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Full text of "The alumni review [serial]"

gM Volume II 



Number 3 



m ii »im imnuiimi iimimi 




AIMNIREVIEW 




MI. 



PUBLISHED BY 

THE ALVMNI ASSOCIATION 



±*s 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



Che University of north Carolina 



^| MAXIMUM SERVICE TO THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE 



A. 

B. 



THE COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS. 
THE SCHOOL OF APPLIED SCIENCE. 

(1) Chemical Engineering. 

(2) Electrical Engineering. 

(3) Civil and Road Engineering. 

(4) Soil Investigation. 



C. THE GRADUATE SCHOOL. 

D. THE SCHOOL OF LAW. 

E. THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE. 

F. THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY. 

G. THE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION. 
H. THE SUMMER SCHOOL. 






I. THE BUREAU OF EXTENSION. 

(1) General Information. 

(2) Instruction by Lectures. 

(3) Correspondence Courses. 

(4) Debate and Declamation. 

(5) County Economic and Social Surveys. 

(6) Municipal and Legislative Reference. 

(7) Teachers" Bureau. Preparatory Schools, and College 

Entrance Requirements. 

For information regarding the University, address THOS. J. WILSON, JR., Registrar 



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tmsbes pou a jrlerry (Cljrtstmas, anb 
expresses tfje bope tijat tije J7etu §>ear 
tutU be an exeeebtnglp prosperous one, 
anb tijat i>ou tutll be tjappp. .* ..* ..* * ..* ..* 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



Volume II 



DECfcMBfcK, 1913 



Number 3 



OPINION AND COMMENT 



ELIGIBILITY jf the new agreement, arrived at 
RULES since the Virginia game between the 

Alumni Council and the faculty, 
stands, the eligibility rules of Virginia and Carolina 
will be practically identical. This means that Caro- 
lina gives up the October 12th rule and takes on the 
one year rule. Under the present rules a man is not 
eligible who enters later than October 12th, but an 
athlete from another college is eligible when he has 
been in the University five months, attendance in the 
Summer Law School counting as part of the required 
residence time. Under the proposed change a student 
can register later than October 12th and be eligible, 
but an athlete from another college can not become 
eligible in the college year for which he registers. 
According to the specific interpretation of this rule, 
five months residence in a previous year renders a 
man eligible for the succeeding year. The man who 
enters in January may play football in the fall but 
the man who enters in September cannot play base- 
ball in the spring. While the October 12 rule is 
abrogated a stricter rule is put in force. ]\Iore is 
gained for amateur athletics than is lost, as a study 
of the change will show. Then it is only fair that 
the two institutions should meet on the basis of equal 
eligibility requirements. 

This rule will make of no effect the trustee regula- 
tion that attendance in the summer law school should 
count as part of the required residence. 

□ □□ 
SCHOLARSHIP There has been considerable agita- 
REQUIREMENTS tion over the strictness of Carolina's 
scholarship requirements for eligi- 
bility on athletic teams. There has been no question- 
ing of the justice of the regulation that requires a 
man to pass on a certain part of the term work but 
the agitation was directed against the ruling of the 
faculty that a student who made unsatisfactory on 
studies during a month would be disqualified until 
his standing was satisfactory. Nb kick was made on 
the disqualification of Jones, the powerful 230 pound 
'Varsity center who failed on his work last year, 
but considerable stir was created by the disqualifica- 
tion for two weeks of Boshamer, Edwards, and An- 
drews for unsatisfactory scholarship in October. 
Gooch was declared ineligible because he failed on the 



work of the summer law term. After the dust is all 
cleared away it is safe to say that the requirements 
for term standing and monthly satisfactoriness will 
remain, with the approval of both alumni and stu- 
dents, as one of the guarantees of the representative 
character of Carolina athletic teams. 

nan 

THE COACHES When the Princeton season closed, 
Bluethenthal, head coach of the 
Princeton line, came to Chapel Hill and joined the 
force of Princeton coaches already on the field. It 
was a remarkable force, these four sons of Old Nassau, 
who had figured in the makeup of official and unoffi- 
cial All- American teams — Trenchard, end; Wilson, 
guard; Bluethenthal, center; and Pendleton, half- 
back. They have adapted the Princeton formation to 
the Carolina system and it is bound to be a going 
concern. The salvation of Carolina athletics, of any 
athletics, is in the idea back of these coaches, not to 



ring in but to bring out. 



MORE GAMES 
AT HOME 



nan 

The Tar Heel protests, and with 
eminent right, that too few foot- 
ball games are played on the Hill. 
Carolina men barely have an opportunity to know 
Carolina elevens, and failing to witness genuine con- 
tests in which Carolina is pitted against her strongest 
rivals, they fail to develop the maximum of college 
spirit. 

The excuse for playing away from home, or rather 
the reason, which once held, will scarcely hold these 
days ; for football games played at Chapel Hill entail 
but little more loss than those played in cities like 
Greensboro and Winston, and the income from the 
student $5.00 athletic fee turns something over 
$1,000 into the treasury. More games should 
be played in the presence of the entire student 
body A^d especially should a game be scheduled here 
for University day. The gain resulting in tieing up 
the student with his team and with the University is 
far greater in the long run, than the immediate 
cash receipts Which may come from a financially suc- 
cessful game played in a distant city by a team which 
the students hear about in the daily press or by means 
of a telegraphic report rather than see and know on 
the home gridiron. 



52 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



SEEING THE B. B. Dougherty, '99, with other 
POINT members of the faculty of the Ap- 

palachian Training School of Boone, and J. B. 
Robertson, '05, Superintendent of Public Instruction 
of Alamance, have shown a fine appreciation of what 
the University, through the Bureau of Extension, is 
attempting to do and have given others an illustra- 
tion of how it may be used to profit in their commu- 
nities. Upon the receipt of the Bulletin entitled 
"Addresses on Education for Use in Declaiming, 
Essay Writing, and Beading," each of these gentlemen 
conceived the idea of having every declamation given 
in the schools of their counties during the year, and 
at the county commencement at the end of the year, 
taken from this collection. In this way, "Sparticus 
to tbe Gladiators," "Beyond the Alps Lies Italy," 
and other familiar favorites of Friday afternoon 
and commencement programs have been replaced by 
the stirring messages of Aycock, Mclver, Alderman, 
Page, Poe, and a host of others relating to the fun- 
damental, vital problems of today. 

Along a slightly different line, the Charlotte Alum- 
ni Association has started something. Early in Novem- 
ber Acting President Graham delivered an address 
at a rural school rally in Charlotte on '"Culture and 
Agriculture" that touched upon the fundamentals 
of North Carolina life. His address, widely printed 
by the press of this and other Southern States, con- 
tained the significant suggestion that in the future a 
part of the first week of November should be set aside 
in every county in North Carolina to be devoted to the 
discussion of the common good of the county. The 
local association saw the significance of the idea and 
has undertaken to reprint the address in a large edi- 
tion to be distributed throughout the state, and, what 
is even more to the point, to outline a definite, vital 
set of questions to be discussed at the conferences. If 
that idea prevails, the Charlotte Alumni will have 
put something over that is thoroughly worth while. 

In another section of the state, a group of Alumni 
who want to do something for the University in 
some way other than athletics, have conceived the idea 
of utilizing the service of several members of the 
faculty by combining with the local school authori- 
ties and offering free of charge to the community a 
series of three or four University lectures under the 
auspices of their local Association. They recognize 
the University's need of meeting the people and they 
are proposing to give it the opportunity. They wish 
to help the University and the people who support it 
to a better understanding of each other. 



THE FRESHMAN The attempt to conserve the Fresh- 
man class to the University and to 
the educated citizenship of the State is making head- 
way. Back in the nineties and well on towards 1910 
conservation through class orgnization on. the part of 
the Freshman was not only unthought of, but any at- 
tempt to bring it about by early class elections was 
vigorously combatted. The posting of a notice for a 
Freshman election was a challenge to the upperclass- 
men, the Sophomores in. particular, to assemble the 
munitions of war and to keep the newcomers from 
settling down to unified class existence and becoming 
a necessary and useful part of the University. 

But the old order has changed. Under the direction 
of the president of the Senior class the present Fresh- 
man class has held an orderly, harmonious meeting 
and has chosen capable leaders. It has settled down 
to college life, and during its first year, and the very 
first part of that, too, it is catching the real University 
spirit. One fourth of 1917's stay in college is being- 
conserved as that of no other class has been. It is not 
too much to predict that the number of Sophomores 
next year will be increased accordingly. 



DDD 



OTHERS 
FOLLOW 



Beports of the success of the High 
School Debating Union of North 
Carolina are spreading to other 
southern states. As a result, this year definite organi- 
zations of high schools for state-wide debates are being 
effected in Virginia and in Florida. Both of these 
contests are modeled after the plan of the North 
Carolina Debating Union. In Virginia the State 
University is taking up the plan, while in Florida 
the movement is being initiated by the high schools 
themselves, with W. B. Thomas, a U. N. C. graduate 
of the class of 1911, as a leader. 



DDD 



1000 STUDENTS 
IN 1914-15 



One thousand students iu 1914-15 
is a goal which the University 
should set for itself. Before this 
session ends the 900 mark will have been passed. 
After that no alumnus should be content till the four 
figure number is reached. And by the way this is a 
matter in which the alumni can greatly help. 



DDD 



PICTURES 



The Review very gratefully ac- 
knowledges the gift of a snug lit- 
tle fund to be used in securing pictures of campus 
and athletic field scenes. The donor withholds his 
name but the gift is none the less appreciated. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 
VIRGINIA 26, CAROLINA 7 



53 



The Varsity Fights a Stubborn Battle Fuller Thrills the Tar Heels With a Seventy- Yard Dash for 

the First Touchdown Against Virginia in Seven Years 



The forward passing of Gooch behind the heavier, 
more seasoned Virginia team defeated the well train- 
ed, hard-fighting Carolina eleven Thanksgiving Day in 
Richmond by the score of 26 to 7. Back of the fig- 
ures is the story of a college which, defeated OG to 
on the same field last year, is, with practically the 
same material, fighting its way back without surrender 
of its athletic ideals but with patient faith in the value 
of training and the power of spirit. It was a great 
game restored to its classic standing. The play was 
openly clean and expertly fierce. The spirit of the 
two Universities was the generous spirit of true sports- 
men. The record crowd came with enthusiasm and 
left with admiration for a worthy intercollegiate bat- 
tle. It was Carolina-Virginia day in Richmond and 
Virginia's capital gathered there her flower and her 
chivalry. 

With Carolina having the call in the number of 
first downs made, Virginia rendered them unavailing 
by twice making a magnificent stand under her own 
goal ; and she turned the trick by clean and accurate 
forward passing, Gooch to Gillette. The game, which 
was replete with moments of suspense and spectacular 
turns, reached its dramatic climax early in the second 
half. 'Young "Walter Fuller, calmly alert on the thirty 
yard line, intercepted a forward pass and as the 
Carolina team, true to their training, cleared the way, 
dashed seventy yards for a touchdown. It was worth 
the trip to Richmond to see that run — a tiresome 
trip, hours late, no breakfast, no dinner, dust, cinders, 
and disappointments, all were forgotten in the high 
moment of that touchdown. Men who had gritted 
their teeth in defiance of humiliating defeats now 
cried wet tears in the moment of victory; for that 
touchdown was as real a victory and caused as much 
sheer joy as any mathematical victory a college 
ever won. Fuller, class team and sub-scrub half- 
back, you trained for your turn to come and when 
it came you ran your way to a place beside Howell, 
Graves, and Stephens, not because you are as great 
an athlete as they were but because you represent 
as great a victory as theirs in the years of Carolina's 
supremacy in Southern athletics. 

At 2:30 o'clock, with the anxious Carolina student 
body miles away, behind a sorry Southern railway ex- 
cursion engine, Kernodle entered for the brief open- 
ing scene and kicked off for Carolina and immediately 
retired in favor of Foust. Virginia made a touchdown 



early in the quarter on straight football. In the 
second quarter Gooch got away for a thirty yard run 
and on a forward pass which bounded from Tayloe to 
Ray and into Randolph's unexpecting hands a second 
touchdown was scored. Carter again kicked goal. 
Tayloe, who had been playing brilliantly for Caro- 
lina was forced to retire on account of a wrenched 
knee. After pushing the ball to Virginia's one yard 
line Carolina failed to get it across. The first half 
ended with the ball on Virgina's 27 yard line in 
Virginia's possession. 

The second half began as the Carolina student body 
reached the field. Though somewhat scattered they 
immediately put the bellows power of empty stomachs 
into immediate lung action. Burnett, Ervin, Allen 
and Fuller fought their way to the Virginia goal line 
but a forward pass went a trifle wide of Cowell, who 
was standing uncovered just beyond the goal posts. 
On the touchback scored, Virginia scrimmaged from 
the 20 yard line. The net gain of a punt and an inter- 
cepted pass put the ball on Carolina's thirty yard line 
in Virginia's possession. Gooch shot a quick pass 
but Fuller snatched it from its course and as Vir- 
ginian after Virginian went down before terrific in- 
terference he ran faster than he knew across seven 
chalk lines for the first touchdown Carolina has scored 
against Virginia since the ancient days of Story and 
Abernathy. Tandy kicked goal. 

The fourth quarter found Carolina's stars, Tayloe, 
Tandy, Fuller and Homewood on the sidelines with 
injuries. Gooch got loose for a forty-five yard run. 
Another yard gave a touchdown. A long forward 
pass by Gooch enabled Gillette to run thirty yards 
for a touchdown. Carter missed his second goal. 
The game ended with the ball in the middle of the 
field/ 

Gooch was the headwork and the aggressive spirit 
of Virginia's play. Without Gooch there might 
have been another story. Aside from his brilliant 
run Fuller played a consistently strong game for 
Carolina. Parker was a tower of defensive strength. 
Ervin was powerful on offense. Tayloe excelled on 
the off tackle play. Burnett totaled large gains. 
Allen, Avith the exception of his bungling at the one 
yard line, exhibited the best generalship of Carolina's 
season. His was a rapid rise from the senior class 
quarterback in September to varsity quarterback 
in October. Foust gained on every exchange of 



54 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



punts. Cowell withstood the mighty Carter. Capt. 
Abernathy played the best and last game of his 
devoted career. Ramsey won this from Coach Wil- 
son — "the best seventeen year old tackle I have ever 
seen." Homewood tackled fiercely behind the line 
and Huske got down under punts with telling dash. 
Wherever there was a play there was Tandy in the 
midst of it. To the lasting credit of Coaches Trench- 
ard, Pendleton, and Wilson the Carolina team gave 
all that it had all the time. 

The line up: 



Carolina Position 
Huske L. E. . . . 

Cowell, McCall ) 

T HP 
Ramsey j 

Edwards, and Orr L. G. . . . 

Tandy, Boshamer C 

Foust R. G.... 

Abernathy, (Capt. 1 ) R. T... 



Virginia 
. Flannigan 

. . . Maiden 

Redus 

Jett 

. . . . Carter 
. Woolfolk 



Homewood. Grimesley R. E Coleman 

Allen. Lord Q Gooch 

Tayloe, Burnett L. H Mayer 

Fuller, Phillips R. H Ray 

Parker, Ervin F Landes 

Referee, Thorpe of Columbia; Umpire, Murphy of Yale; 
Headlinesman, Sugden of Harvard. 



CAROLINA DEFEATS WAKE FOREST 

111 the last tryout of strength before the Virginia 
game Carolina defeated Wake Forest in Durham 
November 15th by the score of 29 to 0. Tayloe, 
Ervin, and Burnett featured for Carolina. Not until 
the last quarter did Wake Forest make first clown. 
A brilliant spurt toward the end of the game brought 
Tandy, Homewood, and Huske back into the lineup. 
Time was called with Wake Forest in a threatening 
position. 

Carolina Position Wake Forest 

Huske, Joyner L. E Bell 

Ramsey, Boshamer L. T Blackburn 

Edwards, Cowell L. G Oliver 

Tandy. Cowell C Carter 

Foust R. G Camp 

Abernathy R. T Moore 

Homewood, Grimsley, Love . . R. E Jones 

Allen, Lord Q Billings 

Tayloe, Burnett L. H Lee 

Fuller, Pope, Ranson R. H Trust 

Parker, Ervin, Tennent F Savage 

Referee, Fetzer of Davidson; Umpire, Broughton of Wake 
Forest; Headlinesman, Sampson of Saint Albans. 




FOOTBALL SQUAD, 1913-'14 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



05 



THE TOUCH OF AN EXPERT 

Headcoach Trenchard, whu had special charge of 
the endmen, put the finishing touches to two stalwart 
ends, Horuewood aud Huske. The last year Homewood 
had the zeal of a good player, hut not according to 
knowledge. Huske was just ordinary. A season 
of expert training developed them into a pair that 
is hard to he matched in the South for rugged strength 
and tierce dash. In the Virginia game Homewood 
several times shot in from his end and got Gooch 
hehind the line trying to circle the other end. Huske 
got away under punts, nailing man after man in his 
tracks. It is a likely pair for South Atlantic gossip. 
They just show what good coaching can do. Home- 
wood and Huske will be on the job next fall. That 
freshman end, Williamson, will be around there 
somewhere too. Doggie will make a wonder out of 
this sensation of the class field. 



class team players is high testimony to the worth of 
his work. Carolina wishes for Tol Pendleton many 
good things in his business life. 



COACH WILSON 



The man who won the hearts of the boys was Tom 
-Wilson, line coach. He is the kind of a leader that 
men fight for — harder than they know. As head 
line coach at Princeton he mastered the technique of 
the Princeton modifications of the Minnesota shift. 
In fine co-operation with Pendleton he inaugurated 
the shift system at Carolina. More than that he 
won the love of the team and it was a better team for 
that fact. His parting words at the Jefferson Hotel 
show the nature of the man. "The man who fails to 
make his work in the class room is just as yellow as 
the man who quits in the game.' - It is the general 
wish that Wilson will be among us again. 



COACH PENDLETON 

Tol Pendleton, coach of the backfield during the 
past football season, has declined the position of base- 
ball coach and has gone into business in Duffalo, 
New York. It was the hope of the entire college that 
Pendleton would return to the field both for the spring 
and the fall. His work in developing a backfield out 
of unpromising material marked him as a great coach. 
His playing at Princeton is part of the athletic tradi- 
tions of that University. A great half back, a wonder- 
ful outfielder, and a lightning man on his feet, Pen- 
dleton is considered one of the foremost amateur ath- 
letes of his day. He declined chances to enter the big 
leagues bub accepted I he position of coach here in 
order to help in the institution of a good football 
system at Carolina. The fact that three of the back- 
field that started the Virginia game were unheralded 



TAYLOE, CAPTAIN 

In the Jefferson Hotel Thanksgiving evening the 
Carolina team elected Dave Tayloe, '10, star half- 
back, to be the Captain of the Varsity for 1914. Tay- 
loe is from Washington, .X. C. This is his second 
year on the team. During the season just closed 
Tayloe was Carolina's greatest ground gainer and 
with the exception of the Washington and Lee game, 
the star in every game he played. In the Georgia 
game he shared honors with McWhorter. His bril- 
liant work in the Virginia game was brought to a 
close by an injury in the second quarter. His second- 
ary defensive strength was greatly missed in the 
last half. Powerfully built and alertly confident, 
another year will bring him to a front place in South 
Eastern Athletics. 



HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL CHAMPIONSHIP 

The high school football championship resolved 
itself into a three cornered race between Raleigh, 
Wilmington, and Washington. Wilmington was 
eliminated in the game played in Chapel Hill the 
sixth of December. Raleigh ran away with the 
game, 29 to 6. The interference of the Raleigh back- 
field worked with the precision of a mowing machine 
as it cleared the way for end runs and off tackle 
plays. Thompson was the mainstay for Wilmington's 
lighter team. Earl Johnson generaled the Raleigh 
team like an old head. 



RALEIGH WINS STATE CHAMPIONSHIP 

The State Championship went to the Raleigh High 
School Saturday, December the thirteenth, when the 
Capital City lads defeated the Washington High 
School on the University athletic field by the score of 
29 to 0. It was a more interesting game than the 
score expresses and had all the color and tumult of 
a championship contest. A special train from Raleigh 
and automobiles through the country brought a large 
crowd for the game. The student body was out in full 
force and divided its support with vigorous enthu- 
siasm. 

Washington, slightly heavier and considerably 
slower than Raleigh, could not stand before the be- 
wildering attack of the Raleigh machine. Tayloe 
and Moore played a strong game for Washington. 
Champion and Mills, the Raleigh half-backs, punc- 



56 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



tured the line and skirted the ends. Crinkley and 
Smith at ends kept the Washington offense inside and 
when on the offense converted forward passes into 
touchdowns. Earl Johnson at quarter proved himself 
the Little Corporal of the high school gridiron. 

Washington was entertained by the Beaufort Coun- 
ty Club and Kaleigh by the Wake County Club. The 
student body enjoyed having the high school boys 
on the campus. 

Line up: 

Washington Position Raleigh 

Moore L. E A. Crinkley 

Harris L. T Weathers 

Howard h- G S. Crinkley 

Wilkinson C Tyree 

Hudnell R. G Parham 

Jones R. T Whitaker 

Smith R. E Smith 

Meekins Q Johnson 

J. Weston L. H Mills, (Capt.) 

E. Weston R. H Champion 

Tayloe, (Capt.) F Bowen 

Referee, Trenchard; Umpire, Kluttz; Timekeeper, Tandy; 
Headlinesman, Oates ;Time 12 minute quarters. 



executive, and a man of unusual personal attractive- 
ness. He will be a good citizen in any community. 
Carolina is glad that he will not be far away. 



M'LENDON GOES TO DURHAM 

L. P. McLendon, who has been graduate manager 
of athletics for the past two yearSj has decided to 
locate in Durham for the practice of law after Janu- 
ary 1, 1914. McLendon will be greatly missed both 
in the town and in the college. He is at present the 
popular and efficient mayor of the town. While a 
student in the University he took a leading part in 
college life. In a spirited debate with Tulane Uni- 
versity, McLendon's clear thinking was an important 
factor in Carolina's victory. 

McLendon is a capable speaker, a good business 



ATHLETIC NOTES 

The coach of the Raleigh Team is Guy Phillips, 
'13, teacher of English in the High School. He has 
directed one of the best football machines running 
at large in North Carolina this season. 

The telegram from Charlotte telling of the death 
of Richard B. Abernathy brought sorrow to this 
University that was deep and personal to the men on 
the campus. He was a member of the Junior Class, 
quiet, clean, straight — the kind that took his blows 
on the football field silent and cheerful above the 
bruises. 

At the Chapel Exercises Friday morning the stu- 
dent body stood in respect to his memory while the 
University quartette sang "Integer Vitae." At twelve 
o'clock the bell was tolled. The funeral exercises 
were conducted in the afternoon. Walter P. Fuller, 
classmate and teammate, was the student representa- 
tive. 

Mr. Earle Mack, manager of the Raleigh League 
Team, will coach the Carolina baseball team this 
spring. He will have a goodly squad of men to work 
with and we trust he will prove a worthy son of the 
Wizard manager of the World's Champions. 

In the opening basketball game Saturday night 
Elon College defeated Carolina by the score of 21 
to 15. It was evident throughout that Carolina's 
hastily gathered team was not in form for the super- 
ior trained Elon five. 




First Kick-off, Cakolixa to Virginia, 1913. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



57 



ESTIMATED CONDITION OF ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

This report is not intended to be exact but was 
made <mt roughly to give some idea of the financial 
status of the Association. 

Games loss cain 

Wake Forest at C. H $ 125.00 

Va. Medical College at C. H 200.00 

Davidson at Greensboro 75-00 

S. C. at Columbia 65.00 

V. P. I. at Winston-Salem 65.00 

University of G. at Athens 

W. and Lee at Lynchburg. Va 24.00 

Wake Forest at Durham $ 65.00 

University of Va. at Richmond 2,300.00 

$ 554.00 $ 2,365.00 

Indebtedness Sept I, 1913 $ 4,650.00 

Equipment of team 1,200.00 

Training table 577-00 

Woolen, Salary from June 100.00 

McLendon, Salary from June 150.00 

Coach Wilson, expenses 95.00 

Coach Wilson, salary 900.00 

Coach Pendleton, expenses 79-00 

Coach Pendleton, salary 900.00 

Coach Bluethenthal, expenses 44-00 

Coach Cartmell, salary 1-2 year 1,000.00 

Expenses High School teams 300.00 

Total expenditures and indebtedness. .. .$10,549.00 

Received from registration fees Sept.1913 1,955.00 

Total receipts, net $ 4,320.00 

Present Liabilities of Athletic Association, $6,229.00. 

The Association has a credit to the amount of $974.00 with 
the General Alumni Committee, this being the excess amount 
paid coaches over and above $1,000.00 contracted to be paid 
by the Association. 



BASEBALL SCHEDULE 

Manager Carl Taylor has prepared a schedule of 
twenty-five baseball games. Thirteen of these are 
to be on the local diamond. Among the principal 
games are Wake Forest, Davidson, Washington and 
Lee, Virginia, Penn State, Georgia, the Navy and 
Princeton. Three games will be played with Virginia, 
in Durham, Greensboro, and Charlottesville. 

The schedule follows : 

March 13 — Oak Ridge Institute at Chapel Hill. 
March 17 — Elon College at Chapel Hill. 
March 24 — Wake Forest College at Chapel Hill. 
March 26 — William and Mary College at Chapel Hill. 
March 27 — West Virginia Wesleyan at Chapel Hill. 
March 28 — University of Vermont at Chapel Hill. 
March 31 — Amherst at Chapel Hill. 
April 1 — Amherst at Chapel Hill. 
April 2 — Hampden and Sidney at Chapel Hill. 



April 

April 

April 

April 

April 

April 

April 

April 

April 

April 

April 

April 

April 

April 

April 

May 

May 



7 — Wake Forest College at Wake Forest. 

8 — Davidson at Fayetteville. (Pending.) 

9— Penn. State College at Chapel Hill. 

11 — Wake Forest at Raleigh. 

13 — Guilford College at Greensboro. 

14 — West Virginia University at Chapel Hill. 

15 — Washington and Lee University at Chapel Hill. 

18 — University of Virginia at Durham. 

20 — University of Virginia at Greensboro. 

21 — Davidson College at Charlotte. 

25 — University of Virginia at Charlottesville. 

27 — Virginia Military Institute at Lexington, Va. 

28 — Catholic University at Washington, D. C. 

29 — Navy at Annapolis 

30 — Princeton University at Princeton. 
1 — University of Georgia at Chapel Hill. 
2 — University of Georgia at Chapel Hill. 



BASKETBALL 

With the close of the football season Thanksgiving 
Day, the centre of athletic interest shifted from the 
chalked field to the gymnasium floor. Coach Cart- 
mell has a likely squad of thirty basketball candidates 
in competitive training every night at 7 :30 in the By- 
num Gymnasium. Tillett, Carrington, and Redmon, 
strong members of the 1913 team, are missing. Four 
of the 1913 squad are back. ex-Captain Chambers 
and Captain Mebane Long, regulars, and Homewood 
and Ranson, substitutes. Promising new men are 
Edwards, Dowd, Johnston, Andrews, Goodson. and 
Tennent. There is also material for good class teams. 
Manager Cy Long has prepared the following sched- 
ule: 



Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Mar. 
Mar 
Mar 



13— Elon College at Chapel Hill. 
16 — Durham V. M. C A. at Durham. 
19 — Durham Y. M. C. A. at Durham. 
9 — Georgia at Raleigh. 
30 — Guilford at Guilford. 
31 — Elon at Elon. 
6— Wake Forest at Chapel Hill. 
9 — Virginia at Raleigh. 
14 — Wake Forest at Wake Forest. 
19— Guilford at Chapel Hill. 
27 — Woodberry Forest at Orange, Va. 
28 — V. M. I., at Lexington. 
2 — V. P. I., at Lynchburg. 
3 — Lynchburg Y. M. C. A. at Lynchburg 
4 — Virginia at Charlottesville. 



ESTHER WAKE PLAYED IN RALEIGH 

Esther Wake, 1 lie pla.y based on the story of the 
Regulators and written by Prof. Adolph Vermont, of 
the Smithfield Schools, was played to a full house in 
Raleigh on the night of December 5th. L. X. John- 
ston, '12 and W. H. Rhodes, Jr., '15, appeared as 
James Pugh and Edward Fanning. 



58 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 
CONTEST FOR AYCOCK MEMORIAL CUP 



One Hundred and Forty High Schools Begin Work for the Prize 



The latest offering of the Bureau of Extension of 
the University is Extension Series Bulletin Xo. 5 
entitled ''The Initiative and Referendum," which is 
to be used by the members of the High School De- 
bating Union as the basis for the state-wide debate 
in the contest for the Aycock Memorial Cup. 

The bulletin, planned on the lines of the "Woman 
Suffrage" handbook of last year, though considerably 
more extended, contains a history of the initiative 
and referendum movement, a complete brief for the 
affirmative and negative, fifty or more pages of 
carefully selected arguments pro and con, and a list 
of references to other material which may be secured 
by schools from their local public libraries or by pur- 
chase. In some instances it has been indicated that 
the material of governmental origin, such as speeches 
from the CongTessional Records and Documents. 
may be obtained free from the North Carolina sena- 
tors and representatives. Among the articles on the 
affirmative is the recent speech of Hon. E. J. Justice, 
delivered before the ISTorth Carolina House of Repre- 
sentatives in October. On the negative is a selection 
from the address of Senator Henry Cabot Lodge, of 
Massachusetts, before the State Literary and Histori- 
cal Association, delivered in Raleigh in 1011. 

In addition to the handbook, the Debating Union 
has secured a number of governemnt documents, 
copies of which have been sent to the schools entering 



the Union. Material on both sides has also been fur- 
nished by the National Popular Government League, 
with headquarters in Washington, of which Senators 
Owen of Oregon and LaFollette of Wisconsin are 
members. 

The Bulletin has been prepared by E. R. Rankin, 
Secretary of the Union, and L. R. Wilson, Chairman 
of the Committee on University Extension, together 
with the members of the Debating Union committee 
from the Dialectic and Philanthropic Societies. 

On the part of the schools, one hundred and forty 
have entered the Union to date, and work has been 
begun in earnest for the contest, the finals of which 
will be held at the University the 2nd Thursday and 
Friday in April. Preparations are under way to 
combine this contest with one in track athletics, and 
thereby give to the high schools a combination contest 
brimming full of interest. Other schools are expected 
to enter still. Those already enrolled are : 

Durham. Goldshoro, Wilmington, Raleigh, Char- 
lotte, Greensboro, High Point, Winston-Salem, Reids- 
ville^ Concord, Salisbury, Statesville, Hendersonville, 
Asheville, Marion. Pleasant Garden, Pittshoro, Car- 
thage. Apex, Bay Leaf, Creedmoor, Poplar Branch, 
Manteo, Ml. Airy. Pilot Mountain. North Wilkes- 
boro, Washington, New Bern. Elizabeth City, Elon 
College. Haw River, Jamestown, Abbotsburg, Bladen- 
boro, Clarkton, Tarbofo, Rocky Mount, Greenville, 




THE TEXXIS ASSOCIATIOX COURTS 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



59 



Weldon, Oxford, Louisburg, Haw Fields, Sylvan, 
Friendship, Oak Ridge, Warrenton, Whitsett, Eden- 
tun, Belhaven, Plymouth, Mt. Ulla, Stony Point, 
Lenoir, Morganton, Hickory, Sunbury, Gatesville, 
Eeynoldson, Graham. Burlington, Sanford, Mt. Olive, 
Clinton, Atkinson, Garland, White Oak, Troutmans, 
Scott's, Harmony, Sylva, Bryson City, Almond, Pock 
Hill, Clyde, Cooleem.ee, Courtney, Yadkin College, 
Roberdel, Mason's Cross, Enfield, Scotland Neck, 
Roanoke Rapids, Pikeville, Falling Creek, Seven 
Springs, Churchland, Piedmont, ALt. Pleasant, Ken- 
ly, Smithfield, Clayton, Fremont, Selma, Lucama, 
Wilson, Kinstoii, Philadelphus, Rowland, Spring 
Hill, Holly Springs. Wakclon, Cary, King, Pinnacle, 
Walnut Cove, Gastonia, Shelby, King's Mountain, 
Hookerton, Snow Hill, Sparta, Turkey Knob, Glade 
Valley, Piney Creek, Madison, Stoneville, Bethany, 
Wentworth, Leaksville, Lumberton, Laurinburg, Ap- 
palachian Training School, Cullowhee, Knap of 
Reeds, Stem, Bessemer City, Dallas, Cherry ville, 
Belmont, Rich Square, Lattimore, Mooresboro, Battle- 
In iro, VVhitakers, Polkton, Unionville, Franklinton, 
Glen Alpine, Cameron, Huntersville. 



THE MUSICAL CLUBS 

The University is delighted with the Glee Club. 
The first concert was given on December the fifth, 
and it left the audience enthusiastic. On that occa- 
sion the mandolin club was not running easily , there 
was grit in the machinery somewhere. But there 
is another good glee club this year. Also — and this 
is an exception — the soloists are close to the edge of 
professional excellence. What is more: both club 
and soloists are giving some unusually good things. 

The present writer does not pretend to say just 
what is the matter with the mandolin club. It drew 
rounds of applause ; but for all that, it seemed to him 
to lack snap and precision. And its selections ! All, 
"turkey rags" or tangorines. 

The mandolins suffered, perhaps, by comparison 
with the glee club. The latter organization is strong 
and well balanced, — 21 voices, with an unusually 
hue supply of first tenors. Furthermore, it is well 
trained. (Congratulations ; Mr. Sneath !j 

The clubs were supported by solos from Meeks, 
Epps, W. C. Wright, and -Mr. Sneath. These soloists 
presented a combination of attractions such as has not 
been heard here in years. And the piano accompani- 
ment of J. E. Harris did not break down. It appealed 
to the writer as particularly sympathetic. 

The program offered really gave the excellent talent 
a fair chance. Seldom, if ever, has the writer heard 



happier selections. The pieces are far and away above 
the ordinary Glee Club commonplaces. Take, for 
instance, the club's "Drinking Songj" Mr. Sneath's 
"The Pipes of Pan;" Meeks's "Jean" and his encore, 
"Rosalind ;" and "A Perfect Day," sung by Epps. 
These songs have something in them, and they are not 
above the heads of the average audience. One could 
hardly make the latter comment of Wright's "Hun- 
garian Dance.'' It is a beautiful piece, and it gave 
Wright an excellent opportunity for a display of 
violin technie; but the writer suspects that the tre- 
mendous outburst of applause which greeted it was 
excited by wonder rather than emotion. On the other 
hand, the two encores from Drdla that followed 
"Souvenir" and "Serenade" — must have charmed 
everybody. 

Indeed, if the concert had a "feature," Wright was 
it. 

Whoever the critic be, — whether a layman, like 
the present writer, or an expert, — he will agree with 
the statement that the clubs gave Friday night's au- 
dience a most enjoyable evening. If the impression 
made on the road equals that made on the Hill, the 
Alumni will have no cause to be ashamed of their 
clubs. 

The personel follows: 

Glee Club: Mr. George M. Sneath, Director; Mr. M. H. 
Meeks, Jr., President; Mr. J. S. Cansler, Manager; Mr. H. 
L. Brockman, Treasurer. First Tenor — E. M. Deaton, G. 
Harden, E. W. Jarman, M. H. Meeks, W. A. Rudisill, M. 
Stubbs, W. C. Wright; Second Tenor — E. P. Andrews, h. H. 
Clement, F. W. Hancock, J. T. Pritchett, J. A. Taylor, E. 
A. Hill, G. M. Sneath; First Bass—C. W. Beckwith, P. H. 
Epps, G. M. Long, R. H. Long, R. N. Page, W. C. Lord; 
Second Bass — H. L. Brockman, W. M. Hicks, E. P. Jones, 
J. F. Love, W. N. Pritchard, C. B. Woltz. 

Mandolin Club: G. M. Long, M. H. Meeks, W. A. Rudi- 
sill, VV. C. Wright, L. H. Clements, E. P. Jones, W. C. Lord, 
H. Cone, J. L. Wright, W. H. Royster. 



THE FARMERS AND METHODISTS LEAD 

Statistics collected in the Registrar's ofhee con- 
cerning the occupations of the fathers of members 
of the student body and the church affiliations of the 
students themselves present the interesting facts that 
266 of the 900 students are of farmer antecedents and 
279 are identified with the Methodist church. In 
detail, the classification follows: 

Farming 206, merchandising III, law 56, medi- 
cine 50, ministry 34, manufacturing 33. government 
service 30, real estate 23, teaching 19, railroading 

15, contracting 17, banking 17. traveling salesmen 

16, insurance 15, lumber 12, druggists 11, mechanics 

{Continued on Paijc 62) 



60 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 

To be issued monthly except in July, August, September 
and January, by the General Alumni Association of the 
University of North Carolina. 

Board of Publication 

The Review is edited by the following Board of Publication : 

Louis R. Wilson, '99 Editor 

Associate Editors : Walter Murphy, '92 ; E. K. Graham, '98 ; 
Archibald Henderson, '98; W. S. Bernard, '00; J. K. 
Wilson, '05 ; Louis Graves, '02 ; F. P. Graham, '09 ; Ken- 
neth Tanner, '11. 
E. R. Rankin, '13 Managing Editor 

Subscription Price 

Single Copies $0.15 

Per Year 1.00 

Communications intended for the Editor should be sent to 
Chapel Hill, N. C. ; for the Managing Editor, to Chapel Hill, 
N. C. All communications intended for publication must be 
accompanied with signatures if they are to receive considera- 
tion. 

OFFICE OF PUBLICATION, CHAPEL HILL, N. C 



Entered at the Postofnce at Chapel Hill, N. C, as second 
class matter. 



THE UNIVERSITY IN LETTERS 

"Twenty Centuries of Paris/' by Mrs. Mabel S. 
C. Smith, author of ''A Tar Heel Baron'' and "Tbe 
Spirit of French Letters," bas been recently publish- 
ed by the Tbomas Y. Crowell Company in its ''Tra- 
vel Series." 

The present work is a history of tbe growth of Paris 
that will prove of great service and entertainment to 
the prospective visitor as well as to those tbat are 
already familiar with tbe French capital. Mrs. 
Smith bas presented in most readable form those 
facts concerning the streets, buildings and monu- 
ments, and history of the city that add so much to the 
traveller's enjoyment. Most of us, I judge, have 
contented ourselves with the historical introduction 
in Baedecker's Paris or some similar compendium. 
Mrs. Smith bas expanded and unified this material 
into an interesting and dramatic story. ~No city of 
Europe manages to conceal its romantic past so com- 
pletely beneath an exterior of pleasure and gayety. 
To the average visitor Paris is the city of news-boys, 
rushing cabs, cafes and white-aproned waiters; and 
yet, probably, no modern city contains in its past 
more stories of bloodshed and horrors. Mrs. Smith bas 
succeeded very well in creating for the reader the 
atmosphere of romance which is needed to appre- 



ciate fully the city of Henry IV, Louis XIV, Robes- 
pierre and Napoleon I. 

The work should be of interest also to those who 
have no first-hand acquaintance with Paris; they 
will enjoy the history in itself and will be given the 
opportunity of visualizing more clearly the scenes de- 
scribed in the romances of Dumas, Hugo and Balzac. 
They will derive especial pleasure from the handling 
of such subjects as the material growth of Paris itself 
from the mud-village of the Celts to the modern city 
of the millions ; the gradual construction of the 
Louvre, from the palisades of Roman times to the 
joint palaces of the Louvre and tbe Tuilleries in 1850 ; 
the historic roles of public squares, tbe Place Neau- 
bert, the Place de la greve, the Place de la Bastille, 
the Place de la Concorde, — in the scenes of the re- 
ligious wars, the Fronde, the Revolution and Napo- 
leonic times. 

One of the most instructive single elements of the 
book is the history of the churches of Paris from the 
point of view of architecture. All the stages in the 
development of styles, from the Romanesque style 
in Saint Germain-des-Pres to the recently constructed 
Eglise du Sacre-Coeur, are well represented, — early 
Gothic in Notre Dame and the Sainte Chapelle, 
flamboyant Gothic in Saint Germain TAuxerrois, 
renaissance Gothic in Saint Etienne-du-Mont, clas- 
sic and neo-classic in Saint Roch, Saint Sulpice, the 
Invalides and the Val-de-grace. 

Mrs. Smith should be complimented also upon her 
success in reproducing in few words tbe historic 
color of the most important periods and personages 
of Paris history. I noticed particularly the charac- 
ter portrayal of the pious Saint Noris, of the six- 
teenth century patriot, Etienne Marcel, and the de- 
scription of Revolutionary Paris. 

The work may be recommended to any one plan- 
ning to spend a month or two in Paris with the aim of 
thorough appreciation of its artistic and historic pos- 
sessons as well as to those interested in Paris merely 
as readers and students of literature. — 0. T. 



Two publications coming from University men of 
(lie middle nineties have recently appeared which are 
thoroughly in accord with tbe best thought concern- 
ing the subjects of agriculture and American litera- 
ture for tbe public schools of tbe country and North 
Carolina teachers and study clubs in particular. They 
are Fundamentals of Farming and Farm Life, by E. 
J. Ivyle and A. C. Ellis, '94, published by Charles 
Scribner's Sons, 1912, $1.25 and Studies in Ameri- 
can Authors, by W. C. Smith, '96, published by the 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



61 



State .Normal and industrial College, Greensboro, 
1913. 

Fundamentals uf Fwrnung and Farm, Life, of 
which Dr. Ellis, of the School of Education of the 
University of Texas, is joint author, sets for itself the 
task not only of presenting the subject of elementary 
agriculture for the Schools, but also of making the 
presentation in a pedagogical!*? as well as scientifi- 
cally correct way. it has also been the purpose of the 
authors to provide a book that did not stop with giv- 
ing mere advice about farm practices to be memorized 
by the pupils, but taught hrst of all the principles of 
plant and animal growth and reproduction and of 
soil management, in this way it was hoped that the 
pupils might be enabled to understand the reasons for 
farm practices and to criticise any old or new prac- 
tice independently, in order further to develop the 
powers of observation, exercise the reason, and con- 
nect the lesson with the daily life and home needs of 
the pupils, lists of suggestive questions, exercises, and 
problems have been provided for each subject. 

Another purpose of the authors, which is highly 
commendable, is to give more than passing mention 
to the work of the farmer girls and farmer's wives. 
They have attempted to broaden the conception of a 
course in elementary agriculture from that of a 
mere treatise on raising plants and animals for sale 
to that of a means of preparation for living intelli- 
gently and happily, as well as profitably, on the farm. 

The book contains 557 pages, two color plates 
illustrating the wide difference in methods of tilling 
the soil as portrayed in "The Spaders" by Millet, 
and those of today, and 282 exceedingly attractive 
illustrations. In every sense it is an admirable text- 
book for the purpose for which it is intended. 

North Carolina has long been in need of just such 
Studies as are provided in the Bulletin which Dean 
Smith, of the State Normal, has given to the teachers 
and members of literary clubs in the State, namely, a 
comprehensive set of aids which are a little more 
definite than those contained in books about litera- 
ture and a little less detailed than those given in the 
manuals concerned chietly with grammar, prosody, 
and figures of speech. 

The Studies, comprising 171 pages, treat of the 
American poets Bryant, Longfellow, Whittier, Lowell, 
and Lanier, a splendid photogravure of the last serv- 
ing as a frontispiece for the Bulletin. Under each au- 
thor biographical notes, study lists, references for 
study, suggestions fur study, and topics for papers and 
for discussions, arc given. The concluding chapters 
offer suggestions as to the dramatization of poems by 
each author and srive lists of work on American litera- 



ture and books especially suitable for the literary 
sections of study club and public libraries. 

Two further facts, though incidental, are worthy 
of mention: the Studies mark the development of a 
series of important extension publications which the 
Normal, as a part of the public educational system 
of the State, proposes to issue for the benefit of those 
who are unable to pursue courses on its campus; and 
they may be had for the asking. 

^till another fact: They represent the thoughtful 
work of a teacher, who, by virtue of rare native 
ability and experience gained in teaching some 3,750 
sons and daughters of North Carolina since 1896, 
has learned the real art of teaching. 



PROFESSOR M. H. STACY MARRIES 

Eriends of Professor M. H. Stacy, Acting Dean 
of the College of Liberal Arts of the Lniversity, re- 
ceived the following interesting announcement on 
Thursday, November the thirteenth: 

Dr. and Mrs. S. E. Ivoonce announce the marriage 
of their sister, Miss Inez Eay Eoonce, to Mr. Marvin 
LLendrix Stacy, on Wednesday, .November twelfth, 
1913, at Wilmington, N. C. 



In his effort to secure funds for a memorial to the 
late William Sidney Porter (O. Henry), Dr. Archi- 
bald Henderson has been greatly assisted by the 
actor, Norman K. Hackett, who, on December 10th, 
concluded a tour of 19 North Carolina cities in which 
he presented "A Double Deceiver'" based on (J. 
Henry's well-known story "A Double-Dyed Deceiver.'" 
By actively aiding in drawing the attention of the 
State to the playing of Mr. Hackett, and by speaking 
of the object of the memorial in Greensboro when the 
jday was presented there, Dr. Henderson received 
for the memorial Association a generous per cent from 
Mr. Hackett of the gross receipts taken in by his 
company during its tour of the state. 

Prof. G. M. McKie gave a recital on the night 
of December 1 at Cary from the American Humorists. 

Dr. E. A. Greenlaw is the author of a pamphlet 
just from the press entitled "Sidney's Arcadia as an 
Example of Elizabethan Allegory." 

Prof. Collier Cobb and Dr. < '. 11. Ilerty attended 
the National Conservation Congress in Washington 
during the week November 17-22. 

On November Oth Dr. L. R. Wilson spoke before 
the North Carolina Library Association at its annual 
meeting in Washington, X. G, on "The Library as a 
Factor in Community Building." 



62 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



"LIGHTING UP THE STATE" 

Gregory Mason, in the Outlook, gives an account 
of a recent conference in Philadelphia between lead- 
ins; educators of "Wisconsin and Pennsylvania at 
which ways and means were discussed for "lighting 
up the State. 1 ' lie says: 

"It is the Wisconsin theory that democracy is 
based upon equal opportunity, and that it is the func- 
tion of a State university to otter equal opportunity 
in eduaction to all. If the citizen can't come to the 
college, the college should go to the citizen, has been 
the view of President Van Hise since he took office 
eleven years ago. Beginning in an humble way, with 
the aid of a small appropriation from the State Legis- 
lature, correspondence courses were started and lec- 
turers were sent out among the public ; later, voca- 
tional continuation schools were begun and 'package' 
libraries circulated among the people. Steadily the 
work has grown in scope and steadily the annual 
appropriations have increased 2 until now there are 
few subjects of practical importance that aren't cover- 
ed under one- phase or another of the university ex- 
tension 

"if a University is to mean anything, it must bear 
some direct relation to life. One of the benefits a 
college derives from participation in extension work 
is the galvanization of the members of its teaching 
force. Xo University or college can have its proper 
place as the focus of .the forces that advance civiliza- 
tion while its faculty is dominated by the dry-as-dust 
type of professor, theory-ridden and hidebound." 

The above is of very special interest to the people 
of this State at this time, in view of the new spirit 
which has seized our University and is evidencing 
itself in a splendid program of extension work. When 
we come to think of it, the old policy of exclusiveness 
was, indeed, short-sighted and wasteful. The ex- 
pense of maintaining a great university is enormous 
and heretofore the overwhelming majority of the 
people could derive no benefit, except second-hand 
from the comparatively few who attended its courses. 
The new policy is to use the means and brains of the 
institution to their fullest capacity in sending knowl- 
edge to those who can never go to get it. Then, too, 
it encourages the idea that a man should be a student 
all his life and continually increase his power by in- 
creasing his knowledge. 

Every community in the State should at once get 
in communication with the Extension Pureau of the 
University, at Chapel Hill, and seek information bear- 
ing on the many social, economic, and governmental 
problems pressing for solution. — Stale Journal, De- 
cember 5. 



STATE ASSOCIATION PRESIDENTS 

At the hands of their fellow members in the State 
Literary and Historical Association, the Xorth Caro- 
lina Teacher's Assembly, and the j^orth Carolina 
Folk-Lore Society, members of the University faculty 
received marked honor at the meetings held late in 
Xovember. Dr. Archibald Henderson was elected 
president of the Literary and Historical Association; 
Prof. M. C. S. Xoble, of the Teacher's Assembly, 
and Dr. J. F. Koyster, of the Folk-Lore Society. 



MR. R. T. WYCHE TELLS UNCLE REMUS STORIES 

President of the Story Teller's League of America, 
Eichard T. Wyche, formerly a student of the Uni- 
versity and now editor of the Story Teller's Magazine, 
delivered the first lecture of the year given under 
faculty auspices. Mr. Wyche discussed the subject 
of folk-lore in the South as depicted by Joel Chandler 
Harris and gave an appreciation of Mr. Harris as a 
man and writer. His stories from Uncle Eemus with 
which he illustrated the points made in his lecture, 
were admirably told and greatly enjoyed. 



THE FALL DANCES 

The fall dances of 1913 began on Thursday night, 
December 4th, when the order of Gimghouls gave its, 
annual dance at the Bynum Gymnasium. Frank 
Drew, with Lenoir Chambers and E. J. Lilly as as- 
sistants, led. On Friday afternoon the Order of 
Gorgon's Head gave an informal dance at their lodge, 
and on Friday night immediately after the concert 
by the Glee Club, the final ball was given by the 
German Club, with George Strong, W. C. Lord, and 
Avon Blue leading. 



Carolina has arranged for a triangular debate for 
1913-11 with Virginia and Johns Hopkins. The de- 
bates will be held in April. The series with Georgia 
has not been renewed. 

(Continued from Page 59) 
11, tobacco 9, journalism 6, bookkeeping 5, livery 5, 
dentistry 4, jewelry 4, hotel 3, engineering 3 broker- 
age 2, chemistry 2, automobiles 2, photography 2, 
fishing 2, promoting 1, and tailoring 1. 

By church affiliation there are: Methodists 279, 
Baptists 214, Presbyterians 146, Episcopalians 10S, 
Christians 16, Hebrews 15, Universalists 2, Chris- 
tian Scientists 1, Unitarians 2, Moravians 8, German 
Keformed 3, Friends 8, Adventists 2, Eoman Catho- 
lics 8, Holiness 1. Lutherans 11, Armenian 1, and 
Congregationalist 1. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



63 



WITH THE FACULTY 

Addresses were made as follows at the meeting of 
the Nlorth Carolina Teachers' Assembly at Raleigh 
November 24-29: Acting President E. K. Graham, 
••Calvin IT. Wiley;"' Prof. M. C. S. Noble, "The 
Grammar Grade Teachers' Association — How to Im- 
prove It and Improve Ourselves Through It;" Dr. C. 
L. Paper, "Taxation and the High Schools;" Prof. 
N*. W. Walker. "Do Manual Training and Vocational 
Branches Keep the High School Pupil in the 
Schools?" Dr. L. P. Wilson. '•Co-operation with Out- 
side Agencies;" Dr. IT. W. Chase, "Vocational Train- 
ing. Equipment and Teachers," "Are the Standards 
for Judging the Standards of Efficiency of Teachers 
Changing?" Dr. L. A. Williams,- "The Function of 
the High School in a Community;" Mr. E. P. Ran- 
kin, "'Aids in Debate Afforded by the High School 
Debating Union." 

Mr. J. E. Smith of the Department of Geology, has 
contributed papers on North Carolina Geography to 
North Carolina Education in its November and De- 
cember issues. 

Dr. W. deP. McNider addressed the Mecklenburg 
County Medical Society in October on "The Differ- 
ence in the Effect of Chloroform and of Ether on the 
Nephritic Kidney." 

"The National Yellowstone Park," "Ballads and 
Folk Songs in North Carolina," and "Paradiso and 
the Lake District of Northern Italy" are titles of 
addresses delivered by Prof. Collier Cobb at Ped 
Springs, Raleigh, and Carthage during November 
and early December. 

"The Present Status of Vocational Subjects 
in the Rural Schools of the South" was the theme of 
an address delivered by Prof. N. W. Walker before 
the Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools 
at Knoxville. Tenn., in November. 

Dr. J. G. de Roulhae Hamilton addressed the State 
Literary and Historical Association in Raleigh, No- 
vember 21, on "The North Carolina Convention of 
1865-66." 

Dr. J. F. Royster delivered the presidential ad- 
dress of the North Carolina Folk-Lore Society at the 
Society's meeting in Raleigh, November 21. 

T. F. Hickerson lectured at Stem and Oxford late 
in October on "Good Roads" and the "Problems of 



Professor M. C. S. Noble. H. W. Chase, and L. A. 
Williams of the School of Education have recentlv 



participated in educational campaigns and confer- 
ences in Beaufort, Alamance, Person, and Buncombe 
counties. 

Proceedings of the American Society of Civil En- 
gineers for November 1913 contained an article by 
Prof. William Cain on "Stresses in Wedge-Shaped 

Reinforced Concrete Beams." 

Dr. Charles Lee Raper, as the representative of 
North Carolina at the seventh National Conference 
on state and local taxation, discussed "The Fre- 
quency of Assessments" before that body at its meet- 
ing in Buffalo. N. Y.. on October 24th. An article 
by Dr. Raper entitled "Our Taxation Problem," ap- 
peared in the October number of the South Atlantic 
Quarterly. During November Dr. Raper, with the 
Assistance of Professor W. R. Camp, of the A. and 
M. College, examined the hanks in twenty North Caro- 
lina counties to ascertain fact-; for the United States 
Rural Organization Service concerning loans made to 
farmers. 



CAMPUS AND TOWN 

The second University sermon for the year was 
delivered on Sunday, November 16th, by Rev. B. 
F. Huske, '03. of Christ Church, New Bern. 

Under the auspices of the Greater Council of the 
University, Dr. L. B. McBrayer, Secretary of the 
Board of Health of Asheville and a member of the 
State Board of Health, spoke to the students on 
"Preventive Medicines" on December 11. 

Rabbi Egelson. of Greensboro, spoke in Gerrard 
Hall on the night of December 7th on the "Ideal of 
Israel." Lie was the guest of the Jewish Society of 
the University. 

The Dialectic Society has recently placed on its 
walls a portrait of Hon. I. E. Emerson, of Baltimore. 

Marion Ross of Shelby, a contestant last March 
in the High School Debating Union, won the fresh- 
man prize in the freshman debate of the Dialectic 
Society December 6th. The query debated was that 
nf the Initiative and Referendum which is also the 
query of the High School Debating Union for 1913- 
1014. 

On Wednesday night. December 0th. the Gradu- 
ates' Club, an organization of graduate students of 
the University and other colleges pursuing courses in 
the University, formed in October, held a delightful 
smoker in the Y. M. C. A. Tin- Club has a member- 
ship of forty members. 



64 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



THE GENERAL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

of the 
UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 



Officers of the Association 

Julian S. Carr, '66 President 

Walter Murphy, '92 Secretary 

Members of the Council 

Term expires 1914: D. B. Teague, '10; T. K. Wilson, '05; 
P. D. Gold, 98; T. D. Warren, '9i-'93; J. 0. Carr, '95. 

Term expires 1915 : J. Y. Joyner, '81; R. H. Sykes, '95-'9~; 
George Stephens, '96; W. H. Swift, '01; W. S. Bernard, '00, 

Term expires 1916 : A. M. Scales, '93 ; L. I. Moore, '93 ; J. 
A. Parker, '06; A. L. Cox, '04; W. J. Andrews, '91. 

Officers of the Council 

Julian S. Carr, '66 Chairman 

Walter Murphy, '92 Secretary 

J. Y. Joyner, '81 Treasurer 



THE ALUMNI 

W. S. BERNARD, '00, Alumni Editor 



It is the purpose of this department not only to publish all 
timely facts of interest about alumni — changes of residence 
and occupation, marriages, deaths, meetings, achievements, 
etc.. but also to trace alumni of whom the University and 
their classmates have no record since their leaving college, 
thus bringing the class histories up to date. Therefore items 
of information are solicited from all alumni and their friends 
but especially are the secretaries of the associations and 
the secretaries of the classes requested to keep the editor 
informed. Notes on a few alumni in each city or county 
and class contributed every month will be greatly appreciated. 



THE CLASSES 

1867 
— Moses Ashley Curtis, '62-'63, is in the banking business at 
Tarboro. Mr. Curtis was among the number of Confederate 
veterans who received their diplomas at the 191 1 commence- 
ment. 

1879 
— Hon. Francis D. Winston of Bertie has been appointed 
United States District Attorney for the Eastern District of 
North Carolina. 

1881 
— Professor M. C. S. Noble of the Department of Education 
of the University of North Carolina w-as elected president 
of the Teachers' Assembly for 1914. 

1886 

— R. B. Nixon, '8i-'82, is practicing law at Newbern, N. C. 
He takes an active interest in affairs of the University. 

1888 
— Hon. Charles Henry Duls, L., '86-'88, Judge of the Superior 
Court of North Carolina from the sixteenth district, has re- 
signed because of ill health. W. F. Harding of the Charlotte, 
N. C. bar was appointed in November by Governor Craig 
to fill the vacrancy. 

1890 
— Hon. Stephen C. Bragaw, Superior Court Judge from the 
first judicial district, has resigned his commission because 
of ill health. Judge Bragaw was appointed in December 1911 
to succeed Judge G. W. Ward resigned. He was unopposed in 
the fall elections and succeeded himself for the term of 
eight years. Judge Bragaw was a student in the Academic 
department of the University from '86 to '89, and in the 
School of Law, '9l-'92. He was a member of the football 
team of '9i-'92. 



1893 

— In "The Engineering Magazine" for November DeBernier 

H. Whitaker contributes a paper entitled "Cuban Iron Ores : 
Three Billion Tons Practically Free from Trust Control." 

1894 

— William F. Harding of the Charlotte, N. C. bar was appoint- 
ed in November Judge of the Superior Court from the six- 
teenth district to succeed Judge C. H. Duls resigned. 

1895 

— Dr. Herman Harrell Home, professor of the History and 
Philosophy of Education in New York University, delivered 
an address before the Literary and Historical Association of 
North Carolina on the evening of November 20. His subject 
was "A New Method of Historical Investigation." 

1897 

— Michael Schenck, former mayot of Hendersonville, N. C, 
has been appointed by Governor Craig solicitor for the 
Eighteenth Judicial District to succeed A. Hall Johnston, re- 
signed. 

— On the evening of November 20 Miss Roberta Henshaw 
of Columbia S. C. was married to Mr. Sidney W. Minor in 
the First Presbyterian Church. Dr. W. T. Blackburn officiat- 
ing. Mr. Minor is Cashier of The Fidelity Bank, Durham, 
N. C. 

1898 
— E. E. Sams, of the State Department of Education, was re- 
elected Secretary of the North Carolina Teachers' Assembly 
at its recent meeting in Raleigh. 

1899 

J. E. Latta, Secretary, Chicago, 111. 
— Miss Florence Lee Heitter, of Kent, Illinois, was married 
to Dr. John Robert Carr on Wednesday, November 12. 
— J. E. Latta is special agent for the Underwriters Labora- 
tories, with headquarters at Chicago, 111. Formerly he was 
associate editor of the "Electrical Review and Western Elec- 
trician." 

1900 
W. S. Bernard, Acting Secretary, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
— On Wednesday, October 1, in the First Presbyterian Church 
of Charlotte, N. C, Miss Sarah White Wilson, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. George E. Wilson, was married to Mr. John 
Austin Tate, of Charlotte. 

— Henry Reynolds, after spending two years in the Law 
Department of Columbia University, has located at Wilkes- 
boro for the practice of his profession. He will get his L. L. 
B. degree from Columbia next summer. 

— Contradicting the newspaper reports that "Hurry-Up" 
Yost was largely responsible for the Army team's successful 
open game tactics against the Navy, the official statement of 
the Army Athletic Council, published in the New York Times 
of December 2, places the credit where it says it is due — 
upon the head coach, Lieut. C. D. Daly and the assistant 
Coach, Capt. Ernest Graves "These two officers," says the 
statement, "were responsible for the coaching, and to them 
is due the credit for the team which gave such an excellent 
account of itself on the Polo Grounds." 

Ernest Graves, '00 was a great football player at Carolina 
on the teams of '98 and '99, before he became a West Point 
Cadet and Captain of an Army team. In 1912 he was head 
coach at Uncle Sam's Military Academy. 

1901 

F. B. Rankin, Secretary, Rutherfordton, N. C. 
— B. S. Skinner is practicing law at Durham, N. C, is a 
member of the Board of Aldermen and Mayor Pro Tern. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



65 



1902 

R. A. Merritt, Secretary, Greensboro, N. C. 
— Organization of the Equal Suffrage League of North Caro- 
lina was recently effected in Charlotte. Mrs. Archibald Hen- 
derson, of Chapel Hill, was elected president. 
— Dr. and Mrs. S. E. Koonce announce the marriage of their 
sister Miss Inez Fay Koonce to Mr. Marvin Hendrix Stacy 
on Wednesday, November the twelfth nineteen hundred and 
thirteen, Wilmington, North Carolina. 

— Miss Margaret Locke Moore and Mr. Tod Robin Brem were 
married on the evening of November 16 at the home of the 
bride's sister, Mrs. J. B. Bowen, in Dilworth, N. C. Mr. and 
Mrs. Brem left immediately for Los Angeles, Cal., where 
they will make their home. 

1904 

T. F. Hickerson, Secretary, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
— On November n in the Presbyterian Church at Oxford, 
N. C. were married Miss Annie Bryan, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Chas. W. Bryan, and Mr. Robert W. Herring, Ph. G., 'oS. 

1905 

Frank McLean, Secretary, Maxton, N. C. 
— At 9 o'clock, Wednesday evening, November 19, in the 
Methodist Church of Lawrenceville, Va., Dr. Hugh Yelverton, 
of Wilson, N. C, was married to Miss Myra Alma Peebles, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. S. Peebles of Lawrenceville. 
— Stroud Jordan, who was one time instructor in the depart- 
ment of Chemistry in the University of North Carolina, is 
now Chief Chemist for the American Tobacco Co., in New 
York. 

— Clemment Wrenn is cashier of the Deposit and Savings 
Bank at Reidsville, N. C. 

1906 

J. A. Parker, Secretary, Charlotte, N. C. 

— J. W. Winborne is a member of the firm of Pless and Win- 
borne attorneys of Marion, N. C. 

— Herbert Henry Moses is teaching in the Tennessee Military 
Institute at Sweetwater, Tenn. 

— Roy M. Brown is teacher of English in the Appalachian 
Training School, at Boone, N. C. 

— "Wanderlust," a book of 98 pages published by the Broad- 
way Publishing Company, of New York, 1913, and dedicated 
to O. Max Gardner, Law 'o5-'o7, and Bernard M. Condon, 
recounts the varied experiences of Robert R. Reynolds, '06, 
solicitor of the fifteenth North Carolina judicial district, 
from his early boyhood and college days up to the time he 
began the practice of his profession in Asheville in 1908. 
University men who remember Reynolds' dash in the 'Varsity 
backfield and unlimited fund of breezy experience gained as 
traveller and adventurer from every quarter of America and 
Europe, will find in this realistic semi-autobiography a most 
striking likeness of the Reynolds they knew back in the days 
of 1902-1905. 

1907 
C. L. Weil. Secretary, Grensboro, N. C. 
— On November 12 at the residence of the bride's mother, 
Mrs. William Mangum Morgan, were married Miss Annie 
Tate Morgan and Mr. Thomas Henry Sutton, Jr. The cere- 
mony was performed in the Highland Presbyterian Church, 
Rev. Louis T. Wilds, officiating. 

— Q. C. Tucker is in Tutuila, Samoa, in the employment of the 
Navy Dept. U. S. 



1908 
Jas. A. Gray, Jr., Secretary, Wiston-Salem, N. C. 
— Fleetwood W. Dunlap has been elected Mayor of Wadcs- 
boro, N. C. 

— "Brain-Shapes" is the title of a booklet containing 23 poems 
recently published by S. H. Lyle, of Franklin. Other books 
previously published by Mr. Lyle are "Leaves of Life," "Ways 
of Men," and "By-Ways." 

1909 

C. W. Tillett, Secretary, Charlotte, N. C. 
— Miss Anna M. Hopper announces the marriage of her niece 
Mary Helen Casey to Dr. John Thomas Beavers Wednesday 
October sixteenth nineteen hundred and twelve, Baltimore, 
Maryland. 

— On Tuesday, November 25, Miss Rosa Powell and Mr. 
Frank Borden Daniels were married in St. Paul's Methodist 
Church at Goldsboro, N. C. 

— On November 5, at the home of the bride's mother in Rock- 
ingham, N. C, Miss Lila McQueen Stancill was married to 
Mr. George Gordon Shannonhouse, Rev. E. H. Davis, officiat- 
ing. They will make their future home in Charlotte, N. C. 
— J. F. Thomson is practicing law at Goldsboro. 
— The play "Esther Wake" by Prof. Adolf Vermont, Superin- 
tendent of the Smithfield graded schools, was produced at 
Smithfield November 14, and in Raleigh, N. C, December 6, 
with gratifying success at both places. 
— C B. Ruffin is practicing law at Bishopville, S. C. 

1910 

W. H. Ramsaur, Secretary, New York, City. 
— On November 26 in St. Paul's Episcopal Church at Clinton, 
N. C, Miss Rena Lea, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A. W. Lea, 
was married to Mr. Langdon Chevis Kerr. 
— At St. Paul's Evangelical Lutheran Church in Wilmington, 
N. C, on the afternoon of December 3, Miss Louise Elizabeth 
Vollers, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. H. Louis Vollers was mar- 
ried to Mr. David Linsay Struthers, Rev. F. B. Clausen offi- 
ciating. Mr. Struthers is at present assistant City Engineer 
of Wilmington. 

— J. H. Allen is principal of the Pikeville High School, Pike- 
ville, N. C 

— W. B. Rodman, Jr., is located at Washington, N. C. in the 
practice of law. 

— Nixon S. Plummer is city editor of the Greensboro Daily 
News. 

— R. C. Dellinger is district cashier for the Bell Telephone 
and Telegraph Co., in the Mobile (Ala.) district. 
— Mr. James J. Hatch and Miss Alice B. Kizer were married 
in Greensboro, N. C, on December 8. Mr. and Mrs Hatch 
will make their home in Mount Olive, N. C, where Mr. Hatch 
is in the real estate business. 

1911 

I. C. MosER, Secretary, Oak Ridge, N. C. 
— George W. Rhodes is principal of the Falling Creek, (N. C.) 
High School. His Address is Goldsboro, N. C. R. F. D. 
No. 4- 

— On Tuesday, November 11 at the home of the bride's father 
in Greensboro, N. C, Miss Eliazbeth Scales Merrimon and 
William Bobbitt Byrd were married. Rev. Charles W. Byrd 
officiated. 

— J. E. Hines is practicing law in Clay City, Kentucky. 
— Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Shuford announce the marriage of their 



66 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



daughter Linda Lowe to Mr. Charles Eugene Mcintosh, on 

Wednesday, the fifth of November, nineteen hundred and 

thirteen, Newton, North Carolina. 

— E. C. Ward is professor of mathematics in the Helena 

(Ark.) High School. His address is 620 Pecan St., Helena, 

Arkansas. 

— W. C. George, instructor in Zoology, spent a part of the 

summer in zoological research at the Beaufort Laboratory of 

the U. S. Bureau of Fisheries. 

1912 

C. E. Norman, Secretary, Concord, N. C. 
— A. J. Warren is an Assistant in the Medical faculty of 
Tulane University. Mr. Warren led his class of 300 at 
Tulane, and received the honor of appointment to deliver 
a series of five lectures to his class on Minor Surgery. 
— "Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Hinton request the honor of your pres- 
ence at the marriage of their daughter Martha Macon to Mr. 
Thaddeus Shaw Page on the evening of Wednesday, the 
twenty-ninth of October, at nine o'clock, Presbyterian Church. 
Raleigh, North Carolina." 

1913 
A. L. M. Wiggixs, Secretary, Hartsville, S. C. 
— Geo. B. Mason and Miss Violet Rankin were married re- 
cently. Mr. Mason is an attorney at Gastonia. 
— T. H. Norwood is with the National Bank of Goldsboro, 
Goldsboro, N. C. 

— M. R. Ingram is principal of the Mount Airy High School. 
— John Busby is pursuing a law course at Harvard University. 
— Paul R. Bryan is with the Juragua Iron Company at Firm- 
eza, Province of Oriente, Cuba. 

1914 

— Walter Blackner is in the U. S. Navy on the battleship 
Arkansas. 

— Blake Applewhite, full back on the 'Varsity in 1912, is 
manager of the Carolina Advertising Company, with head- 
quarters at Wilson, N. C. 



NECROLOGY 
1854 

— Major John D. Shaw, beloved citizen and distinguished at- 
torney of Rockingham, N. C, died suddenly on the 9th of 
October at 9:30. 

Major Shaw was born on the farm about twenty miles from 
Rockingham, June 26, 1833. He passed the four score years 
in superb physical form and had rarely been in better health 
than this summer. Monday of this week he was called to 
Raleigh on legal business and on the afternoon of the sixth, 
spoke before a joint Senate and House committee in favor of 
some measure that touched the Seaboard Air Line. He was 
listened to during an hour set for some pressing matter, and 
made his last appearance as an attorney. 

Major Shaw lived on his farm and educated himself in the 
old-fashioned country schools until 1850 when lie entered the 
State University. He graduated from that institution in the 
class of 1854 with the highest honors. He studied law under 
Judge Richmond Pearson, the eminent chief justice of North 
Carolina in after years, and received his license to practice in 
1857. In 1858 he married Miss Margaret Henderson, of Lin- 
colnton, who died in May of 1907. Five children were born to 
them. 

When North Carolina seceded, Maj. Shaw volunteered and 
followed the flag of his beloved State. His record as a soldier 



was so good that he soon attained rank and won the title of 
major. He served three years in the arm}', and a year after 
the Confederacy had been destroyed he went to Texas. He 
formed a law partnership with Judge O'Chiltree, of Texas, a 
distinguished jurist, and remained in that State until 1869. 

Upon his return he moved to Lincolnton and practiced law 
in that town until 1876 when he moved back to Rockingham 
and began anew his practice in his old home. He soon became 
one of the leading attorneys of that section. He has been for 
many years division counsel of the Seaboard and has done 
great service for that road. His character has been worth 
thousands to that carrier. 

Major Shaw was a prominent layman in the Episcopal 
church and held his membership in the Church of the Messiah, 
from which place he was buried. 

1856 

—Rev. J. M. Stallings, for a long time a prominent educator in 
North Carolina, a member of the Convention of 1875, and a 
prominent Baptist clergyman, died at his home in Salisbury, 
X. C, in June 1913. 

1858 
— Dr. J. P. Gibson died in Salisbury, N. C, in May, 1913. 

1869 

— Dr. I. H. Foust died at his home in Salisbury in June, 1913. 

1886 

— E. M. Foust died at Kemp, Texas, in April, 1913. 

1888 
— C. G. Cates, for a number of years a teacher in this State 
and Texas, died at his home in Texas on October 4th. 

1896 

— Volney Armstrong died at Bryan, Texas, in December, 1912. 

1898 
— Edward Hill, Captain U. S. A., died recently at Fort Ethan 
Allen, Vt. 

1908 
— Earl Morrow, formerly of Gastonia, but recently of Ham- 
let, was killed in an automobile accident on December 9. 
While at the University he was prominent in athletics and 
represented Carolina both on gridiron and diamond. For 
several years he has been a druggist in Hamlet. He leaves 
a wife and a three year old son. 

— R. B. Abernathy (known on the campus as "Little Ab"), 
for two years a member of the football squad, died at his 
home near Charlotte on December 9. He became ill with 
typhoid fever in Greensboro while on his way to the Wash- 
ington and Lee Game in Lynchburg and was removed to his 
home later. 



The new filtration plant is rapidly nearing com- 
pletion and by the beginning- of the Spring term it 
is expected that the University will have an adequate 
supply of clear water. The settling basin is being 
placed immediately in the rear of the old printing 
shop and the new reservoir just to the South of the 
old reservoir. The capacity of the new plant will 
be nine times greater than that of the old one. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



67 



On the night of [November 7th the Odd ^Number 
Club, a chapter of the Sigma Upsilon (literary) fra- 
ternity, installed a chapter at Trinity College. 

Collier Cobb, Jr.. and K. C. Spence, of the track 
team, have been coaching the track team of the 
Flillsboro High School for the interscholastic track 
meet next Spring. 

Claims have been filed by Manager L. P. McLen- 

doii against the Southern Railway for the return of 
fares and admissions to the Virginia game on account 
of the failure of the special train to reach Richmond 
in time for the boys to see the entire game. In the 
event the claim is denied a test suit is to be brought 
in the courts. 

W. F. Taylor of the law class, and F. L. Webster 
of the senior class, have recently been initiated into 
the Senior Order of the Golden Fleece. They were 
elected last spring, but were unable to be initiated at 
that time. Other members from the class of 1914 
are J. S. Cansler, S. W. Whiting, Frank Drew, Oscar 
Leach, J. T. Pritchett, Lenoir Chambers, George 
Strong, and P. D. Applewhite. 

The Department of Zoology has been presented by 
Henry V. P. Wilson, Jr., with a collection of fishes 
of the North Carolina coast. The collection embraces 
eighty species and includes all the forms that fish- 
ermen are apt to meet with. 

Elections in the Elisha Mitchell Scientific Society 
fin- the year have been as follows: Prof. P. H. Dag- 
gett, president; Dr. J. M. Bell, vice-president; Dr. 
F. P. Venable, permanent secretary; Mr. W. W. 
Rankin, recording secretary; Drs. Coker, Pratt, and 
I Jell, editorial committee. The Society has been 
thrown open to students and ils membership has been 
considerably increased. 



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SPARGER — STATE AGENT — DURHAM 

Can use a few high-grade College men 
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Pioneer Jlulo £M,an 



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■ ■ THE QUALITY LA UNDR Y" 

J. L. ORR, Manager 



68 THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



I The Royall 8 Borden Co. | 

1 106 and 108 Weft Main Street, DURHAM, N. C. I 



DEALERS IN ALL KINDS OF 

FURNITURE 

CARPETS, RUGS, LINOLEUMS, 
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THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



69 



Spending by Check 



To the Public : 

A checking account in our 
bank presents NO ADDED EXPENSE to 
you and yet guarantees additional 
safety and an accurate system to 
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Every person whether "busi- 
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person, traveler, farmer, mechan- 
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every one who earns money, must 
spend a portion of it. 

This spending should be done 
by check, which will keep an exact 
record of the income and disburse- 
ments . 

All check books and bank 
books are free. Checking presents 
NO ADDED EXPENSE. 

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Winston-Salem, N. C. 



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Carolina Teams. Look the boys up there. 



70 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



CHE Original Adam Kluttz— at the Book 
Store. Established 1883. Everything: for 
the Student. The latest in Men's Fur- 
nishings, Novelties, Stationery and Souvenirs. 
Respectfully, 

A. A. KLUTTZ. 



GO TO 




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THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



71 









" Keeping in Front " 

You fellows know what that means ! 
We've been very successful in this 
regard with Fatima Cigarettes. By 
the way, these cigarettes were first 
sold in the college towns — and you 
agreed with us that they were good. 

Then we put out for the big race, 
to make Fatimas of nation-wide rep- 
utation, and today more are sold than 
any other cigarette in this country. 

No purer, or more carefully chosen 
tobacco grows than that in Fatimas. 
We purposely put them in a plain 
inexpensive wrapper — in this way 
we can afford quality tobacco, and 
twenty of the smokes for 1 5 cents. 

Now your college crew is of utmost 
importance to you — so is a good 
cigarette, and it's your aim in life 
to keep Fatimas in the lead — right 
up to their good quality — right up 
to where you first found them, and 
will always find them. 

Success fellows ! You started this 
cigarette on its successful career — 
and you pull a strong oar all over 
this country. 




^ TURKISH BLEND ^ 

CIGARETTES 
20 forty 







"Distinctively Individual " 






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There are more downs than touch downs 
YOU OUGHT TO BUY LIFE INSURANCE 

Because You May Die 

BUT YOU OUGHT TO BUY THE BEST CONTRACT 

Because You May Live 

WRITE TO ME 

Cyrus Thompson, Jr. 



CAPITAL CLUB BLUG. 
Raleigh 



LIRE UNDERWRITER 



NEW KLUTTZ BUILDING, 
Chapel Hill 



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CHARLOTTE, NORTH CAROLII 



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apitfil and Surplus, S600,000 



A PROGRESSIVE BANKING INSTITUTION, 
ABLE AND WILLING TO SERVE THE PRO- 
GRESSIVE BUSINESS INTERESTS OF THE 
J. * J. PIEDMONT SOUTH * J- J. 



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S B. N. DUKE, Vice-President 

\ W. S. LEE, Vice-President 



GEORGE STEPHENS, President 
P. C. WHITLOCK, Trust Officer 



W. H. WOOD, Treasurer 

J. E. DAVIS, Assistant Treasurer 



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