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Full text of "Al Iraqi 1955"

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AL IRAQI 




19 5 5 




PUBLISHED BY THE 

SENIOR CLASS 



BAGHDAD COLLEGE 



IRAQ 



DEDICATION 



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T is a pleasure this year to express our sincere 
appreciation to one who has followed with keen interest and 
enthusiasm the progressive development of Baghdad College. 
Ever willing to encourage and assist our enterprises, he has 
from the beginning manifested a genuine fondness and ardent, 
zeal for the ideals of our school. In grateful recognition of 
his solicitude and paternal affection for the welfare and 
advancement of all our students, the Senior Class is privileged 
to dedicate the 1955 edition of Al Iraqi to His Excellency, 
The Most Reverend Monsignor Athanasius J.D. Bakose, 
Syrian Catholic Archbishop of Baghdad. 




His Excellency, The Most Reverend Monsignor Athanasius J.D. Bakose 

Syrian Catholic Archbishop Of Baghdad 




AIR VIEW OF CAMPUS 




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FACULTY RESIDENCE 




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VERY REVEREND THOMAS F. HUSSEY, S.J. 

Hector of Baghdad College 



= ADMINISTRATION 





REV. LEO J. SHEA, S.J. 

Administrator 



REV. JOHN J. WILLIAMS, S.J. 
Treasurer 





REV. ROBERT J. SULLIVAN, S.J. 
Principal 



REV. THOMAS J. KELLY, S.J. 

Assistant Principal 



ADMINISTRATION 




Bro Italo A. Parnoff, S.J. 
Director of Maintenance 




Dr. Romeo De Sousa 
School Physician 




Mr. Hanna George 
Secretary 





Bro. Lawrence J. Foley, S.J. 
Infirmarian 



Mr. Petros John 
.4 ssistant Secretary 



FACULTY 






Rev. Edward F. Madaras, S.J. 



Mr. George Abbosi 



Rev. John A. Miff, S.J. 





Rev. Joseph P. Merrick, S.J. 



Mr. Maiimid Yusuf 




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Rev. Charles W. Maiiax, S. J. 



Mr. Abdll-Qadir Saab 



Rev. William D. Sheehan, S.J. 



FACULTY 






Rev. Joseph P. Connell, S.J. 



Mr. Jamil Salim 



Rev. Michael J. McCarthy, S.J. 






Rev. Charles M. Loeffler, S.J- 



Mr. Haui Nasir 




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Rev. Sidney M. MacNeil, S.J. 



Mk. Ali Talih.i 



Rev. Joseph D. Quinn, S.J. 



FACULTY 






Rev. Stanislaus T. Gerry, S.J. 



Mr. Mikhail Naum 



Rev. Joseph G. Fennell, S.J. 





Rev. Thomas H. Milvehill, S.J. 



Mr. Abdulahad Siman Geor< 







Rev. Joseph J. La Bran, S.J. 



Mr. Ylsuf Elias Antun 



Rev. Edward J. Banks, S.J. 



FACULTY 






Rev. Joseph L. Ryan, S.J. 



Mk. Jamil Danno 



Rev. John L. Mahoney, S.J. 





Rev. Charles G. Crowley, S.J. 



Mr. Nasir Taqtaq 






Rev. Neil F. Decker, S.J. 



Mr. Muhammad Sarur 



Rev. Joseph F. Fallon, S.J. 



FACULTY 







Rev. John J. McCarthy, S.J. 



Mb. Sami Abdul-Razzaq 



Rev. Walter M. Shea, S.J. 







Rev. Edml'no F. Kelly, S.J. 



Mr. Ibrahim al-Mansur 



Rev. Alfred J. Jolson, S.J. 






Rev. William T. Egax, S.J. 



Mr. Elia Yaqub 



Rev. Joseph A. Paquet, S.J. 



FACULTY 






Rev. John A. Carty, S.J. 



Mr. Yusuf Haddad 



Rev. Robert F. Regan, S.J. 







Rev. Joseph E. O'Connor, S.J. 



Mk. Hanna Tobia 



Rev. Thomal J. Gibbons, S.J. 





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Rev. Walter R. Pelletier, S.J. 



Rev. George F. Gloster, S.J. 



Rev. Albert A. Ca.hdo.vi, S..J. 




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ADNAN NASRI GHANTUS 

A cheerful and serious classmate. . . one of the few who could distinguish 
his twin brothers. . . biology classes and laboratory periods were no burden 
for him. . . played on his class baseball team. . . enjoyed history books and 
historical novels. . . studied French during the vacations. . . will begin medical 
studies after graduation. 

Intramural Sports. 



AMIR ELIAS ZARA 

Took an active part in the athletic program of the school. . . expert tennis 
player and member of class baseball team.. . . one of champion swimmers 
in Baghdad schools. . . reading of English stories and music were his pas- 
times . . . worked on Al Iraqi staff in senior year. . . has chosen engineering lor 
his profession. 

Al. Iraqi Staff 5 ; All-Star Baseball Team 4, 5 ; Intramural Sports. 



ANTRANIK BARKEV GAROSHIAN 

A student with a calm disposition. . . paid close attention in class. . . pre- 
ferred chemistry to his other subjects . . . liked a game of tennis. . . member 
of Debating and Scientific Societies. . . music and reading occupied his free 
moments. . . a frequent spectator at intramural games. . . will continue his 
studies at the Pharmacy College. 

Debating Society 4, 5; Scientific Society 5; Intramural Sports. 





ANUSHUVAN LEON SHAHUWIAN 

Favorite subject of conversation was the homework assignment. . . laboratory 
experiments were a joy for him. . . a tennis player of renown. . . spent the 
summer vacations in Iran. . . often seen touring the city in his automobile. . . 
an enthusiastic player in intramural games. . . plans to enroll in the Pharmacy 
College after graduation. 

Intramural Sports. 



ARM IN ARDAWAZD MARTIR 

His friendly manner won for him a wide circle of friends durings his school 
days. . . spent long hours on the botany and physics homework. . . passed 
the summer holidays at Habbaniyya. . . an accomplished piano player. . . 
regular patron of the science library. . . architectural engineering is his choice 
for a career. 

Scientific Society 4; Debating Society 5; Intramural Sports. 





ARSHAVIR STEPHEN YAMAYAN 

A quiet and diligent student who prepared well for the daily classes. . . won 
testimonials for excellence in biology. . . the intramural baseball games were 
his chief attraction during noon recreations. . . passed his leisure time listen- 
ing to his collection of records. . . sang the praises of Basra. . . plans to study 
architectural engineering. 

Intramural. Sports. 



ASAD MUHAMMAD AL-KHUDHAIRI 

A prominent athlete of the class . . . member of Iraqi Team which travelled 
to Lebanon last summer . . . played all sports and starred on his class teams. . . 
physics and mathematics classes appealed to him . . . listening to the radio 
was his favorite hobby . . . dependable guard on varsity basketball team. . . . 
will study mechanical engineering. 

Boxing Finals 1 ; Tennis Finals 2 ; Varsity Basketball Team 4, 5 ; Varsity Track 
Team 4, 5 ; Varsity Football Team 5 ; All-Star Baseball Team 4,5; Intramural Sports. 



BERJ KHACHIK HUWAKIMIAN 

A large collection of medals testifies to his athletic talents. . . a member of 
Iraqi Basketball Team at games in Lebanon. . . always had the right answer 
in solid geometry classes. . . an authority on school sports in Baghdad. . . 
during his spare time he read English novels. . . engineering is his chosen 
work. 

Varsity Basketball Team 2, 3, 4, 5; Varsity Track Team 2, 3, 4, 5; Intramural 
Sports. 




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DOUGLAS SALIM THOMAS 

One of the youthful members of the class. . . an ever-present smile was the 
index of his happy outlook on life. . . placed solid geometry at the top 
of the list among his subjects. . . one of our best ping-pong players. . . jour- 
neyed to Beirut for the summer holidays. . . plans uncertain but will continue 
studies. 

Sodality 2, 3, 4; Intramural Sports. 



FARUQ, ABDUL-LATIF AHMAD 

A sense of humor made him a popular member of any gathering. . . mathe- 
matics homework was always a pleasure for him. . . a bundle of energy on 
the volleyball court. . . warm days of summer found him by the banks of the 
Tigris for a daily swim. . . has elected petroleum engineering for future study. 

Intramural Sports. 



FAVVZI BUTROS HABBOSH 

A faithful member of the school Sodality. . . named biology as the subject 
he preferred. . . spent his afternoons working in the school library . . . showed 
a marked fondness for classical music. . . happy when working in the labora- 
tories. . . a catcher on his class baseball team. . . will continue his studies 
after graduation. 

Sacred Heart League 1 ; Sodality 3, 4, 5; Debating Society 4, 5; Library Staff 4. 5; 
Intramural .Sports. 





FERDINAND ISKENDER CONSTANT 

A polished speaker of the class. . . no stranger to the elocution contests. . . 
named swimming as his favorite sport. . . one of the many bicycle commuters 
to the school.. . served as treasurerer of the Sodality in senior year. . . read 
mystery stories for a pastime . . . medical studies are in his plans for the 
future. 

Sodality 3, 4, 5 (Treasurer) ; Sacred Heart League 3, 4, 5; Debating Society 4, 5; 
Elocution Finals 3, 4; Intramural Sports. 



GILBERT HENRY ESSAYI 

Appeared in the school dramatic productions. . . member of his class baseball 
team and took part in tennis tournaments. . . learned to speak French while 
vacationing in the Lebanon. . . interested in music and a good accordian 
player. . . enjoyed bicycle picnics. . . English classes were his favorites. .. . 
will begin studies in electrical engineering. 

Sacred Heart League 2 ; Dramatic Society 5; Tennis Finals 1.2; Intramural Sports. 





HABIB SALIM HABIB 

A cheerful and friendly classmate. . . never known to worry. . . an all-star 
baseball player during his student days. . . a medal-winner in handball tour- 
naments. . . biology and English classes held the most appeal for him. . . often 
visited airport to study structure of airplanes. . . will devote next few years 
to study of civil engineering. 

Handball Finals 3; All-Star Baseball Team 4; Intramural Sports. 



HAGOP MAKARDIJ MAKARDIJIAN 

Interested in matters of science. . . physics and botany problems kept him 
busy and happy. . . played a fast and clever game of handball. . . made the 
pilgrimage to Bethlehem in third year. . . a loyal supporter of his class 
teams. . . made many friends in his school years. . . has chosen medicine for 
his life's work. 

Scientific Society 5; Intramural Sports. 



HARITH JIBRAIL LOQA 

A prime mover in activities of the Sodality. . . mathematics and physics were 
his favorite subjects. . . a consistent winner in handball games. . . collected 
stamps as a hobby. . . a happy sense of humor beneath his quiet exterior. . . 
spent the noon recreations with his friends at the canteen. . . the study of 
medicine is his ambition. 

Sacred Heart League 1, 2, 3, 4, 5; Sodality 2, 3, 4, 5. 




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HISHAM TAWFIQ. RASHID 

An Al Iraqi staff worker in senior year. . . a conscientious student who pre- 
pared well for his classes. . . interested in the porblems of mathematics and 
physics. . . his questions in class helped to clarify our difficulties. . . a regular 
patron of school library during the summer holidays. . . mechanical engi- 
neering appeals to him for the future. 

Al Iraqi Staff 5; Intramural Sports. 



HUSAIN ABDUL-MUNIM MURSI 

Class athlete. . . member of varsity teams and high scorer in track meets. . . 
travelled to Egypt during the summer holidays. . . chose mathematics as his 
favorite subject. . . holiday afternoons found him touring the city on his 
bicycle. . . owns a large collection of medals from his athletic triumphs. . . a 
candidate for medical school. 

Boxitig Finals 1, 2; Varsity Basketball Team 3, 4, 5; Varsity Football Team 5; 
Varsity Track Team 3, 4, 5; Intramural Sports. 



JOHN ARAM BASMAJI 

Prominent member of school activities. . . prefect of the Sodality in senior 
year. . . a baseball and basketball player on his class teams. . . collected 
stamps as a hobby. . . read many of the books in the school library. . . a fast 
runner on the track team. . . physics classes were his favorites. . . a future 
mechanical engineer. 

Sodality 2, 3, 4, 5 (Prefect) ; Sacred Heart League 3, 4, 5; Al Iraqi Staff 5; Debat- 
ing Society 5; Intramural Sports. 





JOSEPH BUDAGH MARUKIL 

An unruffled temperament characterized Joseph. . . served on Al Iraqi Staff 
in senior year. . . tennis was his favorite sport. . . a veteran chess player. . . 
preferred physics to his other subjects. . . found no difficulty in writing com- 
positions. . . followed the intramural games with keen interest. . . present 
plans call for the study of mechanical engineering. 

Scientific Society 5; Al Iraqi Staff 5; Intramural Sports. 



LAITH ISMAIL NAMIQ. 

A generous and popular member of the class. . . one of the leading actors in 
the Dramatic Society. . . never missed the basketball games. . . solved physics 
and geometry problems with ease. . . found relaxation working with model 
airplanes. . . a member of his class basketball team. . . has made plans to 
study mechanical engineering. 

Scientific Society 5; Dramatic Society 5; Debating Society 4,5; Intramural Sports. 





MUFID ABDUL-WAHAB AL-SAMARRAI 

A student with many talents. . . one of the outstanding baseball pitchers in 
the school. . . starred on the football team in senior year. . . appeared in 
several elocution contests. . . a very capable actor. . . travelled to Turkey 
during the summer holidays. . . read English novels for relaxations. . . will 
begin study of mechanical engineering after graduation. 

Debating Society 4; Scientific Society 4; Dramatic Society 5 ; Elocution Finals 1 , 2, 4, 5 ; 
Varsity Football Team 2, 3, 5; Varsity Track Team 3, 4, 5; All-Star Baseball Team 
4, 5; Intramural Sports. 



MUKARRAM MUSTAFA AL-UMARI 

A popular classmate who widened his circle of friends during his school 
years. . . ping-pong and tennis were his favorite sports. . . had a strong prefer- 
ence for mathematics and found the problems easy. . . played chess in his 
spare moments. . . usually had a question to ask in class. . . spent vacations 
in the Lebanon. . . a future engineer. 

Intramural Sports. 



NAJAH NAMU SITTU 

Walked to school each day from his home nearby. . . a veteran runner on the 
track team. . . always ready for a game of basketball or handball. . . enter- 
tained on class picnics with his harmonica. . . considered chemistry his num- 
ber one subject. . . noted for his class spirit. . . has made plans for the study 
of medicine. 

Varsity Track Team 4, 5; Varsity Football Team 5; Intramural Sports. 




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NAJIB AZIZ SHAMMAM 

A variety of interests enabled him to join many of the school activities. . . scien- 
tific subjects were much to his liking, especially chemistry and botany. . . 
played handball and followed intramural games with great interest. . . one 
of the amateur photographers of the class. . . has chosen chemical engineering 
as his subject for future study. 

Sodality, 3, 4, 5; Sacred Heart League 2, 3, 4, 5; Debating Society 5; Scientific 
Society 5; Intramural Sports. 



NAMIR ABBAS MUDHAFFAR 

Had a cheerful greeting for everyone. . . excelled in the study of history. . . 
physics laboratory periods were his delight. . . usually found on the tennis 
courts on holidays. . . listened to his collection of records in spare moments. . . 
often discussed topics of the day with his friends in the school garden. . . a 
candidate for the Engineering School. 

Intramural Sports. 



NAMIR AMIN KIRDAR 

Came to Baghdad College from Kirkuk. . . generous with his time and talents 
for school activities. . . worked in the science library. . . fascinated by the 
problems of solid geometry. . . an authority on current events. . named 
swimming as his favorite sport. . . enjoyed the class picnics. . . plans to enter 
Royal College of Medicine. 

Debating Society 4; Intramural Sports. 








NUHAD MAJID MUSTAFA 

Walked to school from his home in Sulaikh each day. . . mathematics classes 
passed quickly for him. . . read novels and listened to the radio on his free 
evenings. . . one of the real conversationalists of the class. . . followed the 
baseball games with lively interest. . . hopes to begin study of radio engineer- 
ing after graduation. 

Intramural Sports. 



NUJYAR HAZIM SHEMDIN 

A veteran of the boarding school. . . expert fielder on his class baseball 
team. . . spent the long summers at his home in Zakho. . . named English 
classes as the most enjoyable. . . stalwart member of 5A volleyball team. . . 
joined the Dramatic Society in senior year. . . will make advanced studies 
in agriculture. 

Debating Society 4, 5 (Secretary) ; Dramatic Society 5; Intramural Sports. 





QAFTAN KAMAL ARIF 

A consistent winner of testimonials for excellence in studies. . . talented 
speaker and actor. . . wrote English compositions with ease. . . Al Iraqi staff 
worker. . . perennial third baseman on his class baseball team. . . excelled in 
mathematics. . . an outstanding swimmer. . . classical music appealed to 
him. . . Qaftan has chosen civil engineering for his future profession. 

Dramatic Society 3, 4, 5; Debating Society 4; Elocution Finals 4; Al Iraqi Staff 5; 
Intramural Sports. 



RAMZI DAUD DAWISHA 

Zealous member of Sodality and served as secretary in senior year. . . one of 
the best artists in the class. . . a finalist in most of the ping-pong tourna- 
ments. . . never tired of geometry classes. . . a detective story fan. . . played 
an occasional game of baseball. . . the class wishes him success in the study 
of architecture. 

Sodality 3, 4, 5 (Secretary); Sacred Heart League 3, 4, 5; Dramatic Society 3; 
Scientific Society 4; Ping-Pong Finals 1, 3, 4; Intramural Sports. 



RAMZI HAGOP FARAHIAN 

Class leader and honor student. . . his many activities kept him busy. . . 
handball and ping-pong games occupied his noon recreations. . . president 
of Debating Society. . . liked all scientific subjects. . . studied German in his 
free moments. . . a clever chess player. . . active in Scientific Society. . . his 
success in study of civil engineering is assured. 

Scientific Society 4, 5 ; Debating Society 5 (President) ; Al Iraqi Staff A, 5 ; Ping-Pong 
Finals 3; Intramural .Sports. 




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RAMZI NAIF BARNUTI 

A devoted worker in the school library. . . study of physics came easy to 
him. . . considered an authority on the news of the day. . . ranked among 
the top handball players of the class. . . found time to read many detective 
stories. . . a basketball fan. . . plans uncertain but he will continue his studies- 

Library Stuff 4, 5 ; Intramural Sports. 



RAYMOND ISHAQ. KASPAR 

Found time for studies and athletics during his school years. . . a fast basket- 
ball player and a dependable member of the track squad. . . English classes 
held the most interest for him. . . travelled to Iran during the summer holi- 
days. . . his cheerful sense of humor was ever present. . . aeronautical engi- 
neering is his choice for future study. 

Varsity Basketball Team 2, 3, 4, 5; Varsity Track Team, 3, 4, 5; Intramural 
Sports. 



RAYMOND KARUP KARUPIAN 

Ready to discuss class matter with his friends at a moment's notice. . . passed 
the noon recreations at the handball courts. . . worked long hours on the 
chemistry homework. . . enjoyed picnics and summer excursions. . . noted 
for his hearty laugh. . . has read many of the books in the school library. . . 
a future mechanical engineer. 

Intramural Sports. 





RICHARD JAMIL NABHAN 

One of the tallest boys in the class. . . took an active part in the sports pro- 
gram, and excelled in volleyball. . . always in a hurry. . . biology classes and 
laboratory periods held a strong appeal for him. . one of the stamp collectors 
in the class. . . has made plans to enter Royal College of Medicine. 

Sodality 2, 3, 4; Sacred Heart League 1, 3; Debating Society 5; Boxing Finals 1 ; 
Ping-Pong Finals 2; Intramural Sports. 



SABAH KAMIL GEORGE 

Vice-Prefect of the school Sodality. . . an eloquent speaker and a regular 
finalist in elocution contests. . . starred in the productions of the Dramatic 
Society. . . showed a marked preference for scientific studies, especially chem- 
istry. . . spent the summer holidays in the North. . . stamp collecting was 
his hobby. . . his goal is to be a doctor. 

Sodality 3, 4, 5 (Vice-Prefect); Debating Society 4, 5; Dramatic Society 4, 5; 
Intramural Sports. 





SALAH YUSUF BUTROS KHAYYAT 

A quiet and studious classmate. . . preferred the physics classes and especially 
the laboratory periods. . . spent many a recreation at the ping-pong tables. . . 
has gathered a large collection of stamps. . . always on time for the picnic- 
bus. . . enjoyed farm work during the summer. . . his plans call for study in 
petroleum engineering. 

Sodality 3; Intramural Sports. 



SAMIR MAHMUD KHALAF 

The leading photographer of the class. . . his camera was at hand for all 
important events. . . his scholastic interests were centered in scientific sub- 
jects. . . could name the best books of the science library. . . tennis was his 
favorite sport. . . went to Lebanon for the vacations. . . will travel abroad for 
engineering studies. 

Scientific Society 4, 5; Debating Society 4, 5; Intramural Sports. 



SAMIR NASRAT AL-FARISI 

One of our class leaders in studies. . . chemistry and physics are numbered 
among his specialties. . . well-versed in Arabic and English literature. . . 
discussed the affairs of the day with his friends at the canteen. . . an authority 
on stamps, and has an excellent collection. . . will make advanced studies 
in scientific subjects. 

Al Iraqi Staff 4; Intramural Sports. 




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SAMIR WADI NAYYIM 

A classmate who likes to travel. . . spent summers in the Lebanon, and jour- 
neyed to Rome and Lourdes on the pilgrimage. . . member of class baseball 
teams. . . named English as his favorite subject. . . a capable tennis player. . . 
emjoyed a cinema on a holiday afternoon. . . will travel abroad for studies 
in civil engineering. 

Tennis Finals 3; Intramural Sports. 



SARMAD ANWAR SAIB 

Established an enviable scholastic record during his years at school. . . fre- 
quent member of honor roll. . . an authority on the rules of volleyball, and 
an expert player. . . compositions in Arabic and English were no burden for 
him. . . read many books during the holidays. . . petroleum engineering is 
his choice for future studies. 

Intramural Sports. 



SHAIBAN ABDULLAH AWNI 

A friendly and likeable classmate. . . starred in all sports and scored many 
a point in track meets. . . a visitor to Lebanon during the summer holi- 
days. . . gave his time generously for school activities. . . found the chemistry 
classes most enjoyable . . . listening to classical music was his relaxation. . . 
will study business administration. 

Debating Society 5; Varsity Basketball Team 2, 3, 4; Varsity Football Team 2, 3, 
5; Varsity Track Team 2, 3, 4, 5; Handball Finals 1 ; Intramural Sports. 





USAMA ABDULLAH ABDUL-KARIM 

Class scientist. . . prominent member of Scientific Society and librarian of 
the science library. . . a winner of testimonials for excellence in studies. . . 
spent summer holidays working in his garden and model laboratory. . . 
swimming and tennis were his favorite sports. . . has read many books on 
science. . . plans to study chemical engineering abroad. 

Debating Society 4, 5 (Vice-President) ; Scientific Society 4, 5; Library Staff 3, 4, 5; 
Intramural Sports. 



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WALID CONSTANTINE ASSAF 

One of best musicians in class. . . entertained with the accordion on class 
picnics. . . a swimmer and champion diver. . . made the pilgrimage to Rome 
and Lourdes. . . followed solid geometry classes with keen interest. . . painting 
and drawing were his hobbies. . . member of Dramatic Society. . . architec- 
ture is his choice for a career. 

Dramatic Society 4, 5; Intramural Sports. 





WARUSH HAIK ZAGHKUNI 

A quiet and unperturbable classmate. . . took the daily quizzes in stride. . . 
physics classes held the most interest for him. . a football player of real abil- 
ity. . . studied his homework in the garden while waiting for the bus. . . 
found his relaxation at the cinema. . . plans call for studies in mechanical 
engineering. 

Intramural Sports. 



WILLIAM PAULUS ISA 

A dependable member of varsity football team. . . found trigonometry the 
most interesting of his subjects. . . rode his bicycle around the city. . . viiited 
northern Iraq during the summer vacations. . . a hunting enthusiast. . . 
listening to the radio and his records occupied his free moments. . . plans to 
enter Engineering College after graduation. 

Varsity Football Team 5; Intramural Sports. 



YASAR YAHYA QASIM 

His generosity admired by all his classmates. . . a testimonial winner in his- 
tory. . . played many a game of handball. . . cheered his class team to vic- 
tory. . . passed the summers in Lebanon. . . president of Scientific Society 
in senior year. . . read the daily newspaper to keep informed of world 
events. . . plans advanced studies in chemistry. 

Scientific Society 4, 5 (President) ; Debating Society 5; At Iraqi Staff 5; Intramural 
Sports. 




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ZIYYA YOAB JACOB 

One of the track stars of the class. . . played on the varsity football team 
in senior year. . . a frequent visitor to the science library. . . scholastic inter- 
ests were physics and mathematics. . . named the radio as his favorite pas- 
time. . . followed sporting events with a lively interest. . . plans to study 
mechanical engineering. 

Varsity Track Team 3, 4, 5; Varsity Football Team 5; Intramural Sports. 




GRADUATION AT KING FAISAL GARDENS 






mm. 




4A 




First Row, left to right: Mukhtar Hashim, Thamir al-Takriti, Zuhair Rabban, Father La Bran, S.J., Nabil Yusuf, Haidar Ismail, Murad 
Manashian. 

Second Row: Surin Azizian, Faruq Kubba, Ghazi Maghak, Duraid al-Yawir, Sabah Khayyat, Zuharab Kazanjian, Ghanim Tobia. 
Third Row: Shamshun Antar, Shawkat Jazrawi, Ghalib Abdul-Mahdi, William Abdulahad, Abdul-Wahab Makiyya, Majid Shamami. 
Fourth Row: Samir al-Churbachi, Jamal al-Wattar, Haidar al-Haidari, Naqi Tereza, Samir Butros, Manuel Maizi. 
Fifth Row: Antranik Thaddeus, Yaqub Yusuf, Najib Mansur, Zuhair Butros, Sabah Busha, Usam Ismail. 



First Row, left to right: Awakim Papazian, Qais al-Awqati, Adnan al-Rashid, Father O'Connor, S.J., Munthar Shaina, Johnson Mirza, 
Nabil Hikari. 

Second Row: Falar Ishu, Hikmat Saddiq, Wilson Ishaq, Antwan Awadissian, Amir Sittu, Wadhah Jamil, Jamal Fattuhi. 
Third Row: Paul Bahoshy, Ghanim George, Nufal Jamil, Barnuah Emmanuel, Tariq Makiyya, Samir Zainal. 
Fourth Row: Kalam Aziz, Aprim Shamuel, Samir Philip, Yashar Shemdin, Noel Emmanuel, Nazar Rumani, Nasir al-Saadun. 
Fifth Row: Frederick Yonathan, Pius Zusimas, Faruq al-Wazir, Haik Lajinian, Basil Qalian, Charles Yuhanna. 




4B 




4C 



First Row, left to right: Fawzi Khayyat, Ghassan al-Zahid, Miqdad al-Ani, Father Cardoni, S.J., Saiim Yusuf, Zuhair Yusuf, Walid Nannis. 
Second Row: Samuel Barsikian, Abdul-Aziz Kamil, Muhammad Said, Haik Awakian, Hagop Ghazarian, Yusuf Hanna, Faruq Ziada. 
Third Row: Albert Alexander, Korkis Shamuel, Abdul-Latif Ashkuri, Sawa Issa, Abdul-Wahab al-Pachachi, Anwar Naji. 
Fourth Row: Samir Lawrence, Salim Jazrawi, Shakir Mursi, Korkis Daud, Suhail al-Naqib, Ohannes Tchobanian, Tariq al-Hammami. 
Fifth Row: Sabah Jadun, Sadiq AM, Sirop Ohannessian, Ramzi Naman, Samir George, Tuma Ishu, Amin Husain. 



First Row, left to right: Ibrahim Hikmat, Stephan Ovanessoff, Saad Shaffu, Father Madaras, S.J., Nabil Bachir, Massis Alexanderian, 
Shamuel Elisha. 

Second Row: Nabi! Marrar, Faiz al-Naman, Fakhir Kirdar, Edward Abdulahad, Abdul-Rahman al-Shaikh, Jamal Shallal, Riadh al-Takarli. 

Third Row: Basil Balian, Faris al-Hadi, Falih Akram, Anwar Wujdi, Haik Kakafian, Numan Nadhim. 

Fourth Row: Hanna Barish, Tawzer Korkis, Misak Mamarian, Saad Zara, Qais AM Ghalib, Sabah Tuminna, Faruq al-Sarraf. 



3 A 




3B 




First Row, left to right: Adhid Dawisha, Nazad Ahmad, Voltaire Ivan, Father Mulvehill, S.J., Mawlud Elia, Timatius Baijan, Usama Rassam. 
Second Row: Qusai Shanshal, Fad h it al-Azzawi, Yuil Sarkis, Baruir Hagopian, Ismail Awad, Hassan al-Shahwani, Walid Hindu. 
Third Row: Eugene Raubitshek, Fraidun Ishaq, Warujan Karamian, George Ziyya, Haidar al-Attar, Zaki Bahoda, Zuhair Faraj. 
Fourth Row: Adil Said, Walid al-Askari, Kamal Boukather, Khalid Antwan Butros, Joseph Abbosh, Eddie Muqhar, Abdul-Ridha al- 
Jasim, Adnan al-Shalji. 



First Row, left to right: Sami Kasbarian, Abdul-Munim Chucha, Rabi Faiq, Father E. Kelly, S.J., John Malcon, Khalid Antwan Faraj, 
Samir Shaffu. 

Second Row. Zuhair Tuqatli, Diran Markarian, Muayyad al-Amiri, Tatul Papazian, Muhammad al-Jawhar, Basil Bah nam, Salman Kuhaila. 

Third Row: Adil Randquist, Ibrahim Ardhrumli, Walid Ghantus, Muwaffaq Aziz, Varujan Manasikian, Jamil al-Umarai, Haithan al- 
Turaihi. 

Fourth Row: Wayil al-Tai. Nadhmi Awji, Varujan Makardijian, Suhail al-Chalabi, Bahnam Sliwa, Basil Jazmi. 




3C 



4m !|*«| fm^ 




3D 



First Row, /eft to right: Asim al-Basir, George Tobia, Raja Subhiya, Father MacNeil, S.J., Hadi Atiyya, Dhia Azzu, Walid al-Qupi. 
Second Row: Hafidh al-Attar, Qais al-Samarrai, Daud Ishaya, Sami Hanna, Nail Basmaji, Aram Wartanian, Warant Ohanessian. 
Third Row: Zuhair Shaul, Paulus John, Khaldun Abdul-Baqi, Mawlud Shamami, jirair Takessian, Leon Kivorkian, Lutuf Ghantus. 
Fourth Row: Samir Shabandar, Sudad al-Jaibaji, Ibrahim Maluf, Nawwaf Nuri, Mumtaz Tawil, Sabah Khayyat, Muzhir Hasan. 



First Row, left to right: Namir Zainal, Zuhair al-Dhahir, Daud Sliwa, Father Paquet, S.J., Qais Karim, Nasrat George, Iraj Ishaq. 
Second Row: Munir Qambar Agha, Basil Qirma, Ghanim Habib, Usam Ibrahim, Abdul-Sattar Tawfiq, Jack Asalian, Umar Shemdin, 
Khalid Naami. 

Third Row: Edward Hakhwardian, Najdat al-Farisi, Aram Thaddeus, Sami Jurjis, Tuma Zusimas, Nasir al-Gailani, Leon Kasbarian. 
Fourth Row: Ramzi Victor, Ishkhan Khajdarian, Nuri Fattuhi, Utba al-Jadir ,Nuzad Uthman, Sami Francis, Salim al-Ani. 



3 E 




3 F 




First Row, left to right: Misfir al-Mudhaifi, Murad Muradian, Fuad Tawfiq, Father Gloster, S.j., Edmund a!-Khuri, Basil ai-Zuhair, 
Sarmad Baban. 

Second Row: Anis Ruman, Ara Kuyumjian, Hikmat Hindi, Amir Awji, Falah Qambar Agha, Charles Ganja, Sughuman Sarkissian. 
Third Row: Ghassan Majid, Samir Sabbagh, Abdul-llah Kafil, Wamidh Nadhmi, Akram Shaba, Sarkis Rushanian. 
Fourth Row: lyad al-Qas Elias, Ghanim Saisi, Munir Alali, Awadis Kurbikian, Surin Alexander, Mumtaz Attisha. 
Fifth Row: Artin Markassian, Safa Qirma. 



First Row, left to right: Albert Badran, Sabah Qasirat, Hawar Ziad, Father Miff, S.J., Jafar al-Sadr, Zavin Ouzanian, Samir Busha. 
Second Row: Fazwi Habib, Nabil Adil, Usam Elias, Muhannad al-Durrah, Isa al-Khudhairi, Qais Fattah, Rajih Ibrahim. 
Third Row: Khalid Jamil, Basil Marmarchi, Adil Hanna Shaikh, Shihab al-Qaisi, Amad Daddy, Mazin Abdul-Latif. 
Fourth Row: Yaqub Yusuf, Luay al-Khalil, David Antar, Ghassan Frangul, Zuhair Tuma. 
Fifth Row: Umar Hamu, Wayil Kubba, Husam Ashkun, Najdat al-Chalabi. 




2A 




2B 



First Row, left to right: Basil ai-Fakhri, Yusuf Calotti, Yuil Yuhanna, Father Mahan, S.J., AM Mursi, Mushtaq al-Jabouri ,Fuad Abdul-Latif. 
Second Row: Munthar Naman, Sati Maghzal, Munthar al-Shawka, Sabah Yusuf, Salman Daud, Maan al-Ubaidi. 
Third Row: Harith Rassam, Ramadhan Hamu, Malcon Leon, Dikran Sarkisian, Vahe Ashjian, Najib Yuhanna. 
Fourth Row: Fakhri Burachi, Faris Lutfi, Sabah Jazrawi, Badi George, Mutaz Shunasi, 
Fifth Row: Hikmat Shamun, Samir Vincent, Hagop Kutukchian, Yusuf al-Dhaif. 



First Row, left to right: Shaul Ishu, Samir Juma, Marwan Ayyash, Father Pelletier, S.J., Talal Katchachi, Jafar Dhia, Luay al-Jawad. 
Second Row: Ghassan Andrus, Hatif Hdaib, Izzat Hanna, Allen Svoboda, Harith Abdul-Majid, Munthar al-Qaisi, Fawzi Najib. 
Third Row: Muayyad al-Jafari, Ashraf Karrumi, Ghassan Jihad, Banuel Sarkis, Hikmat Jamil, Tariq Hindu. 
Fourth Row: Vartan Garabetian, Zuhair Humadi, Kamil Killu, Abdul-jabbar al-Habib, Manuel Daghilian. 
Fifth Row: Krikor Muradian, Sabah Abid. 




2D 




First Row, left to right: Matti Ibrahim, Shibib Halabu, AM Husain, Father Gibbons, S.J., Nabil Khurdachi, Adnan Mahmud, Husam Shina. 
Second Row: Abdul-Salam al-Maidani, Husamaddin al-Farjo, Nazih Muhammad, Sabah al-Rumani, Anwar Yusuf, Basim Abdul-AI, Walid 
Khaddouri. 

Third Row: Sabah Guria, Khalid Elias, Sabah Shunia, Faruq Jawad, Fawzi Shaba, Vartan jamkujian. 

Fourth Row: Wilson Aprim, Shamun Awdishu, Vahe Kerkoyan, Sabah Bashuri, Ghassan Musa, Najib Jurjis. 

Fifth Row: Sami Boghos, Nail Marrar, Basil Abdul-Majid. 



First Row, left to right: Samir Faraj, Jalal Tuma, Amir Khayyat, Father Jolson, S.J., Wartkis Siropian, Wilson Paulus.Wayil Hafidh. 

Second Row: Ramzi al-Saigh, Qais al-Qaisi, Walid Salim, Malcon Abil, Riadh Abdul-Karim, Zaki Jamil, Adil Elias. 

Third Row: Popkin Asadurian, Abdul-Muhsin Mahdi, William Shaushu, Faruq Gizi, Ali Jamil, Ahmad Rahmatallah, Ala al-Rafaqani. 

Fourth Row: Muhib al-Amiri, Ibrahim al-Mumaiz, Sami Joseph, Vahan Zaghkuni, Munthar al-Fattal. 

Fifth Row: Ramzi Razzuqi, Petros Ishu, Hisham Rawdha, Khairi Kurial. 




2E 




2F 



First Row, left to right: George Khouri, Yahya Dhia, Munthar Francis, Father Regan, S. J., Fatz Ghazzul, lyad al-Ghazali, Vikin Termin- 
assian. 

Second Row: Subhi al-Zuhairi, Ronald Yoab, Muwaffaq Alexander, Shawqi Talia, Zuhair Dabish, Amir Abdulahad, Najib Arabu. 
Third Row: Yasir Kubba, Yunis Elia, Nabil Obaji, Nishan Oskanian, Haikaz Sarkissian, Hadi al-Qazwini. 
Fourth Row: Hagop Garabet, Laith al-Astrabadi, Emmanuel Ishaq, Nazar Khayyat, Dikran Wartkissian. 
Fifth Row: Rauf Jambaz, Umar Dazai, Amir Ahmad, Yusuf Khamu. 



First Row, left to right: Munib George, Awishalem Joseph, Baba Enwia, Father Carty, S.J., Adil Abdul-Mahdi, Francis John, Najdat 
al-Kutani. 

Second Row: Zuhair Elias, Libaret Bedrossian, Joseph Elias, Adnan Jazrawi, Mudhaffar Mammu, Ali al-Chalabi, Nabil Abbosh. 

Third Row: Mazin al-Zahawi, Yusuf Sadiq, Daud Leon, Faris Maqdisi, Maunel Jurjis, Haqqi Ismail. 

Fourth Row: Ahmad Mawlud, Muhammad Hamu, Arshak Tchobanian, Mahdi Salih, Muwaffaq al-Chalabi, Muhannad al-Gailani, Ab- 
dullah Al-Ani. 



1A 




IB 




First Row, left to right: Zuhair Qashat, Wahe Jamkujian, George Yaldu, Father Egan, S.J., Usam Attisha, Nabil Loqa. Sabah Kamil. 

Second Row: Zuhair Manju, Hraj Azadian, Sami Askar, Dikran Dikranian, Sabah Muhammad, MudhafFar Hassu. 

Third Row: John Nakkashian, Bahnam Aggula, Faiq Bahir, Husam al-Zuhair, Samir Yaqub. 

Fourth Row: Ahmad Majid, Awishalem Emmanuel, Sahak Sahakian, Victor Hayes, Barjuwan Manuelian, Salah al-Rawi. 

Fifth Row: Sami AM, Namir al-Mufti, Usmat Fawzi, Muhannad al-Yawir. 



First Row, left to right: Sabah Alwan, Lutfi Talia, Basil al-Khudhairi, Father Banks, S.J., Adam Yaqub, Nasr Yusuf, Ghassan Cotta. 

Second Row: Nadim Naaumi, Abdul-Majid Abdullah, Akram Siman, Zuhair Saisi, Muhannad Qasim, Sabah al-Hasani, Yusuf Mikha. 

Third Row: Bahjat Alfred, Alfred Zakaria, Kanabi Dazai, Qutaiba Aqrawi, Marwan Daud, Riadh Salman. 

Fourth Row: Yasin al-Sabawi, Maziad Sulaiman, Wilson Israil, Walid al-Umar, Baba Shamun. 

Fifth Row: Ibrahim al-Arnasi, Udai Abdul-Ghaffar ,Sarchil Qazzaz, Amad al-Yawir, Akram Hanna Shaikh. 




1C 




ID 



First Row, left to right: Nabil Majid, Hazim Bakki, Haithan al-Rahim, Father M. McCarthy, S.J., Zuhair al-Mudarris, Hushiar al-Jaf, 
Ghassan Hasan. 

Second Row: Muhammad al-Salam, Zuhair Yusuf, William Aprim, Saad Shwailiyya, Louis Fernandez, Samuel Answerlian, Nadim Peter. 
Third Row: Qais Hammadi, Basil Ibrahim, Bahaddin Ali, Edward Roy, Faiz Kilu, Akram George. 
Fourth Row: Abdul-Muhsin Chalabi, Amad Bartaw, Faris Dazai, Farid Bahjat, Mansur Hazim, Samir Farid. 
Fifth Row: Jack Malaki, Kamal Jamil, Hikmat Bakose, Muhsin Dazai, Sabah Dikran, Haidar Musa. 



IE 



First Row, left to right: Muwaffaq Sittu, Sanharib William, Kamal Dinkha, Father Decker, S.J., Nabil Kamal, Johnny Shallal, Sahir Salim. 

Second Row: Basil Shaina, Wajih al-Shaikh, Qais Wuhayyib, Abdul-Man Aziza, Sabah Hanna Shaikh, Muhammad al-Uzri, Sargon Dick, 
Adnan Shubbar, Yusuf Obaida. 

Third Row: Hamid Khammas, Afif Abdul-Latif, Faisal Zakki, William Nara, Fikrat al-Khouri, Albert Sitrakian, Muayyad al-Dabouni, 
Sabah Butros. 

Fourth Row: Hikmat Sharu, Abdul-Karim Abboud, Fahmi Fadhil, Namir Thnayyan, Tariq Salbi, Mudhar Shubbar, Daniel Raffu, Nazar 
Hindu. 




IF 




First Row, left to right: Abdul-Jabbar Mahmud, Peter Constant, Dilawr Uthman, Father Mahoney, S.j., Munaf Abdul-Ghafur, Sabah 
Thomas, Adib Rumaya. 

Second Row. Najah Shunia, Shawqi Hanna Shaikh, Wayil Hindu, Gabriel Miraziz ,Amir al-Mawlani, Nufail al-Qadhi, Jamal Rahmani, 
Hasan al-Khudhairi. 

Third Row: Basil Akram, Dhia Ashkuri, Akram Sami, Nazar Abdul-Jabbar, Namir al-Askari, Abdul-Hamid Abdul-Husain, Wisam al- 
Haimus. 

Fourth Row: Samir Faraj, Mumtaz Burachi, William Benjamin, Edmond Skender, Muhammad al-Sahrawardi, Abdul-Majid al-Dahhan, 
Albert Stephan, Sabah Mansur. 

First Row, left to right: Nabil Yusuf, Raad al-Umari, Sabah al-Qupi, Father Loeffler, S.J., Leon Malconian, Basil Naman, Richard Shen. 

Second Row: Bailis Shamun, Usam Ashkuri, Nasir al-Farisi, Vraj Harutunian, Sami Halata, Aram Tanialian, Fadi Abbosh, Joseph 
Kandarian. 

Third Row: Alfred John. Phenuel Philip, Garabet Tabrian, Nelson Roy, Walid Daud, Samir Abboud, John Edwin, Muthanna Shanshal. 

Fourth Row: Harith al-Gailani, Hrand ShamiMan, Faruq Hanna, Abdul-Sahib Muhammad Sadiq, Alexander Marianoff, Nuri Gharibian, 
Rafi Ghazarian. 

Fifth Row: Lutfi Yusuf, Najat Qadir. 




1G 




1H 



First Row, left to right: Lincoln John, Alexander Skenderian, Ghaith al-Barakati, Father Quinn, S.J., Ayman Bachir, Emil Salim, Nabil 
Mustafa. 

Second Row: Sami Banarji, Sabah Harutunian, Abdul-Karim Mahmud, Misak Markarian, Balibani Ishaq, Samir Qattan, Nazar Makkiyya, 
Yusuf Gandalov. 

Third Row: Nabil Yaqubi, Wagner Aprim, Junaid Najib, Antonius Zusimas, Munthar Kubba, Sabah Baqilian, Leon Asilian. 

Fourth Row: Nazaret Abazijian, Astur Tufankjian, Yarchanik Minasakanian, Ivanhoe Phoenix, Rafi Sadurian, Surin Haik. 

Fifth Row: Garabet Zulumian Muhammad al-Shakarchi Ramzi Vincent. 




P*' 




SMM 



f 



ft 



PS 




Sodality of 



Father La Bran with the Officers and Council. 



Two significant events were of paramount 
interest to the Sodality program this year : the new 
Chapel was opened in the Cronin Building, and a 
Sodality reading room and library was made available 
for our use. The closing of school last June marked 
the opening of the summer program. Meetings were 
held once a week, the catechism classes were con- 
ducted regularly, and a closed retreat was held at 
the school in July. Father La Bran represented the 
Sodalists at the Marian Year exercices in Rome, in 
September, and the Baghdad College Exhibit was 
considered one of the best at this world-wide 
meeting. 

For the close of the Marian Year the Sodality 
sponsored a Novena to the Immaculate Conception, 
and on the feast day in December a Solemn High 
Mass brought to an end this special year in honor of 
Mary. During the Christmas holidays the Sodalists 



made a pilgrimage to the Cribs in Baghdad and 
prayed especially for their benefactors. Daily Mass 
and daily Rosary at noon still continued to draw 
large numbers throughout the school year. In 
January the Church Unity Octave was observed 
with Mass being celebrated in the various Oriental 
Rites represented in Iraq. The annual Novena of 
Grace was conducted in March, in the Chapel of the 
Sacred Heart, with a large and encouraging attend- 
ance each day. As we go to press plans are being 
formulated for World Sodality Day in May. At that 
time new members will be admitted, in the presence 
of the Faculty and the families of the Sodalists. 

The works of charity, so essential an aspect of 
Sodality life, were carried on this year with renewed 
enthusiasm. During the flood season last spring a 
drive for food and clothing was conducted and its 
extraordinary success was due to the generosity of 




rdoni with the Apostolic Committee. 



Father Pelletier with the Eucharistic Committee. 



Our Lady 




Father Merrick celebrates daily Mass in the Sodality Chapel. 



the entire student body. A similar drive, organized 
in December, brought joy to the Poor during the 
Christmas season. Stamps were gathered from all 
the classes in the school this year, and the proceeds 
from this campaign will be set aside for scholarships 
for poor boys. The year has not been without its 
social aspects. A bicycle picnic in October proved 
to be a most enjoyable holiday for all of us. On 
February 2, with our mid-year examinations com- 
pleted, we took a train ride to Baquba where we had 
a day of fun and sports. In many ways this has been 
one of the most successful years for the Sodality of 
Baghdad College. We have not only profited 
ourselves from our devotion to its ideals ; we have 
been able to help others by our charity and zeal, 
and have learned to understand and appreciate more 
fully the Sodality way of life. 



The various committees pictured on these pages 
indicate the scope of our work during the year. 
These committees were directed by Fathers La 
Bran, O'Connor, Cardoni and Pelletier. Their untir- 
ing labors helped in a real way to crown our efforts 
with success. To them we offer our sincere thanks 
and gratitude. We are also grateful to Father Merrick, 
who celebrated our daily Mass. On several occasions 
this year he celebrated the Mass facing the people, 
and this innovation was a stimulus to our devotion. 
The officers chosen to lead the Sodality this year 
were all from the senior class. John Basmaji was our 
exemplary prefect ; Sabah Kamil served as vice- 
prefect ; Ramzi Dawisha was secretary ; and Ferdi- 
nand Iskender was treasurer. They graduate in June 
with our sincere wishes for their future success, and 
the promise to carry on in their inspiring tradition. 



O jH| O 




Father O'Connor with the Marian Committee. 



Father Cardoni with the Catechetical Committee. 



AL IRAQI STAFF 




ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

Seated: Ramzi Farahian, Father Mulvehill, Q_aftan Kamal. 
Standing : Samir Zainal, John Basmaji. 



Meeting a deadline is the major problem of any 
group who edit a yearbook, and the Al Iraqi Staff is 
no exception to this general rule. During the warm 
days of October the book seemed a long way off, but 
within two weeks of the opening day of school we 
were hard at work on our annual publication. The 
staff was announced in the middle of October and 
the senior class members dressed smartly for the 
Al Iraqi pictures. Biographies were written by the 
staff writers, faculty members were photographed, 
and the twenty -three undergraduate classes posed 
for their pictures at the school. As the new year 
began the first three sections were in the hands of 
the printer. Father Gibbons and Father Donahue 



had been busy during this time photographing the 
activities groups and the athletic teams, and taking 
the many informal shots which appear throughout 
the book. Father Walter Shea prepared the advertis- 
ing section during January and February, and by 
the first week in March most of the manuscript had 
been completed. Father Shea and Father Mulvehill 
travelled to Beirut for the Easter holidays, checked 
the proofs, and made the final arrangements for the 
printing. We then awaited that happy day in June 
when the announcement would be posted on the 
bulletin board: "The Al Iraqi will be distributed 
today ! " 



BUSINESS MANAGERS 

Father W. Shea, Yasar Yahya, Joseph Marukil, 

Barnuah Emmanuel, Hisham Tawfiq, Usama Abdullah. 




STAFF ARTISTS 
Frederick Yonathan, Father Mulvehill, 
Sabah Khayyat. 







LIBRARY STAFF 




Seated : Fawzi Habbosh, Father Miff, Mr. Simon Sharu, Ramzi Barnuti. 

Standing : Walid Ghantus, Tuma Ishu, Father Banks, Father John McCarthy, Usama Abdullah, Lutuf Ghantus. 



r:;J .;--;- ■■ 





Looking for the new books. 



It should be right here in the files. 





Mr. Simon Sharu. assistant librarian 



In search of knowledge. 



SANCTUARY SOCIETY 




Boarding Students with Father Carty, their Moderator. 





Father Carty instructs, the Mass servers 



Members assist at Benediction in the Chapel. 




mJL.m • 

Day Students with Father Pelletier, their Moderator. 



COLLECTORS FOR THE POOR 




The charity and generosity of the boys of Bagh- 
dad College reached new heights this year, as they 
endeavored to help the poor and the less fortunate. 
During the serious flood crisis they contributed a 
large amount of clothing and money to those in need. 
At the same time they maintained their weekly aver- 
age throughout the year, and during the Christmas 
season more money and clothing were given to the 
Poor of the city. The Missions also were helped by 
the Christian boys of the school and at the end of 
the year we were proud of the donation presented to 
His Excellency, the Apostolic Delegate in Iraq, for 



the missions throughout the world. The task of di- 
recting this noble work was in the capable hands of 
Father Thomas Kelly, our Assistant Mudir. But the 
happy results of our collections are due in great 
measure to the boys pictured on this page. They are 
the representatives of the twenty-five classes in the 
school, and during the year they made their collec- 
tions on Tuesday and Saturday, while we all waited 
for Father Kelly's announcement of "The Big Ten". 
It was a happy and a profitable year for the Poor 
and the Missions. 



COLLECTORS FOR THE MISSIONS 





THE 

DRAMATIC 

SOCIETY 



Actors, coaches and stage hands of the successful production of the Dramatic Society. 



The Dramatic Society made history this year 
by its presentation of three one-act plays. In previous 
years the production has been offered to the students 
at the school. This year the general public was invit- 
ed and for the occasion we had the pleasure of a real 
theatrical atmosphere in the beautiful auditorium of 
King Faisal Hall. "The Drums of Oude" and "The 
Monkey's Paw" were given in English, while the 
third play, "God's Justice", was presented in Arabic. 
A special performance for the students took place on 
the afternoon of November 25, and the following two 
evenings witnessed capacity audiences who came to 
honor our thespians. It would be impossible in this 
short space to do justice to the cast of characters in 
the plays, but it was a universal opinion that they 
were well chosen for their parts, and performed with 
a dramatic skill that surpassed all expectations. 



We owe a special debt of gratitude to His Excel" 
lency, Mr. Khalil Kanna, Minister of Education' 
under whose patronage the plays were presented. Mr. 
George Cabac did a masterful job as the make-up 
artist, and Mr. Joseph Conway, an alumnus of the 
school, offered his artistic talents for the scenic ef- 
fects. Mr. Mahmud Yusuf and Mr. Ibrahim al- 
Mansur, professors of Arabic, very generously offered 
their assistance in the play, " God's Justice ". A word 
of thanks must be given to the stage hands, who 
spent long hours in the hidden labor of preparing the 
stage. Father Fallon and Father Gibbons were mod- 
erators of the Dramatic Society this year and to 
them and the entire cast we offer our congratulations 
for a magnificent production, well-directed and well- 
performed. 



BACHDAD COLLEGE DRAMATIC GROUP 


THRF.F, O.VE-ACT PLAYS 


Re*. Jo**n>h r. FaOem, S. J. Modrr>tor 
Bov. Tbmam J. OblMM, 5, i. A.%t- Moderator 




1 -■■. t! f, -34 
NU»t H.W, Wam Awtt 


BAGHDAD COLLEGE 



lOutidun Ab-i!,l -H«ij 



'. •mfu-i«.n 



H E THE MINISTER OF EDUCATION 



.\VV-_ 



- „l • ^j. > 



THE MOMKVS PAW 

BY W. •. JACOBS 



IMF. DKt MS OF OL'L>£ 






Cn*t of Character* 



BAGHDAD COLIFGE BHAMATIC CROCI 



Rev. &HMph F. F»Ij.jh, S. J. Moctal 

R«sv, Tbema* j. Ctefrooa, S. J. ftnt Mtrfni 



KING FAISAL HALL 



S,i,<w-,y! lirti^in-iam 



KNIGHTS OF THE BLESSED SACRAMENT 




Meeting in the Chapel with Father Carty and Fath 



Fifty- five boys from first and second high classes 
comprised the membership of our organization this 
year. Weekly meetings were conducted on Wed- 
nesday, during the noon recreation, in the school 
Chapel. Our moderators, Father Fennell and Father 
Carty, gave several talks during the year and frequent- 
ly we had the pleasure of listening to one of the other 
Fathers as a guest speaker. The happiest day for all 
of us came in December when the reception of the 
new Knights was held. Each boy received a Rosary 
and a pledge card at this time, and Reverend Father 
Rector delivered an inspiring talk to us. Breakfast 
was served following the ceremony, where we were 
joined by many of the Fathers. 

We have combined with other groups of the 



school on occasion, especially in works of charity and 
help for the Poor. Our moderators took us on several 
picnics during the holiday seasons and they awarded 
prizes for faithful attendance to meetings, and to 
those with the highest marks in Religion. We have 
all endeavored to fulfill the requirements of a good 
Knight : a daily visit to the Chapel, reception of Holy 
Communion at least once a week, and a good example 
to all in our daily lives. Our group is one of the few 
opened to the younger boys of the school. We have 
had a happy and successful year, due to the efforts 
of Father Fennell and Father Carty, and those of us 
who move into third year look forward to joining the 
older boys in the Sodality. 



The happy group at lunch, following the reception of candidates. 

! 







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Vj&'M^J&.H' 





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* 







The Catholic Hierarchy presides at the Marian Year_Exercises. 



Children's Day at Marian Year Exercises. 





His Beatitude, Yusuf VII Ghanima, 

opens the school year with the Mass 

of the Holy Spirit. 




Outdoor Benediction at the Marian Year 
Exercises. 




Father Paul Elias, S.J., conducts 
the annual retreat. 




His Eminence, Gregory Peter XV Agagianian, photographed 
during his visit to Baghdad College. 



His Excellency, the Most Reverend Athanasius Bakose, 
celebrates Mass in the Chapel. 




THE 

CLASSICAL 

ACADEMY 



Father Fallon with the members of the Classical Academy. 



The spectacular success of the Dramatic Society 
production this year created a keen interest in the 
drama and led to a new activity in the school. Many 
of the older students expressed the desire to learn 
more of the great plays of literature and to practice 
reading and interpretation of the roles. Yielding to 
this spontaneous request, Father Fallon announced 
that such a club would be formed. Membership was 
opened to students in the three upper classes who 
were maintaining a satisfactory scholastic average. 
Officers were chosen at one of the early meetings to 
lead this new group. 

Our moderator, Father Fallon, began our study 
by a discussion of the principles of dramatic form, 
and we then went to work on our first play. The 



tragic story of the Thane of Glamis was selected as 
an introduction to the inspiring works of the great 
Shakespeare. Subsequent meetings found the group 
engrossed in the dramatic reading and appreciation 
of MacBeth, with an occasional pause for the discus- 
sion of the dramatic structure and character por- 
trayal. After our study of MacBeth we looked for a 
change of pace, and laughed with Rosalind in the 
play, "As You Like It". It is our fond hope that 
these studies will give us a greater facility in the me- 
dium of English, a deeper appreciation of great liter- 
ature, and a greater ease in our oratorical and dra- 
matic productions. For the future we plan a series of 
short programs for the enjoyment of the student 
body. 



The Moderator offers a suggestion to 
Sarmad Anwar. 



Nufal Jamil, Umar Shemdin and Qaftan Kamal interpret 
a part at one of the meetings. 





LITURGICAL CHOIR 




First Row : Fawzi Khayyat, Fawzi Habbosh, Walid Hindu, Nabil Hikari. 
Second Row : Yusuf Hanna, Samir Philip, Paul Bahoshy. 

Third Row : Abdul-Latif Ashkuri, Sabah Busha, Bahnam Sliwa, Zuhair George, Basil Qalian, 
Samir Lawrence, Father John McCarthy. 



With the opening of the Chapel of the Sacred 
Heart the need was felt for a liturgical choir to assist 
in the many religious functions of the academic year. 
Early in October Father John McCarthy announced 
the formation of the choir and called upon those who 
were interested for tryouts. Within a week the select 
group was chosen and rehearsals were conducted 
twice a week. The first performance was the solemn 
closing of the Marian Year on the feast of the Im- 
maculate Conception. The Mass of the Angels in the 
ancient tones of the thirteenth century Gregorian 
chant, and the austere sincerity of the Gregorian Ave 
Maria marked the debut of the choir, and praise was 
forthcoming from all who attended this inspiring 
ceremony. 

On the day before the Christmas holidays the 
choir once again proved its versatility by singing 
carols of the season in Arabic, English and Latin. In 
the practice sessions held after the holidays the group 
undertook the more difficult task of polyphonic music 
in preparation for the Lenten Season and the ob- 
servance of Holy Week. The final performance of 
the year will be the Mass on Graduation Day, when 
we bid a melodic farewell to the boys of the senior 
class. An excellent beginning has been made in this 
new activity and, with most of the group returning 
next year, it is hoped that our members will increase 



and that our enlarged repertoire will enable us to 
participate in all the devotions conducted in the 
Chapel. 



tf^ 




Choir practice under the direction of Father McCarthy. 



CHRYSOSTOM DEBATING SOCIETY 




Seated: Ramzi Farahian, President; Father Madaras, Usama Abdullah. 

Vice-President. 
Standing : Wilson Ishaq, Sergeant at Arms, Nujyar Shemdin, Secretary. 



The Chrysostom Debating Society, under the 
guidance of Father Madaras, started its program this 
year shortly after the opening of school. Candidates 
were accepted from fourth and fifth years, and at the 
opening meeting Father Madaras stressed the prac- 
tical value of the Debating Society. He explained 
that the members would not only attain a facility in 
speaking, but would also be trained in the orderly 
arrangement of arguments, and from this twofold 
advantage would come a confidence and poise that 
would serve us well in the future. 

Fifth year students, with the background of a 
year's experience, were appointed for the first de- 
bates. Our subjects were chosen for the most part 



from the events of school life, the emphasis of science 
in the world today, and the social and educational 
needs of the present day. Due to the large numbers 
in the Debating Society it was not possible for every- 
one to take part in a formal debate, but all were 
given the opportunity of speaking from the floor at 
the meetings, and often this period proved as inter- 
esting as the debate itself. At the time of writing the 
speakers for the Prize Debate have not been chosen. 
Those who have excelled in intramural debates dur- 
ing the year will be selected for this annual event, 
and a prize will be presented to the outstanding 
speaker at the Graduation Exercises in June. 




Fawzi Habbosh takes the floor to defend his argument. 



Father Madaras coaches Ramzi Farahian for his speech. 



$m 



*.'. 



'■ ':•. 



■ 




Meeting of the Sacred Heart League. 




Father MacNeil addresses 
the Sacred Heart League. 



Christmas Crib. 



May Shrine. 



First Friday Mass in Chapel of Sacred Heart. 




SCIENTIFIC SOCIETY 



■ - ■ f 




Faruq Kubba, Executive Secretary ; Ramzi Farahian, Recording Secretary; Father Crowley, 
Moderator; Majid Shamami. Vice-President; Yasar Yahya, President. 





^ 



*t#mmmfr 



Namir Abbas mixes the chemicals 



Armin Adawzd writes down the results. 




William Paulus watches the reaction. 



Every book a science book. 




Usama Abdullah, Father John McCarthy and Lutuf Ghantus, 
librarians of the science library. 




SENIOR ELOCUTION FINALISTS 

First Row : Nabil Bachir. Timatius Baijan, Hikmat 
Hindi, Qais Karim. 

Second Row : Majid Shamami, Nufal Jamil, Father 
Loefner, Mufid al-Samarrai, Wilson Ishaq. 






I fc 





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JUNIOR ELOCUTION FINALISTS 

First Row : Nabil Mustafa, Sabah al-Hasani, Ala 
al-Rafaqani, Samir Busha. 

Second Row : Maan al-Ubaidi, Zuhair Humadi, 
Father Cardoni, Hadi al-Qazwini, Walid Khaddouri. 




I I 



Ul<u Tirisk XJ'is'Jr Lo Lke Q)mtis^ 



BY 



QAFTAN KAMAL 



I was five years old at the time, but I can recall vividly the details of the incident. It was my first 
visit to the office of the dentist. The prospect filled my heart with fear, for the first time in my young 
life. But my story should not begin with my visit to the dentist. It really began the evening before. In 
the middle of the night, when all was quiet, and darkness enveloped the house, I awoke with a sharp 
pain in my mouth. I wept, I groaned, I screamed. In a short time everyone in the house was awake, and 
each one proposed a remedy for my affliction. But the remedies did not cure my ill, and my screams 
increased in volume and duration. 

It was a night of torture for me, for my family, for the servants and the neighbors, and my mother 
made up her mind then and there that the dentist should share our agony. My father, of course, had 
nothing to say in the matter. Naturally, I was not consulted. So when my mother informed me, after 
breakfast, that she was taking me to the dentist, I registered no little surprise. I informed my mother 
of my objections to this proposal and resisted her efforts to dress me for the occasion. True, I had never 
visited a dentist before, but I had friends and advisers who had informed me that there was nothing 
more unpleasant in the world. At the tender age of five, I was ready and willing to believe them. 

I shall say no more about my resistance, but it suffices to report that in a very short time I was 
marching to the dentist's office, or rather I was being pulled there by my mother. When we arrived, 
the door of the office did not appeal to me, so I kicked it. When this delaying action proved futile, I 
decided that I liked the door, and held the knob in a death grip. My mother soon separated me from 
my new friend, and together we entered the waiting room. 

I stopped crying for a moment, and began to consider my next move. The room looked pleasant 
enough. There were several chairs, and on a table in the center of the room were the latest magazines 
of the day. Across from me sat an old man, his face hidden beneath white bandages. I found out later 
that he was suffering from a toothache, of all things. There were other people there, and while I was 
observing them my inspection was interrupted by a shriek from the adjoining room. My heart pulsated 
wildly. I placed my head in my hands and wept bitterly. After a short interval I looked up, and only 
the man with the bandaged face remained. I wondered if the others had passed through the door marked 
"Dental Surgery", or the one marked "Exit". My guess was that they passed through the latter, and 
quickly. Soon the door of the office opened and there appeared a pretty lady, dressed in white. For a 
moment my pains and worries vanished. But only for a moment. She glared in my direction, pointed 
a finger at my mother and me, and said, coldly: "Your're next." 

Should I make a run for the street? My mother must have read my thoughts, for she suddenly rose, 
grabbed my hand, and we started for the office. But I was not one to yield in a crisis like this. With all 
my manhood, or boyhood, I fought this forceful entrance. The pretty nurse was no friend of mine, I 
learned, for she immediately came over to offer her assistance to my mother. In the meantime the dentist, 
hearing the noise, rushed into the waiting room, and joined forces with the enemy. What chance had I 
against such formidable opposition? There was an element of injustice in this maneuver, to begin with. 



ALIRAQI 67 

The old man with the bandaged face had come into the waiting room before my arrival. Why should 
he be kept waiting? After all, I was not in any particular hurry. 

Once inside the office, my mother began to whisper to the dentist. He then walked over to the door, 
turned the key, and placed it in his pocket. I was trapped ! I was no better off than an animal, locked 
in his cage at the zoo. In fact, I was not as well off as the animal. I bore the added burden of pain and 
suffering. The smell of medicine began to nauseate me. I was placed in a chair, surrounded by horrible 
instruments. A glaring light almost blinded me as the dentist held me fast. Now I had a good oppotun- 
ity to examine this man. He was rather short, wore a white coat, and was pompous. I took a strong 
dislike to him, then and there. By this time I was sick all over. The pain in my mouth was nothing in 
comparison with my general physical condition. Perhaps that chair was made for comfort, but I cannot 
say that I felt comfortable in it. 

My mother stood at my right, the nurse on the left. The dentist forced open my mouth, for I was 
still carrying on my program of resistance. As he looked in I could watch his eyes, moving from one 
side to the other. He then held my mouth open with one hand, and with the other he reached for a screw 
driver. At least, that is how it appeared to me. He began to hit my teeth, one after the other. What a 
cowardly way of acting, I thought. He would not dare to do this unless he had two people helping him. 
He continued to hit my teeth for about a year, as it seemed to me. I could see that he did not understand 
his business. If he did, he would have found the defective tooth the first time. I was wondering if my 
mother realized this. Perhaps if she did, we could get out of here and go to a good dentist. 

After what seemed an eternity the dentist stopped his work, took the instrument out of my mouth, 
and straightened up. He called the nurse over to a corner of the room, and a whispering conversation 
ensued. What direful plot was now being discussed? Soon my mother was called over. More whis- 
pering. I cast a furtive glance at the door. It was no use, for the dentist had the key in his pocket. Should 
I start screaming? The idea appealed to me, but fear and a busy morning had drained all my energy. 
I only hoped my mother would not be deceived by these two plotters. The doctor walked back to me- 
I gripped the arm of the chair. He wore a grin from ear to ear. Was this the same man? What kind 
of a trick was he going to play now? I was on guard. But his words proved to be reassuring. 

"Young man," he said, "there is absolutely nothing the matter with your teeth. I have examined 
them thoroughly (he did not have to tell me that) and find that they are in perfect condition." 

I could hardly believe his words. It was only then that I realized that my mouth did not pain. To 
telle the truth, there had been no pain since the night before. These words brought my visit to an end, 
and with inexpressible joy I leaped from the chair, a free man! For some reason or other my mother 
was opening her pocketbook. Perhaps a little reward for my good behavior, I thought. I was wrong. 
She handed some money to the dentist, and for a long time this proved to be the most mysterious aspect 
of my adventure. The doctor and the nurse smiled affably, and bade us goodbye. I soon found myself 
once again in the fresh air, and was thankful to be alive and still in a condition to enjoy it. I looked up 
at my mother, who appeared quite relieved after the ordeal, and spoke my first pleasant words of 
the day. 

"You know, Mom, I liked that dentist from the first moment I saw him. And wasn't the nurse a 
kind lady?" 

"Yes," replied my mother. There was a smile on her face, so I knew that she agreed with me. 

Thus ended one of the early escapades of my life. Whenever I pass a dentist's office today I recall 
the event with fear and trepidation. But I must admit that when I walked into the office that day I was 
a sick boy, and when I came out my illness had vanished. Was the pain all imagination, after all? Was 
it all a dream, or was I really ill? The answers to those questions came the following morning, when I 
awoke with an acute case of mumps. 



rLontiienn 1 nxxa 



BY 



BARNUAH EMMANUEL 



For many years I had read of the picturesque country of northern Iraq, with its rolling hills, and 
snow-capped mountains, its fertile valleys, the mountain streams that flowed down through those 
valleys, and green pasture land and orchards that dotted the landscape. But like many of my classmates, 
I had never visited the North, and was familiar only with the flat, open desert of central and southern 
Iraq. My opportunity to visit this section of my native land came last summer when I made a journey to 
Amadiya, and there I saw for the first time the wonders of nature in northern Iraq, far surpassing my 
expectations and dreams. Since the journey was one of the happiest experiences of my life, I would like 
to share it with you in this essay. 

It was a warm, sultry day in August when I packed my bag with the clothes and necessities of my 
vacation. In the early evening I went to the railroad station to board the train for Mosul. The sun had 
set, and the evening was cool and pleasant. The train was crowded with passengers, seeking relief from 
the heat of the city in the famous resort towns of the North. Soon after the train started, darkness came, 
and no longer could I watch the passing landscape from my window. But as the train moved northward 
I knew that we were passing several villages along the way, villages that had been watered by the historic 
Tigris river for centuries beyond number. As I went to sleep I thought of the many events of the dim 
past that had taken place along the very path that I was traveling. With the coming of dawn we were 
drawing near to Mosul, the chief city of northern Iraq. Here one finds the rare combination of the an- 
cient and modern world. A modern taxi drove me to the garage where I would board a bus for the 
remainder of the journey, passing along the way the time-honored arabana of another day. 

Travelers from all walks of life gathered at the garage, many of them weighted down with their 
purchases made in the city. These people, I knew, were making one of their infrequent visits to Mosul, 
and were now on the way back to their villages with supplies for the next few months. Shortly after 
noon about twenty passengers, enough to fill the bus, were ready to start. The luggage was made secure 
on the roof, everyone was seated, and as the smiling driver started the engine I sat back to enjoy the trip 
which for so long a time had been my ambition. The passengers were an interesting group. Some were 
desert shepherds, others wore the distinctive dress of their villages, and some, like myself, bore the 
indelible mark of the modern city. 

Leaving the crowded thoroughfares and innumerable shops of the city we soon came to the great 
Mosul Plain. For fifteen miles we drove along a smooth, tarred road, flanked on both sides by fields 
whose harvest is bountiful in season. Already we could notice the change in temperature as the cool 
breezes blew through the open windows of the bus. Looking ahead I could see the hills in the distance 
and before long we were climbing a steep ascent, and were looking down upon the valleys we had left. 
Only the scattered homes of shepherds could be observed until we reached the little village of 



A L I R A Q I 69 

Kushkawa. Here the monotony of sand and hills was broken by expansive fields of grain and rice, 
and the welcome view of trees and shrubs. This was the first stop on the journey, and the passengers 
rested and drank cool milk beneath the shade of the trees. 

The pause had refreshed all of us and we then began to climb higher into the mountains along a 
winding road. Sleepy villages with names that echoed from the past dotted this long mountain road. 
Menstoka is noted for its cool summer weather and many come from the cities to this mountain village 
for a vacation. Winding through the hills and valleys we came to Abenshy, a small village with a magnif- 
icent view of the long mountain ranges. Then came the journey across the beautiful Sinja Valley, 
followed by a long and difficult climb to the village of Duhok. This was the greatest challenge our bus 
had met, and it rattled and choked as it wound its way up the steep mountain side. A scene of majestic 
beauty greeted all of us as we looked from the windows of the bus. Below lay the long, winding road, 
curling along the mountain side like a huge snake, and reaching as far as the eye could see. Patches of 
green appeared in the distant valleys, harmonizing with the clear, blue sky. The peaks of mountains, 
one upon the other, looked down upon us from all sides, rugged symbols of a rugged land. The pano- 
rama surpassed anything I had ever seen in my life, and I felt as if I were riding on top of the world. 

We finally arrived at Duhok, a village whose gardens and orchards are watered by mountain streams 
and thrive in the mountain air. The bus passed through the main street and stopped at the caravansary, 
where we were met by an excited group of children and villagers. The weather was now cold, and one could 
hardly believe that he had left the hot city of Mosul just a few hours ago. After a light lunch we walked 
about the village, until the sound of the horn on our bus summoned us to the caravansary. We were on 
our way once again, passing many villages along the road, each one situated near the life-giving stream 
that had by now become a commonplace. But our schedule did not allow us to stop until we arrived at 
Shaikh-Bamirne. There we rested at a tea shop near a stream that rushed wildly down from the mount- 
ains and disappeared in the village fields. 

A fascinating picture of rare beauty awaited us as we continued our journey, for we were soon to 
enter Sarsank, most famous of all the resort towns in northern Iraq. The town is surrounded on all 
sides by towering mountains, and is itself a beautiful oasis of fruit trees, green fields and lovely gardens. 
The summer residence of His Majesty, King Faisal II, is located in this charming village. We travelled 
onward to Bebady, situated on a hillside, and with an expansive view of the Sharifa and Mezorke 
Valleys. After leaving Bebady our driver took the road that led through the Mezorke Valley, and there 
in the distance I saw for the first time Amadiya, my destination. But to reach it we had to drive around 
the mountains until we came to the Sulawa Valley. A wide river flows through this valley, and after 
crossing a bridge that spanned the river, we came at long last to Amadiya. 

This is one of the larger villages of the North. Schools and hospitals are established here, and many 
of the inhabitants are the farmers who till the rich soil that abounds in this area. One of the unique 
features of Amadiya is the native dress, which has remained unchanged for centuries. In this twentieth 
century it serves as a striking reminder of an ancient and honorable civilization that has played an im- 
portant part in the drama of man's life on this earth. My journey has been an education. I had never 
before realized the beauties of the North, the long mountain ranges, the sparkling streams and rivers, 
the refreshing mountain air, the numberless villages along the way, the forests and the green valleys. 
Here I would spend my vacation, far from the heat and excitement of the city, and although I had only 
arrived at Amadiya I looked forward to the return journey, with its ever-changing scenery and beauty. 
In a day that passed too quickly I had travelled through one of the most ancient dwelling places of man. 
These hills and streams have watched the evolution of history for countless years, and hidden away in 
many of these villages is the story of man in his earliest days upon the earth. And now, for a few months, 
it would be my joy to reflect on the wonders of nature about me, and the stirring events that have taken 
place in this historic land of the old and the new. 



Cne J^dst ^unrtend 



en, 



BY 

SAMIR ZAINAL 



The May winds blew furiously over the hot sands of the^desert. The drooping crowns of lofty 
palm trees groaned and swayed under the pressure of the sand-laden winds. Their branches cut and 
lashed at each other. Clouds of dust darkened the skies and in the west the setting sun was scarcely 
visible. Through the blinding storm a caravan slowly made its way, as the horses stumbled in the deep 
furrows made by the winter rains. Grief, despair, and the strain of a hard journey showed upon the 
faces of the men. Riding at the head of this small group was a colorfiul figure in handsome robes, a 
golden sword by his side. He raised his head and, scanning the area as best he could, perceived the 
outline of a village, situated on a grey hill that rose in the west. Turning to his companions he spoke. 

"Do you know the name of that village, Jamal?" 

"Yes, sir, it is the village of Shaikh Najib, the last station to the west." 

"Very well," replied Shaikh Nasir. "Now you must follow my advice. I am asking you to escape 
while there is still an opportunity, and leave me to my fate." 

"Have you forgotten the pledge we made?" asked Jamal. "Do you not remember that we 
promised your father, on his deathbed, that we would guard you and defend you with our lives?" 

"Oh, if I knew the days that were ahead of me, I would never have allowed you to make that pledge. 
I would have preferred death, rather than endanger you and your companions. But bad luck followed 
my days. I have led my tribe into battle on six occasions, and have been defeated each time. Life holds 
little hope for me now, but you and your loyal friends are young. You are no longer bound to your 
pledge, and I beg you to flee before we are overtaken by our enemies." 

But the men would not listen to his request, and as they guided their horses to the village a heavy 
silence fell upon the dejected riders. The valiant animals plodded along slowly, worn out and exhausted 
by their long and difficult journey. Shaikh Nasir thought of better days. He remembered his happy 
boyhood with his tribe, the first horse given to him by his father, the sword he received when he reached 
manhood. His father was the leader of the tribe, and one day Nasir would take his place, and guide his 
people. He took part in many a battle with the enemy and was the admiration of his people for his 
courage and skill. He had tasted victory more than once. But the soldier of the desert, like all soldiers, 
must feel the sting of defeat. Nasir's soldiers gradually weakened as the assaults of the enemy increased. 
During the last year they had suffered much, and Nasir's father had grown ill. One night he called 
Nasir to his tent, and asked him to bring his most loyal friends. And so that evening, in the cool desert 
air by the light of a lamp, Nasir and six of his friends listened to the parting words of his father. 

"We are in danger of being overcome by our enemies," he explained. "We cannot win another 
battle. Our men are weakened, our food supply is low. I am an old man, and they will spare me. But 
you are young. You have your life before you. Perhaps you can rally support for our men, and one day 
restore our tribe to its former nobility. I beg of you to go, and I ask your friends to promise me this 
night that they will guard you with their very lives." The six companions made their pledge, and after 
a sad farewell the small group disappeared into the dark night of the desert. 

Jamal could read the thoughts of his master as they made their way to the village. He, too, had been 
reflecting on the melancholy events that had brought them to this village. 



AL IRAQI 



71 



"Do not let sorrow and despair fill your heart, my friend. Not far from here you will find your ally? 
Shaikh Najib, ready to organize an army and fight for you. Then, perhaps your luck will change, and 
you will be able to return to your tribe in triumph." So spoke Jamal. 

Nasir nodded silently. But he was still overcome with grief, and the memory of his last defeat 
haunted his mind. No words of hope could take away the sadness that overwhelmed his heart. As the 
caravan drew near the village a party of horsemen appeared on the scene. They were led by Shaikh 
Najib himself, and his nephew, Ahmad. Najib immediately guessed the identity of the strangers. 

"They are the defeated tribesmen of Shaikh Nasir," he said to his nephew. 

"I hope not," replied Ahmad. "We do not want to become involved in any more warfare." 

The desert warrior rose in his stirrups and looked long and searchingly at the approaching horse- 
men. 




"I am sure they are the men of Shaikh Nasir, and if I am not mistaken, he is leading them. We 
shall soon known for certain." 

"Why must they come to us?" asked Ahmad. "We are a peaceful people. We want no war with 
other tribes." 

"What else can they do?" replied his uncle. "They have no way to escape, unless we accept them 
as our guests. If they ask our protection I shall be forced to grant it. It shall never be said that I refused 
hospitality to one who asked for it." 

And thus it was that on the barren desert, near the village, the two tribal leaders met. Nasir asked 
for protection for himself and his loyal bodyguard, and Najib told him that he was welcome to stay with 
him and his tribe. That evening a banquet was served to Nasir and his friends, in true desert style, and 
after the meal the men told the sorrowful story of the defeat of their tribe. Shaikh Najib sympathized 
with his friend, but was careful not to offer any assistance. That evening he lay awake for a long time 
in his tent. Well aware of the danger to his own tribe, with the presence of these men, he wondered if it 
would not be more wise to ask them to leave in the morning. He slept less than an hour during the night, 
and as the first light of the new day crept into his tent, he had definitely made up his mind. He would 
protect Nasir and his men, no matter how great the danger involved. He had given his word, and he 
would keep it. 

He rose from his bed and walked to the entrance of the tent. It was early dawn. The tribe was still 
asleep. His sharp eyes soon focused on what appeared to be a cloud of dust on the dim horizon. As he 
watched he was soon able to make out small objects, moving ever nearer. There was no time to lose. 
Here were the victorious tribesmen, coming to demand the surrender of Nasir and his followers. Najib 
immediately awakened his men and the guests, and warned them of the danger. Nasir said he would 
leave the tribe immediately, in order to avert any trouble. Najib assigned five of his men to lead them 
to a glen, where they could defend themselves, if the occasion demanded it. 



72 AL IRAQI 

When they arrived at the hideout Nasir left his men and rode alone for some distance. He stopped 
his horse, dismounted, and began to walk, meditating upon the fate that had befallen him. He imagined 
that he could hear a voice in the quiet glen, whispering to him and warning him of his danger. 

"Why do you cling to false hopes?" asked the voice. "You have fought in many battles. From some 
you have emerged as victor; you were defeated in others. But now there can be no battle, for you have 
no army. This will be your last surrender." 

Nasir drew his sword from his side, and was about to fling it upon the ground. But, on second 
thought, he returned it to its place, and walked back to his horse. When he reached his companions he 
found them still mounted upon their steeds, waiting for the enemy. He was about to tell them to flee, 
when a shout was heard in the distance. It was Najib, with some of his men. 

"Flee with your men," he shouted. You are completely outnumbered by the enemy, and this is 
your only chance for escape. They will not follow you if you retreat further into the glen." With these 
words he wheeled around and returned to the encampment. Nasir looked at his men and read the signs 
of fear and defeat on their countenances. 

"You have my permission to escape," he told them. "As for myself, I shall remain here, and await 
my fate." 

The men begged him to join them in their flight, but their entreaties were in vain. Then came the 
shrieks of men, the thundering beat of horses racing across the sands. The tumult grew louder each 
second. The loyal followers turned their horses into the glen, as if to abandon their leader. Thinking 
that they were leaving, he spoke his final, touching words of farewell. 

"Quicken your pace, my friends, before the trap is closed. Our next meeting, I hope, will be in the 
everlasting happiness of heaven." 

With these words the men leaped from their horses and embraced their leader, while he stood in 
wonderment. 

"We shall never abandon you!" shouted Jamal. "We have promised to defend you with our lives, 
and if the fulfillment of our pledge means that we are to die, then we shall die as men." 

Nasir was visibly moved. He could find no words to express his gratitude. He turned away, and 
walked slowly to the entrance of the glen. His eyes were moist with tears, and in the distance he dimly 
perceived the oncoming enemy. To his amazement he found that Najib was leading the band of men. 

A faint smile crossed his lips. "You do not need so great a force of warriors. I am one man. Neither 
I nor my companions will offer any resistance." 

"We did not come to capture you," said Najib. We are here to defend you. We shall fight to the 
last man to defend your life." 

Before he had finished his words, the enemy appeared, racing for the glen. They outnumbered the 
followers of Najib, and were armed for battle. But there was to be no fight. Their leader drew up his 
men facing Najib and his followers, and the two groups stood silently, waiting for the next move. There 
was an interval of interminable silence, the quiet that precedes the storm. Shaikh Nasir moved forward, 
and with faltering steps walked directly to the leader of the enemy. It was a picture that has often been 
painted in history. Without speaking a word he drew his sword from his side and offered it to his enemy. 
There was silence, once again. Then, of a sudden, the entire force of the enemy shouted in unison. At 
a signal from their leader they turned and sped across the desert. Nasir turned and faced Najib and his 
men, and his own loyal bodyguard. It was a tense moment. They had all expected to be taken prisoners, 
but their expectations had been false. The trace of a smile appeared on the face of Nasir, and he spoke 
with deep emotion. 

"I have surrendered my sword today, but I have found new friends, and a friend is worth more 
than all the swords in the world." 



(Jie \\eadi\xa ol Ifaanks 



BY 



YASAR YAHYA 



It was a beautiful, sunny day in November. The air was cool, a cloudless sky looked down upon 
Baghdad, and I had not a worry in the world. As the school bus passed through the city I laughed and 
talked with my friends, and before we realized it we were nearing Sulaikh. As we drove into the school 
yard I could see many of the boys who had already arrived, and I stepped from the bus with a light 
heart, eager to join them. But first of all I wanted to enter the main building and look at the bulletin 
board. Here one learns all the news of the school, and it had been my custom for many years to inspect 
the notices as soon as I reached the school. There were many signs on the board this particular day, but 
one of them gave me reason to pause. I had seen it often before, and inevitably it caused me to shudder. 
It read: "The Reading of Marks Will Be Held Today". 




The Reading of Marks ! What thoughts that brought to my mind ! It was the first marking period 
of the year, and I felt that I had made a slow start in my studies. Now I could picture Father Mudir 
standing before the lineups and announcing the time and place of this exercise. It would come as a 
surprise to many, for not all the boys read the bulletin board as faithfully as I. When the announcement 
came I would look down at my shoes, as usual. The picture of the report card would come to my mind, 
and I would count the red circles. Without fail I would meet one of the Fathers in the afternoon and he 
would ask me how my marks were this month. I would give a general answer and he would ask to see 
my card. Then he would shake his head and advise me to spend more time on my homework. But a 
greater cause for concern was the reception I would receive when I returned to my home. My father 
would ask for the card as soon as he entered the door that night. I knew he would be angry and would 
shout at me. He would tell me, as he had told me often, that when he was my age he was a class leader. 
My brothers would whisper to each other, no doubt discussing my poor marks. My mother would inform 
me that there would be no more cinemas until I had shown an improvement. Ah ! This was to be a day 
of shame, and to think I had been so happy a few short minutes ago. There are other boys standing near 
me, reading the same notice, and all discussing the same subject. But I do not see them, nor do I hear 
their words. I have time only to ponder the future. 

I walk around in a daze until the bell calls me back to reality. The students are standing in line 
before the main building. Father Mudir makes the announcement, and automatically I walk to class. 
My physics teacher explains that we are taking new matter today and, since it is important, we must pay 
close attention. I do not understand a word of it. I try to concentrate on electricity, but it is a hopeless 



74 AL IRAQI 

task. The second, third and fourth classes are no different. I am there in body, but my mind is shuttling 
from one thought to another. But soon the agony will be over, for the marks will be read the fifth period. 
The bell rings and the fourth period ends. I decide to eat my lunch before going to the ball field, where 
the news awaits all of us. The food is tasteless, and furthermore, I am not hungry. More than that, 
I feel slightly ill. I look at my watch. It is time to go to the ball field, and I walk alone to my ordeal. 

All the students are there when I arrive, filled with expectation, and the Fathers and Arabic teach- 
ers are in the front row. There is nothing secret about this reading of marks. Father Mudir is on the 
platform, holding a formidable set of papers. My name is on one of them. Soon he is reading the average 
of every boy who has a passing grade for the month. The suspense will soon be over. If I do not hear 
my name, then I am sure that my worst forebodings are true. One boy has an average of ninety-two, 
another has eighty-nine. They will not face my problems today. They can go home happy, and wave 
the report card before the whole family. Down the class list goes Father Mudir, and now he is about to 
read my average. I have a pencil and paper, ready to write it down. Then I suddenly hear the name of 
a boy who follows me in the alphabetical order. My name was not mentioned! I have failed for the 
month! My head starts whirling around in circles. People are turning around to stare at me. I begin 
to feel the effects of the sun, as it is much warmer than I had thought. But when I look up to the sky 
there is no sun; heavy clouds have suddenly appeared to join me in my misery. There is one hope, and 
I am ready to grasp it. Perhaps my average was read, but I was so confused that I did not hear it. 

Many other marks were read by Father Mudir, but I heard none of them. Class averages are being 
read now. My class average is sixty-four, due to my low marks, I suppose. Now the class leaders are 
walking to the platform to receive their ribbons from Father Rector. How I admire them ! Many years 
ago I hoped to be a class leader. Now the very thought seems fantastic to me. The testimonials are now 
being presented for leadership in each individual subject. This does not interest me. My day ended ten 
minutes ago. The leaders of my own class have been called, and some are rising from their seats to go 
to the platform. 

"Stand up!" shouts the boy beside me. 

"Why?" I ask, suddenly coming to life. 

"You have just been awarded the testimonials for English and mathematics," he informs me. 

I hesitate. There must be a mistake. Suppose I walk up to the platform, and Father Rector tells 
me that these testimonials are for another boy. That is all I would need to crown my humiliation. But 
my friend pushes me gently, and before I have time to think more on the subject, I am on my way to 
the platform, amid the applause of the students and teachers. Father Rector presents the testimonials 
to me, congratulates me on my good work, and shakes hands with me. I return to my seat, walking on 
air, and there I receive more congratulations from my friends. The clouds have suddenly vanished, the 
sun is smiling down on all of us, and now I peer once again into the future, this time with a happy sense 
of pride. 

I can now see the Fathers meeting me afterwards and telling me what a good student I am. My 
father will be the happiest man in Baghdad, and will telephone his friends to give them the good news. 
My brothers will look up to me as the hero of the family. And my mother will insist that I take my 
brothers to the cinema, after telling them to imitate me in their school work. Father Rector is speaking 
now. He is telling how pleased he is with the marks of some of the boys. He seems to be looking in my 
direction so I suppose he is thinking of me. Ah! This is a happy day in a happy world. If we do our 
best in life then there is no reason for worry nor alarm. 

The Reading of Marks has fininshed. I walk up to my teacher and there he is waiting, with a happy 
smile, to give me my report card. Not one red circle is on the card. What ever made me believe I would 
have a red circle? Well, I think I will walk over to the canteen now and buy a big dinner. After all, it is 
x hours since I had my breakfast, and for some strange reason I have an excellent appetite. 






THE YEAR IN SPORTS 



At the opening of school this year we inaugu- 
rated the new athletic facilities placed at our disposal. 
A beautiful football field, a new baseball diamond, 
and additional basketball courts offered to everyone 
the opportunity to take part in some sport. The new 
playing fields were, as it turned out, a symbol of a 
new era in the athletic program of the school. The 
intramural program was a success from the very 
beginning, when the baseball season opened in Oc- 
tober. Besides the baseball, there were basketball and 
volleyball, and many a new star made his debut in 
these games that included every class in the school. 
As the year progressed the boys of the upper classes 
gained valuable experience as referees and umpires 
in the intramural games. Apart from the fun and the 
keen competition displayed in these contests, there 
developed a class spirit and a school spirit that was 
admirable. Those who could not play on the teams 
found that they could exercise their lungs, and cheered 
their classes in victory and defeat. The intramural 
program was directed by Father Mahoney, and the 
smooth running of the many schedules was due to 
his careful planning. At the end of the year the 
windows of many classrooms were adorned with 
winning cups gained in the school leagues. 

The Varsity Teams this year added to the honor 



and the glory of the Gold and Maroon. Father Regan's 
Secondary Basketball Team was the best in its class 
and eventually won the championship. Our Second- 
ary Football Team, coached by Father Quinn, reached 
the finals of the Class B League, and was awarded 
the Cup in the championship game. The Intermed- 
iate Track Team was one of the best ever to repre- 
sent the school and easily won the Government Track 
Meet in March. In the same Meet the relay team 
took first honors to add one more trophy to our 
collection. In the Government Track Meet for Sec- 
ondary Schools we placed second among the twelve 
schools taking part in the program, and the relay team 
also took second honors. During the year we fielded 
a basketball team and a football team in the Intermed- 
iate Section, but both teams met strong opposition 
in their respective leagues and we were eliminated 
by our rivals near the end of the season. The success- 
ful year in sports is due to the Fathers who coached 
the different teams and to the boys, whose daily 
attention to practice and drills was an inspiration to 
the entire school. Looking back it was one of the best 
years we ever had; looking ahead the prospects 
are bright, for many will be donning their uniforms 
again next year to retain the trophies pictured on 
this page. 







SECONDARY FOOTBALL TEAM 
First Row: Najah Sitcu, Wilson Ishaq, Suhail al-Naqib, Ziyya Yoab, Tariq Makiyya. 

Second Row: Husain Mursi, Naqi Tereza, Shaiban Awni, Asad al-Khudhairi, William Paulus, Mufid 
al-Samarrai, Nasir al-Saadun, Father Quinn. 



SECONDARY FOOTBALL 



The Secondary Football Team was sparked this 
year by Husain Mursi and Asad al-Khudhairi, both 
of whom played on the championship Basketball 
Team. Husain proved early in the season that he was 
as adept in using his feet and dribbling as he was in 
ringing baskets. Asad, playing goal, used his height 
and steady hands to save many a point for our side, 
and it was only on rare occasions that one slipped by. 
Shaiban Awni, a veteran of four years, was the most 
versatile member of the squad. His experience made 
him eligible for any position, but this year Father 
Quinn gave him the job at center halfback, where he 
could assist two new players, William Paulus and 
Tariq Makiyya. Nasir al-Saadun proved to be the 
most durable player on the team, and his speed and 
clever foot-work set up many a goal shot during the 
games. The fullback positions were capably played 
by Naqi Tereza and Mufid al-Samarrai. Najah Sittu, 
Ziyya Yoab, and Wilson Ishaq played the outside 
wing positions, and rounded out our championship 
aggregation. 

In league competition we bowed only once, and 
that was a 1-0 defeat at the hands of Primary Teach- 
ers School. At the close of the season we ranked 



second in the league standings, and faced the same 
opponent for the championship game and Cup. Early 
in March we met at Scouts' Field before a large crowd 
and the Maroon and Gold played inspired football. 
The credit for our 3-2 victory goes to Husain Mursi, 
who scored all three points. But the brilliant team 
work of each individual player was responsible for 
this Class B championship, and it was a jubilant team 
that brought the winner's Cup back to the school, 
to be added to our many trophies. 





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INTERMEDIATE FOOTBALL TEAM 



First Row: Wilson Aprim, Daud Leon, Banuel Sarkis, Malcon Abil, Daud Ishaya, Leon Kasbarian, 

William Benjamin. 
Second 1 Row: Pecros Ishu, Nuri Fatcuhi, Nadhmi Awji, Adil Randquist, Father Mahoney. 



INTERMEDIATE FOOTBALL 



The three intermediate classes were well repre- 
sented on the football team this year. Daud Leon and 
William Benjamin of first year made the squad early 
in the season; second year offered Banuel Sarkis, 
Petros Ishu, Wilson Aprim and Malcon Abil; the 
veterans from third year were Nuri Fattuhi, Adil 
Randquist, Nadhmi Awji, Leon Kasbarian and Daud 
Ishaya. When Father Mahoney saw this experienced 
and versatile group on opening day, his hopes for a 
successful season were high. The first practice ses- 
sions and the practice games with the Secondary 
Team convinced most observers that the prospects 
of another trophy were excellent, and the team started 
the season filled with hope and confidence. 

The weather man then stepped into the picture, 
and rain and wet grounds made it impossible to con- 
tinue our systematic practice. The opening game of 
the season was played against the Jaafar School. We 
held our own during this contest and won by a score 
of 2-0. Credit for the victory goes in large part to 
William Benjamin, who scored both goals for the 



Maroon and Gold.The second opponent in the league 
competition was the Ibn Haiaan School, and here 
we met a strong and experienced team. On three 
different occasions they kicked goals from beyond 
the 25 yard mark, and took us completely by surprise. 
This was a difficult lead to overcome and,even though 
we played our best, we lost by a 4-2 score. Naaman 
School was next on the schedule and we knew we would 
be facing one of the best teams in the league. Each 
afternoon found us on the field, practicing and dril- 
ling with all our might. Confident that we were ready 
for the game we travelled to Scouts' Field, but before 
many minutes had passed we knew we were battling 
against superior odds. The score at the end of the 
half was 1-0, in favor of Naaman School; but in the 
second half their experience began to manifest itself 
and they scored six more points to defeat us 7-0. 
While we won no coveted trophy this year, we did 
have a good time and gained valuable experience 
which should help both Intermediate and Secondary 
Teams next year. 




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IG RELAY TEAM 

Bail is Shamun, Aram Tan ialian, Phenuel Philip, Hrand Shamilian, Nuri Gharibian. 



2C RELAY TEAM 

Ashraf Karrumi, Abdul-Jabbar al-Habib, Munthar al-Qaisi, Tariq Hindu. 




2B BASKETBALL CHAMPIONS 

First Row: Najib Yuhanna, Ali Mursi, Malcon Leon. 
Second Row: Father Mahan, Hikmat Shamun, Samir Vincent, Faris Lutfi. 




IG BASKETBALL CHAMPIONS 

First Row: Aram Tanialian, Najat Qadir, Bail is Shamun. 

Second Row: Father Loeffler, Rafi Ghazarian, Faruq Hanna, Nuri Gharibian. 




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5A RELAY TEAM 

Asad al-Khudhairi, John Basmaji, Berj Huwakimian, Richard Nabhan. 




Wilson Ishaq on the way to a goal. 




SECONDARY 
BASKETBALL 



SECONDARY BASKETBALL TEAM 

First Row: Suhail al-Naqib, Yashar Shemdin, Husain Mursi, Sawa Issa. 

Second Row: Shakir Mursi, Asad al-Khudhairi, Father Regan, Nasir al-Saadun, Sabah Jadun, Jamal al-Wattar. 



The Secondary Basketball Team of 1954-1955 
will go down in history as one of the really great teams 
of Baghdad College. Husain Mursi played an out- 




Suhail al-Naquib and Shakir Mursi in action shot during game. 



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Asad al-Khudhairi gets the ball in the championship game. 



standing offensive game all season, averaging 20 points 
for each game. Our number one man on defense was 
Asad al-Khudhairi, and in the close games his bril- 
liant play at guard meant victory for the Maroon and 
Gold. Inspired by these two senior class representa- 
tives were Nasir al-Saadun, Yashar Shemdin, Sawa 
Issa and Suhail al-Naqib in the forward positions. 
Working as guards were Sabah Jadun and Jamal 
al-Wattar, with Shakir Mursi performing at center. 
The squad had a busy season, playing six league 
games and fourteen non-league contests. Steady drill 
and practice brought the team along and within a 
month it appeared to be of the best quintets in 
Baghdad Schools. Our margin of victory was never 
too large, but we did manage to win all league games. 
The final game, for the championship of Baghdad 
Secondary Schools, was played in late January before 
a capacity crowd on the court of the Royal Sporting 
Club. Our opponent was Markaziya School, a team 
we had met earlier in the season. Fortunately for us, 
this turned out to be the best game we had played 
all season. Never was the spirit of the team higher, 
the shooting surpassed any performance we had 
given, and the opposition found it almost impossible 
to break through our defense. When the final whistle 
was blown we had won by the score of 73-36, and 
were awarded the Cup symbolic of the Class A cham- 
pionship. Due credit must be awarded to Father 
Regan, who spent long hours in drilling the team, 
and arranged several practice games to keep us in 
condition. Most of the team will be reporting to him 
next year for another championship season. 



*Sk^yi Baghdad College 

LASJ Secondary School Champions 
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INTERMEDIATE BASKETBALL TEAM 

First Row: Umar Shemdin, Ibrahim Hikmat, Samir Sabbagh, Falih Akram, Basil Jazmi. 
Second Row: Father Egan, Mumtaz Tawil, Samir Vincent, Nuzad Uthman, Sudad al-Jaibaji. 



INTERMEDIATE BASKETBALL 



When Father Egan looked over his candidates 
for the Intermediate Basketball Team in October he 
realized that his number one problem would be the 
inexperience of the club. Not one veteran had re- 
turned from last year. But in a short time the team 
was organized, daily practice sessions and drills were 
held, and by the time our first league game was sched- 
uled we were a team that could compare well with 
the other schools of the city. Holding down the for- 
ward positions were Samir Vincent, Ibrahim Hikmat, 
Mumtaz Tawil, Basil Jazmi, Samir Sabbagh and 
Umar Shemdin. Sudad al-Jaibaji played center, and 
the guards were Falih Akram and Nuzad Uthman. 

The first league game was played with Rasafa 
School, and the outcome was in doubt until the last 
two minutes of play, when Ibrahim Hikmat dropped 
two baskets to assure us of a 25-20 victory. Spurred on 
by this win we engaged in a few practice games and 
improved with each contest. Our second triumph in 
the league competition came with a decisive victory 
over the Najib Pasha School. We then met the 
strongest team in the league, the Mansur School, and 
went down to defeat by a score of 48-36. Undaunted 



by this setback, we moved onward and won clear-cut 
victories at the expense of Khadhimiya School and 
Karkh School. Our final opponent was the Sharqia 
Team, and the game was a thriller all the way. We 
lost by the close margin of 55-54, but this second loss 
was enough to eliminate us from further league com- 
petition. 

High scorer for this vastly improved quintet was 
Mumtaz Tawil, with Samir Vincent a close second. 
Falih Akram and Nuzad Uthman developed into one 
of the best guard combinations in the league. The 
team spirit and high morale all during the season 
contributed in no small way to a record for which we 
can all be proud. Father Egan will face the same 
problems next year, for only one of these players will 
be returning to the Intermediate Team, but Samir 
Vincent will find a lot of company from among the 
many stars developed in the first and second year 
intramural basketball games. The others will be 
welcomed by Father Regan, and should enable him 
to mold together another championship Secondary 
Team. The experience gained and marked improve- 
ment of the players augurs well for the future. 




5A BASKETBALL CHAMPIONS 

First Row: Ramzi Dawisha, Berj Huwakimian, John Basmaji, Joseph Marukil. 

Second Row: Richard Nabhan, Asad al-Khudhairi, Father Gerry, Shaiban Awni, William Paulus. 



INTRAMURAL BASKETBALL 



Many a good basketball player would pass un- 
noticed in the crowd if he did not appear in the in- 
tramural games. The success of our two varsity teams 
this year is due in large measure to this league, which 
develops and brings forward the best players in the 
school. The Senior League, made up of third, fourth 
and fifth years, developed into a contest between the 
two fifth year teams. 5 A went through the league 
undefeated ; 5B was beaten once by a strong 4C 
team. In the final game between these two quintets 
5A emerged victorious, aided by such stars as Asad 
al-Khudhairi, Berj Huwakimian, Shaiban Awni and 
Richard Nabhan. 

The Second Year League was dominated by 
Father Mahan's 2B team, led by Samir Vincent, Ali 
Mursi and Malcon Leon. This team was unbeatable, 
but the opponent in the final game could not be 
determined with any degree of certainty until the 



semifinals. 2F and 1A played a close game, but 1A 
was the victor, and faced the strong 2B outfit in the 
Cup game. When the final whistle was blown 2B had 
won another game, and was awarded the champion- 
ship of second year. The first year teams had been 
engaging in practice sessions in preparation for their 
own league, and were now ready to thrill the cheering 
throngs with their spectacular games. Father Loef- 
fler's 1G team was one of the best and forged ahead 
with one win after another. IF and 1H played in the 
semifinals in a fast game, with 1H the winner. 1H 
then challenged 1G for the championship and won 
the first game in a contest packed with thrills and 
excitement. In the final game for the Cup, 1G proved 
conclusively that it was a better team and won the 
championship of First Year. The game was a fitting 
close to the intramural program of the school 
year. 






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BASEBALL 



SCHOOL BASEBALL CHAMPIONS 
First Row: Usama Rassam, Khalid Antwan Butros, Fraidun Ishaq, Adil Said, Eddie Muqhar. 
Second Row: Warujan Karamian, George Ziyya, Abdul-Ridha al-Jasim, Father fiulvehill, Eugene 
Raubitshek, Zaki Bahoda, Zuhair Faraj. 



There is a belief that lightning never strikes the 
same place twice, but the Senior Baseball League this 
year proved that there can be an exception to this 
general rule. Father Mulvehill's unbeatable 3B nine 
of a year ago was now scattered among the fourth 
year classes, and those experienced in baseball picked 
the fourth and fifth year teams as the class of the 
league. A week of practice games offered everyone 
an opportunity to work out the kinks, and on October 
1 3 the first official game was played on the new base- 
ball diamond. 5B was unquestionably the team to 
beat, and the only serious challange it met all season 
was a tie game with 3F. This latter team played two 
tie games with 3B, and finally 3B came out on top. 
This proved to be the turning point of the season, 
for after this win 3B could not be stopped and 
marched on to the finals for the second year in a row. 

The championship game was played on Novem- 
ber 20, with the entire student body on the sidelines. 
Khalid Antwan, who had pitched his team to the 
finals, was on the mound for 3B, while Mufid al- 
Samarrai of 5B was winding up his pitching career 
in the school. Both twirlers were in top form, and for 
a while it looked like a tie game. In the second inning 
5B gathered 4 runs, and 3B came back in the next 
inning to duplicate their feat. Husain Mursi scored 
in the fifth inning to give 5B a 5-4 lead. Zaki Bahoda 
evened the score in the sixth inning, coming home 
on a long double by Abdul-Ridha al-Jasim. With the 
winning run on second base George Ziyya sacrificed 



and Abdul-Ridha advanced to third. Eugene Rau- 
bitshek then stepped up to the plate, hit safely and 
brought Abdul-Ridha home with the winning run. 
The bell ended the game with an unexpected 6-5 
victory for 3B, and since 5B had gone through the 
season undefeated, another game was necessary to 
determine the school champions. 

Two days later the teams met again, and this 
time the story was different. 3B had been playing 
steadily for more than a week, winning one game after 
the other. In the second inning their big bats began 
to click and seven runs were chalked up in their favor. 
Two more were added in the fourth inning, while 
5B remained scoreless. In the fifth inning 5B started 
a rally, but it ended with only one run. 3B scored 
once again and the final tally was 10-1. In the lineups 
that afternoon Father Mudir presented the Cup to 
Fraidun Ishaq, whose steady batting and flawless 
play at shortstop had been largely responsible for the 
successful season. One final challenge remained for 
this great team. An all-star nine was assembled from 
the entire school and 3B proved its superiority once 
and for all by a 3-2 win over the best school players. 

With the school championship now settled we 
awaited the annual classic between the Fathers and 
the All-Stars of Baghdad College. Father Sheehan, 
who coached the All-Stars, hed been watching the 
class teams in action, and was sure that he had a win- 
ning combination. With the Fathers fielding one of 
the best teams in years, the game was close all the 








IF BASEBALL TEAM 

First Row: Najah Shunia, Dilawr Uthman, Shawqi Hana Shaikh, Nufail al-Qadhi, Jamal 
Rahmani. Second Row: Wayil Hindu, Samir Faraj, Albert Stephan, William Benjamin, 
Father Mahoney, Edmond Skender, Mumtaz Burachi, Basil Akram. 



2F BASEBALL TEAM 
First Row : Yahya Dhia, Munthar Francis, Zuhair Dabish, Nishan Oskanian, 
Ronald Yoab, George Khouri. Second Row: Hadi al-Qaswini, Shawqi Talia, 
Umar Dazai, Father Regan, Laith al-Astrabadi, Yasir Kubba, Emmanuel Ishaq. 



way, and the outcome was uncertain to the very end. 
Both teams scored one run in the first frame, and the 
only other score of the game was Father Egan's tally 
in the sixth inning. Although nearly 700 students 
were cheering for their team, the All- Stars came out 
on the losing end of a 2-1 score. The fielding of 
Father Mahoney and Wayil al-Tai enlivened the 
game and brought continual applause from the spec- 
tators. 

The Second Year League began in early Decem- 
ber and while the competition was keen all the way, 
the 2F team of Father Regan displayed early in the 
season the qualities of champion. Zuhair Dabish was 
a dependable, steady pitcher. Umar Dazai and Yasir 
Kubba gave strength to the infield, and the outfield 
was dominated by Yahya Dhia, who saved many a 
run by his spectacular catches. The team was an 
enthusiastic outfit in every game, and came into the 
finals undefeated. The final game was played on 



January 8 against 2B, and 2F won by a score of 9-2 
for the championship of Second Year. 

The baseball season extends from October to 
February, and the season was closed this year by a 
First Year League that was marked by outstanding 
baseball. Father Mahoney's IF team was unbeatable 
during the league play, but the 1G nine of Father 
Loeffler was pressing all the way. The Cup game was 
played on February 9, with 1 G winning an easy vic- 
tory by a 7-1 score. When the teams met again IF 
proved itself a real competitor by chalking up a 7-2 
victory for the Cup and the honors of First Year. 
Edmond Skender was the winning pitcher, Albert 
Stephan, William Benjamin and Samir Faraj starred 
in the infield, while Shawqi Hanna Shaikh ranked 
among the best outfielders in the league. A word of 
thanks is offered to Father Mahoney, who dirrected 
the intramural program, and the boys of the upper 
classes who umpired the games. 



ALL-STAR BASEBALL TEAM 

First Row: Zuhair Faraj, Saad Zara, Basil Jazmi, Husain MursL 

Second Row: Adil Said, Fraidun Ishaq, Wayil al-Tai, Mufid al-Samarrai, Adil Randquist, Father Sheehan 

Third Row: Khalid Antwan Butros, Nuri Fattuhi, Asad al-Khudhairi, Ghanim Saisi, Amir Zara. 








TRACK 



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SECONDARY TRACK TEAM 

First Row; Shakir Mursi, Husain Mursi, Najah Sitcu, Nabil Hikari, Jamal al-Wattar. 

Second Raw: Richard Nabhan, Faruq al-Wazir, Asad al-Khudhairi, Father Quinn, Shaiban Awni, Berj 

Huwakimian, Nasir al-Saadun. 



On a cool, sunny day in February the track stars 
of the school gathered for the first meet to be held 
on the new athletic field. It turned out to be one of 
the best meets ever conducted at the school, and 
created a spirit of optimism as we looked forward to 
the Government Track Meets. A wealth of new talent 
was uncovered, especially in third year. This class 
earned 150 points in the events of the day to lead the 
other classes of the school by a very comfortable 
margin. 

When the final results were tabulated it was 
learned that two athletes had tied for the high scoring 
honors of the day. Jamal al-Wattar had won the 1 500 
meter race and the javelin event, and had placed 
second in the 800 meter. All of these were open 
events and gave him a score of 26 points. Basil Jazmi 



won the 100 meter and the 200 meter races and 
came in second in the broad jump. These Class A 
events brought his score to 26 points, and he tied for 
first honors. 

Husain Mursi was awarded the consolation 
medal in Class A for placing second in the 400 meter 
and third in the hop-step-jump and the 800 meter 
race. In Class B the medal went to Adil Randquist 
for placing second in the 400 meter, tieing for second 
in the high jump, and for third place in the shot put. 
Ibrahim Hikmat, in Class C, won the medal for taking 
second honors in the pole vault, and for Class D the 
medalist was Astur Tufankjian, who finished second 
in the 100 meter and third in the 50 meter. Asad 
al-Khudhairi won the broad jump in Class A and 
captured first honors for the hop-step-jump with 



SECONDARY RELAY TEAM 

Najah Sittu, Nasir al-Saadun, Husain Mursi, Asad al-Khudhairi. Berj Huwakimian. 




INTERMEDIATE RELAY TEAM 

Leon Kasbarian, Falih Akram, Leon Kivorkian, Basil Jazmi, 







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INTERMEDIATE TRACK TEAM 
First Row: Petros Ishu, Falih Akram, Ibrahim Hikmat, Basil Jazmi, Leon Kasbarian, Falah Qambar Agha, 
Second Row: Adil Randquist, Sami Francis, Nawwaf Nuri, Father Quinn, Samir Vincent, Nuri Fattuhi, 
Leon Kivorkian. 



13.15 meters. Another outstanding runner in Class A 
was Petros Ishu, winner of the 800 meter and 400 
meter races, as well as third place in the high jump. 
The program concluded with the relay races, and the 
Cups were won by the relay teams of 5 A, 2C and 1G. 
When the results were ready for publication, the 
entire student body gathered at the Cronin Building 
for the presentation of medals and prizes by Reverend 
Father Rector. 

The Government Track Meets, held annually 
during the month of March, provide the most col- 
orful events in the year of sports. The Gold and 
Maroon Intermediate Team entered the Meet this 
year a heavy favorite, and proved to be the best of 
the ten contending schools. Basil Jazmi, the number 
one track star of the season, won four medals and 
gathered 18 points. He took first place in the 200 
meter and the broad jump, was third in the 100 
meter, and did more than his share to win the relay 
cup. Petros Ishu earned 14 points, with first place 
in the 400 and 800 meter races. Samir Vincent estab- 
lished a new record for Intermediate Schools in the 
hop-step- jump, his distance being 13.11 meters. He 
also placed second in the hurdles for a total of 12 
points. The remaining points were won by Sabah 
Tuminna, Leon Kasbarian, Falih Akram, Leon Ki- 
vorkian, Fraidun Ishaq and Falah Qambar Agha. 
When the results were announced we were the win- 
ning team with 70 points to our credit. Fifteen medals 
were presented to the wearers of the Gold and 
Maroon, and the Championship Cup and Relay Cup 
were added to our trophies of the year. 



Ten members of the Secondary Team placed in 
the trials, and performed superbly on the day of the 
Meet. Twelve schools took part and first place went 
to the powerful Sharqia Team. Baghdad College was 
second with a total of 50 points and took second prize 
in the relay race, for a very creditable performance. 
Husain Mursi was second in the 800 meter, third in 
the hop-step- jump, and sixth in the 1500 meter. 
He added 10 points to our score and also ran in the 
relay race. Jamal al-Wattar accounted for 10 points 
by taking second place in the javelin event and 1500 
meter race. More points were scored by Nasir al- 
Saadun, Suhail al-Naqib, Asad al-Khudhairi, Shakir 
Mursi, Faruq al-Wazir, Shaiban Awni, Nabil Hikari 
and Najah Sittu. The Secondary Track Meet brought 
to a close the varsity program of the year, one that 
will be remembered for a long time for its thrills and 
victories. 

THIRD YEAR TRACK CHAMPIONS 

First Row: Falah Qambar Agha, Leon Kasbarian, Misfir al-Mudhaifi, 
al-Takarli, Amir Awji. 

Second Row: Ibrahim Hikmat, Leon Kivorkian, lyad al-Qas Ehas, 
Fattuhi, Umar Shemdin, Sami Francis. 

Third Row: Adil Randquist, Falih Akram, Basil Jazmi, Nawwaf 
Nadhmi Awji, Mumtaz Tawil. 



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SCHOOL VOLLEYBALL CHAMPIONS 

First Row: Anushuvan Shahuwian, Yasar Yahya, John Basmaji. 

Second Row: Ramzi Farahian, Sarmad Anwar, Berj Huwakimian, Ramzi Dawisha. 

Third Row: Asad al-Khudhairi, Shaiban Awni, Richard Nabhan, Nujyar Shemdin. 



An Intramural Volleyball League was started 
this year and proved to be one of the biggest attract- 
ions in the sports program of the school, both from 
the players' and spectators' viewpoints. The senior 
league was made up of classes from third, fourth and 
fifth years. At the end of the first round 5 A was the 
only undefeated team in the league. 5B and 3D fought 
it out in the semifinals, and the championship game 
was ultimately played by the two fifth year teams. 
In the finals 5B won the first game, and then the 5A 
team proved its mettle by taking the next two games, 
and the championship of the school. 

The interest in the volleyball increased as the 
games were played, and by the time the Second Year 
League opened there were organized cheering sect- 
ions. Father Mahan's 2B outfit, and the strong 2E 
team of Father Jolson, were the class of the league. 
2B went through the competition undefeated, and 
the Cup Game with 2E was one of the best to be 
played all year. The first two contests were taken by 
2E, and then the 2B team turned the tables and cap- 
tured the next two for the championship of Second 
Year. Then came the First Year League, with several 
of the classes fielding strong teams. Father Quinn's 
1H team won every game and in the finals was chal- 
lenged by 1G, coached by Father Loeffler. This 
proved to be one of the longest play-offs on record. 
1 G won the first set of games and then the final set 
was played for the Cup, with 1G taking two out of 
the three games for the top honors of the league. 




2B VOLLEYBALL TEAM 

First Row; Faris Lutfi, Ali Mursi, Father Mahan, Sabah Yusuf. 
Second Row. Malcon Leon, Samir Vincent, Hikmat Shamun. 




IG VOLLEYBALL CHAMPIONS 

First Row : Najat Qadir, Hrand Shamilian, Aram Tanialian, 

Faruq Hanna, Bailis Shamun. 
Second Row : Father Loeffler, Rafi Ghazarian. Nuri Gharibran. 



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92 



AL IRAQI 




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MOHAMEO AMIN EL-HADI 

King Faisal Sq. - Baghdad 



if^&J' 



AL IRAQI 



93 



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radio 



Mohamed Amin El-Hadi &*Q>\<J^X£j& 



KING FAISAL SQ. 






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Information & Bookings Iraqi Airways, Al fiashid Street. Baghdad, Tel 4891, "0.57 — B.O.AC., 

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Technical Manager 88082 

Office 6837 

Works 83915 



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F. A. KETTANEH & CO., LTD. 




BAGHDAD 




Agents 


for : 


Chrysler, Dodge and Plymouth Cars 




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International General Electric Co. 




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SPINNEY'S (IRAQ) 1948 LTD 

are able to provide you with all vour 



Provisions (Local and Imported 

Wines (French, German and Italian 
and Spirits 

Our stocks include all the well known 
reputable brands and are available from 



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Old Southgate Shop Tel. 88313 

Northgate Shop Tel. 86077 



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IMPORTERS and MANUFACTURERS' 
REPRESENTATIVES 



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ALIRAQI 99 



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INCORPORATED IN ENGLAND 
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L. FORSTER & SABBAGH COMPANY DRUG STORE 

Mustansir Street BAGHDAD 

Telegraphic address : RETSROF Baghdad Tel. 6247 

Sole Agents for : 

MAY & BAKER LIMITED 

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THE CROOKES LABORATORIES LTD. 

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SCOTT & TURNER LTD., (Andrews Liver Salt & Rose Hip Syrup) 

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WILSON PHARMACY, Cairo (Protective Products) 

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Iraq & Persian Gulf : Concordia Line NORWAY Atlantic Ports and Persian Gulf Ports. 

General Freight Agents : Schenker & Co., Germany Express freight service 

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Shipping Correspondents : The American Express Co., Inc. World Wide Shipping Service 

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Appointed Surveyors : General Committee of the Survey Reports Issued for Goods 

French Marine Insurance Insured with any French 

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STEPHAN 
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KHANAQIN OIL COMPANY, LIMITED 

( Incorporated in Great Britain ) 
DISTRIBUTORS OF LUBRICATING OILS AND OIL SPECIALITIES 

THROUGHOUT IRAQ 

IMSHI 

Insecticide and Sprayers 



COMPROX "A" 

LIQUID PARAFFIN 

YELLOW AND WHITE 
PETROLEUM JELLY 




ALL GRADES OF GREASES 
INDUSTRIAL AND AUTOMOTIVE 

ALL GRADES OF BITUMEN 
CUTBACK AND SOLID 

HIGH MELTING POINT 
PARAFFIN WAX 



E N E R G O L 



ENERGREASE 



FULL RANGE OF LUBRICATING OILS FOR ALL PURPOSES 



ALL GRADES OF AVIATION FUELS AND LUBRICANTS 
SUPPLIED BY 



AVIATION 



BP 



SERVICE 



IRAQ CEMENT CO., LTD. 

BAGHDAD 

We have pleasure in announcing that 
our product is now available for every 
need. We are proud to say that our cement 
has been analysed by independent author- 
ities in England, and its physical test has 
proved well in line with British Standard 
Specification. 

RETAIL PRICE is now 

ID 7 plus 500 fils government tax per 
ton delivered at factory 

Tel » Office 85119 
851 lO 

Managing Director 7574 



KOTHARI & ANI TRANSPORT 



CLEARING, TRAVEL AND FREIGHT CARRIERS 



HEAD OFFICE 

Baghdad 
Tel. 3936 

7532 
Cable : KOTHARl 



^^ 



BRANCHES 

Basrah, Khanaqin 
Tehran, Kermanshah 
Khosrovi, Damascus 
Beirut, Aman 



AL IRAQI 107 



ANDREW WEIR (IRAQ) LIMITED 

(INCORPORATED IN IRAQ) 
BASRAH BAGHDAD 



EXPORTERS 

Grains — Cotton — Cottonseed 
Wool — Skins — Hides 



IMPORTERS 

THE A. C. V. SALES LTD. Motor Vehicles and Buses 

ASSOCIATED BRITISH OIL ENGINES (EXPORT) LTD. Complete Range of 
Oil Engines 

THE AVON INDIA RUBBER CO., LTD. Tyres and Tubes 

BRITISH STEEL PILING LTD. Vibro Pile Equipment 

MERRYWEATHER & SONS LTD. Fire Engines and Extinguishers 

THE ROVER CO. Landrovers and saloons 

SHELL CHEMICALS LTD. Industrial and Agricultural Insecticides 

STANTON IRON WORKS CO., LTD. Cast and Spun Iron Pipes 

THERMO TANK LTD. Air Conditioning installation 



AGENTS FOR : 

THE BRITISH COMMONWEALTH INSURANCE CO. LTD. 

THE LONDON ASSURANCE 

THE UNION ASSURANCE SOCIETY LTD. 

PATRONIZE OUR ADVERTISERS 



08 



AL IRAQI 



VisiT 






PRINTING 




oro 




PRESS 






Ras al Qaria 7/177 
Baghdad 
Telephone No. 5787 



STATIONERY SHOP 

Ras al Qaria 300/1 
Rashid St. Baghdad 
Telephone No. 87503 



AL IRAQI 



109 



Coca-Cola 



is 



uniq 



ue! 




DRINK 




cm 



IT'S THE REAL THING! 



The time when you 
pause to relax 
is the time for 
Coca-Cola. Pure 
and refreshing, 
Coca-Cola is 
unique in its 
flavour. Whenever 
and wherever 
you need 
refreshment, 
drink delicious 
Coca-Cola. 



AUTHORISED BOTTLERS : EASTERN INDUSTRIES LTD. 



Eastern Industries, Ltd. Baghdad, Iraq 



PATRONIZE OUR ADVERTISERS 



110 



AL IRAQI 



IRAQ MERCANTILE LIMITED 


BAGHDAD 


& BASRAH 


Tel. BAGHDAD : 85168, 85169, 85170 




Telegrams : MERCANIRAQ, BAGHDAD 


Tel. BASRAH : 2371 

REP] 




MERCANIRAQ, BASRAH 


RESENTING 


A. P. V. Co. Ltd., London 




Heat Exchange Equipment, Dairy & Brewery 
Plant, etc. 


Associated Clay Industries Ltd. 




Sanitary Ware 


Aston Construction Co. Ltd., London 




Fabricated Steel Work, Structural Steel 


Austin Motor Export Corporation Ltd. 




Cars & Trucks 


Geo. Banham & Co. Ltd. 




Belting 


British Reinforced Concrete Engineering Co 


Ltd. 


Steel Reinforcement 


British Tyre & Rubber Co. Ltd. 




Tyres, Transmission & Conveyor Belting 


Cement Marketing Co. Ltd. 




Special Cements — Snowcem, Impermo 


Chamberlain & Hookham Ltd. 




Electricity Meters 


Cochran & Co. (Annan) Ltd. 




Multitubular Boilers 


Consolidated Pneumatic Tool Co. Ltd. 




Compressors, Pneumatic & Electric Tools 


Crittall Manufacturing Co. Ltd. 




Metal Windows & Doors 


Crossley Brothers Ltd. 




Oil Engines 


W. B. Dick & Co. Ltd. 




Lubricants 


Fenner & Alder Ltd. 




Paints 


Fibreglass, Ltd. 




Thermal & Accoustic Insulating Materials & 
other Glass Fibre Products 


General Electric Co. Ltd. 




Everything Electrical 


Gilbert, Gilkes & Gordon, Ltd. 




Hydro-Electric Plants & Water Turbines 


Hanovia Ltd. 




Lamps for Medical, Scientific & Industrial 
Applications 


Hoffmann Manufacturing Co. Ltd. 




Bearings 


Imperial Typewriter Co. Ltd. 




Typewriters 


Lodge Plugs Ltd. 




Sparking Plugs 


Pulsometer Engineering Co. Ltd. 




Pumps 


Quasi-Arc Co. Ltd. 




Welding Rod & Equipment 


Railway Mines & Plantation Equipment Co. 


Ltd. 


Railway Equipment 


Ransomes & Rapier Ltd. 




Sluices, Excavators, Cranes & Contractors' Plant 


S. A. F. T. 




Alkaline Batteries 


Sanderson Brothers & Newbould Ltd. 




Files, Tools, etc. 


Staveley Iron & Chemical Co. Ltd. 




Spun Iron Pipes 


Stewarts & Lloyds Ltd. 




Steel Pipes & Tubes 


J. Stone & Co. Ltd. 




Non-Ferrous Metals 


E. R. & F. Turner Ltd. 




Flour Milling Equipment 


Vaughan Crane Co. 




Cranes & Pulley Blocks 


Watson & Sons (Electro-Medical) Ltd. 




X-Ray Equipment 


Woods of Colchester Ltd. 




Exhaust Fans 


Yorkshire Copper Works Ltd. 




Copper Tubes, etc. 



AL IRAQI 111 



MUHAMMAD ISMAIL 


J t frU-M ^J 


SURGEON DENTIST 




FOR 


vL-J^I _-d> 


BAGHDAD COLLEGE 


jU_i; U£j 


CHURCH STREET 
BAGHDAD 


al-Uu — ^mJU^JI f-jLi 




•^u : a.>L*!i - j^iL - 


Tel. : Clinic - 691 1 Residence - 9458 


^ieA : jCJLI 




■JillJ sit J I .fel. 



FIRST CLASS THROUGHOUT 

Air-Conditioning — American Bar — Lounges 
Famed for its Excellent Cuisine and Personal Attention 

All Rooms With Bath and Every Modern Comfort 
Fine Terrace on Tigris River 



Cable i Telephones 

Sindbad - BAGHDAD 6478-86181 - 86182 



PATRONIZE OUR ADVERTISERS 



112 AL IRAQI 

S. M. CARIBIAN & CO. LTD. 

BACHDAD— BASRAH - MOSUL 
AGENTS FOR 

UCOMETAL- BELGIUM 

(Union Commerciale Beige de Metallurgie, S. A.) 

STEEL WORKS - Ste. Ame. JOHN COCKERILL 

Ste. Ame. FORGES DE LA PROVIDENCE 
Ste. Ame. METALLURGIOUE DE SAMBRE & MO- 
SELLE. 
Ste. Ame JOHN COCKERILL - BELGIUM. Steel Railway Sleepers. 
COMPTOIR DES ACIERIES BELGES - BELGIUM.— Rails. 
LA BRUGEOISE ET NICAISE ET DELCUVE - BELGIUM. Railway 

Rolling Stock. 
POUDRERIES REUNIES DE BELGIQUE S.A., - BELGIUM. Powder 
& Explosives. 

Entreprises Industrielles et de Travaux Publics — FRANCE 
Dams, Barrages, etc. 

Baume & Marpent, SA. — BELGIUM 

Metallic Bridges, Prefabricated Steel Structures 

Soc. Gen. Des Minerals, SA. — BELGIUM 
Tin, Copper, Lead 

Coblemetal — Phenix Works — BELGIUM 

Galvanized Steel Sheets, Tinplates 

Ferblatil — BELGIUM 

Cold Boiled Steel Sheets, Tinplates 

Laminoirs de Longtain S.A., — BELGIUM 
Steel Window Sections 

Laminoirs de L'Escaut — BELGIUM 
Aluminium 

Ciments Portland Artificiels Beiges D'Harmignies — Belgium 
White Cement 

Chamebel — BELGIUM 

Steel Windows & Doors 

Photo-Produits Gevaert SA. — BELGIUM 
Photographic Goods 

Voigtlander — GERMANY 

Precision <& Amateur Cameras 

Barbier, Benard & Turenne — FRANCE 
Optical Instruments 

Kinderman & Co. G.M.B.H., — GERMANY 
Photographic Apparatus 

Ste. Ame. de Magenta Epernay — FRANCE 
Champagne 

Chas. Mackinlay & Co. Ltd. — ENGLAND 
Whisky 

Associated Paint Manufacturers Ltd. — ENGLAND 
Paints 

Carrers Limited — ENGLAND 

The famous Craven "A" Cigarettes 



AL IRAQI 113 



The 
NATIONAL TOBACCO CO., LTD. 

Produces 
The Most Popular Cigarettes 

LUX ROYAL 

GOLDEN CROWN 



THE TOWS PALACE HOTEL 

BAGHDAD 

Baghdad's leading and best appointed hotel. One of the outstanding hotels in the Middle East. 

Comprising 50 well-ventilated and comfortable bedrooms, each with a private bathroom. 

Luxurious Lounge — Spacious Dining Room — Superlative Bar — Big Verandah on the Tigris 
River — Elevator to all floors. 

The most luxuriously furnished and modernly equipped hotel in the country. 

The sanitary system is the best devised in Baghdad. Everything is scrupulously clean. 

The cuisine is unique in Iraq, with a choice of European and Eastern dishes. « A Master Chef. » 

The highest standard of hotel service. 
The acme of hotel comfort. 

Proprietor and Manager : YOUS1F TOMINIVA 



PATRONIZE OUR ADVERTISERS 

Al Iraqi — ft 







o'^^L-i-V 







•iU^*»> (Luicl J O^Jiy ^1 Ol>jj J tiJ >\ all O^lilll jl 

t.l_..,.n j ^u^tjjl^ J .r^ 'o'j 5 ^' 
J^J' ut i>>Hj . Clo^i e'a> joy 

JA dL-JLJV £U~0\SLB J_J> J\-4' 
. w-L-iiNM w>l$Jlj 

jc A_-ybl J& 1! J_j_ Jl ^i*>JI 
ji a'.'.cJ' 0' ^i*' 'J' *>1 Aj-L-aJ' 
L~3^)l ^ o^^j; ]1 4+ab~i\ JjUi' 

**-* J J^ 1 J— -* 1' u* 3 



U&^£ ~j »» oil ojajJl^ La. all 
l^Li" S.LJ1 ja JJj j JU 5 j 5J> , 



^jb» ^3«-J1LiUj J* w , al , T t. 7 t jl J^ji 



^J L'-»-u>^j 



-Jl* 



*£> 



AL IRAQI 



115 







itlliiSlii^iil iliiljisiit 


:i 


THE LEADING STORE IN IRAQ 




ESTABLISHED 1855 




Branches in EGYPT, LEBANON and NORTH AFRICA 




Can offer you the best of everything 




at moderate prices 






General Automotive & Technical Equipment Co. Ltd. <ffll|> 



Exclusive Distributors in Iraq for 



DeSoto 

(Product of Chrysler Corporation 
of America) 

Passenger Cars 

All Steel Body Station Wagons 

Utility Vans 

Trucks 

Tanker Trailers 

Tippers 



Regie Nctionaie des 
Usines Renault — France 



Passenger Cars 

Trucks 

Trailers and Tractors 

Diesel Tankers 

Special Body Busses 



MASTER Air Coolers 
CORDLY Water Coolers 
DIAMOND Tyres and Tubes 
REGENTONE Radios and Gramophones 



PATRONIZE OUR ADVERTISERS 



116 



AL IRAQI 




.11 products developed in 
the »$£s#e*« laboratories after 
extensive clinical trials are con- 
sidered as outstanding scien- 
tific achievements. In the hands 
of the medical profession they 
have proved to be successful 
remedies. 



7 




^ 



J 



Leverkusen 

Germany 



Sole Agent : 

SAMHIRY BROS Co., Ltd. 

BAGHDAD - T«l. »65»5 



AL IRAQI in 



G> cl ™ Tjcilhias 

406 Rashid Street - Baghdad 

Leonard (American Motors) Refrigerators, 
Air Conditioners, Ranges 

Thermador Electrical manufacturing Co. 
Webster Chicago 
Zenith Radios 

Universal Motor Electrical Parts 
Marconiphone Radios 

Fasco Oscillating Fans 



K. & E. M. LAWEE LTD. 

DISTRIBUTORS IN IRAQ 
FOR 

BUICK and CHEVROLET Cars and Trucks 

DEALERS IN : 

AUTOMOTIVE PARTS AND ACCESSORIES, LUBRICATING OILS AND GREASES, 

TYRES AND TUBES, REFRIGERATION AND AIR-CONDITIONING, 

STEEL OFFICE EQUIPMENT. 

HEAD OFFICE : AL RASHID STREET, BAGHDAD 
Branches : BASRAH — MOSUL - KIRKUK — KUT 

T. A. : «TAXI, BAGHDAD" Telephones : 87121, 83516, 300 

PATRONIZE OUR ADVERTISERS 



118 AL IRAQI 



IMPERIAL CHEMICAL INDUSTRIES (EXPORT) Ltd. 

C Incorporated in England > 

A SUBSIDIARY COMPANY OF IMPERIAL CHEMICAL INDUSTRIES LTD. 
IRAQ BRANCH — BAGHDAD 




Die, Pigments and Indigo 
Fertilizers 

Acids and Alkalies 
Refrigerants 

Pharmaceutical and Medical Products 
Paints, Enamels and Varnishes 
Water Treatment Chemicals 

Insecticides and Veterinary Products 
Plant Protection Products 
Explosives of all descriptions 
Sporting Gun Cartridges and Ammunitions 
Leathercloth, Oils 

Fine and Heavy Chemicals 

Copper, Bras and Aluminium Alloys 
Plastics Including « Perspex » 
Lime Solvent Soap, Detergents 
Marine Insurance 

t><! 



P.O.Box <S* No. 278A/1 Rashid Street Tel. No. 86131 

86132 

BAGHDAD 



AL IRAQI 



119 



"I'm a member of the 
International Set" 




All over the world 
car owners are calling for 
more and more Valvoline 



SOLE DISTRIBUTOR 



SHAK1I* JANABl & Co. 

Sinak Street — BAGHDAD, Iraq 
Tel. : 7983 



> 



L(di 



(dice as 



muck 



CASCADE 
AIR COOLERS 

Distributors : 

L. & D. MANGASARIAN LTD. 

Tel. : 7042 
4255 

Ras el Qaria 
BAGHDAD, IRAQ 



NAIRN TRANSPORT CO., LTD. 

REGULAR PASSENGER SERVICE EVERY DAY EXCEPT MONDAY 
BAGHDAD — DAMASCUS — BEIRUT 

Special Reduction in Fares for Students 

>o 

I0°/o Rebates for All Return Tickets 



PATRONIZE OUR ADVERTISERS 



120 



AL IRAQI 



Saurer 

Komet 




Diesel Engine 
130 hp 




Best Austrian Trucks and Buses 



YliDOL 



* J) 




OILS & GREASES 




Distributors : SADIK & NUHANAD KATTAX, BROS. 

Tel. : 4430 



AL IRAQI 



121 



(X * 

ie-U^aJL l*&\-£.\ I^jLj U OJ.s-lj %j$i~ itLs^ ^jjC-" OL.5U o-i 




i/o 



:J^ i?^nil *"£=d fJ£*j 



&M i^U-l S^L^il -jlill ^^j iJb-Mij i-JVl jJ J.UL1 OJb-l *UJN 



<©♦ 



• • • 



Am A 5/1 aJI : 0>& 
A«A^ jA.\ 



dL- — -vJ^l p-jU : ila« _ ejb^fl 



PATRONIZE OUR ADVERTISERS 



122 



AL IRAQI 



THE 




DOUBLE DUTY 




HILLMAN HUSKY 




As a smart, comfortable saloon, the Husky seats 
4 people in absolute comfort besides taking 250 
lbs of luggage. The 2 front bucket seats are 
adjusted independently and tilt forward for easy 
access to rear seats. With all the amenities for 
pleasant travel, the Husky ensures smooth and 
comfortable riding. 



a New co/vcepr/o/v of ecoNO/uy motor wo 




As a sturdy load-carrier, the versatile Hillman 
Husky has room for 5 cwt. of goods. The rear 
seal folds neatly into the floor leaving ample 
platform space. Easy to drive and manoeuvre, 
the H usky gives maximum speed of over 65 m.p.h. 
Tough, safe, reliable, it is brilliantly economical 
at 40 miles to the gallon. 



YOUR 



NAME 



ADDRESS 



HERE 



«THE AUTOWORKS LTD.» 



AL IRAQI 



123 



CRESCENT PHOTO STORES 

354/1 RASHID STREET, BAGHDAD 

PHOTOGRAPHERS 
By Special Appointment to 

H. M. THE KING OF IRAQ 




AGFA Record II 




AGFA Solinett I I 






AGFA Billy I 



Cameras of "World 
Renown 

FILMS 
PAPERS 



CHEMICALS 

and All Photographic 
Requirements 

Shot Guns and 
Ammunition Dealers 

AGFA Rondinax 60 V AGFA Rondinax 350 

AVAILABLE AT ALL PHOTO DEALERS 




AGFA Isolett III 




PATRONIZE OUK ADVERTISERS 



124 



AL IRAQI 



Tel. 



J. SAAD & FILS - BAGHDAD 

Nos. Main Office : 7488, 84184, 84185 
Drugs Dept : 7070 
Insurance Dept : 85251 



EXCLUSIVE DISTRIBUTORS FOR : 

Cars & Trucks : 

Willys Overland Export Corp., Ohio, U. S. A. 
Federal Motor Truck Co., Detroit, U. S. A. 
Nuffield Export Limited, Cowley, England 
Leyland Motors Limited, London, England 
Jaguar Motors Limited, Coventry, England 

Agricultural Machinery and Farm Implements : 

Minneapolis Moline Company, Minnesota, U. S. A. 
Hanomag Limited, Hannover, Germany 

E:trt3B-Moving and Road-Making Machineries : 

Le Tourneau-Westinghouse Company, Peoria, U. S. A. 
The Huber Manufacturing Co., Marion, Ohio, U. S. A. 
J. D. Adams Manufacturing Co., Indianapolis, U. S. A. 
The Thew Shovel Co., Marion, Ohio, U. S- A. 
Iowa Manufacturing International Sales Inc., U. S. A. 

Generating and Pumping Sets : 

Jaeger Machine Company, Columbus, Ohio, U. S. A. 

D. W. Onan & Sons Inc., Minnesota, U. S. A. 

Pneumatic and Electric Tools : 

Thor Power Tool Co., New York, U. S. A. 

Diesel Engine : 

Cummins Diesel Export Corp., Indiana, U. S. A. 

Household and Commercial Relrigerating and Cooling Equipment 

Nash Kelvinator Corp., Detroit, U. S. A. 

Kelvinator Ltd., Crewe, England 

York Corporation, New York, U. S. A. 

Pharmaceuticals, Drugs and Surgicals : 

E. R. Squibb & Sons, New York, U. S. A. 

F. Hoffmann La Roche & Co., Basle, Switzerland 
Roche Products Limited, England 

Johnson & Johnson (Gt. Britain) Ltd., England 
Ortho Pharmaceuticals, Ltd., Bucks, England 
Coss & Maxwell, London, England 

Steel Buildings, Tanks and Grain Bins : 

Butler International Co., Kansas City., U. S. A. 

Radios and Electrical Accessories : 

Ferranti Limited, Hollinwood, England 

Lubricating Oils and Greases : 

Sinclair Refining Co., New York, U. S. A. 

Marine, Fire and Accident Insurances : 

The London Guarantee & Accident Co., England 



AL IRAQI 



125 



% 




PATRONIZE OUR ADVERTISERS 



126 



AL IRAQI 




A 
S 
F 

A 

R 

» 

S 



Finest Iraq Date Products 

MANUFACTURED II V PIONEERS IN THE IRAQ DATE INDUSTRY 



ORIGINATOR OF THE FAMOUS 

«ASFAR'S DATE CUBES » 

AND OWNERS OF THE WORLD KNOWN 

« BLACK SWAN BRAND » 



Some of our Numerous Products Include : 

WALNUT and ALMOND DATE CUBES 

WALNUT and GINGER DATE CAKES 

WALNUT and ALMOND DATE PUDDING 

CHOCOLATE DATES 

CARAMEL DATES I 

CHOICE DATES and ASSORTED NUTS 

DATE SYRUP 

SPICED DATES IN SYRUP 

DATE CHUTNEY 

DATE CANDIES 



T7 



ASFAR & CO., BASRAH, IRAQ 



AL IRAQI 127 



ABDUL MASIH KHAYYAT 

GENERAL MERCHANTS 
SINEK ST., - BAGHDAD — i'-^J — dLJI 



Cable Address 

"KAWKAB" 



"vO"* ■ JjjJI ul 



TELEPHONES 

Management 

Stores 



3088 
6752 



r«AA 






SOLE DISTRIBUTORS : : (Ji ^ ^J**-"". 4 " <Jj*Jj^ 

"HOBAT" Arc Welders, Electrodes and l^jlj^lj UU^I ^1 ^lC ,OjL/, 

Accessories, U.SA. 

"NEW BRITAIN" Machine Tools, U.S.A. .->-.. 

"GORDON Machine Tools, England. - -■> . j u *<~> m j,jz 

"EPCO" Hydraulic Equipment, England. IjJlxJl c d/^- 4 iJp ((Oijj^i 

George Angus & Co. Ltd., England. ^j£ ; , t ^y ^ oU ; (j ((J £| () 

The Nerus Flexible Shaft & Equipment Co., n \'s \ s w u i<- ^ 

Rye - Sussex - England. (I^l^-Sw^. ^J^' oj^j^l £j^ 

"ALUP" Air Compressors, Car Washers, OljlJ! J—iJ d/lS^ t u-jjSI OU^T «<~>j]I» 

Spray Guns & Garage Equipment, Germany. ^j _ ^ 0|jp|j t ^, oUjUt 

"WEBERWERKE" Siegen, Germany, 

Oxygen & Acetylene Generators. M^V* 1 oU V VU 1 ~ U^> '^W **> 

"ELLISON" Self-Priming Pumping Sets, U^^J^'j 

England. .^-., . ., ... 

lydXil ((Oj*»jJI)) >_jL>tva^ 

"PELAPONE" Diesel Engines & Generators, 

England. l/l£_Jl c V^^il s ^ !l ol -^J^-> <4>„ J l/ 1 ^ 4 

Official Agents of ABDUL MASIH KHAYYAT in U. K. and the Continent : 

A. F. Dee and Company, Ltd., London 

jaJ — S-ij-uM «jl5^ij .^j .<->! .<^1 



PATRONIZE OUR ADVERTISERS 



128 



AL IRAQI 



For the SIXTH consecutive year- 



CAMELS 

First again in 1954! 




CAMEL'S Richer Flavor and True Mildness Win Again 



M 



Agents : 



G. A. KHAYATT & CO. 

Damerchi Building 
Baghdad 



Tel. 87717 
84389 



AL IRAQI 



129 




THE MEN WHO DO 

BIG BUSINESS 
ALL 

READ THE 

IRAQ 

TIMES 



The Times Printing & Publishing Co. Ltd., 
Baghdad and Basrah. 




PATRONIZE OUR ADVERTISERS 



Al Iraqi — 9 



130 



AL IRAQI 



J. P. BAHOSHY BROTHERS 

ENGINEERING MERCHANTS & CONTRACTORS 

Etablished in 1919 



We specialize in the supplies and erection of plants and equipment : — 

Brickmaking, Transportation and Lifting Equipment ; 
Lighting Sets and Electric Power Stations ; Water Works ; 
Mains, Valves and Fittings ; Ice, Flour and Rice Mills, etc. 

We represent manufacturers of world-wide reputation for the above equipment. Any en- 
quiry from prospective clients in Iraq receives our prompt attention. Our reputation is your 
guarantee for obtaining efficiency at the most competitive cost. 



ENGINE 



VALVE 



ELECTRIC MOTOR 




BRICKMAKING MACHINE 



SET STOCKS and DIES 






PLEASE PHONE 6197 



AL IRAQI 



I£I 



L^noode me 



Tnod^ 




Equal to 40,000 times around the world! 

ONE BILLION MILES 

... and more! 

Pan American's unmatched record in international service 

An airline gains a lot of experience in flying over one 
billion miles — experience that's passed on to you in 
operating "know-how" better service and lower fares. 
Over 13,000,000 people have flown abroad by Pan Am 
Clipper*... Why don't you, too, fly with the Leader ? 

For reservations, call your Travel Agent or any 
the 41 1 Pan American offices throughout the world. 
There is a Pan American office in Baghdad. 



PM 



WORLD'S MOST EXPERIENCED AIRLINE 

PlK ZfMERlCm 

* Trade-Mark, Reg. U. S. Pat. Off. 



PATRONIZE OUR ADVERTISERS 



132 



A L IRAQI 



DUNLOP 

WELL KNOWN FOR QUALITY 



TYRES and TUBES 

FOR CARS, TRUCKS, MOTORCYCLES & CYCLES 
MOTOR CAR ACCESSORIES 




AL IRAQI 



133 




MOVADO 

■' -; -'.^WINNERS OF 168 OBSERVATORY AWARDS 




We Always Offer Quality Goods 

THE SWISS WATCH Co. Lid. 



Semiramis Hotel Building 
Rashid St. Baghdad 








Tel. 7476 



PATRONIZE OUR ADVERTISERS 



134 



AL IRAQI 



King Faisal Sq. 
Baghdad 



(ESTABLKHKD IX IIIMVK1S SINCE 1»3«) 

Manufacturers' Representative 
Importers - Exporters 



Tel. : 84781 




WILSON 
Horizontal Diesel Engine 




ssKn%&% 



MS**. 
Surface Cooled 
Slip Ring Motor 
I to 100 H. P. 



ELECTRIC 
MOTORS 

For every 

industrial 

rpose where 

st is present. 

Get a BROOK 

quotation for 

your next motor 

requirements. 

Surface Cooled 
'/i tolOOH.R 



BROOK MOTORS LTD 

■J iHiMJktmERS FIELD 




AL IRAQI 



135 



IMPORTERS - CONTRACTORS - WHOLESALE DEALERS 


for : Electrical Goods and Fittings 


Radios and Accessories 


Refrigerators and Air Conditioners 


Household Appliances 


Machineries and Hardware Articles 


Tools of all Descriptions 


Motors and Generators 


Electric Welding Sets 


>)N 




Consult : 




F. & A. TAWFIK 


YOIYAIV 


AL-RASHID STREET (RAS EL-QUARIA No. 1/186) — 


BAGHDAD, IRAQ 


Telephone No. 4937 Telegraphic add. « YONANS Baghdad » 



(f)nme a r(ask 



J&S&.X 



m 



nm 






AMERICAN AUTO Co. - Nash Cars & Trucks 

AMERICAN AUTOMOTIVE Co. - Auto-lite Products 

Acme Quality Paints 
Kohler Electric Plants 
Bendix International Products 
Ryoco-Penn Motor Oils 
Alen Evaporative Air-Coolers 

Sole Distributors for Iraq : 

B. BOUKATHER 

Administratrix of the late C. BOUKATHER 

Established in 1928 
Gazali St. — Baghdad — Tel : 6646 



patronize; our advertisers 



136 AL IRAQI 



CONSTANTINE JOHN HALKI5\S 



BAGHDAD Telephone : 6459 



ARMS & AMMUNITION 



Sporting Goods 



ijj^\ m J^H w 


U^niU ^ti:)i / w 






( ( £.**»» j*k 


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4ij_U-l 4jjj!l (3_;kil (JP 


<i'>*^ ^ u-*-*"'-? 4 J-*^'* ^ 


Ltd. 




Eastern Distillery 


& Products Co., 


(Successor to J. D. 


MESSAYEH DISTILLERY) 






12/40 Ras el Qurya Street, Baghdad (Iraq) 






Telegraphic Adress : 


Telephone : 




«GARESCO» Baghdad 




Office 


6569 






Factory 


9304 



AL IRAQI 



137 




PATRONIZE OUR ADVERTISERS 



138 



AL IRAQI 



QjnAMi 




iS* 



Baghdad 



SijJbJll JLill 2u-*xi iJI^JI 2LJ*yi iT^lll 

Iraq National Bottling Co. Ltd. 



Tel. 9036 



AL IRAQI 



139 




A 
L 
U 
M 
N 



S 

o 

D 

A 
L 
I 

T 
Y 



CONGRATULATIONS TO THE CLASS OF 1955 



G. K. KOTHARI 



& 



ABDUL-LATIF JASSIM EL ANI CO., LTD. 



Contractors 



BUILCING - TRANSPORT - SUPPLIERS 



Rashid St. — Baghdad 



Transport 
Tel. 3936 



G 


enera 


1 Office 




Tel. 


4242 
7532 
5812 



PHOTOGRAPHER 

of 

BAGHDAD COLLEGE GRADUATES 

SPECIALIST 

in 
PORTRAITS 



JEAN, Pro P . 

RASHID STREET — BAGHDAD 
Opposite FETTO'S PHARMACY 



PATRONIZE OUR ADVERTISERS 



140 



AL IRAQI 



SEMSRAMIS 

The Leading Hotel 
in Baghdad 

The largest and best 

Terrace Garden 
overlooking the Tigris 



.(Ilk. 



Telephones : 86191 
86192 
85134 
85145 

Telegram : SEMIRAMIS HOTEL 
BAGHDAD 



FOR 
PERFECT 
PICTURES 



t><t 



Sole Agent for 



IRAQ and the 



Persian Gulf: 




S. M. GARIBIAN & CO., LTD. 
Baghdad 



ANDREA'S PHARMACY 



WHOLESALE AND RETAIL CHEMISTS 



BAGHDAD 



TEL. 4452 



AL IRAQI 



141 



(( When we say Tomorrow, we mean Tomorrow » 



Samawal Street 

AL DAMARCHI Building 

Telegraphic « ALBAQIR » 

Telephone : 6866 



ABDUL HADI BAQIR 

BAGHDAD 



J[— Jl )) : J^JI Ol^JI 



CUSTOMS CLEARING AGENT 



IMPORTER 



EXPORTER 



Spec/o//zes in /ego/ questions affecting Customs, Duties, Import Licences, etc. 



Agent for FORSTER & SABBAGH Co. and LEVANT EXPRESS TRANSPORT Co. 

and other well known firms 



Has served as Clearing Agent for Baghdad College since its foundation in 1932. 



AL-SUHAIL TRADING CO., LTD. 

Rashid Street — Baghdad 

Tel. Manager : 5265 

Tel. Office : 3213 Tel. Garage : 5875 



Sole Distributors in Iraq for : 

HUDSON CARS 

WHITE TRUCKS 

THE OLIVER CORP. — Agricultural Machines 
& Implements 

BETHLEHEM STEEL CORPORATION 

GOODRICH TYRES & ACCESSORIES 

CITIES SERVICE OIL & GREASE 

STANDARD STEEL WORKS — Road Mainten- 
ance Equip. 

etc. etc. etc. 



l3Men, J-lahh mtii 


MAZDA 


lamps 


Distributors : 

L. & D. MANGASARIAN LTD. 


Ras el Qaria Tel : 7042 


Baghdad 4255 



PATRONIZE OUR ADVERTISERS 



142 



AL IRAQI 




GENERAL® ELECTRIC 






mm 



1. 

I 



Room Air Conditioners 



Water Coolers 



r.r]. Kettaiiek £ Co., J—td. 



Packaged Air Conditioners 



Baghdad 



^l<_^4>>U-SX 




AL IRAQI 



143 



grudpig) 




s^^s^e^i^ 




^ 



<^y 



*r * 



. ,vs> 



CdeuuLslon £ Recoridens 
ILo FdDMSTEM <& SAIBIBAOnlffl WMPAKIY 

MUSTANSIR STREET TEL. 88134 



MIDLAND ELECTRIC MANUFACTURING CO. LTD. 

BIRMINGHAM, ENGLAND 
O 



High 

Quality 



Electrical 
Products 



E' 



o 



Represented by : 

F. & A. TAWFIK YONAN 

Baghdad Tel. 4937 



ZIA 


HOTEL 


MICHAEL ZIA 




ESTABLISHED IN 1911 




OverIooI< 


iiviq tIhe TiqRis 


RJVER 


AiR'CoolEd 


BecJrooms, 




Louin 


qe, Bar ano* 






DiNiNq 


ROOMS. 


All ROOMS 


; wiTri pRivATE 

O 


t)ATh 


Telegram : AL 


ZIA Telephones : 7462 






4808 



PATRONIZE OUR ADVERTISERS 



144 



AL IRAQI 




"Fitting" for any occasion 



STYLE 42 
Fils 1.690 



STYLE 35 
Fils 2.590 



Ijata Z^koes 



FOR LONG-STANDING WEAR 



FOR FIT 



FOR VALUE 



FOR COMFORT 




AVAILABLE FROM OVER 50 
SHOPS & AGENCIES IN IRAQ 



at the right prices 



Bat 



a 



Shoemakers to the world 



INDEX TO ADVERT SERS 



145 



Page 

A. Abbosh 123 

Abdul-Hadi Baqir 141 

Abdul-Masih Khayyat 127 

Al-Suhail Trading 141 

Alumni Sodality 139 

Andrea's Pharmacy 140 

Andrew Weir 107 

Asfar Dates 126 

Autoworks 122 

Babylon Studio 139 

Bata Shoe 144 

B. Boukather 135 

B.O.A.C 94 

Camels 128 

C. John Halkias 97, 117 

Coca Cola 109 

Constantine John Halkias 136 

Diana Beer 102 

Eastern Distillery 136 

F.A. Kettaneh 97, 142 

V. & A. Tawfik Yonan 98, 135, 143 

General Automotive & Tech. Equip. 115 

George Wimpey 104 

Ghazi Cigarette 104 

G. Kothari 106, 139 

Halatah Bros 134 

H.S. Abed 132 

Ibrahim Saad 124 

iCI 118 

Imprimerie Catholique 137 

Iraq Bldg. Materials 96 

Iraq Cement 106 

Iraq Mercantile 110 

Iraq Spinning & Weaving 95 

Iraq Times 129 

Ismail Sharif 98 



Page 

John Birch 99 

J.P. Bahoshy 130 

K. & E.M. Lawee 117 

Khanaqin Oil Co 106 

KLM 129 

L. & D. Mangasarian 119, 141 

Levant Express Transport 103 

L. Forster & Sabbagh 103, 143 

Mohamed Amin El-Hadi 92, 93 

Muhammad Ismail Ill 

Nairn 119 

National Tobacco 113 

Orosdi-Back 115 

Pan American Airlines 131 

Pepsi Cola 138 

Philips Radio 125 

Rafidain Developments 105 

Rafidain Drug 114, 142 

Samhiry Bros 116 

Semiramis Hotel 140 

Shakir Janabi 119 

Singer Sewing Machine 121 

Sindbad Hotel Ill 

S.M. Garibian 112, 140 

S. & M. Kattan 120 

Spinney's 98 

Stephan Lynch 104 

Swiss Watch Co 133 

Thomas Printing Press 108 

Tigris Palace Hotel 113 

Trans-European & Eastern Transport 95 

Vegetable Oil Extraction 100 

W.J. Coker 101 

Zia Hotel 143 



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