted yellow fever on one of these trips and died in New 
Orleans before the birth of his son, who was the grandfather of Everett 
T. Love. The grandfather was truly a self-made man, his progress and 
advancement being due entirely to his own capability and efforts. Event- 
ually he became a minister of the United Presbyterian church and won 
the degrees of D. D. and LL. D. He was also a prominent farmer, acquir- 
ing large landed interests, in the development and cultivation of which he 
displayed marked business ability. The grandfather of Everett T, Love 
on the maternal side was also a pioneer settler of Ohio and became a pros- 
perous agriculturist but in later years turned his attention to trading in 
wool and live stock, in which connection he developed a business of sub- 
stantial and gratifying proportions. The parents of Everett T. Love 
were hard working farming people, leading lives of unremitting industry 
and about two years ago they removed from Ohio to Alberta. There were 
but two children in their family, the brother of E. T. Love being also a 
resident of Edmonton. 

In the acquirement of his education Everett T. Love attended the high 
school of St. Clairsville, Ohio, where he completed his studies as a mem- 
ber of the class of 1905. He was graduated from the State College at 
Pullman, Washington, in 1912, with the degree of Bachelor of Science 
in agriculture. He may truly be called a self-made man, having justly 
won this proud title. He obtained his education through his determina- 



404 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

tion, whereby he formulated and executed the plans that enabled him to 
pursue his college course. While a college student he managed the Y. M. 
C. A. dormitory for free rent and he also worked on Saturdays during 
the school year in a shoe store, while in the summer months he was em- 
ployed in connection with the different departments of the Experimental 
Station Farm. During his college career he was honored by his fellow 
students in several ways, such as being made business manager of the 
Monthly Agricultural Magazine of the college during his sophomore year 
and manager of the Class Annual during his junior year. In this way 
he received his business training, together with his class work and hour 
work for pay, when he had time, in the college creamery. The experi- 
ence of marketing the butter from this creamery in Spokane at various 
periods during his junior and senior years was of value to him in a 
business way and from each activity in his life he learned the lessons 
therein to be gained. His educational training, however, was not con- 
tinuous, for in early manhood, before entering upon his college work, 
he was principal of the school at Fairpoint, Belmont county, Ohio, in 
1905-06, and in the latter year became surveyor on the Spokane, Port- 
land & Seattle Railroad, a position which he occupied for fifteen months. 
While still engaged in surveying and before deciding to enter the State 
College of Washington, he had an offer from the Northern Pacific Rail- 
road to go to China for three years in survey work for the railroad com- 
pany but after due deliberation finally refused, in order to promote his 
education. It was then that he entered the State College of Washing- 
ton and following his graduation therefrom he obtained a position as prin- 
cipal of a high school in western Washington and director of the West 
Side Experiment Station. He resigned, however, without entering upon 
the active duties of the position, in order to become dairy inspector in the 
city of Edmonton. After serving in that capacity for three months he 
resigned to become manager of the Woodland Dairy, Limited, of Edmon- 
ton, which position he has held continuously to the present time. In this 
connection he controls a business of extensive proportions and the re- 
sponsibilities and duties that devolve upon him are extensive and oner- 
ous. He is thoroughly adequate to the demands made upon his energy 
and he displays marked administrative direction and executive ability in 
controlling the interests of the company. He is today a director and 
the secretary and treasurer of the Woodland Dairy, Limited, and presi- 
dent of the Woodland Dairy of Innisfail, Limited, at Innisfail, Alberta. 
His position as a representative of the dairy interests of western Canada 
is a prominent one. He was appointed secretary-treasurer of the Alberta 
Dairymen's Association in 1917 and is still active in that capacity. He 
also holds the same position in the manufacturer's section of the associa- 
tion. He was a member of the board of the National Dairy Council of 
Canada in 1918-19 and he has also held and still holds several positions 
as director in various western Canada dairy organizations. He is now 
a member of the advisory committee of the National Dairy Council for 
1922-3 and he was recently elected to the position of chairman of t^*^ 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 405 

agricultural section of the Board of Trade of the city of Edmonton for 
one year. 

At Spokane, Washington, on the 18th of March, 1912, Mr. Love was 
married to Miss Anna Elizabeth Schneider, the only daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. W. E. Schneider of Plaza, Washington. They were pioneer settlers 
of the Great Palouse country of Washington, where Mr. Schneider home- 
steaded and where he was extensively engaged in farming for many 
years, while later he became a prominent real estate man of Edmon- 
ton and is now living retired in Los Angeles, California, being ranked 
with the men of affluence in that city. Mr. and Mrs. Love have become 
the parents of four children: William Thomas, Edwin Phillip and twin 
sons, Harold Houston and Norman Howard, all living. The religious 
faith of the family is that of the Presbyterian church, their membership 
being in Westminster church in Edmonton. The military chapter in the 
life record of Mr. Love covers three years of training in the military 
department of the State College of Washington. In politics he maintains 
an independent course, supporting men and measures calculated to pro- 
mote the welfare and progress of the community. He is a member of the 
Board of Trade and of the Kiwanis Club. He belongs to the Masonic 
fraternity, to the Phi Delta Theta and to the Alpha Zeta, two Greek letter 
fraternities of the United States, the former social in its purposes, while 
the latter is an honorary agricultural fraternity. Mr, Love is certainly 
deserving of much credit for what he has accomplished. His determina- 
tion to secure an education early indicated the elemental strength of his 
character, which has led him steadily forward until he is today an out- 
standing figure in connection w'ith the dairy interests of Alberta, thor- 
oughly meriting the success that has crowned his efforts, while his envi- 
able business position may well serve as an example to others, showing 
what can be accomplished through individual effort, intelligently directed. 



WILLIAM CRAWFORD. 



William Crawford, who was long identified with the railroad service 
and later became a speculator in real estate, in which field he most care- 
fully and sagaciously directed his interests, so that success in substantial 
measure came to him, is now living retired in the enjoyment of the fruits 
of his former toil and is accounted one of the highly esteemed residents 
of Medicine Hat. He comes to this section of the country from Ontario, 
where his birth occurred on the 7th of April, 1864, his parents being 
John and Mary (Kerr) Crawford, both of whom were natives of Scot- 
land. Leaving the land of hills and heather, they came to the new world 
in early life and were married in Ontario, where the father followed the 
occupation of farming and thus provided for his family, which numbered 
twelve children, six of whom are living, William being the seventh in 
order of birth. The parents held membership in the Presbyterian church 



406 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

and John Crawford always gave his political allegiance to the Liberal 
party. 

The public schools of his native province accorded William Crawford 
his early educational opportunities. He passed through consecutive grades 
and eventually became a high school pupil at Park Hill, Ontario. His 
educational training thus constituted a sure foundation upon which to 
build success and he started out in the business world in a clerical posi- 
tion in a bank. The year 1884 witnessed his arrival in Medicine Hat and 
he obtained employment with the Canadian Pacific Railroad as a brake- 
man. After working in that capacity for a time he was advanced to the 
position of conductor and continued with the railroad company for a 
quarter of a century — a fact plainly indicative of his faithfulness and 
capability. Just when the boom at Medicine Hat was at its height, how- 
ever, he left the road and began speculating in property. His sound judg- 
ment enabled him to make judicious investments and he disposed of the 
major part of his property before the boom died out. He had thus real- 
ized a handsome fortune and his success was sufficient to enable him now 
to live retired, save for the management which he gives to his invest- 
ments. He is a stockholder and director of the J. H. Tabor Candy Com- 
pany, has been president of the Medicine Hat News for several years 
and is a director of the Medicine Hat Steam Laundry Company. 

In 1900 Mr. Crawford was united in marriage to Miss Eva Edwards, 
who was born in Ontario, a daughter of Samuel Edwards, one of the 
pioneer farmers of that province. Mr. and Mrs. Crawford have four 
children : George Maxwell, who is a student in the Alberta University at 
Edmonton ; Hugh Wilfrid, also a university student ; Dorothy Mary, a 
high school pupil ; and Edith Jean, who is also in school. That Mr. Craw- 
ford's life has been guided by high and honorable principles is indicated 
in the fact that he has long been a consistent member of the Presbyterian 
church, of which his wife is an equally faithful representative and both 
take active and helpful interest in all branches of the church work, Mr. 
Crawford serving at the present time on the board of managers. Fra- 
ternally he is a Scottish Rite Mason and member of the Mystic Shrine 
and is a past master of the lodge. He also belongs to the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows and is a past noble grand. Since age conferred 
upon him the right of franchise he has always voted with the Liberal 
party but has never sought nor desired office, preferring to concentrate 
his efforts and attention upon his business and personal affairs. He 
had nothing but the clothes which he wore when he came to Medicine 
Hat. He was one of a large family and his parents were not in affluent 
circumstances, so it was necessary that the sons should early begin to 
provide for their own support. Like his brothers, he started out when a 
youth in his teens and from the beginning his course was characterized 
by indefatigable industry and perseverance. Steadily he has worked his 
way upward, improving every opportunity that has come to him, and 
with the passing years he has accumulated a most substantial fortune, 
so that he is now able to enjoy all of the comforts and many of the 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 407 

luxuries of life. He has a nice home at No. 9 First street in Medicine 
Hat and is able to surround his family with much that goes to make life 
worth living. His example should serve to inspire and encourage others, 
showing what may be accomplished through individual effort, persist- 
ency of purpose and straightforward dealing. 



DAVID L. DICK, M. D. 



Dr. David L. Dick, superintendent of the Provincial Mental Institute 
at Oliver, near Edmonton, is one of the foremost members of his profes- 
sion in the district and province. He was born at Ridgetown, Ontario, 
in 1884, a son of David and Ellen (Clark) Dick, likewise natives of On- 
tario. On the paternal side Dr. Dick is of Scotch descent, the grand- 
father having come to Canada from Scotland at an early day and home- 
steaded some land in Ontario. The father is still living on this old home- 
stead near Ridgetown. He has followed farming the greater part of his 
life and has won substantial success. Mrs. Dick passed away in 1908. 
To their union eight children were born. Dr. Dick being the fifth in order 
of birth. Mr. Dick has always given his allegiance to the Liberal party 
and his religious faith is manifest in his membership in the Presbyterian 
church. He is an honored and respected citizen of the community in 
which he has resided so many years. 

In the acquirement of his early education David L. Dick attended the 
public schools in the vicinity of the home farm and was graduated from 
the Ridgetown Collegiate Institute in 1904. He then attended Normal 
School at Chatham and for the following three years taught school. In 
early life his greatest ambition was to become a physician and subse- 
quently he enrolled in the medical department of the University of To- 
ronto, from which institution he was graduated in 1911. The next two 
years he spent in Grace Hospital, Detroit, Michigan, taking postgraduate 
work and then engaged in general practice at Edmonton. He enlisted 
for service in the World war and in August, 1915, he went overseas as a 
member of the Imperial Medical Corps, holding the rank of lieutenant, 
being one of the first one hundred to go. Dr. Dick was in the different 
hospitals in Europe and was placed on the front line about six weeks after 
his arrival in France. While in the trenches he was attached to the One 
Hundred and Forty-second Field Ambulance Corps, Fifteenth Division. In 
February, 1916, he contracted trench fever and was confined to a hospital 
for six weeks. He was then invalided to England, where he remained 
until he was transferred to the Fourth and Fifth Black Watch at Rippon, 
and remained there until the expiration of his term of enlistment, when 
he returned to Canada. That was in 1917. He was then offered the 
position of resident physician of the Strathcona Military Hospital at 
Strathcona with the rank of captain, and so served for nine months. He 
resigned to take the superintendency of the Soldiers Mental Hospital 



408 ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 

located near Red Deer, which was opened in 1918. In 1923 the Soldiers 
Mental Hospital at Red Deer became the Provincial Training School for 
Mental Deficients and a new Provincial Mental Institute was opened at 
Oliver, nine miles from Edmonton, where Dr. Dick is now superintendent. 
Dr. Dick stands high in the medical fraternity of the district and province 
and no man could discharge the duties of his present position with more 
efficiency than he. 

In June, 1918, was celebrated the marriage of Dr. Dick and Miss 
Margaret Kathleen Hurst, who was born in Woodstock, Ontario, but lived 
in Edmonton for eighteen years, a daughter of W. S. Hurst, one of the 
oldest commercial traveling men in the west. 

Dr. and Mrs. Dick are consistent members of the Presbyterian church 
and are zealous workers in its behalf. The Doctor is identified with the 
Masons and is a Knights Templar and a member of the Mystic Shrine. 
He is essentially public-spirited and his aid can always be counted upon 
in the furtherance of any movement for the development and improve- 
ment of the community. The greater part of his time and attention, 
however, is devoted to his duties as head of the hospital. 



FRANK BEATTIE. 



Frank Beattie, proprietor of Frank Beattie & Son, merchants of Banff, 
was born in Grey county, Ontario, on the 11th of May, 1855, a son of 
Francis and Mary (McCullum) Beattie, natives of Scotland, who came to 
Canada and located in Toronto about 1825. They came to this country 
with their respective parents and their marriage was celebrated in To- 
ronto. By trade the father was a stonecutter and bricklayer, but after 
coming to this country he engaged in farming, and continued that occu- 
pation for the remainder of his life, being one of the most successful agri- 
culturists in the province, and enjoying the confidence and esteem of all 
who knew him. His death occurred at the age of sixty-five years. Mrs. 
Beattie died in 1886. 

In the acquirement of his education Frank Beattie attended the pub- 
lic schools of Ontario, remaining with his parents on the home farm for 
some time and during the latter years of his life there, he and a brother 
ran the farm, that association being maintained until 1881, when Frank 
Beattie came west. He spent one year in Montana and in 1882 joined the 
Winnipeg police force, where he served for one year, then for two years 
he was cook for a construction gang working on the Canadian Pacific 
Railroad, and in 1884 he went into the hotel business in Golden and in 
Beaver, British Columbia. The following year he operated a hotel on 
the summit of Selkirk Range. In 1887 he came to Banff and bought out 
the Hot Springs Hotel. After conducting it for ten years he then rented 
it out and went to Kaslo, West Kootenay, British Columbia, establishing 
a hotel there, which subsequently was burned to the ground, and as Mr. 




MR. AND MRS. FRANK BEATTIE 



ALBERTA, PAST AND PRESENT 411 

Beattie had no insurance on it the venture proved a very expensive one. 
He then returned to Banff and opened the Alberta Hotel, which had not 
been used for some four or five years, running this hotel for two years, 
during which time his Hot Springs Hotel burned down. Subsequently he 
bought out the Old Park Hotel, but after a short time also rented it out. 
In 1915 it burned to the ground and Mr. Beattie decided to withdraw 
from the hotel business. He erected a new building on the old location, 
in which he now has a pool hall and bowling alley, and he also is in the 
confectionery business. 

In January, 1888, Mr. Beattie was married to Miss Katherine Cam- 
eron and to their union six children have been born : Three of the boys 
volunteered for service at the ou