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Full text of "Almanac for the year 1863 being the thirty fourth year of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. (From April 6, 1830) .. by W.W. Phelps, Joseph Smith's last dream"

,^^^^/^V^'^ ^^Z^c^ 






!-• \ 




FOR THB TEAR 




BEING THE THIRTY FOURTH YEAR OF THE 
CHURCH OF JESUS CHUIST OF LATTER DAY 

SAINTS. (From April 6, J830.) 

Calculated for the meridian of G. S. L. City. — Lat. 40° 
46m. norili, aud Longitude lU"^ 26m. west. 



BY W. W. PHELPS. 



GREAT SALT lAKE CITY. UTAH: 

PRINTED AT 'DESERKT NEWS' OFFICE. 
18 6 2. 



SIGNS or Tni! ZODIAC. 

'T'— Aries, the Rum, the head; 
y— Taurus, the Bull, the neck; 
n — Gemini, the Twins, the arms; 
2:3— Cancer, the Crab, the breastj 
Q — Leo, the Lion, the heart; 
up— Virgo, the Virgin, the bowels; 
jci— Libra, the Scales, the reins; 
m— Scorpio, the Scorpion, the secrets; 
J — Sagittarius, the Archer, the thighs; 
!,>— Caprlcoruus, the Goat, the knees; 
■!ti— Aquirlus, Waterman, the legs; 
>£— Pisces, the Fishes, the feet. 

NAMES AND CHARACTERS OF THE PLANETS. 

Q — Sun; rf— Mars; 

09DC— Moon: T|— Jupiter; 

J— Mercury; >2— Saturn; . 

5— Venus; lil— Herschei: 

(5— Co jj unction; Q — Node. 

The arrangement of the calendar pages gives the day*-* 
of the week, day of the month, rising and setting of the 
£UD, In apparent time: a column of fa^t and slow of tbo 
clock In minutes and seconds. Moon rising from full to 
change, and setting from change to fnll. The moon'g 
days In the signs of the Zodiac are also given near enough 
for the geHeral reader. 

The space on the right of these pages Is occupied with 
•'Events, &.C.," most useful to be remembered as nota- 
ble. 

•,* Look for war to be poured out upon all natlonst 
after the year 1366; also, for a total ec'lpse of the 
iun »t. Jerusalem at 7 a.m., April 6th, I8T5; also, at 
Zl»n (Jackson county, Mo.) same year, Sept, 79tb) at 3 
y.m. Great things uwalt (hie geoeriktlool 



JANUARY has 31 days. [1S63. 




1 D. H. M. 1 D. H. M. 




O^'nllnioon 4 8 6 p.m.l<|Newinoon J9 8 36 a.m. 




CLaBtqr. 12 4 40 p.tB.I JJFirst qr. 26 9 27 a.ra. 




Pav ot 
Week. 


g SUN SUN Slow MOON',' j,; 1 

^ rise set. sets. |o| Events, &c. 




|h m h m'm s 


h m ri 




: Thursday 


117 25 4 437X47' 


4 15 1 y cf soutli eh. 41m. 




Friday 


2:7 25 4 44| 4 Ifi 


5 58 In 




: SHiiirday 


'!7 25 4 451 4 46 


6 47 n y south 9h. 34ra. 




SUNDAY 


4 7 25 4 461 5 12 


rises. iQ 




Monday 


97 25 4 471 S 40 


7 41 £:s O.Hyde b. 1806 




Tuesday 


6 7 25 4 48! 6 6 


8 19 23 




' Wednesday 


7 7 24 4 49 6 33 


8 50 




Thursday 


8 7 24 4 60 7 0; 9 17 'Q ^soBth Ch.SSm. 




Friday 


7 24 4 61 7 27, 9 4t IQ. 




Satiir(j|av 


10 7 24 4 531 7 50iIO 14 HI 




, SUNDAY 


11 7 24 4 53| 8 14 


10 42 ni Df^b 1 




' Monday 


127 23 4 54| 8 36 


tl 37 U Jx^lf. 




Tuesday 


13 7 23 4 65) 9 


morn U^ 




' Wednesday 


14 7 23 4 66 9 22 


18 HJ 




Thursday 


157 22 4 67; 9 40 


I 18 nVd'soiithSb.iem. 




Friday 


16 7 22 4 58' 10 9 


2 14 T 




Saturday 


17 7 21 4 59 10 25 


3 15 ijl 




SUNDAY 


18 7 21 5 00 10 45 


4 13 rip.' 
sets. lA, 




Monday 


197208 111 6 




Tuesday 


20 7 205 2 11 25 


7 35:^])d9 C65 




Wedues^day 


21 7 19 5 3 11 38 


8 46 '-~ 




Thursday 


22 7 18 5 4 11 59 


9 13 1^ 




Friday 


237 185 5 12 11 


9 55 S 




Saturday 


24 7 17 5 6,12 30 


11 ^1 
morn m 

8 cp Jdd* 
1 6 L 




SUNDAY 


25 7 16 5 7 12 40 




Monday 


26;7 15 5 8 12 57 




Tuesday 


27 7 15 „ 9 13 5 




Wednesday 


287 145 10 13 17, 2 80, 

29 7 13 5 11 13 30 3 28 

30 7 19 6 12 13 40 3 66 |2, ' 5 sets 6b. 6nj. j 
317 11 5 13 13 48| 4 45 gl 1 




Thursday 




Friday 




Saturday 




i C. KIDGELL, 




TEWKLEH, fast side of Main strset, 13th Ward, works 
J all kinds ot metals Into deblrablo ornaments, etc. 






0. URSENBAUGH 




■nKPATRS Watches and Clocks to order, east Bide of 
li Main street, 13th Ward. 







1863.] FEBKTJAEY has 28 days. 

»■ H. M. I D. H. M. 

OPuniloon 3 2 .ISp.m ©VpwMood 17 9 40 p.m. 
PLBStqr. 11 3 20 a.m.' ([ First qr. 25 5 7 p.m. 



Pay of 
Week. 



rise. I set. | set-. ,c5 | 



Xlvents, &c. 



6 7 

77 
87 
9 7 
10 7 



1 7 10 5 14 13 52 

2 7 9 5 16 13 54 
8 5 17 14 2 
7 5 1&14 T 
6 5 2014 13 
55 21 14 21 
4 5 23 14 24 
3 5 24 14 27 
2 5 2G 14 29 
1 5 28 14 29 
Cd 30 14 30 

12 6 68 5 31 J4 29 

13 6 67 6 32 14 27 
|]4 6 56 5 34 14 2 
lis 6 55 5 35 14 23 
18 6 63 5 36 14 19 
17 6 52 5 37 14 14 

Wednesday 18 6 51 5 38 14 11 
Thursday ,13 6 4963914.4 

20 6 48 5 41 14 

21 fi 46 5 42 13 52 

22 6 45 5 44 13 44 

23 6 44 5 45 13 S6 

24 6 42 5 47 13 27 
Wednesday 25 6 41 6 48 13 18 
Thursday 26 6 39 5 49 13 8 
Friday 27 6 38.5 50 12 5S 
Saturday ,28 6 37 6 51 12 45 



SU^UAlr 

Monday 

Tuesday I 3 7 

Wednesdayi 4 7 

Thiiraday I 5 7 

Friday 

Saturday 

SUNDAY 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday II 7 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturdav 

SUNDAT 

Monday 

Tue.-day 



Friday 

Saturday 

SUNDAY 

Monday 

Tuesday 



6 26 

6 5 
rises. 

7 15 

7 56 

8 22 

9 31 
JO 8 
10 40 
n 22 
raorn 

5 

1 6 

2 10 

3 2) 

4 38 
sets. 

6 30 

7 33 

8 14 

9 45 
10 52 
n 56 
morn 

50 

1 47 

2 36 

3 20 



06y 

cf s, 5h. 37m. 



H.-nilthb.l800 



J cf s. 6h. 20m. 



Joseph's V. 1832 
W. W. Phelps b. 
9 C5 IC 1792 

Smus S. 8h-48m 



E. T. BenBon b. 
cfdlJ 1811 

? sets 7h. 13m. 
? sets 7h. 18m. 



i-k^'^^^ J. EUNOT 
^^^SbVt 'Sllversniithlng, west side of Hain street, 

^•^& "tf ardj near the town cijek. 

E. €ROUCH, 

)iii[9TlTUl'I0N H0U3K, east side o/ Main Street, i 



MARCH has 31 days. 



[1§63. 



'OPii'lMoon 5 
I d Last qr. 19 



7 19 a.Tii. ©Xew Mood 19 7 11 a.m. 
1 29 a.m. I D First qr. 27 1 21 a.m. 



Day of 
Week. 



sun:suN|S1o 
rise. I set. | 
li m'h m, m 



SUNDAY 1 1,6 35 5 52 12 
Monday 2 6 34 5 53 12 
Tuesday | 3 6 32 5 54 12 
Wedrifsday 4 6 31 5 55 II 
Thursday 5 G 29 5 5fi H 
Friday i 6 6 27 5 57 1 1 
Satnrdiv '■ 16 25 6 58 11 
SUNDAY 8 6 24 5 fiO 11 
Monday ' 9 6 22 6 0,10 
Tuesday 'l0 6 20 6 l|lO 
Wednesday U6 19 6 2ilO 
Thursday 12 6 17 6 3, 9 
13 6 16 6 4 9 
114 6 14 6 5] 9 
15 6 12 6 6; 9 
1166 116 7 8 
Il7 6 9 6 8' 8 



Friday 
Satiiriiav 

sunOat 

Monday 
Tuesday 
"Wednesday '8 6 
Thursday 19 6 
Frl lay 
Satnrdav 
SUNDAY 
Monday 
Tuesday 



7 6 9i 
6 6 10 
4 6 ll' 
26 12 
1 6 13; 



20 6 

21 6 

22 6 

l23 5 59 6 14' 6 

24 5 57 6 15' 6 

Wednesday 25 5 55 6 16; 6 

Thursday 26 5 53 6 Hj 6 

Friday 27 5 51 6 isl 5 

Saturday 28 5 49 6 19, 5 

SUNDAY j29 5 47 6 20, 4 

Monday '30 ■ 46 H 21 4 

Tuesday JSI 5 45,6 22| 4 



WjMOON 

sets. 
s| h m 

SsTTos"" 

23 4 57 
10|rises. ' 
67i 6 15 
42 6 61 
3ij 7 30 
16 8 13 
8 50 
45: 9 52 
30 10 8 
15 11 
55 morn 
41 1 59 

1 29 

2 19 

3 13 

4 9 

5 6 
sets. 

7 27 

8 31 

9 85 
45 10 36 
27 n 34 

8 morn 
60l 38 
33! 1 13 
13 1 54 
50, 2 42 
37I 3 7 
IS 3 40 



I o I Events, &c. 
=:sWVW-ood'77bl807 

H 

fl $ rises 7h. 27m. 

m 

mhdD 

m 

lie 

TID 

I 11 rises 8h. 30m. 

■?i 

yy, }i rises 6I1. 43m. 



t; 

qpj 

n 
n 

D 



A.Lyman b. 1813 



J. BIRD, 

CABINET and Chair M%er, East side of Main Street, 
14tli ward, wishes fiie share of custom. 

CHARLES HALL, 
/CARRIES on his Cooper Shop West tide Main Street. 



D- It. 

j OPuUMoon 3 8 
I C Last qr. 10 5 



APKIb has 30 days. 

M. I r. H. M. 

42 p.m. I ^New Moon 17 7 39 p.m. 

66 p.m.. DFirst qr. 2.5 8 41 p.m. 



^ ;SUNlSUN|ai0W |MOON] 
* 1 rise set. i sets, i 

q 'h mlh mlm e' h ml 
■Wednesday, 1 5 44 6 24 4" 0| 4' 8 ^ h (3 !> 



Dav of 
Week. 



Thursday 

Friday 

Satnrdar 

SUNDAY 

Monday 

Tuesday 



25 436 25 3 4l| 4 Slilll K.U.K'df b. 18-21 
3 5 41,6 26 3 23, rises. |)l[ | h. Snow b. 1814 



4 5 Sn 6 27 3 4 

5 5 37^6 28 2 47 
5 36 6 29 2 30 
7 5 34 6 30 2 12 



Wednesday 8 5 32:6 31 1 54 



Thursday 

Friday 

Satiirdar 

SUNUAY 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 165 2 



6 14 

5 42:2: 

6 15«)J 

6 57 III! 

7 49 jT 



9 5 30 6 32 1 38 8 40 ^ 

105 2S'6 33 1 22 10 1 i^ 

n 5 26|6 34 I 5 11 l^ 

12 5 24 6 3.') 49 morn™ 

13 5 23 6 36 33| i3^ 

14 5 22 6 37 18' 1 25 ~ 
6 38 © F i 2 29 ^ 



3 37j^'j 

4 37 cp 



Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 

SUNDAY 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday225 11 6 45 1 3lllO 5n 

Thurt-day 23 5 10 6 46 1 44! 11 49 □ 



16 5 20 6 39 10 

17'5 1<):6 40 25 

18 5 17 6 41 .19 set 

19 5 16 G 42 531 7 2Iio 

20 5 14 6 43 1 6; 8 21 S 
2li5 12 6 44 1 19: 9 2liy 



Church L. P. S. 
orsanized 1830. 
$ &ets8b.62m. 



P.P.Pratt b.l807 
$ sets 9h. 6m. 

56D 



Friday 

Saturday 

SUNDAY 

Moniiay 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 29 5 

Thucsday 30,5 



245 
255 

26 5 

27 5 

28 5 



8 6 47 1 541 morn 
7 6 48 2 5! 28 
6 6 49 2 16 
4 6 50 2 0(5 

2 36 

2 42 
53 



3 6 61 
2 6 52 
I 6 53 



1 3=^ 

2 3b in 

3 6.^ 



cTdD 

$ sets 9b. 31m. 



MRS. COLEBROOK, 

MILLINER, east side of East Temple street, I3tli 



Ward. 



E. B. TRIPP, 



MANUFACTURES Boots and Shoes, West side Main 
street. Mth Ward. 



MAY has 31 days. 



[1863. 



D. H. M. j D. H. M. 

Ol'ullMoon 3 7 25 s.ni. ©NewMoon 17 P 23 am. 
J)Lasc qr. 9 11 49 p.m. | d First qr. 25 1 20 p.m. 



Day of 
"Week. 



Friday 

Saturday 

SUNDAY 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 

SUNDA-r 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday] 13 

Thursday jl4 

Friday 16 

Saturday' |l6 

StWDAY 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 

SUNDAY 

Monday 

Tuesday 



g [SUNjSUNlFast.|MOON 

^ rise. I set. sets. 

fl Ih EQ'h mim e I 4i m 
H5 0|6 51 3 iTs 36 
2 4 59 6 55 
4 58 6 56 
4 66 '6 57 
4 55 6 58 
4 6 69 
4 53 7 
1 
2 
3 
4 
6 
6 
7 



o Eventsj &c. 



3 8' 4 49 
3 15 rises. 
3 21 1 7 46 
3 271 8 32 
3 331 9 25 
3 37 10 34 
3 42111 25 
3 44imorn 
3 47j 26 
3 50' 1 31 
3 51 1 2 38 
3 6-2| 3 38 
3 63| 4 42 
3 53' 5 50 
3 53 6 54 



4 52 7 

4 51 7 

4 50 7 

4 48 7 

4 47,7 

4 46 7 

4 45 7 

4 44 7 8 

4 43 7 9 
17'4 42 7 10 
18'|4 41 7 11' 
19 4 39 7 12 
20j4 38 7 13 

21 4 37 7 14 3 40 10 26 
22:4 36 7 15 3 36 11 
2s|4 357 161 3 39 11 46 

24 4 347 17 

25 4 33 7 18 

26 4 32 7 19 



3 51! sets. 
3 50 



3 47 
3 44 



8 58 

9 44 



Wednesday 27 j4 31 7 20 



Thursday 
Friday 
Saturdav 
■SUNDAY 



3 27 morn 
3 22: 3 
3 16i 31 

3 101 68 
3' 1 33 



ii 2 beis 9I1. 45m. 

Ill cf seta lib. Om. 

Ill 

J: 9 sets 9Ji. EOm. 

\y>'(f sets 10h.55m. 



y^ 2 sets lOh. Cm 

cp 9 sets lOh. 8m. 
qp 1| eveHing star. 

D?6D •■.''' 
^ A. Smith p. 1773 

^Jno Smith d.l854 
n Q. Vict. b. 1819. 



28 4 3O 7 21 { 

29 4 307 2-1 2 56i 2 1 
30'4 30 7 23 2 48 2 35 
31 4 30 7 24 2 40, 3 14 



2 2 Bets 10h.21m. 

n 



H. RISER, 

a si) 

14tli ward. 

W. BALL AN, 

;r and 
street, 13th Ward. 



TBWELER and silver smith, west side of Main street, 



TITATCH Repxirer and Sllversmitb, east side of Main 



1SS3.] JUNE has 30 days. 


r>. H. M. 1 D H. M. 1 


OPiillMoon 14 3 p.m. ^N'^eivMoon 16 9 a.m.! 


DLast qr. 8 6 26 a.m.j (J yi'st qr. 24 3 6 a.m. 


O Full Moon, 30(1^ llh. 19m. p.m. j 


Day Of |g«^.^f 
Week. . ["''^ 


SUNiFast.MOONI.; 1 1 


set. 


f rises. | o 


Events, &c. II 


la h m h m 


m s 1 h m 1 J2 


1 


1 Monday , 1 4 30|7 24 2 31 


rises. 


^ B.Y'ng. b. 1801 il 


Tuesday 1 2 4 30|7 25 


2 22 


8 11 


I 




1 Wednesday 3|4 30|7 26 


2 13 


9 6- 


va 




1 Thursday 


4l4 3U 7 26 


2 2 


9 58 


VCP 




' Friday 


5 4 30[7 27 


1 52 


10 40 


'jT^h south 8h. 11m 1 


Saturday 


6 4 29i7 27 


1 42 


11 9 


xrJ.'i sets lOh. 22111. il 


SUxVDAr 


7 4 29i7 28 


1 31 


11 50 


yi 




Monday 


8 4 29;7 29 


1 21 


morn 


X. 


cf sets 10. 6m. 


Tuesday 


94 2817 30 


1 9 


22 


^ 




Wednesday 10 4 28|7 31 


68 


65 


cp.ll south 7h. 61 m 1 

rpi ' il 


Thursday ;11 4 28:7 31 


44 


1 48 


Friday |12'4 28!7 32 


33 


2 25 


T 


5 sets 1 Oh. 19m. ' 


Saturday ^13!4 287 32 


21 


3 


y 


i 


SUNDAY 14|4 28 7 33 


7 


3 40 


8 
u 


H.C.Kimball b. ' 


! Monday 15 4 287 33 S. 


4 10 


$dl> 1801 J 


1 Tuei^day 16 4 28 7 31 


16 


sets. 


p 




1 Wednesday;l7 4 28:7 34 


29 


8 27 


n 


7f south 7h. 20m 


t Thursriay 
1 Friday 


18 4 28,7 34 


42 


9 2 




j 


19 4 28:7 34 


55 


9 39 


^ 


c?rfD 


Saturday 


20 4 28 7 34 


1 9 


10 3 


fi V (3 D 

n ^ f outh 7h. 4m. ' 

iiK a c5 ? 1 

im;W. Ki chard 8 b. ! 
J:il/(3D 1804. 


SUNDAY 


21 14 29 17 .34 


1 22 


10 35 


Monday 


22 4 297 34 


1 36 


11 


Tuesday 


23 4 29;7 35 


1 48 


11 29 


Wednesday 24 4 297 35 


2 


morn 


' Thursday 26 4 30i7 35 


2 12 


2 


Friday i26 4 30,7 35 


2 26 


37 




Saturday 27 4 30 7 35 


2 38 


1 3 


m J. and n. Smith 
111 martyred 1841 


SUNDAY 28 4 30 7 35 


2 51 


1 50 


Monday i29 4 3117 35 


3 3 


2 38 


1*1 "^ 

T 

7 1 5 sets 9h. 58m. 


Tuesdav 30 4 31,7 35 

1 


3 16 


3 68 


C. M. D0N15LS0N | 


ITTORKS at COOPERING west side of East Temple i 
yy atreetj I4lh Ward. 


A. LA.MB, 


pOOPER, east side of East Temple Street, 13th Ward. 



JULY has 31 days. 



[1863. 



D. H. M. I r>. H. M. 

DLastqr. 7 3 02 p.m. d First qr. S3 2 C6 p.m. 
©NewMoonlS 3 27 p.m. iQ Full Moon 30 6 07 a.m. 



Day of 
■\Teek. | 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 

SUNDAY 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Satuniav 

SUNDAY 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 

SUNDAY 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 

SUNDAY 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednecday 

Thursday 

Friday 



■ , SUN, SUN 
S |r!se. Slit. 
p Ih m'h m| 
1 4 32 7 35 
2l4 32 7 35 

3 4 33 7 35 

4 4 33 7 34 

6 4 317 34 
fi 4 34 7 34 

7 4 35 7 33 

8 4 35 7 33 

9 4 36 7 33 

10 4 36 7 32 

11 4 37 7 32 
12^4 38 7 31 
13 4 39 7 31 
14'4 40 7 30 
15 4 41 7 30 
16[4 427 29 
17|4 43 7 29 
18;4 44 7 28 
19 4 457 28 
20^4 46 7 27 
21 4 47 7 26 
22. 4 48 7 25 
23,4 49 7 24 
94i4 50 7 23 
2514 51 7 22 
26j4 62 7 21 
27 4 53 7 20 
28U 54 7 19 

29 4 55 7 18 

30 4 56 7 17 
3114 57 7 16 



Slow IMOON 

I rises, 
m. S.I h m 
" 3 27r 7"^! 1 "v>j ?8ets lOh. 3m 
3 38 7 58 \y\ 

3 49 8 34 ^ 

4 9 15 ~ 
4 n 10 41 ^ 
4 21 11 9 i^ 
4 31 11 45 ^ 
4 41 morn op 
4 50 16 cp 



Events, &c. 



Independence. 
$ sets 9h. 55m. 
J" sets 9h 6m. 



5 1 33 6 
5 8 2 15 8 
5 15 3 38 
5 23 3 52 n 
5 30 4 43 □ 
5 37 8ets c- 
5 43 7 41 23; 

5 49 8 9 Q 

6 54 8 40 Q 

5 58 9 5 Q 

6 2 9 30 m 
6 510 2 „}) 
6 7 10 35 m 
6 9 11 3 ^ 
6 11 !1 28 ^^ 
6 12 morn m 
6 13, 3 m 
6 13 1 17 ;V 
6 12! 2 24 i"r 



6 II 
6 8 
6 2 



3 31 

4 43 

5 



J. Smith) sen.b. 
[1773. 

% setsllh. 21m. 

.Ino Smith b.nSl 

9c5D 

hc5!) 
^46 5 

G.S.L.Val. ent. 

[1847. 
(f sets 8h.27ra. 

il seta 9ta. 63m. 

$ Bets 9h. 4m. 



W. S. GODBE, 

KEEPS diug?, medicines, etc., for sale, east Bide of 
Main streetj 13th Ward. 

CHARLES F. JONES, 

TIN SMITH, halt block south ot Court House 15th 
Ward. 



1S63.J 



AUGUST has 31 days. 



D. H. M. 

DLagt qr. 6 2 41 
©New Moon T4 6 35 



I D. H. M. 

a.m. d First qr. 21 10 53 p.m. 
a.m. (OFuUMoon 23 1 28 p.m. 



Day of 
Week. 


^ jSVNISUN Slow MOONl,^ | 


^ j rise. set. rises, j o i Erents, &c. 
(i ih mlh m m. s. h m i JJ | 


Saturday 


1|4 58 7 1564 841 r. T2~selTrohTl7nr. 


SUN DAT 


2 4 58 7 Ul 6 Oj 9 19 ^, §^5© 


Monday 


3 4 59 7 13' 5 54 9 50 :v^ Tern. lot Zion ded 


Tuesday 


4 4 59 7 12 5 49 10 22 cp\ [1831. 


"Wednesday 


5 5 7 1 1, 5 44 10 55 qp 5 sets 8h. 61m. 


Thursday 


6 5 1 7 10 6 38 11 32 ;y 




Friday 


7 5 2 7 9 5 31 morn i w 




Saturday 


85 3 7 8; 5 24, 25 ' w 


}l sets 9h. 8m. 


SUNDAY 


95 4 7 7 5 16 1 2 n 




Monday 


105 5 7 6 5 7, 1 48 n 


$ sets 8h. 53m. 


Tuesday 


115 7 5 4 58 2 40 £3 




Wednesday 


12 5 7 7 4 4 49i 3 26 23 


,.r sets 8h. 46m. 


Thursday 


13 5 8 7 3 4 39 4 19 n Ti sets 9h. 36m. 


Friday 


145 9 7 2 4 28 sets, n 


Saturday 


15 5 10 7 1, 4 17 7 4 Q HrfD 
1G5 n 6 09 4 6; 7 36 m 
17 5 ]2 6 58 3 54 8 7 m Q Ah 
IS 5 13 6 ."»7 3 41! 8 34 \m 9 A]) 


SUNDAY 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


19 5 14 6 56 3 28 9 7 ^ » A j> ■VA]) 


Thursday 


20 5 15 6 55 3 14 10 8 \^ C.U.Rich b. 1809 


Friday 


21 5 10 6 ^i 3 10 23 mi 

22 5 17 6 63 2 45morn ijii 

23 5 18 6 02 2 30| 28 m h sets 8h. 12m. 

24 5 19 6 60 2 14: i lo /, 

25 5 20 6 49 1 58 2 14 ! t o sets Sir. 43m. 

26 5 21 6 47 1 42 2 44 il 

27 5 22 6 45' 1 25 3 35 ^}J 11 sets 7h. 31m. 


Saturday 


SUNDAY 


Monday 


Tue.sday 


Wednesday 


Thorsday 


Friday 


28 5 23 6 43 


1 8 4 40 ^' 


Saturday 


29 5 24 |6 41 


60 rises. iZT/li sets 8h. 28m. 


SUNDAY 


30 5 25 ;6 39 


31 7 9 1^1 

13 7 47 ij^ Ti sets 7h. 44m. 


Monday 


31 5 26 iO 37 



H 



W. H. FOSTER 
AS Removed his Tarnlnc Shop to East side of Main 
street, 13lh War^l, near J. Wells. 

W. W. FOSTER, 

S CAPMAKER and Stocking knitter, west Bide Main 
street, 14th Warj^.' 

A. NETBAUB, 
ATCH Maker, above Emigration street, 13th ward. 



M 



SEPTEMBER has 30 days. 



[1S63. 



JD. H. M. I T>. H. M. 

CLastqr. 4 5 43 p.m. 1 5 First qr. 20 6 6 a.m. 
©NewMoon 12 9 15 p.m.lOPu" Moon 26 10 35 p.m. 



Tlsyof 
Week. 


g SUN SUN Fast. 
_ rise, 1 set. 
p h ml m h m, s. 
" 1|5 27 6 35© F. 


MOONI j£ 
rises. |o Erent« 

h m 1 n 




fcc. 


Tuesday 


8 55 


T ? sets 7fi, ISm. 


Wednesday 


215 2S6 33| 21 


9 30 


doj 




Thursday 


315 29 6 321 42 


10 12 


8 




Friday 


4 5 30j6 301 1 1 


10 55 


do.hd? 




Salurdav 


5' 5 3116 2S' 1 22 


tBorn 


n 




SUNDAY 


f) 5 32 


6 26 1 40 


36 '(il<■^ setsSh. 


€lll. 


Monday 


7 5 33 


6 24; 2 


1 30 a 




Tuesday 


8o 34 


6 22 2 21 


2 23 lao! 




Wednesday 


9 5 35 


6 20, 2 42 


3 15 do|T^set8 7h. 


earn. 


Tbuveday 


10 5 36 


6 18 3 2 


4 13 Ql 




Friday 


11 5 37 


6 16 3 22 


5 11 iuo:>2 sets «h 


. 6m. 


Saturday 


12 5 38 


6 h; 3 43 


sets do] 




SUNDAY 


13 5 39 


6 13 4 4 


6 10 ITl d-d D 




Mod lay 


14 5 40 


6 12 4 25 


6 37,duh.c5i) 9 6y 


Tuesday 


155 41 


6 111 4 4e 


7 10 -!$c5]) 




Wedne.sday 


16 5 42 


6 9 5 7 


7 38 rtollfc^ » 




Thursday 


17 5 43 


6 7: 5 28 


8 24 lip 


h6D 




Friday 


18 5 4J 


6 5 5 49 


9 11 !.u. 






Saturday 


19 5 45 


6 3 6 10 


10 3 jr 


0. Patt b 


1€11. 


SUNDAY 


20 5 48 


6 16 31 


11 6 do 






Monday 


215 47 


6 6 52 


morn ^/^ 






Tuesday 


22 5 48 


5 68 7 13 


7 do 






■Wednesday 


23 6 49 


5 56 7 34 


1 13 do 






Thursday 


24 5 50 


5 54 7 55 


2 26 ~ 


?dd" 




Friday 


25 5 51 


5 52 8 16 


3 41 do 


h Bets 6b. 


l«in. . 


Saturday 


26 5 62 


5 51 S 30 


rises yi\ 


' 


SUNDAY 


97 53 


5 49 8 56 


6 3 do §(3© 




Monday 


28 5 64 


5 47 9 17 


6 38 qp 


j 


Tuesday 


29 3 55 


5 45 -9 36 


7 S|8 


1 


Wednesday 


38 5 6t) 5 44 9 56 


8 2luu!l/Fets6h. 


trjn.] 



A. FIELDING, 
ATCH Maker, opposite Walker Brothers' store. East 
Temple s'reet, 14111 ward. 

THOMAS COLBURN ; 

AKES Broomsj and Keeps them for sale in the Second 
Ward. ] 

J. PUGMIRE, Jr., \ 

OSSSlacksmlth at Public Works, In the IStb. ward. 

always on hand. 



1SG3.] 



OCTOBER has 31 days. 



D. H. M. I D. H. M. 

dLast qr. 4 11 5,-j a.m. | 5 First qr. 19 39 p.m. 
©NewMoonl2 11 16 a.m.]O''^u"M''0° 2C 10 29 a,m. 



T)avof 
Week. 


g SUN SUN Fast.| 


MOONi !5 




• rise. set. i 
^ h m h m ra s ! 


rises |H 
li m l'^ 


Events, &c. 


Thursday 


T5"57'^5~43l0~15' 


ll'SO i y S. Smith b. 1779 


Friday 


25 


.58 5 42 10 35 I 


9 36'nhci© cfc50 


Saturday 


35 


59 5 41 10 63 


10 29 dol 


SUNDAY 


46 


5 3Q 11 12 


11 20 do 7| sets 6h. 30m. 


Monday 


56 


1 5 38 1 1 30 


morn £31 


Tuesday 


66 


2 5 37 n 47 


14 do' 


Wednesday 


76 


3 5 36,12 5 


1 10 a'7*ssonth6h.46. 


Thursday 


86 


45 31112 22 


2 23 (101 


Friday 


96 


5 5 32 12 33 


3 6 do! 


Saturday 


10 6 


6 5 3i:i2 64 


4 7 in $ d 5 


SUNDAY 


116 


76 29 13 S 


5 5 doj 


Monday 


12 6 


85 28|13 24 


sets do' 


Tuesday 


13 6 


9 6 26 13 39 


5 4G ;- Ti (3 ]) 


Wednesday 


1416 


10 5 25 13 53 


6 23 !do 


Thursday 


156 


115 2314 6 


7 lO'do 


Friday 


166 


12 5 22114 19 


8 14 iiri 


Saturday 


17 6 


13 5 20 14 32 


9 do' 


SUNDAY 


18 6 


14 5 18|U 43 


10 2 j^ ^6h 


Monday 


190 155 1714 53 


11 13 001 


Tuesday 


20 6 


166 16,15 4 


morn V> 


Wednesday 


2i;6 175 14115 14 


2 jdo 7*s Bouth6h.26m 


Thursday 


226 18 5 13 15 23 


1 20 [r; 


Friday 


23 6 19 5 ll'lS 32 


2 15 00 


Sutnrdav 


24 6 


20 5 lOiie 4') 


3 10 '}^ 


SUNDAY 


25 6 


21 5 8 '15 47 


4 19 qp D. W. Patten m. 
rises |do 1838 


Monday 


■266 22 5 7,15 54 


, Tuesday 


27,6 23 5 6116 


7 sly 


' Wednesday 


28,6 


245 4 16 6 


8 7 luo 


Thursday 


,29 6 


25 5 3 IG 9 


9 3 do 


j Friday 


30,6 


266 1 16 13 


9 6o,n^6® 


Saturday 


31 6 275 0|16 15 


10 34 dOjiarWestmobbed 



L. I. SMITH 

CARUTRS the Mail and passengers to Fillmore twice a 1 
weelij keeps a meat market and goodSj 14lh ward. 

JOB SMITH 

CARRIES on Basketmnklng, In variety, on the west 
side of Main street, 14th Ward. 



NOVEMBEB has 30 days. [1S63. 

D. H. M. : D. H. M. 

CLastqr. 3 8 T a.m. j ]) First qr. 17 7 39 p.m, 
©NewMoon 11052 a.m.lOFHll Moon 25 1 35 a.m, 



r.o^«» |_: |SUNlSUN|FaSt.,MOON,fc 

I 'ay or I* rise. set. bets. >o 



Week. 



10 {h mlh m'm. s I h m 



EventB, &c. 



SUNDAY 

JtoiiiJay 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 

SUNDAY 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 

SUKI-AY 

; Monday 
Tuf^sday 
Wednesday 
Thursday 

i Friday 
Saturday 

\ SUNDAY 
Monday 
Tuesday 
■vyednesday 

i Thursday 
FrKlay 
Saturday 

■SUNDAY 

'Monday 



1 6 

26 
36 
46 
66 
66 
76 
86 
96 
10 6 
116 

13 6 
l36 

14 6 
156 

16 6 

17 6 
18G 
19 6 
■20 6 
216 
22 « 
■23 6 
24 6 
26 



2817 
i29 7 

|3()i7 



284 59 

29 4 68 

30 4 57 
3.\4 56 
33 4 64 
35 4 53 
374 51 
38,4 50 
3914 49 
4(1 j 4 48 
4214 47 
43|l 46 
4614 45 

46 4 44 

47 4 43 

48 4 42 

50 4 41 

51 4 40 

53 4 39 

54 4 38 
65 4 37 

56 4 36 

57 4 35 
5S4 34 
59 4 33 

4 33 

1 4 32 

2 4 32 

3 4 32 
4.4 32 I 



Ifi 16 11 3 
Iti 18 11 54 
16 18 morn 
16 18 58 
Iti 16 1 53 
,16 14 2 03 
|I6 10 3 51 
,16 6 4 45 
116 5 37 
1 15 56 6 30 
15 49 sets 
15 41 5 63 
5 34, 6 48 
5 25 7 48 

I 5 16 8 58 
15 4 9 20 
14 63 10 24 
14 40 morn 
14 27i 28 
14 J3 1 33 
14 2 40 
13 44 3 60 
13 26 4 47 
13 9 5 54 
12 62' rises 
12 33 5"21 
12 14 6 S 

II 64 7 
U 33 7 57 
11 12 8 5-2 



J.Tayur ii. itiua 



[Saints 1833 
Mo. mobbed 

$6(1 

K. Snow b.1618 



$6^ 



Sirlas even'gstai 



96h e6% 



S. J. LKES, 
:over d 
Machine to his business. 

J. B. HAWKINS, 



01 ACE and Wason-cover makerj bss added a Peg 



BLACKSMITH, west side East Temple-Btreet. 14th 
Ward, 

K. CUTHBERT, 

FIRST South street, 13tli Ward, works at black- 
smithing. I 



1863.] DECEMBER has 31 days. 

D. H. M. , D. H. M. 

DLastqr. 3 4 47 a.m. ] C First qr. 17 4 17 a.m. 
0fJewMo on 10 6 7 p.m.lOFuU Moon 24 7 24 p.m. 



Day of 
Week. 



rise set. I rises o 

h mill mim. s.'li. m. IS 



Events, Jcc. 




n Q morDingsiar 
tio (J" do 

do 11 do 

nUh do 

ilo 

iiii^cJC 

do, 

w 
M 



dol 
do| 

T, 

y : pS05 

y Joseph Smttti b 

n| 

do! 

do Cbrlstmas day. 



A. MERllILL, 

HATTBR, 17th Ward, follows hatting In common 
style. 

B. FROST, 

BLACKSMITFT, at the old stand, Sth 'Ward, works at- 
blacksmithlng as usual. 

P. MARGETT3, 

BLACKSMITH, tack of A. DaU's Store, 14th fTard, 
does work to order. 



15 
ECLIPSER IN 186 3. 



Tbere will be fnur ecllpsea during the year, two of tbe 
sun and two of the moon. 

I. Of the enn, May 17J. 9h. 22m. a.m. not Tlslbla In 
Dtah, but In British and Russian America, If tho sky 
parmlts, It may be seen for nearly four hours. 

II. A total eclipse of the moon, June 1st, as foUowsS 
Beginning, June 1, 2h. -JSra. p.m. 

Total begine, „ 3h. 26m. ,| 

Middle, „ 4h. Om. ,, 

Total ends, „ 4b. 33m. „ 

Eclipse ends, ,, 6h. 40m. ,$ 

Total, Ih. 7m. „ 

"Whole duration, 3h. 11m. ,, 
Not visible In Uiah, but ostensibly an Atlantic Ocean or 
eastern eclipse. 

III. An annular eclipse of the sun, Nov. 11, at Oh. 32Sl> 
in the morning, visible only In the South Sea. 

iV. A partial eclipse of the moon, Nov. 24 and 55, M 
follows: 

Beginning, Nov. 24, at llh. 49m. p.m. 
Middle, << 25, lb. 29in. a.m. 

Knds, « " 3h. 10m. " 

Duration, 3b. 21m. 

Visible is Utah. 

•»• Look for a comet near the heavenly ram. 



16 

TAILOE-S. 

CLIVE & ERSKINE, 

TAILORS, west side of Main street, 14th ward, maka 
clothes and warrant to tit; a sewing machine at- 
tached. 



HATTERS. 

J. SHELMERDINE 

CAKRTES on hatting, ou the north side of 8th ward. 
JTuM wanted. 



J. C. TATTON, 

nrt honse, 14tl 
for sale. Purs wanted. 

L. LEONARD 



"VTEAU the Court honse, 14th ward, makes good hats 



CARRIES on Hatting on the east side of 7th Ward. 
Furs wanted. 



SADDLE AND HARNESS. 

YOUNG & PLATT, 

MANUFACTURERS of Saddles and Harness, we&t 
side of Main street, Uth Ward. 



J. W. JENKINS 

les, Harness, and booti 
bide of Main street, 14th Ward. 

WILLIAM HOWARD, 

& Harness Maker, shoemafeer, 
distiller, west side Kast Temple-street. 



TtTAKRS Saddles, Harness, and boots and Bboe.s, west 



OADDLER & Harness Maker, shoemaker, tanner and 



SEEDS. 

WM. WAGSTAFF, 
ri ARDENER and Seedaman, Stace Road, 3d Ward. 



17 

PHOTOGRAPHERS. 

E. R. SAVAGE, 

PHOTOGRAPHIC Gallery, east side Main street, IStli 
Ward, Is in full operation. 

PERRIS & HOPKINS, 

PHOTOGRAPHKRS, east side Main street, 13lh Ward, 
take portraits in tlie fine art line. 

CABINETS AND CHAIRS. 

H. DINWOODEY, 

CABINET and Chairmaker, west side of Main street, 
14th ward, 

C. TRAVELLER 

¥AN"TS all kinds of suitable Lumber In exclisnge for 
FurnltDre, west side Main street, 14th Ward. 



TINNERS. 

E. STEVENSON, 

TrNNER a^d Sheet Iron worker, next door north of 
H. E. Phelps. 

T. HAWKINS, 

TINNER, weft Ride of Main street, i4t.h Ward, will 
serve the public wUh Tin and Sheet Iron ware. 

A. BEST, 
rniNNER, etc., west side Main street, 14th Ward. 



COOPERS. 

E. & B. LAMB, 

COOPERS for Dixie, Virgin City, are ready for busi- 
ness. 



18 

POTTERS. 

CROXALL, CARTWRIGHT & CO., 

MAKE all kinds of earthenware tinder Moore & Greene'* 
old store, a few doors east of Main street, ISth 
Ward. Fiddle strings for sale. 

EARDLEY BROTHERS 

CABRT on business snccessf uUy at the Deseret Pottery, 
north side of 7th Ward. 



NIELS JENSEN & CO. 

re ctod a New Pottery, on the nort 
of the block, 2a Ward, to accommodate all. 



TTAVB erected a New Pottery, on the northwest corner 



FIREWORKS. 

FINDLAY & MARTIN'S 

FIRST PRISE MATCHES, wholesale and retail, al the 
signof tiie Bee Hive, east side ot Main street, ISIU 
Ward; also Blacking, 

J- ■ • ■ ■ ■ 

CUTLERY. 

JAMES WELLS ' 

CARRIES on business at his old stand, 13th Ward. 

PAINTERS. 

W. PITT, 

SKiN and House painter, on North Temple street, 17th 
ward. 

E. MARTIN, 

SIGN and House painter, west side of Main street, 14th 
Ward. ' 



SQUIRES & DAY, 

BARBERS ami Greengrocers, easi side of Bast Temple 
street, are on baud for everything In their line. 



A 



19 

MERCHANTS. 

WALKER BROTHERS, 

T the new "Red Brick," offer a general asgorfment 
cf goods, east side or East Temple St., 13th ward. 

J. B. KIMBALL & CO., 

KEEP Dry Goods and Groceries, corner of East Tern- 
pie and First South streets, Hth ward. 

WM. JENNINGS, 

MERCHANT, Butcher, Tanner and Currlf r, and Boot 
and Shoe mafeer, corner of East Temple and First 
South streets, 14th vrard, 

NIXON'S STORE. 

THE Administrators of Wm; Nixon continue to trade 
In Koods at the old -stand, east side East Temple 
street, 13ih Ward. 

H. E. PHELPS 

BARTERS, buys, exchanges, sells and trades In Roods 
merchardlze, wares, peltries, grain and other com- 
modities. Fair bargains. 



THE BENNE PLANT. 

THIS highly valoable plant 'of which the leaf is the 
part u^ed) is especially beneficial In all cases of 
cholera infantum, diarrhoea, dysentery and all affections 
of a slmil'ar nature. It has also been proved to be a 
great remedy for sore eyes; but for all cases of dysen- 
tery, either in children or adults, its Influence and heal- 
ing properties appear almost miraculous. Seed and 
leaves can be had at my res-idence, south of the Putjlic 
Square, in the 16th Ward, S. S. L. City. 

WILLIAM DERR. 

COUGH RHIAKUY. 

Put half a pint of good vinegar in a tumbler. In 
which place a new laid egg and cover the tumbler 
clesely. In about twenty-four hou:8 the egg will be 
dissolved; sweeten with sugar, and the fluid will be 
ready for tise. Take a table-spoonful about live tlmtit 
a-day. 



20 
WUXT MAKES A BUSHEL. 

The following table of the number of pounds of yarl- 
«us articles to a bushel may be of some interest to our 
readers: 

Wheat, sixty pounds. 

Corn, shelled, fl(ty-six pounds. 

Corn, on the cob. seventy pounds. 

Oats, thlrty-slx pounds. 

Bye, flfty-six pounds. 

Barley, forty-six pounds. 

Buckwheat, fifty-two pounds. 

Irish Potatoes, sixty poucdS. 

Onions, fifty-seven pounds. 

Beans, sixty pounds. 

Bran, twenty pounds. 

Clover Seed, sixty pounds. 

Timothy Seed, forty-five pounds. 

Flax Seed, forty-five pounds. 

Hemp Seed, forty-five pounds. 

Blue Grass Seed, fourteen pounds. 

Dried Peaches, thirty- two pounds. 

Stone Coal, (about) one hundred pounds. 

Peas, flfty-eight pounds. 

Red Top Seed, fourteen pounds. 

Salt, fitty-slx pounds. 



"WHAT MAKbS A GALLON. 

Molasses, eleven pounds, 

OH, olive, nine pouuds. 

Alcohol, pure, ten pounds. 

Nitric acid, pure, twelve pounds. 

Vitriol, eighteen and a half pounds. 

Turpentine oil, eight and three-fourth pounds. 



21 

SUGAR. 

S«gar Is made from the Juice of plants and trees, !.<•., 
from sugar cane, beet roots, carrots, maple trees, etc. 
It crystallzes, is sweet, soluble in water and alcohol, and 
Is nourishing to the human system. Nitric acid turns It 
to oxalic add. 
Oue hundred parts of sugar contain: 
28 parts of carDon; 
64 parts of oxygen; 
8 parts of hydrogen. 

HONEY. 

Honey Is composed of sugar, mucilage and water, and, 
being ready-made, like manna in heaven, falls upon 
flowers and leaves, and Is gathered by bees. Aside from 
worldly philosophy, sugar or honey is one of the elements 
of a wise God, and better medicine than calomel. 

INBIA RUBBER. 

The common India rubber, or gum-elastlc, goroetlmes 
called cacntchouc, Is prepared mostly from the Juice of 
the real "Slpbonica elastlca," by tapping the trefs, as 
we do pine tor rezin. The juice is white like milk, and 
after It is taken from the trees stiffens itself Into an elas- 
tic gum or rezln. It always remains soft. It would be 
well to obtain some of the seed of the real trees lor 
Utah. 

PRESERVATION OF CROPS BY ELDER. 

If branches of elder be brushed occasionally over 
plants, such as cabbages, cauliflowers, turnips, or any 
other productions of the garden^ the operation is found 
to have a remarkable effect in preserving the plants from 
the attacks of insects, and also preserving fruit-trees 
trom being blighted. 



22 

FLTTID FOR PRKSERVIIVG SEEDS FROM 
THE l>JEPREDAXJONS OF VERMIIV. 

H.Brown, of Derby, observes to the Seciety for the 
EDCouragement of Arls, etc , that when he steeped seeds 
lor three or four hours, or for a sufficient length of time 
to penetrate the huek,in a strong solution of liver of sul- 
phur, he never lost a seed by vermin during a three 
years' trial. 

METHOD OF MAKING SEALING WAX. 

Take any quantity of shell-lac in powder; add to It 
half its weight in rosin, and half its weight of vermilion. 
Melt these ingredien's ever a gentle Are, and when they 
are thoroughly Incorporated, work the composition Into 
sticks, rolls, or any other form desired. 

This composition makes a fine, liard, red sealing wax: 
any other color may be obtained by using a pigment of 
the color desired, Instead of vermilion. 

Red lead is used instead of vermilion for common red 
wax, and the quality of the composition is further de- 
based tsy reversing the proportions of rosin and shel-lac. 

The whitest rosin should be used for all bright colois. 
The wax will be mora tenacious, if turpentine, boiled 
■with a little water til! it is hard, is used instead of rosin. 
The lowest heat at which the Ingredients can be melted 
should also not be exceeded. 

The gealing wax may be softened hy adding; white wax 
to It; it is formed into sticks by rolling it upon a stono 
•while it is yet soft; and Is polished merely by melting its 
surface over a fire, and letting it cool without being 
touched. 

CEMENT OR GLUE TO RESIST WATER. 

JL Bo'ntlon of ghell-lac In alcohol, added to a solution 
of Isinglass In proof spirit, forms a cement that reslsta 
water, and may be used as a glue. 



23 

METHOD OF PREPARITVG A CHEAP SUB- 
STITUTE FOR OIL PAINT. 

It often happens that people do not choose, or can- 
not employ oil painting In the country, either because It 
does not dry soon enough, and has a disagreeable smell, 
or because It Is too costly. 

Ludicke employed, with the greatest success, the fol- 
lowing composition for palatlng ceilings, gates, doors, 
and even furniture: 

Take fresh curds, and bruise the lumps on a erlndinB- 
Btone, or In an earthen pan or mortar, with a spatula. 
After this operation, put them in a pot with an equal 
quantity of lirae, well quenched, and become thick 
enough to be kneaded: stir this mixture well without 
adding water, and a whitish semifluid mass will be ob- 
tained, which may be applied with great facility like 
paint, and which dries very speedily. It must be ena- 
ployed the day it Is prepared, as It will become too thick 
the day following. Ochre, Armenian bole, and ei\ colors 
which hold with lime, mny be mixed with It, according 
to the color desired; but care must be taken that the ad- 
dition of color made to the first mixture of curds and lime, 
contain rery little water, or It will diminish tho dura- 
blllly of the painting. 

When two coats of this paint have been laid on, it may 
bs polished with a piece of woolen cloth, or other proper 
Bubstance, and It will become as bright as varnish. This 
kind of painting, besides its cheapness, possesses the ad- 
vantage of admitting two coats to be laid on and polisheij 
In one day, as it dries speedily and has no smell, 

AniBER VARNISH. 

Oil varnishes, which have become thick by keeping, ars 
made thinner with spirits of tarpentlue. i 



■24 
STAINING WOOD. 



stilus do not lie, like paints, upon the surface of woodj 
but sink more or les3 into its substance. Ilence thewood 
■which has been stained exhibits its natural grain and 
hardness; and, It must be remembered, that if the wood 
be not white, the color taken will be a compound of that 
of the wood and the stain. The dyeing woods employed 
must be understood to be in small chips, or raspings, 

When the wood is intended to be brushed several 
times over with any fluid, It should be dried previous to 
each repetition of the operation. The woods which have 
been stained are afterwards rubbed up with rushes, then 
with a cloth, dipped in a solullon of bees' wax in spirits 
of turpentine, and afterwards rubbed with a woolen 
cloth alone. When the stain is intended to be very deep, 
the pieces should be boiled in the staining liquor, and not 
merely brushed over. 

TO STAIN WOOD RED. 

Take two ounces of Brazil wood, and two ounces of 
potash; mix them with a quart of water, and let th& 
composition stand in a warm place for several days, stir- 
ring it occasionally. With this Uqaor, made boiling hot, 
biush over the wood till the desired depth of color is ob- 
tained. Then, with another brush, brush over the wood, 
while yet wet, with a solution of alum, in the proportion 
Of two ounces of alum to a quart of water. 

For a pink or rose red, use double the qaantUy of pot- 
ashes. 

TO STAIN l^-OOP GREEN. 

Dissolve verdigris In vinegar, or crystals of verdigris 
in water) »a4 brush over the wood with the hot s&lutlon* 



25 
TO STAIN WOOD YELLOW. 

Infuse an ounce of turmeric In a pint of ppirlts of 
v?lne, and let tlie mixture stand for several days closely 
covered, shaking It occasionally. Brush over the wood 
with this infusion. A reddish yellow maybe given to 
the color by the addition of a little gum-tragacanth. 

Diluted nitric acid will stain wood yellow. 

TO STAIN WOOD BLUE. 

Dissolve copper In diluted nitric acid, and brush It 
while hot several times over the wood; then m-ike a so- 
lution of pearl-ashes, In the proportion of two ounces to 
a pint of water, and brush over the stain made with the 
solution of copper, t'll the color be perfectly blue. 

The green stain, made as above with verdigris, may be 
changed to a blue by the solution of pearl-ashes. 

Ttje sulphate of indigo, which may be had ready pre- 
pared of the dyers, will, when diluted »Uh water, niaka 
a blue ttain. 

TO STAIN WOOD BLACK. 

Brush the wood several times with a hot decoction of 
logwood, then several times with common ink. 

To make a very f5ne black, brush over the wood with 
a solution of copper in nitric acid as for blue, and after- 
wards with logwood, till all the greenness of the copper 
Bolution is gone. 

TO STAIN WOOD A MAHOGANY COLOR. 

Two ounces of madder and one ounce of fustic, boiled 
In a quart of water, make a light mahogany stain: but a 
dark stain may be obtained by using half an ounce of log- 
wood insteaii of the madder, and brushing the Btalned 
wood over with a weak solution of potash. 



25 
TO STAIN WOOD PURPLE. 

Take one ounce of logwood and two dracbms of Brazil 
wood: boil them together In a quart of water over a mo- 
derate fire. When one-half of the fluid Is evaporated, 
straiQ the decoction, and brush It several times over the 
wood. After the wood is dry, brush it over with a solu- 
tion of a drachm of pearl-ashes in a pint ot water. 



A FIREPROOF AND WATER-PROOF 
CE.^IENT. 

To halt a pint of milk put an equal quantity of vineftar 
In order to curdle it; then separate the curd from the 
■whey, and mix the whey with the whites of four or flva 
eggs, beating the whole well together. When it is well 
mixed, add a little quick lime through a sieve until it hag 
acquired the consistence of a thick paste. 

With this cement, broken vessels and cracks of all 
ktads may be mended; it dries quickly, and resists the 
action of water and ol Are applied to vessels containing 
water. 

POTATO SIZE. 

Size is a mtich-diluted cement, and is either prepared 
from common glue or Idnglass, or by boiling the shreds of 
parchment or white leather, or consists of flour pasta 
made very thin; but these composltlong, particularly 
those of an animal nature, qnickly putrefy, and produce 
a disagreeable smell, from which potato size is free. Tlae 
potatoes must be grated into wafer, and after changing 
the water oneo or twice, there will be found at the bot- 
tom of the vessel a white fecula or starch. This starch 
Is made Into size by boiling It with a sufficient qnantVty 
of water. Mingled with whitewash, an excellent and 
dnrable white is farmed, which will not rub off. 



27 

JOSEPH SMITH'S LAST DKEAM. 



In Jnne, 1844, when Joseph Smith went to Carthage 
and delivered himself up to Gov. Ford, I accorapanled 
bliU; and while on the way thither) he related to ma 
and bis brother Hyrurn the following dream: 

He said: "While I was at Jordan's In Iowa the other 
Bight, 1 dreamed that myself and ray brother Hyrum 
went on board of a large steamboat, lying in a small 
bay, near the great ocean. Shortly after we went on 
board there was an '^alarm of flre,'' and 1 discovered 
that the boat had been anchored some distance from the 
shore, out in the bay, and that an escape from the fire, 
in the confusion, appeared hazardous; but, as delay waa 
folly, I and Hyrun Jumped overboard, and tried our 
faith at walking upon the waier. 

At first we sank in the water nearly to our knees, but 
as we proceeded we increased In failb, and were soon 
able to walk upon the water. On looking towards th« 
burning boat in the east, we saw that it was drifting 
towards the wharf and the town, with a great flame and 
clouds of smoke; and, as if by whirlwind, the town was 
taking flre, too, ro that the scena of destruction and 
horror of the frightened inhabitants was terrible. 

We proceeded on the bofom of tho mighty deep and 
were sson out of sight of land. The ocean was still; the 
rays of the sua were bright, and we forgot all the trou- 
bles of our Mother Earth. Just at that moment I heard 
the sound of a human voice, and, turning round, saw 
my brother Samuel H. approaching towards us from tho 
east. We stopped and he came up. After a moment's 
conversation he Informed me that he had been lonesome 
back, and had made up his mind to go with me across 
the mighty deep. 

We all started again, and in a short lime were blest 



•28 

•with tho first sight of a city, whoRe gold and silver 
steeples and towers were more beautiful than aay I had 
ever seen or heard of on earth. It stood, as It were, upon 
the western shore of the mighty deep we were walking 
on, and Its order and glory seemed far beyond the wis- 
dom of man. While we were gazing upon the perfec- 
tion of the city, a small boat launched off from the port, 
an(?, almost as quick as thought, came to us. In an in- 
stant they toofe us on board and saluted us with a wel- 
come, and with music such as is not on earth. The next 
scene, on landing, -was more than I can describe: the 
greeting of old friends, the music from a thousand towers, 
and the light of God himself at the return of three of 
his sons, soothed my soul Into a quiet and a Joy that I 
felt as If I was truly in heaven. I gazed upon the splen- 
dor; 1 greeted my friends, I awoke, and lo, it was a 
dream! 

■While I meditated upon snch a marvelous scene, I fell 
asleep again, and behold I stood near the shore of tha 
burning boat, and there was a great consternation among 
the ofncers, crew and passengers of the flaming rraft, 
as there seemed to be much ammunition or powder on 
board. The a'arm was given that the fire was near the 
magazine, and la a moment, suddenly, it blew up with a 
great noise, and sank in deep water with all on board. 
I then turned to the country east, among the bnshy 
openings, and saw William and Wilson Law endeavoring 
to escape from the wild beasts of the forest, but two lloi>« 
rushed out of a thicket and devoured them. 1 awoko 
again." , 

I will say that Joseph never told this dream again, as 
he was m&rtyred about two days after. I relate from 
recollection as nearly as I can. 

rilELPS. 



29 

A REVELATION TO JOSEPH SMITH, 3VH., 
GIVEN JUNE, 1830. 

The words of God which he spake unto Moses at a 
time when Moses was caught up into an exceeding h'gh 
mountain; and he saw God face to face, and he talked 
"wl h him, and the glory of God was upon Moses; there- 
fore Moses could endure his presence. And God spake 
unto Moses, saying: Behold I am the Lord God Al- 
mighty, and endless is my name, for I am without be- 
ginning of days or end of years, and is not this endless? 
And behold thou art my son, wherefore, look and I will 
6how thee the workmanship of mine hands, but not all: 
for my works are without end, and also my word", for 
they never cease: wherefore no man can behold all my 
works except he behold all my glory; and no man can 
behold all my glory and afterwards remain In the flesh. 
And I have a work for thee, Moses, my son; and thou 
art In the similitude of mine only begotten; and mine 
only begotten is and shall be the Savior, for he is fnll ol 
grace and truth; but there is no God besides me; and all 
things are present with me, for I knew them all. And 
now behold this one thing I show unto thee, Moses, mj. 
son, for thou art In the world, and now I show it nnto 
thee. 

And it came to pass that Moses looked and beheld the 
world upon which he was created, and Moses beheld the 
world and the ends thereof, and all the children of mea 
which was and which are created; of the.same ha greatly 
marvelled, and wondered, and the presence of God with- 
drew from Moses, that his glory was not upon MosesJ 
and Moses was left unto himself. And as he was left 
unto himself he fell unto the earth, and it came to pass 
that it was for the ^pace of many hours before Moses did 
again receive his natural strength like unto man; and 
he salth nnto himself: Now, for this cause \ know that 
man is nothing, which thing I never had eup;osed, but 



30 

now mine eyes, mine own eyes, but not mine eyes, for 
tnlue eyea could not have beheldi lor I ehould have 
withered and died In hl8 presence; but his glory was upon 
me; and I beheld his face, for I was transfigured bbfors 
him. 

And it came to pass that when Moses had said thesa 
wordF) behold Satan came tempting him, saying: Moses, 
eon of man, warship me. And It came to pasF, that 
Moses looked upon Satan, and s»id who art thou?^for 
behold I am a son of God, In (he similitude of his only 
begotten) and where Is thy glory, that I should worship 
thee? For behold I could not look upon God except hJs 
glory should come upon me, and I were strengthened be- 
fore him, but I can look upon thee in the nitnral man. 
Is It not so suiely? Blessed ia the name of my God, for 
hlf spirit hath not altogether withdrawn from me, or 
else, where Is thy glory, for it Is darkness unto me; and 
I am Judge between thee and God; for Gcd said unto me, 
worship God. for him only shall thou serve. Get thon 
bence, Satan; deceive me not, for God said unto me, 
thou art after the similitude of mine only begotten. 

And he also gave me commandments, when he called 
■nnto me out of the "burning bush," saying: Call upon 
God In the name of mine only begotten, and worship me. 
And again Moses said, I will not cease to call upon God. 
I have these things to inquire of him, for his glory has 
been upon me; wherefore I can judge between him and 
.thee. Depart hence, Satan. 

And now when Moses had said these words, Satan 
cried with a loud voice, and went upon the earth, and 
commanded, saying; I am the only begotten, worship 
me. And it came to pass that Moses bescan to tear ex- 
ceedingly; and as he began to fear he saw the bitterness 
of hell: nevertheless, calling upon God, he received 
strength, and he commanded, saying: Depart from me, 
Satan, for this one God only will I worship, which is tbft 



81 

Cod of glory. And now Satan becan to tremble, an^ 
(he eartb shook; and Moses receive'! streDgtti, and ca I- 
ed upon God, saying: In the name of Jesus Christ, de- 
part hence Satan. 

And It came to pass, that Satnn cried witly a lotid 
voice, with weeping and gnashing of teeth, and depart- 
ed hence; even from the presence ef Moses, that he be- 
held him not. 

ABd now of this thing Moses bore record, but because 
of wickedness It Is not had among the children of men. 
And It came to pass that wh»n Satan had departed from 
the presence of Moses, he lifted up his eyes unto hea- 
ven, being filled with the Holy Ghost, which beareth 
record of the Father and the Son; and calllcg on the 
name of God he beheld his glory again, for It was upon 
him, and he heard a voice, Basing: Blessed art ihou, 
Moses, for I the Almighty have chosen thee, and thou 
Shalt be made stronger than many waters; for they shall 
obey thy command as if thou wert God. And lo, I am 
with thee, even unto the end of thy days, for thou 
Shalt deliver my people from bondage, even Israel my 
chosen. 

And it came to pass as Koses' voice was still speaking) 
he cast his ejes, and beheld the earth, yea, even all the 
face of It, there was not a particle of It which he did not 
behold, descrying It by the Spirit of God. And he be- 
held also the Inhabitants thereof, and there was not a 
soul which he beheld not, and he discerned them by the 
Spirit Of God. And their numbers were great, even num- 
berless as the saBd upon the sea shore. And lie be- 
held many lands; and each laad was called earth, and 
there were Inhabitants on the face thereof. And it 
came to pass that Moses called upon God, saying: Tell 
n»e, I pray thee, why these things are so, and by what 
thon madest them? And behold the glory of God was 
upon Moses, eo that Moses stood In the presence of God, 
MSi he taUed wtth Hosts face to tace; and the Loid Gu4 



32 

sslJ unto Mosef, for mine own purpose have I maife 
th«se things. Here Is wisdom, «nd It remalneth In mo 
And by the word of my power have I created themj 
which Is mine only begotten Son, vho Is full of graca 
and truth. And worlds without number have I created; 
and I al>o created them for mine own purpose; and by 
the Son I created them, which Is mine only begotten. 
And the first man, of all men, have I called Adam, 
which isflianj.. But only an account of this earth, and 
the inhablvmts thereof, give I unto you; for behold 
there are many worlds which have passed away by the 
wordj of my power. And there are many which now 
Btand, and lunum^rable are they unto man, but all things 
are numbered unto me, lor they are mine, and I know 
them. 

And it came to pass tbat Moses spake unto th'e^nrd) 
saying. Be merciful unto thy servant, O God, an 1 tell mo 
concerning this earlh, and the Inhabitants thereof, and 
also the heavens, and then thy servaiit will be content. 

And tha Lord God spake unto Moses, saying. The 
heavens they are many, and tbey cannot be numjered 
unto man, but they are numbered unto me, for they aro 
mine, and as one earth shall pass away, and the hodvens 
thereof, even so shall another come; ^y^there is no end 
to my works, neltlier to my words. -^^ ' 

■Beh<3M this is my work to my glory, to the immortality 
and eternal life of man. And now Moses, my son, I 
will speak nnto you concerning this earth upon which 
thou Blandest; and thou sbalt write these things which 1 
Bhall 8peak, and in a day when tbe children of men 
Shall esteem my words as nought, and lake J'uny of 
Ihem from the book which thou shait write, behold I 
xvlll raise up another like unto thee, and they shall be 
had aeain among the chl dren of men; among as ma-ny 
HS shall bellovw those words wert- spoken -unl>' 
Kflses in the Mount, the name of whi'h shnll not bo 
tnuwn amonc the cbiMreu oi man. And now they arO' 
epokun uatoyuu. Amen.