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>^"S NEW YORK ' 

■ oUC LIBRARY 

. ■'■■■■.■ rrvr^v ,v.;g^ ; 

■■'-.-■■■ ■ > i 



•5 KNEW YORK 

or.IC LIBRARY 



•* » 



ALUMNI RECORD 



AND 



GENERAL CATALOGUE 






OP 




RACUSE UNIVERSITY 



I89Q-I9O4 



» 






VGi",.-n... ■•• 

* 
(iiupn.^ii3r;T> •" . - . ', 



■DITSU BY 



FRANK SMALLEY, '74 



Poblithed by the Aliimni Association of Syracuse University 



SYRACUSE, NEW YORK 
1904 



PUBLIC UBR/^P^^ 

68945§ 






LCNOX AND 

^^,^.. NATIONS 






• • • • •,• 



- •• • 






•• • 
• • 

•• •« 



••• 



W. P.*AUl(Paill^*ptflH{BR AND BINDER 



• • • 



• • • 



^904 
•• ••• ••• • 






• ••• ••• •• 






• •• 



ALMA MATER 

Fair lady of our love^ an J /on J as fair ^ 

We wko are tAine, within these /eaves enrolled^ 

As on seme Trajan* s triumph column bold 

Full carved noitk xlofsia grace jtrd^d'e^-^- 

Anew salute^ibse^ anu (itf*- love ^la^e. 

Tet mights* t th^ chide us at toe cold, 

Who art so young, Vfhije nut ere grytving old. 

And challenge us tc pro've our linfn^* •^^<'« 

Take then^ vte asi, tli* J^^ecpfd uev^ wf bring , 

Which wrought fiv^ioySf moft oft from burning tears. 

Doth make some hint^ though brief of thee and thine. 

Robbing oblivion of forgotten years, 

And th* Achillean shield of time to ring 

With lives re-lit at Learning* s sacred shrine. 

Arthur Copeland, D.D., *84. 



ILLUSTRATIONS 

I. Chancellor Day in Cap and Gown. Frontispiece 

a. Senior ProfessovsS •Atfrr^Mever and John Van Duyn. Facing page 51 

3. Trustee* and Bct^pi<AdfHt IVastiMjp. jaoloob/Hon. Peter Burns, Theodore Irwin, 
Hon. James J. Belden, John Lymaif. FaViiSft P9g^^ > 

4. Lyman Cornelius Smit^ ^Codo&fVC rP<>*l'>i^B of Lyman C. Smith and Dean Wm. 
Kent. Facing page 346 * • ** T . . • *. *r T f *• • 

J Trustees : Man1«y«^^arji an^jGeprge* Lansing Taylor. ♦ o-«;«« «-«- «q, 
5- 1 Alumni Trusteed ^fti»^. HolSci tncJ-Harry N. Marvin. \ ^»^»°8 P*K« ^3 

6. Hall of Languages, Jo^fl T2roa8e2:«2ftgf aad Library. Facing page 326 

7. Holden Observatory, Oval and Law College. Facing page 466 

8. Winchell Hall, Haven Hall and Heating Plant. Facing page 589 



CONTENTS 

PAOB 

Preface 7 

ADDals, 1899-1904 9 

The Corporation 51 

The Alnmni Association 55 

Constitution 55 

Officers 56 

Alumni Trustees 57 

Alumni Record Account 59 

Alumni Endowment 61 

New York Alumni Association 62 

Chicago Alnmni Association 63 

Rochester Alumni Association 63 

Buffalo Alumni Association 65 

Albany Alumni Association 66 

Central New York Alumni Association 67 

Graduate Teachers' Association 67 

Faculty of the University Alphabetically Arranged 69 

Summary , 85 

Professors* Degrees and theif, Sor.rces.^. ..... ^ ^v^ -••*• 86 

University Senate ..'. . » . . . ,;%•.. . V. • » •'• . . V^'. ' 87 

Library Committee , ^ , . . . .^. 88 

Faculty of the University, with Records .;..'. 89 

Chancellor ..........,....-..=. 89 

Professors : College of Liberal' Arts-. . . . '. ." 89 

Associate and Assistant ProfeadcAv:*Colle|;e of Liberal Arts 97 

Instructors : College of Liberal Arts 101 

Assitants : College of Liberal Arts 106 

Professors : College of Medicine 114 

Lecturers : 'College of Medicine 115 

Instructors : College of Medicine 118 

Demonstrators : College of Medicine 120 

Officers : College of Medicine 122 

Professors : College of Fine Arts 123 

Associate Professors : College of Fine Arts. 125 

Instructors : College of Fine Arts 126 

Professors : College of Law 131 

Instructors : College of Law 132 

Lecturers : College of Law 134 

Professors: College of Applied Science 136 

Associate Professors : College of Applied Science 137 

Instructors : College of Applied Science 138 

Assistants : College of Applied Science 139 

Alumni, 1899-1903 inclusive, with Records 140 

Numerical Index of Graduates 241 

Duplicate Degrees 247 

Graduates in Certificate Courses, with Records 248 



6 CONTBNTS 

PAOB 

Numerical Index of Graduates in Certificate Courses 255 

Graduate Alumni, with Records 256 

1. Degrees in Course 256 

2. Degrees ad eundetn 259 

Honorary Alumni, with Records : Degrees honoris causa . . 260 

1. Masters* Degrees 260 

2. Doctors* Degrees 261 

Numerical Index of Graduate and Honorary Alumni 268 

Graduate Courses and Degrees 270 

Statistical Tables 273 

I. Annual Attendance, 1899-1904 273 

II. Degrees Conferred and Undergraduate Attendance. . .273, 274 

III. Summary of Students, 1903-1904. 274 

IV. Geographical Summary of Students, 1903-1904 275 

V. Summary of Alumni 276 

Brief Financial Statement of the University ( 1903) 278 

Library Statement 279 

University Papers 281 

Publications of tnei^TUivevsity*. .^ 281 

Some Syracuse Senl^ ^. «. /. .V . . .*. •« •*...;«/.' 283 

Some Special Historical ^I^terial * .:',.ft\l\ .\ 289 

I. Fac Sifniie}^iTh^^A2A*kf9W[^ei\ in Geneva College, 1 1 

II. Inaugu^tioh Ci ^i^f^aXX^ 291 

III. Laying Of *C>cirner^'S^Ofie}Htf 11 of Languages 301 

IV. Dedication of the Hall of Languages 322 

V. Early Commencement Programs 327 

VI. Class Day Programs 349 

VIL College of Medicine •. 363 

VIII. College of Fine Arts, Early Papers 371 

IX. Rehearsals and Exhibitions 387 

X. Calculus Ceremonies 405 

XI. Boating in the *7o*s 422 

XII. Early Track Meets 427 

XIII. Miscellaneous 437 

Athletics 457 

Track and Field Records 464 

Syracuse University Academic A. A 465 

Scholarship Honors 467 

Geographical Distribution of Alumni 473 

Non-Graduates 1899-1903 — Alphabetically Arranged 503 

Summary of Non-Graduates 588 

Index of Alumni 589 

** ** *• Class of 1904 664 

Index of Graduates in Certificate Courses 67 1 

General Index 673 



PREFACE 



It may safely be affirmed that the Alumni Record published by the 
Alumni Association first in 1887, and in a complete and final form in 1899, 
established the value of a publication that fixes in compact historical form 
all that merits permanence in University history. In this form the history 
of every important event and of every individual connected with the Uni- 
versity is given in some detail, and every phase and feature of University 
life is exhibited. This certainly is more satisfactory to any reader who has 
sustained the relation of officer, teacher or student than would be a general 
history of the institution in the usual form. In fact it is a store-house of 
facts, neither dry nor uninteresting, an indispensable source book of infor- 
mation, for the writer of such a general history. To the editor the satis- 
faction that alumni have experienced in turning the pages of the former 
volume has often been expressed in emphatic terms. It is his hope that 
these and the later graduates will derive the same pleasure from the reading 
of this volume wherein the same method has been pursued. 

II 

Daring these five years since the publication of the Record the University 
haa advanced by leaps and bounds. The annual student increment has been 
almost exactly 200, until the attendance is now expressed by the twice 
repeated iteration of the figure 2. The faculty has grown remarkably and 
now includes 189 names. These teachers are all in active service and they 
represent in their degrees 69 different American and foreign colleges and 
universities. 

A new college has been bom — Applied Science. A generous citizen and 
trustee, Mr. Lyman Cornelius Smith, has earned the lasting gratitude of 
every friend of the University by bringing our hopes in this direction into 
snccessful realization. Among money donations the princely gift of 
(400,000.00 of President Archbold ranks first. Several deceased trustees 
have left muni ficient bequests, notably this very year, Hon. James J. Belden 
and Mr. John Lyman. These gifts show as nothing else could, the con- 
fidence of financiers, who are the most conservative of men, in the perman- 
ency of the University, in the wisdom of the management and in the value 
of the output. The University has been broadened and strengthened in 
xbrnxLj ways, and was never so vigorous and so confident of the future as it 
is now. Among added facilities during the quinquennium must be noted 
the buildings erected of which there are four, viz. the Smith College, the 
Heating Plant, Winchell Hall and Haven Hall. The next half decade will 
witness even greater activity in building if the imperative demands of 



8 PRBFACB 

unprecedented growth shall be heeded. No one who has caught the spirit 
of the administration can doubt that they will be heeded. 

Chancellor Day has had fine visions of a university of the broadest scope 
and of national eminence, and wisely and unweariedly has sought to realize 
his ideals. With sufficient financial support his complete success is not in 
doubt. To conclude this paragraph, it is only just to say that to his 
breadth of view, practical business ability, personality and leadership more 
than to all other causes combined is due present prosperity. 

Ill 

This volume is a supplement to the Alumni Record, 1835-1899, and is 
based on it. And yet the records of alumni given in that volume are not 
supplemented here except the records of those who are members of the 
faculty, which are of necessity brought down to date, and of those who have 
taken an additional degree since 1898. The reasons for this exclusion are 
the necessity of keeping this book within reasonable limits and, especially, 
the probability that a third volume will be published in 1909, and in that, 
ten years having elapsed, all alumni records should be fully supplemented. 
Eight hundred and eighty-eight degrees were conferred during the five years 
here covered, a few of these being second degrees to persons already pos- 
sessed of one from Syracuse. 

The Index of Alumni has received much attention. No pains has been 
spared to secure correct addresses. This is difficult because business and 
professional requirements, and marriages also, lead to many changes of 
residence, and the perplexed corrector of these addresses dealing with 
about four thousand names, is sometimes ready to affirm that the changes 
are at the rate of at least one a minute. 

The index of Alumni is supplemented by an Index of Graduates in Cer- 
tificate Courses. The first certificate given was in 1898 in a Course in Library 
Economy. These certificate courses extend over a period of two years, and 
except the course just mentioned are all scheduled in the College of Fine 
Arts. Fifty-three certificates altogether have been given. 

Credit is given in loco for nnremunerated assistance in the preparation 
of material. The Editor. 

Syracuse University, January, 1904. 



ANNALS OF SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY 

1899-1904* 

Z899 

fan. 2. Banquet of the Chicago Alumni Association of Syracuse Univer- 

[an. 3. Classes resumed after the holidays. Death of Prof. Scott Owen, 
D., »83. 

Jan. 4. Glee, Mandolin and Banjo Clubs returned from the holiday trip. 
Jan. 5. Professor Mace left to deliver a series of University extension 
rtnres. 

Jan. 6. Machinery in the new Steele Hall of Physics set in motion. 
Jan. 10. The Phi Kappa Psi*s gave a party to their women friends of the 
sshman class. 

Jan. II. Mr. Lyman Cornelius Smith presented the University a pre- 
don lathe for the Phjrsical Laboratory of the Esther Baker Steele Hall of 
kyaics. 

Jan. 12. Kappa Kappa Gamma opened the new chapter house with a 
ception to the faculties. 

Jan. 13. Professor Holzwarth elected president of the Modem Language 
laociation. 

Professor Hargitt was recently elected president of the N. Y. State 
ience Teachers' Association. 

Jan. 14. Carl Dorr, 1900, elected football captain for next season. 
Jan. 15. Miss Ruth Rouse, National Secretary of the Collegiate Y. W. 
A., addressed the students at the Association rooms. 
Jan. 16. The University Debating Club organized, C. T. Murdock, '99, 
esident. Membership limited to twenty. 

Jan. 19. Basketball games at the gymnasium between the S. A. A. and 
e Highland Club ; also between the Y. M. C. A. team and the ITniversity . . 
rore in the latter a tie. 

Jan. 20-27. Mid- year examinations in the College of Liberal Arts. 
Jan. 24. Meeting of the Trustees. Tuition in the College of Fine Arts • 
duced. Gifts to the University were announced as follows : John S. 
nyler, $2,000, Wm. McEckron, |i,ooo, and A. A. Howlett, |soo. Mr. 
owlett sent in his resignation as a member of the Board on account of 
iling health. He was unanimously requested to withdraw his resignation • 
id he was relieved from serving on the Executive Committee, his place- 
ing filled by the election of Lyman C. Smith, and on the Finance audi 
vestment Committee, James J. Belden being elected to fill the vacancy « 

> Compiled mminlj by Miss Lucy 1$. Babcock, '03. 



lO ANNALS 1^ 

Professors Peck and Bmcns were reelected. J. Harte Cuningham was 
appointed Superintendent of Buildings and John H. Cuningham, Superin- 
tendent of Grounds. 

Ralph A. Wilcox and Albert G. Watkins were voted the degree of M.D. 
The Chancellor reported that the faculty of the College of Liberal Arts was 
unanimously opposed to any change in the present method of Commence- 
ment Exercises. • The Board authorized the creation of an endowment of a 
chair to be named in honor of the late Vice-Chancellor, John Raymond 
French. The Chancellor was authorized to appoint a delegate to represent 
the University at the Twelfth International Congress of Orientalists to be 
held in Rome, Italy, 2 Oct., 1899 ; also to sign a proper legal consent for the 
Syracuse Rapid Transit Co. to construct a single or double track road on 
University Place. Consent was not given to the Company to enter the 
Campus. 

Jan. 30. Rev. J. H. Myers, Ph.D., '79, began a series of meetings under 
the auspices of the College Christian Associations. 

Jan. 31. Beginning of second semester, College of Liberal Arts. 

Feb. 3. Members of the sophomore class made arrangements to place a 
memorial tablet in the chapel of the Hall of Languages for the late J. 
Edward Durston. The class of 1900 will erect another in memory of 
Lucius C. Barry. 

Feb. 5. Students in the College of Medicine adopted a new cap. 

Feb. 6. Syracuse University Chess Club organized. Class elections of 
1902 ; L. S. Carter elected president. 

Feb. 7. Kappa Alpha Theta entertained informally. Dr. Wm. North 
Rice, Professor of Geology at Wesleyan University, visited the University. 

Feb. 9. Annual City Glee Club Concert at Wieting Opera House. 

Feb. 12. Day of Prayer for Colleges. Rev. W. D. Marsh, '79, of Utica, 
addressed the students on the '* Secret of Spiritual Power." 

Feb. 14. Formal opening of the Classical Club Rooms. Address by Mrs. 
Ellen M. Mitchell. 

Feb. 17. Announcement of a course in magazine and newspaper illus- 
trating to be offered in the College of Fine Arts. Gifts of $1,000 each were 
received by the Chancellor from Hon. J. J. Belden and Erastus F. Holden 
of Syracuse. 

FeT). 17-19. Y. W. C. T. U. Conference of Central New York held with 
the Syracuse University Union. On Feb. 19, Miss Laura Wild, Editor of 
The Evangel addressed a meeting on ** Temptations of Young People.'* 

Feb. 20. Election of Officers of the Senior Class resulted as follows : 
President, C. T. Murdock ; Vice-president, L. A. Bard ; Historian, Zona L. 
Dunn. 

Feb. 21. Phi Delta Theta entertained their women friends in their new 
chapter house. 

Feb. 28. *The '* Comstock " Chapter of Phi DelU Phi established at the 
College of Law. 

• The fmternity Phi Delta Phi (the *' Kent " Chapter) was founded at the law depart- 



.o^ SYRACUSB UNIVERSITY II 

March 3. Delta Upsilon gave a reception to celebrate the twenty-fifth 
anniversary of the establishment of the Chapter. l5,ooo presented to the 
University by the heirs of the late Trustee, H. H. Crary of Binghamton, 
N. Y. 

March 7. Clarence W. Darling, '00, won first prize in the New York 
State Intercollegiate Oratorical Association competition at the University 
of Rochester. His theme was '* Christ and Mohammed.** 

March 9. Four records were broken at the indoor athletic meet. The 
tuccessfnl men were Scrafford, £. T. Glass, Orvis, and Hickox. 

March 10. The general Athletic Committee appointed the following 
coaches : Instructor Scott for the track teams, Frank E. Wade for the 
football and E. C. Griffin for the baseball. 

March 17. Professor I. J. Peritz invited to contribute to Encyclopedia 
Biblica edited by Prof. T. K. Cheyne, LL.D., of Oxford University. 

March 21. Chancellor Day addressed the students in chapel. He 
announced that Mr. Lyman C. Smith would present the University an 
eight oar shell if a crew were organized. 

March 24. Crew organized. $1,320 raised for athletics at Mass Meeting. 
Addresses by Chancellor Day, Professor Smalley, Professor John Van Dnyn 
and Geo. H. Bond, '94. 

March 26. President Charles F. Thwing of Western Reserve University, 
addressed the union meeting of the Associations. 

March 29-April 4. Easter vacation. 

April I. Faculty Committee appointed for Intercollegiate athletic con- 
tests in New York, consisting of one member from each of the five colleges 
having the highest scores for the year. Dr. Smalley was named to repre- 
sent S3rracu8e. 

April 4-5. Convention of N. Y. State Elocutionists in Assembly Hall. 

April 7. Catalogue issued. Students number 1,130; Faculty 132. 

The University Block and the Esther Baker Steele Hall of Physics were 
erected during the year. 

April ii« Meeting of the Chess Club. Out of nine games played simul- 
taneously. Dr. Calthrop won six. 

April 13. Funds for a rowing machine were given by Trustee Clarence 
W. Seamans. 

April 15. Syracuse University was invited to send a crew to the Pough- 
keepsie regatta. 

April 18. Banquet at the Phi Kappa Psi house to celebrate the fifteenth 
anniversary of the founding of the chapter. 

ment of the Univenity of Michigan in 1869. The chapters were to be named after di»- 
tiagnished lawyers. In 1875 a second chapter, the '* Sharswood." was established at the 
DniTersity of Pennsylvania. It is purely a law fraternity and takes members of all Col- 
lege fraternities. The badge until i88a was a shield shaped lozenge, pointed at the top, 
rounded at the bottom. In the center was a field upon which was displayed five crosses. 
Above this were the letters " « a • " with a star in each comer. The badge since 188a 
is a monogram. The fraternity colors are wme color and pearl blue. The flower is the 
forget-me-not. Sair^t Manual. 



12 ANNALS 

1899 

April 28. Pi Beta Phi celebrated the thirty-second aaniversary of the 
founding of the fraternity. 

April 29. Annual inter-class meet. Freshman score 36 ; sophomore 50 ; 
junior 12 ; senior 25. 

April 30. Bishop Merrill addressed the union meeting of the Christian 
Associations in John Crouse College Hall. 

May I. J goo Onondagan issued. Lecture under the auspices of the Class- 
ical Club by Charles Waldstein, L.H.D., of Cambridge University, at 
Assembly Hall, on ** The Spirit of Greek Art.'* 

April 2-3. Twentieth Century Endowment Convention held in John 
Crouse Memorial Building. 

May 6. Syracuse University Fencing team defeated the Cornell Fencing 
team. E. R. Smith, '96, Syracuse, won the individual championship. 

May 8. Concert by the Syracuse University Symphony Orchestra in John 
Crouse College. 

May 13. Dual Track meet between Syracuse and Cornell. Syracuse 48)^, 
Cornell 55^. 

May 19. * A chapter of the Delta Chi Fraternity established at the Col- 
lege of Law. Moving-up day celebrated. 

May 22. Alumni Record issued. 

May 22-June 2. Final examinations. 

May 27. Second Annual Track meet of the Syracuse University Academic 
Athletic Association held on Syracuse University field, Claverack, { Hudson 
River Institute), winning by a score of 59 points. Wyoming scored 27 
points, Cortland 21, Cazenovia 10, etc. 

Intercollegiate meet won by Pennsylvania with 57 points. Harvard second 
with 28 points, Yale third with 22>^ points, Princeton fourth with 11 points 
and S3rracuse fifth with 10 points. 

May 29. First Musical Soiree of the Class of '99 ; held in John Crouse 
College Hall. 

Bequest of $5000 to the University by Mrs. Thankful A. Price late of 
Cortland, N. Y., for founding scholarships in memory of her son, Ros- 
well S. Price, '76, who died in 1878. 

Meeting of Onondagan Board to elect officers. R. A. Waite, Jr. was 
elected editor-in-chief and H. B. Myron business manager. 

June I. First Annual Banquet of Syracuse Alumni Association of Beta 
TheU Phi held at the St. Cloud Hotel. 

June 3. Special meeting of the Phi Beta Kappa. The following were 
elected to membership from the senior class : Hugh Sears Lowther, Hva 
May Bryan, Clara Blanche Knapp, Edna Hildreth, Gilbert Giddings Benja- 
min, Willis Hoag Michell, Bertha E. Coates, Edith M. Wilson, Minnie F. 
Heermans, Willis B. Ridgeway, Frederick Probst Webster, Zona L. Dunn. 

June 5. Annual Meeting of the Phi Beta Kappa. The following alumni 

* The Delta Chi fraternity was organised in 1890 at Cornell University. Its memberahip 
is restricted to lawyera and law students. Government is vested in a body called the 
" Supreme Court." The badge is a jeweled '* A ** superimposed upon a gold ** X. * 
BairtPs Manual, 



i899 



SYRACrSB UNTVBRSITY I3 



were initiated : Roland S. Keyser, '72, Elbridge Olin Kinne, '76, Bdwin 
Nottingham, '76, William Nottingham, '76, James Duane Phelps, '76, 
Charles Newell Cobb, '77, Edward L. Harris, '78, Horace Humboldt Howe, 
*79, Edward D. Roe, Jr., *8o. Benjamin J. Shove, *8o, Frederick Herbert 
Howard, '81, David Engene Smith, *8i ; also the members elect of the class 
of '99 ; alao Francis J. Cheney, '72, was initiated 6 June, 1899, Wilbur P. 
Steele, '72, 13 June, 1899; Henry D. Didama, 21 Dec, 1899; Walter A. 
Brownell, '65, same date ; Maltbie D. Babcock, '79, 22 Dec., 1899 ; Martha 
Footc Crow, '76, I Jan., 1900. 

June 3. The Chancellor*8 Oratorical Prize Contest, won by William John 
Henry, *oi, 2d, prize by Chas.^T. Murdock, '99, third prize by Elizabeth G. 
Delaney, *do. 

June 4. Baccalaureate sermon by the Chancellor. 7:30 p. m. sermon by 
Rev. C. C. Albertson, Ph.D., pastor Delaware Avenue M. E. Church, Buf- 
falo, N. Y., before the Young Men's and Young Women's Christian Asso- 
ciations. 

June 5-7. Annual Exhibition, in John Crouse College, of works of art 
produced by students during the year. 

Jnne 5. Second musical soiree of the Class of '99 in John Crouse Col- 
lege Hall. 

June 6. Annual meeting of the board of Trustees. Chancellor Day was 
unanimously reelected. 

The East Syracuse High School and Cortland Conservatory of Music 
were made gymnasia of the University. The following officers were elected : 
President, John D. Archbold ; First Vice-President, Erastus F. Holden ; 
Second Vice-President, James B. Brooks ; Third Vice-President, Alfred A. 
Howlett ; Secretary, Edwin Nottingham ; Treasurer, Wilfred W. Porter. 

A favorable response was made to the requests of the University Chris- 
tian Associations through their president that they be given financial assist- 
ance for the purpose of employing a secretary. A committee was appointed 
to revise the by-laws of the University. 

Instructor J. H. Hamilton was made Associate Professor of Economics, 
Instructor F. E. Farley, Associate Professor of English and Instructor 
J. A. R. Scott, Professor of Athletics and Director of the Gymuasium. The 
following instructors were elected for the College of Liberal Arts : Harry 
M. Smith in Chemistry, John A. Bole in German, John G. Coulter in 
Botany, Herbert M. Burchard in Greek, Geo. A. Wilson in Philosophy and 
Arthur S. Patterson in French. Samuel N. Taylor was elected Associate 
Professor of Physics. In the College of Medicine, Professor William Man- 
liua Smith resigned as Professor of Chemistry and was elected Emeritus 
Profesaor of the same. Dr. Geo. M. Price was made Professor of Anat- 
omy and Dr. T. H. Halstead Professor of Laryngology and Otology, which 
Chair was now first established. 

Richard G. Calthrop was elected Professor of Vocal Music to succeed 
Albert H. Garrett in the College of Pine Arts, and a course in Normal 
Drawing was established in the same College. 



14 ANNALS 



1899 



In the College of Law, Hon. Louis Marshall oC New York was made 
Lecturer on the Constitution of the State of New York and Lamont Stil- 
well Lecturer on Medical Jurisprudence. 

Business meeting of the Alumni Association in the Hall of Languages ; 
addresses bj Chancellor Day, Deans Leonard and McChesney and Roland 
S. Keyser, '72. W. W. Porter, '86, was elected an alumni trustee. The 
president. Professor F. J. Cheney, Ph.D., '72, presided. 

June 7. io:co a. m. Commencement of all the Colleges in John Crousc 
College Hall. Oration by Dr. Henry King Carroll, LL.D., formerly of 
'*The Independent ** and recently President McKinley*s Special Commis- 
sioner to Porto Rico. His subject was ** Expansion." 

Hiram Gee Fellowship in painting was awarded to Charles Bertram 
Walker. 

The graduate scholarships established by the Trustees were awarded as 
follows : Mabel Jacoby, scholarship in instrumeotal music ; Theresa Frantz, 
vocal music ; Mattie Phoebe Goodrich, painting. 

The exercises were followed by a Corporation Dinner for Trustees, Facul- 
ties, Alumni and Visitors. 

Graduates : A.B., 27 ; Ph.B., 28 ; B.S., 9; B.L., 5 ; B.Mus., 9 ; B.P., 4 ; 
M.D.,4; LL.B., 21 ; Total 107 (less 3—104). Also A.M., 6; Ph.D., i ; 
D.D., 4 ; LL.D., 2 ; Litt.D., 2. ToUl 15 (less 11—4)* Net total 108. 

8:00 p. M. Chancellor's Reception in John Crouse College. 

Sept. 19. College formally opened at 9:30 a. m. by Chapel exercises in 
the John Crouse College Hall. 

Announcement made that the William C. Ruger law library has been 
presented to the College of Law by Hon. Louis Marshall of New York. 

Annual Salt Rush. 

Sept. 21. Annual reception of the sophomores to the freshman class in 
the Gymnasium. 

Sept. 23. Annual reception of the Young Men's and Young Women *s 
Christian Associations in the Gymnasium. New departure of toasts. 

Sept. 27. Annual football game between Syracuse and Cornell at Ithaca, 
score 17-0 in favor of Cornell. 

Dr. C. W. Cushing conducted chapel exercises. 

A bronze tablet has been placed in the chapel of the Hall of Languages 
by the class of 1900 in memory of L. C. Barry, 1900, who died in the Span- 
ish-American war. 

Oct. 3. The College of Medicine began sessions for the year. 

Mass meeting of stndents to arouse enthusiasm for football. Short 
addresses from professors, alumni and undergraduates. 

Rev. T. R. Green, '80, was appointed financial secretary of the Univer- 
sity for the Central N. Y. Conference and Rev. J. D. Phelps, D.D., for the 
Genesee Conference. 

Oct. 4. Dean Brooks spoke in Chapel on ** Individuality.'' Meeting of 
the Fencing Club ; Instructor W. E. Taylor elected president. 

Oct. 5. Information Bureau established in Room 23, Hall of Languages. 




. SYRACUSB UNIVERSITY I5 

Oct. II. Annaal fall meet between freshmen and sophomores. Score 71- 
44 in fayor of the sophomores. 

Oct. 12. Meeting of the Alpha Chapter of the College Settlement. 
Nettie Sadler, 1900, elected president. 

Oct. 20. Announcement made that Howard P. Denison has subscribed 
$25 annoallj for two prizes for freshman declamations. 

Oct. 25. Reception given by the Christian Associations to faculty and 
students. B. R. Weeks, impersonator of David Harum and the Cecilian 
Quartet furnished entertainment. 

Oct. 28. Football ; Williams 6, Syracuse o. 

Nov. 2. Louis Baker Phillips, '97, succeeded Professor Irving Hyatt as 
a member of the faculty of the College of Fine Arts. 

Nov. 22. Closing of the football season ; result, 63 points for Syracuse 
and 63 for her opponents. 

Nov. 23. Celebration and speeches. Mather Smalley, Law 1901, the 
first representative of the Comstock Chapter of Phi Delta Phi, at the con- 
vention held in Ann Arbor, Mich. 

Nov. 27. Professor C M. Moss, '77, of the University of Illinois, spoke 
in chapel on ** The Educational Tendencies in the West.*' 

Dec. 8. Twenty-fifth annual banquet of Alpha Chapter of Gamma Phi 
BeU. 

Dec. II. Hayden A. Patten, '01, elected captain of the football team. 

Dec. 13. Benefit for the department of History. 

Dec. 18. Professor E. H. Gaggin read a paper on ** Classical Architec- 
ture '* before the Classical Club. Football team entertained by the Tan 
Chapter of Kappa Kappa Gamma. 

Dec. 2i-Jan. 3. Holiday vacation. 

Dec. 25. Erastns F. Holden, first vice-president of the Board of Trus- 
tees and a generous benefactor of the University, died at his home on W. 
Onondaga Street. 

Professor Metzler elected to fellowship in the American Association for 
the Advancement of Science. 

Dec. 27-Jan. 6. Annual Holiday trip of the Glee and Instrumental Clubs. 

A Syracuse Graduate Teachers' Club was organized at the holiday Con- 
ference of the Associated Academic Principals of the State of New York. 
C. N. Cobb, *77, was elected president. 

Dec 29. The Central New York Alumnse Chapter of Alpha Phi held its 
annual meeting at the Chapter house on University Place. 

Z900 

Jan. 3. E. R. Sweetland, Cornell, '99, chosen as football coach for 
next year. 

Jan. 5. Announcement that Mrs. Willard Ives has given $40,000 to the 
University to establish a chair in memory of her husband. 

Jan. 8. The Biological department, under Dr. Hargitt, engaged in study 
and classification for the Government of Alcyonaria found in Porto Rican 
Waters. 



l6 ANNALS '900 

Jan. 16. Semi-annnal meeting of the Board of Trustees. Lyman C. 
Smith elected first vice-president. H. S. Holden elected to fill the vacancy 
caused by the death of his father, B. F. Holden. 

Rev. Dr. Gutteridge reported a gift of $30,000, with an annuity condition. 
Chancellor Day reported a gift of |io,ooo. 

A distinction was made between Professors and Instructors in the College 
of I<aw, and Dean Brooks, Giles H. Stilwell, Edwin H. Burdick and Prank 
R. Walker were elected Professors. The degree of Doctor of Medicine was 
conferred on John Walrath Plant and Benjamin VanEtten Dolph and after 
the oath had been administered by Dean Didama, they received their diplo- 
mas at the hands of the Chancellor. Professor F. J. Holzwarth was 
granted leave of absence for a year. Trustee W. S. Carter of New York 
presented two etchings to the College of I^aw. 

Jan. 19-26. Mid-year examinations. 

Jan. 24. An unusually fine recital given in John Crouse College Hall by 
the Musical department. 

Jan. 26. Ninth annual dinner and reunion of the New York Association 
of Alumni of Syracuse University at the St. Denis Hotel. 

Jan. 29. Large reception given by the Christian Associations in the 
Gymnasium. 

Feb. 2. The Science Association met and was addressed by Dr. Haanel 
and Instructor Sawin. 

Feb. 3. * A Chapter of the Alpha Kappa Kappa fraternity established 
at the Medical College. 

Feb. 6. E. R. Sweetland, Cornell, '99, chosen for crew coach. 

Feb. 8. Annual City Concert of the Glee and Instrumental Clubs at the 
Wieting Opera House. 

Feb. 9. Thirteenth annual ^banquet of the local chapter of Phi Delta 
Theta held at the Vanderbilt. 

Feb. 1 1 . Day of prayer for colleges. Dr. Sims made the address. 

There was much activity among the fraternities during the month. Besides 
what is above stated the following may be noted: (6) An *' At Home*' 
given by Kappa Alpha Theta ; (9) Phi Kappa Alpha gave its usual annual 
entertainment at the Empire Hall ; (12) Pi Beta Phi entertained in honor of 
the fourth anniversary of the founding of the chapter; ( 14) Valentine party 
given by the 1902 Kappa Kappa Gammas in honor of 1900 ; (17) Phi Kappa 
Psi entertained a party from Kappa Alpha Theta ; (19) Members of the Alpha 
Phi gave a dance at the Standard Club ; (20) 1902 Delta Upsilon entertained 
1902 of Kappa Alpha Theta ; (21 ) Beta Theta Pi gave a party to the women 
of the freshman class ; (22) Miss Julia Talbott entertained in honor of Pi 
Beta Phi ; (23) Reception of Gamma Phi Beta at the Standard Club to the 
upperclaasmen and women and faculty of the University. A busy, if a short 
month. 



* The Alpha Kappa Kappa fraternity was founded at the Medical department of Dart- 
mouth College in 1888. The colors are green and white. The badge is a crescent encir- 
cling a book. Saird's Manual. 



'900 SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY I7 

March 6. Dr. Goucher, President of the Woman's College,Baltiinore,and 
Hon. H. K. Carroll, LL.D., spoke in chapel. 

March 8. The Rochester Alumni Association organized. Porter M.French, 
'70, president. 

March 12. The student body ratified the nominations of the General Ath- 
letic Committee for asst. managers as follows : Track team, A. A. Webb, Jr., 
*oi ; Baseball, £. P. Piper, '01 ; Football, h. D. Cornish, *02. 

March 16. Faculties of the Colleges of Liberal Arts and of Fine Arts were 
entertained in honor of Dr. and Mrs. Holzwarth by the local chapter of 
Delta Delta Delta. The professor and his family will start on March 20th 
for Germany. 

March 18. Special religious meetings lasting for two weeks were brought 
to a close by a union meeting which was addressed by the Chancellor. 

March 20. Organization of a Philosophical Club with G. C. Wood, 1900, 
as president. 

March 23. Non-Fraternity Banquet held at the St. Cloud Hotel. 

March 24. Major Poole addressed the Historical Association on ** Onon- 
daga in the Rebellion.*' 

March 27. Indian lecture and exhibition given in the Gymnasium under 
the auspices of the department of Political Economy. 

March 29. Silhouette party given in honor of the faculty by the Women's 
League in the Association parlors. 

April 6. University catalogue for 1899-1900 issued. Total registration 
1,402, showing an increase of 272 students in one year. 

April 11-18. Easter vacation. 

April 17. Professor Flick lectured in the Central Baptist Church on ** The 
Dutch and English in South Africa." 

April 18. Preliminary contest for the selection of representatives for the 
intercollegiate contest in oratory, resulted in the selection of William J . 
Henry. *oi, as first speaker and B. A. Green, '00, as alternate. 

April 19. First Annual Banquet of Syracuse University Alumni Associa- 
tion of Buffalo. C. M. Underbill, '60, elected president. A vigorous asso- 
ciation was organized. 

April 24. Sixth annual intercollegiate oratorical contest between Union 
Rochester and Syracuse Universities was held in the John Crouse College 
Han. Prize awarded to William J. Henry, 'oi, Syracuse. 

April 25. The eight oared shells arrived from Ithaca. 

April 28. Myer Prinstein won the broad jump at 24 ft. 7X in., breaking 
the world record, at the sixth annual races of the University of Pennsylvania. 
Lee, Waite, Scrafford and Prinstein won the relay race in 3 minutes, 27 
seconds over Columbia, Cornell, Lafayette, Pa. State College and Western 
University of Pennsylvania. 

Baseball game with Cornell won by Syracuse. 6 to i. 

Altogether April 28th, 1900, was one of the most glorious days in the ath- 
letic history of Sjrracuse University. 

April 39. Union meeting led by E. C. Jenkins, '00. Northfield day. 



l8 ANNALS I^QQ 

April 30. Annual senior-junior baseball game. Score 5-2 in favor of the 
seniors. 

Annual inter-class field and track meet. Won by the freshmen with 31 
points. 

May 4. William Manlius Smith, A.M. , M. D., Emeritus Professor of Chem- 
istry, died at his home in Syracuse, after a brief illness. 

May 5. Annual dual meet between Syracuse and Cornell. Score 70-34 
in favor of Cornell. 

Harry Vibbard, '98 chosen instructor in piano and organ. 

May 10-11. Sixty-seventh annual convention of the Psi Upsilon frater- 
nity held at Syracuse with the Pi chapter. 

May 13. Mrs. William Manlius Smith died at her home, surviving her 
husband only nine days. 

May [5. Moving- up day. Faculty members addressed the freshmen from 
the front steps of the Hall of Languages. 

May 18. Syracuse-Dickinson Debate. Won by Dickinson. 

May 19. Third Annual meet of the Syracuse University Academic Athletic 
Association held on University oval. Resulted in victory for the Buffalo 
Central High School. 

May 20. Dean McChesney addressed a union meeting of the Associations 
on ** Intellectual loyalty to Christ." 

May 25. Senior banquet of Delta Delta Delta held at the chapter house. 

May 27. Syracuse gained fifth place at meet in New York City, for the 
third time. The standing of the various Colleges was as follows : Pennsyl- 
vania, 39 points, Princeton, 25, Yale, 20>^, Harvard, 14, Syracuse, 10, Cali- 
fornia, 8, Cornell, 7>4, Williams, 6, New York University, 5, Brown, 3, 
Columbia, 2, Georgetown, 2, Bowdoiu, i. The points for Syracuse were 
won by Prinstein (5). Lee, H. G. (3), Lewis, W. F. (i), Scrafford (1). 

May 28. Class of 1900 inaugurated the custom of celebrating **Last 
Chapel.*' Farewell speeches by E. D. Shepard, president of the senior 
class, Dean Brooks of the College of Law, Dr. Smalley, Prof. Cabeen, Rev 
T. R. Green, Prof. Pattee, Prof. Eniens and Prof. Morris. Dean Leonard 
gave the last farewell to the seniors. 

June 7. First musical soiree of the class of 1900 iu John Crouse College 
Hall. 

June 8. First Annual Denison prize speaking contest held in John Crouse 
College Hall. First prize awarded to Stephen A. Lloyd, '03, second to 
Ancil D. Brown, '03. Roy K. Shefiield, '03. received honorable mention. 

The Syracuse crew was beaten by the Francis Club crew of Cornell. 

jgoi Onondagan issued. 

June 9. Annual meeting of the University Senate. 

Chancellor's oratorical prize contest. First prize won by E. A. Green, 
'00, second by Thomas M. Bishop, '00, third by Bertha Wilson, '01. 

June 9. Special meeting of Phi Beta Kappa. The following members of 
the class of 1900 were elected to membership : Laura Parsons, Mabel V. 
Parker, Fred W. Sherman, George L. Phelps, Marion L. West, Frank R. 



*900 SYBACUSB UNIVERSITY 19' 

Strong, Mary M. Brown, Marion E. Wright, Bessie M. Hawks, Clyde L. 
Harvey, Harxiette A. Curtiss, Edwin H. Shepard, Elizabeth G. Delany, 
Lanra M. Latimer, Rose P. Egan. 

Jane lo. xoxx> a. m. Baccalaureate sermon by Chancellor Day in John 
Cronse College Hall. 

7:30 P. M. Sermon before the Young Men*8 and Yonng Women's Chris- 
tian Associations by Ex-Chancellor Sims, D.D., LL.D. 

June II. Annual meeting of Phi Beta Kappa. The following were initi- 
ated : Ebenezer H. Latimer, '67, C. W. Winchester, '67, Richard E Day, 
'77, William D. Marsh, '79, Charles W. Rowley, '79, Julia E. Church. '97, 
Clara G. Hookway, '97, Julia B. Kellogg, '97, Mary E. Moxcey, '97, Martha 
P. Tracy, '97 and the members elect of the class of 1900. Initiated after 
the annual meeting, partly in absentia by officers of other chapters : Jennie 
L. Whitbread, '87. Nicholas Knight, *82, Jndson B. Coit, '75, Anne G. Wirt, 
'84, Theodore W. Haven, *8i, John A. Ingham, '86, Efifa Z. Ham, '97, Byron 
B. Brackett, '90, Elizabeth Leyden, '87, William A. Wilson, '86, Paul Fitz. 
Gerald, '91, Milton J. Fletcher. *88, Edward C. Morey, '84, Anna H. Smith, 
'89. Charles O. Dewey, '85. 

3xx> p. M. Class Day exercises in John Crouse College Hall. 

8'joo P. M. Second musical soiree of the class .of 1900. 

June 11-13. Annual exhibition in John Crouse College of works of art 
produced during the year by students of College of Fine Arts. 

June 12. Annual meeting of the Board of Trustees. The former officers 
were reelected and the former standing committees continued. A com- 
mittee was appointed with the Chancellor as chairman and William Not- 
tingham and Lyman C. Smith as members to supervise the construction of 
the new engineering building to be erected by Mr. Smith. Recommenda- 
tions for a central heating and lighting plant were referred to the executive 
committee for report at the next meeting. The report of the advisory com- 
mittee of the Christian Associations was accepted and R. A. Waite, '01. 
nominated as General secretary. The deficiency of $30,000. created during 
the current year, was made up by personal subscription among the trustees. 

A resolution received from the Alumni Association with reference to an 
increase in the incidental fee for better support of athletics was referred to 
the executive committee, recommending favorable action. 

The following appointments to the faculty were made : 

Associate Professor A. C. Flick was made Professor of European History, 
Associate Professor J. H. Hamilton, Professor of Political Economy, Del- 
mer B. Hawkins, Instructor in Political Economy, Instructor P. C. Nugeuti 
Associate Professor of Civil Engineering, Instructor H. M. Smith, Associate 
Professor of Chemistry, Instructor H. M. Burchard, Associate Professor of 
Greek, Instructor Geo. A. Wilson, Associate Professor of Philosophy, 
Edward D. Roe, Jr., Associate Professor of Mathematics, Frederick D. 
Losey, Instructor in English ; also in the College of Fine Arts : Harry L. 
Vibbard, Instructor in Piano and Organ to succeed Miss Vernon, resigned, 
Lonis B. Phillips, Instructor in Piano and Theory of Music, to succeed Pro- 



ao A.NNALS 



1900 



feasor Hyatt, resigned, Mary K. Ketcham, Instructor in Normal Art and 
Decorative Design, Mrs. Minnie Mason Beebe, Professor of History and 
English to succeed Miss Graham, Instractor Carl T. Hawley, Associate 
Professor of Art Anatomy and Freehand Drawing, Instructor Thomas W. 
Gaggin, Associate Professor of Architecture. 

Professor K« C Morris and Professor Geo. A. Parker were given a year's 
leave of absence ; a leave of absence of one-half year was given to Pro- 
fessor Unni Lund. 

The resignation of Dean Albert Leonard of the College of Liberal Arts 
was accepted and a committee of five appointed to nominate a successor at 
the next semi-annual meeting. 

June 12. The meeting of the Alumni Association was the greatest in the 
history of the University. The usual business was transacted at the busi- 
ness meeting. Dr. Jacobson, '77, was elected president for next year. At 
the banquet which was beld in the chapel many were unable to get in. 
The president, Professor Frank Smalley. acted as toastmaster and called 
first on the Chancellor. It was in his speech on this occasion that Dr. Day 
first announced the gift of a new College by Lyman C. Smith. Mr. Arch* 
bold also spoke briefly but most interestingly. The toasts were limited to 
ten minutes each. The College song ** The Vale of Onondaga ** was song. 
Classes were called up, and altogether it was '*a great day.*' Reunions of 
many classes were held at appointed places. 

June 13. Commencement of all the Colleges in John Crouse College 
Hall. Oration by Rev. Bradford Paul Raymond, D.D., LL.D., President of 
Wesleyan University, on **The Intellectual Aristocrat.** 

Graduates A.B., 42 ; Ph.B., 39 ; B.S., 15 ; B.E.E., 2 ; B.P., 4 ; B. Mus., 
9 ; B.L., 8 ; M.D., 24 ; LL.B., 2. Total 145 (less 2 = 143). Also A M.,5; 
Ph.M., I ; D.D., 4; LL.D., i ; LH.D. i ; S.T.D., i ; D. Mus , i. Total 14 
(less 6 = 8). Net total 151. 

8:00 P.M., Chancellor's reception in John Crouse College. Manager 
Farley, Coach Scott, Captain Harry G. Lee, Prin stein, W. F. Lewis and 
Scrafford started for Paris to represent Syracuse at the inter-continental 
games. 

Sept. 4. Coach Sweetland began practice with the football men. Ten of 
the old men reported. 

Sept. 18. College formally opened by chapel exercises in John Crouse 
College Hall. Chancellor Day made an address of welcome and announced 
the appointment of Professor Smalley as Acting Dean of the College of 
Liberal Arts. 

Sept. 20. Professor Pattee appointed Acting Registrar. 

Sept. 26. Dr. Burchard urged the students to support the football team. 

Sept. 29. Students chartered a special train for the game with Cornell at 
Ithaca. 

Oct. 4. Law Debating Club organized. The Mary B. Hathaway collec- 
tion of shells received by the Biological department. 

Oct. 18. Professor Mace read a paper before a convention of history 



SYRACUSB UNIVBRSITY 21 

1900 

teachers at the Northern-Central States at the Wisconsin University, 
ICadiaon. 

Oct. 18-19. Sixty-sixth annual convention of Delta Upsilon fraternity at 
SyxBcuae. 

Oct. 19. Professor Cabeen lectured before the Junior Class on the 
French Revolution. 

Oct. 20. Football on the oval ; Syracuse 5, Amherst o. 
Oct. 22. Jnstns M. Scrafiford elected editor-in-chief of the igo2 Ononda' 
gan, and Willard T. Pangmon business manager. 

Mrs. Teall lectured before the students in American History. 
Oct. 23. Freshman-sophomore track meet resulted in a victory for the 
sophomores, 73^ to 29)^. Organization of the Albert Leonard Debating 
Oob. 

Oct. 24. Professor Pattee addressed the Household Economic Association 
of Syracuse. 

Oct. 26. Professor Ayers entertained in honor of Delta Sigma Phi. 
Fifth annual banquet of the Omicron Chapter of Delta Delta Delta . 
Oct. 27. First number of Syracuse Univetsity Weekly issued, dated Oct. 
25th. H. B. Myron, '01, president ; Leon F. Haley, '02, business manager ; 
and E. D. Bddy, '02, editor-in-chief. 

Oct. 31. Student mass meeting in the interests of the new weekly paper. 
Alpha Phi gave a Hallowe'en party in the evening. The 1903 delegation of 
Gamma Phi Beta gave a Hallowe'en party at the Willard homestead in 
Dewitt. 

Nov. I. Ground broken by civil engineers for the new Lyman C. Smith 
College of Engineering. 
Nov. 3. Football at Oberlin ; Syracuse 6, Oberlin o. 
Nov. 13. Professor Peritz gave the first of his series of lectures on Bibli- 
cal topics in room 106 of the University Block. 

Nov. 14. Professor Burchard gave a stereopticon lecture at the Central 
Baptist Church on " The Glories of Greece." 

Nov. 15. Professor W. P. Graham, assisted by some of the students in 
the department of Electrical Engineering, placed several incandescent 
electric lights in the Von Ranke library. 
Kappa Kappa Gamma gave a tea in honor of Delta Sigma Phi. 
Not. 16. Non-fraternity reception for the freshman class at Foreman's. 
Chancellor Day announced that Syracuse University will give six free 
scholarships to worthy Philippine students in response to the request of the 
Taft Commission. Syracuse vras the second college to respond. 
Nov. 17. Football on the Oval ; Syracuse 68, Rochester 5. 
Mrs. Wm. Nottingham, *8o, entertained the alumnae chapter of Alpha 
Phi. 
Nov. 78. Professor Beebe, '90, addressed the Christian Associations. 
Nov. 22. Organization of a University Gun Club. 

Nov. 24. Football at Providence, R. I. ; Syracuse 6, Brown 6. Basket- 
ball in the Gymnasium ; Syracuse Women's team 24, Elmira College 2. 



-^a ANNALS j_j 

Professor Btnens gave stereopticon lectures to his classes on " Travels in 
•Greece." 

Nov. 28. Thanksgiving vacation began. 

Dec. 6. Junior promenade held at Empire Hall. 

Dec. 13. First meeting of the new board of Governors of the University 
Navy. 

Dec. 14. Professor Hamilton gave an address before the Household 
Economic Association. 

Professor Losey gave interesting readings from Dickens in the Chapel of 
the Hall of Languages. 

Dec. 18. The Benefit for the Historical Association at the Weiting Opera 
House was a great success. 

Dec. 20-Jan. 3. Holiday vacation. 

Dec. 26~Jan. 5. Holiday trip of the Glee and Instrumental Clubs. 

Z90Z 

Jan. 3. Room 33-34, Hall of Languages, was seated during the vacation 
with 204 opera chairs vnth adjustable arms for writing purposes. 

Jan. 8. Mass meeting in behalf of the navy held in the Chapel of the 
Hall of Languages. A fine address by Chancellor Day, and speeches by 
Karl Swartz, '86, Whittle, '95, and Bond, '94. Mr. Alexander T. Brown 
donated a launch to the nav>. 

Jan. 10. Alpha Gamma Beta, a men's local fraternity, gave its first ban- 
quet at the Empire House. 

Jan. 13. President Merrill of Colgate University, addressed the Chris- 
tian Associations. 

Professor Coddington occupied the pulpit of Plymouth Church. 

Jan. 15-25. Mid-year examinations. 

Jan. 16. C. H. McCormick engaged as track team trainer. 

Jan. 21. A committee from the faculty was appointed to represent Syra- 
cuse University in the Committee of the Association of the Colleges and 
Preparatory Schools of the Middle States and Maryland, whose purpose is 
to secure uniform entrance examinations in the colleges. 

Jan. 22. Mid-year meeting of the Board of Trustees. 

Rev. Chas. N. Sims, D.D., LL.D. and Chas. W. Warner were elected 
trustees at large. It was decided to increase the student athletic fee from 
$3 to|6. Trustees Hendrick S. Holden and John D. Archbold assumed the 
athletic debt of $2,400. 

Dr. Frank Smalley, who had been Acting Dean of the College of Liberal 
Arts during the past semester, was elected permanent Dean. E. N. Pattee, 
Professor of Chemistry and Acting Registrar, was made Registrar. P. W. 
Revels, of the College of Fine Arts, was promoted to the position of Asso- 
ciate Professor of Perspective and Descriptive Geometry. Mrs. Mary J. 
Sibley was made Instructor in Bibliography and Cataloguing. T. C. 
Hopkins was appointed Professor of Geology, J. R. Street, Professor of 
Pedagogy, W. D. Bullard, Associate Professor of Mathematics, Miss Jean 



I90I SYRACUSB UNIVBRSITY 2$ 

Marie Richards, Associate Professor of English. Official recognition was 
nude of Mr. Archbold*s offer to give the University $400,000 provided a like 
tmoant was raised from other sources, and a committee was appointed to 
make plans for raising the money. The conditions of admission to the 
College of Law were made the same as those to the College of Liberal Arts. 

New Courses throughout in the College of Applied Science were adopted. 
In the College of Liberal Arts new Courses in Geologj* and in Pedagogy 
were approved. 

Jan. 31. Day of Prayer for colleges. No regular college exercises after 
chapel. Address in Chapel by Rev. Dr. Beiler, of Buffalo. Meeting of 
University Debating Club in the evening. 

Feb. I. Tenth annual dinner of the New York City Alumni Association 
of Syracuse University at Hotel St. Denis. 

Feb. 5. Missionary rally of the Christian Associations led by W. E. 
DoQghty, *03. 

Feb. 4. First rehearsal of new University band under the leadership of 
Professor H. E. Cogswell. 

Feb. 5. Candidates for the track team were called out. About forty 
reported. 

Feb. 6. Public debate between the University and the Liberal Arts 
debating societies. Subject, Resolved^ That an income tax should form 
part of the federal system of taxation. The negative won. 

Feb. 8. Reception of Delta Kappa Bpsilon at Empire Hall. Banquet 
by Phi Delta Theta at the St. Cloud Hotel. Meeting of the Phi Beta 
Kappa in the Dean's office in the Hall of Languages. 

Feb. 12. Annual city concert of the Glee and Instrumental clubs in the 
Wdting Opera House. 

Feb. 14. Professor Underwood, '77, of Columbia University, addressed 
the Biological seminary on Myxomytes. He gave an illustrated lecture 
before the Academy of Science at the College of Medicine on the following 
erening on '* Botanical Gardens and their Influence.** 

Feb. 19. Arthur Marvin, ex. •91, (Yale *9i), addressed the Classical Club 
on '* The Classical Learning of Shakespeare.'* 

Feb. 23. The Intercollegiate Athletic Association of America held its 
annual meeting in New York City. Manager Webb and Captain Prinstein 
represented Syracuse. 

Feb. 23. A permanent debating union of the debating clubs of the Col- 
lege of Liberal Arts effected and constitution drawn up. 

March i. New pair-oared gig, given by the classes of 1900 and 1901, used 
for the first time. 

March 2. Mrs. Ellen M. Mitchel addressed the Historical Association on 
" The Hegelian Conception of History.*' 

March 4. Dr. W. P. McDowell spoke at the Christian Association meet- 
ing. He also spoke in chapel the next morning on ** The Good Soldiers of 
Jetos Christ. " 

March 7. First annual *' Fake'* Exhibition given by the Society of Fakirs 
in John Croose College. 



24 ANNALS ,^, 

March 8. Annual non-fraternity banquet held at the Empire Hooae. 

March 9. Professor Lnnd accompanied by her mother returned from 
Norway after a ten months' stay in Europe. 

Dr. Andrews of Colgate University lectured in Assembly Hall on " Greek 
Sculpture and Art." 

March 15. A uniform consisting of a dark blue coat and trousers trimmed 
with orange adopted by the University. Band. 

Banquet of the Sjrracuse University Alumni Association of Buffalo. Chan- 
cellor Day was present. 

March 15. The Biological and Geological departments received a valat- 
ble gift in the collection of birds, shells and minerals sent by Dr. Whiting 
S. Worden, *8i, who is now engaged in missionary work in Japan. 

March 16. The Women's basketball team defeated the Barnard College 
team in New York, 10 to 5. 

A meeting was held in Dean Smalley's office, of representatives of pre- 
paratory schools, in the interest of organizing, under the auspices of the 
Syracuse University Academic Athletic Association, an interscholastic foot* 
ball league. 

March 19. The Steele Scientific Society held a mock trial in Chapel. 

March 23. Dr. Henry Carver of California lectured in Chapel on " Jean 
Valjean, a Character Study in Conscience." 

March 24. Professor Flick gave an address at University Ave. Church on 
** Lnther and the Reformation." 

March 28. Concert of the Glee and Instrumental Clubs in John Grouse 
College Hall. Professor Ayers read several selections. The business 
management was in the hands of the young women. 

March 31. Professor Hargitt gave an address in University Ave. Church 
on **The Religion of Science." 

April 4-1 1. Easter vacation. 

April 5. The General Athletic Committee issued a statement breakiug 
all athletic relations with Cornell University on account of the attitude of 
the latter on the question of football between the two Universities. To get 
a just understanding of this matter the reader should read the Syracuse 
Manifesto and then the full correspondence between the representatives of 
the two Universities. See University and City papers. 

April 6-13. Easter trip of the Glee and Instrumental clubs. 

April 12. University Catalogue for 1900-1901 issued. Total number of 
students 16 13. This is a gain of more than 200 over last year. The ratio of 
increase for the year was more than 15 per cent. 

April 12. Professor Coddington spent several days in New York visiting 
the public libraries. 

April 13. Professor Street spoke before the Onondaga County Council 
on ** Adolescence." 

April 14. The Christian Associations held a Northfield rally. Professor 
Losey gave an address in University Ave. Church on "Shakespeare as a. 
Moral and Religious Teacher." 



Ifm SYRACUSB UNIVBRSITY 25 

April 15. L. E. Carter, '02, chosen as contestant for Syracuse in the State 
Intercollegiate Oratorical contest It was held April 29th at Union Univer- 
sity, the representative of Rochester winning. 

April 16. The Senior Class elected Class-day officers : Valedictorian, R. 
Alfred Waite, Jr. ; Salutatorian, Alice O. Pratt; Orator, John C. Tennant; 
Historian, Eleanor W. Thayer ; Poetess, Janet L. Kevand ; Statistician, 
Edith M. Cobb ; Prophet, John J. Ackerman ; Orator to 1902, Dana B. Hin- 
man. 

April 18. Professor Cabeen gave a stereopticon lecture in the Hall of Lan- 
guages for the benefit of the Baseball Association. The subject was 
•' Paris." 

April 19. The Constitution of the new Tennis Club published. Dean 
Baell of Boston University spoke at Chapel. 

April 22. President Rush Rhees of the University of Rochester address- 
ed Professor Peritz's class on the English Bible. Dr. Rhees spoke on the 
life of Christ. 

April 27. Athletic carnival of the University of Pennsylvania in Phila- 
delphia. Syracuse took first place in the broad jump, third in the one mile 
relay race and fourth in the one hundred yard dash. Chapel Celebration 
on Monday, April 29. 

April 28. Dean Smalley gave an address in University Ave. Church 
on *' Csesar or Christ, the Issue joined.'* 

April 29. Professor Mace addressed the Daughters of the American Rev- 
olution at Judge Vaun*8 residence on ** Revolutionary History.** 

Announcement made in Chapel that there will be no more impromptu 
celebrations nor any interference with classes. 

May 4. Track meet with Rochester on University Oval won by Syracuse 
by a score of 79 to 25. 

May 7. Alpha Phi gave a reception to alumnae and members of the 
faculty. 
May 9. The first Band Concert in John Crouse College Hall. 
Rochester Alumni Association of Syracuse University banqueted at 
Teairs. 
May 10. Moving-up day. Speeches. 

May II. Track meet with Amherst on University Oval, won by Amherst ; 
score 70>i to 46^. 
May 14. Reception given the seniors by Chancellor and Mrs. Day. 
May 15. Chancellor's oratorical prize contest for Law freshmen won by 
H. D. Cornwall. 

May 18. Syracuse University Academic Athletic Meet held on Univer- 
nty Oval. Won by Buffalo Central High School. 

Annual Denison prize declamation contest for freshmen held in the 
Chapel of the Hall of Languages. First prize for men won by Wm. H. 
Snyder, second, Basil R. Gabriel. First prize for women won by Adelaide 
Crim, second Irene Copley. « 
Death of Dr. Maltbie D. Babcock, '79, at Naples. 



36 ANNAI.S 19^1 

May 20. Baseball on the Oval ; Syracnse 8» University of Michigan 4. 

May 24-25. Intercollegiate games at New York. Syracuse dropped to 
two points. 

May 24. *Rho Chapter of Delta Gamma installed at Syracnse. It was 
the local society Delta Sigma Phi. Reception given the Chapter by Mr. 
and Mrs. James W. Pen nock. 

May 25. *' Last Chapel *' exercises held in the chapel of the College of 
Liberal Arts. 

May 27-June 7. Final examinations. 

May 27. Chancellor Day announced two gifts, one of ^25,000, the other 
$[0,ooo to aid in securing the $400,000 ofifered by Mr. Archbold. 

May 28. t Sigma Nu of Phi Gamma Delta founded at Syracnse. It was 
the local society Alpha Gamma Beta. Initiation at the Yates. 

May 29. Song recital given by the students of Professor R. G. Calthrop 
in John Crouse College Hall. 

May 30. The University Band attended the annual Memorial day games 
at Ithdca. 

May 31. 1902 Onondagan published. 

Pan-American College Championship track games. Syracuse represented 
by Prinstein, ScraflFord, Lowe, W. C, Gardner, H. L., and Petrie. 

June 7. Regatta on Onondaga Lake. Single Scull Race won by John 
M. Francis from C. K. Goodwin, *oo. 

One and one-half mile race between Francis Junior and Syracuse Fresh- 
man crews won by Francis Junior. Two mile race between Francis Club 
crew and Syracuse University won by Francis crew by one-fourth of a 
length. 

June 8. 10:00 A. M. Annual meeting of the University Senate. 

8:00 p. M. Chancellor's Oratorical Prize contest won by Merton Winfield 
Pierce, *02, Lewis Erwin Carter, '02, second, Claude M. Marriott, *oi, 
third. 

Special meeting of Phi Beta Kappa. The following members of the class 
of 1901 were elected to membership : John L. Bauer, John C. Tennant, 
Bertha Wilson, Iva Lowther Peters. Frederick M. Harvey, Carrie A, Hilts, 
Edgar D. Congdon, Edith M. Cobb, Clarence Perkins, John A. Beers, 
Eleanor W. Thayer and William Ryan. 



* Delta Gamma was founded at the University of Mississippi in 1872 by four young lady 
students. The isth of March is reunion day. The governing bodies are a convention 
and a council. The journal of'the fraternity is Uti^Anchora, The badge is a gold anchor, 
the cross- bar of which displays the letters ' T ^ H ",in gold on white enamel, and above 
the flukes is a shield bearing the letters ** A F." The colors are pink, blue and bronxe 
A cream colored rose is the fraternity flower. — Baird's Manual. 

f The fraternity Phi Gamma Delta was founded at Jefferson College. Canonsburg, Pa., 
May, 1S48. The journal of the fraternity is called the Phi Gamma Delta Quarterly 
and is published at Cleveland, O. The badge is a lozenge of about an inch in length dis- 
playing the letters '* ^ P A,'* above which is a single star in white enamel and below 
the letters '*««/*'?•*' The color is royal purple, and the flower is the heliotrope. The 
flag is pennant shaped bearing the letters " ^ F A across the face on a white back- 
ground. In the upper left-hand corner is a purple square containing a white star.— 
Baird*s Manual. 



I90I SYRACUSE UNIVBRSITY 2^ 

Jane 9. 10:00 am. Baccalaureate sermon by the Chancellor in John 
i^ronse College Hall. 

7:50 p. M. Sermon before the Young Men's and Young Women's Chris- 
ian Associations by Rev. Nacy McGee Waters, pastor of the First Congre- 
gational Church, Binghamton, N. Y. 

June 10. Annual meeting of Phi Beta Kappa. The following were 
nitiated : Dr. A. C. Flick, Dr. J. H. Hamilton, Charles E. Hamilton, '86, 
lohn T. RoberU, '76, William C. Wilbor, '86, Edgar H. Brown, '8r, WUliam 
:. Kitchin, '82, Charles F. Sitterly, '83. Frank R. Walker, '84, A. W. 
Broadway, '84, Henry L. Taylor, '84, William L. Wallace, '85, S. G. Harris, 
85, Frank H. Wood, '85. H. H. Murdock, '85, F. T. Keeney, '86, Wilfred 
W. Porter, '86, H. G. Coddington, '86, George G. Brower, '87. Jennie 
rhorbum Sanford, '87, Emmons H. Sanford, '87, Frank W. Merrick, '87, 
Kary F. Call, '88, F. D. Leete, '89, Levi S. Chapman, '89, W. H. Benham, 
89, L. P. Hitchcock, '89, Minnie Mason Beebe, '90, William A. Jenner, '90, 
Frank W. Goreth, '91, Frank D. Torrey, '91 ; also Dr. C. N. Sims,Dr. T. 
3. Hopkins, Ezra S. Tipple, '84, Arthur Copeland, '84 ; also all the mem- 
t>ers elect of the class of 1901. Initiated later ; Jesse Wbyborn Rosebrugh, 
'92, 4 Oct., 1901 ; Dr. J. R. Street, 30 Nov., 1901 ;IF. Louise Warr, '94, 31 Dec, 
[901 ; DixH. Rowland, '95, 19 Feb., 1902, Edith E. Clarke, '81, 15 April, 
[902. 

3xx> p. M. Class Day exercises in John Crouse College Hall. 

8xx) p. M. Musical Soiree of the class of 1901, College of Fine Arts, in 
(ohn Crouse College Hall. 

June II. The annual meeting of the Board of Trustees was held in the 
Chancellor's office. The Chancellor made an elaborate report. In it he 
called attention to the sad death of an alumnus, Dr. M. D. Babcock, '79. 

The changes in the faculties were as follows : Professor W. P. Graham 
was made Professor of Electrical Engineering ; Instructor F. D. Losey, 
Associate Professor of English ; Instructor Henry O. Sibley, Professor of 
Library Economy ; Herman Cooper, Instructor in Chemistry ; Frederick 
Saunders, Instructor in Physics ; Edward H. Krans, Instructor in German 
■nd Mineralogy ; Associate Professor Roe, Professor of Mathematics ; 
Instructor Delmer E. Hawkins. Associate Professor of Political Economy ; 
Associate Professor Julie H. Hine, Professor of the German Language and 
Literature in the College of Fine Arts ; Joseph C. Seiter, Instructor in Piano ; 
Nina Hayes, Instructor in Vocal Music ; Charles B. Walker, Instructor in 
Cast Drawing ; Mary Ketcham, Instructor in Normal Art and Decorative 
Design. 

John C. Tennant, '01, was appointed General Secretary of the Christian 
Associations. 

The financial relation of the College of Medicine to the University was 
put on an improved basis. Reports on the financial condition showed 
a deficiency for the past year of $33,000.00 which the trustees quickly 
•nbscribed. $100,000.00 was subscribed to meet in part the condition of 
Mr. Archbold's offer of$400,ooaoo, as follows : Lyman C. Smith, $25,000.00, 



2S ANNAI.S 1^1 

Clarence W. Seamans, $25,000.00, John S. Hay ler, $25,000.00, S. W. Bowne, 
$12,500 and William Nottingham, $12,500. 

Business meeting and banquet of the Alumni Association in the chapel of 
the Hall of Languages. Professor Nathan Jacobson, '77, president, 
presided. 

June 12. Commencement of all the colleges in John Crouse College Hall* 
Oration by Rev. William DeWitt Hyde, D.D., LL.D., president of Bowdoin 
College. Subject ** Cardinal Virtues." 

The Hiram Gee Fellowship in painting was awarded to Grace M. Church. 

Graduates : A.B., 44 ; Ph.B., 38 ; B.S., 7 ; B.Mus., 5 ; B.P., 2 ; B.Ar., 3 ; 
B.L., 4 ; M.D., 19 ; LL.B., 31. Total 153 (less 8=145). Also A.M. i ; M.S., 
2 ; D.D., 5 ; LL.D., i ; S.T.D., i ; LittD., i. Total 11 (less 7«4). Net 
total, 149. 

8:00 p. M. Chancellor's reception in John Crouse College. 

July a-5. National biennial convention of Pi Beta Phi fraternity held at 
Syracuse. 

July 3. Syracuse University participated in the regatta at Pough- 
keepsie. In the eight-oared race her crew came in fifth, beating Pennsyl- 
vania. This was a four-mile race. In the freshman eights (two miles) 
Syracuse was last (fourth). In the single scull (one and one-half miles) C. 
B. Goodwin, '01, rowed alone, the Georgetown man withdrawing. He 
covered the distance in 9 m. 31} sec. 

Sept. 17. At the opening exercises of the University, resolutions on the 
death of President McKinley were read and endorsed by every member of 
the faculty and student body. 

Sept. 23. Annual " salting " of freshmen. It was postponed at the 
opening on account of the national bereavement. 

Sept. 24. Annual reception of the sophomore class to the freshmen in 
the Gymnasium . 

Oct. 3. Foster S. Post, '02. elected captain of the track team. 

Clinton E. Goodwin, '00, has received a beautiful silver stein ; being the 
prize to the winner of the single scull race at Poughkeepsie. 

Oct. 5. Football between Syracuse and Brown University ; score, Syra- 
cuse 20, Brown o. Annual track meet between the two lower classes. 

Result, '04, 72; '05. 32. 

Oct. 7. Celebration for the football team. All classes excused. 

Oct. 9. The Arch bold Debating Club was organized. 

Oct. II. The McLennan Law Club held an informal reception in the 
Club parlors. 

Oct. 12. Lafayette scored 5 points to o for Syracuse at football. 

The German department equipped with a fine seminar library purchased 
by Dr . Holzwarth when abroad . * 

Professor Thwing was recently elected president of the Science Associa* 
tion. 

** OutUnes of Biology '* by Professor Hargitt just issued from the press 
of C. W. Bardeen & Co., Syracuse. 



I9B1 SYRACUSB UNIVBRSITY 29 

Oct. 15. Death of Rev. Joseph H. Zartman, A.M., B.D., who was sec- 
retary and treasurer of the Alumni Association, 1889-90, and the very faith- 
ful and efficient corresponding secretary and treasurer of the same from 
1890 to his death 

Oct. 25-27. Leaders in the Y. M. C. A. Bible-study work of seven of the 
colleges and preparatory schools of the state held a conference at Syracuse. 

Oct. 26. Syracuse 28, Amherst 17, was the score in football to close 
October. 

Oct. 28. Last game between freshmen and sophomore teams for the 
banner. Victory for the freshmen ('05). 

Oct. 29. Professor Cabeen lectured on " Paris and its Environments *' 
at the Good Will Congregational Church. 

Dean Brooks announced to the seniors in Law that each one must submit 
a thesis of at least 1500 words. 

Hallowe*en was duly celebrated, especially at the various chapter houses. 

Nov. I. Associate Professor Smith read a paper on Explosives before the 
Science Association. 

Nov. 2. The English Club met at the Pi Beta Phi Chapter house. Paper 
by Associate Professor Parley. 

Nov. 6. Freshman banquet held at the Vc^nderbilt. 

Nov. 9. Bulletins of the Syracuse-Columbia football game received at 
the Hall of Languages every three minutes of actual play . 

The game resulted as follows : Syracuse 11, Columbia 5. Torchlight 
procession after the game. 

Nov. II. Celebration of football victory over Columbia held in the 
Chapel of the College of Liberal Arts. 

Nov. 14. Dean McChesney read a fine paper on '* Greek Art " before 
the Classical Club. 

Nov. 15. Death of Miss Unni Lund, a talented professor of the college 
of Fine Arts. 

Nov. 27-Dec. I. Thanksgiving vacation. 

Nov.. 28. End of the football season. Total points won ; Syracuse 185, 
Opponents 23. Games played 9; won 7, lost 2. 

Nov. 29-50. Convention of the Association of the Colleges and Prepara- 
tory schools of the Middle States and Maryland held at the University. 

Dec. 4. Junior promenade at the Empire Hall . 

Dec. 5. The New York Kappa Chapter (Syracuse University) of Phi 
Beta Kappa celebrated the one hundred and twenty-fifth anniversary of the 
founding of the Society by a banquet at the Yates Hotel. Wm. Notting- 
ham, '76, presided. 

Dec. 8. Dean H. C King of Oberlin College addressed the students on 
the '* Snpreme Claims of the Christian Life upon Thoughtful Men.*' On 
the tenth he addressed a meeting of college women and in the evening a 
meeting of men, as well as a union meeting the next evening. 

Dec. 13. Iota Alpha Mu, a new junior fraternity, organized among the 
young women of the Junior class. 



30 ANNALS 190a 

Dec. 14. Benefit for the Hittorical Association in the Wieting Opera 
House. 

Dec. 20- Jan. 3. Christmas vacation. 

Dec. 20-Jan. 5. Annual Christmas trip of the Glee and Instmmentsl 
Clnbs. 

Dec. 27. Syracuse Alumni teachers' banquet at the Yates. Fifty-eight 
were present. 

1902 

Jan. 10. Coach Sweetland re-engaged to coach Uniyersity crews and 
football team . 

Professor Holzwarth's new book ** Zriny *' published by D C. Heath 
&Co. 

Jan. 20-30. Mid-year examinations. The Lyman C. Smith College 
used for the first time. 

Jan. 21. Semi-annual meeting of the Board of Trustees. Mr. Lyman 
C. Smith, first yice- president, presided in the absence of president Arch- 
bold. The Executive committee was instructed to have plans prepared for 
a new dormitory opposite Winchell Hall. 

The Erastus Franklin Holden Professorship in Astronomy and the John 
Raymond French Professorship in Mathematics were established. The 
following faculty promotions were made : F. E. Farley from Associate 
Professor to Professor of English ; H. M . Smith Professor of Chemistry ; 
H. M. Burchard Professor of Greek ; E. H. Kraus, Associate Professor of 
Mineralogy ; W. M. Smallwood, Associate Professor of Zoology. Charles 
B. Thwing was elected Professor of Physics to succeed Professor Haanel, 
resigned. P. O. Place was elected Instructor in Latin. 

Leave of absence for the coming year were granted to Professor Flick of 
the History department and to Professor Jeanette Scott of the Painting 
department. Professor Peck of the Astronomy department will also be 
absent part of the year studying in Europe. A new course in Mineralogy 
was adopted and permission to hold a Summer School granted. 

Jan. 23. Announcement was make that John D. Rockefeller has given 
$100,000 to the University. 

Jan. 31. Annual banquet of the New York Association of Syracuse Uni- 
versity alumni held at the hotel Savoy. Governor Odell was a guest. 

Feb. 5. Annual Phi Kappa Alpha Ball held at the Alhambra. 

Private Musical recital in the College of Fine Arts. 

Feb. 7. The new athletic constitution appeared in the University 
Weekly. 

The representation of faculty, alumni and students is much like the old 
organization. It differs in introducing representatives from the outside and 
in not requiring representation from students and faculties of all the Col- 
leges of the University. 

Feb. 7. General John B. Gordon of Savannah, Ga., addressed the stu- 
dents after chapel: 



j^p^ SYRACUSB UNIVERSITY 3I 

Feb. 14. A number of valuable gifts have been made to the University 
Library : J. William Smith presented a set of the ** Journal of the Frank- 
tin Institute" in 152 volumes. Theodore Irwin of Oswego presented a set 
of the ** Acts of the Jesuits in America.'* An anonymous gift of three 
hundred dollars has been made to purchase books for the department of 
Semi tics. 

Feb. 21. A valuable article of Professor Morris on *'The Old Law** 
appeared in the current issue of the quarterly publications of the Modem 
Language Association of America. 

Feb. 22. Basketball game in the Gymnasium ; Syracuse 35, University of 
Fa., 8. 

Feb 24. Professor Coddington read a paper on'* Present Day Philoso- 
phy and the Faith " before the Ministerial Association of Syracuse. 

Feb. 27. Sigma Nn of Phi Gamma Delta gave a large reception at the 
home of Professor and Mrs. Scott. The guests were the faculty snd the 
upper classes. 

Feb. 28. New activity has been manifest during the past month in debat- 
ing matters. It is a good sign. 

The senior class has decided to wear caps and gowns. New Athletic 
Board elected. 

March 7. The faculty of the College of Liberal Arts voted that cuts taken 
by the students during the three days immediately before or after a vacation 
shall be counted double. 

Six men of the sophomore class suspended for rushing in the Hall of 
Languages. 

March 10. Second annual Exhibition of the Fine Arts Fakir Association 

March 13. Annual Glee Club Concert in John Crouse College Hall. 

March 19. ** Taming of the Shrew'* presented by the English Club at 
the Wieting Opera House in a very successful manner. 

March 21. 1901-2 Catalogue issued. Total registration 1,806, an increase 
of 193 over last year, a ratio of about 12 per cent. 

March 21. Professor Richard Grant Calthrop chosen as head of the 
department of vocal music. 

Mrs. Vernelia Gilmour Nichols and Mrs. Amy Elwell Crane engaged as 
Instmctors in the Vocal department. 

March 23. igoj Onondagan issued. 

March 26-April 3. Easter Vacation. 

March 28. Professor Henry A. Peck sailed for Europe intending to return 
in September. 

April 4. Instructor H. C. Cooper spoke before the Science Association 
on *' The Present Status of the Periodic System.*' Professor Graham 
reviewed the electrical progress of the year. 

April 8. Syracuse University Congress revived to hold weekly debates. 

April 1-12. Easter trip of Glee and Instrumental Clubs. 

April II. Orange club organized by a nun^ber of non-fraternity men. 

April 16. Mrs. Sibley and the senior class in Library Economy attended 
the District Library Convention at Cortland. 



32 ANNALS 1^ 

Professor Thwing and his students in Physics have constructed a new 
blast furnace. 

April 19. The Denison Declamation Prize contest held in the Chapel of 
the Hall of Languages. First prize for men won by W. J. Boyd, second by 
S. G. Prime. First prize for women won by Theresa K. Tobin, second by 
Helen Knapp. 

Inter-class meet on the University Oval won by the freshmen (*05). 

April 21. Professor Berwald's *' Queen of the Night ** was on the pro- 
gram of the Musical Festival at the Alhambra. 

April 22. ** Flachsmann als Brzieher ** presented by the German Club at 
Wieting Opera House with distinguished success. 

Syracuse-Brown University debate at Providence, R. I. Syracuse repre- 
sented by Messrs. Myron (H. B.), '03, leader, Behm, '02, Sumner, '03 and 
Nelson, '03, alternate. Debate won by Brown University. 

April 25. Annual banquet of Buffalo Alumni Association at the Genesee 
Hotel. 

The faculties of all the colleges of the University have decided to wesr 
the scholastic uniform of cap and gown at Commencement Exercises here- 
after. 

April 26. Sophomore Class banquet held at the Tavern, Onondaga Valley. 

Professor William H. Metzler has been elected to a fellowship in the 
Royal Society of Bdinburgh ; also in the Royal Society of Canada. 

April 28. The annual banquet of Eastern New York Alumni Association 
held at Albany. 

May 9. Professor C. L. Becker appeared in a violin solo at the Musical 
Festival in Watertown. 

May 10. Track meet between Syracuse and Columbia on the University 
Oval. Won by Columbia. Score 56^ and 47 >^. 

Dr. Bushnell has published a book entitled '* Readings from Latin Verse.** 

May 14. Moving-up day . 

**Lawn" Festival held by the Biological Association (in the Gymnasium). 

May 15. Dr. Melvil Dewey spoke for nearly two hours in chapel, and 
addressed the English Club in the evening. 

May 16. Annual contest of the New York State Intercollegiate Oratori- 
cal League held at Rochester. Won by J. Roy Allen, *o4. of Syracuse. 

May 17. Track meet between Syracuse and Williams at Williamstown. 
Won by Syracuse. Score, 62 and 55. 

Annual track meet of the Syracuse University Athletic Association on the 
University Oval. Won by Colgate Academy with 33^^ points. 

May 22. Last chapel exercises. 

May a3-June 6. Final examinations. 

May 23. Sigma Rho Alpha organized among the students in Architect- 
ure in the College of Fine Arts. 

May 24. Regatta on Onondaga lake. University crew against Laureate 
Boat Club of Troy and Freshman crew against Cascadilla School. Both 
races won by the University. 



SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY 33 

Celebrmtion in the evening on the University campus. 

A Graduate Fellowship in Sociology of {400 a year has been established 
by Mr. Wm. J. Mantanye of Cortland, N. Y. 

May 30. Cayuga Lake regatta between 'Varsity second crew and second 
crews of Cornell and Harvard. Won by Cornell, Syracuse second. 

May 30-31. Intercollegiate games on Berkley Oval, New York. Won 
by Harvard with 34 points. Syracuse was seventh with 8 points. Colum- 
bia and Cornell tied for eighth place with three points each. 

June 7. Annual meeting of the University Senate. 

Chancellor's oratorical contest in John Crouse College Hall. First prize 
won hj J. Roy Allen, *o4, second, Wilbur Grant Boyd, '02, third, Lynn C. 
JeniaoD, *02. 

Special meeting of Phi Beta Kappa. The following members of the 
class of 1902 were elected to membership : Matthew L. Dann, May Van 
Doren, May Spring, Edgar A. Lowther, Mary E. McKinley, Joseph P. 
Behm, George F. DuBois, Solomon Ferguson, William G. Siddell, Arthur 
R. Horton, Cornelia C. Ward, Frederick T. Delany, Albert H. Damon, 
Gertrude Robinson, Ralph E. Wager and George T. Hargitt. 

June 8. 10:00 A. M. Baccalaureate sermon b^r the Chancellor. 

7:30 P. M. Sermon before the Young Men's and Young Women's Chris- 
tian Associations by Mr. Robert E. Speer, A.M., Secretary of the Mis- 
sionary Board of the Presbyterian church. New York. 

June 9-11. Annual exhibition in the John Crouse College of works of 
art produced during the year by students of the College of Fine Arts. 

June 9. Annual meeting cf Phi Beta Kappa. The following were 
initiated : Dr. F. E. Farley, Dr. H. Monmouth Smith. H. O. Sibley, '89, 
W. D. Lewis, '92. L. H. Rice, '92, E. D. Shepard, '92, C. F. Wiley, '92, 
J. L. Barnard, '92, Miriam Guernsey Mix, '93, Nettie A. Chapman, '93, 
Clara E. Ward, '93, William P. Graham, '93, William E. Taylor. '93, 
George H. Haigh, '93, G. R. Miller, '93, Cora Dodson Graham, '94, Martha 
Keefe Phillips, '94, Lizzie Lowell Hammond '94, Schuyler F. Herron, '94, 
Delmer B. Hawkins, *94,Pred Z. Lewis, '94, Mabel Boomer Hodder, '95, 
Gertrude M. Leete, '95, Nellie J. Allen, '95, Mabel Potter Daggett, '95, 
Guy H. Baskerville, '95, J. W. Stevens, '95, Harry B. Tilbury, '95 ; also 
the members elect of the class of 1902 ; also the following partly in 
absentia : Charles S. Gager, '95, George G. Groat, '95, 7 June, 1902 ; Her- 
man Churchill, '94, 12 June, 1902 ; Marcus L. Glazer, '92 ; Frank Hoyt 
Wood, '91, 15 June, 1902 ; Caroline S. Romer, '95, 13 June, 1902 ; Howard 
J. Banker, '92, 12 June, 1902 ; Genevra Gwynn Wiley, '92, 23 July, 1902 ; 
Annie M. Knapp '92, February, 1903. 

3:00 P. M. Class Day exercises in John Crouse College Hall. 

8:00 P. M. First Musical Soiree of the class of 1902, in John Crouse 
College Hall. 

June 10. 10:00 A. M Meeting of the Board of Trustees. Mr. William 
Nottingham, '76, having been elected a regent of the University of the 
State of New York, resigned his office of alumni trustee. Mr. Willis B. 



34 ANNALS 1^ 

Bums of Syracuse was elected trustee at large. Trustee John S. Huyler of 
New York, gave |i,5oo for Christian Association work next year. A deficit 
of $32,000 for the current expenses of the University was made up by the 
trustees present. The Bishop Charles H. Fowler Professorship was eaUl>- 
lished. The Board voted to sanction and adopt the academic costume and 
directed it to be worn atiCommencement Exercises and on other public ooci- 
sions by all trustees, officers of the corporation, faculties, and that senior 
students be required to present themselves at graduation in such costume. 
Associate Professor Paul C. Nugent was made Professor of Civil Engineer- 
ing ; Associated Professor George A. Wilson, was made Professor of Logic 
and Metaphysics ; Associate Professor, Delmer £. Hawkins, was made Pro- 
fessor of Political Economy ; Instructor William E. Taylor was made 
Associate Professor of Mathematics ; Instructor A. S. Patterson was made 
Associate Professor of French and given a leave of absence of one year ; 
Instructor F. A. Saunders was made Associate Professor of Physics; 
Harold Pender was appointed Instructor in Physics in place of S. N. 
Taylor, resigned ; Roland C. Dryer was appointed Instructor in French. 
Miss Luella Stewart, Professor of Painting, and Professor E. H. Gaggin of 
the department of Architecture tendered their resignations which were 
accepted. Associate Professor F. W. Revels was made Professor of Archi- 
tecture ; Earl Hallenbeck, Instructor in Architecture ; George Alexander 
Russell, Instructor in Piano ; Mrs. Amy E. Crane, Instructor in Vocal 
Music. Miss Lilla M. Taylor and Mrs. Vernelia G. Nichols were made 
Instructors in Vocal Music ; Miss Elizabeth Van Valkenburg, Instructor in 
Normal Art. Professor Louis B. Phillips was given a leave of absence for 
one year. Dr. Chas. W. Hargitt was given a leave of absence from January 
to October, 1903. 

Several members of the faculty for the Smith College of Applied Science 
were chosen. Charles L. Griffin was elected Professor of Mechanical 
Engineering. William M. Towle and George H. Shepard, Associate Pro- 
fessors of Mechanical Engineering. 

William Nottingham was made Lecturer on Corporations in the 
College of Law ; Jerome L. Cheney, Instructor in the Law of Corpo- 
rations ; Benjamin J. Shove, Lecturer on Criminal Procedure ; 
John W. Church, Instructor in Criminal Law and Practice ; Howard 
P. Denison, Lecturer on the Law of Patents. Professor H. N. Pattee 
resigned his position as Registrar. The Chancellor's Baccalaureate sermon 
was ordered published. 

The establishment by the United States Weather Bureau of a forecast sta- 
tion in connection with the University was approved. 

10:00 A. M. Business Meeting of Alumni Association. W. A. Holden, *8o, 
and H. N. Marvin, '83, elected alumni trustees. 

1:00 p. M. Banquet. Presentation of fine life-size portrait in oil of Vice* 
Chancellor John R. French by the New York Alumni Association. B« J* 
Read, '86, was the artist. Steven B. Ayers made the presentation address, 
Dr. J. D. Phelps, president and presiding officer responded. The Chancellor 
followed, and finally Mr. Archbold. 



SYRACUSE UNfVBRSlTY 35 

f . Second Musical Soiree of the Class of 190a. 

iox)o A. M. Commencement of all the colleges in John Crouse 

alL Procession of faculty in scholastic cap and gown. Oration 

dartin A. Knapp, A.M., Chairman of the Interstate Commerce 

>n, Washington, D. C, Subject : *' Evolution of Commerce with 

»ns to Business and Social Life." 

si tablet for Dean Leroy M. Vernon unveiled in John Crouse Col- 
Address by William Nottingham, '76. 

cs: A.B., 57 ; Ph.B.,48; B.S., 14; C.B., 4; E.E.,6; B.Mus.,io; 

i.Ar., 4 ; B.L., 6 ; M.D., 21 ; LL.B., 26. Total 197 (less 8 ■= 189) 

., 6 ; Ph.M., 3 ; M.L., i ; Ph.D.. i ; D.D., 4 ; S.T.D., i ; LL.D., 

2 ; M.Mus., 3. Total 23 (less 9 » 14). Net total 203. 

[. Chancellor's reception in John Crouse College. 

Intercollegiate regatta, Poughkeepsie, N. Y. Won by Cornell. 

ifth. Freshman race won by Cornell, Syracuse fourth. 

LUg. 9. First Summer School, attendance 39 ; also a summer ses- 

icution for three weeks from July ist. 

United States Weather Bureau Station established at the Univer- 

inder McC. Ashley in charge. Mr. Ashley is an alumnus of 
College. Later M. ft. Sanford, '88, became Assistant. 
Fred Walker Sherman, A.M., '01, Assistant in French, 1901-2, 

I Other's home in Onondaga. N. Y. 

•r and Mrs Hawkins spent the summer abroad. Professor Peritz 

n Europe and purchased a library for the Semitic department. 

and Mrs. Peck spent the summer in Germany. See Jan. 21. 

. Opening of the College year. Students assembled in John 

allege Hall. Salt rush after chapel by the two lower classes. 

. Sophomore reception to the freshmen in the Gymnasium. 

ub organized to aid Americans in learning Spanish. 

. Resolution adopted by the faculty that '* no officer or instructor 

iversity shall give to any student any information whatever in 

his grade except that he has passed or failed." 

reception of the Christian Associations for the freshmen in the 

m. 

istration was very heavy. The classes were crowded in the College 

Arts almost beyond capacity to care for them. 

. Alpha of Gamma Phi Beta announced that it has pledged no 

ice the opening of College. Its policy is to defer pledging until 

I semester. • 

Mr. E. E. Sperry, '98. was appointed Instructor in History. Dr. 

ley in German, Mr. J. L. Boysen also in German. Mr. W. S. 

was appointed to take charge of shop work in the Physics depart- 

IS Mabel Rhoades, '98, became the first Mantanye fellow in Soci- 

arry S. Lee. '99, was made Assistant in Latin and teaches elemen- 

. Smith College of Applied Science opened. Charles L. Griffin, 

ir Polytechnic Institute, '88, was appointed Acting-Dean. An 



36 AMNAI«S t90l> 

excellent faculty has been organized consisting, besides the Acting-Dean of 
Professors Graham and Nugent, Associate Professors Shepard and Towle, 
and Instructor Leon B. Howe, '98, who was transferred to this faculty and 
made Instructor in Descriptive Geometry and Mechanical Drawing. 

Instruction in English, German, Physics, Chemistry, etc., will be given in 
classes in the College of I^iberal Arts. 

In the College of Pine Arts Miss A. B. Hunt was appointed Instructor in 
Painting, and Geo. A. Russell, '01, Instructor in Piano. 

Sept. 30. Alpha of Alpha Phi celebrated its thirtieth anniversary. It was 
for nine years the only chapter of the fraternity in existence. 

Oct. I. The Journal of Pedagogy is hereafter to be published by Profesi- 
ors Metzler and Street. 

Oct. 3. Mrs. Esther Baker Steele has presented to the Greek department 
a valuable collection of Greek vases and Tanagra figurines. 

Oct. 4. Two football games under the auspices of the Syracuse Univer* 
sity Academic Athletic Association were played, one at Cazenovia and the 
other at Oneida. 

Professor and Mrs. Hopkins entertained the faculty, introducing Acting- 
Dean and Mrs. Griffin, Associate Professor and Mrs. Smallwood and Associ- 
ate Professor Towle. 

Oct. 7. Professor Jean Marie Richards entertained the English Clnb at 
the Chancellor's residence. 

Oct. II. Football on the Oval. Syracuse 23, Colgate o. Quite different 
from the old contests between the two Universities. 

Oct. 13. Rev. C. C. Wilbor, Ph.D., D.D., *68, has been appointed Regis- 
trar. 

Oct. 15. Sophomore-freshman track meet. Sophomore (*Q5), 73 ; fresh- 
men (*o6), 44. 

Oct. 17. Only upper classmen can carry canes. So decided by the senior 
class. Football games between the two lower classes will decide which shal^ 
have its numerals placed on the football banner. This eliminates the 
'* cane game ** from college customs. 

Mr. Archbold gave ;Sioo to the new University Band. 

Oct. 18. Central New York Alumni Association organized, James H. 
Gilbert, '75, president. 

Syracuse defeated Amherst in football, 15 to o. 

Oct. 28. Professor Hamilton addressed the Prohibition Club on "The 
Sociological Side of the Saloon Question." 

Oct. 31. Henry Danziger, Jr., '9f, has presented to the German depart- 
ment an alcove of choice books. Chester A. Congdon, '75, gave|iootothe 
athletic fund. Trustee H. S. Holden also gave $50. 

Prizes endowed by alumni in 1902 : 

A prize has been offered in the history department by J. C. Tennant, '09, 
his mother and sister, for the best essay on some subject connected with the 
Civil War. 

Rev. William Harmon van Allen, '90, of Boston, offered a prize to be 



2 SYRACUSB UNIVBRSITY 37 

own ms •• The van Allen Latin Verse Prize " for a Latin poem on a 
cred Snbject and consisting of not less than sixty lines. Open to juniors. 
Nov. I. Professor H. A. Peck had an elaborate article in the Astronomi- 
1 Journal on •* The Definite Orbit of Comet 1898. IX. »' 
Nov. 3. The Crown Prince of Siam and party visited the University and 
ade a tour of the campns. 

Nov. 6. Professor Hill addressed the members of the Painting Associa- 
Dn on ** Monotypes.*' 

An exhibition of architectural work given in the Art Library of John 
rouse College. 

Nov. II. A Minister's Club was organized among the students with fif- 
^en members as a nucleus. 

Nov. 12. Professor Losey gave readings from Macbeth at Assembly Hall. 
Nov. 14. First of a series of ten lectures on *' The American Revolution*' 
iven by Professor Mace in the city for the benefit of the History depart- 
lent. 

Nov. 24. Dr. Booker T. Washington, Principal of Tuskegee Institute, 
Lbu, addressed the students at Chapel. Union Chapel services were held in 
ohn Croase College Hall. 

The Chemical Society of Syracuse organized. Professors Pattee and 
Imith are among the officers. 

* Beta chapter of Phi Mu Epsilon installed at the University. Only musi- 
ml students eligible. 

Nov. 25-Dec. I. Thanksgiving vacation. 

Nov. 36. Sigma Theta Chi organized by certain freshmen women. The 
»lor8 are green and orange. 

Nov. 27. Football at New York ; Syracuse 6, Columbia 6. 

Dec. 3 Junior Promenade at the Alhambra. 

Dec. 4. University calendar, prepared by Stanley Makepeace, '04, issued. 

Dec. 5. Dr. Pender invited by M. H. Poincaretogo to Paris and perform 
lis experiments in company with M. Cremien, proving the theory of the 
convection of electric charges. M. Cremien has reached opposite conclus- 
ions from those of Dr. Pender. 

Dec. 6. Freshman banquet at the Empire House. 

Dec 10. Prank 0*Neil, '04, elected football captain for season of 1903. 

Dec. II. Re-organization of debating societies influenced by Professor 
Losey. 

Dec. 20. End of football season. Out of six games played with the large 
ooUeges, Syracuse won from Colgate, Amherst and Williams, tied with 
Columbia, was defeated by Yale and West Point. 

Points, Syracuse 125, opponents 63. 

In the Syracuse University Academic Athletic Association the Syracuse 
High School won the championship. 



* This frstemity wa« fouvded at DePauw UniTcrsity in 189a. The badge is a harp with 
three stringa. The fraternity flower is the white rote. The colors are lavender and 
white. 



38 ANNAI3 1903 

The SyracuM University Weekly issued a football number. 

Dec. 22-Jan. 5. Christmas vacation. 

Dec. 22-Jan. 6. Professors Hargitt, Hopkins, Smallwood, Saunders and 
Instructor Cooper attended the Scientific Meetings at Washington, D. C. 

Dec. 23 -Jan. 2. Holiday trip of the Glee and Instrumental Clubs. 

Dec. 25. Death of Theodore Irwin of Oswego, N. Y., long an honored 
trustee and benefactor of the University. 

Dec. 30. Dinner at the Yates Hotel of the graduates of the University in 
the teaching profession. 

The Phi Kappa Psi Chapter House, 1 13 College Place, almost entirely 
destroyed by fire. 

1903 

Jan. 7. Crew practice begun. 

Bulletin of Summer School issued. Dates of school July 6th to Aug. 15th. 
Jan. 10. Initiation and banquet of Nu Sigma Nu. Dr. John VanDnyn 
was toastmaster. 

Jan. 13. Annual meeting of the student Athletic Association. Professor 
Morris, president of the Athletic Governing Board, reported as follows: 

Total receipts |i8,867 .64 

Total disbursements 18,825 . 37 

Balance on hand $43*27 

The above includes all athletics from March i, 1902 to Jan. i, 1903. 

Officers of the Student Association for next year: President, George G. 
Hares, '04, vice-president, Arthur L. Evans, '04, secretary, Frank Sowers, 
•04. 

The University Press Association met and organized. Leon Haley, '03, 
is president. 

Jan. 17. Dr. C. H. Weller of the Hopkins Grammar School, New Haven, 
Conn., gave a lecture before the Classical Club on " Greece and Recent 
Excavations.'* 

Jan. 18. Mrs. Blla A. Boole, of Brooklyn, addressed the student meeting 
on ** The Logic of Temperance." 

Jan. 19. Henry D. Costello, '01, engaged to coach the baseball team. 

Jan. 20-30. Mid-year examinations. 

Jan. 20. Mid-year meeting of the Board of Trustees. Need of a central 
heating plant was discussed. Plans for Haven Hall, the new dormitory, 
presented and approved ; plans were drawn by Professor Revels and Instruc- 
tor Hallenbeck. Announcement made that Mrs. Esther Baker Steele had 
just given $10,000 more to the University. By-laws amended so that the 
Chancellor may nominate new members to the faculty after having con- 
sulted the Deans of the several colleges. 

New grade of Assistant Professor adopted for the College of Liberal Arts, 
making the order of seniority, Professor, Associate Professor, Assistant Pio- 
fessor and Instructor. 

Professor C. W. Cabeen, Professor Berwald and Professor Hawley were 
granted a year's leave of absence. 



19^ SYRACDSB UMIVBRSITY 39 

Professors T. C. Hopkins and H. M. Smith were granted leave of absence 
from May ist until September. 

Changes in the Law faculty at the opening of the college year were 
formally approved. Resignations of'E. Nottingham and B. H. Burdick 
were accepted and the following appointments made : Louis L. Waters, 
Professor of Law, B. I. Bdgecomb, Instructor in Code of Procedure, G. N. 
Cheney, Instructor in Negligence and Damages and Bailments, L* G. 
Haight, Instructor in Domestic Relations. 

Resolutions were adopted on the death of trustee Theodore Irwin, of 
Oswego. An extended report of the New Lyman C. Smith College of 
Applied Science was given. 

Jan. 31. James A. Ten Byck engsged to coach the crews. 

Jan. 33. First basketball game of the season played with Oswego Nor- 
mal School at Oswego. Oswego won, 15 to 14. 

* Gamma Chapter of Alpha Omega Delta has been established in the Col- 
lege of Medicine. 

The Athletic Governing Board entertained the wearers of Block S. 

Jan. 30. Annual reunion and dinner of the New York Alumni Associa- 
tion of Syracuse University held at Hotel Savoy. 

Feb. 4-5. Illustrated lectures given by Professor George P. Baker of 
Harvard on "Shakespeare's London." 

Mid- Winter services of the Y. M. C. A. Addresses by R. A. Waite, *oi, 
and others. 

Feb. 6. New York Bpsilon of Phi Delta Theta celebrated its sixteenth 
anniversary. H. B. Tilbury, '95, was toastmaster. 

Feb. 7. The senior class elected class-day officers as follows : President, 
Judson P. Davis ; secretary, Carrie Elizabeth Smalley ; treasurer, H. W. 
Connell ; valedictorian, W. H. McClelland ; salutatorian, C. J. Taft ; orator, 
E. H. Snmner; prophet, Katherine A. Davies; historian, Sarah M. Don- 
ovan ; address of welcome, A. S. Viall ; pipe orator, William L. Wise ; 
poet, Lnra B. Bmens ; address to 1904, A. D. Brown ; tree orator, A. B. 
Davis; chairman of executive committee, F. B. Clarke. The president 
represents the College of Fine Arts, the others represent all the Colleges. 

Feb. 8-9. Dr. W. P. McDowell addressed a large meeting in the Gym- 
nasinm. He also spoke in Chapel Monday morning and addressed two 
meetings, one for women and one for men, Monday evening. 

Feb. la Annual concert of the Glee and Instrumental Clubs in Cronse 
College Hall. Every number was encored. 

Feb. 13. Death at Germantown, Pa., of Rev. Manley S. Hard, D.D. , '63, a 
tmstee of the University and a loyal and devoted alumnus. 

Feb. 14. Sixty alumnae of the University met at the residence of Mrs. 
Wm. Nottingham, '80, and organized an association. Miss Ella I. French, 
'78, was elected president. 

Feb. 19. Annual Oratorical contest of the Prohibition Club. 

Feb. 20. ** The Debater '* appeared, a publication in the interests of 
debating and oratory for schools and colleges, edited by Syracuse students. 



40 ANNALS H03 

The Syracuse UniverBity (Alumni) Aaaociation of Central New York was 
revived (see i8 Oct., 1902) at a meeting at Assembly Hall, University Block. 
It is designed to aid in supporting athletics. E. I#. French, 'oa, was elected 
president. 

Feb. 21. Indoor track meet at Buffalo under the auspices of the 74th 
Regiment Athletic Association. Score : Cornell, 34>^, Regiment A. A. 10, 
Syracuse, 8^. 

Annual catalogue of the University issued. Total number of students 
2,009, an increase of more than 11 percent, over last year. The summary 
shows as follows : Liberal Arts, 905 ; Fine Arts, 706 ; Medicine 140 ; Law, 
123 ; Applied Science, 183 ; Summer School, 39. Thirty-five states and the 
District of Columbia were represented, as well as nhie foreign countries. 

Feb. 26. Sophomore banquet at the St. Cloud Hotel. 

March. R. A. Waite, Jr. , entered on his duties as Secretary of the 
University Christian Associations. 

In the architectural competitions of the Society of Beaux- Arts Architects 
of New York, Syracuse University students received four honorable 
mentions. 

Associate Professor Hawley announced a traveling exhibition of students' 
work in the Painting department. 

March 5. Ifrofessor John Rummell of Buffalo gave the first of a series ol 
three Shakesperian readings in Assembly Hall under the auspices of the 
Elocution department. 

March 9. *' Fake Show '* held in John Crouse College by the Fine Art 
Fakirs Association. The net receipts were $425. 

March 10. The Philosophical Club organized. Professor Coddington is 
the president. 

March 15. Dr. J. D. Phelps took pledges at the University Ave. Church 
for a scholarship and realized $1,162. 

March 17. The upper classmen took action abolishing two under class 
societies, Pipe and Stein, and Double Seven ; also prohibiting the use of 
paint on the walks and buildings of the University. 

March 18. W. C. O'Donnell, Ph.D., '92, spoke in Chapel to an inter- 
ested audience. He had lectured in the city the evening previous. 

March 21. Lecture at Assembly Hall by Sidn^ Lee of London, editor 
of the Dictionary of National Biography and aulhor of a complete life of 
Shakespeare. 

March 23. The third faculty Recital of the Music department was given 
under the direction of Professor Berwald assisted by Mrs. Berwald. 

March 27. Announcement made that Professor Mace will give a course 
of lectures on American History at the Summer School at Knoxville, Tenn., 
beginning June 23d. 



* This fraternity was founded in 1879 at the University of BuflFalo. The Beta Chapter 
was established in 1902 at Baltimore Medical College. It is ezclusiTely a Medical frater- 
nity. The pin is a monogram of the Greek letters studded with points in the colors of 
fraternity. The colors are red and blue. 



1903 SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY 4I 

Traiuiug table for the crews started at the Yacht Club House. 

Professor John VanDuyn is making a tour of Spain. 

Hospital appointments for the Class of '03, College of Medicine are as 
follows : Syracuse, N. Y.; St. Joseph's Hospital, Drs. W. W. Davis and H. 
A. Harris ; Hospital of the Good Shepherd, Drs. C. £. Goodwin and F. H. 
Nichols ; Utica, N. Y. : St. Elizabeth's Hospital, Dr. H. J. Brayton ; Faxton 
Hospital, Dr. W. P. Hall ; Utica General Hospital, Dr. H. H. Lenahan ; 
Brooklyn, N. Y. : St. John's Hospital, Dr. S. P. Richmond ; Kings County 
Hospital. Dr. P. W. Smith; St. Catharine's Hospital, Dr. K. D. Wood; 
Paterson, N. J. : St. Joseph's Hospital, Dr. J. C. Palmer ; Lewiston. Me. : 
Central Maine General Hospital, Dr. Lasher Hart. 

Professor Peritz lectured in Assembly Hall on ** How we Got the Bible.'* 

April I. Professor Heffron lectured before the Biological Association on 
•• Tnbercnlosis." 

April 2. Phi Mu Hpsilon, the newly organized musical Sorority, held a 
brilliant reception at the Vanderbilt. 

Dr. Calthrop entertained the English Club with a talk on '* Recollections 
of Oxford." 

April 3. Baseball team off for the southern trip. They will play at 
Gettysburg as well as at Washington and Baltimore. 

April 6. University Band Concert in John Crouse College Hall. 

University of Virginia defeated in baseball. Syracuse 8, University of 
Va., 7. 

April 8-15. Baster vacation. 

April 14, 15, 16. District council convention of the second district of the 
Phi Kappa Psi Fraternity held in Syracuse. 

April 16. Professor Calthrop's recital was given as one of the series of 
faculty recitals. Professors Becker and Frey assisted. 

April 23. The new English Seminar Room in the Hall of Languages 
formally opened. 

April 24. Graduate system of coaching in football adopted. 

Mr. Ernest Mahr engaged as Instructor in Cello and Piano in the Col- 
lege of Fine Arts. 

April 25. Relay races at Philadelphia. Syracuse was represented by W. 
C. Lowe, Captain, Ralph, Sechner, Twombley and Erway. Their work 
was excellent. 

April 27. Denison Prize Speaking Contest held in the Chapel of the 
College of Liberal Arts. Open only to sophomores. First prize for the 
men won by Earl G. Rice, second by Newman W. Adsit. First prize for 
the women won by Miss Matie E. Reynolds, second by Miss Stella 
McTammany. 

Professor Emens lectured at Wyoming Seminary on '* Ancient and 
Modem Greece." 

April 29. Banquet of the Albany Alumni Association. Chancellor Day 
made an address. 

Professor Thomas C. Hopkins of the department of Geology sailed for 
Europe to spend the summer. 



42 ANNAI^S 1903 

Mrs. Sarah Sumner Teall addressed the students in American History on 
*' Personal Reminiscences of Conditions in Syracuse at the time of the Civil 
War.'* 

April 30. Enthusiastic Mass meeting of men in John Cronse College 
Hall in the interests of athletics and the Brown debate. Addresses were 
made by Professors Smalley and I^osey and Messrs. D. R. Cobb, Chas. J. 
Jewell, Harley Crane and I. D. MacGregor. 

May 2. Cornell-Syracuse track meet. Score: Cornell 69, Syracuse 48. 
Syracuse made four records, viz. hammer throw, pole vault, high hurdles 
and high jump. 

In baseball Syracuse defeated Columbia by a score of 4 to 2. 

Syracuse-Brown Debate held in John Crouse College Hall. Won by 
Syracuse. The Syracuse representatives were Herbert B. Myron, Captain, 
George K. Warren, Ernest H. Sumner and Arthur J. Sheldon, alternate. 
Professor Losey trained them. 

John C. Tennant, '01, has offered an annual prize of $25 to the Semitic 
department. 

May 5. Mrs. Esther Baker Steele, Ph.D., addressed the Classical Club 
on ** Civic Conditions at Athens in the Age of Pericles." 

May 6 Book-day of the Historical Associations. Class representatives 
made addresses. 

Last faculty recital for the year given by Dr. Parker assisted by Mrs. 
Nicholas . 

May 9. Moving-up Day. Speeches by Chancellor Day and Congressman 
Driscoll. The Chancellor announced that '* Moving-up Day ** is abolished 
and that '* Senior Day '* will take its place. 

Professor H. M. Smith of the department of Chemistry* sailed for Ger- 
many to attend the fifth annual Congress of Applied Chemistry held in 
Berlin. 

May 14. Rochester won in the Intercollegiate Oratorical Contest which 
was held in John Crouse College Hall . 

May 15. John H. Cunningham completed his twentieth year of service 
at the University. 

May 16. Williams and Syracuse track meet. Score: Williama 4i>^, 
Syracuse 75 >^. Syracuse made five records, viz., mile run, two mile run, 
120 yard hurdles, running high jump and pole vault. See Table of Records. 

May 17. Professor Borden P. Bowne addressed the tmion meeting. On 
Monday evening ( 1 8th) he lectured in Assembly Hall on **The Theistic 
Outlook" and spoke in chapel on Tuesday (19th). 

May 20. First inter-class regatta on Onondaga Lake won by the sopho- 
mores. 

Cup presented by the Phi Kappa Alpha as a prize. 

First annual banquet of the Delta Chi Alumni Association of Central New 
York in honor of the senior class in the College of Law. 

May 22. Dr. Hermon C. Cooper of the department of Chemistry granted 
a leave of absence for one year to engage in scientific work in the MasiSp 
chusetts Institute of Technology. 



SYRACUSB UNTVEltSITY 43 

The faculty of the College of Liberal Arts ruled that elections of studies 
for next jear must be made before June 6th. 

New Society, Pi Lambda Sigma, formed by the senior class in Library 
Economy. 

May 23. Sixth annual meet of the Syracuse University Academic 
Athletic Association held on the Oval. Won by Colgate Academy, Score 
33, Masten Park High School, Buffalo, next with 35 >^ points. 

May 29. The Chancellor's Prize Oratorical Contest for Law students was 
held in Assembly Hall. The prizes were won by O. B. Black, J. P. Hen- 
nessey and S. A. Ralph. 

May 29-30. Intercollegiate games at New York. Syracuse won fifth 
place again, falling y^ point below Princeton. Yale won the- meet with 
{^1% points; Harvard scored 41, Cornell 16, Princeton 11)^, Syracuse 11, 
Amherst 9, Georgetown 8, Pennsylvania 3, Williams 2. Harry L. Gardner, 
'04, took first place in the pole vault, scoring five points for Syracuse ; W. 
C. Lowe, *o3, was second in the high jump, three points ; C. Van Duyne, 
'04, second in hammer throw, three points. Gardner tied the intercolle- 
giate record of 1 1 ft. 7 in. in the pole vault. 

May 3a George O. Moore, '04, elected captain of the baseball team for 
the season of 1904. 

Work completed on the Delta Kappa Bpsilon Chapter House which is to 
be formally opened at this commencement. 

The Pi Chapter of Psi Upsilon announced that no freshmen will be 
pledged by it after the beginning of the fall term until the first of Febru- 
ary. Gamma Phi Beta and Kappa Alpha Theta have followed this plan 
for the past year. Tau Chapter of Kappa Kappa Gamma has also adopted 
the plan. 

Phi Gamma Delta has purchased the house No. 712 Comstock Ave. for a 
chapter house. 

Jone I. Work begun on Haven Hall, the new dormitory. 

June 3. Strict lodging house regulations issued by the Chancellor. 

The annual report of the Y. M. C. A. showed receipts and expenditures 
smoonting to I265.63. That of the Y. W. C. A. , $227.79. 

June 6. Annual meeting of the University Senate. 

Sum p. If . Chancellor's Oratorical Contest in John Crouse College Hall. 
First prize for men won by Wesley T. Hook, '04, second, Charles E. Wood- 
ley, *o4. First prize for women won by Grace Hunt, *o4, second, Claudia 
B. Allen, '04. 

Special meeting of Phi Beta Kappa : The following members of the Class 
of C903 were elected to membership : Omar Bdgar Jones, Charles D. Skin- 
ner, Charles Silas Bryan, Jr., Isabel Mary Pike, William H. McClelland, 
Carrie Blizabeth Smalley, Clinton J. Taft, Verne Seeley Fowler, Elizabeth 
V. Darrow, Edward Day Curtis, Elizabeth Berry, Stella L. Post, Alice R. 
Clarke, Phillip Peter Jacobs, Walter H. Powlesland, Claribel Glass, Jessie 
Castle Worden, Bertha Louise Beach. 

Jone 7. loxx) a.m. Baccalaureate sermon by the Chancellor in John 



44 ANNAI3 1903 

Crouse College Hall. Text, My Kingdom is sot of this World, John 
XVIII., 36. 

7:30 P. M. Annual Christian Association Sermon by Rev. Charles Edward 
Locke, D.D., of BuflFalo, N. Y. 

June 8-10. Annual exhibition in John Crouse College of works of art 
produced during the year by students of the College of Pine Arts. 

June 8. Annual meeting of Phi Beta Kappa. The following were initi- 
ated : Electa B. Whipple, *74, James M. Gilbert, '75, William A. Wood, 
'75, Jane S. Higham, '76, Herbert Huntington, '76, G. F. Darrow, '76, 
Curtis E. Mogg, '78, George W. Weaver, '78, Julian H. Myers, '79, Eloite 
Holden Nottingham, '80, Willis A. Holden. '80, Alice Wells, *8i. Bertha 
Holden Wilson. '82, Watson S. Hawkins, *83, Harry N. Marvin, '83, 
Charles M. Eddy, '84, Ida Saxton Wilcox, '93, T. Aaron Levy, '95 ; also the 
members elect of the class of 1903. 

Initiated partly in absentia : Byron C. Matthews, '77, 11 June, 1903 ; 
Nettie L. Wilmont, '89, and Nellie M. Wilmot, '89, 11 Aug., 1903 ; Ada J. 
Todd, '80, 17 Aug., 1903. 

Arthur Copeland, '84, was elected president for the next year. 

3:00 P. M. Class day exercises passed off smoothly. 

June 9. Annual meeting of the Alumni Association. Both the business 
session and the banquet were presided over by the president, James M. 
Gilbert, '75. The following officers were elected for 1903-4 : President, 
Professor F. J. Holzwarth, '87 ; vice-president. Professor M. M. Beebe, '90; 
recording secretary, Carl E. Dorr, '00 ; secretary and treasurer, Francis E. 
Oliver, '91 . 

Formal opening of the new Lodge of the Phi Gamma Chapter of Delta 
Kappa Epsilon with an enthusiastic banquet. 

The annual meeting of the Board of Trustees was held in Chancellor 
Day*s office. Much business of importance was transacted. A deficiency 
of {25,000 was reported, of which $21,500 had been raised by Chancellor 
Day prior to the session of the Board. At the meeting $3,500 was sub- 
scribed to meet the balance of the deficiency. The amount of money 
expended during the year was $403,658.28. William H. Peck of Scranton, 
Pa., was certified as having been elected trustee by the Wyoming Confer^ 
ence to succeed Dr. Manley S. Hard, deceased. Thomas B. Crary of 
Binghamton was elected by the Board trustee at large to succeed Theodore 
Irwin, deceased. Alexander T. Brown of Syracuse was also elected trustee 
at large. W. W. Porter was appointed secretary in place of Edwin Not- 
tingham, resigned. Rev. R. A. Waite, Jr., 'oi, was elected General Secre- 
tary of the Christian Associations, the appointment to date from last of 
March. The following changes in the faculty of the College of Liberal 
Arts, were made : Associate Professor Jean Marie Richards, Professor ol 
English ; Instructor Mary J. Sibley, Associate Professor of Bibliography ; 
Instructor J. E. Kirk wood. Associate Professor of Botany ; Instructor A. M. 
Reese, Associate Professor of Histology and Embyrology ; Instructors C C 
Bushnell and P. O. Place, Assistant Professors of Latin ; Instructor in Ger- 



1903 SYRACUSB UNIVBRSITY 45 

man, M. P. Tilley, Instructor in English. Dr. E. W. Otto was appointed 
Instructor in German. Miss Mabel C. Rhoades, ^98, was given the Man- 
tanye Fellowship another year. The Hiram Gee Fellowship was voted to 
Astociate Professor C. T. Hawley for 1903-4. Dr. I. H. Levy of the College 
of Medicine wbs granted a year's leave of absence. William Kent was 
elected Dean of the College of Applied Science. Strong resolutions of 
appreciation of the great work of the Chancellor were unanimously adopted. 

Chancellor Day ¥ras granted a leave of absence for the summer and Dean 
Smalley named Acting Chancellor. It was voted to proceed with the 
erection of a central heating and lighting plant at once. 

W. B. Bums was appointed on the finance and investment committee ; 
W. A. Holden, a member of the Senate, and Rev. R. D. Munger, D.D., on 
the library committee. 

An oil painting of Peter Burns, for thirteen years benefactor and trustee, 
was presented to the University by his daughter, Mrs Lyman C. Smith. 

Jnne 10. lo'xxy a. m. Commencement of all the Colleges in John Crouse 
College Hall. Faculty procession to the platform. Oration by General 
O. O. Howard on *' Some Lessons from Gettysburg.*' 

Graduates : A.B., 43 ; Ph.B., 54 ; B.S., 14 ; B. Mus., 7 ; B.P., 3 ; B.Ar., 
4 ; B.L., 3 ; M.D., 29 ; LL B.. 33 ; E. E., 13. Total 198 (less 9—189). Also 
A.M., 5; Ph.M., 4; M.L., I ; D.D., 4; S.T.D., 2; LL.D., i ; D.C.L., i ; 
Pd.D., I ; M. Mus., 2 ; D. Mus., i. Total 22 (less 10—12). Net total 201. 

Sxx> p. If. Chancellor's reception in John Crouse College. 

June 13. Chancellor Day, wife and daughter, Imogene, Professor Jean 
M. Richards and Mrs. Esther Baker Steele, Litt. D., sailed from Montreal 
for Enrope to be gone until the middle of September. 

Jnne 19. The 'Varsity and freshman crews left for Poughkeepsie. 

Jnne 24. Mrs. John R. French died at her residence on Crouse Ave. 

Jnne 27. Syracsue was fifth in the 'Varsity race on the Hudson, defeat- 
ing Columbia. The order of the crews was Coraell, Georgetown, Wiscon- 
sin, Pennsylvania, Syracuse, Columbia. In the freshman race the order of 
finish was Cornell, Syracuse, Wisconsin, Columbia, Pennsylvania. Syra- 
cuse was only 4^ seconds behind the winners. The future has great promise. 

Jnly 6- Aug. 15. Summer School. 

July 10. Death at New York of Mrs. John M. Reid. 

July 26. Death of Rev. Dr. George Lansing Taylor (No. 1835), at New 
York Dr. Taylor was one of the organizers of the University, a charter 
trustee and a member of the board until his death. 

Daring the snmmer the Chemical Lecture room, No. 11-12, Hall of 
Languages, was converted into a laboratory and the old parlor No. 46, was 
made into a Chemical Lecture room. At the same time a commodious 
lectnre room was constructed under the Library. Haven Hall and the 
Heating Plant were pushed under the superintendence of Professor Revels 
and Harte Cuningham, Supt. of Buildings. A new wing was also added 
to the Library building. 

Sept Dr. J. H. Hamilton, Professor of Sociology, resigned early in 



46 ANNAI^ 1903 

September to accept the position of Head Worker of the University Settle- 
ment in the city of New York. 

Sept. 12. Chancellor and Mrs. Day and family arrived in Syracuse from 
their European trip. The Chancellor devoted some time to the study of 
the universities when abroad. 

Sept. 15. College opened at 9:30 a. m. Exercises as usual in Music 
Hall of the John Crouse College. The faculty appeared in cap and 
gown. Chancellor Day*s address was most impres:iive and was suggested 
by the death (Sept. 9) of a graduate of last June, Miss Carrie Elizabeth 
Smalley (No. 3375), out of respect for whom the sophomores, with gen- 
erous kindness, postponed the salt rush. The Chancellor insisted that the 
labor of preparation for life is by no means lost even though death follow 
speedily on graduation. *' We go on to a greater life when translated to 
the beyond." 

First appearance of the Syracuse Daily Orange^ C. T. Robertson, *qs, 
Manager, I. R. Tempi eton, '04 Editor. 

Sept. 16. Mass meeting after Chapel, College of Liberal Arts, in the 
interest of the College papers. After some remarks by Chancellor Day, 
B. D. Eddy, '02, and A. L. Evans, '04, presented the interests of The Syra- 
cuse Weekly t and Rev. Karl Swartz, *86, Dr. Charles Jewell and J. Robert 
Rubin, *04, spoke for the new paper, the Syracuse Daily Orange, Its first 
issues were excellent and the enterprise promised to be a success. 

Announcement of the sad death (Sept. 15) of Henry M. Galpin, '05, at 
Cornwall, N. Y. 

Sept. 17. The sophomores gave a reception to the freshmen in the 
Gymnasium. Upper classmen not allowed in the building. 

Registration of new students, the largest in the history of the University. 

Professor Flick offered a new course in Recent European History. 

Sept. 19. The 'Varsity defeated the Cortland Normal School team in the 
first football game of the season by a score of 23 to o. 

The graduate Coaches were J. B. Parrish, *o2, and A. D. Brown, '04. 

The Christian Associations of the University gave a reception to the 
faculty and students. It was estimated that 800 attended. 

Sept. 23. Professor Holzwarth has published a new text-book, " Gcethe- 
Schiller-Leitfaden." 

The freshmen defeated the sophomores in a game of baseball, 20-5. 

Sept. 24. The postponed salt rush took place in the rear of the Esther 
Baker Steele Hall of Physics. 

Sept 26. Football on the Oval ; 'Varsity 35, Onondaga Indians, o. 

Sept. 29. Professor end Mrs. Hargitt arrived from their trip in Europe. 

Mr. J. C. Tennant, '01, has established a prize in the Semitic department. 
(See 2 May, 1903.) Subjects for competition will alternate between the 
Old and the New Testaments. The subject for 1903-4 is *' The Babylonian 
Monuments and the Bible." 

Oct. The Athletic Governing Board enforced the one year rule, ruling 
out several strong football men. Bleachers erected on the north side of the 
Oval. Class cap adopted by the freshmen. 



SYRACUSB UNIVERSITY 47 

• 

:t. 3. Football ; Clarkson Institute c^ Syracuse 47. 

le annual sophomore-freshman track-meet resulted 68 to 49 in favor of 

sophomores, ('o6). 

:t. 4. The Sunday afternoon meeting of the Christian Associations of 

University v^as addressed by Mr. N. Wilbur Helm, who will soon leave 

.0 Association work in Japan. The University Associations contribute 

he support of Mr. F. S. Brockman, National Secretary for China and 



::t 4. Dean McChesney addressed the Central New York Conference 

anandaigua, N. Y. 

St. 5. W. H. Douglass, Business Manager, and A. F. Rider, Bditor-in- 

sf of the Onondagan of the class of 1905 announced an offer of cash 

S8 for various illustrations. The University Band has organized for the 

* and is practicing. 

:t. 6. Opening of the College of Medicine. 

:t. 10. The 'Varsity defeated the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute at 

ball, 33-0. 

rt 12. The " Engineering Society of Syracuse University ** formed to 

eed the Electrical Engineering Society. 

:t. 13. First monthly dinner for 1903-4 of the Buflhlo Alumni Asso- 

on. 

:t, 14* Mass Meeting after Chapel in the interest of athletics. 

:t. 15. First meeting of the various class Debating Clubs. 

::t. 16. Democratic students organized a Club. 

:t 17. Colgate won from Syracuse in football, 10 to 5. The first 

lomore-freshman game (Ocr. 31) was a tie, neither side scoring. Mass 

tings in the evenings of Oct. 31 and 22 in the interest of athletics. 

It. 21. Dean Kent gave an address to the Engineering students in the 

iry lecture room . 

:t. 23. Chancellor Day gave the students an excellent Chapel talk, 

sly on smoking. 

:t.i24. Williams, 17, Syracuse, 5, in the football game on the Oval. 

:t. 24. Rev. Dr. F. D. Leete, '89, addressed the Christian Associations 

he University. 

:t. 26. First Literary Bulletin of the University issued, dated Oct. i. 

rt. 28. The alumni were defeated in football by the 'Varsity, 17 to 6. 

x>fessor Mace lectured before a Teacher's Institute in Pennsylvania. 

:t. 29. Meeting of th* four class debating societies. 

1 the department Clubs have been very active recently — the English 

», the German Club, the Historical Association, the Philosophical Club, 

Classical Club, etc. 

rt. 30. The new wing of the Library made ready for occupancy. 

3v. 2. First meeting of the Debating Union. 

3V. 3. Dr. M. P. Tilley addressed the English Club in their Seminar 

a. 

ov. 4. Initiation and banquet of Monx Head, junior class fraternity. 



48 .ANNAI^ I9P3 

Nov. 7. Athletic results were as follows : Football, Syracuse, o, Yale, 
30, at New Haven. Basketball, Freshmen, 31, Oswego Normal, 25, at the 
Gymnasium. 

Nov. 8. General Secretary, A. R. Waite, Jr., addressed the Christian 
Associations. 

Nov. 8-14. The World's students' week of prayer observed at the Uni- 
versity. 

Nov. 10. Professor Hawkins addressed the Political Economy Clob. 

Nov. II. First monthly recital of the Music department held in John 
Crouse College. 

Opening of the fifty -seventh annual convention of Delta Kappa Epailon 
with the Syracuse chapter. 

Nov. 13. Dean Kent addressed the students of Sibley College, Cornell 
University, on "The University Education of Engineers.'* 

Nov. 14. The Student Association approved the amendments to the 
Constitution proposed by the Athletic Governing Board. F. B. Clarke, '03, 
made a stirring address. 

Brown University defeated Syracuse on the Oval in the final football 
game of the season. Score 12 to 5. 

Nov. 16. l)ean Kent lectured before the Engineering Society on "The 
Iron and Steele Industry." 

Father Clune lectured in Assembly Hall before the Philosophical Clnb 
on " St. Thomas Aquinas and his Philosophy.'* 

Nov. 17. Rev. Dr. Calthrop addressed the English Clnb on " Tennyson." 

Nov. 19. Mrs. Esther Baker Steele, Litt.D., read a paper before the 
Classical Club on " Education in Ancient and Modem Greece." The 
Greek vases given by Mrs. Steele to the Greek department were formally 
presented. A reception to her followed. 

Nov. 20. The first basketball game of the season was won by the 
'Varsity from the Oswego Normals by a score of 17 to 6, at Oswego. 

Nov. 21. The freshman class, through its president, apologized in 
Chapel, as required by the seniors, for placing posters and class numerals 
on University buildings, etc. The spirit of the class was highly com- 
mended by upper classmen. 

There was much discussion of the merits and demerits of the graduate 
coaching system in football. The sophomores won the final game from the 
freshmen by a score of 40 to o. 

Nov. 23. Professor Sweet, President of the Syracuse Straight Line 
Engine Works, lectured before the Engineer's Association on " Accuracy 
in Mechanical work." 

Nov. 24 . Announcement made that medical students will not be passed 
up on high marks solely and that they must pass all subjects by examina- 
tion in order tu be advanced. 

Nov. 24-26. Alpha Province of Phi Delta Theta held its Convention with 
the Syracuse Chapter. 

Nov. 25-30. Thanksgiving recess. 



X903 SYRACUSB UNIVBRSITY 49 

Dec. I. The German Club met in the Gymnasinm. There was a varied 
program including music. A Christmas meeting was also held Dec. 15. 

Dec. 2. Miss Irene Sargent addressed the French Club (Lib. Arts) on 
*« CiUes of Belgium." 

Death in Chicago of Professor Albert G. Beebe, M. D., *66. 

The freshman banquet (formerly '* Lit.") was held at the Globe Hotel. It 
was pronounced a decided success. 

Dec 3. Professor Hargitt gave an illustrated lecture on Italy to the 
Classical Club. Dr. Bushnell lectured on the same subject before the 
freshmen, Dec. i and 3. 

Dec. 4. Professors Roe and BuUard have published ** Selected Chapters 
in Algebra *' for use in the freshman class. 

Robert Park, '05, elected Captain of the football team. 

The Biological library is being catalogued by a force from the library. 

Dec. 7. President Booth Davis of Alfred University spoke in Chapel. 
The Engineering Association was addressed in the afternoon by Mr. W. R. 
Hill on •• The Syracuse Water Works." 

Dec. 8. Dr. H. A. Eaton spoke to the English Club on '* John Donne." 
The Mathematics Club reorganized. Dr. Metzler is director. 

Edward W. Mauley, Law, '04, elected manager of the baseball team ; 
Harrison D. Sanford, '05, assistant manager. 

Dec. 9. Recital by musical students attended by the usual crowded 
house. 

Dec. 10. Professor Losey gave a'reading from Othello in John Crouse 
College Hall. 

Dec. II. The Orange Club held a banquet. Chas. H. Dayton was toast- 



Dec. 12. Dr. J. D. Phelps, '76, lectured before the Historical Association 
on ''Cape Cod Folks." 

Joint historical lectures by Professor Mace and Principal Wickes 
announced. 

Herbert C. Shattuck, Cornell, vice-president of the National Intercollegi- 
ate Prohibition Association, addressed the Prohibition Club. He also spoke 
in Chapel the f<^lowing Monday (14). 

Dec. 13. Professor Mace addressed the Christian Associations. 

Dec. 14. The constitution of the new Syracuse University Chemical Club 
was adopted. 

Rev. Arthur Copeland, '84, lectured before the Philosophical Association 
on *' Morality versus Religion from a Christian Standpoint." 

Dec. 14. Basketball game at Potsdam ; * Varsity 30, Potsdam Normals 
12. (15) St. Lawrence 14, Syracuse 13. 

Dec. 15. The juniors in the Combination Liberal Arts and Medical 
Course have organized a society to be known as Beta Mu Delta. 

Dec. 16. Henceforth the library is to be open evenings until 10 o'clock. 

The University Band Concert was given in John Crouse College. 

Dec. 17. Professor Emeus gave to the Classical Club an illustrated lect- 
ure on ** The Restoration of the Monuments of Greece." 



50 



ANNALS 



I« 



Dec. i8. Batketball in the Gymnasinm ; Sjracnae 15, Yale 5. 

J. A. Mathews, Ph.D., Sc.D., lectured before the Engineering Asaoda- 
tion on "The Constitution of Alloys.** He is the metallurgist of the Cm- 
cible Steele Company. 

Dec. ao. Dr. E. H. Lovett of Colgate University addressed the Christtio 
Associations on '* What is my Way?** 

Dec. 21. Harry D. Costello appointed again as coach of the basebtU 
team. 

Dec. 22. The Glee, Mandolin and Guitar Clubs, twenty-seven men, left 
for their holiday trip. 

Jan . I . Death of Hon . James J . Belden at Syracuse, N . Y . Mr. Belden wu 
a member of the Board of Trustees from 1872 until his death, and a gener- 
ous benefactor. He left by will $150,000.00 to the University. 

Jan. 12. Death of Mr. John Lyman at Syracuse. Mr. Lyman became t 
trustee in 1893 and was a liberal contributor to the University, for which he 
also left a fine bequest amounting to more than $200,000.00. 






> • X 




DR.JO/M VAJiUVX/i 



THE CORPORATION 

See Alumni Rbcord, pp. 81-89 

SUPPLBMBNT, 1899-1903 

I Hon. Chari^bs Andrbws, LL.D., at large, 1906 

Ex-chief Jadge Coart of Appeals, State of New York, Syracuse, 

N. Y. 

> Bir. John D. Archbou>, at large, 1904 

Vice-President SUndard Oil Co., New York, N. Y. 
I * Hon. Jambs J. Bbldbn, at large, 1904 

Banker, Congressman. Died i Jan., 1904 at Syracuse, N. Y. 
\ Bir. M. £. Bi^NCHARD, 1907 

Newark Conference, Newark, N. J. 

> *Mr. Charlbs M. Bolbn, 1901 

New York Conference, New York, N. Y. 
\ Mr. Samubl W. Bownb, at large, 1907 

Merchant, New York, N. Y. 
I Mr. Ira D. Brainard, 1907 

Northern N. Y. Conference, Banker, Watervilie, N. Y. 

I Dean Jambb B. Brooks, D.C.L.. 1908 

Central N. Y. Conference (No. 1897), Dean College of Law, Syra- 
cuse, N. Y. 

\ ICr* AUXANDBR T. Brown, at large, 1909 

Manufacturer, Syracuse, N. Y. 
• Mr. WkZAis B. Burns, at large, 1908 

Manufacturer, Syracuse, N. Y. 
^, Mr. Waltsr S. Cartbr, 1907 

N. Y. Bast Conference, Lawyer, New York, N. Y. 

^,Soa. WnxiAM Connbll, 1907 

^. Wyoming Conference, Banker and Congressman, Scranton, Pa. 
^fmr* Tbsron Coopbr, D.D. , 1906 

Ontral N. Y. Conference (No. 117), Clergyman, Syracuse, N. Y. 
r. Thomas B. Crary, at large, 1904 

Bingbamton, N. Y. 

, H. K. Curtis, 1907 

Kaw York Conference, Financier, Ossining, N. Y. 
AirOBLA K. Davis, at Inrge, 1901 

Kochaster, N. Y. 

Jambs R. Day, S.T.D., LL.D., £x officio. 

Chancellor of the University, Syracuse, N. Y. 
i^ -BMk ASEAM I. Dbckbr, 1906 

Wjroming Conference, Merchant, Waverly, N. Y. 
I Daan Hbvry D. Didama, M.D., LL.D., at large, (No. 1872), 1906 

Daan College of Medicine, Syracuse, N. Y. 



52 TRUSTBBS 

1895 Rev. HOMBR J. Eaton, D.D., 1907 

Troy Conference (No. 1884), Agent Methodist Book Concern, 
New York, N. Y. 

1901 Rev. Gborgb p. Bckman, D.D., 19QS 

New York Conference (No. 3443 Snp. ) »Clerg3mian, New York,N.Y. 
ic^i Rev. W. P. FbrguSON, Ph.D., 1907 

Newark Conference (No. 1729), Clergyman (Resigned 1903). 

1884 Mr. Gborgb P. Folts, . 1906 

N. N. Y. Conference, Manufacturer, Herkimer, N. Y. 

1896 Bishop Charlbs H. Fowi^br, D.D., LL.D., at large, (No. 44), 1908 

Clergyman, Buffalo, N. Y. 

1896 Mr. PORTBR M. Frbnch, A.M., Alumni,(No. 198), 1902 

Lawyer, Rochester, N. Y. 
1903 Mr. Charlbs Gibson, 1909 

Troy Conference, Druggist, Albany, N. Y. 

1889 Rev. Hbnry Graham, D.D., 1907 

Troy Conference (No. 1855), Clergyman, Albany, N. Y. 

1890 *Rev. Manlbv S. Hard, D.D., 1908 

Wyoming Conference, (No. iii). Clergyman. Died 13 Feb., 1903' 
at Germantown, Pa. 

1897 Hon. Jambs L. Haybs, 1907 

Newark Conference, Postmaster, Newark, N. J. 
1895 Professor John L. Hbffron, M.D., Alumni, (No. 517), 1907 

Physician, Syracuse, N. Y, 
1895 Hon. Francis Hbndricks, at large, 1907 

Banker and Merchant, Syracuse, N. Y. 
1878 * Mr. Erastus F. Hoij>bn, at large, 1900 

Merchant. Died 25 Dec, 1899 at Syracuse, N. Y. 
1900 Mr. Hbndrick S. Holdbn, at large, 1906 

Coal merchant, Syracuse, N. Y, 

1902 Mr. Willis A. Holdbn, B.S., Alumni, (No. 474), 1908 

Coal merchant, Syracuse, N. Y. 
1874 Mr. Alprbd a. Howlbtt, at large, 1904 

Banker, Syracuse, N. Y. 
1900 Mr. John Bowman Huff, 1904 

New York Conference, Ossining, N. Y. 
1890 Mr. John S. Huylbr, at large, 1908 

Merchant, New York, N. Y. 
1886 ♦Mr. Thbodorb Irwin, at large, 1904 

Died 25 Dec, 1902, at Oswego, N. Y. 
1870 Rev. Bbnoni I. Ives, D.D., at large, 1908 

Clergyman, Auburn, N. Y. 
1893 *Mr. John Lyman, at large, 1908 

Merchant. Died 12 Jan., 1904, at Syracuse, N. Y. 

1898 Mr. William McEckron, 1903 

Troy Conference, Manufacturer, Glens Falls, N. Y. 

1897 Rev. Gborgb P. Mains, D.D., 1903 

N. Y. East Conference (No. 1873), Agent Methodist Book Con- 
cern, New York, N. Y. 



TRUSTBBS 53 

X90S Mr. Ha&ry N. Marvin, A.M., Alumni, (No. 624), 1904 

Capitalist, New York, N. Y. 
X898 *Mr. Hiram Mbrritt, 1903 

N. Y. Conference, New York, N. Y. 

1897 Rev. C. B. MiLl^PAUGH, A.M., 1907- 

Genesee Conference (No. 201), Clergyman, Batavta, N. Y. 
1896 Rey. R. DrwiTT Mungbr, D.D., 1907 

Central N. Y. Conference (No. 79), Clergyman, Elmira, N. Y. 
1903 Rey. BUGBNB A. NOBLB, 1909 

N. Y. Bast Conference, President of C. C. Institute, Hacketts- 
town, N, J. 

1886 Mr. Edwin Nottingham, Ph.B., Alumni (No. 314), 1906 

Lawyer, Syracuse, N. Y. 

1898 Mr. William Nottingham, Ph.D., Alumni, (No. 315), 1904 

Lawyer (Elected State Regent 1902), Syracuse, N. Y. 

1899 Rev. E. S. OSBON, D.D., 1909 

N. Y. Conference (No. 270), Clergyman, New York, N. Y. 
1903 Mr. William H. Pbck, 1908 

Wyoming Conference, Banker, Scranton, Pa. 

1898 Rey. Jambs D. Phblps, D.D., 1909 

Genesee Conference (N0.317), Financial Secretary, Syracuse,N.Y. 

1899 Mr. WiLFRBD W. PORTBR, A.B., Alumni, (No. 774), 1905 

Treasurer of the Uniyersity, Syracuse, N. Y. 
1896 Rey. David B. P. Randolph, 1902 

Newark Conference, Clergyman, Jersey City, N. J. 

1886 Mr. Edwin R. Rbdhbad, A.B., 1908 

N. N.Y. Conference (No. 248), Banker and manufacturer, Fulton, 
N.Y. 

1870 Mr. Eliphalbt Rbmington, 1809 

N. N. Y. Conference, Manufacturer, Ilion, N. Y. 

1898 Mr. John L. Rombr, at large, 1904 

Lawyer, Buffalo, N. Y. 
1893 Hon. WiLUAM H. RowB, 1905 

Troy Conference, Manufacturer, New York, N. Y. 

1899 Rey. Arthur B. Sanpord, D.D., 1905 

N. Y. East Conference (No. 1889), Clergyman, Brooklyn, N.Y. 
1895 Mr. Clarbncb W. Sbamans, at large, 1906 

Manufacturer, New York, N. Y. 

1895 Mrs. Kathbrinb P. Simpson, at large, 1907 

Scranton, Pa. 

1900 Rey. Charlbs N. Sim8» D.D., LL.D., at large (No. 3427 Sup.), 1907 

Clergyman, Ez-Chancellor, Syracuse, N. Y. 
I9P3 Rey. CharlbS P. SiTTBRLY, Ph.D., S.T.D., 1907 

Newark Conference (No. 635), Professor, Madison, N. J., 

1896 Mr. Lyman Cornbuus Sbhth, at large, 1904 

Manufacture, Syracuse, N. Y. 
1896 Rey. Hbmry Spbllmbybr, D.D., 1907 

Newark Conference (No. 1850), Clerg3rman, Newark, N. J. 



54 TRUSTBBS 

1883 Rev. L. L. SpraguB, D.D., 191^ 

Wyoming Conference. Principal Wyoming Seminary, Kingtton. 
Pa. 
1895 Mrs. Esther B. Stbblb, Litt.O., at large (No. 1885), 1907 

Elmira, N. Y. 
1870 *Rev. Gborgb Lansing Taylor, D.D., L.H.D., 1903 

Nv Y. East Conference (No. i835),Clerg3rman. Died 26 July, 1905, 
at Brooklyn, N. Y. 
1892 Mr. Gborgb L. Tbornb, 1900 

Genesee Conference, Real Estate Dealer, BufiFalo, N. Y. 
1897 Rev. Ezra S. Tipplb, Ph.D., D.D., Alumni (No. 68a), 1909 

Clergyman, New York, N. Y. 
1900 Mr. CharlbsM. Warnbr, at large, 1908 

Contractor, Syracuse, N. Y. 
1895 Mr. Gborgb B. Watkins, 190^ 

Genesee Conference, Merchant, Rochester, N. Y. 
1883 Mr. F0RB8T G. Wbbks, 1907 

Central N. Y. Conference, Manufacturer, Syracuse. N. Y. 
1892 Rev. WiLUAM C. WlLBOR, Ph.D., D.D., 1908 

Genesee Conference (No. 786), Clergyman, Buffalo, N. Y. 
1899 Rev. Charlbs S. Wing, D.D., 190S 

N. Y. East Conference, (No. 1886), Oergyman, BrooklTn, N.Y. 

OFFICERS OF THE BOARD 

PRBSIDBNT 

1893 Mr. John D. Archbold 

VICB-PRBSIDBNTS 

1880 *Mr. Erastus p. Holdbn (ist) 1899 

1893 Dean Jambs B. Brooks, D.C.L., (2d), (No. 1897) 

1893 Mr. Alprbd a. Howlbtt (3d) 
1899 Mr. Lyman C. Smith (ist) 

SBCRBTARIBS 

1887 Mr. Edwin Nottingham, Ph.B., (No. 314) 1903 

1903 Mr. WHFRBD W. PORTBR» A.B., (No. 774) 

TRBASURBR 
1895 Mr. WILFRBD W. PORTER, A.B., (No. 774) 

FINANCIAL AGENTS 

1897 Rev. J. A. GUTTBRIDGB, D.D. 1899 

1899 Rev. Thbron R. Grbbn, A.M., (No. 470) 1903 

1899 Rev. James D. Phelps, D.D., (No. 317) 

REGISTRARS 

1894 Prof. Frank Smallby, Ph.D., (No. 249) 1900 

1900 Prof. Ernest N. Pattee, M.S. 190a 
190a Rev. C. C. W113OR. Ph.D., (No. 178) 



THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

See Alumni Record, pp. 90-98 

♦SUPPLBMBNT, 1899-1904 

Dwing changes and amendments of the Constitution and By-Laws 
mni Association were made at the dates indicated : 

11, 1901, Sec. 2, Art. i of the By-Laws were amended by omit- 
ords *' Member of the corporation *' and inserting in their place, 

" Alumnus of the University.'* 
ras added to Art. 2 of Constitution as follows : 
»ership in an Alumni Association of any of the colleges of Syra- 
ersity shall also constitute membership in this general Alumni 
n, whenever such application shall be made and proper evidence 
embership shall be given. In all such cases the membership fee 
>e called for, but the annual dues must be paid.*' 
of the Constitution, as amended in June, 1902, and again in June, 
a as follows : 

No person shall be eligible to the office of Alumni Trustee unless 

is a graduate of Syracuse University of at least five (5) years 
and a member of this Association, entitled to vote at an Annual 
hereof. 

Vhen the notice of the Annual Meeting of this Association is sent 
I Corresponding Secretary, he shall send to each person who has 
i degree from the University and to each graduate of the year in 
> election is held, one blank ballot for each Trustee to be elected 
luing Annual Meeting. 

(responding Secretary shall designate on each ballot the term for 
; person to be voted for on it is to be elected and whom he is to 

Any person receiving such ballot or ballots, desiring to vote for 
'rustee, shall write the name of the person for whom he desires to 
luch Trustee on the proper ballot and return the same to the 
iding Secretary so as to be in his hands before 12 m., of the day 
the Annual Meeting is held. 

ion shall be entitled to have his vote counted for Alumni Trustee 
or she is a member of this Association and entitled to vote at the 
[eeting thereof. 

The Executive Committee shall canvass the votes so received by 
sponding Secretary at 12 M., on the day of the Annual Meeting, 
announce the result of the vote immediately upon the completion 
ivasB or at such later date as the Annual Meeting shall order. If 
m so voted for shall receive a majority of all the votes cast for 



56 AI^UMNI ASSOCIATION 

Alamni Trustee for that term, he shall be declared elected. In case t 

is no election of Alamni Trustee in the manner hereinbefore provided 

Annual Meeting shall proceed to the election of such Trustee or Tros 

as the case may be, from the persons so voted for receiving the big 

number of votes, not exceeding five for each term for which an electic 

to be made. 

It shall require a majority vote of those present and voting to elect 

^Material furnished by Mr. Francis B. Oliver, Ph.B., '91, Corresponding Secret! 
the Alumni Association. 

OFFICERS OF THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

See Alumni Rbcord, pp. 95-98 
SuPPiAMBNT, 1899-1904 

Prbsidbnts 

1899-1900 Prof. Prank Smalley, Ph.D., *74 

1900-1 Prof. Nathan Jacobson, M.D., *77 

1901-2 Rev. James D. Phelps, D.D., '76 

1902-3 Mr. James M. Gilbert, A.M., *75 

1903-4 Prof. Franklin J. Holzwarth, Ph.D., *87 

Vicb-Prbsidbnts 

1899-1900 Mrs. Anna P. Terry Whitford, A.B., 89 

1900-1 Mrs. Florence Wright Cook, B.P.. '90 

1901-2 Mrs. Harriet Blakeslee Wallace, B.Mas., '84 

1902-3 Mrs. Bloise Holden Nottingham, Ph.M., *8o 

1903-4 Mrs. Minnie Mason Beebe, Ph.D., '90 

Rbcording Sbcrbtary 

1898-1900 Mr. Henry Phillips, A.M., '93 

1900-1 Mr. Francis E. Oliver. Ph.B., '91 

1901-3 Mr. Charles F. Wiley, Ph.B., M.D., '92 

1903-4 Mr. Carl E. Dorr, A.B., LL.B., 'oo 

CORRBSPONDING SBCRBTARY AND TrBASURBR 

♦1890-1902 ♦Rev. Joseph H. Zartman, A.M., B.D., '78 
1901-4' Mr. Francis E. Oliver, Ph.B., '91 

PoBT (correction) 
1897 Rev. William Harman vanAUen, Ph.M., '90 

1899-1904 Alumni Endowmbnt Fund Committbb 

Prof. Frank Smalley, Ph.D., '74, Ch'm 
Prof. Franklin J. Holzwarth, Ph.D., '87 

*Mr. Zartman was elected for the year 1901-s but his death occurring 15 Oct., 190 
Bxecutive Committee appointed Mr. Francis B. Oliver to serve for the remainder ( 
year. 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 57 

ALUMNI TRUSTEES 

Q the By-laws of the University published in 1871, Sec. i. 3 reads as 
ows : ** Three members of the Board shall be members of and represent 

Alumni of the University. They shall be elected by the Association ; 
i at the time and place of each alternate Annrial Commencement, in 

place of one whose term of office shall then expire ; and at any annual 
sting the said Alumni Association shall have power to declare and fill 

vacancies in their own number of trustees ; it being provided that 
il the Alumni shall number twenty-one the election of the three trus- 
I provided for in this section shall be made by the Board of Trustees.** 

Alnmni Record, pp. 753-4. The alumni trustees for 1872-3 and 1873-4 
t appointed by the Board. Beginning with 1874-5 they were elected by 
Asaociation. 

Q 26 June, 1904, the Board of Trustees provided for six alumni trustees 
•ppears in the following minute from the trustees' records : ** The Sec- 
7 read the report of the Committee upon the application for an 
eaae of Alumni trustees, and the same was adopted. The report recom- 
ded the increase of Alnmni trustees from three to six ; the first addi- 
il trustee to be elected in 1895, the second in 1897 and the third in 
." Bdwin Nottingham was chairman of the Trustee Committee and 
). Hunger of the Association Committee. How the increase was car- 
ioto e£fect can be seen in the detailed statement below. (For eligi- 
Y and method of election see p. ) 

though in the Record and in the Supplement alphabetical lists of 
xes are given, a better idea of the Alumni representatives can be 
ed by grouping them by years as below. The exact method of state- 
t u given in the Catalogues is retained : 

72-3 Hon. Edward C. Walker, A.M., Batavia, N. Y, 

Rev. J. Dorman Steele, Ph.D., Elmira, N. Y, 

Prof. James H. Hoose, Ph.D., Cortland^ N. Y. 

Term expires 
3-4 Hon. Edward C. Walker, A.M., Batavia, 1874 

Rev. Prof. J. D. Steele, A.M., Ph.D., Elmira, 1876 

Prof. James H. Hoose, A.M., Ph.D., Cortland^ 1878 

4-5 Rev. Prof. J. D. Steele, A.M., Ph.D., Eltnira, 1876 

d Prof. James H. Hoose, A.M.. Ph.D., Cortland^ 1878 

5-6 J. D. F. Slcc, A.M., Esq., Elmira, 1880 

S-7 Prof. James H. Hoose, A.M., Ph.D., Cortland^ 1878 

d J. D. F. Slee, A.M., Esq., Elmira, 1880 

7-8 Prof. J. D. Steele, A.M.. Ph.D., Elmira, 1882 

J-<j J. D. F. Slee, A.M., ^/miVa, 1880 

d Prof. J. Dorman Steele, A.M., Ph.D., Elmita, 1882 

>-8o Prof. James H. Hoose, A.M., Ph.D., Cortland, 1884 



58 AI^UMNI ASSOCIATION 

1880-1 Prof. J. Dorman Steele, A.M., Ph.D., Elmira, i88a 

and Prof. James H. Hoose, A.M., Ph.D., Cortland^ 1884 

1881-2 Hon. Ross C. Scott, A.M., Waiertown, 1886 

1882-3 Prof. James H. Hoose, A.M., Ph.D., Cortland, 1884 

and Rev. Isaac Gibbard, D.D., Rochester^ 1886 

1883-4 Prof. J. Dorman Steele. A.M., Ph.D., Eltnira, 1888 

1884-5 Rey. Isaac Gibbard, D.D., Rochester, 1886 

and Prof. J. Dorman Steele, Ph.D., Eltnira, 1888 

1885-6 Prof. James H. Hoose, Ph.D., Cortland, 1890 

Dr. Steele died 25 May, 1886. 

1836-7 Edwin Nottingham, Ph.B., Syracuse, 1888 

and Prof. James H. Hoose, Ph.D., Cortland, 1890 

1887-8 Rev. Isaac Gibbard, D.D., Rochester, 1892 

1888-9 Prof. James H. Hoose, Ph.D., Cortland, 1890 

Rev. Isaac Gibbard, D.D., Rochester, 1893 

Edwin Nottingham. Ph.B., Syracuse, 1894 
Dr. Hoose resign^ 21 June, 1889. 

1889-90 Chester A. Congdon, A.B., St, Paul, Minn,, 1890 

Rev. Isaac Gibbard, D.D., Rochester, 189a 

Edwin Nottingham, Ph.B., Syracuse, 1894 

1890-1 Rev. Isaac Gibbard, D.D., Rochester, 1891 

and Edwin Nottingham, Ph.B., Syracuse, 1894 

1891-2 Chester A. Congdon, A.B., St, Paul, Minn,, 1896 

1893-3 Edwin Nottingham, Ph.B., Syracuse, 1894 

and Chester A. Congdon, A.B., St, Paul, Minn,, 1896 

1893-4 William Nottingham, Ph.D., Syracuse, 1898 

1894-5 Chester A. Congdon, A.B., St, Paul, Minn,, 1896 

William Nottingham, Ph.D., Syracuse, 1898 

Edwin Nottingham, Ph.B., Syracuse, 1900 

1895-6 Chester A. Congdon, A.B., St. Paul, Minn,, 1896 

William Nottingham, Ph.D., Syracuse, 189B 

Edwin Nottingham, Ph.B., Syracuse, 1900 

John L. Heffron, M.D., Syracuse, 1901 

1896-7 William Nottingham, Ph.D., Syracuse, 1898 

Edwin Nottingham, Ph.B., Syracuse, 1900 

John I4. Heffron, M.D., Syracuse, 1901 

Porter M. French, A.M., Rochester, 190a 

1897-8 William Nottingham, Ph.D., 5ynffa#5^, 1898 

Edwin Nottingham, Ph.B., Syracuse, 1900 

John L. Heffron, M.D., Syracuse, 1901 

Porter M. French, A.M., Rochester, 1903 

Rev. Ezra S. Tipple, Ph.D., New York, 1903 

1898-9 (Same names except that the first becomes last as follows: ) 

William Nottingham, Ph.D., Syracuse, 1904 



AlfUMNI ASSOCIATION 59 

1899-1900 Edwin Nottingham, Ph.B., Syracuse^ 1900 

John L. Hefifron, M.D., Syracuse ^ 1901 

Porter M. French, A.M. , Rochester, 190a 

Rev. Ezra S. Tipple, D.D., New Yorky 1903 

William Nottingham, Ph.D., Syracuse^ 1904 

Wilfred W. Porter, A.B., Syracuse, 1905 

1900-1 (Same names except that the first becomes last as follows :) 

Mr. Edwin Nottingham, Ph.B., Syracuse, 1906 

1901-2 Mr. Porter M. French, A.M., Rochester, N, K, 1902 

Rev. Ezra S. Tipple, Ph.D., D.D., New York, N, Y,, 1903 

Mr. William Nottingham, Ph.D., Syracuse, N, Y,, 1904 

Mr. Wilfred W. Porter, A.B., Syracuse, N, Y, 1905 

Mr. Edwin Nottingham. Ph.B., Syracuse, N. Y,, 1906 

Prof. John L. He£fron, M.D., Syracuse, N, Y,, 1907 

1902-3 Rev. Ezra S. Tipple, Ph.D., D.D., New York, NY.^ 1903 

Mr. Harry N. Mandn, A.M , New York, N. Y., 1904 

Mr. Wilfred W. Porter, A.B., Syracuse, N Y., 1905 

Mr. Edwin Nottingham, Ph.B., Syracuse, N. Y„ 1906 

Prof. John L. Heffron, M.D., Syracuse, N, Y,, 1907 

Mr. Willis A. Holden, B.S , Syracuse, N. Y„ 1908 

1903-4 (Same except that the first becomes last, as follows :) 

Rev. Ezra S. Tipple, Ph.D., D.D., New York, N Y., 1909 

(Note. Mr. Harry N. Marvin (1902-3 above) was elected to fill the unex- 
pired term of William Nottingham who resigned because elected a State 
Regent. Editor.) 



ALUMNI RECORD ACCOUNT 

The Alnmni Record and General Catalogue of Syracuse University, 1835- 
1899, was issued 22 May, 1899. It is printed on superior paper and elegantly 
bound in cloth and morocco. The printer was W. P. Humphrey, of 
Geneva, N. Y., the publisher, the Alumni Association of the University. 

The following statement was made to the Association 9 June, 1899 : Order, 
750 books. No. of pages 989. Illustrations 20 pages. Total 1009 pages. 

RBCSIPTS 

(i) Frank Smalley $ 82 50 

'* ** Loans $125 00 125 00 

Joseph H. Zartman 90 14 

«i II If i* 



214 21 214 21 

William Y. Foote 170 76 

•• •* •• •• 250 00 250 00 

$589 21 J932 61 



6o ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

DiSBURSBMBMTS 

(a) Frank Smalley $ 68 oi 

** ** 125 oo 

Joseph H. Zartman .... 304 35 

William Y. Footc 362 27 

I859 63 I859 63 

Bills Payablb 

(3) Printer ($1427 65 less|4oo.) $ 1027 ^5 

Labor 3^3 35 

(Loans, $589 21, included in Dit- 

bursements) 

$1351 00 X351 00 

Total Cost of Record $2210 63 

Cost per Tolume (735 copies) 301 

(4) Nbbdbd to Mbbt Bills 

See (3) 

Printer $1027 65 

Labor 3^3 35 

Loans 589 21 

Total 1x940 21 

Paid on Record besides loans 270 42 

Total $2210 63 

Cash on hand 72 98 

Alumni Record Committee, 
Prank Smallby, Ch*m. 

In order to pay the bills promptly and at the same time relieve the Assodi- 
tion of accumulating interest, the plan was adopted of securing from alumni 
•mall loans to run for five years without interest, thus converting the debt 
into a non-interest bearing obligation. The notes of the Association were 
given and loans amounting to $1000, were secured. More than 300 copies 
of the Record were on hand as assets. But the amount of money received 
was still insufficient and the Executive Committee borrowed from the 
alumni endowment fund I456.92. A number of alumni donated to the 
Association the notes given them, others endorsed them for copies of the 
Record so that the report to the Association of 12 June, 1900, showed the 
debt to be 

Due to holders of five-year loan notes $ 866 80 

Due to Alumni Endowment fund 456 92 

Total debt $1323 72 

$2$ more was obtained on the loan note plan in Dec., 1900, and the report 
to the Association 11 June, 1901, made the following exhibit : 

Paid back to the Alumni Endowment fund $ 291 94 



AlfUMNI ASSOCIATION 6l 

Dne to holders of five year loan notes {$20 had been 

donated) 87180 

Dne to endowment fund (I456 92 — ^$291 94) 164 98 

Total debt $1036 78 

Progress is shown during the year. 10 June, 1902, the report 
reads: 

Dae to holders of five-year loan notes (|io donated) $ 861 80 

Dae to endowment fnnd (reduced by I147 16) 17 82 

Total debt $ 879 62 

During the year 1902-3 the debt ^as reduced by |(ii.52. The debt to 
the endowment fnnd was fully paid and $93.70 paid for notes not yet duet 
The debt on 9 June, 1903, was (entirely dne to holders of the five-year loan 

notet) $ 768.10. 

At this meeting the Association voted to request the holders of notes to 
Mod them to the Secretary who shall give due credit and shall charge np 
the annual dues yearly against said notes until they are fully paid. 



ALUMNI ENDOWMENT 
See Alumni Rbcord. pp. 105-109 

SUPPLBMBNT, 1899-I903 

It if not necessary to print here the report of each of the five years. The 
hst report shows the status of the fund at the time of the issue of this 
poblication. The report of the Association for the year 1902-3 was as 
follows : 

9 June, 1903 

Total snbcription to date l39»4o6 00 

Total subscriptions for the year 1902-3 (included above) 

($300 00 have since been added) 2,100 00 

ToUl f4ii5o6 00 

Endowmbnt 

Cash received to report of 10 June, 1902 |i3fi9i 55 

Cash received since report of 10 June, 1902 431 70 

ToUl $13*623 25 

INTBRBST 

Cash received to report of 10 June, 1902 $ 3,465 22 

Cash received since report of 10 June, 1902 95 10 

Totol $ 3,560 32 

Total paid by alnmni, 1902-3 526 80 

Total paid by alnmni to date $17, 183 57 



62 NBW YORK CITY ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

THE SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

OF NEW YORK CITY 

See AxuMNi Rbcord, p. loo 

Supplement : 

Oppicbrs, 1 898-1899 

President. William H. Ives, A.M., '91 

First Vice-President, Byron C. Mathews, Ph.D., '77 

Second Vice-President, Charles O. Dewey, Ph.D., '85 

Recording Secretary, Francis B. Trowbridge, A..M., '81 

Corresponding Secretary, Frank G. Banister, A.M., '88 

Treasurer, Karl Swartz, Ph.D., *86 

Officers, i 899-1900 

President, Charles O. Dewey, Ph.D., ^85 

First Vice-President, Henry T. Dawson, Ph.D., Ex-'8o 

Second Vice-President, Lincoln E. Rowley, A.M., '00 

Recording Secretary, Francis £. Trowbridge, A.M., 'S2 

Corresponding Secretary, Elizabeth L. Foote, A.B., '88 

Treasurer, Byron C. Mathews, Ph.D., '77 

Officers, 1900-1901 

President, Charles O. Dewey, Ph.D., '85 

First Vice-President, J. Frank Tallman, A.M., '79 

Second Vice-President, Ernest L. Fox, A.B., '81 

Recording Secretary, Lincoln E. Rowley, A.M., '00 

Corresponding Secretary, M. Florence Heermans» B.S., '99 

Treasurer, Frederick Z. Lewis, A.M., '94 

officers, 1901-1902 

President, Lincoln E. Rowley, A.M., *oo 

First Vice-President, Franklin Pierce, A.M., '79 

Second Vice-President, Steven B. Ayrbs, Ex. '82 

Recording Secretary, Frank W. Go reth, A.M., '91 

Corresponding Secretary, M. Florence Hkbrmans, B.S., '99 

Treasurer, Frederick Z. Lewis, A.M., '94 

officers, 1902-1903 

President, Lincoln E. Rowley, A.M., 'oo 

First Vice-President, Steven B. Ayrbs. Ex. '82 

Second Vice-President, Charlbs F. Sitterly, Ph.D., '83 

Recording Secretary, Frank W. Goreth, A.M., '91 

Corresponding Secretary, M. Florence Hbbrmans, B.S., '99 

Treasurer, Frederick Z. Lewis, A.M., '94 



CHICAGO AI^UMNI ASSOCIATION 65 

OPPICBRS, 1903- 904 

President, Stbvbn B. Ayrbs. A.B., *03 

Pint Vice-President, Prank W. Gorbth, A.M., '91 

Second Vice-President, Bmmons H. Sanford, A.M., '87 

Recording Secretary, Frank J. Marion, A.B., '90 

Corresponding Secretary, M. Pi^orbncb Hbbrmans, B.S., '99 

Treasurer, Prbdbrick Z. Lbwis, A.M., '94 

as CHICAGO ALUMNI ASSOCIATION OF SYRACUSE 

UNIVERSITY 

See Alumni Rbcord, pp. 103-104 

supplbmbnt : 

oppicbrs, 1 899-1900 

President, Martha Pootb Crow, Ph.D., '76 

Vice-President, Louis KisTLBR,XL.D., '58 

Recording Secretary, JBSSIB T. Pbck, B.Mus. , *88 

Corresponding Secretary, Charlbs B. Atwbll, Ph.M., '79 

Treasurer, Charlbs M. Turton, A.M., '83 

OPPICBRS, 1900-1901 
President, J. ScoTT Clark, LittD., '77 

Vice-President, Francbs S. Lanb, M.S., '64 

Recording Secretary, Hattib Cobb Smith, A.B., '86 

Corresponding Secretary, Char lbs B. Atwbll, Ph.M., '79 
Treasurer, Clarbncb N. Goodwin, A.B., '94 

OPPICBRS, 1901-I902 
(Same as for 1900-1901) 

OPPICBRS POR 1 902-1 903 
(Same as for 1901-1902) 

OPPICBRS, 1 903- 1 904 
President, J. ScoTT Clark, Litt.D., '77 

Vice-President, Sara Maxson Cobb, Ph.D., '83 

Secretary, Charlbs B. Atwbll, Ph.M., '79 

Treasurer, Charlbs M. Turton, A.M., '83 

IE ROCHESTER ALUMNI ASSOCIATION OF SYRA- 
CUSE UNIVERSITY 

By Edwin C. Mason, '88 

This Association owes its inception to the loyal efforts of Rev. C. E. 
llspangh, *7o. The matter was suggested by him to a small party of 
mni who were dining informally at the Livingston Hotel in February, 

fhe Association was perfected at an enthusiastic meeting held in the 
tmber of Commerce, 10 March, 1900. Porter M. French, '70, son of 



64 BOCHBSTBR AI^UMNI ASSOCIATION 

the late Vice-Chancellor John R. French, was elected president, Mn. 
Nettie Fuller Leete, '89, vice-president and £. C. Mason, '88, secretary 
and treasurer. 

The first annual dinner was held at Teall's a month later and sixty per- 
sons sat at the tables. Among them were many of the old graduates of 
Genesee College, who from the first took an active interest in the new 
association. 

The officers for 1901-1902 were Dr. M. J. Whiteside, '94, president, Mn. 
Eva Potter Remington, '88, vice-president and £. C. Mason, '88, secretary 
and treasurer. 

At the annual dinner in 1901 Chancellor James R. Day was the guest of 
honor. 

The following letter is of historical interest : 

Ai^BiON, N. Y., Feb. i6th, 190a 
Dbar Professor SMAXri.BY : 

You will like to know of our meeting in Rochester yesterday. There 
were 14 present — 5 ministers, 2 physicians, 2 business men, i newspaper 
man and 4 lawyers — 2 from '62, i from '68, i from '70, 4 from '72, 2 from 
'88, I from '89, and 3 from '94. The meeting was enthusiastic. A com- 
mittee was appointed to take the matter in hand, prepare a constitutioii, 
call a meeting and go ahead with the matter. 

Will you please send me a copy of the Constitution of the Syracnae 
Association and make any suggestions you think best. We want this Asso- 
ciation organized so as to reach as large a number as possible and help the 
University as much as possible. 

I can see that with the increase in the number of Associations, there 

should be a Syracuse Association, and the present organization changed 

somewhat. Have you examined the Cornell organization ? 

With kind regards, I am. 

Very truly, 

C. £. MILI3PAUGH. 

OPPiCBRS, 1900-1901 
President, PORTER M. Frbnch, A.M., '70 

Vice-President. Nbttib FUI.1.BR Leetb, A.B., '89 

Secretary and Treasurer, Edwin C. Mason, A.B., '88 

OPFiCBRS, 1901-1902 
President, Mii^pord J.WhiTESIDB, (M.D.),M.S.,'94 

Vice-President. Eva Pottbr Remington, B.S., '88 

Secretary and Treasurer, Edwin C. Mason, A.B., '88 

OPPICBRS, 190 2-1 903 
(Same as for 1901-1902) 

OPPICBRS, 1903-1904 
President, Eugene H. Howard, (M.D.). A.M., '03 

Vice-President, Cornbi«ia White Thomas, M.D., '95 

Secretary and Treasurer, Wiluam W. N1CHOI3, A.M., '94 



BUPPAIX) ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 65 



IE BUFFALO ALUMNI ASSOCIATION OF SYRACUSE 

UNIVERSITY* 

Ji attempt was made during the pastorate of Dr. James D. Phelps, '76, 
'lymoath Church to form an alumni association of graduates of Syracuse 
Tersity residing in Buffalo and vicinity, but it ended with an informal 
^ptioll at the residence of Dr. Phelps. 

ate in 1899 some of the younger graduates be^an agitating the matter 
finally a call was sent out for a banquet at the commodious quarters of 
Bllicott Club. About 25 men who are proud of their Alma Mater 
xmded and the present association was formed. Professor Henry A. 
k, 85, represented the faculty of the University. The date was 19 April, 
>. Chancellor Day was present at the banquet the next year which was 
1 at the Genesee Hotel. Last year was inaugurated the practice of 
ing informal lunches on the second Tuesday of each month, for a time at 
(O P.M., but now at 6.30 p.m. There is a good average attendance. The 
eesB of the Buffalo Association is very largely due to our thoroughly loyal 
enthusiastic president, Charles M. Underbill, who, although of the class 
k>, 18 always present and is the youngest fellow in the crowd. Among the 
er alumni may be named Dr. Charles A. Wall, '76, Dr. W. C. Wilbor, 
, Professor M. M. Maycock, '75, Dr. C. W. Winchester, '67, Rev. P. E. 
oda, '66, and Professor P. P. Piper, '89. The Buffalo alumni are demon- 
iting that College life need not end with Commencement day and the 
Loma, but that some of its most enjoyable experiences come through 
xiation with fellow graduates of dear old Alma Mater, 

OPFICBRS, I900-I90I 

President, Chari,bs M. Undbrhii,!,, A.M., *6o 

Vice-President, Walter A. Scott, M.D., '92 

Secretary and Treasurer, Richard H. Tbmplbtiom, A.B., '99 

OPFICBRS, 1901-1902 

President, Charlbs M. Underbill, A.M., '60 

Vice-President, P. Prsdbrick Piper, B.S., '89 

Secretary, Richard H. Tbmplbton, A.B., ^99 

Treasurer, Wiluam H. Burgbss, A.B., '95 

officers, 1902-1903 
(Same as for 1901-1902) 

officers, 1903-1904 
(Same as for 1902-1903) 

•DeUila bj R. H. Templeton, '99. 



66 



A13AMY ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 



ALBANY ALUMNI ASSOCIATION OF SYRACUSE UNI- 
VERSITY * 

The preliminary meeting was held i8 Apr., 1901, at the home of Dr. B. 
H. Brown, '81. The alumni present besides Dr. Brown, were Dr. A. H. 
Baton, '85, Dr. H. L. Taylor, '84, Dr. Henry Graham, '83, Dr. R. E. Dty, 
*77, C. N. Cobb, '77 and Rev. H. H. Murdock, '85. E. H, Brown wii 
made president and H. L. Taylor, secretary. The president stated the d^ 
sire of Syracuse alumni in the Troy Conference for the organization of tn 
Association, and that the trustees of the First Methodist Church offered tbe 
use of their chapel for the meetings. A program was arranged for the 
first banquet, Dr. C. W. Rowley, '79, was appointed toaat-maater, and 
many prominent people invited. 

At this meeting and banquet, held 29 Apr., 1901, a constitntion wti 
adopted and officers chosen. The second annual meeting was held 28 Apr., 
1902, at Troy, N.Y. Dean McChesney gave an address. At the third annual 
meeting 29 Apr., 1903, held in Albany Dean Ripton, '96, of Union Univer- 
sity and Chancellor Day were the principal speakers. 



President, 

First Vice President, 
Second Vice-President, 
Secretary and Treasurer, 



OFPiCBRS, 1901-1902 

Charles N. Cobb, A.M.,- '77 
Hbnry L. Taylor, Ph.D., '84 
Frbd Wolfk Manly. M.D., '97 



Martin H. Walrath, A.M., '89 
Stonding Committee: F. L. Mead, '78, W. C. KiTCHiN, '82, F. H. 
Wood, '85, E. H. Brown, '81, and W. H. Pbrry, '93 



OFPICBRS, 1902-1903 

President, Edgar H. Brown, A.B., '81 

First Vice-President, Farrington L. Mbad, Ph.B., '78 

Second Vice-President, Kathbrinb HulsT. A.B., '96 

Secretary and Treasurer, Martin H. Walrath, A.M., '89 

officers, 1903-1904 

President, Henry L. Taylor, Ph.D., *84 

First Vice-President, Noble E. Whitford, A.B., '89 

Second Vice-President, Maude Ripton, B.Mus., '02 

Secretary and Treasurer, Eugene Wiseman, Ph.D., '85 



♦ Details by Charles N. Cobb, '77. 



SYRACUSE UNIVXItSlTY ASSOCIATION 67 

iTRACUSE UNIVERSITY ALUMNI ASSOCIATION OF 

CENTRAL NEW YORK 

PtolMibly the first attempt to form an organization qualified to be deaig- 
ted by the above stated title must date from the effort of 18 Oct., 1902. 
limited number of graduates met and organized. James M. Gilbert, 
M., *75, was made president. 

rhe main object was to give support to University athletics. The 
ranization was revived 20 Feb., 1903, at a meeting held in Assembly Hall, 
xmstitntion was adopted and officers elected as follows : 

President, Edmund L. Frbnch, B.S., '02 

Vice-President, Augustus C. Stbvbns, ez-'94 

Secretary, Habry J. Hamlin, ez-*92 

Treasurer, Henry Philups, A.M., '93 

It the annual meeting held 21 Feb., 1904, the following officers were 
cted : 

President, Dorr R. Cobb Ph.B., '92 

Vice-President, William RrBiN, Ph.M., '93 

Secretary, Francis E. Oliver, Ph.B.. '91 

Treasurer, Willis H. Michell, A.B., '99 

Mrectors : Willis A. Holden, B.S., '80, Edmund L. French, B.S., *o2, 
CNBY Phillips, A.M., '93, Franklin J. Holzwarth, Ph.D., '87 



rRACUSE GRADUATES IN THE TEACHING PRO- 
FESSION IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK 

By Henry L. Taylor, '84 

[n 1885 there was organized in the city of Syracuse the Association of the 
ademic Principals of the State in Holiday Conference assembled, which 
I met annually during the holidays in Syracuse from that date. 
Ouxing the earlier years of this organization various informal gatherings 
the S. U. graduates occurred. By invitation of Professor Smalley one or 
o meetings were held at his house. Later the Chancellor and faculty 
ited the members of the organization to receptions at the University, 
[n Dec, 1899 a permanent association was organized which met at the 
tes under the presidency of Inspector Charles N. Cobb, '77, of the Univer- 
y of the State of New York. Since that date the Association has met 
anally at the Yates. At the Holiday Conference of 1901 a list, as com- 
!te as could be made, of the Syracuse graduates in the teaching profession 
the State of New York was printed in full which, revised to 1903, gives 
rat 325 names. 



68 sybacusb univbrsity association 

year prbsidbnt sbcrbtary and trsasuuk 

1899-1900 Chari«bs N. Cobb/77 Guy H. Baskbrviixb,'95 

1900-1901 Hbnry L. Tayix>r, '84 A. LiNcoi^ Travis, '94 

1901-1902 Guy H. Baskbrvili,b, '95 Christabbl Abbott, '95 

I902-1903 GURDON R. MiLLBR, *93 

Secretary, Christabbi. Abbott, '95 

Treasurer, Wiujam Nottingham, '76 

As a farther contribntion to the history of the efforts to effect a helpful 

organization of our teaching graduates the reader is referred to the Alanni 

Record for Dec, 1893, p. 57, for a brief reference. 

[The following is s fac -simile of the call issued for that, the first meet- 
ing of the kind. At that gathering the undersigned was elected president, 
and W. Y. Foote, '87, secretary of the organization. 

[Editor] 

SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY. 

You are cordially invited to be present at a Reception to the 
Alumni of the University who are engaged in teaching in this 
State, to be given at the residence of Prof, and Mrs. Smalley, 
on the evening of Dec. 27, l^^B. from 7 to 10:30 P. M. 

The object is to spend an evening together socially and with 
little formality, and to afford an opportunity for those graduates 
whose profession generally debars them from attendance at Com 
mencement, to become acquainted, to meet the faculty and inci- 
dently to renew their interest in our Alma Mater. Do not fail 
to be present. Please reply to the first named below. 

It will be noted that this Reception is appointed for the time 
of the Conference of Associated Academic Principals of the 
State of New York. The co-incidence is designed. Let all 
Syracuse Alumni who can do so avail themselves of the decided 
advantages of this Conference ! 





W. Y. Foote, 


'87 




F. W. Goreth. 


*9o 


Syracuse. N. Y. 


M. F. Call. 


•88 


December. 1893. 


A. E. Taylor. 


'91 



FACULTY OF THE UNIVERSITY 

See Ai^uMNi Record, pp. 1 10-125 

SUPPLBMBNT. 1898-I905 

1900 Mary Ethrl Abbott, A.M. 

Assistant in Library 
1899 AX3BRT J. AbBBL, A.M., M.D. 19OX 

Demonstrator of Anatomy 
1903 Harold Morton Adkins 

Instructor in Vocal Music 
1895 Henry B. Aujsn, M.D. 

ProfeMor of Obstetrics, 1886-1901. Emeritus Professor 
of Obstetrics, 1901- 
1903 WlIXIAM DbwBY AI3BVBR, B.S., M.D. 

Instructor in Physical Diagnosis 
1897 Charlbs W. Andrbws, A.m. 

Lecturer on Searching and Examination of Titles 
1894 WuxiAM S. Andrews, A.M., LL.B. 

Lecturer on Legal Medicine 

1902 Alexander McClure Ashley, A.M., LL.B. 

Lecturer on Meteorology and Climatology 

1903 Edward M. Avery, 

Instructor in Metal Work 

1894 Evelyn B. Ayers, B.O. 

Professor of Elocution and Physical Culture, 1896- 

1895 Charles G. Baldwin, A.M., LL.B. 1903- 

Lecturer on Partnership and Liens, 1895-9, 
Lecturer on Medical Jurisprudence, 1899-1902 
1902 Harriet Lucile Baldwin, A.B . 1903. 

Assistant in English 

1902 Mary A. Barker 

Assistant Secretary and Assistant Librarian 
1897 Ralph Emerson Bassbtt, A.M. 1899 

Instructor in the Romance Languages and Literatures 

1903 Carl Huff Beach, B.S., M.E. 

Instructor in Mechanical Drawing 
1890 Conrad Louis Becker, M.Mus. 

Professor of Violin, 1893-4 (Correction), 
Professor of Violin and Ensemble Playing, 1894- 
1900 Minnie Mason Bbbbe, A.M., Ph.D. 

Professor of History and English ; Instructor in French » 
1900-2 



70 PACUI^TY OP THB SYRACUS8 UNIVSRSXTY 

Professor of History and French, 1902- 
m, 1895 EUGBNB W. BBI.KNAP, A.M., M.D. 

Instructor in Medicine, 1895-190^ Instructor in Medi- 
cine and Director of Clinical Obstetrics, 1900-1. Lect- 
urer on Clinical Obstetrics, 1901-3. Lecturer on Obste- 
trics and Chief of the Obstetrical Clinic, 1903- 
m. 1902 Francis Rob Bbnham, M.D. 

Assistant in Clinical Obstetrics, 1902-3, 
Instructor in Clinical Obstetrics, 1903- 
/.a, 1899 EuGBNiA Bakbr Bbrwai^d 1901 

Instructor in Vocal Music 
/.a. 1892 WiixiAM Hbnry Bbrwai«d, M.Mus. 

Professor of Piano and History and Theory of Masic, 
1893-4 (Correction) 

Professor of Piano and Theory of Music, 1894- 
/.a. X902 Maudb E. Bloomingdalb 1903 

Assistant in Library 
/.a. 1899 John Archibai,d Bolb, A.B. 190s 

Instructor in German 
m, 1896 Abby M. Bond 

Secretary and Assistant Librarian 
/.a. 1901 Gastin Borch 190a 

Instructor in Piano and Violoncello 
La. 1902 JOHANNBS Lassbn Boysbn, A.B. 

Instructor in German 

m, 1898 *HORACB WlI«UAM BrITCHBR, B.C.E. I^)^ 

Instructor in Embryology 
m, 1903 Gborgb Sidnby Brittbn, M.D. 

Demonstrator of Anatomy 
m, 1897 Gborgb Birnby Broad, M.D. 

Instructor in Pathology, 1898- 1900. Instructor in Pathol- 
ogy and Bacteriology, 1900-2. Instructor in Clinic^ 
Gynecology, 1902- 
/. 1895 Jambs Byron Brooks. A.M., D.C.L. 

Dean of the College of Law, 1895-. Instructor in Eqnitf t 
Jurisprudence Trusts and Constitutional Law, 1897-9* 
Professor of Law (Equity, Jurisprudence, Trusts and 
Constitutional Law), 1899-1900. Same (Procedure at 
Common Law and Constitutional Law), 1900-1. Same 
( Procedure at Common Law, Medical Jurisprudence and 
Roman Law), 1902- 
/.a. 1900 Warrbn Gardnbr Bui.i«ard, Ph.D. 

Instructor in Mathematics, 1900-1. Associate Professor of 
Mathematics, 1901- 
/.a. 1899 Hbrbbrt Morsb Burchard, A.M., Ph.D. 

Instructor in Greek, 1899-1900. Associate Professor of* 
Greek, 1900-1. Professor of Greek, 1901- 



FACULTY OP TRB SYRACUSB UMIVBRSITY 7I 

1895 Edward H. Burdick, A.M. 1902 

Inttmctor in Contracts and Domestic Relations, 1895-9. 
Professor of Law f' Contracts and Domestic Relations), 
1899-1900. Same (Contracts, Domestic Relations, Bail- 
ments and Common Carriers), 1900-2 

1899 RoBBRT Burns, M.D. 

Demonstrator of Anatomy, 1899-1903. Instructor in 
Anatomy, 1905- 

1900 Curtis Clark Bushnbll, Ph.D. 

Instructor in Latin, 1900-3. Assistant Professor of 
Latin, 1903- 
1895 Charlbs Willl\m Cabbbn, A.m. 

Professor of Romance Languages and Literatures, 1897- 
1899 Evbrard John Calthrop 190 i 

Instructor in Vocal Music 
1899 Richard Grant Calthrop, M.Mus. 

Professor of Vocal Music 
1888 Jambs Carlton Carson, M.D. 

Lecturer on Mental Diseases 
1903 Howard Grbgory Casb, M.D. 

Demonstrator of Anatomy 
1902 Gborgb N. Chbnby 

Instructor in Negligence and Damages 
1901 JBROMB L. Chbnby 

Instructor in the Law of Corporations 

1901 John Wbntworth Church, LL.B. 

Instructor in Criminal Law and Procedure in Criminal 



«adiLa. 1880 Gaylord Parsons Clark, A.M., M.D. 

Professor of Physiology, 1897- 
• 1902 AucB Rbbd Clarkb, B.L., Ph.B. 

Assistant in French 

1897 Brnbst p. Clymbr, M.D. 1899 

Demouf trator of Anatomy 

^ 1865 WBLLBSLBYPBRRY CODDINGTON, A.M., D.D. 

William Penn Abbott Professor of Philosophy, 1897- 
1896 John Rogbrs Commons, A.M. 1899 

Professor of Sociology 

1902 Gborgb LbRoy Connbll, A.B. 1903 

Assistant in Greek 

1903 Harvby Francis Connbll, E.B. 

Assistant in Electrical Engineering 

1898 Clarbncb Erpord Coon, M.D. 

Demonstrator of Anatomy, 1898-9. Director of Anatomical 
Laboratory, 1899-1902. Instructor in Clinical Surgery, 
1902-3. Instructor in Surgery, 1903- 



/. 


1897 


/.«." 


1901 


/.«. 


1899 


m. 


1894 


/.a. 


1902 


m. 


1890 



72 faculty op the syracusb univbrsity 

Stbphhn Mortimbr Coon, A.M.» LL.B. 

Lecturer on International Law 
Hbrman Charuis Coopbr, A.m., Ph.D. 

Instructor in Chemistry 
John Gaylord Coultbr, Ph.D. 

Instructor in Botany 
Charlbs a. Covbz.1*, M.D. 

Lecturer on Chemistry 
Amy Elwbll Cranb 

Instructor in Vocal Music 
WiLUAM A. Curtin, M.D. 

Lecturer on Therapeutics, 1896-1900. Lecturer c 
Materia Medica and Therapeutics, 1900- 
/.a. 1901 Clara A. Curtiss, A.B. i 

Assistant in English 
/.a. 1903 Edward Day Curtis, A.B. 

Assistant in Greek 
/.a. 1901 Blanchb Stbvbns Daman 

Instructor in Piano 
/.a. 1902 Marib L. Davis 

Instructor in Vocal Music 
1894 Jambs Roscob Day, S.T.D., LL.D. 
Chancellor of the University 
m, 1902 Tbnnyson L. Dbavor, M.D. 

Demonstrator of Anatomy 
/. 1902 Howard P. Dbnison, A.M. 

Lecturer on the Law of Patents 
Iff. 1872 Hbnry Darwin Didama, M.D., LL.D. 

Dean of the College of Medicine, 1888-. Professor of 
Science and Art of Medicine and Clinical Medicine,i8 
93. Emeritus Professor of same, 1893- 
»f. 1903 Hbnry Burton Doust, M.D. 

Demonstrator of Anatomy 

/. 1897 MiCHABL B. DRISCOLL, A.M. 

Lecturer on the Law of Negligence 
/.a. 1902 Roland Clair Drybr, A.B. 

Instructor in Romance Languages 
/.a. 1903 Norman Armin Dubois, A.M. 

Instructor in Chemistry 
/.a. 1903 HORACB AiNSWORTH Eaton, A.M., Ph.D. 

Instructor in English 
/. 1902 Ernbst Isaac Edgcomb, A.M. 

Instructor in the New York Code of Civil Procedure 
m. 1884 Hbnry L. Elsnbr, M.D. 

Professor of the Science and Art of Medicine and Clin 
Medicine, 1895- 



FACUI.TY OF THR SYRACUSE UWIVKRSITY 73 

1894 Arthur Van W. Ei^tingb, B. Mas. 1901 

Instructor in Organ and Piano 
1891 Edgar Alprbd Embns, A.M. 

Professor of the Greek Language and Literature, 1893- 
1903 Gracb Lydian Evans 

Instructor in Cast Drawing 
1898 Frank Edgar Faki^by. A.M., Ph.D. 1903 

Instructor in English, 1898-9. Associate Professor of 
English, 1899-1901. Professor of English, 1901-3. 

1899 PRBDBRICK HBNRY FI,AHBRTY, M.D. 

Demonstrator of Anatomy, 1899-1903. Instructor in 
Anatomy, 1903- 
(. 1896 A13ZANDBR Clarbncb Pi«ick, A.m., Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of European History, i898-i9oa Pro- 
fessor of European History, 190a- 

• 1902 Thomas Frbd FoRBM AN, M.D. 

Demonstrator of Anatomy 
^ 1901 Howard M. Frbdbrick 

Instructor in Vocal Music 
1884 EiXA IRBNB Frbnch, B.Mus. 
Professor of Piano, 1894- 

• 1893 Adoi,ph Frby, M.Mus. 

Professor of Piano and History of Music, 1894- 

• 1891 Edwin Hai^i, Gaggin, B.Ar*. 1902 

Professor of Architecture, 1897-J902 
^ 1895 Thomas Wai^kbr Gaggin, B.Ar. 1901 

Instructor in Architecture, 1895-1900. Associate Professoi 
of Architecture, 1900-1 

• 1897 AI3BRT Howard Garrbtt 1900 

Professor of Vocal Music 
'• and /.a. 1897 Sarah Nbwcomb Graham, A.B., A.M. 1900 

Assistant in English, College of Liberal Arts, 1897-8. 
Instructor in English, College of Fine Arts, 1897-1900. 

• and a J 1897 Wii^uam Pratt Graham, Ph D. 

Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering, 1897-1901. 
Professor of Electrical Engineering, 1901- 
1902 Chari^s Lbwis Griffin, B.S. 1903 

Acting Dean of the College of Applied Science and Pro- 
fessor of Mechanical Engineering 
1901 WiixiAM AvBRY Groat, M.D. 
Instructor in Chemistry 
. 1893 Miriam A. Gubrnsby (Mix), Ph.B. 1899 

Instructor in Vocal Music 

1888 EUGBNB Emii* Fblix RICHARD Haanbi*, Ph.D., F.R.S.C, 

1901 

Professor of Physics and Joel Dorman Steele Professor of 

Theittic Science 



74 FACm^TY OF THR SYRACUSB UNIVBRSITY 

f,a. 1897 FlX>RBNCB EUGBNIB HaANBI*, B.P. 

Instructor in Cast Drawing 
/. 1902 Lbonard Titus Haight, A.B., LL.B. 

Instructor in Domestic Relations 
m, 1892 Thomas Hbnry Hai^tbad, M.D. 

Lecturer on Laryngology and Otology, 1895-9, Px 
of Laryngology and Otology, 1899- 
l.a. 1896 Jambs Hbnry Hamilton, A.M., Ph.D. 

Instructor in Economics, 1896-9. Associate Profe 
Economics and Sociology, 1 899-1900. Profes 
Political Economy, 1900-1. Professor of Soc 

1901-3 
m. 1885 Rbdbbn C. Hanchbtt, M.D. 

Professor of Materia Medica, i898-i9oa Profe 

Materia Medica and Therapeutics, 1900- 

m, 1903 Gborgb Arthur Hanford, Ph.D. 

Lecturer on Physiological Chemistry, 1902-3. L 

on Chemistry and Physiological Chemistry, 1903- 

La, 1891 CHARI.BS WBSI.BY HargiTT, A.M , Ph.D. 

Professor of Biology, 1895- 

w. Professor of Embryology, 1897- 

/.a. 1903 Gborgb Thomas Hargitt, A.M. 

Assistant in Zoology 

La, 1901 Mary Josbphinb Hasbrouck, Ph.B. 

Assistant in English 

DBI.MBR Edward Hawkins, LL.B. 

Instructor in Political Economy, 1900-1. Asaoda 

fessor of same, 190 1-2. Professor of same, 1902- 

Cari. Tracy Hawlby, B.P. 

Instructor in Painting, 1897-9. Instructor in Fn 

and Cast Drawing, 189^1900. Associate Profe 

Drawing ; Instructor in Art Anatomy, 1900- 

/.a. 1900 Nina Bayus Haybs 

Instructor in Vocal Music 

m, 1883 John Lorbnzo Hbpfron, A.M., M.D. 

Professor of Clinical Medicine, 1895- 

m. 1899 Mark Hbiman, M.D. 

Demonstrator of Anatomy 

/.a. 1903 ROYAI« Lbsi^ib Hbndbrson, B.S. 

Assistant in Biology 

/".a. 1897 ROSWBLI. Stonb Hii,!. 

Professor of Painting and Water Color 

Ija. 1901 Carrib Augusta Hii.ts, Ph.B. 

Assistant in Romance Languages 

/.a. 1895 JuuB Hbimbach Hinb 

Associate Professor of the German Language and 

ture, 1 897- 1 90 1. Professor of the same, 1901- 



La. 


1894 




1900 


M. 


1895 



FACULTY OF THB SYRACUSB UNIVRRSITY 75 

m, 1897 WiLUAM Graham Hinsdai«b, M.D. 

Instructor in Obstetrics, 1 897-1 901. Lecturer on Obste- 
trics, 1901- 
f.a. 1902 Earl Hollbnbkck, B.Ar. 

Instructure in Architecture 
La 1891 Franklin James HoLzwARTH, A.M., Ph.D. 

Professor of the German Language and Literature, 1893- 
1 901. Professor of the Germanic Languages and Litera- 
tures, 1901- 
Im. 1900 Thomas Cramer Hopkins, A.M., Ph.D. 

Professor Geology 
m, 1901 Albbrt Stbubbn Hotaling, M.D. 

Assistant in Clinical Obstetrics, 1901-2. Instructor in 
same, 1902- 
fji. 1 901 Lbon Brucb Howb. B.Ar. 

Instructor in Architecture, 1901-2 

Instructor in Drawing, 1902- 
Adblinb Bblinda Hunt, B.P. 

Instructor in Painting 
Nathanibl Irving Hyatt 1900^ 

Professor of Piano and Theory of Music, 1 896-1900 
Nathan Jacobson, M.D. 

Professor of Clinical Surgery, 1895- 
MabblBmmaJacoby, B.Mns. 1901 

Instructor in Piano 
Frbdbrick Bird Jonbs, A.M. 1901 

Assistant in Latin 

OWBM MBRRIWBTHBR JONBS, B.B. 

Instructor in Civil Engineering 
Richard JoNBS, Ph.D., 1899 

Professor of English Literature 
Wiluam Kbnt, A.m., M.E. 

Dean of the College of Applied Science and Professor of 
Mechanical Engineering 
/a. 1900 Mary Kbtcham, Litt.B. 

Instructor in Decorative Design, Normal Art and Keramic 
Art, 1900-2. Instructor in Decorative Design, 1902- 

U, 1^,2 JANBT LUCINDA KBVAND, Ph.B. I903 

Assistant in English 
^' 1898 Thbodorb Josbph Kibffbr, M.D. 1902 

Instructor in Pathology, 1898-1930. Instructor in 
Pathology and Bacteriology, 1900-2 
''^- 1901 Josbph Edward Kirkwood, A M., Ph.D. 

Instructor in Botany, 1901-3. Associate Professor of Bot- 
any. 1903- 
*• 1897 Frank Pattrngill Knowlton, A.M., M.D. 

Instructor in Physiology and Embryology, 1897-1900. 
Lecturer on same, 1900-3. Lecturer on Physiology, 1903. 



«,L 




/a. 


1902 


/.a. 


1895 


w. 


1885 


u 


1900 


u 


1900 


a4. 


1903 


U 


1898 


«.J. 


I9P3 



76 FACULTY OP THB SYRACUSK UNIVBBaiTY 

/.a. 1896 Edward Hbnry Kraus. M.S., Ph.D. 1899 

^9^^ Assistant in German and Mineralogy , 1896-7 1902 

Instructor in same, 1897-9. Instructor in Mineralogy, 1901- 

Jan. 1902. Associate Professor of same, Jan.-June, 1902 

Iff. 1900 Albbrt Edwin Larkin, M.D. 

Instructor in Clinical Medicine, 1900-1. Instructor in 
Medicine, 1901- 
/.a. 1900 Emma Aurblia Lbb (Walkbr) 1901 

Assistant in Library 
La, 1902 Harry Shbridan Lbb, A.B. 

Assistant in Latin 
La. 1897 Albbrt Lbonard, A.M., Ph.D. 1900 

Desn of the College of Liberal Arts and Professor of 
Pedagogy 
m. 1894 ISRABL Harris Lbvy, M.D. 

Lecturer on Histology 1896-1903. Lecturer on Physical 
Diagnosis, 1903- 

w*. 1903 Jacob Joshua Lbvy. Ph. B., M.D. 

Demonstrator of Anatomy 
/. 1900 Titus Aaron Lbvy, LL.B. 

Instructor, 1900-2. Instructor in Quasi Contracts, 1902- 
/. 1895 Cbylon H. Lbwis, A.M. 1903 

Lecturer on Practice, 1895-9. Instructor in Practice, 1899- 
1900. Instructor in Code Practice aud Pleading i& 
Civil Actions, Special Proceedings and Provisional Rem- 
edies, 1900- 
Iff. 1900 E1.LA May Lbwis 1902 

Assistant Secretary and Assistant Librarian 
La. 1900 Frbdbrick Dougi^as Losby, A.M. 

Instructor in English, 190C-1. Associate Professor of Eng- 
lish, 1901- 
La. 1903 Wii^UAM Chari^bs Lowb, Ph.B. 

Assistant in German 
/.a. 1893 *Unni Lund 1901 

Professor of Vocal Music 
/.a. 1898 Ensign McChbsnby, Ph.D., S.T.D. 

Dean of the College of Fine Arts and Professor of 
Esthetics and History of the Fine Arts 
/. 1895 Gborgb McGowan 

Lecturer on Elementary Law and Trusts, 1895-9. Instmct' 
or in Elementary Law and Trusts, 1899- 1900. Instructor 
in Elementary Law, 1900- 
La, 1901 Chari,bs Hbnry McLaury, A.B. 1902 

Assistant in Library 
/. 1895 PBTBR BAII.I.IB McLbnnan, A.m. 

Judge of the Supreme Court. Lecturer on the Trial o^ 
Actions 



FACULTY OF THB SYRACUSE UNIVBRSITY 77 

1903 LiLUB JANB McMAHON 

Assistant in Library 
1896 PBTB& Robert McMastbr, M.D. 1903 

Instructor in Surgery, 1896-190 1. Lecturer on Surgery, 
1901- 
1902 JBSSB BlmBR McMuiXAN, Ph. B. I903 

Assistant in History 
1891 WiLUAM Harrison Macb, A.M., Ph.D. 

William Griffin Professor of History and Political Science, 

1891- 
Lecturer on the Constitution of the United States, 1897- 
1886 Frank Wiluam Marlow, M.D., M.R.C.S. 
Professor of Ophthalmology, 1393- 
Librarian, 1890- 
Lucy Isabhixa Marsh 190a 

Instructor in Vocal Music 
Louis Marshall 

Lecturer on the Constitution of the State of New York 
Albrrt John May, A.M. 

Assistant in Biology 
William Hbnry May, M.O. 1900 

Lecturer on Pathology and Bacteriology, 1893-1900. 
Curator, 1896-1900 
Alfred Mbrcbr, M.D. 

Emeritus Professor of State Medicine, 1895- 
Alfbbo Cliffobd Mbbcbr, M.D. 

Professor of Clinical Pediatrics, 1893-. 
Treasurer, 1890-1901 
William Hbnby Mbtzlbr, Ph.D., F.R.S.C, F.R.S.E. 

Francis H. Root Professor of Mathematics, 1897- 
Aaron Bbnjamin Millbr, M.D. 
Professor of Gynecology, 1891- 
William Hough Mills, M.D. 

Lecturer on Hygiene and Public Health, 1896- 
PRBD L. Morgan, M.D. 

Demonstrator of Anatomy 
Edgar Coit Morris. A.M. 

Professor of Rhetoric and the English Language, 1895-7. 
Professor of Euglish, 1897-9. Jesse Truesdell Peck 
Professor of English Literature, 1899- 
^' 1903 Flora Bellb Moybr 
Assistant in Library 
<• 1902 John A Munson, A.M. 1903 

Assistant in French 
I. 1903 Ellbn Lovisa Nbwton 

Instructor in China Painting 



•• 


1901 




1899 


s. 


1901 


1. 


1892 


1. 


187a 


1. 


1880 


a. 


1895 


1. 


1884 


1. 


1884 


1. 


1898 


c 


1894 



78 FACUI.TY OF THE SYRACUSB UNIVERSITY 

f,a, T900 Vbrnblia Gii«morb Nichols 

i9^>2 Instructor in Vocal Music 

/.fl. 1902 Waxter S. Northcott 

Assistant in Physics Machine Shop 
/. 1895 Edwin Nottingham, Ph.B. 

Lecturer on the Law of Evidence. 1895-9. Instr 
the Law of Evidence, 1899- 1902 
/. 1895 WiLUAM Nottingham, A.M., Ph.D. 

Lecturer on the Law of Corporations, 1895-9. In 
in the Law of Corporations, 1899- 1901. Lect 
Corporations, 1901-3 
/.a. and a.s, 1897 Paul Cook Nugent, A.M., C.E. 

Instructor in Civil Engineering, 1897-1900. A 
Professor of same, 1900-2. Professor of same, i 
/.fl. 1899 Matty Beley Nutting 

Instructor in the Decoration of Fine Pottery 
f,a, 1902 LiLUA Marwick Olcott 

Instructor in Keramic Art 
/,fl. 1903 Erick Walter Otto, Ph.D. 

Instructor in German 
La, 1900 Edith Morton Packard, B.L. 

^902 Assistant in English 

/.a. 1883 George Albert Parker, D. Mus. 

Professor of Piano and Organ, 1884- 
f,a 1894 Mary Sims Parker 

1899 Instructor in Vocal Music 

l,a, 1890 Ernest Noble Patt^ce. M.S. 

Professor of Chemistry, 1897-. 
Registrar, 1900-2 
ha, 1899 Arthur Sayles Patterson, A.M., Ph.D. 

Instructor in Romance Languages, 1899-1902. A 
Professor of French, 1902- 
/.tf. 1887 Henry Allen Peck, A.M., Ph.D. 

Professor of Astronomy and Director of the Obse 
1893- 1901. Erastus Franklin Holden Professor oi 
nomy and Director of the Observatory, 1901- 
/.a. 1902 Harold Pender, Ph.D. 

Instructor in Physics 
/.a. 1895 Ismar John Peritz, A.M., Ph.D. 

Professor of Semitics 
/.a. 1901 George Lee Phelps, A. B. 

Assistant in Latin 
/. 1897 Albert C. Phillips, A.M. 

Lecturer on Wills and Administration, 1897-9. In 
in same, 1899-1902. Instructor in the Law of W 
Administration, 1902- 



FACUI.TY OP THE SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY 79 

1899 Louis Baker Phii,ups, B. Mas. 

Instructor in Piano and Theory of Music 
1899 Robert Hamilton Pierson, M.D. 1902 

Instructor in Histology, 1899-1900. Instructor in EUlstology 
and Assistant in Clinical Obstetrics, 1900-2 
1901 Perley Oakland Place, A M. 

Instructor in Latin, 1901-3. Assistant Professor of I^atin, 

1903- 
J. Edward Porter 1903 

Instructor in Chemistry 
Royal Arthur Porter, M.S. 
Instructor in Physics 
Daniel Pratt, A.B. 

Assistant in Mathmetics 
George Merriman Price. M.D. 

Lecturer on Anatomy, 1893-9. Prof essor of Anatomy , 1899- 
William Frederick Prouty, B.S. 

Assistant in Geology 
Edmund Chase Qubreau, Ph.D. 1899 

Professor of Geology and Palaeontology, 1897-9 
George Everett Quick, B.S 

Assistant in Electrical Engineering 
Angely.s Bertrice Randall 1904 

Assistant in Library 
Edward John Redington, A.B. 1900 

Instructor in Latin 
Major Fred Reed, A.B. 1903 

Assistant in English 
Albert Moore Reese, Ph.D. 

Instructor in Histology and Embryology, 1902-3. Asso- 
ciate Professor of same, 1903-. 

Lecturer on Histology and Embryology, 1902 — 
Frederick William Revels, B.Ar. 

Instructor in Perspective, and Descriptive Geometry, 1895- 
1900. Associate Professor of same, 1900-2. Professor of 
Architecture, 1902 — 
Mabel Carter Rhoades, Ph. B. 1903 

Assistant in Sociology 
Jean Marie Richards, Litt.B. 

Instructbr in English, 1 895-1 900. Associate Professor of 
English, 1900-3. Professor of English, 1903 — 
Minnie Lublla Roberts 

Assistant in Library 
Edward Michael Roedbr, A.B. 

Assistant in German 





1901 


• 


1902 


t 


1902 


■ 


1890 


I. 


1903 


I. 


1895 


s. 


1903 


1. 


1902 


8. 


1894 


a. 


1902 


a. 


1902 


1. 




a. 


1895 



a. 


1902 


a. 


1895 


i. 


1900 


r. 


I9Q3 



80 FACUI«TY OP THB SYRACUSB UNIVBRSITY 

/.a. 19CX) Bdward Drakb Rob, A.M., Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Mathematics, 1900-1. Professor of 
Mathematics, 1901- 
/.a. 1897 Chari«bs Gardnbr Rogbrs, A.M. 1902 

Assistant in Biology, 1897-9. Instructor in Biology, 1899- 

1902. 
/.a. 1902 Gborgb Albxandbr Russbli*, B.Mas. 

Instructor in Piano 
/.a. 1895 IrbnbSargbnt 1896 

190 ' Instructor in Italian, 190 1- 

l,a. 1901 Prbdbrick Albbrt Saundprs, Ph.D. 

Instructor in Physics, 1901-2. Associate Professor of Phy- 
sics, 1902- 
l.a, 1899 Ai,BBRT MONROB Sawin, M.S. 1900 

Instructor in Mathematics 

/.tf. 1895 JBANNBTTB SCOTT 

Professor of Painting 
La, 1893 John Ai^bxandbr Robinson Scott 

Director of the Gymnasium, 1893-9. Professor of Athletki 
and Director of the Gymnasium, 1899- 
/.a. 1901 JosBPH Cari, Sbitbr, B.Mus. 

Instructor in Piano, 1901-a. Instructor in Piano and Theory 
of Music, 1902- 
/.a. 1901 Edwin Hbddbn Shepard, B.S. 

Instructor in Mathematics 
a.s, 1902 Gborgb Hugh Shbpard, M.M.E. 

Associate Professor of Steam Bngineering. 
La, 1900 *Frbd Walkbr Shbrman, A.B. 190 < 

Assistant in Romance Languages 
f,a, 1898 Gail Shbrman 190^ 

Instructor in Modeling and Life Drawing, 1898-1900- 
Instructor in Modeling, 1900-a 
/. 1897 Florbncb Campbbli. Shbrwood, B.O. 

Instructor in Elocution 

La, 1895 Bbnjamin Jay Shovb, AM. 190* 

1902 1903 

Lecturer on Criminal Law and Procedure in Criminal case^* 

1895-9. Instructor in same, 1899-1901. Lecturer on same* 

1902-3. 

/.a. 1889 Hbnry Orrin Siblby, A.M., Ph.D; 

Instructor in Library Economics, 1892-1900. Instructor i^ 

Library Economy , 1900-1. Professor of Library Economy* 

1901-. Librarian, 1889- 

La, 1903 Katharinb Sibley 

Assistant in the Gymnasium 



/.a. 


1903 


U. 


1874 


I. 




U, 


1896 
1901 


U. 


1896 
1898 



VACULTY OF THB SYR A CUSS UNIVBRSITY 81 

/.a. 1892 Mary J. 0*Bryon Sibi^y. Ph.D. 

Instructor in Cataloguing and Bibliography, 1900-3. Asso- 
ciate Professor of Bibliography, 1993-. Assistant Libra- 
rian, 1892- 
Charlbs Drake Skinnbr, A.B. 

Assistant in Philosophy 
Frank Smallby, A.M., Ph.D. 

Dean of the College of Liberal Arts, 1900-. Gardner Baker 
Professor of the Latin Language and Literature, 1893-. 
Lecturer on Roman Law, 1895-1902. 
Wii,UAM Martin Smai,lwood, A.M , Ph.D. 1898 

Instructor in Botany, 1896-8. Associate Professor of Zool- 
ogy. 1901- 
EuGBNB Randolph Smith, A.M. 1897 

1899 
Assistant in Mathematics 

/.a. 1899 Harry Monmouth Smith, A.M„ Ph.D. 

Instructor in Chemistry, 1899-1900. Associate Professor 
of Chemistry, 1900-1. Professor of Chemistry, 1901- 

m. 1876 *WlLUAM MANI4US SMITH, A.M., M.D. I9OO 

Professor of Chemistry, 1890-9. Emeritus Professor of 
Chemistry, 1899-1900 
^•tf. 1902 Earl Evblyn Sfbrry, Ph.B. 

Instructor in European History 
M> 1900 Halbbrt S. Stbbnsland, M.D. 

Lecturer on Pathology and Bacteriology and Director of 
the Pathological Laboratory 
U, 1^3 Ori^ndo Samubi* Stbtson, B.S. 

Instructor in Mathematics 
A 1889 hvnhUL Marib Stbwart 1902 

Professor of Painting and Drawing, 1894-1902 
^' 1895 GiLBS H. Stxlwbll. a.m. 

Instructor in Personal Property and Torts, 1895-9. Pro- 
fessor of Law (Personal Property and Torts), 1899-1900. 
Same (Personal Property, Trusts and Torts), 1900- 
1899 Lamont Stilwell 

Instructor in the Law of Partnership and Liens 
^* 1895 Charlbs L. Stonb, A.m., LL.B. 

Lecturer on Principal and Agent, 1895-9. Instructor in 
Principal and Agent, 1899-1902. Instructor in the Law 
of Principal and Agent, IQ02- 
'•«• 1900 Jacob Richard Strbkt, M.A., Ph.D. 

Professor of Pedagogy 
^'5. 1903 Arthur H. Swbbt 

Assistant in Mechanical Labratory 
U, 1901 Edwin R. Swbbtland, B.S., Ph.M. 1903 

Instructor in Athletics. 1 901-3 



/. 



a. 5. 




m. 


1899 


La. 


1901 


m. 


1902 



8a FACULTY OF THB SYRACUSB UNIVBRSITY 

l.a, 1901 Edwin Platt Tanner, A.M. 1903 

Assistant in American History, 1901-2. Instructor in 
same, 1902-3 
f.a. 1902 LiLi«A Taylor 

Instructor in Vocal Music 
l.a. 1899 Samubl Newton Taylor, Ph.D. 1901 

Associate Professor of Physics 
l.a, 1897 William Erastus Taylor » Ph.D. 

Instructor in Mathematics, 1897- : 902. Associate Professor 

of Mathematics, 1902-3. 
Associate Professor Mathematics, 1903-4. Professor uf 
Applied Mathematics, January, 1904- 
Peter Campbell Ten Eyck, M.D. 

Demonstrator of Anatomy 
Charles Burton Thwing, A.M., Ph.D. 

Joel Dorman Steele Professor of Physics 
Frank William Tilley, M.D. 

Instructor in Pathology and Bacteriology, 1902-3. Lec- 
turer on same, 1903- 
l.a. 1902 Morris Palmer Tilley, Ph.D. 

Instructor in German, 1902-3. Instructor in English, 

1903- 
m. 1876 David Maydole Totman, M.D. 

Professor of Clinical Surgery, 1888- 
Registrar, 1993-8 
a.5, 1902. William Mason TowLE, B.S. 

Associate Professor of Practical Mechanics 
/. 1895 William G. Tracy, LL.B, 189S 

Lecturer on Surrogates Court and Practice 
l.a. 1895 Charles H. Treadwell, Jr., B.S. 1899 

Instructor in Physics. 1895-6. Assistant in Physics, 1896-7* 
Instructor in Physics and Chemistry, 1897-9 
l.a. 1898 Ansel Augustus Tyler, A.M., Ph.D. 1899 

Instructor in Botany 
m. 1899 Edward Sequin Van Duyn, M.D. 

Demonstrator of Anatomy, 1899-1901. Lecturer 00 
Anatomy, 1901-3. Lecturer on Surgery, 1903- 
m. 1872 John Van Duyn, A.M., M.D. 

Professor of Surgery, 18S8- 
m. 1902 Frederick William Van Lengen, M.D. 

Demonstrator of Anatomy 
/. 1895 Irving Goodwin Vann, AM., LLD. 

Judge of the Court of Appeals 
Lecturer on the Law of Insurance 
f.a. 1901 Elizabeth Van Valkenburg 

Instructor in Normal Art Methods 



FACULTY OP THB SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY 83 

/.a. 1896 BvALiNA Vbrnon, B.Mus. 1900 

Instructor in Piano 
f.a, 1900 Harry Lbonard Vibbard, B. Mus. 

Instructor in Piano and Organ 
/.a. 1900 Charles Bbrtram Walkbr, B.P. 

Instructor in Cast Drawing, 1900-2. Instructor in Cast 
Drawing and Modeling and Perspective, 1902- 
/. 1895 Frank Robinson Walkbr, A.M. 

Instructor in Bills and Notes and the Law of Real Pro- 
perty, 1895-9. Professor of Law (Bills an4 Notes and 
the Law of Real Property), 1899-1900. Same (Bills 
and Notes, Equity Jurisprudence and the Law of Real 
Property), 1900-2. Same (Bills and Notes, Contracts 
and the Law of Real Property), 1902- 
M. 1897 William Lewis Wallacb, A.M., M.D. 

Demonstrator of Anatomy, 1897-9. Instructor in Anatomy,, 
1 899-1900. Lecturer on Anotomy, 1900- 
/.a. 1903 Clara Euzabbth Ward, A. B. 

Assistant in English 
'a. 1902 Alicb MacDougal Warnbr 1903 

Assistant in Library 
^' 1897 Louis Lincoln Waters, LL.M. 

Lecturer on Statute Law, including the Statute of Limita- 
tions and the Statute of Frauds, 1897-9. Instructor in 
same, 1899-1902. Professor of Law (Statute Law, Equity, 
Constitutional Law and the Law of Evidence), 1902- 
U, 1900 Paul Emil Wbithaasb, A.M. 1902 

Instructor in German 
'■«. 1902 Lewis Hart Weld, A.M. 

Assistant in Zoology 
**• 1899 Walter Jacob Werpslman, M.D. 1901 

Instructor in Therapeutics, 1899-1900. . Instructor in 
Materia Medica and Therapeutics, 1900-1. 
1903 Marion Lesley West, Ph.B. 
Assistant in History 
^•^* 1903 Florence JuuA Wheaton 

Assistant in Library 
/.«. 1903 William Alfred White 

Instructor in Violoncello and Piano 
^- 1896 Charles Frederick Wiley, M.D. 1898 

'903 Demonstrator of Anatomy, 1903- 

^' 1897 Alfred Wilkinson, A.B. 1902 

Lecturer on the Law of Patents 
^•«. 1900 Horatio Burt Wiluams. A.B. 1902 

Assistant in Machine Shop 



/.a. 



84 FACULTY OF THE SYRACU8B UNXYBRBITY 

/.a. 1899 Gborgb Arthxtr Wix^son, Ph.D. 

Instructor in Philosophy, 1899- 1900. Associate Professor 
of Philosophy, 1900-a. Professor of Logic and Meta- 
physics, 1902- 
La, 1901 Milton Biglbr Wisb, A.M. 1900 

Assistant in European History 
/. 1895 Edward C. Wright, A.M. 

Lecturer on Sales, 1895-9. Instructor in the Law of Sales, 
1899-1902. Instructor in the Law of Sales and War- 
» ranty, 1902- 

La. 1902 CirARA Elizabeth Wykbr, Ph.B. 1903 

' Assistant in German 

iM. 1895 Edward Judson Wynkoop, M.D. 

Director of Anatomical Laboratory, 1897-1900. Lectures 
on Anatomy, 1900- 1. Lecturer on Pediatrics, 1901- 
/.a. 1900 Leonard Ernest Young, B.S. 1901 

Assistant in Chemistry 
Summary, 1898-1903 : In College of Liberal Arts, 112; College of 
Medicine, 65 ; College of Fine Arts, 57 ; College of Law, 33 ; College of 
Applied Science, 14 ; Chancellor 1 »28o. 

OTHER EMPLOYEES 

See Alumni Record, p. 125 

1883 John H. Cuningham, Superintendent of Grounds, 1898- 
1888 J. HarTE Cuningham, Superintendent of Buildings, 1898- 

1890 Martha A. Keepe (Philups), B.S. (No. 1237), Secretary of the 

Chancellor 1893 

1891 Laura E. De&hon, Bookkeeper 1894 
1896 Jessie E. Wheeler (Lewis), A.B. (No. 1431), Secretary of the 

Chancellor 1899 

1898 Charles. U. Billings, Agent of the University Block 

1899 Caroline R. Rulison, Secretary of the Chancellor 

1900 LA.URA Parsons, Ph.B. (No. 2845 Sup.), Cashier 1903 
1900 Addir a. Weed, Bookkeeper 

1903 Jennie O. Lewis, Ph.B. (No. 3132 Sup.), Cashier 1904 

1903 Clara Cook, Stenographer 

1904 Ada p. Nichols, Bookkeeper 



1891 John P. Dwyer, Janitor 1904 

1897 Samuel A. Steele, Janitor 

1898 William J. Mouhat, Janitor 
1900 Charles Austin, Janitor 
1902 Fred C. Wilcox, Janitor 
1902 Chauncey a. Harper, Janitor 
904 William Jones, Janitor 



FACULTY : mnOlARY AMD DRGKRSS 



FACULTY : SUMMARY AND DEGREES 
The folio wing tables show the diitribntion of the Pacnltj of the year 
1905-1904, (i) uuong the Colleger of the VaWetnly, (3) ft 
tntioiM whence their degrees were obtuned, 

SUMMARY OP THE FACULTY 



o the insti- 





£ 


-8 

< 

1 


1 

'£ 


1 


I 


1 


-. 


Chauckllor 




34 


19 


15 

9 

14 


4 
7 


4 
4 


, 


PfcOFKSaORS 


So 
13 














»9 






i 


70 


3» 


50 


^3 


13 


189 





86 



PROFBSSORS* DBGRBBS 



PROFESSORS' DEGREES 

Colleges and universities, American and Foreign, whose degrees are rep- 
resented in the faculty of Syracuse University. Where more than one 
degree is represented the number is expressed in parenthesis following the 
name of the institution. 



In tbb Collsgs of Libbrax. Arts 



1. Allegheny 

2. Beloit 

3. Bonn 

4. Boston 

5. Bowdoin 

6. Brown (2) 

7. Central Wesleyan 

(Mo.) 

8. Chicago (2) 

9. Clark (3) 

10. Colgate 

11. Columbia (3) 

12. Dartmouth (2) 

13. DePauw 

14. Dickinson (2) 

15. Emerson (Ora- 

tory) 

16. Erlangen 

17. Grenoble 

18. Hamilton (2) 

19. Harvard (9) 

20. Heidelberg (2) 

21. Jena 

22. Johns Hopkins 

(2) 

23. Leipzig (2) 

24. Mass. Inst. Tech. 

25. Michigan 

26. MoDre's Hill 

27. National (Law) 

28. Nebraska 

29. Northwestern 

30. Oberlin 

31. Ohio 

32. Otterbein 

33. Pacific 

34. Princeton (2) 

35. Rochester (4) 

36. Smith 

37. Stanford 

38. Strassburg 

39. Syracuse 

40. Toronto (3) 

41. Victoria (2) 



42. Virginia 

43. Wesleyan (4) 

44. Wisconsin 

45. Yale 



Of the 38 institn 
tions represented in 
the other colleges ot 
the University 24 are 
in addition to those 
represented in the 
College of Liberal 
Arts. The entire 
number represented 
in the University fac- 
ulty is 69. 



In THB othbr Collbob 



1. Albany (Law) 

(2) 

2. Albanv (Medictl) 

3. Alfred 

4. Amherst 

5. Baltimore (Med.) 

6. Bellevue (Med.) 

7. Berlin 

8. Boston 

9. Bucknell 

10. Columbia 

11. Columbian 

12. Colgate 

13. Cornell (2) 

14. Dartmouth 

15. Geneva (Med. ) 

16. Hamilton (4) 

17. Harvard (5) 

18. Iowa 

19. Iowa Wesleyan 

20. Johns Hopkins 

21. Kentucky (Med.) 

22. Maryland 

23. Biichigan 

24. New York 
(Med.) 

25. Princeton (3) 

26. Rensselaer Pol. 
Inst. 

27. Roanoke 

28. Rochester 

29. Stevens Inst. 
Tech. 

30. Syracuse 

31. Toronto 

32. Tulaue 

33. Vanderbilt 

34. Wesleyan 

35. Williams 

36. Worcester Pol. 
Inst. 

37. Yale (3) 

38. Zurich 



THK UNTVKRSITY SHNATB 87 



THE UNIVERSITY SENATE 

See Alumni Record, p. 126. 

body was organized 21 June, 1887. In the published By-laws of the 
tity (1890) appears the fol lowing (Art. VII, Sec. 3) : ** There shall be 
trsity Senate which shall consist of the Chancellor, the Deans of 
eral colleges, two professors from the College of Liberal Arts, one 
or from each of the other colleges and two members of the board 
tees. Such professors and trustees shall be annually appointed by 
ird«" The following shows the membership to date : 

Chancellor Chari«bs N. Sims, 1887- 1893 
Chancellor Jambs R. Day, 1894 — 

Dean John R. Prbnch, i 887-1897, Secretary 

Dean Hbnry D. Didama, 1888 — 

Dean Gborgs F. Comfort, 1837-1893 

Dean LbRoy M. Vbrnon, 1893- 1896 

Dean Jambs B. Brooks, 1895 — 

Dean Albbrt LBonard, 1897-1900, Secretary 

Dean Ensign McChbsnby, 1898— 

Dean Frank Smallby, 1900 — , Secretary 

Dean William Kbnt, 1903 — 

Professor W. P. Coddington, 1887— 

Professor Charlbs J. Littlb, 1887- 1891 

Professor Alfrbd Mbrcbr, 1887-1896 

Professor Nbwton A. Wblw, 1887-1889 

Professor Gborgb A. Parkbr, 1889 — 

Professor Frank Smallby, 1891-1900 

Professor John L. Hbffron, 1896 — 

Professor GiLBS H. Stilweli., 1896— 

Professor Bugbnb Haanbl, 1900-1901 

Professor Wiluam H. Macb, 1901 — 

Professor William P. Graham, 1903 — 

Trustee Erastus F. Hoidbn, 1887-1898 

Trustee Gborgb F. Comstock, 1887-1892 

Trustee William Nottingham, 1892-1902 

Trustee Thbodorb Irwin, 1898-1902 

Trustee Hbndrick S. Holdbn, 1902— 

Trustee Willis A. Holdbn, 1903— 



THR LIBRARY COIIUITTXK 



THE LIBRARY COMMITTEE 

This committee was organized in 18S9 and consiated >t first of the Cbub 
cellor and two members of the Facnltj' of the College of Liberal '.'Aita. Ii 
1891 Tnutee John M. Reid and the librarian were added, the latter bdoi 
diacontinued after 1896. A UQiversit; By-law, pablithed In tile ediUon of 
1894, (Art. IV, Sec. 6) provides that " there ahall be a Libmrj CommtttM 
annuallj elected by the tmEtees, consisting of the Chancellors and Uk 
Deans, ex-oSicio, two tinstees, two members of the Facnity of the ColkfB 
of Liberal Arts, and one member from each of the other facnltLes." TMl 
is at the present time the composition of the committee and the member* 
ship, repreeeuting the corporatiou and the five colleges, cotuiau, as don 
the UniTerstljp Senate, of fourteen persons. Membership from the first ti 
shown •■ follows : 

Chiuicellor Charles N. Sius, 1889-1893 

Chancellor James R. Day, 1894— 

Dean John R. French, 1S94-1897 

Dean Menrv D. Didaha, 1S94— 

Dean LeRoy M. Vhrhon, 189J-1896 

Dean James B. Brooks, 1895— 

Deau Albert Leonard, 1897-1900 

Dean Ensign McCheSney, 1S97 — 

Dean Prank Smallev, 1900— 

Dean William Kent, 1903— 

Professor CHARLES ]. LlTTLE, 1BS9-1891 
Professor W. V. Coddington. 1889-1903 
Profrssor William H. Mace. 1891-1894 
Professor William G.Ward, 1894-1897 
Professor John VanDdyn, 1B95 — 
Professor George A, Parker, 1S95 — 
Professor Frank R. WAI.KKE, 1895— 
Professor Hdgak C. Morris, 1897-1901 
Professor ChablssW. Hakcitt, 1901— 
Professor Frank E. Farlky, 1903-1903 
Professor Jean M, RICHARDS, I903— 
Professor Paol C, NncsNT, 1903 — 
Trustee John M. Reid, 1891-1894, 1895-1896 
Trustee Eli C. Bruce. 1894-1895 
Trustee Theodore Irwin. 1H94-1903 
Trustee Francis Hendricks, 1896— 1S9S 
Trustee Jamks J. Bblden, 1898-1904 
Trustee R. DeWitt Mdngkr, 1903— 
Librarian HENRY O. SiBLRY, 1891-1896 



.THE n;. 
PUBLIC 1. 



1 






ADMINISTRATION AND INSTRUCTION* 

CHANCELLOR 

4 JAMES ROSCOE DAY 

CC Al«UMNI RBCORD, p. 137. 

ORRBCTioN : In 9th line read 1873 for 1893. 

upplbmsnT: Chancellor: Charles Henry Fowler Foundation (Chair 
led 1902). Elected Bishop of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 1904. 
lined, preferring to remain Chancellor of Syracuse University, 
esidence, 604 University Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

PROFESSORS : COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

r ALBERT LEONARD, DEAN 1900 

ie Alumni Record, p. 138. 

tpplbmbnt: Dban op Thb Collbgb op LiBBRAi. ARTS, Syracuse 
ircrsity, and Professor of Pedagogy, 1897-1900. 
esidence, 4 Park St., Boston, Mass. 
[ FRANK SMALLEY, DEAN 

ie Alumni Rbcord.No. 249 and Faculty Record, p. 141, College of Lib- 
Arts. 

DRRBCTiON : Gardner Baker Professor of the Latin Language and Liter- 
e (Chair named 1893). 

7PPLBMBNT : Registrar, 1894-1900. Lecturer on Roman Law, College 
lAw, 1895-1902. Acting Dban op thb Collbgb op Libbral Arts, 
icuse University, Sept. 1900- Jan. 1901. Dban, Same, since Jan. 1901. 
ing Chancellor of the University, Summer 1903. 

as edited ** Alumni Record and General Catalogue of Syracuse Uni- 
lity, 1835-1899," 1009 pp., Geneva, N. Y., W. F. Humphrey, 1899. 
esidence, 607 University Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 
[ WELLESLEY PERRY CODDINGTON 

se Alumni Rbcord, pp. 138 and 139. 

ORRBCTION : William Penn Abbott Professor of Philosophy (Chair 
led 1882?). 
esidence, 106 Walnut Place, Syracuse, N. Y. 

«e Alummi RBComD, i>p. 135-axi. Piease note the following : i. Names of person* 
le record was completed in the Alumni Rbcobd are not here repeated. This publi- 
m includes, with supplemental matter, records that were not then completed and 
e of subsequent acceasions. 2. Persons giving instruction in two Colleges are 
icd in the College to which they primarily belong and names are not repeated. 3. 
lea are not repeated with each grade of advancement, but are ranked under the high- 
jade only. 4. The date before each name is that of its possessor's earliest connec- 
ion with Chis body. 5. The order of names differs from that in the catalogues, but 
le exact order of election as it appears on the minutes of the Board of Trustees. 
Inta 2, 3 and 4 indicate departures from the method followed in the Alumni Rbcob d 



90 ADMINISTRATION AND INSTRUCTION 

1888 EUGENE EMIL FELIX RICHARD HAANEL 1901 

See Ai,UMNi Record, p. 143. 

Supplement : Professor of Physics and Joel Dorman Steele Professor of 
Theistic Science, College of Liberal Arts, Syracuse University, 1888-1901. 

Residence, Ottawa, Canada. 

1891 CHARLES WESLEY HARGITT 

See A1.UMNI Record, pp. 143 and 144. 

SUPPI.EMENT : Has published notes on Scaphiopus Holbrookii, Am. Nat. 

1888; Color Variation among Animals, ibid., 1889; Methods of Mounting 

Infusoria, Am. Mic.Jour, 1890 ; Habits of the Fresh Water Crayfish, ih\i. 

1890 ; Habits of Amphiuma, Science ^ Sep. 1892 ; Paraitism of Molothrns 
Ater,t^iV/.Dec. 1893 ; Origin of Sex -cells in Eudendrium, Proc. Am. Ass'n. 
1889; Some Remarkable Floral Variations, Botan. Gaz. Vol. xiv ; Varia- 
tions in Daucas Carota, ibid.\ Notes on Isopyrum Biternatum, ibid. Vol. xv; 
A NewHydroid from Long Island Sound, Am, Nat. 1894; Natural History 
of Soils, Trans, New York Agt, Soc 1895 ; The Problem of the Origin of 
Sex Among Hydromedusae, Proc, Am. Ass*n,\ Variation Among Hydro- 
medusae, Proc. Am. Ass^n, 1900 ; Variation Among Hydromedusae, £iol. 
Bull,t 1901 ; The Alcyonaria of Porto Rico, Bull, U, S, Fish Commis. 
1900 ; Synopsis of the Hydromedusae Part I Am. Nat,, May-Apr., 1901; 
Synopsis of the Hydromedusae, Part //, Am, Nat., May, 1901 ; Synopsis of 
the Hydromedusae, Pari III, Am. Nat., July, 1901 ; Synopsis of the Hydro- 
medusae, Part iy\ Character and Distribution of Genus Perigonimus, Mitt, 
Zool. Sla., Naples, 1895 ; Recent Experiments on Regeneration, ZooLBuU., 
Vol. I, 1897 ; Experimental Studies on Hydromedusae, Biol, Bull. Vol. i, 
1899 ; Methods of Mounting FrotozoR, Jour. App. Mic, Vol. II, 1899; Natu- 
ral History and Development of Pennaria, Am, Nat, Vol. xxxiv, 1899 ; Tbe 
Coelenterate Fauna of Woods Holl, ibid,, July, 1902; Some Mednaae New 
to Woods Holl, Biol. Bull,, Vol. iv., 1902; Notes on Cordylophora, Zool. 
Bull,, Vol. I, 1897 ; Some Anomalous Eggs, Biol. Bull,, Vol. II, 1899. 

Residence, 909 Walnut Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

1891 WILLIAM HARRISON MACE 
See Alumni Record, p. 144. 

Correction: William GriflSn Professor of History and Political Science 
(Chair named 1889?). 

Supplement: Has published ** Syllabus on American Revolution," 
Phila. Amer. Society for University Extension, 1901 ; ** Method of Last 
Course in High School History, "/<'«'' Pcd,, xiii, 183 ; ** Central Defect of 
the Normal School," Educ. Rev., Feb., 1901. 

Residence, 127 College Place, Syracuse, N. Y. 

1891 EDGAR ALFRED EMENS 

See Alumni Record, p. 145. 
Residence, 727 Crouse Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

1887 HENRY ALLEN PECK 

See Alumni Record, No. 719 and Faculty Record, p. 145, College of 
Liberal Arts. 



ADMINISTRATION AND INSTRUCTION 9I 

SupPLBMKNT : Professor of Astronomy and Director of the Observa- 
^'yi 1 895-1901. Erastus Franklin Holden Professor of Astronomy, etc., 
1901-. 

Has published *' The Eqninoz and Obliquity of the Bclictic for 
'^5.5 and the Constant of the Lunar Equation from Observations made 
^>pon the Repsold Meridian Circle of the Strasburg Observatory, 1883-3," 
The Nichols Press, Lynn, Mass., 1897 ; *• Definitive Orbit of Comet, 1894, 
ii," -<4j/n>«. /47«r., Vol. xxi, Nos. 16-17, Apr,, 1901 ; •* Definitive Orbit of 
Comet 1896 iv," ibid. Vol. xxii. No. 5, Oct. 25, 1901 ; ** Definitive Orbit of 
Comet 1898 ix," ibid.. Vol. xxii, No. 21, Oct. 15, 1902. 
Roridence, 307 Waver ly Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

1891 FRANKLIN JAMES HOLZWARTH 

See Alumni Rbcord, No. 811 and Faculty Record, pp. 145 and 146, Col- 
lege of Libera] Arts. 

SUPPUtMKNT : Professor of the German Language and Literature, College 
of Liberal Arts, Syracuse University, 1893-1901. Professor of the Germanic 
LangiiAges and Literatures, Same, since 1901. 

Abroad on leave of absence, Mar., 1900-Sept., 1901, studying at the Uni- 
Tcrattiea of Jena, Leipzig and Heidelberg. 

Has published " Modern Language Requirements,*' ^^^^ff/*5 Bulletin; 
Komer's Zriny," edited with Introduction and Notes, cloth, 134 pp., Bos- 
ton, D. C. Heath & Co., 1902; "Leitfaden zu einem Gcethe-Schiller 
Cnrsns," 1905. 

President Syracuse University Alumni Association, 1903-4. 

Married 19 March, 1889, Anna A. Stumpf of Lockport, N. Y. 

CkUdren — Raymond C, born 5 Mar., 1890. 
Irene M., born 4 July, 1894. 
Karl F., born 3 July, 1897. 

Residence, 301 Waverly Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

1894 EDGAR COIT MORRIS 
See Ai^UMNi Rbcord, p. 146. 

SupPlJIMBNT: Professor of Rhetoric and English Language, 1895-7. 
Professor of English, 1897-9. Jesse Tmesdell Peck Professor of English 
Literature, 1899-. 

Has published " The Campaign Speeches of Lincoln and Douglass ** 
edited with Introduction and Notes, Maynard, Merrill & Co., 1899; "On 
the Composition of the Old Law,*^ Publications of the Modem Language 
Asssociaiion 0/ America, Vol. xvii. No. i. 

Residence, 309 University Place, Syracuse, N. Y. 

1895 EDMUND CHASE QUEREAU 1899 
See Ai^UMNi RSCORD, p. 146. 

SUPPI.SICSNT : Professor of Geology and Palaeontology, College of 
Liberal Arts, S3nracuse University, 1897-9. Asst. Engineer B. and M.R.R. 
io Wyoming and Montana, 1 898-1900. Asst. Roadmaster and Roadmaster 
C. and N. W. Ry. in South Dakota since 1900. 



92 ADMINISTRATION AND INSTRUCTION 

Married 6 Feb. 1902 Elizabeth F. Packard (See non-graduates), of Syra- 
cuse, N. Y. 
Residence, Redfield, So. Dak. 

1895 JOHN ROGERS COMMONS 1899 

See Alumni Record, p 146. 

SUPPI,BMFNT : Professor of Sociology, College of Liberal Arts, Syri- 
cuse University, 1896-9. 

Residence, Madison, Wis. 

1895 CHARLES WILLIAM CABEEN 

See Ai,uMNi Record, p. 147. 

Correction and Supplement : Professor of the Romance Languages 
and Literatures, College of Liberal Arts, Syracuse University, since 1897. 
Abroad on leave of absence, studying in Europe, since March, 1903. 

Residence, 403 University Place, Syracuse, N. Y. 

1895 WILLIAM HENRY METZLER 

See Alumni Record, p. 147. 

Correction : In the first line read Ontario for Ohio. Francis H. Root 
Professor of Mathematics (Chair named 1893). 

Supplement: F. R. S. C, F. R. S. E. Has published "Compound 
Determinants," ^w.yi?«^- Math,^ Vol. 20, July, 1898 ; "A Theorem in Deter- 
inants," ibid.^ Vol. 20, July, 1898 ; ** On the Excess of the Number of Com- 
binations in a Set Which have an Even Number of Inversions over Those 
which have an Odd Number," Am, Jour, Math, Vol. 22, No. i, 1899; "On 
the Roots of a Deterniinantal Equation,'* Am, Jour, Maih,^ Vol. 21, Oct., 
1899; "On a Determinant Each of whose Elements is the Product ofK 
Factors,** Am. Math. Monthly ^ Vol. 7, No. 6, 1900 ; " On Certain Aggre^rates 
of Determinant Minors," Trans. Am. Math Soc. Vol. 2, No. 4, 1901 ; *'A 
Theorem in Determinants Related to Laplaces," London Math, Soc,, 1898; 
*' On a Theorem Regarding Determinants with Polynomial Elements,** 
Trans. Royal Soc, Canada^ 1902 ; •* Some Indentities Connected with Alter- 
nants and with Elliptic Functions,** Trans. Royal Soc, Edinburgh^ Vol 24, 
Part 3, 1902. 

Residence, 724 Comstock Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

1894 EVELYN BENEDICT AYERS 
See Alumni Record, pp. 147 and 148. 

Supplement : Professor of Elocution and Physical Culture, College of 
Liberal Arts, Syracuse University, 1896-1904. 
Residence, The Moore, James St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

1895 ISMAR JOHN PERITZ 
See Alumni Record, p. 148. 

Supplement: Has published "Woman in the Ancient Hebrew Cult,'* 
4 opp., y<9»r. Bib, Lit., Pt. II., 1898; also as a pamphlet by Soc. of Bib. 
Lit. and Exegesis; "Hallel,** Encyc, Biblica, vol. ii, p. 1942 sq. The 
Macmillan Co., New York, 1901 ; Article on Hymn referred to in Matt. xzvi» 
30 and Mark xiv, 26 ; " Synagogue,** Encyc, Biblica, vol. iv. 

Residence, 608 University Ave., Syracuse, N, Y. 



ADMINISTRATION AND INSTRUCTION 93 

ERNEST NOBLE PATPEE 
\i,UM Ni Record, p. 148. 
>I*BMSNT : Registrar, 1900-2. 
dence, 402 Euclid Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

RICHARD JONES 1899 

\i.uMNi Record, p. 148. 

XBMENT : Professor of English Literature, College of Liberal Arts, 
se University, 1898-9. 
dence, Nashville, Tenn. 

JOHN ALEXANDER ROBINSON SCOTT 
Alumni Record, p. 157. 

»LEMENT : Director of the Gymnasium, 1893-9. Professor of Ath- 
jid Director of the Gymnasium, Syracuse University, 1899- 
lence, Winchell Hall, Syracuse, N. Y. 

ALEXANDER CLARENCE FLICK 
\i.uMNi Record, p. 149. 

XEMENT: Associate Professor of European History, College of 
I Arts, Syracuse University, 189S-1900. Professor of European His- 
Same, since 1900. Abroad on leave of absence, studying mainly in 
ny, 1902-3. 

published '* Loyalism in New York during the American Revolu- 
New York, The Columbia University Press (Vol. xiv. No. i of Studies 
tory. Economics and Public Law, Edited by the Faculty of Politi- 
ence of Columbia University); *' History in Rhymes and Jingles,** 
, O , Saalfield Pub. Co., 1901 ; ** Socialism in the French Revolu- 
An.Amer. Acad, of PoL andSoc. Set. Vol. xiii., Philadelphia, 1899 ; 
ems Confronting Modern France,*' The Current Cyclopedia^ Vol. i, 
o, 1902 ; **A Short History of New York State *' (jointly with Ander- 
[ew York, Maynard & Merrill, 1902 

led 10 June 1899, Laura T. Page (No. 1601) of Syracuse, N. Y. 
iren — Dorothy Jean, bom 27 Apr. 1900. 

John Williston, born 29 Jan. 1902. 

Alexander Clarence, born 31 Oct. 1903. 
deace, 108 Waver ly Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

JAMES HENRY HAMILTON 1903 

\LUMNi Record, p. 154. 

XBMBNT : Instructor in Economics, College of Liberal Arts, Syra- 
niversity, 1896-9. Associate Professor of Economics and Sociology, 
1899-1900. Professor of Political Economy, Same, 1930-1. Pro- 
^f Sociologfy, Same, 1901-3. Head Worker, University Settlement, 
ork City, since 1903. 

published** A Neglected Principle in Civic Reform,** Am. Jour, 
, May, 1900. ** Savings and Savings Institutions,*' New York. The 
llan Co., 1902. 
lence, The University Settlement, New York, N. Y. 



94 ADMINISTRATION AND INSTRUCTION 

1900 THOMAS CRAMER HOPKINS 

Born 4 May 1 861 in Center County, Pa. Student in DePauw Univernty, 
1883-7. *Ae. B.S. A.M. (Stanford) 1892. Ph.D. (University of Chi- 
cago) 1900. 

Teacher, High School, Rising Sun, Ind., 1887-8. Instructor in Chenui' 
try, DePanw University, 1888-9. Assistant State Geologist of Arksnasi, 
1889-92. Assistant Professor of Geology, Pa. State College, 1893-9. Pro- 
fessor of Geology, College of Liberal Arts, Syracuse University, since 1900. 

Has published a text book, ** Geology of Coal," Scranton, Pa., 1903; 
and the following articles : " Marbles and other Limestones,'* Little Rock, 
Ark., 1893; ** Brownstones of Pennsylvania,*' Harrisburg, Pa., 1896; 
*' Bedford Oolitic Limestone,** Indianapolis, Ind., 1897 ; ** Clays of Penn- 
sylvania,*' Harrisburg, Pa., 1898 ; etc. 

Married 8 Jan. 1890, Bdistina Farron of Greencastle,|Ind. 

Residence, 908 Irving Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

1900 JACOB RICHARD STREET 

Born 18 July i860 at Palmyra, Ontario, Canada. Student from Palmyra 
at Victoria University. B.A. 1884. M.A. (Toronto) 1888. Ph.D. (Clark), 
1898. 

Modern Language Master, Smithville High School, 1885-6 ; Walkerton 
High School, 1886-7 ; Principal, Caledonia High School. 1887-95. Student 
of Pedagogy, Clark University, 1895-6. F*^llow in Psychology, Same, 1896-8. 
Instructor in Pedagogy, Bible Normal College, 1898-9. Professor of 
Pedagogy, Mt. Holyoke College, 1899-1900. Professor of Pedagogy, Col- 
lege of Liberal Arts, Syracuse University, since 1900. 

Has published ** Methods of Language Teaching,'* Ped, Sem. Vol. iv. 
No. iii ; " A Study in Moral Education,'* idid. Vol. v. No. i ; "A Genetic 
Study of Immortality,** idid. Vol, vi. No. iii; etc. 

Married 1885, Rose Northcott of Belleville, Ontario, Canada. 

Children — Lockwood Northcott, born 5 Dec. 1890. 
William Walter, born 18 Oct. 1892. 
John Northcott, born 19 Sept. i8q8. 

Residence, 721 Comstock Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 
1900 EDWARD DRAKE ROE, JR. 

See A1.UMN1 Rbcord, No. 483. 

Corrections: A.M. (Harvard) 1886; 4th line, read ** Shortledge'8 
Academy,** for *' Shirtlidge's Academy'* ; 7th line read Associate Professor 
of Mathematics, Oberlin College, 1892-9. 

SUPPI«EMENT : Associate Professor of Mathematics, College of Liberal 
Arts, Syracuse University, 190C-1. John Raymond French Professor of 
Mathematics, Same, since 1901. 

Member of American Association for the Advancement of Science ; Die 
Deutsche Mathematika — Vereinigung. 

Has pubished ** A Text-book on Trigonometry** (jointly with Prof. F. 
Andereggof Oberlin College) 108 pp., Boston, Ginn & Co., 1896 ; *< DieBnt- 
wickelung der Sylvester *schen Determinante nach Normal-Fonnen," 8to., 



ADMINISTRATION AND INSTRUCTION 95 

$2 pp., Leipzig, B. G. Teubner, 1898; *'Oii Symmetric Functions/* Am, 

^ttth. Monthly, 1899 ; ** On the Fundamental Fonn of the Resultant," t^fV/. , 

900; **On a Formula of Interpolation,** ibid,^ 1901 ; **Note on Symmetric 

XLQCtxons,'* Am, Jour, 0/ Math., 1903; "Note on a Partial Differential 

qoaiion of the First Order,/ Annals 0/ Math,, 1903. 

Married 15 Mar. 1890 Mrs. Harriet A. B. Gourley of Cambridge, Mass., 

10 died 18 May 1898. 

Residence, 105 Ostrander Aye., Syracuse, N. Y. 

39 HENRY ORRIN SIBLBY 1904 

See Alumni Record, No. 922 and Faculty Record, p. 152, College of 

beral Arts. 

SUPPLKMBNT : Instructor in Library Economics, Syracuse University, 

^2-1900. Instructor in Library Economy, Same, 1900-1 . Professor of 

brary Economy, Same, 1901-4. 

Residence, 773 Inring Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

31 CHARLES BURTON THWING 

Bom 9 Mar. i860 at Theresa, N. Y. Student from Hamilton, Mo., at N. 

. Univ., 1884-8. « K i". « B K. A.M. (Same) 1889. Ph. D. (Bonn) 

94. 

Instructor in Physics, N. W. Univ. Academy, 1888-93. Instructor in 

lysics, Univ. of Wisconsin, 1894-6. Professor of Physics and Astronomy, 

DOS College, 1896-1901. Joel Dorman Steele Professor of Physics, College 

Liberal Arts, Syracuse University, since 1901. 

Has published *' Color Photography by Lipniann*s Process,** Am. Jour, 

f., 1891 ; ** Eine Beziehung zwischen Dielektrizitats — konstante und 

emischer Konstitution des Dielektrikums,** Zts. J, phys Chem,, I894. 

Exercises in Physical Measurement** (jointly with L. W. Austin), Boston, 

lyn & Bacon, 1895 ; *• On a New Form of Water Battery,** Phys, Rev., 

n. 1896 ; *' An Experimental Research on Gravitational Permeability," 

id,, Nov. 1897 ; •* An Elementary Physics,** Boston, Benj. J. Sanborn & 

)., 1900 ; *• A Photographic Study of the Maguetic Field,*' Am. Jour. Set., 

02. 

Married Lucy Blakeslee White of Cazenovia, N. Y. 

Children — Myra, born 13 July 1895. 

John Burton, bom 10 Jan. 1897. 

Philip Leonard, born 25 July 1898. 

Alice Cushing, born 13 Apr. 1901. 
Residence, Fayetteville, N. Y. 

98 FRANK EDGAR FARLEY 1903 

See Alumni Rbcord, p. 156. 

SUPPLBMENT : Instructor in English, College of Liberal Arts, Syracuse 

Diversity, 1898-9. Associate Professor of English, Same, 1899-1901. Pro- 

SK>r of English, Same, 1901-3. 

Has published *' Milton*s Paradise Lost,** Books I. and II.. edited for 

:hool Use, Chicago, Scott, Foresman & Co., i8q8 ; "Scandinavian Influ- 



96 ADMINISTRATION AND INSTRUCTION 

ence in the English Romantic Movement/' Vol. VIII. of Studies and 
Notetf in Literature and Philology, Boston, Ginn & Co., 1903. 

Married 5 Aug. 1903, Mrs. Amy El well Crane (see Faculty Record, Sop. 
College of Fine Arts. ) 

Residence, Simmon's College. Boston, Mass. 

1899 HARRY MONMOUTH SMITH 

Born 31 Aug. 1868 at Middletown, Conn. Student at Wesleyan UniTer- 
sity. Ben. A.B. (Wesleyan) 1891. A.M. (same) 1894. Ph.D. (Heidd- 
berg) 1898. 

Instructor in Chemistry, College of Liberal Arts, Syracuse University, 
1899-1900. Associate Professor of Chemistry, Same, 1900-1. Professor of 
Chemistry, Same, since 1901. 

Has published " Kryoskopische Untersuchnngen,** Heidelberg, J. 
Hoerning, 1898. 

Residence, 701 University Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

1899 HERBERT MORSE BURCHARD 

Born 16 July 1869 at Hamilton, N. Y. Student in Colgate University. 
AKE. A.B. (Colgate) 1891. * B K. A.M. (Same) 1894. Ph.D. (Uni- 
versity of Chicago.) 1900. 

Professor of Mathematics and Sciences, Ives Seminary, Antwerp, N. Y., 
1891-Feb. 1892. Professor of Mathematics, Cook Academy, Montour Falls, 
N. Y., Feb. 1892-1894. Prirfcipal and Professor of Greek, Wayland Acad- 
emy, Beaver Dam, Wis., 1894-6. Graduate Student, University of Chicago, 
1896-7. Fellow in Greek, Same, 1897-9 

Instructor in Greek, Syracuse University, 1899-1900. Associate Professor 
of Greek, Same, 1900-1. Professor in Greek, Same, since 1901. 

Thesis for Doctor's degree : " The Influence of Homer on Palatine 
Anthology." 

Married 28 June 1893 Minnie E. White of Skaneateles, N. Y. 

Residence, Haven Hall, Syracuse, N. Y. 

1899 GEORGE ARTHUR WILSON 

Bom 17 Mar. 1864 at Wabash. Ind. Student from Wabash at Boston 
University, 1887-91. Ben. Ph.B. S.T.B. (Boston) 1893. Ph.D. (Boston) 
1898. 

Student in Jena and Berlin, 1896-7, as Jacob Sleeper Fellow, Boston Uni- 
versity, School of Theology. 

Clergyman, Meth. Epis. Pastor at Muncie, Ind., 1893-5. Acting Pro- 
fessor of Philosophy, Dickinson College, 1898-9. Instructor in Philosophy, 
College of Liberal Arts, Syracuse University, 1899-1900. Associate Pro- 
fessor of Philosophy, Same, 1900-2. Professor of Logic and Metaphysics, 
Same, since 1902. 

Married 6 Aug. 1902, Winifred Warren, Ph.D., of Cambridge, Mass. 

Residence, Comstock Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

1894 DELMER EDWARD HAWKINS 1896 

1900 
See A1.UMNI Record, No. 1227 and Faculty Record, p. 152, College of 

Liberal Arts. 



ADMINISTRATION AND INSTRUCTION 97 

SUPPLEMBNT : Instructor in Political Economy, College of Liberal 
Arts, Syracose University, 1 900-1. Associate Professor of Political Eco- 
nomy, Same, 1901-2. Professor of Political Economy, Same, since 1902. 

Residence, 310 Walnut Place, Syracuse, N. Y. 

1895 JEAN MARIE RICHARDS 

See Alumni Rscord, p. 153. 

SUPPI.EMBNT : Instructor in English, College of Liberal Arts, Syracuse 
University, 1895-1900. Associate Professor of English, Same, 1900-3. Pro- 
fessor of English, Same, since 1903. 

Residence, 604 University Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 



ASSOCIATE AND ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

1899 SAMUEL NEWTON TAYLOR 1901 
Pb.B. (Wesleyan) 1887. AA*. Ph.D. (Clark) 1896. In practical electri- 
cal work at the head of an experimental laboratory for the Thomson-Hous- 
ton Co. for four years. While teaching the Natural Sciences at the Maine 
Wesleyan Sem. was awarded a Fellowship in t'hysics at Clark Univ., Wor- 
cester, Mass., and held competitive Fellowships in that institution for two 
years. Professor of Physics, Purdue University, three years. 

Associate Professor of Physics, College of Liberal Arts, Syracuse Univer- 
citj, 1899-1901. Subsequently a student at Erlangen, Germany, doing 
research work. 

Residence, Goethestrasse 64, Erlangen, Germany. 

1900 WARREN GARDNER BULLARD 

Bom 25 Feb. 1867 at Hinsdale, N. Y. Student from Geneva, N. Y., at 
Brown University, 1888-92. A.B. * B K. Ph.D. (Clark) 1896. 

Instructor in Mathematics, Elmira (N. Y.) Free Academy, 1892-3. Same, 
St. Lawrence University, Feb.-June 1894. Graduate student, Clark Uni- 
versity, 1893-6. Instructor in Mathematics, University of Vermont, 1896- 
19C0. Same, College of Liberal Arts, Syracuse University, 1 900-1. Asso- 
ciate Professor of Mathematics, Same, since 1901. 

Has published " On the General Classification of Plane Quartic Curves,'* 
Math, Rev. Vol. I. 

Residence, 100 Waverly Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

1900 FREDERICK DOUGLAS LOSEY 

Bom 28 Nov. 1866 at Conesus, N. Y. A.B. (University of Rochester) 
1891. A ^. Bachelor of Elocution (National School of Oratory, Phila.) 
1894. A.M. (Harvard) 1899. 

Public Reader, 1891-8. Instructor in English, College of Liberal Arts, 
Syracuse University, 1900-1. Associate Professor of English, Same, 1901-4. 
Profesfor of Rhetoric and Public Speaking, 1904. 

Married 25 May 1890, Marie L. Hale of Rochester, N. Y. 

Residence, Comstock Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 



98 ADMINISTRATION AND INSTRUCTION 

i«97 EDWARD HENRY KRAUS 1899 

1901 1902 

See Ai,UMNi Rbcord, No. 1383 and Faculty Record, p. 157, College of Lib- 
eral Arts. 

Correction and Supplbmbnt : Ph.D. (University of Munich) 1901. 

Graduate Student and Assistant in German and Mineralogy, College of 
Liberal Arts, Syracuse University 1896-7. Instructor in German and Miner- 
alogy, Same, 1897-9. Graduate student, University of Munich, Germany, 
1899-1901. Instructor in Mineralogy, Syracuse University, 1901-Jan. 1902. 
Associate Professor of Mineralogy, Same Jan. 1902-June 1902. Head of 
the Dept. of Science, High School, Syracuse, N. Y., since (90a. 

Ha« published ** Ueber Fedorowit'* (with Prof. C. Viola, Rome, Italy.) 
Zeiischrift fur Krysiallographie, etc , Munich, 1901, Vol. 33, 36-38 ; •* Ueber 
eigenthiimlich verzerrte Salmiakkrystalle,** Munich, 1901, Vol. 33, 160; 
** Ueber Kaliumquecksilberchlorid,*' Munich, 1901, Vol. 33, 161; "Die 
Zusammensetzung des Cey loner Mondsteins," Munich, 1901, Vol. 34, 
174-175 ; ** Hussakit, ein neues Mineral, etc.," (with Dr. J. Reitinger, 
Munich), Munich, 1901, Vol. 33, 268-277 ; also American Geolofcisi^ Min- 
neapolis, Vol. 34,46-55; ** Ueber topische Axenverhaltnisse'Mwith Dr. 
G. Mez, Munich), Zeitschrift fur Krysiallographie^ etc., Munich, Vol. 43, 
389-396; ** Ueber einige Salze der seltenen Erden,** Munich, Vol. 34, 

397-433. 
Member American Association for the Advancement of Science ; Am. 

Chem. Society ; Syracuse Chem. Society. Fellow of the Geological Society 

of America. President, 1903, Onondaga Academy of Science. Professor 

of Geology and Geography, Summer School, Syracuse University, 1903. 

Married 1902 Lena Margaret Hoffman, of Syracuse, N. Y. 

Child — Margaret Anna, born 19 May, 1903. 

Residence, 907 E. Adams St., Syracuse, N. Y.* 

1896 WILLIAM MARTIN SMALLWOOD 1898 

1901 

See Alumni Record, No. 1412 and Faculty Record, p. 155, College of 
Liberal Arts. 

Supplement: A.M. (Syracuse) 1897. Ph.D (Harvard) 1902. Profes- 
sor of Biology, Allegheny College, 1898-1900. Graduate Student, Harvard 
University, 190C-1. Associate Professor of Zoology, College of Liberil 
Arts, Syracuse University, since 1901. 

Has published *'A contribution to the Morphology of Pennaria tiarella," 
Am. Nat. Vol. xxxiv. No. 397, 1900 ; '* The Centrosome in the Maturation 
and Fertilization of Bulla solitaria,'* Biol. Bull., Vol. ii, No. 4, 1901 ; Tbe 
Maturation, Fertilization and Early Cleavage of Bulla solitaria, Bull, 
Mus. Comp, ZooL, Harvard College. (In Press.) 

Married 6 Sept., 1899, Mabel Sarah Coon (No. 1361) of Oswego, N. Y. 

Child, Harold Stephen, born 20 Dec, 190 1. 

Residence, 609 Walnut Ave., Syracuse N. Y. 



ADMINISTRATION AND INSTRUCTION 99 

WILLIAM ERASTUS TAYLOR 1904 

CNi Rbcord, No. ii77and Faculty Record, p. 156, College of 
5. See also Faculty Record, Sup., College of Applied Science. 
BNT : Instructor in Mathematics, College of Liberal Arts, Syra- 
rsity, 1897-1902. Associate Professor of Mathematics, Same, 
le. College of Applied Science, 1903-4. Professor of Mathe- 
le, since Jan. 1904. 
;o June 1903, Mabel Wright Smith (See non-graduates) of Syra- 

e, 722 Irving Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

ARTHUR SAYLES PATTERSON 

>ct. 1873 at Carlisle, O. Ph.B.(Oberlin)i895. A.M. (Harvard) 

X (Greenoble) 1903. 

r in Natural Science, High School, Atlanta, 111., 1895-6. Asst. 
University of Illinois, 1896-7. Graduate student, Harvard 
1897-8. Principal, High School, Atlanta* 111., 1898-9. Instruc- 

ance Languages, College of Liberal Arts, S3'racuse University, 
Associate Professor of French, Same, since 1902. Abroad on 

;ence studying in France 1902-3. 

ished '* L 'Influence d 'Edgar Allan Poe sur Charles Baudelaire.'* 

1$ Aug. 1903, I. Marie Langdon of Saint Clair, Neb. 

e, 314 S. Beech St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

FREDERICK ALBERT SAUNDERS 

ronto) 1895. Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins) 1899. 
r in Physics. Haverford College, 1899-1901. Instructor in Phys- 
of Liberal Arts. Syracuse University, 190 1-2. Associate Pro- 
lysics. Same, since 1902. 

ished *'Note on the Radiation of a Black Body " (jointly with 
lenhill),/. //. Univ, Circ, June, 1898 ; Note on the Absorption 
e Ultra-red," ibid,, June, 1898 ; *< On the Radiation of a Black 
ntly as above), Astrophys. Jour,, Jan. 1901 ; •* Note on a New 
idiometer," ibid,, Sept., 190 1. 
e, Comstock Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

CURTIS CLARK BUSHNELL 

lug. 1870 at New Haven, Conn Student from New Haven in 
rsity, 1887-1891. A.B. Ph.D. (Yale) 1895. 

of the Classics, University of Cincinnati, Fall term of 1892. 
ry and Henry College, 1893-4. Same, New Haven High Schools, 
me. Union University, 1899-1900. Instructor in Latin, Syra- 
sity, 1 900-1903. Assistant Professor, Same, since 1903. 
lished ** Readings from Latin Poetry," New Haven, 1901 ; 
from Latin Verse," New Haven, 1902 ; *'A Study of Browning's 
n," Transac, Atner, Phil. Assoc, Vol. 32 ; "A Note on Seneca, 
-382," ibid,. Vol. 33; "The First Four Feet of the Dactylic 



689458 



lOO ADMINISTRATION AND INSTRUCTION 

Hexameter of Horace's Satires.*' ibid,^ Vol. 33; **A Parallel between 
Lacan and Wordsworth," Am. /our. Philology, Nov., 1903 ; Book Reviewi, 
Jour, Pedagogy, Apr., 1903. 

Residence, 201 Dell St., Syracuse. N. Y. 

1899 MARY J. O'BRYON (SfBLEY) 

See Alumni Record, No. 914 and Faculty Record, p. 158, College of Lib- 
eral Arts. 

SUPPLBMBNT : Assistant Librarian, Syracuse University, since 1892. 
Instructor in Cataloguing and Bibliography, Same, 1900-3. Associate 
Professor of Bibliography, Same, since 1903. 

Residence, 773 Irving Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

1901 JOSEPH EDWARD KIRKWOOD 

Bom 24 Jan. 1872 at Cedar Rapids, la. Student from Veronia, Oregon, at 
Pacific University, 1894-8. A.B. A.M. (Princeton) 1902. Ph.D. (Columbia) 
1903. Graduate Student (Special Fellow in Biology) Princeton University, 
1898-9. Student at Columbia University, 1899- 1 901. Assistant in Botany, 
Columbia Univ. Summer Sch , 1900. Assistant in Biology, Teacher's Col- 
lege, Columbia Univ., Sept. 1900- Jan. 1901. Instructor in Botany, Syracuse 
University, Jan. 1901-June 1903. Associate Professor of Botany, same since 

1903. 
Has published '* The Composition of the Plant Body," Chapter ix of Mac 

Dougals' Text-Book 0/ Plant Physiology ; '*The Chemical Composition of 

the Cocoanut with notes on Changes during Germination," Bull, Tor, Bot. 

Club, June, 1902 ; "Vegetation of Northwestern Oregon," Torreya, Sept-, 

1902 ; "The Cocoanut, its Composition and Germination," School Science, 
Jan. 1903 : "The Value of Research in Botany," Proc, N, V, Stale Science 
Teachers Assoc, 1902. 

Member American Assoc, for Advancement of Science ; Society for Plant 
Morphology and Physiology ; Torrey Botanical Club ; Onondaga Academy 
of Science ; Biological Assoc, of Syracuse University. 

Married 28 June 1901 Ella B. Hoyt of Hillsboro, Oregon. 

Child. — Robert Hoyt, born 27 Feb. 1903. 

Residence, 112 Raynor St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

1901 PERLEY OAKLAND PLACE 

Born 25 Nov. 1872 at Oakland, Cal. Student at Dartmouth College. 
eAX. A.B.(Dartmouth)i893. A.B. (Harvard) 1 894. A.M (Dart mouth) 1896. 

Graduate student, Harvard University, 1893-4 and 1897-8. Teacher of 
Latin and Greek. Little Rock Academy, Little Rock, Ark., 1894-7. Classi- 
cal Master, High School, Brookline, Mass., 1898- 1901. Instructor in 
Latin, College of Liberal Arts, Syracuse University, 1901-3. Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Latin, Same, since 1903. 

Married 12 July, 1899, Harriette E. Stanton, of Jamaica Plain, Boston, 
Mass. 

Residence, 1204 E. Adams St., Syracuse, N. Y. 



ADMINISTRATION AND INSTRUCTION lOI 

1903 ALBERT MOORE REESE 

Bom I Apr. 1872 at Lake Roland, Md. Student from Lake Roland at 
Johns Hopkins Uniyersity, 1889-1902. Ben. A.B. Ph.D. (Johns Hop- 
kins) 1900. 

Instructor in Science in Preparatory Schools, Baltimore and Phila., 
1892-7. Graduate Student, Johns Hopkins University, 1895-96 and 1897- 
1900. University Scholar, Same, 1900 Lecturer in Southern Homoeo- 
pathic Medical College, Baltimore, 1894-6, 1899-1900. . Instructor in His- 
tology and Embryology, Penna. College, 1898. Professor of Biology and 
Geology, Allegheny College, 1901-2. Instructor in Histology and 
Embryology, College of Liberal Arts, Syracuse University, 1902-3. Asso- 
ciate Professor of Histology and Embryology, Same, since 1903. Lec- 
turer on Histology and Embryology, College of Medicine, Same, since 1902. 

Has published ''Lampreys in Captivity," Biological Bulletin, Vo\, I. 
No. 3 ; "Artificial Incubation of Alligator Egg<t,*' Amer, Naturalist^ 
Mar. 1901 ; *'The Nasal Passages of the Florida Alligator," /V^r. ^oz^. 
Nat. Sc. of Phila., July 1901 ; "Structure and Development of the Thyroid 
Gland in Petromyzon," ibid,^ Mar. 1902; " Habits of the Giant Salaman- 
der," P&pularSc, Monthly^ Apr. 1903. 

Residence, 709 Crouae Ave. Syracuse, N. Y. 

INSTRUCTORS 

1894 EDWARD JOHN REDINGTON 1900 
See Alumni Record, p. 152. 

Supplbmrnt: Instructor in Latin, College of Liberal Arts, Syracuse 
University, 1894-1900. Student in Law Dep't., Columbia University, 
1900-3. LL.B. (Columbia) 1903. With Hatch, Keever andClute, 100 Broad- 
way, New York, N. Y. 

Residence, 100 Broadway, New York, N. Y. 

1895 CHARLES HUMPHREY TREADWELL, JR. 1899 
See Alumni Rbcord, No. 1338 and Faculty Record, p. 154, College of 

Liberal Arts. 

CORRBcnoNS and Supplbmbnt : Graduate student, Syracuse Univer- 
sity, 1895-9. Instructor in Physics, College of Liberal Arts, Syracuse Uni- 
versity, 1895-6. Assistant in Physics, Same, 1896-7. Instructor in 
Physics and Chemistry, Same, 1897-9. 

Residence, 361 E. 45th St., Chicago, 111. 

1897 RALPH EMERSON BASSETT 1899 
See Alumni Rbcobd, p. 155. 

SUPPLBMBNT: Instructor in the Romance Languages and Literatures, 
College of Liberal Arts, S3rracuse University, 1897-9. 
Residence, 

1898 ANSEL AUGUSTUS TYLER 1899 
See Alumni Rbcord, p. 156. 

SUPPLBMBNT : Instructor in Botany, College of Liberal Arts, Syracuse 

T*«ti«»rttifv tRo51-o 



loa ADMINISTRATION AND INSTRUCTION 

1897 CHARLES GARDNER ROGERS 1902 

See Ai,UMNi Rbcord, No. 1501 and Pacalty Record, p. 157, College of 
Liberal Arts. 

Suppi«BMBNT : A M. (Syracuse) 1899. Graduate Studeut, Syracuse Uni- 
versity, 1897-9. Assistant in Biology, College of Liberal Arts, Syracuse 
University, 1897-9. Instructor in Biology, Same, 1899-1902. Assistant io 
Physiology, Univ. of Chicago, Autumn Quarter, 1902 ; Uniy, of California 
since i Jan., 1903. . 

Has published '*The Alcyonariaof Porto Rico,** (jointly with Dr. Hargitt). 

Residence, 2230 College Ave., Berkeley, Cal. 

1899 JOHN GAYLORD COULTER 1901 

Bom 20 July, 1876 at Hanover, Ind. Student from Crawfordsville, Ind. 
at Lake Forest University. A.B. (Lake Forest) 1895. BGII. Ph.D. 
(University of Chicago) 1900. 

Instructor in Botany, College of Liberal Arts, Syracuse University, 1899- 

190 1. Botanist, for Govt., of Philippine Islands, 1902-3. 
Married 21 May, 1903, Florence West, of Syracuse, N. Y. 
Residence, Manila, Philippine Islands. 

1899 . JOHN ARCHIBOLD BOLE 1902 

Born 26 June 1869 at Sandy Creek, Pa. A.B.(Geneva College)i8S8. 
Ph.D. (University of Penna.) 1903. 

Graduate student, Johns Hopkins University, 1891-2 and 1894-5. Student 
at Berlin, 1893 ; at Bonn, 1895. Instructor in German and French, Beaver 
College, 1895-7. Assistant Principal of High School, Beaver, Pa., 1897-9. 
Instructor in German, College of Liberal Arts, Syracuse University, 1899- 

1902. Graduate student, University of Penna., 1902-3. Teacher of Ger- 
man, Eastern District High School, Brooklyn, since 1903. 

Thesis for Doctor's degree '* The Harmony Society, a Chapter in the 
History of German-American Culture." 

Residence, E. Dist. High School, Driggs Ave. and S. 3d St., Brooklyn 
N. Y. 

1899 ALBERT MONROE SAWIN 1900 

Born 3 Apr. 1858 at Brooklyn, Wis. Student at University of Wisconsin, 
1877-82. B.S. M.S.(i883). B.D.(N-W Univ.) 1894. 

Graduate student at the N. Western an.i at Johns Hopkins Universities. 

Professor of Mathematics, Wyoming State Univ., 1887-92. Asst. in 
Math , Mankato State Normal School, two years. Instructor in Math., 
N. Western Univ., Prep. Dept Professor of Math., Clark Univ., Atlanta, 
Ga.. 1897-9. Instructor in Mathematics, College of Liberal Arts, Syracuse 
University, 1899- 1900. 

Has published in Science , "Solution of Cubic Equations" ; in \h^ Annals 
of Mathematics,'' Solution of the Quartic Equation," ** Sylvester's Ternary 
Cubic Forms," '* On the Algebraical Solution of Equations,** and *' Lagran- 
ge's Sextic.** 



ADMINISTRATION AND INSTRUCTION IO3 

ber American Mathematical Society. 

ied 23 June 1885, Josephine Alice Hull of Bvansville, Wis. 

iren, — Lester Monroe, born 6 Nov., 1886. 

Genevieve, born 11 Dec., 1890. 
lenoe, 

PAXIL EMIL WEITHAASE 190a 

I Oct. 1866 at Reichenbach in Voigtland, Kingdom of Saxony, 
ay. A.B. 1898. A.M. (Bucknell) 1899. 
nctor in German, College of Liberal Arts, Syracuse University, 

ied 30 Aug. 1894, Helen E. Jesson. 
lence, 

HERMON CHARLES COOPER 
22 Nov. 1875 at Glen Ellyn, 111. Student from Glen Ellyn at 
College, 1892-6. Ph.B. A.M. (Beloit) 1899. Ph.D. (Heidelberg) 

pendent research student, Univ. of Chicago, 1899-1900. Instructor 
mistry. High School, Lincoln, Neb., 1900-1. Instructor in Chemis- 
llege of Liberal Arts, Syracuse University, since 1901. On leave of 
t as Research Associate in Physical Chemistry, Mass. Inst, of Tech., 

published ** I. Versuche ueber die Loeslichkeit der Carvozime ; 
ir Kentnia der Benzhydrylamine,'' Heidelberg, J. Hoerning, 1899, 
iral-Dissertation) ; ** A text-book of Inorganic Chemistry,*' by Dr. 
lolleman, rendered into English. 8vo. viii-f-458 pp., New York, 
^iley & Sons, 1902; *' Versuche ueber die Loeslichkeit der Carvox- 
emeinschaftlich mit Heinrich Goldschmidt)." Zts. /, Phys, Chem, 
\ Leipzig, 1898; '* Stereoisomers and Racemic Compounds,'* ^m. 
/our. Vol. xxiii.. No. 3, 1900; An Introductory Science Course for 
ary Schools." 5icA. Rev,, 1931, also Sch, and Home Educ., 1901 ; 
lay's Law and the Theory of Electrons," Electro-Chem. Industry^ 
5, Phila., 1903 ; ** New Terms in Chemistry," Science, xviii., No. 44, 

lence, 205 Waverly Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

EDWIN REGUR SWEETLAND 1903 

10 Jan. 1875 at Dryden, N. Y. Student from Dryden at Cornell 
sity. ?-i895. ♦PA. B.S. Sphinx Head. Ph.M. (Syracuse) 
Coach of football team, Hamilton College, 1899. Crew and foot- 
lach, Syracuse University, Feb. 1900- Jan. 1903. Instructor in athlet- 
racuse University, 1901-3. 
deuce, Dryden, N. Y. 

EDWIN PLATT TANNER 1903 

1 12 Dec. 1874 at Paterson, N. J. Student from Paterson at Colum- 
liversity. A.B. 1897 and A.M. 1898. 

owin American History, Columbia University, 1898-1900. Instructor 



104 ADMINISTRATION AND INSTRUCTION 

in History, High School, Stillwater, Minn., 1900-1. Fellow and Assistant 
in American History, College of I^iberal Arts, Syracuse University, i90[-5. 
Fellow and Instructor in same, 1902-3. Instructor in History, Adelphi 
College, Brooklyn, N. Y., since 1903. 

Has published an article on ** Colonial Agency in England during the 
Bighteenth Century,*' Pol,Sc. Quar., Mar. 1901. 

Residence, 383 Greene Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

1902 HAROLD PENDER 1903 

Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins). 

Instructor in Physics, College of Liberal Arts, Syracuse University, 
1902-3. 

Has published ** On the Magnetic Effect of Electrical Convection,** fkil. 
Mag. p. 169. 1901-2 ; also on same subject, Phys, Rev.^ xv., p. 291. 

Residence, 
1902 MORRIS PALMER TILLEY 

Born 7 Feb., 1876. Student at the University of Virginia. ♦PA. B.A. 
1897. M.A. (Univ. of Va.) 1899. Ph.D. (Leipzig) 1902. 

Student at the University of Gottingen, 1899-1900 ; at the University of 
Leipzig, 1900-2. 

Teacher of German and English, Norfolk (Va.) Male Academy, 1897-8. 
Asst. in English Literature, University of Virginia, 1898-9. Instructor is 
German, College of Liberal Arts, Syracuse University, 1902-3. Instructor 
in English, Same, since 1903. 

Residence, 114 Waverly Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

1902 EARL EVELYN SPERRY 

See Alumni Rhcord, No. 1618. 

SuPPLBMSNT : Ph.D. (Columbia) 1903. Graduate student, Columbia 
University, 1899-1901. Student in Europe, 1901-2. Instructor in Bnro- 
pean History, College of Liberal Arts, Syracuse University, since 1902. 

Has published *' History of Clerical Celibacy in Western Europe,'* (Doc- 
tor's dissertation), 1903. 

Residence, 1305 E. Genesee St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

1902 JOHANNES LASSEN BOYSEN 

Born 20 Feb. 187 1 at Loitkirkeby, Schleswig, Germany, Student from 
Minneapolis, Minn., at Harvard University, 1894-8. A.B. 

Teacher of Ancient and Modern languages, Prot. Epis. Acad., Phil., Pa., 
1898-1902. Instructor in German, College of Liberal Arts, Syracuse Uni- 
versity, since 1902. 

Married i Oct. 1902, Catherina Boysen of Lake Bluff, 111. 

Residence, 112 Raynor st., Syracuse, N. Y. 

1902 ROLAND CLAIR DRYER 

Son of No. 214 
Born 21 Feb. 1877, at Springville, N. Y. Student from Rochester, N. Y., 
at the University of Rochester, three years between 1893 and 1902. Two 
yeais were spent in Germany and one year in Italy and France. A K B. A.B. 
(U. of Roch. ) 1902. 



▲DBnNISTRATlON AND INSTRUCTION IQ5 

Instructor in Modern Languages, Cayuga Lake Military Academy 
1897-9. Instructor in German. Cascadilla School, 1900- 1. Instructor in 
Romance Languages, College of Liberal Arts, Syracuse University, since 
1902. 

Residence, 737 Crouse ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

1902 ROYAL ARTHUR PORTER 

Bom 8 Feb. 1877 at Adair, 111. Student at N. W. University, ?-i90i. B. 
S. M.S. (N. Western) 1902. 

Fellow in Physics, North Western Univ., 1901-2. Special student, 
Mass. Inst. Technology, 1902. Instructor in Physics, College of Liberal 
Arts, Syracuse University, since 1902. 

Has published ** The Influence of Atmospheres of Nitrogen and Hydro- 
gen on the Arc Spectra of Iron, Zinc, Magnesium and Tin, Compared with 
the Influence of an Atmosphere of Ammonia." Astrophys, Jour, xv., p. 275 
and Proc, Am. Acad,^ Arts and Sciences, xxxviii., p. 373. 

Residence, 8o8 08trom Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

1903 HORACE AINSWORTH EATON 
Bom 1871 at Quincey. Mass. 

A.B. (Harvard) 1893. « B K. A.M. (Same) 1897. Ph.D. (Same) 1900. 

Instructor in English, University of Vermont, 190 1-3. Same, College of 
Liberal Arts, Syracuse University, 1903-4. Associate Professor, Same, since 
1904. 

Married 1902 Emily Russell Lovett of Brookline, Mass. 

Child ^ Rebecca, Born 11 June 1903. 

Residence, 607 Walnut Ave,, Syracuse, N. Y, 

1903 ERICH WALTER OTTO 

Bom 26 May 1880 at Leipzig, Germany. Ph.D. (Univ. of Leipzig) 1903. 

Was Librarian of the Germanistisches Institute, University of Leipzig. 
Instructor in German, College of Liberal Arts, Syracuse University, since 

1903. 
Has published ** William Cullen Bryant's Works (translation of Homer, 

Bryant's Relation to German Literature)," in German. Leipzig, T. T. 

Weber, 1903 ; ** The Student of Modem Philology Abroad," Neuphilolo- 

giscke Blatter, Leipzig, 1902, 

Residence, 112 Raynor St., Syracuse, N, Y. 

1903 NORMAN ARMIN DUBOIS 

Bom 25 Dec. 1877 at Pall River, Mass. Student from Fall River at Mass. 
Inst, of Tech., 1897-1901. Z X. B.S. A.M. (Brown) 1903. 

Instructor in Chemistry, Brown University, 1901-3, 

Instructor in Chemistry, College of Liberal Arts, Syracuse University, 
since 1903. 

Residence, 405 Euclid Ave., Syracuse, N, Y. 

ORLANDO SAMUEL STETSON 
Bom 6 Aug. 1877 at Boston, Mass, Student from Franklin, Mass., at 
Dartmouth College. B.S. (Dartmouth) 1 901. « B K. 



I06 ADMINISTRATION AND INSTRUCTION 

Civil Engineer, Worcester Polytechnic, 1896-8, Scholar and Janior Fel- 
low in Mathematics. Clark Univ., 1898-1900. Senior Fellow, Same, 1901-2. 
Teacher of Mathematics, Syracuse Classical School, 1902-3. Instructor in 
Mathematics, College of Liberal Arts, Syracuse Univ., since 1905. 

Has published ** Triangular Residues.** Dartmouth, 1901. 

Member of Socidt^ Mathematique de France ; of Deutscher Mathe 
matiker-Vereinigung. 

Married i Jan. 1903, Flora E. Dearborn Clarke of Worcester, Mass. 

Residence, 100 Waverly Ave., Syracuse. N. Y, 

ASSISTANTS 

1896 EUGENE RANDOLPH SMITH 1897 
i8qS 1899 

See Alumni Record, No. 1414 and Faculty Record,p. 155, College of 
Liberal Arts. 

Correction and Supplbmbnt : Assistant in Mathematics, College of 
Liberal Arts, Syracuse University, 1896-7 and 1898-9. 

Residence, Montclair, N.J. 

1897 SARAH NEWCOMB GRAHAM 1898 
See Alumni Rbcord, No. 1460 and p. 157 ; also Facalty Record, College 

of Fine Arts. 

1900 ♦FRED WALKER SHERMAN 1901 

Brother of Nos. 3188 and 3378 

Born 16 Nov. 1877 at South Onondaga, N. Y. Student from Collamer, 
N. Y. and Onondaga,N. Y., 1896-1900. A.B. « B K. A.M. (Romance Lan- 
guages) 1901. 

Graduate student, Syracuse University, 1900-1. Assistant in Romance 
Languages, College of Liberal Arts, Syracuse University, 1900-1. Teacher 
of Languages, Greenville, Mich., 1901-2. 

Died 10 Aug. 1902 at Onondaga, N. Y. 

1900 HORATIO BURT WILLIAMS 1902 

Bom 17 Sept. 1877 at Utica, N. Y. Student from Utica, 1896-1900. "¥ T. 

A.B. 
Assistant in Machine Shop, College of Liberal Arts, Syracuse University, 

1900-2. Student in College of Medicine, Syracuse University, since 

1901. 
Residence, 404 E. Willow st., Syracuse, N. Y. 

1900 LEONARD ERNEST YOUNG 1901 

Born 10 Mar. 187 1 at Darien, N. Y. Student from Darien, 1895-9. BOB. 
B.S. M. S.( Chemistry) 1901. 

Teacher of Science, High School, Shamokin, Pa. 1899-1900. Graduate 
student, Syracuse University, 1 900-1. Assistant in Chemistry, College of 
Liberal Arts, Syracuse University, 1900-1. Teacher of Chemistry and 
Physics, High School, Camden, N. J., 1901-3. Manufacturer of photographic 
chemicals and papers, Syracuse, N. Y. , since 1903. 



ADMINISTRATION AND INSTRTTCTION IO7 

ed 28 Aag. 1901, Mary Rath Stevens of Gainesville, N. Y., who 

Sept. 1902. 

ence, 135 Wood Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

FREDERICK BIRD JONES 1901 

29 Sept. 1877 at Auburn, N. Y. Student from Auburn at Colgate 
ity. « K Sk. A.B. 1898. A.M. (Columbia) 1899. 
ictor in Latin, Greek and French, Lakewood, N. J., 1899-1900. 
:e student, Syracuse University, 1900-1. Assistant in Latin, College 
ral Arts, Syracuse University, 1900-1, Principal, High School, 
Domfield, N. Y., since 1901. 

ed 15 July 1902, Katharine Harden of Bellona, N. Y. 
ence. East Bloomfield, N. Y. 

EDITH MORTON PACKARD 1901 

xuMNi Record, No. 1496. 

;bmbnT : Teacher of English and History, High School, Rome, 

899-1900. Assistant in English, College of Liberal Arts, Syracuse 

ity, 1900-1 and since 1902. 

ence, 303 University Place, Syracuse, N. Y. 

MARY ETHEL ABBOTT 
LUMNi Record, No. 836. 

«BMBNT : Certificate in Library Economy, 1898. Assistant is 
, Syracuse University, since 1900, 
ence, 1316 Madison St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

MINNIE LUELLA ROBERTS 
17 Sept. 1878 at West Bzeter, N. Y. Student from West Exeter, 
ifield H. S.) in the Course in Library Economy, 1898-1900. Certifi- 
Library Economy. 

Ant in Library, Syracuse University, since 1900. 
ence, 306 Waverly Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

EMMA AURELIA LEE (WALKER) 1901 

27 Nov. 1879 A^ Darien, N. Y. Student from Darien (Attica H. S.) 
lonrse in Library Economy, 1898-1900. Certificate in Library Econ- 
Assistant in Library, Syracuse University, 1900-1. 
ed 16 Oct. 1901, Clifford Prescott Walker, 
ence, 538 Wall St., Los Angeles, Cal. 

MILTON BIGLER WISE 1902 

17 Oct. 1S77 at Philadelphia, Pa. Student from Philadelphia at the 
ity of Pennsylvania, 1895-9. A.B. A.M. (Univ. of Penna.) 1900. 
Bon Scholar of History, Univ. of Pa., 1 899-1900 ; University Scholar, 
900-1. Fellow and Assistant in European History, College of Lib- 
s, Syracuse University, 1901-2. Professor of the English Language 
srature, Bridgewater College, Bridgewater, Va., 1902-3. Instructor 
try and English, High School, Newark, O., since 1903. 



I08 ADMINISTRATION AND INSTRUCTION 

Assisted Professor Dana C. Monro (Univ. of Wisconsin) in writing articles 
on Medieval and Old English History for the new International. 
Residence, Newark, O^ 

1901 MARY JOSEPHINE HASBROUCK 

Bom 12 Apr. 1880 at Syracuse, N. Y. Stndent from Syracuse, 1896-1900. 

Ph.B. 
Preceptress, Munro Collegiate Institute, 1 900-1. Graduate student, Sym* 

cuse University, since 190 1. Assistant in English, College of Liberal Arts, 

Syracuse University, since 1901. 
Residence, 604 S. Salina St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

1901 CLARA ADELLE CURTISS \^ 

Born 25 Sept. 1866. Student from Lyons, N. Y., at Syracuse University* 

College of Liberal Arts, 1893-5. Student at the University of Michigan^ 

?-i900. A.B. (U. of Mich.) 

Graduate student, Syracuse University, 190 1-2. Assistant in English, 

College of Liberal Arts, Syracuse University, 1901-2. 
Residence, Lyons, N. Y. 

1901 CARRIE AUGUSTA HILTS Vfm 

Born 17 Sept. 1876 at Cape Vincent, N. Y. Student from Cape Vincent, 

1897-1901. Ph.B. ^BK. A.B. A.M. (Romance Languages) 1902. 
Graduate student, Syracuse Uuiversity, 1901-2. Assistant in Romance 

Languages, College of Liberal Arts, Syracuse University, 1901-2. Precep* 

tress, Union School, Oriskany, N. Y., 1902-3 ; Sandy Creek, N. Y., since 

1903. 
Residence, Sandy Creek, N. Y. (Home address, Cape Vincent, N. Y.) 

1901 GEORGE LEE PHELPS 190a 

Bom 20 Nov. 1878 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, 1896^ 
1900. A.B. ^ B K. A.M. (Latin) 1902. 

Teacher, High School, Moravia, N. Y., 1930-1. Graduate student, Syra* 
cuse University, 1901-2. Assistant in Latin. College of Liberal Arts, 
Syracuse University, 1901-2. Teacher, High School, Oswego, N. Y.i 
since 1902. 

Married 26 Nov. 1902. Lena Hattie Britton (see Non-graduates) of Syra- 
cuse, N. Y. 

Residence, Oswego, N. Y. 

1901 ALBERT JOHN MAY 

Bom 5 Oct. 1880 at Buffalo, N. Y. Student from Union City, Pa., in 
Allegheny College, 1897-1901. ^ K 4^. A.B. (Allegheny) 1901. tBK. 
A.M. (Biology, Syracuse) 1902. 

Graduate student, Syracuse University, 1901-2. 

Assistant in Biology, College of Liberal Arts, Syracuse University, since 
1901. 

Assistant in Physics, Chautauqua Summer School, since 1899. 

Has published **The Morphology and Development of Corymorpha Pes- 
dula, Ag.,*' American Naturalist^ June, 1903. 

Residence, 113 College Place, Syracuse, N. Y. 



ADMINISTRATION AND INSTRUCTION IO9 

' 1901 CHARLES HENRY McLAURY 1902 

r Born II Jane 1874 at Deposit, N. Y. Student from Deposit 1 895-1900, 

I four years. A.B. A.M. (Latin) 1902. 

» Instmctor in Latin and Greek, Western Reserve Sem., Ohio, 1 900-1. 

, Graduate student. Syracose University, 1 901-2. Assistant in Library, 

f Sjracnse University, 1901-2. Head of Dept. of Latin, Vincennes Univer- 

' Bty, fince 1902. 

^ Residence, Vincennes, Ind. 

19M HARRY SHERIDAN LEE 1904 

Bom 5 Jan. 1877 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, 1895-9. 

A KB. A.B. LL.B. (Syracuse) 1901. 
Lawyer at Syracuse, N. Y. since 1901. Assistant in Latin, College of 

Liberal Arts, Syracuse University, 1902-4. 
Residence, 806 S. West St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

19W MABEL CARTER RHOADES 1903 

See Alumni Record, No. 1605. 

Suppx^BMBNT ; Ph. M. (Sociology) 1903. Asst. Sec. Bureau of Labor 
tnd Charities and S.P.C.C. , Syracuse, N. Y. , 1898-9. Teacher, High School, 
Syracuse, N. Y., Feb. 1900-Feb. 1901. Mantanye Fellow in Sociology, 
Syiacuse University, 1902-4. Assistant in Sociology, College of Liberal 
Arts, Syracuse University, 1902-3. Will study in Germany on the 
Mantanye Fellowship, 1903-4. 

Residence, 406 Walnut Place. Syracuse, N. Y. 

m JESSE ELMER McMULLAN 1903 

Bom I July 1858 at Arcadia. Ind. Student at DePauw University. Ph.B. 

^•M. (History, Syracuse) 1903. 
. Graduate student, Syracuse University, 1902-3. Assistant in History, 

College of Liberal Arts, Syracuse University, 1902-3. 
Residence, Marion, Ind. 

1902 ALICE MACDOUGAL WARNER 1903 

Bom 16 Sept. 1880 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Syracuse in the 

Course in Library Economy, Syracuse Unversity, 1900-2. n B *. Certifi- 

^te in Library Economy. 
Assistant in Library, Syracuse University, 1902-3. In New York Public 

Libraries, Summer of 1903. 
Residence, 337 Westcott St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

I902 ANGELYN BERTRICE RANDALL 1904 

Bom 7 Mar. 1880 at Oneida, N. Y. Student from Oneida in the Course 
in Library Economy, Syracuse University, 1899-2. n B ^. Certificate in 
Library Economy. Assistant in Library, Syracuse University, 1902-4. 
Residence, 58 Broad St., Oneida, N. Y. 

I902 MAUDE EMMA BLOOMINGDALE 1903 

Bom 18 Sept. 1881 at Alabama, N. Y. Student from Freedom, N. Y. in 
the Coarse in Library Economy, Syracuse University, 1900-2. Certificate 
in Library Economy. 



no ADMINISTRATION AND INSTRUCTION 

Assistant in Library, Syracuse Universityi 1901-3. Librarian Public 
Library, Keene, N. H., since 1903. 
Residence, Keene. N. H. 

1902 GEORGE LBROY CONNELL 1903 

Brother of Nos. 3956 and 3357 

Bom II Feb. 1878 at Jamesville, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, N. Y., 
1898-1902. XAZ. A.B. A.M. (Greek) 1903. 

Graduate student, Syracuse University, 1902-3. Assistant in Greek, 
College of Liberal Arts, Syracuse University, 1902-3. 

Residence, 1005 E. Genesee St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

1902 JANET LUCINDA KEY AND 1905 

Born 14 Nov. 1878 at Weedsport, N. Y. Student from Weedsport, 1897- 

1901. r*B. Ph.B. 
Teacher, Union School, Weedsport, N. Y., 1901-a. Graduate student, 

Syracuse University, 1902-3. Assistant in English, College of Liberal 

Arts, Syracuse University, 1902-3. 
Residence, Weedsport, N. Y. 

1902 CLARA ELIZABETH WYKER 190^ 

See Alumni Rbcord, No. 1637. 

SUPPLBMBNT : Ph.M. (German) 1903. Graduate student, Syracuse Uni- 
versity, 1902-3. Assistant in German, College of Liberal Arts, Syracuse 
University, 1902-3. 

Residence, Liverpool, N. Y. 

1902 DANIEL PRATT 

Bom 1 87 1 at Dewitt, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, N. Y., at Princetoa 
University, 1890-4. A.B. 

Instructor, High School, East Syracuse, N. Y., 1895-1901. Prindptl* 
High School, Pittsford, N. Y., 1901-2. 

Graduate student, Syracuse University, since 1902. Assistant in Mathe- 
matics, College of Liberal Arts, Syracuse University, since 1902. 

Married 1901 Clara B. Wheeler of East Syracuse, N. Y. 

Child^ Charles, bom 7 Nov. 1903. 

Residence, 729 Ostrom Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

1902 HARRIET LUCILLE BALDWIN (VAN SLYKE) I9P3 

Born 28 Sept. 1879 at Mannsville, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, N. Y., 
1898-1902. KAe. A.B. 

Graduate student, Syracuse University, 1902-3. Assistant in English, 
College of Liberal Arts, Syracuse University, 1902-3. 

Married 31 Dec. 1903, George M. Van Slyke (No. 3019 Sup.) of Brooklyn, 
N. Y. 

Residence, 369 Clinton Place, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

1902 WALTER SUMMERFIELD NORTHCOTT 

Bom 27 Oct. 1865 at Belleville, Out. Can. Student from Belleville, Ont. 

two years at Toronto Univ. Medical School. 
Machinist for the Grand Trunk Railway Co., ten years; for the General 



ADMINISTRATION AND INSTRUCTION III 

Bkctric Co., Ljmn, Mass., one year. Toolmaker for the Wellandvale Mf *g. 
Co., three years. Die-maker for three years. 

Assistant in Physics Machine Shop, College of Liberal Arts, Syracuse 
Univcriity, since 1902. 

Married 3 Sept. 1900 Alice Conner of Chatterton, Ont., Can, 
I Residence, 316 Pine St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

I 19W LEWIS HART WELD 

Bom 30 Dec. 1875 at Ridgeway, N. Y. Student at University of 
Rochester, 1S96-1900. A.B. A.M.(U.of Mich.)i902. 

Assistant in Zoology, University of Michigan, 1900-2. Assistant in 
^^7i College of Liberal Arts, Syracuse University, since Jan. T903. 
Residence, 511 Crouse Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

1901 ALICE REED CLARKE 

Bom 29 May 1857 at Niagara Falls, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, N. Y. 
1900-2. B.L. Ph.B. (1903). 

Student m College of Liberal Arts, 1901-3. Assistant in French, College 
of Liberal Arts, Syracuse University, since 1902. 

Residence, 112 Comstock Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

190a JOHN A. MUNSON 1903 

Bora 1861 at Linkoping, Sweden. A.B. (Central University of Iowa) 
%. A.M.(U. of Mich.) 1894. 

Instructor in German and French, Central University of Iowa, two years. 
Oradoate student, Univ. of Michigan, one year ; Same, University of 
Chicago, one year. Instructor in French, German and Latin, Vincennes 
University, Ind. Student at University of Berlin four years ; at University 
^ Paris, one year. Assistant in French, College of Liberal Arts, Syracuse 
University, part of 1902-3. 

Residence, 
1903 EDWARD DAY CURTIS 

Bom 3 Nov. 1880 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, 1899-1903. 
A.B. «BK. 

Graduate student and Assistant in Greek, Syracuse University, 1903-4. 
Residence, 1408 E. Genesee St , Syracuse, N. Y. 

1903 WILLIAM CHARLES LOWE 

Bom 8 Aug. 1879 at Rochester,N. Y. Student from BufiFalo, N. Y., 1899- 
1903. ♦£♦. Ph. B. 

Graduate student and Assistant in German, Syracuse University, 

19^*3-4. 
Residence 113 College Place, Syracuse, N. Y. 

1903 WILLIAM FREDERICK PROUTY 

Bom 15 Aug. 1879 at Putney, Vt. Student from Putney, 1899-1903. 

«A6. B.S. 
Graduate Student and Assistant in Geology, Syracuse University, 1903-4. 
Residence, 908 Irving Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 



XI2 ADMINISTRATION AND INSTRUCTION 

1903 GEORGE THOMAS HARGITT 

Bom 15 Feb. 1881 at Fairfield, Ind. Student from Syracuse, ] 
Moore*8 Hill College, 1898-9; at Syracuse University, i899-i< 
Ph.B. «BK. A.M. (Univ. Nebraska) 1903. 

Fellow in Zoology, Univ. of Nebraska, 1902-3. 

Graduate student and Assistant in Zoology, Syracuse Universit^i 
Professor of Biology, High School, Poughkeepsie, N. Y. since Jan 

Has published ** Notes on Regeneration of Gonionema,'* Biol, j 
iv.. No. I. J 902. 

Elected to Society of Z X, 1903, University of Nebraska. 

Residence, 73 Hooker Ave., Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 

1903 EDWARD MICHAEL ROEDER 

Bom 2 Sept. 1876 at Warrentou, Mo, Student from St. Louis 

Central Wesleyan College, Warrenton, Mo., 1899-1903. A.B. 
Instructor in Mathematics, Central Wesleyan College, 1902-3. < 

student and Assistant in German, College of Liberal Arts, Syracus< 

sity, since 1903. 
Residence, 333 Crouse Ave. , Syracuse, N. Y. 

1903 CHARLES DRAKE SKINNER 

Bom 31 Aug. 1874 at Milanville, Pa. Student from Milan ville, i! 
A.B. ♦BK. ^ 

Clergyman, Meth. Epis. Pastor at East Solvay, N. Y., 1903. < 
student, and Assistant in Philosophy, College of Liberal Arts, 
University, since 1903. 

Married 10 June 1896, Alberta Harding, of Plainsville, Pa. 

Children, Cora Leila, born 19 Mar. 1898. 
Martha, born 15 Aug. 1900. 

Residence, 224 Lamont Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

1903 LILLIE JANE McMAHON 

Bom 21 Nov. 1880 at Fairport, N. Y. Student from Geneva 
X901-3. Certificate in Library Economy. Catalogued the Genes 
Historical Library. In charge of the University Library, summex 
Assistant in Library, Syracuse University, since 1903. 
Residence, 202 Euclid Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

1903 ROYAL LESLIE HENDERSON 

Bom 31 May 1875 at Collamer. N. Y. Student from CoUamer, il 

B.S. Graduate student and Assistant in Biological Laboratory, C 

Liberal Arts, Syracuse University, since 1903. 
Residence, 104 Raynor St.,. Syracuse, N. Y. 

1903 FLORA BELLE MOYER 

Born 6 Nov. 188 c at Oneida, N. Y. Student from Oneida, 1901 

tificate in Library Economy. 

Assistant in Library, Syracuse University, since 1903. 
Residence, 773 Irving Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 



ADMINISTRATION AND INSTRUCTION II3 

FLORENCE JULIA WHEATON 
Aug. 1881 at Skaneateles, N. Y. Student from Skaneateles, 
ertificate in Library Economy, 
t in Library, Syracuse University, since 1903. 
cc, 729 Ostrom Ave., Syracuse, N. Y, 

CLARA ELIZABETH WARD 
ifNi Record, No. 1185. 

KXNT : ^ B K. Has continued to make contributions to the 
for example, a story, ** Regeneration of Mary Mather/' Lippin- 

t in English, College of Liberal Arts, Syracuse University, since 

ce, 604 Irving Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

KATHARINE SIBLEY 
Feb. 1883 at Chelsea, Mass. 

e of the Posse Normal School of Gymnastics, Boston, 1903. 
t in Gymnasium, Syracuse University, since 1903. 
:c, Winchell Hall, Syracuse, N. Y. 

MARION LESLEY WEST 
Nov. 1878 at Syracuse, N. Y Student from Syracuse, 1896-1900. 
B. «BK. 

; Student, Syracuse University since 1901. 
t in History, College of Liberal Arts, since 1903. 
:e, 422 W. Onondaga St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

ALEXANDER McCLURE ASHLEY 1904 

Dec. 1872 at Washiugton, D. C. Student from Washington in 
College, 1890-4. *K4^. Ph.B. *BK. 

National Univ. of Law, Washington) 1895. M.A.(Dickinson)i897. 
t Observer, U. S. Weather Bureau. Pittsburg Pa., 1895-8. 
. Weather Bureau, Washington, 1898-1902. Forecaster in charge 
ther Bureau, Syracuse, N. Y., 1902-4. Lecturer on Meteorology 
lology, College of Liberal Arts, Syracuse University, 1902-4. 
)lished treatise on '* West Indian Hurricanes" (for master's 
' Long Range Seasonal Forecasts for the Pacific Coast States*' ; 
leather Review, Jan. 1901 ; numerous newspaper articles on the 

21 Nov. 190 1, Harriet E. Powell of California, Pa. 

u the Weather Bureau Office, Honolulu, Sandwich Id*s. since 

:e. Weather Bureau Office, Honolulu, Sandwich Islands. 



XI4 ADMINISntATION AND INSTRUCTION 

PROFESSORS: COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 

1872 HENRY DARWIN DIDAMA, DEAN 

See Ai,UMNi Record, No. 1872 and Pacnlty Record, p. 160, College of 

Medicine. 
CoRRBCTiON and Suppi,BMENT: LL.D (Syracase) 1889. « B K. 
Residence, 424 S. Salina St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

1872 JOHN VAN DUYN 

See Alumni Rbcord, p. 163. 
Residence, 318 James St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

1872 ALFRED MERCER 

See Alumni Record, No. 2204 and Faculty Record, pp. 164 and 1659 
College of Medicine. 

Residence, 324 Montgomery St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

1876 ♦ WILLIAM MANLIUS SMITH 190CP 

See Alumni Record, pp. 167-168. 

Supplement: Professor of Chemistry, College of Medicine, iSi^o-^ 
Emeritus Professor of Chemistry, 1899-1900. 

Died 4 May 1900, at Syracuse, N. Y. 

1880 GAYLORD PARSONS CLARK 

See Alumni Record, No. 464, and Faculty Record, p. 169, College &i 
Medicine. 

Residence, 619 W. Genesee St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

1883 JOHN LORENZO HEPFRON 

See Alumni Record, No. 517 and Faculty Record, pp. 169 and 170, Co^ 
lege of Medicine. 

Residence, 528 S. Salina St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

1885 ♦ HENRY BIGELOW ALLEN 1904 

See Alumni Record, p. 170. 

Supplement : Professor of Obstetrics, College of Medicine, Syracnie 
University, 1 886-1901. Emeritus Professor of Obstetrics, Same, 1901-4. 

Died 30 Jan. 1904 at Bald winsvi lie, N. Y. 

1880 ALFRED CLIFFORD MERCER 

See Alumni Record, No. 396 and Faculty Record, pp. 170-172, College 
of Medicine. 

Supplement : Treasurer of the College of Medicine, 1890-1901. 

Residence 324 Montgomery St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

1884 HENRY L. ELSNER 
See Alumni Record, pp. 172 and 173. 
Residence, 406 E. Genesee St., Syracuse. N. Y. 

1876 DAVID MAYDOLE TOTMAN 

See Alumni Record, No. 331 and Faculty Record, p. 173, College iA 
Medicine. 

Supplement : Registrar of the College of Medicine, 1893-8. 

Residence, 303 Montgomery St., Syracuse, N. Y. 



▲DMimsntATION AND INSTRUCTION II5 

FRANK WILLIAM MARLOW 
UuMNi Record, No. 714 and Faculty Record, pp. 173 and 174, 
: of Medicine. 

UMBNT : Librarian of the College of Medicine, Syracuse Univer- 
Bce 1890. 

!, University Block, 
lence, aoo Highland St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

NATHAN JACOBSON 
U.UMNI Record, No. 352 and Facnlty Record, pp. 174 and 17s, 
! of Medicine, 
lence, 430 S. Salina St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

AARON BENJAMIN MILLER 
auMNi Record, p. 175. 
lence, 326 Montgomery St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

REUBEN CALDWELL HANCHETT 
a.DMNi Record, No. 667 and Faculty Record, pp. 175 and 176, Col- 
Medicine. 

UMBNT : Professor of Materia Medica, College of Medicine, Syra- 
liversity, 1898-1900. Professor of Materia Medica and Therapeu- 
me, since 1900. 
ence, 423 S. Warren St., S3rracnse, N. Y. 

GEORGE MERRIMAN PRICE 
XUMNi Record, No. 776 and Facnlty Record, p. 180, College of 
c. 

EMENT : Lecturer on Anatomy, College of Medicine, Syracuse 
>^y* iS93~9* Professor of Anatomy, Same, since 1899 
mce, 412 S. Warren St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

THOMAS HENRY HALSTEAD 

[,UMNi Record, p. 181. 

EMENT : Lecturer on Laryngology and Otology, College of Medi- 

racnse University, 1895-9. Professor of Laryngology and Otology, 

nee 1899. 

tnce, 117 Dewitt St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

LECTURERS 

JAMES CARLTON CARSON 

LUMNi Record, p. 178. 

ence, State Institution for Feeble-Minded Children, Syracuse, N. Y. 

WILLIAM HENRY MAY 1900 

LUMNI Record, No. 962 and Faculty Record, p. 179, College of 
c. 

EMENT: Lecturer on Pathology and Bacteriology, College of 
5. Syracuse University, 1893-1900. Curator of the College of Medi- 
16-1900. 
rocc, 800 E. Fayette St., Syracuse, N. Y. 



Il6 ADMINISTRATION AND INSTRUCTION 

1894 WILLIAM SHANKLAND ANDREWS 

See Ai«UMNi Rbcord, pp. 180 and 181. 
Residence, 404 Oak St., Syracase, N. Y. 

1894 ISRAEL HARRIS LEVY 

See Ai«UMNi Record, No. 958 and Faculty Record, p. 181, College of 
Medicine. 

SUPPI<BMBNT : Lecturer on Histology, College of Medicine, Syracuse 
University, 189^1903. Lecturer on Physical Diagnosis, Same, since 1905 • 

Residence, 717 E. Genesee St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

1890 WILLIAM A. CURTIN 

See Ai«UMNi Record, No. 800 and Faculty Record, p. 181, College of 
Medicine. 

Supplement : Lecturer on Therapeutics, College of Medicine, Syracase 
University, 1 896-1900. Lecturer on Materia Medica and Therapeutics, 
Same, since 1900. 

Residence, 408 E. Genesee St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

1884 WILLIAM HOUGH MILLS 

See Alumni Record, No. 531 and Faculty Record, pp. 181 and 182, Col- 
lege of Medicine. 

Residence, 926 W. Genesee St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

1894 CHARLES AUGUSTINE COVELL 19(9 
See Alumni Record, No. 121 i snd Faculty Record, p. 182, College of 

Medicine. 

Supplement : Lecturer on Chemistry, College of Medicine, Syracase 
University, 1898-1903. 

Residence, 1464 S. Salina St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

1895 EDWARD JUDSON WYNKOOP 
See Alumni Record, No. 1120 and Faculty Record, p. 188, College of 

Medicine. 

Supplement : Director of Anatomical Laboratory, College of Medicine, 
Syracuse University, 1897-1900. Lecturer on Anatomy, Same, 1900-1. 
Lecturer on Pediatrics, Same, since 190 1. 

Residence, 406 James St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

1897 WILLIAM LEWIS WALLACE 

See Alumni Record, No. 734 and Faculty Record, p. 188, College 
of Medicine. 

Supplement : Demonstrator of Anatomy, College of Medicine, Syra- 
cuse University, 1897--9 Instructor in Anatomy, Same, 1 899-1900. Lect- 
urer on Anatomy, Same, since 1900. 

Residence, 620 E. Genesee St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

1897 FRANK PATTENGILL KNOWLTON 

See Alumni Record, No. 2819 Sup., and Faculty Record, p. 186, College 

of Medicine. 
Supplement: M.D. (Syracuse) 1900. Instructor in Physiology and 

Embryology, College of Medicine, Syracuse University, 1897-.1900. Lect- 



ADMINISTRATION AND INSTRUCTION 1 17 

1 Phystologj and Embryology, Same, 1901-3. Lecturer on Physiol- 

une, since 1903. 

dence, 309 Orange St, Syracu^, N, Y. 

HALBERT SEVERIN STEENSLAND 
1 22 July 1872 at Madison, Wis. Student at the University of Wis- 
,1891-5. B.S. M.D.( Johns Hopkins Univ.) 1899. 
arer on Pathology and Bacteriology and Director of the Pathologi- 
)orBtory, College of Medicine,, Syracuse University, since 1900. 
published ** Acute Degenerations of the Nervous System, the Mus- 
d the Heart,** Medical and Surgical Reports of the Boston City Hos- 
Twelfth series, 1901 ; *• Cachexia,** fVood*s reference Hand-Book of 
*dical Sciences^ 1901 ; *' Castration,** ibid.; New Growths of the 
aes,** ilnd, 1902 ; *' New Growths of the Liver,** ibid ; ** Hygromia,** 

ience, 614 S. Salina St., Syracuse, N Y. 

WILLIAM GRAHAM HINSDALE 
LI«UMNI RBCORD, p. 186. 

LBMBNT : Instructor in Obstetrics, College of Medicine, Syracuse 
lity, 1 897- 1 901. Lecturer on Obstetrics, Same, since 190 1. 
ience, 546 Seymour St., Syracuse, N. Y, 

PORTER ROBERT McMASTER 1903 

.1.UMNI Rbcord, p. 185. 

[^MBNT : Instructor in Surgery, College of Medicine, Syracuse 
dty, 189^1901. Lecturer on Surgery, Same, 1901-3. 
ence, IQ3 W. Kennedy St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

EUGENE W. BELKNAP 
XTJMNi Record, p. 185. 

CBMRNT : Instructor in Medicine, College of Medicine, Syracuse 
tity, 1895-1900. Instructor in Medicine and Director of Clinical 
ics, Same, 1900-1. Lecturer on Clinical Obstetrics, Same, 1901-3. 
T on Obstetrics and Chief of the Obstetrical Clinic, Same, since 

Ience, 426 James St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

EDWARD SEGUIN VAN DUYN 

Li«uMKi Rbcord. No. 1512. 

CBMBNT : Demonstrator of Anatomy, College of Medicine, Syracuse 

(ity, 1899-1901. Lecturer on Anatomy, Same, 1901-3. Lecturer on 

r. Same, since 1903. 

Ience, 318 James St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

GEORCB ARTHUR HANFORD 

14 Oct., 1875 at Syracuse, N, Y. Student from Syracuse at Yale 
fity, 1894-8. A.B. (Yale). Ph.D.(Yale) 1902. 
imte student at Yale three years. Assistant in Physiological Chem- 
ale University, 1899-1902. 



Il8 ADMINISTRATION AND INSTRUCTION 

Lecturer on Physiological Chemistry, College of Medicine, Syracuse Uoi* 
versity, 1902-3. Lecturer on Chemistry and Physiological Chemistry, Same, 
since 1903. , 

Has published "Physiological Role and Toxicology of Caesium Com* 
pounds,'* Am. Jour, Physiology^ June 1903. 

Residence, 309 Tallman St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

1902 FRANK WILLIAM TILLEY 

Born I Nov. 1878 at Providence, R. €. A.B. (Bucknell) 1898. M.D. (Har- 
vard) 1902. 

Instructor in Pathology and Bacteriology, College of Medicbe, 
Syracuse University, 1902-3. Lecturer on Pathology and Bacteriology, 
Same, since 1903. 

Residence, 412 Crouse Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

INSTRUCTORS 

1897 GEORGE BIRNEY BROAD 

See Alumni Record, No. 1352 and Faculty Record, p. 187, College U 
Medicine. 

SUPPLBMBNT : Instructor in Pathology, College of Medicine, Syracuse 
University, 1 898-1900. Instructor in Pathology and Bacteriology, Same, 
1900-2. Instructor in Clinical Gynecology, Same, since 1905. 

Residence, 706 Cortland Ave. , Syracuse, N. Y. 

1898 THEODORE JOSEPH KIEFFER 1902 

See Alumni Rbcord, No. 1381 and Faculty Record, p. 186, College of 
Medicine. 

SUPPLBMBNT : Instructor in Pathology, College of Medicine, Syracuse 
University, 1898-1900. Instructor in Pathology and Bacteriology, Same, 
1900-2. 

Residence, 517 Townsend St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

1898 ♦ HORACE WILLIAM BRITCHER 1901 
See Alumni Rbcord, No. 889. 

SUPPLBMBNT : Instructor in Embryology, College of Medicine, Syracuse 
University, 1898-1901. 
Died 30 Apr. 1903 at Syracuse, N. Y. 

1899 WALTER JACOB WERFELMANN 1901 
See Alumni Rbcord, No. 975. 

SUPPLBMBNT : Instructor in Therapeutics, College of Medicine, Syracuse 
University, 1899-1900. Instructor in Materia Medica and Therapeutics, 
Same, 1900-1. 

Residence, 904 N. Salina St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

1899 ROBERT HAMILTON PIERSON 1902 

See Alumni Rbcord, No. 1604. 
SUPPLBMBNT : Instructor in Histology, College of Medicine, Syracuse Uni- 



ADMINISTRATION AND INSTRUCTION II9 

J, 189^1900. Instractor in Histology and Assistant in Clinical Obstet- 

kme, 1900-2. 

idence, 430 Crous« Ave.» Syracuse, N. Y. 

ALBERT EDWIN LARKIN 
Ai,uMNi Rbcord, No. 1478. 

PUMBNT : NZN. Student abroad, 1898-9. Physician at Syracuse, 
, lince 1899. 

rnctor in Clinical Medicine, College of Medicine, Syracuse University, 
Instructor in Medicine, Same, since 1901. Assistant visiting 
Jan to St. Joseph's Hospital. Physician to Syracuse Free Dispensary, 
idence, 334 Montgomery St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

J. EDWARD PORTER 1903 

mctor in Chemistry, College of Medicine, Syracuse University, 

nist to N. Y. State Board of Agriculture, 
lence, 905 W. Genesee St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

WILLIAM AVERY GROAT 
Alumni Rrcord, No. 1462. 

»LRifHNT: M.D. (Syracuse) 1900. Physician at Syracuse, N. Y., 
900. Instructor in Chemistry, College of Medicine, Syracuse Uni- 
, since 1901. 

led 2 Oct. 1901, Nellie Nichols Bacon (See Non-graduates) of Syra- 
^. Y. 
lence, 107 Shonnard St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

CLARENCE ERFORD COON 
\LUMNi Record, No. 1549 and Faculty Record, p. 1897 College of 
ne. 

'LBMHNT : Demonstrator of Anatomy, College of Medicine, Syra- 
Diversity, 1898-9. Director of Anatomical Laboratory, Same, 1899- 
Instructor in Clinical Surgery, Same, 1902-3. Instructor in Surgery, 
since 1903. 
ience, 509 S. Salina St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

ALBERT STEUBEN HOTALING 
18 May 1873. Student from Syracuse, N. Y., in College of Medi- 
B90-1 and 1891-2. «KSk. M.D.(College of P. and S. Baltimore) 1894. 
dent physician in Baltimore Hospital, 1894-8. Physician, at Syra- 
L Y. , since 1898. 

ttant in Clinical Obstetrics, College of Medicine, Syracuse Univer- 
pi-2. Instructor in Clinical Obstetrics, Same, since 1902. 
etrician to Hospital for Women and Children and to the Dispensary, 
-led 1900, Mary E. Nottingham of Syracuse, N. Y. 
ience, 801 E. Genesee St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

FRANCIS ROE BENHAM 
Vlumni Record, p. 8x8. 
22 Sept. 1876 at Newark, N. Y. Student from Baldwinsville, N. Y., 



I30 ADMINISTRATION AND INSTRUCTION 

in College of Liberal Arts,. 1895-7 ; in College of Medicine, 1897-1901 
AA^ (Wesley an). NZN. M.D. Physician at Syracuse, N. Y., sine 
1901. Assistant in Clinical Obstetrics, College of Medicine, Syracns 
University, 1902-3. Instructor in Clinical Obstetrics, Same, since 1903. 

Married 7 June 1899, Clara J. Andrews, of Syracuse, N. Y. 

Residence, 1105 E. Genesee St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

1899 FREDERICK HENRY FLAHERTY 

See A1.UMNI Record, No. 1371. 

SuPPi«BMBNT : Demonstrator of Anatomy, College of Medicine, Sjri 
cuse University, 1899-1903. Instructor in Anatomy, Same, since 1903. 

Residence, 507 S. Warren St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

1899 ROBERT BURNS 

See Ai«UMNi Record, No. 1446. 

SUPPI«EMENT: Demonstrator of Anatomy, College of Medicine, Syr 
cuse University, 1899-1903. Instructor in Anatomy, Same, since 1903. 

Residence, 823 S. Salina St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

1903 WILLIAM DEWEY ALSEVER 

See Alumni Record, No. 1349. 

SUPPI.BMBNT: M.D. (Syracuse) 1900. Instructor in Physical Diagnosi 
College of Medicine, Syracuse University, since 1903. Assistant in Moi 
cine to the Hospital of the Good Shepherd. 

Residence, 1223 E. Genesee St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

DEMONSTRATORS OF ANATOMY 

1897 ERNEST FLETCHER CLYMER i» 
See Alumni Record, p. 189. 

SUPPI.EMENT: Demonstrator of Anatomy, College of Medicine, Syr 
cuse University, 1897-9. 
Residence, 2756 N. Winchester Ave., Chicago, 111. 

1898 FRED L. MORGAN 

See Alumni Record, No. 1389 and Faculty Record, p. 189, College 
Medicine. 

Residence, 511 E. Fayette St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

1899 PETER CAMPBELL TEN EYCK 
See Ai.uMNi Record. No. 1506. 

Supplement : Demoustrator of Anatomy, College of Medicine, Syract 
University, since 1899. 
Residence, 401 Montgomery St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

1899 MARK HEIMAN IS 

See Alumni Record, No. 1467. 

Supplement : Demonstrator of Anatomy, College of Medicine, Syraci 
University, 1899-1903. Assistant Surgeon to St. Joseph's Hospital, Syrmcu: 
N. Y. 

Residence, 320 Montgomery St., Syracuse, N. Y. 



3, 



4, 



ADMINISTRATION AND INSTRUCTION 121 

1899 ALBERT JAY ABBEL. 1901 

See A1.UMNI Rbcord, No. 1435. 

SuppuncSNT : Demonstrator of Anatomy, College of Medicine, Syracuse 
Umyenity, 1899-1901. 

Residence, 1115 S. Selina St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

190a FREDERICK WILLIAM VAN LENGEN 

See AtuifNi Record. No. 1626. 

Suppi,BMBNT : Demonstrator of Anatomy, College of Medicine, Syracuse 
Uniyersily, since sqoi. 

Residence, 704 Catharine St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

1902 THOMAS FRED FOREMAN 

See Alumni Rbcord, No. 2791 Sup. 

Born 3 Oct., T876 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student in College of Medicine, 
Syricnse University, i896-i9oa N2N. M.D. 

Interne at St. Joseph's Hospital, Syracuse, 1901. Anesthetist at Same. 
Pbjsician to the House of Providence. 

I>emon8trator of Anatomy, College of Medicine,Syracuse University, since 
1902. 
Harried 17 June 1903, Bessie V. Ford of Olean, N. Y. 
Residence, 303 Delaware St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

1901 TENNYSON LORAINE DEAVOR 

See Alumni Rbcord, No. 1453. 

Suppi,BMBNT : Physician at St. Joseph's Hospital, Syracuse, 1897-^. In 
sctnal practice in Syracuse, N. Y., since 1898. Demonstrator of Anatomy, 
College of Medicine, Syracuse University, since 1902. 
Married 15 June, 1898, Grace L. Harter of Nescopeck, Pa. 
Residence, 614 S. Warren St., Syracuse. N. Y. 

1896 CHARLES FREDERICK WILEY 1898 

1903 
See Alumni Rbcord, No. 11 14 and Faculty Record, p. 186, College of 

Medicine. 

Supplbmbnt: Demonstrator of Anatomy, College of Medicine, Syracuse 
University, since 1903. 

Residence, 751 Harrison St. Syracuse. N. Y. 

190J HENRY BURTON DOUST 

Bom 16 Nov., 1877 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, 1896-1900. 
KZN. M.D. 

Interne at St Joseph's Hospital, Providence, R. I., 1900-1 ; at Woman's 
Hospital, New York, 190 1-2. Resident Physician, New York Hospital, 
New York, 1902-3. At Syracuse, N. Y., since 1903. 

Demonstrator of Anatomy, College of Medicine, Syracuse- University, 
since 1903. 

Residence 217 Richmond Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

I9C^ GEORGE SIDNEY BRITTEN 

See Alumni Rbcord, No. 2755 Sup. 



122 ADMINISTRATION AND INSTRUCTION 

Born i8 Nov. 1874 at Coalburg, O. Student from Chittenango, N. Y., 
1S96-1900. AKK. M.D. 

Resident Phjrsician and Snrgeon to the Hospital of the Good Shepherd, 
1900-1. Physician at Montezuma, N. Y., 1901-2 ; at Syracuse, N. Y., since 
Apr. 1903. (Special work in nose, throat and ears.) 

Assistant Lar3mgologist and Aurist at Hospital of the Good Shepherd 
and Dispensary. Demonstrator of Anatomy, College of Medicine, Syra- 
cuse University, since 1903. 

Residence 601 £. Genesee St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

1903 JACOB JOSHUA LEVY 

See Alumni Record, No. 2823 Sup. 

Born 12 July i879,Elmira, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, N.Y.,i896-i9oa 
Ph.B. M.D. 1903. 

Student in College of Medicine, 1900-3. Demonstrator of Anatomy, 
College of Medicine, Syracuse University, since 1903. 

Residence, 717 E. Genesee St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

1903 HOWARD GREGORY CASE 

See Alumni Record, No. 3249 Sup. 

Born 13 Nov. 1880 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Fulton, N. Y., 
1899-1903. *Ae. N2N. M.D. 

Physician at Syracuse, N. Y. Demonstrator of Anatomy, Coll^[e of 
Medicine, Syracuse University, since 1903. 

Married 26 July 1900, Harriet T. Bdgarton of Fulton, N. Y. 

Residence, loi W. Castle St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

REGISTRAR 

See Alumni Record, p. 190. 

1893 DAVID MAYDOLE TOTMAN 1898 

TREASURER 

1890 ALFRED CLIFFORD MERCER m 

LIBRARIAN 

1890 FRANK WILLIAM MARLOW 

CURATOR 

1896 WILLIAM HENRY MAY 1900 

SECRETARY AND ASSISTANT LIBRARIAN 

1896 ABBY M. BOND 

ASSISTANT SECRETARY AND ASSISTANT LIBRARIAN 

1900 ELLA MAY LEWIS ijtt 

1902 MARY A. BARKER 



ADMINISTRATION AND INSTRUCTION I23 

PROFESSORS : COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS 

1883 GEORGE ALBERT PARKER, ACTING DEAN 

See Alumni Record, No. 1888 and Faculty Record, p. 192, College of 

Fine Arts. 
CoRRBcnoN : D. Mna. (Syracuse) 1893. 
Residence, 211 University Place, Syracuse, N. Y. 

1898 ENSIGN McCHESNEY, DEAN 

See Alumni Record, pp. 193 and 193. 
Residence, 200 Walnut Place, Syracuse, N. Y. 

1889 LUELLA MARIA STEWART 1902 
See Alumni Record, pp. 196 and 197. 

Supplement : Professor of Painting and Drawing, College of Fine Arts, 
Syracuse University, 1894-1902. 
Residence, Oak St., Syracuse. N. Y. 

1890 CONRAD LOUIS BECKER 
See Alumni Rscord, pp. 197 and 817 and No. 3421 Sup. 
Supplement : Bom 15 Dec 1868 at Newark, N. J., Student from Vine 

Valley, N. Y. in College of Pine Arts, 1884-90. M. Mus. (Syracuse) 1902. 

Instructor in Violin and Piano, College of Fine Arts, Syracuse Univer- 
sity, 1890-1. Instructor in Violin, Same, 1891-3. Professor of Violin, 
Same, 1893-4. Professor of Violin and Ensemble Playing, Same, since 
1894. 

Studied music in Royal High School, Berlin — Violin under Jacobson and 
Joachim, Harmony under Schultz Later with Sauret in London and Hugo 
Heermann in Frankfort on Main. Concertized as soloist one season with 
the Beethoven Trio Club of Boston ; also one season with the Kellogg Con- 
cert Company. 

Member of the Royal Opera House Orchestra, Frankfort, during the sum- 
mer of 1895. 

Married 28 June 1893, Nellie A. Hawley of Canandaigua, N. Y. 

Residence, 307 Marshall St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

1892 WILLIAM HENRY BERWALD. 
See AxuMNi Rbcord, p. 197, and No. 3422 Sup. 
SUPPLBMHNT : M. Mus. (Syracuse) 1903. 

Married 9 June 1897, Eugenia Baker (See Non-graduates, p. 814) of 
Auburn, N. Y. 

Child, Elsa Eugenia, born 12 Feb. 190 1. 
Residence, 908 Madison St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

1893 'UNNILUND 1901 
See Alumni Record, p. 197. 

SUPPLBMBNT : Professor of Vocal Music, College of Fine Arts, Syracuse 
Uoiversitj, 1893-1901. 
Died 16 Nov. 1901, at Syracuse, N. Y. 



124 ADMINISTRATION AND INSTRUCTION 

1884 ♦ ELLA IRENE FRENCH 

See Alumni Record, No. 378 and Faculty Record, p. 197, College of 
Fine Arts. 

Died 24 June 1904 at Syracuse, N. Y. 

1893 ADOLF FREY 

See Alumni Record, p. 198 and No. 3423 Sup. 
SUPPLBMBNT : M. Mu8. (Syracuse) 1902. 
Residence, 724 Ostrom Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

1895 JEANNETTE SCOTT 

See Alumni Record, p. 198. 
Residence, 603 E. Genesee St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

1895 NATHANIEL IRVING HYATT 1900 

See Alumni Record, p, 198. 

Supplement : Professor of Piano and Theory of Music, College of Fine 
Arts, Syracuse University, i89S-i9DO. 

Residence, 
1891 EDWIN HALL GAGGIN 1902 

See Alumni Record, No. 1057 ^^^ Faculty Record, pp. 198 and 199, 
College of Pine Aits. 

Supplement : Professor of Architecture, College of Fine Arts, Syracme 
University, 1897-1902. In business in Syracuse with T. W. Gaggin since 
1902, (Gaggin and Gaggin, Architects). 

Residence, 700 Grouse Ave., Syracuse N. Y. 

1897 ALBERT HOWARD GARRETT 1900 

See Alumni Record, p. 199. 

Supplement : Professor of Vocal Music, College of Fine Arts, Syracnte 
University, 1 897-1900. 

Residence. 
1897 ROSWELL STONE HILL 

See Alumni Record, p. 199. 

Supplement : Born 1861 at Lawrence, Kas. Studied at Art Students' 
League, N. Y., 1880-2; at the Beaux Arts and Academic Julian, Paris, 
1890-2. Pupil of Carroll Beckwith, New York ; of Gerome, Bonguerea, 
Gabriel Farrier, Paris. Exhibited at Salon, Paris. 1892 ; at Colnmbiiii 
Exposition, 1893 ; at the folloMdng competitors exhibitions, annually : 
Carnegie Institute, Pittsburg ; Penn. Academy of Fine Arts, Sodetv of 
Amer. Artists, National Acad, of Design, New York ; Copley Society^ 
Boston. 

Married 1889, Nellie M. Birdsey of Middletown, Conn. 

Residence, 615 Walnut Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

1899 RICHARD GRANT CALTHROP 

See Alumni Record, No. 3424 Sup. 

Born 28 July 1865 at Boston, Mass. 

M. Mus. (Syracuse) 1903. ^FA. Student in Florence, Italy, of Udfi 
Vannuccelli for four years. Teacher of Vocal Music in Syracuse for tea 



ADMINISTRATION AND INSTRUCTIOtf I25 

ean. Professor of Vocal Masic, College of Pine Arts, Syracuse Univer- 
Ity, siiice 1899. 

Married 22 Jane 1897, Blanche A. Atherly of Oneida, N. Y. 

Child — Charlotte Primrose, born 24 June 1898. 

Residence, 743 Crouse Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

900 MINNIE ADELINE MASON (BEEBE) 

See A1.UMNI Rbcord, No. 961. 

Suppi^bmbnt: Ph.D. (University of Ziirich) 1900. Student at Ziirich 
rom Oct. 1898 to June 1900. Spent vacations while abroad (three months 
t a time, as well as the Summer of 1902), in Paris studying French. 

Professor of History and English ; Instructor in French, College of Fine 
Lits, Syracuse University, 1900-2. Professor of History and French, 
teme, since, 1902. 

Residence, 1007 E. Adams St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

895 JULIE HEIMBACH HINE 

See Alumni Rbcord. p. 198. 

CoRRBCnoN and Supplbmbnt : Associate Professor of German, Col- 
ore of Fine Arts, Syracuse University, 1895-7. Associate Professor of the 
rerman Language and Literature, Same, 1897- 1901. Professor of the 
verman Language and Literature, Same, since 1901. 

Residence, 704 James St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

895 FREDERICK WILLIAM REVELS 

See Alumni Rbcord, No 13 18 and Faculty Record, p. 203, College of 
^ine Arts. 

CORRBCTIONS and Supplbmbnt : Instructor in Perspective, and De- 
criptive Geometry, College of Fine Arts, Syracuse University, 1895-1900. 
Lsscciate Professor of Perspective, and Descriptive Geometry, Same, 1900- 
902. Professor of Architecture, Same, since 1902. 

Residence, 600 Crouse Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

89s THOMAS WALKER GAGGIN 1901 

See AXUMHI Rbcord, No. 1290 and Faculty Record, p. 203, College of 
'ine Arts. 

SupPltKBCBNT : Instructor in Architecture, College of Fine Arts, Syra- 
tise University, 1895-1900. Associate Professor of Architecture, Same, 
1900-1901. 

In bosiness in Syracuse with E. H. Gaggin since 1902 ; (Gaggin and Gag- 
gin. Architects.) 

Residence, 700 Crouse Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

1895 CARL TRACY HAWLEY 

See Ai,UMNi Rbcord, No. 1228 and Faculty Record, p. 203, College of 
Fue ArU. 
CORRBCTIONS and Suppz^mbnt : Instructor in Painting, College of 



126 ADMINISTRATION AND INSTRUCTION 

Fine Arts, S3rracu8e University, 1895-6 and 1897-9. Instructor in Cast 
Drawing, Same, 1896-97. Instructor in Freehand and Cast Drawing, Same, 
1 899-1900. Associate Professor of Drawing ; Instructor in Art Anatomy, 
Same, since 1900. 
Residence, 514 Crouse Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

INSTRUCTORS 

1893 MIRIAM ADELIA GUERNSEY (MIX) 1899 
See Alumni Rbcord, No. 1140 and Faculty Record, p. 202. College of 

Fine Arts. 

SUPPI.BMBNT : ^BK. Instructor in Vocal Music, College of Fine 
Arts, Syracuse University, 1893-9. 

Residence, Cliftondale, Mass. 

1894 MARY SIMS PARKER 1897 
1899 1903 

See A1.UMNI Record, p. 202. 

SUPPLBMBNT : Instructor in Vocal Music, College of Fine Arts, Syracuse 
University, 1894-7 and 1899-1902. 
Residence, 211 University Place, Syracuse, N. Y. 

1894 ARTHUR VANWAGENEN ELTINGE 1901 
See A1.UMNI Rbcord, No. 1216 and Faculty Record, p. 203, College of 

Fine Arts. 

CoRRBCTiONS AND SUPPI.BMBNT : Instructor in Organ and Piano, College 
of Fine Arts, Syracuse University, 1894- 1901. Private Studio, since 1901. 
Organist and Choir-master at Grace (Episcopal) church, Syracuse, since 
1891. 

Married 23 June 1896, Mary Gilbert Taber of Syracuse, N. Y. 

Children^ Eleanor Gilbert, born i May 1897 I died 3 Apr. 1898. 
Ethel Taber, born i June 1899. 
Esther Van Wagenen, born 9 Nov. 1901 ; died 20 May 1902. 

Residence, 666 Madison St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

1895 IRENE SARGENT 1896 
1901 

See A1.UMNI Rbcord, p. 203. 

CoRRBCTiON AND SUPPLBMBNT : Instructor in French, College of Fine 
Arts, Syracuse University, 1895-6. Instructor in Italian, Same, since 1901. 
Residence, Empire House, Syracuse, N. Y. 

1896 EVALINA VERNON (HONSINGER) 1900 

See Alumni Rbcord, No. 1426 and Faculty Record, p. 204, College of 
Fine Arts. 

SUPPLBMBNT : Instructor in Piano, College of Pine Arts, Syracuse Uni- 
versity, 1896-1900. 

Married 9 Oct. t 900, Frederick S. Honsinger (No. 1574) of Syracuse, N. Y 

Child^ Evalina Frances, born 21 Feb. 1902. 

Residence, 609 E. Willow St., Syracuse, N. Y. 



ADMINISTRATION AND INSTRUCTION I27 

FLORENCE EUGENIE HAANEL 1899 

7MNI Rbcord, No. 1296 and Faculty Record, p. 204, College of 
• 

MBNT : Instrnctor in Cast Drawing, College of Pine Arts, Syra- 
rersity, 1897-9. 
ice, Ottawa, Canada. 

SARAH NEWCOMB GRAHAM (BOWERMAN) 1900 

7MNI Rbcord, No. 1460 and Faculty Record, p. 157, College of 

MENT : Assistant in English, College of Liberal Arts, Sjrracuse 
f, 1897-8. Instructor in English, College of Fine Arts, Same, 
Instructor in Latin, English and History, Gardner School for 
w York, Jan.-June 1901. 

I 13 June 1901, Geo. F. Bowerman, of Wilmington, Del. 
ice, 1706 Broome St., Wilmington, Del. 

GAIL SHERMAN 1902 

tor in Modeling and Life Drawing, College of Fine Arts, Syra- 
'ersity, 189S-1900. Instructor in Modeling, Same, 1900-1902. 
ice, 

EUGENIA BAKER (BERWALD) . 1901 

7MNI Record, Non-graduates, p. 814. 

:mbnt : Bom 13 Apr. 1876 at Auburn, N. Y. Student from Auburn, 
KKr. Certificate in Vocal Music and Theory. See No. 3 C. Sup. 
tor in Vocal Music, College of Fine Arts, Syracuse University, 

I 9 June 1897 William Berwald (No. 3422 Sup. q, v, for further 

■ Syracuse, N. Y. 

ice, 908 Madison St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

LOUIS BAKER PHILLIPS 
jMNi Record, No. 1498. 

IMSNT : Student of Piano and Theory for seven months in Ger- 
nstructor (private) in Music, Syracuse, 1898-9 Instructor in Piano 
ryof Music, College of Fine Arts, Syracuse University, since 1899. 
I 30 Nov. 1898, Daisy Anna Boone (See Non-graduates) of Syra- 

ir. 

9f, Harold, bom 12 Oct. 1899. 

Louis Baker, Jr., born 16 Apr. 1903. 
ice, 912 Madison St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

EVERARD JOHN CALTHROP 1901 

tor in Vocal Music, College of Fine Arts, Syracuse University, 

ice, 1821 S. Salina St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

MATTY BELEY NUTTING 1900 

tor in the Decoration of Fine Pottery, College of Fine Arts, 
University, i899-i9oa 
ace, 606 Second North St., Syracuse, N. Y. 



128 ADMINISTRATION AND INSTRUCTION 

1900 HARRY LBONARD VIBBARD 

See Alumni Rbcord, No. 1627. 

SUPPI.BMBNT : Instructor in Piano and Organ, College of Fine Arts, 
Syracuse University, since 1900. 

Residence, 824 £. Genesee St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

1900 MARY KETCHAM 

Instructor in Decorative Design, Normal Art and Keramic Art, College 
of Pine Arts, Syracuse University, I90c~i902. Instructor in Decoratiire 
Design, Same, since 1902. 

Residence, 735 Crouse Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

1900 CHARLES BERTRAM WALKER 

Born 18 Oct. 1875 at Warren, N. Y. Student from Rictifield Springs, 
N. Y., 1895-9. *rA. B.P. 

Received the Hiram Gee Fellowship in Painting and pursued studies in 
Paris, 1899-1900. Instructor in Cast Drawing, College of Fine Arts, Syrt- 
cuse University, 1900-2. Instructor in Cast Drawing and Modeling and 
Perspective, Same, since 1902. 

Residence, 712 Comstock Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

1900 NINA BAYLIS HAYES 19M 

See Alumni Record, Non-graduatea, p. 848, 1896-8. 

Instructor in Vocal Music, College of Fine Arts, Syracuse University, 
1900-2. . 

Residence, 
1900 MABEL EMMA JACOBY (JOHNSON) 1901 

Bom 22 Apr. 1878 at Syracu<ie, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, 1895-9. 
r^B. B. Mns. 

Received Scholarship in Piano at Graduation. 

Graduate student, Syracuse University, 1 899-1 900. Instructor in Piano, 
College of Fine Arts, Syracuse University, 1 900-1. 

Married 13 Oct. 1902, Lucius S. Johnson (See Alumni Rbcord, Non- 
graduates, p. 855) of Syracuse, N. Y. 

Residence, 115 Comstock Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

1900 VERNELIA GILMORE NICHOLS 1903 
Instructor in Vocal Music, College of Fine Arts, Syraciise Universitj, 

1 900- 1 and 1902-N0V. 1903. 
Residence, 209 Robinson St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

1 901 JOSEPH CARL SEITER 
See Alumni Record, No. 1328. 

Supplbmbnt : Studied three years with Leschetezky in Vienna (Piano) 
and Henberger (Composition). Later studied two years in Berlin. 
Instructor in Piano, College of Fine Arts, Syracuse University, 1901-2. 
Instructor in Piano and Theory of Music, Same, since 1902. 

Married 5 Sept. 1901, Anna Hortensia Knoop. 

Residence 900 E. Genesee St., Syracuse, N. Y. 



ADMINISTRATION AND INSTRUCTION I29 

HOWARD MASSEY FREDERICK 
\ Aug. 1879 at Saodasky, O. A stadeat with John Dennis Mehan, 
Whitney and George Henschel. Inatmctor in Vocal Music, Col- 
ine Arts, Syracuse University, since 1901. 
Bce, 304 Waverly Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

EDWIN HEDDEN SHEPARD 
Nov. 1878 at LeRoy.N. Y. Student from LeRoy, 1896-1900. AT. 

t in College of Medicine, Syracuse University, since 1901. Instruc- 
ithematics, College of Pine Arts, Syracuse University, since 1901. 
ace, 100 Waverly Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

LUCY ISABELLA MARSH 1902 

itor in Vocal Music, College of Fine Arts, Syracuse University, 

nee, 

BLANCHE STEVENS DAMAN 
,UMNi Rbcord, Non-graduates, p. 889. 

CMBNT : Instructor in Piano, College of Pine Arts, Syracuse Uni- 
dnce 1 901. 
nee, 621 E. Genesee St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

GASTON BORCH 1902 

lor in Piano and Violoncello, College of Fine Arts, S3rracuse Uni- 
:90i-2. 
nee, 

ELIZABETH VAN VALKENBURG 
:tor in Normal Art Methods, College of Fine Arts, Syracuse Uni- 
tince 1901. 
nee, 509 Crouse Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

EARL HOLLENBECK 
,UMNi Rbcord, No. 1471. 

5MKNT : In Architectural office of G. A. Wright (No. 932), 1897-8; 
P. W. Kirkland (No. 1072), Rome, N. Y., 1898-9 ; offices in New 
•7i 1899-1902. Instructor in Architecture, College of Fine Arts, 
University, since 1902. 

d 20 May 1902, Margaret E. Telfer of Syracuse, N. Y. 
nee, 617 Walnut Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

AMY EL WELL CRANE 1903 

:tor in Vocal Music, College of Fine Arts, Syracuse University, 

d 5 Aug. J903 Frank Edgar Farley (See Faculty Record, p. 156 
, College of Liberal Arts). 
snce, Boston Mass. 

LILLA TAYLOR 
:tor in Vocal Music, College of Fine Arts, Syracuse University, 
a. • 

tnce, 204 Marshall St., Syracuse, N. Y. 



I30 ADMINISTRATION AND INSTRUCTION 

1902 GEORGE ALEXANDER RUSSELL 

Born 2 Oct. 1880 at Franklin, Tenu. Student from Gainesville, Tex., 

1897-1901. B. Mus. 
Teacher and Organist. Organist, Tabernacle Baptist Church, Utic<«, N. Y. 

Instructor in Piano, College of Fine Arts, Syracuse University, since 

1902. Associate American Guild of Organists, obtained in Jan. 1903 at 

Syracuse, N. Y. 
Residence, 418 Crouse Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

1902 MARIE LINDEMER DAVIS 

Instructor in Vocal Music, Collesre of Fine Arts, Syracuse. University, 
since 1902. 

Residence, 713 Townsend St., Syracuse. N. Y. 

1902 ADELINE BELINDA HUNT 1903 

Born 1876. Student from Oneida 1895-1900. B.P. Received the Hiram 

Gee Fellowship in Painting and pursued studies in Paris, 1900-1. 
Instructor in Painting, College of Fine Arts, Syracuse University, 1902-3. 
Residence, 721 So. Beech St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

1902 LILLIA MARWICK OLCOTT 1903 

Born 18 June 1879 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Syracuse in College 
of Liberal Arts, 1896-7 ; in College of Fine Arts, 1899-1903. IIB*. Cer- 
tificate in Decorative Design, 1902 ; in Normal Art, 1903. 

Instructor in Keramic Art, College of Fine Arts, Syracuse University, 
1902-3. Supervisor of Drawing in the Public Schools and Instructor of 
Drawing in the High School, Johnstown, N. Y., since 1903. 
Residence, Johnstown, N. Y. 

1902 MAJOR FRED REED 1903 
Bom 17 May 1875 ^^ Reynoldsville, Pa. Student from Reynoldsville, 

1897-1901. *T. A.B. B.Ar.1903. 

Student in College of Fine Arts, 190 1-3. Assistant in English, College 
of Fine Arts, Syracuse Univerity, 1902-3. 

With Cass Gilbert, architecture, New York, N. Y. 

Residence, 79 Wall St., New York, N. Y. 

1903 HAROLD MORTON ADKINS 
Born 31 Oct. 1876 at Cleveland, O. 

Instructor in Vocal Music, College of Fine Arts, Syracuse University, 
since 1903. 

Residence, 101 Durston Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

1903 WILLIAM ALFRED WHITE 

Born 9 Mar. 1875 at Baltimore, Md. Pupil Peabody Conservatory. 
Director of Music in North Carolina School for the Blind, six years ; Same, 

A. and M. College, two years. Head of department of Theory in Clavier 

Piano School, two years. Instructor in Violoncello and Piano, College of 

Fine Arts, Syracuse University, since 1903. 
Residence, 707 Madison St., Syracuse, N. Y. 



ADMINISTRATION AND INSTRUCTION I3I 

GRACE LYDIAN EVANS 
m 19 Feb. 1877. Former residence Philadelphia, Pa. Student of 
iam Chase, Clifford Grayson and others. 

stmctor in Cast Drawing, College of Pine Arts, Syracuse University, 
t 1903. 
isidence, 608 University Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

ELLEN LOVISA NEWTON 
im 3 May 185 rat Mexico,N. Y. Was graduated from Packer Collegiate 
itnte, 1871. 
stmctor in China Painting, College of Fine Arts, Syracuse University, 

t 1903 

isidence, 714 Crouse Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

PROFESSORS : COLLEGE OF LAW 

JAMES BYRON BROOKS, DEAN 
« Alumni Rbcord, No. 1897 and Faculty Record, p. 205, College of 

• 

7FPLKMENT : Instructor in Equity Jurisprudence and Wills, 1895-7. 
istmctor in Equity Jurisprudence, Trusts and Constitutional Law, 
-9. Professor of Law (Equity Jurisprudence, Trusts and Constitutional 
), 1899-1900. Same (Procedure at Common Law and Constitutional 
), 1900-1. Same (Procedure at Common Law, Medical Jurisprudence 
Roman Law), since 1902. 
esidence, 1013 E. Adams St.. Syracuse. N. Y. 

GILES H. STILWELL 
« AxuMNi Record, pp. 205 and 206. 

rppi,KMBNT : Instructor in Personal Property and Torts, College of Law, 
icuse University, 1895-9. Professor of Law (Personal Property and 
a), [899-1900. Professor of Law (Personal Property, Trusts and Torts), 
e 1900. 
»idence, 1906 W. Genesee St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

EDWARD HAMILTON BURDICK 1902 

;e Alomni Rbcord, p. 206. 

TPPLBMBNT : Instructor in Contracts and Domestic Relations, College 
waw, Syracuse University, 1895-9. Professor of Law (Contracts and 
lestic Relations), 1899-1900. Same (Contracts, Domestic Relations, 
ments and Common Carriers), 1900-2. 
eaidence, 605 E. Genesee St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

i FRANK ROBINSON WALKER 

ee Alumni Rbcord, No. 684 and Faculty Record, p. 206, College of 

9. 

UPPLBMBNT : Instructor in Bills and Notes and the Law of Real Prop- 

f, College of Law, Syracuse University, 1895-9. Professor Law (Bills 

i Notes and the Law of Real Property), 1899- 1900. Same (Bills and 



132 ADMINISTRATION AND INSTRUCTION 

Notes, Equity Jnrispmdence and the La^r of Real Property), 1900-2. Same 
(Bills and Notes, Contracts and the Law of Real Property) , since 1902. 
Residence, 1524 Grape St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

1897 LOUIS LINCOLN WATERS 

See Alumni Record, p. 210. 

SUPPLBMBNT : Lecturer on Statute Law, including the Statute of Limi- 
tations and the Statute of Frauds, College of Law, Syracuse Universitj, 
1897-^. Instructor in same, 1899-1902. Professor of Law (Statute Lsw, 
Equity, Constitutional Law and the Law of Evidence), since 1902. 

Residence, 341 Westcott St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

INSTRUCTORS 

1895 CHARLES L. STONE 

See Alumni Record, p. 207. 

SUPPI.BMBNT : Lecturer on Principal and Agent, College of Law, Syra- 
cuse University, 1895-9. Instructor in Principal and Agent, Same, 1899-1902. 
Instructor in the Law of Principal and Agent, Same, since 1902. 

Residence, 815 James St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

1895 GEORGE McGOWAN 

See A1.UMN1 Rbcord, p. 207. 

Suppi^mrnt : Lecturer on Elementary Law and Trusts, College of Law, 
Syracuse University, 1895-9. Instructor in Elmentary Law and Tmsti, 
Same, 1899-1900. Instructor in Elementary Law, Same, since 190a 

Residence, 207 Highland Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

1895 EDWIN NOTTINGHAM 19W 

See Alumni Rrcord, No. 314 and Faculty Record, p. 207, College of Law. 
Suppi^BMBNT : Lecturer on the law of Evidence, College of law, Syra- 
cuse University, 1895-9. Instructor in the law of Evidence, Same, 
1899-1902. 
Residence, Syracuse, N. Y. 

1897 ALBERT C. PHILLIPS 

See Alumni Rbcord, p. 210. 

SUPPLBMBNT : Lecturer on Wills and Administration, College of Law, 
Syracuse University, 1897-9. Instructor in Wills and Administration, Same, 
1899-1902. Instructor in the Law of Wills and Administration, Same, since 
1902. 

Residence, 1210 S. Salina St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

1899 LAMONT STI LWELL 

Born 29 June 1852 at Windsor, N. Y. Student at Cortland Normal School. 
Admitted to the practice of Law 12 Feb. 1892, since which time has prac- 
ticed in Syracuse. Alderman 17th ward of Syracuse, 1900-2. Instructor ifl 
the Law of Partnership and of Liens, College of Law, S3rracn8e Universal 
since 1899. Has published, " Stilwell's Practical Question Book,*' i8%i 
** Stilweirs Brief Lessons on Human Body,*' 1886. 



ADMINISTRATION AND INSTRUCTION 133 

17 Dec. 1883, I. Adelle Smith of Auburn, N. Y. 
&lph L., bom I Apr. 1885. (See Non-graduates), 
e, 108 Comstock Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

CEYLON H. LEWIS 1903 

CNI RSCORD. p. 208. 

BNT : Lecturer on Practice, College of Law, Syracuse University, 
instructor in Practice, Same, 1899-1900. Instructor in Code 
d Pleading in Civil Actions, Special Proceedings and Provisional 
Same, 1900-3. 
e 105 Purman St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

BENJAMIN JAY SHOVE 1901 

1903 
<Ni Rbcord, No. 486 and Faculty Record, p. 208, College of 

[BNT : Lecturer on Criminal Law and Procedure in Criminal 
ege of Law, Syracuse University , 1895-9. Instructor in Criminal 
rocedure in Criminal Cases, Same, 1899-190 1. Lecturer on Pro- 
Iriminal Cases, 1902-3. 
e, 365 Green St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

EDWARD C. WRIGHT 
iNi Rbcord, p. 208. 

[BNT : Lecturer on Sales, College of Law, Syracuse , University^ 
istructor in the Law of Sales, Same, 1899-1902. Instructor in the 
ts and Warranty, Same, since 1902. 
e, 216 Harrison St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

TITUS AARON LEVY 
iNi Rbcord, No. 1305. 

ibnt: ^A^. ^BK. Graduate student, College of Liberal 
1902. Instructor, College of Law, Syracuse University, 1900-2. 
in the Law of Quasi Contracts, Same, since 1902. 
e, 717 E. Genesee St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

JEROME L. CHENEY 
•r in the Law of Corporations, College of Law, Syracuse Uni- 
ce 1901. 
e, 728 Crouse Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

JOHN WENTWORTH CHURCH 
iNi Record, No. 1359. 

[BNT : Member of the Law firm of Brooks, Gere and Church 
1901). Instructor in Criminal Law and Procedure in Criminal 
ege of Law, Syracuse University, since 190 1. 
12 Sept. 1900, Mary Stanley of Syracuse, N, Y. 
e, 408 Second North St., Syracuse N. Y. 

ERNEST ISAAC EDGCOMB 
<Ni Rbcord, No. 901. 
[BNT : Instructor in the New York Code of Civil Procedure,. 



134 ADMINISTRATION AND INSTRUCTION 

College of Law, Syracuse University, since 1903. Supervisor of the i6tli 
ward, Syracuse, since 1898. Member of Com. to construct a new Court 
House for the County of Onondaga. 

Child^ Julian Webb, born 30 Dec. 1902. 

Residence, 708 University Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

1902 GEORGE N. CHENEY 

Instructor in Negligence and Damages, College of Law, Syracuse Uni- 
versity, 1902-3. Instructor in the Law of Negligence and Damages and of 
Bailments, since 1903. 

Residence, 728 Crouse Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

1902 LEONARD TITUS HAIGHT 

Born 32 Oct. 1872 at Skaneateles N. Y. 

A.B. (Williams). Student in College of Law, Syracuse University, 1899- 
1901. ^A^. LL.B. (Syracuse) 1901. Member of the Firm of Haight and 
Darling (No. 2773 Sup.) Syracuse, N. Y. Instructor in the Law of Domes- 
tic Relations, College of Law, Syracuse University, since 1902. 

Residence, 410 E. Willow St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

1897 FLORENCE CAMPBELL SHERWOOD 

See Ai«UMNi Record, p. 211. 

Suppi,BMBNT : Bom 14 Dec. i860 at Brewerton, N. Y. Student from 
Syracuse, N. Y., at Emerson College of Oratory, Boston. ?-i895. B.O. 

Teacher of Oratory, Physical Culture, Voice and Psychology at Syracuse 
and Canastota, and Studio Instructor in Oratory and Physical Cultuxe in 
the Public Schools of Canastota, N. Y., since 1895. Instructor in Elocution, 
College of Law, Syracuse University, since 1897. 

Residence, 426 S. Warren St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

LECTURERS 

1895 WILLIAM G. TRACY 1898 

See Alumni Record, p. 206. 

SUPPI.BMBNT : Lecturer on Surrogate's Court and Practice, College of 
Law, Syracuse University, 1895-8. 

Residence, 422 James St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

1895 CHARLES G. BALDWIN 19M 

See Alumni Rrcord, p. 208. 

SuPPLBMBNT : Lecturer on Partnership and Liens, College of Law, 
Syracuse University, 1895-9. Lecturer on Medical Jurisprudence, Same, 
1899-1902. 

Residence, 520 Oak St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

1895 PETER BAILLIE McLENNAN 

See Ai,UMNi Record, pp. 208-209. 
Residence, 716 Crouse Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 



ADMINISTRATION AND INSTRUCTION l$$ 

IRVING GOODWIN VANN 

DMNI RBCORD, p. 209. 

ice, 720 Lodi St., Syracnse, N. Y. 

WILLIAM NOTTINGHAM 1903 

(JMNI Rbcord, No. 315 and Faculty Record, pp. 206 and 207, Col- 
aw.' 

IMBNT : Alnmni trustee, 1892-1902. Regent of the State of New 
ce 1902. Lecturer on Law of Corporations, College of Law, Syra- 
ersity, 1895-9. Instructor in Law of Corporations, Same, 1899-1901. 
on Corporations, Same, 1901-3. 
ice, 701 Walnut Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

ALFRED WILKINSON 1902 

UMNi Rbcord, p. 210. 

CMBNT : Lecturer on the Law of Patents, College of Law, Syracuse 
y, 1897-1902. 
ice, 807 James St., S3rracuse, N. Y. 

STEPHEN MORTIMER COON 
UMNI Rbcord, pp. 210 and 211. 
ice, Oswego, N. Y. 

MICHAEL E. DRISCOLL 
OMNI Rbcord. p. 211. 
ice, 218 Green St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

CHARLES WALKER ANDREWS 
UMNI Rbcord, p. 211. 
ice, 606 James St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

LOUIS MARSHALL 
UMNI Rbcord, p. 180. 

CMBNT : Lecturer on the Constitution of the State of New York, 
f Law, Syracuse University, since 1899. 
ice, New York, N. Y. 

HOWARD PERCY DENISON 
I May 1859 at Parish, N. Y. Student from Euclid, N. Y., at Wes- 
liversity, 1881-3. AA*. Traveled in Europe, 1884. A. M. (Iowa 
v.)i899. 

' at Syracuse, N. Y., since 1888. Counselor in Patent Causes. 
. to practice before Supreme Court of the United States, 24 Mar. 
^nrer on the Law of Patents, College of Law, Syracuse University, 
u 

niaon has for some years maintained two prizes for excellency of 
ion, in the College of Liberal Arts. 
1 14 Oct. 1886, Bessie E. Hildreth of Herkimer, N. Y. 
m, Marian H. 

H. Hildreth 

Winthrop W. 
ace, 300 Walnut Place, Syracuse, N. Y. 



136 ADMINISTRATION AND INSTRUCTION 

PROFESSORS: COLLEGE OF APPLIED SCIENCE 

1902 CHARLES LEWIS GRIFFIN, ACTING DEAN 1903 
Born 1867 at Springfield, Mass. 

B.S. (Worcester Polyt. Inst.) 1888. 

Acting Dkan of Thk Collhgb of Applibd Scibncb, Syracuse Univer- 
sity, and Professor of Mechanical Engineering, 1902-3. 

Member American Society of Mechanical Engineers ; of American 
Society for Promotion of Engineering Education. 

Residence, 747 Crouse Ave,, Syracuse, N. Y. 

1903 WILLIAM KENT, DEAN 

Bom 5 Mar. 1851 at Philadelphia. Pa. Student at Central High School, 
Phila., graduating in 1868. A.B. A.M.(i873). Student at Cooper Union, 
New York, 1870-2. Graduated with Cooper Union Medal. Student at 
Steven's Inst, of Tech., 1875-6. M.E. ATA. Asst. in U. S. Board for 
testing metals ; research under Prof. R. H. Thurston, 1868-74. Editor 
Am. Manufacturer and Iron World, Pittsburg, Pa. 1877-9. Supt. Steel 
Dept. of Shoenberger & Co., Pittsburg, 1879-82. Mgr. Pittsburg office of 
the Babcock & Wilcox Co., Boiler Mfr*s., 1882-3. Supt. Sales Dept. and 
Eng*r. of Tests, same Co., at New York, 1883-5 Gen. Mgr. The Springer 
Torsion Balance Co., New York, 1885-90. Office practice as Consulting 
Engineer, New York, 1890- 1903. Assoc. Editor Engineering News, New 
York, 1895- 1903. Dean of thb Collbgb of Applibd Scibncb, and Pro- 
fessor of Mechanical Engineering, Syracuse Uniyeraity, since 1903. 

Has published ** The Strength of Materials," Van Nostrand's Science 
Series, No. 41, 1879 : *' Wrought Iron and Chain Cablea ** — abridgement <^ 
Beardslee's Report, New York, John Wiley & Sons, 1879 ; *• The Mech. 
Engineer's Pocket Book'*, r'^iV/., 1895; ** Steam Boiler Economy*', ibui,t 
1901. Contributed about 300 pp. of ** Modern Mechanism *'~ supplement 
of Appleton's Cyclopedia of Mechanics. Frequently contributed papento 
the Trans, of the Amer. Inst, of Mining Engineer's and of the Amer. Soc. 
of Mech. Engineers. 

Member Amer. Inbt. of Mining Eng'rs. since 1876 ; Mgr. of Same, 
1900-2 ; Member Amer. Assoc, for the Advancement of Science since 
1877 ; Fellow of same since 1883; also Vice-President and Chm. Sec. D-. 
1895 ; Member Amer. Soc Mech. Eng'rs, since 1880 ; Mgr. of same, 1885-^1 
and Vice-President, 1888-90 ; Member Eng'rs. Soc. of Western Penna^ 
188 1 -4 ; of Amer. Soc. of Heating and Ventilating Engineers since 1898; 
Vice-President of same, 1903 ; Member Soc. for the Promotion of 
Engineering Education since 1894 ; of the Amer. Soc. for Testing Materi- 
als ; of the Engineer's Club, New York, since 1888. 

Married 25 Feb. 1879 Marion W. Smith of Jersey City, N. J. 

Children, Robert Thurston, born 17 July 1880. 

William Edgar, born 4 Feb. 1884 ; died 4 Apr. 1885. 

Agnes Scott, born 4 Feb. 1884. 

Edward Raylor, born 6 Dec. 1888. 

Frederick Wield, born 9 July 1893 ; died 5 Mar. 1894. 

Residence, 808 University Ave. , Syracuse, N, Y. 



ADMINI9TRATXON AND INSTRUCTION I37 

WILLIAM PRATT GRAHAM 
UMNi Record, No. ii39and Faculty Record, p. 149, College of 
kits. 

CMRNT : Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering, Syracuse 
J, 1897-1901. Professor of Electrical Engineering, College of 
Science, Same, since 1901. 

d 8 June 1899, Cora May Dodson (No. 1213) of Syracuse, N. Y. 
ttce, 504 University Place, Syracuse, N. Y. 

PAUL COOK NUGENT 
,uMNi Record, p. 156. 

SMENT : Instructor in Civil Engineering, College of Liberal Arts, 
University, 1897-1900. Associate Professor of Civil Engineering, 
)ao-02. Professor of Civil Engineering, College of Applied 
Same, since 1902. Has published " Plane Surveying " Mar., 1902, 
[ohn Wiley & Sons, N. Y. 

d 12 Sept. 1899, Mary Louise Logan of Salem, Va. 
fif, Paul Cook, born 15 Jan. 1901. 

Robert Logan, bom 9 Feb. 1902. 
nee, 417 University Place, Syracuse. N. Y. 

WILLIAM ERASTUS TAYLOR 
rUiCNi Record, No. 1177 and Faculty Record, p. 156, College of 
Lrts. 

BMENT : Ph.D. (Syracuse) 1902. lustructor in Mathematics, 
)f Liberal Arts, Syracuse University, 1897-1902. Associate Pro- 
Mathematics, Same, 1902-3. Professor of Applied Mathematics, 
>f Applied Science, since Jan. 1904. 

iblished ** On the Product of an Alternate by a Symmetric Fnnc- 
wf. Math, Monthly, 1903. 

d 30 June 1903, Mabel Clair Smith (See Non- graduates) of Syra- 
Y. 
ncc, 722 Irving Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

GEORGE HUGH SHEPARD 
8 Dec. 1870 at Trcnipa lean, Wis. Student from LaCrosse, Wis., 
Naval Academy, Annapolis, 1887-91. *rA. M.M.E.( Cornell) 
erved on the active list of the Navy until 8 Jan. 1898. Was then 
>n account of physical disability incurred in the line of duty. 
oring the Spanish War at Naval Station, Key West, Fla. 
:tor in Sibley College, Cornell University, 1898-J902. Associate 
r of Steam Engineering, College of Applied Science, Syracuse Uni- 
since 1902. 

d 1893, Jessie Elizabeth Watt of York, Pa. 
-Andrew Gilbert, born 25 June 1897. 
ncc, 307 Waverly Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 



138 ADMINISTRATION AND INSTRUCTION 

1902 WILLIAM MASON TOWLE 

Born 21 Dec. 1851 at Franklin, Vt. B.S. (Worcester Polyt. In§t.) 1877. 

Manufacturer of Builders* Finish and Furniture, Bnosbnrg Falls, Vt., 
1878-84. Mech. Supt. Bramble Lock Co., Terre Haute, Ind., 1884-5. 
Draftsman for United Brass Co., Loraine, O., 1885-6. Foreman Machine 
Shop, Rose Poly t. Inst., Terre Haute, Ind., 1886-8. Draftsman for Buck- 
eye Engine Co., Salem, O., 1888-9, Foreman of Machine Shop, Sibley 
College. Cornell University, 1889-91. Mech. Engineer, Mansfield Machine 
Shops, Mansfield, O., 1891-2. Asst Prof, of Practical Mechanics, Penna. 
State College, 1892-1902. Associate Professor of Same, College of Applied 
Science, Syracuse University, since 1902. 

Member American Society of Mechanical Engineers. 

Residence, 907 University Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

INSTRUCTORS 

1901 LEON BRUCE HOWE 
See Alumni Record, No. 1575. 

SuPPLEMBNT: Architectural Draughtsman with H. W. Wilkinson, Syra- 
cuse. 1898-1901. Same with E. A. Josselyn, New York City, 1901. 

Instructor in Architecture, College of Fine Arts, Syracuse University, 
1901-2. Instructor in Drawing, College of Applied Science, Same, since 
1902. 

Married 21 Feb. 1902, Irene Stevenson of S. W. Oswego, N. Y. 

Residence, 208 Woodland Ave., Syracuse, N. Y 

1902 EDWARD MORTIMER AVERY 
Born 28 Feb. 1849 at Groton, N. Y. 

Foreman of Machine Shop of The Groton Bridge & Mf'g. Co., 1873-99 
Instructor in Sibley College, Cornell University, 1899-1902. Instructor in 
Metal-work, College of Applied Science, Syracuse University, since 1902. 

Married 9 Oct. 1877, Lina L. Field of Lansing, N. Y. 

Children — Henry Gardner, born 27 Oct. 1878. 
Harold Field, born 2 Aug. 1880. 

Residence, 506 Irving Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

1903 OWEN MERIWETHER JONES 

Born 8 Nov. 1878 at Nashville.Tenn. Student from Nashville at Vandcr- 
bilt University, 1896-1900. B.E. 

Transitman, Tenn Central R'y., i Jan.-i May 1901. Resident Engineer 
of Construction of Atlantic & Birmingham R.R., 1901-2. Asst. Engineer. 
Nashville. Chattanooga & St. Louis R*y., Nashville, Tenn., i^y 
Instructor in Civil Engineering, College of Applied Science, Syricus* 
University, since 1903. 

Residence, 417 University Place, Syracuse, N. Y. 

1903 CARL HOFF BEACH 

Born 23 Feb. 1875 at Oberlin, O. 
B.S. (Iowa Univ.) 1900. M.E.(Comell) 1903. 



ADMINISTRATION AND INSTRUCTION 139 

itsman for Crocker-Wheeler Co., Ampere, N. J., Sammers of 1901 
Machinist with Pond Machine Tool Co., Plainfield, N. J., Jaly- 
. Instructor in Mechanical Drawing, College of Applied Science, 
University since 1903. 
nee 100 Waverly Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

ASSISTANTS 

ARTHUR H. SWEET 
7 Ang. 1854 at Bolivar, N. Y. 

nt in Mechanical Laboratory, College of Applied Science, Syracuse 
;y, since 1903. 

1 26 Sept 1883. Ida Benjamin of Groton, N. Y. 
Walter B., bom 8 Oct. 1885. 
nee, 205 E. Colviu St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

HARVEY FRANCIS CONNELL 
Brother of Nos. 3062 and 3355 
July 1876 at Jamesville, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, N. Y., 
). XAZ. E. E. 

.te Student and Assistant in Electrical Engineering, College of 
Science, Syracuse University, 1903-4. With C. H. Stoelting Co., 
;o since 1904. 
nee, 39 W. Randolph St., Chicago, 111. 

GEORGE EVERETT QUICK 
Brother of No. 3166 Sup. 
,UMNI RBCORD, No. 3167 Sup. 

Dec. 1879 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, 1898-1902. 

Itsman for the Kemp Mfg. Co. Electrical Engineer, General 
il Co.. Schenectady, N. Y. Assistant in Electrical Engineering, 
)f Applied Science, Syracuse University, since 1903. 
nee, 342 Delaware St., Syracuse, N. Y. 



ALUMNI OF SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY 

1 899- 1 903 Inclusive 
Class of 1895* 

2637 JANE B. DOWNS (TIPPLE) 
See Alumni Rbcord, p. 835. 

Born 15 May 1873 at Newark. N. J. Student from Newark, 1891-5. A*. 
A.B. (Conferred 13 June 1900 but to date from 1895). 
Asst. Principal. High School, Greenwich, Conn., 1895-6. 
Married 2 June 1897, Bertrand M. Tipple (No. 1263) of Camden, N. Y. 
Children, Silva, born 18 March 1898. 

Elizabeth, born 6 Sept. 1899. 

Bertrand Squier, born 11 Oct. 1900. 
Residence, 230 Decatur St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Class of 1898 

2638 ALBERT GREENLEAF WATKINS 
Born 6 Feb. 1871 at Ponipey, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, N. Y., 1894-^. 
M.D. 
Married 6 Apr. 1893, Harriet E. Stewart. 
Child^ Oliver M., born 7 Feb. 1894. 
Residence, Speedsville, N. Y. 

2639 RALPH ALLEN WILCOX 

Bom 23 Mar. 1874 at Dewitt, N. Y. Student from Manlins, N. Y., in 
College of Liberal Arts, 1892-3 ; in College of Medicine, 1894-8. B6II. 
M.D. 

Physician at Phoenix, N. Y., since 1899. 

Married 15 Nov. 1899. Margaret Glidden of Syracuse, N. Y. 

Residence, Phoenix, N. Y. 

Class of 1899 
2640 carrie may allen 

Born 27 July 1873 at Dewitt, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, 1894-9. KKT. 
B.S. M.S. ( Biology ) 1901 . 

Laboratory Assistant, Syracuse University, 1899-1901. Science Teacher, 
Mynderse Academ}', Seneca Falls, N. Y., since 1902. Has published '* A 

*One record of the class of i8q5 is given (reason for delay stated in the record) and two 
of the class of 1898. These two persons received their degrees at the semi-annual mectiDf of 
the trustees in Jan. 1899, but rank with the class of 1898. The trustee action wastoo late 
for their insertion in the Alumni Record. 



1^99 AX^UMNI OP 8YXACUSB UMIVBRSITY I4I 

Contribation to the Development of Parypha Crocea.*' Biol, Bull,, July 
1900. 
Residence, 204 W. Kennedy St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

2641 EVELYN FRANCES ALLEN 

Bom 2 Apr. 1876 at Oswego, N. Y. Stndent from Syracuse, N. Y., 1895-9. 
AM. B.L. 

Editor of Woman's Page, Syracuse Journal, 1899-1900. Music teacher, 
private pupils, since 1900. 

Residence, 324 W. Onondaga St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

2642 SUSAN MARIA ARMSTRONG (RYDER) 

Bom 24 Feb. 1874 at North Hampton, N. Y. Student from Cobleskill and 
SyraCQse, N. Y., 1895-9. A*. A.B. 

Teacher High School. Deposit, N.Y., 1899-1901; High School, Cobleskill, 
N. Y., 1 901-2. 

Biarried 31 Dec. 1902, Frank H. Ryder of Cobleskill, N. Y. 

Residence, Cobleskill, N. Y. 

2643 HELEN FRANCES AVERY 
Bom 29 August 1877 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, 1895-9. 
r#B. B.P. 
Residence, 504 W. 143d St., New York, N. Y. 

BASIL BRADLEY AYLESWORTH 
1897-9. LL.B. (See No 1439). 
SUPPLBMBNT : Student ia College of Law, 1897-9. 
Residence, 201 S. Beech St.. Syracuse, N. Y. 

2644 LEON BROOKS BACON 

Bom 24 July 1870 atTaberg, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, N. Y., 1897-9. 
♦A«. LL.B. Student at Williams College. AA«. A.B. (Williams) 
1893. Admitted to the Bar, 1898. Lawyer for a short time at Syracuse, N. 
Y., then in New York. Now at Cleveland, O. Has published '* Michael 
Bacon and his Descendants.** 

Married 24 July 1900, Anna Osborne Anthony of Philadelphia, Pa. 

Child, Harriet Anthony, born 27 Apr. 1902. 

Residence, 1131 Williamson Bld'g, Cleveland, O. 

2645 FLORENCE EMILY BAILEY (CROUSE) 
Bom 15 July 1877 at Salina, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, 1895-9. r*B. 
Ph.H. 
Bfarried 6 June 1901, Huntington Beard Crouse of Syracuse, N. Y. 
ChUd, Dorothy Bailey, born 26 May 1902. 
Residence, 104 Liberty St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

2646 LEONARD ASHLEY BARD 

Bom 29 Apr. 1874 at Gloversville, N. Y. Student from Gloversville, 
1895-9. A.B. 

Clergyman, Meth. Epis. Pastor at Johnsburg, N. Y., 1899-1901 ; at Rock 

City Palls, East Galway and Middle Grove, N. Y., since 1901. 

Married 15 Sept. 1893, Harriet M. Easterly of Gloversville, N. Y. 

Residence, Rock City Falls, N. Y. 



142 ALUMNI OF SYRACUSE UNIVBR8ITY 18^9 

2647 LOUIS JEREMIAH BEDELL 
Born 13 Oct. 1877 ^^ West Vienna, N. Y. Student from Bast Syracnie, 
N. Y. 1897-9. LL.B. 
Lawyer at Syracuse since 1899. 
Residence, East Syracuse, N. Y. 

2648 GILBERT GIDDINGS BENJAMIN 
Born 6 Dec. 1874 at Fond du Lac, Wis. Student from^ Buffalo, N. Y., 
1894-9, four years. ♦K*^. Ph.B. *BK. 

Teacher, Silver Creek, N. Y., 1899-1901. Graduate student, Yale Univer- 
sity, since 1901. Instructor in German and French, HMlhouse High School, 
New Haven, Conn., 1901-2. Fellow and Ass't. in^History, Yale University, 
1902-3. Instructor in American History, Hillhouse High School, since 
1903. Has published some articles in the Syracuse University Herald and a 
Buffalo, N. Y., newspaper. 
Residence, Hillhouse H. S., New Haven, Conn. 

2649 BERTHA ILIONE BENNETT 
Born 26 Feb. 1877 at Ilion, N. Y. Student from Norwood, N. Y., 1895-9. 

EB*. B.L. 
Graduate student in France pursuing Literature, Art, History and Mnsic, 

1899-1900. Student at the N. Y. State Library School, Albany, N. Y., 

1901-3. Scientific Assistant in the Library of the Dep*t. of Agriculture, 

Washington, D. C, since i Oct. 1903. 
Residence, 1220 O St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

2650 CLARA AMELIA BINGHAM (COLLINS) 

Born 12 Apr. 1876 at Lockwood, N. Y. Student from Lockwood, 1895-9, 
four years. r*B. Ph.B. 

Teacher, High School, Comwall-K>n-Hudson, N. Y., 1899-1902 ; Boon- 
ton, N. J., 1902-3. 

Married 4 Nov. 1803 , Halsey Mudge Collins of Cortland, N. Y. 

Residence, 18 Clinton Ave., Cortland, N. Y. 

2651 JOHN CARY BOLAND 
Bom 27 June 1876 at Watervale, N. Y. Student from Manlius, N. Y., 
1895-9. Ben. Ph.B. LL.B.1901. 
Student in College of Law, 1899-1901. 
Lawyer at Syracuse, N. Y., since 1901. 
Residence, 406 Crouse Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

2652 VINCENT DEPAUL BRADY 
Born 24 June 1879 at Springfield, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, N. Y., 

1885-9. Ph.B. LL.B.1901. 
Student in College of Law, 1899-1901. Lav^er at Syracuse, N. Y., 

since 1901. 
Residence, 725 Crouse Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

2053 PATTY NAOMI BRALEY 
Born 12 Sept« 1879 at Chestertown, N. Y. Student from Cobleskill, N. 
Y., 1895-9. AAA. Ph.B. 



I^ ALUMNI OP SYRACUSB UNIVERSITY 143 

Teacher at Franklin, N. Y., 1899-Peb. 1900 ; at Warrensburg, N. Y., Feb. 
1900-2 ; at Cobleakill, N. Y., since 1902. 
Residence, Cobleskill, N Y. 

2654 CLARA BMMA BROCKWAY (SPENCER) 
Bom 17 Feb. 1873 at Gloversville, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, N. Y., 
1894-9. B.L. 
Harried 23 Oct. 1902, Charles E. Spencer of Syracuse, N. Y. 
Residence, 405 Cortland Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

2655 EVA MAY BRYAN 

Bom 20 Aug. 1878 at Onondaga Hi11,N. Y. Student from Onondaga Hill, 
1895-^ KKF. A.B. «BK. 

Teacher of Languages, High School, Henderson, Ky., 1 899-1 901. Pre- 
ceptreaa. Classical High School, Palmyra, N. Y., since 1901. 

Residence, Palmyra, N. Y. 

2656 KATE LUELLA BURDICK 
Bora 6 May 1876 at Brookfield,N.Y Student from Syracuse, 1895-9. B.S. 
Teacher at Constableville, N. Y., Jan. 1900-June 1902 ; at Manlius, N. Y., 
nnce 2 Feb. 1903. 
Residence, 154 Coming Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

2657 GRACE ELMA BURPEE 
Bom 21 Mar. 1876 at Beebe Plain, Quebec. Student from Syracuse, N. Y., 
1895-9. A.B. 
Teacher, High School, Syracuse. N. Y., since 1900. 
Residence, 325 Delaware St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

2658 JESSIE R. CAMPBELL 

Bom 16 June 1877 at Pittsfield. Mass. Student from Pittsfield at Middle- 
bury College, 1895-7 ; at Syracuse University, 1897-9. JIB*. A.B. 
Teacher of English, Academy, Corning, N. Y., since 1903. 
Residence, 122 East First St., Corning, N. Y. 

2659 LENA MAY CHAPMAN 

Bom 7 June 1874 at East Cobleskill, N. Y. Student from East Coble- 
skill, 1895-9. A.B. 

Teacher, High School, Pulaski, N. Y., 1899-1900 ; Hammonton, N. J. 
1900-3 ; Amsterdam, N. Y., since 1903. 

Residence, 6 Kimball St. , Amsterdam, N. Y. 

2660 HOWARD FITZGERALD CLARK 
Bom 21 Mar. 1875 at Camillus, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, N. Y., 

1895-9. M.D. 
Physician at Oswego, N. Y. 
Residence, 194 W. 5th St., Oswego, N. Y. 

2661 LYMAN WELLS CLARY 
Bom 7 Oct. 1875 at Oswego, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, N. Y., 
1894-9. 'i'T. B.Mus. 
Engaged in Choir, Oratorio and Concert work as a vocalist in New York- 
i, 204 Highland Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 



144 AX.UMNI OP SYRACUSE UNIVBRSITY 1899 

2662 BERTHA ELIZABETH COATES 
Born 26 Jan. 1878 at Erie, Pa. Student from Erie, 1895-9. T^B. PIlB. 
4»BE. 
Residence, 220 W. Fourth St., Erie. P. 

2663 CARLOS JOHN COLEMAN 
Born 28 Jan. 1866 at Catharine, N. Y. Student from West Eaton, N. Y., 

1898-9. LL.B. School Commissioner ist Dist., Bladison Co., since 1899. 
Admitted to Bar, Oct. 1899. Lawyer at Madison, N. Y., 1899-1903:11 
Hamilton, N. Y., since 1903. 

Married 13 Aug. 1896, Cora E. Peck of Cortland, N. Y. 

Children ^ Donald John, bom 12 June, 1897. 
Dorothy Louise, born 17 Jan. 1901. 

Residence, Madison, N. Y. 

2664 MARY LOUISE CONNELL 
Born 7 Sept. 1876 at Lysander, N. Y. Student from Baldwinsville, N.Y., 

1894-9. KKP. B.Mus. 

Private music teacher at Baldwinsville for a time. Teacher of Piano sod 
Vocal, Classical School, Syracuse, N. Y., 1901-2 ; Same, Acadia Seminsry, 
Wolfville, Nova Scotia, since 1903. 

Residence, Wolfville, Nova Scotia. 

2665 MARGUERITE ROSE CONNELLY 

Bom 28 Dec. 1876, in Wicklow Co., Ireland. Student from Syracuse, 
N. Y., 1895-9. B.P. 

Studio in Syracuse, N. Y. 

Residence, 304 Gifford St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

2666 BYER IVES COOPER 

Born 26 Nov. 1874 at Auburn, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, N. Y., in 
College of Liberal Arts, 1895-7 ; in College of Law, 1897-9. AKE. tA*. 
LL.B. Lawyer in New York and Syracuse since 1899. 

Married 22 June 1904, Frances Myers (see Non-graduates) of Syracuse, N. Y. 

Residence, 108 Walnut Place, Syracuse, N. Y. 

CHARLES EDWIN COONEY 
1897-9. LL.B. (See No. 1450) 

Suppi^KMENT : Student in College of Law, 1897-9. Lawyer at Syracuse, 
N. Y., since 1899. 

Residence, 112 Standart St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

2667 HARLEY J. CRANE 

Born 18 Mar. 1875 at Spafiford, N. Y. Student from Otisco Valley, N. Y., 
1895-9. AT. Ph.B. LLB.i9or. 

Student in College of Law, 1899-1901. Lawyer at Syracuse, N. Y., since 
1901. 

Residence, 141 W. Kennedy St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

2668 LILLIAN BELLE CROMMIE 

Born 16 Aug. 1872 at Williamstown, Mass. Student from Syracuse, N. Y., 
1896-9. B.Mus. 

Director of Music at Cazenovia (N. Y.) Seminary and also conducting s 



1899 ALUMNI OF SYRACUSE UNIVBRSITY I45 

privmte studio in Syracuse, and church organist, since 1899. Has done much 
concert work, ist Vice-President for Onondaga Co. of the Music Teachers' 
Association of New York State for three years. 
Residence, 134 South Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

2669 CARLOS EMMONS CUMMINGS 
Brother of Noa. laiaand 3068. 
Bom 7 Aug. 1878 at Springville, N. Y. Student from Buffalo, N. Y., 
1895-9. ^^* A.B. M.D. (Buffalo Univ.) 1903. 
Residence, 560 Auburn Ave., Buffalo, N. Y. 

2670 ERNEST RALPH DBMING 

Bom 25 Mar. 1874 at Day, N. Y. Student from Sandy Hill, N. Y., and 
Sjrracuse, N. Y., in the College of Liberal Arts, 1891-2 ; in the College of 
law, 1897-9. LL.B. 

lawyer at Syracuse, since 1899. Clerk of the Board of Supervisors, 
Onondaga Co., 1902-3. Member of the Citizens* Club ; the Syracuse Yacht 
Club ; the Unity Club, etc. 

Residence, 360 Seymour St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

2671 BENJAMIN VAN ETTEN DOl^PH 
Bom z8 Oct. 1875 at Port Jervis, N. Y. Student from Port Jervis, 1896- 
1900. *Ae, NZN. M.D. 

On staffs at Bellevue Hospital and Hodson St House of Relief, New 
Vork, 1899-1900. Physician at Sufferu, N. Y., 1900-3; at Denver, Colo., 
iiiice Feb. 1903. Member Rockland Co. Medical Society. 
Residence, 916 E. loth Ave., Denver, Colo. 

2672 THOMAS DOUGHERTY 
Bom 16 Sept. 1872 at Chittenango, N. Y. Student from PenTville, N. Y. 
1897-9. LL.B. Lawyer at Syracuse, N. Y., since 1899. 
Residence, 811 E. Fayette St, Syracuse, N. Y. 

2673 MARY EUNICE DOW (CARRIER) 
Bom 24 June 1876 at Lanesborough, Mass. Student from Lanesborough, 
^^5-9- Ph.B. 
Teacher, Lanesborough, Mass., 190C-1. 

Married 3 Apr. 1901, George Irving Carrier of Fulton, N. Y. 
Child, Grace Muriel, born 24 May, 1902. 
Residence, Lanesborough, Mass. 

2674 ZONA L. DUNN (RUSSELL) 

Bom 5 Aug. 1875 at Stokes, N. Y. Student from Rome, N. Y., 1895-9. 
m». Ph.B. 4»BE. 

Teacher, Bethel College. McKenzie, Tenn., 1899-1900; High School, 
Clyde, N. Y., 190C-1 ; Cornwall, N. Y., 1901-2. 

Married i July 1902, George W. Russell, D.D.S.,of St. Joseph, Mich. 

Child, Edna Lnlita, born 6 Oct 1903, at Peoria, 111. 

Residence, Lewistown, 111. 

2675 THERESA FRANTZ 
Bom 13 June 1878 at Geneva, N. Y. Student from Canoga, N. Y., 1895-9. 
RMos. 



146 ALUMNI OF SYRACUSE UNITBR8ITY 1899 

Awarded graduate acholarsliip in Vocal Music. Teacher of Vocal Mniic 
and Piano, Southern Female College, Petersburg. Va., 1900-1 ; Samc.Nomial 
School, E. Stroudsburg, Pa., 1901-2. 

Residence, Canoga, N. Y. 

2676 GERTRUDE HALL GAGGIN 
Born 50 July 1872 at Erie, Pa. Student from Erie, 1895-9. r*B. Ph.B. 

Teacher, Pefkiomen Seminary, Pennsburg, Pa., 1899-1900; High School, 

Erie, Pa., since 1901. 
Residedce, Erie, Pa. 

2677 MATTIE PHEBE GOODRICH (HOYT) 
Bom 6 Nov. 1873 at Plainfield, Vt. Student from Syracuse, 1895-9. B.P. 
Awarded graduate scholarship in painting. Student at New York School 
of Art, New York City, two years. Teacher,Goddard Seminary, Barre, Vt, 
one year. 
Married 20 Aug. 1902, Charles A. Hoyt of Barre, Vt 
Residence, 4 Camp St., Barre, Vt. 

2678 BENJAMIN FRANKLIN HAANEL 
Born 2 Sept. 1877 at Coburg, Ont., Canada. Student from Syracuse, 

1895-9. Ben. B.s. 

Residence, Ottawa, Canada. 

2679 ANNA ROBERTSON HART 
Sister of No. 1465. 
Born 21 Oct. 1867 at Florence ville, N. B. Student from Bridgetown, 
Nova Scotia, 1895-9. A*. Ph.B. 

Teacher of English, High School, North Tonawanda, N. Y., 1899-1900; of 
Sociology, Folts Institute, Herkimer, N. Y., since 1900. 
Residence, Herkimer, N. Y. 

2680 WILLIAM LYON HASBROUCK 
Born 23 Aug, 1877 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, 1895-9. 

<^T. Ph.B. 

In business in Chicago, 111., 1899-1901 ; in Kansas City, Mo., since 1901. 

(Commercial salesman for Barton Bros., Shoe Manufacturers, Kansas City, 

Mo.) 
Residence, Kansas City, Mo. 

2681 MINNIE FLORENCE HEERMANS 
Born 9 Oct. 187 1 at Penfield, N. Y. Student from Milo Center, N. Y. 

1892-3 and 1896-9. r*B. B.S. *BK. 
Preceptress, Free Academy, Addison, N. Y., 1894-6. Teacher of Phjrsics 

and Mathematics, Wadleigh High School for Girls, New York, N. Y., since 

1899. 
Residence, 58 W. 105 St., New York, N. Y. 

2682 GEORGE WASHINGTON HEY, JR. 
Born 8 June 1875. Student from Syracuse, 1895-9. B.Mas. 
On a ranch in Montana and giving instruction in Music. 
Residence. 121 N. 25th St., Billings, Mont. 



) AI^UMNI OP SYRACUSB UNIVSRSlTy 147 

3683 LYMAN BARL HIGBBB 
mh 9 Sept. 1878 at Homer, N. Y. Student from B. Onondaga, N. Y., 
^-9- LL.B. 

iwyer at Syracuse, N. Y., since 1899. (Wilcox & Higbee). 
arried 17 July 1899, Rosanna Smith of Seneca Falls, N. Y. 
kiidt Lanra Margaret, born 12 Feb. 190X. 
esidence, 215 Corning Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

2684 BDNA HILDRETH 
3m 20 Jan. 1876 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, 1894-^. 

A.B. ♦BK. A.M.(N. Y. Univ.)i902. 
Kt. in English department, Syracuse University, 1899-Feb. 1900. 
:hcr of Greek and English, High School, Passaic. N. J., Feb. 1900-Jnne 
!. Teacher of English, National Park Seminary, Forest Glen, Md.,1902- 
ligh School, Syracuse, N. Y., since 1903. 
esidence, 210 B. Onondaga St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

2685 LENA LBMOYNB HOOSE 
:>m 23 Mar. 1876 at Mexico, N. Y. Student from Mexico, N. Y., 1894-9. 

esidence, Mexico, N. Y. 

2686 MABEL EMMA JACOBY (JOHNSON) 
195-9. B. Mus. (See Faculty Record, p. 128 Sup., College of Fine Arts.) 

2687 HERBERT RAY JAQUAY 
mi 16 Aug. 1870 at Chaumont, N. Y. Student from Chaumont, in Col- 
: of Liberal Arts, 1889-91 ; in College of Law, 1897-9. ^A6. ^A^. 
B. 
Kwyer at Syracuse, N. Y., since 1899. 

iarried 20 Mar. 1894, Sarah E. Simpson of Alexandria Bay, N. Y. 
esidence, 134 Page Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

2688 WILLIAM KEN YON JERMY 
om 17 Feb. 1875 at Hammond, N. Y. Student from Oneida, N. Y., 
»-9. «A«. LL.B. 

Mporal Co. C. 3d N. Y. Vol. Infantry, 1898. 

ftwyer at Oneida, N, Y., two years ; at New York, N. Y., two years. 
X, and treas. South McAllister Sash & Door Co. 
esidence, South McAllister, Ind. Ter. 

2689 ♦ M YRTIE EVELYN JOHNS (TAYLOR) 
om 25 Nov. 1875 at Penfield, Pa. Student from Syracuse, N. Y., 1895-9. 

J. Fh.B. 

eacher at Solvay, N. Y. 

larried 15 Aug. 1901, (Rev.) Joseph Taylor of Columbus, O. 

^hUdf Dorothy Winters, bom 18 June 1902. 

)ied 23 June 1902 at Columbas, O. 

2690 WILLIAM KAST 
Boni 17 Apr. 1875 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Syracuse in College 
Uberal Arts, 1895-7 ; in College of Law, 1897^9. LL.B. , 



148 ALtTMHI OP SYRACU8B UNIVBRSITY 

Lawyer at Syractise, N. Y., since 1899. 

Residence, 404 Seymour St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

2691 HARVEY STEPHEN KELLY 

Bom 24 Dec. 1876 at Manlias, N. Y. Student f rem Erieville, N. Y., 1895^ 
4»Ae. A.B. 

Special Agent N. W. Mutual Life Insurance Co., Syracuse, N. Y., 1899- 
1902. Manager Kelly Lumber Co., Syracuse, since 1902. 

Residence, 313 E. Onondaga St., Syracuse, N. V. 

2692 CLARA BLANCHE KNAPP 
Born 17 Nov. 1877 at Fairmount, N. Y. Student from Fait mount, 1895-9. 

r4»B. A.B. «BK. 
Teacher of Languages, Academy, Lowyille, N. Y., 1899-1903 ; at Biassent, 

N. Y., since 1903. 
Residence, Massena, N. Y. 

2693 J. CLAUDE LATHAM 
• Bom 12 Jan. 1875 at Franklinville, N. Y. Student from Franklinville, 
1895-9. *K4'. A.B. 

Asst. Supt. of Schools, Columbus, Neb., 1899-1900. Owner and Editor of 
the Canisteo Times and the Titnes- Republican ^ Canisteo, N. Y. 

Married i Jan. 1900, Mary E. Mumford (see Non-graduates) of Syracuse, 
N. Y. 

Child^ Elna Jeannette, bom 15 June 1901. 

Residence, Canisteo, N. Y. 

2694 HARRY SHERIDAN LEE 
1895-9. A.B. (See Faculty Record, p. 109 Sup., College of Liberal Arts.) 

2695 WILLIAM FRASER LEWIS 
Born 2 Mar. 1876 at Hopewell, N. Y. Student from Hopewell and Syra- 
cuse, N. Y., 1895-9. AT. Ph.B. LL.B.r903. 
Student in College of Law, 1899-1903, three years. 
Married 17 May 1902, Cora B. Spencer of Rochester, N. Y. 
Residence, 702 Irving Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

2696 HUGH SKARS LOWTHER 
Born 10 Nov. 1877 at Knight, O. Student from Fishkill, N. Y., 1895-9. 

♦K^'. A.B. ^BK. 

Teacher, Genesee Wesleyan Seminary, Lima, N. Y., 1899-1901; Friends 

School, Wilmington, Del., 1901-2. Graduate Student, University of Penna., 

since 1901. 

Residence, Univ. of Pa., Philadelphia, Pa. 

2697 HENRY MICHAEL MCCARTHY 
Born 5 May 1871 at Pittsfield, Mass. Student from S3rracuse, N. Y., 1897-^ 
♦A*. LL.B. 

Residence, 124 Hawley Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

2698 PHILLIP IRVING MANSON 
Born 21 Apr. 1878 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, 1897-9. 
LL.B. 



AI,UMNI OP SYRACU8B UNIVBRSITY 149 

wyer at San Francisco, Cal., since Jan. 1900. 
sidence, San Francisco, Cai. 

2699 EDWARD ARTHUR MARTIN 
m 6 Dec. 1869 in Devonshire, England. Stndent from Kingston, Pa., 
-9. ♦K'i'. Ph.B. 

rrgyman, Meth. Epis. Pastor at Apalachin, N. Y., 1899-1901 ; at 
wpany, Pa., since 1901. 

Tried 20 Aug. 1899, Eva L. Miller (see Non-graduates) of Mexico, N. Y. 
sidence, Mehoopany, Pa. 

2700 WILLIS HOAG MICHELL 

rn 10 June 1876 at Copake, N. Y. Student from Philmont, N. Y., 

-9, ♦T. A.B. *BK. 

fryer at Syracuse, N. Y. 

aideuce, Moore Plats, Syracuse, N. Y. 

2701 GEORGE ALLEN MILLER 

m 18 May i860 at Louisville, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, N. Y., 

-9. LL.B. 

wyer at Syracuse, N. Y., since 1899 

mried 24 June 1901, Eva D. Gardner of Marathon, N. Y. 

ild^ Selma Louise, born 15 June 1902. 

sidence, 825 University Block, Syracuse, N. Y. 

2702 MARSHALL EMORY MORRIS 
m 13 May 1877 ^^ Rome, N. Y. Student from Rome, 1895-9. ^E4^. 

the newspaper business. With the Syracuse Herald 
irried 30 July 1900, Edith Cox Millett of Gouverueur, N. Y. 
ildren, John Sweet land, born 2 Feb. 1902. 

Richard Templeton, born 4 July 1903. 
:sidence, 319 S. Warren St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

2703 FREDERICK ALLEN MOTT 
rn 2 Aug. 1874 at Darien, Wis. Student from Syracuse, N. Y., 1894-9. 

B.S. 
aughtsman with Keystone Electric Co. , Erie, Pa., Feb. 1899- Aug. 1900. 
sting department General Electric Co., Schenectady, N. Y., Aug. 1900- 
1902. Asst. Supt. Lincoln (Neb.) Traction Co., Jan. 1902- Apr. 1903. 
trical Engineer, Keystone Electric Co., Erie, Pa., since Apr. 1903. 
*mber American Institute of Electrical Eu>{ineer8. 
irried 20 Aug. 1902, Alice R. Coates (No. 1544) of Erie, Pa. 
sidence, 701 Liberty St., Erie, Pa. 

2704 CHARLES THOMAS MURDOCK 
Brother of No. 717 
rn 1874 at West Pittsfield, Mass. Student from Worcester, Mass., 
^. AT. A.B. 

ident in Boston School of Theology. Clergyman, Meth. Epis. Pastor 
est Pittsburg, Pa., 1902-3 ; at Munhall, Pa., since 1903. 



I50 AI«UMNI OP SYRACUSE UMIVBRSITy l8)) 

Married 23 Jan. 1902, Edith M. Wilson (No. 2741 Sup.) of Olean, N. Y. 
Child t Ruth Elizabeth, born 30 Apr. 1903. 
Residence, Munball, Pa. 

2705 FREDERICK WHITING NOBLE 
Born 1877 at Middleburg, N. Y. Student from Ticonderoga, N. Y., 

in Middlebury College, 1895-7 ; in Syracuse University, 1897-9. XSk. A.B. 
Student at the New York Law School, 1 899-1901 . Lawyer in New York 

since 190T. 

Residence, 121 Montague St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

2706 ARTHUR HENRY NORTON 

Born 9 Dec. 1870 at Hartford, N. Y. Student from Hartford, 1895-^ 
SkT. B.S. 

Asst. Principal, High School, Mexico, N. Y., 1 899-1900. Principal, Same, 
since 1900. President, Oswego Co. Educational Council, 1903-4 ; of Teachers 
Assoc. 3d Dist, Oswego Co., 1903-4. 

Married 23 July 1902, Susan Hurd of Coloss^^, N. Y. 

Residence, Mexico, N. Y. 

2707 ANNE GRAY NOXON 
Born II Apr. 1876 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, 1893-7 and 
1898-9, four years. A.B. 
Residence, 309 Cathedral St., Baltimore, Md. 

Home address, 325 Burnet Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

2708 SUSIE SHAW OVER 

Born 27 Feb. 1873 at Pittsburg, Pa. Student from Syracuse, N. Y., 1894-9. 
Ph.B. Pd.B. (Albany Normal College) 1903. 

Teacher, High School, Canton, N. Y., 1899-1900. Student at State Nor- 
mal College, Mar. 1902- Feb. 1903. Teacher, High School, Albion, N. Y., 
Feb. -June 1903. 

Residence, 122 Erie St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

2709 BURTON BRADFORD PARSONS 

Born 17 Feb. 1874 at Wolcott, N.Y. Student from New York City, 1897-9. 
*A*. LL.B. 

Lawyer at Syracuse, N. Y. 

Married 29 June 1903, Ida Curtiss Emery of Sodus Point, N. Y. 

Residence, 519 Park Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

2710 ALBERTA ELEANORE PERRY 

Bom I Apr. 1876 at Canajoharie, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, N. Y., 
1895-9. AAA. Ph.B 
Assistant and Office Work with Dr. D. H. Murray, Syracuse, since I90i' 
Residence, 238 Fitch St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

271 1 PAYSON EDWARD PIERCE 
Born 27 June 1873 at Weld, xMe. Student from Kent's Hill. Me.. 1895-^ 

^K^'. B.L. 
Graduate student at Syracuse University, 1 900-1. Clergyman, ColDg»^ 

gational. Supplied First Church, Clayton, N. Y., 1901 ; Geddes Chnrcht 



ALUMNI OP SYRACUSE UNIVBRSITY T5I 

ac, N. Y., Jan.-Jnne 1902. Pastor First Church, Rensselaer, N. Y., 

one 1902. 

dence, Rensselaer. N. Y. 

2712 JOHN WALRATH PLANT 
I 23 Sept 186S at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, 1895-8. 
899. Physician at Syracuse, N. Y.. since graduation, 
dence, 224 Harrison St.. Syracuse, N. Y. 

2713 HARRY BLAKE REDDICK 
I 10 Aug. 1877 at Picton, Ont. Student from Picton, Ont., 1896-9. 
It from Picton at Albert College, Belleville, Can., 1895*6 ; at Syra- 
niversity, 1896-9. ♦AG. A.B. B.D.( Drew) 190a. 
j;yman, Meth. Epis. Pastor at Parish, N. Y., 1899-1900. Student at 
rheo. Sem., 1900-2. Pastor at Caton, N. Y., 1902-3 ; Montour Falls, 
since 1903. 

led II Mar. 1903, Ruth Robinson of Ithaca, N. Y. 
dence. Montour Falls, N. Y. 

2714 LENA MARGUERITE RHODES 

I July 1876 at Elmira, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, N. Y., in Col- 
Liberal Arts, 1894-7 ; in College of Fine Arts, 1898-9. KAG. B.L. 

tr of German, Cazenovia (N. Y.) Seminary, since 1903. 

dence, Cazenovia, N. Y. 

Home Address, 1005 Walnut Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

2715 WILLIS EVERETT RIDGEWAY 

1 30 Apr. 1870 at Towanda, Pa. Student from Towanda, 1895-9. 

4>BK. 

^man, Meth. Epis. Pastor at Bridgewater, N. Y., 1900-3 ; at Phil- 

t and Wurtsboro, N. Y., 1903-4 ; at Edenville, N. Y., since 1904. 

ied 24 Oct. 1900, Chloe J. Loveland (No. 1578; of Taberg, N. Y. 

/, George Loveland, born 27 Sept. 1901. 

dence, Edenville, N. Y. 

2716 WILLARD A. RILL 
I 17 June 1874 at Cicero, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, N. Y., 
. LL B. LL.B.(Columbian University) 1898. 
yer at Syracuse, N. Y., since 1899. 

ried 17 June 1902, Lillian G. Drawbridge of Syracuse, N. Y. 
dence, 1305 Midland Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

2717 GRACE LOUISE ROBINSON 
1 26 June 1872 at Salem, N. Y. Student from Hampton, N.Y., 1895-9. 

LCher, Friends* Academy, Locust Valley, N. Y.,1899-1900. Teacher of 
in, Mt. Union College, Alliance, O., 1900-2 ; of English and German, 
on College and Academy, Northfield, Minn., 1902-3. Professor of 
m Languages, Mt. Union College, since 1903. 
ddence, Alliance, O. 



152 AI.UMNI OP SYRACUSE UNIVBRSITY 1899 

2718 MAURICB ROSSMAN 
Born 14 Jan. 1875 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, 1894-^ 
A.B. LL.B. 1901. 
Student in College of Law, 189S-1901. 
Residence, 752 Harrison St, Syracuse, N. Y. 

2719 ETHEL LYON RULISON 

Born 30 Sept. 1877 at Port Henry, N. Y. Student from Salem, N. Y., 
1895-9. A.B. 
Teacher at Brandon, Vt., 1900 ; at Livonia, N. Y., 1902-3. 
Residence, Schoharie, N. Y. 

2720 FRANCIS JOSEPH RYAN 

Born 6 Aug. 1874 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student 'from Syracuse, 1894-9 
M.D. 

Physician at Syracuse, N. Y., since 1899. 

Married 25 Apr. 1900, Agnes C. Gannon of Syracuse, N. Y. 

Residence, 416 Fabius St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

FREDERICK PARM ENTER SCHENCK 
1896-9. LLB. (See No. 1325) 
Supplement : Student in College of Law, 1897-9. ♦A*. 
Residence, 35 Beach St., East Orange, N. J. 
Business address, 11 33 Broadway, New York, N. Y. 

2721 EDWARD FRANCIS SHEA 
Born 7 Apr. 1872 at Fabius. N. Y. Student from Fabius, 1897-9. LL.B. 
Lawyer at Syracuse, N. Y., since 1899. 
Residence, 205 E. Onondaga St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

2722 MILDRED KORLEEN SHEA 
Born 25 Sept. 1876 at Pulaski, N. Y. Student from Syracuie, N. Y., 

1895-9. Ph.B. 
Vice-Principal, High School, Stillwater, N. Y.. 1899-1901 ; Teacher of 

Latin and French, High School, Trenton, N. J., since 1901. 
Residence, 259 Hamilton Ave., Trenton, N. J. 

2723 JOSEPH HENRY STOLZ 

Born 14 June 1877 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, 1895-9- 
Ph.B. B.H., Bachelor of Hebrew (Heb. Union Coll.)i90o. 

Student at Hebrew Union College, Cincinnati, O., preparing for rab- 
binical degree. Will be graduated 1904 with title of Rabbi. 

Residence, 1438 E. McMillan St., Cincinnati, O. 

2724 JULIA HARDIE STOWELL (STONE) 

Born 17 Dec. 1875 at Pulaski, N. Y. Student from Mexico, N. Y., 1895-9' 
KAe. Ph.B. 

Teacher, Marlboro, N. Y., 1899-1900; Newark, N. Y., 1900-2. Regents 
Examiner in English Language and Literature, Univ. State of N. Y., 1902-J. 

Married 16 Oct. 1903, Rev. Warren S. Stone of LeRoy, N. Y. 

Residence, LeRoy, N. Y. 



ALUMNI OP SYRACUSE UNIVBRSITY 153 

2725 ANDREW JAMES TELFER 
Sept. 1877 at Boston, Mass. Student from Syracnse, N. Y., 1895-9. 

>apt. National Tube Co., Syracuse, N. Y., since 1899. 

d 14 Oct. 1902, Annetta Williams (see Non-graduates) of Syracuse, 

nee, 115 Walnut Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

2726 RICHARD HARKNESS TEMPLETON 
23 Sept. 1877 at Buffalo, N. Y. Student from Buffalo, 1895-9. 
...B. 

r at Buffalo, N. Y. 
ncc, 466 W. Ferry St., Buffalo, N. Y. 

2727 MARTHA SIBILLA UMBRECHT 
6 Mar. 1877 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, 1895-9. 
B. 

!r at Atfaens, Pa., 1 899-1902 ; Wilmington, Del., 1902-Feb. 1903; 
, N. Y., since Feb. 1903. 
nee. Yonkers, N. Y. 

2728 MAILLER ORVILLE VANKEUREN 

3 June 1877 at Equinunk, Pa. Student from Croton, N. Y.> 1894-9. 

man, Congregationalist. Pastor at Smyrna, N. Y., 1899-1900 ; 
anca, N. Y., (ist Church), since 1900. 

d 8 Aug. 1900, Mabel Elizabeth Eldredge of Smyrna, N. Y. 
nee, Salamanca, N. Y. 

2729 MABEL A. VAN WINKLE (HOYT) 

3 Apr. 1877 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, 1895-9. 

h.B. 

d 21 May 1901, Gordon W. Hoyt (see Non-graduates) of Syracuse, 

:nce, 729 Crouse Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

2730 SARAH VOLINSKI 
Oct. 1877 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, 1894-9, four 
t'h.B. Teacher, Eastwood School, since 1899. 
!nce, 112 Ren wick Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

2731 LEE WALDORF 
8 June 1872 at Churchtown, N. Y. Student from Clyde, N. Y., 
Ph.B. 

ate Student in Sociology, Univ. of Chicago, 1899-1900 ; Univ. of 
1900-1 ; Columbia University, 1901-2. 
fuce, Clyde, N. Y. 

2732 CHARLES BERTRAM WALKER 
I. B.P. (See Faculty Record, p. 128 Sup., College of Fine Arts.) 

2733 CLARA MABEL WEBB 
J Apr. 1874 at Evansville, Ind. Student from Syracuse, N. Y., 
A*. B.MU8. 



154 AI.UMNI OP SYRACUSB UNIVBRSITY 1899 

Vocal teacher, Stndio in Oswego, N. Y., and Director of Mnsic and 
Soprano in quartet at Grace Pres. Church, Oswego, i899-i9oa Instructor 
in Vocal Music, John B. Stetson University, DeLand, Fla., 1900-2. Student 
in New York and Soprano in Yonkers, N. Y., 1902-3. Instructor in Vocil 
Music. Blair Presbyterial Academy, Blairsto?m, N. J. 

Residence, Blair Hall, Blairstown, N. J. 

2734 FREDERICK PROBST WEBSTER 
Bom 25 Feb. 1867 at Wyoming, N. Y. Student from Wyoming, 1895-9. 
B.S. ♦BK. 

Principal, Union School, Hillsdale, N. Y., 1899-1902 ; High School and 
Academy, Dryden, N. Y., since 1902 
Married 1892, Anna Thusebe Dewey of Lima, N. Y. 
Children^ Alford Dewey, bom 16 Sept. 1894 at Newark Valley, N. Y. 
Walter Wright, bom 22 Aug. 1896 at Syracuse, N. Y. 
Alice South worth, bom 30 Oct. 1898 at Syracuse, N. Y. 
Bradford Gray, born 30 Oct. 1898 at Sjrracuse, N. Y. 
Mary Janette, bom 8 Aug. 1902 at Hillsdale, N.- Y. 
Residence, Dryden, N. Y. 

2735 LUTHER LESLIE WELLER 

Born 25 Sept. 1875 at Liverpool, N. Y. Student from Liverpool, 1897-9. 
LL.B. 
Admitted to the Bar. i Aug. 1899. Lawyer at Syracuse, N. Y. .since 1899. 
Residence, Liverpool, N. Y. 

2736 EDWIN THOMAS WHIFFEN 

Born 2 Sept. 1874 at Ithaca, N. Y. Student from Oswego, N. Y., 1895-9. 
A.B. 
Residence, 540 W. 126 St., New York, N. Y. 

2737 ANICE LADD WHITNEY 

Born 9 Apr. 1877 at Rushville. N. Y. Student from Red Creek, N. Y., 
1895-9. KAO. B.Mus. 

Instructor in Music and Theory, Maryville College, Maryville, Tenn., 
1899-1900 ; Andrew College, Cuthbert, Ga., 1901-3; Marion College, Fred- 
ericktown. Mo., since 1903. 

Residence, Fred ericktown, Mo. 

2738 COURTNEY DUANE WHITTEMORE 
Bom II Mar. 1875 at West Paris, Me. Student from Payette, Me.,i895-9* 
Ben. A.B. LL.B. 1903. 
Student in College of Law, 1900-3. Assistant Coach of track team, 1900-3. 
Residence, 712 Irving Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

2739 GRACE LAURA WIKOFF 
Bom 2 Apr. 1876 at Richfield Springs, N. Y. Student from Richfield 
Springs, 1895-9. Ph.B. 
Teacher of English, High School, Warren, Pa., since 1899. 
Residence, Warren, Pa. 



I900 AZ.X7MNI OP SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY 155 

2740 REBA DYGERT WILLARD 

Bom 18 Apr. 1875 ^t Frankfort, N. Y. Student from Baldwinsville, N. Y., 
i^-^* B.Mas. 

Graduate student at Sjrracuse University, 1899-1900. Teacher of Piano, 
College at Petersburg, Va., 1900-1. Student of Piano at Leipzig, Germany 
1901-2. 

Residence, Baldwinsville, N. Y. 

2741 EDITH MONG WILSON (MURDOCK) 

Bom 14 Feb. 1875 at Braceville, O. Student from Olean, N. Y., 1894-9, 
four years. r*B. Ph.B. ♦BK. 

Married 23 Jan. 1902, Charles T. Murdock (No. 2704 Sup., q, v. for fur- 
ther record) of Worcester, Mass. 

Residence, Munhall, Pa. 

2742 PERRY ALBERTUS WOOD 

Bora 28 Jnly 1868 at Jordanville, N.Y. Student from Jordanyille, 1897-9. 
LL.B. 

Lawyer at Syracuse, N. Y. 

Residence, 205 E. Onondaga St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

2743 LEONARD ERNEST YOUNG 
B.S. 1895-9. (See Faculty Record, p. 106 Sup., College of Liberal Arts. 

Class op 1900 
2744 charles burdick alford 

Born 2 June 1873 at Cropsey, 111. Student from Saranac, N. Y., 1896- 
1900. Ph.B. 

Clergyman, Meth. Epis. Pastor at Lake George, N. Y., 1900-1 ; at Ausa- 
ble Forks, N. Y., 1901-4 ; st Johnsonville, N. Y., since 1904. 

Married 16 Oct. 1900, Margaret R. Burton of Lake George, N. Y. 

Children, Culver Burdick, bom 14 Aug. 1901. 

Margaret Elizabeth, bom 29 Jan. 1903. 

Residence, Johnsonyille, N. Y. 

2745 MABEL MOORE ALLIS 
Bom 7 Apr. 1879 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, 1896-1900. 
KKF. Ph.B. 

Preceptress, High School, Liverpool, N. Y., 1900-2. Teacher of German 
and History, High School,Fairport, N. Y., 1902-3. Teacher at Medina, N. 
Y., since 1903. 
Residence, 1604 Park St., Syracuse, N. Y. 
Home address, Medina, N. Y. 

WILLIAM DEWE^ALSEVBR 

i896-i9oa M.D. (See No. 1349 and Faculty Record, p. 120 Sup., College of 

Medicine. ) 

2746 BELLE AMDURSKY 

Bonus Jan. 1876 at Syracuse,N.Y. Student from Syracuse, 1896-1900. B.L. 

Teacher of English, High School, Syracuse, N. Y., since 1901. 

Keiidence, 756 Harrison St, Syracuse, N. Y. 



156 AI.UMNI OP SYRACUSB UNIVBRSITY I90O 

2747 MARY ZUBA BARRETT (STALEY) 
Born 7 July 1878 at Titusville, Pa. Sea lent from Titasville, i896-i9oa 

HB*. Ph.B. 
Married 26 June 1902, George Rowe Staley (No. 28S3 Sap., q,v, for farther 

record) of Oneida, N. Y. 
Residence, Oneida, N. Y. 

2748 MARY AMANDA BATES 
Born 20 July 1876 at St. Johnsville, N. Y. Student from St. Johnsville, 
1896-1900. KKr. B.S. 
Teacher of English, High School, Gardner, Mass., since 1900. 
Residence, 20 School St., Gardner Mass. 

2749 ROBERT EARL BENJAMIN 
fiorn 12 June 1877 ^^ Minneapolis, Minn. Student from Buffalo, N. Y., 
1896-1900. ♦KSk. Ph.B. 

In Texas Oil business. Treasurer Neches Consolidated Oil Co. 
Residence, 405 Univ. Place, Syracuse, N. Y. 

2750 ANNE TEFFT BINGHAM 

Born 25 Feb. 1876 at Watertown, N. Y. Student from Watertown, 1896- 
1900. KAe. Z4>. M.D. 

Hospital work in Woman's and Children's Hospital, Detroit, Mich., 1901. 
Physician at Albany, N. Y., since 1901. 

Residence, 82 S. Swan St., Albany, N. Y. 

2751 THOMAS MORLEY BISHOP 
Born 8 Mar. 187 1 at Troy. N. Y. Student from Troy, 1896-1900. *T. 

A.B. 

Clergyman, Meth. Epis. Associate Pastor at Pittsfield, Mass., 1900-1. 

Pastor at Johnsonville, N. Y., 1901-3 ; at West Sand Lake, N. Y., since 

1903. 
Mr. Bishop did much for University papers when in College; was editor 

of the Tribune eiud. of the Forum, 

Married 26 Sept. 19C0, Clara H. Schilling of Troy, N. Y. 

Child ^ Wesley Morton, born 10 Nov. 1901. 

Residence, West Sand Lake, N. Y. 

2752 FRANCES MAY BLISS 

Born 2 July 1876 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, 1895- 1900, 
four years. HE*. Ph.B. 

Preceptress and teacher of Latin, etc., at Friendship, N. Y., 1900-1 ; Same 
at Bainbridge, N. Y., since 1901. 

Residence, Bainbridge, N. Y. 

2753 CHARLES NORMAN BOTTUM 
Born 15 Jan. 1877 at Westfield, Pa. Student from Westfield, 1896-1900. 

B.S. M.D.(Univ. of 111.) 1903. 
Student at Rush Medical College and University of Illinois, 1900-3. Fby- 

sician at Marquette, Mich., since 1903. 
Residence, Marquette, Mich. 



AZ.UMNI OP SYRACUSB UNIVBRSITY 1 57 

2754 ARTHUR GIRARD SWIFT BRINK 
[ Sept. 1878 at Marathon, N. Y. Student from Marathon, 1897-9. 

Uimaz Road Machine, Marthon, N. Y., 19C0-1. Aaat. Cashier 
i Life Assurance Society of N. Y. since 1902. 
ice, Cleveland, O. 

2755 GEORGE SIDNEY BRITTEN 

00. M.D. (See Faculty Record,p.i2i Sup., College of Medicine.) 

56 ANTOINETTE LOUISE BROWN (STRICKLAND) 

^ Not. 1872 at Newark, N. Y. Student from Newark, 1896-1900. 

P. 

r of Dravnng and Painting, Hudson River Institute, Claverack, N. 

1. Special teacher of Arts, Queensboro, New York, N. Y., 1901-3. 
i 22 July 1903, Rev. Francis L. Strickland of Flushing, N. Y. 
ice, 136 Flushing St., Flushing, L. I., N. Y. 

2757 FREDERICK ANDREW BROWN 
) Nov. 1872 at Granville, N. Y. Student from N. Granville,N. Y., 
I. LL.B. 

' at Syracuse, N. Y., since 1900. 
ice, 336 W. Onondaga St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

2758 FRED LEROY BROWN 

> May 1878 at Newark, N. Y. Student from Newark, i896-i90a 

tor in Sciences and Mathematics, Delaware Acad., Delhi, N.Y., 
Teacher, New York Military Acad., Comwail-on-Hudson, 1901-2 ; 
f Coll. Inst., Hackettstown, N. J., since 1902. 
ace, Hackettstown, N. J. 

2759 MARY JANE MCCLELLAND (BROWN) 
5 Jan. 1861 at Brandywine, Del. Student from Chester, Pa., 
>. B.S. 4»BK. 

r, High School, Camden, N. J., since 1900. 
ice, 427 Penn St., Camden, N. J. 

2760 MILTON BRACKEN BRUNDAGE 

> Dec. 1877 at Ne wburgh, N. Y. Student from Newburgh, 1896- 
S. 

r, Ulster Co., N. Y., 1900-1. Teacher of Sciences, High School, 
N. J., since 1901. 
flce, Newton, N. J. 

2761 JUSTUS LYMAN BULKLEY, JR. 

S July 1879 at Sandy Creek, N. Y. Student from Sandy Creek, 
». AKK. M.D. 

m at Brooklyn, N. Y., and Jamaica, N. Y. Member of Visiting 
le Jamaica Hospital, Jamaica, N. Y. 

1 17 Nov. 1900, Helene Weston Cox (See Non-graduates) of Ball- 
N. Y. 



158 



AI.UMNI OP SYRACUSE UNIVBRSITY 



1900 



Child, Justus Lyman, born 15 Oct. 1901 ; died 9 June 1902. 
Residence, 143 Lefferts Ave., Richmond Hill, Qneensboro, N. Y. 

2762 ANNA ELIZABETH BURLINGAME 

Bom 21 Sept. 1874 at East Springfield,. N. Y. Student from Bast Spring- 
field, 1894-1900. KAO. A.B. 

Teacher at Stamford, Conn. 

Residence, Stamford, Conn. 

2763 ALLEN DUNCAN BURNHAM 

Bom 27 Oct. 1859 at Boonville, Mo. Student from Claverack, N. Y., 
1896-1900. ♦AG. A.B. 

Instructor in English, Mich. Military Academy, Orchard Lake, Mich., 
1901-2 ; Same, N.W. Military Academy, Highland Park, 111., since 1903. 

Married 9 June 1903, Mary Gardner Ten Eyck of Belleville, N. J. 

Residence, Highland Park, 111. 

2764 DILLON AUSTIN CADY 

Bom 29 Mar. 1876 at Chatham, N. Y. Student from Chatham, i89^i9oa 
B.S. 

Residence, Lowville, N. Y. 

2765 ELLEN MARIE .CHAPMAN 

Born 16 Nov. 1877 at Seward, N. Y. Student from Shelbome, Vt, 189^ 
1900. A*. Ph.B. 

Teacher, East Aurora, 1 901-2 ; Tarrytown, N. Y., 1902-3 ; Saranac LakCi 
N. Y., since 1903. 

Residence, Saranac Lake, N. Y. 

2766 CASS FITCH CHILER 

Bom 12 Sept. 1873 at Fulton, N. Y. Student from Central Square, N. Y., 
1896-1900. M.D. 

Physician at Fulton, N. Y., i9oa-Peb. 1903 ; at Montezuma, N. Y., tiflce 
Feb. 1903. Health Officer at Granby, N. Y., two years, President Board of 
Health, Fulton, N. Y.. 1902-3. 

Married 19 July 1900, Bessie P. Ladd of Central Square, N. Y. 

Residence, Montezuma, N. Y. 

2767 RANDOLPH THATCHER CONGDON 
Bom 30 Aug. 1877 at Pittsford, N. Y. Student from Bradford, Pa., 1895- 
1900. AT. A.B. 
Teacher. Assisted in Summer School, Syracuse University, 1903. 
Residence, Canajoharie, N. Y. 

2768 MABEL LOUISE COOK 

Bom 13 Nov. 1877 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, i896-i9oa 
A«. B.Mus. 

Received at graduation the graduate scholarship in Music for one yetr. 
Graduate student, Syracuse University, since 1900. 

Residence, 708 Lodi St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

2769 WILLIS DAVID CUDDBBACK 
Bom 28 Jan. 1878 at Skaneateles, N. Y. Student from Skancstelei, 
1896-1900. Ben. M.D. 



AI,UMNI OP SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY 159 

late work in New York city. Physician at Auburn, N. Y., since 

ed 2 Apr. 1902, M. Marie Hilt of LaPorte, Ind. 
ence, Aurora, N. Y. 

2770 MARY EMILY CURTIS 
II July 1878 at Camden, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, N. Y., 
n. KAO. A.B. 

er of Greek and History, Syracuse Classical School, 1900-2. Private 
dnce 1902. Studied two summers at Harvard. Teacher in Brooklyn, 
ince 1903. 
uice, 226 Willoughby Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

2771 HARRIETTE ARMS CURTISS 
:o July 1879 at Sodus, N. Y. Student from Sodus, 1896-1900. 
^B. ^BK. A.M. (Columbia) 1902. Masters Diploma, Teacher's 
1902. 

er of Sciences, Syracuse (N. Y.), Classical School, 1900-1. Gradn- 
lent, Columbia University, 1901-2. Traveler in Europe, 1902. 
, High School, Rochester, N. Y., since Feb. 1903. 
mce, Rochester, N. Y. 

2772 ♦ EBENEZER WESTON CUTLER 
n Nov. 1877 at Worcester, Mass. Student from Sandy Creek, N.Y., 
10. AT. A.B. 

er in a private School, Chautauqua, NY., 1900-1. Principal, High 
Penn Yan, N. Y., 1901-3. In the Book Publishing business with 
[olt & Co., New York, 1903-4. 
7 April 1904 at New York, N Y. 

2773 CLARENCE WINFIELD DARLING 

Brother of No. 3774 
\ Feb. 1877 at West Winfield, N. Y. Student from Ogdensburg, 
396-i9oa i^. A.B. LL.B.1902. 

it in College of Law, 1900-2. Lawyer at Syracuse, N. Y., since 
Haight & Darling) 
aice, Moore Flats, Syracuse, N. Y. 

2774 FLORA MILDRED DARLING 
sister of No. 3773 
4 Oct. 1875 At West Winfield, N. Y. Student from Ogdensburg, 
)95-i900, four years. KA9. B.Mtis. 

er, private pupils, New York Mills, N. Y., 1901-2 ; Mexico, N. Y., 
East Hamilton, N. Y., since 1903. 
mce, East Hamilton. N. Y. 

2775 MARY EMOGENE DAY 
Daughter of Chancellor Day 
4 Feb. 1878 at Portland Me. Student from Syracuse, N. Y., 1895- 
♦B. B.Mus. 

ate student, Syracuse University, since 1900. 
mcc, 604 University Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 



l6o AXUMNI OP SYRACUSB UMIVBRSITY I90 

2776 GRACE GRIGGS DE KAY (PRATT) 

Born II Aug. 1877 &t Riverside, N. Y. Student from Binghamton, N. Y 
1896-1900. r*B. Ph.B. 

Instructor in the International Correspondence Scliools, Scranton, Pi 
Nov. I, 1900-July I, 1902. 

Married 2 Sept 1902, William Henry Pratt of Binghamton, N. Y. 

Residence, 4 Ogden St., Binghamton, N. Y. 

2777 ELIZABETH GERTRUDE DELANY 

Born 8 Jan. 1879 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, 1896-19C 
A.B. «BK. 
Teacher of languages, High School, Little Palls, N. Y., since 1900. 
Residence, Little Falls, N. Y. 

2778 SAMUEL HENRY DODSON 
Bom 24 Dec. 1864 at Terre Haute, Ind. Student at the University 
Wisconsin and the Indiana University ; at Syracuse University, 1899-191 
Ph.B. Ph. M. (1900). 

Pofessor of History and Method, State Normal School, Jamaica, N. 
1900-2. Lecturer on History and Philosophy, Brooklyn Institute of Artst 
Sciences, 1901-2. Lecturer on History to New York City Board of E( 
cation since 1902. Lecturer on History to the American Society for U 
versity Extension, Philadelphia, Pa., since 1903. Has published **1 
Physiology of the Senses," Medical Journal^ Hot Springs, Ark., Apr. 18 
(original experiments). It was read before the Tri-State Medical Soci( 
of Georgia, Alabama and Tennessee. 
Residence, Bloomfield, N. J. 

2779 CARL ELIJAH DORR 
Born 25 Dec. 1879 ^^ Depauville, N. Y. Student from Watertown, N. ^ 
1896-1900. AT. A.B. LL.B.1902. 
Student in College of Law, 1900-2. Lawyer at Syracuse, N.Y., since 19 
Married 26 Dec. 1903, Amelia L. Morgan (No. 2834 Sup. ) of Rome, N. 
Residence, 200 W. Castle St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

2780 JAY WILLIAM DOUNCE 
Born 4 Mar. 1876. Student from Elmira, N. Y., 1896- 1900. N2N. M. 
Residence, 8 W. 92 St., New York, N. Y 

2781 HENRY BURTON DOUST 
1896-1900. M.D. (See Faculty Record,p. 121 Sup., College of Medicin 

2782 HERMAN HORATIO DOWNEY 
Born 26 Mar. 1876 at Akron, N. Y. Student from Akron, N. Y., 1896-19 

Ben. A.B. 
Student in Boston University, School of Theology, 1900-2. Clergynu 

Meth. Epis. Pastor at Buffalo, N. Y., since 1902. 
Residence, 253 Northhampton St, Buffalo, N. Y. 

2783 ROSE FRANCES EGAN 
Born 27 Feb. 1879 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Sjrracuae, 1896-19 
A.B. «BK. 



1900 Ai;UMNI OP SYRACUSB UNIVB&SlTy l6l 

Teacher of English, High School, Syracuse, N. Y., since 1901. Official 
pftss correspondent, Catholic Summer School, Cliff Haven, Lake Cham- 
plaifl, N. Y., since 1900. Has written for Catholic Magazines and papers. 
Residence, 223 Seymour St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

2784 MBRRIAM BRNHOUT 

Born 23 Sept. 1879 at Wilcox, Pa. Student from Syracuse, N. Y., 
i895-i9oa r«B. B. Mus. 

Gradnate student, Syracuse University, 1900-1 and 1902-3. Teacher of 
Pitnoio private school, Woodside, Hartford, Conn., 1901-^. 

Reiidence, 731 Euclid Ave., Syracuse, N. Y, 

2785 LEONARD LEWIS EVERSON 
Born 17 June 1876 at Macedon, N. Y. Student from Macedon 1896-1900. 

Ben. B.E.E. 
Conatmction Engineer with Rochester and Sodus Bay Elec. R. R., 1900. 

In General Electric Testing Dept., Schenectady, N. Y., 1900-2. In General 

Electric Engineering Dept., Same, since 1902. 
Residence, 115H Clinton St., Schenectady, N. Y. 

2786 ALLIE VAN DUYN FAHNESTOCK 
Bom 16 Feb. 1876 at Syracuse ,N. Y. Student from Syracuse, 1896-1900. 
B.P. 

Teacher of Painting, Studio at residence. 
Reaidence, 141 1 Park St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

2787 ELIZABETH VAN DUYN FAHNESTOCK 
Born 16 Feb. 1876 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, 1 896-1900. 

B.I. 

Teacher, Onondaga Free Academy, Jan. -June 1901. Asst. Preceptress, 
%h School, Port Byron, N. Y., since 1901. 
Residence, 141 1 Park St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

2788 KATHARINE ALICE FAIRCHILD 
Bom 18 Nov. 1876 at Brooklyn, Pa. Student from Rochester, N. Y., 
^896-i9oa A*. B.L. 
Teacher at Susq. Collegiate Institute. Towanda, Pa. Now at Albion, N.Y. 
Residence, Albion, N. Y. 

2789 JOSEPH WALDRON FARLEY 
Bom 13 May 1878 at Equinunk, Pa. Student from Equinunk, 1896-1900. 
frr. B.S. 

Electrical Engineer, Pittsburg, Pa. Transformer Designer for Westing- 
loose Elec. and Mfg. Co. since Jan. 1901. 
Residence, Pittsburg, Pa. 

2790 JACOB FINGER 

Bora Apr. 1872 in Russia. Student from Madison, N. J., 1896-1900. A.B. 
}.D.(Drew)i902. 

Student at Drew Theol. Sem., Madison, N. J., 1900-2. Clergyman, Meth. 
^ Pastor at Bakersfield, Vt. 

Residence, Bakersfield, Vt. 



l62 AI^UBCNI OP SYRACUSB UNIYBRSITY I9OO 

2791 THOMAS FRED FOREMAN 
1896-1900. M.D. (See Faculty Record, p. 121 Snp., College of Medicine.) 

2792 PEARL MARY FOSTER 
Born 27 Oct. 1878 at Whitesboro, N. Y. Student from Whitesboro, 189^ 
1900. Ph.B. Z*. M.D.1903. 
Student in College of Medicine, 1900-3. 
Residence, Whitesboro, N. Y. 

2793 CLINTON EDDY GOODWIN 
Bom 26 May 1878 at Calcutta, India. Student from Saco, Me., 1896-19CXX 

Ben. A.B. AKK. M.D. 1903. 
Student in College of Medicine, 1900-3. Interne, Hospital of the Good 

Shepherd, Syracuse, N. Y., since i July, 1903. 
Residence, Hospital of the Good Shepherd, Syracuse, N. Y. 

2794 SUSAN AMANDA GOULD 
Bom 9 Sept. 1874 at Seneca Falls, N* Y. Student from Seneca Falls, 
1896-1900. Ph.B. 
Residence, Seneca Falls, N. Y. 

279s HELEN LOUISE GO WING 
Born 19 Oct. 1877 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, 1806-1900. 
r«B. Ph.B. 
Residence, 608 Danforth St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

2796 EDWARD AUGUSTUS GREEN 

Bom 13 Sept. 1875 at Gilbertsville, N. Y. Student from Holmesville, 
N. Y., 1896-1900. ♦K*. A.B. 

Instructor in Science, High School, Williamtport, Pa., 1900-2 ; Gramnuf 
School, Haverford, Pa., since 1902. 

Married 22 June 1904, Edith A. Nye (No. 2837 Sup. ) of Syracuse, N. Y. 

Residence, Haverford, Pa. 

2797 JAY LAMONT GREGORY 

Bom 12 Aug. 1877 at Windsor, N. Y. Student from Sanfoid, N. Y.,1896- 
1900. ♦AG. A.B. LL.B.1902. 

Student, College of Law, 1900-2. Lawyer at Binghamton, N. Y., sbce 
Nov. 1902. 

Residence, Binghamton, N. Y. 

WILLIAM AVERY GROAT 
1897-1900, M.D. (See No. 1462 and Faculty Record,p.ii9Snp., College of 
Medicine. ) 

2798 DAMON AUSTIN HAGADORN 
Bom 24 May 1875 at Conesville, N. Y. Student from Manorkill, N. Y., 
1896-1900. «Ae. A.B. 
Student at Harvard Law School since 1901. 
Residence. Manorkill, N. Y. 

2799 FRANKLYN PARKER HAMMOND 
Bom 16 June 1878 at Hackensack, N.J. Student from Newark, N.J-i 
1896-1900. i^T. A.B. B.Ar.1901. 



AZ.UMNI OP SYRACUSB UNIVBRSlTy 163 

adent in College of Pine Arts, (Architecture), 1900-1. Architectural 

ightsman. 

esidence, 81 Wall St., New York, N. Y. 

2800 FRANK WOOD HARGITT 
Brother of No. 3105 
lorn 30 Mar. 1879 at Abington, Ind. Stndent from Syracuse, N. Y. 
6-i9oa AT. B.S. N2N. 

With Western Blectrical Co., New York, since 1902. 
ELwdence, 48 W. 17th St., New York, N. Y. 

2801 CLYDE LEON ARD HARVEY 
Bora 22 May 1876 at Boonville, N. Y. Student from Martinsbnrg, N.Y., 
96-1900. A.B. «BK. 

Instrnctor in Latin and Greek, Union Acad., Belleville, N. Y., 1900-2. 
iadpal, High School, Hoosick Falls, N. Y., since 1902. 
Rendence, Hoosick Falls, N. Y. 

2802 WILLIAM JAMES HARVIE 
Born 17 June 1875 at Buffalo, N. Y. Student from Buffalo, 1896-1900. 
I*. B.E.E. 

His had charge of Electrical department of the Syracuse and Suburban 
• R. and of the S3rracuse, Lakeside and Baldwinsville Ry. Electrical Engi- 
!er for the Utica and Mohawk Valley Ry. Co. , Utica, N. Y. 
Married 14 Oct. 1901, Eatella L. Foote (No. 2922 Sup.) of Newark, N. Y. 
Residence, 463 Blandina St., Utica, N. Y. 

2803 MARTHA HAWLEY HASBROUCK 

Born 18 Aug. 1875 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, i896-i9oa 

I. 

I'receptress, High School, Smethport, Pa., since 1901. 

Residence, Smethport, Pa. 

2804 MARY JOSEPHINE HASBROUCK 

1896-1900. PIlB. (See Faculty Record, p. 108 Sup., College of Liberal 

^) 

2805 BESSIE MILDRED HAWKS 

Bom 10 June 1879 ^^ Beaton, Mass. Student from Syracuse, N. Y., 1896- 

30. Ph.B. ♦BK. 

Residence, Georgetown, N. Y. 

2806 CHARLES FRANKLIN HITCHCOCK 
Son of No. 76. Brother of Not. 905 and 2807 

>ee Axjaum Rscord, p. 850. 

)om 14 Biay 1862 at B. Palmyra, N. Y. Student from Union Springs, 

Y., 1885-88. Degree granted in 190a Ph.B. M.D. (Mo. State Homoe- 

idc Med. College) 1891. 

Iiysidan at Sodna, N. Y., since 1896. 

tesdence. Sodua. N. Y. 

2807 MYRA FINETTB HITCHCOCK 
Daufhter of No. 76. Sifter of Not. 905 and a8o6 
Unn 12 liar. 1876 at Naples, N. Y. Student from Port Gibson, N. Y., 
1S-1900. B.P. 



1^4 AI,UMNI OP SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY I9OO 

Student in Ohio State University since 1903. 
Residence, 380 W. Eighth Ave., Columbus, O* 

2808 STARR CLARENCE MOLLIS 
Bom 8 Aug. 1878 at Sandy Creek, N. Y. Student from Sandy Creek, 
1896-1900. M.D. 
Physician at Belleville, N. Y. Member Jefferson Co. Medical Society. 
Married 26 Sept. 1900, Ora D. Zufelt of Ellisbnrg, N. Y. 
Residence^ Belleville, N. Y. 

2809 ♦FLOYD FAYETTE HOLLISTER 

Bom 24 June 1877 at Mexico, N. Y. (?) Student from Mexico, 1896-1900. 
N2N. M.D. 

Physician at Weedsport, N. Y. 

Died 28 Mar. 1904 at Mexico, N. Y. 

2810 WELTHY BLAKESLEB HONSINGER 

Bom 18 Sept. 1879 at Rome.N. Y. Student from Rome, 1896-1900. IIBt. 
Ph.B. 

Teacher at Haverstraw, N. Y., 1900-2; High School, Englewood, N. I- 
since 1903. 

Residence, Englewood, N. J. 

281 1 ADELINE BELINDA HUNT 
1895-1900. B.P. (See Faculty Record, p. 130 Sup. , College of Fine Arts.) 

2812 WILLIAM MERRILL HYDON 
Bom 23 June 1874 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Vernon, N. Y., 

1895-1900. ♦KSk. A.B. 

Student at DrewTheol. Sem., 190C-1. Clergyman, Meth, Epis. Pastor it 
Lowell, N. Y., 1902-4 ; at Rome, N. Y. since 1904. 

Residence, Rome, N. Y. 

2813 EDWARD CORBIN JENKINS 
Born II Sept. 1875 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Syracaae, 1894-^ 

and 1897-19C0, four years. AT. Ph.B. 

Student Secretory N. Y. Stote Y. M. C. A., 1900-2. Secretary of Interns- 
tional Committee since 1902. 

Residence, 3 West 29th St., New York, N. Y. 

2814 CLARA BELLE JOHNSON (CHAMPLIN) 
Born 13 Apr. 1878 at West New Brighton, N. Y. Student from Syncuse, 

N. Y., 1896-1900. AAA. Ph.B. 
With the Mason Publishing and Printing Co., Syracuse, N. Y., one jetr* 
Married 24 Nov. 1903, George J. Champlin (see Non-graduates) of Bof* 

falo, N. Y. 
Residence, 22 Lytle Ave., Buffalo, N. Y. 

2815 JOHN SCHUFELT KELLEY 
Born 4 June 1876 at Polo, 111. Student from Walton, N, Y., i896-i9» 

♦KSk. M.D. 
Physician at Binghamton, N. Y., since 1900. Pathologist and Bscteriolo* 

gist to Binghamton City Hospitol. 



O AI.UMNI OF SYRACUSB UNIVBRSITY 165 

Carried 1903, Emma L. Ells of Walton, N. Y. 
Elesidence, Binghamton, N. Y. 

2816 WILLIAM BROOKS KELLY 
Born 12 Jan. 1878 at Newburgh, N. Y. Student from Newburgh, 
l96-i9oa ♦T. Ph.B. 

With the Equitable Life Assurance Society, New York, N. Y., since June 
900. 
Rcffldcnce, 60 W. 51st St., New York, N. Y. 

2817 ANNA GRACE KING 
Boni3Biay i878ut Carverton, Pa. Student from Parsons, Pa., 1896- 
900. B.L. 

Teacher at Diamondville, Wyo., 1900-1 ; at Kenimerer, Wyo.,since 1901. 
Residence, Kemmerer, Wyo. 

2818 LENA MAE KING 
Born 23 Jan. 1876 at Clark's Green, Pa. Student from Parsons, Pa., 
896-1900. B.L. 

Teacher at Oakley, Wyo., 1900-2 ; at Port Collins, Colo., since 1902. 
Residence, 426 Remington Ave., Fort Collins, Colo. 

2819 FRANK PATl^ENGILL KNOWLTON 
897-1900. M.D. (See Faculty Record, p. 116 Sup., College of Medicine.) 

2820 LAURA MILLS LATIMER 

Bora 30 Aug. 1877 at Churchville, N. Y. Student from • Olean, N. Y. 
%6-i9oa r*B. A.B. *BK. 

Teacher, Mt. Morris, N. Y., 1900-3 ; Franklin Academy, Malone, N. Y., 
ince 1903. 

Residence, Malone, N. Y. 

2821 HARRY GLOVER LEE 
Born 22 Feb. 1877 at Waterloo, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, N. Y., 
^5-1900. AKE. A.B. 
In business in Syracuse, N. Y. 
Residence, 103 Malcolm St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

2822 JAY DUR WOOD LESTER 
Bom 26 Aug. 1873 at Boylston, N. Y. Student from Orwell, N. Y., 1894- 
KK). ♦K*. A.B. 

^^rincipal, Union School, New South Berlin, N. Y., since 1900. 
Residence, New South Berlin, N. Y. 

2823 JACOB JOSHUA LEVY 
'896-T9oa Ph.B. (See Faculty Record, p. 122 Sup.. College of Medicine.) 

2824 SYLVENAS DANFORTH LEWIS 
k>m 20 Jan. 1870 at Franklin Furnace, O. Student from Syracuse, N. Y., 
35-1900. #A0. A.B. B.D. (Drew) 1902. 

itudent at Drew Theol. Sem., 1900-2. Clergyman, Meth. Epis. Asst 
itorat Warren St. Church, Brooklyn, N. Y., 1901-3. Pastor, Summerfield 
urch, Bridgeport, Conn., since Apr. 1903. 



l66 AI.UMNI OF SYRACUSB UNIVBRSITy 

Married ^7 Mar. 1902, Laura Delia Olrich of Syracuse, N. Y. 
Childy Charles Olrich, born 25 Dec. 1902. 
Residence, 1079 Central Ave., Bridgeport, Conn. 

2825 CLAUDE CARL LYTLE 
Bom 14 Apr. 1874 at Westbury, N. Y. Student from Wolcot 

1896-1900. AT. NZN. M.D. 
Physician at Geneva, N. Y., since 1900. Member Medical Staff of 

City Hospital. Commissioner of Health, City of Geneva, since Jan 
Residence, Geneva, N. Y. 

2826 LEON ALLISON McKOWN 
Bom 20 Oct 1878 at Ontario, N. Y. Student, from Ne¥rark, N. ' 
1900. B.S. 
Teacher. 
Residence, Central College for Women, Lexington, Mo. 

2827 CHARLES HENRY McLAURY 
1895-1900, four years, A.B. (See Faculty Record, p. 109, Sup.,C 
Liberal Arts.) 

2828 CHARLES SAMUEL MAC DOUGALL 
Bom 17 Oct. 1874 at State Road, N. Y. Student from Westn 
N. Y., 1896-1900. AX. Ph.B. 
Lawyer at Buffalo, N. Y. 

Married 19 Sept. 1903, Edna Aura Porter of Brocton, N. Y. 
Residence, Buffalo, N. Y. 

2829 FRANCES ELIZABETH MADDEN 
Bom 27 Dec. 1878 at Port Byron, N. Y. Student from Jordai 
1896-1900. nB4^. A.B. 
Teacher, High School, Schenectady, N. Y. 
Residence, 19 University Place, Schenectady, N. Y. 

2830 ELIZABETH CLARA MILLER 
Bom 30 Sept. 1873 at Auburn, N. Y. Student from South Richlan 

1895-1900. B.Mus. 
Teacher of Music. Taught in North Carolina after gradaati< 

teaching at Adams, N. Y. 
Residence, Lacona, N. Y. 

2831 FRANK MILLER 
Bom 29 Apr. 1871 at Andes, N. Y. Student from Andes at Ui 

lege, 1896-8; at Syracuse University, 1898-1900. Ph.B. 
Teacher, Andes, N. Y., 1900-2. Principal of Schools, Havana, 

since 1902. 
Residence, Havana, N. Dak. 

2832 FREDERICK AUGUSTUS MILLER 
Bom 4 Sept. 1875 at Rome, N. Y. Student from Rome at Willi 

lege, 1896-7 ; at Syracuse University, 1897-1900. A.B. 

Clergyman, Meth. Epis. Pastor at Central Square, N. Y., 1899- 

New Haven, N. Y., since 1902. 



AUJUXa OF SYRACUSB UNIVBRSITY 167 

1 5 Sept. 1900, Rose M. Nichols of North Bay, N. Y. 
ICC, New Haven, N. Y. 

2833 WILLIAM HOWARD MONTGOMERY 
, June 1877 at Downsville, N. Y. Student from Walton, N. Y., 
. *K*. M.D. 

in at Walton, N. Y., 1900-1. Interne at Willard (N. Y.) State 

1901-2. Junior Asst. Physician, Utica (N.Y.) State Hospital, 

rhird Asst. Physician, Craig Colony for Bpileptics, Sonyea, N. Y., 

.1903. 

ice, Sonyea, N. Y. 

2834 AMELIA LUCRETIA MORGAN (DORR) 

Sister of Mq. 1243 
Jan. 1878 at Madison, N. Y. Student from Rome, N. Y., 1896- 
B. Ph.B. 

xess. Union School, Cambridge, N. Y., 1900-3. 
I 26 Dec. 1903, Carl E. Dorr (No. 2779 Sup. ) of Syracuse, N. Y. 
ice, aoo W. Castle St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

2835 ♦ WILLIAM HENRY MUDDLE 
t Nov. 1873 at Gloversville, N. Y. Student from Gloversville, 
. A..B. 

nan, Meth. Epls. Pastor at Blue Mountain Lake, N.Y., 1900-1 , at 
, Col., 1901-Jan. 1902. Went to Phoenix, Ariz., in search of healtl}. 
Blar. 1902 at Gloversville, N. Y. 

2836 GRACE GERTRUDE NOBLE 
Feb. 1876 at Addison, N Y. Student from Addison, 1896-1900. 
Mus. 

r at Addison, N. Y., private pupils in Vocal and Piano, 1900-1. 
r in Piano, Southern Female College, Petersburg, Va., since 1901. 
ice, Petersburg, Va. 

2837 EDITH AVERY NYE (GREEN) 
May 1878 at Syracuse, N.Y. Student from Syracuse, 1896-1900. 

r. High School, Solvay, N, Y. 

I 22 June 1904, Edward A. Green (No. 2796 Sup.) of Haverford,Pa. 

ice, Haverford, Pa. 

2838 RENA LIGHT OBERDORFER 
Mar. 1879 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, 1896-1900. 

r in the Commercial High School, Syracuse, N. Y., since 1901. 
ice, 615 E. Fayette St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

2839 DAVID DANIEL O'BRIEN 
June 1872 at Woodville, N. Y. Student from Woodville, 1896- 
.D. 

an at Oswego, N. Y.. since 1900. 
ice, Oswego, N. Y. 



l68 AlfUMNI OP SYRACUSB UNIVERSITY 19OO 

3840 MARTHA BLIZABBTH O'BRIEN 
Born 19 Nov. 1878. Student from Syracuse, N. Y., 1896-1900. B.I. 
Teacher, High School, Syracuse, N. Y, 
Residence, 528 Cedar St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

2841 LAURA EDITH OSBORNE 
Born 12 Sept 1877 at Black River, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, N.Y., 
1896-1900. KKF. A.B. 

Preceptress, Union School, Warner, N. Y., 1900-2. Teacher of Math., 
High School, Muscatine, la., 1901-2. 
Residence, Muscatine, la. 

Home address, 206 Purman St, Syracuse, N. Y. 

2842 CHARLES TURNER OSTRANDER 

Born 26 Nov. 1875. Student from Syracuse in the College of Libenl 
Arts, 1896-7 ; in the College of Medicine, 1896-1900. BOn. M.D. 

House Surgeon, Hospital of the Good Shepherd, Syracuse, 1900-1. 
Physician at Junius, N. Y., since 1901. 

Married 3 Dec. 1902, Edna Alice Andrews (No. 1529) of Bethel, N. Y. 

Residence, Junius, N. Y. 

2843 CHARLES LIVINGSTON PALMER 

Born 23 May 1877 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, i896-i9oa 
AKE. Ph.B. 
I Secretary Syracuse Time Recorder Company since July i, 1900. 
Residence, 1200 S. Salina St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

.2844 MABEL VAN WAGENEN PARKER 
Bom 18 Dec. 1896 at Colorado Springs, Colo. Student from Syracnse, 
N. Y., 1896-1900. KAG. A.B. *BK. 

Teacher of History and German, High School, Frankfort, N. Y. 1900-3. 
Preceptress, High School, Spring Valley, N. Y., Sept. -Nov. 1903. Teacher 
of Greek and Roman History, High School, Syracuse, N. Y., since Not. 

1903- 
Residence, 353 Delaware St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

2845 LAURA PARSONS 

Born 8 Mar. 1877 &t Fairmount, N. Y. Student from Fairmooflt, 
1896-1900. A*. Ph.B. *BK. 

Cashier, Syracuse University, 1900-3. Treasurer Alpha Phi frateniitj 
since 1903. Graduate student at Simmons College, Boston, Mass, since 1903. 

Residence, Franklin Square House, Boston, Mass. 

2846 CELESTIA MAY PEMBER (HAZEN) 
Born 3 May 1875 at Wells, Vt. Student from Wells, i896-i9oa Ph-B^ 
Taught Modern Languages, Alfred University, Alfred, N. Y. 
Marrried 18 Nov. 1902, C. H. Hazen, M.D., of E. Corinth, Vt. 
Residence, E. Corinth, Vt. 

2847 FRANK SPENSER PERRY 
Born 19 July 1876 at Brooklyn. N. Y. Student from Deposit, N. Y., 
1896-1900. $A9. A.B. LL.B.1902. 



I 1900 AUJWHl OF SYRACUSB UNIVBRSITY 169 

Student in College of Law, 1900-2. Lawyer in New York, N. Y., since 
1902. 
Married 30 fan. 190 1, N. Dorothy Palmer of Deposit, N. Y. 
Residence, 324 W. I22d St., New York, N. Y. 

2848 GEORGE LEE PHELPS 
1896-1900. A.B. (See Faculty Record, p. 108 Sup., College of Liberal Arts.) 

2849 LOUIS DeLAITTRE PULSIFER 
Born 18 Oct. 1872 at Stetson, Me. Student from Augusta, Me., 1896- 

1900. Ben. M.D. 

In hospital work in New York, N. Y., 1900-2. Physician at DeRuyter, 
N. Y., 1902-3 ; at Mexico, N. Y., since Sept. 1903. Health officer of De- 
Rnytcr, N. Y., Apr. 1902-Nov. 1903. 

Married 18 June 1902, Lulu A. Huntington (see Non-graduates) of Mexico, 
N.Y. 

Residence, Mexico, N. Y. 

2850 lONE ARMENIA REYNOLDS 
Born I Oct. 1877 at Croton-on-Hudson, N. Y. Student from Golden 's 
; Bridge, N. Y., at Vassar College, 1896-8 ; at Syracuse University, 1898-1900. 
-A*. Ph.B. 

Studying and traveling in Europe, 1900-1. At home, 1901-2. Teacher 
in Public Schools, New York City, since 1902. 
Residence, 2041 Washington Ave., New York, N. Y. 

• 2851 HOWARD VICTOR RULISON 
Bom 25 Dec. 1876 at Apalachin. N. Y. Student from Syracuse, N. Y., 
1896-1900. ♦Ae. Ph.B. 

Principal, Academy, Lisle, N. Y.. 1900-2. Principal, Public Schools, War- 
wick, N. Y., since 1902. 
Residence, Warwick, N. Y. 

2852 ALONEY LYMAN RUST 

Bom 15 Sept 1876. Student from Moira, N. Y., 1896-1900. B6n. 
^IIX. M.D. 
Residence, Moira, N. Y. 

2853 NETTIE MAY SADLER 

Bom 25 Jane 1876 at Troy, Pa. Student from Syracuse, N. Y., 1896-1900. 
^B. B.S. 
Teacher, Prattsburg, N. Y., 1900-1 ; Palmer, Mass., since 1902. 
Residence, Palmer, Mass. 

2854 GRACE ROGERS SHEFFIELD 
Bom 2 Sept. 1876 at SoduB Point, N. Y. Student from Newark, N. Y., 
1^9^1900. nB«. Ph.B. 
Teacher, 190X-2. 
Residence, Newark^ N. Y. 

2855 EDWIN HEDDEN SHEPARD 
i895-i9oa B.S. (See Pacnlty Record, p. 129 Sup., College of Fine Arts.) 



X70 AI«UMltI OP SYRACUtB UNXVXRSlTy K 

1856 *FRED WALKER SHERMAN 
Brother of Nos. 3188 and 3371 
A.B. 1900. (See Faculty Record, p. ic6 Sup., College of Liberal Arts.) 

2857 WILLIAM THORNTON SMALL WOOD 

Son of No. 133 
Born 14 Dec. 1873 at Warsaw, N, Y. Student from Warsaw, 1896-ic 
♦*K. B.S. 

Teacher, Union School, Warsaw, N. Y., 1900-1 ; Instructor in Chetnis 
College of Pharmacy, N. W. University, Chicago, 111., 1901-2. Profci 
of Sciences, Normal School, Charleston, 111., 1902-3. 
Married 10 Sept. 1902, Olga Aldberg of Chicago, 111. 
Residence, 7808 Union Ave., Chicago, 111. 

2858 MAUDE LILLIAN SMITH 
Born 16 Apr. 1876 at East Syracuse, N. Y. Student from East Syraci 

1896-1900. HE*. AB. 
Teacher, High School, Chester, N. Y., since 1900. Preceptress, si 

1902. 
Residence, Chester, N. Y. 

2859 MONTGOMERY CALEY SMITH 
Born 18 Nov. 1876 at London, England. Student from Groton, N. 

1896-1900 *Ae. Ph.B. 
Principal, Union School, Slaterville, N. Y., 1900-1 ; High School, Am 

N. Y., since 1901. 
Residence, Andes, N. Y. 

2860 MERRITT AMOS SOPER 

Born 5 July 1875 at Canton, Pa. Student from Mainesburg, Pa., i896-i< 
4»K*. Ph.B. 

Clergyman, Meth. Epis. Pastor at East Troy, Pa., 1900-2; at Uls 
Pa., since 1902. 

Married 14 Sept. 1898, Maud E. Gates of Mansfield, Pa. 

Residence, Ulster, Pa. 

2861 MAUDE ESTELLE SOUTHWORTH 
Born 18 Apr. 1876 at Sidney, N. Y. Student from Norwich, N. 
1896-1900. AAA. Ph.B. 
Teacher at Andes, N. Y., 1900-1 ; at Norwich, N. Y., since 1902. 
Residence, Norwich, N. Y. 

2862 HARRY MARVIN STACY 

Born 7 Nov. 1877 at New Haven, N. Y. Student from New Haven, ri 
1900. *K4'. A-B. *A*. LL.B.1902. 

Student in College of Law, 1900-2. Lawyer at Oswego, N. Y., since i< 
Editor-in-chief Onondagan of class of 1900. 

Residence, Oswego, N. Y. 

2863 GEORGE ROWE STALEY 

Bom 31 Mar. 1874 at Burtonsville, N. Y. Student from Burtonsvi 
1896-1900. ^'T. B.S. 



AlfUMNI OP SVRACUSB UNIVBRSTTV Z7I 

r, Troy Conf. Acad., Ponltney, Vt., 1900-f ; at Oneida, N. Y., 

E. 

1 26 June 1902, Mary Zuba Barrett (No. 2747 Sup.) of Titnsville, Pa. 
Eleanor Overbaugh, born 22 Apr. 1903. 
ace, Oneida. N. Y. 

2864 RAYMOND JAMES STOUP 

' May 1878 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, 1896-1900. 

-Graduate Hospital, New York, 1900-1. Physician at Syracuse, 
ice 1901. Police Surjjjeon of Syracuse. 
ice, 612 Lodi St, Syracuse, N. Y. 

2865 HUGH BUTLER STRANG 

I Oct. 1876 at Birch Run, Mich. Student from Westfield, Pa., 
. Ph.B. 

at Westfield, Pa., since 1900. 
ice, Westfield, Pa. 

2866 FRANK RAPHAEL STRONG 
) June 1876 at Brewerton, N. Y. Student from Brewerton, 1896- 
S. ♦BK. 

L in College of Medicine since 1900. 
ice, Brewerton, N. Y. 

2867 RICHARD LEO SULLIVAN 

Sept. 1876 at Stiles, N. Y. Student from Stiles in College of 
irts, 1895-6 ; in College of Medicine, 1896-1900. AKK. M.D. 
an at Baldwinsville, N. Y., since Nov. 1900. 
ice, Baldwinsville, N. Y. 

2868 MARY FRANCES SWEET 

Feb. 1874 at Camillus, N. Y. Student from Syracuse in College 
1 Arts. 1892-5 ; in College of Medicine, 1896- 1900. KA9. Z*. 

V England Hospital for Women and Children, Boston, 1 900-1. 
I at Albany, N. Y., 1901-4 ; at Syracuse, N. Y., since 1904. 
ice, 1 108 E- Genesee St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

2869 MARY AGNES THOMPSON 

5 Oct. 1875 at Cohoes, N. Y. Student from Adams, N. Y,, 

B.Mus. 
rat Mt. Hermon, Mass., one year ; at Adams, N. Y., two years, 
ice, Adams, N. Y. 

2870 FRED MONROE THURSTON 
E4 Jan. 1871 at Kenwood, N. Y. Student from Kenwood, 
. A.B. 

nan, Meth. Epis. Pastor at Cardiff, N. Y., since 1900. 
I 31 Oct. 1900, Ruth A. Osgood of Mansfield, Pa. 
ice, Cardiflf, N. Y. 



172 ALUMNI OP SYRACUSB UNIVBRSITY I9OO 

2871 LULU MARIE TICKNOR 

Born 22 June 1870 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, i&ps-i^oo. 
B. Mus. 

Soprano solist at Grace Presbyterian Church, Oswego, N. Y. ; Same ; 
Presbyterian Church, Cortland, N. Y. Instructor in Vocal Music, Comer- 
▼atory of Music, Cortland, N. Y. 

Residence, Cortland, N. Y. 

2872 ALLEN GIDEON TRIPP 

Bom 12 Nov. 1868 at Clay, N. Y. Student from Cicero, N. Y., 1896-1900. 
AKK. M.D. 
Physician at Cicero, N. Y., since 1900. 

Married June 1900, Angie L. Overacre of East Syracuse, N. Y. 
Child f Carleton Overacre, born 25 Sept. 1902. 
Residence, Cicero, N. Y. 

2873 OAKLEY EARL VAN SLYKE 

Bom 7 Jan. 1876 at Richville, N. Y. Student from Carthage, N. Y., 
1896-1900. AT. A.B. S.T.B.(Sco. of Theol. Boston Univ. )I902. 

Clergyman Meth. Epis. "Supply** at Worcester Missions, Worcester, 
Mass., 1900-1 ; at Congregational Church of Dennis, Cape Cod, Mass., 
1901-2 ; at Evangelical Congregational Church, Hingham. Mass., 1902-4. 
Graduate student at Boston University, 1902-4. Pastor of M. B. Church at 
Lakeside, N. Y., since 1904. 

Married 25 June 1902, Elizabeth P. Nusbickel (No. 2970 Sup.) of Lyons, 
N- Y. 

Residence, Lakeside, N. Y. 

2874 CHARLES ROWE VICKERY 
Bom 10 Sept. 1873 ^^ Lansing, Mich. Student from Phcenix, N. Y., 

1 894-1 900, four years. *K*. Ph.B. B.D. (Drew) 1903. 
Student at Drew Theol. Sem., 1900-3. Clergyman, Meth. Epis. Pastor 

at Cold Spring, N. Y., 1902-3. Asst. Pastor Elm Park Church, Scranton, 

Pa., since 1903. 
Residence, Scranton, Pa. 

2875 NEWMAN D. WAFFLE 

Born 19 Mar. 1879 a^ Salt Springville, N. Y. Student from Salt Spring- 
ville, 189 5-1 900. four years. *Ae. Pd.B.(N. Y. S. Normal College) 1902. 
Ph.M. (Same) 1903. 

Student at N. Y. State Normal College, 1901-3. 

Residence, Salt Springville, N. Y. 

2876 JESSIE MAY WAKEFIELD 
Born 20 May 1878 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, 1896-1900. 

UB* Ph.B. 
Student at Cortland (N. Y.) Normal School, 1900-1. Teacher, Higb 

School, Camden, N. Y., 1901-2. Preceptress, Same, since 1902. 
Residence, Camden, N. Y. 



ALUMNI OF SYRACUSB UNIVBRSITY I73 

2877 RUTH LEORA WARD 

I Apr. 1879 at Carthage, N. Y. Stndent from Evans Milla, N. Y., 
)00. AAA. A.B. 

tier of Latin and History, High School, Hard wick, Vt., 1900-2; of 

1 and History, High School, Phoenix, N. Y., since 1902. 
lence, Phoenix, N. Y. 

2878 ROSA REGINA WEIGAND 
27 Feb. 1877 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Sjrracuse, 1896-1900. 

sptress. High School, Argylc, N. Y.. since J902. 
lence, Argyle, N. Y. 

2879 MARION LESLEY WEST 

1900. Ph.B. (See Faculty Record, p. 113 Sup., College of Liberal 

2880 GRACE FRANC WIGHT 

31 Mar. 1878 at Antwerp, N. Y. Student from Watertown, N. Y., 
00. KKF. B. Mus. 
lence, 303 Marshall St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

2881 MORGAN ALLEN WILCOX 
16 Dec. 1875 at WilkesBarre, Pa. Student from WilkesBarre* 
00. AT. Ph.B. LL.B.1902. 
mtin College of Law, 1900-2. 

sling salesman for J. C. Tennant (No. 3012 Sup.) & Co. of Wilkes- 
ince 1902. 
lence, 24-25 Bennett Building, WilkesBarre, Pa. 

2882 HORATIO BURT WILLIAMS 

1900. (See Faculty Record, p. 106 Sup., College of Liberal Arts.) 

2883 GEORGE CLAYTON WOOD 

2 Feb. 1878 at Mexico, N. Y. Student from St. Johnsville, N. Y., 
00. *K*. A.B. 

ipal Grammar School, Little Falls, N. Y., 1900-2. Teacher of 
', Port Richmond High School, Borough of Richmond, New York, 
[902-3 ; Same, Boys High School, Brooklyn, N. Y., since 1903. 
lence, 124 Kingston Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

2884 KARL DWIGHT WOOD 
6 June 1879 at Nashua, N. H. Student from Nashua, 1896-1900. 
A.B. M.D.1903. 

mt in College of Medicine, 1900-3. At St. Catharines* Hospital, 
rn, N. Y., since Sept. 1903. 
lence, St. Catharines* Hospital, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

2885 MARION ELIZABETH WRIGHT 

II Sept. 1878 at Davenport, N. Y. Student from Pulaski, N. Y., 
>oo. KKr. A.B. *BK. 

tier of Latin, German and English, High School, Pulaski, N. Y., 

Teacher of English, High School, Rochester, N. Y., since 1903. 
lence, Rochester, N. Y. 



174 AI^UMNI or 8YKACUSB UNIVXR8ITY 19OI 

28S6 MABEL YKOMANS (HOLDBN) 
Born 25 Nov. 1877 at Walworth, N. Y. Student from Walworth. 1896- 

1900. KKr. Ph.B. 
Married 14 March 1902, Raleigh W. Holden (No. 2938 Sup., q, t. for 

further record) of Honeoye Falls, N. Y. 
Residence, Honeoye Falls, N. Y. 

Class op 1901 
2887 henry jesse ackerman 

Born 20 July 1878 at Stockport, N. Y. Student from Wappingers Falls, 
N. Y., 1897-1901. A.B. 
Teacher at Red Hook, N. Y. , and Law student. 
Residence, Red Hook, N. Y. 

2888 JOHN JAMES ACKERMAN 

Bom 20 Nov. 1876 at Hartsville, Mass. Student from Wappingers Palls, 
N. Y.. 1897-1901. A.B. 

Bookkeeper, 1901-2. Law Clerk, May-Nov. 1902. Lawyer at New York, 
since 1902. (100 Broadway). Student in New York Law School (Evening 
Division) one year. 

Residence, 1200 Hancock St., Brooklyn N. Y. 

2889 GEORGE ARTHUR ADAMS 

Born 5 Feb 1874 at Winchendon, Mass. Student from Hancock, N. H., 
1898-1901. *K*. *A*. LL.B. A.B.( Dartmouth) 1897. 

Admitted to the Bar. Mar. 1901. Lawyer at Syracuse, N. Y., 1901-2 ; at 
Canton, N. Y., (with Hon. L. P. Hale), since July 1902. 

Residence, Canton, N. Y. 

2890 EVA JANE ALGIRE 

Bom 6 Nov. 1878 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, 1897-1901. 
Ph.B. 

Preceptress, High School, Manlius, N. Y., 1901-2 ; Same, Schuylerville, 
N. Y., since 1902. 

Residence, Schuyl,erville, N. Y. 

2891 JASON ROY ALLEN 

Bora 22 May 1876 at Sandy Creek, N. Y. Student from Sandy Creek in 
College of Liberal Arts, 1896-7 ; in College of Medicine, 1897-1901. AKK. 
M.D. 

Physician at Orwell, N. Y„ since 1901. 

Married 50 Jan. 1902, Ethel J. Barney of Sandy Creek, N. Y. 

Residence, Orwell, N. Y. 

2892 ALFRED WARREN ARMSTRONG 
Born 20 Nov. 1877 at North Bennington, Vt. Student from Syracmei 
N. Y., 1897-1901. AT. AB. 
Student in College of Medicine since 1901. NZN. 
Residence, 609 Crouse Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 



^901 Aixnaa of svracusb nmvsRSiTY 175 

2893 tBNA HARRISON BALDWIN 
Bora 18 Jan. 1878 at Big Prairie, Ohio. Student from WilkesBarre, Pa. , 
'897-1901. Ph.B. 

Teacher of History and English at Plemington, N. J., 1901-2 ; at home, 
I902-3. 
Residence, 79 Carey Ave., WilkesBarre, Pa. 

2894 STBPHEN BASTABLE 
Bom 27 Jan. 1879 ^^ Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, 1898-1900. 
Ben. AX. LL.B. 
Lawyer at Syracuse, N. Y., since 1901. 
Residence, 112 Cambridge St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

2895 JOHN LEOPOLD BAUER, JR. 
Bom 26 Feb. 1879 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, 1897-1901. 
«K^. A.B. «BK. 
Student in College of Medicine, since 1901. NZN. 
Residence, 218 Fitch St, Syracuse, N. Y. 

2896 JOHN ISAAC BECKER 
Bom 27 June 1870 at Harlemville, N. Y. Student from West New 
Brighton, N. Y., 1897-1901. A.B. 
Student in College of Medicine since 1901. 
Residence, Harlemville, N. Y. 

2897 JOHN ALANSON BEERS 

Bom 16 Apr. 1876 at Jenningsville, Pa. Student from Hornbrook, Pa., 
1897-1901. A.B. «BK. 
Vice-Principal. High School, Watkins, N. Y., since 1901. 
Residence, Watkins, N. Y. 

2898 FRANCIS ROE BENHAM 

1897-1901. M D. (See Faculty Record, p. 119 Sup., College of Medi- 
cine.) 

2899 ORLOW D'NASAN BLANCHARD 

Bom 5 June 1878 at Fayetleville, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, N. Y., 
1897-1901. AKE. Ph.B. 

In Dept. Public Works, Syracuse, N. Y., Mar. 1902-Jan. 1903. With 
the H. H. Franklin Mfg. Co., Syracuse, since Jan. 1903. 

Residence, 1804 B Genesee St.. Syracuse, N. Y. 

JOHN CARY BOLAND 
1899-1901. LL.B. (See No. 2651 Sup.) 

2900 DE FOREST HERMAN BONSTED 

Bom 4 Dec. 1876 at Manlius, N. Y. Student from Manlius in College of 
Liberal Arte, 1896-^ ; in College of Law, 1898-1901. AKE. «A«. LL.B. 
Lawyer at Syracuse. N. Y., since 1901. 
Residence, 204 Slocnm Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

VINCENT DE PAUL BRADY 
1899-1901. LL.B. (No. 2652 Sup. ) 



176 ALUMNI OF SYRACUSB UNIVBRSITY 19OI 

2901 ARTHUR OTIS BRIDGMAN 
Born 9 Apr. 1872 at Addison, N. Y. Student from Addison^ 1 895-1901. 
Ph.B. 
Teacher. Principal Union School, Orient, N. Y. 
Residence, Orient, N. Y. 

2902 CHARLES HOWARD BURR 
Bom 15 May 1879 at Oswego, N. Y. Student from Oswego, 1897-1901- 
4fK^. B.S. 
Teacher of Mathematics, High School, White Plains, N. Y., since 1901. 
Married i Sept. 1903, Jessie A. Knapp (No. 3127 Sup.) of Fabius, N. Y. 
Residence, White Plains, N. Y. 

2903 CHARLOTTE IRENE BURROWS 

Born 28 Nov. 1879 at Deposit, N. Y. Student from Bingbamton, N. Y., 
1897-1901. KAG. A.B. 

Preceptress, High School, Marathon, N. Y., 1901-2. Teacher, High 
School, Titusville, Pa., 1902-3. General Secretary Y, W. C. A., La Crosse, 
Wis., since 1903. 

Residence, La Crosse, Wis. 

2904 ELIZABETH SARAH BURROWS 

Born 13 Nov. 1878 at Deposit, N. Y. Student from Binghamton, N. Y., 
1897-1901. KAG. A.B. 

Teacher, Delaware Literary Institute, Franklin, N. Y., 1901-2. Precep- 
tress, High School, New Berlin, N. Y., since 1902. 

Residence. New Berlin, N. Y. 

2905 EDWARD MARK BYRNE 
Bom 5 Apr. 1878 at Pompey, N. Y. Student from Pompey, 1898-1901. 
LL.B. 
Lawyer at Syracuse, N. Y., since 1901. 
Residence, 229 Cedar St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

2906 GRACE MILDRED CHURCH 

Born 6 Oct. 1877 at Coxsackie, N. Y. Student from Coxsackie, 1896-1901. 
KKF. B.P. 

Awarded the Hiram Gee Fellowship at graduation. Student in Paris on 
Fellowship, 1901-2. 

Teacher of French and Art, Troy Conf. Acad., since 1902. 

Residence, Coxsackie, N. Y. 

2907 SAMUEL JAMES CLARK 
Bora 22 Aug. 1871 at Tully, N. Y. Student from TuUy, 1897-1901. B.S. 
In the office of the City Engineer, Atlantic City, N. J., 1901-2. With the 
firm of F.Middleton & Co., Same place, 1902-3. City Engineer of Plemot* 
ville, N. J., since Apr. 1903. 

Married 7 Apr. 1901, Susan J. Baker, of Clinton, N. Y. 
Children ^ Mary Baker, born 11 Jan. 1902. 
Samuel Willis, born 9 July 1903. 
Residence, Pleasantville, N. J. 



X90I ALUMNI OP SYRACUSB UNIVBRSITY 177 

2908 EDITH MATTY COBB 
Bom 24 Mar. 1878 at Mexico, N. Y. Stndent from Mexico, 1897-1901. 
AT. A.B. *BK. 

Preceptress, Granville, N. Y., since 1901. 
Residence, Granville, N. Y. 

2909 EDGAR DAVIDSON CONGDON 

Bom 25 Apr. 1879 at Walworth, N. Y. Student from Hornellsville. N.Y., 
1897-1901. AT. A.B. ♦BK. 

Teacher of Science, High School, Dobbs Ferry, N. Y., 1901-2 ; Malone, 
N. Y., since 1902. 

Residence, Malone, N. Y. 

2910 IMOGENE MARY CONLAND 

Bom 6 July 1870 at Brookiield, Vt. Student from Cambridge, Mass., 
1900-1. Ph.B. 

Teacher in Public Schools of Medford, Mass. 

Residence, 121 Walden SL, Cambridge, Mass. 

2911 GEORGE CUTLER COOL 
Born 28 June 1878 at Geddes, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, N.Y., 1898- 
1901. AX. LL.B. 
Lawyer at Syracuse, N. Y., since 1901. 

Married 28 Oct. 1902, Alice Lillian Murray of Syracuse, N. Y. 
Ckiid, George Murray, born 21 Aug. 1903. 
^ Residence, 309 N. Lowell Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

2912 ♦MARY ADA CORNISH (PARKER) 
Boni 22 Jan. 1876 at New Baltimore, N. Y. Student from Matte wan, 
N. Y., 1896-1901 . B.Mus. 
Teacher of Vocal Music, Centenary Collegiate Inst., Hackettstown, N. J., 

1901-2. 

Married 24 Sept. 1902, Jabez Sparks Parker, M.D., of Philadelphia, Pa. 
^ed 7 Apr. 1904 at Philadelphia, Pa. 

-.4 2913 HENRY DISSELL COSTELLO 

Born 5 Sept. 1877 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Syracuse in College 

:c ^ liberal Arts, 1896-8 ; in College of Law, 1898-1901. *A*. LL.B. 
l*^yerat Syracuse, N. Y., since 1901. 
Residence, 214 Highland Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

; HARLEY J. CRANE 

^^1901. LL.B. (Sec No. 2667 Sup.) 

2914 WILLIAM BRADFORD CURLEY 
^ 12 Oct. i»74 at Louisville, Ky. Student from Fargo, N. D., 1897- 
'^i. B.Ar. 
Sapcrintendcnt for Benson & Brock way, New York, June-Sept., 190X. 
'^^Hawley & Wharton, Architects, Pittsburg, Pa., since Sept. 1901. 
^Hidence, 426 Taylor Ave., Allegheny, Pa. 

2915 DENNIS DAVID DALY 
J^ 19 May 1875 at Brashton, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, N. Y., 
%-i90i. ♦K*. NZN. M.D. 



178 ALUMNI OP SYRACUSB UNIVB&SITY I9U 

Physician at BUenburg, N- Y., since 1901. 
Residence, Ellenburg Depot, N. Y. 

2916 ELIZABETH BOYD DEAN 
Born 4 Feb. 1874 at Towanda, Pa. Stndent from UlTsaes, Pa., at HoWeke 
College. 1897-8 ; at Syracuse University, 1898-1901. KA9. Ph.B. 
Asst. Principal, High School, Canton, Pa., 1901-3. 
Residence, Ulysses, Pa. 

2917 FLOYD FISKE DECKER 

Born 23 Mar. 1881 at Dennison, Texas. Student from Cohocton, N. Y., 
1897-1901. Ph.B. 

Vice-Principal and teacher of Mathematics, etc., High School, Newark 
Valley, N. Y.; Same, Glenwood CoUesriate Institute, Matawan, N. J. 
Teacher of Mathematics, South Jersey Institute, Bridgeton, N. J. 

Residence, Bndgeton, N. J. 

2918 EDWIN V. DENICK 

Born 12 Aug. 1876 at Syracuse, N. Y. Studest from Syracuse, 1896-1901. 
B.Ar. 

Architectural draughtsman at Pittsburg, Pa., 1901-3. Architect at 
Pittsburg. 

Residence, 337 Arabella St., Knoxville, Pa. 

2819 ANNA FLORILLA DILLS (AVERY) 
Born 19 May 1876 at Union Springs, N. Y. Student from Union Springs, 
1897-1901. AAA. Ph B. 
Teacher in Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Married 18 Nov. 1903, Floyd B. Avery (No. 3226 Sup.) of Syracuse, N. Y, 
Residence, 141 8 S. State St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

2920 HELENA EVANS 

Born 14 Nov. 1889 at Rome, N. Y. Student from Rome, i897-i90i- 
KAG. Ph.B. 

Teacher, High School, New Berlin, N. Y., 1901-2 ; Charleston, Hl.i 
1902-3. 

Residence, 205 West Court St., Rome, N. Y. 

2921 FRANK EDGAR FISK 

Born I June 1878 at N. Bangor, N. Y. Student from N. Bangor, 1897- 
1901. ♦PA. Ph.B. 

Teacher of Math, and Sciences, High School, E. Syracuse, N. Y., i^^'i* 
Principal, High School, Brushton, N. Y., since 1903. 

Residence, Brushton, N. Y. 

2922 ESTELLA LOUISE FOOTE (HARVIE) 
Born 18 Jan. 1879 at North Parma, N. Y. Student from Newark, N. Y. 

1896- 1901, four years. IIB*. Ph.B. 
Married 14 Oct. 1901, William J. Hanrie (No. i8o« Sup.)ofBoft^ 

N. Y. 
Residence, 463 Blandina St, Utica, N. Y. 



ALman op syracusb umvBmsiTY 179 

2923 AVERY AUSTIN GANNETT 

n. 1876 at Galloup Island, N. Y. Student from Smithville, N. Y. , 
«Ae. A.B. 
reneva, N. Y., since 1901 
J Jan. 1903, Sara Belle Leffingwell (see Non-graduates) of Water- 

• 

e, loi Andes Ave., Geneva, N. Y. 

2924 GEORGE WILLIAM GRAY 
Jan. 1877 at Triangle, N. Y, Student from Sjrracnse, N. Y., 

AX. LL.B. 
X Syracuse. N. Y., since 1901. 
e, 408 Cortland Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

2925 BLANCHE EDITH GUNN 
lug. 1878 at Buffalo, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, N. Y., 1897- 
Ph.B. Ph.M.iqo2 

jf History, High School, Warren. O., since 1902. 
e, 308 Park Ave., Warren, O. 

2926 GEORGE MARLETTE HAIGHT 
spt. 1897 at Onondaga Valley, N. Y. Student from Onondaga 
7-1901. A.B. 

in College of Law since 1901. 
e, Onondaga Valley, N. Y. 

2927 LEONARD TITUS HAIGHT 
[, LL.B. (See Faculty Record, p. 134 Sup,, College of Law.) 

2928 CAROLYN AUGUSTA HAMMOND 
Sister of No. 2799 ^up* 
June 1876 at Jersey City, N. J. Student from Newark, N. J., 
r*B. Ph.B. 
at Saugerties, N. Y., 1901-2 ; High School, Mt. Vernon, N. Y., 

:e. Mount Vernon, N. Y. 

FRANKLYN PARKER HAMMOND 
I. B.Ar. (See No. 2799 Sup.) 

2929 JANET NEWLAND HARRIS 
in. 1880 at Rochelle Park, N. J. Student from Syracuse, N. Y., 

KA6. Ph.B. 
i student at Leipzig, Germany, two semesters. Teacher of Eug- 
Elall, Blairstown, N. J., since 1903. 
:e, Blairstown, N J. 

2930 FREDERICK MILTON HARVEY 
Kar. 1866 at Corn worthy, Devonshire, England. Student from 
N. Y., 1897-1901. A.B. *BK. 

an, Meth. Epis. Pastor at Coustantia, N. Y., 1899-1904 ; at 
len,N. Y., since 1904. 



l8o AI«UMNI OP SYRACUSB UNIVBRSlTY I9OI 

Has published several articles on religious subjects. 
Residence, West Camden, N. Y. 

2931 TRAFTON LEROY HATCH 
Bom 17 Aug. 1875 at Morrill, Me. Student from Morrill in College d 
Liberal Arts, 1896-7 ; in College of Medicine, 1897-1901. B8II. M.D. 
Interne at St. Joseph's Hospital, Syracuse, N. Y., 1901-2. 
Physician at King Ferry, N. Y., since 1902. 
Married 30 June 1902, Annamae Murray, of King Ferry, N. Y. 
Residence, King Ferry. N. Y. 

2932 ALICE ISABEL HAZELTINE 
Bom 15 Apr. 1878 at Warren, Pa. Student from Warren, 1897-1901. Af 

Ph.B. 

Student N. Y. State Library School, Albany, N. Y., 1901-2. Aast, 

Chautauqua Summer School for Library Training, July-August, 190a. ' 

Organizer, Tuesday Club Library, Mayville, N. Y., Sept. -Nov. 1902. Asat, 

Public Library, Buffalo, N. Y., since Feb. 1903. 
Residence, 116 Mariner St., Buffalo, N. Y. 

2933 JENNIE AVERY HENDERSON 

Born 24 June 1877 at Weedsport, N. Y. Student from Weedsport, 1897- 
1901. r4»B. Ph.B. 

Teacher at Ridgewood, N. J., since 1901. 

Residence, Ridgewood, N. J. 

2934 WILLIAM JOHN HENRY 

Born 27 Apr. 1873 at New York, N. Y. Student from New York, 1897- 
1901. i'T. A.B. 

Married 6 Oct. 1903, Cora M. Rhodes (No. 2986 Sup.) of Elbridge, N. Y. 

Residence, 365 W. 24th St.. New York, N. Y. 

2935 CARRIE AUGUSTA HILTS 
1897-1901. Ph.B. (See Faculty Record, p. 108 Sup., College of 

Liberal Arts.) 

2936 DANA BIGELOW HINMAN 
Born 19 July 1874 at Pitcher, N. Y. Student from Binghamton, N. Y., 

1897-1901. AT. Ph.B. 
Law Student at Binghamton, N. Y., since 1901. 
Residence, Binghamion, N. Y. 

2937 WILLIAM OTTO HINTERMISTER 
Born 3 Oct. 1877 at Chittenango. N.Y. Student from Chittenango, 189^ 
1901. LL.B 
Lawyer at Syracuse, N. Y., since 1901. (Ward & Hintermister). 
Residence, 810 E. Fayette St , Syracuse, N. Y. 

2938 RALEIGH WARNER HOLDEN 
Born 7 July 1878 at Honeoye Falls, N. Y. Student from HoncoycFiIli. 
1897-1901. AT. A.B. 
Clerk, 1901-2. Cashier Bank of Honeoye Falls since 1902. 
Married 14 Mar. 1902, Mabel Yeomans (No. 2886) of Walworth, N. Y. 



19DI AI^UMin OP SVRACUSB UNIVBRSITY l8l 

Child, Richard Yeomans, bom 3 Dec. 1902. 
Rettdence, Honeoye Falls, N. Y. 

2939 ALBERT HENRY HOLLENBECK 

Bom 27 Nov. 1874 at Marathon, N. Y. Stndent from Syracuse, N. Y., 
i896>i90i. A.B. 

Asst. Manager of the Cataract Paper Co. 

Married 23 Jan. 1902, Blanche A. Barber (see Non-graduates) of Syracuse, 
N.Y. 

Residence, 116 W. Kennedy St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

HARRIS AYRES HOUGHTON 
1897-1901. M.D. (See No. 1300.) 

SUPPLBICBNT : Sporting editior on the Post-Standard ^ Syracuse, 1895-7. 
Stodent in College of Medicine, 1 897-1901. AKK. On House Stafif of the 
Hospital of the Good Shepherd, Syracuse, 1901-2 ; of the New York Post- 
Gnduate Hospital, 1902-3. In Europe in 1887 and in 1903. During the 
htter visit studied in various Berlin clinics. 

Physician at Bayside, L I., since 1903. 

Married 1903, Virginia Boyd Dudley of Bramwell, W. Va. 

Residence, Bayside, h. I., N. Y. 

2940 ELY A LENA HOWARD 
Bom 2 July 1879 at Henderson, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, N. Y., 
1897-1901. B.S. 
Student in Business College, 1901-2. 
Residence, 308 Kellogg St., Sjrracuse, N. Y. 

2941 FRANCIS ASBURY HULST 
Bom 12 Oct. 1877 at Greenwich, N. Y. Student from Greenwich, 1897- 
1901. A.B. 
Student in College of Medicine since 1901 . 
Residence, 103 W. Kennedy St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

2942 HERBERT DEW ART HUMPHREY 
Bom 12 Aug. 1876 at Lysander, N. Y. Student from Fulton, N. Y., 
189^1901. LL.B. 
Lawyer at Sjrracuse, N. Y., since 1901. 
Residence, 643 S. Salina St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

2943 FAY ROLISON HUNT 
Son of No. 174 
Bora 14 Aug. 1879 at Lawrenceville, Pa. Student from Millerton, Pa., 
%-i90i. A.B. 
Student in Boston School of Theology since 190 1. 
Residence, 72 Mt. Vernon St., Boston, Mass. 

2944 SIDNEY EGGIvESTON HUNT 
Bom 17 Mar. 1871 at Guilford, N. Y. Student from Guilford, 1899-1901. 

Ph.B. C.B.(Comell)i894. 
Clergyman, Meth. Epis. Pastor at Litchfield, N. Y.. 1895-7 ; Barton, 

^. Y., 1897 -1900 ; at College, 1900-1. Pastor at Castle Creek, N. Y., 1901-3; 

Maine, N. Y., since 1903. 



l8a AI,U1CNI OP SY&ACUSS UNIVBR8ITY I90I 

Married 14 Apr. 1896, Rettie Chaffee of Warren Centre, Pa. 
Child^ Walter Lincoln, bom 19 Nov. 1897. 
Residence, Maine, N. Y. 

2945 EDWIN CUMMINGS IDE 
Bom 16 Oct. 1873 at Brooklyn, N. Y. Student from Winthrop, Mft«., 
1898-1901. AT.,*A*. LL.B. 
Lawyer at Syracuse, N. Y., since 1901. 
Married 1900, Anna L. Colton of Syracuse, N. Y. 
Residence, 517 Park Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

2946 ALEXANDER GRANT JACKSON 

Bom 2 Mar. 1873 at Oneonta, N. Y. Student from Margaretville, N. Y., 
1897-1901. AT. A.B. 

General Secretary Y. M. C. A., Waverly, N. Y., 1901-2. Journalist, Mtr- 
garetville, N. Y., since 1902. 

Has published " The Mongaup Letters,*' 1902. 

Residence, Margaretville, N. Y. 

2947 GEORGE McLAURY JANES 
Born 23 Mar. 1879 at Verona, N. Y. Student from Onondaga Valley, 
N. Y., 1897-1901. Ph.B. 

With Eager Dynamo Co., Syracuse, N. Y., 1901-2. Received appoint- 
irent as electrician in the U. S. Navy, Mar. 1902. On Crusier Montgomerj, 
Aug. 1902. In sham battles on the Coast. Was given position as Machin- 
ist Feb. 1903. 
Residence, Onondaga Valley, N. Y. 

2948 ADELADE EVELYN JEFFERS 
Born 26 Nov. 1875 at Harford. Pa. Student from Harford, 1897-1901. 
KKr. Ph.B. 

Teacher, High School, New Brighton, Pa., 1901-3 ; High School, Mont- 
rose, Pa., since 1903. 

Residence, Montrose, Pa. 

2949 WILLIAM R. JOHNSON 
Bora 6 Sept.. 1880 at Staten Island, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, N. Y.. 
1898-190T. Ben. AX. LL.B. 
Lawyer at Syracuse, N. Y., since 1901. 
Residence, in W. Castle St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

2950 JANET LUCINDA KEVAND 
1897-1901. Ph.B. (See Faculty Record, p. no Sup., College of Lib««^ 
Arts.) 

2951 EDITH LYDIA KINNEY 
Born 22 Sept. 1879 at Flushing, N. Y. Student from Flushing, 1897- 
1901. AAA. B.S. 
Student at Normal School, Jamaica, N. Y., 1901-2. 
Teacher in New York since 1902. 
Residence, Flushing, N. Y. 



AI«UMNI OP SYRACUSB UNIVBRSITY 183 

2952 BRNEST WILLIAM 'LA WTON 
rn 14 July 1877 at McLean, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, N. Y., 
1901. *A*, LL.B. 

iryer at Syracuse, N. Y., since 1901. (McLennan, Parsons, Ide and 
on.) 
sidence, 608 W. Onondaga St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

HARRY SHERIDAN LEE 
^1901. LL.B. (See No. 2694 Sup., and Faculty Record p. 109 Sup., 
!ge of Liberal Arts. ) 

2953 ROSE LEWIS 
rn3oOct. 1877 at Blackinton, Mass. Student from Syracuse, N. Y., 
-1901. B.L. 

acher, Saratoga Springs, N. Y., since 1901. 
tsidence, Blmwood Hall, Saratoga Springs, N. Y. 

2954 JOHN EDWARD LINQUEST 
im 20 Oct. 1877 at Mexico, N. Y. Student from Mexico, 1898-1901. 
B. 

iwyer at Mexico, N. Y., since 1901. 
esidence, Mexico, N. Y. 

2955 JAMES BRYANT MACK 
lorn 23 Oct. 1875 at Wellsboro, Pa. Student from Wellsboro, 1897-1901. 
J. 

Teacher of Mathematics, Dickinson Seminary, Williamsport, Pa., since 

)i. 

Residence, Williamsport, Pa. 

2956 THOMAS FRANK MANLEY 
Bom 5 Sept.* 1874 at Plymouth, N. Y. Student from Norwich, N. Y., 
97-1901. AKK. M.D. 

J^widcnt Physician and Surgeon, St James Hospital, Newark, N. J., 

01-2. 

Physician at Norwich, N. Y., since 1902. 

RcBdcnce, Norwich, N. Y. 

2957 CLAUDE MITCHELL MARRIOTT 
^rn 25 Oct. 1873 at Verona, N. Y. Student from Vernon, N. Y., 1897- 
!>» ♦Ae. Ph.B. 

^ith Western Electric Company since 1901. At New York office until 
^' '• 1903. Transferred to St. Louis, Feb. i, 1903, as Cashier and Chief of 
^tDep't 
'Residence, Western Electric Co. , St. Louis, Mo. 

2958 ELIZABETH ETHEL MAYNARD 
^m II Oct. 1879 *' Auburn, N. Y. Student from Onondaga Valley, 
^', 1897-1901. A.B. 

*achcr. Union School, MorristoMm, N. Y., 1901-2 ; High School, Jordan, 
^., since 1902. 
^^idence, Jordan, N. Y. 



184 ALUMNI OP SYRACUSB UNIVBRSITY I901 

2959 JOSEPH MANN MEATYARD 
Bom 29 Nov. 1880 at Syracuse, N. Y. Stodent from Syracuse, 1 898-1901. 
AX. LL.B. 
Lawyer at Syracuse, N. Y., since 1901. 
Residence, 239 Gertrude St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

2960 FREDERICK WILLIAM MILLSPAUGH 
Born 27 Apr. 1880 at Buffalo, N. Y. Student from Albion, N. Y., 189S- 

1901, four vears. BGII. A.B. 
Teacher, New Mexico Mil. Inst., Roswell, N. M., 190T-2 ; Kentucky Mil 

Inst., Lyndon, Ky., 1902-3. With the Interior Construction and Improre- 

ment Co., Olean, N. Y.. 1903. Private Secretary of Senator Horace White, 

of Syracuse, since i Jan. 1904. 
Residence, 712 Irving Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

2961 EDWIN JAMES MIZEN 
Bom 21 Sept. 1879 at Westbury, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, N. Y., 
1899-1901. LL.B. 
Lawyer at Oswego, N. Y., since 1901. 
Residence, Oswego, N. Y. 

2962 HALLIE GIRDEANE MORGAN 
Born 24 Apr. 1875 at North Brookfield, N. Y. Student from Earlville, 
N. Y., 1898-1901. B.Mus. 
Teacher, Union Academy, Belleville. N. Y., since 1901. 
Residence, Belleville, N. Y. 

2963 ARTHUR WILLIAM MORSE 
Bom 9 July 1878 at Pittsfield, N. Y. Student from Pittsficld, 1899-1901. 
LL.B. 
Lawyer at Syracuse, N. Y., since 1901. 

Married 4 Sept. 1901, Anna J. Houck of Hartwick Seminary, N. Y. 
Residence, 726 Hickory St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

2964 WILLIAM JOHN MULHERAN 
Born 31 July 1877 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Walton, N. Y., 189^ 
U901. AKK. M.D. 
Interne at St. Joseph's Hospital, Syracuse, N. Y., 1901-1903. 
Physician at Syracuse since Jan. 1903. 
Residence, 516 Prospect Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

2965 HERBERT BENJAMIN MYRON 

Bom 25 Apr. 1879 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, i897-i90^' 
Ph. B. LL.B. (1903). 

Student in College of Law 1901-3. Chief Examiner of the 'ilvaad^ 
Civil Service Commission of Syracuse, N. Y., since 17 Jan. 1901. 

Lawyer at Syracuse, N. Y., since i Aug. 1903. 

Married 3 Jan. 1903, Florence May Ryan (see Non -graduates) of Syracii*i 
N. Y. 

Residence, 107 Sabine St., Syiacuse, N. Y. 



AI^UMNI OP SYRACUSB UNIVBRSITY 185 

2966 BENJAMIN EDMUND NEAL 
Brother of 2967 
July 1879 ^^ Nichols, N. Y. Student from Holland, N. Y., 1897- 
m. A.B. 

r in the Philippines since 1901: At SanQnintin.Pangasinan, Scpt.- 
[. At Tayug (Same), Nov.-Dec, 1901. At Urdaneta (Same), 
e, 1902. At Binalonan, Urdaneta, Asingan, SanManuel, June, 
i 1903. At Dagupan, Pangasinan, since 15 June, 1903. 
ice, Dagupan, Pangasinan, Philippine Islands. 

2967 OUN IvEROY NEAL 
Brother of 2966 
» Oct. 1877 at Hornellsville, N. Y. Student from Holland, N. Y., 
. Ben. A.B. 

r in the Philippines, since 1901: At Humingan, Pangasinan, Sept.- 
At Urdaneta, Pangasinan, Dec. 1901-June 1902. At Binalonan, 
ane 1902-June 1903. At Dagupan since 15 June 1903. 
Qce, Dagupan, Pangasinan, Philippine Islands. 

2968 ♦ ALVIN JAY NEFF 
[ Sept. 1870 at Bouckville« N. Y. Student from Madison, N. Y., 
jran University, one year ; at Syracuse University, 1896-1901, three 
LB. 

man, Meth. Epis. Pastor at North Non^rich, Exeter, Sm3rrna and 
rt Center, all in N. Y. 

d Aug. 1898, Maude Holliday of North Norwich, N. Y. 
I Nov. 1902 at Davenport Center, N. Y. 

2969 HILDA HERRICK (NOYES) 
8 Jnne 1878 at Kenwood, N. Y. Student from Kenwood, at 
I Medical College of the New York Infirmary, three years ; at 
University, 1900-1. M.D. 
ian at Kenwood, N. Y., since 1901. 

d 5 Jnne 1897, John Humphrey Noyes of Kenwood, N. Y. 
nt, Adele Charlotte, born 12 May T889. 

David Kirby, born 22 Apr. 1903. 
Qce, Kenwood, N. Y. 

-0 ELIZABETH FREDREKA NUSBICKEL (VAN SLYKE) 

5 July 1877 at Lyons, N. Y. Student from Lyons, 1897-1901. A#, 

d 25 June 1902, Oakley E. Van Slyke (No, 2873 Sup., q.v. for 
ecord) of Hingham, Mass. 
Qoe, Lakeside, N. Y. 

FRANCIS ELLIOTT OLIVER 
901. LL.B. (See No. 1018) 
KMKNT : Student in College of Law, 1898-1901. 
r at Syracuse, N. Y., since 1901. 
nee, 702 University Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 



l86 ALUMNI OP SYRACUSB UNIVBRSITY I90I 

2971 JAMES HARRISON OLMSTEAD 
Born 10 Dec. 1877 at Windham, Pa. 
Student from Nichols, N. Y., 1897-1901. A.B. 
Student at School of Theology, Boston University, since 1901. 
Residence, 72 Mt. Vernon St., Boston, Mass. 

2972 VINCENT STEBBINS ORVIS 

Born I Dec. 1877 at Mexico, N. Y. Student from Mexico, in College of 
Liberal Arts, 1897-8; in College of Law, 1898-1901. LL.B. 

Admitted to the Bar, Sept. 1901. Lawyer at Mexico, N. Y., Jan.-Jnne 
1902 ; at Syracuse, N. Y., since 1902. 

Broke College record in pole vault and one-half mile mn, 1898. Pole 
vault, 10 ft. 1^ in. Half mile run 2 m. 5 s. 

Married 6 Sept. 1897, Virginia May Wood of Pern wood, N. Y. 

Child^ Reginald Lincoln, bom 12 Peb. 1899. 

Residence, 511 Thayer St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

2973 BESSIE TIPFT PADDOCK 
Born 17 Feb. 1877 at Wolcott, N. Y. Student from Wolcott, 1897-1901. 
A*. B.L. 
Residence, Wolcott, N. Y. 

2974 MAYME PAKELNISHKY (or PACKARD) 
Bom I Jan. 1879 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, 1897-1991. 
B.L. 
Residence, 115 Burt St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

2975 LOUIS DEFOREST PALMER 

Born 13 Jan. 1871 at Brook field, N. Y. Student from Chenango Forks, 
N. Y., 1897-1901. *Ae. A.B. 

Clerjiryman, Meth. Epis. Pastor at Chenango Bridge, N. Y., 1900-3;*^ 
Factoryville, Pa., since 1903. 

Graduate student at Syracuse University, 1901-2. 

Married 28 June 1899, Sarah P. Lewis of KattellviUe, N. Y. 

Child, Dorothea Baker, bom 23 Oct. 190 1. 

Residence, Factoryville, Pa. 

2976 ALFRED HARRISON PARSONS 
Born 15 May 1877 At Long Island City, N. Y. Student from Richffloo^ 
Hill. N. Y., 1897-1901. AT. A.B. 
Student at Long Island College of Medicine since 1901. 
Residence, 763 E. 183 St., New York, N. Y. 

2977 NICHOLAS WALTER PENDBRGAST 
Bora 7 July 1878 at Phoenix, N. Y. Student from Phoenix, I'^f-Vp^ 
AKK. M.D. 
Interne at St. Joseph's Hospital, Syracuse, N. Y., 1901-2. 
Physician at Syracuse since 1902. 

Married 12 Jan. 1903, Genevieve Sheehan of Syrmcuaey N. Y. 
Residence, 408 E. Genesee St., Syracuse, N. Y. 



AX.UMNI OF SYRACUSB URIVBRSITY 187 

2978 WILLIAM WELLBSLEY PERCY 

CNI RBCORD, p. 874. 

an. 1874 at Ogdensburg, N. Y. Student from Ogdensbnrg, in 

Liberal Arts, 1894-7 ; in College of Medicine, 1897-190 1. irT. 

). 

Rochester City Hospital, 1901-2. Pathologist, Jackson Sanita- 

sville, N. Y., Oct.-Dec. 1902. Resident Surgeon, Rochester 

•ital, Dec. 1902-May 1903. Ph3riician at Rochester, N. Y., since 

Monroe Co. Medical Society. 

15 June 1903, Susan M. Briggs of Rochester, N. Y. 

e, 480 West Ave., Rochester, N. Y. 

2979 CLARENCE PERKINS. 
\.ng. 1878 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, 1897-1901. 

«BK. 
tr in History, High School, Bloomfield, N. J., 1901-3. Graduate 
History, Harvard University, since 1903. 
e, Cambridge, Mass. 

2980 IVA LENA LOWTHER (PETERS) 
Apr. 1876 in .Ritchie County, West Virginia. Student irom 
. Y., 1895-7, and 1900-1. KAe. A.B. ♦BK. 
ung Women's Christian Association, New York, 1901-2. Teacher 
nd Latin, High School, Asbury Park, N. J., since 1902. 
in Heidelberg, Germany, summer of 1902. 
17 Nov. 1898, Frederick Peters of Fishkill. N. Y. 
:e, Fishkill, N. Y. 

2981 MARY ISABEL PHILP 
July 1873 at Chateaugay, N. Y. Student from Chateaugay, 
Ph.B. 
High School, Orange, N. J., 1902-3 ; New York, N. Y., since 

C 35 W. 93 St., New York, N. Y. 

2982 CHARLES BLAINE PIPER 
May 1879 at Blaine, Pa. Student from Sinnamahoning, Pa., at 
Seminary, Williamsport, Pa. (B.S. 1897); at Syracuse University , 

♦T. N2N. M.D. 
It Newark, N. J., City Hospital, 1901-3. On Medical SUfif of the 
Insurance Co., Newark., N. J., since i Feb. 1903 
6 Oct, 1903, Lillian M. Rumrill (see ^Non-graduates) of Syra- 

• 

:e, 179 Fairmount Ave., Newark, N. J. 

2983 EDGAR FOSTER PIPER 
^g* 1S75 At Tyrone, Pa. Student from Sinnamahoning, Pa., 1897- 

A.B. 
: student, Syracuse University, 1901-2. Student at Drew Theol. 



l68 AI^UMNI OP SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY I90I 

Sem. since 1902. Aasistant Pastor DeGroot Meth. Bpis. Church, Newark, 
N. J., 1902-4. Pastor at Greenwich, Conn., since 1904. 
Residence, Greenwich, Conn. 

2984 AIvICE OI.IVIA PRATT 

Born 10 Nov. 1878 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, 1897-1901. 
lvA9. A.B. 

Teacher of Greek and English, High School, Albion, N. Y., 1901-3; of 
Greek, German and English, High School, Glens Palls, N. Y., since Feb. 

1903. 
Residence. Glens Palls. N. Y. 
Home address, 115 Holland St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

2985 MAJOR FRED REED 
A.B. 1897-1901. (See Paculty Record, p. 130 Sup., College of Pine Arts.) 

2986 CORA MAY RHODES (HENRY) 
Born 3 Sept 1879 at Camillus, N. Y. Student from Camillus, 1897-1901. 
A*. B.P. 

Married 6 Oct. 1903, William J. Henry (No. 2934 Sup.) of New York, 
N. Y. 
Residence, 365 W. 24 St., New York, N. Y. 

2987 CAROLINE ADBLLIJ RIKER 
Born 12 Nov. 1874 at Canandaigua, N. Y. Student from Canandaigna, 
1897-1901. KKr. Ph.B. 
Vice- Principal, High School, Sidney, N. Y., since 1901. 
Residence, Sidney, N. Y. 

2988 PABLO DEL RIO 

Bom 19 Peb. 1872 at Guanajuato, Mexico. Student from Guanajoito, 
1897-1901. M.D. 

Administrator of the Good Samaritan Hospital, Guanajuato, 24 June 1901-- 
Aug. 1902. House physician of Same since Aug. 1902. 

Residence, Guanajuato, Mexico. 

2989 PAUL TRESCOTT ROBARTS 
Born 4 June 1880 at Eldred, Pa. Student from Eldred, Pa., 189^19^'' 

AX. LL.B. 

Lawyer at Atlanta, N. Y., later at Tonganoxie, Kas., now at Los Angela 

Cal. (?) 
Residence, Los Angeles, Cal. (?) 

2990 JOHN LEVI ROBERTSON 
Bom 24 Jan. 1877 at Lenox, N. Y. Student from Canastota, N. Y., iS 
1901. LL.B. 
Lawyer at Syracuse, N. Y., 1901-2 ; at Canastota, N. Y., since 1902. 
Residence, Canastota, N. Y. 

2991 RUBY EMELINE ROBINSON 
Bom 21 Jan. 1882 at Pompey, N. Y. Student from Pompey, 1897-1901. A.B. 
Preceptress, High School, Hancock, N. Y., since 1901. 
Residence, Hancock, N. Y. 



ALUMNI OF SYRACUSB UNIVBRSITY 189 

2992 WILUAM CARSON ROBSON 
9 Feb. 1873 at Middlesex, N. Y. Student from Middlesex, 1897- 
A.B. 

Western Union Electric Co., New York, since 1901. 
lence, 124 W. 11 St., New York, N. Y. 

2993 GEORGE HUNTING ROCKWELL 
9 Mar. 1878 at Cato, N. Y. Student from Weedsport, N. Y., 1896- 
AKK. M.D. 

idan at Syracuse, N. Y., 190 i-i Jan. 1903. Ear, Nose and Throat 
e, Cornell Medical College Dispensary, New York, and New Amster- 
yt and Ear Hospital, New York, Jan.-Sept. 1903. Exteme, New 
-dam E. and E. Hosp., since June 1903. Asst. Lar3mgologist, Hoepi- 
be Good Shepherd, Syracuse, 1903. 

ied 10 July 1901, Tade Fargo Adkinson (see Non-graduates) of 
port, N. Y. 
lence. New Amsterdam Eye and Ear Hospital, New York, N. Y. 

2994 JOHN ARCHIBALD RODGER 
9 Aug. 1855. Student from Owasco, N. Y., 1900-1. Ph.B. 
;yman, Presbyterian. Pastor at Owasco, N. Y. ?-i903 ; at Moravia, 
since 1903. Has published " The Story of a Century,** 1896. 
dence, Moravia, N. Y. 

2995 CHARLES LYMAN ROOT 

17 Jan. 1877 at Madison, N. Y. Student from Madison, 1897-1901. 
A.B. 

cipal Union School, West Eaton, N. Y., 1901-2. Vice-Principal, 
School, Huntington, Mass., Mar. -June 1903. Principal High School, 
on, N. Y., since 1903. 
idence, Jefferson, N. Y. 

MAURICE ROSSMAN 
^1901. LL.B. (See No. 2718 Sup.) 

2996 HENRY STANTON ROWE, JR. 

18 Nov. 1879 at Chestertown, N. Y. Student from Burlington, Vt., 
vcrsity of Vermont, 1897-9 ; at Syracuse University, 1899-1901. ATO. 

lent at Medical College, Albany, N. Y., since 1901. 
dence, Cohoes, N. Y. 

2997 GEORGE ALEXANDER RUSSELL 
-1901. B.Mus. (See Faculty Record, p. 130 Sup., College of Fine 

2998 WILLIAM RYAN 

15 Apr. 1870 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, 1897-1901. 

«BK. 

Student, Syracuse, N. Y., since 1901. 

ience, 301 S. A. & K. Building, Syracuse, N. Y. 



190 AlfUMNI OP SYRACUSE UNIVB&8ITY 

2999 FRANCES ADELINE SAGER (SCRAFFORD) 
Born 16 Apr. 1876 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Sjrracuse, 1895- 

four years. KKF. B.Mus. 
Married 28 Apr. 1902, Justus M. Scrafford (see Non-graduates) of t 

N. Y. 
Residence, 477 W. 140 St., New York, N. Y. 

3000 GRACE JUUA SAWYER 
Born 15 May 1878 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, 1896- 
A«. Ph.B. 
Residence, 700 University Ave., Syracusei N. Y. 

3001 JOHN WATSON SCOVILLE 
Bom 22 Nov. 1879 ^^ Varysburg, N. Y. Student from Varysburg, : 
1901. B.S. 
Vice-Principal, High School, Adams, N. Y., since 1901. 
Residence, Adams, N. Y. 

3002 ELIZABETH LATIMER SHRIMPTON 
Born I July i»75 at Fayetteville, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, N 
1897-1901. Z*. M.D. B.S.(Knoz College)i896. 
Residence, 611 E. Genesee St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

3003 ROBERT WILLIAM SKINNER 
Born 31 July 1877 at Vernon Centre, N. Y. Student from Lowell, N 
1897-1901. Ph.B. 
Teacher. 
Residence, Lowell, N. Y. 

3004 HORACE WRIGHT BUNN SMITH 
Bom 27 Dec. 1876. Student from Phoenix, N. Y., at Colgate Univei 

1897-X900 ; at Syracuse University, 1900-1. A.B. 
Principal, High School, Chateaugay, N. Y., 1901-3 ; High School, F( 

N. Y., since 1903. 
Residence, Fonda, N. Y. 

3005 RICHARD BRISON SMITH 
Bom 27 Aug. 1878, at Syracuse, N.Y. Student from Syracuse, 1898- 
AX. LL.B. 

Lawyer at Syracuse, N. Y., since 1901. 
Residence, 411 Elm St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

3006 WARREN WELLMAN SMITH 

Bom 31 Jan. 1878 at Brockwayville, Pa. Student from Olean, ^ 
1897-1901. A.B. 

Ministerial *' Supply/* 1901. Lecturer, with an entertainment Co., 
Real Estate dealer, 1903. 

Residence, Olean, N. Y. 

3007 CAROLYN MABEL SPENCER 

Born 7 Apr. 187 1 at Coventry, N. Y. Student from Coventry, 1897- 
AAA. A.B. 



AI,UMNI OF SVRACUSB UNIVBS8ITY I9I 

:her of CUatics, High School, Norwich, N. Y., since 1901. 
idence, Norwich, N. Y. 

3008 HAROLD CHRISTOPHER SPRAGUE 
n 28 Oct. 1877 at Little Valley, N. Y. Student from Little Valley, 
[901. B.S. 

.Cher of Science, Swarthmore Preparatory School, since 1901. 
ddence, Swarthmore, Pa. 

3009 ALBERT EDSON STAFFORD 
n 30 Apr. 1877 at Plattsbnrg, N. Y. Student from Plattsburg, 1897- 

AKR. M.D. 
use Phjrsictan and Surgeon, 1901-2. Physician at Whitesboro, N. Y., 

1902. 

med IS Sept. 1903, Edith L. Cooke of Whallonsburg, N. Y. 
sidence, Whitesboro, N. Y. 

3010 CHARLES EDWIN SWEET 
rn 22 Sept. 1878 at Scranton, Pa. Student from Scran ton, 1 898-1901. 

AX. LL.B. 
thD. L. & W. R. R., Scranton, Pa., 1901-Jan. 1902. With National 

Register Ca, Scranton, since 1902. 

irried 10 Nov. 1901, Margery Jayne Eden of Dunmore, Pa. 

<Af— lona Mae, born 29 Sept 1902. 

•idcnce, 2321 Adams Ave., Scranton, Pa. 

301 1 ROSCOE CONKLIN TARBELL 
m 17 Jan. 1876 at West Groton, N. Y. Student from West Groton, 

1901. AKK. M.D. 

ysidan at Groton N. Y., since 1901. 

iidence, Groton, N. Y. 

3012 JOHN CURTIS TENNANT 
m 18 Nov. 1874 at Ashley, Pa. Student from WilkesBarre, Pa., at 
eyta University, 189779, at Syracuse University, 189^ 1901. AT . 

«BK. 
neral Secretary University Y. M. C. A., June-Nov. 1901. Wholesale 
3er Merchant since 1901. 

Tried ao June 1901, Maude Estelle Stevenson of Jersey Shore, Pa. 
(/(/—Gertrude Elizabeth, born 16 Mar. 1902. 
ndence, WilkesBarre, Pa. 

3013 ELEANOR WARREN THAYER 

1115 June 1880 at Greensboro, N. C. Student from Portland, Me., 

1901. KKP. A.B. «BK. 

cher. High School, Baldwinsville, N. Y., 1901-3. 

idence, Springfield, Vt. 

3014 FLOY MAY THOMAS (RIXON) 

a 3 July 1879 at Moravia, N. Y. Student from Moravia, 1897 -i 901. 

A.B. 
cher of Modem Languages, Hig^ School, Moravia, N. Y., 1901-2. 



193 AlfUMNI OP SYRACUSB UNIVBRSITY 19OI 

Married 29 Oct. 1902, Howard L. Rizon (No. 874) of TuUy, N. Y. 
Residence, Tully, N. Y., 

3015 JOHN ROYAL THOMPSON 
Bom 10 Dec. 1873 at Longmont, Col. Stndent from Longmont, 1898-1901. 
LL.B. 
Lawyer at Syracuse, N. Y., 1901-3 ; at Oklahoma City, Ok., since 1903. 
Residence, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. 

3016 HENRY GLEASON THRALL 

Born 31 Mar. 1877 at Gouverneur, N. Y. Student from GoaTemeor, 
1897-1901. AKK. M.D. 

House Physician at Hospital of the Good Shepherd, S3rracuse, N. Y., 
1901-Jan. 1903. Physician at Fayetteville, N. Y., since Jan. 1903. 

Married 7 July 1902, Adah Russell of Syracuse, N. Y. 

Residence, Fayetteville, N. Y. 

3017 WESLEY DAVISON TISDALE 
Born 28 July 1879 at Potsdam, N. Y. Student from Rensselaer Falls, N.Y., 

1897-1901. *Ae. A.B. 
Principal, Union School, Liverpool, N. Y., since 1902. 
Residence, Liverpool, N. Y. 

3018 OSMOND IRA VANKEUREN 
Born 15 Dec. 1879. Student from Marfraretville, N. Y., 1897-1901. M.D. 
Physician at Prattsville, N. Y., 1901-2 ; at Sloansville, N. Y., since 1903- 
Residence, Sloansville, N. Y. 

3019 GEORGE MAURICE VAN SLYKE 
Born 27 July 1878 at Richville, N. Y. Student from Carthage, N. Y., 

1897-1901. AT. Ph.B. 

Reporter for Brooklyn Daily Eagle since 1901. 

Married 31 Dec. 1903, H. Lucille Baldwin (No. 3037 Sup.) of Syracmet 
N. Y. 

Residence, 369 Clinton Place, Brooklyn, N.,Y. 

3020 IDA LOTTIE VAN VALKENBURG 
Bom 31 Jan. 1874 at Ames, N. Y. Student from Lassellsville, N. Y.. 

1897-1901. Ph.B. 
Teacher of English and History, High School, Hamburg, N. Y. 
Residence, St. Johnsville, N. Y. 

3021 WILLIAM ABBOTT VAN WAGNER 
Born 12 Jan. 1879 at Weedsport, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, N* V.i 

1898-1901. Ben. AX. LL.B. 
Residence, 536 Tallman St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

3022 LOE ABIGAIL VOAK 
Born 15 Jan. 1877 at Canandaigua, N. Y. Student from CanandaigvAi 
1895-7 and 1899-T901. Ph.B. 
Preceptress, High School, Deposit, N. Y., since 1901. 
Residence, Deposit, N. Y. 



AI^UMNI OF SYRACUSB UMIVBRSITY 193 

3023 RICHARD ALFRED WAITE, JR. 
in. 1874 at Buffalo, N. Y. Student from Buffalo, 1897-1901. 
\. 

a, Meth. Bpis. Pastor at Alden, N. Y., 1901-3. General Secre- 
le University Christian Associations since 1903. 
** Bible Side Light Department," Northern Christian Advocate. 
S Oct. 1901, Olive Reeve (see Non-graduates) of Syracuse, N. Y. 
ive Sarah, born 11 May 1903. 
;, 1302 Madison St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

3024 ARTHUR AUGUSTUS WEBB, JR. 
i^eb. 1879 ^ Concord, Mass. Student from Syracuse, N. Y., 
AKE. Ph.B. 

I College of Law, 1901-Feb. 1902. Traveling Salesman for the 
icuit Co., Syracuse, N. Y., since Feb. 1902. 
:, 402 Walnut Place, Syracuse, N. Y. 

3025 MILTON HEWETT WELLS 
ily 1878 at Burtonsville, N. Y. Student from Burtonsville, 
*T. Ph.B. 
, Schenectady, N. Y. 

3026 MARY MAUDE WHITE 

.ug. 1877 at Westernville, N. Y. Student from Rome, N. Y., 
nB«. Ph.B. 
, Rome, N. Y. 

3027 FLOY FISKE WHITNEY 

[uly 2877 at Dickinson, N. Y. Student from Malone, N. Y., 

AAA. B.L. Pd.B. (Albany Normal College) 1903. 

High School, Manlius, N. Y., 1901-2. Student, Normal Col- 

^ N. Y., 1902-3. 

, Malone, N. Y. 

3028 ROSCOE RANDALL WILCOX 
:ar. 1874 at Dewitt, N..Y. Student from Manlius, N. Y., 1898- 

Syracuse, N. Y., since 1901. (Wilcox & Higbee.) 
, 136 South Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

3029 SADIE BAKER WILLIAMS (BELL) 
spt. 1876 at North-Western, N. Y. Student from Dolgeville, 
1901. nB«. B.Mus. 
f Music at Clayton, N. Y. 
^ Dec. 1903, Thomas B. Bell of Clayton, N. Y. 
, Clayton, N. Y. 

3030 STACY D WIGHT WILLIAMSON 
spt. 1876 at Malone, N. Y. Student from Malone, 1896-1901 
. M.D. 
at Malone, N. Y., since 1901. 



194 ALUMNI OF SYRACU8B UNIVBRSITY I9B 

Married 4 June 1902, Laura P. Fisher of Malone, N. Y. 
Residence, Malone, N. Y. 

3031 BERTHA WILSON 

Bom 20 Sept. 187 1 at Rochester, N. Y. StudenC from FayettevJle, N. Y., 
1892-4 ; and from Rochester, N. Y., and Brooklyn, N. Y., 1899-1901. Ar. 
B.S. «BK. 

Teacher, High School, Johnstown, N. Y., 1901-2; HowHrd SemiDiry, 
West Bridgewater, Mass. Teacher in Euphrates College, Harpoot, Turkey, 
sent out under the auspices of the American Board. 

Residence, Euphrates College, Harpoot, Turkey. 

Class of 1902 
3032 hamilton lizars aberdeen 

Born 8 Oct. 1876 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, 1895-^ and 
1897- 1902. *T. C.E. 

Civil Engineer with the Oneida Ry. Co., Syracuse Ry. Construction Co., 
1901 ; with the N. Y. C. & H. R. R. R. Co., 1902 ; in the City Engineer's 
Oflfice, 1903. 

Residence, 325 James St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

3033 MARY ELIZABETH ALDERDICE 
Born 18 July 1879 at Leeds, England. Student from New York.N. Y., 

1898-1902. A.B. 
Graduate Student at New York University, 1902-3. Her ancestors weie 

scholars, teachers and professional men. 
Residence, 2291 >^ Second Ave., New York, N. Y. 

3034 DAVID HASTINGS ATWATER 

Bom 8 Oct. 1875. Student from Syracuse, N. Y., 1897-1902. M.D. 
Was a student at Brown University one year. 
Residence, 226 E. 20th St., New York, N. Y. 

3035 LESTER SALISBURY BAKER 

Bom II Apr. 1880 at LaFayette, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, N. Y., 
1898-1902. *K^. B.S. 

In the Insurance business. Baker & Knapp. and Milton H. Northmp & 
Co., Syracuse, N. Y.; also agent for the Mutual Benefit Life Ins. Co. of 
Newark, N. J., since 1902. 

Married 17 Sept. 1902, Ella P. Felter of LaFayette, N. Y. 

CA»7^--Lester Donald, born 4 Nov. 1903. 

Residence, 100 Pleasant Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

3036 FRANK BERNARD BALDWIN 

Born 23 Jan. 1880 at Gouverneur, N. Y. Student ^x>m Syracuse, N. Y., 
1898-1902. ^T. Ph.B. 
Student in College of Medicine since 1902. 
Residence, 816 E. Fayette St., Syracuse, N. Y. 



i 



903 AI,DMMI OP 8VRACU8B UNIVBRSITY I95 

3P37 HARRIET LUCILLE BALDWIN (VAN SLYKE) 
1898-1903. A.B. (See Faculty Record, p. no Snp., College of Liberal 

3058 .VINCENT KINNE BARKER 

Bom 10 Sept. 1868 at Sanquoit, N. Y. Student from Onondaga Valley, 
r. Y., 1898-1902. Ph.B. 

Frincipal at Regents School, Turin, N. Y. Member National Geographic 
ociety. 

Residence, Turin, N. Y. 

3039 ♦ADELBBRT WILLIAM BARLOW 

Bora 6 Oct. 1873 at Albion, N. Y. Student from Warsaw, N. Y., 1898- 
902. Ph.B. 

Clergyman, Meth. Bpis. Pastor at Pillar Point, N. Y., June-Oct. 1902. 

Died 7 Nov. 1902 at Warsaw, N. Y. 

3040 SARA LILLIAN BARTOW 
Bora 38 Jan. 1880 at Northport, N. Y. Student from Northport, 1898- 
902. A.B. 

Teacher, High School, Northport, N. Y., since 1902. 
Residence, Northport, N. Y. 

3041 VERA HARRIET BEAMAN 
Born 13 June 1880 at Decalb, N. Y. Student from Oouvernenr, N. Y. , 
B98-1902. AAA. A.B. 

Tescher of Mathematics, High School, Phoenix, N. Y., since 1902. 
Residence. Phoenix, N. Y. 

3042 EVELYN BOWER BEARDSLEY 
Bora 3 Mar. 1878 at Union Springs, N. Y. Student from Union Springs 

897-1902. B.Mus. 
Graduate student at the University, 1902-3. Traveling with a Concert 

lompany, 1903. 
Residence, Union Springs, N. Y. 

3043 JOSEPH PETER BEHM 

Born 25 Dec. 1877 at Cazenovia, N. Y. Student from Cazenovia, 1898- 
902. A.B. ♦BK. 

Principal Union School, Gaines, N. Y., 1902-3 ; Same, Lewiston, N. Y., 
dnce 1903. 

Hembo' of first intercollegiate (Brown) debating team. 

Residence, Lewiston, N. Y. 

3044 WELCOME ANDREW BETTS 
Bora 30 June 1879 at Onondaga, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, N. Y., 
1899-1902. LL.B. 
lawyer at Syracuse, N. Y., since 1892 (Hopkins & Betts.) 
Married 3 Sept. 1902^ Blanche Crichton of Syracuse, N. Y. 
Kctidence, 809 Midland Ave. , Syracuse, N. Y. 

304s ROBERT STEVENS BOYCE 
Bora 14 Oct. 1875 at Middlefield, N. Y. Student from Pleasant' Mount, 
^&M 1897-1902, four years. ♦Kir. A.B. 



196 AXUMNI OF SYRACUSE UNIVB&SITY 1902 

Student at Drew Theol. Sem., Madison, N. J., since 1902. 
Residence, Madison, N. J. 

3046 WILBUR GRANT BOYD 

Born 9 Feb. 187 1 at Spragneville, N. Y. Stndent from Middlesex, N. Y., 
1898-1902. «rA. A.B. 

Clergyman, Metb. Epis. Pastor at Brewerton, N. Y., since 1902. 

Married la June 1902, Lnra E. Wigbtman (see Non-gradnates) of Weit 
Monroe, N. Y. 

Residence, Brewerton, N. Y. 

3047 NEAL BREWSTER 

Born 30 Jan. 1879 at Weedsport, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, N. Y., 
in College of Liberal Arts, 1898-9 ; in College of Law, i899>i902. fT. 
♦A*. LL.B 

Lawyer at Syracuse since 1902. 

Residence, 161 Holland St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

3048 ELIZABETH PEARL BROWN 
Born 15 Mar. 1878 at Erieville, N. Y. Student from Erieville, 1898-1901 
KKr. B.L. 
Teacber at Cazenovia, N. Y., since 1902. 
Residence, Cazenovia, N. Y. 

3049 CHARLES KING BULL 

Bom 30 Apr. 1875 at Breeseport, N. Y. Student from Elmira, N. Y., 
1898-1902. A.B. 

Student at Scbool of Tbeol., Boston Univ., since 1902. Supply at N. 
Salem Metb. Epis. Churcb sinc^ Feb. 1903. 

Married 7 June 1900, Lena H. Millard of Dundee, N. Y. 

C*«7fl?— Pbilip Millard, bom 30 Oct. 1901. 

Residence, 669 Sbawmut Ave., Boston, Mass. 

3050 THOMAS LAWRENCE BURKE 
Bom 4 Nov. 1875 at Otisco, N. -Y. Student from Ssrracuse, N. Y., 
1899-1902. LL.B. 

Lawyer at St. Paul, Minn., since 1902. 
Residence, St. Paul, Minn. 

3051 CLAUDE ADELBERT BURRETT 
Born 13 July 1878 at Parma, N. Y. Student from East Bloomfield, N. Y.. 

1898-1902. Pb.B. 
Student in College of Medicine, 1902-3. AKK. Studentat Cleveland, (0.). 

Homeopathic Medical College and Laboratory Instructor in Same since 1903. 
Residence, 415 Cedar Ave., Cleveland, O. 

3052 ADELBERT D. CARPENTER 

Bora 27 Sept. 1874 at Kelsey, N. Y. Student from Kelsey, 1898-190^ 
B.S. 

Cbemist for Semet Solvay Co., of Syracuse, at Wheeling, W. Va. 

Married 29 Dec. 1903, Geneveret Quick (No. 3166 Snp.) of Syrscttfc. 
N. Y. 

Residence, McMechen, W. Va. 



AI.UMMI OP SVRACIXSB UNIVBRSXTY 197 

3053 LEWIS ERWIN CARTER 
^y 1873 At Greenwich, N. Y. Student from Greenwich, 1892-3 
92, four years. ^rA. A.B. 

D, Meth. Epis. Pastor at Conklingville, N. Y., 1902-3 ; at 
its, N. Y., since 1903. 
J, Rexford FlaU. N. Y. 

3054 FESTUS MAHLON CHAFFEE 

pr. 1879. Student from Sheshequin, Pa., in College of Liberal 
; in College of Medicine, 1898-1902. AKK. M.D. 
at Ulster, Pa., 1902-Jun. 1903 ; at Lock wood, N. Y., since Jan. 

, Lockwood, N. Y. 

3055 HOWARD DAMON CHAPMAN 
:ni Record, No. 1205. 

SNT : Student in College of Medicine, 1898-1902. NZN. M.D. 
at Auburn, N. Y., since 1902. 
5, 24 South St., Auburn. N. Y. 

3056 WILLIAM DEWITT CHENEY 

[ar. 1876 at Antwerp, N. Y. Student from Antwerp, 1899-1902. 

t Syracuse, N. Y., since 1902. 

5, 103 Comstock Place, Syracuse, N. Y. 

3057 CHARLES J. CLARK 
pr. 1876 at Hyde Park, N. Y. Student from Edenville, N. Y.» 
♦Ae. CE. 

1 Engineering work since 1902. 
J, 65 Livingston St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

3058 EMMA CHAMBERS CLARK 
»ept. 1866 at Malone, N. Y. Student from Malone, 1899-1902. 

St on Medical Staff at the Sanitarium, Clifton Springs, N. Y.^ 

5, Clifton Springs, N. Y. 

3059 ALICE REED CLARKE 
. B.L. (See Faculty Record, p. 11 1 Sup., College of Liberal 

3060 FRANCIS WARE CLARY 
let. 1879 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, 1898-1902. 

in the Construction and Operation of the S3rracuse and Auburn 

Load since 1902. 

s, 204 Highland St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

3061 MARK EDWIN CONAN 
Jan. 1879 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from S3rracuse in 
:«ibecal Arts, 1896-^; in college of Law, 1899-1902. AX. LL.B» 



ISS AI.UMNI OP SYRACU8S UNIVBRSITV I9QI 

Lawyer at Syracuse, N. Y., since 190a. 
Residence, 218 W. Beard Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

3062 GEORGE LEROY CONNELL 
Brother of Nos. 3*55 and 3236 
1898-1902. A.B. (See Faculty Record,p.iioSnp.,College of Liberal Arti.) 

3063 SAMUEL HENRY COOK 
Born 27 Oct. 1879 at Ogdensbnrg, N. Y. Student from Ogdensbofg, 
1899-1902. AT. Ph.B. 
In the newspaper business. 
Residence, 720 Crouse Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

3064 JAMES HAMMOND CORNELL, JR. 
Born 3 June 1877 at Brooklyn, N. Y. Student from Asbnry Park, N. J., 
1899-1902. <l>Ae. AX. LL.B. 

Lawyer at 56 Wall St.. New York, N. Y. 
Residence. 56 Wall St., New York, N. Y. 

3065 LORENZO DANA CORNISH 

Bom 30 Mar. 1877 at Lee Center, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, N. Y., 
1898-1902. C.E. 

Instrument man for Allen & Farrington. Syracuse, since Sept. 1902. 
Surveyor for IT. S. at Beaver. Pa., 1902-3. Junior Civil Engineer for U. S. 
at Beaver, Pa., since i July 1903. 

Served as private in Co. C. 3d N. Y. Vol. Inf. 17 June-^o Nov. 1898. 

Married 23 Jan. 1901. Mary Elizabeth Brodhead of Syracuse, N. Y. 

Residence, Beaver, Pa. 

3066 FRANK JAMES CREGG 

Born 26 June 1877 at Howlett Hill, N. Y. Student from Hewlett Hill 
in College of Liberal Arts. 1896-8 ; in College of Law, 1899-1902. #A6. 
LL. B. 

Lawyer at Syracuse. N. Y.. since 1902. 

Residence, 104 Barrett St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

3067 EDWARD M. CULINAN 

Born 29 Jan. 1874 at Brooklyn, N. Y. Student from Brooklyn, 1898- 
1902. A.B. 
Clergyman, Meth. Epis. Pastor at Truzton, N. Y., since 1902. 
Residence, Trnxton, N, Y. 

3068 CHARLES DEFOREST CUMMINGS 
Brother of Nos. 121a and 2669 
Born 15 July 1880 at Springville. N. Y. Student from Buffalo, N. Y., 
1898-1902. AT. ♦A*. A.B. 

Manager and Contractor — lumber — Ha ! Ha ! Bay, Quebec, Can., 1902-3. 
Law student. Univ. of Buffalo. (N. Y.), since 1903. 
Residence, 560 Auburn Ave., Buffalo. N. Y. 

3069 WESLEY LEONARD CURTIS 
Born 6 Apr. 1878 at St. Johnsville, N. Y. Student fyom Bast Syracnie, 
N. Y., 1898-1902. E.E. 



AI^UMNI OP SYRACUSE UMIVBRSITY 199 

With Utica and Mohawk Valley R. R. Co., 1902. Electrician with the 
K. Y. C. & H. R. R. R^ Co., 1903. 
Residence, 5 Vanderbilt Ave., Grand Central Station, New York, N. Y. 

3070 RICHARD BRUCE CUTHBERT 

Bom 25 Feb. 187 1 at Pittsburg, Pa. Student from Pittsbnrg, 1894-8. 
Degree conferred in 1902. AKE. Ph.B. B.D.( Drew) 1902. 

Clergyman, Meth. Epia. Pastor at Braddock, Pa., 1898 ; at Sonthtown, 
N. y., 1899-1900 ; Newark, N. J., 1900-1 ; at Somerset, Pa., Z901-4. 

Msnied 5 Nov. 1903, Frances Irene Cartwright of Scottdale, Pa. 

Residence, Allegheny, Pa. 

3071 ALBERT HOWE DAMON 
Brother of No. 80a 
Bom 30 Oct. 1878 at Penn Yan, N. Y. Student from New York, N. Y., 
1898-1902. ^¥r. A.B. «BK. 
In business with W. W. Damon (No. 802) since 1902. 
Mirried 9 June 1903, Grace H. Telfer (see Non-graduates) of Syracuse, 
K.Y. 
Residence, 115 Hamilton Place, New York, N. Y. 

3072 MATTHEW LINCOLN DANN 
Brother of Nos. 1551 and 155a. 
Bom 13 Sept. 1879 at Downsville, N. Y. Student from Downsville, 1898- 
1902. ♦Ki'. A.B. ^BK. 
A«rt. Principal, Academy, Troy, N. Y., 1902-3. 
Principal, Gilbertsville, N. Y., since 1903. 
Residence, Gilbertsville, N. Y. 

CLARENCE WINFIELD DARLING 
1900-1902. LL.B. (Sec No. 2773 Sup.) 

3073 FREDERICK THOMAS DELANY 
Bom 8 Sept. 1881 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, 1898-1902. 
A.B. «BK. 
With the Water Bureau, Syracuse, N. Y., 1902. 
With the Smith Premier Typewriter Co., Syracuse, since 1903. 
Residence, 711 Oswego St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

3074 EDA AMELIA DICK 
Bom 13 Jane 1880 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, 1898-1902. 
AM. B.Maa. 
Tescher, Syracuse, N. Y., since 1902. 
Residence, Z19 McAllister Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

CARL ELIJAH DORR 
1900-2. LL.B. (See No. 2779 Sup. ) 

307s CARRIE DOUGLASS 
Bom II Apr. 1878 at Stafford, N. Y. Student from Batavia, N. Y., 
189^-1902. KAe. Ph.B. 
Tescher, High School, Bennington^ Vt., since 1902. 
Residence, Bennington, Vt. 



20O ALUMNI OP SYRACUSB UNIVRRSITT I9tt 

3076 GEORGE FRANCIS DUBOIS 
Born 6 July 1875 ^^ Highland, N. Y. Student from Highland, 1898-1901. 

A.B. *BK. 
Principal, High School, Millerton, N. Y., since 1902. 
Residence, Millerton, N. Y. 

3077 FRANK BANKER DUVALL 
Bom 7 Nov. 1874 at Sterlington, N. Y. Student from Suffem, N.Y., 

1898-1902. Ben. A.B. 

Clergyman, Meth. Epis. Pastor at Preble, N. Y., since 1902. Graduate 
student at Syracuse University since 1903. 

Married 10 Oct. 1903, Mary L. MacKellar of Preble, N. Y. 

Residence, Preble, N, Y. 

3078 ADELBERT DAVID DYE, JR. 
Born 9 June 1877 at Towanda, Ps. Student from Towanda, 1898-1902. 

Ph.B. 
Student at the Hahnemann Medical College, Philadelphia, Pa., since 1902. 
Residence, Towanda, Pa. 

3079 EDWARD DANFORTH EDDY 
Bom 25 Sept. 1880 at Saratoga, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, N. Y^ 

1898-1902. *rA. Ph.B. ♦A*. 
Student in College of Law since 1902. 
Residence, 203 Palmer Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

3080 DAYTON ELLIS 
Born 19 Feb. 1875 *^ Dunmore, Pa. Student from Dunmore, 1898-1902* 
♦PA. A.B. 
Surveyor in Engineering department, Erie R. R. Co., since 1902. 
Married 2 Oct. 1902, Grace M. Engle of Dunmore, Pa. 
Residence, Dunmore, Pa. 

3081 PHILLIP ERHARD 
Bora II May 1887. Student from Syracuse, N. Y., 1898-1902. AKK. M.D. 
House Physician at the Hospital of the Good Shepherd, Syracuse. N. Y., 
1902-3. 
Residence, 212 Willow St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

3082 ALBERT HENRY EVANS 
Born 28 May 1875. Student from Plymouth, N. Y., 1898-1902. AKK. M.D. 
Interne at St. Joseph's Hospital, S3rnicuse, N. Y. 
Residence, Plymouth, N. Y. 

3083 SOLOMON FERGUSON 
Born 30 June 1881 at Greenville, Tex. Student from Syracuse, N. Y., 
1898-1902. Ph.B. *BK. 
Student in College of Law since 1902. 
Residence, 1002 Montgomery St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

3084 PHOEBE ANNIE FERRIS 
Bom 5 Dec. 1869 at De Witt, N. Y. Student from De Witt, i89»-i9» 
AZ«. M.D. 



AI.UMNI OP SYRACUSB UNIVBRSITY 301 

iteme in New Bngland Hospital for Women and Children, Boston, 
^3. PhjTsician, associated with Dr. Sarah A. Bond, in Boston since 

1903- 
isidence, 855 Boylston St., Boston, Mass. 

3085 ANNA LODEMA FLINT 
»m 7 Ang. 1882 at Nevada City, Cal. Student from Red Creek, N. Y., 
-1902. Ph.B. 

eceptress, High School, Cleveland, N. Y., 1902-3. 
isidence, Fulton, N. Y. 

3086 ANNA ELIZABETH FOOTE 
ra 18 Dec. 1868 at Chittenango, N. Y. Student from Brooklyn, N. Y., 
-91 ; at Barnard College, 1893-4 ; again at Syracuse University, 1901-2. 

A.B. 
imcher of English and History, High School, Olean, N. Y., 1894-5. 
eptress, High School, Oneida, N. Y., 1895-1902. Teacher State Normal 
lol, Jamaica, N. Y., since 1902. 
ssidence, Jamaica, N. Y. 

3087 MARGARET EVANS POX 
¥m 24 Mar. 1880 at Towanda, Pa. Student from Towanda at Elmira 
ege, 1898-1900 ; at Syracuse University, 1900-2. Ph.B. 
tmcher at Coscob, Conn., J902-4 ; at Brooklyn, N. Y., since 1904. 
»idence, 80 Joralemon St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

3088 MARGARET FREEMAN 
>m I Jan. 1873 at Edwards, N. Y. Student from Saratoga Springs,N. Y., 
Rutgers Female College, 1893-5 ; at Syracuse University, 1901-2. 
J. 

I the Regents Office, Albany, N. Y., since 1897 except 190 1-2. 
raidence, Saratoga Springs, N. Y. 

3089 EDMUND LEAVENWORTH FRENCH 
>m 12 Oct. 1870 at New York, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, N. Y., 
^3 ; at Freiberg, Saxony, 1891-3. AKE. B.S. Degree conferred in 

;udent at the Royal School of Mines, Freiberg, Metallurgical course, 
-3. In newspaper work, 1896-7. Chemist, Sanderson Bros. Steele 
rks, Syracnse, N. Y., 1898- 1902. Metallurgist for Crucible Steele Co. 
imerica with headquarters at Sanderson Works since 1902. 
[arried 23 Sept. 1896, Frances Cooper Smith of Oswego, N. Y. 
hildren — Grace Mansfield, born 28 July, 1897. 

Helen Cooper, bom 7 Feb. 1899. 

Frances EHzabeth, bom 25 July 1900. 
Residence, 219 Rich St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

3090 ADA NELLIE FRINK 
Sister of No. 3091 
Born 10 Jan. 1880 at Ridott, 111. Student from Syracuse, N. Y., 1898- 
9w. Ph.B. 



S02 AI.UMNI OP SYSACUSB UNIVBRSITY I9OI 

Preceptress, High School, Warner, N. Y.. since 190a. 
Residence, 1212 S. State St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

3091 AMANDA NBTTIE FRINK 
Sitter of No. 3090 
Born 10 Jan. 1878 at Jacksonville, III. Student from Syracuse, N. Y., 
1898-1902. B.S. 
Teacher of Math., Central High School, Binghamton, N. Y., since 1908. 
Residence, Binghamton, N. Y. 

3092 WILLIAM TERRY FULKERSON 
Born 16 Apr. 1878 at Woodhnll, N. Y. Student from Ingleside, N. Y., 
1898-1902. M.D. 
Physician at Cohocton, N. Y., since 1902. 
Residence, Cohocton, N. Y. 

3093 GEORGIANA FULMER 
Born 4 Feb. 1880 at Fayettville, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, N. Y., 
1898-1902. nB«. A.B. A.M. (English) 1903. 
Graduate student at Syracuse University, 1902-3. 
Residence, 1222 N. 42d st., Philadelphia, Pa. 

3094 MARY GERTRUDE GARDNER 
Born 3 Sept. 1879 ^^ Onondaga Valley, N. Y. Student from Manlioi, 

N. Y., 1898-1902. KKP. Ph.B. 

Asst. Preceptress. High School, Greene, N. Y., since 190a. 
Residence, Greene, N. Y. 

3095 ERNEST FREDERICK GEORGE 
Born 6 Apr. 1869 <i^ Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, 1896-1901 

B.Mus. 

Organist and Director of Music, St. John's Military School, Manlius, N. Y., 
since 1902. 

Residence, Manlius, N. Y. 

3096 CHARLOTTE FINN GERE 
Bom 16 June 1880 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, 1898- 
1902. A.B. 
Graduate student Syracuse University, Z902-3. 
Residence, 514 Montgomery St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

3097 FREDERICK GIFFIN 

Born 6 May 1878 at Bradford, 111. Student from Morristown, N. Y., 
1897-1902. ♦PA. B.Ar. 

Supt. and draughtsman for the Architectural firm of MacClnre sihI * 
Spahr, Pittsburg, Pa., since 1902. . | 

Residence, 426 Taylor Ave., Allegheny, Pa. 

3098 THOMAS COOK GIFFORD 
Born 26 Aug. 1873 West Camden, N. Y. Student from West Csmdeii, 
1898-1902. M.D. 
Was Student in Hamilton College three years. 



ALUMNI OP 8YRACU8B UNIVERSITY 90% 

onae Snrgeon at Pazton Hospital, Utica, N. Y., 1902-3. Physician at 
lereld, N. Y., since 1903. 
saidence, Bameveld, N. Y. 

3099 ELIZABETH HUESTIS GOODALE 
»m 18 Nov. 1879 at Richfield Springs, N. Y. Student from Richfield 
ngs, 1897-1902. KKr. B.L. 
-eceptess, High School, Liverpool, N.,Y., 1902-3. 
widence, Richfield Springs, N. Y. 

3100 HELEN GREEN 
»m 10 Dec. 188a at Granville, N. Y. Stndent from Granville, 1898- 
. A.B. 

^ecepCress, Delaware Literary Institute, Franklin, N. Y., 1902-3. 
:her. High School, Keyport, N. J., since 1903. 
esidence, Keyport, N. J. 

JAY LAMONT GREGORY 
00-2. LL.B. (See No. 2797 Sup.) 

3101 EDDIE DARIUS HALL 

im 31 Oct. 1872 at Central Square, N. Y. Stndent from Caughdenoy, 
r., 1898-1902. M.D. 

lysician at Caughdenoy, N. Y., 1902-3 ; at Brewerton, N. Y., since 

»• 

arried 1895, Prances W. Hopkins (died 17 Sept. 1900). 

If'A/— N. Ward, bom 19 Sept. 1896. 

eaidence, Brewerton, N. Y. 

3102 NETTIE C. HALL 
ym 10 June 1878 at La Payette, N. Y. Student from Pompey, N. Y., 
M902. A.B. 

receptress, High School, Manlius, N. Y., 1902-3. Teacher of Latin and 
ach. High School, Richfield Springs, N. Y., since 1903. 
endence, Richfield Springs, N. Y. 

3103 WILLIAM ALEXANDER HALL 
>m 5 May 1871 at Chittenango, N. Y. Student from Chittenango, 1897- 
u E.E. 
eaidence, 812 E. Payette St., Syracuse. N. Y. 

3104 WILLIAM Mcdowell halsey,jr. 

om I Aug. 1879 at Dryden, N. Y. Student from Amenia, N. Y., 

$-1902. AKK. M.D. 

^aaa student in Princeton one year and in Cornell one year» 

liysician at EUisburg, N. Y., since 1902. 

Residence, EHisbtirg, N. Y. 

3105 GEORGE THOMAS HARGITT 
Brother of No. aloo 

1^9-1902. Ph.B. (See Paculty Record, p. 112 Sup., College of Liberal 

lU.) 



204 AI.UMIII OP SYRACU8S UNIVBRSITY I90t 

3106 RUTH VERA HAWKS 

Born 8 Dec. 1880 at Phoenix, N. Y. Student from Phoenix, 1898-1902. 
nB*. Ph.B. 

Residence, Phoenix, N. Y. 

3107 PHILETUS MARTIN HELPER. 

Born 3 Aufi^. 1876 at North Manlius, N. Y. Student from Minoa, N. Y., 
1895-7 and 1900-3. ♦K^'. Ph.B. 

Principal, High School, Marathon, N. Y. 

Married 6 Ang. 1902, Mary Sarah Waite of Buffalo, N. Y. 

Residence, Marathon, N. Y. 

3108 KATHARINE NATHALIE HEWITT 
Born 3 May 1880 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, 1898-1903. 

A.B. 
Teacher in St. John's Academy, Syracuse, N. Y., 1902-3; High School, 

Syracuse, N. Y., since 1903. 
Residence, 612 Mc Bride St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

CARRIE AUGUSTA HILTS 
1901-2. A.B. (See No. 2935 Sup.) 

3109 RAYMOND NEWMAN HOCKENBERRY 
Born 16 Sept. 1876 at Berrysburg, Pa. Student from Carbondale, Pa., 
1899-1902. ^KZ. (Dickinson). B.Ar. A.B. (Dickinson) 1899. 
Architectural draughtsman, Pittsburg, Pa. 
Residence, 426 Taylor Ave., Allegheny, Pa. 

31 (o ARTHUR ROE HORTON 
Bom 16 Apr. 1877 at Tarry town. Pa, Student from Wyalusing, Pa., 
1898-1902. *rA. A.B. *BK. 
Principal, Union School, Waterport, N. Y. 
Residence, Waterport, N. Y. 

31 1 1 CLARA ELIZABETH HOSKINS 
Born 19 Dec. 1879 at Auburn, N. Y. Student from Auburn, 1898-1902* 
A*, A.B. 
Teacher at Auburn, N. Y. 
Residence, 17 Hamilton, Ave., Auburn, N. Y. 

31 12 HOMER DOLIVER HOUSE 
Bom 21 July 1876 at Kenwood, N. Y. Student from Oneida, N. Y., 
1898-1902. B.S. A.M. (Columbia) 1903. 
Awarded scholarship in Columbia University, 1902-3. 
Asst. in Botany, Columbia University, since 1903. 
Residence, Bedford Park, New York, N. Y. 

31 13 CLARENCE EDMUND HOWARD 
Bom 16 Apr. 1881 at Baldwinsville, N. Y. Student from BaldwinsviUe, 
1898-1902. Ben. B.Ar. 

Has been with the firms of *' J. Galen Howard ** and " Carrier and Hast- 
ings '* respectively of New York since 1902. 
Residence, 365 Manhattan Ave., New York, N. Y. 



iy)l AIATMMI OP SYRACUSB UNIVBSSITY 30$ 

a 

3 1 14 LYDIA GRACE HUFF 

Bora I Sept. i88o at Aurora, Neb. Student from Rome, N. Y., 1898- 
1902. UH*. A.B. 
Preceptresa, High School, Norwood, N.Y., since 1902. 
Refldence, Norwood, N. Y. 

3 1 15 LULU NORTON HULL 

Born 17 Feb. 1880 at Granville, N. Y. Student from Granyille, 1898- 
1902. A.B. Pd.B.(Normal College, Albany) 1903. 

Student at the Sute Normal College, Albany, N. Y., 1902-3. Teacher at 
Booonlle, N. Y., since 1903. 

Residence, Boonville, N. Y. 

3116 IRVING ERNEST HURST 
Born 6 Jan. 1881 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, 1899-1908. 
U.B. 
Admitted to Bar 8 July 1903. Lawyer at Syracuse, N. Y., since 1902. 
Residence, 114 Davis St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

3 1 17 THEODORE IRWIN 
Bom 25 Dec. 1859. Student from Oswego, N. Y., 1898-1902.. NZN. M.D. 
Gndnate student in Vienna. 
Residence, Oswego, N. Y. 

31 18 LYNN EVERETT JENNISON 
Bom 5 Oct. 1878 at Groton City, N. Y. Student from Morris, N. Y., 
1898-1902. *K^. A.B. 
Tcscherof History, High School, Asbury Park, N. J., since I902« 
Married 7 Sept. 1903, Hester Wortendyke Shields of Dover, N. J. 
Residence, Asbury Park, N. J. 

31 19 EDITH FRANCES JONES 
Bora 29 May 1879 at Jamestown, N. Y. Student from Jamestown, 1898- 
19W. A.B. 
Professor of Greek, Greenville College, Greenville, 111., since 1902. . 
Residence, Greenville, 111. 

3120 ETHEL KELLOGG (BENEDICT) 
Born 9 June 1880 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, 1899-1902. 
AAA. A.B. 
Married 9 June 1903, George W. Benedict, Jr., of Scranton, Pa. 
Residence, 2067 N. Main Ave., Scranton, Pa. 

3121 DANIEL ROLFE KENNEDY, JR. 
Born 16 June 1880 at Savannah, Ga. Student from New York, N. Y., 
1898-1902. AA«. (Manhattan Chapter. ) A.B. 
Stndent at Hartford (Conn.) Theol. Seminary since 1902. 
Residence, Hartford Theol. Sem., Hartford, Conn. 

3122 CHESTER CHAFFEE KENT 
Bom 5 May 1874 at Meriden, Conn. Student from Cazenovia, N. Y., 
1899-1902. AKE. LL.B. A.B.(Wesleyan)i898. 



ao6 AI^UMNI OF 8YRACUSR UNIVBmSITy I9M 

Lawyer at Syracuse, N. Y., since 190a. 

Private in Second Signal Ca, U. S. V. in 1898. 

Married 25 Nov. 1901, Josephine Pearl Powers of Middletown, O. 

Residence, ** The Snowdon,*' Syracuse, N. Y. 

3123 HELEN MARIE KEOUGH 
Bom 14 July 1877 at Geddes, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, N. Y., I89^ 

1903. B.Mus. 
Teacher at St. Vincent's School, Syracuse, and at Oneida, N. Y., nooi 

1902. 
Residence, St. Vincent's School, Syracuse, N. Y. 

3124 ANSEL REDDY KINNE 
Bom 26 July 1879 at Jacksonville, Pla. Student from Jacksonville, 189s- 
1902. AT. A.B. 
Teacher, High School, Warren, O., since 1902. 
Residence, Warren, O. 

3125 WILLIAM HENRY KIRK WOOD 
Born 26 May 1879 at Little Falls, N. Y. Student from Little Falls, 1897- 

1902. Ph.B. 
Graduate student in Syracuse University, and student in College of I4W 

since 1902. 
Residence, Little Falls, N. Y. 

3126 HAROLD GLENN KLINE 

Born 24 Aug. 1877 at Burlington, Pa. Student from Waverly, N. Y., 
1898-1902. N2N. M.D. 

Inteme at St. Elizabeth's Hospital, Utica, N. Y., 1902-3 ; at St. Joseph's 
Hospital, Syracuse, N. Y., 1903-4. 

Residence, St. Joseph's Hospital, Syracuse, N. Y. 

3127 JESSIE ADELLE KNAPP (BURR) 

Bom 31 May 1879 at Fabius, N. Y. Student from Fabina, 1898-1903. 
KKr. B.S. 

Teacher, Goshen, N. Y., since 1902. 

Married i Sept. 1903, Charles H. Burr (No. 2902 Sup.) of White Plaint, 
N. Y. 

Residence. White Plains, N. Y. 

3128 FREDERICK HENRY KNOFF 
Born 28 Oct. 1877 at Dickinson Center, N. Y. Student from Antwerp» 
N. Y., 1898— 1902. AT. Ph.B. 

Student in College of Medicine since 1902. 
Residence, 730 Crouse Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

3129 CHARLES DEAN LAIDLAW 
Bom 30 Mar. 1878 at Gouverneur, N. Y. Student from South Bdwardii 
N. Y., 1898-1902. M.D. 
Physician at Canton, N. Y., since 1902. 
Residence, Canton, N. Y. 



Ai^uMHi OF SYKACUSK uinvnsiTy 907 

3130 EDWARD GYRILLE LA PORTE 
<m 24 Aug. 1876 at Ftilton, N. Y. Stndent from Pulton, 1898^1902. 
. M.D. 

ijsician at Amaterdam, N. Y., aince 1903. 
iaidence, Amaterdam, N. Y. 

3131 FRANK DAVID LAWYER 

>m I Aug. 1880 at Bfineral Springa, N. Y. Student from Mineral 
nga, 189B-1903. A.B. 

ndent at Drew Theol. Sem. and Columbia University, 1902-3. 
ergjman, Meth. Epia. Pastor Third St. Church, Troy, N. Y., aince 1903. 
saidence, Troy, N. Y. 

3132 JENNIE OLIVIA LEWIS 

im 14 Jan. 1879 at Knowleaville, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, N. Y., 

-1902. r*B. Ph.B. 

aidier. High School, Saugertiet, N.Y., since 1902. 

lahier at the Univeraity, 1903-4. 

•aidence, 1721 W. Geneaee St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

3133 FRED BERNARD LOREN 
■n 19 July 1879 at Caughdenoy, N. Y. Student from Caughdenoy, 
-1902. C.E. 
eaidence, Caughdenoy, N. Y. 

3134 EDGAR ALLAN LOWTHER 

>m 25 Oct 188I at Knight, O. Student from Kensico, N. Y., 1898-1902. 

\ A.B. ♦B*. 

sacher» Barnard School for Boya, New York, 1902-4. Clergyman, 

h, Bpia. Paator at Fishkill, N. Y., aince 1904. 

arried 21 Feb. 1903, Marguerite Connell Dickson of Brooklyn, N. Y. 

eaidence, Fiahkill, N. Y. 

3135 MAY LOUISE McCHESNEY 

>m 10 Mar. 1873 at Chicago, IlL Student from Syracuae, N. Y., 1899- 

!. r«B. B.Mua. 

eacher of Piano, Conservatory of Music, State Normal School, Mana- 

I, Pa., aince 1902. 

eaidence, Mansfield, Pa. 

3136 MAE ROSAMOND McECKRON 
>m 12 Oct. 1878 at Schuylerville, N. Y. Student from Schuylerville, 
ki932. Ph.B. 

receptrcaa, High School, Luzerne, N. Y., 1902-3. 
eaidence, Schuylerville, N. Y. 

3137 MARY EDNA McKINLEY 
om 2 Dec. 1876 at Greenville, Pa. Student from Syracuse, N. Y., 1899- 
I. AT. Ph.^. «BK. 

'eacher, High School, Fayetteville, N. Y., aince 1902. 
Residence; Fayetteville, N. Y. 

Home Address, 402 N. State St., Syracuse, N. Y. 



208 ALUMNI OP SY&ACUSB UXnVBRSITY I^OI 

3138 MARY ELLEN McMAHON 
Born I Jan. 1880 at Caughdenoy, N. Y. Student from Syracnae, N.Y., 

1898-1902. Ph.B. 
Teacher, High School, Boonville, N. Y., 1902-3 ; High School, Hornens* 

ville, N. Y., since 1903. 
Residence, 10 Center St., HomellsTille, N. Y. 

3139 THEODORE DOUGLAS MacGREGOR 
Bom 15 Mar. 1879 at Liverpool, Nova Scotia. Student from Antwerp, 
N. Y., 1898-1902. *rA. Ph.B. 
On City Staff of The Syracuse Herald since 1902. 
Residence, Herald Office, Syracuse, N. Y. 

3140 MARY DEARSTYNE MACKENZIE 
Born 22 Feb. 1876 at Bath-on-Hudson, N. Y. Student from Ttoy, N. Y., 

1898- 1902. AAA. Ph.B. 
In Chanty Organization Work, Buffalo, N. Y., June-Dec. 1902. Teacher, 

High School, Plattsbnrg, N. Y., since Dec. 1902. 
Residence, Plattsburg, N. Y. 

3141 ARTHUR BURRILL MASON 

Born 2 Feb. 1880 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, :89s- 
1902. A.B. 

Vice-Principal, High School, Sherman, N. Y., since 1902. Won prize in 
Onondaga Co. Baptist Association by Essay on ** Baptist Principles.'* 

Married 25 June 1902, Helen L. Joyce of Syracuse, N. Y. 

Residence, Sherman, N. Y. 

3142 MARY ELIZABETH MASON 

Born 6 Feb. 1877 at Geneseo, N. Y. Student from Geneseo, 1898-1902. 
r*B. A.B. 
Teacher, High School, Batavia, N. Y., since 1902. 
Residence, Batavia, N. Y. 

3143 ELI DELBERT MAYBEE 

Bom 14 Apr. 1881 in Canada. Student from Syracuse, N. Y., 1898-1902* 
B.P. 

Art studio at Syracuse, N. Y. 

Married 29 June 1903, Metta Potter (see Non-graduates) of Syracuse, 
N. Y. 

Residence, **The Florence Flats," Syracuse, N. Y. 

3144 LILLIAN MARY MEAD 
Born 2 Apr. 1880 at Ilion, N. Y. Student from Mechanicville, N. Y., 
1898-1902. A*. Ph.B. 
Residence, Mechanicville, N. Y. 

3145 AUGUST HERKIMER MERRILL 
Bom 6 Aug. 1877 at Oriskany, N. Y. Student from Oriskany, 189?" 
1902. LL.B. 
Lawyer at Utica, N. Y., since 1902. 
Residence, 70 Arcade, Utica, N. Y. 



AZ^UMNI OP 8YRACUSB UNIVBRSITY 309 

3146 THOMAS HAYES MBSICK 
B 10 Oct. 1876 Student from Syracuse, N. Y., in College of Liberal 
1896-8 ; in College of Medicine, 1898-1902. AKK. M.D. 
sme at Hospital of the Good Shepherd, Syracuse, 1901-3. 
ddence, Hospital of the Good Shepherd, Syracuse, N. Y. 

3147 EDNA ELIZABETH MILLER 
n 13 Dec. 1879 ^^ Oswego, N. Y. Student from Frankfort, N. Y., 
1902. KKr. B.Mus. 

cher of Music, Herkimer and E. Syracuse, N. Y., since 1902. 
idence, 240 Mohawk St., Herkimer, N. Y. 

3148 CLARA MARIE MORGAN 
n 26 Feb. 1S81 at St. Paul, Minn. Student from Auburn, N. Y., 1898- 

r*B. Ph.B. 
icber of German and French, High School, Goshen,- N. Y., since 

idence, Goshen, N. Y. 

3149 FANNIE DUNCAN MORGAN 

n 39 Jan. 1881 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Silver Springs, N.Y., 

r902. AT. Ph.B. 

idence, 353 Westcott St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

3150 WILBUR CORKRAN NOBLE 

n 22 May 1880 at Preston, Md. Student from Smyrna, Del., 1898-1902. 

cher of English and History. Wilmington Conf. Acad., Dover, Del., 
3. With Amer. Bridge Co., Phila. Pa., since 1903. 
ddence, 204 Sumac St., Wissahickon, Philadelphia, Pa. 

3151 FLORENCE ALLEGRA NOTTINGHAM 
n 8 May 1875 at Manlius, N. Y. Student from Manlius, 1895-1902. 
B.Mus. 

cher, Middleburgh, N. Y., 1902-3 ; Teacher of Piano and Harmony, 
rare Academy. Delhi, N. Y., since 1903 ; also church organist, 
lidence. Delhi, N. Y. 

3152 DAISY MAY NOXON 
n II Apr. 1880 at Comstock, N. Y. Student from Granville, N. Y., 
1902. A.B. Pd.B.( Albany Normal College) 1903. 
dent in Albany Normal College, 1902-3. Teacher at Oyster Bay, L. I., 
,, since 1903. 
tidence, Oyster Bay, L. I., N. Y. 

3153 JASON BASFORD PARRISH 
m 28 Sept. 1878 at Canandaigua, N. Y. Student from Canandaigua, 
•1902. Ph.B. 

w Student in office of McElheny & Bennett, 15 William St.,New York, 
., since 1902. 
isidence, 77 Union St., Flushing, N. Y. 



2IO AI^UMiri OP SYRACUSS UlOVKmSlTY I90I 

3154 EUNICE RACHEL PEARSON 
Born 29 Mar. 1878 at Junius, N.Y. Student from Waterloo, N. Y., 1898- 
1902. KAG. Ph.B. 
Teacher at Waterloo, N. Y.; in Union Academy, Belleville, N. Y., lince 

1903. 
Residence, Belleville, N. Y. 

3155 JESSIE PEARL PEASE 
Born 18 Aug. 1879 at Oswego, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, N. Y., 
1898-1902. AAA. Ph.B. 
Preceptress, High School, Bergen, N. Y., since 1902. 
Residence, Bergen, N. Y. 

3156 AVILLIAM MACE PECKHAM 
Bom 30 Oct. 1877 at Solsville, N. Y. Student from Solsville, 1899-1902. 

LL.B. 
Lawyer at Syracuse, N. Y., since 1902, in partnership with John T. 

Roberts '76 (No. 322), 

Residence, 720 W. Brighton Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

FRANK SPENSER PERRY 
1900-2. LL.B. (See No. 2847 Sup. ) 

3157 RAYMOND WEAVER PHELPS 
Born 28 Sept. 1879 at Elmira, N. Y. Student from Buffalo, N. Y.. 1898- 

1902. AKE. Ph.B. 
With the J. P. Lewis Co., Beaver Falls, N. Y., Oct. 1902-Apr. 1903. 

With Middle States Inspection (Fire Insurance) Bureau, New York, since 

Apr. 1903. 
Residence, 58 William St., New York, N. Y. 

3158 ALBERT DANA PHILLIPS 
Born 14 Feb. 1875 at Carverton, Pa. Student from WilkesBarre, ?&> 
1898-1902. A.B. 
In business. 
Residence, Southdale, Pa. 

3159 MERTON WINFIELD PIERCE 
Bom 29 Aug. 1877 At New Gloucester, Me. Student from iCent's Hill, 
Me., 1899-1902. *K*. LL.B. 
Lawyer at Syracuse, N. Y., since 1902. 
Married 1901, Louisa Mae Morrill of Farmington, Me. 
Residence, no Waver ly Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

3160 EDA PINZER 
Bom 16N0V. 1881. Student from Syracuse, N. Y., 1897- 1902. B.Ma». 
Residence, 312 Court St. , Syracuse, N. Y. 

3161 MARY ADELAIDE PIPER 
Born I Mar. 1876 at Derby, N. Y. Student from Bradford, Pa., 1898-19°^ 
B.S. 
Residence, Derby, N. Y. 



ALUMNI OP SYRACUSB UNIVKBSITY 311 

316a WILLIAM HART PLATZER 
a 18 Nov. 1878 at Mellenville, N. Y. Student from HarlemTiUe, 
, 1898-1902. B.S. 
tcipttl, LeRAjTsviUe, P&.. dnce 1902. 
idence, LeRaytville, Pa. 

3163 CHARLES DAYTON POST 
n 9 Feb. 1879 at Corry, Pa. Student from Centerrille, Pa., 1898-1902. 

Ph.B. 
dent in College of Medicine since 1907. 
idence, 507 S. Salina St., Syracuse, N. Y. . 

3164 SAMUEL AARON POTTER 
n 14 Sept. 1879 at Neinstadt, Poland, Russia. Student from Syracuse, 
, 1899- 1902. LL.B. 
ryer in New York, N. Y., since 1902. 
ddence, 140 Nassau St., New York, N. Y. 

3165 MARY ELIZABETH PRESTON 
n 13 Nov. 1877 at Victor, N. Y. Student from Lima, N. Y., 1899- 

KKP. Ph.B. 
cher of English, High School, Kearney, N. J., since 1902. 
idence, 27 Elizabeth Ave., Arlington, N. J. 

3166 GENEVERET QUICK (CARPENTER) 

Sister of No. 3167 Sup. 
n 3 Aug. 1878 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, 1898*1901. 

Ph.B. 
rried 29 Dec. 1903, Adalbert D. Carpenter (Na 3052 Sup.) of Bellaire, 

lidence, McMechen, W. Va. 

3167 GEORGE EVERETT QUICK 
Brother of No. 3166 Sop. 
)8-i902. B.S. (See Faculty Record, p. 139 Sup. , College of Applied 
ice.) 

3158 MABEL RITCHIE RAMSAY (VAN BERKALOW) 
ini6 Aug. 1877 at Shandaken, N. Y. Student from Cozsackie, N. Y., 
-1902, five years. XA6. B.Mus. 

etcher of Piano, Wilmington Conference Sem., Dover, Del., since 1902. 
Arried 19 Aug. 1903, Dr. J. L. Van Berkalow of Dover, Del. 
Psidence, Dover, Del. 

3169 FLORENCE REED (MUNRO) 
^ 17 Jan. 1879 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, 1897-1902, 
years. r#B. B.L. 

^ed 30 Dec. 1902, E. K. Munro of Camillus, N. Y. 
cnclence, CamUliia, N. Y. 

3170 JUSTINA WINrFRED REYNOLDS 
^ II Jan. 1879 at Goldenbridge, N. Y. Student from Goldenbridge, 
^1902. A«. Ph.B. 



312 ALUlfNI OP SYRACUSB UKIVBRSITY 1901 

Teacher, High School, Oneida, N. Y., since 1902. 
Residence, Oneida, N. Y. 

3171 SUMNER RHOADES 
Bom 31 Jan. 1881 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, 1898-1902. 
ARE. B.S. 
Student in College of Iraw, 1902-3. 
Insurance Engineer, New York, since 1903. 
Residence, 16 W. 94 th St., New York, N. Y. 

3172 ELLA MAY RICH (HODGE) 
Born 29 May 1878 at Rem wood , N. Y. Student from South Richirds, 
N. Y.. 1898-1902. KKr. B.L. 
Married 8 July 1902, Lamont F. Hodge of Malone, N. Y. 
Residence, Malone, N. Y. 

3173 EVA GERTRUDE RICHARDSON 
Bora II Dec. 1877 ^^ Elba, N. Y. Student from Honeoye Falls, N.Y., 
1899-1902. KKr. Ph.B. 
Teacher, High School, Homellsville, N. Y., since 1901. 
Residence, Homellsville, N. Y. 

3174 ARDEEN E. RICHMOND 
Bom II Mar. 1879, a^ Independence, N. Y. Student from Oswego, K.Y.. 
1898-T902. *rA. A.B. 
Traveling salesman, — will study medicine. 

Married 25 June T903, Martha Knickerbocker of Port Alleghany, Pa. 
Residence, Wellsville, N. Y. 

3175 DENISON RICHMOND 
Born I June 1877 at Syracuse. N. Y. Student from Syracuse, i899-i9« 
LLB. 
Lawyer at Syracuse, N, Y., since 1902. 
Residence. 212 Park Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

3176 JOSEPH BREEN RINGLAND 
Born 23 May 1878 at Oswego, N. Y, Student from Oswego, 1898-190 

AKK. M.D. 
Inteme at St. Joseph's Hospital, Syracuse, N. Y., 1902-3. Physidin 1 

Syracuse. 
Residence, St. Joseph's Hospital, Syracuse, N. Y. 

3177 MAUDE RIPTON 
Daughter of No. 1905 
Born 20 May i88t at Johnstown, N. Y. Student from SchenecUdj 
N. Y., 1899-1902. A*. B.Mus. 
Teacher of Piano and Vocal since 1901. 
Residence, Schenectady, N. Y. 

3178 MARGUERITE BEEBE RISLEY 
Born 28 Jan. 1881 at Hamilton, N. Y. Student from Hamilton, 1898-190^ 
A*. Ph.B. 
Teacher, High School, Hubbard, N. Y., since 1901. 
Residence, Hamilton, N. Y. 



1902 ALUMNI OP SYRACUSB UNIVRRSITy 21 S 

3179 FAY NILES ROBINSON 

Bora 23 Feb. 1879 at Syracuse, N. Y, Student from Syracuse, 1898- 1902. 
AKS. Ph.B. 
In the Fire Insurance business in Syracuse. 
Residence, 515 Crouse Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

3180 GERTRUDE ROBINSON 

Boni 21 Sept. 1876 at Canaan, N. H. Student from Eagle Mills, N. Y., 
1898-1902. Ph.B. ^BK. 
Teacher, Troy Conf, Acad., Poultney, Vt. 
Residence, Cheshire, Mass. 

3181 WILLIAM WELLINGTON ROBINSON 

Bora 27 Feb. 1878 at Bamsborongh, N. J. Student from Allen's Hill, 
N. Y., 1898-1902. *K*. A.B. 

Stndent at Drew Theol. Sem. and Columbia Univ. since 1902. 

Gexgyman, Meth. Epis. Pastor at Cold Spring Harbor, N. Y., 1903. 
Senrisg as pastor of the Cold Spring Harbor (N. Y.) Church. 

Married i Sept. 1903, Anna B. Hoover of Buffalo, N. Y. 

Residence, Madison, N. J. 

3182 JOHN WESLEY ROOT 

Bora 4 Jan. 1874 at Galway, N. Y, Student from North Galway, N. Y., 
1898-1902. A.B. 
Priocipal, Union School and Academy, Round Lake, N. Y., since 1902. 
Residence, Round Lake, N. Y. 

3183 WALTER KING ROOT 

Bora 8 June 1879 at Madison, N. Y. Student from Madison, 1898-1902. 
Ben. A.B. 
With the Mutual Reserve Life Ins. Co. since 1902. 
Residence, 365 Manhattan Ave., New York, N. Y. 

3184 AARON MORTON SAKOLSKI 

Bom 12 May 1880 at Baltimore, Md. Student from Syracuse, N. Y.,. 
1898-1902. Ph.B. 

Graduate student in Johns-Hopkins Univ. since 1902. 

Has published ** The Working Day in Maryland,*' J. H. U. Circular, 1903 ; 
"Legislation in State Finance in 1902,'* N. Y. S. Lib. Bull. No. So, 1903. 

Residence, 704 Madison St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

3185 STANLEY WILSON SAYER 
Bom 4 Oct. 1880 at Gouvemeur, N. Y. Student from Gouverneur, 1898- 
1902. NZH. M.D. 
Interne in Hospital of the Good Shepherd, Syracuse, N. Y., 1902-3. 
Physician at Montezuma, N. Y., since i Aug. 1903. 
Residence, Montezuma, N. Y. 

3186 WILLIAM DENNIS SCANLAN 
Bora 7 Mar. 1877. at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Syracuse at St. John*a 
College, Fordham, X898-19PI ; at Syracuse University, i90i-2« A.B. 



314 AXUMNI OF SYRACUSS UNIVBRSITY X9OI 

Student in College of Medicine since 1902. 
Residence, 417 Turtle St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

3187 DELMAR ROY SHAFER 
Bom 18 Nov. 1876 at Cobleskill, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, N. Y., 

1898-1902. AT. B.S. 
With the Western Electrical Co., 1902-3. In Real Estate business since 

Apr. 1903. 
Residence, 50 W. 17th St.. New York. N. Y. 

3188 FRANK READY SHERMAN 
Brother of Nos. 2856 and 3371 
Bom 19 Jan. 1880 at Summit Station, N. Y. Student from Onoodsgt, 
N. Y., 1898-1902. A.B. 

Instructor in Modern Lan^ages, St. John's Military Academy, Delafield, 
Wis.. 1902-3. Instructor, N. Y. Military Academy, Comwallon-Hodsoo, 
N. Y., since 1903. 
Residence, 329 E. Castle St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

3189 WILLIAM G. SIDDELL 
Born 8 June 1872 at New Paltz, N. Y. Student from Walden, N. Y., 

1898-1902. ^r. A.B. «BK. 
Principal, Union School, West Winfield, N. Y., since 1902. 
Residence, West Winfield, N. Y. 

3190 ROSS LOWE SIMONS 
Bom I Dec. 1878 at Mexico, N. Y. Student from Mexico, i899-i903* 

LL.B. 
Admitted to Bar, May 1902. 
Lawyer at Mexico, N. Y., since 1902. 
Married 8 Apr. 1903, Mabel Jessie Virgil of Pulaski* N. Y. 
Residence, Mexico, N. Y. 

3191 MURLIN SEYMOUR SMALLWOOD 

Son of No. a23 
Bom 27 Feb. 1877 at Warsaw, N. Y. Student from Waxaaw, 1900-a. 
♦K*. LL.B. 
Lawyer at Syracuse, N. Y., 1902-3 ; at Warsaw, N. Y., since 1903. 
Residence, Warsaw, N. Y. 

3192 CORA EMILY SOPER 
Bom 22 Sept 1879 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, iSi^ip^ 

ivA9. A.B. 

Teacher of Latin, Greek and Ancient History, High School, GouTernenri 
"N. Y., since 1902. 
Residence, Gouvemeur, N. Y., 

Home. 123 Shonnard St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

3193 MAY SPRING 
Born 20 Nov. 1880 at Baldwinsville, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, 1^9^ 
1902. A.B. #BK. 
Teacher, High School, Syracuse, N. Y., since 1902. 
Residence, 1221 Park St., Syracuse, N. Y. 



I 



I AXUMNI OF SVRACUSB X7MIVXRSITY 21$ 

3194 WILLIAM HAMILTON SQUIRES 
k>ni 23 Aug. 1877 at Tidioute, Pa. Student from Bldred, Pa., 1897- 
12. E..E 
Residence, Eldred, Pa. 

HARRY MARVIN STACY 
1900-2. LL.B. (See No. 2862 Snp.) 

3195 HELEN THERESE STAHLBERGER 
Born 21 Feb 1879 at Auburn, N. Y. Student from Auburn, 1898-1902. 
.B. 

Tetcher, Seminary, Stamford, N. Y., since 1902. 
Residence, Stamford » N. Y. 

ALLEN DORMAN STEELE 
1899-1902. LL.B. (See No. 1331.) 
SopptniBNT : Student in College of Law, 1899-1902. 
Lawyer at Utica, N. Y., since 1902. 
Residence, 70 Arcade, Utica, N. Y. 

3196 HENRY RAYNOR STEVENS 

Born 30 Oct 1874 at Pairmount, N. Y. Student from Onondaga, N. Y., 

^1902, four and one half years. E.E. 

With Seattle Electric Co., as Asst. Chief Electrical Engineer, one-half 

V ; with Snoqualime Falls Power Co. , Seattle, Wash. 

Residence, 1633, 13th Ave., Seattle, Wash. 

3197 HARRY HOWLETT STONE 

Born II Apr. 1880 at Marcellus Falls, N. Y. Student from Marcellus 

ils, 1899-1900. AX. LL.B. 

Lawyer at Syracuse, N. Y., since 1902. 

(Residence, 105 Rich St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

3198 CHARLES ALBERT SWEET 

ion 3 Apr. 1880 St Waterloo, N. Y. Student from Waterloo, 1898-1902. 
8. M.D. 

interne in Central Maine General Hospital, Lewiston, Me., 1902-3. 
Mdence, Waterloo, N. Y. 

3199 ALBERT GEORGE SWIFT 
Kom 32 Nov. 1879. Student from S3rracuse, N. Y., 1898-1902. AKK. 
D. 

Phyndan at Syracuse, N. Y., since 1902. 
Residence, 122 S. Hudson St, Syracuse, N. Y. 

3200 ABBIE MAY TALBOT 
Bom 7 Dec 1879 at WaahingtonviUe, N. Y. Student from Comwall-on- 
odson, N. Y., 1898-1902. A#. B.S. 

Teacher, Rust University, Holly Springs, Miss., since 1902. 
Residence, Comwall-on-Hndson, N. Y. 

3201 CHARLES NELSON THOMAS 
^orn 16 Sept. 1873 at Elbridge, N. Y. Student from Elbridge, 1897- 
W. A.B. 



2l6 ALUMNI OP SYRACUSS UMIVBRSlTy 

Stndent in Auburn (N. Y.)Theol. Sem. since 1902. 

Married Aug. 1899. Blanche M. Risley of South Bend, Ind. 

Childem — Robert W., bom 11 June 1900. 

Roee £., bom 21 May 1901. 
Residence, Auburn, N. Y. 

3202 GEORGE MUSKGROVB THOMPSON 
Born 16 Sept. 1880 at Flemington, N. J. Student from Plemi 
1899-1902. LL.B. 
Lawyer in New York, N. Y, (55 Liberty St.,) since 1902. 
Residence, Flemington, N. J. 

3203 EUNICE EVELYN TITUS 

Born 12 Jan. 1876 at Nicholson, Pa. Student from Binghamton, 
1899-1902. Ph.B. 
Instractor in Modern Languages, High School, Torrington, Conn. 

1903. 
Residence, 155 Prospect St., Torrington, Conn. 

3204 CHARLES ELLIS TONEY 

Bom 24 Dec. 1875 at Isbell, Ala. Student from Homellsrille, 
1898-1902. Ph.B. 
Student in College of Law since 1902. 
Residence, 761 Harrison St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

3205 HOB ART FRANK TRANSUE 
Bom 13 Mar. 1881 at Bellona, N. Y. Stndent from Jamesville, 
1898-1902. E.E. 
Electrician, Utica & Mohawk Valley R. R. since June 1902. 
Residence, Utica, N. Y. 

3206 EDWIN PHINNEY VALKENBURGH 

Bom 23 Oct. 1878 at Katsbaan, N. Y. Student from Saugerties, 
1899-1902. Ben. B.Ar. 

Architect at Pittsbtirg, Pa., Sept. 1902-Jan. 1903 ; at Albany, 
Jan.-June 1903 ; at Watertown, N. Y., since June 1903. 

Residence, Watertown, N, Y. 

3207 MAY VAN DOREN 

Born 14 Jan. 1880 at Phoenix, N. Y. Student from Phoenix, 1900-2 
Ph.B. *BK. 

Student of Art, Music and French, Chicago, 111., 1902-3. 

Residence, Phoenix, N. Y. 

3208 RUTH CASTNER VOORHEES 
Bom 16 Sept. 1879 ^^ Mine Brook, N. J. Student from Mine 
1898-1902. KKr. B.S. 
Teacher, Arlington, N. J., 1902-3. 
Residence, 27 Elizabeth Ave.. Arlington, N. J. 

3209 RALPH EDMOND WAGER 
Born 31 Mar 188 1 at Grooms, N. Y. Student from Round Lake, 
1898-1902. «KSk. A.B. «BK. 



I Aunan of syracusb univbrsity 217 

'eacherof Science, Hifi^h Scbool, Bscanoba, Mich., 1902-3. Student at 
nual College, Albany, N. Y., since 1903. 
tesidence, Round Lake, N. Y. 

3210 CHARLES FREDERICK WALTER 
k)ni 18 Sept 1878 at Middlesex, N. Y. Student from Middlesex, 189S- 
n. ♦Ae. Ph.B. 

Mncipal, High School, Sinclairville, N. Y., since 1902. 
lesideoce, Middlesex, N. Y. 

321 1 CORNELIA CARHART WARD 
Bom 39 Mar. 1878 at Puller's, N. Y. Student from Fuller's, 1898-1902. 
.B. ♦BK. Ph.M.(English)i902. 

teacher of English and German, Delaware Acad., Delhi, N.Y., since 
». 
ftcsidence, Delhi, N. Y. 

3212 ALBERT HENRY WATKINS 

Born 26 Jan. 1874 at Clear Creek, Kan. Student from Naples, N. Y., 

)^I902. A.B. 

i^radiiate of the Buffalo (N. Y.)t Normal School. 

^dpal, High School, Richfield Springs, N. Y., since 1902. 

Carried 21 July 1897, Clara S. Kimber(No. 3213 Sup.jof Naples, N. Y. 

Residence, Richfield Springs, N. Y. 

3213 CLARA KIMBER WATKINS 

orn 28 Nov. 1874 at Naples, N. Y. Student from Naples, 1899-1902. 

'. 

radnate of the Bufhlo(N. Y.)Normal School. 

arried 21 July 1897, Albert H. Watkin8(No. 3212 Sup.) of Naples, N. Y. 

sadence, Richfield Springs, N. Y. 

3214 HELEN ANNA WEED 
m 15 Dec. 1879 at Simsbury, Conn. Student from Three Mile Bay, 
., 1898-1902. A.B. 
sidence. East Springfield, N. Y. 

3215 ANNA BOWDEN WHITE 
m 29 July 1868 at Peak Forest, England. Student from Walton, N. Y., 
-1902. Z#. M.D| 
lysician at Walton, N. Y., since 1902. 
isidence, Walton, N. Y. 

MORGAN ALLEN WILCX)X 
Xh-2. LL.B. (See No. 2881 Sup.) 

3216 HOMER TALMAGE WILMOT 
Km 4 July 1873 at Varden, Pa. Student from Varden, 1898-1902. A«B. 
indpal. High School, Central Square, N. Y., since 1902. 
Biried Z4 Mot. 1903, Lilian L. Bomham of Syracuse, N. Y. 
■aidenoe, Central Square, N. Y. 



2l8 ALUMNI OP SYRACUSB UNIVBRSITY 19^3 

3217 ♦EDWARD RALPH WISE 
Born 4 Sept. 1873 ^^ Groveland, N. Y. Student from Irakeville, N. Y., 
1899-2. *A*. LL.B. 
Died 5 Dec. 1902 at Syracuse, N. Y. 

3218 JAMES BENJAMIN WOODRUFF 
Born 4 May 1880 at Penn Yan, N. Y. Student from Penn Yan, 189ft- 

1902. B.S. 

Student in College of Medicine since 1902. 
Residence, 613 Crouse Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

3219 ROYAL DWIGHT WOOLSEY 
Born 22 Feb. 1875 at Glen Wild, N. Y. Student from Livingston Manor, 
N.Y., 1898-1902. Ben. A.B. 
Student in College of Law since 1902. 
Residence, 712 Irving Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

3220 JOHANNA ZIMMER 

Bom 26 July 1857 at Leipzig, Germany. Student from Syracuse, N. Y., 
1900-2. B.L. M.L. 1903. 

Graduate student in Syracuse University, 1902-3. 

Was missionary in Constantinople, Turkey, for nine years. 

Teacher of German and French at St. Elizabeth Convent School, N.Ji 
since 1903. 

Residence, Elizabeth, N.J. 

Class of 1903 

3221 GEORGIA may ALLEN 
Born I June 1881 at Sharon, Canada. Student from Syracuse, N. Y., 
1900-3. KAe. B.L. 
Residence, Oneida, N. Y. 

3222 ELIDA GRACE AMES 
Bom 12 June 1880 at East Dorset, Vt. Student from East Dorset, 1899" 

1903. B.P. 

Residence, East Dorset, Vt. 

3223 PETER AUSTIN ANDERSON 

Born 20 Aug. 1878 at Mahopac Mines, N. Y. Student from Mabop«c 
Mines, 1900-3. LL.B. 

Lawyer at Mahopac Mines since 1903. 

Residence, Mahopac Mines, N. Y. 

3224 LILLIAN MAY ARTHUR 

Born 30 June 1877 at Cheshire, Conn. Student from Waterbury, Cofln., 
at Woman's College, Baltimore, 1897-9 : at Syracuse University, 1901-3- 
KAG. Ph.B. 

Residence, Euclid and Roseline Ave., Waterbury, Conn. 

3225 MARCELLUS RAYMOND ATWELL 
Bom 13 Oct. 1879 at Rushford, N. Y. Student from Ruthford, if*>'i^ 
LL.B. 



i ALUMNI OF SYRACUSB UNIVBRSITY 219 

iwyer at Syracuse, N. Y., since 1903. 

arried 26 Mar. 1903, Adeline Lawson Scott of Amelia, Va. 

cadence, 523 Cedar St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

3226 FLOYD BENTLEY AVERY 
)ni 15 Nov. 1875 at Lysander, N. Y. Student from Lysander, 1900-3. 

rincipal High School, Skaneateles, N. Y., 1903. 
(Strict Manager Aetna Life Ins. Co., at Syracuse, N. Y., since 1903. 
arried 18 Nov. 1903, Anna F. Dills (No. 2919 Sup.) of Brooklyn, N. Y, 
ttidence, 1418 S. Sute St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

3227 CLIFFORD AXTELL 
odentfrom Barbourville, N. Y. 1900-3. AX. LL.B. 
isidence, Barbourville. N. Y. 

3228 STEVEN BECKWITH AYRES 
m 27 Oct. 1861 at Fort Dodge, Iowa. Student from Penn Yan, N. Y., 
•8a ♦T. A.B. Degree given in 1903. 

Dg engaged in Editorial work. Real Estate broker since 1887, with 
Bsts in Advertising Agency, etc. 

8 published " Genealogy of the Ayres Family," New York, 1902 ; 
implain *' three column review, N. Y. Times* Sat. Review of Books 
Vrt, 1901 ; and many newspaper articles. 

rried 6 Feb. 1884, Harriet Margaret Bower of Penn Yati, N. Y. 
'Jd — Malcolm Beckwith, born 15 Aug. 1886. 
odence, 1123 Broadway, New York, N. Y. 

3229 LUCY ELLA BABCOCK 
n 20 Jan. 1882 at Syracuse N. Y. Student from Syracuse, 1899-1903. 

Ph.B. 
xrher of Sciences, High School, Kalamazoo, Mich., 1903. 
ddence, Kalamazoo, Mich. 

Home, 1307 Spring St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

3230 MAY BELLE BAKER 
n 17 Oct. 1878 at Hudson. Mich. Student from Mexico, N. Y., 1899- 

KA9. A.B. 
icher, Yates Union School, Chittenango, N. Y., since 1903. 
lidence, Chittenango, N. Y. 

3231 'EDWARD RICHARDS BARBER 
"n 9 Feb. 1878 at Knowlesville, N. Y. Student from Albion, N. Y., 
1903. i^. A.B. 
icher of Latin, W. Pa. Clas. & Scientific Institute, Mt. Pleasant, Pa., 

id 10 Mar. 1904 at Mount Pleasant, Pa. 

3232 PRANK STONE BARTON 
-n 17 Jan. 1881 at Cooper ville, N. Y. Student from Nunda, N. Y., and 
wd City, Va., 1899-1903. E.E. 
lidence, Richmond, Va. 



220 AI«UMNI OP SYRACUSB UNIVBRSITY I9QS 

3253 BERTHA LOUISE BEACH 
Bom 25 Apr. 1877 at Southold, N. Y. Student from Predonia, N. Y., 
1899-1903. AAA. A.B. «BK. 
Residence, New Castle, Pa. 

3234 ELIZABETH BERRY 
Bom in New York, N. Y. Student from Buffalo, N. Y., 1899-1905. PkB. 
«BK. 

Residence, 39 Normal Ave., Buffalo, N. Y. 

3235 DOROTHEA BERDELLA BLOOMER 
Bora 19 Dec. 1878 at Whitney's Point, N. Y. Student from Syracnse, 

N. Y., 1899-1903. B.P. 
Awarded the Hiram Gee Fellowship in Painting for 1903-4, and is spend* 

ing the year in Paris, France. 

Residence, American Students* Cluh, 4 rue de Chevreuse, Pftris, Prance. 

3236 ELMER JEREMIAH BOND 
Born 28 Oct. 1874 at Lansing, N. Y. Student from West Groton, N. Y., 
1898-1903. Ph.B. 
Principal, High School, Dundee, N. Y., since 1903. 
Married 24 Dec. 1903, Ina May Hull of Richford, N. Y. 
Residence, Dundee. N. Y. 

3237 MABELLE CLAIR BOND 
Bom 21 Apr. 1 881 at Newhurgh, N. Y., Student from Newburgh, 189^ 
1903. A*. Ph.B. 
Residence, 10 Henry Ave., Newburgh, N. Y, 

3238 EVA MARIE CLARISSA BORN 
Student from Syracuse, 1 899-1903. AAA. B.Mus. 
Residence, 608 Townsend St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

3239 SARAH MABEL BOUCK 
Bom 6 July 1879 at Frankfort Hill, N. Y. Student from Frankfort HiU, 
1899-1903. Ph.B. 
Teacher, Union High School, Verona, N. Y., since 1903. 
Residence, Verona, N. Y. 

3240 ETHEL DAISY BOWLES 
Born 9 Dec. 1879 <^t Staffordshire, England. Student from Albion, N. Y. 
1899-1903. AAA. A.B. 
Teacher of Latin and Greek, High School, Frankfort, N. Y., dnoe I903> 
Residence, Frankfort, N. Y. 

Home Address, Albion, N. Y. 

3241 HARRY VANSCOY BOYD 
Bora 25 May 1881 at Pulteney, N. Y. Student from Palteney, 1900-1903- 
A.B. 
In business at Penn Yan, N. Y. 
Residence, Penn Yan, N. Y. 



19^3 AlfUMNI OP SYRACUSB UNIVBRSITY 221 

324a CLIFFORD ERNEST BRANCH 
Bom 15 Oct. 1879 at Lawrenceville, N. Y. Student from Olean, N. Y., 
X899-1903. Ph.B. 
Residence, Olean, N. Y. 

3243 HARRY JAY BRAYTON 
Bom I Oct. 1880 at Niagara Falls. N. Y. Student from Syracuse, N. Y., 
1899-1903. N2N. M.D. 
Interne at St. Elizabeth's Hospital, Utica, N. Y., 1903-4. 
Residence, St. Elizabeth's Hospital, Utica, N. Y. 

3244 ANCIL D. BROWN 
Bom 19 Sept. 1873 at Freetown, N. Y. Student from McGraw, N. Y., 
1899.1903. Ben. «A«. A.B. 
Stndent in College of Law since 1903. 
Residence, McGraw, N. Y. 

3245 CHARLES 'SILAS BRYAN. JR. 

Bom 4 Feb. 188 1 at Onondaga Hill, N. Y. Student from Onondaga 
Hill, 1899-1903. B.S. «BK. 

Laboratory Assistant in Physical Chemistry at the Mass. Inst, of 
Technology, 1903-4- 

Residence, 137 W. Canton St., Boston, Mass. 

3246 WILLIAM ADAM BUBCHELER 

Bom 9 Oct. 1880 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, 1899-1903. 
Ph.B. 
Student in Collie of Medicine since 1903. 
Residence, 227 Seward St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

3247 GEORGE COOK CARHART 
Bom 13 Apr. 1880 at CoUamer, N. Y. Student from Collamer, 1899-1903. 

E.B. 
Designing draughtsman for the H. H. Franklin Mfg. Co., of Syracuse, 

N. Y. 
Residence, 215 Grace St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

3248 MANLEY EARL CARR 

Bom 20 Sept. 1874 at Canewango, N. Y. Student from Randolph, N. Y., 
1899-1903. B.S. 

Asst. Soil Expert, U. S. Department of Agriculture, Washington, D. C. , 
«nce Apr. 1903. 

Has published in Report of Field Operations, U. S. Dept. Agric. Bureau 
of Soils, jointly with others, Soil Surveys of the Connecticut Valley and of 
Port Payne, Ala., 19^3. 

IdLarried 25 Ang. 1903. Florence Lena Graff of Utica, N. Y. 

Residence, Dept. of Agriculture, Washington, D. C. 

3249 HOWARD GREGORY CASE 
189^1903. M.D. (See Faculty Record, p. 1 22 Sup. , College of Medicine.) 



222 ALUMNI OP SYRACUSE UNIVfiRSlTY I9Q9 

3250 MILDRED BICE CHAPMAN 
Born 27 Nov. 1878 at E. Cobleskill. N. Y. Stndent from £. Cobleskill, 
1899-1903. Ph.B. 
Teacher, High School, Hammonton, N. J. 
Residence, Hammonton, N. J. 

ALICE REED CLARKE 
Ph.B. 1903. (See No. 3059 Sup.and Faculty Record,p. I II Sap., College of 
Liberal Arts.) 

3251 FRANK EDGAR CLARKE 
Bom 26 Oct. 1878 at Hillsdale, N. Y. Student from Highland, N Y., 1898- 
1903, four years. AKE. Ph B. 
Residence, White Plains, N. Y. 

3252 CHARLES EDMUND COLLERD 
Born 10 Apr. 1870 at Newark, N. J. Student from Newark, 1899-1903. 
Ben. A.B. 
Stndent in Drew Theol. Seminary, Madison, N. J., since 1903. 
Residence, 106 S. loth St., Newark, N. J. 

3253 JOSlfe BENET COLON 
Bom 16 Dec. 1875 at Cayey, Porto Rico. Student from San Juan, Porto 
Rico, 1900-3. LL.B. A.B.(Habana Univ.) 
Lawyer at San Juan, Porto Rico, since 1903. 
Residence, San Juan, Porto Rico. 

3254 GUY COMFORT 
Bom 17 Nov. 1878 at Canisteo, N. Y. Student from Canisteo, 1899-1905. 
«A6. Ph.B. 
Engaged in journalism since 1903. 
Residence, Canisteo, N. Y. 

3255 HARRY WESCOTT CONNELL 

Brother of Nos. 306a and 3256 
Born 4 July 1876 at Jamesville, N. Y. Student from Syrmcnse, N. Y., 
1899-1903. XA2. E.E. 
With Western Electrical Co. of Chicago, since 1903. 
Residence, Chicago, 111., care of Western Elec. Co. 

3256 HARVEY FRANCIS CONNELL 

Brother of Nos. 3063 and 3255 
1899-1903. E.E. (See Faculty Record, p. 139 Sup., College of Applied 
Science.) 

3257 EDITH MAY COONEY 
Born 19 Sept. 1879, ^^ Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, 1899-1905- 
Ph.B. 
Teacher at Syracuse, N. Y. 
Residence, 112 Standart St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

3258 ROSS WATSON COPELAND 
Born 3 Nov. 1879 at Otisville, N. Y. Student from Ljndonville, N. Ym 
1899-1903. E.E. 



ALCJMNI OP SYRACUSB UNIVBRSITY 223 

h the Westinghouse Electrical and Manufacturing Co., Pittsburg, 

ince 1903. 

idence, Turtle Creek, Pa. 

3259 HAROLD DAVENPORT CORNWALL 

D 16 July 1881 at Alexandria Bay . N. Y. Student from Alexandria 

900-3. SkT. *A*. LL.B. 

rytr at Syracuse, N. Y., since 1903. 

idence, loi College Place, Syracuse, N, Y. 

3260 ELIZABETH ALICE CUNNINGHAM 

Q 18 Dec. 1878 at Saltbum, Yorkshire, England. Student from Syra- 

S. Y., 1898-1903. KAe. A.B. 

±er. High School, Gouverneur, N. Y. 

Idence, Gouverneur, N. Y. 

3261 EDWARD DAY CURTIS 
-1903. A.B. (See Faculty Record, p. 11 1 Sup., College of Liberal 

3262 CHARLES ERWIN CURTISS 
I 23 June, 1879 at Mexico, N. Y. Student from Mexico, 1899- 
AKK. M.D. 
dence, Manlius, N. Y. 

3263 ELIZABETH VERNERA DARROW 
[ 1 1 Dec. 1874 at West Eaton, N. Y. Student from West Eaton, 
503. A.B. *BK. 

her, High School, Monticello, N. Y., since 1903. 
ience, Monticello, N. Y. 

3264 KATHERINE ANNE DAVIES 
7 Oct. 1877 at Remsen, N. Y. Student from Holland Patent, N. Y., 
J03. Ph.B. 

(ted in the Gymnasium during the latter part of the course, 
her. High School, Holland Patent, N. Y., since 1903. 
ience, Holland Patent, N. Y. 

3265 ARTHUR EVERETT DAVIS 

13 Feb. 1877 at Canisteo, N. Y. Student from Olean, N. Y., 1899- 
B.S. 

ent at the New York Homoepathic Medical College since 1903. 
ience, 177 W. 73d St., New York, N. Y. 

3266 JUDSON PERCIVAL DAVIS 

20 Jan. 1880 at Coram, N. Y. Student from Coram, 1899-1903. B.L. 
her at Maplewood Institute, Concord ville. Pa. , since 1903. 
ience, Concordville, Pa. 

3267 WALTER WILLIAM DAVIS 

7 Jan. 1880 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, 1899-1903. 
M.D. 
ne at St. Joseph's Hospital, Syracuse, 1903-4. 



224 ALUMNI OP SYRACUSB UNIVERSITY I9Q} 

Physician at Syracuse, N. Y. 

Residence, St. Joseph's Hospital, Syracuse, N. Y. 

3268 DAVID ORCUTT DECKER 
Bom 20 Apr. 188 1 at Waverly, N, Y. Student from Waverly, 1899-iqQj. 
AT. Ph.B. *A*. 
Student in College of Law since 1902. 
Residence, Y. M. C. A. Building, Syracuse, N. Y. 

3269 WALTER WHITNEY DIBBLE 

Born 30 Dec. 1881 at New Haven, N. Y. Student from Fulton, N. Y., 
1899-1903. AT. A.B. 

Graduate Student in Syracuse University since 1902. Clergyman, Meth. 
Epis. Pastor at Vernon Center, N. Y., since 1904. 

Married 14 Apr. 1904, Isabel Cordelia Gage, (see Non-graduates) of Syn- ; 
cuse, N. Y. 

Residence, Vernon Center, N. Y. 

3270 SARAH MADELINE DONOVAN 

Born 10 Mar. 1882 at Canandaigua, N. Y. Student from Canandaigni, 
1899-1903. A.B. 
Residence, Canandaigua, N. Y. 

3271 CHARLES MONTAGUE DOYLE 

Born 5 Jan. 1879 at Pittsford, N. Y. Student from Pittsford, 1900-3. 
LL.B. 
Lawyer at Pittsford, N. Y., since 1903. 
Residence, Pittsford, N. Y. 

3272 FRANK MELV^N EDSON 
Bom 20 Dec. 1874 at Binghamton, N. Y. Student from Binghamton, 
1899-1903. *A*, A.B. 
Teacher in High School, Waterloo, N. Y., since 1903. 
Residence, Waterloo, N. Y. 

3273 HARRY STANTON EDWARDS 
Bom 28 Oct. 1877 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, 1900-5. 
LL.B. 
Residence, 1506 N. Salina St., Syracuse, N. Y* 

3274 HARRY EDWARD BLDEN 
Born 4 Feb. 1878 at Camden, N. Y. Student from Camden, 1899-1903. 
Ph.B. 
Principal, Union School and Academy,' Elbridge, N. Y., since 1903. 
Residence, Elbridge, N. Y. 

3275 LURA BURROUGHS BMENS 

Born 22 Oct. 1881 at Fayette, N. Y. Student from Payette, 1899-1905. 
A*. Ph.B. 
Residence, Fayette, N. Y. 

3276 JAMES BARRETT EMERICK 

Bora 10 Aug. 1880 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Syracnse. 1899-190)1 
three years. LL.B. 



AI,UMMI OP 3YRACUSB UNIVERSITY 225 

ir at Syracuse, N. Y., since 1903. 

»ce, 192 1 E. Genesee St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

PEARL MARY FOSTER 
903. M.D. (See No. 2792 Sup.) 

3277 VERN SEELEY FOWLER 
Jan. 1881 at North Cohocton, N. Y. Student from Atlanta, N. Y., 
13. A.B. <&BK. 

er of English, Clifton Springs, N. Y. 
ince, Clifton Springs, N. Y. 

3278 JAMES FRANKLIN FREEBORN 
(I Dec. 1876 at Cazenovia, N. Y. Student from Chittenango, N.Y., 
13. A.B. 

pal, Union School, Perry ville, N. Y., since 1903. 
jnce, Perryville, N. Y. 

3279 JOHN NEWTON FRENCH 
Son of No. 198 
!0 July 1877 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Rochester, N. Y., 
♦T. E.E. A.B.(Univ.of Rochester) 190a 
It at University of Rochester, 1 896-1900. 
aice, 8 Portsmouth Terrace, Rochester, N. Y. 

3280 LYNN LYLH FULKERSON 
3 Apr. 1881 at Ingleside, N. Y. Student from Ingleside, 1899-1903. 

nee, Ingleside, N. Y. 

3281 FRANCES LOUISE FULLER 
2 Oct 1880 at Hampton, Va. Student from Syracuse, N. Y., 1899- 
b.B. 
nee, 202 Renwick Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

3282 JOHN TREMBLEY GARDNER 
o July 1880 at Livonia, N. Y. Student from Baldwinsville, N. Y., 
AX. LL.B. 

r at Baldwinsville, N. Y. , since 1903. 
ince, Baldwinsville, N. Y. 

3283 DON EDDY GIFFIN 
5 Apr. 1878 at Fond du Lac, Wis. Student from Fond du Lac at 
e University, 1899-1901 ; at Syracuse University, 1901-3. ♦PA. 

odent. University of Wisconsin, since 1903. 
nee, Fond du Lac, Wis. 

3284 CLIFFORD LAURIER GLADMAN 
June 1881 at Lindsay, Out. Student from Lindsay, 1900-3. LL.B. 
if at Fulton, N. Y., since 1903. 
mce, Fulton, N. Y. 



226 



AI,UMNI OP SYRACUSa UNIVBRSITY 



m-] 



3285 CLARIBEL GLASS 
Born 9 July 1880 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Syracuse. 1899-191^ 
Ph.B. *BK. 
Residence, 116 South Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

3286 ANGELINE C. GOLLY 
Bom 7 Apr. 1881 at Rome, N. Y. Student from Rome, 1899-1903. AT. 
A.B. 
Teacher, High School, Whitesboro, N. Y., since 1903. 
Residence. Whitesboro. N. Y. 

CLINTON EDDY GOODWIN 
1900-1903. M.D. (See No. 2793 Sup.) 

3287 CHARLES AUGUSTUS HAHL 
Born 2 Mar. 1878 at Buffalo, N. Y. Student, from Buffalo, 1900-3. BOIL 
Ph. B. LL.B(Univ. of Buffalo) 1900. 
Residence, 82 Monroe St., Buffalo, N. Y. 

3288 LEON FRANK HALEY 

Born 18 Nov. 1874 at Bucks Bridge, N. Y. Student from Bucks Bridge, 
1899-1903. ARE. A.B. 

Clergyman. Meth. Epis. Pastor at Manchester, N. Y., as supply, sum- 
mer 1903. With the Smith Premier Typewriter Co., Syracuse, N. Y., mbcb 

1903. 
Residence, loii Walnut Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

3289 MERCHANT BILLINGTON HALL 
Born 6 May 1877 at Chittenango, N. Y. Student from Chittenango is 
College of Liberal Arts, 1897-8; in College of Law, 1900-3. LL.B. 
Lawyer at Oneida, N. Y., since 1903. 
Residence, Oneida, N. Y. 

3290 WILLIAM PITT HALL, JR. 
Born 19 Feb. 1881 at Earlville, N. Y. Student from Earlville, 1899-1903. 
AKK. M.D. 

Interne at Faxton Hospital, Utica, N. Y., 1903-4. 
Residence, Faxton Hospital, Utica, N. Y. 

3291 BURKE COONLEY HAMILTON 
Born 13 Aug. 1881 at Cicero, N. Y. Student from Cicero, 1899-19Q}' 
B.S. 
Residence, Cicero, N. Y. 

3292 WELCOME ANSON HAN OR 
Bom 17 Nov. 1879 at Central Square, N. Y. Student from Central Sq'nut* 
1899- 1 903. M.D. 

Physician at Caton, N. Y., since 1903. 
Residence, Caton, N. Y. 

3293 IRMA WALTON HARD 
Born 8 Sept. 1881 at Oneida, N. Y. Student from Oneida, i90^> 
r4>B. Ph.B. 
Residence, Oneida, N. Y. 



Vn ALUMNI OP 3YRACUSB UNIYBRSITY 327 

3394 HARLIN ANDREW HARRIS 
Born 27 Nov. 1880 at Syracnse, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, 1899- 
1903. M.D. 
Interne at St. Joseph's Hospital, Syracuse, N. Y., 1903-4. 
Residence, St. Joseph's Hospital, Syracuse, N. Y. 

3295 LASHER HART 
Bom II Jan. 1877 at Taberg, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, N. Y., 1899- 
i^p^ AKK. M.D. 
Wis at U. S. Naval Academy, 189S-9. 

Interne at Central Maine General Hospital, Lewiston, Me., since 1903. 
Residence, Lewiston, Me. 

3296 ALANSON CYR HAUGHTON 
Born 8 Oct 1876 at St Johnsville, N. Y. Student from Lassellsville, 
N. Y., 1901-3. LL.B. 
Residence, Lassellsville, N. Y. 

3297 FRANK ROSS HAVILAND 
Born 18 Jan. 1880 at Fulton, N. Y. Student from Fulton, 1899-1903. 
«♦. irZN. M.D. 
Interne at Manhattan State Hospital, East, New York, N. Y., since 1903. 
Residence, Manhattan State Hospital, East, New York, N. Y. 

3298 HARVEY NATHANIEL HENDERSON 
Bom 14 Nov. 1878 at Himrods, N. Y. Student from Himrods, 1900-3. 
LL.B. 
Residence, Himrods, N. Y. 

3299 ROYAL LESLIE HENDERSON 
1899- 1903. B.S. (See Faculty Record, p. 112 Sup., College of Liberal 
Arti.) 

3300 IRVING JACKSON HIGBEE 
Bom II Nov. 1881 at Homer, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, N. Y., 
1900-3. LL.B. 
Ltwyer at Syracuse, N. Y. , since 1903. 
Residence, 1892 S. Salina St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

3301 GROVE WHITTEMORE HINMAN 
Bom 6 Feb. 1882 at Chase's Lake, N. Y. Student from Detroit, Mich., 
1900-3. LL.B. 
Residence, 12 14 Geddes St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

3302 ANNIE ELIZABETH HUBBLE 
Bora 30 Mar. 1882 at Stirling, Ontario, Canada. Student from Solvay, 
N. Y., 1899-1903. Ph.B. 
Residence, Orchard Road, Solvay, N. Y. 

3303 LEON DAVID HUESTIS 
Bora 20 Nov. 1878 at Rodman, N. Y. Student from Rochester, N. Y., 
1899-1903. OAe. Ph.B. 
Cbemist with Lackawanna Iron & Steele Co. 
Residence, Lebanon, Pa. 



228 AlfUMNI OP SYRACUSB UNIVBRSITY t^Of 

3304 HERBERT EVERARD JACKMAN ! 

Born 18 May 1881 at Rochester, N. Y. Student from Rochester, 189^ ■ 
1903. Ben. Ph.B. 

Gymnasinm Instructor and Athletic Coach, High School, Montclair, N. J,* 
since 1903. 

Residence, Montclair, N. J. 

3305 PHILIP PETER JACOBS 
Born 28 Mar. 1879 ^^ Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Binghamtoo, N. Y.^ 
1899-1903, four years. A.B. *BK. 
Residence, 15 Elm St., Binghamton, N. Y. 

3306 LEOLA S. JERMY 
Born 9 Oct 1883 at Oneida, N. Y. Student from Oneida, 1899-1903. 
r4>B. Ph.B. 
Residence, Oneida, N. Y. 

3307 GERRARD SILAS JOHNSON 
Bom 3 Dec. 1880 at Baldwinsville, N. Y. Student from Baldwinsrille, 
1900-3. AX. LL.B. 
Lawyer at Jamsica, L. I., since 1903. 
Residence, Richmond Hill, N. Y. 

3308 WILLIAM HERBERT JOHNSON 
Bom 4 June 1876 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, 1899-1903. 
LL.B. 

Lawyer at Syracuse, N. Y., since 1903. 
Private Co. L. 6th Mass. Porto Rico Expedition and Cuba. 
Married 24 Aug. 1898, M. K. B. Simmons of Brandon, Manitoba. 
Children — Edith H. L.» born 24 Aug. 1900. 

Charles E. F. 
Residence, 618 E. Washington St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

3309 OMAR EDGAR JONES 

Bom 22 July 1877 in Calvert Co., Md. Student from Viola, Del., 1900-^ 
A.B. «BK. 
Clergyman, Meth. Epis. Pastor at Delaware City, DeL, since 1903. 
Residence, Delaware City, Del. 

3310 MIRIAM KAUFFMAN 

Bom 23 Dec. 1880 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, 1899-1903. 
A.B. 
Residence, 662 Madison St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

331 1 BERTHA VILAS KNAPP 
Bom 3 Dec. 1880 at Keeseville, N. Y. Student from Essex N. Y., 1899- 
1903. KAG. Ph.B. 
Asst. Principal, High School, Willsboro, N. Y. 
Residence, Willsboro, N. Y. 

3312 FLORENCE ROBINSON KNAPP 
Bora 9 Nov. 1880 at Fayettville, N. Y. Student from Syracuae, N. Y. 
1899-1903. KKr. Ph.B. 



1|«5 AJJJUm OP SYRACUSB UNIVmtSITy 229 

Teacher, High School, Hornelltville, N. Y., since 1903. 
Rendence, Homellsville, N. Y. 

3313 HUGO WILLIAM KOBHLER 
Bora 2 Not. 1878 at Goppingen, Wiirttenberg, Germany. Student from 
Wttcrloo, N. Y., 1899-1903. A.B. 
Gradnate student at Leipzig University, Germany, since 1903. 
Residence, Fichte Strasse 26", Leipzig, Germany. 

3314 CLARKE SKINNER LANKTON 
Bora 8 July 1878 at Elbridge, N. Y. Student from Elbridge, 1899-1903. 
112. B.E. 
With the Auburn and Syracuse Electric Railway Co., 1903. 
Residence, Elbridge, N. Y. 

3315 SAUL R. LA VINE 
Bora 4 July 1879 in Russia. Student from Syracuse, N. Y., 1900-3. 
LLB. 
Ltwyer at Syracuse, N. Y., since 1903. 
Residence, 605 Taylor St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

3316 HUGH HAGEN LENAHAN 
Born 9 Jan. 1879 at Utica, N. Y. Student from Utica, 1899-1903. BOII. 
M.D. 
Interae at the Utica General Hospital, Utica, N. Y., since 1903. 
Residence, S^yi Lansing St., Utica, N. Y. 

JACOB JOSHUA LEVY 
1900-1903. M.D. (See No. 2823 Sup. and Faculty Record, p. 122 Sup. 
College of Medicine.) 

WILLIAM FRASER LEWIS 
1899-1903. LL.B. (See No. 2695 Sup.) 

3317 ARCHIBALD LINDSEY 
Born 28 Dec. 1873 at Harford, N. Y. Student from Dryden, N. Y. 
1901-3. A.B. 
Tescher, High School, Fulton, N. Y., since 1903. 
Residence, Fulton, N. Y. 

3318 THOMAS HILL LOW 

Bora 25 Apr. 1879 at Lime Ridge, Pa. Student from Lime Ridge in 
College of Liberal Arts, 1897-1999 ; in College of Law, 1900-3. #A8. 
U.B. 

Residence, Lime Ridge, Pa. 

3319 WILLIAM CHARLES LOWE 
1899-19P3. Ph.B. (See Faculty Record, p. iii Sup., College of Liberal 
Arts.) 

3320 JUSTIN SEBASTIAN MCCARTHY 
Bora 10 Jane 1881 at Tully, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, N. Y., 2899- 

1903- A.B. 
Residence, 2x6 Sabine St., Syracuse, N. Y. 



230 AI^UMNI OP SYRACUSB UNIVBRSITY 

3321 CLARA VIRGINIA McCLELLAND 
Born 6 Apr. 1879 ^^ Saranac Lake, N. Y. Student from Saianac 
1899-1903. Ph.B. 
Residence, Saranac Lake, N. Y. 

3322. WILLIAM HARVEY MCCLELLAND 
Bom 15 Aug. 1872 at Port Gibson, N. Y. Student from Port Gi 
1899-1903. B.S. «BK. 
Graduate Student at the University, 1903-4. 
Married 28 .Dec. 1898, Minerva M. Atvmter of Elba, N. Y. 
Residence, 907 Madison St , Syracuse, N. Y. 

3323 CLAIR STEVEN McGAVERN 
Bom 20 Nov. 1878 at Cambria, N. Y. Student from Coldeo, N. Y., i< 
LL.B. 

Lawyer at Allegany, N. Y., since 1903. 
Residence, Allegany, N. Y. 

3324 EVA FERRIS MAGEE 
Born 15 Feb. 1879 at Scottsburg, N. Y. Student from Scottsbnrg, 
1903. TLB*, A.B. 
Residence, Scottsburg, N. Y. 

3325 GENE ETHEL MARKHAM 
Born 31 May 1879 at Oswego, N. Y. Student from Lowville, N. Y., 
1903. A4>. A.B. 
Student at the State Normal College, Albany, N. Y., since 1903. 
Residence, Frankfort, N. Y. 

3326 FLORA MITCHELL METCALF 
Bom 30 Aug. 1878 at Centerville, N. Y. Student from Centerville, 
1903. KKP. Ph.B. 
Residence, Centerville, N. Y. 

3327 JAMES MIDDLETON 
Born 14 Apr. 1 881 at Crosshouse, Scotland. Student from Bnffiilo, I 
1899-1903. *KSk. A.B. 
Residence, 695 West Ave., Buffalo, N. Y. 

3328 LILLIAN MARION MILLER 
Bom 12 Nov. 1880 in Canada. Student from Syracuse, N. Y., 1899-1 
M.D. 
Residence, 1520 S. State St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

3329 DANIEL BLIZARD MILLS 
Bom 3 May 1879 at Waverly, N. Y. Student from Waverly, 1899-1 
♦T. B.S. 
Principal, Academy, Cincinnatus, N. Y., since 1903. 
Residence, Cincinnatus, N. Y. 

3330 *JOHN ALEXANDER MOLLOY 
Bom 2 June 1882 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Sjrracnte, 19^ 
AX. LL.B. 









19D3 AI.UMNI OP SVRACUSB UNIVBRSITY 23I 

Lawyer at Syracnse, N. Y., 1903. 
Died 28 April Z904 at Syracuse, N. Y. 

3331 ANN ISABELLE MOORE 
Bom I Sept. 1876 at Rochester, N. Y. Student from Rochester, 1898- 
1901 and 1902-3. nB4>. Ph.B. 
Rendence, 89 Hamilton St., Rochester, N. Y. 

3332 GEORGE ROBERT MORRIS 
Born 1877 at LeRaysville, Pa. Student from Le Raysville, 1899-1903. 

ZPA. B.Ar. 

Architectural Superintendent for Gaggin and Gaggin of Syracuse, N. Y., 
at Pittsburg, Pa., on the Metropolitan National Bank Building. 

Residence, Arsenal Station P. O. , Pittsburg, Pa. 

HERBERT BENJAMIN MYRON 
1901-1903. LL.B. (See No. 2965 Sup.) 

3333 GEORGE HERBERT NELSON 
Bom 13 Oct. 1869 at Cattaraugus Station, N. Y. Student from Ellicott- 

fillc, N. Y., 1897-8, and 1899-1903, four years. Ph.B. 
Residence, Watertown, N. Y. ? 

3334 WILLIAM HARRY NEVILLE 
See Alumni Record, p. 870. 
Bom 12 Apr. 1876 at Darwen, Eng. Student from Syracuse, N. Y., in 

College of Liberal Arts, 1896-8 ; in College of Medicine, 1899-1903. M.D. 
Residence, 112 Oxford Street, Syracuse, N. Y. 

3335 FREDERICK HERBERT NICHOLS 
Bora 5 Jan. 1876 at Beekmanstown, N. Y. Student from Plattsburg, N.Y., 

1^1903. AKK. M.D. 
Interne at the Hospital of the Good Shepherd, Syracuse, N. Y., since 

Residence, Hospital of the Good Shepherd, Syracuse, N. Y. 

3336 FREDERICK HENRY NUSBICKEL 
Bora 30 May 1881 at Lyons, N. Y. Student from Lyons, 1899-1903. AT. 

A.B. 
In business at Lyons, N. Y. 
Residence, Lyons, N. Y. 

3337 STEPHEN CLIFFORD ORMSBEE 
Bora 12 Mar. 1879 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, 1900-3. 
ARE. «A«. LL.B. 
Residence, 614 Irving Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

3338 ORIN EPHRAIM PAGE 
Bora 8 Dec. 1878 at Caughdenoy, N. Y. Student from Pennellville, N.Y., 
^%-i903. A.B. 
Vice-Principal, Academy, Lovmlle, N. Y., since 1903. 
Resdence, Lowville, N. Y. 



232 AXUMNI OF SYRACUSE UNIVBRSITY I9Q} 

3339 JOSEPH COOLIDGE PALMER 

Born 28 May 1875 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, 1899-1903. 
N2N. M.D. A.B.(Yale)i899. 
Residence, Paterson, N. J. 

3340 CAROLYN JANET PATERSON 
Bom 18 Aug. 1881 at Wallsville, Pa. Student from Fleetville, Pa., it 

Bucknell University, 1899-1901 ; at Syracuse University, 1901-3. 
Teacher, High School, Scranton, Pa., since 1903. 
Residence, Fleetville, Pa. 

3341 MARY ETHEL PEASLEE 
Born 27 Oct 1880 at Norwood, N. Y. Student from Boonville, N. Y.. 

1898-1903. four years. KKP. B.L. 
Residence, Vernon, N. Y. 

3342 JAMES CLINTON PEET 
Born 25 Nov. 1880 at West Webster, N. Y. Student from Westfield, Pi, 

1899-1903. XA2. E.E. 

With the General Electric Company, Testing Dep't, Schenectady, N. Y., 
since 1903. 

Residence, Schenectady, N. Y. 

3343 JOHN GILBERT PEMBLETON 
Bom 8 July 1880 at Waverly, N. Y. Student from Tioga Center, N.Y., 
1899-1903. ARE. Ph.B. 
Residence, Tioga Center, N. Y. 

3344 ALBERT EDWARD PETRIE 
Born 14 Oct. 1879 ^^ Oneonta, N. Y. Student from Binghamton, N. Y., 

1899-1903. AKE. E.E. 
Residence, 304 Walnut Place, Syracuse, N. Y. 

3345 DUANE FORREST PHELPS 
Bom 22 Aug. 1 881 at Cazenovia, N. Y. Student from Buffalo, N. Y..aB^ 

Syracuse, N. Y., 1899-1903. AKE. A.B. 
With the Collins Bakery Co., Buffalo, N. Y., since 1903. 
Residence, 701 West Ave., Buffalo, N. Y. 

3346 CAROLINE EMMA PIERSON 
Sister of Nos. 1399, 1604, and 3347 
Bom 7 Mar. 1881 at Fayetteville, N. Y. Student from S3rraeiise, N.Y.,»* 
Wellesley College, 1899-1901 ; at Syracuse Univernty, 1901-3. A.B. 
Residence, 420 Crouse Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

3347 SARAH GARDNER PIERSON 
Sister of Noi. 1399, 1604. and 3346 

Born 18 June 1877 at Fayetteville, N. Y. Student from Syrmcnie, N. Y" 
in College of Liberal ArU, 1896-7 ; in College of Medicine, 1899-1903. ^' 
M.D. 

Physician at Rochester, N. Y. 

Residence, 10 Gibbs St., Rochester, N. Y. 



AI^UMNI OP SYRACUSE UNIVBRSITY 233 

3348 ISABELLA MARY PIKE 
rn I July 1880 at Sjrracnse, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, 1899-1903. 
. «BK. 

eceptrets, Cleveland, N. Y., since 1903. 
sidence, Cieyeland, N. Y. 

3349 STELLA LYDIA HAVEN POST 
irn 5 Apr. 1872 at Boonville, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, N. Y., 
-1903. A.B. ^BK. A.M.(I903.) 
"eceptress, High School, Sandy Creek, N. Y., 1893-8. 
aidence, 621 Crouse Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

3350 WALTER HOWARD POWLESLAND 
)ni 6 Oct 1877 at Collamer, N, Y. Student from East Syracuse, N. Y., 
-1903. A.B. ♦BK. 
ischer of Greek and Latin, Union Academy, Belleville, N. Y., since 

m 

trried 20 July 1904, Maud Elizabeth Stetler. 
ssidence, Belleville, N. Y. 

3351 HENRY BELL PRATT 
m 30 Mar. 1876 at Philadelphia, Pa. Student from Towanda, Pa., in 
sge of Liberal Arts, 1896-8 ; in College of Medicine, 1898-1903. AKB. 

• 

raduate student at Vienna, Austria, 1903. 

irried 10 June 1903, Ruth H. Gilbert (see Non-graduates) of Syra- 

, N. Y. 

isidence, 905 Walnut Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

3352 WILLIAM FREDERICK PROUTY 

9^1903. B.S. (See Faculty Record, p. iii Sup., College of Liberal 

».) 

3353 CAMILLA QUACKENBUSH (CHRISMAN) 

orn 9 Mar. 1876 at Herkimer, N. Y. Student from Herkimer, 1899- 

V KAO. Z*. M.D. 

toed 23 Sept. 1903, F. W. Chrisman of Herkimer, N. Y. 

esidence, Herkimer, N. Y. 

3354 JOHN ARTHUR RANDOLPH 
i>ni 31 Dec. 1880 at Olean, N. Y. Student from Olean, 1899-1903. E.E. 
^er Station Operator for the Utica and Mohawk Valley Railroad Co. 
sidence, 137 Mary St., Utica, N. Y. 

MAJOR FRED REED ^ 

Ar. X901-1903. (See No. 2985 Sup. and Faculty Record, p. 130 Snp.» 
cge of Fine Arte.) 

3255 VILETTA CLARKE REED 
*fn 3 Not. 1879 ^ Canajoharie, N. Y. Student from Canajoharie» 
-1803. A*. Ph.B. 

•cher, High School, Canajoharie, N. Y. 
=iidence, Canajoliarie, N. Y. 



234 AI«X7MNI OF SYRACUSB UNIVB&SITY l^ 

3356 CORNELIA HOWE RICE 

Born 4 Aug. 1875 at Fnlton, N. Y. Student from Fulton, 1899-1905. if 
B.S. 

Teacher at Chester, N. Y., since 1903. 

Residence, Chester, N. Y. 

3357 DANIEL JUDSON RICHARDSON 

Born 14 Feb. 1878 at Dunellen, N. J. Student from Donellen, 1898-1903. 
♦FA. Ph.B. 

Clerk, General Bureau, Fourth Assistant Postmaster GenexBl, Washing- 
ton, D.C. 

Residence, Washington, D. C. 

3358 SCHUYLER PARSHALL RICHMOND 

Born 14 July 1880 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, 1899-19PJ. 
NSN. M.D. i 

Residence, 212 Park Ave, Syracuse, N Y. 

3359 CHARLES CARTER ROBINSON 
Bom 4 Dec. 1877 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, 1899-1903- 
E.E. 
Residence, 206 Catherine St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

3360 RAY HOSKINS RULISON 
Born 30 Sept. 1882 at Jonesville, N. Y. Student from Biaodon. VU 
1899-1903. Ph.B. 
Student in College of Medicine since 1903. NZN. 
Residence, 406 E. Willow St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

3261 RUTH ELVA RUSSUM 
Bom 16 Nov. 1881 at Nassau, N. Y. Student from Schenectady. N- Y*' 
1898-1903. r*B. Ph.B. 
Teacher, Fort Edward Institute, Fort Edward, N. Y., since 1903. 
Residence, Fort Edward, N. Y. 

3362 LYDIA HANNAH SCHAEFER 
Bom 24 Jan. 1881 at Rome, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, N. Y., i^y 
Ph.B. 
Preceptress, High School, Liverpool, N. Y., since 1903. 
Residence, 634 Catherine St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

3363 EDWARD SCHOENECK 

Born 6 Aug. 1875 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, X9*^3' 
LL.B. 

Lawyer at Syracuse, N. Y., since 1903. 

Member Board of Supervisors, Onondaga Co., representing the 34 ^ 
of the City of Syracuse. 

Residence, 908 N. State St. , Syracuse, N. Y. 

3364 IRMA MATILDA SCHOEPFLIN 
Born 16 June 1881 at Gardenville, N. Y. Student from Hatubofgi I^* ^'' 
1899-1903. r4>B. B.S. 



▲IfUMNI OP 8YRACUSB UNIVBRSITY 255 

xess and teacher of German and Mathematics, High School, Lib- 
iT., since 1903. 
ICC, Liberty, N. Y. 

3365 ALBERT ROE SEAMAN 

, Mar. 1882 at Comwall-on-Hudson, N. Y. Student from Comwall- 
n, 1899-1903. 4>A6. Ph.B. 
ice, Comwall-on-Hudson, N. Y. 

3366 BESSIE MABEL SEELY 

I Bfay 1 881 at Dixon, 111. Student from Syracuse, N. Y., 1900-3. 

at Syracuse, N. Y., since 1903. 
ice, 413 Croton St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

3367 JENNIE GRAY SEELY 
I Nov. 1872 at Ithaca, N. Y. Student from Waverly, N. Y., 1899- 
•. M.D. 
ice, Waverly, N. Y. 

3368 LUELLA SCOTT SEX SMITH 
; Dec. 1881 at Coleville, Pa. Student from Scio, N. Y., 1900-3. 

ice, Scio, N. Y. 

3369 ELWOOD WARD SHAFER 
3 June 1878 at Schodac Center, N. Y. Student from Cobleskill, 
99-1903. AT. A.B. 

r in Ulster Academy, Kingston, N. Y., since 1903. 
ice, 102 Hone St., Kingston, N. Y. 

3370 ROY KISOR SHEFFIELD 
9 June 1877 at Enfield, N. Y. Student from Enfield. 1899-1903. 

nan, Meth. Epis. Pastor at Clayville, N. Y., 1903-4 ; at Leonards- 

^., since 1904. 

1 27 Aug. 1963, Helen G. Leete of Kirkville, N. Y. 

ice, Leonardsville, N. Y. 

3371 FLOYD CURTISS SHERMAN 
Brother of Nos. 2856 and 3188 
Nov. 1881 at Perryville, N. Y. Student from Onondaga, N. V., 
). A.B. 

itendent of Schools, Thompson, O., since 1903. 
ice, Thompson, O. 

3372 JOHN WESLEY SHORT 
[ Ang. 1880 at Bemhard's Bay, N. Y. Student from Verona, N. V., 
,• M.D. 

an at Cauastota, N. Y., since 1903. 
ice, Canastota, N. Y. 

3373 CHARLES DRAKE SKINNER 
103, four yean, A.B. (See Faculty Record, p. 112 Sup., College 
lArU.) 



i 



236 AI,UMNI OP SYRACUSB UNIVBRSITV I903 

3374 FRANCIS HALL SLATER 

Born 18 July 1878 at Saranac Lake, N. Y. Student from Saranac Lake 
in College of Liberal Arts. 1896-1900 ; in College of Law, Z900-3. BOH 
LL.B. 

Married 12 Dec. 1901, Bessie I. Frost of Syracnse, N. Y. 

Child — Laura Mildred, born 3 Aug. 1902. 

Residence, Saranac Lake, N. Y. 

3375 *CARRIE ELIZABETH SMALLEY 
Daughter of No. 249 ; Sister of No. 16x6 
Born 19 Oct. 1879 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, 189^19^3. 
r*B. Ph.B. *BK. 

Died 9 Sept. 1903 at Syracuse, N. Y. 

3376 EVA MARION SMITH 
Bom 27 Dec. 1880 at Trumansburg, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, N. Y., 
1899-1903. KAO. Ph.B. 
Teacher, High School, Dryden, N. Y., since 1903. 
Residence, Dryden, N. Y. 

3377 FREDERICK WILLIAM SMITH 
Bom 13 Sept. 1875 at Leeds, Canada. Student from Syracuse, N.V.f 

1899-1903. N2N. M.D. 
Asst. Physician, Hopewell Sanitarium, Bristol, R. I., July 1 1903-Jan. * 

1904. House Physician, Kings Co. Hospital, ^ew York, after Jan. i vfi^ 
Residence, Kings Co. Hospital, New York, N. Y. 

3378 HENRY OLIVER SMITH 

Born 4 Dec. 1878, at Northport, N. Y. Student from Northport in CoUe^ 
of Liberal Arts, 1899-1900 ; in College of Law, 1900-3. AT. LL.B. 

Residence, Northport, N. Y. 

3379 EDWARD SNYDER 

Bom 14 Dec. 1881 at New York, N. Y, Student from New York, Vffy-y 
LL.B. 

Lawyer at Brooklyn, N. Y., since graduation. Offices 345 Hambarl 
Ave. 

Residence, 209 Palmetto St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

3380 HERBERT CLINTON SOULE 

Born 14 Sept. 1879 at Rose, N. Y. Student from Clyde. N. Y., 1898-19OS. 
SkT. E.E. 

With General Electric Co., Schenectady, N. Y., since 1903. 

Residence, Schenectady, N. Y. 

3381 CYNTHIA STEERS 

Bora 24 June 1882 at SchenecUdy. N. Y. Student from Schenect0lT> 
1899-1903. Z^. M.D. 

Physician at Schenectady, N. Y., since 1903. 

Residence, 19 Wendell Ave., Schenectady, N. Y. 

3382 GEORGE HENRY STEPHENS 
Bom 13 Sept. 1874 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Syiacnae, lifj^^V^ 
M.D. 



ALUMNI OP SYRACUSB UNIVRRSITY 237 

le at Samaritan Hospital, Troy, N. Y., fiince Dec. 1903. 
encc, Troy, N. Y. 

3383 GEORGE BURDEN STEVENS 

13 Sept. 1879 At Oakfield, N. Y. Student from Oakfield, 1899-1903. 
A.B. 

Western Electric Co., 463 West St., New York, N. Y., since 1903. 
lence, 365 Manhattan Ave., New York, N. Y. 

3384 WALTER ADDISON STEVERS 
22 Dec. 1879 at S. Dansville, N. Y. Stndent from Hornellsville, 
1899-1903. AT. Ph.B. 
lence, Homellsville, N. Y. 

3385 ALEXANDER McLAREN STEWART 

14 Apr. 1876 at Bristol, Quebec, Canada. Student from Atlanta, 
1899-1903. M D. 

(icitn at Atlanta, N. Y., since 1903* 
dence, Atlanta, N. Y. 

3386 FREDERICK DARWIN STONE 
1 10 July 1878 at Pulaski, N. Y. Stndent from Mexico, N. Y., 1899- 
AKK. 'm.D. 

ddan at Palermo Center, N. Y., since 1903. 
dence, Palermo Center, N. Y. 

3387 MYRTLE COSETTE STONE 

i 4 Jan. 188 1 at Homer, N. Y. Student from Homer, 1899- 1903. 

Ph.B. 

her, High School, Oxford, N. Y., since 1903. 

dence, Oxford, N. Y. 

3388 MARCUS BEEMAN STOUT 

1 x8 May 1878 at Lyons, N. Y. Student from Lyons in College of 
1 Arts, 1898-9 ; in College of Fine Arts, 1897-1903. B.Ar. 
ightsman for the Solvay Process Co. since 1903. 
dence, 121 W. Fayette St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

3389 GEORGE BENNETT STRAIT 
27 Jan. 1865 at Sylvania, Pa. Student from Sylvania, 1899-1903. 

cipal, High School, Towanda, Pa., since 1903. 
led 24 Dec. 1892, C. Bertha Sucese of Troy, Pa. 
ience, Towanda, Pa. 

3390 MARIAN AUGUSTA STURDEVANT 
20 May 1880 at WilkesBarre, Pa. Student from WilkesBarre, 1899- 
KKP. A.B. 

her at WilkesBarre, Pa., since 1903. 
lence, 68 W. Ross St., WilkesBarre, Pa. 

3391 ERNEST HENRY SUMNER 
19 Aug. 1878 at Darien, N. Y. Student from Darien, 1899-1903. 
Ph.B. 



358 ALUMNI OP 3YRACUSB UNIVBRSITY X9Q3 

Graduate stndent in Syracnse University, 1903-4. 

Member intercollegiate debate teams which met teams from Brown 
University, 1902 and 1903. 

Residence, Corfu, N. Y. 

3392 CLINTON JAY TAPT 

Bom 17 Dec. 1877 at Fulton, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, N. Y., 1899- 
1903. Ph.B. *BK. 

Pastor Bristol Hill Congrefi^ational Church, Volney, N. Y. 

Residence, Fulton, N. Y. 

3393 HENRY ROBERT TEMPLETON 
Bom 26 July 1879 ^^ BufiFalo, N. Y. Student from Buffalo, 1899-1903. 
*K*^. Ph.B. 

In the Department of Public Works, Buffalo, N. Y., since 1903. 
Residence, 466 W. Ferry St., Buffalo, N. Y. 

3394 ARTHUR MORGAN TOWNSEND 
Brother of No. 3395 
Born II Dec. 1880 at Potsdam, N. Y. Student from Fulton, N. Y.. 1899- 
1903. AT. A.B. 
Assistant principal, High School, Mauch Chunk. Pa., since 1903. 
Residence, Mauch Chunk, Pa. 

3395 HAROLD AM ASA TOWNSEND 
Brother of No. 3394 
Born 20 Dec. 1879 at Potsdam, N. Y. Student from Fulton. N. Y., 1899- 
1903. AT. A.B. 
Engaged in business in Canada. 
Residence, Bagotville, Ha Ha Bay, Saguenay, Can. 

3396 ARTHUR SCOTT VIALL 

Born 25 Feb. 1875 at Jersey Shore, Pa. Stndent from Hopson, Tcnn-i 
1900-3. LL.B. 

With the Law firm of Gill & Stilwell, 921-5 University Block, Syracuse, 
N. Y. 

Residence, 237 W. Washington St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

3397 STELLA HOAG WALRATH 
Bom 15 Dec. 1884. Student from Syracuse, N. Y., 1899-1903. AAA. 
B.Mus. 
Awarded Graduate Scholarship in Music. Will study in Vienna, vpi"^ 
Residence, 500 University Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

3398 HARRY GLENN WEEKS 
Born 17 Dec. 1880 at Montrose, Pa. Student from Binghamtoo, N. V.. 
1899-1903. AKE. E.E. 
Residence, 235 Court St., Binghamton, N. Y. 

3399 RALPH ROGER WELLES 
Bom 25 July 1880 at Binghamton, N. Y. Student from Syracnse, N. Y.i 
1899-1903. B.P. 
Residence, 100 Barden Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 



AI«UMNI OP SYRACUSB UNIVERSITY • 239 

3400 ALBION MERRILL WENDELL 

10 Jan. 1878 at Town of Campton, Canada. Student from Ilion^ 

900-3. LL.B. 

er at Ilion, N. Y., since 1903. 

cnce, Ilion, N. Y. 

3401 ARTHUR WILLIAM WHALEN 

18 Sept. 1880 at Perry, N.Y. Student from Perry, 1899-1903. B.Ar 
Architectural draughtsman for the U. G. Wilkins Co., 903 Westing- 

building, Pittsburg, Pa., since 1903. 
lence, Alleghany, Pa. 

3402 EDWARD MANSFIELD WHARFF 
27 Mar. 1882 at Bangor, Me. Student from Machias, Me., at the 
Bity of Maine, 1899-1901 ; at Syracuse University, 1901-3. *rA. 

ber at Joliet, 111. 

ience, 321 S. Eastern Ave., Joliet, 111. 

COURTNEY DUANE WHITTEMORE 
)03. LL.B. (See No. 2738 Sup.) 

3403 LYNN BOYD WIKOFF 
6 July 1874 at Richfield Springs, N. Y. Student from Richfield 
I, 1899-1903, four years. *rA. B.S. 
her, Kentucky Mil. Inst., Lyndon, Ky., since 1903. 
icnce, Lyndon, Ky. 

3404 CHESTER WILCOX 
I June 1874 at Camden, N. Y. Student from Camden, 1900-3. 

yer at Camden, N. Y., since 1903. 
lence, Camden, N. Y. ^ 

34Q5 WILLIAM LAV AY WISE 
14 May 1877 at Port Byron, N. Y. Student from E. Syracuse, N. Y. , 
)03. Ph.B. 

her at Bordentown (N. J.) Military Institute since 1903. 
lence, Bordentown, N. J. 

KARL DWIGHT WOOD 
•1903. M.D. (See No. 2884 Sup.) 

3406 GERTRUDE MAY WOODFORD 
31 Jan. 1879 *t Marcellus, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, N. Y., 
^3, four years. Ph.B. 
lence, 315 Tallman St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

3407 JESSIE CASTLE WORDEN 

19 July 1881 at Fayettcville, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, N, Y., 
03. AAA. Ph.B. «BK. 

ler of Latin and German, High School, Pulaski, N. Y., since 1903. 
lence, Pulaski, N. Y. 



340 



AlfUMNI OP SYRACUSE UNIVBRSITY 



I9QS 



3408 LAURA HENRIETTA YOUNG 
Bom 29 Aug. 1880 at Rural Grove,N. Y. Student from Johnstown.N.Y.. 
1899-1903. A*. Ph.B. 
Residence, 28 S. Perry St., Johnstown, N. Y. 

3409 NANA CATHERINE YOUNG 
Born I Oct. 1879 ^^ ^^w Hanover, Pa. Student from Pottstown, Ft., 
1899-1903. AAA. B.S. 
Residence, Pottstown, Pa. 



^ 



[ERICAL INDEX OF GRADUATES 

(♦ indicates ♦BK) 



1895 



ftldwin Downs (Tipple). A.B. 



Grecnleaf Watkins. M.D. 



1898 

3639 Ralph Allen Wilcox, M.D. 



1899 

ICay Allen. B.S. 2692 

Frances Allen. B.L. 2693 

tCarie Armstrong (Kyder). A.B. 2694 
fiances Avery. B.P. 3695 

radley Aylesworth (No. 1439). ^696 



rooks Bacon. I«L.B. 
X Bmily Bailey (Crouse). Ph.B. 3699 
d Ash lev Bard. A.B. 3700 

feremian Bedell. I«L.B. 2701 

G. Benjamin. Ph.B. ^. 3702 

Ilione Bennett. B.L. 3703 

melia Bingham(Collins). Ph.B. 3704 



ary Bolana. Ph.B 
L De Paul Brady Ph.B. 
raomi Braley. Ph.B. 
;mma Brockvray. B.I«. 
ly Bryan. A.B. ^. 
lella Burdick. B.S. 
ilma Burpee. A.B. 
I. Campbell. A.B. 
:ay Chapman. A.B. 
1 PitzGerald Clark . M.D. 
Wells Clary. B.Mus. 
Elisabeth Coates. Ph.B.. ♦. 
John Coleman. LL.B. 
ouise Connell. B.Mus. 
»rite Rose Connelly. B.P. 
i BdwinCooney(No.i450). I«L.B 
es Cooper. LL.B. 
J. Crane. Ph.B. 
Bell Crommie. B Mas. 
Bmmons Cummings. A.B. 
Ralph Deming. LL.B. 
tin Van Btten Dot ph. M.D. 
s Dougherty. LL.B 
lunice Dow (Carrier*. Ph.B. 
. Dunn (Russell). Ph.B. ♦. 
■ Prants. B.Mus. 
le Hall Gagarin. Ph.B. ' 
Phoebe Goodrich (Hoyt). B.P. 
lin Franklin Haanel. B.S. 
Lobertson Hart. Ph.B. 
a Lyon Hasbrouck. Ph.B. 
Florence Heermans. B.S ^. 
Washington Hey, Jr. B. Mus. 
Barl Higbee. LL.B. 
lildreth. A.B. ^. 
emoyne Hoose. A.B. 
Bmma Jacoby (Johnson). 

IS. 

t Ray Jaquay. LL.B. 
a Kenyon Jermy. LL.B. 
Bvelyn Johns (Taylor). Ph.B. 3742 
D Kast. LL.B. 3743 

Stephen Kelly. A.B. 



3705 
3706 
2707 
3708 
3709 
3710 
3711 
2713 

2713 
3714 

2715 
3716 
2717 
3718 
3719 
3730 



2721 
2732 

2723 
2724 

22 
3720 

3727 

2738 

3739 

3730 

3731 

3733 

2733 
2734 
2735 
2736 
2737 
2738 

2739 
2740 

2741 



Clara Blanche Knapp. A.B. *. 
J. Claude Latham. A.B. 
Harry Sheridan Lee. A.B. 
William Fraser Lewis. Ph.B. 
Hugh Sears Lowther. A.B. ♦. 
Henry Michael McCarthy. LL.B. 
Philip Irving Manson. LL.B. 
Bdward Arthur Martin. Ph.B. 
Willis Hoag Mitchell. A.B. ♦. 
Georse Allen Miller. LLB. 
Marshall Bmory Morris. A.B. 
Frederick Allen Mott. B.S. 
Charles Thomas Murdock. A.B. 
Fred Whiting Noble. A.B. 
Arthur Heniy Norton. B.S, 
Anne Gray Noxon. A.B. 
Susie Shaw Over Ph.B. 
Burton Bradford Parsons. LL.B. 
Alberta Bleanore Perry. Ph.B* 
Payson Bdward Pierce. B.L. 
John Walrath Plant. M.D. 
Harry Blake Keddick. A.B. 
Lena Marguerite Rhodes. B.L. 
Willis Bverett Ridgeway. A.B. ♦. 
Willard A. Rill. LL.B. 
Grace Louise Robinson. Ph.B. 
Maurice Rossman. A.B. 
Bthel Lyon Rulison. A.B. 
Francis Joseph Ryan. M.D. 
Frederick Parmenter Schenck (No. 
1525). LL.B. 

Bdward Francis Shea. LL.B. 
Mildred Korleen Shea. Ph.B. 
Joseph Henry Stolz. Ph.B. 
Julia Hardie Stowell (Stone). 
Andrew Tames Telfer. B.S. 
Richard Harkness Templeton. 
Martha Sibilla Umbrecht. Ph. 
Mailler Orville Van Keuren. A.B. 
Mabel A. Van Winkle (Hoyt). Ph.B. 
Sarah Volinski. Ph.B. 
Lee Waldorf. Ph.B. 
Charles Bertram Walker. B.P. 
Clara Mabel Webb. B. Mus. 
Frrderick Probst Webster. B.S. ♦. 
Luther Leslie Weller LL.B. 
Bdwin Thomas Whiffen. A.B. 
Anice Whitney. B. Mus. 
Courtney Duane Whittemore. A.B. 
Grace Laura WikoflT. PhB. 
Reba Dygert Willard. B. Mus. 
Edith Mong Wilson (Murdock). 

Ph.B. ♦. 
Perry Albertus Wood. LL B. 
Leonard Ernest Young. B.S. 



Ph.B. 

A.B. 
.B. 



242 



NUMBRICAI, INDBX OP GRADUATES 



VA4 
2745 

2746 

2747 
2748 

2749 
2750 

27s I 
275a 

*75l 
2754 
2755 
2756 
2757 
2758 

2759 
2760 

2761 

2762 

2763 
2764 



I9CX) 

Charles Burdick Alford. Pta.B. 2815 

Mabel Moore AUis. Ph.B. 2816 
William Dewey Alsever (No. 1349). M.D. a8i7 

Belle Amdursky. B.I«- 2818 

Mary Zuba Barrett (SUIey). Ph.B. 261Q 

Mamie Amanda Bates. B.S. sSao 

Robert Earl Benjamin. Ph.B. 2821 

Anne Tefft Bingham. M.D. 2S22 

Thomas Morlry Bishop. A.B. 2823 

Prances May Bliss Ph.B. 2824 

Charles Norman Bottum. B 8. 2825 

Arthur Girard Swift Brink. LI«.B. 2826 

George Sidney Britten. M.D. 2827 

Antionette L. Brown (Strickland). B P. 2828 
" LI^.B. 



Frederick Andrew Brown. 
Fred LeRoy Brown. B.S. 
Mary J. McClelland (Brown). B.S. 
Milton Bracken Brundage. B.S. 
Justus Lvman Bulkley, Jr. M.D. 
Anna Blixabeth Burhngarae. A.B. 
Allen Ducan Barnham A.B. 
Dillon Austin Cadv. B S. 

2765 Bllen Marie Chapman. Ph.B. 

2766 Cass Fitch Chiler. M.D. 

2767 Randolph Thatcher Congdon. A.B. 

2768 Mabel Louise Cook. B. Mum. 

2769 Willis David Cuddeback. M.D. 

2770 Mary Emily Curtis. A B 

2771 Harriet Arms Curtisn. Ph.B ♦. 

2772 *Kbenexer WeHton Cutler. A.B. 

2773 Clarence Winfield Darling. A.B. 

2774 Flora Mildred Darling. B. Mus. 

2775 Mary Bmogene Day. B. Mus. 

2776 Grace Griggs DrKay (Pratt). Ph.B. 

2777 Elizabeth Gertrude DeLany. A.B. 

2778 Samuel Henry Dodson. Ph.B. 

2779 Carl Blijah Dorr. A.B. 

2780 Jay William Dounce. M.D. 

2781 Henry Burton Doust. M.D. 

2782 Herman Horatio Downey. A.B. 

2783 Rose Frances Egan. A.B. ♦. 

2784 Merriam Ernhout. B. Mus 

2785 Leonard Lewis Everson. E.E. 

2786 Allie Van Duyn Fahnestock. B.P 
2787 
2788 



2829 
2830 
« 2831 
2832 
28*3 
2834 

2835 
2836 

2837 

2838 

2839 
2840 
2841 
2842 
2843 
2844 
2845 
2840 

2847 
2848 
♦. 2849 
28S0 
2851 
2852 

2853 
2854 

2855 
2856 

2857 

2858 

Eltzabeth Van Duyn Fahnestock. B.L. 2859 

Catharine Alice Fairchild. B.L. 2860 

2789 Joseph Waldron Farley. B.S. 2861 

2790 Jacob Finger. A.B. 286a 

2791 Thomas Fred Foreman. M.D. 2863 
2793 Pearl Mary Foster. Ph.B. 2864 

2793 Clinton Eddy Goodwin. A.B. 2865 

2794 Susan Amanda Gould. Ph.B. 2866 
279s Helen Louise Gowing. Ph B. 2867 

2796 Edward Augustus Green. A.B. 2868 

2797 Jay Lamont Gregory. A.B. 2869 
William Avery Groat (No. 1462). M.D. 2870 

2798 Damon Austin Hagadorn. A.B. 2871 

2799 Franklyn Parker Hammond. A B. 2872 

2800 Frank Wood Hargitt. B.S 2873 

2801 Clyde Leonard Harvev. A.B. «. 2874 

2802 William James Harvie. E.E. 2875 

2803 Martha Hawley Hasbrouck. B.L. 2876 

2804 Mary Josephine Hasbrouck. Ph.B. 2877 

2805 Bessie Mildred Hawks. Ph.B. «. 2878 

2806 Charles Franklin Hitchcock. Ph.B. 2879 

2807 Myra Finette Hitchcock. B.P. 2880 

2808 Starr Clarence Holli.s. M D. 2881 

2809 *Floyd Fayette Hollister. M.D. 2882 

2810 Welthy Blakslee Honsinger. Ph.B. 2883 

281 1 Adeline Beldina Hunt. B.P. 2884 

2812 Willinm Merrill Hydon. A.B. 2885 

2813 Edward Corbin Jenkins. Ph.B. 2886 

2814 Clara Belle Johnson (Champlin). Ph.B. 



John Schafelt Kelley. M.D. 
William Brooks Kelly. Ph.B. 
Grace King. B L. 
Lena May King. B.L. 
Prank Pattenglll Knowlton. M.D. 
Laura Mills Latimer. A.B. ♦. 
Harry Glover Lee. A.B. 
Jay Durwood Lester. A B. 
Jacob Joshua Levy. Ph.B. 
Sylvenas Danforth Lef» is. A.B. 
Clande Carl Lytle. M.D. 
Leon Allison McKown. B S. 
Charles Henry McLaary. A.B. 
Charles Samuel MacDougall. PbJ. 
Prances Elisabeth Madden. A.B. 
Elisabeth Clara Miller. B. Mat. 
Frank Miller. Ph.B. 
Frederick Augustus Miller. A.B. 
Willtam Howard Momgomery. M.D. 
Amelia Lucretia Montati (Dorr). FlUl 
*William Henry Muddle. A B. 
Grace Gertrude Noble. B. Mas. 
Edith Avery Nye. Ph.B. 
Kens Light Oberdorfer. B.L. 
David Daniel O'Brien M.D. 
Martha Elisabeth O'Brien. B.L. 
Laura Edith Osborne. A.B. 
Charles Turner Obtrander. M.D. 
Charles Living4ton Palmer. Ph.B. 
Mabel Van Wagenen Parker. A.B. *. 
Laura Parsons. Ph.B. *. 
Celestia May Pember (Hasen). Ph.B. 
Frank Spenser Perry. A B. 
George Lee Phelpa. A.B. *. 
Louis De Laittre Pulf^ifer. M.D. 
lone Armenia Reynolds. Ph.B. 
Howard Victor Rulison Pn.B. 
Aloney Lyman Rust. M.D. 
Nettie May Saddler. B S. 
Grace Rogers Sheffield Ph.B 
Edwin Hedden Shepard. B S. *. 
*Pred Walker Sherman. A.B. *• 
William Thornton Smallwood. B.S. 
Maude Lillian Smith. A.B. 
Montgomery Caley Smith Ph.B. 
Merritt Amos Soper. Ph B, 
Maude Bstelle Southworth. Ph.B. 
Harry Marvin Stacy. A B. 
George Rowe SUley. B.S. 
Raymond James Stonp. M.D. 
Hugh Butler Strang. Ph B. 
Prank Raphael Strong. B S. *. 
Richard Leo Sullivan. M.D. 
Mary Frances Sweet. M.D 
Mary Agnes Thompson. B. Mai. 
Frt.d Munroe Thurston. A.B. 
Lulu Marie Ticknor. B. Mus. 
Allen Gideon Tripp. M.D. 
Oakley Earl Van Slyke. A.B. 
Charles Rowe Vickery. Ph.B. 
Newman D. Waffle. A.B. 
Jessie May Wakefield. Ph.B. 
Ruth Leora Ward. A.B. 
Rose Regina Welgand. B.S. 
Marion Lesley went. Ph B. *> 
Grace Franc Wight. B. Mns. 
Morgan Allen Wilcoz. Ph.B. 
Horatio Burt Williams. A.B. 
George Clayton Wood. A.B. 
Karl Dwight Wood. A.B. 
Marion Elisabeth WrighL A.& *• 
Mabel Yeomana (Holdcn). Pb.B. 



NXm KRICAI, INDBX OF GRADUATBS 



343 



1901 

2954 
3955 
2956 

2057 

3958 

3959 
3960 

3961 
3962 

2963 
3964 

2965 
3966 



a 



' Henry Jesse Ackermsn. A.B. 

i John Jsmes Ackermsn. A.B. 

) George Arthur Adsms. Ll«.B. 

» Uts jane Alffire Ph.B. 

I Jason Roy Allen. M.D. 

a Alfred Wsrren Armstrong. A.B. 

3 Lena Harrison Baldwin. Ph.B. 

M ^ephrn Bastahle. LL.B. 

15 John Leopold Bauer, Jr. A.B. ♦. 

tb John Isaac Becker. A.B. 

yj J^n Alaoson Beers. A.B. «. 

)B Frsncis Roe Benham. M.D. 

» Orlow D'Nasan Blanchard. Ph.B. 

John Gary Boland (No. 2651 Sup.) LL.B 3967 

00 be Forest Hermsn Bon»ied. LL.B. 3968 
Vincent De^ul Brady (No. 2652 Sup.) 2969 

LLB. 3970 

01 Arthur Otis Bridgman. Ph.B. 
03 Charles Howard Bur. B.S. 

03 Charlotte Irene Burrows. A.B. 3971 

04 Slixabrth Sarah Burrows. A.B. 2973 

3 Edward Mark Byrne. LL.B. 3973 

Grace Mildred Church. B.P. 3974 

Samuel Jaroes Clark. B.S. 3975 

Bdith Mattie Cobb. A.B. «. 3976 

109 Bdgar l>avldson Congdon. A.B. *. M77 

ao loaogene Msry Contend. Ph.B. 387H 

)ii George Cutler Cool. LL.B. 3979 

111 Mary Ada Cornith (Psrker). B.Mus. 3980 

M3 Henry Dispell Costello. LL.B. 3981 

Harley J. Crane (So 2667 Sup.) LL B. 3982 

)i4 William Bradford Curley. B.Ar. 2983 

)i5 Dennis David Daly. M D. 2984 

)!6 Blixabeth Boyd Dean. Pn.B. 2985 

917 Floyd Fisk Decker. Ph B. 2986 

918 Edwin V. Denick. B Ar 2987 

919 Anna Florilla Dills (Avery). Ph.B. 2988 
9» Helena Evans. Ph.B. 2989 
931 Frsnk Edgar Fisk. Ph.B. 3990 
923 B»tella Louise Foote(Harvie). Ph.B. 2991 

933 Avery Austin Gannett. A.B. 2992 

934 (veorge William Gray. LL B. 2993 
93; Blanche Bdith Gunn. Ph.B 2994 
^ George Marlette Hsifthi A B. 2995 
)37 Leonsrd Titus Haight. LL.B. 

^ Carolyn Augusta Hammond. Ph.B. 2996 

Frsnklyn Parker Hammond (No. 3799 2997 

Sup.) B.Ar. 2998 

09 JamtNewlnnd Harris. Ph.B. 3999 

ty) Frederick Milton Harvey. A.B. « . 3000 

31 Trafton Leroy Hatch. M.D. 3001 

133 Alice Isabel Hszeltine. Ph.B. 3003 

33 Tennie Avery Henderson. Ph.B. 3003 

34 William John Henry. A.B. 3004 
t5 Carrie Auau%ta Hilts. Ph.B. « 3005 

36 Dana Bigelow Hinroan. Ph.B. 3006 

37 William Otto Hinterroister. LL.B. 3007 

38 Rsleigh Warner Holden A.B. 3008 

39 Albert Henry Uollenbcck. A.B. 3009 
Harris Ayers Houghton (No.i3oo).M. D. 3010 

40 Elva Lena Howard. B.S. 301 1 

41 Frsncis Asbui7 Hnlst. A.B. 3013 
43 Herbert Dewart Humphrey. LL.B. 3013 
43 Fsv Rolison Hunt. A B. 3014 
14 Sidney Bggleston Hunt. Ph.B. 3015 
(S Edward Cummings Ide. LL.B. 3016 

46 Alexander Grant Jsckson. A.B. 3017 

47 George McLnuiy Janes. Ph.B. 3018 
It Adelade Svelyn Jeffers. Ph.B. 3019 
•9 William R. Johnson. LL.B. 3030 

50 Janet Lndnda Kevand. Ph.B. 3031 

51 Edith Lydia Kinney. B.S. 3023 
Sa Ernest William Lawton. LL.B. 3033 

Rsrry Sheridan Lee(No.3694Sup.)LL.B.3034 

is ftose Lewis. B.L. 3035 



John Bdw«rd Linauest. LLB. 
James Bryant Mack. A.B> 
Thomss Frank Msnley. M.D. 
Claude Mitchell Marriott. Ph.B. 
Elisabeth Ethel Maynsrd. A.B. 
Joseph Mann Meatvard. LL.B. 
Freaerick Willism Millspaugh. A.B. 
Edwin James Misen. LLB. 
Hallie Gtrdeane Morgan. B.Mus. 
Arthur William Morse. LL.B. 
William John Mulheran. M D. 
Herbert Benjamin Myron. Ph.B. 
Benjamin Edmund Neal. A B. 
Olin Leroy Nesl. A.B. 
*Alvin Jay NefT. A.B. 
Hilda Herrick Noyes. M.D. 
Elisabeth Fredreka Nusbickel (Van 

Slyke). Ph B. 
Francis Elliot Oliver (No. 1018). LL.B 
James Harrison Olmstead. A.B. 
Vincent Stebbius Orvis. LLB. 
Bessie Tifft Paddock. B.L. 
Mayme Pakelnishky. B.L. 
Louis DeForest Palmer. A.B. 
Alfred Harrison Pardons. A B. 
Nicholas Walter Pendergast. M.D. 
William Wellesley Percy. M.D. 
Clarence Perkins. A.B. « 
I va Lena Lowther (Peters). A.B. * 
Mary Isabel Philip. Ph.B. 
Charles Blsinp Piper. M.D. 
Edgar Foster Piper. A.B. 
Alice Olivia Pratt. A.B. 
Major Fred Reed. A.B. 
Cora May Rhodes. B.P. 
Caroline Adelle Kiker. Ph.B. 
Pablo Del Rio. M.D. 
Paul Trescott Robarts. LL B. 
John Levi Robertson. LL.B. 
Ruby Bmeline Robinson. A.B. 
William Carson Robson. A.B. 
George Hunting Rockwell. M.D. 
John Archibald Rodger Ph.B. 
Charles Lyman Root. A.B. 
Maurice Kossmau (No. 3718 Sup.) LL.B. 
Henry Stanton Rcwe, Jr. A.B. 
George Alexander Russell. B.Mus. 
William Rvsn. Ph.B. « 
Prances Adeline Sager(Scrafford). B.Mus. 
Grace Julia Sawyer. Ph B. 
John Watson Scoville. B.S. 
Elizabeth Latimer Shrimpton. M.D. 
Robert William Skinner. Ph.B. 
Horace Wright Bunn Smith, A.B. 
Richard Brihon Smith. LL.B. 
Warren Wellman Smith. A B. 
Carolyn Mabel Spencer. A B. 
Harold Christopher Sprague. B.S. 
Albert Edson Stafford. M.D. 
Charles Edwin Sweet. LL.B. 
Roscoe Conklin Tarbell. M.D. 
John Curtis^cnrant. A.B. ^. 
Eleanor Wsrren Thayer. A.B. ^. 
Floy May Thomas (Rixon). A.B. 
John Royal Thompson. LL B. 
Henry Gleason Thrall. M.D. 
Wesley Davidson Tisdale. A.B. 
Osmand Ira VanKeuren. M.D. 
George Maurice VanSlyke. Ph.B. 
Ida Lottie Van Valkenburg. Ph.B. 
William Abbott Van Wagner. LL.B. 
Loe Abigail Voak. Ph.B. 
Richard Alfred Wsite. Jr. Ph.B. 
Arthur Augustus Webb. Jr. Ph.B. 
Milton Hewitt Wells. Ph.B. 



244 



NUMBRICAI, INDBZ OP GRADUATBS 



1901 {continued) 



3016 Maty Maude White. Ph B. 
3037 Floy Piske Whitney. B.h. 
3oa8 Roscoe Randall Wilcox. I<I<.B. 



3039 Sadie Baker Williama. B.M1M. 

3030 8Ucy Dwight Williamaon. M.D. 

3031 Bcrtna Wilson. B.8. ♦. 



1902 



3037 
3038 



304« 

3043 
3044 
3045 
3046 
3047 
3048 
3049 
3350 

y>st 
3052 
3053 
3054 
3055 
3056 

3057 
3058 

3059 
3060 

3061 



303a Hamilton Lixars Aberdeen. C.B. 

3033 Mary Blixabeth Alderdice. A.B. 

3034 Uavid Hastings At water. M.D. 
303s Lciicr Salisbury Baker. 
3036 Frank Bernard Baldwin. 

Harriet I«ucille Baldwin 

A.B. 
Viucent Kinue Barker. Ph.B. 

3039 *Adelbert William Barlow. Ph.B. 

3040 Sara Lillian Bartow. A.B. 
Vera Harriet Beaman. A.B. 
Bvelyn Bower Beardsley. B.Mus. 
Joseph Peter Behm. A.B. «. 
Welcome Andrew Betts. K«L.B. 
Robert Stephen Boyce. A.B. 
Wilbur Grant Boyd. A.B. 
Neal Brewster. LK«.B. 
Blisabeth Pearl Brown. B.I«. 
Charles King Bull. A.B. 
Thomas Lawrence Burke. LL.B. 
Claude Adelbert Burreit. Ph B. 
Adelbert D. Carpenter. B.S. 
Lewis Brwin Carter. A B 
Pestus Mahlon Chaffee. M.D. 
Howard Uamon Chapman. M.D. 
Wilham DeWitt Cheney. LL.B. 
Charles ]. Clark. C.B. 
Bmma Chambers Clark. M.D. 
Alice Keed Clarke. B.L. 
Francis Ware Clary. B.B. 
Mark Bdwin Conan. LL.B. 

3062 George LeKoy Connell. A.B. 

3063 Samuel Henry Cook. Ph.B. 

3064 James Hammond Cornell, Jr. 

3065 Lorenzo Uana Cornish. C.B. 

3066 Prank James Cregg. LL.B. 
Bd ward M. Culi nan. A.B. 
Charles DePorest Cummings. 
Wesley Leonard Curtisa. B.B. 
Richard Bruce Cuthbert. Ph.B. 
Albert Howe Damon. A.B. ^. 
Matthew Lincoln Dann. A.B ^. 
Clarence Winfield Darling. (No. 

Sup.) LL.B. 
Frederick Thomas DeLnny. 
Bda Amelia Uick. B.Mus. 
Carl Elijah Dorr (No a779Sup.) LLB. 
Carrie Douglass. Ph. B. 

3076 George Francis DuBoi:». A.B. ^. 

3077 Prank Banker Du vail. A.B. 

3078 Adelbert David Dye. Jr. Ph B. 

3079 Edward Danforth Eddy. Ph.B. 

3080 DavtOM Ellis. A.B 

3081 Phillip Erhard. M.D. 

3082 Albert Henry Evans. M.D. 
Solomon Ferguson. Ph.B. ^. 
Phoebe Annie Ferris. M.D. 
Anna Lodema Flint. Ph.B. 
Anna Elizabeth Foote. Ph.B. 
Margaret Evaus Fox. Ph B. 
Margaret Freeman. Ph B. 
Edmund Leavenworth French. 
Ada Nellie Fnnk. Ph.B. 
Amanda Nettie Prink. B.S. 
William Terry Fulkerson. M.D. 
Georgians Fulmer. A.B. 



3067 
3068 
3069 
3070 

3071 
3072 



3073 
3074 

3075 



3094 
3095 
3096 

B.S. 3097 
Ph.B. 3096 

(Van Slyke). 3099 
3100 



3101 
3102 
3103 

3104 
3105 
3106 
3107 
3108 



3109 
3110 

3111 
31x2 

3"3 
3t«4 
3"5 
3"6 

31 17 

31 18 

3119 

3130 
3131 
3133 

3"3 
3134 

3"5 
3126 

3127 
3128 
3129 
3130 
3 13 1 
2773 3132 
3133 



LL.B. 



A.B. 



A.B. «. 



3083 
3084 
3085 
3086 
3087 
3088 
308Q 

3090 
3091 

309a 

3093 



B.S. 



3134 
3135 
3136 
3137 
3138 
3139 
3140 
3MI 
3»42 
3M3 
3144 

314s 
3140 

3147 
3148 

3149 
3150 
3«5i 
3152 
3»53 
3154 
315s 



Mary Gertrude Gardner. Ph.B. 
Ernest Frederick George. B.Mm. 
Charlotte Finn Gere. A.B. 
Frederick Giffin. B.Ax. 
Thomas Cook Gifford. M.D. 
Elisabeth Huestia Goodale. BX. 
Helen Green. A.B. 
Jay Lamont Gregory (No. 3797 Sn^) 

LL.B. 
Eddie Darius HaU. M.D. 
Nettie CHaU. A.B. 
William Alexander Hall. B.B. 
William McDowell Halaey. Jr. 1I.D. 
George Thomas Hargitt. Fn.B. *. 
Ruth Vera Hawks. Ph.B. 
Philetus Martin Heifer. Ph.B. 
Katharine Nathalie Hewitt. AJ. 
Carrie AugnsU HilU (No. 2935 8011.) 

A.B. 
Raymond Newman Hodcenberry. BJU. 
Arthur Roe Horton. A.B. *. 
Clara Klisabeth Hoakins. A.B. 
Homer Doliver House B.S. 
Clarence Edmund Howard. B.Ar. 
Lydia Grace Huff. A.B. 
Lulu Norton Hull. A.B. 
Irvins Ernest Hurst. LL3. 
Theodore Irwin, Jr. M.D. 
Lynn Everett leuniaon. A.B. 
Edith Frances Jones. A.B. 
Ethel KellogK (BenedictJ. A.B. 
Daniel Rolfe Kennedy, Jr. A.B. 
Chester Chaffee Kent U.B. 
Helen Marie Keough. B.Mus. 
Ansel Reddy Kinne. A.B. 
William Henry Kirkwood. Pb.B. 
Harold Glenn Kline. M.D. 

iessie Adelle Knapp. B.S. 
'redcrick Henry Knoff. Ph.B. 
Charles Dean Laidlaw. M.D 
Edward Cyrille LaPorte. M.D. 
Frank D^^id Lawyer. A.B. 
Jennie Olivia Lewis. Ph.B. 
Fred Bernard Loren. C.B. 
Edgar Allen Lowther. A.B. f. 
May Louise McChesney. B.Moi. 
Mae Rosamond Mc^kron. Ph.B. 
Mary Edna McKinley. Ph.B. *. 
Mary Ellen McMahon. Ph.B. 
Theodore Douglas MacGregor. PIlI. 
Mary Dearstyne Mackensie. Ph.B. 
Arthur Burrill Mason. A.B. 
Mary Elisabeth Mason. A.B. 
Eli Delbert Maybee. B P. 
Lillian Mary Mead. Ph.B. 
August Herkimer MerrilL LLJI. 
Thomas Hayes Mesick. M.D 
Edna Elisabeth Miller. B.M11S. 
Clara Marie Morgan. Ph.B. 
Pannie Duncan Morgan. Ph.B. 
Wilbur Corkran NoMe. A.B. 
Florence Allegra Nottingham. B.Mtf. 
Daisy May Noxon. A.B. 
Jason Baaford Parrish. Ph B. 
Eunice Rachel Pearson. Ph.B. 
Jessie Pearl Pease. Ph.B. 



NtJMB&ICAI. INDBX OF GRADUATES 



245 



1902 (continued) 



William Mace Peckhftm. i;,L.B. 
Frank Spenser P er ry (No. 9847 Sap.) 

I.L.B. 
Raymond Weaver Phelps. Ph.B. 

Albert Dana Phillips. A.B. 

Merton WInfield Pierce. I«L.B. 

Bda Pinxer. B.Mas. 

Marr Adelaide Piper. B.S. 

WiUiam Hart Platxer. B.S. 

Charles Dayton Post. Ph.B. 

Samuel Aaron Potter. Ij:#.B. 

Mary Elisabeth Preston. Ph.B. 

Geneveret Quick (Carpenter). Ph.B. 

George Bverett Quick. B 8. 

Mabel Ritchie Ramsey. B.Mas. 

Florence Reed (Munro). B.L. 

Jostina Winifred Reynolds. Ph.B. 

Sumner Rhoades. B.S. 

Blla May Rich (Hodge). B.L. 

Bva Gertrude Richardson. Ph.B. 

Ardeen B. Richmond. A.B. 

Denison Richmond. LL.B, 

Joseph Breen Ringland. M.D. 

Mande Ripton. B. Mus. 

Marguerite Beebe Risley. Ph.B. 
5179 Fsy Niles Robinson. Ph.B. 
31I0 Gertrude Robinson. Ph.B. *. 
3181 Willism Wellington Robinson. A.B. 
}iS3 John Wenley Root. A.B. 
3183 Walter King Root. A.B. 
31I4 Aaron Morton Sakolski. Ph.B. 

3185 Stanley Wilson Sayer. M.D. 

3186 William Dennis fk^nlon. A.B. 
318? Delmar Roy Shaffer. B.S. 

3188 Frsnk R4P>ady Sherman. A.B. 
3x89 William G. Siddell. A B. «. 



313^ 



J»57 

V» 
3160 

3161 

3163 

3»63 
3164 

3166 

3167 
3I6B 

3169 

3»7o 
JX71 
3»7J 
3173 
SI74 
3175 
317* 

3178 



3»90 
3191 
3192 
3193 
3194 



3195 

3196 
3197 
3»98 
3199 

3300 

3201 
3202 
3203 
3»4 

3»5 
3206 

3207 
3308 
3209 
3310 
3311 

3313 
3213 
3214 
3215 



3216 

3217 
3218 
3219 
3330 



Ross Lowe Simons. LL.B. 

Murlin Sevmour Smallwood. LL.B. 

Cora Bmily Soper. A.B. 

Msv Spring. A.B. *. 

William Hamilton Squires. B.B. 

Harry Marvin SUcy (No. 3863 Sup.) 

LL.B. 
.Helen Theresa Stahlberger. A.B. 
Allen Dorman Steele (No. 1331). LL.B. 
Henry Ray nor Stevens. H.E. 
Harry Howlett Stone. LL.B. 
Charles Albert Sweet. M.D. 
Albert George Swift. M.D. 
Abbie Msy Tslbot. B.S. 
Charles Nelson Thomas. A.B. 
George Muskgrove Thompson. LL.B. 
Eunice Evelyn Titus. Ph.B 
Charles Ellin Toney. Ph.B. 
Hobart Pisnk Transue. B.E. 
Edwin Phinoey Valkenburgh. B.Ar. 
May VsnDoren Ph.B. *. 
Ruth Castner Voorhees. B.S. 
Ralph Edmound Wager. A.B. *. 
Charle)< Frederick Walter. Ph.B. 
Cornelia Carhart Ward. Ph.B. *. 
Albert Henry Watkins. A.B. 
Clara Kimber Watkins. A.B 
Helen Anna Weed. A.B. 
Anna Bowden White. M D. 
Morgan Allen Wilcox (No. 3881 Sup.) 

LL.B. 
Homer Talmage Wilmot. A.B. 
*Edward Ralph Wiite. LL.B. 
James Benjamin Woodruff. B.S. 
Royal Dwight Woolsey. A.B. 
Johanna Zimmer. B.L. 



3MI 

3W 

503 
3224 



$"7 
3»9 

3232 
3233 

3>34 
3235 

5239 

32«o 

3241 
3242 
3243 
3244 

3246 
3247 
3248 
3249 

33)0 



3^1 
3a5a 
3^ 



Georgia May Allen. B L. 
Blida Grace Ames. B. P. 
Peter Austin Anderson. LL.B. 
Lillian May Arthur. Ph.B. 
Marcellus Raymond At well. LL.B. 
Floyd Bent ley Avery. A.B. 
Clifford Aztell. LL.B. 
Steven Bcckwith Ayres. A.B. 
Lncy Blla Babcock. Ph.B. 
May Belle Baker. A.B. 
*Bdward Richard Barber. A.B. 
Frank Stone Barton. B.E. 
Bertha Louise Beach. A.B. ♦. 
Elisabeth Berry. Ph.B. ♦. 
Dorothea Berdella Bloomer. B.P. 
Elmer Jeremiah Bond. Ph . B. 
Mabelle CUir Bond. Ph.B. 
Eva Marie Clarissa Born. B. Mus. 
Sarah Mabel Bonck. Ph.B. 
Bthel DaisT Bowles. A B. 
Harry VanScoy Boyd. A.B. 
Clifford Ernest Branch. Ph.B. 
Harry Jay Brayton. M.D. 
Ancil D. Brown. A.B. 
Charles Silas Bryan, Jr. B.S. ♦. 
William Adam Biicheler. Ph.B. 
George Cook Carhsrt. B.E. 
Manleir Barl Carr. B.8. 
Howard Gregory Case. M.D. 
Mildred Bice Chapman. Ph.B. 
Alice Reed Clarke (No. 3059 Sup.) 

Ph B. •. 
Frsnk Bdgar Clarke. Ph.B. 
Charles Bomund Collerd. A.B. 
Jos< Benet Coldn. LL.B. 



1903 

3254 
3255 

3256 
3257 
325B 

.3259 
3260 

3361 
3263 
3263 
3264 
3265 
3266 
3267 
3268 
3269 
3270 
3271 
3272 
3273 
3274 

3275 
3376 



3277 
327B 

3279 
3280 

3381 

3383 

3283 

3284 
328$ 
3286 



Guy Comfort. Ph.B., 
Harry Wescott Council. B.E. 
Harvey Francis Connell. E.B. 
Edith May Cooney. Ph.B. 
Ross Watson Copeland. E.B. 
Harold Davenport Cornwall. LL.B. 
Elisabeth Alice Cunningham. A.B. 
Edward Day Curtis. A.B. ♦. 
Charles Erwin Curtiss. M.D. 
Elizabeth Vernera Darrow. A.B. ♦. 
Katherine Anne Davies. Ph.B. 
Arthur Ever* tt Davis. B.S. 
JudNon Percival Davis. B.L. 
Walter William Davis. M.D. 
David Orcutt Decker. Ph.B. 
Walter Whitney Dibble. A.B. 
Sarah Madeline Donovan. A.B. 
Charles Montague Doyle. LL.B. 
Prank Melvin Bdson. A.B. 
Harry Stanton Edwards. LL.B. 
Harry Edward Blden. Ph.B. 
Lura Burroughs Bmens. Ph.B. 
James Barrett Emerick. LL.B. 
Pear! Mary Foster (No. 3793 Snp.) 

M.D. 
Vern Seeley Fowler. A.B. ♦. 
James Franklin Freeborn. A.B. 
John Newton French. B.B. 
Lynn Lxle Fulkerson. A.B. 
PrancesLouise Fuller. Ph.B. 

{ohn Trerablev Gardner. LL.B. 
>on Bddy Giftn. Ph.B 
Clifford Lsurier Gladman. LL.B. 
Claribel Glass (Blossom). Ph.B. «. 
Angeline C. Golly. A.B. 



24^ 



NUMERICAI, INDBX OF GRADUATES 



1903 (continued) 



Clinton Bddy Goodwin (No.a793 Sup.) 3346 



M.D. 
Charles Augustus Hahl. Ph.B. 

3388 Lton Prauk Haley. A.B. 

3389 Merchant BilliDgton Ball. LL.B. 

3390 William Pitt Hall. Jr. M.D. 
Burke Coonley Hamilton. B.S. 
Welcome Anson Hanor. M.D. 
Irma Walton Hard. Ph.B. 
Harlin Andrew Harris. M.D. 
Lasher Hart. M.D. 
Alanson Cyr Haughton. ]«L.B. 
Frank Ross Haviland. M.D. 
Harvey Nathaniel Henderson. 

LL.B. 
Koval Leslie Henderson. B S. 
Irving JacksOQ Higbee. LL.B. 
Grove Whiitemore Hinman. LL.B. 
Annie Elizabeth Hubble. Ph.B. 
Leon David Huestis. Ph.B. 
Herbert Everard Jackman. Ph.B. 
Philip Peter Jacobs. A.B ♦. 
Leola S. Jermy. Ph.B 
^ . Gerrard silas Johnson. LL.B 

3308 William Herbert Johnson. LL.B. 

3309 Oranr Edgar Tones. A.B. ^. 
Miriam Kaufiman. A.B. 
Bertha Vilas Knapp. Ph B. 
Florence Robinson Knapp. Ph.B. 
Hugo William Koehler. A.B. 
Clarke Skinner Lankton. B.B. 

^.^ Saul R. Lavine. LL.B. 

3316 Hugh Hhgen Lenahan. M.D. 

Jacob Joshua Levy (No. 3823 Sup.) 
M D. 



3291 

3*93 
3294 
3^95 
3396 
3*97 
3398 

3399 
3300 
3301 

330a 
3303 
3304 
3305 
3306 
3307 



33»o 
33" 
33i« 
3313 
33M 
33»5 



3347 
3348 

3349 
3350 
3351 
335a 
3353 
3354 

335) 
3356 
3357 
3358 
3359 
3360 
3361 
336a 
3363 
3364 
33^ 
3366 

US 

3369 
3370 
3371 
337a 
3373 
3374 
3375 
3376 
3377 
3378 
3379 



Caroline Bmnw Pienon. 
Sarah Gardner PieraoB. M.D. 
Isabella Mary Pike. PhJi. «b 
Stella Lydia Haven Post 
Walter Howard Powtealaad. 
Henry Bell Pntt. M.D. 
William Frederick Prooty. 
Camilla Qnsckenbasb. M.D. 
lohn Artnur Randolph. R S. 
Major Fred Reed (No. agte tapj y 
Viletta CUrke Reed. PbTl 
Cornelia Howe Rice. B.8. 
Daniel Judson RichArdaon. IfcJL 
Schuyler Parshall Richnoad. MA 




William Fraser I^wis (No. 2965 Sup.) 3380 



LL.B. 

Archibald Lindsey. A.B. 

Thomas Hill Low. LL.B 

William Charles Lowe. Ph.B. 

Justin Sebastian McCarthy. A.B. 

Clara Virginia McClelland. Ph.B. 

William Harvey McClelland. B.S. ♦. 

Clair Steven McGavern. LL.B. 

Eva Ferris Magee. A.B. 

Gene Ethel Markham. A.B 

Flora Mitchell Metcalf. Ph.B. 
,,., James Middleton. A.B. 
3328 Lillian Marion Miller. M.D. 
3339 Daniel Blizard Mills. B.S. 
3330 ♦John Alexander Molloy. LL.B. 

Ann Isabelle Moore. fh.B. 

George Robert Morris. B.Ar. 

Herbert Benjamin Myron (No. 2965 
Sup.) LL.B. 

George Herbert Nelson. Ph.B. 

William lUrry Neville. MD. 

Frederick Herbert Nichols. M D. 

Frederick Henry Nusbickle. A.B. 

Stephen Clifford Orrasbee. LL.B. 
333§ Grin Ephraim Page. A.B. 
3339 Joseph Coolidge Palmer. M.D. 
334U Carolyn Janet Paterson. A.B. 

3341 Mary Ethel Peaslee. B.L. 

3342 James Clinton Peet. E.E. 

3343 John Gilbert Pembleton. Ph.B. 

3344 Albert Edward Petrie. E.E. 

3345 Duane Forrest Phelps. A.B. 



33*7 
3318 
3319 
33» 
33ai 
3322 
3323 
3324 

3325 
3326 

3327 



3331 
3332 



3333 
3334 
333.S 
3336 
3337 



3381 
3382 
3383 
33**4 
3385 
3386 

3387 
3388 

3389 
3390 

3391 
3352 

3393 
3394 

33! 



3397 
3398 

.3399 
3400 

3401 
3402 



3403 
3404 
3405 

3406 
3407 
3408 
3409 



Charles Carter RoUi 
Ray Ho!«kiB8 Rnliami. PhJ. 
Ruth Blva Russinn. Ph.B 
Lydia Hannah SchKfer. 
Edward Schceneck UU.B. 
Irma Matilda SchoepfliB. BlS. 
Albert Roe Seaman. Ph.Bi 
Bbssie Mabel Seely. LL Bl 
Jennie Gray Seely. M.U. 
Lnella Scott Sexsmith. PhJ. 
Elwood Ward Sbafer. A.B. 
Roy Kisor Sheffield. Ph.B. 
Floyd Curtiss Sherman. A.B. 
John Wesley Short. M.D. 
Charles Drake Skinner. A.B. #. 
Francis Hall Slater. LL.B. 
♦Carrie Elizabeth Smalley. Ph.B. t^ 
Bva llaHon Smith. Ph.B. 
Frederick William Smith. M.D. 
Henry Oliver Smith. LL.B. 
Edward Snjrder. LL B. 
Herbert Clinton 8oale> K.B. 
Cynthia Steers. M.D. 
George Henry Stephens. M.D. 
George Burden Stevena. AJI, 
Walter Addison Stevens. Ph3. 
Alexander McLaren BIcwait. lUk 
Frederick Darwin Stone. XJI. -' 
Myrile Coiette Stone. Ph.B. ^ 

Marcus Beeman Stont, BJkr. **1- 
George Bennett Strait. BlB. - ^ 
Marion Auguata Sturdevnat. AK"^ 
Ernest Henry Sumner. A.BL - * 
Clinton Jay Taft. Ph.B. •. 
Henry Robert Templeton. Ph A 
Arthur Morgan Townsend. A.B. 
Harold Amasa Townaend. A.B. 
Arthur Scott ViaU. LL.B. 
Stella Hoag Walrath. B.Moa. 
Harrv Glen Weeks B B. 
Ralph Rogers Wella B.P. 
Albion Merrill Wendell. LL B. 
Arthur William Whalen. B.Ar. 
Edward Manafield Wharif. B.S. 
Courtney Duane Whittemore. (No. 

3738 Sup) LL.B. 
Lynn Boyd Wikoff. B.S. 
Chester wilcoz. LL.B. 
William La Vay wise. Ph a 
Kari DwightWood (No. 1884 Siii>.)M'I'' 
Gertrude May Woodford Ph.B. 
Jeasie Castle Worden. Ph.B. *• 
Laura Henrietta Young. Ph.B. 
Nana Catherine Yonng. B.S. 




[jUAS W5 VA^'^T 



THE NEW YORK 

PUBLICLIPKARY 






f r 



DUPLICATE DEGREES 

[Ni Record, p. 577. 

ENT, 1898-1903. 
persons who have received more than one first degeee : 

Bradley Aylesworlh. 1897 A.B. 1899 LL.B. 
les Edwin Cooney. 1897 Ph.B. 1899 LL.B. 
srick Parmenter Schenck. 1895 A.B. 1899 LL.B. 
am Dewey Alsever. 1896 B S. 1900 M.D. 
am Avery Groat. 1897 B.S. 1900 M.D. 
Gary Boland. 1899 Ph.B. 1901 LL.B. 
mt DePaul Brady. 1899 Ph.B. 1901 LL.B. 
iy J. Crane. 1899 Ph.B. 1901 LL.B. 
klyn Parker Hammond. 1900 A.B. 1901 B.Ar. 
f Sheridan Lee. 1899 A.B. 1901 LL.B. 
cis Elliot Oliver. 1891 Ph.B. 1901 LL.B. 
ice Rossman. 1899 A.B. 1901 LL.B. 
nee Winfield Darling. 1900 A.B. 1902 LL.B. 
Elijah Dorr. 1900 A.B. 1902 LL.B. 
4imont Gregory. 1900 A.B. 1902 LL.B. 
e Augusta Hilts. 1901 Ph.B. 1902 A.B. 
k Spenser Perry. 1900 A.B. 1902 LL.B. 
Y Marvin Stacy. 1900 A.B. 1902 LL.B. 
i Dorman Steele. 1895 B.S. 1902 LL.B. 
;an Allen Wilcox. 1900 Ph.B. 1902 LL.B. 
Reed Clarke. 1902 B.L. 1903 Ph.B. 
Mary Poster. 1900 Ph.B. 1903 M.D. 
on Eddy Goodwin. 1900 A.B. 1903 M.D. 
) Joshua Levy. 1900 Ph.B. 1903 M.D. 
am Fraser Lewis. 1899 Ph.B. 1903 LL.B. 
ert Benjamin Myron. 1901 Ph.B. 1903 LL.B. 
r Fred Reed. 1901. A.B. 1903 B.Ar. 
tney Duane Whittemore. 1899 A.B. 1903 LL.B. 
Dwight Wood. 1900 A.B. 1903 M.D. 



GRADUATES IN CERTIFICATE COURSES 

Class of 1898 

ic KATE DEANE ANDREW 

Born 1865 at Charles City, Iowa. Student from Buffalo, N. Y., 18964. 
Certificate in Library Economy. 
Librarian of Steele Memorial Library, Ehnira, N. Y., since 1899. 
Married 1889, Sanford H. Andrew of Dubuque, Iowa. 
Child t Dean Hamilton, born 14 Dec. 1891. 
Residence, Elmira, N. Y. 

Class op 1899 

2C MARY ETHEL ABBOTT 

1897-9. Certificate in Library Economy. (See Alumni Record, No. %t 
and Faculty Record, p. 107 Sup., College of Liberal Arts.) 

3C EUGENIA BAKER (BERWALD) 

1895-9. Certificate in Vocal Music and Theory. 

(Sec Faculty Record, p. 127 Sup., College of Fine Arts.) 

4C MINNIE LAVINIA KELLOGG 

Student from Carthage, N. Y., 1897-9. Certificate in Library Bconomy. 
Assistant in Reference department, Public Library, Syracuse, N. Y. 
Residence, Syracuse, N. Y. 

5C ♦ADA MARIA LUCAS 

Bom 28 Oct. 1875 at Chicago, 111. Student from Mexico, N. Y. (Stf 
Antonio, Tex.), 1896-9. Certificate in Library Economy. 
Died June (902 at San Antonio, Texas. 

6c ELLEN ESTHER MORTON (WILLEY) 

Born 4 Feb. 1862 at Cazenovia, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, N. Y., ifl 
College of Fine Arts, 1885-6 and 1897-8 ; in College of Liberal Arts, 1897-9- 
Certificate in Library Economy. 

Pastor's Asst., University Ave. Meth. Epis. Church, 189^1901. 

Married 4 September 1902, A. C. Willey (No. 1720) of Ancram, N. Y. 

Residence, Ancram, N. Y. 

7c CHRISTINA VAN ALEN OAKLBY 

Bom 16 Mar. 1874 at Salisbury Mills,N. Y. Student from Newbtuylii ^' 
Y., 1897-9. r ♦ B. Certificate in Library Economy. 



GRADUATES IN CKRTIPICATB COURSRS 249 

brary Work : In Public Library, Syracuse, N. Y., 1899. Asst. in New- 
5h Free Library, Newburgh. N. Y., since June 1901. 
esidence, 73 Grand St,, Newburgh, N. Y. 

8c MARY ESTELLE TODD 

« 

dm 20 Feb. 1877 at Parisb, N. Y. Student from Parish, 1895-9 ; in 
rary Course 1897-9. Certificate in Library Economy. 
I Syracuse Public Library, 
eadence. 

Class of 1900 
9c ruby ann bannister 

»m 9 May 1877 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, 1898-1900. 
ificate in Library Economy, 
lokkeeper, C. E. Eager's Jewelry Store, 
isidence, 135 >i Holland St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

IOC MARY ELIZABETH HOPKINS (FENTON) 

>m 15 Mar. 1879 ^^ Palmyra, N. Y. Student from Palmyra, 1898-1901. 

ificate in Library Economy. 

ith Booklovers' Library, Des Moines, Iowa, 1901. 

irried 17 June 1903, Edward H. Fenton of Brookline, Mass. 

isidence, 9 Shailer St., Brookline, Mass. 

lie HELEN BERTHA JOHNSON 

tm 7 December 1876. Student from Geneva 1 895-1900. Certificate in 

ting. 

wdence, 

1 20 EMMA AURELIA LEE (WALKER) 

98-1900. Certificate in Library Economy. (See Faculty Record, p. 107. 
, College of Liberal Arts.) 

13c LUA CHAMBERLAIN NOYES 

m 25 Jan. 1876 at Seneca Falls, N. Y. Student from Rochester, N. Y., 
-1900. r ^ B. Certificate in Vocal Music and Theory of Music. 
eddence, 283 Alexander St., Rochester, N. Y. 

14c MINNIE LUELLA ROBERTS 

998-1900. Certificate in Library Economy, (See Faculty Record^p. 107. 
}.t College of Liberal Arts.) 

15c MARTHA BELLE SCOTT (HASKELL) 

Born 29 NoTember 1870 at S3rracuse, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, 
9^1900. Certificate in Organ and Theory of Music. 
Htrried 29 Apr. 1903, William Mowry Haskell of Glens Falls, N. Y. 
^^k«U— Theodore Scott, bom 20 Apr. 1903 ; died 23 Apr. 1903. 
Residence, Glena Palls, N. Y. 



250 GRADUATES IN CBRTIFICATB COURSES I9OI 

Class of 1901 

i6c ELRENI WAVE BURTCH 

Born 21 Sept. 1870 at Halls Corners, N. Y. Student from Branchport, 
N. Y., 1 899-1 90 1. Certificate in Normal Art. 

Teacher of Music, Public Schools Penn Yan, N. Y., 1902-1905. Snper- 
visor of Music and Drawing, Public Schools, Herkimer, N. Y., since 1903. 

Residence, Herkimer, N. Y. 

17c ♦SARAH GERTRUDE CONNELL 
Born 14 Aug. 1878 at Lysander, N. Y. Student f rom Baldwinsville, N. Y., 
1899-1901. KKF. Certificate in Library Economy. 
Died 27 Feb. 1904 at Baldwinsville, N. Y. 

i8c EUGENIA ELIZABETH HALLOCK 

Born 9 Nov. 1879 at Cayuga, N. Y. Student from Fulton, N. Y., 189^ 
1 901. Certificate in Library Economy. 
Teacher at Somers Center, N. Y., since 1902. 
Residence, Fulton, N. Y. 

• 

19c ELIZABETH FAESCH SCHAEFER 

Born 12 June 1879 ^° Prov. Espirato Santo, Brazil, S. A. Student from 
Syracuse. N. Y., 1895-6 and 1900-01. Certificate in Decorative Design. 

Artist with Beck Eng. Co., Phila., Pa., 1902-3 ; with Historical Publish- 
ing Co., Phila., since May, 1903. 

Residence, 3725 Powelton Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. 

20C CELIA SCHOENFELD 

Born 4 May 1881 at Columbus, O. Student from Johnstown, Pa.. 
1S99-1901. Certificate in Library Economy. 
Residence, 543 Vine St., Johnstown, Pa. 

21C MABEL LOUISE STOUT 

Bom 18 May 1877 at Waverly, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, N. Ym 
1 899- 1 90 1. Certificate in Library Economy. 

Librarian of the ** Engineering Library '* connected with the Gencril 
Electric Co. at Schenectady, N. Y., since 1901. 

Residence, 431 Liberty St., Schenectady, N. Y. 

22c GRACE LILIAN WHITE 

Born 1870 at Western, N.Y. Student from Rome, N. Y., 1896-1901, 
four years ; three years in the Painting Course and one year in Normal Art 
Certificate in Normal Art. 

Teacher of Painting at Rome, N. Y., 1901-2. Teacher of Dnwia^* 
Union and High School, Newark, N. Y., since 1902. 

Residence, Newark, N. Y. 



I 



903 GRADUATBS IN CBRTIFICATK COURSES 25I 

23c RUTH WORDEN 

Born 5 JaDoaiy 1879 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Syracnse, 
899-1901. Certificate in Normal Art. 

Graduate student one half year. Special Teacher of Drawing, Geueva, 
r. Y., 1903-4. 

Residence, Amsterdam, N. Y. 



Class op 1902 
24c harriet louise andrews 

Born 13 Apr. 1881 at Memphis, N. Y. 

Student from Syracqse, N. Y., in College of Fine Arts, 1899-1900 ; in 
oUege of Liberal Arts, 1900-2. IIB*. Certificate in Library Economy. 
Residence, 1815 W. Genesee St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

25c MARY EMMA BAKER 

Bom 1877 at Clinton. N. Y. Studentjfrom Clinton, 1900-2. Certificate 
I Normal Art. 

Asst. Preceptress, High School, Mexico,N. Y., since 1902. 
Residence, Clinton, N. Y. 

26c MARCIA MANNING BALDWIN 

Bom 23 June 1882 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, 1900-2. 
ertificate in Library Economy. 
Residence, 520 Oak St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

27c MAUDE EMMA BLOOMINGDALE 

1900-2. Certificate in Library Economy. (See Faculty Record,p. 109 Sup., 
oUege of Liberal Arts. ) 

28c FRANCES HENRIETTA ELLIS 

Bom 5 Oct. 1882 at Rome, N. Y. Student from Rome, 1900-2. KKF. 
lertificate in Library Economy. 

Asst. Librarian of Jervis Library, Rome,vN. Y., 1903. 
Residence, 109 N. Jay St., Rome, N. Y. 

29c ANNA ELSBREE 

Bom 22 July 1877 at Towanda, Pa. Student from Dauby, N. Y., 1900-2. 

Certificate in Library Economy. 

Rendence, 713 Crouse Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

30c MAY ELIZABETH GLAHN 

^dentfrom Syracuse, N. Y., 1900-2. 
Certificate in Decorative Design, 
^ewdcncc, Fnlton, N. Y. 



2^2 GRADUATES IN CB&TIPICATB COTJRSB8 t^ 

31C BERTHA JUNE GOODRICH 
Bom 6 June 1882 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, 1900-2. 
Certificate in Library Economy. 
Residence, 103 Comstock Place, Syracuse, N. Y. 

32c PHEBE SQUIRES HALL (VALENTINE) 

Born 28 Dec. 188 1 at Saranac Lake, N. Y. Student from Saranac Lake, 
1900-2. Certificate in Library Economy. 

Asst. Editor of *' Modes and Fabrics ** and ** Gardiner* s Magazine" 
1902-15 Apr. 1903. 

Married 30 Apr. 1903, W. S. Valentineof Danbury, Conn. 

Residence, 35 Deer Hill Ave., Danbury, Conn. 

33c CAROLINE JENKINS* 

Born 6 May 1879 at Red Creek, N. Y. Student from Red Creek, 1900^ 
Certificate in Normal Art. 

Student in Normal Art advanced course, 1902-3. Teacher of Drawini, 
High School, Utica, N. Y., since i May 1903. 

Residence, Utica, N. Y. 

34c LILLIA MARWICK OLCOTT 

1899-1902. Certificate in Decorative Design. (See Faculty Record, p.ijp 
Sup., College of Fine Arts. ) 

35c ANGELINE BERTRICE RANDALL 

1898- 1 902. Certificate in Library Economy. (See Faculty Record, p. 109 
Sup., College of Liberal Arts ) 

36c EDITH CHATHAM STACKUS 

Born 7 May 1880 at Skaneateles, N. Y. Student from Skaneateles, 1900-2. 
Certificate in Library Economy. 
Asat. Librarian in Seymour Library, Auburn, N. Y., since i Dec* 1901 
Residence, Auburn, N. Y. 

37c ALICE MACDOUGAL WARNER 

1899-1902. Certificate in Library Economy. (See Faculty Record, p. 109 
Sup., College of Liberal Arts.) 



Class of 1903 

38c BERTHA EMILY BELL 

Bom 17 May 1883 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, 1899-19^ 
Certificate in Piano and Theory of Music. 
Continuing studies in College of Fine Arts. 
Residence, 1009 E. Adams St. , Syracuse, N. Y. 



GRADUATIS IN CBRTIFICATB COURSB8 t$$ 

39c JESSIE MAY DAY 
n 19 Sept. 1881 at Seneca Palls, N. Y. Student from Seneca Palls, 
3. KA6. Certificate in Library Economy. 

iployed in the Bloomingdale Branch of the New York City Public 
ry, 1904-. 
lidence, Bloomingdale Branch, Public Library, New York, N. Y. 

40C EDITH MAY DUCKETT 

-n I May 1879. Student from Skaneateles, N. Y., 1901-3. Certificate 

corative Design. 

ridence, Skaneateles, N. Y. 

41C HARRIET LAFOU ENGLISH 

n 23 Sept. 1883 at Boon ton, N. J. Student from Boon ton, 1 901-3. 

icate in Library Economy. 

the American Geographical Library, New York, N. Y. 

ddence, Boonton, N. J. 

42c BESSIE MARGARET HAWLEY 

n 17 Feb. 1883 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, 1901-3. 

icate in Libra ly Economy. 

dent in College of Liberal Arts since 1903. 

ddence, 206 McAllister Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

43c GRACE GERE HAWLEY 

n 26 Jan. 1882 at Port Leyden, N. Y., Student from Syracuse, N. Y., 
i course in Painting, 1 899-1901 ; in the course in Decorative Design, 
3. A^. Certificate in Decorative Design, 
ddence, 718 Crouse Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

44c MINNIE ISABEL McCUTCHEON 

119 Mar. 1883 at Arcade, N.Y. Student from Arcade, 1901-3. Certifi- 
n Normal Art. 
ddence. Arcade, N. Y. 

45c LILLIE JANE McMAHON 

1-3. Certificate in Library Economy. (See Faculty Record, p. 1 12 
College of Liberal Arts. ) 

46c FLORA BELLE MOYER 

)i-3. Certificate in Library Economy. (See Faculty Record, p. 1 12 
, Collie of Liberal Arts.) 

47c FRANCES ELEANOR MYERS 

ni 29 June 1883 at Carthage, N. Y. Student from Watertown, N. Y., 
-3* Certificate in Library Economy, 
ddence, 17 Stone St., Watertown, N. Y. 



254 GRADUATES IN CBRTIPICATB COURS88 I903 

LILUAN MARWICK OLCOTT 
1902-5. Certificate in Normal Art. (See No. 34c) 

48c KATHARINE ETHEI. PICARD 

Bom 1884 at Columbus, O. Student from Syracuse, N.Y., 1901-3. Certifi- 
cate in Decorative Design. 

Residence, 601 S. Warren St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

49c ANNA MEKEEL SEARS 

Born 1879 at Searsburg, N. Y. Student from Ithaca, N. Y., 1901-3. Cer- 
tificate in Library Economy. 
Residence, Litchfield, Conn. 

50c LAURA ELLEN SHELDON 

Bom 15 Sept. 1882 at Weedsport, N. Y. Student from Weedsport, 1901-3. 
Certificate in Normal Art. 
Residence, Weedsport, N. Y. 

51C CAMILLA ELLA SNELL 

Born 3 Dec. 1880 at Fort Plain, N. Y. Student from Fort Plain, 1 901-3. 
Certificate in Normal Art. 
Residence, Fort Plain, N. Y. 

52c ELLA SYLVIA WEBSTER. 

Born 26 Aug. 1881 at Syracuse, N. Y. Student from Syracuse, 1901-3. 
Certificate in Library Economy. 

Substitute in various Branch Libraries in New York during summer ol 
1903. Cataloguing the '* Jacob Riis Tenement Chapter Library," a library 
under the supervision of the King's Daughters. With Pendry & Co., 
Publishers, Rochester, N. Y. 

Residence, Care of Pendry & Co., Rochester, N. V. 

53c FLORENCE JULIA WHEATON.' 

1901-3. Certificate in Library Economy. (See Faculty Record, p. xx3 
Sup., College of Liberal Arts.) 



UMERICAL INDEX OF GRADUATES 
IN CERTIFICATE COURSES 

1898 

ic Kate Deane Andrew Library Bconomy 

1899 

3C Mary Ethel Abbott . . Library Bconomy 

3c Eugenia Baker Berwald Vocal Music and Theory 

4c Minnie Lavlnia Kellogg Library Economy 

5c *Ada MaMa Lucas " 

6c Ellen Esther Morton (Willey) 

7c Christina Van Allen Oakley 



II 

«« i« 

ti tt 



8c Mary Estella Todd 



II << 



1900 

9c Ruby Ann Bannister Library Bconomy 

IOC Mary E. Hopkins (Penton) " " 

lie Helen Bertha Johnson Drawing and Painting 

I3C Emma Aurelia L«e Library Economy 

13c Lua Chamberlain Noyes Vocal Music and Theory 

I4C Minnie Luel la Roberts Library Economy * 

15c Martha Belle Scolt Organ and Theory 

. 1901 

i6c Bireni Wave Burtch Normal Art 

17c *Satah Gertrude Connell Library Economy 

18c Eugenia Elizabeth Hallock " 

19c Ellzat>eth Schaefer Decorative Design 

20c Celia Schoenfeld Libiary Economy 

21C Mabel Louise Stout " " 

aac Grace Lilian White Normal Art 

23c Ruth Worden 



tt tt 



1902 

24c Harriet Louise Andrews Library Economy 

asc Mary Emma Baker Normal Art 

26c Marcia M. Baldwin Library Economy 

27c Maude E. Bloomingdale " " 

38c Frances Henrietta Ellis... 

290 Anna Elsbree '• ' 

30c May Elixabeth Glahn Decorative Design 

31C Brrtha June Goodrich Library Economy 

J2C Phebe Squires Hall (Valentine) ' 

33c Caroline Jenkins '..Notmal Art 

34c Lillian Marwick Olcott Decorative Design 

35c Angeline Bertrice Randall Library Economy 

36c Edith Cha» ham Stackus 

37c Alice MacDougal Warner " ** 

1903 

38c Bertha Emily Bell Piano and Theory 

39c Jessie May Day Library Economy 

40c Bdith May Ducket Decorative Design 

41C Harriet La Hon English Library Economy 

4ac Bessie Margaret Ha wley " " 

43c Grace Gere Hawley Decorative Design 

44c Minnie Isabel McCutcheon Normal Art 

4SC Lillie Jane McMahon Library Economy 

46c Mora Belle Moyer '* ' 

47c Frances Eleanor Mvers " ** 

Lillian Marwick Olcott Normal Art 

48c Katharine Ethel Pickard Decorative Design 

49c Anna Mekeel Sears Library Economy 

Soc Laura Ellen Sheldon Normal Art 

51C Camilla Ella Snell 

sac Blla Sylvia Webster Library Economy 

53c Florence Julia Wheaton " " 



GRADUATE ALUMNI 

I Dbgrebs in Coursb* 

See A1.UMNI Record, pp. 578-620. 

WILLIAM ORVILLE ALLEN 

1899 A.M. (Pedagogy). (See No. 1436) 

SUPPI.BMBNT : Graduate student, 1898-9. Student in School of Theol* 
ogy and Graduate School of All Science, Boston University, 1899-1901 
Clergyman, Meth. Epis. Pastor at Springville, Vt., 1902-3. Jacob Sleeper 
Fellow of Boston Univ. School of Theology, studying Philosophy at Leip- 
zig, Germany. 

Residence, Carlstrasse 12, Leipzig, Germany ; also 51 High St., Mancha- 
ter, N. H. 

HENRY CLINTON EMM 

1899 A.M. (Greek) (See No. 1557) • 

SUPPI.BMBNT : Tutor, Classical Preparatory School, Syracuse, 1899-1900. 
Principal, High School, Faribault, Minn., since 1900. 
Residence, Faribault, Minn. 

SARAH NEWCOMB GRAHAM (BOWERMAN) 

1899 A.M. (English) (See No. 1460 and Faculty Record, p. 127 Sap., 
College Fine Arts. ) 

34 10 WALTER R USSELL NEWTON 

1899 A.M. and Ph.D. (Latin.) 
Born 28 May 1855 at Highgate, Vt. 
Teacher, Phillip's Academy, Andover, Mass. 
Residence, Andover, Mass. 

THOMAS RALPH ROBINSON 

1899 A.M. (Latin) (See No. 1606) 

SUPPI.BMBNT : With the book firm of Bailey & Sackett, Syracuse, 1S99- 
1900. Scientific Assistant. Bureau of Plant Industry, U. S. Dept. Agric» 
Washington, D. C, since 1900. 

Residence, U. S. Dept. Agric, Washington, D. C. 

CHARLES GARDNER ROGERS 

1899. A.M. (Biology) (See No. 1501 and Faculty Record, p. 102 Sap^ 
College of Liberal Arts. ) 



* Since 189s no degrees have been aiven in cutsn, Tbe title " Dborbbs zk CouUi 
signifies advanced degrees taken in resident &tudy. 



GRADUATE ALUMNI 257 

SAMUEL HENRY DODSON 
1900 Ph.M. (Pedagogy) (See No. 2778 Snp.) 

ROBERT HEBBLETHWAITE 

1900 A.M. (History) (See No. 1466). 
SUPPLSMBMT : Pastor at Brewerton, N. Y., at Cayaga, N. Y., and at 

Rom, N. Y. 
Residence, Rose, N. Y. 

CARRIE MAY ALLEN 

1901 M.S. (Biology) (See No. 2640 Sup.) 

FRED WALKER SHERMAN 

1901 A.M. (Romance Languages) (See No. 2856 Snp., and Faculty 
Record, p. 106 Snp., College of Liberal Arts.) 

LEONARD ERNEST YOUNG 

1901 M.S. (Chemistry) ' (See No. 2743 Snp., and Faculty Record,p. 106 
Sop., College of Liberal Arts. ) 

BLANCH^ EDITH GUNN 

1902 Ph.M. (History) (See No. 2925 Snp.) 

34 1 1 HOMER WILLIAM HARRIS 

1903 A.M. (German) 

Born 17 Not. 1870 at Canaseraga, N. Y. Principal, Free Academy, Rome, 
N.Y. 

Residence, Rome, N. Y. 

CARRIE AUGUSTA HILTS 

1902 A.M. (Romance Languages) (See No. 2935 Sup. and Faculty 
Record, p. 108 Sup., College of Liberal Arts.) 

CHARLES HENRY McLAURY 

1902 A.M. (Latin) (See No. 2827 Sup. and Faculty Record, p. 109 Sup., 
College of Liberal Arts.) 

34" ALBERT JOHN MAY 

1902 A.M. (Biology) (See Faculty Record, p. 108 Sup., College of 
libertl Arts.) 

GEORGE LEE PHELPS 

1902 A.M. (Latin) (See No. 2848 Sup. and Faculty Record, p. 108 Sup., 
College of Liberal Arts. ) 

3413 MARION PRATT 

1903 A.M. (Greek.) 

Bom 12 May 1879 at Dewitt. N. Y 
A.B. (Cornell) 1900. 



258 GRADUATE ALUMNI 

Residence, Scheuectady, N. Y. 

Home address, East Syracuse, N. Y. 

WILLIAM ERASTUS TAYLOR 

1902 Ph.D. (Mathematics) (See No. 1177 and Faculty Record, p. 
Sup., College of Applied Science.) 

ALETHEA WYMAN TRACY 

1902 M.L. (English), (See No. 1625) 
Residence, 108 Grant Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

3414 EDWIN REGURSWEETLAND 

1902. Ph.M. (Sociology) (See Faculty Record, p. 103 Sup., College 
Liberal Arts. ) 

CORNELIA CARHART WARD 

1902 Ph.M. (English) (See No. 3211 Sup.) 

ANNA IRENE BYRNE 

1903 Ph.M. (History) (See No. 1200). 
Residence, 611 Crouse Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

GEORGE LEROY CONNELL 
1903 A.M. (Greek) (See No. 3062 Sup., and Faculty Record, p. iioS 
College of Liberal Arts.) 

GEORGIANA FULMER 
1903 A.M. (English) (See No. 3093 Sup.) 

3415 JESSE ELMER McMULLAN 

1903 Ph.M. (History) 

Born I July 1858 at Arcadia, Ind. Student at DePauw University. 
B. (De Pauw). 
Residence, Marion, Ind. 

STELLA LYDIA HAVEN POST 
1903 A.M. (Romance Languages) (See No. 3355 Sup.) 

MABEL CARTER RHOADES 
1903 Ph.M. (Sociology) (See No. 1605 and Faculty Record, p. 109 * 
College of Liberal Arts.) 

IDA BELLE TALLCOTT 

1903 A.M. (Pedagogy) 

Bom 7 Sept. 1880 at Syracuse, N. Y., A.B. (Smith) 1902. 
Teacher of Latin, High School, Ponghkeepsie, N. Y., since 1903. 
Residence, 55 S. Hamilton St., Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 

Home address, 11 1 Furman St., Syracuse, N. Y. 



GRADUATB AI.UMNI 259 

CLARA ELIZABETH WYKER 

C903 Ph.M. (German) (See No. 1637 and Faculty Record, p. no Sup., 
liege of Liberal Arts.) 

JOHANNA ZIMMER 
1903 MX. (German) (See No. 3320 Sup.) 

2 Dbgrbes Ad Eundem 
See Ai,uMNi Record,, pp. 620-623. 

3417 ELAM EDWARD MARSH 
1900 A.M. 

Bom 5 Apr. 1865 at Saranac, N. Y. A.B (Williams) 1890. S.T.B. (Bos- 
on School of Theology) 1893. 
Clergyman, Meth. Epis. Pastor at West Chazy, N. Y. 
Residence, West Chazy, N. Y. 

3418 CHARLES N. SIMS 
1900 A.M. 

See Alumni Record, p. 137. 
Residence, 211 University Place, Syracuse, N. Y. 

3419 CHARLES CONKEY TOWNSEND 
1900 A.M. 

Boni I Mar. 1852 at North Lawrence, N. Y. Student at the University 
«* Rochester, 1873-7. A.B. A.M. (Same) 1880. Teacher, Normal School, 
Potsdam, N. Y., 1877-83. Clergyman, Meth. Epis. Pastor at various 
Chirgesin N. N. Y. Conf. since 1883. Sec. N. N. Y. Conf. eleven years. 
Married 17 July 1878, Hattie M. Morgan of Potsdam, N. Y. 
CAtWffii— Harold Amasa, bom 20 Dec. 1879. (No. 3395 Sup.). 
Arthur Morgan, bom 11 Dec. 1880. (No. 3394 Sup.). 
Carl Lucius, bom 4 July 1882. (See Non-graduates). 
William W., bom 30 May 1887. 
Edith W., bom 28 July 1890. 
Residence, Camden. N. Y. 



HONORARY ALUMNI 

DEGREE, Honoris Causa 

I. Mastbr's Dbgrbbs 
See A]:.nMNi Record, pp. 626-631. 

3420 LINCOLN ELLIOTT ROWLEY 
1900 A.M. 

Born 16 Oct. 1863 at Seward, N. Y. Student in Syracnse University, 
1834-6. A r. 

Principal, High School, Sidney, N. Y., 1886-9; Athens, Pa., 188^; 
Lowville (N. Y.) Academy, 1892-6 ; East Orange (N. J.) High School, 
1896-1900. 
With American Book Company since 1900. 
Married, 1887, Martha C. Butler of St. Johnsvillc, N. Y. 
Children — Katherine Maria, born 27 June 1893. 
Muriel Esther, bom 10 June 1895. 
John M9Kinley, bom 21 Apr. 1898. 
Eliot Henry, bom 6 Apr. 1903. 
Residence, East Orange, N. J. 

3421 CONRAD LOUIS BECKER 
1902 M. Mus. (See Faculty Record, p. 123 Sup., College of Fine Arts.) 

3422 WILLIAM HENRY BERWALD 
1902 M. Mus. (See Faculty Record, p. 123 Sup., College erf Fine Arts.) 

3423 ADOLPH FREY 

1902 M. Mus. (See Faculty Record, p. 124 Sup., College of Fine Arts.) 

3424 RICHARD GRANT CALTHROP 

1903 M. Mus. (See Faculty Record, p. 124 Sup., College of Fine Arts.) 

3425 HAMLIN ELISHA COGSWELL 
1903 M. Mus. 

Born 1852 at Silvara, Pa. Student at Wyoming Seminary. Student of 
Lowell Mason, William Mason, Charles R. Adams, Leander Campanaii,!^* 
Hugh A. Clarke and others. Made special study of methods of tetduo^ 
music in public schools. 

Director of Music at Mansfield, Pa., for ten years. Supervisor of Mo^^ 






HONORARY AI,UMNI a6l 

It Bioghamton, N. Y., two years ; at Syracuse, N. Y., for fonr years. 
Director of Conservatory of Music, Mansfield, Pa., since 1902. 
Residence, Mansfield, Pa. 

3426 BUGENB HBNRY HOWARD 
1903 A.M. 

Bora 30 Oct. 1850. Student from Lima, N. Y., at Genesee College, 
1869-71. Student of Medicine, University of Buffalo. M.D. 1873. BOII. 

Resident Physician Monroe Co. Hospital, Rochester, N. Y., 1873-1881. 
In general practice at Rochester, 1881-5. Medical Sap*t. Rochester State 
Hospital since 1885. Dr. Howard has a national reputation as a physician 
tod alienist. 

Married 25 Dec. 1879, Emma R. Remington of Caledonia, N. Y. 

Childt Henry Remington, born 3 Feb. 1881. 

Residence, Rochester, N. Y. 



2. Doctor's Dbgrbes 

See Alumni Record, pp. 631-651. 

JOHN SCOTT CLARK 

1899 Utt. D. (See No. 340). 

SupPLBMBNT : Has published " A Study of English and American Poets,*' 
dm. Scribner*8 Sons, New York, 1900. 

Residence, 21 14 Sheridan Road, Evanston, 111. 

RICHARD EDWIN DAY 

1899 Utt D. (See No. 344). 

SuppLBMBMT : « B K. On the steff of the Regents ofiEce, Albany, N. Y., 
lioce 29 June 1899, most of the time . connected in an editorial capacity 
with the publishing work. 

Residence, 374 Madison Aye., Albany, N. Y. 

DE WITT CLINTON HUNTINGTON 

1899 LL.D. (See No. 1736). 
SUPPI.BMB9T : Chancellor of Nebraska Wesleyan University since 1898. 
Residence, Uniyersity Place, Neb. 

3427 DAVID F. PIERCE 
1899 D.D. 
Bora 26 Apr. 1847 at Depeyster, N. Y. 

Gcrgyman, Meth. Bpis. Pastor Arsenal Street Church, Watertown, N. Y. 
Was a member of Co. I. 14th N. Y. Heavy Artillery in the Civil War, 
Residenoe, 4 Maaaey Aye., Watertown, N. Y. 



262 HONORARY AI*UMNI 

3428 JOHN H. RACE 
1899 D.D. 

Bom 10 Mar. 1862 at Paupack, Pa. Student at Princeton Univer^, 
1886-1890. A.B. A.M. (Princeton) 1894. 

Clergyman, Meth. Bpis. President of Grant University since 1892. 

Has published varions addresses, sermons and contribntions to the PmL 

Married 25 June 1890, Alice Bannister (No. 493) of Kingston, Pa. 

Residence, Chattanooga, Tenn. 

ELMER ELLSWORTH SMILEY 

1899 D.D. (See No. 724). 

SuPPLBMBNT : President Wyoming State University, 1899-1 904. Piitor 
at Groton, N. Y., since 1904. 

Residence, Groton, N. Y. 

EZRA SQUIRES TIPPLE 

1899 D.D. (See No. 682). 

SUPPI.RMBNT : Executive Secretary of the 20th Century Joint Commissioi 
for the Boroughs of Manhattan and the Bronx, N. Y., 1901-^. Pastor rf 
Grace Church, New York, since Apr. 1904. 

Residence, 300 W. 85th St., New York, N. Y. 

3429 WILLIAM FRANCIS WHITLOCK 

1899 LL. D. 

Born 20 Oct. 1833 at Euphemia, O. 

Professor of the Latin Language and Literature, Ohio Wesleyan XJmytt 
sity. 

Has published " The Storv of Book Concerns** and articles in the Metho- 
dist Review and in the Church papers. 

Residence, Delaware, O. 

GEORGE HENRY BRIDGMAN 

1900 LL.D. (See No. 1843). 
Residence, Hamline, Minn. 

3430 SAMUEL ROBERT CALTHROP 
1900 L.H.D. 

M.A. (Harvard) before i860. 

Bom in the village of Swineshead, Lincolnshire, England. Entered 
Trinity College, Cambridge, 1848. Declined to take a degree on acobnot^ 
religious restrictions. (These have since been removed). Pastor tf*^ 
Memorial Church, Syracuse, for many years. Has published Poems, S^' 
mons, Essays, '* Primitive Gospel.** 

Residence, 1571 S. Salina St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

THERON COOPER 
1900 D.D. (See No. 117). 

Supplement : 4>BK. Delegate to General Cpnf., 1900 and 1904. 

Residence, 104 Woodland Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 






HONORARY ALUMNI 263 

3431 CHARLBS VALENTINE GRISMER 
1900 D.D. 

Born 10 Mar. 1852 at Newtonville, N. Y. B.D. (Drew) 1884. Clergyman, 
Metb. Epis. Pastor etc., since 1880. President of the Examining Board of 
Troy Conf . 

Residence, Plattsburg, N. Y. 

3432 JOSEPH FRANKLIN HALEY 
1900 D.D. 

Born 26 July 1857 at Kennebunk, Me. A.B. (Wesleyan) 1876. A.M. 
(^ame) 1879. 

Professor in E. Maine Conf. Sem., 1876-80. Clergyman, Meth. Epis. 
Pastor and presiding Elder, 1880-98. President E. Maine Conf. Sem. 
1898-1900. Pastor at Portland, Me. 

Residence, 39 Pine St., Portland, Me. 

3433 PETER CHRISTIAN LUTKIN 
1900 D. Mns. 

Born 27 Mar. 1858 at Thompson ville, Wis. Director Theoretical Dep*t., 
American Conserratory, Chicago, 111., 1885-91. Director Dep't of Mnsic, 
N.W. Uuiv. Evanston, 111., 1891-5. Director Kvanston (111.) Musical Club, 
lince 1893 ; Ravenswood Musical Club since 1895. Dean of the School 
of Mnsic, N. W. University, since 1895. 

Organist and Choir-master, St. Clement's Church, Chicsgo, 1884-1890. 
Organist, St. James Church, Chicago, 1890-6. Organist and Musical Di- 
rector, First M. E. Church, Evanston, 1899-1901. 

Reviewer for Swinney's Music Review, Chicago, 1 891- 1900. 

Has published Church Music through Novello & Co., London, and C. F. 
Swinney & Co., Chicago. 

Blarried 27 Oct. 1885, Lelah Carman of Chicago, 111. 

Children — Harris Carman, bom 20 Oct. 1886. 

Caryl Cecil, born 28 Sept. 1888 ; died 5 Dec. 1892. 

Residence, Evanston, 111. 

CURTIS ELLIOT r MOGG 

1900 D.D. (See No. 397) 

SupPLBMBmr: Pastor at Oneida, N. Y., 1885-7 ; at Cazenovia, N. Y., 
1887-90 ; at Ithaca, N. Y., 1890-5 : at Wilkesbarre, Pa., since 1895. 

Residence, 65 Academy St., Wilkesbarre, Pa. 

CHARLES FREEMONT SITTERLY 

1900 S.T.D. (See No. 635) 

SuppLBMEMT : Trustee of Syracuse University representing the Newark 
Conf. since 1903. 

Residence, Madison, N. J. 



264 HONORARY AhVUKl 

MILTON DANA BUCK 

1901 D.D. (See No. 255) 
SUPPLBMBNT : Pastor at Berkeley, Cal. 
Residence, Berkeley, Cal. 

3434 GEORGE PECK ECKMAN 
1901 D.D. 

Bom 8 Jan. i860 at Gouldsboro, Pa. A.M.1895. Ph.D.1897. 

Clergyman, Meth. Epis. Pastor St. Paul's Church, New York, N. Y 

Residence, West End Ave. and 86th St., New York, N. Y. 

CHARLES ELBERT HAMILTON 

190 c D.D. (See No. 760) 
SuPPLBMBNT : ^BK. 
Residence, 65 N. Fitzhugh St., Rochester, N. Y. 

3435 BENNETT WERTZ HUTCHINSON 
1901 S.T.D. 

Bom 15 Jan. 1859 at Mount Pleasant, Pa. 

President of Genesee Wesleyan Seminary, Lima, N. Y., 1898- 

Clergyman, Meth. Epis. Pastor at Gowanda, N. Y., since 1903. 

Married 14 July 1886, Ruth A. Eastwood (No. 508, ^. v, for farther m 

Residence, Gowanda, N. Y. 

FREDERICK THOMAS KEENEY 

1901 D.D. (Sec No. 763) 

SupPLBMBNT : ^BK. Pastor at Penn Yan, N. Y., 1898-9. Pies 
Elder Auburn District, 1 899-1 901. Pastor Hedding Church, Elmir 
Y., since 1901. 

Residence, Elmira, N. Y. 

3436 BENJAMIN BARKER ODELL, JR. 
1901 LL.D. 

Governor of the State of New York, i899->. 

Residence, Albany, N. Y. 

LEON HARRY VINCENT 

1901 Litt.D. (See No. 598) 
Residence, Box 122, Back Bay, Boston, Mass. 

3437 NACY McGEE WATERS 

1901 D.D. 

Born 1866 at Independence, W. Va. 

Clergyman, Congregational ist. 

Residence, 123 Brooklyn Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

3438 ROBERT BAIRD 

1902 LL.D. 

Born 21 Jan. 1844 at Glasgow, Scotland. Professor of Greek, 1 
western University, Evanston, 111. 
Residence, Evanston, lU. 



HONORARY ALUMNI 265 

3439 ANDRBW BURR BLODGETT 
1902 Pd D. 

Born 19 May 1850 at Mottville, N. Y. 

Soperintendeiit of Schools, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Residence, 127 Burnet Ave. , Syracuse, N. Y. 

3440 MEL VIL DEWEY 
1902 LL.D. 

Born 10 Dec. 185 1 at Adams Center, N. Y. 

Director New York State Library and Home Education. Author of 
** Decimal classification and Relative index ;'* ''Library School Rules.*' 
Editor Literary Journal, v. 1-5 ; Literary Notes^ (a quarterly journal of 
Hbnrianship) 1887-98 ; also author of cyclopedia and magazine articles, 
addresses, etc. 

Residence, Albany, N. Y. 

CHARLE3 EDDY 
1902 D.D. (See No. 55) 

Residence, Manchester, N. Y. 

3441 DAVID HENRY HANABURGH 
1902 ST.D. 

Bom 10 Nov. 1839 at Rhinebeck, N. Y. Student at Wesleyan University, 
rt6&-i879. A,B. A.M. 1873. 

Gergyman, Meth. Epis. Member Maine Cosf., 187 1-4 ; New York 
Coof. since 1874. President Drew Seminary for Young Women, Carmel, 
N. Y., since 1899 

Married 11 May 1875, Hattie M. Turner. 

Children — Martha Lee, bom 4 Aug. 1876. (See non-grad^ates,p. 846). 
Emory Foss, bom 30 Jan. 1888. 

Residence, Carmel. N. Y. 

3442 WILLIAM SHEPPARD JONES 
1902 D.D. 

Bora 14 Feb. 1830 at Bristol, England. 

Clergyman, Meth. Epis. Began ministry 1848. Member Maine Conf. 

nnce 18S3. 

Married 22 July 1852, Hannah Neppington. 

Children — Thomas Frederick, born 23 Jan. 1854. 

Francis William, bora 2 Feb. i860. 

Mary Hannah, born 6 Oct. 1862. 

Charles Ellis, bom 22 Mar. 1868. 
Residence. 24 Hartley St., Portland Me. 

WILLIAM DIXON MARSH 

1902 D.D. (See No. 434) 

Sufplkmbnt: Pastor First Church, Utica, N. Y., 1898-1904 ; at Little 
Falk, N. Y., since 1904. Member of the General Conference, 1900, and of 
the General Misaionary Committee. 

Residence, UtUe Palhi, N. Y. 



ttf BONORARY At0MlfI 

3445 ISAAC BUCHANAN POUCHBR 
1902 Pd. D. 

Born 21 July 1827 in Columbia Coanty, N. Y. 

Teacher in Pnblic Schools, Oswego, N. Y., 1848-61. In State Kor 
School, Oawego, since 1891. 

Residence, 148 W. 5th St., Oswego, N. Y. 

3444 WII^LIAM PATTON STEVENSON 

1902 D.D. 

Born at West Alexander, Pa. 
A.B. 1882. 

Clergyman, Presbyterian. Pastor at Yonkers, N. Y., following apt 
ate at the Park Church, Syracuse, N. Y. 
Married i June 1887, Elizabeth M. Cooper of Allegheny City, Pa. 
CA*Y</— William Cooper, born 30 July 1888. 
Residence, iii N. Broadway, Yonkers, N. Y. 

3445 FRANK DAVID BOYNTON 

1903 Pd. D. 

Born 29 Apr. 1863 at Potsdam, N. Y. 

Supt. of Schools, Ithaca, N. Y. Ch*m. Regents Syllabus Revision 
of Associated Acad. Principles since 1895. Editor New York 
Teacher^ 19^3-4. 

Has published, *' Plane and Solid Geometry*' ; ** Syllabus of Civ: 
'♦Library Manual of Civics*'; '* School Civics**; Contributer to B 
tional magazines. 

Residence, Ithaca, N. Y. 

EDGAR HUNTINGTON BROWN 

1903 D.D. (See No. 496) 

SupPLBMBNT : ^BK.1900. 

Pastor at Gloversville, N. Y., 1895-1900 ; at Albany, N. Y., First Chi 
since 190a 

Residence, 13 Philip St., Albany, N. Y. 

3446 LEWIN FRANK BUELL 
1903 D.D. 

Bom 21 Sept. 1863 at Killingworth, Conn. A.B. (Yale) 1885. 
(Yale) 1888. 

Clergyman, Congregationalist. Ordained at Sm3rrna, N. Y.,3jan., 
Pastor at Smyrna. N. Y., 1888-92 ; at First Church, Mt. Vernon, V 
1892-8; at Good Will Church, Syracuse, N. Y., since 1898. 

Residence, 113 Malcolm St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

3447 ERNST CARL EBERHARDT HELD 
1903 D.Mus. 

Born 38 June 1823 at Halle on Saale, Germany. Was engaged as 
ing expert in the service of the Prussian government from 1840 to 



HONORARY ALUMNI 367 

pirticipAted in the Revolntton of 1848, emigrated to America the same 
year and has taught music in Syracuse, N. Y., since 9 Jan. 1849. 

Has pnbhshed musical and literary compositions. 

Dr. Held*s father was Johann August Held, Pastor of St. I/aureatii, 
Newmarket, Halle, and was born 9 Feb. 1768 ; died 8 Aug. 184a 

Residence, 129 Burnet Ave., Ssrracuse, N. Y. 

3448 BDWIN HOLT HUGHES 
1903 S.T.D. 

Bom 7 Dec 1866 at Moundsville, W. Va. President of DePauw UniTer- 
aty. 

Residence, Greencastle, Ind. 

3449 WILLIAM EDWARDS HUNTINGTON 
1903 aT.D. 

Bom 30 July 1844 at Hillsboro, 111. Dean of the College of Liberal Arts, 
Boiton Univennty, since 1882.' 

Residence, Newton Centre, Mass. 

FREDERICK DbLAND LEETE 

1903 D.D. (See No. 908) 

8um*BMKNT: ♦BK. Pastor at Rochester, N. Y., Monroe Ayenue 
dmrdi, 1898-1903 ; at Syracuse, N. Y., University Ayenue church, since 

1903. 
Cil»£^— Frederick DeLand, Jr., bom 12 Nov. 1901. 

Residence, 907 Harrison St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

WILLIAM NOTTINGHAM 

X903 LL.D. (See No 315) 

Supplkmsht: Alumni trastee of the University, 1899-1902. Elected by 
the Legislature Regent of the State of New York, 1902. 

Residence, 701 Walnut Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

3450 CHARLES TYLER OLMSTED 
1903 D.C.L. 
Bom 28 Apr. 1842 at Cohoes, N. Y. Clergyman, Prot. Epis. 
Bishop-Coadjutor of Central New York. 
Residence, Utica, N. Y. 

3451 FRANCIS BOURNE UPHAM 
1903 D.D. 

Bom 21 Nov. 1862 at Bristol, R. I. 

AB. (Wealeylan) 1885. B.D. (Drew Theol. Sem.) 1888. 

Gergyman, Meth. Epis. Pastor at Mamaroneck, N. Y., 1899-1904 ; at 
Bridgeport, Conn., since 1904. 

Rendence, 623 Fairfield Ave., Bridgeport, Conn. 



NUMERICAL INDEX OF GRADUATE A 

HONORARY ALUMNI 

See Alumni Rscord, pp. 652-659 
SUPPLBMSNT, 1899-1903 

I. DEGREES IN COURSE 

1898 

Eugene Randolph Smith (No. 1414)* 
A.M. (correction). 

1899 

William Onrille Allen (No. 1436). A.M. 3410 Walter Ruaaell Newton. A.M.a 

Henry Clinton Bmm (No. 1557). A.M. Thomas Ralph Robinson (M 

Barah Newcomb Graham (Bowerman) A.M. 

(No. 14^)* A.M. Charles Gardner Rogers (N 



A.M. 



1900 



Samuel Henry Dodson (No. 3778 Sup.) Robert Hebblethwaitc (No. 14 
Ph.M. 

I90I 

Carrie May Allen (No. 2640 Sup.) M.S. ]>onard Bmest Young (No. 274 

Pred Walker Sherman (No. 2856 Sup.) M.S. 
A.M. 

1902 

Blanche Bdith Gunn (No. 2925 Sup.) 3413 Marion Pratt. A.M. 

Ph.M. William Brastus Taylor (N 

34x1 Homer William Harris. A.M. Ph.D. 

Carrie Augusta Hilts (No. 2935 Sup.) Alethea Wyman Tracy (No. 16: 

A.M. 3414 Bdwin Regur Sweetland. Ph, 

Charles Henry Mcl«aury (No. 2827 Cornelia Carhart Ward (No. 321 

Sup.) A.M. Ph.M. 
3412 Albert John May. A.M. 

George Lee Phelps (No. 2848 Sup.) A.M. 

1903 

Anna Irene Byrne (No. I300). Ph.M. Mabel Carter Rhoades (N< 

George LeRoy Connell (No. 3062 Sup.) Ph.M. 

A.M. 3416 Ida Belle Tallcott A.M. 

GeorgianaPulmer(No 3093 Sup.). A.M. Clara Blixabeth Wyker (N* 

34x5 Jesse Blmer McMullan. Ph.M. Ph.M. 

Stella Lydia Haven Post (No. 3355 Johanna Zimmer (No. $uo Sup 

Sup.) A.M. 



2. DEGREES AD EUNDEM 

See A1.UMNI Rbcord p. 635 
1900 

3417 Elam Bdward Marsh. A.M. 34x9 Charles Coakey Townaend, i 

34x8 Charles N. Sims. A.M. 



NUMBRICAI, INDBX OP GRADUATE ALUMNI 



269 



ORARY ALUMNI— I. MASTER'S DEGREES 



Elliott Rowley. A.M. 



U>uis Becker. M. Mui. 
Heniy Berwald. M. Mus. 



1900 

1902 

3433 Adolph Prey. M. Mtli. 

^903 



Grant Caltbrop. M. Mua. 3436 Bugene Henry Howard. A.M. 
Bliaha Cogawell. M. Mus. 



2. DOCTOR'S DEGREES 



1899 

>ttCUrk(No.340). Utt.D. 3428 John H. Race. D.D. 

Bdwin Day (No. 344). Litt.D. BImer BUaworth Smiley (No. 724).D. D. 

Clinton Huntington (No. 1736). 

Bzra Squire Tipple (No. 683). D.D. 

.Pierce. D.D. 3439 William Prancis Whitlock. hh.D. 

1900 

Herbert Bridgman (No. 1843). 

3433 Joseph Pranklln Haley. D.D. 

Robert Catthrop. L.H.D. 3433 Peter Christian Lutkin. D.Mus. 

:ooper(No. 117). D.D. Curtis BUiott Mogg( No. 307). D.D. 

Valentine Griamer. D.I}. Charles Preemont Sitterly (No. 635)* 

S.T.D. 



I9OI 



>ana Buck (No. 355) . D.D. 



Prederick Thomas Keeney (No. 763). 
l>.l}. 

PeckBckman. D.D. 3436 Benjamin Barker Odell, Jr. I«I«.D. 

Blbert Hamilton (No 760). D.D. I^on Harry Vincent (No. 599). I«ittD. 

Wcrts Hutchinson. S.T.D. 3437 Nacy McGee Waters. D.D. 



iaird. I«L.D. 
Burr Blodgett. Pd.D. 
>ewey. LL.D. 
Bddy(No.5^). D.D. 
:. Hanaburgh. S.T.D. 



1902 
3443 



1903 



William Sheppard Jones. D.D. 
William Dizpn Marsh (No. 43^). D.D. 
Isaac Buchanan Poucher. Pa.D. 
William Patton Stevenson. D.D. 



NiTid Boynton. Pd.D. 3449 William Bdwards Huntington. S.T.D. 

[untington Brown (N0.496). D.D. Prederick DeLrSnd Leete (N0.Q08). D.D. 

'raBkBuell. D.D. William f«rottinsham (No. 313). LL.D. 

irl Bberbardt Held. D.Mus. 3450 Charles Tyler Oimatea. D.C.L. 

Iblt Hughes. S.T.D. 3451 Prank Bourne Upham. D.D, 



GRADUATE COURSES AND DEGREES 



See Alumni Rkcord, pp. 66o>662. 

SUPPLSMBNT, 1898-1903. 

The following is a sapplemental list of resident graduate stndeoti ihi 
have pursued or are now pursuing courses at the UniYersitjlesdiiigll! 
higher degrees. The major subject is given. 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

Carrie May Allen, B.S. (No. 2640 Sup.) Biology. 

Ralph Waldo Allen, A.B. (No. 1528.) English. 

William Orville Allen, A.B. (No. 1436.) Pedagogy. 

John Clarence Atwater, A.B. (No. 1532.) Pedagogy. 

Sarah Ostrander Avery, Ph.B. (No. 1534.) English. 

Harriet Lucille Baldwin. A.B. (No. 3037 Sup.) English. 

Florence M. Bryant, A.B. (Mt. Holyoke)i895. Latin. 

Anna Irene Byrne, Ph.B. (No. 1200.) History. 

Edgar Davidson Congdon, A.B. (No. 2909 Sup.) Biology. 

George LeRoy Connell, A.B. (No. 3062 Sup.) Greek. 

Clara Adele Curtiss, A.B. (Univ. of Mich )i9X>. English. 

Harriette Arms Curtiss, Ph.B. (No. 2771 Sup.) Biology. 

Clarence Winfield Darling, A.B. (No. 2773 Sup.) Political Economy. 

Samuel Henry Dodson, Ph.B. (No. 2778 Sup.) Pedagogy. 

Henry Clinton Emm, A.B. (No. 1557.) Greek. 

LeRoy C. Floyd, Jr., A.B. (Wesleyan). Pedagogy. 

Georgiana Fulmer, A.B. (No. 3093 Sup.) English. 

Takeshi Funahashi, Ph.B. (Albion). English. 

Charlotte Finn Gere, A.B. (No. 3096 Sup.) Latin. 

Helen Eliza Gere, Ph.B. (No. 513.) Biology. 

Sarah Newcomb Graham, A.B. (No. 1460.) English. 

Blanche Edith Gunn, Ph.B. (No. 2925 Sup. ) History. 

George Marlette Haight, A.B. (No. 2626 Sup.) History. 

Homer William Harris, A.B. (Lake Forest; 1894. German. 

Theodore Winfield Harris, A.B. (Columbia )i&a4. A.M. (UniT« ol N. U] 

1898. Sociology. 
Mary Josephine Hasbrouck, Ph.B. (No. 2804 Sup.) English. 
Robert Carr Hebblethwaite, A'B. (No. 1466.) History. 
William John Henry, A.B. (Na 2934 Sup.) History. 
Edna Hildreth, A.B. (No. 2684 Sup.) English. 
Carrie Augusta Hilts, A.B. (No. 2935 Sup.) French. 
Francis Asbnry Hnlst, A.B. (No. 2941 Sup.) Biology. 



GKADUATB COUHSBS AUD DBOmBSS 17Z 

Frederick Bird Jones, A.B. (Colgate) 1898. A.M.(Coliimbit)i899. Latin. 

Oscar Cnrtis Kenyon, A.M. (No. 578.) Physics. 

Janet Lacinda Kevand, Ph. B. (No. 2950 Sup. ) English. 

William Henry Kirk wood, Ph.B. (No. 3125 Sup.) Philosophy. 

T.Aaron Levy, A. B., LL.B. (No. 1305.) History. 

William Dodge Lewis, A.B. (No. 1076.) Pedagogy. 

David Liknaitz, B.S. (Univ. of Pa.) 1898. Semitics. 

Charles Henry McLanry, A.B. (No. 2827 Sup. ) Latin. 

Jesse Elmer McMullan, Ph.B. (DePauw). History. 

Herbert A. Manchester, A.M. Sociology. 

Albert J. May, A. B. (Allegheny)! 901. Biology. 

Frank Lincoln Mead, A.M. (No. 1013.) Pedagogy. 

Faanie Duncan Morgan, Ph.B. (No. 3149 Sup.) German. 

Herbert Benjamin Myron, Ph.B. (No. 2965 Sup.) Political Economy. 

Lids Blay 0*Bryon, A.B. (No. 1600.) German. 

Edith Morton Packard, B.L. (No. 1496.) English. 

loms DeForest Palmer, A.B. (No. 2975 Sup.) History. 

Bessie Parsons, A.B. (No. 1396.) Greek. 

George Lee Phelps. A.B. (No. 2848 Sup.) Latin. 

Pajson Edward Pierce, B.L. (No. 27 11 Sup.) Semitics. 

Edgar Foster Piper, A.B. (No. 2983 Sup.) Philosophy. 

Daniel Pratt, A.B (Princeton) 1890. Mathematics. 

Marioo Pratt, A.B. (Cornell) 1900. Greek. 

Habel Carter Rhoades, Ph.B. (No. 1605.) Sociology (Mantanye Fellow.) 

Jean Marie Richards, Litt.B. (Smith). English. 

Thomas Ralph Robinson, A.B. (No. 1606.) Latin. 

Charles Gardner Rogers, A.B. (No. 1 501.) Biology. 

*Fred Walker Sherman, A.B. (No. 2856 Sup.) French. 

William Martin Small wood, A.M. (No. 1412.) Biology. 

Engene Randolph Smith, A. B. (No. 14 14.) Mathematics. 

Earl Evelyn Sperry, Ph.B. (No. 1618 ) History. 

Edwin Regnr Sweetland, B.S. (Cornell). Political Economy. 

Ida Belle Tallcott. A.B. (Smith)i902. Pedagogy. 

Bdwin Piatt Tanner. A.M. (Columbia) (?) History. 

William Erastns Taylor, Ph. M. (No. 1 177.) Mathematics. 

John Cnrtis Tennant, A.B. (No. 3012 Sup.) History. 

Alethea Wyman Tracy, B.L- (No. 1625.) English. 

Charles Humphrey Treadwell, Jr., B.S. (No. 1338.) Physics. 

(krtmde Harriet Walch, A.B. (Vassar)i902. Sociology. 

Marion Lesley West, Ph.B. (No. 2879 Sup.) History. 

Aane Grace Wirt, Ph.B. (No. 685.) German. 

Hilton Bigler Wise, A. M. (Univ. of Pa. ) 1900. History. 

Heten Mabel Wood, A.M. (No. 11 16.) English. 

Minnie Amelia Wood, Ph.B. (No. 1635.) English. 

Royal Dwigbt Woolsey, A.B. (No. 3219 Sup.) Philosophy. 

Alexander Wonters, A.M. (Hamilton) (?) Semitics. 



373 GRADUATB i COURSBS AND DKGftBBS 

Clara Blizabeth Wyker, Ph.B. (No. 1637.) German. 
Leonard Ernest Young, B.S. (No. 2743 Sup.) Chemistry. 
Johanna Zimmer, B.L. (No. 3220 Sup.) German. 



COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS 

Jennie Weller (Archamboj, B.Mus. (No. 883.) Music. 

Helen Frances Avery, B.P. (No. 2643 Sup. ) Painting:. 

Florence Louise Barney, B Mus. (No. 1440.) Music. 

Evelyn Bower Beardsley, B.Mus. (No. 3042 Sup.) Music. 

Mrs. Ansel E. Beckwith, B Mus. (No. 1082.) Music. 

Lyman Wells Clary, B.Mus. (No. 2661 Sup.) Music. 

Mary Louise Connell, B.Mus. (No. 2664 Sup.) Music. 

Mabel Louise Cook, B. Mus. (No. 2768 Sup.) Music. 

Lillian Belle Croramie, B.Mus. (No. 2668 Sup.) Music. 

Alton Eugene Darby, B. Mus. (No. 1364.) Music. 

Grace Leeds Darnell, B.Mus. (No. 1553.) Muisic. 

Mary Emogene Day, B.Mus. (No. 2775 Sup.) Music. 

Jessie Zelette Decker, B.Mus. (No. 467.) Music. 

Carrie May Dixson, B.Mus (No. 947.) Music. 

Merriam Emhout, B.Mus. (No. 2784 Sup.) Music. 

Theresa Frantz, B.Mus. (No. 2675 Sup.) Music. 

Maude Van Tassell (Frey), B.Mus. (No. 1513.) Music. 

Florence E. Haanel, B P. (No. 1296.) Painting. 

Grace Darling Haanel, B.Mus. (No. 1224.) Music. 

George Washington Hey, Jr., B.Mus (No. 2682 Sup.) Music. 

Evalina Vernon (Honsinger), B.Mus. (No. 1226.) Music 

Mabel Emma Jacoby (Johnson), B.Mus. (No, 2686 Sup.) Music. 

Charlotte Meade Janes, B.P. (No. 1380.) Painting. 

Mary L. Parmelee, B.L. (No. 1602.) 

Leila M. Ferine, B.Mus. (No. 1497.) Music. 

George Alexander Russell, B.Mus. (No. 2997 Sup.) Music. 

Julia Adelaide Talbott, B. Mus. (No. 142a) Music. 

Sarah Eleanor Veeder, B.P. (No. 1425.) Painting. 

Harry Leonard Vibbard, B.Mus. (No. T627.) Music. 

Harriet Blakeslee (Wallace), B.Mus. (No. 649.) Music. 

Grace Franc Wight, B.Mus. (No. 2880 Sup.) Music. 

Reba Dygert Willard, B.Mus. (No. 2740 Sup.) Music. 

COLLEGE OF APPLIED SCIENCE 

Harvey Francis Connell, E.E. (No. 3256 Sup.) Electrical Engineerini 



STATISTICAL TABLES 



I. ANNUAL ATTENDANCE 



iLDMin Record, p. 734- 

LBMKHT, 1899-1904. 



CoU«c°i 
LHHilAru. 


Si-^r.' 


S-!Kl 


Coll.,. of 


Applied Scitnc. 


1 










































1 




i 

& 


1 


1 


a 


U 


1 


1 


i 


1 


1 


3 


If 


¥ 


1 


,- 


i 


5 
S 


1 


1 




i 


1 














"' 


:i 






« ^ 


^■ 


* 








UI 


^ 








103' 6 
I09' 7 


n,nn 


296 










,l„,™ 












^5 




>93 


81 


181 793 


o'ii6 


270 


11 


6.1 


\z 


4 


oUa6 












lis 


r<)t 


lOJ 






0.13* 


iMi 




11,671 


















•t 


7SI 




30, 905 




o'lflo 


w 


IPS 








OlII 


,6. 






18. 


1'; 


i-. 


^ooq 


|B39 


'3J 


33; 'WS 


UI;il 


"i'»= 


ti" 


aw 


"4 .737 


uo 


' 




/ij 




^ 











BeerlDKitadeDtBUkcDontfOTtlie fini time tb I* year, 

II. DEGREES CONFERRED 
rom 1853 to 1S73 the only bactaelor's deuces conferred were A.B. and 
. The Pint Ph.B. waa given in 1874, the first M.D. under the anapicea 
iyracate University in 1873, and tbe firat Pine Arts degree in 1875. Tbe 
ircnnmber of degree* conferred to date by Syracnae University (inclad- 
Geneaee College, 379, and Geneve Medical College, 731, altogether 
30) it 4367. Of tbew9i6 are duplicate*, leaving 3431 aa tbe number of 
ividoaJa who have received degrees. The number of first degrees con- 
red is 1411, of wbich 773 were given in the last &ve years. The entire 
mber of desreei conferred during the last five years is 888, of wbich 73 
: daplicatea, that ia, accond degrees to gradnates. The first degrees 
ndtd among the collegea of tbe University nutuber as follows : Lilieral 
u. 1574 ; Medicine, 405 ; Pine Arts, 330 ; Law, 165 ; Applied Science, as. 
Im dopKcate* in tbeae number 78. 



274 SUMMARY OP 8TC7D8NTS, I9Q3-4 

UNDERGRADUATE ATTENDANCE 

Residence invariably required. 

COLI3GS • UNIVBRSm 

1 87 1 (opening year) 41 ..41 

1875 149 2# 

1880 146 * 

1885 182 3^ 

1890 338 649 

1895 398 »9» 

1896 498 1130 

1897 551 «<V 

1898 644 iiy 

1899 727 I4« 

1900 793 ^^^3 

1901 934 1806 

1902 905* 3009 

1903-4 1005 2Ml 

The ratio of increase in tlie University for 1903-4 over 1902-3 was more 

than 10 per cent. 

* Engineering students taken out for the first time this year. 
The students come from 29 States of the Union and the District of Colum- 
bia ; also from 14 foreign countries. Syracuse University has more students 
in the college proper (Liberal Arts) than any other college in the State. 
Note the following comparison, which is made to include also three Univer- 
sities in other states. These statistics( Liberal Arts) are taken from Sciena, 
Vol. XVIII, December, 1903, compiled by Registrar Tombo of Columbia 
University: Columbia (including Barnard). 892, Cornell 726, Northwestern 
792. Pennsylvania 514, Princeton 732, Syracuse 1,005 (94^ ^^ table by onr 
error) . 

III. SUMMARY OF STUDENTS, 1903-4 

COLLSGS OF LiBBRAL ARTS 
Undergraduates 839 

Special Students 133 



CoLi^BGB OP PiNB Arts 

Resident Graduates 14 

Senior Class 28 

Juuior Class 64 

Sophomore Class 135 

Freshman Class 203 

Special Students 253 

Design and Normal Art 40 



1005 



737 



GBOGRAFBICAi; SDlfliAKV, Z903-4 
COZABG8 OF M8DICINB 

Jourth Year a8 

Third Year 22 

Booond Year a6 

^irit Year 55 

XJnclatsified and Special ai 

COZABO8 OF Law 

mdidYear 27 

Second Year 30 

nntYear 63 

Special Student i 

COI.I«BGS OP ApPUBD SCISNCB 

Ketident Gradnates . . 2 

Undergraduates 223 

Special Students 36 

SuMMBR School 
Students 

Names Repeated 

ToUl 



«75 



132 



lai 



261 



48 

2304 
82 

2222 



IV. GEOGRAPHICAL SUMMARY, 1903-1904 



STATBS 

Pennsylyania 106 

New York 1973 

New Jersey 23 

Connectient 11 

Vermont 12 

Massachttsetts 10 

Maine 8 

Michigan 7 

Ohio 5 

Delaware 4 

Florida 3 

Maryland 3 

Virginia 3 

Indiana 2 

Oregon 2 

New Hampshire 2 

Illinois 2 

Wisconsin 2 

IXttrict of Colnmbia 2 

Alabama i 

Colorado i 

Kanaas i 

Hitineaota i 

JJiMonri I 

Montana i 



Nebraska 

North Dakota. 
Oklahoma .... 
Tennessee .... 
West Virginia 



STATBS 



Total 219c 

COUNTRIBS 

Porto Rico 10 

Canada 4 

Argentine Republic 3 

Cuba 2 

England 2 

Japan 2 

Africa( Liberia) 

Armenia 

British Columbia 

Bulgaria 

Germany 

India 

Mexico 

Norway 



Total 31 



V. SUMMAI 
See Ai,Duni Rbcokd, pp. 741-7^3, 

SUPPLBMBNT, 1S9S-I903. 

The gndoatea sioce 1 8 ji number 3411 <Bee colamn ai in the foHon 
table) and tbe entire number of alamni (see colnmn 53) is 1730. Adt 
the alumn) of Geneva Medical College (711) the entire number is 3 
While the namber of persona receiving degreei is 3451 the nnmb< 
degrees conferred 18916 more than tliat, or 4367, See repeated natni 
the table, columns ti and 51. The entire nnmber of degrees coafei 
1899-1903, five jcars, is 888 of which 73 were second degrees to the t 
person. Thus 815 persona received the University d^ree for the first t 















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5 


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1 




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« 


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H 




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* 1 


18SJ-1898 


67^ 


laS 


168,10 




1094 


lOO 












S3 








1686: i68 


1899 






































































i7 


38 


9 ■ 




64 


4 


9 




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18 


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IC7 


17<) 


I90< 


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1901 


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A 


14 


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IS.' 


»«! 


190: 


s: 




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t 




ai 




4 






I4', 


»3S 


1903 


43 


54 


14 






111 


J 




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i 


12 


39 


33 




'= 


'3 


.98 






















38 


^ 


320 


105 












Totals. . . 


887 


435 


«7i.o 


15 


'574 


114, "8 


■'= 


» 


" 


as 


^48,; 



stntHAKY or ALtwin 



"DlGRSSS COMFKRKSD." For the bonoimrr degree* Me the table. 
ij mBj be summarized u follow! : 



rracnM UiuTersity has conferred boDormrf A.U. on 9 peraoDS ; (he otber 
laTiog been given by 'Genesee College. 



s 

< 


i 

! 

a 
i 

59 


1 

i 

£ 

3 

4 


66 


1 


a 




< 
X 


1 

a 
i 


3 


1 


1 


R 






a 

i 


ci 


4 


Q 


2 
3 


J- 
1 

107s 

15 

14 

3; 


1 


i 


1 
1 
1 

'77 

'93 
J07 
319 


1 

795 

806 
81a 
8.9 
8a£ 


■s 

1 


103 

"6 

I 

( 
4 




3 




•j 


5 


.48 


3 


98 

4 
4 
5 

4 
4 


■; 


»3 


7 








107a 
io87 

ii.« 

"'57 


7 
9 


191; 

■ 9i( 

■ 9it 

iir. 
15* 


HI 


59 


39 


66 






8 




aj 7 


150 


3 


119 


S 


30 


.0 








3 


1.S7J 


838 






3451 



BRIEF FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

See Alumni Rscord, p. 744. 

By W. W. PORTBR, '86, Treasurer 

Summary op Coli^bgb Property : 

University Campus, Buildings, etc |i,2ao,739<U 

Real Estate, Investments 1.338,677.70 

Stocks, Bonds and Mortgages 137,741.09 

Bequests in Probated Wills 444.ooo.oo 

Apparatus 125,997*^0 

CabineU 44»ooo.oo 

Library 108,164.59 

Notes and various other resources 246,675.46 

Total resources S3i556,i83.o6 

Liabilities 86,67aoo 

Net resources t3A'^9*S^y^ 

•Gain over 1898 (See Alxtmni Rbcord) 1,428,865.55 

Tuition Fees, 1903-4 109,586.46 

Total Salaries paid, 1903-4 I54.85a36 

Cash received and expended, 1903-4 435,875>7S 

Total Cash Gifts, 1903-4 90,440.60 

JNet Income from Endowment, 1903-4 55i739>93 



278 



LIBRARY STATEMENT 

See Ai,UMMi Rbcord, p. 745. 

By Aftociate Professor Mary J. Siblby, '89 



BOUND VOLUMES IN UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES 

Gmxkmal Library: 

Von Ranke Library received in 1888 16570 

Belden Library of Economics, started in 1895 819 

Peck Alcove, started Nov. 1900 237 

Other volumes 29728 



47354 

5917 
1864 
2425 
1014 
876 

773 
350 

336 
226 
100 

61235 

GROWTH IN BOUND VOLUMES, i JUNE, 1898 TO 

31 MAY, 1904 



DiPAETMBMT LlBRARIBS IN OTHSR BUILDINGS .* 

College of Medicine 

Wm. C. Rnger Law Library 

Historical Association 

Biology department * 

German department, started in 1901 

Semitic department, started in 190 1 

Clasrical Club 

Fine Arts 

English Club 

Philosophy department 



College 
Year. 


Bonghtby 
Univeraity. 


Bought by 
Friends. 


Binding. 


Gifts to 

General 

Library. 


Bzchange 
of Dupli- 
cates. 


Department 

Library Books 

Acceaaioned in 

Gen. Lib. 


Total 
Accea- 
aiona. 


l89aH99 

1899-1900 

1900-01 

1901-02 

1902-03 

1903-04 


166 

367 
687 

303 
346 

159 


95 
4 

"61" * 
81 
4 


192 

183 

87 

308 

H7 
161 


663 
1 165 

759 
718 

1635 
1349 


58 

2 

32 


2 

47 
II 

937 
761 

74 


1 176 
1768 

1544 
2327 

2872 
1747 














1 1434 



279 



a8o 



I^IBRARY STATBMBNT 



LIBRARY EXPENDITURES 



Year. 


Book!. 


1895-96 


^800.85 


1896-97 


753.85 


1897-98 


721.56 


1898-99 


721.17 


1899-00 


733.^9 


1900-01 


1657.24 


1901-02 


3448.77 


1902-03 


1644.46 


1903-04 


1546.54 



Period- 
icals. 



I243.55 
308.84 

273.19 

312.30 

375.85 
225.25 
412.93 
460.26 
518.33 



Binding. 



>93.25 
46.85 

85. 

70.45 

157.35 

46.95 
203.30 

38361 
126.25 



Salaries. 



S2187.07 
1469.63 

2354.43 
2404.21 

2000. 

2350. 

2457.50 

3451.75 
3547.82 



Other 
Expenses. 



$48354 

442.59 
39.61 

48 4< 
71.88 

83.36 
96.80 



353.35 



ToUL 



$3808.16 
3021.76 

3473-79 
3556.54 

333837 
4362.80 

661930 

5940.08 

6092.29 



BOOKS LOANED FOR HOME USE FROM THE 

GENERAL LIBRARY 



1895 243 

1895-96 925 

1896-97 1453 

1897-98 3114 

1898-99 3332 



1899-1900 5119 

1900-01 5606 

1901-02 7379 

1902-03 6385 

1903-04 5697 



Nineteenth Feb., 1895. The Board of trustees instmcted the library com 
mittee to make a part of the library circulating. The opening of Ui< 
library evenings and the loaning of books to departments has decreased|t]» 
circulation of the General Library. In 1903-4 there were 627 borrowers. 

Sixteenth Dec, 1903. The library began to be opened till 10 p. M. Th< 
remainder of the college year had an average nightly attendance of 14. . ^ 



THE UNIVERSITY PAPERS 

See Alumni Rbcord, pp. 746-747. 

SUPPLSMBNT, 1899-1904. 

Tke Universiiy Forum continued until commencement 1900, having had 
a career of five years. 

The first number of The University Weekly was published 25 Oct. , 1900. 
It was and is under student management. The venture has been success- 
ful. The paper has had each year an increased number of subscribers. 

A desire on the part of students and faculty to have the news of the Uni- 
tenitj oftener than once a week and to have a good medium for daily 
tnoooncements as well as to keep abreast of the times led to the publica- 
tion of \hit Syracuse Daily Orange, The first number appeared 15 Sept., 

1903. 
At present the papers published in the University are The University 

Herald^ founded 1872, The University Weekly ^ founded 1900, and the Syra- 
cuse Daily Orange^ founded 1903. 



PUBLICATIONS OF SYRACUSE UNIVER- 
SITY 

See AujMNi Record, page 749. 
SuppuuiBNT, 1899-1904. 

I. PAMPHLETS 

Annnal, 1899- 1900. 

Bulletins, University Number, Number I of Series I to IV respectively, 
April 1, 1900, to April i , 1904. 

Annooncement of the College of Medicine, 1899-1900, 1900-1901 ; Bulle- 
tin No. 5 of Series II to IV respectively, 1902, 1903, 1904. 

Announcement of the College of Law, 1899, 1900, 1901 ; Bulletin No. 3 
of Series II to IV respectively, 1902, 1903, 1904. 

Announcement of the Summer School, 1902. 

Bnlletin of the Summer School, 1903. 

Onondagan, 1899, 1900, 1901, 1902, 1903, 1904. 

The University Herald, Vol. 26-31, 1898- 1904. 

The University Forum, Vol. 4-5, 1 898-1 900. 

The University Weekly, Vol. 1-4, 1900-1904. 

281 



282 PUBLICATIONS OF SYRACUSB UNIVERSITY 

Syracuse Daily Orange, Vol. I, 1903-4. 

Charter and By-laws of Syracuse University, 1903. 

Financial Exhibit of Syracuse University, 1899, 1900, 1901, 1902, 

1904. 

Librarian's Report of the Medical College, June i, 1901. 

Bulletin of the College of Fine Arts, 1901. 

Illustrated Bulletin of Syracuse University, 1900, 1901. 

Bulletin of the College of Applied Science, 1903-4. 

General Information, Synopsis of Courses, Daily Program, Calei 
1900-1901. 

Views of Syracuse University June 5, 1895, by Wm. G. Ward. 

Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A. Annuals, 1899-1904. 

Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A. Hand-books, 1899-1904. 

Bulletin of Syracuse University containing Chancellor Day's Baccs 
reate Sermon, 1902. 

Report of the Museum and Courses in Biology, 1900. 

Literary and Bibliographical Bulletin of Syracuse University, 1903, Se 
IV, No. I. 

Chancellor Day's address. on Wm. McKinley, 1901. 

Yearbook of the Department of Architecture, 1899-1900, 1903-4. 

Bulletin of the Painting Department, 1904. 

Syracuse University and Seminaries, 1899. 

Contributions from the Zoological Laboratory of Syracuse Unirersi 
Vol. I. 



II. PROGRAMS 

Commencement Day, 1899-1904. 

General Program of Commencement Exercises, 1899-1904. 

Class Invitations, 1899-1904. 

Class Day, 1899-1904. 

Field Days, 1 899-1 904. 

Commencement Musical Soirees, 1899-1904. 

Annual Exhibitions of Works of Art, 1899-1904. 

Public Recital of Musical Students, 1899-1904. 

Public Recital of Musical Faculty, 1902-3, 1903-4. 

Denison Declamation, 1902, 1903. 

German Play, Flachsmann Als Erzieher, April 22, 1902. 

Society of Fine Art Fakirs, 1902,1903. 

Alumni Reunion and Announcement, 1899-1904. 



TV^E NEW Yw^-^K ". 

. , i. ' vi. 

■ ..... .-.^J 



284 SYRACUSB UNIVERSITY SONGS 

Chorus — All hail the f^lorious day 

Of Syracusae*s birth ! 
We'll sound her uame ! We'll hymn her fame ! 
And peal ber anthem forth. 

II 
Where Onondaga's lakes and mountains 

In summer's sunshine flash and glow, 
Where more than Arethusa's fountains 

With more than fiibled virtues flow, 
Where mighty tribes their watch-fires planted, 

Where now the Conqueror builds his home, 

Here Syracusae rears her dome, 
And lifts once more her brow, undaunted ! 

Chorus— All hail, etc. 

Ill 

O, Learning, sacred Guide of sages. 

Heaven-sent, mankind to illume and cheer, 

Stoop from thy awful throne of ages, 

Descend, and crown thy temples here ! 

Bring all thy train, the nine, immortal. 

Nymphs, Fauns, Hours, Graces, bring them all. 
And people, campus, grove, and hall, 

And glide, unseen, through every portal ! 

Chorus — All hail, etc. 

IV 

O, Heavenly Wisdom, throned eternal 

Above the starry spheres of light. 
Here shed thy effluence supernal. 

Till mind and soul, alike, are bright ! 
Here shine through nature, science, story. 

Art, song, philosophy divine, 

Till all our light shall blend in thine, 
And glory deepen into glory. 

Chorus— All hail, etc. 

V 

O, Spire-crowned City, fair and golden. 

Star of the mighty Empire State, 
Thy glor>' far outshine the olden. 

In more than empire's grandeur great ! 
Proud Alma Mater reign forever. 

Throned on thy hills a seat sublime ! 

Thy bells ring on, in tuneful chime. 
Till time and nature fail and sever ! 
Chorus — All hail, etc. 

Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1873, by George 
sing Taylor, in the office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washing^* 



SYRACUSB UNIVBRSITV SONGS 



285 



II. UNIVERSITY SONG 



By Junius W. Stevens, '95 



Syracuse University Song. 



»3=f 



^^ 




e vale of Onondaga 
s the eastern sky, 
itands our alma mater 
er hilltop high. 

Chorus 



2 When the evening twilight deepens 
And the shadows fall, 
Lingers long the golden sunbeam 
On thy western wall. 

Chorus 



3ve,Orange,fioat for aye ! 3 When the shades of life shall gather 

>yracuse, o*er thee ; Dark the heart may be ; 

sons be leal and loyal Still the ray of youth and love shall 

ly memory. Linger long on thee. 

Chorus 



a86 



SYRACUSB UNIVBRSiry SONGS 




SYRACUSB UNIVBRSITY SONGS 287 

IV. SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY SONG 
By Ernst Hbld, Mas. D. (No. 3447 Sup.) 



Rally all, ye sons of Syracuse ! 

To onr Alma Mater let us sing ! 
Let our cheerful voices loudly ring 

And may Heav'n with love our hearts infuse ! 

PRAiN— Hurrah, hurrah, hip ! 

Press the cup to lip ! 
Drink : By Syracuse we'll stay ! 
Let the Orange o*er us sway ! 

II 

Knowledge, wisdom, true humanity 
Let us seek ; they'll bring us honors high ; 

Syracuse will bloom and beautify 
Many generations yet to be. 

^^Aw— Hurrah, hurrah, hip ! etc. 

Ill 

Maiden eyes, the dark, the gray, the blue 
Cheer our path and bless us everywhere ; 

And our eyes may find one, life to share 
As companion, loving, gentle, true ! 

'HAiN—Hurrah, hurrah, hip ! etc. 

IV 

Rally, then, ye sons of Syracuse, 

To our Alma Mater let us sing ! 
Let our cheerful voices loudly ring! 

And may Heav'n with love our hearts infuse ! 

^AiK — Hurrah, hurrah, hip ! 

Press the cup to lip ! 
Drink : By Syracuse we'll stay! 
Orange be our flag for aye ! 



288 



SYRACUSB UNIVBRSITY SONGS 



-3 

"S. -i* 
a. «o 



c 


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o 


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«» 




3 




5 




1 


<b 


« 


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^ 


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1 


i 




SOME SPECIAL HISTORICAL MATERIAL 

In the Ai«UMNi Record was printed (pp. 750-768) in fac simile the first 
amioancement of Syracuse University, thus giving it wide circulation and 
I pennanent place as historical matter. In this Supp lement other matter 
of decided value and interest is treated in the following pages in like man- 
ner. It is to be regretted that we have so little of the detailed history of 
Genesee f oUege preserved. It may be that we can bring to light more 
fhmi that early field for the third volume of this series. A serious efifort 
will be made to do so. Meanwhile the first of the following selections is 
from that source. 

In selecting from the early programs it was difficult to fix a limit, for the 
peculiar features of each succeeding class and the personnel kept luring the 
•ditor on, bnt a limit had to be fixed and he used his best judgment. It 
was a strong temptation to reproduce a mock scheme or two, for they are 
decidedly interesting and quite witty, but the grinds are too fierce and 
might now give offense, and many of the allusions which constitute much 
of the wit could be understood only by those especially familiar with the 
entire situation in time and place. 

I. FAC SIMILE : FIRST PRIZE AWARDED IN GENESEE 

COLLEGE, II JULY, 1856 

Thit fac simile herewith given has an interesting history aside from the 
interest and affectionate regard with which many readers will note the 
names of the noble men who have appended their signatures to the paper, 
•11 of whom have now passed away. It is a personal notice to the success- 
ful young contestant, signed by the members of the committee of award 
and written with pencil on a fragment of yellow-brown wrapping paper 
torn from a larger sheet. Tht fac simile reproduces all except the color of 
the paper fragment. 

The prize was "The Presidents*,'* Dr. Joseph Cummings, and consisted 
of a large illustrated volume of Sbakespere, heavily bound in Morocco. It 
was the first prize given in the history of Genesee College. The circnm- 
itances were peculiar. On 3 May 1856, the members of the freshman 
(*59) and the sophomore ('58) classes elected six from each class to repre- 
lent them in the prize declamation contest. There were some fine young 
men in those classes, men who have done great work and have had great 
careers. The reader should scan the list. 

There was much rivalry in those days between the two literary societies, 
the Aletheon and the Atticeum. It was supposed that an equal number 
frsm each society as well as from each class would be selected, but it 
chanced that eleven were selected from the Atticeum and one from the 
Aletheon. The latter was the successful contestant and was lionized by his 
tociety in a noisy student celebration. 

289 



HISTORICAL MATTBR : INAUGURATION OF THB FACULTY 29I 



II. INAUGURATION OF THE FACULTY OF THE 

UNIVERSITY, 31 AUG., 1871 

A. large audience assembled iu Shakspeare Hall at 10 a m. of Augast 
S^it, to witness the inauguration of the Faculty of the College of the Uni* 
versity. The Trustees of the University, the Faculty elect and visitors 
occupied the stage. 

Rev. Dr. Jesse T. Peck presided and opened the exercises with a few 
Appropriate remai^M after which twelve verses of the Ninth Chapter of 
Proverbs were read from the Scriptures by Rev. B. I. Ives. 

After singing by the audience Rev. Dr. Lore offered a fervent and appro- 
priite prayer closing with the Irord's Prayer in which the assembly 
joined. 

Rev. Dr. Peck, President of the Board of Trustees, then delivered the 
iosngiiral charge to the members of the Faculty elect who rose in their 
places upon the platform and remained standing during the charge. The 
members of the Board of Trustees present also stood near Dr. Peck on 
the platform. 

INAUGURAL CHARGB BY RBV. DR. PBCK 

Gentlemen of the Faculty elect : 

By authority of the Board of Trustees of Syracuse University I have the 
distinguished honor of inducting you into the important offices to which 
you have been severally called. 

You have, no doubt, carefully studied the plans of the University and 
fetlized the grave responsibilities which must belong to your respective 
positions. You are aware that your methods of thought, your Christian 
ipirit, your daily Uves and your modes of teaching, will not merely stamp 
the characters of your students but fix forever the style of the University. 
You are to be the first instructors, the first, let us trust, of a long succes- 
sion of officers, who, as through tbe ages to come they follow in your 
"tcps will find everywhere the marks of your mind-power and of your 
p^nest toil If in the scope and aims you define, in the spirit you impart, 
^ the methods of government you adopt and the standaid of scholarship 
you establish there should be grave mistakes you need not be told how 
**treinely difficult, if not impossible, it will be to save the University from 
^^ disastrous results of such mistakes. If, on the other hand, as we do not 
for a moment doubt, the stamp you give tlie University in all these respects 
shall conform to the highest standard of wisdom it will be forever inefface- 
able. You have been selected, allow me to say, becauFe in >our years of 
^^perience as educators, you have left nothing questionable which will 
Pvethe friends of the University any just concern for the forming period 
^^ its history. Your plans will be broad and strong, your standard of char- 
J^rand scholarship will be elevated, your government will be paternal, 
'^^t firm and steady, and above all, you will see that the spirit of a sound 
^^ngelicil Christianity pervades the whole institution. 

Yon are placed in charge of the first ** College of the University," which 
f designed to be an Undergraduate College of the highest grade. In this 
rollege the faculty is. and will be, complete in itself. In everything essen- 
^1 to success which relates to instruction and government your functions 
^ill be full and your responsibilities exhaustive. This most important 



292 HISTORICAL MATTBR : INAUGURATION OF THE FACULTY 

department of University studies will be what yon and your colleagnes 
shall make it. You will stand firmly by the old historic curriculum of the 
classics and sciences which must constitute the fundamental basis of the 
highest scholarship. If Syracuse University does not become celebrated 
for the soundness and breadth of the learning it imparts it will be because 
you, gentlemen, misunderstand or fail to reduce to practice one of the 
strongest ideas in which the University originated. You will, of course, 
recognize special proclivities and provide for them, but you will not seta 
premium on them nor manage in any way so as to make a partial educa- 
tion appear more valuable than one broad *and profound in its foundatioot 
and far-reaching in its developments. 

In the mean time, the modern education, as it is termed, will receive yonr 
most faithful attention. There will be no revelations in science, no phase 
of " modern thought *' which 3rou will not apprehend, thoroughly sift and 
utilize for the benefit of your students. Let it be, however, distinctly 
understood that Syracuse University repudiates the idea that to keep pace 
with the historic development of truth in any of its great departments, it 
is necessary or expedient to throw away th^ grand old past^ or run wild in 
pursuit of novelties which have not yet been thoroughly tested nor revealed 
half their power to harm. Here, at least, the people shall see the work- 
ings of a patient purpose to demonstrate the perfect harmony and indiaaol- 
uble oneness of all that is valuable in the old and the new. We shall not 
allow any institution in the land to exceed our devotion to the demands of 
genius, be it ever so eiceptional or erratic, or of professional culture, how- 
ever special or broad may be its requisitions. Nor will we, on the other 
hand, ignore the classic learning which lias given breadth and strength and 
polish to the minds of the greatest men of the present and the ^one-by ages. 

Allow us also to say that to you is given the honor of forming the body 
of the higher •* Faculty of the University " which will in some important 
respects preside over the assemblnge of Colleges which are to constitute 
the University in its future development. 

You will have noticed, gentlemen, that in its aim and privileges the 
Institution over which you will preside is to be impartial and general. The 
laws under which you will do your work say, **the conditions of admission 
shall be equal to all persons." This pregnant clause is no accident. It 
represents the clear and well defined purpose of the Trustees that there 
shall be no invidious discriminations here against woman or persons of 
any nation or color. It means more. Brains and heart shall have a fair 
chance, and we propose no narrow-minded sectarianism on the one hand, 
nor infideli y on the other. We are, in the words of our fundamental law, 
devoted to the promotion of ** Christian learning.** This will, therefore, 
be ^our authority for a noble equality of rights and for the universal dif- 
fusion of the true Christian spirit throughout the University. 

By authority invested in me by the Board of Trustees, I hereby declare Rev. 
Daniel Steele, D.D., to be duly inducted into the ofiiceof Vice-President of 
the College of the University and to be Professor of Mental and Mofil 
Philosophy; John R. French, A.M., LL.D., Professor of Mathematics; 
Rev. Wesley P. Codingion, A.M., Professor of the Greek Language and 
Literature ; Rev. J. J. Brown. A.M., Professor of Chemistry ; and Rev. 
Charles W. Bennett, D.D., Professor of History and Logic. 

To you. Dr. Steele, as the present representative of the highest executive 
authority of the College of the University, I hereby deliver the keys which 
symbolize the power of the Faculty to admit or reject applications for the 
position and privileges of students in the College of the Untversitv. Yoo 
will accept this seal, conveying to you the right to stamp the diplomas of 
graduates with the high endorsement of the Syracuse University ; and I 
give you this Holy Bible to define the source and produce the spirit of your 
authority and ours. God bless the Faculty ! 



HISTORIC AI. MATTSR : INAUGURATION OF THB FACUI«TY 293 

lading the charge Dr. Peck announced that Dr. Steele would deliver 
Iress in behalf of the Faculty of the College. 

Rev. Dr. Stbelb's Address 

not appropriate for me, one of the seven professors elect, to as- 

pronounce a personal inaugural indicating the scope, spirit and 
e of this University. This duty awaits the election of the Chancel- 
the University and the President of the College/ and the future rein- 
vent of our corps of Professors. Yet, as it has pleased the curators 

institution to make a formal opening before the election of these 
I, it becomes the portion of the Faculty already elected to publish 
students and to the public their ideal of a college and the requisites 

part of the students for its realization. We have published a pro- 
d curriculum of both classical and scientific studies and have 

1 our young friends to gather about us for instruction. It now 
ea necessary to announce the principles which will be our guides in 
ernal economy and government of the institution committed to our 
ill the fashioning hands of its superior officers shall be laid upon it. 

proceeding to this duty we must record our deep conviction that this 
sity has been called into being by very signal interpositions of Divine 
ence, uniting, in a very short p>eriod of time, a large Christian 
ination throughout the wide domain of the Empire State, as they 
ever before been united in any educational enterprise, pouring upon 
he extraordinary baptism.of the spirit of Christian beneficence, and 
ing a growing, central and munidcent city for its location, a city 
has given the most substantial assurance of its interest in the pros- 
of the University which wears its classic name. For these indica- 
il the Divine favor we pause to lift up with glad and reverent hearts 
' Deum Laudamus, 

bose who are demanding a larger array of instructors and more 
appliances in the form of libranes and cabinets we would suggest 

is scarcely eighteen months since we were gathered in this very 
iscassing the name which should be given to the child to which the 
Convention had that day given birth. The demands of our students 
ed for college and of those in the onlv college of their church in 
Bite about to scatter unless an institution should be opened to receive 
in a bod^, together with the long time required for the erection of 
St building, have rendered it advisable to begin our enterprise on a 
t scale, commensurate with our resources, before our endowment has 
le productive to any great extent. Our confident expectation, 
sd on the blessing of God and the liberality of our patrons, is that 
•tttntion, now in its infancy, will in the course of a few years attain 
roos manhood. There must be time for growth. Let those who 
lown their seed patiently wait for the coming har\*est. While we 
ihis word of explanation we speak the feeling of all hearts when we 
at this is a historic hour. Our emotions are much like those of the 
African explorer who after years of research amid the rugged high- 
of Abyssinia, stands at last at the long sought fountain of the Nile 
I feet above the level of the sea and sees bursting from its rocky 
1 the river whose sweet waters are to sweep down through Egypt, 
ranary of the world, fertilizing all its harvest fields. The fountain, 

to-day for the first time quietly bubbles up in this hall, is, we 
to be in years not distant a broad and deep river of sweet waters re- 
Dg many lips and watering many lands. It is ours as its first Trustees 
*rofessori to clear the stones from this streamlet's bed and to direct, 
few days, its onward, widening course and then, when age has 
'zed oar footsteps, to gaze as from some mount of vision with prophetic 



294 HISTORICAI« matter: INAUGURATION OP THB PACUI^TY 

yet tearful and lingering eyes upon its future career of power and grtn- 
deur. May God grant us grace to do with gladness the humble yet criticil 
task which he has assigned to us, remembering that 

*' A pebble in the streamlet's bed 
Has changed the course of many a river, 

A dew drop on the baby plant 
Has warped the giant oak forever.*' 

In laying the foundations of this University we are not inclined to experi- 
ment upon novel theories. We do not discard the wisdom which the experi- 
ence of centuries of Christian educators lays open to our use. Yet we ait 
aware that progress is the great and beneficent law of human society, and 
that all human institutions and methods are capable of improvement. Bat 
all is not gold that glitters, all motion is not progress. Mere change is not 
advancement. 

We hope that we shall hold fast all that is good in the old theories of 
education, while we carefully test what the English style the new educs- 
tion. This to Americans is no novelty. It is more than thirty years since 
Dr. Wilbur Fisk, the foremost educator in the Methodist Episcopal Chnrch, 
advocated the introduction of the scientific course into the Wesleyan Uni- 
versity, the first in America to innovate upon the custom of conferring 
degrees upon classical scholari* only. While we continue the scientific 
course of study we do so with the strong conviction that we are not laying 
the foundations of the broadest and most thorough scholarship, but that we 
are yielding to the pressure of the times and to the pecuniary necessitiei 
of many students whose circumstances will not permit the longer period 
and increased expense of the classical curriculum. The scientific curricn- 
lum we commend to those who can take no other on the principle involved 
111 the maxim that half a loaf is better than no bread. At the end of this 
course the student invariably feels that this half loaf is a meagre supplj 
for his ^arpened appetite and he longs when too late for the whole loaf, 
a thorough classical as well as scientific course of study. Would that these 
words uttered out of a long experience as educators could fall upon the 
ears of hundreds of youth who are pondering the question of the best edu- 
cation for the duties of life. 

Nevertheless the physical sciences and the modem languages, called 
the new education, shall have their full share of attention consistent with 
the aim of the collegiate curriculum. This aim is not to fit men for trades 
or professions, but primarily, to be men, roundly developed, well cultured 
men, drilled to the most efficient energizing of all their powers. Disci- 
pline first and knowledge second is our motto. The chief studies should be 
not those made up of accepted facts to be treasured in the memory without 
tasking the inventive and constructive powers but rather those whidi fur- 
nish an arena for athletic intellectual exercise where the mind grapples 
with difficulties and becomes self-reliant by conqnest. The mathematics 
and the ancient classics have been proved by experience to be this gruid 
palestra for the mind. By inspecting our classical curriculum you will ob- 
serve that just eighteen of the thirty-six whole term studies required for 
the degree of Bachelor of Arts consist of philological and matnematictl 
subjects. We cannot without detriment to sound and true erudition abrid^ 
the amount of these drill studies however noisy the clamor for sncb to 
abridf^ement. Aside from the use of the mathematics as intellectual gyiD* 
nasties they underlie all the physical sciences. Well did Plato say, "Go^ 
geometrizes. " While the ancient classics, aside from their disciplioAry 
value, are the key to the vast tombs of buried thoughts. So long as Rome 
is the fountain of law and the center of history, the language of NniD* 
and Livy must be studied, and so long as Greece furnishes to the hnmao 
race her matchless ideals in poetry, sculpture, oratory and philosopby; 



I 



HisTORiCAi. mattbr: inauguration of the faculty 295 

and above all so long a9 Jesus, the God-Man, speaks to His brethren after 
the flesh in Hellenic symbols, so long must we furnish instruction in the 
language of the majestic Demosihenes, t he divine Plato, and the inspired 
Paul. These languages, lying as they do at the foundation of our world- 
conquering Hngli&h, and constituting the key->tone of the vast Indo-Ger- 
manicarch of tongues, and entering fo laigely into the terminology of all 
the natural sciences, have become indispensable to all exact scholarship in 
science or to accuracy and copiousness in style. We promise that the 
sciences which constitute a part of the undergraduate course shall be made 
as disciplinary as our facilities for individual experimenting and analysis 
will admit. We hope that the University will soon be able to open post- 
cradnate courses of btndy in which there will be still more* ample facilities 
for the thorough investigation by each student of the arcana of nature. 
The limited space allotted to modern history and English literature is 
rather an earnest of a future larger inheritance than a definite and fixed 
allotment. 

If any nation on the face of the earth needs the thorough study of history 
to anchor them on safer waters it is the people of the United States. We 
have so little reverence for antiquity and so slight a regard for the institu- 
tions, precedents and opinions of the older civilizations beyond the Atlan- 
tic, and withal, a confidence in ourselves so unbounded, that we are in dan- 
ger of repeanng the follies which have marked past generations. We are 
in danger of building up a national character of rude strength without the 
tmenities of culture, of contempt for the past in our eagerness to grasp the 
golden future, and of disgusting conceit in our forgetfulness that wise and 
frood, great and progressive nations lived on the earth before the May 
Flower was moored at Plymouth Rock. We are advocates of a course of 
hberal study of the English Language. 

" Stronger, far, than hosts that march 

With battle flags unfurled, 
It goes with Freedom. Thought and Truth, 

To rouse and rule the world.** 

We will employ our best endeavors to engraft upon our course of study 
at least one whole term to be devoted to the genius and works of the many- 
minded poet of nature, our immortal Shakspeare. 

The time has come when, through the facilities of travel, the languages 
of continental Europe can be studied by multitudes of American students 
in the lands where they are spoken. Yet for the benefit of other mnlti- 
tndes who may never cross the ocean we furnish rudimentary instruction in 
the collegiate coarse, necessarily rudimentary, because of the brief space 
allotted to them. 

Since it is our aim not only to fit our students to be true men and women 
bat also American citizens, competent to the discharge of the duties of citi- 
zeni^ip, we shall issue no diplomas to students who cannot pass a satisfac- 
tory examination in constitutional law and in ethics, the foundation of all law. 
In this age of intense materialism, when science falsely so called, is 
eliminating from the universe, God as a free, personal spirit, and reducing 
all beings to a series of developments by natural agencies, the study of 
mind assomes an importance with which it was never before invested. The 
proof of the existence of the Divine Personality depends upon it. For, if 
man is not a mere physical organism but a free intelligence acting through 
organs, then have we a solid foundation for the proof that God exists as a 
free spiritual personality presiding over the material universe. *' If there 
be a spirit in Uie little world of man there is a God in the great world 
of the universe.** Hence we have incorporated psychology into our curricu- 
hun as a stndy necessary to graduation. The reasons for the require- 
ment of a knowledge of the Christian evidences will be given presently. 



296 HISTORICAL MATTER : INAUGURATION OF THB FACULTY 

It may seem to our staaents that we are tantalizing their hopes by pot- 
ting ourselves on record as favoring elective studies at so early a period, 
when from the limited number of our present Faculty we are noable to 
afiford any such election. Nevertheless we will publish our theory and 
call upon onr friends to increase the endowment so generously as to enable 
us to make our ideal speedily practicable. We believe in a high standard 
of requirements for admission to the collegiate department of the Univer- 
sity, a standard to be gradually lifted higher and higher as onr academiei 
and high schools advance in scholarship, so that students will come to the 
University, as they do from the German gymnasia, with a thorough knowl- 
edge not only of the rudiments of the ancient languages and the mathe- 
matics but a very considerable advancement beyond. This would bring 
our students to the doors of the University knocking for admission at the 
average age of twenty-one years when they could make an intelligent 
selection of studies looking towards their future life-work. But our best 
preparatory schools are far below the grade of Prussian gymnasia. Hence 
the American University, compelled as it is to do the drill work of the pre- 
paratory school, should hold its students, matriculating at the average age 
of 19, to a uniform prescribed curriculum for at least two years when ther 
will be qualified by age, self-knowledge, and scholastic attainments to 
select from a liberal range of studies. Lest any one may l>e apprehensive 
that this bifurcating or trifurcating of the curriculum by elective conreei 
at the end of the Sophomore year may prove detrimental to classical erudi- 
tion we quote the recent statistics of Harvard College : — ** From a class of 
rather more than 130, last year, about no elected Greek; and the same 
number, not in all cases the same individuals, read Latin.'* In that Col- 
lege the election of studies is allowed after the Freshman year. In the 
Junior and Senior years the number of classical students in Harvard very 
naturally diminishes. 

We also recommend to the Trustees, under such regulations as they may 
be pleased to establish, the admission of University students to the recita- 
tions and lectures of the College classes. By this we mean the admission 
to the privileges of the lecture room of persons qualified to receive instmc- 
tion in special studies only and who are unable to pass the examination 
required for matriculation. The Trustees should be earful to limit this 
privilege to such a number as will not incommode the classes and to 
require the same tuition fee lest the pecuniary motive should be against 
the prescribed courses of study. 

Having spoken thus cursorily and by no means exhaustively of the sub- 
jects of collegiate study we turn to the motives which are to be applied to 
the will of the student to secure that earnest and continued attention whidi 
is called hard study. It is an old adage, " Youth hates study.'* The appe- 
tites are clamorous for indulgence ; the spirits are volatile ; the great, gay 
world allures to its pleasures ; fiction seduces by her tinsel charms and the 
social nature cries out for constant companionship. All these are obstacles 
to continuous and concentrated attention to irksome drill studies. What 
counter-influence must be applied to hold the mind from the sway of iocfa 
influences? The ready answer is the principle of emulation. Appeal to 
the love of superiority implanted in each bosom and turn it to the use of 
discipline and knowledge. Thus most of our modern educators have ree- 
soned and have concluded their argument by the system of marks, honon 
and prizes for scholarship. Yet all who employ this as the chief motive to 
study feel a secret misgiving for the sacrifice of true nobility and manhood 
to expediency. The inquiry comes up in the minds of all Christian edn- 
cators is there not a more excellent way ? Cannot the student be indoced 
to application except by motives which afford a tremendous incentive to 
deceptive arts and which eat out the moral integrity as doth the canker? 
Moreover, the testimony of all college professors stands uncontradicted 



0I8TORICAI. MATTBR : INAUGURATION OF THB FACUI.TY 297 

thai emulation reaches, after the first year or term, only a very few who 
idll remain as contestants for the honors and prizes after the majority of 
the class have quietly withdrawn from the field of* strife. The question 
arises ought a motive to be applied which fails in the case of a majority ? 
Hsve not all human souls been so constituted that they can be reached and 
actuated by some one class of motives? The answer is at hand that moral 
md religious considerations have this design and when properly applied 
they seldom fail of their legitimate effect. But what is to be done with 
tbcse cases of failure ? There will come to ns those who cannot be swayed 
to mental application by the love of truth nor by the law of God with its 
tremendous sanctions. The judgment day in their estimation, is too far 
away to constitute a restraint from an idle or sinful employment of the 
golden hours of youth. Some motive much nearer to their volitions than 
the day of doom must be applied to such pupils in order to drive them to 
their distasteful tasks. Of course when Hgh motives fail after a fair trial 
lower incentives must be applied. Just as the statesman depends on moral 
motives for the conservation of society but where these fail provides pen- 
alties to influence such as are below the reach of moral suasives. so the 
school disciplinarian must in the last resort have penalties as sanctions of 
hia authority. These will consist in a privation of the privileges of the 
College in whole or in part according to the gravity of the offence or the 
nature of the delinquency. We shall seek to throw around our students no 
immunity from the police laws in force in this city. European university 
students may be exempt from obedience to municipal authority and may 
expiate their offences in the University dungeon unmixed with common 
criminals. But in Americd the student is a citizen amenable to the laws of 
the State which affords him protection and when he tramples that sov- 
ereign authority under his feet his gown shall not exempt him from arrest 
bj the municipal authorities, and if incarcerated, no university habeas cor- 
/ss shall deliver him from the society of the illiterate felons to which he 
has degraded himself. Scholars are not a sacred caste in America. Here 
tU men are equal before the law. We would not change this broad demo- 
cratic principle of our free institutions if we could. We expect the students 
of Syracuse to be law abiding citizens If they are not such we expect the 
police to arrest and the court to punish them like other offenders against 
Uie good order of the city. We do not mean by this declaration to divest 
ooraelves of that paternal watch-care and fatherly regard which becomes 
ns in loco parentis. We shall cherish the liveliest interest in the welfare of 
our pupils and shall charge ourselves with the guardianship of all, but 
more especially of minors and non-residents cut off from parental over- 
sight. But kind fathers chargei their sons and daughters to be law-keeping 
and warn them of the penalties of violated law and assure them that there 
will be no perversion of justice in their favor. After this digression on the 
relation of the student to the penal enactments of the State we return to 
oar system of internal laws. We have no burdensome code to enact. A 
few most obvious requirements will be laid upon our students with the 
consequences of non-compliance. 

The marking system as an incentive to personal rivalry will be abandoned, 
and, of conrse, college honors also, but the marks will be retained as a part 
of our system of examinations and the marks for daily recitations will be 
combined with the examination mark to determine the question of advance- 
ment and graduation. The details of the system it is not our purpose to 
qnead before you at the present time. Our aim will be to bring the pres- 
sure of motive to stud^ to bear not merely on the examinations after the 
Bnglish method with its vices of idleness, dissoluteness and cramming, but 
to bring it to bear on every day's work as well as on the final test of exam- 
ination. 
But other topics demand at least brief notice on this occasion. The lit- 



298 HISTORICAL MATTER : INAUGURATION OF THE FACULTY 

erary societies of the students contribate no trifling part to the caltnre 
afforded by a college. Students very largely educate each other. It hM 
been said, ** Send your child to any instructor whom you may select, Ui 
companions will be his real teachers." We could most earnestly wish tint 
at least two public literary associations would be formed affording a fidd 
for practice in debate, declamation and public address, freqaentl^r mwitiM 
the public to witness their intellectual gladiatorship and stimulating eta 
other by a generous rivalry in the noble art of persuasion. But from tke 
recent history of public societies in American colleges we fear that ov 
wish is vain. An institution hostile to the life of these public literary 
associations has arisen in all our colleges before which theae associitioiii 
are wasting away to mere skeletons and in some instances to death itietf. 
I refer to the college secret society. I am not prepared to say that tUsil 
an unmitigated evil. It may minister incentives to scholarship and it oitr 
afford a field for the exercise of literary criticism and a far-reaching bond 
of scholastic friendship. But it antagonizes the public society by acs t i it 
divisions where there should be unity and by monopolizing the time tin 
interest of its members. By a strange infirmity of the human mind tint 
which throws about itself the veil of mystery and utters itself in sigm 
known only to the initiated has a peculiar charm b^ which to fascinate thoM 
young in ^ears and those also who are young m understanding. In tSi 
our American colleges and universities secret societies have established 
themselves without the consent, and in man^ instances against the e xui ca s ed 
will, of the authorities. They are not officially recognized, they are beyood 
all control. Perhaps from their very nature they must always be ontkus. 
But the experiment is worth trying of granting these organizations t 
chartered existence and rooms in the University building with the require- 
ment of stated public literary exercises which shall, in part at least, com- 
pensate for the absence of the public societies. It is a sad day for any lit* 
erary institution when its most flourishing and attractive societies are secret 
fraternities, in danger of falling headlong from literary associations to mere 
convivial clubs, dragging their members down to sensuality instead of giv- 
ing them wings for mounting to the empyrean of divine philosophy. 

To a majority of our faculty the presence of ladies in college is no nov- 
elty . We apprehend no more difficulty in discipline from this fact than k 
found and surmounted in your grammar schools and high school of Svxa- 
cuse. In fact from the maturity of the students we apprehend the dffi- 
culty arising from the co-education of the sexes will be less in the Unrrer^ 
sity. In this regard we have no other rules to impose upon the stadenli 
in their intercourse than good society lays upon its members. 

A far more important and much discussed question is the relatioo of 
University culture to religion . We are not disposed to evade a qnestioo so 
vital nor do we wish to assume any equivocal attitude on this subject 
before the public. Here we do not wish to innovate npon the general 
usage of American colleges which has prevailed with scarcely an excep- 
tion from the day that Harvard opened its doors to the sons of tne]nlgriiBS 
two hundred and thirty-five years ago. This mother of our colleges, by the 
appointment of a chaplain and by its required attendance upon osi^ 
prayers and public worship twice upon the Sabbath reflects the almost nil- 
form practice of the universities and colleges of our country. These initi- 
tutions have with few exceptions been the outgrowth of the religions fcd- 
ing and religious wants of the people who have founded and endowed then. 
The exceptions are very few to the general statement that a strong religion 
life in them and in the patrons behind them is necessary to the vaeeemd 
these highest institutions of learning not excepting State Universitici 2i 
the broad significance of the word success. We speak not merely of tfait 
success which is measured by the millions of endowment and theunjd 
alumni and the length of the roll of present attendance bnt of theqnil- 



HISTORICAL MATTBR : INAUGURATION OF THB FACULTY 299 

fcy of culture bestowed, the kind of work done for the world. It has been 
omid that those who have been trained under the influence of mere mun- 
tine motives to the exclusive development of the earthward side of their 
Mttire to the neglect of the spiritual part and by the use of ideals devoid 
li the high spiritual qualities which religion affords have been destitute 
if that strength, symmetry, beauty and usefulness which mark the lives 
if thcMe who have thrown open the skylight of the soul, the spiritual 
■Btnre, to the transfiguring power of religious truth and spiritual infiuences 
tmd who have been moulded by a culture vitalized and guided by the spirit 
of God. The true university aims to afford instruction in every science 
nd to unfold every faculty and susceptibility of the student, body and 
Kml. It is a very hasty analysis of man which fails to disclose his spiri- 
taal susceptibilities. It is a very slovenly and careless reading of history 
iriuch closes the volume without the discovery that man is constitutionally 
ft rtlispous being. We know that there are philosophers guilty of such a 
iMmKUng analysis who unhesitatingly eliminate from man every element 
vtaicfa cannot be weighed by the steelyards of their positive or material- 
igtic philosophy or which is too subtle to be detected by the electrometer 
lad wno boast that they can reduce all there is of man to a gas. There are 
pliiloaophic historians who accurately trace the lineaments which the acci- 
oents ot soil, climate and government have impressed on nations, while 
lliey are stone-blind to tbe inherent and essentially religious structure of 
Kbe human soul. 

** We are most profoundly convinced that there is a God -ward side to 
every human soul and that any process of education which ignores this 
neat fact, whatever other excellencies it may combine, must be radically 
Sefective in its results. An atheistic culture develops monstrosities and 
■ot beautiful symmetries in human character. History confirms this dec- 
huation. There are three recfuisites to true culture which religion alone 
Gin sapply. First, a faultless ideal of manhood. Character-building is a 
fine art. The fine arts are practicable only as they find ideals of perfection 
lo natnxe and in the analytical and synthetical power of the human intellect. 
The painter whose soul is not only a photograph of observed nature in her 
vsrymg modes but a creative energy, idealizing nature by a process of ab- 
Sliaction and combination, creates his own ideals and then struggles for 
flwir realization. There are few who have this rare creative or poetic 
power. The mass of men must have a model furnished by another. The 
ahakespeares, the Homers, the Angelos, the Phidiases are rare in history. 
God has sparingly sown the earth with genius and he has jealously divesik- 
ed it of the power of reproduction. Nevertheless every human beiuf^ is 
nqurcd by his creator to sieze the chisel and carve out for himself the im- 
mrtal product of character. Endowed with little ideality he is incompe- 
tent to the formation of an ideal which shall beckon him onward to success. 
Be must either copy the marred and disfigured characters of his fellow- 
•en standing on the same plane with himself or some faultless ideal must 
be revealed to him from aoove. Here is where Christianity comes to the 
lid of cnlture disclosing the glorious perfections of the Creator and render- 
iiig the ideal character still more practicable and copyable by its incar- 
SstioaL ** And the Logos was made fiesh and dwelt among us and we be- 
lield his glory full of grace and truth.** These qualities of benignity and 
Verity are the very ideals which this selfish and false world cannot afford. 
They stand forth resplendent as the noon-day sun in Jesus Christ the God- 
%aa. The culture which has blessed mankind and lifted up our modem 
fiiviKzadon has all come directly or indirectly from the study and imitation 
Of this matchless model. It is not our purpose to remove Jesus Christ from 
that pedestal on which He stands in the system of collegiate education in 
America and to put in His place any figment of the imagination. But 
tather by teaching Christian apologetics we will endeavor to strengthen 



30O HISTORICAL MATTER : INAUGURATION OF THB FACULTY 

in the faith of the students the foundations of that pedestal and by pro- 
moting their spiritual development we will help them to a cUarer tnd 
more adequate view of the excellences of this faultless ideal. It is the 
Holy Spirit which takes of the things of Christ and shows them onto men. 
So far as our prayers, counsels and influence may go these shall all be 
directed to secure not only the intellectual cultivation of our students but 
also that spiritual transformation which is expressed in the term conversion 
or regeneration. We should as educators aim to secure this end from 
mere aesthetical reasons, in order to secure the highest beauty, symmetry 
and perfection of character aside from all questions relating to the futnrt 
life. 

In the second place religion is requisite to true culture as the only effect 
ual safeguard to th& morals of the student. There are systems of religion 
in which morals are divorced from the religion. Such is not Christianity. 
She descended from the skies with the rewards of heaven in one hand anc 
an absolutely perfect moral code in the other, a code commending itself t( 
every man's conscience and enforced by the amazing sanctions of etemt 
rewards and punishments. So long as the Bible is the acknowledgec 
foundation of our civilization, our civil and criminal codes of law, and •( 
long as its spirit and teachings are requisite to the existence of self govern 
ment and of free institutions it should have a place in the common school 
the high school, the seminary, the university, as an influence necessary U 
conserve good order and pure morals. You have wisely put the Bible iot< 
our hands. '* The word of the Lord endureth forever.*' All men and al 
institutions built upon it shall share its immortality. 

In the third place religion is necessary to culture by^ the aid which i 
affords. The pathway of mental and moral discipline is severe. Its task 
are irksome. There is need of relief, of the good cheer which is invo1ve( 
in the word grace ^ the favor of God assisting tempted and imperfect men 
battling with besetments and confronted by obstacles. Such gracious ai< 
does our Christianity aflord to all who seek. Hence we shall not only at 
sume the truth of Christianity and teach its evidences disclosing the im 
mutable foundation stones on which it rests but we shall exhort on: 
students to put on the Lord Jesus Christ, making no provision for the flesl 
to fulfil the lusts thereof, and we shall afford them facilities for socis 
religious worship and encourage their attendance. We shall also reqnin 
daily attendance upon morning prayers in the chapel and also upon th< 
morning Sabbath service in the churches of this city and vicinity wfaid 
they may elect or their parents may elect for them. We shall expect tbi 
members of the various Protestant denominations to attend npon their ows 
churches, the Roman Catholic his cathedral, the Jew his s^nsjgogne, be- 
lieving that each of these forms of faith contains elements of spiritual cnl' 
tnre almost infinitely better than Atheism. We take this earliest oppor* 
tunity to suggest to the students the propriety of organizing a Chruinsfl 
association or society of missionary statistics or of religious inquiry, by 
whatever name it may be called, for the promotion of the spirit of evangeliflo 
in this institution. 

And now having indicated to the public the spirit and policy of the 
Faculty of this institution we are modest in regard to our personal promisei, 
preferring to achieve our tasks with no flourish of trumpets bnt toaddretf 
ourselves to the truly Herculean labor laid on us of laying the fonndstioB 
stones so firmly that they will bear the walls which shall rise npon them. 
Our successors who may lay the successive courses of masonry and briif 
forth the capstone with shoutings will from their more conspicnoos poMr 
tion attract the notice of the public eye after the obscure sabtnTsnetti 
toilers who laid the foundations in the deep trenches shall hare been to* 
gotten. Nevertheless we accept our providential mission and oonsecrstt 
to this work our highest energies and impressed with the ntterance of ttail 



HISTORICAL MATTBR : LAYING OP CORNBR STONB 30I 

Holy Bible, ** except the Lord build the house they labor in vain that build 
it,*' to the Lord Jesus Christ we pledge our earnest prayers, looking forward 
to the day of final accounts for the reward of our labors and a reco);nition 
of the motives which have actuated us. 

At the close of the address the Dozology was sung, the benediction was 

pronoanced by Rev. Dr. Hibbard of Rochester and the assemblage 

uuiperaed. 



III. LAYING OF CORNER STONE. HALL OF 
LANGUAGES. 31 AUG., 187I 

At three o'clock p. m.. the corner stone of Syracuse University was laid 
with appropriate ceremonies. Ao immense gathering of people assembled 
CO the grounds at an early hour. 

The platform was crowded with distinguished guests and members of the 
^Mrions boards — ^the Trustees of the University, Trustees of the College of 
IfiaBionaries. the State Committee of Methodism, the Committee from the 
UniTeraalist State Convention, etc. Among the distinguished gentlemen 
yreaent were Chief Justice Sanford E. .Church, Hon. Andrew D. White, 
Pkcaident of Cornell University. Rev. Dr. Richmond Fisk, President of St. 
l«awrence University, Rev. Dr. Cummings, President of Wcsleyan Uni- 
maitj and Rev. Dr. E. O. Haven, President of the Northwest University, 
Jndgea Andrews and Comstock ; Hon. W. H. Bogart. 

Shortly after three o'clock the ceremonies were opened by the reading 
ffom Scriptures the 8th chapter of Proverbs by Rev. J. S. Bacon, pastor of 
the Fonrth Presbyterian church, Syracuse. 

Rev. Dr. Eddy, pastor of the Central Baptist church, Syracuse, announced 
t hymn which was sung by the congregation after which prayer was 
offered by Rev. Dr. Cammings, President of Wesleyan University, 
Middletown, Connecticut. 
Rev. A. J. Phelpa of the Board of Trustees delivered the following 

Historical Sketch 

Mr. PrbsidbnT, Ladibs and Gbntlbmbn :~It devolves upon me to 
offer a few brief statements connected with the history of the Syracuse 
Ufiiverrity. Like many other great and noble enterprises this seems not 
^ to have been the result of plan or concert, but rather, as we then thought 
tod still believe, a sort of intuition or inspiration which came upon several 
ftinds almost simultaneously . 
^ This enterprise, in its inception, contemplated the removal of Genesee 
L Qollexe to Syracuse and the first tangible expression within our knowledge 
looking in this direction was a note from Professor J. R. Frrnch which 
Ht received in reply to a communication we had made to him in the 
ftooth of Jannary, 1866, declining to cooperate with him in the proposed 
pita to raise Centenary funds for the endowment of Genesee College, on 
tlie gronnd that its location was quite too uncentral and ineligible to meet 
Ike demands of our educational interest in the great Empire State and 
•tionKly urging the imperative necessity of a first class college under the 
]iitroiiage and anpervision of our denomination in some central position 



• 



302 HISTORICAI* MATTBR : LAYING OP CORNSR 8TONB 

in which oar people from all parts of the State might feel a commoo inter- 
est and where they might invest with better promise of grand results. 

To these sentiments Dr. French promptly responded and fnllj committtd 
himself in favor of the removal of Genesee College from Lima toaomemoR 
eligible location. Almost instantly after the receipt of this note we levned 
of an incidental conversation occurring only a few days before betucen 
Rev. B. Arnold and Professor Bennett. The spirit fell first upon the former 
and the latter soon caught the inspiration and as quick as thcaght tfaoe 
appeared screws under the sills, a locomotive on the track, and the time 
honored college seemed trembling for its journey. At almost equal dite 
Dr. I/ore might have been seen in his sanctum listening to this topic when 
suddenly he replied by placing in the hand of his friend a half colmna of 
"proof" on the removal of Genesee College, and the two agreed that the 
intuition or inspiration, which ever it was, must be good. 

The uezt fact of interest time will allow us to note was the first ooKl^ 
convention, called under the auspices of a centenary meeting at Elmn 
and held at Syracuse, April 12, 1866. This convention of representatives of 
five central and western conferences took action decidedly favoring the 
enterprise and adopted measures for its advancement. Daring the sane 
month Black River and Oneida conferences took harmonions action and 
constituted their visitors to Genesee College, commissioners to confer with 
the Trustees and negotiate for the removal of the College to some centisl 
locality in the State. 

At the annual meeting of the X^^s^c^ ^^^^ ^^ Lima, Jnne 27, 1866, the 
Commissioners being present and representing their several Conferences, 
the Trustees responded in substance that, the Genesee and Hast Genesee 
Conferences concurring, we deem it best that Genesee College should be 
removed to some more central location in the State on condition that two 
hundred thousand dollars irrespective of ground and buildings be rais^ by 
the Conferences east of Cayuga Lake to equal two hundred thousand dol- 
lars to be furnished by the two Genesee Conferences. 

Immediately after this action of the Trustees the Commissioners issued 
a call for a convention of Laymen and Ministers from Black River, Oneida, 
and Wyoming Conferences, which was held at Syracuse, July 26, 1866. This 
Convention indorsed the basis agreed upon by ^e joint meeting of Ttnsteee 
and visitors and recommended that Syracuse and other eligible localities 
should be canvassed to ascertain what inducements would be ofiFered to 
locate the college in their midst. 

At the session of the Genesee Conference in the autumn of 1866 this 
whole plan was, with great unanimity, indorsed, whereupon the Tmsteefl 
took measures to secure the passage of an act by the Legislature of 1866- 
67 legalizing the removal of the college. Immediately thereafter psrtiei 
entered upon the authorized canvass in several localities. In Syracnse pri- 
vate interviews were held with several distinguished gentlemen by whoM 
advice and co-operation a preliminary counsel was called and therenpos 1 
private note was prepared as follows : 

**SYRjkcnsB, Blarch 5. 1867. 
Sir : You are requested to meet several of our citizens at the office of 
the Salt Company of Onondaga, Thursday, March 21, at seven P. lc»to 
attend an adjourned meeting for consultation in regard to a matter of gtett 
public interest. Yours, etc., 

William D. Stewart, ' C. T. Longstrrst, 
Gkorgk F. Comstock, Chas. Andrews, 

E. W. Lkavenworth, T. B. Fitch, 

A. D. Whitb, C. Tallman, 

A. MUNROE." 



HISrORICAX. MATTBR : I«AYING OF CORNBR STONB 303 

note WAS addressed to one hundred or more of the most wealthy and 
tial of onr citizens. The convention thus called was largely 
id and of marked interest. After brief addresses by Dr. Lore, A. J. 
and others, without the least suggestion from members or ministers 
own denomination, the convention took measures to secure the bond- 
the city for the promotion of this enterprise. Whereupon Judge 
)ck was requested to draft an enabling bill and the convention 
a public call for a mass meeting of the citizens of Syracuse, 
meeting convened the following week at City Hall. The' gathering 
•g^, enthusiastic and harmonious. The proposed bill was presented 
ge Comstock, which provided for bonding the city for the sum of 
K>, conditioned on the establishment of a college in S3rracuse or im- 
e Ticinity with endowment of $400,000, independent of city bonds, 
ill was approved by the convention with great unanimity ana at once 
ded to our representatives at Albany and immediately passed the 
fttnre and became a law. 

ng this year, 1866, which was observed as the Centenary of Methodism, 
iptions were secured on many of our charges in furtherance of this 
In this work Rev. J. B. Poote, A.M. and Rev. D. D. Lore, D.D. 
bers were specially active and successful. 

le spring of 1867 Black River and Oneida Conferences fully ratified 
preliminary proceedings, elected college commissioners and appointed 
. D. Adams, Rev. James Brwin and Rev. A. B. Gregg agents to raise 
for this enterprise. Meantime volunteers among whom Rev. C. P. 
., Rev. E. Arnold, and others, were prominent, operated with marked 

I in securing subscriptions and awakening interest in favor of this 
lent. 

Conferences of 1868 re-affirmed their confidence in the enterprise and 
minted commissioners and agents to further the cause. 

II the first the Trustees of Genesee College have been true to the faith 
▼e done all in their power to consumate this noble work. 

ng to secnre the passage of the desired bill for the removal of the 
t in the legislative session of 1866-67 they renewed their efforts 
lowing year and procured the passage of an ** enabling,*' or rather 
\4d>ling act, authorizing the trustees to remove the college, leaving 
a Seminary all the real estate of the college and $75,000 of its cash 
ment. The removal was opposed by the citizens of Lima who 
i from the court an injunction which has not yet been dis- 

• 

was a day of darkness to our enterprise. Still the overhanging 
were not utterly dark. The hearts of the masses and the open 
bands of the people were with us. The pledge of {loo.ooo from 
ise and $125,000 on subscriptions, leaving only $75,000 to be raised 
\ the proportion of our Central Conference, with assurances from 
st that the required balance should be timely met, shed some light 
lur darkness. Still the persistent opposition of interested parties at 
the disabilities of the so-called * * Enabling act, ' ' and the legal restraints 
Injunction upon the Trustees, made the timid falter and even our 
il agents in mid-season thought it wise to turn to other means of 
ood and some of the people began to talk of defeat. But the original 
iding friends of the enterprise who never so much as thought of 
or mortification only talked of a '* change of base,^' 
le midst of this peril, in the darkest hour of the dark day, one who 
the sentiments of the many with almost prophetic assurance 
med, ** We shall see in due time a magnificent university towering up 
ue of the high lands of our Central City, standing there a living 
I of constancy and perseverance, a blessing to the great State in which 
e, a perpetual honor to the church we represent and an imperishable 



304 HISTORICAL MATTER : LAYING OF CORNER STONB 

monument to the praise and glory of the great head of the church. God 
hasten the dav when the vision shall be real ! ** 

Thus while many were disheartened and paralyzed by murmnringt of 
coming evil others were looking and hoping, praying and planning, when 
almost as if by magic the air was vocal, a voice from the center edioing 
from the west and the east, from the south and the north, cxied 
let us have a convention — a z^eat State Methodist convention. Let 
us come together and deliberate upon great issues that concern the chmdi 
and the State — especially let us combine the wisdom and strength of the 
people and make some new strike which shall pat our great raucatioiitl 
interest beyond peradventure. 

In the order of Providence the auspicious day appeared. On the 23nd 
day of February, 1870, thank God^ the convention came^ and the able ntter^ 
ances and wise deliberations of many distinguished men wiUi the skillful 
supervision of the President, Rev. J. T. Peck, D.D., made it a great occa- 
sion in more respects than one. While it conserved in a high degree other 
interests vital to religious and social life it was the day-spring to our long 
cherished project of establishing on some prominence of our beautiful city, 
halls of science and letters to rejoice our own hearts and make glad and 
elevate the generations to come. 

The interest of this convention was greatly intensified by the ptasage 
of the following resolution : 

*' Resolved, That this State convention of the M. B. chnrch of New YoiIl 
approves of the plan to establish without delay in the city of ^racuae or 
its immediate vicinity a first class university and that we recommend 
that immediate measures be taken to raise at least $500,000, to endow the 
university." 

But the grand climax was reserved until, as if by direct impulse from 
above, name after name was announced with magnificent subscriptions for 
the university, inspiring and electrifying the people beyond measure. 

Perhaps no better description can be given of this hour of thrilliog 
interest and prophetic history than is set forth in the following abstract 
of the published proceedings of the convention. After the close of tbe 
several able and stirring speeches on this subject Dr. Jesse T. Peck aroae. 
evidently impressed with the historic significance of the occasion, ana 
said, 

'* I have heard it said that talk will not build a college but that maatf 
will. I propose that you instruct Brother Ives to stand here on the plat- 
form and see how much can be raised here and now. All in favor of thii 



)t 



say aye. 

The proposition was unanimously approved and Rev. B. I. Ives came 
forward and said, 

" I liked that brother's speech over yonder, and about the last thing be 
said was, * Send us Brother Ives.' Here I am and I am after yon.*' 

Mr. Ives asked for two hundred thousand dollars from the audience. 

Tbe first subscription was in the foUovdng words and read l^ Rev. Dr. 
I#ore: 

" I will be one of four to subscribe $25,000 each, making $100,000, towardf 
endowing four professorships, when the University to be located at Syia* 
cuse is legally and practically established ; with the understanding that I 
with my good wife appropriate the savings of a life-time to the pajment 
of this subscription and make arrangements for any balance which may be 
unpaid at our decease to be paid from our estate." 

JRSSB T. PSCK. 

F. H. Root, Esq., proposed to pay the interest on twenty -five thousand 
dollars for five years. E. Remington pledged to pay twenty-five thons- 



HISTORICAL MATTRR : LAYING OF CORNER STONB 305 

liars as soon as circnmstances permit, which will be soon. Rev. J. 
irford pledged twenty-five thousand dollars. Hon. Georgfe F. Com- 
iledged the interest of twenty- five thousand dollars for ten years, 
tiooal subscriptions were then made in sums varying from ten 
nd dollars to one hundred dollars and amounting in the aggregate 
hundred and eighty-one thousand dollars. 

igh these figures partially depreciated so as to leave a real footing 
at $160,000, still this was the grand breeze which set our strandea 
irift and turned her prow towards the glorious harbor. 
goodly craft so suddenly emerged from jeopardy the convention 
ncd •* The S3'racuse University," and at once proceeded to elect the 
ng 

BOARD OF TRUSTBBS 

\afge: Rev. Bishop E. S. Janes, D. D., of New York ; Hon. Reuben 

iton. 

fsee Conference: Rev. Thomas Carlton, D.D., Rev. A. D. Wilbor, 
P. H. Root, Esq., J. N. Scatchard, Esq. 

Genesee Con/ereftcei Rev. J. E. Latimer, D.D., Hon. D. A. Ogden, 
David Decker, Esq., Ezra Jones, Esq. 

ml New Yofk Conference r Rev. D. D. Lore, D.D., Rev. A. J.Phelps, 
L I. Ives, Rev. J. F. Crawford, E. Remington, Esq. 
ming Conference: Rev. H. R. Clark, D.D., Rev. D. W. Bristol, D.D., 
I. G. Prindle. 

k River Conference : Rev. I. S. Bingham, Rev. S. R. Fuller, A.M., 
Millard Ives. 

f Conference: Rev. J. T. Peck, D.D., Rev. J. E. King, D.D., Rev. 
ck Hawley, D.D., Professor H. Wilson, A.M. 

• York Conference : Rev. M. D'C. Crawford, D.D., Professor Alonzo 
A.M., Philip Phillips. 

' York East Conference : Rev. George Lansing Taylor, A.M., John 
tnaon, Esq., John H. Ockershausen, Esq. 

of Syracuse : Judge G. F. Comstock, Rev. E. Arnold, Hon. Charles 
ira, W. W. Porter. M.D., T. B. Fitch, Esq. 

Board convened immediately after the convention and organized 
the general law, electing Rev. J. T. Peck, D.D., President of the 
Rev. D. D. Lore, D.D., Secretary, and T. B. Fitch, Esq., Treasurer. 
!Cutive committee was also elected consisting of Rev. J. T. Peck, D. D. , 
). D. Lore. D.U., Hon. G. F. Comstock, T. B. Fitch, Esq., Hon. C. 
ws, A. J. Phelps and Rev. E. Arnold : and at a meeting held in April, 
lev. B. C- Curtis was elected general agent for the University, and 
month of September last the Board unanimously selected the beau- 
rounds where we are standing as the site for onr Syracuse University 
pointed a committee to supervise the grading of the grounds and 
action of the Hall of Languages. 

distinguished agent. Rev. E. C. Curtis, with the self-sacrificing and 
/r co-operation of the President of the Board, Rev. Dr. J. T. Peck, 
en eminently successful and the people have responded nobly. And 
it might be impracticable to make special reference to every liberal 
% we are constrained to record one of the noble acts of Uie Hon. 
gtons, — ^the stupendous gift of the St. Charles Block. This property 
irchaaed at the cost of $120,000, and freely bestowed, one-half upon 
liversity and one-half upon the college of missionaries and other 
I purposes. This and other free will offerings of the people have 
xd our assets to a very encouraging amount. 

le it appears that but a little more than half of the old Genesee Col- 
ibscriptions have been transferred, still independent of the ** College 



3o6 HisTORiCAi* matter: x^ying op co&nbr stons 

of Missionaries/* which is no part of the University, we have now on hand 
in bonds, subscriptions and other property over $550,000. With tbit 
amount secured and with the flattering prospect of increased sabicrip- 
tions the trustees at their meeting in May last judged it expedient to open 
the college the present season, and accordingly proceeded in due time to 
elect the following faculty, viz : 

Rev. Daniel Steele, D.D., Vice-President, professor of mental and monl 
philosophy. 

John R. French, A.M., I^I/.D., professor of mathematics. 

Rev. Wesley P. Codington, A.M., professor of the Greek langnage and 
literature. 

Rev. J. J. Brown, A.M., professor of chemistry. 

Rev. Charles W. Bennett, D.D., professor of history and logic. 

Heman H. Sanford, A.M., professor of the Latin language and Hteratore. 

George F. Comfort, A.M., professor of modern languages and esthetics. 

Professor J. P. Griffin was elected clerk, librarian and registrar. 

And on this 31st day of August, 187 1, it has been our distinguished priv- 
ilege to witness the impressive ceremonies of inaugurating the faculty. 
And now we stand at the base of what promises to be an imposing struc- 
ture whose history must be penned by other hands and in other times. 

We are here to lay the corner stone of the Syracuse University. This is 
the day towards which many longing, praying, hoping hearts have looked 
with intense desire. The Lord be praised, the day has come. The Ions 
night of fear has passed ; the morning beams fall on our cheerful faces and 
the precious sunlight shines brightly on our glad, rejoicing hearts. But tiie 
full day is not yet. The meridian glory waits for the future. May heaven 
grant that the coming history may be exceedingly transcendant as oonH 
pared with the past and that many redeemed, purified and thoronghij 
furnished scholars may pass out over the threshold here to be laid, to grsce 
and honor the church and the world and to stand up in the last great day 
and call the Syracuse University blessed. 

Rev. Dr. E. O. Havbn, President of the Northwest University, delivered 
the following 

Address 

To found a university is an undertaking so far-reaching and powerful in 
its anticipated results as to summon the noblest energies of all who engige 
in the enterprise. And if it shall be properly constituted and conducted and 
shall succeed in winning popular favor and patronage' so far as to accom- 
plish its designs it will satisfy the holiest ambition. Met as we are, then, 
to lay the corner stone of one of the grandest edifices erected in this conn- 
try by the voluntary devotions of liberal men and women, I purpose to 
consider what this university should propose to accomplish and to show 
what are the grounds of our hope of success. 'Speaking in the open air 
where the physical labor of a long oration, and indeed of listening to one 
might be deemed unwise in this age of newspapers and much speaking, I 
shall aim at brevity and condensation. 

A university is an originator and director of mental and moral power. A 
great part of the useful activity of man is the result of patient disciplined 
thought. Instinct is not to man sufficient ; there must be study, and I 
believe there mubt be also prayer and divine direction. Muscles mnst be 
trained, machinery must be devised, the subtle forces of nature mntt be 
mastered, social science and religion must be cultivated, the sources of crinie 
and degradation must be exposed, the means of reform and improvement 
must be ascertained, and the conscience must be enlightened. Schools of 
all grades, on the principle of division of labor, are essential to ft 
civilized humanity. A civilized nation cannot abide without univerntiei 
The great difference between universities and other schools is theoretically 



HISTORICAL matter: LAYING OF CORNBR STONB 307 

tTc is no fixed limit to the amount of information which uniyersities 
i to giye or to the study and thought which they propose to encour- 
M other schools have curriculums or courses of studies with a 

defined beginning and end. The university may require a definite 
ng but it should assign no end. It should never pronounce an edu- 
finished or its work done. Its teachers are students and its stu- 
lay become its teachers, but original study should never cease. The 
ity proper — whatever may be the character of the buiding — has no 
[ta upper stories are never complete and its lower stories are con- 
changing. If it could also embrace all kinds of study it would be 
ughly complete university, an institution which except in imagina- 
ver has been nor can be. 
r see the desirableness of a stronger and better university than any 

America or even in the world and from time to time essays are 

and appeals are made to induce the United States to establish 
lere a National University and bestow upon it some millions of 
This may or may not yet be attempted ' but all can see that such 
rprise would be beset with formidable if not insuperable difficulties, 
11 wise men must perceive that individuals of a common sentiment, 
irily and compactly organized, need only such an amount of money 
or as can easily be commanded in this land of wealth and enterprise, 
Ler all the means of investigation and of illustration that can be 
lically employed. The value of universities must not be estimated 

by their bulk. After all the material that can be commanded is 
id the increase is only repetition. There is a natural limit of size to 
the greatest advantage. There can be a division of universities into 
or kinds without sacrificing the university idea. The State can sup- 
litary and naval schools — each of which may be a university in its 
^ecialty. There may be industrial universities, normal universities 
I like. 

iversity is a collection of men selected for their work on account of 
bility and fitness, conversant with previously ascertained truth in 
espective departments, furnished with requisite material in the 
»f books, charts, monuments and apparatus, skilled by travel and 
ition and practical experience, stimulated by the rivalry of various 
es of culture, devoted to the double purpose of enlarging the area of 
t and of furnishing to students all possible means of increasing their 
ental and moral powers. Their time should be about equally divided 
n study and teaching. When they cease original investigation, as 

thing, it would be better if others could be called to fill their places, 
irfect university' will be one of the last attainments of a ripened 
ity. A university must be modified bj the circumstances and 
la of its age and people, for it is human, and all things human — 
'en also divine — are susceptible of improvement, progress to the 
and better being a universal characteristic of humanity when it ful- 
s ideal of its Creator. 

the object of the university to strengthen and direct men who after- 
will strengthen and direct all the people. A Palmerston and a 
>ne received the impress of character while university students which 
Dploy in the administrations over which they preside. Our presi- 
udges, legislators, clergymen, physicians, teachers, editors, carry 
lem and employ the power of thought and action developed in the 
(. Self educated men learn by contact with the educated and from 

written for the most part by university students and professors, 
sities are electric batteries which gather force from the great reser- 

the infinite and transmit it througb chosen conductors into the 
m society. All, therefore, are interested in them. The nation is a 
ity. There is a commune — no secret band meeting at night and 



308 HISTORICAI* MATTBR : LAYING OP CORNER STONB 

E lotting destrnction — bat a genuine commune like the many in one that 
uild up a coral reef, the many in one that constitute the indivisible church 
of Christ. 

It is an indication of the intelligence of our American people that its 
men and women of wealth contribute so liberally to found and enlariire tod 
sustain institutions of learning. States also encoura^^e thetn. Directly or 
by authorizing corporations with peculiar privileges almost every one of 
our States has aided one or more schools that aim to become universities. 
The great State of New York is pre-eminent in this respect. The Regents 
of the university preside alike over private and public colleges and therehr 
the State authorizes and encourages them. All universities in New York 
are to a certain extent State universities, though some of them are snstained 
mostly by private benefactors and those who found them justly share with 
the State in their management. This is a State university— and also a Syr- 
acuse university, and also a university of a great religious denomination. 
The State in this way encourages private enterprise. In no other way can 
benevolent men and women make so profound and beneficient an impress 
on future generations than by founding and sustaining schools of a hi^ 
grade, a sufficient number of which the State cannot be expected to snppmrt 
by taxation. God and right demand of our men of wealth and enterprise 
that they shall accomplish the most possible with their money. How grand 
the work to establish a college that shall develop the book-makers and 
thought-directors of future ages ! 

But have we not universities enough ? What a question is that to ask in 
a country which almost doubles its population and wealth every ten years ! 
Have we churches enough ? Libraries enough ? Is there a plethora of 
soundly educated men and women ? Fancy pictures are often drawn of what 
might be seen if all the college students of the nation were gatheied in two 
or three centres, instead of the hundreds of colleges scattered throngh the 
country, and the faculties and libraries were proportionately concentrated 
and enlarged. Nothing is said of the immorality and waste of time thit 
would almost inevitably result. It is quietly assumed that the nnmber of 
students would be as great as now. an assumption not indicated by facts, 
past or present, in this or any other country. It is also assumed that the 
great law of voluntary enterprise ought not to prevail or does not reach the 
t)est results in the establishment of colleges, an assumption which no wise 
political economist would grant. 

Colleges draw their pupils mostly from their immediate vicinity. Two- 
thirds of the College students of Harvard are from New Bngland ; three- 
fifths of those in the University of Michigan are from Michigan ; three- 
fifths of Cornell aie from New York. It is the right of all parties who 
desire to try their hand in establishing universities. Let the law of supply 
and demand prevail. What we need in this country is to create or ftimo- 
late into activity a demand. There is wealth enough and power enough. 
Let the fact be published that skilled workmen are called for and that Gtt' 
many furnishes them for the want of thoroughly trained Americans ; let it 
become clear, as it will more and more as the country grows older, that a 
thorough education greatly increases the power and value of manhood, ind 
it will be found that the supply of genuine university education vrill for i 
time fall short of the demand. All of our colleges that have only one 
sharply defined course of study and another perhaps made up of fragments 
of the first are simply high schools and not much superior to what is for 
nished in almost every large town. It is not wonderful that the number of 
their students does not increase. Some of our wealthier and larger institu- 
tions encourage technical and professional schools at the expense of 
thoroughness and are simply large aggregations of primary studentSL On 
the principle of natural selection the s.rongest and best will yet receifcthe 
public preference. 



HISTORICAL MATTER : LAYING OP CORNER STONE 309 

intain there is now a call for more gennine universities. There are 
Ides of onr young people who wish to spend some of the years of their 
lanhood in thorough study under skilled instructors where a wider 
f study prevails than in our colleges generally. 
11 not enter here upon the vexed question as to the comparative value 
ssical or scientific education. No man is fit for the presidency of a 
ity who would espouse either side. Let narrow partisans fight their 
ttles. A university, like a mother, should cherish with equal fidelity 
children. All thought is valuable : all truth leads to God. Each 
lugh positive work to do without endeavoring to injure others. What 
emand here ? That is the practical question. You are in the midst 
isely populated country — on a great thoroughfare of eastern and 
I travel. There are thousands of ^oung people within the natural 
f your influence many of whom will .be won by a university here to 
rh culture. There are hundreds whom you alone can reach. You 
lave the patronage and leadership of a great body of Christian minis- 
i people. They are associated and orgsnized with the avowed pur- 
f creating and sustaining Christian life and character based on 
in doctrine and faith. Their purpose is as open as the heavens, as 
i sunlight. Not to build up a sect, but to spread the faith and life, 
ire the ground of the sect. The city of Syracuse gives its support to 
erprise. Political and ecclesiastical powers thus voluntarily unite to 
e a great public benefaction which shall rise alike above partisan- 
politics and sectarianism in religion and yet shall boldly sustain the 
principles of true statesmanship and of genuine piety. This is your 
You have a right to live. God will not hold you guiltless unless 
fill your mission. I congratulate you that you take your first steps 
rmblingly but vdth a clear vision and a determined tread. The world 
K)6itiveness. ** The positive philosophy," so called, was negative, 
xefore is already moribund, but the world wants a " positive religion.*' 
anity is just that — ** Christianity in earnest," methodical, alive, 
ined, unconquerable. It has never apologized for existence — not 
hen its early avowed disciples were less than a dozen, one having 
a traitor. It is based on history, on a revelation written from heaven 
lan experience. God is its upholder. It should reign in the univer- 

>w it said Christianity can take care of herself ? Why should she be 
ted by schools ? Sure enough she can take care of herself. More 
iat,she can take care of law, morality and science, which cannot with- 
* take care of themselves. This is what she has been attempting to 
eighteen centuries and she does not propose now to acknowl^ge 
beaten and retire from the contest. She cannot, indeed, be politely 
oot of colleges and schools. She will not allow herself to be degraded 
mpanionship and equal favor with enfeebled and expiring supersti- 
r their modem successors, such as Buddhism, Negativeism and the 
ligion. Christ would never consent to a place in the Pantheon, 
anity has planted all the genuine universities in the world and she 
>t retreat from her own ground now. 

his be a Christian university. Christianity and science are one. 
and heart need both. Let this determination be openly avowed, 
announced. Let the spiritual banner that floats over you hear no 
liserable interrogatoi y as what is all this worth ? Nor those other 
!>f delusion and folly, *' Science first and Christianity afterward," 
nowhere spread on all its ample folds that other sentiment dear to 
Christian heart, " Christianity and Science, now and forever, 

Cn> INSEPARABLE. * * 

lerve that the btulding whose corner stone you lay today bears the 
rant title, " The Hall of Languages." It has itself a voice. It is 



3IO HISTORICAI« MATTBR : IKYING OP CORNBR STONB 

prophetic. It bids as look for other buildings, younger members of the 
same family, which shall be called the ** Hall of Philosophy,*' the " Htllof 
Science/' the ** Hall of History,'* and so on. It is perhaps fitting that the 
oldest of the brotherhood should be the Hall of Languages, for I wpalk it 
reverently, ** in the beginning was the word." T%ougMt word, ACTION, 
is the divine order. G<xl said^ *' Let there be light and there was light!" 
* ' By the word of the Lord were the heavens made." Languages is fint the 
plane mirror, then the multiplying mirror of thought. A dumb unifene 
would soon be dead. Thought and emotion are a dead sea till language 
breaks it into ripples and sends it dancing in beautifying showers over the 
earth. Language may be gesture or the click of the telegraphic armature 
on the magnet, or any chosen representative of thoughts and emotions and 
purposes, but best of all is it articulate speech and written symbols. ■ la 
these forms it is God's own instrument of developing and saving man. 
Speech is heaven-born and heaven's inspiration took permanent fonn in t 
book. 

Language should be both studied and improved in a university. I saj 
studied and improved. Philology has a nobler function than the dissectioa 
of dead words and the chemical analysis of carcasses of expression from 
which life has fled. Etymology, though useful, is one of the least of its 
objects. It should look forward. The English language may yet become 
superior in grace and finish, as it is in fulness, to the ancient Greek if it 
shall receive as careful attention as that language did in which the Goq^ 
was enframed. God has given to us a wondrous composite speech n/bMt 
genius it is to discard all superfluities and puerilities, utilizing most peifectlj 
breath and voice, so as to express without the necessity of shonlder-shnig- 
ging and gesticulation the greatest possible amount of feeling and thought 
And this language, like civilization and Christianity of which it isthe htr- 
binger, is rapidly extending itself over the globe. It belts the earth. One 
may travel around the world and not leave the range of English speech. 
It nourishes in all soils, in every atmosphere. 

In this Hall of Languages let prime attention be given to our own speech. 
Let the copiousness of a Shakspeare, the melliflousness of an Addison and 
a Washington Irving, the logical simplicity of a Wesley, the majesty of a 
Webster, and above all the inimitable variety and soul-commanaing foxce 
of our almost inspired English version of the Bible, be analyzed and mas- 
tered, and let students here be furnished with a rich vocabnlaiy for the 
mental and moral work demanded of the leaders of thought and faith in 
their age. 

Here, too, let other languages be studied. The simple rough Hebrew 
ashlers with which God's first architects built their temples, the variegsted, 
polished, translucent Greek, the strong, square, massive, Latin. Here, too, 
let missionary students learn the dialects in which they are to preach the 
unsearchable riches of Christ and extend science and religion over the 
world. Language is the photograph of soul. Chaos vms inarticulate. The 
kosmos is the oratorio of God ; the universe is His epic, and the worship 
of angels and the redeemed is offered to Him in speedi. 

But« friends, I must not weary you. Let me repeat a thought already 
expressed. This should be known as a Christian university. You shonld 
build it not for amusement but because you must build it. " Woe is me," 
said St. Paul, '• if I preach not the gospel." Woe to the world if it forgeli 
Christ. Woe to the nation if it neglects thought and religion ! Our hallf 
of language and our halls of science will be hollow and echo the batter- 
ings of vanity, and will be inscribed by the finger of God with the ien- 
tence, Mene, mene, tekel, upharsin^ unless Christ sits in the seat of the 
teacher and warms the heart of the people. There is no salvation to otfD 
or nation out of Christ. The history of uninspired philosophy ttnninttes 
with a pronunciation of its own emptiness and in its own recantation. \ 



HISTORICAI* MATTER : LAYING OP CORNB& STONB 3II 

chievements in science alone are bat the gilding of a dream which 
>t in waking but in death. Christ exalts manhood. He reveals 
Uity. He solves the mystery of life. Christ demands admission 
lor not only in the solitary heart, the family circle, and the chnrch, 
he halls of language, philosophy and science, the halls of legida- 
1 justice, on the mountains and in the valleys, on the prairies and 
)cean, and wherever may be found the soul of man. 
tone which we ceremonially lay upon the proposed foundation here 
I simply a mass of matter, with others, to form a structure within 
protected from heat and cold and storm , professors may study and 
nd pupils may study and learn facts, thoughts and laws by which 
ay round out their own souls into beauty and prepare to bless their 
nen ; but the real corner stone is not this fragment of rock fashioned 
an hammer and chisel. The structure which you propose to build 
risible to eyes of flesh and nerve. It cannot be photographed 
, that delicate structure, the human brain. It must be spiritually 
Its foundation is bounded by no linear limits ; its walls Mrill be 
lened by no material abutments. It will be more than " forty years 
ling,'* and it will never be thrown down and never be complete, 
id many generations after you will be under-builders but God will 
irchitect. Angels perhaps will help you ** roll the stones*' to their 
md decorate the walls. That temple will never fall, never be dilapi- 
This little structure may be rebuilt and enlarged — that will need no 
iug. It will be an ever-lasting apartment of the palace of God. 
hen, as God shall give you strength. 

yd and to Wisdom— the Son — First born of God, who '* was with 
fore the mountains were settled,'* *' rejoicing in the habitable parts 
!arth,'* before as yet the earth had any inhabitants, and to the 
I all truth — the Holy Ghost — ^I dedicate this corner stone. May 
iple which shall rise around and above it be at least an earthlv em- 
id one of the outer courts of the temple** not made with hands, 
in the heavens.*' 

RBMARKS OP HON. ANDRBW D. WHITE 

E^BSIDBNT : As one deeply interested in our State system of educa- 

1 AS a citizen of Syracuse I congratulate the trustees, faculty and 

of this university on this auspicious beginning. 

ose who, like myself, have trod these paths and frequented these 

>m childhood this landscape before us is beautiful indeed ; nor does 

an element of consecration, for near this spot sleep our loved and 

i dead. 

bere is more in this panorama here unrolled than a merely personal 

. Recent as aU this life before us is compared to that which flows 

1 many other parts of the State and nation the scenes before us 

tiistoric interest. 

the waters of yonder placid lake were borne the first missionaries of 

188 to this part of the continent and on yonder slopes the great 

first performed the rites of their religion. 

>nder beautiful valley was the central council house of the Iroquois, 

tral fire of the six nations whose alliance was sought for through all 

I of diplomacy and of war by the two most powerful monarchies of 

• 

, almost within rifle shot, on the left of us, was fought one of the 
tter skirmishes in the early wars for the national existence, 
onder stream, now hidden by lofty warehouses, was once borne to 
d chieftain of the Onondagas, a young man flying the French guillo- 
Elis description of the scenes in this valley and of its inhabitants 



312 HISTORICAI* MATTBR : I,AYING OP CORNBR STONS 

are among the most interesting pages of French literature, and he retnmcd 
to his native land to become one of the foremost orators, the most brUliiat 
writer, and the noblest statesman of his time ; the only one who, when tlK 
policy of the first Napoleon became murderous, dared to withstand him— 
Rene de Chateaubriand. 

On yonder greater lake which those shall see who hereafter look foitk 
from the battlements of this edifice, on the lovely island, hidden by yonder 
trees at the north of us, sat and mused the Frenchman, who most deeply 
studied our institutions, and there he wrote the reverie on the scenes about 
him that has become a French classic — Alexis de Tocqueville. 

Beautiful indeed it all is, but to every thoughtful man it has lacked one 
element of beauty. That, I trust, you propose to give this day. If yoa 
shall place here a wise University, devoted to the search for God*s truth in 
all his works and in the spread of that truth faithfully and fearlessly, yon 
will have placed on the brow of this hill a crown that shall cast a new and 
more beautiful glow over this whole landscape than any it has ever known. 

Nor will you have added merely elements of beauty ; yon will have added 
a new and most substantial value to every acre within our view. Here it 
our feet lies a city second to none in this nation in energy, thrift and in the 
goodly prospect that conies by these. 

By vigorous toil it has been wrested from an unsightly bog. It is rich 
and prosperous, yet one element of wealth and dignity has been lackinjf, 
and that the most important of all. Cities where there is merely material 
wealth and comfort figure but poorly in human history. 

The little hamlet of Heidell)erg stands near the great rich vigorous dty of 
Manheim, yet Heidelberg is far better known — far more honored. Why? 
simply because it is the seat of a university. 

Gottingen is a small town, the seat of a university. Near it are many 
cities large and powerful and wealthy. Who does not know the fame of the 
former ? Who knows even the names of the others ? 

Which is the better known, Oxford with its University, or Leeds withiti 
vast manufactories and trade ? I^ook through our own country. New Haves 
is as nearly as may be of the size of Syracuse. There are other towns in 
that part of the country not less populous, not less rich, but of how little 
account are they compared to the seat of Yale College which earnest men 
established nearly two hundred years ago. 

No, my friends, it needs something more than heaped up wealth to make 
a city honored ; and therefore do I hope that by what shall be reared 
here this fair view is to be made still fairer and yonder riches shall be 
made still greater by the light that shall be shed and the truth that shallbe 
spread from this center. 

But, sir, still more do I congratulate this commonwealth on the admii- 
sion of a new sister into the existing ^laxy of institutions of learning. 

In this work there need be no jealousies. In this commonwealth with 
its four millions of souls there is work enough for all. Nay, if advanced 
education be made what it ought to be, fitted to the needs of this land and 
this time, I believe that twice the existing number of colleges might be 
filled. 

Nor does any mere difference in theory or in educational methods change 
in the least the heartiness of my congratulation. 

It was the remark of perhaps the keenest and most profound of modem 
thinkers on social and political subjects — John Stuart Mill — that the great- 
est danger to education was uniformity — a uniformity leading to a Chineie 
routine, to a Mandarin t^-pe, to the casting of all educated men in the same 
mould. Whereas it is far better to have different systems^^ncatins men 
in different ways— developing men naturally and not conventionally ; ^ 
that, by their friction even light and warmth may be evolved. 

As there be many flowers of many kinds in one garden and yet one naf 



HISTORICAL MATTBR : LAYING OP CORNBR 8TONB 313 

tnty strikes the ton! from all, so from the different growths of the 
11 mind with its differences in flowers and fmitage, one good result is 
ce4 upon oar race. As in one army there be many corps with differ- 
reapons and uniforms and yet one great purpose, so in the war of edu- 
I upon ignorance, vice and wrong. I recognize all as of one great 
no matter what the weapon or the uniform. 

ive said that I congratulate the commonwealth. Never was there 
n need of institutions for advanced education than now. 
; ten years ago this nation found itself, as was supposed, in most terri- 
langers. Vast armies were opposed to it — nay, it seemed likely to be 
. on to withstand the world in arms. 

friends, in the light of the handwriting of God on the pages of 
7, we were not then in the greatest danger. All history proves that 
;>ublic was ever destroyed by opposing arms. 

who shall here interpret classic literature shall show how the little 
lie of Greece beat back all the might of Asiastic despotism and how 
i overcame all the wealth of Carthage and the genius of Hannibal, 
bo shall unfold here the lessons of modern history shall show how the 
ian republic baffled the leagued monarchs of Europe — how the little 
lie of Switzerland outliv^ all her enemies^the imperial monar- 
f Germany, the ducal power of Burgundy, the Bourbon and Napo- 
: dynasties of France ; how the republic of Holland defeated the 
rcb who said, ** I am the State ;" how our own country in its infancy 
red independence despite the mightiest of maritime powers. No, my 
Is, the danger of a republic comes not from avowed attacks, it comes in 
ation after victory, in the luxury engendered by wealth in the hands 
n who use it merely in luxury. 

y that period we are now entering. Our danger is now here. A 
0* far more threatening than on the day the first shot was fired on Fort 
er. 
n no alarmist. I have still faith ; but there is work to do—and hard 

m shall the danger be met? You may say by the spread of Christtan- 
I grant it, but Providence works by human agencies — how shall 
agencies be provided? You will say by education and will speak of 
Iffusion of education. I yield to no one in admiration of our system 
blic schools ; we should sacrifice everything sooner than see it injured; 
mnst ever be feeble without a good provision for advanced education. 
leed universities to train your earnest young men to marshal that 
ins array — to shed life and light into it. 

you need it in the present emergency for yet another reason. And 
! would make a statement that I have made before this in the presence 
m of wide experience in public affairs and which was never gainsaid. 
it statement is this : — In the corruption which disgraces usiu so many 
lant centers, which disheartens the friends, rejoices the enemies of 
blicanism throughout the world, as a rule you do not find the men 
lave received an advanced education ; as a rule you do not find the 
lates of your best academies and colleges and universities and scientific 
lis, or national military and naval academies. You will often find the 
latea of t^hese unduly ambitions but it is very rare to find them dabbling 
it poiaonons pool whose vapors are contaminating this land. 
ere is a lesson in this that I leave you to ponder. I only say make 
inttitntion good enough to attract young men of vigor and of good 
Me and make it broad enough to receive them. 

d now, in conclusion, I wish you again God-speed. Build here a for- 
for seekers of truth in every field. Man it with instructors self-sacri- 
{ in work, fearless in investigation, broad enough to hold what is good, 
old or new, and you shall have the help of your fellow men and the 
angs of Heaven. 



314 BiaroRiCAL mattbr : laying of corner stonk 

Rev. Geo. Lansing Taylor read the following Poem : — 

WISDOM— A DRAMATIC ODE 
By Rev. Gko. Lansing Tayw)r, A.M. 

I. 

When from the dnst, while spheres celestial sang, 
Beneath God's hand man's form terrestrial sprang, 
With the same breath that breathed the vital flame, 
Of brute existence through his mortal frame, 
From Beings* Fount a life sublime was given, 
And mind immortal crowned him heir of heaven. 
The Sons of God« in glad surprise, 
Shouted for joy through all the skies, 
The harps of Ucd awoke 
To raptest seraph's stroke. 
And from their strings of gold, 
Harmonious rapture rolled 
Up to the white 
Un uttered height 
Of steadfast light, 
Unpierced by cieature sight. 
Where the Infinite to the Infinite alone 
Revealable, confest in part, yet all unknown, 
Forever fills the Universal throne. 

II. 

They sang the immortal mind of man, whose birth 

Forged a new link in being's golden chain. 
Crowned with new grandeur this unpeopled Earth, 

And taught the choir of worlds another strain ; 
The mind of man, sole master of this globe, 

A splendid planet built to match his will, 
Wrapped for a time in matter as a robe. 
But quenchless, deathless and ethereal still ; 

Launched forth alone, chained to this star. 
His dungeon or his triumph car, 
Remote from worlds around. 
No fellow-spirits found. 
Save his own kind ; 
With bestial mind 

Below him grading down through every form 
Of life and instinct, to the mole and worm. 
Distinct from all bv boundless gulfs he stands, 
With angel mind and earthly bands ; 

A toiler for two worlds, of both compiled, 
'Twixt brute and seraph stands Jehovah's latest child. 

IIL 

Who shsU instruct him ? Who 
His soul inform, 
His spirit warm, 
And teach him to subdue 
The brute within him, till the seraph rise, 

Beyond his darkling earth and skies, 
And seek companionship above, 



B18X0RICAI, KATTBR : I«AYING OF GORNB& STQNX $1$ 

In unknown worlds of light and love ; 
Or find in fitness for that nobler sphere, 
That nobler being bursting on him here ? 

What is the life to be ? 

What is eternity ? 
Has space diviner fields than those we see ? 

Are other worlds more fair ? 
Are brighter forms of being basking there ? 

What in this world is best ? 

What most can make man blest ? 
What is the bliss that orbs his t>eing's scope, 
That fills his loftiest firmament of hope, 
Refines, sublimes, exalts his nature's whole, 
Great as his worth, enduring as the soul ? 

IV. 

PI.BASURB stood forth, a rosy, flower-crowned sprite, 

With eyes forever brimming o'er with laughter ; 
Her win£[s were like the rainbow's braided light, 

Her voice was song, with harp-striugs quavering after. 
*' Being is bliss," she cried ; 
** Come, revel at my side. 
Sorrow is death ! 
Come, quaff my charmed breath ! 
Beneath my power 
The Universe shall open like a flower. 
Thou, like a bee o'er dewdrops that reflect her, 
Shalt roam from world to world and feed on nectar. 
Thou, while Care's dog-star 'neath thee smites and rages, 
Shalt drift on amber streams down summer ages. 
Sense, sound and si^^ht, and scent, and taste, and touch, 

Shall thrill, ecstatic, at each fleshy portal ; 
And when love faints with sweetness over-much. 
Fancy shall mount on wings of fire, immortal ; 
And unknown sensuous worlds, like stormless harbors. 
Shall woo thee sateless through Blysian arbors. 
Pleasure is life, fit for the gods supernal; 
Clasp me, and thrill with ecstacies eternal I" 

V. 

Next Knowledge spake. Her brow was like the drifts 
Of calm white cloud that sail the skies of June ; 

Her eyes, like planets, gleaming through their rifts, 
Unquenched and eager 'mid the blaze of noon. 

*' Come, if thou wilt," she said, '*and share the boon ; 

I give it to all who take it. Read this earth 
On which thou ridest without sound or shock ; 
Itself almost a sun to yon admiring moon ; 

Read all its leaves of rock. 

Read all its elements back to their bitth. 

From chaos and from nothing ; all the forms 

Of complex life its generous bosom warms, 

Trace through time's labyrinth thy own high race. 

Read all its tongues and records. Read the space 

That spreads around thee, populous with suns, 
Where each iu glory runs, 

htsuding a glittering host of worlds like thine. 
By the same hand divine, 



3X6 HISTORICAL MATTBR : LAYING 09 CORNBR 8TONB 

Sown radiant as foam ))abbles o'er the deep» 

Read all the mystic laws that keep 
Those flocks of worlds, as shepheros lead their sheep. 
Read thy own soul ; 

What awful problems roll 
Their shadows round their destiny ? What lies 
Beyond thy earthly eyes ? 
Who reigns above? 
Is being's plan, chance, destiny, or love? 
Whence came and whither goes thy fleeting breath? 
Knowledge is life ! Dark Ignorance is death !" 

VI. 

Art touched the wond'rons lyre. 

Her eyes of dreamy fire, 
Half-closed, seemed fixed on things unseen and high. 

Unknown in earth or sky. 
Her senses all are double. Outward forms 
To her are veils of one wide life that warms 
Plastic through all things, matter, being, mind ; 
Simple in each, complex in all combined. 
That life in Beauty, and its holiest shrine 
Is in the Beauty, Infinite, Divine. 

Art touched the wond'rons l3rre : 
*' Come learn of me," she whispered in soft tone ; 
The breathing statue burst its shell of stone ; 
The painted goddess sighed her conscious fire ; 
And as the song swept hisher, 

Arches and temples rose sublime, 

And pyramids defying time ; 

Minster, Cathedral, Parthenon 

Blossomed while centuries swept on, 

Pure marble flowers of human thought, 

Hints of the soul in matter wrought. 
And when the powers of matter failed expression, 
When color, form and vastness could no more. 
Then Song alone, Art's first and last progression, 
Caught up the echoes from Creation's shore. 
Imagination walked new world's among, 

And Nature found a tongue. 
And the soul sung. 
And throbbing seraphim their censers swtmg. 
While Art in raptured wedlock bound 
Beauty and thought in rythmic sound, 
And stole the essences of all bright things 

For garlurds. crowns, and wedding rings ; 
And cried, with sunrise kindling in her eyes, 
** Beauty is lite and chaos dies !" 

VII. 

Philosophy Divine 
Rose slow, with port benign. 
And soul serene, deep, passionless and still 
She stood a space remote upon a hill, 
In statue of sublimest mold. 
And contemplative eyes of truth, 
And brow of cloudless, endless youth, 
For centuries ne'er shall make her old. 



HI8TQRICAI. MATTBR : I,AYING OF CORKBR STONB 3x7 

Her voice was like a chime of wond'rous bells 

When some grand anthem swells 
Far, solemn, sweet through groves and vales and dells. 

** Come sit by me,** she said ; 
Beneath my gaze, as on a map outspread, 
Lie all the secret principles of thing^s, 

The forces* that like bidden springs 
Impel and guide this universal frame 
Which men call Nature. Undiscovered Name ! 
Beneath my gaze the causes lie 
Of all events in earth or sky ; 
The reasons of all change,— its how and why, 

And wh^ not,— for I claim 
Negation needs its reason all the same. 

They who deny 
At Reason's court must give a reason why. 
As they who do affirm ; 
For only thus is found causation's final term. 
That search is mine ; 
Through mind and nature up to the Divine 
My clew shall guide 
The reverent soul who walks obedient at my side. 
Reason still bears my torch ; 
Her mild beams never scorch 
The clear-eyed pilgrim seeking Truth's high goal, 
And he who mounts with me till mists are passed, 
Shall find the steadfast Absolute at last. 
The one unc^angiug Fount of matter, force and soul. 
** Mount ! Mount with me !" Philotophv still cries, 
'* Reason is godlike life ! Unreason dies ! 



I* 



ti 



VIII. 

A blast of trumpets smote my ears ! 
I caught the echoing roar of cheers ! 
A roll of drums ! 
A shout — ** He comes !** 
PowBR I Power ! Make way !" stentorian heralds cried. 

Back surged the obsequious tide 
Of cheering thousands, and a space full wide 
Opened ; and lo ! illustrious from afar. 
Blazing like dawn, an all-refulgent car, 
A throne sublime, untold by art or story. 
Rolled onward down a pave of beaten glory, 
Flashing iridean splendors, rainbow- vaulted. 
Above the burning stars of God exalted ! 
Power ! Power ! All grandeurs in his person strove ; 

The might of Hercules was in his frame ; 
Apollo's grace, the majesty of Jove, 

His locks ambrosial and his eyes of flame ; 
His voice melodious thunder, his right arm 
Olympian to smite, Adonian to charm. 
*' Mount to my side ! 
All things are mine !" he cried. 

** Ride on my throne. 
And call the world thy own ! 
Wealth ? — 'Tis the bribe I toss to my poor slaves ; 

Gold ? — 'Tis the pavement for my jasper wheels ; 
Honors? — I shower them cheap on fools and knaves ; 



%tB HISTORICAZ, MAITBR : LAYIHG OP CO&KKR 8TONB 

Rank, titles, place are his who hamblest kneels. 
What are all these to me ? 
I sit like Destiny, 
My glance bids kingdoms rise and empires fall. 
I mle this wide round ball, 
I throne its dynasties, 
And dash its emperies, 
And bid its millions tremble at my calL 
The sweets of all its climes are mine, 
I drink its centuries like wine ; 
Its beauty, genius, labor, lore, 
Are but the toys that trick my store ; 
Its time-entrancing arts and lays 
Are but the echoes of my praise. 
An hundred nations grew to swell Rome's state. 
And Rome expired to make one Caesar great ! 

Grasp me ! Grasp me ! 
I'll thrill thee with a sense of deity \ 
All pangs, all ecstasies, all bliss 
Of time, are swallowed up in this ; 
Weakness expires beneath my nod. 
Power, Power is this world's god !" 
** Power, Power is god I" — realms, races, ages cried ; 
And Power stood deified ! 

IX; 

No more hoarse trumpets stunned the shattered air, 

The Babel shout of myriads seemed a jest ; 
The earth grew silent as a whispered prayer, 
While day's last embers died along the west. 
Still one deep longing, sateless, unrepressed, 
Cried like a lost child through heart, soul and mind ; 
And is this all? — I moaned, in anguish blind ; 
Not yet, not yet, immortal man is blessed ! 
Not worlds on worlds can fill the gulf within his breast ! 
Amazed, o'erwhelmed, distressed, 
I sank, oppressed. 

And sighed for endless rest. 
Then from the soundless infinite there stole 
A nameless whisper sweet through all my soul. 
Soft as the wind-harp's.last expiring stress, 
It breathed illimitable tenderness. 
No form, no vision rose revealed, 
All earthly sense was closed and sealed, 
But like the balm when buds of rose. 
In silence hid, their hearts unclose, 
A sacred, infinite repose 
Filled all my being, its profoundest deeps 
Lay like calm coves where Ocean's flooa tide sleeps 

Then Wisdom said, 
*' Child, I was with Jehovah when he laid 

Creation's Corner-stone, 
Before all creatures I was His alone. 
His loved, his own. 
As one brought up with him of old, 
I saw the unborn universe unrolled 
In archetypal thought. 
Ere suns were wrought, 



HX8XORICAX, KATTBR: I,AYING op CORKBR 8TONB 319 

Before the first archangel sprang from nought. 
When from God's breath flamed forth the seraphim, 
I tuned their untried harps and infant hymn. 
When fiery chaos streamed before his Word, 
The uproar wild I heard. 

When at his fiat matter, force and law 
Bloomed into worlds, I saw. 
When his wide compass swept the arch of heaven, 
And traced their orbits for tne golden seven, 
I marked their flight. I watched him while his hand 
Scooped out the seas and heaved the solid land. 
Settled the mountains, gave the deeps their bound. 
And taught the changeful year its fruitful round. 

I saw the oak and palm 
Rise like green hymns in the third morning's calm ; 
I saw the living tribes of earth 
Leap from the hand that gave them birth, 
I saw the Triune counsel crown the eternal plan, 
And heard the words go forth, ** Let us tnaJte man ! ' ' 
1 saw man stand majestic like his God, 

Last, fairest, noblest trmmph of creation ; 
The golden mean of being, from the sod 
Towering to archangelic exaltation. 
I saw his .future, from his Eden station, 
Stretch through time's ages like a cloudy sea ; 

I saw his sin, his ruin, his salvation. 
His fate, self-chosen through eternity. 
I saw his a^ony and shame, 
I saw his tnumphs and his fame, 
His tears, his blindness and his sorrow. 

The devious paths of life he chose, 
His dark to-day, his bright tomorrow, 
. His transient hour of joys and woes, 
The infinite glory waiting for his winning, 
Al| these I saw before creation's first begmntng. 
I saw man* s final good ^ 
Not pleasure, knowledge, art, philosophy or power, 
Bui to be like his God^ 
As once erect he stood, 
In all the grandeur of his primal dower, 
Pure and self -poised in truth and virtue, free, 
Epitome sublime of Deity. 

False Pleasure flatters to deceive ; 
Knowledge no heart cry can relieve ; 
Art gilds man's misery, not removes ; 
Philosophy his woe but proves ; 
And all the boast of earthly Power 
Is but the phantom of an hour. 
Fading, dissolving, changing, mocking all, 
Like lover's ghosts when dreaming lovers call. 
Is man then wronged ? — His being worse than vain? 
The Universe a cheat? — extinction gain? 
Creation frustrate ? — folly ? - or a crime ? 
With man so far from heaven? —so weak to climb ? 
Nsy ! Nay ! This cannot be ! 
I knew creation as a thought. 
Ere suns or seraphim were wrought, 
Ere God's first fiat woke eternity ; 



320 HISTORICAL MATTBR : LAYING OP CORNBR 8TONB 

Below all gulfs beneath, beyond all heights above, 
I know what being's sum wrecked, lost, could ne*er disprove, 
I know creation's comer stone is love f 
I know that goodness is man's final good ^ 
Pure loving goodness^ like, from ^ in, his God; 
Brave, humble, fruitful, all-enduring, sweet. 
Goodness his own, love's nature orbed complete. 
This gift to man I bring. 
This is the holiest thing 
His soul can know, his t>eing bear or borrow. 
This lights his darkness, glorifies his sorrow, 
Refines his spirit beyond all Art's adorning, 
Illumes his reason with celestial morning. 
This solves life's tearful history, 
And Death's cold fearful mystery, 
And flings o'er ruin's wild and dread abyss 
The beacon splendors of a world of bliss. 
Mourn not that all terrestrial fades and flies ; 
Doubt not that goodness lives, though nature dies. 
Seek not my works but Me. 
I built eternity. 
And gave myself for thee ; 
And he who builds pure love on God's own love, 
As o'er a drowned world safe flew Noah's dove, 
O'er seraphs lost and suns in blackness driven, 
Shall mount with song and find God, love and heaven. 

[There are a few verses of this splendid ode that are evidently incorrect, but there is it 
hand no copy by which corrections can be made. Editor.] 

Dr. Peck introduced Chief Justice Sanford B. Church who said, 

'* He had come here simply in his capacity as a trustee and with no 
expectation of taking part. B«it a short time since we were rejoicing over 
the triumphal termination of the war to maintain the authority oi the 
government. This had cost an immense sacrifice of blood and treasure. 
This was the triumph of war. But peace has its triumphs as well as war, 
and they are unaccompanied by this terrible sacrifice and are far more pleas- 
ant. All the indications are that war has passed away and peace has 
assumed its place. He had no doubt all would join with him in the invoct- 
tion that it may last forever. 

" He had no doubt this institution would meet all the expectations of iti 
friends and take a proud position in the front rank of universities. It 
needs but a slight stretch of the imagination to see when we shall pits 
these slopes covered with buildings, to see this institution the pride of the 
citizens and exerting a powerful influence. May the free principles of the 
government ever be taught here, may the constitution ever remain, tod 
may the civil and religious liberty of the present be transmitted to pos- 
terity." 

At the close of Judge Church's remarks Dr. Peck explained the posi- 
tion of the buildings of the University, describing the bounds of the lands 
which included fifty acres, and expressing satisfaction at the presence of so 
many distinguished educators and citizens. He also said they owed a large 
debt of gratitude to all our citizens present for their valuable assistance and 
encouragement. 



HISTORICAI, MATTBR: I,AYING of corner STONB 331 

B. Foote then read the following list of articles desposited in the 

9ne: 

ible ; 

lings of the New York State Methodist Convention, 1870 ; 

m Christian Advocate, August 31, 187 1 ; 

n Christian Advocate, August 23, 1871 ; 

in Advocate, August 24, 1871 ; 

Western Christian Advocate, August 16, 187 1 ; 

nia Christian Advocate, August 16, 1871 ; 

rg Christian Advocate, July i, 1871 ; 

sthodist Advocate, August 23, 1871 ; 

Herald, August 24. 1871 : 

sthodist, August 26, 1871 ; 

:ial Wesleyah, August 24, 1871 ; 

atchword, August 26, 187 1 ; 

ork Daily Witness, August 29. 1871 ; 

icement Syracuse University ; 

ents on Political Reform ; 

J of the Great Republic ; 

ine and Hymn Book, M.B. Church ; 

s of Patronizing Conferences ; 

Be Daily Journal, August 31, 1871 ; 

se Daily Standard, August 31, 187 1 ; 

se Daily Courier, August 31, 1871 ; 

le City Directory, 1872 ; 

psleyan, August 30, 187 1 ; 

ine and Hymn Book, Wesley an Church ; 

an Intelligencer, April 20, 1871 ; 

ork Evangelist, Aug. 17, i87i ; 

RTord and Reflector ; 

ition Monthly, June, 187 1 ; 

1 of I/Ast Convention of Protestant Episcopal Church ; 

of Architects; 

of Ladies* Foreign Missionary Society. 

:k proceeded to lay the corner-stone in the following words : — 

ithority invested in me by the Board of Trustees, I hereby declare 
the comer-stone of * Syracuse University,' an institution devoted 

ffusion of knowledge among men,' the promotion of * Christian 
literature and science, and the knowledge of the learned profes- 

presence of these witnesses, and with humble, earnest prayer to 
' God for his approbation and blessing, on this thirty -first day of 
871, 1 lay this corner-stone, in the name of the Father, Son, and 
3st. Amen.'* 

'zology was sung and the audience dismissed with the Benedic- 



52a HISTORICAI, KATTB& : DSDICATION OP TH8 HAIX OF LAKOUAGSS 

IV. DEDICATION OF THE HALL OF LANGUAGES, 

8 MAY, 1873 

The following account is taken from The University Herald^ Vol. I, Ko. 
9, 24 May, 1873. 

Thb Promised Land Possbssbd. — The transfer of the movables of 
the University from the Myers block to the Hall of Langnages began with 
the removal of the Library, Saturday, April I9thy [1873], ^^^ ^^^ former 
was finally abandoned on the 30th ult. 

After chapel when the announcement that the Hall of Langnages woold 
be occupied on the following day had been made and received with s uni- 
versal cheer, *' Auld Lang Syne '* was sung at the suggestion of Dr. Ben- 
nett, while the faculty came down from the rostrum and mingled with the 
students on the floor and even stood by consenting while they sang, ** We 
won't go there any more," ** Good bye Myers block,** and " So say we all of 
us.*' Afterward, in the lower hall, ** Kefoozelum," ** Upidec,** etc., were 
rendered with unusual unction and this valedictory uproar was wound 
up with cheers for the Myers Block and the Hall of Languages. 

Accordingly, the first chapel exercises in the Hall of Languages were 
held on the ist inst. [May, 1873]. The Chancellor announced the hymn, 
** Oh for a Thousand Tongues to sing,** and read the 92d Psalm. Bishop 
Peck was present and offered prayer and afterward addressed the students 
recalling some reminiscences of the University enterprise, congratulating 
them on having so beautiful and appropriate a place of study and enjoin* 
ing careful treatment of the new building and its belongings. It may 
please the Rochester students to know that the Bishop held them up as mod- 
els of attention to this latter point. The Chancellor followed in an excellent 
little speech and introduced Prof. Brown. The reception of his character- 
istic hits was all that he could have asked. A prolonged call on Dr. Ben- 
nett for a speech was declined. Plenty of pleasantry was indulged in by 
the speakers throughout and everybody was in a mood to be resolutely 
delighted with it. After the adjournment from the chapel and a lusty sing 
in the lower hall, recitations proceeded as regularly as if they had always 
been held in the Hall of Lang^uages. 

The dedication, however, did not occur until the 8th inst. 

We copy the/oumal*s report printed on the 9th inst. [May, 1873.] 

From this day forth Syracuse University formally commences its career 
in a building of its own. A description of this magnificent stmctore ha^ 
been presented heretofore in these columns. The readers of Thejownul 
are fully aware of the grandeur of the view — the blue lake far off toward 
the north, the mist mantled valley of Onondaga on the south, the rolling 
hills stretching away toward the east, and below, the Central City with its 
many spires and elegant villas— all these things are well known. Tbe 
inspiration which the beauty of the scene produces is exhilarating. Nature 



STORZCAI, MATTSR : DltDICATlON OP THB HALL OP LAN6UA6BS 323 

seems to have designed this as a site for Minerva's shrine, and may 
eatnres of a day " be no less lavish of their means in beautifying it 
s nature herself. 

rday saw the first of a series of buildings dedicated to the service 
ningon this hill. Others will go up in course of time, and in 
iges— not so very distant either, we hope — Syracuse will be as cele- 
for her Uiliversity as she is now for her commercial enterprise and 
works. The day was not pleasant and yet the attendance was all 
lid be accommodated in the spacious chapel. 
oUowing was the program of the exercises : — 
z — '* Seek ye the Lord,'* — by a College quartette. 
BE— By Rev. Dr. Ferris of New York. 

ODUCTORY Remarks — By the President of the Day, Bishop Peck. 
LESS— By President F. A. P. Barnard, S.T.D., LL.D., L.H.D., of 
»ia College. 

c— •• Blow On,"— By the ** University Glee Club." 
.BSS — By Andrew D. White, LL D , of Cornell University. 
C— '•Kefoozelum,'*— By the ** University Glee Club." 
LAL Dedication — By the President of the Board of Trustees. 
z — By the '* University Glee Club," University Hymn composed 
occasion by Rev. Geo. Lansing Taylor, A.M. [See Syracuse 
tsiTY Songs, I. p. 283] 
DICTION— By Rev. M. L. Berger. 

e platform was a large number of distinguished visitors among 
vere Bishop Janes, President Barnard, President A. D. White, Rev. 
ria of New York, Prof. J. H. Hoose of Cortland, Rev. G L Taylor 
York, B. Remington of Ilion, Rev. B. I. Ives of Auburn. Of our 
.besides the Faculties of the University, we noticed Judge Comstock, 
'. Lore, John Crouse, J. J. Belden and T. B. Fitch. The singing was 
' in the hands of the College students and was very capitally done, 
lly the Quodlibet and the encore response Upidee, After prayer by 
r. Ferris of New York Bishop Peck began the speaking. His ad- 
M mainly congratulatory. We can only give a synopsis of most of 
resses. He said : It is difficult to understand the power of an 
t includes great principles. The idea of a University in Central New 
rhen first conceived by one clear sighted man, was found to coincide 
nilar thoughts in other educated minds. The idea eventually framed 
to grounds. Working on these grounds, it became an organized 
oney was collected, students assembled, and that thought has brought 
to-day to realize this idea. We now begin to interpret that thought, 
yple of this and other communities have watched our progress with 
We do not experience any special feeling of exultation. We 
do our work but not with unbecoming ostentation. Before this 
ity can take its most advanced place we must put our shoulders 
t and lift it over all difficulties. 

lent Barnard of Columbia College then delivered a scholarly and 
ning address which was listened to ¥rith marked attention. 



324 HISTORICAI, MATTBR : DEDICATION OP THB SAIX OP I,AM0UA(»9 

He began with a beautiful simile likening the frequent appearance of 
new educational institutions to the coming out of the lights, one by one, in 
the houses scattered over a wide, dark landscape scene at evening from tone 
commanding height. He then argued the indebtedness of money to mini 
** There is a wealth of the moral and intellectual as of the physical mtn, i 
wealth so much more to be desired and coveted as the soul is more noble tnd 
honorable and excellent than the body.'* 

" But the productive power of human industry in the day in which ne 
live is greater than it was a century ago in a proportion almost beyond cod* 
putation ; and this vast increase has been owing to improvements in the 
useful arts not reached by accident but ¥rrought ont by careful study of the 
properties of matter and the laws of force." 

A large part of the address consisted of pertinent instances under tha 
principle. The address was forcible and elegant. 

Bishop Janes spoke on *' The Claims of the University on the Wealth of 
the Country.'* He said : ** There are few things or men in this world thtt 
have an independent existence. All things bear a mutual relation to each 
other. This law is a general one. The blessing of God is necessary to 
man to secure the result of his labors. There are several agencies at work 
in the world seeking to elevate mankind, the philanthropist, the moralist 
and the Christian. All these three regard education as the important mesns 
to be employed for the accomplishment of their work, and Christianity 
especially so. Hence we see the church founding colleges and seminaries. 
These colleges are indispensable to a proper growth, but money is needed to 
sustain them." 

'*Our public wealth is indebted largely to the considerate and wise manner 
in which the financial department of the government has been adminis- 
tered. The power to coin money, to fix the standard of value, to regulate 
the tariff, are among the highest functions of national authority and sover- 
eignty. The statesmen who devised these financial measures were disci* 
plined in our colleges. Hence the first source of our national wealth is in the 
colleges." 

"Another source of wealth is the facilities for business which we poss es s. 
Education is the engineer in the progress of the world." 

"Another source of our wealth is the application of science to industry. 
Science is every day enriching the general culture of the country." 

"Syracuse University is a representative institution, in plan and purpose, 
and ecclesiastically. /I is nol sectarian, / trust. If I thought it was I wouU 
sit down at once* Christianity must go hand in hand with Science. I say 
to all the rich men here and throughout the state, you must fgis^ a larj^e 
portion of your wealth before you can square your account with Science, 
and science and religion are cheap at any cost." 

In the next musical selection the Glee Club was encored and may be said to 
have made its debut under favorable circumstances. Miss Ella French pft> 
sided at the piano with her usual excellence. 

Bishop Peck very generously gave way to and invited our honored towns- 



HISTORICAL MATTBR : DBDICATION OP THB HALI. OF LANGUAOBS 325 

iota, Prcttdent White of Cornell University, to speak. After some introdnc- 
Uiry remarks he said : — *' You have received congratulations from the oldest 
College in the state, and it affords me supreme satisfaction to extend to yon 
bcuty congratnlations on the part of one of the youngest colleges in the 
•bte." 

**It is said that two of a trade cannot agree. I cannot believe that any such 
feelings exist among the larger minded men of our universities. There is 
plenty of work for all. Never was jealousy more out of place. We, of 
ecwrse, differ in theory, but this ought not to divide us ; our end is the same. 
Jobn Stnart Mill says, the greatest danger in our system of education is 
that all are too mnch inclined to cast in the same mould, and, to use a vul- 
gar phrase, to '* grind out *' minds too much alike. Without some differ- 
ences in theory and practice our system must result in a Chinese manda- 
rinism." 

'*Bnt I have a personal interest in this institution. For five years I 
was (addressing Chancellor Winchell) yonr colleague in the same institu- 
tion. I congratulate you upon your accession to this post of honor. We 
worked hard at Michigan. We must work harder now. I do not presume 
to offer yon any advice ; I would rather receive it ; but I may tell yon some- 
thing." The speaker then explained his method,not in begging money, but 
in suggesting to some man of means the propriety of devoting n portion of 
hia wealth to a specific purpose. He took Mr. Cornell upon this very spot 
before the University at Ithaca was founded, and suggested to him that this 
was the place for a college. In this suggestion he did not prevail. Dr. 
White then advised the Chancellor to guard well the object of students' 
Sfute, the chapel bell. Put a good lock on the door. Have so many bells 
that they will despair of stealing them. He said, you ought to have a 
chime of bells to scatter melody over these hills and through these verdant 
vales. He then offered some practical advice. Many things must be left 
for his successors but if he succeeded in establishing the institution in the 
galaxy of educational institutions, he would do a good work. He would 
meet with men of wealth who will be willing to assist. '^Suggest to sotne 
one the additional buildings that are needed, and the means will be found 
to supply them.*' 

President White's remarks were received with the greatest interest and 
put the audience in exceeding good cheer. 

THE DEDICATION 

Bishop Peck then proceeded with the dedication ceremony as follows : — 
CHRiSTiAif Fribnds : — It becomes us upon this occasion of surpassing 
interest reverently to recognize the supreme ruler of the Universe. He is 
the anthor cf science. The minds which we propose to educate are His 
creation. , We cannot doubt that He regards with interest this endeavor to 
rear an inatitntion of learning under the fostering care of His churches in 
hnmble dependence npon His blessing. Let us this day devoutly acknowl- 




326 HI8T<»UCAI, MATTBR : DBDICATION OF THB HAU, OF I«AJIGUAOIt 

edge our responsibilty to Him. ** Except the Lord build the hoose thiy 
labor in vain who build it.*' 

With such means as Hi j good Providence has furnished, and let ni tmfti 
for such purposes of human education and progress as He will appfOfti «e ■ 
have advanced thus far in laying the foundation of a Christian Uaiftiitty. 
Our task is but just commenced. Large means must be added.tD wlwt m 
have already gathered. Heavy burdens must be borne. Bor-MBMiii 
educating the public up to this grand endeavor, in imparting Umi 
true scholarship to our students, and bringing a large morel 
upon the interests of coming generations, we are entirely 
His blessing. Let us. therefore, revere His holy law, enter 
earnestly into the plans of His Providence, and consecrate ooreelfee md 
our best treasures anew to this noble work under the divine enapjces. 

Will the people stand reverently before God. 

*' I solemnly dedicaU this edifice — the Hall of Langumg€S of Syraaut 
University — to the purposes of Christian Uamingy lUertUure amdscience^ awi 
the learned professions^ for the diffusion of knowledge among mem. In the 
name of the Father and the Son and the Holy Ghost, ' ' 

The Dedication took place at 4:42 p.m. Chancellor Winchell gave notice 
that the building was open for inspection, and after singing the exceUent 
''University hymn,** (see Some University Songs, /. p.a83) compoeed for the 
occasion and the benediction, the audience scattered throogh the building, 
all speaking of it in highest terms. The institution, to be a fitting hooor 
to the city and state, must be properly and adequately stiatained. 

The following is the leading editorial in the same number of The Uni- 
versity Herald, written by the editor, Geo. W. Elliott, '73. It ia prophetic 

In another column will be found a detailed account of the dedicatory 
exercises of the Hall of Languages. The day was *' dark and cold aod 
dreary,*' and yet the attendance was all that coold have been accommo- 
dated. The satisfaction which the students and officers feel at being awsj 
from the busy haunts of men, and learning and dispensing learning undis- 
turbed by rolling cars, rattling carriages, and the clatter of countless hoofs 
on the pavements, is better felt than described. Already has yonder hill, 
" beautiful for situation.'* won a place in our affections. What fond mem- 
ories will linger around it in future years. We brush away the dim vista 
and in imagination we see yet other spacious edifices scattered here snd 
there over its surface. Here stands a majestic tower surmounted by a 
dome, within which through a telescope of no inferior power the eye of a 
Peters or a Watson peers at the worlds rolling in the black expanse above 
them. Yonder stands an Art Building, in which are stored the rarest works 
of antiquity. Here a Gymnasium and there a Library. A lofty qnre yoo- 
der crowning a Gothic structure in which He is worshipped who is tbe 
source of all true wisdom. 

These are all in fancy, and yet sooner or later they will come. Syrscioe 
University is destined to see prouder days. The men of wealth in thisTL 
cinity have its interests at heart. The poor will contribute of their povextj. 
and Wisdom shall be decked with no unseemly crown. 




/lAUU 9'^ LA/SeVASES 



THE NEW Y^'lxK 

PUBLIC LIBRARY' 



1 






\RLY COMMENCEMENT PROGRAMS 



owing programs will be found in order in the succeeding pages 

Class of 1872 
Class of 1873 
Class of 1874 
Class of 1875 
Class of 1876 



327 



'. EARLY COMMENCEMENT PROGRAMS 





•^^•^^•^^ A % 




> Suos Cultores ScitntU Coronai. / 



CLASS OF '72, 













3^9 



i 



cy ^ 



MUSIC. 



Prayer. 



MUSIC 



1 * ORATION— Pluck. 

William W. Smallwood, Warsaw. 

2 ORATION— The Problem of Labor, 

Roland S. Kkyser, Havana. 

3 ORATION— Wait, 

Warren Mann, Romulus, 

MUSIC. 

4 ORATION— Progress in the Nineteenth Century, 

Francis J. Cheney, Yorkshire. 

5 ORATION— Self-Sacrifice, ... - 

Richard W. Copeland, Clarendon. 

6 MASTER'S ORATION— 

Prof. Erasmus D Blakeslee, A.B., Polsdam. 

* The order is assigned by lot. 



530 



MUSIC. 

7 ORATION— The Lord's Holy Day or the Devil's Holi- 

day, 

Wilbur Flbtchkr Steele. Boston, Mass. 

8 ORATION— A National University, - 

Heman W. Morris, Scoiisburz. 

9 ORATION— The Stone Rolled Away, 

Francis D. Blakeslee, Groveland, 

MUSIC. 

10 ORATION— The New Organ. 

George Herbert Dryer, Rush. 

11 ORATION— Stick To It, - - - . 

John E. Weaver, Elmira, 

12 MASTER'S ORATION. .... 

Rev. Oscar A. Houghton, A B., Syracuse, 

MUSIC. 



Degrees Conferred. 



MUSIC. 



331 



Candidates for the Degree of Bachelor of Arts. 



FRANCIS D. BLAKESLBE, 
FRANCIS J. CHENEY, 
NOYES B. CONGDON, 

RICHARD W. COPELAND, 
JOHN M. DOLPH, 

GEORGE HERBERT DRYER, 
ROLAND S. KEYSBR. 
WARREN MANN. 

WILBUR F. STEELE. 



Candidates for the Degree of Bachelor of Science, 



GEORGE H. BAKER. 
JOHN W. BLAKE, 

NOYES K. FOWLER. 
HENRY O. HARRIS. 

MARY L. HUNTLEY. 
HENRY M. HILL, 

GEORGE MARTIN, 

HEMAN W. MORRIS. 

WM. W. SMALLWOOD, 
JOHN E. WEAVER. 



3St 



^ 



o 



^^^ OF ExE^ec,^ 



«s 





ntntitfictiitnl m^. 





% 




^9n siiiw 



%# 



XXVI JUNE, MDCCCLXXIII. 



313 



^ 



/flexaivdro WtivcKell, LL. T>,, 



€anccttario, 



^voUf550vit>u5 l^OTjoranMg, 



(Curalorifcu^ IRc&crcij&iB atquc l^onoranMs ; 



Patroni^quc munifidB 



amVExRSWATlS SYRAGaSANAE; 

'(HnibcrBiB ^cniquc ufcicumque terraruTTj 

jB^umanitarig €uttovit>UB ; 

IRcique J^ufcticcE noBivct £ilcrari« 



SautoriBujp ; 



334 



^ 



ZToSt &xdbvim 3accalaurealem 
recepturt, oibelicet, 

GEORGIUS - GUILIELMUS ELLIOTT, 
MILTONUS - JOSEPHUS GRIFFIN, 
ROBERTUS - HALL MACLAY. 

tt 

HoS; <5ra&um Zriagistralem 
recepturit Dtbelicet 

PORTER . M. FRENCH. A. B.. 
EMMA. L. HYATT. MURPHY, A. B., 
CAROLUS - E. MILLSPAUGH, A. B , 
JOHANNES- S. MORGAN, A. B.," 
GUILIELMUS - H. REESE, A. B., 
HARRIET - KENDALL THOMPSON. A. B., 
MONROE - G. CHENEY. B. S., 
JOHANNES A. MUNSON, B. S.. 

et 

€go, Crabum Doctoralem 
recepturus, mbelicet, 

JASON N. FRADENBURGH, A. M., 

^asce €xercttatione8 

oerecunbe 

Debtcamus* 




535 






fupnmmt. 



NiVSlC— Grand March. 

PRAYER. 

UXSSiQ—Prayer of a Youth. 

ORATION—** The Fourth Profession.'' 

Gborgb William Elliott, Auburn 

ORATION — ** Governmental Control of thg Railway am 
Telegraph Systems.'' 

Robert Hall Maclay, New York 

MASTER'S ORATION— **/Va/^' J Republic." 

CharlbsE. Millspaugh, a. B., Pultney 
MUSIC — Selections from Sonamhula. 

ORATION—*' The Universal Passion." 

Milton Josbph Griffin, Westfield, Pa 

MASTER'S ORATION— •*/:awa»^/?r/i^tw." 

John S. Morgan, A. B., Rochester 

VLM^IZ— Autograph Waltzes. 
CONFERRING OF DEGREES. 
MUSIC— 5^^5 without Words. 
BENEDICTION. 



Music by Drescher's Orchestra. 




336 



^ 



^^ OF EX£i^^ 





iwnittittMtif Pii 



% 




^9H BirtW 



%\*'*- 



XXV JUNE, MDCCCLXXIV. 



337 



^ ^ 



jfflexaivdro WtivcKelU LL* T>., 



Canceffario, 



^voUmov\&ub tforiovdniiBf 



(ffuralori6u0 IRc&crcTj&b atque l^onoraniiB ; 



^atroni^que munificijj 



amVExRSWATlS SYRAGaSANAE; 



l^uic '^irBique l^onoranJcB : 



'JHni&erj^b ienique uBicumqiw Unavnrq 



l^umanitatb €ntiov\iu0 ; 
IRcique J^uftKccB noffttc^ JtiUvcmct 



SautoriBu0 ; 



538 



^ 



los, Qradum ISaccalaureakm 
recepfuri, 

videlicet. 



MARIA - F. CARY. 
CAROLUS- A. FOWLER, 
D - S. KELLICOTT, M. S.. 
RENA . A. MICHAELS, 
FRANC ISCUS ■ S. PORTER, 
EDVINUS - R. REDHEAD. 
FRANCISCUS SMALLEY. 
ELECTA - B. WHIPPLE, 

{asce Sjc^i'citafiones 

verecunde 



D^dicamus. 



339 



^ ^ 



ftnpmmt. 



MUSIC — BARiTONB SOLO AND CHORUS, from Pint Walpargis Night— 
** Thy light shall shine forever.** — Mendelssohn. 

PRAYER. 

MUSICS-MADRIGAL FOR SIX VOICES, 

" Charm me to sleep.** — Henry Leslie. 

* • Mind Power in Social Development, ' * 

Frank S. Portbr, Granville Summit, Pa. 

** National Faults,*' 

Edwin R. Rbdhbad, Skaneatdes. 

' ' At Evening Time it shaU be Light. ' ' 

Electa B. Whipple, Perrysburg. 

MUSIC—** O God have mercy.** —Yvoi, Herrmanson. 
Prom *' St. Paul.'*— Mendelssohn. 

** Public Conscience,'' 

Prank Smalley, Towanda. Pa. 

' * The Microscopic Life of the Moat at Fort Erie. ' ' 

D. S. Kellicott, M. S., Buffalo. 
''By Work Only,'' 

Mary P. Cary, Fishkill. 

music— OCTBTTB FOR FEMALE VOICES. 

•' Ye Spotted Snakes,** -^^AcVsxr^n. 

** The Leaven of Democrcuy." 

Rena a. Michaels, Utica. 

* * Ought Women to have the Ballot f ' ' 

Charles A. Fowler, Binghamton. 

MUSIC — Gipsey Life. — Schumann. 

—CONFERRING OF DEGREES.— 

MUSIC — Prom Walpurgis Night. — Mendelssohn. 
^^ Disperse, ye gallant men.** 

BENEDICTION. 



The music for the occasion will be furnished, under the direction 
of Professor Ernst Held, by the Mendelssohn Vocal Society and Prof. 
B. Herrmanson. 

^ J 

340 




St 




ft/® 



^^Sif. 




CLASS OF 1875. 



Jane 23 d, 



«b 



^^^^CEMDNT ^^^^^^ 



<-eS> 



341 



(irdet of 3Exetci$e$. 



MUSIC. 



Prayer. 



MUSIC. 



ISaccalaureafe Discours^t 

BY THE CHANCELLOR. 



MUSIC. 



Conferring of D^grMS. 



BENEDICTION. 



MUSIC. 



342 



fattiltilafes inn %tpttSf 

WITH THE TITLES OF THEIR THESES. 

T^or tlie Degree of fl. S. 

:BBIB L. ARNOLD, Syracuse, 

A Critique on LabouUye's *' Paris in Amerique." 

LPHA R. BBAL, E. Palmyra, 

Universal Suffrage. 

3ARLK8 BLACK, Oayton* 

Latin Classics. 

ILTON D. BUCK, Onondaga ValUy, 

The Physical Basis of the Moral Sentiments. 

7DSONB. COIT, Central Squart, 

Dnson the Crowo ; Statesmanship of Demosthenes and the Pall of Greece. 

SBSTBR A. CONGDON, Ovid, 

Co-education in HiRher Schools. 

LMES M. GILBERT, Syracuse, 

ical Comparison of the Orations of Demosthenes and Bschines " DeCorona." 

WATSOV GOODIBR, Cedar Lake, 

oence of Dissent on Liberal Opinion in Bagland in the XVIIIth Century. 

lARLBS D. LATHROP, Fulton, 

Socialistic Leaders. 

)HN C. NICHOLS, Monroe, 

Public Parks ; their Relation to Health, Civilization and Art. 

LIAS S. OSBON, EUenville, 

The Romantic Drama from its origin to the time of Shakespeare. 

IRAM L. PBBT, St, Louis, Mo„ 

Education in the West. 
ILLIAM H. SHUART, .... Honeoye Falls, 

National Arbitration. 
ELVILLEJ. WELLS, - - - - Casenovia, 

ographical and Topographical Arguments on the Evidences of Christianity. 

ATHANIEL M.WHEELER. Sheldrake, 

Herbert Spencer's Plea for Science. 

*Tor tl^e Degree of S. S. 

LARA BANNISTER, Syracuse, 

Comparison of Grecian and Gothic Architecture. 

. FLORENCE CHIDESTER, Syracuse, 

The Practical Value of Chemistry. 

ILLIAM H. DUNLAP, Syracuse, 

The Influence of America on the French Revolution. 
ATE E. HOGOBOOM, ...-..- Syracuse, 
Critique on Laboulaye's " Paris in Amerique." 

ILLIAM A. WOOD. Syracuse^ 

A Critical Analysis of Goethe's Bgmont. 



343 



^or tlie Degree of OQ. S. 



FRANCIS A. BAKBR, B. S., (Genesee,) 
GBORGB U. BAKER, B. S., 
NOYBS K. POWLBR. B S., 
HENRY O. HARRIS, B. S.. 
MARY L. HUNTLEY, B. S., 
HEMAN W. MORRIS, B. S., . 

CHARLES J. POWERS, B. S . {Cornell.) 
JOHN E. WEAVER, B. S.. 



- Rochester, N. Y. 

Boston, Mass. 

Kentland, M. 

Philadelphia. Pa. 

Jfock Stream, A'. Y. 

/Rochester, N. Y. 

Syracuse, N. Y. 

New York. 



Tor the Degree of 3. ffi). 



PRANCIS D. BLAKBSLEE, A. B.. • - • 

PRANCIS J. CHENEY, A B., 

JOHN U COLE, A. M., ( Yale, ad eundem,) 

JOHN M. DOLPH, A. B., (aif ««Mtfeiw,) 

ALVAH H. DORRIS, A. M., 

GEORGE H. DRYER, A. B., .... 

CHARLES E. PITCH, A. B., {IVilliams,) 

E. W. HALL, A. M., {Genesee, adeundem,) 

ELIJAH HORR. {causa honoris,) 

ROSS C. HOUGHTON, {causa honoris) 

ROLAND S. KEYSER, A. B , - 

WARREN MANN, A. B., 

ALEXANDER A. PHELPS, A. M , {Genesee, ad eundem,) 
WILLIAM H. ROGERS, A. M., {Alfred, adeundem,) 
WILBUR P. STEELE, A. B., .... 



East Greenwich, R. i 

Dryitn. 

Lycni. 

• Port Jervis, N.J. 

' Genesei. 

- Springville. 

Hockester. 

' Quincy,ni. 

- Oswega. 

Buffalo. 

Ernst Greenwich, X. I- 

PoUdam. 

' Vineland, NJ. 

- Nunia. 

Raynham, Mass. 



Tor \\[<i Degree of PH. D. 



JAMES R. JAQUEJ), A. M , - Bloomington, lUinati 

Thbsis :— Instruction in Latin and Greek. 

L. D. WATSON, A. M.. Olean. 

Thbsis :— Philosophy of Paith. 



Tor !H« D«grM of CQ. D. 



LOUISA L. WOODIN, 



Mount Vernon. 



^or i\[^ Degree of 13. p. 



MARK M. MAYCOCK, 



Buffalo- 



Tbbmb :— Art in every day life. 



* In February last eleven students received the Degree of M. D. 



344 



^^ 




^ y c f\ • y A 
W A • W 4 h V 



SYraGuse UniversitY 

§ei^eral jPrniiramiiie 



— OF 



InniversarY Exercises 



3iinet t870. 



^__JL?-^ »^ * V A 

$ J ■ ■■ I ^g 




345 




^^ 



3m» 14— 10. 

Examination of Senior Class. 




3m» 20 — 22. 

Examination of Graduating Class in the Medical Col- 
lege. 



3mi» 21^23. 

Examination of the Junior, Sophomore and Freshman 

Clashes. 



OltfitrjBdag, Jttttf 22. 

8 P. M. Commencement of the Medical College. 

Address by Prof. H. B. Wilbur, M. D., at Wietiog 
Opera House. 



J^ridag, Jttt» 23. 



8 P. M. Address before the Alpha Phi Association by Miss Pramos 
E. WiLLARD, A. M. of Bvanston, 111., in the Universitj 
Chapel. 



I^alitrliui, Jnnr 24. 



8 p. M. Elocutionary Rehearsal of the Sophomore Class in the 
University Chapel. 




346 




($4^ 




i^mtllaii, Jnttt Z5. 



3 P. M. BACCAijkURBATB Sbrmon by the Chancbli.or» in the 
University Avenue M . E. Church. 

7>^ p. M. Sermon before the University by the Rt. Rev. F. D. 
Huntington, D. D., in the First Presbyterian Church. 



Hbmbag, June ZB. 

9 A. M. Entrance Examinations in Latin. 
5 p. M. Ci^ss Day Exbrcisbs on the Campus. 
8 p. M. Ci,Ass Day Exbrcisbs in the Chapel. 



3unr ifi— ifl. 

Exhibition of works of Axt by Students of the College of Fine 
Arts. (A Loan Art Exhibition is in progress in the University 
Building at the same time.) 



9 A. M. Entrance Examinations in Greek and Mathematics. 
10 A. M. Annual Business Meeting of the Alumni Association. 

2 p. M. Annual Meeting of the Trustees. 

2 p. M. Literary Meeting of the Alumni Association. 

8 P. M. Annual Dinner of the Alumni, followed by the Alumni 
Reception. 





^ 

347 




«4^ 



I 



•WrdnrB&ag, Jttttr 2B. 



9 A. M. Examinations for Admission, Continued. 

2 P. M. Commencement of the Colleges of Liberal and 

Fine Arts, 
at Wieting Opera House. 

8 P. M. Chancellor's Levee at the University Parlor. 



Examination for admission to the Colleges of Liberal and Fine 
Arts will begin September i8, and the regular exercises on Sep- 
tember 21. The Medical College exercises will be resumed Octo- 
ber 5. 





^t^ 



348 



VI. CLASS-DAY PROGRAMS 



be following programs will be found in order in the succeeding pages: 

Class of 1873 
Class of 1875 
Class of 1876 
Class of 1877 



M9 



550 HISTORICAI, MATTBK : CI«A88 DAY PROGRAMS 



VI. CLASS DAY PROGRAMS 



CLASS OF 1873 

The following program is taken from 77u University Herald^ June 14, 
1873: 

Ci«ASS Day Bxbrcisbs— (Monday 23 Junb 1873) 

On the Campus 

2 p. M. Ceremony of presenting the Class Sun Dial to the University. 
Addrbss, By Milton J. Griffin. 
Response, By Prof. Charles W. Bennett, D.D. 
Pi^ANTiNG CI.ASS IVY, at the north-west angle of the Hall of Un- 

guages. 
Immortelle Ceremony and Presentation Addresses, By 

Robert H. Maclay. 
Parting Address to the University, By George W. Elliott. 
Response. By Chancellor Winchell. 



)YRACUSE University. 



f Ia$$^9ag jprogramive 



+ OF+ 






MUSIC BY DRESCHER. 



CLASS OFFICERS: 

ent, ....... W. H DuNLAP. 

resident, - K. W. Goodibr. 

iry, - - - - - M. D. Buck. 

irer, - - - - M. J. Wblls. 

W. A. Wood. 

ian, - - J. M. Gilbert. 

N. M. Whbblbr. 

•t, - - - - - - - . - J. C. Nichols. 

ter, - - - M. u. Buck. 

rator, J. B Coit. 

rater, W. H. Shuart. 

ir, - - - - - M.J. Wells. 

^ ) A. K. Bkal. 

g Ceremony, 1 E. W. Goodibr. 



Committee of Arrangements. 

M. GILBERT. W. A. WOOD. J. C. NICHOLS. 



351 



(§thtt at l^xn^BtB. 



0^1N THE CHAPEL-?j^ 



•yftiudt'c 



ixi«y#*. 



^^C4€dce. 



sdJ^l^^, - . 7^Mu^ sdu^/in\ 



CTCUi^ry, - ^iam^ .^kfwm J^y 



^yv(€€dce. 



^€>€m, - ^a/inanie/ ^^ailMm^ ^A 






353 



(Stbtt of lE.Xttt\BtB. 



mrON THE CAMPUS-?J^ 



•yffu 



t€S€/C, 



- .y^Mm i:^€ma ySuod, 



^fHi/um, 



^^^itdCC, 



Jfluasan z^^ardnun^ ^oUi 



^«* <Dc^. 



^r^mcn^. 



n^. 



Una ^^f^mtmu. 



/fi^ium :7CBn^€r/ Sfnuar/, 






353 



TREE ODE. 

W. A. IVood. 
AZR-**How Can Z ]>aTe Thee.** 



Lonff live our elm tree 

Tenderly planted here. 
May storm and tempe»t spar^, 
Many a year. 
Sun send thee strr'nsth and power, 
Clouds lend refreshing bhower. 
Round thee are clustering 
Memories dear. 

II. 

Gently wave leaflets. 

Rustling in summer wind, 
Keep thou|(ht8 of happy hours 
Green in ea- h mind ; 
Hours that have quickly fled, 
Days thai have swiftly sped. 
Years that we'll t'er recall, 
Nevermoie find. 

III. 

Firm as t'ly rootlets 

Old mother earth enthralls, 
May Alma Mater bind 
Us to her halls. 
Let Seventy- Five be one, 
Let every loyal ^on 
Joyfully honor her 
When 'ere she calls. 



PARTING SONG. 

N. Af. Whefler. 

AIR— ** Meet Me by the Runnlnff Brook.** 

I. Chor US- 

Fled are all the years that shone. Keep me in your thoughts.my friend 

Fairer far than words can tell ; Keep me, comrade, in thy heart, 

Syracuse, thy first born come, Keep me while the y^ars shall fi^ 

Bidding thee their last farewell. Ever nigh, though far apart. 

Tend'rest ties must now be broken. 
Saddest words must now be spoken, 
For to-day we're leaving home. jjj 

Chorus— »». . j i4 /»«a -Va/^r, we must go. 

Give me once again thy hand, p^^ f^^^ classmate* and from thee : 

Greet once more each brother's eye, Saddened is each light heart'sgloi 

Meet we ne'er on sea or l«nd, p^ir though all it- future be. 

Memory shall never die. Ga^ly streams Hope's banner o'er a 

II Bright the future lies before us, 

„ . , ,' ^^ But to-day we're leaving home. 

Backward one last moment turn, ^ * 

Ere we try life's wild'nnK maze ; 

Need we haste our fate to leain? Chorus — 

^ o"5!i*;l" ^uVu"*"?" Pa\^^*y«- . Pledge me. classmates ere we pirt. 

Faded though the joys that crowned vX^^e that we shall meet again, 

T^« *"'.u !,♦ nij . A And though then our heads be grti 

Long our thoughts will linger 'round Hearts shall blossom Ull Ufe'i end 
them. 
When we've left our College home. 



354 



m 



(^t<^ 



^-^ 








m@ mr 



ff 



1876. 

*.y^i^im€/ay, ^«n« ^e/A, J^7e. 



PRESIDENT, E. OLIN KINNE, 

VICE-PRESIDENT, .... VINCENT A. CRANDALL, 

TREASURER, HUGH McDOWELL. 

SECRETARY, ALICE M, LEE. 

ORATOR, JOHN T ROBERTS. 

HISTORIAN, EDWIN NOTTINGHAM. 

POET, - - J. DUANE PHELPS. 

PROPHET, IDA A.GILBERT, 

PIPE ORATOR, HENRY F.THOMSEN. 

TREE ORATOR, WILLIAM NOTTINGHAM. 



COMMITTEE. 

M. L. SPOONER, 
V. A. CRAI^DALL, H. F. THOMSEN. 




<^^ 




355 



flrder of Exercises. 



Afternoon, 2 1-2 o'clock. 



Tree Oration^ - . - IVil/tam Nottingham 

TREE ODE. 



M. X,, SPOONBR. 
Air,—*' Stars of the Summer Nights 



I. 
Bmblem of valor true. 

Raise high your branches brave ; 
Hide not your em'rald hue, 

They wave, thy leaflets wave. I 

II. 

Drink ye from Nature's font, 

Which she so freely gives ; 
Ne'er, ne'er our mem'ries want, 

It lives, our elm tree lives I 

III. 

Though tempests 'round thee rage. 

And winds around thee moan ; 
Live to a golden age, 

Blow on, ye winds, blow on. I 

IV. 

We soon will scatter'd be 

Whither there's none can tell, 
But we'll revere our tree. 

Farewell, classmates, farewell. I 

Pipe Ceremony, 
Pipe Oration, ... Henry F. Thomsen 

Pipe Song, 

CLASS PRESENTATIONS. 
Resolutions, 



556 



flrderof Exercises. 



Evening, 7 1-2 o'clock. 



Music^ 

Oration y 

Music, 

History^ 

Music, 

Poem, 

Music, 

Prophecy, 

Music, 



Hungarian Overture 

- John T, Roberts 

A drop of Rhine Waltz 

Edwin Nottini^ham 



Memento 



/. Duane Phelps 
Trio by Hummell 



Ida A, Gilbert 



On the Wing Galop 



Banquet at Temperance House. 



Parting Song. 



357 



PIPE SONG OF '76. 

H. P. TBOMSBN. 

Air,—'' It was my Last Cigar." 

Come, draw up in • circle, boys, 

A circle true and strong, 
And sing once more before we part, 

To part for oh ! so long ! 
And as we raise our voices high 

In sad farewell to sound, 
Do not forget in amity 

To pass the pipe around. I Ter. 
Do not forget in amity. 

To pass the pipe around. 



Those dear old halls, familiar scenes. 

These friends so true and tried, 
We now must leave, be scattered far. 

On Time's relentless tide. 
Then seize the moments ere they fly ; 

Cast down, let's not be found ; 
I^t not the social chance slip by. 

But pass the pipe around. I Ter. 
I«et not the social chance slip by, 

But pass the pipe around. 



A pipe of peace? O ! may it be ! 

May strifes be buried deep ! 
And, of the hours here thoughtless spent. 

May but the pleasant keep ! 
Though in the South. Bast, North or West. 

We find a home-like spot, 
This loyal thought be ever near : 

" Fair Syracuse, Vivat ! I Ter. 
This loyal thought be ever near 

•• Fair Syracuse, Vivat /' 



»'• 



A symbol of our fancy's flights,— 

We hope not quite so true — 
The curling smoke wreathes 'round our heads 

To vanish from our view. 
Among the thoughts of times gone by 

Within the distant past, 
Do not forget, how on this spot. 

We smoked together last ! I Ter. 
Do not forget, how on this spot. 

We smoked together last ! 



358 



I 



<^4f?) 




^^xacttst ^rtiifer^,^^ 



C/, 






3p. M- 



^t^ 




359 



O vAe^ €^i Exe veloes% 



PART I. 



3tt tift OUjott^L 



March, ... 

Oration, ... 

Music — Overture La Gazza Ladra, 
Essay, - . - - 

Music — Fantasie, — II Trovatore, 
POBM, .... 

Music— Caprice Playful Rockets, 



HiNTON. 

prbd. c. bsmond. 
Rossini. 

• May G. BissstL. 

Vbrdi. 

• J. Scott Clark. 

Frbising. 
Chari^BS N. Cobb. 



History, - . - - - 

Music — Medley College Songs, dedicated to the Class, Hinton. 

Prophbcy, - - - - . Thomas D. Wordbn. 

RBS0I,UTI0NS, • - - - JENNIB M. BANCROFT. 



PART II. 



(6ntiit (ilamtnitf. 



March — Brazilian, 

Trbb Oration, 

PiPB Oration and Cbrbmonibs, 



Brbpsant. 
Samuel H. Bakbr. 
Ai^RED C. Haven. 



PIPE SONG. 



dlaaa Pr^B^ntatunuL 



PARTING SONG. 



36o 



Air :— " Marching through Georgia." 



Chorus: 



Jolly boys we've always been, 

Our songs were always gay ; 
Fortune ne'er could make us grieve, — 

We whiffed our cares away ; 
Smoked and sang, and so survived, 

To sing once more to-day; 

Smoking our parting pipe together. 

Hurrah ! hurrah ! a jolly class are we. 
Hurrah ! hurrah ' our pipe is burning free ; 
Loud swell the chorus, and once more we'll jolly be. 
Smoking our parting pipe together. 

mokers are the wisest men Given to us by those before. 

Of all the world's wise folk, We've kept this mighty bowl, 

ever bowed by sorrow or Emblem ot one mighty mind, 

Misfortune's blighting stroke ; And of one glowing soul ; 

or whenever trouble comes. Pass it round once more to-day, 

TtacT light their pipes and smoke, And loud the chorus roll. 
Dreaming of brighter days coming. To cheer our sad hearts at parting. 

CBORT78 : Chorus : 

Heirloom of succeeding years. 
We now resign the Pipe ; 
Seventy-Eight, 'tis yours to keep, 
Until your brains are ripe ; 
Guard ft well, and ere you part, 
Do not forget to smoke. 
Thinking of old times and comrades. 
Chorus : 



Parting ^ottg. 



Air :— " Juaniu." 



R. B. DAY. 



Slowly the day-light 

Sinks into the pesceful west ; 
Sadly youth's gay light 

Sinks in every breast : 
Soon will night's dim azure 

All the hilTs and vales o*ercast ; 
So these hours of pleasure 

Hide them in the past. 

Chorus : 

Classmates ! Dear classmates ! 
Shades of evening bid us part ; 

Shadows more sombre 
Gather o'er each heart. 

When on still pinion Gone is youth's gladness, 

Circling over earth and sky, Yet who would its hour recall ? 

Darkness' dominion Come is life's sadness ; 

Cloudeth ev'ry eye, It doth not appall : 

Stars will, sweetly roaming. E'en to-morrow's hidden — 

Rain their drops of light o'er all. Hidden from our eager view. 

So through life's thick gloaming And the past we've bidden 

Memory's stars will fall. Evermore adieu. 

Chorus : CUasmates, etc. Chorus : Classmates, etc. 



361 



(2?^ 



(UlUBB (SttUttB. 



LoRiNG S. Hutchinson, 
Edward C. Hoskins, 
Richard J. Smith, 
Jennie M. Bancroft, 
Fred C Esmond, 
May G. BissKLL, 
Charles N. Cobb, 
J. Scott Clark. 
Thomas D. Worden, 
Samuel H Raker, 
Alfred C. Haven, 



- President. 
Vice-President. 

- Treasurer, 

Secretary. 

Orator. 

Essayist. 

- Historian. 

- Poet. 

Prophet. 

Tree Orator. 

Pipe Orator. 



^^^^ 



362 



VII. COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 



following programs, etc., will be found in order in the succeeding 

From the First Announcement, 1872 

Firj»t Commencement 

Opening and Commencement, Second Year 

Commencement, 1876 

Call for a Meeting 

Commencement, 1882 



363 



364 HISTORICAL MATTER : COLLEGE OP MSDICINB 



VII. COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 



A. FROM THE FIRST ANNUAL ANNOUNCEMENT j 

The first ** Annual Announcement of the College of Physicians and Sor- I 
geonsof the Syracuse University '* (for the session of 1872-5) is a puh I 
phlet of ten pages. It sets forth the Trustees, the Faculty of 19 mcmben 
(all Professors but one) and the courses. 

The opening paragraphs are as follows : 

This school has been organized as one of the departments of the Synr 
cuse University. It has had the good fortune at the outset to obtain the 
valuable Medical Library and Museum of the Geneva Medical College, tad 
secures the services of a majority of its Faculty. 

To this Faculty have been added a number of Professors, residents cf 
Syracuse and elsewhere, through whom it is hoped instruction may be gif 
en in all the branches that are now considered essential to a complete sid 
thorough medical education. 

Syracuse is centrally located and growing rapidly. It has a Hospital 
and Dispensaries that will afford good opportunities for clinical ill8t^l^ 
tion. It was for these reasons that the friends of the Geneva Medicsl Col- 
lege consented to the transfer of the Library and Museum to Syracuse. 

Under these circumstances it would seem to be a proper time to set ost 
with such improved methods of study as would meet the demands of the 
profession at the present day. These demands, as promulgated by the 
American Medical Association at its last Annual Meeting as well as on f<K^ 
mer occasions, are for a course of study that shall be more systematic, tbor 
ough and complete than has hitherto been pursued ; that shall make a med- 
ical diploma in the future an evidence that its possessor has a positive, 
accurate, thorough and practical knowledge in every department of medi- 
cine. 

The plan and scope of the new method proposed by the College of PhT 
sicians and Surgeons of the Syracuse University, may be briefly described 
here. 

The regular course of study will cover a period of three years. The 
academical year will begin on the first Thursday in October, and end 00 
the last Wednesday in June, and will be divided into two equal terms bf* 
vacation of two weeks. 

B FIRST COMMENCEMENT 

From Thg University Herald^ Feb. 28th, 1873 

CoMMBNCBMBNT.— The first Commencement Exercises of the Medical 
Department were held in Convention Hall, on the evening of Pebmsry I3^ 
Prayer was offered by Rev. George Lansing Taylor. H. G. Buckingb^* 



HISTORICAI, MATTBR : COLLBGB OP MBDICINB 365 

ad a thesis ; subject, '* Pain as a Friendly Monitor." Mrs. Van Tuyl's 
esis was omitted for lack of time. Diplomas were conferred upon Henry 
. Buckingham, James E. Kelsey, John S. Niles, George P. Reynolds, 
ariah D. Simonds and Sarah Van Tuyl. A few remarks were made by 
lancellor Winchell after which Dr. Pease of the Medical Faculty delivered 

address welcoming the graduates to the Medical profession. After the 
cercises a reception was given by the Medical students at the residence 

Dr. Mercer. The whole affair wa^ a fine success. 



:. OPENING AND COMMENCEMENT, SECOND YEAR 

From the Syracuse Herald t Oct. nth, 1873 

^oi,i,BGB OP Physicians and Surgsons.— This department of the Uni- 

reity commenced its second year Thursday 25th inst., in'the Clinton 

ock as heretofore. We understand that there are about twenty- five in 

.endance at present. 

Also the following from the issue of Feb. 13th, 1874 : 

rHB Coi,LEGB OP PHYSICIANS AND SORGSONS. — The Second Annual 

ifnmencement of the College of Physicians and Surgeons took place in 

imkeapeare Hall Thursday evening, Feb.6th. A large audience, in which 

m largely represented the medical profession of the city, assembled at 

pen o*clock. The exercises were introduced by music by Maurer's Band 

jtr which prayer was offered by Rev. Dr. Lore of the Northern Christian 

dvocaU. 

The only thesis of the evening was read by Mr. £. A. Ains worth of 

bsca on "Medical Studies." The main ideas advanced by the speaker 

ere that no science could be mastered withost great labor and thorough- 



After music by the Band Chancellor Winchell presented diplomas to the 
xdnates who were E. A. Ainsworth of Ithaca, Charles O. Baker of 
nbnrn, Charles W. Bowen of Lisle, Amos S. Edwards, Horace F. Hatch 
id Asa G. Henry of Syracuie, Herman D. Hunt of Preble, John A. 
riffin of Canastota and Elias A. Overhizer of Watkins. 

After another selection by the Band Mr. A. S. Edwards of Syracuse 
elivered the Valedictory Address of the class. This address was well 

rritten in all its parts and was finely delivered After more music 

vj the Band Prof. John Towler delivered the Valedictory address for the 
faculty. It would be folly for us to attempt to give any synopsis of this 
^hsrscteristic address. It bristled with life and vivacity and was very 
popular with the audience. The charge to the graduates was especially 
eloquent and interesting. Prof. Bennett of the College of Liberal Arts pro- 
Donnced the Benediction. 

Thns ended the second year of this College, a year marked by earnest 
Itbor on the part of the students and by a cordial sympathy and the best 
tf good feeling between the Faculty and students. 



3« 



HISTORICAI« MATTBR : COI«LBGB OF MBDICIKB 



The Annual Election of Officers for this College was held Jan. 28th vitk 
the following result: Dr. Frederick Hyde, Dean, Dr.J.W.Lawton, Registnt, 
Dr. A. Mercer, Treasurer, Drs. Fowler, Nivison and Didama delegaieito 
the American Medical Association, Dr. H. D. Didama, Valedictorian. 

The present accommodations for this College have been found to be 
unsuitable for its purposes. It is therefore announced that other rooms lill 
be provided before the opening of the next recitation term which will be 
Feb. 20th. Negotiations are now being made which will probabW tenBl> 
nate in the purchase of a building to be occupied by both the College of 
Physicians and Surgeons and the College of Law. 




p ®t 1E@^| 




AT 

lETiNQ Opera House, 



Mt^*i 



I, . . . Heu. W. H, Annable. 

Mendelssohn Vocal Society ^ 
Q Thesis, ..... Miss M, Stanton. 

J. S. Oibbs, 
ALEDicTORiAN, . . - M. K. Reading, 

Mendelssohn Vocal Society' 

Conferring of Degrbes—^^ Chancellor, 

STo Graduates, . . . Prof, E. B. Stevens. 

Mendelssohn Vocal Society- 
Benediction. 



CLASS OFFICERS. 

'-sident, .... Miss M. STANTqn. 

^etary, ..... GEO. LALOR. 

COMMITTEE. 

M. K. Reading, W. H. Dwight, 

J. S. Marshall. 

367 



Syranise, July Slst, 1876 



Dear Sir : 
TJve undersigned, representing the Syracuse Vm- 
versity, and particularly the Medical College, believing thai 
it is a great public and benevolent interest, earnestly desire 
to set forth the condition and claims of the Medical ColU^t 
before a select number of our public spirited citizens, thathy 
means of their counsel and aid we m^ay be able to secure i)^ 
property absolutely essential to its continuance and success- 

For this purpose you and a few other citizens of Syra- 
cuse, are respectfully invited to meet us at the Medical Col- 
lege Building , on Orange Street, between Fayette and East 
Oenesee Streets, on Thursday, July 27th, at 8 o'clock in the 
evening- 

Brief remarks on the subject will be made by the Chan- 
cellor, and members of the Medical Faculty • 

Please favor us with your presence and, counsel. 

E. O. HAVEN, 

ChMcellor. 

H. D. DIDAMA, 
JOHN VAN DUYN, 
H. H. WILBUR, 
W. W. PORTER, 
W. T. PLANT. 
R. W. PEASE, 
A. MERCER, 
J. O. BTJRT, 

Resident Professors of the Medicai C(M^' 
368 



TENTH ANNUAL 




<9Q 

of the 

C allege of Medicinei 

Syracuse University^ 

THURSDAY EVENING, JUNE 8, 1882. 
GRAND OPERA HOUSE. 



w^MmKmm olas®* 



William J. Ayling. 

Frank M. Bur dick. 

Burt Cowles. 

Lucius P. Deming, Jr. 

A. Blair Frazee. 

Frank H. Green. 
Emil Henckell, Jr. 

Edward F. Lake. 

Leonardo A. Saxer. 

Fred. W. Slocum. 

George S. W^eaver. 



369 



Overture, - - Siradella — Flotow. 

Prayer, - Prof. Coddington, D. D. 

Remarks, - - Chancellor Sims. 

Music, - Patience — Sullivan. 

Report of Censors. 

Music, - - Selection—^. N. Catlin. 

Conferring of Degrees and Presenta- 
tion OF Prizes. 

Music, Flute Solo, Pepping Mblpi, M. D. 

Address to Graduating Class, 

W. S. Ely, M. D., Rochester, N. Y. 

Music, - - Donna Juanita — Suppe 

Benediction. 



370 



COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS: EARLY 

PAPERS 



owing papers will be found in order in the succeeding pages : 

<:tures, 1872-3 

st Announcement of Purpose to found a College of Fine Arts 

citation to Inauguration 

ingnration 

nouncement of Courses 

idtation to Anniversary Address 

irmal Institute 

3gram of Organ Concert 



371 



COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS ; EARLY PAPERS 



iNivERSiTY Lectures 



■UPON- 



i872-'73. 



Six Public Lectures upon the Fin8 Arts, will be given under 

the auspices of the 



^c/racuse ^nioersii^, 



-AT— 

WIETING OPERA HOUSE, 

e Months of NOVEMBER, DECEMBER and JANUARY, by 
the following Speakers : 

V. BELLOWS, D. D., of New York, npon ** Music and other 

I America." 

A. D. WHITE, of Cornell University, uporf** Michael Angelo." 

iTATERHOUSE HAWKINS, of New York, upon ** Parks and 

ounds.*' 

,LIAM BUTLER, D. D., of New York, upon *' The Rock Temples 

r. BENNETT, D.'D., of Syracuse University, upon ** Byzantine 
» »» 

F. COMFORT, of Syracuse University, upon •• The Art 

: Rome." 

ectures will be abundantly illustrated by the Stereopticon and by Drawings 

• 

3 Single Lectures, 50 cents; to Gallery, 35 cents ; tickets to the Entire 
leserred Seats. I2.50 ; to Gallery, I1.50 ; to be had at Inciter Bros.* store, 
>re, Durston's Bookstore, Howe's Bookstore, and Wynkoops & I«eonard's 
V The times of the I«ectures will t>e announced hereafter. 

373 



374 Historical Matter: Collhgb of Fins Arts 

FIRST ANNOUNCEMENT 

From The University Herald y June 14, 1873 

Thb Collbgb op Fine Arts.— We are pleased to know and are no less 
pleased to announce that the above College will soon be instituted in con- 
nection with the University. Plans therefor are being developed and it is 
confidently expected that the College will be in operation within a year. 
It is already well known that the first coarse of lectures upon the Fine Arts 
ever instituted in the country was the one we had the pleasure of listening 
to last winter. Prof. Comfort is really getting to himself great credit for 
the energy with which he is consummating his plan of making Syractue 
University the foremost of the American Colleges in the department of Art. 
Yale has its Art Baildinc:, but until this year there have been no particnltr 
efforts to give its students systematic instruction in eesthetics. Here wc 
have had curriculum lectures all the year and these have been supplemented 
by a very interesting special public course. Art is destined to receive more 
attention in College curricula than it has hitherto. The time is coming 
when Art Departments will be considered as necessary as any other depart- 
ment of a University. We say then to Prof. Comfort and to all who are 
interested in this movement towards the higher cultivation of seathetic taste, 
let us have the course in Art enlarged and a College of Art established as 
soon as possible. 



College of Fine Arts, 



» ♦ » 



Yourself and friends are invited to attend the 
\auguration of the College of Fine Arts of the 
vracuse University, to be held in the Chapel of the 
niversity, on the evening of 



f ^urg^ap, ^cpt J8f^, 



rnimencing at half past seven o clock. Several dis- 
inguished speakers will be present and participate 



n the exercises. 



yracuse, iV. K, Sept, lo, 1873. 



C. F. COMFORT, 

Dean of the ColUge, 



» ♦ ♦ 



Cars run to the head of Chestnut Street, near the University Building ] 

375 



376 Historical Matter : Collbgb of Finb Arts 



INAUGURATION 

From The University Herald^ Oct. nth, 1873 

The Fine Arts College. The inaagu ration of the first College of Fine 
Arts in this coaniry took place in the College Chapel Thursday evening, 
Sept. 1 8th. The Chapel was well filled with a fine and appreciative aadieoce 
and the speeches were exceptionally good. The speakers were Rev. George 
Lansing Taylor, Revs. Calthrop and Beard of the city and the Chancellor. 

Owing to the suddenness with which this College was organized and the 
short time since its inception nothing very definite can be given as to its 
prospects. We are informed however that the number of students will be 
fully as large as its projectors anticipated. Only the departments of Painting 
and Architecture are in working order at present ; others will be added next 
year or before. 

Rooms 49, 50 and in the Hall of Languages are devoted to the ose of 

the Art students and are to be well supplied with apparatus, patterns, ctstt, 
etc., which have only begun to arrive as yet. 



COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS 



-OF THE- 



YRACUSE UNIVERSITY. 



le Trustees of the Syracuse University congratulate them- 
s upon being able to announce, at this early date, the organi- 
Q of the College of Fine Arts. They commend this College 
e patronage of those interested in the progress of art in the 
ire State, with the hope that it may become an important 
cy in promoting the cultivation of the fine arts, a branch of 
ition which exerts so important an influence upon the cult- 
refinement, and wealth of a nation, but which has been so 
:ly neglected in our American system of education, 
urses of study have been prepared in Architecture and Paint- 
each course extending through a period of four years. The 
;es include systematic and progressive instruction in the 
•y, the history, and the practice of Architecture and Paint- 
and in those branches of science, philosophy, history and 
lage, which bear most intimately and directly upon these 
and without a knowledge of which success in the higher 
lins of art is impossible. 

le other colleges of the University furnish excellent opportu- 
to those students who may desire to pursue other studies 
ed to the fine arts than those included in the courses of this 
?ge. 

ndidates for admission to the regular courses will be exam- 
in English Grammar, Arithmetic, Geography, and Elemen- 
Drawing. 

udents graduating in the Course in Architecture will receive 
iegree of Bachelor of Architecture (B. Ar.), those graduat- 
n the Course in Painting will receive the degree of Bachelor 
linting (B. P.). 
•ecial students, or those not purposing to graduate in either 

377 



378 Historical Matter: Coli^bgb of Finb Arts 

coarse, may enter the College at any time and take up such studies 
as they are prepared to pursue. 



The fee of matriculation to the University is five dollars. 

The tuition is a hundred dollars a year (or thirty -three and a 
third dollars a term.) 

The fee of graduation in each course is twenty dollars. 

Board, with furnished rooms, can be obtained in the city for 
from four to five dollars a week. 

balenhar. 

The Collegiate year of thirty-nine weeks is divided into three 
terms, as follows : 

ist Term. Begins September 15, closes December 17. 
2d ** Begins January 5, closes April 3. 

3d ** Begins April 6, closes June 25. 

For further particulars, address 

PROF. G. F. COMFORT, 

Syracuse, N. Y. 

PACULTY. 

ALEXANDER WINCHELL. LL.D., Chancellor of thb 

University. 

GEORGE F. COMFORT, A.M., Dean of the Faculty, 
and Professor of Esthetics and History of the Fine Arts. 

HORATIO N. WHITE. Professor of Architecture. 

ARCHIMEDES RUSSELL, Professor of Architecture. 

HENRY C. ALLEWELT, Professor of Decorative Art. 

SANDFORD THAYER. Professor of Portrait Painting. 

GEORGE K. KNAPP, Professor of Portrait and Landsc^^ 
Painting. 

Professor of Landscape Painting^ - 

Professor of Drawing. 

WARD V. RANGER, Professor of Photography. 



Historical Matter: Collbgb op Finb Arts 379 

•■■- ' _ 

JOHN R. FRENCH, LL.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

REV. JOHN J. BROWN, A.M., Professor of Physics and 
Chemistry. 

REV. CHARLES W. BENNETT, D.D., Professor of His- 
tory and Christian Archeology. 

REV. WESLEY P. CODDINGTON, A.M.. Prof essor of Eng- 
lish Literature and History of Philosophy. 

JOHN A. DURSTON, A.M., Ph.D., Professor of Modern 
Languages. 

W. LOCKE RICHARDSON, A.M., Professor of Elocution. 

[You will confer a favor by showing this circular to any persons of your 
acquaintance, who are interested in the study or the promotion of the Fine 
Arts.] 



CoHese of fine Urte 



OF THB 




^^mmm UialTeralty. 






^Jf'Ttc^, Cfy/ S <a c/acA, 



SYRACUSE, JUNE 19TH, 1874. 



380 



NORMAL INSTITUTE 



-OK- 




fiti}tii| 





IN SYRACUSE, N. Y. 

» ♦ ♦ 

mpliance with numerous requests from educators in the State of 
ork, and to supply in a decree an acknowledged deficiency in the 
onal provisions of this State, a Normai« InstituTb op Drawing 
MINTING will be organized during the coming summer at the Coi«i«HGB 
B Arts of the Syracdsb University 

session will extend from July nth to August 4th, 1876. While oc- 
^ a considerable portion of the usual long summer vacation, it will 
persons connected with institutions of learning to be in attendance, 
1 still leave them a part of the vacation free for recreation or travel. 

FOR WHOM DESIGNED. 

Normal Institute is organized with reference to the wants of the 
ng classes of persons : 

'. Teachers in public schools who find themselves now required by 
ft of the State to teach free-hand and industrial drawing in their 
I, but who have hitherto had no practice in drawing and no instruc- 
the elements of art and design. 

id. Principles of public schools, superintendents of city and village 
\, and county commissioners of schools, who find themselves re- 
to superintend a branch of education with which they may have im- 
acquaintance ; Also principals of seminaries, academies and private 
(. 

d. Teachers of drawing and of painting in high schools, academies, 
ries, and private schools, who may hitherto have had but limited 
unities for acquainting themselves with methods of instruction in the 
I branches of drawing and painting, with the principles of the science 
etics (which underlies the fine arts), and with the history of art and 
ition to the general history of civilization. 

^/A. Teachers of other branches of education than drawing and 
ig especially of the natural sciences, who may desire to acquaint 

381 



382 Historical Mattbr: Coli^bgb op Finb Arts 

themselves with the processes of execution, the resources and the limita- 
tions of the various branches of drawing and painting. 

Fifth. Recent graduates of colleges, normal schools and other iasdtii- 
tions, who may desire to acquaint themselves with the general pnncipletaf 
art, in its theory, history and practice, as a supplement to their other 
general liberal education. 

WHAT IS FEASIBLE. 

Professional artists can, of course, be trained only by many years of ctre 
ful and consecutive study and application. But it is altogether pncticable 
for persons of mature age, who have enjoyed the benefits of thorough ele> 
mentary literary and scientific education to acquire within a limited 
time a general knowledge of the fundamental principles of art, and 
of the processes of execution, the scope, and the limitations of the variooa 
branches of drawing and painting. It is also practicable for teachers who 
have a general knowledge of pedagogic science, and who have had experi- 
ence in teaching other branches of education, to acquire within a limited 
time a sufficient general knowledge of art and of pedagogic methods in ait 
to enable them to impart instruction (at least to primary classes) in draw- 
ing, with great acceptability and success ; also teachers in art, of more ex- 
perience, who have had imperfect advantages in their artistic education, 
can attain to more correct views of the nature and office of art, and can 
acquire a better knowledge of technical execution and of pedagogical 
methods Tn art, in a comparatively limited period of time. 

COURSE OF INSTRUCTION. 

The instruction will be given in classes, by lectures, or to individuals, as 
may be found necessary. The course will include practical instmction in 
the various kinds of drawing — as with the lead-pencil, the crayon, charcoal, 
the steel pen, in India ink and sepia, and with drafting instruments ; also 
in painting both in water colors and in oil colors. This practical instruction 
will be interspersed with frequent dissertations upon the relative advant- 
ages and disadvantages, the natural scopetand the limitations of these vari- 
ous branches of art. 

There will be daily class exercises during the session of the Normal In- 
stitute as follows : 

1. In free-hand drawing (artistic and industrial) for beginners. 

2. In free-hand drawing (artistic and industrial) for advanced students. 

3. In mechanical and architectural drafting. 

4. In perspective drawing (from plans and elevations, and with the fre^ 
hand). 

5. In painting in water colors. 

6. In painting in oil colors. 

Parties will be formed as often as may be found convenient, to practice 
sketching from nature amid the picturesque scenery which abounds in the 



HISTORICAL MATTBR : COLLBGB OF FIMB ARTS 383 

rbs and the vicinity of the city of Syracuse. 

uses will be formed, should any desire it, in modeling in clay, snd in 

ography. 

Btmction in the above branches will be given by the following persons : 

of. G. F. Comfort, A.M., Dean of the College of Pine Arts of the Syra- 

University, 

of. Sanford Thayer, of the College of Fine Arts. 

of. Archimedes Russell, of the College of Fine Arts. 

of. W. V. Ranger, of the College of Pine Arts. 

incipal J. W. Armstrong, D.D., of the State Normal School, at Pre- 

a, N. Y. 

of. M. M. Maycock, B.P., of the State Normal School. Buffalo, N. Y. 

rangements have been made for adding to the number of this corps of 

uctors as it shall be found necessary. 

LECTURES. 

le or more lectures will be given on each day during the session of the 
tute, as follows : 

Five lectures upon the Science of Esthetics and the Principles of Art 
icism, by Prof. G. P. Comfort, Dean of the College of Fine Arts. 

Five lectures upon the History of the Pine Arts, by Prof. G. P. COM- 
r. 

Two lectures upon Pedagogical Methods in teaching Drawing and 
ting, by Prof. G. P. Comfort. 

A lecture upon Pedagogical Method in Industrial Drawing, and the 
! Scope of Industrial Art, by Prof. G. P. Comfort. 

Four lectures upon Artistic Anatomy, by Prof. E. E. Van Db War- 
, M.D., of the College of Fine Arts. 

Four lectures upon the Application of Drawing to the teaching of 
iny, Zoology and Geology, by Prof. Albxandbr Winchbll, LL.D., of 
Syracuse University. 

. Four lectures upon the Application of Drawing to the teaching of 
mistry and Physics (with accompanying experiments), by Principal J. 
iJtMSTRONG, D.D., of the State Normal School at Fredonia, N. Y. 

A lecture, with Stereopticon Illustrations, upon the laws of Linear 
pective, by Principal }. W. Armstrong. 

A lecture upon the Common Bond of the Fine Arts, by Chancellor E. 
Iavbn, LL.D., of the Syracuse University. 

A lecture upon the Cathedral Builders of the Middle Ages, by Presi* 
; Andrew D. Whitb, hh.D , of the Cornell University. 

Two lectures upon Artistic Sttidies in Tree Forms, by Principal J. H. 
OR, Ph.D., of the SUte Normal School, Cortland, N. Y. 
. Two lectures upon the Relation of Art to Religion, by Prof. C. W. 
nbtt, D.D., of Syracuse University. 

• A lecture upon Points of Contact between Science and Art, by Prof. 
^ Comfort. 

. Three lectures upon the Chemistry of Colors, by Prof. J. J. Brown, 
!., of Syracuse University. 

. A lectnre upon Teaching as a Fine Art, by Prof. J. W. Mbars, D.D., 
[amilton College, Clinton, N. Y. 

). A lectnre upon the Cultivation of Taste at the Home and in the 
Ml, by Principal H. B. Buckham, A.M., of the State Normal School, at 
alo, N. Y. 



384 HISTORICAL MATTER : COLLEGB OF FINB ARTS 

17. Four lectures upon Early American Art, by W11.US De Haas,MD., 
of New York City. 

18. A lecture upon Art in India, by Hon. N. F. Graves, Ex-Mayor of 
Syracuse. 

19. A lecture upon Chinese and Japanese Art and Customs, by Prof. V. 
V. Ranger, of the College of Fine Arts. 

20. A lecture upon the Present Condition of Architecture in Amfria, 
by Prof. Archimedes Russell, of the College of Fine Arts. 

2f. A lecture upon the present Condition of Painting and Sculpture ia 
America, by Prof. G. F. Comfort. 

Most of these lectures will be extensively and brilliantly illustrated by 

stereopticon views, diagrams, or drawings made on the blaokboani or 00 

cartoon paper during the course of the lecture. 

ART EXHIBITION. 

A Loan Exhibition of Works of Art will be held in the University boiW- 
ing during the coming summer, continuing through the session of theNo^ 
mal Institute. Those attending the Institute will have daily access to tbv 
Exhibition without extra charge. 

EXPENSES. 

The tuition in the Normal Institute will be twenty-five dollars. 
Board, with furnished room, can be obtained in the city for from three 
dollars and a half to five dollars a week. 

REMARKS. 

It will be noticed that in the programme given above of class instnictiot^ 
and of lectures, provision is made for more exercises each day than can b^ 
attended with profit by any one person. This is necessitated by the varied 
artistic attainments of the different persons who may be in attendance tt- 
the Institute. 

It will greatly facilitate the preparations for conducting the Institute, i^ 
persons proposing to be in attendance will state with some definiteoefl^ 
what degree of advancement (if any) they have attained in the study 0^ 
practice of art, and what branches in the above programme they desire tc 
pursue, and especially if they desire to take up modeling or photography^ 

Persons proposing to attend the Institute will confer a favor by coffl- 
municating their intention as early, at least, as by the first of June. 

The opening exercises of the Institute will take place in the Univenity 

building, at three o'clock on Tuesday afternoon, July nth. It is gititlT 

to be desired that all shall be present on that occasion. 

For further particulars, address 

PROF. G. F. COMFORT, 

Dean of the College of Fine Arts, 

Syracuse ^ N. ^- 



!2a)^t^)^t4)(&t4)(^t4)>a^t4)(^t^)^^^ 






H 




Oo 



GIVEN BY THE 



LLE&E GF FIRE ARJPS 



OF 



SYRACUSe UNIVeRSITY. 



IN THE 



IRTH PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. 



Saturday, June 25th, '81. 



t 




385 



^rogranunr. 



1. Grand Offertoire in F, - - - IVefy. 

Miss Kate Stblla Burr, Syracuse. 

2. Solo and Chorus, '* Inflatntnatus/' - - Rossiniy. 
Miss Mary Dumont Sims, Syracuse, and University 

Chorus. 

3. Triumphal March, ... Sainton Dolby. 

Miss Carrie Estella Green, Rushvii<le. 

4. Andante Cantabile, ... - Batiste. 

Mr. Arnold Douglas Scammell, Syracuse. 

5. Sonata No. 2, - - - - Mendelssohn, 

Grave ; Adagio ; Allegro ; Fugue, 
Miss Ida Clepere Marion, Syracuse. 

6. Vocal Solo, ** Ave Maria,'' - - Qmnod. 
Prof. W. E. G. Evans, with Violin Obligato by 

Dr. W. H. Schultze, 

7. Pastorale, . - - - - KvUttk- 

Miss Caroline Ida Gilger, Syracuse. 

8. Violin Solo ; Nocturne in E flat, - - Chopin. 

Dr. W. H. Schultze. 

9. (a) Elevation. - . - - - Batiste, 
(b) Etude in F, - • - - Rinck. 

Mr. Charles Frederic Thomsen, Syracuse. 

10. Grand Offertoire in A, - - - BatisU. 

Miss Ida May Hamilton, Port Byron. 

11. Prelude and Fugue in A Minor, - - /, S, Baek, 

Prof. J. V. Flagler. 

12. Hallelujah Chorus, (from the Messiah), - Handel. 

By the University Chorus. 



386 



S:. REHEARSALS AND EXHIBITIONS 



Following programs will be found in order in the succeeding pages: 

Elocutionary Rehearsal (perhaps the first one) 
Elocutionary Rehearsal ; Freshman Class ('77) 
Sophomore Rehearsal ('79) 
Sophomore Rehearsal ('80) 
Sophomore Rehearsal ('81) 
Junior Exhibition ('76) 



387 



IX. REHEARSALS AND EXHIBITIONS 



SjjFacuSe UniueF§iti] 



COLLEGE OF THE LIBERAL ARTS. 



Sloeutionar||i Rehearsal, 

TTJoivda/ EveMiv^, Jane 2^, 187?. 



PBe6B7I|S|SE. 

MUSIC. 

CE RETaRN OF Rkgulus," — Kellogg. Lee Jennison, '75. 
CB Two Angels " — Longfellow. - Ida A. Gilbert, 76. 
IB War of the League,'* — Macaulay. Melville J. Wells,'75. 

MUSIC. 
IB Old Sergeant,*' — Anon. - John T. Roberts, '76. 
N THE Fisher,'* — Lucy Larcom. Mattie E. Foote '76. 

^n Power of Conscience,'*— Webster. J. D. Phelps, '76. 

MUSIC. 

H Wreck of the Hesperu3,** — Longfellow. 

W. H. Hall, '76. 
Owned," — Mrs. Southey. - - Clara Bradley, '76. 
^^ Quandary," — Gail Hamilton. Grace Hubbell, '76. 

MUSIC. 

tnusic will consist of College Songs, &c., by the University 

Glee Club. 



389 





mmm lliiiiitfstii 




COLLEGE OF UBERAL ARTS. 



Elocutionary Rehearsal 

BY THB 

TReSHMAN CLASS. 

IN THR 

Friday Evening, June 19, 1874. 



P98GR7I|S|SE. 

MUSIC,— F/owfrs. - - - - - / 

—PRAYER.— 

MUSIC, — Remembrance. - ' - - - — 

*Thb Patriot's Defence,"— /iww^?//. B. C. Math 

•The Polish Bos,''— Stephens, - - F. C. Esm 

•The Traitor's Death,'' - - W. H. E 

* Death of Paul Dombey," — Dickens. Minnie A. Bingl 
MUSIC,— Patron's Waltz. Sir 

* George Whitefield," — Punshon. - T. D. Wot 
'McLain's Child,"— - - - L. S. Hutchii 

* The Fisher's Child," Aldrich, - May G. Bij 

* Shamus O'Brien."— Z,^/a««. - - - Mark B. ] 

MUSIC— Bismarck's Galop. .-.-.-/; 

* The Battle of Flodden."— 5^^//. - N. A. ^ 

* The Launching of the Ship," — Longfellow. 

Lucien Underw 

'Massacre of St. Bartholomew," — Punshon. 

O. A. Mercl 

'Darius Green," — Trowbridge. - - A. S. Durs 
MUSIC,— Round the World,— Mazurka. - - /ferm 
The Music will be furnished by Drescher's Orchestra. 



390 



lUUUUWWWf^ftAf 



p iftAnnnn/i ^i 






SQtacus^ Wnintt9iitQ. 



» m » 



mfukiiiiift 




fiif»tr$at» 



IN THE COLLEGE CHAPEL, 



Ihriftag Sa«ttittQt 3nn« 22t 1977. 



» ♦ » 



IHttsir bg 9»0rl(rr (Srtl^tiUm. 






J 



391 



PruQramm^^ 



» ♦ ♦ 



Music — Overture — Ein Morgeu, Ein Mittag, Ein Abend, in Wien — Suj 



l^m^tr. 



Music. — ^Traumbilder, - - /dossier. 



I. David and Goliath, .... /. Samuel XI 



Frank Ingram Wili^ba, Lima. 



2. John Wetley, --..-. J^nsi 



Samubi« John Sornbbrgbr, Cortland. 



3. How he Saved St. Michael's, - - - Anonym 



NBI.UB LouiSB Gborgb, Wlieeling, W. Va, 



4. Window Love, --_... ^^, 



Maltbib Davbnport Babcock, Syracuse. 



Music— Waltz — Schoner Mai, - Siruuss, 



392 



What Ailed Ugly Sam, ----- AnonytHOus. 

WiLUAM Dixon Marsh, Potsdam. 

The Last Hymn, - - - ... Anonymous, 

Harriet Sophia Sragbr, Syracuse. 
Daniel O'Connell, - - . . Wendell PhUlips. 

Charles Watson Rowley, Hyndsville. 

The Great Beef Contract, - - - - 5. Z. Clemens, 

William Clarke Bennett, Syracuse. 

Music. — Lucretia Borf^ia, - - - Donizetti, 

Hector and Andromache, - - - . Iliad^ Book VI, 

Katharine Jane Pickard, Syracuse. 
Fallof the Pemberton Mill, ... - Phelps, 

James Wm. Armitage Dodge, Syracuse 
My First Political Speech. . . - - Max Adeler, 

Watson Seymour Hawkins, Potsdam. 
Music. — Galop — Errinerung an die Jaj;d, Farlow, 

(Eotttmittrr of ArrangrmmtB. 

Willis Augustine Holden. Charles Beach Atwbll. 

Julius Jefferson Van Horne. 



593 



i- 



^^««« •"'wr^^ 



)®u|;i0nG[pg J^ef;)eap§al 



■OF- 



$o|if|omore da$$t 



<t€Ut'i/, (O'V-eoz^/noj ^pccne^ 2 /d^y 




wm^ 



t 



395 



PRCMBRABEIIIS. 



I. 



2. 



3. 



6. 



8. 



10. 



Music — Overture GreeHvg — Hermann, 

Prayer. 
Music — Gavote — Fungmann, 
RufusChoate, - - Wendell PhUHi 

MR. T. B. NOSS. 

The Shipwreck, - - - Havergi 

MISS JBNNIB C. BURNS. 

The Legend of the Wissahikon^ - Lippa 

MR. A. C. IJOX3CKS, 

Chills and Fever, ... Talma 

MR. CHARI«BS SBAGBR. 

Music — Frohe Herzen — Parlow. 
The Leak in the Dyke, - - Phoebe Ca 

BflSS BI.OISB HOLDBN. 

Selection from ''Miles Standish^' Longfell 

MR. M. R. SACKBTT. 

Trouble in the Sanctum, - - Twa 

MISS MIRA B. HAVBN. 



Music — Stanbild — Krebs. 
The Modem Cain, 

MR. G. P. DRAPER. 

The Bugle Song, 

MISS CARRIB B. HUI^I*. 

** The Morning Argus,'' 

MR. J. B. BIGBLOW. 

Music — Out 0/ the Way — Faust. 



Edwaf 



TennySi 



Aiei 



396 



3¥B7ICU)9E UNIVEB3I9Y. 



College of fiiberal ^rts. 



locutionary Rehearsal, 



■BY THE- 



39Ppe]iiie9H cii^99. 



ikag Enmitts. Jiuv ZQ% at Hgtit a'tlatk. 



1879. 



397 



PBeOBTIIIIlH. 

PRAYER. 

Music— Praeludium and Minuet KraMse 

Miss Florence Palmer. 

1. Will. Lloyd GarriBon IVendfU PkW^ 

Geo. E. Hutchings, Cardi£F. 

2. The Young Grey Head Mrs. Soulkey 

Carrie E Pitkin, Syracuse. 

3. Our First Boots 7fl/«^ 

Sidney H. Cook, Syracuse. 

4. The Sailor's Wife ^'^'^ 

Lor A E. Watson, Bristol. 

Muslc^-Lesend of the Rhine ^'^^ 

University Glee Club. 
398 



aiel O'Connell Phillips 

MoMTGOMBRY M. GooDWiN, Chicago, 111. 



e Widow's Choice Aytaun 

Bbrtha Boombr, Brooklyn. 



inting the Deer Chas. Dudley Warner 

Thbo. W. Havbn, Syracuse. 

. Bnmble and Mrs. Comey Dickens 

Chas. P. Lucb, Onondaga Valley. 



-Menuetto Presto from Sonata in B Major Haydn 

Mrs. Gatbs. 



ag Robert of Sicily Longfellow 

David Eugbnb Smith, Cortland. 



e Sparton Exile 

Carrib Shbvbi«son, Syracuse. 

t Pilgrims 

Boyd McDowki,!,, Elmira. 



n Quartz Mark Twain 

Edgar H. Brown, Pittsfield, Mass. 



•Hungarian Dances— Piano Duetto Brahms 

MissBS Hamilton and Eastwood. 

399 



^^CX3SB UNIV^^^^^^ 



inior exbibition, 



^^E CLASS OF ^* 



dc/ix.^ (O^VL^, , K^^ce/KoA^ (^j/d^j P^3* 



TluBic 6^ ®te0C$er'0 ^xt%t%ix(x. 



401 



W^^!Bmimwt». 



MUSIC, - - - CORRESPONDBNZ PoT POURRI 

PRAYER. 

I 

MUSIC, - - Sblbctions from Ernani 

INDEPENDEJSICE OF THOUGHT, 

Gbo. F. D arrow, West Eaton 

LABOR A NECESSITY, 

Clara Bradlby, Syracuse 

SEARCHING FOR TRUTH. 

Wm. H. Hall, Pmmal, VL 

THE GOLDEN MEAN, 

Hbrbbrt Huntington, Cortiand 

MUSIC, .... VibnnaTbmpm 



402 



PECIALTIES. 

E. Olin Kinne. De Witt Center 

HE COSMOPOLITAN SPIRIT, 

Mattie E. Foote, Weedsport 

RGANIZATION AS AN AUXILIARY TO LABOR, 

E Nottingham, Syracuse 

[USIC, ----- Oberlander 

HB WORLDS LESSON OF SELF-SACRIFICE, 

Jambs D. Phelps, Martinshurg 

SUBJECTIVE INFLUENCE OF COLLEGE LIFE, 

E. Grace Hubbell, Rochester 

HLBERFORCE AND SLAVERY. 

John T. Roberts, Onondaga 
^USIC, - - - Angela Polka Mazurka 

BENEDICTION. 



(ommillee of |irraiii|eiiieiils. 

W, Nottingham^ 
?. 5. Price, , A, B. Randall 



403 



X. CALCULUS CEREMONIES 



t following programs will be found in order in the sacceeding pages 

Class of '75. First celebration of the kind 

Class of *77 

Class of '78. At Frenchman's Island 

Class of *8i 

Class of '84 



405 



X. CALCULUS CEREMONIES. 



tt 



Deeper than did ever plummet sound, Fll bury my 
book." 

" Jfot that we love Prof, F less, but that we 

love custom, m^re." 



DEPARTED WIS LIFE 

On the i8th inst., at 10:30 A. M., 

Qen. Geo. Metry, A. Calculus d. x., 

OF SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY. 



His mortal remains will be co(n)sined to earth accord- 
ing to the rites and ceremonies of Ye Ancient SufEermoric 
Order of Klaudestine Kalkulus Konflagrationists, this 
(Monday) evening, when Diabolaster touches the zenith. 

The sad and solemn procession will move from the late resi- 
dence of the deceased immediately after the little boys and girls 
have spoke their pieces and proceed in an asymptotic line to the 
Scientific Protuberance on the west side of the campus, where the 
funeral ceremonies will be eliminated. 

Friends and acquaintances of the deceased, " benefactors and 
officials of the S. U., and professional gentlemen, &c., generally, 
with their ladies,*' are requested to spectate. 

Ye Faneral Cortege will move as followeth : 

PONTIFEX MAXIMA AND MINIMA. 

ULULATISTS. 

CORPSE. 

INTE(R)— ORATORS. 

NECROLOGICAL EXPATIATOR. 

YE FRATERNITY IN REGALIA. 

Oi Ektos. 



Xj:x:x:Trii- 



Funerese Exercitationes 

ANNO DOMINI 

Ante diem quattuordecim Kal. Jul. 

MDCCCLXXV, 

pro 

Miss Ann A. Lytics, 

Filia maxima natu 

HON. MR. ARGHEMEDIS, 

qui 

Antiquissimis temporibus, 

In Syracusas, 

Cum omnibus suis 

Venit, 
et ibi 
obiit. 




408 



PERNOCTATIONAL UPRISING. 



>cality of Assis^natiotiy - Arnold's I/ivery Stable, 
^od of Coagulitition and Mobilititiony After the 
Bloqnential Stag^nation in the Third Story, 
^ambulatory Circuition, - A Diabolical Ca8(p). 
endezvons, - J^sthetical Anterior Dirt Heap. 



O R P O. 
Drum Major. 

luminationist, - - Illuminationist 

Unsquelchable Wailist. 



X o p o ^ 

eipsichorean | ( Tartarean [sub ] 

intinnabulationist. i ( Squawkist. 

Te»«r Furlo«>J | ^^^^'' 

Ye Tender- Hearted Migrationists. 



■D 






Ye Ascensionists. 

Maxima, [Boss.] ^j Supe, [Minima.] 

Consanguinii. 

Mathew flatics, Qeo. Metry, 

Al. Oebra, ^__^^_^ Cal. Cuius. 

luminationist. - - Illuminationist. 



409 



AS follows: 



Preliminary Harmonification, 

[Symphony, Meter, Leminis(oat)icaI, 

Beethoven.] 



Final Exordial Lamentation 



The dear girl goeth upward, accompanied by 

DIRGE. 

Mendelssohn Quartette Qub, with full 

Orchestra, — Last Hope^ - Gottschalk* 



N. B. — Spectators will please keep off Johnny Ps 
lawn, and not mar the shrubbery (or oats.) 



410 



/ 

/ 



\)j^ NltMOff/^^ 



JOHN R. CALCULUS 



AND 



MARY ANNA LYTICS, 



HIS WIFE, 



'RACUSE. NEW YORK. 

DIED JUNE 20, A. D. 1876, 

BOARD TBE SHIP **BOSCOVICH/' BOUND TO 

ISLE FLUNK. 

Ag&d Respectively, 

;,HI592653589J93 + & 2,7J828J + Years. 

lED AT SEA JUNE 27, A. D., 1876 

Their Spirits hcive been rectified, 

Requiescant In Pace, 



411 



G. T. Hellesquire, 

Hades, Sulphur Co., 

( With Care, ) State of Tormen 



POMPA FUNEBRIS. 



ORDINATOR 



Vespillones. 



PulU 



PLIAUS HIM 



Oratio Sacra. 



Recordation 



EXSEQUIAE. 



Pro Mortuis Res Divina. 

(Windham.) 

— Floralia Dona. — 

— Ye Maximi Dumpii — 

—Dump I— 



413 



' 


-PLEYELS HYMN. 


^i>— WINDHAM. 


OHN R. CALCULUS. 


TO ANNA LYTICS. 


en all assembled here, 
this rectilinear bier, 

monm, in sorrowing 
Hi. 
lerer from rectitude. 


I. Pause Breth'ren, Pause, "suffi- 
cient there ;'* 
While mournfully we contem- 
plate 
The virtues of the lovely dead, 
The sadness of her cruel fate. 




2. Behold her lean and wasted 


spirals high in air, 
le end of rr* ; 


form, 
Behold her gaunt and hollow 


nbled on an asymptote 
'eut his life in darkness 


cheeks. 
Her parabolic mouth sealed up 


t 


While love in bitter sorrow 




weeps. 




3. And now we give her last re- 


]) hear the sounds of woe 


mains. 


I up from dire Pluto, 


To rest forever 'neath the wave, 


the imps in fiendish glee, 
igh his agonies to see. 


May none her curves and sines 
molest. 
No vandal hand disturb her 




grave. 


# 

is fate, but not too hard. 


4. Let her sad fate a warning 


J year our peace he's 
•red ; 


prove 
To all creation 's lords and ladies, 


ce he*s gone to the bad 


For all who conic sections love. 


De no more to see his face. 


Will surely come at last to 
Hades. 





413 



m 



4 

.1 
■ r 
t 



H 

!!■■■ 
I 






IN MEMORIAM. 






hanne^ ^. Gal?ulu|, ^. I., 

I est, hominum interfector,) cum uxore 

XNNA LYTICA, 

US a 8ui8 servU in Universitate Syracusana, a. d. 
:al. Jul., MDCCCLXXIX. Corpora, quattuor dies 
nifice composita, in 

LACUM OWAHGENUM, 

ttentur a. d. VII. Kal. Jul. 

r*Consansuinii mortuorum et socii ad funcra 
randa vehementer invitantur. 



415 



I 



POMPA FUNEBRIi 

SPLENDIDA ET SOLEMNIS. 



I. Navis qua praeses, ora 

consanguinii et spectatc 
vehuntur. 

II. Prisci servi Johannis in 

viculis. 

III. Corpora Johannis et An 
in rate ini|>osita. 



I. Ordinatio. 

II. Carmen funebre. 

III. Oratio f unerea. 

IV. Combustio corporum. 

V. Naenia ultima. 

VI. Ave I Salve! Vale! 



416 



Tune— Pleycra Hymn. 

1. John Calculus, with honor due 
We bid a last farewell to yon ; 
Rest you in your watery bed ; 
Let the last sad rites be said. 

2. We worshipped you in life, you know ; 
Now to Pblegethon you go. 

For the trials you've given us here, 
May you'suffer torment drear. 



TuNB— •* There is a Land of Pure Delight." 

1. There is a class awaiting us, 
And open is the door, 

Where Doctor John R. Calculus 
Can trouble us no more. 

2. This Doctor lived on Asymptotes, 
On Cusps, and Lemniscates, 

On Cissoids, Cycloids, Ellipses, 
And right coordinates. 

3. So let your tears, dear brethren, flow ; 
He's dead, so dead, to us ; 

He*8 with his father, old Pluto, 
This old polar fo-cuss. 

4. A last farewell to him we give, 
With groans we fill the air ; 
Ne resquiescat in pace^ 

Is our most heartfelt prayer. 



417 



















+ '84 + 










EXCURSION 




TO 




SKANEATELES LAKE 


■ 
-f 






AND 






funeral Ceremonies 






OF 






John R. Calculus, 






AND HIS WIFE. 






Ann A. Lytics, 






J^IDj^Y, JUJiE 23, '82. 













419 



Ordino Reruh. 



(• Pfoccssto ad fcfias^ 
2* Salttis ad naviculas» 

3* Soltcttafeni in lucos> 
4« Epulatio ct hilaritas^ 
5. Iter in l aco ad lunam* 
6 Oration 

7. Ncnia funcbfis, 

8. Exscquiac plor atofum ad asccnsionem, 

9. Tfiste vale Calculo et uxori. 
to. Asccnsio comm. 

U* Tripudtans pedem inconstantcm levcinque* 
12. Iter ad domum. 



4?o 



NENIA 



IN MEMORIAM. 



JOHN R. CALCULUS ET UXOR EJUS 

ANN A. LYTICS. 



I, CON8BCRATIO. 

Calculus is dying now. 
He is sinking ^neath the wave; 

Long he^s been a constant /riend, 

Now heUl find a watery grave, 

CHO . — Weep a nd groan , 
Wail an i moan I 
Calculus^ O ! fare-thee-well. 

On a tangent he has gone 
Ad finitum. Nevermore 

Will we see a sint of him, 
For his functions now are o^er, 

Chonui. 

Anna, too, has gone with him, 
Lift your voices loud in grief : 

Variable we'e their moods. 
Now we find a sweet relief. 

Chortts. 

Cal, in '^transcendental terms." 
Bade us solve finite equations ; 

Differential /(72//I// we him, 
Leading on to integrations. 

Choras. 

L^t us now unite our wails, 
While we take the parting view ; 

Briny tears let each one shed 
As we chant this sad adieu ! 

Chorus. 



421 



XI. BOATING IN THE '70's 

Eari,y Editorials 
From The University Herald^ Vol. I, No. i, June 22, 1872 

Shall wb Boat? Considering the natural advantages and the materitl 
at onr command we would unhesitatingly say, Yes. Some may decry the 
practice but they might with equal justice tyrade against any other health- 
ful amusement. If there be any objections to boating they lodge against 
its abuse and not its legitimate use. If they oppose regattas they mightas 
well rule all emulation out of the world ; and if they did what would be the 
effect on human effort ? It may appear to others as premature, this advo- 
cacy of boating, so early in the history of the University. It will certainly 
do no harm to thus agitate the matter for agitation precedes all action. 

The Onondaga would be considered a gem of a sheet were it near one of 
our larger boating colleges. Of course we cannot expect to rival the down- 
Easters just at present but we predict that the time is not far distant when 
the colors of the various colleges of New York State will stream in the 
Saline breezes of the Onondaga and the manly struggle of aquatic sports will 
be witnessed by our own denizens and on their own waters. Our University 
boys are rapidly acquiring the go-aheaditiveness and enterprise of the older 
institutions and we expect at no distant period to record the fact of the 
organization of a Boating Association in the University. Colleges in New 
England, some of them the staidest in the land a few years ago, are all 
qui vive with enthusiasm on boating matters. But we must not look too 
far away to discover the development of this furore, Cornell has already 
formed several boat cl ubs and has erected a commodious boat house on the 
shores of the Cayuga. The birch yields to the cedar, and where the stalwart 
Indian skimmed the waves, now plys the graceful shell. The splashing of 
the *' spoon" is heard on the Seneca, too, where years ago the almost noise- 
less dip of the paddle cut the placid lake. Hobart is not without the pale 
of this boating mania and neither ought we to be. Once more may these 
inland lakes resound with the shouts of friendly rivalries ! Once more may 
their surfaces be rippled by the tiny craft ! We confidently believe that as 
soon as suitable crews can be selected we shall not be behind the older insti- 
tutions in enthusiasm for this manly and distinctively University pastime. 

From The University Herald^ Vol. I, No. 8, April 19, 1873 

The season for boating is Upon us and what is Syracuse to do about it? As 
near as we can find out certain members of the freshman class have organ- 
ized a club, collected funds, bought a boat and erected a commodious $700 
boat house near the lake. But cui bono f Is the matter going to stop with 
this ? It seems to us that '76 ought to scare up enthusiasm enough to take 
the subject in hand and put some life into our boating affairs. It is not at 
all improbable that Cornell would like to row with the Syracuse crew and 
we would certainly enjoy the sport though we know who would get the 
"wash.*' Ye valiant sons of Neptune awake to glory ! Give na a crew! 
Give us a race ! Do ! 

422 



From The University Herald^ Vol. I, No. 9, Mmy 24, 1873 

Boating in the Uniyenity has thns far been confined to some private 

individuals of the freshman class. Bv them monev has been raised, a boat 

jrarchased, a fine $700 boat house erected, and everything prepared for the 

boped-for attack of the mania of the oar. Recently the Commodore of the 

Cornell navy was in town and invited these gentlemen to send a crew to the 

Cornell regatta, which takes place at Ithaca on the 30th inst. A crew was 

lelected immediately and put into training. Now then the question occurs 

who is to pay the expenses of this crew ? Will the College students and 

officers come down or not? The Herald Association tried to aid them, but 

oh no, couldn't do it. It was uncoustitutioual. There is one thing which 

oar students may as well understand first as last. If boating is to flourish 

here we must put our hands into our pockets and push things. 

From The University Herald^ Vol. I, No. 10, June 14, 1873 

[In the Commencement Week Program published on page 118 Vol. I of 
The University Herald is found the following : — ] 

Wednesday t June ^5, 3 p. m. — Regatta on Onondaga Lake, in which Citi- 
zen Clubs from New York, Albany, Rochester, Union Springs, and Buffalo 
will enter crews under the auspices of the Boating Association in the Uni- 
versity, 

From The University Herald ^ Vol. II, No. i, Oct. 11, 1873 

Boating. — The state of this sport among us is pretty well known ; there 
it now a prospect of change. Thursday morning, October 3, a general col- 
lege meeting was held and an eminently practical discourse delivered by 
Plaistcd, '76, the substance thereof being that if an association were organ - 
i»d, and would take up the matter, he, as representative of the boating 
tpparatns acquired through the labors of himself and Hine, '76, would turn 
Mid property over to the College unconditionally. The boathouse, boats, 
ftc, are valned at I900, on which there is a debt of $400, due in three annual 
ptjtnents, the first being January ist, 1874 ; the land on which the boat- 
hoose stands is secured by a lease for ten years. 

We very much doubt if any College Navy has had a better offer made it 
at the start ; and if boating is not to be a success in our University, the cause 
will not be so much in lack of money as in lack of a decent amount of Col- 
lege spirit. Messrs. Plaisted and Hine have done a grand good thing for 
their College, but the time for personal effort alone is past. Now is the 
time for an organized effort, outside of cliques and coteries ; the Gods rain 
blessings, don't let us put up our umbrellas. We sincerely hope the dead 
silence in which the announcement was received was simply another 
instance of the characteristic phlegm of our students and not an indication 
of indifference. The only action taken was the appointment by the Chair, 
Redhead, *74, of a committee of three to draft and present a constitution, 
the committee being Congdon, '75, Plaisted, 76 and Esmond, '77. 

423 



Prom The University Herald, Vol. II, No. a, Oct. 31, 1873 

Aquatic— The Committee appointed to prepare a constitntion for €» 
prospective navy reported in general college meeting Oct. 20th, Fowkr 
of * 74 in the Chair. Before the report Mr. Plaisted rose and asked for n 
expression from the meeting as to whether they proposed to go into IniI> 
ing. Since he was not justified in giving over the property inhisposMsiki 
to those who did not want it, wherenpon Mr. Wood moved " that we go in- 
to boating*' which was carried by acclamation. The Constitution of the 
*' Syracuse University Navy '* was then read and the Chairman putting it to 
vote whether the meeting approved said instrument, about two-thirdi roie, 
excessive modesty, we suppose, keeping the rest down. This action, of 
course, was entirely informal. By motion the Chairman was instructed to 
appoint a committee of three to present the matter to the students generally 
and secure the names of those who wished to join the navy. The Committee 
consists of Plaisted, '76, Wood, '75, Thomsen, '76, and therefore when any 
of these gentlemen approach you give ear unto their words. The conditions 
of membership are so easy that any one who desires can join and see lus 
name in the next Herald, 

From The University Herald, Vol. II, No. 3, Nov. 25th, 1873 

[part of a longer article] 

Our PifEASURB Boating. — It may be a favor to the entering class, poai- 
bly to others of our students, to call their attention to the existing fadUttei 
for boating on Onondaga Lake. 

These facilities consist chiefly of the collections of boats at the Salinaaod 
Geddes landings. At the former are kept the shell belonging to the ns?7 
members of the Sophomore class and a good lot of boats on hire at reason- 
able rates. The boathouse stands on the flat north of the city, at some dis- 
tance from the lake, communicating with it by a little canal which it 
crossed by the Northern Railroad at this point. The place is in the heart of 
the salt region, but the air is not thereby prevented from reeking with ss 
*' 'ancient and a fishlike smell ;" and the landscape around this end of the 
lake suggests nothing but the ''meshes'* in Great Expectations. This 
neighborhood is under water in the Spring and boats are then necessary to 
reach the boathouse. 

From The University Herald, Vol. II, No. 3, Nov. 25, 1873 

Aquatic. — The Committee appointed to canvass the subject of boating 
and to secure the names of those who desired to join the Navy have thos 
far met with but indifferent success, only sixteen names having as yet been 
secured. We do not know whether the want of interest displayed it doe 
to a lack of live men in the college or to the recent financial development 
in Wall street. Whatever may be the cause one fact is quite evident, and 
that is that to make boating a success in the College a greater interest in 
the matter must be shown by the students. This is not the place to review 
the superior advantages we possess for boating. These are all well known. 
We need only to state that in addition to Cornell as a neighboring compet- 
itor we have the Syracuse Rowing Club which has purchased a fine six* 

424 



^red shell and will hold itself in readiness, and expects to row with ns 
next Spring. Brery class onght to be well represented in the Navy in 
order that crews may be selected that shall, by gymnasium practice, be in 
condition to enter a boat in the Spring. Will not those who voted to '* have 
boating ** hasten to subscribe to the constitution ? The following students 
have become members of the Navy : — A. F. Berrian, M. D. Buck, William 
CoUen. C. A. Congdon, J. M. Gilbert. J. C. Nichols, W. A. Wood. N. M. 
.Wheeler and W. H. Dunlap from '75 ; H. F. Thomsen, Charles H. Wall, 
E. Nottingham and S. H. Wilhelm from '76 ; D. E. Anthony. Pred Esmond 
and C. E. Holden from '77. . 

From The University Herald, Vol. II, No. 4, Dec. 17th. 1873 

Aquatic. — A Meeting for the purpose of organizing the *' Syracuse Uni- 
TCfsity Navy.'* was called by those who had signed the constitution drafted 
by the committee appointed at the general college meeting Oct. 3CI. Mr. 
Congdon was called to the chair. After he had stated the object of the 
meeting the annual election of officers was held with the following result : 
President. A. F. Berrian, '75, Vice President, J. M. Gilbert, '75, Secretary, 
N. M. Wheeler, '75, Treasurer, W. A. Wood, '75, Commodore, C. A. Cong- 
<loni '75i Vice-Commodore, W. H. Dunlap, '75. The boating interests of 
the College have thtis been placed in the hands of those who are competent 
to manage them if they are well supported by the students. Without their 
mpport nothing can be done. It must not be expected that eighteen or 
twenty men can support the Navy financially or furnish the material for 
crews. What we now want and must have in order to make boating a suc- 
cess is the hearty cooperation of all the students. Such support as is 
needed may be given if every man who is able will subscribe to the consti- 
tation and become a member of the navy. If this is not done, then all the 
present organization can do is to hold the property of the Navy in tmst and 
leave it for future and larger classes to make use of the advantages which 
we possess. If such support is given we will be able to try our luck with 
Cornell and send a Freshman crew to the next Intercollegiate Regatta. 



425 



XII. EARLY TRACK MEETS 



The following programs present two Track Meets, the first in the 
listory of Syracuse University, and the seventh which was held in 1882. 
T^t two will illustrate pretty well the character of the early Meets. 



427 



XII. EARLY TRACK MEETS 



i»gp0<3u§e ilnivepgitg. 



FIEEiB WAY. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

E. NOTTINGHAN, '76, \ r- 1 I I a a 

T i,r ^ if Col. L'O. Arts. 

J W, Tavlok, 77, ) 

A. W. DoDS, — Co/. Mtdicine. 

H. S. GuTSKLL, — Col. Fine Arts. 



REFEREE, 

Phof. John H. Durston. 



JUDGES. 

lARLES A. F0WLHR,'74. jAMBS M. G1I.BBKT, '75. 



MASTER OF CEREMONIES. 
E. Olin Kinnb, '76. 



TIME KEEPERS. 

E Brown, '78, T. M. Nichols, '78. 



©pdep of ©xePGiges. 



FORENOON-9 A. M 



I.— RIFXrE MATCH. 

II.— HAIrP MIIr9 RUN. 

ConUslanls —AheW, Bennett, Congdon, Day, Hawkins, Hollett, 
Hovey, Moule, Weaver, Wells. 

III.— THROWING BASE BAI/I<- three trials. 

Contestanfs—Qohh, Comstock, Hawkins, C. D. Holden, W. A. 
Holden, Hovey, Knight, C. M. Moss, W. Nottingham, Tallman. 

IV.— RUNNING XrONG JUMP— three trials. 

Contestants — Abell. Babcock, Jones, Keeler, Taylor, Wells. 

v.- THROWING HAMMER— weight za lbs., three 

trials. 

Contestants — Dods, Cobb, Hawkins, Howe, Jones, Moule, E. 
Nottingham, W. Nottingham, Taylor, Young. 

yi.-8TANDING IrONG JUMP-with or without weights, 

three trials* 

0?«/«/aw'j— Abell, Allen, Bringofif, Cobb, A. G. Hall, Howe. 
Weaver. 

YI.-ONE MIXrE WAIrK. 

Contestants — Abell, Baker, Ensign, Fairfax, Giles, Hollett, Tay- 
lor. 

VII.— ROPE PUIrlr-Sophs vs. Fresh. 

Front men of contesting classes to be ten feet apart ; the 
class to be declared winner which pulls its opponent entirely across 
the line — time not to exceed twenty minutes. 



430 



AFTERNOON-2 P. M. 



I.— WH99i;,BARROW RAC9— zoo Yards. 

Contestants — Atwell, Brown, Congdon, Dolley, Ensign, Giles, 
Harrison, Hawkins, Mead, Moule, P. Price, Tallman, Weaver. 

II.— HUNDRBB YARD DASH. 

Contestants — Day, Fairfax, A. G. Hall, Hawkins, C. M. Moss, 
Moule, Van Horne, Weaver. 

III.— RUNNING HIGH JUMP— to befirin 3 ft. 8 in. high. 

Contestants — Abell, Allen, Bennett, Cobb, Dods, A. G. Hall, 
Howe, Weaver, Taylor. 

lY.— THR99 XrBGGED RACE— zoo Yards— Ruttners 

tied above and below the knees. 

Contestants — Babcock and Mix, Bennett and Holden, Baker and 
Ensign, Brown and Blowers, Cobb and Taylor, Clark and Smith, 
Congdon and Atwell, Dolley and Weaver, Fairfax and Hovey, 
Giles and Hall (A. G. ), Moss and Haven, Smith (C. E.) and Tall- 
man. 

STANDING HIGH JUMP— to befifin a ft. 8 in. high- 
three trials. 

Contestants — Allen, Bringoff, Cobb, Dods, Howe. 

YI.— EGG RACE— six eggs, two rods apart, to be col- 
lected one at a time, without breaking, into a 
basket at the starting point. 

Contestants — Brown, Clark, Congdon, Comstock, Dolley, Dnrs- 
lon. Haven, Moss, P. Price, Underwood. 

YII.— HOPj SKIP AND JUMP-three trials. 

Contestants — Brown, Comstock, Ensign. A. G. Hall, Jones, 
Taylor, Wells. 

YIII. -HURDIrE RACE— 150 yards, la Hnrdles, 3 ft. 

high. 

Contestants — Bennett, Comstock, Clark, Dods, Day. Fairfax, 
A. G. Hall, W. A. Holden, Haven, C. M. Moss, Moule, Under- 
wood, Weaver, Wells. 

IX.— FOOT BAIfIr— Iriberal Arts vs. Medics— American 

College Association Rules. 

Keeler, captain for Liberal Arts ; Dods, captain for Medics. 



431 



ry^t^ee^e ^/m^f^s^f^. 



■•~ v^-^^ ^> 



SEVENTH ANNUAL 



FIELD DAY 



FRIDAY, MAY 26th. 1882 



AT TWO O'CLOCK P. M. 



(geferee. 

Prof. Frank Smalley. 
. Wm. E. G. Evans, Edwin Nottingham, Esq. 

Qltaef er of Ceremoniee. 

W. S. Hawkins. 
RY Pease, Chas. W. Wood, Geo. E. Zartman. 

0xecufi)>e Commtffee. 

I. M. Wells, '82, A. Copeland, '84, 

P. R. Sleight, '83, F. A Gillette, '85. 



435 



i 




MENTS. 



Extra. First Trialin the Bicycle /^ace,—KaU mile race; best 
two in three. 
Prize. ••Gold Charm." 

1. Pole Vaulting, — To begin at 6 feet high. Pole to be left ; two 

trials at each height. 
Prize, " Dressing Case ;" Awarded by the Ladies. — Best Record 
7 ft. 5 in. 

2. Throwing Base Ball. — Two trials. 

Prize, " Derby Hat ;'* Awarded by Stevens and Adams.^Besi 
Record 338 ft. 

3. Throwing Hammer. — Weight ten Pounds. 

Prize, ** Gibbons History of Rome;" Awarded by T. IV. Durs- 

ton and Co. 
Best Record 103 ft. 4 in. 

Extra. Second Trial in the Bicycle Race. 

4. Hundred Yard Dash. — 

Prize, ** Student Lamp ;" Awarded by Gamma Phi Beta Ladies. 
Best Record 9>^ seconds. 

5. One Hour Race.—^'^ Go a» you please." 

Prize, " Hume's History of England." 

6. Running High Jump. — To begin at four feet height. 

Prize, ** Herald."— Best Record 4ft. 10 in. 

7. Standing Long Jump. — Two Trials. 

Prize, *' Syracusan." — Best Record 11 ft. 3 in. 

8. Half Mile i^«;i.— Prize, '• Hunting Shirt;" Awarded by T. E- 

Taylor. — 
Best Record 2 min. 19 sec. 



434 



9. Running Hop, Skip and Jump, — Two trials. 

Prize, **Macaulay*8 History of England ;" Awarded by Wyn- 

koop and Co. — 
Best Record 39 ft. i in. 

Extra. Third Trial in Bicycle Riue. 

10. Running Long Jump, — Two Trials. Prize. ** Hood's Works ;** 
Awarded by IVolcott and Greenway. — Best Record 18 ft. 4 in. 

11. Hundred Yards Dash Backwards, — Prize, ** Silver Headed 

Cane ;" 
Awarded by Brumelkamp, 

12. Wheelbarrow Race, — Two-hundred yards. Two runners to 

each barrow ; first to wheel the second one-hundred yards 
and turn about ; then the second runner to wheel the first 
one-hundred yards return. One trial. 
Prize, Box of Collars and Cuffs. — Best Record 41 % sec. 

13. Putting the 54<?/.— Weight 10 lbs. Two trials. 

Prize, ** Yale Yachting Shirt ;** Awarded by Fellows Brothers, 
Best Record 38 ft. 6 in. 

14. Three Legged Race — Runners tied above and below the knee. 
Prize, **One dozen Pairs of Cuffs" ; Awarded hy I, L, Loomis, 
— Best Record 12X sec. 

Extra. Bicycle y?flr^.— Half-mile ; " Hands off handles.*' 

15. Stilt Race, — Height of stilts two feet or more. Prize, "Silk 

Umbrella" ; Awarded by Burch and Clark, 

16. Mile Walk. — Prize, •*Bronze Ash-tray" ; Awarded by Brown 

and Dawson, 

17. High /Cick.— Three trials. Prize, One dozen ** Carbon Photo- 

graphs;*' Awarded by University Art Gallery, — Best Record 
7 ft. 7 in. 

18. •• Tug of W^fltr."— Between 'Eighty-four and 'Eighty-five ; 

number to be chosen by the class ; front men of each class 
to be ten feet apart ; that class to be declared winner that 
palls its opponents entirely across the line. 



435 



XIII. MISCELLANEOUS 



The following programs and papers will be found in order in the 
mcceediug pages : 

Glee Club Concert. Perhaps the first concert ci Syracuse University 
itadents. 

School of Geology ; Dr. Winchell 

Paper to the Conferences 

Celebration of Washington's Birthday 

Sophomore Program for the same celebration 

Recitation Schedule 

Literary Exercises of Alumni 



XIII. MISCELLANEOUS 



GRAND 

Vocal and Instrumental Concert 

BY THK 

fracuse University Glee Club, 

AT 

CeNCB99 BHIiIi. C7IIIBNevI7I> 

ON 

riday Evening, June 13tK/73. 

♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦•••#♦♦♦♦♦♦'« 
le C1ul3 conaiate of the followins named Btudents: 

FIRST lEKOR: 
B, RANDALL, W, H. SHUART. 

SECOXD TEH OR : 
ESLEY ARNOLD, W, C. WILBOR. 

FIRST BJISS: 
fAS. FO WLER, E, O. KINNE, 

SECOJfD BASS : 
9. CO/T, GEO, F HINE. 

The Club will be assisted by an accomplished Trio, consisting of 

f. HINTON, Piano ; 

Mr, STEWART, Violin; 

Mr, ME YER, Flute, 



8KK PROGRAMME ON THIRD PAGBi. 



DMISSION. - - 35&50CTS. 

Reserved Seati may he obtained at the Book Stores- 

E. D. PLAISTED, Maxuger. 



439 



PART I. 
I— COLLEGE SONG— ''Quodlibet/' 

Glee Club, 
2— CHORUS— • * Stars of the Summer Night. ' ' - 

Glee Club, 
3— TRIO— •* Poet and Peasant/' - - - Suppb 

Messrs, Hinton, Stewart and Meyer. 
4— SOLO— *' Remember when I'm Gone," - Abt 

Mr, Wesley Arnold, 
5— CHORUS— *• March," - - - BeckBR 

GUe Club 

g TRIO \ ^' Andante Symphony, - Bbbthovsn 

o— ii^iu j b. Musical Rockets, - - Frrising 

Messrs, Hinton, Stewart and Meyer. 
7-COLLEGE SONG- { J :; ^Ijg^^^^^^^^ . " 

Glee Club. 



PART II. 

1— SOLO— ** Goodnight, Farewell." - - Kuckbn 

Mr, Geo, F, Hine. 
2— CHORUS— ** Waltz," • - - Vogbl 

Glee Club, 
3— TRIO— * Wine, Wife and Song, "—Piano, Violin and 

Flute, ----- Strauss 

Messrs, Hinton, Stewart and Meyer. 
4— COLLEGE SONG— ''Upidee," 

Glee Club, 
5— CHORUS— ** Wanderer's Return," - - Abt 

Glee Club, 
6— TRIO— ' Swiss Air." Varied— Piano, Violin and Flute, 

POIDB 

Messrs, Hinton^ Stewart and Meyer. 

7-COLLEGE SONG- { f i.' SS°nfgSri^ies.'- - 

GUe Club. 



440 



HISTORICAI, MATTER : SCHOOI. OP GBOI^OGY 44 1 

SCHOOL OF GEOLOGY 

In The 

SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY. 

Tbe Professor of Geology io the Syracuse University, desiring to bring 
more distinctly under observation the course of instruction in Geology 
provided in the regular curriculum, and also to organize provision for more 
idvanced study, has determined, with the approval of the government of 
tbe University, to make the following announcement : 

The elementary instruction in Geology which has heretofore been dis- 
tributed through the first and second terms of the collegiate year, will be 
condensed this year into the months of February and March ; and dur- 
ing these two months the attention both of students and instructors will 
be devoted, somewhat exclusively, to this subject. This arrangement, while 
expected to prove advantageous to regular students in the University, will 
afford a favorable opportunity for special geological students to attend to 
tbeir chosen branch of science without having to spend time upon other 
subjects. The plan is intended to accommodate the large number of per- 
sons of all ages who feel the desirableness of an outline acquaintance with 
geological science, and who might be able to devote two months to the 
stndy, while their convenience does not permit them to take an entire col- 
legiate course or to keep the study in hand six months or a year. The 
attention of all interested in the applications of geology, or in the grand 
cooclasions set forth in its accepted theories and doctrines, is respectfully 
invited to this announcement. 

Simultaneously with the Elementary Course two advanced courses will 
be inaagurated and pressed with vigor during the months named. One of 
these courses will be Lithological and the other Palseontological. Both 
will be prosecuted in the laboratories of the University rather than the lec- 
tnre rooms. The student will become an investigator with the aid of such 
ipecimens and books as may be necessary and available and such sugges- 
tions and guidance as may be compatible with his intellectual indepen- 
dence. 

The Lithological Course will aim to impart to the student a knowledge 
of the different species of rocks and their constituent minerals. It will 
include the determination and analysis of ores. It will embrace manipu- 
lations with the blow-pipe as well as with the wet processes of analysis. 

The Palseontological Course, which will be carried forward simultane- 
ously, will con^st of a series of synoptical lectures on the distribution of 
zoological types in time, followed by the laboratory study of one or two of 
these types in its details. These types are so numerous and their details so 
multifarioui that it will be impossible to grasp them all within any limited 
time ; and it will be necessary, therefore, to restrict the study, this year, to 
a single one or two— say the type of Brachiopods and the type of mammals. 
Other types may be taken tip on a future occasion. The types selected will 
be studied with all the accessories of materials and books which may be 
obtainable. 



442 HISTORICAI, MATTER : SCHOOL OP GSOI,OGY 

The advanced courses in Litholog^y and Palseontology are intended esp^ 
cially for persons havingr some acquaintance wilh the elements of geolofj 
(of whom a number have already made application for such opporttmitki 
of study) and for the convenience of those pursuing study for advanced 
degrees in accordance with a plan promulgated by the government of the 
University. 



CONSPECTUS OF COURSES IN THE SCHOOL OF 

GEOLOGY. 

A. ELEMENTARY STUDY 

I. Undbrgraduatb Course. 

A series of lectures with exhibition of specimens, diagrams and screen 
illustrations. The course will embrace a general view of the inorganic tnd 
organic history of the earth in the light of all the sciencea. Collatenl 
reading will be required of the student. 

B. ADVANCED STUDY [POSTGRADUATE COURSES ] 

II. L1THOI.OGICAI. COURSB. 

Physical and chemical study of rocks, ores and other^minerals. Work 
conducted in the laboratories. 

III. PALiEONTOI.OGICAI. COURSE. 

(A) Copspectns of the distribution of zoological types in time. 
Lectures and specimens. 

(B) Special studies (in part — of which a selection will be taken np ) 

1. Special study of corals — their organization, claasificatioo ao^ 

geological distribution. 

2. Special study of Bracbiopods. 

3. Special study of Trilobites. 

4. Special study of Cephalopods. 

5. Special study of Fishes. 

6. Special study of Reptiles. 

7. Special study of Mammals. 

8. Special study of Man. 

In connection with the Advanced Courses, lectures, expoaitions and dis- 
cusaions will be offered, on the more salitot points of geological doctrlBe 
and collateral problems, such as the Age of the World ; the World's Fat- 
ure; the Condition of the Earth's Interior; the Origin of Species; the 
Methods of Nature ; the Origia of Coal, Petroleum, Salt, Gypemn and In* 
Ores ; Glacial Periods ; the Conduct of a Geological Survey ; Gedogietl 
History and Biography ; Connection of Geology with the other Sdeooef : 
thfe Use of the Imagination in Science ; Relations and Limltitione of Sci- 
ence and Philosophy. 



HISTORICAI, MATTER : SCHOOI, OP OBOI^OGY 443 

Tlie Blementary and Advanced Courses will be carried forward sitnultan- 
eoatly. All together vnll famish at least three daily exercises. Students 
q{ the Advanced Courses may also attend the Elementary Coarse. It is 
eunestly advised that every advanced student devote his entire time to 
geological study daring the progress of the courses. It is hoped to see two 
months oi intense activity and a result affording unbounded satisfaction 
to all concerned. Any person, however, not pursuing a full University 
Coarse, may take either one or two of the Advanced Courses here adver- 
tised. No formal examination for entrance will be held ; but if any can- 
didate shall appear to be unprepared to pursue to advantage the course pro- 
posed he will be so informed. The courses are open to everybody. 

The fee for students not matriculated in the University will be eight dol* 
lars for a single course ; thirteen dollars for two courses ; and fifteen dollars 
for three courses. For matriculated students no additional fee will be 
charged — ^the matriculation fee being $$ (paid once), and the tuition in 
any studies desired, |20 per term of about three months. 

Thebooks used will be, in part, as follows : In the ElrmbnTary Course, 
a '* Syllabus •* of the lectures to be delivered; Dana's " Manual of Geol- 
ogy" and Wincheirs.** Sketches of Creation/* Steele's *' Fourteen Weeks 
in Geology " or Dawson's ** Story of the Earth and Man." The last three 
are adapted to those who aim only at a general knowledge of results and 
also to all students seeking a comprehensive review of the subject. Dana's 
"Manual " should be the ZMide fnecunt of the earnest student. 

In the Lithological Coursb, Dana's '* Manual of Geology," Part II, 
Uthology ; Cotta's ** Manual of Lithology " (translation) ; Bru&h's •* De- 
terminative Mineralogy and Blow-pipe Analysis," or Foye's ** Tables for 
the Determination and Classification of Minerals ;" Cotta's *'Ore Deposits" 
(Prime's translation) ; Whitney's " Metallic Wealth of the United States;" 
lUymond's Reports on the *' Mineral Resources of the United States." 

In the PALiEONTOLOGiCAL CouviSBy general authority, Pictet's "Pal^on- 

tologie." In Brachiopoda, Davidson's " Introduction to the Brachipoda ;" 

Natural History of the State of New York, Palaeontology, Vols. I, II, III, 

and IV, by Prof. James Hall ; Reports of the University of the State of 

New York on the condition of the State Cabinet, Appendices by Prof. 

James Hall ; the various State Geological Reports, especially of Illinois 

•nd Ohio; Canadian Geological Reports. In Mammalia, Flower's **Intro- 

daction to the Osteology of the Mainmalia ;'.' Huxley's ** Anatomy of 

Vertebrated Animals;" the various memoirs by Leidy, Cope, Marsh and 

others in America and by Cuvier, Owen, Huxley and others in Europe. 

Students are requested to supply themselves with as many as possible of 
the above works. All books in the general market may be ordered, in Syra- 
cuse, of Thos. W\ Durston & Co., R. G. Wynkoop & Co., E. P. Howe & 
Co. and Robert H. Davis. The public Reports may be obtained either 
through the State authorities of the different states, or will, if possible, be 
procured, on order, by the dealers just mentioned. Single copies of all 
the works used in the Advanced Courses will be supplied from the Library 
of the University or that of the Director of the School. 



444 HISTORICAI. MATTER : SCHOOL OF GBOLOGY 

All persons intending to become members of this School, if not matricu- 
lants in the University, are requested to communicate as early as possible 
with the Director. 

The School will open Tuesday, January 25th, 1876. 

The instruction in the Special School of Geology will be under the dine* 
tion of Prof. Alexander Winchell, LL.D. (address, 131 Warren St);iith 
the co-operation of Prof. J. J. Brown, A.M., in Chemistry; Prof. Frank 
Smalley, A.B., in Geology and Zoology; Rev. S. R. Calthrop, A.M., in 
Geology ; Prof. James Hall, LL.D., in Geology and Palaeontology; Prof. 
R. P. Whitfield, on the Classification and Geological Distribution of the 
Brachiopoda ; Prof. B. G. Wilier, B.S., M.D., on the Di£Ferentia] Q\aiK- 
ters of the three great types of Pishes; Prof. E. D. Cope, A.M., on the 
Vertebrate Palaeontology of ihe Western Territories. 

Syracuse University, September ist, 1875. 



suiacuse umvBrsltu. 

the Members of the Conferences of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
in whole or in part in the State of New York. 



During the College Year 1874-5 the Syracuse University has 
ijoyed steady prosperity. The number of students attending 
I its departments has proved the wisdom of its founders, and 
:hibited clearly the necessity for onb University in thb 
rATB OF New York under the Supervision of the Methodist 
piscopal Church. We would call the attention of all our minis- 
rs and people to the following statements, especially remind- 
g you that the University has passed beyond the stage of 
leoretical discussion and can appeal to facts. 

The Catalogue shows the following number of students : 
In thb College of Liberal Arts. 
Senior Class, Males 19, Females 4, Total 23 



Junior ** 


26, 


( ( 


10, 


" 36 


Sophomore Class, ** 


28, 


( t 


5. 


" 33 


Freshman * * 


47. 


i 1 


9. 


" 56 


Total, 


120, 


1 1 


28, 


" 148 


In the College of 


Fine Arts. 




Senior Class, Males 


i. I, 


Females, 0, 


Total I 


Junior •* 


0, 


i < 


4. 


" 4 


Sophomore Class, " 


3. 


it 


5. 


" 8 


Freshman 


6, 


< ( 


?» 


" 9 


Total, 


10, 


i t 


12. 


22 


In the College of 


Physicians and Surgeons. 


Senior Class, Males, 


10, 


Females i, 


Total II 


Junior * * 


43* 


( 1 


■ 6. 


49 


ToUl '• 


53. 


1 1 


7. 


" 60 


In all the Colleges 


• 


• 


• 


230 


Rejecting those counted 


a second time. 


• 


3 



Genuine Total, ..... 227 



445 



Of this number eleven received the degree of Doctor of Medi- 
cine at the Commencement of that College, on February 19th, 
1875 ; and sixteen are candidates for the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts, and four for the degree of Bachelor of Science, at the 
Commencement to be held June 20th, 1875. 

Of this encouragingly large number of students, 227, already 
gathered in the University in the third year of its history, we 
believe not one third would have received a collegiate education 
but for the establishment of this University. If a sound liberal 
and religious education is of immeasurable value to the recipient 
and a great advantage to the community, — which no competent 
person who has carefully examined the subject denies — ^who 
shall estimate the good already accomplished and the greater 
good promised by the Syracuse University ? 

The Faculties are composed of thirty-four persons, some of 
whom, however, are engaged in other professional work, and 
devote but a part of their time to instruction in the University. 
Besides the Chancellor, nine are engaged all the time in the Col- 
lege of Liberal Arts ; one engaged partially in that College has 
also charge of the College of Fine Arts, assisted in that college 
by eight professors who generously devote a part of their time 
spared from their professional occupation to instruction in the 
University ; and in the College of Physicians and Surgeons fif- 
teen professors are employed. The number of students in all the 
colleges is steadily increasing. We have no doubt it will speed- 
ily reach 500, and it should be observed that, unlike some insti- 
tutions in the newer portions of the country, it does not couDt in 
its total, students in the Preparatory Schools. 

The Syracuse University owes its existence to the unanimons 
and hearty action of two State conventions of Methodists, en- 
dorsed and encouraged by unanimous expressions of approval by 
the Annual Conferences in the State of New York. 

The Methodists of New York are therefore morally and, we 
believe, heartily and joyfully bound to carry this great enter- 
prise to completion. It is, indeed, a great enterprise, and it is 
not yet completed, A University, competing with several others 
in the State, cannot meet the expectations of our people without 
an endowment of at least $500,000, besides what is expended for 

446 



Aiids, tmildiiigs and apparatus. Already the Syracuse Uni ver- 
ity has a noble property iA land and buildings, worth at least 
1300,000, but the actual productive endowment over and 
bove the obligations it must meet is not quite $200,000. It 
las, ' however, pledges and unproductive property that will 
^et become productive, which will add at least $50,000 to the 
bove mentioned endowment. Two hundred and fifty thou- 
and dollars more should therefore be speedily secured. This 
r the smalUsi sum (hat will make the enterprise perfectly safe far all 
me to come. When this sum is once secured the University 
rill grow by its own influence without extraordinary e£Fort. 
Llready $25,000 of this sum is secured, and $75,000 more is 
ledged towards this additional $250,000, on conditions that the 
rhole is obtained. That a people who have already purchased 
his noble property for $300,000, and added to it $250,000 of 
ndowment, and pledged $75,000 more, will speedily add the 
ast $150,000 to make the enterprise perfectly safe and perma- 
lent, we ought not to doubt. Certainly our faith should grasp 
his problem and our works should speedily prove our faith 
x)rrect. But conversation and resolutions will not efFect the pur- 
)ose. This additional endowment is essentially needful. 

There are, we believe, many friends of sound education in 
Syracuse and vicinity, who are contemplating aiding still more 
Q all the enterprises of this University. Just let it be under- 
tood that there is a unity of purpose and action between these 
170 great parties — the Methodist in the State and the local 
riends of the University — and the completion of the work^ by 
le addition of $150,000 just now, will only stimulate still far- 
lier voluntary contributions ; and this enterprise, which started 
1th so much promise, will never experience any appreciable re- 
rtion or retardation in its great work. 

If ever an institution was founded with prayer and with a 
ncere purpose to promote the cause of Christ, this was so 
unded. We want no fictitious prosperity, no endorsement, or 
d, or restriction that shall embarass us in the great work of 
romoting the broadest and soundest Christian culture. We 
> not appeal exclusively to the rich. We do indeed ask those 
horn God hath blest at the same time with command of money 



447 



and with an earnest desire to do good, to help us. We ask ilso 
those who must deny themselves to do anything, still, out of 
their limited means, to share in this good Christian work. We 
are proud of the fact that the list of donors to the University 
already embraces more than nine hundred names. All these are 
catalogued. There will hereafter be published a list of donors; 
and in the arrangement and naming of Professorships and 
Fellowships, to be made out at out earliest convenience, i 
proper acknowledgment will be made. 

Genesee College always maintained a noble character for 
scholarship, and its Alumni we regard as our Alumni, and are 
gratified to see the result of a sound Christian education in 
their general prosperity. To them, with others, we look for 
the interest and aid which every University needs from those 
who have enjoyed its advantages. 

We ask the Conferences not only to continue to the Univer- 
sity their official endorsement and co-operation, but also that the 
individual members will make the University one of their per- 
sonal interests, and especially bring its claims home upon the 
members of our churches, who are able, and who, if properly 
interested, will be glad, to strengthen this our only University 
in the great State of New York. 

E. O. HAVEN, 

Ckancelior. 

Syracuse, N. Y., 

April 5th, 1875. 






44^ 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. 






ORDER OF EXERCISES. 

. CALLING TO ORDER, by his Honor, MAYOR JOHN J. GROUSE 

, SINGING,—'* America," By the audience, led by the 

UNIVERSITY GLEE CLUB 

,. PRAYER, By REV. E. G. THURBER 

U SINGING,— •• RED, WHITE AND BLUE," 

By audience and UNIVERSITY GLEE CLUB 

>. CENTENNIAL ORATION.— Subject,- -•* GEORGE WASHINGTON." 

By CHANCELLOR E. O. HAVEN, LL. D. 

5. SINGING,— •• THE STAR SPANGLED BANNER," 

By the audience and UNIV. GLEE CLUB 

^ BENEDICTION, - - By REV. A. C. GEORGE, D. D. 



449 



1876 
ONE HUNDRED rORTY-riETH 

ANNUAL, 

Birt^^a^ of U?a0§mgton. 



PUBLIC EXERCISES 



HCUO IN THE- 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, 



Tu*s4ay Evvning, F*b 22, 1876, 



the Royal Proctorship of the Sophomore Class 



■OF- 



SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY. 



451 



Order of Kxercises. 



NATIONAL SALUTE OF 38 GUNS. AT THE ARMORY PARK. 
CALLING TO ORUBR. by His HONOR Mayor JOHN J. CROUSE 

Singing,—" America," Audiencf. 

Words by Ben. Butler. Music by Yankee Doodle. 

Prayer Rev. K. G. Thurb«r. 

Singing— " Red, Whiteand Blue." Audienct. 

Words by Uncle Sam. Music by Brother Jonathan. 

Centennial Oration Subject, " George Washingtoo. ' 

Chancellor E. O. Haven, LL.D. 

LiFB OF Washington.— Bom at Genoa 1492, weight 9 lbs.; growth rapid; cut teeth it 
3 mos.; had a British coin — a medallion of George III. to bite on-turning point in bis lifr: 
he now swears eternal enmity to Mr. Bull ; weaned at xo moa., sun in the constellstioo 
cancer ; increased opposition to the British lion ; walks and talks at one year ; dad >>aji 
him a hatchet ; chops down the old man's favorite currant bush; doesn't lie about it: fnms 
rapidly ; passes through the mumps, measles and whooping cough successfully : goet to 
sea ; has the smallpox ; ma doesn't wish him to be a sailor ; becomes a county surveyor- 
** passes up ;" goes " agin the Injuns ;" the red skins shoot at him seventeen times : cibI 
hit him ; remarkably preserved ; marries Martha Washington : has no progeny : elected 
commander-in-chief at thirty-two years; whips John Bull; is made President twice: 
orders Congress to repeal the tax on paregoric ; it is received with applause, hence nlled 
the Stamp Act ; retires to Mt. Vernon ; has a "green old age ;" finally dies : is buried; 
the people weep ; never smoked ; never "chawed"; never " sweared." " First in wir. 
first in peace, and first in the hearts of his country-women." Go thou, and do likewite. 

Singing— "The Star Spangled Banner" Audteoce 

Words by Fernando Wood. Music by *' Boss" Tweed. 

Benediction Rev. A. C. George, U.D. 



452 



NOTICE. 

; crowd of " greenies" up there in the gallery are the Fresh. Scrutinize him cane, 
oae hat. Consider them paws. Observe that smole on his mug. 

'*THE REASON WHY.*' 

Su. Fbbb. i8, 1876. 

B SOFBRMOAB CLAS : 

tAMBD Gardbans — pLBsc may wee Ware sum Hi hatS and kaRry Sum Cains at 
xeBISHun ? wBB wunt maikee enuy moise, nur NUTHin, ef yew wil Let us. Kin 

Yure humbly Sirviunts & bute Blax. 

THB FRBSH. 
¥e dezire preserved seA.TS, as wee will cum in a boddy— " in mASS" as IT wur. 

•• *79." 
communication was read before the Sophomore Class, in solemn conclave assem- 
id after a long and exciting debate, and a very close vote, it was 
LVBo, "That we, the Sophomore Class of S. U., in accordance with the spirit of 
eenth Amendment, and our desire to present to the citizens of Syracuse a rare 
>n of novelties, do grant this premature though humble petition of the gentle 
and permit them to occupy seats in the gallery. 

SOilE PATRIOTIC SONGS. 

OUR MIGHTY DEAD. 

By Bunk R. Hill, '78. 
Air—^'iyjUre, O, where are the Hebrew children f 

Where, O, where is Georgie Washington ? (ter) 

Away up in the promised land. 
He went up in the '' Star-spangled banner," (ter) 

Away up in the promised land. 

Chorus— Bum, bum, by, we are going for to meet him, (ter) 
Away up in the promised land. 

Where, O. where is Tommy Jefferson? 
He went up on the " Declaration." 

Where, O, where is Patsy Hennery? 
He went up a shouting *' liberty." 

Where, O, where is Benny Franklin ? 
He went up on a streak of lightning. 

Where. O, where is " Honest Abe" Lincoln ? 
He went up in the arms of a " culled pus>son." 

Where, O, where is old Cotton Mather ? (ler) 

Away down in the dragon's realm. 
He went down to seek the Witch of Bndor, (ter) 

Away down in the dragon's realm. 

Chorus— Bum, bum, by, we'll never go to meet him, (ter) 
Away down in the dragon's realm. 

Where, O, where is Kid the Captain ? 
He went down to " assist" grim Charon. 

Where, O, where is Benedict Arnold ? 
He went down on the British lion. 

Where, O, where is poor Jeff. Davis? 

He went down in his grandma's petticoat. 

453 



ONE HUNDRED YEARS AGO. 

By Hi8 Cbum, *78. 

Air—'' /rs a Way we have at Old Harvard,'' 



John Bull came over the oceaa, 
To rid Uncle Sam of the notion 
He had got in hia )iead, of devotion 
To British tjrrmnny. 

Then Bam he " got on his ear/' sir, 
Told Bull *' if he didn't Uke keer sir, 
He'd hev tew git up and clear, sir. 
Across the dark blue sea.** 

John Bull he quickly got mad, sir, 
And up and out with a gad, sir. 



And began for to whip the lad, sir. 
To see what it would do. 

Then Sam he spit on his hands, sir, 
Seized Bull on the bloody sands, sir, 
And kicked him off from his Lands, sir. 
And over across the sea. 

Uncle Sam*s a jolly good fellow, (ter) 
As all of us can say, (ter) 

Once so merrily cheer we, 

Twice so merrily cheer we. 

Thrice so merrily cheer we. 
Hurrah ! Hurrah ! Hurrah ! 



Chorus — Shoo, Fresh, don*t bother 

For tie are on a Sophomore spree. 

A — DUCKS. 



454 



S1 



Recitations and Lhcturss. 







HAVEN. 


FRENCH. 


CODINGTON. 


BROWN. 








Room 


Algebra, 
Fresh, i, a, 3. 
M.Tu.W.Th. 


Room 


Psychology, 
Jun. I, a, 3, 
Tu. Th. 

Christian Ev. 

Sen 1,3. 
M. W. F. 


Room 


* 

Physic*. 
Soph. I. a, 3. 
W. F. 


Room 




l:35A3f.... 




S3 
53 


30 
30 


II 
la 


I A. 

F 

F. 

M 

M 


to A. M 


Bng. Ui. 
Sen. X, Jun. 3. 
M. W. F. 

Rhetoric, 

Sen. X, 3. 
Tu. Th. 


33 
34 

33 
34 


Analytics, 
M.Tu.\fr/rli. 


1 
1 

1 

1 

i 
1 


Physiology, 
Fresh, x, a, 3- 
M. 

Tcr. Physic, 

Fresh. 3. 
Tu. Th. 


11 
ta 

XI 

la 


rl 


II A. M 





Astronomy, 
Jun, I, 2, 3. 
M. Tu. Th. 


S3 


Greek. 

Fresh, x 
M.Tu.W.Th. 


30 


Chemistry, 
^un. .. ,. J. 


IX 

la 

1 


Re 

t 


13 M 






Greek. 

Fresh. 1. 
F. H 


30 


• 


Fw 

Sen 

Ta. 

Phil 
Sen. 
M. 


^:35A. M... 


Chapbl 


, Bxxi 


ICIBBS. 















NoU.-^lf, % signifies each alternate Friday. Numerals indicate the several courses of Study 

I, Classical, a, I^tin-Scientific. 3. Scientific. 



r 



Winter Tbrm. 1875. 



I FORT. 


WINCHHLL. 


DURSTON. 


RICHARDSON. 


SMALLBY. 




Room 




Room 


French, 


Room 




Room 




Room 








37 














Jun. I, 2, 3. 




















M W. 




















Polit Bcon. 


37 


















Sen. 1, 3. 




















Tu. Th. 














1 






Preach Ut. 

Sen. 3. 
M. W. 


37 


Blocution, 
Soph. I, 2, 3. 
F. 


36 


Chemistry, 
(Art College). 
W. 


36 


•lory, 


31 




German, 


37 






Greek, 


36 


»»S- 








Soph. I, Fr. 3,3. 
TuVTh. 




Blocution, 
Fresh. I, 2,3. 


33 
34 


Sen. I. 
F. 




Draw. 


59 






Pollt. Bcon. 


37 


F. 




Analyt. Chem. 


16 


•3- 






31 


Sen. 1,3. 
F. 








M. Tu. W. Th. 




. Phil. 


33 


Zo<Slosy, 
Soph. 3. 


German, 


37 










US 


34 




Jnn.r,Soph.3,3. 












1. 




M. Th. 




Tu. W. 




Blocution, 
tun. I, 2,3. 


33 
34 


Greek, 
Sen. 1. 


36 


Draft. 


59 


Geology, 


31 


German, 


37 




Tu. Th. 




a,Fr.s. 




Sen. 1,3. 




Soph x,Fr.2,3 




. 








7. 




W. F. 




F. 













N. B.— Bach student is expected to attend 15 Bxercises per week, besides 
Blocution, unless specially excused. 



SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY: 



lutnni OaT 6xcrci8C8. 



TUESDAY. JUNE 29. 1880. 



ness Meetings, lo a. m. and 2:30 p. m. 
rary Exercises, 8 p. m. 



455 



ftofum of LitetUT Kietclaeo* 



Music — Norwegian Bridal Procession, for Piano, Grieg 

Miss Charlotte N. Hardy. 



PRAYER. 

Music — Vocal — Hymn to the Night, Gounod 

Prof. W. R. Nash. 

Poem — Prof. J. Duanb Phelps, Class of '76 

Music — Vocal — Angels Serenade, Bragi 

Miss Kate E. Hogoboom, with Violin accompaniment. 

by Dr. W. H. Schultze. 

Oration— Rev. C. C. Wilbor, Class of '68 

Music — Ballad in G Minor, for Piano, Chopifl 

Miss Elizabeth M. Pitkin. 



BENEDICTION. 



456 



ATHLETICS 

By the Editor 
See Alumni Rbcord, pp. 769-779 

SUPPLBMBNT, 1899-1904 

Mr. Bond's article in the Alumni Record brings the history of athletics 
attiie University down to the year 1899. In the Spring of' that year Mr. J. 
A. R. Scott was appointed coach of the track team, Frank E. Wade of the 
football and E. C. Griffin of baseball. The last named team did fairly well 
)D its Sonthem trip defeating the Carlisle Indians and playing close games 
fith Dickinson and the University of Pennsylvania. 

Id the field meet four new records were established, two by B. D. Glass 
shot pat and hammer throw) and two by W. P. Lewis ( low and high 
lordles). 

The third annual field meet with Cornell was held on the Oval, May 13, 
ind was lost by seven points only. The three meets thus far held between 
he two colleges show results as follows : 1897, Cornell 66, Syracuse 46 ; 1898, 
lomell 62)^, Syracuse 49^ ; 1899, Cornell 55>^, Syracuse 48^^. 

In April, a fencing contest was won by Cornell by a small score at the 
intmeet although E. R. Smith, Syracuse, made the best individual score. 
\i the second meet, a week later, the tables were turned very neatly. 

The record of Syracuse in the games of the Intercollegiate Association is 
1 prond one. In the third year of her participation ( 1897) she scored one 
)oi]]t which gave her sixth place. In 1898 the score was raised to nine 
)oints and the rank to fifth. In 1899 this rank was gallantly maintained by 
coring ten points. Pennsylvania led, followed by Harvard, Yale, Prince- 
00, Syracuse, Columbia and Cornell (a tie), Williams, Georgetown, Haver- 
OTil, in order. The points for Syracuse were won by E. D. Glass (3), W. P. 
^wis (2). R. A. Waite, Jr., (1), M. Prinstein (3) and C. D. Whittemore 
I). A pleasing feature of it is that five men participated in the victorious 
coring in five different events. 

The most important development during the Spring was that of the Navy, 
'nittee Lyman Cornelius Smith offered to donate an eight oared shell if the 
tndents would organize a crew and cmter upon aquatics. The crew was 
peedily formed and on May 13 a constitution was adopted. Thus was boat- 
ig organized a second time at Syracuse. Por some account of the first 
flbrt of this kind see pages 422-425. 

The football record for 1899 was not particularly brilliant. Rochester, 

Hckinson and New York Universities were defeated, but Syracuse suffered 

& eclipse at the hands of Buffalo ; Williams scored a victory also (6-5) and 

Vest Point (12-6). 

1900 

On Jan. 3 E. R. Sweetland was engaged to coach the crew. He was a 
'ornell man and was strongly recommended by Courtney, the Cornell 
oach. The men went on the water for the first time, March 30. On June 

457 



458 ATHLBTICS 

8 this new crew rowed against the Francis Club' crew of Cornell and nude 
so good a showing as to elicit comments of warm approval from ererjooe. 

The basketball team (women) journeyed to Boston and were defeated bj 
the Baron Posse team (women) by a score of 8 to 7. 

The baseball team on its southern trip defeated Bucknell, Dickinson, sad 
Pennsylvania State College. It was later defeated by Cornell, 7 to 2. How- 
ever, on Apr. 28 it beat Cornell by a score of 6 to i. This is the lastgsiBe 
between the two Colleges to date. On the same date occurred the leltf 
races at the University of Pennsylvania. Here Prinstein made that mand- 
lous jump of 24 ft. T% in. In the relay, Lee, Waite. Scrafford and Priutdn 
won the race over I^afayette, Columbia, Cornell, Dartmouth and Westen 
University of Pennsylvania. Time 3 m. 27 sec. See Annals p. 17. 

Cornell won the fourth dual meet by the large score of 70 to 34. 

In the Intercollegiate games at New York, May 25-26 Syracuse still ke|it 
fifth place (third time) by scoring ten points, Prinstein, Lee, Lewis and 
Scra£ford being the successful athletes. See Annals, p. 18. 

On Sept. 4 Coach Sweetland began his work with the football team. Ab 
excellent showing was made this Pall. As a football coach Mr. Sweedsad 
is a genius. St Lawrence was defeated by a score of 70 to o. New York 
University 12 to o, Amherst, 5 to o, Dickinson 6 to o, Rochester 68 to 5. sal 
the game with Brown was a tie, 6 to 6. The Cornell game resalted ini 
score of 6 to o in favor of Cornell. It was the last game Mdth that CoIlc(e 
to the present time. 

These was considerable activity in basketball this winter, teams of both 
sexes playing with like teams from other colleges. 

1901 

Owing to lack of funds the General Athletic Committee was anaUe 
to support baseball in the Spring of 1901. A team was again organifcd, 
however, and played the usual number of games with a good degree of 
success. It was supported by subscriptions. 

Mr. C. H. McCormick coached the track team of 190 1. In the Athletic 
Carnival of the University of Pennsylvania, April 27, Syracuse took fint 
place in the broad jump (Prinstein), tbird place in the mile race (Scrsffocd, 
Gardner, Post, F. S. and Prinstein) and fourth place in the loo-yard dull 
(Prinstein). 

The track meet with Rochester resulted in a score of 79 to 25 in fayor of 
Syracuse, while Amherst won, 70>j to 46^. 

In the Intercollegiate meet. May 24 and 25, S3rracuse stood tenth, scoriog 
only one-half point, Prinstein failing to qualify for the broad jump. 

A regatta was held on Onondaga Lake, June 7. In the single scnil rsoe, 
John M. Francis of the Laureate Boat Club of Troy won over C. B. Good* 
win, Syracuse, by 10 seconds. The Junior Francis Crew of Ithaca dcfested 
the Syracuse Freshmen in the eight-oared one and one-half mile iscc by 
10 seconds and the 'Varsity eight-oared crew suffered in like manner iotbe 
two mile race with the Francis Club Crew of Cornell, being beaten by 00I7 
four seconds— one-fourth of a boat length. 



ATHI^KTICS 459 

The crew participated for the first time in the regatta at Poughkeepsie, 
alj 3. lu the 'Varsity race of four miles six crews participated. It was 
roa by Cornell in time 18 m. 53 1-5 sec.» followed by Columbia, Wisconsin, 
leorgetown, Syracuse and Pennsylvania. In the Freshman race Pennsyl- 
ania was the winner, Syracuse being the last of the four crews. C. £. 
loodwin won the single scull race, his competitor having withdrawn, row- 
ig his mile and one-half in 9 m. 31 3-5 sec. Syracusans were encouraged 
ecanse in the University race their crew in the first race came in ahead of 
'eansylvania and they were fairly well satisfied with this initial showing. 
This year occurred the unfortunate break in athletic relations with Cor- 
lell University. The authorities at Syracuse were surprised and pained by 
•tatements made and published at Ithaca impugning the amateur standing 
>r some of the players on the Syracuse football team. And Cornell made 
ip her schedule omitting Syracuse. An earnest correspondence between 
the two Universities ensued conducted by Professor Dennis of Cornell and 
the writer, the latter endeavoring in the most conciliatory spirit to convince 
the Cornell authorities that their contention was based on misinformation, 
ind in a self respecting manner urging a continuance of the former pleas- 
tat relations, and that a game be scheduled with Syracuse. Two charges 
by Cornell appeared in the correspondence, first, that Syracuse rules did 
not sufficiently guard against professionals, and, second, that Syracuse 
players were so rough that in the last game there was strong ill feeling 
between the teams. The former charge was easily refuted by reciting the 
rales in force which effectually prevented the abuse complained of, and in 
fact this charge was not urged after the first exchange of letters. It was 
sdmitted that a slight violation of rules sometimes occurs despite the 
Qtmost vigilance of the authorities. Careful investigation was made of 
the second charge and it was also found to be absolutely groundless. Nev. 
tftheless Cornell persisted in refusing to arrange any game for the season 
tad at last gave all the correspondence to the press. Syracuse was really 
benefited in the public estimation by the published facts, but the act was 
ttgnificant of a definite refusal by Cornell to continue football relations 
with Syracuse. Indignant at this arbitrary act and dibcerning its signifi- 
cance, the Syracuse General Athletic Committee issued a dignified mani- 
festo (April 1901) severing all athletic relations with Cornell. See The 
^yracuie University Weekly ^Vo\,\^ No. 23, April 5, 190 1 for full text of 
his paper. 

Bvery member of the Committee exceedingly regretted tbe necessity for 
ach an assertion of right and self respect, but no other course seemed 
pen. 

Syracuse players have been repeatedly exhorted to be gentlemen always, 
Ithongh they might reasonably resent the undeserved implication of such 
a exhortation. And further the spirit animating athletics at this Univer- 
ty woold favor perpetual defeats rather than a dishonest victory. 
The most notable football victories of 1901 were those over Brown Uni- 
eraity, by a score of 20 to o, over Amherst by a score of 28 to 17, over 
olnmbia by a score of 11 to 5, and over the University of Vermont by a 



460 ATHItBTlCS 

score of 38 to o. The New York Sun gave Syracuse seventh place in the 
standing of college teams for this year. Seven College games were plajed 
of which six were won. Syracuse scored during the season 150 poiiits 
to 27 by her opponents. 

1902 

Coach Sweetland was again engaged. 

In 1902 a change was made in the management of athletics. The Genenl 
Athletic Committee was superceded by the Athletic Governing Board. Tbii 
board consists of sixteen persons distributed as follows : four faculty mem- 
bers appointed by the Chancellor, four alumni elected by the Alnmni 
Association, four students elected by the undergraduate members of the 
Athletic Association and four sustaining members outside the above-named 
classes, elected by the other twelve members of the board. The principle 
is not unlike that of the Committee it displaced. The chief differences 
are in the smaller faculty and student representation and in the election to 
membership of persons in no way connected with the Univeraity. This 
board has supervision also over the navy which was not the case of its pre. 
decessor, at least the latter abstained from exercising the authority it 
doubtless possessed. The present is certainly the better plan in that respect 
The Chancellor has a veto power. The first election of undergraduate mem- 
bers of the board was held Feb. 28, 1902. 

In baseball the Syracuse team scored altogether 85 points to 79 by opp> 
uents, winning seven games and losing a like number. The greatest vic- 
tories were over Columbia (12-4), Williams (10-9), and Colgate (14-7^. 

The track meet with Columbia resulted in a defeat for Syracuse 56^ to 
47/^. but the Williams meet was a victory, 62 to 55. 

The crew won their first successes May 24, the Freshmen defeating Cas- 
cadilla and the 'Varsity the I^aureates of Troy, both by good margins. This 
was the first omen of the prowness of Syracuse on the water. A week later 
occurred the triangular regatta (so-called) at Ithaca. The crews were the 
Junior 'Varsity of Cornell, the Syracuse Freshman and the Newell of Har- 
vard. They finished the two mile race in the order given above in these times : 
10 m. 48 sec, II m. I sec. and 11 m. 11 sec. The omen was thus repeated. 

May 31 at Berkeley Oval, Syracuse scored eight points and tied with Cal- 
if ornia for seventh place. Lowe took first in the high jump, 5 ft. 11 in. and \ 
Gardner second in pole vault, 11 ft. 

On June 21 occurred the annual regatta at Poughkeepsie, and Syracuse was 
represented for the second time by a University and a Freshman crew. The 
results of the races from a Syracuse point of view were an improvement 
over those of 1901. The University race ended with the Syracuse boat fifth 
as in 1901, but followed now by the Georgetown boat. The Freshmen were 
fourth in the order as in 1901, but this time ahead of Pennsylvania whose 
Freshman crew was first in the race of the preceding year. The time of the 
Syracuse 'Varsity in that race, 19 m. 31} sec., is still their record time. 

Football in 1902 was characterized by some excellent scores, Syracuse get- 
ting 153 points to 87 by her opponents. The moat notable successes were 



ATHLBTICS 4^1 

ifcr Colgate (23-0), Williams (26-17), Amherst (15-0). Defeats by Yale 
iiH>) An<l West Point (46-0) were discouraging, it is true, and the even 
))reak with Columbia (6-6) was less than was hoped for. 

1903 

Athletics sUrted o£f well in the Spring of 1903. The baseball team made 
good trips and won more than the usual successes. Some of the successful 
gsmes were University of Va. (8-7), Hobart (15-2), Wesleyan (7-2 and ri-5), 
Columbia (4-2), Amherst (6-0) and Colgate (15-0). 

An indoor track meet under the auspices of the Seventy FouJth Regi- 
ment A. A. of Buffalo was held Feb. 31. Cornell and Syracuse Universities 
and the Regiment Association were the competitors. The result was far from 
pktsing to Syracusans, the score being Cornell, 34>i points, the Regiment, 
10, and Syracuse 8^. 

Track athletics were renewed vrith Cornell this year, the latter being sue- 
cenfal in the meet by a score of 69 to 48. But Williams was again over- 
whelmed as a consolation, 75 >^ to 41 >^, 

With a score of eleven points Syracuse found herself again in fifth place 
tttha Intercollegiate games on Berkley Oval. Gardner took first place in 
the pole vault, Lowe second in the high jump and Van Duyne second in the 
hammer throw. 

The veteran oarsman James A. Ten Byck had been engaged, Jan. 21, to 
coach the crews. In the regatta on the Hudson, June 27, the crews gave a 
good account of themselves. The 'Varsity came in ahead of Columbia, 
holding fifth place, but the Freshman boat was behind the winner (Cornell) 
bjooly 4^ seconds, and in record breaking time Wisconsin, Columbia and 
Pennsylvania followed in order. 

FootbalL In 1903 the graduate coaching method was given a trial, the 
coaches being Jason B. Parrish, '02 and Ancil D. Brown, '03, both excellent 
men and fine players. The defeats sustained during the season led to a 
serions discussion of the merits of graduate coaching. The initial games 
^th Cortland Normal School, Clarkson and the Rensfelaer P. I. were very 
iavorable. But Colgate won by a score of 10 to 5. This was the second 
defeat Syracuse had suffered on her home grounds by any team in three 
years. The score of the game with Williams was adverse (17-5) for the first 
time in four years. Vale won, 30-0, and Brown, 12-5. It was evident that 
football at Syracuse was experiencing a set-back. Perhaps no two experts 
woald agree in a full analysis of the causes. 

1904 

In January, Dr. C. B. Hutchins was engaged as head coach for the season 
of 1904 and later T. M. West was secured as assistant. Lovers of football 
look forward to this season with great expectations, for the material for a 
first class team is here. This fact and the reputation of the coaches certain- 
ly jnitify a hopeful outlook. If the coaches possess those indispensable 
qualities, power to tuccessfnlly command, which implies obedience and 






462 ATHI^BTICS 

warm respect, and ability to teachf which implies eagerness to lean ind 
sacceisfnl acquisition by the players, the games this year will be charKter- 
ized by skillful playing and satisfactory scoring. 

More attention than ever before was given to basketball this season, the 
team (men) playing nineteen games and winning eleven. The signtlvk- 
tories were over Yale (15*5). Colgate (18-10), Wesleyan (22-21) tod 
Amherst (3S-26). Syracuse altogether scored 418 points to 338 bj her 
opponeuts. 

The second indoor track meet at Buffalo was held Feb. 20. Cornell led 
again with 43 points. The Regiment scored 13, and Syracuse 9^. In both 
Buffalo meets Syracuse has for some reason been unfortunate. A better 
showing can and should be made. 

The baseball record for 1904 was varied. Many games were pltjed. 
Among those resulting favorably were the following : U. S. Naval Actd- 
emy (i 1-1)1 Lehigh (7-5) and University of Vermont (6-2). 

In the relay meet at the University of Pennsylvania, Apr. 23, (teoth 
annual Carnival) Syracuse made a good showing. First place was easily 
captured in the mile race b}' the Syracuse four, Twombly, Ralph, Seckncr 
and Cole. Lowe took second place in the high jump and VanDuyne tkird 
in the hammer throw, breaking his former record. 

Cornell easily won the track meet held on the University Oval, Msy 7, 
the score being 84 >^ to 32)^, the most disastrous of the six meets with 
Cornell. 

The Intercollegiate games were held this year at Philadelphia, May 27- 
28. Yale won the meet, Syracuse ranking sixth with a score of io>^ pointi. 
The athletes who won the points were Gardner, who tied with Gring of 
Harvard and McLanahan of Yale for first place in the pole vault, 11 ft. ^% 
in.; Lowe who was first in the high jump and Van Dnyne who was third iD 
the hammer throw. Gardner broke by X 1°* ^^^ intercollegiate record in 
the pole vault, 11 ft. 7 in., held by him and Horton of Princeton. 

One other contest alone remains to be duly recorded in these pages. It 
is a pleasure to close this account with the most glorlons victory in the hit- 
tory of Syracuse athletics, a victory on the water, two-fold in character and 
unquestioned in merit. Although Syracuse has so recently taken up aquatic 
sports, yet by the skillful coaching of Ten Byck and the faithful work of 
the crews, the victory which was really foreshadowed by the great work of j 
the Freshman crew of 1903 was fully realized in 1904. The regatta, the < 
fourth in which Syracuse has participated, was held at Poughkeepsie, Jod^ 
28. Syracuse was represented as heretofore by only two crews, the Uni- 
versity and the Freshman, both eight oared boats. Next year through the 
generous gift of a four oared shell by the founder of the navy, Mr. L}^*^ 
C. Smith, and brothers, she will be represented by three eager crews. The 
Syracuse Freshmen won their two mile race in 10 m. i sec, followed bf 
Cornell, Pennsylvania and Columbia. Last year Cornell's time was 90. 
18 sec, but conditions were much more favorable for fiist time. Syracuse 
'Varsity won the four mile race in 20 m. 22f sec, Cornell second. Recor<l 
time as made by Cornell in 1901 is 18 m. 53} sec As before stated coD<h' 



lyas 







iy 27-28 







17 28-29 


I 


6th 


ly 27-28 


9 


5th 


ay 26-27 


10 


5th 



>iiit8 


Place in ort 


10 


Sth 


K 


lotb 


8 


7th 


II 


5th 


io>i 


6th 



ATHLETICS 463 

Te very much to do in determining time. The Syracuse 'Varsity 
le better time in 1902, namely 19 m. 3if sec., which is her best record. 
»llowing summaries may be useful for reference : 
slative status and number of points of the Syracuse teams at the 
f the Intercollegiate Association. 

Points Place in order Date 

1900, May 25-26 

1901, May 24-25 

1902, May 30-31 

1903, May 29-30 

1904, May 27-28 

immary of Meets with Cornell, all in favor of the latter. 1897, 66- 
5, 62>i-49>4 ; 1899, 55^ -48>^ ; 1900, 70-34 ; 1901, no meet ; 1902, 

; I9P3. 69-48 ; 1904, 84^-32^- 

egatta at Poughkeepsie * Varsity, 4 miles ; Freshman, 2 miles. 

Preahman 
Time 

not taken 

i9-3if 

19.36! 

20.22} 

we have endeavored to add to the history of Syracuse University 
I a brief account of the strenuous activities, the successes and de- 
the last six years. They have been years pregnant with events and 
^reas made has been, with some regrettable recessions, substantial, 
the whole, satisfactory. The benefits derived from athletics are not 
by the victories won. The development of the man in every depart- 
his nature is the great end to be secured and to be kept always in 





Varsity 
Place in order 


ly 2 


5th 


ne2i 


5th 


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5th 


ne28 


1st 



Place in order 


Time 


4th 


10.44 


4th 


9.53 


2d 


9.22^ 


fst 


10.01 



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ATHI.BTICS 4^5 

E SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY ACADEMIC ATHLETIC 

ASSOCIATION 

See Alxtmni Record, pp. 780-781 
ven meets of this Association have now been held on the University 
and they have all been successful and enthusiastic. In every year but 
records have been made that stand. The first meet (1898) was won by 
Syracuse High School, the second ( 1899) by the Hudson River Institute, 
erack, N. Y., the third (1900) by the Central High School, Buffalo, 
.. the fourth (1901) by the Central High School, Buffalo, N. Y., the 
(1902) by the Colgate Academy, Hamilton, N. Y.. the sixth (1903) by 
ate Academy, Hamilton, N. Y., and the seventh (1904) by Colgate 
lemy. 

ie Schools represented in the seven meets are as follows : 
gh School, Syracuse, N. Y., 1898, 1899, 1900, 1901, 1902, 1903, 1904. 
idsoQ River Institute, Claverack, N. Y., 1898, 1899. 
ites Academy, Chittenango, N. Y., 1898. 
ica Free Academy, Utica, N. Y., 1898. 
gh School, Pulaski, N. Y., 1898, 1899. 
;zico Academy, Mexico, N. Y., 1898, 1900, 1902. 
irfield Seminary, Fairfield, N. Y., 1898, 1899. 
inesee Wesleyan Seminary, Lima, N. Y., 1898, 1901. 
oeca Falls Academy, Seneca Falls, N. Y., 1898. 

zenovia Seminary, Cazenovia, N. Y., 1898, 1899, 1900, 1901, 1903, 1904. 
gh School, Jordan, N. Y., 1898. 

innal School, Cortland, N. Y., 1898, 1899, 1900, 1901, 1902, 1903. 
jToming Seminary, Kingston, Pa., 1898, 1899, 1902, 1904. 
ckinaon Seminary, Williamsport, Pa., 1898. 
gh School, Watertown, N. Y., 1899, 1902, 1903. 
gh School, Fulton, N. Y., 1899, ^9'^^- 
ntral High School, Buffalo, N. Y., 1900, 1901, 1902. 
Igate Academy, Hamilton, N. Y., 1900, 1901, 1902, 1903, 1904. 
gh School, Marcellus, N. Y., 1900. 
gh School, East Syracuse, N. Y., 1900, 1901, 1902. 
sxico Academy, Mexico, N. Y., 1900, 190T, 1902, T903. 
nton Academy, Canton, N. Y., 1900. 
mira Free Academy, Blmira, N. Y., 1901, 1902, 1903. 
gh School, Warsaw, N. Y., 1901, 1902. 
gh School, Batavla, N. Y., 1901, 1902, 1903, 1904. 
gh School, Auburn, N. Y., 1901. 
. Johns' Military School, Manlius, N. Y., 1901. 
isten ParkH. S., Buffalo, N. Y., 1902, 1903, 1904. 
gh School, Olean, N. Y., 1902, 1903, 1904. 
mers Preparatory School, Syracuse, N. Y., 1902. 
racnse Classical School, Syracuse, N. Y., 1902. 
gh School, GouTemeur, N. Y., 1903, 1904. 
gh School, Ithaca, N. Y., 1903, 1904. 
[gh School, Penn Van, N. Y., 1903. 



466 



ATHi^sncs 



The assistant managers of the University track team condact the meeti. 
Professor B. H. Kraus succeeded Dean Smalley as President of the Assoda^ 
tion in 190 1 and he in turn has been succeeded by Professor P. J. HbUwarth, 
who is now President. Under the auspices and management of the 
Association thirty-four schools have been represented on the Unirtnfty 
Oval by some of their best and most active young men who hATe been tku 
brought into contact with many of the best phases of life and work M 
Syracuse University. That this is of great advantage to both 
not be doubted. 

The best records of the track meets are appended. 

Records 



f 



Event. 



Record. 



100 yards dash. . 10^ sec. 

120 yards hurdle 16 sec 
I mile run 



220 yards dash. . 22} sec. 



4 min. 47i sec. 



I mile bicycle. ., 
12 lb. hammer. . 
One-half mile 
run 



220 yards hurdle 

J2 lb. shot 

440 yards dash . | 
Running broad 

jump 

2 mile run 

Pole vault .... 
Running high 

jump 



2 min. 44 sec. 
165 ft. 7}^ in. 

2 min. 3j sec. 

26| sec. 

44 ft. 8^ in. 
44i sec. 

21 ft. 11^ in. 
10 min. 34 sec. 
10 ft. 8)< in. 

5 ft. Sin. 



Name. 



i 



G. C. Bladworth 
F. Castleman 
R. L. Young 
F. Castleman 
S. C. Stokeley 

F. Castleman 
R. S. Young 
Haskell Brown 
F. M. Horr 

Sidney Hughes 

F. Castleman 
F. M. Horr 
Howard Best 

L. H. Simons 
W. Y . Boyd 
J. T. Moore 

Floyd Risley 



School. 



Claverack 
Colgate 
Colgate 
Colgate 
Buffalo, Cen- 
tral 
Colgate 
Colgate 
Syracuse 
Colgate 

Buffalo, Ma»> 

ten Park 
Colgate 
Colgate 
Claverack 

Wyoming 

Syracuse 

Blmira 

Colgate ai 



Date. 



27 May 1899 , 

17 " 1902 
21 " 1904 

18 •• 1901 



18 
17 

»3 
38 

ai 

31 

17 

31 
27 



•I 



•I 



4« 
«• 



• • 



II 



I9OI 
1902 

i89» 
1904 

190* 



'• 1902 
" 1899 



31 •• 1904 
17 " I9U2 

£7 " 19M 



1904 




Ca*=''TlNIVEasSIT.V OVAL 



SCHOLARSHIP HONORS 

See Alumni Record, pp. 783-787 

SUPPLEMBNT, 1899-1903 

On 15 May 1903 a facalty committee (Professor H. A. Peck, Ch'm) made 
t following report on the honor system and the facalty (College of Liberal 
ts) adopted the report : The committee to which was referred the matter 
an alleged increase in the number of Commencement honors report as 
lows : 

1. The number of honors of the highest grade (summa) is increasing at 
e expense of the ne%t lower (tnagna) without materially changing the 
rcentage of cutn laude marks or the percentage of names not marked 
th any distinction. 

2. The percentage of summa and tnagna combined is always greater than 
e cum laude, 

). This may be referred to the ease with which the grade A is attained, 

rticularly in the later years of the student's course. 

I. We recommend that the professors use greater caution in granting 

^ A and B grades. 

S. We recommend also that an average of 13 hours A be required to 

-ain the grade summa cum, laude and 13 hours A and B (5 A and 8B) to 

ain the grade magna cum laude, 

Xlie following list is confined to the summa and the magna grades. 

SUMMA CUM LAUDE 

^ner, John L., Jr., *oi. 

Behm, Joseph P., '02, Thesis, were the Constitutional changes of Diocle- 

n and of Constantine Progressive or Retrogressive? • 

Brown, Mary M.. *oo, Thesis, a Study of Variation in Gonionemus 

rtens. 

Bryan. Charles S., Jr., '03. 

Bryan, Eva M., '99, Thesis, The Cid. 

Clarke, Alice R., B. L., '03. 

Cobb, Edith M., 'or, Thesis, The Origin, Development and Results of the 

igitive Slave Law of 1850. 

Congdon, Edgar D., '01. 

Damon, Albert H., *02, Thesis, The Roman Industrial System. 

Dann, Matthew L., '02, Thesis, A comparison of the Ethical Ideals of 

iristianity and of Contemporary Roman Stoicism. 

DuBois, George F., *02, Thesis, The Economic Policy of the Romans. 

Ferguson, Solomon, '02, Thesis, The Growth of Lincoln's Anti-Slavery 

ews. 

Powler, Verne S., '03, Thesis, The Colonial Policy of the Stuarts. 

Hargitt, George T., '02, Thesis, Studies on the Regeneration of the 

ydromednsae. 

467 



468 SCHOLARSHIP HONORS 

Harvey, Frederick M., 'oi. 

Hawks, Bessie M., 'oo, Thesis, What Rome has contribated to Ancient 
Mythology. 

Hilts, Carrie A., 'oi, Thesis, Religious Toleration of Pagan Rome. 

Lowther, Edgar A., '02, Thesis, The History of the Carpet-Bag Role in 
the South. 

Lowther, Hugh S. , '99, Thesis, Rome and Her Provinces. 

Parker, Mabel V., '00, Thesis, Origin, Principles, Measures and Tniu- 
formation of the Jeffersonian Democracy. 

Parsons, Laura, '00, Thesis, The Influence of Foreign Religion on the 
Roman Religion. 

Peters, Iva L., '01, Thesis, A Study in Degenerate Genealogy. 

Phelps, George L. , *oo. Thesis, The Testimony of Aristophanes the Come- 
dian as to the place of Women in the Greek Religions System. 

Pike, Isabella, M., *03. 

Sherman, Fred W., '00, Thesis, The Moral Sense of Honor^ De Balzac ai 
Exemplified in ** Eugenife Grandit.** 

Siddell, William G., '02, Thesis, Lincoln's Border-State Policy. 

Skinner, Charles D., '03, Thesis, Herbert Spencer's Theory of the Origin 
and Development of Religion. 

Spring, May, '02. 

Taft, Clinton J., '03, Thesis, A Study of Modern Biblical Criticism. 

Tennant, John C, '01. 

Van Doren, May, '02. 

Ward, Cornelia C, *02. 

West, Marion L., '00, Thesis, Origin, Principles, Measures and Trans- 
formation of the Federal Party. 

Wilson, Bertha, '01. 

Wright, Marion E., '00, Thesis, A Study of the Correspondence between 
Thomas Carlyle and Ralph Waldo Emerson. 

MAGNA CUM LAUDE 

Algire, Eva J., 'or. Thesis, The Palatine Hill. 

Allis, Mabel M., '00, Thesis, The Roman Army. 

Baldwin, Lena H., 'ox. Thesis, The Relation of the Abolition Orators to 
Political Orators. 

Barker, Vincent K., '02. 

Beach, Bertha L.. '03, Thesis, The Rise of Quakerism. 

Benjamin, Gilbert G., '99, Thesis, The Contribution of the British Parlii- 
ment to the Causes of the American Revolution. 

Berry, Elizabeth. '03, Thesis, Italy, Physiography and Ethnography. 

Bishop,Thomas M ., '00. 

Bliss, Frances M., '00, Thesis, The Roman Forum. 

Bond, Mabel C, '03. 

Boyd, Wilbur G., '02. 

Branch, Clififord E., '03, Thesis, The Ethical Basis of Modem Crimintl 
Law. 



SCHOI«ARSHIP HONORS 469 

inll. Charles K., '02. 

inrlingame, Anna E., '00. 

Burpee, Grace E., '99, Thesis, The Art of the Romans as shown in their 

chitecture. 

Seers, John A., '01, Thesis, Roman Imperialism. 

barter, Levds E., '02. 

Chapman, Ellen M., '00, Thesis, The Great Compromises of 1820 and 

Zoates, Bertha E., '99. 

i^onnell, George L., *o2. 

Zonnell, Harry W., '03, Thesis, Design of Track and Feeder System for a 

gh Speed Alternating Current Electric Railroad. 

i^onnell, Harvey F., '03, Thesis, Design of Power House Equipment for a 

gh Speed Alternating Current Electric Railroad. 

Cunningham, Elizabeth A., '03. 

Curtis, Edward D., '03, Thesis, The Roman Navy. 

Curtias, Harriette A., *oo, Thesis, A Comparative Study of the Develop- 

mt of the Eudendridae. 

Cutler, Ebenezer W. , '00. Thesis, The Development of the Monroe Doc- 

De from its Origin to its Promulgation in 1823. 

Darrow, Elizabeth V., '03, Thesis, The Growth of Religious Freedom in 

i New England Colonies. 

[>ecker, Floyd F., *oi. 

De Elay, Grace G., '00, Thesis, Is Mommsen's Opinion of Cicero Justifi- 

le? 

DeLany, Elizabeth G., '00, Thesis, Constantine the Great and his Environ- 

tnt. 

DeLany, Frederick T., '02, Thesis, The Athenian Colonies. 

Dowt Mary E., '99, Thesis, Goethe's Iphigenie auf Tauris. 

Dntin, Zona L., '99, Thesis, The Debt of Rome to Etruria. 

Sdson, Frank M., '03, Thesis, The Feudal System in New Netherland and 

the Province of New York. 

Sgan, Rose F., *oo, Thesis, The Tragic Theory of Aristotle and the Tragic 

t of Shakspere ; A Comparative Study . 

Slden, Harry E., '03, Thesis, Attempts at Colonial Union. 

SUis, Dayton, *o2. Thesis, Lincoln's Exercise of the War Power. 

?oote, Bstella L., '01. 

?rink, /^da N., '02, Thesis, Rome's Peculiar Adaptation as the Birth- 

ice of Christianity. 

?rink, Amanda N., '02. 

?Qlmer, Georgiana, '02. 

jere, Charlotte F., '02, Thesis, Source and Character of Roman Art. 

!>lass, Claribel, '03, Thesis, The Roman Senate and Popular Assemblies. 

;>olly, Angeline C, '03, Thesis, Hugenot and German Migration to the 

iglish Colonies. 

[>reen, Helen, '02. 



470 SCHOI«ARSHIP HONORS 

Gregory, Jay L., Thesis, Roman Engineering. 

Hard, Irnia W., '03. 

Harvey, Clyde L., '00, Thesis, The Constitutional and Social Institutiont 
of the Spartans. 

Hasbrouck, Mary J., '00, Thesis, Tennyson's Use of Malory in theldjls 
of the King. 

Hazeltine, Alice I., '01. 

Heemians, Minnie F., '99, Thesis, Investigation of the Variation of the 
Temperature Coefficient of Commercial Copper Wire, under the inflneoce 
of repeated Heating and Cooling, with and without Tension. 

Hewitt, KatherineN., '02, Thesis, Barly Christian Life at Rome. 

Hildreth, Edna, '99, Thesis, The Nature Study of the Iliad. 

Holden, Raleigh W., 'ot. Thesis, The Protozoa of Onondaga County. 

Horton, Arthur R., '02, Thesis, Some of the Principal Athenian Festi- 
vals. 

Hoskins, Clara E., Thesis, Public Opinion in England during our Civil 
War. 

Huff, Lydia G., '02, Thesis, The Alabama Claims and the Geneva Award. 

Hydon, William W., '00. 

Jacobs, Philip P., '03, Thesis, Insanity and Crime. 

Jenkins, Edward C, '00, Thesis, Intensive Study of the Debate on Repre- 
sentation in the Convention of 1787. 

Jones, Edith F., '02, Thesis, The Position of Women in the Greek Relig- 
ion. 

Jones, Omar E., '03, Thesis, Ethics of good Citizenship. 

Kevand, Janet L., *oi. 

Kuapp, Clara B., '99, Thesis, The Roman Historical Novel. 

Knapp, Jessie A., '02. 

Latimer, Laura M., '00, Thesis, The Development of the Roman Senate. 

Levy, Jacob J., '00. 

McClelland, William H., '03. 

McKinley, Mary E., '02, Thesis, Constitutional Opposition to the Con- 
duct of the Civil War. 

MacKenzie, Mary D., '02, Thesis, Morphology and Development of 
Clava Leptostyla. 

Madden, Frances E., '00, Thesis, Slavery Question in Congress up to 

1844- 

Mason, Arthur B., '02. 

Mason, Mary E., '02, Thesis, Powerful Friends in England during oar 
Civil War. 

Michell, Willis H., '99, Thesis, Criminal Statistics of Sjrracnse. 

Morgan, Fannie D., '02. 

Myron, Herbert B., '01. 

Noble, Wilbur C, '02, Thesis, The Reconstruction Views of Lincoln. 

Nye, Edith A., '00. 

Osborne, Laura E., '00, Thesis, The Roman Municipal Sjrstem. 



SCHOLARSHIP HONORS 477 

T, Celestia M., 'oo, Thesis, The Nibelungenlied. 
s, Clarence, 'oi, Thesis, The Causes and Character of the Kansas- 
K Bill. 

Mary A , '02, Thesis, A Study of Individual Color Preferences. 
>tella H., '03, Thesis, The Campus Martins. 

$land, Walter H., '03, Thesis, Roger Williams in his Relation to 
<land. 

Alice O., '01, Thesis, The Social and Domestic Position of Women 
ays of Euripides. 
11, Mary E., '02. 

dson, Eva G., '02, Thesis, Jefiferson Davis and the Doctrine of 
Jghts. 

vay, Willis E., '99, Thesis. The Origin and Growth of the Senti- 
Independence. 

, Marguerite B., '02, Thesis, The Negro as a Military Factor in the 
.r. 

aon, Gertrude, '02. 

son, Ruby E., '01, Thesis, Recreations of the Classic Nations. 
Charles L., '01, Thesis, Christianity and the Roman Government. 
John W., '02, Thesis, A Comparison of the Moral Status of Early 
Rome and of the Present Day. 
William, '01. 

ki, Aaron M., '02, Thesis, The Attitude of the Radical Republicans 
le Civil War. 

d, Edwin H., '00, Thesis, Determination of the Valve of *' g '* by 
n Observations and Construction of Necessary Accessory Appara- 

an, Floyd C, '03. 

an, Frank R., '02, Thesis, The Influence of the Life and Times of 

pon the Character of His Works. 

jy, Carrie Elizabeth, '03, Thesis, Contributions of Rome to Modern 

ion. 

, Horace W. B., '01. 

, Maude L., '00, Thesis, The Mycenean Age. 

Cora Em *o2. Thesis, The Structure of Ancient and of Modern 
compared, 
sr, Carolyn M., '01, Thesis, Sources and Character of the Roman 

• 

le, Harold C, '01. 

cj^cr. Helen T., *C2. 

:, Frank R., '00. 

vant, Marion A., '03, Thesis, The Colony of New Plymouth. 

ir, Ernest H., '03. 

r, Eleanor W., *oi. Thesis, Roman Municipal System. 

Eunice E., '02. 

lyke, Oakley E., *oo. 



47 2 SCHOI«ARSHIP HONORS 

Voorhees, Ruth C, '02, Thesis, A Review of Experimental Morphologj. 

Wager, Ralph B., '02, Thesis, Con tri bat ions to the Morphology of 
Actinozoa. 

Waite, Richard A., Jr., '01. 

Webb, Arthur A., '01. 

Webster, Frederick P., '99, Thesis, A Contribution to the Geologiol 
History of the Onondaga Valley. 

Weed, Helen A., *o2. Thesis, The Marriage and Funeral Rites of the 
Greeks. 

Wilson, Edith M., '99, Thesis, Two Roman Poets of the Golden Age. 

Wise, William L., '03. 

Woolsey, Royal D., *02. 

Worden, Jessie C, '03, Thesis, Topographical Study of the City d 
Rome. 

Young, Leonard E., '99, Thesis, A Chemical Analysis of some of the 
Rocks of Onondaga County. 



GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION 



gnifies graduate alumnus, one who has completed a graduate course and taken 
kom.f honorary; the other abbreviations indicate the respective colleges. See 
\eg, for similar use. 

San Jose 

Thomas D. Tooker, /.a., '56 



AlvABAMA 

ty P.O. 

:G. Brownell, /.a., '93 



Arizona 

le t,. Vincent (Taylor), /.a., '81 

California 

ah B. Arnold (Hitchcock), /.a., '75 
I P. Hitchcock, /.a., '89 
K Jamison, /.a., '83 
'. P. Reynolds, m., '73 

A 

•JO D. VanArman, /.a., '93 

9rce, m., '7a 



D. Buck, l.a^ '75 ; A#ii., '01 
I G. Rogers, /.a., '97; i' a., '99 



1 10. Crook, I'.a., '94 

I 

%.. Barr (Maclay), /.a., '61 

leh 

. Dorris, l.a., '60; Aon., '64 

(lea 

If. Bain (Hogoboom). l.a., '60 
t P. Pergusun. I'.a., '96 
S. Gibbs, m., '70 
ICcDowell, /.a., '76; ^.a., '77 
. Robarts, /., 'oz 

m 

• B. Boynton, m., '88 
coe Augsbnrg./.a., '84 



C. Brown, /.fl., '85 
B. CUrk./ui., *88 



tradley (Burdette), /.a , '76 

H. Hoose, l.a., '61; Atfit., '72 

H. Shults, l.a., '76; jf.a., '78; m., '88 

idsco 

! P. Loomis. l.a., '83 
. Manson. m., '97 
lianson, /., '99 
N. Sboecraft, /.c.,'97 



Colorado 

Delta 

Edmund K. Macomber, l.a., '93 



Samuel H. Baker, l.a., '77 

Benjamin V. Dolph, m., '99 

Bdward P. Lake, m., '83 

Carrie I. Shevelson (Benjamin), l.a., '81 

William P. Singer, m., '96 

Prank I. Willsea. l.a.. '79 



Charles W. Douglass, /.a., '91 

Fort Collitid 

LenaM. King,/.a., *oo 

Oraad Jiinctlon 

Frederick Welles, m., '83 

UnlTeralty Park 

Ammi B. Hyde, hom., '67; hom., '74 
Wilbur P. Steele, l.a., '72; hom., '93 
Anne G. Wirt, l.a., '84 

Connecticut 

Betlie 

Ada J. Todd, l.a., 'So;g'ji., '83 

Bridgeport 

Joseph B. Burroughs, m., *8i 
Sylvenas D. Lewis, l.a., '00 
Frauds B. Upham, Hon., '03 
Elixabeth B. Parkhurst Walters (Mrs.), 

/.«•» '95 
Frank D. Walters, l.a., '95 

Clinton 

John A. Swann, l.a., '93 

Oreenwieh 

Edgar P. Piper, l.a., '01 

Hartford 

Daniel R. Kennedy, Jr., l.a , '02 
Charles W. McCormick, Hon., '97 
Waldo S. Pratt, hom., '98 

Klbbe 

William B. Harlow, ^.a., '85 

XrakerUle 

Prank H. WalUce./.a., '85 



1 



474 



GBOGRAPHICAI« DISTRIBUTION 



CoNNBCTicoT — Contintud 
Xlddletown 

Mary F. Cary (Davis), /.a., '74 

Sarah E. Douglass (McMahon), /.a., '70 

William N. Rtce. Hon., '86 

New Haven 

Gilbert G. Benjamin, I. a., '99 
Alexander M. Drummond. /.a., *66 
AKnes H. Ford (Rowe), /.a., '94 
Grace S Hiller, La , '91 
George Barker Stevens, ^.a., '83 

New Mllford 

Frank D. Torrey, l.a., '91 

Norwalk 

Augustus F. Beard, Hon., '75 
George VanAIstyne, /.a., '62 

Norwich 

Olive C. Moorhead (Beckwith)/.a., '92 

Stamford 

Anna B. Burlingame, l.a., '00 
Peter J. VanVleet, «., '68 

TorrinKton 

Bunice B. Titus, l.a., '02 

Waterbttry 

Lillian May Arthur, /.a., '03 

Dblawarb 
Delaware City 

Omar E. Jones, /.a., '03 

Dorer 

Isadore H. Cropsey,/.a., '93 

Emma R. Potter, /.a., '82 

Mabel R. Ramsay (V'anBerkalow)y.a., *02 

Xriaeoln City 

Isaac L. Wood, g.a.^ '90)^.a., '91 
Milton 

Bmerson P. Roberts, ^.a., '95 

Wilmington 

John W. Connell, /.a., '98 
Arthur A. Wilmot, l.a., '98 

District of Columbia 

Waahlngton 

Bertha I. Bennett, /.a., '99 

Manley E. Carr, l.a., '03 

Orator F. Cook, /.a. ,'90 

Alice Carter (Cook),/.a., •88;jf.a., '88 

John N. Dorris, La., '59 

Arthur H. Giles, La., '78 ; g,a., '8a 

Sarah N. Graham (Bowerman), La., '97; 

Blias D. Huntley, La., '66 

Sarah M. Logueu (Fraser), m.. '76 

Belva A. McNall (Lockwood) La., '57 

George G. Markland. La., '62 

Will R. Maxon, La., '98 

Joseph Morrison, /.a., '84 

lida M O'Bryon. La., '98 

Daniel J. Richardson, La., '03 

T. Ralph Robinson, La., ^^\g.a., '99 

Florida 

Crescent City 

Katharine A. Crawford, f.a., '89 
Tampa 

Bliasaph Dorchester, m., '49 



Gborgia 

Xacon 

Reunnette B. Puller (Boone), m., *8i 

Illinois 

Alton 

Bertrand C. Richardson, La., '9} 

Bloominffton 

Harvey C. De Motte, j'.a.. '77 
Bradford S. Potter, l.a., *6o 

Charleston 

Ellen A. Ford. l,a„ '85; ^-.a., '94 

Chicago 

Morgan K. Bamum, /.a., '85 

Hattie M. Cobb (Smith). /^., *86 

George L. Connell, /.a., "02,gm., '03 

Harry W. Connell, a.s., '03 

Harvey F. Connell. a.s., '03 

Nellie L. George (Hollett). /.«., '79 

Clarence N. Goodwin, /.a.,*94 

Ida M. Hamilton (MaDsell)./.*., 'Si 

Edward E. Hill, /.a.. '88 

Edward L. Hollett. / a., '9a 

Edwin H. Lewis, ^.a., '92 

John S. Marshal], m., '76 

Sara M. Maxson (Cobb), /.a., '^3; A*-. '^ 

g.a., '86; ^.a., '90 
Truman W. Miller, m., '64 
Matthew M. Parkhurst.^.a., '70 
Jessie T. Peck,/.a., '88 
Maude G. Reynolds (Barkey),/.a , '84 
William O. Shepard, ^.a., '95 
Frances A. Small wood (Lane), Im., 'U 
William T. Smallwood, La.. '00 
Winfield S. Smythe, hon.^ '76 
Harriet C. Stacev,/a., '9^ 
Polemus H. Swih.^.a., '88 
James P. Thorns, g.a., '89 
Henry F. Thomsen. /.a., '76 
Charles H. Treadwell, La., '95 
Charles M. Torton, /.a., '83 
Joseph W. Young, La., '91 

Decatnr 

Clark P. Hard, l.a., '65 

Biffin 

Lilian B. Lewis, /.a., '98 

ISvanaton 

Charles B. Atwell, La., '79 

Robert Baird, Hon., '02 

Herman Churchill, / a., '94 

J. Scott Clark, La., '77; hon.^ '99 

Martha B. Foote(Crow), l.m., 76;/^.. J 

Margaret S. Davidson Fry(Mrs.),f^.,'" 

Sara M. Hanchette (Hunt). 7.a., *67 

Rhodenck P. Hollett, La., '76 

Ralph Hunt, La., '68 

Olin C. Kellogg, La., *^^g.m., '9yf'->'^ 

Peter C. Lutklu, kom., '00 

Fort Sheridan 

Charles P. Lynch, m.. '91 

Oalena 

Benjamin P. Fowler, m., '50 

Oaleabnrff 

Helen M. Guernsey (Spragiie),/«"'95 



GBOGRAPHICAI. DISTRIBUTION 



475 



tUNOis — CofUinued 



'. Bumbam, /.a., *oo 

k.. Michaels (Atchiion), /.a., '74 

'79;i'.fl..'8o 

1 M. Wharff. /.a.. '03 



a. Meadii, l.a„ '85 

2. Haven, /.a., '77; m., '80 
1 G. W. Schmidt, /.a., '88 

1 B. Norton, J". a., 'q6 

-n 
Dunn (Russell), /ui., '99 

ACity 

. GUIette, IM., '85 



A Arnold, /.a^ *76;/.a., '79 
\ Wood, m., '50 

I 
Owens, m., '81 



SteinKrebe(Jenter),/.a., '85 

T. Waite, M., *5i 

i. Cham hers, m., '64 

I B. Haven (Moss). /a., '77 
I M. Moss, /.a., '77;^ a., '81 
.. Ellis (Wells), /.a., '62;^.a., '88 
I A. Wells./.fl., '77 

Indiana 

G. Hudson, /.a., '63 

H. Myers, /.a., '94 

itle 

H. Hughes, Hon., '03 

Oils 

. l^ughmiller, /.a., '82 
t. Sheldon (Howe), /m., '85 
• C. Shoecraft. /.a., '83 



s J. Bassett,^.a., '88 
;e A. Waldo, ^.a., '9^ 



ir C. Wilcox, SI., '42 

He 

U M. Quivey (Stabler), /.a., '77 

1 C. Miller, /.a., -59 

d 

W. Dennis, j'.a., '87 



Salem 

James W. May, /.a.. '81 

Terre Haute 

Alpheus McTasgart, ^.a., '77 

Upland 

Charles W. Winchester, /.a., *67; Aom., '92 

Vlneennea 

Charles H. McLaury, /.a., *oo; /.a., 'oa 

a^ionsTille 

Frank W. Hemenway, /.a.. '82 

Indian Territory 

Sonth XcAleater 

William K. Jermy, /., '99 

Iowa 
Dee Koines 

James P. Stephenson, ^.a., '91 

Fairfield 

Nelson A. Sloan, m., *88 

Xt. Pleasant 

Augusta M. Hubbard (Blakeslee), /.a., '62 

Xt. Vernon 

Nicholas Knight, /.a., '82;i^.a.. '88 

Ottttmwa 

Alfred E. Craig, g.a.^ '96 
Josiah H. Lynch, /.a., '37 
Ella S. Nicholson, g.a.^ '93 

Sionz City 

Ella D. Corey (Quick), /.a., '80 
Mary E. Nash (bpence), /.a., '53 

Waterloo 

Henry W. Brown, m., '67 
John C. Gates, /.a., '63 

Wayland 

L. D. Wiggins. i«., '65 

West Union 

E. A. Ainsworth, m., '74 

Kansas 

Bmporla 

Carrie P. Jones (Sauber),/.a.. '85 

Ooddard 

William H. Dwight, m., '76 

Herin^ton 

Edward H. Cooke, m., '81 

Kansas City 

James W. Alderman, Hon., '80 

Oskaloosa 

J. Wilbur Somcrvillc, /.a., '90 

Salina 

Calvin G. Stevens, m., '84 

Topcka 

Ardelia B. Bush (Wayne), /.a., '65 



476 



geocraphicai« distribution 
Kentucky 



▲shlaad 

S. Thomas I«anghorne, m., '92 

Berea 

William H. Webster, la., '60 

Irynden 

Lynn B. WikoflF, La., '03 

Owensboro 

Charles P. Luce, l.a., '81; jf.a., '85 

Padncah 

James W. Lowber.jg-.a., '80 

Toleaboro 

William T. Burdick, w, '75 

Vaacebttrg 

T. S. Clarke, m.,70 



Maine 

Baaaror 

Daniel Hennessey, m,, '66 

Bnuiswlck 

William D. Hyde, Hon., '97 

Kent's HIU 

Alice R. Divine, /.a., '95 

Bllen Deuel Morse, (Mrs ), horn., '95 

Wilson F. Morse, Hon., '95 

Oroflo 

Abbie M. Adams, m., '84 

James S. Stevens, g^.a., 'og;g.a., '90 

Portland 

Joseph P. Haley, hou., '00 
William S. Tones, Aon., '02 
Edward S. J. McAllister, l.a., '94 



Maryland 

Baltimore 

Charles S. Bryan, Jr., a.s., '03 
John A. Pisher, if-.a., '87 
Eugene W. ManninR. ^.a., '86 
Jennie L. Whitbread. /.a., '87 
Nellie M. Wilmot, /.a., '89 
Nettie L. Wilmot, l.a., '89 

Federalabnrff 

Hiram W. Hunt, l.a., '69 



Massachusetts 

Adams 

John W. Thompson, Hon., '91 

▲ndover 

Russell W. Newton, l.a., '99; j^.a., '99 

▲thol 

Elisabeth S. Bridgefurd (Amsden),/.a.,'87 



Boston 

Charles K. Bull, l.a,, 'oa 
Walter S. Baton, /.a*. '87 
Phoebe A. Ferris, m., *oa 
Percy Goetchtns, kon., '9a 
Montgomery S. Goodwin,7.a., '8t 
Pay R. Hunt, /.a., '01 
George H. Maxwell, la., '88 
James H. Olmstead, l.a., '01 
Laura Parsons, l.a., '00 
Prank L. Purdy, l.a.. '92 
Edith C. Stobo (Cave), /.a.. 'oS 
William H. van Allen, l.a., '90 
Leon H. Vincent, l.a., *6i; htm., *oi 
Charles P. Webber, hon., '78 
Joseph A. Wright, l.a., '9a 

Bralntree 

Charles A. Pitkin, ^.a., '90 

Brookllne 

Mary E. Carlton, m., '86 
ina D. Mercer (Rice)./.a.. '9a 
L. Hall Rice, /.«., '92 

Cambridge 

Winfield H. Ames, m., '93 
Imogene M. Conland, la., *oi 
Clarence Perkins, l.a , *oi 

Chelaea 

Sarah M. Holland (Ellery), l.a., hi 
Ross C. Houghton, hon., '75 

Cheshire 

Gertrude Robinson, la., '02 

Clifiondale 

Miriam A. Guernsey, (Mix), l.a., '95 

Dlffhton 

Sberbume C. Hutchinson, l,a., '92 

Dorcheater 

Eva L. Harrison, f.a., '79 

Brerett 

Frank S. Husted, l.a., *9i; f.a., '93 

Gardner 

Mary A. Bates, /.a., '00 

Hanson 

Plavel 8. Thomas, l.a., '85 

Honaatonlc 

Mary L. Parmelee (Reynolds), /.«., ^ 
Howard H. Reynolds, l.a,., '95 

Xranesboronffh 

Mary E. Dow (Carrier), l.a,, '99 

Melrose Highlands 

Judaon B. Coit, l.a,, 'TS'.j'.aM *S< 

New Dorchester 

William A. Wood, l.a., '75: ^.a., '7® 

Newton Centre 

Wm . Edward Huntington, kon., '^ 
North Adama 

John A. Hamilton, La., '91 
Northampton 

Jacob H. Carfrey, La,, '93 



GBOGRAPHICAI* DISTRIBUTION 



477 



cavsmrs— Continued 



y Sadler, la., *oo 



iCiiight(Howlett), l.a., '98 



7. Goodier, l.a., '75;i'.a.,'78 

«y 

Bradford, /.a., '88 
If .Clapp, La.,*S8,g^.a. ; '88,i'.a.,'89 
:. Green, l.a., '90 
B. Hooker, l.a., '88; if. a., '88 
fudd, l.a., '90 



I. Shuart, l.a., '75 
liters, l.a., '65 



i^. Bowen, m., '74 

Merrick. /a. '87 
Uatimer (Merrick), /.a., '87 

oiaAni,£.a., '93 

Smith (Easley), l.a., '96 

Michigan ' 

Welch, I. a., '52 

>. Brown, A0«., '58 

k 

. French, m., '42 

lark (Patchell), l.a., '83 



in, m., *46 
I. Osbom, l.a., '85 
ice. /.a., '77 
(mithpj'.a.. '85 
rwart, m., '41 



Blake. l,a., '72 

da 

. Ellis, l.a., '85 

;er, m., '64 
artin, l.a., '72 
I. Grove, /.a., '62 
eck, /.a., '60 



KmlatBAKoo 

l^ucy B. Babcock, /.a., '03 

XrAke City 

George Varion,^.a., '95 

Marqnette 

Charles N. Bottum, l.a., '00 
William J. Stevens, la., '82 

Ovid 

Lewis O. Ludlum, m., '67 

Port Httfon 

Myron Northup, m., '59 

Rockford 

Louise V. Shepherd (Hancock), l.a., '76; 
^.a., '78 

SagliiAw 

Lyman W. Bliss, m.. '57 
Cora E. Dyer (Smith), /.a., '85 
Fred H. Potter, l.a., '60 

TpsUaatl 

Lucy Aldrich (Osband), l.a., '61 
William M. Osband. l.a., *6i 

Minnesota 

Caaton 

Martha L. Knight Allison, La., '57 

Dttlntk 

Clara H. Bannister (Congdon), l.a., '75 
Chester A. Congdon, /.a., '75 
Thomas H. Fairfax, l.a., '78 

ISyota 

Harry O. Harback, l.a., '93 

Falrbanlt 

Henry C. Emm, l.a., 'oS-.j^.a., '99 

Hamlin 

George H. Bridgman, han., '79; Aon., '00 
Marsena E. Peirce (Thompson), l.a., '69 
William E. Thompson, ^^.a., '86 



Bancroft (Robinson), l.a., '77; Harmony 



William B. Coates, m., '86 

I«e Snetir 

Francis A. Darling, m., '56 

Xliuieapolla 

Francis A. Baker, l.a.. '66 

Grace W. Bramlev (Matthews), la., '86 

John R. Gordon, /.a , '68 

Jonathan G. Pelton, m., '46 

George H. Warren, l.a., '66 

Sontk Xlnaeapolla 

Francis A. Baker, l.a., '66 

« 

Stillwater 

James C. Rhodes, m.,'47 

St. Panl 

Thomas L. Burke, /., '02 
Norman W Foster, m., '98 
Milton J. Griffin, l.a., '75 
Samuel G. Smith, ^.a., '82 
William P. Westfall, l.a., '88 



478 



QBOORAPHICAI, 



Missouri 

Fayette 

Stella C. Jone8,/.a.. '83 

Frederlckton 

Anice L. Whitney, /.a., '99 

Olaagow 

W. Newton Holmes, /.a., '85 

KaiuiAs City 

Williftm Hasbrouck, I. a., '99 

Kidder 

Charles A. Mets, /.a., '93 

Klrkrille 

William T. George, /.a., '53 

I^ezlafftoa 

Leon A. McKown, /.a., '00 

Xaeoa 

Edwin McKee, /.a., '60 

Richmond 

I*ewis F. Kirk.^.a., '77 

Spring Held 

Sarah A. Ford (Crosby), /.a., '63 

8t. Xronia 

Tames W. Hall, la.. '67 
William H. Horner, /.c. '65 
William M. Jones, jf.fl., '91 
Claude M. Marriott, Im„ 'oi 
Arthur E. Mink, «i., '87 
Leo A. Stlger, jf.a., '89 

Montana 
▲naconda 

Charles H. Eggleston, /.a., '78 
Bercail 

itl^^ ^' Jcffres (Moule), /.a., 'So 
Philip I. Moule, /.a., '78 

BiUiags 

George W. Hey, Jr., /.a., '99 
Bntte City 

Warren W. Walsworth. /.«., '83 
Crow Agency 

Hartman L. Oberlander, m., '87 

Nebraska 

McCook 

Rose E. Rolison (Benjamin), La., '68 

OhlowA 

Charles A. Fowler, Ac., '74 
Seward 

JeflFers^n T. Potter, m., '75 

University Place 

^Aoi" ^ ^"n"n8*oo.A<>i.., '68 ; hon., '74; 
Minnie CTjiy.^.fl.^ .,3 



distribution 

New Hampshire 

Bzeter 

Arthur G. Leacock, l,a., '92 
Greenfield 

Preston R. Crowell, /.a., '86 

Xancheater 

Wm. Orville Allen, /.a., *97;^.a., '99 
Snncook 

Frederick C. I^yford, /.a., '88 

New Jersey 

▲rilttffton 

Mary E. Preston, /.a., 'oa 
Ruth Voohees, /.a., '02 

▲abnry Park 

Lynn E. Jenniaon, Im., 'oa 

Bayone 

Eleanor L. Orr (Ripley), Im., •9a 

Blairstown 

CUra M. Webb, /.a., '99 

Bloomfield 

Charles H. Bailey, jw., '68 
Barbara F. Crane ^Vau Wagoner), /^ 
Samuel H. Dodson, /.a., 'oo 

Bordentown 

John W. Blaisdell, kon., '96 
George G. Brower, /.a., '87 
Wilham LaVay Wise, /.a., '93 

Camden 

Mary M. Brown (Mrs.), /.a., 'oo 
Consent Staaon 

Johanna Zimmer,/.a., 'oa ; /.«., '^ 
Baat Orange 

Frank W. Goreth, i.a., '91 
Lincoln E. Rowley, /.a., '00 
Fred P. Schenck. /.a.. '95; /..'oj 
Austiana E. Taylor (GorethX Aa.. '9« 

Bngflewood 

Welthy B. Honsinger, /.«., 'oo 
Vleminyton 

Marats L. Glazer. /.a., '98 
George M. Thompson, /., 'oa 

Hackenaack 

Rose A. Baird. /.«r., '94 

Hackettatown 

Fred Le Roy Brown, /.a., 'oo 

Grace L. Damel,/.a., '98 

Frederick W Schlieder, /a.. '95 
Hammonton 

Mildred B. Chapman, /.«.. '<q 
Jeraey City 

George W. Gardner. / «., '95 
William C. O'Donnell, /.a ;^9a;/A, V 
Miner H. Paddock, /.a., '68 
William E. Palmer, /^,, •9i;/.#^"9l 
r«M '96 
Keyport 

Helen Green, I. a., 'oa 



GBOGRAPHICAI, DISTRIBUTION 



479 



r JBRSBY — Continued 

I 

V. C. Petit, /.a., '79 



New Mbxico 

Fort Balrd 

Robert H. Pierson, m., '98 



». Boyce, l.a., '02 
Nicholson, /.a., '9a ; g^.a., '94 
W. Robinson, /.a., 'oa 
F. Silterly,/.a., '83 [jf.a.,'Ss,gM., 
911., '00 



ake (Gibson). /a., '84 
R.Smith, /.a , '96: j^.a., '98 
ace Wilcox, /.a , '81 

m 

H. Bassinger, m., '42 



B. Collerd. /.a., '03 
X Gerald, /.a., '91 
R. Kent, l.a., '62 
Ih Leyden, /.a., '87 

H. McKenzie. i.a., '89 
. Mathews, /.a., '77; ^.a.. '93 

L. Morgan, /.a., '94 

W. Murray, m., '98 

B. Piper, m., '01 

. Raymond (Plum), m , '04 

. Reed (Morgan), /a., '96 

' 8. Romer, /a., '95 

Ipellmeyer, Aon , '81 



3. Brundage, l.a., '00 



I*. Drake (Pellet), I, a., 89 
i. Hutton, /.a., '57 
r. Sanford (McBurney), /.a., '89 
Twist, /.a., '91 



X. Hutchinson, l.a,, '87 

C. Palmer, m., '03 

. Reinhart,^.a., '77;^ a., '81 

F. Thomsen,/.a., '83 

P. Tracy, l.a., '97 



C. Carroll, Aon., '85 

Ule 

J CUrk. /.a., 'oi 

'raater or Praser, l.a., '88 ;^.fl.,'89 

F. A. Klein, g.a., '84 
as W. I«ari8on, m., '63 

ier H. Tuttle. Aan.,'87 

1 N. Mumper, ^.a., '86 
I K. Shea, l.a., '99 

•fitelalt 

e M. Merrell, La., '58 



New York 
▲dama 

John B. Pitcher, I. a., '95 
John W. Scoville. /.a.. '01 
Mary A. Thompson, /.a., '00 

▲dam*s Centre 

Judson O. Perkins, g.a., '89 

▲ddlson 

Albert A. Aldrich, «.. '83 
Reuben P. Brown, m., '49 
Payette K. Congdon, l.a., '94 

Afton 

Philetus A. Hayes, m., '70 

▲Ibaay 

Anne T. Bingham, m., '00 

Edgar H. Brown, l.a., '81; Aon., '03 

Charles N. Cobb, /.a., '77 

George D. Coons, /.a., '94 

Richard E. Day, l.a., '77; ^Am '78; A<»«i 99 

Melvil Dewey, hon., '02 

Alfred H. Eaton, /.a., '85; f.a., ^S;.?^*-. '96 

Mary A. Osbom Fox (Mrs.), /a., '79 

Charles S. Gager, l.a., '95 

Henry Graham, hon., '83 

Julia B. Kellogg, :.a. 97 

Benjamin B. Odell, Jr . hon., *oi 

Henry I.. Taylor, /.a., •84;^.a., '85;j?'.a.i '87 

Anna P. Terry (Whitford), l.a., 89 

William J. Wallace, hon., '82 

Noble B. Whitford, l.a., '89 

Harriet A. Woodward, m., '75 

Albion 

Katharine A. Pairchild,/a., '00 

Allegany 

Clair S. McGavem, /., '03 

Alton 

Harry P. Seaman, m., '71 

▲materdam 

Lena M. Chapman, lui., '09 
Bdward C. La Porte, m., Voa 
Jessie C. Worden. l.a., '03 

Andes 

Montgomery C. Smith, l.a,, '00 

Antwerp 

Mary E. Render,/a., '95 

Mary E. Robinson (Conkling), la., '95 

▲rnrle 

Edwin M. Sanford, l.a., '89 
Rose R. Weigand, l.a., *oo 



George B. Clark, m., '94 

Atlanta 

Alexander M. Stewart, m., 'oj 

Attica 

Arthur B. Brigden, l.a., '84 



48o 



GROGRAPHICAI« DISTRIBUTION 



New YoRK-'Continutd 
▲ntmm 

Howard D. Chapman, /.a., '94 ; m., '02 

Grace A. Hobart (Clark), I.e., '97 

Clara B. Hoskins, /.a., '02 

Julia I. iTcs (Messenger), /.a., '94 

James M. Jenkins, m., '7^ 

Nettie E. Tripp Jenkins (Mrs.), m., '77 

John C. Nichols, l.a., '75 

Alfred J. Saxe, l.a., '94 

Hobart P. Transue, a.s., '02 

▲nrora 

Willis D. CuddelMck, m., '00 
Helen P. Smith, Hon., '89 

▲toca 

De Porest O. Chamberlayne, l.a., '83 
Christopher Patterson, m., '48 

▲ron 

Benjamin P. Hitchcock, l.a,, '6§ 
Etnilie Pughe (Stra8enburgh),/.a., '87 

Balnbridffe 

Prances M. Bliss, /.a., '00 

BaldwlaflTllle 

John T. Gardner, /., '03 
James V. Kendall, m., '44 
Richard t,. Sullivan, m., '00 
Gervas M. Wasse, m., '90 
Reba D. Willard, /.a., '99 

Ballstoa Springs 

Burton D. Esmond, /.a., '94 
William A. Mehan, la., '87 

Bsrbonrrille 

Cliflford Axtell, /., '03 

Bameveld 

Thomas C. GiflFord, m., '02 

Barton 

Edward S. Hunt, l.a., '83 

Batavla 

Grace E. Mclntyrc (Heinie), l.a., '93 
Nellie G. Mclntyre, l.a., '89 
Mary E. Mason, l.a., *02 
Charles E. Millspaugh, l.a., '70 
Henry P. Tarbox, ^.o., '67 
Pred K. Ward, f.a., '93 

Batli 

Jeremiah Dunn, m., '47 

Bayside Xr. X. 

Harris A. Houghton, l.a., '95 ; m., '01 

Belle Xale 

Helen E. Gere, l.a., '81 

Bellerllle 

Starr C. HoUis, m., *oo 
Hallie G. Morgan, fa., '01 
Eunice R. Pearson, l.a., '02 
Walter H. Powlesland, l.a., '03 
Edmund I^. Shepard, l.a., '94 

Belloaa 

Alexanders. Sloan, m., '43 

Belmont 

Charles H. Munson, l.a., '97 



Benton Center 

Hiram R. Shoemaker, /.a., '86 



Richard W. Copeland. l.a., '73 
William D. Johnson, m., '92 
Jessie Pearl Pease, i.a.,'o» 

Berkshire 

I^ouisa A. Darbonnier./ui., '81 

Binshamton 

Gertrude S. Burlingham, /.a., '9S 
Daniel S. Burr, m.,^68 
Grace G. DeSLay (Pratt), La., '00 
Charles C. Eastman, m., '70 
Prank M. Edson, /.a., *P3 
Amanda N. Prink, l.a., *oa 
Mabel J. Puller (Whitmarsh). U., '< 
Jay I,. Gregory, l.a , 'oo ; /.. '« 
George N. Hall, m., *83 
Dana B. Hinman, l.a.. *oi 
Philip P. Jacobs, l.a., '03 
John S. Kellev, m., '00 
Gurdon R. Miller, l,a., '93 
Charles M Olmstead, la., "% 
George P. Wadsworth, l.a., ^ 
Harry G. Weeks, a.s., '03 

Bine Stores 

^ Benedict A. Weeks, m., *6i 

Blnff Point 

Kirke P. Richardson, l.a., '97 

Bolton-on-I*ake Oeorye 
ElU M. Hall, l.a , '92 

BoonTiUe 

Prank E. Arthur. / a., *8i 
Lulu N. Hull, l.a., '02 

Bradford 

Henry S. Dennis, l.a., '60 

Brewerton 

Wilbur G. Boyd, l.a., '02 
Eddie D. Hall, m., '02 
Prank R. Strong, l.a., '00 

Brldffehamton 

Martha I,. Sanlord. l.a., '96 

Bridgeport 

William T. I«um. m., '95 

Bristol Centre 

David J. Mallory, m., '47 

Brockport 

Daniel Holmes, m., '68 
William H. Lennon, l.a., '67 

Brookfleld 

Herbert C. Brown, m., '81 

Brooklyn 

John J. Ackerman, l.a , 'ox 
E. V. Aldridge, l.a., '81 ',g.a., 'Sj 
Alonxo A. Ashman, l.a., '68 
Harriet h. Baldwin (VanSlyke), /■'•. 
Charles J. Clark, a.s., *o2 
MaryE. Curtis, l.a., '00 
Charles O. Dewey, iM.,*H 

{ane B. Downs (Tipple), Im., '« 
Cargaret E. Poz, /.a., *oa 



GBOGRAPHICAI* DISTRIBUTION 



481 



V York — Continued 

■Continued 

Groat (Richardson), f.a., '97 

I. Howe, /.a., '79 

;. Hunt, l.a., '93 

. Knight, /.a.. '78 

Ic Z. Lewis, /.a., '94 ; ^.a., '96 

McKelway, Ao«., '90 

Nozon, l.a., '99 

ichardson. /a., '94 

. Rooney./ui., '90 

Rumsey (Van Alstyne), l.a., '62 
Snyder, /., '03 
;. Stout, la., '91 
rallman, l.a., '79 
M. Tipple, l.a., '94 
I. Van slyke,/.a., 'o( 
H. Wakeham, l.a., '93 
Gee Waters, hon., *oi 
Wheeler (Lewis), /.a., '96 
Willey.^.a., '88 
». Wing, Hon., '92 
. Wood, l.a., '00 
XTood, l.a., '00 ; m., '03 
^. Woodford, Aom., '94 



Pisk, La., '01 

tee 

Haley, /.a., '03 



1 Berry, l.a., '03 
H. Burgess, l.a., '95 
. Cummings, l.a.. '99 
mmings (Croff), l.a., '94 
>. Cummings, /.a., '02 

Dorris, l.a.. *6o 

H. Downey, l.a., 'oo# 

3unn(Thorne),/.a. '90 

a Fowler, /.a., '« '59; Hon., '78 

i. Hahl, l.a., '03 1 

lenstein, m., '44 

lazeltine, l.a., '01 

dusted, /.a., '92 

lie Johnson (Champlin), /.a.,*oo 

Jones, m., '45 

Kenaiitnn (Russell), /.a., '88 
i. MacDougall, l.a., '00 

Maycock,/.a.. '75 
iddleton./.a.. '03 
:. Minard. l.a., '94 
e. Peck. /.a., '78 
. Phelpa, l.a., '03 
rick Piper, /.a.. '89 
. Templeton, l.a., '03 
H. Templeton, l.a., '99 
. Thorne, l.a., "96 
hf. Underhill. /.a., '60 
i.. Wall, IN., '76 
D. Watson, ^.a., '74; j-.a., 75 

Whipple, l.a., '74 ; m., '84 
kiting, m., '75 

C Wilbur, /.a., '96, g.a., '88; 

I B. G. Woods, l.a., '66 



ilea, m., '78 



e C. Wallace, m., 50 



Harriette A. Hynes, l.a., '95 
Charles C. Townsend, l.a., '00 
Jessie M. Wakefield, l.a., *oo 
Chester Wilcox, /., '03 

Catnllltta 

William Cregg. m.. '96 
Prank B. Paddock, /.a., '95 
Florence Reed {MunTo),/.a., 'oa 
Pred W. Slocum, m., '82 

Cani^oliAile 

Randolph T. Congdon, l.a., '00 
Viletta C. Reed, l.a., '03 

Caiumdalctui 

Alfred W. Armstrong, l.a., *oi ; in., '04 
Sarah M. Donovan, /.a., '03 
Herbert Huntington, l.a., '76 
Alberta Huntoon, l.a., '97 
Lena Huntoon, l.a., 's^ 
Harold A. Townsend, l.a., '03 

Canastota 

Anna J. HoUis, l.a., '97 
James W. Knapp, m., '81 
John L. Robertson, /., '01 
John W. Short, m., '03 

Candor 

Naboth Osborne, Im., '97 

Caniateo 

Guy Comfort, l.a., '03 

Clara G. Hookway (Dunham), /.a., '97 

J. Claude Latham, l.a., '99 

Canoffa 

Theresa Fronts, /.a., '99 

Canton 

George A. Adams, /., '01 
Charles D. Laidlaw, m., '02 

Cape Vincent 

Bugene M. Crabb, in., '76 
Carrie A. Hilts, l.a., '01 ',g.a., '02 

Cardiff 

Blmer B. Hutchings, l.a., '94 
Pred M. Thurston, l.a., '00 

Carmel 

David H. Hanaburgh, kon., '02 
Bessie A. Reed, /.a., '93 
Georgie Roae,/M., '92 

Carthaffe 

Nelaon D. Ferguson, m., '44 

Catliarlne 

William H. Beach, m., '66 
Silas B. H. Nichols, in., '57 

Cato 

John P. Hoole, m., '94 

Caton 

Welcome A. Hanor, m., '03 

Canchdenoy 

Pred B. Loren, a.s., '02 

Caynta 

Charles P. Godfrey, in., *68 



482 



GROGRAPHICAI, DISTRIBUTION 



Nhw York — Continued 

Ca«enoTlA 

Francis D. Blakeslee, l.a., '72 
Blisabetb P. Brown, /.a., '02 
Isaac N. Clements, r.a., 'S7 
Ruth B. Guibault,/a.. '84 
George B Strait, /.a., "03 
John B. Van Petten, j?-.a.. '89 
George M. White, m., '96 

CenterrlUe 

Flora M. Metcalf. /.a., '03 

Central Square 

Homer F. Wilmot, /.a., *02 

Charlotte 

Jeremiah H. Sullivan, m., '9S 

Chatham 

Prank H. Wood, /.a., '85 

Chcmttnff 

Bbenezer Gere, m., '48 

Chenanco Forks 

James D. Guy, in., *68 

Cherry Creek 

Henry C. Millington, /.a.. '98 

Cherry Valley 

Menzo Burlingame, /.a., '94 

Cheshire 

Francis R. Bentley, irr., '41 

Chester 

Cornelia H. Rice, I. a., '03 
Maude L. Smith, /.a., '00 
William A. Wheatley, /.a., '94 

ChltteaaaffO 

May B. Baker, /.a., '03 
John R. Baton, m., '75 

Cicero 

Allen B. Atwater, /.a., '89 
Lucien A. Davison, /.a. 'v/) 
Burke C. Hamilton, a^., '03 
Allen G. Tripp, in., '00 

Ciacinuattts 

Marcellus L. Halbert, wi., '72 
Daniel B. Mills, /.a., '03 
John H. Murray, /.a., '88 

Clarkson 

Horace Clark, m., '40 

Clayton 

Sadie B. Williams (Bell)./.a., '01 

CleTeland 

Willis G Babcock. m., '84 
Isabelle M. Pike, I. a., '03 

Clifton Sprlafs 

Brama C. Clark, m., *02 
John Baster, g.a., '81 
Frank P. Bdeerton, /.a., '69 
Vern S. Fowler, /.a., '03 

Clinton 

Frederick M. Barrows, »f., '46 
Frank Hoyt Wood, /.a., '91 



Clyde 

Darwin Colvin, av., '44 
Bessie M. Cowles, /Ui., ^95 
I^ee Waldorf, /.a., ^99 
Charles W. Walker, l.a., '97 

CobleskUl 

Susan M. Armstrong (Ryder),/.*., '99 
Patty N. Braley. /.a.. *99 

Cohocton 

Robert B. Brettle, l.a^ '93 
William T. Pulkerson, m., *02 

Cohoes- 

HenryS. Rowe, Jr., /.a., '01 

Cold Siirinffs 

Richard Wheatley, hon,^ '83; Am.. '9( 

Collamer 

Anna H. Smith, /.a., '89 

Conklia 

Ransom T. Gates, in., '67 

Constableville 

Frank M. Ringrose, av., '94 
Cooper's Plains 

B. A. Overhiser, av., '74 

Cooperstown 

Lillian B. Root, /.a., '91 

Copenhagen 

Alice B. Clarke (Greene), /.a., *%t 

Corfo 

Bmest H. Sumner, /.a., *<q 

Cominff 

Jessie R. Campbell, /.a., '99 
Nelson Homing, in., '57 
Leigh R. Hunt, g.a.^ *8q 
George W. Pratt, in., '45 
William H. Reese, /.«., '70 ; 4<m., 94 

Cornwall 

Wm. F. C. Beattie, «v., '50 

Comwall-on-the-Hndson 

Albert R. Seaman, /ui., '<^ 
Abbie M. Talbot, /.a., *o2 

Cortland 

Charles B. Bennett, in., 'So 

Burt L. Bentley, /.a., '97 

Clara A. Bingham (Collins), /.a., '99 

Cornelia I«, Brown, /.a., '84 

Frances J. Cheney, /.a., '72 ; j'.s.. "^ 

g,A., '89 

AUonB. Darby, /.a., '96 

Henry A. Dickinson, l.a., '82 

Bmory A. Didama, m.,'9S 

Kate M. Foster (Somberger), l.a., *7* 

Asa G Henry, m., '74 

David Keppe1,^.a., '92 

Warren L. Loope, /., '98 

Lulu M. Ticknor./.a., '00 

Charles D. Vemooy, m., '92 

Cozsackie 

Grace M. Church, y.a., '01 
Crown Point 

Mary B. Burdick, l.a,, '89 



GBOORAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION 



483 



tw York — Continued 



,. Caldwell (Banning), /.a.. '96 



ce A. Nottingham, /.a., '02 
, RoUo (Wood). /.a., '92 
. Wood, /.a., "92 



in Rouse, /.a., '93 

le 

{. Frame, m., '44 

n L. Harris, /.a., '86 
Voak. /.a.. '01 

1. Piper, /.a., '02 

r W. Roscnberry, /.«., '96 

A. Marks, /.a., '98 

• W. Brundage, in., '46 



arion Smith, /.a., '03 
I R. Sweetland, /.a., *02 
ick P. Webster, /.a., '99 



J. Bond, /.a., '03 

d M. Sawyer, /.a., '69 

rlUe 

sM. Williams, /.. '97 

mllton 

If. Darling, /.a., '00 

«th T. Conklin (Dowding). /.a., '98 

ray 

s D. Skinner, /.a ., '03 

iasfield 

A. Weed, /.a., '02 



;. Bedell, /., '99 
. Gary, /.a., '94 
nin P. Chase. IN.. '81 
and I). Br way, m., '83 
nt W. Marsh, m., '91 

Ic 

I. Traver,/.a., '93 



J. Loreland (Ridgeway), /.a., '98 
B. Ridgeway, /.a., '99 

e A. Wood (Partridge), /.a., '98 

« 

ret M.Clark, /.a., '91 
E. Elden, /.a., "03 
\ S. I^ankton, a.x., '03 



Bldred 

Ralph W. Allen, /.a., '98 

BUenbnrff Depot 

Dennis D. Daly, in., *oi 

Blliabiirc 

William McD. Halsey, Jr , iw., '02 

Blmhiirst 

George H. Kingsbury, /.a., '93 

Blsnlra 

Frederick S. Ay res, /.a.. '80 

Elisabeth M. Disbrow (Gould), /.a., '64 

John C. Dyott^ Jr., /., '98 

George H. Hatgh, /.a., '93 

Frederick T. Keeney, /.a., '86; Hon., *oi 

Rose I. Levy (Bloch), /.fl.. '98 

Boyd McDowell, /.a., *8i 

Edmund M. Mills,jr.a.. '78 

Reuben D. Munser, /.a., '61 ; hon,^ '97 

Ray W. Niver./.rt., '98 

Louis L. Psrkhurst. m., '67 

Carrie E. Pitkin (McDowell), /.a., '81 

Winifred Rogers, /.a., '96 

Lillie S. Smith, I, a., '91 

Esther B. Steele, hon.^ '9a 

Jessie K. Symonds (Mason), /.a., '94 

Daniel D. vanAUen, ^.a., '91 

Bltnwood Park 

Prank L. Hall, in., '72 
William H. Manchester. /., '97 

BrieTille 

Harvey S. Kelly, /.a., '99 

Bmclid 

Garrison L. Brown, in., '78 

Fabltts 

Frederick M. Williams, /.a., '97 

Fair HaTeti 

Myrtle E. Brewster, /.o., '98 
Albert L. Hall, iM.,'79 

PalnrlUe 

Charles W. Herman, /.a., '87 

Falconer 

Pearl R. Jewell, /.a., '95 

Fartnlttgdale 

James F. Michel, m., '86 

Fawns 

LeRoy S. Stowc.^.a., '84 

Fayette 

C. Anna J Brown (Mrs ), »f ., '97 
Lura B. Emens, /.a., '03 

FayetteTlUe 

Clarence W. Austin, /., '98 
George J. Bryan, m., '98 
Ella L. Chapman,, /.a., '91 
Mary E. McKinley, /.a., '02 
Henry G. Thrall, in., '01 

FlahkiU 

Edgar A. Lowther, /.a., '02 

Iva Lowther Peters (Mrs.), /.a., 'oi 



484 



GBOGRAPHICAI, DISTRIBUTION 



Nbw York — Continued 

Fiahkill-on-Httd son 

Elias S. Osbon, La , '75 

Flttshiaff, T4, I. 

Antoinette L. Brown (Strickland), /.a., 

•00 
Edith I«, Kinney, /.a., '01 
Jason B. Parrish, /.a., '02 

ForestTille 

Franklin S. Thorpe, ^.o., '89 ; ^.a., '90 

Port Kdward 

Ruth K. Russum, /.a., '03 

Frankfort 

Ethel Daisy Bowles, /.a., '03 
Gene Ethel Markham, /a., '03 
P. Ernest Turtelot, i.e., '87 

FranklltiTUle 

Monroe G. Cheney, I. a., '70 
Ada C. Holmes, / a., '94 
Hamilton Terry, I. a., '87 

Fredofila 

George G. Miner, l.a., '80 

Free-rille 

John B. Rogers, /.a., '89 

Ftilton 

George B. Deuel, i.a , '84 

Harriet M. Doane, m., 'q6 

Anna t,. Flint, la., '02 

Clifford I«. Gladman, /., '03 

F. M. Andrews Goodjon (Mrs.)./.rt., '94 

Charles M. t,ee, m., '50 

Archibald Lindsay, l.a., '03 

Leila M. Ferine (Sawtelle). /a., '97 

Edwin R. Redhead, i.a., '74 

Clinton J. Taft, l.a., 03 

OaUttpTUle 

Ducan M. Schell, l.a., '83 
Oenera 

Charles D. Bean, l.a., '85 

Mattie B. Caldwell (Congdon), l.a., '97 

Herbert U. Eddy, w, '68 

Avery A. Gannett, l.a., '01 

James C. Knapp, l.a., '79 

Claude C. Lytie, m., *oo 

David C. Munroe, l.a., '91 

Mary E. Preston, l.a., '64 

Oeorsretown 

Bessie M. Hawks, l.a., '00 

OilbertSTille 

Mathew L. Dann, l.a., '02 

Mary S Trowbridge (Watkins), l.a., '92 

Frederick H. Watkins, l.a., '92 

Olen CoTe 

Alice O. Pratt, l.a., '01 

Oleas FalU 

Eva M. Bryan, l.a., '99 

OloTersTllle 

Melvin H. Fuller, m., '93 
Henry H. Murdock, la., '85 
Stephen A. Vickery, l.a., '95 



Gorhaflu 

Alexander D. Allen, m.. '80 

Ooshca 

Guy H. Baskerville, l,a„ '9s 
Clara M. Morgan, /.a., *oa 

GonTeaettT 

Elisabeth A. Cunningham, l.a.. '03 
Charles L. Peck, l.a., '95 
Cora E. Soper, l.a., '02 

Gowanda 

Everett C. Countryman, l.a., '89 
Ruth A. Eastwood (Hutchinaon),/4., ' 
Bennett W. Hutchinson, kon., '01 

GranTlUe 

Edith M. Cobb, l.a., '01 

Jeanette F. Graham (Statham), La.. *97 

George K. Statham, La., '90 

Greene 

Mary G. Gardner, La., *02 

Greenfield 

William Colden. La., 76 

Greenwich 

Katharine Hulst, La., '96 

Groton 

Howard I. Andrews, La., '96 
Florence L. Bamey,/.a.. '97 
Elmer E. Smilev, La., '85 ; ken., '99 
Roscoe C. Tarbell, m., '01 

Hamilton 

Carlos T. Coleman. /., '99 
Herbert H. Hawkins, / a., '88 
Marguerite B. Risley, La., '02 

Hammondaport 

Moses T. Babcock, m., '5a 

Hancock 

Ruby E. Robinson, La., '01 

Hannibal 

Frederick Maunder, la., '97 

Harford 

Charles B. White, m,, '97 

HarlemTille 

John I. Becker, La., '01 

Harperarille 

Ezekiel Guy, m., '67 

Herkimer 

Maurice Fikes. /., '97 

Wilhelmine Hagerman (Horrocks), 1^ 

Anna R. Hart, La., '99 

Schuyler F. Herron, La., '94 

Edna E. Miller, /.a., 'oa 

Warner Miller, Aon.. '91 , 

Camilla Quackenbush (Chrismsn). m^ 93 

HUladale 

Osmon P. Hoyt, La., '93 

Hill View 

Charles E. Hamilton, La., '98 



GBOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION 



485 



rw York— Continued 

N. Henderson, /., '03 

*Atetit 

nc A. Davies, i.a., '03 



I. Green, m., '82 
I B. Morse, I.a., '81 

Palls 

Abbott (Shepard). /.a., '92 
W. Holden, i.a., 'oi 
Shepard, I.a , '92 
'oemans (Holden), /.u., '00 

^AllS 

, Harrey, I.a., '00 

Ule 

B. Brown, I.a., '78 
; R. Knapp, I.a., '03 
McMahon, i.a., '02 
ticbardson, iui., '02 
Sherman (Shults). /.a., '98 
L Stevens, /.a., '03 
k E. Walton, i.a., '93 

L« 

! D. Van Alstine (Yard), /.a., '97 
H. Yard, I,a., '97 



Waldo, «., '97 
f. Wendell, /., '03 

Pnlkerson. i.a., '03 



W. Hunt, i.a,, '68 

:. Rolison (Hunt), i.a., '62 

>n-the- Hudson 

[ngham, i.a., '86 

Wixom, m., '46 

Boynton, Aon., '03 
B. Brown, i.a., '98 
GuUel!, /.a., "80 ;/.« , '82 
uire (Gutsell). f.a., '82 

le 

Chase, m., '56 



Footc. /.a.. '02 

. Keyser, i.a,, '72 ; g.a., '81 

Fletcher, /.a., '88 
Jones, I. a., '02 
obinson (Alray), m.,'70 

'. Finney, i.a., '94 

le 

. Alford, /.a., 00 
1. Jakway, /.a., '93 



Jolmatowii 

KateL. Burdick, /.a., '99 
Laura H. Young, /.a., '03 

Jordan 

Elizabeth E. Maynard, /.a., '01 

JordanTllle 

Adam Miller, m., '44 
Edgar C. Swift, m., '81 

Junina 

Edna A. Andrews (Oftrander), i.a., '98 
Charles T. Ostrander, w., '00 

KelloffffaTllle 

Olin R.Howe, /.a., *82 

William A. Strohmenger, wi., '90 

Kendall 

Nellie A. Tooke (Woodmancy), f.a., '08 
hodc D. Woodmancy, /.a, '98 

Kenwood 

Hilda H. Noyes, «., 'oi 

Klnff Perry 

Trafton L. Hatch, «., 'oi 

Klnra Park 

John R. Harding, m., '93 

Kingston 

Arthur C. Connelly, i.a., '88 
Daniel J. Connelly, m., '88 
John D. Eckert, i.a,. '79 
Elwood W. Shafer, i.a., '03 

Kirkvllle 

Miltoa A. Curtiss, m., '78 

KIrkwood 

George E. Pierson, m.,'71 

Knozboro 

Helen M. Dodge (Ferguson), i.a., '76 
l^acona 

Elizabeth C. Miller. /".a., 'oo 

Lake Oeofffe 

Mabel E. West, i.a., '98 

I^akealdc 

Elizabeth F. Nusbickel (Van Slyke), i.a., 

Oakley E. Van Slyke, i.a., '00 

i^aaaellaTille 

Alanson C. Houghton, /., '03 

IreonardsTillc 

Roy K. Sheffield, i.a., '03 

Laura I. Stone, i.a., '95 

Julia H. Stowell (Stone), i.a., '99 

Xrestcrahlre 

Solomon P. Allen, m., '67 
Bennett D. Brown, i.a., '94 

lirewlaton 

Joseph P. Behm. i.a., 02 



486 



GROGRAPHICAI, DISTRIBUTION 



Nbw York — Continued 

I^lberty 

Bmma S. Cook (Dann). La.. *q8 
Harvey M. Dann. /.a., '98 
Irma M. Schoepflin, I. a , '03 

Gedney S. Banter, /.a . '70 

La Payette Congdon, l.a., '67; jf.fl., '83; 

hon., '88 
Alexander A. Phelps, l.a., '60 

I^lttle PalU 

May K, Brown (Torrey), /.«., '93 
Wm. H. Kirkwood, l.a., '02 
William D. Manih, l.a., '79; hon., '02 
John A. Randolph, a.s., *03 

];iTenH>ol 

Weslev D. Tisdale, /.a., 'ci 

Luther L. Weller. /.. '99 

Clara E. Wyker, /.a., '98 ; ga., '03 

J^lTOflia 

Martha A. Beecher, l.a., '94 

XfOckc 

Albert C. Knapp, m., '96 
JayN. Taft, /.a., '79 

J^ockwood 

Pestus M. Chaffee, m., '02 

LofiR Island City 

Menro W. Herriman, m., 'Hi 

lK>well 

Robert W. Skinner, l.a., '01 

];rOWTille ^ 

Dillon A. Cady, l.a., '00 
Orln E. Page, l.a., '03 
William H. Perry, l.a., '93 

l^yons 

Mary L. Collini (Logan), l.a., '87 
Thaddeus W. Collin?, l.a , '55 ; '56 
Frederick H. NuRbickcl. l.a., '03 
Sarah E. Veedcr,/.a., '96 

Madlaoti 

Charles S. Root, l.a., '01 

Mahopac Mlnea 

Peter A. Anderson, /., '03 

Maine 

Sidney K. Hunt, l.a., *oi 

Malone 

Edgar D. Congdon, l.a., 01 
Laura M. Latimer, l.a , '00 
Julian H. Myers, la., '79; g^.a., '93: 

£'a.. *95 
Ella M. Rich (Hodge), f'.a., '02 
Albert C. Wells, f.a , "Si 
Floy P. Whitney, /.a., 'oi 
Stacy D. Williamson, m., '01 



Manlina 

Charles B. Curtiss, m., '03 
Newton H. Curtiss, m., ^jk 
Ernest F. George, /.a., '02 
Charles W. Lanning, m., '98 
Mary E. Reed, /.a., '93 
William Verbeck, hon., '97 

Manorkill 

Damon A. Hagadorn, l.a., '00 

Marathon 

Philetus M. Heifer, l.a., '02 

Marcellna 

Edwin B. Mott, l.a., '96 
Ploy Thomas (Rixon). l.a.. '01 
Howard L. Rixon, /.a., '88 

MarffaretTiUe 

Alexander G. Jackson, l.a., '01 

Marilla 

Sarah L. Jackman (Gregory), l.a., '54 
John W. McGavern, la., '98 

Marion 

Jane B. Garlock, l.a., '98 



Stephen S. Cobb, l.a., *8} 
Clara B. Knapp, l.a., '99 

Matteawan 

Earlman Fenner, l.a., '90 

McDonouch 

George 8. Weaver, m., '82 



Joseph L. Gillard, l.a., '89 



Charles A. Boyce, m., '79 

MeckanicTiUe 

Marie S. Carey, la., '98 
Robert Ftazier, l.a., '98 
Parrington L Mead. /.a., '78 
Lillian M. Mead, l.a,, '02 

Medina 

Mabel M. Allis, l.a,, '00 

Memphis 

Clinton T. Brando w. m., '98 
Charles N. Thomas, l.a., *02 



Arthur B. Sanford, Iiom.. 'ht, 

Manchester 

Charles Eddy, l.a., '60; htm., '02 



Lena L. Hoose (Markham). l.a., '99 

John E. Linquest,/., 'ox 

Vincent S. Orvis, / ; '01 

Louis UeL. Pulsifer, m., *oo 

Mary M. Sandhovel (Whitney). /J 

Ross L. Simons, /., '02 

Wsrren L. Wet more, m., '96 

Middlesex 

Charles F. Walters, / a.. *03 
Middletown 

William A. Wilson, l.a., *86 
Millbrook 

William W. Wilcox, l.a., \^ 
Millerton 

George F. DuBois, l.a., '02 



GBOORAPHICAI, DISTRIBUTION 



487 



£w York — Continued 



a 1,. Spooner, /.a., '76 



m G. Atwell, l.a., *86 



r B. Rood, M., '89 
f L. Rust, m., '00 



t Bell, IN., *4S 



Frederick A. Miller, l.a., *oo 
Harry M. Stacy, /.a., '00; /., 'oa 



'. Ctailer, iw., 'oo 
y W. Sayer, »«., '03 

llo 

►eth V. Darrow, /.a., '03 

FaUs 

C. Pistaer (Barton). Im., '69 
r H. Norton, /^., '99 
If. Quirk, IN., '94 
B Reddick, /.a., '99 

a L. BUine (White), /.a., *86 
rd D.White, /.a., '85 

1. Rodger, /.a., '01 

1 H. Carr, /.a., '94 

Ulc 

2, Culligan, l.a., '91 

1 P. Norton, ^.a., '88 

I B. Norton (Brown), l.a., '82 

e 

ette A. Morton, /.a., '95 

Eonia 

min S. Coffin, /.a., '66 

ser H. Latimer, /.a., '67 ; Aon., '96 



m A. Hammond, l.a., '01 
M. Mains (Strong*, l.a., '96 
r B. Strong, m., '918 

MM. Bddy, l.a., '84r 
es H. Kelly, m., '50 
A.Mattison./.a..'93 
R. Sheffield, l.a., '00 
ic B. Woodwortb, l.a., '93 
itns A. Young, l.a., '76; w., '79 

▼alley 

im J. Burr, m., '45 

rlltt 

beth S. Burrows, l.a., '01 

ghtwut ]^« I- 

kc HiUyer, l.a., '94 

Kit 

lie Claire Bond, l.a., '03 
im H. Kelly, Ami., '97 
or MacAUister, m,, '89 



New Hope 

Wesley A. Pratt, /.«., 



'88 



New Palis 

Bugene Bouton, g,a,, '8a 

Newport 

Ulysses G. Williams, m., '9a 

New Rochelle 

Saul O. Curtice, jT.a., '91 

New South Berlin 
Jay D. I«ester, /.a., '00 

New York City 

Mary B. Alderdice, /.a., 'oa 

Nellie J. Allen, l.a., '95 

Bdward G. Andrews, kon., '63 

Helen F. Avery, /.a., '99 

Steven B. Ayres, l.a,. '03 

Frank G. Banister, l.a., '88 

James Y. Bates, hon., '96 

Cora M. Bowman, l.a., '93 

Jesse L. Bronner, l.a., *S$ 

William L. Bttlkley,ir-a., '03 

Bdward W. Burdick, /., '96 

William C. Burdick, l.a., '89 

Kate S. Burr, /.a., '83 

Nicholas M. Butler, ham., '98 

Samuel P. Cadman, Aon., '98 

Samuel B. Caldwell, l.a., '94 

Leon A. Carley, l.a., '9a 

Isora C. Swartz Chandler (Mrs.), /.a., '84 

Jean F. Chauveau, m.. '53 

Martha B. Churchill, l.a., '96 

layman W. Clary,/.*., '99 

Charles I«. Clement, m., '7a 

Anna I«. Cole, I. a., '94 

Ralph M. Comfort. /.a., '93 

George H. Corey, kon., '81 

James H. Cornell, Jr., /., 'oa 

Charles C. Creegan, hon., *86 

Wesley I*. Curtis, a.s., 'oa 

Albert H. Damon, l.a., 'oa 

William W. Damon. /.a., '87 

MaryA. Day, /.a., '89 

JST w. Dounce, iw., 'oo 

Bdmund I«. Dow, l.a., '9a 

iohn C. Draper, Jr., l.a., '8a 
^ranees H. Dunn (Brock way), /.a., '91 
Homer J. Baton, hon., '79 
George P. Bckman, hon., '01 
Charles t,. BlUott, f.a., '96 
Blisabeth t,. Poote, l.a., *88 
Celia Ford, /.a., 'S^ 
Agnes B. Foster. /.a., '87 
Bmest t,. Fox, l.a., '81 
Sylvia 1,. Pox. l.a.. '84 
Henry R. Fuller, /.a., '83 
Charles A. Gardiner, f.a., '83 
George G. Groat, l.a., '95 
Mae B. Hall (Smith), /a.. '96 
Franklyn P. Hammond, l.a., '00 ; /m., 'ox 
Frank w. Hargitt, l.a^ *oo 
Janet N. Harris, t.a., '01 
Clarence F. Haviland, m., '96 
Frank R. Haviland, m., '03 
Minnie P. Heermans, l.a., '99 
William J. Henry, l.a., 'ox 
Stephen J. Herben, hon., '97 
Homer D. House, l.a., 'oa 
Clarence B. Howard, /.«., 'oa 



488 



GBOGRAPHICAI* DISTRIBUTION 



New York — Continued 

Vew York Qitr— Continued 

Harvey M. Hubbard, l.a.,*9^ 

Jesse it. Hurlbut, kon., '83 

Miles G. Hyde, m., '68 

William H. Ives, la.. '91 

Edward C. Jenkins, l.a,, '00 

Carrie P. Jenninjcs./.a., '89 

I^ucy C. Jones, m., '98 

William B. Kelly, l.a., '00 

Jonathan 8. Lawrence, m., '47 

Cora B. Lyon (Read), /.a., '85 

Charles A. Mack, m., '98 

Edgar S. Maclay, /.a., '86 ; ^.a., '88 

Georse P. Mains, hon., '89 

Prank J. Marion, l.a., '90 

Harry N. Marvin, l.a., '83 

Albert P. Miller, m., '97 

Robert J. Mix. l.a., '79 

Henry P. Mott, ^.«., '78 

Fred W. Noble, l.a.. '99 

Maurice Pakelnlshky (or Packard), l.a., 

'96 
Abraham J. Palmer, hon., '85 
Alfred H Parsons, l.a., '01 
Frederick J. Perrine, /.a., '94 
Prank S. Perry, l.a., '00; /.. '02 
Raymond W. Phelps, /.a., '02 
Mary I. Philp, l.a., 'oi 
Franklin Pierce, l.a., '79 
Mabel A. Potter (Daggett), /.a., '95 
Samuel A. Potter, /., '02 
Elmer J. Read. /.a.. '86 
Major Fred Reed, I. a., '01 ; /.a., '03 
lone A. Reynolds, l.a., *oo 
Sumner Rhoades, l.a., 'oa 
Cora May Rhodes (Henry), /.a., '01 
William C. Robson. l.a., '01 
George H. Rockwell, jw., 'oi 
Walter K. Root, l.a., '02 
Frances A. Sager (Scrafford),/.a , '01 
Aaron K. Sanford. hon., *82 
Bertha 8. Sawyer (Ives), l.a., '91 
Genevieve M. Scovillc,/.a., '98 
Marguerite E. Scovillf,/.a., '98 
Delmar R. Shafer, l.a., '02 
Fred W. Sherwin,/a., '9a 
F. Mather Smalley, l.a., '98 
David E. Smith, l.a., '81 ; jftf -, '87 
Frederick W. Smith, m , '03 
Martha E. Smith (Gillies), l.a., '95 
Lora O. Snider, l.a., '96 
Richard J. Stanton, m., '83 
George B. Stevens, l.a., '03 
Nellie A Sweet (Lawlor),/.a., '85 
Albert G. Thorne, l.a., '9^ 
Erwin L. Thorpe, ^.a., '85 
Esra 8 Tipple, l.a., '84 ; gM., '85 ; g^.a., 

*86; hon., '99 
Francis E. Trowbridge, l.a.. '82 
Lrucien M. Underwood, l.a., '77; ^ a., '78 • 

^.Am '79 
Wm. H. VanBenschoten, l.a., '94 
Henry R. Waite, hon., '76 
F. Louise Warr, l.a ., '94 
Theudore L. Waugh, l.a., '98 
Charles C. Wheeler, la.. '57 
Edwin T. Whiffen, l.a., '99 
Solomon C. Whitbeck l.a., '97 
Francis A. Woodward, l.a., '78 

New York M UU 

Daniel M. Lewis, l.a., '9< 

Jessie M. Noulton (Lewis), l.a., '95 

Henry H. Porter, m., '41 



HlAiTAni Falls 

Walter A. Scott, m., '9a 

North ChiU 

Richard L. Robinson, l.a., '76 

North Cohoctoti 

Noyes K. Fowler, l.a., '72 
Olney A. Retan, l.a,, *86 

North Norwich 

James V. Lewis, m., '61 

Northport 

Sara L. Bartow, /.a., '02 
Henry O. Smith, /., '03 

North Tarrytowfi 

John G. Oakley, tr.a., '81 

Northwestern 

C. Win field Porter, la., '84 

Norwich 

Eugene H. Hickok. /.. *a8 
Thomas F. Manley, iw, '01 
Robert H. Phelps, m., '94 
Maude E. 8outhworth. Im., '00 
Carolyn M. Spencer, l.a., '01 

Nyack 

ChrisUbel Abbott, l.a., '95 

Offdenatmrc 

George F, Darrow, l.a., '76 

Olcan 

Cornelius H. Bartlett, m.. '49 
Clifford E. Branch, l.a., *03 
Arthur B. Davis, la., "c% 
Hattic V. Luther (Davis), l.a., *^ 
Warren W. Smith, l.a., 'oi 

OtieidA 

Georgia M. Allen, /.a., '03 
Mary Z. Barrett (Sta ley). /.«.. *oo 
Martha C. Carter. /.«.. '02 
Lavinia R. Davis, m., *q6 
Frank C. Drake, m., '86 
Mary A. Fuller (Fearon), l.a., '86 
Merchant B. Hall, /., '03 
Irma W, Hard, I. a., '03 
Leola S. Jenny, l.a., '03 
Hugh Parker, l.a., '84 
Justina W. Reynolds, l,a., '02 
Avery W. Skinner, l.a., '9a 
George R. Staley, l.a., *oo 

Onconta 

Austin Griffin, hon., *94 

Ella M Pardoe (FordX fa., '86 

Juliette M. Toll (Blakely), /ui., 'n 

OnondAfA VAlley 

Vincent K. Barker, l.a., '02 
S. Ellis Crane, in., '02 
George M. Haight, la., '01 
Dewitt S. Hooker, l.a., '87 
Charlotte M. Janes, /.a , '96 
George M. Janes, La., *oi 

Orchard PAtk 

Pii-ir 7i II ett, *•., '76 



GBOGRAPHICAI* DISTRIBUTION 



489 



5w York — ConHnued, 



O. Bridgmmn, /.a., 'ox 



R. Allen, m., '01 



;I. Abbott, /.a., '88 
dP. Clark, m., '99 
n Hartel, La., '92 
we Irwin, Jr., »i., '03 

C. Ixracks, /.a., '80 ; g.a.^ '91 ; ^.«., 

T. Mixen, A, '01 

D. O'Brien, m., *oo 

• L. Phelps, /.«., '00; /.«., '02 
1. Poucher, Aon., '02 
Ripton (Aiken), /.a., '02 
ide A. Shepherd, /.«., '94 
1 H. Shepherd, »t., '96 
m C. D. Todt, m.y '87 



on R. Heaton, m., '64 
■d J. Smith, l.a , '77 
s C. Stiles, OT.. '65 
L. Storm. /.a., '98 
>r M. Terwilliger, l.a., '98 
B. Tilbury, /.a., '95 



e C Stone, /.a., '03 

ay, i;. I. 

M. Nozon, /.a., '02 

irk, l4» I- 

m M. Panton, La., '92 

[oUow 

• H. Green, m., '59 



rickD. Stone, «., '03 



rine Beal, /".a., '76 
. Hennessy, m 
Smith, OT., '85 



»»u^ >««.«>, /.w., /w 

ml. Hennessy, w., '81 
sH. " 



imH. Hall, /.a., '76 

lie 

n 8. Parker, m., '41 

' V. Boyd, /.a., '03 

es B. Doubleday, m., '87 

1 1^ Lowell (Hammond), La., '94 

f R. Sanford, /.a., '6t 

.Smith, /.a., '68 



A. Stowell (Hard), La., '65 

Ll« 

B P. Precbom, La. , '03 



et S. Seager (Gifford). La., '79 



Vera H. Beaman, Ixi., *02 
Theron R. Green. La., '80 
Ruth V. Hawks, La., '02 
Horace W. B. Smith, La., 'oi 
May Van Doren, La.. '02 
Ruth I«. Ward, /.a., 'ck> 
Ralph A. Wilcox, m., '98 
Daniel P. Young, La., '86 

Plttsford 

Charles M. Doyle, /., '03 

PlattekUl 

Blijah Osterhoudt, m., '96 

PlatUbttrir 

Charles V. Grismer, kon., '00 
Mary D. MacKensie, Im., 'oa 
Charles S. Robertson, La„ '89 

Plymouth 

Albert H. Bvans, m., '02 

Potnpey Hill 

Mary M. Warnc,/.a., '96 

PortAce 

Benjamin T. Kneeland, m., '51 

Port Gibson 

Ada B. Parker, La., '91 

PortjArris 

John M. Dolph, La., '7a 
David D. Wickham, m., '75 

Potsdam 

Byron B. Brackett, La., '90 

Olin B. Coit, Hon., '96 

Warren Mann, La., '72 

Thomas B. Stowell, La., '65 ;^.a., '81 

PoQcbkecpale 

Caroline H. Crawford, /.a., '87 
George T. Hargitt, La., '02 
Ida Belle Tallcott, La., '03 

Pongliqiiaff 

Hugh S. I/>wther, La., '99 

Prattaburff 

Robert J. Scott, iw., '88 

Preble 

Prank B. Duvall, La., '02 
Herman D. Hunt, m., '74 

Pttlaaki 

Amelia G. Bush (Guile), La., '65 

Pulteaey 

John A. Gardner, La., '91 
,yman M. Nichols, m., '58 

Pttrdy'a Station 

Charles S. Oakley, g.a., '95 

Qneenaboro 

Justus I,. Buckley, Jr., m., '00 

Rainbow 

John S. Tack,/.*., '94 
Raritan 

BthelberU Timbrell (Schuyler). / o., '97 



t 



490 



GBOORAPHICAI, DISTRIBUTION 



New York — Continued 



Henry J. Ackerman, /.a., 'oi 



Edward B. Samuel, l.a., *9i 



Fred W. Manley, *•., '97 
Payson B. Pierce, /.a., '99 

Rezford Plata 

I«ewis B. Carter, l.a .« '03 

Richfield Sprlaffs 

BUsabeth H. Goodalf , f.a., '02 
Nettie C. Hall. La., *o2 
Albert H. Watkins, /.a., *o2 
Clara K. Watkins, /.n., 'C2 

Richmond Hill, i;. I. 

Gerrard S. Johnaon, /., '03 

RiTcrhead, i;. I. 

Frederick J. Shackleton, l.a., *8i 

Rochcatcr 

Myron B. Adams, /.a., '98 

Wm. M. Bates. l,a., *63 

Stewart S. Bibbens, m.. '93 

Peter B. Bradley, /.a., '57 

James I*. Brewer, l.a., '93 

William H. Briggs, m , '46 

Frances 8. Case (Morse), /.a., '63 

Laura S. Congdon (Hebaru),/.a., '81 

Horace A. Crane, l.a., '85 

NetU A. Currey (Fuller). /.«., '84 

Harriet 8. Curtis, /.a.. '76 

Harriette A. Curtiss, l.a., '00 

J. Wood Day, m., •7* 

Henry W. Dean, «., '41 

James H. Denois, /.a., '60 

iohn Dennis, Hon., '71 
Lichard H. Dennis. :.a., '71 
Fred 3. Dutton, l.a , '95 
Charles B. Fitch, g.a.^ ^75 
Wilbur F.Flint, /.a., '61 
A. Blair Fracee, m, *82 
John N. French, a.*., '03 
Porter M. French, l.a., '70 
Louis B. Fuller, l.a., '82 
Isaac Gibbard, l.a., '59 ; Aoic., '80 
Benjamin F. Gilkeson, m., '41 
Sylvia Foote Gosoell (Mrs.), ^.o.,'96; 

#.«.» "97 
John T. Gracey, Aon ., '82 

Charles B. Hamilton, l.a., *86; Hon., '01 

Henry M. Hill, l.a., '72 

Bleecker L. Hovcy, »i., '42 

E. H. Howard, AoM., '03 

Herbert B. Jackman. l.a,, '03 

Edwin C. Mason, l.a., '88 

Ann Isabel Moore, l.a., '03 

Heman W. Morris, La., '72 

William W. Nichols, /.a., '94 ; /., '97 

i. Davis Ozmun, in.. *88 
. Clinton Peet, /.a, '76 
(Tilliam W. Percy, iw., '01 
Barton W. Perry, g.a., '96 
Sarah G. Pierson, m„ '03 
Darwin Potter, m., '60 
Eva D. C. Potter (Remington). La,, '88 
Byron I. Prestoo, irr., '68 
wheelock Rider, m., '85 
Lowell Lincoln Rogers, /.a., '89 



Rochester— C^fs/iflMf^tf 

Ida L. Sazton (Wilcox), La., '93 
Charles S. Seager. /.a., '80 
Othello H Stevens, /.a.. '60 
Olive L. Strayrr (Caughey , /.«., '% 
Joseph W. Taylor, /.a., '77 
Zachary P. Taylor.^. a., '85 
Arthur W. Thomas, m , '95 
Myrtle B. Thomson, La., '04 
George W. Weaver. Im., '76 
John E. Weaver, La., '72 
Melville R. Webster, Hon., '8? 
Francis A. Welch, /.a., '85 ; ■>., y 
Cornelia B. White (Thomas), si., '95 
Oeorfre H. White, m., '97 
Milford J. Whiteside, /.«., '94 
Bmily B. Wooden, La., "66 
Marion Wright, /.a., '00 

Rock City Palla 

Leonard A. Bard, La , '99 



Mary A. Bingham (Willonghby), U 
Helena Evans, /.a., *oi 
Homer W. Harris. La., 'oa 
Jane S. Higbam. la., '76 
Lydla G. Huff, l.a., 'oa 
William M. Hydon. La., '00 
Frank W. Rirkland,/.«.. '9a 
Thomas G. Nock, in.. '83 
William B. Reid. in.. '96 
J. Orley Stranahan. in., '96 
Bdward B. Topping, La., *94 
Mary M. White, La., '01 

Roae 

Robert C. Hebbethwaite. /.«.. 
g»a., '00 

Rottnd ^ake 

John W. Root. La,, 'oa 
Lalph B. Wager, La., 'oa 

RtMhville 

Carrie E. Green, f.a., *%2 
Jessie B. Jones (CarsonX fui.y '9a 

Sacketta Harbor 

K. Eugene Williams, at., '96 

Salaaaanca 

Thomas S. Bell, La., '9a 
Mailler O. Van Keuren, La., '99 

Salt SprinffTiUc 

Newman D. Waffle, La., '00 

Sandy Creek 

Frank D. Corse. La., '84 
Robert L. Crockett, m., '97 
Roscoe Sargent, /., '98 

Sandy Hill 

Lewis Sauerbrie, La., '9a 

Saranac Xrake 

Ellen M. Chapman. La., '00 
Clara V. McClelland, La., '(^ 
Francis H. Slater. /.. '03 

Saratoga Spriaca 

Margaret Freeman, La., *oa 
Florence B. Haanel./.a., '9; 
George W. Kennedy, La., "^7 
Roae Lewia,/^., '01 



GBOCRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION 



491 



BW Yoi^K — Continued 

b 

L Munfloo, la.. *7o 
M. Wood, /.a., '92 



id J. Banker, /.a., '9a 



ushinff (Hatmaker)./.a., '87 
rd Ir. HverM>n, a.s., *oo 
D. Hamden, m., '44 
m C. Kitcbin, la., 82; g.a.. '84; 

t 8. Lord, m., '90 

» B. Madden, /.a., '00 

C. Peet, a. J., '03 
a Pratt, l.a.,'02 

B. Reed, m., '76 
nio H. RiptOD, hon., '96 
rtC. Soole, a.*., '03 
ia Steers, at., '03 
rick J. M. Topping. /., '97 
BITelU, /.a., '8 1 
I H. Wells, /.a., '01 

le 

L. Rnlison, /.a.. '99 
. Rnlison, /.a., '03 

rrUlc 

Algire, /.a., '01 

. McBckron, /.a., '02 



S. Sexsmith, /.a., '03 
A. Chapman, /.a., '93 
min B. Loomis, /.a., '87 ; hon., '93 

or 

. ICagee, /.a., '03 
m G.Lacy, m., '41 
t Simpaon, Jr., /.a., '8x 

e W. Sargent, ai., '79 

tine W. Broadway, /.o., '84 ; g.a,, 

f.a., '86 

ion Chamberlain, /.a., *^ 

A. Gould, /.a., '00 

» G. Warren, /.a., '96 

1 

r B. Mason, /.a., *oa 

lie 

I D. Pace, /.a., '96 



n A Riker, /.a., *oi 

ia C. Ward, /.a.. '02 ; g.a.^ '02 



8idae7 Center 

Raymond W. Lowry, /.a., '92 

8ilTer 8prlaffe 

AddieM. Pharis (Duncan), /.a., '81 

8kaneetelee 

Minnie B. Hasbrook, /.a., '98 
Btta L Tolman. f.a.. '96 
Prank N. Westcoit./.a., '78 ; /.a., '79 
Herbert B. Wright, ai., '81 

81aterTllle Sprlace 

Charles H. Gallagher, m., '96 
William C. Gallagher, at., '63 

81oAneTllle 

Osmond I. Van Keuren, ai., 'ox 

8odiM 

Charles P. Hitchcock, /.a., '00 
Julius C. Hitchcock, /a., '61 
William H. Richardson, ai., '96 
Benton C. Rude, /.a., '58 
BUen Sargent Rude (Mrs.), Aaa., '76 

8olTe7 

George T. Boycheff, »., '98 
William A. Gere, /.a., '84 
Annie B. Hubble, /.a., '03 

Sonyea 

William T. Shanahan. ta., '98 

South Butler 

Mortimer P. Sweeting, ai., '50 

8outh Cetnbridce 

Brnest Ten Broeck, /.a., '93 

SpeedTille 

Albert G. Watkins, «., '98 

8peacer 

Bdward C. Hoskins, /.a., '77 

Speacerport 

Seymour C. Perris, /.a., '90 

8priai:field 

I/3uis I. Backus, /.a., *9S 

SprlaffTllle 

Nina H. Paxson, /.a., '96 

8tamford 

Mary E. Orr (Minan),/.a., '86 
Helen T. SUhlberger, /.a., 'oa 

StarkTille 

Vaughn C. Potter, ai., '60 

8t. JolmeTUle 

Ida L. Van Valkenburgh, /.a., '01 

8t. 8tcpliea« 

Gilbert H. Gregory, Hon., '85 

8ulllTAaTillc 

Prands Hawkins, m., '70 

* 

Summit Station 

Anna B. Webster (Greene), /.a., '89 



492 



CEOGRAPHICAI* DISTRIfiimON 



Nkw yo^K— Continued 

Oyracuae 

MaryE. Abbott, /.a., '88 

Albert J. Abeel, in., '97 

Hamilton X,. Aberdeio, a.j., '02 

Prances A. Adanii, m., '85 

Wilbur W. Alden. /.a., 'So ;^ «., '83 

Came M. Allen, /,a., '99 ;^.a., '01 

Bvelyn F. Allen, /a.. '99 

Katherine B. Allis, /.a , N^ 

Mary D. Allis, /.a.. '87 

John N. Alsever, /.a., '96 

w. Dewey Alsever, /.a., '96; »«., 'oo 

Belle Amduraky./.a., '00 

Gertrude I,. Andrews, /.a., '97 

Paul W. Arnold, /., '98 

Marcellus R. Atwell, /., '03 

Floyd B. Avery, /.a., '03 

George 8. Avery, lui., '96 

Grace E. Terry Avery (Mrs.), »w., '95 

Sarah O. Avery, l.a.,'^ 

Basil B. Aylesworth. l.a., '97 

William J. Ayling, m., '8a 

Florence E. Bailey (Crouse), /.a., '99 

I^ucy 8. Bainbridge, /.a., '90 

Nellie R. Bainbridge, f.a., '91 

I«ester S. Baker, /.a., *oa 

Prank B. Baldwin, /.a., 'oa 

Mary E. Barber,/a., '78 

James J. Barrett, /., '97 

Stephen Bastable, /., 01 

John L. Bauer, Jr., /.a., 'oi 

Charles W. Beadel, /.a., '94 

Conrad t,. Becker, Aon., 'oa 

James P. Becker, /.«., '88 

John D. Belknap, /.a., '79 

Francis R. Benham, m., '01 

Roberts. Benjamin, /.a., '00 

Charles H. Benson, m., '91 

William H. Berwald, hon., 'oa 

Welcome A. Betts, /., 'oa 

Harriet A. Blakeslee (Wallace). /.a., '84 

Orlow D. Blanchard, i.a., 'oc 

Andrew B. Blodgett, Aou., *oa 

Charles N. Blum, m., '97 

Oliver A. Blumenthal, m., '93 

John C. Boland. I.a., '99 ; /., 'oi 

George H. Bona, /.«., '94 ; /., '97 

DePorest H. Bonsted, /., '01 

Bertha Boomer (Brooks), /.a., '81 

Ella I*. Boomer (Howard), I.a., '83 

Mabel E. Boomer (Hodder), i.a., '95 

Eva M. C. Bom./.fl., '03 

Cora A. Brackett (Fischer), La., '90 

Vincent D. Brady, /.a., '99 ; /., '01 

Neal Brewster, /., 'oa 

George 8. Britten, m., '00 

George B. Broad, m., '96 

Clara E. Brockway (Spencer), /.a., '99 

Frank B. Brooks, m., '81 

James B. Brooks, Man., '95 

Ancil D. Brown, /.a., '03 

Berton W. Brown, /., '97 

Caleb C. Brown, /.a., '9(S 

Emma Brown, Im., '94 

Samuel R. Brown, ^. a., '97 

Susie D. Brown, La.. '94 

Eli C. Bruce, Aon., '8a 

Wm. Adam Biicheler, I.a., '03 

Harriet M. Budd (Wadleigh), I.a., '91 

Lewin F. Buell, kon., '03 

iohn J. Buettner, m., '06 
Loberi Burns, m., '97 
Grace E. Burpee, I.a., '99 
Charles P. Burrows, sv., '97 



BjTtietLBe— Continued 

Anna I. Byrne, I.a., '94 ; gM., '03 

Celia I. Byrne, I.a., '94 

Edward M. Byrne. A, '01 

Mary P. Call, la., *dS 

Richard G. Cathrop. A«it., '03 

Samuel R. Cathrop, kon., *oo 

Alexander J. Campbell, m., ^3 

George C. Carhart, a.s„ '03 

Florence E. Carpenter, /.«., '98 

Howard G. Case, m., '03 

Lucy C. Chapin, f.a., '98 

Levi 8. Chapman, /.a., '89 

Helen B. R. A. Chase, m., '95 

William D. Cheney, /., *o3 

John W. Church, /.a.. '96 ; /.. 'S* 

Julia E. Church, La., '07 

Gay lord P. CUrk, m„ '80 

Alice R. CUrke,/.a„ 'oa; l.a., '03 

John S. Clarke, w., '77 

P. Ware Clary, a,s., 'oa 

Dorr R. Cobb, La., '9a 

Frances A. Cobb (Siephenaon),/«., » 

Herbert G. Coddington, La., *» 

George P. Comfort, Aon., *93 

Mark E. Conan. /., 'oa 

Noyes B. Congdon, La., '7a 

Marguerite R. Conuelly,/^., *99 

Charles C. Cook, La., '91 

Harry E. Cook, in., '98 

Mabel L. Cook, /.a., '00 

Samuel H. Cook, La., 'oa 

George C. Oool, /., 'ox 

Clarence E. Coon, m., '98 

Mabel 8. Coon (Smallwood), /.a., 96 

Charles E. Cooncy, La., '97 : '•< '99 

Edith M. Cooney, La., '03 

B. Ives Cooper, /., '99 

Theron Cooper, iji., '64; A«"«t '» 

Arthur Copeland, La., '84 

H. Davenport Cornwall, /., *os 

Henry D. Coatello. L, '01 

Charles A. Covell. m., '94 

Harley J. Crane, La., '99 ; /.. *oi 

Samuel B Craton, m., *9i> 

Edward W. Cregg, La., '96 ; /., '98 

Frank J. Cregg, L, 'oa 

I«ena B. Crocker, /.a.. '98 

Lillian B. Crommie,/.a., '99 

Will B. Crowley. La., '89 

William A. Curtin, m., '87 

Edward D. Curtis, La., '03 

Eunice A. Curtis (Curtis). /.«., 'T* 

Prank L. Curtis, A4m.,*88 ^ 

Minnie E. Curtiss (Dinsmore), U., t3 

Eudelmer P. Cuykendall, La., '76 

Robert P. Dallas, /.a.. '78 

Amelia E. Dann (DeMott), m., '?• 

Henry Dansiger. Jr., La., '90 ; jr-s.. "T 

CUrence W. Darling, La., '00; £,*ot 

Walter W. Davis, in., '03 

Mary I. Day, /.a., '00 

Tennyson L. Deavor, ••., '97 

David O. Decker, La., '03 

Jessie Z. Decker,/.a., *8o 

Elisabeth G. De tany, /.«., *oo 

Frederick T. De Lany, La., 'oa 

Ernest R. Deming,/., '90 

Lucius P. Deming, m., 'Ba 

Edward Devlne, I.a., '91 

James Devine. /.a., '83 

Eda A. Dick,/.a., '01 

Henry D. Didama, kon., ^89 

Anne P. Dills (Avery), La., '01 

Carrie BC. Dixson, /m., '90 



GBOGRAPHICAI, DISTRIBUTION 



493 



V York — Continued 

Continued 

H. Dodd, La., '68 
>odson (Graham), /.a., '94 
. Dolaen, /., '98 
>orr, /.a., '00; /., 'oa 
Dougherty, /., '99 

OOUSt, IN., '87 

Doast, M., '00 
EI. Dower, in., '91 
C. DriacoU, /.a., '87 ; e.e., '9a 
Drum, m., '91 
. Dunn, m., '97 
[>. Bddy, La.t 'oa 
Bdgcomb, La., '89 
Sdwards, in., '74 
Bd wards. /., '03 
£gan, /.a., '00 
Itinge. /a., '94 
Brnenck, /.. '03 
r. Boffelhardt, m., '9a 
Bnaign, /.a., '78 
rharcT, in., 'oa 
Brnhont, /.a., '00 
Bverett, i.a., '83 
{▼erson, /.a., '81 

D. Pahae8tock,/.a., '00 
I Van D. Fahne8tock,/.a., '00 
Fanner, /.a.. '96 
Parrington, La„ '89 
ay, «., '93 
. Peigel, IN., '98 
i, Pelton, M., '98 
Perguson, La., 'oa 
. D. Fischer. La., '84 ; in., '95 
c H. Plaherty, iw., '96 
'oote, hon., '69; 'kon., '96 
ir. Poote, La., '87 
?. Foreman, m., 'co 
•I. Pournier, /., '97 
X,. French- La., 'oa 
rey. kon., ^oa 
rink, /.a., 'oa 
Pry, M., '81 
;,. Puller, La., '03 
Puller (Leete),/ a., '89 
B. Puller, /a., 85 
. Gaggin./.a., 'oa 
uxiner (Cooke), /.a., '86 
P. Gere, /.«., 'oa 
. Gere, /.a., "83; /., '98 
Gilbert, /.a., '75 
L Gilger(Spicer)./.a.. '82 
»lass (Blossom), La., '03 
)el. La„ 'oa 

;. Goodwin, /.a.. '00; m., '03 
Goulding. /.a., '96 
Gowing, La. . '00 
P.Graham, /.a., '93 
^ Gray, /., 'ox 
i. Groat, /.a., '97; /., '00 
Grossman, /., '98 
Guilfoyle, /.. '98 
Swynn (Wiley), La., '9a 
r. Haight, /., '01 
Eiatey,/.a., 'oo 
i. Hall, a.s., ^oa 
:. Hanchett. in., '84 
! B. Hancock,^ a., '86 
Harbottle, / a., '95 ; g.a., '96 
a. Harding, /., '98 
[arrington (Out), La., '8K 
e A. Harrington. /.a., '94 
. Harrington, /.a., '88 
Harris, in., '03 
art, m., '03 



Oyractuc — Continued 

Mary J. Hasbrouck, La., '00 

Caroline A. Hatch, iw., '77 

Delmer B. Hawkins, La., '94 ; /., '98 

Carl T. Hawlcy,/a., '94 

Hiram B. Hawley, m.. '93 

Myron J. Hay den, /., ^98 

George T. Head, in., '91 

ethn L. Heffron. in., '81 
ark Heiman, m., '97 
Brnest Held, kon., '03 
Royal I«. Henderson. La., '03 
Katherine N. Hewitt, La., 'oa 
ohn J. B. Hickey, /., '97 
rving J. Higbee. /., '03 



{ 

L. Earl Higbee, /., '99 
Bdna Hildreth, La., V 



09 
Everard A. Hill, La., '83 
Milicent A. Hinkley, La., '94 
Grove W. Hinman, /., '03 
William O. Hintermister, /., *oi 
Bertha Holden (Gilbert), La., '8a 
Bloise Holden (Nottingham). La., *8o 
Willis A. Holden, La., '80 
Albert H. Hollenbeck. La., *oi 
Barl Hollenbeck,/. a., '97 
Franklin J. Holzwarth, I.a., '87; g.a., '88 ; 

g-a-t '90 
Frederick S. Honsioger, m., '98 

Prank Hopkins, La., '79 

Blva L. Howard, La.. ^01 

Leon B. Howe, /.a., '98 

Francis A. Hulst, La., *oi 

Herbert D. Humphrey. /., '01 

Adeline B. Hunt, /.a., '00 

Frederick A. Hunt, in., '98 

Inring B. Hurst, /., 'oa 

Bdward C. Ide, /., '01 

Nathan Jacobson. iw., '77 

Mabel B.Jacoby (Johnson), /.a., '99 

Hebert R. Jaquay, /.. '99 

William A. Jenner, /.a., '90 

Anna 8. Johnson, /.a., '93 

Wm. Herbert Johnson, /., '03 

William R. Johnson, /., '01 

William Kast. /., '99' 

Miriam Kauffman, La., '03 

Martha A. Keefe (Phillips), La., '94 

Thomas B. Kennedy, /.. '97 

Chester C. Kent, /., 'oa 

Oscar C. Kenyon (or Kinyon) La., '8a 

Helen M. Keough,/.a. '09 

iulius H. Kevand, m., '98 
heodore J. Kieffer, iw.. '96 
Stella P. Kingsley (Wells), /.a., '9a 
B. Olin Kinne, La., '76 
George R. Kinne, m., '76 
Henrietta M. Rittell (Devoe), La., *86 
Harold Q. Kline, m.. '02 
Martin A. Knapp.^.a., '76 
Frederick H. Knoff, La., 'oa 
Frank P. Knowlton. m., '00 
Bdward H. Kraus, La., '9S;g.a., '97 
Albert B. Larkin, in., '97 
Saul R. La vine, /., '03 
Brnest W. Lawton, /., 'ox 
B. Bersie Lee. i.a., '96 
Harry G. Lee, la., *oo 
Harry S. Lee, La., '99 ; /., 'ox 
Frederick D. Leete, La., '89; kon., '03 
Anna B. Leonard, /a.. '90 
I. Harris Levy, la,. '90 ; m , '93 
Jacob J. Levy, / a . '00; m., '03 
T. Aaron Levy, La , '95 ; /., '97 

Jennie O. Lewis, La , 'oa 
I. Corinne Lewis, La., '98 



494 



GBOGRAPHICAI, DISTRIBUTION 



New York— Continued 

BjtBCume— Continued 

WillUm D. Lewis, /.a., '92 

WillUm F. Lewis, /.a., '99 ; /., '03 

Clarence A. Lonergon, /uz., *86 

Brace W. Loomis. m., '76 

Mary S. Loomis (Hutchinsoa), /.a., '91 

William C. Lowe, La., '03 

Henry M. McCarthy, /., '99 

iustm S. McCarthy, i.a. ♦03 
lav L. McChesney./.a.; 'oa 
William H. McClelland, /.a., '03 
Joseph R. McGowan, /.a., '96 
Theodore MacGregor, /.a., '02 
Marion Markham,/.a., '98 
Prank W. Marlow, m„ '85 
Minnie A. Mason (Beebc), i.a., '90 ; ^.a., 

Roderick N. Matson, /., '97 
Bdwin S. Maxson, la., '83 ; m., '86 
Albert J. May, i.a., '02 
William H, May, «., '90 
Eli D. Maybee./.a.. '02 
William H. Maynard, m., '83 
Prank L. Mead, I.a., '91 
Harriet Smith Mead (Mrs.),/.a., '91 
Joseph M. Meatyard, /., '01 
Peppino Melfi, m., *8o 
Alfred Mercer, *«., '45 
A. Clifford Mercer. «., '78 
Thomas H. Mesick, «.. 'oa 
WillisH. Michell. /a., '99 
Frank J. Miller, /., '97 
Francis T. Miller, /., '97 
Geotge A. Miller, /., '99 
Harriet M. Miller, f.a., '91 
Katharine R. Miller (Cobb),/.a.. '91 
Lillian M. Miller, m.) '03 
William H. Mills, «., '81 
Frederick W. Millspaugh, i.a., 'oi 
Nathan A. Monroe, m., '89 
Amelia L. Morgan (Dorr), i.a., 'oo 
Fannie D. Morgan, i.a., '02 
Fred L. Morgan, m., '96 
Henrv L. Morgan, i.a., '96 
Marshall E. Morris, ia., ♦90 
Arthur W. Morse. /., '01 
William J. Mulheran, «., 'oi 
Charles C. Mullin, m , '98 

iames F. Munn, m., '81 
>wight H Murray, m , '84 
Louise A. Murray m., '96 
Sr^r.^*^ ^' Myron, i.a., '01 ; /., '03 
William H. Neville. «., -03 
Frederick H. Nichols, m., '03 
Robert A Nicholson, /., '98 
Mabel E. Northrop, /a., '08 
Edwin Nottingham, iui.. '76 
H. Irving Nottingham, la., '97 
William Nottingham, i.a., '^ ; f.a., '77; 

g:.a., '78; hon., '03 
Rena r.. Oberdorfer,/a.. 'oo 
Oscar W. Oberlander, m, '81 
Martha B. O'Brien, /.a , 'oo 
Mary T. O'Bryon (Sibley), ia., •89;^.a./93 
Francis E. Oliver, /.a.. '91 ; /.. '01 "^ ' ^^ 
Stephen S. Ormsbee, /.. '03 
Laura E Osborne, i.a., '00 
Genevieve Ostrander (Porter), ia., '86 
SuRie 8. Over- i.a '99 
Edith M Packard, /.a., '97 
Edward N. Packard. hon.,'qi 
Laura T. Page (Flick). /a . '98 
MaymePakelni8hky,/,a.. '©V 
Charles L. Palmer, /.i^, 'oi 



BjrBCUB»—C»niinued 

Edith Palmer (Smith)./a., '93 
George A. Parker, hon., '93 
Mabel V. Parker, i.a., 'oo 
Bessie Parsons, I.a., 'oS 
Burton B. Parson, I., V^ 
Henry H. Pease, /.a., ^83; m., *86 
Henry A. Peck, I.a., '65; g^., >! 
Louis K. Peck, in., '9a 
William M. Peckham, /.. 02 
Nicholas W. Pendergast, m., *oi 
Alberta E. Perry, i.a., '99 
Albert E. Petrie, a.s., '03 
Mary A. Pharis (Salisbury),/.a^ 'm 
James D. Phelpa, /.a., '76 ; Am., '9B 
Henry Phillips, / a.. '93 
Louis B. Phillips, /a.. '97 
Dee Wolcott Pierce, i.a., '93; si^ ^ 
Merton W. Pierce, /., 'oa 
Carolyn E. Pierson, /.a.. '03 
Frederick T. Pieraon. /.a.,V ;'.'«<» 
Eda Pinzer,/.a.. *oa 
Elisabeth M. Pitkin, /.a., '80 
John W. Plant, m., '95 
Wilfred W. Porter, f.a., •» 
Charles D. Post, /.a., '02 
Stella L- H. Post, I.a., '03 
Henry B. Pratt, m.,*o\ 
George M. Price, in., *86 
William F. Prouty. Im., '03 
George E. Quick, i.a., 'oa 
Herbert L. Reese, i.a., '97 
Frederick W. Revels,/a.. '95 
Mabel C. Rhoades, /.a.. *98;j'.«., *«} 
LenaM Rhodes, /.a., '09 
Denison Richmond, /.. 'oa 
Schuyler P. Richmond, in.. '03 
WilUrd A. RilL /., '99 
Joseph B. Rinjgiand, m., 'oa 
Charles S. Roberta, m„ *8o 
John T. Roberts, i.a., *j6 
William H. Roberts, i.a., *8i 
Charles C. Robinson, a.s., '03 
Fay N. Robinson, i.a., '02 
William D. Rockwell. I.a.. *St 
Edward D. Roc, Jr., I.a., *8o 
William Rosenbloom, /.. '97 
Martha R. Rosenthal, i.a., '98 
Olive M. R088 (Walch)./.a., '97 
Maurice Roasman, /.a., '99 ; /., '01 
William Rubin. I.a., '^ 
Arthurs. Ruland, m., *g4 
Emma A. Rnnniou (Buck), m., *88 
Frank J Rupp, m ., '91 

George A. Russell, X<s*t '01 
Jamea M. Rutledge, in., '95 
Francis J. Ryan, m., '99 
William Ryan, i.a., '01 
John W. Sadler, I.a., '96 
Aaron M. Sakolski. i.a., 'oa 
Morgan R. Sanford, i.a., 'M ; g.M., ^ 
Came E Sawyer, I.a., *87 
Grace J. Sawyer, /.a., 'ox 
Leonard A. Sazer, m., '8a 
William D. Scanlon. I.a., 'oa 
Lydia H. Schaefer, I.a., '03 
Frank J. Schnauber, i.a., 1J8 
Philip P. Schneider, / a , '9a ; gM., '« 
Edward Schoeneck, A. '03 
BvaG. Seaman, i.a., '87 
Frederick W. Sears, m., '9S 
Bessie M. Seely, / , 03 

Richard J. Shanahan. /., '96 
Edward F. Shea, /., '99 



GBOGRAPHICAI* DISTRIBUTION 



495 



York — Continued 

'cnlinued 

Sbepard, l.a„ 'oo 

Sherman, /.a., '02 

Sherwood, /.a., '96 

. Shoemaker, m., '97 

loudy, M., '90 

J. Shove, /.a., '80 

L. Shrlmptou, m., '01 

Sibley, /.<!., '89;jr.tf..'93 

. Sims, / a., '00 

aalley, /.a., '74 ; g.a., '76 ; ^.«.. 

I Smallwood, l.a„ '96 

. Smith, l.a., '92 

imith, m., '85 

ith (BalUrt),/.a., '85 

* D. Smith (Reynolds), f.a., '83 

Smith, /.a.. '93 

lith, M., '9iB 

»mith (Hookin8),/.a., '90 

\. Smith, A, '01 

aon, iN.,*96 

. Solomon. I. a , '86 

•palding,/.a., '8i 

Spalding, Hon., '94 
>erry, i.a.. '98 
spicer, /., '97 
ag, I.a., '02 
. Sprole, /.a., '82 
Stanton, m., '76 
. Stephens, m,, '03 
Stone, /., '02 

J. Stonp, m ., *oo 
in Stout./.a., '03 
rt«, /.a., 'i*6 
iweet, jw., '00 
Swift, m., '02 
Talbott, /.a., '84 
albott,/.a., ^96 
. Taylor, /.a., '84 

W. Taylor, I.a., '93 ; /.. 'g6 
C. Taylor, /.a., '93 ; g.a., '02 
. Telter, i.a., '09 

E. Telfer (Hollenbcck)./.a., '98 
*en Hyck, w., '97 
homas, m, ^85 
.Toney, I.a., '02 
f. Tooke, I.a., '91 
Totman, m., '76 ; ^.a., '94 
7. Tracy,/.a., '98 ; /.a., '02 

J. Tracy, /.a, ^69 

Travis. / a , '94 
Tmair (Gallinger), /.a., '93 
miair,/.a., 'q6 
mim, I.a., '96 
. Turner, I.a., '92 
rtelot, /.a., ^82 
3. Tyler, I.a., '82 
s Tyrrell, I.a., '97 
'. Vadeboncoeur, »«., '75 

Valkenbur|{h./.a., '02 
\. VanDuyn, m., '97 
c W. Van Lengen, m., '98 

Vann,A0M., '97 
in Tassel (Frey), /.a., '97 
&.. Van Wagner, /., *oi 

Van Winkle (Hoyt), i.a., '99 
T^ernon (Honsinger),/.a., '96 
. Viall. /., *o3 
Vibbard,/.a., '98 
^olinski,/.a., '97 
linski, /.a., *99 

Wade, /., »98 
. Wadleigh, /.a., '92 



BjrtLenBe--Continued 

Richard A. Waite, Jr., I.a., '01 

Charles J. Walch, m., '91 

Charles B. Walker, /.a., '99 

Prank R. Walker, I.a., '84 

George H. C. Wallace, /., '98 

William I«. Wallace, I.a., '85 ; m., '97 

Stella H. Walrath,/.a., '03 

Clara B. Ward, I.a., '93 

Helen M. WardwelUHawkins),/.^., '88 

Adelaide A. Wame./.a., '^3 

George B. Warner, La., '65 

Marion E. Weaver,/.tf., '95 

Arthur A. Webb, Jr., I.a., ^01 

Grace H. Webb (Edgcomb), /.a., '93 

Sara h. Weeks (Tooke), f.a , '95 

Jennie E. Weller (Archambo), f.a., '87 

Ralph R. Welles./.a., '03 

Edwin M. Wells, i.a., '82 

Mellville J. Wells, I.a., '75 

Walter J. Werfelmann, m., '90 

Marion L. West, i.a., '00 

Dora A. Westfall, /.a., '80 

Mary Whitford, /a., '81 

Courtney D. Whittemore, /.a.. '99 ; /., '0$ 

Lieber E. Whittic. /.«., '95; '-. '97 

Grace F. Wight, /a., '00 

Carlton C. Wilbor, i.a., '68 ',g.a., '81; Aon., 

'91 
Frank Z. Wilcox, /.a., '76 

Roscoe R. Wilcox, /., 'ox 

Edwin Wildman,^.«., '82 

Mabel I,. Willard,/a., '97 

Horatio B. Williams, i.a., '00 

Louise V. Winfield, i.a., '96 

Perry A. Wood, /., '99 

Gertrude M. Woodford, /.a., '03 

iames B. Woodruff, i.a., *02 
Loyal D. Woolsey, i.a., 'oa 
Florence A. Wright (Cook), /.a., "90 
Gordon A. Wright, i.a., '89; /.a., '9a 
Edward J. Wynkoop. m., '92 
Carrie B. Yefton (Vlbbard),/.a., '98 
Albert M. York, I.a., 'ftj 
Prank E. Young, i.a., 'w 
Leonard B. Young, i.a., 'n',g.a., '01 

TantierSTlllc 

Henry W. Showers, /., '98 



James W. A. Dodge, i.a., "T9\g.a., *8i 
Albert W. Emerson, i.a., '92; g.a., '94 
Emma Y. Emerson (Mrs.), i.a., '94 
Samuel G. Harris, i.a., '85;'^^., '9a;^.a., 
'93 



James B. Kelsey, m„ '73 

TioiTA Center 

John G. Pembleton, i.a., '05 
A. W. Post, m., '71 

TonawAsdA 

Henry Wheaton, i.a., '96 

Torrcy 

Eben S. Smith, m., '43 

Townscnd 

William H. Heist, m., '67 

Tnmpsbturir 

Nathaniel M. Perry, m., '45 



496 



GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION 



Nkw York — Continued 
Ttoj 

Prank D. lawyer, /.a., 'oa 
Martin H. Wafrath. /.a., '89 
Kugene Wiaeman, l.a., ^85 ; j^.a., '91 



Bdward M. Culinan, l.a., 'oa 

TnUy 

Michael M. Lucid, m., '96 

Ploy M. Thomas (Rixon), / a.. '01 

Henry I. Van Hoesen, m., '81 

Tttpper Xrake 

Robert L. Morgan, m., '97 



Charles A. Dann, l.a., '98 
BUsabeth M. Janes (Dann), l.a., '98 



Almon B. Smithy /.a., '96 

Union 

Bmest N. Christopher, «., '87 
William B. Christopher. «., '91 
Linnseus D. Witherill, m., '66 

Union Splines 

Orin W. Smith, m., '66 

Upporjay 

George B. Stright, l.a., '93 

UUea 

Moses M. Bagg, m., *4i 

Harry Jay Bray ton. m.,*o$ 

Carlos V. J. Doolittle, m., 'qi 

Bstella L. Foote (Harvic), l.a,, '01 

William P. Hall. Jr., m., '03 

William J. Harvie, a,s., '00 

A. Louise Klock, l.a., '95 

Annie M. Knapp, l.a., %2 

Mary G. Leete, I. a., '95 

Hugh H. Lenahan, m., '03 

August H. Merrill, /., '02 

Charles T. Olmstead, hon., '03 

Clara Smith, m., '87 

Allen D. Steele, l.a., *95il-» '02 

Florence R. Worster (AlleD),/.a., '91 

TanBtten 

Charles A. Murray, m., '53 

Teimon 

Mary.B. Peaslee,/.a., '03 

Tornon Center 

Walter W. Dibble, l.a., '03 
Robert B. Wilson, m., '94 



Sarah M. Bouck, l.a., '03 
Grace B. Cagwin,/.a., '91 

Tietor 

James P. Draper, m.,'4.6 

Tlctoiy 

Charles A. Fisher, m., '68 

Walden 

William H. Mickle, hon., '94 



Walton 

Anna B. White, m.,^02 

Warsaw 

iohn B Smallwood, l.a., 65 
lurlin S. Smallwood, /., '02 
William W. Smallwood, La., '7a 

Warwick 

Howard V. Kulison, l.a.. '00 

Waterloo 

Jessica B. Marshall, / a., '92 
Charles A. Sweet, m. '02 
George B. Zartman, l.a., *9$ 

Watcrport 

Floyd F. Decker, La., '01 
Arthur R. Horton, /.a., 'oa 

Watertown 

Sidney O. Barnes, /.a.. *6a 
Muud L. Dorr, /.a., '94 
Henry A. Hoyt, m , '96 
George H. Nelson, l.a., '03 
David F. Pierce, h'm., '99 
William H. Steven^, la., '80 
May V. Wheatley, /a., '98 

Watervllle 

Watson S. Hawkins, La., '83 
Watkins 

John A. Beers, l.a., 'ox 
Mathew L. Bennett, m., '66 
Mary L. Huntley (Mathews), U., ' 
Newton Weller, La., '65 

Warerly 

Jennie G. Seely, m,, '03 

Wayland 

BliBigelow, m.^^fi 



Bli Allison, m„ '6x 
Webster 

Ellen F. Chamberlayne,/.a., '87 
George Stratton, La., '77 

Weedsport 

Frederic N. Burritt. Im., '89 

iennie A. Henderson, La., 'ot 
raxell R. Hopkins, /.a.. '81 
ianet L. Kevand. La., '01 
lary B. Moore, La., *98 

WeUs 

Charles S. Coulter, La., '93 

WellSTUle 

George H. Dryer, La., '7a ; k4m., 1 
William H. Platser, l.a., 'oa 
Ardeen E. Richmond, La., 'oa 

Westbnry 

Mary Green (Wood), l.a., '56 

West Camden 

Frederick M. Harvey, La., *oi 

West Chacy 

Blam B. Marsh, La., '00 

West Hampton Beadi, Xr. I. 

Charles P. Gardner, m„ '98 



GBOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION 



497 



J York — Continued 

Biichtoa 

. Green, /.a., '95 

[lake 

M. Bishop, /.a., 'oq 

leld 

G. Siddell, /.a., '01 

D. Bartholomew, /.a., '86 

Ins 

H. Burr, /.a., '01 
. Clarke, /.a., '03 

E. Clarke, hon., '98 

. Knapp(Barr), /.a., '02 



Poster, /.a., '00 ; i«., '03 
f C. Golly, /.a., '03 
?. Shepherd, /.a., '91 
;. SUfford, m., '01 

oint 

Hall, m., '75 



H. MontKomery, m., '00 
J. O'Brien, i«., '63 

W. Crispell, iw., '69 

H. Rogers, ^.a.. '75 

r. Knapp. /.a., '03 

67. May, /.a., '86 

n P. Kidder, ^.a., '91 



Paddock, /a., '01 
Paddock,/.a., '93 
Watkins, m., '83. 



Atwater, l.a., '98 

r. Campbell (Wal8worth),/.a., '90 

* A. Cook, /.a., '81 ; j'.a., '8a ; 

'5 

le Kilpa trick. / a., '91 

:. Pierce, /.a., '88 

Price, ^.a. '86 ;j'.a., '87 

s H. Sanford, /.a., '87 

eveoson, kon.^ '03 

>. Thorburn (Sanford), /.a., '87 

S. Umbrecht, /.a., '99 

X,. Walsworth, /.a., '89 

^ORTH CaROUNA 



r. Lewis, iw., '67 



C. 01cott,/a., '86 



Wilmlagtoa 

George H. I^ocey, /.a., '56 

Wilson 

Dora I«. Norton, /.a., '97 

North Dakota 

Fargo 

Erasmus D. Angell, Jr., /.a., '80 
Barl G. Burch, /.a., '94 xg.a.^ '96 
Jennie C. Bums (Angell), /.a., '80 

Graft on 

Clinton D. McDonald, /.a., *9s iV.a.f 'S7 



Prank Miller, /.a., '00 

Xramottre 

George W. P. Buck, /.a., '56 

Ohio 

Akron 

Carlton H. Norrls, r.a., '93 

Irving C. Rankin, T.a.^ '03 

Lena J. Schreuder (Ranldn),/.a., * 

▲Uiance 

Grace L. Robinson, /.a., '99 

▲shtabnla 

Joshua L. Burrows, j'.a., '77 

Cincinnati 

Klla L. Bryant (Moore),/.a., '90 
Joseph H. StoU, /.a., '99 

CleTCland 

Leon B. Bacon, /., '99 
Arthur G. 8. Brink, /., '00 
Claude A. Barrett, /.a., 'oa 
Edward L. Harris, /.a., '78 
Joshua B. Lamed, /.a., '79 ; /.a., '8a 
Edward C. Morey, /.a., '^ 
Darius H. MuUer, hon.y '69 
Jay D. Stay, /.a., '85 
Wesley Watson, /.a., '78 

Colnmbns 

Myra P. Hitchcock, /.a., *oo 

Conneant 

Edward D. Merriam, m., '51 

Dayton 

Prederick D. Davis, /., '97 

Delaware 

Jared O. Church, jl^n., '54 
Lorenso D. McCabe. A«fi., '75 
William P. Whitlock, Hon,, ^99 

Bast Xrirerpool 

Robert N. Pearon, g.a.^ '79 

XfOckland 

Stephen T. Dial,^.a., '94 

North Bloomfleld 

James G. Hawkins, /.a., '64 

Oxford 

Albert G. Vredenburgh, /.a., '90 



93 



498 



GBOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION 



Ohio — Continued 
Spilttffileld 

Theodore F. Bliss, m., '69 

ThotnpAon 

Newell B. Hulburt, lux., '86 
Ployd C. Sherman, /.a., '03 

Urbana 

John G. Vaashan, /.a., '83 

Termllloti 

George E. Merrill, /.a., '89 



Blanche B. Gunn, /^., '01 ; g,a.^ 'oa 
Ansel R. Kinne, /.a., 'oa 
Prances B. York (Spear), La., '60 

Oki^homa 

DoTer 

John A'. Northrup, m., '66 

Fort Reno 

Allen M. Smith, m., '89 

OkUhoma City 

John R. Thompson, /., *oi 

Orbgon 
Portland 

Herbert W. Swarlz, m., '84 

Salem 

John H. Coleman, Hon., '89 

Pennsylvania 
Allegheny 

William B. Curley,/.a., 'oi 
Richard B. Cuthbert,!/.a., 'oa 
Frederick GriflSn,/.a., 'oa 
Raymond N. Hockenberry,/.a., 'oa 
George W. Ixer, /.a., '78 
Arthur W. Whalen,/.a.. '03 

▲Itoona 

George W. Kessler, /.a., '93 

Athens 

I^evi Morse, m., '68 



Lorenzo D. Cornish, a.j., 'oa 
Nicholas H. Holmes, hon.^ '90 



Frank L. Richards, /.a., '95 

Bradford 

Margaret B. Caldwell, /.a., '87 
James B. Kenyon, hon., '92 

Brooklyn 

Alice L. Lee, /ui., '96 

California 

Theodore B. Noss, La., '8o;^.a., '8a ;^.a., 
'84 

Canton 

Elisabeth B. Dean, La., '01 

Cheater 

Silas G. Comfort, La., '84 ; g.a., '87 



Clarion 

Jason N. Fradenburgh../ui., *66 ; gA^ 

CoUeserUle 

James L. Barnard, /.a., '9a 

Concordville 

Judson P. Davis, /.a., '03 

Doylestown 

Henry O. Harris, La,, '7a 

Dnnmore 

Dayton BUis, La., '02 

Baat Pittsbnrr 

Joseph W. Farley, La., 'oo 

Baat Smithf&eld 

Horace M. Moody, *•,, '66 

Bldred 

William H. Squires, as., 'oa 

Brie 

Alice R. Coates (Mott), La., '98 
Bertha B. Coates. /.a., 'OQ 
Alice B. Oaggin,/a., '98 
Gertrude H. Gaggin. /wi., '99 
Frederick A. Motl, La., '99 
Brwin H. Schuyler, La., '95 ; gM., '56 

Factoryrille 

Louis D. Palmer, l.a., '01 

FleetrUle 

Carolyn J. Paterson, La., '03 

Oermantown 

Milton N. Frantz, La., '86 

OiUett 

Charles P. Kiersted, m., '7a 

Olenside 

William B. Hodge, La.. '95 
Jessie W. Hurlbnt (Hodge), /.a.. '95 

Haverford 

Edward A. Green. La., '00 
Edith A. Nye (Green), la., »oo 

Kendall Creek 

William N. Hanna. La., '66 

Kingston 

Bertha M. Bannister (Buckmas), U 
Junius W. Stevens, La., '95 

Knozrille 

Edwin V. Denick,/.a., 'oi 

Irebanon 

Leon D. Hueatis, La., '03 

Xrime Ridge 

Thomas H. Low, /.. '03 

Mansfield 

Evelyn B. Beardsley,/.a., 'oa 
Hamlin B. Cogswell, Hon., '03 
George E. Hutchings. La., *8t 
Benjamin Moody, m., *68 

Manch Chnnk 

Arthur M. Townsend, La., '03 



GBOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION 



499 



rs YLVAN I A — Continued 



'. Thomas, j'.a., '9ii r^-, '94 

»y 

1 A. Martin, /.a., '99 

HUe 

1 B. Konkle, Jr., l.a., '81 



le B. JcfFcrs, l.a., '01 



I P. Murdock, la., '99 

A. Wilson (Murdock), /.a., '99 



kerson, l.a., '95 

le 

1,. Beach, i.a., '03 

hU 

na Pulmer, i.a., '02 : ;f.fl., '03 
M W. Gocrtner, hon., '54 
7. Ham1in,/.a., '90 
; Hills (Randolph), /.a., '95 
>. Mann, /.a., '85 
1 C. O. Mann, Im., '83 
C. Noble, I.a., '02 
A. Nobles, m, '81 
I S. Perkins, m., '69 
1 P. Randolph, /.a.. '96 
H. Wheeler, la., '91 



I. Beal, l.a., '7^ 
I C. Blaisdell. /.a , '88 
;. Christie, l.a., '88 
t U. Porman (Hamilton), l.a., '93 
cerGanin,./:a.,'95 
8. Gaggin, l.a.. '94 
G. Matson, la., 79 
R. Morrii»,/.fl.. '03 
f. Thomseu, l,a., '83 



I D. Hart (Peck). /.a., '96 
I J. Peck, l.a., '96 



. Young, l.a., '03 

1 V. Flaherty, l.a., '94 

;. William? (Vishanoff),/.^., '97 

:ellogg (Benedict), l.a., 'oa 
E Sweet,/., '01 
R. Vickery,/.a., '00 

lay 

t S. Miller, l.a., '92 

t 

H. Haabrouck,/.a., '00 
t 
D. Phillips, l.a., '02 

C Sprague, l.a., '01 



Tamaqtie 

Peter J. Keiser, m., '66 

Towaada 

Adelbert D. Dye, Jr.. la., '02 

Ida A. Gilbert ( Houghton), l.a., '76; £.a., 

'79 
Oscar A. Houghton, l.a., '69; g.a.,*82; 

hon., '87 

Troy 

Albert E. Hall, /.a., '92; l.a., '93: z.a., '96 

Tartle Creek 

Ross W. Copeland, a.s., '03 

Ulster 

Merritt A. Soper, l.a., '00 

Ulysses 

Micajah C. Dean, la., '57 

Warrea 

Grace I*. Wikoflf, la., '99 

West Chester 

Charlotte N. Hardee, /a , '80 

Westflcld 

. William E. Blair, l.a., '88 
Hugh B. Strang, l.a., '00 

Wilkes Bsrre 

Lena H. Baldwin, l.a.. '01 

Curtis E. Mogg, La , 'lS',ga., '81 ; g^.a., 

'83 ; hot , '00 
George A. Place, la , '76; g.a., '84 
George K. Powell, l.a., '66 
I.«aac B. Rods, m., '67 
Marion A. Sturdevant, l.a., '03 
John C. Tennant, l.a., '01 
Joshua L. Welter, l.a., '82 
Morgan A. Wilcox, l.a.. 'oa ; /., '02 

Willismsport 

James B. Mack, l.a., '01 
Clarence L. Peaslee, l.a., '93 

Teagertowa 

James M. Yeager, hon., '95 

Tork Sprlairs 

Theodore W. Haven, l.a., '81 

ToaagrsTllle 

Ambrose C. Blodgett, m., '46 

Rhode Island 

Providence 

Frank E. Burdick, m , '95 

South Carolina 
Colaaibia 

Ada V. Harbottle (Taylor), l.a., '94 

South Dakota 

Brookiags 

Nina Weston, /.a., '92 

Redfleld 

Charlotte M. Packard, /.a., '94 

Sloaz Falls 

Benson H. Requa, l.a., '82 



500 



GBOGRAPHICAI, DISTRIBUTION 



Tbnnbssbb 

Chattanooga 

Alice Bannister (Race), /.a., '8t 
John B. Race, kon.^ '99 

Korristown 

BffaZ. Ham., /.a., '97 

Tbxas 
Anstia 

Frederick W. Simonds.'^.a., '79 

Dallas 

James L. Adams, m., '68 

Ft. Worth 

Obcar ly. Fisher,^. a., '88 

Palestine 

Caroline L. Mason (Jarvis),/^., '81 

Utah 

Ogden 

Hiram H. Henderson, I. a , '85 

Salt I.ake City 

I,ce B. Wight, /., '98 

VBRMONT 
Bahcrsfleld 

Jacob Finger, /.a., '00 

Barre 

Mattie P. Goodrich (Hoyt),/.a , '99 

Bellows Palls 

Florence M. Farnham (Osgood), /a.. '88 

Bennington 

Carrie Douslass. l,a , '02 

Charles W. Rowley, /a., '79; g a.. '85 

Bnrlington 

Edith E Clarke, /.a.. '81 

Bast Corinth 

Celestia M. Fember (Hazen), /.a., '00 

Bast Dorset 

Elida Grace Ames, /.a., '03 

Moatpelier 

Mathew W. Gordon, / . '98 
Frank P. Rutherford, /., '98 

Northfleld 

Charles C. Brill, /.a., '85; g.a , '86 

Ponltaey 

Charles H. Dunton, Hon., '86 

Pownal 

John S. Niles, «., '73 

Rutland 

David W. Gates. Hon., '95 

Springfield 

Eleanor W. Thayer, l.a , '01 

St. Albans 

Wesley H. Benhani. la , '89 
Wilbur S. Smithers. l.a , '80 
Alvan C. Willey, g.a., '93 ; ga., '94 



Virginia 

▲den 

Miller K. Reading, m., '76 
Chatham 

Elizabeth M. Hall (Willis),/.*., -85 
Xrynchbnrg 

Fernando W. Martin, j'.a,, '53 

Petersbnrir 

Grace G. Noble, f.a., '00 
Florence H. Wilson, /a.. ♦96 

Richniond 

Prank S. Barton, aj„ '<q 

Roanoke 

Lucy I,. Ham8on,/.a.« '97 
Vienna 

French W. Fisher, /,«., '69 

Washington 
Blaine 

Harley D. Wadsworth, /.a.. '84 
Worth Tskima 

Albert S. Congdon, l.a., '79 
Pnyallnp 

Dix H. Rowland, l.a., '05; U '07 
Harry G. Rowland. /.a. 7*88 ^ 

Seattle 

J. Sidney Bovingdon, l.a., *%^ 
John F. Reed, l.a , '915 
Henry R. Stevens, a.s., '02 
Martin l«. Stiles, m., '69 

Tacoma 

Mary E. Gates, /.a., *9o 

West Virginia 

McMechen 

Adelbert D. Carpenter, l.a.. '01 
Geneveret Quick (Carpenter). /.«., 'oa 

Wisconsin 

Pond dn Xrac 

Don E. Griffin, l.a., '03 

Hillside 

Mabel B. Stackes./.a., '98 

Ira Croste 

Charlotte I. Burrows, /.«., »oi 

Kilwankee 

Mary E. Moxcey. l.a., '97 
Thomas W. Rhodes, /.a., '57 

Sparta 

Martin R. Gage, m., *5a 

Wankesha 

William A. Broadhurst.^.a., '91 

Wansan 

Jeannettc Mercer (Staples),/.a., '92 

Wyoming 



Grace King. /.a ^ »oo 



GBOGRAPRICAL DISTRIBUTION 



501 



REIGN COUNTRIES 
Brazil 

ICO G. D. 01ivicra,/.a.. '81 

I, Bmn Paulo 

^. do B. Panlista, / a.. '79 

de Queiroz Tetlen, i.a., '79 

San Panlo 

do P. de Barros, I.a., '79 

Ian Paulo 

lo de ▲. Tillares, / a , '79 

Paulo 

ino A. P. Mcndes. /.a., '79 

aciro 

iodeM. Pinlo,/.fl , '8x 

Ino F. da Veiga, Jr , /.a., '86 

tu, San Paulo 

(CO P. De Barros, I.a., '79 



le M, Sousa, Jr., I.a., '79 

1 Paulo 

A. Lima, I.a., '78 

Canada 
>nt. 

n Cleaver, j'.a., '9c 

W. Tackabury, /.a., ^ 

Ulc, Ont. 

:uir, m.f *72 

.. Colwell. I.a., "95 
1 J. Hunter, j^. a., '92 
1 J. Smyth, I.a., '84 

in P. Haanel, /.a., '99 
>. Haanel, /.a., '94 

sntfc 

Jifton.^.a., '89 

hit. 

1 0*Hagan,^.a., '89 

Ont. 

R. Sackett, I.a., '80 

>at. 

■ Snyder,^.a., '79; £.a., '90 

Birchard.^.a., '84 
. Broken»htre,;r.a., '93 
. Chamberlin(Aliev>,/.a., '81 
leL. Dicklow. /.a. '91 

R. Watson, ^.a., '86 

A. Whyborn (Roseburgh), /.a., '93 

China 

. Maaters, m., '91 



Klu Ktanc 

Charles F. Kupfer, g.a„ '96 

Pckinr 

Joseph L. Whiting, i.a., 66 
Shanghai 

John Stevens, hon., '96 
Tientsin 

Robert H. Maclay, I.a., '73 

England 

Hastings 

.Blizabeth Blackwell, m., '49 
London 

Charles J. Russell, m., '76 
Rotherham, Torkshire 

Alfred O. Smith, ;e .a., '87 

France 
Paris 

Dorothy Bloomer, /.a., '03 

Germany 
X,elp«lg 

Wm. Orville Allen, I.a., '97 ; g.a„ '99 
Hugo Wm. Koehler, I.a., '03 

India 
Raniroon Burma 

Charles B. Hill, /.a., '97 

Japan 

Koji 

Arthur D. Berry, /.a., '95 

Tokohoma 

Gideon F. Draper, I.a., '80 
Whiting 8. Worden, I.a., '81 ; m., "86 

Korea 
Seoul 

Masayoshi Takaki, /.a., '91 

Mexico 

City of Mexico 

George W. B. Cook, Jr., t.a„ '8a 
Bstado de Hidalgo 

Oscar R. Whitford, La., '90 
Guanajuato 

Pablo Del Rio, m., '01 

New Brunswick 

St. Johns 

Richard Knight, hou., '56 
Archibald MacDougall. I.a., ^SsiZ-a., '88 
St. John West 

John A. Clark, /.a, '61 

Nova Scotia 

Halifax 

Charles Churchill, hon., '57 
Plot on 

Johnson Henderson, ^.a., '89 
Thorbnm 

Alexander W. Macleod. g.a., '85 
Wolfyille 

Mary L. Conncll,/.a., '99 



502 



GBOGRAPRICAL DISTRIBUTION 



Phiwppink Islands 

Paacaslaan 

Benjamin H- Neal, l.a., 'oi 
Olin LeRov.Neal, l.a., 'oi 



Porto Rico 

8an Jttaa 

Jos6 Benet Col6n, /., *03 



Portugal 

Oporto 

Carlos d'A. Villares,/.a., '88 



South America 

ChUe 

Brnest P. Herman, /.a., '92 

Bueaoa Aytes 

Almon W. Greenman, g.a.^ *9i ; g.€., '91 

Switzbrland 
Iratuiaime 

William Cornforth, hen., '87 

TURKBY 
Coaatantlaoplc 

William S. Murray, l.a., '88 \gA^ '91 

Harpoot 

Bertha Wilson, /.a., 'ox 



NoTB.— Graduates are now living in thirty-nine States of the Union as well as is thrs 
Territories and the District of Columbia ; they are also found in the Philippine Island! ill 
Porto Rico and in sixteen Foreign Countries. The above distribution is for the year 190^ 



NON-GRADUATES 

sc Alumni Record, pp. 810-904 

OPPLBMBNT : X 899-1903 

Indents now in college are designated by small caps. Letters at the left 
icate the respective colleges, l,e, signifies Library Bconomy. The place 
n which the stndent came is generally given ; when a second place is 
en it denotes present address. 

Alice Mabel Abbott, 1898-9, Camden, N. Y. 
Carrie Lacey Abbott, 1900-1, Syracuse, N. Y. 
CORNBUA Abbott, 1899-, Syracuse, N. Y. 
. Elizabeth Mildred Abbott, 1898-9, Union Springs, N. Y. 
SiDNBY Howard Abbott, 1903-, Oneida, N. Y. 
CAROI.YN M. Abblbs, 1903-, A r, Rochester, N. Y. 
Ralph W. Abbll. 1903-, Syracuse, N. Y. 
Nathan Abblson, 1901-, Syracuse, N. Y. 
Sadie Frances Abrams, 1900-2, Franklin, N. Y. 
David R. Ackerman, 1897-8, Syracuse, N. Y. 
Erlb I/AWRBNcb Acklby. 1901-, ^ r A, Ellington, N. Y. 
Agnes Philetheta Adams. 1894-7 and J 898-9. Canastota, N. Y. 
. and Iff. Charlbs Taylor Adams, 1900-, Port Ann, N. Y. 
Emma H. Adams, 1902-3, Warren, R. I. 
Ephraim C. B. Adams, 1902-, Syracuse, N. Y. 
Frank Stbwart Adams, 1903-, Hopkinton, Mass. 
Grace Winifred Adams, 1897-8, K A 6, Syracuse, N. Y. 
Mabelle M. V. Adams, 1 899-1900, Homer, N. Y. 
:. Nbllib Blanchb Adams, 1903-, E. Bloomfield, N. Y. 
Walter Kelsey Adams, 1897-9, Oneonta, N. Y. 
Ethel Wynne M. Adamsoh, 1902-3, Glens Falls, N. Y. 
Austin Thomas Ad4my, 1902-, Buffalo, N. Y. 
Harold M. Adkins, 1901-3, Syracuse, N. Y. Instructor in Vocal 

Music. Residence, roi Durston Ave. 
Tacie Fargo M. Adkinson (Rockwell), 1899-1900, T ^ B, Weedsport, 

N. Y. Married 10 July 1901, George Rockwell. 
[. Mabbl Barbbr AdsiT, 1902-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Newman W. Adsit, 1901-3, * T A, Vischer Ferry, N. Y. 

Bbrtha Blair Agan, 1903-. Cambridge, N. Y. 

John Benjamin Aiken, 1900-2, ^ K 4^, ^ A ^, Granville, N. Y. Law 

Stndent at Oswego, N. Y. Married 25 Feb. 1904, Maude Ripton. 

(Sec No. 3177.) Residence. Oswego, N. Y. 
William Corey Albertson, 1898-9, <^ A 8, Soutbold. N. Y. Liverymaq 

at that place. 



504 NON-CRADUATBS 

l.a. ftnd/.a. Robert Paul Albright, (/ui.) 1900 (/a.) 1902-, ^ A 6, Bin{ 

ton, N. Y. 
l.a. Elizabeth Wilson Alexander, 1898-1901, K K F, Cossayuoa, N. ' 
/.a, Jean Alexander, 1901-3, Sjrracuse, N. Y. 
La, And /.a, Matilda T. Albxandbr, {la.) 1902-3 (f.a.) 1903-, K 

Syracuse, N. Y. 
/.a. Kbnnbth Wood Algbr, 1901-, Trenton, N. Y. 
l.a. Charles Flint Allen, 1896-b, E. Syracuse, N. Y. 
/.a. Claudia Elbbrtina Allbn, 1899-, AAA, Burnt Hill, N. Y. 
/.a. Cora Torrey Allen, 1897-8, E. Syracuse, N. Y. 
f.a. Mrs. E. J. Allen, 1900-1, Cortland, N. Y. 
l.a. Ethbl Blanche Allbn, 1901-, K K r, Gouvemeur, N. V. 
/.a. Florbncb Bblle Allbn, 1901-, Syracuse, N. Y. 
/.a. George Allen, 1902-3, Syracuse, N. Y. 
l.a. Gracb May Allbn, 1902-, K K r, Gouvemeur, N. Y. 
f.a. Helen Louise Allen, 1900-1, Syracuse, N. Y. 
l.a. Jambs Roy Allbn, 1900-, i' T, Oneida, N. Y. 
f.a. LouiSB Agnbs Allbn, 1899-, Syracuse, N. Y. 
l.a. Martha M. Allbn, 1903-, K A 6, Oneida, N. Y. 
/. Michabl Jambs Allbn, 1901-, Syracuse, N. Y. 
l.a. Myron Alson Allbn, 1900-, Syracuse, N. Y. 
/.a. Sarah Adelia Allen. 1901-3, A T, Richfield Springs, N. Y. 
l.a. Hblbn Elizabbtr Allis, 1900-, K K r, Syracuse, N. Y. 
La. Ida L. Allis, 1903-, S3rracuse, N. Y. 
/.a. Luella Virginia Allis, 1899-1900, Syracuse, N. Y. 
l.a. William E. Allis, 1903-, Syracuse, N. Y. 
l.a. Nbllib M. Allison, 1902-, A r, Gloversville, N. Y. 
m. and La. Ray Charlbs Almy, 1902-, Dundee, N. Y. 
/.a. Amee Armstead Alsop, 1897-8, Syracuse, N. Y. 
f.a. Cornish Jennib Alt a, 1903-, Syracuse, N. Y. 
/. Moses Altman, 1897-8, Syracuse, N. Y. 

/.a. Carl F. AlTmann, 1901-, Syracuse, N. Y. 
l.a. *John W. Alverson, 1902-3, ♦ A 8, liennon, N. Y. Died 13 

1903, at Hermon, N. Y. 
f.a. and l.a. Prances Marilda Ambler, 1900-1, Nassau, N. Y. 
l.a. Ruth E. Amblbr, 1903-, Sandy Hill, N. Y. 
f.a. Saide Amdursky, 1901-3, Syracuse, N. Y. 
I'.a. Sara Anna Ambs 1902- , Richfield Springs, N. Y. 
La. Lucy Amidon, 1903-, Marcellus, N. Y. 
f.a. Christine Amos, 1903-, Baldwinsville, N. Y. 
I. a. Amelia Grace Anderson, 1903-, Buffalo, N. Y. 
/.«. and l.a. Charles William Anderson, 1901-2, Syracuse, N. V. 
La. Flora Belle Anderson, 1902-, K A 6, Syracuse, N. Y. 
f.a. Ida Benbdicta Anderson, 1901-, Camden, Me. 
t.m. RO88 Andbrson, 1902-, Cicero, N. Y. 
f.a. Florbncb M. Andrews, 1903-, New York City. 



NOM-ORADUATKS JdJ 

Florence Andrews, 1901-3, SjrrMciue, N. Y. 

GkscorvGkant Andrews, 1900-, Synicnw, N. V. 

John Watkins AndreivB, 1900-1, Cayler, N, Y. 

Mildred Esther AndrewB, 1900-1, CazcDovis, N. Y. 

Stkpbbn E. Andrews, 1903-, Hurlock, Ud. 

WILLARD W. Andrbws, 19]!-, CoriDth, N. Y. 

M&ad Eveline Andmis, 1896-9, Cinmndaifpm, N. Y. Orailnate of 
Pratt Institate. 190J. 

Pbank Guion Andrds, 1900-, Golden Bridge, N. Y. 

Bkrtha Angbli., 190J-, K K r, Sidnej, N. V. 

Gborge N. Angell, 1903-, Sidnej, N. V. 

Esther Jennie Angius, 1903-, S^racasp, N. V. 
;. Harriet F, Aanable, 1900-1, Syracuse, N. Y. 
I. FrsQcis Leon Antes, 1901-3, Syiacnse, N. V. 
;, Glenn D. Amthonv, 1903-, OakGeld, N. Y. 

Harry Eugene Anthony, 1897-8, * A e, N Z N, Groton, N. V, Grad- 
uate of Baltimore Medical College, 1901. FbysicJan, Locke, N.V. 
'. Albert M. Arusirong, 1903-, Wilson, N. Y. 

Alfred W. Armstrong, 189S-. Syracuse, N. Y. 
I Edith R. Arustkonc, 1897-, Belle Isle, N, Y. 
I. Harriett L. Armstrong, 19CO-1, Synicnie, N. Y. 
I. Cornelia Birdene Arnold, 1897-9, Syrscnse, N. Y. 
I. Gborob Arsbneau, 1903-, Syracase, N Y. 
I. Sarah Maade Arthur, 1903-3, LowviDe, N. Y. 
r. Bessie Margubbitk Ash, 1903-, AAA, Bocmvilte, N. Y. 
I. Lettie France* Ashby. 1901-3, Newport Newa, Va. Studant at Pratt 

Instttnte. Reaidcuce, 181 Steuben St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
I. Haysie L Aahtcnan, 1901-3, Oneida, N. Y. 

Clarence Ashton, 1897-8, Syracuse, N. Y. 
t. Otto Albert Assenheimer. 1001-, Syracuse, N. V. 
. Eliiabeth Arnold Atwater. 1898-9. Syracuse, N. Y. 

Claka Chloe ATwood, 1903-, Chittenden, Vt. 

Wilbur B)-ron Austin, 1899-1900, Syracuse, ^4. V. 

Ar.MBS Helen Avkry, 1903-, Groton, N. V. 

AuA Marion Avsrv, 1903-, Bradford. Pa, 
. Anna C. Avery, i898-[9oo, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Maude Ednice Avbrv. 1903-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Lula Malisia Babbitt, 1S99-1900, Syracuse, N. V. 

Edward Moss Babcock. 1903-, Naples, N. Y. 

Jt'UA Rebecca Babcock, 1900-, r ♦ B. Syracuse, N. Y. 
. Lovem Hill Babcock, 1891-3 and 1898-03, Fayetteville, N. Y. 

Mary Delany Babcock, 1S96-7, Baltimore, Md, 

Lauka Louise Bachtold, 1901^, Syrocnse, N. Y. 

Chester Thurlow Backds, 190J-, MorrU, N. V. 
- and m, ChBrlcs Andreirs Bacon, (f^.) 1697-8, and (m.) 1898^ Sy»- 
cnse, N. V. 



506 NON-CRADUATBS 

/.a. Clara M. Bacon, 1903-, Syracnae, N. Y. 

f,a, Mrs. Cora M. Bacon, 1902-3, Syracuse, N. Y. 

fM, Nellie Nichols Bacon (Groat), 1896-9, A ^^ Syracuse, N. Y. Mi 

20 Oct. 1901, Dr. William Avery Groat (No. 1462) of Syn 

N. Y. 
La. Ross Edwin Bacon, 1903-, ARE, Syracuse, N. Y. 
a,s, Irving Samuel Badgsr, 1903-, Perry, N. Y. 
a.5. Warrbn H. Badgbr, 1901-, Perry, N. Y. 
m,yf,a.^ and /.a. Linus Hombr Bagg, (/.a.), 1901-2 (/la.). 1901-2 (m.) 

4^ T, Syracuse, N. Y. 
/.a. Kathlbbn Bagwbll, 1903-, Saratoga, N. Y. 
/ a, B. Mart Bailey, 1901-2, Syracuse, N. Y. 
/.tf. Eva Bailbv, 1902-, A r, Cla3rville, N. Y. 
/.a. and m, Florence Bailey, (/.a.), 1898-9 (iff.) i89^i9oo,Schenecta(ly, 
/.a. Howard Forsythb Bailby, 1902-, Syracuse, N. Y. 
/.a. William C. Bailby, 1903-, Adams Centre, N. Y. 
La, Benjamin Tracy Baird, 1896-7, Dunkirk, N. Y. 
La, Gracb Nancy Baird, 1900-, K A 6, Newport, N. Y. 
/.a. Amy Spencer Baker, 1897-8, Syracuse, N. Y. 
/.a. Anna Mabel Baker, 1898-9, Syracuse, N. Y. 
La, Dora Artbmbsia Bakbr, 1903-, Honesdale, Pa. 
La, Elizabeth Hall Baker, 1900-1, Clinton, N. Y. 
f,a, Emma Mabel Baker, 1897-8, 1899-1900, 1902-3, Syracuse, N. Y. 
La, Frank Lbb Bakbr, 1902-, ^ K 4^, Mexico, N. Y. 
La. George Sheldon Baker. 1901-2, X A 2, Buffalo, N. Y. Bos 

Manager of the Enterprise, Residence, Phcenix, Arizona. 
La. Hbnry Thomas Bakbr, 1900-, A T, Johnstown, N. Y. 
a.s, Howard Hamilton Bakbr, 1903-, Syracuse, N. Y. 
l,a, Jennie Nekayah Baker, 1895-7, Mexico, N. Y. 
f,a. and La. JosiB Viva Bakbr, if, a ), 1901-2 {La.) 1902-, A A A, Go 

neur, N. Y. 
La. Lavern Leroy Baker, 1900-1, Clymer, N. Y. 
f.a. Mary Edith Baker, 1900-3, Dolgeville, N. Y. 
f,a. Richard Mattison Bakbr, 1902-, Oneida, N. Y. 
/. and /.a., A. A. Loomis Baldrby, 1901-, Syracuse, N. Y. 
f.a. Havnsworth Baldrby, 1901-, Syracuse, N. Y. 
f.a, Valonia Phoebe Baldrey, 1897-8, Syracuse, N. Y. 
a.s, Clayton Lornb Baldwin, 190 i-, Weston's Mills, N. Y. 
f.a. Francbs Voorhbbs Baldwin, IQ03-, Syracuse, N. Y. 
/•fl. Laura Jbannkttb Baldwin, 1902-, K A 6, Syracuse. N. Y. 
La, LBN A Grandin Baldwin, 1903-, Elmira, N. Y. 
f.a, Carl Ray Ballard, 1903-, Mexico, N. Y. 
f,a. Elsie Rebecca Ballard, 1899-1900, Syracuse, N. Y. 
La, Frbdbrick Olivbr Ballard, 1900-, Onondaga, N. Y. 
fa. H. C. Ballard, 1900-1, Syracuse, N. Y. 
f,a. Marion Elizabbth Ballibtt, 1901-, Buffalo, N. Y. 



NON-GRADUATRS 507 

IjL. Beojamin Williain Ballon, 1900- 1, Syracuse, N. Y. 
f,a, Gertrade Anna Ballon, 1901-2, Syracnse, N. Y. 
f.a. Marion Ei.i^ Bai.lou, 1903-, Spring ville, N. Y. 
/".«. Alice I^ura Baltes, 1901-2, Oswego, N. Y. 
/.a. AzRO L. Barbhr, 1903-, Syracuse, N. Y. 
/.a. Bbrtha E. Barbbr, 1901-, Middletown, N. Y. 
La. and /. Harry Barbbr, 1901-, 4^ T, <& A ^, Homer, N. Y. 
«.s. Jambs Watkrbury Barbbr, 1903-, A T, Syracuse, N. Y. 
/.«. Roy De Forest Barber, 190 1-, New York Mills, N. Y. 
/.«. Anna Lavinia Bard, 1903-, Factoryville, Pa. 
a.s. Juwus CoRBiT Bardbn, 1901-2, Ben. Paterson, N. J. 
f.a, Camilla Barker, 1901-2, Alexandria Bay, N. Y. 

La, BI.BBRT EtUNGTON Barkbr, Jr., 1896-9, 1901-, North Norwich, 
N. Y. Pastor M. E. Church, Hart Lake, Pa., 1900-1, North 
Norwich. N. Y., 1901- 
La, *Katberine Ursula Barker, 1896-8, V * B, Syracuse, N. Y. Died 2 
May 1901 at Syracuse, N. Y. 
^ La. MoixiB E1.IZABBTH Barkbr, 1900-, n B ^, Sidney, N. Y. 
La. Ross Wilmot Barker, 190 1-2, Watertown, N. Y. 
/«. Fred P. Barnes, 1900-3, Camden, N. Y. 
/ff. James Phillips Barnes, Jr., 1898-9, Syracuse, N. Y. 
La, Jessie Loretta Barnes, 1897- 1900, Cortland, N. Y. 
f'd. Marion Barnes, 1899-1900, Syracuse, N. Y. 
^•tf. Nellie Addie Barnes, 1900-1, Rome, Pa. 
/«. Ora Ethel Barnes, 1900-1, Syracuse, N. Y. 
La. aod/.a. Marion Emma Barnhart, (/.a.^ i902-3,(/.a ) 1903-, n B ^, 

Syracuse, N. Y. 
'•«.and/.<i. Perry Spencer Barnhart, (/.a.) 1901-, (/!«.) 1902-3, Syracuse, 

N. Y. 
^•«. Bthel Alexander Barnum, 1894-7, Syracuse, N. Y. 
/•a. Minnie Marie Barnum, 1900- 1, Gt. Barrington, Mass. 
^a. Chauncey Edgar Barott, 1897-9, A K E, Canastota, N. Y. 
-^•a. Ernbst Isbbix Barott, 1902-, A K E, Canastota, N. Y. 
-^a. Ethel Leonore Barrett, 190 1-3, Pitcher, N. Y. 
'•a. PRBD Warnbr Barrbtt, 1902-, * r A, Poultney, Vt. 
/^«. Jessie Blake Barrett, 1900-1, n B 4>, Titusville, Pa. 
'• John William Barrett, 1899-1900, Fayetteville, N. Y. 

'.«. Margarbt May Barrbtt, 1902-, Seneca Falls, N. Y. 
Xla. Sarah E. Barron, 1901-3, AAA, Syracuse, N. Y. 
'.fl. Wiluam Earl Barron, 1902-, Three Mile Bay, N. Y. 
/*.a. Bllen M. Barry, 1896-7, Syracuse, N. Y. 
^.a. Hugh Remi Barter, 1901-3. Toronto, Can. 
'.a. Grace Bartholemew, i899-i90», AAA, Reading Center, N. Y. Married 

12 May 1904, Plummer L. Gabriel, 
/a. A. Katb Bartig, 1899-1900, 1903- , Syracuse, N. Y. 
/a. LouBVA Barton, 1903-, Westport, N. Y. 



5o8 NON-GRADUATBS 

I. a. and /. Earl Julian Bassett, 1902-3. Rockville Center, N. Y. 

f.a. Kate J.'Adams (Bassett). 1897-8, Syracuse, N. Y. Biarried 26 

1890, Charles H. Bassett (No. 934). 
/. Frederick Joseph Bastable, 1900-1, A X, Syracnae, N. Y. 
f.a, Lizzie Louise Bastable, 1900-1, Syracuse, N. Y. 

/ a. CijiiRB C. Batbman, 1900-, ^ A e, Scottsburg, N. Y. 

f.a. Grace E. Bateman, 1902-3, Lowville, N. Y. 
/.a. \1A\ Bbckwith Batbs, 1903-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

f.a. Madge Marie Bates, 1900-1, II B ^, Cattaraugus, N. Y. 

I.e. Mary Louisr Batbs, 1903-, Greenwich, N. Y. 

l.a. MiNNiB Lii^WAN Batbs, 1903-, Savannah, N. Y. 

/.a. Emii«y Louisa Battrrson, 1900-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

f.a. Gertrude May Bauer, 1895-8, n B *, Syracuse, N. Y. 

/.a. Pauline Baumer, 1902-3, Syracuse, N. Y. 

f.a. Joseph Bayette, 1896-7 and 1900-1, Syracuse, N. Y. 

f.a. Clara R. Bay lis, 1902-3, Syracuse, N. Y. 

/.a. Mervin Baylis, 1901-3, Syracuse, N. Y. 
La. and /. Waltbr Frankun Bayus, (l.a,) 1900-, (/.) 1902-, A K B, S 

cuse, N. Y. 
tn. Frank Pbrrinb Bayliss, 1901-2, 1902-, Whitesboro, N. Y. 

/.a. *Grace Beal, 1898-9, Palmyra, N. Y. Died, Feb. 1900, at Palm 

N. Y. 

/ a. Bbnjamin Orrbn Bbalb, 1902-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

l.a. Carolyn Augusta Bbard, 1901-. Fayetteville, N. Y. 

f.a, Mabel Inez Beard, 1 899-1900, Syracuse, N. Y. 

l.a. Anna Alicb Bbardslbb, 1902-, Binghamton, N. Y. 

l.a. Gborge Garfibld Bbck, 1903-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

/.a. Bertha E. Becker, 1 900-1, Syracuse, N. Y. 

l.a. Clarence H. Becker, 1901-, Craryville, N. Y. 

l.a. Daniel Pierson Becker, 1903-, Watervliet, N. Y. 

i.a. George Jeremiah Becker, 1902-, Amsterdam, N. Y. 

;;/. John Isaac Becker, 1900-, Harlemville, N. Y. 

fa. Laura E. W. Becker, 1903-, Stamford, N. Y. 

la. Eva Lenora Beckley, 1903-, Binghamton, N. Y. 

fa. Clara A. Beckwith, 1895-7, Syracuse, N. Y. 

l.a. Winifred M. Beckwith, 1902-, Elmira, N. Y. 

f.a. Lester De Alton Bedell, 1897-8 and 1900-1, Syracuse, N. V. 

f,a. Lois Bedell, 1897-9, E. Syracuse, N. Y. 

l.a. Eri Starks Bebbb, 1901-, Canaan Four Corners, N. Y. 

a.s. Irving Nbff Bbelbr, 1902-, * K *, Syracuse, N. Y. 

l.a. Harry Brown Belcher, 1902-, ♦PA, Dolgeville, N. Y. 

l.a. Edith Helen Belden, 1899-1900, Cazenovia, N. Y. 

l.a. Kathryn Bird Belding, 1903- ,«A P, Cove, Oregon. 

l.a, Anson Wood Belding, 1 900-1, ♦ T, Troy, N. Y. 

l.a. Gertrude May Belknap, 1897-8 and 1900-, Syncnaa, N. Y. 

Iff. Howard Robert Bell, 1 899-1 901, Syracuse, N. Y. 



NON-ORADUATRS 509 

Mabsi« VnioXNiA BstL, 1901-, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 
. and Le. Gertrude Young Belles, 1902-3, Ithaca, N. Y. 

Clara Bradner Bellows, 1895-7 and 1898-9, A*, Norwich, N. Y. 
. and/. Harold Hill Bbmis, (/.) 1901-, (/.a.) 1902-3, i' T, A X, Can- 
astota, N. Y. 

Kathasinb Adams Bbmis, 1900-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Bhrtha Prbnticb Bbnbdict, 1902-, r ^ B, Owego, N. Y. 

Bdwina Henrietta Benedict, 1897-9, T ^ B, Canastota, N. Y. 

Bthbl May Bbnbdict, 1903-, Newburgh, N. Y. 

Isbell Benedict, 1899- ^9^* Syracuse, N. Y. 

Mabbl a. Bbnbdict, 1902-, Gnayama, Porto Rico. 

Ralph Curtiss Benedict, 1901-3, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Roy Petrie Benedict, 1899-1900, Syracuse, N. Y. 

ClarbncbJamsbn BBNjAMiif, 1900-, Scranton, Pa. 

Marion Wblls Bbnjamik, 1903-, Scranton, Pa. 
and/a. Mary BuCBNia Bbnjamin, (/.a.) 1902-3, {/.a.) 1903-, A r, 
Syracuse, N. Y. 

Grant Ernbst Bbnkbssbr, 1902-,- Syracuse, N. Y. 

Charlbs Hbnry Bbnnbtt, 1901-, Schuylerville, N. Y. Entered 
from Hamilton. 

EuGBNB Ezra Bbnnbtt, 190c-, Fulton, N. Y. 

Hazbl Ada Bbnnbtt, 1901-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Mary Ellen Bennett, 1895-8, Auburn, N. Y. 

Ralph May Bbnnbtt, 1903-, Little Falls, N. Y. 

ESTHBR AucB Bbnslby, 1903-, Springville, N. Y. 

Abby Benson, 1898-1901, T * B, Waverly, N. Y. 

Alprbd Wylus Bbnson, 1903-, Falconer, N. Y. 

HuRBBRT Carl Bbnson, 1903-, Falconer, N. Y. 

Lawrbncb Clifford Bbnson, 1903-, Falconer, N. Y. 

Mina Louise Benson, 1896-7, Auburn, N. Y. 

Helen Elizabeth Bentley, 1902-3, Pulaski, N. Y. 

INBZ Amblia Bbntlby, 1902-, Svracuse, N. Y. 

Lbna Hamlin Bbntlby. 1899-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Nellie H. Bentley, 1S99-1900, Baldwinsville, N. Y. 

Emma Henrietta Benz, 1899-1900; Syracuse, N. Y. 

Charlbs Hbnry Bbrgmann, 1903-, Constableville, N. Y. 

Clarence H. Bergman, 1902-3, Batavia, N. Y. 
* Jambs Manning Bbrnhard. 1902-, Cleveland, N. Y. 

Mabbl Louisb Bbrnhard, 1902-, Cleveland, N. Y. 

Anna Rbba Bbrnstbin, 1903-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Agnes Berrigan, 1900-1, Onondaga Castle, N. Y. 

Bridget Berrigan, 1898-9, Onondaga Valley, N. Y. 

Maodb Agnbs Bbrry, 1903-1, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Jessie Bert Berson, 1897^, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Sadie Berson, 1896-9 and 1901-2, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Charles Brubaker Berst, 1901-, Erie, Pa. 



510 NON-GRADUATBS 

/.a. Clara Lois Berst, 1901-3, Erie, Pa. Student at University of ^ 

gan. 

t\a, Lawrence A. Bertholf, 1902-3, Syracuse, N. Y. 

f.a. Mrs. Lawrence A.Bertholf, 1902-3, Syracuse, N. Y, 

fa, Daysey BtANCHB Bkst, 1901-, K K T, Kinder hook, N. Y. 

f.a, JoSBPHiNB HoLDEN BEST, 1903-, Port Jervis, N. Y. 

La, Smith Cady Bettingbr, 1902-, Chitteaango, N. Y. 

fa. Lucy Wood Betts, 1897-1900 and 1902-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

La. *Mabel Bcvan, 1899-1900, AAA, Syracuse, N. Y. Died 19CX). 

La. Ralph William Bickle, 190C-1, Oakfield, N. Y. 

La, Blanche Bicknei.l, 1905-, Madison, N. Y. 

La. Bertha Leah Bigei«ow, 1901-, Altay, N. Y. 
/. and La, Henry Raymond Biggar, 1 899-1900, Vernon Centre, N. Y. 

La, Ch ARISES WAI.TER BiWLiNGS, 1903-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

La. John Dixon Bii«ungs, 1903-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

La. *Alma Mabel Billington, 1901-2, Syracuse, N. Y. 

La, LORAINB Wai,Ton Biixs, 1903-, Fairport, N. Y. 

La. Mary Anna Bingham, 1901-3, F 4> B, Lockwood, N. Y. 

La, Ernest Morse Birdsall, 1900- i, Edmeston, N. Y. 

a.s. Samuel Gilbert Birdsall, 1901-3, * K 4^, Syracuse, N. Y. 

a.s. Cai,vin C01.1.1ER Bishop, 1902-, Verona, N. Y. 

f.a, Ethel Irene Bishop, 1899- 1900, Randolph, N. Y. 

m. Frank Ira Bishop, 1903-, Pompey, N. Y. 

la, Grace Bishop, 1899-1900, Syracuse, N. Y. 

La. Vernon Leslie Bishop, 1902-3, Livonia, N. Y. 

a.s. Chester Arthur Bixby, 1902-, Poultney, Vt. 
la. and/. Orla Edison Black, (/.a.), 1901-3, (/.), 1902-, Humphrey,> 

La. Mary Ellen Blair, 1897-9, Rochester, N. Y. 

f,a, ELI.YN Louise Bi.ake, 1903-, A r, Syracuse, N. Y. 

f.a. Theodora Louise Blakeslee, 1900-1, Cazenovia, N, Y. 

f,a. Edgar Horton Blanchard, 1898-9, Bradford, Pa. 

f.a, Bernard W. Blaustein, 1897-8, Syracuse, N. Y. 

f,a. Adelle Picot Blauvelt, 1897-8, Syracuse, N. Y. 

f.a, Maude Bligh, 1899-1901, Oneonta, N. Y. 

t,a, Beatrice Stuart Bloom, 1899- 1900, Kenwood, N. Y. 

La. Daniel McIntyre Blue, 1902-, X A S, Holland Patent, N. Y. 

f.a. Edna Elizabeth Blum, 1902-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

f.a, Florence Blumenthal, 1903-, Syracuse, N. V, 

f,a, Leon LaVergne Bly, 1901-2, Carbondale, Pa. 

a.s. Neil Goddard Hoardman, 1903-, Bald winsvi lie, N. Y. 

La. Charles Samuel Boatfield, 1903-, Camillus, N. Y. 

La. George Ray Bodley, 1903-, Afton. N. Y. 

La, Burton Philip Boeheim, 1902-, 4' T, Palmyra. N. Y. 

La. Ella Colh Bohr, 1899-, r 4> B. Syracuse. N. Y. 

La. Frank Melville Bohr, 1901-, A K E, Syracuse. N. Y. 

f.a, Harry Barras Bohr, i899ri9O0, Syracuse, N. Y. 



WOK-GR ADU ATB8 5 1 1 

^-a . Bbua Boilbau, 190a-, Bath, N. Y. 

M. Francois Xavier Joseph Boisvert, 1898-9, Middleborough, Mass. 
sp. Earl F&Bd Boland, 1901-, Syracuse, N. Y. Member of S. U. Foot- 
ball Team 1901-. 
/.a. DOROTHBA BoLBNius, 1902-, Syracuse, N. Y. 
La, Mary Veronica Bolton, 1901-3, Richfield Springs, N. Y. 
/.a. Ada Florence Bond, 1900- 1, Syracuse, N. Y. 
1.0. BHzabeth Bond, 1902-3, Syracuse, N. Y. 

f.a. Elizabeth Lois Bond, 1902-3, Troy, N. Y. 

m. Charlbs Pbrcy Bonham, 1902-, Tioga Centre, N. Y. 

la. Josepha La Rose Bonham, 1902-3, Buffalo, N. Y. 

la. Harry Vary Bonnbr, 1902-, Orwell, N. Y. 

/. Claudb B0N8TBD, 1903-, Cicero, N. Y. 

f.a. Belle Dodge Bonta, 1901-3, S3n:acuse, N. Y. 

U. Raymond G. Bookout, 1901-3, Vega, N. Y. 

f.a. William Frederick Boon, 1903-4, Syracuse, N. Y. 

/.a. Daisy Anna Boonb (Philups), 1894-8,1900-, AAA, Syracuse, N. Y. 
Married 30 Nov. 1898, Louis Baker Phillips (No. 1498) of Syra* 
cuse, N. Y. 

U. PRBDBRICK W. B0R6WARDT, 1901-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

f.a. A^ Laura Born, 1900-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

l.a. Ruth Eliza BosworTh, 1902-. Cambridge, N. Y. 

La. David H. Botchford, 1901-2, ^ K i^, Blossburg, Pa. 

f-a. Amdrbw Bothb. 1901-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

/.a. Ollie CuUian Bough, 1902-3, Oswego, N. Y. 

f.a. HuLDA BOULLBB, 1903-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

/.a. Rosalind M. Bourlibr, 1903-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

tf.i. Waltbr S. Bourlibr, 1901-, Parish, N. Y. 

Afl. Lnella Lillian Bovard, 1901-3, New York, N. Y. 

Aat Anna Anastatia Bowb, 1902- , Syracuse, N. Y. 

a J. Harry Wright Bowkbr, 1901-, Syracuse, N. Y. 
. fa. Katherine Jessie Bowker, 1902-3, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Aa. Francis Jacob Boyce, 1897-8, ^ K i^. Pleasant Mount, Pa. 

fa, Bessie L. Boyd, 190 1-2, Hannibal, N. Y. 

^.a. Fannie McCullough Boyd, 1899- 1900, Syracuse, N. Y. 

A and l.a, Frank Asbury Boyd, (/.a.) 1898-, (/.) 1902^, 4 P A, Middlesex, 
N. Y. 

Aa. and /. William Jambs Boyd, (/.a.) 1901-, (/.), 1903-, * T, New York, 
N. Y. 

La. WiLUAM Young Boyd, 1902-, Ben, Syracuse, N. Y. Member S. U. 
Track Team, 1902-. 

f-a. Grace Boynton, 1899-1901, Syracuse, N. Y. 

fa. Josephine Brackett, 1899- 1901, 11 Cambridge PI., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

^•a. Harvey Edwin Bradley, 1902-3, Watkins, N. Y. 

a.s, Lbroy Robinson Bradlby, 1903-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

»(. W. Irving Bradahaw, 1897-8, Pittotown, Pa., 



512 NON-G&ADUATBS 

l.a. Charles Holland Bradt, 1902-3, Groton, N. Y. 

l.a. Marshai^L R. F. Bradway, 1902-, Carthage, N. Y. 

a.s, Arthur Jambs Brady, 1901-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

a,s. EuGBNB Joseph Brady, 1900-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

/.a. Fi,ORBNCB TbrBSa Brady, 1903-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

l.a. Maud Sarah Brady, 1903-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

l.a. Mary Laura Braman, 1896-^, K A O, Gal¥my, N. Y. Studi 

Woman's College of Baltimore, Md., 1900-. 

/.a. and l.a. George Waldo Branch, 1901-3, Glean, N. Y. 
/.a. Guy Morton Branch, 1897-8, Keene, N. Y. 
f.a, Moses J. Brande, 1901-2, Syracuse, N. Y. 

l.a. Albertina Ella E. Brandt, 1902-3, Syracuse, N. Y. 

l.a, DbForbst Branb, 1899-, Randolph, N. Y. Member S. U. Fo 

Team, 1901-. Married 14 Feb. 1903, Olive B. Olney of V 

port, N. Y. 

l.a. Elizabeth Helen Branley, 1899-1900, Syracuse, N. Y. 
f.a. and l.a. Mary Lois Brayton, (l.a,) 1898-9, {fJi.) 1898-9, Hartford, 

a.s. Hbnry Edwin Brblos, 1903-, Williamsville, N. Y. 

a.s. John Gregory Brbnnan, 1903-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

/.a. Ambi^ia Brbwstbr, 1901-, Cornwall, N. Y. 

f.a, Floyd Lacey Brewster, 1901-2, Syracuse, N. Y. 

f.a. L. Pauline Brewster, 1898-1903, Syracuse, N. Y. 

f.a. Mabel Amy Brewster, 1896-8, Hannibal, N. Y. 

f.a. Margarbthb a. Bribsbn, 1902-, Utica, N. Y. 

l.a, Joseph Briggs, Jr., 1902-3, Prattsburg, N. Y. 

f.a. Vera Pearl Briggs, 1901-3, Ox Bow, N. Y. 

f.a. Carol Margaret Brimmer, 1897-8, 1902-3, Watertown, N. Y. 

a.s. Howard Frank Brinckbrhopf, 1903-, Niagara Falls, N. Y. 

l.a. Leonard Briois, 1903-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

/.a. Gustav A. Brischel, 1902-3, Syracuse, N. Y. 

l.a. Alice Benedict Briston, 1902-3. New York, N. Y. 

f.a. Alia Benedict Briston, 1901-2, Verona, N. Y. 

l.a, Florence Amy Britton, 1901-3, HE*, Syracuse, N. Y. 

f.a. Lena Hattie Britton, 1H96-1900, Syracuse, N. Y. 

l.a. Nettie M. Britton. 1903-, Onondaga, N. Y. 

a.s. Osborn Edmund Britton, 1901-3, Manlius, N. Y. 

/.a, C. Elma Broad, 1900-1, Onondaga, N. Y. 

f.a. .William Robert Broad, 1902-3, Syracuse, N. Y. 

fa, Jessie Broadhurst, 1898- 1900, Syracuse, N. Y. 

l.a, Lena Bernice Broadway, 1901-. Seneca Falls, N. Y. 

a.s. Roy Ransom Brockett, 1901-, X A Z. Angelica. N. Y. 

fa. Anna Babcock Brock way, 190C-1, K K r, Syracuse, N. Y. 

m. DwiGHT Crofutt Broga, 1901-, A K K, Oneida, N. Y. 
l.a.'Z George A. Bronson, 1898-1903, N. Syracuse, N. Y. Pastor J 

Church at N. S3n'acu8e, N. Y., 1902-. 

l.a, Hbi<bn Laura Bronson, 1901-, Fairfield, Conn. 



KON-GRADUATBS 513 

Danibl Hbnry Brooks, 1903-, Philadelphia, N. Y. 

Edith Brooks, 1901-3, Philadelphia, Pa. 
and La, Blizabbth Nbi30N Brooks, ( /'.a.)i897-i903,(/.a.) I90i-,r 4 B, 
Syracuse, N. Y. 

Harold Bissell Brooks, 1900-3, Erie, Pa. 

Emma Frances Broughton, 1897-8, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Reba Bella Broughton, 1898-1900, Little Falls, N. Y. Organist of the 
New York Ave. M. E. Church, Brooklyn, 1901-. 
and Iff. Arthur Bingham Brown, 1900-1, Alfred, N. Y. 

Bessie Emily Brown, 1898-9, Auburn, N. Y. 

Carol Margaret Brown, 1897-8, Watertown, N. Y. 

Charles Seamans Brown, 1897-1903, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Clara Kingsley Brown, 1900-1, Syractise, N. Y. 
. Blla Moorb Brown, 1903-, Arkport, N. Y. 

Emma Mabel Brown, 1898-9, Syracuse, N. Y. 
. Ethbi. Evbi*yn Brown, 1902-, Euclid, N. Y. 
I. Fanny A. Brown, 190 1-3, Oswego, N. Y. 

Frank Merriam Brown, 1898-9, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Frank WiNNB Brown, 1902-, E. Syracuse, N. Y. 
f. Frbd Hbnry Brown, 1903-, Ovid, N. Y. 
I. Garrbtt Pruynb Brown, 1902-, Syracuse, N. Y. 
. Gracb Fix>rbncb Brown, 1902-, Allen's Hill, N. Y. 
t. Grow Stanlby Brown, 1902-, i^ T, Canton, Pa. 
'. Haskell Brown, 1898-9, A K B, Syracuse, N. Y. 
1. Hbnry Raymond Brown, 1903-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Henry Samuel Brown, 1900-1, A K K, Lakeland, N. Y. 

James Angus Brown, 1901-3, 4 T A, E. Onondaga, N. Y. 
. JBNNIB May Brown, 1900-, AAA, Oneida, N. Y. 

JBSSIB May Brown, 1903-, Moravia, N. Y. 
. JUDSON Lyon Brown, 1903-, Thorn Hill, N. Y. 

Leon Arthur Brown, 1900-1, Savona, N. Y. 

Lillian Coughlan Brown, 1902-3, Adams, N. Y. 
nd La, Li<oyd E1.W00D Brown, 1901-, ^ K i^, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Mabbl Anna Brown, 1902-, A P, Newport, N. Y. 

Mabel Evangeline Brown, 1896-9, Edv^rds, N. Y. 

Mabbi. Wiborn Brown, 1897-8, 1900-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Marion Josbphinb Brown, 1898-9, 1901-, K A 6, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Martin Brown, 1901-, Wyoming, N. Y. 

Mott S. Bro?m, 1902-3, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Oscar J. Brown, 1902-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Ruth Anna Brown, 1887-8, 1896-8, A «, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Sara Lois Brown, 1901-, A F, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Vincent Garfield Brown, 1902-3, Porter, N. Y. 

William Murray Brown, 1902-3, Worcester, Mass. 

George Henry Bruce, 1897-9, Lake Placid, N. Y. 

Frank Edwin Brundagb, 1901-, B 6 n, Belmont, N. Y. 



514 NON-GRADUATSS 

/.a. Katharine A. Bmndage, 1900-3, K A O. Philadelphia, Pa. 

l.a, Hbnry Morton Brush, 1903-. Hornellsville, N. Y. 

/.a. William Cullbn Bryant, 1903-, 4 r A, Bangor, Me. 

f,a. Janbt Dykbs Buchanan, 1902-, Sherburne, N. Y. 

f,a. and l.a. Florence Emily Buck, 1900--1, K A 0, Buckaport, Me. 

l,a, Fritz Julius Buck, 189&-9, Spokane, Wash. 

/.«. Jay William Buck, 1903-, Fulton, N. Y. 

l.a, Byron Gorton Bucklby, 1903-, Minoa, N. Y. 

l.a, Elizabbth Irbnb Bucklby, 1903-, Millbrook. N. Y. 

l.a, and/. Jacob Richard Bubchblbr, (/.a.) 1899-1901, (/.) 1901- 

cuse, N. Y. 

l.a. Faith Bacon Bubll, 1903-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

/.a, Sarah L. Buell, 1 901-2, Syracuse, N. Y. 

l.a. Joaquin M. Buenaventura A., 1899-1900, Guyaquil, Ecuador 

dent at Minnesota University, 1900-. 

La, Edwin Hiram Bull, 1900-1, "ir T, Syracuse, N. Y. 

l.a, Francbs Mab Bull, 1901-, n B #, Chittenango, N. Y. 

/.a, Harribt Cady Bull, 1900-, Chittenango, N. Y. 

l,a, Horace Pierson Bull, 1898-^, A T, Syracuse, N. Y. 

f.a. Sarah Louise Bull, 1900-1, Syracuse, N. Y. 

a.s. Arthur Hamblin Bullard, 1903-. Albion, N. Y. 

l.a. Belle Agnes Bullion, 1897-9, Richfield Springs, N. Y. 

a.s. Guy A. Bump, 190a-, Delevan, N. Y. 

f.a. Mary Louise Bunn, 1897-1900, Syracuse, N. Y. 

f.a. Smith Bunning, 1900-1, Phoenix, N. Y. 

f.a, MiNNiB Whitb Burchard, 1899-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

l.a, George Byron Burdick, 1900-1, De Ruyter, N. Y. 

f.a. Georgine M. Burdick, 1900-1, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Iff. Harry Ethan Burdick, 1902-, Mexico, N. Y. 

m. Hbnry Clinton Burgbss, 1903-, Flint. N. Y. 

l.a, Kate Peck Burghardt, 1901-3, Lestershire, N. Y. 

f,a. Ida Eagle Burgin, 1895-8, Walton, N.Y. Present Residence, { 

40th Street, New York, N. Y. 

f,a. Belle H. Burhans, 1900-1, Fayetteville, N.Y. 

l,a. Harry Newton Burhans, 1902-3, Syracuse. N. Y. 

l.a. George Robert Burke, 1897-1901, Syracuse, N. Y. 

/. John Hbnry Burkb, 1901-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

fa. Vera M. Louise Burkhart, 1 901-3, Dansville, N. Y. 

l.a. Leslie M. Burlingame, 1901-2, Union, N. Y. 

l.a. Lillian Lucy Bumham, 1900-1, Syracuse. N. Y. 

l.a, Charlbs R. Burns, 1903-, Hagaman, N. Y. 

/. Frbdbrick T. Burns, 1901-, A X, Akron, N. Y. 

f,a. Grace Estella Burns, 1899-1900, Syracuse, N. Y. 

fa. Grace Ethel Burns, 1902-3, Syracuse, N. Y. 

tn. JosBPH Raymond Burns, 1903-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

f.a. Mary Hannah Bums, 1898-9, Syracuse, N. Y. 



mm-G&ADXjATBs 515 

Thomas Frmnds Burns, 1900-1, Richfield Springs, N. Y. 

Waltbr Wiluam Burns, 1903-, Greenport, N. Y. 
and/. LBnnius ORDWAy.BuRRBi.L) {iM.) i902-,(/.) 1903-, 4A0, Can- 
isteo, N. Y. 

Amtoinbttb Bakbr Burt, 1902-, Buffalo, N. Y. 

JuuA Macmillan Burton, 1903-, Madison, N. Y. 

Arthur Corbin Bush, 1900-1, 1902-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Edna Lucili.b Bush, 1901-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Sara Edna Bush, 1902- Canajoharie, N. Y. 

Esther Ayres Bushnell, 1899-1900. Collamer, N. Y. 

Hbrbbrt Lbb Bushnbll, 1902-, E. Randolph, N. Y. 

Arthur Elgin Butler, 1901-3, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Gilford Brinton Butler, 1898-9. S. Thomaston, Me. 

Martha Isabel Butler, 1902-3, Jordan, N. Y. 

Orval Theodore Butler, 1900-1, Craigeclare, N. Y. 
;. Lillian Butlin, 1900-3. n B «, Buffalo, N. Y. 
I. EiiiLY Hblbn Buttbrfibi«d, 1903-, Detroit, Mich. 
(. Bbrtha Bdwinna Button, 1903-, Syracuse, N. Y. 
t. Francis Charlbs Byrn, 1901-, Cortland, N. Y. 

Charles Vincent Byrne, 189^, 1900-1, Syracuse, N. Y. 
t. and /. Richard Peter Byrne, (l.a ) i898-9.(/. ) 1899- 1901, Pompey, N. Y. 
(. Ruth Cabeen, 190 1-3, S3n'acuse, N. Y. 
I. Harold Shank Cadmus, 1903-, Syracuse, N. Y. 
:. Bthel Amanda Cady, 190 1-3, B. Chatham, N. Y. 

Florence Esther Cady, 1900-3, E. Chatham, N. Y. 

Rbbd Wiluam Cady, 1903- , Tronpsburg. N Y. 

Frbd Lbland Cagwin, 1903-. 4 A 0. Verona. N. Y. 

Murray Allbn Cain, 19 )3-, Niagara Palls, N Y. 

Charlbs Arthur Call, 190)-, Stafford, N. Y. 

Annb Calthrop, 188^4, 1900-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Everard ]. Calthrop, 1892-3, 1899-1900, Syracuse, N. Y. Instructor 
in Vocal Music in Syracuse University, 1899-1901. Position in 
the Collegiate Church, New York City, 1901. Married 8 April 
1901, Mary Louise Rawlins of Syracuse, N Y. 

Albbrt Edwin Campbbll, 190 1-, 4 A 0, A X Canastota, N. Y. 
. and/.ff. Edna Campbbll, (/.a. ) i90O-,(/'a.) 1901-2, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Eva Pansy Campbbll. 19* 3-, Scranton, Pa. 

JBSSIB IVA CAMPBBLL, 1903-, Weedsport, N. Y. 

Lbwis H\rvby Campbbll. 18^1900, 1903- Syracuse, N. Y. 

Lucie Campbell. 1897- 190c, n B 4. Vemou, N. Y. 

Raymond Nindb Campbbll. 1903-. Syracuse, N. Y. 

Dora Elizabeth Candee. 189S-9, Manlius, N Y. 
u LbMoinb Hamlin Candbb. 1903-, Holland Patent, N. Y. 

Josft Carballbira y Canbllas, 190 1-, Porto Rico. 
:. and /. Francis Archibald Camfibz4>, (/.o.) 1900-1, (/.)i9oi-, 
BllicottTillt, N. Y. 



5l6 NON-GRADUATBS 

m, Richard Robert Canna, iqoi-, Amsterdam, N. Y. 

a.s. Edward John Martin Cannon, 1900-, B n, Niagara Falls, I 

Member S. U. Football Teapi, 1900-. 
l.a. and /. Donald Anderson Capen, 1902-, A K B, Flashing, N. Y 

l.a, Lela Beatrice Capron, iqoi-, Troy, N. Y. 

Iff. Jos^ Carbai^leira, 1900-, San Juan, Porto Rico. 

l.a. Alfred Cardwell, 1898-9, Syracuse, N. Y. 

l,a. George Henry Carl, 1896-8, Ithaca, N. Y. 

l.a, Anna Laura Cari^eton, 1903-, Middle Granville, N. Y. 

f.a. Marietta Blanche Carley, 1897-8, Syracuse, N. Y. 

La. Arthur G. Carman, 1903-, Macedon Center, N. Y. 

/. Alexander Spurgeon Carlson, 1903-, Jamestown, N. Y. 

l.a. Harold Irwin Carothers, 1902-3, ♦ K *, Milton, Pa. 

l.a. Beulah J. Carpenter, 1903-, Oneonta, N. Y. 

/.a. Claudia M. Carpeirter, 1899-1900, Henderson, N. Y. 

Im. Florence Susan Carpenter, 1903-, Verona, N. Y. 

La. Jessie May Carpenter, 1903-, Syracuse, N. Y. 
l.a. and /.a. PERRY A. Carpenter, (/.a.) i9oo-,(/.a.)i90o-i, Fleet 

Pa. 

l.a. Roy William Carpenter, 1900-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

/.a, Fred A. Carr, 1901-3, Scranton, Pa. 

f.a. Hannah Carr, 1903-, Fulton, N. Y. 

/. ]>wis Smith Carr, 1 900-1, Union Springs, N. Y. 

fa. Lake Erie Carrell, 1899-1901, Syracuse, N. Y. 

l.a. Avery Newton Carrier, 1903-, Phoenix, N. Y. 

/. Leman James Carrier, 1896-8, Phoenix, N. Y. 

/.a. Clara Louise Carson, 1902-, K A O, Onondaga Valley, N. Y. 

/ a. Charles Herbert Carter, 1901-, Meriden, Conn. 

/.a. Florence Adelaide Carter, 1902-3, Oneida, N. Y. 

a s. Leon Thompson Carter, 1900-, Carthage, N. Y. 

f.a, Herman Wright Carver, 190 1-3, Cortland, N. Y. 

l.a. IVAH Mary Carver, 1901-, Skaneateles, N. Y. 

m, William Hollenback Cary, 1901-, Barton, N. Y. 

/a. Allie B Case, 1903-, Norwich, N. Y. 

/. I. Homer Tilden Case, 1900-3, Onondaga, N. Y. 

f.a. Helen Mildred Casler, 1900-1. Syracuse, N. Y. 

l.a. Rev A Grace Casper, 1903-, Binghamton, N. Y. 

a.s. Charles Daniel Castle, 190a-, Higginsville, N. Y. 

fa. Cora M. Cately, 1903-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

l.a. Lewis Blaine Chaloux, 1901-, ♦PA. Watervliet, N. Y. 

f.a. Alice Filmore Chamberlain, 1897-1900, Seneca Falls, N. Y. 

fa. Carroll Chamberlain, 1903-, Wyoming, N. Y. 

/a. Roy Pritchard Chamberlain. 1899-1900, 1902-, Syracuse, > 

l.a. Arthur V. Chamberlain, 1902-3, Knoxville, N. Y. 

L George John Champlin, 1897-8, ^ T, ^ A #, Montreal, Can. 

f.a, Joseph Todd Champlin, 1899-1900, Syracuse, N. Y. 



NON-GRADUATBS 517 

LbRoy WallacB Chandlbr, 1902-, Baltimore, Md. ' 

William Lewis Chandler, 1902-, Smyrna, Del. 

Cornelia Belle Chapin, 1900-1, Lima, N. Y. 

Albert Jamet Chapman, 1901-2, Peckville, N. Y. 
and Iff. Edward B. Chapman, (/.a.) 1902-3, (ii».) 1903-, E Syracuse, 
N. Y. 

Edward Davidson Chapman, 1896-8, Onondaga Valley, N. Y. 

Elizabeth B. Chapman, 1900-1, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Leon Warren Chapman, 190 2-, Owego, N. Y. 

Mary Ethel Chapman, 1902-3, A *, Saranac, N. Y. 

Mildred Handy Chapman, 1899-1900, E. Cobbleskill, N. Y. 
. Ross McClure Chapman, 1898-9. *K^, Belleville, N. Y. 
:. Harriet B. Chase, 1897-8. Palmyra. N. Y. 

Helen Frances Chase, 1901-, Syracuse, N. Y. 
!. Mabel Saloma Chase. 1903-, Syracuse, N. Y. 
t. Mrs. Mary P. Chase, 1898-1900, Syracuse, N. Y. 
I. Nina Prances Chatfield, 1902-, Syracuse, N. Y. 
. Clyde E. Cheeseman, 1902-, Antwerp, N. Y. 
\. George Nelson Cheney, 1901-3, Syracuse, N. Y. 
.and/. Lloyd Lyman Cheney, (/.a) i902-,(/.) 1903-, ♦ K *, Sala- 
manca, N. Y. 

LoRBN Warren Chester, 1903-, Albion, N. Y. 

Albert Joseph Chidester, 1902-, Sempronius, N. Y. 

Floyd Earle Chidester, 1903-, Newark Valley, N. Y. 

Ella May Chrislbr, 1903-, Marcellus, N. Y. 

Maynard D. Church, 1902-, Wellsville. N. Y. 

Esther Anna Churchill, 1899-1900, Onondaga Valley, N. Y. 

Jessie Louise Clapp, 1898-9, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Raymond G. Clapp. 1900-1, Fulton, N. Y. 

Agnes Caroline Clark, 1903-, Auburn, N. Y. 

Albert Millard Clark, 1903-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Alma Grace Clark, 1896-8, Lima, N. Y. 

Arthur George Clark, 189S-9, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Burton William Clark, 1903-, Utica, N. Y. 

Edith Zenette Clark, 1894-8, Wellsboro, Pa. 

Elizabeth G. Clark, 1900-2, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Ernest Harry Clark, 1898-9, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Jennie L. Clark, 1902-3, West Bangor, N. Y. 

Jessie S. Clark, 1898-9. Syracuse. N. Y. 

Julia Kathryn Clark, 1897-8, K A 6, Belmont, N. Y. 

Lena May Clark, 1902-3, Syracuse, N. Y. 

LiTA May Clark, 1903-, Waterloo, N. Y. 

Marcia Albertina Clark, 1902-3, Waterloo, N. Y. 

Robert Warren Clark, 1902-, ^ T. Syracuse, N. Y. 

Roacoe Goodsell Cl«rk, 1900-1, Sheffield. Mass. 

Sedgwick Aahton Clark, 1 900-1, Fultonville, N. Y. 



5l8 NON-GRADUATB8 

La. 'pRA.ifK Dana Clarkb, 1901-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

f.a. Louise Clary, 1895-8, Syracuse, N. Y. 

/.a. BrrTha G. Ci«Bvbi«and, 1901-, Naples, N. Y. 

/.a, Genevieve Cleveland. 1899-1900, Amsterdam, N. Y. 

/a. Frank Barl Clifford. 1900-, Perry. N. Y. 

/.a. Grace M Clifford. 189S-9, Pulaski. N. Y. 

/a Effie CliflPt. 1902-3, Syracuse. N. Y. 

l.a. Prank Stevens Clift. 1903-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

/.a. Harriet Elizabeth Clowminzer, 1898-9. Utica, N. Y. 

/.a. Gertrude Lois Clutb. 1903-. Sherman. N. Y. 

/.a. Fl rence Coan. 1898-9. Syracuse, N. Y. 

/.a. Ernest Barnard Cobb. 1901-3, Ithaca. N. Y. 

/a. George L. Cobb. 1902-3, Syracuse, N. Y-. 

/.a. Gbrtrudb Belle Cobb, 1903-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

La, Lydia Aurelia Cobb, 1899-190.), P 4 B, Ul3rs6e8, Pa. 

m. Mabel Lozany Cobb. 1903-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

La. John Charles Coburn. 1903-. Almond. N. Y. 

/.fl. Fannie Lassley Cochran. 1902-3, E. Syracuse, N. Y. 

La. and/.fl. Winifred Coddington, {La.) 1893-6 ,* i897-8,(/.fl.) i899-i90( 

Syracuse. N. Y. 

y.fl. Jeannette Agnes Coe, 1901-3. Theresa. N. Y. 

La. Lulu Ardblla Cob. 1900-, Rochester, N. Y. 

La. ISABELLB Pine Coffin. 1900-. Athens, N. Y. 

f,a. Edna Allan Cogswell, 1901-3, Mansfield, Pa. 

/.a. Elsie Cohen, 1900-. Syracuse, N. Y. 

La. James Olin Coit, 1903-. * K *, Pot<idam, N. Y. 

f.a. Jbnnib Elizabbth Coit, 1899-, Syracuse. N. Y. 

La. Lawrence Stitzer Coit, 1903-, * K *, Potsdam, N. Y. 

La. Harmon Oliver Cole, Jr., 1903-, Wellsburg, N. Y. 

La. Nellie Cole, 1899-1900, Solvay, N. Y. 

/.fl. Sadie Louise Collin, 1900-1, Fayetteville, N. Y. 

/.fl. Lbwis Edward Collings. 1902-, A T, Oneida, N. Y. 

/".fl. Ethel Florence Collins. 1898-1903, Kenwood, N. Y. 

f.a. Florbncb Esthbr Collins, 1903-, Adams, N. Y. 

/. Frank Hughes Collins, 1901-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

La. Mary Collins, 1902-3, Chateauguy, N. Y. 

f.a. Walter Dannat Collins. 1903-, Newburgh, N. Y. 

La, Morton Christian Collister. 1903-. So. Byron, N. Y. 

La. Madge Horton Colt, 190 1-3, n B *. Buffalo. N. Y. 

a.s. Stanley Colter, 1902-, *T, E. Ordnge, N. J. 

/.fl. Alice R. Colvin, 190 i-, K K r, Parsons, Pa. 

La. and/.fl. Cecila Ruth Colvin, (La.) 1901-3. (/.fl.) 1902-3, K KP, S 

ville, N. Y. Married 2 Sept. 1903, Dewey Uawley. 

La. Herbert Tylbr ComF'>rt, 1900-, Wellsburg, N. Y. 

/.fl. Nina Lavinia Compson, 1903-, Seneca Falls, N. Y. 

/.fl. Jambs Matthbw Conan, 19P3-, Syracuse, N. Y. 



NON-GRADUATES 519 

AXTCR BSRTHA CONCANNON, I9O2*, Victor, N. Y. 

Brucb Hawley Conger, 1903-, Bridgeport, Conn. 

Mrs. F. L. Conger, 1900-3, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Berthft Augusta Conklin, 1901-2, Bridgeport, N. Y. 

William Roscoe Conklin, 1898-9, E. Onondaga, N. Y. 

Arthur Ray Conley, 1900-1, Randolph, N. Y. 

Daisy Augusta Connell, 1901-2, Baldwinsville, N. Y. 

Emma L. Connell, 1901-2, Baldwinsyille, N. Y. 

Lottie Ethel Connell, 190 i-, Syracuse, N. Y. 
. *Sarah Gertrude Connell, 1899- 1903, Baldwinsville, N. Y. 

Horace C. Connette, 1900-1, Spracuse, N. Y. 

Marie Louise Connolly, 1903-, Scranton. Pa. 

Margaret Conroy, 1899- 1900, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Frances J. Consedine, 1902-3, Olean, N. Y. 

Clara J. Converse, 1898-9, Woodville, N. Y. Married. 
. Ernest Franklin Conway, 1903-, N. Syracuse, N. Y. 

Bertha Lena Cook, 1900-1, Norwich. N. Y. 

Floyd H. Cook, 1903-, Ayoca, N. Y. 
!. tnd/a. JsssB Norman Cook, (la,) 1 900-1, (/a.) 1901-, B O n, 

Webster, N. Y. 
I. Marjorie Faye Cook, 1903-, Cato, N. Y. 
f. Mary Lbonb Cook, 1902-, K A 8, West Winfield, N. Y. 

Pearl Gordon Cook, 1898-9, 4 A <^, Jamestown, N. Y. Married 25 
Dec. 1900, Mary Stambough of Youngstown, Pa. 

Reuben C. Solmes Cook, 1902-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

RuPORD Byron Cook, 1902-, Cazenovia, N. Y, 

Mabel Juliet Cooke, 1903-, Tx>wville, N. Y. 

Harris Sicks Cookingham, 1903-, Red Hook, N. Y. 

John Gippord Cooley, 1902-. ^ K ^i", Canandaigua, N. Y. 

Louise Evelyn Cooley, 1901-, A r, Granby, Conn. 

Albert Coit Coon, 1897-1901, 4 K i", Oswego, N. Y. Manager S. U. 
Football Team 1900. 

Edith Arvilla Coon, 1900-3, Oneida, N. Y. 
and /la. Paith Jaqueline Coon, (/.a.) 1900-1, (/.«.) 1901-, KKT, 
Olean. N. Y. 

Helen Coon, 1900-1, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Mabib K. Coonby, 1903-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Cynthia Lucinda Coonrad, 1898-9, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Clara M. A. Cooper. 1 896-1901, Durham, N. Y. 

Blla Mildred Cooper, 1 899-1 900, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Mabel Lewis Cooper, 1901-2, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Walter James Cooper, 1899-1903, A K E, Syracuse, N. Y. 
and/. Arthur S. Copbland, {l.a.) 1902, (/.) 1903-, Geneseo, N. Y. 

Henry P. Copbland, 1901-, W. Webster, N. Y. 

Irene Shepard Copley, 1900-1, P * B, Antii^erp, N. Y. 

Bruce Bakbr Corbin, 1903-, Owego, N. Y. 



520 NON-GRADUATBS 

/.a. Lena May Corbin, 1897-9, AAA, Syracuse, N. Y. * 
/.a. KvBi^Yiv Plbming Corkran, i903-» Georgetown, Del. 
f,a. Jennie Alta Cornish, 1901-3, Syracuse, N. Y. 
/. and /.a. Henry D. Cornwall, (/.) 1900-, (/.a.) 1901-, ♦ T, ♦ A ♦, Al 

dria Bay, N. Y. 
La, Lbon Hastings Cornwai.1, 1903-, "^ T, Alexandria Bay, N. Y 
a.5. Charles M. Cortelyon, A T, W. New Brighton, N. Y. 
f,a. JOSBPHiNB SouTHBRTON CORWiN, 1903-, Mt. Vcmon, N. Y. 
/.tf. Robert Cory, 1899-1900, Syracuse, N. Y. 
/. and /.a. George Justin Costello, 1898-9, Syracuse, N. Y. 
/. William Joseph Costello, 1898-1900. « A «, Watervale, N. Y. 
a,s, Db Nbra Autrbd Cotton, 1902-, Syracuse, N. Y. 
/. Arthur Oscar Couch, 1899-1900, E. Onondaga, N. Y. 
a.5. Wii,LiAM R. CouGHTRY. 1902-, Syracuse, N. Y. 
f,a, Helen C. Coulston, 1900-1, Mt. Jewett, Pa. 
/.a. Jambs Archibai«d Coultbr, 1903-. Bovina Center, N. Y. 
/. Lb Roy Farnham Coursbn, 1903-. Candor, N. Y. 
tf.j. William Jacob Covbrt, 1901-, Newburgh, N. Y. 
/.a. Laura M. Cowan (Wilson), 1899-1903, K A 8, Baldwinsrille, N 
f,a, Mariblla Cowan, 190 1-, Syracuse, N. Y. 
f.a, Bessie Mayre Cowic, 1899-1900, Syracuse, N. Y. 
f,a, Florence Marie Cox, 1897-8, n B *, Seneca Falls, N. Y. 
/.a. H^ldne Weston Cox, 1897-1900, Ballston Springs, N. Y. Mtr 

Nov. 1900. Justus L. Bulkley, Jr.,(No. 276i)of SandyCreek 
nf. and /.fl. John Wesley Cox, (f».) 1900-1, 1902-3, (/.a ) 1901-2, 

heads, N. Y. 
f,a, Edna Louise Coykendall, 1901-3, K A 8, Elmira, N. Y. 
/.fl. George Lester Crabb, 1902-3, Cape Vincent, N. Y. 
/.a. Horace Arthur Crabb, 1900-1, Cape Vincent, N. Y. 
La, Harriet Edith Craft, 1898-1901, Westfield, N. Y. 
f,a, Anna M. Cramer, 1898-9, Syracuse, N. Y. 
f,a, Marion Cramer, 1899-1900, Jordan, N. Y. 
f,a. Sara W. Cramer, 1902-3, Lyons, N. Y. 
f,a, Charlbs Watts Cramp, 1902-, Oneida, N. Y. 
f,a, Emma May Crandall, 1902-, Oneida, N. Y. 
/.a. Margarbt Crandall, 1903-, Syracuse, N. Y. 
La. and /. Charlbs Lorbn Cranb, {La,) 1900-1, (/.) 1901-, A X, 

son, N. Y. 
f.a, Edith Gertrude Craner, 1897-8, Jordan, N. Y. 
La, Enid Hbrbbrt Crawford, 1903-, Liverpool, N. Y. 
La, T, Manon Crawford, 190 1-3, Syracuse, N. Y. Married 5 Jul 

Alberta Maxwell of Win field, Kas. 
/. William Jambs Doanb Crawford, 1903-, Canastota, N. Y. 
La, Margaret Cosgrove Creech, 1900- 1, Whitehall, N. Y. 
f,a, Charles Clarence Creegan, Jr., 1899-3, Brooklyn. N. Y. 
/.a. and /. Prbd Douglass Cribb, (/.a.) 19C0-, (/.) 1903-, 4 K ir, 

daigua, N. Y. 



NON-GRADUATBS 5^1 

/.a. Adelaide Crim, Z900-1, A r, Richfield Springs, N. Y. Teacher at 

Monticello, N. Y., 1901-. 
l.a. and m. Brucb Jonas Crisman, (/.a.) 1902-3, (if».) 1903-, ^ r A, Bing- 

hamton, N. Y. 
aj. PosTBJt Baij>win Crockbr, 1902-, Niagara Falls, N. Y. 

aj. C1.AR8NCB Rm. Crockbtt, 1901-, Syracuse, N. Y. 
/.a. Maurice James Crockett. 1897-8, £. Onondaga, N. Y. 

l.a. Maudb Emma Cropoot, 1903-, Sinclairville, N. Y. 

La, MiNNiB Dratt Cropoot, 1900-, AAA, Syracuse, N. Y. 

U, AI3BRT J. Cropt, 1902-, Rubermont, Va. 

/.a, Goldie Crofut« 1902-3, Jordan, N. Y. 

/.a. George Franklin Crommie, 1899-1900, Syracuse, N. Y. 

m. Amelia Marinda Cromwell, 1901-2, Syracuse, N. Y. 

a.s, Edward Davis Cronk, 1902-, New York Mills, N. Y. 

/.a. Ada Juua Cross, 1903-, Washington, D. C. 

/. Earl Richmond Cross, 1902-, Warsaw, N. Y. 

1.0, Elbanorb Addib Cross, 1900-, Fultonviile, N. Y. 

a.s. Garrbtt p. S. Cross, 1902-, Fultonviile, N. Y. 

U. LaDette Robert Cross, 1900-1, 4 K i^, Syracuse, N. Y. Member of 
the S. U. Football Team, 1900-. Position with the Standard Oil 
Co. at Oswego, N. Y. Married 7 June i902,Cora Elizabeth Finn. 

/.a. Minnie Adelaide Cross, 1900-1, Stanley, N. Y. 

U, Hbnry Edward Crosslby, 1898-, WilUamstown, N. Y. 

/^. Alden Martin Crounse, 1898-1900, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

l-a, Florence Beecher Crouse, 1896-8, Syracuse, N. Y. 

/•a. Jean Louise Crouse, 1900-1, P ^ B, Broadalbin, N. Y. 

i.a. Bessie Wisewell Crowell, 1902-3, Dennis, Mass. 

a.5. Chbstbr Dunbar Crowbll, 1900-, Syracuse, N. Y. Member of 

the S. U. Track Team, 1902-. 
/.a. Winifred Irene Crowley, 1898-9, Onondaga Valley, N. Y. 
/.a, Mabel Louise Crum, 1900-1, K K P, Baldwinsville, N. Y. 
m, James Mott Crumb, 1898-9, S. Otselic, N. Y. 
a,s. Arthur Garpibld Crysi«br, 1901-, Syracuse, N. Y. 
/.a. W1144AM Albbrt Cubby, 1903-, Syracuse, N. Y. 
a.i. Eugbnb a. Cuddbback* 1902-, B 8 n, Skaneateles, N. Y. 
/.and /.a. BBRT L. Cumbbr, (la,) 1901, (/.) 1902-, A K E, Seneca Palls, 

N. Y. 
iui. Orviuub Edwin Cumings, 1903-, A T, Greene, N. Y. 
/,a, Richard J. Cummings, 1899-1902, Syracuse, N. Y. 
/m, Fi^rbncb Gii^bbrt Cuningham, 1902-, Syracuse, N. Y. 
/la. Thomas Crousb Cuningham, 1899-, Syracuse, N. Y. 
/. Edgar Bennett Curtis, 1901-2, ^ K i^, N. Jackson, Pa. 
/.a. Blmer Ellsworth Curtis, 1 899-1900, Middle Granville, N. V. 
/.a. Pannib Winiprbd Curtis, 1903-, Syracuse, N . Y. 
i.a. Harlow Dunham Curtis, 1902-3, Manlius, N. Y. 
/. Harry A13ERT Curtis, 1903-, Newburyport, Mass. 



522 NON-GRADUATSS 

/.a. Katherine I. Curtis, 1900-1, Syncnse, N. Y. 

/.«. Nellie B. Curtis, 1898-9, SyrKOse, N. Y. 

fM. Nettie Catherine Curtis, 1898-1900, Syracuse, N. Y. 

/ a. Hrnry Hbr&ick Curtiss, 1902-, Ben, Onondaga Valley, N. 

La. Morris D. Curtiss, 1902-, Onondai^ Valley, N. Y. 

/.a. Emily Cnshing, 1899- 1900, Syracuse, N. Y. 

/. Nelson LeGrande Cashing, 1898-9, B. Syracoae, N. Y. 

La, OuvB CuSHNBY, 1903-. Syracuse, N. Y. 

/.fl. Bmma Louisb Cdtlkr, 1903-, Upper Jay, N. Y. 

La, John Hbnry Cuykbndaix, 1902-, Auburn, N. Y. 

La, Louisb W. Dahlmann, 1902-, Buffalo. N Y. 

fa, Raymond Egguston Dakin, 1900-, Mt. Kisco, N. Y. 

f.a, and La, LbRoy Bu>Rii>gb Dai.b. (/*.«.) 1899-1902, (La,) 1901-, 

Syracuse, N. Y. 

/. Stephen Gay Daley, 1901-2, Apulia Station. N. Y. 

/.a. EuGBNB Smith Dalton, 1900-1, 1903-, i^ T, SjrrBcuse, N. Y. 

I A, James Curtice Dalton, 1898-9, Mansfield, Pa. 

f,a. Gbrtrudb Amrua DamaWOOD, 1903-, Savannah, N. Y. 

La, W11J.IAM Samubl Dane, 1902-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

f.a, Mary E. Daniels, 1900-3, Syracuse, N. Y. 

a.s, Hbnry Dargbrt. 1902-, Buffalo, N. Y. 

La. Anna Mabbl Darrohn, 1903-, Rush, N. Y. 

f.a. CijLRA ELI.BN Darrohn, 1903-, Rush, N. Y. 

a.s, Lbon Ouvbr Darronb, 1903 -, Syracuse, N. Y. 

fa. Elizabeth Dattan, 1900-1, Syracuse, N. Y. 

la. Ursui^ Dattan, 1902-, S>Tacnse, N. Y. 

fa. Charlotte David, 1899-1900, Fulton, N. Y. 

La. George Lewis David, 1902-3, Parish, N. Y. 

La. Blanchb Irbnb Davidson, 1900-, Belmont, N. Y. 
/. and La. John Oscar Davibs, (/.a.)i9oi-,(/.)i9Q3-, Russell Hill, Pi 

a.s, Richard Pricb Davibs, 1902-, Middle Granville, N. Y. 

f.a, Sara Ellbn Davibs, 1903-, W. Winfield, N. Y. 

f.a, Alice M. Davis, Watertown, N. Y. 

La. Darius Alton Davis, 1903-, Ft. Covington, N. Y. 
La. BXkA/.a. Edna Eva Davis, 1902-3, Ballston Spa., N. Y. 

/ui. Faith Ambua Davis, 1902-, K K r, Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

/. Harry Leander Davis, 1897-8, Syracuse, N. Y. Entered from 

nell. 

f,a, Inez Estella Davis, 1898-9, Mariposa, N. Y. 

f,a. Mab Bbixb Davis, 1903-, A r, Cazenovia, N. Y. 

f.a. Marie Lindemer Davis, 1899-1902, Syracuse, N. Y. Instruct 

Vocal Music in Syracuse University, 1902-. 
La. and /. Sy 1 vanus a Davis, {Im. ) 190a-, (/. ) 1902-3, ♦PA, Wilkes Bam 

luu William Howard Davis, 1903-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

/.a. Mabel Winter Davison, 1901-2, II B #, E. Orange, N. J. 

La, Harriet Day, 1902-3, Chittenango, N. Y. 



NON-ORADUAYSS 5^3 

Samuei. Walton Day, 1901-, Skaneateles, N. Y. 

* William Warley Lionel Day, 1897-^, Highland Falls, N. Y. Mem- 
ber of the S. U. Track Team, 1898-. Died Feb. 1900. 

Stephen Strong Dajan, 1 900-1, Syracnse, N. Y. 
nd La. Charles Hodgb Dayton, (/.a.)i899~,(/- )iqoi-, S3rFactise, N. Y. 
and/.a. Howard Hay Dayton, 1902-, Syracnse, N. Y. 

Florence May Deady, 1899-1900, Lyons, N. Y. 

Laura Anna Dban, 1903-, Union, N. Y. 

Nina Arzella Dean, 1903-, Auburn, N. Y. 

Willard Lawrence Dean, 1903-4, Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 

Grace Lavine Deavor, 1903-, Syracnse, N. Y. 

Minor J. DeCamp, 1901-2, West Groton, N. Y. 
ind La, M. Albbrtie DeFrank, 1900-1, 1903-, Utica, N. Y. 

Alden English DeLano, 1898-9, Batavia, N. Y. 

Emma Tyler Delavan, 1898-1903, AAA, Owego, N. Y. 

Morse Orton Dell Plain, 1901-3, X A Z. Tehuantepec, Mexico. 

Charles E. DeLong, 1903-, Euclid, N. Y. 

Roy Benton Deming, 1902-3, Friendship, N. Y. 

Charles William Demong, 1902-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Clarence B. Dempster, 1901-, Mannsville, N. Y. 

Clarence James Dence, 1903-, Brewerton, N. Y. 

Carolyn Charlotte Denick, 1902-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Fannie Gertrude Denio, 1900-3, n B ^, Middletown, Conn. 

Deo Lee Dennis, 1899-1901, Bldred, Pa. 

Lula Bertha Dennis, 1900-1, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Harriet De Revere, 189S-9, Watertown, N. Y. 

Florence Rbna Deuchler, 1900-, Lyons, N. Y. 

Kathryn Elmira Deuel, 1899-1901, A <^, Pine Plains, N. Y. 

Loretta Devendorf, 1900-1, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Hiram De Voe, 1899-1900, Pine Hill, N. Y. 

Nicholas DeVoe, 1899-1900, Pine Hill, N. Y. 

Louise De Witt, 1899-1900, Saugerties, N. Y. 

Henry Merritt Dexter, 1903-, Newport, N. Y. 

LiLAH A. Dibble, 1903-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Dorothy May Dickerson, 1902-, n B <^, Akron, N. Y. 

James Silas Dickerson, 1903-, Oran, N. Y. 

Lottie May Dickie, 1902-3, Vernon, N, Y. 

Harriet Alice Dickerson, 1901-, Macedon, N. Y. 

Georgia Alberta Dickovbr, 1903-, Wilkes Barre, Pa. 
and/. Floyd Kingsley Dibpendorp, (/.a.)i9Oi-,(/.)i903-, Canajo- 
harie, N. Y. 

Marion Diependorp, 1902-, A ^, Canajoharie, N. Y. 

Marie Agnes Diel, 1899-1900, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Sara Mae Dievbndorp, 1903-, Currytown, N. Y. 

Mrs. Thomas Dignum, 1899-1900, 1903-, Auburn, N. Y. 

Clarence Dillenbeck, 1899-1903, Syracuae, N. Y. 



534 NON-GRADUATBS 

/.a. Sarah Dillenbeck, 1900-1, Syracuse, N. Y. 

La, J. J. Dillon, 1898-1901, Syracuse, N. Y. Entered from Nil 

University. 

/.a. LouiSB Kathrink Dinbhart, 1903-, Liverpool, N. Y. 

a.5. William H. Dinehart, 1902-3. Copake, N. Y. 

m. Elda Martin Dings, 1901-, Henderson, N. Y. 

I XL, Jambs Edward Dinnbbn, 1903-, S3rracnse, N. Y. 

/.a, Harribt Mvrtii,i,a Disbrow, 1902-, K A 0, New Rochelle, N. 
I, a, and /. John Alexander Dissel, (l,a,) 1898-9, (/.) 1899-1900, Syn 

N. Y. 

/,a, Mary S. Dissell, 1902-3, Syracuse, N. Y. 

/a. Florbncb Lura Distin, 1900-, A r, Fulton, N. Y. 

l.a. Jambs Arthur Distin, 1901-, ♦AG, Fulton, N. Y. 

/.a, Evangblinb Emily Divbr« 1903-, Rush, N. Y. 

f.a, MiLUB Cathbrinb Divbr, 1902-, Rush, N. Y. 

l,a, AucB HoRTOM Doanb, 1903-, Mansfield, Pa. 

f.a, Carrie Angeline Doane, 1902-3, Skaneateles, N. Y. 

f,a, Mary J. Dockery, 1901-3, Syracuse. N. Y. 

/.a. Bbrtha Fraybr Dodgb, 1900-1, 1903-, Wayland, N. Y. 

/.a. Bertha May Dodson, 1902-3, Syracuse, N. Y. 

a,s. Jambs Dollard, 1902-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

a.s, Edward John Donbbbrg, 1901-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

l,a, Ella Donigan, 1902-3, Syracuse, N. Y. 

f,a, Helen Donohue, i9oc-i, Syracuse, N. Y. 

/.a, Cora Louise Doolittle, 1902-3, Brockport, N. Y. Teacher at 

nianca, N. Y., 1903-. 

l.a, Charlbs Simpson Dopp, 1901-, Lassellsville, N. Y. 

a,s, Ralph Kirk Doran, 1903-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

/,a, Gracb Mab Dornburgh, 1900-, Ticondero^i^a, N. Y. 

I, a, Samuel Harold Dorr, 1900-1, A T, Waterto?m, N. Y. State En] 

at San Francisco, Cal. 

/.a. Gbrtrddb Sarah Dougall, 1902-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

La, WiLUAM Eluson Doughty, 1899-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

La, Emma M. Douglass, 1902-, Canandaigua, N. Y. 

La, Wbslby Hbald Douglass, 1900-, ^ r A, Granyille, N. Y. 

f.a, Harry Esty Douncb, 1903-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

La, Charles Farrington Dow, 1898-9, A T, Syracuse, N. Y. Intc 

Agent, 1900-. 

/.a, Mary A. Dowd, 1901-2, E. Syracuse, N. Y. 

fa, Adel3rn Sophia Downing, 1 901-2, Moravia, N. Y. 

/,a. Lillian Rose Downing (Carl), 1897-8, Syracuse, N. Y. Present 

dence Greenwich, L. I. 

fa. May Elizabeth Downing, 1899-1901, Oneida, N. Y. 

La, Lbila S. Dowsland, 1901-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

La, Jambs Lbwis Doylb, 1903-, Manlius, N. Y. 

La, Anna Pattbn Draimb, 1902-, A^, Syracuse, N. Y. 



NON-GRADUATES 525 

. Chari,B8 Arthttr Drake, 1902-, Norwich, N. Y. 

Emma Delano Drake, 1 899-1900, Jordan, N. Y. 

Gborgiana Drake, 1901-, Savannah, N. Y. 

Marguerite Drescher, 1903-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Walter Nicholas Drew, 1902 -, B 8 n, Oneida, N. Y. 

Birs. Ambrose Driscoll, 1899-1900, Syracase, N. Y. 

Charles R. Drum, 1901-2, Syracuse, N. Y. 
I. Gladys Dryer, 1903-, Wellsvillc, N. Y. 
:. Clifford Llewelyn Du Bois, 1903-, N. Syracuse, N. Y. 
{. Thomas Edward Dudley, 1896-7, Troy, N. Y. 
I, John Charles Duncan, 1903-, Rochester, N. Y. 
r. Harry E. Dunham, 1902- , Baldwinsyille, N. Y. 
t. Jennie Nina Dunham, 1 897-1901, Baldwinsyille, N. Y. 
(. Theresa A. Dunham (Bromley), 1894-5, Bridgeport, N. Y. Married 
1898, Charles J. Bromley. Residence, Boulder, Colo. 

1. Etta May Dunkhorst, 1902-3, Syracuse, N. Y. 

2. Mayme Ida Dunlap, 1903-, Great Falls, Mont. 

I. Nora Kathleen Dunn, 1902-3, A <^, Memphis, Tenn. 
I. De Villo Prank Dunster, 1903-, Syracuse, N. Y. 
h Adelaide Julia Durston, 1903-, Skaneateles, N. Y. 
z. Alfred Goldsmith Durston, 1900-3, Syracuse, N. Y. 
h Marshall Hurst Durston, 190 i-, Syracuse, N. Y. 
t. Albert Peters Dnssing, 1898-9, Syracuse, N. Y. 
I. Alacb Cooper Dutton, 1901-, Middleburg, N. Y. 
I. Ama Alberta Dutton, 1901-. Middleburg, N. Y. 

Asa Albert Dutton, 1903-, Middleburg, N. Y. 
I. Claude Alfred Duvall, 1898-1900, Tyrone, N. Y. 
.and /.a. James Arthur Dwelle, (/.a.) 1901-3, (/.a.) 1902-3, A K E, Syra- 
cuse, N. Y. 
. *Frmnk Parsons Dye, 1901-, Forestville, N. Y. Died 5 Jan. 1904 at 
Forestville, N. Y. 

Harold Le Roy Dyer, 1900-2, Salina, N. Y. 

Marshall Wheaton Dyer, 1902-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Marcia Van E. Backer, 1903-. Fultonville, N. Y. 

Grace Iman Eager, 1901-2, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Anna Belle Eames, 1902-3, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Charles Smythe Earl, 1897-8, Oswego, N. Y. 

Herbert Ivland Earl, 1898-9, Ogdensburg, N. Y. 

Cathie Annette Eastman, 1903-, Attica, N. Y. 

Joseph Silver Eastman, 1900-, Waterville, N. Y. 

MoLUE Eliza Eastman, 1902-, Watertown, N. Y. 

Fred Roy Kaston, 1899-1900, Candor, N. Y. 
. * Francis Edwin Eaton, 1900-1, A T, Berlin. N. Y. 

Grace Marietta Eaton, 1903-, Eaton, N. Y. 
. Marion Eaton, 1900-3, Fayetteville, N. Y. 

Bemardine E. Ebinger, 1901-2, Syracuse, N. Y. 



586^ NON-GRADUATB8 

Iff. George Albert Eckel, 1896-8, Symcuae, N. Y. 

Iff. Lewis Chari.es Bckbr, 1901-, N S N, Fayetteville, N. Y. 

f,a, Prancena V. V. Eckor, 1 899-1900, Syracuse, N. Y. 

/. Edward Danforth Eddy, Syracuse, N. Y. 

f,a, Marjorie Kneeland Eddy, 1902-3, Syracuse, N. Y. 

/.a. Harry Lbon Edick, 1903-, Parish, N. Y. 

/la. J. H. A. Edmonds, 1899-1900, Syracuse, N. Y. 

a,s, Gordon Edson, 1899-, Caneadea, N. Y. 

/.a. Carolyn Walker Edwards, 1899-1900, Syracuse, N. Y« 

/.a. and /. Edwin Stii«E5 Edwards, (/.a.) 1900, (/.) 1903-, "i^T, Syracn 

N. Y. Member of the S. U. Track Team, 1901-. 

La. Fayb Lbnora Edwards, 1902-, Weedsport, N. Y. 

/.a. Hii^DAGARDB Mary Edwards, 1899-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

La* Leon LaVelle Edwards, 1901-3, Binghamton, N. Y. 

f,a, Marion Stiles Edwards, 1903-, P ^ B, Syracuse, N. Y. 

a.s, W. Leon Edwards, 1903-, Utica, N. Y. 

/. Francis Egan, 1898-9, Lairdsville, N. Y. 

/.a. Lulu Eleanor Eger, 1902-3, New York, N. Y. 

/.a. Beryl Eggleston, 1900-3, Syracuse, N. Y. 

/.a. Anna Eglb, 1903-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

/.a. MertiE Ehi«b, 1902-, Canajoharie, N. Y. 

/la. Gorgo Ehrlich, 1895-1903, Syracuse, N. Y. 

/.a. George William Elderkin, 1897-9, A K E, Oak Park, 111. 

/.a. *Fi.ORA Eldrbd, 1901-4, Oneonta, N. Y. 

La, Frank Earl Eldred, 1899-, Akron, N. Y. 

/.a. Alice Julia Eldredge, 1902-3, Wellsville, N. Y. 

Iff. Charles Edward Elkins, 1899-1900, Pulaski, N. Y. 

I A. Frederick William Eller, 1898-1900, New York, N. Y. Entered b 

Columbia University, 

/.a. Evans Bailey EHicott, 1901-3, 4" T, Medina, N. Y. 

Le, Francbs E. Ei*WOTT, 1903-, Elmira, N. Y. 

La. Chari«bs Byron Ei«us, 1900-, B 9 n, Canandaigua, N. Y. 

a.s. Edward Marion Ei^us, 1901-, Oran, N. Y. 

f.a, Isabella Ellis, 1 901-2, Camillus, N. Y. 

La, Eari. Robbrt Ei«mbr, 1903-. Monroe, Mich. 

La. Albert Le Roy Eltinge, 1899-1900, Highland, N. Y. 

f.a, Mrs. May Gilbert Tabor Eltinge, 1898-1901, Syracuse, N. Y. 

f,a, Dora Louise Ely, 1897-8. Syracuse, N. Y. 

La, Gracb Estbi.i«a Embns, 1901-, A ^ , Fayette, N. Y. 

fff. Bbrtha Francbs Embrick, 1903-, Fulton, N. Y. 

La, Sarah Abigail Emerson, 1896-8, Attica, N. Y. 

/. Charles Wilson Emery, 1899-1900, Syracuse, N. Y. 

f.a, Frances DbEtte Emmons, 1903-, K A 8, Manliua, N. Y. 

f,a, Minnie Virginia Emmons, 1903-, K A 9, Manlius, N. Y. 

La. Anna Marib Engbi«hardt, 1903-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

f.a, Florence Louise England, 1902-3, Syracuse, N. Y. 



NON-GRADUATBS 527 

Maude Josephine England, 1902-3, Syracuse, N. Y. 
Harry Kirk English, 1S99-1900, * T, Albion. N. Y. 
William Rndd Eno, 1901-2, A X. Pine Plains, N. Y. 
Efpib May Enos, 1900-, Adams, N. Y. 
James William Enright, 1900-1, 1902-3. B 8 n, Holly, N. Y. 
Thomas Arthur Enright, 190G-3, Syracuse, N. Y. 
Fi^ORBNCB Ensign, 1903-, Syracuse, N. Y. 
Grace Harribt Entwisti«b, 1901-, Jamestown, N. Y. 
Abram G0UI.D Erisman, 1903-, Lancaster, N. Y. 
Walter Lewis Ernest, 1902-3, Westmoreland, N. Y, 
Sara Errbngy, 1903-, Syracuse, N. Y. 
GwtADYS Richardson Erskinb, 1903-, Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 
Waltbr Aixbn Erskinb, 1902-, Pulaski, N. Y. 
CHARI.BS Hbnry Erway, 1901-, HectoT, N. Y. 
Clara Essig, 1901-2, Syracuse, N. Y. 
William Sears Esterbrook, Ph.B., 1900-1, Syracuse, N. Y. 
Frank Edward Eustbn, 1901-, Syracuse, N. Y. 
.and/. Arthur Li.bwbi«i,yn Evans, (/.a.) 1900-, (/. ) 1903-, Ben. 
Oneida. N. Y. 
Charlbs Howard Evans, 1902-, E. Syracuse, N. Y. 
Julia Harmon Evans, 190J-3, Syracuse, N. Y. 
Stephen Ewen Evans, 1901-3, Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 
Walter D. Evans, 1900- r, Syracuse, N. Y. 
W1LI.IAM Francis Evans, 1903-, Scranton, Pa. 
Harriet Louise Fabing, 1902-3, Dewitt, N. Y. 
GracB Mildrbd Fagan, 1 899-, Syracuse, N. Y. 
W11.LIAM Arthur Pahby, 1900-, Solvay, N. Y. 
Ernbst Fahnbstock, 1902-, Syracuse, N. Y. 
Nora Failing, 1903-, Canajobarie, N. Y. 
Edna May Fairchild, 1899-1900, E. Onondaga, N. Y. 
Marion Ellen Fairchild, 1902-3, S3n'acuse, N. Y. 
AUCB Fakb, 1903-, Stanley, N. Y. 
Gborgb Epplby Falk, 1903-, Syracuse, N. Y. 
Luthbr Ernbst Falkby, 1902-, Phelps, N. Y. 
Alveretta Falvey, 189&-9, Syracuse, N. Y. 
Samuel Benjamin Fares, 189S-190T, Selkirk, N. Y. 
Frank E. Farley, Syracuse, N. Y. 
Lois Elbertine Farman, 1901-3, Syracuse, N. Y. 
Harry Haile Farmer, 1898-9, Haileboro, N. Y. 
Thomas Patrick Farmer, 1931-3, A K R, Syracuse, N. Y. 
LbRov Waldorf Farnham, 1903-, Manlius, N. Y. 
Lois Farnham, 190T-2, Syracuse, N. Y. 
Mary Elizabeth Farnum, 1900-1, Savannah, N. Y. 
Irving Lord Farr, 190 1-2, E. Syracuse, N Y. 
PRANCBS JuUA Farrand, 1902-, Lausiug, Mich. 
Michael J. Farrel, 1899-1900, Syracuse, N. Y. 



538 NON-GRADUATX8 

La. Edith Maude Farrell, 1897-9, AAA, Antwerp, N. Y. Teich 

Oneida High School, 1899- 

/. JamesDonegon Farrell, 1899-1900, Syracuse, N. Y. 

a,s. Lawrence jambs Parrei«i«, 1900-, Webster, N. Y. 

/. Wii«UAM Frederick Parrri,!., 1903-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

La, Harry Wii.i«iam Farrington, 1903-, Baltimore, Md. 

a,s, Robert Cornell Farrington, 1899-1903, ♦ K ♦, Cardiff, N. V. 

/.a. Pearl Rosamond Fatout, 1899-1902, A ^, Indianapolis, Ind. 

a,5. Axfrbd Joseph Faui,dbr, 1902-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

f,a, Emma Marie Faui^knbr, 1902-, Magnolia, Del. 

Im. Grace L. Faulks, 1903-, A r, Madison, N. J. 

f.a. Helen Simpson Faulks, 1899-1901, A T, Madison, N. J. 

/,a. Mark Roy Faville, 1899-1900, ♦PA, Dolgeville, N. Y. Mcmt 

U. Football Team, 1899-. 

f.a. Clara L. Pay, 1898-9, F * B. Westfield. N. Y. 
/.a. and /. George Randolph Fearon, (/.a.) 1901-, (/.) 1902-, Oi 

N. Y. 

f,a. Louise RosePenari, 1901-2, Syracuse, N. Y. 

f.a, Charles H. Penner, 1897-1900, Syracuse, N. Y. 

La. Louis McGinnis Penner, 1895-9, ^ A 9, Watertown, N. Y. 

f.a, Joseph Daniel Fennbn, 1900-, Carthage, N. Y. 
f.a. and La, Charles Henry Fenton, {f.a.) 1900-2, (/.a. )i902-. Rid 

Springs, N. Y. 

a,s. Fred LE Roy Fenton, 1900-, Richfield Springs, N. Y. 

La. Arthur Hamilton Ferguson, 1900-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

La, Charles Smith Ferguson, 1901-. Binghamton, N. Y. 

/.a. Emily Louise Ferguson, 1902-, Vancouver, B. C. 

f.a. Esther Ferguson, 1901-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

La. Marion Ferguson, 1901-, K A 9, Syracuse, N. Y. 

/. Solomon Ferguson, 1902-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

La, Floyd Monroe Fernalld, 1901-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

f.a, Grace E. Fernandez, 1903-, Clyde, N. Y. 

fa. Louise Rose Ferrari, 1903-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

La. Arthur Emile Ferris, 1898-9, Pawling, N. Y. 

la. Joseph Elmore Ferry, 1900-1, Cazenovia, N. Y. 

/.a. Lynette Ethelyn Field, 1897-9. AAA, Wellsboro, N. Y. 

f.a. Martha Christine Filsinger, 1896-1900, Syracuse, N. Y. 

m. Sarah Elizabeth Finch, 1900-2, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

f.a. Jennie Veronica Finlay, 1895-8, Syracuse, N. Y. 

f,a. Flora V. Finley, 1 900-1, Syracuse, N. Y. 

f.a. Hariette Ella Finnegan, 1899- 1902, Syracuse, N. Y. 

La. Ida Mae Fischer, 1903-, South Otselic, N. Y. 

fa, Nellie Jane Pish, 1902-, W. Winfield, N. Y. 

/.a. Harriet M. Fisher, 1902-3, Auburn, N. Y. 

La. Ray DeCoudres Fisher, 1903-, Portland, Ore. 

m, Ross May Fisher, 1902-, Savannah, N. Y. 



NON-GRADUATBS 5^9 

Gborgia Mas Pisk, 1903-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Ruth MayPiske, 1901-, Blbridge, N. Y. 

Clara Lanra Pitch, 1901-3, Syracuse, N. Y. 

BuNicH Chari^ottb Pitch, 1902-, A P, Athens, Pa. 

Harriet G. Pitch, 1902-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Irving Swbbt Pitch, 1902-, Watervalc, N. Y. 

Louis Garfiei«d Fitzgerai«d. 1902-, A X, Chester, N. Y. 

Elsie Augusta Pix, 1901-2, Syracuse. N. Y. 

Len Pi«bming, 1902-, Corning, N. Y. 

Paith Plickinger, 1897-8, A ♦, Truraansburg, N. Y. 

George Augustus Pi.ynn, 1902-, Troy, N. Y. 

Harry Stevens Poi«and, 1899-, Addison, N. Y. 

Michael Ambrose Poley, 1900-1, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Bdward B. Poi,i*EY, 1903-. Syracuse, N. Y. 

Bartholemew Poody, Jr., 1900-1, Pultonville, N. Y. 

Bthbi* Knox Pootb, 1903-, Morrisville, N. Y. 

Bdward Brnest Pord, 1900-, Granville, N. Y. 
. and /.«. Walter Bedient Ford, (l.a.) 1901-2, (f.a.) 1901-2, Otego, N. Y. 

Arthur P. Poreman, 1902-, * T, Syracuse, N. Y. 
t. Blizabeth Lyman Porsyth, 1901-2, Greensburg, Ind. 

William M. Port, 1899-1903, Chittenango, N. Y. 
t. Cora Clarinds Posbinder, 1899-1903, Syracuse, N. Y. 
I. Charlotte May Poster, 1898-9, Pulton, N. Y. 
t' Jessie Webster Poster, 1901-3, Ithaca, N. Y. 

Raymond Ai«den Poster, 1902-. Whitesboro, N. Y. 
r. Burton p. Powi^br, 1903-, * T. So. Butler, N. Y. 

Ci,ARENCB Taylor Powlbr. 1903-, Brownville, N. Y. 
I. Kthel Isabel Powler, 1901-2, Warner's, N. Y. 
!. Plorence Elizabeth Powler, 1898-9, Syracuse, N. Y. 

George Winbgar Powler, 1900-, * T, S. Butler, N. Y. 
• Mabel Powler, 1903-, Scran ton, Pa. 

Samuel Robertson Powler, 1896-8, Syracuse, N. Y. 
. Clara Isabel Fox, 1902-, Clifton Springs, N. Y. 

Blsib Anna Pox, 1903-, Depauville, N. Y. 

Grace May Fox, 1902-, Wolcott, N. Y. 

Hariette Olive Pox, 1899-1900, Watertown, N. Y. 

John B. Fox, 1900-1, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Leo Bvbrbtt Fox, 1903-, Naples, N. Y. 

Leona Clair Pralick, 1899-1900, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Okel Price Pralick, 1902-3, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Barl Peter Francis, 1902-3, Morrisville, N. Y. 
(.and /.a. Nathan B. Francis, (/.a.) 1900-, (/.a.) 1901-a, Carthage, 

N. Y. 
(. Bthel Mary Prank, 1903-, Salamanca, N. Y. 
I. Mina L. Frank, 190 [-3, Carbondale, Pa. 

». Thomas Bdward Franklin, Jr., 1899-1900, Oneida, N. Y. Student at 
Yale Medical College, 1901-. 



5^0 MON-GRADUATBS 

/.a. Agaea R. Prantz, 1896-7, Canoga, N. Y. 

La, BllBN Mbttlbr Frasbr, 1902-, Catndeq, N. Y. 

/,a. GrBGORIA a. Prasbr. 190 r-, Puerto PJata, St. Domingo. 

La. Albert S. Prazier, 1897-8, B 8 n, Amsterdam, N. Y. 

La, Margaret Preeman, 1901-2, Saratoga, N. Y. 

/.a. Martha Howb Prbnch, 1902-, Lisboti, O. 

La, Roy Lbon Prbnch, 1902-, Attica, N. Y. 

f,a, Stella May Prench, 1902-3, Mexico, N. Y. 

f,a, Mary Headley Pretz, 1902-3, Milton, N. J. 

/.a. Mayme Priend, 189S-1900, Syracuse, N. Y. 

f.a, Charles S. Prink, 1896-7, St. Cloud, Minn. 

f,a, Josephine Prisbie, 1899-1901, F ^ B, Passaic, N. J. 

/.a. Bessie Irene Prost, 1900-1, Syracuse, N. Y. 

f,a, Bdith Frost, 1899-1900, Syracuse, N. Y. 

f,a, Frances Ethel Frost, 1902-3, London, Bug. 

f,a. Jessie Enid Fulford, 1898-9, Fayetteville, N. Y. 

/,a, Josephine Marie Fuller, 1898-9, South Bend, Ind. 

/.a. Marion De Forest Fuller, 1899-1900, Sherburn, N. Y. 

fja, Mary E. Fui,Ton, 1903-, Syracuse, N. Y. 
Ija, and /.a. Takeshi Funahashi, (La,) [899-1900, (f.a.) 1899-1903, 1 

Japan. 

fu, Isaac Jay Furman, 1902-, Fairport, N. Y. 

La, Mark Byron Furman, 1903-, Fairport, N. Y. 

La, Basii« Raphabi* Gabribl, 1900-, Palu, Armenia. 

La, Chauncey Falcott Gage, 1902-3, Stockton, N. Y. 
f,a, and La, Isabel Cordelia Gage, {f.a,) 1899-1901, (La.) 1900-2, 1 

Syracuse, N. Y. Married 14 Apr. 1904, Walter W. Dil 

Vernon Center, N. Y. 

m, Arthur Franklin Gailey, 1896-9, Weedsport, N. Y. 

/.a. Ruth K. Gai^ughbr, 1903-, Syracuse. N. Y. 

La. Willis Maxwbll Galloway, 1903-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

i.a, * Henry Mericle Galpin, 1901-3, * A 8, Danby, N. Y. 

/.a, Catherine Galvin, 1901-2, Solvay, N. Y. 

m, Lois Eastman Gannett, 1900-, Smithville, N. Y'. 

f,a, Estblla Augusta Ga Nun, 1902-, Brewster, N. Y. 

La, Ada Gardner, 1899-1900, Middletown, N. Y. 

f.a, Harry Lawrbnce Gardnbr, 1900-, A K E, Syracuse, N. Y. 

La, Marjorib Huntington Gardnbr, 1903-, Manlius, N. Y. 

La. Willis Morton Gardner, 1901-, Carbondale, Pa. 

f.a. Jack Hall Gardniera, 1901-2, Syracuse, N. Y. 

fa, Ruth Garland, 1901-3, Oswego, N. Y. 

/. Frederick W. Garlock, 1902-, Dexter, N. Y. 

/,a, Jessie E. Garrison, 1901-2, Syracuse, N. Y. 

La, William G. Gartner, 1902-, Buffalo, N. Y. 

a.s, Edward Gaston, 1903-, Havana, Cuba. 

f,a. Ruth S. Gates, 1903-, Elmira, N. Y. 



NON*GRADUATBS 531 

Jessie Cordelia Gaylord, 1902-3, Binghamton, N. Y. 

JBSSICA OuviA Gbbhardt, 1903-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Fbrmando Jost GBiGBt, 1902-, San Juan, Porto Rico. 

A. M. Geisenhoff, 1901-2, Oneida, N. Y. 

Mrs. A. M. Geisenhoff, 1902-3, Oneida, N. Y. 
and /. WiLUAM W. Gbrbbr, (/.a.) 1902-3, (/.) 1903-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Edith Gbarb, 1903-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

WiixiAM Pbck Gbrb, 1901-, A T, Manlius, N. Y. 

Veronica F. Gerebacker, 1901-2, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Cora Gbrst, 1901-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Gborgb Stbphanov Gbtchbv, 1903-, Shoumen, Bulgaria. 

Jessie May Gettman, 1900-1, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Bertha Isabelle Gibbons (Traver), 1896-8, AAA, Franklin, N. Y. 
Married 29 June 1899, Dr. Alvah H. Traver of Albany, N. Y. 
Residence, Albany, N. Y. 

Harold Romeyn Gibbons, 1900-1, Skaneatelea, N. Y. 

RUPBRT ViMCBNT GiBBONS, 1903-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Annie Jean Gibney, 1900-1, Phillipsburg, N. Y. 

Henry Jarvis Gibson, 1898-9, Clarendon, N. Y. 

* Anna Charlotte Giddings, 1895-8, K K r, Bald wins ville, N. Y. 

Dorr Norman Giddings, 1903-, Baldwinsyille, N. Y. 

B1.US Harvby Gidi«by, 1903-, Dunkirk, N. Y. 

Evelyn Gifford, 1902-3, Newark, N. Y. 

Alma Antoinbttb Gii«bbrt, 1902-, AAA, Adams, N. Y. 

Arthur Benton Gilbert, 1899-1900, Spring Valley, N. Y. 

Arthur Dnane Gilbert, 1901-3, Syracuse, N, Y. 

Dorothy M. Gi^bbrt, 1901-, Knoxville, Pa. 

JBNMIB EtiZABBTH Gii«BBRT, 1900-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Julia Gilbert, 1899-1900, Fulton, N. Y. 

Lena Margaret Gilbert, 1 898-1 900, Weedsport, N. Y. 

Lillian M. Gilbert, 1899- 1900, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Martha Gilbert, 1900-1, Fulton, N. Y. 

Ruth Hogoboom Gilbert (Pratt), 1901-2, A #, Syracuse, N. Y. Mar- 
ried 10 June 1903, Henry Bell Pratt of Towanda, Pa. 

Linda M. L. Gii«chbr, 1902-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Louise Walworth Gilchrist, 1898-9, E. Springville, N. Y. 

F1.0RBNCB Mabbi* Gii,bs, 1901-, A «, Penn Yan, N. Y. 

Louie J. Gill, 1898-9, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Delila Mabel Gillespie, 1899-1901, AAA, Lawrence ville, N. Y. 
Teacher in Johnstown, N. Y., 1901-. 

David F. Gii.i,bttb, 1903-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Sarah Grannis Gilmore, 1902-3, Claremont, N. H. 

Lnlu Isabel Gilson, 1899- 1900, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Howard William Girvin, 1902-3, "ir T, Syracuse, N. Y. 
and f.a, Cyril Ross A. Gladman, 1902-3, Lindsay, Can. 

Edgar Toll Glass, 189^-9, Syracuse, N. Y. Student at Yale Univer- 
sity, X901-. 



S3< NON-GRADUATKS 

a.s. Jay Wai«tbr Glass, 1901-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

/.a. Anna May Gleason, 1899-1900, Batavia, N. Y. 

l.a, and m. Fred Henry Gleason, (l.a.) 1900-1, (iff.) 1901-5, A K K, ! 

cuse, N. Y. 

/.a. Emma Ruth Glicman, 1899-1901, A ^, Lansing, Mich. 

/. Harold Jay Glovbr, 1903-, Lisle, N. Y. 

f.a. Loretta Fowler Gobeil, 1900-2, Syracuse, N. Y. 

f.a, Hblbn Margbry Gobbl, 1903-, Groton, N. Y. 

/a. JuuA Carrib GobtTBL, 1 903-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

/.a. ROSAUND GoLDSTBiN, I900-I ; 1903-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

l.a. Gborgb Abraham Goldstonb, i9cx>-, Hornellsville, N. Y. 

/ a. Joseph Loyd Golly, 1903-, X A 2, Rome, N. Y. 

/. Pbdro Gombz. 1903-, San Juan, Porto Rico. 

La. George Guy Goodelle, 1898-9, Auburn, N. Y. Entered from 

mouth. 

l.a. Mary Crane Goodrich, 1898-9, Syracuse, N. Y. 

f.a, Frances B. Goodwin, 1899-1902, Boston, Mass. 

l.a. Frank Alexander Gordon, 1900-3, Syracuse, N. Y. 

f.a. Gbrtrudb Mab Gordon, 1902-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

l.a. John Graham Gordon, 1902-, Ilion, N. Y. 

l.a. Mabel Gordon, 1899-1903. Idlewild, N. Y. 

l.a. Robert Gordon, 1898-1900, * A 9, Idlewild, N. Y. 

f.a. Ruth Holling Gordon, 1901-, r* B, Williamson, N. Y. 

f.a. Mabel Gothier, 1 898-9-, 1900-3. Syracuse, N. Y. 

m. Louis Ammon Gould, 1901-, A K K, Syracuse, N. Y. Entered 

Columbia University. 

fa. Hblbn pRANCas Govb, 1902-, Jamesville, N. Y. 

l.a. Martha Anne Gowing, 1902-, r 9 B, Syracuse, N. Y. 

f.a. Sarah French Gowing, 1903-, Syracuse, N. Y, 

f.a. Dora. Beatrice Graf, 1903-, Syracuse, N. Y. 
l.a. and/. Arthur Leland GraflF, {l.a.) 1899-1901, (/.) 1900-1, ♦ T, 

Gloversville, N. Y. 

l.a. Fred Graff. Jr., 1902-3, ♦ K *. Uiica, N. Y. 

l.a. Charles Graham, 1897-8, Putnam Station, N. Y. 

m. Milton Dempsby Graham, 190c-, N 2 N, Utica, N. Y. 

a.s. Jacob Edward Gramlich, 1900-, * T, Buffalo. N. Y. 

l.a. Alice Mary Grandey. 1903-, A *, Ticonderoga, N. Y. 

/.a. Grace Grannis, 1902-3, Syracuse, N. Y. 

l.a. Emma Luetta Grant, 1903-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

l.a. Fannie E. Grant, 1903-. A <f>, Sparta, 111. 

/.a. Hattie A. Grant, 1931-2. Syracuse, N. Y. 

l.a. Peter Taylor Grant, 1902-, Livingston Manor, N. Y. 

l.a. Alice Reed Graves, 1894-1896, 1897-8, T * B, Syracuse, N. Y. 

l.a. Arthur Coon Graves, 1903-, Adams Centre, N. Y. 

a.s. Byron Leslie Graves, 1902-, Perrysburg, N. Y. 

/.«. Carl S. Graves, Central Square, N. Y. 



Elmer Tlwyer Gnvei. i9cir-3. 4 K E, Boonville, N. Y. 

Fcrdinuid V. Stuart Graves, 1897-9, 4KB, Boonville, N. Y. 

Helen Brcese Gravei, 1895-190 1, r 4 B, SyracnM. N V. Mareicd 17 
Juae 1904, Dr. Bmoiy Russell Sprague (see Non graduate*). 

Jambs Wbthhrwax Graves, 1903-. Herkimer. N. V. 
. Hargaret Jane Grdves, 1896-S, T*B. Rome, N. V. 

Plokbnce Brooks Grav, 190J-. Albany, N. Y. 

Jambs Tracv Grav, 1901-, Colos«e, N. Y. 

Raymond Gray, 1903-3, A T. Syracuse. N. Y. 

Bari. Rickktts Ghhblev, 1900-. S>raciiRe, N. Y. 

Anna Macij^y Grbbn, 1903-. Syracuse, N. Y. 
:. Bertha Elizabeth Green, ]89S'8, Pruit Valley, N. Y. 
. Bertha V. Green, 1900-3. Syracuse. N. Y. 

Joaepta Isaac Green, 1903-3. Farmington, N, Y. 

IfARGARBT Sarah Grbbn, 19 3-. H'>mer, N. Y. 

Uarioti Edith Green, 1900-3, AAA, Rochester, N. Y. 
. Walter Stn*rt Green, 1899-1903, Syracuse N Y. 

Emma Eliza Grbbnawav, 1902-, Howell, Mich. 
I, BSRTBA V. Gbbbnb, 1903-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Elbert Irs Greene, 1900-1, Homer, N, V. 

JRSSIK M&RCARBT Grbbnb, 1901-, K E T. PuIaski. N. Y. 

MiCHABL Willis Grebnfibld, 1900-, Niagar* Falls, N. V. Mem' 
ber of the Syracnse University Track Team, 1901-. 
. and /. Edward H. Grsbnland, 1931-, 4 T, 4 4 4, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Anna L^uisb GrBGory. 1901-, Monroe, N. Y 

Gborgb Groot Grhgory, 1903-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Lbom Washburn Grbgory. 1903-, Ben, Belmont, N. Y. 

Ruth Beatv Grbgorv. 1902-, Monroe, N. Y. 
and/.n, Robert a, Gribssbr, ( f.a.) 1^1-3, (l.a.) 1903-4, Buffalo, 
N, Y. 

Ida Woods Griewn, 1903-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Caroline Land Griffis, 1897-9, Liverpool, N, Y. 

Cyrds Bart Griffith, 1903-, W. Farmington, O. 

Helena May Griffith, 1S98-1901, 4 T, Palmyra, N. V. 

Mildred Adele Griffith. 1900-3, Glens Palls, N. Y. 

Walter Henry Gripeiths, 1903-, 4 4 6, Utica, N. Y. 

Ambrose Daniel Gring, 1899-1900, Syracuse, N. V. 

Harriet L. Gring, 1900-1, Sytacnse, N, Y. 

Rtbkl Mab GRippih, 1903-, Saratoga Springs, N. Y. 

Sadib HenkibTTA Gkodv. 1901-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

CBARLOTTB MbRSBLDS GROFF, 1903-, Palatine Bridge, N. Y. 

STBPBBN B, Gronbr, 1903-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Anna Cathryn Gros, 1901-, Nellison, N. V. 

Edla Zbnto Grovb. 190Z-, Buffalo, N. V. 

WiLUAM Bcllard Grovb, 1901-, Syracnse, N. Y. 

Adrian Crain Grovet, 190C-1. * T, Port Henry, N. Y. 



534 NON-GRADUATB8 

/.a. Lillian Louise Grnner, i90i-2» Anbum, N. Y. 

a.s. GBORG8 Raymond Guard, 1903-, New London. Conn. 

/.«. Valetta Guernsey, 1898-1901, E. Cobbleskill, N. Y. 

/.«. Cora Guild, 1897-8, Rupert, Vt. 

/.a. Mabel Grace Guinnip, 1902-3, Atco, Pa. 

/.«. Sara Ludwig Guuck, 1903-, Newark, N. J. 

/.a. Bertha Gutstadt. 1901-2, Syracuse, N. Y. 

m, Henry Eugene Haanel, 1900-1, Syracuse, N. Y. 

/.a. Ernest Albert Hackett, 1898-9, Canton, Pa. 

f.a. Mabel Hadcock, 1900-1, Newport. N. Y. 

/.a. AI.BBRT Sidnky HADI.EY, 1900-, Black River, N. Y. 

/.a. EuzABBTH Ei«BANOR Hadi^by, 1903-. Syracuse, N. Y. 

/.a. Emma Pauunb Hagaman, 1903- , A r, Cazenovia, N Y. 

a.s. Ward J. Hagbr, 1903-, Mexico, N. Y. 

/.a. Mary Elizabeth Haight, 1901-3, Onondaga Valley, N. Y. 

/, William Boyce Haight, 1897-8. Elmira, N. Y. 

Iff. Victor Haischbr, Jr., 1901-. Coming, N. Y. 

I, a. Carl Perez Hakes, 1900-3, Albion, N. Y. 

/. Chari^bs Hbrman Hakbs, 1903-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

f.a. Hannah Mary Halcomb, 1897-8, Syracuse, N. Y. 

i.a, Andbrson LBB Hai«b, 1903-. Manlius, N. Y. 

f.a. Mrs. Frank H. Hale, 1902-3, Fayctteville, N. Y. 

I.a. Harry Mnnro Hale, 1899-1900, Elbridge, N. Y. 

I.a. Lyman Lansing Hai«b, 1902-, Manlius, N. Y. 

f.a. M. Theresa Haley, 1901-3, Syracuse, N. Y. 

l.a. Agnbs Skidmorb Hall, 1903-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

/.a. Blanchb AllBN Hall, 1895-, Fulton, N. Y. 

m Burton Albxandbr Hall, 1903-, Antwerp, N. Y. 

/*.a. Caroline Edith Hall, 190 1-2, Baldwinsville, N. Y. 

f.a. Clarence C. Hall, 1899-1902, Hallstead, Pa. 

/.a. Emily Ella Hall. 1900-2, Manchester, N. H. 

m. John Henry Hall, 1899-1900, Hartford, N. Y. 

fa. Lbah Eunicb Hall, 1901-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

f.a. Marie Reed Hall, 1899- 1900, Syracuse, N. Y. 

/. William Henry Hall, Jr., 1903-, Seneca Falls, N. Y. 

La. Edith Elizabbth Hallbr, 1903-, Clayton, N. Y. 

I.a. John Joseph Halloran, 1898-9, Syracuse, N. Y. 

m. BuRKB CooNLBY HAMILTON, 1902-, Cicero, N. Y. 

la. Elizabeth Brown Hamilton,. 1899-1900, New York, N. Y. 

I.a. Eugene Ira Hamilton, 1900-1, Peterboro, N. Y. 
f.a. and m. Fred J. Hamilton. 1900- 1, B * n, Syracuse, N. Y. 

f.a. Gborgb Andrbw Hamilton, 1900-, Three Mile Bay, N. Y. 

fa. Ruth Conrad Hamilton, 1902-3, Auburn, N. Y. 

f.a, Sadie Dunning Hamilton, 1897-8, Greenwich, N. Y. 

/. Harry Joshua Hamlin, 1899-1900, Syracuse, N. Y. 

f.a, Maude May Hamner, 1902-4, Dundee, N. Y. 



NON-GRADUATBS 535 

Hai^xjb Wray Haboiokd, 1902-, ^ AG, S3n'acuse, N. Y. 

Cora Lucy Hampton, 1902-3, Dansville, N. Y. 

Olive Geraldine Hatichett, 1901-3, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Oscar S. Hanchett, 1901-3, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Fred B. Haacox, 1 899-1900, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Elizabeth Hand (Ban^), 1 899-1900, Oneida, N. Y. Married 6 Nov. 

1 901, Walter S. Barr. 
Louis Isaac Hand, 1903-, Baldwinsville, N. Y. 
Nonie Lyon Handley, 1898-9, Fair Haven, N. Y. 
Seymour Handy, 1902-, St. Johnsville, N. Y. 
George Arthur Hanford, Ph.D., 1902-3, Syracuse, N. Y. 
Jane Marie Hanford, 1900-1, UnadiUa, N. Y. 
Bmi£. Hanks, 1903-, Buffalo, N. Y. 
Walter Howard Hanktns, 1902-3, Binghamton, N. Y. 
(. Harry J. Hanmbr, 1902-, ^ r A, Jordanville, N. Y. 
I. Maudb May Hanmbr, 1902-, Dundee, N. Y. 

LiU«iS M. A. Hanna, 1903-, Franklin Centre, Que.. Can. 
I. Mrs. C. F. Hanna, 1900-1, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Gborgb W. Hannbrs, 1901-, Newport, N. J. . 

Gborgb CtBifENT Hannon, 1903-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Grace M. Haperman, 1898-9, Cato, N. Y. 

L. Aileen Hard, 1897-1901, r # B, Kvanston, 111. Daughter of No. 

III. 
Auc8 Mary Hardib, 1903-, Mexico, N. Y. 
Charles Edwin Harding, 1900-2, A X, So. Barre, N. Y. 
Mabel Florence Harding, 1899-1900, Tunkhannock, Pa. 
Victor Hunt Harding, 1903-, Ridgeway, N. Y. 
Gborgia Harb, 1903-, Groton, N. Y. 
CHARLBa Joseph Harbs, 1903-, Skaneateles, N. Y. 
Gborgb S. G. Harbs, 190c-, Skaneateles, N. Y. Member of the 

Syracuse University Football Team, 1900- . 
. and f.a. Chari,BS A. Hargitt, 1901-, A T, Syracuse, N. Y. 
Anna Harmon, 1901-2, Oswego, N. Y. 
Harry Edgar Hamed, 1894-6, 1897-1900, A T, Rochester, N. Y. 

Married 1896, Jeannette Bygrave of Rochester, N. Y. Pastor of 

the Ninth Ward Baptist Church, Syracuse, N. Y., 1898-. 
Fred Haming. 1902-3, Syracuse, N. Y. 
Ida Harnois, 1898-9. 1902-, Syracuse, N. Y. 
Cora Ella LaVanche Harrington, 1898-9. Central Square, N. Y. 
Sadie Elizabeth Harrington, 1902-3, Baldwinsville, N. Y. 
Cari«ton Wiard Harris, 1902-, Syracuse, N. Y. 
Lester Edwin Harris, 1899-1900, Sistersville. N. Y. 
Mary Estella Harris, 1899-1901, Gansevoort, N. Y. 
Mary Francbs Harris, 1903-, West Chazy, N. Y. 
Roi^ND CHARI.BS HARRIS, 1901-, Ontario, N. V. 
Frank Edward Harrison, 1898-9, Ficlon, N. J. 



536 NON-G&ADUATBS 

/.a. Matib Harrison, 1898-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

La. Stoart Manlby Harrison, 1902-, * A 6, Seneca Palls, N. Y. 

La, Allen K. Hart, 1859-1900, Mexico, N. Y. 

f.a. Grace Mary Hart, 1896-19CX), A *, Bridgetown, N. S. 
sister of No. 1465. 

La. Mary Kuza Hart, 1902-, IIB *, Glov^rsville. N. Y. 

f.a. Ella M. Harter, 1 900-1, Oneida. N. Y. 

f,a. May J. Harter, 1900-1. Oneida, N. Y. 

La, Mary Louise Hartig, 1902-3, Beech Lake, Pa. 

La. Arthur William Hartigan, 1903-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

f.a, Louis John Hartman, 190 1-2, A T, Alexandria Bay, N. Y. 

La. Edna Arvilla Hartshornb, 1901-, Hamilton. N. Y. 

f.a. Grace Mildred Hartsou, 1898-9, Syracuse, N. Y. 

La, Frbd William Hartwell, 1901-, Jefferson, N. Y. 

La, Olive Hart wig, 1900-3, A T, Ellenville, N Y. Teacher at Blbr 

N. Y., 1903-. 

/. John Joseph Harty, 1902-3, Utica, N. Y. 

f.a. Mrs. John Harwood, 1900-1, Syracuse, N. Y. 

a.s. Olivbr Kyrlb Harwood, 1903-, Dorset, Vt. 

f,a, Gbrtrudb Mary Haskins, 1903-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

La, Harold Porter Hastings, 1902-3, Canaan Four Corners, N. Y. 

La, Raymond S. Hatch, 1900-, Watertown, N. Y. 

La. Earl Davison Hatheway, 1 901-3, * T, Oriskany Falls, N. Y. 

La. Thomas Haugh, Jr., 1898-1900, * K *, Buffalo, N. V. 

La. LUNBTTB Gbrtrudb Havbns, 1899-, n B ♦, Syracuse, N. V. 

fa. Helbn Hawkbs, 1901- , Phoenix, N. Y. 
La, and f.a. Arthur Hawkins, 1902-3, Potsdam, N. Y. 

a.s. Ernbst Grant Hawkins, 1903-, Batavia, N. Y. 

a.s. Ernbst Hubbard Hawkins, 1903-, Bear Lake, Pa. 

/.a Walter S. Hawkins, 1900-2, Syracuse, N. Y. 

La. Bbssib Margarbt Hawlby, 1903-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

a.s. Charlbs Ray Hawlby, 1903-, Ben, Buffalo, N. Y. 

a.s. William Ezra Hawley, 1902-3, Syracuse, N. Y. 

/.a. R. Maurice Hawn, 1900-3, Ilion, N. Y. 

fa. Joseph Olney Hayden, 1901 -3, Syracuse, N. Y. 

La. Sabra May Haydbn, 1903-, Syracuse, N. Y. 

La. Charlbs Otis Haybs, 1899-, Gasport, N. Y. 

La. Florence Ella Hayes, 1902-3, Berwick, Me. 

La. James Arthur Hayes, 1901-3, Cazenovia, N. Y. 

La. Juan Harold Haybs, 1903-, Boonville, N. Y. 

/,a. Mabel Mary Hayes, 1899-1900, Syracuse, N. Y. 

/.a. Nina Hayes, 1896-9, Madison, N. Y. Instructor in Vocal Ma* 

Syracuse University, 1900-2. 
La. and m Raymond Fblch Haybs, {La.) 1902-3, (m.) 1903-, N. 

wick. Me. 

f.a. Alice Mercy Hayford, 1898-9, Tully, N. V. 



KON-GRADUATBS 537 

Viola Blizabbth Haynbr, i 903-1 Upper Troy, N. Y. 

Bertha F. Hay ward, 1808-9, Eastwood, N. Y. 

Mary Elizabeth Hay ward, 1898-9, Eastwood, N. Y. 

Joseph Avery Head, 1903-, Towanda, Pa. 

Mary Estella Heagerty, 1808-9. Syracuse, N. V. 
and/. John William Hkal.C/.a. ) 1900-4, (/.) i902-,Oakfield, N. Y. 

Anna I. Hearons, 1900-2, Bolivar, N. Y. 

Frances Josephine Hearons, 190 1-2, Bolivar, N. Y. 
and /.a. Charlotte C. Heath, 1902-, Interlaken, Mass. 

Maude Edna Heath, 1900-, Northville, N. Y. 

W. Claude Heaton, 1899-1900, New Paltz, N. Y. 

Mrs. A. W. Heddon, 1899