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Full text of "Album of Abyssinian birds and mammals"



ALBUM OF 

ABYSSINIAN BIRDS AND MAMMALS 

FROM PAINTINGS BY *' 

LOUIS AGASSIZ FUERTES 
SPECIAL PUBLICATION OF FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY 

CHICAGO, U. S. A. 

Through the generosity of Mr. C. Suydam Cutting, Field Museum is privi- 
leged to present in the accompanying portfolio a selected series of reproduc- 
tions of the last work of the late Louis Agassiz Fuertes. The original paintings, 
made on the Field Museum -C/iicagro Daily News Abyssinian Expedition of 
1926-27, were purchased by Mr. Cutting, after the artist's untimely death, and 
presented to the Museum. The great popularity and the prominence of Mr. 
Fuertes as the leading American painter of birds, together with the opinion 
freely expressed that these final studies represented the height of his power, 
brought a demand for their reproduction in some form that would make them 
available to a wide circle. When this became known to Mr. Cutting he promptly 
and most generously guaranteed the cost, with the result here produced. 

The Field Mu&eum- Chicago Daily News Abyssinian Expedition was doubly 
fortunate in having Mr. Fuertes as one of its members. His talent and skill as 
an artist and ornithologist were scarcely less important than his charm of 
personality and his unfailing loyalty. This expedition traversed a large part of 
Abyssinia (Ethiopia), making collections which cover a wide variety of condi- 
tions. The opportunity it gave Fuertes for life studies of African birds was 
varied and unusual. Theretofore engaged solely in painting American birds, he 
found a tremendous enthusiasm in a new field and plunged into it with joyous 
abandon and tireless energy. The conditions under which he worked were ideal 
for him, although to a less versatile painter they might have been distressing 
instead of stimulating. A large expedition constantly on the march offers extraor- 
dinary opportunities for observing birds under various environments, but it also 
presents many practical difficulties for a painter. 

As all recognized who knewhim, Louis Fuertes was a man of many talents. 
He sometimes spoke of himself as an ornithologist first and a painter afterward 
and certain it is that the two were most effectively combined in him. When 
hunting and observing birds, no trail was too rough for him, and at the skinning 
table no hours too long. With gun in hand he was a hunter and collector, having 
no qualms at the shedding of blood; but with a freshly killed bird before him, he 
was the impressionable artist and would sit stroking its feathers in a detached 
ecstasy, wholly oblivious of companions or surroundings. Pure beauty in all 
things fascinated him, and the exquisite combinations of color and texture shown 



751536 



by many small birds were his constant joy. It is significant, however, that his 
favorites among all birds were the falcons — the swiftest, boldest, and most dashing 
of their kind. 

The affiliations which Fuertes made with Field Museum and other institu- 
tions were mutually advantageous and usually so arranged that he retained 
originals of sketches and paintings for himself, while specimens collected were 
shared; but so conscientious was he that what some might have considered 
his own interest was often neglected. He was a good shot and ardent hunter, 
and had such an inexpressible joy in the living bird and its surroundings that 
he would forget everything else, including his painting. In Abyssinia he collected 
birds for the Musemn so assiduously that there was little time left for painting, 
although a more selfish person might have done the reverse. Altogether, he 
collected and personally prepared, labeled, and packed no less than one thousand 
bird skins — a good record, even if no painting had been done. 

This artist-naturalist possessed unlimited patience at the skinning table and 
the drawing board, but otherwise it was not always evident, and at times his 
impetuosity nearly brought on disaster. His first day in Africa was in Djibouti 
on the hot coast of the Red Sea, and while others made necessary arrangements 
for progress inland or sipped cool drinks on the hotel veranda, he slipped out of 
the settlement, dodging local gendarmes, and in the sweltering heat shot seven- 
teen small birds which were skinned with penknives that night in the hotel. 
The next day on the inland train, after it had crossed the Abyssinian border 
but before customs formalities, he was tantalized by unknown birds seen at a 
distance. Finally, at a small station, over the heads of a gaping and jabbering 
crowd of Abyssinians, a beautiful blue roller alighted on the telephone wire. 
Fuertes could stand it no longer but dove into his luggage for a small shot pistol 
and started out of the standing train intent on having the bird in his hands, 
come what might. It required the combined efforts of the four other members 
of the party, with argument and at least with threatened force, to convince him 
that the bird was not worth the almost inevitable altercation with bystanders 
which would follow. This was characteristic, and similar incidents took place 
from time to time throughout the trip. The sight of a new bird might at any 
time cause Fuertes to abandon in a flash all practical considerations, his own 
safety or comfort, plans for the day, and hopes for the morrow. As Dr. F. M. 
Chapman has said, "That instinctive, inexplicable passion for birds which arouses 
an imcontrollable desire to know them intimately in their haunts and to make 
them part of our lives, and which overcomes every obstacle until, in a measure at 
least, this longing is gratified, is the heritage of the elect; and few have been 
more richly endowed than Louis Fuertes." 

The total number of paintings made by Fuertes in Abyssinia is 108, including 
a few of mammals and a few mere sketches of birds, scarcely more than records 
of the fugitive colors of soft and unfeathered parts which are altered in the pre- 
served specimen. As intimated above, the number might have been much greater, 
but his passion for the living bird was so intense and his loyalty to the expedition 
and to the Museum so marked that his time was spent largely in himting, observ- 



ing, and preparing specimens. Since the painting required daylight, it would 
often be done at the expense of the skinning which was then accomplished by 
candlelight far into the night hours. Under these conditions it is remarkable 
that such splendid results were obtained. The painting was in almost all cases 
done in the tent, the artist sitting on his sleeping cot and his materials and speci- 
mens scattered all about him. His technique was something secure and mastered 
and rarely offered him any difficulty. Sometimes a picture would be finished 
within an hour and seldom did one occupy more than two hours. Occasionally 
one would be taken up on a later day for finishing, and a few were left for final 
touches when he should be returned to the quiet of his own studio. He was 
limited to one size of sheet on which to work and, since all subjects were done 
in natural size, the larger birds could not be shown entire. Nevertheless, there 
was pictorial quality and subtle feeling in nearly every subject and, although 
many must be regarded merely as studies, they all reflect the power and genius 
of their creator. 

If it be true, as many have felt, that this series of paintings represents high- 
water mark in the artist's career as well as its termination, the explanation may 
perhaps be found in the joyous, high pitch to his spirits, which was maintained 
throughout the Abyssinian expedition. From beginning to end, he was like a 
boy let out of school. His enjoyment of every feature of the expedition, scientific, 
practical, and social, was intense and exuberant. He was under no irksome com- 
pulsions, and the pictures he painted were of his own free choosing with no regard 
to whether or not they might ever be sold or put to any definite use. Spontaneous 
expression of his pencil and brush, therefore, was natural and easy. 

The thirty-two subjects presented herewith have been selected from the 
larger number the originals of which are preserved in Field Museum. They 
include four studies of mammals and twenty-eight of birds, among which the 
proportion of raptorial species is rather large, these being the artist's favorites. 
They have been reproduced by offset lithography in eight and sometimes nine 
colors. Proofs have been very carefully scrutinized and, in practically all cases, 
complete fidelity to the originals has been obtained. 

WILFRED H. OSGOOD, Curator of Zoology 
November , 19S0 



LIST OF SUBJECTS 

1. Cape Teal. Anas capevsis (Gmelm). 

2. Spur- winged Goose. Pledroptertis gambensis (Linnaeus). 

3. Secretary Bird. Sagittarius serpentariiis (Miller). 

4. White-necked Vulture. Pseudogyps africanus (Salvadori). 

5. Lappet-faced Vulture. Torgos tracheliottis nubiais Smith. 

6. White-headed Vulture. Trigonoceps occipitalis (Burchell). 

7. Egyptian Vulture. Neophron percnopterus (Linnaeus). 

8. Abyssinian I^anner. Falco hiarmicus abyssinicus Neumann. 

9. African Swallow-tailed Kite. Chelictinea riocourii (Vieillot and Oudart). 

10. Black-shouldered Kite. Elanus caernleus (Desfontaines). 

11. African Tawny Eagle. Aquila rapax raptor Brehm. 

12. Bateleur Eagle. Terathopius ecaudatus (Daudin). 

13. Bateleur Eagle. Terathopius ecaudatus (Daudin). 

14. African Sea Eagle. Cuncuma vocifer Daudin. 

15. African Sea Eagle (Immature). Cuncuma vocifer Daudin. 

16. Bearded Vulture. Gypaetus harhatus meridionalis (Keys, and Bias.). 

17. African Harrier Hawk. Gymnogenys typicus (Smith). 

18. Black-bellied Bustard. Lissotis melanogaster (Riippell). 

19. Lowe's Sand-grouse. Eremialector quadricinctu^lowei Grant. 

20. Green Pigeon. Vinago waalia (Meyer). 

21. Gray Plantain-eater. Crinifer zonurus (Riippell). 

22. Pigmy Kingfisher. Corythornis cristata (Pallas). 

23. Gray-headed Kingfisher. Halcyon leucocephala (Miiller). 

24. Crested Hombill. Bycanistes cristatus (Riippell). 

25. African Night Heron. Nycticorax len^^onotus (Wagler). 

26. Narina Trogon. Apaloderma narina (Stephens). 

27. Nile Helmet-shrike. Prionops concinnata Simdevall. 

28. Thick-billed Raven. Corvultur crassirostris Brehm. 

29. Abyssinian Wolf. Canis simensis Riippell. 

30. Gelada Baboon. Theropithecus gelada Riippell. 

31. Gelada Baboon. Theropithecus gelada Riippell. 

32. Abyssinian Duiker. Sylvicapra abyssinicus Thomas. 



\ 



FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY 

CHICAGO. U. S. A. 



PUBLICATION ANNOUNCEMENT 



ALBUM OF 

ABYSSINIAN BIRDS AND MAMMALS 

FROM PAINTINGS BY 

LOUIS AGASSIZ FUERTES 

Field Museum of Natural History takes pleasure in announcing 
the publication on November 17, 1930, of a portfolio of accurate 
lithographic reproductions of paintings of birds and mammals, 
made by the well-known American artist, Louis Agassiz Fuertes, 
while a member of the Field Museum-Chicago Daily News Abys- 
sinian Expedition of 1926-27. 

This portfolio, issued as a special publication of Field Museum, 
is made possible through a generous donation from Mr. C. Suydam 
Cutting, who was also a member of the above mentioned expedi- 
tion. The paintings made by Mr. Fuertes, consisting of 108 
subjects, were purchased by Mr. Cutting after the artist's untimely 
death and presented to the Museum. Fromthis collection, thirty- 
two of the finest have been selected and reproduced by offset 
lithography, and are enclosed in a portfolio of convenient form. 

The portfolio includes four studies of mammals and twenty- 
eight of birds, among which are many of the finest and most 
characteristic species of Abyssinia. A brief descriptive text 
accompanies the plates which are suitable for individual framing 
or for preservation as a collection. 

This album of Abyssinian Birds and Mammals is not avail- 
able on exchange. It is priced at $3.00 per portfolio, plus postage 
or other delivery charges. The weight, wrapped for mailing, is 
three pounds, six ounces. A limited de luxe edition, in attractive 
fabrikoid binding, is available at $5.00 per copy. Orders should 
be sent to the Director, Field Museum of Natural History, 
Chicago, Illinois, U. S. A. 

STEPHEN C. SIMMS, Director 

November 17, 1930 






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UBRARY 
OF THE 

Gelada Baboon 

Theropithecus gelada RiJppell 

Although most African baboons, 
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It frequents rocky peaks and walls 
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with incredible ease and speed. 

Painted from life by 

Louis Agassiz Fuertes 

Published by 

Field Museum of Natural History 
Chicago, U. S. A. 

Through the generosity of C. Suydam Cutting 
No. 30. Album of Abyssinian Birds and Mammals 



Lithographed in U. S. A. Goes Litho. Co., Chicago 




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UBRARY 
OF THE 

Thick-Billed Raven 

Coruuftur crassirostn's (Riippell) 

(Four-fifths natural size) 

This strikingly marked bird belongs 
to the crow family but is vulturine in 
habits and commonly feeds on car- 
rion in company with the vultures 
and kites. It frequents villages and 
camps where it acts as a scavenger. 

Painted from life by 

Louis Agassiz Fuertes 

Published by 

Field Museum of Natural History 
Chicago, U. S. A. 

Through the generosity of C. Suydam Cutting 
No. 28. Album of Abyssinian Birds and Mammals 




RAVEN 



USRARY 
OFTHE 

Nile Helmet Shrike 

Prionops concinnata Sundevall 

(Four-fifths natural size) 

The helmet shrikes are of restless 
disposition and travel about in flocks 
through the open woods, keeping in 
nearly continuous motion. 

Painted from life by 

Louis Agassiz Fuertes 

Published by 

Field Museum of Natural History 
Chicago, U. S. A. 

Through the generosity of C. Suydani Cutting 
No. 27. Album of Abyssinian Birds and Mammals 



Lithographed in U. S. A. Goes Litho. Co., Chicago 







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UBRARY 
OF THE 

Narina Trogon 

Apaloderma narina (Stephens) 

(Four-fifths natural size) 

Like other trogons, this species 
inhabits deep forests, mainly in 
mountainous regions. It is ordina- 
rily shy but may be decoyed by 
imitations of its soft whistled note. 

Painted from life by 

Louis Agassiz Fuertes 

Published by 

Field Museum of Natural History 
Chicago, U. S. A. 

Through the generosity of C. Suydam Cutting 
No. 26. Album of Abyssinian Birds and Mammals 



Lithographed in U. S. A. Goes Litho. Co., Chicago 



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UBRARY 
OF THE 



African Night Heron 

Nycticorax leuconotus (Wagler) 

(Four-fifths natural size) 

The very large eye of this spedes 
is in accord with its nocturnal habits. 
It is found mainly in west-central 
Africa, especially in the lowlands 
along the upper branches of the 
Nile and the Congo rivers. 

Painted from life by 

Louis Agassiz Fuertes 

Published by 

Field Museum of Natural History 
Chicago, U. S. A. 

Through the generosity of C. Suydam Cutting 
No. 25. Album of Abyssinian Birds and Mammals 



Lithographed in U. S. A. Goes Litho. Co., Chicago 









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. OF THE 

fVIT— - -' • : -..,.r,-, 

Gray-Headed Kingfisher 

Halcyon teucocephala (Miiller) 

(Four-fifths natural size) 

This handsome bird is commonly 
found in the forests of central Africa 
as well as along the margins of 
streams. Its food consists of in- 
sects, small reptiles and fish. 

Painted from life by 

Louis Agassiz Fuertes 

Published by 

Field Museum of Natural History 
Chicago, U. S. A. 

Through the generosity of C. Suydam Cutting 
No. 23. Album of Abyssinian Birds and Mammals 



Lithographed in U. S. A. Goes Litho. Co., Chicago 




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GRAY-HEADED KINGFISHER 




OF 1HE 

Pigmy Kingfisher 

Corythornis cristata (Pallas) 

(Four-fifths natural size) 

This tiny kingfisher is no larger 
than a sparrow. It feeds on water 
insects as well as very small min- 
nows. It is found over most of Africa 
south of the Sahara Desert. 

Painted from life by 

Louis Agassiz Fuertes 

Published by 

Field Museum of Natural History 
Chicago, U. S. A. 

Through the generosity of C. Suydam Cutting 
No. 22. Album of Abyssinian Birds and Mammals 



Lithographed in U. S. A. Goes Litho. Co., Chicago 




PIGMY KINGFISHER 



UBRARir 

OF THE 

Gray Plantain Eater 

Crinifer zonurus (Ruppell) 

(Four-fifths natural size) 

This Is a very noisy, restless bird, 
somewhat distantly related to the 
cuckoos. It travels in pairs or small 
flocks and feeds on fruit, inhabiting 
light scrub rather than heavy forest. 

Painted from life by 

Louis Agassiz Fuertes 

Published by 

Field Museum of Natural History 
Chicago, U. S. A. 

Through the generosity of C. Suydam Cutting 
No. 21. Album of Abyssinian Birds and Mammals 




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UBRARV 
OF TOE 

mmj^rrf of lussm 

Black-Bellied Bustard 

Lissotis melanogaster (Riippell) 

(Four-fifths natural size) 

A bird of rather solitary habits 
found on the open grassy plains. 
It is considered a game bird and is 
hunted both for sport and for food, 
since its flesh is excellent. 

Painted from life by 

Louis Agassiz Fuertes 

Published by 

Field Museum of Natural History 
Chicago, U. S. A. 

Through the generosity of C. Suydam Cutting 
No. 18. Album of Abyssinian Birds and Mammals 



Lithographed in U. S. A, Goes Litho. Co., Chicago 







BLACK-BELLIED BUSTARD 



UBRARY 
OF THE 



African Harrier Hawk 

Gymnogenys typicus (Smith) 

(Four-fifths natural size) 

A hunter of small prey such as 
frogs, lizards, snakes, and some 
small birds. It frequents grasslands 
and burned-over areas, and usually 
flies only moderate distances, rest- 
ing at frequent intervals. 

Painted from life by 

Louis Agassiz Fuertes 

Published by 

Field Museum of Natural History 
Chicago, U. S. A. 

Through the generosity of C. Suydam Cutting 
No. 17. Album of Abyssinian Birds and Mammals 



Lithographed in U. S. A, Goes Litho. Co., Chicago 




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UmARY 
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UNtvERsrry oi- iLmofs 

African Sea Eagle 

Cuncuma uocifer (Daudin) 

(Four-fifths natural size) 

This species has been accused of 
killing small lambs on occasion, but 
its ordinary food consists of much 
smaller and more easily procured 
animals, such as fish, crabs, and 
reptiles, to which is added a variable 
amount of carrion. 

Painted from life by 

Louis Agassiz Fuertes 

Published by 

Field Museum of Natural History 
Chicago, U. S. A. 

Through the generosity of C. Suydam Cutting 
No. 15. Album of Abyssinian Birds and Mammals 



Lithographed in U. S. A. Goes Litho. Co., Chicago 



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AFRICAN SEA EAGLE 

IMMATURE 



U8R*RY 
OF THE 

UNtvERsrry c- iimm 

African Sea Eagle 

Cuncuma uocifer (Daudin) 

(Four-fifths natural size) 

Common on the coast and found 
also inland in the vicinity of rivers 
and lakes. It is usually seen perched 
in conspicuous places nearthewater 
or flapping slowly over the surface, 
ready to pounce on an unlucky fish 
that rises too near the top. 

Painted from life by 

Louis Agassiz-Fuertes 

Published by 

Field Museum of Natural History 
Chicago, U. S. A. 

Through the generosity of C. Suydam Cutting 
No. 14. Album of Abyssinian Birds and Mammals 



Lithographed in U. S. A. Goes Lithe. Co.. Chicago 



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AFRICAN SEA EAGLE 



Of THE 
UNIVERSITY Or ILUNOIS 

Bateleur Eagle 

Terathopius ecaudatus (Daudin) 

The extremely short tail gives 
these birds in flight a peculiar abbre- 
viated appearance that is very char- 
acteristic. They are rarely seen 
except on the wing, where they are 
very expert, swift, and graceful. 

Painted from life by 

Louis Agassiz Fuertes 

Published by 

Field Museum of Natural History 
Chicago, U. S. A. 

Through the generosity of C. Suydam Cutting 
No. 13. Album of Abyssinian Birds and Mammals 



Lithographed in U. S. A. Goes Litho. Co., Chicago 




BATELEUR EAGLE 



LIBRARY 

OF THE 

UNIVERSmr OF ILLINOIS 

Bateleur Eagle 

Terathopius ecaudatus (Daudin) 

(Four-fifths natural size) 

This handsome eagle kills much 
of its own prey but sometimes is 
found devouring carrion in company 
with the vultures. Its soaring flight 
is unusually swift and graceful. 

Painted from life by 

Louis Agassiz Fuertes 

Published by 

Field Museum of Natural History 
Chicago, U. S. A. 

Through the generosity of C. Suydain Cutting 
No. 12. Album of Abyssinian Birds and Mammals 



Lithooraohed in U. S. A, Goes Litho. Co.. Chicaao 



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UBRAmr 

OF THE 
UNIVERSmr OF ILLWOfS 

African Tawny Eagle 

Aquila rapax raptor Brehm 

(Fouf-fifths natural size) 

A powerful species of predatory 
habits, which feeds on small ante- 
lopes, hares, bustards and other 
such game. It is allied to the well 
known golden eagle of northern 
countries. Its nest is a large struc- 
ture occupied and enlarged from 
year to year. 

Painted from life by 

Louis Agassiz Fuertes 

Published by 

Field Museum of Natural History 
Chicago, U. S. A. 

Through the generosity of C. Suydam Cutting 
No. 11. Album of Abyssinian Birds and Mammals 



Lithographed in U. S. A. Goes Litho. Co., Chicago 



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UBRARY 
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African 
Swallow-Tailed Kite 

Chelictinea n'ocourii (Vieillot and Oudart)^ 

(Four-fifths natural size) 

This bird is very graceful in flight 
and is seen mostly on the wing, 
rarely perching or alighting on the 
ground. It feeds principally on small 
birds. 

Painted from life by 

Louis Agassiz Fuertes 

Published by 

Field Museum of Natural History 
Chicago, U. S. A. 

Through the generosity of C. Suydam Cutting 
No. 9. Album of Abyssinian Birds and Mammals 



Lithographed in U. S. A. Goes Litho. Co., Chicago 




AFRICAN SWALLOW TAILED KITE 



UBRARV 
Of THE 

Abyssinian Lanner 

Faico biarmicus abyssinicus Neumann 

' (Four-nfths natural siie) 

The lanner is a true falcon, swift, 
active, and powerful in flight. It is 
a relative of the well known pere- 
grine falcon and has been a favorite 
among the species used in falconry. 

Painted from life by 

Louis Agassiz Fuertes 

Published by 

Field Museum of Natural History 
Chicago, U. S. A. 

Through the generosity of C. Suydam Cutting 
No. 8. Album of Abyssinian Birds and Mammals 



Lithographed in U. S. A. Goes Litho. Co., Chicago 



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ABYSSINIAN LANNER 



U8RARY 
OF THE 



Egyptian Vulture 

Neophron percnopterus (Linnaeus) 

(Four-fifths natural size) 

A common and well known species. 
It nests on rocky precipices and, in 
Egypt, on the pyramids. It is one of 
the birds commonly represented in 
Egyptian hieroglyphics. 

Painted from life by 

Louis Agassiz Fuertes 

Published by 

Field Museum of Natural History 
Chicago, U. S. A. 

Through the generosity of C. Suydam Cutting 
No. 7. Album of Abyssinian Birds and Mammals 



Lithographed in U. S. A. Goes Litho. Co., Chicago 





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EGYPTIAN VULTURE 



OF TTiE 

White-Headed Vulture 

Tn'gonoceps occipitalis (Burchell) 

(Four-fifths natural size) 

This vulture commonly feeds apart 
from other species. It is widely dis- 
tributed in Africa except in the heavily 
forested regions. 

Painted from life by 

Louis Agassiz Fuertes 

Published by 

Field Museum of Natural History 
Chicago, U. S. A. 

Through the generosity of C. Suydain Cutting 
No. 6. Album of Abyssinian Birds and Mammals 



-ithographed in (J. S. A. Goes Litho. Co., Chicago 



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WHITE-HEADED VULTURE 



UBRARY 
OF THE 



Lappet-Faced Vulture 

Torgos tracheliotus nubicus (Smith) 

(Four-Hfths natural size) 

The curiously folded, naked skin 
of the head is a marked feature of 
this species. It is one of the largest 
ofOldWorld vultures and, like others, 
it feeds mainly on carrion. 

Painted from life by 

Louis Agassiz Fuertes 

Published by 

Field Museum of Natural History 
Chicago, U. S. A. 

Through the generosity of C. Suydam Cutting 
No. 5. Album of Abyssinian Birds and Mammals 



Lithographed in U. S. A. Goes Litho. Co., Chicago 



UBRARY 
OF THE 

White-Necked Vulture 

Pseudogyps africanus (Salvadori) 

(Fouf-fifths natural size) 

This vulture is most common in 
forest regions, though it is often 
found on the African plains in com- 
pany with other carrion-feeders. 

Painted from life by 

Louis Agassiz Fuertes 

Published by 

Field Museum of Natural History 
Chicago, U. S. A. 

Through the generosity of C. Suydam Cutting 
No. 4. Album of Abyssinian Birds and Mammals 



Lithographed in U. S. A. Goes Lithe. Co.. Chicago 




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WHITE-NECKED VULTURE 



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UBRARy 
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Spur-Winged Goose 

Plectropterus gambensis (Linnaeus) 

(Four-fifths natural size) 

This fine species is found near 
rivers and ponds but also visits cul- 
tivated fields. It has a spur on the 
inside of each wing which is used 
in fighting. 

Painted from life by 

Louis Agassiz Fuertes 

Published by 

Field Museum of Natural History 
Chicago, U. S. A. 

Through the generosity of C. Suydam Cutting 
No. 2. Album of Abyssinian Birds and Mammals 



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