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C O I. I. K C T I O N < ) F 

N () K T H C A R O L I N I A N A 



K N D O W E I) I! Y 

J () H N S P R U N T HI L L 
of the class of 1889 












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There are more clowns than touch clowns 
YOU OUGHT TO BUY LIFE INSURANCE 

Because You May Die 

BUT YOU OUGHT TO BUY THE BEST CONTRACT 

Because You May Live 

WRITE TO ME 

Cyrus Thompson, Jr. 



CAPITAL CLUB BLUQ., 
Raleigh 



LIRE UrSDERNVRIPER 



NEW KLUTTZ BUILDING, 
Chapel Hill 



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Ammran ©rust (Eumpang 

OH^HLOffls l?I©l:f H CAROLINA 



A PROGRESSIVE BANKING INSTITUTION, 
ABLE AND WILLING TO SERVE THE PRO- 
GRESSIVE BUSINESS INTERESTS OF THE 
^ ^ ^ PIEDMONT SOUTH ^ ^ .^ 



B. N. DUKE. Vice-President 
W. S. LEE. Vice-President 






GEORGE STEPHENS. President 
P. C. WHITLOCK. Trust Officer 



W. H. WOOD. Treasurer 

J. E. DAVIS, Assistant Treasurer 



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t^( Volume II 



Number 5 



•ALVMIREVIEW 



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March, 1QI4 



OPINION AND COMMENT 

International Good Will— The Local Association— For 

Example— Commencement 1914— Important Dates 

—The University and Social Service 



SHALL NORTH CAROLINA INITIATE AND REFER? 

Thirty Thousand Tar Heels Will Have to Decide the 
Question March Twentieth 



WHAT THE NEW YORK ALUMNI DO 
WHEN PLAYTIME COMES 

THE MERCER-HURREY MEETINGS 



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PUBLISHED BY 

THE ALVMNfl ASSOCIATION 



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Che University of Dortb Carolina 



MAXIMUM SERVICE TO THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE 



A. 
B. 



THE COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS. 
THE SCHOOL OF APPLIED SCIENCE. 

(1) Chemical Engineering. 

(2) Electrical Engineering. 

(3) Civil and Road Engineering. 

(4) Soil Investigation. 



C. THE GRADUATE SCHOOL. 

D. THE SCHOOL OF LAW. 

E. THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE. 

F. THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY. 

G. THE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION. 
H. THE SUMMER SCHOOL. 



L THE BUREAU OF EXTENSION. 

(1) General Information. 

(2) Instruction by Lectures. 

(3) Correspondence Courses. 

(4) Debate and Declamation. 

(5) County Economic and Social Surveys. 

(6) Municipal and Legislative Reference. 

(7) Teachers' Bureau, Preparatory Schools, and College 

Entrance Requirements. 

For information regarding the University, address THOS. J. WILSON, JR., Registrar 



ffi&tng ilnhttattiittH 



FASHIONAB 1_Y 



ENGRAVED 



IPou can't affovb to place ^our or^er wbere 
cheapness of pro&uction is the tbino striven 
for ratber tban tbe qniet elegance an^ strict 
a&berence to correct social form wbicb cbarac* 
terise onr \vov\\, all tbe latest an^ most Cor* 
rect Stales of engravino anJ) sises. : : : : 

SAMPLES FURNISHED ON REQUEST 



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EfltabltBijEi laas litrljam, Jfnrtlj (Earolina 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



Volume II 



MARCH, 1914 



Number 5 



OPINION AND COMMENT 



INTERNATIONAL The occasion wliicli recently wit- 
GOOD WILL nessed the meeting here of two 

exchange professors from foreign, 
countries to the United States could do no less than 
quicken one's consciousness of the new era in inter- 
national communication of ideas. Such an occasion 
is something more than educationally significant ; 
indeed, there is about it an air of historical signifi- 
cance. The one visitor was Dr. Shosuke Sato, the third 
of the American-Japanese exchange professors, who 
was at the time giving a course of lectures here; 
the other was Dr. Karl Kathgen, the eighth incumbent 
of the Kaiser Wilhelm exchange professorship. It 
happened — though in this era of international com- 
munication the hajjpening cannot justly be described 
as accidental — that Dr. Kathgen was for eight years 
(1882-1890) professor of political science at the Im- 
perial University in Tokyo, Japan. iSTo longer can 
roll trippingly under the tongue, in face of such a 
conjuncture, the familiar lines of Kipling: 
■■' East is East, and West is West, 
And never the twain shall meet." 
For such a meeting, nowadays, symbolizes the arrival 
of the cosmopolitan spirit which has already set its 
mark upon the face of this century. 

During Dr. Sato's visit here, attention was called 
conspicuously to the memorable fact that it was under 
the regime of a son of this University as Secretary of 
the Navy, William A. Graham, that was prepared 
Commodore Perry's expedition to Japan in 1853 
which, as the lecturer himself graciously observed, 
marked the beginning of the era in which the real 
Japan has emerged from international obscurity into 
the charmed circle of world-powers. In this day of 
Mexican imbroglios, exclusion acts, and rumors of 
Japanese designs, i't is refreshing to have the air once 
more cleared with the message of peace, good-will, 
and friendship brought by Dr. Sato. And to an 
audience of typical Americans, profoundly interested 
in problems of political economy, it is invigorating 
and enlightening to hear the pregnant declaration of 
Dr. Eathgen that stability in trade relations among 
the great industrial and manufacturing nations, com- 
peting for place in world-markets, and not the ideal- 
istic utterances of the perfervid orator, is the true 
guaranty for the maintenance of world-peace. 



Assuredly the time has come to raise the vital 
question whether the nations of the world are not 
sufticiently versed in the arts of self-control to cease 
preying upon and oppressing one anotJher. In order 
to live together as " fellow-sharers in a world's civili- 
zation," it is imperative for nations in their cor- 
porate capacity to exercise the fundamental princi- 
ples of morality which the individual citizen so ar- 
dently professes. It is peculiarly needful for Ameri- 
cans, in the hour of a grave international crisis, to 
ponder these things. For, as Dr. Nicholas Murray 
Butler has recently said, " We Americans need the 
international mind as much as any people ever need- 
ed it. We shall never be able to do justice to our 
better selves or to take our true part in the modem 
world until we acquire it. We must learn to sup- 
press rather than exalt those who endeavor, whether 
through ignorance, selfishness, or malice, to stir up 
among us antagonism to other nations and to other 
peoples. If we are to take the place which many of 
us have fondly hoped America would take, at the 
very forefront of the movement for the establishment 
of a world peace based upon even-handed justice, we 
must first learn to rule our tongues and to turn deaf 
ears to those who, from time to time, endeavor to lead 
us away from the i>ath of international rectitude and 
international honor with false cries of a pseudo-pa- 
triotism." 

The visit of such picked men as Dr. Sato and Dr. 
Kathgen has a two-fold significance. To-day, they 
convey to us the results of the most advanced knowl- 
edge and refined research in regard to the conditions 
and problems of their respective countries. Tomorrow 
they will convey to 'their respective countries the im- 
pression of the trained observer in regard to the 
United States, her spirit, her people, her institu- 
tions. This reciprocal relation can only result in 
benefit to both the nations, the one which sends and 
the one which receives ; and this is guaranteed by the 
quality and high principles of the men chosen to fill 
this exceedingly important position. A deepening 
and broadoiing of the streams of world-culture, 
the discouragement of strife between nations, the 
stimulation of friendly rivalry in trade relations in 
the markets of the world, the cultivation and foster- 
ing of the international spirit — these consequences, 



100 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



we venture to hoiJe, shall eventuate, these mutual 
benefits accrue, in God's good time, from the ex- 
change of these ministers of good will. — A. H. 

nnn 

THE LOCAL Jn many towns in ISTorth Carolina 
ASSOCIATION there are groups of alumni who are 
not organized into a local alumni 
association. This, obviously, should not be; for a 
properly organized association not only brings the 
alumni together for an occasional social evening, but 
promotes the welfare of ;the University and increases 
the influence for good of its members in the com- 
munity. 

Organization in and of itself is of no special value. 
T!he association must work for something. It must 
have some definite purpose. Fortunately the field of 
activity is wide. The association can 

(1) Keep potentially alive and active the power 
represented by the local association. 

(2) Keep the General Association informed con- 
cerning the attitude of the people toward the Uni- 
versity. 

(3) Bring before and keep before the people of 
the community correct ideas concerning the work and 
purposes of the University. 

(4) Support the work of the General Association 
for the University by co-operating heartily with it. 

(5) Keep the alumni informed as to the activ- 
ities of the members of the local association through 
the Keview. 

(6) Keep in touch with promising young men 
who should have an opportunity to secure a college 
education, and help them to secure it. 

(7) Take an active interest in co-operating with 
the Bureau of Extension and help to make its work 
effective among the people of the locality. 

(8) Devote time and energy to local affairs, par- 
ticularly educational. 

The alumni of the University scattered throughout 
the State constitute the best argument for or against 
the sujjport which it receives from the public. Upon 
the local association falls, in large part, the responsi- 
bility of determining whether this argument shall be 
favorable or unfavorable to alma mater. 

nnn 

FOR EXAMPLE Qn Friday, March 20, the State- 
wide contest for the Aycock Me- 
morial Clip projected by the High School Debating 
Union will be held in one hundred and fifty towns list- 
ed elsewhere in the Review. This occasion, which is a 
development of thei work of the Dialectic and Philan- 
thropic Societies extended to the High Schools of 



Xortli Carolina, will furnish the alumni a specific 
object in which it is important that they interest 
themselves. There are several things which they can 
do to make the contests successful. They can give 
them publicity. They can attend as individuals or 
in a body. In the event that both the local teams 
win, they can aid them in planning for the trip to 
'Chapel Hill. Whatever the outcome, they can rally 
to the support of the University in its effort to mag- 
nify the importance of vital public discussion in 
every nook and cranny in North Carolina. 

nnn 



COMMENCE- 
MENT 1914 



Commencement this year begins on 
Sunday, May 31st, and ends on Wed- 
nesday, June 3rd. The address on 
Wednesday will be made by Secretaiy of Commerce, 
W. C. Redfield. The Baccalaureate sermon will be 
jjreached by Dr. Edgar P. Hill, of Chicago, and the 
Y. M. ,C. A. sermon by Dr. 0. E. Brown, of Nash- 
ville, Tenn. This is a group of notably fine speakers. 
Each of them is a man who has something to say and 
knows how to say it. Their pi-esence gives assurance 
that the high standard of past commencements will be 
splendidly ui^held. The main feature of the 1914 
commencement, however, will be the alumni them- 
selves. This is to be a Home-coming Commencement 
and everybody is coming. Two of the classes that 
hold reunions — 1904 and 1909 — have been at work 
for sometime with the idea of getting ercnj member 
hacl\ There is every indication that on June 3rd, 
1914, the campus will hold the greatest gathering of 
Carolina men in its history. 

nnn 

IMPORTANT Dates of importance to the University 
DATES and the public, which is invited to the 

Hill, are those for the forthcoming 
lectures on March 25, by Alfred Noyes, tlie English 
poet, and President Vincent of the University Minne- 
sota, the deliverer of the McJSTair lectures for 1914, 
April 15-18. Interest in hearing these distinguished 
visitors is widespread among the student body, hav- 
ing been voiced in a special editorial comment by 
the Tar Heel. Many alumni are also planning to 
be present. 

nnn 

THE UNIVERSITY The University finely sustained 
AND SOCIAL i.fg share in the splendid Confer- 

SERVICE ence for Social Service held in 

Ealeigh February 13-15. At the 
Conference for Eural Uplift on February 12th, the 
faculty was represented by Acting President Graham 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



101 



and Professors Raper and Walker, all of whom made 
reports. At the Social Service Couference that fol- 
lowed. University meu took an active part in dis- 
cussioiis. Governor Locke Craig, Dr. J. Y. Joyner, 
W. H. Swift, C. E. Maddry, A. M. Scales, R. T). W. 



Connor, A. W. McAllister, J. Sprunt Hill, and Act- 
ing President E. K. Graham had prominent places on 
the programme. Many University alumni, leaders 
in civic and social reform from various points in the 
State, attended the meeting. 



SHALL NORTH CAROLINA INITIATE AND REFER? 



Thirty Thousand Tar Heels Will Have to Decide the Question March Twentieth 



Shall the Constitution of North Carolina be so 
aniende<l as to allow the Initiative ami Referendum 
in State- wide legislation ^ This question will he dis- 
cussed on ilarch 20th hy six liundi-ed student-de- 
haters in the one hundred and fifty schools having 
membership in the High School Debating Union, and 
the discussions will be listened to with interest by 
fully thirty thousand ?fortli ^Carolinians. Erom 
^lanteo, Elizabeth City, New Bern, and Wilmington, 
in the East, to Asheville, Heiidersonville, Brj'son 
City, and Andrews, in the West, the high schools are 
everywhere, in every section of the State, getting 
ready for this gigantic struggle in debate. 

The High School Debating Union is carried on un- 
iler the auspices of the Dialectic and Philanthropic 
Literary Societies and the Bureau of Extension of 
the University. A large amount of material on the 
question to be discussed, including one sixty-page 
Extension Series publication, and several thousand 
■Congressional speeches and documents, has been sent 
to the schools free of charge. Doubtless on the 20th 
of March more intelligent consideration and lively 
discussion will be given to the " Initiative and Refer- 
endum '' in Xorth Carolina than has ever been given 
it on any date in any other State of 'the American 
Union. 

Every school in the Union has been placed in a 
group for the triangular debates on fhis date. Each 
school puts out two teams, one on the affirmative, and 
the other on the negative. The affirmative team de- 
bates at home, and the negative team is sent to an- 
(►ther school of the same triangle. Thus a debate is 
held at every school on the same date. Every school 
which wins both of its triangular debates will send 
both teams to Chapel Hill on April 3rd in the final 
contest for the Aycock .Xfemorial Cu]i — the prize 
which has been generously prDviih'd fm- the school 
winning out finally by tlic iufcr-collegiate debaters of 



Concord 

Asheville 

Carthage 

Mt. Airy 

Washington 

Abbottsburg 

Tarboro 

Weldon 

Oak Ridge 

Mt. Ulla 

Lenoir 

Sunbury 

Graham 

Atkinson 

Troutmans 

Andrews 

Cooleemee 

Pikeville 

Kenly 

Wilson 

Wakelon 

Hookerton 

Sparta 

Madison 

Battleboro 

Wentworth 

Lumberton 

Stem 

Dallas 

Belmont 

Unionville 

F.lkin 



Salisbury 

Marion 

Pittsboro 

N. Wilkesboro 

New Bern 

Bladenboro 

Rocky Mount 

Oxford 

Warrenton 

Stony Point 

Morganton 

Gatesville 

Burlington 

White Oak 

Scotts 

Bryson City 

Courtney 

Falling Creek 

Clayton 

Kinston 

Holly Springs 

Snow Hill 

Glade Valley 

Stoneville 

Whitakers 

Leaksville 

Laurinburg 

Bethesda 

Bessemer City 

Stanley 

Marshville 

Bethania 



Statesville 

Hendersonville 

Pleasant Garden 

Pilot Mountain 

Elizabeth City 

Clarkton 

Franklinton 

Louisburg 

Whitsett 

Taylorsville 

Hickory 

Reynoldson 

Jamestown 

Garland 

Harmony 

Almond 

Yadkin College 

Seven Springs 

Selma 

Greenville 

Cary 

Ayden Seminary 

Turkey Knob 

Walnut Cove 

Spring Hope 

Bethany 

San ford 

Knap of Reeds 

Cherryville 

Huntersville 

Wesley Chapel 

Tonesville 



the University. 






Elon 


The schools 
arranged are: 


enrolled in tiic 


Union and triangles 


Clinton 

Boonville 

Columbus 


Durham 


Goldsboro 


Wilmington 


Apex 


Raleigh 


Greensboro 


Charlotte 


Mantco 


High Point 


Reidsville 


Winston-Salem 


Haw Fields 



It lias i)een imjwssible to arrange full triangles 
for ail the schools, so a groii]) of two schools has in 
some? cases been substituted for a full triangle. In 
these instances the two schools will have two debates 
with each other, in accordance with the regulations 
of the Union, each sending a team on the negative 
to the other on ifarch 20th. If either school wins 
bfvtli deliatcs, it will send both teams to Chapel Hill 
for tb(> final contest. The schools which debate under 
tliese conditions are: 

Liberty 
Tcacheys 
Yadkinville 
Christ School 
Bay Leaf 
Poplar Branch 
Sylvan 



102 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



Edenton 

Roberdel 

Enfield 

Churchland 

Rowland 

King 

Shelby 

Piney Creek 

Cullowhee 

Rich Square 

Mooresboro 

Glen Alpine 

Bain Academy 



Belhaven 

Mason's Cross 

Lucama 

Mt. Pleasant 

Orrum 

Pinnacle 

Gastonia 

Helton 

Appal. Tr'n School 

Ahoskie 

Fallston 

Nebo 

Rockv River 



RECENT INITIATIONS 

The following men have been initiated into fra- 
ternities recently: 

H. Gr. Winslow, of Hertford, into Alpha Tau 
Omega ; Lawrence /C. Barber, of Asheville, into Phi 
Delta Theta ; H. M. Pleasants, of Eowland, into Pi 
Kappa Alpha; Oliver Smith, of Ealeigh, into Kappa 
Sigma; W. I. Proctor, of Raleigh, into Kappa Al- 
pha ; B. P. Anld, of Baltimore, Md., and J. P. Pugh, 
of Old Trap, IST. C, into Sigma Upsilon. 



It has been impossible to arrange any groups for 
the schools of Atlantic, Bethel Hill, Polkton, and 
Pock Hill. In each of these schools a public debate 
will be held on the evening of March 20th. 



Acting President Graham has accepted an invita- 
tion to make the Phi Beta Kappa address at the Uni- 
versity of Virginia on June 17. He will also deliver 
the Founders' Day address at the State ISTormal Col- 
lege. 



WHAT THE NEW YORK ALUMNI DO WHEN PLAYTIME COMES 



Two University alumni who dwell in New York 
City were discussing, recently, the recreations of 
other members of itheir colony ; and, as a result, one 
of the two had the whim to find out just how the 
University of North Carolina men in the metropolis 
actually did spend their time when off duty. He made 
the inquiry, and he learned this fact : thalt the recre- 
ations of the alumni, for the most part, were not such 
as pertained to city life any more than to life in the 
country or the small town. Theatregoing, which is 
ordinarily ;thought of as the favorite form of pleasure 
in a city, ranks first with none of them; it is merely 
a " filler-in." 

The New Yorker, though, has this advantage over 
him who lives in a rural or semi-rural section, that a 
wide variety of sports and amusements is open to 
him. In fact it has often been remarked that, even 
among cities of the first class. New York's situation 
is remarkable in this respect. The sea is only half an 
hour or so away from the center of the city; the Hud- 
son, the East Eiver and the Harlem River are close 
at hand for the rowers and canoeists ; there are hun- 
dreds of tennis courts in the city and the nearby sub- 
urbs; golf courses flourish on every side, and more 
are being built all (the time ; miles and miles of 
smooth roads are open to automobilists; numberless 
amateur organizations find a place for football and 
baseball matches; in Central Park, Van Cortlandt 
Park, Prospect Park and on Staten Island are ponds 
and lakes for the skaters ; it is only a short journey to 
ithe trout streams in New Jersey and New York State ; 
and, in these dance-mad days, there are literally thou- 
sands of places where one may exhibit his grace, or 
the lack thereof, at the hesitation waltz, the one-step, 
the tango and the other new-fangled steps. (By the 



Itime this appears in print, there will doubtless be an 
entirely new list.) 

These things for those who want to participate. 
For those who merely want to look on, of course, 
there are the football games in the city or in easy 
reach, the tennis and polo and hockey tournaments, 
Ithe Big League baseball games both in New York and 
Brooklyn, the " movies," the concerts and the opera, 
and theatres and music halls without end. 

Then there are the social diversions that are about 
the same everywhere — dinners, bridge parties, and the 
like — and the University alumni are active in tha't 
direction. One form of amusement, if by courtesy 
it may be called such, is the public or semi-public 
dinner. Probably there was never such a place as 
New York for dinners and after-dinner oratory. Be- 
fore one has lived many years in the city, even though 
he lays no claim to being a " prominent citizen," the 
question is noit how many he shall attend, but how 
many he can escape. 

Judge Augustus Van Wyck, the President of the 
New York alumni association, though he is around 
seventy years old now, is as vigorous and alert as a 
youngster. He is an enthusiastic automobilist, and 
enjoys looking at baseball games and polo matches. 
George Gordon Battle is so busy in the law courts 
that, in the winter be has little opportunity for out- 
door recreation. In warm months, though, he plays 
golf with great regularity; and throughout the year 
he is a prominent figure in the social life of the city. 
Dr. Charles Baskerville is another who is active in 
society ; and he, too, is devoted to golf. 

Perhaps golf is the spoiit which has the highest 
favor among the New York alumni. Francis A. 
Gudger, James A. Gwyn, Logan D. Howell, Louis G. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



103 











SNOW SCENES— DR. "battle's RESIDENCE AND ALUMNI HALL 



Eounti-ee, Bynum Glenn, Staples Fuller, P. D. Gold, 
Jr., Frank Mebane, John M. Greenfield, Dr. W. D. 
Price, Junius Parker, Lindsay Kussell, Thomas D. 
Toy, Victor Whitlock — these are all devotees of the 
game. It is second choice with Ealph H. Graves, 
whose favorite diversion is fishing, and with Louis 
Graves, who likes tennis best. Until recently it was 
first with A. Marvin Carr, hult now, his friends de- 
clare, Mr. Carr enjoys nothing so much as propelling 
a baby carriage along the upper stretches of Park 
and Fifth Avenues. 

Thomas Hill, formerly of Hillsboro, is now partner 
in a concern which conducts a number of public-tennis 
courts on the Upper West Side; and, though he does 
not claim to be an expert player, he has acquired an 
extensive knowledge of the theory of the game. Some- 
times, in his leisure hours, in the tennis season he may 
be found diverting himself in the instruction of the 
youths who patronize his courts. 

Unquestionably the most enthusiastic tennis fol- 
lower among the alumni is Preston Gumming. He has 
a wide acquaintance among the crack players of the 
country, and has made a good record in a number of 
tournaments. Dr. Henry C. Cowles often plays with 
his fellow-physicians on. the court adjacent to the 
Woman's Hospital. Reston Stevenson is another 
tennis entliusiast. And both he and Mr. Cumming are 
experts at all kinds of water sports. 

x\lfred W. Haywood, Jr., has perhaps the most 
catholic itaste as far asdiversionsareconcerncd among 
the alumni in New York. He is exceedingly fond of 
tennis, which he plays two or three times a week in 
the spring and summer; he goes swimming and ca- 
noeing whenever the opportunity offers ; he plays golf 
some; and recently, having joined Squadron A, New 
York's crack cavalry organization, he has become a 
skilful horseback rider. His brother, T. Holt Hay- 
wood, is more attached to water sports than to any 



other kind ; but in the closed winter season he goes in 
for gymnastics. 

Eufus L. Patterson is fond of auitomobiling, as are 
Junius Parker, Dr. Charles Baskerville, Francis A. 
Gudger, Herman Koehler, the Reverend St. Clair 
Hester, Dr. Owen Kenan, George B. Wills, and 
Frank Harty. Dr. George Mallett enjoys the various 
sports offered by the JSTew York Athletic Club. Isaac 
F. Harris rides horseback on the excellent roads of 
Westchester County, dabbles with tennis and golf, and 
is fond of dancing. With Don, Richardson music, 
though it is work, stands first also as a recreation. 



EXTENSION LECTURERS ARE KEPT BUSY 

Visits for the purpose of lecturing or holding con- 
ferences have been made recently as follows by mem- 
bers of the faculty un.der the auspices of the Bureau 
of Extension: Prof. M. C. S. Noble, at a meeting 
of the Robeson -County Teachers' Association at 
Lumberton, February 21, and at a community meet- 
ing at Farmville, March 7 ; Dr. L. A. Williams, at a 
meeting of the Iredell County Teachers' Association 
at Statesville, February 14; Prof. W. S. Bernard, at 
the joint meeting of the city schools of Raeford and 
Hoke County at Raeford, March C ; Prof. Collier 
Cobb, at a joint meeting of the school and Woman's 
Betterment Association of Poplar Branch, at Poplar 
Brauch, February 21, and at the " House-warming" 
of the Woman's Club of High Point, February 23 ; 
Dr. H. W. Chase, before the city schools of Smith- 
field, February 28, before the teachers of the city 
schools and pulilic of Washington, on March 2, and 
before the Woman's Club of New Bern on March 3. 
Dr. Chase also spoke before the teachers of the city 
schools of Asheville on February 3, the address being 
the third of a series he has delivered at Asheville 
during the year. 



104 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



THE MERCER-HURREY MEETINGS 



E. C. Mercer and Charles D. Hurrey came into 
the life of the University aud touched it at many 
points of contact, talking straight from the shoulder 
and raising the faith of men in God and in human 
life. " Ted " Mercer, as he is affectionately known 
in the universities of the East, is convicted with a 
sense of message for college men. Like the Ancient 
Mariner he must tell his story. He would burn into 
the hearts of young men the fact of the evolution of 
sin. When temptation charms and lures with its 
pleasures in the subtle beginnings, Mercer challenges 
the college man to look at the other end of the line. 
You can't sow wild oats and get aw'ay with it. He 
put his i^lea for a clean life on the basis of earning 
capacity and highest eificiency and then showed the 
way through Christ to a victorious fight for character. 
To the three hundred freshmen present he said these 
significant words : "When you are kidded by the older 
men as being green in the things of life, tell them for 
Ted Mercer that you had rather be green than be 
rotten." Seven hundred men packed in Gerrard 
Hall responded to the thought with spontaneous ap- 
plause. Mr. Mercer delivered two addresses : " The 
Fight of Every College Man — Purity," and " Down 
and Out and Up Again." In the first address he 
talked straight out on the facts of gambling, drink- 
ing, and sexual impurity, both secret and social. Tt 
was simple, practical, clean, and uplifting. In the 
second address Mr. Mercer told the story of his life, 
how he started in the ways of the crowd to be popu- 
lar in college and ended in the gutter of New York 



City. The story of his come back is both a warning 
and an inspiration to young men. " Don't try it, 
fellows, I would to God I had the chance to start in 
college again — the scar remains." 

Mr. Charles 1). Hurrej- was the directing force in 
the two closing meetings. '' Men of Mettle " had the 
ring of the upward fight ; and the final address, ''The 
Challenge of Modern Religion to the Students in All 
Lands," was charged with the struggles of college 
men everywhere as they reached out for a larger and 
deeper life. The speaker brought to bear a first hand 
knowledge of life in Asia, the near East, and South 
America. It was a splendid address in which was 
caught the spirit of modern life astir the world 
around. His j^icture of Christ, the central figure 
in it all, was dynamic with power. 

What of these meetings ? The student body has 
been touched more than on the surface. The four 
meetings averaged over five hundred men. Over two 
hundred men followed Mr. Hurrey from Gerrard 
Hall to the Y. M. C. A. auditorium for an after meet- 
ing for practical suggestions on the way to win the 
fight for character. One hundred and twenty-seven 
men signed cards that they were taking advanced 
ground in their moral and spiritual life. In the closing 
meeting of the series over four hundred men came out 
in the rain to hear Hurrey. Practically the whole 
crowd remained for another short personal talk and 
more than half stood up expressing a decision for a 
more aggressive .Christian life. Ervin and Parker 
of the football team. House, leader in scliolarshij), 







> ' 3^SSSi^^^^^M^^^Si^^^l^^^^K^m2l JkRE " 


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THE BAIX (formerly ALEXANDER) RESIDENCE 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



105 



and a dozen other positive minded men made short 
talks expressing aggressive decision. 

Mr. Mercer had a conference with Coach Maelv and 
thirty men in the baseball squad on clean living and 
its value to the athlete. Mr. Mercer and Mr. Hurrey 
had a joint conference with the fraternitymen, em- 
phasizing the big opportunity of fraternitymen in 
standing for character, scholarship and the good 
things on the campus. Mr. Hurrey had an interest- 
ing meeting with the Jewish Society of the Univer- 
sity. One of the most significant utterances during 
the meetings came from Sam Newman., a Russian 
Jew, who is now a hard student in the medical school. 
Xewman got his ideas of Christianty from the cruelty 
and rottenness of the ecclesiastical Greek machine in 
Russia. It has been burned into his radical socialis- 
tic heart by Russian persecution to hate the tyranny 
of the Christian Church in his native land. Newman 
was drawn, to the big friendly heart of Charlie Hur- 
rey and saw that his Christianity was somethiug dif- 
ferent. He stood up in the last meeting and said as a 
loyal Hebrew, " ]\Ir. Mercer and ]\Ir. Hurrey have 
shown me more clearly the ditference between church- 
anity and Christianity." Mr. Hurrey made short 
cheering talks to the Jewish Society, the rural Sun- 
day school workers, to the Bible group leaders, and 
to the workers in the night school for colored peo- 
ple. The greatest good, perhaps, was accomplished 
by the iJersonal interviews that ^Mr. fiercer and [Mr. 
Hurrey had with more than two score men troubled 
with life problems, temptations, and intellectual 
doubts. Mr. Hurrey in staying over for the Satur- 
day night meeting had to ride all the way to Raleigh 
in a machine on a rough night of slush and rain to 
catch a midnight train for Xew York where he joined 
John. R. Mott in conducting one of the most remark- 
able campaigns ever attempted anmiLg college men 



in America. With him and ^ifercer went the warm 
hearts of Carolina men. 

Whatever else was done or not done by these meet- 
ings, certain pictures have come down in more than 
one room in college. 



PUBLIC DISCUSSION AND DEBATE 

With the object of stimulating public discussion 
and debate in civics clubs and schools in North Caro- 
lina, the Bureau of Extension has just issued a sixty- 
page bulletin bearing the above title. 

While the bulleitin is intended primarily to serve 
as a handbook for use by schocfls in the formation and 
conduct of literary societies, it is also intended that 
it shall serve a similar purpose for rural communities 
and villages which may care to form clubs for the 
discussion of problems incident to their economic, 
social, educational, and religious upbuilding. By 
whomsoever used, it is intended 'to be a practical, use- 
ful handbook provocative of intelligent interest in the 
(pitistions demanding solution in North Carolina to- 
day. 

The bulletin contains six distinct divisions. The 
first discusses the importance of debate and gives prac- 
tical suggestions for the organization and conduct of 
school and community societies. The second outlines 
the formal steps to be taken in argumentation and 
brief making. The third presents a model brief and 
complete references on one query and more or less 
complete outlines, with extended references, to eleven 
other subjects. Among these are taxation, good roads, 
compulsory education, child labor, the commission 
]dan of city government, j^rison reform, race segre- 
gation, co-operation among farmers, and engineering 
assistance for counties. The initiative and referen- 




THK •"WKLI, FISO-M THK SOUTH BUILDING STEPS 



106 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



diim, woman suffrage, and recall of judges are also 
included in this division. 

The fourth division is devoted (to the statement of 
fifty other queries, of which thirty deal almost entire- 
ly with North Carolina questions. For these no 
outlines or references are given, but in the fifth di- 
vision an extended list of other debate handbooks and 
curremt weekly and monthly newspajDers and maga- 
zines is given, and sources are indicated, such as the 
University Library and the North Carolina Library 
'Commission, from which material can be borrowed. 

The sixth division gives a complete model consti- 
tution and by-laws for the guidance of those who 
wish to form clubs or societies. The methods of pro- 
cedure in putting a society on a working basis are 
clearly pointed out and should enable any school or 
club ito organize and begin work without any diffi- 
culty whatsoever. 

The bulletin is edited by Louis E. Wilson, with the 
assistance of Professors IST. W. Walker and G. M. 
McKie, and Messrs. E. E. Eankin and F. P. Graham. 
Others contributing queries or other aid are : Mr. W. 
IT. S-wift, Prof. C.^'L. Coon, Eev. G. W. Lay, Mrs. T. 
W. Lingle, Dr. J. H. Pratt, Miss H. M. Berry, Prof. 
E. C. Branson, Mr. E. F. Beasley, Mr. Clarence H. 
Poe, Prof. W. H. Hand, Mr. J. S. Hill, Dr. C. L. 
Eaper, and Acting President E. K. Graham. 

iCopies may be secured by addressing the Bureau 
of Extension. 



HERE ARE THE FIGURES 

The following authorized statement of the finances 
of the Athletic Association of the University has been 
furnished University publications by Graduate Man- 
ager Woollen. It will be noted that while it appears 
in a form somewhat different from the estimated 
statement appearing in the December issue of the 
Eeview, there is but slight difference in the two 
totals indicated — a difference of less than $200. It 
should be kept clearly in mind that this statement 
represents the financial condition of the istudent 
Athletic Association with which the alumni are fa- 
miliar and is not in any way to be confused with the 
special alumni athletic committee of which George 
Stephens is chairman and James A Gray, Jr., is 
treasurer, and \vhich is responsible for the alumni 
system of coaching and the administration of the 
Athletic Store. The statement shows an increased 
indebtedness of $1,197.77 at the end of the fall term 
over that at the beginning. The statement covers 
the dates Septemher 1, 1913, to January 27, 1914. 



Outstanding Notes Sept. I, 1913 

Cash in bank 

Deficit 

DISBURSEMENTS 

Supplies and upkeep 1,505.68 

Grounds and help 107.70 

Printing, postage and telegrams 133-46 

Traveling expense 282.05 

Training table 697.49 

Salary Graduate Manager 150.00 

Salary Treasurer 100.00 

Salary extra coaches 636.20 

Expenses extra coaches 295.55 

High School contest 290.30 

Interest 132.36 

4,330.79 
L")ue Cartmell nn salar\' 750.00 

5,080.79 

RECEIPTS 

Fees Fall term $1,960.00 

Net proceeds from games.... 1,923.02 3,883.02 

Deficit Fall term 

Fees for Spring term 



$4,700.00 
500.00 

4,179-50 



1,197-77 

5,377-27 
1,745.00 

$3,632-27 



A balance of probably $200 is still due from the 
Virginia Graduate Manager in settlement of the 
Thanksgiving game. After the athletic fees of the 
spring term ($1,745.00) have been applied to reduce 
the deficit, the Association faces the expenses of 
basketball, track, and baseball, $3,632.27 behind. 



VIRGINIA CLEARED $7,038.12 

The following note taken from a summary of the 
football season of the University of Virginia for 
1913, as given by the Alumni Record, tells the story 
of a full treasury at Charlottesville : 

"Eight games were jilayed, five at home and three 
away. The attendance was as follows: Eandolph- 
Macon, 629 ; South Carolina, 679 ; Hampden-Sidney, 
505; V. M. L, 922; Vanderbilt, 2,910. Total num- 
ber attending home games, 6,274. Georgia, at At- 
lanta, 4,500 ; Georgetown, at Washington, 5,800 ; 
North 'Carolina, at Eichmond, 6,000. Total number 
attending games away from home, 16,300. Total 
paid admissions to see Virginia play this season, 
22,574. The total income for the season was $14,- 
831.54. The excess of receipts over expenditures was 
$7,038.12. 



Prof. M. H. Stacy is to be one of the speakers at 
the inauguration of Dr. S. B. Turrentine as presi- 
dent of Greensboro College for Women on March 18. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



107 



BASEBALL, 1914 

Baseball practice has gone into winter quarters 
and a few snowball fights constitute most of the prac- 
tice to date. Coach Mack has had his men playing 
basketball to keep in shape and Assistant Coach Lee 
has been training the batteries every afternoon in 
the gym throughout the snow siege. Unless 'the Oak 
Ridge boys play ball in the snow. Carolina will have 
an equal chance with them in the opening game on 
the thirteenth. 

In the lucid intervals the following candidates have 
been on the field : Catchers, Hart, Kux)wles, Burnett, 
C, Woodall, Eagles, and Woltz; pitchers, Aycock, 
Williams, Foust, Watkins, Cagie, Johnson, and 
Coleman ; first basemen, Patterson, Norris, and Rob- 
ert Burnett; second basemen, Bailey, K. (captain) 
and Dobbins; third basemen., Lewis, Groom, Jack- 
son, Harper, Love, and Loughran; shortstop, Rous- 
seau, Royster, and Fuller ; lef tfielders, Litchfield and 
Long; centrefielders, Hubert Bailey and Turbyfill ; 
and rightfielders, Julius Johu-^on, iSTanee, Alderman, 
and Williams. 

A number of men are ineligible on the various 
grounds of professionalism, residence, and scholar- 
ship. In this outlaw league will be found " Shag " 
Thompson, DeWit Kluttz, Raymond Lee, Groom, 
Cagle, Tandy and Cowell. Gooch and Edwards 
failed to make the necessary eight hours and with- 
drew from college. 

Coach Earle Mack had his squad of thirty men over 
in the T. M. C. A. for a group interview with Mr. E. 
C. Mercei", who was in the University making ad- 
dresses on the value of clean living. Coach Mack 
is a clean athlete himself and stands for the best on 
the athletic field. His baseball experience includes 
substitute work on the Athletics, a season with Scran- 
ton in the ISTew York State League and the manager- 
ship of Raleigh. His father, Connie Mack, wishes 
his son to stop baseball and study violin in Europe. 
There were perhaps few more appreciative musicians 
in the audience that heard Kubelik than Carolina's 
baseball coach. 



TRACK SCHEDULE 



L'nder the direction of Coach Xat. J. Cartmell the 
training for the track season has been consistently 
nonnal through many weeks. Joe Hoffman, the 
holder of the Southern record in the 440, is back in 
college. The candidates for places are: two miles, 
('oilier Cobb, Jr., James Harrison, and M. E. Rob- 
inson; one mile, R. C. Spcnce, Seymour Whiting, 
and L. H. Ranson ; the half mile, L. H. Ranson and 
Seymour Whiting; the 440, Iloffniau, Patterson and 



Blalock ; the 220, Smith and Joe Hoffman ; the 100, 
B. B. Sears (captain) ; hurdles, Woollcott, Hoffman, 
Tom Price, and Struthers; the high jump, Woollcott 
and Johnson; broad jump, Blalock; pole vault, 
Strong and Homewood; shot put, Axley; hammer 
throw, Parker, Axley and Meyer. 

The Natmen. have won the State championship for 
several successive years and have called out the met- 
tle of the contestants in the Southern meet at Balti- 
more. 

Manager W. P. Whitaker has given out the fol- 
lowing schedule of track meets : 

March 28 — Class meet at Chapel Hill. 

April 4 — Wake Forest College at Chapel Hill. 

April II— V. P. I. at Blacksburg. 

April i8 — University of South Carolina at Columbia. 

April 25 — -(Pending). 

May 2 and 3 — S. I. A. A. meet at Baltimore. 



BASKETBALL 

The basketball season has run au up and down 
course. Tandy and Edwards through deficiencies 
in studies disqualified themselves at a critical time 
and Virginia turned the next game into a rout. Vir- 
ginia would have won decisively anyway. Carolina 
did not have the reach of the tall Virginians and 
could only look up as the Raleigh crowd looked on. 

With Johnson going fast at centre Carolina made 
it two straights from Guilford by the score of 38 to 
13. Homewood was all over the floor. Long and 
Dowd shot goals with easy accuracy. 

Wake Forest came back and took the deciding 
game in. a close and exciting contest. Chambers per- 
sistently covered the brilliant Holding. Dowd and 
Long excelled in goal tossing but Holding's passing 
on fouls was a decisive feature of the game. This 
game put the State Championship among the mooted 
questions. 

ELEVEN FRESHMEN MAKE HIGH GRADES 

The following Freshmeu have made the first mile 
in the Phi Beta Kappa race : 

E. S. Booth, East Durham High School 1.2 

E. L. Mackie, Yadkinville High School 1.4 

W. T. Polk, Warrenton High School 1.6 

W. J. Adams, Buie's Creek Academy 1.6 

C. C. Miller, Christ School 1.6 

J. H. Hardison, Donaldson Military School 1.7 

R. S. Toxey, Elizabc-th City High School 1.7 

A. M. Lindau, Greensboro High School 1.8 

H. A. Baity, Harmony High School 1.9 

K. Reasouer, IManatie High School, Fla., 2.0 

E. L. Travis, Jr., Halifax High School 2.0 

R. B. House, of Warrenton High School, with 1.4, 
headed a list of sixteen men in last vear's class. 



108. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 

To be issued monthly except in July, August, September 
and January, by the General Alumni Association of the 
University of North Carolina. 

Board of Publication 

The Review is edited by the following Board of Publication : 

Louis R. Wilson, '99 Editor 

Associate Editors : Walter Murphy, '92 ; E. K. Graham, '98 ; 
Archibald Henderson, '98; W. S. Bernard, '00; J. K. 
Wilson, '05 ; Louis Graves, '02 ; F. P. Graham, '09 ; Ken- 
neth Tanner, '11. 
E. R. Rankin, '13 Managing Editor 

Subscription Price 

Single Copies $0.15 

Per Year i.oo 

Communications intended for the Editor should be sent to 
Chapel Hill, N. C. ; for the Managing Editor, to Chapel Hill. 
N. C. All communications intended for publication must be 
accompanied vi'ith signatures if they are to receive considera- 
tion. 

OFFICE OF PUBLICATION, CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 

Entered at the Postoffice at Chapel Hill, N. C, as second 
class matter. 



THE UNIVERSITY IN LETTERS 

European Dkamatists. By Arcliibald Henderson. 

'Cincinnati: Stewart and Kidd Company, 1913. 
Pages 395. 

In all that Dr. Henderson writes there is the ring 
of subtle thought, wide reading, and equally wide 
generalizajtion. He pi'efers and has always preferred 
frontier themes and frontier (thinkers, — those that 
challenge the critic's power to interpret and to cor- 
relate. As a thinker he shows on every page the ad- 
vantage of a rigid training in higher mathematics, 
and as a writer he has so focused his attention upon 
the modern drama that his reach and vogue are more 
than national. In spite of the remarkable achieve- 
ment already to his credit, my own, feeling about him 
is that something greater is yet to come, — a feeling 
tha4; I do not have in reading Ches)terton or Huneker, 
with whom one instinctively compares him. 

The present volume falls naturally into three parts : 
The essay on Strindberg is new; the treatment of 
Ibsen, Maeterlinck, Wilde, and Shaw is essentially 
that of Dr. Henderson's former volume. Interpreters 
of life, and the Modern Spirit; while the last essay, 
that on Granville Barker, though it has appeared in 
English and French, differentiates itself sharply in 
style and method from those that precede it. 

Public opinion has hardly begun to crystallize 



about Strindberg, but the outlines of the man's life 
and character and distinctive achievement are here 
firndy sketched on a broad canvas. In style, however, 
this essay seems to me to fall below the other five. The 
introductory paragrai>hs \vill, we feai", bar many a 
reader instead of enticing him. The essay does not 
leave the impression of having been as finely fused in 
the author's mind as were the other sketches. The 
subject, it is true, was one of rare difficulty; but the 
language, instead of being marked by studied sim- 
plicity and economy, seems at times to writhe help- 
lessly about its thought. Instead of saying, as Dr. 
Henderson would say elsewhere, that Strindberg 
now " began to hate women," he says that he " began 
to be obsessed with the monomania of animadversion, 
against the female sex " (p. 26). And yet, but a few 
Images further on, one meets a sentence as memorable 
in its originality and simplicity as this : " Life with 
him was a form of excuse for art." That sentence, 
elaborated clearly and concretely, would make a com- 
pelling introduction or a compelling conclusion to the 
entire essay. This short sentence means far more to 
me than to know that Strindberg was " antipodal to 
the reflective and anemic mollycoddle" (p. 29), or 
that his method was the " method of focal concentra- 
tion, of magnification of interest through inten- 
siveness of treatment" (p. 56), or that his trilogy 
To Damascus blurs the vision " with its kinetoscopic 
heterogeneity of spiritual films " (p. 70), or that he 
was " obsessed with 'the chimera of exaggerated ego- 
ism, the delusion of referential ideas " (p. 71). 

The essay, in other words, does not seem to have 
been re-read at a sitting. The quotation from Words- 
worth on page 5, like the quotation from Browning on 
page 153 and from Shakespeare on page 155, is 
strangely inaccurate, and would hardly have escaped 
a careful re-reading. We are told also on page 19 
that, if Strindberg became a pessimist, '' his was a 
pessimism not of disillusionment but of contempla- 
tion." The point is an important one if true, but in at 
least five other passages Dr. Henderson affirms or im- 
]dies directly the contrary. Thus on page 29 : "Here, as 
elsewhere, Strindberg reveals himself the disillusioned 
idealist ;" and on page 33 : " It is indubitable that 
Strindberg finally reached the stage of disillusion- 
ment." On page 35 he speaks of '' Strindberg's life 
of disillusion " and on page 52 declares : " It was 
the tragedy of Strindberg's life never to rise above the 
sex-disillusionment which came from early excess." 

The four succeeding chapters make an interesting 
stitdy in the development of Dr. Henderson's style. 
I have compared ithem closely with the corresponding 
chapters in his Interpreters of Life, a book which I 
have read many times with increasing pleasure and 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



109 



profit and loaned as many times to students. The 
additions and omissions are comparatively slight, the 
chief dilTerence being that Dr. Henderson shows a 
gi-owing confidence in the carrying power of English 
when pitted against the tongues of Europe. Thus 
"milieu" is changed in the later volume to "sur- 
roundings " or " scene " or " setting," " Wille zur 
Macht" to "Will to Power," "in petto" to "in 
little," "/(' vie inierieure" to "the inner life,'" 
" the most significant of ithe differentiae " to 
" the most significant distinction," " couleur locale " 
to " local color," " ex oris infantium " -to " out of the 
mouths of babes and sucklings," " simulacrum " to 
■'the seeming" (noun), "denouement" 'to "out- 
come," "stifjmnta" to "defects," "the raison d'etre 
of " to " the reason for," " the quintessential secret 
of his debacle " to " tJie secret of his do'mifall," 
"' utter paradoxical blague " to " talk paradoxical 
stuff," " for Wilde la lutte pour la vie became increas- 
ingly diflicult " to " it became increasingly difficult 
for Wilde to earn a living," " melange " to " mix- 
ture," " peche de jeunesse " to " youthful indiscre- 
tion/' "interminable longueurs" to "interminable 
passages," " d la Balzac " to " according to Bal- 
zac," ■' le beau dans I'horrible " to " the beau- 
tiful in the horrible," " I'ox clamantis in deserto " 
to " the voice crying in ithe wilderness," " la 
grace supreme litteraire " to " supreme literary 
grace," " leit motifs " to " leading motives," 
" tour de force " to " startling climax," " pe- 
culiarly marked by the stigmata of naturalism" to 
" associated with naturalism in art," " rare quality 
of divertissement " to " rare quality as a purveyor of 
intellectual pleasure." "qua" to "considered as," 
" idle and luxurious as an aesthetic faineant " to " an 
aesthetic and luxurious idler," " maestria " to " mas- 
tery,'" " epater le bourgeois" to "shock the average in- 
telligence," " ballons d'essai " to " plays of fancy." 
This wholesale elimination does not mean that Dr. 
Henderson has decided to forego the foreign phrase : 
it means, as I unders;tand it, that no foreign phrase 
need apply unless its credentials are better than the 
credentials of the corresponding English phrase. 

A still further simplification is seen in 'the last 
chapter, that on Granville Barker. Beaders of Dr. 
Henderson's George Bernard Sltaw, which appeared 
in 1911, will recall the handsome portrait of Mr. 
Barker, facing page 368, and the footnote on the same 
page promising that " in a subsequent volume, deal- 
ing with Ithe dramatic movement inaugurated by ^Ir. 
Shaw, the production of his plays at the Court The- 
atre will be fully discussed." This essay seems to be 
a partial fulfillment of the footnote. As Mr. Barker 
has wi'itten nothing since the appearance of The 



Madras House in 1910, a year before Dr. Henderson 
published his gi'eat work on Shaw, the space thait 
would have been given to Mr. Barker's later plays is 
given to the Court Theatre. " The Stage Society," 
says Dr. Henderson, " has played in England, though 
in a somewhat less conspicuous way, the role which 
has been played on the continent by the Theatre Libre, 
L'CEuvre, and the Freie Biihne. From iit came 
Bernard Shaw — and Granville Barker — soon to be 
united in an enterprise at the Court Theatre which is 
without a parallel in the history of the English stage. 
From that fecund school of drama came also the late 
St. John Hankin, a dramatisit of rare promise, and 
Mr. John Galsworthy, the author of the original and 
powerful dramas. Strife and Justice." 

In mastery of the facts, which are known to but 
few, and in ease and clearness of expression, this 
chapter leaves nothing to be desired. The book as a 
whole is a distinct addition to our knowledge of the 
modern European dramatists and deserves a wide 
reading not only by students of the drama but by all 
those who would approach intelligently the complex 
problems of modern society. — C. Alphoxso Smith. 



INTER-SCHOLASTIC TRACK MEET 

Preparations are being made for the Second An- 
nual Inter-Scholastie Track ]\Ieet of N'orth Carolina, 
which will be held at Chapel Hill on April 3rd. 
Every secondary school in the State is eligible to send 
representatives to this meet. Among the schools 
which have already expressed their intention of hav- 
ing representatives in the meet are Ealeigh, High 
Point, Goldsboro, Burlington, Gastonia, Gatesville, 
Edentou, Graham, Asheville, Independent High 
School Team of Greensboro, Wa.shington and Oak 
Ridge. A beautiful trophy cup will be awarded the 
school which wins the highest number of points, 
another cup will be awarded the team winning the 
i-('lay race, and to every contestant winning a first 
place in any event a silver medal will be awarded, 
while to every contestant winning a second place in 
anv event a bronze medal will be awarded. 



HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL CHAMPIONSHIP TROPHY 

A !)cautiful silver loving cup was jiresented to the 
Raleigh High School February the thirteenth as a 
trophy for having won the State High School Foot- 
ball Championship. Prof. N. W. Walker of the Uni- 
versity, made the address of presentation. Supt. F. 
^f. Harper accepted for the school and Coach G. 
B. Phillips for the team. On the trophy was in- 
scribed : " Alex Taylor football trophy North Caro- 



110 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



lina public high school football contest — Kaleigh 
High School winner in 1913. Managed by North 
Carolina Athletic Association." Coach Trenchard 
was present and in a brief talk emphasized the neces- 
sity of athletics measuring up to scholarship require- 
ments. 

The Raleigh team, which was one of the best high 
school teams ever developed in North Carolina, won 
the State championship by decisive scores. Guy Phil- 
lips, '13, instructor in English, was the coach of this 
wonderful machine. 



CHANGES IN THE BASEBALL SCHEDULE 

The baseball schedule which includes twenty-three 
games has been changed in several dates since it was 
published in The Eeview. The game with Elon and 
the second game with Davidson at Fayetteville have 
been cancelled on account of the time limit for days 
off the Hill. The Washington and Lee game was 
called oft' on account of eligibility rules and one of 
the Georgia games cannot be played on account of 
•the train, schedules for Carolina's return from 
Princeton. 

Athletics in Durham, April 1. 
Wake Forest in Wake Forest, April 7. 
Wake Forest in Ealeigh, April 11. 
Guilford in Greensboro, April 13. 
Virginia in Durham, April 18. 
Vii-ginia in Greensboro, April 20. 
Davidson in Charlotte, April 21. 

The season opens with Oak Ridge at Chapel Hill, 
March 13th, and closes with Georgia at Chapel Hill, 
May 2nd. The third Virginia game will l)e played 
in .Charlottesville, April 25th. 



DR. KARL RATHGEN SHOWS THE TRUE BASIS 
OF PEACE 

The University has recently been honored by the 
presence of a distinguished guest. Dr. Karl Rathgen, 
of the Colonial Institute, Hamburg, Germany, and 
Kaiser Wilhelm Exchange Professor of Political Eco- 
nomy at Columbia University. Dr. Rathgen has re- 
cently given a course of lectures at Columbia oh "The 
Economic Problems of Germany;" and in addition to 
conducting a seminar, he has also delivered a course 
of lectures in German under the auspices of the new 
Deutsches Haus on " The Origin and Aims of Ger- 
many's Colonial Policy." Dr. Rathgen accejated an 
invitation to come here and lecture before the Uni- 
versity, during his tour of the South, which will carry 
him as far as Panama. His lecture here, which was 
in the highest degree interesting and instructive, con- 
cerned itself with some economic problems of the 



Germans of today. With a facility in using the 
English language which was nothing short of re- 
markable, and a masterly command of the most intri- 
cate array of economic and industrial statistics, the 
lecturer portrayed the mutual actions and interactions 
of agriculture and industry in Germany in the past 
few decades. Intensive development of Germany's ag- 
ricultural resources finally reaching its limit, there 
necessarily ensued a tremendous quickening and de- 
velopment of the manufacturing industries. As a 
result of the competition of Germany with the world, 
the lecturer showed how and why Germany has won 
and held the position of generally acknowledged lead- 
ership. Basing hisiargument upon an impressive series 
of incontrovertible facts, he drew the inevitable con- 
clusion that the great manufacturing countries are 
mutually their own best customers. '' International 
competition is the life of international trade." The 
cause of one is the cause of all. The solidarity and 
mutual trade interests of individual nations are the 
real factors which conduce to the maintenance of 
world-peace. 



DR. SATO INTERPRETS JAPAN TO AMERICA 

Dr. Soshuke Sato, President of the Agricultural 
College of Tohoku University, Japan, visited the 
University February 9-18, and gave a series of five 
lectures under the auspices of the Carnegie Endow- 
ment for International Peace. The subjects of the 
addresses were : February 9, " From Old Feudalism 
to New Imperialism ;" February 10, "Social Changes 
and Reforms Since the Restoration;" February 11, 
" Local Autonomy and Constitutional Government ;" 
February 16, " Agricultural Credits and Rural Soci- 
ology;" February 18, "Educational Systems and 
Religious Movements." While a guest of the Uni- 
versity, Dr. Sato filled an engagement at Charlotte 
before the Manufacturers' Club. 

Dr. Sato received his post graduate training at 
Johns Hojikins University, has been a careful stu- 
dent and keen observer of national life, and brought 
to the interested University circle a message mark- 
edly instructive and provocative of international 
friendshii^. During his stay at the University, he 
was accompanied by his secretary, Mr. Ileckleman, 
a missionary to Japan at home in America on vaca- 
tion, who also spoke before the Y. M. C. A. and the 
student body on the religious life of Japan. 

The itinerary of Dr. Sato while in America in- 
cludes lecture engagements at the University of Vir- 
ginia, the University of Illinois, the University of 
Minnesota, Johns Hopkins University, Bro^vn Uni- 
versity, and Columbia University. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



111 



THE DRAMATIC CLUB DELIGHTED THE EAST 

The University Dramatic Club left for its annual 
eastern tour, February 17-22, visiting Greenville, 
!N"ew Bern, Wilmington, and Clinton. Tlie trip was 
satisfactory not only from the standpoint of the Club 
but judging from the cordial reception given, it. it 
was satisfactory to the cities visited. 

One sentence clipped from the Raleigh News and 
Observer sums up pretty well what was said about 
the Club at each point: "'The Magistr.ate,' pre- 
sented by the Dramatic Club of the University of 
Xorth Carolina last night in the St. -Mary's audi- 
torium, made an unmistakable hit." 

Coggins, Weeks, Kerr, Hoover, Blal/)ck, Potts, and 
Cox won special mention and every^ member of the 
cast played in such a way as to give balance to tbe 
presentation. / 

The management of the Club is arranging a west- 
ern schedule, to include Salem College, Salisbury, 
and Charlotte, immediately after /Easter. — J. Shep- 
ARD Brtax, Manager. 






THE MUSICIANS PLEASE 

The Glee and Mandolin Clubs of the Univer- 
sity have just completed a week's tour of the western 
part of the state. The cities visited were Greens- 
boro on February 23rd, Statesville on February 24th, 
Hickory on February 25th, Lenoir on February 2fith, 
Gastonia, on February 27th, and Charlotte on Feb- 
ruary 28th. Splendid reports of the trip come from 
every hand. Excellent concerts .wei'e given by this 
musical organization everywhere, and its visits no 
doubt proved a distinct help to the University. The 
alumni of the different cities entertained the mem- 
bers of the Clubs. More than one hundred dollars 
was cleared from the trip. 



MRS. O. P. RHYNE DEAD 

The community of Chapel Hill was shocked ^Ion- 
day morning, February 16th, at the announcement 
of the sudden death early on that morning of ^Irs. 
O. P. Rhyne, wife of Dr. TJhyne, of the Department 
of German. Her body was taken to Gastonia, her 
hiiiiif, wlifTc she was buried Tuesdav. 



PROFESSORS ATTEND N. E. A. DEPARTMENTAL 
MEETING 

Professors ^I. C. S. Noble, L. A. Williams, G. ^M. 
^IcKie, and X. W. Walker attended the meeting of 
the Department of Superintendence of the Xational 
Education Association at its meeting iu Richmond, 
Va., February 24-28. 



CAPT. L. L. ABERNETHY LEAVES COLLEGE 

While ■' Big Abby " had talked of leaving college 
before, it was quite a sorrow to his friends, who 
include the whole University, to hear ilonday that 
he had decided definitely to withdraw from college as 
it will be impossible for him to graduate. 

" Capt." left Tuesday for his home near Charlotte. 
The football season and his brother's sickness and 
death after that took so much of his time that he was 
unable to keep up with his work, which requires an 
extra amount of laboratory work. He was taking 
Electrical Engineering. — Tar Heel, February 19. 



Gymnasium drill is required of Freshmen during 
the Spring term three afternoons a week. 



JUDGE WELLS THOMPSON 

Judge Wells Thompson, '59, died at his home in Bay City, 
Matagorda County, Texas, during the morning of Saturday, 
January 17. igi4, at the age of "6 years, one month and 
live days. 

Judge Thompson graduated from the University of North 
Carolina in the class of 1859 and later entered the Law School 
of the University of Georgia at Athens, where he was at the 
beginning of the War between the States, and where he en- 
listed for twelve months in an artillery company. Having 
served his term of enlistment he went to Thermopolis, Ala., 
where he was born December 12, 1837, and joined in the en- 
listment of Company I, 36th .'Kla. Infantry, of which he was 
elected captain, and with which he served in the Army of 
Tennessee, participating in all its battles, until it was sur- 
rendered under General Joseph E. Johnston, at Greensboro, 
N. C, April 26, 1865. 

When a small boy. Judge Thompson removed with his 
parents to Matagorda County, Texas, where he grew to man- 
hood, and which was his home during his college days. After 
the surrender he returned to his home at Columbus, Texas, 
and began life anew. Possessed of great power as a forceful 
and effective speaker, he was thrown to the front in the terri- 
ble political conflict with the carpet-bag government of Texas, 
canvassing the entire State, before the days of railroads. In 
1871 he was the candidate of his party for Lieutenant Gov- 
ernor of Texas, and though elected was counted out, but 
the fight made by Judge Thompson and others, sealed the 
doom of the party in power, which two years later received 
its Waterloo, from which it has never recovered. At that 
election Judge Thompson was again elected Lieutenant Gover- 
nor, serving as such through the administration of Governor 
(). M. Roberts. He was elected State Senator in 1876, and 
President of the Senate, was again elected Lieutenant Gover- 
nor in 1878, was the codifier of the Texas laws in 189s, and 
at the time of his death, and for several terms prior thereto, 
served as Judge of the 23rd Judicial District of Texas. 

Judge Thompson was a member of the Episcopal Church. 
He was married late in life, and his widow survives him, with 
no children. 

Judge Thompson, accompanied by his devoted wife, attended 
the reunion of the Class of '59 at commencement in 1908, and 
is the third of the 12 who attended that reunion to "pass over 
the rive'r." 

JAMES P. COFFIN, '59. 



112 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



THE GENERAL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

of the 
UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 



Officers of the Association 

Julian S. Carr, '66 President 

Walter Murphy, '92 Secretary 

Members of the Council 

Term expires 1914 : D. B. Teague, '10; J. K. Wilson, '05; 
P. D. Gold, 98; T. D. Warren, '9i-'93; J- O. Carr, '95. 

Term expires 1915: J. Y. Joyner, '81; R. H. Sykes, '9S-'97 ; 
George Stephens, '96; W. H. Swift, '01; W. S. Bernard, '00. 

Term expires 1916: A. M. Scales, '93; L. I. Moore, '93; J. 
A. Parker, '06; A. L. Cox, '04; W. J. Andrews, '91. 

Officers of the Council 

Julian S. Carr, '66 Chairman 

Walter Murphy, '92 Secretary 

J. Y. Joyner, '81 Treasurer 



THE ALUMNI 

W. S. BERNARD, '00, Alumni Editor 



It is the purpose of this department not only to publish all 
timely tacts of interest about alumni — changes of residence 
and occupation, marriages, deaths, meetings, achievements, 
etc., but also to trace alumni of whom the University and 
their classmates have no record since their leaving college, 
thus bringing the class histories up to date. Therefore items 
of information are solicited from all alumni and their friends 
but especially are the secretaries of the associations and 
the secretaries of the classes requested to keep the editor 
informed. Notes on a few alumni in each city or county 
and class contributed every month will be greatly appreciated. 



CLASS REUNIONS FOR COMMENCEMENT, 1914 

The classes scheduled to hold reunions during Commence- 
ment 1914 are those of 1864, 1889, 1894, 1904, 1909, 1913, the 
one-, five-, ten-, twenty-, twenty-five-, and fifty-year gradu- 
ates. Members of these classes will facilitate prepara- 
tions for these reunions if they will place themselves at once 
in communication with their respective class secretaries and 
with W. S. Bernard, Chairman of Committee on Class Re- 
unions, Chapel Hill, N. C. 



THE CLASSES 

1859 

— R. F. Kolb, Commissioner of Agriculture and Immigration 
of Alabama, is a candidate for Governor of the State. 

1860 

— William Edwin Holt is a prominent cotton manufacturer of 
Lexington, N. C. 

1878 
— Rev. W. P. Cline is pastor of the Lutheran Church of Irmo, 
S. C. He was one of the founders of Lenoir College, Hickory, 
N. C. 

1879 
— W. J. Peele is a member of the firm of Peele and Maynard, 
Lawyers, Raleigh, N. C. 

— Ex-Judge J. S. Manning is a member of the law firm of 
Manning and Kitchin, Raleigh, N. C. 

1880 

— James H. Southgate is a member of the firm of Southgate 
and Son, Insurance writers, Durham, N. C. He is president 
of the Board of Trustees of Trinity College. 



— Governor Locke Craig had the pleasure recently of making 
the first long distance telephone banquet address delivered in 
North Carolina. The occasion was the annual "smoker" of 
the Croatan Club, of Henderson, N. C. A specially delivered 
transmitter was used in the banquet hall, by means of which 
Governor Craig was easily heard. Other University men par- 
ticipating in the program or serving on the committee of ar- 
rangements were : S. T. Peace, R. G. S. Davis, W. H. Bagley, 
and F. A. Olds. 

1881 

— F. B. Dancy is Manager of the Northern division of the F. 

S. Royster Guano Company, with offices 1604-1614 Munsey 

Building, Baltimore. Md. 

— W. J. Adams, of Carthage, is Judge of Superior Court for 

the eighth judicial district of North Carolina. 

— Dr. Robert P. Pell is president of Converse College, 

Spartanburg, S. C. 

— Dr. W. D. Pemberton is a physician of Concord, N. C. 

— A. Nixon is clerk of the Superior Court of Lincoln County. 

He has held this position for a number of years. 

1882 
— Thomas D. Stokes is a prominent citizen of Elk Hall, Va. 
— Dr. G. W. Whitsett practices medicine at Greensboro, N. C. 
— A. W. McAllister is president of the Southern Life and 
Trust Company, Greensboro. N. C. 

— Col. Leroy Springs is a prominent cotton manufacturer of 
Lancaster, S. C. 

1883 

— Ira T. Turlington is superintendent of the public schools 
of Mt. Airy, N. C. For a long number of years he served as 
superintendent of the Smithfield and Johnston County public 
schools. As an appreciation of his services, the teachers ot 
the county recently presented his portrait to the Smithfield 
schools. 

1884 
— The inauguration of S. B. Turrentine as President of 
Greensboro College for Women will occur on March 18. 
— James Lee Love is director of the Provident Teachers' 
Agency ; 120 Tremont St., Boston, Mass. 

— S. M. Gattis, of Hillsboro, is Solicitor of the Ninth Judicial 
District of North Carolina. 

1885 

Uncle Sam's star-spangled Neptune was discovered in the 
interior of North Carolina. As Secretary of the Navy he is 
a decided success, which is probably due to the fact that 
being a Tarheel he is a natural Jack Tar. Among the many 
reforms he has instituted in the American Navy is one em- 
bodied in Order 41,144 — "Common seaman are forbidden to 
use the ship's poker deck." His motto is — "Don't chew the 
rag — chew Navy." — The Capital, by Tom Flemming. 
— W. C. Riddick is professor of civil engineering and Vice- 
President of the A. & M. College of North Carolina, Raleigh, 
N. C. 

1886 

— Edgar William Pou. of Smithfield, represents the Fourth 

Congressional District in Congress. He has represented this 

district since 1901. 

— Edward M. Poteat is president of Furman LIniversity, 

Greenville, S. C. 

— G. B. Patterson is practicing law at Maxton, N. C. Formerly 

he represented his district in Congress. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



113 



1887 
— Louis M. Bourne is a member of the law firm of Bourne, 
Parker, and Morrison, Asheville, X. C. 

— H. F. Shaflfner is \'ice-President and Treasurer of the 
Wachovia Bank and Trust Co., Winston-Salem, N. C. 
— L. P. McGehee is Dean of the Law School of the Uni- 
versity. 

— W. S. Wilkinson is engaged in the insurance business at 
Rocky Mount, N. C. 

1888 
— F. M. Harper was last fall elected President of the Wake 
County Alumni Association of the University. He is Super- 
intendent of the Raleigh Township Graded Schools. 

1889 
— The class of i88y will hold its twenty-fifth year reunion 
this commencement. It is hoped that every member of the 
class will attend this reunion, and will send his name to 
Prof. W. S. Bernard, Chapel Hill, N. C, at once. 
— T. L. Moore is a banker at Muskogee, Oklahoina. 
— H. G. Wood is in the insurance business at Edenton, N. C. 
— C. W. Toms is Vice-President of the Liggett & Myers 
Tobacco Company, with headquarters at St. Louis, Missouri. 
— A. A. F. Seawell, of Jonesboro, is chairman of the insurance 
investigating committee authorized by the special session of 
the General Assemljly. 

1890 
— W. F. Shaffner is with the Wachovia Bank and Trust 
Company, Winston-Salem, N. C. 

— Edgar Love is engaged in business at Lincolnton, N. C. 
— Gaston Battle is in the furniture business at Rocky Mount. 
— J. S. Holmes is State Forester for North Carolina, with 
headquarters at Chapel Hill. 

1891 
— J. V'olney Lewis, Professor of Geology at Rutgers College, 
has been appointed Curator of the Geological Museum. 
— Andrew H. Patterson is Professor of Physics and Dean of 
the School of Applied Sciences of the University of North 
Carolina. 

— H. A. Gilliam practices law at Tarboro, N. C. He is a mem- 
ber of the Board of Trustees of the University. 
— Plato Collins is Clerk of Superior Court for Lenoir County 
at Kinston, N. C. 
— Dr. Jiphn G. Rlmint practices medicine at Washington, N. C. 

1892 

— Dr. J. McQ. Lccll)etter. ex-'yj, is practicing medicine at 
Rockingham, N. C. 

— W. C. Hammer, Law '(ji-'gj, has been appointed by Presi- 
dent Wilson United States Attorney for the Western Nortli 
Carolina district. Previous to this appointment, Mr. Hammer 
was solicitor of the eighth judicial district. 

1893 

— James L. Kai)p is in the service of the Post Office, at 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 

— Jas. T. Pugh is a lawyer at Boston, Mass., with offices in 

the Pembroke Building. 

— S. F. .'\ustin is superintendent of pulilic instruction for 

Xash County, and is also a lawyer and prominent business 

man. His home is at Nashville, N. C. 

— John M. Cheek is superintendent of public instruction for 

Alleghany County. His home is at Laurel Springs. During 

his college days he won the Hume medal. Later he studied 

at Harvard, where he received his A. B., degree in 1895. 

— J. F. Watlington is Cashier of the Bank of Rcidsville, at 

Reidsvillc, N. C. 



1894 

— This class holds its twenty-year reunion this commence- 
ment. A full attendance is greatly desired. Write to W. S. 
Bernard, Chairman of the reunion committee, at Chapel Hill. 
Judge W. F. Harding, of Charlotte, and Thos. S. Rollins, of 
Asheville, are a committee from the class helping in the 
arrangements for the reunion. 

— J. W. Yates is Vice-President of the Murchison National 
Bank, at Wilmington, N. C. This bank has recently increased 
its capitalization to one million dollars. 

— Rev. W. P. M. Curry is pastor of the Presbyterian Church 
at Wallace, N. C. 

— A. Caswell Ellis is a professor in the Department of Edu- 
cation of the University of Texas, at Austin. 
— Harry W. Whedbee is a judge of the Superior Court of 
North Carolina. His district is the third, and his home is 
at Greenville. 

— Charles Henry White is assistant professor of mining and 
metallurgy in Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass. 
— W. E. Holt, Jr., is in the cotton manufacturing business at 
Lexington, N. C. 

1895 
— E. W. Myers is a consulting engineer at Greensboro. 
— Thomas Ruffin is a member of the law firm of Douglas, 
Baker, Ruffin and O'Bear, with offices in the Southern Build- 
ing, Washington, D. C. 

— Thomas D. Warren is a leading attorney of New Bern, 
widely known and prominent throughout Eastern North Caro- 
lina. He is a member of the Alumni Council and Board of 
Trustees of the University. 

— H. E. C. Bryant continues as Washington correspondent of 
the Charlotte Observer. For the Sunday editions of this paper 
he writes interestingly of "Tar Heel Tales." 
— Dr. H. H. Home, professor of the History of Education 
and Philosophy, New York University, gave two addresses 
before the Northeastern Minnesota Teachers' Association in 
Duluth, February 12-14, on "Modern Educational Tendencies," 
and "Modern School Ideals." 

1896 
— L. C. Brogden is supervisor of the rural Schools of North 
Carolina. His offices are with the State Department of Edu- 
cation at Raleigh. 
— Louis I. Guion is a prominent farmer of Camden, S, C. 

1897 

— W. D. Carmichael is manager of the Durham branch of the 
Liggett and Myers Tobacco Company. For a number of years 
he w'as superintendent of the Durham Public Schools. 
— President Robert H. Wright, of the East Carolina Teachers' 
Training School, at Greenville, N. C, gave an address before 
the conferences for community welfare in Edgecombe County, 
held at Conetoc, on February 9th. 

— Joe S. Wray is Superintendent of 'the Gastonia Public 
Schools. He has held this position since the organization of 
tlu- Graded School System at Gastonia in 1901. 

1898 

— Charles Scribner's Sons announces for early publication 
"The Modern High School, Its Administration and Exten- 
sion." by Chas. Hughes Johnston, Dean of the School of Edu- 
cation of the University of Illinois, at Urbana. 
— Rev. Ira E. D. Andrews, pastor of Dallonbury baptist 
Church, Wheatley, Kentucky, and Miss Emma Whitehead 
Souther, also of Wheatley, were married on March 4th. 
— Walter Thompson is Superintendent of The Children's 
Home, at Winston-Salem. Formerly he was Superintendent 
of the Stonewall Jackson T'aining School, at Concord. 



114 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



— Chase Brenizer has recently formed a partnership with 
F. L. Black, Law '04, and H. L. Taylor under the firm name 
of Brenizer, Black & Taylor, for the general practice of law, 
succeeding the firm of Brenizer and Black. The firm's offices 
are at 904-6 Commercial National Bank Building, Charlotte, 
N. C. Mr. Brenizer is also attorney for the City of Char- 
lotte. 

— L. E. Covington is Cashier of the Anchor Trust Company 
of Raleigh, N. C. 

— Paul Tinsley Cheek, who has held an important position in 
Samoa, has been appointed by Secretary Daniels to a position 
as director of the Normal School at Agana, Guam. Since 
graduation he has been a successful teacher in Massachusetts 
and Cuba. 

1899 
J. E. Latta, Secretary, Chicago, 111. 

— R. D. W. Connor made the address at the annual meeting 
of the "9019" of Trinity College on February 23rd. The 
address last year was made by Dr. W. E. Dodd, of the 
University of Chicago. Mr. Connor's theme was "North Caro- 
lina Towns Must Build for the Future." 

— J. S. Carr, Jr., is one of the leading cotton manufacturers of 
the State. He is president of the chain of Durham Hosiery 
Mills with headquarters at Durham, N. C. 
— William A. (Coach) Reynolds, Law, '99, is manager of the 
Charlotte district of the Southern Cotton Oil Company, with 
headquarters at Charlotte. 

— Moses B. Gillam, of Windsor, and Miss Virginia Spruill, 
of Plymouth, were married on February 17th in the Metho- 
dist Church of Plymouth. Mr. Gillam is a lawyer and 
banker of Windsor. 

— Clyde R. Hoey, Law, '99, is Assistant United States Attorney 
for the western district of North Carolina. His home is at 
Shelby. 

1900 
W. S. Bernard, Secretary, Chapel Hill, N. C. 

— Geo. N. Coffey is in the Soil Survey Service at Wooster, 
Ohio. 

— J as. A. Lockhart practices law at Wadesboro, N. C. 
— W. G. Wharton is with the Cone Export and Commission 
Company, Greensboro. 

— S. J. Adams is in the grocery business at Raleigh, N. C. 
— T. T. Allison is with the Charlotte Consolidated Construc- 
tion Company, of Charlotte, N. C. 

— John W. Hinsdale, Jr., practices law in Raleigh. He is a 
member of the Board of Trustees of the University. 

1901 

F. B. Rankin, Secretary, Rutherfordton, N. C. 
— Rev. C. P. Coble is pastor of the Presbyterian Church of 
High Point, N. C. 

— J. C. B. Ehringhaus lives at Elizabeth City. He is solicitor 
for the First Judicial District. 

— E. C. Willis is Superintendent of the North Wilkesboro, 
N. C, Graded Schools. 

— Frank Bennett is in the lumber business at Wadesboro, 
N. C. 

— Announcement of the engagement of Miss Elizabeth Alli- 
son and Mr. Pegram A. Bryant, ex-'oi, both of Statesville, 
has been made. The marriage will take place this spring. 
Mr. Bryant is associate editor of the Statesville Landmark. 



1902 

R. .\. Merritt, Secretary, Greensboro, N. C. 
— W. A. Blue is Secretary and Treasurer of the Aberdeen 
and Rockfish Railroad at .\berdeen, N. C. He is also Mayor 
of Aberdeen. 

— .\. M. Carr is Sales Manager for the Durham Hosiery 
Mills, with offices 346 Broadway, New York City. 
— Quinton Gregory is one of the chief representatives of the 
British-American Tobacco Company in China, with head- 
quarters at Peking. His duties require him to go to all 
parts of China. He spent his vacation during the past sum- 
mer at his home in Halifax, N. C. 

— Robert R. Williams is a leading attorney of Asheville, 
N. C. For the past several sessions he has represented Bun- 
combe County in the State legislature. 

— T. C. Worth is secretary of the Griswold Insurance & Real 
Estate Company, Durham, N. C. 

— J. Ed. Swain is a prominent attorney and is a member of 
the law firm of Wiels and Swain, of Asheville, N. C. He is 
chairman of the Democratic Executive Committee of Bun- 
combe County. 

1903 

N. W. Walker, Secretary, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
— Rev. Charles E. Maddry is pastor of the Tabernacle Bap- 
tist Church, of Raleigh, N. C. 

— Jas. W. Horner is manager of a Mercantile Corporation 
styled Horner Bros. Company, of Oxford, N. C. 
— T. L. Gwyn deals in live stock at Canton, N. C. He has 
two large stock farms in Haywood County and one near 
Columbia, S. C. He does a large business in cattle and sheep 
all over the South, especially in Maryland, Virginia, N. C. 
and S. C. 

— Dr. Green R. Berkeley, who was a great football player 
during his days at Carolina, is now with the Protestant Hos- 
pital, of Norfolk, Va. He received the M. D. degree from 
Jefiferson College of Medicine in 1906. He is also the Secre- 
tary of the Norfolk Alumni Association of U. N. C. 
— Dr. N. D. Bitting is practicing his profession, that of 
medicine, in Durham, N. C. 

— Ernest M. Green, Law, '03, is a prominent attorney at 
New Bern. He is attorney for Craven County. 

1904 

T. F. HiCKERSON, Secretary, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
— This class holds its ten year reunion this commencement, 
June 2nd, 1914. .\ full attendance is desired. Write to T. 
F. Hickerson, Class Secretary, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
— F. L. Black has recently formed a partnership with Chase 
Brenizer, Law, '98, and H. L. Taylor under the firm name 
of Brenizer, Black & Taylor, for the general practice of law, 
succeeding the firm of Brenizer and Black. The firm's offices 
are at 904-6 Commercial National Bank Building, Charlotte, 
N. C. At the meeting of the officers of the State National 
Guard, held at Gastonia in February, he was elected president 
of the Asociation for the ensuing year. 
— W. P. Wood is Vice-President of the Elizabeth City Buggy 
Company. He has been in this business since graduation. 
— T. F. Hickerson is associate Professor of Civil Engineering 
in the University of North Carolina. 

— N. R. Graham, was elected last fall secretary of the Meck- 
lenburg County Alumni Association of the University. He is 
an attorney at law, with offices in the Lawyers Building, 
Charlotte, N. C. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



115 



— T. S. Beall is an attorney of Greensboro, with offices in the 
Banner Building. 

— A. W. Grady is Cashier of the Durham Traction Company, 
Durham, N. C. 

1905 

Frank McLean, Secretary, Maxton, N. C. 
— Dr. O. B. Ross has an extensive practice as a physician and 
surgeon in Charlotte. His offices are in the Realty Building. 
— William T. Shore is practicing law at Charlotte, with offices 
in the Lawyers' Building. 

— Horace M. Emerson is in the service of the Atlantic 
Coast Line Railway, at Wilmington, N. C. 
— Dr. W. F. Cole is practicing his profession, that of medicine, 
at Greensboro. 

— B. T. Groome is on the staff of the Charlotte Evening 
Chronicle, Charlotte, N. C. He has recently been very active 
in stirring up more interest in football in Charlotte. 
— Charles J. Hendley is doing graduate work in Columbia Uni- 
versity, New York. His specialty is the economic history of 
the United States. His address is 129 Fulton .Avenue, Long 
Island. 

1906 

J. A. Parker, Secretary, Charlotte, N. C. 
— John A. Staton is in the mercantile business at Bethel, N. C. 
— Miss Flora Bryan and Mr. Frank M. Caldwell, ex-'o6, both 
of Charlotte, were married on Wednesday, February 8th. 
Mr. Caldwell is with the Simmons Company, real estate 
dealers. 

— Walter B. Love is practicing law at Monroe, N. C. 
— Victor L. Stephenson is on the Staff of the Charlotte Ob- 
server. He has recently contributed some interesting special 
articles to the Observer relative to the development of the 
sand hill section of North Carolina. 

— Frank P. Drane, formerly connected with the Chemical 
Laboratory and Soil Survey of the North Carolina Depart- 
ment of Agriculture, was recently appointed to serve on the 
L'nited States assay commission for 1914 by President Wilson. 
— J. Kemp Doughton, ex-'o6, formerly State bank examiner 
of North Carolina, has recently been made National bank 
examiner under the Wilson administration, and has gone to 
Indiana to begin work. 
— D. W. Sorrell, Law, '06, is practicing law in Durham. 

1908 

Jas. A. Gray. Jr., Secretary. Winston-Salem, N. C. 
— J- Q- Jackson, is Assistant State Chemist, Department of 
.\griculture, Laboratory of Fertilizer Control. Raleigh, N. C. 
— J. A. Fore, Jr., is head draughtsman witli Architect J. M. 
McMichacl, Charlotte, N. C. 

— J. B. Coghill is the representative of the General Electric 
Company, with offices in the National Bank Building, Charles- 
ton, W. Va. 

— B. L. Banks, Jr., is engaged in the practice of law at Gatcs- 
ville, N. C. 

— W. B. Davis and Miss Dorothy Perry, of Charlotte, were 
married last July. Mr. Davis is a member of the faculty of 
the Charlotte High School. 

— D. Z. Newton is practicing law at Shelby, N. C. 
— W. E. Velverton is Washington Correspondent for the 
Raleigh Xews and Obserz'er. and Savannah Morning News. 
Formerly he was managing editor of the News and Observer. 



1909 

C. W. TiLLETT, Jr., Secretary, Charlotte, N. C. 
— The Class of 1909 will hold its five-year reunion this com- 
mencement. Every member of the class is cordially and ur- 
gently invited to be present. Write to Chas. W. Tillett, Jr., 
Class Secretary, about it. 

— W. W. Michaux is with the Hunter Manufacturing and 
Commission Co., 58-60 Worth Street, New York City. 
— V. C. Edwards is back in the University pursuing advanced 
work in Chemistry. Last year he was a member of the faculty 
of Wofford College at Spartanburg, S. C. 
— Kemp D. Battle is attending the Law School of Denver 
University. His address is Oakes Home, Denver. 
— Jerry B. Reeves is an instructor in English in the Georgia 
School of Technology, at Atlanta. 

— Wallace H. Strowd, recently assistant chemist to Dr. B. 
W. Kilgore, State Chemist, has been elected Assistant in 
Chemistry in the University of Wisconsin, at Madison. 

1910 

W. H. Ramsaur. Secretary, New York City. 
— Carl Finger, Phar. '10, is Treasurer of Gaston County, 
with offices at Gastonia, N. C. 

— The engagement of O. A. Hamilton and Miss Elise Emer- 
son, of Wilmington, has been announced, the wedding to take 
place in June. 

— Robert S. McNeill is assistant postmaster at Fayetteville. 
Last year he taught in the Fayetteville High School. 
— W. M. Snider is with the Wachovia Bank and Trust Com- 
pany, at Salisbury, N. C. 

— J. D. Eason, Jr., writes that he likes the West and is getting 
along well in the profession of law. His address is 15 Silver 
Bow Block, Butte, Montana. 

— C. C. Garrett is working with Bradstreet's, and has head- 
quarters at Greensboro. He is treasurer of the Class of 1910. 
— W. R. Edmonds is an attorney at law and judge of the 
Recorder's Court at High Point. 

— Lindsay Warren, ex-'io, Law, 'o7-'o8, is an attorney at 
Washington, N. C, and is chairman of the Democratic Ex- 
ecutive Committee of Beaufort County. 
— Louis J. Poisson, Law, 'ro, of the Wilmington bar, associat- 
ed with ex-Judge E. K. Bryan, has been tendered and has 
accepted the position of secretary to E. J. Justice, of Greens- 
boro, special attorney of the Department of Justice, and has 
left for California to begin his work, which will require an 
absence of a year. 

1911 
I. C. MosER, Secretary, Oak Ridge, N. C. 
— W. F. Taylor, recently licensed to practice law, has opened 
an office in Chapel Hill in the new Kluttz building. He has 
formed a partnership with Ezra Parker, '14. 
— .\!ex. L. Feild^ at the midwinter meeting of the N. C. 
section of the American Chemical Society held on January 
_>4th, at Raleigh, presented a paper entitled, "An Electrical 
Contact Vapor-Pressure Thermoregulator," which was pub- 
lished in the current number of the Journal of the .^merican 
Chemical Society. He is Assistant Chemist at the State Ex- 
periment Station and is engaged in research in soil physics. 
— E. C. McLean works for the .American Tobacco Company 
in New York City. His address is 115 East 71st Street. 
— O. B. Hardison is in the Naval .\cademy at Annapolis, 
Maryland. 

— Charles .\. Vogler is practicing law in Winston-Salem, N. C. 
— Marshall B. Wyatt is with the Durham Hosiery Mills of 
Goldsboro, N. C. 



116 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



1912 

C. E. Norman, Secretary, Concord, N. C. 
— Frank P. Barker is a second year law student at Columbia 
University, New York. He has become considerably inter- 
ested in politics during his stay in the metropolis. 
— Eugene F. Rimmer is with the Edgecombe Drug Company 
of Tarboro. 

— C. R. Wharton is teacher of English in the Charlotte High 
School. 

■ — ^Jas. Paull Fenner is farming at Scotland Neck, N. C. 
— Wm. E. Hossfield is in the architectural business at Cedar 
Falls, Iowa. 

— H. L,. Parish is storekeeper for the Durham Traction 
Company, of Durham, N. C. 

— C. W. E. Pittman is teaching at Conetoe, N. C. On Feb. 
9th, he presided over Conferences for Community Welfare 
in Edgecombe County, held at Conetoe. 

— R. W. Winston, Jr., has entered the University Law School. 
— R. A. Freeman is principal of the High School at Lignum, 
Va. 

1913 
A. L. M. Wir.GiNS, Secretary, Hartsville, S. C. 
— The one-year reunion of the class of 1913 this approaching 
commencement is heartily endorsed by President Douglas 
Rights and Secretary Lee Wiggins. A committee consisting 
of E. R. Rankin, M. T. Spears, and Lowry Axley has been 
appointed to make all arrangements for the reunion. This 
committee would like to hear at once from all who can be 
present. It is hoped that every member of the class will at- 
tend, and thus make a reunion memorable in the University's 
history. 

— Thos. H. Norwood is taking the course in Business Ad- 
ministration at Harvard this spring. 

— W. A. Kirksey is teaching in the Horner Military School, 
at Oxford. 

— W. R. Petteway, who is a law student at Columbia, has 
made the triangular debate between Columbia, Pennsylvania, 
and Cornell. Some thirty-five men were in the tryout. H. 
C. Petteway is also at Columbia. 

— R. C. Cox is Superintendent of the Graded Schools of 
King's Mountain, N. C. 

— Miss Watson Kasey is head of the Latin Department of 
Salem College, Winston-Salem, N. C. 

1914 
— Ezra Parker secured license to practice law at the February 
examinations. He has formed a partnership with W. F. 
Taylor, '11, and has opened an office in Chapel Hill in the 
new Kluttz Building. 

— William Cowles, of Statesville, who passed the supreme 
court examination recently, has located in North Wilkesboro 
for the practice of law. 



Reconstruction m north £arolind 

By J. G deRoulhac Hamilton 

Alumni Professor of History in the University of North Carolina 

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THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



117 



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118 THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



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