(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Alfred Gruenspecht Family Collection 1748-2003"

Die Würzburger Juden (The Jews of Würzburg) 



Roland Flade 



Jews lived in Würzburg close to 900 years ago. Phases of steady growth and cultural 
blossoming were very frequently interrupted with persecution and expulsion. Nevertheless, the 
relationship of the Jews with this city was so close, they always retumed and ventured a new 
beginning. This book describes the history of the Jews of Würzburg from the Middle Ages to 
the Present and was originated from records of German, Israeli and American archives, The 
information was gleaned from contemporary eye witness accounts and from interviews with 
immediately affected person. It is exciting to read this book and, at the same time, sufficient 
to meet scientific requirements. The reader is invited to identify with the fate of individuals yet 
it retains the all-around course of Würzburg and Jewish history in view. The Jews, therefore, 
appear as they actually were, active in commerce and not passive sacrifices. 

First the reader will leam what it meant to be a member of the Jewish minority, about 
the thoughts of those persons in center stage. Numerous illustrations are published for the first 
time as well as most of the eye witness accounts. Until now much of the development in the 
19th Century through the catastrophe of the Third Reich was unknown. The book is written 
clearly, for all to understand. It is the result of intensive research of the two authors. 

Roland Flade (bom 1951) has a Doctorate in History and is a member of the Scientific 
Consultation Committee of the Exhibition "To the History and Culture of the Jews of Bavaria" 



1988/89 in the Germanic National Museum in Nurmberg. Noteworthy is the remark of th 






Historische Zeitschrifi (History Periodicals) about his dissertation Tlie Würzburg Jews in the 
Weimar Republic. He is a member of the Editorial Staff of the daily newspaper Mainpost and 
lives with his wife, Annette and son, Luxas in Würzburg. 



Ursula Gehring Münzel (bom 1957) studied History and Germanistics. Her dissertation: 
To the Emancipation and Assimilation of the Jews of Würzburg 1803 to 1870 is about to be 
published. She lives in Athens. 



P.S. My personal relationship to the city of Würzburg: I fondly remember the two years 
of studies at "ILBA." We enjoyed Walking through the Glacispark every moming from 
our dormitory at 6, Bibrastrasse to school and retumed the same way in the evening. 
My mother and two grandmothers came from near Würzburg, Heidingsfeld and Aub. 

I remember Rabbi Dr. Sigmund Hanover, Chief Cantor Rüben Eschwege and 
Baron Ernst Von Manstein teaching at "ILBA." When I entered "ILBA" in April 1934, 
Student Director Jakob StoU and Vice Director I. Steinhäuser were in Charge of "ILBA". 
Hebrew studies were supervised by Rabbi Unna, foUowed by Rabbi Samson Raphael 
Weiss in 1935. ILBA shut its doors after Kristallnacht in 1938. 

I revisited Würzburg in July 1996 on a retum trip from Jerusalem to New York 



and showed my wife, daughtcr and son-in-law "ILBA" and our dorm at Bibrastrasse 6 



but also the grooves of the Mezuzot. 



a^ 



Main Frankische Studien 



Roland Flade 




Juden in Würzhur g 1918-1933 

The book in front of me describes the structure and development of a Jewish population 
group in the years after the end of the first World War and the beginning of the "Third Reich". 
Unusual substantial archival records permit, together with written consiiltations and oral 
conversations of timely witnesses, the complex reconstruction of the social, economic, political 
and demographic conditions and their changes in the Israelitic, religiously-oriented Congregation 
of Würzburg. With a membership of 2,261 it was one of the most significant in the land. 

A settlement of Jews in Würzburg is recorded since 1147, but it can safely be assumed 
to have existed much earlier. The history of the Congregation during the Middle Ages A/^5 
characterized by long phases of continued growth as well as repeated pogroms on a regulär 
basis. The first pogrom to hit the Jewish Community of Würzburg was in 1 147. Afterwards, 
the Congregation developed to an important Center of Jewish learning. 

uuriii^ iiic ici^n 01 Äcvcidi i3j5ii0p:s, ine resiucucc oi j\^wi m »ui/i^uui^ vvv^»c oriLn 
subject to severe restrictions. In the year 1559 Emperor Ferdinand I put in motion a degree that 
ultimately caused the expulsion of the Jews from Würzburg. When their efforts to rescind and 
annul the edict failed, they left the city. In later years a number of Jews were able to get "a 
special privilege Status" to return and live again in Würzburg. This lasted only to the middle 
of the 17th Century. 

At the Beginning of the 19th Century Würzburg was a completely Catholic city, only a 
few Protestant families lived there, but no Jews. 



Many of the Lower Frankonia Jews settled in tlie smaller neighboring (owns, moslly in 
the suburban town of Heidingsfeid'. Üf the 2691 inliabitants of Heidingsfekl 507 were 
adherents of the Jewish Religion. For several cenliiries the city served as the Seal of the Chief 
Rabbinate. 




In 1803 the family of Moses Hirsch froin Gaukönibsiiofen rcceived pcrniission lo seltle 

Cv 

in Würzburg. Other families, above all from Heidingsfeid, Möchberg, Reichenberg and 
Niederwerfen followed. In theyear 1814/1815, 138 Jews lived in Wiirzburg. Around Ihal time, 
the seat of the Chief Rabbinate was transferred from Heidingsfeid to Würzburg. 

The Bavarian "Jew Edict" of 1813 was decidedly signiHcant for their deniographic 
developmeiit. It was effectively carried out in the city of Würzburg when the city returned lo 
the Bavarian State. 

"The Edict" required in its central regislered paragraphs a siricl limilation of Ihe Jewish 
Population numbers in all places with a Jewish establishment. 

The matrical paragraphs were repealed in 1861, but ifs effect on Ihe .social and nuinerical 
development of Bavarian Jews during the !9th Century was negative. Many Jewi.sh families 
were compelied to rnove to other areas in Germany, or emigrated to the U.S.A., Greal Brilain 
and Switzerland. At the beginning of the I9lh Century a quarter of all Jews living in Germany 
resided in Bavaria. At the beginning of Ihe 20lh Century it was less than 10%. In 1840 about 
88% of the Bavarian Jewish population lived in rural villages and small lowns. 

After the annulment of "The Edict", the Jewish population quadrupied wiihin a few 
decades and reached the never-again atlained share of 4'/2% of the city's total population. In 



' My Grei\t-Grandfather, Maniin neiiiciiiiiiui, lived in Heidingsfeid in Ihe I9lh Century 



1/ 

1900 in reached 2,500 Jews — the highest luimber ever reached. A decade later the proporlion 
towards the total population dropped to 3%, and in 1933 it was reduced to 2'/^%.^ 

Dr. Flade's report brings a complete accoiint of commerce and industry, of Jewish firms 
in trade and crafts, as well as Jewish Professionals in medicine, educalion and non-professional 



careers. 



The book relates to the influx of Hastern Hiiropean Jews before and after World War I, 
their integration into the communal life and religious orientation. 

Participation of Würzburger Jews in German National Politics: 398 men fought, 32 feil 
in combat and 8 died from wounds. Two-thirds received decoralions of valor and 82 were 
wounded. 

The book mentions the Emancipation of German Jews and their growth and attitude 
towards Zionism. It gives a detailed account of the incumbent Rabbis, Orthodoxy and liberal 
Judaism as well as background and the difficult conditions that prevailed for Eastern European 
Jews to get citizenship and naluralization in Würzburg and the State of Bavaria; the strucliire of 
the Congregation with voting rights, finance and membership and educational setup.^ 



^ My Great-Grandfather Emanuel Oppenheimer, born in Aub e/Würzburg on November 6, 
1803. My Grandfather Hirsch Oppenheimer was born in Aub February 9, 1858. 

My Grandmother Ernestine Oppenheimer nee Bach was born in Acholshauseii on August 
21, 1862. My mother Leoni Grünspecht nee Oppenheimer was born in Aub January 21, 1895. 
Mv mother's brother David was born in Aub Mav 24, 1897. He married Regina nee Weil, born 
in Acholshauseii. 

My Grandmother Ernestine Oppenheimer had a slroke and lived, after her children left 
for the USA, in 1937 and 1938, in the Jewish Old Age Home in Frankfurt, Germany. She was 
deported with all the other old and sick patients to the concentration camp Theresienstadi where 
she died. 



The Ismelitic Teacher Seminary, Jewish Students at the Julius-Maximilians-University 



A decision by the Prince Max Josef of Bavaria on June 18, 1804 obligaled Jewish 
children lo receive worldly and religious educalion. In 1813 a final decision was made (hat 
Jewish teachers had to pass an examinalion in a seminar. Until 1856 Ihere was merely a Talmud 
Torah School in Würzburg. The Talmud Torah was allended by Jewish students after classes 
in Christian Public Schools. On the basis of the above-mentioned regulation 150 Jewish "public 



schools" were established in the Bavarian Kingdoni. Most of them consisted of ? 



a one rooni 



Space" where all classes were instructed 



The newly established schools needed teachers Ihat adhered to the official training 
requirements of the Bavarian Government. In addition, they had to be able to perform 
supplementary responsibilities such as Cantorial, Adult Education in Jewish Law and Customs 
as well as the Performance of ritual slaughter. 

In July 1859 the government of Lower Frankonia and Aschaffenburg alerled the 
Würzburg District Rabbi Seligman Bär Bamberger of the problematic Situation of providing 
competent and qualified teachers. Rabbi Bamberger called a meeting with his Rabbinic 
colleagues in Lower Frankonia. They drew up a comprehensive, expcrt rcport stating tlial llie 



functions ofa Jewish, religious teacher cannot be compared to a Christian public school teacher. 
Also, the training cannot be identical. Rabbi S.B. Bamberger suggested to the authorities that 
they establish a Jewish Teacher Seminary in the county's capital city of Würzburg, where futiire 
Jewish teachers could be trained in secular and religious subjects. Thereafter, they would have 
to take a final examination in a State teacher seminary. To become a Student in the newly 
established Jewish Teacher Seminary Preparatory Schooling in a Lower Frankonian Talmud 
Torah was a requisite. 



Oti Oclober 4, 1864 tlie Governnienl granied approval and permission for the 
establishment of the hraeli,ic Teacher Se.ni.iary which opened a mon.h laier, on November 7. 
The Seminary began its activities in a rented house on the boundary of the City witii tweive 
students. Preparatorv Schools .whose task it was to arrange and bring about the necessary 
knowledge for the students to enter, "ILBA" were established in 1886 in Höchberg and 1875 in 
Burgpreppach. Botli communities had Tainnid Torah schools before; now these were extended." 

There was such a rush to study at "ILBA" that by the end of the second school year new 
and larger quarters were acquired and the school inoved into the new location al Kettengasse 6. 

Rabbi S.B. Bamberger passed away in 1878. His son, Nathan, became the Rabbi of 
Würzburg and also the Director of "ILBA". 

In 1884 "ILBA" moved into the building at Bibrastrasse 6 with additional roonis for 
classes and dormitory facilities, a dining room, gyni and a small synagogue. 

With the calling of Rabbi Dr. Siegniund Manöver as Rabbi of Wiirzburg, a complele 
change of direction took place at "ILBA". White Rabbi S.B. Bamberger and later his son, 
Nathan, were also coordinators of the daily curriculum of the school, Rabbi Manöver became 
the sole chairman of its supervisory curalorium. Jakob Sloll, a former graduate of "ILBA", the 
Head Teacher and Assistant Administrator at the time, became the Director of the Institution in 
1919 until it was forced to dose in 1938 afler the infamous Krismllnaclu or "Crystal Night". 



The author of this Synopsis on Dr. R. Flade's book Juden in Wür7h,m> wa. ed..c?t-d in 
a one-room schoolhouse, passed his entrance examination into ILBA in 1934^and sludied tliere 
for two years. He left to enter a Iladuhara Center in Mavelberg near Berlin, Germany , to work 
and study m agr.culture m order to emigrate to Palesline. The Center was ordered closed by 
.^^''?{!^; Fortunately, the writer was able to emigrale to the U.S. with parents and brothers 



m June 1937 thereby escaping the horrors, lormeni and fate of Naz 



ism. 



Jakob Stoll, who had completed his academic examinations in Munich thereby being entitied to 
assume the position as Dean of a College, brought fame, prominence and distinction to the 



school. 

The Hebraic studies at "ILBA" were strengthened and improved with the employment 
ofa Seminar Rabbi, Rabbi Y.J. Neubauer. Besides Rabbinical Ordination, Rabbi Neubauer had 
eamed two doctorates, and served "ILBA" for 7 years, until 1933.^ 

At the beginning of 1931/32 a new building was erected and moved into. The building 
accommodated the enlarged teacher's seminary with six classes. 

In June 1928 the Curatorium decided to include female students for study at the 
Seminary. In spite of various religious and rabbinical considerations, the member rabbis of the 
Curatorium agreed with the decision. In 1931 girls were accepted at "ILBA" in Würzburg. 

The old building at Bibrastrasse 6 became the exclusive dormitory for the male students; 
girl students were accommodated in a building on the premises of the new school. The new 
facility at 1 Sandbergerstrasse was able to increase the number of students substantially. 

The author continues to elaborate on the relative high numbers of Jewish students in the 
Julius-Maximilians-University. The preferred subjects such as medicine, dental medicine, law 
and economics were elected by Jewish students. There existed Jewish Student fraternities, the 
U.J.A., Veda, K.C. and Zionist oriented brotherhoods and clubs. For Orthodox students to eat 
Kosher meals a Student mensa was maintained. 



^ My own recollections are of Rabbi Unna in 1934, when I entered the Seminary, followed 
by Rabbi S.R. Weiss until 1938. 



The social setup in the Community is mentioned with its many volunteer helpers, to visit 
the sick, bury the dead, consoling and comforting the mourners. All action had the character 
of conscientious duties. The oldest charitable society was the Chevra Kadisha established in 
1830 which reached a membership of 350 in the 1930's. 



SOCIAL SERVICES FOR THE COMMUNITY 

At the end of the 19th Century a Jewish hospital and an old age home was built. The 
old age home is still in existence. However, with the small existing congregation in 1996 the 
old age home was renovated to become "The Community Center" and a new synagogue was 
built on its extended grounds, small, but graceful and attractive. I visited the Center and 
Synagogue in July 1996. 

Before World War One, a Center for Jewish Nurses was established, to visit, and nurse 
sick and old patients. The Nurses-Order was, and stayed connected to the Bne-Brith 
Organization. However, after World War One, the Würzburg Order of "Jewish Nurses" joined 
the CNationan German Jewish Nurses. Thev assisted the noor and needv Jewish families in the 
cities. 



The dire consequences of losing World War One resulted in enormous inflation and 
devaluation of the German currency. Pensions of the retired, savings of the old and young 
became worthless, and many businesses were financially ruined. Also, the practicing free 
professions had tremendous inflation losses. 

In 1921 "The Central Jewish Weifare" was established, financed by volunteer 
contributions and subsidized by the Congregation and various organizations. 



During the years 1924 to 1929 when the economy had an upturn, "The Middlestandhelp" 
assisted a good number of poor families, providing them with coal for heating and food 
products, as well as Jobs, if possible. The Ladies Auxiliary helped by providing clothing and 
caring for the sick. 

Many Jewish Citizens of the upper and middle classes donated inoney, goods and 
materials to the city in a most generous way. Jews in Würzbiirg were active in the social life 
of the city, belonging to various lodges and societies. 

There existed Zionist youth organizations. The "Blue-White" was founded in 1917 with 
weekly get-togethers, hiking, camping, with singing and discussions. The membership in this 
or similar organizations rescued and often developed the buried, and sometimes hidden Jewish 
roots, amplifying a sense of belonging and maturing newly-won confidence in Jewish values. 
The Würzburg "Esra Group" existed until 1932. It was one of 29 such groups in Germany. 
Orthodox young people joined a "Bachad" (Brith Chaluzim Dati'im) Group, which placed heavy 
emphasis on religious study and Torah lectures. 

Even betöre the Nazi seizure of power, the attitude towards Zionism in a wide circle of 
German Jewry was reassessed and most Orthodox young men and women focused their future 
towards the National Jewish Guidelines and Directions.**(P.S.) 



ANTI-SEMITISM 



In July 1919 a headline announcement appeared in TJie Würzhurg General Anzeiger (a 
leading daily newspaper) written by "The Central Association of German Citizens of Jewish 
Faith." 



8 



Till now Jewish Citizens of Bavaria have lived peacefully and harmoniously with all other 
Citizens. They have worked together, shared happiness and sorrows. However, several months 
ago wild Anti-Semitic hate literature appeared in cities and in the country lands. Scandal sheets 
and posters with vicious lying hateful Statements printed on them, to inake the Jews scapegoats 
for all Problems. This was the essence of the theme. Although historically ridiculous, the 



responsibility for the war, its prolonging and its consequences was blamed on the Jews. 



o 



"But we, as loyal German Citizens, will fulfill our obligations towards our fatherland and 
do our bit to work jointly for inner peace at this difficult time. ... And so we hope the Anti- 
Semitic hate wave will be smashed to piecesü!" 

This article in the newspaper docuinents an active Anti-Semitic hatred in Würzburg 
already in the first few months following World War One, in the year 1919 and it spread 
menacingly from year to year. 

The enormous moral confusion resulting from the defeat, followed by impoverishment 
and Inflation, as well as indebtness could not be understood and reconciled by millions of 
Germans. The often-repeated slogan: "the Jews are our disaster" (bad luck) found strong 
nourishment in their minds. Anti-Semitism disseminated like wildfire in Germany. The author 
of the book writes: In his opinion, never was the Anti-Semitic passioii in Germany more furious 
and enraged as in the years 1919 to 1923. 

The forerunner Organization of the N.S.D.A.P. (National Socialist German Workers 
Party — National SosiaJistiche Deutsche Arbeiter Partei) was The Gerinan People's Proteclioii 
aiid Defiance Union. On November 18, 1919 the aforementioned union sent an advertisement 
into the Fränkische Volkshlatt (a Würzburg daily newspaper) for the first time, stating their 




goals, among other points of view "complete elimination of the predominance of foreign 
Clements" through the establishment of laws. "The German People's Comrades" were urged to 
join this mighty and energetic union to make it strong and effective. 

The protection and defiance union was founded in February 1919 in the city of Bamberg. 
The Chairmanship was given to Baron Konstantin Von Gebsattel, a former general, born in 1854 
in Würzburg. The Baron came from an old Frankovian nobility. His brother, Ludwig was the 
commanding General of the II Army Corps stationed in Wurzburg. The fiery monarchist 
Konstantin von Gebsattle, after being retired in 1919, devoted himself to political considerations. 
In 1913 under the title "Thoughts About Necessary Progress in the Domestic Growth of 
Germany" he wrote a memorandum and sent it to two hundred very important personalities, 
amongst them the German Crown Prince. In his memo he suggested an4|^xtensive guide of laws 
for German Jews. The exclusion of Jews to serve in the armed forces, paying double taxes, 
dismissal from federal Service, from teaching and advocate positions, from extensive real estate 
holdings and furthermore forbidding the publication of newspapers. With forced emigration of 
Jews from Germany resulting in a possible loss of capital and trade in German Commerce, he 
suggested that the major part of Jewish assets should revert to the German Reich. With the 
question, Who is a Jew? orientation on descendency is suggested by the Baron. He states further 
to "the privilege of a German", "one" can only be admitted if not more than a quarter of his 



^ D£r) 



blood is of Jewish descent. 



Von Gebsattel lived, after his retirement, on his estate in Rothenburg, Ob Die Tauber 
(Bavaria). With his Stimulation the Union for "Protection and defiance" was founded and he 
became the Acting Chairman of the All German Association, conceived as a unit of the German 



10 



people for enthusiastic support of its objectives. The Baron proposed to use the Jews as a 
lightening rod for everything wrong! 

The German Protection and Defiance Union merged in the same year (1914) with two 
other Anti-Semitic associations, the Reichshammer Bund and the Deutsch Völkische Bund. The 
resulting union originated into the "German Peoples Protection and Defiance Union." The 
Association was later joined by more than 100 Anti-Semitic organizations during the post World 
War years to become an important and powerful Organization. The Statutes of the union 
command: "The Union strives towards the moral rebirth of the German people, by means of 
awakening and promoting its healthy and very particular requirements." 

He (the Baron) sees in the oppressive undermining influences of Judaism the main cause 
of the German people's collapse. By removing this dominating influence, the preconditions for 
rebuilding will be assured as well as the rescue of German culture and character. The union's 
task is to enlighten its supporters to the nature and extent of the Jewish power and control in the 
life of the German states and the danger to the morals and Systems, and to combat all that by 
using all available means politically, economically and otherwise to fight it resolutely. Members 
had to certify that they were of pure German descent and disposition and, if married, to be 
living in pure German race marriages. 

The Würzburg city administration, from the Mayor to the Chief of Police, opposed the 
recruiting practices of the "Bund". In December 1919 the Bund 's group attendant put up an 
advertisement against "the slanderous distortion of the city administration", saying: Certainiy 
such a mighty Organization as ours cannot pass "without stirring up the dust." The Bund printed 



more 



than seven and a half million flyers, close to five million hand notes and almost eight 



11 



million sticker posters, tagging advertising pillars, mail boxes and especially Jewish businesses, 
often in the form of swastikas. The Mayor and his administration acknowledged the good 
relationship of the Jewish Community, its generosity to the city throughout the years and 
promised to do everything possible to curtail the hateful and detestable offensive. 

In 1922 the Bund Union already had 600 local groups and 180,000 members. The Police 
Office in the city of Bamberg admitted to the possibility of a pogrom or attacks against Jews. 

An important addition to the Bund-Union in Würzburg was when students at the 
University organized the Germanic Peoples' Student Society. They considered "the cultivation" 
of "thought for the Fatherland" as our main objective. 

During a Joint meeting of the Bund and the Student Society, the Agitator, Kunze from 
Berlin said, "The Federal Government has to be chased to the devil." It protects the interests 
of Jews, not of Germans. The fault of the State's bankruptcy is, above all, the ruinous 
influences of Judaism. Therefore, all immigrated Jews since 1914 have to be expelled and the 
authority of the residenced Jews must be confined. 

The author continues to describe the hate Propaganda in detail with inflammatory 
Speeches by agitators and agents of the Bund. 

On 26 October 1923 an article appeared in the Anti-Semitic Markthreiter Wochenhlatt 
(weekly) "Advice to General Commissioner Mr. Von Kahr! "/Solution to the Jewish Question! 
1) It is absolutely necessary to kill the Jews; 2) Otherwise Christian efforts are futile. 3) It is 
absolutely necessary to void the laws of equal justification of the Jews; 4) It is absolutely 
necessary to burn and destroy synagogiies aiid Jewish places of leariiing. The burnt out 
leftovers, including the walls, should be covered with earth so that no stone is visible! 



12 



5) It is absolutely necessary to remove all prayer books and Talmuds (books of Jewish law) since 
they learn the lies and curses from it. 

The members of the Würzburg Bund division looked at themselves as authentic and blue- 
blooded Germans; the Jews were culpable for the total German calamity. Accordingly, only 



blood-true Germans were welcome at functions. 



(7) 



The Bund that became the "NSDAP", National}^ German Workers Party made a 

differentiation between "the noble Germanic race" and "the inferior Jewish race". No Jew can 

be a Folks-comrade. The investigation of the murder of the German Jewish industrialist and 

statesman Walter Rathenau in 1922 yielded results, that not only was the Bund involved, but a 

good number os secret organizations existed whose significant purpose was to con front German 

0\ 

Judaism and to annihilate it. 

The author mentions the fiery and fanatic outburst of Anti-Semitic rhetoric from the 
z%\\2XQr^ Andrea Ellendt resulting in hate campaigns against Jews, with arson attacks and 
property damage to the theme "Race and Nation". She expresses her views as follows: "A 
Single nation is inferior in this world and that is the people of Israel. The Jews are the bearers 
of a hostile outlook on Christendom's ideology. Already two thousand years ago they marred 
Christendom and nailed our Lord, god to the cross. When I teil a Jew, you are a Jew, he 
answers: This is not my fault! He just feels as Jewish, that j/ race is inferior. "But we 



Germans are a noble thoroughbred nation." ... /oreign and interior politics. 

The Anti-Semites saw Germany as a sacrifice of a gigantic conspiracy of world Judaism. 
They caused the World War, the defeat of Germany, the November Revolution, the Treaty of 
Versaille, the harsh reparation demands, inflation, the occupation of the Rhur area, etc. 



13 



According to Folk's theory, the Jewish foreign minister, Walter Rathenau, together with other 
Jewish representatives, worked together with other Jewish members o( foreign land governments 
Hand in hand. 

In Würzburg, "The Bund/Saw^Germantum in 1919 undermined and surrendered by an 
alleged Jewish domination. Jewish-Russian Bolshevism intend bloody atrocities on the German 
folk! On April 15, 1919, at a Session of the Würzburg City Council, the Chief Mayor, Andreas 
Grieser suggested to contradict these wild rumors and issue the parole, iio class and race hatred. 



EASTERN JEWS: 

Eastern European Jews were exposed to violent attacks of Anti-Semitism and the general 
hate toward foreign born alien^s. With the N.S.D.A.P. attacks on this group of Jews, they 
spared yet the Jewish residents of many years back. The Jewish merchants and dealers were 
accused by the Bund members and their followers to underbid, undersell, to profiteer and to 
haggle while these things were frowned upon by Germans. But most incensed were the non- 
Jewlsh small shopkeepers and tradesmen. They feit threatened by the Jewish dealers of the large 
department Stores and the east-Jewish dealers and tradesmen. The German National Bund, 
Würzburg advertisement in the Volkshlatt 2/14/20: We oppose the ruinous immigration of the 
Eastern European Jews. Therefore, a claim must be made for all Jews that immigrated since 
1914 to be evicted. 



14 



NSDAP PROGRAM: 2/24/20 

Immigration of non-Germans is to be prevented. We demand that all non-Germans who 
immigrated since August 2, 1914 immediately be forced to leave the Reich." In April 1920 the 
Bavarian State Government, under Von Kahr made use of the newly accepted decree. However, 
most immigrants were able to prove they were not comniuiiists. On September 26, 1923, 
Gustav Von Kahr was again appointed as the highest officer of the Bavarian State, its General 
State Komissar. Again he began his official duties with an Anti-Semitic measure, to expel 
several hundred Jewish families from Bavaria that came from Eastern Europe but were residing 
20 or even 30 years in the land. Contrary to 1920, this time a considerable number of people 
were affected. This action was evidently pointed at families residing in the cities of Munich and 
Nuremberg. The edict called for leaving Bavaria within two weeks. Housing, stock machines 
and cash were confiscated. The Prussiaii Minister President lodged a complaint against the 
Bavarian Government and Vie Jewish Rundschau, a widely read weekly publication, wrote: 
"The methodical explusions of Jews from Munich, about which we are Publishing today, are the 
first visible signs and most significant success of the Anti-Semitic movement in Germany, which 
today is not anymore party politics, but official practice of the central authorities of an individual 

State, distinctiy put into appearance. This official Anti-Semitism and the administrative 

O 
implemented excesses of hatred against the Jews, signify ancf earnest sign of warning for the 

total Jewish Community of Germany and characteristically for the world to recognize its 

threatening Situation, etc. 



15 



ECONOMIC CONDITIONS 

The difficult economic conditions after the World War hit broad and wide circles of 
Citizens. Shortness of foojf resulted in demonstrations in various cities. The demobilization freed 
many hundreds of thousands looking for work. The German-National Bund used this Situation, 
as well as the N.S.D.A.P. to demand "the complete remoyal of the predominance of the land 
and nations foreign elements of the economic life, breaking off the interest servitiide. (Germany 
had to pay 10 billion Marks annually as reparation payment.) "^ruthless proceeding against 
profiteering, black marketeers, etc. 

The agitators, Feder and Elendt proclaimed in their organized events: "The international 
Jewish capitalism makes us work slaves of the Entente." 

The author writes in detail about the D.N.V.P., the German National Folks Party, and 
the B.V.P., the Bavarian Folks Party. Also 77?^ Daily Voice, the Fränkische Volksblatt (a 
Frankonian newspaper). The Anti-Semitic concept was accepted and spread, although in a 
somewhat moderate form. Anti-Semitic remarks were frequently made by political Catholicism. 
In View of the widespread populär prejudice against Jews, Catholic party representatives feil for 
the temptation to use Anti-Semitic stereotypes for voting recruitment. 



RIGHT WING SOCIETIES: 



In 1898 a local group of the "All German Society" arose with their ambitious goal of 
stimulating "the German national disposition" and the preservation and maintenance of German 
art, customs and morals. In its early years it had some Jews as members although Anti-Semitic 
remarks were frequent. However, during the War (World War I) it determined a hostile course 



16 



towards Judaism. Its leader, the advocate Heinrich Class, published a periodical under the 
Pseudonym Daniel Fryman where he demanded the exciusion of the Jewish influences in politics, 
commerce, culture, education as well as the removal of all foreign immigrants from the German 
Reich. The before already mentioned active Baron Von Gebsatter ^^Jro pressured Class to accept 
leadership of the Anti-Semitic movements in Germany. Actually, the newsprint of the 
Organization published an article that was pleasing to Baron Gebsattel, "A Declaration on all of 



Judaism." 



H 



if 



Anti-Semitism was also virulent in the Stahlhelm Organization. This apparently 
politically neutral war veterans Organization aligned with the devils of the National Folks Party. 
Although one hundred thousand (100,000) Jewish soldiers fought in the war and 12,000 died 
fighting for the Fatherland, Tlie Stahlhelm identified with the idea of a Separation from the 
Jewish foreign folks that lived amongst them. The lower Frankonian Stahlhelm District Leader 
Breidenbach stated on March 21, 1931 that the only beneficiaries of the economic condition are 
the capitalists and the Jews. In 1923 several right wing folk groups in cities and land joined. 
In Würzburg 27 organizations created the working Community of Fatherlandish organizations, 
inviting its members to meetings. 



STUDENTS OF HIGHER EDUCATION 

The author, Dr. R. Flade, continues to describe how the Student body of the Julius 
Maximilians University in Würzburg as well as most other institutions of higher education joined 



O 



the Student umbrella Organization: Hochschul Ring Deutscher Art (Higher Education in German 
Uniqueness). 



17 



Student organizations developed into one of Ihe strengest Anti-Semitic groups in German 



Society. 



The results for the Jewish students was very depressing. Their affiliated societies were 
asked to withdraw voluntarily from the ring or be excluded. The Jewish students became fair 
game, insulted, offended, and were considered in their totality as inferior species. 



THE FICHT AGAINST THE ANTI-SEMITIC MOVEMENT 

a 

In examining the decline of the Weimar Republic, Werner E. Mosse is of the opinion that 
in the field of ideology and Propaganda the apostles of the "folks idea" had it solely to 
themselves. Even reliable advocates of democratic national values were reluctant to complicate 
their anyway difficult positions to defend Jewish Citizens and herewith combat Anti-Semitism. 
The hostile Propaganda towards the Jews, aside from Jewish efforts to fight remained completely 



O 



e; 



unopposed. There was nojf group or association of any importance that feit obligated to resist, 
or object to the pseudo-ideology of the middle class Anti-Semitism with arguments or political 
action. On the contrary, it appeared that there was no price too high for the middle class for 
the promised, and hopefully, expected "rebirth of the nation." "The intoxicating thought of a 
new German Folks Community left no room for petty consideration regarding unpopulär 
minorities or individual liberties and rights. The concept of law could readily be sacrificed for 
the good and welfare of the general public." 

Christians did not make a serious effort of resistance and Opposition. The Catholics 
wanted to testify to their national disposition to escape any reproach to be anti-national. For 
these reasons no counter action towards the Anti-Semitic hate was Coming forth. 



18 



The German Democratic Party gave the German Jews a political home. They put up 
Jewish candidates for city government. Jewish personalities held important positions in the party 
Organization. Since the founding of the S.D.P. it was referred to as the "Jew Party". At public 
assemblies it happened frequently to cat calls, booing, interspersed with Anti-Semitic remarks. 
When candidates were selected for national or State positions, efforts were made to nominate not 
too many Jews. The Chief Mayor of the town of Würzburg, Mr. Hans Löffler showed extreme 
devotion to the Jewish population of the city. His attitude and conduct deserves to be mentioned 
since it was in direct Opposition of the official actions of the representatives of the State. The 
unpopulär combat against Anti-Semitism had to be left with the Jews themselves. The Nazis 
characterized him as "The Jew Mayor." 

In 1928 the B.V.P. (Bavarian Folks Party) Organ Fränkisches VolkshJatt (a daily 
newspaper) appointed Heinrich Leier, a priest, as its chief secretary. Together with another 
publication, 77?^ Volksfreurid\Tht People's Friend) they warned the population of its great 
danger from the "right." He was agitated against the NSDAP, the peril and the threatening 
work of the "Fatherland Associations." He tried to throw his weight in favor and for the benefit 
of the Jewish Citizens, but with little success. The Anti-Semitic press reproved and chastised 
him with sarcastic, ironic satirical and sneering written and verbal assaults, telling him to 
remove "his holy tunic", that he is not dignified to carry. With particular preference, the 
NSDAP orators quoted Leier's comments and sharpened their Anti-Semitic remarks to be more 



venomous and poisonous. 



(ru^ 



The Jews of Würzburg were exposed to Anti-Semitism in varying forms. The ignored 
the hate organs and tried to spend their leisure time in Jewish organizations, where they feit 



19 



comfortable, uninhibited and unprejudiced. For this reason, and its background, it is 
understandable that many Germans, as well as Jewish Citizens uiiderestiinated the growing Anti- 
Semitism. Many were often inclined to look at the Movement "as a passing concomitant" (a side 
accompaniment) to the political and commercial crisis. According to H.A. Strauss, the general 
feeling existed that Jews lived in Würzburg for a very long time and they had a right to be there. 
They actually gave no thought to the background of Anti-Semitism; they looked at it as 
something unintelligible, a sort of stupidity and blunder, something inexplicable. Similarly, 
W.E. Riesenfeld said: Persons were optimistic. They thought "The Germans will outgrow the 
Anti-Semitism." Until March 1933, not more than four members of the NSDAP served in the 
City's Administration. Also, the election results at regional or national elections were way 
below the average of lands and national. In the larger cities and towns the Jews were able to 
escape and evade Anti-Semites. "Perhaps nothing contributed more to the Jews' underestimation 
of Judeo-phobia before 1933 than the simple fact that few of them ever became victims of direct 
racist attacks," writes Dr. Flade. I continue to quote the author's words: "Jewish urbanites, 



^f*CnrP in thp rirrlp nf nrpHoi'ninnnflv Tpxv'^^i ^»"^ ^Ko cp»1<=»r«tpH non-Tp»\i/icli frionHc t-no^i; Hn 

■^ «> -W V« i V ... v..*^ <wA.«^A«^ ■^ i jL' 1. ^ ^« v^ • a 1^ • .«AI i «.• ) >>W>>10<1, v> k^ I. t^tOVy OV.'I V^Vi^ CV^NU 1 I Vy 1 1 ./ V^ * V 1 O I I lliW'llViiJ, I\.IIV./VV 1 I Vj 



11 > 

vv 



to avoid an ugly incident with the odd racist enthusiast. One did not spend his vacation at just 
any resort; Jewish periodicals regularly ran lists of spas and hoteis that excluded Jews and/or 
catered to a Völkisch crowd. Nor did f(one^casually reveal his Jewishness to strangers on trains, 
or in other public places. Those obvious rules observed, one could associate Anti-Semitic 
violence primarily with such benighted regions as Poland and Rumania. For the vast majority 
of German Jews, then, Anti-Semitism was an annoying, but scarcely terrifying Propaganda 



20 



campaign of charges that ran from the predictable — Jews were traitors, exploiters, and so on 
— to the preposterous, etc." (I am ending the qiiote of the aiithor.) 



Consequently, contact between Jews and Christians was not yet expressed in hate so 



openly. 

Before 1933 one could be evasive. Facts of insecurity in private and commercial dealings 
were noticeable, that suspectable Anti-Semitism might be harbored on the siirface. This broiight 
uncertainty in the contact between Jews and Christians; the Jew was not sure whether the Gentile 
was an undercover Anti-Semite. 

THE GENERAL ASSOCIATION OF CITIZENS OF JEWISH FAITH — C.V. 

The lawyer, Karl Rosenthal, was the Chairperson of the C.V. in Würzburg from 1918 
to 1933. Another Organization, the R.J.F., National Association of Jewish Front Soldiers, tried 
their utmost to defend and ward off the attacks of Anti-Semitism. 

IN 1928, one day before elections to the Reichstag (the Lower House), two 

refrain from voting for the NSDAP, a party that flirts with Anti-Semitism under the heading: 

"How do leading personalities judge Anti-Semitism?" 

It quotes Emperor Friedrich III: "Anti-Semitism is the disgrace of the Century." 
Pope Plus XI: "It is against Catholic principles to persecute the Jews. I and several 

Cardinais are friends of the Jews and we support the fight against Anti-Semitism." 

Otto Von Bismarck: "I disapprove totally the confrontation against the Jews." 
Peter Rosegger: "Anti-Semitism is abhorrent that calls for moral enlightenment." 



21 



The author continues with the efforts of the C. V. to enlighten, clear up and ediicate, but 
under the circumstances only a limited success was effected. The C.V. maintained contact to 
all democratic minded parties, the D.D.P., S.P.D. also to the B.V.P. after they adjusted their 
agenda. The C.V. saw as one of its most important obligations to intervene when Jews were 
defamed, maligned or attacked. Many of its local groiips were chaired by lawyers. 

The Zionist organizations did not agree too well with the activities of the C.V. They feit 
that the battle against Anti-Semitism, with the methods of the C.V., was senseless since they feit 
the Jewish problem in the Diaspora is conseqiient to the living conditions and cannot be solved 
with court proceedings and other matters of law. Although their opinions and ideology differed, 
they found ways to work together with the C.V. and the R.J.F. 

The local branch of the NSDAP in Würzburg was organized in 1921. Four weeks later 
a Storni Abteilung was initiated (S.A.). 

On November 8, 1923 the (famous) revolt in Miinich took place. 

In October 1925 the NSDAP in Würzburg distributed pamphlets asking the population 
to refrain from patronizing Jewish department Stores and businesses during the Coming Christmas 
season. The President of the Bavarian State Government, Von Henle, forbade the pamphlet 
because of its hateful contents and the danger of disturbance of the peace. 



In 1926 leaflets were circulated stating: "Your principle: Your Duty: Never buy from 



Jews!" 



The author goes into detail about the agitation: For the public to resist biiying and 
patronizing Jewish businesses. 



22 



THE "RITUAL MURDER" (in 1929) FROM MANAU 

The absolutely unscrupulous assertion used by the Iower Frankonian NSDAP is 
documented by their behavior on the occasion of the alleged "ritual murder of Manau. " On the 
17th of March 1929, a five year old boy was found dead with a wound on his throat. Ue 
Stürmet (The Forward), a national socialist periodical took on the topic claiming: The proof 
is beyond any doubt that it is a possible "Jewish Blood Murder." The purpose of the murder 
is winning human blood for the preparation of Matzot. 

On April 1 , 1929 a gathering was calied by the N.S.D. A.P. of Homeim (a nearby town) 
with the theme "The Blood Murders of the Jews." The day was Easter Sunday and three halls 
were needed to accommodate the masses of the attending public. One of the Speakers was the 
editor of the aforementioned Stümer, spewing hate with a clandestine remark to kill Jews! The 
excitement of the masses was so pitched that murder and arson attacks could happen any time. 



THE PROHIBITION OF RITUAL SLAUGHTER 

On January 29. 1930 the Ravarian Regional Government passed a law, 65-42 votes to 
anesthetize animals before slaughters. This law constituted infringement of the Jewish religious 
Code which prohibits prestunning of animals before slaughter. The law, which became effective 
as of October I, 1930, denotes a significant and difficult Intervention of the constitutional 
guarantees of freedom of conscience. The decision of the Bavarian Regional Government caused 
great Sensation far over the borders of the land. 



Vie Stürmer was the most infamous, shocking and scandalous weekly. 



23 



Jewish periodicals and Rabbinic leaders protested, to no avail. With the attainment of 
the Prohibition of ritual slaughter in the first county in the nation, the NSDAP scored a 
triumphant victory, made possible by the Cooperation of the SPD regional parnameiit facti^n who 
voted mostly with the National Socialisy(Nazis). 

The year 1930 gave the Nazis another important advantage. At elections to the Reichstag 
(National Parliament) the NSDAP had a substantial increase in votes. 



THE HABIMA SCANDAL 

On the evening of November 19, 1930, the city theater of Würzburg booked the Hebrew- 
speaking theater group "Habima", stationed in Moscow, to perform. After niimeroiis 
Performances all over the world the troop had earned an enthiisiastic response already in 
Würzburg playing 'The Golem" in January. Theo Kaufman described the Performance as 
"sensational." It was also a great fmancial success. The management agreed to show "The 
Dybuk", a drama showing a mystic love story set in an Orthodox Chassidic Milieu. 

During the day the NSDAP local group distributed pamphlets, especially in front of the 
University, with a headline: "Kultur Bolschewismus in Würzburg". This Kuliur Schande 
(culture disgrace) is not only a dishonor for the nation, but also a challenge to all those 
preserving a spark of German sensitivity. Furthermore, it called for protestation. 

Already a half hour before the beginning of the Performance, hundreds of adolescents, 
together with students demonstrated in front of the theater, shouting: "Gcrmany awake and Juda 
vanish!" Visitors had to run the gauntlet. At the exact time of the Performance, the 
demonstrators knocked with fists and sticks at the doors, threw stones, yelling and whistling, 



24 



"Down with Jews, out with the Hebrews." The police had great difficulty Holding the 
demonstrators back from forcing their way into the theater. 

The Performance ended at 1 1:30. The main roads normally used by the theater visitors 
were closed and the attending people had to use dark, poorly lit alleys to get home. The Nazi 
demonstrators took advantage of the dimly lit lanes to yell, insult, offend and even attack some 
people. The few policemen on hand stood by helplessly, doing little or nothing. 



ACCEPTANCE OF POWER 

Since January 30, 1933, the "German Anti-Semites" took on the power of running the 
National Government, the high position of Chancellor and most ministerial posts. The opinion 
of many leftists was: "The new N.S.D.A.P. government will exist a short term, then ultimately 
fail. Many Jews assessed the new Situation hoping it wouldn't last. 

Others did not share this casual optimism. Paula Eppstein from Markbreit said: "I 
observed and lived through the rise of Nazism as a Student. My family and I had no doubt that 
Anti-Semitism would be officially legalized and would have catastrophic consequences for all 
Jews in Germany. No matter how long the Nazis remained in power, the fanaticism of its 
supporters would not die down. That the existence, the property and the life of many Jews, 
especially in the smaller town and villages, was deeply endangered and threatened was evident. 
My family had Substantive fear. Nevertheless, we did not know at the moment what to do to 
protect ourselves and escape. 

Many Jews and many of the German public in general lacked an overail vision of what 
direction the NSDAP political leadership would take or whether the Government would last 



25 



longer than just a few months (Germany had 30 Reichs-Chancellors in 10 years). The Jewish 
communities also did not realize how bankrupt tlieir foundations for siirvival looked, already 
before 1933. Actually, whoever followed the developing stages of Nazism in the years of the 
"Weimarer Republic" had enough reason for concern for the fiitiire of the Jewish population 
sector. Now the Jews of Germany and Würzburg suddenly noticed a profound weakness and 
ineffectiveness with the acceptance and estabhshment of power by the N.S.D.A.P. 

A constantly growing group of the population was inclined to believe the reproachful 
attacks of Anti-Semitism, influenced and promoted by the poHtical and economic crisis in the 
late 20's. Then, in 1929,<^eginning world economic crises ended with the takeover of the 
NSDAP Government in Germany. The Jews were the closes and nearest object of assault and 
aggression on which the social psychoIogic needs for scapegoats, cause explanations of affairs 
of evils, was unloaded and vented. All efforts to clear up, enlighten and educational work of 
the Central Verein (C.V.) resulted only in limited success. 

Although, as mentioned earlier, the program of the NSDAP encompassed outright 
discrimination against the Jews, but not yet physical annihilation. However, in the 
Marktbreiter Wochenblatt ^ remarkable Statement, like a prophecy is read: Es Ist Unbedingt 
Nötig Die Juden Zutäten! 'Tt is absolutely necessary to kill the Jews!", and a "horrinc flame 
death" is revealed. 

This was written in the newspaper in 1923. The author sum.narizes that in 1938 
completely successful elimination of Jews from political, economic and cultural life, leading to 
mass deportation and progressive step by step annihilation can only be explained^when the 
already developed isolation of Jews during the years of the Weimarer Republic is considered. 



26 



longer than just a few months (Germany had 30 Reichs-Chancellors in 10 years). The Jewish 
communities also did not realize how bankrupt their foundations for survival looked, already 
before 1933. Actually, whoever followed the developing stages of Nazism in the years of the 
"Weimarer Republic" had enough reason for concern for the futiire of the Jewish popiilation 
sector. Now the Jews of Germany and Würzburg suddenly noticed a profound weakness and 
ineffectiveness with the acceptance and establishment of power by the N.S.D.A.P. 

A constantly growing group of the popuIation was inchned to believe the reproachfui 
attacks of Anti-Semitism, influenced and promoted by the political and economic crisis in the 
lata 20's. Then, in 1929,^eginning world economic crises ended with the takeover of the 
NSDAP Government in Germany. The Jews were the closes and nearest object of assault and 
aggression on which the social psychoIogic needs for scapegoats, cause explanations of affairs 
of evils, was unloaded and vented. All efforts to clear up, enlighten and educational work of 
the Central Verein (C.V.) resulted only in Hmited success. 

Although, as mentioned earlier, the program of the NSDAP encompassed outright 
discrimination against the Jews, but not yet physical aiiiiihilation. However, in the 
Marktbreiter Woch enblatt ?, remarkable Statement, like a prophecy is read: Es Ist Unbedingt 
Nötig Die Juden Zutöten! "It is absolutely necessary to kill the Jews!", and a "horriric flanie 
deafh" is revealed. 

This was written in the newspaper in 1923. The author summarizes that in 1938 
completely successful elimination of Jews from political, economic and cultural life, leading to 
mass deportation and progressive step by step annihilation can only be explained^when the 
already developed isolation of Jews during the years of the Weimarer Republic is considered. 



26 



At that time, already, the activists of the radical and Citizens' rights, folk parties and 
organizations already succeeded in activating the latent reservations and Anti-Semitism against 
the Jews and it became a substantial part of normal political science, pushing the older values 
of a tolerant society concept into the background. The general Opposition was so insignificant. 
when after the establishment of the tyranny, in an unsuspected form, their Weltunschauung of 



racist praxis was turned into serious action. 



- Synopsis written by Alfred Gruenspecht 



P.S. In July 1996, on a return trip from Israel, we stopped over in Würzbiirg to visit two 
Jewish cemeteries nearby where close relatives were buried. 

During our stay in the city I had occasion to meet Dr. Roland Flade, the aiithor 
of the book Juden in Wünhurg 1918-1933. Dr. R. Flade, presently a Deputy Director 
of the daily newspaper, Mainpost, deserves much credit, acclaim and honor for his 
diligent, careful and thorough historic dissertation. I admire Dr. Flade for his scriipulous 

and conscientious research work and his eloquent efforts to put it down in black and 

# 

white. Dr. Flade was born in 1951. He lives with his wife and son, Lucias, in 

Würzburg. 

I have tried my best to give a short general view of his book Juden in Würzburg 
in English in order to enable interested persons, as well as students of these fateful years, 
to get a bright and clear vision of Nazi ideology, its development, expansion and 
ultimately its horrible consequences — the deportation and death of six million Jews and 
millions of additional human beings. 



27 



Again, I extend my respects and compliments to Dr. & Mrs. Roland Flade. Kol 



HaKavodl 



- Alfred Griienspecht 



28 



/{^ 1/0/ i 



im 



nn)^^ (u^ un^^ji^lr /W/ ^ 




/ 



^^ 



^ 



l/^oc^7^i> 



hA^ Uiloilf'^^^^ 



A PROLOGUE 

The lives of the Jewish residents of the Hessian villages and small towns was much 
different than the lives of their contemporaries in the larger cities, such as Frankfurt, Würzburg, 
or Berlin. The Jews of Hessia and Lower Frankonia were interconnected with mountains and 
Valleys, the brooks and rivers, the landscape of their region. When in the beginning of the 19th 
Century Jews were allowed toadd sumames, many selected names of trees, birds, rivers, towns, 
colors and manual occupations. Most of ihcsQ Landjuden were hardworking, frugal, simple and 
thrifty people. There existed several hundred Jewish communities in the Hessian and Lower 
Frankonia area of Germany, which date back over 500 years. Records kept by the Catholic 
church in Wüstensachsen mention my ancestors, the Grünspechts, some 250 years ago. 

The Jews of these villages established a cordial relationship with their Christian 
neighbors. However, in the second half of the nineteenth Century, and after World War I, many 
young Jewish men and unmarried young women emigrated to the United States for lack of 
sufficient possibilities to earn a livelihood. Most villages and small towns had on average 
between 20 and 40 Jewish families. 

In Wüstensachsen, my birthplace, lived about 100 Jewish souls, approximately ten 
percent of the total population. Most families eamed their livelihoods as cattle and horse 
dealers, butchers, bakers, small Storekeepers of textiles, groceries and clothing. The women 
usually manned the shops while the men traveled to the villages, visiting the farmhouses and 
supplying all necessities for house and stable. There was no industry to speak of; I do not 
remember any factory except stone quarries for road-building. In most instances, the Jews were 
frequently very helpful to the farmers and were often consulted to solve fmancial and personal 
Problems. They tried to understand their thinking in times of emergency and distress. 



t 

•% 



The Jew was respected, trusted and won the confidence of his Christian customers. 
There were, of course, exceptions to the rule. However, most Jewish inhabitants -- men women 
and children - made every effort to avoid the creation of rishes (anti-Semitism). 

I vividly remember the war memorial of Worid War I -- 1914-1918 - in Wüstensachsen 
containing the names of several Jewish fathers and sons that died at the front. Every able bodied 
young man was inducted into the Kaiser' s army and fought bravely for his country. My 
grandparents, the Grünspechts had two sons - my father and my Uncle Herman. Both were in 
the fighting force. My grandparents, the Oppenheimers on my mother's side had one son and 
three daughters. The son was in the army, the oldest daughter was already married and the 
other two. My mother and her sister were nurses in the /Red Gross. 

In the year 1823 the administration of the State of Hessia allowed the Jews to establish 
elementary schools with certified teachers. The Lehrer, teacher, now became an employee of 
the State, which was a better income. The income was supplemented by a small side income as 
Chazan, Baal Köre, Schocket, Melamed and Lecturer. Most of these teachers, or better 
'miniature rabbis'. were hiphlv respe^t^e^ Hv narpntQ QtnHpntc cmH tv»^ ;r.^oKi*for.fr of'f^« ^r^n — ^n 
by Jew and Gentile. 

With the rise of Nazism towards the end of the 1920s, the disaster for the Jewish 



Population started. When Hitler 



attained füll power in 1933 the calamity 



became a catastrophe. The young adults were invited to join the S.A. and S.S.; the teenagers 
were urged to join Hitler youth. Hatred and indifference were taught in schools, preached by 
the superiors at every gathering. Malicious, detestable, disgusting material with degrading and 



% 



offensive stories was published -- Propagandist provoked hatred and prejudice, primarily against 
Jews, other minorities and communists. 

In Germany lived 600,000 Jews when the persecution started. Many men were rounded 
up and sent to concentration camps in Dachau, Buchenwald and other places. Of those arrested 
many were released if their families secured visas or affidavits to foreign countries, in the years 
before 1940. Half of German Jewry was able to escape the atrocities of the Nazis; the other half 
were shipped like cattle to extermination camps, into the gris Chambers, shot or murdered by the 
bestiality of the S.A. and S.S. The world was immune to the suffering and tribulations of six 
million of our people. The leaders of the nations lent no ear to the cry of the unfortunate masses 
of men, women and children. 

The millions of the fmest of our people 

Were sacrificed by the Nazis with 

Rivers of blood, 

Mountains of decaying bodies 

And heaps of ashes. 

Only our memories of them are 

Their graves and tombstones. 



Emotions are never dead, only dormant. 
A person's link to his past is never severed. 
Our memory of the past will never recede and 
Several times during a year it should be summoned. 



>ii 



PINKAS KEHILLOT HESSEN 



Translated from Hebrew into 

German 
by: Dr. Max Spangenthal 



Translated from German into 

English 
by: Alfred Gruenspecht 



Wüstensachseny vi Hage, today part of the vi Hage of Ehrenberg, 
county of Fulda. 

193 3: Population 1,236, of them 82 were Jews. 

*** 

Jews are mentioned living there as early as 1660. According 
to Pinkas Kehillot Hessen mentioned are three f amilies. By the end 
of the 18 th Century they increased to 26. In the middle of the 
19th Century, many of the young people emigrated to America. In 
spite of it, Wüstensachsen remained one of the larger Jewish 
communities in the county. They had, at this time, a synagogue and 
an public school (elementary) , which at the end of the Century 
moved into a new building with the help of the offlcial 
authorities. For many years, teacher A. Gundersheimer, Shochet & 
Chazan, taught school until after World War I. In the year 1859 
the Chevra Gemiluth Chassidim was founded and in 1890 also a Ladies 
Auxillary (Frauenverein) . 

In 1892 a change from Rabbinat Gersfeld to Rabbinat Fulda took 
place. In 1919 the school had to be closed. For some time, until 
reopening, the students learned in the Catholic School of the 
village. 

In 1932 the school had 15 students. The Jewish Community 
employed a new teacher, Ivan Goldschmidt in 1930. He also was the 
Chazan (Cantor) and Shochet (Ritual Slaughterer) . There was also 



-**1 



a Mikva (Ritualaria) and Kosher Sch'chita (Kosher Slaughtering) . 
The dead were buried in a collective cemetery in Weyhers. The 
Chairman of the chevra Kadisha (Burial Society) was Liebman 
Weinberger, also a Board Member of the Congregation. 

The Chevrat Gemillat Chassadim had 11 members; the Ladies 
Society 25. The congregation belonged to the Rabbinat Fulda and at 
it's heim was Max Buxbaum. Three Jews from the neighboring village 
of Melperts were affiliated with the congregation. 

The Jews of Wüstensachsen were active in village affairs and 
its societies. Some members of the Congregation were elected to 
serve on the Village Board. 

At the Start of Nazi Rule most members were cattle dealers 
with some farming and agriculture. six members owned stores. At 
election time for the Reichstag, the Lower House of the Government 
in 1932, the Zentrum Party had the prevailing majority 58.2%, the 
nazis 25.5%, while in the State of Hessen-Nassau, the nazis had 
43.6%. 



Nazi Tima: 



In 1933 the nazis demanded a boycott of all Jewish business, 
the aryan customers were photographed and accused as traitors. In 
the early years of the nazi rule, economic dealings between farmers 
and the Jewish cattle dealers took place. Occasionally, there were 
unpleasant incidents on cattle market days. As time went on, 
business with farmers was transacted in the evening er at night. 




But some farmers began not paying their debt obligations and 
threatened the Jewish merchants they owed money to. 

In 1935, the village opened a swimming pool with the sign: 
Jevs are Forbidden to Enter. 

The violence against Jews constantly increased. Mr. Buxbaum, 
the Parness (leader) of the Community (a soldier on the battief ront 
during World War I) was attacked and beaten in the street. Another 
Jew was equally attacked and beaten in his home. The Hitler Youth 
marched together with the S.A. — The Stormtroopers , singing 
inflammatory songs ("Wenn das Judenblut vom messer spritzt dann 
geht's nochmal so gut." — "When Jewish blood splashes from the 
knife, then it will be better, like never before.) 

Jewish business locations were damaged, homes were soiled and 
painted with hateful Slogans. Doors and Windows were broken. One 
night the nazis broke into the synagogue. A Torah scroll was 
taken, walls were dirtied and soiled, furnishings broken up and 
polluted. One Jew was apprehended. For weeks no one knew what 
happened to him. One cattle dealer was accused of br inging the 
Hoof and Mouth Disease {Maul & Klaven Seuche) into the area and was 
apprehended for weeks. 

The Jewish doctor — the only doctor in the village — 
escaped. He happened not to be home when the nazis tried to 
apprehend him. His aryan Chauffeur brought him over the border 
into Holland soon after. His wife was brought into Holland by a 
group of anti-Facists, an Underground group, and reunited with her 
husband. 



*i\ 



In 1935 Teacher Goldschmidt left Wüstensachsen and Teacher 
Berthold Katz took over his position. In the same year the Jewish 
school was closed and the building was taken over by the village 
for ownership. 

On November 9, 1938 the infamous and disgraceful Kristallnacht 
(Night of the Broken Glass) , the synagogue was destroyed and 
whatever remained was removed. 

In January 1939 the last Jews left Wüstensachsen. From a 
directory of 75 names, we read that 22 Jews of Wüstensachsen left 
Germany; seventeen to the United States, 2 to Argentina, 1 to 
Israel (Palestine in those days) , 1 to South Africa and 1 to 
Luxemburg. 1 Jewish person died in Wüstensachsen, 20 left to 
unknown destinations. 32 persons left to various eitles in Germany 
and were later transported to extermination camps, never to be 
heard from again. One of these unfortunates was Max Buchsbaum, the 
Parness (leader) of the Jewish Community. 

David Gruenspecht, who emigrated to the United States oif 
America, describes the fate of the Jews in his "Remembrance and 
Memories of Those Years". He estimates the number of Jews 
perished, murdered or shipped to the crematoria at 30 persons from 
Wüstensachsen . 



II 0/i 



l/Jll 




PP 



^;^/^yW/ /c^^y (oi/fcn'^^ 




'nr 



">»-^~-»-« - 



1 




.' . 



< r- I 



4 • ^ « * 



< >. 



' \ < . 



N • • 



» - t » 



» • » \ f , " 



« • 



K% * • * * . »t « 



- "(;u/77o 



iVz poc7£ss G=aTau3 (Pf?oi^<^ 

($ l^(^oOtfti/3ött7 /7^, Oo£^ MOt C^MpU7J- f7S Rr»CH> 

i/sU C/A^/<A/CL>aJ hP7t:-n/AC ( 9 ^7/U^ O/f^Ol/'^-nTsV ^H/> 

L(77C£ ICUOU)/^ lOOrtlC of fi- (>0£rJ55 Uja[7ffJG/^J 

EkpcnttfJ^^ 1/^70 paö9^' 

Usit- ^ou-rti U(^S S'p£/Ur /^JTUS CiacLjfS cf /4=)Z 






I^L-^ 



/ » , 












I 



' < 



1/ 




% \ • % f 

■ » • • 



V •• ■., ' i^ : 



I ♦• » 



» • • 



.« • * » 



* • • • 



» ,^ 



• .' r 



, r. • * - 



• • • «'s • 



* 



f * ^.- • * \ J 






ortßöfL 



cUiuoa£i 

/9a^P i=>^^0^-y^^o^S H^-n^ D=^e ^^O ffii<- ^-r79cr^//^<<r 

Rf7xn ^/öuTt/^r/o^ . TMS- c^aoA^s (Rsrori^^ 
^o ÖL MOTZ, J^y l^'-f^ TZOry Jo/jJso TU:rjn.Sh}^s 



f 



P 



\^I. 



MoSy of (nSa-Tflu/y (^RoßG's: ^y/?/<C/96. /Sk7S 



!l 



07 



T^--^ hust^(t?ii>j 0^ tf(rio^ iCarLAJfguTf/ , r/^j£jips. 



( IJ lU^ 



Cc>i^nf£ er Tti(l:FS 7h foKjft- 0S<^&O:rC 



lun.' 



insTfii^ ppsfMp A/~"?7-r jjsrc-c 












1 1 



I 

3 



I I 
I I 



I I 



l^sfi {fS7/)7i^ r^/^r 



CotJ^rMpOR.ßn(s} PAS /^cp-r //U ///^// tr$rxl/fj tfA/J^ 

'f^ouh'o tto OLHoj;^ i/o /9^0 . 

ly^n^ss^ fori ij^s-Ti^A^c^ " Oas 9cUiufi>/co''(^-7ü^ a£:io 

I 

!, Slis SfiiAj TClz" Coi^f7fi^7cy GQoujt/u<5 Oß/J^^-fZ op U/i^rz 

j. (^t^o Oo^M ^' "^rn L/jo C^K^Md of T/Ars Jj (93S 

i J 

i 1[{<iOUC,H fl4£ Uzcnic i'lMSS of Oc/(Wfi^ar/oJ^n^7/l£^'ri 



1 1 



1 1 



11 



fr/X/c icßS/Jp-r ßUTsfJfJ; ßlS7 QU, 



tS{At^£l4Ö'UT 






(IJ O^i PiLL7f\C^i SslCdliT UcU£*J, 



. \ 



• ■. • • . , 



' t 



^ 



^ICU MfSt ^sLiy DO-r cU^a^ SoutJQt^G uonp, 



Qf^j-TLr of UiU^Cs . Ho^Tf/>>'c 



^ COdS'tUi^/ 



! 



&. 



1 



i 




■ ' 



Wou f£:il. unii S^ci?^o OsCicuT, 

Jb^iCuT nj-^(p puac yv^fi outJ f^icLoo^. 
<fdm^7 hn H^f^(^''^ t£f^T7.ö<Jc£{j 

f ^,r.' .r / / ^ cr^ / -r--Ai au^ ö£n S=st£ T/sfSvn^ STtLü-: , 



♦ • 



-%.r^ 



mmmmmtm 



il 

1 1 



II 



li 



H 



j^p f\ finor^A/jy 'fui4 tieft" p7jui) ^/^r p^op/:--. 

V-'*^"- (^cy^^ A^/4oi"c- Ho7(JS 5U0US7) /? l)c^ r^joo 






/5 Qsfi^c-7^o 



/Hfi^0/a7=- \7lc7f 



TU £■ Morit^L 0£c L (Vs 



t^s PihJf) fi(^at^oo/U^r) aA^^-s . ßU7 aus^ 



/ 



//w 



0U7 Lauj^»:? ^ A/j>u> /»Äg o^ccAtQ/ac> 



f 7(U o?u.^ns, -r//- oioc 



O 



f^flOlU^nC^ /oJjT 



^ 



^ ) 



' \ • 



\ 



/■ 



(/ 



tt 

cf^i^f^Jofi. Cc>LL£c-r:fjci 9=VjrrLAL. ß^^t^s rff/<i--r U/s 
Ho7il£yL Utto-7^ f/it?/^ "T^^" ixi^at-'f f?a^^ <!>f T//s-ric 

0(l(MJUJ('> , r^ Sl\o(i-7 IpTnoQuc-r/oiJ / h/ uUic^U '7/l<r- 
j t^u^fiort iS')cfjlf3/A^s -rnjr l^t^-7on^ o f U-'*t l-{Ai-'p to flirrt yJ 

0} '7'/// Go-Ut^ SaanotJ n^^a ^floun>Lrs> of -T/W np,0uc7jr) 



> I 




) 



n(^ 



y- 



yoi/ fit^o l/nn(oL>s L eu^s o f i^ypa sfS//PA^ , Ss^> r/riJiJ/AL. 



tf(/ocn-T(=>i^ Of ß p£aSt>i^Au pQS7 QaccJtuS/^fft/z-i (^icnon/s 






7 



t • 



•A . 



* v^ ■ . 



\ . 



*i -.^-v 



b . 



«. » 



• ■•-v 



w\l 



t ■ 



\ • . \ I • 

* ♦. 



jj 

s . 

\ 



^uj- f/rnss o 



:l 



il 



1U£ Tfcic ßHO O^-fUift^, -TU^i/l pUl^O/^y^ . CJf^(c.//uc 

Ion« (^laano 'To Soff/attJQ. a^o ^yism^c ^oa ma/^^^- 

fnau Qo'ft^liiPf O-Zt/swciii (i^SiG^^so P^-y^cr avo 

I I 



li 



IST T^ ^i" cf^f^sat^juCJD Uh>tLtJOt^jy ffi7£ lun» TUS $Vfp3cli\ 



s • 



1 



Pcon, OhJL-i -ril-r Mof^s-rncii 6^jS7i7f:iAj(7- ^</Kae>a(oa/MC. Nßs 

f2t::<^ tt CCS ' 

,i/.._. .-s R pfc^orzr cf pUn^/iA'7 ^c^ATon/^'S /P 

M-^fi(i(b^l(ia= ^ou, ^S7 (/--n-^ Ots-7/ijur [ 
fb'^foa^c fz/^r c ort 7-/7 //u fjfLc . 

i, /9 A^r? ??£^loi^O ^SM/0/AJ^C? TÖVy Ct/37/n. 

\^l/ü TfU- rh(\aiLi^^(c Li fr /j's //o7 -ru-z L^yp^^nt^juc-r ^^ 

\^-rCi^ //JOif/tQuac^^ n,U7 TU- CojiJ^£r^7n,^7yj::> cyf7rrtr^-7y<^ 



i! 

il 



V sO p/^' 



v\yut4. 



U Of /^J^ Ci^Mf^S Sein 



i I 






Tfls iJiCH7 17 ^ 



rL JMx/o (/J 7U£ OxUOOl:ro 57 



lUUof 



wo 5oMX tiorifit. ni^o fic^7(iir(c 



•W»IHW, 



f 



I . 



? 



IV 









III i m i u nnrnnii III iitin » . i m um imumOM— mnwilrtri 'T~r" r~ -■•-| ■ — f- 

,^* L .««,«.,».. «» ■•1* '.'.•♦■••* 

- - • • • • . ; • • 



N\ 



\ A 






ß^' fo£_f^ 









, \- 

/ t: 

Nicl-Im\cit 1^ 



lJ£\Js^ OiC^M'i Uzfinr Af/yrtr" yjc/At A/-77/2//--^5/ 



I j 

ßl r\l leK Olli $7'-(C£p RS PiCcu^aT/ou pt i^Q CoMpC/^/AJT. A/o7 o/JCy 



O^n-TP pi(\fHcS> OottLifr . 1^0 U) Ulfs S7c7iCß ourt Cot/jrVt>fi^S, 



I: <^f [4o(K fiiJp -^(4r l'!6fJT of (^-P - l^l^o C(^u 1£ajs> 

i; /=J Oi<i,.QffJ Sh-{MM£ri .' "^o DuS7. Pö<^ß7^^ 



H/ l-fiS fl^l7N /S hJoodisHliJi^ (4-13 Coi^raou. 



/ 



• • • 



< 



J 



• 



/(?fl 



OUa.^) 



, (hpo $9f(b0£ T/tfir fhsc^ /^£- ficrc/i^Li7Y' ^^■'' -^^^ '^^ 

a£L^7^'i TU PI 7 1 1^ C(?fj£^/'^ ^na7/o/^- Cr^Mpj^ /?£/^---' 7^1^ 

l-lsn^' 7/if ^ Ollen H uofzcp" ßs^oi^j-s Rs^tct-^^ 

\io\\A7 os£p 7p/>-/ rpooujpfp fi^(Lftf^oi-j{a 

^Lot\T Ovis tos TU:r pfiisofjj'n's f~i^T=: n-no 7/fj^ 

/?AA/<^/ of i7'/(S U/ ortet) Cc^yt/zt/^c ri- u/i-^n T/Z^r ro^i^ 
(iJ Cl-lt^ROfJS Iho-oT "To Br ßOoi/(?/Y7 "Tj? -7//^ 

/Osf^A^iu'S , iJ>U7 ^SjfhJ As O^^tef , l.//2>sn/^7/ci^, Boy 



of ß fC2lst'Js>^ C^f7 ß/^^k ö/i^ 7^/i S/Q^ Df7(r^ 



• I 



. 1 •" 



» * \ 



I 



■) 



. ' '. « 



% 



. » • 



' • ♦ . « 



« • •. « 



» » t 



\ " 



» ■> m % • 



lo^ 



a Ojr7f4{c ^ -r/u U095' ot a^'tfi1(<JS^ l^^ns r^scaco:r?p 

Alo^^(^r-n Co (-Jen ST^r OLA<^y / ftt-S^ ^o m de nno uf^s^ «r 
; (\ßoüt -für coTru. u^oat-p HS^ 1^^ pT Q{tti--7((y~' f^>^r) Gfy^=^(^ 

\, ß(/o^ of T/W TSkl^. 0'7US/t Püc7s ff7oM 7'aJ-r?jrruT^^ 

:) ßo- Uh/rürS£-i^/^roct4-T^ 

Osfi idcyf- O^M Hü eist- Ol:: s*^ffous- n>n(Cf^Tf 
' ey OfH^O ^*V O^c en-o^f Ofts (>r^n.o OHO o/x' 2. (jc;^^^ ^ 



r 

t 
I 



T/z 



I . 



I 
( 



. . t 



•...*> 



' • t t ' t « '* • 



• t 



* *. * 



• • 



•'' .' ' . 



• 4 



(il-lf Uln^Oot^fa-^nA 



; ^M/97, .l4iiLr faoM TT/r- v^/^ r^vi^ ru<r c>7U:m. ((/^cr 
\.fno^ -rar ^olcouJi^^ y -w/«- , Gaoicia Ccf^i^,^^r^ 

f^^s OSM Unn/^ idd-/jnc^t/s^ /2.V • 
. li'Jlur u/iiJOoiJ fnati^- apf7=nn> rii^ üjoncjj : 

' 5 fo rt ftie^0c>n -OUT rtUn I" poSi y/oj^i-o ! 

I -r nit^Ms TUt trPn-rH , 7i4£ Uonsr /q^>c) r//-- n--/ ^^^ 

II r^fiotos, fuj- S-ouC t^tjo Vir Uttjcs. o/ Y^-nnfiyfju^ 

0>£HltJp ru^- Ufkc^ Lttfss -7Usujon^£> 



"TK^ fußjx' 



onrur Colli cTior-^'ujr, SoMsit^ss TC^su.- osf.-ns 



-rit^C kJc'J=hJS, IIJ{bo7U ijL>91tX 



P^^S (KzSut^j^^cr /$ 



• •. ♦ 



»V • 



V. -> ' • 



» i- 



• »■•»»,• 



.• 



'I 



l> 



\tlOSf po£n^ ntlc f^l},oo7 t.OJ-^G Ifi/a fort. f/7a^ Pc^rr^^U^ 

.^'Q=a ScCt£u) CiUc f)>L£f9/ji/<r/J oa LlfTsj;^ r/i^/n C-^iiPos 

^4 IS IS lOoiJ HY C-OT 

ySl M^ I-l\/lJ^Cj f^CQi^ IS pf^t/0 fuCC-j CoiJfCfOü^y 



l _- 



//^ 






$1 



■ t 
% • 

I , 



. ^ • •» . > 



/^ 



\y 



you ioVltJCn MDtUxR^ ^ 17 (S TM::' 1/Mf 
Tl/£ UJldcof i'lf-: UJIU.GLC1J Rl tis l^n^7 tronIM7 fs^rof foLK 

Us Liufio p^f a f?£src^n^^ of ^/a/^7 

i^7^f^i^'-(. S^lA'Ti^c (pocr-ts fla£ ffizS'xnU^j? f<^ot^ 
72'«'' l^fl^n "t^Piri -yx-nns jqH'Ot^&sT ^äx&^/i^Sout^Oß 

nf7sn-n-ux-'-u/^fi^ ^ IaJie {CfiiUtJS7 t)u SsHiiJOm" 

^U£ l-pSr UoO-t-p of TUT ffiS7 " 0^rt«C£JA/r iCoffxtt." 

(714z ynciLu S(//7<:fi^£j), ^jfUrH/^cr/rf^-J SUr (iu7 a^ Paoß:tg 



Etudes 



Ludvic E. Välavec 



The Poetess Gertrud Groag 



1889-1979 



Much has been written about the "ghetto" Tlieresienstadt, that a conceivable idea is 
perceivable about its intensive cultural life. In Theresienstadt existed a well developed culture, 
based on the Czechoslovakian language and tradition, next to intense German art and literature. 
Whatever is known about it, does not complete its realm. 

New unknown material is still discovered and published. Here, the writer wants to refer 
to the little known work of a poetess writing in German from Czechoslovakia. She put her 
Theresienstadt experiences into prose. 

Gertrud Groag was born on December 29, 1889, daughter of Dr. Emil Fleischmann, 

« 

lawyer in Zäbre Na Morave (Hohenstadt), a town in North Mähren, where German was spoken. 
Her youth was spent in the circles of her cultivated, art-loving family. In the year 1912 she 
married Emanuel Groag (1886-1961). In March 1939 Emanuel Groag was temporarily interned. 
Subsequent persecutions for "reason of race" increased steadily in various forms. It was also 
feit by the Groag family. 

In the Fall season of 1942 Gertrud Groag, her husband and son, Willi, with his wife, 
were deported to Theresienstadt, where they remained until liberation, in 1945. Their two sons 
had been able to emigrate to Paiestine betöre the war. In Theresienstadt Gertrude worked as 
a nurse in Hospital LI 24 looking after the orphans,' teaching children needle work. Besides 



* Parents were often shipped to slave labor camps or extermmation camps 

1 



that, she had to work in a 'mica factory.' Here, amongst Horror and menace, Groag's love for 
poetry increased to become an essential, human, and artful necessity. She had to voice her 
points of view, of living confined in a concentration camp with the experiences of Nazi 
persecution of innocent human beings. Her poetry about Theresienstadf exceeds in importance 
and expressions her deep and far-reaching grasp of the most inner feelings of human beings in 
extreme situations to all other poetry she wrote before. 

After Liberation, the Groags returned to Olmütz. In 1948 they joined their sons in Israel, 
that were able to meet before. They lived in the city of Kiryat-Tivon. Here Trude Groag 
continued to write prose and lyrics besides giving courses in picture painting. She died on July 
8, 1979. 

Most of Gertrude Groag's lyrical texts were lost. Several of her works were saved by 
the musician, Dr. Egon Kornauth. Those, in the course of three to four decades written poems 
were well known in a broad circle of friends. Their Niveau, according to some contemporaries. 



was kept in high esteem. Many made copies of the texts. A number of them were found in 
Olmütz in 1980. Her estate, that her son Dr. Willi Groag made accessible to us, accounts for 
19 poems, written in the years 1907 to 1937. Some of them are soft, compassionate verses; for 
instance "Das Schilßied" (The Reed Song) 1907. The brilliance in word and calligraphic 
formation appears in "Weisse Wolke" (White Cloud) 1919, "Vergebliches Sehnen" (Futile 
Longing) 1920. In the earlier years of her writing, she wrote predominantly poems of love and 
nature "Herbst Freude" (Autumn Peace) 1907, "Mein Herz" (My Heart) 1920, also reflections 
of emotional matters "Geburt Des Schönen" (Birth of the Beautiful) 1920. Later on she 
composed poems of general contemplation, on conditions in the world, on faith and on people. 



"Erschaffung" (Creation), 1928). Warnings about the threatened peace, "Hoffnung" (Hope) 
1935. She wrote about the Godless and Godforsaken world in which she saw the constantly 
growing danger of war and doom. In "Zeiflied" (Song of Time) 1935, one will find her to be 
modern, but through the hectic times of civilization, a bothered human being that nevertheless 
finds solace in her calming and reassuring verses. 



EINE LEBENDE ANTENNE BIST DUE 



DES GETÖSES TRÄGER, DAST DENRAUM UMBDICHERFÜLLT 



EINGEHÜLLT 



IN DES ALL TAGS SEICHTE WELLEN, 
MUSST DUE ALLE LAUTE GELLEN, 



BIST EIN INSTRUMENT DER GRELLEN 



JAMMER SCHREIEI 



HILFERUFEN, 



RÄDERRASSELN, HUPEN, FLUCHEN 



You are a living antenna, 

Carrier of the uproar that fills the space around you. 

Wrapped up 

In the daily shallow waves, 

You must yell out every sounding word, 



Are you now an Instrument of a harsh 



Gry of pitiful misery! 

Helpessness, 

Rattle of wheels, hooting, cursing 



NUR IN SELTENEN AUGEN BLICKEN 

WENN DU GANZ NATUR VERBUNDEN 

FÜHLST MIT HEILIGEN ENTZÜCKEN 

DICH DEM STROMKREIS AUSGESCHALTED. 

LEIS ENTFALTET, AUS DER SEELE TIEFSTER STILLE, 

TAUCHTALS HEILIGER SCHÖPFUNGSWILLE 

KLAR UND REIN DEIN EIGNES LIED, 

(GEGENWARTSSEELE, 1925). 



Only in rare moments, 

When you are totally engaged with nature 

You feel with sacred delight, 

Yourself removed from the circling current. 

Silently unfolds the deep serenity of the soul, 

Emerging, as sacredly willed by creation 

Bnght and pure your own melody. 



(GEGENWARTSSEELE, 1925). 



The poems, always composed and styled with talent and competence, exhibit an affluent 
vocabulary and Imagination. The Impulses are spontaneous and forcefui, in some places well 
motivated and playfully fitted in. "Die Flüggen Wünsche" (The Fledged Wishes) 1976 (The 
Wish to Fly Away) often portrays the seriousness of feelings and ideas, sometimes only the 
elegance of speech. 

In the year 1936, Groag wrote the fifteen poem cycle of "Alma". This time she was 



inspired by the works of Christian Morgenstern. A sketch of a drama, that was entitied "Ein 
Nachspiel" (An Afterplay) was composed the following year. It was dedicated to a weighty 
social moral problem, the "love affair" between an arrogant "Führer" and the people. 

In the Estate were also two poems from the year 1940, whose motive showed a deep and 
disturbing alarm about the present and future fate of the Jewish Community. In the epic parable 
"Kain-Ahasver" based on the mythological tradition, as well as the traditional experiences of the 
past centuries, the domineeringness of the Nazi rule is reflected, primarily by the psychological 
depressions of the immediate victims and abandoned ones, but also in the moral decline of the 
others. The once outlawed, now are declaring "Brotherly Love." 

The poem "Der Ewige Jude" (The Jew-Forever) portrays the very changed Situation and 
Position of the members of the faith. It speaks about apprehension of values and uncertainty of 
the future. At the conclusion it expresses the hope that the "everlasting spirit" will show the 
way to freedom. 

In the Spring of 1943, after a half-year stay in Theresienstadt, a group of poems came 
into being "Songs of a Nurse". Willi Groag, the son of the author, collected several poems that 
his mother wrote from the early days of their internment. During his illness he copied the texts 



with drawings. The group of poems consisted of two copies. The copy that belonged to the 
poetess was lost and the other was found twenty years after the war and was presented once to 
Jacob Edelstein. According to this group of poems, 25 facsimile reprints were made in Israel. 
This edition consists of 12 poems, 4 drawings, a Short introduction in which the author explains 
the history of her handwritten verses. In this small circle, a document of lyrics of the grief, 
sorrow and troubles of the abducted — a protest to humanity against the brutality of the Nazis, 
shows the poetic mastery of Groag, her "sure hand" and the author's ability. You find various 
levels of expression, sentimental education of a personal past, documentary pictures from the 
innermost experience of the interned woman of Theresienstculr, all in skillfully styled verses of 
personal experiences. Some of the poems are organized in regulär meter with regulär rhyme 
while others have irregulär rhyme. The verse is detached from the regulär bond. The character 
of a documented, accusing "life picture" made while nursing the sick and dying, their pleading, 
wailing, crying and demanding, give an insight of the psyche of the persecuted persons. 

Personal experiences develop into a general validity with regard to suffering and 
existence for many. 

Frau Röttchen, revealed resigned peace and balance. Actually, she died sighing. 

Babette, indignant about the persecution and several of its Symptoms, restrained herseif 
coldly also to her perplexed surroundings. Her pleading and cursing increased to crying from 
agony until death came. 

Abschied" (Farewell) two intellectual and emotional Clements connect. The personal shock, 
resulting in the involuntary abandonment of the homes and yet to be experienced unknown fate 



with the suspected Horror. There will be no groaning and crying. Here the poetess mounts a 
higher position. In honest, reliable and quality language, she describes the psychology of 
leaving the world. In no way is she trying to awaken the consciousness of a fixed, 
unpreventable doom; only the monstrous and stränge surroundings have its effect. 

"Das Fenster" (The Window): The poem recalls a picture of pleasant memories, a vision 
of her native city. It leaves the yearning for the far and unreachable to ring out. The object 
here is uniform and unequivocally clear. The words are poetic, rather smooth. 



Once more you radiate in the evening light 
You, my native city towards me. 
Through the open window enters nightfall 
Nearby are you, yet very distant! 
Unreachable, but the target of my longing. 
I see the buildings play roofs and towers 
The garland green of the gardens 



Before the curtain feil. 



And beyond remained the luster. 



In barrack life, it's not the experience of the individual, but the concentrated experience 



of thousands of companions. The inquartering of prisoners, the unhappy world of the camps, 
etc., shape an unhappy "to be there." 



In contrast, it develops the feeling of a new life of camaraderie and in the devouted still 
of the night, it had some moral and aesthetic value. Not only compassion, but fellowship, 
fraternity and a feeling of solidarity emanate between unknowns. Only six lines are in the poem, 
"Die Schleuse" (The Lock to Pass Through), (Boats to Channel through the facilities in 
Theresienstadt for newly incoming detainees were named "Die Schleuse. " -A.G.) 



HILFLOSER BRUDER NEBED MIR, 



ALT, KRANK UND FREMD. 



NIE HAT MEIN HERZ NACH DEINER NÄH VERLANGT, 
NIE HABICH MICH GESORGT NACH DIR GEBANGT, 



WIE NAH BIN ICH DIR, 



HILFLOSER BRUDER HILF LOS WIE ICH SELBST, 



Helpless brother next to me, 

Old, sick and bewildered. 

Never did my heart desire your nearness, 

Never did I worry, nor was anxious for you, 

How close am I to you, 

Helpless brother, helpless as myself. 



An aroused irregularity, pathos, a sophisticated style characterizes the apostrophe of life 
and death in the poem "Sehnsucht" (Yearning, Longing) styled as an accusation and complaint. 



8 



Not only does death pirate our life, now life steals our loved ones. Is life in camp 
comprehensible, really the deceiving life? Direct and clear are the concluding verses, 
articulating the impotence of the human beings separated from each other and from the limitless 

sorrow and grief. 

In the prayer named "Ende" (At The End), the dust like collapsing human being longs 
for a setting of hope and the light of G-d, who can lend a golden shimmer to dust. Doubtless 
doom lies ahead, but man is not broken up about it; his faith nourishes his control. 

In two poems Groag states the absurdity of existing in Thereisensradr. In the poem 
"Traumwelt" (Dream World) she speaks about the shady side of the interned and the "supposed 
impossible" that became actuality. She doesn't describe the deplorable, but figuratively she 
relates that within concentration camps the forces of night rule. 



Here the "Dream World" becomes reality 

Living in the shade awakes you, to be 

What used to be, drowned far and wide 

(Here) Rules in daylight, what usually rules the night 

In long corridors resounds the Step 

(OO The harassed, or helpless, sickly beings 

The hearts are racing, or remain still 



Once we were, now we used to be. 



In "Der Vision" (The Vision) a similar feeling of unreality is expressed. This time the 
unreality of individual existence, the feeling of having crossed the borders of one's being and 
having the ability to, with ease, float outside the prisoner's fate and the ränge of this world, 
connects with the idea in charons boot, to be brought to the other bank (of the river). This 
feeling, not negative, but seen as relief, liberation, but also connected to mourning for the loss 
of a friend left back on this side of the river bank. The dead, meaning the fatal victim and the 
simultaneously liberated person yearn after the living. 

In "Konzert" (Concert), through a portrayal ofa detail, the loss of relatives was recalled 
at the culture function in Vieresienstadr . The circle was ended with a poem over pain, sickness 
and yearning for love in "Die Junge Schwester" (The Young Sister). 

In the laments, songs, reflections and life-pictures, the name Theresienstadt is not 
mentioned, nor are other concrete places. Also, no background of events or reason, nor the 
perpetrators of the persecution are spoken of. The Statements about the outer world are kept 
relative and general within the neutrality of the milieu. There was no fear for an eventual 
censure or discoursing of the texts. Other poets from Theresienstadt (Ilse Weber, V. A. Polak) 
define their timely and local realities very exactly. The quality of Groag's poetry is by no 
means timeless or shy of reality; its message is strongly connected to reality and actuality. 



WIR SIND DIE ÄRMSTEN, 



DURCH KRANKHEIT GEFANGEN! 



IM FENSTER RAHMEN ERSCHEINT UNS DIE WELT- 



ALL UNSRE SEHNSUCHT 



10 



ALL UNSER VERLANGEN 



IST A UF DIE FREIHEIT DORT DRA USSEN GESTELLT! 



HINTER DER MA UER IST DIE FREIHEIT 



HINTER DER MAUER LEBT DIE WELT 



DIE BERGE, DIE WOLKEN, DIE STRASSEN, DIE FERNE 
VOR SEHNSUCHT SIND UNSERE HERZEN GESCHWELLT. - 
DURCH DES FENSTERS RAHMEN ERBLICKT ICH DEN PLÜGER 



DER AUF DEM HÜGEL DIE SCHOLLE BRICHT! 



ES DAMPFEN DIE ERDE, DAS PFERD UND DIE ZÜGEL, 
ES WACHSEN DER SEELE, DIE SEHNSUCHTSFLÜGEL 
UND AUS ALL DER GLUT WIRD EIN KLEINESS GEDICHT: 



HINTER DER MA UER IST DIE FREIHEIT, 



HINTER DER MAUER LEBT DIE WELT! 



In the unpublished works are fourteen additional poems from the time of internment in 
Theresienstadt , half from the year 1943, the other half from the following year. Groag 
combined them in a typewritten text entitled: "Aus Dem Krankenhaus 124" (From the Hospital 
124). Below is the first of these poems in its füll dimension: "Der Fenster Rahmen" (The 
Window's Frame). 



We are the poorest 
Caught in sickness 



11 



In the Window frame appears the world: 

All our yearning, 

All our desires, 

Is for freedom - out there positioned! 

Behind the wall is liberty 

Behind the wall lives the world 

The mountains, the clouds, the streets, the faraway. 

Our hearts are swelled from yearning. 

Through the window's frame I saw the plower, 



Who breaks the earth on the hill! 



It Stearns the earth, the horse and the reins, 
It grows, the soul and the wings of yearning 
And from the glow will be a small poem: 



Behind the wall is liberty 



Behind the wall lives the world, 



The subject of these poems vary from the individual "I" or the collective "We." 
Sometimes the "we" refers to the inmates of the Camp Theresienstadt\ other times "we" Jews. 
In both instances the subject is about suffering and, simultaneously, it tries to fight it inwardly. 

Regarding the themes of her poems: One was about the death of her friend "Edith," then 
again a childhood dream "Em Traum" (A Dream), but most poems were about longing for 
freedom, the feeling of helplessness and loneliness, as well as the uncertainty of holding out. 



12 



Several times Groag teils about a peculiar psychological and poetic occurrence of meeting an 
elderly woman who gave her a blessing "Der Segen, " (The Blessing) or lifted their hands in 
prayer and blessings (HÄnde der Regine Kohnova). "Lager" (Camp). 



The naked earth is my newest bed 

Once thought to be for the dead 

To rest, with body on body — oh mother earth — 

This is now my lot 

Yet my living body is painfully conscious, 

That it is too weak and that a small pebble, 

Every grain of sand tortures it. 

So I lie earthbound, wounded 

In dust and frost and I cry! - 

Awaiting quiveringly the morning to break. 



A similar Statement is in "Lager" we find in the poem "Morgen Gedanken Im Ghetto" 
(Morning Thoughts in the Ghetto). However, in different words and pictures "The Psalm" 
speaks about a sincere request of G-d to intervene in favor of the victims of persecution. 

In the final year of the war, Groag directs her vision to the future "Die Zukunfi". In 
another poem she speaks about her "Program" for life in the future Community. 

Chanukka (Im Ghetto) Letztes Jahr (Chanukah in the Ghetto Last Year). 



13 



You loving brothers, it is the time 

The Temples were, like then desecrated 

The wick of life will glow at its last moment for the folk 

The net of destiny will wind around our limbs, 

Awake you Brothers! 



Out of darkness, prison, death of the soul 
Out of hunger, need and anxiety 



Out of storm and winter weather 



Assemble faithfully your group 
And light your candles! 
We like to be a restorer of light 
With extended and loving hearts! 



Gertrude Groag continued to write poetry until the last years of her life but, of course, 
with less intensity. Several poems are preserved from the after-war years, among them: 
"Sounds after the War," "Wie Kannst Du, Sehender" (How can you, Seeing Again), a lament 
over the lost world of the past, "Der Kleine Koffer", (the small suitcase). Several times she put 

Soun 

in prose memories of her vwe in Zabre (Hohenstadt) and its environment that was published. 



- Translated from the original German by Alfred Gruenspecht. 



14 




1(014 



W^ 



M 



)ei> 



G /J n 5-/)^^ n hr \M ) ly {oi(^cn^^ 



^ 



w i><sye 



ri> 



vwtw". ^^^t^^m^fmammmmr^ 



f 



A^ Ol/>) 



i^, 





Saloniki , 

Hilda Stern Cohen 



We called them Saloniki. They slept on the broad wooden bunk above me 
All tiie bunks were in three tiers and meant for at least five prisoners to sleep 
on. it üiere were too many transports or an unusual number of prisoners had 

been left ahve we would have to make room for more , or even double up. 

^e Salonikis were two sisters , left over from one of the transports that came 
trom their hometown by the same name . They were Sephardi Jews, the only 
Sephardim that I had encountered in the world of the Concentration Camp 
We called them Saloniki because we could not pronounce their names or we 
did not want to bother with more strangeness and exotica than with what we 

were living with allthetime. 

ITiey were younger than most of us, still belonging to the forbidden age of 

childhood, which the Gennans did not tolerate among the inmates They 

were tall for their ages, though 1 1 or 12, which may have been why they were 

kept alive for the time being 
I believe I heard them teil that a Kapo had taken an interest in them, as they 

arrived with the transport 
Most of US were in our middle or late teens and many of us developed an 

ahnost matemal relationship to the two girls 

There were incidences of shared rations, a true sacrifice ' indeed on a 

starvation diet, and cover-ups at the incessant counting and work details. 

The counting sessions were particularly difiBcuh and took place at set times 
throughout the days. There were to estabhsh a continuous head count of the 

inmates. 

Since diseases, attacks of diarrhea in particular were rampant among the 

pnsoners , many found it dimcult to get off their bunk and march to the 

comiting ,where they were forced to stand in lines, motionless for many hours 

.regardless of the weather 

Elaborate schemes were devised to fool either the Kapo or the Geiman SS 

woman so that those of us who were too iU to attend would not be missed 

Ihe two Salonikis were often the beneficiaries of these deceits 



In tum they would sometimes teach snatches of Greek or Spanish, or perhaps 

Ladino, which sounded much like Spanish to us. 
They picked up Yiddish and even German very quickly and delighted some 

ofthePolish 
Speakers with phrases in their language. 

As Auschwitz was evacuated I lost all contact with them. In my ears I still see 
their dark eyes under the shaven skuUs and their bright voiced calling down to 

my bunk " Kali Mera", Good Moming in Greek. 



I 



Saloniki 

Hilda Stern Cohen 



A^n J "" ^''°"^- ^^'^ ^'^P^ °" *^ ^^°^d wooden bunk above me 
All tiie bunks were in three tiers and meant for at least five prisoners to sleep 

h Jn Srr'" *°° many transports or an unusual number of prisoners had 
been left alive we would have to make room for more , or even double up. 

^e Salonikis were two sisters , left over from one of the transports that came 
from thej hometown by the same name . They were Sephardi Jews the only 

We 'iTh i ^'^.^T""*^^"^ ^ ^' ""^^'^ °f *^ Concentration Camp 
We ca lled them Saloniki because we could not pronounce their names or we 

did not want to bother with more strangeness and exotica than with what we 

were living with allthetime. 

chidhood, which the Germans did not tolerate among the imnates They 
were tall for their ages, though 11 or 12, which may have been why they were 

kept alive for the time being 
I beheve I heard them teil that a Kapo had taken an interest in them, as they 

arrived with the transport. 
Most of US were in our middle or late teens and many of us developed an 

almost matemal relaiionship to the two girls 

There were incidences of shared rations, a true sacrifice ' indeed on a 

starvation diet, and cover-ups at the incessant counting and work details. 

The counting sessions were particularly difficult and took place at set times 
throughout the days. There were to estabhsh a continuous Lad cou^t ofTe 

uimates. 

Smce diseases, attacks of diarrhea in particular were ramnanf amnna the 

pnsoners many found it diflScult to get off their bunk and march tTthe 

countmg ,where they were forced to stand in lines, motionless for many hours 

.regardless of the weather. 

Elaborate schemes were devised to fool either the Kapo or the Gennan SS 

woman so that those of US who were too ill to attend would not be missed 

1 he two Salonikis were often the beneficiaries of these deceits. 



In tum they would sometimes teach snatches of Greek or Spanish, or perhaps 

Ladino, which sounded much like Spanish to us. 
They picked up Yiddish and even German veiy quickly and dehghted some 

of the Polish 
Speakers wdth phrases in their language. 

As Auschwitz was evacuated I lost all contact with them. In my ears I still see 
their dark eyes under the shaven skuUs and their bright voiced calling down to 

my bunk " Kali Mera", Good Moming in Greek. 



} 



i 



A SOLEMN STATEMENT 



I, the undersigned, Kaminsky Zoltan, formerly Goldstein, bom on July 7th, 1923 in 
Mukacevo, Czechoslovakia, appeared today before a Notary Public and was informed of the 
responsibility of "A Solemn Statement." I am conscious of my responsibility and declare as 



follows: 



From 1937 to the end of 1944 I have lived with my family in Mukacevo, Czechoslovakia, 
have worked there in a chemical and paper factory doing manual and physical work. To verify, 
I am naming the following: 

Chemical Factory: Oesrreicher 



Paper Factory: 



Roth 



Additionally, I would like to mention that from early 1943 until April 1944 I have owned 
my own chemical factory producing hand vaseline, grease for wagons, colors for clothing, floor 
wax and various other products. 

Beginning with May 1944, tremendous difficulties developed against the Jews, by 

In the same month, a police raid against the Jews took place, where my family and I 
were assembled in a plaza and was forced to immediately leave my house and business. 

In Order to keep my family and myself alive, I tried to find work, asking the officials in 
Town Hall to assist. The Town Authority allowed me to have a team of horses and a wagon, 
in return for a payment, that would enable me to drive four kiloineters out of town, to try to find 
work at the brick factory — Kalush. 



As soon as I arrived, I walked to the office. While speaking to an officer, he looked at 
me for a while, then started to yell. Suddenly, he grabbed a whip, hit me bestially in the face. 
I feil fainting to the floor. Two men picked me up and threw me into a stable where many civil 
prisoners were held captive. There, we had to live under inhuman conditions! Once every day 
we received a water soup and a tiny piece of bread. We had to play sports, like Coming to 
blows with each other, until fainting, all done under the watchful eyes of a guard. Naturally, 
he matched a strong person against a weak one. 

At the end of May this camp was liquidated. We were loaded into cattle wagons and had 
to travel for four days without a break under unthinkable conditions with no food (goes without 
saying) during all this time. 

On the evening of the fourth day, the wagons were opened and the captives were divided 
into suitable or disquaUfied. 



I was brought to an officer of the S.S. He asked me about my profession. An 






piy witii tue words, "Mechanic" whereupon I was ied with several 
hundred other people to a barrack. There we had to strip completely and were shaved from 
head to toes. When I asked why this was done, I was beaten once more unconsciously. 

Afterwards, the disinfection was made and prison-clothing was handed to us. 

Meantime it was 6 A.M. We were Ied to a huge assembly field where we had to stand 
motionless, the Whole time in a pouring rain until the next morning. 



In spite of our tremendous exhaustion, without any food, we had to march, accompanied 
by S.S. soldiers and dogs, until we reached camp, in Auschwitz. 

After arriving we had another disinfection, a shower and surrender of the prisoner 
number marked on the left arm, mine read A-3267 and finally we received a trifle of food. 
Subsequently I was brought into quarantine for two weeks. 

After this time I was shipped with a group, approximately seven kilometers from 
Auschwitz camp to the Minowitz Work Camp where we had to go through the now customary 
disinfection again. We had to remain again for three days on an assembly field and wait to get 
a small portion of food. finally, I was assigned to Block 26 which I had to share with 100 other 
captives. I also came to a Locksmith-Command #121. 

Daily camp life passed, as will now follow: 

Get up at 5 A.M., marching to the next block to shower, examination for cleanliness. 
If not clean, no food. Often chicanery was employed in this regard. For breakfast a coffee was 
given (today you would call it dishwater) with a tiny piece of bread, sometimes 15 grams of 
margarine was added and now and then a thin slice of sausage. Roll-call on the assembly field 
at 6:30 A.M., then a 5 kilometer march in wooden shoes with march music escort to the labor 
camp. I had very hard and difficult work to perform, since I was strong and a stout type of 
person, such as carrying heavy material, water pumps, etc., alone. At 18 o'clock (6 P.M.) 
marching back to camp with march music escort, wash up, food, to sleep at 21 o'clock (9 



P.M.V 



On one day I was called to come to the commanding leader of my command #121. He 
asked me to be a Work Foreman, but I declined, since it is not in my nature to command, to 
oppress, or denounce others equally pitiful subjects, like myself. 

Thereupon I was punished. On the next day I got no# food after work and had to move 
into a different barrack on Block 41. I was also transferred to work Command 90. 

Since I had, as I've stated before, a very strong Constitution, I was not spared by the S.S. 
and anyway, being a Jew too! I was forced to do the work of three to four men, since many 
were completely exhausted and the work program had to be accomplished. 



After several months I found myself substantially weakened and would not be able to 
continue doing such demanding hard labor. At the end of September 1944, a selection was made 
(the S.S. called it as such) and I feared the worst for my life. Yet, I was lucky again, since the 
Doctor commission declared me for being "good." 

One night, in the month of November, we were suddenly called out from our barracks 
(only clad with the pants of our prisoners' garb and without our wooden shoes) into the deep 
snow and we had to remain there longer than one hour, Standing at attention. They checked our 
numbers (counting us) since one prisoner was missing. 

It was so terribly cold that by the next morning I had a high fever and strong abdominal 
pain, impossible to go to work. I was brought to the prisoner hospital blocks and remained 
there for only one day and was then scheduled to work the following day, which was really 




impossible. Nevertheless, I had to leave this "hospital" under an impending threat of death in 
the gas Chambers. 

When I came to the labor office, I was directed to a cable-command, which was much 
harder than my former assignment. Here, the prisoners died like flies, either from exhaustion 
or the beatings of the Kapo if they failed to work fast, or were unable to march. The Kapo 
assigned to my group was a big criminal. He had a green distinguishing mark and not a red one 
as the politicals had. 

In the evening I approached the labor office since I feit weak and asked to let me return 
to my mechanic command 90, which was granted. 

My luck did not last long. German engineers came and they debated whether to ship me 
to the coal mines — Janina, or give me 25 lashes. Since I opted for the 25 lashes, I had to 
extend a big thank you! Then, I was held by two men, my head bent over a wooden box and 
one man started to beat me with a four-cornered black-jack. The resulting pain was intolerable. 
I pulled myself loose. I could not escape all further blows. The black jack reached my head 
and my hands. My back was swollen. For three weeks I had to sleep on my belly. Sleeping 
was ciose to impossible, since I suffered from headaches since then (which 1 still have, in spite 
of medicines). The pain is so severe and difficult to endure. Since that time I also suffer from 
a chronic nose ailment and I was forced to undergo a necessary surgical procedure. It relieved 
me at first, but after a while the pain and discomfort returned and did not disappear to this very 
day. Therefore, I have to be examined periodically, which is not only painful, but also very 
expensive. The medicines and cost of the frequent Visits to the doctors is almost unbearable to 



carry. 



On one day I had an accident at work with my right band thumb. It happened as follows: 
I was Standing on a scaffold of a four-story high building, that was built by us. We were 
about to lift the steel doors, which were extremely heavy, with ropes upstairs. The ropes were 
pulled by prisoners from below. I had to pull them inward and push to the side. During this 
Operation a rope pinched my right band thumb and smashed it. These working below did not 
hear my cry of pain while my thumb was downright disjointed. You can still see it today, after 
22 years. 

1. My right thumb is much thicker than the left one. 

2. Till today, I cannot use my right thumb, as it should be used. 

One of the most severe winter days in December we had to undergo a delousing 
campaign. One or two lice were found on a prisoner's shirt collar. Afterwards, 160 persons, 
including myself, had to take a very hot shower and walk afterwards naked from the shower 
room through deep snow to our barracks, which of course were not heated. All Windows had 
to be opened by order of the S.S. Our clothing was not given to us, held back by the Kapo, and 
we had to spend the night naked in the barracks. The only thing left to do was to press our 
bodies against each other in order to get a little warmth. The next morning, completely 
exhausted, we had to get out and work hard. Of course, all this, without getting our breakfast. 

On Sundays we worked sometimes. One of these Sundays I was called to work. 
Suddenly, the air-bomber alarm sounded. American Air Force bombers flew over and destroyed 
many blocks where, besides other things, our water supply was located. The result was that for 
several days we did not get our coffee in the morning. 



The food famine was very bad. One fine day I had the idea to steal potatoes, not just 
for me, but to share them with my fellow sufferers, who were in the same Situation as I was. 

Within our work area stood a pail with hot buming coals, where we could warm cur cold 
hands occasionally. Admittedly, it was permitted only, when our tools needed to be bent. 
Immediately, when I had the stolen potatoes, I put some of them into the fire to roast. My good 
fortune was not for long. One of the German engineers noticed my dealings. He took an iron 
bar and removed my potatoes. Unfortunately, my back was opposite of him and while he 
ejected and flung out the potatoes, red hot ashes hit my back, penetrated my shirt and landed 
on my skin. Still, today you can see the burned Spots on my body. 

In January 1945 our Situation changed. Russian troops were 90 miles away from our 
campsite. The Germans were forced to liquidate the camp. 

Herewith ends my very sad lot int bis camp. However, I would like to mention that 
many occurrences, terrible happenings, significant enough to report took place in this camp 
during my internment there, such as the hanging of persons. We were forced to pass by with 
slow Steps, look and observe them, and all this before we could pick up our 'soup.' 



1 do not want to go into details; it would result in a füll book. 

On a mentioned Thursday evening, we had to march in icy cold weather out of Camp 



Monowitz. 



It was snowing very strongly and the extreme cold was hard to endure, since we were 
flimsily clad in our prisoner's garb and the wooden shoes on our feet. In spite of it, we had to 
walk fast to keep pace with the soldiers, even so we were weak and had no strength left. 

All those that feil behind were pitilessly shot and killed. There were many. And when 
we saw a town ahead which I recognized to be Nikolai, we were only half of the original 
prisoners. 

After we had rested a little on the floor of a construction material factory, where more 
prisoners could be found, we resumed our marching out of the town, and constantly persons 
were cold-bloodedly shot that feil exhausted by the way. 

I often thought that soon it would be my fate since my strength left me more and more. 
We did not get any food to eat, nor water to drink. I was always able to secure for myself 
somehow a piece of bread. Now I did not have the time to eat it and in all the confusion around 
me, had lost it. 

In the meantime, because of under-nourishment and extreme exertion, an ulcer developed 
on my right upper leg. It grew as large as a lemon. It hurt me immensely with every step and 
resulted in my falling way behind. My wooden shoes had a crack, which also delayed my 
moving forward. When we arrived at the new campsite I was the last person. A S.S. soldier 
was ready to aim his pistol at me. I suddenly yelled, "Halt! Halt! I am Coming already," when 
he answered, "You G-d damn Jew, you cursed individual. Come on!" And once more I was 
able to stay alive! 

In this camp I was able to help myself to another pair of shoes, which I removed from 
a dead prisoner. On the following day we continued again without having any food or drink. 



8 



We marched to a detachable ramp (platform) of a freight railway Station where we were thrown 
into open cattle wagons with beatings and spankings. We were stored there like herrings in a 
barrel. Nevertheless, the beatings continued. Many of my fellow prisoners were choked, or 
trampled to death, but what does it matter to a German??? 

The trip was over a füll week, without any food or drink. Our only refreshment was 
from the snow that constantly feil on us. 

On the one hand it was good; on the other hand it was terrible for us, since we froze to 
the bones. There was only one Solution for us. We undressed the dead persons before we 
disposed of them by throwing them off the wagons. 

In my opinion, this ride was a downright extermination trip, since the prisoners passed 
away like flies. On the seventh day, the train stopped suddenly for reasons of a nearby 
bombardment. We were Standing a whole night. Later I noticed that the nearby city was 



Würzburg. 



1 



Finally everyone received a little soup (a half cup). Since I was very hungry, I stood 
once again in a row to get another helping of soup. This was noticed by a young S.S. man. 
He pulled me out of the line, hit me with his fist in the face and in my stomach, so hard that 
I thought to have to die on the spot. I feil to the ground and the raving S.S. man left me there. 
I collected my last ounce of strength and hurried back to the wagon. 



' Something is missing here. — A.G. 



We remained another night at this Station during which another bombardment took place. 
Afterwards, we continued the trip and noticed that Würzburg was destroyed. 

We arrived in Bergen Belsen and were pushed into quarantine immediately. 

I do not want to be very specific on this holdover; I only want to State that there Fve 
experienced still worse activities than ever beforeü 

We moved on from Bergen-Belsen, again in cattle cars, over a whole week, criss- 
crossing Czechoslovakia, where sometimes the local population threw some bread into the 
wagons. This was the only food that came to us. From the German side we could continue to 
hunger or die of thirst. The trip went further another three days when we stopped again at a 
loading ramp. An S.S. soldier remarked: "We are here in Mathausen." 

We pleaded noisily for bread and water which awakened the fury of the German officers, 
and they started to shoot simply into our people. I was hit also on my right band. I thought to 
have to die on the spot, like so many of the other prisoners. After a while I noticed it was not 
yet thus far. A stray bullet had grazed my Joint bone and embedded itself into the flesh of my 
band. An S.S. soldier threw a loaf of bread into the car and the pack of the over hungry-horde 
of prisoners rushed to get some of it, including myself. I could have had a piece, but when I 
wanted to put into my mouth, I noticed my wound in the band. I thought it to be wise to 
remove the bullet before an infection set in. I bit with my teeth a sizable piece of meat of my 
hand-joint and bandaged it with torn pieces of my prison shirt. Afterwards, I ate my bread. 

Several hours later we wee again on the move for two days, We had to get off the cattle 
cars for a half hours, all those that could not climb back fast enough, were left back in the snow. 



10 



On the next day we arrived in Loulingen where we were to work at the Messer-Schmitt 
Airoplane Factory. We had to walk two kilometers to the factory-camp. Although I had lost 
a lot of weight and my energy left me also, I still mustered my strength, hoping to bet better 
here. The camp consisted of a very large building and several smaller ones. The building 
where I landed to be was completely empty. Only a few bales of straw. This became our 
resting place. 

My injured hand was swollen to my Shoulder and the points of my feet were frozen, and 
I feit that this condition cannot make me last much longer since the place was not heated and 
food was not forthcoming. 



I put myself upon the straw and said the Shema Yisrael (the prayer one says before 
expiring, before the last breath of air). I had given myself up! 

Suddenly, I heard from afar Soup, Soup. I tried to lift myself up, but feil back several 
times. Finally, I was able to crawl to the distribution place and had some of this so-called 



soup. 



i< 



On the next morning, the Germans handed us new paper forms to fill out with our name, 
place of birth, etc. I thought of my condition and circumstances here, to ever be able to survive 
being a Jew? I came to a decision that I will identify myself as Roman-Catholic and take a 
different name. This is the reason that I made from my name 'Goldstein' simply the name 
Gokstan, a Czechish-sounding name and I received a new number. 



11 



4 



Meanwhile, another week had passed by and my hand and my arm continued to swell 
more and more. Although I wanted to work, I could not do much and reported myself to the 
work commando. I was sand to a kind of Lazaret. The S.S. doctors t here wanted to amputate 
my hand, but I refused to give permission, thinking I would rather die! I had to sit on a chair 
while two assistants Held me. Another cut the infected part of the flesh away with a kitchen 
knife, without giving me any anesthesia. That I cried and yelled during this inhuman act is not 
necessary to describe. 

After this 'Operation' I was so weak that I could hardly stand on my feet. But since I 
heard the 'medical team' personnel laugh over me, I feared once more to be shot, any minute. 
I bit my teeth, pulled myself together and went into hiding behind one of the buildings as quickly 
as I could. I remained there all alone for an hour until I recovered a little, thereby missing the 
meager noonday meal. 

A considerable time had passed when I was ordered, with approximately 30 to 40 other 
detainees, to climb aboard a trailer that was attached to a tractor, and we were transported to 
camp Dachau. 

Immediately after our arrival we were quarantined for three months. I was assigned to 
Block 22. Since our food portions were meager and sparse, my strength ebbed away and the 
hope for my liberation was completely lost. Moreover, the ulcer on my right Upper leg was 
operated on, by cutting it out. 

Finally on April 29, 1945, in the afternoon towards 4 P.M.. American troons marched 
into camp and liberated us. I was extremely weak, could not even get up, although I would 



12 






have loved to greet our liberators. Several Americans, Standing around me, characterized my 
shape as a "Muselman" signifying that I am equal to a dead person. 

Two days after liberation American doctors examined me meticulously, weighed me and 
gave me Vitamin E injections. 

Before I came into this inferno and utter chaos, I had weighed 180 pounds; after my 
liberation, I scaled only 84 pounds (German pounds). In one word I consisted of only skin and 
bones. The Americans put me in a Lazaret in Dachau and nursed me there somewhat. I also 
gained a little weight. 



8 

The military Red Gross picked me up and brought me to the city of Pilse in 
Czechoslovakia. When I arrived there, I thought to be the only surviving Jew. However, I met 
another who also had the good fortune to stay alive. To day he lives in the U.S.A., as I do. 
This man, Mr. Leon Brookstein, lives in New York, USA. 

At the end of May 1945 I was transferred to a lung sanitorium in Psychuuze in 
Czechoslovakia, since I caught tuberculosis during the terrible years. I remained six weeks at 
the sanitorium and gained 36 pounds. After my release, I traveled to Prague and since I still 
did not feel well, decided to enter a hospital for further examinations and medical attention with 
treatments and nursing. Before I left Prague, I changed my name from Goldstein to Kaminsky. 
A Gzech officer urged me to do so, saying: "Your name is outright too German," and I feared 
for more difficulties in my future life, only because of my name. 



13 



* 
* 



t 
« 



I did not want to remain in Czechoslovakia and decided to go into the refugee camp 
Forenwald, located near Wolffratshausen within the surroundings of Munich. 

Before I emigrated to the United States, I went to the U.S. Consulate in Frankfurt. After 
a very thorough examination with X-ray, I was again turned down because my lungs were not 
in Order because of the aforementioned tuberculosis. The Consul had compassion and really 
and implicitly wanted to help me start a new life. And he gave me the chance. He sent me 
to the "Autting-Sanitorium" for Observation. 

Examinations in this sanitorium indicated that the lungs were seriously attacked by the 
tuberculosis illness and that I would never be able to perform physical labor in my future life. 
After some time, the fmdings were considered as 'negative.' 

My last hope was to be able to start a new life in America and, above all, to forget a 
little about all the terrible experiences that I had to live through. Because of this, I have done 
just everything possible to achieve my emigration. It took some time, but I did receive my 
emigration papers. Can you ever imagine my happiness??? 

I do not believeü! 

I arrived in New York on April 6th, 1949 and there I stood without any means. I turned 
to the Jewish Organization "The Joint," which never abandoned me. They were always ready 
to help me, at all times. But this could not go on forever. I immediately looked for work. 

I tried in many lines of business. I thought my myself: Just to earn enough for my 
livelihood. But I did not last long anywhere, because my body was weak. Now I looked, out 
of necessity, for light and easy work, where I hardly could earn by upkeep. My head pain and 
breathing spells worsened by the day. 



14 



t 
r 



? 



One day I chanced to get a good position with the American Foundry Company in 
Brooklyn, NY. I introduced myself (this was in 1957), but was discharged after three days since 
they checked my medical history, saw the lung X-rays and thereby noticed that my health 
condition was not indisputable. So they told me they will engage only 100% healthy persons. 

I had to continue living. Therefore, I decided to become a taxi driver in 1957. Up until 
today, this is my source of income. Although it is not much physical labor, it is very strenuous 
on the nerves. New York isn't a small town and traffic is always intense. In 1960 I had to 
undergo an Operation on my nose. It was absolutely necessary to have it done. After a half 
year, my discomfort returned and I ended up at the point I had started. 

Although I am still not doing well financially, I have to stop working when fatigue sets 
in, go home and lie down. 

Truly I am only 43 years old. Had I not suffered so much and could have lived under 
normal circumstances, I would have more stamina. But the way my Situation is, I am a broken 
man, not only physically, also morally, emotionally and financially. 

I married in 1954 and have two children. Both are in school. My wife is unfortunately 
forced to work, since often I am not able to earn enough money to support our very normal 
lifestyle. 



P.S. For your orientation, I would like to say that the Monowitz-Labor-Camp was also 
known by the name of Buna-werke von LG. Farben Industries at that time. 



15 






« 



Brooklyn l.Dec. 1966 
Swom to Before me 



Signed: 



(OFFICIAL STAMP) 



Kaminsky Zoltan 
5419 Avenue 
Brooklyn, NY 11234 



— Translated from German into English by Alfred Gruenspecht 



"Israel 50 is such an important milestone or our nation," said Rabbi Yehoshua 

Kamensky, principal of Judaic Studies/Elementary Education. "The Hillel staff has done an 
outstanding Job of preparing our students to understand, appreciate and enjoy this special day." 
Hillel is a private Jewish Day School located at 19000 NE 25 Avenue. For more 
information call the school at 931-2831. 



16 



^m //0/6 



y^ 



///r eo> <^{i/h $.l)^th^^^_ ^q ^i/y__ tol/eJf<^'^ 



u 



H pOfjrCi 



hu ^/o 




^ e/ Z/^/e-^-'H./ (^//<,;/ f-\)ei>V,el, Wilhelm Lugl^ 




THE SOLO EFFORT OF 



LIEUTENANT CAPTAIN FRIEDRICH WILHELM LÜBKE 



The brother of the fiitiire President of the Federal Repiiblic of German, Heinrich Liibke, 
contribiited an enormous share toward the resciie of Danish Jews. At that time the Lieiitenant- 
Captain Friedrich Wilhelm Liibke was the senior staff member for sea transport locations to the 
Commander-in-Chief of the military forces in 1943, located at the important Danisli pöit of 
Aarhiis on the Jutlandic Western Coast, signiUcant for war transports and cargo. On September 
18th, 1943 an order from "The Führer" went out to the authorized representative of "The Reich" 
to enact: The Führer conimands to iniplcment the deportation of the Jews froin Denmark. 

Lieutenant Captain Lübke happened to be on his return trip from military leave in Bad 
Gastein. His way back led him over Berlin vvhere he met several personal acquaintances of the 
OKW — OfHce of the High Command. There he was confidentially informed about the 
imminent deportations. A day after his return to Aarhus an order arrived from Berlin to have 
the Iransport ship ''Monte Rosa," belonging to the Hamburg-Süd Line, in readiness to transport 
Jews from Copenhagen. The command specified that the "Monte Rosa" should be in 
Copenhagen on the 25th of September 1943 to take 5,000 Jews on board. About this period 
of time, the development of atmosphere in Copenhagen, the various attempts made to deter 
Hitler from this order of September 18tli 1943 is reported on April 17th 1954 in the Newspaper 
Der Nordschlcsm^cr. Until that time, this dramatic history was in a deep slumber. In January 
1946, a Danish newspaper wrote that "thousands of Jews owe thanks to Lübke to be alive." In 



tlie newspaper report of the Nonfschlcswi^er, Liibke personally teils aboiit the backgroiind 



details: 



"I went to board the ship, which was anchored in the harbor of Aarhus and informed the 
ship's Commander, one of my good friends, Captain Heinrich Bertram from Hamburg, about the 
State of affairs. We decided, unified, to report damaged machinery. The condenser to be 
riiptured and destroyed so that the ship coiild not sail. I informed the OKW Oberkommando Der 
Wehrmacht — the high command of the armed forces by telecommimication, but was ordered 
to bring the "Monte Rosa" to Copenhagen despite the damaged condenser. I telephoned 
thereiipon with the OKW and reqiiested a written order of Clearing the departure, whereby I 
declared that neither I nor the captain woiild Shoulder the responsibility of putting the ship to 
sea. Foiir precioiis days passed with negotialions." 

The report in the Non/schlr.sifii^cr (newspaper) continues: "These foiir days did not 
passed unused. Lübke spread his knowledge of the intended deportations of Jews of Denmark 
to several sides. To one of his friends, a carpenter master, Lauritz Anderson and Sea Captain 
Zopf who was engaged to a half-Jewess in Aarhus. She saw to it that this information reached 
its proper sources." (Captain Zopf married his Danish bride after the war and they now live 
in New York.) Lübke added: "I could not inform the Danish authorities; this was much too 
dangerous." 

No Iransport ship was used to carry away the Danish Jews from Aarhus. During the foiir 
days in which Lieutenant Captain D.R. Friedrich Wilhelm Lübke disciissed with OKW (high 
command) in Berlin, the Jews were able to escape within and all around Aarhus to Sweden. The 



Coast Giiard vessels of tlie Coastal Marine who keep watch and siirveillance of the coast were 
ordered oii land by Lübke. The laues of escape were opened for niimeroiis fishing boats. 

— Translafed from the Original Genimn hy Alfred Grue fispecht 



Pifhlished hv the 



Research OßJce of Mihtary Histoiy 



Herausgegeben vom 
Militärgeschichtlichen 
Forschun g sa mt 



m 



seit 178^ 

Verlag ES. Mittler & Sohn 
Herford und Bonn 



3 



4 



-■> 




luf Warschau vorrückenden deutschen Truppen unc 
'ersuchten mit den Vorausabteilungen, und sonnit als 
■rste, in die polnische Hauptstadt zu Kommen. Üoe^ 
jeneralkonsul Geist und Helmut Wohlthat hatten sie 
auch Erkennungsmerkmale für die Juden in Wa'- 
'.chau ausgemacht, um Oberrabbiner Schneerson zu 
erreichen. Die Aktion lief mit grober Präzision ab. Sie 
erachten Rabbiner Schneerson nicht nur aus War- 
schau heraus, sonoern übergaben ihn an eine ne^tic 
en Grenze, oeren es ja nocn einige um Deuisjnia'v, 
lab. den aortigen ameriKanischen Konsuiaroef-orcje'. 
Tausenae sp>ne' Annanpe' empfinge'^ Of;'^ OL'jr.-a: 



V Z t ^ 



jinde- in- Hatpn vor. Nev. YorK. al^ e- Acr 
^Däte- einira* Oüerstloutnan: Hcratze» ;vifr.!' r..^- • 
/weiter fü' die Ar.iwen. ir. Warscnai- Mcir-- Bw. • .'- 
smen- Autou^fa: zl;t On^e: Oticrrar.T'i'f :•■ •'•'~»^*? 
sor is: 195C an 2b Jdr.ja- a- e-^en ^--r/-^- ;.t • 
Ne^^ York verstoroer: 

De' AMeingang aes Kapitänleu:rian:s 
Friedrich Wilhelnr. Lübke' 

Der Bruder des späteren BunaesDrasioenten He!r';C' 
Lübke hat an der Rettung dänischer Juoen einen crc 
Ben Anteil. Der damalige Kapitänleutnant d.R. Fneo 
rieh Wilnelm Lübkc war 1943 Dienststellenleite' ae- 
Seetransponstelie aet OberKommandos ae: Wen 
macht In dem für die Kriegstransporte wichtigen däni- 
schen Hafen Aarhus an der jütländischen Westküste. 

Am 18. September 1943 erging an den Reichsbevoll- 
mächtigten In Dänemark ein Führerbefehl: „Der Füh- 



rer hat angeordnet, daß der Abtransport der Juden 
aus DänemarK durchgeführt werden soll . 
Kapitänleutnant Lübke befand sich ^^'tte September 
auf der Rückreise von einem Urlaub aus B^^ G^^^^^^^ 
Sem Wea führte inn über Berlin, wo er \w OKW nnit 
K söShln Bekannten -sammentraf. Der wurde 
e^ vertraulich über die bevorstehende Deportation un 
terrfchtet. Am Tage nach seiner RückKehr nach Aar. 
nu. erhielt er aus Benu. öen B^^«^;^^^ '^.^",^3'; '", 

r ^^e^^^^tit^^C^'lmv^cklun, de- A: 
::;:scn^ ''^^.P.-.ae. 0. ve^meoenen^ers.. 

aozubringer,. ben.n a zeitpunK; hat 

Hp' Norascnieswiüe" . o'.t ..<J aiebci ^c.im 
;■; d,e aramatiscne Geselchte vollKommen ge 
te die °'^'"°' .„,,,. .y4efia|,e eine damscneZe. 

tuno aescnneDen. daf. „Tausenofc vo 
in- Leoen veroariKer, könnten-. In aem Ber cn. ae. 
m, '-^°^[/® ,„„.., ^,. „anr LübKe oen Hergang 
„Nordschleswige' na. oanr. uuun.^ 

selDst geschiioert; 

ich ging an Bord des Schiffes, das im Hafen von Aar- 
hus laG^nd mform.erte oen Fünre: des Schifies. e^ 
nen meiner guten Freunde. Kapitän Hemricn Benram 
äu Hamburg. Oder d.e Situation, Wir wurden uns da,- 
über emig. daß das Schiff ^aschinerischaden habe - 
der Kondensator sei zerstört - und daß das Schiff 



deshalt. nicht fahren konnte. Icf. tf"te das dem OKVV 

Der Fernschreiben mit. bekam aber BejehL daß d e 

Mnnfp Rosa" trotz des schadhaften Kondensators 

men wollten, das Schiff in See stechen zu lassen. v,o 

«.nnon knstbare vier Tage mit Verhandlungen. ... 
verg ngen Kosioare vici loy^ «MKr* nann fort* 

De- Bericht im ..Nordschleswiger 'ährt dann fort 
..Diese vier Tage ließ Lübke nicht ""genutzt verstre, 
cier Er ließ seine Informationen übet die Devorsie 
n.noe Decortierunc de- Juder aus Danemark nach 
zwe Seiter. nm wei.eroener Ar einen seiner dan,- 

scner Freunde ,r. Aarnus Z"^'^«^'"^'^'«;',^ " If an 
rpr^pr einerseits uno aurcr Kaoitan zur See Zopf an 
ce ser Ver!oDte eine HolDiudm ir Aarhus. die dafür 

;c,: daß die Mittei.un, -'-'^-'t^^f ^J^' ^nacn 
(Kaoitan Zop^ heiratete sein, ^aniscne Braut nacn 
oem K'ieae und lect mn ih- ir. Ne^^ York,. Der Auto 
Lübke fügte selDSt hinzu ..Die dänischen Beliöroen 
konme icfnicni intormieren. das wäre zu gefährlich 

Tus AäThus kam kein Schiff für den Abtransport der 

dänischen Juden zum Einsatz in °«" r'f'J^^' elm 
denen der Kapitänleutnant d.R. Friedrich Wiineirn 
Lübke mh dem OKW in Berlin verhandelte, konnten 
ÄudTn in und um Aarhus nach Schweden entkörn^ 
men Die Küstenwachbooie der Küstenmarine, die die 
Küste überwachen sollten, hatte Lübke an Land oe- 
Sen. Der weg zur Flucht in zahlreichen Flschert>oo- 

ten war frei. 



163 




H IH I, i p.,JlUI,U1JWlil.l . ili lL. 



mßmmi' 






*^ V7 D'^i^^^ 



71^ ^v^//,(^J; ^C)|p^/eV^ 




^ 



'; 



1934 - 1935 



THE SWAMP SOLDIERS 



(Die Moor Soldaten) 

The train stopped. Station X. About 200 S.S. men stood in formation, rank and file on 
the platform with pent up bayonets and the assault strap under the chin. 

"Get off!" We stumbled and tripped over the tracks on the platform. "Fall in formation, 
four abreast. Let's go, let's go, faster, faster." A small, stocky Sergeant was in supreme 
command. He led a German shepherd on a leash. 

"Line up, you, go back, you go forward. Yes, you go backward, pig! Move your 
criminal visage (ugly face) backwards. Count your men. We are 480 persons. The Station's 
Police Lieutenant turned the Charge of the transport over to the S.S. Sergeant and left the 
platform with his policemen. 

Our group of people were left in the hands of the S.S. The Sergeant runs up and down 
the line up, yelling: "Invalids and cripples line up to the rear, March! Everyone listen! Now 
the march to the camp followed. No one is permitted to speak a word while marching. Every 
face has to look forward. Whoever dares to look to the right or left will be shot, dead. We 
shall use our guns ruthlessly. With the smallest infraction, to move out of formation, we'll 
shoot. 1 demand flawless obedience and order ... March to the right!" 

Now we Started a forced march through moorland, a march which VW never forget. To 
begin with, we had to move "on the double" through a pinc trcc forest. Right and l.-^ft, next to 
US, only S.S. men with shotguns under their arms ready to shoot any time, yelling commands. 



"Keep formation. Keep your distance. March straight. Move, move! That 
the second row, over there, look forward!" 



• • 



swme m 



We had to rush with speed across the road, through puddles of rain water, carrying our 
cartons on our backs or in our hands. We were yelied at from all sides. 
"Keep in formation. Stay in üne. Keep your distance!" 

We were forced to strictly observe the distance allowed between the marching columns. 
The S.S. acted towards us like "cattle drivers" Walking next to a hero! Up front, a command 
wasshouted: "On the double, march, march!" We had to move on in a trot. Some of the 
people jut couldn't. Immediately, S.S. men came yeliing: "Let's go! Should we make you 
move faster? You damned swine bastards! Can't you keep proper distance?" 

We ran on the double through the forest. In front of us was now an endless swamp. 
"Tempo, tempo, hurry up!" Our packages feit like we were carrying a hundred weight (100 
kg). The cord cut our hands. We were not used, or able, to keep running. The heart is beating 
wildly. After four months in prison, the body is weakened. The S.S. is rested and trained. 

In front of me runs a former salesman. He is the only person with a vaiise, carrying it 
on his Shoulder. His sweat drips down his face and neck. I know that towards the rear of our 
column are cripples, Walking with canes. We stare straight ahead, but cannot recognize 
anything, only the never-ending moor and more heather. 
"Keep in step, keep in line, go on, move!" 

In front, the column was in disorder. The S.S. hit and beat the rows of marchers with 
their rine butts. The poor comrades spread apart, crying, cursing, groaning and moaning. 



"You swines, you pigs, damned sows. Stay in formation, bastards," they yelled while 
beating the poor people. Meanwhile, we ran forward like a bunch of lunatics. I bit my teeth 
together. 

"Do not look to the right or to the left." 

All I See are the telegraph posts, a small canal and the evening sky. 

"Come out you, red swine, out of your row! You just spoke a few words. " 

They pulled one man out. He cried out loud, but we chased on. No house to see, no 
village near or far, only an endless flat land. 

"Company halt!" 

Huffing and puffing, we stood still. 

"Right turn! Urinate!" 

We were happy to get a chance to answer the call of nature. Now we could breathe 
more easily. Sick persons tried to negotiate with the S.S., saying, "We cannot continue 
Walking. It is impossible." 

"Shut up! ... Company ready, march! Left, left, right, left!" They picked up three men, 
chasing them ahead across the road, pushing them into the dirt, ordering them up and to 
pushing them down again, then ordering them to join their ranks. 



run, 



"On, let'sgoü" 



We arrived at a bridge. A sign post read 'X 18 Km.' The water in the canal was oily 






t uiv^^o wdd piiCu up Uli uie euge oi the road. 

"Tempo, tempo, faster, faster. Keep your distance. Stay in line. Left, left, left!" 
Someone yelled, "sing, sing." 



The S.S. roared along the lines, "Sing everybody, sing. "» 'Das wandern ist des müller^s 

lust. " To hike is the relish of the milier. 
We growled along. 

"Can you not open your mouth? Let's sing another song!" 
'A hailstorm' of foot kicks rained on us. "Sing you red swine."^ 
We sing, muddled, mixed up, just about any song that one remembers. But the forced 

marching tempo had to be kept. 

"Left, left, left. Just wait, VW not forget you! One fine day all will 'end' for you. Left, 
left, left." 

"Au, au, au." One of us feil. He was immediately beaten severely. 
"Left, left, left. If I would have you by your throat right now, yes you, you!," shouted 
the S.S. man. "Yes, just look at me! Left, left, left!!" 

Finally, some houses were seen along the canal, small farm houses. 



»• I ^*i 



Let's go. Keep in step." 
Farmers with their children lined the edges of the road, watching us passing in a goose 
Step march. No camp to be seen. ... Finally, we see some yellow huts on the distant horizon. 
We are Coming nearer. Long stretched low barracks set up in a section of removed moor. The 
area was fenced in with barbed wire, fastened to tall posts. Two wooden towers. We turned 
to the left, over a small bridge. 

"Keep in Step. Line up. Onr feet are moving!" 



To go hiking is the miller's pleasure. 
Referring to a communist. 



Cr:::——— 

^^ «••"ved at the entrance gate of the 

"arracks co.es a heavyse, SS.. • . ""'" ^ ' '"""' '"'• ^"' °^ -^ «^ ^^e 

y^^i ^.b. man without a r;in n u 

- "is l>and. "''' ^ '"^^ «" °- Of ''■•^ feet. and a wooden s,at 

"T-he Co,..a„da„t. " ,He Sergeant reports "480 nr' 
accounted fori " - »U pnsoners in protective custody, aJI 

■""'"" ^""•' '^X '«f>acco products, .atches kni 

• ^^ow, march to fhp rir»i,f j 



"Do 



iN THR BUNKER 



you recognize this card? I do 



takes (he card froin 



not recognize the names on this 



me. Plays with it in his hand 

"Vou know, better for you toten the truth.- 

"ButldoteJIthetruth,"! 

Tel! ^'^^ f»-..*u 



card." The S.S. man 



«nd nods his head to the other S.S. 



comrades. 



answered. 
'' ^^^'■ything in a quiet low 



voice. " 



"Of course, I speak only the truth." While I answered, I noticed one of the S.S. men 
removing his night stick from his belt. He took the truncheon in his hand and tipped my breast 
with it. I tumbled backwards and Struck another S.S. man who was Standing behind me. 

"Na, na, na. Do not bump into me," giving me another push towards another S.S. man. 
This fellow grabs me and laughingly says: "Finally now, are you ready to teil us the truth now? 
Lookhere!" He took his night stick in his hands. "This thing can pull answers! Should I try 



it?" 



He hit me with the truncheon towards my ear. "Teil the truth!, Teil the truth!," all of 



them Started to holler in rhythm. And I was smacked and beaten from all sides. I put my two 
hands in front of my face, trying to protect myself a little. I started crying from pain, yelling, 
"Stop, stop, you are killing me! For G-d's sake, help me, stop, stop!" 

"You shut up! Shut your trap!" With every spoken word, they gave me another smack. 
More and more, they heated up, hitting and punching me. Breathing faster, they collected more 
courage to hit. I feil, but they pulled me up and continued their beatings. 

RG 104 A 104 



Translated from the original German into English 



- by Alfred Gruenspecht 




Mfp 



C{ux>leeli fi^^ily ^AA^ 



<f/t 



u •* O'Z't'i' 




Tt^ej^, fiUl^k ^ /^-^r / j/e^s}'/^ 



/ 




TEACHER, ATHLETE, FOUNDER OF NEWSPAPEP 



THE JEWS OF HÖCHBERG AND THE ISRAELITIC PREPARATORY SCHOOL 



Die Höchberger Juden 
und die Israelitische 
Ptäparandenschule 





Dauerausstellung 

im Gebäude der ehmallgen 

Präporahdenschule, Sonnemannsfraße 15 

PERMANENT EXHIBITION AT THE FORMER PREP SCHOOL BUILDING, 

SONNEMANNSTRASSE 15 



TEACHER, ATHLETE, FOUNDER OF NEWSPAPER 
THE JEWS OF HÖCHBERG* AND THE ISRAELITIC PREPARATORY SCHOOL^ 

- by Roland Flade 
- Translation and Comments by Alfred Gruenspecht 



THE DREAM TO BELONG TO . . . 

For three and a half centuries the Jewish Community of Höchberg was an inseparable part 
and parcel of the village. Symbolic of Jewish integration into the daily life of Höchberg was 
belonging to the athletic Community. At the turn of the Century, Lazarus Ehrenreich was a 
member of the Executive Board and the Director of the Israelitic Preparatory School. His son, 
Moses Ehrenreich, who had just returned as a non-commissioned officer (NGO) from World 
War I, trained the soccer team of "the athletic Community" in 1920. 

Lazarus Ehrenreich was also the founder of the Poultry Breeder Association in 1905, 
presiding over it in its early years. The teachers of the preparatory school, Dr. Benno 



^ Höchberg is a suburb of Würzburg. I vividly remember the hilly village. During m.y two 
years of study ing at ILBA in Würzburg, always two students of the lower classes were delegated 
to fill the quorum to pray for the Shabbat Services. 

^ Preparatory School: A school exclusively designed to prepare students for admittance into 
"ILBA", the Würzburg Jewish Teacher Seminary. Graduates from the preparatory Institution 
still had to pass entrance examinations to be admitted to the Seminary. 

1 



Hirnheimer^ and Abraham Bravmann, both from Höchberg, were co-foimders of the association 
to beautify the village. 

These people were Höchberger's, Bavarians, Germans, and nobody would and could have 
imagined that anybody would or could rob them of their homestead and life! 



RABBI LAZARUS OTTENSOSER 
On November 2nd, 1828, Rabbi Lazarus Ottensoser, 30 years old, signed a Service 
contract wlth the Israelitic Cultus-Community of Höchberg. At that time, only the larger and 
prominent congregations could employ their own Rabbi. The Cultus-Congregation of Höchberg 
with its 203 members (about one-fifth of the population) was one of the most important Jewish 
Settlements in lower Frankonia. 

Jews settled in Höchberg, also in Reichenberg and Heidingsfeld'* after the Prince-Bishops 
Friedrich Von Wirsberg (1558-1573) and Julius Echter (1573-1617) forbade them residency in 
Würzburg. 



Dr. Benno Hirnheimer: I remember this gentle, highly cultivated teacher. Strict but fair. 
I recall once when Dr. H. was in Charge of a semester's fmal examination, being a small man 
and havmg difficulties Walking around (because of a paralysis), he sat at the teacher's front desk 
reading a tall newspaper. Two students made some uncalied for moves, believing he could not 
See it. But how did he notice it, calling them with a warning? Dr. Hirnheimer had made a 
small hole in his paper and could observe every move of the students. Dr. B. Hirnheimer, his 
wife, two sons and one daughter were transported to Auschwitz and died in the gas Chambers. 

' Heidingsfeld: A suburb of Würzburg, which had a large Jewish Community. For several 
decades it was the seat of the Chief Rabbis of lower Frankonia. My great, great gr.mdparents 
lived in this small town. I remember a (trolley) street car connecting Würzburg and 
Heidingsfeld at my time. 



In 1721, a synagogue was erected in the upper part of the village, near most Jewish 
homes. In contrast to inany other Jewish land communities, Höchberg dedicated their own 
Jewish cemetery^in the year 1822. 

Since 1816 a newly established Jewish grade school existed, where the twenty-one year 
old teacher, Hermann Stern, instructed the children of the Community members.^ Rabbi 
Lazarus Ottensoser made every effort to lift the spiritual niveau of his congregation. He 
conducted religious studies for the local people, and many young students from outside came to 
learn. 



LEOPOLD SONNEMANN 



Leopold Sonnemann, son of a master weaver, was born on October 29, 1831 in 
Höchberg. The family left Bavaria in 1840. In 1856 Sonnemann founded a small stock 



^ In my home town, Wüsten Sachsen, the Jewish Community did not own a cemetery. As 
long as the Community existed, aboul liiree ceniuries, the dead had to be brought to a coiiective 
cemetery quite a distance from the village. Until the mid-19th Century, grounds for the 
cemeteries were assigned by the ruling nobility or the Church. Jews were dependent on the 
assignment by the responsible ruler of the area, since the acquisition of land by Jews was strictly 
regulated until far into the 18th Century. The eniancipation in the 19th Century brought a 
significant change. The old coiiective cemeteries lost more and more of their importance, since 
Jews were now lawfuUy equal Citizens and, consequently, had the right to purchase land. Many 
smaller Jewish communities purchased parcels of land nearby to bury their dead. Most of these 
lots were located out of the way. I have visited several cemeteries in lower Frankonia. They 
were all located on hilly terrain. I also recall negotiations to purchase a parcel of land for a 
cemetery in Wüstensachsen, my hometown, in the early 1930s. It did not come to fruition; the 
Nazis solved the problem! 

^ My brothers and I attended the Jewish elementary school in Wüstensachsen, my birthplace. 
It consisted of one large room, and our teacher, Ivan Goldschmidt, taught all classes. He was 
a 'genius,' a man with a brilliant mind and unlimited patience. He, together with his wife and 
son, Erwin, were deported to the Auschwitz gas Chambers. 



exchange news report with the title Fraiikfiirter Business News, the foreriinner of the most liberal 
and very prestigious German newspaper, Die Frankfurter Zeitung. 

As a representative of the left wing German liberal folks party, Sonnemann became a 
decisive Opponent of the conservative Reich-Chancellor Otto von Bismarck. Sonnemann, as a 
parliamentarian, fought in his newspaper the f rem Bismarck actively forced annexation of 
Elsass-Lorrain, the socialistic laws of 1878, through which every social democratic activity was 
banned for 12 years and the anti-Catholic "Cultur Confrontation." On October 9, 1878 
Bismarck and Sonnemann fought a bitterly contested debate on the socialistic laws in the 



Reichstag (the German Parliament). Leopold Sonnemann died in 1909 in Frankfurt. 



THE ISRAELITIC PREPARATORY SCHOOL^ 
Around the learned Rabbi Lazarus Ottensoser gathered groups of knowledge-seeking 
young boys to study religious subjects extensively. From the Rabbi's students, sitting at bis 
round living room table, originated the exclusive religiously oriented Talmud Torah school in 
1840. When more and more young men came to Höchberg, many from out of town places to 
study and prepare themselves for the purpose of becoming teachers, Rabbi Ottensoser changed 
the name of the school to Israelitische Praparanden Schule (Israelitic Preparatory School). 
While the Würzburg district Rabbi Seligman-BäV Bamberger established The Israelitische Lehrer- 
Bildungs Ansatalt (ILBA) in 1864, the continuing ' curriculum of the Höchberg students was 
outlined for them. After two years (later 3 years) of studying in Höchberg, students had to 
complete their Instruction at a State teacher seminary. With the establishment of ILBA in 
Würzburg, students were able to consummate their studies as teachers and cantors at the 



"^ Rabbi Elazar Dov (Lazarus) Ottensoser was born on Erev Sukkot in the Hebrew year of 
5559 corresponding to 1798 C.E. in the small town of Weimar Schmieden, near mellrichstadt, • 
lower Frankonia. He was the oldest son of Rabbi Naftoli Ottensoser. 

During my two years of studying at ILBA in 1934 and 1935, I had the joy and privilege 
to meet and be together with Max Ottensoser, a descendent of this illustrious family. Although 
Max O. was several years older and graduated ILBA in 1936, I remember him well as a 
friendly, almost gracious and companionable person. His father, Samuel, graduated from ILBA 
at the turn of the Century. He waja teacher, cantor and shochet until his accidental death in • 
1927. 

After graduating ILBA, Max taught school in the German city of Karlsruhe. There, he 
met his sweetheart and future wife, Ruth. They emigrated to the U.S. Max became a social 
worker for the Citv of New York Havin«^ e^T-ppd ^ (]p'nrf^f^ in cr»r^ioi w^»*^ fr-r^^^ c^f^r» WnU 
University. The happy and lovely couple had three children. Like father, grandfather and 
ancestors, all three studied law and are successful professional. Max died at only 67 years old 
in 1982. His grandchildren have excellent role iiiodels to follow in their ancestors' footsteps. 

Selig Steinhäuser was later the Assistant Director of ILBA in Würzburg. His son, 
Ludwig, was my classmate during my stay at ILBA. Ludwig's sudden death on the way to 
Eretz Yisrael was a terrible shock to his parents and to the students. Selig 
Steinhäuser and his wife died in Auschwitz. 



Israelitische Lehrer Bildimgs Ansfolt, with everydiing needed to serve in Jew Cultus 



communities. 



Lazarus Ottensoser, along with his relative, the merchant Samuel Eldod, acquired a large 
building in 1865 (today Sonnemannstrasse 15) into which he located the Praparauden Schule 
(Preparatory school) and his living quarters. The Eldods^ remained living in the ground floor 



apartment. On the first floor were three classrooms, a 



Conference room and a small area 



to Store teaching materials. The two rooms take in now the pernianeiit exhibitioii.^ The floor 
below the roof offered two additional classrooms and a sickroom. Later on, supplementary 
accommodations for students were added. While the preparatory school grew expeditiously, the 
Jewish grade school had to be discontinued in 1869 for lack of students. Meanwhile, only 79 
Jewish souls lived in Höchberg. (Jews were permitted to live in Würzburg again.) Jews 
represented 5.9 percent of the village population. 

Lazarus Ottensoser died on September 12, 1876. He was buried at the Höchberg Jewish 
cemetery. With his inheritance he established the "Lazarus Ottensoser Grant" for the 
preparatory school in Höchberg. 



^ Eldod: I remember having spent several Shabbatot as a delegated Minyan-man at the 
Eldod home. Mr. Eldod, a former teacher, had long before retired. His body was weak and 
fragile, but his mind was still sharp and brilliant in his older years. The Nazis deported him and 
his family to an extermination camp. 

^ Permanent Exhibition: As a Symbol for the harmonious co-existence of Christians and 
Jews in the village of Höchberg, a suburb of Würzburg, the local village administration under 
the leadership of the Mayor and his Advisor, Dr. Roland Flade of Würzburg, decided to install 
a permanent exhibition. Will it teach something to the upcoming generations? 



THE STUDENTS 

Instruction was given both morning and afternoon in school. During noon recess, a meal 
was served at the boarding house "Ehrenreich" opposite the school. Afterwards, students were 
given an opportunity to visit the nearby playground for sports. In the late afternoon a stroll to 
the surroundings was arranged. Since the Jewish boarding house could not accommodate all 
students, some had to live with Christian families. 

Because the boarding house had only one wash-room, but no bathing facilities, students 
walked once every weck in the afternoon to Würzburg to bathe in the city Bath House. This 
free afternoon was frequently used to see a movie or a play. 

The most enjoyable hobby of the PR. school students was a soccer game. The boys used 
the Sport field constructed in 1921 for the Höchberg Sport Club, but also the playground next 
to the school, and the narrow courtyard. The Student, Max Grünebaum invented "serving" in 
a constructed play area, a soccer duel that was suitable to the confined "field" in the courtyard. 
Grünebaum emigrated later to Palestine and became one of the founders of the soccer club 
Maccabi-IIaifa, a freqiicnt winncr and master of Israeli Soccer Teams. 



FIRST WORLD WAR AND THE WEIMAR REPUBLIC 
When World War One began, teachers and students made the war their concern. At 



certain times the school was closed to accommodate soldiers' training in the classrooms. The 
prep school students passed a military youth edücational program. A number of teachers were 
called into Service, amongst them the school director Selig Steinhäuser^; who was rewarded as 
a front-fighter with the Bavarian Meritorious Gross. 



Except for one, all students at the Prep school were too young for war diity. However, 
many former students fought in the front lines; at least 13 died. 

Abraham Bravman, a member of Höchberg's Jewish Community, died on December 10, 
1914, a war fatality. He was born October 13, 1875 in Unteralterheim. 

After 1918 an enlargement of the PR school was made to become a "Citizen School" 
where, besides religious subjects, commercial and business subjects, math, steno, typewriting 
and English were taught. In 1929, 55 students attended "The Preparady" and 20 "The Citizen 
School." In isolated cases non-Jewish students from Höchberg were accepted. Twelve teachers 
presented instructions to the students. 

Together with ILBA in Würzburg, the Höchberg Institution was the only training school 
for Jewish teachers in Germany. 

With the beginning of the world economic crisis in 1929, the construction of a new 
building, as demanded by the authorities was definitely made impossible. Since ILBA moved 
into a newly erected school building in 1931 at 1 Sandbergerstrasse in Würzburg, the 
Preparatory classes were merged into ILBA'". The school tradition in Höchberg ended 1 15 
years after the establishment of the Jewish grade school. 



l^ii ^" November 9th the history of ILBA at 1 Sandbergerstrasse had come to an end. I had 
the good fortune of emigrating to the U.S.A. in 1937, together with my parents and 3 brothers. 
Seminar Director Jacob Stoll and Mrs. Stoll emigrated to the U.S.A. 1 had the privilege of 
meeting them frequently. 



8 



EXPULSION AND MURDER 



With the moving of the Prep School, its stiidents and teachers, the Situation of the 
Höchberg Jewish Community changed drastically. While 85 Jews lived in Höchberg in 1925, 
about 3.8 percent of the inhabitants, in 1933 there remained only 22 persons, 0.8 percent. 

As of September 26, 1933 Jews were not permitted to move to Höchberg. Several 
Jewish families and some Single persons sold tlieir possessions and emigrated to the U.S.A., 
England, Switzerland and Palestine. The only son of Seiig Steinhäuser, 16 year old Ludwig, 
died on his way to Italy to board a ship that was to bring him to Palestine. 

During the pogrom" on November 10, 1938, 16 S.A. men arrived at noontime in four 



^^ A relentless effort was made by the Nazi party, fully supported by the Government, to 
segregate and isolate Jews from the German public. Children were not allowed to attend public 
grade or high schools. Advanced students had to leave all schools of higher education. Jewish 
artists were dismissed from places of entertainment, Jewish doctors and lawyers could not 
practice their professions and Jewish businessmen were discharged and ousted from high 
positions in commerce, industry and govemment. Factory and owners of wholesale and retail 
Stores were forced to close, or had to seil for much less than the real value of their property or 
possessions. 

The violence of November 9 and lOth, 1938 was a mad Obsession, an opportune time to 
destroy, burn and ransack Jewish treasures, synagogues, Community centers, homes and 
businesses. The action was fully supported by police and govem mental authorities, perpetrated 
by Nazi party members and quietly consented to by the majority of the German folks. Common 
law to Protect Jewish Citizens was declared null and void. 

"The System" constantly elaborated on new regulations, decrees and innovations to make 
it impossible for the Jew to exist living in Germany. All rights of citizenship were abrogated. 
Law and order for a Jew did not exist anymore. Young and old were shipped off to 
concentration camps Dachau and Buchenwald, often whipped, beaten and slapped while being 
degraded with derogatory remarks. 

The countries of the world did not act to help the unfortunate Jews. Motionless and 
inactive, they watched. Instead of opening their doors to the destitute Jews, they closed them 
and refused visas. Many were turned back at the borders (Switzerland) to face new onslaught, 
starvation and later annihilation. 

There was a good chance to save niaiiy of our people, but no country volunteered, even 
to raise their normal Immigration quota. I vividly remember when President Franklin D 
Roosevelt and our State Department permitted a mere 1000 extra Jewish refugees to come into 



cars from Adelsberg. They destroyed the furniture in Jewish liomes and in the synagogue. 
They tore into pieces the holy Torah scrolls and prayer books. When Emaniiel Eldod, the 
Chairperson of the Jewish Community bent down to pick up a Torah scroll, a S.A. man stepped 
onto his hands. Some persons of the Höchberg public participated in the destruction. 

Tombstones were overthrown and damaged at the Jewish cemetery. Between 1941 and 
1945 the remaining Jews of Höchberg and other former members of the Community that had 
moved out to nearby cities were murdered in death camps. Amongst them were Emanuel Eldod 
with his wife, Miriam and daughter Rifka, sister Recha and Naftali Eldod. The cattle dealer, 
Salomon Bravman and his wife Selma. The last director of the Prep School, Selig Steinhäuser, 
died in Auschwitz as well as Dr. Benno Hirnheimer with his family; wife, Wolf, Rachel and 
Moses Hirnheimer. The three children were 6, 5 and 2 years old when the door of the gas 
Chamber was locked behind them. 



BRIDGES TO THE FAST 
The synagogue building was claimed by IRSO, the Organization appointed to administer 
Jewish ownerless property. IRSO sold the building to the Evangelic Church in 1951. After 
completion of extensive alterations and rebuilding, it became the Church of the Evangelic 
Matthäus Congregation. The interior still has the "Chuppa", stone of the former synagogue as 
well as a portrayal of the erstwhile synagogue area. 



the U.S. A. They were brought to OSWEGO in the State of New York and encamped there for 
some time before being released. 

- Alfred Gruenspecht 
10 



The Jewish cemetery, located at the "Am Judengarten Street," is now under the 
protection of the Landesverband Der Israelitischen Kultus-Gemeinden in Bayern (Land 
Federation of Israelitic Cultus-Comnnmities of Bavaria). In the birth house of Leopold 
Sonnemann at 62 Sonnemann Street, there exists a memorial tablet. 

The former Prep School became an apartment house until 1933. The Höchberg 
Community renovated and reconstructed the building between 1995 and 1996 to house medical 
specialists' offices and the permanent exhibitioii, "The Höchberger Jews and the Israelitic 



Preparatory School." 



fl-6- 



11 



f L AAOAio 



//ea 



-H^L-fR^eb Sf^l^KJ ^ peeKT T/kHilv CoulCCTi 



0^-' 



^^1i9^ 



5> 



\l ^S]otAJ^ 



II 






^ 



füc^r\ ^"^^^ 



^otJ£ S\\r 'rii:rficfoar (^ 



\\m9 P>i^o 



S^u^^oa^ ^ ^Psü (v^f^i' ^^^'^^-"^ 



f^^M 5'^f 7 -'A«-?'" / (^^ (S fd^-^^'i^'^ 



f^-HfbC£ 



-ߣ niOitft^/^ 






U^siu (^' l^oo^^'cr^^^ 



pl IC 















j ot^^yi^ 






?7 



iish'O 










^^ (^L'=fP^ 






,')H 



(^- <^^ 



j ,9/0 A'^ 



7 ^. 



rf/lA/J 



.c ^■ 



ztL- 



^oa^^^^ 







^; i^t'"^ 



O P> 






5 ^'^''^''rrU-r^-P'-^"^'^ 



/^M 



r)sJ I 



l^•ül^f^^^ 






ca.an.^ wnn T^^^ ^"^^-'^ '^ ^^^ ^^1^^^ 

r^ ly^o/' -iu^ ^^''^ '^^'^ < .r 



flwn P^v -rWf^l i^u- C^ 



■i</i' -S //i^ ^^^- U'&<-o 



\j^n^ ca 



,'^■^zn hfM-^ ft 



^O P'tifil', //=' ÄrV/jAT^ 






(ji(j£ cf^cß oi^-r ^ rf^-^^ / 



-n 



^>1 



^.-fj nr ^' "^'^ 



7 0^' 



yß^ A'i*^ 



^ /^r/.^'Z'^'- 



^ ii-: Ih)^ fi ^-''^'2^' 






()t//gA 7/^<^- ^ 



It 



-ff^^-n 



(ü ^p(^- 



p^tJC) Ulf" 






6V 



r /J /^ 








rf-^)' 



y^n-f 



-inu^ 



C I 



S /Vf^^-"^^ 



rzo ßr^^"' ^'''"^'^' 



45 



t^4i 



C(2S^^^ ' 



c; ' i^'fi ^ 



7^19 /cZ-TJ/^*^ T^ß- 



Pl 



ijc) ^of -ro /-mv- 



7^f=-cn ßSeo^^^tr^^s^n.a.fVz^ns. 




f;;,,; /«.-- /3^--^ ^^^-^'"^ " ■ 



79 



___T»/$ /^ts<? i^^puAit^S U^HI fff^ COk^ i-t-no -To ^x^ Q<^^. 

:5^<^ 5//»^^ fid'^ C^<nP/<tn^D /3y -7^-=' /^'^pu^fT /^/g/^^ "733 



[K> jq $'?)<» 7-' <pp ^^ps^ciiof^ (lerftpo^ rU:rs^j/J a>F7ifz' (^oojtü 

"^OUs pCf^C^ UfOh^ 17' 

7)t/=»'7 _T//ri fün$T O^o ^*^^ M?; •?3 ß^ Gii/^^ 7<=>' 



i^ 



•fV£ ßt/nfi/it^C' of Tili OsO ^ot^ , R^fouic-^s Tl^^' ßay^/ur/,.^ o f^ 



* \jl\Sh/ 









■fU^ P-f>SotJ L\^^ T/fjf /?j?Ö <r^ <L/ Coi</7A Hfl^/H7:;r:> fiA^Oi^^ i^i4o 






17 J/^iS //^ wVji.t ♦ / f/O/ fiH 3£?: »-a ^oo S/^ ftH^ 0^-ffL^ /^AS^ 



^jöu s'\^u. cprsn r^~-M i^ußr^ n s /^ 











fi' 7^ Cff£<^ fA^S * Ji ^O P=r>pLf li /? g , ri£lC^1> ToMf P Syo<J /^/?-' . ^^•^J\'/'' 



1 






fy -f^M^sK^ '^•oi^fp firjp ri>i.jr9^ y 



1^=' 







"fi^^ 



'-^ 



i^ltji 



U,':^%-'-r /^S 



-^^^CC^fiy^C,, Ifl/^m-j riAi^ M?*^*<7 (roM;r n>^-f ■£>'?-- /^^ SU:r /:^ ^O (^0/7o*J 



l^^^Ppii.caffoiJ c>f'i'ii^ O'^'^^f^ ^ -?^^/ L'Usj^ Hof^^ ^/ir^-n Co^^-;,f2p 







AL.FRED GRUBNSPECHT 

830 GABRINI BOULEVARD 
NEW YORK, NEW YORK 10O4O 



/f^^P^t 




(^1 ^^jc -^piu^s^^^-i. 



A H Cu^^^hi^u-jon/t-T jf\*H Cil>%fn^ n^^/'"^^ 









(-v rK-f 






|7r?^^^J c^f^r^'^'-^-^' 



^ 












1h 



Jb.,.Jo ./ ^^r>^ ^.Ä<-(.o^/ /-^ 



ylojLJk^i'^ 



^ 



i-aili 



s- 



p^ 



n 



{'Vi p^->o 



^"■> 



!■» 



/ JSD(<^^ ti"^/^ 






(TfF /j^' '^P^' ^^'^ 



? -> 



j^ \k> 






O^ti ^rnv^U |\ Oi^^ ^yyi^U 4t^ Au^jUT 



U(Pc\^ 



CA^ J rs dc^ Hp Sc^^. 









i/W 



^ rJ>/c^^/( \ufti^ /f J^ 



^uip (/Y .e^^ ^ -y. y^cu^ y\^4 A:^ ,x 



Ck,^v 



\c> 




^^aa^-. 



lA-^ (7K^ 



^c 



If 






€am 



Aje. 






C^K^ 



/H^ 









\i^o(i^ r/C 



yu S^^^n i:oti^\^r Dh^^p. c^ ^ ^.^ .P h ^'^^ ,1^ 



^(Au^\ Q 



<v\ <i^ 



i) 



urCo up'^ ^ ka^ ,-( • (j^^n ^ '(^(c^?3 



(i? /; 



pi^o ?j7 ?/>r ^-.v^L_^ iTo/ S7^? 






r. 



</" 



fv 



'(L 



/J f/^^ ??6"^ 



n 



J. 



oo C 



/U>c^ Yf>t=nc^\/ L^ [^ 



u-ef 






0-^ J^Cc>ft, 



a.j2i^ 



Aaü^^ lyL^e, ^(^^ ciac-LjP J^ aJ^ ^ c'-f^, I 






Cc 









=-L. iyUyv^ lU ^ 



Co 



(p ci^-y^ tiA. 



^ 



/ 



h^ yf<j^iytc:y h> //-> 



/?>., 



Jo^rVxS^ 



> ^^U'ux^ 



(j^A <^^^ 






f<C.f>uL4^ J2. 









-'»'i-i-e. 



// 



^//^?3"^ 



6^.7T7i/o«^w iSvil^^ ^\UCnAs^coo> jriw'Zy.-TtfWr 



? p ZJ ' ? ' r^f«^ '^'r6 '=>/ / ^ j^ 



(? 









^ 
















f 



: I tj-^ fiic 



Ayt/v*^ ih^ ./pUi-yi c>l*ifot^^ (pdf A^ P^ ■K-»^^-^/^ /u,/»,^, 

'^ yo^ll 7j^£2_f^^ •^('(rfc \\'-^da\ 




v^ /i: 



J^^ 






(^(^AVl ftP ^/^a/cJj^h^Trron ^fri' i 






^"0 



'l^^?, y\i^!> "^ Por^ = r\'? ]f^_^ 




\o X ti/vc ( i nvvt^ y)fiA4 yw^'WJi. 






i t I I I 6^ I 



(pW>c^ /Ht^yt a/yHu, i ^ y C Cun/u c ^^^K^VT^o.^'ic^ ^ (^y^^^ ,4^t^i^}^ 




i ! ! I I 



>" ^4^A , <'^^i^M. 



Q- ctJd,(r 



M^__^ Colli ^^Pf2/z<.ys Urux£ 



trc^X<rrt-.Z_^flj-^ ^^ y?^Y .^ /S^ ^^ ^^ i^ Ow^fin (/V yih^ 



i II I 

^pSyin S::^ ^ i fl^ ßy^^^sh> Ifi^^-^^^fr^ ,^n,tMx.etL^ cpv^ux 



JtO 




^^^aMA ^ tu rac Yi Pf^ ^ i^j)^^Y2.^/^ 









/vu e (/ i^ A(: 






-7 /VVu L'y\^'^>i^ 






jn^^t^t-^yi^ i {^^A^ ^ 



"^ 



Ct'LX y^ 






c-^M^\ 97 



yC%0t ^•.•-. in^ 



+ 



/Luu^-^-ti'iaJo,! 






-1 



,1^ 



. ^ ^^ f^U^ßCcM^ j C,^ ( ^^JL 

i ' ' ' i^ i p I i . 1 I I i ^ ^ 







VC u< vc 4i ^^ut^ %J {jj-^hoLv J! \ijL 9^p^ c^^/ /Jofl u<^ I lU Jn ^M 




i'* 




1^ 



Q 

k 

^ 



'f 
< 

5 



/ 

D 
■i 



Z 




n 






Q 

UJ 

r 
a 
< 



T ' 1 ^^i — r 








^ac^ 



^u/^ , "^U^x (j^^ /Z<^ ^ecij^ äi 



AA<J^y^^ 



pg^'i ^ 



/# 



.^ ' ! ! - j I , i - I i 







UyjKjL. 



ij^/ptc^ oi fU rl^'/^uf /h'Uct^Wi^U jld cf /yhoi^u^ 



?^ i ?o if 



l 



i 



Jjyj I C O^* t/^ 







CaJ^^ 








'(^ \/UuAx 



CcC^y\/\jL, 










ypt^ 



y^xJS r^ P/t-u^ t>^.u^ \L4. frxu^ J 



yA,.^ 



1^<W<^ (ß^y^ (o -ev^ ccu ee ^ i^'^ ^ 



JLc^^ (p-öXy>^jCic^r^^ i^ 



_5'>^^ 



J^-^^^^-'n^ 





I 

1 











-r- 









>^ y^wlK^_Ä„_|^r^^_il'L4y?_|,^^ ^ fhiii^ ^(^^ 






t-c 



IvKi^ SVvxO,^ ^L^Mcin^c^ if^^ h 



a 






J^^ fb/^/4^ (f^U^ (i^AcXJ Jj-ct^'^ 







-^^^^fXrv^ --^^ ^^f^^-k^ 



1? ' 1^ I I ^ 



/vr'^t-^ 



Ji/cM^ 




^>LC curujCtJ^ 




i^^t^ 






l^^y \UJ kjL K ^^H^v tu^^i c % J^CU^ ?^fu^ i ^J n^y th^^t^ '^ lY ^9k^^ 



\ ^VV A- c£>- /Uvj /V fea J C-^|(^\0^4v Z;^P<^ .'^r'^y /?^>Co_ 



^3/^ ?i_22!_^ 



flw [cyoM i^i 



S- 



^1^ 



-A 



U_o]x^/v fW fu-ot' ^1? U |0>3 



/(3^ / f^/ ^p ?-^ ^ ^ ->^ro^■p // '^r]/^^y^ 



iAMAv\;4 










AaJ^ J I Qil o I |tt^ tli^ ! U iy^/v-^ ^ /^vT^ ^^^;^ 



/W<r1i '^<^:<^ä4!__P'i4^ ^^txu^|<n.-t^ ■ Ao ^t-i •j^ ^ / h^ 6^T-r- .'-c-<^ 



^/' A'DAlt <g ftl/l l^ 



H^ ß^L^ /U^cat ,-,^ '^<^ hH~<. ^itv^ ^ 'i^v> ^ 












tvO 



J9 9// 



Crryynpyy'y^ 






V 






A><_ 



1^ ^ 



^2/v-<- l.^'l^ 



^>6i i, ^vr^is 



c<^' 



Wpewf I (^ JV- (J^^.^v/ A-nf 



_ ^ Saoni^ c^ ro ^ "^ Qd'c^pUl^ -^.frx ^^ 



m^,^ 



^. 



?- 













) A Ww^/vv ^^^v^X U~c«^ JA^r^vUl Jh^r^ ^ 1 ^^ >^>:^ -^ it /yo , Oi"^»-^^ ^ 







^ MC ^e2>^/ 






I 11 I 1^1 













'/lie I ' hfi Gl fmxo lA/ io^ c i/w ift-<. ■^fcy^ 




/ 







j^'n 



y- Q^^<<. (^44*^^'^ IcHM^^ Ju .4V^ä o^ Uyyt^c^ 



j^ i<j6o__ ^ '^^ M^ 



^ 



rW^ 



}^^t^ 






yLiyt^ 



^ 



c 



^ 'p C -^ j? 



Petrin 



P=e^ 



-J^/'G'J^ J^V 



s/ 



jo''?ir 



•^ 



-r^ -^ ^;/ — -^ , — / ^ " ^ ^ p-^ ^ p- 



^ ^;^ ^ , / , V ...^ ^ J ^ 1 








<1v /il- 



o^s^ - 3- ^ 









ftyyi^^^ 









A-rj^ti*^«^ 


_fv>5 /)4'i^-^ 


^ 


c4^ 








i 
— 1 


1 


(1 
















1 









































— 1 

i 






_ ,_ _ 
















1 

1 


' 










































o 

0. 






m 
< 

5 







7 
O 

c 



IT 
O 
O 

T 




i I » I 1 I I j 









t cOi/i ^1/^ k/yy^^ (^ '? 3;f C^gc^^ /^J Cpru^c^ yz^^ X, (/'Tu /?/ furo 



.1 ' ^ r I ' Pd '^ ' 



• t * ' J *" 



ur^ LjiAciJ 






C ^ \Uju ^dn^X JU^ /3 /f>r) 



'^i..^^ 




__ ^ — I 



A'U<i]a,^dZ. 



flu /^V> ^ 






OßUr- 



f 



ju %-^ 



I I 



1 I 



9iTn>J Au^ Wi[t< 'Vrii UnvM 



"a/- 



^^7 t- //t^ ^^0/ 








< 







^pl^p^ crf^^yn^^^ . /7J^><^ ^'^^^^ 



y^A |?'^p ^fU^^c^ /^u ^ /hi^Y7i^/i^c^ Ca^'^^ ^^-^fP^Ot^: 



^ ^ ^^ — ^ ^ ^^--f _-^ ^ 1 

fl V< f] ^' ' (ji^KZi Jr^xi. ^ jft^ L^g^ / L A '7/2 '^-^ k^^ ^ 1 '"^^^ ^-»^ ^ 



\ 



\ 






rf^V ^^V/. l>Vr^ ^ 



Ü-yvyc 



Unr^JLA ycc^U^ o^yu^ yi-l^ 










I » « 



' ' I ! 

I i 







n y J^ 



70^) 




1 



1 



o 



I 
a 
<t 

(E 

O 
O 

I 
»- 










\U. 



>/ /J-^ 



/i^-ti^ 



/^/ 



ly^ 



fC^ J C<''x^c:. f-^Vt 



^ 



/ 



X- 



_ /^ 7' 'f [ ■ /- /|W li- c^ Ol [< 









c<^j^±_ A^ '^'~ >ij/^ 



i r n r I ! i I I "1 



<^^ J^. 




^^■^2 









<*5l_<*. 











>tw w -Uu/ty^ ^1/^ ^U. ^^ 7 3/^ 










I 
a 



T 





(^^n^^l5 '"^K K-(jMl cf^^Jn icrc^ 1^9^ U^( o^^ (Ij^U^o Vt^<^— ^- 



V Aa >^\rA/^ AVu^iA."^. 



^ 



-^ft^-,^ ffa^^YK, ^ / 



T ' 



?iAf '^'O?^ .f*-»^.?!? ^ ij ^Gj"» ^G"? p/^j/ /'?^? -^ 






CM^ I JdCi^yr 



/n^ 






/H^o^ A*^ _/^ /li^ A A^ _^c-/ ^.^^ OupiJ ^ fp 



\^Ot (l^oi(\oc CißnaaiH 



9 






"^ 














Vr. 



■ppfc v ?/2/ f^^"^/^ 



?/ 



-^ r>( 



<o 



sA 



K 



A j* '3 ^5 y 



f?r^ pj 



jp'f^ 



tPTJ 



CUA. \jSiJ\K/B\^<,^ 



I I ; * I i ' i 



i 



a> /v/ 



f < 



rr-/ 



vA^C')?' 



^.. .. 



/ < 



\y\/\/<^ 3r^\ -^^y\A/YW\ /\\ U/^ ^^^ ^^^ 


\ "'-v^ S l'^\ F 


ri ^ c ^^ \ Ä ^f 


i 




Ü ^ 


Js67 






A 





o 



//r/'/ 



p 



/ 



r 




/Av^ I^YVvmJ? 




>/^. 













• 



• 



p 



'S'JJ^ 




li)w. \Uc OOOjM. 







(2j2.W^ /Q<^'£^t^ k> k<^' I 753 -jp^'^-)/ /« /< 



I . I I 



\J I 



K 






jU 



41^ Zu. 



/ 




Ouv^jC «/t-^AV 














1' ^^ X ^ i A< A;/r 



O-^Uf <K^ <Qv<. Ja<^Ox^/ <1^ jb*?^TV-i'9 Ox^^ L^C i^^i;,^^^ 



\p JU, 1*?^ 




(pT>"«Vt , (^ /VV1<?c^ ;2^ ]<<^u^ ,^^f^O ftlf^nSS l-lftl^O^/i» 




Ifveoi^St .^^ü-t-rw- c>LXeL^^ /w**^ ^^«^ J^£ (y^ t't^ k'X/Y^^k>/<^ 



£ 



^^fe(' Qj^ Ä^^ ^ 



^^XLT^ /\UhA<<:^ \JLcJ >U^^ (P^t'V»^ idc-e^^ 

i*?^ ' 11-1 « _ > tf ^^ 







Iks t^rS SUiuM S<^ 



■nn' 






y-/ 



|V>S Av^ce> $li£LU- cL-^Ct,^ xfCt Ci^'ij?(^ <yi ,^^*^ ,77ftJ U^oi^ 

i' I I I "1 — I — i — 1 — ' ■■ i I 



^ 



(^^""^ i ^^)f ,\Ji\t .OwvH- a,^/ J^f^ 



j I * - I II \j i , 




I 





i 







oJI^CClL 



i' 



U 



^r^ /)tl^l^ Ai^o<^ tcrtOTao«- yuc/ (>v 




o 3 



[/u ^ G-Mc^fyt^m^ 



^fk 



^ 



«i 



i^cV Q.M^_Jh^r^ H^ ^YTt^ k-n^JJ ^Y"^ to gYv>t^ ,^^c^ 



9^ 



/^U. 



Ly^o Q( 4kc ^.6{><s^ qKc u^ t ^ 












r 



^ 



ifvV ^- 



eis. 



drt^\^^^ y^fuccA ^_ 



n 






/ I ' f ' ^ ' 



iv<_ 






(h/vw>j(. ö^ r> 



^ tr1{U 








Joy\,A^ 






Zu 




I ' t ** ^ ' ' ' 









1^ 




/^o9 n^^ 




o 

Q. 






< 



o 





h 



-»-«^la. 



fV_^K-r)Y ^^^vw^o ly-nO.^ ec>rih'H' v-^ \i^ ^-^-.-^^rs' Aj'^^r-K-H 






"d-^'^ 



i^ü^ JU-"-^^ C^Ci^l^X J^^^^^ {ScfA;-At-^ (pöu^J lUm^s U'-v^f 

i) rs I I ! j I J 



1/14 'jttiv<- \\ y^>- Ax w-».*-y cX cXciAyx yV-^J^TTy^ /^ -■T'Lcf 




£r^na^h^^ äfiU^ ^- ^ itJKt 



'yc Ct^'uxC-^ 






\/^V/v Äc. 



i/eA^:..< /fl^K Unp.'^i' 




(^lif\\^ ^ ^-^:'W<_ C^^ p 'J ^^ rpy. <?f<J I fr>ryy^ ^^^^ \^ U^^^^ioS^^ 



ziu-^ 



\i / 









(^rvn.^ 



^JM (p^^^^ JhciaAc^ 



fryi^^ />t^^H^ fv^ /^^'^^^-^^^X-^ 




o 

—I 
Q. 



'SC 






PI^J ^'? 



<^ 




• Ir 



I rr 



/(^a^\0<^-K/v.c, Ovt^ '^cJrcku.W (A Kt lAh<>^' ßp^' 5^c<i <i**t_ 
fr'f|</v^'A.^ U./» //(?f^U'J Ou/ |Uk.|^ ('f^V«o G.cc^,pt (U£<. k> G" 



_ Cl 



! V ! 1 ! ij 1 



'CvdA^C^ 



— \ — r I ! ~T "^ ^ ^ ^ n r \ 




/>^^?t-»^ 









cnrt^ 






• k 






I I j 1/ 



ßc/Vu^ ^ K^^^«^ XA>^./^i^^ (^ (p.^V>K.*(M -f^ ^'^<^ .X^vC 



fc j^^n?^ J^r'^, f^th^-^jN p:>j^V" '^P>'/^/^ /N'?^ //^?)> '^ 



UH^ ^c^tsT c^c2cc 5'^^ficc. fo G^ ^ Ket^ 6Ä; fD cri ip^ n^t pocuo'^ 






JjJ\^r^^ 






(uJL<yi 



? 







ih- -^(yirtU (2Jyv l<cu£u^ 






p<> 






i^»-«-j 

n 



[c-]^'7icl -^Jj 




r 




k 



I^Vk^ 



T T 



i? 



-9// 



I 

&o\lX ^ t^ 1^^ /yu^>r^c€<. {/(^-c^ G "" ^^«^^7 r^^*-*-« ciinjr^ 






i r I i I ' ^ 



^>t^ 







^ 






yU^ ^/VLi 4^c 





c;z^i^ 






l/) 

D 









I ■ ■ - \ ■ 1 ! 


s_y^ /V 'iN^ 


i i ^ i 1/ 1 ^ 
(/K 7^3'*^ J^/' . fP^-^f^x^ SUiXj A^cS' CLß^aU iXüL c&^a 


t "^ i '• ' 




1 / U 1 1 1 I / 
_ 04^^ Pli/( HV /:>t^^ 4v»:e^<re /P^/'A Z(K>t- <L OtYXy^ ^'<^^rt^ A f^ 






( 

1 1 ^1 1 1 


1 ' \ 






1 


' ^ 








1 v/ 








/ 


V 


^ — 































































































































































































































































































j 












































\ 






















j 






















! 












! 










1 






















1 

j 






























- ,1 




, . . 








i 



^ ' // o 











— 1 ~ — I — ' — I — 

i "=* i i "^ i 



öwv/ /^ y //i? yL^J. /^^*i4^ p/inrA^z/t^c fyu(ßmdy\^ b^^^i^ ^y^ /U. 



I 



^ p VA' 





i%'i \lJ.iryjL J^ Ai^-jffh'^j iU< J^-^i Joz^ i'^fi^ J-aJ^ 7i /L 

Vr^^y^ .Jj^ Jsy>^^ Qi^UrZOfH Ju ^^/ ^^ UJ^ 

^/^>- l^-i/ <S üWlii-«^ Cnof . , /?^ O^?.:?/^ Uici^ loJ<. 



u**^.,^ 



% 



/^ -ßvrK^^^z^ 






J^cJ^jJl . c9^ Ipr^jJ^yt^ oi/L^^-cßuJ yicJuu^ //i -f^^^ t^^y^f^ f/ißJ. 



fJk^^l^ I^J^ J^^ 






i£^ lis^ij 



k 



yuoi- 






I 



• 



# 






i 



cy\<^ 



av^< iricU <ju 



11/ I 




t^f? to ^^Wi • I I 




?/^ 



Ptru^ Al±^ ^^c^ L^^ ^'J ph^ "^crT? ^i^ ^^^ . oU^cc^^^ cqog^r^ix iK 







yU/^'O 






\ 



COuJl 





AvV {Ua 


Ww- ir 




VI 




f ■ 




i 



^ 



s/ 



yi^frr»-^ <Äi. \^ ÜAi^^YX ly&jae. , Ä-^^r?,:^« /u^ .yiCi-«-Jc k> 



l 








I I /l ^ I / >^ _ /"^W 






JiCuoL (TIa^o^ /yvtO<X^ Jr^'^ QC(rcn^'^(y\ ^ J^^} ß(pprc^'^ y , (i^ 

trdtv^ /'j ^/u^U^ j^(^f^'i^<^ . P> ^>K^ (^a<,, />vr/ 



r 



--^ rj lATCaJ^f^ CX^-^ C^l^ (fß^e^^ yn€«<-^ /h^^^^'<^ I .^ /pPtAAvi^^C^ 




Q^^ 



^y*.^ ca^itj, 




"I ^ r r^ 1 M 1 1 " — 

(Tu. \r^ SU^a-^^ lylcU b^-^Dftfin ^A^ aJ-vy^ /U^^ iXOru^y'^^^ 







miüfy^ 




JfoiUti^cJfßrerfLliiümj-ßtiß^^ 








J k^ck^ ifjjt ifafut 



ai 






^06.V.qORRES 



Wdcocne S'.H5 

gfcdinge VAiicc^iee 

Visiiina ouv ^cUnbö in, öscfi^l J^ptiiAC Bcöwrr 

Gmilclkkllrxg (fiSOp.ctz 

KxhbxlAi Bh^ibbxi ^€c^uc6 -j'.oop.cn 

©inncc |ollcwuifl ^ccvlcce CÜAin^muia R^ar 

T ^zxy/ n unc 3o^>^ 

Coj¥ccpltt6 * CTlAin^inuifl RxHxn^ 

^llAibAijScCvicCd 8:30 Ä^OX. 

j»i"^ip ^yzjL AL^cei ^ruenepecht 

Scccnonu RAbbt H^cob Wicnct? 

S uW ÄhtAA^bÄ*" i:oop,cnL. 

jn=ij* •»'P'^^ KAbblJuötin.l2ofaiÄimÄoo 

CfllruhAh. ^ ^:30 

^'u^Ai ^hllöhiir , 7t oo 

OlÄÄuiv AnMjAvi^lAh^ 9:30 



ChMCcaxru AUv Robciiü 

SludiÄcCt ö'XH?^,ai.. 

BccAkJAöt ?:ooÄ..cnL.. 

ptcturc ixkitm io:ooa..ar< 

Clognng oiöcUiaa ll:3o^xa. 

ChMCj^CJceofi. Ruih^vuäiUc 

nifeetiyg/ '^^lllo^^ Aricfieon^ . . . . i-.oop.ov. 

'JÄwwc-tl OlseRcbeca 








~n 



V 



^ 






^x 



r 



/ 



t- 



_ \/^ (JU TO(lA 









^ *o 



I I i I 

fIk £<fx. ^ (fu Ao-A^ di^J^ ^.t^ A-^^ f'ß^^y^f^ 






^Cu^^ 









Cu^ 












15 



'0 r^' 




f 

j 

1 













l^ r^^ C-_.ü^^ A4. 



11 




i^i^ 



i^^ 



0^2 ' 



/7<^ 




r 





-b 



WA<^ c jkäi ^ ^«i^ H ^^4 U Jkr^ 









h]j 



CU^^GX^JJ^ . lu^ ,/'^ 'frrp-^ uff- L^ ^-^ 



^^ I I 1/ l'l L ^ ^ 

"flu. .•^o(iaH ^IaJUX yLco\,^ Sa^cP ^irL^ ^ ca^-f ...^. u Xy^. 

[LccA <2-rc ß-em-^ * (jtU-iA Oo.^^ .^^^l ^^ip^ -t^t^ 






\\ 





■ , J^^'^p^ . UMju^ ^ 






D 



X^ ^^ 



-^ "Vt ^3l^ V ^ 



^ 



ß< Cc^^t^ o Mx^ "yrV^^ 



Im ' 

_(it\fU'it^ iK^ M*»^ cUa. ^Csl Ur^ f^ ^^<-,JWw 



^yu>^ 








p 



—^ mm. «• I I ^:^^ ■"" » 



P- 






i i I *** I ' ' ' /^ 






dM^yo 



<<,QjUcL/\o p'C/^/^'(K' cl\^m<c ¥^ M^^/-PH fWnJ U^M^ 



r 



<^A 







yvv 



iUjj^ J ^^ ^ S9^^ JO 










Lok. 




nw/ 










_'Vltf^i> (^' 



({Whx^ 



} i ' l 



• i V' 



i4S,.^lLc_ iL„ikr_ ( n ^ o C^ AiTL^j'^., Ar^L^^y^ , 







o 






in 
< 

o 

7. 
Q 
< 




Z 

r 

i 







\ h'Au^J'i 


:;^ oLi 


(pl^^^ik.^Hi^Si 


! 1 1 . 


1 


(0 


1 


V 1 






-fl^hi 4^^. 


cA^^ fl 






o; a^.( ^ //.7/r^j 


tW«- i'i /4i 


vo-fL-^^^f 


-^i. ^^^r^ Ä 


' (I^UH.'t^J^^O^Ti^^U I/u^ 


. 4^ A^f^^ 




^^V^" / C^J 


\ 1 1 ü 




' D — 




J 














/ 






i 1 










































1 


















, H 






















■ 




























































! 

1 










































































i 

1 





































































































































_|. . 




































_ 







f 




j^iäo 'o(jjf ,i'>C »>ic j^"3(6i ^ro ^r>?// 

I A ' 



^,^j. ^^ 3^r \\^;^Tfl J'^^^ PV? ^J^"?^ "^ ^V^ 



AiyLe^ ß^if^xicj^ /pucm^ fyyccuP ^y/^ /ö^ 



I I I I 

V» i ^ I I i i i 



^ , OiHyO Aoj^^^ K ^ 



b 



T^ 







M^ W-e^o. jjwvA ^ U^A/Ai/w fti L^w Hm^ Um>^ j^^^ /^vu/J 

^ * V II * I 



C3 



Q „.^v^r^^ j^jC K 



-j-^ j^ 



P?l' 



\ • 




I .. I I I I ^ - 



T I r i I i I i I 

(^ 7''ao /"' Van (CfPf'^i^ . 

I I * I 



ywu^*^cJ^ . 



1 







i i I I "^" 1 / ' i f I 



I 



1^1^ ^ 



g 






tvi*. 



(p*tl«H 



|vvw JVeo^^T^^ 



j^ 



dA>/ 




AcjJi^jy^'^ 



i^yXi^'--^^ 




-3 



1 








fV iW^ t^^Q «Y /U S'tJ^^.c^ '^V^ CL0iuc&^ 



/o /<-c 



^-^\><^^Uv H^tfiv? |t^^ Q.^^O'iA^ -Äü-c/O- <^ /OerOtA^ -A;"Uj-> c^x^^^ 






d^/)^''^^;«^' 






'^^'^ 



4vx 



.1.1 " /i i j \ 



fU 



lU 



pO ij^^J f^>^ <P<^^^ -^i^t-i-j ^/it 




(P^'bt 




\0^ryUi^\o 



K /^ ^2/> 






(i 



<Kii>^ ^fto a /W:^^ir ^^X'^y: CLL 







a 




' ^ ' ] '^ ^"" i "1" " ' 1 — ' — 

H^«,vi A-ri/iA'x V^v^ ./^ hv^cl^-s i^ ^s C<nrr</ 



Hl 





V^i ^c^£ß^_^Jl,H^ v^ o.(j)cf>JK yfi«^^ ^'3_ (^c?'^ *#^ O^^ 





^ j SO <^cyD eY /^'^ ^^ (^~^ ) -^ Pioh£-^ ^"^ <>^-^ '^^ 



<,-< 







I I I I I 



f]R ^c>( tM Jb ^ " Cyt^Cu<^fiUu~ <ftUC M a6c:^orc*^ 






p^npx^'fvA ^c^^ Ihj J^} (ai^Ä^ ^ 1 fk^ JW^ / J K^cAi ^^ 



^> o^ 






^ 



*»< 



-^ 



^'T^uO 



/ivu^i^ 



XUju. 




I^'jU 
















H 



J 



Ylk. ■fit,-^^ l-^0< ^ TV (tCl- --v ^ e )^-Crfrv-^ tyN^v-t^-A -^ CcTty^i (O' 



i. 



^C^cJi-^ ''«^ 



^;2^-^^ 1^' 



/i^Vx Q,yV\^-^<..^^ 



G 



t^Dax0i/s2k 



(^ 



i>:4^r^i_d'...'^ 



U-vv^i 



^ 



(/^ 




^ 



/ü /Cf 




<)v3 4tcc 3>/wJv (?<L^t^ t/^ /ö (U [QjLa A>i^i <k7/ZL< "^ 



VßriP« ^^>v»MX2qijli 









1^/2^ 




Ah, ' / ' '0 



QUjuJ^ Up tv ^ 9P'<??<??P\"TH 



~>ri 



t'l 'O 



/ 



P»")?/ 











v/o-T yZc/UT ^^t^ (ftu /QC^rt*^ HVh^ . 




1 I 






1 




i^C<^ . JUoiAU^'y^'^^ 




<lk [jir^S C4 Kc f 




1 (J 


\jt CXUK^ jQö^ 






I ^ 






1 1 1 1 -, 1 « , 




1 


f 




1 

> 

• 
1 




« 


1 




\ 






















































































































j 














1 
1 


1 






















. 




















j \ , 










































\ - — .- 1 -.. 






































1 










_ 








































































1 























; 






























































1 



















. 


1 




.1 



■q 






<p pf \n )c <?o^ 







ftiAViu^^A. I \ \ (^ ^'i Y-^Ccii^ 




A 



£ 








»■yv V ^1 






0cA.. a^^ k- 3 ZtH^^ /^^ 



f 



/lOfiMDc^i^^O /^' n''^ M CiQ^c/i^^yfS^^ü 




VJ! iO.T I ! ,f II ^ 






v<y^,>:hSE^Ei^ 



|c? 













1^äIa<^ 










£iLk3j 



CuVv^ U>-«^ 



I II I S- j I 



/ 



/ 




o 

r— 



CJ 

^ 

■^ 



n 
< 



r 




}ör^f ^( 



(^ 




Ujc A 



Jlycc^i^ 



^ O^ [SfintP^ 




(pcr>i^ir^ 



clcc^^c^vt^r^^L^JP Jnvyx^ h^-c Jstrfi-^ 



V<-^''^i^^*^ ^^^<3^/^Vr7 



-^X-x^ C-A^ 



cA 



C'^ Sl C,<ii u 1^ o> L sn s> 
(mcA^^^ K^^^y ./ua-*A^7) y(^cc^y^^ p^a-t^^ <j-o <H^-^^ J^^^^ 



clu 




l-lto 







IxTUv^ 



Cc\)-«- 










G(AV>^ !^1-«A/T» 



• 




r 





Ö2 



y>/y^ 



fj 



\6eci. Hv ^ 



w 



p' 



Vk- 



(Wiy^ 






ilk h^nl \tA(i',^ (S ji-J /^ Q-or^te^/^^ <^(A^e.f /ic^i^ J-ccU- 

\tcc{(^ (Ix S'ix c-ytJ^ ' ^(/ro JU [jik'^^ 9\^ fii^'^ ß^ . I 



'[/^ 









^:^?£ 







I i I L 






/^-»vc<i 



C^i c^y 



iSÄßM-^ 






CÜ ^Hi . Q (('J \^ d^-ß ccUi h Mx ^ a6.rrC^ : (Z^ yt^^ x^ 



^, 






■v-cci^ ^^^rfi*^ 



^ßnH 







I3'?i'i 













II I I I II ' /? I ' /^ 



-l^JrtrfK W^ Sr^p^ 




4 



PvS^i.- (J^o i^^ (fu-/ K: it/r^r^^^7^- -^n^cC ^Y /^^^ ^4rr^^' fmmi 



^^/:> /, 



^/^ (^ M / -'(^^^ ^-t^.^/^ S£^f^(70> 



I 



P)ßCAPit±^ ^ c)C'7:nßh n^[f^^/i)^ (ßruu^'^^^^ lUo^^ iUiM i^nMllu 



-t- 5 • ^ ^ ^ ^ — ^ ^■ 



-^ ^ V70 ^-^ 'fh^^x^-in!^xpj 



/ 






-l^rCh 



J 



o ['3i'p 



J3?'l 




o 

0. 



Cl 

^ 

^ 




J 



^//^^ 



<::k^t^ 



Oclc^ lo^^wUJ Is^ Jk- Ov1n^>.^ il^^ (py^^^'S^ <Pcvt:>HJ^ (P^'''!f^ 4'r>^</^ _ 
£M^(:,p--t^^ vo <^^^ f^/'^^^ ^. ^ /?^ y^^^.^c flu ß(H>c^^y^ C^U^^^^^c ^ ^^Th^r^^^ u^ 



f^y 




1/4* ^ f f':r^„ '^''V^'b^^ 



h.. 



a ^^. 




^::n ^1^2 



Vc^l-wv ^ _yU ^1 ^ .J^ (p^ 



H^ 



-'ft^_ /2-^T^ 



/ ^^^A Ao 






/^/o>t: / J g^ (^ ti^r>n%^ yccch^ ^cJ ScLoyu h äu. ^ 7Xa^^,y ^__J^ 



^c^y y , C^ Ja ^^^^^ J^ac/^y^-^ c/^^/ /^ r^-fLIu.^v^ c^o^ / ^ 



i^ev- 







I -* Jh 



l' ^ fvyc ^ c^ fy feyVe^^r) ^ . ( f ^^ X^ ^^(' ^ f tJ c £c ^^/ l, 




I ; I I "^ *^ '■ t I t ■- 



K< (R'v^w 



<>TV> V ^W\ A^ -VI I 1^^ 



K^r (p^> 



i^ce. . 



Uhd'O J6'^\ ifV^ Cy^ 1^ SO^^wO ^) fC^ ^ fC ^u<fJ VC/Hl c^^-u^^ /^- ^^,e^' 




) 

f 




• 



/ 



a^ 



J(iu4> Aci^J! biv^ aec X'J /^^(^ 



I i i f 






A;mi^ 



<x^ 






Qi^l^ iX ^(t4^r' ^'*^-»-^^_. 










.A^^^ 






^r^f y Jvi_^lJ^ 



^/%c^ 






)/U CJt^ 



r^A f^n t.^ A ci ,j2^ 



ihrc^ 



L^^ 




Sk\-^^ 







i^fU « ^co^^^wi^ a^ ^u-u ^^yt^pA 



I i i /^ I I 



Cu^<. 











I 




II ' , i I t ' ^ ! 






<1^ /) 



r) 



/ A /^tM. ttK Tt^t >^^ .^^ "Jy^ ^ Cg^f ^ V <L^ y i Hc > ^ y(K C^^w^ ><- ^It/HL 



' ^ 



üi-«*^ 



A-r<-*''^ 



Kac^ c^il- 



'*l /th-^ 



1 



d oaxat iv/ ^ 



^ 



^ 



W ^tt Y /^yt ^ / ^L^t VC C>^«^ //t/i^ /PPIC*-^^ fj^^^Y'^ y^' 



CA,*><- ^l^f'**^ 



,Jit~vK. 



h .Am ^^Jrt^--*-- ^^ Q^^'ivi-v ^ 1^ ^^^ ^^ /^i^ /<^w c-cci^p^l, 



^pc-*^ 



() a^^-.Jyn 



t«--f 



^C 



M^^y^- 



Ou^] V^ fi^ C cc^ ytc 



%jhC<j-<^ *^.*^ 



^C^tv 



vy^^ ^S 



a> 



'«.HL« 



^ 







g-O «7 tot yit 



/ 






i^ 



^~Ha y^u^ fU^^ Jju-v< - ^" > "itW 



Pf. 



^ 



^/l*V 



/ 



^^ ö-C <-<, 



P"' 



^i2c 



f^>ur, fh'^ ax 



o^ ti^ McJ[ 



C\ lo< yu.o Jl^ sJL ^ ^|v>3AMnv/ oluf ^^M.- ^ Ji^^^ JL.^ A 



t*>viX 



|o,Z'S 






^^t 



V 





II 

- { 

d 




-3 











Ä 



<? /V_ 






?f ^3. n 



n 



7 



111 "^ "• 

0? ></^^vv^ /tc^ yfU^ 





1=^ 



ro^ / 



I • I ^\ I I I 1^1 i . 



^ G^(^ (^fJ>^^ //^>' /^ '?^^> 







U^A^^ -AHU^cA^vvX (;\^ x^vIvc vwcX^ L>c ^cX<^ A\cii^'c^ ,(/vo^'yL^ j 






p' 




IV 



"^nf- 



^^ 



J&; 



^e^^-^^ az^ A^ 



^ cL%y:s_ 






J(V^PC^ J etyvA^ /IcOiK ^^K^ iV.^v( /s>i, ßckj^^ ,-/7 7 , 







<pi/lic^ ( {}^ /PU^ 



iy^H'AY^ 



eU O-Cud 



J 1:^/0 



d/v 




jl^ h 



- I y I ' I 



fo £^/yvvWL ^/U^ ^^ /^ C-xc-tt'^^y^ iWy^ Lirt-v\A^ .-^ "^tc^^^^-te 




^ 



."i^^ 



6 



-^/ 



i>T^V. f^^ (\i^itß,A f)t-7 e/ /ty (/Y*^"^ .M^i>^-^ llr^LUi^S UtkA/ f^ /Cf 



[vJ2^f^: 



u^ 



JOei^ib- (^«^^ 







?e/ 




X 



•^ 

^ 

^ 



n 

i 

5 







7^Xlr (I)örei^^^2^ i 


1 II 1 


1 V 


V 


- ' / 

1 


^t^/ /<,^t^ ^^/ >/v-t) AvK^y , /vJ/f /^ 


/ f 


^{ 


' ßl^^( 




j^Vu) 


yiyVL £^x^^ 6it^e^^\. iruy^- /LcrH<^/:*^.0, 




/ 










'j / 





















































































































































1 


































































t — . _ — 






































■ , 




— 






























• 




\ 




















1 
































































































■ 





























■ 


__ 











p 



f(i 




;3 



^ 

^ 

•< 



jr"Z. 



jC 







I I 

\ ! 






P:^I^J^MfiJ^ 



(Tl^-^' 






^..JhäjL^ß^^yjL 



-^-Ai 



> ^ ' 



-e. 







/^u/ 






Lj-cl^ 



l^huX^ 




O^ A^ P ^COi^U><^ i/\^ [i i^ N OUuJ' 



iyu^ U>rCf^^o 1^^ ÄJ~ C(sf^ ^/)ii^^ 



3 

r 

1 

r 

3 




«of "0 




r 





^^d^^ 



JIjC\!^{^ 0>) i^ \U iHr^ 



*j\^rp. 



n 



r 






S'c 






füiru hKcL^c^ 



UrtvvX^ 






i I 



ai 



i/^< 



(f -^^ 




JW> 



I I I g 



-^^ / 



f>ccJ^ J<^r /pi?c^ 



<. 



.^ '^rc•^^ 



cn/U i^^/H yc^rln a^xjßr^, r£u 



^t^i<y>i 



U ni/i)ficn \ 







ff * 

a 


ßi de. 


1 V " y-| 


1 

T 


^ ^ 






k \^ 






' A^ 


oot^t / ch^^"^^ l 








up'/vv-e . Qi r -* 




f (7 

yci^'/1^^ ho fuX 


A^ i'yh^P^^rük^ 













r 








yifx^ h/yi ^ 


i 

/ 


^^ -A^^^/lO /T.^t^t.'l^.^^ ,^^^t^n/>^-^<^ 


o 




^ h'^m 


, ^/ (h}de^ cu^ jt^<us^L 


1 


u^/ 


—1 




(Xv^ ^ V>tP<^'v^ 


4. CT-OHf^fZ) 


1 


/ «^ 






a 








\l 


















C3 
























^ 


























< 
























\ 
























• 
















































GQ 
p 







































































. 






















\ 
























1 
























1 
1 
























1 
























— 1 
























' — 1 






















1 






















1 


• 


























_- - — 






































i 



HOUSE OF ETERNAL LIFE 

Jewish Ceineteries in thc Rhön and thc Lipper Land 

in Photos and Poem 
Gerhild Birmann-Dähne 

Historical and Dias 
Heinz-Jürgen Hoppe 

(Exhibition Catalogue) 
By H.J. Hoppe 



"MAY THE STONES TESTIFY FOR US" 

This was ihe proud call of the Frankfurt Jewish Community to its distressed members in April 
1933. Today Jewish cemeteries in Germany testify of the once flourishing Jewish life in the 
land communities. Bavaria, Hessia and Thuringia had the largest Jewish population. Jews filled 
important economic and social positions in agriculture commerce as middlemen, in the retail and 
Wholesale, in craftsman Services. 

Jews were highly respected, were very active in commerce, social and political life. 
Communities had iheir synagogues, schools and cemeteries. 

In April 1933 began the terrible and longstanding tale of woe and suffering for the Jews of 
Germany. Existence and livelihood were ruined, shattered and destroyed. Many emigrated to 
foreign lands, but most remained and were deported to extermination camps in the war years 
1941-1943. As a young German I will recollect to keep alive the memory of the best times as 
an exhortation and appeal. 

- HJ, Hoppe 



September 1, 1995 
'. . . werden in Kürze anderweitig untergebracht ..." 
"... shortly they'll be stowed away elsewhere ..." 



A brief comment on the contents and structures of this book: 

I believe that all of the historical facts and picturesque copies of dozens of documents and 
original ukase, the official proclamations of the N.S.D. A.P. (National Socialist German Workers 
Party) is the best proof to convey the approach and effectiveness of the Nazi "War Machine" 
against the Jews. But the past should not be forgotten or nb^bni On * be swept under the rüg. 
These decrees were strictly enforced and there was no escape from Nazi persecution, unless you 
were able to leave. The acts of Nazi demeanor will show the worid the Nazi inhumanity and 
the sufferings of the Jewish people, and this was only the beginning. As the book says on its 
Cover, "... werden in Kürze anderweitig untergebracht ..."; "... shortly they'll be stowed away 
elsewhere ..." 

The Streicher Göbbels Propaganda, the brainwashing machine and indoctrination of the 
Population of Germany that Jewish people are cowardly, malicious, greedy, lewd, incapable of 
physical work, unthinkable as athletes, Jewish inferiority, unimaginable as soldiers, known 
usurers and political conspirators. 

Should this constant onslaught year after year not have left its Sediments in the souls? 

The Jew became ostracized, degraded, humiliated, uprooted, pauperized and terrorized. This 
terrible nightmare did not end, a worse one was just beginning. 

It shows an exaggerated respect for people in authority or command. 



* G-d forbid. 






u i/i ):>9^i ^v> 



Te 



f\\\iO^ 



Os-nn. -T(? n^ IJJ M'-t ^(f-^. 



ß^ PlAJ^tST^ Pt^/tJ f^np yjr^/g /ty / /^ <r=> . 







V ' ofnttu 

kJlpft«. 

Oi^Ofi^ p(oru£ Ur TvnAJ MAacU 

(^f200(9 i£t^ oin 5 t/^Si T 7^-7^ CJ' 7Ua7 •JM^ fi/p^iz/ön s *P/^ 



V}£n£ $£i^j> -jo TU£ Gas OiA-Mß/r?s 



fi . tf , (?». 

Gas r^PiMßxny' OH 714^^ y^'^of JUL'i MH-'i 

f^ 'TU'*' C£>f^Ciy)Tnn'7tOfJ cam(> SrurTUaF 







q22£ ^J£ä^ 






l(7nA 



0£r) yjWshJ JUS ^lA-Liß l^'i/rto^O l4oLLAh>K:> 

O^foit^sj^ ^o /j| Co iJ c^nj Tn/ü -r^^^ C/i^Mj 



Qr^uoißir^yt Mi^nrf-/^ nt^anico ö7ro Reis 







df?A^Hs 7/S- 6'^9- 7^Y8' 



WiVx hAnt(^p/i€ 'fr?^ti 'fuLO/^ 

__ O^foiz-r^s:? -To ru:n2Js/c/ys7/^0T . 







"pl/irpr U*A9 l^ocAl^cTO OijTyfOJ' nPz'^tTy ^,^^ 
TU:' Afizy* flt£^ UzT^J- T'» C(c/j:\ /AyTZsTi^cf Q "m/cS 



•4» -^ 



.^. . 



'1iC(^^. /^^5^ " Uaadn Jfi^ccn, c;n<)AJsUf^^ rar 



L-TT^ 









SjpniK^c^ of ff^S" r>^s> 9r^r U)nu o'?U£-n. 



C 



i/N >% .». J^ . . mm^ ^ ß J^ , ./ 



/-*!< 



O-t fh^y ^ 



^L/ 



U/*^^ 



(c^C{ 



'p^fTiAT^ frt^M '/''•CT 



/OrfifiifL^cr onCz-y^L, 









"Xo /2jfLra -r /t/j i "^o Ca^ ^^rnr^ ort a , 'fflo t-^ 



__/^5 / /-ini/'^' A/'s-P/tr? ffZort Üg'U3-T((/J-S^ ^MjT 
l/ufo -für <^/l5 CfiflHn>zf^,_ 




flU5i>» 






5/4or 



) 



Y^-rt-rts \iz Uni CUc^iti MdtJ /of^Ur JslJCjH Com- 

r^^c:f -Tb trHf^rtarJ" 



hns. /^(/-rra ^t/fi^pjnsUcr/M 



( 



yösrsusfi c« PJ-/Ü 



für Ul^^p 0/7Ä 7lil flu Ml L^ cf^ l-l:a a^on^^oas 



SU£ at^Pli? OkI rx/i' fayrfct. floAr> 



of l-^0(ias>,^ pti/fj t^i^c? Oy^'^''^ 



/3^/i? $!7P ÖU$r/AJ 



CALt-) tn^S^i Gon^& MAO, ^sf^f^Mic^ 




-»: — TT" 



/t/^ r/v n- /O ^ono 14 4 u$jn 



j 




n ^(oUhJC^syt. 0^U_^y7^yt. Rost tt/r^$ An>Cz 
^A^C-tLri/Jt::»^ 

fli^ i^ri/^fn J^T^fff/ C^yy^::" Os-nc^ns /4/^a 

H^ni U£ 5^7? (/■=?? R crt (jr fo*f. %y^-nn.s f)Luj 
^ ^ Starts In U^oncrp ut^tt J^ tj\y nUjTfieto^ 

$£c\n£7 poLici^ nthJ<? Sfiippjyp 7^ f^f^ 1=^7-71 M/ 
IU(^-rfo»j Cr^ Mf ?. 14 IS kif^Sil-flrx n^o u/^ 2^ 

pd^0^7syz> To TiJ£ ^^nf7 * 



/^ /^P^ e^^^-ytM/ 1-^/9 7-.-n=> .' 






l 



(4 IS k/ffTf^/^OO/^ O^U7jrn ILSs 

k^lU fort Hü/oY </jmns U>ns Coh Osllst) T? /9o 



es. 










/f -z-cp /p/u/p Ljjm^r <^qor:> 




ny 



m. — « ' 



CU£Ui(OSuoui^tC(fi Us'flf^fJ nUf^^ ^PAT ßoPJ, 



JOfJl^S 









Co m*' "7^ -fUj- poi-i^rC j 5 n^^r -7U£- uy- 







^^O PfSfs 



VJ^^^fU'i i^iusa i^ppOS/'7:r TU- 






1 



t^<r7-S 



f^^?/^ U/^-n-" ^u=-yi. s^ ^^-nnj oLip 




pi^C» ^'^•' TfU^ r\(£o Scco ^{TM 



I 



PHV Uc[fJf3£RC=i^n ^ Wifcf Ro$^^$cfiiLpß3} 



y^ 



of^ M/^^ Ou'p fi hisirzo'f 9cy^-7(j- forv-ri4jr 

(^f-rm. /-7 ujßs_^^ (poS9rn3Cz^ ßN'irt'on^' 






\X£ ^sTl U£0 fi ^ T/U^t 7 ßsTfon.J' iJOftcp tOf^ fu i ^^ 

füoM <fac^A- 'Tli:-'^ u^nJ- "(lF9sr7LJo''T-^ 
t^tnr» 9f£6'Fftt£0 l^ottu=:-v ^^ ^ 37ottA(Srß(/ii.^ 

Ol/yJlS'. ^U<lli^&' n CU£c/c miJO //osps-C^/otJ of 

^ür h£>i n ^4 j 'fo^i^o "W^^v //--' i^flQ n />o 

UlU^i ^l-i07. 

Ulfe llsnrra ri-^o 'lUfin CUiLo/tJ^ ujzn^ 
OF ßUSc(4U(7t,- 



c*^u h^mjTK pjf tenaoicar^ , IVr JJUf^ ßtuais ^^ia/ar) 

iUl- -in 0-0 1-7,0 UAL, lߣ:fdxn rlcf^^ fir7fi/Ati''^ H/j^on>r,yx 
CohiJ Op /^ÄÄ/J fort, /PfU^^f/oJ. jOo O/Jjr /s /}SA^S>y 

SsHi7ffM '^e.iüs^ Jnr 7U:fnr un^hr -r(/c /J^tj^ 

t '~ — 

^'Z jihj . __ -rus vsa-\ ffiS7 C0^ nisrfi gauj . 







Vot^oa^S 



OlclxH C^QU^aJ 



■^^— *** ■ ■ ■ *■■ -• - I t w 



— ^^^■.,^. ^ — . - - ■ ^^^ 



DouuB-nS ^^ot/s /u, 60^/^ 



r^%: 



l o ^" 9C<Sr- :3'o^i^ 



S^/^ 






7l-^ 



•^-/T." 6?b"- g^5"// 



pfioßjr^H^ 



izRici<i L^ui , riinrtntcc? j^tJ uin 



in -Ol pfiaiC L-i^Us: $ooM KcW^f^rtOz-Ms A/^ 



PfiUC'?Ul£^fl 




(CA fZ£jJ 



/^AO/SoA^j hZ/Sc, 






n^y (^1^9 ro^cI^£tj Ht^Q o(^£ ^fULo 

77/C//2/A/G //9 



ßon/^ Oci -^3, /9/y 




ß^no Kl A/inJ' 11 n ZZ- 



!••'*' 






^ ^ r 









O^ujO GduA^if^^^t (}pnA jAiJ'j''^y /^^. 



_ rA/UÖSTe/^^/icNSi'rO 












x.) Oauip Ot Omfcvoft pf /MXuA 4/Jcc Co f jjViiy^a 












7o 0Ll\/£7^ nicl-llGfilo 7^ /^i" X/--?c)rt. H/n Svi^ 

MS 71 OicO i/u ÖU\/£l, n i <^f( I ci li) ju ofjtlf^üSu 
TAU' M ( 5-rrt «;/ 1(0 OLwjsr hicufri/^ju^ MA/ifL/s£> 






ci-ia^jc^sp /-J/s A/fltfj- % 



H (^ \/=- 2- 






H(^0 RUOlUzTl 



fboaiO S /JHJ /?c?S 






Cfllsn- - JUS- 'fnr±iL-f troUsQ To A/ü/i/Jß>^ß^ 



SISfl^'^H itJ Oufb/afJt<rA ifo^^jü. /^r-r/z^-ci^p 



. — ■■■ ■•— - ■ • • — ■ , , - , _^ ^ 






Pico Jt^^> rcj ^ i^c;^ 



^ -~ ■ ■■■! II ■! ■ » ■ ■ * 



WrTt n4//xy (b^fJ Sp-f- ? IST ^7 



htia Oj^D ^'^•'i^ /'7'^'f OML-i /^y^mni ooo 






-TT-k"/ n cU 1^0(2=']^: 



TuttJ i 






OhJ ßi-ocic gr 



(^(i(/Spjp£cHy 






h\cmiL. : ßooL'r, pAi/io, LiNf\ 



I 



I 



i-liascu : iOh-pJ 



^i^na 



JUl.lcf$ Opp--PiJ.-f f^ 



t^obss : Of\^iO , WsnaMßi^i^, Msia 



I 



Qo3(iLlS\ f^QOLf Oßi/lO, (2^^U^ 



J (JL/s 



n-^is 



SflM 






flclr^ 

hsia Cnus 7,0 u/ Tojoi I Riifü Juli OS 



tiicUAH'/C'/Nn. haivfft^p (ß^rfi-i^J 






Cll^^fQ£p 6ß0^f^ 



JlOKli7iyf Qi^i/ip 



" !■ " ■ '■■■■ • 



i^m^i^^^^^^i^mr a t M w^rt i—^— —i— <>^ 



■ »■! '■ ■■■ If 



i W H mn iii ■III I 11» ^ I I -n» 







M /So^. 



mtt^t^a^aamukim^im 



■m w ij MM i I I ■!■■ !■«■ *■■■>■■■ 'i*— I ■ 11 I ■ mmm (■■■>■ ■■!! 



■ ■ umwiiii* iiwi »■ 



■ » i n ■ ■ I H III H W» H i^.llll li» >■■! 



■H» II > iM*^M«^lfc-i»^»»<*»l»^h^M1>**' 



■ ■■■II II ^ I 



%i ifcliMii ■»! 






"lo tJMort /f rt/J7 CoiJc^nuj 



g->3>^/ 



S:\/L^U6 I O-I^^^OS UO l/(MC((^ ^Mo(0 Vi iJo Gaß Ob vJ 

UlCdYMiJS U U\C(iftitJc\ f H(\0 f^snns. öf _ 

I 

Map T^ haricH "^o j^ i co m^- y z-nc '7<^ 

CHliff I 



1 üs.tij)(/jsp [j^ Mnu-fH/9u^^^ (r<pfj^=iur/t/}-7^^J 






ÜA/ty OM/ fftYnSMT t>t0 



^n(£ ^o<it S'lBf^a-roac MoifirVi^p 






■IkMWaMNHMaM^MMte. 






^0^ 33i hüf^c(i£iJ^ 3l!^t1Ai^H 



tf /P5^f^^^w*i/ CAna 



^£fL£C'Jtoi<4S 1"^ -/»j T UoCpogus^ 

















rt (J/-T) 









-' ' L ^ a 



H(C^ I l^J-i ^f^V)OoT l<-- 



f£-0()/.= . pi "T/^r j-'fine- Tims iS'Ci-^^ (>^so/^^n~ 



f 



* ■' I ■ .. - - ■■ ■■- — ■ ■ »^»^— . — ■ - ■ ■ ■ - - 

: ■\ ■ 



f?>^^r^^^!.^^ liT^cs^ 



^3^ -^ /S<^ ^ y/^p 






dilti /^/J , -T^i^ clIoSl^O l/fi taf , ß.-^OcU 1:' Oon 7 O/^' l/ol/CS' 



/ 



; 



/f^L 




Bn(^zir^C/^^::>i H ojQA n/o53£Khf^AJ& ._0ön7 l-l- ß-r 
2 6^ e= na 1^/4 7 --7-^ if / /^-i Cor 7 fd-C£>fS- ///? üpr 9o'cMc /^/.^ 

/lx/'^'757^^3 Q£U7f^Üs!> (^^Ai^7, l)^S^^ (^fhrs/Cc//^6r Hü$97^- 

öfr^ns r^ortfh'cxj c/^0£/^ piof--^ cns7UJfißz-}J 



■« 



tt 



[cW yi=o-i^ M (7 ^/y--A/ C^ujßL-^ hnasa /y/:icff O^^ 






fLi^.f:^z-iy,. Ni^clX ^ijjjaz-h^ UocA^n^ fßfGz" i-l(^(hr_ 



II 



I! 









cänaacr^-ttiirr) 7//--" pjor?nooy<-/ Dfr/^/SOP-/ u//s /^ /// y^^c^ . 

L/s kJ~ar 12^:" OS SM so (^ /^o sao'si{::_of f^oQ-] , /^ qL, 7fC(a<^- $ 

^Sfyß-'ai/^n^c !'==> foaß/^ Tfißl 7/iiS Oft"^ /Uo7 o/^i-^f /^^n/irs 7//-: 

I 






I ■ ii I III U li 



II 



THi^iJ TllS'-^ Plexus up -Tz-f^^ Co r-r /^ u /-^ i s -7 s 

S//^C/- l /^i) 5 /Joi /? C o 1^ Mu /-"i sT 



-vr 



Tl-/^/^ '^/r'y p/c(('so u f^ 'Tl^J' l^r^ßoCL uuiotö f>japc>Hj 

n N l. ._ Ol l^on yß-{ P/t^7 7(^oJj^ 

^/(JC^ l cj ß $ No-? ß L^^(3s>a U (0(0(0 oFf^^'^^ 



(7 N 9 NO Ol^^ l^n $ ^ ^ r ^ 

•• ' v • " ■ — ■ ■■ 

O - - ■ '- 




ffi-^ So MI THi /JG , 






k'atifi /^ 17 — 



// 



..'/-./ . / ^ 



U^ / MX -Ju 12(3-1^ -^^CP- 



ü}iffiÜLi^Gzh. f Ouisipf (Tiai^C 



1 



ifoft "^liX G=aMAtJ hlLtr^rt-^ RcimA/^-Aj-J lP0<>'^''n.^.^^(XlfiSi7loJ\ 

,C(^n^$ U^ni.TH^ cÜEt^p^ ynt\ou-t ^icU79 u/otKicjfoncrSj Fis 



TdATios: ßi^7uo(i(7'i 0=c(0£o ioHo i^fis f''7 Ufontcfhmo^. 



1 



• . ■-->- - ■ - — — r T-f •- ■ ■' - •' — ' ■ ■ ." - r^ — — ^— ■ ■—- '"-" — — — — — ■ 

( 

C.t\l=Xl (7~ÜiOl Sl'7fOtJf fon. ^\!>(LC^-p l'ß(hOa. Ulis fffif^O^-ZP 



n 



ysnr JJoi tzi/jT/J l^spT^ 71(^ Tc^T/OL /^/^puju-? of <^/Qp7iJ~' 

NfilJT C<^r1(?S- /S r^oi d^flf^a^t-iS* T(i^^ fAC7 ui^ß^ 7MA-r 7lf= 

-ru^ [2Uiuf t=ii^o (~LO?s f^i(/sns. . 

C\(.L{cO boK Chart t^^ 1^7 S l^6i^/(jSi (frlttMA/^ c/tfss 



crk-isr rA/6. 



II 



S7(iuc7z-r)ryPnfr (/^^rau^7/o/os ^_ö<Cr:i fs^ i A> Tür tltQou 
lU^rir^rt /?»(/-"n l/nu = ^ W."ßx os^Afiu. 'Ttl£Sr SH^fr /a^-:_ 

oi "lUi Pi<\ti^rp foar<s fippc^oftcJ-Q ^f^fhoa. Ca/^ p- 

. 10 Jt'lV %^.l^^H A(P(prtö V ( M fl Tc L^ 'PJO Pa tSOA/c/7 S Of 

fll£- Sucütx/JUücp K^' ^-^' HaacU-0 "T^ C^ßTcnopfil fli^o 

.77/c" C/iMp <^(2€Utu>QS Uns lbon.Ocytz2:> f^nu /? Tioo tl^-Zr^^ 

R/^0 -To Pl^Jf^. . 

M>" 7 'To -Tue C(it-[(> :fofL Mf^CS fnrfoiusrzS / A^ 



f(tOM -7H£ IC 2, !^C\VcUSfbaUClc hJt^S cSl(iChU9^£0^\AjnU- 



^)Js Y tZSCSl t/Sr> ß U CU- K/I^aur) -pO. / So AJfn —/VC H/^J7L'5' 7/J^ 

tl^HLfuHdfn- ^^' (^(yi^rio 0^7/9 1(^ liJL-fir i^/^at-v 55 



Cop Ql 1t O US p£ fi c Un^-y "foo^ S'^^pL y ^ /Mf^ Q~ Cl an 7j^ 

Miit^ßio P6r?nMr. 'TJ/e'f svcl t^Kr^r roQfi'^^ (-loij^u^-tT, 

c IT^/J(\ c4Jr ön f}> Ur((£^ UALj)t /q C^c j-j Täf in. U/Ufne - 



'TU£ i^fJliaC foc-yoa/s~S , tn /^ cU ( f^^s i^/^O n^^ 



^OYL fl^SfClUT/OlO , ^^ U^OrLt hl^L-<^S UJc>t.z^ 0yiJr^M,-7jrc 






/ 



"IV^ PocTiss G=m(zu3 (Paof^a 






..fu{i>LisUsr), [■Uni^'Tuf untren ua/u^s 7b n^fs'n To7//^ 
>/TT^:/ fCfjocJAy' uonjc cf (^ (>ö£rJ5s uan/ju^ //j 

^k^caiepcss IU70 pao9fi. ______ 

,0(\vGi\ reo, of P/2 . ^ /^tc _ _:fL^i scrma ^fj^ c-^io^xit /^ 



I4srt ^ou7(t ufls s>p£/UT_//>jri4s ctacLjfs cf i-1=k 










— t- 



D-^on r-TQ 'J'^ 






TU^y 



--T" 



^o So PS i-i^O />---rW rtOyCz^ T^ (xriK^n/^ir^- "7^ 



> 



Tioio of^ //U/^or^/^7 flut-ti^/u rhs/AJa^_z. Usn po^ynp^ 
flfbo(^7 ^^(i^srs^, 37/^07 ^y<r=^ps /ju /cipm7f^/y<rx 

R/^p t^^po:=-rs'/o^s K^ei^ Oc^C ^^o ffi^-jQjmc^/Aj g 

Rf7^'n /-/^^Tt^T^o^ TMS- c^r?o^^2S_ J2~- rü/z^sy> 

7o OL M OTT,, J^^ l±l^^^/4^1 Jo/jJ.-t> -ni.-^n.Shy.s 






li 






1 1 



I I 
1 I 



3 




^sfl (fS7A7-~ -///^r 



/frto-r Co(^i:$cf- -ft: 'Ts)(7s- /? AJc^Mih£n of 7arrr t>jj-fti 

"fo /f37. Sotir of ^UcM ans Sofr^ cot^p/)fF/oi^^7^- 



i I 

■tt 



I! 



I 

4t- 



-n 



. P /o Q iJfii Ton < " Ha (112,57 -frZf UQc " C^ ^ TWm P p^i^ ^r/) 1% 7 
(ß(n7u of 7U:r fh£A<y7i{-ac^Z> (^-to ^ {^t^TSn. o/O (JToTr^öf 



^ 



Slis SfiUJ 'TUz' CoHf7/^/J7cy Oqooj(/l>g pR/Ui^=rn of Utfia 
C>iJ S U iu, fit->0 Ustt "7c? ß4~ n Moo^^A^ f ßo7 

^HüOUCiH 7*//-' l4zcnic. T'lMJ^S of Cfi/{L/?^/i}'7/oJp/}^7/iSn^-o 



H 



11 



ir 



i 

4f 



_\/OCl(^^p£r) Of ^ 

V(7C; N(^ST ^^LU ouf c\jsa^ SoutJQitJCr UOnp^ 

UsLpLa^^hiBSS, 



\ 



QC^TTLC Of U(4£j:C9 , H0Z>Tr /^C^ . Ci-^flf/fja 



/ 



/ 



m ♦ 



Ot^L^ ( (\j üf) nf /fo Mfi^TSf 



i! 



Vüo f?c"L tonn SCKcac^t^ OsCicmt, ^„_ 



4; 



II 
/?><?/ ClA'7 I^MC? pf^ßf YqU/l öutJ TisLoO^. 



c 



A/Un- /// $sLT£UJlJ fi Uario p^Uc((£u 



Coui. /Ujy-i ^rf fti 



'/ 



1! 
1t 



:f(j(-fi-S7 hn l-l^iL-iGf/^ i£tJ72.uckciJ 

^0\äi 0=ti sraoM lentis f^uscprsa^/HTc-p, 



5* 



1Ü£ ^L£OtA^C:C of $ffjcä. 



c^cLs- OfJ_C\L.M^* - -rUis> TIM-- SMJ- ujf\s it^^fJ/rz^oUv 

... (^ 6l^x7a/ of (^ Otii^M^ rff/ar uns 'Tiz-i^o "e/AZ/ÜAcn 

l^| Tu-' tfSyfi?^" A/.r??r" /9a^o '^uo ffo^ns fnoM 'T^r 



^\:n\^ [^Ho ^ lj[\os=r Motu-' SUotjsj) /? Os^ r^/oo 
J' {)9^Cl<^hU_^ [CaiU - Pl l-iPiSl/S/L , fhas£o «^/^ '^^■^ __. 

jie^aiiJCniJ^ss pf^ r/ir /^n-Li Quls 1$ Qsfifc-7^0 _ 



ftJ T^ r Mortt^i c- Pj'c l tV= f__7{/j- o 7(4j^ns» yt-ff otocj 



w 



^ 






( (0 1^1= QfS'if/o S-j/^t) T/ fL_ ß(?^of^ pf fosT^S' r/?//.-' /^ 7-x. 



f 



XUS / 



TU-: po£-7j:ss jtjp,^ l^osT I -für o-rUxTt u(^5 f^o^r? fioiui^ 



II 



OdPtUlfJC-* . t^ THoa-r l/^^noOuc-r/oio> / hJ uUuff t/jl^- 



- / 







1 



• t .11 an ^ 



WUi«- 



l^)i^H ^fC^uLArt (2/4-^ M^ , '/^..O'yf/SnS /7^l/r /Ht}S(^CrCAiC 



_nu^n: . ^us i/rtiss f s ^ OS 7 a C//--S? f/?£>M r/yj- 



/ 



Hi£ S'fcU f^HO O'^ll^a j -TUSIA. pUi^O/J^^ tJA(C,//UC 












SfAffi UiLc] 'i^OiC tyjSUz-CTUfiC. (CltJf) 



MoTtOf^AC crL£/iif-J7l 



\_(iJüe>Loj^n/:irt.^ PI ßfiP Qo/f tlS^7 Of 7l/'£ f-fOMIS (^uQ TtCs 



h ^/T {» Pf£ ä)<p£ai£fi^ciD Ut^lt^Oi^r^ fA7^ kniü TUS $Ufp-cl:r> 
7Ör po^Y/?? Nou i>^75 Wsnc XS Hl6/Jffl Poff7/o/J^ th^ lUu£S7 ^ 



s 



n$ 0ffsc-j. 






-TU.:r pOjTM' 






V>onQ)4.%£f0Sntc j l^nTMJ'n. $^oorg. 



I 



Oucr Ho(ie \fou a^oifiis h'^ TU: f^t^'jjr/^^ C-fCffr 

^^^^(lO?^( aas ^ou , ^ST l/sn-i OiTT/^j^r i 



r 



1 



/ [0 -TfW rbaßfi-A^^c Li Fi" l TS Mo 7 -ra-z jFyp^nftfjucc o t __ 

_ SU (\ f-" Ri^ uNH f^ rr-f "t^ i'^ r TU£a£\ 

Tii£ h/ic^7 i^ f-ii^o sot^s iiorifit. fl,iu() ncsjuiric 






^ 

0-£7>Mi/££^ l^^S A/i^M=jp 






A/£&^/t/ Aim^ fon. M£UL'^ /A^^oz-i/A^t^? 









__^£[js-j^ ^/p^T7 Hs/4rtT OfSin^ ^cun. i^£Bn.fJ£$^ , 
_}louJ ci-osi i^M l "T^^ou. 






j, O-'W^^ Pin A7cS> OuttLi f^ j/q^j Ulfj STcnCS Ourt ^l/.^z>^fS, 

_ CLuoitJC> i/sns£Sy Cin7(coua7/j/'^9^7Ui' ih(^o7£jJcr ofru£ 



(4lt.f (rOS _ 







t iJ mr fnfi^shL MRtfzQ ' Ef^o^" ( n-j 



IUI ehJD 



f (■io(K fiijp -f(4r l.i(^fj7 of (^-p — 10 Ho caiJ /:sA/j> 



d> 



R Cioi-O^P Sl4-tMM£rL 



"Yo Du $7^ Pooß7^J'S£r 



OooM ^icS f^U£Y\Of ß(J7 tifip (S /^07__ß9DI^£/uaf> /gßof/y 

(7/ l-llS fi^l7N /S fOoofii^UiiJC^ 14-19 Cokiraou. 



I<3 



S(4i!^0i^S(Oc of "rat" [f^^ntJ^p l^pQ -J^--' "^ofjpoßcj^ _ 



l^iri£ IIU ' OdSPtM UOdCr, " ßf^OMrS f2£»6/7^ 









1 1 



/A/*^^n (/(Sfop" (Tijrußtot^) /? Srrtfc^fiiri ff^'Ln^(=, 



S of 



f 



yUsßoriOsns o-f ohJ^s /ic//^<^ /:?a^ Unu cfns'e 




/ 



i/(^//7 To -7^. 



/OS(^AituS^ ßu7 <pS:ri^ /^s. OsLie-f L//^sn/^7/o^ , 



OlÜ^n fb^^(C (^e>fTt4^a(J£n.?) -r^/5 f£lfL.l/o£^ /U0-7 



/ß(J7 



of /9 fC2isiJs>, ^^f7 ß/^^k i^/u T^rs SfQs of ycfj- 



ßius-n. /3/^A-'rd._j7/6r O^i^q^ /-fx/^A/z/j^ 



/ 



"7/7^ fi^ r/? c 



1i 

1t 






II 



^"^^07, ./^/9^r faoM IVs ^jfnn l'^H2>^ TfW o7U£-rt(f/^cf 





j Qh'^c/^. 



































k^ (^nf Tur pooa^sr - 

CtiUC-ilXI I p Sichle Ujf S 5 



H^lUr k/tuOotJ fnAM^i" npps-r^n> T^y ü/£>n.cp : 

/ ~ ! 






^y^^J^oyu ifi^njs^ TU£ Ct.ouio/ ^ -Tus S7ni^7p , fT/-' fr^^nc^kjoy. 
_ — . ^Ußoucu für UJit^r)oiJs frtArt:' { $atJ rfi^r pLoios^n.. __ 

^iJo ViSizmc} Tur b-nn-ru ou -ru^ M/cc ! 

CZL ^7atiH^ ^Ur ePn7H , 7ur (-iotzSi i^t^o tt*-' f^^y ^Sy 

— '"^ ^''fious , fu^ fouc a^Jo fUr UiucS' of y./^-nnfi/fhj^ 

^^0 fnoM Tu- ^Lc>u> uiuc ßi n StT^i-^- (io^tii 

fb-'U/jun -Tlt.r (Jqtx. ts l^ifb£a7y__ 

. 'Tli^ yunjrcy of yax-/^- i^oTt^ (^f=inY ^ ^ 7U^ /AJQfi/iOt^-rL V ' 

•^[s> ^Ha i/yjhA'7£j_a^f= -rar ^/unp 1'U;(ißfrs/u$7^or,f^^ov4^7t.___ 



(V 



tlo$7 poxti^ Rac /^n?ot>7 l^opatA/^ fort. fr^a^ße^z-r^TU/ 



fifJ eLo->aL^ UJOH^iJ Wl-10 _S/9(/^' U-rrt n ßl-crSS/A/a 



"0^0. Se<p,£tJ) Ciuc (luf9/A/<r/j O/Z (.ifT^-p r/u/n C-fr^^os 



_QtJci: Tüouc^ui To ß r fön lUxr OrAO_ 



'4 4 

„ ■iVlS IS KJouJ HY ^OT ^__^__ 










i I 

' I 
I ) 



13 



CohnfJi^i-T'^ . . 






Tl/£ Wtckof ^ifs uiu. G^ou R7 ns i^n$7 Motiifijy ^txJiL' foLK 



0(J7 of f)fln i6iJ-'$^y pfT- (S'^iJ Osyi 7(fof nrso uc 

Oui of ^7oan pijp UJii^r^'tt ijjTi la^rz. 






it 






."^US l^!^$7 y^nnj ^of //Sn /-/f-S of Coan^f tui-^a 6££S 
J^7^Sl^'^, ixi/^Tt aO c pocrtS Fla£ fa£Sx7t(/-^j:> ff^ott _ 

\_fip<? I7'f t^Kf\/iaot^ MstJT ii'tA7 uas fu<^i.ifusp. 



[OC? 






pnu^ ^ S(c[CiOJ-$^ ßiJ0^_yfx-p{n.A///J4> fort ^£>UI. 



Itif 



^(ok/ioG Sls'r^ru') 



(y TAT ^r^^x'M7s^ ^ojuas^ !?xfCSyto{'jQ i^t^o ^ ^w -^ 



ß((oe, of f//-' TSki^ .^__ 07us/t posts frioM Ta^-r^^^ruT.-- 

S^Cloh>C<-^ Cof^tJSd^j:-^^ 'lO fl:ri^a7-t i^/^n jQc7c^t^L{7<^, 



■ A' 



V ifiic^t ^^i-l^^O (hJ^lU VjUC^fiS u^nic m^HRfj Moc/J-Q ro7(]£CnY 



CHI^lS, 



J 









<o 



h^ fßllLpyt RiJ() Oi.rp^S-7 Sl57^n, ffif^SiP fiua<^ b^rfoRC t 



(/frt-^ Unncx- ^o^P, tiof?£ j£UiiSi-l Cilf 2£pS uyt?r f^ooaj^T/AJ 






uiun^ 






'li 



^L2f7, /\/oU l I^M 73Y-'7^/ij öL^ ^ /\//SjP CO PS 7ft^ tr^Ofct^iL 



V 



/ 



A 



II 

•li 

l 

\liJ 0=f^ Oa-T ß/j l'tT'H ^ Off^^ <^^?^/-a/ 1*^1^^ /OAc/Ü Sjrl/l^U^ 

Die fi^Mi L tz ui^azjJ ; £L iJ-n/J t/t^Q € KrjJOifL , V m^o.-zs 

l^t^O ^//J ßofiA/. Icl-i' , U5n. MffJl^ UJ^tL 0/QS 701 /7S 

«IPpj f\ßSOC^l/(cn7S ___^Jftl4n^ t^U-tTxJ^fr^ft o^p Hioc^j- 

/?A^ t^lfJcrt 7fl6 //U OSn. iJcc//c ߣX</cff7S /*.// O/s- 

3c9n72oiuc'>^-'n*MJt^$ci4i^fr Mussrsj^ uin , nu77s-7i 

: , - « - -^ _ 









A^[£Li£t^ U/in. Slaou-Mf\Ta^7.su Hsi4a o 1^0 m/in __ 

II / ^ — - 

J()r7(JWZrA^ t^ÜKriiJSYif fnaustJ c/^/p ta/uosK. (t/uri.or)J_ 

— — -— — '■ ' ■ ■ — — — I - - 

UiOr> M£/hJz^ ()(l^( C?,=ScUL'lS7z-rL M(\cU [:\uScKU)l7^ ^(hrCrjÄ 

\cil ujuaoi G£ia£K>tJi t/oj M£//j£>i ft^tiiLjs UAyp /-If^/^zr 

Sit /V7l" k//^r>£rz G£££N£/J . • 



U^unOz^ lc^(4- VjFR Scl4\<z(C7 Ruf irf/UzAy {^aofSl/y 



^ 



_5!fW/t ^££Un7£n. 9t^cHBSfi.A7_Stt Ci t<y^ ■ 

^^// fhn7£ S^ii l4of^(cr/s7 N/^cufons'^uc/A/a ic^m/^^-^ 



(^(h7nfi/ospon'r/'jfh'7 LJUrtor. 



\^. 



„[7<F//J-=~ Pfip/c-r?£ ijumpii^ /VirL fju /^c/j^a^ut-^^ r^,2,c^-^ 

\ Mo M f-f£>-^ ütOf^ A/{£- -Zono^C ^rt=L-/3^-/J' /cU ^/f/$>j: O-fU 

C/A^J7 r/c/53 SfOio (\£U£jSJr /baZ/UiSSA^ l/o/J J^^/u-Tt^t 

I4vf' Il-ICl.^ HlLfs uiao 9fliJUrb/)rL nfl/sn^c^Aj/^'7^__ 



V 



nt^o s'tii^pds) "Tb /g fc^riM^ oiaa//yQ -Tß^/^j^n^s 

rt PP A^rVjrTi GlifSfJ (b(^c(c . , ' 









\ (BlJCdof^' "TU^ ySt=fnS Of M^ Ltfi" 0un//0^ A^AZ/ OC<z<^fiA-7roK> 



I^Uh(hB(l =tt 



hl 



\*^ 



C7> 

VA 



Cj 

Ol 



I». 



CS 



IS 



f^^Y: -Jt^i-'if nc fiele ^ ^ 



dCS'cif£///^^7__3£i _St-iJ£( IzL^a^A^ Of^^ r7(7 rr/n ■zo-- 



^<ffi(^L> trOßr^fif?=7 ffSc/^tTt^TC (?D ^__ 

Ot^cit/C^P^U/^ U)0(lRUr (oft UUdT. Q^JJßcU t//L/<<i£-fiqatL 

^f£l7 h£i(J£K D?^f(l^fOf^& t/e>tJ ps^ l/saScäu 

<)£tJ:rhJ [^.2. L^<^5rz/u L= i or (oH vp7£n. Gns7^s — 

O'MS rifi^ ü cv /\JtckT f/n^{c /^s/iO^i ^p 7 i'^A/^o/i^t^A^c 



j^Sfkc(4'Z iJ£('7=n -^1/ ߣ'i/^fzfh£c7:n^ C//^yp MS^/^ 71/9 /^aJ 




tfzitJjC 



— — — 


G 


.- 


s 




tt 











/ 



U ßiT7-r Sic , Ui<^£^^ Q£tL ofh^j a^^/^j'J/^r-'T^ p^r^f<u^ 
St c u rf0&h3, na •2 rc^f^^/jjr /-p 7 7j^fts'' S/^^rp auf l/sn^A/^^uJ i^turiLTUcti- 












DI 5q^ 












il/S ß^o7ii^R% Süio: UHStJ ^ {<:ijJCß Ozp^ü^r^ lj£ Hwf/^o l^s/tys^ _ 



tijic/jJc; {jU. 






Ji/y?/^?// tu»a5 pr?/ 












'>> lOou«-r) UsLf -ttl^r^ iQijO L:1 -fäzn fw^ ß .uA^ aor ojIMSin pRioicg. 









'f 



Lc^ A/7 U)c>iios. ^AJrsn, ^jöun- esiqas i ^isll . 

SoMf so^ Jy^T JUOM CJfiS /Qcr(/f:)u<^ 2:f fj-/z/z./A/^ -75. 



T -r 



Lt7 yooa S:^r7i^fi/Jt^S'f>£'flk fl uottp ///Tb youa tfiOn^ rit^O Oo ^t^^ 

t^O otJJ' bJlUC. //u-/^/7, ^/ou UJiUL S:£c^ T>y/97 ^^ ff/MPs6f 
UifiS ^^/ d>V£ UJffo pL^^£r) -r^dT Cuf> Ott c/^^i^/cr /A/ 
'b^l^jaHllJS f>C\ck, (f^M SüfZS -TMOT Us £OAS ra^fA/L 

Jiif seiMf ris pMfiri^ ^ti. 



/ /^$U "ioa^t^ <^n-^:^rzJhM '7^1 



T 



flQ-lßjs ^fport Snrtß HOiif S A/o-r i-i^/^np fgfhoc^-? yäz 



f^ija 



rTz/i^ Po 9Si(biL-n ^, 

JUS "fl^^-fTy U^ /S ro^O ä^a- Sc AUS uTniL \U woau^n off. 



h 



i 



Hfiai^so fort H(io//>y& Oha'i^o yoon ono-'^ " 



/iT. 



ft^tu^n 



z. — 



ys M^t^NT 'T//AT ej^ ^Sf 2f^ V)oij(^f) 'fn-ic^'- TuttA/s 

l-^^"-/ ^^f i>f^^ UJOOLO 57/9r /^A'p -ra^' e>ra^^ kJooe-O ^J'Ti/rt.A/ 

/ fiJxax^oe.^ un^A "/oo ^ -/ Port i^^cscL£/uc- i _ pUf^Sj: 

__ UH^u p^opLr ßn^ t\nn~:s r=-T2 _y/J£ y s/^y^ r/ifir V/Z^y 



/ 



"iov wit-c- y\^07 Com MIT ^u<g:ji f^jJ lLl>S<^f=^'^ /^cT. _ 



(nt?m7 






h 



9 






4! "7« yoüK I N1^UIQ:ijc.£ . 



Oli/tMi^ pfioi/t PsPcs '. —'I'lli' Q(?iAT hg^fjn o-f 72ir- (/jJ(\/^fi s:: 

l/(o\*\ 'K/^ T^^'Y ^^lytCmC^ Ort, SoCfAC. H£ CHiU^J -7^// /?^:/. TaC^ßotO ftToM -Tjlf--^ 
^, ; $HAt.L^S7 J^JOl-ZA^^S , 






xo"^ 



? 












rtüY)^^ ^J^JrojJ Uns J*'^3r^_ 



I ' < 






.-,,,. 




- P'-fdC * fiS 'fO* Soll. ^orL OUK 0£\/xCoptf£/ur P you7»fcfC_J^/viJ 

P 9*SatJ0n^ e^ ff/s fftM/t-^ Mar) tG ^ tZtJZs- ߣf^rl ^jr o 74:^3^ 

JP^DJSTUiiJf^- S laCitJCi£rK% ' ^U^nS'xLUJS. t^fi>tJ rar t^auo ^Uicd ru-^ U^ar 7h> Till, 

GosUilO u/rt^ flv Ifoi-Arjo Pßou/fij^j: ff^t^ijoiq foit- "JV-"" 



)i£M^ 



mTT/^ Pxfr^a/ct^OLT /KCfti^r^oAj of/JAr/ojJs f/rio /^^n^^oy — 




■■II ■ ^ 



("d?-! iK i.^J2M&dM^— . - . , . 

"^* '^ /9/^j) A/r«r yi>t^AL f^c^stüizs Af^rt\J^S> ofrftfSplKici'^ 

^(is ßßtiaf£nj -^^7 r^^- A^^r/o^s f{fio tRsCTtfp ToJSoCßzf 

T/Zi" C^PfUlttt?^^ ■fßÜriStjfi'^ JOS^f^ /7^0s a pDWJ of /)/s<:^ - 



_,^o rAT ^c^pr/pfjß.aci/ur=hJoso7^^r^ /7^ r (2^^501.7, ffis ;_ 

CoLUn(hOi 'ihüo7ü^lX> StfaoLO ßi" Ssh>7 7<p PUxLC IJü R fpoi/i/jcr 



[ SoLiCi"i£o fapn 7fir f?£$r of Tff=r Co(^K>ra.^,_ 





-IlL. ^1K^ ^''^'^ poiuTS out r/^fii ? 7j/^ff /? ///2^ Ä/ALT 

(Jpfj-fz (>flnT of f^is /^cßf . TUs" Ss~t) s^nr. ._ 



I ] -^ 

CVCiW} €^f{fJiSll J=kJS (K>7o TU^trZ loA^a / /^ Spo/tA , I T J^t 

lOoui-ß I4t^(/^ [^zSaJ ^osr l/J öon Gs/oj-nfif/o/^ ' 



^ 



A/oiO 600 y^iqnß LAr^n ^ \JS flB^odfJizi JUi 11/ ja/s 



00 r -T^a kj . V)\\B^ llUfr eyiLrS Snitäp en^T / T/u^ too^o 
_ Ttfj- 0770 ti^P £M p\a£ Of£i0fo /-r^ poons 7o -ruj- Jsiuj ulh> 

t^OSLuhS Uno (bsiti /!}S l/j7oUnAi^7 ßf rf/i''7 lOJ'fiS' Ct^yj-rz 7Uj. 

__ tzuoop^ l-lnc? Joj-? u7ofj 7//r7/z i/ooxpii^p^h'^^ /^i'^D feuj^o^ l4oUjtuj:> 

jl ' 



eil!» 



n)ruci 












^(/ouCtU l-^aSr //c>7 Qp/JZ ppr W/A/C fi7Au ., To rgi/j 7ff^ p^'öpls.- 

\ ^/o^^oo vjiLu Ssr ^ tjUnr fui'^oo tg. jj V^ ^l ^ {dt^fJS ^i^ZC" ^^^/ ^?^ 



^^(i, 9(^sPi(cwc So KnnUlL^i ßt^7 G-J) l^n/ous ^c/^ny f^nfof^^ Os^ft-sr ^o'TTux'-s 

JUSflCs , ßii/7 pl^n^'f pm\!)/A^i, fofl, ^fS f>£cp^£ B£'<:(ttJ3r ofHiS C'Oi/J-foft.'T^jr/^. 

ii 

öor of 6Ct^p7 . ^00 bjiu- Sߣ Mf ti(rLi^<^c£s , ßUT j^fi Tef( l ^ Co K=u l putJisß 

3t [CHi(''^ [{j tä£ pߣ>(iCS;r>) LAt/Of /oU UlUL, fing 5£/ AV Gn£l^r kloftJCS* 

II ■ — "" ' ""^ ■ ' - " ^' - I 

ftlO^vaKoü-r Ta^'Tö^zAH, CjU^l^cVstc G-{?^£i^/<rS T^ n'c^j-S.rrs^^A 



üi/^ 



H^nr 



; ' O We ^mi r^ i-^in 97saiJLi (unu M7tcc\ •> >-> j ^ 6 /? 9 ^ Jjr 



J'filc ,, /5 Tjfs l^l/fSl(i,U^ ÖP-' kJfU /?^/öit/5 //^rii/ t^/f//U£ Uortco.l/^ 

Oisroiss ij{ncf{ i^fldSL. -Hf\r^ To s^ff^ ^ ///?/? S^ao/^&^oM mruMc 
l fl;ini<tocs? ff jjT) t iapu^A^sjs . ßur N<^ü " (^ ii^"__\ an '?> ijih (^amcj 



J^ 0(tq mM uns Tllr fauJo-^f 6 - o {^j^ojifC: tsj- a//}7/cus ^ /iai r^:-,J 

1 1 f 

(jjoue^p fJ=U£K. Ht^or '[blCDttg- rj[g-p$o(>U of^'D, 'T/^(S fi^ppcns /^^ 
'fovnQ=pS^Ul-i Ofoii (n-0 f^pp U(>D0 'Tür fC:^ ^ U> lusj? t^odAc^ fuf/u.^.£fyr 

15 t^Hi TÄff /Vrt7/j>jo l-ltit^-fo Bc(^/aJ (i/ii=nr '^ifr oTUstc ;jfiT(e?^j> (-/r^Q dcfroff, 






J- 



^ )C ,Af^M <0? yUo ßßoiKr-,»-/ wo^ o^'r_ .Sin^^T J^(fc^^ ^-7/<r^/o^<= 



t^üT /wf\SA/07 U=coo,tJi-z£r^ fh^riUH (h~i n'i /? 7 7puX(j7c~_ o r J^ 
tbü7 -riLr oj^Lw ^Rtir l üS'so ^(k^^HSL-^^HAOem ^ OfO aJo? f2£U^'r}6. 




Ti 



T^ 7U£ti.Tl4£- hH£^^ öf tt^ lJf\tlc Vk. yiC 5^^/7%rY /i^/?P 



11 

IflrtCÄtcfo afr^-ftf lc-)j)j J(^'^^''^i . __j 




Tz/r U^l. 00-7 i^AS cu>9,n^. ^ ) 

^^ß^üsh {4(ioHAa- (paoMts^'i To T/LS ^y?/^ . ^r flßo Pfzo^is^ 

(4(^0 iJot Y-'T* ßfp=l^n^pTs> 1(U 7U£M /^ 7/^/3 /^amj- ^ K uil _ 

__ fll^Q'^ ^l/lSl'' ' 



O 



m. 



U- 






1 1 






' II ' ' ' f ' 

otoi ßuj> IS 0^7^ 1^ ^'^ff^<^f^^JT.7h OxSYonr -tT^s pcßAjy TS 6rf^j- 
-0^970 "is D , 'T/u yp/ftt-^i 7/iJ' Coon/^aj-flt^o TOS ^rr^jt/^/A^^-^^^^ e>r7a. 







l/^vqf^ 



i3 



/ 



vAvi 



^cu^ 



i'bift ti 'M^ tmi lHafc^lMUBM ■■ 



The President of Police 
IA30^^ 



rth 



Köln, The27"' ofOctober, 1938 



To the Polish Citizen: Führeer, Leib in Köln (Cologna) Roon Str. Nr. 30 



By reason of § 5 Paragraph 1 Letter A of the police (section) for foreigners - Decree of 
august 22, 1938, 1 forbid you to continue residing within the Reich' s territory taking effect 
immediately. You have to leave the Reich's territory instantly. You are under direct police force 
Order to be deported across the Reich's Border. 

Any objection of yours against this decree can be forwarded to me in writing within 2 
weeks since the announcement. However, a complaint will not resuit in a postponement. 

On behalf of the President of Police, 



— »t-j 



D«r Pollxeipräaident 
II 30 33 



An 



• « 



rrankfKt/M. ,d«n, 






* . 






Meiner Aufforderunß vom 27.1o.l938,d»8 ftttiohsg«bl«t zu vor. 
Uaaen, haben Sie bin Jetzt keine Folge geleistet. 

Aufgrund des 5 5 Aba.l der Ausländerpolizeiverordnung vom 
22.8.1938 fordere Ich Sie letztnnll^ «of.das Reichsgebiet 
sptttestens bis zum 



. tu verlassen. 

Diese Aufforderunif erstrecjct sich auch auf .Jhre Ehefrau und 
Kinder. - ; 

Bin aufschiebendes Rechtsmittel gegen dieses Aufenthaltsverbot 
Ist Jhnen nicht gegeben. 1- 

Sollten Sie dieser Aufforterung ni«ht naohkomoon.mUsste Jhre 
" ^se A b sc h iebung auf Jhr« icaat»« y^|.-^„^ 



Jm 



» •* -• • • « ^ii, 1 



r\ vv 



4u^ 



r 



s)f -»-i. •■;• s-. 






J'i 



% ^ 



/ •*■ 



yj 



'y'^rr^ 






i 



i .» 



li A- 50 






n 27. Oktolor 



) :»^^\ 




ENGLAND,10/31/45 

HONORABLE MR. MARX ! 
FINALLY WE ARRIVED IN ENGLAND THE TRIP WAS "PRIMO^.WHAT A 
PITTY ,THAT WE TRAVELED DURING E VENING HOURS AND COULD NOT 
SEE THE TOWNS FROM THE PLANE. HOWEVER WE FELT GOOD AND 
PLAYED CARDS. AT THE AIRPORT WE WERE MET B Y REPRESENTATIVES OF 
VARIOUS JEWISH ORGANIZATIONS AND ENGLISH AIR FORCE 
PERSONELLJHEY RECEIVED US ,WITH GIVING US SOUP,CAKE AND 
ORANGES. [ORANGES ARE TODAY A RARITY IN ENGLAND]. I HA VE A 
FEELING , THE JEWS WERE DISAPPOINTED SEEING US, THEY FLAD THE 
IMPRESSIONJHAT SMALLER CHILDREN WOULD BE COMING, SINCE 
YESTERDAYS TRANSPORT OF CHILDREN FROM BERGEN -BELSEN WERE 
ALSO OUR AGE. WITH MUCH GRIEF I HA VE TO LEARN ,TFL\T WE ARE TFDE 
YOUNGEST OF EUROPEAN JEWRY TO BE STILL ALIVE. 

WE ARRIVED IN A CHILDREN' S HOME APPROXIMATELY 12 
KILOMETERS AWA Y FROM SOUTH HAMPTEN. THERE WE WERE RECEIVED 
PRIMARILY BY JEWS FROM GERMANY.THEY GAME HERE IN 1939 AND TO 
OUR ASTONISHMENT ARE ALL ORTHODOX. THE VERY FIRST ITEM WE 
RECEIVED THAT E VENING WAS A "KIPPA'T AM SENDING ONE TO YOU AS 
A SOUVENIR. 

DEAR MR. MARX ! ENGLAND 1 945 

OUR LONG DESIRED WISH IS NOW REALITY.I AM SITTING ALREADY IN OUR 
"NEW HOME" AND WRITE TO YOU FROM ENGLAND. 

WE HAD A GOOD JOURNEY AND ARRIVED HERE AT 10 PM. EVERYONE IS 
VERY NICE TO US.FIRST WE HAD TO EAT WITH THE SOLDIERS AT THE 
AIRPORT ,AFTERWARDS WE WERE TRANSPORTED BY BUS HERE .THIS IS A 
REAL JEWISH HOME, WE ALL LIKE IT VERY MUCH. BEGINNING NEXT WEEK 
WE'LL START WITH STUDYING. THE PEOPLE HERE TAKE GOOD CARE OF 
US. WE HA VE A NUMBER OF CHAVERIM FROM THE ZIONIST 
ORGANIZATION HERE THEY WILL ALSO TEACH US IT IS GOOD TO KNOW 
,THAT THERE ARE NICE PEOPLE AROUND,WHICH AIM TO COMPENSATE US 
FOR SOME OF OUR LOSSES AND THINGS WE WERE DEPRIVED OF. 

IN MY LETTER I WANT TO THANK YOU AND ALL THE ' 'UNRRA 
PERSONELL" AGAIN. YOU WERE TO US LIKE "FATHER AND MOTHER".I 
BELIEVE , THAT EVERYONE OF US FEELING HEARTSICK,FELT HIMSELF 
DRAWN TO YOU. WITH YOUR KIND AND BENEVOLENT WORDS YOU HAVE 
HELPELD MANY OF US TO GET OVER DIFFICULT TIMES. 

DEAR AND BELOVED MR. MARX, WORDS ARE NOT ENOUGH TO THANK 
YOU FOR ALL THE GOOD YOU DID FOR US .1 HOPE TFL\T YOUR GOOD 
DEEDS WILL BE REPAID TO YOU AND YOUR FAMILY. 

I WOULD BE HAPP Y,IF YOU WOULD WRITE BACK TO ME AND INCLUDE 
THE ADDRESS OF MY SISTER . IF YOU HAVE TIME AND ARE WILLING TO 
WRITE TO ME , I WOULD BE VERY HAPPY TO STAY IN CONTACT WITH YOU. 

HEARTY GREETINGS TO THE HOUSE AND THE BEST OF ALL 
GOOD WISHES TO YOU AND YOUR FAMILY . SHALOM, 

NELLY JUSSEM. 



REICH'S CITIZEN'S LAW FROM SEPTEMBER 15. 1935 
LAW JOURNAL YEAR 1935, SECTION 1 
"DER REICHSTAG," {THE LOWER HOUSE] DECIDED UNANIMOUSLY THE 
FOLLOWING LAW, WHICH WILL BE HEREBY PROCLAIMED. 
1] A {GERMAN} NATIONAL IS ONE, WHO IS A PROTECTED MEMBER DP THE 
GERMAN REICH[STATE] AND IS THEREFORE OBLIGATED TO DEFEND IT. 
2JNATIONAL CITIZENSHIP IS ACQUIRED ACCORDING TO THE REICH AND 
STATE CITIZEN LA WS. 

SECTION 2 
A REICH'S CITIZEN IS ONLY A CITIZEN OF GERMAN, OR RELATED BLOOD, 
WHO PROVES IT BY WA YS OF HIS BEHAVIOR , THAT HE IS READY AND 
WILLING TO SERVE THE GERMAN REICH AND ITS PEOPLE FAITHFULLY. 
1] CITIZEN RIGHTS ARE GRANTED THROUGH A REICH'S -CITIZEN LETTER 
2] THE REICH'S CITIZEN IS THE SOLE BEARER OF FÜLL POLITICAL RIGHTS 
.ACCORDING TO THE AUTHORATIVE LAWS . 

SECTION 3 
THE REICHSMINISTER OF INTERIOR,WITH THE UNDERSTANDING OF THE 
REPRESENTATIVE OF THE FUEHRER DECREES THE NECESSARY LAWS AND 
ADMINISTRATIVE LEGISLATIONS. 

NUREMBERG , SEPTEMBER 15. 1935. 

THE FUEHRER AND REICH'S CHANCELLOR. 
ADOLF HITLER. 
LAWS FOR THE PROTECTION OF GERMAN BLOOD AND GERMAN HONOR 
SEPT. 15 1935 

CONVINCED, OF THE KNOWLEDGE, THAT THE PURITY OF THE GERMAN 
BLOOD IS A PREREQUISITE FOR THE CONTINUED EXISTENCE OF THE 
GERMAN PEOPLE AND INSPIRED BY THE INFLEXIBLE WILL TO SECURE THE 
FUTURE OF THE GERMAN PEOPLE ,THE REICHSTAG DECIDED 
UNANIMOUSLY THE FOLLOWING LAWS , WHICH ARE HEREBY 
PROCLAIMED. 

SECTION 1 
MARRIAGE BETWEEN JEWS AND AND CITIZEN OF GERMAN ,OR RELATED 
BLOOD ARE FORBIDDEN. MARRIAGES ENTERED BY CIRCUMVENTING THE 
LAW NEVERTHELESS ARE NULL AND VOID, EVEN WHEN ENTERED IN A 
FOREIGN COUNTRY. A RECTff ICATION COMPLAIN CAN ONLY BE 
ASCERTAINED BY A PUBLIC PERSECUTOR. 



SECTION 2 

THE NOTORIOUS" NUREMBERG LAWS" 
NUMBER 100 . DAYOF ISSUE , BERLIN SEPTEMBER 15. 1935. 
INTERCOURSE BETWEEN JEWS AND MEMBERS OF THE [GERMANJSTATE OR 
RELATED BLOOD IS FORBIDDEN. 
SECTION 3 
JEWS ARE NOT PERMITTED TO EMPLOY FEMALE GERMANS ,0R OF 
RELATED BLOOD IN THEIR HOUSEHOLDS UNDER 45 YEARS OF AGE. 



SECTION 4 
JEWS ARE FORBIDDEN TO HOIST THE FLAG OF THE [GERMAN REICH] AND 
THE NATIONAL FLAG ALSO TO SHOW THE THE REICH' S COLORS. 
HOWEVER THEY ARE PERMITTEF TO SHOW THE JEWISH COLORS 
THE PRACTICE OF THIS AUTHORIZATION IS PROTECTED BY THE STATE. 

SECTION 5 
CONTRAVENTION OF THE PROHIBITION OF SCT.l WILL BE PUNISHED WITH 
PRISON. 

THE MALE PERSON THAT ACTS CONTRARY TO SECTION 2 WILL GET 
PENITENTL\RY, OR PRISON. 

WHO CONTRAVENTS REGULATIONS SCT .3 OR 4 WILL BE PUNISHED WITH 
UP TO A YEAR IN JAIL AND A FINE. 
SECTION 6 
THE REICHS MINISTER OF INTERIOR WITH THE AGREEMENT OF THE 
ASSISTANT OF THE FUEHRER AND THE REICHSMINISTER OF JUTICE 
DECREED TO THE IMPLEMENTATION AND COMPLETION OF THE LAW AND 
ALL NECESSARY ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATIONS. 
THE LAW IS IN FORCE ON THE FOLLOWING DAY AFTER IT *S 
PROCLAMATION. 

NUREMBERG , SEPTEMBER 15. 1935. 
ON THE REICHS PARTY DAY OF FREEDOM. 

THE FUEHRER AND REICH'S CHANCELLOR 

ADOLF HITLER. 
THE REICHSMINISTER OF INTERIOR 

FRICK 
THE ASSISTANT TO THE FUEHRER 
R. HESS. 




^luj^/^jCt^i ; 



y^T^^f'-yn^ 




^//l 




■ - rl4 



/ 



//^^i^^ /M^^i^^^^^ ^ ^-^^^^ ^A^^ j^j^ ^rj^^^^ A^u^\ 






i^\^ i'^'^/t^;^, 



/i 



/^c 



jd-i/i^^^t^t^ /^-^^ i^i^pu 





-^/i^'^A^/ ./^^^ /^ 



/x^^n 




/ 



i^ft 








^l<^.''^^^'-;^^'^^^^ 




;^^ .4^^^ 



^"y^^^yO^C- 




( 



n^a/ /^^^ -/^ 




^ yl^V^ J^^'y!^'^ J^ ^'^»'^^^^^^ 



^ 



^^^J/^^^^ro^ -^^^ y^ 




//^>'^^. 



*a^^i4^ 



^ ) 








^,j4y~7WW*^ x/V<V"7<^Pv>-Ck*^/«-<-^ .C/lA^^^^ "^li^ ^4*/^ 




Xvv5y-»-*--<^ 



«-^^rr^ ^; 



A^X-^' 



^^ 






/^^^CUx^e^<-*- ^.t>,^^^ 



^^u^^ 







/^/^^ 




'7V^t--<i^ 










/ 



/^' 



^^-'t^^X^ 



.i^ 



- 1 - 

I 

Mit Eitzes sind wir versehen bar Greld brauchen wir. 



Wer zikend hat verloren. 



Der Chochem schweigt 



Ich tat ach lache, wenn der Schote net mir war. 
Erst klopft er Schale, dann legt er sich schlofe. 

Der Sechel, der hintenan kommt, sollt net erdocht sei. 






Auf nixsollt mer kei Cherote haben. 



?7ie man Töchter hat, ^ tut man auch Schituchim, 



Viel Schmechel 



-wenig Sechel* 



Es kratzt sich Keiner um Bechinem- 

cder Kinnim. 



entweder hat er Dajes — - 



Lekowet Ghafruze hat sich schon mal einer gehenkt 



Mehr Schöchtim wie Kühner . 



- 2 - 

-^Das ganze Jahr schicker am Purim nüchtern. 

"" •— •"" •""•■"•"••-"# — ♦-• •""• ■"• ^# •"• — » "^• — ♦"••""♦*■»"■ •■"»■" •""•"•♦"■• ""• — ♦""•■•»"••*^» 
Am vielen Schmusen ist kei Breche» 
• ■"•■"•""•"^•■"•■"••"•■■•■••"■•■"•■••— '•—•—»—•—♦■•,•—, — , — « — « — ♦—•♦ — »—» — »•—» — »— ♦• 

Ein fleischiger Löffel ist besser als e milchige Sude» 

Bamoko^i ascher ein Isch 

is Hering ach en Eisch. 

Wer net gibt Jajkob '- 

muss geben Esov. 

Wenn der Dalles kommt ins Haus 

fliegt die Lieb' zum Fenster naus* 



^ ^ ^ 



AUP FREIERS FÜßEN (BRAUTSCHAU) > 



Auf die Fragen der Kameraden , 
sagte der Schmul : 



ft o 



Schö^ is» se riet, aber sie gewinnt im Umgang." 



Es sagte der Lob zu seinem Bruder, der mit ihm 
auf Brautschaa gegangen ^v&r : 

" Eine Schlemihlde muß ich doch nehmen, da will 
ich die gleich nehmen. ♦♦ 



Es sagt der Meier : 



• 



Das will ich Euch gleich sagen 

" Von der «rste^n Sorte is' se net , aber von 
der zweiten, vornheranter, " 




-^h^^^^y^ y^u^ ^aiiZoA^ /^^-^^ lyi^r^v^^^^^ 41ju^^ ; 



r 






*tV 






4/(o-^n(i<lL. ^ .fco. 






ff 



/f 



^vA^ 



M 






^ *''*<■ filA M.mJ 



jui UA.tp"k'nMuc 






A^^% ^^^A^^'f^, 



1 



Myi/lu^'—- 






"^tsu..^ 




lACti^ 



Q- 







A^£C 



1 *>? \ A 




/H^-^T/n^^''^ AJtC^^^$Am^t^C/ y4^'C^^yU^t^<?<^>fi^B.yi^^ 



\^^ 



// 




,/^^^ /^-t^'^>^ \%: 






^/?^i''<'-i^Z^-t/^'^^>p>t/ii^ 



^■p. 






'I 







/ 



ic^^^ ''M<(/^^-if^»/^ 



y4^-ff^4^i^Kt^ A^^ 



y^mj\ 




/^ 



*-*^<t-*'C' 




y 



tyytyl. 



^/ßyiy^ 





ii^-^u ^1^ .^fi^-y^ ^ 



a.: 



■tMA 



t/tf-t^ 




^^t^i^.V ^-^ l / t 



■^ 



W%^ S^/^ ' ^' 



^/^/^.t^t^^f^ 




-Tt^ 



U.U ^^^; s^ '^^-^//^ ^^ .^zf^^^^- 



Wi-^ 



^^<^ ^»v^ .'^^ 




^ 



/ 



^;^/^t 



/ 








^Ar>^ ^.^. 







cl/- ji^'c/^^A-^^^ 




' -r / 



/ 




y2^t^ >^^ 



A 



-T-'t-^-^ 



'/ ^,^1^ .^^r^^^./^'^^^^.'^-^'^y^^" 



(^>■^^ > 



H^^a.f2ieA ,^'^/* ^Uyf^ J'A^-A-^--- /^'■'■^' ^^yu j^/^^ 






'■ S ^ 



4' '\^7(^' 



l'l ^i(Xf^^ /V^*"^!^ ^^^-'/^ /^zti^^ '^•-^'^^^ /^i?^ -^'/^ ^^^<-^ 

c ^ *^( ^ <^ "ty /) y ^ 



^^<^ 







Mt-^^^-- ^-^ ^^^^^xY'- ^.^^ 




Kt^'iH'^' 







%- 



/u -^ ^/^ 



^^^'-^-^ ^^y^ ^ ^-^^^-tf . 



^y^A^^- /^^^^^ -^-^^^^ ^^I^-'Y .^'^"^ ^4^</^ 4^^^"^^- 



?^-v*^ 



'^ 







^c c.,^<y 




/ 




if 



MOi^C-uy^^ 



P^L^ 



6r 



»^-TO^A ^ 



^ /^ 



jC'i^ 




/ 










^^^' 




^ 



y 



"7 



^v-^^-^^ 



) 














Jit*-C 



.'t^*^ 4^U<^^^ ^A-^ i--*>^<^ ^ 




''»^ 



^^ '»^S^^ 



^'U^7^ 




/V^'>1^ ^«'^ (^^ <^ ..?^V ^Uf^^t^i. ^i^^A- /^A^i^ //^ 






C^/...^ l'U^ ■ 



^ ^p/t^'^'^m^ 




^^^Y/^ f^ 



s^^.:-^ ^^^ 



T' 



.c 




^n; 



.C' 






<;^tH^^<'W^ .'^^W^ -,<-^ .^4^v-t>^'/^ jßtyt^ 



^'^-»-^-Txv^e-' 



/'/fc^'^i^ 




'^<-*^iw 



<^,,#'aoe<'<- 








.^^vT^i^yt/" 



• rL^^^ 



.^^^rf/^T'«-*'»^' 



>t .»*^v' 



Z^ 



7 



.^-^ft^^l^ -f^t^Tt^^t^^ 








'l^-^^:^^ ^'T^ihTT 'f^^t'^^yt^^f^i^^^a^^^^ 




. ^^ /-t^^.4i^u^ M//^ 



yi^-lMT 





"i-^.u^t^ 



'^f-2<^\ 



/fy^. 



/^ 3*^-^^?^ ^^r^ /^/ 




f A^^x^ ^ /^ 










•^^^a-?t^t-<^ /^(^^^t-UV^T^^ 



^>^^-y^iv-. 



f-^^o^^e/^^/ 



^cOe^ 



^^1 






y 



^/i^ yUC^f^^ 




f^l^ 



r^' 








"iJuM^-nc-^'j^^^ 



j/U/^^^ nu^^^^ 






t/' Mf/'-T/^ ^^1;^ W^'S/^2^;.^^^, 



y^Sji^l^f''''^^^ y^i'«>t>*^ yu^f-^t^----^ -^'^^-^-^^'^^^'^ ^04,^^1!^^ 



'/ //^J'^^^-rt.^^ 




\ w^^ 



'yii^^^n^'^ 



// 










/^ 




J.'flo^f^utj IS./^^ f^^^ 



.9^ t](^%sp(^tJc,=pr/^pu 

r 

fup^in^ion. Cocn-7 Cooi-f^ru 



ii6LtO,1U^- ^T^ ^''^'f^^ 



/ 



y», 




f^eic|4'j7-r^^'7ortT -ft^iupC- ctf^cy oirwoi^ 








an*c 



— M^Tq^fn^yLt^QL;^ ft lUffinmc !*fUM,^c ^amo Rfisn pic ^a,>n r' 



lb^S'-l72'Ss ni tm Iltis huiLOt^c iy£QatJf(u fon.fi ctt MuSy£ri~/ 



p£A <*y »»>-«K 7IJ€ jft AAUCr 6«««.4(ri9 //^/MooÄftffc aJ,<^fb 



ß^aU^£^P i^^^^ol. S^Tlu^lCJC S \ . -f//^ ffint 7ü^C 



ctf oAö££i:2ä 



""Jm^LüTJL 



CHK-^t^nf /Yr-T^i^a>tc. /(/o Syp^}jS:n ri-i^iP gffon7i usm 



j » 



n> filS- 'finsy Ci>nii<^i^i'r-i /2/?f*.^/^1y //O QjTc im 



1H^ lic^f.^ l/H> Cccopi^i? VhJlii^ Tlh" ^£&l/^tJit^<:, ü-f t(f^ 



nt 



\%CCX0LrtcT:> ß^ '^(■i^ UJol^f ^lAn Ic.^ U\{ü Vf^H 11 n^ TM.^irL 






o^t*^i^A 






Jim 



I 






ü cctrf ä ^io mJ finC- a ^«^ /2L?rT/aK> Jj-U(si/ £oCö/ync US^/d 




illr yfUiJL., 






Onfi^AMJ^iorätiej I^om -TV-sT f/ai? ä/?i./=- t /^ 7A^^ /^. <^^'^-'<jt*, ts 



Y^y^ Lts>n^u Tdn/iU» u/i-r/^ j-ou^ ~ra>*U4 s^c/tocg L'l^teM ct^^^ 






I I 



J^ucs« triff atojj ^($fony ffs ü*«-n; U''^fi's7on-f c^f7//sJxL'5'/A^ 



!(ü»9^-1!li. JiefX ^-CHct,S f uti 



i^U-no/L a^n (pZo •ziof/i f'* rtnnu-n NtXltttiiJ Pjtaj\/ii>fm M. Of^lLU 
T tfc Jiu i4w w«? , oti TUr finsT fUbUL anr llscifL.Afir^e)t , Hio%crtottji 



I 

i 



CaLL£C;2i±}!, 




I 






ßUI};i£ 



/3y (S.-nt-iiLr) (iinn/^r^r^ - un-i-"^ 



{■\Y\S7 0^0 in 0=1 jj ntid^n. 

So c/o^clJ VonC',^57=-icT ? 
Qu ijJ Oc/,j--M ^Lfyh 
A/ocH \/oLLsn. LsßetySMUt 
l/cU.-yt ^Lßhj^' fön 0=iKrjrJJ LS^='f^s r^ry^r^r^ 

[ci-i, l4t^o^ MIT" L:nr) Mii Oin. 

i^m tii^iioj- i/t^T^ri -r^r^ju 

/ 6C/6C - 

h^aiL.^ssA/--ssc^ -ropsrnTi^ - 

lo (^1^9 THY\7 ujiß^ ^ — 

UvUia-T Oio ^jcxj/t /^-^ICi-i fbons Hf^h^O T^aiKic> 

on^}ft,o fuc O^r^-TH — 

U>1 7U (r's fiT-f (^/^ -7 füL Oa t^s 



Vi 



rT 



-/t>u 



Y//t r^i^S'li^M 57 f) T 



'f ^ ^ 






u 



mar nsci^c 



S6l-\^ von. Mia 

\CoK>Ki T<^ Df^s Lc(hcJ^ _QeT-r(^Ay> — 



Würto^tj i/^afft^s-r ,,^ •'■*'-^^^^-^ ni^'OA^^^y - 



^^ '^ ^ICIH nt\L a-l^=~p \<UQ>\K h.^Tsrx, 

I 



R PcT( T/PA/ fort HUhtfis/^ Tfi^-tq-T M if/^T 

'fCio M ft ß Loup i'?>L(/c e^ij-j) /<: z- ^/9 «-/ oocTon 

OI^L-f llace STILL 

/■/(/A/<P fitfOS 



nii-Liaius 



Ot^c 



ICUßtc tiEjcrz 



IN LENZrNG."BUT THE SS WAS DECENT BY NOT SHOOTING US A SMALL CONTRADICTION 
CAN BE NOTED BETWEEN THE TWO VERSIONS ACCORDING TO THE NUMBER OF COVERS 
GIVEN TO EACH PRISONER.FROM THE" 3 COVERS'IN THE DIARY , ONLY" 2 VERY ROUGH 
COVERS "IN THE INTERVIEW. 

DIARY AND INTERVIEW CONDEMN THE BEHAVIOR OF THE" PROMINENT 
PRISONERS" IN AUSCHWITZ DURING THE TIME IN LENZINGJHE DIARY MENTIONED 
SOME PREFERENTIAL TREATMENT BECAUSE OF PROMINENT PRISONERS IN THE 
INTERVIEW IS GENERALLY A DEPRAVED PICTURE OF THE PROMINENTES" GIVEN, 
WHICH IS SUPPLEMENTED BY THE REPORT THAT SEVERAL OF THE LENZING" 
PROMINENTS" WERE MUCH MORE FRIENDLY" TALES OF INSUFFICIENT FOOD IS AN 
OUTSTANDING FEATURE IN BOTH VERSIONS. YET CERTAIN QUALITATIVE DIFFERENCES 
CAN BE NOTED IN DEALING WITH THIS THEME. THE DIARY SPEAKS ABOUT THE SMALL 
AMOUNT OF FOOD ON SEVERAL OCCASIONES AND OF THE TROUBLE TO DIGEST IT JUST 
AS IT NOTES ALSO CONCRETE EVENTS OF TIMES WHEN THE PRISONERS HAD TO WAIT 
M ANY HOURS ,EVEN DAYS FOR FOOD. THIS DIFFERENCE PERTAINS TO THE TIME IN 
AUSCHWITZ, INCLUDING THE CONSISTENT LACK OF FOOD AS FAR AS LENZING IS 
CONCERNED ,BOTH VERSIONES HAVE CONCRETE DETAILS ABOUT FOOD,BUT THE 
DIARY DESCRIBES THE BETTER FUNDAMENTAL FOOD CONDITIONS AND THE FOLLOW UP 
WORSENING,WHILE THE INTERVIEW REPORTS POOR FOOD CONDITIONES FOR ALL TIMES 
IN LENZING. " PAGE 169" 

WITH REGARD TO THE TRANSPORT FROM AUSCHWITZ TO LENZING,BOTH VERSIONS 
REPORT DETAILS ABOUT THE FOOD IN THIS CASE THE MAIN EMPHASIS IS ON THE LARGE 
AMOUNT OF FOOD GIVEN TO THE PRISONERS AND THE RESULTING FEAR OF BEING 
SHIPPED TO A DREADED CAMP IN GERMANY OR POLAND 

FURTHERMORE A DIFFERENCE IS FOCUSED ON STATEMENTS MADE TO THE FACT OF 
SURVIVING WHILE THE DIARY CREDITS THE EDUCATIONAL INFLUENCE MADE BY HER 
F ÄTHER, AS IT IS NOTED IN AN ENTRY JN THE INTERVIEW SHE RECOGNIZES HER 
INTELLIGENCE ,RESERVED ENERGY AND HER" WILLPOWER TO SURVIVE". 
ALTHOUGH,BOTH DECLARATIONS DO NOT DISQUALIFY EACH OTHER , THE DIFFERENCE 
IN THE EMPHASIS IS WORTH MENTIONING . 



ANOTHER DIFFERENCE IN BOTH VERSIONS CAN ONLY BE MADE WITH CAUTION.THE 
ONLY REVERENCE OF GAS-CHAMBERS CAN BE FOUND IN A DETAILED QUOTATION FROM 
THE LONDON TIMES ,REGARDING THE CONDITIONS IN" THE DEATH CAMP MAJDANEK". 
IN SO FAR AS IS REPORTED IN HER DIARY ,SHE ONXY BECAME AWARE OF TFIE 
NEWSPAPER ARTICLE CONTENT AFTER SHE HAD MADE HER OWN ENTRIES ABOUT 
CREMATION SHE MENTIONES IN BOTH VERSIONS,THE EXPECTATION TO BE KILLED IN 
AUSCHWITZ,BUT ONLY TFIE INTERVIEW MENTIONS THE FEAR TO BE GASSED DURING A 
SHOWER. [SHE WROTE IN DETAIL ABOUT THIS SITUATION. ]ALTHOUGH JUDGING FROM 
HER ENTRIES IN THE DIARY ,IT APPEARS THAT THE AUTHOR BELIEVED OF MASS KILLING 
OF HUMAN BEINGS BY CREMATION,IT IS NOT DEFINITIVELY SURE, WETHER SHE STILL 
BELIEVED THAT AT THE TIME SHE WROTE HER DIARY.IN ANY CASE ,KNOWLEDGE ABOUT 
THE GASSING PROCEDURE IS NOT DOCUMENTED IN HER DIARY. WHEN ASKED ABOUT 
THIS SUBJECT DURING HER INTERVIEW,SHE GAVE EVASIVE ANSWERS.[I THOUGFTT ,IT 
WOULD BE SO,BUT I WAS NOT SURE AT THE TIME ONE THING I KNOW; LATER ON , WHEN 
WE HAD TO UTniDRESS EVERY 2 OR 3 DAYS,WTIEN TFIEY CUT OUR HAIRS, WHEN WE HAD 
TO SHOWER ,WHEN WE WERE FREEZING COLD AND THEY OPENED THE WINDOWS AND 

WITHOUT DRYING OUR WET BODIES WE HAD TO GO TO ANOTHER ROOM THEN I 

ALWAYS THOUGHT ,NOW THEY WILL TURN ON THE GAST BELIEVED THIS WOULD BE THE 
PROCEDURE]. THE FACTS ARE CLOSE,IT IS[POSSIBLE]THAT SOME INFORMATION 

RECEIVED DURING HER TIME IN CAMP WAS ADDED AT THE INTERVIEW.— PAGE 170 

- AS ALREADY NOTED, THE INTERVIEWED READ A GOOD PORTION OF HER DIARY 
TOWARDS THE END OF THE SECOND INTERVIEW- STTTING TO THE INTERVIEWER. WITH IT 
CLAUDIA G MADE SOME SPONTANEOUS COMMENTS TOWARDS HER 
RECOLLECTIONS DURING A SECTION ABOUT "THE SELECTION"IN AUSCHWITZ SHE 
REPORTED, THAT SHE WAS SELECTED FOR GAS ERRONTiOUSLY BY A STRANGE SS MAN. 



PAGE 163 
DIFFICULT POINTS OF HER EXPERJENCES 



THE 



A GASE STUDIE "CL^^^^ ^^^,^,^ nicpini! T POIN 1 b ur noiv ^^. ^.^^ - 
SOME CH ANGES IN I^COLLECTING D^^^^^^^ TOW ARDS 

THIS STUDY OFFERS A COMPA^SON OF TW^ ^UU ^p^rred HERE AS 

CONCENTRATION CAMP E^^WENCES OF A ^^^ ^^ ^^^^ 1^ MAY 

CLAUDIA G THE FIRST SOURCE IS A DAY^^^^ ^^ ^ ^^p^ ^HICH 

1945 ,SIXTEEN DAYS AFTER ^^J^J^^^^^^^^^ FRAME WORK OF AN 

WASMADEBY ANAUTHOR l^NEWYO^^^ jHE COMPARISON COMPARES 

EXTENDED STUDY OF CONCENTRATIAN CAMP Sm^^ 
2 GOALS ON ONE SIDE AN ATTEMPT WAS ^^DE TO TEST ^9^^^^^^^^ PROBLEM 

WRSIOnS O^^^^^ ATTCMPTS WERE MADE TO EXPLAIN AND BE SPECIFIC 

TO POINT OUT SOME IMPORT ANT DIFFERENCES IN THE 2 SOURCES .^^oynv^ 

THERE EXIST SEVERAL SIMILARITIES AND DIFFERENCES IN THE 2 VERSIONS 
IN VIEW OF THEIR LOGIC CONSISTENCY AT THE SAME TIME ,THE TWO VERSIONS CAN BE 
EXAMINED ON THEIR MOST DIFFICULT POINTS ,ACCORDING TO THEIR SELECTED 
SPONTANEOUS OR HALF SPONTANEOUS SELECTION , THE ARRANGEMENT OF THE 
MATERIAL BY THE INDIVIDUAL,AND THE FORM OF THE EXPRESSION ONE ASPECT OF THE 
STUDY IS ALSO THE PROBLEM OF CHANGE IN HER RECOLLECTION AND OTHER DIFFICULT 
POINTS OF ASPECTS IN A CERTAIN EXPERIENCE IN THAT SPAN OF TIME NATURALLY IN 
THIS CONNECTION ,WE ASSUME , THAT THE VARIATIONS ARE NOT A MATTER OF TIME , 
BUT RATHER THROUGH AN INCIDENT THAT HAPPENED THEN. WHILE THE PROBLEM OF 
CONSISTENCY IN REMEMBERANCE HAS A BETTER CHANCE TO BE EXPLORED IN A 
CONTROLLED INVESTIGATIONJHE SPONTANE OR HALF SPONTANE DIMENSION OF THE 
MATERIAL IS EXACTLY WHAT MAKES THE RECOLLECTION OF DIFFICULT POINTS 
POSSIBLE OF COURSE , THE STUDIE OF A SINGLE GASE HAS ITS LIMITS. IN VIEW OF THE 
PRECEDING POSITION OF PROBLEMS IN THIS UNDERT AKING, THE EXPERIENCE IN CAMP 
WILL HERE NOT BE DEALT WITH ANY FURTHER. IT IS NOT ASSUMED,THAT THE PAGE 164 
EXPERIENCES OF THE HERE PRESENTED INDIVIDUAL IS TYPICAL FOR ALL OTHER 
SURVIVORS,YET MANY IN THIS CASE REPORTED EXPERIENCES ARE TYPICAL [FOR 
INSTANCE TRANSPORT, RECEPTION PROCEDURES IN CAMP AUSCHWITZ ,FOOD 
CONDITIONES] IS COMPAREABLE TO MANY REPORTS 

OF OTHER PRISONERS IN A SIMILAR SITUATION. THE INTERVIEWED YOUNG WOMAN 

GAME OF AN UPPER MIDDLE CLASS GERMAN-JEWISH BACKGROUND. HER FATHER WAS 
A LAWYER WITH A TENDENCY FOR ART AND INTELLECT. HER MOTHER WAS A JEWISH 
EMIGRANT FROM WHITE RUSSIA.FOR REASON OF HER FATHERS SERVICE IN WORLD-WAR 
ONE,THE FAMILY WAS SEND TO THERESIENSTADT,WHERE CONDITIONS WERE LESS 
EXTREME THAN IN OTHER CAMPS. FROM THERE, THE FATHER FIRST AND CLAUDIA 
LATER WERE DEPORTED TO AUSCHWITZ. AFTER 3 WEEKS IN AUSCHWITZ CLAUDIA WAS 
BROUGHT TO LENZING ,AN OUTER CAMP TO THE CONCENTRATION CAMP MAUTHAUSEN 
, WHERE SHE REMAINED UNTIL HER LIBERATION. 

THE FIRST INTERVIEW LASTED TWO AND A HALF HOURS AT THE END OF THE 
INTERVIEW,CLAUDIA G MENTIONED TO HAVE IN HER POSESSION A DIARY WHICH SHE 
STARTED TO WRITE SHORTLY AFTER HER LIBERATION SHE OFFERED THE DIARY FOR 
USE IN THE STUDY 

DURING THE NEXT INTERVIEW SITTING , 2 DAYS LATER SHE READ PARTS OF THE DIARY 
TO THE INTERVIEWER DURING HER READING , SHE STOPPED FREQUENTLY AT A NLTMBER 
OF PLACES SAYING , SHE COULD NOT REMEMBER THIS OR THAT OCCURRENCE THE 
INTERVIEWER QUESTIONED,;WHEN DID YOU READ FROM YOUR DIARY THE LAST 
TIME,SHE ANSWERED, NOT TO HAVE OPENED IT DURING THE PAST 18 MONTH THIS 
SIGNIFIES THAT THE POINT OF TIME OF HER LAST READING MUST HAVE HAPPENED 
SHORTLY AFTER HER ARRIVAL IN THE U. S. A EXGEPT FOR AN ENGLISH NEWSPAPER 
QUOTATION, THE LANGUAGE OF THE BOOK IS GERMAN.THE LITERARY FORM OF THE 
BOOK IS STYLED AS A" LETTER TO MY FATHER", ALTHOUGH FROM THE GONTEXT 
EMERGES, THAT THE AUTHOR WAS AWARE OF HER FATHERS DEMISE AT THE TIME OF 



HER COMPOSITION AT THE BEGINNING IS A SHORT QUOTATION FROM "GOETHE'THAT 
HER FATHER WROTE IN HER DIARY. 

THE GERMAN IN THE DIARY SUFFERS FROM LACK OF PUNCTUATION RULES AND 
UNDER THE TENDENCY TG USE LONG AND ENCAPSULATED SENTENCES [OFTEN USED IN 
MODERN GERMAN ] THE AUTHOR USES SEVERAL SLANG EXPRESSIONS, RELATING TO 
VOMITING AND DEFEC ATING, WHICH , CONSIDERING HER BACKGROUND AND HER 
EDUCATIONAL LEVEL WOULD HA VE BEEN UNACCEPTABLE ESPECIALLY SINCE THESE 
EXPRESSIONES ARE IN DIRECT OPPOSITION TO THE PICTURE OF HER FATHER WHOSE 
ACHIEVEMENTS IN THE ARTS AND HIS INTELLECT IS FREQUENTLY PAGE 165 

EXPRESSED ADDITIONALLY SHE USES SOME TECHNICALLY MINDED EXPRESSIONS 
BORROWED FROM MILITARY LANGUAGE ALL IN ALL THE STYLE AND VOCABULARY 
CORRESPOND TO A SEVENTEEN YEAR OLD GIRL WITH MIDDLE SCHOOL EDUCATION THE 
DIARY IS EASY TO READ , MOST OF IT IS WRITTEN WITH A PENCIL. 

MOST OF THE DIARY SPEAKS OF THE EXPERIENCES IN CONCENTRATION-CAMP THE 
ENTRIES ,REFLECTING LIFE IN CAMP , WERE WRITTEN ON 4 DIFFERENT DAYS IN MAY 
1945, DURNG THE WEEK OF CLAUDIA'S LIBERATION THE REMAINING 5 ENTRIES REFER 
TO EXPERIENCES AFTER THE END OF THE WAR,THEY HA VE THE STYLE OF BRIEFLY AND 
FLEETING PERSONAL NOTES. 

THE SECOND SOURCE TO THE CAMP EXPERIENCE OF THE INDIVIDUAL WAS 
COMPLETELY INTERVIEWED IN ENGLISH THE INTERVIEW DEALT WITH CONDITIONS 
BEFORE CONCENTRATION CAMP EXPERIENCES ,DURING TIME IN CONCENTRATION CAMP 
AND AFTER CONCENTRATION CAMP EXPERIENCES AND ATTITUDES CERTAIN TESTS 
WERE APPLIED , SUCH AS TAT, RORSCHACHTEST[ANALYSIS OF PERSONALITY], SZONDI— 
AND MACHOWER TEST THE INTERVIEW FOLLOWED A CERTAIN GUIDE BUT WAS 
UNSTRUCTURED TO GIVE THE QUESTIONED PERSON A RELATIVE FREE ARRANGEMENT 
OF THE MATERIAL DURING OPEN QUESTIONING FOLLOWED BY DETAILED INQUHUES . 1] . 

1] During the interviews ,CAUDIA G. reprimanded the possibility to have answered difFerently , 
if the interview would have been conducted in GERMAN and she rally changed several points for a short 
Periode of time to GERMAN. Actually her ENGLISH is good This is not surprising, since she learned 
English in her youth while she had contact with an English speaking aunt. As a partial test of her claim to be 
able to express herseif better in GERMAN,some of the TAT cards,which were given to her in the 
ENGLSH language ONLY restrained answers were given,they were again given inGERMAN at another 
sitting. While the requirements of this comparison remained uncontrolled ,the results proved, that the use of 
the ENGLISH was no deciding factor blocking the TAT productivity. This opinion was voiccu by 
CLAUDIA G aller the test. PAGE 1 66 

THE HERE EMPLOYED COMPARISON REFERS TO THE PERIOD OF CLAUDIA'S 
DEPORTATION TO THERESIENSTADT AND HER LIBERATION THE REASON FOR THIS FACT 
IS REALLY , BECAUSE THE DIARY HAS NO ENTRY FROM THE TIME BEFORE. THE TIME 
SPAN RIGHT AFTER LIBERATION WAS NOT INCLUDED BECAUSE THE MAIN PART OF THE 
INTERVIEW WAS RECORDED ONLY AFTER THE READING OF THE DIARY. THE DIARY AND 
THE TAPE RECORDING OF THE INTERVIEW AND THE DATES OF THE PROJECTED TESTS 
ARE AVAILABLE TO BE SEEN IN NEW YORK. 2] 

LOGIC ALL Y ,THE 2 VERSIONS ARE CONSISTENT THEY JOINTLY POINT TO A 
NUTVIBER OF COMMON CHARACTERISTICS WITH REGARD TO THE NARRATIVE AS WELL AS 
TO SPECIFIC GRAVITY OF A MATTER BOTH VERSIONS RECALL THE TRANSPORT FROM 
THERESIENSTADT TO AUSCHWITZ [AND IN BOTH CASES IS MENTIONED ABOUT THE 
ENLARGED PORTIONS OF FOOD GIVEN TO THE PRISONERS,CREATING THE FEAR OF A 
LONG TRIP] THE EXPERIENCES OF A 3 WEEK STAY IN AUSCHWITZ [ SFLWING OF ALL 
BODY^ HAIR, ANTICIPA1 ION TO BE CREMATED, DEPRIVATION OF BODILY COMFORT BY 
PUSHING AND PACKING PRISONERS IN BARRACKS, WET CLOTHES, CHANGING OF 
BARRACKS AT THE TIME OF FOOD DISTRIBUTION ,ROLL CALL,BARBED WIRE FENCES, 
MASSES OF HUMANS FIGHT FOR A LITTLLE SPACE TO SLEEP].THE TRANSPORT FROM 
AUSCHWITZ TO LENZING,TO BE PREOCCUPIED WITH FOOD ; THE EXCHANGE OF COOKING 
RECEPIES AMONGST THE LENZING PRISONERS,THE PAINFUL HAND IN LENZING, THE 



WEITHER THE DIARV , NOR THE •NTER^^^^^CL^^ «J^^^^^^^ 

Lad passages of the •^!:^T}y!h«mT ?ffi?E tS ISd once added, that "she 

STOPPED TO REMARK , THAT «HE FORGOT TffiSE TONO^ ^CPLAINED.THAT SHE FORGOT 

INTERVIEWJHAT THE PRISONERS AS WELL AS SHE ,RECEIVED NbWb 
SEVERAL FÖREMEN. 



THE PRECEDING 



DISCUSSION: nn.^xrr^x^ r^ * et. CVTCTC a 

ANALYSIS SHOWS THAT IN THE ABOVE MENTIONED GASE EXISTS A 
BROAD SIMILARITY BETWEEN THE DIARY AND THE INTERVIEW SIMULTANEOUSLY 
SIGNIFICANT DIFFERENCES CAN BE ASCERTAINED BETWEEN BOTH VERSIONS. 

TO EV ALU ATE THE INTERVIEW OVER THE KZ. EXPERIENCE, ONE IS INEVITABLY 
CONFRONTED WITH THE PROBLEM OF THE SELECTION OF THE OPTIMAL-- TIME 
INTERVALS FOR THE ACCURACY OF HER RECOLLECTION WHILE THE ACTUAL 
SELECTION OF TIME INTERVALS CAN BE DETERMINED BY CERTAIN CONSIDERATIONS, 
THE PROBLEM REMAINS ,IF REPORTS MADE TEMPORAL ,OR FAR- -LATER ARE THEY 
SUFFICIENTLY RELIABLE AS RESEARCH- DATES . THIS PROBLEM TURNED OUT IN A 
CONCRETE FORM WITHIN THE INTIRE STUDY STRICTE Y-TAKEN THERE IS NO 
THEORETIC BASE TO ASSUME THAT A FAR— LATER RECOLLECTION OF CIRCUMSTANCES 
INEVITABLY IS LESS RELIABLE THAN SHORT-TERM RECOLLECTIONS. PAGE 171 

SUCH AN ASSUMPTION WOULD BE INCONSISTENT TO THE OPINIONJHAT A CHANCE 
OF RECOLLECTIONS IS NOT A FUNCTION OF ELAPSED TIME , BUT DEPENDS ON 
PERSONALITY FACTORSJHE VARIETY OF THE MATERIAL, INTERVENING EXPERIENCES IN 
THE INTERVAL OF TIME AND THE IMMEDIATE TIME THE SITUATION IS REMEMBERED IT IS 
POSSIBLE JHAT SEVERAL DISTORTIONS HAPPENED WITHIN A LESS THAN 2 MONTH 
LAPSE OF TIME AFTER LIBERATION. THE TYPE AND EXTEND OF SUCH A BIAS CAN NOT BE 
ESTABLISHED BY REASON OF AVAILABLE DATES. 

AT THE SELECTION OF THE INTERVIEW MATERIAL,CONSIDERATION MUST BE GIVEN 
,THAT THE MATERIAL WAS NOT GIVEN IRRESPECTIVE OF A POSSIBLE INFLUENCE OF THE 
RECOLLECTION PROCESS, WHICH IN CONNECTION WITH THE WTITING AND READING OF 
THE DIARY [THE LAST TIME 1 8 MONTH BEFORE THE INTERVIEWJNEEDS TO BE 
CONSIDERED THIS BOUNDARY IS GIVEN,IN CONSIDERATION OF THE SPONTANEOUS 
CHARACTER OF A PART OF THE MATERIAL SIMULTANEOUSLY TT IS EXACTLY THE 
QU ALITY OF THE SPONTANEOUS AND THE HALF SPONTANEOUS WHICH MAKES THE 
ANALYSIS SO VALUED, WITH REGARD TO GIVE EMPHASIS ON mCIDEOTSlN^ 
EXEPTIONAL LIFE— SITUATIONES. 

THIS IS A PARTIAL TRANSLATION OF A STUDY ON CLAUDIA G WRTTTPm tm /-i^dx/taivt 
TRANSLATED INTO ENGLISH B Y ALFRED GRUeSeChJ Ty^^ ^^ 

I 



♦.. 



PICKING OF "SAUERAMPFER", [A SOFT GRASS THAT CAN BE EATEN] IN A MEADOW 
AFTER LIBERATION ANYWAY , BOTH VERSIONS DESCRIBE THE CAMP EXPERIENCE AS 
"UNREAL"[DIARY;I WAS NOT COMPLETELY AWARE IF ALLTHESE THINGS WERE REAL] 
INTERVIEW;" THIS WHOLE SITUATION ONE CAN NOT IMAGINE , IT WAS LIRE A DENSE 
FOG" ANOTHER POINT OF SIMILARITY IS THE EMPHASIS AND PREOCUPATION WITH HER 
FATHER ,AFTER THEY WERE SEPERATED IN THERESIENSTADT. 

WITHIN THIS FRAME OF SIMILARITIES SEVERAL DIFFERENCES WERE 
NOTICE ABLE.SEVERAL ASPECTS OF THE CAMP EXPERIENCE WERE MENTIONED TN THE 
DIARY ,BUT NOT IN THE Ü^JTERVIEW PAGE 167 RELATIVELY AND IN DETAIL NOTES 

THE DIARY ABOUT "THE SELECTION IN AUSCHWITZ ",THE EXAMINATION FÜR 
TRANSPORT AND THE HIDING OF VALUABLES IN BODY OPENINGS [NAMED] VOMETING, 
AND STANDING AT APPELL [ROLL-CALL] BEING HALF CONSCIOUS ,PUNISFIMENT TG 
KNEEL OR KEEP STANDING THE DIARY REFERS ALSO TO A S.S. WOMAN IN CONNECTION 
WITH ADV ANTAGES GIVEN AT'LENZING VERSUS AUSCHWITZ FURTHER MORE THE 
DIARY MENTIONED RESTRICTIONS WHEN VISITING THE LATRINE IN AUSCHWITZ AND 
THE DIFFICULTIES BECAUSE OF INADEQUACY, ALSO THE EXTREME INSUFFICIENT TOILET 
WHILE BEING TRANSPORTED FROM AUSCHWITZ TO LENZING. THE DIARY CONTINUES TO 
MENTION 3 DIFFERENT SITÜATIONES OF DIARRHE AALWAYS TOGETHER WITH 
INADEQUATE TOILET CONDITIONES. THESE FACTS , NOR THE DIARRHEA WAS 
MENTIONED IN THE INTERVIEW. WHILE THE DIARY GIVES AN EXACT DEFINITION OF ALL 
THE DIFFICULTIES AND SHORTCOMINGS ,AS WELL AS THE MODERATE CONDITIONES 
DURING THE TRANSPORT FROM AUSCHWITZ TO LENZING,THE INTERVIEW MENTIONES 
ONLY THE TRANSPORTS 

IN THE DESCRIPTION OF CONDITIONS IN LENZING ,THE DIARY REPORTS AND 
ADVICES OF SEVERAL REASONABLE CONDITIONS ,FOR INSTANCE THE BETTER QUALITY 
OF FOOD FOR A 4 WEEK LONG PERIOD OF REST ,THE CLEAN AND HEALTHY AIR IN CAMP, 
MORE LIVING SPACE IN THE BARRACKS IN COMPARISON TO OTHERS, FAVORS BY 
"PROMINENT PRISONERS" AND A FOREMAN IN THE FACTORY THE AILMENT ON HER 
HAND ,MENTIONED IN BOTH VERSIONS IS BETTER DETAILED IN THE DIARY. OTHER 
ASPECTS ARE MORE PROMINENTLY MENTIONED IN THE INTERVIEW [AND NOT 
MENTIONED IN THE DIARY] THE INTERVIEWED PERSON OCCUPIES HERSELF WITH A SPAN 
OF TIME DESCRIBING THE "UNFRIENDLY BEHAVIOR AND AGGRESSIVE ATTITÜDE OF 
JEWISH PRISONERS ,THAT WERE IN CHARGE OF PREP ARING THE RECEPTION OF THE 
PRISONERS. 

SHE TRIED TO EXPL.AIN THEIR ATTITLTDE , THEY BEING PRESSLTIED FROM ABOV'^.THE 
DIARY ALSO MENTIONES THE SAME OCCURRENCES IN GREATER DETAIL WITHOUT 
CRITICIZING,OR EXCUSING THE CONDUCT.BOTH VERSIONS MENTIONE THE SCUFFLE FOR 
SPACE,HOWEVER IN THE INTERVIEW THESE MATTERS ARE MENTIONED MORE PROMPTLY 
AND EXPLICITLY CONDEMNED. WHILE BOTH VERSIONES MENTION "HUNGARIAN 
JEWS'IN THE INTERVIEW SHE TRIES TO JUSTIFY THE BEHAVIOR WITH BELONGING TO A 
LOWER CLASS AND INADEQUATE EDUCATION. 

PAGE 168 "ALL HUNGARIAN, POLISH AND RUSSIANS WERE ABLE TO" GET— 
OVER EVERYTHING BETTER" PEOPLE FROM THE LOWER CLASSES 

BOTH VERSIONS TELE ABOUT THE FIGHT FOR FOOD BETWEEN THE PRISONERS OF 
LENZESfG. THE INTERVIEW INSISTS,SHE SAW NO ADV ANTAGE TO PARTICIPATE IN A 
CERT.\IN SITUATION SHORTLY BEFORE LIBERATION. THE DIARY CONTAINS THE SAME 
EVENT ,THOUGH WITHOUT REFERENCE ON NOT PARTICIPATING IN THE CONTEST 
REGARDING FOOD THE DIARY REFERS TO ANOTHER EVENT OF NOT PARTICIPATING IN 
THE MELLE FOR FOOD IN THE CONTEXT OF ANOTHER EVENT, MENTIONED IN THE 
INTERVIEW [IT IS POSSIBLE , THAT THIS EVENT WAS IMPORT ANT FOR A MODERATION OF 
CIRCUMSTANCES IN HER GASE WITH REGARD TO EXTRA FOOD.,WHICH SHE RECEIVED 
FROM HER BLOCK— ELDER] 

BOTH VERSIONS MENTION THE PICKING OF SAUERAMPFER [A SOFT GRASS] IN A 
MEADOW ,OPPOSITE THE CAMP, SHORTLY AFTER LIBERATION THE INTERVIEW REFERS 
TO AN ADDITIONAL EVENT , THE PICKING OF DIRTY GRASS DURING THE MARCH FROM 
CAMP TO THE FACTORY, WHICH ILLUSTRATES THE CATASTROPHIC EXTEND OF FIUNGER 



V\,S. Hc>9f^ 



HEINZ JUERGEN HOPPE DAS JUEDISCHE FULDA. [THE JEWISH FULDA] FULDA 1998 
A HISTORIC WALK THROUGH THE CITY. 

FOREWORD, BY DR. WOLFGANG HAMMER, MAYOR PAGE 5 

DAS JUEDISCHE FULDA, REMARKS BY ISRAEL SCHWIERTZ " 6 

HISTORIC BACKROUND BY THE AUTH0R,H.J.HOPPE *' 8 

TOMBSTONE OF THE MAHARAM SCHIFF[RABBI IN FULDA 1622] " 14 

PICTURE OF THE PROVINCIAL RABBI DR. MICHAEL CAHN [1677/1918..." 17 

VARIOUS PICTURES ,HACHSHARA RODGERS, SCHOOL,HECH ALUTZ "18/19 

A DEROGATORY PICTURE IN "THE FULDAER NEWS" 1938 

[LEVELING THE JEWISH CEMETERY TO BUILT A PUBLIC PARK] "...20 

BEGINNING OF THE CITY WALK H.J.HOPPE "...23 

PICTURES OF FORMER SYNAGOGUE OF FULDA,INSIDE &OUTSIDE 26 

ADDITIONAL PICTURES OF "THE JEW- STREET " 28 

A MEMORIAL TABLET FOR THE ANNIHILATED JEWISH CITIZENS " 30 

PICTURE OF THE OPENING OF THE JEWISH CULTURAL CENTER 1987 ".. 30 

PICTURE OF THE FORMER JEWISH PUBLIC SCHOOL AND OLD ACE HOME".. 32 

COPY OF A "LAST LETTER" FROM FULDA " 34 

OFFICIAL ACCOUNTFNG IN" THE FULDAER ZEITUNG" OF" HOW MANY 
JEWS ARE "STILL LEFT IN THE CIT Y JAN. 1939,MARCH,MAY, AUGUST 1939..". 35 
PICTURE OF A DEPORTATION- TRANSPORT- TRAIN,FROM FULDA RAILSTAT.36 



DAS JUEDISCHE FULDA[THE JEWISH FLT.DA] A HISTORIC SURVEY. 

FED.DISTRICT KASSEL— PROVINCIAL RABBIS IN FULDA: 
RABBI DR MICHAEL CAHN[1877-1918] 
RABBI DR.LEO CAHN [1919-1938] 

RABBI B ARUCH KUNSTADT[1909-1939] 

SYNAGOGUE [UPPER JEW STREET] WITH MIKWE [RITUAL ARIUM] 
1 423 SYNAGOGUE OFFICI ALLY DOCUMENTED 

1 575 LOAN LETTER FOR THE JEWISH SCHOOL 

1859 NEW BUILDING 

1927 EXPANSION 

1938 DESTRUCTION["PROGROM NIGHT] 

1939 TORNDOWN 



'39 



ISRAELITIC PUBLIC SCHOOL 

DEC 20 1 784 DECREE TO HA VE A JEWISH TEACHING INSTITUTION IN THE ROYALLY 
RESIDENCE CITY OF FULDA. 

APRIL1,1900 OPNING OF A JEWISH ELEMENT ARY SCHOOL 
UNTIL1940 TEACHERS AR. SONN,B.KATZ 

JEWISH CEMETERY 

SINCE 1476 OFFICI ALLY DOCUMENTED 

SINCE 1913 SECOND CEMETERY 

JEWISH WEEKLY FOR FULDA AND VICINITY 

OFFICIAL COMMUNICATION PAPER FOR THE DISTRICT OF THE PROVINCIAL RABBINATE 



FULDA[1930/1933] ALL ON PAGE 39 

WELFARE INSTITUTIONSANT) ORGANIZATIONS. PAGE 40 

1 WELFARE FUNDS FOR JEWISH POOR 

2 CHEVRA BIKKUR -CHOLIM[SOCIETY FOR HELPING AND VISITING JEWISH SICK 

3 CHEVRA KADISHA[ BURIAL SOCIETY] 

4 LADIES AUXILL ARY FOUNDED IN 1 927 

5 RITUAL KOSHER KITCHEN EST. 1 927 

6 MAHARAM SCHIFF LODGE [BNAI BRITH] 



7 SOCIETY OF EASTERN EUROPEAN JEWS 

8 CHEVRA SHASS, WITH YESHIVA [ A CENTER FOR LEARNING HEBR. STUDEES] 

9 BLUE- WHITE [A JEWISH YOUTH ORGANIZATION] 



JEWISH POPULATION STATISTICS 



1567 

1671 

1802 

1905 

1933 

1933-1940 

1941-1942 

AFTER 1945 

FROM 1990 



1 8 FAMILIES 

5 "[EXPULSION] 
237 JEWS 

862 "[20420 residents] 
1029 "[28291 residents] 

950 "[emigration] 

243 "[deporations 

300 "[DISPLACED PERSONS] 
RUSSIAN IMMIGRANTS 



OUT OF THE JEWISH HISTORY[ OF FULDA] PAGE 40. 
JULY 1.1019 EMPEROR HEINRICH II ALLOWED FULDA THE RIGHT OF SETTLEMENT FOR 

PAGE41 



JEWS. 
DEC.27 1235 FULDAER" BLOOD LIBEL"[ ACCUS ATION] 
3 DE AD CHILDREN WERE FOUND 
JEWS WERE ACCUSED OF" RITUAL MURDER" 
32 JEWISH MEN,WOMEN AND CHILDREN WERE MURDERED 

THEY WERE BURIED IN SCHLUECHTERN.[A SM ALL TOWN EARBY] 
JULY 1236 ACCUS ATION AGAINST JEWS REJECTED BY EMPEROR FRIEDRICH II. 

1245 THE POPE INNOCENZ II FORBID THE FAIRY TALES OF RITUAL MURDER 
FEBRUARY 

9™, 1301 THE ABBOT HEINRICH ,5™ ACQUIRED' ' TFIE RIGHT OF OWNERSHIP"ON THE 
JEWS OF FULDA: JEWS WERE " SERVANTS"OF THE EMPEROR[KAMMERKNECHTE]. 
1348/1349/ "THE BLACK DEATH" 

1 364 1 80 JEWS LI VING AT THAT TIME IN FULDA WERE MURDERED AND THROWN 

INTO FIERY FLAMES 
JUNE 7th 1399 ABBOT JOHANN PERMITTED THE JEWS ABRAHAM DEM WALCH,KOPHELIN 
AND VIVELMANN WITH THEIR WIVES AND CHILDREN TO ESTABLISH THEMSELVEIS 
ACCORDING TO THEIR LDONG IN THE CITIES OF FULDA, VACHA,HAMMELBURG , OR AT 
ANY OTHER LOC ATION IN THE MONASTRY-LANDS FOR 6 YEARS AND PAY "PROTECTION- 
MONEY *'0F 6 GUILDERS FOR THE FIRST 4 YEARS, 2 GUILDERS FOR THE LAST 2 YEARS SO 
NO ONE SHOULD INVADE THEMTO HURT THEIR EDDIES ,0R PROPERTY. 
1476 JEWISH CEMETERY IN FULDA. 

1492 APPOINTMENT OF JACOB JAHRE AS AJEWISH DTOR. 
N0V5. 1565 PRINCE.\BBOTWOLFG.\NG II PATRON VON MILCHLI>;G: JEWS OF TUE ABBE Y 
OF FULDA CAN HAVE ONLY ONE SYNAGOGUE AND ONE CEMETERY IN FULDA. 
PAGE 42 
JAN. 11 1 582 A PETITION OF THE CITIZENS OF FULDA, GEISA AND BRUECKENAU AGAINST 

THE JEWS ABOUT PROFITEERING AND DRAINING THE COMMON PERSON TO GET 

RID OF THE JEWS AS POISON AND PLAGUE . 

1591 LOOTING OF FULDA'S JEWS BY SOLDIERS. 
CITIZENS REFUSED TO PROTECT THEM. 
PUNISHMENT OF TFIE CITY[8000 GUILDERS]BY THE EMPERORS GOVERNOR. 

1635/1644 ORDER FOR CLOTHING FOR JEWS: "YELLOW RING AROUND THE 
JACKET,COAT OR BELLY. 



AUG.14TH 1671 DECREE OF THE PRINCLY ABBOT BERNHARD GUSTAV , MARKGRAF VON 

BADEN- DURLACH . 

EXPULSION OF 2000 JEWS FROM THE "HIGH MONASTERY AREA" 

5 FAMILIES ALLOWED TO REMAIN 

FIRST TIME GHETTO IN FULDA [JEW-STREET] 

1730/1751 SETTLEMENT OF INDIVIDUAL "SCHUTZ JUDEN" [PROTECTED JEWS] 

"NUMEROUS RULES FOR THE JEWS" . 

DEC .20™ 1784 A DECREE BY THE PRINCELY BISHOP HEINRICH THE EIGHTH OF BIBRA 

REGARDING THE JEWISH SCHOOL IN" THE HIGH PRINCELY- RESIDENCE CITY OF FULDA " 

1802 SECULARIZATION 

1802/1806 ORANIAN REGIME , PRINCE FRIEDRICH WILHELM [PROTESTANT] 
PAGE 43 
1806-1910 FRENCH MILITARY ADMINISTRATION , GENERAL THIBAULT 
1810-1813 GRAND DUCHY FRANKFURT/MAIN DEPARTMENT FULDA : PRIMATE 
CARL VON DALBERG[MAINZ] 
JAN. 5™ 1 8 13"0RGANIZATI0N PATENT" 
JEWS RECEIVED CITIZENS RIGHTS [FOR60.000 GUILDERS] 
1813-1815 DIVISION OF FULDA : 
FULDA TO KURHESSL\ 
GEISA TO THURINGIA 
BRUECKENAU TO BAVERIA 

CONGRESS TO VIENNA FEDERAL RECORDS ARTICLE 16 . ANNULMENTOF JEWISH 
EMANCIPATION [NAPOLEON] 
1816-1866 KURHESSIA-KASSEL 
JAN 5™ 1831 KURHESSIAN LAND CONSTITUTION 
OCT. 29™ 1833 LAW FOR EQUAL RIGHTS [FOR JEWS] 
1 859 NEWLY BUILT S YNAGOGUE 

1866-1945 KINGDOM OF PRUSSIA— PROVINCE OF KURHESSIA 
1868 CONSTRUCTION OF RAIL LINE[ KASSEL-FULDA,.FRANKFURT/MAIN ] 

INDUSTRIALIZATION 
1914-1918 WORLD WAR I NUMEROUS JEWISH CASUALTIES 
SPT 1 1. 1927 DEDICATION OF THE EXPANDED S YNAGOGUE. 
APR. 1 . 1933 DAY OF BOYCOTT AGAINST JEWISH BUSINESSES 

WTTH THR SLOGAN [ 
"GERM ANS DO NOT BUY FOM JEWS] 
SPT. 15 1935 " 
" NUREMBERG LAWS" LAW OF CITIZENSHIP IN THE GERMAN REICH 

" LAW FOR THE PROTECTION OF GERMAN BLOOD AND GERMAN HONOR" 
EXCLUSION OF JEWISH CITIZENS FROM GERMAN VOLKS COMMUNITY 
1933-1940 EMIGRATION OF 950 JEWS FROM FULDA 

OCT. 27TH 1938 " ACTION -POLAND" [EXPELLING AND DEPORTING OF POLISH JEWS] 
NOV.9.TH1938 "CRYSTAL-NIGHT" PAGE 44 

SYNAGOGUE DESTROYED AND TORCHED 

JEWISH CEMETERIES DISTURBED AND DISHONORED, HOMES AND 

APARTMENTS DF.STROT TFWISH MFN APR^RTEH n 8 -«0 VF AP ni m 

JAN. 1939 CEMETERY AT RABANUS STREET MADE EVEN, SYNAGOGUE STRIPPED 

JULY 1939 REICH SOCIETY TO HELP JEWS TO EMIGRATE FROM GERMANY 

SPT 1. 1939 ATTACK OF POLAND : SECOND WORLD WAR. 

DEC 8 . 1 94 1 /MAY 3 1 . DEPORTATION OF JEWS FROM FULDA. 

SPT 5. 1942 TO REGA /LUBLIN/THERESIENSTADT : 243 MEN, WOMEN AND CHILDREN 

APR. 1945 SURRENDER AND AMERICAN OCCUPATION. 

1945 ca. 300 JEWISH DP'S [DISPLACED PERSONS] SURVIVORS FROM KZ. CAMPS 

1990 IMMIGRATION OF RUSSIAN JEWS. 



JEWISH CEMETERIES IN THE HESSIAN RHOEN. 
COMMUNITY CEMETERY 



COMMUNITY 
ALTENGRONAU 
AUFENAU 
BURGHAUN 
EITERFELD 
FULDA 



SINCE 



CEMETERY 

1100 UNTIL1934 
UNTIL1932 



SINCE 14.TH CENTURY 

1905 
*' 1 3. TH CENTURY 
A SECOND CEMETERY SINCE1913 
ERDMANNSRODE SINCE 1927 

FLEEDEN " 1905 

GERSFELD INWEYHERS *' 
BAD HERSFELD *' 19.TH CENTURY 

HETTENHAUSEN INWEYHERS 
HEUBACH IN ALTENGRONAU 

HUENFELD IN BURGHAUN 

LANGENSCHWARZ SINCE 1832 

MACKENZELL IN BURGHAUN 
NEUHOF IN FLEEDEN 

NIEDERAULA SINCE 1 9.TH CENTURY 



( ) 



1938 



1939 



i* 



RHINA 

BAD SALZSCHLIRF 

SCHENKLENGSFELD 

SCHLITZ 

SCHLUECHTERN 



t > 



1700 



IN SCHLITZ 
SINCE 



if 



SCHMALNAU 
STERBFRITZ 
TANN 

UTTRICHSHAUSEN 
VOLLMERZ 
WEHRDA 
WEYHERS 



1870 
1899 
1200 

SECOND CEMETERY 1926 
INWEYHERS 
IN ALTENGRONAU 

SINCE 18.TH CENTURY 
INWEYHERS 
SINCE 1847 

1853 



<m 



19'" CENTURY 



WUESTENSACHSEN IN WEYHERS 



JEWISH CEMETERIES IN THURINGIA 

COMMUNITY COUNTY REMARKS 

ASCHENHAUSEN MEININGEN S YNAGOGUE RESTORED[ 1 99 1 ] 

BARCHFELD BAD SALZUNGEN MEMORIAL TABLET [SYNAGOGUE] 

BAUERB ACH 

BERKACH 

BLEICHERODE 

DREISSIGACKER 

EISENACH 

FLLRTCH 

ERFURT 
GEHAUS 
GEISA 
GERA 



MEININGEN 

MEININGEN SYNAGOGUE RESTORED[ 1991 ]&MIKWE 

NORDPL\USEN MEMORIAL STONE, [SYNAGOGUE] 
MEININGEN 

EISENACH MEMORIAL TABLET [SYNAGOGUE] 

NORDR^USEN MEMORI ajl T.\BLET [SY>TAG0GLT] 
ERFURT MEMORIAL STONE SYNAGOGUE 

BAD SALZUNGEN 

BAD SALZUNGEN MEMORIAL TABLET [ SYNAGOGUE] 
GERA MEMORIAL STONE [SYNAGOGUE] 



GLEICHERWIESEN PHLDBURGHAUSEN 



GOTHA 

HEILIGENSTADT 

HEINRICHS 

MEININGEN 

MUELHAUSEN 

NORDHAUSEN 



GOTHA 

EICHSFELD 
SUHL 

MEININGEN 
MUELHAUSEN 
NORDHAUSEN 



MEMORIAL TABLET [SYNAGOGUE] 
MEMORIAL TABLET [SYNAGOGUE] 

MEMORIAL TABLET [SYNAGOGUE] 

SYNAGOGUE 
MEMORIAL TABLET [SYNAGOGUE] 



FLAUE 

SCHLEUSINGEN 

SCHMALKALDEN 

SCHWARZA 

SODERHAUSEN 

SONNEBERG 

STADTLENGSFELD 

SUHL [CITY] 

VACHA 

WALLDORF 

WEIMAR 

WEITERSRODA 



ARNSTADT 
SUHL 

SCHMALKALDEN 
SUHL 

SONDERHAUSEN 
SONNEBERG 
BAD SALZUNGEN 
SUHL 

BAD SALZUNGEN 
MEININGEN 
WEIMAR 
HILDBURGHAUSEN 



MEMORIAL TABLET [SYNAGOGUE] 

MEMORIAL TABLET [SYNAGOGUE] 

MEMORIAL TABLET [CEMETERY] 
NO JEWISH CEMETERY 

MEMORIAL TABLET [SYNAGOGUE] 



MEMORIAL TABLET [CEMETERY] 



JUEDISCHE LANDESGEMEINDE THUERINGEN ERFURT JURI-GAGARIN-RING 16, 

ERFURT,99084 
JEWISH CEMETERIES IN LOWER FRANKONIA 



COMMUNITY 


COUNTY 


ESTABLISHED 


ALLERSHEIM 


WUERZBURG 


1720 


ALTENGRONAU 


MAIN/KINZIG 


1100/1661 


ASCHAFFENBURG 


ASCHAFFENBURG 


1890 


AUB 


WUERZBURG BEFORF 1826/1880 


BAD BRUECKENAU 


BAD KISSINGEN 


1923 


BURGPREPPACH 


HASSBERGE 


1708 


DEIIELBACH 


KITZINGEN 


16.TH CENTURY,DESTROYED 


EBERN 


HASSBERGE 


1832 


EIBELSTADT 


WUERZBURG 


17.TH CENTURY, DESTROYED 


ERMERSHUSEN 


HASSBERGE 


1832 


EUERBACH 


SCHWEINFURT 


1672 


GEROLZHOFEN 


SCHWEINFURT,BEGIN 0F18TH. CENTURY 


HEIDINGSFELD 


WUERZBURG 


1811 


HOECHBERG 


WUERZBURG 


1821 


HOERSTEIN 


ASCHAFFENBURG 


1812 


HUEMENHEIM 


KITZINGEN 


1816 


KARBACH 


MAIN-SPESSART, END 0F18.TH CENTURY 


BAD KISSINGEN 


BAD KISSEnGEN 


1801 


KLEINBARDORF 


RHOEN-GRABFELD 


1574 


KLEINHEUBACH 


MnTENBERG 


1730 


KLEINSI EINACH 


HASSBERGE 


1596 


KOENIGSHOFEN 


RHOEN-GRABFELD 


1921 


LAUDENBACH 


MAIN-SPESSART BEGIN OF 18.TH CENTURY 


LIMBACH 


HASSBERGE 


1705 


MASSBACH 


BAD KISSINGEN 


1904 


MELLRICHSTADT 


RHOEN-GRABFELD 


1869 


MEMMELSDORF 


HASSBERGE 


1835 


Mn.TENBERG 


MILIENBERG 


1812/1902 


BAD NEUSTADT 


RHÖJbN-GRAüi^uLD 


1887 



NEUSTAEDTLES-WILMARS, RHOEN-GRABFELD 18.TH. CENTURY 
OBERLAURINGEN SCHWEINFURT BEGIN 19.TH. CENTURY 

OBERWALDBEHRUNGEN, RHOEN-GRABFELD 



PFAFFENHAUSEN 

REHWEBLER 

REISTENHAUSEN 

ROEDELSEE 

SCHWANFELD 

SCHWEINFURT 

SCHWEINHEIM 



BAD KISSINGEN 

KITZINGEN BEFORE 

MILTENBERG 

KITZINGEN 

SCHWEINFURT 

SCHWEINFURT 



19.TH CENTURY 

1580 

1812 DESTROYED1933 

16.TH. CENTURY 

1432 

1579 

1874 



ASCHAFFENBURG, SINCE 1300 



SCHWEINSHAUPTEN 

STEINACH a.d.SAALE 

SULZDORP a.d.LEDERH. 

UNSLEBEN 

UNTERMERZBACH 

WEIKERSHEIM 

WEIMARSCHMIEDEN- 

FLADUNGEN 

WENKHEIM 

WUERZBURG 



HASSBERGE BEGIN OF 17 TH CENTURY 
BAD KISSINGEN BEGIN OF 19. TH CENTURY 
RHOEN-GRABFELD 1833 

RHOEN-GRABFELD 1856 

HASSBERGE 1835 

BADEN-WUERTEMBERG 

RHOEN-GRABFELD BEGIN 19.TH CENTURY 

BADEN-WUERTEMBERG 
WUERZBURG 1881 



SOURCE LITERATURE : 

GABRIELE KOKOTT/ANITA SPERLE" JUEDISCHE FRIEDHOEFE 

IN UNTERFRANKEN" 1985 
HERBRT SCHULTHEIS: "JUDEN IN MAINFRANKEN 1933-1945" 1990 
ISRAEL SCHWIERTZ : "STEINERNE ZEUGNISSE JUEDISCHEN LEBENS IN BAYERN" 

1988 
EDITED B Y HEINZ JUERGEN HOPPE IN HIS BOOKLET ' 'DAS JUEDISCHE FULDA' ' 1 998 

TRANSLATED FROM TFIE ORIGINAL GERMAN INTO ENGLISH BY ALFRED GRUENSPECHT 

AUGUST 1999 



LAST LETTER FROM FULDA. 
SALOMON ANSBACHER MADE A PETITION ON AUGUST 26,1 942 WITH THE GERMAN RED 
CROSS " FOREIGN COUNTRY- SERVICE -RED CROSS"[SECTION] TO ARRANGE NEWS- 
EXCHANGE THE PETITION NUMBER 388599 [DATED AUG.26. 1942] AND CONTENTS THE 
FOLLOWING DETAIL: I.SENDER SALOMON ANSBACHER, FULDA, SCHILDECKSTRASSE 10 
[RELATIONSHIP] PARENTS, PLEADS TO CONVEY THE FOLLOWING MESSAGE TO 
2.RECIPIENT: BERNHARD HEIDINGSFELD,HAIFA,PALAESTINA,GEULA STRASSE 42 
CONFIRM OUR JUNE- LETTER. 
STILL EXPECTING NEWS-LETTER FROM YOU 
HOPE ALL IS WELL.WE ARE WELL,THANK G-D 
WE HA VE TO GO ON A TRIP,ADDRESS WILL FOLLOW 
BEST WISHES TO THE COMING NEW YEAR 
SINCERE GREETINGS, PARENTS, MAX. 

FULDA,UUGUST 2 1 . 1 942 SIGNED: 

SALOMON ANSBACHER. 

THE IMPRINT ON THE STAMP : SEPT. 9. 1942 
"WE HAVE TO GO ON A TRIP" MEANS THE NOTIFICATION OF THE COMING 
TRANSPORTATION TO A CONCENTRATION CAMP 

THE RESULTING DEPORTATION WAS ON THE SEPT.5.1942 OVER KASSEL TO 

THERESIENSTADT. 



HIS HIGH HONOR JOHANN PHILIPP / BY THE GRACE OF G-D 
BISHOP TO WÜRZBURG / AND DUKE OF FRANCONIA 



Greetings to all and to every official within our Würzburg monasteries and the nobilities 
of the Dukedom of Franconia, the Prefects, Governors, Magistrates, Mayors, Tax Collectors, 
Court and communities, also many others. To all our merciful greetings. 

We herewith add to inform you that we have graciously accepted the SALOMON JEWS 
including wife, children and his servants upon his submissive bidding, under our protection and 
shelter (as long as he and she will conduct themselves properly). We do, and proclaim it in this 
letter, a way to allow SALOMON with his entourage, to acquire a dwelling in our locality 
"Gossmannsdorf. " He is permitted to do his trading, upright, honest and sincerely. In exchange 



for all Privileges, he shall pay a protection fee of 



Gulden 



Batzen. Also, 



all other extraordinary Supplements, uniformly paid by other Jews under our protection. 

With this Protection Agreement he is not permitted to add (to his household) brother, 
sister or triends, since they are not specitled under the aforementioned "Protection" Accord. 
However, if the Jew has an old father, or an old mother with him, to feed and support, he or 
she have no income and no wealth, our "Protection" Accord will gracefully and understandingly 
permit to have his parents in his dwelling without extra payments — and we herewith give 
solemn Orders to our officials to inform our protected family SALOMON-JEWS, his wife, 
children and servants: Anywhere, whether on land, or water, to pass duty-free, secure and 
unconcerned. When purchasing or selling of goods, after payment of regulär taxes, custom 
duties, or the like, he may conduct his business unrestrained, unhindered and undisputed, with 



passage guaranteed. He should get assistance, if possible, in cases of rightful Claims to collect 
debts and should military activities bring officers and soldiers march in, or billet, he should not 
be burdened with extra charges, or fees. We trust our officials to implement this Accord. 

We have signed and sealed this Accord at our Castle "Marienburg" over Würzburg on 
February 9, 1699. 



Signed: Johann Philipp 



— Translated by Alfred Gruenspecht from the original 'old German' 



REFLECTIONS AND EXPLANATIONS 



DER SCHUTZJÜDE 



Jews who held letters of protection in the Holy Roman Empire, Jews were considered 
a special class of the population, protected and taxed by the Emperor. Later, the Emperors 
transferred their rights over the Jews to Territorial Princes who issued Letters of Protection for 
a regulär yearly fee, to the Jews living, or desiring to live, in their communities. The 
Schutzbhef included commercial Privileges, freedom. of movement and religious rights. 
Schutzjuden were common in Bavarian counties. My great graiidfather, Marum Heinemann, 
living in Fuchsstadt, near Würzburg, was a Schutzjude, His first child, Zerline, was my 
grandmother. 



- A.G. 







Ihifmi @<t ulj utU) ©^irm ( fo (ang er / llt1^ fic / fi c& rro^l t)f r{)fl(rcn ) 
grMWgflauffrunOanflnionitiKti^atxn-, 2D<ri6unDa^auc(?4nünDm<t 




i!id/fi9crÄ»ufri^^«nMun0ctiimDektt)frW fltbrauc^rtifan m1^ma8; 
©aj(nflrafnfoUt>crfrJ5€»ri^3y^rHc^t>orfrioe<^ufi9dDevy^./ r^ 

©ÜIOCO ?Ba$<tt fccjaf (ctt / UnD mhtrj W Extraordinari iOfffo^ 

8m/g(d(^ai)tmiOhfmie^«$t)mrmiD(fii 3uDctt nac() bflHarndfi 
fi9<r Prof^rnonn-flaftai/n//4)i tDfnJan: fdnt^ ju bffögrrm r;,,^ 

AfU/^ r.'jtA' 6cttJ0&naiDcn ^aufr^ ^dlba itift 

Dort/ficr ©dnr^n^ Mc ^urgcrüc^r fotroOl PcrfonaUfö ant)rrc Prxfta^ 
noncs(Nctrürrfl<c(K€<rKiuflrrmjn9au00niottiiticti)ttiU tragen t)df^ 
fcn / au(t wucr tH)rgce)a(t)ffro ectuft fdnai ^niDtr / e<6ttJf(itr / 
x^ii aiitwc ^(frcutUwi ( maffcti t^dbc unccr cnrf^mnn Sc^u^ 
nictltvgnfrn )o(;neOnfcrrflrulDi0(?c (Erraubnußauficfe minien foUr/ 
5 dtrc p aba tr3uD dorn afrr dc6trti fblc^m «Oar rrr/oDf r SWiurn: bfp p* 
im 55roDf /^a• oDn Wr t>or (i(^ it/c^r aüdn f dn ij)atiMurtg/ fön^m1 auc& 
gar !i<(Je£;,fci ajamögrii ^bcn / foJctni gaü^ foU Der ec^uft miß fon^ 
Drtbot^reti «naDni nM irrnfgcr ufffdWgc fciiir arme €ltrrti/al^ uflf 
onDrr frinSroD^erfiaö/Dt'^Cmgdtwcntircfn^n /unbDicfcmtiac^ 
crgcf^fC an t^ifrni ^-.X. ./.././^ 'i'' •'///'^>- •^jvirif aucfe an ant)rre CSn^ 
(irrt ^ambrr ^(rrmie Onftr gndb/glluijjt) (Emf«ic^cr^fd(&/lw^fie 
crmcttcn ^nfrni ©ctufJfwripanDtm ^^^^ ^-^«^^ „j - 3uDrn/ 
fdn^2Ddb/Ä<nl>cr/unD©<cn(t©ffitib/ affair^albfn ju ^Daffrr un^ 
ja 2aiiD JoKfrcp/ [it^cr witmnwamniaf/abionmiKvabrr im iVfluf'' 
f<tt unb Oetfauffdi ber ^a(Mr<n/ NOi^ Stb^'o^ unt)^n(f((6<utigbc^ 

l^i^ON f(tuU)(grifi 9oU£;/^ct)lag^ Accifs.unD «crgtdc^m / xo\t au(6 
fonfita ^rdbuQgfrinre|ektt'rrbe( un0^umirfc(Mffr/unMr^üiD<i:njnD 
imongcfcK^rcnpan-uiiDrcpanircn laf]rn /n^knlc^t trcn^gcrt^mr jufd« 
um liquididi^^cn rcc^fmdfj'fgrn 6ctu(t)rn uff crffagrn nac^^i^güc^ 
f de wr^ljfctt / unD brt) rrdgnmDcn 'Öurct^iügrti / (Einquarrk rungrn/ 
unO anDcrn fofc^cn militarif((^rn ^ufdUrn/ (amü'rr unb bU @dn(g< 
i?onbai ©olbatdiobtrOflflcicrcrnttJlcDcr Wröibfljrnh^ebffc^njr^ce 
tpaixn/ (cb(^ma(iW b((1maglf(t)c amb(e?'^illfFroi«^üfn foUcn/ 20^r 
IHrIa([fnCn^ ^)r([cn alfo iugrfd&cp/unD ö^bcu ^ ?Jrfunl>*On£( r(- 
fl(n()diib(g ünrcrf(t)r<cbca/fluc^ unfcrSccrcu3"riW'(?'fr*M' ju \x\u 
rfcngndbl0rtk(fo(^((a. ^ogcbrn un6 grfct^rbctl ouff ^nfattt 
©c&loß SnotUttbcra c6 gjörQburg bca ;;.r ^ fri^.^jj . 




/■• » 



DAHNE 



by Gerald Birrnann 



DIFFICULT UNDERTAKING 



Shalom = Peace = Complete Harmony 

I was told -- 

Complete harmony with myself - 

And- 

Love Thy Neighbor as Thyself 

Leads to Peace — 

To see my shadow and to love it 

Makes me complete 

Gives me inner peace — 

Diftlcult undertaking, as I see it 

But — it can be done - 



Page 56 of Haus Des Ewii^en Lc hens 



Schwieriges Unterfangen 

Shalom = Friede = Vollkommene Harmonie 

Sagt Man Mir 

Vollkommene Harmonie Mit Sich Seihst — 

Führen zum Frieden — 

Meinen Schatten 'zu Sehen und Zu Liehen 

Macht Mir Inneren Frieden — 

Gibt Mir Inneren Frieden — 

Schwieriges Unterfangen 

Wie ich Seile 

Aber - Es Geht 



"HOUSE OF ETERNAL LIFE" 
For the people of the Jewish Faith, the Cemetery is The House of Etemal Life, 
A Holy place — 
A worthy place — 

As an Evangelist Christian, bom during the war I experienced this, since I live here in the Rhön 
and I feel the power of these places. 

I want you to share my constemation and urge you to visit these places and feel their 
peace and power. 

With a continued search, you'll find, just as I did, that the Christian cemeteries give off 
peace, silence and beauty, with thoughtfulness and power, as well as the Jewish cemeteries. 

Eül the Jewish Cemeteries are remnants of an ancient religion and ancient leaming. 

Most of them are located near second-hand roads and old tradeways, near moats or 
strongly receding slopes. 

by Gerhild Birman-Dähne 




HAUS DES EWIGEN LEBENS 
We name the Cemetery 

Holy Place 

House of Eternal Life — 
We permit the stones to grow tilted 
Just place a stone, as a sign of our visit — 
We dig up earth 
To let rest brotherly 
One on top of the other 
We search prudently, 
The place for Eternal Rest 
Until the youngest of days 

It is a scene for strength 
Many graves of Rabbis 
Are a destination of pilgrimages 
To pray and to plead 
Like Aschenputtel 
In the Fairy Tale 
We selected carefully 

the tombstone 
— Over centuries it emits light 
We call the Cemetery 

A Holy Place 

"House of Eternal Life" 

Page 38 



By Gerhild Birman-Dähne 



Wailing for Eternity 

Timeless 
We are Standing now, 
Trees are bending us 
Trees grow over us 
Trees are shading us 
Ivy overgrows us, 
Next lo each other 
Like slrings of pearls 
We stand in our identity 
And into stone turned a waiting mass of people 
Waiting we are, for eternity - 



Haus Des Ewigen Lehens 

Warten Wir Ewigkeif: By Gerhild Dinmin-Dähne 



Zeitlos 

Wir Stehen Nun — Bäutne Drücken Uns Um 

Bäume Üherwmhsen uns — Büume Umschatten Uns 

Efeu Umwuchert Uns — Neheneinander 

Aufgereiht Wie Perlen 

Stehewir In Unserer Gleichheit 

Eine Stein Gewordene — Wartende Menschenmenge 

Warten Wir Der Ewigkeit - 



Page 40 



,/ 



> ^7 










M 



) 



NEW YORK , JULY 20000 
A SUMMARY OF JEWISH FAMILIES ,LIVING IN WUESTENSACHSEN IN 1933 
AS I REMEMBER THEM. IT WAS ONLY A SHORT TIME BEFORE 

THE NAZIS EXTINGUISHED FOREVER THE LIVING WORLD OF GERMAN AND 
EUROPEAN JEWISH LIFE AND TRIED TO WIPE OFF THEIR TRAGE THE NAZIS 
DID NOT GARE TO DESTROY THEIR HOUSES OF WORSHIP ,BURNING AND 
DEVASTATING THEIR LIVING QUARTERS AND MURDERING MEN WOMEN 
AND CHE.DREN.THIS ALSO MEANS A LOSS OF CENTURIES OF 
IRREPLACEABLE JEWISH CULTURE. ALL THAT IS LEFT IS THE 
COMMEMORATION OF THE STE.L LIVING ,ESCAPED DESCENDENTS 

BEING ONE OF THE STILL LIVING ,BORN IN 1 920 IN WUESTENSACHSEN I 
RECALL THE NAMES OF THE FAMILIES AND SINGLES HAVING LIVED 
THERE IN THE YEAR OF 1933 WHEN MY TWIN AND I WERE BAR=MITZVA 
AS JEWS , OUR GOAL IS TWO FOLD; "TO COUNT OUR DAYS AND TO 
MAKE EACH DA Y COUNT" 

"LIMNOT YAMENU KEN HODA , V'NAVIE L'VAV CHOCHMA" 
TEACH US TO COUNT OUR DAYS , TH/SiT WE MAY ATTAIN A HEART OF 
WISDOM" PSALM 80. 

MAX BUCHSBAUM 1 FORMER PARNESS .PRESIDENT OF THE JEWISH 
CONGREGATION.WIFE META.BOTH WERE DEPORTED AND EXTERMINATED 
THEIR TWO SONS .ALFRED AND WALTER ESCAPED & EMIGRATED TO USA ' 

MAX BUCHSBAUM II A COUSIN OF THE FORMER, BECAME THE 
PARNESS AND LEADER OF THE JEWISH COMMUNITY. HIS WIFE ROSA HIS 
DAUGHTER ILSE WITH HER HUSBAND DR. HERBERT LEVI WERE 
DEPORTED TO" THE EAST" MRS BUCHSBAUM WAS COMPELLED TO DO 
FORCED LABOR,SHE SURVIVED, THEIR SON FRED WHO STUDIED IN 
CZECHOSLOVAKIA WAS ABLE TO ESCAPE TO PALESTINE ILSE AND HER 
HUSBAND, DR. LEVI WERE IN A HOSPITAL BARRACK IN THE 
' 'BURGGRABEN -LAGER [CAMP] 1/ DANZIG. ' ' ON MAY 22 1 945 THE Y GAME 
LINDER BOxMBARDMCNT. ILSE AND HER HUSBANT) WERE KILLEDAND 
WERE BURIED IN A MASS-GRAVE THERE . LATER BOTH SURVIVORS FRED& 
HIS MOTHER GAME TO USA. FATHER MAX BUCHSBAUM 
HAD BEEN ASSIGNED TO THE TENT CAMP OF "TROEGLITZ AND DIED 
THERE IN NOV. 1944 AND WAS CREMATED IN GERA 

LEVY AND JEANETTE BUCHSBAUM, PARENTS OF MAX B II DIED IN 
WUESTENSACHSEN IN 1933. 

BRAUNSCHWEIGER BERNHARD, WIFE BERTEL , CHILDREN LOTHAR 
BEATRICE, EDITH AND MEINHARD. THE WHOLE FAMILY WAS ABLE TO ' 
EMIGRATE TO U.S.A. LRONG IN N. Y 

BRAUNSCHWEIGER, MOSES, BROTHER OF BERNHARD HIS WIFE SON 
BERTHOLD AND DAUGHTERS JENNY & RITA.THE CHILDREN MARRIED 
AND LIVED IN NEW YORK. THE PARENTS DIED IN WUESTENSACHSEN 

THERESE GAERTNER ,[HER HUSBAND WAS KILLED ON THE FRONT IN 
WORLD WAR I] DAUGHTERS GERDA, BELLA AND SON EMIL MOTHER 
GERDA& EMIL EMIGRATED TO SOUTH AFRICA , BELLA WENT TO LIVE 
WITH RELATIVES IN LUXEMBURG ,SHEWAS SUPPOSED TO FOLLOW LATER 



TO JOIN HER MOTHER, SISTER & BROTHER IN SOUTH AFRICA . BELLA WAS 
APPREHENDED BY THE NAZIS AND BELLA WAS STERILIZED . SHORTLY 
AFTER HER RECOVERY THE NAZIS DEPORTED HER TO AN EXTERMINATION 
CAMP. 

GRUENSPECHT DAVID ,WIFE LEONI , SONS ALFRED, ERIC,MARTIN & 
HANS , [MY PARENTS] WITH THEIR SIBLINGS EMIGRATED TO USA IN 1937. 

GRUENSPECHT HERMANN, WIFE ROESCHEN, SONS MANFRED & 
HELMUT EMIGRATED TO THE USA.THE FAMILY ESCAPED MIRACOUSLY, 
UNCLE HERMANN WAS INTERNED AFTER CRYSTAL-NIGHT IN KZ. 
BUCHENWALD,AND LATER RELEASED.HE WAS ABLE TO GET TO 
AMSTERDAM AND PROM THERE TO ENGLAND . HIS SON MANFRED 
ESCAPED TO ENGLAND WITH A "KINDER-TRANSPORT , BOTH REMAINED 
I N ENGLAND FOR SOME TIME 

MY AUNT ROESCHEN' S BROTHER MANFRED GRUENEWALD & OUR 
AMERICAN COUSINS HAD ISSUED AFFIDAVITS FOR THEM TO EMIGRATE TO 
USA. THE Y GAME TO NEW YORK. AUNT ROESCHEN AND HELMUT 
FOLLOWED LATER ,TRAVELLING BY TRAIN TO LISBON AND BY SHIP TO 
THE USA,ARRIVING IN H0BOKEN,N.J. IN APRIL 1941. AFTER SEVERAL 
YEARS OF SEPERATION ,MY UNCLE HERMANN'S FAMILY WAS 
REUNITED,LIVING HAPPILY AND CONTEND NEAR US.MY UNCLE WORKED 
IN OUR ESTABLISHED BUSINESS AND THE BOYS FOUND SUITABLE WORK. 
BUT THE HAPPINESS AND GOOD FORTUNE DID NOT LAST . UNCLE 
HERMANN WAS SEVERELY BEATEN BY THE NAZIS IN CONCENTRATION 
CAMP ,HE BECAME SICK ,WAS OPERATED AT MT. SINAI HOSPITAL ,AND 
DIED THERE. — AUNT ROESCHEN'S MOTHER, "TANTE MARIANNE 
GRUENEWALD" SURVIVED THE CONCENTRATION CAMP 
"THERESIENSTADT" ,CAME TO S WITZERLAND AND FROM THERE TO NEW 
YORK SHE LIVED YET 20 YEARS WITH HER DAUGHTER ROESCHEN AND 
GRANDCHILDREN.THREE OF HER SONS,WHO ESCAPED TO USA ADDED JOY 
1 IHE CONCLUDING YEARS OF HER BLESSED LONG LIFE. 

GRUENSPECHT ROSA, HER HUSBAND LOUIS DIED IN WUESTENSACHSEN 
,ROSA'S DAUGHTER META EMIGRATED TO USA IN THE THE LATE 
20™.MARRIED HER COUSIN SIMON REISS AND LET HER 
MOTHER,BROTHERS GUSTAV ,JULIUS, SISTER RITA &TONI WITH HER 
DAUGHTER INGE,EMIGRATE TO THE USA. 

GOLD SARAH ,AND SISTER JOHANNA WERE NOT MARRIED, TWO 
UNASSUMING, HUMBLE AND VERY MODEST LADIES IN THEIR 50™. WERE 
DEPORTED TO EXTERMINATION CAMPS . 

I REMEiVIBER THEM WELL, THEY EARNED THEIR LIVELIHOOD SELLING 
BAKED GOODS AND SEAFISH AND ATTENDING THE COMMUNITY 
"MIKVAH." 

THEOBALD GOLD ,HIS WIFE DAUGHTER HERTA AND ANNI . HERTA 
MARRIED A NICE YOUNG MAN FROM A LOWER FRANKONIAN VILLAGE BY 
NAME OF SEMMI STRAUSS,THE WEDDING TOOK PLACE IN THE GOLD'S 
APARTMENT MY REBBI AND TEACHER, IVAN GODSCHMIDT WAS THE 
"MESADER KEDUSHIN" I WAS THERE AND HAD THE PRIVILEGE TO HOLD 




A POLE OF THE" CHUPA". THE YOUNG COUPLE EMIGRATED TO THE 
USA.THEY LIVED IN THE BRONX ,HERTA GAVE BIRTH TO TWO SONS.LATER 
ON THEY MOVED TO WASHINGTON HEIGHTS. SEMMI WAS FOUND ONE 
DAY ON THE SHORE OF THE HUDSON RIVER ,NEAR THE GEORGE 
WASHINGTON BRIDGE. "PEOPLE RESPOND TO EXTREME CONDITIONES IN 
DIFFERENT WAYS .SOME ARE ABLE TO SHARE THEIR EXPERIENCES 
,OTHERS CAN NOT FIND THE NECESSARY PEACE OF MIND AND SEEK A 
WAY OUT. "THE TRAGEDY OF THE TIME"- HERTA DIED ABOUT 12 YEARS 
AGO.HER PARENTS AND SISTER WERE DEPORTED TO AN EXTERMINATION 
CAMP. 

GOLDSCHMIDT IVAN,OUR TEACHER IN ELEMENTAR Y SCHOOL IN ALL 
SUBJECTS INCLUDING HEBREW LANGUAGE AND RELIGIOUS TEACHINGS. 
BESIDES HE WAS EXPECTED TO PERFORM MANY ADDITIONAL DUTIES 
,SUCH AS SHOCHAT[RITUAL SLAUGHTERER] CANTOR,AND LECTURER. 
THIS GENIUS INTELECTUAL TAUCHT 8 CLASSES IN A ONE ROOM SCHOOL 
AND THE RESULTS WERE FANTASTIC . THE FEDERAL SCHOOL 
CHANCELLOR WAS FÜLL OF PRAISE OF THE FINE RESULTS OF THE 
STUDENTS. ALSO THE DISTRICT RABBI APPLAUDED AND COMPLIMENTED 
TEACHER AND STUDENTS FOR THEIR NOTEWORTHY ACCOMPLISHMENTS. 

BRUNGESSER, JOSEF,WIFE BERTHA THEY WERE DEPORTED TO REGA 
JOSEF WAS SHIPPED TO AN EXTERMINATION CAMP ,BERTPL\ TO DO 
FORCED LABOR. I REMEMBER THEM WELL. JOSEF WAS A GOOD- 
NATURED,GOOD -HUMORED ,JOLLY FELLOW ,A SALESMEN. HE TRAVELED 
FREQUENTLY STAYING AWAY FOR TWO WEEKS. WHEN HE GAME HOME , 
HE ALWAYS VISITED WITH US ,1 REMEMBER HIM SINGING : 
ACH JOSEF, LIEBER JOSEF , DU HAST SO WAS DAS MACHT MIR SPASS" 
"OH JOSEF, BELOVED JOSEF, YOU HA VE SOMETHING THAT GIVES ME JOY." 
THE COUPLE HAD NO CHILDREN . 

SCHLTLMAN HEDWIG,A WIDOW ,HER HUSBANDWAS KILLED IN 
WORLD WAR I , SHE RETURNED TO HER FATHER'S HOUSE , MORD'CHE 
IN WUESTENSACHSEN. BERTHA BRUNGESSER WAS HER SISTER,AND HUGO 
WEINBERGER WAS HER BROTHER. F ÄTHER MORD'CHE DIED IN WUESTENS. 
THE TWO SISTERS WERE KILLED B Y MACHINE-GUN FIRE IN THE 
WOODLANDS OF REGA, ONLY HUGO ESCAPED TO EMIGRATE TO CHILE S.A. 

DR. NEUWAHL,HIS WIFE AND SON. THE DOCTOR HAD A WELL KNOWN 
MEDICAL PRACTICE IN OUR SMALL TOWN. HE BUILT A BEAUTIFUL VILLA 
WITH AN ELABORATE GARDEN AND OFFICE.HE OWNED A LIMOUSINE AND 
HAD A CHAUFFEUR WHO DROVE HIM TO THR MANY SMAT J . VTI J , AGF.S 
SINGE MOST OF THEM HA VE NO STREET NAMES AND THE CHAUFFEUR 
WAS FAMILL\R WITH THE INHABITANTS AND THE COUNTRY ROADS. THIS 
DEVOTED DRIVER SAVED DR. NEUWAHL' S LIFE. THROUGH CHANNELS 
AND HIS CONTACTS IN THE NAZI PARTY AND ITS ORGANIZATION, HE 
HEARD THAT THE DOCTOR WAS TO BE ARRESTED ON A TRUMPT UP 
CHARGE . AT MIDNIGHT HE WOKE DR. NEUWAHL AND HIS FAMILY, AND 
DROVE THEM OVER THE GERMAN BORDER INTO HOLLAND . LATER ON 



THE DR. EMIGRATED TO ENGLAND.THE LOYAL DRIVER SAVED THEIR 
LIFES. 

IN OUR SMALL JEWISH COMMUNITY LIVED 8 FAMILIES WTH THE N. AME 
OF NORDHAUESER 

NORDHAUESER DIENCHEN , AS SHE WAS CALLED [PROBABLY DINA] 
LWAS A WIDOW ,SHE HAD THREE CHILDREN ARTHUR, WILLIE AND GERDA 
. DIENCHEN DIED IN WUESTENSACHSEN,GERDA MARRIED AND ESCAPED 
TO ISRAEL . THE TWO BOYS WERE NEVER HE ARD OF AG AIN. PROBABLY 
SUFFERED "THE FATE OF THE MILLIONS." 

NORDHAUSER,HERMANN, WIFE ERNA ,TWIN SONS GERT AND 
SIEGBERT ,DAUGHTER LIESEL AND SON HERBERT. 
THE WHOLE FAMILY WAS ABLE TO EMIGRATE TO THE USA INCLUDING 
ERNA'S FATHER ,THE WELL KNOWN "MOHEL BACHARACH FROM RHINA". 
HERMANN WAS A HARD WORKING MAN ,HE WAS EMPLO YED IN A BIG 
KOSHER BALOGNA FACTOR Y IN ALBANYN.Y. 
NORDHAUSER ARNO, WIFE PAULA,DAUGHTERS RUTH AND HELLA 

ARNO DIED IN WUESTENSACHSEN,WIFE PAULA AND HER DAUGHTERS 
WERE ABLE TO EMIGRATE TO USA. 

NORDHAUSER LEO,I WITH WIFE AND SON EMIGRATED TO USA. 

NORDHAUSER LEIME AND WIFE, PARENTS OF HERMANN DIED IN 
WUESTENSACHSEN. 

NORDHAUSER LEO II I REMEMBER HIM WELL. HE WAS THE ONLY 
KOHEN IN THE CONGREGATION. LEO HAD AN OPEN OPEL AUTOMOBILE, 
HE BOUGHT AND SOLD HIDES AND SKINS. 

NORDHAUSER NATHAN, WIFE SELMA, DAUGHTERS BEATE, 
HANELORE,AND ROSI. NATHAN HAD A SISTER LIVING IN HOLLAND . HE 
WAS ABLE TO FIND EMPLO YMENT, THERE BUT LATER HE WAS 
APPREHENDED B Y THE NAZIS, HE AND HIS WIFE AND DAUGHTERS BEATE 
AND HANELORE WERE DEPORTED TO EXTERMINATION CAMPS ,ONLY 
DAUGHTER ROSI ESCAPED WITH A "KINDERTRANSPORT TO ENGLAND 

NORDHAUSER JONAS AND HIS WIFE. JONAS WAS KILLED IN A K.Z 
HIS ASHES WERE SOLD TO HIS WIFE, SHE BURIED THEM IN A JEWISH 
CEMETERY, SHE WAS DEPORTED TO THE"EAST " AND EXTERMINATED. 
NUSSBAUM KLARA, LIVED WITH HER DAUGHTER ROSA GRUENSPECHT IN 
SEPARATE SECTION OF THE HOUSE. SHE REACHED AN OLD AGE AND DIED 
IN WUESTENSACHSEN. 

JAKOB WEINBERG ,WIFE LINA AND SON JUSTIN. 
THE FAMILY WAS DEPORTED TO REGA AND KILLED B Y MACHINE GUN 
FIRE IN THE WOODLANDS OF REGA B Y NAZI SS TROOPS. 

WEINBERGER,LIPMANN,WIFE BABETTE.LIPMANN HAD ELEVEN 
CHILDREN.fflS FIRST WIFE GAVE BIRTH TO MAX, SALLY ,WHO WAS KILLED 
ON THE FRONT IN WORLD WAR I, MILLIE AND CLARA. OF THESE CHILDREN 
I REMEMBER MILLIE BEST, SHE GAME TO AMERICA IN THE MID 
TWENTIETH , MARRIED A FINE YOUNG MAN AND THE HAPPY COUPLE 
OWNED AND OPERATED A MAN'S CLOTHING STORE ON BROADWAY AND 
147.TH STREET IN MANHATTAN. MILLIE WAS AN EFFICIENT AND CAPABLE 



SALES -PERSON, WITH A PLEASANT SMILE AND A CONVINCING ATTITÜDE. 
MY FATHER ALWAYS TOLD ME ABOUT MAX. THEY WERE BEST 
FRIENDS,SCHOOL COMRADES,SERVING TOGETHER DURING ACTIVE 
MILITARY TIME BEFORE WORLD WAR I AND DURING WORLD WAR L. 
MAXWAS AWARDED TFIE IRON GROSS MEDAL FIRST CLASS. HE MARRIED 
AND MOVED TO THE NEIGHBORING SMALL TOWN OF GERSFELD. WHEN 
THE NAZIS CONVISCATED HIS LICENSE TO DO BUSINESS HE MOVED TO 
BERLIN . HE AND HIS FAMILY WERE DEPORTED TO "THE EAST "AND 
NEVER HEARD OF AGAIN. 

LIPMANN'S WIFE DIED AND HE MARRIED HER SISTER BABETTE,SHE GAVE 
BIRTH TO 

SIEGFRIED,ALMA ERNA,MILTON,EMMA,HERMANN AND HILDE. 
SIEGFRIED WAS A SUCCESSFUL BUSINESSMAN AND HAD A BEAUTIFUL 
FAMILY HE WAS ALSO A DECORATED SOLDIER IN W. W.I,THEY WERE 
"RESETTLED TO REGA". SIEGFRIED WAS SHOT BY THE SS HIS WIFE AND 
CHILDREN WERE DEPORTED TO AUSCHWITZ. 

ALMA, ERNA, MILTON,HERMANN AND HILDE TOGETHER WITH FATHER 
LIPMANN AND MOTHER BABETTE EMIGRATED TO THE USA . 

WEINBERGER MOSES AND WIFE ROSA, DAUGHTERS EMMA,IDA 
AND SON PAUL. EMMA EMIGRATED TO THE USA WITH HER COUSIN 
MILLIE, IDA MARRIED AND LIVED IN MUNICH 

PAUL EMIGRATED TO TH USA ,HE ENTERED THE REAL ESTATE MARKET , 
BECAME VERY WEALTHY AND LEFT MOST OF HIS FORTUNE TO "THE 
UNITED JEWISH APPEAL". MAY HIS MEMORY BE FOR A BLESSING" 
MOSES AND ROSA DIED IN WUESTENSACHSEN. 

SCHNEEBERGER , MARCUS HIS WIFE ,CHILDREN:: ELSE ,HELWINE PAULA 
AND LUCY, SONS MANFRED AND ERWIN. 

MARCUS AND HIS WIFE DIED IN WUESTENSACHSEN. ELSE MANAGED THE 
FAMILY BUSINESS,GROCERIES AND DRY GOODS. SHE WAS VERY 
EFFICIENT ,COMPETENT AND A PRODUCTIVE.BUSINESSWOMAN. THEIR 
LIVING QUARTERS WERE IN THE SAME BUILDING .SHE EVEN COOKED THE 
WEEKLY "RAISIN WINE" 

FOR "KIDUSH"USED IN THE SYNAGOGUE. I VIVIDLY REMEMBER MY TWIN 
BROTHER ERICH O.H. AND I PICKED UP THE FÜLL BOTTLE ON FRIDAY 
AFTERN0ON,F0R THAT GOOD DEED WE COULD EAT THE COOKED 
RAISONS, WHICH WAS AN ENVIED TREAT.MARCUS SCHNEEBERBER WAS 
THE PERSON THAT WAS BLOWING THE "SHOFAR"ON ROSH HASHANA.IN 
THE BUSINESS HE HAD THE RESPONSIBILITY TO ROAST THE GREEN 

i^Ul^l^li±i-öl:lAIN5, UlNti CUULU :iJVmi.l. IhLtl l^lJNtl Akuma IN lüü WHULE 

LOWER SECTION OF THE VILLAGE. 

ERWIN AND SISTER LUCY WERE ABLE TO EMIGRATE TO THE USA, THE 

OTHER SEBLINGS I HAVE NEVER HEARD OF AGAIN . 

MOSES FROM POLAND,WAS A LITTLE MAN ,LIVING ON THE PREMESIS 
OF THE NORDHAUSER BROTHERS NATHAN AND JONAS.I DO NOT KNOW 
,WETHER HE HAD ONE OR TWO ROOMS, BUT I KNOW HE COOKED FOR 
HIMSELF AND EKED OUT A LIVELIHOOD BUYING AND SELLING RABBIT- 



SKINS. HE ALSO HELPED THE CATTLE DEALERS, WHICH WAS THE 
PRIMARY OCCUPATION OF MOST MALE MEMBERS OF THE JEWISH 
COMMUNITY IN OUR AREA TO MOVE THE ANIMALS FROM ONE PLACE TG 
ANOTHER, CR TO THE RAILWAY STATION FOR SHIPMENT TO TOWNS WERE 
MARKETIG OF ANIMALS TOOK PLACE.HE 

ALWAYS GAME NEATLY DRESSED TO SYNAGOGUE .SITTING IN THE LAST 
ROW AND LIVED A VERY QUIET UNASSUMING LIFE, ASKING LITTLE AND 
ALWAYS MINDING HIS OWN BUSINESS. ONE DAY HE WAS ORDERED TO 
COME TO THE POLICE OFFICE .HE DISAPPEARED AND WAS NEVER SEEN 
AGAIN. 

THESE FEW PAGES WILL GIVE THE READER A GLANCE 
AT A WORLD THAT WAS. SEVEN DECATES HAVE PASSED AND MUCH KATE 
AND SUFFERING HAD TO BE ENDURED BY EVERYONE TIL\T IS STILL ABLE 
TO RECALL THOSE TIMES AND YEARS.THERE ARE STILL A LOT OF 

QUESTIONS AND EVEN MORE NO ANSWERS. 

INSTE AD OF STOPPING "INSANITY" 
THE CIVILIZED NATIONS BECAME" INSANE AND INSENSITIVE 
THEMSELVES" 

IT IS MY RESERVOIR OF MEMORIES OF SHARED EXPERIENCES 
THAT URGE ME TO PUT IT DOWN ON BLACK AND WHITE. I LOVED EVERY 
MEMBER OF THE JEWISH COMMUNITY IN WUESTENSACHSEN ,ALL FINE 
PLEASANT AND DIGNIFED PEOPLE ,CARING AND RESPECTING EACH 
OTHER.THIS SMALL COMMUNITY MUST HAVE EXISTED OVER 300 YEARS 
MY OWN FAMILY TRACES BACK MORE THAN 250 YEARS IN THE VILLAGE 
NOW WE PRAY FOR ISRAEL'S UNITY AND IT'S PROPER PLACE IN THE 
WORLD . MAY G-D BLESS THE REMNANT OF HIS PEOPLE WITH HIS 
ABUNDANCE OF BLESSINGS. 

ALFRED GRUENSPECHT , AUGUST 2000 
THE NAMES OF THE JEWISH HEADS OF FAMILIES IN WUESTENSACHSEN 

COU'NTY OF FULDA, GERMANY. 



BUCHSBAUM, LEVI 
BUCHSBAUM, MAX I 



BRAUNSCHWEIGER, MOSES 
L^U'lxrSCHWEIGER, BERNTiARD 



r>T> 
j->r 



BRUNGESSER, JOSEF 
GAERTNER, THERESE 
GOLD, JOHANNA&SARAH 
GOLD , THEOBALD 
GOLDSCHMIDT, IVAN 
GRUENSPECHT, DAVID 



DR. NEUWAHL 
NORDHAUSER,ARNO 
NORDHAUSER, 
NORDHAUSER, LEO, I 
NORDHAUSER ,LEO II 
NORDHAUSER, HERMANN 
NODHAUSER, NATHAN 
NORDHAUSER, JONAS 
SCHUXMANlsi,HEDWlG 
STRAUSS ,SEMMI 

SCHNEEBERGER,MARKUS 
WEINBERG, JAKOB 
WEINBERGER HUGO 
WEINBERGER ,LIEBMAN 
WEINBERGER, MOSES 
WEINBERGER SIEGFRIED 



GRUENSPECHT, HERMANN 
GRUENSPECHT, LOUIS 
MOSES, FROM POLAND 
NUSSBAUM ,CLARA 



THERESIENSTADT 



- by Gerhild Birmann-Dähne 



Höre geschickten über diese Stadt - 

Sehe vor mir 

Bilder des "Edel - KZ's" - 

Das Leben 

Die Heimlichkeiten 

Um Einen Gepßanzten Baum - 

Das Falsche Getue 

Wenn Kontrolle Vom Roten Kreuz - 

Ein Antrag Auf Menschliche Behandlung 

Von Einer Blonden Blau äugigen KZ-Ärztin 

Abgelehnt - 

Dem Brüllen und schlagen 

Und Sonstiger Machtdemonstation 

Hilflos aus gesetzt - 

Nur Still Halten 

- Vielleicht - 

Konnte das leben retten - 

Dennoch - Hunderte Tausende Millionen - 

Wurden vergast verscharrt verbrannt - 

Ihre asch fillt nicht mal einen Kubic meter. 



THERESIENSTADT 



Listen over stories of this city 

See in front of me 

Pictures of the magnanimous KZ's 

The life - 

The secrets 

Around a planted tree - 

The falsified fuss 

When control of the Red Gross (came) - 

A Petition for humane treatment 

From a blond, blue eyed KZ-Lady doctor 

Rejected - 

The shouting and beating 

And for other demonstrations of power 

Helplessly exposed - 

Only keep still 

- Maybe - 

Can it save life - 

Nonetheless - 

Hundreds, Thousands, Millions 
Were gassed buried cremated 
Their ashes do not even fill one cubic meter. 



Translated by A. Gruenspecht 



BUBE 



- by Gerhilä Birmann-Dühne 



Jeanette Meyer Geh, Löwenstein 
Elmvüntig Ergraut - 
Bist in Theresienstadt 
Einer Sannnelstadt für alte 
Erbarmungswürdig 
Verended- 

Hast due dir dein alter 

So enden vorgestellt? 

Du in deinem alter 

Noch voller lebensnwt 

Voller plane für deinen lebensahend 

Witwe, kiiuler aus dem haus - 

Doch - was brachte dir die band des nachbarn 

Ei/um schleichetiden schrecklichen tod - 

Ein quälen nur weil Jüdin 

Betroffen steh ich 

Vor deinem grab 

Mit seinen erschreckenden daten - 

Ich habe mitled mit dir 

Und - bitte um Verzeihung 

Für das was meiiw väter taten -- 

BUBE 



Jeanette Meyer, nee Löwenstein 

Venerably grayed 

You're in Theresienstadt 

A gathering city for the old 

Mercilessly to perish - 

Did you picture your old age 

To end that way? - 

You in your advanced years 

Still füll of life 

Füll of plans for your retirement 

Widow, children out of the house - 

Yet, what did your neighbor's hand bring you? 

A 1 ingering, dreadful death - 

Stuffed out iike an animal 

Tortured only because a Jewess - 

Saddened, I am standing 

In front of your grave 

With its frightful dates 

I feel pity for you 

And beg for forgiveness 

For that, the deeds of my fathers — 



Trans lated by A, Gruenspecht 





'^'/^^'^^^ 






■"N, 




^; 



"■^^5^^' ^^ 



»^^^»^■»»■« ^ «VO 4 







Jüdischer Religionsunterricht: Stundenplan für das Schuljahr 1889/90. 

(Quelle' LAO ^^^^^^ Alrt^ m^ Uf^^/;t;o^U^ n^/:^: t , ^ r, ' , 

^.^cffc. i^.-iv^ ^^.^^^ .a..»w „^».^ -o/wu»***oc/«c Ä\cii^iLf/tööLftute uojjmannsctorj 1861'* 




synagogue for the agreed sum of 1 , 100 Rheinish Gulden and one Caroline (dollar) Thaler. The 
contract was signed and sealed on October 17, 1764 in the office of the Mayor of 
Gossmannsdorf. According to the protocol taken at this occasion, the two master-builders 
obligated themselves to complete the construction of the shul by mid June 1765. In case of 
culpable delay in the construction-work past the agreed time, the Jewish contract partner would 
have the right to hold back 50 Reichsthaler as a conventional punishment fine. Thanks to this 
favorable arrangement, as well as solid planning, the master-builders with their crafts and 



tradesmen, finished the synagogue building at the agreed upon time. On the 17th of August 



1765 the Community dedicated theShul in Gossmannsdorf. 




'tm^ij-^»""^' 




Die Photoaufnahme zeigt die 1765 
erbaute Synagoge mit dazugehöriger 
Lehrerwohnung. Repro mit freundlicher 
Genehmigung von Herrn Erich Weiß 
(Goßmannsdorf). 



24 



Den Herren Oekonomen zur Nachricht, 

toir toicbcr mit cittcm ßtöftcrcn Xranöpprt 

äil)t liclgifdjci jFu^lett 

l^eute angelommcn ftnb unb fielen sunt S^erfaufe bei 




Reklameanzeige — entnommen aus: Bezirksamtsblatt für die Landgerichte Ochsenfurt 
und Aub 8. Oktober 1892 



Handel mit ordentlicher Buchführung 
1 Haushaltsvorslaiid verdiente sich seinei 
Lebensunterhalt als israelitischer Religions 
lehrer, Vorsänger und Schächter; der zuletz 
noch Verbleibend»^ betrieb ein nicht nähe 
bezeichnetes Gewerbe'". Differenzierten 
Angaben liefert ein Gewerbeverzeichnis de 
Gemeinde Goßrmnnsdorf aus dem Jahr 
1852, das bei den indischen Haushaltsvor 
ständen folgende Herufe aufführt: Kauf 
mann (2x), Seifensieder (2x), Schacher 
Händler (2x), Weber (2x), Cichoriefabri 
kant, Getreidehäiidler, Kammacher, Krä 
mer, Metzger, Säckier und Weinhändler"" 



ADVERTISEMENT — copied from the Countv Official Bulletin for the Countv 



Courts of Ochsenfurt and Aub 




»•s • »-• • • -♦ '- 








■ Jt".! 1\ 




.u.iz-j^... vv._..^ Kx^-: 



•'i^ii^.^.:V%Ai.w-;i: 



;au§ gutcir^:©toffcn.Ttnb~ m ttcncficr 'gagön unb* groBer *2ruärod^r cmgrd:offcn."P ^"•" * 
i^-.§| ferner' empfd^Ic mein reid^^aftigeS 2Qger??tg^i"i5it - P- ^= - • ■■^- -''*• •" - 





oon ben,Btgigften Bt§ ju jBen'l^od^fcinften Cualttäten'.'^^f^ 



• . •• I ' • .^imt: v_7_._~ V- '.i9<A 











Lodenstoffe^ 




--;^^- 



;cnnQrBig,;fomic gemufterl, iu bittioften ^^^^^ _. ._ . . . . .. , 

Ready Made Winter Coats, Rain Coats & Jackets made from Good Material, in 
the Newest Fashion and Large Selection. Furthermore, I recommend my 
abundant stock in material, buckskin, yarn goods, overcoat material made from 
the best Eskimo in piain, striped, plaid, in modern colors, Loden Material. Solid 
Colors, Patterned in the Best Quality, Reasonably Priced. 

(Taken from the Official Bulletin of the County Courts Gossmanndorf, J. Saalheimer 
Advertisment Announcement, Ochsenfurt and Aub, November 1, 1890. 




^ Notice to Gentlemen Farmers: "Another large transport of Belgian, pure young horses 
arrived today and are ready to be sold: Firnbacher & Adler, Gossmannsdorf. 



21 



STATISTICS OF THE GOSSMANNSDORF 

696 Inhabitants Community, District Authority Ochsenfurt 

120 Citizens; 178 Taxpaying Inhabitants 



\^^rensortiment zu günstigen Preisen Kun- 
den zu gewinnen"\ Einige kluge jüdische 
Geschäftsleute nutzten das Medium der 
Presse und warben mit Hilfe von Reklame- 
anzeigen für sich und ihre Güter'". Deren 
Risikobereitschaft und Einfallsreichtum 
wurde schließHch auch durch den wirt- 
schaftlichen Erfolg bestätigt. So gehörte 
z. B. Isaak Saalheimer, Besitzer eines Stoff- 
warengeschäftes, nach Angaben der Goß- 
mannsdorfer Gemeindestatistiken 1882, 
1891 und 1899 jeweils zu den 5 Gewerbetrei- 
benden, die die höchsten Steuerabgaben zu 
leisten hatten"^ Gerade 1891 war offen- 
sichtlich für einige jüdische Geschäftsleute 
ein erfolgreiches Jahr, denn die entspre- 
chende Liste der Höchstbesteuerten weist 
neben Isaak Saalheimer mit Abraham und 
Salomon Firnbacher sowie Faust Weikers- 
heimer, alle Viehhändler, 3 weitere Juden 
auf". 




StitiHik irr i^mmh 




ftt^irtm 



Oiiiiunr IHitI 




iriirksfltntü 

'3 li r j e r. .-j^/. ft t u f r p r ( i d> li 9 e (i i \^v ü 11 f r 




n. Nüd) N'm rrtfcniiufl-MiKifmf n Slanbe Dom i(t)lui»i Dp* 0^1)»^ l>!tl Mta^fn fin'Aluill.i txr ärarialif(^cn Stfiifriaf f 



ii 6« (ScnicintK 6if 0« brr^i'lr urrii : 

\) @ruiiti't(U(rn 

;.') 31r(albau3it(urrn 

■ '>') i'i'tetl>bau«flfUfrn 

■l) (Slttwrb^fteu/tii 

''>) Aapitalrenirnilruern 

•>l (I'infonimenfirurrn 

T) in Summa . . . 

Hon öififn «laal^flifurrn 

2) b . ^a£^ 





















iimraaj (ei - fnir 



j^ ye^X/f/. . ......... ^j/ yjr 






/^^^cic^'e^ 4-i.''<**lt''»^ 

in Summa . . .^^^. 7^" 

Die (»rime , flrMt iitib «iftbbaiieflfii.Tu oon bm im («nn.'iiiftebnirfe eiroa bcfinbli(<),-n I) X^S. 5d)(oiT^rnniiti mürlfn 
:?) (M.'baiibeii imb («ruiiMlnrf^ii nie 5iniie D« .'(r:. U ,^ift". 2 ber (flemeiiibforbnunj, uiib ;W ron b«n i"lanOf»b*rrli(fcfn «e' 
■iiainqfii, ii'üraiir bi« jum ,>. 1s(m; Ke ;HHi4i!rtanbi(taft baHete, bfiraqen 

in 5iimmii JCr JC f7 j, 

m. -Äiif ttt (««■mfinbi-marfiiiiq baitft b.rnialeii ein «übfnii)i«an bi( Staal^f.ifff oon jaferlid) //'S/ .H. '/^ ^ 

,in bif flblülunqsfaile J^y^« .«/^ A an Mt rlifiuiifl — _ ^ ji, diT Mf . 

'*ul*berrid?ait -^ '^ .4L < X 



ti 

bfrra 
ü 11 1 t > n q < ^Mi II r I i( II » i'ii II r I 

( 1t# »»"tifi«.-f»ftfinbjm*liwaf '#-;.fi r tt ri# fcl.W" 'ILiIw-, ,llir* 
• r ,l.!t»fi', CA ri' Jflfailttfifmnnrrljjl» ^f^ *:itl*fllfii 1Ii^lr, i.ntfii 
If v^f tl'MNfi tritrii. twf^ ffit f(>rrh' r nrr 'MtmnNN ti.ii tinrr .iii> 

:fTnt Ut.inriii»f vVr Oiii^jtr vfimirrl? wir .u^ tJnwiiiBlidtrn tfiirfl. 
Hranktllm writfn ) 




-') 


«. 1 J1,U 
II.:« «ilg. 


IWti :i > 
1' •■: PJ!<(r. 


.'Wi4ii (»ro 


3 


l ^ 







"b öfr ÄV.t 11 »pllftinbiii runituiniB bmnicn 

([■. I mit «viriiiiM'.iu, 1',-iilfiiiiriiicB, ifii(ii,u.il.fii \m; 
^.Wlff^ tiiie rtifl.i.K ofiuhfii) ^^(tbl mir rhrtliprift 

tuiMl.lfllllil tlo,),Mflll III ' cOir Cl .|l(i* fllKIll MilHIl 

flBuvK mir in fm, i ii b( i f i f ittn .;al' i t- .ibn hnifbi 

\K* 6) i|l iiunihn. 0» l«riii»oa. rriilinkiM, iHrot« .Mr ^ai 



c. öon 



j7 "^in../^^ 



3 - 



^-^j/—f-y^ 



r^ 




4) 
;' r f i I f 



r.]|n 






Wfin 



j-iu: 



^ 




mil P J 11. 
IM f 11 u<el(brr 

Ml -ILif.i 

ICKfl ' 



5* 



V^ 



'■>) Ob unb au« iwl(^m «runb» hcm cinn ober aiib*r<n (flfmfinbeiPfqe pinf bijlrifiiuf, b. i. bie crilicbf n Ontmiifn 
ubcrragtnbf 6«bfulun!) iutcmmtV 

" ^ '^^^"^^ — ' ^^ — "^ — -~^ -^ — d^^^ii^.^-^ 





A. 



3»l- Slflbl*« (huMradmi (,<flh Olli Orirjburi«. 



Finanzstatistik von 1891 — entnommen aus: StAO Abteilung Goßmannsdorf Nr. 1312. 



^3 



26 



3.4. Statistisches und Exemplarisches zum 
jüdischen Gemeindeleben 

Vor der Säkularisation hatten die Quellen 
nur gelegentlich Angaben zur Größe der 
Goßmannsdorfer Judengemeinde überlie- 
fert'", aus denen sich kaum Rückschlüsse 
auf deren genauere Zusammensetzung und 
Entwicklung (Zu- und Abgänge) ziehen lie- 
ßen. Diese unbefriedigende Situation sollte 
sich jedoch spürbar ändern, als seit dem 
Beginn des 19. Jahrhunderts sowohl die 
großherzoglich-würzburgische wie auch 
später die königlich-bayerische Regierung 
die regelmäßige Durchführung von Volks- 
zählungen und anderen statistischen Erhe- 
bungen veranlaßten. 

So erstellte im Jahre 1811 der Goß- 
mannsdorfer Pfarrer Wilhelm Keil auf Be- 
fehl der großherzoglichen Regierung eine 
erste genauere Übersicht zu den Verhältnis- 
sen der im Ort wohnenden Juden. Danach 
umfaßte die jüdische Gemeinde des Dorfes, 
wie vorgeschrieben, 18 Familien mit 76 Mit- 
gliedern, von denen 38 männlichen und 38 
weiblichen Geschlechts waren"''. Als im 
Jahre 1814 die Regierungsgewalt über 
Mainfranken dem Königreich Bayern zu- 
fiel, ordnete die neue Obrigkeit sogleich die 
Durchführung einer Volkszählung an; nach 
deren Ergebnis wies der Ort 68 jüdische Be- 
wohner auf. Bis 1861 stieg ihre Zahl noch- 
mals auf 75 Personen an, um bis 1880 auf 
62 abzusinken. Der sich hier bereits andeu- 
tende negative Trend wurde durch die stati- 
stische Erhebung des Jahres 1900 bestätigt, 
wonach die jüdische Gemeinde Goßmanns- 
dorf nur noch 46 Mitglieder zählte'^. 

Für die relativ geringfügigen Schwan- 
kungen hinsichtlich der Zahl der jüdischen 
Dorfbewohner, die bis zur Jahrhundcnmit- 
te auftraten, waren die auswärtige Verheira- 
tung jüdischer Töchter sowie die Abwande- 
rung einzelner männlicher Personen nach 
Übersee verantwortlich'". Diese Defizite 
konnten jedoch durch hohe Geburtcnra- 



iti 



ten und Ansässigmachungen immer wie- 
der aufgefangen werden, so daß sich die 
Stärke der jüdischen Gemeinde längere Zeit 
auf einem Niveau von 60 bis 70 Mitgliedern 
hielt. Gegen Ende des 19. Jahrhunderts 
nahm dann allerdings die Mitgliederzahl 
durch den Wegzug vieler junger Juden'^^ 
die sich, wohl meist von wirtschaftlichen 
Erwägungen geleitet, entweder in benach- 
barten Städten (v. a. Würzburg) niederlie- 
ßen oder in Großstädten (z. B. Frankfurt) 
das Heimatrecht erwarben'*^, mehr und 
mehr ab. 



Die jüdischen Kinder, die in der \e: 
genheit weitgehend von den Bildungs 
tutionen ausgeschlossen waren "^', ke- 
im Laufe des 19. Jahrhunderts endli. 
den Genuß einer geregelten schulis 
Ausbildung'^**. Im Rahmen ihrer Int 
tion in das staatliche Schulsystem wa 
ben dem Besuch der Elementarschule 
die Möglichkeit der Absolvierung hö 
Studien vorgesehen, was deren Aussic 
auf den Erwerb einer gehobenen be: 
chen Stellung wesentlich vergrößerte. 
ben der allgemeinen Ausbildung sucht. 











Wl;^ 



^<^^?/»/y^;r <*r,<Z^^^^ y^^^^^^ 





Jüdischer Religionsunterricht: Stundenplan für das Schuljahr 1889/90. 

Quelle: LAO 85/333 Akte „Die Israelitische Religionsschule Goßmannsdorf 1861". 



In 1890, Sigmund Pollak was engaged as teacher and cantor in the synagogue. The 
teaching program included the following: Reading, writing, translating of prayers in Hebrew 
and German, study of the Five Books of the Pentateuch, Biblical and Jewish history, customs 
and morals, study of Psalms and grammar. 



25 



Below: 



A clipping of a section of the Gossmannsdorf Advise Book calling 



for the Boycott of Jewish Trades. 



30 Mit dieser Boykottmaßnahme lag die 

örtliche Gemeindeverwaltung ganz auf der 
Linie anderer von den Nationalsozialisten 
gesteuerter Behörden. Die beiden verbliebe- 
nen jüdischen Haushalte gerieten dadurch 
unter starken finanziellen Druck"*', der 
von einer zunehmenden gesellschaftlichen 
Isolation begleitet wurde'". Dies führte 
dazu, daß vor allem bei den jüngeren Juden 
der Entschluß reifte, ihre Heimat zu verlas- 
sen und ins Ausland auszuwandern "^ Ja- 
kob Mayer, der letzte Kultusvorstand, löste 
daraufhin im Jahre 1938 die israeütische 
Kultusgemeinde offiziell auf und übergab 
den Großteil des Synagogeninventars an 
den Verband Bayerischer Israelitischer Ge- 
meinden in München"\ Diese Vorkehrun- 
gen wurden gerade noch rechtzeitig abge- 
schlossen, bevor die jüdische Gemeinde ih- 
re vorerst schwerste Prüfung erlebte. Denn 
im Zuge judenfeindlicher Ausschreitungen 
im ganzen Reichsgebiet"^ kam am 10. No- 
vember 1938 ein motorisierter Trupp von 
SA- und SS- Leuten aus Ochsenfurt nach 
Goßmannsdorf, brach die Häuser der Ju- 
den auf und verwüstete die Inneneinrich- 
tungen. Von deren blinder Zerstörungswut 
wurde auch die Synagoge betroffen: sie 
ging jedoch glücklicherweise nicht in Flam- 
men auf. Die Täter nahmen die beiden jüdi- 
schen Haushalts vorstände"' nach Ochsen- 
furt mit und steckten sie in das dortige 
Gefängnis"^. Nach diesem brutalen Ein- 
schüchterungsakt sahen sich die wenigen 
Goßmannsdorfer Juden weiteren schweren 
Diffamierungen"^ und Diskriminierun- 

198 

gen ausgesetzt. 



zu 1 ) ' Dt c Gemeinde Satzung wird nach der kin,3eK. Dom 

14,11.1932 -GYBl. 1932 o. 427 - und vom 18.4.1935 - 
GVBl, 1935 S. 411 - veröffentlicnen Mustersatzung 
erlassen. Siehe Beilage 1, 

Die ortspolizeiliche Vorschrift zur Sicherung 
der Gemeindebiersteuer wird nach dem mit min.deH, 
vom 18,4,1935 - GVBl. 1935 S. 411 -Ziffer II A b 
abgedruckten Muster erlassen. 
Siehe Beilage 2. 

Die Ausführung sbe Stimmungen zur Gemeindebier= 
Steuersatzung werden ebenfalls nach vorgeschriebenem 
Muster des Bezirksamts Ochsenfurt erlassen. 
Siehe Beilage 3. 

zu 2) Von den vom Amtsarzt als Fleischbeschauer für 

tauglich befundenen Bewerbern wird der Landwirt Emil 
Kesselring dem Bezirksamt zur Teilnahme an dem in 
absehbarer Zeit beginnenden Fleisch- u. Trichinen= 
schauerKurs gemeldet. 

- - - . ^ 

zu 3) Gewerbetreibende und Handwerker erhalten künftig 

von der Gemeinde keinerlei Aufträge mehr, wenn sie 
nicht der NSV, Deutschen Arbeitsfront und dem Förderer= 
verband der Arbeitsdienstlager als Mitglieder angehören. 
Auch solche, die nachweislich rnit jüdischen Firmen 
im Geschäftsverkehr stehen, sind bei Auf trags Vergebungen 
ausgeschlossen, 

Empfänger von Unterstützungen aller Art aus öffent= 
liehen Mitteln, die nachweisbar jüdische Geschäfte 
oder einen jüdischen Rechtsanwalt, Arzt oder Zahnarzt 
aufsuchen, ist die Unterstützung zu entziehen. 

XU 5) Dem Gemeindeschreiber und dem Gemeindediener wird 

auch im Jahre 1935 eine Weihnachtsbeihilfe von je 25 RM 
aus der Gemeindekasse als freiwiUige Leistung ge== 



zu 4) 



Boykottauf ruf de'^ Goßmannsdorfer Gemeln^e\ «rv- M- ung p -; ■■ />//' c//p Gewerbetreiben- 
de. Quelle: StA* " "-^^^lannsc ^ '-./o. 



28 



Säle of Synagogue 



Letter from Association of Bavarian 



January 21, 1939 



Israelitic Congregation to the 
Mayor of Gossmannsdorf — 2/22/39 



4 J. Der Synagogenverkauf vom 
21. Januar 1939 

Unter dem Eindruck des Ereignisses vom 
10. November 1938 und zusätzlicher Demü- 
tigungen von staatlichen Ämtern und Be- 
hörden entschlossen sich die beiden verblie- 
benen jüdischen Familien zum Verkauf der 
Synagoge und des dazugehörigen Wohn- 
hauses"'. Am 21. Januar 1939 wurde der 
Kaufvertrag zwischen dem Verband Bayeri- 
scher Israelitischer Gemeinden (VBIG), der 
ihre Interessen vertrat, und der politischen 
Gemeinde Goßmannsdorf abgeschlos- 
sen^**. Die Käuferin erwarb danach zu ei- 
nem Preis von 400 Reichsmark das Anwe- 
sen Hs. Nr. 62 einschließlich des Wohnhau- 
ses, das zuletzt noch an die Familien Lin- 

201 

senbreder und Gernet vermietet war . 
Von dem Kaufpreis, der bereits deutlich un- 
ter dem geschätzten Einheitswert von 720 
Reichsmark'"' lag, erhielt der VBIG trotz 
massiven Protestes bei der NSDAP-Kreis- 
leitung Ochsenfurt nur 300 Reichsmark 
Timpcnmrhpn^"' In einem Schreiben an 
den VBIG begründete der Kreiswirtschafts- 
berater die erhebliche Minderung des Ver- 
kaufserlöses mit folgenden Worten: „Als 
Auflage gemäß VO. über den Einsatz des 
jüdischen Vermögens vom 3. Dezember 
1938, Artikel V, § 15, wurden RM 100,— 
zur Verfügung des Herrn Regierungspräsi- 
denten gestellt*'"**. 



den 22.Febr,i3 



Verband München 15, 

Bayerischer Israelitischer Gemeinden Lindwurm.tr.ie 125 r^b 

Ferntprecher 73216 



Absender: Manchen IS. Lindwurraitraie 12S Bgb. I 

an den 

Herrn Bürgermeister 

der aemeinue Gossmannsdorf a.::. 

Gossmannsdo rf a.Liain 

I 

TagebuchNr. > • . 

Betreff: Verkauf der Synagoge in Gossmannsdorf. 
Zum Schreiben vom 13. Februar 1939. 

Die i'irma Seiler & Co. in München (Nachfolger von H.Aufhäusir 
ist Devisenbank. Wir bitten um Mitteilung der Bestimmung, das» 3iL 
lungen für Verkäufe der in Frage, stehenden Art auf ein Sonderkooto 
bei einer Devisenbank erfolgen müssen. 

Schliesslich bitten wir uns anzugeben, warum nur KU 3C0,— u 
nicht KU 400. — des Kaufpreises an uns auszuzahlen sind« 



Dr. Alfred J<r9 Ol m». 




31 



Schreiben des Verbandes Bayerischer Israelitischer Gemeinden zum Synagogenverkauf von 
1939. Quelle: StAO Abteilung Goßmannsdorf Ausgabe-Belegband zur Gemeinderechnung 
1938 



Fate of the Remnant of Jewish Residents of Gossmannsdorf 

The persecution of Jews also included two remaining families in the village. Several 
members of the families Adler-Lind and Mayer were able to flee to a foreign country in time, 
while others were caught in the claws of the Nazi annihilation machinery, where they were 
murdered. 

Jacob and Klara Mayer moved to the city of Würzburg on March 4, 1940. On 
September 23, 1942 they were shipped with a transport to the Ghetto Theresienstadt. Klara died 



on February 16, 1943; her husband died on February 28, 1943. 

dort wanderte er 1941 ebenfalls nach New 



York aus^\ Seine Schwester Ruth, die ihm 
am 1. September 1940 nach Ichenhausen 
folgte, reiste am 7. August 1941 auch nach 
New York aus^°^ Ihre Eltern, Seligmann 
und Gisela Lind, wohnten dagegen noch bis 
1942 in Goßmannsdorf im Anwesen Hs. 
Nr. 45. Am 21. März desselben Jahres wur- 
den sie von der Polizei abgeholt und nach 
Kitzingen geschafft. Zwei Tage später ver- 
schickte man sie mit einem jüdischen Sam- 
meltransport nach Osten^"'. Im Jahre 1945 
soll das Ehepaar in Izbica bei Lublin gestor- 
ben sein 



210 



Max Mayer, der Sohn des letzten Kul- 
tusvorstandes, hatte bereits am 5. Dezem- 
ber 1938 Goßmannsdorf verlassen und war 
anschließend nach Mexiko ausgewan- 
dert^". Seine Eltern, Jakob und Klara 
Mayer, zogen am 4. März 1940 nach Würz- 
burg und wohnten eine Weile in der Dürer- 
straße 20^'^ Am 23. September 1942 wur- 
den sie mit einem Sammeltransport in das 



irr?rf 



■Kf«r«.f";; 



Ochsenfurt 



%/4> 



if-i>'tM hi^ 



~W' 




^-v^ 



Hy 



■Df-rnowcn 



C^tburtjtaj 






— , » — . . i* . • — 





^'^ß' 



:| 






Ochsenfurt 



6t? 

/ 



S>et Cflnbrat 







.< 



Kennkarte von Klara Mayer. Quelle: LAO 85/333 Jüdische Kennkartensammlung 

Identity Card of "Klara Sara Mayer, N6e Saalheimer" 



31 



Kennkarten von Seligmann und Gisela 
Lind. Quelle: LAO 85/333 Jüdische Kenn- 
kartensammlung. 



Ochsonfurt 



v^. ^ v r^r 






IIa«! 



Donimiifii 



4Vkiitt»tatf 




Crtt.rt»ert 



Smf 






txattUUM 









AlMtiiiWI 



.«^'W^.A-''Ä-»«fc- ■■ Jl»«. «MÄT«».^.»« 



n< ctt Ochaenfurt 



gyiti» tw /^9 



tteM 



9«ni«Mii 



«ctaitM«« V^, 



«WkUtlMt 



vcn^ 






lUlHQril^ll 



AMMt»-Mf9 




33 



33 I? 



Letter of Annulment of Purchasing the Gossmannsdorf Synagogue in 1939 
Addressed to the Jewish Restitution Successor Organization 

Nuremberg, U.S. Army 



34 ^'5, Schlußbetrachtung 

Von den Juden, die Goßmannsdorf vor 
oder während des 3. Reiches verlassen hat- 
ten, kehrte nach dem 2. Weltkrieg niemand 
mehr dorthin zurück^''. Im Zuge der Ent- 
nazifizierung kamen zwischen 1948 und 
1951 21 Personen, die an den Ausschreitun- 
gen vom 10. November 1938 beteiligt wa- 
ren, in Würzburg vor Gericht. Von den An- 
geklagten erhielten 13 eine Gefängnisstrafe 
von drei Monaten bis zu einem Jahr und 
acht Monaten^'^ 

In den ersten Nachkriegs jähren wurden 
den Amerikanern auch die zwielichtigen 
Vorgänge um den Synagogenverkauf von 
1939 bekannt. Die „Jewish Restitution Suc- 
cessor Organisation" meldete daraufhin 
am 29. März 1949 bei der Goßmannsdorfer 
Gemeindeverwaltung Anspruch auf Rück- 
erstattung des ehemaligen jüdischen Eigen- 
tums an^'^ In seinem Antwortschreiben 
vom 10. Mai desselben Jahres teilte der Ge- 
meinderat mit, „daß er eine Wiedergutma- 
chung anerkennt und im Zuge derselben 
von dem am 20. 1. 1939 erfolgten Kaufab- 
schluß zurücktritt**^". Weiterhin versprach 
er, „an einem bestmöglichsten Weiterver- 
kauf des Objektes mitzuwirken**^". Mit 
der vertraglichen Vereinbarung vom 9. Fe- 
bruar 1951 wurde der Synagogenkauf für 
nichtig erklärt^^". Am 14. November 1952 
erwarb Herr Erich Weiß das Anwesen Nr. 
62, das sich seitdem in seinem Besitz befin- 
det^^ 



die 



den 10.5.1949 



An 

JEWISH RESTITUTION 
ORGANIZATION 
APO 696 A 



SUCCESSOR 
U.S. Array 



NU r n b e r f 
Fürliterat ras se 3ol 

Wir nehmen höfl. Bezug auf Ihr w. Schreiben vom 29.3.49 
und bestätigen gleichzeitig die mit dem Unterzeichneten am 5.5.49 
gehabte persönliche Unterredung, Der Gemeinderat hat daraufhin 
In seiner Sitzung vom 7.5.1949 über die Rück-erstaltung, bezw. 
Wiedergutmachung des am 2o.l.l9f9 lt. Kaufvertrag: v^n der 
Israelitischan Kultusgenielnde Gossmannsdorf n.M., bezw. vom 
Verband B ayer. Taraelitlgcher Kultuesemelnden in Münohen 
Käuflich erworbenen Anwesens Hs.Nr. 62 ( Wohnhaus u. Synagoge) 
beraten und alsdann besohlcsr.en, dass er eine Wiedergutmachung 
anerkennt und im Zuge derselben von dem am 2o. 1.1939 erfolgten 
Kaufabsohluss lurüoktrltt. Gleichzeitig will der Geraeinderat 
bemüht sein, an einen bestmöglichsten Weiterverkauf des 
Objektes mitzuwirken. 



Der Geraeinderat! 



Ein Akt der Wiedergutmachung: Annullierung des Synagogenkaufs von 1939. Quelle: 
StAO Abteilung Goßmannsdorf Akte „Kultusgebäude* ' 



Tomb Stones of Moses and Jeanette Firmbacher 

Jews from Gossmannsdorf, buried at the Jewish cemetery of Allersheim. Photo 
by Joachim Braun, the author. The small Jewish communities in Lower 
Frankonia, Hessia and many other German lands had difficulties obtaining 
acreage for Jewish cemeteries. Several communities arranged for a collective 
burial place. 

















Grabsteine der Goßmannsdorfer Juden Moses und Jeanette Firmbacher auf dem jüdischen Friedhof in Allersheim — Aufnahmen des 
Verfassers. 



30 







Die Photoaufnahme zeigt die 1765 
erbaute Synagoge mit dazugehöriger] 
Lehrerwohnung. Repro mit freundliq 
Genehmigung von Herrn Erich Weiji 
(Goßmannsdorf), 



1 



-1. 



mßKMtm 



:Z'.^'^^'^ 



'ÜjSvfi' ■ y*' ' "'■' ' *''*■"■ 






^-m^Mm^iB, 















'^«iNt«>'..Ji(Mt('«^' 






"i*"««"«!»- 













Die Photoaufnahme zeigt die 1765 
erbaute Synagoge mit dazugehöriger\ 
Lehrerwohnung. Repro mit freundlic 
Genehmigung von Herrn Erich Weij\ 
(Goßmannsdorf). 



von bössen Leuihen nachts umb 12 Uhr das 
tach mit Steinen eingeworfen worden''. Ob- 
wohl man sogleich nach ,,den Nachbarn ge- 
ruffen habe, so sey Ihne keiner bey gestan- 
iden", weshalb die Täter unerkannt entkom- 



men konnten''\ Nach der Erbauung der 
neuen Synagoge war auch dieses Gebäude 
mehrmals Zielscheibe solcher Aktionen, so 
in den Jahren 1786"' und 1797"^ 



^. 



/^7 





m 




; . > . .. ^. 




m 




4 
» * 


i 


\ 






























i 




U 


/lifC Orc 


.r r M r. ^ L 


1 


^ jr /2_ — / 1 


/^>^ y' ^ '7 ÖX 






e 



•^Vt?f^ 



/^^t?y 



lo£ ^(\tif -riif CsMsrsrx^ 



Hol 









1 



> 

» 



t t '' 



I i > 



Lji 



r 



CPiLjL^ 



.:^r 



/ Us (^SMS -r;frt-'-1 



/ 



f 



rv6/ 3^ 



ß-r C7=ßÜ!c<9 ßltlKfinJ O/Off /^^ 



i 



-m^ 






ffisr:?- 




7 






<^i ATr ^y y 5 



Ei/^S ßTci/^f 6ShJoa x-j^aJ; ^ L/flfi7s 



1^0:' ti=NScUf/^f^eh(Gz 



k/i^aTcf^' ^ifL 0=0- ^uJi(^ KifiT 



fß (7r ^ 



r 




l-lousj^ of i/Zfr?/0/^^ i./fi 



/T. 



fofi^ -rilr psopd^^ of '^^^^ JSU(^U f^/^/7/7^7:?/^'^7/^-;S'/2/ 



le^ 



^^^^ l4oufC of- ersrL/^t9L Lifz 



j 






C. 



y 



Ayo VdCni ^ou Tc? (//5'/r <(J^$f pLficjs flfjQ fj^'i. ru^^ja 



\\ 



\Jiniir fi- Cot^t( ^(^-^'ü SziMc'U , "-jou'Lc- ff/üp , Jus7 ns^ f / 



y 



QiOi^^^^ "T/Zl" CUriiS7i(\i^ Cst^£i-iLcj^^ ^/^i-"^/^/^ p/«(r/ 



I 



Oo(\f)i f^hJß Olc) ^nap:ruxK'-\% M:^rL [/(>Uiui^ Hoa-rS Da, 





Vo Li- 1(0 n ti^ hJ-^ [■li^nMo/Ji/' niT Sic-i^ 9=L iT'Sr - 



f^ 






S-31 

^'%'f 



( 



) 

f 



i, 



(^(h£(L 



e^ c^si-if 



(Oi^ne- 







//^f 



/l/r^?> Gs::.h<^eli /^^U/ /"o/M^/iy 



Ui^P^7(^l> 



/. 



MW 



i^«?v 





W. RATHENAU 



INDUSTRIALIST & STATESMAN 



— Translaredfrom the German by Alfred Gruenspecht 



Selected Excerpts from Deutsche Jüdische Soldaten 

WALTHER RATHENAU, JEWISH INDUSTRIALIST 

CULTURE CRITIC, POLITICIAN AND FOREIGN MINISTER 



Walther Rathenau was born September 29, 1867 in Berlin. His father was the founder 
of the Algemeine Elektrizitäts: Gesellschafi AEG (the equivalent of a big electrical Company in 
the U.S.A., i.e. G.E. or Con Edison). His mother came from the bankers' family 'Nachmann' 
of Frankfurt/M. Walther Rathenau graduated from the Königlichen Wilhelms Gymnasium, 
Berlin. He continued to study at the Berlin University. Study subjects were philosophy, 
physics, chemistry. In 1889 he attained a Doctor of Philosophy on the subject: 'The Absorption 
of Light in Metals." In 1890 Walther Rathenau continued to study at the Polytechnical Institute 
in Munich. Subject: Center of Gravity and Mechanical Engineering. From 10/1/1890- 
9/30/1891 he served a one-year volunteer service in the Garde-Kürassier Regiment in Berlin. 

Remarkable to mention are the efforts of Walther Rathenau to become a Reserve Officer, 
or even an Active Officer in one of the most feudal regiments of Prussia. He reeled for the high 
social Prestige that comes to Officers of the Garde-Kürassier Regiment. Likewise, the fact that 
a major part of diplomats selected to the Foreign Service of the nation came from the Garde- 
Regiments. This must have been his deciding decision to join. Walther Rathenau's chances as 
a Jew and Middle-Class Citizen were certainly minimal. A certain influence for Rathenau's 
decision was also the particular, special uniform, the impressive appearance of the Garde 
Officers. Although Rathenau's military achievements were very efficient, he could not make a 
decision to change his religion in order to become an Officer, or even a Reserve Officer and. 



therefore, had to pass up on this career. This spontaneous tum-down of an Officer-career for 
reasons of religion became a sore point in his life. The undignified dishonor because 'of being 
a Jew' he could never overcome. 

A closer contact to military spheres started again after the outbreak of World War I, as 
the Director of the KRA — Kriegs-Rohstoff-Abteilung — the War-Raw-Material Department, of 
which he was the founder. This was done with his high feelings of duty and his patriotism. 

For the first time a Civil Director became the Head of a Department in the Prussian War 
Ministry. Of significant importance were the establishment of KriegsgesdlscJwfien - War 
Enterprises, to manage the War-Material. Rathenau's success in the KRA was frequently 
accompanied by civil and military agencies with reservations and distrust. Disagreements could 
not be avoided. Rathenau coordinated the complete material maintenance of the German Reich. 
His measures influenced decisively the management of the war. 

Even after Rathenau's retirement from the Directorate of the KRA in April 1915, he still 
kept contact with high ranking military personnel. Besides the many Generals and Admirals of 
the Pnissian War Ministry, he made acquaintance with two officers of the Prussian Army: 
General Erich Ludendorff and General Hans V.Seeckt. The belief in Ludendorffs abilities as 
Germany's savior lasted longer with Rathenau than with other understanding personalities. 

Rathenau's father, Emil, industrialist and engineer, founder of the Electrical Corporation 
A.E.G., AIlgemeine-Elektrizifäts-Gesellschafi, diedin 1915. Walther Rathenau became the head 



of A.E.G. in Berlin. 



A Total Mobilization! 

Rathenau suggested a national offense of a Levee en Masse J His call brought about 
violent discussions in military and political circles, but the Cabinet decided against it. 
Ludendorff s decision against the idea of Levee en Masse was a considerable disappointment to 
Walther Rathenau since, in his opinion, Germany could have fought nine more months. 

Although he had recognized the weaknesses of General Ludendorff, he was deeply 
depressed on leaming of his dismissal. The complete defeat of Germany became inevitable, in 
his opinion. 

At the end of the war, Walther Rathenau was assailed by many persons. He was branded 
to have been a Kriegsverlängerer^ because of his Levee en Masse, The reservations against him 
were so strong that his proposals for a new German State were disregarded. 

When Walther Rathenau stated in November 1918 that Germany could still avoid defeat 
and an Armistice, he feil in sharp disagreement with General Lundendorff. This was the cause 
of the split and dissension between the two men. When Ludendorff had to justify himself before 
a fact-finding committee, he accused Rathenau, successfully, with war Sabotage. Ludendorff 
was looking for any opportunity to hurt Rathenau. His actions added hatred to the extreme 
nationalistic groups. At the Start of the Weimar Republic, Rathenau remained politically isolated 
for awhile. However, the Reich's Chancellor, Josef Wirth, installed him, against much 
Opposition, as Economic Advisor and Negotiator on the War Reparations in 1919. Chancellor 



Total mobilization. 



To prolong the war. 



Wirth appointed Rathenau to be Minister of Reconstruction in 1921. He tried to get a 
Moratorium on Germany's obligations. 

The Problem of how to establish a reliable interior Police Force and a Republic-Oriented 
Defense Force occupied Rathenau 's thinking and actions until his election to a political office. 
As a member of the Cabinet, he put much effort into problems with disarmament and the 
military. In this area he worked more harmoniously together with Reiches Defense Minister 
Otto Gessler as with General V. Seeckt, Chief of the Armed Forces. Against the advice of 
friends, he was appointed Foreign Minister in February 1922. In April 1922, while negotiating 
with the suspicious Western Allies in Genoa, he signed the Rapallo Treaty (Rappalo is a city on 
the sea coast in Italy) with Soviet Russia. 

Rathenau was always a target for the anti-Semites. While serving in the Cabinet, he 
realized that his life was in danger, but he refused to allow his being a Jew to prevent him from 
being Germany's Foreign Minister. Up until his assassination on June 24, 1922, Walther 
Rathenau took pains to confine the activities of theintemational Control Commission. His effort 
was, since exact compliance of all disarmament measures were met, the reasons of the 
Commission to remain would be weakened. All his efforts only increased the enmity of the 
rightist politicians, the defense militia and the many anti-Semitic groups: Two former soldiers, 
Officers, were his assassins. They wanted to remove a representative of the Erßllungpolitik (the 
politic of fulfillment) and hit a man who, through his whole life, had understanding and 
appreciation for the importance of the military in füll measure. 

Walther Rathenau's attitude to Judaism was ambiguous. He wrote an essay: Höre Israel 
(Hear Israel). It was a plea for assimilation, calling Jews ein Furcht Volk (a people of fear). 



Later, he showed respect for the intellectual, ethical and economic achievements of the Jews. 
He always expressed a strong contempt for Jews that converted to Christianity out of economic 
or social interests. In 1917 he published Eine Streitschrift des Glaubens (An Issue Document 
of Faith) where he rejects Baptism. He writes in it that monotheism has the power of freedom 
from dogma and Church, the only denomination that permits belief without inner contradictions. 
As a Cabinet Minister he showed great sympathies for the rebuilding of Israel through a 
Declaration of the Foreign Office of February 15, 1922. Furthermore, he wrote, Reflexionen 
1908 (Reflections), Zur Kritik Der Zeit 1912 (Criticism of the Time), Zur Mechanik des Geistes 
1913 (To the Mechanic of One's Imagination), Von Kommenden Dingen 1917 (From Coming 
Affairs, Die Neue Gesellsschafi 1919 (The New Society), and Politische Briefe 1920 (Political 
Letters). 

His complete works are published in Berlin by S. Fischer in five volumes. 

Walther Rathenau's practical and intellectual abilities were outstanding. He was also 
artistically gifted. He was not married, he had a wide circle of friends and acquaintances which 
included Stefan Zweig. 

Walther Rathenau was also a deep-thinking philosopher, a genius industrialist and gifted 
author. A true Jew, who would never change his religion to enhance his desired military 
achievements. Having lived through The Dryfus Affair,' he tumed his mind to Zion as a 
possible Solution for the Jewish people. 

Walther Rathenau became one of the first martyrs of blatant Nazism in our times, the 
infamous Twentieth Century, where six million Jews were murdered by the Nazis and their 



cohorts. 



Biographical Dates: Walther Rathenau 



Born: 



September 29, 1867 in Berlin 



Parents: 



Father — Emil Rathenau 



(Founder of AEG Allgemeine Elektricitäts Gesellschaft - General 
Electric Company) 
Mother: Mathilde nee Nachmann 

(Descended from a family of bankers in Frankfurt/M) 



Edncation: 

1885 



1885 

1886-1887 
1888 
1889 



1890 



Gymnasium 

School-leaving exam at the Royal Wilhelms Gymnasium with University 

entrance qualification = Abitur 

Study Subjects: Philosophy, Physics, Chemistry 

University of Berlin 

University of Strassburg 

University of Berlin 

Promotion to Doctor of Philosophy on Topic: "The Absorption of Light 

in Metals" 

Studies at Politech University in Munich 

Study Subjects: Center of Gravity, Chemistry, Engineering 



1890 



1892 



1893 - 1899 

1899 

1899 - 1902 



1902 



1907 



10/1/90 - 9/30/91: Military Service as a Graduate Volunteer for one year 

with the Garde-Kürassier Regiment in Berlin 

Technical Officer with Aluminum Industry A.G. in Neuhausen, 

Switzerland 

Director of the 'Electrochemical Factory GMBH' in Bitterfeld 

Decision of Rathenau to withdraw from industry to do literary work 

lipon Suggestion of AEG, to enter Directorship instead to take on the 

Department of Building Central Stations with simultaneously retaining the 

direction of the Electro-Chemical Works. Active Delegate of Electro- 

Bank Zürich (The Bank for Electric Enterprises). 

Change-over from Director of AEG to the Great-Bank 'Berliner- 

Commercial Corporation Bank' BHG - Berliner Handels-Gesellschafi to 

become its proprietor. 

ReOrganization of a major part of their industrial enterprises. 

Member of the Board of Trustees of close to one hundred 
enterprises since 1904, also of the AEG. 

Ending activity at the Berlin Commercial Corp, but retaining the function 
of a Trustee of the BHG. 

No retum to the Directorship of the A. E.G. Rathenau becomes a 
'private person,' but he still kept his Trusteeship with the A.E.G. 



1907 



1908 



1910 
1911 



1912 
1914 



1918 



1918 



July - October. Trip to German East Africa, together with the Secretary 

of State in Charge of the Reich's colonies, Dernburg, at the request of 

Chancellor Fürst (Prince) v. Bülow. 

May - September. Second trip to Africa with Dernburg to the English 

Colonies and German Southwest Africa. 

Voted to be Deputy Chairman of AEG Board of Trustees. 

A futile effort to be nominated as a Candidate of the National Liberais for 

the Reichstag (Lower House). 

Elected to Chairman of AEG Board of Trustees. 

August 13: Take over as Director of the KRA, Kriegs-Rohsroff-Ahteilung 
- War-Raw Material Department. 

June 20: Death of Emil Rathenau. Walther Rathenau takes over 
as 'President' with far-reaching Power of Attorney, opposite the Board of 
Directors. 

On the 7th of October Rathenau called for a Levee en Masse in an article 
in the Vossische Zeitung (newspaper). 

Called upon to create a party for German Freedom, 1918. 
Rathenau becomes Founder Member of the Deutsche Demokratischen 
Partei (The German Democratic Party) DDP, but has no success at the 
line-up of candidates. 

Refusal of Rathenau as a Member of the Commission for 
Socialization. 




8 



1920 
1921 



Participation at the Conference of SPA from July 5th to July 16th. 
Becomes Member of the Second Commission for Socialization. 
Rathenau becomes Minister of Reconstruction on May 29th in Cabinet 
Wirth. Rathenau resigns from the AEG. 

October 22: Resignation of the Cabinet Wirth. After 



1922 



reorganization of the Cabinet, Rathenau did not return. 

January 6-12: Rathenau participates as an Official Federal Delegate at the 

Conference in Cannes. 

January 31: Appointment of Rathenau to Foreign Minister. 

April 10 - May 19: Conference in Genoa 

April 16: Signing of Treaty of Rapallo by Rathenau 

June 24: Assassination of Rathenau 



— Translated from the Original German by Alfred Gruenspecht, July 1998 



:^ ■ - f^'' 




iV-RLTHcR 






f 

f 




Wallher Rathenau als GardekOrassIer, 1890/91. (Entnommen 
der RathenauBlographle von E. Federn-Kohlhaas) 





•# 



Walther Rathenau In seinen letzten Lebensjahren 



139 









-/ <'•■...*• -Alt ■■. 









■■*■'*•'••« **t^w»!\ •»..,, 



I 




DEUTSCHE 
aöDISCHE 
SOLDATEN 
1914-1945 



Herausgegeben vom 
Militärgeschichtlichen 
Forschungsamt 




Mit 1788 



Verlag E.S. Mittler & Sohn 
Herford und Bonn 



00 00 
CO CO 
-»• O 



C» 
CO 

o 



..i 



I 



00 C30 00 00 
00 Ä 00 00 

<D 00 05 c;i 

OO 

"Nl 



S5 

c 

Q. 

c* 
3 



a 



Q 
a 

CD 

I 

^ CD 

C: cn 

-^ 

0) 

CO 

C/) 



y- CO 

CA 



La $ ^ ^ 
00 CD $ /— 

co^ fl ;^- 



ai7 

00 M 

c 



I 



5^ o b- 



C/) 

m 

3- 



CD rri 



CD 
CO 



5 -n 

^ (D 



5 $ 



CO 3- O) 

P 2 CD o 
CO 0) w -S 

>§§§■ 

CD Q) _. ^ 
c/i' F -'cd 
c 

(Q 



O 2. 2. 

3 ;S < 

^ CD cd 

O -I -1 

W CO 

o ^ -^ 

3 0): to 

<-♦■ <-»■ 

N C/) C/) 

C U) (fl 

ä c c 

-I c 

T,3 



CO 

3 ZT 
< CD 

2 3 



Si? O > CD 
~ 3 



■O ^ O =?. W W W CD 
C 3 3- -^ - • - 

i- w- Q) 



— • CD rr -» 



0): 

<— »■ 
CO 
CO 

«— ► 

c 

Q. 



C C IT =: = 



c 
3 



3:5 



c 
3 



^ ^ ^ ? 
:i CO 0) CO 
QJ= c 3 ? 

^ P ^^ 

CD Q: 

n CD D 

^ (5' 






CD 



9 

3 



3 3 



^ E" ;r- 



CD 



6\i 



OD = 

CD (Q 

:=- CD 



^Q.3 



3 CD 



D OD CO 

•• ^ CT 

I 



CD 
CD 



=; 3 O 

O 3 

0) CD 

O 3 

? § 

CD =: 



3- 
CO 



3 
CD 

3 

CO 



CD 
CO 



cd' 2 



CD • • 

a <d" ^ i 

0) CD 
(D CT 

c 2 

(0 0) 
-», f^ 

0) 3 

3 0) 



CD O" 

CD 

3 



CD il^ 03 CO 

CD 3 <5 c/) 
— n. • • CD 

o ü; m -«■ 

0) Q- 3 q 

^ 33 CD 

rricQ 5 r^ 

Oo CD ^ 



55 

0) o 

DD 5: 

»-*• o 

CD (D 

Q) D 
C 0) 

^ CD 



CD OD 

3 CD 

m = 



CO 
I 



? ^ ST O 

CD ie ® j? N- 

fit: 

cd" Q. 3 ;:; 

m ® <Q CD 
CD -I M 3 

CD fsi XJ 

0) CD O 3 

^ 5: =.• ;:;■ 
(Q cd" ~ 
n> CT ~ 33 

CL CD CT ^ 
CD P CD 5 

W " g Q 

S5- 2. 3 

.^ CD (D 
Q): CO 3 CD 

«^ § C ^ 

C CD Q. -^ 

CO 5 =r J 

g-3 9l5 

o Q) CO 

-09? 




W-RLTHc/^ 





^Tll^ N'fi U, INOUSTRl n UIS7 



t f- 



i' • 




■5', ■■-:.o 

Walther Rathenau als Gardekürassier, 1890/91. (Entnommen 
cjer Rathenau-Biographie von E. Federn-Kohlhaas) 



i 




Walther Rathenau In seinen letzten Lebensjahren 



139 



> 



1"! 






"*/l 



* 



" ^^^''af/'^^ '^^^^raiT.n'ÄTs'' ß-'^J^^^'^r^^T- R£G 
cf (Rfi tJu fc^n -r/n. U i?. danot/^ /.-?> faotJi 'rar 

t^u-i/t/i/sp -fo STuffij /97 rar ßc/?i//iy t/A^/cr-tz9/7ji 

Vt^LUPTM^O- TSfU^ic^ 1,^7(4^ Cmx)s-l<ö(lASSlSiL ß/t/- 

t^älJ7 (IJ B^auit-'' 

Ui.f^. 7c? fhscoHn n Q^S^m^c (^ffiC£fl,, oa^irstJ ntJ (^c 

!({/£' Office a iiJ ous oF^Hc f}fc>sT feupl^L. R^ci- 



n^5'*-*#>» ^ -r// 



r •••- •/ Mt'»- 



( rjft t 



Mk i^ m , 



hsSf 72> officj^cL^ of /UjT Crr^a^Qjr^ 



KOiiCisSiBd Rsc^in^ut, U\cru{$r. rus f^ 



c-j 




»•^ r'K»-^i*w#tv7 I ^js- yur^r^ 



rrji^ 



r 



I 



l5*t^'- 



>) 



^ %i 



^ > * *-ii ji ry 



^^^^ '^'s p.c,;J:^;^;''''' r^^ r,... „^,_. 

Ta Passus '" "'"''' " l^-^Sitit^r ofp,„„^ Ptiai^ 



^6 
Ml 

B/41 






« A* ry- ^uuujp ^/.~^^py^ O,,--^ . 'F 






—U. 






^HW-ST'- 



» 






m 

r.^^ 




iJlArt hl^iSin^.OFfl' ^/fy^/f^^/f/^r nif^n-ia^^cs- 

■ 



w 






7 




/•• 



I 






isi;,- 












•^1 



i» ^ i» ^ 



i» b 



y V^^^'Vfc \, ^ II 



V 

C£>ps(.Osnf<fbt,c p/5-rtff^//'/7/7rVr <o u/.i? 

ß«^ ^'^'^rt p^^oioj , /Vi"u«)j f^aRuosr? -7o Haue 1 




t2) PaOUONi^ T^jTU/rUfZ 



\ 















;'u-. 







y 



iiir^it i.?^^päil»^.r 






I 



V .^^'*1 


^■^^^H 




■ 




1 


•;/f ; 


PI 




-•^ä&^ 




■•h'-^ 








v^':-ä 


# 


'•"'* 




.,-^1 




■y-i 






'..Mi 



■ 



■m 



ij^iii.ti,iiii»i,viTr 




Oi^fBPSfo^ fynj.'s^ TMS 7u)o n.-fJ. yuii^i.uoj^. 
OooW Uf^oro JaS7if^ n>crcr7r ^ r^.y.f,^,,,^^. 

t^fln.5^«0oTA^r, Luo.-t^OodFf uc^^Loot.^c fcd^rL 

IhJ s-^tRurjD f4hy ^ (\<^^ ips'7 hüc« c(>pos,'r,o^, 

-i^yiton ßoUcs fon.cs r^t^o n r?fpu^L,c'0n.i-t,7so 






.^^ 



,%tt •»-• 



I 



,^mt- 



■■'\::>\ 



n 

Hl 







(iMUxt/f^O (Jf\l nuUlP\-fi n rf)C,£l fo(LTAS nMliTJ- 
THRf U(^ C-fftf UJiai nJÜfi jucnrt ^ ß U7 f/j a£fusfo T» 
7^ fiLt.OtJ> Uli fh£(tJC a Jjüf-T^ pfiz-iATh/-! Nim 

Of RLL Oisprt.M<«» M<M-f n£f\suai^5 \fJ^n£ nsr^iUs 

r ei/niTi e,rm£ UlCUT^'7^ PoLiTlcitaiu^ ,'jf(r 



7«: 






^C^^" AMirtr" . ,^ ■— 






i*: 






w 



./ 



W'^% 



»**>>■>»■»>• .7 — t* T>^» * fT^i 



y' 



I 

























'■,m 






i 




i 












fi^^n-^ 



ctiOf^s 



) 



unojs "ßsfLJ-w^ousTi^ 



'^^n Knniic qso. 1^ 



'T dtz^ 












.. ,-, A 






."•>3 



ii.' Mllipili'*^ 



m-mith »►•^ 



I 






j' V i 












V 







i! 
Hl 

!: 

-4- 
i 

1. 

\4 

ii 




V 

.CacTici^n ef -THs ^iciä, 10(1 hccm//iL 0£s 
Uiaicxu r^ t^/^(/A}^^^' /-{,s (pjrfinj-^ tXiur^nj 

1^.. yfc 



■ ff 






y* 




' i'-*., • 



t : 



I 






w'at-riiftiftito^ 



■ .,..., ... M... ■ «. -^..^-.j-.^ ^ , ^ • | l iM> . 



irWX'i In iir i 



■^midttmätm 



ii**> % ■ Kll 



W35 



IgQjTechnlscher Beamter der „Aluminium- 
Industrie A.G." In Neuhausen/Schweiz 
Direktor der „Elektrochemischen Werke 
"*mbH" in Bitterfeld 
.^^^ Beschluß Rathenaus, sich aus der Indu- 
i^M strie zurückzuziehen, um literarisch zu 
arbeiten. 

/O^^Auf Vorschlag der AEG stattdessen Ein- 
.|^|., tritt In das Direktorium der AEG. 
•^^'' Übernahme der Abteilung für den Bau 
von Zentralstationen unter gleichzeitiger 
Beibehaltung der Leitung der Elektroche- 
mischen Werke. 

Tätigkeit als Delegierter der „Bank für 
Elektrische Unternehmungen" 
(Elektrobank Zürich). 
t^C^ Wechsel vom Direktorium der AEG zur 
.^ ^Tfrcßbank „Berliner Handels-Gesell- 
* ••7 Schaft" (BHG) als Geschäftsinhaber. 
Reorganisation eines Großteils Ihrer In- 
dustrieunternehmungen. 
Aufsichtsratsmitglied in nahezu 100 Un- 
ter nehmunyen. 
Seit 1904 auch der AEG. 
l^C^ Beendigung der Tätigkeit in der Berliner 
Handels-Gesellschaft unter Beibehal- 
tung der Funktion als Mitglied des Ver- 
waltungsrates der BHG. Keine Rückkehr 
in das Direktorium der AEG. Rathenau 
wird „Privatmann", dennoch blieb er als 
Aufsichtsratsmitglied mit der AEG ver- 
bunden. 



1907 



1908 

1910 
1911 

1912 
1914 

1915 



1918 




Juli— Oktober. Reise nach Deutsch-Ost- 
afrika zusammen mit dem Staatssekre- 
tär des Reichskolonialamtes Dernburg 
auf Wunsch des ReichsKanzlers Fürst v. 
Bülow. 

Mai— September. Zweite Afrika-Reise 
mit Dernburg nach den englischen Kolo- 
nien und Deutsch-Südwestafrika. 
Wahl zum stellvertretenden Vorsitzenden 
des Aufsichtsrates der AEG. 
Vergeblicher Versuch, als nationallibera- 
ler Reichstagskandidat aufgestellt zu 
werden. 

Wahl zum Vorsitzenden des Aufsichtsra- 
tes der AEG. 

13. August. Übernahme der Leitung der 
Kriegs-Rohstoff-Abteilung im Preußi- 
schen Kriegsministerium. 
Zum 1. April Niederlegung der Leitung 
der Kriegs-Rohstoff-Abteilung. 
20. Juni. Tod Emil Rathenaus. Walther 
Rathenau übernimmt dessen Stellung in 
aer AEG als „Präsident" mit weitgehen- 
den Vollmachten gegenüber dem Vor- 
stand. 

Rathenau ruft am 7. Oktober in einem 
Artikel der „Vossischen Zeitung" (Ein 
dunkler Tag) zu einer Art „Levee en mas- 
se" auf. 

Aufruf zur Bildung einer „Partei der 
Deutschen Freiheit" (Oktober 1918). 
Rathenau wird Gründungsmitglied der 



1920 



1921 



1 



1922 



MMb 



*\m>i\m mtJf< I, Vk< HJiM^ i' '.i ii» 



iWaiMtiii 



Deutschen Demokratischen Partei (DDP), 
hat aber keinen Erfolg bei deren Kandi- 
datenaufstellung. 

Ablehnung Rathenaus als Mitglied der 
Sozialisierungskommission. 
Rathenau wird Mitglied der zweiten So- 
zialisierungskommission. 
Teilnehmer an der Konferenz von Spa, 
die vom 5. bis 16. Juli stattfand. 
Rathenau wird am 29. Mai Wiederauf- 
bauminister im Kabinett Wirth. Aus- 
scheiden Rathenaus aus der AEG. 
22. Oktober. Rücktritt des Kabinetts 



Wirths. Rathenau kehrt nach Neubildung 
nicht in das Kabinett zurück. 

6.— 12. Januar. Rathenau geht als offi- 
zieller Vertreter der Reichsregierung zur 
Konferenz nach Cannes. 
31. Januar. Ernennung Rathenaus zum 
Reichsaußenminister. 
10. April — 19.Mal. 
Konferenz von Genua. 
16. April. Unterzeichnung des Rapallo- 
Vertrages durch Rathenau. 
24. Juni. Ermordung Rathenaus. 



1922 




^ 






PA TS 3 






ScUAn' 














*. 







((■*■" 



■■:'i^% -«V Ji'^ 



'.' '■■'S^ 




»«-«•»«•s-l'»« 



mmm 



»'^ 



J 



I 






■^*fl 






ilop 




' 1 



^Aßcttß^R cf-ni^Jhof^(io oF-ravsTSc} it^ 



Vi<:u>sS'Ti> 0^slioiJ\yasK> ct^7^rL(>(Lis£s 

SfH<^ l'^ö*^ fjLfo or 7^-" R.i=.G. 

i 

(gfOY (^uoiu^ r^ c 71 1/^(7^ 7 7//j- ßinu /j co « - 



js^'5--'-. 
%'^' 




^^M. 







I 



KAlWs/Zfli?, ßrcchi$ t^'pnii/mf pins^/j" (lui lU 






I9l( 



— u; I -» M Off a«vy ß (/a (1 r«? r/v^- c/i/a^ifu CoLo- 

öyJlur IJof ÖC.T QATUJ^iOfiu Cc^iju^o fon. 

die 



ms 




cauu 



^m 



mm 



MI9 






^fvai-V^^si^i 



^ 



^^■; 



»■,' 



'•'^ 



^C^^a 






I 






( 










) 



\\K\>\ U 1 1 




7 (^t^lHc/UAi^ (h^tc^fii-^ faoi^O-'y*- rTciithfn 



ßMJ iirts t^o Succefs dl mr Lifi/f-uf of Cf\tj 



Cfitit\{^fl0%) f^H. Soci ai'l'J'KiTfC'hJ 



fts (\t} offic(Au f^QzfinL O^Lf^^rr n-r^iu 




-r: 







"-I 




^.h"^ 



JfA/c 



-3&. 



r oatefffnc 



'^A»MfM7-'0 ^rt 



Cv 



O^flM^^fi 










-t..'. .jv'; 


■'"^^SBlsiüSSSS^lSiM- 





h(L AäCÄ^ 



\hh '-' 



'iCD Gß.UN-i »^'^(^ *i T +/(t>/ICV COLCeC~loM 



U H /> ^ /^i^4i> 



/, 



\Vc cU 



D 




' "^1/ \ d r' Ot<X b» \\o^M 



-Ht7 



^^ 





9 
Ol 



^ 






firtiu -nu UN ß^Ulfi/ZfißL: Btiitvmi^» fiou/h/ns n pos$i(hLc^ mar 

TUsiri Jik/i f« A/r /<?»i d^cQ^j ßcm eVstJ pn n-rtctpmuJ^; ty sislf^w c/ias^ 
\^ Tftf SouTu-THpniiJaiaiJ 0>MM0i^t7~j of Ufju-oofi fj //mit im cn^ 
t?f /^t7A//A^<?eV^ / Wrti^' f?£S£nntti-:Q flßoi/r ITs fiffnMKi Jik/ifti CtiUa^s 

firtc«\UrS offHf Coovt'i^ LocAtJifft) tUi Cii-j jfiF Mirif/i/i/ß--/^. Unjt itJfontmrjofi 

o'fl B\/iti7$ WHic« took p^flCÄ ßl TUCii TiMii fIS UiiLU Hß sons "csf cnrcf/" 

0--C«O-'^ a tiWtf 6f tJft-Ll Ql/LS. 'TUl eh(>inUtqL l?SfuU7$ »f h^tic Stielt 

Vsft'-[ Cms^ouL^^ s-TiLt fluo fltu^ / fs£Li riM\r 7)k' SjAf^-M^yrs Ht^(^ 
ß^ -THr UfiLLßanf^A? /9/?-- Qspfi'f£Uyi9r/</S' dt/itJ fort hi^t^n Ji^^u 




. rti »^ ^ ^»»«»**!!*^ -■ 



l^ty[^P|IW»Jt»Pli^|||^pWf^piflj<WWW»||»WW><>l>! t H ii l«. i n « n «»ii|iw> WW ii» .y i;«» r tm »}»*» n mtm mil i i U m mj' 



mfiß>mmmim»m»f 






C3 













hOS7C^ UJiQO^/d^P» fh> ^U£ 0'COMOhlC l-lfa" oF7i4::' l//UAdiSjM^ 

JsUfiSU HciicHffnis rti-'ji nustty^if fsO^Ls' pi^^,'p fi^ \t\(>omfii^i QcU. 
THs WjMLQonf ' puot-ic GLi^oU^ ßt>aau7 ^non ßuTc^Sn A/^-g o/i 

f^t^Ufn^ ' Quo -lUx $'icnJ -c fort h^tvcHAt^Ts C-lNO ^ ORTk/Jiun. 

'H-Ii *? i/^ntf '-^5 'T"«*- I4ffj 9i>/fi (i>f riu p^H(iULST fu/s Ojaol^ 

<?iTei^oiJ THyQT JiVi'in P>£ <r üuss i!>f -tUsin CHnS7lf'J , UF^S7^CSy 



/ 






i^ 



<^ 



-^ 
^ 






% 



Oiisn^p: " t//£^ HLouGio To QS ^ (hur -na^i UJ^as ^07 U(am 

[2,1/7 (^oop hJm6MR>oac^ Qfi-^T/of^j occauoiuAu^ f?jnc ffusuos^/e- 

t/Ol Wotio^-st/sovs, Sonr y^mr ysuuT^'Oo ^ ojusas pccft^ ^ohj- 

Oiarnj. ^rtoucip To Tttt' fc .p. d • , 7j/v C»mhomS7 Pfinty^ (kLTH'^uM 
Ql Tüsirx. JilJtjU Kisl^UPfOdS UI7U U/J p^'/1 S/?Ajr7 fr^itt/^Sj 

U£nr ho/tr ^Mpint^n? ,Tt)fiP li^ or^-^/t pLncrs^ lu7iw UfnaP^s/ 
p^y^^-^o Oi^tn^fS -JsUijU tfjTi.cou Cittt^'t^s , TMr CootJ-itK^ -^ 



^3 



^ 
% 



J4 




% 

^ 
^ 
'^ 
^ 
^ 
^ 
^ 
^ 
-# 



i^ 



-frt/cjupj. Oi^TlU: oiH£K W*\tJO, '7U£ Unn<^=icn/o ^/^{A- /^ i^rr/.! 

'TrfVTt'rt "fo (Toms / 

OkiL^ -^«^o «Orte -70 (p,p A/ap ciiiLQu-fs ffikhtLi:rs UfFT U/f^.- 

Pos^ts'n^ Usnr ^-n<ic-Wc-j? " potJot ßu^ fn^f^ M^$- 



fient-iA/ OtFftiT3 Gum^sti^j Lcfn/i/i^ li£not^ u/m^ k/i^^-jAnf^ 

(fH^^ t^hjfi fk-in. 'LCtiiCQßsXi 'fort ^Sfi{/SAi£M /A/ /^3V . 

@ I QsM~hf^ "T"«-- ti'/'-"*' OtipLR-i cr*'Qsn ^lOaHsTL iKfM f^n-n*. 



/ 



^^ 



\ 1 




\ 



X 




Oi/x o{ in; Tincti;fi$ t/i; 7^-- t.£><^£. pui^uic S^Moou j> lUf 

'^liS StOQitjrs 'fcspi7£ Tit£- Uf^tJofot- pfJiM9(j caaofZ^. ;«• 
(4 IS kJ(f5 Hz (\ti<^^iU£ß fitsi/evy Qoon. JsMSff /(/ytcff/^nß u/iru htxLi- 

i\\% raat-Sis £»sHfi(/ion- fk li tu- ouL^7£ncU£n ^^tuo "7^ (^ffi/J l)t^cni Mi- 
tkam fi(;AtA)^ -tiif ^as^^hjo RsMMiJtAfi Jiuiffi S7*^CüAjrir ^-s 

liA7.rK> youJ o/^<7 OA/^r p^rr^satJ fiS/^^p FiPrt(77so 7^ ^ißM 
{^cUc\/JO /9tt TU; t^tö i^wjJ tl'^O fpttsi^O ß^ 7Hr M>^i.i PaeGa- V 






■iSTtjir 



.,»,■ *.-t<f^7-< 



i# 






^ 

^ 




•^ 



^ 



% 



QOlCn^ i<c(>-r ?(LBkJ-r pUl^HcL^ — Uif •»■( e>f fra^^oA. pUt^lSU- 

P^oga^^^/Q/i ah>o cau, fe^ (^o'^coi'-Ts suokjj-r? -rusirz 

5s -V -fo ^crinoPi7,r ^ VJoulo Cfn 'Tat*- pgnsoty TU^r $'7iri/i^\ 

^o 'Tll£ fdU ifiJ-raipio wcma^j Bic^ou&sf? hos. IC.w^n^ 

f-(oriAc (pu(v/(ift(>ic-<Jr ()[Q fjoi ßoliJSn Ufa. , 









"4 







VJI 



Tstloui^ CotJ^rOfjstJcjri^ or "^tl^ 'T^pteAC (isäHAtu) j'il/^tA^ 

f^nnvor t *o(hc:oir/^cc "four^rtr^ß fax' (^aosiz^H^^/ hrtf^ 

atodcf Ht/fi.i^fs^ lij nin/iJ W($ QJScAJfrtJMT Ut^ntt^sT -rtu 
Jifc/5 «>F lüO^tport/^ \ij u^ieH Us MAO-'' nccosarfot^^/^CAitJn^ 

TU5M, k/l1l» ln/iZ/MTiv'/ Nlf»H«»/o^pA/^r^ W-' (>ttt>0t>sfp csnr^/n 

doc{jMSiJif, tH£ tUf^iftstitor* Sshi7 a (2^fUy/jc Malfcs: 

/A^i^Ohif9iOU. 'fUx M^lorz ^ ßr T/HS 'T/nr'"^//o7 ru^ flOßCt) 
Oi/Jn ff^-" M<i(?ic'' l-fj i?0J-SoM AüC^ was vfs^i /?<»*«' ^ Ht^ 

(■/o4p l-iln ddcU "To ß Ms tili m /^KHi -To 7ifS JsiJt>il 
PjUTcU/n -fo (^/7 SOHt a^'Oß r^f^O r^^O^ft hx't^T fonl4iS 



mmmmmm 



mmmmmm^ 



wmmmm 



^9 



■^ 
-» 



■-% 




--^:!>k 



^7^ 



Of- ^\Jo Jz'uiSfi CiT/ij'yj u/ns pcRMf-T-r^' c> n?^ Lfio . 
'i.svi j 1'u-^ k>£nr nur) [isM<iitJ-ffi Jojt JlUS, tlcnr jnpon- 

pdocsrpotrr CeMn£tJ1i'*? h(i9. //. CJ((o (S ti^J^7/OfJJO -To 

OisirtxPY* (?/ J=U[SH haio Ortfli-^7-'j? fl^o ^cvk)c> Jxuuk lUoMMti 

fiUO\^% \OSnf \^i7iaATxO ^f7U iV/jTr-^^oftrt/^^ ItHO RLCOUOL 
7 «ein. 'ff:LiiJ6<9 of cifi/rY ^/^ö 74^^'M i-US7 fon S^H$/fl7(:>u . 



WBjWppP^^^'yW^WW^I f lW ^ I U I p JUM W ^j l H pi |H) ipp|fT»^i|f|y U l i y II II ii,i^y-p^ - 



ypir«!<TaH| H! 11 ■ ! iipi,,y^ 



Mm 



iife 







IX 



Wft^ rtt,-Ar^37 'rr?i-c^^.-/J7 ^.-z?^-//^^ c>fru:r r^rn^^ po^ctc 

\^-^fo,e H.'^no^so hos. K. Slk v.wr? an t/v^ ^^c.i^, ""' 






■«■nwinifnOT 



'*'^WPif^l | I IP| I H IIII»II M„ . „ 



• l'"IHJ^(^l,M»iJl.i.|- -- 



^ 



i 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 




3 
3 

3 
3 
3 



X 



bz Cl\J\^f I Ott- U/lc CoMr ofi'fo ^01/ "7^^.* SomS of 7/U 

Hoai niJ/) Hön£ Ooi of :f£Ai of aeiOiutr^ acrtöps , faoM 
'Tflifd pos:fSf(OtJ^ t^tJt) -TOB in pxfisoiüAc fa^tspot. c(/=n.^ 

{iNr, -Tür ^oL(,:£f^^ij -fcn. TUs ^flAuTotJ/j pcA^sr) ffl^ /tl-^ 

"TUsia d>7(4=tx <0n>i,(<^A7fO/J^ coj^rao^/fj^T/^r f^u/7^/fMc^ 
of fH^ l<H<r7(^S£ti(7(c OlCdiSc^ , ßfpoap 7I4: j£u$ 7H^y 

l-(ftl/r ^Miartf^lJ-j:) fiyo TMOsS 57ILI- C-il/tt^f, TUjfrz^^ 



w^^mfmmmmm 



%ig^i^'^ 



Yl 



^ 
^ 

% 
% 

« 
^ 

^ 
^ 

■^ 
« 




■lUs ft^A/a-cfctq^ JsUUt^-rsn^ . /}>uf ^ /\/e7 fz/j- 7cm fJ 
Ifj ias fpccokJifje» Li77f!t\ U^^nac Sponry fitf7ut,it<7Y 

R H0ü7Hpi£c£ Of His CoHtioiL>i7*^ ^ Us DßOtfl 

(iniiotj £i/ini /?o«i. istf'f iujai a utn'i io Rxcoam tmis ßfio^'s 

'i'iAdin tfffxc^ CoucQ o^r dicfycc^c» ß^ "TUS kJrittQottt^ /y- 

UOOd^tJ'JS . flt^i^'l l-iatü- (isl^J fcrtif0 7-7s*J . f(7a>M 07HFn%7a£^ 

[kr^Mi hJo UiooiJLx/yr?/. ß(/7 7%'Y S7/ic Qxhfsrti^aso -ruar 
-TÄf*| Q.S tixHOssncQ -rui\7 aLc J^wf Uno t-^ w-f^t TUt f^iMatj 



üiihidte 



^-9 



Vii 




Mm»»^.^>äalälttMai,mätL. 



^0 7(i>r O^fittuof of- für f/az( ßi^ffif f\urp Ton-Mfr) Ryn^ 
■^flor^ -fuint J=hii;u faniLid-s. l-lok)si/jn au -rao^i-, Tunr- lifto 

" ( fit^'l fonn^ fon 'Td-i Jsi^S . itfjfi^ ftftr fH'^o //irfi/7AJ /3^'/ax$ 
ßl^Q / Coucr, ypUi l'i>£fiJ JjftJ(J(i -Tool fUiT i/spff^^/fJ-TJ-r) 

)/Ox\ii 9ü)L£ To t^Mirinp-?^' -Tc "TUj d/M f Am tun l'WO 



-XlT(O0 <ff JiUlSU '^i/f/A/jffSS, Tl^^id Hdh£> «vCr^i* thOuCt4 7 



'9 

-0 



yiu 



-9 



^«f<i 







Ofi^r ßMfii/A^rj ouxD 'h "^r Jiuß tv'.-zir fotuf^i fso, 
Uticx ht>tJ£^. TUf t:Mp7'^ Uvn^& 9p(\csS cou<} fhr 
/s LoiJG. 

\ UuAO g f /?fi/i>/J J iVJiiÜ /i/£lGHHoaS . U(i£l^ KU Heut, of 



a 



Cad^j/O' 



'^tk S^lt/Aciv<^u£ wi^s V)as^kxrp lu i<)if fif^p 7///- orf/ - 



lia-t ySGL£C7:fp, 



9f k)i\uppn.{ ^(^Qsjp (^iJt^'-\, 'T<>Ol^^ ^o7(t(^G /5 $(ioUrJ 



t:-s z. . *: 



mtk 



Xw 




9 



(^/^7i-^ Afonr -7///?a; ^6 7c-fl/^r.* 

(b£<^0o}£ -flh^ Covi-p Hfyi^f ßc£fj anciJOsy 'Tn.- psaf^^-m/i-rons^ 
f^0 7 ■7'4'yy Q/p ijoi Cnn^' ifjüouGJ^ TS r?- fi.scr' c/oTttsU 

Q=fL£c7fc/^s> i^^jf) Conus tJfs of Tai- TnaAJfi'nrDa^ 
öf ^i^t^ p>f^h PULST, Puf-r2fo (^nt/£fyjp=ci4r, 

WoMAfJ atJ(? Oi/j:ru 0/0/ /^li.L/p/0 C(H£.p(?^/v} lüHmy \ 
SU^^^ep l)j-rU£irt H/Uosy lJl\t:il /i^o^ f^^P fh^fcot^ 

'Vir (2q^l/iC (^O.^f\k> Td-lUiCt/üi^ S7£H9 ff2oM 7^!.' /^I^ 






wmmB 



mimmimmm 



■W't'^IWi^WPVIpinpnpHV^P^MvnsiMiivminHpipaapp« 



fi0Pl^!<>'''^>>fik**« 



• < 



isa^tSi 



"3 



^ 
« 




)cV 



'♦ 
'♦ 



<p/^^^ic»6 SldijüGfu, (^canF>ui l^cmi^ifJtli^ Uifi^n-7t){ 

'Tshp:rn:rp CLiM^fT ^ Hoo^Jit^/j^/s f^^^p /nCLr^Sy'77/s 
Mortn^-'S'sn ninp Bf^sr-^^f^ , Oii/^S- nh>0 L(M<£S .lux 

'Trp. "T/f^ K?^/0 -^ ^--t/-7"5«r/Vi Hf^Q A/0 O^So/o Th/To 

piop 'fnauc£ , To "T/u ifi^sr rth>p Us^r op^^r -ta^^^fz^'ß 

ßi'^fiV^ fl|t>p 'f/Z^Y U^nx" fitcuJA^ nn^O^'7^ Osf^otJfM/? 

ßjTC/^c/fjT l^t^AJ fitJO S'TCliti h^ICsJ popuLA7ioi^S 

Szf 11 Ih^ 00(1 oOtJ Cooi^T^-j f ifo /zipfLica ^ ort n$//^ 
SoMJT t(o(iA yoti^ Lsf^' "^U^ fuac^r O^^iohihA-k^i^ /^UJ) 




\m» wmmmmmm 



"9 



1i 
1» 







\y»*4^ 



19 



^ 




B 
'« 






WE GLADLY PURCHASED FROM THE JEW! 

Dagmar Seidel 

Member of the Research Team 

The Pate of the Jews in the National Socialist Tlmringia 

- Translation, Remarks & Comments by Alfred Gruenspecht 



THE DISMISSAL OF THE JEWS OF WALLDORF 



STATE OF THURINGIA, GERMANY 



DURING NATIONAL SOCIALIST RULE 



The following detailed description should assist to make the unbelievable believable. 
How was it possible that legitimate people tolerated the undignified treatment of their Jewish 
neighbors, some even participating in Single cases? 

In the South-Thuringian Community of Walldorf, near the city of Meiningen, I have 
researched about its former Jewish Citizens and found an abundance of Information. It comes 
from the main archives of the country, located in the city of Meiningein, with Information 
concerning the administrative and technical management of the persecution of the Jews in the 
State, I also have reports of eyewitnesses on events which took place at that time, as well as 
some "eye catching" observances of participants, in one case, even from the victim. The "stone 
witnesses" — The Jewish Cemetery in Walldorf the former Jewish owned homes, and give 
testimony. 

Combining the various levels of information we'll get a good picture of the occurrences 
of the '30s and MOs years in the decade and a half of Nazi rule. The empirical results of my 



research remain next to my questions and my presumptions for the cause of these tragic 
events.^ Generalizations have to be made very carefully, still and all, I feel that the Statements 
made by the Walldorfers are representative even for many such similar small land communities 
at the time of Nazi rule. 

To the Situation before the "take over" of power by H.... during the 200 year tradition 
of communal life of Christians and Jews. The Jews were continuously more and more integrated 
into the life of the village communities. This was made possible by the equalization Laws of 
1856^ Living together with the Christian subjects in the Duchy of Sachsen-Meiningen- 
Hildburghausen. It resulted in the exodus of many Jewish families to the cities, especially to 
Meiningen. At the Start of the 30th year in our Century the population of Walldorf was 2000 
inhabitants. Thirty-seven were Jewish, comprising eleven households. The following families 
belonged to the Jewish Community: Frank, Frühauf, Grünspecht, Hermann, Katz, Lind, 
Ortweiler, Wertheim, as well as some Single persons, mostly widowed. In the economic life 
of the village, the Jewish merchants and business people played an important role. The 
Walldorf public gladly bought from butcher Katz, or in the Grünspecht Department Store, from 
the Wertheim bakery, and the skin and für merchants Lind & Ortweiler. This verifies the 
heading of the pamphlet: "W? Gladly Purchased From The Jew." The merchandise was good 
and reasonably priced. You could also Charge it or barter it in agriculture, goods and products. 
One can reason that Jews, because of their chastity, lifestyle, their efficiency and general 
contentment, were highly respected, although not always liked by all. Frequently, they were 
envied for their commercial accomplishments. 



The fact that they believed in a different religion, having a different lifestyle, the non- 
Jewish inhabitants reacted, at all times, with incomprehension. Reflexively, they uttered: "They 
belonged to us, but they were not like we are. They were just Jews," emphasizing "We had not 
hatred, but good neighborly relations, occasionally real friendship." 

The group of Walldorfers of mosaic belief was not homogeneous. Some were well-to-do, 
others poor, some liberals, a few communists, others politically inactive, but true believers in 
Jewish traditional values. A very few were distantly removed from practiced Judaism. Some 
were members in the S.P.D., the Social Democratic Party of Deutschland. Others belonged to 
the K.P.D., the communist party. Although they were dependent on each other, they did not 
mix. It was peaceful, but not always an untroubied, living together. 

In the forever existing chasm between Jews and non-Jews, the powerful machinery of 
the Nazis was always ready and willing to drive a larger wedge of distrust deeper and deeper. 
It wasn't successful with the friends of the Jews, but suited those who looked at their Jewish 
neighbors with unpleasant feelings, or with complete indifference. 

The only living eyewitness of the victims remembered that in Walldorf actions against 
Jews were more tempered than in other places. In the nearby town of Meiningen many more 
Nazi activists were busy distressing fellow Jewish Citizens. The country milieu was 
advantageous to many, since people knew their neighbors very well, secretly helping their 
friends. On the other band, the larger cities gave a little more anonymity to the victims. 



Very few German Jews sensed the implication of terror to come! 



Only two, well-to-do and childless families left Walldorf before the November pogrom 
in 1938.^ 

How effective was the Nazi Anti-Semitic Propaganda onslaught on the minds of the 
village people? The Walldorfers asked, very vlvidly remembered, the showcase at the 
Municipality office, where the Nazi Propaganda newspaper Der Stürmer (The Forward) was 
displayed^ under the heading "D/e Juden sind unser Unglück:' (The Jews are our misfortune.) 
With abhorrence, they considered the portrayal of Jews as grotesque caricatures and read with 
disgust the filthy insults perceiving at that time the unjust accusations, thinking, "Why the Jews? 
What did they do?" On all poles, posters were attached, "Do not buy from Jews." 

One of the teachers in the local public school lectured the students to spite the handful 
of Jewish children in a demagogue way. He referred to them as J. creatures. At the start of 
his classes in the morning, he read sections from Der Stürmer, with nasty comments. This 
teacher retained a hateful attitude to anything Jewish. In companionship with his wife, he 
ambushed his next door Jewish neighbors with malicious and wicket tricks. Many people in the 
village resenied liis lactiess behavior. He is the only teacher named to have discriminated 



' I remember my father's uncle, who practiced medicine in Berlin, Dr. Fritz Gumpertz, 
leaving Berlin with his wife, Tante Emmy and their two children for Jerusalem in 1934. 

2 1 remember the open display of D^r Stümer in my former hometown, Wüsten Sachsen, füll 
of derogatory remarks, disgusting caricatures and insulting stories, read and believed by the Nazi 
mob. 



against the last two remaining students.' He accomplished that these kids were teased and 
beaten. They lost their desire to attend classes. 

My conversation partners feit upset by the massive flood of anti-Jewish Propaganda. 
Many feil victim to the constant onslaught of hate, also, here in this south Thuringian village, 
and became influenced by it. 

How big the share of sympathizers were,cannot be estimated now. Only one person 
asked, admitted to have believed all the lies and mud spread by the Nazi Propaganda machine. 
When this person met the surviving daughter of the former butcher Katz who visited (probabiy 
the cemetery), he feit uneasy. His guilty conscience must have bothered him. 

Another part of the inhabitants reacted towards the anti-Jewish campaign with perplexity 
and helplessness. "What could we do against it?," resigned to their superiority and 
predominance. All those who did not trust the hate campaign kept silent publicly - less out of 
fear or punishment, but more out of worry to be exciuded from the Community. 

Propaganda and calls for boycotts showed their results graduaJly. Customers stayed away 
from Jcwish businesses. Others shopped secretiy. Look-outs watched: Who would still go to 
the Jew. The fear of being caught buying at a Jewish störe or being seen to patronize, would 
get the person the stigma as a Volksverräter (public traifor). In spite of the consequences, 
women helped in the Matzoh bakery Wertheim in the weeks before the Passover holiday. To 
the few intrepid women belonged Mrs. K., well befriended with Family Wertheim. At one 



I remember when our teacher, in our Jewish elementary school, became ill. We had to 
attend public school in Wüstensachsen, my birthplace. One of our teachers there, Lehrer 
Mutzek, was a Nazi in flesh and blood, always finding a reason to stigmatize us. I will never 
forget this man. A.G. 



time, when she brought a cake to have it baked in the bakery, someone photographed her. The 
photo was displayed in the community's showcase with the heading Volksverräter (public 
traitor). However, this moral punishment did not bother her. 

To many others the feelings for rights and justice and injustice, the courage for truth did 
get lost. The saying: "Well, we were not permitted to have any contact with the Jews" was 
given as an excuse and apology for their conduct. This shows the disastrous consequences of 
they typical German mental attitude, "obedience towards the government is the primary rule of 
the Citizen." 

One person who did not need any excuses to be an Opponent to the Jews and was 
responsible for the execution of many anti-Semitic decrees was the Mayor of Walldorf. In a 
letter to the Thuringian Minister of the Interior of August 1935, he aired his resentment against 
the Jews of Walldorf in which he made accusations against them. With inventive 
highhandedness, he proposed certain measures against them, similar to those the government 
implemented years later. According to available documents, the Ministry sent a refusal notice 
informing the Mayor that the planned measures were inadmissable. The Mayor, al this time 
"shot the arrow over the mark." He presumably was upset about his own suppressed eagerness. 
His mental attitude did not hold him back from sneaking at night to the Jewish butcher to get 
some good and tender meat for his sick father. 

Another example of highhanded and independent proceeding was done by the person in 
Charge of the Bureau of Vital Statistics. He found reasons to prevent, for unknown reasons, the 
planned marriage of Alfred Lind with his bride Ell! Mansfeld despite the fact that marriage of 
two Jewish Citizens was permitted by law. Every time the couple showed up at his office to get 



the necessary documents, he refused to see them. Mr. Lind had to leave his bride behind on 
his emigration to the U.S.A., and she was deported, experiencing the fate of the unfortunate 
millions. 

The Federal Law for Citizens of November 1935, that described the term "Jude" (Jew) 
in lawful terms, caused no changes in Walldorf towards the Jewish Citizens. They were and 
remained just Jews. More important, and more troublesome, appeared the fact that everybody 
had to show proof of descendency. To this procedure, commented Mrs. H., who is mentioned 
to be the dearest friend of the Jews, to have made the disrespectful, funny remark: You have 
to prove now your "Arab descendency." 



The Pogrom-Night, November 1938 

The occurrence on Pogrom-Night is told as an incomphensible, inconceivable trauma. 
The Walldorfers refer to it as "The Night" when the synagogue was destroyed, Jewish men 
arrested, and young Jewish women ashamedly beaten. AUegedly, a number of "dumb fellows" 
were instigated with hate Slogans and alcohol against the Jews of Walldorf. Now they could 
shed their feelings of envy and their lust for Sensation. 

The horde marched noisily through the village, whereby the instigators kept themselves 
in the background. Everyone remembered a "poor joke" that "the fellows" afforded to do. Sali 
Wertheim, the Jewish baker, had a wagon to deliver bread. This wagon was pushed into a 
nearby river. A former employee helped along. His motive is not known. It could have been 
gloating or a desire for recognition or an act of personal revenge. The deeper question remains: 
Did he and the other participants have to overcome a guilt feeling to ruin and destroy the 



property of others? The startied inhabitants, awakened by the uproar, assembied on the streets 
and before the synagogue and observed the spectacle. A person asked if he remembered these 
scenes, answered, "Yes, I remember my father's warning to stay away from this band of people 
saying: 'If you lift one band against a Jew, I dare you!!'"^ 

In the opinion of the eyewitness, most of the onlooking people disagreed with the actions 
against the Jews, but nobody ordered these vandals to stop. This was the most frequent reaction 
of the German public towards events against their Jewish neighbors. The only person daring 
to violently protest was the aforementioned Mrs. K. She yelled at the raging nien: Shame on 
you! In return, they answered: "Be quiet, or we'II come up to you too." Some of the 
persecuted and injured Jews found compassion and shelter by some neighbors. 

The events of that night caused a tremendous tremor to the already shaken relationship 
of Jews and non-Jews. The belief of living harmoniously together in Walldorf was shattered. 
The Jewish inhabitants were able to look into the abyss of human souls. Up until that time they 
couid not believe that their fei low men could be so nasty and spiteful. They withdrew more and 
more out of fear of renewed actions. From then on, they could encounter nothing but a wall 
of new edicts and laws, Orders to refrain from almost everything, to sever all relations to the 
common public. Step by step, they were robbed of their livelihood, their possessions and their 
personal freedom. Every move was covered by legal means. 

The representatives of the State government, the Mayor (since 1937 a new Mayor came 
into Office) and the policemen for the small town played an important role in all events. They 
were responsible, besides their other obligations, for Controlling the observance of the anti- 



Not many fathers protested these unholy deeds openly. 



8 



Semitic decrees. reporting the Jews that have emigrated and those still living there, confiscating 
assets and reporting violations. Available records confirm this Information. 

The author of the pamphlet writes: 

My conversation-partners condemned the deeds of the fanatical Jew-haters, but ' 

not the town officials, excusing them. They had to foUow orders and do their 

duty. " 

The fact that the town officials were respected persons made it difficult for the Walldorf Citizens 
to criticize and judge their conduct. 

In the following letter to the Föderal Sports Authority, dated February 1939, by the 
Mayor, who made himself into the mouthpiece of his Community, he wrote: 

It causes much offense in our village to have the Jewess, Elli Mansfeld, wearing 
"The Federal Sports Decoraüon" every day. Isn't there a way to reclaim this 
badge? 

The author brings a few additional episodes of anti-Semitic measures to picture "violations of 
German honor! " 

Only a few anti-Semitic ordinances and their effects could be recalled by the Walldorf 
inhabitants. Many have been forgotten, from others they have no knowledge, but they still 
remembered that Jewish businesses were forced to close and the sons of the Grünspecht family 
(Two first Cousins of my father were called to do forced labor, building the Hohenwarte water- 
lock. One of them died at work, 47 years old, in 1942.) were forced into hard labor. They 



remembered that all Jews had to wear the yellow star and were forbidden to enter the German 



forest. 



Outwardly, the Walldorf population showed obedience to the demands of the Nazi regime 



and tumed away from their Jewish families. However, all those that had good contact and 
relations to Jewish families ignored the Nazi orders. in spite of impending punishment, they 
visited their Jewish friends, under cover of darkness, brought them food, spoke to them words 
of consolation and urged them to emigrate. Sali Wertheim, for instance, received money to pay 
towards his emigration and food for work done. 

The oldest of Walldorfers said in an interview: "I feit sorry for the Jews. They are also 
human beings and I could have been Jewish too! " She represented one, that showed her humane 
sympathies and self-respect. 

Up to the last possible time, eleven Jews of Walldorf were able to emigrate to the U.S. A. 
Families Lind, Ortweiler, Katz, Friedmann and Wertheim. They were saved. The others were 
deported in two sections: The first in May 1942 to Poland, and the second to Theresienstadt. 



Only 



' nno T>*-rcr»n sup/ived, the widower G, but he died soon after Liberation. 



v^iiw LyW'X avyi 



What advantage did the village gain from dispossessing and expelling their Jewish 



coinhabitants? To begin with, they eliminated bothersome competition of Jewish businesses. 
Their homes were bought cheaply , or taken over by the administration. The debt amounts owed 
to jews were forfeited. Furniture and other Utensils were acquired for little money. The empty 
living Spaces could be assigned to others. The list of those who profited is long. 

The evaluation of the Walldorf public reached from fanaticism to those who feit they 
were just "doing their duty", from the indifferent to the gloating and malicious bystander, from 



10 



the sympathetic helper to the grudge-loaded, advantage-seeking person. This evaluation can 
stand up for many other German communities. 

After the end of World War II, everyone had different worries than thinking of the 
missing, never heard of again Jewish neighbors. When the hour of truth came and the awful 
tragedy of mass murder of Jews was publicly confessed, a number of villagers were "shocked." 
Only a few reacted with mourning and horror. The only survivor did not talk. (He passed away 
soon after Liberation. He was one of my father's cousins. 

The synagogue was wrecked in 1949, and the cemetery neglected. 

Slowly the remembrance of the former, dose association between the Jewish and non- 
Jewish inhabitants of Walldorf faded away. Today, nothing is spoken of these past times by the 
younger generation and the old ones do not care to be reminded. When the author of this 
Pamphlet asked, now after more than 50 years, "How could all this happen?," the eyewitness 
asked, feit embarrassed,not because they could have been amongst the perpetrators, but they did 
not care enough to reflect on these past events! They have difficulties fmding enough reasons 
to explain the resignation and blind devotion given to their "former leader" and his followers. 



11 



Reflections and Comments of the Translator of this Pamphlet: 

Alfred Gruenspecht 



Nazi persecution, murder, extermination, plundering, stealing and destroying was done 
in Europe throughout the centuries by ordinary Christians, men and women who went to 
churches to pray, by people, brought up and schooled within a modern society. How could they 
stoop so low? Annihilate millions of innocent men and women and over one million children? 
What snapped in their minds? What made men become brutal, like beasts with an animal 



mstinct? 



The myth of the Aryan super raceü The racial Aryan thinking stems from the belief in 
the purity of their blood and their physical strength. Germany, located in the heart of Europe, 
has nothing missing. It is blessed with a tempered climate, mountains and Valleys, the North 
Sea, the East Sea, rivers and lakes. The countryside is well kept and tended and populated. 
The Volks-Deutsche had no reason to run away. The country could support 70-80 million 
inhabitants. Only the frequent political upheavals and wars with their neighbors, Russia and 
France, to the East and West, upset the area in every Century. Germany had victories and 
defeats, but they always believed themselves to be the master race. They enjoyed dominating 
others and always prided themselves with their power! "The Master Race Myth" was part of 
their belief, and they were alwavs readv to demonstrate iff 

My personal opinion is: There is no purebred folks anywhere in this world because 
wars and strife make populations move and shift, which then integrates and intermarries and 
purity is lost. We can see it in our own country, in Africa or Asia or in the Americas. All 



12 



have mixed populations, some more, some less. The purest denomination and folks is probably 
the Jewish National Community. I believe that this is one of the reasons of hate and persecution 
in the past 2,000 years. Many folks have completely disappeared from the world's scene, but 



Jews have prevailed, although often barbarously decimated. 



- Alfred Gruenspecht 




fe erfolgte im September des gleichen Jahres, mit 
dem die betden über 70jährigen Juden Ins soge- 
nannte Altersghetto Theresienstadt gebracht wur- 
den. Sie waren so gebrechlich, daß oin Bauer 
ihnen einefi letzten verbotenen Dienst er.vies, in- 
dem er sie auf seinem Mistwagen zum Bahnhof 
fuhr. Unterwegs waren sie den Spöttereien einiger 
Leute ausgesetrl. Von ihnen allen kelirle nur der 
später deporlierle V/itwer G. als Überlebender 
zurück. 



Noch Kriegsende hatlen die Menschen ganz ande- 
re Sorger» u's die \.i\r^ ihre verscfiollenen jüdischen 
Nachbarn. Als die Stunde der Wahrlieit kam und 
die Tragödie des Massenmordes an den Juden 
bekanntgemacht wurde, zeigten sich viele Dorfbe- 
wohner davon betroffen. Einige Zeugen meinen 
allerdings, es hätten nur wenige riiit Trauer und 
Entsetzen darauf reogierl. Der einzige v^ieder im 



13 




WE GLADLY PURCHASED FROM THE JEW! 



Dagmar Seidel 



Member of the Research Team 



The Fate of the Jews in the National Socialist Thüringia 



- Translation, Remarks & Comments by Alfred Gruenspecht 



THE DISMISSAL OF THE JEWS OF WALLDORF 



STATE OF THÜRINGIA, GERMANY 



DURING NATIONAL SOCIALIST RULE 



The following detailed description should assist to make the unbelievable believable. 
How was it possible that legitimate people tolerated the undignified treatment of their Jewish 
neighbors, some even participating in Single cases? 

In the South-Thuringian Community of Walldorf, near the city of Meiningen, I have 
researched about its former Jewish Citizens and found an abundance of information. It comes 
from the main archives of the country, located in the city of Meiningein, with information 
concerning the administrative and technical management of the persecution of the Jews in the 
State, I also have reports of eyewitnesses on events which took place at that time, as well as 
some "eye catching" observances of participants, in one case, even from the victim. The "stone 
witnesses" — The Jewish Cemetery in Walldorf the former Jewish owned homes, and give 
testimony. 

Combining the various levels of information we'll get a good picture of the occurrences 



of the '30s and '40s years in the decade and a half of Nazi rule. The empirical results of my 



i 






4 



research remain next to my questions and my presumptions for the cause of these tragic 
eveiits/ Generalizations have to be made very carefully, still and all, I feel that the Statements 
made by the Walldorfers are representative even for many such similar small land communities 
at the time of Nazi rule. 

To the Situation before the "take over" of power by H.... during the 200 year tradition 
of communal life of Christians and Jews. The Jews were continuously more and more integrated 
into the life of the village communities. This was made possible by the equalization Laws of 
1856^ Living together with the Christian subjects in the Duchy of Sachsen-Meiningen- 
Hildburghausen. It resulted in the exodus of many Jewish families to the cities, especially to 
Meiningen. At the Start of the 30th year in our Century the population of Walldorf was 2000 
inhabitants. Thirty-seven were Jewish, comprising eleven households. The following families 
belonged to the Jewish Community: Frank, Frühauf, Grünspecht, Hermann, Katz, Lind, 
Ortweiler, Wertheim, as well as some Single persons, mostly widowed. In the economic life 
of the village, the Jewish merchants and business people played an important role. The 
Walldorf public gladly bought from butcher Katz, or in the Grünspecht Department Store, from 
the Wertheim bakery, and the skin and für merchants Lind & Ortweiler. This verifies the 
heading of the pamphlet: " W^ Gladly Purchased From Vre Jew, " The merchandise was good 
and reasonably priced. You could also Charge it or barter it in agriculture, goods and products. 
One can reason that Jews, because of their chastity, lifestyle, their efficiency and general 
contentment, were highly respected, although not always liked by all. Frequently, they were 
envied for their commercial accomplishments. 



The fact that they believed in a different religion, having a different lifestyle, the non- 
Jewish inhabitants reacted, at all times, with incomprehension. Reflexively, they uttered: "They 
belonged to us, but they were not like we are. They were just Jews," emphasizing "We had not 
hatred, but good neighborly relations, occasionally real friendship." 

The group of Walldorfers of mosaic belief was not homogeneous. Some were well-to-do, 
others poor, some liberals, a few communists, others politically inactive, but true believers in 
Jewish traditional values. A very few were distantly removed from practiced Judaism. Some 
were members in the S.P.D., the Social Democratic Party of Deutschland. Others belonged to 
the K.P.D., the communist party. Although they were dependent on each other, they did not 
mix. It was peaceful, but not always an untroubled, living together. 

In the forever existing chasm between Jews and non-Jews, the powerful machinery of 
the Nazis was always ready and willing to drive a larger wedge of distrust deeper and deeper. 
It wasn't successful with the friends of the Jews, but suited those who looked at their Jewish 
neighbors with unpleasant feelings, or with complete indifference. 

The only living eyewitness of the victims remembered that in Walldorf actions against 
Jews were more tempered than in other places. In the nearby town of Meiningen many more 
Nazi activists were busy distressing fellow Jewish Citizens. The country milieu was 
advantageous to many, since people knew their neighbors very well, secretly helping their 
friends. On the other band, the larger cities gave a little more anonymity to the victims. 

Very few German Jews sensed the implication of terror to come! 



Only two, well-to-do and childless families left Walldorf before the November pogrom 
in 1938.^ 

How effective was the Nazi Anti-Semitic Propaganda onslaught on the minds of the 
village people? The Walldorfers asked, very vividly remembered, the showcase at the 
Municipality office, where the Nazi Propaganda newspaper Der Stürmer (The Forward) was 
displayed^ under the heading ''Die Juden sind unser Unglück,'' (The Jews are our misfortune.) 
With abhorrence, they considered the portrayal of Jews as grotesque caricatures and read with 
disgust the filthy insults perceiving at that time the unjust accusations, thinking, "Why the Jews? 
What did they do?" On all poles, posters were attached, "Do not buy from Jews." 

One of the teachers in the local public school lectured the students to spite the handful 
of Jewish children in a demagogue way. He referred to them as J. creatures. At the Start of 
his classes in the moming, he read sections from Der Stürmer, with nasty comments. This 
teacher retained a hateful attitude to anything Jewish. In companionship with his wife, he 
ambushed his next door Jewish neighbors with malicious and wicket tricks. Many people in the 
villa«^e resentexi his tactless behavior. He is the only teacher named to have discriminated 



^ I remember my father's uncle, who practiced medicine in Berlin, Dr. Fritz Gumpertz, 
leaving Berlin with his wife, Tante Emmy and their two children for Jerusalem in 1934. 

^ I remember the open display of Der Stürmer in my former hometown, Wüstensachsen, füll 
of derogatory remarks, disgusting caricatures and insulting stories, read and believed by the Nazi 
mob. 



against the last two remaining students.^ He accomplished that these kids were teased and 
beaten. They lost their desire to attend classes. 

My conversation partners feit upset by the massive flood of anti-Jewish Propaganda. 
Many feil victim to the constant onslaught of hate, also, here in this south Thuringian village, 

and became influenced by it. 

How big the share of sympathizers were^cannot be estimated now. Only one person 
asked, admitted to have believed all the lies and mud spread by the Nazi Propaganda machine. 
When this person met the surviving daughter of the former butcher Katz who visited (probably 
the cemetery), he feit uneasy. His guilty conscience must have bothered him. 

Another part of the inhabitants reacted towards the anti-Jewish campaign with perplexity 
and helplessness. "What could we do against it?," resigned to their superiority and 
predominance. All those who did not trust the hate campaign kept silent publicly — less out of 
fear or punishment, but more out of worry to be excluded from the Community. 

Propaganda and calls for boycotts showed their results gradually . Customers stayed away 
from Jewish businesses. Others shopped secretly. Look-outs watched: Who would still go to 
the Jew. The fear of being caught buying at a Jewish störe or being seen to patronize, would 
get the person the Stigma as a Volksverräter (public traitor). In spite of the consequences, 
women helped in the Matzoh bakery Wertheim in the weeks before the Passover holiday. To 
the few intrepid women belonged Mrs. K., well befriended with Family Wertheim. At one 



^ I remember when our teacher, in our Jewish elementary school, became ill. We had to 
attend public school in Wüstensachsen, my birthplace. One of our teachers there, Lehrer 
Mutzek, was a Nazi in flesh and blood, always fmding a reason to stigmatize us. I will never 
forget this man. A.G. 



time, when she brought a cake to have it baked in the bakery, someone photographed her. The 
photo was displayed in the community's showcase with the heading Volksverräter (public 
traitor). However, this moral punishment did not bother her. 

To many others the feelings for rights and justice and injustice, the courage for truth did 
get lost. The saying: "Well, we were not permitted to have any contact with the Jews" was 
given as an excuse and apology for their conduct. This shows the disastrous consequences of 
they typical German mental attitude, "obedience towards the government is the primary rule of 
the Citizen." 

One person who did not need any excuses to be an Opponent to the Jews and was 
responsible for the execution of many anti-Semitic decrees was the Mayor of Walldorf. In a 
letter to the Thuringian Minister of the Interior of August 1935, he aired his resentment against 
the Jews of Walldorf in which he made accusations against them. With inventive 
highhandedness, he proposed certain measures against them, similar to those the government 
implemented years later. According to available documents, the Ministry sent a refusal notice 
informing the Mayor that the planned measures were inadmissable. The Mayor, at this time 
"shot the arrow over the mark." He presumably was upset about his own suppressed eagerness. 
His mental attitude did not hold him back from sneaking at night to the Jewish butcher to get 
some good and tender meat for his sick father. 

Another example of highhanded and independent proceeding was done by the person in 
Charge of the Bureau of Vital Statistics. He found reasons to prevent, for unknown reasons, the 
planned marriage of Alfred Lind with his bride Elli Mansfeld despite the fact that marriage of 



two Jewish Citizens was permitted by law. Every time the couple showed up at his office to get 



the necessary documents, he refused to see them. Mr. Lind had to leave his bride behind on 
his emigration to the U.S.A., and she was deported, experiencing the fate of the unfortunate 
millions. 

The Federal Law for Citizens of November 1935, that described the term "Jude" (Jew) 
in lawful terms, caused no changes in Walldorf towards the Jewish Citizens. They were and 
remained just Jews. More important, and more troublesome, appeared the fact that everybody 
had to show proof of descendency. To this procedure, commented Mrs. H., who is mentioned 
to be the dearest friend of the Jews, to have made the disrespectful, funny remark: You have 
to prove now your "Arab descendency." 



The Pogrom-Night, November 1938 

The occurrence on Pogrom-Night is told as an incomphensible, inconceivable trauma. 
The Walldorfers refer to it as "The Night" when the synagogue was destroyed, Jewish men 
arrested, and young Jewish women ashamedly beaten. Allegedly, a number of "dumb fellows" 
were instieated with hate sloeans and alcohol a^ainst the Jews of Walldorf. Now thev could 
shed their feelings of envy and their lust for Sensation. 

The horde marched noisily through the village, whereby the instigators kept themselves 
in the background. Everyone remembered a "poor joke" that "the fellows" afforded todo. Sali 
Wertheim, the Jewish baker, had a wagon to deliver bread. This wagon was pushed into a 
nearby river. A former employee helped along. His motive is not known. It could have been 
gloating or a desire for recognition or an act of personal revenge. The deeper question remains: 
Did he and the other participants have to overcome a guilt feeling to ruin and destroy the 



property of others? The startled inhabitants, awakened by the uproar, assembled on the streets 
and before the synagogue and observed the spectacle. A person asked if he remembered these 
scenes, answered, "Yes, I remember my father's warning to stay away from this band of people 
saying: 'If you Uft one band against a Jew, I dare you!!""* 

In the opinion of the eyewitness, most of the onlooking people disagreed with the actions 
against the Jews, but nobody ordered these vandals to stop. This was the most frequent reaction 
of the German public towards events against their Jewish neighbors. The only person daring 
to violently protest was the aforementioned Mrs. K. She yelled at the raging men: Shame on 
you! In return, they answered: "Be quiet, or we'll come up to you too." Some of the 
persecuted and injured Jews found compassion and shelter by some neighbors. 

The events of that night caused a tremendous tremor to the already shaken relationship 
of Jews and non-Jews. The belief of living harmoniously together in Walldorf was shattered. 
The Jewish inhabitants were able to look into the abyss of human souls. Up until that time they 
could not believe that their fellow men could be so nasty and spiteful. They withdrew more and 
more out of fear of renewed actions. From then on, they could encounter nothing but a wall 
of new edicts and laws, orders to refrain from almost everything, to sever all relations to the 
common public. Step by step, they were robbed of their livelihood, their possessions and their 
personal freedom. Every move was covered by legal means. 

The representatives of the State government, the Mayor (since 1937 a new Mayor came 
into Office) and the policemen for the small town played an important role in all events. They 
were responsible, besides their other obligations, for Controlling the observance of the anti- 



Not many fathers protested these unholy deeds openly. 



8 



Semitic decrees, reporting the Jews that have emigrated and those still living there, confiscating 
assets and reporting violations. Available records confirm this information. 

The author of the pamphlet writes: 

My conversation-partners condemned the deeds of the fanatical Jew-haters, but ^ 

not the town officials, excusing them. They had to foUow Orders and do their 

duty." 
The fact that the town officials were respected persons made it difficult for the Walldorf Citizens 
to criticize and judge their conduct. 

In the following letter to the Federal Sports Authority, dated February 1939, by the 
Mayor, who made himself into the mouthpiece of his Community, he wrote: 

It causes much offense in our village to have the Jewess, Elli Mansfeld, wearing 

"The Federal Sports Decoration" every day. Isn't there a way to reclaim this 

badge? 
The author brings a few additional episodes of anti-Semitic measures to picture "violations of 
German honori" 

Only a few anti-Semitic ordinances and their effects could be recalled by the Walldorf 
inhabitants. Many have been forgotten, from others they have no knowledge, but they still 
remembered that Jewish businesses were forced to close and the sons of the Grünspecht family 
(Two first Cousins of my father were called to do forced labor, building the Hohenwarte water- 



lock. One of them died at work, 47 years old, in 1942.) were forced into hard labor. They 



remembered that all Jews had to wear the yellow star and were forbidden to enter the German 



forest. 



Outwardly, the Walldorf popuIation showed obedience to the demands of the Nazi regime 



and turned away from their Jewish families. However, all those that had good contact and 
relations to Jewish families ignored the Nazi Orders, in spite of impending punishment, they 
visited their Jewish friends, under cover of darkness, brought them food, spoke to them words 
of consolation and urged them to emigrate. Sali Wertheim, for instance, received money to pay 
towards his emigration and food for werk done. 

The oldest of Walldorfers sald in an interview: "I feit sorry for the Jews. They are also 
human beings and I could have been Jewish too!" She represented one, that showed her humane 
sympathies and self-respect. 

Up to the last possible time, eleven Jews of Walldorf were able to emigrate to the U.S.A. 
Families Lind, Ortweiler, Katz, Friedmann and Wertheim. They were saved. The others were 
deported in two sections: The first in May 1942 to Poland, and the second to Theresienstadt. 
Only one pcrson survived, the widower G, but he died soon after Liberation. 

What advantage did the village gain from dispossessing and expelling their Jewish 
coinhabitants? To begin with, they eliminated bothersome competition of Jewish businesses. 
Their homes were bought cheaply, or taken over by the administration. The debt amounts owed 
to jews were forfeited. Furniture and other Utensils were acquired for little money. The empty 
living Spaces could be assigned to others. The list of those who profited is long. 

The evaluation of the Walldorf public reached from fanaticism to those who feit they 
were just "doing their duty", from the indifferent to the gloating and malicious bystander, from 




10 



the sympathetic helper to the grudge-loaded, advantage-seeking person. This evaluation can 
stand up for many other German communities. 

After the end of World War II, everyone had different worries than thinking of the 
missing, never heard of again Jewish neighbors. When the hour of truth came and the awful 
tragedy of mass murder of Jews was publicly confessed, a number of villagers were "shocked." 
Only a few reacted with mourning and horror. The only survivor did not talk. (He passed away 
soon after Liberation. He was one of my father's cousins. 

The synagogue was wrecked in 1949, and the cemetery neglected. 

Slowly the remembrance of the former, close association between the Jewish and non- 
Jewish inhabitants of Walldorf faded away. Today, nothing is spoken of these past times by the 
younger generation and the old ones do not care to be reminded. When the author of this 
pamphlet asked, now after more than 50 years, "How could all this happen?," the eyewitness 
asked, feit embarrassed,not because they could have been amongst the perpetrators, but they did 
not care enough to reflect on these past events! They have difficulties finding enough reasons 
to exnlain the resignation and blind devotion given to their "former leader" and his followers. 



11 



Reflections and Conunents of the Translator of this Pamphlet: 

Alfred Gruenspecht 



Nazi persecution, murder, extermination, plundering, stealing and destroying was done 
in Europe throughout the centuries by ordinary Christians, men and women who went to 
churches to pray, by people, brought up and schooled within a modern society. How could they 
stoop so low? Annihilate millions of innocent men and women and over one million children? 
What snapped in their minds? What made men become brutal, like beasts with an animal 
instinct? 

The myth of the Aryan super raceü The racial Aryan thinking stems from the belief in 
the purity of their blood and their physical strength. Germany, located in the heart of Europe, 
has nothing missing. It is blessed with a tempered climate, mountains and Valleys, the North 
Sea, the East Sea, rivers and lakes. The countryside is well kept and tended and populated. 
The Volks-Deutsche had no reason to run away. The country could support 70-80 million 
mhabitants. Only the frequent political uplieavals and wars with their neighbors, Russia and 
France, to the East and West, upset the area in every Century. Germany had victories and 
defeats, but they always believed themselves to be the master race. They enjoyed dominating 
others and always prided themselves with their power! "The Master Race Myth" was part of 
their belief, and they were always ready to demonstrate it! 

My personal opinion is: There is no purebred folks anywhere in this world because 
wars and strife make populations move and shift, which then integrates and intermarries and 
purity is lost. We can see it in our own country, in Africa or Asia or in the Americas. All 



12 



have mixed populations, some more, some less. The purest denomination and folks is probably 
the Jewish National Community. I believe that this is one of the reasons of hate and persecution 
in the past 2,000 years. Many folks have completely disappeared from the world's scene, but 



Jews have prevailed, although often barbarously decimated. 



- Alfred Gruenspecht 




End^ösuni / 
-produld n 
-punkt m 
-sliuJon/ 
-lumme/ 




te erfolgte im September des gleichen Jahres, mit 
dem 6\e beiden über 70jährigen Juden ins soge- 
nannte Altersghetto Theresienstodt gebracht wur- 
den. Sie waren so gebrechlich, daß ein Bauer 
ihnen einen letzten verbotenen Dienst er.vies, in- 
dem er sie ouf «meinem Mistwagen zum Bahnhol 
fuhr. Unferv;egs waren sie den Spöttereien einiger 
Leute GusgesetTt. Von ihnen nllen kehrte nur der 
später deportierte V/itwer G. als ÜbeHebender 
zurück. 



Nach Kriegsende hatten die Menschen ganz ande- 
re Sorgen als die um ihre verschollenen jüdischeri 
Nocfiborn. Als die Stunde der Wahrheit kam und 
die Tragödie des Massenmordes an den Juden 
bekanntgemacht wurde, zeigten sich viele Dodbe- 
wohner davon betroffen. Einige Zeugen meinen 
allerdings, es hätten nur wenige mit Trauer und 
Entsetzen darauf reogierl. Der einzige v^ieder im 



13 



+ß AACA^ 



i 



/^9 



M-t(^eD Gl^UMU^^^CttX r*V^>V_V COCLeCTlOK/ 



^ vr V9"|f t> I "^ ^ ? ^ <^ C'^^ 




/ 



I 



\ 



7b/v\^^^ 



1 Vf 



^'^^0^ 




ISRAEL NACHRICHTEN ^^-)i^'> r\Win 



Sonnfag, 6.6.1976 



SANDRA PARETTI 



vV 



Wunsch bäum 



(^U0m€K K^AUR i'fRLAS SCHOiLUR i CoLocar.o}975\ 



Sexualmordprozess unter 
Ausschluss der OeHenllichkeil 



te^^^^hllng^-; falls, bei dem drei Personen vci- 



Ais sie endlich in die v^eue Halle hinaustraten, 

in der die Menschen sich rasch vcriiclcn. schiiiunzcl- 
te Frii/ Hotmann vor sich hin: ..Wenn der cc- 
wusst hiitie. was ich in meinem Kotier habel Aber 
so ist das, Kleider machen noch immer Leute." 

.,Das hatte genausogut schietgehen können." 

„Ein paar Stück Seite wird man wohl noch dabei- 
haben dürfen! Wer weiss, wie das Essen in der Kli- 
nik ist; gegen Seife kannst du alles haben." 

Sie wollte etwas Heftiges erwidern, da hörte sie, 
dass jemand ihren Namen rief. Sie blickte sich 
suchend um; ihr Gesicht wurde noch um einen Schat- 
ten ernster, als sie Dr. Kautsky erkannte, aber dann 
dachte sie: Sicher hat er eine Droschke. 

Dr. Kautsky war der Anwalt der Firma, und 
sie hatte gewisse Reserven ihm gegenüber; er war 
ihr etwas zu glatt und etwas zu gerissen, aber das 
hatte natürlich auch sein Gutes, vor allem in ei- 
ner Zeit wie dieser, wo man sich sein Recht ei- 
gentlich nur noch auf Umwegen verschaffen konnte. 

Er kam heran, klein, das linke Bein leicht nach- 
ziehend, die Folgen einer Kinderlähmung; der re- 
lativ junge Mann war dadurch vom Militärdienst 
befreit. 

„Wie du nur mit einem solchen Mann auskom- 
men kannst", flüsterte Hof mann. 

,,Er ist tüchtig, nur darauf kommt es an, nicht, 
dass er mir sympathisch ist. Also, leg dich nicht 
gleich wieder mit ihm an wie letzthin, bitte.' 

Dr. Kautsky nahm kurz den Hut ab, so dass 
sein dunkles stark gekräuseltes Haar sichtbar wur- 
de. Einen Augenblick schien er zu überlegen, ob 
er eine Bemerkung über das Wetter und die Ver- 
spätung des Zuges machen sollte, aber dann kam er 
wie immer direkt zur Sache. 

,,Sie haben den Termin der Verhandlung vor- 
verlegt. Ich habe es selber erst vor einer Stunde 
erfahren und konnte Sie in Neustrelitz nicht mehr 
erreichen." 

„Wann ist der neue Termin?" 

„Um zwei Uhr im Kriegsbeschaffungsamt, zwei- 
ter f^tOcV. *st\S\\ TX' To\-» ^ .M SilclxV -lwii.Wi.,^^. vi-» Slsi 

steh noch vor Mittag bei mir melden, deshalb bin 
ich hergekommen. Es gibt da noch einiges zu be- 
sprechen." 

„Haben Sie eine Droschke?" 

„Ja. Kann ich Sie ins Hotel bringen?" Er deute- 
te auf die Koffer; „Ist das Ihr ganzes Gepäck?" 

,, Macht Ihnen ein kleiner Umweg etwas aus? Wir 
könnten während der Fahrt reden." 

„Nicht das geringste. Wo soll ich Sie hinbringen?" 

„In die Wallbaum-Klinik. Sie liegt ziemlich am 
Weg, wenn Sie Monbijou-Platz fahren, zeige ich 
Ihnen, wo wir abbiegen müssen." 

„Ich werde dem Fahrer Beschied sagen." 

Dr. Kautsky nahm Camilla den Koffer ab und 
ging voraus. Als sie aus der Halle ins Freie traten, 
hatte das Schneetreiben aufgehört, und Camilla be- 
dauerte es fast, denn das hätte den tristen Anblick, 
den der Bahnhofsplatz bot, vielleicht etwas gemil- 
dert: Die Menschenschlangen vor den Geschäften 
jenseits des Platzes, oft zwei, drei Häuserfronten 
lang; die verrosteten Karren der Schneeräume-Ko- 
lonne, die sich aus Frauen und Halbwüchsigen rekru- 
tierte; die Litfassäulen, die nicht mehr mit bunten 
Reklameplakaten beklebt waren, sondern nur noch 
•mit öffentlichen Bekanntmachungen, im Moment 
war es die Ausschreibung der fünften Kriegsanleihe. 

Die Ankunft in Berlin, früher ein Fest, war jetzt 
immer ein Schock für Camilla; jedesmal wurde der 
schrittweise Verfall der Stadt sichtbarer. Manch- 
mal schien es ihr, als gäbe es die Stadt, die sie 
so liebte, nicht mehr — ihr Berlin... Sie hatten 
damals, 1914, das Haus in Steglitz von der Bank 
gekauft, noch im August, zu einem besonders gün- 
stigen Preis. Als im Mai 1915 Italien zum Feind 
überging und die Italienische Botschaft in Berlin 
ihre Zelte abbrach, war es plötzlich leeraestanden, 
laber sie hatten sich nicht entschliessen können 
einzuziehen und hatten die Uebersiedlunc für die 
Dauer des Kriegs aufgeschoben. Eine sehr weise 
Entscheidung, wie sich inzwischen gezeigt hatte, 
denn in Neustrelitz war es mit allem besser, an- 
gefangen bei den Arbeitskräften bis hin zu den 
Lebensmitteln. Das unbewohnte Haus war dann be- 
schlagnahmt und in ein Lazarett umgewandelt 
worden... 

Sie hatten in der Droschke Platz genommen, und 
Camilla hätte am liebsten die Rollos heruntergezo- 
gen, um sich weitere deprimierende Bilder zu erspa- 
ren. Ihr Vater hatte den Anwalt in eine Unterhal- 
tung verwickelt, die sich um die neuen Kriegs- 
anleihen drehte. 

„Sie als der Anwalt meiner Tochter sollten ihr 
eigentlich dringend abraten, weiter zu zeichnen " 

..Wir haben schon die letzte nicht mehr gezeichnet." 

(Fortsetzung folgt) 



Gerichtssa 



hafi ge^n Kauiions.^tellunc zu. 



AMTSRICHTER \ OR DEM 

BFZIRKSRICHTER 

Der Haifaer Amtsrichier Ram 
Savir ni"sste sich 



letzt wurden, verantworten. 

nie Aussagen der Zeugen er- 
schienen dem Bezirksrichter der- 

den 



versierter 

art unglaubhaft, dass er den i sen und Gelehrsamkeit nach in und Stimmstörungen. wandte 

Amtsiichter von der Anklage der | heutiger Zeil zu den Seltenhei- er sich hier mit besonderer l ie- 

.irksee ••■■ h, Nazar.r' '^"^ «e- : fahrlässigen Handlungsweise frei- 1 ten gehört. | be phonetischen Problemen der 

zirKsyc .^ I t'^H/aret \\e'^cn der — . - . -~ - . 



sprach 



DAV ACri 



Der 27jahrißc Schlomo Cha-j Die ;*o|,/.ei .t.mmic der Fni- j Verur^achunc emes \cikchrsun- 
lawa ans Akko steht unter dem.lassung aus der Lni 

^crd;uh(. die Sexualmorde an 
Eeoiiore Ken-I iilii und an zwei 
weiteren Madehcn in der (iegend j 

/wischen Netania luid Haifa! 
durchßefiihrl zu haben. 

Die \ erhiitidlungcn beginnen 

jetzt unter Ausschlu-s der Öffent- 
lichkeit. Inzwi.schen haben be- 
reits tiint .Madchen, die von 
C'halawa vergewaltigt wurden, ih- 
re Zeugenaussagen vor dem Be- 
zirksgericht .lerusalem zu Proto- 
koll gegeben. 

Fin njahriges Mäilchen fuhr 
am 31.10.1975 mit dem Aulobus 
von Tel Aviv nach Maale Hacha- 
mischa. Chalawa folgte ihi und 
frug sie nach einem Abkürziings- 
weg nach Schoeva. fm Walde 
zog er ein Mes.ser imd zwang 
das Mädchen, sich zu entkleiden. 
Dann vergew.iltigte er sie drei- 
mal. 

Am 7. .Januar diesexS Jahres 
suchte sich Chalawi eine 20jäh- 
rige freiwillige Helferin aus den 
L'S.A aus, die mit dem Autobus 
von Haifa nach Galed fuhr. In 
einem Wald erklärte er ihr in 
englischer Sprache, dass er sein 
Verlangen nach ihr nicht bändi- 
gen könne und sie ermorden 
müsse, wenn sie sich ihm nicht 
preisgebe. Er vergewaltigte sie 
und Hess sie dann frei. 

Neun Tage später war eine 
20järige Soldatin, die mit einem 
Auto von Tel Aviv nach Arad 
fahren \\ollte, sein Opfer. In der 
Nähe von Bet Dagan führte er 
sie in eine Zitrusplantage, wo 
er sie zweimal vergewaltigte, 
dann aber gegen die Zusage, dass 
sie in nicht anzeige, ihren Weg 
fortsetzen Hess. 

Eine 29jährige Touristin aus 
den USA wollte am 27. .Januar 
von Tel Aviv nach Jerusalem 
fahren. Chalawa hatte eine Mi- 
litärimiform angezogen und sich 
ein Gewehr umgehängt. Darum 
ii«iiiui ein MilJiarauio beide bis 

Maale Hachamischa mit. Dort 
bedrohte er die Touristin mit 
dem Gewehr, doch sie entfloh 
ihm in Richtung zur Chaussee. 
Chalawi eilte ihr nach und 
würgte sie, bis sie das ßewusst- 
sein verlor. Als sie wieder zu 
sich kam. angeblich durch Mund 
zu Mund-Beamtung, waren ihre 
Hände gebunden, sodass sie Cha-| 
lawa vergewaltigen konnte. 

Am Abend des 31. Januar war- 
tete eine 21jährige Pianistin ne- 
ben dem Country Club auf ein 
Taxi nach Herzlia. Ohalawi, der 
wiederum eine Militärjacke und 
ein Gewehr trug, bot ihr an, sie 
auf einen Abkürzungsweg zu ih- 
rem Ziel zu bringen. Aber bald 
fiel er über sie her und forderte 
ihr Geld. Als das Mädchen er- 
widerte, dass sie nur wenig Geld 
bei sich habe, gab sich Chalawi 
mit einer zweimaligen Vergewal- 
tigung zufrieden. Der Pianistin 
gelang es dann. Chalawa in das 
Haus ihrer Bekannten einzula- 
den. Er konnte zwar entkommen, 
bevor die Polizei eintraf, doch 
gelang kurz darauf seine Festnah- 
me, als er bei Bet Schemescb 
ein neues Opfer suchte. 

RECHTSANWALT HATTE 
SPIELSCHCLDEN 

Rechtsanwalt Amnon Stern- 
berg aus Haifa, der unter dem 
Verdacht der Annahme von ge- 
stohlenen Wertgegenständen 
steht, erklärte vor Gericht, dass 
er erpressi wurde, weil er hohe 
Spielschulden abzuzahlen hatte. 
Er hat diese Schmucksachen, von 
denen er nicht wusste. dass sie 
gestohlen waren, jedenfalls nicht 
als Honorar eines Mandanten 
empfangen. 



wmMdeh, 



Dr Jechiel F. Gumpertz — in Memoriam 

M>i dem Tode von Dr. Gum-den Vorzug, uahrcnd vieler Jah- 
Pert/. der \or einigen Wochen rc mit dem Heimcccancenen in 
m lerusalem im Alter von 88 1 der Berliner (icmemdc im Rah- 
Jcihren verschied, isi eine derimen der jüdischer Volkspartei 
hervorragciulsicn und mmkanie-j zusammen m arbeiten, 
"^ten PcrHinlichkciten unseres; 
l.andis d,ihingegancen. Wer ihm' SEIT 1933 IN ,ll'.Rl SAEF.M 

noch bis vor wenigen .Iahten — : J933 hatte Dr. (.iinicM/ sich 
aut den Strassen Jerusalems tag-, in Jerusalem als vielbcschäftig- 

aus ti gein mit seiner Instrumen- ^ jcr Facharzt nicdcrgcla^-^cn. stets 

tcntasche auf dem Wege zu sei-: noch Zeit findend^ für wissen- 
ncn Patienten begegnete, mochte schaftliche Forschung auf sci- 
I wohl kaum vermuten, da.ss sich i nen Spezialgebieten. Und hier im 
I hinter dem vielbeschäftigten Arzt j Lande treten seine Neigungen 
eine ganz aiisscigewöhnliche Per- i und Fähigkeiten erst in vollem 
sönlicikeit veibarg. wie sie dem ; Umfang zutage. .Ms 
Ausmiss und Umfang von Wis- . Kenner menschlicher 



Imposanter Komplex an 
der Themse 

Zu Gast im Nationaltheater — rondoner Theaterbrief 

\o\\ Peter Miink 

Da^ Londoner Nationalfheater ist eröffnet — sang- und 
klanglos begann es naeh über lOOlährißer Wartezeit endlich 
seine erste Spielzeit mit Vorführung von Stücken, die man 
schon letztes Jahr im "Old Vic- gesehen hatte. Man ging aber 
hm, lim die Möglichkeiten des Neubau« zu erforschen. Ist 
die Akustik ausreichend? Sind Saal und Bühne anpassiings- 
fähig genug für Anforderungen moderner Bühnentechnik, 
Hurden Foyers und Restaurants adäquat gestaltet? 

Nur ein Drittel des neuen Hauses (aus drei Häusern in- 
cinanöc-rgeschachtelt) ist erstmals zugänglich, das Lyttelton- 
theater mit etwa 900 Sitzplätzen. Und wie beeindruckt auch 
immer der Besucher von dem Gesamtplan dieses neuen, im- 
posanten Komplexes an der Thefse sein mac — mit seinen 
weitau>ladenden Terrassen, den licht- und schattenaufgeglie- 
derten Kuben und Rhomben — das Theater selbst, in dem 
bis zim Fruhsommer alle Aufführungen beheimatet sein 
werden, entpuppt sich als eine Enttäuschung. Fast kindlich 
bejubelte das Publikum anfangs den neuartigen eisernen 
Vorhang, der sich geräuschlos öffnete oder schloss, freute 
sich an der riesigen haifischrachenartigen Proszeniumbühne, 
an den plump und unverhohlen in den Raum sehängten Be- 
leuchtingskörpern. Doch dann fragte man sich ernüchtert: 
Wieso konnte hier ein neues Theater errichtet werden, das 
so ung:mein konventionell wirkt .nicht sehr bequeme Sitze 
hat, eine nahezu unberechenbare Akustik, eine unverändei 
fiche uiiu iraduionefi erhome tjutincinampt: — gciduu..:^ 

wie in anderen Theatern des Londoner Westend, von nüch- 
tern gioben Betonrängen eingeklammert und zusammenge- 
halten v.ie ein Kino. 

Die Erklärung, hier solle später vor allem klassisches Re- 
pertoire gespielt werden, befriedigt nicht, denn es gibt heut- 
zutage technische Möglichkeiten, e ne konventionell wirken- 
de Bühnengestaltung zu transformieren. Das ist nicht getan 
worden — wohl aus Geldmangel Denn aller Ideenreich- 
tum w e auch ein Löwenanteil der fast 200 Millionen IL, 
die der gesamte Bau kostet, sind auf das noch unfertige Oli- 
vier-Theater ausgeschüttet worden. Schon jetzt konnte man 
feststehen, dass dieses neue Theater mit seiner brillanten 
Synthese aus griechischem Amphitheater und elisabethani- 
scher Schürzenbühne eines der grossartigsten Bühnenhäuser 
der Wtit zu werden verspricht. 



1 Anerk:annter Facharzt für Hals- 1 hebräischen Sprache zu. Hier in 
Nasen und Ohienkrankheiten, Jerusalem fand er in der Epoche 



Spezialist für Behandlung von 
Sprach- und Stimmstörungen, 
war Dr.Gumpertz gleichermassen 
bewandert auf dem Gebiet der 
hebräischen Phonetik. Sicher gibt 



des Kibbuz Galujot eine nie wie- 
derkehrende Gelegenheit, pho- 
netische Fragen an der Ot'elle 
zu .studieren. 
Im Gespräch mit einem jeme 



es nicht viele, die so wie er die! niti.schenCchacham, einem kurdi- 
verwKkelten Probleme der Ge- Uchen Lasttrüger oder einem ..rei- 
schichte der Hebräischen Gram- jnen Sfaradi'". deren Aussprache 
matik. die komplexen Sprachfra- j noch nicht durch aschkcnasische 
gen d_-r Bibeliexte und die fein- j Lehrer nivelliert wurde, klärt er 
sten Ausspiach-Differenzierungenjdie feinsten Differenzierungen 
des von Juden in aller Welt ge-jder verschiedenen Dialekte i^nd 
sprochenen Hebräischen be- zieht Folgerungen in seinen For- 



herrschte. Daneben war er ein 
Mann grossen jüdischen und all- 
gemeinen Wissens — Talmud 
Chacham im wahrsten Sinne des 
Wortes. Kunst- und Musik-Iie- 
bend. lie sich mit oberflächlichen 
Kennt lissen begnügend, sondern 
stets in die Tiefe dringend. 



schungen über die Entvvicklungs- 
phasen der hebräischen Gram- 
matik. 

Die Krone seiner wissenschaft- 
lichen Tätigkeit auf die.sem Ge- 
biet kann ohne Zweifel in dem 
vor vielen Jahren erschienenen 
Buch „Mivtä Sfatenu" — phone- 



tisch-historische Studien, gesehen 
HERVORRAGENDER VATER 1 werden, das noch heute als Stan- 

dardwerk für all die gilt, die sich 
Geboren in Hamburg, wuchs 

Dr. G impertz als Sohn einer be- 
kannten und. weit verzweigten 
Familie heran, in der echteFröm- 
migkeit, Thorawissen und allge- 
meine Bildung keine Gegensätze 
waren Sein Vater, Hermann 
Gumpertz, gehörte zu den her- 
vorragendsten Gestalten des 
Henrichen Judentum«! meiner 7eit. 



Schwarzes Ensemble 

Bisher hatte man in London farbige oder dunkelhäutige 
Ensembles nur in Musicals sehen können — das Royal 
Court-Lhcater aber bot das ungewöhnliche Schauspiel eines 
'^bis aif zwei übertrieben alberne weisshäutige Polizisten) voll- 
kommjn dunklen Ensembles in dem neuen Stück des in Lon- 
don ansässigen Nigerianers Yemi Aiibade. "Parcel Post" (Pa- 
keipos-Annahme verweigert) gibt Einblick in die tw^c VVelt 
schwazer Londoner. Eine beNtellte Braut trifft aus Nicerlen 
ß'"' it aber schon schwanger, und die .Annahme wird ver- 
weigett. Um diese ttagikomische Situation rankt sich 
exotish-charmantes Spiel mit den Gebräuchen. Woodoo 
und ihristlich angehauchten Riten, der oft lärmenden Mu- 
sikalitit. Humor und Naivität dieser Neu-Londoner. Beste- 
chendwirkte nicht nur die präzise Wiedergabe, sondern auch 
die diistellerische Kunst dieses Ensembles. Einzelne Farbige 
habet! bisher in seltenen Rollen — wie etwa ein schwarzer 
"Calhan" oder eine schwarze Mätresse im "Kaiser von Ame- 
rika" — flüchtig die Londoner Biihnenbrctier betreten kön- 
nen. \ber dies ist das erste Mal. dass ein schwarzes boden- 
stämiDiges Ensemble verdienten Erfolg hat. Die zahlreiche 
Hier gebürtige farbige Jugend beginnt, ihren Platz und ihre 
Beachtung auch auf der Londoner Bühne zu erringen. 



Käutrfiä.;n g»*r.^Ncri>oimai.s. gjan-i (jebicic«! 
zender Reciiier, Talmudgelehrter, 
ein Mann ausgeprägten Verstan- 
des und von weit voraussehender 
Klugheit, verband er in sich jü- ! In einer Zeit, in der der geistige 



mit den Problemen der hebrä- 
ischen Grammatik befassen. Das 
alles geschah ohne den heute 
üblichen Hang zur „Publicity". 
Als treuer Schüler des Berliner 
Rabbiner-Seminars und im Sinne 
seines Gründers Rabbi Esriel Hil- 
desheimer galt auch bei Dr. 
Gumpertz der Drang nach Meh- 
rnnT 'ir.'^f'-e«: W'<-^pr.«: auf allen 
äJS iweOOISiiiCA. ^ 

So blicken wir Freunde und 
Kollegen mit Wehmut, aber auch 
mit Stolz auf den Verblichenen. 



dische> W'ssen mit den grossen 
und unstet blichen Werten der 
Weltkiiltur. Als Elieser Ben Je 



und politische Horizont von 
dunklen Wolken umwölkt ist, ist 
es ein erhebender Gedanke zu 



huda nach Hamburg kam. um, wissen, dass eine solche Persön- 



für sein gro.sses Wörterbuch zu 
werben, wohnte er in Gumpertz 
Haus. Kurz nach Herzl's be- 



lichkeitunter uns weilte, und die 
Erinnerung an ihn soll für uns 
alle ohne Unterlass. Mahnung 



rühmter Reise nach Jerusalem.; sein, das Panier geistiger Werte 

und schöpferischen Tuns hoch- 
zuhalten. 

W. Silberstein, 
Jerusalem 
AUSSCHMUECKEN 
VON GRAEBERN 
Die Ausschmückung von Grä- 
bern mit Blumen ist sehr schön. 



besuchte auch Vater Gumpertz 
das Heilige Land. In solch gei- 
stesge«ichwängerter jüdischer At- 
mosphäre wuchs Dr. Gumpertz 
heran, so die besten Werte jüdi- 
scher und universaler Kultur in 
sich aufnehmend. 

In Berlin lernte er einige Zeit 
am Hildesheimerschen Rabbiner- könnte aber noch mit einer gu- 
semiurr. wo er zu den vorzüg-jten Tat veibunden werden, und 
liebste 1 Schülern des grossen; zwar ungefähr wie folgt: 
Orientalisten und Bibelexegeten Anstelle von Naturblumen 
Prof. Barth. Vater von Dr. .\h- sollten künstliche oder dehy- 
ron Barth s. A., General-Direktor j drierte Naturblumen verwendet 
ein M- Bank Loumi. zählte. Gumpertz j werden. Sie sollten aus Papier 
studierte dann Medizin und hergestellt sein (nicht aus Pia- 
wandle sich nach Abschltiss sei- stikstoff). denn auch sie sol- 
ner l'ni\ersiiätsstiidien seinem! len durch Sonne und Regen 
Spezialgebiet, der Oto-Laryngo-| ..verv\,elken' 
logie 2\\. indem er sich während 
seines Aufenthaltes in Wien als 
Schule- des berühmten Prof. 
Neumimn vervollkommte. 

In Mannheim, wo er einige 
lahre wt^hntc. kam er in enge 
Beruht lui'i mit dem Klausrabbi- 



und erneuert wer- 
den. Diese Blumen sollten in 
kleinen Pappschachteln geliefert 
und mittels Automaten mit 
Geldein wurf verkauft werden. 
Jede VVohltätigkeitsinstitution 
^vic z.B. solche für behinderte 
Kinder), die Spenden korrekt 



Gastspiel der „Scala" 

Die \! LI i Kinder 



ner Dr. Jizchak Lnna. einer | verwendeL kann die Erlaubnis 
der bevoiragendsten rabbinischen bekommen, einen solchen Auto- 
Persönlicnkeiten des damaligen niaten am Friedhofseingang auf- 



zustellen. Aus Ersparnisgründen 
könnten mehrere Vereine einen 



BRIEFPARTNER GESUCHT 

Kerstin Thumser, Albertistras- 
se 49. 98 Reichenbach-Vogti., 
DDR, 17 Jahre alt. möchte ger- 
ne mit israelischen Ji.gendlichen 
Korrespondieren. Sie ist an 
alem. \\as Israel betrifft, sehr 
interessiert: Natur. Sport, he- 
bräische Spiache (von der sie 
bereits einige Kenntnisse bat) 
usw. Korrespondenz in deutscher 
oder englischer Sprache er- 
wünscht. 



_ deutschen Judentums und in Hei- 

Scala" kam. sang und siegte. In Verdis , ^jclbert: entdeckte er für sich und 

• Simone Boccanegra" entfalteten Sanger und Orchester eine j j.j„^ grosse Reihe jüdischer .Stu- ' gemeinsamen benützen und den 

ai'ch für London ungewöhnliche Klangfülle, aber ihr Spiel ! Jenten (}cv damaligen Epoche Ertrag aufteilen. So könnten 

wirkte komisch-opernhaft. Ohne Frfolg halte sich offenbar Haraw S B. Rabinkoff. einen i^hiiich viele Tausende von 

der gl:in/.vollsten jüdischen Ge-, Pfunden für wohltätige Zwecke 
lehrten aus dem Osten, der auf ' aufgebracht werden und ich bin 
eine ganze Generation jüdischer sicher, es wäre auch im Sin- 
Studen en Heidelbergs einen ent-i r>e der Toten. 



die Regie bemüht, die traditionelle Clesiik i\n<.\ Mimik 7\\ 
zahmen. Im 'T:oliseum" bot die englische Volksoper "Rng- 
Ü^h National Opera" eine ansprechende "Tosca". 

Shakespeare Stück "Die lustigen Weiber von Windsor" 
gilt allgemein als Schmarren. Doch die Neuinszenierung 
Terry Hands im Royal Shakespeare Theater bot überraschen- 
de Vertiefungen mit I icht und Schatten. Nicht Lüsternheit, 
sondern Lust am Gold wurde hier die Triebfeder. Falstaffs 
Geplänkel mit den Weibern ist eine Fahndung nach dem 
"Handel mit West- und Ostindien". Bürgerlicher Snobismus 
öttnei dem verkommenen Adeligen Hand und Herz. Und 
die spassvolle Rache der Weiber kehrt sich auch gegen ihre 
Burgerherren, die sie als kostbaren Besitz eifervoll angeket- 
tet halten. Ein Reigen städtischer Buben mit Bocksprüngen. 
Fussballspiel und Streichen umrankt den Scherz. Ein Fest für 
ALigea und Ohrcp 



»cheidenden Einfluss ausübte. j 
All di's macht uns verständlich.* 
dass sich in Dr. Gumpertz die! 
Klarhet der letzten grossen Au- 
toritäten des deutschen Juden- 
tums mit der Tiefe und Präsi- ' 
sion des osteuropäischen Juden- 1 
tums \erband. j 

Schon als junger .Mensch traii 
Dr. Gumpertz der nationalreli-! 
, giösen BevNegung des Misrachil 
/bei. Schreiber dieser Zeileü hatte [ 



Richard Deutsch. TA. 



tung I 

fcirht i 



Besondere Einrichtung 
FLER ELTERE 

Dauernde äztliche Aufsicht, 
individuelle Pflege.. Privatbad. 
herrlicher Garten. 
Angemessene Preis. •♦».• 

„ALUMIVr, Haifa,. 

Har HacarmeL Kadima 27, 






Sonrteg, 6.6.1976 



ISRAEL NACHRICHTEN *}^1^'> nWm 



iWfWWWWWnWWIllllWMIl Ut « J WWVlfWWWIWWWHIWlIIIIWniWIWWWIllWVWWWH^ 



Der Mapam-Tagung entgegen 




BESCHIUESSE HISTORISCHER TRAGWEITE ERWARTET 



Gering ist kein Ehrenbürger 

mehr 

Dio B'.ha'tp'uno dev I citcrs des jüHkchcn Dokiinicnfa- 
tionv/cnJriini in Wien. .^Jmon \Vicsciithal. die Salzbnrccr 
Gemeinde Mainernriorf führe din früheren Reichsmarschafl 
Hcrmrinn Güring novh minur ais Fhrcnbiirsier, \Mirde 
>oni HJirccrnui>ter des Ortes ziiriickfieuiesen. ..Die Statu- 
ten unserer (iemeinde hes;']L;en, dass jeder automatiseh die 
Khrenbiiryerschaft \er!iert. der ucrichtlieh verurteilt nird"". 
sa^te Bü ;:;ermei<>Ier Franz Fingerlos. Da Görinj; im Nürn- 
berger Prozess abi^eurteilt vurde. habe die Gemeinde es 
nieht für notvendii; erachtet, einen eipenen Beschhiss über 
die Xbcrkenniin«: der Fhrenhürfierreehte zu fassen. 

VVicscnthal hafte erklärt. Görinjy;s Khrenbürgerschaft 
sei in einem i'her den Ort und seine Cleschiehte erzählen- 
den Buch fest<»ehn!ten. Fr habe auch gehört, die Orts'jewal- 
tipcn würden s'ch w eisern, die Ehrenbürgerschaft rück- 
gängig zu machen. 

Fingerlos gab zu, dass Görings Name in dem Buch 
erscheine. Darin würden aber auch alle anderen erwähnt, 
denen die F.hrcnbürgerschaft je verliehen worden sei. Gö- 
ring habe der Gemeinde einmal beim Bau einer >>asser- 
leitinig Hiife zukommen lassen, und dafür sei ihm die Eh- 
renbüi gerschaft zuerkannt worden. 



Schmerzensgeld für Böl! 

Als „Genugtuung für die erlittene schwere Verletzung 
seines Persönlichkeitsrechtes" soll der Schriftsteller Hein- 
rich Böll nach einem Spruch des Oherlandesgerichtes Köln 
40 000 Mark Schmerzensgeld von dem Journalisten 
Matthias Waiden und dem Sender Freies Berlin erhalten. 
Böll hatte Waiden verklagt, weil er in einem Fernschkom- 
mentar am Tage der Trauerfeierlichkeiten für den ennor- 
deten Berliner Kammergcrichtsnräsidenten Günther von 
Drenkniann unter Erwähnung Bölls gesagt hatte: Der Bo- 
den der Gewalt in der Bundesrepublik sei ..durch den Un- 
geist der Sympathie mit den Gewalttätern gedüngt" worden. 
In erster Instanz war Bölls Klage abgewiesen worden. 



Amerikaner fürchten den Killer-Frosch 

Zu den südamerikanisch-afrikanischen Mordbienen, 
die regelmässig durch neue Berichte für Beunruhigung in 
Amerika sorgen, hat sich ein weiteres Untier gesellt: der 
sogenannte afrikanische Krallen-Frosch, der in Südkalifor- 
nien anf dorn Vormarsch ist. 

t.s handelt sich um ein exotisches Wesen von *iiittle'rer 
Froschgrösse, das aus Afrika stammt und einen offenbar 
unstillbaren Appetit besitzt. Wie Wissenschaftler von der 
Universität von Kalifornien mitteilten, frisst es alles, was 
ihm vor das Maul kommt, inklusive eigene Artgenossen. 
Sorge macht den Biologen die Vernichtung von Jungfi- 
schen, die eigens gezüchtet wurden, um in den flachen La- 
gunen die Moskitoplage einzudämmen. 

Der Killer-Frosch, wie ihn die Amerikaner nennen, 
vermehrt sich schnell wie Kaninchen und breitet sich im- 
mer weiter über das Land aus. Die ersten Exemplare wur- 
den vor sechs Jahren aus Südafrika eingeführt, um von 
Tierhandlungcn an die zahlreichen Froschliebhaber Kalifor- 
niens verkauft zu werden. Statt sich aber bei den Frosch- 
Wettspringen zu bewähren, machten sich die afrikanischen 
Einwanderer davon. 

Die Biologen sind mit der Bezeichnung Krallen-Frosdi 
nicht einverstanden; genaugenommen handelt es sich nm 
eine Kröte, die keine Krallen, sondern nur kurze Zehen- 
nägel an den Hinterfüssen bat. Der Handel mit den Exoten 
wurde inzwischen verboten. Der bisher am stärksten betrof- 
fene Bezirk Riverside hat 4000 Dollar bereitgestellt, um 
eine Studie darüber anzufertigen, wie man am besten den 
kleinen Vielfrass wieder loswerden kann. 



In Schweden laeuten 
die Werbeglocken 

Das grosse Geschäft mit der Hochzeit des schwedischen 
Königs ist angelaufen. Kaum ein Tag vergeht, da schwedi- 
sche Zeitungen nicht riesige Anzeigen einrücken, die Por- 
träts von Cari Gustaf und Silvia Sommerlath in allen mög- 
lichen Variationen anpreisen. Ein Juwelier bietet in Zier- 
schrift ..einrigartise Hochzeitsplaketten" des Brautpaars 
feil, Ausführungen in Bronze, Silber und Gold von 190 
Kronen (rund 360 IL) bis zu 5600 Kronen. 

EJne Firma preist für umgerechnet 230 IL einen Erin- 
nerungsteller aus Porzellan in Blau und Gold an, eine an- 
dere ein Doppelporträt der beiden in Gold auf Leinwand 
für 450 IL. 

Auch die Musikbranche macht mit: Als der König 
nach seiner \ crlobung im März gefragt wurde, wie er 
denn zu Silvia gekommen sei, antwortete er: „Es machte 
einfach klick." Dies inspizierte den Schlagermacher Peter 
Mimmeistrand zu folgenden Text: ..Es machte einfach 
klick / dann klickte es weiter die ganze Zeit / mit dem er- 
sten Blick verzeiht / es machte einfach klick / und hörie 
nicht mehr auf zu klicken / dann klickte es weiter die gan- 
ze Zeit / und mit einem Schlag wusste ich / dass ich 
mein Mädchen hatte.'' 

Eine Münchener Werbeagentur will den schwedischen 
Schulkindern am Hochzeitstag Spruchbänder in die Hand 
drücken mit Aufschriften wie ,.Herzliche Glückwünsche — 
Coca-Cola'\ „Wir wünschen dem Königspaar eine glück- 
liche Zukunft — Peter Stuyvesant" oder „Glückwünsche 
von Asbach". Das schwedische Fernsehen, das die Hoch- 
zeit direkt überträgt, nannte den Einfall der Münchner 
einen „Skandal" — in Schweden gibt es kein Werbefern- 
sehen. 



UUUUUUU UUJUUUUUUUUUUUmJUUUUUll 



\on AWIGDOR ^ FSHA 



In einigen Tagen findet die Landestagung der Mapam statt, pam-Partei an scincj Wirtschafts- 



weil er befürchtet, dass die Ma- zune oie Frnge der von Finnn/- 



bei der Beschlüsse *on historischer Tragweite gefasst werden dürf- 
ten. Nicht nur das Schicksal des Maarach und der internen B<^- 
ziehnngen im Arbeitslager, sondern auch die Zukunft der Koali- 
tionshe/iehungen sind in grossem Masse von den Tagungsergeb- 
nissen abhängig. 

Fs stellt bereits heule fest.! Partei und der Arbcitsp;irtei 
dass tue Mapam zu den nächsten j Stellung genommen. Die lAP- 
KncNsetwahlen selbständig und | Vertretung hatte auf die .X^^^- 
unabhäncig ausserhalb des Rah-| nen Unterschiede" in der poV^U- 
niens des Maarach schreiten | sehen Haltung zwischen beiden 
wird. Die Tagung wird jedoch j Arbeiterparteien hingewiesen, 
offiziell den vor einigen Wochen Diese Unterschiede waren als 
gefassicn Mehrheitsbeschkiss ge-j „unwesentlich" hingestellt wor- 



nehmigen müssen, wonach die 
Partei vorläufig zumindest bis 
Jahresende im Maarach verblei- 
ben wird. 

..Der kleine Unterschied in 
den Ansichten der Regierungs- 
mitglieder" war kürzlich Thema 
einer heftigen Debatte in der 
Mapam-Führung. Naftali Ben 
Mosche war über eine am 23. 
Mai im Mapam-Organ ,.A1 Ha- 
mischmar" erschienene Wieder- 
gabe seiner Ausführungen auf 
einer Mapam-Sitzung erbost, die 
er als ..entstellt und falsch" be- 
zeichnete. Ben Mosche hatte zu 
einer Erklärung der lAP-Ver- 
tretung bei den Beratungen der 
Mapam über die zukünftigen 
Beziehungen zwischen seiner 



den. ..Ich sagte damals", er- 
klarte Ben Mosche, ..da*^'' ^^ 
sich jeweils um geringfügige 
Meinungsdifferenzen zwischen 
Finanzminister Rabinovvrtz "nd 
Aussenminisler Allon. zwischen 
Allon und Rabin und zwischen 
Rabin und Israel Galili handelt. 
Die Meinungen gehen tatsäch- 
lich zwischen den Ministern 
nicht allzu weit auseinander. 
Aber generell betrachtet handelt 
es sich um gewaltige Weinungs- 
verschiedenheiten, wenn man 
alle „kleinen Meinuigsunter- 
schiede zusammenaddiert". Ra- 
binowitz ist in wirtsciaftlicher 
Hinsicht keine Taube. Der Fi- 
nanzminister spricht sich für das 
Weiterbestehen des Masrach aus. 



Politik strengste 

wil 



Kritik üben 



Heute Debatte 

über Etat-Kürzung 

m Höhe von 

2 Milliarden IL 

Kurz vor der Mapam-Tagung 
wird heute auf der Kabinettssii- 



S^x 



>:••■;•*''■*■ 



1^ 

K 

^ 




Generaldirektor des 
Finanzministeriums 
ARNON GAFNI: 

Beschlü.s.se über drastische 

Wirtschaftsimassnahmen 

nicht vor seiner Rückkehr 
aus dem Ausland 



minister Rabinowitz beantragten 
Kürzing des Ftats t.m zwei 
Milh'aiden IL das Hauptthema 
bilden 

Die Kürzungen sollen im Si- 
cherheitswesen, im Sozialen 
Wohn mgsbau (Schikiinimm). .so- 
w ie in einigen Dienstleistungen 
vorgenommen werden. Wegen 
der Verschlechterung der Wirt- 
schaft ichen Lage war dieses 
Thema früher als erwartet auf 
die Tagesordnung ge>etzt wor- 
den. Vor allem aber wird das 
Kabinett heute die Frage der 
Subsicienkürzungen für grundle- 
gende Nahrungsmittel beschäfti- 
gen, in diesem Problem ^-ehen 
die Meinungen zwischen Mapam 
und dcrArbeitspartei weit ausein- 
ander. Finanzminister Rabino 
witz will das Sicherheitsbudget 
um eine Milliarde, das Wohn- 
baupr^gramm um 300 Mio. IL 
und die verschiedenen Regie- 
rungsdienste um etwa sieben- 
hundert Millionen IL kürzen. 
Die Kürzungen sollen angesichts 
der Teuerung vorgenommen 
werden, damit der Staatsetat auf 
seiner ursprünglichen Höhe von 
85.2 Milliarden IL verbleibt. Da 
die leuerung in diesem Jahr 



vwvwwwvvvvvwvvvvwwwwwwwwvvww^^ 

Am Rand des libanesischen Bürgericriegs: 

Der »Zentralbank-Chef« im HauseinM 



Von ALBERT SCHNEIDER 

Die Beirutcr rue Madame-Curie war bis vor einem Jahr 
eine der vornehmsten der Levantehaiiptstadt. Wer von den welt- 
berühmten Taubengrotten in einer kleinen Bucht des Mittelmeer- 
ufers die corniche Chourane, jetzt umgetauft in corniche du Gene- 
ral de Gaulle, über die rue Diab zu der im Koreitem-Quartier 
liegenden und mit schönen alten Bäumen umstandenen Pracht- 
strasse emporstieg, stand staunend vor den oasenartigen Luxus- 
villen der oberen Zehntausend. Die Bäume haben inzwischen stark 
geJitten unter den Artillerie-» Mprser- und Raketengeschossen der 
Hürgerkriegskombattanten. Einige Villen stehen leer, ilve Besitzer 
^Hm ins sichere Ausland. .Vndcrc \iiirdcn geplündtrt, wieder 
andere sind nur noch Ruinen. Inmitten dieser bizarren Umge- 
bung befindet sich das Tag und Nacht von bis an die Zähne be- 
waffneten Milizionären bewachte und abends im bellen Lichter- 
glanz erstrahlende Domizil eines geheimnisvollen Mannes na- 
mens Machmut Schakardschi. 



der arabischen Welt. Sie ver- 
zeichnete an den internationalen 
Devisenbörsen nur geringe Kurs- 
verluste und ist noch immer 
völlig frei konvertierbar. Dieses 
Phänomen ist das Verdienst eben 
jener schon erwähnten kleinen 
..Strassenhändler in Franken u. 
Rappen". Akzeptierten sie auch 
früher schon bare Münzen und 



ner Zunft, er ist aber keineswegs 
der einzige. Tausend Dollar 
kriegt man in Beirut, wenn man 
sie d ingend braucht, noch im- 
mer von jedem WecKselstuben- 
besitzer. Hunderttausend sind, 
ohne Sicherheiten, von einem 
halben Dutzend Händlern zu ha- 
ben: einem Palästina-Flüchtling, 
einem libanesischen Juden, zwei 



Scheine, Traveller- und Euro- 1 a-__.,- __ ,,„, ^^. _. ' . : 
c^u^^ir u • j, «.i i/^rmeiiern und zwei Einheimi- 

de höchster Not bei In- u. Aus 



etwa 32 Prozent ausmachen 
wird, würden zwei Milliarden 
Pfi.nd nötig sein, um die 
Teuerung des Budgets 7.u dek- 
ken. Als die Regierung den Etat 
festlegte, hatte man mit einer 
25 pro/enligcn Teuerung in die- 
sem Jahr gerechnet. Auch die 
Tohnzulitgen. die man den 
Staatsbeamten zugestehen mus.s- 
le. hatten ein höheres Mass als 
vorgesehen erreicht. 

Die Wirtschaftsdebatte im Ka- 
binett war ursprünglich für .An- 
fang August anberaumt worden. 
Nun musste sie vorverlegt wer- 
den. Die geplanten Kürzungen 
im Etat sollen eiligst besprochen 
werden, weil das Budget von der 
Knesset noch nicht bestätigt 
worden ist. 

Vor drastischen 
Massnahmen 

Die Kabinettssitzung wird sich 
auch mit drastischen Wirt- 
schaflsmassnahmen befa.ssen, die 
der Finanzminister ab August 
erwägt. Nur der Umstand, dass 
man die Rückkehr des General- 
direktors des Ministeriums. Ar- 
non Gafni, aus dem Rusland ab- 
wartet, trug dazu bei, dass noch 
keine Beschlüsse gefasst worden 
sind. 

Vor allem soll die ab 1. Juli 
in Kraft tretende zehnprozentige 
Mehrwertsteuer 2,5 Milliarden 
IL einbringen. Die Subsidien für 
grundlegende Nahrungsmittel 
sollen um 850 Millionen IL ge- 
kürzt werden. Ausserdem will 
das Kabinett den Beschluss fas- 
sen, neue Emissionen von Spar- 
zertifikaten herauszugeben, die 
gegen Regierungs.schuldverschrei- 
bungen ausgewechselt werden 
können, die noch dieses Jahr 
ablaufen. Damit die Bevölke- 
rung von diesen Sparzertifikaten 
Gebrauch macht, werden sie zu 
hundert Prozent an den Index 
gebunden. 



Es-Saiijid Machmut ist keines- 
wegs einer der zahlreichen am 
Bürgerkrieg beteiligten Partei- 
oder Bandenchefs; er ist nicht 
einmal Libanese. Doch auch die 
hierzulande ohnehin nicht mehr 
anerkannte diplomatische Immu- 
nität des ausländischen Diploma- 
ten verschafft ihm nicht seinen 
privilegierten Status mitten in 
dem schrecklichen Inferno. Mon- 
sieur Schakardischi ist, was der 
frischgebackene neue libanesi- 
sche Staatspräsident bis zum 
Ausbruch des Bürgerkrieges — 
offiziell — war, der — inoffi- 
zielle — Chef der nationalen 
Finanzen. 

Maerchenhafte 
Karriere 

Schakardschis märchenhafte 
Karriere begann in einem Haus- 
eingang der heute in Schutt und 
Asche unweit von seiner Traum- 
villa entfernt liegenden fashio- 
nablen rue el-Hamra. Dort, wo 
sich Touristen, käufliche Damen, 
Halbweltjünglinge und reiche 
Tunichtgute ein Stelldichein zu 
geben pflegten, mietete der cle- 
vere Geschäftsmann eines Tages 
einen halben Hausflur, stellte 
ein Sperrholztischchen hin und 
setzte sich auf einen wackligen 
Klappstuhl dahinter. Der Iraker 
hatte seine Heimat verlassen, als 
der Wind nach dem Sturz der 
Haschimitischen Monarchie unter 
ihrem letzten König Feisal in 
Bagdad schärfer wurde und pu- 
ritanische sozialistische Offiziere 
dort das Heft in die Hand nah- 
men. Fr fand, wie damals alles 
politische Strandgoit aus der un- 
ruhigen arabischen Welt, seine 
Zuflucht im weltläufigen und 
toleranten Beirut. Seine Karriere 
verlief ganz ähnlich wie die ei- 
nes anderen, aber aus Palästina 
stammenden, Geldwechslers am 
Strassenrand. Jener gründete 
später die unrühmlich bekannt 
gewordene „Intra-Bank", die 
durch nie völlig aufgeklärte 
Fehlspekulationen in einem die 



erschütternden Riesenbankrott 
unterging und deren Sanierung 
nicht einmal dem späteren N'a- 
tionalbankchcf und jetzigen 
Staatspräsidenten Sarkis gelang. 
Dieser wurde nicht nur Multi- 
milliardär, sondern finanziert 
heute anstelle der handlungsfä- 
higen Nationalbank des Prä.si- 
denten Sarkis das gesamte öf- 
fentliche und private Leben im 
Libanon. 

Anfang als 
Devisenhaendler 

„Machmut Bey". wie ihn seine 
Untergebenen respektvoll nen- 
nen, begann zwar als Devisen- 
händler im Hausflur, ist aber 
heute, ohne eine eiuene Bank zu 




ländem aoich persönliche 

Schecks aus aller Herren Länder. 
Sicher bereicherte sich bei dieser 
Gelegenheit so mancher windige 
Betrüger. Doch wie die rührigen 
Wechsler beteuern, war die 
, Ausfallquote" erstaunlich ge- 
ring. Woher sie das wissen? Die 
Schecks gelangen auf wer weiss 
was für Schleichpfaden nach 
Damaskus oder Amman und 
man schreibt den Gegenwert 
dort den trotz des Infernos, in 
dem sie ihre Geschäfte abwik- 
keln. auf die Ehrlichkeit ihrer 
unbekannten Kunden vertrauen- 
den Wechslern gut. 



:\l' 



\V. 



Moslemischer Stras^en- 

kämpfer mit Maske und 

Kalatschnikow vor dem 

Parlament in Beirut 

besitzen, der grösste .JKissige' 
Bankier inmitten der Bürger 
kriegsszene. Schakardischi er- 
kannte nämlich schon in der An- 
fangsphase des noch immer an- 
dauernden Blutbades seine ein- 
malige Chance. Auch Freischär- 
ler, und seien sie noch %q blut- 
rünstig, brauchen für ihr tägli- 
ches Brot trotz ihrer einträgli- 
chen Beutefeldzüge Zuweilen 
Bargeld. ,Machmut Bey" ver- 
stand es — Gott weiss v^-ie — 
zu beschaffen. Die libanesische 
Pfundwährung ist auch nach 
dreizehn Monaten Bürg^j-iy-icg 



gesamte nahöstliche Finanzwelt noch immer eine der härtesten 



Grösster aller 
Wechsler 

Wechsler Schakardschi ist der 
grösste aller Wechsler. Der 
'Sechzigjährige beschäftigt sich 
längst nicht mehr mit Dreihun- 
dert Franken-Beträgen. Er hono- 
riert die Gehaltsforderungen der 
libanesischen Staatsbeamten auf 
ihre blosse Unterschrift hin 
ebenso wie die Soldan Weisungen 
der Bürgerkriegskämpfer. Er er- 
möglicht christlichen Flüchtlin- 
gen, die ins Ausland wollen, die 
Verflüssigung ihrer unerreichba- 
ren Konten. Er bezahlt die weni- 
gen noch im Land befindlichen 
Mitarbeiter ausländischer Unter- 
nehmen und Botschaften. Er be- 
schafft Devisen in jeder ge- 
wümchten Höhe. 

Wie er das macht? In der er- 
wähnten luxuriösen Villa tik- 
kern Tag und Nacht die mit den 
gro.ssen Finanzzentren der west- 
lichen Welt verbundenen Fern- 
schreiber. In New York, Lon- 
don, Paris, Amsterdam, Frank- 
furt, Zürich und Luxemburg 
unte'hält er nicht nur wohlge- 
füllte Bankkonten, sondern auch 
eigene Vertreter. Wer Libanon 
verlässt und sein Vermögen un- 
geschmälert, abgesehen von einer 
gepfefferten Provision, im 
sicheren Ausland wiederfinden 
will, für den genügt sein Wort. 

Marktlücke erkannt 

„Machmut Bey" ist alles 
andere als ein ..Bürgerkriegsge- 
winnler". Er erkannte nur eine 
Marktlücke, und er hat Geld 
und MuL Er ist der grösste sei- 



verweisen sie alle, die sich er- 
staunlicherweisc nichts unterein- 
ander neiden, auf Schakardschi. 
Für ihn scheint nichts unmöglich 
zu sein. 

Er ist, wie gesagt, sechzig. 
Um die breite Glatze legt sich 
nur noch ein dünner Kranz sorg- 
fältig gepflegter grauer Locken. 
Er neigt zur Fülle. Aber man 
sidht ihm an, dass er einmal kein 
Kost\erächter war, sondern ein 
gutaussehender Mann. Erstaun- 
lich an dem Alternden ist sein 
eiserrer Wille. Gefragt, ob er 
an eine Zukunft in dem krisen- 
geschüttelten Libanon glaube, ant- 
wortete er ohne Ueberlegung: 
„Was denken Sie?" Der Blut- 
rauscfi, so ist er überzeugt, reinigt 
schliesslich die Atmosphäre. Die 
Reichen werden teilen müssen. 
Die Armen haben ein Recht auf 

ein menschenwürdigeres Leben. 
Für Tüchtige aber gibt es hier 
immer einen Platz! 

„Machmut Bey" sitzt keines 
Wegs auf gepackten Koffern. Ei- 
ne Flucht genügt ihm. Er wird 
sich hier auch morgen einrich- 
ten, vie immer dieses „Morgen" 
aussehen mag. Ex-National- 
bankchef Sarkis fände in ihm 
wahrscheinlich seinen würdigsten 
Nachfolger für die Leitung der 
Staatsfinanzen. Aber das wehrt 
Schakardshi bescheiden ab. Dies 
ist sein Land, aber seine Heimat 
ist im Zweistromtal. im Irak. 



» 



Waehrungskorb" 
gebunden 

Auf der Tagesordnung der 
heutigen Kabinettsitzung steht 
noch ein wichtiges Thema. Eine 
Gesetzesvorlage soll der Knesset 
unterbreitet werden, wonach 
man die Bindung des Pfundes 
an den Dollar aufhebt und ge- 
stattet, von nun an unsere Wäh- 
rung an die harten Währungen 
europäischer Staaten zu binden. 
Allerdings dürfte heute noch 
kein entgültiger Beschluss in die- 
ser Frage fallen. Schliesslich 
steht noch ein Thema auf der 
Tagesordnung, welches von der 
Mapam zum Anlass harter An- 
griffe auf die Finanzpolitik der 
Regienmg genommen werden 
wird: Der Finanzminister will es 
durchsetzen, dass die Teuerungs- 
zulage nicht mehr voll ausge- 
zahlt, sondern um 65 Prozent 
gekürzt wird. In dieser Frage 
dürfte es zu heftigen Zusammen- 
stössen zwischen Rabinowitz 
und Mapam kommen. 

Die Mapam-Tagung wnrd sich 
auch mit der Siedlungsfrage 
„jenseits der grünen Greuze im 
Westufergebiet" befassen. Das 
Kabinett hat die Behandlung 
dieses Themas bis nach der 
Mapam-Tagung verschoben, um 
diesem unangenehmen und sehr 
heiklen Fragenkomplex auszu- 
weichen. 



I 

I 
I 
I 
I 

I 
I 

I 
I 



„ERMES' 



präsentiert 

nach dem Erfolg in Tel Aviv 

THE MOSTOVOY SOLOISTS 
OF PHILADELPHIA 

enter Leitung und Stabführung von MARK MOSTOVOY 
Gastsolbtin: RUTH ZANDMAN, Klavier 
Im Programm Werke von Corelll, Vivaldt, Tarfinl, Händel» 
»aydn, Telemann, Mozart, Dritten and Ben-Halm 

Heute. Son ntag. 6.6. — Technion. Haifa 

Montag, 7.6. _ BEER SCHEWA, Aoditoriom det 
Konservatoriums, unter dem Patronat de» 
Bürgermeisters. Herrn E. NAWI 
Dienstag, 8.6. ^ HAIFA, Rothschild Aadltorlum 

ABSCHIEDS-KONZERT: 
Mittwoch, 9.6. — RECHOWOT, Wlx-Saal 



KARTEN: HAIFA: „Berger-Neva" und „Gerber**. 
KECHOW OT: „Wix" „Peltours und an der Abendkasse. 



1 

I 

I 
I 

I 

I 

I 
j 



__/__ 


-/ r 


- 










1 

1 


L 


ÜL 


iKa 


■■■■ 


1 



^> 



^^T^ 



• •- T^ . 



\ 



/. 



•J:^. 



"ü-: 



.fl'..** 



^ 




*l^ 




-^i^J 



\l 



bcJ^i 




■IUI 



km 



u.-^i 



iKaa 




i 



>' 



^. 





^ 



"C 





' - 


"' -mm-mL 


iTnD 




Mi 



'Jitlll 



\' 



w 



'>^.-^" ' 




¥'^ 



m, -^j 



'S 






.m 



» 



V 




-^ '"X. 



-^ 



.-- t 





A'i 



•>^'. 



r.'V- 





fr 


?^- 



/•»^^ ... 



iS^ 



.J 'S 



V— 



X 



^ 1 



^*» 




w 



..äim 






m- 



'•>,'", 



?r: JT 



V-.» < 



V. 



■v / 



$^' 



l ,-J 



^: 



( _ 



'ai-'-^- 



/■ -, 



'.w-'' 






r>i}u-i 



--^— J 



J 



^—^ ~*'r~. 



4 i 



•* ^ t —, t 






A. 



x 



i^»^ 



Nr. 97 



2 G . ^-. 2- o o ^ 



HASSBE RG KREIS £o(, ^, i<^p^ 



aj^ 




Am BIZ in Haßfurt wurde eine Gedenicmauer zur Erinnerung an die deportierten Juden offiziell der Öffentlichkeit übergeben. foto Marcus Haas 

Die Opfer nie vergessen 

Gedenkmauer vor dem Haßfuiter BIZ offiziell eingeweiht 



Von unserem Mitarbeiter 
MARCUS HAAS 



HASSFURT Eine Gedenkmauer be- 
findet sich vor dem Haßfurter BIZ. 

^l\. \.l.xikkk\.k\. Uli vuc i>wL/wt i.uliL/ii 

jüdischer Mitbürger aus Unter- 
franken beziehungsweise aus dem 
Landkreis vor nunmehr 60 Jahren. 

Die Mauer wurde am Donnerstag 
offiziell der Öffentlichkeit überge- 
ben, wobei der Zeremonie Schüler 
mit Musikstücken einen feierlichen 
Rahmen gaben. 

„1939 bis 1942 aus unserem Land- 
kreis vertrieben, deportiert, ermor- 
det" steht auf einer Tafel, die Schüler 
während der Einweihung an der 
Mauer anbrachten. Die setzt sich aus 
Ziegelsteinen zusammen auf die 
Schüler der elften Klasse des Haßfur- 
ter Regiomontanus-Gymnasiums 
Namen, Alter, Wohnort der jüdi- 



schen Mitbürger geschrieben haben, 
die an jenem 22. April vor sechs Jahr- 
zehnten aus dem Landkreis depor- 
tiert worden waren. 
Die Grundlage dazu bildet eine 

die die BIZ-Leiterin nach intensiven 
historischen Recherchen im Land- 
kreis erstellt hatte. Sie unterhielt sich 
zudem mit Zeitzeugen. 

„Eine Mauer, die den Ermordeten 
wieder ihre Namen gibt", so die Init- 
iatorin des Projekts, bei dem Schüler, 
Lehrer, Landkreis, Gemeinden, Städ- 
te, Firmen und andere seit Dezember 
2001 zusammenwirkten. Die Namen 
sagen allerdings nichts über die 
schrecklichen Einzelschicksale aus. 
An die erinnerten Schüler der elften 
Klasse des Regiomontanus-Gymna- 
siums am Rednerpult, indem sie 
Zeitzeugen zitierten, die diesen Tag 
vor 60 Jahren im Kindesalter mit- 
erlebt hatten. 



An jenem Morgen begann der 
größte Abtransport jüdischer Mit- 
bürger aus Unterfranken. Es waren 
insgesamt 852 Menschen, im Alter 
zwischen drei Monaten und 82 Jah- 

k\.lk. „ia^o aui mein lidU5 duh VVil 

kommen wieder", rief ein jüdischer 
Bürger vom Leiterwagen herab ei- 
nem Nachbarn zu - eine Hoffnung, 
die sich selten erfüllte. 

Kappner las in diesem Kontext aus 
einem Bericht über ein Konzentra- 
rionslager vor und verdeutlichte die 
schrecklichen Umstände, unter de- 
nen auch viele jüdische Bürger aus 
dem Landkreis umgebracht wurden. 

„Wen erreichen die Schüler?", 
fragte Karl-Josef Schneider am Red- 
nerpult. Der Direktor des Regiomon- 
tanus-Gymnasiums stellte kritisch 
für die Gegenwart fest, dass Korrup- 
tion in vielen Bereichen die Glaub- 
würdigkeit sinken lasse und Umzüge 
junger Leute mit Springerstiefeln 



samt Schlagstöcken keine Seltenheit 
seien. Mahatma Gandhis Auffassung 
„History teachs ncjthing" (Geschich- 
te lehrt uns nichts) teilte Schneider 
allerdings nicht und verwies auf die 
Bubclidfleu der Mauer. Die Opfer 
dürften nie vergessen werden, jeder 
müsse bereit sein, aus der Geschichte 
zu lernen und die aktuelle Situation 
sollte mit größter Aufmerksamkeit 
verfolgt werden. 

Haßfurts Bürgermeister Rudi Eck 
verwies auf ein bereits bestehendes 
Denkmal in der Haßfurter Prome- 
nade, das 1988 eingeweiht worden 
war, und erinnerte an bewegende 
Einzelschicksale. Von Eck stammte 
zudem der Vorschlag zu Standort 
und Material. Und vielleicht liegen 
auf der ziegelsteinernen Gedenk- 
mauer vor dem BIZ schon bald 
Steine - als Zeichen für den Besuch 
jüdischer Mitbürger. 



Nr. 8 



^%i 



^ Vöh^ 



k 



^ 



^ 



c\u 



HASSBERGKREIS 



\y 



q. 4-. 2^ 




Cordula Kappner hat den Weg des jüdischen Jungen Gerhard Eckmann von Burgpreppach in das Konzentrationslager Sachsenhausen nachgezeichnet 
Ihre Ausstellung in der Volksschule Hofheim wurde am gestrigen Montag eröffnet. FOTO KERSTIN VOLKMER 

Dem sicheren Vergessen entrissen 

Ausstellung: „Von Burgpreppach über Auschwitz in das KZ Sachsenhausen" 



Vnn iin«;prpm Rprl;ik-tinn<;mitnlipr) 
KERSTIN VOLKMER ^ 



HOFHEIM/BURGPREPPACH Von 

Burgpreppach über Auschwitz in 
das Konzentrationslager Sachsen- 
hausen führte das kurze Leben des 
Gerhard Eckmann. Cordula Kapp- 
ner zeichnete den Weg des Hurg- 
preppachers in einer Ausstellung 
nach, die bis zum 26. April in der 
Volksschule Hofheim zu sehen ist. 

Anerkennende Worte hörte Cor- 
dula Kappner zur Ausstellungscröff- 
nung am gestrigen Montag viele. Am 
vielleicht treffendsten beschrieb ihr 
Verdienst Israel Schwierz, Rektor der 
Volksschule Arnstein und Vorstand 
der jüdischen Gemeinde der US- 
Streitkräfte in Würzburg: „Wer hätte 
noch einmal an Gerhard gedacht '^ 



Sie haben sein Schicksal dem siche- 
ren Vergessen entrissen." 

„Eine Spurensuche" hat Cordula 
Kappner ihre Ausstellung über- 
schrieben. Die Leiterin des Biblio- 
theks- und Informationszentrums in 
Haßfurt stieß auf das Schicksal des 
jüdischen Jungen durch ein Telefo- 
nat mit einem Nutzer des Würzbur- 
ger Staatsarchivs, der nach der Fami- 
lie Eckmann aus Burgpreppach frag- 
te. 

Einjährige Recherche 

jetzt begann eine einjährige Re- 
cherche für Cordula Kappner, die für 
jede jüdische Familie im Landkreis 
schon eine Mappe mit Fotos, Doku- 
menten und Stammbaum zusam- 
men gestellt hatte. Sie knüpfte Kon- 
takte in die USA und Schweiz und 
nach Frankreich, unternahm meh- 
rere Reisen. 



Aus Fotos, amtlichen Dokumen- 
ten, Zeitungsartikeln, Zeugenberich- 
ten und Kinderzeichnungen ent- 
standen 21 Ausstellungstafeln. 
Chronologisch zeichnen sie die Le^ 
bensstationen des Burgpreppachcrs 
nach, der im Alter von KS Jahren im 
Arbeitslager Lieberose bei Sachsen - 
hausen ermordet wurde. 

In einer Feierstunde zur .Ausstei- 
lungseröffnung würdigte Rektor 
Werner Ffolzinger den „außeror- 
dentlichen persönlichen Einsatz 
und die Akribie und Kompetenz" 
von Cordula Kappner. 

Richtig sei es, die Ausstellung ge- 
rade in einer Schule zu zeigen. Sie sei 
didaktisch gut aufbereitet und habe 
hohen Stellenwert für die Werterzie- 
hung. 



Kannner w;inr1te sich besonders 
an die Achtklässler, die der Feier- 
stunde beiwohnten; Respekt und 
Achtung gelte es dem Mitmenschen 
zu zeigen, auch wenn er anders sei. 
Als Mahnung und als Aufforderung 
zum Nachdenken möchte sie ihre 
Ausstellung verstanden wissen. 

Schule umbenennen 

Eine besondere Anregung hatte 
Israel Schwierz für Burgpreppach, 
wo es früher eine jüdische Schule 
gab: Die heutige Grundschule konn- 
te man nach Eckmann, dem „un- 
schuldigen Opfer der Nazi-Zeit", be- 
nennen, soseine Idee. 

Die Ausstellung in der Volksschule 
Hofheim ist bis 26. April geöffnet 
von Montag bis Freitag von 8 bis 
18 Uhr, samstags von 11 bis 16 
Uhr; außerdem am Sonntag, 14. 
April, von 11 bis 18 Uhr 





26. -/^PRiL. 2oo2- 





Q^DpFUUf^^ '. tlo. 



I 



8.-(tffe«u , ^Co 



» 



Ü^ 



ä«Mwievi<i»^aLr voU Grixica l4<R?a«a? 



2« ^fe&KHfnqew : "Tl. 



-»USSfUi2T~ 



I 



HC 



SA 



8*'- 48'' Wß^ 



OFr^MÖJ^ SoMNn;A(2i : A^k-. A^ic ^2 



^'t 



«o 



- \%r' uf(e 



••^.'Tuldaer Zeitung" 



Region 



Mittwoch, 14. August 1991 

Nummer 187 



Auf dem neu gestalteten Synagogenplatz in Tann wurde ein Gedenkstein an die jüdische Gemeinde enthüllt / Jüdische Gäste aus Tel Aviv 

Tann ehrt frühere jüdische Mitbürger 



Tann (ai) 
Im Rahmen der Einweihung des 
neugestalteten Synagogenplatzes 
in Tann enthüllte Bürgermeister 
Dieter Herchenhan zum Geden- 
ken an ^verfolgte, vertriebene 
und ermordete jüdische Mitbür- 
ger" einen in Israel geschaffenen 
Gedenkstein. 

In einem solchen Augenblick 
polte es, innezuhalten im Getriebe 
unseres Allings und zurückzublik- 
ken, sagte Herchenhan. Es sei 
nicht der Abschluß einer her- 
kömmlichen Baumaßnahme, son- 
dern, «eine Begegnung mit einer 
dunklen Zeit unserer Stadt". 

Einen herzlichen \Viiikc?rT!- 
mensgruß entbot der Bürgermei- 
ster Kurt Jüngster und dessen Fa- 
milie aus Tel Aviv. Dieser - so 
Dieter Herchenhan - sei maßgeb- 
lich an der Vorbereitung des Ge- 
denktages beteiligt gewesen. 

Im November 1978 besuchte 
der letzte Tanncr Rabbiner, Hen- 
ry Okolica, erstmals wieder Tann. 
Während einer christlich-jüdi- 
schen Feierstunde sei der Wunsch 
geäußert worden, den Synago- 
gcnplatz würdiger zu gestalten, 
erläuterte der Bürgermeister. 
Zwar habe eine Bronzetafel dar- 
auf hingewiesen, daß hier bis zu 
ihrer Zerstörung im Jahre 1938 
die Synagoge der Jüdischen Kul- 
tusgemeinde Tann/Rhön gestan- 
den hatte. Die Nutzunc als Park- 
platz sei dem Standort eines ehe- 
maligen Gotteshauses aber un- 
würdig gewesen. 

Heute erinnere man sich insbe- 
sondere der Existenz «einer fast 




Gemeinsam enthüllten Tanns Bürgermeister Dieter Herchenhan (rechts) und Kurt Jüngsterden Gedenkstein 
auf dem neugestalteten Synagogenplatz. Foto: Helmut Laibach 



200jnhrigen jüdischen Gemeinde 
in Tann**. Der Bürgermeister ging 
auf die Brandkatastrophe am 12. 
Mai 1879 ein, bei der auch die 
Synagoge Raub der Flammen 
wurde. Aber bereits am 17. Sep- 
tember 1880 sei die neue Synago- 
ge eingeweiht worden. „So feier- 
lich die Einweihung vollzogen 
wurde, so fürchterlich wurde das 



l 



Gotteshaus 1938 geschändet und 
zerstört." 

Man könne und dürfe um der 
Wahrheit willen diese ^dunklen 
Seiten unserer nationalen Ge- 
schichte" ebensowenig löschen, 
^wie wir die hellen Seiten unter- 
schlagen wollen". Es gelte, kleine 
Mosaikstcinchen zu setzen: Ach- 
tung der Menschenrechte und Er- 



füllung der Menschenpflichtcn für 
eine bes.sere, friedlichere Welt 
seien das Gebot der Gegenwart. 
Die Erinnerungen und Erkennt- 
nisse, die dieser .Stein anreren 
könne, wären „aber unfruchtbar, 
wenn sie nicht einmünden wür- 
den in eine Bejahung des Lebens 
und in eine getroste Zuversicht zu 
Einsicht und Vernunft". 



Kurt Jüngster aus Tel Aviv, der 
bis zu seinem 15. Lebensjahr in 
Tann lebte, sagte, die Enthüllung 
dieses Gedenksteins sei für ihn 
einerseits ein Privileg, zum ande- 
ren aber auch „ein trauriges Er- 
eignis". Er erinnere sich in dieser 
Stunde verschiedener jüdischer 
Mitbürger: Sie seien fleißige Bür- 
ger und ehrliche Leute gewesen. 
„Paß auf dich auf!" habe ihm die 
Mutter noch zugerufen, als sich 
der Zug am Tanner Bahnhof in 
Bewegung gesetzt habe. Seine El- 
tern und den Bruder Horst hat er 
nie wiedergesehen. Sie sind im KZ 
umgebracht worden. 

Rabbiner Henry Okolica hat in 
einem Schreiben an Bürgermei- 
ster Dieter Herchenhan unter an- 
derem formuliert: „Hier ist jetzt 
von Tannem ein Mahnmal errich- 
tet worden, um den früheren Mit- 
bürgern Ehre und menschliche 

I ttfkr%« ^f« ^#%«#%«*M •• f lp^/4 04f^ Or\* 

schafter der Bundesrepublik 
Deutschland in Israel, Otto von 
der Gabicntz, sandte zur Neuge- 
staltung des Synagogenplatzes 
seine „besten Wünsche". In Ge- 
sprächen mit Israelis erfahre er 
immer wieder, wie wichtig solche 
Initiativen deutscher Bürger sei- 
en, „ein ehrliches und würdiges 
Verhältnis zum deut.sch-jüdi«:cheii 
Zusammenleben zu finden". Pfar- 
rer Johann Rüppcl trug den 74. 
Psalm vor, während Ruth Flüccl 
COuerflöte) die Snlo«;iiite von Jo- 
hann-Sebastian Bach und Synago- 
gengesänge zu Gehör brachte. 
Ebenfalls anwesend war der 
Propst des Sprengcls Hanau, Ger- 
hard Pauly. 



THÜRINGEN 

BLÄTTER ZUR LANDESKUNDE 



Die frühesten Hin- 
weise auf eine 
Existenz jüdi- 
schen Lebens in Thü- 
ringen stammen aus 
Erfurt. Dort gab es spä- 
testens seit dem 12. Jh. 
eine jüdische Gemeinde. 
Weitere mittelalterliche 
jüdische Gemeinden 
befanden sich in Arn- 
stadt, Eisenach, Ell- 
rich, PYankenhausen, 
Ilmenau, Jena, Meinin- 
gen, Mühlhausen und 
Nordhausen. Die Juden 
hatten als Nichtchri- 
sten eine rechtliche, 
wirtschaftliche und so- 
ziale Sonderstellung 
inne. Sie galten als 
„Kammerknechte" des 
Kaisers, waren diesem 
tributpflichtig und ge- 
nossen im Gegenzug 




ToramanteL 
18. oder 19. Jh., 
(Thüringisches Landes- 
museum Heidecksburg, 
Rudolstadt) 



seinen Schutz. Dieses 
sogenannte „Judenre- 
gal" ging im Zuge der 
Territorialisierung auf 
die Landesfürsten über, 
die es ihrerseits wei- 
terverleihen konnten. 
Im Laufe der Zeit ver- 
schlechterte sich die 
Lage der Juden zuse- 
hends. Sie wurden von 
allen zünftischen Be- 
rufen ausgeschlossen, 
so daß ihnen nur der 
Handel und Darlehens- 
geschäfte offen blieben. 
Durch den wachsen- 
den religiösen Fana- 
tismus und den wirt- 
schaftlichen Neid ihrer 
christlichen Nachbarn 
wurden sie immer wie- 
der verfolgt und in 
ihrer Existenz bedroht, 
wie etwa 1221 in 



Juden in Thüringen 



Erfurt. 1298 griffen judenfeindliche 
Ausschreitungen von Franken auf Süd- 
thüringen über. Während der großen 
Pestepidemie 1349 wurden in vielen 
thüringischen Städten die Juden unter 
dem Vorwand, sie hätten die öffent- 
lichen Brunnen vergiftet, ermordet, be- 
raubt und die Überlebenden vertrieben. 



In der Folgezeit konnten sie sich man- 
cherorts - meist unter verschlechterten 
Lebensbedingungen - wieder nieder- 
lassen, so in Erfurt spätestens 1354. Die 
Erfurter Gemeinde, die schon vor 1349 
im thüringisch-sächsischen Gebiet eine 
herausragende Stellung eingenommen 
hatte, zählte bald durch ihre Größe, 



ihren Wohlstand und die Ausstrahlung 
ihrer Kahhiner und Gelehrten /ai den 
bedeutendsten jüdisehen Gemeinden 
des Deutsehen Reiches. 1458 jedoeh 
wurden die Krfurter Juden erneut ver- 
trieben. Von da an bis zu Beginn des 
19. Jahrhunderts weigerte sich die 
Stadt, wieder Juden in ihren Mauern 
aufzunehmen. 

Auch aus anderen thüringischen 
Orten wurden die Juden im Laufe des 
15. und 16. Jahrhunderts vertrieben, 
zuletzt aus Mühlhausen 1545 und Nord- 
hausen 1559. Im 17. und 18. Jahrhun- 
dert war ihnen in vielen Städten die 
Niederlassung verboten. In den Klein- 
staaten wurden vereinzelt wohlhaben- 
de jüdische kaufleute, Bankiers oder 
lleereslieferanten als „llolluden" auf- 
genommen. Im 18. uFid fridien 19. Jahr- 
hundert lebte die Mehrzahl der 
thüringischen Juden in den reichsritter- 
schaniichen Dörfern der Bhön und 
um Meiningen (z. B. in Aschenhausen, 
Sladllengsfeld, Berkach, Bibra, Drei- 
ßigacker, Marisfeld, VValldorl). Man 
betrachtete sie als zusätzliche Kinnah- 
mecjuelle und gewährte ihnen gegen 
eine gewisse Geldsumme und Sonder- 
steuern einen „Schulzbrief'', der ihnen 
u.a. Wohnrecht und Handelskonzes- 
sionen garantierte. 

Eine grundlegende Veränderung der 
rechtlichen, vvirtschaf\lichen und sozia- 
len Lage der jüdischen Minderheit 
brachte die F.manzipationsgesetzge- 
bung des 19. Jahrhunderts mit sich. Die 
Juden der zum Königreich Westfalen 
gehörenden Gebiete wie Mühlhausen 
oder iNordhausen erlangten zwar mit 
dem Dekret vom 27. Jamiar löU« die 
völlige Gleichstellung, doch wurde die- 
se nach der Niederlage Napoleons und 
der Aullösung des Königreichs wieder 
zurückgenonunen. Auch im preußisch 



gewordenen Krfurl verschlechterte sich 
ihre Bechtsstelhmg wieder, die sicli 
unter der französischen Besatzung ver- 
bessert hatte. 

Die zu Beginn des 19. Jahrhunderts 
von den verschiedenen deutschen Staa- 
ten erlassenen Lmanzipationsgesetze 
basierten auf der Annahme, die Juden 
müßten vor der endgültigen Gleichstel- 
lung zunächst durch erzieherische 
Maßnahmen an den Staat herangeführt 
werden. Denn ihre Kultur wurde als 
lücht zeitgemäß erachtet. Sowohl das 
sachsen-meiningische „Patent" vom 
5. Januar 1811 als auch die sachsen- 
weimarische „Juden-Ordnung" vom 
20. Juni 1825 hielten noch an zahl- 
reichen diskriminierenden Bestimmun- 
gen fest, wie zum Beispiel am 
Schutzgeld und an der Beschränkung 
von Berufswahl, Familiengründung und 
Freizügigkeit. Andererseits grilT der 
Staat durch Kelbrmvorgaben in die ehe- 
mals aulononien jüdischen Bereiche 
des Kultus und des Schulwesens ein. 
Nur in Schwarzburg-Sondershausen 
wurde den Juden bereits 1815 Lokal- 
und Staalsbürgerrechl ohne größere 
Einschränkungen gewährt. Die ande- 
ren Staaten zogen wesentlich später 
nach: Sachsen-Weimar-Eisenach 1850, 
Sachsen-Coburg und Gotha 1852 und 
Sachsen-Meiningen 1868. In Beuß, wo 
ohnehin kaum Juden lebten, war die 
Gesetzgebung diskrimiiüerend, und in 
Sachsen-Allenburg wurde noch 1867 
das Niederlassungsverbot für Juden 
erneuert. Erst das Gesetz des Norddeut- 
schen Bundes vom 5. Juli 1869 brachte 
allen jüdischen Thüringern die endgül- 
tige Gleichstellung mit ihren christ- 
lichen Nachbarn. Die rechtliche Eman- 
zipation blieb nicht ohne Wirkung auf 
das soziale und religiöse lieben der 
Juden. Sie paßten sich immer stärker an 
ihre nichljüdische Umgebung an. Man 




l^yalldorf/llerra: Innen rauni der 19)8 zerstörten Synagoge aus dem IS. Jdhrlumdert 
(Photo: Central Archivesfor tlie llistoty ofthe Jewish People, Jerusalem) 



sprach nicht mehr jiddisch, sondern 
deutsch und verzichtete auf traditionell 
jüdische Namen zugunsten von deut- 
schen. Rehgiöse Bindungen lockerten 
sich. Die neu errungene Freizügigkeit 
und der hei der jüdischen Minderheit 
früher einsetzende Trend, in die Städte 
zu ziehen, verstärkten diese Entwick- 
lung. 

Die vielfältigen Veränderungen 
schlugen sich auch in der Bevölke- 
rungsentwicklung nieder. Stellten die 
Juden 1833/54 noch 1,06% (1.524 Per- 
sonen) der sachsen-meiningischen Be- 
völkerung und 0,6% (1.427 Personen) 
der sachsen-weiniarischen, so machten 
sie 1871/72 nur noch 0,89% (1.625) der 
sachsen-meiningischen und 0,35% 
(1.120) der sachsen-weimarischen Be- 
v()lkerung aus. Kine niedrigere Gehur- 
lenrate und eine größere Bereitschaft 
auszuwandern waren wahrscheinlich 
die Gründe für diesen Prozeß. Im 
preußischen Regierungshezirk Krfurt 
wurden 1843 1.452 jüdische Kinwohner 
gezählt. In den ührigen thüringischen 
Ländern gah es nur wenige Juden. Die 
thüringischen Staaten gehörten zu den 
Regionen des Deutschen Reiches mit 
einem zahlenmäßig und prozentual 
geringen jüdischen Bevölkerungsanteil. 

Der Kinfluß der Einanzipationsge- 
setze auf die Berufstruktur der thürin- 
gischen Juden ist noch nicht erforscht. 
Der jahrhundertelange Ausschluß der 
Juden aus Landwirtschaft und Hand- 
werk hatte Spuren hinterlassen. Auf 
dem Land waren viele Juden im Handel 
beschäftigt, vor allem im Viehhandel, 
aber auch in der Texlil- und Spielzeug- 
industrie. In den Städten fanden sich 
seit der zweiten Hälfte des 19. Jahrhun- 
derts neben vielen Kaufleuten zuneh- 
mend Juristen und Ärzte, aber auch 
Bankiers und Unternehmer. Die Armen 



und Mittellosen, die noch zu Beginn des 
19. Jahrhunderts das Gros der jüdischen 
Bevölkerung ausgemacht hatten, ver- 
schwanden zusehends. 

Die Abwanderung der thüringischen 
Juden vom Land in die Städte, die schon 
im 19. Jahrhundert eingesetzt hatte, 
hielt im 20. Jahrhundert an. Zwischen 
1910 und 1925 verringerte sich die jü- 
dische Bevölkerung in den Landkreisen 
(ohne preußische Gebiete) von 2.055 
auf 1.554 Personen. Am stärksten 
betroffen waren jene mit der größten 
jüdischen Bevölkerung: Eisenach, Mei- 
ningen und llildburghausen. Demge- 
genüber konnten die Stadtkreise im 
selben Zeitraum einen Zuwachs von 
1 .767 auf 2.049 jüdische Einwohner ver- 
zeichnen. Insgesamt waren 1925 3.603 
Juden im Land Thüringen gemeldet, 
1.850 im preußischen Regierungsbezirk 
Erfurt. Die größte jüdische Gemeinde 
bestand mit 810 Mitgliedern in Erfurt. 
In Nordhausen, Gera, Gotha und Eisen- 
ach gab es mittelgroße Gemeinden mit 
je 350 bis 500 Mitgliedern. 

Betrachtet man die Geschichte der 
deutschen Juden vom Beginn der 
Emanzipationszeit bis in die 1920er 
Jahre, so läßt sich ein sozialer Aufstieg 
beobachten, der mit der Übernahme 
bürgerlicher Normen verknüpft war. 
Die jüdischen Bürger integrierten sich 
in steigendem Maße in das gesellschaft- 
liche und politische Leben ihrer Städte 
und Gemeinden, wie z.B. der Mathema- 
tiker Ephraim Salomon Unger (1789-1870) 
oder der Kunstmäzen Alfred Heß (1879- 
1931) in Erfurt. Gleichzeitig etablierten 
sie aber im llmfpJd ihrer Synagogen 
und Schulen ein jüdisches Vereins- 
leben. Während des Ersten Weltkrieges 
meldeten sich zahlreiche jüdische Män- 
ner als Kriegsfreiwillige. Später arbeite- 
ten andere, wie der Verfassungsrechtler 



11 



{ 



!1 



Eduard Rosenthal, engagiert am Aufbau 
der Weimarer Republik mit. Gegen die 
Emanzipation und die Integration der 
Juden in die Gesellschaft formierten 
sich jedoch seit den siebziger Jahren 
des 19. Jahrhunderts im ganzen Reichs- 
gebiet antisemitische Verbände und 



Parteien. Nach dem Ersten Weltkrieg 
gewannen sie immer mehr an Zulauf. 
In den letzten Jahren der Weimarer 
Republik gelang es ihnen, eine breite 
antisemitische Strömung in der deut- 
schen Bevölkerung zu erzeugen. 



Verfolgung und Vernichtung 



Am 23. Januar 1930 wurde der 
Nationalsozialist Wilhelm Frick 
thüringischer Innen- und Volks- 
bildungsminister. Damit war Thürin- 
gen das erste Land der Weimarer 
Republik, in dem die Nationalsozia- 
listen an der Regierung beteiligt wur- 
den. Zwei Jahre später gingen sie aus 
den Wahlen so gestärkt hervor, daß sie 
die erste nationalsozialistische Landes- 
regierung in Deutschland bilden konn- 
ten. Schon Frick als Innenminister war 
bemüht, eine demokratiefeindliche und 
antisemitische Poltik durch die Entlas- 
sung liberaler, sozialdemokratischer 
oder jüdischer Beamter, die Einführung 
nationalistischer Schulgebete und die 
Einrichtung eines rassenkundlichen 
Lehrstuhls an der Universität Jena 
durchzusetzen. 

1932 sollte das Schächten, das rituelle 
Schlachten, verboten werden, jüdische 
Bürger wurden vermehrt von NS-Schlä- 
gertrupps angegriffen, Synagogen mit 
Hakenkreuzen beschmiert. Bereits etwa 
einen Monat nach Hitlers „Machtergrei- 
fung", am 5. März 1933, wurde der 
„Central-Verein deutscher Staatsbürger 
jüdischen Glaubens" vom Thüringer 
Innenministerium verboten und sein 



Vermögen beschlagnahmt. Zu diesem 
Zeitpunkt lebten in Thüringen (ohne 
den preußischen Regierungsbezirk Er- 
furt) noch 2.882 jüdische Bürger, in der 
Stadt Erfurt 831. Die Ab- und Auswan- 
derung hatte schon begoiuien. War ein 
Boykottaufruf von Fritz Sauckel gegen 
jüdische Unternehmer und Kaulleute 
im November 1932 noch auf öffent- 
lichen Widerspruch gestoßen, so wurde 
der für das gesamte Reichsgebiet ange- 
ordnete Boykott vom 1. April 1933 auch 
in thüringischen Städten und Gemein- 
den durch massiven SA- und SS- Einsatz 
durchgesetzt. Von da an wurden an vie- 
len Orten NichtJuden, die weiterhin mit 
ihren jüdischen Nachbarn Kontakte 
pflegten, von der Partei bedroht und 
unter Druck gesetzt. Auf den Boykottag 
folgte am 7. April 1933 das „Gesetz zur 
Wiederherstellung des Berufsbeamten- 
tums", auf dessen Grundlage die Entlas- 
sung jüdischer Bürger aus dem 
Staatsdienst vorangetrieben wurde: Jü- 
dische Lehrer, Hochschullehrer, Rich- 
ter, Pohzisten und Vcrwaltungsbeamte 
verloren nach und nach ihre Stelle. Aus- 
genommen waren zunächst noch ehe- 
malige Weltkriegsteilnehmer, bis die 
„Nürnberger Gesetze" im Herbst 1955 
den Juden die Reichsbürgerschall ent- 



zogen und die totale gesellschaftliche 
Trennung von Juden und NichtJuden 
gesetzlich festschrieben. Für eine Auf- 
nahme in den Staatsdienst waren von 
nun an „Ariernachweise" erforderlich. 
Ehen und außereheliche sexuelle Bezie- 
hungen zwischen Juden und Nichtju- 
den wurden verboten. Der staatlich 
verordnete Antisemitismus wurde auch 
in der thiningischen Bevölkerung willig 
umgesetzt: Die gleichgeschaltete Lokal- 
presse veroffenllichte regelmäßig ver- 
leumderische lletzartikel, an den 
Ortseingängen und vor Gasthäusern 
fand man immer häufiger Schilder mit 
der AufschriR „Juden uneruimscht", 
und in vielen Läden wurden Juden 
nicht mehi" bedient. W em es gelang, ein 
\ isum für einen sicheren Staat zu 
erwei'bcii, der wanderte aus, vor allem 
nach Palästina, Großbritarmien und in 
die USA. Bei nicht wenigen scheiterten 
die Auswanderungspläne jedoch an 
ihrem Ibrlgeschi'it 
fehlendem Kapital. 



ihrem Ibrlgeschiittenen Alter oder an 



Das Jahr 1938 brachte eine weitere 
V'erschärlung iWv Lage. Eine Reihe von 
Gesetzen sollte die Juden mm um ihre 
wirtschaflliche Existenz bringen und 
zur Auswandcrimg zwingen. Durch 
eine Nerordmmg vom 14. Juni 1938 
uuiden Juden verpllichtet, ihre Gewer- 
bebetriebe als „jüdische Gewerbebe- 
triebe" anzumelden, kurze Zeit später 
verloren jüdische Arzle ihre Approba- 
tion und jüdische Rechlsanwälle ihre 
Zulassung. In Ihiuingen halle bereits 
im März 1938 eine „Arisierungskonunis- 
sion" beim Gauwirtschallsberater der 
NSDAP in Weimar damit begoimen, 
„jüdische Betriebe" festzustellen und 
ihre „Arisierung voranzutreiben, d.h. 
ihre Enteigmmg bzw. ihren Verkauf an 
NichtJuden weit unter ihrem Wert. Seit 
1933 gingen die Eiimahmen jüdischer 
Geschänsleute ständig zurück, die Kun- 



den blieben aus, viele wurden zahlungs- 
unfähig und mußten ihr Geschält aufge- 
ben oder verkaufen. In F.rfurt besaßen 
jüdische Geschäftsleute und Unterneh- 
mer 1937 noch mehr als 100 Betriebe 
(Bekleidungs- und Schuhgeschälte, 
Gärtnereien, Lederwaren-, Textil- und 
Viehhandlungen), die dann im folgen- 
den Jahr „arisiert" wurden. Besonders 
dranuitisch verlief der „Arisierungspro- 
zeß" der Simson-VVerke in Heinrichs bei 
Suhl, die einer alteingesessenen jüdi- 
schen Familie gehcirt hatten und lange 
Jahre llauplarbeitgeber der Region 
gewesen waren. Auf Betreiben des 
thüringischen Gauleiters und Reichs- 
stalthalters Fritz Sauckel wurden 1935 
Mitglieder der Familie Simson in 
„Schutzhalt" genommen und gezwun- 
gen, ihre Anteile an den Simson-Wer- 
ken der von Sauckel kontrollierten 
„Wilhelm-GuslIoff-StiiUmg" zu über- 
schreiben. Der Familie gelang es an- 
schließend, über die Schweiz in die USA 
zu Hiehen. 

Ein weiterer Schrill auf dem Wege 
ziu' völligen Ausgrenzung und Vernich- 
tung war die Pogronmachl vom 
9./ 10. November 1938, die „Reichs- 
kristallnacht". Auch in thüringischen 
Städten und Dorfern wurden in jener 
Nacht Synagogen gebrandschatzt, W oh- 
mmgeii und Geschälte jüdischer An- 
wohner geplündert und die Menschen 
mißhandelt. Die Aktion war von langer 
Hand geplant und von SS- und SA-Leu- 
len durchgeführt worden. Die Synago- 
gen in Erhirt, Eisenach, Gotha, 
Arnstadt, Meiningen, Suhl, Barchfeld, 
Schleusingen, Schmalkalden und Nord- 
hausen wurden zum Raub der Flam- 
men. Versclionl blieben nur jene 
Gotteshäuser, deren Brand - wie in Ber- 
kach oder Mühlhausen - nah gelegene 
Wohnhäuser gefährdet hätte, und jene, 
die - wie in Aschenhausen - schon vor 



1938 an nichtjüdische Besitzer ver- 
äußert worden waren. In ganz Thürin- 
gen wurden jüdische Männer aus ihren 
Wohnungen geholt, verhaltet, schwer 
mißhandelt und in Turnhallen unter 
erneuten Folterungen gefangengehal- 
ten. Von ihnen wurden 1.178 in das KZ 
Buchenwald verschleppt. Etwa 25 der 
Gefangenen verloren dort ihr Leben: 
Sie wurden zu Tode gequält, wählten 
den Freitod oder gingen an den kata- 
strophalen Lebensbedingungen des 
Lagers zugrunde. Die Überlebenden 
w urden in den Folgemonaten unter der 
Bedingung entlassen, ihren Besitz „ari- 
sieren" zu lassen und so schnell wie 
möglich auszuwandern. Am 12. Novem- 
ber 1938 erlegte der NS-Staat den jüdi- 
schen Gemeinden eine „Sühneleistung" 
von 1 Milliarde Reichsmark auf Zudem 
mußten sie den Abriß der Brandruinen 
selbst tragen. Fällig gewordene Ver- 
sicherungssummen durften nicht an die 
Geschädigten, sondern mußten an die 
Staatskasse gezahlt werden. 

hn November und Dezember 1938 
folgte ein antisemitisches Gesetz dem 
anderen. Am 15. November wurden 
jüdische Kinder endgültig vom Besuch 
öffentlicher Schulen ausgeschlossen, 
am 23. November wurde die Auflösung 
„jüdischer Einzelhandels- und Hand- 
werksbetriebe" angeordnet, und am 
8. Dezember wurden jüdische Studen- 
ten von Universitäten und Hochschulen 
verbannt. Durch die „Verordnung über 
den Einsatz des jüdischen Vermögens" 
vom 3. Dezember 1938 und vom 
21. Februar 1939 wurden Juden ge- 
zwungen, Grund und Boden zu verkau- 
fen und Schmuck, Wertpapiere, Edel- 
metalle etc. abzuliefern. Ihre Isolation 
wuchs, die Chancen auszuwandern 
sanken. Ab Mai 1939 trat das „Gesetz 
über Mietverhältnisse mit Juden" in 
Kraft, das die Konzentration der jü- 



dischen Bevölkerung in „Judenhäu- 
sern" vorschrieb, ihre eventuell noch 
vorhandenen Kontakte zur nichtjüdi- 
schen Bevölkerung unterbinden und 
ihre Kontrolle vereinfachen sollte. Zu 
diesem Zeitpunkt lebten noch 1.947 
Juden in Thüringen. Sie wurden nun 
vermehrt zur Zwangsarbeit verpllich- 
tet. Ab Juli 1939 war die „Reichsvereini- 
gung der Juden" die einzige noch 
zugelassene jüdische Organisation. Sie 
stand unter Aufsicht der Gestapo. In 
Thüringen liefen sämtliche Anweisun- 
gen der Gestapo über die Außenstelle 
Erfurt der Reichsvereinigung der Juden 
in Deutschland, Verband Sachsen- 
Thüringen. 

Nach Kriegsbegiim wurden die 
Lebensbedingungen der Juden noch 
weiter eingeengt: Nach Einbruch {\vv 
Dunkelheit durften sie sich nicht mehr 
draußen auflialten, am 23. September 
1939 wurden ihre Rundfunkgeiäle 
beschlagnahmt, sie durlten nur noch zu 
bestimmten Zeiten und in bestimmlen 
Läden einkaufen, und als schließlich 
Lebensmittelkarten eingeführt wurden, 
erhielten sie geringere Rationen und 
wurden später auch von der Zuteilung 
besonders nahrhafter Lebensmittel, wie 
Milch und Heisch, ausgeschlossen. An 
Flucht oder Auswanderung war fiu* die 
meisten nicht mehr zu denken. Am 
14. April 1942 ging der erste Deporta- 
tionszug mit 148 jüdischen Thüringern 
in das Vernichtungslager Majdanek, am 
10. Mai 1942 wurde ein Transport von 
etwa 600 Personen aus 40 thüringischen 
Orten zusammengestellt und in das Ver- 
nichtungslager Belzec geleitet, am 
19. September 1942 wurden 364 vor 
allem ältere Menschen in das Ghetto 
Theresienstadt deportiert. Die Zurück- 
bleibenden wurden im Frühjahr 1943, 
im Sommer 1944 und im Januar/Febru- 
ar 1945 über Erfurt in die Konzentrali- 



onslager Theresienstadt, Auschwitz und nicht erforscht. Man muß jedoch davon 
Ravensbrück verschleppt. Das Schiciisal ausgehen, daß kaum einer die Vernich- 
der Deportierten ist im einzelnen noch tungslager überlebt hat. 



Der Wiederaiijbau nach 1945 



Die wenigen, die nach der Befrei- 
ung aus den Lagern, der Emi- 
gration oder der Illegalität nach 
Thüringen zurückkehrten, begannen 
schon recht bald mit dem Wiederaufbau 
der zerstörten Gemeinden. In Erfurt, 
Eisenach, Gera und in Mühlhausen 
wurden neue Gemeinden gegründet, 
die sich jedoch mit Ausnahme der 
Erfurter bis 1952/53 wieder auflösten. 
Die antisemitischen Aktionen im Rah- 
men des Prager Slänsky-Prozesses und 
der Moskauer Ärzteprozesse führten 
auch in der DDR zu Repressalien gegen 
Juden, die die überwiegende Mehrheit 
zur Flucht in den Westen veranlaßten. 
Die Erfurter Gemeinde, die nach 1945 
durch den Zuzug von Überlebenden aus 
Schlesien auf ca. 350 Personen ange- 
wachsen war, schrumpfte nach 1953 auf 
etwa die Hälfte ihrer GemeindemitgUe- 
der. Auch der Neubau der Synagoge in 
Erfurt, der einzige auf dem Gebiet der 
DDR, und ihre Einweihung im Jahre 



1952 konnten die Abwanderung nicht 
stoppen. In den folgenden Jahren sank 
die Mitgliederzahl stetig, zumal es 
kaum Geburten oder Zuwachs durch 
neue Mitglieder gab. Im Jahre 1989 
zählte die Jüdische Landesgemeinde 
Thüringen mit Sitz in Erfurt noch 28 
Mitglieder. 

Die „Wende" brachte auch hier eine 
Veränderung. Seit 1991/92 werden 
Juden aus der GUS als „Rontingent- 
flüchtlinge" in der Bundesrepublik auf- 
genommen und nach einem Quoten- 
system auf die Bundesländer verteilt. 
3,3% der Zuwanderer kommen nach 
Thüringen. Die Jüdische Landesge- 
meinde Thüringen ist inzwischen 
wieder auf 134 Genieiiidemilgiieder an- 
gewachsen. Die Zukunft der Gemeinde 
wird nicht zuletzt von der Bereitschaft 
der Thüringer abhängen, die Neuein- 
wanderer mit offenen Armen aufzu- 
nehmen. 



Herausgeber: 
Landeszentrale fiir politische Bildung THÜRINGEN 

Bergstraße 4, 99092 Erfurt 

Autoren: Projekt „Juden in Thüringen", PH Erfurt 

Gestaltung: Heinz Wolf, Sömmerda 

Druck: Druckerei Sömmerda GmbH 

1996 





it 

r 
r 

u 

1 

i| 

1 
1 



r 
( 
f 



pharmftituUicfien aoaeliicnaft. der !-••• 
■opharra Q. m. b. It.. verpadilei wtu- 
dtn. nlf^t lohon fldirltU unlarnoran^. 
um diese wirkllefi i.na ▼onOflldie 
Brholunffiftltle fOr dl« lleT«lli«raiic 
der 8U4t Fulda wu reUenT 

Wir itolltn d)tf« Fraot flffentlldi, weil 
•• una notwendlf ertcholnt. daß dl« blaher 
unwlia«nde Bevölkerung von dieaen Dln- 
«en Kenninta erhlli. Ohne den audi Im 
Inureaio dar aeumthelt lieaendvn Zwedc 
f Jne« pharmaieutlidien InitUutea herabmln« 
dern zu wollen, glauben wir, daO audi die 
Erhallung von Bodcanlagcn heute, da die 
Volkjgeiundhelt vor allergröOt« Oefahren 
geatolU Ifl, eine mindcitena ebenao groOe 
Bedeutung hal. Wenn man In mandie durch 

Ueberbelesung In allen Teilen elr.jeachrgnkU 
Wohnungen bildet und wolO. daO kaum für 
dl» Menictten nodi die MOglldikelt tu einer 
orünuflitjgem40«a Körpivrpnego gegeben lat. 



/ Der Landfriedensbruch i n Wüste naachsen 

VerhsndlnB« tot ier 1. SlnflMUMr im CSSSSridUa Kaaael Im Marmoraaal . " 



9ck 75 Jahre all 




lan DIenit an der Sdiulc. Die jUngfl« gr*- 
Oere Vcrnf/cnillfhung LHbeck?, ^Daa Bonl- 
falluagrob xu Fulda-, gibt weit mehr alj 
Ihr beadteldener Titel vermuten liOt. 

Der Gelehrte bleibt ' Jedodi mit seiner 
Forsdiung nJJu am helmfUldirn Boden 
haften, er spürt audi dem rellgiflson Wir- 
ken, der politisdien Bedeutung und dem 
wlriidujnlidien riniluß der Abtei Jen* 
• olta Ihrer Grenzen eifrig nadi, 
wenn er beispielsweise in dem „Nledeis- 
sdchilsdien Jahrbudi der Landesgesdiidite* 
Dd. 10. 1930 ..Das Fuldaer Clgenklusler Ha- 
mol* bchandeH. In der „Zoltadirlft dea 
Harx-Voreina** für Oesdildite und Alter- 
tumskunde, 1943, „DIo MUiIoniorung dca 
nOrdlldicn Iforgebiote«'* untersudit oder In 
den Fulüoer Gead^ldildblültern uns ^Ole 
V.'4liitorua des Klosters Fulda* In der 
nholnpfolz. In Baden, WUrttomborflf, Bay- 
ern, ThUrlnsen. Im EliaO, In der Sdiwelz, 
der Provinz Saducn und In Hannover 
nachweist. e 

Ea hlcOo dem 7S. G^burtstiitfe dea Pri- 
Inton LUbcdc nldit gerodit werden, wollte 
man seine speilflsdi klrdilldi« und kir- 
dwimcsdiiditlld^e • Tätigkeit übersehen. 
Frucht »einer Im Aullrag« der GOrrea-G»- 
Roll Schaft unternommenen Orientreisen 
lind eine ganze Anzahl Abhandlungen über 
utu 4k«. tiMtwn*v6(itM4«ii*i«« Qn wjkons. von 
der Wortsdiitzung dieser Arbolten In 
Fachkrolien legt dio Ernennung Ihraa Ver- 
fassers zum ordentUchea Mltglle« 
do der Akademie der Byiantl. 
nladion Wisaonschnften berodte« 
Zougnia ab. Papat Plus X hat diea« der 
Ausadhnung der (Istllchen und westlldian 
Kirche dloneowollenden Tätigkeit mit der 
eigenhändigen BesUtlgung der dem Ge- 
lahrten verliehenen Würde oinea Ardü- 
mandriten der grlediisdi-ur Herten Kirch« 
anerkdonl. Audi heuta noch lat "^^ For- 
fcher unermüdlich In Mlnem Si n. 

Lpr. 



Wohl kaum hat etwas dem deutsdien 
Volke Im Auslande §o geschadet wl« die 
Vorgdnce Im November I«». J0d9r ao- 
■tAndig« DeuUdM edUmt tieh nedi beute 
der Judenpogrome und der Niederbren- 
nung, VemHhtung und Aneignung jQ4l- 
fdier KultsUtten und jüdiadier KuJtgegen- 
aUnde und Ut bis Ina ^lefsU getroffen an« 
gezlchU der Tataadie, daO deuUche lUi^ 
•ihe« aldi ao weit vergeaaen konnten. 

Audi die Synagoge In Wüstensachien 
wurde ein Opfer der sdiUndlldsen Tage 
um dm 9. Kovember t83g. Wenn audi die- 
ser Fall, wie daa Gerldit faeteteUU. durdi 
besondere UmsUode eine feiditere FIrbuag 
annimmt ala andere dieser Art. ao bleibt 
dod* die bOae Absldit der JodMverfolgung 

'^Tl.'^S^'l ^' ''•*• ^^ »Fn««oge wurde 
BlAt deahalb von den Angeklagten, die 
•Idi vor der Strafkammer dea LandgerldiU 
tu verantworten hallen, nIedergerlMen« 
well ds« Gebdude idion feit Jahren nldit 
mehr aU Kultstfttte von den Juden benutzt 
jmd von Ihnen atlbat auf Abbnidi lum 
Kaufe angeboten worden war. aondem 
well der Befehl von der Gauleitung kam. 
ale SU verbrofinen. Za ist auch aldit das 
Verdiene« der Tiler, dafl sie nldit ver- 
brannt, aondem eingerlseen wurden Dieae« 
geschah nur aua der Ueberleguag beraua. 
dalS die Gefahr bestand, nahegelegene Hiu- 
aer durch den Brand zu gefährden. Ir- 
stauall(h Ut. wie wenig Interessiert die 
Bevölkerung en dem Ausgang das Protea ■ 
teswar. Der Zuschauerraum des Marmor- 
aaale« Im StfidtsdücÖ war fast \tw, B«. 
dauerlldi wsr die Haltung der Wüsten- 
aadtaener selbst, die keinen weeentUcMn 
Bo ostungszougen itellten, so daO die ür- 
tellsnndung für die Kammer iuflent 
adiwlerig gemacht wurde. 

/So mußte die Kammer der UrtalUflodung 
Ble Ergeboisae der zu einem früheren 
Zeltpunkte stattgefundenen Vernehmungen 
der drei Angeklagten Kümmel. Ro- 
mala luid Mehl er zugrunde legen. 
Diese OeeUndnlaae wurden iwar In der 
Hauptvarhandlung widerrufen, well KQm- 
mel damaU angebUch nldit vemehmunga- 
fihig war und Romela und Mohler anga- 
ben, nur unter dem Druck dar Drohung 
von Verhaftung wegen Verdunkelunpge- 
fohr gestanden zu haben. Beide GaaUnd* 
niase atimmten jedod« ao auffllllg mitein- 
ander Ubereln. daO dia Kammer Ihre Rich- 
tigkeit mit guUm Gewisaen annehmen 
konnte. Die Strafkammer verurteilte da- 
her die fünf Angeklagten KUrajBALtfrü- 



zan 2:alt der NlederreiOung am Pbtzo auf- 
gehalten hall« und bei UndXrledensbruch 
?!?.i"**L*'^ Zuschauer als Teilnehmer 
idiuldig >nacht. Die Angekiogten WjV- 
Mnd und Böhm wurden wegen Manl" 
yw^ß BeWrUFTund der Angeklagte • 
Krtniex, wegen erwiesener Unschuld 
freigesprochen. Der Orf*4nippenleltcr 
ttU mmel erh ielt die gteliho Strnfe wie die 
OkMieren vier Angeklagten, obgleidi er der 
Anreger dee ganzen Unternehmens war. 
aber er hatte Ja den Befehl von der Gau- 
Isitung erhalten. Sein freica Geständnis 
veranlaOte dia Kammer, «eine Strafe nldu 
zu erhöben. Da auf schweren Landfrle- 
denabrudi mn und (Or. sich Zuchthausstrafe 
•teht. bedeuten die Geflngnlsatrafen Hnn 
erheb! khe Mildcrunc. die nur dimt obeti 
erwghnten Umstände zu veHnnk^n ist 
daO die KulfsUtte nldit mehr In Denui-* 
lunt war. „^ 

rartelen. Orwerkscäalten. Vereine 
fFD-nSditllBgaeasscaag rvlda-aiatfi 
J2S""5 «J« »• Uhr Im BsillMua. Msrktxr. 

Vuunu^ "•• ""^ Jfetmstvartrie. 

OswerkS€ksrta|aff«Bd 
IJelmebend Donnerslsr 10 Uhr. Im nuro 

emwurfes zum Schulz« der srt>eltenden Ju- 
Wsadtrcrsfrea der kslholUdivn Mutend 

am Pflngaimontsg in der NSh« von rr#w.i*, 
£«n der Oruppen wird dos Traffcn durVti 

3s^%r%7^ii,in^'-"?ÄT.!.% T:;;t 



UIC^gJ^|H.mpf-.un. 



Heger . 
iChwereh 



ftndfrledensbrudila su Je zehn 
Monaten Oeflngnii, da ale aadi den Feet« 
Stellungen der Beweisaufnahme die Ein- 
rrlOtchnur bedienten. Der Angeklagte 
Blehn erhielt eine Getingniaatrafa van 
S Monaten, well er iidb wlhreod dar gaa- 



^'•^"•Volir;7«n7v"oTOhn"A7on ""älr'^iZ' 
^en. zu dem Wsndcrtrcffcn verjährt d?r 

aMMtn vieiielcsii auch noch ein Sondcrxua. 
Klrcfallchea Laben 

Vw^ die Uakeli «er evangelUchan Kirrhe 
öli^tiL/SS^JSa!^\'^^t ><»«»he«vrniammluns. 

■KD •fidlSm.*Ji'i!"!l 0««»«a des Ra«« rtrr 

bJSf«"^ÄüsSnf"idr "• •'"«• "•*^ «^«•» 

Pia Wetter 

Kelae weaeaiUehe Asademag 
i««Si!f-t.'.**'*. ^*» ••matsiffrilh: 

rSlrS'' y**^. '■^öa^aa her führen lsns«Mn an. 

Ää£SSl'*.S^? Lufjmamn tilfuSTr zu 
wediselnder, meist stsrker Dewoikuns mii 

iiiTiHt» «••*'U* ^«^•' BawoUuniscUdcganf 

oia IS orea nactics ll bla 31 Grad am tj»» 
•«iwsd>e umbowegung. AnTKli^u 



T 



tli 

|i 

II 



A//^ /7/ 5 £>f P^P- f*as m 7cn s 



ui^osn. LI K>io 



Nummer 7 - Seite 26 



BUCHENBLÄTTER 



Donnentag, 16. Mirz 1989 



vnd geht fürtter an der dürren Wieß die da stöst vff die 
Hüne wiß vnd gett dan . . ." Auch hier ist die Dürr- 
mühle nicht namentHch genannt, aber eine »dürren 
Wieß", wie auch generell die anderen darin aufgeführ- 
ten Örtlichkeiten keine Baulichkeiten enthalten (so 
auch nicht die Mühle von 1394), sondern natürliche 
Punkte wie Bäche (nasse Grenzen), Waldbestände, 
Bergrücken, Gräben etc. 

Urkundlich erscheint die ,,Dürr Mühlen* mit einem 
Jacob Ebert in einem von Balthasar Happel 1625 
angelegten Register über den vom Stift Fulda erwor- 
benen Steinrückischen Besitz zu Poppenhausen. 

Die Herren von Steinau hatten sich, nachdem ihr 
Teil des Stammsitzes in Steinau a. (L Haun bei Fulda 
wegen ihrer Teilnahme am Fuldaer Abtsmord 1271 
zerstört worden war, hier in Poppenhausen ansässig 
gemacht. Sie werden zuerst 1327 als Besitzer von 
Poppenhausen genannt, nennen sich nun von Stein- 
rück und sind in dem folgenden Zeitraum eng mit der 
Ortsgeschichte verbunden. 1559 starb Christoph von 
Steinau genannt Steinrück kinderlos. Dessen und sei- 
nes vorher verstorbenen Onkels Balthasar von Stei- 
Dau-Steinrücks Erbe traten des letzteren Schwieger- 
söhne Karl und Philipp von Thüngen zu Bonland und 
Greifenstein an. Karl heiratete Elisabetha von Steinau 
genannt Steinrück und Philipp deren Schwester Aga- 
tiia. Während sich Karl nach Wüstensachsen wandte, 
erbte Philipp Poppenhausen, mit dem er schon 1546 
als Provasall seiner Ehefrau belehnt worden war. 
Seine Nachfahren verkauften 1619 das Burggut zu 
Poppenhausen mit Zugehörungen für 33000 Gulden, 
1624 (mit der Dürrmühle!) und 1656 die restlichen 
Güter an das Fuldaer Hochstift Diese Feststellungen 
lassen den Schluß zu, daß die Dürrmühle zu Zeiten der 
Herren von Steinau- Steinrück erbaut worden sein 
muß, und zwar zumindest vor dem Jahr 1560. 

Die Müllerfamilie Ebert ist nach dem Dreißigjähri- 
gen Krieg m der Mühle nicht mehr anzutreffen. In 
einem 1683 von Pfarrer Johannes Senger aufgestell- 
ten Poppenhäuser Pfarrverzeichnis nach Unteriagen 
von 1681 erscheinen im „Rüschelbacher Vierteil" 
(Rauschelbacher Viertel): Hanß Ruppert „Durrismül- 
1er" 41 Jahre; Catharina, seine Frau 50 Jahre; der 
8jährige Sohn Curth; „huius parens" = dessen Vater 
oder Blutsverwandter Veiten Ruppert mit 75 Jahren 
(vermutlich der Vater des Müllers) und ein Nikolaus 
Ruppert mit Frau Apollonia, beide 26 Jahre alt. Dieser 
Johannes Ruppert ist sicherlich derjenige, den sein 
Vater Valtir Rupert vom «Trenckhoff" am 8. April 
1639 taufen ließ! Pate und zugleich Voniamensgeber 
war Hans Ebert vom Mittelberg. (Wird fortgesetzt!) 

Anmerirongfn: 

1 Es handelt sich hier um Curt Till von Berlepsch zu Eichen- 
Zell und Poppenhausen. Curt Till war zunächst seit 1571 
fuldischer Rat und mischte bald tatkraftig in der Politik des 
Hochstiftes mit Er überwarf sich wegen der Religionspoli- 
tik mit Fürstabt Balthasar von Dermbach, trat nach 1573 m 
den Dienst der Grafen Jsenburg zu Büdingen, spater dann 
in den Dienst der Grafen von Hanau als Hanau-Münzen- 
bergischer Rat und Oberamtmann zu Hanau. Berlepsch 
ehelichte 1569 die 17jährige Barbara von Ebersberg gen. 
V. Weyheis, eine Tochter Georg v. E g. v. W., und damit 
kam 1571 auch Poppenhäuser Ebersberger Besitz in Ber- 
lepsche Hände. Curt Till starb am 7. August 1589. Aus der 
Ehe waren fünf Töchter und sieben Sohne hervorgegangen. 

2 Ober das Wappen siehe meüien Beitrag „Putto mit Wappen 
der Herren von Stemau-Steinrück" in: Bubi. 61. Jahrg., 
1988, Nr. 14, S. 53 L 

Rhöner Anekdoten 

Ein seltsamer Bergname 

Ein Sommergast sprach einst einen alten Rhönbau- 
cm an und fragte: „Schöne Gegend hier! Sagen Sie 
mal, wie heißt eigentlich dieser Berg? Der Berg dort 
hinten?" 

»Bosnfieränner?" 

„Aha. Dank* auch schön! Seltsamer Name für einen 
Bergl Wohl keltisch?- 

Im Bett lesen 

Das hochdeutsche Wort „Bauch" lautet in der Rhö- 
ner Mundart „Buch". Daraus hat sich einmal folgen- 
des Mißverständnis ergeben: 

Ein Rhöner Junge war erkältet, und der Arzt mein- 
te: „Es ist nicht schlimm. Aber du mußt dich ins Bett 
legen, meinetwegen mit 'em Buch." Da sagte der 
Junge: „Ich lenn leewer ofm Boggel" („Ich liege lieber 
auf dem Rücken "). Gottfried Rehm 



Zur Pogromnacht in Wüstensachsen 

Von Otto Berge 



Nach Paul Arnsbergs Geschichte der jüdischen Ge- 
meinden in Hessen bestand in Wüstensachsen seit dem 
17. Jahrhundert eine jüdische Gemeinde. Da die jüdi- 
schen Einwohner vor Übergriffen seitens der übrigen 
Dorfbewohner nicht immer sicher waren, vertwt der 
damals zustandige Landesherr, der Fürstbischof von 
Würzburg, den Bewohnern dieser Gegend (im Amts- 
gericht Hilders), sich gegen Juden oder deren Eigen- 
tum zu vergehen. Am Ende des 18. Jahrhunderts 
zählte die jüdische Gemeinde 2^Familien, von denen 
viele während des 19. Jahrhunderts nach Amerika 
auswanderten. Im 20. Jahrhundert verzeichnete die 
jüdische Gemeinde eine Mitgliederzahl von 126 Per- 
sonen. 

Die Berufs- und Sozialstruktur weist im Jahre 1933 
aus, daß die Juden in Wüstensachsen hauptsächlich im 
Handel (zumeist Viehhandel) und in der Landwirt- 
schaft tatig waren. Außerdem gab es sechs Ladenge- 
schäfte, die von Juden geführt wurden. Die in Kopie 
beigefügte Übersicht über „Daitsche Geschäfte" in 
Wüstensachsen aus der damals in Fulda erscheinenden 
nationalsozialistischen Zeitung ^Fuldaer Nachrich- 

in Sttfkitfad^feit, 

Um Quc^ bem fegten beutfc^en !Bo(fsgeno{{en in 
UBüftenfac^fen (SR^on) guten- unb* unuber« 
Dortetiten CEintauf beim reellen, beutfc^cn 
®e|c^aftsmann ju getoa^Ieiften- geben mir 
nodjfolgenb bie iübl|4ien Qejc^äfte in •'SBüffen- 
\cid}\en beConnt 
I^cbbolb ®olb, Äolonlot-, 6c^u^, 6<fjnltlu)a- 

rengefc^äft (ouc^ ^oufierer). 
Tlaj; IBud^sbaum I, Sc^ntttmoren-; unb Ser- 

[anbge(d)äf| (ou(^ ^ufierer). 
Maj; aju^^sbaumll, »onjeflions- u. iSc^nltf- 

n>arenae[(^Qff, ßa^rrober, 91a^mofd}inen. 
SBltme (B Q r t n e r, kolonial, unb 6d)nitln)aren- 

g\(d)n|l (au(^ ^auflerer). t.. 

IBcrt^cC !B r Q u n i (^ ro < i g e r,^ 6{()iiitln)aren-, 

.S)uU unb,Äfeiberge[(^a[t. • -r. 

SP.orfifs S (^^ n c e b e r 8 e r, Itctonfaf- «nb Riiri" 

U)arenge[d^ft. • 

^aiob Beinberger, G'^ufy- unb €f^nil!- 

cDarengeic^äfl. 
Ceo !n r b t> a u I e r, 0e(cf;äft für Älelnülelä^, 

{^eKe, 3)arme, Dele, Sted^anbel, ^c^^etbe^. 

©cbrüber (B r fi n ( p e (^ t, SWefegerei, Oie^^anbef.. 
(Be[c^tDirter (Bofb, ftominumsgefc^ärt. für. Aofo- 

nia(-, Sarfroaren, fS'\\^t^ Äoffee. . ^ 
i)ermann IHorb^auftr, Sielji^nbet. 
i)ugo SBeinberger, Sie^^anbeL 
^rn^ärb Brounfc^melgcr, Si*e(^^onbe(. 
3onQ0 !Rorb4aufer, SSieb^anbel. 
D^Qt^an 91 r b j^ Q u f e j, Sie^^^anbet 
«mo iyit)rbfjäuftr; SJlelj^anbel, 
Sert^olb' Sr<iunf4meiger, Sief)^nbe(, 
^ermann ÜBeinberger« Eiie^^anbef. 

Ausschnitt aus den „Fuldaer' Nachrichten" 
(15. Sept 1933), einem nationalsozialistischen 
Kampfblatt, das in Fulda vom 1. September 1933 bis 
1, Februar 1934 erschien und der Verbreitung der 
nationalsozialistischen Weltanschauung dienen 
sollte. Da nicht genug Bezieher vorhanden waren^ 
mußte dies NS-Kampßlatt sein Erscheinen wieder 
einstellerL 

Eine wesentliche Aufgabe sah diese NS-Zeitung 
darin, die Juden zu diskriminieren, zu isolieren und 
aus dem Wirtschaftsleben auszuschalteru Daher wur- 
den unter der Rubrik Jüdische Geschäfte' die in 
Fulda, Gersfeld und Hünfeld ansässigen Betriebe jüdi- 
scher Geschäftsinhaber veröffentlicht, um die Ein- 
wohner davor zu „warnen", in solchen Geschäften 
einzukaufen. Wer es trotzdem tat, wurde an den 
^Franger' gestellt, wozu unter der Rubrik ,^m Pran- 
ger' die Namen der Käufer bekannt gegeben wurden. 
Für Wüstensachsen wurde die Überschrift „Daitsche 
Geschäfte' gewählt, um die Juden bereits durch diese 
Schlagzeile zu diskriminieren und lächerlich zu 
macheru O. Berge 



ten" vom 15. September 1933 gibt Hinweise auf die 
jüdischen Geschäfte. Damals at^r sollten die Kaufer 
vor jüdischen Geschäften ^gewarnt* werden. Ziel 
derartiger Maßnähmen war nicht nur eine Diskrüni- 
nierung der jüdischen Bürger, sondern auch ihre end- 
gültige Ausschaltung aus dem Wirtschaftsleben und 
die Vernichtung ihrer Existenzgrundlage. Derartige 
Warnungen wurden auch für Fulda, Hünfeld und 
Gersfeld in die Fuldaer Nachrichten eingefügt 

Aus den Berichten der Geheimen Staatspolizei ist 
zu entnehmen, daß die jüdischen Einwohner von 
Wüstensachsen in den Jahren 1934 und 1935 vor 
Übergriffen auf ihr Eigentum nicht sicher waren* 
Beschädigungen an Häusern, Zertrümmern von Fen* 
sterscheiben, Beschädigung der jüdischen Schule so- 
wie Bedrohungen und Einschüchterungen von Perso- 
nen wurden in der genannten Berichtszeit nach Kassel 
gemeldet Um diesen Angriffen zu entgehen, verlie- 
ßen viele Juden bald Wüstensachsen. Sie emigrierten 
entweder unmittelbar ins Ausland oder verzogen zu- 
nächst nach Fulda, in Großstädte bzw. über Fulda in 
Großstädte und von dort ins Ausland; zunächst aber 
waren sie aus dem Dorf weg, um in einer größeren 
Gemeinde mehr anonym zu bleiben. 

2^ele der Emigration waren Nord- und Südamerika, 
Südafrika und Palästina. 30 Juden aus Wüstensachsen 
sind in Vernichtungslagern musam umgekommen; 
unter ihnen auch der letzte Vorsitzende der Gemein- 
de, M. Btichsbaum II (Kriegsteilnehmer 1914-1918)» 
mit Tochter und Schwiegersohn. 

Ohne auf Einzelheiten einzugehen, berichtet Arns- 
berg: ^Die Synagoge wurde in der Kristallnacht zef- 
^ stört und abgerissen.* In der Fuldaer Volkszeitung 
vom 13. Mai 1948 erfahren wir unter der Oberschrift 
„Der Ländfriedensbrucb in Wüstensachsen" Einzel- 
heiten über die Pogromnacht in Wustensachsen. In der 
Einleitung weist die Fuldaer Volkszeitung darauf hin, 
daß sich »jeder anstandige Deutsche noch heute der 
Judenpogrome und der Niederbrennung« Vemichtune. 
und Aneignun£ jüdischer Kultstatten und jüdischer 
Kultgegenstände schämt und bis ins tiefste getroffen 
ist angesichts der Tatsache, daß deutsche Menschen 
sich so weit vergessen konnten*. Auch die Synagoge 
von Wüstensachsen wurde ein Opfer der beschämen- 
den £rci|ni&^ vom 9. November 1938. Sie \^iiide 
zwar nicht abgebrannt, wie es ^ Gauleitung'der 
NSDAP befohlen hatte, sondern „nur* eingerissen, 
um umliegende Gebäude durch einen Brand nicht zu 
gefährden. Im Prozeß gegen die Synagogenschander 
wurden fünf Personen zu jexehn Monaten Gefängnis 
verurteilt, weil „sie nach den Feststellungen der Be- 
weisaufnahme die Einreißschnur* zur Zerstörung der 
Synagoge bedient hatten. Em Angeklagter erhielt eine 
Strafe von fünf Monaten Gefänenis^ „weil er sich 
während der ganzen Zeit der Niederreißung am.Platz 
aufgehalten hatte und bei Landfriedensbruch sich 
auch der Zuschauer als Teihiehmer schuldig macht*. 

In dem Beitrag der Fuldaer Volkszeitung wird insbe- 
snnHpr» die Milde des Urteils hervorgehoben, da bei 
Landfriedensbruch im allgemeinen Zuchthausstrafen 
verhängt werden. Das milde Urteil erklärt sich aus der 
Tatsache, daß die Synagoge als Gotteshaus (wegen der 
geringen Zahl mäniüicher Gemeindemitglieder) nicht 
mehr genutzt wiu-de und auf Abbruch verkauft wer- 
den sollte. 

In der Berichterstattung über den Prozeß (1948) 
verdienen zwei weitere Bemerkungen hervorgehoben 
zu werden: 

t 1. „Erstaunlich ist, wie wem'g interessiert die Bevöl- 
kerung an dem Ausgang des Prozesses war. Der 
Zuschauerraum des Marmorsaales im Stadtschloß war 
fast leer.* 

• 2. „Bedauerlich war die Haltiuig der Wüstensachse- 
ner selbst, die keinen wesentlichen Belastungszeugen 
stellten« so daß die Urteilsfmdung für die Kammer 
äußerst schwierig gemacht wurde,* 
QneOefl oad Utentnn 

Fuldacr Volksieitving vom 13. Mai 1948. 

Paul Arnsberg, Die jüdischen Gemeinden in Hessen, Frank- 
furter Sodetätsdruckcrei 1971. 

Thomas Wein (Hrsg.), Die Lageberichte der Geheimen 
Staatspolizei über die Provinz Hessen-Nassau 1933-1936. 
Köln, Wien (Böhlau) 1986. 

Verantwortlich: Dr. Otto Berge 



M 

4 
■l 




THE BRIDGE TO THE JEWISH WORLD ()!jew.»h ■■m8»(J 



JEWISH HISTORY 

YEHOSHUA LEIMAN, Editor 





Rabbi Zeckel Leib Wormser 
The Baal Shem Of Michelstadt 

Parti 

Yitzchok Aryeh (Zeckel Leib) Mattes was born in 
1768 in the village of Michelstadt in the Erbach region 
of the province of Hesse in Germany. His father, Mat- 
tisyohu (Mattes), born in 1729 and died in 1802, was a 
cloth merchant in Michelstadt. His mother, Sorale, died 
in 1791. Zeckel Leib was the eighth of 10 boys and girls, . 
some of whom died as children, and outlived them all. 

The family name Wormser was given when re-. 
quired by government edict i n 1808. The origin of the 
name is the fact that his greai-grandfather, Yitzchok 
Zecklen Eichel Louans, who died in 1710, lived for many 
years in the city of Worms wh'ere he served as a judge 
in the rabbinical court. Yitzchok Zecklen's father was 
Moshe Boruch Alsace. Apparently the family came from 
Alsace to Worms and then to Michelstadt. 

Rabbi Zeckel Leib Wormser's grandfather, Yaakov 
Michelstadt (died 1758), married Yettla (died 1756), 
daughter of Rabbi Mattisyohu Ahrweiler (died 1728), 
who had served as rabbi of Bingen, later as Klaus-rabbi 
in Mannheim, and last as rabbi of Heidelberg. His fa- 
ther, Rabbi Hertz Ahrweiler (died 1678), had been a 
rabbinical court judge in Frankfurt. Ahrweiler is a town 
in the German province today known as Rhineland- 
Palatinate. 

Yaakov Michelstadt was a descendant of Rabbi 
Eliyohu Louans, known as the Baal Shem of Worms 
(1564-1636), who served as rabbi of Worms, Fulda, Ha- 
nau, Mainz, Friedberg, and again Worms. He was a 
Scholar in the reveaied as weil as the secret parts of 
Torah and the author of a number of works: Rinaa 
Dodim on Song of Songs (Basel, 1600), Glosses on 
Sefer Mitzvoa Godol; Michlol Yofi on Ecclesiastes 
(Amsterdam, 1695); Vikuach Yayin im Hcunayim 
(Amsterdam, 1757). A number of his manuscripts were 
never published, including Aderea Eliyohu on Zohar. 

Rabbi Eliyohu Louans's grandfather was Rabbi 
Joselman of Rosheim (1478-1554), whose mother was a 
descendant of the Lurya family which traces itself back 
to Rabbi Shelomo Shpira. Rabbi Shpira, who lived in 
the town of Speyer around 1375, was a descendant of 
Rabbi Shelomo ben Yitzchok — Rashi. 

His Youth 

Zeckel Leib spent his youth in his birthplace, 



Michelstadt, studying sacred works and additional sub- 
jects such as German language and music. His father 
wanted him to become a merchant and often sent him to 
nearby Erbach for that purpose. 

At the age of 13 he wished to study in a yeshiva, 
but his parents — possibly because of their difficult 
economic Situation — refused. The communal cantor 
taught him Mishna; after a while he admitted he did 
not know enough to satisfy Zeckel Leib. 

Some years later his parens acquiesced to his go- 
ing to Merzig in Westphalia to study Talmud under the 
local rabbi. He feil ill on his way there and had to re- 
turn home, where he lay bedridden for two months. He 
spent the time at home studying with great persever- 



ance. 



(To be continued) 




N t W Y U H K 



Unlikely Angel 

The $17million gifi to UJA-Federationfrom 'a regulär guy in Q 
begins to help the needy. 





ELICIA BROWN 

STAfT WrITER 

Likc many in his gcncrallon, Paul Wcinbcrgcr bought 
only whal hc absolutcly nccdcd. Hc took fcw vaca- 
tions, ncvcr bought a car and donaicd only nicagcr 
sums to charity. 
Up to Ihc day hc died at agc 90, Wcinbcrgcr's onc- 
bcdroom apartmcnt in Flushing, Queens, was dccorated 
with thc samc fumiturc that his wifc, Greta, brought over 
from Gcrmany in 1939. 

"Hc uscd to makc mc drivc from onc Waldbauins to an- 
othcr if Üic eggs wcrc fivc ccnls cheapcr thcrc," s;iys Werner 
KJccman, one öf Wcinbcrgcr's fcw friends. 

Likc only a fcw in cvcry gcncralion, howcvcr, Wcin- 
bcrgcr's frugal lifestylc and shrewd real cstatc invcstments 
helpcd him amass a fortunc. Thc coinbination hclpcd the 
balancc shccts of morc than onc Philanthropie Organization 
Espccially onc. Paul Weinberger. Refugee from Germany made a fortune In real estate T^^^ '"'^."^ 'T'' '""' 

forYad Sarah, an Israeli voluntccr Organization that providcs to Yeshiv;; Univcrsily's Stern College for Womcn aschool 

mcdical Services and cquipmcnt to thc eldcriy and ill. Uses for with which shc had no apparent affiliation in life ' 

thc rcmainmg money in thc Greta and Paul Weinberger Fund And last May, Irvin Abranison, who spent his days in sccdy 

will bc dctcnnincd iater. hotcls, left $10 million to a Queens yeshiva and Jerusaicrn 

Ourpolicyistowaituntilwcgctallthemoneytodccidc orphanage 

an^ — «^„— -",,•- k ;, • r f " ■ ^ diionisn. ,,fnc 1,^ j^^j j 550 apartments [homcs not bu Idincsl a lot of 

a.._....vv......^. -H,,. as a .ut of .uuucy. wc arc not going "1 'vc becn hcrc for ninc ycai. and I can only count on onc iheni near Columbia Univcrsity " 

'nanö g.lis tnat arc. fhat iargc,;- sajd Streit. 'weui'tDcrger mamtamcd a Sharp focus Ihroughout his lifo - 
A. IS customary for any g.ft thc officc's fu^t rcaction "was he commuted rcgularly to his M^to^ oSSsSv be 
:ck toscewhethcr thc ndv dual u/nQnrnntr;K..f<.rh..,„ r i... ...... .f. ' . ^' ""'"w"""'ccunuisnoniy oe- 



way vith Wcinbcrgcr from Flushing to Manhattan. "Wc 
wüu! j Chat for a half hour of train travcl," thc rabbi said. 

Kabbi Hait oncc mcnlioncd that hc was to bc honorcd at 
a di;:ncr. Wcinbcrgcr promplly scnt thc suggcstcd check. 

"i Said, 'Oh my gosh, why did I mcntion it to Mr. Wein- 
berger?' " thc rabbi rccalls. "Maybe hc couldn'l afford thc 
$ 100 but he feit obligatcd. I was flabbcrgasted whcn 1 leamed 
Üic magnitude of his asscts." 

Born in 1903 near thc city of Fulda in central Germany, 
Weinberger grew up with two sisters in a small village whcrc 
bicad was baked in a communal oven and peoplc lived off 
tlic land, much thc way thcy had for ccnturies. Wcinbcrg- 
cr's own family was quite religious and very poor. 

After high school, Wcinbcrgcr movcd to Munich to live 
with his sister Ida's family and Icarn her husband's trade, 
bicycle manufacturing. In the late '30s, howcvcr, the threat 
of Na/.i aggrcssion scnt thc whole family packing. Wcin- 
bcrgcr .spcnt somc timc in Liechtenstein bcforejoining liL:i 



A fcw ycars Iater, Wcinbcrgcr discovercd what would bc- 
comc his passion: real estate. 

"Hc Started buying apartmcnt houscs. Hc startcd with onc, ' 
and then anothcr one, and another ...," says Richard Hesky, 
Ida's cldest son. "Hc bought cvcrylhing with long-tcrm fi- 



to just rush off and spend it 

Smallcr sumsftünrWcmcicrgcr's cstatc were bcquestcd to 
Hadassah, thc American Committec for thc Weizmann Insti 



check to sce whethcr the individual was a contributor here 



tute of Sdcncc, thc Society of thc New York Hospital, thc Hos- and he ncvcr came up " shc said 

wdl S'l^eä'oü^'Srr'^-'''' ''""' """"" '°' ''' ^''"' '' "^^ ""^' ^P'^^' °^ Wcinbcrgcr's wealth. the shock ripplcd 

Tmo^rit "^;*^ .^"^"^'^•*^- , , '^^on^ f'c Offices of charitics to lhehon.es of thc fcw who vtc.c 

rruc pcrhaps to Ihc complcx naturc of human rclations, his acquaintanccs 

Weinberger left roughly $600,000 to family and friends. In the late 1970s, Rabbi Paul Hait oftcn rode the No. 7 sub- 




snniiEiiiiiiiiiiii^^ 




Come Make Jevvish Music on December 25th 
Matthew Lazar and the Zamir Choral Foundation 

invite you to our annual 

OPEN SING 

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 25, 1996 
^ 2-4 p.m. 

Jewish Thcological Scminary 

(Unlcrbcrg Auditorium) 

3080 Broadway 

Open to the public 

Music Rental Fee: $10 - non-members R.S.V.R: (212) 362-3335 

$ 7 - Zamir Choral 

Foundation members 

fTTfTTflffflfflfflillMJIIIHinin^ 





forc his death. Hc kept fc\v dose friends, fcwer hobbics and 
grew mto "a firm type of old man who had his own ways," rc- 
mcmbcrs Minetta Brown, who livcd with him for 6'/2 ycars as 
his homc aide. 

As hc grew wealthicr, Wcinbcrgcr apparently told family, 
fricnd^ and cmployees thcy would be remembercd for their le- 
gal hclp, housckecping or chauffeuring. But whcn thc Provi- 
sion:, of his wiU were read prior to a small funcral scrvicc, many 
wcrc disappointcd. 

"Thcrc wcrc a handfiil of peoplc screaming in thc funcral 
homc," says Ralph Jacobson, thc stepson who was ncvcr for- 
mally adopted by Weinberger but says he maintaincd a close 
rclationship. n 

Jacobson, an attorney, submitted three Claims to thc es- 
täte, mcluding onc for $82,500 to pay for 25 ycars of legal Ser- 
vices and trips to Queens. During Wcinbcrgcr's last fcw ycars 
hc oftcn was ill, and his stepson and ncphews took tums vis- 
iting New York. 

"I did it wrong," Wcinbcrgcr said, according to Hesky "I 
did cvcrything wrong by working. My whole lifc I had no 
frientls." 

Maybe Wcinbcrgcr didn't want his relatives to cnioy thc 
lifestylc he didn't havc, Hesky suggests. Or pcrhaps Wein 
berger rccognizcd that less for family - who aftcr all live com 
fonably — yields more for charity. 

In fact, in his last ycars Wcinbcrgcr altcrcd thc will scvcfaI 
limcs. rarsing and lowcring bcquests to individuals dcncndJno 

onmoodswing,''accordinßto Ralph Engel, theattom"^^^ 
drafted thc various wills. ^ "" 

ish charity. This is what most puzzIcs UJA-Federation«. q. 

Mc's not a lifclong contributor, shc said "hc's ius, n . T 
guy who livcd out in Oueens."a ' J"'' ^ '""^^'^ 



lar 



) 



FRIDAY,JULY 19,1996 



ALGEMEINER JOURNAL -B4- 



t?N:)nivyt nvo^>)3v:ibN 



1996 19 >t?p :iN\:»nD 



On My Mind 



Continued from page B3 
documents found in the caves near the Dead Sea. 

Sanctity of 
Ancient Hebrew Script 

Throughout the 300 years that Jewish coins were Struck, 
only the ancient, biblical Script was used, never the ktav 




'-• /.' 



^^0 iyuj 1337 012^ 

D'^tt^n*' min'? 



Redemption of Jerusalem publicized and name of 
Shimon (Bar Kochba or Ben Kosiba) 

Ashuri, the Script which was brought back from the 
Babylonian Exile from which cur modern Hebrew sciipl is 
derived. It is also interesting that in the Dead Sea ScroUs, 
which are mostly written in ktav Ashuri, the Divine Name is 
often written in the ancient Script. This Script was thcrefore 
considered more sacred than the later, '^modern" Script. 

The iragic end of 1,135 years of Jewii>ii indepenuciice in 
Jerusalem is documented by the cruel Roman coins issued to 
teil the worid that "Judea Capta," Judah, is captured. The 
small area of the Jewish State v/ai so important to the politi- 
cal and religious life of humanity that emperor after emperor 
announced to the worid through coins that the Jewish State 
was no more. 

Jewish Survival 

We are privileged to live to see and proclaim to the Aorld 
that the Jewish State is alive. When you visit the Tiius Arch 
in Rome, raised to commemorate the defeat of the Jeu , you 
will always find that somcone has written in chalk ihese 
words: "Am Yisrael Chai!" Those words teil the wholc story 
of the perilous victory of the Jewish people and the Jewish 
religion over its enemies. The chain of the story can be 
traced through the long trail of Jewish coins - contemporary 
evidence of Jewish heroism and resilience. We can only 
exclaim in awe and gratitude to Hashem: "Am Yisrael 
Chai!" Ancient Jewish coins are therefore a source of great 
Inspiration and faith.Q 



News and Commentary |( 



Continued from page Bl 
retort was most timely. 

'Chazak Chazak': Congregation 
Encourages Netanyahu 

To me Netanyahu' s appearance in shul Saturday mi^nüng 
was more memorable than all the T.V. appearances. !t was 



Th« Polh# of Tofoh l«fic/ 



Why Are We Still Mourning? 



a loss that we have trouble feeling, of crying about some- 
thing we do not really understand? 

Perhaps the answer is that, paradoxical as it may seem, 

T. ^ . „ o * /z:nu\ • our continucd mouming for the loss of the Beit Hamikdash 

he Gemara in Bava Batra (60b) gives us some ^^ p^ecisely whai keeps the Beit Hamikdash "alive." 
msight into the angu«h feit by the Jew.sh people 4^,^^^^ 'y ^^ ^^ ^^^^ ^f ,^6 significancc and the 

m the generations followmg the destnict.on of the ,g„^^^ ^f f^^ ^^^ Hamikdash, attaincd through ihc study 
Beit Hamikdash (Temple), The Gemara relates ^^ Mishnayot and Gemarot and other traditional sourcos that 

describe it, is made more meaningful by the fact that we are 
required to recognize that the absence of the Beit 
Hamikdash indeed represents a great loss. 

We are told that we must long for the days 
of a Standing, operative Beit Hamikdash, that 
we must regularly pray that it be rebuilt and 
that we must, even at the monients of our 
greatest personal celebrations, recall that our 
lives are incomplete without it. Wc are 
required to mourn, perhaps, specificaily in 
Order to make the Beit Hamikdash, which we 
have never seen and whose importance we 
have never experienced, a part of our lives 
nonetheless. By learning about what once 
was, by imagining how Jewish life in 
Jerusalem must have been, and, yes, by 
mouming, we are able to see to it that the Beit 
Hamikdash remains an integral part of our 
Spiritual existence even when it is no longer 
physically standing. 

The pasuk (verse) in Tehillim (31:13) 

implies that people have the ability to forget, 

to go on with their lives aiiu to be pioduclivc without con- 

,-,...,_, . , tinually being consumed by the anguish over the loss of 

ing the week of shim is indeed permitted to consume meat ^^^^ ^ |^^^ ^^,^^.^^ j^ ^^^^ ^^^ ^^^^^^ „^ Pesachim 

and wine). We can see cleariy, however, just how mtense ^^^^^ ^^^^^^ ^^^^ ^^.^ ^^.^. ^^ ^ j^ necessary for human 

the feelmg of sadness and moummg was among the Jews of ^^. ^^ ^^ ^^^^ ^^ ^^^^-^^ Someone or something that is 



by Rabbi Michael Taubes / Principal, The Marsha Stern 
Talmudical Academy-Yeshiva University High Schoolfor Boys 

he Gemara in Bava Batra (60b) gives us some 
insight into the anguish feit by the Jewish people 
in the generations following the destruction of the 
Beit Hamikdash (Temple). The Gemara relates 
that there were certain Jews at that time who feit that they 
should abstain on a permanent basis from eating meat and 
drinking wine because these products used to be offered on 
the mizbeiach (altar) as part of a sacrificial Service that was 
now no longer possible. 

"How," they reasoned, "can we eat meat 
and drink wine when we can no longer offer 
meat and wine on the mizbeiach of the Beit 
Hamikdash?" They were prepared even to 
forego eating bread and certain fruits because 
these products too had once been part of the 
Service of the Beit Hamikdash. 

The Gemara concludes that these stringent 
expressions of mouming the loss of the Beit 
Hamikdash did not become the accepted 
norm, and the halacha (Jewish law), there- 
fore, does not prohibit the consumption of 
meat, wine, bread or fruits. (It is possible, 
though, that our practice to avoid eating meat 
and drinking wine during the Nine Days is 
related to the behavior of these pious Jews. 
Unlike other practices observed during the 
Nine Days. the abstention from meat and wine is not some- 
thing generally associated with mouming, as a mourner dur- 




Rabbi Michael Taubes 



the post-C/iwr^an (destruction) generations, since they were 
prepared to give up even basic Staples of life, even the most 
simple of pleasures, in order to demonstrate their sorrow. 

It should not be difficult to understand why there were 
people who feit this way. The Beit Hamikdash was the focal 
point of Jewish life. It was the center of Service of Hashem, 
of Jewish law, and of Jewish communal activities. Even 
during the tumultuous years of war and strife prior to the 
Churban, the Beil Hamikdash still stood as a symbol of 
Judaism. Jews had a place to direct their hearts and their 
thoughts. And suddenly, this pillar of religious activity was 
gone. Where now should they tum for religious direction? 
Where now could they serve Hashem? Where now would 
they travel as a people three times a year? And so the feel- 
ing of devastation took over. They had trouble imagining 
Jewish life without the Beit Hamikdash. They had difficulty 
conceiving even of engaging in the normal activities of day- 
to-day life. Some, chazal (the sages) teil us, still went to the 
Site of the Beit Hamikdash on holidays. And they enacted 
decrees designed both to recall what used to take place in 
the Beit Hamikdash and to take note of and mourn its 
absence. 

The challenge we face today is to continue, especially at 
this time of year, to be able to think about the Beit 
Hapiikdash and try to appreciate what its absence should 
mean to us. This is especially difficult in light of the fact 
that we have never seen the Beit Hamikdash. We do not 



alive, however, can never be forgotten and can never be 
removed from one's mind completely. 

This idea is found in the Midrash in Bereishit Rabhah. 
cited by Rashi in Chumash, to explain why Yaakov Avinu 
could not forget bis son Yosef. As long as someone is alive. 
he cannot be forgotten. It may thus be suggested that by 
actively mouming the loss of the Beit Hamikdash. by refus- 



ing to forget about it and remove it from our minds,'we are 
testif}iiig that it is srill alive, still part of our religious psy- 
che, and still a religious focal point. We are still mouming 
because by doing so we are refusing to let the Beit 
Hamikdash become truly destroyed. 

Th aforementioned Gemara in Bava Batra states that 
one vho moums over Jerusalem merits seeing its rejoicing. 
It is nrteworthy that our sages do not say that such a person 
will iiKfit or will see its rejoicing, in the future tense, but 
rathcr (hat one does merit and does see its rejoicing, in the 
presciir lense. Perhaps this is because the mere fact that one 
mouiii> over Jerusalem is itself testimony that Jerusalem 
and tl;j Beit Hamikdash still survive, and that alone is cause 
for ccLbralion. May Hashem cause all our days of moum- 
ing to become true days of celebration. 

Yi hivat Rabheinu Yitzchak Elchanan, the cradle and 
üjfilu.ic of Yeshiva University, is proud to present this mes- 
sage ihe eighth in a series on Torah through the eyes of our 
Rosln I Yeshiva. The Yeshiva, now in its I09th year, is the 
Westi in Hemisphere's largest center for higher learning in 
the Onhodox tradition of Judaism. It produces rabbis, edu- 
cators and communal leaders who will guide Jewish com- 
munitits into the next Century. 

F(i Information on a variety of programs at the 
Semiiuuy. or to obtain a copy of the essays and other relat- 
ed mmcrials, write or call: 

Rahhi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary 
500 lest 1 85 th Street 
New \nrk, NY 10033 
(2I2r^60-5262 

Rabbi lauhes, an educator and Torah scholar, has just 
compl'ted hisfirst year as principal ofTMSTA. He is Spiri- 
tual liider of Congregation Tzemach Dovid in Teaneck, 
N.J., and the author of ''The Practical Torah: A Collection 
ofPrcsentations of Halachah Based on the Parshas 
Hashnua (Genesis Jerusalem Press 1995)" - Mordechai I. 
Twi'i k\, Series Editor. 




Kosher Dining Guide 



212-267 5561 




BROOKLYN 



MANHATTAN 



Natanya Fast Food & Pizza 

Kosher Pizza • Falafel • Humus • Ice Cream • Tea • Coffee 
Cholov Yisroel »1506 Ave. J • 718-258-5160 



^ 



kiONi'S Creative Catering for All Occasions 

ßAGELS DaiiT Vegetarian Rettanrant 

Frcsh Bakcd Bagcis, Brcads, Pastrics, 
Hors d'Ocuvrcs • Pa»ita Dishcs 
• Frcsh Fish • Sandwiches • Salads 
(212) 764-1566 15 W. 45 Street 



MOM'S 
CnTERING 



Cr 





%kt Gtiental Mlatt l^oshet t^atautant 1 fyillagc Crown Restaurant & Garden Cafe 



er lo come to shul in lime. Rabbi Haskel Lookslein liad 
extended an invitalion to me, for which I thank him. He guid- 
ed the service in a dignified and disciplined Community icle- 
bration. Netanyahu entered the shul just before shvi'i und was 
calied up as "Binyamin ben Ben-Zion" and pronounced the 
blessings flawlessly. Therefore "Chazak Chazak va- 
Nitzchazek" ("Be strong! Be strong! And may we be strength- 
ened!" - sung when a Book of the Torah is completed) was 
sung in his presence by the entire congregation with extraordi- 
nary enthusiasm. Other songs were also sung: "Sinian Tov 
U'mzal Tov," and finally, "U'reh Vanim Le'evaneycha 
U'bnei Banim Shalom AI Yisrael." Returning to his seai. he 




Rabbi Haskel Lookstein 

shook hands all around. 

This also being the Shabbat for Birchat haChodesh, 1 was 
singled out for an unusual honor. On orders of the rabbi, I was 
inviled to come forward and hold the Sefer Torah during the 
Blessing for the» New Month. I was frankly overcome by this 
great honor. I proudly held the Torah in the presence of 
Netanyahu, accompanied by Ambassador Rabinovitch and, up 
in the gallery, Sara Netanyahu, Erat Rabinovich and Omsul 
General Colette Avital. (Many worshippers afterwards 
remarked on the significancc of this appearance). Rabbi 
Haskel Lookstein told me: "If any one deserves to sharc this 
great cclcbration, il is you who has so consistently supported 
Mr. Netanyahu." I again thank him for the great honor. 

Netanyahu then delivered a speech. The most revciiling 
part of his speech came when he cried out: "I am a Jew first, 
an Israeli second!" This revealed his priorities. He is a Clear 
inspiration to our generation. His main poinl was that ncxt to 
aggression by the Arabs against us, the greatest dangcr is 
assimilation and loss of identity. ) 

"How many of you can be sure that your grandchildren 
will not only be Jews, but also proud Jews?" he askeci. He 
calied for redoubled effort for Jewish education, acquiring 
Jewish books, speaking Hebrew and particularly sendin;^ our 
children to Israel for a year or so to impress on Ihem the spir- 
itof Israel. 

Mr. Gershon Jacobson, Editor in Chief of the Algemiiiner 
Journal, who sat next to me, reminisced with me on our Joint 
presence at the Madrid Peace Conference in 1991. THere, 
loo, we attended the local Madrid Synagogue where 
Netanyahu, then deputy foreign minister, came to worshi() on 
Friday night. We thought back and concluded how wonderful 
it was to see him now as prime minister at thi^ critical 
moment in our history. Providence at work! Then as no^V, he 
handied remarkably well hundreds of press Conferences and 
interviews. We can only marvel at his skill with the mc^ia - 
just the skill needed. 

I wish him all the success in his task ahead. 



Yom Kippur and witness visible signs that Hashem has 
granted His people atonement. We do not understand how it 
must have feit to partake of the Korban Pesach (Passover 
offering) with so many other Jewish men and women filling 
the streets of Jerusalem. We are unable to picture precisely 
the excitement and Jubilation of the Simchat Beit 
HaShoeivah in the Beit Hamikdash. And yet we too are told 
to moum for the loss of the Beit Hamikdash and to lament 
the absence of something we have never seen. Our moum- 
ing obviously cannot be as intense as that of the people who 
lived in the aftermath of the Churban, but we are required, 
nevertheless, to moum. 

Why is this necessary? What is the purpose of mouming 

Presidents Conference Chairman and 

Eliezer Wiesel Approved Appointment 

of Gentile to Jewish Studies Post 

Thomas Bird, a Catholic recently appointed director of 
the Jewish studies program at Queens College, resigned 
from his new position this week, citing as the reason an 
"attempt to trash my record" based on "objections to my 
being a gentile." 

But the President of Queens College said the appointment 
was made after he sought the advice of several Jewish lead- 
ers, who supported the choice. 

Allen Lee Sessoms, the president of Queens College, said 
that those he consulted with included Leon Levy, the chair- 
man of the Conference of Presidents of Major American 
Jewish Organizations and a member of the Jewish studies 
program board, and Nobel Peace Prize laureate Elie Wiesel. 

The appointment of Bird, 58, a 25-year veteran of the 
program, came under harsh scrutiny last week in two Jewish 
newspapers. 

Samuel Heilman, chairman of the school's Sociology 
Department and a Jewish studies professor, said that the 
appointment of a non-Jew to head a Jewish studies program 
was ludicrous. 

Heilman said that appointing Bird director of the Jewish 
studies program was like making him head of the black stud- 
ies program. 

Bird said in his resignation letter that he believed he was 
"the object of primitive religious bigotry at the hands of a 
few academic colleagues." 

Sessoms told the New York Times that after the stories 
were published in the Jewish newspapers, several Jewish 
leaders calied him expressing surprise about the appoint- 
ment. He added, though, that some leaders said it didn't 
matter that Bird was not Jewish. 

But Heilman said that the director of an ethnic studies 
program must be able to be a role-model and be willing to 
engage in communal outreach, and, therefore, the heads of 
such programs are almost always representatives of the par- 
ticular group. 

He also objected to Bird on academic grounds, pointing 
out that he does not have a Ph.D., doesn't speak Hebrew and 
hasn't published much in the field of Jewish studies. 

Bird, wJio is nearing completion of his doctorate at 
Princeton University, speaks Yiddish and is an expert on 
World reiigions, according to College spukeMiidii Ron 
Cannava. 

Bird wrote in his resignation letter, "It is impossible not 
to conclude that the attempt to trash my academic record and 
Standing in the Community through insinuation and Omission 
is anything other than a fig leaf for objections to my being a 
gentile." 

Queens College, with a Jewish popuIation of almost 20 
percent, boasts one of the top Jewish studies programs in the 
city. Each semester, 800 students attend its classes. Heilman 
said that he feared the appointment of a gentile as head of 
the program could jeopardize funding, which has helped to 
develop the program. 



718-338-0809 

Far Eastern Cuisine Chinese, Japanese, Vietnamese & Korean 

Customers says we are the best in the world! 

viaobo o»)nn ivi nmvn rnn oipöa »Tor» n'j\y>3 



SIZZLING STEAK KEW HUNAN REEF PEKING DUCK 



(Zhlna(5latt 

The "Uptown" Ambiance Right Around the Corner 
4413-13th Avenue • 438-2576 

h<"V)>'?\y v'imiD ^\y>o onoN mn nn;i\ynn 

Haimishe Ownership * Chassidishe Shechita * Vegetables Checked 



HOURS: SUNDAY 1 :00 PM - 1 1 PM MON-THURS 1 1 AM - 1 1 :00 PM 



EDNA^S RESTAURANT & DELI Glatt Kosher 

(718)438-8207 

125 Church Ave. (Opp. McDonald Ave.) Brooklyn 

Catering and Take Home Foods - Mouth Watering Food 
Under Supervision of Vaad Harabonim of Flatbush 



ESSEX ON CONEY Glatt Kosher Gourmet Deli 

1359 Coney Island Ave. - (718) 253-1002 - Delivery Available 

Catering and Take Out - Vaad Harabonim of Fiatbush - Chassidishe Shechita 

Featuring Our New Ct)inese Menü 

HOURS: SUN.-THURS. 11 AM - 12 MIDNITE, FRI, 1 1 AM - 4 PM 




^ggßgtämmm&ös xsksm 




4521 FT HAMILTON PKWY 
BROOKLYN, NY 11219 
FREE TtL 851-8712 • FAX: 851-8704 PHONE 

DEUVERY iKnsn '7K'n' mn nmwT} nnn Orders 

We Cater Brisim " Sheva Brochos • Bar Mitzvah 

Come to See Our Specials 



FUJI HANA -KOSHER JAPANESE RESTAURANT 

GLATT KOSHER • VAAD HARABONIM OF FLATBUSH 
SisbL Hiit h Hsh dis'ini (in Priiisi Catirini Parti» ip ti III Piipli) 

Come to Fuji Hana for a Unique and Exquisite Dining Experience in a Warm, 
Gracious Atmosphere lor Lunch or Dinner 
512 Ave. U, Brooklyn, (718) 336-3888 



Reservations 
StrongW Suggested 



D. Zion 

osher 



The Restaurant \A/hich is Famous for 

Its Delicious Ycminite & On'ental 

Israeli Food. Delicious Specials Daily 

4102-18th Ave. Blvlyn, N.Y. 
718-871-9467 • 718-871-5248 



MANHATTAN 



96 Thirri Ave. (bat 12-13 Sts. 

Shabbat Menü Available •Middle Eastern • Vegetarian Cuisine • Füll Barj^teriij 
EXOTIC TROPICAL GARDEN FOR PARTIES 
Open Sat. Night one hour after Shabbat tili 1 AM 






T'f+E BRAWD OELt © 

Chinese & American Cuisine 

Delivery & Catering. The critics rave "The original Sine Steak 
& Fabulous Ribs" moderately priced • corporate accounts wel- 
come OU Glatt Kosher Chassidishe Shechita 
399 Grand Street Open 11:30 am -Midnight Sun.-Thurs., Fri. 
9am-2 hrs. before Shabbos; Open Motzoei Shabbos Oct. 
thru May (212) 477-5200; Fax (212) 477-3515 




Glatt Kother 

® 



Delicatessen Bar Restaurant 

61 E. 34th ST. at Park Ave. 

Open Sat. Night (212) 576-1010 

N.Y. 's Newest & Finest 

Delicatessen & Restaurant 

Catering & Private 

Party Facilities( 10-200). 



ALL AMERICAN Health b Cafe Bar ® 



24 E. 42nd St (Set. 5tti & Mad. Ave.) •(212) 370-4525 

Hot Pasta ♦ Gourmet Pizza & Salad • Fish • Upscale Ambience • 
Room • Lunch • Diner • Distinaive Catering • Delivenes 
• 20% Off After 3:00 PM and All Day Sunday 



Party 



Glatt • Pas Isroel 



® 



CAFE CLASSICO (FormerlyS/th st. Kosher Gourmet 
35 W. 57th St. (Upstairs) Set. 5th & 6th Ave., (212) 355-5411 

Gourmet Salads • Sandwiches • Pastas • Deli Meats • Italian Specialties 

• Steaks & More Lunch - Dinner - Fine Dining by Candlelight 
- Specialty Catering, Parties, Deliveries • 10% off After 3 PM & All Day Sun. 



QUEENS 



LASSOVA Glatt Kosher Restaurant 
(718) 897-1 450 64-29 1 08 St., Forest Hills 

Middle East Cuisine • We Deliver \# 
Lunch, Dinner, Specials u 

Hrs. 12-11 pm, Motzei Shabbos tili 1 am D 

Vaad of Queens lal 



GLATT WOK PALACE 



V 

H 
Q 



(718) 740-1362 



190-13 Union Tpke., Fre$h Meadoton, • Fax ( 718) 740-4570 

• Cliitl Koshcr Chinese & \merinin Restnuninl * Ftne Eleitanl Dminfi 
• Prii/ifc Purh Ruom * Oilerin^ • Mnnhuttnn {mhuinre m Queens 
Ml Dishes Can be Prepareil lo Your Tnsle 
niVf mw Ounershifi* Chnsidushe Sherhitn 

^iir, Thur !!-30\M-!i}-3i}PM 

TAKE OUT NEXT DÖÖR AT GLATT WOK EXPRESS 
190-11 Union Tpkt., Freifc MäoJomi • (71«) 740-1675 




LONG ISLAND 




THE V^GETABLE QARDEN 

Dairy Restaurant Et Caterer 

linder the strict supervision of the KOF-K Mashgiach on premises • bNl\^* 3bn exciusively 
Soups, Salads, Hot Intries, Fish, Stuffeä Potatoes, 
Cold Platters, Frozen Yogurt b More. 
15 East 40th St. (bet. 5th-Madison) (212) 545-7444 
ISO S§ats, 2 FrivatB Dining B§§ms 



20% Discount 

every day after 

3PM and Sundays 



L^Afe/rs 



Wine MR. BROADWAY Kosher Deli Glatt 

_* 1 372 Broadway (Bet. 37-38 St.) NYC (21 2) 921-21 52 
BGGf 

Served 



® 



-OSHI R riZZERIA 

Under Supervision of Rabbi Meir Ossey 
426 Hawkins Ave., Lake Ronkonkoma, N.Y. 

(L.I.E. Exit 60 North) 
516-167-3278 

*Everyone comes to Long Island to eat here-tell your friends about us. 




AMERICAN DELICATESSEN & MEDITERRANEAN CUISINE 
OPEN 1 1 :00 AM - 11 :00 PM - CLOSED SAT. NITE 



FLORIDA 




Chalav 
Yisroel 




Yne i»»eB cbvsi 

PIZZA & FALAFEL 
Visit Our ^""'"y Catering 

■ «. o T- • i> I OA For OfTice, Home & Take A«av ■ 

I Pizza & Falatel Store Any Time of Oay or Evenin« ■ 

mat 1376 Lexington Avenue (bei. 90th & 91 st St.) (212) 987-913()j 



© 



KOSHER RESORTS, ORLANDO'S ONLY 
GLATT KOSHER SERVICES HOTEL 

Includes: "THE LOWER EAST SIDE" A FINE RESTAURANT AND A SHUL 

407-648-4830 ^ 

SAVEII FOUR DAYS OF HOTEL ACCOMMODATION ONLY $79 KIDS STAY FREE 

($249 INC AIR) GOURMET DINING IN A LOVELY ATMOSPHERE OVERLOOKING OUR 

GARDEN POOL. OPEN ALL YEAR AROUND INCLUDING PESACH SHAVUOT, ROSH 

HASHANAH AND SUCCOT ALSO AVAILABLE CATERING / TAKE OUT / DELIVERY 

1 -4 EXIT 32 & JOHN YOUNG PKWY AT THE CATALINA INN HOTEL 



'CV.^^j 



^ 



> 



W 







Algemeiner Journal 

225 East Broadway 

New York. N.Y. 10002 

Tel: (212) 267-5561 

Fax:(212)267-5624 

Volume XXV 

No. 1276 



Am^metnEr Inumal 



PUBUSHED 
WEEKLY 
SECOND CLASS 
POSTAGE PAID 
AT NEW YORK. N.Y. 



25 







A NATIONAL JEWISH JOURNAL 



FRIDAY, JULY 19, 1996 • 3 AV, 5756 - ENGLISH SECTION PAGE B1 



n"a 



Copyright Algemeiner Journal 




Prime Minister Netanyahu and his wife Sarah Walking in Ihe rain last Saturday to shul.' 
The picture was taken by a non-Jewish phoi((f>rapher. 

Israeli Prime Minister Says 

He's Totally Satisfied with 

His Talks in Washington 



by Gershon Jacobson 



Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin 
Netanyahu lold me last hnday and reit- 
erated it again on Saturday that he was 
"completely satisfied" with his meetings 
and talks in the United States. 

"I will teil the members of my 
Cabinet and the whole Jewish naiion in 
the Third Jewish Commonwealth, Israel, 
that the Clinton administration and the 
American public understand and support 
the policy of my government," 
Netanyahu said. 

Speaking to Jewish editors, and later 
in an exclusive interview with the 
Algemeiner Journal on Friday moming, 
Netanyahu said that he does not feel that 
"President Clinton or members of his 
administration are unhappy with our 
Position. I did not see that the president 
should be irked or that any member of 



want to move out of Hebron immediate- 
ly. Everybody in Washington imdcr- 
stands that the foremost responsibiiity 
of my govemmcnl is the security of the 
Jews of Israci. And there arc no its 
and 'buts' about it." 

He said that he was "cxceptionaliy 
pleased" with ihe reception he receivcd 
at Sabbath ^crvices in the Kehilath 
Jeshurun svnagogue, where Rabbi 
Haskel Loc^k.icin welcomcd him with 
the Iraditional biessing for Jewish n^yal- 
ty. Netanyahu also said that hc was 
pleased with ihe welcome hc was given 
by .some 3,000 Jews who gathcred at ihe 
Sheraton Hotel to applaud him and ear- 
lier at the nieeting with the national 
leadership of ihe Presidents Conference. 

I accompai led Netanyahu and his 60- 
man entoura*. j for five days during iheir 
Visit to Washington and New York. In 
the Coming vveek I hope to report on my 
conversations and observaliofts with the 
new Israeli prime minister and his 



Clinton Administration Wams 
Israel Against New Settlements 



In an allcinpt to head off a ground 
swell in Israel for building new Settle- 
ments in Judvü and Samaria, the 
United States wained this week that it 
regards scitleincius as an iinpedinieni 
to Middlc Hast pcace. 

'it's long becn the United States' 
Position - certainly the posilion o{ this 
auministratioii - iliat settlemciit activi- 
ty is a probleiii and a complicating fac- 
tor in tho Middlc East pcace negolia- 
tions betvveen the Faicstinians and the 
Israeli governnicnt .' State Dcparinieiil 
spokesman Nicholas Bunis said. 

Ihe Clinton Administration State- 
ment cainc a day alter setller leaders 
dcclared iheir inieniion to iriplc the 
Jeuisli populati^n in ihc territories 
while Prime Minister Benjamin 
Netanyahu is in power. Tliey said they 
planned on crcaling new Settlements, 
aiifiough their locus wouid bc on 
enlarging current ones. 

Agncullure and Hnvironnieni 
Minister Ralael Eitan also encouraiied 



increasing the Jewish population in the 
territories. 

Bums, .speaking at a news briefing, 
said that Israel and the PLO agreed in 
Iheir accords that Settlements would 
not be dealt with uniil the final Status 
talks, which were to begin in May. 

"Our Position, therefore, that I have 
enunciatcd today on Settlements, a 
long-standing position, rcmains true," 
Bums said. 

Netanyahu stated during his recent 
trip to the United States that he has not 
ruled out building new Settlements and 
that his Cabinet has yet to take up the 
issue. Hc pomted out, however, that 
under the left-wing Labor-led govern- 
ment the past four years, the settler 
population has rnore than doubled. 

The prime minister said that he did 
not discuss seitlement policy with 
President CInUon during their meeting 
at the White House. 

Jewish sctticment of the territories 
has lonü been a contenlious area 



between Israel and the United States. 
In 1991, the Bush administration with- 
held a $50 billion loan pending assur- 
ances that Russian imniigrants would 
not be allowed to settle in Judea and 
Samaria. The Labor government of 
Yitzchak Rabin, upon coming to 
power in 1992, largely acquiesced to 
Bush's demands by freezing construc- 
tion of new Settlements. | 

The policy guidelines of the new 
Likud-Ied government read: 
''Settlement in the Negev, the Galilee, 
the Golan Heights, the Jordan Valley, 
and in, Judea, Samaria and Gaza is of 
national importance to Israel' s defense 
and an expression of Zionist fulfill- 
ment. ! 

'The govemment will alter the set- 
lleineiil policy, act to cunsolidate and 
develop the settlement enterprise in 
these areas, and allocaie the resources 
necessary for this." 




W ' "" 





v*."!>%'>rt y ^v, 



X 'Xvvs«-:sy;ss,>>X.>: 




' ^^*'''''^'*Wft^^<WW*SK<i 



*.*«**■■*» ^I*^*"* 



i .. 



% ' 



% 



1 



IV 




'»»*y 



V 







% 






News ata Glance 

Meeting with Arafat 

Imminent, Israeli Foreign 

Minister Says 

Israeli Foreign Minister David Levy 
said this week that he might meet PLO 
chairman Yasser Arafat very soon. 

"We are working on it and it will hap- 
pen," Levy told Israel radio, Kol Yisrael. 
"We must establish a framework so that 
when we meet nothing will go wrong. 
It's a matter of coordination ... maybe of 
days." 

The meeting would be the first 
between Arafat and a member of the new 
Likud-Ied govemment. Last week Arafat 
refused to meet with Dore Gold, an 
adviser to Israeli Prime Minister 
Benjamin Netanyahu. 

Israeli Public Workers 

Stage 10-Hour Strike to 

Protest New Budget Cuts 

Israeli public sector workers number- 

Strike this week for 10 hours to protest 
the decision of Prime Minister Benjamin 
Netanyahu* s new govemment to cut 3.2 
percent from the 1997 budgct. 

The strike, organized by the Histadrut 
federation of labor unions, affected air- 
ports, rail and port Services, banks, hos- 
pitals and state-owned companies, 
including telephone and electric Services. 

Israel financial markets shut down 
because of the strike, and the Bank of 
Israel did not open foreign currency trad- 
ing, ,.:;.■■ :■:■■..,:;„..■ 

Olympic Committee 
Rejects IsraeFs Request to 
Bar Talestine' Flag from 

Opening Ceremony 

Although there is no Palestini an State, 
the three-man Palestinian Olympic team 
will march under a banner proclaiming 
"Palestine" at Friday 's opening ceremo- 
ny in Atlanta. 

The International Olympic Committee 
rejected this week Israelis request that 
the team not be allowed to use the ban- 
ner since the Arabs in the territories of 
Judea and Samaria have not been granted 
statehood. 

IOC director Francios Carrard charged 
that IsraePs request was motivated by 



IIS adminisfration he upset inai wc ouii i advisci:»". 



Prime Minister Netanyahu 

in Shul: 7 Am ajew First 

and an Israeli Second' 



Netanyahu's victory march through 
Washington and New York last weck 
was reported in the media, step-by-step, 
pronouncement by pronouncemeni. 
Never before had a foreign dignitary 
been met with such resounding enthusi- 
asm and cheerful applause as 
Netanyahu received in the packed, com- 
bined Senate and House of 
Representatives. 

My daughter, who was invited to the 
House Gallery, reported that the spon- 



News and Commentary 

Dr. M.R. Lehmann 



taneity of the cheers was indescribable, 
lasting for minutes, when Netanyahu 
solemniy declared that Jerusalem would 
never be divided again, no matter whal 
half divisions or part divisions had been 
planned in the past. Congress' over- 
whelming support for this stand was so 
clear that Arab spokesmen expressed 
shock and despair. (The New York 
Times, the leftist Spin master as always, 
spoke unbelievably of a "frosty recep- 
tion" given Netanyahu. Their reporter 
must have been on the moon, not in 
Washington.) 

JCRC Mass Meeting 

The prime minister's appearance 
before 3,000 enthusiastic supporters at 
the Sheraton on Thursday was true 
proof that the rank-and-file Jews in this 
country never embraced the leftist doc- 
trine of the giveaway of Jewish land and 
the dismantling of traditional Jewish 
values. (The New York Times only 
interviewed Reform and Conservative 
rabbis, whose vanity was hurt by the 
Israeli electorate's disavowal of their 
counterfeit variety of Judaism.) 

Conference of Presidents 

I must thank Leon Levy, chairman of 
the Conference of Presidents of Major 
American Jewish Organizations, for 
inviting me to the Organization' s memo- 
rable meeting with the Prime Minister. 
The increase in yarmulkes among the 
attending delegates was evident. Many 
celebrities were to be found there. In 
front of me was sitting John F. Kennedy 



Jr., son of tlie late president, as well as 
comedian Ja^kie Mason. 

Netanyahu's 
'Schlagfertigkeit' 

The Gerrnans have a word for it: 
"Schlagftrtigkeit," the ability to hit 
back instaniuneously. Netanyahu is the 
master of ihat art. When a member of 
Americans for Peace Now posed a 
qucstion as to what the new governmenl 
would do 10 alleviate discomfort for ihc 
Palestinians. Netanyahu shot back: "I 
was eleclcd to alleviate the discomfort 
of Jews, mn of Arabs." Many years ago, 
my wife jnd I attended a dinner in 
London wliere Netanyahu was the guest 
Speaker. Hc said there: "If you want to 
teil the diffcrence between Judaism as a 
national n ligion and other religions - 
did you evcr hear a Goy say, 'Next year 
in the Vatican!?'" 

On the question of maintaining the 
authentic Jewish reiigion in Israel, 
despite attacks by the destructive influ- 
ences of Reform and Conservative, he 
answered that the "status quo" would be 
maintained, referring to the Status quo 
introduced ;ind agreed to in the days of 
Ben Gurion. (When Moshe Arens 
appeared nefore the Conference of 
Presidents not long ago, he pointed out 
that only I percent of Israelis are 
Reform Jews: What right do they have 
to dismantle the traditional, authentic 
reiigion practiced and followed in 
Israel?) 

Reform Reveals 
its Ugly Face 

During (he prime minister's visit, 
some IM) Reform rabbis wrotc to 
President Clinton to stop aid to Israel if 
new setllcruents were buili. These are 
the kind ol Reform leaders who over 
100 ycars ago purged their prayer books 
of all rcfcrences to Jerusalem, the 
Temple. Moshiach and the return to 
Israel. Now they think they can impose 
their anti Jewish practices on the Je"/ish 
people. And our president is surrounded 
by advisors who share the Reform, pro- 
PLO prograin. What happened to their 
clamor to supporl the democralically 
elected Jewish government," which they 
cried whtii Rabin and Peres were 
attacked"^ Therefore Netanyahu's quick 

Continiied on pa^e B4 



#"^ 


^* J 


VSox^ '^.r 




^'''-'^^jt^ittäl 


my^-itÜ 




^^nr . ^mM 



i^>> 



*«%. 



l 



\^>;sM%«g*ife 



i ^ ^1 '^ '^ 



MMaüUi^Ml 






..■.: 4-; 



':-:v:-fH>i(-:^>.2 



*^>> 



Jewj.sh politemen on horsebuck chusin^ religious Jews who were denionstrating on Bar-Ilan Avenue in Jerusalem 
on the -Sahbath. Participants in the demonstration said it was "a real pogrom." 

Religious Party Legislator Demands Police 
Dismissals for Togrom' During Jerusalem Protest 



Rcacling angnly to police tactics 
during a protest by observant Jews 
demanding that a Jerusalem thorough- 
fare be closed durinii the Sabbath, 
Knesset Member Avrahain Ravit? of the 
rclieious L^nited Torah Judaism Pariv 
di-mandcd ihc disniissal of the 
Jerusalem police Commander and olhcr 
top police officials. 

Although he backed down from bis 
ihreal to submit a no confidence rnolion 
in the government of Prime Minister 
Benjamin Netanyahu if police Comman- 
der Arieh Amil and olhers were not 
rcmcned, Ravii/ described in heatcd 
terms the police effort lo quell llie 
demonstration. 

"What happened tonight was a 
pogrom by bloodthirsty police officers " 
he said. "They beal chikiren and prcg- 
nant women. I told ihem the protcsts 
v.Huild cease if they left, bul they just 
vvanted to liit ihc people." 

The Sabbath day protest, the second 
in two weeks on Bar Ilan and 



Yirmiyahu streets, followed a week of 
political skirmishing on the issue last 
week. First, Transportation Minister 
Rabbi Yilzchak Levy, a leader of 
United Torah Judaism, ordered that the 
streets be closed to traffic during 
Sabbath Services, Friday night and 
Saturday morning. But two days later, 
after mcmbers of the anti-religious 
Meretz Party and the leftist Labor Party 
challenged Levy's order in court, the 
Israeli Supreme Court barred the gov- 
ernment from closing the streets, giving 
the government two weeks to explain 
the new policy. 

The Jemsalem Police District, how- 
ever, announced this week that it will 
close Bar Ilan Avenue this Saturday, 
during prayer Services, in an attempt to 
avoid a repeat of last week's violent 
clashes. 

The Meretz Party, meanwhile, said it 
will conduct demonstrations during the 
closure. Meretz members exacerbated 
tensions between protesters and police 



last Saturday when they drove through 
the Jewish neighborhood in a long pro- 
cession of cars. 

Police used water cannons to dis- 
perse the protesters. Three poücemen 
were injured, according to police 
reports. 

The streets are major traffic routes in 
Jerusalem, however, they run through 
neighborhoods that are over 90 percent 
Sabbath-observant. Residents argue that 
if the streets are closed, motorists could 
take alternate routes that would only 
delay them by several minutes. Meretz 
leaders, on the other band, describe the 
conflict as a "culture war" that will 
determine whether Jerusalem will be 
dictated by religious prerogatives or 
secular Privileges. 

Netanyahu has yet to decide on the 
matter. When asked during his trip to 
the United States about the battle over 
Bar Ilan Avenue, he said that the objec- 
tive of his government on religious 
affairs was to maintain the status quo. 



Netanyahu Adviser Met with Syrian 
Ambassador During U.S. Trip 



Despite Syria's furious reaciion to the 
election of Benjamin Netanyahu as 
IsraeTs prime minister, the new Israeli 
government establishcd conlact with 
Damascus for the first lime last week, as 
Netanyahu's adviser met in Washington 
with Syria's ambassador to the United 
States. 

Political adviser Dore Gold, who has 
cmerged as one of Netanyahu's top ncgo- 
tiators. lalked wilh Ambassador Walid 
Mualcin prior lo a State Department 
meeting among representatives from the 
l'iiilet! Siates. Israel, Syria, Lcbanon and 
France, according to Israel radio, Kol 
Yisrael. 

Gold told the Syrian ambassador that 
Neianyaiiu waiilcd lo coimnuc iieguiia- 
tums with Damascus, Kol Yisrael report- 
ed. Israel olTicials were not availablc for 
coininent. 

Mualcin has played a central role for 
Syria in past negotiations wiih Israel. 

Whilc Gold met with Mualcm, Israeli 
newspapers c]Ui)ted Netanyahu as saying 
to the U.S. Foreign Affairs Conimitlee 
that the point of dcpariure for talks 








Dr. Dore (iold, 
Prime Minister Netanyahu's adviser. 

between Israel and Syria was each coun- 
try 's Claims to the Golan Heights. Syria, 
which demands that Israel give up the 
Golan in exchange for normalized rela- 
tions, reacted angrily to the newspaper 
report. 



"Netanyahu cannot put his rejected 
and condemned stand, which is keeping 
the Golan, as a base to start negotiations 
on the Syrian track, because the Madrid 
Conference had decided the base which 
was füll withdrawai from io llie Golan in 
accordance with U.N. Resolution 242," 
said Tishreen, the official Syrian newspa- 
per. 

"Syria will not abandon an inch of its 
land and occupation, no matter how long 
it lasts, will not lessen an atom of the 
rights to retum the Golan on the way to 
achieve just and compiehensive peace," 
Tishreen said. 

Syrian Foreign Minister Farouq al- 
Shara predicted to reporters that the lead- 
ers of Egypt and Jordan will teil 
Netanyahu when they meei with him later 
in the week that "land for peace" must 
continue to be the basis for negotiations 
between Israel and the Arabs. 

Israel 's President Ezer Weizman, vis- 
iting the Golan over the weekend, told 
reporters that Israel will reach peace with 
Syria. He added, however, "It could be 
that it will take many more years than we 
think." 



But Yaacov Levy, an Israeli Foreign 
Ministry official, told Israeli radio, Kol 
Yisrael: "Il's not a question of recogniz- 
ing a people or flag, and it isn't a techni- 
cal detail. It's not a U.N. forum, but a 
Sports forum and that's precisely the 
focus of our appcal - to prevent a sports 
forum from becoming a political forum." 

Hungary Adopts 
Tandmark' Plan to 

Restore Holocaust 
Survivors' Property 

Hungary announced recently that it 
will begin retuming stolen Jewish prop- 
erty to its 20,000 Holocaust survivors - a 
plan that Jewish organizations praised as 
a milestone in European restitution for 
the crimes of World War 11. 

**This agrecment is a landmark," Dr. 
Israel Singer, secretary-general of the 
World Jewish Congress, said. "It is liter- 
atly the first serious East European 
attempt by a government which made 
promises for a long time and which were 
finally fulfUled." 

Under the plan, the Hungarian govern- 
ment will provide $27 million worth of 
compensation coupons to a new founda- 
tion to administer the coupons in lieu of 
confiscated property. Hungary will also 
help fund the foundation. 



^VVHAT'S INSIDE 



Daniel Keren B2 

Tanzßnia Honors AI Jolson 
and Dr. Jonas Salk 

Boruch Jacobson B2 

Two Jews 

Dr. Manfred Lehmann B3 

The Message of Jewish Coin Inscriptions 

Larry Gordon B3 

Rebbitzen Basia Bender: A Life 



Rabbi Michael Taubes 

Why are We Still Mourning? 



B4 



CALENDAR 
FOR SABBATH 

Candle Lighting Time 

Friday, July 19, 

8:05 P.M. 

Sabbath F.nds on 

Saturday, July 20, 

9:10 P.M. 

Torah Portion of the WcqR: 
Devorim 

Shahbat Chazon 
Thursday, July 25 Fast 9th ofAv 



\\ 



FRIDAXJULY 19, 1996 



ALGEMEINER JOURNAL -B3- t^Nni\yx iv:)»QV>bN 



1996 19 >bv ,:iN\:)>>10 




The Message of Jewish 
Goin Inscriptions 




sign of a pcople's 
civilizaiion and 
cultural advaiice is 
its ability to pro- 
duce a writtcn 
Script - to be ablc 
to confer from gen- 
eration to genera- 
tion information of 
important cvents 
and Personalities, whose memory is considcred 
precious enough to pass on to future genera- 
tions. 

Almosl every nalion has, throughout hisiory, 
produced a Script with which to ctcmalize its 
history. Interestingly, only one continent is 
absent from the chart of Scripts: that oi' Africa. 
No black nation has ever produced a writtcn 
Script. (The Egyptians who produced thc hicro- 
glyphics were not a Negroid peopie.) This is of 
course of considerablc significance in judging 
the mental capacity of the black nations and 
should be studied by sociologisis. 

It is true that instead of Script they have 
devised other means of passing on niessages 
from generation to generation. For example. in 
Ghana, the former Gold Coast, the "talking 
drums" replace the task of writing. Professional 
drummers are trained in passing on entire epics 
and narratives by way of hours and hours of 
drumming. (I have attended such sessions and 
know that the Atrican sense of Hearing is much 
more developed than that of white nations. I 
heard hours of drumming with what sounded to 
me like the same beat and rhythm over and 
over. The Africans listening to the drumming, 
however, told me of the wonderful stories that 
the drumming convcyed.) 

No wonder that the Mishnah in Avoih 5:9 
proclaims "the Script and the writing lool" as 
part of the original Creation of the World. 
Many types of matcrials have bcen used on 
which writing can bc inscribed, engraved or 
chiseled. The most enduring material is metal. 
whether gold, silver, copper or bronze. And so, 
eventually coins were picked to be the carners 
of important political, religious and social mes- 
sages from generation to generation. 

Mention of coins appears in the carliest 
books of the Torah, for example, in the pur- 
chase of the Machpelah by our patriarch 



considcred a Persian or Greek province; its 
coins bore no particularly Jewish text or ele- 
ment. 

Hasmonean Coins 

Jewish texts began to appear openly on 
coins after the Maccabeans had cleansed the 




nw Dil aoa^K ks^ö 



King .\leander Janneus - Aramaic Text 
"King Alexanderus Year 25" 

iand ot pagan influences. Judah Maccabce's 
brolhcr. John Hyrkanos I, declared himself 
High Piiest and King in about 140 B.C.E., and 
u.seu a> an ciiihieiii llie liiy uf Jeiusalein. 







The most prolific producer of coins among 
the Maccabees was King Alexander Jannaeus 
(in Hebrew Yonatan or Yannai), who ruled 
from 103 to 76 B.C.E. He fought many wars 




... B/<J7373-y3 

n hixn 



Hebrew text: "Matthias the High Priest 
and Council of the Jews." 

against the Syrians. As a Sadducee, he also 
fought a religious war against the Pharisees 
(Perushim), although his own brother-in-law, 
Shimon ben Shetach, was a leader of the 
Perushim. 

When Yannai died, his widow, Queen 
Alexandra, who was a sister of Shimon ben 
Shetach, took over the rule. Yannai's coins 
were the first Jewish coins to bear an extended 
text. Using the ancient Hebrew Script, the coins 
made reference to Yannai being Kohen Gadol 
and the head of a Council called "Clicvei 
ha'Yehudim" ("Jewish Brotherhood"). The 
exact nature of this Council is not clear; this 
might well be a reference to the Anshei 
Knesset Hagedolah, the men of the great synod 
which plays such an important role in the 
Talmud. Thus the brief text on these coins 
gives US information on the political, social and 
religious Organization of the Jewish Community 
in Eretz Yisrael at the time. 

The tragedy that befell the Jewish State after 
the deaths of King Yannai and Queen Salome 
Alexandra is well knovvn. Thc surviving broth 
ers, John Hyrkanos and Judah Aristobulus, 
engaged in fratricide which eventually led to 
the invasion of Rome by Pompey and the even- 
tual ending of Jewish independence. We find 
now on the coins that Hyrkanos (Yehochanan) 
was both High Priest and the "Rosh ha'Chever 
ha'Yehudim"; the religious and political 
Offices were combined. 

Herodian Coins 

King Herod (40 B.C.E to 4 C.E. ) was a 
mighty builder and ruler. Rome had a prefer- 
ence for him and supported him politically. 
Although a descendant of Edom, he qualified 
as a Jewish king by virtue of being married to 
Mariamne, a Maccabean princess. Because of 
family rivalry, Herod finally had Mariamne 
executed. 

iinlv as a magnificent 



Machpelah. He tumed this structure in Hebron 
into a magnificent building, in exactly the same 
style of masonry as the Temple itself. Almost 
all of his coins bear Greek legends only. He is 
called "Basileus," or King, on these coins. 

Of the remaining coins of the Herodian fam- 
ily, only those of Agrippa (37-44 C.E. ) are of 
interest to us. Agrippa, who is mentioned often 
in the Talmud, had a checkered rule. As grand- 
son of the last Hasmonian ruler, Mariamne, he 
was given much respect and honor by the rab- 
bis. His coins bear only Greek legends. One of 
the most remarkable ones is the text: "A vow 
and treaty of friendship and alliance between 
the great King Agrippa and Augustus Caesar, 
the Senate and the peopie of Rome." 

Roman Procurators 
and Their Coins 

Judea was ruled by Rome - appointed 
procurators for a long time, under the emperors 
Augustus, Tiberius, Claudius and Nero. 

Jewish Coins of the First Revolt 

With the unbearable oppression of Jews 







Sanctity of Jerusalem was immediately stressed 
on coins of independent Jewish State. 

under the Romans, the seed for the First Revolt 
(66-70 C.E. ) was apparent. In the vast expanse 
of the Roman Empire, from England to India, 
only Judea, the tiny country, posed a real threat 
to Rome. Jewish independence was a thom in 
the side of the old Roman establishment. 
Paganism was long undermined by doctrines of 
Judaism, and the foundation of Rome was seri- 
ously threatened. Any political victory of Judea 
over Rome could lead to the collapse of the 
entire Empire. Therefore, when the Revolt 
broke out in 66 C.E. , Rome brought its most 
powerful generals and armies to bear. The 
Revolt had to be subdued at any cost. 

Thus Jews immediately signified to the 
worid their independence by striking beautiful 
coins with magnificent Jewish themes and 
texts. The centrality of Jerusalem and its sancti- 
ty was clearly demonstrated on the coins The 
number of the year of the revolt was carcfully 
engraved on the coins. To show that the shekel 
used by the men of the great revolt lay la the 



("Holy Shekel"). As the Revolt succeeded, the 
date of the Revolt took a prominent place in 







Freedom of Israel publicized. 

inscriptions: "Cherut Zion," ("Freedom of 
Zion"); "Geulat Zion" ("Redemption of Zion") 
... from "Year 1" to "Year 5." These coins exist 
until this day. The coins of this period were 
also found at Massada, where the Jews took 
refuge until its fall in the year 73 C.E. 

Second Revolt, 132-135 

Then years of suffering and renewed 
oppression followed. In 132 C.E., under 
Emperor Hadrian, the Jews took to arms again, 
under the heroic and mighty figure of Shimon 
Bar Kochba. It is not clear whether he, in keep- 
ing with the requirements of a legitimate, gen- 
uine Messiah, rebuilt the Temple. But many of 
his coins show the Temple and its implements, 
and Bar Kochba is called the "Nessi Yisrael" 
("Prince of Isiael"). Assisiing him on his coins 
was Elazar, the High Priest, so that the Revolt 
had a military-political as well as a priestly- 
religious leadership. No wonder that Rabbi 
Akiva declared his faith in Bar Kochba as the 
Messiah. 







Redemption of Zion 

A multitude of coins has been found from 
this period. This evidence has been dramatical- 
ly augmented by letters, contracts and other 



The Persian 
and Hellenistic Periods 

During the period of about 300 B.C.E, coins 
were produced Hearing the legend "YHD," or 
"YHDH," or "Judah." The Jewish land was 



Hebrew text: ''Yehochanan the High Priest 
and head of Council of (he Jews." 

Evident ly the coin was Struck for use by Jews, 
niainl) in Jerusalem. 



builder of the largest conslructions in the entire 
Middle Hast. The faci that he undertook lo 
rebuild the Temple shows how much he strove 
for the acceptance of the religious leadership of 
the Jews. He also rebuilt the second most 
sacred structure in the Holy Land - the 



stressed again 
and again the 
sanctity of the 
shekel, by call- 
ing it "Shekel 
ha'Kodesh" 



Rebbitzen Basia Bender: A Life 




In the current season, in which 
we mark and commemorate the 
impact that destruction has had 
on our lives, we mighi lake com- 
fort in a story of a life that emerged 
from a seed that was planted in that 
very destruction. The story is of a 
woman who almost did not survivc the 
Holocaust. It was only through a coin- 
bination of last-minute decisions and 
twists of G-d-controlIed failh that made 
it possible for her lo live. 

Her name was Basia Bender. She 
passed away just ovcr two months ago 
after a teaching career that spanned 
more than a half Century. Though she 
traveled the country educating Jewish 
women. her base was the Bais Yaakov 
Yeshiva in the Boro Park section of 
Brooklyn. I never met Rebbitzen 
Bender, bul I have experienced her life 
and what she meant to so many 
through listening to the words and siar- 
ing in the eyes of one of her sons, the 
dean of Mesivta Chaim Shiomo and 
Yeshiva Darchei Torah in Far 
Rockaway - Rabbi Yaakov Bender. 

It was late August 1939. Ailhough 
many Jews did not wanl to believe it, 
war was imminent. The borders of 
Poland were being sealed. Polish Jewry 
did not yet realize that millions of them 
were doomed, that the most vibrant of 
Jewish communities would be decimat- 
ed - that some of the most revered and 
learncü Torah scliolars and ihe finesi 
young people and children would 
shorily be subjected to systematic 
slaughter. 

Those with the some foresight knew 
that there was no choicc bul to gel out. 
But getting out was not easy. It 
required separaling from family thai 
might never be secn again. It demand- 
ed using ingenuity and whatever 
resources were available lo secure a 
Visa. For Rebbitzen Bender and her 
husband it meant taking her parents' 
last 500 American dollars, squirrelcd 
away for an emergency, and frantically 
searching for an open foreign consulate 
willing lo issue a visa. 

It was after office hours when the 
Benders found one junior diplomat still 
on duiy in the Consulate of Estonia. 
They lold him what they wanied and 
showed him the money. He barely hes- 
itated. indicating that he just needed to 
call a foreign passage. The Benders 
Keard him quietly discussing on the 



phone how he would split the $500 
with bis colleague. Shortly they were 
on their way lo another office where 
the deal was qiiickly consummated, the 
money exchaniied hands and the visas 
were delivered 

There was barely any time to say 
goodbye to parents and friends. They 
were late for ihcir boat and needed to 
pack a few ihings for the trip to 
America. One old suitcase, a few very 
quick, final go- nlbyes, lots of tears, and 
they were off ti» the docks. The delay at 
the consulate, however, and the contin- 
ual bombing of the city caused the 
Benders to miss their boat. They must 
have been fraiitic, not knowing for the 
momcni if their efforts were for 



Real World 



naught. Finali\. they learned that one 
final boat would depart several hours 
iaier. Ii wasn i ufuü much iaier ihai 
they learned that the boat they missed 
was sunk by the Nazis. 

Yaakov Bender says that his moth- 
er's life was icaching. Her expertise 
was teaching ilic intricacies and beauty 
of family purii\ . America was a Virtual 
Spiritual desen to observant Jews who 
managed to es ape the fires of Europe. 
A communal lisorienlation and panic 
look hold. The relentless efforts of a 
few very coui igcous visionaries were 
required for > iddishkeit to survive in 
America. 

As Rabbi Bender describes it, there 
was no time i waste. His mother and 
falber arriveci in New York on Erev 
Yom Kippur 1939; the next day, she 
was rccruiled lo resume her teaching 
career. For maiiy ycars she served as 
the right haid to Rebbitzen Vicha 
Kaplan, the lounder of the Bais 
Yaakov schooK for women. Her daily 
teaching to sinall groups of women, 
and eventually lo larger groups, may be 



one of the most grossly underestimated 
contributions to the fortification of 
Jewish life in America. There is no 
question that in those early years - 
with the immense pressure under 
which Orthodoxy found itself- it could 
have easily fallen apart. The untiring 
and ceaseless efforts of Basia Bender 
and those who shared her deep faith 
and commitment to Jewish life may 
have made the difference. 

The law of family purity is a sensi- 
tive subject dealing with the sexual 
relationship between a man and a 
woman. Adherence to halacha (Jewish 
law) means that each aspect and each 
moment of one's life has halachic 
implications. The relationship between 
men and women is no different. 
Perhaps even more difficult than writ- 
ing about it is teaching the intricacies 
of these laws to young women eager to 
embark on a marriage with the goal of 
having and raising children. It is sensi- 
tive material that requires mature and 
competent teaching skills if they are to 
be imparted properly. As Yaakov 
Bender recalls, as a young yeshiva Stu- 
dent, there were many evenings when 
he was not allowed into his families 
small apartment because his mother 
was teaching a group of women a sub- 
ject too sensitive for his young ears. 

Yaakov Bender's father, Rabbi 
Dovid Bender, learned in the Mirrer 
Yeshiva in Europe. Upon his arrival in 
America he became a rosh hayeshiva at 
the yeshiva in Baltimore, traveling 
back to New York for the weekends. 
The burdens of travel, the week-long 
Separation from his wife and the impor- 
tance of the work she was doing in 
New York, resulted in leading rabbis 
advising him to forego his position in 
Baltimore and join his wife in New 
York. 

Many of the thousands of women 
Rebbitzen Bender educated were either 
orphans from Europe or from other 
parts of America where there was sim- 
ply no Jewish education available. As a 
result, many of the young girls came to 
refer to her simply as "Mama." Her 
home was their home: She assumed 
responsibility for their upbringing and 
in many instances was the one who 
found a shiduch (marriage partner) for 
her students. 

Rebbitzen Bender's husband died 



suddenly as a relatively young man, 
and she was left to single-handcdly 
raise four boys and two girls, who 
today are all leading educators in their 
individual communities. At the age of 
76, when she became too ill to travel to 
school, students came to her home to 
listen to her lectures. 

I attended her funeral, which took 
place at the Bais Yaakov building on 
15th Avenue in Brooklyn. In the aus- 
tere surroundings of the school gymna- 
sium, great Torah scholars from 
America' s leading yeshivas gathered to 
eulogize her as a peer and colleague. 
While thousands attended her funeral, 
this was nowhere near the many thou- 
sands of people whose lives she 
touched with her spirit, drive and deter- 
mination. Those additional thousands 
are now spread around the world's 
leading schools and communities wiih 
the teachings they first heard from 
Basia Bender. She was one woman of 
whom it can be said, that had she not 
survived, perhaps we would not have 
survived either.© 



Israel Reportedly to Close Arab 
Offices in Jerusalem 



L 



Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin 
Netanyahu will demand thai the PLO 
shut down four Jemsalem offices, Israeli 
media reported last week. 

Israel's Army Radio said that 
Netanyahu would order, ihis week, the 
dismantling of the Islamic Affairs office 
on the Temple Mount, PLO headquarters 
in Orient House, and statistics and edu- 
cation Offices. 

According to the Israci-PLO peace 
accords, the Arabs are forbidden from 
engaging in political or governmental 
aclivity in Jerusalem until a final agree- 
ment is reached between tlie two sides. 

A spokesman for the prime minister 
said he could not commeiit immediately 
on the media reports. 

Faisal Hussein!, the PLO's head man 
in Jerusalem, who operiites out of the 
Orient House, reacted angrily to the 
reports. 

'To say that Jemsalem in not an issue 
for negotialions and no lompromise ... 
that is saying there is no feace," he said. 
"We have returned to th: days of war. 
No peace with the Arabs. no peace with 



the Palestinians, no peace in the region." 
Last week Netanyahu received a 
Standing ovalion in Congress when he 
declared that Jerusalem would never be 
divided. 

In a related development a spokesman 
for the prime minister announced that a 
decision has been made to end the clo- 
sure on Arabs entering Israel from the 
territories of Judea and Samaria. The 
spokesman told Reuters news agency 
that he did not know when this would 
take place. 

Defense Minister Yitzchak Mordechai 
told Egyptian Ambassador to Israel 
Mohamed Bassiouni this week that the 
easing of the closure will be linked to the 
Palestinian Authority's efforts to curb 
terrorism. 

The Palestinian Authority released 1 1 
Hamas terrorists last week that it had 
been holding custody. It was unclear 
whether the Authority intended to 
release all 900 Hamas and Islamic Jihad 
terrorists that it had arrested since 
bombers killed 59 people in Israel last 
February and March. 




(onifOJiTiii^u LiYiHd wn 



Kosher Vendin^ 

Spring Water, Coca Cola Products 
Home & Office Free Delivery 
Serving All Five Boros 
Best Prices Call 
(718) 972-2213 or (718) 854-5663 



• ALOG SERVICE GROUP INC. • 

FiOOR SUPPLIES 8 MACHINE SALES, RENTAL 

8805 69th Avenue • Forest Hills, N.Y 1 1375 

Tel: (718)793-4046 • Fax: (718) 793-4049 

Pa quet • Wood Tile Installation • Scraping • Bleaching • Staining • Finishing 

718-793-4046 OpWJH ÜDn .ülimN-INJ Ü"PJU1 'IDia 




FOR THE VERY LATEST IN CROWN HEIGHTS 



40« 

«RCALL 



FOR THE LATEST COMMUNITY MEETINGS 



»976-7701 

FOR THE VERY LATESTIN ISRAEL 

»976-7702 

FOR HIGHLIGHTS OF THE NEWS 

»774-0140 Sc 



40< 
PER CALL 



"«774-1981 
> 773-2898 



REG. 
CALL 

REG. 
CALL 



Therapy by Aliza 

Messages • General Medicine • Reflexology • Bio- 

Energy • Expcii in RchcibWtmion of Disabled 

• For Men and Women 

718-575-8454 



FÜR DONATIONS & YOUR INPUT; 
C.H. NEWSLINE 

852 EASTERN PARKCWAY 

BROOKLYN, NY 11213 

TEL: 718-774-5011 • FAX:7 18-493-3261 



Target Exterminating 

Integrated Pest Control Service 
Residential, Commercial, Industrial 

Call: 

(718) 424-6479 



«. JVIARTIN EDRY. M.B.A. 



CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANT 

Specializing in 
Small and Medium Business Enterprise 

Reparation of Financial Reports • Corporate and Personal Return: 
• Hing for New Corporations • Computerized Bookkeeping Service • Settlement of 

Tax Problems by Tax Experts 
FOR YOUR PEACE OF MINO - CM I TOnav 
Tel (718) 693-0079 Fax: (718) 693-0204 503 Ditmas Ave., Brooklyn, N.Y. 






NEWl Tiny Hearing Aids, 

hidden deep inside the ear canal. 



• Complete Hearing Tests to determine ifvpu need 
amplification 

• Complete Line of Hearing Aids to meet your needs 
and budget 

• Specialists in ttie most advanced Hearing Aids 

• Hearing Aid Tune-ups. Sen/ice & Batteries 



y?» 



NOW 0« SEHT, NOW YOU PONT 

/ut 7/5'*' - /»"7»A' rrj/7 i^a 



(718) 
434-2320 



IBETTER HEARING CARE 
729 Ocean Parkway 

(naar Fostar Ave.) 



\ 

1 



4 



FRIDAY,JULY 19, 1996 



ALGEMEINER JOURNAL -B2- t^NmwT iVD»ov:ibN 



1996 ,19 >t>V ,>NO>nD 



News From the Stamp Den / Daniel Keren 

Tanzanian Stamps Honor 
AI Jolson and Dr. Jonas Salk 



Tanzania, a repuhlic in East 
Africa, will release, some- 
time this summer, a serics of 
two sheetlets, each conlain- 
ing eight differcnt verticai 250 
Shillings postage stamps that celcbrale 
famous people who helped shape the 




Tanzania stamp honors AI Jolson for his 

achievement in being the star of the world's 

first major talking motion picture in 1927. 

20th Century. Two individuals, now 
deceased, who were selected for this 
colorfui Philatelie tribute arc AI Jolson 
and Jonas Salk. 

Jolson, a tamous American enter- 
tainer, was born Asa Yoelson in St. 
Pclci;»l)ui^. Ru^Nid, on May 26, 1886. 
Whcn he was a lad of sevcn. his father. 
a rabbi, immigrated to the United 
States and accepled a pulpit in 
Washington, D.C. 

AI Jolson forsook his Orthodox reli- 
gious traditions and his fathcr's desire 
that the young man use his great 
singing talents to serve G-d as a cantor 
in Order to pursue his dream of becom- 
ing a great vaudeville stagc performer. 

It was in 1909 that he put on black 
face whiie in San Francisco to sing on- 
stage the song "Mammy," creating a 
style that catapulted him into national 
attention and, two years later, a major 
role in a Broadway musical, "La Belle 
Paree." 

Jolson continucd to star in numer- 
ous Broadway slage productions until 



United States Postal Service in 1994. 
He died on October 23, 1950, at the 
age of 64 in San Francisco. 

Stamp Honors 
Conqueror of Polio 

The second Tanzanian stamp honor- 
ing a prominent 20th Century Jew 
depicts Dr. Jonas Edward Salk, an 
American physician and microbiolo- 
gist who helped eliminate polio that 
terrible killer and crippler of children. 
Salk was born in New York City on 
October 28, 1914. He first graduated 
from City College of New York with a 
bachelor of science degree in 1934, 
before getting his medical degree from 
New York University in 1939. 

Salk became an assistant professor 
of epidemiology at the University of 
Michigan where he was actively 
involved in researching the influenza 
virus. In 1947 he transferred to the 
University ot Pittsburgh where he was 
engaged in ihe desperate struggle to 
find a niethod to prevent poliomyelitis 
or polio (also known as infantile paral- 
ysis). 

Terrible outbrcaks of polio occurrcd 
in the United States from 1942 until 
1953, the year that Salk announced his 
discovery of a Vaccine that when car- 
ried out threc or four times, affords the 
individual immunity from infantile 
paralysis. Known as the Salk Vaccine, 
il is made by cultivating three strains 
of the dreaded polio virus separately in 
monkey tissue. 

After separating the virus from the 
monkey tissue and storing it in the lab 
for a week, the virus is then kiüed off 
with formaldehyde. After being tested 
to make sure that the virus is indeed 
dcad, the Salk Vaccine is now ready to 
be injected. 

In 1963. Dr. Salk accepted the post 
of director of the Salk Institute for 
Biological Siudies at the University of 
California ai San Diego. In the last 
years of his life, he devoted his talents 
toward trying to find a eure for AIDS. 
He died last year at the age of 81 . 

Along with Dr. Albert Bruce Sabin, 
the Russian-born American biologist 
(1906-1993) who created the Sabin 
Oral Vaccine tbat also provided immu- 
nization against polio, Salk is consid- 
ered one of the great 20th Century 
medical Champions of the general pub- 
lic. Intcicstiogly, ncithcr of ihese 



Italy briefly in order to accept the 
Nobel Prize in Stockholm, they decid- 
ed simply not to retum to their home- 
land - which had just passed anti- 
Semitic laws. Rather, they immigrated 
to the United States where he was a 
professor of physics at both Columbia 
University (1939-1945) and the 
University of Chicago (1946-1954) 
before dying of Cancer. 

During the Second World War, 
Fermi was instrumental in leading 
research on the Manhattan Project that 
resulted in the creation of the atomic 
bomb, which was later used for ending 
the war again:>t Japan in the Pacific. 

Other prominent gentiles honored 
on the same Tanzania stamp issue 
include Orville and Wilber Wright, 
Charles Lindbergh, Sir Alexander 
Fleming (discoverer of penicillin), 
Amelia Earhart, Mahatma Gandhi, 
Mao Zedong, John F. Kennedy, Neil 
Armstrong, Mikhail Gorbachev, 



Heaven and Earth / Boruch Jacobson 




Dr. Jonas Salk is honored on stamp for discov- 

ering an inoculation in 1953 that helped prevent 

young children from falling victim to polio. 

Nelson Mandela and Colin Powell. 
The stamps were designed for the 
Tanzania Post Office by Zina 
Saunders. Q 



T 



wo ews 



This past Shabbat I had the 
honor of spending a few 
hours with two pious Jews, 
whose wavy beards, bushy 
eyebrows and finely carved wrinkles 
teil the Story of two young Russian 
children from Samarkant who were 
smuggled into Underground chadorim 
to hide from the Communists and the 
Yevsektzia. Their gentle smiles 
revealed a happier adult life here in the 
golden land of opportunity, where each 
of them raised large, flourishing fami- 
lies with dozens of grandchildren, all 
of whom go to yeshivoth - the very 
same y^5/i/vor/i which grew out of 
those Underground chadorim that were 
outlawed in the old country by punish- 
ment of death. 

One is a rosh yeshiva and mashpia 
(Spiritual guide) for young adults, cou- 
ples and their families; the other is a 
Printer and typesetter of Jewish books 
and seforim. 

What Struck me at first was how 
friendly they treated one another at the 
Shabbat kiddush/farbrengen after the 
moming prayers. The respect they had 
for one another was right out of par- 
adise. The true humility and simplistic 
character that each possessed made 
them appear to be ordmary people - 
piain folks. 

Their concealed qualities didn't 
scream or Jump at you; in fact, their 
presence was hardly noticeable unless 
your ears were tuned into their almost 
whispering dialogue. By whispering, I 
don't mean that they spoke low; on the 
contrary, they spoke loud and proud 
but without theatrics and without a 
pounding fist. Their quiet noise didn't 
demand your attention unless you vol- 
üntccicd it - ihcir cömments like fresh 
sunshine traveling behind scattered 
clouds, their message clear and articu- 
late. 

Even their names are characteristic 
of two vintage, pious chasidim from 
the old shtetl, Pinye and Mottel, and 
though due to their humility, they will 
be upset that I chose to focus my col- 
umn on them, I'm risking it because I 
know that they are too modest to make 
any kind of fuss over themselves one 
way or the other. I hope they will just 
swallow the embarrassment of my 



observations as good sports. 

The format of their discussion was 
most unusual. Neither out-shouted the 
other; each gave the other as much 
time to speak as necessary without cut- 
ting into mid-sentence. It almost 
seemed they had rehearsed their well- 
timed exchange of ideas and inspira- 
tional sußgestions. 

Pinye - whom I should really call 
Reh Pinye - spoke about prayer and 
reading the Shma like a chasid, with 
proper preparation followcd by deep 
meditation and climaxed with positive 
results and a change of behavior. Even 
those who have other responsibilities, 
such as reaching out to lorlorn and 
assimilated Jews to rescuc them from 
Spiritual suicide, must also set aside 
time for real, intense prayer, even if 
it's just for a short while, said Pinye. 

After a warm "cheek-wetting" 
melody, Mottel (Reb Moltel) contin- 
ued where Pinye left off, saying that 
the most important mitzvah is loving 
our fellow Jew and the strengthening 
of Jewish unity. 

Quoting a talk from the Lubavitcher 
Rebbe, Mottel explained that Jewish 
unity and love for our fellow Jew is 
part of our preparation for the Ultimate 
Redemption and the arrival of 
Mashiach when all Jews will enjoy the 
complete in-gathering and harmony of 
our entire nation from all corners of 
the World. The Rebbe has revealed a 
new messianic kind of ahamt Yisroel 
which is the call of the hour, said 
Mottel. 

Every act of kindness and sharing 
between one Jew and another is a step- 
ping stone to those glorious days to 
come when we will no longcr know of 
any strife, war, conflict, jealousy and 
hatred, proclaimed Mottel. 

Pinye nodded along as Mottel shyly 
expressed his commitment to strength- 
en his love for all Jews starting with 
the Jew beside him, coniinuing with 
the Jew down the block and including 
the Jew across the globc. As the Baal 
Shem Tov explained, loving our neigh- 
bor means loving a Jew whom we have 



never even seen. This is pure ahavat 
Yisroel. 

"Loving one another ... This is 
Redemption!" said Mottel with a sigh, 
followed by a friendly, heart-melting 
smile. 

As soon as Mottel took a deep 
breath and a slug of Smimoff, wishing 
everyone "L'chayim!" Pinye, as if 
contmuing MotteTs last sentence, 
responded with these words: ''Ubiur 
hainyan " - "The explanation of the 
above mentioned": 

Just as we have to love a fellow Jew 
to hasten and prepare for the ultimate 
Jewish unity of the coming messianic 
era, as Mottel so clearly explained, so, 
too, do we pray and live according to 
the Jewish Code of Law with a new 
tone and an increased thrill as we pre- 
pare to take flight out of exile. There is 
a messianic fervor, faith and anticipa- 
tion that underlines and saturates our 
every act, every hour of the day and 
every day of the year. When we wake 
up and recite the Shma or the morning 
benedictions, in addition to the tradi- 
tional devotion and spirit, we also 
experience a new feeling of passion 
and awe in preparation for the joy and 
celebration in the days of redemption 
to come under the leadership and guid- 
ance of our righteous Mashiach. 

The brotherly love and comradeship 
of these two middle-aged Jews made a 
deep impression on me. Their words, 
which came from the heart, entered the 
heart and quill of this writer; thus, this 
repon for my readers to relish. 

Usually, when you meet two Jews 
they are either arguing about some 
Talmudic verse or debating a complex 
issue with another pair of Jews. 

Here, on the Shabbat preceding 
Rosh Chodesh Menachern Av, as we 
mourn over the destruction of the Holy 
Temple, I found comfort sitting face- 
to-face with two pure-hearted cha- 
sidim. 

I wish them and all the Jewish peo- 
ple a toast of "L'chaim" for many 
years to come together in Jerusalem in 
the Third Holy Temple. Q 



Your '15 Minutes of Fame' Awaits 
in Our Summer Snapshot Contest 

Imagine one of your pictures enlarged 30x40 the opportunity to meet other winning amateur 
inches and displayed at National Geographie photographers. Your very well might become 
Society's Explores Hall in Wasfiington, D.C, as something of a celebrity, at least for a few min- 



On June 9th, 1996 the West Side Jewish Center 

at 347 West 34th Street - one of the oldest and best 

known Synagcgues in Manhattan - celebrated its 

Annual Dinner at which time 

Rabbi Solomon Kahans 

was honored upon his retirement. 

The Main Sanctuary of the Synagogue was named 

The Rabbi Solomon Kahane Sanctuary, 



history by siarring in "The Jazz 
Singer," the world's first major film 
with sound. In this movie the Jewish 
Singer appeared in black face as depict- 
ed on last year's Israeli stamp released 
to honor the centenary of the cinema. 

AI Jolson became even more popu- 
lär across America following the Start 
of his nationally broadcast radio pro- 
gram in 1932. Besides "Mammy," 
Jolson was famous for his recordings 
of such songs as "Swanee," *'April 
Showers" and "Sonny Boy." 

Jolson was honored on one of 13 
diffeient 29 cents American music 
series postage stamps issued by the 



were ever awarded the Nobel Prize in 
physiology or medicine. 

Another personality, who did win a 
Nobel Prize. is honored on the 
Tanzania stamp. The Italian-born 
physicist Enrico Permi (1901-1954) 
became a Nobel laureate in physics in 
1938 in recognition of his important 
research leading toward the discovery 
of uranium fission. 

Enrico Fermi Flees Italy 
Because of Jewish Wife 

His wife Laura (nee Capon) was 
Jewish, and for that reason, when he 
and his family got permission to leave 



pavilion at EPCOT Center, Walt Disney World, 
Orlando, Florida. 

Imagine your big, beautifui picture gracing 
important trade shows and special events, stop- 
ping mall shoppers in their tracks, turning execu- 
tive heads at corporate facilities. 

This is exactiy what will happen if your photo 
is recognized as the best picture entered in the 
1996 Kodak International Newspaper Snapshot 
Awards (KINSA). Sure, you will collect $10,000, 
but your photo also will enjoy an unprecedented 
opportunity to be seen. 

Even betöre your picture reaches interna- 
tional competition, you may enjoy your "15 min- 
Utes of fame" as local winners are chosen and 
announced. Not only could your picture appear 
in the newspaper, it also might be displayed 
locally - so your friends and relatives can drop 
by to savor your snapshot savvy. 

Your could be interviewed and invited to a 
reception or awards ceremony. Your might enjoy 



To earn a Chance for all this acciaim, you 
don't have to pay any money. You simply have 
to locate one or more pictures you've taken 
since January 1, 1994. The pictures can be 
black-and-white or color, negative or transparen- 
cy. 

Send your entries to KINSA Contest Editor, 
Algemeiner Journal, 225 East Broadway, New 
York, N.Y. 10002 by August 9, 1996. If your 
have several potential entries, you might want to 
spread them over the weeks of the contest to 
maximize your opportunities to win. 



Rabbi Yossf Vlenw is the successor to Bibhl Xiibana 

as the Spiritual leader of the Synagogue. 

Rabbi Solomon Kahane 

has been designated as Rabbi Emeritus. 



KODAK International Newspaper Snapshot Awards 



n't Be BashfuI! 



Bahamas, ■VVSTK7#VTCiTS Beautifui 
Carlbbean, Wuti^u ml miWmXw vi ^ Dream 
Mexico, etc. BüÄMü^MBiBa«™^ Vacations 

Special Prices to Israel 

If Your Looking for Good Service and Good Prices 

Call Us Ask for Mira or Miri 
718-275-0700 • 104-70 Queens Blvd Suite 310 Forest Hills, New York 11375 



IDEAL TOURS 

Our Company was Born Together with EL-AL 

An Offer You Cannot Refuse 

Fly with Usto Israel, and You Will Receive 



FREE Five Days Unlimited >!\WS Rent-A-Car 



Only gas and Insurance not Included. Based on two people sharing a car. 

IDEAL TOURS ou.n., 

56 West 45th Street New York, NY 10036 '/sFm//'^^ 
Tel: 212-764-8000 • 1-800-FLY-9996 ConiputlL^ 
FAX: 212-764-1509 ^'"fenzecf 



Fabuious Glatt Escortcd Tours 



ITALY N & S/RIVIERA- GRAND EUROPE 



Holland/Bel/Lux, France/R ivlera/Dordogne 

Eng/Scot/Wales, California, Spain, Portugal/Glb7Canada 

Morocco - Australia / N.Z. - Eastern Europa, Poland/Prague 

Italy, N. & S. and San Marino Grand Europe/6 Countries 

Program for Singles/Fam/Prof • Limit reg., All Sites & Jewish 

GRANT ^esign-^I-Tour 
DR. A GRANT Collegiate • Graduate Grand Europe (212) 734-9360 



: 



TRAVEL irm 



CICWOT42iTWn 

4:0]^ Wi^VilTlOHKflLL TOLL«« 
l-900-9Cq-4C^0 0J^:2l2-CqC-717l «X2I2-QC7-C02C 




/ 









Kosher Switzerland 

HOTEL SILBERHORN 



Luxurious Suites • Enioy the Most Beautifui Scenery of the Swiss Alps 

linder superrislon of the Orthodox Rabblnate of Lu^jano 

for further info. call: 036-53-28-22 Fax: 036-53-48-22 



Davidman's 

Homowack 



Your First Resort 
for a Great Vacation Spring Glea N.Y. 

for reservations call Toll Free: 
1-800-243-4567 or 914-647-6800 



1641 E. 13th St. Brooklyn, N.Y. 11229 

Israel ^ ^^^^^' (^^^> 339-3141 • Fax: (718) 645-4155 



•399 \ We Can Meet All Your Travel Needs • We Plan 
one way non-stopK Vacations, Trips and Tours «We Pride 
Boeina 747 
based on rM ^ 



Ourselves on Our Good Service 



Budaptst 

•359 

one way nonstop 
based on r/t 




^^#"s. 



"^ 



J>*Ä 



öss-'C i Mfiismi'mM 



W#iS!«*(!«f# ii.mmfMß-- i.P^^^ .^'S?^ 



N 



ISkAEL CONNECTiON INC. 

We Cuarantee 

BEST PRICES BLAS WELL AS IM ISRAEL AND EGYPT 
AIR VIA EL-AL HOTELS AND TOURS 

800-848-927:2 



Tired of Being Grounded? 

Advertlse in the Algemeiner Travel Guide Piease Call: 212-267-5561 





i-xs-M-.-;-;- %-y 



The Kodak International Newspaper Snapshot Awards 
(KINSA) contest is strictiy for amateur photographers. 
Amateur Pt\otographers are those who derive less than 5% of 
their income from photography. 

Rlark-;in(t-whiti> and rnlnr nhntnaranhs taken after Janiiarv 1 
1994. are eligible. This allows for a two-year eligibility. Photos 
prevjously published or entered in any KINSA or other 
competitions are not eligible. 

Snapshots may be taken with any make of camera, but all 
antritt mutt bt talien on Kodak Ulm AND. il printtd, on 
Kodak paptr. No retouching or other alteration (except 
cropping) is permitted of negatives or prints: no composite 
pictures or multiple printing can be submitted. 

Entrant's name and address must be written clearly, in ink. on 
the back of each print or transparency mount. Mail entries to 
the KINSA Contest Editor, care of this newspaper. 

Entrants by their entry agree that the Newspaper may publish 
their pictures for local promotion of the contest. Entrants 
must be able to furnish the original negative or transparency, 
if requested, by the Contest Editor. All photos submitted 
become the property of the Sponsors and none will be 
returned The Sponsors assume no responsibility for 
negatives, transparencies, or prints 



in KINSA to 

Grand Award 



Cash prizes totaling $52.500 will be awarded in Intarnational 
Judging as follows: 



Grand Prize 


S1 0.000 


2 First Prizes 


$5,000 each 


2 Second Prizes 


Sa.OOOaach 


2 Third Prizes 


$2.000 each 


50 Honor Awards 


$250 each 


200 Special Merit Awards 


$50 each 


Honor Awards may include the Categories of 


• Abstract 


• Still Life 


• Landscape 4 Scenic 


• Humor 


• Olympic Moments 


• Grown-ups 


• Candids 


• Action 


• Animals 


• New Parents 



»• 

# 



Send entries to: KINSA Contest Editor, The 
Algemeiner Journal, 225 East Broadway, 
New York, N.Y. 10002 






••Wm 



EDITORIAL COMMENT 



>, 



THE DECISION of United Nations 
Sccrctary-Gcncral Javier Perez de 
Cuellar to convene all \H) signatories 
to the Fourth Cieneva Convention to 
discuss Israd's alleged failure to pro- 
tect Palestinians in the "(Kcupied terri- 
tories" makcs one wonder if, like a Rip 
Van Winkle, the IIN hits bcen in deep 
eoma for the past 4() years. Violations 
of the Convention by many of its signa- 
tories have claimed the lives of several 
million people since it was signed. In 
Asia, Africa, Europe and Latin Amer- 
ica, wholesiile slaughters have been 
committed by armies of occupation 
and by gov^'^r^'^nts suppressing mi- 
norities dei tanding elf-deterniination. 
Yet Israel, wiicrc no unprovoked, 
wanton killing by the State has ever 
taken place, has now been singled out 
for scrutiny and censure, if not sanc- 
tions. Only the 1975 UN General As- 

sembly decision to brand Zionism a 
form of racism, sponsored by some of 
the most viciously racist tyrannies in 
history, can match Perez de Cuellar's 



The UN travesty 



StNOAV, NOVEMBKR 4, 1990 



action for cynieism, hypt)crisy and 
bigotry. 

What makes this exerdse particular- 
ly obnoxious is that it is doubtful 
whether the 1949 Geneva Convention 
is in any way applicable in Israels aise. 
Not only beamse the incident which 
triggered the two UN condemnations 
and Perez de Cuellar's ire occurred in 
Jerusalem - Israelis capital, an integral 
pärt of the State and certainly not "oc- 
cupied" - but because, under interna- 
tional law. "the territories," too, ain- 
not be described as occupied. 

As Professor Eugene Rostow, one 
of the world's leading authorities on 
international law, as well as other ex- 
perts, have pointed out, the last recog- 
nized sovereign in Judea, Samaria and 
Gaza was the Ottoman empire. Jor- 
dan 's attempt to at annexation was not 
recognized by the world Community, 



and they cannot in any sense Ix* charac- 
terized as "Arab land.'" Since the very 
terms of the Geneva Convention limit 
its applicability to territories bclonging 
to signatory states, and since the teni- 
tories in question do not belong to 
Jordan or any other country. the Con- 
vention is irrelevant. Israel voluntaril) 
and unilaterally agreed to apply its hu- 
manitarian features in Judea, Samaria 
and Gaza and has given their inhabit- 
ants the right of habeas corpus before 
its High Court of Justice, something 
occupying powers are not obliged to 
do. 

Whether under Convention provi- 
sions or not, the claim that the Palestin- 
ian inhabitants need "protection" from 
Israel strains credulity . Weither the Sec- 
retary-General nor anyone eise in the 
West believes that the Israeli army at- 
tacks inhabitants arbitrarily. What the> 



surely know is that, for almosl three 
years now, an insurrection has been 
going on in which Israeli civilians, sol- 
diers and police have l")een bombarded 
with stones and petrol bombs, imd as- 
saulted with knives, daggers, axes, iron 
bars, pistols and rifles. Almost 50 Is- 
raelis have been stoned, crushed bumt 
alive or shot to death. Almost four 
thousand have been injured. 

In response to these assaults, Israeli 
soldiers and police have been using 
mud Shells, water cannon, tear gas, 
clubs, rubber buUets and plastic b'ullets. 
When their lives are iniperiled, they 
first shoot in the air, then at the assail- 
ants' feet, and only then to kill. Sol- 
diers and police who, in exce[>tional 
cases, have used unwarranted force 
and committed acts of brutalit\ have 
been tried by the courts. It can be 
stated cleariy and unequivocally that 



no other army in the world wouid have 
conducted itself with such restraint; nor 
in any other country could tens of thou- 
sands of violent incjdents involving 
hundreds of thousands of noters have 
cnded with a toll of fewer than 7(X) 
killed. 

There is only one area in which 
Israel has failed to protect Palestin- 
ians. Its forces have been unable to 
prevent the murder of 3(K) of them 
by Palestinian terror gangs. It is no 
easy assignment, particularly be- 
cause the majority of the cases have 
nothing to do with contacts with Is- 
rael but with the PLO's campaign to 
establish a reign of terror. Nor is 
IsraePs task made easier by the fail- 
ure of most human rights groups to 
report, let alone condemn, these 
murders. In fact, some human rights 
activists, like Joost Hiltermann, 
who has worked witb the Palestinian 
human rights Organization Al-iiaq 
for five years, have actually justified 
these cruel "executions." 



er - in what many Interpret as a clel?l 
erate snub - skips Israel on his Middle 
East tour, and as the Gaza district boils 
over with violence, the advice fre- 
quently offered the Israel govemment 
is that it had better come up with a new 
political initiative. Otherwise, the 
waming is sounded by various Israeli 
politicians and American friends, rela- 
tions with the U.S. are sure to deterio- 
rate even further - especially once the 
Gulf crisis is over - and the Situation in 
the territories will become untenable. 
Since advice-giving is a favorite 
Sport, particulariy among American 
Jewish leaders whose eagemess to of- 
fer it is usually in inverse proportion to 
the number of people they represent, 
one would have expected some con- 
crete suggestions. But no one seems 
willing to define what this new initia- 
tive should contain. There is, after all, 
no need to remind Israel that talks with 
the Palestinians are desirable and nec- 
essary. There is wall-to-wall conscnsus 
on the subject. There are differences 
only about the identity of the interiocu- 



^ initiative MÖNDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 1990 



tors. Before the invasion of Kuwait, 
there were those who were willing to 
talk directly with the PLO or its prox- 
ies. Others insisted such talks would be 
tantamount to Israel conceding with- 
drawal to the pre-1%7 lines and the 
establishment of a PLO State, and that 
only talks untainted by the PLO were 
acceptable. 

Now that Arafat has become Sad- 
dam Hussein's most constant and trust- 
ed ally, hardly anyone is suggesting 
that Israel negotiate with the PLO. But 
since there is currently no alternative 
Palestinian leadership - nor can there 
be one as long as terror stalks the 
Palestinian street - it is difficult to 
imagine whom the advocates of a new 
initiative have in mind as partners for 
negotiations. 

It would be more useful were they to 
demand fresh thinking not from Israel 
but from those govemments whose 
recognition of and support for the PLO 



help it maintain its reign of terror. 

Nor is it any easier to imagine why 
the govemment's peac€ initiative of 
May 1989, approved and adopted by 
the U.S. administration, is consistently 
ignored. Some in the U.S. and Israel 
have accused Prime Minister Shamir of 
sabotaging his own plan because he 
would not accept the interpretation 
provided by the U.S. The differences 
occurred mostly because the adminis- 
tration, persuaded by Egypt that, with- 
out Arafat's approval, no settlement 
was possible, insisted on insinuating 
the PLO into the process. But this 
should no longer Ix* an obstacle. The 
PLO alliance with Saddam has cost it 
credibility even in Egypt, and has justi- 
fied Israel's contention that the PLO is 
not, and cannot be, a force for peace. 

The Palestinian Arabs' identification 
with Saddam Hussein and their sup- 
port for his pan-Arab drearn should 
also have made it clear to the U.S. 



aamtrirrtwrtkMrthat a "separate peace" 
with the Palestinians is utterty mean- 
ingless. By themselves, the Palestinians 
can make neither war nor peice. If 
there is any connection between Ku- 
wait and the Palestinian issue it is not in 
invidious comparisons between Sad- 
dam 's obscene act of aggressicm and 
Israelis war of self-defense, but in the 
fact that, as long as there are aggressors 
like Saddam who can threaten Israel, 
there is no hope for a settlement with 
the Palestinians. 

What is needed, then, is not a new 
initiative but a sober reassessrr ent of 
the existing Israeli peace plan. This 
time around it must be perceived as a 
whole. The fatal error of taking one 
section of the plan - the proposed 
elections in "the territories" - out of 
context should not be repeated Even 
when the PLO is removed from the 
>ceiic, talks with the Palestinwns can 
be meaningfui only if accompariied by 



the recognition of Israel by the "rejec- 
tionist" States, the abolition of the 
Arab boycott, the winding down of the 
arms race and by other steps in the 
Arab world towards peace and 
normalization. 

Nor can the pian be viabie if one 
ignores another of its integral points; 
the refugee problem. The frustration 
and hatred bred by the refugee 'shanty 
towns in Judea, Samaria and Gaza 
renders a rational search for a lasting 
settlement useless. 

If, instead of dedicating its energies 
to finding new ways to condemn Israel, 
the UN were to enlist the international 
Community to provide decent housing 
for the refugee population, it would 
kindle hope for peace. Permanent 
housing would not only afford the 
camp inhabitants a t)etter life and ame- 
liorate their rage. It would make im- 
mensely more difficult the job of incit- 
ers, who promise them a "retum" to 
their ancestral homes - a promise 
NN hieb, if kept wouUi ultimately de- 
stroy Israel. 



IT IS unthinkable that Jews should 
suffer discrimination in their own coun- 
try. Israeli religious society in particular 
should be free from the alien viruses of 
bigotry and racism. Such discrimina- 
tion has no sanction in Halacha 
whatsoever. 

Astonishingly, a case of discrimina- 
tion against Israelis of Ethiopian origin 
surfaced in a Habad-operated State re- 
ligious school in Tivon. The school last 
week refused to admit 45 Ethiopian 
immigrant children unless they under- 
went the controversial "symbolic" con- 
version. Officials at the institutions re- 

lied on a shamefui directive issued in 



'Our' Jews and other Jewsi=ii 



NOVEMBER 6, 1990 



1985 by the director of the State reli- 
gious schools department, which per- 
mitted Habad institutions to impose 
this requirement on Ethiopian Jews. 
Fortunately, ministry officials have de- 
clared the directive null and void and 
instructed the school to admit the chil- 
dren. 

The case brings to mind last month's 
complaints from Sephardi parents 
whose children had not been allowed 
to enrol in some Agudat Yisrael 

schools. Despite last year's govem- 



ment Order to end discriminatory ad- 
missions policies, some Aguda schoc/ls 
accepted only pupils who "pray and 
study in the Ashkenazi fashion." The 
Knesset education committee has giv- 
en these schools two months to remedy 
the Situation; MK Rehavam Ze evi has 
threatened to propose ending the 
schools' govemment funding if they fail 
to abandon discriminatory practises. 

In both these cases, the schcx)ls pur- 
port to nurture confomiity to their par- 
ticular traditions of religious obser- 



vance. But there are limits o the 
tolerance the govemment can extend 
to proponents of educational piiiloso- 
phies who erect barriers agairst the 
education of children Coming from dif- 
ferent societies. Responsible for an im- 
migrant society in which people from a 
myriad backgrounds must leam to live 
together, the govemment cannot toler- 
ate educational practices which leave 
scars of discrimination. Children can- 
not be expected to understand that 
their peers who immigrated from Ethi- 



opia or belong to the Sephardi Commu- 
nity are kept out of their school for 
technical religious reasons and not be- 
cause of who they are. As one of the 
pupils in the Habad school said about 
the principal who was forced to resign, 
"His Job is to educate in the Tora, not 
cause rifts among Jews" 

Habad has done much to bring Ju- 
daism to Jews in every comer of the 
world. It is sad indeed that it has pre- 
ferred to relinquish control of the 
school rather than see its way clear to 
educating Jewish children from Ethio- 

pia who may not conform to its defini- 
tions of Jewishness and observance. 



POLITICAL assassinations may not 

be unique to the Middle East, but they 
are endemic to the region, outside Isra- 
el. Just within the past three weeks, the 

Speaker of Egypt 's pariiament was as- 
sasssinated in Cairo, and Lebanese 
Christian leader Dany Chamoun and 
his family were murdered in Beirut. 
Those killings were hardly aberrations. 
In every Arab country in Israelis neigh- 
borhood, without exception, bullets 
have Struck down at least one head of 
govemment - and often several - since 
they achieved independence. 

It is in this context - rather than as a 

phenomenon related to the kind of 
politics he represented - that the a>n- 

temptible assassination of Meir Ka- 
hane in New York on Monday night 
should be viewed. Two weeks ago, a 
leaflet issued by Fatah, Yasser Arafat's 
group in the PLO, called for the "liqui- 
dation" of Deputy Minister of Science 
Geula Cohen, several activists in Ka- 
hane's Kach movement, some alleged- 
ly "rightist" residents of the Jewish 
quarter in the Old City of Jemsalem. 
and 10 Arabs alleged to have c(X){X"rat- 
ed with the Israel authorities. A few 



Kahane's assassination 



WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 7 1990 



weeks before, PLO leader Abul Ab- 
bas, whose group hijacked the Achille 
Lauro in 1985 and attempted to raid 
the Tel Aviv beaches last May, prom- 
ised in Baghdad to help Saddam Hus- 
sein's "fight against the imperialists" by 
launching an international terror 
campaign. 

It is not yet known whether the 
group in Amman which yesterday ac- 

cepted responsibility for Kahane's 

murder was acting in response to Fa- 
tah 's call for political assassinations, or 
to Abul AbbiLs's directives on anti- 
Amencan terrorism or whether - as it 
claimed - it served as an arm of an 

Arab-American terror Operation led 
by an Arab professor in an American 
university. What is clear is that Middle 
East terrorism is retuming to the world 
arena, and particulariy to the United 
States. 

The support system for Arab fanati- 
cism in the U.S. is solid and wide- 
spread. Both the PLO and the Islamic 



Jihad movement have organizations 
branches and lobbies in all majoi 
American and Canadian cities. The 
tone of their publications, especially in 
Arabic, is every bit as inciting as that o1" 
the fanatical literature published in tht 
Middle East. That no acts of Arab« 
terrorism were committed in the U.S 
before Monday is due not to the ab 
sence of operatives in America but to 

Saddam's wariness of provoking 
American military action. If an armed 

confrontation in the Gulf dt^es txxur, 

terrorism aimed at America and 
Ameriains will accompany it. It may 
continue even if Saddam himsclf is 
eliminated. Amencans may have to gel 
used to the idea that, while the threai 
of communism may be gone, the dan- 
ger of Arab terrorism is still very real 
Ilie purposc of making the assassi- 
nation of Kahane the first major terror- 
ist act in America since the invasion of 
Kuwait seems clear. By murdering a 
politician with (xlious ideas, the killers 



could expect world censure to be limit- 
ed to lip Service. Nor could the U.S. 
use the murder as an excuse to attack 

Saddam. They must have knowi, too, 
that, having no power anc^representing 
no authority in Israel, Kahane posed 
no real threat to Palestinian ispira- 
tions. On the a^ntrary, he was a politi- 
cal pariah, forbidden to mn for the 
Knesset and virtually boycotted by the 

press. What they hoped to achieve was 
an escalation of animosity and hostil- 

ities between Arab and Jew in Israel 

and a diversion of world attention from 
Saddam to the Palestinians. U ifortu- 
nately, they seem to have enjoyed in- 
stant success. If the cowardly murderer 
who drove into an Arab village yester- 
day and shot two elderly yillagers is 
indicative of the trend in the Kahane 
ranks, the New York assassn and 
those who sent him should Ix.* satistled. 
Israel now faces the formidaf>le task 
of frustrating these terrorist aims. As 
wiLs shown clearlv bv a recent "mass 



demonstration" which Kahane tried to 

organize in Jerusalem, his hard-core 
following in Israel is small. The vast 
majority of the population considei^ 

his ideas irrational. But among many, 
the recent brutal murders in Jemsalem, 
the assault on Westem Wall worshipv- 
pers during the Succot holiday and 

Kahane's murder itself have raised 
rage and thirst for revenge to a new 
pitch. They may try to vent their hostil- 
ity on innocent Arabs. 

The Jemsalem police, still reeling 
from their blunders preceding last 

month's Temple Mount riot, will have 
to be prepared for provoaitions of all 

sorts during today's burial of Kahane. 
They will also have to do whatever is in 
their power to proted the Jews and 
Arabs on the long PLO assassination 
lists. The sccurity Services will un- 
doubtedly do their utmc^t, in collakv 
ration with the U.S. authorities, to 
punish the temirist organiziition be- 
hind the killing. But alxwe all, political 
leaders of all persuasions mu.st exhort 
the nation to keep calm. TTie assassina- 
tion of Mcir Kahane must not become 
a victorv for hatred. terrorism and war. 



*'And hv came to his father and said 
'Father.' And hc said, 'Here am I, 
uho arc you, my son?* And Jacob 
said to his father, 'I am Ksau, your 
firstborn, I have donc cvervthing as 
>ou told me.' "Kien. 27:18-191 

JA( OB'S charactcr is paradoxical. ()n 
ihc onc band, thc figure we know from 
tbc Bible is steeped in tbc vinegar of 
dcccit and lies, baving deccived bis 
fatber in (uder to gain tbe hirthright. 
Yet. thc Jacob \vc carry witbin our 
breast is tbat of a rigbtetms patnarcb, 
fatber of tbe 12 tnbes of our nation, tbe 
very personification of "trutb." Tbis 
last characterization is. perbaps, to a 
large extcnt, a result of a verse we 
recite in tbe prayer service every day as 
part of tbe "And a redeemer sball 
comc to Zion' sequence. Tbe words 
are from tbe last verse of tbe last cbap- 
le:;. dLNIjCiib's prophecy: "...and you 
sball give trutb to Jacob and loving- 
kindness to Abraham." [7:20] 

Repeated so often - titen emet 
rVaacov vehesed l'Avraham - it bas 
become a "classic," virtually an apho- 
rism; just as no one could argue with 
Abrahams lovingkindness, Jacob's 
truth is also seif -evident. 

But the evidence in this werV\ ;> >f 
tion. ToTcfof. iit Wust on t/ic burlace, 
Steins io puint in another direction. 
Abraham may be a man of "besed" 
(benevolence) - after all, his tent bad 
four openings, ready to aceommodate 
travelers fiom all directions - but how 
can we adom Jacob with tbe epithet of 
truth after he so deceived his father? 
Two central incidents are narrated. 
In the first, the younger Jacob is cook- 
ing a pot of lentil soup when the eider 
Esau arrives dead tired, throwing his 
bungry gaze upon the "red stuff' sim- 
mering on the fire. Perbaps this scene 



False truths and honest lies 



between the brotbers is a rccurrcnt onc 
- after all, weve already bcen told tbat 
Esau is a hunter and Jacob dwells in 
tents, and it's tbe nature of bunters to 
retum exhausted from the chase, just 
as it's natural for a tent dweller to tend 
to the long cxx^king time needed for 
lentils to become edible. 

But this one time, tbe Tora teils us, 
Jacob does not serve his brother imme- 
diately. Ratber, be bolds out for tbe 
birtbright, which expressed tbe leader- 
ship of tbe future nation, and especially 
tbe Spiritual leadership, since the custo- 
dian of the birtbright was the heir to 
and carrier of tbe family tradition. 
Scoffing at the birtbright, Esau willing- 
ly swears to seil bis spiritual inheritance 
for a bowl of soup. Once the deal is 
made, Esau eats, drinks, gets up and 
leaves, and tbe Tora declares tbat Esau 
"...despised his birtbright." [Gen. 
25:34] As if this were not condemna- 
tion enough, Esau then goes and mar- 
ries two Hittite women - an act of 
intermarriage severely forbidden h\ 
Abraham Onco ;.iz...n. t/ic bible 
thitic-s thc clder brother, stating tbat 
this caused a "bittemess of spirit for 
Isaac and Rebecca." [Gen. 26:35] 

From this background the entire 
family becomes involved in acting out a 
tragjc drama. Overhearing tbat her 
husband Isaac bas bidden Esau to go 
out and bunt venison so tbat his soul 
will bless Esau before his death (which 
could happen at any moment), Rebec- 
ca Springs into action. 

Clearly, she favors Jacob, and for an 
obvious reason. Suffering incredible la- 
bor pains after years of infertility, she 
went to seek God, and was told tbat 



SHABBAT SHALOM 

Shiomo Riskin 



two nations raged inside her womb, the 
younger destined to ruie ovcr tbe ei- 
der. And all subsequent incidents, es- 
pecially tbe emerging divergent charac- 
teristics of each of her sons, merely 
confirmed the correctness of this divine 
prophecy. 

Isaac can no longer see - perbaps he 
doesn't want to see because ever since 
tbe near-sacrifice on Mt. Moriah be 
bas seen too much - and is subject to 
tbe wiles of Esau, the hunter who en- 
snares people as well as animals. 

Knowing the truth, Rebecca com- 

mands her reluctant son to pretend he 

is someone he is not. The tasty morseis 

she prepares herseif, and then provides 

Jacob with Esau 's clotbes, covering his 

smooth flesh with ffo.nt «^v.;.«- 

xiioiieM neai dcaUi and blind, Isaac 

IS suspicious. He recognizes Jacob's 

voice but is confused by Jacob's touch, 

which feels like Esau's. In the end, 

however, Isaac eats and drinks, draw- 

ing his son closely as he blesses Jacob 

with the "dew of the heaven and the fat 

of the earth." [Gen. 27:28] 

As Jacob departs, Esau arrives, 

bearing the venison. But it is too late. 

Apparently, blessings are not mere 

words mechanically uttered. Once 

blessed, Jacob becomes the possessor 

of his blessing. Esau utters a cry from 

the depths, beseeching his father for 

one leftover blessing- which Isaac halt- 

ingly comes up with - but which fails to 



appeiLse Esau. 

Leaving the tent. he declares bis 
intention of killing Jacob when their 
father dies, and Rebecca, overhearing 
Esau, sends Jacob away to her family 
in Haran. 

We have to ask ourselves why the 
Tora sees fit to reveal tbat the founder 
of the nation of Israel bas a pa.st mired 
in tbe mud of Esau's anger and rage? 
And why is this patriarch who is driven 
to deceive his father presented botb by 
prophet and prayer with the character- 
istic of truth? 

Our World is not perfect. We may 
know exactiy what it takes to perfect 
things, but there are dozens of stjm- 
bling blocks along the way. Jao^b's 
nemesis was his twin brother. Certain- 
ly,if Esau bad never been bom, it 
might appear tbat Jacob's task would 
have been easier. 

But Jacob's life carves out the path 

his d€scendnnt<> v«."in f.ie» a;> iijcy llee 
iioin Uieir own Esaus. "The acts of the 
patriarchs foretell the destiny of ttieir 
children." The bistory of the Jewish 
people bas been filled with frustration, 
suffering and rejection, and often re- 
quired lies and deceit in order to retain 
a modicum of what they deserved , in 
Order to survive. 

Jacob becomes the epitome of tioitb 
not becaue he is bom with a geretic 
code which makes him squirm every 
time he lies, but because of whai he 
who Started out "whole" hearted and 
naive {tarn) must leam to survive in a 
World filled with deceit. 

Prior to the night of deception. we 
leam two things about Esau: he de- 
spises his birtbright, and he mairies 



two Hittite women. Undouhtcdiy, 
Rsau is morally cripplcd. The grcatest 
deception would be his being rewarded 
with his birthnght - Ixxtiming heir to 
Abraham and Isaac, Standard bcarcr 
of the new religion of ethical monothe- 
ism. Indeed, he iraded tbat for a mess 
of pottage and two Hittite wives. His 
baving received the birthnght would 
have created an etemal lie - and abort- 
ed tbe unique nation of Israel. And if 
Isaac was blind to this fundamental 
tmth, then Jaa)b must wrest what is 
rightfully his througb an act of 
deception. 

No, the end does not justify the 
means, and Jacob must bear the conse- 

• 

quences of his trickery. He is in tum 
deceived by botb Laban (who gave 
him his eider daughter intead of the 
younger) as well as by his own sons 
(who teil him tbat his beloved son 
Joseph bas been mutilated by wild ani- 
mals). But the end does necessitate 
certain means, a lie which - in an 
imperfect world -can stanH for tK- ^— * 
ttnitix ...>.\- ■ vv»«^ cucuuLsiances. 

Similariy, we cannot yeam for an 
age of peace - a messianic era of truth - 
unless we are willing to wage war 
against evil and aggression. Weaponry, 
we are told in Tractate Shabbat (63a), 
is a disgrace, and so we cannot walk 
into a public domain on the Sabbath 
carrying a weapon as if it were an 
Ornament. Nonetheless, war, in de- 
fense of the life of our nation, is seen as 
a divine commandment. The two are 
not exclusive. It is no more of a para- 
dox than Jacob's life. 

What Jacob's life teaches is tbat 
sometimes the tmth may take on the 
appearance of a lie. In an imperfect 
World, we must leam to distinguish 
between a false tmth and an honest lie. 

Shabbat Shalom. 



From The Jerusalem Post Video Collection: 

Colorful Israel 





Israel in Dance 

On stage and backstage with the Sha- 
lom 90 Dance Troupe... the story of the 
young people who live to dance and 
preserve the heritage brought by so 
many diverse peoples to Israel. Re- 
freshing, heartwarming and lively one 
hour Video is chock-full of their most 
famous dances, performed indoors and 
out throughout Israel. 



Discovering Israel 

A fantastic video aerial album of modern 
Israel in flora and fauna, art and archi- 
tecture, dance and drama-acx^ompa- 
nied by an original music score. This 
production received first prize at Inter- 
national Tourism Film festivals in Za- 
greb, Yugoslavia and Monte Catini, Italy 
and a special award at 66a Fiera Mila- 
no. Running time 42 min. 



Prlce: US$ 33.95 per Video tape Inc. air mall delivery from Jerusalem 



To The Jerusalem Post Video Collection, 21 1 E. 43rd St Suite 601 New York, 

NY 10017 USA or POB 81, Jerusalem, 91000, Israel 

Please send me air mail: 

D Israel in Dance D Discovering Israel 

The System I require is: 
D YHS-NTSC (North America) D YHS-PAL (Europe) 

Enclosed is my check, payable to The Jerusalem Post, for US$33.95 per tape. 

Name 



Address 

City State . 

Zip Country 



^^Let Us Care For Our little Ones../' 









For 42 years, The Jerusalem Post Toy Fund has been helping to 
care for Israels less fortunate children. This years children need you 

as much as ever before 

Your contnbution goes a long way to providing special learning aids 
for retarded and blind children. clothing. furnitjre and equipment for 
youth Centers, and sports equipment. And, of course. we give them a 
slice of happiness with toys that mean more to them 
than you can imagine. 

Please, give generously 
Lefs make this year the best ev€'r. 



Contributions may be 
mailed to: 

211East43rdSt., 

Suite 601, New York, 

NY 10017. USA 



ttttttttttMtttttttttttMtM 



idiWhikMhi 






Week ending November 17, 1990 



IHK JKRISALKM POST IM K«NA I IO\.\L Kl>J' ION 



PAGE 23 



Samstag, 16. November 1996 



ZeITUND BILD 

Frankfurter Rundschau am Wochenende 



^■■4 i-l ■ • hijb) r 'y^: ia>Ll;l";iU/ÜAJa'.«*3l*i m 



•«»•' «? ' 



»>^' -jf ■ auxAiw t 




SL' ^ a'^SW-u- *>''■». i*- *i 



Johanna Bodenstab 



Als Esther Goldfarb guter Hoffnung war 



Eine Berühruno mit den Fortunoff Video Arcliives l for Holocaust Testimonies an der Yale Universität 



I 



Im Grunde fing meine Recherche 
über die .\rbeit des FortunotT Video 
.\rchives tbr Holocaust Testimonies 
an der Yale-Universitat damit an. 
daß ich von den organisatonschen 
Problemen hörte, die eine Gedenkfeier des 
Landes Brandenburg anlaßlich des 50. 
Jahrestages unserer Befreiung aufwarf. 
Es war ein internationaler Aufruf an die 
ehemaligen Gefangenen der KZ Ravens- 
brück und Sachsenhausen ergangen, und 
tatsächlich hatten sich über 3000 Men- 
schen entschlossen, dieser Einladung zu 
folgen. 

Die Resonanz bei den Überlebenden 
und ihren Familien .var stärker, ais <fs 
selbst die Organisatoren der Gedenkfeier 
erwartet hatten. 3000 .Antworten drohten 
ihr Projekt ins Chaos zu stürzen. Als eine 
Kollegin das Wort „Sonderzug' in die Dis- 
kussion warf, kam mir schlagartig zu Be- 
wußtsein, daß wir vor demselben Problem 
standen, das die Nazis gelost haben. Die 
Organisatoren waren von ungetahr in das 
Operationsfeld -jer.iten. das die Appara- 
tur, die die Vernicntung der europäischen 
Juden verwaltete. >o etüzient oearbeitet 
hat. Sie fanden sich vor der Aufgabe wie- 
der. 3000 Juden und Jüdinnen ms KZ zu 
transportieren. 

In dem Moment, in dem die Vergangen- 
heit greifbar wird, weil die Parallelen der 
Gegenwart an den Abgrund der Wieder- 
holung führen, stürzen wir ins bewußtlose 
Chaos. Wenn der Nationalsozialismus aus 
der Verdrängung hervorschießt, ist das 
ein Überfall, der das Bewußtsein in die 
Knie zwingt. Er zerrt wie eine Bestie an 
ihrer Kette und könnte jederzeit losbre- 
chen. Selbst wo man sich diese Bestie als 
Gestalt einer fernen Zeit vom Hals zu hal- 
ten meint, stellt sich die fürchterlichste 
Bedrohung der eigenen Existenz dar: 
3000 Menschen — das «intspricht der Ver- 
nichtungskapazität des Todeslagers Treb- 
linka in einem Zeitraum von !wei Stun- 
den; nach dem Bau der neuen Gaskam- 
mern im September 1942. 



11 



Das Fortunoff Video Archive for Holo- 
caust Testimonies wurde 1981 von dem 
PsychoanaWtikür Don 1-aub und dem Li- 
teraturwissenschatller Geoffrey Hartman 
gegründet. Es besteht aus mehr als 3500 
Video- Interviews mit Überlebenden. Ehe 
ich nach Yale gefahren bin, um in dem Ar- 
chiv zu arbeiten, habe ich niemals mit 
Juden über den Holocaust gesprochen. 
Von denen, die mir bis dahin begegnet wa- 
ren, trennte mich mein Schuldgefühl, so 
daß ich jedesmal dankbar war, wenn sie 
über das Wetter sprachen. Ich wußte ge- 
nau, daß ich es diesmal nicht dabei belas- 
sen würde. Der Gedanke an meine Ameri- 
kareise erfüllte mich mit einer drängen- 
den Lust nach Berührung, die ganz phy- 
sisch blieb, weil ich sprachlos war. 

Als ich nach Yale kam, suchte ich das 
Vertraute: Ich wollte etwas über unsere 
Grausamkeit hören. Aber ich wurde ent- 
täuscht. Die Menschen, deren Testimo- 
nies — das heißt, deren Zeugnisse als 
LTjerlebende des Holocaust — ich gesehen 
habe, sprachen nicht von uns: Sie spra- 
chen von sich. 

Ludwig H. war 82 Jahre alt, als sein 
Inter\'iew aufgezeichnet wurde. Er ist em 
alter Herr, der von seiner Schulzeit er- 
zählt. Er könne nicht sagen, daß er in 
Deutschland jemals ohne .Antisemitismus 
gewesen sei. 1933 geht er illegal über die 
Grenze nach Frankreich. In Dortmund 
hatte man ihn una seinen Dackel aui der 
Straße verhallet. Er hatte sich erboten, 
seinen Hund nach Hause zu bnngen und 
sich danach wieder m Poiizeigewahrsam 
zu begeben. Aber sie hatten ihn auf den 
offenen Lastwagen zu den anderen Juuen 
gezwungen una ms Gefängnis gebracnt. 
Jlrste Ladung tür Palästina' stand \\i\ 
dem Lkw. — Zum Zeitpunkt des Inter- 
views ist der alle Herr oiind und so 
schwerhong, daß ihm aie Inien'iewer :hre 
Fragen zubrüllen müssen. Sie sprechen 
ihn mit seinem Namen in. Wenn er ihn 
hört, hebt sich -ein Kopf und «'r sagt: „Ja. 
bitte!**, als klopt'e lemanti ir: -(".ne Tur. 

Das Vertraute holt mich auf eine irritie- 
rende Weise ein: Muin ' ucr st heute in 
dem \!N'r. das Laawig H. 1984, .ils die Vi- 
deo-Aufnahme »entstand, gehabt hat. Ich 
entdecke an dem H»*rrn im Film die glei- 
che umstandlicne iwilicMkeii. die gleicnt- 
Korrektheit und .Autontatsgiaubigkeit. 

die ich von meinem Vater kenne. — .\is 
der alte Herr von semer .Spieizeutftäbnk 
zu erzählen beginnt, die er -^ich in Frank- 
reich autgebaut hat, nehme ich meine 
Mittagspause. In einem (?ale aul <iem 
Campus tnnke icn Ean Grey mit einem 
Schuß fnscher .Milch und esse einen Blue- 
berr>' Muffin. Die Dunkelheit und Stille, 
in die Ludwig H. eingeschi(jssen ist. erin- 
nern mich an das onrenbetaut)ende 
Schweigen, in dem mein Vater brütet 

Die Ennnerung an die Spieizeuglaorik 
ist wie ein süßer Traum tür Ludwii; H . 
dem ich jetzt zuhöre. Die Interviewerin- 
nen. die mit ihren bedrohlichen Fr:iL'"n in 
seine Tur kiopten. laßt er -Jie .Scnieuse sei- 
ner Schwerhörigkeit nur widerwillig pas- 



sieren. Er schwelgt ungestört in seiner 
Vergangenheit. Er will noch nicht davon 
sprechen, daß er seine Fabrik abbrechen 
mußte. Er ist bei den Bleifigürchen ange- 
langt, die er bemalte: seinen wilden Tie- 
ren — die Tiger! — und seinen Indianern. 
In seiner Erinnerung ist noch alles an sei- 
nem Platz. Er will nicht erzählen, daß der 
Polenfeldzug aus ihm, dem religiös Ver- 
folgten in Deutschland, einen etran^er in- 
desiderable in Frankreich gemacht hat. 
Er sitzt wieder in seiner Küche, bemalt 
seine Figurchen und träumt von seiner 
Fabnk. Er scnmiegt sich in die L^nver- 
sehrtheit dieses Moments. Ich spähe 
durch seine Spieizeugwelt wie durch ^in 
Schlüsselloch auf seine Verluste Hinter 
seiner Gescnichte erzählt sich vie von 
selbst eine nndere. von der er nar spre- 
chen kann, maem er sich ihr verweigert. 
Und da beginnt noch eine dntte Geschich- 
te: die sei.icr Seele. 



HI 



Vor ungefähr sechs Jahren habe ich 
...Music Bo.x* mit Jessica Lange und Armin 
Mül'.er-Stahl ge.sehen. Nach dem Kinobe- 
sucn versuchte ich. meiner amerikani- 
acncn Freundin zu erklären, daß der Film 
eine springteufelnde deutsche Angst be- 
rührt. — Ich ertappe mich immer wieder 
dabei, wie xh Bilder lus dem Zweiten 
VveitKneg, speziell solche von der Ost- 
front, nach dem Gesicht meines Vaters 
absuche. Ich bin jeder Fotografie dankbar, 
die ihn entlastet. Bisher habe ich ihn zwi- 
schen den grinsenden Landsem nicht ent- 
decken können. Aber ich denke immer, 
daß es mogiicn wäre. Ich fürchte den Au- 
genblick des Films, wenn die aufsteigen- 
den Bilder der Vergangenheit die süße 
Melodie der Spieluhr zerreißen. Das Idyll 
der Beziehung von Vater und Tochter 
birst, und das freundliche Lächeln des al- 
ten Herrn verkehrt sich in die perverse 
Fratze eines Schlächters. Der Versuch der 
Tochter, den geliebten Vater von der An- 
schuldigung reinzuwaschen, er sei 1945 
an der Ermordung von Juden in Budapest 
beteiligt {gewesen, wird zur Schuld. 

Vielleicht sollte ich mir eingestehen, 
daß am .\nfang meiner Recherche im 
Fortunotl Video Arcmve mein vacer steht. 
Mein Thema war bereits gebore a, ehe es 
an den Video-Interviews m't den Überle- 
benden auszukristallisieren begann, initi- 
iert wurde ich von meiner Mutter, die von 
der russischen Kriegsgefangenschaft mei- 
nes Vaters erzählte. Jedes Jahr, das ihr 
Mann in Rußland verbringen mußte, sag- 
te meine Mutter, zähle eigentlich fünf 
Mein Vater hätte nach dieser Piechnung 
20 Jahre in Lagern zugebracht — ein Zeit- 
raum, der mein Vorstellungsverinögen im 
Alter von fünf oder sechs Jahren vollkom- 
men überforderte. Mein Vater erschien 

mir als ein Held, den die Wechselfälle des 
Krieges ins Leid gestürzt hatten. Ich erin- 
nere mich, daß er meiner Frage auswich, 

ob er einen seiner Freunde neben sich hat 
fallen sehen. 

„Kameraden' sagt mein Vater für 
„Freunde"'. „Wir hatten nichts zu fressen"*, 
sagt er, wenn er von seinem Hunger spre- 
chen will. Er riß den Fröschen, die ihm bei 
der Zwangsarbeit über den Weg hüpften, 
die Beine aus und briet sie sich abends. In 
Frankreich hatte er gelernt, <iaß man 
Froschschenkel essen kann. Er erzählte, 
wie er sich Aufenthalte in der Kranken- 
station erlistete, um den Verfall seines 
Körpers aufzuhalten. Seine Wut über die 
Offiziere, die sich nach ihrer Gefangen- 
nahme in -\ntifaschisten verwandelten — 
die „umiieien", wie er das nennt — , ist 
noch heute überwältigend. Manchmal, 
wenn ich ihn im Garten stehen sehe, 
nimmt sein Korper die Haltung des deut- 
schen Soldaten m einer Zigarettenpause 
im vieiecntöStand ein. Es ist. als trüge er 
den Watfenrock unter der Haut. Er er- 
wähnte nur im Rande, daß sein Cousin 
wegen semer Nachtblindheit z-Aangssteri- 
üsiert wurde. Was er in der SA wollte und 
was ihn dann, als die Partei sich nach 
jem Rohm-Put.sch reorganisierce, davon 
abhielt, m die SS überzugehen, weiß ich 
nicht. Die Vergangenheit meines V^aters 
iragt die Totenmaske seiner Kriegsenn- 
nerungen. Für mich blieb das Dritte Reich 
lange Zeil der Zweite Weltkrieg, dem 
meine .Mutter den Tenor von Li'iden unii 
Opferung unterschob. 



1 ' 



Die Überlebenden erzählen, was sie 
verloren haben und wa-^ :iir.en im 'i- 
dachtnis geblieben ist. Vordem Holocaust 
— wahrend des Holocaust — nach dem 
Holocaust. Das ist die Grundstrjktur des 
Intep.'ie\vs. über die alle in völliger Frei- 
heit improvisieren. Sie sprechen von Or 
ten und Br:iuchen. die der Vergingenheil 
angeht)ren. von .Vngsten. die sie nicht ver- 
las.sen, und von .Men.schen. die niemand 

mehr keni. 

Eine Frau spricht von Esther Goldfarb. 
Sie war hwchbchw.ingr.T. als sie aus dem 
l}ettü deportiert wurde. Ich haln? verges- 
sen, um welche^ f M'Uo es >;ich handelte. 
M\iA -luch den Namen des Lagers, in da- 
der Transport gehen sollte, weiß ich nicht 




■^^a^^Xm^hv^ 



mehr. Natürlich glaube ich immer, es ist 
Auschwitz. — Auf dem Weg zu den Zügen, 
SO beschreibt die Frau die Erinnerung, ha- 
ben die Männer aus Esthers Familie die 
Schwangere umringt, als könnten sie ih- 
ren schwellenden Leib so vor den kom- 
menden Unbilden bewEÜiren. Das Bild ist 
kühner, als ich es mir auszumalen gewagt 
hätte. Die Diskrepanz zwischen Leben 
und Tod setzt mir zu. Es gibt keinen Platz 

für die Zukunft in ihrem Leib. 

Esther Goldfarb. die vielleicht im Gü- 
terwagen niederkam, läßt mich nicht los. 

Ihr Name verleitet mich, die Begebenheit 

zu einem Tafelbild mit Resten einer Blatt- 
gold-Fassung zu stilisieren. Darauf 
schreitet Esther Goldfarb mit der Zer- 
brechlichkeit einer Elfenkönigin im 
Kreise ihres würdigen Gefolges in einem 
taillierten Mantel aas grünem Rips, der 
die Hülle ihrer Mädchenzeit war und aus 
dem sich jetzt ihr Bauch hen.'ordrängt wie 
Blütenblätter aus einer Knospenkapsei. 
Der Kontrast ihrer .veißen Haut zu aem 
dunklen Haar, das in sanften Weilen otfen 
über ihren Rücken fließt, ist herzzerrei- 
ßend. Sie trägt ein Kleid aus Gold. Ich 
möchte alle Pracht autbieten, um sie nur 
ja nicht der .Ausweglosigkeit ihrer Situa- 
tion preisgeben zu müssen. Das Heiiig':%n- 
bild beschützt ihre Fruchtbarkeit. Sie 
.schwebt zwischen aen Mannern wie in 
einer Prozession. Die Fischer von St. 
Mane-de-la-Mer sind es, glaube ich, die 
ihre Madonna hoch über ihren Köpfen ins 
Meer iragen. am sie dort zu baden, damit 
sie die Wasser heiiigt, m denen sie :i- 
schen. Nocn Wocnen nach meiner Ruck- 
kehr aus .Amerika bleibt der (^danke m 
Esther Goidfarn mit äußerster Pracntent- 
faitung verbunden. .Aber eines Tages, ais 
die Madonna m die Weilen les .Vlittei- 
meers taucnt. bncnt hint*T lem netannv- 
slschen Bild die aaßlicne '.Vanrneit iier- 
vor: Esther betrxii len Duschraum, aer 
eine ge!:arnte Gaskammer ist. 

Je schöner icn le maie. um -o plasti- 
scher streiche ich die Grausamkeit aer- 
aus. der Esther Goiufarn .:um Opfer tiei. 
Icn Kenne sie nur vom Hörensagen, unu so 
behandele ich sie luch: wie ein Gerucnt. 
daß ich schamlos ausschmucKen kann. Sie 
.vird zum Spielbail meiner Phantasie, die 
hoch pokert, um aas .MaUonnenbiid an der 
Wahrheit vorbeizumogein. 

Ich unternehme einen letzten Versuch, 
mich zu retten: Estaer (ioiafarb liegt zu- 
sammengesunken aaf der .Seite, umgeben 
von emer Flut aus (M)ld and Rips, um- 
spielt von den W.-ilen hre^ Haars, .n de- 
nen Saphire schimmern, die blauen Kri- 
stalle des ZvKlon B .Mit aem .Namen les 
'"lirtes 'auchi der T )ii'nkopi luf ier Do.se 
auf. der vor der Wirkung des Inhalts war- 
nen loll. — E.>the^ Goldfarn Aira .:um 
nackten Leichnam In Ihrem Bauih ij,. 
hegraf't'ne üuifnung. Da.-> Hu.ir laiieu .»^ 
ihr vielleicht schon vorher abgeschnitten. 



(Illustration: FR/Graphisches Büro) 

Es wurde ja gesammelt und in Säcken 
nach Deutschland geschickt. Meine Mut- 
ter trug als Schwester einen Knoten, in 
den sie einen falschen Zopf einflocht. Sie 
hat sich niemals davon getrennt. Als sie 
mir ihn später zeigte, sagte ich sofort: 
,J)as ist Judenhaar."* Meine Mutter 
schnappte nach Luft und leugnete. 



VI 



Die Schule sorgte dafür, daß ich zwi- 
schen zwei Vergangenheiten aufwuchs: 
Einerseits hat mein Vater den Kneg ver- 
loren, andererseits haben die Deutschen 
versucht, die Juden überall in Europa zu 
ermorden. Der Geschichtsuntemcht mei- 
nes älteren Bruders berührte den Natio- 
nalsozialismus zuerst: die Nürnberger Ge- 
setze, den gelben Stern, Auschwitz. Im 
Geschichtsbuch die Menschen, die mit er- 
hobenen Händen auf der Straße zusam- 
mengetrieben wurden, die Geschorenen m 
den gestreiften Lumpen, die Haufen von 
ausgemergelten Körpern, die verwesen. 
Ihre Asche. 

Es waren Bilder, die den größten Scha- 
den annchteten. Sie gingen mit der Un- 
barmherzigkeit von Hagelschiägen aui 
mich nieder. Es war iie .Ausweglosigkeit 
dieser Bilder. Sie waren so stark, daß ich 
den Blick nicht abwenaen konnte, son- 
dern sie tief eindnngen lassen mußte. 

Diese Faszination . schlug bei aer Lektü- 
re von Eugen Kogons .Der SS-Staat" m 
meine Phantasie im. xn nteressierte 
mich nur rür die Passagen des Buches, iie 
die (jewalt der SS-Manner schilderte. Ich 
•eriiei der Grausamkeit, weil ich ihr 
nichts mtgegenzusetzen hatte. Sie war 
ias iinzige, was mich )eruhrte. — Im 
Laufe meiner Recne.'-cn-.- ntaec.Ktc 'cri. 
laß iile.>' Wissen, las ich über len Natio- 
•lalsoziaiismus. den Zweiten Weitkr:e.; 
una ien .loiocaust '.)esaij. aar n .meiner 
Einbilduni; -xistierte. Ich lebte m 3e- 
.vubL^ein *iner angeborenen [*l.\pertise. 
emer Vertrautheit mit der Matene a pno- 
n. he n WirkilcnKejt ^ur Scnutzhaltun- 
4en wari'n. .Man kann über ien Holocaust 
schweigen, mdem .Tian inausgesetzt über 
.hn -pnchi ^Lm kann :hn .,icn verschwei- 
gen, indem .man ias Interesse :ür hn 
ständig nahii. Ich ließ alles in dem bered- 
ten NeDel versinken, der auch aber ier 
t jeschichte meines Vaters liest 

Ich sitze zwischen den Vergangenheiten 
wie zwischen den Stuhlen Ich kann die 
Zusammenhange nicnt -ehen. w.-il .cn -i • 
nicht kenne. Der ganze .Nationalsozialis- 
mus bleibt ein Stuc.Kwerk, vernarmio.^.-nd 
und Jnvenänglicn :ur ias Bewußtsein. 
Das L.cht, iias die Bilder m diese Finster- 
lu^ schicken, ist .so grell, daß cn gebienuet 
bin. Das ist die Faszination !ch soure den 
.Notstand nur v.-nn xn m der Falle der 
(]rausamKeit .!apnele 



Eine Schauspielerin hat in der Kamp- 
nagelfabnk ein Ein-Personen-Stück über 
Ilse Koch entwickelt. Ich war nach der 
Vorstellung, die ich besuchte, zunächst 
sehr enttäuscht, weil der .Abend die Frage 
aussparte, wie Ilse Koch vor sich selbst ih- 
re Unschuld verteidigt hat. Mir blieb ein 
Rätsel, wie sie ein psychisches Gleichge- 
wicht in sich herstellen konnte, das es ihr 
erlaubte weiterzuleben, nachdem der äu- 
ßere Rahmen, der sie gehalten und getra- 
gen hatte, zu splittern begann. Ich hätte 
gerne einen Augenblick des Selbstzweifels 
gesehen. Ich hätte gerne etwas Menschli- 
ches an Ilse Koch entdeckt. Ich wehrte 
mich gegen einen befreundeten Regisseur, 
der mir sagte, es gäbe nichts Menschli- 
ches an diesen Leuten, er meinte die 
Nazis, zu entdecken. Er wies mich daraui 
hin. daß ich einem Wunsch nach Normali- 
tät folgte. 

Ich wollte Ilse Koch verstehen, wollte 
wissen, was sie trieb. So wie ich .Amon 
Goeth verstanaen hatte, als ich .,Schind- 
lers Liste"' sah: ein Wesen, das gegen 
seine eigene Menschlichkeit wüten muß. 
wenn es die Ordnung vergißt, mit der es 
sich identifiziert. .Auch die Koketterie mit 
dem Bösen ist ein Gesicht der Faszina- 
tion: Schindler spielt Schach mit dem Tod, 
wenn er mit Goeth um das Leben ..seiner'' 
Juden feilscht. Die Vorstellung, hinter aer 
Bestialität hocke bibbernd die unerlöste 
Seele, entzieht der Grausamkeit ihre 
Wirklichkeit. Sie verkommt zur Fassade 
des Eigentlichen. Eigentlich, heißt es 
dann, wäre Amon Goeth ein Mensch ge- 
wesen. Und die Frage muß dann lauten: 
Was bringt einen Menschen dazu, so zu 
handeln? 

Claude Lanzmann geht so weit, von der 
Obszönität des Verständnisses zu spre- 
chen. Jeder Versuch, eine Erklärung für 
den Tod von 6000000 Juden zu tinden. 
setzt Identifikation voraus — mit den Tä- 
tern. Lanzmanns Arbeit basiert auf iden- 
tifikatorischer Abstinenz. Er beschreibt, 
die Blindheit seiner Weigerung zu verste- 
hen als Klarsicht — als die einzige Mög- 
lichkeit, sich nicht von einer Realität ab- 
zuwenden, deren Anblick die Sinne blen- 
det. 

Wenn ich mich entschließe, die Grau- 
samkeit anzuerkennen, gegen die meine 
Phantasie arbeite'., um die verlorene 
Esther Goldfarb zu retten, wenn ich sie 
als das mir nicht Verständliche akzeptie- 
re, kann ich meiner Phantasie erlauben, 
die Richtung zu wechseln; dann bewege 
ich mich auf Ilse Koch zu. 

Ilse Koch, die Frau des Kommandanten 
von Buchenwald, heißt es, hat die Täto- 
wierungen der Häftlinge des Lagers ihres 
Gatten gesammelt. Sie muß sie zunächst 
aus der Haut ihrer Opfer herausschnei- 
den lassen haben. Daran, daß sie sich 
nicht die Mühe machte, sie abzeichnen zu 
lassen, kann man ablesen, daß es Ilse 
Koch um Besitz ging. Sie hätte sie auch 
abfotografieren können, aber das hätte 
eine Distanziertheit vom Gregenstand ih- 
rer Begierde vorausgesetzt, die sie nicht 
gehabt haben kann. 

Ich weiß nicht, ob die Menschen, denen 
sie Hautstücke abziehen ließ, vorher getö- 
tet wurden. Eher vermute ich, man hat 
sie an den Folgen der Sepsis jämmerlich 
zugrunde gehen lassen. Wahrscheinlich 
hat Ilse Koch darüber nicht mehr nachge- 
dacht als der Insektenforscher, der eine 
Nadel durch den Rumpf eines Schmetter- 
lings stoßt, über die Agonie des Insekts. 

Dabei lallt mir auf. daß ich keine .Ah- 
nung habe, wie der Insektenforscher lm- 
gentlich seine (3bjekte präpanert. damit 
sie sich in seinen Glasvitrinen erhalten 
und auch die schonen Firnen nicht verlie- 
ren. Welche Wege der Haitbarmacnuni^ 
konnte Ilse Koch gewählt haben.' Wer :iat 
ihr die Haute gegernt .' 

Während der Insektenforscner aem 
Prachtexemplar -Mnes -».xotischen Falters. 
den er begehrt, m die Tiefen des Unvaids 
am .Amazonas roii,a and sich als Fanger 
noch wahnt. wo er langst schon Gefange- 
ner wurde, bleibt Ilse Koch über aiese 
Dialektik "rnaoen. "^ie verliert sich nicht, 
wahrend ^le n Besitz nimmt. Sie tracntet 
aicnt nacn fremder Haut, sondern r-eitei 
die eigene. Sie hat -icheriich niemals dar- 
über nachiTodacht. daß die Bilder, .nacn 
denen -.le jagte, an lebendigen .Menschen 
fesigew.ichsen waren. — ..Heute i^nort 
uns Deut.-ichiand. und .morgen iie ganze 
W.*!t ■ - .^le -oll einmal einen Hattling 
vor einer .\uspeitscnung oewahrt iiaoen. 
weil .iir iie Tätowierung auf -einem Ruk- 
ken geliel. ..Bindet ihn los. Er genort mir " 
Rettung bedeutet Tod. Gnade ist (»rau- 
>amkeit. .So lautet die perverse DialeKtik 
der Ilse Koch. 

Wahrend ier In.sektenfor^cher irgend- 
wann seinen Irrtum erkennt und m den 
Tiefen des l'p.valds im .Amazonas in sei- 
ner Verzweillung und Verlorenheit zu- 
grunde 'eht. hat ll.se Koch bia zuletzt 
nicht verstellen wt)ilen. daß sie sich ver- 
laufen hatte, (irausamkeit erfordert Be- 
herrschung Ilse Koch hat -ich keinem .\u 
genblick vergessen, sie konnte es gar 



Selbstmord besiegelt die verkehrte Welt 
der Kochschen Perversion endgültig. 

Ich erkenne nicht Ilse Koch, sondern ih- 
re Grausamkeit an. Wenn ich mich nicht 
^egen sie wetire, spricht auch nichts für 
sie. Ebensowenig, wie es in ihrer Samm- 
lung etwas zu sehen gäbe, gibt es ein 
menschliches Rätsel zu lösen, wenn es um 
Ilse Koch geht. Ihre Grausamkeit ist kei- 
ne Legende, sie ist so schrecklich, daß sie 
die Phantasie stets übertrifft. 

Menschen, die das KZ Plaszow überlebt 
haben, erzählen genau das über Amon 
Goeth. was Spielbergs Film neoen allem 
identifikatorischen Kitsch auch zeigt: Sie 
beschreiben Goeths unberechenbare 
Grausamkeit. Allerdings standen sie 
nicht wie die Zuschauer neben ihm. wenn 
er oben auf semer Veranda das Gewehr 
anlegte, sondern waren seine Zielschei- 
ben. Sie sind durch die desintegrierende 
Erfahrung semer Grausamkeit gegangen. 
Sie können sich nicht entziehen. Plaszow 
bleibt für sie ein realer Ort, der sie ein- 
holt, egal wie weit sie sich von ihm fort 



:raumen. 



VII 



nicht. Sie hat ich schii-'JIich m Bew-iiit 
sein ihrer 1 'n.schuld aufgehängt. Ihr 



Bessie K. hat ihren Sohn im Getto zur 
Wpjt gebracht. Bei einer Selektion hat sie 
mn in ein Bündel mit Kleidungsstücken 
gewickelt und anter ihrem Mantel ver- 
steckt. Als ihr Kind in der Enge zu quen- 
gein begann, nef der deutsche Otfizier sie 
zurück und verlangte, sie solle ihm das 
Bündel zeigen. Sie hat -ich ihr Leben lang 
nicht erklären können, was sie bewog, ih- 
ren Sohn auszuliefern. Sie mußte vor sich 
selbst und anderen leugnen, daß es dieses 
kleine Kind jemals gegeben hat. 

.3ut if I look back I don't think that I 
had anybody with me. I was alone. Within 
myself. * Und seit dieser Zeit bin ich, glau- 
be ich, allein gewesen. Mein ganzes Leben 
lang. Ich glaube, für mich .selbst war ich 
gestorben. Ich war tot, und icn wollte 
nichts hören, ich wollte nichts wissen, ich 
wollte nicht darüber sprechen, und ich 
wollte mir selbst nicht eingestehen, daß 
mir das passiert ist. — Später, als ich 
nach Stutthof kam, traf ich die Ärztin 
wieder, die mich im Getto operiert hatte. 
Ais sie mich sah. freute sie sich sehr und 

sagte sofort: Wo ist das Baby? Was ist aus 
dem Baby geworden.' L'nd ich sagte: Wel- 
ches Baby.' — I said to the Doctor: What 
baby.'' I diiin t imve a baby. — Thac'^s wliac 
itdidtome."' 

Das einzige Bild, das ich von Bessie K. 
habe, ist ihr Porträt. Das ist alles, was die 
Video-Interviews im Fortunoff Video Ar- 
chive zulassen. Die Kamera nimmt die 
Menschen, die ihre Erinnerungen an den 
Holocaust erzählen, im Brustbild auf Sie 
vermeidet den Hautkontakt. Sie ist nie- 
mals diebisch, zoomt sich nur selten an 
ein Gesicht heran. Sie bleibt ebenso neu- 
tral wie die beiden Interviewer, die den 
Überlebenden Gehör schenken. Ihre emo- 
tionale Präsenz ist während der Auftiah- 
me Wichtig, weil sie den Ennnerungspro- 
zeß ermöglicht. In dem fertigen Band 
kommen sie nur als Stimmen aus dem Off 
vor. So bleibt der Stuhl gegenüber Bessie 
K. und Ludwig H. frei für den Zuhörer. 
Dort sitze nun ich. 

Strenggenommen bin ich trotz des Me- 
diums keine Zuschauenn, denn ich beob- 
acnte einzig den Vorgang des Erzählens. 
Das. wovon die Rede ist. spielt sich nicht 
vor meinen Augen ab. aber auch nicht in 
meinem Kopf Die Geschichte, die ich bo- 
re, hat ein Gesicht: Ich habe em Gegen- 
über, mit dem ich sie identifizieren kann. 
Ich befinde mich endlich in der Konstella- 
tion eines Dialogs, wenn er auch nicht 
statttindet. Die Überlebenden schweben 
vor meinem (}esicht. Sie sprechen zu mir. 
noch ihr Schweigen ist Mitteilung an 
mich. Meine Erwiderung kann sie nicht 
berühren. Sie werden weiter :hre Ennne- 
runsren vor mir ausbreiten, selbst wenn 
.meine Phantasie -ie noch so gerne authal- 
:en mochte. Ich kann mir ihre Worte nicht 
zurechtlegen. Ich konnte nur den Vide«)re- 
corder aostellen und das Band zuruckspu- 

en. 



MII 

-Ais mein Vater ui;er aie Guterwagen la- 
bten, m aenen die Russen ihn aus der Ge- 
.anijenschart nach Deutschland zuruck- 
'.ran^portiert nar)en — sie enthielten 
^tockbetten unu einen Toiiettenivubei. der 
jeim lagnchtn H.ilten des Zuges geleert 
werüen .konnte, vinrend aich die Männer 
die Beine vertr..: •:; — fallt mir em. daß 
'JarTit W. in :hrem InterMew im For 
tunoit Video Archive von einem Transport 
zwischen Ravensoruck und Bergen-Bei- 
sen erzählt: Bei klirrender Kalte wurden 
die Frauen in olTene Waggons verladen. 
Viele hatten kleine Kinder und Babys, die 
sie m Lumpen wickelten, um sie nur ir- 
gendwie vor dem Frost zu -.chutzen. .Als 
der Zug hielt, kam das Kommando, daß 
iie Mutter mit ien Kindern aussteigt n 
sollten. Sie legten die ertVormen Kinder 
IUI Mnen Haufen in den Schnee, ehe sie 
Welter nach Bergen- BeLsen fuhren — Ich 
frage meinen Vater, ob er denn nicht 
v«-»:*> :nter welchen Bedm-.ning'^n v.r die 
Juüen deportien naüen. 



Fuldaer Zeitung 
Hünfelder Zeitung 



1 fl Donnerstag, 5. Dezember 1996 

A. O Fuldaer Zeitung Nummer 284 



Region 



Lettischer Holocaust-Forscher Vestermanis im Jüdischen Kulturzentrum 



Namen für Namenlose 



Fulda (iu) 
Nicht den Tätern, sondern den 
Opfern galt ein Vortrag des letti- 
chen Holocaust-Forschers Mar- 
gers Vestermanis im vollbesetz- 
ten Vortragssaal des Jüdischen 
Kulturzentrums. 

Eingeladen vom Fachbereich 
Sozialwesen der Fachhochschule 
Fulda und der Jüdischen Gemein- 
de, referierte innerhalb einer Vor- 
tragsreihe durch Deutschland der 
Überlebende des Rigaer Ghettos 
über das Thema „Der Holocaust 
als Mentalitätsgeschichte". • 

„Die Holocaust-FcM^chung 
weiß fast alles, doch wo bleiben 
die Opfer?" provozierte der Refe- 
rent zu Beginn seines Referates, 
um danach sein Anliegen und sei- 
ne Absicht darzustellen, nämlich 
den „ausgelöschten Menschen, 
den Namenlosen wieder einen 
Namen zu geben". 

Das sei nötig, weil in der unter- 
gegangenen UdSSR die Judenver- 
folgung tabu gewesen sei, wes- 
halb es auf den Massengräbern 
nur Hinweise auf ermordete 
„friedliebende Sowjetbürger" ge- 
geben habe. Unter den neuen po- 
litischen Verhältnissen, so Vester- 
manis, „kann man auch den bis- 
her vergessenen Juden wieder ei- 



ne Stimme geben". Diesem Ziel 
diene auch das von ihm geleitete 
Dokumentationszentrum „Die 
Juden in Lettland", für das er mit 
dem Erlös seiner Vortragsreise ei- 
nen wissenschaftlichen Mitarbei- 
ter zur Auswertung der von den 
Opfern hinterlassenen Dokumen- 
te einstellen wolle. Vestermanis 
ging nach dem Einspielen eines 
Videos zur Einstimmung auf sein 
Thema besonders auf die Gedich- 
te eines 20jährigen lettischen Ju- 
den ein und zitierte aus dem Ta- 
gebuch einer jüdischen Lettin, um 
damit Eindrücke von der Art des 
zur Erforschung vorliegenden 
Materials zu vermitteln. 

Auch seien nun amiliche Doku- 
mente aus sowjetischen Archiven 
zugänglich ge-worden, die ebenso 
ausgewertet würden wie die akri- 
bischen Aufzeichnungen deut- 
scher Augenzeugen und Täter, 
aus denen hervorgehe, daß die 
deutschen Juden in deutscher 
Sprache Hilfe gerufen hgtten, 
„weil sie auch im Angesicht des 
Todes noch immer an eine deut- 
sche Ordnung glaubten". 

Man werfe den deutschen Ju- 
den mitunter vor, sich bis zuletzt 
an Befehle gehalten zu haben, 
weshaib sie als „vertrauenswür- 
dig" gegolten hätten. Viele Juden 



hätten Stolz gezeigt, hätten nicht 
„Drecksjuden" sein wollen, wäh- 
rend andere sich an den brennen- 
den Scheiterhaufen gewärmt hät- 
ten. Ihm selbst gehe es niemals 
um eine allgemeine Beschuldi- 
gung eines Volkes. Daniel Gold- 
hagen irre, so der Zeitzeuge zu 
dem pauschalen Schuldvorwurf 
eines aktuellen Autors an die 
Deutschen, denn „eine allgemei- 
ne Verteufelung ist nicht halt- 
bar". In diesem Zusammenhang 
sprach der Referent „von priva- 
ten Initiativen und Phantasien bei 
der Unterdrückung und Vernich- 
tung der Juden, eine Einschät- 
zung, die er an der unterschiedli- 
chen Handhabung der Juden- 
kennzeichnung in Lettland ein- 
leuchtend nachwies und mit der 
Bemerkung unterstrich: „Grausig 
war dieser Beamteneifer." 

Vor Beginn des Vortrags hatte 
Linde Weiland, die Vorsitzende 
der Jüdischen Gemeinde, sich in 
ihrer Begrüßung erfreut gezeigt 
über die große Zuhörerresonanz, 
während Professor Dr. Peter Kra- 
hulec besonders die vielen Stu- 
dierenden der FH erwähnte« Kra- 
hulec dankte Fuldas Oberbürger- 
meister Dr. Wolfgang Hamberger 
tür seine persönliche Spende und 
zeitweise Anwesenheit. 



Samstag, 7. Dezember 1996 
Nummer 286 



w^mmrmfrm 



Das grenzt an 
debile Perfidie 

Betrifft: Artikel „Namen für Na- 
menlose" (FZ vom 5. Dezember, 
Seite 16). 

Die akribischen Aufzeichnun- 
gen deutscher Augenzeugen und 
Tiilcr (der Jiiilemnorde), dnß die 
deutschen Juden in deutscher 
Sprache „Hilfe" gerufen hätten, 
„weil sie auch im Angesicht des 
Todes noch immer an eine deut- 
sche Ordnung glaubten", grenzen 
- situativ - an debile Perfidie: In 
welcher anderen Sprache als der 
ererbten Muttersprache hätten sie 
denn sonst in höchster Todesangst 
schreien sollen? 

Und was hat die systematische 
Ermordung unschuldiger ziviler 
Menschen mit „deutscher Ord- 
nung" zu tun? Hier geraten Ratio 
und Irrationalismus arg durchein- 
ander. 

Wenn die Holocaust-Forschung 
„fast alles weiß", warum gestand 
dann vor kurzem der Zentralrats- 

land, Ignatz Bubis, daß „aus mei- 
ner Sicht die Geschehnisse nicht 
erklärbar sind" und es „müßig" 
sei, „nach Erklärungen zu su- 
chen"? 

„Tragt ihn mit Stolz, den gelben 
Fleck!", ermutigte die ;, Jüdische 
Rundschau" ihre Leserinnen und 
Leser schon am 1. April 1933 
(„Boykottag"). Um wie vieles 
schwerer mußte dies angesichts 
Erschießungskommandos und 
Gaskammern sein? 

Weder allgemeine „Verteufe- 
lung" nocij „Verklärung" histori- 
scher Tatsachen, sondern nur die 
objektive Erforschung der Fak- 
ten, Ziele und Motive können uns 
d«r „Wahrheit" näherbringen. 
Hierzu hat die deutsche Histo- 
riographie Hervorragendes gelei- 
stet. 

Heinz-Jürgen Hoppe 
Von-Schildeck-Straße 10a 
36043 Fulda 



"Frankfurter Rundschau" 
Samstag, 22. Februar 1997, Nr. 45 • S/R/D 



Dokumentation 



Schaler Beigeschmack 

Für die Dokumentation zum Holocaust- 
Gedenktag Wo die Hölle den Zweitwohn- 
sitz hatte, fährt heute der Bus stündlich 
(FR vom 27. 1. 1997) danke ich. Ich war 
mehr als enttäuscht, daß unser öfTentlich- 
rechtliches Fernsehen für die Übertra- 
gung der Bundestagssitzung am 27. Ja- 
nuar keine Notwendigkeit sah. Dafür hät- 
te auch die Präsidentin des Bundestage."^ 
sorgen müssen. So aber bekamen die mit 
viel Pathos vorgetragenen Reden, die aus- 
zugsweise in der Presse nachzulesen sind, 
einen schalen Beigeschmack. Sie wären 
hesser nicht gehalten worden. Gerade an 
einem solchen Gedenktag sollten wir alle 
miteinbezogen werden, dies gerade in 
pinpr Zeit, in der der Rrchtsrxtremismus 
zunehmend zu schlimmeren als nur dem- 
agogischen Mitteln greift. 

Ruth Baicke, Brühl 

"Frankfurter Rundschau" 
Nr. 44, 21. Februar 1997 



Aus dem Inland 



Meiischenveraclituiig 

Zu dem Bericht Bedauern für KZ-Häft- 
linge findet der Herr Bürgermeister fehl 
am Platz (FR vom 8. 2. 1997): Daß der 
CSU-Bürgermeister von Eurasburg ein 
Mahnmal für Opfer aus dem früheren 
Konzentrationslager Dachau mit der Be- 
gründung abgelehnt hat, dort habe es 
„Verbrecher" gegeben und es in Euras- 
burg eben keinen Aufschrei gegen diese 
Ungeheuerlichkeit gibt, macht auf er- 
schreckende Weise deutlich, welche zu- 
tiefst menschenverachtenden Denkstruk- 
turen hierzulande und sicherlich nicht 
nur in Eurasburg auch über fünfzig Jahre 
nach der Befreiung vom Faschismus oft 
noch vorherrschen. 

Wenn der Eurasburger Gemeinderat 
keinen Pfennig für die Opfer des „Todes- 
marsches" von Dachau zur Verfügung 
stellen will und damit die von den NS- 
Schergen Gequälten und Ermordeten 
nochmals demütigt, dann ist das auch das 
Ergebnis davon, daß es in dieser Republik 
bis zum heutigen Tage weitgehendst ver- 
säumt wurde, eine ehrliche, konsequente 
und engagierte Aufarbeitung des deut- 
schen Faschismus zu bewerkstelligen. 
Der Geist von Eurasburg ist in diesem 

T^and lpid*»r Irpjn Flin-rplfpH 

Manfred Kirsch, Neuwied 



"Frankfurter Rundschau" 



Freie ausspräche 



Nr. 38, 14. Februar 1997 



Der Gedenktag 



Feuilleton 



Tlieina freiwillig gewählt 

Zu dem Bericht Das abstrakte „Nie wie- 
der" hat Michael gründlich satt 
(FR vom 25. 1. 1997): 

Was tut ein Journalist, dem aufgetra- 
gen ist, über den 27. Januar zu berichten? 
1945 wurde an diesem Tag das KZ Ausch- 
witz durch die Rote Armee befreit. 
Auf in die nächste Schule! Dort findet sich 
schon was, denn: Schüler sind geschichts- 
los! Sie wollen nichts mit den Verbrechen 
ihrer Großeltern zu tun haben, interessie- 
ren sich nicht für das Leid, das andere 
Menschen im Namen ihrer Nation erfah- 
ren mußten, bekennen sich nicht zu ihrer 
Geschichte. 

In keiner Weise wird der Artikel dem 
Ernst dieses Themas gerecht. 
Wir, der Französischkurs der Freiherr- 
vom-Stein-Schule, sind vermutlich die 
einzige Lerngruppe in Frankfurt, die dem 
27. Januar eine ganze Unterrichtsreihe 
gewidmet hat. 

Wir sind freiwillig auf das Thema einge- 
gangen, also keineswegs demotiviert, wie 
in dem Bericht dargestellt. Wir haben 
dem Journalisten freiwillig Zugang zum 
Unterricht gewährt, betrachten es daher 
als schlechten Stil, die Gastrolle zu einem 
teilweise abschätzigen Kommentar zu 
nutzen. Einzelne Zitate sind aus dem 
Kontext gerissen oder durch Suggestivfra- 
gen herbeigeführt. Michael hat das „ab- 
strakte ,Nie wieder' keineswegs „gründ- 
lich satt". 

Michael Fidora für den 
Französischkurs der Stufe 11 (Ollig), 

Freiherr-vom-Stein-Schule, Frankfurt/M. 



Was dazu beiträgt, daß das „Holocaust-Gedenken" Tradition wird 



Zu Times mager — Gedenktag in der FR 
vom 28. 1. 1997: Die Initiative Bundes- 
präsident Roman Herzogs, die Wieder- 
kehr des Tages der Befreiung überleben- 
der Häftlinge des KZ Auschwitz von An- 
fang 1945 zum „Holocaust-Gedenken" zu 
machen, verdient fortgesetzte öffentliche 
Diskussion. Es müßte Tradition werden, 
sich dieses Tages zu entsinnen. 

Wenn im Sinne Wolfram Schuttes Tra- 
dition eine Verfallsform kollektiven Erin- 
nerns ist, wird klar, warum das schwierig 
ist. Kollektives Erinnern setzt kollektives 
Erleben voraus. Außerdem wird nicht al- 
les, was kollektiv erlebt wurde, zur kollek- 
tiven Erinnerung. 

Die Befreiung von Auschwitz sowie die 



anderer KZs hat die Allgemeinheit in 
Deutschland nicht miterlebt, im Chaos 
der letzten Kriegsmonate vielfach nicht 
einmal zur Kenntnis genommen. 

Der Verfasser dieser Zeilen, Jahrgang 
1920, ist aber überzeugt, daß jeder, der 
während der Hitler-Jahre in Deutschland 
oder den im Krieg besetzten Gebieten ge- 
wesen ist, mindestens einmal, wenn nicht 
öfters, unwillkürlich Zeuge davon gewor- 
den ist, daß in aller Öffentlichkeit Juden, 
Zigeuner, Opponenten, Kriegsgegner be- 
spuckt, mißhandelt und abgeführt wur- 
den. Millionen haben es gesehen, müssen 
es gesehen haben! Das war ein kollektives 
Erleben — manchmal von einer Minder- 
heit begrüßt, meist von der Mehrheit be- 



troffen und wie gelähmt hingenommen — 
entsprechend aus dem Erinnern ver- 
drängt. 

Daß solche Szenen Vorspiel zum KZ wa- 
ren, wußte die Allgemeinheit. Nicht aber, 
daß die meisten Opfer fabrikmäßig ermor- 
det wurden. Das erfuhr sie erst nach 
Kriegsende. Würde jeder der Überleben- 
den jener Jahre nach kritischem Nach 
denken wie der Unterzeichner an dieser 
oder anderer Stelle erklären: „Ich habe 
Unrecht gesehen"!, diente das kollektivem 
Erinnern. Es trüge dazu bei, daß das „Ho- 
locaust-Gedenken" Tradition wird und 
daß die Opfer nicht vergessen werden. 

Ernst A.Moehlau, 
Ondara/Spanien 



Seite 10 Frankfurter Rundschau 



D/R/S • Montag. 27. Januar 1997, Nr. 22 



Seite 8 Frankfurter Rundsctiau 



Dienstag, 28. Januar 1997, Nr. 23 • S/R/D 



Stein des Anstoßes 

Zu 1 heoiie und Praxis des Wiener Holocaust-Denkmals 

Von Paul KriiiKorad man vor einij?on Jahrzehnten eine Les- 



VVo die Praxis in der Sackgasse endet, 
sucht man Hilfe in der Theorie. Die Er- 
riclitung des im Vorjahr beschlossenen 
Wiener Holocaust-Denkmals ist ins Stok- 
ken geraten, und so holt man Theoretiker 
aus Deutschland. Gemeinsam haben das 
Jüdische Museum Wien und das Institut 
für die Wissenschaß vom Menscht n eine 
Diskussionsreihe unter dem Titel „Stein 
des Anstoßes. Denkmäler-Mahnmale- 
Schoa-Erinnerung" durchgeführt. Daß 
man nicht eineri Repräsentanten der 
österreichischen Öffentlichkeit, scmdern 
die deutsche Botschaflerin in Wien, Ursu- 
la Seiler-Albring, eingeladen hat, die Ver- 
anstaltung zu eröffnen, entbehrt nicht der 
Absurdität — als wäre die Mahnmal-Pro- 
blematik ein Import aus Deutschlan d. 

Die Diskussion bestritten vor allem 
Experten aus der Bundesrepublik: Julius 
H. Schoeps vom Mendelssohn-Zentrum 
Potsdam, Edna Brocke von der Altei Syn- 
agoge Essen, Hanno Loewy vom Frank- 
furter Fritz-Bauer-Institut, Reinhardt Ko- 
selleck von der Universität Bielefeld, der 
Künstler Jochen Gerz aus Hamburg, dazu 
der österreichische Friedensforscher 
Thomas Macho (derzeit Berlin) und Isolde 
Charim vom Institut für die Wissen- 
schaften vom Menschen. Die Protagoni- 
sten des Wiener Mahnmal-Dramas linge- 
gen waren nicht geladen. 

Zur Erinnerung: Dem Bildhauer Alfred 
Hrdlicka gelang es nach mehrjähriger 
Vorbereitung, seinen Entwurf für Wien zu 
realisieren, als Gruppe von drei Mfirmor- 
Skulpturen auf einem Platz zwischen 
Oper und Albertina. An den Wiener Ter- 
ror soJJ eine knieende Figur erinnern, die 
das Pflaster wäscht — bekanntlicl] wur- 
den die Wiener Juden gezwungen, wie 
auch Carl Zuckmayer in seinen Memoiren 
berichtet, aufs Pflaster das Wort „Jude" 
zu malen und es dann mit einer Zahnbür- 
ste wieder wegzuschrubben. Gegen Hrd- 
lickas drastisch-pathetisches Mahnmal 
wurde eine Kampagne geführt, die noch 
immer virulent ist. Der „straßenwaschen- 
de Jude", später mit einem Stachel draht 
versehen, weil sich Passanten gern auf 
seinem Rücken niederließen, mißfiel von 
Anfang an insbesondere Simon Wiesen- 
thal. Die Kritik an der Ästhetik des 
Mahnmals ging von der Behauptung aus, 
die Judenmorde ließen sich nicht reali- 
stisch darstellen. Als Hrdlicka polemisch 
überspitzt Gysi und Heym gegen Bier- 
manns Attacken in Schutz nahm, warf 
man ihm nicht nur in Österreich Aitise- 
mitismus vor. Simon Wiesenthal nahm 
Hrdlickas Polemik zum Anlaß für einen 
weiteren Vorstoß: Es müsse auch in Wien 
ein spezifisches Holocaust-Mahnmel ge- 
ben, Hrdlickas Antifa-Monument werde 
der Aufgabe, der Shoa-Opfer zu gede iken, 
nicht gerecht. 

Eilig trommelte man in Wien eine Jury 
unter dem Vorsitz des Star-Architokten 
Hans Hollein zusammen, um unter den 
Entwürfen der zum Wettbewerb eingela- 
denen Künstler den geeignetsten ajszu- 
suchen. Als Standort gab man den Juden- 
platz vor, einen kleinen Platz im Stadt- 
zentrum mit etlichen denkmalgeschütz- 
tcn Häusern. In der Mitte des Platzes hat 



sing-Statue aufgestellt, wohl nicht ohne 
Blick auf die Antisemitismus-Kritik des 
deutschen Humanisten. Unter den wie er- 
wartet mehr oder minder der concept art- 
Ästhetik verpflichteten Entwürfen setzte 
die Jury das Projekt der jungen engli- 
schen Künstlerin Rachel Whiteread auf 
Platz eins. Der graue Betonwürfel mit 
einem Buchrücken-Muster an der Außen- 
seite, innen nicht begehbar, sollte rasch 
gebaut werden. 

Die archäologische Untersuchung des 
Judenplatzes, die man auf Anregung Hol- 
leins durchführte, stieß, wie eigentlich 
vorauszusehen war, ;iuf die Reste der 
Synagoge, die hier im 13. Jahrhundert 
von der blühenden Wiener jüdischen Ge- 
meinde errichtet worden war. Sie ging an- 
läßlich der Wiener „geserah" in Flammen 
auf, einem „Holocaust", den Herzog Al- 
brecht V. anordnete. 

Die Funde der Ausgrabung legten es 
nahe, sie öffentlich zugänglich zu machen. 
Doch einem Schauraum würde Rachel 
Whitereads nach außen gestülpte Biblio- 
thek im Wege stehen. Die Künstlerin 
wehrt sich gegen einen anderen Standort. 
Die Israelitische Kultusgemeinde, der die 
Stadt Wien die Entsc}ieidung, ob gebaut 
werden solle, überlassen wollte, lehnte 
das Ansinnen mit den Worten ab: Nicht 
die jüdische Gemeinschaft habe sich zu 
den Opfern der Shoa zu bekennen. Und 
wiederum haben sich die Kritiker gegen 
Whitereads Block formiert, dieses Mal 
vom entgegengesetzten Standpunkt: Der 
Block sei als Mahnmal zu abstrakt. Nicht 
die vagen Assoziation(?n, die von White- 
reads Entwurf womöglich ausgelöst wer- 
den, sondern die Inschrift allein erinnert 
an die Opfer. Ihr Text nennt die Zahl der 
Wiener Juden, die in deutschen Konzen- 
trationslagern umgebracht wurden. Das 
mobilisiert nur bei jenen eine Erinnerung, 
denen die Umstände des Holocaust be- 
reits bekannt sind. 

Das soziologische und philosophische 
Umfeld der Mahnmal-Problematik hat die 
Wiener Diskussion gründlich auft)ereitet, 
etwa mit Thomas Machos Untersuchung 
der gesellschaftlichen Funktionen des 
Vergessens und des Erinnerns, mit Isolde 
Charims Beitrag über die Arbeit der Eri- 
nenrung. Charim hatte schon zuvor dar- 
auf hingewiesen, daß Shoa-Mahnmale 
fast automatisch auch Entlastung bedeu- 
ten, da man mit ihnen die Erinnerungsar- 
beit scheinbar abschließen könne. 

Eines freilich macht den Wiener Kon- 
flikt über alle Schuld Zuweisungen und 
den spezifisch österreichischen Anteil am 
Judenmord hinaus bed.?nklich: Anläßlich 
des Hrdlicka-Mahnmals und des in seiner 
Realisierung noch ungewissen Projekts 
Whitereads bildet sich eine ästhetische 
Front, wo einerseits Positionen des Kalten 
Krieges wiederholt werden (die wütenden 
Attacken gegen Hrdlickas „Realismus") 
und sich andererseits das „gesunde Volks- 
empfinden" zu Wort meldet (in den Attak- 
ken gegen die „abstrakte" concept art 
Whitereads). So wird klargestellt, was al- 
les Österreich nach dem Krieg vernach- 
lässigt hat: Die Aufarbeitung des eigenen 
Anteils am deutschen Vcilkermord und die 
Lektionen der Moderne. 



Times mager 






Gedenktag 



Von Wolfram Schütte 

„Warum ist es in Deutschland so 
schwierig, ja geradezu peinlich, einen Ge- 
denktag für die Opfer des Nationalssozia- 
lismus zu etablieren?" — fragte Eva-Eli- 
sabeth Fischer gestern in einem beden- 
kenswerten Aufsatz im Feuilleton der 
Süddeutschen Zeitung. Am Ende ihrer 
Überlegungen zu dem vor 2 Jahren, an- 
läßlich der 50. Wiederkehr der Befreiung 
von Auschwitz, von Bundespräsident 
Roman Herzog eingeführten „Holocaust"- 
Gedenktag, kommt sie zu dem Schluß, 
daß dieser Tag schon bei seiner zweiten 
Wiederholung „weitgehend unbemerkt 
vorüberging. Das mag peinlich sein. Aber 
es ist auch ehrlich. Und noch ehrlicher 
wäre es, den Tag als besonderes Datum 
aus dem politischen Kalender zu strei- 
chen, weil er sich darin sowieso nicht ver- 
ankern läßt." 

In E.-E. Fischers Argumentation spielt 
— wie jetzt auch in den ästhetischen Dis- 
kussionen um das Holocaust-Denkmal in 
Berlin — das Paradox eine Rolle, das sich 
aus der Frage ergibt: „Wie soll man sich 
im Land der Mörder erinnern?" Sie 
schreibt: „Ein solcher Gedenktag, mit dem 
eine symbolische Pflicht erfüllt wird, lei- 
stet dem Vergessen ruhigen Gewissens- 
Vorschub." Wenn man die Praxis betrach- 
tet, fallt es schwer, ihr zu widersprechen. 

Jenseits solcher triftigen moralischen 
Argumente weist die Peinlichkeit eines 
(auch noch bloß halbherzig) „verordneten 
Gedenkens" auf ein Problem, das bislang 
meist nur von konservativer Seite poin- 
tiert wurde: die Absenz oder die Faden- 
scheinhaftigkeit heutiger symbolischer 
staatlicher Akte generell. 

Das Symbolische, als (pseudo-)sakraler 
Ausdruck einer gemeinsamen geistigen 
Intention — der Feier oder der Trauer, in 
jedem Fall aber des kollektiven Eingeden- 
kens — bezieht seine Legitimation aus 
Grundüberzeugungen, die wenigstens als 
Tradition (dieser Verfallsform von kollek- 
tiver Erinnerung), so verblaßt auch im- 
mer, wie Weihnachten und Ostern in 
einer religionsneutralen Staatsverfas- 
sung, noch vorhanden sein muß. 

Alle Versuche von Staats wegen, in 
einer liberalen Demokratie heute Gedenk- 
tage auf dem Verordnungswege zu „eta- 
blieren" (ohne sie totalitär mit symboli- 
schen Formen ausgestalten zu können), 
tragen den Keim des Scheiterns in sich. 
Ja, das Symbolische selbst in einer demo- 
kratischen Ordnung — noch dazu, wie bei 
uns, mit starken zentrifugalen Kräften 
des Föderalen — verweist auf ein Uniso- 
no, das der wechselnden Balance der In- 
teressen zuwider ist. Unser „Pragmatis- 
mus", der anders als im zentralistischen 
Frankreich und den europäischen konsti- 
tutionellen Demokratien keine großen 
symbolischen Formen kennt, hat sie bis- 
lang auch aus gutem Grund gemieden. 
Darin drückt sich ein historisch bedingter 
Traditionsbruch aus: entschiedene Zivili- 
tät — als Antwort auf eine totalitäre Mili- 
tarisierung des bürgerlichen Lebens. 
Auch mag hier protestantisches Erbe der 
Innerlichkeit tiefer nachwirken als eine 
„katholische" Zeichensetzung. 

Was als symbolischer Akt des Gemein- 
wesens intendiert ist, wird zum bloßen 
symbolischen Ritus, dem sich bestenfalls 
die Symlwlträgerie ächzend, wo nicht 
scheinheilig unterziehen — von den Fern- 
sehkameras fixiert, zum feixenden Ver- 
gnügen oder dem desinteressierten Hin- 
schauen der übrigen Bevölkerung darge- 
boten. Das war in der Bundesrepublik am 
17. Juni so wie es am dafür eingetausch 
ten „Tag der deutschen Einheit" heute ist 
— nur daß die herbstliche Deutsche Ein- 
heit meist schlechteres Ferienwetter zur- 
folge hat als das vorsommerliche Gcnlen- 
ken der Deutschen Trennung. 



Dienstag, 25. Februar 1997, Nr. 47 S/R/D 



Die SEITE DREI 



Frankfurier Rundschau - 



Zeugnisse für den Rest der Menschheit 

Das Projekt Steven Spielbergs, zehntausendfach an die Slioah zu erinnern, steht im Wettlauf gegen die Zeil 



Von Inge Günther (Jeiiisalem) 

Die Geschichte Rachel Kuttners könnte 
ein Buch füllen. Und tatsächlich eines zu 
schreiben, ist ein Gedanke, der die 71jäh- 
rige nicht losläßt. „Je älter man wird, de- 
sto bewußter wird einem das", sagt sie 
und kramt in ihren Unterlagen, die sich 
im Laufe des Gesprächs auf dem Wohn- 
zimmertisch ihres Tel Aviver Apparte- 
ments aufgetürmt haben. Irgendwo muß 
es sein, das Zitat, das ihre selbstgesetzte 
Aufgabe, ja ihren Auftrag untenitreicht. 
Mit dem Finger f^rt sie über die gefun- 
dene Zeile. „Und sie soll und muß überle- 
ben, um erzählen zu können, wie es da- 
mals war..." 

Rachel Kuttner hat das unzählige Male 
getan. Hat sich immer wieder konfron- 
tiert mit jenen sechs Jahren, in denen sie 
alles verlor. Ihre Jugend, ihre F'amilie, 
eine ganze Welt. Jene sechs qualvollen 
Jahre, die begannnen, als die damals 
14jährige mit ihren Angehörigen i is Get- 
to verschafft wurde, und die nicht einfach 
endeten, als sie, 20jährig, am 6. Mai 1945 
aus der Hölle des Todesmarsches befreit 
wurde. Die Mutter und die jüngeren Ge- 
schwister waren in Auschwitz umgekom- 
men. Ihr Vater, erfuhr sie später erst, 
wurde wenige Tage vor Kriegserde auf 
dem Weg von Auschwitz nach Buchen- 
wald erschossen. 

Rachel Kuttner überlebte als einzige ih- 
rer Familie. Die Nazis hatten sie aussor- 
tiert, zur Zwangsaibeit im schie siechen 
Neustadt bestimmt. Von dort ging <?s nach 
Grünberg und im Januar 1945 auf einen 
750 Kilometer langen Todesmarsch. „Zu 
Beginn waren wir 3000 Mädchen", erin- 
nert sie sich, „zum Schluß noch 120." 

Über die Zeit dieses Martyriums zu 
sprechen, die Bilder einzelner Gescheh- 
nisse hervorzurufen, die sich in ihr Ge- 
dächtnis unauslöschlich eingebrannt ha- 
ben, ist Rachel Kuttner ein schmerzliches 
Bedürfnis. „Ich muß das alles rsuskot- 
zen", sagt sie. „Immer wieder." Tausende 
Mal hat sie die Szenen durchlebt, als sie 
sich in Fünferreihen nachts zum Schlafen 
in den Schnee legen mußten und tfigs vor 
Hunger und Entbehrung kaum aufrecht 
halten konnten. „Die Toten warf man auf 
die Fuhren und daneben die, die nicht 
mehr gehen konnten. Wenn ein Schuß 
fiel, dann liefen wir wieder, vor Schreck, 
wie die Schäfchen." Die Schreie eines 
Mädchens Wingen ihr im Ohr, das sich 
auf die tote Mutter warf Ein SS-Mann 
hatte sie wie ein Hund abgeknallt, weil 
sie nicht mehr weiter konnte. „,Erschießt 
mich auch', bat das Mädchen den Aufse- 
her, , den Gefallen werde ich dir nicht tun', 
erwiderte der. Nach einer Weile hatte es 
sich ein wenig beruhigt, als der SS-Mann 
sich näherte und meinte: ,Du wolltest 
doch erschossen werden.' Dann zog er 
seine Pistole und schoß ihr ins Genick." 

In Versform hat Rachel Kuttner ver- 
sucht, ihre Gefühle auszudrücken, meist 
in Jiddisch, ihrer Muttersprache; ihrer 

Tochter, ihrem Sohn hat sie die grausigen 
Erlebnisse ein ums andere Mal erzählt. 
„Andere wollten ihre Kinder schonen, ich 
habe von Anfang an nichts verschwi«jgen." 
Ob Rachel Kuttner ihr Buch je fertig- 
stellen wird, weiß sie selbst nicht genau. 
„Ich müßte mich irgendwo einschiießen, 
um alles aufzuschreiben, die Zeit läufl 
mir sonst davon." Daß zumindest ihr Be- 
richt als Augenzeugin des Holocaust der 
Nachwelt erhalten bleiben wird, ist gesi- 
chert. Vor einigen Wochen hat ein Video- 
team ihre Aussagen über mehrere Stun- 
den hinweg aufgenommen. Inzwischen ist 
das Filmmaterial eingeordnet im Visual 




Interviews gegen das Vergessen: Regisseur Spielberg (links) bei den Aufnahmen zu „Schindlers Liste" 



(Bild: UIP) 



History Archive, das Steven Spielbergs 
Stiftung der Survivors ofthe Shoah in Los 
Angeles gegründet hat. An die 25500 auf 
Video dokumentierte imd von Historikern 
ausgewertete Interviews in über 21 Spra- 
chen lagern bereits dort. Zeugnisse der 
Shoah, die Überlebende in aller Welt gaben. 

Die Idee dazu entstfind bei den Drehar- 
beiten zum Spielberg-Film „Schindlers 
Liste". Dessen bewegende Schlußszene 
zeigt eine mühsam ansteigende Prozes- 
sion älterer Frauen und Männer, die über- 
lebt haben. Und mit jodem einzelnen von 
ihnen, so hat es Regisseur Spielberg ein- 
mal ausgedrückt, sei eine Geschichte ver- 
bunden, die „zu wertvoll ist, um nur mir 
erzählt und nicht mit dem Rest der 
Menschheit geteilt zu v^erden". 

Da es sich um ein Spielberg-Projekt 
handelt, ist es zugleich das ehrgeizigste 
seiner Art. Das Archiv soll einmal so um- 
fassend sein wie kein anderes — die Yale- 
Universität besitzt 3000, die Yad-Vashem- 
Gedenkstätte in Jerusalem rund 10000 
Zeugenaufnahmen. Dazu ist geplant, fünf 
internationale Forschungsstätten online 
zu verknüpfen. Aber tcichnische Probleme 
sind das Geringste; fast 53 Jahre nach 
Kriegsende ist das Projekt ein Wettlauf 
gegen die Zeit. Die meisten der weltweit 
auf 325000 geschätzten Holocaust-Über- 
lebenden sind bereits über 70, 80 Jahre 
alt. Irgendwann, in nicht sehr ferner Zu- 
kunft, werden diese Zeitzeugen ausgestor- 
ben sein. „Solange es aber Überlebende 

gibt", sagt Michelle Kleinert, die Leiterin 
der israelischen Nied«jrla8sung des Pro- 
jektes, „werden wir weitermachen." Etwa 
150 Festangestellte und mehr als 3000 
Freiwillige arbeiten daran, ob in Amster- 
dam oder Warschau, Miami, Moskau oder 
eben Jerusalem. 

In Israel findet sich die Mehrzahl der 
Überlebenden, bis zu 200000 sollen es 
sein. Doch daß die Erfahrung des Holo- 
caust sich im kollektiven, staatlichen 
Selhstverständnis niedergeschlagen hat. 



half den einzelnen oft nur wenig. „Die 
meisten Überlebenden sind nach ihrer 
Ankunft gleich in den Unabhängigkeits- 
lu^eg gegangen, danach waren sie be- 
schäftigt mit dem Aufbau einer neuen 
Existenz", weiß Debbie Neufeld von der 
Koordinierungsstelle des Spielberg-Pro- 
jekts in Israel. „Sie haben sich nie die Zeit 
und die Kraft genommen, über die Ver- 
gangenheit zu reden und zu trauern." Mit 
dem Alter sind die Erinnerungen wieder 
stärker geworden. Viele fürchten oft auch, 
daß die Auschwitz-Leugnung überhand- 
nehme, wenn sie nicht Zeugnis geben. „Es 
ist sehr schwer, darüber zu sprechen, aber 
da wir überlebt haben, müssen wir", so 
gibt Debbie Neufeld das Motiv wieder, das 
„in jedem zweiten Satz" genannt werde. 
Es ist zugleich die Suche nach einem Ver- 
mächtnis, nach der Möglichkeit, den er- 
mordeten Eltern und Freunden, der un- 
tergegangenen Lebenswelt ein Denkmal 
zu setzen. 

Manche fühlen sich anschließend er- 
leichtert, andere leiden nach dem mehr- 
stündigen Interviewtermin oft wochen- 
lang an den aufgerissenen alten Wunden. 
Jedem der Interviewten wird anschlie- 
ßend die Telefonnummer von ,Amcha" in 
die Hand gedrückt, einer Hilfsorganisa- 
tion für die Überlebenden in Israel, die 
psychologische und soziale Unterstützung 
anbietet. Aber dem Trost sind Grenzen ge- 
setzt. Das Wissen darum gehört zu den 
Grundregeln, die den Interviewern wäh- 
rend einer viertägigen Schulung beige- 
bracht wird. „Wir müssen den Leuten die 
Zeit geben, um zu weinen", sagt Debbie 

Neufeld. „Und wir akzeptieren, daß man- 
che Dinge einfach zu schmerzhaft sind, 
um erzählt werden zu können. Aber wir 
dürfen nie sagen, daß wir verstehen, was 
sie durchgemacht haben. Denn niemand 
kann das Grauen verstehen, der es nicht 
selbst erlebt hat." 

Dabei ist schon das Zuhören, das Sich- 
einfühlen eine psychische Bela.stung. Kein 



Interviewteam — das aus jeweils einem 
Befrager und einem Kameramann besteht 
— soll daher mehr als zweimal pro Woche 
eingesetzt werden. Eine logistische Her- 
ausforderung, wie an den Wandplänen 
des Jerusalemer Büros abzulesen ist, die 
mit blauen, orangen, grünen Kärtchen ge- 
spickt sind. Schließlich gehen jedem 
Interview Vorgespräche voraus; histori- 
sche Quellen werden nachgeschlagen, Ma- 
terialien zusammengetragen. Wenn einer 
der Überlebenden von 1942 bis 1945 in 
Stutthof war, muß der Interviewer 
wissen, wie dort die Transporte und Se- 
lektionen organisiert waren. Noch schwie- 
riger ist es, wenn jemand in den Vernich- 
tungslagern in Treblinka oder Majdanek 
war. Schon deshalb, erklärt Chagid Adler, 
„weil wir darüber viel zu wenig wissen. Es 
gibt ja nur ganz wenige Menschen, die 
dort überlebt haben." 

Seit vergangenem Sommer, als die is- 
raelische Zeitung Yediot Achronot ein 
Interview mit Steven Spielberg veröffent- 
lichte, hat die israelische Dependance der 
Survivors of the Shoah einen wahren 
Schub erlebt. Wie aber läßt sich die ge- 
schlossene ultra-orthodoxe Gemeinschaft 
in Mea Schearim oder Bnei Brak von dem 
Projekt der Zeugendokumentationen 
überzeugen? Eine heikle Angelegenheit, 
die besonderes Einfühlungsvermögen ver- 
langt. Inzwischen, immerhin, hat man In- 
terviewteams zusammengestellt, die 
selbst streng religiös sind und so leichter 

einen Zugang finden. 

Das eigentlich Erstaunliche aber ist, 
daß das Bewußtsein, Neuland zu betreten] 

auch noch mehr als ein halbes Jahrhun- 
dert nach dem Holocaust mit jedem Tag 
wächst. „Ich dachte einmal, alles über die 

Shoah zu wissen", sagt Adler. „Doch jedes 
neue Zeugenvideo zeigt mir, daß ich viel 

zu wenig weiß. Und dabei erfahren wir ja 
noch die Geschichten, die immer auch 
einen Trost bergen." Denn diese Opfer ha- 
ben überlebt. Sie sind die Ausnahmen. 




CD-ROM DES MONATS 



(( 



,,Gegen das Vergessen 

Ein verantwortungsvoller Umgang mit 
den Themen der deutschen Vergangen- 
heit auf einem Medium der Zukunft muß 
kein Widerspruch sein. Im Gegenteil: Die 
CD-ROM „Gegen das Vergessen — Eine 
Dokumentation des Holocaust" belegt ein- 
drucksvoll, daß kein anderes Medium bes- 
ser geeignet ist, eines der dunke sten 
Kapitel deutscher Geschichte auf sensible 
und zugleich wirkungsvolle, lehrreiche 
Weise zu vermitteln. 

Anstelle von schulmeisterlichen Flos- 
keln und pathetischen Kommentierungen 
„sprechen" Original-Tonaufnahmen und 
mehr als 30 Minuten Filmmaterial. Dar- 
über hinaus kommen über 500 Fotogra- 
phien aus Archiven der ganzen Well, hin- 
zu sowie interaktive Landkarten urid er- 
klärende Texte zu den Originalaufnah- 
men, beispielsweise aus Propagardafil- 
men und Reden aus dem Reichstag. 

Der Betrachter ist ergriffen, betroffen 
und hochaufmerksam zugleich. Diese 



Wirkung wird durch da« graphisch sehr 
gelungene, still-zurückjjenommene, m 
schwarz-weiß gehaltene Screendesign un- 
terstützt. Besonders hervorzuheben ist 
auch die übersichtliche, intuitive Naviga- 
tion und Benutzungsführung sowie die 
erstklassige Qualität des Videomatenals 
und der Sprecherstimme. 

Die Dokumentation beleuchtet die Hin- 
tergründe des Holocaust, erklärt die hi- 
storischen Zusammenhänge und zeigt 
auch, wie die Täter nach der Kapitulation 
im Jahre 1945 mit ihrer Verantwortung 
umgingen. Diese außergewöhnliche Dar- 
stellung deutscher Geschichte sollte eben- 
so als Pflichtmaterial für den Schulunter- 
richt eingesetzt werden. 

Die interaktive Dokumentation, umge- 
setzt von der belgischen Firma Endless 
Interactive, vergegenwärtigt uns das Un- 
faßbare — die Verfolgung der jüdischen 
Bürger im Dritten Reich . 
Die deutsche Version der Dokumentation 
„Gegen das Vergessen" ist bei Navigo er- 
schienen und kostet etwc WO Mark. 




"Frankfurter Rundschau" Nr. 37, 13. Februar 1397 



*^«^>' %^.. 


M. . 


\::"^ . 


p^ 






öfe&ii^'y - 









A 




K^« 




M 



■y^ä^ 



1 



*^^' 



r <• j > 



:i^>.-^,. o V-s'c -.fj-'C-: 









Geqen das Vergessen" - richtet sicti unsere CD-ROM des Monats im Februar: Sie 
ist eirie eindrucksvolle Dokumentation des Holocaust der Nationalsozialisten. 



"HOUSE OF ETERNAL LIFE" 
For the people of the Jewish Faith, the Cemetery is The House of Etemal Life, 

A Holy place — 

A worthy place — 
As an Evangelist Christian, bom during the war I experienced this, since I live here in the Rhön 
and I feel the power of these places. 

I want you to share my constemation and urge you to visit these places and feel their 
peace and power. 

With a continued search, you'U find, just as I did, that the Christian cemeteries give off 
peace, silence and beauty, with thoughtfulness and power, as well as the Jewish cemeteries. 

But the Jewish Cemeteries are remnants of an ancient religion and ancient leaming. 

Most of them are located near second-hand roads and old tradeways, near moats or 
strongly receding slopes. 

by Gerhild Birman-Dähne 



'^ Nr. 19, 23. Januar 1997 



Nachrichten 



"Frankfurter Rundschau" 



Die grausigen Bilder des Kuriers 

Jan Karskis Berkli«. ms dem Warschauer CJIieKo koiuileii die igm.ranle Maclil der l'olilik iiielil erscliiillern 



Von lile Frings (Berlin) 

T)or Andrang ist groß. Zu groß für den 
kloinen Saal dor Jüdischen Volkshoch- 
scIuiIp in der Oranicnhiirgpr Straße. Hun- 
derte sind gekommen, um Jan Karski zu 
hören, den Mann, dessen Leben EHe Wie- 
sol als „Meisterstück an Mut, Integrität 
und Humanismus" beschreibt. Ein wenig 
erstaunt blickt der hagere alte Herr in die 
Kameras. „In Deutschland hat sich ei- 
gentlich nie jemand für mich interessiert." 
Jan Karski fällt es schwer, immer und 
immer wieder seine Geschichte zu erzäh- 
len. „Ich habe furchtbare Dinge gesehen." 
Kr hält die Erinnerung auf Distanz, sie 
wäre anders nicht zu ertragen. Die Bilder 
von den Hungernden und die Schreie der 
NVahnsinnigen aus dem Warschauer 
(Jbetto, die sein fotografisches Gedächtnis 
seit dem August 1942 bewahrt. Die Bilder 
aus dem Konzentrationslager Izbica Lu- 
belska: Tausende menschliche Wesen, 
Untote auf dem Weg in die Gaskammer. 

Doch davon will der 83jährige Jan 
Karski nicht reden, wenn er, wie am 
Dienstag abend, von jenen sechs Jahren 
zwischen 1939 und 1945 berichtet. „Schei- 
tern" ist das Thema; sein vergeblicher 
Versuch, die Vernichtung der europäi- 
schen Juden aufzuhalten. Angesichts die- 
ser „Hölle" sei er wohl zu klein gewesen, 
zu unbedeutend, sagt er mit fester Stim- 
me. Der Schmerz, aber auch die Verbitte- 
rung über den verlorenen Kampf haben 
sich tief in sein Gesicht eingegraben. 

Jan Karski ist müde. „Ich habe zuviel 
gesehen, ich bin zuviel gereist." Noch ein- 
mal hat er sich aufgemacht und ist von 
Washington nach Deutschland gefahren, 
wo er sich vor 55 Jahren das letzte Mal 
aufhielt und seitdem nicht einmal mehr 
auf einem Flughafen umsteigen wollte. 
Jetzt hat ihn die Informations- und Bera- 
tungsstelle für NS-Verfolgte in der Bun- 
desrepublik eingeladen. Er sei gekommen, 
sagt er an diesem ersten Vortragsabend, 
in der Hoffnung, etwas zu bewirken, „für 

diejenigen Überlebenden, die noch immer 

von jeglicher Hilfe seitens der Deutschen 
ausgeschlossen sind". Am Freitag wird er 
in Bonn den Internationalen Appell „Ge- 
rechtigkeit für die Überlebenden des Ho- 
locaust in Ost- und Mitteleuropa" vorstel- 
len, am Sonntag, dem Vorabend des Ge- 
denktags für die Opfer des Nationalsozia- 
lismus, im Bonner Wasserwerk sprechen. 

Jan Karski ist wieder als Kurier unter- 
wegs. Dieses Mal überbringt der emeri- 
tierte Professor für osteuropäische Politik, 
Ehrendoktor fast aller polnischen Univer- 
sitäten und Ehrenbürger Israels, seine 
Erinnerungen. Während des Krieges 




Der verlorene Kampf schmerzt ihn: Jan Karski. 



(Bild: Bleicher Verlag) 



schmuggelte er Informationen für den pol- 
nischen Untergrund nach Paris und Lon- 
don zur Exilregierung, eingeschweißt in 
einem Hausschlüssel. Die Bilder aus dem 
Ghetto und dem KZ, einem „Selektions- 
platz" für das Vernichtungslager Belzec, 
bewahrte er in seinem Kopf Bilder von 

nackten Leichen auf der Straße. Von Wag- 
gons, in denen sich ungelöschter Kalk mit 
der Körperflüssigkeit der Eingepferchten 
zu Chlorgas vermischte und das Fleisch 
der Lebenden zerfraß. 

In zerlumpten Kleidern, mit dem „Ju- 
denstern" auf der Brust, hatte die jüdi- 
sche Widerstandsbewegung Jan Karski 

ins Ghetto geschmuggelt. Als ukraini- 
scher Wachmann verkleidet, gelangte er 
ins KZ. „Ich habe es mit eigenen Augen 
gesehen", sagt Karski. Danach brach er 
zui3ammen. Hat geschrieen. Hat sich ver 
zweifelt gewaschen. Erbrach sich. Schlief 
ein-ErbrachsichundbesoffsichmitWodka. 



Wieder in London setzte er sich leiden- 
schaftlich für die Forderungen der polni- 
schen Juden ein: Die Alliierten sollten die 
Verhinderung der Massenvernichtung 
zum Kriegsziel erklaren, als Vergeltungs- 
maßnahme deutsche Städte bombardie- 
ren und allen Flüchtlingen Asyl garantie- 
ren. Karski sprach mit Diplomaten, PoHti- 

kern und Journalisten. Sein erschüttern- 
der Bericht beeindruckte. „Keiner tat et- 
was. Die jüdische Hölle war für die westli- 
chen Alliierten nicht mehr als ein 

schmerzlicher Nebenkriegsschauplatz." 
Die Angelegenheit v/erde ihren korrekten 
Gang nehmen, beruhigte der britische Au- 
ßenminister Anthony Eden im Februar 
1943. Papst Pius XII. schrieb: Er habe be- 
reits alles in seiner Macht stehende für 
die Leidenden in Pohm getan. 

Im Juli 1943 traf Karski den US-Präsi- 
denten Franklin D. Roosevelt, auch er sei 
an einem detaillierten Bericht über den 



Gono7id nicht interessiert gewesen. Was 
der K irier damals nicht wußte: schon im 
Novenher 1942 hatte der „World Jewish 
Congress" in der Presse über Hitlers Plä- 
ne zuj „Endlösung" berichtet; auch Eden 
war seit 1941 über Massenerschießungen 
informiert. Heute bezweifelt der alte 
Mann, daß Roosevelt aufgrund des Ge- 
sprächs mit ihm eine Hilfsorganisation 
für Fliichtlinge eingerichtet hat. Manche 
Historiker glauben das. „Das wäre schön", 
sagt Karski mit mildem Lächeln. 

Die Karriere des jungen Jan Karski, als 
achtes Kind der Handwerkerfamilie Ko- 
zielewski in Lodz geboren, begann in den 
30er tfahren. Als angehender Diplomat 
absolvierte der tiefgläubige Katholik und 
Anhänger des reaktionären polnischen 
Nationalhelden Jozef Pilsudski Praktika 
an den polnischen Botschaften in der 
Schwe z, Frankreich und Deutschland. 
1935 nahm er als Vertreter der polnischen 
Jugend am Nürnberger Parteitag der 
NSDAP teil. Als deutsche und sowjetische 
Trupp(»n Polen überfielen, war er 25 Jah- 
re alt. Der Offizier geriet in sowjetische 
Kriegsgefangenschaft, entkam nach War- 
schau imd schloß sich der Untergrundbe- 
wegun;^ an. Die setzte den weltgewandten 
jungen Mann als Kurier ein. 

Sein 3 Aufgabe beschreibt Karski als die 
eines „Tonbands", eines von vielen, das 
Informationen übermitteln sollte, nicht 
fragen, schon gar nicht eingreifen. Beim 
zweiten Auftrag, im Juni 1940, geriet 
er in der Slowakei in die Hände der Ge- 
stapo. Halbtot geprügelt, versuchte er 
sich m;t einer Rasierklinge das Leben zu 
nehmen, aus Ang.st, unter den Stiefeltrit- 
ten der Deutschen zum Verräter zu wer- 
den. Verbündete der polnischen „Heimat- 
armee" verhalfen ihm schließlich zur 
Flucht. 

Nach dem Krieg wollte Karski verges- 
sen, einfach vergessen: Die grauenhaften 
Bilder, die Enttäuschung, nichts bewirkt 
zu haben. „Zu jener Zeit haßte ich die gan- 
ze Menschheit" zitieren ihn seine Biogra- 
phen E Thomas Wood und Stanislaw M. 
Jankwoski. In den USA lebte er ein „nor- 
males Leben" als „Yankee mit ausländi- 
schem Akzent". Karski hätte weiter ge- 
schwiegen, wenn nicht der französische 
Filmemacher Claude Lanzmann ihn 1977 
an seine Pflicht gemahnt hätte, zu spre- 
chen. Wieder hat er einen Bericht ge- 
macht, wie damals, jetzt für den Film 
„Shoa". „Der Menschheit", sagt er in Ber- 
lin, „hat Gott die Wahl gegeben, Gutes 
und Böses zu tun." Beides ist Welt. Un- 
endlich müde ist Jan Karski. Unendlich 
traurig. Den Glauben an das Gute im 
Menschen hat er nicht aufgegeben. 



Frankfurter Rundschau 



Aus DEM INLAND 



D/R/S ■ Dienstag.21.Januar1997,Nr.17 



Kurier Karski bricht sein Schweigen im Land der Täter 

Der Mann, der Roosevelt von der Vernichtung der polnischen Juden berichtete, besucht erstmals Deutschland 



Von Ute Frings (Berlin) 

Jan Karski hat sein Schweigen gehro- 
chen. Mehr als fünf Jahrzehnte nach dem 
Ende des Krieges sprach der US-ameri- 
kanische Professor, der als Kurier des 
polnischen Untergrunds die Alliierten 
üher die Massenvernichtung polnischer 
Juden aufklärte, am Montag zum ersten 
Mal in Deutschland üher sein Lehen. 

Eine Woclie lang wird der gebürtige Po- 
le das Land bereisen, in dem er zuletzt 
1942 war und das er, wie er jetzt in Berlin 
sagte, damals „zutiefst haßte". Doch habe 
sich dieses Land verändert und heute sei 
er mit einem „guten Gefühl" hierherge- 
reist. Die Jugend in Deutschland forderte 



er auf, einen Beruf zu lernen und den 
„Unsinn von Antisemitismus und Rassis- 
mus" aus den Köpfen zu bannen. 

Die Reise durch das Land der Täter be- 
gann am 55. Jahrestag der sogenannten 
Wannsee-Konferenz — ein Datum, das für 
den Beginn der systematischen Vernich- 
tung der europäischen Juden steht. Jahr- 
zehntelang hat Karski über seine Erleb- 
nisse geschwiegen, aus denselben Grün- 
den, wie er sagte, aus denen die jüdischen 
Überlebenden so lange schwiegen. Selbst 
mit seiner Frau, einer Jüdin, deren Ver- 
wandte in den Konzentrationslagern er- 
mordet worden waren, habe er nie dar- 
über geredet. „Wir wollten ein normales 
Leben führen." Zum ersten Mal hat Jan 
Karski 1978 mit dem französischen Fil- 



memacher Claude Lanzmann für die Do- 
kumentation „Shoa" über seine Erfahrun- 
gen gesprochen. 

Die Geschichte des heute 82jährigen 
Professors für Osteuropakunde blieb, wie 
diejenige von Oskar Schindler vor dem 
Spielberg-Film in der Bundesrepublik, so 
gut wie unbekannt. 1942 erhielt der Ka- 

vallerieoffizier Karski, dessen Geburtsna- 
me Jan Kozielewski ist, den Auftrag von 
der polnischen Untergrundregierung in 
London, Informationen über Hitlers Pläne 
zur Vernichtung der europäischen Juden 
zu beschaffen. Karski ließ sich im Oktober 
1942 zweimal in das Warschauer Getto 
einschleusen, als ukrainischer Wachmann 
getarnt war er im Konzentrationslager Iz- 
bica Lubelska. Hunger, unbeschreibliches 



Elend sah er im Getto. Im KZ war er Zeu- 
ge, wie Deutsche „zum Spaß" Juden er- 
schossen. „Ich habe furchtbare Dinge ge- 
sehen", faßte er seine Erlebnisse zusam- 
men. Selbst Felix Frankfurter, Jude und 
Richter am Obersten Gerichtshof der 
USA, habe ihm nicht glauben wollen, er- 
innert sich Karski. „Nicht weil er dachte, 
ich lüge, sondern weil ich Unglaubliches 
berichtete." Seine gefahrliche Arbeit be- 
schrieb Karski als die eines „Tonbands", 
das die AUierten genutzt haben. Gefühlt 
habe er während des Krieges nichts, „das 
kam erst danach". Die Berichte des polni- 
schen Kuriers, unter anderem bei dem 
amerikanischen Präsidenten Franklin D. 
Roosevelt und dem britischen Außenmini- 
ster Anthony Eden, blieben folgenlos. 




"Frankfurter Rundschau" Nr. 282, 3. Dezember 199B 



Die Briefe der Emigranten wiegen schwer 

In diesem Jahr 16 neue Nachlässe im ,,Deutschen Exilarciiiv" / Suche geht weiler 



Von Claudia Michels 

Am Anfang war die „Emigrantenbihlio- 
thek". Längst ist die Frankfurter Sam- 
melstelle für Werke und Hinterlassen- 
schaften der zwischen 1933 und 1945 zur 
Auswanderung getriebenen Künstler und 
Wissenschaftler zur Forschungsstätte 
,,Deutsches Exilarchiv** geworden. 1996 
konnte die Deutsche Bibliothek in den 
USA 16 neue Nachlässe akquirieren. 100 
weitere Namen", so hieß es jetzt, „könn- 
te man noch bekommen*'. 



^<**o*^ 



cijiBl <f2.mnr i^eleßli 



noue 






1 



^/ 



lyefs 



»» 



V«i w5fl find this Card or>nv<mftnt r«jf~-* 
Itslitip thetn. (heck iftt ,'iit^l tlittrJory.} 

2. Nuntbcrs you f^l ff-r« "Infomwtio«." 



RtifinrM 0AuH5 {V\iA Ul). 



„Wir rätseln immer", sagte Bibliotheks- 
direktor Professor Klaus-Dieter Lehmann 
mit Blick auf Professor John M. Spalek 
am Tisch gegenüber, „mit wievielen Kof- 
fern er wieder aus den USA anreisen 
wird." Spalek, ein in Warschau geborener 
Amerikaner, ist die Kontaktperson der 
Deutschen Bibliothek zu den Exilanten, 



„Wie Immer Dein 

alter Böff", schrieb 

der Emigrant 

George Grosz an 

den Emigranten 

Hermann Borchardt. 

Die Telefonliste des 

Soma Morgenstern 

(Bild unten) liest 

sich wie ein „Who Is 

Who" der 

Emigration. 




FlÄB - fMACt - AlAmttASCt 



QUs..&f/Wn 



VJf$ 



^ Berliner 




JsaLSXT... jastfe jstiL_ 



iJeutach Ho 8aü3 Harr&t Str 






' Frank ty Hotel Iddo 6&00 Jucc a S tr^ 

t ...grank fi. HaJUm JJiJnäfet . JÖ^^CöCCiÄsJ 

_ 5^<3^!! M W.j,|j,pushby ?tYt? 

\ Gimpnl Ito /grM:^gW^..afc.. 

\...^^^ Wo :^iQa_^^tm^t. 

I Kaus ao l^'ix> Doheiunv Tt . 

L.,£ürtnsx..^ £U iioS üt>.tli..Str, 

> Land shof .. .Bo . öfeO^ Jii&ödsti^Äjpjr.. 











^&ami IM*^^:^ ^K^.«^"'. 

l Vier!;«! 

jk^lerfei ao Los Tl Xlo s ru ► 



ea .„föabgJXJCß.^ ' 



{ 



Adorno 



-ä46.jLj5riit5Ä„a5f« >4ii<5hU 



/i ^»■i^a^:.,^ ^/$ ^>»»t« / ^y^fV ^^,. 



''M'MfA 



..Mi.. 



vcm^<^ 



v^> 



'K^Acf'Untxc •119» 



Ho i7eo 



SM MS 1.5 



Tl 



Cr liCoß 



i&jU^^ J 

Cr 6B5.CJH I 



.SK_ÄJi^7?> 

Gr 67i 5Ö, 

He 12!K)_ 
Ä7iU. 



\ 



y ..... ■ "■"■^ . » ^ * 



mOP^M Jtm^iiim^~m^ Oinxhuy telU ym *Wl^« h f>»r W 



und er „schleppt gewöhnlich auf einem 
ganz normalen Flugticket ein ganzes 
Transportunternehmen mit". 

Dabei pflegen die Briefe fast am 
schwersten zu wiegen: 2500 Schreiben 
enthielt allein der Nachlaß des Schrifl,- 
stellers Iven George Heilbut; rund 900 
Briefe, Telegramme und Karten, die Hin- 
terlassenschafl; der beiden Soziologen Jo- 
seph und Alice Maier. Und fast durchweg 
sind auch die Briefpartner von besonde- 
rem Gewicht: Al- 
lein 67 Briefe des 
Malers George 

Grosz fanden sich 
im Erbe des Ger- 
manisten Her- 
mann Borchardt. 
In den Unterlagen 
des Kunsthistori- 
kers Paul Frankl 
tauchte eine Korre- 
spondenz mit Al- 
bert Einstein auf 
Der Dramaturg 
Rudolph S. Joseph 




hatte sich schriftlich mit Ferdinand 
Brückner, Bruno Frank, Odön von Hor- 
vath, Oskar Kokoschka, Lotte l^hmann, 
Thornton Wilder und Carl Zuckmnyer 
ausgetauscht. Der Philosph Ernst Moritz 
Manesse hat einen dreißigjährigen Brief- 
wechsel mit Karl Jaspers hinterlassen, 
der Journalist Henry Marx Austausch mit 
Ernst Deutsch, Fritzi Massary und (^rete 
Mosheim gepflegt. Der Schriftsteller So- 
ma Morgenstern aber, der heute, zwanzig 
Jahre nach seinem Tod in New York, als 
„literarische Neuentdeckung" bezeichnet 
wird, lebt auch in Briefen von Theodor W. 
Adorno, Ernst und Karola Bloch, Max 
Brod, Martin Buber, Otto und Lotte 
Klemperer, Alma Mahler-Werfel, Erwin 
Piscator, Joseph Roth, Gershom Scholem, 
Franz Werfel und Stefan Zweig weiter. 

Professor John M. Spalek, der seit der 
Beschäftigung mit dem Leben des Nazi- 
Opfers Ernst Toller in seine heutigen 
engen Beziehungen zu den Exilanten 
hineingewachsen ist, richtet sich bei den 
Recherchen danach, „wer bereit ist, uns 
zu empfangen". Manche Türen zu den in 



Berlin oder in Wien, in Frankfurt oder 
Leipzig Geborenen stünden schon olTen, 
andere müsse man Jahrelang auf- 
schieben". 

Auf manche Namen stoße er so neben- 
bei — den der Dramatikerin Hedwig Rossi 
etwa habe er ,,durch Zufall bei irgend- 
einem Lunch erfahren". Später stellte er 
fest: Die Enkelin, wiewohl sie „keine 
deut.schsprachige Zeile mehr losen kann", 
hatte den Nachlaß der 1891 in Wien gebo- 
renen (Großmutter in Michigan „auf dem 
Dachboden behalten". Oftmah seien nur 
noch zwei Koffer da, bei Joseph und Alice 
Maier in New Jersey hingegen, die in en- 
ger Beziehung zu den Mitgliedern des In- 
stituts für Sozialforschung standen, fan- 
den sich „vier Stockwerke Matf rial". 

Etwa 105 Emigranten-Nachlässe sind 
heute im Exil-Archiv der Deutschen Bi- 
bliothek bewahrt, dazu angekaufte 
Sammlungen. Ein Großteil der Mittel für 
das Sammeln und Kaufen stammt von der 
Deutschen Forschungsgemeinschaft oder 
v(m Frankfurter Stiftungen. F twa 10 000 
Emigranten sind mit unterschied- 
lichen schriftlichen Zeugnissen präsent: 
Neben den Briefen sind es Manuskripte, 
Notizen, Artikel, Kataloge, Aufsätze, 
Tagebücher. Manch sprechendes Doku- 
ment darunter: Briefe mit de n Kopf des 
KZ Sachsenhau-sen, Identitätskarten 
voller (lestapo Stempel, ein Telefonver- 
zeichnis, das bei Bertolt Bro<ht beginnt 
und hei Theodor W. Adorno ni( ht endet — 
und sich liest, wie der „Who is Who" der 
Emigration. 

Die Doiitsclie Hiblif>thek nutzte die 
Kunde über di'* lf> neuen Nnc'dnsse auch 
zu einer Hommage an den Inngjährigen 
Leiter des Exil Arcl)ivs, Werner Herthold. 
Zur Veröffentlichung eines Lesebuchs sei- 
ner Aufsätze und Vorträge beschrieb 
HfMthold dio F.ntwickivmg des \rchivs von 
der ,J^ibIinthek ohne Wirkuu)»" der 5()er 
Jahre, als der Emigrant noch mit einem 
Komn)unis(en und Verräter gleichgesetzt 
wurde bis in ihre heutige Integration in 
die allgemeine Forschung. 



"Frankfurter Rundschau" Nr. 282, 3. Dezember 1996 

Lob spendete Eichel auch für den Widerstand 

Ministerpräsident verleiht Leuschner-Medaille unter anderem an Trude Simonsohn und den Gewerkschafter Paul Schuster 



WIESBADEN. An der Startbahn West 
standen sie sich einst unversöhnHch ge- 
genüber. Gestern wurden die beiden ehe- 
maligen Kontrahenten, der Schriftsteller 
Peter Härtling und der hessische Ex-In- 
nenminister Ekkehard Gries (FDP), ge- 
meinsam geehrt: So wie vier weitere ver- 
diente Bürger erhielten sie aus der Hand 
des Ministerpräsidenten Hans Eichel 
(SPD) die Wilhelm Leuschner-Medaille. 

„Sie alle stehen für das, was Demokra- 
tie in Hessen ausmacht: Vielfalt, auch Ge- 
gensätze, politische Gegnerschaft im fair 
ausgetragenen Streit, ruhige politische 
Alltagsarbeit, aber auch widerständiger 
Bürgersinn, Selbstbewußtsein und Enga- 
gement als Citoyen", schlug Eichel bei 
einem Festakt im Biebricher Schloß den 
Bogen. In der ersten Reihe des Kuppel- 
saales saßen drei „engagierte, zuweilen 
widerborstige Citoyennes und Citoyens" 
sowie „drei glaubwürdige, demokratisch 
gewählte Politiker". Sie alle hätten sich 
für Wilhelm Leuschners Maxime „Freiheit 
und Gerechtigkeit" eingesetzt. 

Ausgezeichnet wurden mit der 75jähri- 
gen Trude Simonsohn, deren beide Eltern 
im Konzentrationslager ermordert wor- 
den sind, und dem 91jahrigen Gewerk- 
schafter Paul Schuster zwei Menschen, 



^..^ 




Ausgezeichnet: Trude Simonsohn und Paul Schuster. 



(FR-Bild: dpa) 



die sich im Widerstand gegen die Nazis 
engagiert breiten. Frau Simonsohn ist 

noch heute als Gemeinderatsvorsitzende 
der Jüdischen Gemeinde zu Frankfurt ak- 
tiv. Schuster, 1948 Mitbegründer des 
DGB, führt Jugendliche zu den Stätten 
von Widerstand und Verfolgung. 

Am Werk Peter Härtlings lobte der Mi- 
nisterpräsidi^nt das durchgängige Bemü- 
hen, „gegen Vergessen und Verdrängen 
Geschichte in Personen lebendig zu ma- 
chen". Der Schriftsteller sei bei seinem 
Protest gegen die Startbahn West „gegen 
den Strom geschwommen". Gleichzeitig 
verteidigte lOichel die Entscheidung sei- 
ner Vorgänger für den Ausbau des Flug- 
hafens. Quasi zur „Symbolfigur" in den 
harten Auseinandersetzungen Ende der 
siebziger Jahren sei Ekkehard Gries ge- 
worden. Eichel würdigte ihn als überzeug- 
ten „Soziallil)€ralen*'. 

Auch seinen Amtsvorgänger Walter 
Wallmann ((JDU) zeichnete der Minister- 
präsident aus. Wallmann habe Identität 
und Selbstwertgefühl der Frankfurter zu 
stärken gewußt. Bei der Landtagswahl 
1987 hatte Wallmann den SPD-Kandida- 
ten Hans Krollmann aus dem Feld ge- 
schlagen. Der ehemalige Minister wurde 
gestern ebenfalls ausgezeichnet. doe 




Feuilleton 



Mittwoch, 13 November 1996, Nr. 265 Frankfurter Rundschau Seite 7 



Ein Wall des Nichtverstehen-WoUens 

Auschwitz, danach: Thomas Mitscherlichs Dokumentarfilm ,,Reisen ins Leben" 



^ , Von Dietrich Kuhlbrodt 

I FRANKFURT A. M. Drei Hochschulleh- 
rer, die als Kinder Auschwitz überlebt 
hatten, sitzen in Thomas Mitscherlichs 
Dokumentarfilm Reisen ins Leben — Wei- 
terleben nach einer Kindheit in Auschwitz 
•vor der Kamera und erheben bittere, aber 
bedachte Vorwürfe gegen ihre Aufnahme- 
länder. In den USA, den Niederlanden, in 
Israel, willkommen fühlten sich die Ju- 
gendlichen, gerade noch dem Tod entkom- 
men, nicht. Sie blieben mit ihren trauma- 
tischen Erfahrungen allein. Niemand 
wollte davon etwas wissen. Um sich inte^ 
grieren zu können, mußten sie schweigen 
lernen. Und im stillen Kämmerlein ein 
Buch schreiben. Die Literaturwissen- 
schaftlerin und Autorin Ruth Klüger, 65, 
liest im Film aus ihrem Buch weiterleben 
vor. Sie berichtet von ihren Depressionen 
in der neuen Heimat New York und von 
ihren gescheiterten Versuchen, Zuhörer 
für ihre Gedichte zu finden. Ihre Trauma- 
ta hatte sie (notgedrungen) poetisch ver- 
arbeitet. Doch als sie sich auf diese Weise 
mitteilen wollte, empfanden die anderen 
dies als Zumutung. Und sie faßte die Zu- 
rückweisungen als Kränkung auf. 

Gleichgültigkeit, Unverständnis und 
Zurückweisung — - das war die gemeinsa- 
me Erfahrung der Auschwitz-tS>erleben- 
den. Was wir im Film von Thomas Mit- 
scherlich sehen, ist neu. Denn bisher hat 
sich keine deutschsprachige Publikation 
so dezidiert die Zeit danach zum Thema 
gemacht, die Zeit, in der die Überleben- 
den von Auschwitz sich in ihre neue Hei- 
mat zu integrieren versuchten, jedoch al- 
lein gelassen wurden und, wie der nieder- 
ländische Soziologe und Schriftsteller 
Gerhard Durlacher, sich in die Arbeit 
stürzten, die einzige Möglichkeit, ein 
zweites Mal zu überleben. 

Das sind für uns, die wir mit unserer 
Kollektivschuld beschäftigt sind, überra- 
schende Vorwürfe. Mitscheriich setzt noch 
eins drauf In seinem Film sehen wir au- 
thentische Aufnahmen, die die Befreiung 
der Lager dokumentieren. Das Material, 
das zur Aufklärung der ungeheuerlichen 
Verbrechen dienen sollte, verschwand je- 
doch wieder in den Militärarchiven. Der 
eigenen Bevölkerung sollten die Bilder 
des Schreckens nicht zugemutet werden. 
Und die Deutschen wurden wieder für den 
Kalten Krieg gebraucht. Der Wall des 
Nicht-VerstehenwoUens, der die drei Pro- 
tagonisten in ihrem neuen Heimatland 
isolierte, er war politisch gewollt. ; . , j 

Sieht man Mitscherlichs Film, muß 
man zur Feststellung kommen, daß zu- 
mindesi in den USA schon seit der zwei- 



ten Hälfte der vierziger Jahre ein kollekti- 
ver Wille bestand, Auschwitz nicht zur 
Kenntnis zu nehmen. Womit, sehen wir in 
die Gesichter der drei Überiebenden, ein 
neuer kollektiver Schuldvorwurf erhoben 
wäre. Dazu möchte man, da dieser Um- 
stand hier nicht gegenwärtig ist, doch, bit- 
te sehr, näheren Aufschluß haben. Und 
den gibt es. Das gleichnamige Buch zum 
Film (mit ergänzendem Material) ist von 
Barbara Johr, Mitarbeiterin an Mitscher- 
lichs Bremer Institut, geschrieben und bei 
ponat verlegt worden. Dort lesen wir: Die 
Überlebenden ,4iatten Deutschland mit 



später kompensiert. Das können wir nach 
Besichtigung von Weiterleben nach Ausch 
Witz und nach der Lektüre des Buches, 
das sich selbstredend nicht direkt mit 
(joldhagen befaßt, mit Interesse feststel- 
len und uns beruhigt zurücklehnen. Die 
Sohn- Vater-Konflikte sind sowieso bevor- 
zugtes Thema in US-Film und -Buch. 

Falsch. Denn es beginnt die Aufregung. 
Mitscherlichs Film und die Ergänzung 
durch das Buch geben den Weg frei zu et- 
was, das überfällig war, nämlich nicht bei 
der Vergangenheitsbewältigung stehen zu 
bleiben, sondern die Cxeschichte der Ver- 




Uberlebende von Auschwitz auf dem Rückweg In die Freiheit, aufgenommen von 
amenkanischen Kameraleuten, deren Material Thomas Mitscheriich für seinen Doku- 
mentarfilm „Reisen ms Leben" venvandte. (Foto: National Archives, Washington) 



,amerikanischen' Augen zu sehen. Das 
hieß, den Deutschen keine Kollektiv- 
schuld zu unterstellen und Nazi-Greuel 
nicht m der Öffenthchkeit zu schildern". 

Mitscherlichs Film kommt daher noch 
gerade recht zur aktuellen Goldhagen- 
Diskussion. Natürlich mußte (joldhagen 
sein Buch schreiben. Natürlich haben wir 
uns den Schuh angezogen. Der wahre 
Adressat war jedoch nicht der Leser der 
Zeit, sondern sozusagen der Vater Gold- 
hagens. Die Kollektivschuld wurde, und 
das ist noch nicht einmal polemisch zuge- 
spitzt, von (jroldhagens Vätergeneration in 
den USA nicht ge-, wohl aber verleugnet, 
und zvar so lange, bis, laut Johrs Buch, 
mit dem Eichmann -Prozeß die J'opulari- 
sienmg" des Holocausts einsetzte. Mit 
dem Goldhagen-Buch wird das frühe Ver- 
leugnen & Verschweigen eine (xeneration 



gangenheitsbewältigung zu schreiben. 
Und damit ist jetzt ein dinkussionswürdi- 
ger und auch aufregender Anfang ge- 
macht. Das Buch endet mit praktischen 
Hinweisen für Bildungsarbeit. Was fehlt, 
ist eine vernünftige Risikoeinschätzung 
zum Fazit der zweiten Schuld oder wie 
auch immer man den Preis des zweiten 
Überlebens nennen mag. Von Deutsch- 
land ist, da die drei Überlebenden von an- 
deren Ländern berichten, für die Zeit- 
nach-Auschwitz auffallend wenig die Re- 
de. Fühlt sich dadurch wer hier entlastet? 
Wird die (Kollektiv-)Schuld geteilt? Ha- 
ben auch die anderen Dreck am Stecken? 
Den (jenerationskonflikt haben wir auch. 
„Wir tragen als Deutsche dieser Nach- 
kriegsgeneration schwer daran, daß wir 
unsere Väter lieben, v/iv. jedes andere 
Kind auf der Welt es auch tut — und doch 



mußten wir sie zugleich ablehnen, weil 
wir annehm.m müssen, daß sie in Verbre- 
chen verstri( kt waren" (Mitscheriich). 

Sich von den Eltern, der Auschwitz-Ge- 
neration, abzulösen, führt zu einem 
schweren Gf nerationenkonflikt. Ihn zu lö- 
sen, bieten sich die Bilder dieses Films an, 
der aus der Fixierung hinausführt. Und 
doch hätte ich mir gewünscht, den breite- 
ren Raum, den das Buch für Deutschland 
übrig hat, im Film wiederzufinden. Wie 
gingen die Deutschen in der DDR und der 
BRD mit den Überlebenden des Holo- 
causts um? Und wie gehen die Überleben- 
den ihrerseits hier mit den Kränkungen 
um, in denen die NS- Vergangenheit Ge- 
genwart wild? Der Film vertraut allein 
und vielleicht zu sehr aufs Wort und auf 
die Texte, die er transportiert. Sichtbar 
vermeidet er, den Überlebenden nahezu- 
kommen, sie gar zu porträtieren. Und op- 
tisch wird die Reise, die von der Ausch- 
witz-Vergangenheit in die Gegenwart der 
neuen Heimat zurückgelegt wird, ab- 
strakte Figui'. 

Thomas Mauchs Landschafls-Fotos 
sind intellektuelle Struktur. Ein Asphalt- 
band windet sich durch Stadt und Land. 
Es proportioniert den Redefluß der drei 
Akademiker zu Anekdoten. Highway. 
Next exit. Nächstes Erlebnis. Ein Road 
Movie wird behauptet. Die ästhetische Di- 
stanz findet sich bereits im übernomme- 
nen Archivmaterial. „Ich drehte mit dem 
Teleobjektiv, ich wollte Distanz", wird der 
US-Kameramann zitiert, der in Buchen- 
wald die Weimarer Bürger ins Visier 
nahm. Aber damals wurde die Distanz ge- 
braucht, um die Realität ertragen zu kön- 
nen. Heute findet der Film im Saxofonsolo 
und in der kunstvollen Musik Jens Peter 
Ostendorfs zu akademisch gesichertem 
Niveau. Die Kühle einer wissenschaft- 
lichen Arbeit herrscht in diesem Film, in 
welchem jedoch von Persönlichem, von 
Empörendem die Rede ist. 

Mitscherlichs persönliche Zurückhal- 
tung in aller Ehren. Aber ich hätte im 
Film doch schon gern das Gedicht gehört, 
das Ruth Klügers amerikanische Zeitge- 
nossen nicht zur Kenntnis nehmen woll- 
ten. Auch hätte ich einen näheren Blick 
auf die Zeichnungen werfen mögen, mit 
denen Yehuda Bacon, Maler und Hoch- 
schullehrer für Kunst in Jerusalem, seine 
Auschwitz-Erlebnisse verarbeitete. Ob es 
dem deutschen Film ins Konzept paßt 
oder nicht. ^Jiders gesagt: Ich sah den 
kühlen Film mit heißem Kopf und bleibe 
neugierig. 

Der Film wird heute um 20 Uhr 30 im 
Kommunalen Kino Frankfurt gezeigt, 
Thomas Mitscheriich ist anwesend. 




Die deutsche Wehrmacht sei ein 
Jahrbares Stahlwerk", schrieb 
Curzio Malaparte 1941 in seinen 
Kriegsberichten an eine itaüenische Zei- 
tung. In der NS-Wehrmacht, aber auch 
bei der Roten Armee seien ^^ihtärische 
Disziplin'* und „technische Disziplin der 
Arbeit verschmolzen'*. Gewiß, solche For- 
mulierungen spiegeln jenen pathetischen 
Heroismus des Durchhaltens, den Faschi- 
sten und Nazis gleichennai3en zu nutzen 
suchten. Dennoch entsprach die Parallele 
von Soldaten- und Arbeiterleben den All- 
tagserfahrungen vieler, die eingezogen 
wurden oder sich zum Kriegseinsatz mel- 
deten. So ist die Propagandaphrase auch 
ein Hinweis darauf, warum so viele Deut- 
sche „wilhg" am Ausrottungskrieg und am 
Holocaust teilgenommen haben. 

Daß die einfachen Deutschen nicht nur 
„gelassene" Zuschauer gewesen seien, 
sondern vielfach eigene Beiträge'* gelei- 
stet haben als Polizisten oder Soldaten — 
diese These ist nicht neu. Bisher wird die- 
se Frage aber nur auf der Ebene allgemei- 
ner Konzepte diskutiert: Während Zeitge- 
nossen einen angeblichen „Volkscharak- 
ter" beschworen, so wurde in den 70er 
Jahren der „Sonderweg" Deutschlands 
zum Thema. Auf derselben Ebene liegt die 
These, die NS- „Weltanschauung" sei weit- 
hin verinnerlicht worden ( Omer Bartov). 

Hier wie dort bleiben die angeblich „ein- 
fachen Leute" bloße Rädchen im Getriebe. 
Nur die Funktionseliten bekommen Ge- 
sichter, nicht aber die vielen. Es käme 
aber darauf an, das mentale und kulturel- 
le „Unterfutter" zu zeigen. Was bedeutete 
Jiitlerkult" im Alltag der Massen? Wie ist 
die Zustimmung zu Quälereien, Verhöh- 
nungen und Boykotten „von mnen" kon- 
struiert gewesen? Was bewegte die Men- 
schen, wenn sie schulterzuckend den Ver- 
höhnungen von Jlasseschändem" zusa- 
hen, wenn viele nur wenig später ^Juden" 
oder Fremdarbeiter denunzierten, wenn 
nicht wenige zumal den slawischen „Un- 
termenschen" Vernichtung wünschten? 

Wie geht man vor? Übersehen wurden 
bislang die Formen des Alltagsleben, die 
alltägUche Präsenz und Durchschlags- 
kraft kultureller Orientierungen und der 
mit ihnen verknüpften Emotionen und 
Mythen. Hier ist die Kategurie „Aibeit" 



Alf Lüdtke 

Destruktion und Produktion 

Über den Zusammenhang von Holocaust, Ausrottungskrieg und „Arbeit" 



zentral. Seit dem späten 19. Jahrhundert 
finden sich zunehmend Äußerungen von 
Ingenieuren und Industriellen, von Sozi- 
alreformem und Sozialforschem, aber 
auch von (wenigen) „schreibenden" Ar- 
beitern über industrielle „Qualitätsar- 
beit". Nennen wir Beispiele. In Geraer 
Nähmaschinenfabriken, Berliner Elektro- 
betrieben oder im Chemnitzer Textilma- 
schinenbau ermöghchte Handfertigkeit" 
und „Geschicklichkeit" beides: taugliche, 
„schöne" Produkte, aber auch Befriedi- 
gung beim Arbeiten. Beobachter wie Ak- 
teure an den Werkzeugmaschinen streb- 
ten nach Fertigkeiten, die die Arbeit „pro- 
duktiv" machten und Befriedigung ermög- 
lichten. „Qualitäts-" oder „Wertarbeit" 
meinte also nicht bloßes Bilanzieren der 
Resultate. Das Ziel war auch nicht die Op- 
timierung der Handhabungen, der „one 
best way" von F. W. Taylor. Vielmehr ging 
es um Stolz der Arbeiter über eigene Lei- 
stung, um ihre Freude am Arbeiten. 

Diese Emotion war in mehrfacher Hin- 
sicht unbestimmt und ließ sich vielfaltig 
aufladen. Von Beginn an transportierte 
der Verweis auf die „Qualität" von Pro- 
dukten und produktiver Arbeit eine ent- 
schieden ,^ationale" (Jefühlsladung. Im 
Ersten Weltkrieg war das Krupp-Ge- 
schütz JDicke Bertha" Resultat wie Sym- 
bol produktiver Arbeit, die die Destruk- 
tion perfektionieren sollte. In der „deut- 
schen Qualitätsarbeit" war alles enthal- 
ten und verbunden: StaatspoUtik und 
-Symbolik mit individueller Alltagspraxis. 

Die Bilder der ,^beit" waren vielfaltig 
präsent. Sie fanden Anklang über Klas- 
sengrenzen, Geschlechter und Generatio- 
nen hinweg — und sie ließen sich mit an- 
deren verbinden. Zum Beispiel denen 
über die „Fremden". Im 19. Jahrhundert 
hatten Stereotype von den sittlich ver- 
wahrlosten, zugleich „faulen", wenn nicht 



gar 






erhalten: Sie taugten dazu, der napoleoni- 
schen „Fremdherrschaft" den Stachel der 
eigenen Schmach zu nehmen. Derart „fal- 
sche" Feinde würden nur kurzzeitig über 
„Siegfried" triumphieren. Die Bilder, die 
das „Eigene" markierten und vom „Frem- 
den" abgrenzten, fanden große Resonanz, 
wobei es aber nicht nur Bilder „der" Fran- 
zosen, sondern auch „der" Russen, ^o\- 
lacken" und nicht zuletzt Serben waren, 
die sich mit neuen Weltdeutungen und ei- 
genen Erfahrungen vermischten. 

Vorstellungen, die Eigenes und Frem- 
des scheiden, versammeln Erfahrungen 
nicht „pur". Sie sind übersetzt, verdichtet 
in Ritualen und Symbolen. In den zwanzi- 
ger Jahren, nach dem dem Schock der 
Granaten und des Hungers, antwortete 
eine Mischung von JCörperkultur" und 
Totenkult auf die Erfahrung zerfetzter 
Körper. Solche Beispiele sind nicht nur di- 
daktische Hilfsmittel. Sie zeigen vielmehr 
jene „Gemengelage" von Interessen und 
Emotionen, die den Alltag bestimmen. 
Victor Klemperer berichtete bereits in sei- 
nem Lingua tertii imperii (LTD von sol- 
chen „Gemengelagen". Er war zur 
Zwangsarbeit in einer Tütenfabrik ver- 
pflichtet, wo „deutsche" Arbeiterinnen 
und Arbeiter, die — so Klemperer — 
„durchaus nicht nazistisch gesinnt (wa- 
ren), . . . mindestens im Winter 1943/44 
nicht mehr" arbeiteten. Klemperer berich- 
tet auch von einem ,Albert". Er war erbit- 
terter Kriegsgegner, überstand immer 
wieder Musterungen ohne Einberufung. 
Im Gespräch mit Kollegen schimpfle er 
über den „dreckigen Krieg". Auf die Ge- 
genfrage, wie denn das möglich sein solle, 
antwortete er, daß „wir doch unbesiegbar 
sind". Zeigte sich hier „Wille" zur Vernich- 
tung? Erkennbar werden Haltungen, die 
alles andere als eindeutig waren — und 
auch nicht bloßer Ausdruck von „Weltan- 
schauung". Auch wenn jemand „ganz un- 



nazistisch und ganz menschlich empfand" 
(Klemperer), so ließ sich das mit Wahr- 
nehmungsweisen verbinden, die keine 
Grenzen anzeigten: weder gegenüber der 
Ausgrenzung und Erniedrigung noch ge- 
genüber der Deportation. 

Entscheidend scheint mir deshalb: Es 
herrschte eine untergründige Haltung des 
aktiven Mittuns; es gab keine Grenze zu 
einem „Mehr" der Gewalt. Es geht also 
nicht um ein eindeutiges „Motiv", das her- 
auszufiltem und (juristisch) „beweisbar" 
wäre; es geht um eine mentale »Atmo- 
sphäre", die es erlaubte, das „gute Organi- 
sieren" ohne besondere Anstrengung in 
„gute Arbeit" zu übersetzen, und diese in 
„deutsche Qualitätsarbeit", die Symbol 
keinen Unterschied machte zwischen Pro- 
duktions- und Destruktions-Arbeit. 

Erst die Arbeit, dann das Vergnügen!" 
Oder: „Ohne Fleiß kein Preis!" Arbeit 
buchstabierte sich als jene Verbindung 
von Ordentlichkeit, Handfertigkeit und 
Gewandtheit, die am Produktionspunkt 
selbst dafür sorgten, daß aus Aufträgen 
ein „gutes", ein erwünschtes Produkt wur- 
de. Dabei konnte das Produkt ganz unter- 
schiedlichen Zwecken dienen. Nicht die 
destruktive oder die produktive Verwen- 
dung war ausschlaggebend: Der Ge- 
schützturm eines Schlachtschiffes galt 
unter .Arbeitern ebenso viel wie ein Auto- 
mobil. Auch hatten sich die Tätigkeiten 
der Soldaten verändert; sie wurde arbeits- 
teiliger, wie in der Fabrik. 

Im "Krieg wurde dann aus dem ,^itma- 
chen", der Mischung aus Anpacken, Zu- 
schauen und Wegsehen, das Mitmachen 
beim Töten. Millionen gingen Jiin", als 
die Einberufungsbefehle zu Wehrmacht 
und später zur Waffen-SS kamen, als sie 
in Rüstungsbetriebe zwaoigsverpflichtet 
wurden oder ihre Arbeit z.B. bei den Ar- 
beitsämtern beitrug, den Kriegseinsatz zu 
steigern. Zehntausende, vor allem auch 



von jungen Leuten meldeten sich für den 
„Osteinsatz^ nicht nur als Führennnen 
von BDM-Lagem (Melita Maschmann), 
sondern als Verwaltungssekretäre oder 
Bibliothekarinnen. Bei Soldaten „drau- 
ßen" wie bei den Deutschen an der „Hei- 
matfront" war eine Intensität des Han- 
delns zu beobachten — ein innerer JF\i- 
ror", der bisher kaum beachtet worden ist. 
Lange Zeit sind Thesen zum „Sonderweg" 
variiert worden, zuletzt rückten jene 
deutschen Männer in den Vordergrund, 
die auf ihre „Ehre" versessen waren (Nor- 
bert Elias; Ute Frevert). Diese Norm habe 
Disziplinierung und schließlich Kadaver- 
gehorsam hervorgebracht. Solchen „lan- 
gen Blicken" kontrastierte die konkrete 
Analyse; es zeigte sich situativer Grup- 
pendruck vor Ort (Christopher Browning). 

Während das eine Theorieprogramm so- 
zial eher unspezifisch blieb, schien die 
Kleingruppenanalyse jeden Bezug zum 
NS-Programm, zur „Weltanschauung" 
auszublenden. Bleibt also „nur noch" An- 
tisemitismus, um beides zu erklären: akti- 
ve Teilnahme am Vernichtungskrieg und 
am Völkermord? Zeigt nicht aber der Ver- 
gleich mit Frankreich, daß allgemeine Be- 
funde nicht dazu taugen, tatsächliches 
Verhalten zu erklären? Denn in der Pra- 
xis bedeutete Antisemitismus höchst Un- 
terschiedliches. Deshalb kommt es darauf 
an, das ganze Spektrum kultureller 
Orientierungen in den Blick zu nehmen. 
Dazu gehören auch jene mentalen Prä- 
gungen, die im Antisemitismus konkret 
wurden: die Wechselwirkungen der 
Selbst- und Fremdbilder. Diese Wechsel- 
wirkungen ermöglichten „gesteigerte In- 
tensität des Gefühls" oder: Politik (Alex- 
ander Kluge) 

Ein zentrales Medium dieser Intensi- 
vierung war ,^beit". Insofern bedeutet 
,^beit macht frei" an den Lagertoren 
nicht nur den blanken Zynismus, der sich 
dem ideologiekritischen Blick zeigt. Darin 
war zugleich die Symbolik der Selbst- 
rechtfertigung angesprochen — Selbst- 
rechtfertigung in und durch ^\rbeit". Lie- 
ßen sich nicht Vorstellungen von „guter", 
von „deutscher Qualitätsarbeit" mit Anti- 
semitismus verknüpfen? Und diese „deut- 
sche Qualitätsarbeit" konnte beides sein 
— Produktion wie Destruktion. 



"Frankfurter Rundschau" Nr. 288, 10. Dezember 1996 



Autorinnen und Autoren: Doris Bach- 
mann-Medick ist wissenschaftliche Mitar- 
beiterin am Sonderforschungsbereich „Die 
literarische Übersetzung" an der Univer- 
sität Göttingen und Herausgeberin der 
Sammlung JCultur als Text" (S. Fischer 
Verlag); Alf Lüdtke ist wissenschaftlicher 
Referent am Max-Planck-Institut für Ge- 
schichte in Göttingen und apl. Professor 
an der Universität Hannover 



OBITUARY 




*'"«'»' »)»•»>. « «• 




Gertrude Hirschler, 
Jewish Scholar 

kJ^Z! ^ " M^attan. She was 64. . ; . . k,. . : 

Krschler, a naüve of Vienna, Austria, who escaoed th« 

Nazis and was brought to the United Stetes a^ acWW vJa.^ 

theassistant editor of the Hei^I Press and thelncycIopX 

ofZ.on.sm and Israel, to which shecontributed mS! 

briSto'TheEn.tf/hr'V'''^'""^''^°"*"''"«°" ^^ to 
onng to the English-speaking world the bulk of the works 

of the famous I9th centuty religious teacher and iTader 
Rabb. Samson Raphael Hit^ch. who made the S Adath 

ö?.rfH ?^ . ,^ •'''°'""S that it was possible to live a life 
of^Ojad.t.onal Judaism within ü,e franiework of the modern 

i>.^u^r "'^ t**^^"* °'"*'' Nazis. Rabbi Hirech's grandson 
M, .' {?'^P''„^1"'='-- »«-established the FrankfülSTn 

Mrschler was educated in Baltimore and giaduated fmm ' 
the Hebrew College and Johns Hopkins uS^S Ä 

Survi ving are her mother. Alice Dukes Hirschler a sister 
Helene Hirsch er Hooner a mV/-/, t ,«.., u =*^n'er, a s.ster. 



5h. 



4 



i 






m^ r^ j^ 






-9^ fiLfüfr^ (7/?o'i^J^rcUT 



0:^(1 Gc-nrqcio/ , uliaw^ t^Qu' ^ooZ- 



/ 



.. / 



r^LL. a%LL-5> Tp Y^«^ R:rH^JjJ t//J RA'SU^fZfP 



l l<MOlJ ^OU Ucnj C(^lL5p "^ ri4£ 



\i£^ \}= 



vc^ ßiboo-: flfjp ^oun Ä 



/S ^/7iJ' 



lO'.^H Goop ßni/ioz ^//v/^yc Ct^fiJ}y& 
\ //\ i.iO. ^ )<o/) (/ / < rt / / '/-" , (-^kjf ^-t \ I -^ , < /J- /n o '>^ 

A^sucn T/<c <r/t3t.£.o?^ UlCUcTL auVüoni 



\ 



A 



7y 



\joun. ti~-rro{i^ Ujiu- Uu^ o/u (p 7?/^ 



[\£r\nns oi ^c^n. -fmspoj nnp Rf)tii fixtiS 




L l'l HKI IMANN, TIIl'X) WKSTKNHKIUII'H KOK NKWSVVKKK (BKLOW) 

Welcoming the liberators: Recording the memories of Dachau prisoners (above, 1945) and others 

'A Race A gainst Tim e' 

History: Holocaust survivors teil their own stories 



IN A MOVING PASSAGE AT THE 
end of Steven Spielberg's 
1993 film "Schindler's List," 
a long procession of elderly 
men and women make their 
way haltingly across the screen. 
These Holocaust survivors, 
whose stories inspired the film, 
have now inspired a second 
Spielberg project. Last spring 
the director set up a new non- 
profit foundation dedicated to 
collecting and preserving Holocaust testi- 
mony. By the end of 1998 he plans to have 
assembled about 50,000 videotaped Inter- 
views, each two hours long, with survivors 
all over the world. The project will be the 
largest oral-history archive in existence. 
"The stories were too valuable to be told 
just to me and not shared with the rest of 
the World," says Spielberg. 

Most of the world's estimated 325,000 
Holocaust survivors are in their 70s and 
80s; as Spielberg says, the project is in a 
"race against time." (Survivors are invited 
to call the project, toll-free, 800-661-2092.) 
The technology, typically Spielberg, is so 
cutting edge that some of it hasn't even 
been invented yet. The completed Inter- 
views will be digitized — converted to an 
electronic format that makes it possible to 
put the interview online. What remains to 




New list: Spielherg 



be developed is the next step: 
Video on demand exists only in 
prototype. But Spielberg's team 
expects the technology to be 
refineu wiihiii ihree years. To- 
tal costs may reach $65 million; 
about $13 million— enough for 
the first year— has already 
come in. Contributors include 
MCA/Universal, MCA chair- 
man Lew Wasserman, Time- 
Warner, NBC and Spielberg. 
The money, the moguls and the high- 
speed mobilization are making scholars in 
the field a little nervous. "This is such a 
vast project," says Geoffrey Hartman, proj- 
ect director of the Fortunoff Video Archive 
for Holocaust Testimonies at Yale, which 
houses 3,000 survivor videotapes. (He esti- 
mates that about 6,000 such videotapes 
already exist in various archives.) "We 
have tried to transmit to them as much of 
our experience as we can. We have many 
hopes and some fears." Hartman says 
Spielberg's project could drain resources 
from smaller efforts, and he worries about 
its seriousness of purpose. The Yale ar- 
chive will continue its videotaping. "We 
are within a great university that has edu- 
cation and research value," he says. "Until 
they demonstrate that they have those 
same values, it would be disastrous if we 



simply Said, 'Let them do it'." 
Spielberg's staif says it has 
consulted extensively with ex- 
perts at Yale and elsewhere. 
The videotapes will be made 
available to researchers at five 
Centers: the U.S. Holocaust 
Memorial Museum in Wash- 
ington, D.C., the Museum of 
Jewish Heritage in New York, 
the Simon Wiesenthal Center 
in Los Angeles, Yad Vashem in 
Jerusalem and Yale. Ultimately 
Colleges and other research fa- 
cilities will be able to provide 
students with Computer access 
to the archive. For younger 
students there may be Virtual 
walk-throughs of concentration 
camps on CD-ROM. "There 
will be some skepticism," con- 
cedes senior producer James 
Moll, an independent filmmak- 
er. "Until it's finished." 

Larry Lerner isn't skeptical. 
The New York physician, one of 
hundreds of lawyers, journal- 
ists, therapists and others who are volun- 
teering to conduct Interviews, has just com- 
pleted a 20-hour training session and is 
eager to Start. "My parents are both Europe- 
an and survived the war," says Lerner, 37. 
"They didn't have a concentration-camp ex- 
perience, but they definitely had a rough 
time. Now my great-great-grandchildren 
will be able to watch somebody like my 
mother teil exactly what it smelled like, feit 
like, in a concentration camp." 

Laura Shapiro with Mark Miller in 
Los Angeles and Maggie Malone in New York 

Lady Sings 
Ballads, Too 



Divas: Etta James leaves 
her blues behind 



ETTA JAMES TENDS TO COMPARE HER- 
self to Billie Hohday, but you can hard- 
ly blame her Like Hohday, she was 
bom to a teenage mother and spent a 
good portion of her youth being raised by 
family relations. Like Holiday, she found 
a way to adapt the blues to her own vernac- 
ular. And like Hohday, she sacrificed years 
of her career to heroin addiction. James's 
autobiography, due out next spring, is 
called "Rage to Survive," but it could just 
as easily have been titled "Lady Sings the 
Blues." From the story ofbow she dyed her 
hair blond at the age of 16, through her 
drug rehabilitation in 1974, to her Status as 




98 N F. W S W F K K N O V K M B F R 2 1. 199 4 



^f 



(Q-ERT 



RUD] 



E 



H 



Rsc: 



H 



'O ^n^ppredation 



99 



A H 



By Elliott Bondi, M.D. 




i^ If N he passing of Gertrude 
Hirschler on January 19, 1994 
^ leaves a deep void for those 
who are appreciative of her contribu- 
tion to Torah, and in parlicular the 
Torah of Rav Samson Raphael Hirsch. 

Gertrude Hirschler was born to an 
aristocratic family in Vienna in 1931. Her 
grandfather, a grandson of the Chasam 
Sofer, was the head of the famed 
Schiffshul whose rabbi was Rav Zalman 
Spitzer, the son-in-law of the Chasam 
Sofer. The Schiffshul was the leading 
Orthodox congregation in Vienna at a 
time when that city was the epicenter of 
Central European Jewry. Her father, 
Bernard, was a princely, dignified china 
manufacturer and her mother, Alice, 
stemmed from the Ducas family from 
Budapest. Both were typical of the edu- 
cated "modern" Orthodox Jews of 
Vienna. It was in this cultured, Ger- 
man-speaking Austro-Hungarian milieu 
that Gertrude was raised. 

Gertrude was still young when the 
1938 Anschluss forced the Hirschlers to 
flee, via England, to the United States, 
where they settled in Baltimore. 
Through childhood friendship with 
Chazati Abba Wiesgal of the then-Ortho- 
dox Chizuk Emunoh Congregation in 
Baltimore, Bernard Hirschler was intro- 
duced to many of the prominent mem- 
bers of the congregation and he per- 
suaded many of them to grant affidavits 
to Viennese Jews desperate to emigrate. 
Not only did he manage thereby to save 
over a hundred families, but he also 
convinced the benefactors to provide Jobs 
for the refugees. 



His refined, impeccable nature was 
such that it was characteristic that he 
never spoke lashon harah. His absolute 
loyalty to Torah was demonstrated 
when he was one of the few to resign 
from Chizuk Emunoh Congregation 
when it introduced mixed seating. His 
wife, Alice, was one of the early leaders 
of the Chevra Ahavas Chesed, a Service 
Organization still vibrant today, which 
was founded during the War to help 
refugees. The respect which the 
Hirschlers commanded among the Bal- 
timore Orthodox German Jews was leg- 
endary. Gertrude's youth was imbued 
with a European atmosphere. 

Gertrude was educated in public 
schools; the Bais Yaakov of Baltimore 
had not yet been founded. Her Jewish 
upbringing was greatly influenced by 
Rav Simon Schwab, then of Congrega- 
tion Shearith Israel (the congregation 
which the family joined after leaving 
Chizuk Emunoh), who remained her 
Spiritual guide throughout her life. He 
introduced her to the Torah literature 
of Rav Samson Raphael Hirsch. As a 
highly intellectual person, Gertrude was 
deeply affected by the Torah im Derech 
Eretz approach and she was determined 
to utilize her studies in a creative, use- 
ful fashion to the henefit of Torah. 

Gertrude had a great aptitude for 
languages and graduated with honors 
from Johns Hopkins University. She 
began to translate documents and ar- 
ticles from German to English. In the 
mid-1950s, she moved to Washington 
Heights, the section in New York City 
where many German-speaking Jews 
lived and where there was a greater 
opportunity for translation work. 

Rav Dr. Joseph Breuer, zt"l, had es- 
tablished his famed K'hal Adath 



Jeshurun in Washington Heights, recon- 
structing a Kehillah on the Hirschian 
model. Rav Breuer understood that it 
was essential to bring the Hirschian writ- 
ings to the English-speaking public. The 
need for Torah im Derech Eretz and the 
Hirschian Kehillah concept was critically 
relevant to our time. Thus he estab- 
lished the Samson Raphael Hirsch Pub- 
lications Society and arranged for the 
publica tion in England of the monumen- 
tal six-volume Commentary to the 
Pentateuch, translated by Dr. Isaac Levy 
and the Horeb, translated by Dayan I. 
Grunfeld. Rav Breuer's son, Jacob, ren- 
dered into modern English Nineteen 
Letters, which had been previously trans- 
lated by Dr. Bernard Drachman. How- 
ever, an English translation was still 
needed for the other Hirschian works. 
Jacob Breuer, then principal of Ye- 
shiva Rabbi S.R. Hirsch, recognized 
Gertrude's skills: in 1956 he asked her 
to translate Rav Breuer's /^u^/s/i Marriage. 
Her translation was masterful and she 
subsequently translated for the Society 
(and its successor Organization, the 
Rabbi Dr. Joseph Breuer Foundation) the 
Hirsch Psalms, the Hirsch Siddur and the 
eight-volume Collected Writings of Rabbi 
S.R. Hirsch. (The eighth and last voIume 
was in the process of complction at the 
time of her passing.) In addition, she 
translated a one-volume anthology of 
the Hirsch commentary to the Pentateuch, 
entitied Terumath Tzvi, as well as the 
translation of Rav Breuer's commentar- 
ies to Yirmii/ahu and Yechezkel and Rav 
E. Munk's World of Prayer. This prodi- 
gious Output, in spite of its time-con- 
suming nature, is a testimony to her rare 
abilities. Her precise and easily under- 
stood translations made these works ac- 
cessible to the English-speaking public. 



f 



\ 



-— fi4 



JEWISH ACTION 



/^ 



y^ 



.^ 



In effect, she contributed to the dissemi- 
nation of this vital portion of our Torah 
literature which has become an integral 
part of Olam Hatorah. 

In her translations, Gertrude 
demonstrated her skill at being 
able to preserve the style, nuances 
and subtleties of the original Ger- 
man while writing in a modern, 
precise, clear English. Her Euro- 
pean background and familiarity 
with the culture and times of Rav 
Hirsch helped her understand the 
historical circumstances of many 
of his writings as well as his lan- 
guage. With her scholarly na- 
ture, she utilized library re- 
sources as well as consultation 
with such rabbinic sources as Rav 
Breuer and Rav Schwab when- 
ever she met with difficulty. Her 
intellectual honesty always pre- 
vailed when she turned to others 
to assist her. Pride never pre- 
cluded her welcome acceptance 
of corrections and suggestions 
from her editors, who included 
such scholars as Rabbi Moshe 
Tendier, Marc Breuer and Rabbi 
Ephraim Oratz. Yet she had an 
innate skill at creative writing. 
A sentence in nineteenth-century 
German can often be the length 
of an entire page! While remain- 
ing faithful to the often-cumber- 
some original, she would present 
the English in a succinct, free- 
flowing, highly-readable fashion. 



associates. However, this did not in any 
way interfere with their relationship. 
Gertrude's wit and stimulating intellect 



Her editorial skills were well- 
recognized and she served as an 
in-house editor for Jewish pub- 
lishers. She co-authored several 
books, such as the definitive 
biographies of Menachem Begin 
and Rav S. Schonfeld. Her 
knowledge o( Central European 
history made her an authority on 
the subject of nineteenth-century 
Moravian Jewry and she wrote 
scholarly articles on the topic. 
Though Gertrude read widely, 
her Spiritual life and Weltanschauung was 
to a large degree formed by the thought 
of Rav Hirsch. Nevertheless, she did 
have her own decided views. For ex- 
ample, she was much more favorably 
inclined to Zionism than many of her 



0^ Personal 
^miniscence 



Sylvia Axelrod Herskowitz 
Director, Yeshiva University 
Museum 



It is hard for me to imagine 
that Gertrude Hirschler, a"h, is no 
longer with us. In my mind's eye I can 
See her with her cart füll of books, news- 
papers and her written notes which she 
often brought with her on her Visits to the 
Museum and the Yeshiva University 
libraries. On those occasions, she would 
sometimes drop by my office and we 
would Chat about all sorts of things — not 
the normal ränge of conversational top- 
ics, but fascinating tidbits about Jewish 
history that she would slip into her con- 
versation like tiny gems. 

Gertrude knew so much about Jewish 
history and the personages that populate 
its pages. When she edited our Ashkenaz 
catalogue, she spent countless hours in 
the galleries of the exhibition adding in- 
credible richness and depth to the curato- 
rial texts. She was a thorough and pains- 
taking scholar who would not stop until 
she had uncovered every last clue on her 
trail. What I remember best is her trium- 
phant smile when she would present her 
findings to me. She derived so much plea- 
sure from researching and learning that 
her face would light up at each discovery. 
At such times, she was radiant. 

We mourn the fact that she is ßone 
from our midst, but in her works and in 
our hearts, she has a presence that will 
never fade. 



made her a sought-after Speaker and 
Consultant by many organizations. 
Aware of her interest, the Yeshiva Uni- 
versity Museum asked her to prepare 
the catalogue for its Ashkenazic Jewry 
exhibition. 

Clearly Gertrude Hirschler's great- 



est accomplishments were her Hirschian 
translations. Her achievements were a 
representation of Torah im Derech Eretz 
^^^ — the use of modern skills and 
— 1 education for Torah. Just a week 
I before her passing, she was pre- 
I sented with a prestigious aw^ard 
by Rav Zechariah Gelley of K'hal 
Adath Jeshurunand Marc Breuer, 
the head of the Rabbi Dr. Joseph 
Breuer Foundation. Her response 
was: "My legacy will always be 
my Hirschian translations." 

Indeed, her legacy remains for 
a grateful public, appreciative 
that she was able to preserve, 
transmit and make accessible the 
Hirschian writings for genera- 
tions to come. Though she was 
embraced by the Breuer Commu- 
nity and became an integral part 
of its life, there was yet a certain 
loneliness to her existence. But 
through the emotional intensity 
and psychological breadth of the 
Psalms she found a vehicle for 
the expression of her own inner 
life, as reflected in a passage from 
the Hirsch Commentary to Psalms 
(90:12) as she translated it: 

All the happiness man is capable 
ofattaining lies in the blissful cer- 
tainty that he has lived all his years, 
days, hours and minutes on earth in 
loyalty to God, and that he has faith- 
fully done his duty through time. 
He who knows how to appreciate 
this kind ofbliss, who measures the 
total zvorth of his life span accord- 
ingly, and who knows how to uti- 
lize every moment of his existence 
for the faithful Service of his God, 
will find the true purpose ofhis life 
in every moment that he spends on 
earth. And whenever God will see 
fit to call him away, he will heed the 
summons, serene in the thought that 
he has happily reached the goal for 
which he was created. ■ 



Dr. Bondi is Chief of Pulmonary Medi- 
ane at Brookdale Hospital Medical Center, 
Brooklyn, N.Y. He is a member of the 
Samson Raphael Hirsch Publica tions Soci- 
ety, and has been associated with Ms. 
Hirschler for many years. 



\> 



JEWISH ACTION 



65 



■\^ 



• Friday, March 4, 1994 • THE JEWISH PRESS • Page 25 



PROFILE 



TOVIA PRESCHEL 



ik 




Gertrude Hirschler, A"H 
Author, Translator And Editor 

Gertrude Hirschler died last month in New York 
at the age of 64. She was a very prolific writer, transla- 
tor and editor of books of interest to Jews. 

Having worked together with her for a number of 
years — both of us served as assistant editors of the 
Encyclopedia of Zionism and Israel (published by 
the Herzl Press and McGraw-Hill) — I had the opportu- 
nity to follow from close-hand her widespread literary 
activities. 

She wrote on many subjects, translated a large 
variety of works and edited numerous books, but she 
was primarily known for her lucid and beautiful 
translations of the writings of Rabbi Samson Raphael 
Hirsch. 

My good friend Jacob Birnbaum, the founder of 
the Student Struggle for Soviet Jewry — whose wife 
Freda visited Miss Hirschler almost daily during the 
last weeks of her illness — mentions the Hirsch 
Siddur among the books translated by the deceased in 
the obituary he published in THE JEWISH PRESS. 

This is true, but one will look in vain for Gertrude 
Hirschler's name in the En^ish edition of the Siddur. 
After she did the translating, those who had commis- 
sioned her to do the work introduced various changes 
with which she could not agree, either because she 
thought that their English was not elegant enough or 



because she feit that they did not adequately convey the 
meaning of the original. She declared; "If you insist on 
inserting the changes, I will have no choice but to 
withdraw my name. I cannot accept responsibility for 
sentences or paragraphs of whose style I do not ap- 
prove." 

[The separate edition of the English translation of 
Rabbi Hirsch 's German translation and commentary on 
Pirkei Avot (Samson Raphael Hirsch Publications 
Society — Philipp Feldheim, 1967, 1979) bears Miss 
Hirschler 's name.) 

This was not the only time she took her name off a 
publication, because of interference in her work as 
translator or editor. 

She was a perfectionist. What others might have 
regarded as good, very good or even excellent was not 
always so in her eyes. There were cases when she was 
commissioned to edit translations and she didn't edit, 
but revised them altogether, 

Mr. Jack Goldman of Judaica Press, who pub- 
lished Miss Hirschler's translations of Asher Lehmann's 
book about young Moshe (The Young Moses, Prince 
of Egypt) and Alexander Z, Friedmann *s Toiroh Kval 
(Wellsprings of Torah) conceived the idea of Publish- 
ing in EngUsh an excerpted edition of Hirsches commen- 
tary on the Torah. T'rumath Tzvi — The Pentateuch 
with a Translation by Samson Raphael Hirsch and 
Excerpts from the Hirsch Commentary appeared in 
1986. The volume, which was edited by Ephraim Oratz 
and translated by Miss Hirschler, carried a brilliant 
introductory essay "Samson Raphael Hirsch: His Life 
and Work," by the translator. 

(A German version of the essay was published in 
volume 13 of Udim, (Frankfort a.M-Luxembourg, 1988) 
the Organ of the rabbis of West Germany, which was 
edited bv the late Prof. Dr. Ernst Roth.l 



In her "Notes on the Translation," Miss Hirschler 
wrote inter alia: "The task of selecting 'excerpts' from 
Hirsch's commentary on the Pentateuch for inclusion in 
an introductory presentation was not taken lightly. A 
Suggestion that Hirsch's commentaries should not be 
translated but raerely 'Condensed' or epitomized was 
rejected. The passages of commentary included in T'ru- 
math Tzvi are translations of Hirsch's own words, 
except that his involved sentences, typical of the ornate 
German of his day, have been broken up into less cum- 
bersome structures, and lengthy passages have been 
divided into paragraphs for easier reading. The present 
translation has attempted to follow a simple, classic 
style which seeks to convey the sense of Hirsch's origi- 
nal, while at the same time making his thoughts readily 
accessible to the modern reader." 

The volume introduced many, many thousands to 
Hirsch's Interpretation of the Torah and world of ideas. 
"T'rumath Tzvi had two impressions. We sold almost 
40,000 copies," Mr. Goldman told me. 

Less known is Miss Hirschler's study on Hirsch's 
activities in Mikulov (Nikolsburg). "Rabbi and States- 
man: Samson Raphael Hirsch, Landesrabbiner of Mora- 
via (1847-1851)" appeared in vol. 1 (1987) of the Re- 
view, the annual publication of the Society for the His- 
tory of Czechoslovak Jews. Miss Hirschler was the asso- 
ciate editor of the Review's sixvolumes which have 
appeared to date. 

The Review was preceded by the Society's trilogy 
The Jews of Czechoslovakia (1968-1984) Miss 
Hirschler was one of the associate editors of the third 
volume. To the second volume (1971) she contributed 
'The History of Agudath Israel in Slovakia (1918- 
1939)." 

(To be continued) ■ 




CHECK IT OUT! • FANTARTir vai ititc a. crDinrci 







id Ansiclit der AuücnküiiunaiKlos des 






Vom Kali-Schacht 
zum KZ-Außenlager 

Xen^müeiiheii und Zukunft von Abteroda 



«./'IM*.* 



UllC'lC'll Will J T vvr'ii*' 






An«"«.' 






O/vxJnil »...., «1«. • ,.., 



, (w »^i'« -*"" 



CrO^vmkri 



A'iriti'irv 



.flCff.! 



.»-* 









, I.. lO'l •/ M<'>'"-«' 

I C if-. 'j'K' > / M.i|l.»qf 

■i m „!,•■ lO'vi r.* ti.i'ikt^' 



discoloring of skin and hair and harmful inf ections^ consequent ly , 
adding the difficult living conditions, deficient food supply, 
inadequate hygiene, as well as cold and moist Temperatures / many 
be )me sick and died. Similar conditions are known to have 
existed in the subdordinate camps Stadtallendor^ and Hessian 
Lichtenau. Both camps had Rail connections to the Eisenach works. 

When towards the end of 1944, the Allied Air Forces bombarded 
the Thuringia-Hessian sector, the captives were forced to find 
protection in the shafts during air raid alarms. They still exist 
today. However damaged and collapsed. In early April 1945 American 
troops reached Thuringa. At a hastily arranged departure / 221 male 
and 249 female prisoners were sent on |'Death Marches" in direction 
of Eisenach or Buchenwald. About their where abouts is nothing 
recorded or known. 




The entire factories, machines and all. was dismantled in 1945/46 
and brought to Russia for restitution. The work halls were dynamited 
only the shaft installations remain as a monument of "industry- 
culture under protection . In a project by the Hessian Heftinqe n 
and the Thuringian Abterode and Merkers the nightmare and terror 

of Eisenach will carry the financial cost to perserve and maintain 
the facilities in sanitary condition. 



Translated from the Original German by Afred Gruenspecht. 



\on neii'.z-Jurgeii Hoppe 

Zu Jon Jankclsicii Seilen in der Geschichte 
JtT Koim-:;:tatioas!at;er gehören die zahlrei- 
cher, lokdlci-; Außen- und Ncbenlagcr. Zu- 
!r.el^l in i'oi:n \on Fertigiings- oder \M*rk!.tat- 
;c.-. Jw: Jc-:schcn Rüstungiindustri-* betrie- 
be::, forderien diese unzalih^e deiiischc und 
.i..'...iii>J)s^lie Malihnge. Kriegsgefangene oder 
/■.vNa:.i:>..i.l\'.U"r aus den Konzenliatiünslagern 
ji-., wiir. s;c als billige und reclulüsc Arbeits- 
k;aKe zo „vcrschroiien", w,c dies von Wirt- 
>;haliilü!irern genannt \surde. 

•\niangs bcsiminiic das SS-Wiriscliaftver- 
.val'.ungshaupianu, wer zum Arbeitseinsatz 
kam oder wer als „Nichtarbeiisl'ähiger". also 
körperlich zerrütteter, kranker oder schwa- 
:ner Hafiling gegen ..gesunde" Gefangene 
ausgetauscht wurde. Spater forderten die In- 
JuüMebotnebe die Z\^angsalbeiter direkt bei 
den Lagerserwaltungen an. Da hierüber kci- 
;,tTlei Mai!si;sclie Unterlagen mehr existieren, 
Ott au^n i'.ichi angefertigt wurden, ist die Ge- 
.^an'.;zall! der durch diese Außen- und Neben- 
i.igei gc'jchleasten Gclangenen nicht ab- 
NChaizbar. So unterstanden der Zentralverwal- 
i^üc des KZ Buchenwald zeitweilig über ein- 
liundei; Lager zwischen Rheni und Hlbe. 

Im Zage dos raschen militärischen Zusani- 
incnbruciis der deutschen Froaten sowie der 
\er5iarkten alliierten Bombenangriffe auf 
deuiscf'.e Städte und Industriezentren wurden 
J;e Rj'-iungsbetriebe in kleinere Einheiten 
au%gegl:cderi. Soweit vorhanden, wurden da- 
rei unterirdische Anlagen bevorzugt. Nach- 
jcni dic Uümbenaiigrifl'e immer tiefer in den 
mittcidcuischen Rai; '.;en wurden. 

\;ihen sich auch «J-*. » ■ ->« ' -b»'.oioren\verke 
ÜMveris^Lh^ Motorf werke Eiscnach' 



gelegte Kalischachianlagcn im mittleren Wcr- 
ratal auszulagern, in Absprache oder Ziisanv 
nienarbeit mit der Wintershall AG wurden so 
drei AulJenkonmiandos des Lagers Buchen- 
wald cingericlUet: l.cimbach/Kaiscroda (..Lud- 
wig Kennticr"), Springen (..Heinrich Kalb") 
und Abteroda („Anton"}, üiese Scliachtanla- 
gc, kurz vor dem lirsten Weltkrieg gegründet, 
wuidc nur wenige Jahre betrieben und 1920 
stillgelegt. Wahrend des Zweiten Weltkrieges 
richtete man in den bestehenden Anlagen ein 
Strafgefangenenlanger der Wehrmacht und 
ein Zwangsarbeiislager ein. 

Am 31. Juli 194-4 wurden etwa 23ü Häftlin- 
ge aus üuchenwald nach Abteroda in Marsch 
gesetzt und dort in üaracken untergebracht. 
SS-Scharlührcr Landau rührte mit einem klei- 
nen Konmiando von SS-Jungmannern. Hun- 
dekommandos und alten Lnndesscluitzen die 
Aufsicht. Das Gehlnde des Mrlnnerlagers 
wurde durch einen zwei Meter hohen Zaun 
mit drei Reihen Stacheldrahi umgrenzt; an 
den Ecken standen Waclitürme. In zwei gro- 
ßen Werkhallen nuiUicn die Häftlinge arbei- 
len und schlafen. 

Neben diesem Manncrlager wurde nach 
dem 6. Okiober 194-» in Abteroda auch ein 
Frauenlager tnii zirka 250 weiblichen ..politi- 
schen" Häftlingen aus dem KZ Ravcnsbrück 
errichtet. Aus den vorhandenen Unterlagen 
gehl hervor, daß diese Frauen vorwiegend aus 
Frankreich. Italien und Jugoslawien stamm- 
ten. Sie erhielten Ihichcnwalder H.ifllings- 
nuinmern. Dieses F'raucnlagcr wuide von 
SSScharlühier Melilführer geleitet. Die 
Wachmannschnfien waren weibliche SS- 
Ücwacherinnen aus Ravcnsbrück. Die Frauen 
waren mit der Herstellung von Sprengstoflcn 
Ijesch.inirit. Volim ungescliüc/t dem Umgang 



giftungen auf. Infolge der unmenschlich har- 
ten Lebensbedingungen wie mangelhafte Kost 
und Hygiene und durch Feuchtigkeit und Kal- 
te lag die Krankheits- und Todesquote sehr 
hoch. (Ähnliche Bedingungen sind aus den 
Nebcnlagcrn in Stadtallcndorf und Hessisch 
Lichtenau bckamii). Beide Lagci waicuduicli 
einen eigenen Gleisanschluß an das Werk Ei- 
senach angebunden. 

Als gegen Ende 1944 der alliierte Luftkrieg 
bis in den ländlichen hessisch-thüringischen 
Raum getragen wurde, mußten die Hiiftlinge 
bei Luftalarm in einem Stollen Schutz suchen. 
Dieser existiert noch heute, ist aber stark be- 
schüdigl und einsturzgefährdet. Anfang April 
1945 erreichten amerikanische Truppen Thü- 
ringen. In hastigem Aul"bruch wurden 221 
mannliche und 249 weibliche Häftlinge in 
Richtung Fisenach oder Buchenwald in To- 
desmarsche geschickt. Über den weiteren Ver- 
bleib der Häftlinge ist nichts bekannt. 

Das ganze Werksgelündc wurde in den Jah- 
ren 1943/46 im Rahmen der Wiedergutma- 
chung abgetragen und die Maschinen in die 
Sowjetunion überführt. Die Werkhallen wur- 
den spater alle gesprengt. Heute steht noch 
die ursprilnglichc Schachtanlage als ein 
Denkmal der Industriekultur unter Schutz. In 
einem Projekt eines grenzübergreifenden re- 
gionalen Werra Kalibergbau-Museum zwi- 
sehen dem hessischen Heringen und dem 
thüringischen Abteroda und Merkers soll 
auch an die schreckliche Geschichte dieser 
ehemaligen KZ-Außenlagcr erinnert werden. 
Der Kreis Eisenach ist zur Trügerschaft bereit. 
Die von der Treuhand vorgesehenen finanziel- 
len .^iitcl zum Abbruch der Anlage sollen 
stattdessen für deren Erhalt und Sanierung 



tPOTUOkT 



/■v*^'.*^»iV V.. 



X Israel MuMum. ha« greater 
reNgiou* utd tchoUriy importanoe 
than any other mantncripl of the 
Bible. Written in TiberiM over a 
miUennium aio ander the lupervi- 
sion of Aaron Ben Aaher, th« last of 
the dynasty thal ihaped the Hebrew 
ttxtut netpnu of th« Bible. it is th« 
most aGcurate,and authoritative 
souree document. not only for the 
biblical text, but also its vocaüza- 
tion, cantillation and mtasortüi. Lit- 
tle wonder that traditioD has invest- 
ed It with revcrence and holineu. 
,, It has also led a charmed life. It 
survived the sack of Jenisalem, ei- 
ther by the Seljuks or the Cnisaden, 
when It was ransomed by the Cairo 
Jewiah Community. It was kept in 
Cairo untii the Uth centurv, when it 
was entrusted to the Aleppo Com- 
munity, where it was guarded with 
ireal care and revercnce for over 
five centuries, only to bc panly de- 
itroyed when Syrian nationalists 
made an attempt to bum down the 
Aleppo synagogue in 1947, follow- 
ing the UN decition on Palestine at 
Lake Suocew. 

^ox a decade the Codex was be- 
lieved toat, mounted by the Jewish 
workl. It was even given an "obitu- 
ary" in Ha'antz by the late Moshe 
David Umberto Caasuto. the only 
modern «cholar who had bcen al- 
low«d to View it and thercfore the 
only oiM H) view it in its entirety 
(Cässuto's notes reoently tumed up. 
but the Scholar had faiied to edit 
them bcfore he died). 

In fact, however, the Codex had 
survived, ihough not in its entirety: 
about a quarter of it had been 
bumed. It was concealed in differ- 
ent places by two eiders of the Com- 
munity. It wu deemcd another Co- 
dex miracle when it suddenly lurned 
up in Israel a decade laier, having 
been smuggied out through Turkey 
by an inirepid littlc nun nanfcd 
Mordecai Faham, who presented it 
lo President Ben-Zvi «t the begin- 
ning of 1938. Faham had risked bis 
hfe. 




C'ir- ^•^^'^f "](',, 




(Clockwise from Icfl) Torrn au». 
photogrmptted üi 1947. A pagtfnm 
ihe mort ihan 1 ,000-year-old 
Aleppo Codex. Tora siudenü in the 
synagogue, 1947. Tt.e Sealed Ark 
is at the end of the aisle. Bima or 
Teva in the summer courtyard. 





Crown 




A leaf from the Aleppo Codex, the earliest-known manuscript öf the füll 
text of the Bible, is currently on view al the Israel Museum, together with 
prev ously unseen photographs of the synagogue In which the keter 
was Jealously guarded for over 500 years, Melr Rönnen reports. 



B 



en-Zvi had been in the fore- 
front of an attempted rescue 



.1.. ^_j._ 



same year that it had been seen by 
Cassuto. Ben-Zvi was then head of 
the Va'ad Leumi, the National 
Council of Jcws in Palestine. He and 
Judah Magnes, the first President of 
«he Hebrew University, sent Yitz- 
hak Shamosh to Aleppo to persuade 
the eiders to transfer the Codex to 
Jerusalem for safe-keeping. llie 
JCWS oi" A!cp(x>, .vh« for centuhes 
held the Codex (their keter, or 
crown. or taj as they calied it) to be 
a talisman of their continu^d well- 
being, rejected the offer out of 
hand. 

Their decision was a fatefui one. 
Though they eventually placed the 
Codex in a kxked iron box kept in 
the "Cave of Elijah" aection of their 
synagogue, it wu seriously dam- . 
Mgcü in ihc firc, oniy 294 oi lome 
.VtO original leaves now resid« per- 
manently in the Ben-Zvi Institut« in 
Jerusalem. Incidentally, Shrine of 
Ihe Book curator Dr. Magen Bro- 
shi, who mounted this slww (and 
produced its pithy caUlogue with 
notes by Amnon Shamoah, Zvi Zo- 
har and Edina Meyer), uys there 
are at le*«t nine different versions of 
Ihe aocount of how the Codex was 
rescued. 

Th« Codex bro«ght to J«niMl«m 
was so b«««tihtl that th«re was littk 
doubt that it was th« real thing. It 
ulliad wfth th« only v«rifying photo- 
graph avallaM«. one of a ^Mri« pagc 
pubKshod in Oxford in IWn by an 
EngUsh tnv«ll«r namcd Wickes. 
who had poichased the photo in 
Aleppo. Ine nbaeqacnt eiders of 




the Aleppo synagogue had never al- 
lowed it to be pholographed; they 
kept it locked and safe from the 
sticky fingers of visiting scholars and 
tourists. 



Th« y«ar 1947 sa«) anoth«r littl« 
miracl« in Aleppo. Sara 
Shammah, an Aleppo housc- 
wife of no academic background or 
pretensions, gave way to a sudden 
Impulse to oommission a local Ar- 
menien photographer (the Arme- 



nians have long had a handle on this 
profession in Ihe Middle East) to 
photograph the huge synagogue. 
Not long after the photO)(raphs were 
printed, the synagogue was exten- 
sively damaged in tne >\n. Sham- 
mah ioined the general escape of 
Jews from Aleppo. taking the prinis 
with her. The pholos oi. view here 
are the original prints. '<cpt out of 
sight in Shammah's hor.ie here for 
Ihe last 40 years. 

Today there are only 700 Jews in 
Aleppo of a Community that once 



numbered tens of thousaods; fheir 
fascinating synagogue is the oldest 
in Ihe world still in use. having been 
lovingly restored some 10 years ago 
through the generosity and connec- 
tions of Steve Shalom of New York, 
scion of an Aleppo family who «vi- 
denlly enjoys special consideration 
from President Assad. 



w 



hy had the codex been de^ 
posiied in this almost för- 
gotten Ottoman town? 



Wsak 



Jkw25, INI 



TUE jnUSALEM POST INTERNA nONAL EDmON 



Dm \Mh Miityry inn o( OOrai 
haiini tor iti umy, foh that riW 
thrlving Aleppo eomaitinity. wh«t« 
Maimonides's best p«pil had settkd 
(tradition has it that the Codex was 
iKcd hy MaimonidM when oopying 
his own Tora scroll). was th« best 
place and had no doubts about send- 
ing it th«r«. Aleppo, then astride the 
great earavan route tp Ih« east. was 
one of the flourishing dties of the 
world and home to one of the riebest 
and most and culturcd Jewish com-- 
munities. 

In size and comnterce, Aleppo 
wu soon to rival European cities 
like Marseilles and Hamburg. 

Lepcnd has it that Joa^ be*'' 
Zeniiah, the Commander of DavfcTs 
army, built a tower and ftktreu that 
form the foundation's of Aleppo's 
dtadel; the great synagogue. the 
««st«rn wing of whMt can be daicd 
to the fifth oantury, Is named for 
him. Thar« is «videncc of a Jewiih 
presenc« hi Aleppp In the Sccond 
Temple period and M pershted there 
even after th« dcWtipn of the 
Jews in Palestine.af tne <nd of the 
talmudic period. By ttk |]th ccnn»- 
ry Aleppo had b«Mi to «dii«v« in 
reputetion,for'lMaB'teirnin|; it 
*« dtsd bv ^.aimtr^iit a«; e >-S- 
con in the darkne»^, /«v/^v", " 
Uk%tn thrMii^MfW^V 
peatfedty iiiTadMX''m;Montoli 
sparwl th^ hm% hi ttfclaaaarr* of 
12M. But In ■ ^bad^ScM Mongoi 
Invasion in 1400, led M Talneflanr; 
many J«wl w«r«^ UüM or* enalaved.' 
When timcs imp(iHwdi the dty at« 
tracted Jews expelMl from Spain, as 
well u.later European Jewish trad- 
en termed frmcos. Oould this be 
the reason why Ashkenazim in this 
country once mistakenlv referred to 
Sephardim u frtnkim j Many frari- 
cos had come here from Aleppo. 

The Aleppo comnnini^ contin- 
ued to be led by th« Dlyan fimily 
who claimed ri>yi|l (fiaeent from the 
house of DayHU Um Dmna jealous- 
ly cortteSfMiJdMW'of SpAhish öri-*, 
gin like Laniado and Huxin. In this 
exhibit, quite miraculously. is a little 
silver Hebrew Tora case plaque 
made SOO years ago bv a Laniado of 
Aleppo in memory of his dead son. 
It lurned up In Jerusalem not so long 
ago when brooght by an Arab lo a 
üeaier who recognized the name 
Laniado; many Laniados are settied 
here. The inscribed silver plaque 
wu acauired by fabied Judaica coi- 
lector Yiuhak Einhorn, who loaned 
it to this Show. 



Aleppo wem into a decline in 
Ihe 19th Century, when al- 
ternative roules lo the east 
opened up. The inaugurktion of the 
Soez Canal in 1869 made matten 
«terse< A modern Khool of the AIN- 
ance Israelite Universelle was 
opened there the same year. Never-t 
theless. the children of the Haiabis. 
as Aleppo Jews are affectionately 
known. began to emigrate to En^ 
gland, Italy. North and South 
America and also to Jerusalem, 
»iicic ÜMy iormcd an intiuennal 
semi-autonomous Sejphardi Commu- 
nity in the ISgOs. 

Those who stayed behind were 
traders, Importen or goMsmiths and 
silversmithSi.They w^re feisty 
enough lo boyoott Oerroan goods in 
the Thirtie« but cscaped the restric- 
tions placed on Jews eisewhere by 
the Vichy Fnafh, But Syrian Arab 
nationaliam wit another autter. af^ 
ter 1947. those who could, fled. All 
that moat Israelit knpw about thana 
and of their illuatrious keter eamie 
from a populär Israel TV drama a«> 
ries. Michel Stfrti md his Som. >:\ 
"Treasures of th« Aleppo Cow i 
munity" is on vi«w st the Israel Mv- 
s«um Library (oy«r until mid-July. 
Accompanving it is a flne little aaod» 
el of the Ateppo syn«fogue. on loaa 
from the Diaspora liuseuns. . - O 






l. 



n 



• t 

i 
\ 
\ 



\ 
\ 
\ 
« 

\ 

aV' 
« 










//^<f 



/ 



^^KP dTf^^^-^A// /g^^^ f<//Pf/io^_ 



/f^f 



\ 



A DAY 

TO 
REMEMBER 




MERGER OF THE CONGREGATIONS 
AHAVATH TORAH and TIKVOH CHADOSHOH 

23 FORT WASHINGTON AVENUE, NEW YORK, N. Y. 10032 



MARCH 14, 1965—10. ADAR II, 5725 



o^ 'Day To ^member. . . 



THERE IS AN old populär saying that on a Jewish holiday or Yom Tov the 
weather is usually beautiful. Gentile women would always remark that when 
the Jews celebrate their holiday it is good to launder, for the weather will be 
good to dry the wash. How true this adage proved for our Congregation on Sunday, 
March 14, 1965. On that day Congregation Ahavath Torah and Tikvoh Chadoshoh 
celebrated its merger; on that day the weather was all sunshine — it was a 
beautiful day. 

The festivities began in the sanctuary of Cong. Tikvoh Chadoshoh. The 
ceremony was brief but very moving. The opening address of Mr. Ferdinand Rubel, 
the long time president of the congregation, brought many a tear to the cyes of 
the overflow assembly. The stirring oration of Mr. Apt brought many memories 
to the congregants. The ceremonies, which were attended by the leaders and many 
members of both congregations, were concluded with a short sermon by Rabbi 
Zimmer. Then the Sifrai Torah were majestically taken from the Oron Kodesh 
with the traditional Vaj'hi Binso'a and escorted by the entire congregation. 

The scene then shifted to the street where our beautiful red and gold trimmed 
chupah was waiting to escort the holy scroUs to their new abode. The procession 
crossed Broadway with a large entourage viewed by many bystanders. 

When the Sifrai I orah reached our beautiful synagogue, they were grceted 
by songs of our boys choir who all donned white and blue yarmulkas. The red, 
white and blue as well as the mogen-David rippled in the brisk spring breeze. The 
procession reached its climax when 3 Sifrai Torah from the synagogue carried by 
the leaders of Congregation Ahavath Torah greeted the scrolls in an official 
''Shalom Alaichem." The gold and silver crowns and K'lai Kodesh as well as the 
royal red "Maentelchen" of Tikvoh Chadoshoh matched by the majestic gold of 
Ahavath Torah made an everlasting Impression upon all participants. 

The entire congregation then entered our synagogue. There, in the presence 
of a Standing overflow crowd, which included representatives of government, and 
lay and spintuai leaders ot many local congregations, the Sitrai 1 orah were 
formally carried into the synagogue to the festive Boruch Habo of our choir. 

After the scrolls were placed into our magnificent Oron Kodesh to the 
words of the traditional UVnucho Yomar, also sung by our choir, the meaning 
of the occasion was expressed by a number of Speakers. The history of our 




Kchilot and the spiritual triumph of rcfugees from a Holocaust novv united was 
eloqucntly expressed by the President, Dr. Nathan Meyer. Greetings and messages 
of congratulations upon the merger of the two congregations were extended by 
Rabbi Eric Zimmer, Mr. Morris Oppenheimer, Honorary President, and Mr. 
Ferdinand Rubel, Vice President. The Union of Orthodox Jewish Congregations 
of America expressed its congratulations personally by an address of Mr. Harold 
Boxer, one of its vice presidents. The messages were interspersed with renditions 
of our choir. 

At the conclusion of the program a reception and collation were held in 
the social hall. Mazol tov congratulations and best wishes were extended by all 
our guests. All left in the same spirit which King Solomon described after the 
dedication of our holy Temple in Jerusalem: ''happy and in good spirits." 

Our prayer for the future is to live up to the words of the Psalmist: Behold, 
how good and how pleasant it is for brethren to dwell together in unity! 

RABBI DR. ERIC ZIMMER 



Abschied von der Synagogue der Congrcgation 
Tikvoh Chadoshoh 




ABSCHIEDS - ANSPRACHE DES PRAESIDENTEN, 
HERRN FERDINAND RUBEL, IN DER 

CONGREGATION TIKVOH CHADOSHOH 

MEINE lieben Freunde: Es ist fuer mich nicht leicht, in dieser Stunde des 
Abschieds von den lieb und teuer gewordenen Raeumen, zu Ihnen zu 
sprechen. 

Wenn man wie ich, als Praesident der Gemeinde fast taeglich hier 
weilte und den Beginn und das Wachsen der Gemeinde ueberwachte, dann 
faellt der Abschied doppelt schwer. 

Hier wo ich zusammen mit Ihnen allen meine Freunde von der Tikvoh 
Chadoshoh, Freud und Leid geteilt habe, wo wir zusammen kamen in Gottesdiensten 
''LICHWAUD HASCHEM" und in wunderbaren Chanukah und Purimfeiern, 
in Sefer-Einweihungen und Schulfeiern, diese Staette war mir und Ihnen allen 
zu einer zweiten Heimat geworden. 

Vor ueber 26 Jahren wurde mit Mithilfe des Prospect Unity Clubs von 
unserem unvergesslichen Rabbi Henry M. Shotland Zichrono Livrochoh. hier 



unsere Gemeinde gegruendet, mit dem Namen ''Tikvoh Chadoshoh" (Neue 
Hoffnung). 

Diese neue Hoffnung hat sich erfuellt. Von einigen wenigen Mitgliedern 
hat sich die Gemeinde zu einer Groesse von einigen Hundert MitgHedern 
entwickelt. Wir sind in dieser Stunde im Gedenken mit all denjenigen verbunden, 
die nicht mehr unter uns weilen. Viele haben ihre letzte Ruhestaette auf unseren 
Friedhoefen im Cedar Park und Beth El gefunden. Est ist uns ein Vermaechtnis 
ihren Geist unter uns weiter leben zu lassen. 

Wenn wir nunmehr, durch Zeitumstaende bedingt, uns mit der Gemeinde 
Ahavath Torah vereinigen, so wird am besten Gewaehr gegeben, dass unsere 
alte Tradition voll erhalten bleibt. 

Ich danke Ihnen Allen, die heute hier versammelt sind, um Zeuge zu sein 
bei der Ueberfuchrung der heiligen Sefer Thorahs von diesen Raeumen zu der 
Synagoge "Ahavath Torah vTikvoh Chadoshoh." Es ist nichts Alltaegliches, bei 
einer solch heiligen Handlung Zeuge sein zu koennen. 

Dieser heilige Moment wird mit Ihnen fuer viele Jahre fortleben. Moegen 
diese Jahre fuer Sie und Ihre Familien Gesundheit und Freude bringen in treuer 
Gemeinschaft mit Klal Israel. 



ABSCHIEDS — ANSPRACHE DES FRUEHEREN LEHRERS, 
DER CONGREGATION TIKVOH CHADOSHOH, 

HERRN THEODOR APT 



«W 



AJAUMER haschem el Avrom: Lech' L'choh Me'arz'choh. . . . G'tt 
sagte zu Abram, gehe hinweg aus deinem Lande, von deinem Geburtsorte 
aus deinem Vaterhause." Dieses Lech L'choh, das zum erstenmale 
an unseren Stammvater Abraham, der damals noch den Namen Avrom fuehrte 
erging, ist seitdem das Schickais — und Losungswort des juedischen Volkes 
geworden. Durch die Jahrtausende mussten unsere Menschen immer wieder zum 
Wanderstab greifen, kaum eine Generation blieb davon verschont. Ob nun 
religioese Probleme die Ursache bildeten, oder Rassenfragen den Grund darstellten, 
das ''Wajelech" des Weiterziehens wechselte stets ab mit dem ''Wajeschew," 
dem zeitweiligen Verbleiben. Und unsere Generation bildete davon keine Aus- 
nahme. Wir koennen ein Lied davon singen, wir haben es am eigenen Leibe 
verspuert, wir wissen, was es heisst, Abschied nehmen zu muessen. 

So sind Sie nun heute auch wieder zu einem Abschied zusammen gekommen. 
Sie wollen die Raeume verlassen, die Ihnen viele, viele Jahre den Mittelpunkt 
Ihres juedischen Lebens bildeten, und die Ihnen das ersetzen sollten, was for 



N 



mehr als 26 Jahren drueben im anderen Lande zerstoert worden ist. Sie kamen 
hierher um Ihrem G'tte zu dienen, Sie kamen hierher wenn Simchaus in der 
Familie zu verzeichnen waren, um hier Ihrer Freude Ausdruck zu geben und 
Ihrem G'tte zu danken, Sie kamen aber auch hierher wenn G'tt behuete das 
Leid eintraf, weil Sie an dieser heiligen Staette Trost finden wollten. 

Die Zeitverhaeltnisse haben nun auch hier diktiert. Raschi erklaert den 
Ausdruck 'i^ech L'choh" in wunderbarer Weise, indem er sagt: Lech L'choh" — 
Lahanos'choh Ultauwos'choh. Zu deinem Nutzen und zu deinem Besten. Und das 
sagen auch wir in dieser Stunde, es sei zum Besten. Dinge, die man im Leben nicht 
aufhalten kann, muss man versuchen das Beste daraus zu machen. 

Und Sie haben das Beste daraus gemacht, denn Sic haben sich vereinigt mit 
einer Gemeinde die einen grossen Namen hat, mit einer Gemeinde, die gefuehrt 
wird von wahrhaft torah-treuen, tief religioesen Menschen, und die in ihrem 
geistigen Fuehrer einen Mann besitzt, der ueber die Grenzen von Washington 
Heights hinaus bekannt ist, fuer seine vortrefflichen Fuehrereigenschaften. Eine 
Gemeinde die so ungeheuer aktiv ist, und deren ganzes Wirken, Streben und 
Schaffen von echt juedischem Geist durchzogen ist. Das kann nur eines zur Folge 
haben, dass der Segen des Allmaechtigen, ''BIRKAS HASCHEM'' auf der neuen 
Vereinigung ruhen wird. 

So ist nun auch fuer mich der Augenblick gekommen, wo ich mich von 
Ihnen, meine Freunde von der Tikwoh Chadoschoh verabschieden muss. Gewiss 
es ist kein Abschied fuer immer und wenn ich eine Gelegenheit habe, in Ihrer 
Mitte zu sein, so, werde ich es tun. Aber ich bin auch so ehrlich zu sagen, dass 
dies nicht zu oft der Fall wird sein koennen, denn ich wohne nicht in dieser 
Gegend und gehoere ausserdem seit vielen Jahren einer anderen Grossgemeinde 
an, mit der ich sehr verwachsen bin. So nehme ich die Gelegenheit, Ihnen allen 
von Herzen dafuer zu danken, dass Sie es mir ermoeglicht haben, noch einmal., 
kurz bevor ich das sogenannte Retirement Alter erreicht habe, fuer 1 1 ' ^ Jahre in 
dem Beruf taetig zu sein, der mir von allen, der schosnste, liebste und teuerste 
war, der Lehrerberuf. Ihnen den Mitgliedern der Gemeinde gebuehrt dafuer mein 
Dank, denn ohne Ihre Mitgliedschaft in dieser Gemeinde, waere es ja nicht 
moeglich gewesen, eine Hebrew-School zu unterhalten. Und ebenso war es fuer 
mich stets eine hohe Ehre, als Ihr "SCHLIACH ZIBBUR'^ oft am Schabbos und an 
den hohen Feiertagen vor den Allmaechtigen hinzutreten. Mein Dank gilt auch 
den Maennern vom Board, mit denen ich in so harmonischer Weise zusam- 
mengearbeitet habe. Und 'iast but not least" danke ich den Herren Rubel und 
Rosenberg, die zu mir nicht wie Vorgesetzte, sondern wie wahre Freunde waren. 
Mit Stolz kann ich sagen, dass in den 1 1 Jahren meiner Taetigkeit nicht ein einziges 
hartes Wort zwischen uns gefallen ist. Ich bin gluecklich, soviel Erfolg in der 
Schule gehabt zuhaben, um die Kinder dem Judentum zuzufuehren. 

So wuensche ich Ihnen allen in dieser Stunde von Herzen alles Gute, moege 
"Haschem Jisborach" seinen Segen ueber Sie ausschuetten, und Ihnen und Ihren 



Familien nur Gesundheit und Wohlergehen zukommen lassen. Ich rufe Ihnen zu: 
"Boruch Atoh B'Zeseehoh," gesegnet moegest Du sein bei Deinem Auszug, ich sage 
aber auch "Boruch Atoh B'Wauechoh" gesegnet moegest Du sein bei Deinem Ein- 
zug, wenn sie nun in wenigen Minuten unter dem Gesang des "Boruch Haboh" in 
ihre neue Staette einziehen werden. Ich zitiere Ihnen, um mit hebraeischen Worten 
abzuschhessen, 2 Psalmen, die mit den Worten enden:: "Siehe wie gut und wie 
schoen es ist, wenn Brueder in Eintracht zusammen wohnen." Das ist die Botschaft 
in dieser Abschiedsstunde. Mag es draussen auch toben und stuermen, moegen die 
anderen sich bekaempfen und befeinden, wir muessen eintraechtig und in Scholaum 
miteinander leben, denn nur dann koennen wir zusammen arbeiten; Lichwaud 
Hak'hilloh, Lichwaud Hatauroh W'Lichwaud Haschern," zur Ehre der Gemeinde, 
zur Ehre der Torah und zur Ehre des Allmaechtigen, Amen. 



ABSCHIEDS— ANSPRACHE DES RABBINERS 

DR. ERIC ZIMMER IN DER SYNAGOGUE 

DER CONGREGATION TIKVOH CHADOSHOH 

C"^ ESTERN beerten wir die Parsha von Amaiek Parshas Sochor. Der Talmud 
T sagt uns, dass diese Mizwoh Amaiek auszurotten und seine haessliche 
grausame Tat nicht zu vergessen, mit zwei anderen Mizwohs verbunden 
ist. Die eine ist einen Koenig zu waehlen, das heist eine Obrigkeit zu erwaehlen 
welcher das Volk leiten &. fuehren wird. Die Andere ist ein G'ttes Haus zu 
errichten. 

Diese drei Mizwohs spielten eine grosse Rolle in der Geschichte des Juedischen 
Staates in alter Zeit und in aehnlicher Weise spielten diese eine Rolle in der 
Geschichte dieser Gemeinde Tikvoh Chadoshoh und in der Gemeinde Ahavath 
Torah. 

Wer O' Wer kann den Amaiek unserer Zeit vergessen. Wer O' Wer kann 
den Mord unserer Muetter und Vaeter, Brueder und Schwestern, Soehne und 
Toechter vergessen. Nein, der Mizwoh Amaiek immer zu gedenken, wird bei uns 
in unserer Zeit, bei unserer Generation nie mehr vergessen werden. Es war unser 
Sechus den Untergang unseres Feindes zu erleben. So moegen alle Amalekiter 
die unsere Vernichtung begehren, vom Erdboden verschwinden. 

Das zweite Gebot einen Leiter und Fuehrer des Volkes zu erwaehlen ist 



noch wichtiger. Die Vernichtung des Feindes sichert uns noch keine Juedische 
Existenz. Eine Juedische Existenz ist uns aber versichert, wenn wir in den Wegen 
des Ewigen, wie er es uns in seiner Torah vorschreibt, wandeln. Fuer dies benoetigt 
Israel Wegweiser und Fuehrer. Der Talmud fragt: Wer sind heute die Koenige? 
Unsere Rabbiner! Tikvoh Chadoshoh hatte das Sechus diese zweite IVIizwoh in 
Erfuellung zu bringen. Sie hatte faehige geistige Fuehrer die ihre Gemeinde 
leiteten. Wir gedenken heute des Gruenders der Gemeinde Rabbi Henry Schott- 
land und Herrn Theodor Apt. 

Die dritte Mizwoh ist ein G-tteshaus zu bauen. Das Juedische Volk mag 
wohl Rabbiner und Fuehrer haben, aber eine Staette in dem die Torah gelehrt 
und gelernt werden kann ist ebenso wichtig. Ein Ort wo wir unsere Gebete 
sprechen koennen und wo man mit Andacht zum Ewigen beten kann. Eine 
Stelle wo man in Zeiten der Gefahr die Barmherzigkeit G'ttes sucht. Ein Raum 
wo man in Zeiten der Freude zusammen feiern, und unseren Dank und Preis dem 
Allguetigen entbieten koennen. Ein Haus G'ttes, ein Heiligtum wo man durch 
die Kedushoh des Göttlichen sich erhoben fuehlt. Ein Bais Hamikdosh ist uns 
befohlen zu bauen. Auch diese Mizwoh hat die Gemeinde Tikvoh Chadoshoh 
erfuellt. In diesen Raeumen haben sie 26 Jahre gebetet und gelernt. 

Diese 3 Mizwohs sind charakteristisch fuer diese Gemeinde. Dies ist im kurzen 
die Geschichte dieser Gemeinde. Geschichte ist aber eine Erzaehlung der Ereignisse 
der Vergangenheit. Es ist nicht leicht sich von Raeumen, in denen man 26 Jahre lang 
freudige und traurige Zeiten erlebte, zu trennen. Es ist sehr schwer sich von der 
Vergangenheit zu trennen. Eigentlich ist es eine Mizwoh der Vergangenheit zu 
gedenken. Aber wir Juedische Menschen leben nicht nur ganz in der Vergangenheit, 
wir leben heute auch fuer die Zukunft. Obwohl wir jetzt von diesen Raeumen 
Abschied nehmen, was uns ein wenig betruebt, scheint doch die Sonne der 
Zukunft auf uns, zusammen als Ahavath Torah vTikvoh Chadoshoh. Wir koennen 
und werden weiter bauen, weiter lernen und in groesserer Zahl unseren Preis und 
Lob dem Ewigen singen. Wenn wir uns nun von unseren Plaetzen erheben um 
das Wajhi Binsaua zu singen, so sollen wir denken, dass wir jetzt unsere heilige 
Torah, die von der glorreichen Vergangenheit unseres Volkes erzaehlt, in die 
strahlende Zukunft hinaustragen. 

Moege der Ewige uns beistehen in allen unseren Werken, und die Arbeit 
unserer Haende segnen. Omen. 



P R G R A M 



* • • • • 



an the occasion oj the tnerger of 



Congregation Ahavath Torah and Tikvoh Chadoshoh 

Sunday, 10. Adar II, 5725. March 14th, 1965, in the Synagogue, at 

23 Fort Washinston Avenue 



* • * * • 



1. Procession with Sifrai Torah 

2. Festive Entrance of Sifrai Torah into Synagogue followed 
by Hakofoh 

3. Greetings: President Dr. Nathan Meyer 

4. Greetings. Rabbi Eric Zimmer 

5. Choir: Toras Hashem Temimo 

6. Greetings: Honorary President Mr. Morris Oppenheimer 

7. Greetings: Vice President Mr. Ferdinand Rubel 

8. Boy"s Choir: Shalom Rov 

9. Address: Mr. Harold Boxer, Vice President, Union of 
Orthodox Jcwish Congrcgations of America 

10. Reccption 



Minchah Service FolJowing Reception 




GREETINGS OF THE PRESIDENT DR. NATHAN MEYER: 



RABBI ZIMMER, members of the l^oard, 
Ladies and Gentlemen, members of Con- 
gregation Ahavath Torah vTikvoh-C'hado- 
shoh of Washington Heights: 

It is my privilege and an honor to extend our 
heartiest welcome and our thanks for participating 
in our festivities to: 

Congressman of our District of N. Y., The 
Honorable William F. Ryan, 

Senator of the State of N. Y. and Senate 
Majority Leader, The Honorable Joseph 
Zaretzski, 

The Vice-President of the Union of Orthodox 
Congregations, Mr. Harold Boxer, 

The esteemed Rabbis and Delegates of Congregation Shaare Hatikva, Con- 
gregation Beth Israel, Congregation Beth Hamidrosh Hagodaul, Congrega- 
tion of Washington Heights, Congregation Ohav Sholaum, Congregation Beth 
Hillel, Congregation Sichraum Kedaushim, and the Representatives of the 
Jewish War Veterans. 

It is furthermore my privilege to State today and in this hour publicly and as a 
fact the merger of two great Congregations of the orthodox jewish faith: the 
Congregation Ahavath Torah and the Congregation Tikvoh Chadoshoh into ons 
Congregation, Incorporated by the State and the City of New York, as ''Congre- 
gation Ahavath Torah vTikvoh Chadoshoh of Washington Heights." This is in 
the history of our City a rare occasion and to all who have given their efforts to 
the success and fulfillment of this work of brotherly love and understanding, 1, 
as President of our Congregation extend my thanks and my good wishes. 

It is fitting at this moment to go back to the history of our Congregation, 
to their beginning and their existence. when the first immigrants from a country 
with decaying moral, found refuge in this beloved land. 

They were jews from Germany, members of a decent society, who had 
contributed with the best of their abilities to the culture, the science, the economi- 
cal and ethical development of their fatherland, who had written their names 
with the blood of their fathers and their sons in the past of this country. 
They were deprived of their rights by a criminal government, that had gained 
the Upper hand, their possessions were taken away, their property was stolen, 
their money was confiscated and they were fortunate to reach a haven in 
gaining entrance in the harbors of the United States. First 1933/34 there came a 
few, then the masses arrived. Most of them had no money, they had nothing to 
Support themselvcs, most of them depended on the hclp of Charitablc Institutions, 
but they did not come empty handed, they brought with them their skills, they 
brought their knowledge, they brought their science and education, they brought 
their wisdom and their initiative, they brought their connections in the business 
World and most of all they brought their good will to serve their new homeland. 
And it was a good immigration, an Immigration that worked out to the good of 




the country and thc individiial. Biit that was not all, that thcy had taken with them 
to thcir New Land. 

They had in thcm thc burning desirc to serve G'd, to servc G'd in the same 
way as their tathers and torefathers had done. And when on the lOth ot November 
1938. the infamous Cristal night, the Houses of G'd were burned in Germany, 
uhen the Holy Scrolls went up in flames, when all jewry all over the world feil in 
mourning, the desire to have their own place of worship, a place where they 
could pray and sing and come together and learn Torah and Mishna and Gemoroh, 
a place where a Rabbi could speak to them, a man to whom they could turn in 
their niisery, became stronger and stronger and out of this desire many Congre- 
gations originated, among them Ahavath Torah and Tikvoh Chadoshoh, separated 
only by a few blocks, characterized more or less, by "Landsmannschaften," by the 
part of the old country where they came from, but similar in their religious upbring- 
ings and their traditions. 

May 1 mention 2 men only, who gave their energy and their enthusiasm to 
the hard beginning and the growth of these Congregations: Rabbi Henry M. 
Shotland of Tikvoh Chadoshoh, Sichronoh Livrochoh, and Mr. Max Oppenheimer, 
Sichronoh Livrochoh, the first President of Ahavath Torah, who gave their ali 
to their Congregations. May their memory be blessed. 

Out of the small earnings of the newcomers they spared themselves a few 
peanies a day for the support of their congregations. But within the years these 
congregations grew richer and soon the formerly poor were able to support the 
less fortunates and from these new congregations many institutes of the sick, 
of the poor. institutions of learning in the U. S. and in Israel were benefiting by 
a steady strcam of financial support. 

But within the years many members passed on, many moved away to other 
parts of the city and the country. the young ones got married and looked for 
homes far from the Syna^ogues and their parents.So the leaders of the two 
Congregations came together and like brothers joined their hearts and their hands 
to bc one. 

I am very proud to have the honor to be the President of this Congregation. 

May G*d. the Almighty G'd. hold His protecting band over us, that we may 
serve HIM. that we may serve this Community, and that we may be able, in our best 
way to contribute to the peace and welfare of our Country, the United States, the 
Land of Israel and the whole world. 

And now I want to introduce to you a man, who is young but wise, who is 
energetic but peaceful, he is a man you can turn to and speak to, a man who 
will help you to solve your problems, a man of high integrity and pureness ot 
character, Ladies and Gentlemen, I introduce to you our spiritual leader, our 
most revered, our beloved Rabbi Dr. Eric Zimmer: 




GREETINGS OF RABBI DR. ERIC ZIMMER 




I 



T IS RULED in the Shulchan Aruch that when 
individuals wish to enter into a partnership 
they are not considered incorporated by the 
mere declaration of intentions. What makes their 
intentions binding is an act, a symbolic transac- 
tion; a Kinyan — an act of acquisition. Through 
such acts, and they are numerous and varied 
according to the nature of the partnership, does 
the actual association of the parlies involved take 
legal effect. 

This day we officially celebratcd the estab- 
lishment of a union of two congregations. We have 
entered into a partnership to share a common 
cause — that cause is our dedication to Torah. Since the law just cited 
reads that mere declaration of intention to incorporate does not render the 
partnership binding, we have, therefore, this day, performed a symbolic act. 
We have enacted a symbolic Kinyan, as it were, by the meeting of the Sifrai Torah 
of both congregations and their festive Installation into one common ark. 

Our sages were always concerned with the methods by which the Torah, 
the totality of Jewish law, can be properly acquired. The tannaitic addition to the 
Tractate Aboth (the Sayings of the Fathers), appropriately entitled "On the 
Acquisition of Torah," thoroughly discusses this problem. There are 48 qualifica- 
tions which are required for the acquisition — the Kinyon — of Torah. On this day 
of our merger we pledge ourselves to attempt their fulfillment. May we enumerate 
but a few: 

He who loves the Almighty! We pledge to bring glory to our Torah through 
the love of G-d, through communal prayer and by fulfillment of Mitzvot. 

He who loves mankind! We pledge to bring glory to our Torah by honoring 
the dignity of our fellow men and by extending understanding and respect to all men. 

He who loves righteousness! We pledge to bring glory to our Torah by recog- 
nizing the needs of our brethren, near and far, who need our help and seek our 
support both financial and moral. 

We pledge to fulfill these with reverence, in awe, with modesty and cheer- 
fulness. May the graciousness of the Lord, our G'd, be upon us. Establish Thou 
the work.of our hands; the work of our band do Thou establish. 




PRAESIDENT DR. NATHAN MEYER: 

MONATF. ziiriieck hat eine kleine Gruppe von Maenncrn zusammen mit mir, 
kommend von beiden Gemeinden Ahavath Torah sowohl als Tikvoh Cha- 
dcshoh sich zusammen gefunden und in vorbereitenden Besprechungen den 
Zusammenschluss der Gemeinden angebahnt. Ich danke an dieser Stelle unserem 
Ehren-Praesidenten Herrn Isaak Rosenberg, imseren beiden Vice-Praesidenlen 
Herrn Helmut Isaacson und Herrn Ferdinand Rubel, besonders aber dem Mann, 
dem ich vor 4 Jahren als Praesidcnt der Gemeinde folgte, dem Mann, der die 
Geschicke der Gemeinde 1 I Jahre geleitet hat. unserem verehrten Ehren-Praesi- 
denten. Herrn Morris Oppenheimer, der nun 7u Ihnen sprechen wird: 



^ 



ANSPRACHE DES EHREN-PRAESIDENTEN 
HERRN MORRIS OPPENHEIMER: 







F 


«LOi^H 


w 

1^ 


r 


^^it^g 


.JIK^MßW^ 


IHi 





TIEF geruchrt und doch voll Freude erfuellt, 
stehe ich in dieser weihevollen Stunde vor 
Ihnen, um Ihnen meine lieben Freunde, 
innigste Glueckwuensche zu entbieten. 

Glueckwuensche zu dem Bund, den Tikvoh- 
Chadoshoh mit Ahavath Torah geschlossen. 

Vor wenigen Tagen wurde die Vereinigung, 
dem Gesetz entsprechend vor einem Richter dieses 
Landes vollzogen. Heute stehen wir vor dem 
hoechsten Richter, der den geschlossenen Bund 
besiegelt. 

Ich moechte diese Bindung mit einer Eheschliessung vergleichen, so wie 
der Braeutigam seine Braut unter die Chuppo fuehrt. haben wir heute die TORAH 
ROLLEN unter einer Chuppo getragen, empfangen von 3 Torah Rollen dieser 
Gemeinde, welche alsdann gemeinsam in die Heilige Lade gestellt wurden. 

Moegc dieser Bund zum Segen und Nutzen dieses Landes sein, das Land, 
das uns vor ca. 25 Jahren aufgenommen und uns unsere Freiheit wieder gegeben, 
das Land in welchem wir unseren gewohnten, traditionellen rcligioeseii Pflichten 
wieder nachgehen konnten. 

Moege der Allmaechtige diesem Bund seinen Segen geben und uns die 
Kraft, sodass wir vereint alle Pflichten erfuellen koennen, zum Wohle unserer 
Gemeinde Ahavath Torah v'Tikvoh Chadoshoh und zum Wohle von ganz Israel 




ANSPRACHE DES BISHERIGEN PRAESIDENTEN 

DER CONGREGATION TIKVOH CHADOSHOH, 

HERRN FERDINAND RUBEL: 

RABBI ZIMMER, Guest Rabbis und Dele- 
gierte anderer Gemeinden, Praesident Dr. 
Meyer, Ehren Praesidentcn Mr. Rosenberg 
und Mr. Oppenheimer, Vice Praesident Vir. Isaac- 
son, Herren vom Board of Trustces, Freunde und 
Mitglieder beider Gemeinden. 

Vor einer halben Stunde haben wir zum 
letztenmal in unseren alten Raeumen geweilt, um 
Abschied zu nehmen von der Stactte, d:c uns 26 
Jahre lang als ein G'tteshaus gedient und ein 
Sammelpunkt unserer Gemeindemitgüed.r war, 
zur Ehre des Allmaechtigen. 

Mit dem Gesang des "Wajhi Binsauah" sind dann die heiligen Torahrollen uns 
vorangegangen, um zu Ihrer neuen Staette geleitet zu werden. LJnd unter dem 
Gesang des "Uvnucho Yomar" ist nun hier in diesen heiligen Raeumen der 
Graun Hakaudesch geschlossen worden. So war es stets beim juedischen Volke. 
In Freud und Leid, in Krieg und Frieden, die Torah ging stets voraus. Und in der 
wunderbaren art wie unsere Sifrei Torah von den Ihrigen empfani^en wurden, 
wollen wir ein Symbol sehen, fuer die Einigkeit und Zusammenarbeit unserer 
neuen Gemeinde ^'Ahavath Torah vTikvoh Chadoshoh." 

Gemeinsam und mit neuer Kraft wollen wir geeint unserem G'tte dienen und 
ueber allem was wir tun, soll das Motto stehen: 

"Lichwüud Haschern'' zur Ehre G'ttes. 

Ich moechte in dieser Stunde meinen Dank aussprechen meinem alten Board 
und allen Mitgliedern der Tikvoh Chadoshoh, aber ebenso herzlich danke ich den 
Fuehrern unserer neueen Kehillo, Rabbi Zimmer, President Dr. Meyer, Mr. 
Oppenheimer, sowie allen Mitgliedern der Ahavath Torah, von denen ich weiss, 
dass sie all den neuen Mitgliedern ein herzliches '^Boruch Haboh" zurufen werden' 

Unsere Bitte in dieser Stunde geht an den Allmaechtigen, dass er unser Werk 
segnen moege. 




IN CONCLUSION of the festivities, thc Chairman of the Joint Youth Com- 
mission of thc Union of Orthodox Congregations of America and newly elected 
Vice President of the Union 

Mr. Harold H. Boxer 
spoke to the new Congregation Ahavath Torah vTikvoh Chadoshoh. He extended 
bis best wishes and expressed the importance of Cooperation among orthodox 
jewish Congregations. 



Our Choir which participated during the festivities with sacred melodies, concluded 
with the words of the psalm: "Shalom Rov." 

May the Almighty extend His blessing to our Congregation. 



fi" ^Ao/k 



lAf 



au+REO GfiUMUCcitT T^u)^y cou_ecriDHi 



^r 



f\fv\AlL-^n£>^ Pui/5><;flvg 



i/. 



Donnerstag, 8. Juni 1995, Nr. 131 • S/R/D 



"Frankfurter Rundschau" 



Die SEITE DREI 



Er formuliert flüssiger und wirkt gelöster als sonst 

Beim zweiten Besuch in Israel vermied Kanzler Kohl Peinlichkeiten und trat wie ein großer Staatsmann auf 



Von Ferdos Forudastan (Jerusalem) 

Was ist das wohl für eine Situation? 
Man läuft durch die nachtschwarze Ge- 
denkstätte, sieht die Kerzen flackern, hört 
die Stimme vom Band Namen der 1,5 Mil- 
lionen von den Nazis ermordeter Kinder 
verlesen, tritt ins sonnengrelle Freie, 
blickt in Dutzende von surrenden und 
klickenden Kameras, bekommt ein Mikro- 
fon vor die Nase gestoßen und die Frage 
zugerufen, was einem 50 Jahre nach dem 
Ende der NS-Herrschaft und 30 Jahre 
nach Aufnahme der diplomatischen Bezie- 
hungen zu Israel an diesem Ort bewegt . . . 

Wie Helmut Kohl sich an diesem Mor- 
gen in Yad Vashem fühlen mag, was er 
denkt: Die vielen Begleiter der Kanzler- 
Reise in den Nahen Osten können es sei- 
ner Antwort nicht entnehmen. Er sei „tief 
bewegt", sagt Kohl und „voll Scham"; es 
wäre schlimm, wenn man vergessen wür- 
de, es wäre aber auch schlimm, wenn man 
sich nur erinnern und die Zukunft vergeu- 
den würde . . . Das alles klingt einstudiert 
und ist es vermutlich auch. Nachdem die 
erste Israel-Reise des deutschen Regie- 
rungschefs vor elf Jahren so schiefgegan- 
gen war, wird der Kanzler beim zweiten 
Mal alles daran gesetzt haben, daß der 
zweite Besuch der heiligen Stadt Jerusa- 
lem ganz glatt verläuft. Und das gelingt. 

Hatte er 1984 versucht, die Israelis mit 
zackigen Worten über den richtigen Um- 
gang mit der Geschichte zu belehien, hat- 
te von der Gnade der späten Geburt ge- 
schwatzt, war in einem unangemessenen 
Tempo durch die Holocaust-Gedenkstätte 
Yad Vashem geeilt, war nicht imstande, 
seine Ungeduld zu verbergen, und war da- 
für von israelischen wie deutschen 
Medien ziemlich kritisiert worden, so 
streicht Kohl dieses Mal fast nur Lob ein. 
Die israelischen Zeitungen berichten 
überwiegend nüchtern bis freundlich über 
den Besucher. Die deutschen Zeitungen 
und Sender begleiten ihn sehr wohlwol- 
lend. Und auch Ignatz Bubis, Vorsitzen- 
der des Zentralrats der Juden in Deutsch- 
land und Mitglied in der großen Delega- 
tion von Industriellen, Nahost-Experten, 
Journalisten, findet, daß Helmut Kohl „es 
dieses Mal richtig gut macht". 

Bei der Begrüßung mit militärischen 
Ehren im Rosengarten vor der Knesseth, 
danach Yad Vashem, vor der Presse mit 
MiniQfprnräsiHpnt Yit7hak Rahin bpim 

feierlichen Abendessen in der Privatresi- 
denz des Regierungschefs: Überall, wo 
Helmut Kohl während dieser dreieinhalb 
Tage in Israel auftritt, formuliert er flüs- 
siger als früher, wirkt gelöster als sonst, 
wenn er etwas zur deutschen Geschichte 
sagen muß. Natürlich, er spricht auch 
hier von den Nazi-Greueln nur als Verbre- 
chen, „die in deutschem Namen begangen 
worden sind". Noch immer und selbst an 
diesem Ort scheint er es nicht über die 
Lippen bringen zu können, daß es „Deut- 
sche" waren, oder wenigstens „Nazis und 
ihre Helfershelfer", die sechs Millionen 
Juden auf dem Gewissen haben. Im deut- 
schen Namen, kritisiert Bubis am Rande, 
das höre sich an, als ob damals Fremden- 
legionäre oder Marsmenschen am Werk 
gewesen seien. Doch bleiben die „Verbre- 
chen in deutschem Namen" praktisch das 
einzige Steinchen des Anstoßes während 
dieser Reise. 

Helmut Kohl in Israel 1984, Helmut 
Kohl in Israel 1995: Zwischen beiden Be- 
suchen liegen elf Jahre, in denen sich sehr 
viel getan hat. Da ist einmal der Kanzler 
selbst. Damals war Kohl erst kurze Zeit 
im Amt, war ein nervöser Neuling. Heute 
gilt Helmut Kohl als Schirmherr der deut- 




Der Kanzler vor der Gedenkwand, auf der an die von den Nationalsozialisten vernich- 
teten jüdischen Gemeinden in Deutschland erinnert wird. (Bild: M. Kahana/dpa) 



sehen Wiedervereinigung, als Bauherr des 
Hauses Europa. Ignatz Bubis drückt es so 
aus: Menschen entwickelten sich eben in 
einem solchen Zeitraum. Kohl sei heute 
viel professioneller, viel souveräner als 
damals. Mehr noch, er woF-de inzwischen 
„der Rolle des Staatsmannes voll und 
ganz gerecht". 

Es ist aber auch ein völlig anderer äu- 
ßerer Rahmen, in dem die zweite Israel- 
Reise Kohls stattfindet, der diesen Besuch 
zu einem ganz anderen macht als jenen. 
1984 verkündete der damalige Regie- 
rungschef Yitzhak Schamir in der Illu- 
strierten Stern: „Wir werden niemals mit 
der PLO verhandeln, denn diese Leute 
sind unsere Todfeinde." Seit vorvergange- 
nem Jahr herrscht mindestens auf dem 
Papier Frieden zwischen Israelis und Pa- 
lästinensern. Damals warf Schamir unter 
anderem den Deutschen vor, daß sie dar- 
aufdrängten, die Palästinensische Befrei- 
ungsorganisation in den nahöstlichen 
Friedensprozeß einzubeziehen. Heute bit- 
tet Regierungschef Yitzhak Rabin den 



Bundeskanzler, daß das wirtschaftlich 
starke und politisch mächtige Deutsch- 
land bei der Unterstützung des — ins 
Stocken geratenen — nahöstlichen Frie- 
densprozesses eine führende Rolle über- 
nimmt. Vor gut einem Jahrzehnt verfolg- 
ten die Israelis Kontakte der Bundesrepu- 
blik zu den Arabern mit Argusaugen. In 
diesen Tagen kann Helmut Kohl zu dem 
ehemals als Terroristen geächteten PLO- 
Chef Yassir Arafat ins inzwischen palästi- 
nensisch verwaltete Jericho fahren, ihm 
seine Sympathie bekunden, ohne den is- 
raelischen Unmut auszulösen. 

Er wolle kein Vermittler im nahöstli- 
chen Friedensprozeß sein; er sehe sich als 
„Fürsprecher" innerhalb der Europäi- 
schen Union. Das hatte der Bundeskanz- 
ler noch wenige Tage vor seiner Reise, die 
ihn über Kairo und Amman nach Jerusa- 
lem führte, gesagt. Nach kurzer Zeit frei- 
lich schwindet die demonstrative Zurück- 
haltung des Kanzlers und seiner Mitar- 
beiter ein wenig. Und das liegt besonders 
an den Gastgebern. Ägyptens Staatschef 



Hosni Mubarak lobt den „lieben Bruder 
Helmut" und seinen Einsatz für den Frie- 
den. Jordaniens König Hussein würdigt 
Kohl als „einen der größten Staatsmän- 
ner", ähnlich preist ihn Israels Premier 
Yitzhak Rabin. Mubarak, Hussein, Ara- 
fat, Rabin drängen den Kanzler mit unter- 
schiedlichen Vokabeln zwar, jedoch glei- 
cher Eindringlichkeit, dön Nahost-Prozeß 
so weit er das vor allem innerhalb Euro- 
pas vermag, zu unterstützen. 

Bitten, auf die der Deutsche mit ziem- 
lich konkreten Versprechen reagiert. Yitz- 
hak Rabin etwa sagt Kohl zu, Israel die 
Tür in die Europäische Union weiter zu 
öffnen, sich für ein neues Kooperationsab- 
kommen, für niedrigere Handelsschran- 
ken einzusetzen. Zusammen mit Rabin 
und König Hussein hebt der Kanzler im 
israelisch-jordanischen Grenzgebiet ein 
Wasserbauprojekt aus der Taufe, das die 
Europäer rund 450 Millionen Dollar ko- 
sten soll. PLO-Chef Yassir Arafat be- 
kommt eine zusätzliche Aufliauhilfe von 
zehn Millionen Mark. Außerdem hat man 
in Jerusalem besprochen, daß die bisheri- 
ge Entwicklungshilfe von 140 Millionen 
Mark an Israel künftig überwiegend in 
den Aufbau der Infrastruktur in palästi- 
nensisch verwalteten Gebieten und in Jor- 
danien fließt. 

Mag sein, daß sich Helmut Kohl von 
dem begeisterten Empfang in Kairo und 
Amman und in dem palästinensisch ver- 
walteten Jericho, von der sehr freundli 
chen Aufiiahme in Jerusalem mitreißen 
läßt, daß seine Reden deswegen bewegter, 
seine Gesten größer werden. Doch es 
steckt sicher auch noch etwas ganz ande- 
res hinter der Eindringlichkeit Kohl'scher 
Worte, die im Verlauf der sechs Tage zu- 
nimmt. Überall erfährt der Kanzler, wie 
sehr der nahöstliche Friedensprozeß vom 
Scheitern bedroht ist. Und so klingen dio 
Worte aus der Umgebung des Bonner Re- 
gierungschefs immer dringender: Die 
stockende Annäherung zwischen Israelis 
und Arabern drohe die Lage zu „verfesti- 
gen", die Situation zu „verklemmen". Die 
Araber hätten den Israelis viele Zuge- 
ständnisse gemacht, nun müsse Israel die 
besetzten Gebiete so bald wie möglich 
räumen, müsse die Palästinenser wählen 
lassen, und in der Frage nach dem künfti- 
gen Status von Ost-Jerusalem kompro 
mißbereit sein. Weshalb das alles so wich- 
tig ist. das sagt der Bonner Regierungs- 
chefunverblümt: Der Friedensprozeß dür- 
fe nicht scheitern, weil sonst seine Gegner 
Aufwind bekämen, der Fundamantalis- 
mus erstarken würde, und damit nicht 
nur Europa, sondern der Frieden weltweit 
gefährdet wäre. 

Bedürfte es noch einer Szene, die die ge- 
wandelten Beziehungen zwischen Jerusa- 
lem und dem Bonner Regierungschef illlu- 
striert, so wäre das wohl das Essen zu Eh- 
ren Kohls am vorletzten Abend des Besu- 
ches in der Privatresidenz von Yitzhak 
Rabin. Da stimmt eine Sängerin die letzte 
Strophe eines fröhlichen Liedes über den 
Aufbau des Staates Israel an und die vie- 
len israelischen Gäste singen mit. Kaum 
haben sie geendet, steht der Kanzler auf, 
ergreift das Mikrofon, spricht, er habe 
schon viel erlebt, aber das hier sei wohl 
einmalig. In Deutschland, plaudert Kohl, 
würde man formulieren, „das Establish- 
ment singt". Und: „Ich wünsche Ihnen, 
daß auch in 40 Jahren noch das Establish- 
ment singt". So spontan wie der Kanzler 
reagierte auch Rabin. Diese emotionale 
Reaktion des Kanzlers, sagt der Israeli, 
habe bewiesen, „wie Kohl wirklich zum 
Staat Israel und zu seinen Menschen 
steht". 




"Frankfurter Rundschau" Nr. 113, 16. Mai 1995 



Antisemitismus Kampf angesagt 

Süssniutli kündigt in Israel deutschen Holocaust-Gedenktag 



an 



JERUSALEM, 15. Mai (afp/dpa). Bun- 
destagspräsidentin Rita Süssmuth (CDU) 
hat den Israelis versichert, daß Antisemi- 
tismus und Fremdenfeindhchkeit in 
Deutschland entschieden bekämpft wer- 
den. „Auch das vereinte, das demokrati- 
sche Deutschland hat sich mit Neo-Nazis- 
mus, fremdenfeindlichen Übergriffen, Ex- 
tremismus, Brandanschlägen und Antise- 
mitismus konsequent auseinanderzuset- 
zen. Den Anfängen wehren, heißt wach- 
sam sein, nicht wegschauen, klar und ent- 
schieden handeln", sagte die CDU-Politi- 
kerin am Montag vor israelischen Parla- 
ments-AuRschiissen in .Jemcjainrr, 

Süssmuth versprach: „Wir werden die 
Erinnerung an die Opfer der Shoa wach- 
halten und auch weiterhin zur histori- 
schen Verantwortung Deutschlands ste- 
hen." Zukunft sei nur möglich, „wenn wir 
die Erinnerung bewahren". Das Bonner 
Parlament werde in historischer Verant- 
wortung für sechs Millionen von den 



Nazis ermordete Juden im Juni einen Ho- 
locaust-Gedenktag beschließen. Ein mög- 
licher Termin wäre der 27. Januar, der 
Tag, an dem 1945 das Konzentrationsla- 
ger Auschwitz befreit wurde. 

Die schwedische Vize-Ministerpräsiden- 
tin Mona SahJin hat wegen Meinungsver- 
schiedenheiten über die Rechte der Palä- 
stinenser auf Jerusalem einen Israelbe- 
such vorzeitig abgebrochen. Dies meldete 
der israelische Rundfunk. Israels Außen- 
mmisterium habe schwere Vorbehalte 
gegen einen geplanten Besuch Sahlins im 
Jerusalemer Orienthaus angemeldet, das 
als dortiges Palästinenser-Hauptquartier 
genutzt wird. Dies würde den — von Is- 
rael zurückgewiesenen — Anspruch der 
Palästinenser auf Jerusalem als Haupt- 
stadt stützen. Sablin wollte in Israel an 
Gedenkfeiern für den schwedischen UN- 
Friedensbotschafter Graf Bernadotte teil- 
nehmen, der 1948 von jüdischen Extremi- 
sten ermordet worden war. 



- 2 - 



Daher rührt auch der leidige (und völlig überflüssige) "Streit" 
um die Art, den Inhalt des 8. Mai 1945 ("Befreiung" - "Nieder- 
lage" ?) 

Es sollte nicht in Vergessenheit geraten, daß am 6. und 8. Au- 
gust 1945 die japanischen Städte Hiroshima und Nagasaki durch 
US-amerikanische Atom-/Wasserstoffbomben binnen weniger Minuten 
völlig zerstört und Hundertausende unschuldiger Menschen ermor- 
det wurden oder in jahrelangem qualvollem Leiden starben. 

Wer allerdings die einen Verbrechen mit anderen Verbrechen "legi- 
timieren" will, begeht genau jenen Fehler des "Aufrechnens", den 
er anderen ankreidet: Verbrechen gegen die Menschlichkeit sind 
unteilbar, Granaten und Bomben haben keine Nationalität, sondern 
nur Tötungs- und Vernichtungskraft. 

Heute - 50 Jahre nach jenem unbeschreiblichen Grauen - stehen wir 
alle vor so gravierenden (weltweiten) Problemen (Energieversorgung, 
Klimaschutz, Umweltverschmutzung, Dauer-Massenarbeitslosigkeit etc.), 
daß wir -bei allem gebotenen "Erinnern"- im Interesse unserer zu- 
künftigen Generationen schnellstens zupacken müssen - sonst verspie- 
len wir das Leben auf dieser Erde. 

Zu Pfingsten war ich im Meininger Theater (Richard Wagner: "Die 
Meistersinger von Nürnberg") : eine sehr gute Inszenierung in ein- 
em kleinen aber feinen Hause (leider waren die Sitzreihen etwas 
eng - ich habe lange Beine) . Gestern hörte ich einen hochinteres- 
santen Vortrag über Martin Buber: viele seiner religiösen, ethi- 
schen und politischen Vorstellungen haben auch heute aktuellste 
Bedeutung ! 

Anbei lege ich (nur eine kleine Auswahl) Anmerkungen zur "Vergan- 
genheitsbewältigung" vor. 

Ich hoffe, Sie haben genügend Sonnenstrahlen in den Großstadtdjungel 
mitgenommen und verbleibe 



mit freundlichen Giißen aus dem beschaulichen Fulda 




P.S.: Sollten Sie Herrn Arnold Goldsmith (früher Fulda), 
5-42 River Road, Fairlawn, N.J. 07410, 
(vormals: 5 Carlton Lane, Monsey, N.Y. 10952) 
kennen und treffen, so grüßen Sie bitte herzlich 
von mir. • 



.-.} 



Heinz-Jürgen Hoppe 
von-Schildeck-Str . 10a 

D-36043 Fulda 
Tel. (0661) 78912 



8. Juni 1995 



Herrn 

Alfred Gruenspecht 

350 Cabrini Boulevard 

New York,N.Y. 10040 
U. S. A. 



Sehr geehrter Herr Gruenspecht, 

vielen Dank für den inteiBssanten Artikel über einen frühen 
Warner vor Hitler (in Florida). Auch in Deutschland hat es 
(wenn auch nur wenige) frühe Warner gegeben - doch wollten 
wenige ihre Botschaft hören. Später mußte selbst der Pfarr- 
er Martin Niemöller ("Bekennende Kirche") resigniert fest- 
stellen: 

"Zuerst holten sie die Juden 
und ich sagte nichts - : 
weil ich kein Jude war. ■ 

Dann holten sie die Kommunisten 

und ich sagte nichts - 

weil ich kein Kommunist war. 



Dann holten sie die Gewerkschaftler 

I inH 1 nh ean-f-o n-ioh-ho _ 

weil ich kein Gewerkschaftler war. 



Dann holten sie mich 

und es war niemand mehr da, 

etwas zu sagen." 

Das Ergebnis dieses "Schweigens" ist hinlänglich bekannt: 
ca. 50 Mio. Tote, unzählige körperlich und seelisch Verwunde- 
te, unzählige Städte und Dörfer, Industrieanlagen, Verkehrs- 
und sonstige Anlagen, einmalige Kunstwerke etc. lagen in Schutt 
und Asche. Millionen Menschen wurden brutal zur Flucht oder aus 
ihrer angestammten Heimat vertrieben (Auch meine Mutter, mein 
Bruder und ich befanden uns -wie Millionen andere- um den 8. 
Mai 1945 auf der Flucht aus Schlesien; mein Vater geriet bei 
der -aussichtslosen- Verteidigung von Breslau in russische Ge- 
fangenschaft, aus der er schon 1946 wegen Typhusepidemie ent- 
lassen wurde). Grenzen wurden gewaltsam verändert, Länder zer- 
stückelt (wir sehen heute eine Wiederholung in Jugoslawien und 
andernorts) . 

Jeder Einzelne, jede Gruppe hatte seine/ihre eigenen Erlebnisse 
und "Erfahrungen" und mußte diese selbst verarbeiten. Deshalb 
ist eine eindimensionale Interpretation eines so komplexen histor- 
ischen Sachverhaltes unsinnig und verfälschend. 

- 2 - 




4/GESCHICHTE & CEselt Rru a ttt 



TAlinr^^er Af/sci^eJ^^ 



ft 



11. Mai 1995 




Friedrich Bonhoeffer: 

„Zum willenlosen Instrument 
geworden, wird der Dumme zu 

allem Bösen fähig sein und zu- 
gleich unfähig, dies als Böses 
zuerkennen." 



Dr. Max Adolf Wagenführer, 
Mitarbeiter des Instituts, re- 
sümiert 1 942 nach zweiein- 
halbjähriger Arbeit: 

„Das Institut dientderEmeue- 
rung des frommen deutschen 
Lebens. Im großen deutschen 
Schicksalskampf gegen das 
Weltjudentum dient es der 
Überwindungaller Überfrem- 
dung im Inneren des Reiches. 
MitFugund Rechtdarf die Ar- 
beit des Institutes als ein Stück 
Kriegseinsatz deutscher 
Wissenschaft bezeich- 
netwerden." 



Bereits ein halbes Jahr zuvor 
töntederselbewie ein theolo- 
gischer Kriegsberichterstat- 
ter:„UnserGlaubensbuch 
.Deutsche mit Gott' ist in. . . 
blutvoller Verbundenheitmit 
dem großdeutschen Lebens- 
und Schicksalskampf entstan- 
den, mit jenem Kampf, in dem 
sich erweist, daß Deutsche mit 
Gott den Glauben haben 
dürfen: Gottmit uns!" 



Ein Resultat des „Institutes 
war ein überarbeiteter Kate- 
chismus, in dem u.a.folgen- 
deGebote formuliert sind: 

„Halte das Blut rein 

unddie Ehreheilig! 

Wahre und mehredas 

Erbe der Ahnen! 

SeibereitzumHelfen 

undVergeben! 

Ehre Führer und Meister! 

Diene freudig dem Volk 

mit Arbeit undOpfer!" 

Das„lnstiturarbeitetedie 
Evangelien um, alles Jüdische 
sollte entfernt werden. Jüdi- 
sche Namen wieZacharias 

undHannahenttielen, ebenso 
heDra\scne Onsnarrven . C3ali - 

läa wurde als von Ariern be- ' 
wohnthingestellt, hebräische 
Wörter wie „Halleluja" wurden 
QTseXiX durch Formeln wie „das 
walte Gott" und..lobet den Her- 
ren". Im Johannesevangelium 
wurde der Vers „Das Heil 
kommt von den Juden"umge- 
wandeltin„Dle Juden sind 
unserUnglück". 



ProiessorWalterGrund- 

mannwarab 1936 Dozentfür 

NeuesTestament"undspäter 

" für VölkischeTheologie"an 

der Universität Jena. Seme 

Kommentare sind bis heute 
maßgebend. Er entwarf unter 
anderemfolgendesBild:„Der 
JudeverstehtsichseinemGott 
gegenüberalsSklave,derdie 
Satzung seines Gottes zu er- 
füllen hat, undsiehtinseinem 
Gotte den Herrn und Souve- 
rän, der seinen Knechten den 
Lohn auszahlt oder straft." 



Buchempfehlung: 

Inder Reihe„Arnoldshainer 
Texte"gab Dr. Leonore Siege- 
le-WenschkewitzzumThema 
ein Buch heraus, Titel: „Christ- 
licher Antijudaismusund Anti- 
semitismus-Theologische 
und kirchliche Programme 
DeutscherChristen". Erschie- 
nen bei Haag& Herchen Ver- 
lag, Frankfurtam Main 1 994, 
für49,80Mark. 



Wie Jesus 
Arier werden 
sollte 

Ein dunkles Kapitel in der Geschichte der Christen: 
1939 wurde in Eisenach das „Institut 
zur Beseitigung des jüdischen Einflusses auf das 
deutsche kirchliche Leben" gegründet 

Wie groß ist das Maß der Mitschuld, das die Christen 
am Holocaust tragen? Um eine Aufarbeitung dieses 
dunklen Kapitels bemüht sich Dr. Leonore Siegele- 
Wenschltewitz, Studienleiterin an der Evangelischen 
Alodemie Aroidshain. In den 70er Jahren begann sie, 
an der Geschichte der Christen im Dritten Reich zu ar- 
beiten. Ihre Recherchen führten sie zum sogenannten 
„Entjudungsinstitut". Elf nationalsozialistisch gesinnte 
Landeskirchen waren daran beteiligt. Ziel war es, sämt- 
liche jüdischen Einflüsse aus Bibel und Gesangbuch zu 
entfernen. Rund 200 Mitarbeiter wirkten daran mit. Zu- 
sammen mit kirchlichen Einrichtungen, wie dem Eisen- 
acher Predigerseminar, regtSiegele-Wenschkewitz, die 
ebenfalls Privatdozentin an der Universität in Frankfurt/ 
Main ist, auch in Thüringen eine Auseinandersetzung 
mit dem Thema an. 







— ' 






> 








^* >C^ 




fcfck. 




"■^2 


i 






IP^ 


;. 




1 






HBm 


'^' 




1 




Hi^^ 


H 


1 ^^HG 




1 




1^ 


W 


J^^l 




1 






m 


1 "^ 




1 






P^r 


j '-*>>S5 


8S 


P 




HItti 


1 


1 

1 




,jji£. 












Kirche und Nationalsozia- 
lismus - das klingt nach ei- 
nem wenig bearbeiteten und 
heißen Thema. Was haben Sie 
während Ihrer Recherchen 
zum „Entjudungsinstitut" er- 
lebt? 

Ich will es Ihnen ganz ehrlich 
sagen: Mit meiner Arbeit über 
die enge Beziehung zwischen 
Kirche und NS-Staat war ich 

(^1,4:^«^^ /^roi »Hon OMC ain^r aUp- 

Jerr.ischen Karriere. Mir v/urde 
gesagt, wenn ich aufhören wür- 
de, über dieses Thema zu arbei- 
len, würden meine Chancen 
wesentlich besser stehen. 

Ganz direkt? 

Nein, da wird ganz formal ge- 
sagt: Ich würde die Schranken 
meiner Disziplin - der Kirchen- 
qeschichte - verlassen, indem 
ich nicht nur sage, was war, son- 
(jern auch Konsequenzen für 
die heutige Theologie ziehe. 

Sagt das die Generation, 
die es auch erlebt hat? 

Ja. Aber es gab auch Schüler 
jnd Leute meines Alters, die 
eine Aufarbeitung unmöglich 
finden. 

Mit welcher Begründung? 

Da ist der Wunsch zu sagen, 
es seien ein paar arme Irre ge- 
wesen, die nicht repräsentativ 
für den Protestantismus waren. 
Und indem man heute so etwas 
„hen/orzerrt" diskreditiere man 
Kirche und Theologie. Sie kön- 
nen nicht verstehen, daß in der 
Aufarbeitung etwas Reinigen- 
des, etwas Erneuerndes liegt. 

Welche Konsequenzen hat- 
te das für Sie? 

In Tübingen habe ich mich 
Anfang der achtziger Jahre 
nicht habilitieren können. Und 
wenn Leute jetzt in das Tübinger 
Universitätsarchiv kommen, hö- 
ren sie schon aus der theologi- 
schen Fakultät Bemerkungen, 
die zu verstehen geben, daß es 
eigentlich besser ist, nicht an die 
Dritte-Reichs-Geschichte zu ge- 



hen, der zeitliche Abstand sei 
noch zu nah. Ich bin an der 
Frankfurter Universität habilitiert 
und doziere dort. 

Sie haben bereits seit den 
siebziger Jahren an dem The- 
ma gearbeitet, wie sind Sie an 
Material herangekommen? 

Ich habe darüber promoviert. 
Dabei habe ich mitbekommen, 
daß ein Großteil der Tübinger 
Universitätslehrer 7u den „Deut- 
schen Christen" gehörte und da- 
mit nationalsozialistisch gesinnt 
war. Das war aber völlig tabui- 
siert. Alle wußten es, alle hatten 
ihre Geschichten, aber nur unter 
vorgehaltener Hand. Es wurde 
nicht seriös aufgearbeitet. Die 
es erlebt haben, tun es nicht, 
und die Jüngeren haben Angst, 
über ihre Lehrer zu arbeiten. Ich 
habe sie zum Teil noch intervie- 
wen können. 

Wie ging' es Ihnen bei sol- 
chen Gesprächen? 

Ich wußte nicht recht, wie ich 
damit umgehen sollte, als ich 
die Kontinuität nationalsoziali- 
stischer Überzeugungen in den 
Leuten entdeckt habe. Die sag- 
ten dann: Alle verstehen uns 
ganz falsch, weil wir nur das Be- 
ste gewollt haben. Sie können 
sich nicht wirklich annähern an 
das, was sie getan haben, well 
sie das Schicksal der betroffe- 
nen Menschen ausblenden. 

Gab es trotzdem Schuidein- 
geständnisse? 

Nein. Die gab es nicht. Kein 
Unrechtsbewußtsein, nicht 
einmal ein kleines Schwanken. 

Wie konnte es dazu kom- 
men, daß Menschen mit atte- 
stiert hoher Bildung - Hoch- 
schülprofessoren, Wissen- 
schaftler und hier nun gerade 
Theologen - dieses System 
unterstützten? 

Wir müssen in ihre Zeit 
schauen. Ende des 19. Jahr- 
hunderts begann die Religions- 
geschichte bereits, die Religio- 



nen untereinander zu verglei- 
chen. Es ging um die Frage, 
worin sich das Christentum von 
den anderen Religionen unter- 
scheidet. Der Absolutheltsan- 
spruch des Christentums sollte 
postuliert werden. Andere Reli- 
gionen wurden abgewertet. 

Haben sich also auch Chri- 
sten auf eine Unterteilung von 
Über- und Untermenschen 
eingelassen? 

Ja. In einer Art von vorausei- 
lendem Gehorsam. Dabei war 
das Christentum nicht einmal in 
der Defensive, wo es um seine 
Identität hätte ringen müssen. 
Sondern es ging darum, Überle- 
genheit zu demonstheren. 

Wie kam es zur Gründung 
des „Entjudungsinstituts"? 

1939 haben sich deutschna- 
tionale Christen zusammenge- 
tan, um eine, wie sie meinten, 
' „friedliche Koexistenz" dem NS- 
Siaat anzubleiüfj. Dabei ilierna- 
tlsierten sie das Verhältnis von 
Christen zu Juden dahinge- 
hend, daß sie erklärten, nichts 
mit dem Judentum zu tun zu ha- 
ben, ja sogar einen „unüber- 
brückbaren Gegensatz" zu ih- 
nen darzustellen. Elf Landeskir- 
chen haben diese „Godesber- 
ger Erklärung" unterzeichnet. 
Das „Institut" ist eine praktische 
Konsequenz daraus. Dabei 
brauchten sie das Feindbild „Ju- 
de" gar nicht erst zu kreieren, 
das war bereits vorhanden. 

Die Arbeit des Institutes 
wird von den Gründern als 
Reaktion hingestellt, und 
zwar als Verteidigung und so- 
gar Selbstschutz, insbeson- 
dere vom Mitbegründer Prof. 
Walter Grundmann. Gegen 
die Kirche sei gesagt worden: 
Christentum sei Judentum für 
NichtJuden. 

Grundmann meint ein Zitat 
des Rassentheoretikers Alfred 
Rosenberg. Aber Grundmann 
selbst war sogar ein Konkurrent 




Rosenbergs. Ihm geht es dar- 
um, gegenüber Rosenberg zu 
sagen: „Für das, was du willst, 
braucht man die alte Institution 
nicht abzuschaffen. Das ma- 
chen wir selben" Das wurde mir 
ganz deutlich, als ich seine Tex- 
te angesehen habe. „Wer entju- 
det besser?", „Wer entjudet ef- 
fektiver?", so der Tenor. Im End- 
effekt ging es ihm um die Schaf- ' 
fung eines neuen Glaubens. 

Was für eine Art Glauben 
sollte entstehen? 

Grundmann will den „Mythus 
des 20. Jahrhunderts" - eine 
neue heldische germanische 
Frömmigkeit. Dafür haben sie 
gearbeitet in dem Institut. Sie 
haben tatsächlich mit schwedi- 
schen - „arischen" - Kollegen 
gearbeitet. Sie waren interes- 
siert, germanische Einflüsse 
deutlich zu machen, den 
ganzen jüdischen „Ballast" ab- 
zuwerfen, wie sie es nannten. 
Und Jesus wird natürlich zum 
Galiläer. „Nach seiner seeli- 
schen Art", so meinten sie er- 
forscht zu haben, sei er „germa- 
nisch gewesen". Vor ihren Au- 
gen entstand die Vision eines 
großen christlichen Staates. 

Sie wünschten sich Macht? 

Ja, ganz bestimmt. 

Was war das Ziel des kirch- 
lichen „Institutes"? 

Die Forschungsarbeit war ein 
wichtiger Teil, aber dann doch 
auch diese Bibel, die sie ge- 
macht haben - das „entjudete 
Volkstestament" - das Lieder- 



buch, das Andachtsbuch. Das 
ist ja in irrsinnig hohen Auflagen 
unter die Leute gebracht wor- 
den. Das liegt wahrscheinlich 
noch in vielen Haushalten oder 
auf Dachböden herum. 

Die Konkurrenz mit den ande- 
ren „Forschungsinstituten" war 
scharf, die staatliche Förderung 
erstaunlich gering. Das war im 
Prinzip ein kleiner Einmannbe-» 
trieb, die Leute arbeiteten alle 
ehrenamtlich. Ich finde es sehr 
Interessant, daß sie kaum hono- 
riert wurden dafür. Hitler hatte 
bereits 1 933 gesagt, die Gleich- 
schaltung der Kirche sei schon 
gelungen. Zuständig für die 
ideologische Ausrichtung sei die 
Partei und nicht die „Deutschen 
Christen". Ich bin davon über- 
zeugt, daß die Pläne, sich leise 
und still von den Kirchen zu ver- 
abschieden, zunahmen. 

Nun stehen Theologen wie 
Dietrich Bonhoeffer in dersel- 
ben Situation. Für ihn bedeu- 
tete christlicher Glaube aber, 
sich nicht aus der Verantwor- 
tung zu ziehen. 

Die „Deutschen Christen" 
meinten tatsächlich, etwas Gu- 
tes für die Kirche zu tun, sie zu 
retten. Die Kreise um Bonhoef- 
fer haben bewiesen, was chhst- 
liche Mitverantwortung bedeu- 
tet, nämlich die vorbehaltlose 
Solidantät mit den verfolgten 
Menschen. 

Wie sah die Aufarbeitung 
dieser Geschichte hier in Thü- 
ringen aus? 



Diejenigen, die „deutsche 
Christen" gewesen sind, muß- 
ten sich der sogenannten „Ent- 
nazifizierung" unterziehen, zum 
Beispiel ihre Parteizugehörig- 
keit offenlegen. Wenn sie seh 
auf evangelische Grundhaltun- 
gen, auf die „Barmer theologi- 
sche Erklärung", steilen konn- . 
ten, wurde dies als Reue gewer-, 
tet, sie konnten wieder in den., 
kirchlichen Dienst gehen. Etli-.; 
che wurden zurückgestuft. ♦ 
Grundmann, Dozent der Jenaer.. 
Universität, ist nicht wieder or- . 
dentlicher Professor geworden. , 
Was hatte sich geändert? 
Was hätte sich schon ändern 
können - ohne Unrechtsbe- 
wußtsein? Das Schema, so 
habe ich an der theologischen ; 
Literatur festgestellt, war natür- . 
lieh dasselbe geblieben: Das,- 
Christentum steht absolut, das 
Judentum wird weiter als unter- - 
legene Religion bezeichnet. Im--, 
mer wird dem Judentum unter-,' 
schoben, es sei von der Ge-, 
schichte ganz unberührt geblie- j 
ben. Ohne Weiterentwicklung, - 
ohne Differenzierung in Libera- 
les Reformjudentum und Ortho- 
doxes Judentum, ohne jede 
Vielfalt, immer starr und gesetz- 
lich. Und die Werke Grund- 
manns stehen in fast jedem Re- 
gal eines Pfarrers und dienen 
bis heute vielen zur Vorberei- 
tung ihrer Sonntagspredigt. 

Was muß an Aufarbeitung 
jetzt geschehen? 

Die Bücher, die davon heute ,' 
noch erscheinen, müssen drin- ; 
gend mit einem Vorwort verse- .* 
hen werden. Wenn nicht überar- % 
beitet. Ich halte es auch für \ 
höchste Zeit, daß sich die Kir- >*; 
chen, die am „Institut" beteiligt ■; 
waren, dazu äußern. Daß sie .; 
deutlich Schuld eingestehen. .' 
Und zwar die konkrete Schuld. ;. 
Es gibt immer noch lebende . 
Zeitzeugen. •: 

Gab es denn noch keine 1; 
Aufarbeitung im Sinne einer :| 
Entschuldigung der am „Insti- ;: 
tut" beteiligten Kirchen? ►! 

Nein. Die erste gemeinschaft- -; 
liehe Erklärung, die die Evange- '; 
\ische Kirche Deutschlands ' 
(EKD) uberhauDt zum Thema ,■ 
„AntiJudaismus" gegeben hatte, ;. 
war bei der Weißenseer Synode * 
1950. Aber ganz allgemein. Im- ' 
merhin besagt sie, daß es eine 
Verbundenheit zwischen Chri- 
stentum und Judentum gibt, daß , 
Jesus Jude war und daß die Kir- - 
che am Antisemitismus schuldig ^ 
ist. Ganz deutlich wird es aber." 
erst 1 980 bei einem Beschluß ; 
des rheinischen Kirchenparla- 
mentes. 1978 haben die DDR- 
Kirchen und EKD-Kirchen zum 
Novemberpogrom eine Stel- 
lungnahme abgegeben. Ich 
glaube, das waren die ersten 
Versuche, sich überhaupt an 
das Thema „AntiJudaismus" ran- 
zurobben. 

In Ihrem Buch sagen Sie, es 
sei eine Fiidion zu meinen, 
Theologie und Politik hätten 
nichts miteinander zu tun. 

Daß die theologische Lehre 
mit ein Mittel war, den Antisemi- 
tismus zu transportieren, wurde 
geleugnet. Es hieß immer, was 
die Kirche macht, ist ganz was - 
anderes als der „rassische" An- 
tisemitismus. Mein Buch habe 
ich gemacht, um zu sagen, daß 
das eine durchaus in das ande- 
re übergehen konnte. Und daß 
sich auch der „rassische" Anti- 
semitismus selbstverständlich 
aus diesen christlichen Wurzeln 
gespeist hat. 

Frau Siegele-Wenschke- 

witz, danke für das Gespräch. 

Erfragt von Ulrike GREIM 

Fotos; EAA, amw 



J:>M mii JJU 



Die Anzeige der Neuen Rechten in der FAZ. die aus „P'atzmanger* mit keiner Silbe des Bedauerns der Ausrottung des halben 
jüdischen Volkes gedacht haben, veranlaßt uns, unseren Aufruf, den unschuldigen Opfern gewidmet, an dieser Stelle der üttentlich- 
keitzuoitenbaren: 

Wider das Vergessen 



• denn wie sollte man vergessen, daß um die fünf Millionen Kin- 
der durch die Nazihenker sterben mußten, 

• daß 1,5 Millionen jüdische Kinder methodisch ermordet wur- 
den, 

• daß 55 Millionen Menschenleben ab 1933 bis 1945 ausge- 
löscht wurden, 

• daß in Ortschaften wie Lidice und Oradour die gesamte Bevöl- 
kerung niedergemetzelt wurde, 

• daß in Konzentrationslagern wie Auschwitz, Majdanek, Treb- 
linka. Sobioor, Cheimno. Buchenwald, Bergen-Belsen und wei- 
teren Lagern Millionen von wehrlosen Opfern zuerst ihrer Men- 
schenwürce und dann ihres Lebens beraubt wurden und bei 
den Todesmärschen in den letzten Kriegswochen um die 90% 
der malträtierten KZ-Häftlinge das Knegsenoe nicht mehr er- 
lebten, 

•daß Hunderttausende von jüdischen Frauen in den Lagern 
Stutthof. Ravensbrück und ähnlicnen Höllen unfruchtbar ge- 
macnt worden sind, 

• daß anstelle von Tieren jüdische Menschen für tödliche Exceri- 
rnente — darunter auch Tausende von Kindern — ausgebeu- 
tet, gefoltert und ihrer Menschenrechte beraubt wurden. 

•daß Tausende von unschuldigen Menschen in Scheunen und 
Synagogen zusammengetneben wurden, um anschließena bei 
lebendigem Leibe verorannt zu werden. 

• daß das Bataillon 101 pro Mord nur eine Kugel „verschwende- 
te', indem sie ihren Opfern (unschuldige Frauen und Kinder) 
nur zwischen aie Augen schoß, 

• daß Ilse Koch, die Frau des Buchenwald-Kommandanten, aus 
der Haut der gelöteten Opfer Lamoenschirme anfertigen ließ. 



das die Haare der' Opfer für Matratzen deutscher Haushalte 
verarbeitet wurden und aus den ausgemergelten Körpern der 
Vergasten Seife hergestellt wurde, 

• daß die Goldzähne der Getöteten ausgebrochen, die Eheringe 
von den abgeschnittenen, geschwollenen Fingern gerissen 
und zusammen mit Hais- und Armketten sorgfältig, penibel una 
mit entsprechenden Listen an die Deutsche Reichsbank ver- 
sandt wurden, wo sie zu Goldbarren verschmolzen wurden 
(und wahrscheinlich noch heute dort oei ihrer Nachfolgebank 
gehandelt werden). Ghettos errichtet. ;n denen die jüdische Be- 
völkerung gesammelt und eingeschlossen wurde, um sie an- 
schließend mit Epidemien, Hunger und willkürliche Erschie- 
ßungen auszurotten. Hunderttausende dazu gezwungen, ihre 
eigenen Gräber zu schaufeln, sicn nackt auszuziehen und sich 
am Grabrand so hinzustellen, daß nach dem Knattern der 
f\/1aschinengewehre ihre manchmal noch lebenden Körper oh- 
ne weitere Hilfe in das Massengrab fielen, 

• daß in Babij jar während der Drei-Tagesaktionen die SS unter 
aktiver Mitwirkung der Wehrmacht 33 700 Männer. Frauen und 
Kinder gnadenlos abgeschlachtet hat (zum Vergleich: In 
Auscnwitz konnten aus Organisationsgründen „nur' bis zu 
1 000 Opfer pro Tag vergast werden — diese Tatsache wurde 
vom Kommandanten „mit Bedauern" an den Reichsrührer wei- 
tervermittelt, 

• daß Millionen von russischen Kriegsgefangenen unter grau- 
samsten Bedingungen verreckten, 

• denn wie sollte man den sechs Jahre andauernden Krieg ver- 
gessen: Coventp/, Rotterdam. Warschau und unzählige ande- 
re Städte sind zum Teil dem Boden gieicrgemacnr .vorcen. 



Die Kultur und der menscnliche Bestand des Sibelvoikes. aus cem Moses. David. Saiomon. de P-ccneten. Mutter Maria, -^sus aie 
-wölf Aoosiel Philosoonen wie Scinoza. Maimonides. Menceisscnn. Kcmoonisien und Virtucsen wie .1enGeisschn-dart.,oic/. 
3izet Schonoera, Kaiman, üersr.win. .-^ucmsiein. oisiracn. .vienunm. oernsicin, Hane^. w.aaio.-.a.M.v-. ...w ^ .^.^^.. -... -- J' 
^-cida Meir 3aian Pathenau. Mcceioreistrager wie Einstein. ZenKerwie Marx. Freud, Künstlerwie Cnagail. vlocicüani. ccnriuc.eiier 
vie -euc.-r.vancer. Heine. Kafka. Celan. Roth una viele andere he n/orgegangen sind, sind fabrikmäßig vemicntet worden^ tin 
^igantiscnes Geiängnis :ür aas jüdiscne Vcik von .Vliilionen Kiiomeiem in ganz buropa sorgte darur, daß die gezeichneten ^prer 
niiflcs cen Häscnern una Henkern ausgelierert wurcen. 

Und so ennnern wir gegen das Vergessen in ewiger Trauer: Ich, ARTUR BRAUNER, an 49 meiner von den Nazibestien umgebrach- 
ten Ven^vanaten Ich. MARIA-THERESA BRAUNER, an meinen erschossenen Vater, meinen einzigen Bruder und meine über 30 
Ven^/andten (meine Mutter war in einem dunklen bäuerlichen Backofen über drei Jahre lebendig begraben und hat den 
3 Mai 1945 nalbblind" er- und übenebt). Wir, ALICE und SAMMY BRAUNER, an die nächsten unserer Eltern, an die Millionen 
juqenalicher Opfer in meinem Alter (davon mindestens zwei Millionen jüaischer). Wir nehmen uns das Recnt. festzuhalten, caß die 
Fiucnt Millionen Deutscher und cie erfolgte VertreiDung. ebenso wie das Bombardement von Dresden und anderen Städten aus- 
schließlich als Folge des von Hitler und seinen Nazischergen angezettelten Krieges einzustufen ist. Ohne Knegsangrirf und Zersto- 
runa halb Europas — keine Fiucnt. keine Vertreibung, keine Vergeltung. Eine kausale Folge, die bei jedem humanen und politisch 
integer aenKenaen ivienscnen aui ve(biciiiüiiibiiui:)i. um so mcm aiouci ut>t=i.v.c^c. .^c . &.. v-^. l^^^..^^..^ -w. — .,^ . 

Aber enA/arten kann man eine solche Einstellung von alten, eingefleischten, zum Teil fanatischen Nazis und viel zu vieler anderer, für 
die wie es scheint der Genozid eines ganzen Volkes, verursacht von mehr oder weniger Gleichgesinnten ein vergleichbares ueiiKi 
unter anderen darzustellen scheint, nicht. Damit werden die vergessenen Opfer mit Füßen getreten. Wenn ein Morder und seine 
vorsätzliche Tat betrachtet wird, so ist das Opfer zu temitleiden. nicht der Täter. Die Würde des Menschen ist unantastbar, aucn oie 
Würde und das Andenken der Millionen ermordeter Juden. Am 8. Mai 1 945 endete die Tyrannei, qie '" der Geschichte der Menscn- 
heit beispiellos dasteht. Ein Datum ohne Vergleich. Ein Datum, das eine Aurrechnurg nicht zulaßt, bin Datum ohne Alternative. 

Berlin, anläßlich der Wiederkehr des 50. Jahrestages der Befreiung der Welt von dem verbrecherischsten System aller Zeiten. 

gez. Artur Brauner • Mana-Theresa Brauner • Alice Brauner • Sammy Brauner 



"Frankfurter Rundschau" Nr. 105, 6. Mai 1995 



"Berliner Zeitung" Nr. 100. 29. /30. April 1995 




Keine Zeit für Besinnung. 



Zeichnung: Bernd Bruns 



l 



"Frankfurter Rundschau" Nr. 131, 8. Juni 1995 

Aus DEM INLAND 




Eine neun Meter lange und 3,5 Meter hohe Spiegelwand auf dem Berliner Hermann-Ehlers-Platz trägt die Mannen von 1723 wäh- 
rend der Nazi-Herrschaft aus Steglitz deportierten Juden. (Bild: Andreas Altwein/dpa) 

Eine Spiegelwand erinnert an ermordete Juden 

Mahnmal im Berliner Bezirk Steglitz enthüllt / „Namenlose aus der Anonymität gerissen" 



I 

l! 

ji 

M 

\\ 

i ■ 
1 1 



Von Ute Frings 

BERLIN, 7. Juni. Mehrere hundert 
Menschen haben sich am Mittwoch auf 
dem zentralen Hermann-Ehlers-Platz im 
Berliner Bezirk Steglitz versammelt, um 
die Enthüllung des Mahnmals für die von 
den Nazis deportierten Juden des Bezirks 
mitzuerleben. Unter den Gästen waren 
auch jüdische Bürger, die vor ihrer Ver- 
treibung in Steglitz gelebt haben. 

Die Spiegelwand konfrontiere die Men- 
schen mit Elend, Tod und Vernichtung, 
aber auch mit Hoffnung und Lebensfreu- 
de, sagte Bausenator Wolfgang Nagel 
(SPD). In dem Spiegel „sehen wir uns" 
und gleichzeitig „die Namen derer, denen 
alles genommen wurde". Das Denkzei- 
chen mache deutlich, betonte Nagel, daß 
die Ermordeten und Vertriebenen „Men- 
schen wie wir waren". 

Die Namenlosen aus der Anonymität 



herausgerissen zu haben, ist für Roman 
Skoblo vom Vorstand der Jüdischen Ge- 
meinde zu Berlin eine wichtige Funktion 
des Denkzeichens. Im Unterschied zum 
geplanten zentralen Holocaustdenkmal 
im Zentrum der Hauptstadt, das, so Sko- 
blo, als „zentraler Entsorgungsort" vor al- 
lem zum Niederlegen für Kränze geplant 
sei, könnten hier „Juden ihre Toten be- 
trauern". 

Es sei allerdings ein Skandal, sagte 
Roman Skoblo, daß bis zu Beginn der Fei- 
er Mitglieder der „Republikaner" mit poli- 
zeilicher Erlaubnis auf dem Platz Geld ge- 
sammelt hätten, das sie der jüdischen Ge- 
meinde für die Reinigung der Spiegel- 
wand zur Verfügung stellen wollten. Die 
Rechtsextremen unterstellten auf diese 
„perfide Weise", daß die Juden schuld an 
antisemitischen Schmiereien seien und 
letztendlich auch für deren Beseitigung 
aufkommen müßten. 



Die Spiegelwand hatten die Mehrheit 
der Bezirksabgeordneten aus „Republika- 
nern", CDU und FDP vor allem mit dem 
Argument abgelehnt, daß sie ,^laß zu 
Schmierereien und Sachbeschädigung 
bieten wird". 

Der Streit um die Realisierung der 
neun Meter langen und 3,50 Meter hohen 
allseitig spiegelnden Wand hatte weit 
über die Stadt hinaus für etliche Schlag- 
zeilen gesorgt. Da würden „Schuldgefühls- 
koliken theatrahsch" vorgespielt, hatte 
etwa die Bezirkszeitung der CDU polemi- 
siert, und es werde „eine neue Mauer" er- 
richtet. 

„Wir brauchen diese Denkmäler in er- 
ster Linie für uns selbst", betonte Nagel, 
„gegen das Vergessen, das Verdrängen 
und die Gleichgültigkeit". Diejenigen, die 
es beschmieren wollten, müßten es in ih- 
rem eigenen Angesicht tun und so würdt?^ 
sie es nie vergessen können. 



Freie ausspräche 



"Frankfurter Rundschau" Nr. 121, 26. Mai 1995 



Dialog im „Schatten der Schoa" 

IJiscIiöfe betonen Wert chrisllich-jüdischer Verständigung 



ul)k WORMS, 25. Mai. Ignatz l^ubis, 
(In Vorsitzende des Zentralrats der Juden 
in Deutschland, hat davor gewarnt, 
das „Wachhalten der Erinnerung an 
Auschwitz als „Aufwühlen von Schuld" 
niißzuvcrstehen. Der jüdischen CJeinein- 
schafl gehe es niclit darum, Schuldgefühle 
zu schüren. „Aber die Gescllschafl muß 
wissen, wozu Unrecht führen kann", sagte 
Buhis am Mittwoch bei einem Empfang 
der nislünier Mainz und Limburg. 

Das Treffen in Worms, zu dem der Vor- 
silzrode der Deutschen Bischofskonfe- 
renz, l^arl Lehmann (Mainz), und der 
LimhuTger Hischof Franz Kamphaus ein- 
geladen hatten, war der deutsch-jüdi- 
schen Verständigung gewidmet. Lehmann 
mahnte, das Unrecht, das den Juden zu- 
gefügt worden sei, dürfe nicht vergessen 
werden. Er rief Christen und Juden auf, 



gemeinsam Verantwortung für die Zu- 
kunft zu übernehmen. „Wir wollen ein 
neues Blatt aufschlagen in unseren Bezie- 
hungen", sagte Lehmann zu F3ul)is. 

Diese christlich-jüdischen Beziehungen, 
so Hans Hermann Henrix, stünden im 
„Schatten der Schoa", des Holocaust. Der 
Direktor der Bischöflichen Akademie in 
Aachen sieht den jüdisch-christlichen Dia- 
log auf christlicher Seite von einer „epo- 
chalen theologischen Neuhesinnung" be- 
gleitet. Die „Theologie nach Auschwitz" 
wolle christliche Identität nicht f^egen 
Juden und Judentum ausbiiden. Es gehe 
nicht darum, im christlichen Denkgebäu- 
de einen Ort und Platz für das Judentum 
zu fnulen, sondern darum, Israel und Ju- 
dentum als ein Gegenüber zu begreifen, 
das für das christliche Sclbstverständnis 
von wesentlichem Belang sei. 



Nacinichten 



Konkretes historisches Erzählen und Erinnern 



Die christlich-jüdischen Beziehungen 
stehen s(Mt fast 2000 Jahren im Schatten 
jenes Kreuzes (Jesu), an dessen Opfer- 
krafl die Christen selbst zu glauben ver- 
zweifeln. Wenn der Direktor der Bischölli- 
chen Akademie in Anclien, Hans Her- 
mann Ilr'Tir ix, für eine (christliche) „Theo- 
logie nach Auschwitz" eine christliche 
hlentität nicht gegen Juden und Juden- 
tum ausbilden und im christlichen Denk- 
gebäudf» nicht einen Ort und Platz für das 
»hidontum suchen will, sondern Lsrael und 
das Judentum als Gegenüber begreifl, das 
für das christliche Sclbstverständnis von 
wesentlicher Bedeutung sei, verbleibt 
auch er in jener christlich verschwomme- 
nen Unverbindlichkeit, die das historische 
Erinnern und Erzählen bis in das Mythi- 
sche abstrahiert (FR vom 26. 5. 1995 
„Dialog im .Schallen derSlioa"'). 

Der Theologe Johann Baptist Metz hat- 
te schon in seinem Aufsatz „Im Angesicht 
der Juden. Christliche Theologie nach 
Auschwitz" (Arnoldshainer Texte-Band 
15; 198.'i) unmißverständlich daran ge- 
mahnt: „Christliche Theologie nach 
Auschwitz muß die jüdische Dimension in 
der christlichen Glaubensweise neu zur 
Geltung bringen und die gewaltsame 
Sperre des jüdischen Erbes im Christen- 
tum überwinden." Gerade die jüdisch-alt- 
tcstnnientnrisch geprägte Glaubensweise 
(Synopsis) erinnere daran, daß christli- 
cher (Jlaube ein leibhaftiges, sinnenhalles 
Geschehen sei, das nicht zum reinen Ge- 
sinnungsglauben spiritualisiert werden 
kann. 

Um dieses konkrete historische Erin- 



nern und Erzählen wieder in den christli- 
chen (Jiaubcn zurückzugewinnen, muß 
christliche Theologie nach Ausdiwitz - 
endlich — von der Einsicht geleilet sein, 
daß Christen ihre Identität nur „im Ange- 
sicht der Juden" bilden und verstehen 
können — nicht „im Angesicht des (anony- 
men) Judentinns". „Um Au.schwitz willen 
müssen sie in den Blick kommen: die zer- 
störten Antlitze, die verkohlten Augen 
(der Juden), von denen man nur erzählen, 
die man nur erinnern, aber nicht in Sy- 
stembegrifTe rekonstruieren kann." 

Wieviel deutlicher beklagten die katho- 
lischen deutschen Bischöfe in ihrem Hir- 
tenwort vom 23. August 1945 (Fulda) 
„zutiefst: Viele Deutsche, auch aus unse- 
ren Reihen, haben sich von den falsclien 
Lehren des Nalionalsoziali.c:mus betören 
lassen, sind bei den Verbrechen gegen 
menschliche Freiheit und men-chliche 
Würde gleichgültig geblieben; viele leiste- 
ten durch ihre Haltung den Verbrechen 
Vorschub, viele sind selber Verbrecher ge- 
worden. Schwere Verantwortung triffl je- 
ne, die aufgrund ihrer Stellung wissen 
konnten, was bei uns vorging, die durch 
ihren Einfluß solche Verbrechen hätten 
verhindern können und es nicht getan ha- 
ben, ja diese Verbrechen ermöglicht und 
sich dadurch mit den Verbrechern solida- 
risch erklärt haben." 

Heinz- Jürgen Hoppe, Fulda 



Vprö/fontlidnjngen in dieser Rubrik sind keine 
redaktionelle Meinungsäußerung. Die Redak- 
tion hrlifiltsirli dns Rprht. nnf Kiirznnann vor lUn(\ ) 



wm^mmmmMmm 



"Frankfurter Rundschau" Nr. 129, 6. Juni 1995 



»MMi 



nmrw^V'^^ww'mt 



4 



Fuldaer Zeitung/Hünfelder Zeitung 
Kinzigtal-Nachrichten 



Politik 



Samstag, 6. Mai 1995 
Nummer 105 



Alfred Dregger (CDU) zum Kriegsende vor 50 Jahren: Das Wort „Befreiung" paßt für West-, aber nicht für Mittel- und Ostdeutschland 



Den 8. Mai in würdiger Weise begehen 



Niemand, der bei gesundem 
Menschenverstand ist, kann be- 
zweifein, daß der Zweite Welt- 
krieg und seine Folgen eine Kata- 
strophe waren; nicht nur für 
Deutschland, sondern auch für 
Europa und weit darüber hinaus. 

Der französische Philosoph 
Raymond Aron hat die beiden 
groikn Kriege in der ersten Hälfte 
unseres Jahrhunderts mit der bis 
dahin schlimmsten Katastrophe 
der europäischen Geschichte ver- 
glichen, indem er die Jahre 1914 
bis 1945 als den „zweiten 30jähri- 
gen Krieg" bezeichnete. 

1648, am Ende des ersten 
30jährigen Krieges, stand ein um- 
fassender Friede mit dem strikten 
Verbot, die alten Fronten und 
Kampfhandlungen fortzusetzen, 
unter welchem Vorwand oder un- 
ter welcher Rubrik auch immer. 
Es gab weder Vertreibungen noch 
Deportationen. 

1945, am Ende des zweiten 
SOjährigen Krieges, war das Bild 
differenzierter: Wir, das heißt 
Deutschland und Europa, erleb- 
ten die Befreiung von der natio- 
nalsozialistischen Schreckens- 
herrschaft. Aber diese wurde öst- 
lich des Eisernen Vorhangs abge- 
löst durch die kommunistische 
Schreckensherrschaft. 

Vertrieben und deportiert 

Über 14 Millionen Menschen 
wurden damals aus ihrer seit Jahr- 
hunderten angestammten Heimat 
vertrieben, nur weil sie Deutsche 
waren. Bei diesem „Bevölke- 
rungstransfer", wie es einige kalt- 
schnäuzig genannt haben, verlo- 
ren noch nach Ende der Kampf- 
handlungen über zwei Millionen 
Deutsche ihr Leben. All diese 
Erinnerungen verbinden sich un- 
vermeidlich mit dem Kriegsende 
vom 8. Mai 1945. 




Alfred Dregger 



Es wurde aber nicht nur vertrie- 
ben, es wurde auch deportiert. 
Die arbeitsfähigen Menschen gan- 
zer Landschaften wurden in die 
Sowjetunion verschleppt 



'7nrir»rtc»n»-Kotf l^r»i r^ 



"o- 



«■^kyWAk, tU^*. k*ti 



zur 






den Türkenkrie- 
gen angesiedelt 
wurden. 

Für viele deut- 
sche Soldaten be- 
zeichnete der 8. 
Mai 1945 den Be- 
ginn jahrelanger 
Kriegsgefangen- 
schaft, die für die 
meisten tödlich 
endete. 

Es ist absurd, all 
diese Vorgänge 
mit ihren unter- 
schiedlichen Fol- 
gen mit demsel- 
ben Begriff bele- 
gen zu wollen. 
Das Wort „Befrei- 
ung" paßt cum 
grano salis für 
West-, aber nicht 
für Mittel- und 
Ostdeutschland. 

Es paßt für die 
von den Nazis ein- 
gekerkerten und 
gequälten Juden 
Foto: FZ und für andere 
Opfer des Sy- 
stems. 
Es paßt aber nicht für die Ver- 
triebenen, nicht für die damals 
Verschleppten, nicht für die jahre- 
lang zurückgehaltenen Kriegsge- 
fangenen. Es paßt nicht füi* die. 



wenn nicht die meisten umkamen. 
So etwas gab es auch in Rumä- 
nien. Die dort ansässigen Deut- 
schen, zunächst die Siebenbürger 
Sachsen, die dort seit dem 12. 
Jahrhundert gelebt, die Türken- 
stürme überdauert und ihre Kul- 
tur auch zum Nutzen ihrer Nach- 
barn entwickelt haben, wurden 
Opfer der Deportation durch und 
in die Sowjetunion. Nicht besser 
ging es den Banater Schwaben, 
ebenfalls Deutsche, die dort nach 









te verfolgt wurden. 

Es paßt nicht für die zwischen 
1945 und 1949 von Haus und Hof 
gejagten Ostdeutschen. 

Für all diese Menschen, Hun- 
derttausende, ja Millionen, muß 
das Wort „Befreiung" wie eine 
Provokation und eine mutwillige 
Grausamkeit wirken. Ich wame 
davor. Warum das? 50 Jahre nach 
dem Ende des Krieges sollte damit 
endlich Schluß sein. Die Debatte 
über den 8. Mai muß zur Versöh- 



nung führen, auch in Deutschland 
selbst. Daher müssen sich alle in 
der Botschaft wiederfinden: die- 
jenigen, die befreit wurden und 
diejenigen, für die der 8. Mai Be- 
ginn neuer Leiden und neuen Un- 
rechts war. 

Patriotische Tat 

Was die Versöhnung im eige- 
nen Land angeht, sind unsere 
Kriegsgegner weiter als wir. Mei- 
nes Erachtens war es eine patrioti- 
sche Tat von Franqois Mitterrand, 
daß er seine Rolle in Vichy-Frank- 
reich nicht verschwiegen, sondern 
im Gegenteil öffentlich gemacht 
hat - sicher nicht, um den Streit 
darüber anzufachen, sondern um 
ihn zu beenden. 

Es war richtig, daß der Bundes- 
kanzler an den Siegesfeiern der 

A Hti^H-öt-i tri 



A^AAAtarA h.«»'AA Ai.A ^A W 



4 « WJk AXAC4XAC&1W ilAA 



vergangenen Jahr nicht teilge- 
nommen hat. Hätte es sich um 
Versöhnungsfeiem zu Ehren der 
Gefallenen gehandelt, dann wä- 
ren wir selbstverständlich dabei 
gewesen, nicht nur als Gäste, son- 
dern als Beteiligte. Auf einer Sie- 
gesfeier der Alliierten dagegen 
hat der deutsche Bundeskanzler 
nichts zu suchen. 

Aus der gleichen Überlegung 
heraus lehnt Bundeskanzler Kohl 
es mit Recht ab, am 9. Mai an 

serer ehemaligen Kriegsgegner in 
Rußland teilzunehmen. 

Wir Deutschen haben den 
Krieg verloren. Wenn diejenigen, 
die ihn gewonnen haben, dies fei-"' 
em wollen, dann ist das ihre Sa- 
che, die wir nicht zu kritisieren 
haben. Wir müssen ja nicht hin- 
gehen. 

Erstens: Was der 8. Mai 1945 
für uns Deutsche bedeutet, hat 
niemand besser zum Ausdruck 
gebracht als der erste Bundesprä- 



sident Theodor Heuss. Er sagte: 
„Im Grunde genommen bleibt 
dieser 8. Mai 1945 die tragischste 
und fragwürdigste Paradoxie der 
Geschichte für jeden von uns. 
Warum denn? Weil wir erlöst und 
vernichtet in einem gewesen 
sind." 

Zweitens: Was die deutsche 
und europäische Politik nach 
1945, was die Selbstreinigung und 
die Leistung des deutschen Volkes 
seitdem bewirkt haben, findet sei- 
ne Würdigung in dem Besuch, den 
die Staats- und Regierungschefs 
unserer wichtigsten ehemaligen 
Kriegsgegner uns am 8. 5. 1995 
der Hauptstadt unseres wieder- 
vereinigten Vaterlandes abstatten 
wollen. 

Wir verdanken diese Idee Fran- 
^ois Mitterrand, der mit seinem 
letzten großen Auftritt als Staats- 
präsmcnt auueriiaio rranKieichs 
dem deutschen Volk auf diese 
Weise die Ehre erweisen will. 

Die Tatsache, daß außer Mitter- 
rand auch der britische Premier- 
minister John Major, der Vizeprä- 
sident der USA, AI Gore, und der 
Ministerpräsident Rußlands, Vic- 
tor Tschernomyrdin, uns eben- 
falls in Berlin besuchen und zu uns 
sprechen wollen, ehrt uns eben- 
falls. 

Verläßliche Verbündete 

Welcher Wandel gegenüber der 
ersten Hälfte des zu Ende gehen- 
den Jahrhunderts. Damals stan- 
den wir Deutsche in der Regel 
allein. Heute sind wir die verläßli- 
chen Verbündeten des Westens 
und zugleich die gesuchten Part- 
ner des Ostens. 

Mit allen unseren Nachbarn im 
Norden, Süden, Osten und We- 
sten leben wir in Frieden; mehr 
noch, wir arbeiten mit allen eng 
zusammen. 



Dokumentation 



Dregger zum 8. Mai: 

Der Kern 
der Rede 

Fulda (uh) 
Der Fuldaer Bundestagsabge- 
ordnete Alfred Dregger stand 
in den letzten Wochen im Mit- 
telpunkt kontroverser Diskus- 
sionen. 

Ausgangspunkt war ein 
Aufruf der rechtskonservati- 
ven Initiative „Gegen das Ver- 
gessen", von Dregger mit un- 
terzeichnet, der sich dagegen 
wandte, den 8. Mai einseitig 
als Tag der Befreiung zu bege- 
hen. Für eine Gedenkveran- 
staltung dieser Initiative am 7. 
Mai in München war Dregger 
als Hauptredner vorgesehen. 
Nach dem Rückzug des Ehren- 
vorsitzenden der CDU/CSU- 
Buudebtagsirakrion war die 
umstrittene Veranstaltung ab- 
gesagt worden. 

Im folgenden dokumentie- 
ren wir den Kern der Anspra- 
che, die Dregger am 7. Mai 
halten wollte. 



Alle unsere Nachbarn verspre- 
chen sich Vorteile für ihre eigene 
Entwicklung durch diese Zusam- 
menarbeit mit Deutschland. 
Deutschland ist vom Angstgegner 
ein Stück weit zum Hoffnungsträ- 
ger für seine Nachbarn geworden. 
Welch ein Glück! 

Wenn wir den 8. Mai in würdi- 
ger Weise begehen, wenn wir al- 
les daran setzen, niemanden un- 
nötig zu verletzen, dann ermögli- 
chen wir es allen Gruppen unserer 
Gesellschaft, dieses Glück zu be- 
greiien. Und wer es begreift, der 
wird es auch erhalten und schüt- 
zen wollen. 



"Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung" Nr. 104, 5. Mai 1995 




Im Qrunde genommen bleibt dieser 8. Mai 1945 die tragischste und 
fragwürdigste Paradoxie für jeden von uns. Warum denn? Weil wir 
erlöst und vernichtet in einem gewesen sind, « Die Paradoxie des 8. Mai, 
die der erste Bundespräsident unserer Republik, Theodor Heuss, so 
treffend charakterisierte, tritt zunehmend in den Hintergrund. Einseitig 



wird der 8. Mai von Medien und Politikern als »Befreiung« charakte- 
risiert. Dabei droht in Vergessenheit zu geraten, daß dieser Tag nicht nur 
das Ende der nationalsozialistischen Schreckensherrschaft bedeutete, 
sondern auch den Beginn von Vertreibungsterror und neuer 
Unterdrückung im Osten und den Beginn der Teilung unseres Landes. 



Ein Geschichtsbild, das diese Wahrheiten verschweigt, verdrängt oder* 
relativiert, kann nicht Grundlage für das Selbstverständnis einer, 
selbstbewußten Nation sein, die wir Deutschen in der europäischen 
Völkerfamilie werden müssen, um vergleichbare Katastrophen künftig • 
auszuschließen. ** 



Die INITIATIVE 8. Mai hatte für den 7. Mai eine Gedenkveranstaltung in München geplant. 
Dr. Alfred Dregger sollte der Hauptredner sein. Aufgrund seiner Absage fällt die Veran- 
staltung aus. Eine aggressive Kampagne linker Medien versuchte von Anfang an, das An- 
liegen der Initiative zu diffamieren. Die Kampagne konnte nur deshalb Erfolg haben, weil die 
Führung der Union statt offensiv gegen die linke Polit- und Medien-Agitation aufzutreten, dem 
Druck nachgab und Herrn Dregger die Unterstützung venA/eigerte. Es wiederholte sich damit 
ein Mangel an Standfestigkeit, der schon den »Fall Heitmann« kennzeichnete. 
Obwohl wir die Absage der Veranstaltung bedauern, ist doch ein wesentliches ZieMer 
nitiative erreicht, nämlich die Einheitssprachregeiung von der «Befreiung- zu durchbr""" 






Neben den Schrecken der nationalsozialistischen Diktatur, an die die Erinnerung wachgehal- 
ten werden muß, wurden in den letzten Wochen in der öffentlichen Debatte auch die Vertrei- 
bungsverbrechen thematisiert. 

Der ungeheure Zuspruch, der uns aus allen Schichten der Bevölkerung erreicht hat, bestätigt 
uns darin, das Deutungsmonopol der veröffentlichten Meinung auch künttig nicht mehr 
hinzunehmen. Eine selbstbewußte Nation muß vor allem ein Zusammenschluß selbstbe- 
wußter Bürger sein, die sich in ihrem Engagement für die geistige Freiheit durch keinerlei Dif- 
famierungskampagne beirren lassen. 






INItIaTIVE 8. Mai • Manfred Brunner • Dr- Klaus Rainer Röhi • Ulrich Schacht • Heimo Schwiik • Dr. Rainer Ziteimann 

Wir danken den Spendern die diese Anzeige ermöglicht haben. Wir bitten um Verständnis, daß wir die zahlreichen hinzugekommenen Unterzeichner nicht alle namentlich aufführen können. 
V.i.S.d.P.: Klaus Rainer Röhl. Oberländer Ufer 190 A, 50968 Köln • Spenden bitte auf das ..Sonderkonto Demokratie«, c/o Heimo Schwilk, Deutsche Bank Berlin. BLZ 100 700 00. Konto-Nr. 550 93 10-01. 

l 



\ 



f 



^ 
< 



:f ^.c. 



i 




Im Qrundc genomincn bleibt dieser 8, Mai 1945 die tragischste und 
fragwürdigste Paradoxie für jeden von uns. Warum denn? Weil wir 
erlöst und vernichtet in einem gewesen sind.« Die Paradoxie des 8. Mai, 
die der erste Bundespräsident unserer Republik, Theodor Heuss, so 
treffend charakterisierte, tritt zunehmend in den Hintergrund. Einseitig 



wird der 8. Mai von Medien und Politikern als »Befreiung« charakte- 
risiert. Dabei droht in Vergessenheit zu geraten, daß dieser Tag nicht nur 
das Ende der nationalsozialistischen Schreckensherrschaft bedeutete, 
sondern auch den Beginn von Vertreibungsterror und neuer 
Unterdrückung im Osten und den Beginn der Teilung unseres Landes. 



Ein Geschichtsbild, das diese Wahrheiten verschweigt, verdrängt oder 
relativiert, kann nicht Grundlage für das Selbstverständnis einer 
selbstbewußten Nation sein, die wir Deutschen in der europäischen 
Völkerfamilie werden müssen, um vergleichbare Katastrophen künftig 
auszuschließen. 



Der spontane Zuspruch von zahllosen Menschen zu diesem am 7. April veröffentlichten Appell steht 
im Kontrast zu dem Tenor, in dem Teile der Medien über die INITIATIVE 8. Mai berichtet haben. 
DIE ZEIT nannte den Text »widerlich«, und Ralph Giordano, der sich im übrigen Verdienste um die 
Thematisierung von Vertreibungs- und SED-Unrecht erworben hat. ließ sich leider dazu hinreißen, die 
INITIATIVE zum 8. Mai als Beleg für die Existenz eines »Krebsgeschwürs« zu werten: »Die Liste der 
Unterzeichner deutet auf Metastasen in nachgewachsenen Generationen hin.« 
Diese biologistische Sprache, die Andersdenkende als »Krebsgeschwür« und »Metastasen« 
bezeichnet, sollte in Deutschland 50 Jahre nach dem Ende des NS-Regimes nicht mehr möglich 

SQ i r-% A K r^ » 

CHI. MUO I 



er A I I r^ ^> i ro 
I Muoc; 1 1 IUI I v^ o I oc L^- ui I 



I K\ r4 






IUI 



L< r^ tr\ r^ r^ K\ >'^ + i</r>r^ 
IXWIIOdVCILIVdl 



Ul lU 



r\l I IIOOI ION 



i-iuoi aioi I ouiicinI in 



Deutschland alles erlaubt. 

Unerträglich ist die Unterstellung, daß derjenige, der von Vertreibungsterror und kommunistischer 



Diktatur nach 1945 spricht, damit die 1933 einsetzende Vertreibung der Juden aus Deutschland und 
den späteren Massenmord an den europäischen Juden und an anderen Minderheiten relativieren 
oder verharmlosen wolle. Das Leid, das Menschen Im Namen totalitärer Systeme in diesem Jahr- 
hundert zugefügt wurde, darf nicht aufgerechnet werden. 

Natürlich kann der 8. Mai unter verschiedenen historischen Blickwinkeln gesehen werden. Aber eine 
Gesellschaft, in der nur noch eine Sichtweise eines so ambivalenten historischen Datums möglich 
Ist, wäre totalitär. In der DDR gab es die regierungsamtlich verordnete Sichtweise des 8. Mai. nach 
welcher dieses Datum als »Tag der Befreiung« zu feiern war. Eine pluralistische Demokratie kennt 
jedöch kein allgemieinverbindliches Geschichtsbild, zu dem sich alle Bürger bekennen müßten. Alle 
Demokraten - von links bis rechts - sind aufgerufen, dem Meinungsterror der »political correctness« 
entgegenzutreten und die geistige Freiheit zu verteidigen. 



INITIATIVE 8. Mai • Dr. Klaus Rainer Röhl • Ulrich Schacht • Heimo Schwilk • Dr. Rainer Zitelmann 

Wir öanken den Spendern, die diese Anzeige und aie Durchführung einer Gedenkveranstaltung am 7. Mai in München ermöglicht haben Wir bitten um Verständnis, daß wir die zanireichen hinzugekommenen Unterzeichner nicht alle namentlich aufführen können. 

V.i.S.d.P.; Klaus Rainer Röhl. Oberlänaer Ufer 190 A. 50968 Köln • Spenden bitte auf das »Sonderkonto Demokratie-, c/o Heimo Schwilk. Deutsche Bank Berlin. Bl_2 100 700 00, Konto-Nr. 550 93 10- 01. 



t 



"Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung" Nr. 99, 28. April 1995 



•( 



'^—'p^' 



Vi'' 




Im Qrunde genommen bleibt dieser 8. Mai 1945 die tragischste und 
fragwürdigste Paradoxie für jeden von uns. Warum denn? Weil wir 
erlöst und vernichtet in einem gewesen sind,« Die Paradoxie des 8. Mai, 
die der erste Bundespräsident unserer Republik, Theodor Heuss, so 
treffend charakterisierte, tritt zunehmend in den Hintergrund. Einseitig 



wird der 8. Mai von Medien und PoHtikern als »Befreiung« charakte- 
risiert. Dabei droht in Vergessenheit zu geraten, daß dieser Tag nicht nur 
das Ende der nationalsozialistischen Schreckensherrschaft bedeutete, 
sondern zugleich auch den Beginn von Vertreibungsterror und neuer 
Unterdrückung im Osten und den Beginn der Teilung unseres Landes. 



Ein Geschichtsbild, das diese Wahrheiten verschweigt, verdrängt oder 
relativiert, kann nicht Grundlage für das Selbstverständnis einer selbstbe- 
wußten Nation sein, die wir Deutschen in der europäischen Völker- 
familie werden müssen, um vergleichbare Katastrophen künftig 
auszuschließen. 



Herbert Ammon (Dozent und Publizist. Berlin), Karl-Hermann Altena (Stadt. Verwaltungsrat. Hagen), Rudolf Andreas (Generalsekretär Deutsche Soziale Union [DSU], Landesvorsitzender DSU-Thüringen), Dr. Hans Apel (Bundesminister a.D., SPD, Hamburg). Dr. Alfred Ardelt (Stv. Vorsitzender Bund der Vertriebenen [BdV], Landesverband 
Niedersachsen. Hannover), Helmut Bärwald (Publizist. Vorsitzender »Gesellschaft für Soziale Demokratie«. Grafschaft-Esch), Jörg Bahnemann (Generalmajor a.D., Unternehmensberater), Lothar Beck (Verkaufsleiter, Mannheim), Andreas Becker (TV-Redakteur. München), Heinz Behrendt (Landesvorsitzender DSU-Niedersachsen. Buchholz), Mana 
von Beiow (Mielkendorf), Karl-Fnednch von Below (Mieikendorl), Jost Berlin (Hannover), Bngitte Bielke (Stv. DSU-Bundesvorsitzende, Dessau), Ferdinand Fürst von Bismarck (Rechtsanwalt, Fnedrichsruh), Frank Blochmann (Kaufmann), Ewald Bodeit (Niedersächsicher Landesgeschäflsführer Landsmannschaft Ostpreußen. Hannover), Wilfried Böhm 
(ehem. CDU-MdB. Vorsitzender »Deutschland-Stiftung«, Melsungen), Dr. Alexander Böker (Bad Homburg), Chnstoph Bolay (Dipl.-Ing.. Bretzfeld), Peter Bohnsack (Landesvorsitzender DSU-Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, Güstrow), Andreas Borchert (Dipl.-Vw.. Hann. Münden), Heinz Bornmann (Regierungsoberamtsrat. Dresden). Gottfned Bouvain 
Schlegel (München), Christoph Brandt (Dipl.-Ing., stv. Fraktionsvorsitzender CDU-fvIecklenburg-Vorpommern), Dr. Manfred Brunner (Rechtsanwalt, Bundesvorsitzender Bund Freier Bürger [BFB]-Die Freiheitlichen, München), Roland Bubik (Student und Publizist, Mannheim), Dr. F. Bünger (Volkswirt. Düsseldorf), Alfred Busek : Bankkaufmann i.R. 
Braunfels). Carl-Wilhelm Busse (Verleger. Bielefeld). Joachim Collasius (Berlin). Burkhard Cornelius, MdA (Rechtsanwalt, FDP, Berlin), Jürgen von Corvin, M.A. (BFB. Raisting), Heinz Cyris (Stuttgart), Mario Czaja (Vorsitzender Junge Union Berlin-Hellersdorf). Wilhelm Czypull (Niedersachsischer Vorsitzender Landsmannschaft Ostpreußen. Lehrte). 
Prof. Dr. J. L. Decamilli (Vorsitzender »Internationale Arbeitsgemeinschaft Freiheit und Demokratie«, Berlin), Katja-Julka Dejak (Stv. Vorsitzende Junge Liberale Bertin-Friedrichshain), Gerhard Dewitz (Vorsitzender Berliner Landesverband der Verthebenen), Dr. Hans-Walter Dieckmann (Lippstadt), UInch Diekotter (Rechtsanwalt. München), Johannes 
Doenng (Pfarrer, stv. Sprecher »Fnedenskomitee 2000«. Unna). Dr. Alfred Dregger. MdB (Ehrenvorsitzender der CDU/CSU-Bundestagsfraktion. Bonn), Hildegard Ebel (Lehrerin utnd Fürsorgerin, Güstrow), Prof. Dr. med. F. Ehrenbrand (Kreisvorsitzender DSU-Mainz). Werner Ehrhardf (Rechtsanwalt, Dortmund), Dr. Chnstof Ehrler (CDU. Dresden) 
Prof. Dr. Gerhard Eiselt (Berlin). vVolfram Ellinghaus (HartewinKel), Joachim Ergenzinger (Dipl. -Kaufmann, Nörtershausen), Dr. Siegfried Ernst (Arzt, Vorsitzender »Europäische Ärzteaktion e.V.«. Ulm). Reiner Eschweiler (Bonn), Dr. Günther Eßbach (Stadtrat, DSU-Fraktionsvorsitzender Dessau), Prof. Dr. Achim Fahs (Landesvorsitzender BFB 
MecklenDurg-Voroommern, Rostock). Siegmar Faust (Schriftsteller. Berlin). Dr. Gerhard Femppel (Kaufmann, Stuttgart), Klaus Fenten (Architekt, Berlin), Reiner Fink (Unternehmensberater, Münsing), Dr. Herbert Fleissner (Verleger, München), Michael Frank (Betnebswirt und Publizist. Wattenscheid). Alexander Fritsch (Publizist. Berlin). Dr. Manfred 
Fröhlich (Hochschullehrer. Ratsmitglied, stv. Fraktionsvorsitzender »Bürgergemeinschaft für Bielefeld«), Peter Fröhlich (Bürgerrechtler, Bielefeld), Immo Garrn (cand. mg., Berlin), Dr. Peter Gauweiler. MdL (Rechtsanwalt, Vorsitzender CSU-München), Franz G. Gell (Rechtsanwalt. München), Flottillenadmiral Chnstian Giermann (Stabsabteiiungsleitei' 
im Fuhrungsstab der Manne. BMVg, Bonn). Klaus Gille (Staatssekretär i.R., Landesvorsitzender BFB-Sachsen-Anhalt. Arensberg), Volkmar Gieseler (VenA/altungsgerichtsrat a.D., Hannover), Ronald Gläser (Student, Berlin), Adalbert Gloyna (DSU-Fraktionsvorsitzender Landkreis Spree-Neiße, Bärenklau). Rüdiger Goldmann. MdL (Oberstudienrat. 
CDU. Dusseldorf). Dr. Rainer Goldt (Studienrat im Hochschuldienst, Wiesbaden). Herbert Goliasch. MdL (CDU. Dresden), Wilhelm von Gottberg (Sprecher Landsmannschaft Ostpreußen), Martin Gotzes (cand. med., Münster), Volker Graffstädt (Dipl. -Kaufmann. Sprecher Bezirksausschuß FDP Berlin-Tempelhof). Uwe Greve (Journalist. Kiel), Klaus 
G.-obig (Vorsitzender FDP-Berlin-Tempelhof). Pater Lothar Groppe SJ (Bad Pyrmont). Dr. Rosemane Groß (Oberstarzt a.D.. Bonn), Winfned Groß (Oberstleutnant a.D., Bergingenieur. Bonn), Günther Grossmann (Reit im Winkl). Sabine Haase (cand. phil.. Lindenberg). Axel Hahn. MdA (Vorsitzender FDP-Berlin-Neukolln). Prof. Dr Eberhard Hamer 
(Rechtsanwalt. Wissenschaftlicher Leiter -Mittelstandsinstitut NieOersachen«, Hannover), Ernst-Ulrich Hantel (Generalmajor a.D., Bonn), Heinz Hartmann (Garbsen), Frank Hauke (Redakteur, Berlin), Hans Heckel (Journalist. Hamburg), Walter Held (Oberstleutnant a.D.. CSU. Traunstein), Kurt Helle (Dipl. -Volkswirt. Bonn), Stefan HenA^ig (Vorsitzender 
Junge Liberale Worms). Carl-Chrictian Hesse (Dipl. -Landwirt. Verden-Honisch), Ass. -Prof. Dr. Lothar Höbelt (Histonker, Universität Wien). Eberhard Honig (Rechtsanwalt, Bonn), Udo Hoevel (Unternehmer. Arnsberg), Martin Holzfuß (Generalma)or a.D.. Mitglied FDP-Landesvorstand Hessen). Helmut Hörn (Dipl. -Pädagoge. Wuppertaii. Prof. Dr Klaus 
Hornung Politikwissenschaftler. Universität Hohenneim), P. A. Hussock (Publizist. Vorsitzender »Help e.V.«. Berlin), Claus Jäger (ehem. CDU-MdB, Wangen), Hans-Joachim Josewski (Bankdirektor, FDP-Berlin-Spandau), Prof. Dr. Egon Jüttner, MdB (CDU. Mannheim), Karsten Jung (Kreisvorsitzender Junge Union Waldeck-Frankenberg. Voh). 
Johannes Kalker (Unternehmer. Lanaesvorsitzender BFB-Sachsen, Großenhain), Evelyn Kalous (Apothekenn, stv. Landesvorsitzende BFB-Baden-Württemberg, Schwetzingen), Andreas Kaluza (Amtsleiter i.R., Landesvorstandsmitglied DSU-Sachsen-Anhalt, Dessau), Prof Dr. Gudrun Kammasch (Hochschuilehrenn. Berlin), M. J. Egon Kamper 
(Unternenmensberater. Rottenbachi. Helmut Kamohausen (Journalist. Gartow), Peter Freiherr von Kap-herr (Seevetal), Dr. Heiner E. Kappel, MdL (Stv. Fraktionsvorsitzender FDP-Hessen, Bad Soden), Heinz Karst (Brigadegeneral a.D., Reichenau), Silke Kaufmann (Klinische Forschungsangestellte. Frankfurt am Main). Thomas Keup 
(Horfunkredakteur. Berlin), Hemer Kausch (Landesvorsitzender Junge Union Berlin). Hans G. Kirschstein (Ministenalrat a.D.. Bonn). Manfred Kittlaus (Leitender Polizeibeamter. Berlin), Dr. Ernst Kittner (Hannover). Karl-Heinz Klein (Moers), Jürgen Knobloch (Louveciennes, Frankreich), Karsten Knolle. MdL (CDU. Quedlinburg), Prof. Dr. Hans-Helmuth 
Knutter (Politikwissenschaftler. Bonn). Roland Kortel (Hiidesheim), Eckhard Krause (Dipl.-Bibl.. München), Holger Krestel (Regierungsamtmann. stv. Vorsitzender FDP-Berlin-Tempelhof). Manfred Kreuzer (Kreisvorsitzender Sudetendeutsche Landsmannschaft Waldeck). Helmut Kneser (Elektroniktechmker. Lmd-Plittersdorf). Götz Kubitschek (Student 
und Journalist. Potsdam), Felizitas Kuble (Racakteunn »Komm mit«, Münster). Detlef Kuhn (FDP. ehem. Präsident Gesamtdeutsches Institut), Hans Küster, (Major i.G. a.D.. Berlin), Dr. Hans-Peter Kunze (Hannover), Karlheinz Lau (Oberschulrat. stv. Bundesvorsitzender »Ost- und Mitteldeutsche Vereinigung m der CDU/CSU«. Berlin), Dr. Willi Leeo 
(Ulm). Prof. Dr. Uwe Lehnert (Berlin). Ulf Leisner (Landesgeschaftsführer CDU-Brandenburg, Potsdam). Martin Lessenthin (Bundesvorsitzender »Chnstliche Gewerkschaft Medien«), Manfred Libner M.A. (Politikwissenschaftler. Bad Brückenau). Hans Chnstian Limmer (Unternenmensberater. Meerbusch), Dr. Hansgeorg Loebel (Hannover). Gerhard 
Lowenthai (Journalist, ehem. Leiter »ZDF-Magazm". Wiesbaden), Ortwin Lowack (Rechtsanwalt, Bundesvorsitzender »Freie Bürger Union«, Bayreuth), Heinrich Lummer MdB (Senator für Inneres a.D.. (3DU. Berlin), Franz Lutz (Alfter), Wolfgang Madai (ehem. MdL, Dresden), Hans-Holger Malcomeß (2. DSU-Bundesschnftfuhrer, Dresden). Dieter 
Mallon (DiDl.-Ing.. Huttenberg). Sigrid Manuel (Bochum). Wolfgang Manuel (Bochum). Ernst J. Marliany (Oberstleutnant d.R.. Landesbeauftragter DSU-Rheinland-Pfalz, Landesvorsitzender Landsmannschaft Schlesien Rheinland-Pfalz. Heidesheim). Gerda Marten-Prahl (Hamburg), Heinz Matthias (Vorsitzender »Arbeitskreis Christlicher Publizisten- 
Niedenstein), Helmut Matthies (Chefredakteur evang. Nachrichtenagentur »idea«). Dr. Tilman Mayer (Sozialwissenscnaftler. Rhembreitbach). Wolfgang Mayer (Autor, Bonn), Dr. Alfred Mechtersheimer (Friedensforscher, Sprecher »Fnedenskomitee 2000". Starnberg). Mag. Peter Meier-Bergfeld (Journalist. Graz). Dr. Klaus Meyer lOelde). Mana 
Mever (Oelde). Woifgang MIeczkowski, MdA (Vorsitzender FDP-Beriin-Spandau). Heiko Möhnng M.A. (Unternehmensberater. Düsseldorf), Sascha A. F. Monath (PR-Berater, Berlin), Prof. Dr. Klaus Motschmann (Berlin), Eckehart G. Münnich (Frankfurt am Main). Dr. Michael Neibach (»Forschungsstelle zur Aufdeckung politischer Mamoulatioren 
in europaischen Demokratien«), Patnck Neuhaus (Student. Berlin), Jürgen Neureuther (Stv. Vorsitzender Junge Liberale Worms), Dr. Joachim Nothdurtt (Landesvorfeitzender DSU-Sachsen-Anhalt, Dessau), Dr. Wolfgang Nowak, MdL (CDU. Bundessprecher »Chnstlich-Konservatives Deutschland-Forum« Dresden), Dr. Freiherr von Oer iBngade- 
nonorgl 3 Pt Chx^rrwnn) l-larhprf Qhl (CS'J 1 Rijrnprmpi«;tPr RiihnnlHinn) Jpn«; Olrlpnhiirn (<;fii(1 rpr nnl Fr<;trharniprtpr pkaH »I and«;m3nn<5rh;^ft Thiirinnia Berlin im Coourger Convent ff^Cl«) Han^-r^imfhpr Parnlip«; (BdV-Vi7Pnra<;idpnt I ;^n(ip<;vnrc:jt7pndpr B(iV-Nnrnrhpin.\,Vp<;ff.^,lpn DüSSe'ddK R'JdO'f °2SCr: (Ehrenvorsitzender DcmcKratlSChCr 
K^ub Ber.n«), Rolf W.^Peter (Oberst i.G. a.D., Jurist. Ludwigsburg). Tho'mas Martin Pfaff tSankkaufmann, Attenkirchen), Erwin Pfortner (Laatzen), WerneT Pohlmann (Dipl.-Ing., Iserlohn), Ursula Popioiek (Dipl.-Slavistin. Berlin), Prof. Dr. Dr. Jürgen Potel (Hannover) Günter Poreada lAootheker. Berlin). Volkmar P'eyer (Student. Berimi. Dirk Po'tt 
(Aoothener. Blaicnach). Chnstian P'ess (Student. Berlin). Horst Pneßnitz (Rechtsanwalt. Bad Homburg), Gudrun Prior (Chemotechnikehn, Berlin). Dr. Dieter Radau (BdV-Präsidialmitglied. Deutsch Evern). Florian Raebel (Oberpnmaner. Erstchargierter ■Pennalen/erbinoung Borussia Berlin"), Peter Recknagel (Landesvorsitzender DSU-Bayern, 
München/. Kay W. Reimann (Vorsitzender »Europaisches Jugendwerk«. Dresden). Dr. Klaus Reschop (Hannover), Dr Chnstian Reuleux (Hannover), Dr. Chnstian Richter (Jurist, Frankfurt am Main), Frank Richter (Landesvorsitzender DSU-Brandenburg, Grafendorf), Dr. Klaus Rainer Röhl (Publizist, ehem. Herausgeber »konkret«. Köln). Markus 
Röscher (Rechtsreferendar. Vorstandsmitglied FDP-Berlin-Tempelhof). Hans Manfred Roth (Dipl.-Ing.. FDP-Bad Cannstatt. »Cannstatter Kreis«), Dr. Werner Roth (»Konservatives Büro«, Bielefeld). Hans-Jachim Freiherr von Rothkirch (Deggenhausertal). Karl Rubin (Müller und Landwirt. Hugsweier). Reginald Rudorf (Chefredakteur Mediendienst 
»rundy«. Sailauf-Eichenberg). M. 0. Rüdiger (Schauspieler. Berlin), Curt Rüggebrecht (Lüdenscheid), Manfred Ruhnau (St. Augustin),^Renate Sappelt (Bundesvorsitzende Schlesische Jugend, Gummersbach). Dr. Rolf Sauerzapf (Dekan, Kassel), Ulhch Schacht (Schnftsteller und Redakteur. Hamburg), Mane-Therese Schaefer-Kehnert (»Arbeitskreis 
Sicherung des Friedens«. Remagen), Prof. Dr Walter Schaefer-Kehnert (Agrarokonom, Remagen), Felix Schecke (Kreisvorsitzender »Ost- und Mitteldeutsche Vereinigung in der CDU/CSU«, Hannover), Dr. Horst Schelling (Unternehmensberater. Homburg/Saar). Karl-P. Schlor (Landesvorsitzender BFB-Baden-Wurttemberg, Tamm), Gerd 
Schmalzhaf (Schatzmeister FDP-Beriin-Tempelhof). Dr. Joachim Schmiele (ehem. DSU-MdB. Berlin), Dr. Hans Hellmut Schneider (BFB, Erkrath), Günter Scholz (Mannheim), Dr. Godehard Schramm (Schriftsteller. Nürnberg). Caspar von Schrenck-Notzing (Herausgeber »Criticon««, München), Hadwig Grafin von der Scnulenburg (Frankfurt am Main). 
Carl-Ludwig Schulz (Kaufmann. Berlin). Beate Schwarz (Göttingen), Dr. Gerhard Schwarz (Göttingen), Andreas Schwegel (Kreisvorsitzender Junge Union Göttingen), Bruno Schweinert (Hannover). Heimo Schwilk (Autor und Redakteur. Berlin). Michael A. Schwilk (Journalist). Hermann Segnitz (Unternehmer. Bremen). Ingeborg Seifert (Apothekenn! 
Benin). Prof. Dr. Franz W. Seidler (Histonker. München), Helmuth Seliger (Tuttlingen), Johann Semmler (Rotenburg), Hans-Michael Seydier (Berlin), Willi-Peter Sick (ehem. CDU-MdB, Norderheistadt), Sebastian Sigler (Fernsehredakteur, München), Heide-Maria Sinner (BFB-Vorstandsmitglied, Passau), Gunnar Sohn (Dipl. -Volkswirt. Bonn), P.-a! 
Sonoermann (Frankfurt am Main), Carl-Dieter Spranger. MdB (Bundesminister für wirtschaftliche Zusammenarbeit und Entwicklung, CSU, Bonn), Alexander von Stahl (Rechtsanwalt, Generalbundesanwait a.D., FDP-Berlin-Spandau), Michael Stange (Chefreporter und Autor. Hamburg), Dr. Wolfgang Stappert (Nürnberg), Dieter Stein (Chefredakteur 
»Junge Freiheit«. Potsdam). Enka Steinbach. MdB (CDU. Frankfurt am Main), Herbert Steinjan (Rentner. Ockenheim), Dr R. Steinmann (Nersingen), Prof. Dr. Wolf-J. Steifer (Chefarzt. BFB, Bäd Soden), Dr Heinz Steudel (Physiker, Berlin), Günter Stiff (Herausgeber »Komm mit«, Münster), Gerhard Strabel (Unternehmer. Königstein), Harald Strunz 
(»Union der Opfen/erbande Kommunistischer Gewaltherrschaft«. Berlin). Hermann-Chnstian Thomasius (BdV-Niedersachen, VIotho), Diednch Thoms (Dipl. -Volkswirt, Verbandssyndikus, Rastede), Dr. Wolf Tietz (Geograph). Günter Trampenau (Architekt. Emsdetten). Dr. Franz Uhle-Wettler (Generalleutnant a.D.. Meckenheim), Reinhard Uhle-Wettler 
(Bngadegeneral a.D.. Timmendorfer Strand). Dr. Peter Volkmann (Arzt. Berlin). Chnstian M. Vollradt (Wolfenbüttel), Jörg Waga (Bezirksverordneter. Vorsitzender Junge Union Berlin-Schöneberg), Thomas Wagener (Künstler, stv. Vorsitzender FDP-Berlin-Hohenschonhausen). Dr. Alfred Wagner (Landwirt, Wetzlar). Ottmar Wallner (Hotelier). Jo Weber 
(Journalist. Hamburg). Dr. H. G. Weber (Kreisstadtdirektor i.R.. Braunschweig). Dr. Karlheinz Weißmann (Histonker, Bovenden). Johanna Gräfin von Westphalen (Bundesvorsitzende »Christdemokraten für das Leben«, Meschede), Philipp L. Wiesenacker (Unternehmensberater, Wiesbaden). Prof. Dr. Franz-Ulrich Willeke (Mitglied BFB- 
Bundesvorstand. Neckargemund). Wolfgang Winke) (Lehrer und Autor. Balge). Torsten Witt (Journalist, FDP-Berlin-Tempelhof), Casimir Prinz Wittgenstein (Frankfurt am Main), Kurt Wolf (Redakteur, Potsdam), Uwe Wolff (Schriftsteller und Studiendirektor. Ilsede), Dr. Ekkehard Wruck. MdA (Rechtsanwalt. CDU, Berlin). Hans-Eberhard Zahn (Dipl.- 
Psych.. Vorsitzender -Bund Freiheit der Wissenschaft. Sektion Berlin-Brandenburg«). Wolfgang Ziegenhardt (Techn. Angestellter. Trebur), Tilman Ziegler (Tittmaning), Dr Friedrich Zimmermann (Rechtsanwalt. Bundesminister a.D., CSU, Planegg), Dr. Rainer Zitelmann (Historiker und Redakteur, FDP-Berlin-Spandau). 

Bitte tragen Sie 2ur Finanzierung dieser und eventuell weiterer Anzeigen bei durch eine Spende auf das »Sonderkonto Demokratie«, c/o Heimo Schwilk, Deutsche Bank Berlin, BLZ 10070000, Konto-Nr. 55093 10-01. V.i.S.d.P.: Katja-Julka Dejak, Wolfsgartenstraße 2, 12555 Berlin 



"Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung" Nr. 83, 



1 
I 



April 1995 



Freitag, 26. Mai 1995, Nr. 121 ■ S/R/D 



Frankfurter stadt-rundschau 



Frankfurter Rundschau • Seite 25 



• I 



• • 



Wenn vom „Erinnerungsmarathon" nur noch der Überdruß bleibt 

Eine Frankfurter Lehrerin zieht eine pädagogische Bilanz zur Halbzeit im „Supergedenkjahr"/ Auch die „Schrecken der heutigen Zeit registrieren" 



Von Ingrid Apel 

„Die Frage ist, was nach dem 
Erinnerungsmarathon bleibt" — in 
den Schulen gibt es die 
Befürchtung, mit einem 
Überangebot von Veranstaltungen 
zu den 50. Jahrestagen der KZ- 
Befreiung und des Kriegsendes 
„bei Jugendlichen Unlust und 
Überdruß zu erzeugen". Die 
Frankfurter Lehrerin Ingrid Apel 
zieht „zur Halbzeit im Super- 
Gedenkjahr" eine pädagogische 
Bilanz und stellt darüber hinaus 
Überlegungen an, wie „den 
ausländischen Schülern mit zum 
Teil eigenen leidvollen 
Erfahrungen zumindest der Raum 
zur Aussprache und damit das 
Gefühl einer Anerkennung auch 
ihrer Geschichte und ihrer Trauer 
gegeben werden kann". 

Sommer 1995: Erst Halbzeit im Super- 
Gedenkjahr — doch beinahe das Ende 
eines Schuljahres und damit Gelegenheit, 
pädagogische Bilanz zu ziehen. Es war ein 
Jahr, in dem Kultus- und Schulbehörde, 
Politik-, Gedenk- und Bildungsplanungs- 
institute wie nie zuvor versuchten, auch 
die junge Generation zum Gedenken und 
Erinnern zu bewegen: Hier die Ankündi- 
gung eines Theaterstückes über Anne 
Frank, dort der Aufruf zur Spurensuche 
jüdischen Lebens im Stadtteil, und da- 
nach die Bitte um Teilnahme am Ausstel- 
lungsbasar, dazu die Veröffentlichungen 
von Berichten gegen Vergessen und Ver- 
drängen und die Bereitstellung von Listen 
der Zeitzeugen, die bereit sind, in die 
iSrhnlen zu kommen Offenert d?is Frnnk- 
furter Institut für Stadtgeschichte einen 
Projekttag für Schulklassen am 8. Mai 
mit Ausstellungen, Zeitzeugengesprä- 
cherv, Disk-Ussionen vind Musik, oo logt der 
Pädagogikprofessor Micha Brumlik uns 
das Gedenken in Form liturgischer Unter- 
weisung ans Herz. 

Es ist dies nur ein kleiner Ausschnitt 
eines massenhaften Angebots, das im 
Laufe des letzten halben Jahres die Schu- 
len überflutete mit der selbstverständ- 
lichen Erwartung, es auch pädagogisch 
sinnvoll umzusetzen. Die Stimmen, die 
sich melden, um vor einem Überangebot 
zu warnen, sind leise und meist verbun- 
den mit der Frage, was nach dem Erinne- 
rungsmarathon bleibt. Die Befürchtung, 
bei den Jugendlichen Unlust und Über- 
druß zu erzeugen, wird noch seltener ge- 
äußert. 

Tatsächlich könnten derartige Beden- 
ken, aus eigener Erfahrung, ja nur von 
Lehrern formuliert werden. Diese setzen 
sich damit sowohl dem Zweifel an ihrer 
pädagogischen Kompetenz aus, daß sie 
die betreffenden Themen nicht adäquat 
vermitteln können, und ziehen den Vor- 
wurf der Verdrängung, des Nicht-aufklä- 
ren-Wollens auf sich. 

Vielen Lehrern meiner Generation, der 
heute 40- bis 50jährigen, fällt aber das 
Eingeständnis, es könnte zuviel des 
Guten sein, auch aus anderen Gründen 
nicht leicht: Politisch sozialisiert in den 
sechziger Jahren, sind wir in die Schulen 
gegangen, um uns erstens gegen die sozia- 
le und kulturelle Benachteiligung der Ar- 
beiter- und Unterschichtskinder zu enga- 
gieren und zweitens, um in Geschichts- 
und politischem Unterricht dem bleiernen 
Schweigen der fünfziger und sechziger 
Jahre ein Ende zu machen und uns für die 
Aufarbeitung der faschistischen Vergan- 
genheit einzusetzen. 




Jugendliche In der Gedenkstätte des Vernichtungslagers Auschwitz. 



Es war nie einfach, die Themen Natio- 
nalsozialismus und Holocaust im Unter- 
richt zu behandeln. Wollten wir doch so- 
wohl über die sozioökonomischen wie 
auch über die sozialpsychologischen Be- 
dingungen seiner Entstehung aufklären, 
aber auch die Strukturen des ,^utoritä- 
ren CharaktcrG**, der sich durch Unterta- 
nengeist und Mitläufertum auszeichnet, 
offenlegen. Der Blick auf die Opfer sollte 
Interesse und Mitgefühl der Schüler wek- 
ken. So zeigte die engagierte Lehrerin zu 
Beginn ihrer Schullaufbahn in den siebzi- 
ger Jahren den Film J^acht und Nebel" in 
einer Mädchenklasse (ein Film, der in den 
Landesbildstellen oft nicht zu erhalten 
war, weil offenbar viele Lehrer auf einen 
Lemeffekt durch Schock setzten) und war 
auf die emotionalen Ausbrüche weinender 
Schülerinnen ebensowenig vorbereitet wie 
später auf die — durch Abwehr von 
Schuldgefühlen gespeisten? — betont 
skeptischen bis nationalistischen Reaktio- 
nen männlicher Jugendlicher. 

Es vollzog sich ein Prozeß manchmal 
schmerzlichen Lernens mit einer neuen 
jungen Generation, die in der Regel nicht 
den Anspruch hat, das Vergangene radi- 
kal zu durchleuchten, um Ursachen und 
Schuldige des Nationalsozialismus zu fin- 
den. Möglicherweise deshalb, weil sie 
nicht vermuten muß, ihre Eltern könnten 
an dem Schrecklichen beteiligt, könnten 
Zuschauer, Mitläufer oder gar Täter ge- 
wesen sein. War dies noch ein zentraler 
Teil des Generationenkonflikts der „68er", 
so ist es für die heutigen Jugendlichen 
doch Geschichte. Ihre Haltung zu dieser 
Geschichte ist keinesfalls gleichgültig, das 



Thema interessiert und berührt sie, 
erzeugt auch — abgesehen von den er- 
wähnten extremen Reaktionen — Momen- 
te der Nachdenklichkeit. Schuld- und Be- 
troffenheitsgefühle aber, wie wir als 
Nachkriegsgeneration sie empfunden ha- 
ben und wie wir sie als linke Lehrer gerne 
weitergegeben hätten, lehnen sie ab. Mit 
Recht sind sie nicht bereit, den ,^ea- 
culpa"-Gestus einer Gesellschaft zu über- 
nehmen, die ein Verantwortungsgefühl 
verordnet, wo sich eines bilden müßte. 



„ Wollen wir es den Jugendlichen 
angesichts einer Übermacht von 
negativen Selbstbildern so leicht 
machen, jedes gesellschaftliche 
Engagement zu vermeiden, oder 
sich dieses angeschlagene Bild 
mit rechtsradikaler Hilfe wieder 
aufpolieren zu lassen?" 



„Diese Zeit ist vorbei. Der Faschismus 
in Deutschland ist besiegt. (...) Wir kön- 
nen nicht ein Leben lang dafür gerade- 
stehen, wie unsere Eltern und Großeltern 
früher gehandelt haben. Wir können es 
nur besser machen, und ich glaube, daß 
wir uns auch auf diesem Weg befinden." 

Oft sind mir von Schülerinnen und 
Schülern Äußerungen entgegengehalten 



worden, wie die hier zitierte aus dem neu 
erschienenen Buch von Abraham Teuter 
(„Freiheit, na und?" Texte junger Autorin- 
nen und Autoren). Äußerungen, die zei- 
gen, wie zwiespältig für Jugendliche Er- 
fahrung und Umgang mit dem Thema Na- 
tionalsozialismus ist, wie schmal mögli- 
chenveise der Grat ist z^\'ischen der hier 
zitierten Bereitschaft, nie wieder etwas 
Ähnliches geschehen zu lassen, und 
einem resigniert-trotzigen „Ja, ich bin 
Deutscher — na und?" mit anderen denk- 
baren Konsequenzen. 

Methodische Unterrichtshilfen neben 
den Schulbüchern gibt es inzwischen etli- 
che: Frankfurter Stadtarchiv und Fritz- 
Bauer-Institut empfehlen das Einladen 
von Zeitzeugen und helfen bei der Kon- 
taktaufnahme — eine Anregung, der lei- 
der natürliche Grenzen gesetzt sind. Auch 
der Besuch von Gedenkstätten und Aus- 
stellungen gehört seit Jahren zum festen 
Ritual gegen das Vergessen — neu ist al- 
lerdings der Hinweis, nebeti dem Blick auf 
die Opfer, wie sie in den meisten Ausstel- 
lungen und Gedenkstätten überwiegen, 
den Blick auf die Täter nicht zu vernach- 
lässigen. Die „Spurensuche am eigenen 
Ort", d. h. im Archiv der eigenen Schule 
oder im Stadtteil nach Hinweisen auf 
jüdische Schüler, jüdisches Leben und 
nationalsozialistische Untaten zu suchen, 
ist ein neuer, erfolgversprechender An- 
satz, der den großen Vorteil hat, Schüler 
durch eigenes Forschen und Handeln auf 
immer neue Fragen und Erkenntnisse 
zum Thema stoßen zu lassen. 

Neben den alten Filmen über Ausch- 
witz haben wir den Film jShoa", und wer 



(Bild: Ostblick^; 

es mit seinem Gewissen vereinbaren 
kann, Schülern auch einmal deutsche 
Vorbilder für nicht-opportunistisches Ver- 
halten zu zeigen, greift zu Spielbergs 
„Schindlers Liste" oder Marek Halters 
„Tzedek": in beiden Filmen werden Men- 
schen gezeigt, die, indem sie Juden hal- 
fen, ein Beispiel für Zivilcourage geboten 
haben. Auf eine absurde Weise akade- 
misch und weit weg von dem Interesse an 
einem pädagogischen Diskurs zu diesem 
Thema, mutet die Debatte um die beiden 
letztgenannten Filme an: Die Darstellung 
solch positiver Beispiele sei geschichtsver- 
falschend, zu entlastend für die Deut- 
schen und damit ,4iicht empfehlenswert", 
war zu hören. 

Wollen wir es den Jugendlichen wirk- 
lich so schwer machen bei ihrer Suche 
nach Identifikationsmöglichkeiten in der 
Politik, nach Vorbildern für Zivilcourage? 
Darf es, politisch korrekt, nur die „Weiße 
Rose", der „20. JuH" oder Bonhoeffer — 
mit letalem Ausgang — sein? Oder, 
anders herum, wollen wir es den Jugend- 
lichen angesichts einer Übermacht von 
negativen Selbstbildern der Deutschen so 
leicht machen, jedes gesellschaflliche 
Engagement zu vermeiden, oder schlim- 
mer, sich dieses angeschlagene Bild mit 
rechtsradikaler Hilfe wieder aufpolieren 
zu lassen? 

Es geht nicht darum, aus den Deut- 
schen während der Hitlerzeit ein Volk von 
Resistance-Helden zu machen, aber sich 
anders, sich menschlich und voll Mitge- 
fühl zu verhalten, muß — nicht nur Schü- 
lern — immer als eine Möglichkeit vor 
Augen gehalten werden. 



Ein weiteres Problem: Was ist der ad- 
äquate Umgang mit dem Thema Natio- 
nalsozialismus und Holocaust in der mul- 
tikulturell zusanunengesetzten Schul- 
klasse der heutigen Schülergeneration? 
Der Anteil nichtdeutscher Schüler liegt in 
Frankfurt bei 37,5 Prozent, in Hauptschu- 
len häufig zwischen 70 Pozent und 90 Pro- 
zent: Schüler, die unsere (Kultur)Ge- 
schichte nicht haben, und deren eigene 
Biographie oft geprägt ist durch Krieg, 
Verfolgung und Vertreibung. 

Im Entwurf des neuen Hessischen Rah- 
menplans Gesellschaftslehre findet sich 
zum Thema Nationalsozialismus der Hin- 
weis: „Für den Bildungsgang der Haupt- 
schule ist zu dem Stichwort , Ideologie des 
Nationalsozialismus' zumindest der Anti- 
semitismus verbindlich zu behandeln." 
Keine leichtes Unterfangen in einer Klas- 
se, die zu einem Drittel aus Flüchtlingen 
aus dem ehemaligen Jugoslawien besteht 
und zu 50 Prozent aus moslemischen 
Schülern. „In Bosnien werden wir alle 
umgebracht, aber die Deutschen wollen 
immer nur über die Juden reden**, so der 
zornige Ausbruch eines bosnischen 
Flüchtlingsjungen. 

Es soll hier keiner Relativierung des 
Holocaust das Wort geredet werden. Er 
ist, was den Vemichtungswillen der Täter 



„ Wir können nicht ein Leben lang 
dafür gradestehen, wie unsere 
Großeltern und Eltern früher 
gehandelt haben — wir können es 
nur besser machen. " 



und ihre Methode betrifft, ein singuläres 
Ereignis. Wohl aber muß es möglich sein, 
zu einem differenzierteren Umgang mit 
den Themen Nationalsoziaiismus, Ausch- 
witz und Holocaust in der Schule zu ge- 
langen. 30 Jahre nach ihrer Niederschrift 
genügt es nicht mehr, Adornos Forderung 
an Erziehung, „daß sich Auschwitz nicht 
mehr wiederhole", aufs neue in die Lehr- 
pläne hineinzuschreiben. Als moralischer 
Imperativ steht sie dort, ebenso wie in 
den Köpfen der engagierten Lehrerschaft, 
lange genug. 

Es gilt, auch die Schrecken der heutigen 
Zeit zu registrieren, sie als Beispiele 
menschlicher Barbarei zu kennzeichnen, 
die nach Auschwitz stattfindet, die offen- 
bar immer möglich ist, aber der wir, an 
dem Ort, an dem wir leben und mit use- 
ren Möglichkeiten entgegentreten müs- 
sen. 

Eine differenzierte Beschäftigung mit 
der Weltgeschichte dieses Jahrhunderts, 
mit seinen verschiedenen Formen von 
Rassismus, Säuberung, Vertreibung und 
Völkermord könnte eine Möglichkeit sein, 
den ausländischen Schülern mit zum Teil 
eigenen leidvollen Erfahrungen zumin- 
dest den Raum zur Aussprache und damit 
das (jrefühl einer Anerkennung auch ihrer 
Geschichte und ihrer Trauer zu geben. 

Denn wer es mit einer „Erziehung nach 
Auschwitz" ernst nimmt, wer mehr meint 
als eine Metapher deutscher Selbstbespie- 
gelung und Selbstbezichtigung, wer sich 
als ein Ergebnis dieser Erziehung ein 
friedliches und tolerantes Zusammenle- 
ben aller Bürger unseres Staates 
wünscht, darf nicht einem Teil dieser 
künftigen Staatsbürger durch die Igno- 
ranz ihrer Geschichte und ihrer (jefühle 
die Selbstachtung nehmen, die eine Vor- 
aussetzung ist zur Herausbildung der 
Kraft, die Adorno die „einzig wahrhafte 
Kraft gegen das Prinzip von Auschwitz" 
nennt: ,Autonomie (...); die Kraft zur Re- 
flexion, zur Selbstbestimmung, zum 
Nicht-Mitmachen". 



/\R \\0\l> u, ^^^^^ GROfysPta\T -^mi":} coatnioiv 





2(C>(P0 




c^\Qt\>i^ 



]^ei/iB 



lel\^fp)lp^^p '/I^^Jj/y ^< 



<je) z^>y^ 



L 



r^ 



\lt* 







nJc 



'oodbouriji'MI. 





nzrhis progc^urr WAe hAnbvcn)hcn. fovuoii v^iiL low bw Olsc^. 



^ oMptCtfiCf out imtgocf out; ^ut ij (ffoul^i (Mdlty 
ycitp anoi^ir fjunpup bein^. 



flLBCRTGHUJEITZ£n 



ytoacMn / 



?■ 



C(X^. 



CAnSUiklitma T:20p.ar. 

K^b^At Sh^bAt ^ctvkce T:5op,(rL, 

©mnec -PoUowUia jSci^vu^b ^Dlnina R^oor 






Shjihh^&cjevicce S-.^oxxtv. 

ScrcnonL * \l^hbl^,^xch\Oicfjjic 

^'u^Ai Sht^bbA^tr X:,ooa 



cn.. 



»Ufteßhioiente 5J0<>p*av. 

•rTin>a. '''p'^J^V K^\i^udin/l2Gfcn^Mn5''HS 

(nincfiAh^ ♦ ♦ t:oo 

&'ubUShilehiJtr 7:30 

CYlÄÄClV ÄoMjÄV^ivUb^ ?J^SLO 



jShAcbAiJ^t ♦ a:öOA,ar* 

BcC^k^ASt ö:30Ä..a2^, 

ülducQ/ Uikina ioicoxjctl. 

Cioeina onccilna \\:oox.cin. 

Ixccwcli' oUeKobcrfl 




^AU oiu: \c\VQiXUQ tAkeplAcetrrthefire-plAaJJpuiifle. 







fffrr}OViKi 






to (ook hack oikr dipw iwpe^^ rvcaCC ißc QOtß-9^ y<^/ 



W 



VoAcocna .^ S'ASo^cih 

OacMcuiAustCÄXiA/ /Tötil kAtori^ 

TCAbbAlAt ShtAbbAt 6m?ice5 q:oopcTi. 

(Duino: foUowUifl Jöervices . . ''OlAtAÖoc'cooaL 

CoffcepLu5 ''02AU6oc''co(xrL 

Sb^bbAt Sewicce s^soa^oi 

(^AbbAi Atfrx6 ^t^uendpecht 

Setmotr RAbbl HAlpfi üculiAue 

S'oÖAt ShtAt?bÄt . . . • : i:oop.ai 

pTziN. -'p-)Ä t^blJusttaTjop^^ 

OlincbthL &:30p.crL. 



5u6Ät öfiLblut 7;0Dp.cn 

(Haä^U? An6 l]Äv6AlAh^. ^50por 

^cnwij ^)rogriu»i ö)Mvcmi^ic a^vi 

5h^dnAclt 8:oo^.0(h 

Bt^CAkj^Aöt. ^:OOA.ai 

lUtiuJC/plAtie-AÖtöcaösion. I0l00^x\h 

ChAittTUti Alex Roboj^ 
TJlctucc tAking Uiooxm^ 

^mKkcv 'J^ic (^ceeribAuai^ 



f^iWill 



OlecTRobct^ 




■l■)■^>^l 




jiloiiXuraJeil 



ncjieuman^ 



( O^mJi TSerattumj 

'Jflürlici ''Berfimer 
öeWlBer/inaer 



Olccnbeis of the Qf:dhkX£>iih'is^ Clasö of 1930 




ha^tiJÄ tarn*^ tB^-Ä-tVa ä^tosn ^^'"o'^^ 



fri/iptc iJi^Jl^e ^Hfscp 



iT 










^^ÜMf,nj. 




'jse^a.rdlcis of tf)e üme, i/ig-plaa, 
im smsoti or tli^ j^tßer, 

uJhe^n cid friends 





VOaCACTL 

XcAcoooi. operi kooi atrlvAL 

CA\ibkiiQ\iii}fit^ T*i5 p.cn 

1W)balAt SixbbAt SecvLceö V^^ P^ 

X^tnriec [oLLovc>lrm ServLces 

TT^rn -iirr T^bL^JAcob^ierier 

Cbj^cc pLiö intb^Teacoocn 

3ln2sbbdJt ^xiVQvcQJö 8:50 axn 

VTTp 

S'luW SfiabbAlr 12^:15 poi 

(TllndiAli. 6:30 PiTL 



5^uiW sbltöhit :t p.oi 

^lA\dv xxih hÄX>6^r 9-iO pai 

'Report oa'iHi^'Bx)k 
TFiougbtöonLJükire reanioriö. 

ShAchATlt 8:00 a..(n 

'Bccakköt 9:oodv.oi 

CCldciinn or Cocncni-tteeö . . .iO:oo a..ox. 

piducc-tAking W'^saun 

ChÄJcnpaLgrL- nouc 11:50 a..(ix 

^l^tive 'jf^ualorr'^Ani Juet: ii:30 

KonocuiQ tiie.i)iba.C/t:aöuAk5 op^30 

J5?^ Afe/" JZ7 ifoodseeiruf i{ou — 

rmu r?") {7rard-u^ t{? med amn ßndmm. 



^'\ 



of Oict*jourticu ilproua^ Um 



Pb]li$^ 




VhiMjUutmJieutiioiy 




J^radtlf(^^fMün^jp/jjta^ 



"^niOT^afk 



Junne-28ji^^6 00 



Jprlrm ^(cip,^. 



i 





Xh.ls pcoariun, ^m, tiMidvccrtteru fot; mx, wiih. Low. tnj Jue ^. 



Trüridj ort tfit jfoTtJerj 

' tficgarcrniofllfe 



TcA^oooi opea ^.'.sa-- 6:30 

^üjt'ö gcttogcriicc'! 5:3op.<n.. 

Cjcutirt^s xnb OptentAtion. Otrcina \Ujan^ 

I 

m>t^ J ane 27^^ 

Co|j^eep(u6 , • . 6'30-8:30A.av. 

ShAcnArii^ . . LocAtionto be Änrxouwcgi • . SiSOÄ-.m^. 

Äccoiöfv ^AcobWlemc 

Aneeriooa^ 

OluidiAh^ 7i50»,a2.. 



j&eLccte6 pocm.6 ^ pocicy bij . . ^Dc-Kcccu Wonbcm 

ShAxkAcl^ S*OOA^.CfTL. 

BtreÄ-kfA^ir 8-t5A.-crL.. 

^Viducc^i^Akin^ iO'*OOA.m^. 

Closiru^cnjüdin^ . . . . WAlkcg{w . I|:00a..ov. 



ysttve ^Eeamoa^üanc^ico 



n»^ (2i45ttov. 



1 



1 






y■^yr-^y 




^ 



t1' 



H/c liiere miiü kaälfn 



^i 



t 



aiw 



Oi 



(den 



Ourcf^reif bccanti adulty 
3ut ijf/dh/a) ktiJeeiiuj 






^oianAa CtH?65 



TliU pcogcÄcn^ NVÄ.6 liAtiiwciitcrxjou vjoit wltli bvc bvjOU^ V. 



i! 



I i 



;, 




rnihtj/ 



Jj;ncßiif4^Mf^^ßf('/hM0^^ 






Jiuicfb-15 ,1000 00 

4 





^i 



Jletttj Cottin pogrcbtn. 




Kcpeslioacrits NX'itL besefveö upon AtrLVA.L 

ijefs aettoQctliec' H-.Mspm.. 

i^tkcs c&coivib iuDmq thc- vjCAt^ . Otsc- l^obej;g 
(jccctLrzas frooxtJscAÄl . . . .ijeo OCU^ß-c 

CÄaiUliqlitlnja itoop.iTi, 

01\ACiV Tl5|3.CT^ 

Dinaec -folloNxjina sccvices . ^'J^lnlm^ Ifloocn^ 



L-tk- 



Cc-Pcc plus 

i^\i6^i SliAbb^t , Uooy.cn.. 

(:nin&i^^^, ... .6:f5p.ox. 



*..*•« « 







ILBA REUNIONS - compiied bv Ruth Fruchter 

JUNE. 2000 

1. Lakehouse HoteK Woodridge. NY - 

June 18 -20, 1976 
Attendance- 47 
SundayOnly- 9 

2. June 23 -25, 1978 

Rav Weiss, z.l. and Rav 
Zeilberger visit on Sunday 
In Memoriam ( 1 00* Yahrzeit) 
Of BLBA's founder Rabbi 
Seligman Baer Bamberger by 
Norbert Hellmann 

3. June 27 -29, 1980 

We honor ILBA graduates of 1 930 

Hom Bartura z.l. and Yerach Barchai z.l. 

attend 

Total attendance - 80 

4. June 25 -27, 1982 

Walter Kaufinann z.l. speaks: 
**Between the lines ofthe ILBA Book" 



5. Homowaciu Spring den. NY 

June 22 -24, 1984 

Guest Speaker- Malcolm Hoenlein, 

Executive Director of Jewish Community 

Relation Council. 

50 year graduates are honored: 

Max Gruenebaum, Ephraim Hoenlein, Julius 

Kleinmann, Martha Mandel, Alex Roberg. 

Ruth Translateur-Salm from Columbia, 

South America attends. 



6. Homowack. Spring Glen. NY 

June 27 -29, 1986 

Rabbi Ralph Neuhaus z.l. gives sermon on 
Shabbos moming. Dr. Tzippora Jochsberger 
speaks at closing lunch. Yerach Bar Chai 
from Israel attends. 



7. 



8. 



June 24 -26, 1988 

Attendance - 68 

In memoriam of Rabbi S. R. Weiss z.l. by 
Eric Greenbaiun. Toni Aron from Australia 
speaks about "Jewish Life in Australia". 

June 29 - July 1, 1990 - The Originator of our ILBA 
Reunions, Ruth Fruchter, moves to 
Brookline, Mass., cannot attend and 
therefore infonnation is missing. 3- 'K . 



9. Chaiet Virn, NY 



June 19-21, 1992- 



'Our children went on Aliyah, 
their trials and triumphs" 
Participants - Hugo Apt z.l., 
Lothar Brown, Walter Mittel, 
Ruth Thaler. 

Lotte Lapian attends from 
Hongkong, speaks on "from 
Jerusalem to Hongkong". 



10. Chalet Vim, NY. 

June 1 7 - 1 9, 1 994 - Attendance - 4 1 

1 . from "A People and Its 
Music" - Video on Ashkenazi 
music produced by Dr. 
Tzi.ppora Jochsberger. 
Closing meeting - "In 
Celebration of our 1 0* 
Anniversary Reunion 
arranged by Alex Roberg. 

2. Audience Participation: 
"An Experience I would Like 
to share with you". 

11. Homowack HoteK Spring Glen« NY 

June 28 - June 30, 1996 

Sermon - Jacob Wiener 
"Greetings from Eretz 
YisraeF' by attending Leo 
Mayer. Audience 



teacher) I fondly remember. 



or 



12. 



June 26 - 28. 1998 



/ . 



% 



Attendance - 30 
Poems by Hilde Cohen z.l. 
read by her husband, Werner. 
Dr. Kerry Weinberg reads 
selected poems she wrote. 
Film on the Danzig .Tewish 
Community presented by 
Irving Kahn. Sundays' 
special guests- Walter 
Neuman z.l. accompanied by 
his wife and son. 



m ' 



" One of tht niccet tlilngs th^t wo? 



r 




i* 
^ 






SliÄrbÄ^Ct 8-OOA.cru 

Bc(rMfAÄb' S''HSA.xn^ 

plctiicc tÄ^kCnq , IO-OOa-.ch^ 








<t<2><?xm:;x3,/Gnüc>^v90v>-:3v>-:^ 




V.. 



^ 



HfSOtTHOm 



^ 5... u.^ ^e.^ .^j..^. ^ r^- ^^/^^ '^ ^^^'^'' ^'^- ^'^'^ 



;.^ 



Lcc/o^-gO^ 



t^^«-<^ 







f7 /ö^^ \<^^-<-^ Q^i^-r^-^ 



4^^^^, 







Ijl 



q^\^U^ Ha^Lc ! ^}tUt/^ ^ /^^ 7?^^^^ .^^^^^ 



^V-^rvp^^^ 





/^. 



'T) 




'Äi- 



;|^il /Aftc ./<ti 








tCvttl ylyVt^ 



Ia, 









i 



P( 



<j O ^ A^^oAi^ ^^ ^(^i^^^L^ y^Ju cf .^^i^j2^^ 



ä^:^^^^ 'h^^^ei^^^ 



-\. 



c^v; e^t 




^'v 44li^ p 6-Ui^ V 



hlAt- 



lüt Kl 





Hc'T^'-^ 



■)iu\:^'tu^ <y^ • ^f-^- «^^^ 






U^u 




A>uaS 5"^ 



^ 



% 



/^<aA- A^'eo/x^ f<^^^ f^- 



KViAck^ HiLcyoHok- *^<2- i^-cd^ c(, ojjjödi '^'aaajZ -Oma^: mo^ U/^i»«;? 



\AAA/>i^ 



ö 



1 






3 



J co^t nujjoß ßu ßoicktp fpour^ 
"j coutj,tniM muf ßij jrni,lef,ijotU4iri 

(llJ,d'V^^lHUm'äp{4UffOftßfto pfiff, 

J7 ^^fpt fnu a-ffe Bu/rmjäf - - tjütuearf. 
'(jtrowlm 016" bijllocoiAnB.ßcAnii 



DCND 



i 







Z^-Z^J<)SG 



/: W 






r 



.^T^^ 



Tb.l€> pcogCAor WA^ hAn^wtüUixj'ocuoitwUhLUve. \)\^JljC( 



T 









Ci5ai6kilgbtiti0 6:55 p.(TL. 

TiAbb(UÄt5f2AbbÄt Services 'X:oop.OL. 

Dluncc foUowlng Sccviceß 
AjkcDlnntc • 

CfiMcomti SiAno) BMioiAjr 

n~)ijT -)iiT JcfÄcfiBAcClm 

CJöCAtl ruantoti'85 Betti) nmhüuiö 

*Schcnu5Uig''Se66U)ii^ 

Coffee plus *Dtntngcoocn^ 

iShivbbM' 5ccvlc<i6 8:?o A..(n.. 

j5ec(norL . . . RAbbl RAlpli tlaihÄUö 

^'u6i\t SJiAbbxt j:oo p.ai 

jnim •''r)-)^ : RAbbl ^ustlaTiofoiÄaa 5:00 
cnindiÄh^ 6-.^op.aL 



5'u;62d öhtlshit- :7:00 

CCl^Mvo An6TiA»6AlAh^ 




CtiAirwiva: KAbbtT>c.3Ncob Wienec 

pcesenUtwn-. RutfiXlmler 



Ä^j3^^?= 



5flACh^Clt 8:00X-.(Y1. 

BpeMf^6t ^tooiv.ai. 

|atacc/ wlAas- a. 6i6ciiS6ionL lo-^ x.ctl. 

plctuce tÄkina ii:ooa..ol 

ifeaUvQ. ^ g^utilorL j\indicon — ^. . . uooxm. 

olASto? of üwrecnonkö I>c. WMtwTCMJJWrL 

SpcAkec: "DcX^ippotrA/jochsbeaiec 

'fcAwll t 1 Oleel^bera 








I ) 






JJ!$/ly 




^moVack öpri 







. f The \jeM:8 p^ös bvj mij6 öUoip thieir 

orLout\x?Äc6 öhoNx? of [^ce \n6 (occnu 
but fcunösliip, 6eep vc^UhuitheficArt;^ 



Autboc unkKiovon^ 



^G^>Q,.<rXLAsy'^v^<>^ 



T)co^c 



Acn — 

Oämt^tiotacnecting Uitht oiAin lobbvj • • • fioop.oi. 

CMi6lellgbtiii0 ^)o p.0L. 

KAbbMAt 5hAl)l?At 5ccviceö . *: q^oop.OL. 

Düitiec foUowuig 5ccvice6 
AftecDüinec : * 

*V(?clcoaic toouc ftftfi'^ßuiiion! 

CliÄtcpcföon. Rutb-Icuchtec 

rT-)Tp -)zr^ riocbßctT^elUnanti 

ascAcL Rmnioti '8> BcÄ^llcuhAU5,:5ic]Jm/ 

'"TcocYT Reunloato RmmorL^ 

Coffec plas Düitngcoocn-- 

Serenoa. . . RAbbl RAlph Heuh^uis 

^'aö^t ^hAbbat 1^:00 p.ai 

Aftecnoori-. 

jna>i -«-n-jH ÜAbbt 3ustla1iof(t7Ann 5.00 
0riincKÄ.h- ^-^op-OL 



Sui>Ät öhlishitr q:oo 

(HääcIv äjiÖIiäxt^MaIx 9:^0 p.cn 

^'5^eniiigl)cogcAon^ 

5toUfuni>, 
IJCbA- Boolc^ 
Ontco6uctioii of 3LbA- 5tu6v) pcogtÄcn — ^ 
*Ouc ßol^ea^eACö" "KÄbblrcjÄCobWUnet? 

5hAch^cLtr 8:ooÄ..crr 

BceAkiAöt 9•oo^.al 

^J^g -union. I fft gaic ( uct~ r J^^oo 

ort thcic Qolöen AnnivecöAcv) 

(U^ötec of Ceccoionlcö Vi^kchud 

ÖuestöpeA-kec (nAlcoloo-TioenLeüi 

^ecattvc ülcecloc of th«.Tiwoiöh.CocncnuraU»j RdAti3naCoiuKät,n.\|. 

<Cll^LlmßC6 of tlitlcwlsliCboioiumtvj uithC'80U&, 
'fcwelt j \ OL5(i'Roba:5 




"XcA-Lwax 0|)cti fi-ooi arriVAl 

CiuailcliglitiJig j'io\ym.. 

■KAbbAlAt SbAbbÄt Services T3op.ai. 

"Dümec followtng Scrviccö 
AftccDüiiicc (inShuL): 

"VPelcöOK tö OUT ^urtbTtoinion" 

ajÄ5teofCct:eax)aiC5 .Dc.XOem(!c\ftäf2t)er0 

nnrp -)zc\ 'WAltccl)^ 

Bing ^Oonpithlfu:'' 'ibicijpä 

''Dmpccööiotiö fcooi lecuöAüm" 

Coffec plu6 in thelcÄrcxxrL 

SliAbbÄt Sccvlccö 850 a..oi 

« 

"•3 f 

S'u6^ SbAbbÄt a:i5p.(n 

n-i'ip — »I3.-T QocbccfheUuMa 

%a;nln^ pecloi •• . . Ax^CÄhAOi ZcntaiÄJi . . 5 p.oi 
OlmcbaJi. - <^-5o poi 



5'iiievt shliöhit ^ pcn 

■n->m ->3-^. . . .'R^t3acob\Piena:' 

(Ttotclv 2tn.6 FmcoÖäUIi :?-.ap p-cn 



Tvepocte: :3ilBÄ.Book . .:3cvin0T<Aha,"hii^Apt: 

Tkwslettct: t^w^J^wl 

StoU'JLUiö 0]Äctln:pre66butfC 

5ü6cpoJ6ciitation3:*BethÄkfu30t; 

DöCÄelRcunioti'Sl . . .3beRobecg 

SbAch^tclt 8-oOÄ.(n 

BccAkjci&t 9:00A.(rL 

Didiut-taking 



io:<h5a.(n 



^-'i — i^ 



ij:3oa..(rL 



3f^^3to^Q^^^il^ i'i-5<^ 

(ßasto of Ceoecnonlcs "Dc.^hllUp Veit 

Speaker: "DcWAllecKaufowi 

" "Bctween thc Ujicö o[ Uk 3ilB A-Book* 



I 



p'iß/o'P ;;)/cp;;) ^/ef^'ic 



! j-n-srrpm 




cühxr XRe ibe keij tooRÖs of oun IiVes , 

xhe cfuxLines (De cüeRexMjqhr ÄrT:bcil^^ jrnD 

ro bve ^ocoRÖitiq ro ouk. tra6itioix p^TüD 

xhe TORzJx. 
p^Msoi h^5 Becooieihe sc^ff oj^ouRlivtes, 7tuT> 
on cütiich u)e cMilj£Mi,u)hid2 oiAkesüs srnonq. 
ü)e ^au2e6 xhe püiii)xcioas of- oioR^L bviriq "ngiT) 
so uje coali Becooie KespoosißLe Le^j^eRS ctd^ttD 

ifi isK^eL 
^x^ cooscietinous x:e^d2eRS jii-iiD^ n^7iT3 

u)ho Qui6e ouK t|otrch inrhe TOR\h cuxq 
u)e qive xhwiks ro xhe *1LB\r poca crpnxpop 

übe 6eprh or oür heÄRus 
fOK xhe inöeljßlg icnpRession. ix h^s o^»?!! □'•T3 
Iq^ on US, oti öudi Mi6 6VeKtjone*s p€RS0»i3lixi| ! 



^ Z^ts proqram iJa^s 
/kindu^riUenJor Ijow 



II 



on ms. Occasion, ofaic 

UO ^^ jinniifersarj 

of ifu 1936 Gratfaaies 
lakiHouse Jfoid .. ModriJoc ^11.1^. 



CLA^ss-sorx«; 19^6 

ijetirs comt aruCßo 
iirm rrwrcnes by. 
ßic^ our fo\>& jor soriß 
aml our jritmUnip stronß 
y^ilt [astßreiftr lonj 
ditcC neiftr die . 



fltf*temSerTa and ■irttnslfite£ 



TeMioooi openfKOOi m?kivvL 

cxn^l^liqhnaq Vio p.oi 

k^aBxl^ s1i\BB»r seRVices T'.30 p.cn 

bnn&K roHgunnq seKVices 

•nn-\p -)ziT HÄ8B1 yxjoos tuieneK 

oiÄ-sceK. 0]^ ceK£Cßonies aI^x ROßeKq 

corree ßlus mihfe TeÄRoocn 

sllÄ^BB^SeRVlCeS 8'-30 X.Ol 

s'u6xT sh^eBÄT 1115p.01 



Lewmiiiq peRioJ) , rxbbi bR.jusrin hojw\n . . .5 poi 

oimdixh. 6-.3op.oi 

s'üÖät shlishiT .ip.oi 

•n")iji nn-^ e-Ric qKeenBMJOi 

oax'ARiV iMib h\vbi\Lxli 9-'2op.aL 

eVemriq- pK.oqKMi -. 

^"^J hÄ.ppij porheRS OMi •; 
shxdiKRir ß A.01 

6Rfe\1Cf AST 9 Ä..01 

j€sTiVe K^uniori Bxnauer 

Ji^ Wä5 -SO iVry ntci: ^o fia\fe ^ich Uocc (vactCrL '■■ 





f 

& 







•jcn 



0_jS^ 



i P 



^^ 



8- 









Mocfriäac ,fl.if. 



Co me^ pirfrimcLj wu nekr cank ofd, 



w HS 1/ou itJere mm m 



sj 




Sey'fl 



mr em j ei/ 
jupfv seems imr muh jiifC 



eJnakcspeare. 
front Jonnei: io4- 



TexRooor openpwcrLAKRjvivL 

ovniLeLiqbxiriq Ti3op.cn 

kÄBBALdx sbxBBi^ Services T:3op.ar 

Ap]eR-OinnLeR.t 

"voelcoQieTO oüRsecoß^ RginiorL* 

"siriq Alonq wixfi €»iio » ewc LeVf 

^ schctiusing sessiorL. '^ 

-4 

corf^epLus imheTeau^oooi 

sfiAöBAT seRVices 8:3oa,.ai 

S'UO^T sflÄ-BBÄX 12:15p.ai 

oiinchAh^ G-.3opxn. 




s'aiAx shLish-iT .Tpoi 

mirr "iixt : ^oeL hess 

chÄJR.aiÄn.5 . . \oeRn.€R >»eir2BeRq 

RfipoRT on 'newsLeTüeR." mi6 *3\BK-booU^ 

to9e cotvtütiwL OK Suiidiiij-nwrmna at^^iOcLfu,. 

shAchiVRiT . . . 8iv.ai 

BReÄkPÄÄT 9 Ä-Ofx 

cormtiLieS BU5in€S5- Session- 9-30A.xn. 

f)ia cnenaoRixoTL rä3Bi SeLiqcnAna B^eR. Bafl2߀wj€R.V|^ 

OBsaiinq ikc 100*^ 'falirj.ci'6 oftkc ^jJue-rzhioyctiiat' " 

diMKcaxrL äIsk ROBeR^; 

speÄJ<eK.i RABBI oR. Saxvison. RÄ^pfiAeLVCfess ^'j 

Mau' ti)c he prMegzdiü meetaaavtp.