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Full text of "The alumni review [serial]"



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COLLECTION OF 

NORTH CAROLINIANA 



E X D O W K T> B V 

JOHN SPRUKT HILL 
of the class of 1889 



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©irflcPi Typ©wirl{t@ir 
°0)ini§lhinps for 1914 

WON ON THE 

UNDERWOOD 



At the Annual justness Show, 
ZACeu) York City, October 26, 
1914, Underwood carries off 
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Emil A. Trefzger Writing at 
1 29 words per minute becomes 
World's Champion typist. 



UMDEE 

'"^The^iCachine You will Eventually Buy" 



THE ATHLETIC STORE 

Extends a cordial invitation to the entire student 

body and the Alumni of the University 

to call on i's for Gymnastic 

Supplies 

J. M. NEVILLE, Prop. 



"YOU ARE A GENIUS," wrote George Bernard 

Shaw to Dr. Archibald Henderson after 

reading his "George Bernard Shaw** 

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It is different from other books on the 
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'■ Headquarters in DURHAM: At the Royal Cafe, Main Street, and Southern Depot 

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Respectfully, 

A. A. KLUTTZ 



The Bank o/Chapel Hill 

The oldest and strongest bank in 
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business. 



M.C S NOBLE 
President 



H. H. PATTERSON 
Vice-President 



J. C. TAYLOR 
Cathier 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



Volume III 



JANUARY, 1915 



Number 4 



OPINION AND COMMENT 



EXPLANATORY The present number of The Re- 
view presents a slight departure 
in content from that to which its readers are accus- 
tomed. This is justified on two special grounds: the 
Chirstmas holidays furnished but little University 
news to be reported; and the first of January is a 
good time for alumni to ascertain where alma mater 
stands. 

A new year is ahead. Many things are to be 
planned and done. The University needs the every- 
day, constant, informed assistance of its sons. In 
order that the University may receive this sort of 
assistance, certain facts should be brought before the 
alumni. This issue of The Review attempts to 
serve as the medium through which this result may 
be achieved. 

nan 

A POINT j n this section, The Review pro- 

OF VIEW poses to emphasize certain matters 

which it regards as of fundamental 
importance to the University. Of these, the first is 
the point of view, the attitude from which the Uni- 
versity should be considered by the State at large. 
This, so far as The Review is concerned, is very de- 
finite. It is that the University of North Carolina 
is the State University. Back in the days when the 
State Constitution was in the making, the University 
was conceived of as an organic, essential part of a 
great State's life, and up to this good day no change 
has been made in the organic law which would lead 
any citizen to infer anything to the contrary. Not- 
withstanding the fact that other State-supported 
schools have been established, it is, as it has distinct- 
ly been for twelve eventful decades — the University 
of North Carolina — the head of the State's public 
educational system. 

nan 

ITS FUNCTION As the State University it has 

AS THE STATE } )af ] aQ( \ con tinues to have a 

UNIVERSITY definite, distinct function. 

This, to quote from the report 
of the President of the University for 1914, "is to 
search for truth and to develop the passion for truth, 
to raise and invigorate intellectual standards, to dis- 



cover and apply principles of human conduct, and 
to quicken the sense of ideal values. Each of our 
states, and North Carolina among the first, has recog- 
nized that such an institution is an organic part of 
State life, not only that through it the State may 
make a due and worthy contribution to the discovery 
of new truth, but may provide a place within State 
borders where the 'best possible instruction may be 
given to its youth. The wisdom of this has been 
justified by the steady development, with the develop- 
ment of the states themselves, of these institutions 
into the finest and most promising achievement of 
American Democracy. 

"The production of good members of society by 
means of good instruction is the main concern of the 
University, and will always remain so; but as the 
State's institution of higher learning its points of 
contact with the material and spiritual development 
of the State at large are manifold and of fundamental 
importance. The University puts its knowledge and 
its spirit into the active service of all the State. 
Popular diffusion of the content and the point of 
view of learning need not affect in any sense the pu- 
rity and the power of that passion for truth that is 
the heart of its life. On the contrary, for an insti- 
tution of learning to be truly great, it must not only 
seek the truth in perfect and disinterested freedom, 
it must also interpret its truth, diffuse its spirit and 
carry its scholarly achievements out to men wher- 
ever they can be reached. The fine spirit and at- 

sphere that is the essence of all the good that a 

university has to give is not thereby lessened; it is 
liberated and humanized, and acquires a richer vi- 
tality and a robuster tone." 

□ □□ 
VARIETY AND in the public mind, it is possible 
SCOPE OF t | ia t (but little distinction is made 

WORK between the functions of different 

classes of institutions within a 
state. It is not The Review's intention to discuss 
such differences here, but to indicate the variety of 
the instruction which must be offered and the scope 
of the work which must be done by a state university 
in properly performing its function. Quite naturally 
such an institution is expected to offer thorough 



THE REGISTRATION FOR 1914-15 REACHED lOOO — JANUARY 15 



ss 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



courses leading to regular college degrees — the found- 
ation work for later specialization. In addition, it 
is expected to offer advanced, technical courses in 
special fields such as education, the sciences, history, 
literature, engineering, law, pharmacy, medicine, 
etc., and to build upon the general foundation laid 
in the undergraduate courses. A graduate school 
leading to the higher degrees is also an absolute re- 
quisite. Together with the additional faculty and 
specialized instruction required for such specializa- 
tion, go highly specialized laboratory equipment and 
extensive library facilities. Participation by the 
state university in the activities of learned societies 
and the publication of scholarly journals and books 
are taken for granted, and in the expression of the 
state's larger, intellectual life, the state university 
is expected to be the state's first and most dis- 
tinguished leader. 

Formerly, the state university went little afield. 
To-day, it is expected to extend its campus to the 
farthest borders of the state in varied forms of 
service. Institutions other than the state university 
may or may not participate in this service, hut not 
so with the state university. The matter is not 
optional. It is imperative. The university is the 
creature of all the people, and, to that extent, it is 
the servant of all the people. Consequently, exten- 
sion lectures, correspondence courses, summ •• ^°s- 
sions, night courses, publications issued in the in- 
terest of special groups, package libraries, economic, 
social, and civic surveys, and many other means em- 
ployed in serving the entire citizenship of a state, 
must be maintained. 

For a state to fail to have this point of view con- 
cerning its highest institution of learning; for it not 
to recognize that such an institution of necessity re- 
quires a larger support than institutions with less 
extensive and complex functions, is for the univer- 
sity and the state alike to suffer — the former through 
insufficient support; the latter through failure to re- 
ceive the full, complete service of a completely func- 
tioning institution. 

ODD 

A further consideration is, that 
A FURTHER f the University's income. In 

CONSIDERATION: its May issue for 1914 The Ke- 
INCOME view established the point beyond 

question that the funds for main- 
tenance of the University were totally inadequate if 
it was to continue to serve North Carolina with the 
highest efficiency and was to maintain its standing 
among the higher institutions of leaning in the coun- 



try. It wishes, here, to bring into evidence certain 
comparisons and figures which throw additional light 
upon the situation, and to urge auew the necessity 
of securing funds adequate to a proper functioning 
of the University. 

DDD 

OTHER According to Bulletin No. 60, for 

SOUTHERN i9i3 5 f t he United States Bureau 

UNIVERSITIES f Education, entitled "Statistics of 
State Universities and Other Insti- 
tutions of Higher Education Partially Supported by 
the State," the University of North Carolina stood 
9th on the basis of the total working income received 
in 1912-13 by 13 Southern state universities for all 
purpoes, building included. The amounts received 
follow : 

TOTAL WORKING INCOMES, 1912-13 

1. Missouri $1,106,535 

2. Texas 625,509 

3. Virginia 283,237 

4. Louisiana 275,743 

5. Georgia 246,770 

6. Tennessee 229,288 

7. Florida 227,745 

8. Oklahoma 225,088 

9. North Carolina 206,194 

10. Arkansas 1.69,274 

11. Alabama 160,796 

12. South ( larolina 139,3s_' 

13. Missippi 129,750 

In view of the fact that $50,000 of the above total 

received by the University of North Carolina was 
specifically appropriated for building, the net total 
for maintenance was only $156,194. On this basis, 
after similar deductions have been made in the case 
of the other institutions, its rank is 10th. 

DDD 

INCOME PER The. most significant single point, 

STUDENT IN however, that can be derived from 

ATTENDANCE a s t lu ly of these tables is that the 

University of North Carolina re- 
ceived less income per student for regular mainten- 
ance and instruction, buildings not included, than 
any of the other Southern universities. Its rank in 
this particular is 13th, being only $192, or $9 less 
than the next lowest and $10S less than the average 
for the other twelve. The amounts follow : 

INCOME PEE STUDENT IN ATTENDANCE 

1. Florida $5. r .O 

2. Missouri 380 

3. Georgia 353 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



89 



4. Louisiana 336 

5. Virginia 335 

6. Texas 268 

7. Oklahoma 254 

S. Mississippi 245 

9. Tennessee 239 

10. Alabama 23S 

11. South Carolina 222 

12. Arkansas 201 

13. North Carolina 192 

□ □□ 
Another fact brought out by the 
SUPPORT FROM Bulletin is that North Carolina 
TUITION an j South Carolina are the only 

AND FESS two Southern States which re- 

quire their resident students 
(with certain exceptions) to pay tuition — and there- 
by become partly self-sustaining rather than com- 
pletely State-supported. As a result of this, the Uni- 
versity of North Carolina collects more tuition and 
fees from its students — and, in that respect, is there- 
by more self-sustained — than any other Southern 
universities except Missouri, which has a total of 2,- 
544 students as against Carolina's 810 in the year 
under review, and Virginia, which, while having no 
tuition for residents of the state, charges all non- 
residents and all professional students, non-resident 
or otherwise, $95 tuition per year. Inasmuch as 38S 
of the 843 students enrolled in Virginia in 1912-13 
were of this group, it is easily seen how the total 
amount of income derived from this source is high. 

INCOME RECEIVED FROM TUITION AND FEES 

1. Virginia $73,313 

2. Missouri 54,275 

::. North Carolina 46,439 

4. Texas 40,797 

5. Alabama 39,408 

6. Tennessee 35,076 

7. Mississippi 26,000 

8. Georgia 18,619 

9. Oklahoma 14,338 

10. South Carolina 13,190 

11. Louisiana 13,166 

12. Arkansas 7,500 

13. Florida 3,826 

DDD 

ADDITIONAL So far attention has been drawn 

EVIDENCE ,, H ] V i s tate universities in the 

South. Additional evidence is 
furnished by referring to the total working incomes 
of state universities in the central and far West 
where the state university as an institution has been 



given more adequate support and is being used to the 
best advantage in promoting the welfare of the peo- 
ple to the highest degree. 

TOTAL WORKING INCOME OF OTHER STATE UNIVERSI- 
TIES 

Arizona $ 193,000 

California 3,105,249 

Colorado 285,875 

Illinois 1,983,103 

Iowa 860,257 

Kentucky 300,888 

Michigan 2,205,255 

Minnesota '2,238,607 

Nebraska 1,078,383 

North Dakota 270,349 

Washington 450,531 

Wisconsin 2,076,254 

DDD 

GROWTH Before passing to the briefest 

ENTAILS mention of the financial pinch 

EXPENSE which the University constantly 

feels and the inevitable result 
which must follow in loss of strength in faculty and 
in position among other universities, if the pinch 
continues, attention is also drawn to the fact of the 
University's rapid growth in recent years — numeri- 
cally, in courses offered, and in buildings. At the 
close of 1914, the total registration for the current 
session was 982 as against 875 for the preceding year. 
The enrollment in the Summer School for 1914 was 
596 as against 500 for 1913. That is, a total of 1,- 
578 students had to be taught in 1914 as against a 
total for the preceding year of 1,375. The instruc- 
tion of each additional student entails additional 
expense which tuition and fees do not, and cannot, 
adequately cover. 

Again, within the year additional courses have 
been offered to meet the demands of regular and 
Summer students. Thirty-three correspondence 
courses have been offered students away from the 
Hill, with the result that the expense incurred neces- 
sarily must exceed the fees received. 

A further fad is that the University plant com- 
prises some twenty-five buildings. Since 1900, four- 
teen have gone up, that is, one a year, with the in- 
evitable result that the cost of maintenance has also 
increased. Each additional building, if it is prop- 
erly utilized, calls immediately for three definite ex- 
penditures — janitor service, heat, and light, not to 
mention repairs, painting, etc., which accompany the 
continued use of any structure. 

Here again, the University is brought face to face 



90 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



with the question: will it take advantage of the en- 
larging opportunity for service; will it respond to 
the call of a State that is tugging at its bonds to 
break away into a larger life ; or will it let the hour 
of opportunity pass because, perchance, each addi- 
tional student, or course offered, or building put up, 
entails additional expense which it is in no wise pre- 
pared to meet. This is the daily question that haunts 
the administration of the University. The Review 
passes it along to the alumni, who, in turn, should 
pass it to the people of the State. 

nan 

WHAT THE From an investigation carried on 

PINCH by the United States Bureau of 

PORTENDS Education in 1912, it was found 

that four universities in the 
South were entitled to rank among the leading higher 
instituions of learning in America. These were the 
Universities of Virginia, North Carolina, Texas, and 
Vanderbilt University. From an investigation made 
in 1910 by Dr. J. McKeen Cattell, editor of Science, 
and compiler of "American Men of Science," it was 
found that out of the first 1,000 leading scientists of 
America, the South was entitled to 30. These were 
accredited to the Southern States as follows : Virginia 
10, North Carolina 7, Louisiana 4, Texas 4, Ala- 
bama 2, West Virginia 2. South Carolina, Georgia, 
Florida and Mississippi were without representation. 
Of the 10 in Virginia, 7 were connected with the 
faculty of the University of Virginia, and of the 7 
in North Carolina, 6 were located at Chapel Hill. 

Furthermore, the University, with Virginia, Van- 
derbilt and Texas, was one of the first four Southern 
institutions to be granted a chapter in Phi Beta 
Kappa, the scholarship society of America. 

Again, the University has been maintaining this 
record with an income of $76 per student less than 
Texas and $143 per student less than Virginia. As 
Vanderbilt is not state-supported, figures do not ap- 
pear in the government bulletin from which these 
quotations are made. The University, or rather the 
University faculty, has achieved this at a tremendous 
sacrifice of vital, and, in large part, unrequited 
energy. 

But while this is true, and every North Carolinian 
is proud of these achievements, it must be kept in 
mind that on account of the smallness of the return 
which the University is able to give to its faculty, 
not merely in dollars and cents, important as this is, 
but in laboratory and library equipment, and in op- 
portunity for future development and participation 
in the affairs of an institution whose scholarly 



achievement and influence are enlarging and expand- 
ing — it must be kept in mind that on account of these 
facts Virginia and Vanderbilt and Texas, in one, two, 
three order, by offering more of those things which 
appeal to the professional sense of university profes- 
sors, have been able to take a Smith and a Mims and 
a Royster respectively from us without our being able 
to draw from them in return. In that sort of fail- 
ure, in that sort of all give and no take, there is grave 
danger for the University in the days ahead. And 
this is a matter which concerns not only the alumni, 
but the whol i State as well. 



THE PRES- 
IDENT'S RE- 
PORT 



DDD 

The President's report for 1914 
is just from the press. It is 
crowded to the last page with 
matter about which every alum- 
nus should be informed. If a copy has reached you, 
read it. In the event a copy has not reached you, 
write for one. And then give it to your representa- 
tive or senator and back up the information contain- 
ed in it with your personal interest. 

In view of the fact that The Review was going 
to press when the report appeared, it is impossible 
in this issue to give an analysis of its contents. Three 
facts, however, are outstanding. As the State Univer- 
sity, the University is rendering North Carolina a 
splendid service ; it is athrill with the desire to in- 
crease this service; in its effort to enlarge its use- 
fulness to all the people of the State it is sorely in 
need of increased support. 

DDD 

ALUMNI An innovation growing in pop- 

MEETINGS ularity in recent years has been 

the holding of alumni meetings 
during the Christmas holidays. During the recent 
vacation such meetings were held in Goldsboro, Gas- 
tonia, Lillington, Kinston, Lenoir, Franklin, Hen- 
dersonville, and Clinton, and everywhere they were 
pronounced unusually successful. And there is a rea- 
son for their success. Possibly two or three. In 
the first place, folks are in holiday humor. Again 
there is not much to do during the days immediately 
following Christmas. Furthermore, the students are 
back at home fresh from the Campus and they give 
the meetings vitality. They carry "atmosphere," 
and save the occasion from running entirely into 
reminiscence. Two further features tried out success- 
fully this year were the presence of high school sen- 
iors at several of the meetings, and visiting alumni 
as special speakers. The Kinston association was ad- 
dressed by an alumnus not directly from Chapel Hill, 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



91 



but from another city — Mr. V. S. Bryant, of 
Durham. H. W. Bagley, of Raleigh, was one of 
the out-of-town alumni speakers at Lillington. 

Of the various things done by the associations, 
the one which meets most heartily with The Re- 
view's commendation is the action of the Goldsboro 
association. It established a scholarship, and even 
more to the point, it gave the administration to un- 



derstand that if there were any students in the as- 
sociation's territory who were unable to return after 
the holidays on account of lack of funds, that it would 
arrange a sufficient loan fund to meet the emergency. 
Such action on the part of other associations will 
mean the continued presence of a number of men at 
the Hill who otherwise might have to give up their 
work temporarily. 



MAKING THE CAMPUS STATE-WIDE 



Through the Bureau of Extension the University is Serving Every Section of North Carolina 

Xo longer do colleges and universities confine their made to the State is a matter of permanent record, 
work within their own walls. More and more do they The object of the division of public discussion and de- 
attempt to reach all the people of the communities bate of the Bureau is to stimulate discussion and de- 
to which they minister. The campus of the state claiming among North Carolina secondary schools, 
university has come to be co-extensive with the bord- thereby increasing the scope of the usefulness of the 
ers of the state whose people tax themselves for its Societies which hitherto has been confined to the local 
support. campus. To this end 1309 copies of the bulletin com- 

Wherever men and women labor in the heat, or piled for declaimers were supplied both elementary 

toil in the shadows, in field or forest, or mill or shop and secondary schools during the year and 150 schools 

or mine, in legislative halls or executive offices, in so- in 64 counties participated in the annual debate of 

ciety or in the home, at any task requiring an exact the High School Union. A 62-page handbook, issued 

knowledge of facts, principles or laws, there the mod- in a 2,250 edition, was furnished as the basis of this 

ern university sees both its duty and its opportunity, debate, and 164 members of winning local teams were 

—P. P. Claxton, U. S. Commissioner of Education, entertained free of cost by the student body and mem- 

In complete harmony with the underlying idea of bers of the faculty on April 2nd and 3rd during the 

the foregoing statement, the University of North Car- fin al contest for the Aycock Memorial Cup. The 

olina, through the Bureau of Extension, has recently query discussed was the Initiative and Referendum, 

made definite progress. This has been accomplished and the victorious team was the negative from the 

through seven special divisions of the Bureau and Winston-Salem High School which triumphed over 

along the following lines. the affirmative team from Graham. The total cor- 
respondence and mailine; of material involved in car- 

GENERAL INFORMATION ■ ^ ^ ^ -, i ■ 

rymg the debate to its conclusion was : 
In view of the fact that the University has a library 

containing 75,000 volumes and the members of its Letters 2 400 

faculty are specialists in many fields, the general in- Bulletins on the Initiative and Referendum 2^250 

formation division of the Bureau of Extension at- Invitations to the final contest 750 

tempts to see that inquiries which may be answered by Congressional documents and speeches 

means of loans from the library or by information se- loaned 2 200 

cured from its reference collection or from members 

of the faculty, are promptly and satisfactorily met. t l 

In its effort to render this service during the year 

the division loaned 542 books and pamphlets from the The handbook on Shi Subsidies for the debate of 

library, sent out 199 i copies of bulletins which had m5 hag been igsued and mm . e ^ 225 gchoo]g are 

been prepared to answer general and specific ques- now flt work on the 

tions, and mailed replies to 1714 letters of inquiry. _ , , . . , , , _ . 

a l * i- • -vt ii_ n v j m j j. r. In order to extend its service beyond the Union, the 

Sc-arr-elv a township m North Carolina failed to be ,. . . . , . T „ J . ' , 

___.i,-j • „ , „* + i division issued in January, 1914, 3,000 copies of a 

reached m some one of these ways. ■" '.' *L 

handbook entitled "Public Discussion and Debate, 

discussion and debate containing a model constitution and by-laws for liter- 

The contribution which the Dialectic and Philan- ary or discussion societies, brief debates on a dozen 

thropic Literary Societies of the University have live topics, and queries for fifty others which would 



92 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



prove of interest to North Carolina communities. 
Local problems were made the subject of discussion 
as far as possible, and sources of material for the dis- 
cussions were suggested. The resources of the Uni- 
versity library were also offered and special package 
libraries on many of the subjects were made up and 
loaned. 

CORRESPONDENCE COURSES 

Only one person out of every thousand in North 
Carolina attends college. Consequently one of the 
first measures which the Bureau of Extension sought 
to effect upon its organization, was that of offering 
correspondence courses to persons not able to pursue 
courses in residence at the University. It wished to 
offer the 999 the opportunity of university instruc- 
tion. In conformity with its request, a schedule of 
non-credit courses was arranged in 1913, and in Sep- 
tember, 1914, this was enlarged by the addition of 
other non-credit courses and credit-courses leading to 
the A. B. degree. At present 33 courses are offered, 
17 of which lead to a degree. 

LECTURES 

For years the University has furnished lecturers 
and speakers upon request for educational and other 
meetings. To systematize and extend this service, the 
lecture division arranged a series of 101 subjects in 
1913-1-4 embracing history, literature, travel, fine 
arts, useful arts, agriculture, engineering, sanitation, 
and country life, and furnished speakers for 1 32 com- 
munities or a total audience of more than 30,000. The 
demand for speakers during the spring was so great 
that 128 invitations had to be declined. 

To meet this demand more adequately in 1914-15, 
the division has secured additional speakers and has 
increased the number of subjects to 128. It has also 
outlined plans in its revised announcement by which 
it is possible for several communities to combine for 
a series of lectures, thereby reducing the expense per 
lecture and increasing the number of these series. 

COUNTY SURVEYS 

With the coming of Professor E. C. Branson to 
the University in September, 1914, the county clubs, 
previously organized for social purposes, perfected 
a definite organization in October, and under the 
name of the North Carolina Club, have begun to 
study at first hand North Carolina economic and 
social conditions. This division is compiling com- 
plete information concerning many facts relating to 
the life of the State as a whole and as to the coun- 
ties individually, and is furnishing this to citizens 
of the State who call for it. In this way, and through 
the University Neius Letter, it is serving as a clear- 



inghouse for informatiw- concerning things economic 
and social in North Carolina. The handbook which 
is used as a basis of these studies is entitled "A 
Syllabus of Home-County Studies" and was issued 
in an 8,500 edition late in October and distributed 
widely throughout the State. 

MUNICIPAL AND LEGISLATIVE REFERENCE 

The absence of a legislative reference bureau at 
the State capital or of a municipal reference bureau 
in any of the larger cities of the State, has left city 
and State law-makers in North Carolina without any 
special source to which they can turn for comparative 
legislative reference material. This the Bureau has 
attempted, in part, to supply. Drs. C. L. Raper and 
J. G. de Roulhac Hamilton have conducted the ac- 
tivities of this division and have placed the resources 
of the University library in these special fields at the 
command of city boards of aldermen and those in- 
terested in State legislation. 

EDUCATIONAL INFORMATION AND ASSISTANCE 

The most vital link binding the University to the 
State and conversely the State to the University, is 
the School of Education. To it North Carolina looks, 
and rightly, for leadership in every sort of educa- 
tional activity. In continuation of its effort to meet 
this expectation, the School organized during 1913-14 
a department of general educational information and 
responded to every call made upon it for help. This 
it did through visitation to schools, by correspon- 
dence, by correspondence courses, by instruction given 
in the Summer School and more recently by a se- 
ries of lectures and study outlines regularly appear- 
ing in the News Letter. Another feature of its 
service which has been of distinct benefit to communi- 
ties has been the maintenance of a teachers bureau 
by which school boards and committees have been 
enabled to secure competent teachers. 

RURAL LIFE WEEK 

In co-operation with the University Summer 
School, the Bureau aided in conducting the second 
University Conference on Country Life. This was 
held June 16-23, and was participated in by the 
entire Summer School, by the Commissioner of Agri- 
culture of North Carolina, the President of the 
Farmers' Union, and by a number of distinguished 
school and country-life workers of the State. The 
sessions of the conference were presided over by Dr. 
Lyberty H. Bailey, of Cornell, and Prof. E. C. 
Branson. The discussions were of such a practical 
and at the same time inspirational nature, that there 
was a unanimous demand that the conference be made 
a regular feature of the Summer School. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



93 



PUBLICATIONS 

One of the means which the Bureau has employed 
in carrying out its work has been the issuing and 
distributing of a special series of bulletins and the 
Xeus Letter. The bulletins issued to date number 
11 and are as follows. They, together with the weekly 
Ni ws Litter, are sent upon request to any one wish- 
ing them. 

1. A Professional Library for Teachers in Sec- 
ondary Schools. 

2. Addresses on Education for Use in Declaim- 
ing, Essay Writing, and Reading. 



3. Extension Lectures for North Carolina Com- 
munities. 

4. Correspondence Courses. 

5. The Initiative and Referendum. 

6. Public Discussion and Debate. 

7. University Extension. 

8. Co-operative Institutions Among the Farmers 
of Catawba County. 

9. Syllabus of Home-County Club Studies. 

10. Part I-Extension Lectures for North Carolina 
Communities; Part II-Correspondence Courses. 
1 1. Ship Subsidies. 



FROM MURPHEY TO JOYNER— 1799-1915 



For Twelve Eventful Decades the University has Given North Carolina Distinctive 

Educational Leadership 



From the year 1799, in which the University con- 
ferred the bachelor's degree upon Archibald DeBow 
Mm-phey as a member of its second graduating class, 
to the present, the University of North Carolina has 
given to the State men who have constantly stood 
at the front in the cause of general, State-wide edu- 
cation. Murphey, Yancey, and Wiley, alike, all stu- 
dents of the University, have been fittingly styled the 
"fathers"' of public education in North Carolina, be- 
cause they stood out pre-eminently in their generation 
as the distinctive leaders in this special field. To 
Wiley, in particular, the title is especially appro- 
priate, because under his leadership as the first super- 
intendent of public instruction of the State, the pres- 
ent system of public tax-supported schools was es- 
tablished and set effectively to work in North Car- 
olina. 

THE NEW TEACHEB-PATBIOTS 

Again, in 1875, after the State had lain prostrate 
for a decade succeding the surrender at Appomatox, 
Dr. K. P. Battle, another son of the University, 
made possible a new educational era by gathering 
together the remnants of the old University and 
breathing into the institution the breath of a new life. 
Under his direction, in 1877, the first Summer Nor- 
mal School ever connected with an American State 
University was opened at Chape] Hill. Filled with 
the spirit which characterized that session and the 
campus generally during the late seventies and early 
eighties, Alderman and Mclver and Joyner and 
Noble and Aycock, went out into the State to begin 
the preaching of the Gospel of Universal Education 
— the results of which are evidenced on every hand 
today in the normal schools, the high schools, the 



city schools, and the improved rural schools which 
have risen into power and influence in places where 
schools did not exist when these teacher-patriots be- 
gan their splendid labors. 

CONTINUING TO MAKE EDUCATIONAL HISTORY 

From the Directory of School Officials of North 
Carolina, issued in November, 1914, by the State 
Department of Education, the following evidence is 
takeu showing that the University in this good year 
1915, continues to build upon this splendid record. 
From the lists contained in this publication, informa- 
tion is limited to official positions. Consequently, 
the complete contribution which the University is 
making to the rank and file of educational endeavor, 
though of tremendous proportions, is suggested, rath- 
er than completely indicated. 

STRATEGIC POSITIONS FILLED 

Not including hundreds of teachers who have at- 
tended Summer School sessions since 1ST", the fol- 
lowing persons who have attended regular sessions 
of the University or Law School were in educational 
service in North Carolina at the time the publication 
mentioned came from press: 

State Board of Education : Locke Craig, President; 
J. Y. Joyner. Secretary; J. Bryan Crimes. T. W. 
Bicket. 

Department of Public Instruction: J. Y. Joyner, 
Superintendent; C. E. Mcintosh, Chief Clerk; E. 
E. Sams, Supervisor of Teacher Training: L. C. 
Brogden, Supervisor of Rural Elementary Schools; 
X. W. Walker, Inspector of Public High Schools. 

State Hoard of Examiners: J. Y. Joyner, Chair- 
man, ex-officio; C. E. Mcintosh, Secretary; X. W. 
Walker. W. A. Graham, Z. V. Judd. 



94 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



The North Carolina High School Bulletin: N. 
W. Walker, editor. 

North Carolina College Presidents : E. K. Graham, 
University of North Carolina; J. I. Foust, State 
Normal and Industrial College; K. H. Wright, East 
Carolina Teacher Training School ; B. B. Dougherty, 
Applachain Training School; H. E. Rondthaler, Sa- 
lem Female Academy and College; S. B. Turrentine, 
Greensboro College for Women. 

The North Carolina Teachers' Assembly: M. C. 
S. Noble, President; E. E. Sams, Secretary. 

MARSHALING THE COUNTY FORCES 

County Suprintendents : J. B. Eobertson, Ala- 
mance; J. M. Cheek, Alleghany; Frank A. Edmon- 
son, Avery; Y. D. Moore, Caldwell; S. M. Brinson, 
Craven; C. W. Massey, Durham; W. H. Pittman, 
Edgecombe; W. B. Speas, Forsyth; E. L. Best, 
Franklin; J. F. Webb, Granville; T. R. Foust, Guil- 
ford; J. A. McGoogan, Hoke; K. B. Nixon, Lincoln; 
W. A. Cochran, Montgomery ; P. J. Long, Northamp- 
ton ; S. P. Lockhart, Orange ; T. T. Murphy, Pender ; 
E. S. W. Cobb, Polk ; L. N. Hickerson, Eockingham ; 
E. M. Rollins, Vance; Z. V. Judd, Wake; B. B. 
Dougherty, Watauga. 

DIRECTING THE CITY SYSTEMS 

Superintendents of Graded Schools: C. E. 
Teague, Asheboro; Harry Howell, Asheville; Eu- 
gene Harris, Beaufort; C. B. Garrett, Belhaven; E. 
C. Byerly, Bessemer City; H. O. Carver, Bethel; 
A. H. King, Burlington; Harry P. Harding, Char- 
lotte; L. R. Hoffman, Canton; F. W. Morrison, 
Chapel Hill; C. A. Credle, Carthage; J. T. Cobb, 
Enfield; H. H. McLean, Farmville; W. S. Snipes, 
Fayetteville ; Joe S. Wray, Gastonia ; J. T. Hatcher, 
Granite Falls; L. R. Crawford, Hertford; C. C. 
Sharpe, Kernersville ; G. O. Rogers, Lenoir; M. S. 
Beam, Lincolnton; H. H. McKeown, Mocksville; 
I. T. Turlington, Mount Airy; G. B. Strickland, 
Murphy ; E. C. Willis, North Wilkesboro ; Frank M. 
Harper, Raleigh; R. C. Cox, Randleman; T. W. 
Andrews, Reidsville; W. H. Mizelle, Robersonville ; 
R. M. Wilson, Rocky Mount; L. J. Bell, Rocking- 
ham ; W. H. Jones, Rowland ; A. T. Allen, Salisbury ; 
R. W. Allen, Sanford; Z. H. Rose, Scotland Neck; 
C. O. Small, Siler City; Fred Archer, Selma; A. 
Vermont, Smithfield; S. G. Lindsay, Troy; J. H. 
Mclver, Wadesboro ; J. W. Mcintosh, Wilkesboro. 

DEVELOPING CENTERS OF POWER IN RURAL NORTH 
CAROLINA 

Public High School Principals: Meade Hart, 
Friendship; J. F. Love, Hawfields; R. W. Holmes, 
Turkey Knob; T. I. Jones, Helton; W. H. Britt, 



Newland; F. E. Howard, Abbottsburg; E. E. Con- 
nor, Hominy Valley; J. T. Hatcher, Granite Falls; 
T. E. Story, Oak Hill ; C. L. Cates, South Mills ; A. 
L. Hamilton, Atlantic; J. C. Kelly, Milton; C. O. 
Small, Siler City; G. B. Strickland, Murphy; Ivey 
Willis, Waco; R. W. Isley, Poplar Branch; E. W. 
Joyner, Manteo; P. E. Shaw, Teacheys; W. W. 
Rogers, Bahama; L. L. Hargrave, Battleboro; D. H. 
Carlton, Macclesfield ; J. A. Walker, Bethania ; C. C. 
Sharpe, Kernersville; A. A. Long, Lewisville; J. G. 
Lee, Bunn; J. R. Nixon, Cherryville; H. A. Car- 
roll, Gatesville; R. H. Claytor, Stem; S. T. Liles, 
Monticello; F. L. Foust, Pleasant Garden; J. T. 
Cobb, Enfield; J. E. Redfern, Angier; L. C. Wil- 
liams, Ahoskie; S. G. Parker, Sladesville ; W. T. 
Byrd, Harmony; C. W. E. Pittman, Kenly; W. H. 
Mizelle, Robersonville; B. L. Baker, Huntersville ; 
J. A. Holmes, Matthews; J. M. Shields, Biscoe; 
S. G. Lindsay, Troy; C. G. Credle, Carthage; W. D. 
Barbee, Seaboard; I. M. Bailey, Jacksonville; F. W. 
Morrison, Chapel Hill ; H. 0. Carver, Bethel ; H. H. 
McLean, Farmville; E. S. W. Cobb, Columbus; W. 
H. Jones, Rowland; Eugene Trivette, Stoneville; L. 
A. Price, Mt. Ulla; J. G. Feezor, Woodleaf ; H. C. 
Miller, Garland; William Graves, King; R. A. Sul- 
livan, Pinnacle ; W. P. Moore, Dobson ; G. L. Tabor, 
Rosman; H. C. Craver, Unionville ; J. E. Bagwell, 
Bona Vista ; J. E. Holmes, Townesville ; J. H. 
Workman, Bay Leaf; J. E. Pearson, Holly Springs; 
James Eldridge, Roper; D. G. Kelley, Falling 
Creek; J. H. Allen, Pikeville; E. C. Harris, Seven 
Springs; J. W. Mcintosh, Wilkesboro; C. O. Arm- 
strong, Rock Ridge; Jerry Day, Boonville. 



THREE STATE UNIVERSITY PRESIDENTS 

The University of North Carolina has the dis- 
tinction of furnishing the heads of three of the lead- 
ing State Universities of the South: Dr. E. A. Al- 
derman, of Virginia; Dr. E. K. Graham, of North 
Carolina ; and Dr. William J. Battle, of Texas. 



PACKAGE LIBRARY SERVICE 

By reason of the fact that the University has the 
largest library in the State — 75,000 volumes — it has 
been able in recent years to make inter-library loans 
to other institutions for use in special investigations. 
Of the 512 volumes loaned for outside use in 
1913-14, a number were sent to members of the 
following institutions : 

Trinity, Wake Forest, Davidson, Elon, the State 
Normal, East Carolina Teacher Training School, 
Salem, St. Mary's, Lenoir, Meredith, and the South- 
ern Presbyterian College. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 
SOIL EXPERTS FOR NORTH CAROLINA 



'.I.", 



Since 1895 the University has Sent 60 Trained Experts into Scientific Soil Investigation 



Whatever touches the farming interests of our 
State is vital to all Xorth Carolinians, since three- 
fourths of us are farmers. Most of our people know 
that the Federal government is doing much for the 
farmer's business. Now most of us could guess that 
all this work the government is doing is based upon 
the scientific study of soils, which today is mainly a 
geological problem, and lies at the foundation of all 
progressive agriculture. How many are aware that 
a large part of this fundamental work has, from the 
start, been dune and is now being done and directed 
by men who received their training at the University 
of Xorth Carolina ? 

WHO THEY AXE 

Dr. George 1ST. Coffey, A. B., '00, who is now in 
charge of the Soil Survey of Ohio, entered the U. S. 
Bureau of Soils on the lowest rung of the ladder, a 
few months after graduating here, and worked up 
through every grade until he was in charge of the 
Soil Survey of the United States. While in Wash- 
ington Mr. Coffey made the A.M. and Ph.D. de- 
grees at George Washington University on work done 
there and at Johns Hopkins. When Coffey left the 
Soil Survey he was credited with knowing more about 
the soils of the United States than any other man. 
He had worked his way up in college, was assistant 
in geology during his senior year, and graduated 
"ahead of his course." 

W. E. Hearn and T. D. Bice, assistant in geology, 
of the same class, entered the U. S. Soil Survey by 
examination after doing graduate work in the Uni- 
versity, and both are now inspectors of the work in 
large areas of the United States. A. S. Boot, '01, 
J. L. Burg-ss, '<>;.', and Frank Bennett, '02, also en- 
tered this year. Root rendered valuable service in 
Florida and in Xorth Carolina, and left the Survey 
to study medicine. Bennett served well in all parts 
of the country and left the work to take charge of the 
old home place in Anson on the death of his father. 
E. P. Carr. '96, and A. W. Mangum, '97, took up 
special work in the Geology of Soils, and entered the 
Survey by examination in '02. Both did high grade 
work in Washington and Oregon. Carr became 
a manufacturer of cotton, Mangum continuing with 
i lie Smvev and working well over the United States. 
Pie is now on a year's leave of absence establishing a 
camphor plantation in Florida for the American Cel- 
luloid Company. 



II. II. Bennett, '03, has worked all over the United 
States, has made a Soil Map of the Canal Zone, and 
has spent some months investigating the agricultural 
possibilities of Alaska. He also is an inspector, having 
in charge a large section of the United States. Thus 
three out of five inspectors for the whole country are 
Carolina men. 

LOCATED IX XORTH CAROLINA 

Burgess is the only man who ever won his position 
before graduation. He returned seven years later, 
completed his examinations, and took his degree. His 
work was of such high grade that various states bor- 
rowed him from the government, and when Xorth 
Carolina borrowed him she kept him as State Agrono- 
mist. He has had as assistants G. M. Garren, E. G. 
Moss, and Elden Bayley, all Carolina men. 

11. B. Hardison, B. A. Winston, J. J. Skinner, B. 
T. Allen, J. W. Turrentine, are all with the Bureau 
of Soils. Hardison, Winston and Allen are in the 
field. Skinner is investigating soil fertility in the 
laboratory, and Turrentine is carrying on a field and 
laboratory investigation of kelp as a source of potash, 
his fieldwork being done along our entire Pacific 
Coast, reaching well into Alaska. 

Dr. E. O. E. Davis, '01, who entered the Bureau 
of Soils for chemical work, is now leading and di- 
recting the investigations formerly in charge of the 
late W. J. McGee, the foremost geographer in the 
government service. 

W. II. Fry, '10, assistant and instructor in geology 
during his course here, is mineralogist and jjetrog- 
rapher to the Bureau of Soils, and joint author of 
the best book on the microscopic study of rocks and 
the mineral analysis of soils that has appeared in 
this country. Fry has published a number of papers 
involving valuable research work. 

Wm. B. Cobb, '12, has done work worth while in 
Pennsylvania, Florida, and Virginia, and is now in- 
vestigating soil fertility and crop adaptation in the 
Mississippi delta lands, working from Pine Bluff, 
Arkansas. 

PROFIT TO THE STATE 

But how docs this work touch Xorth Carolina? 
The United Slates government has made and is now 
engaged in making carefully constructed large scale 
maps of counties in various parts of the State show- 
ing distribution and character of soils, and the kinds 
priculture suited to each soil type. These maps 



96 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



and reports are of great service to the farmer and to 
the prospective settler. They are made by experts 
from the Federal government assisted by men from 
our North Carolina Department of Agriculture. Nine 
times in ten the government expert has been a Caro- 
lina man, and generally the assistant on the part of 
the State has received his training here. Messrs. 
Drane, MacNider and Brinkley have all done this 
kind of work for the State. The latest addition to 
this force is R. C. Jurney, '13, assistant in geology 
during his senior year. 

Alamance County, the region around Asheville, 
Bladen, Cabarrus, Caswell, Chowan, Craven, Duplin, 
Edgecome, Forsyth, Gaston, Granville, Henderson 
Counties, Hickory, Lake Mattamuskeet and Mount 
Mitchell Areas, Mecklenburg, New Hanover, Pitt, 
Pender, Perquimans and Pasqutank Counties, a wide 
strip from Raleigh to Newbern, Richmond, Robeson, 
and Scotland Counties, the Statesville Area, Transyl- 
vania, Pender, and Johnston Counties have been 



mapped. These have all been published and may be 
obtained from your Congressman. Others are now 
in the making and will be published as soon as com- 
pleted. This work is directed on the part of the 
United States by Mr. W. E. Hearn, '00. 

The Bureau of Soils of the U. S. Department of 
Agriculture has sent lecturers to the University from 
time to time. Among these have been Coffey, 1900, 
Hearn, 1900, Mangum, 1897, and Cobb, 1912, all 
of whom have lectured here. 

Among University of North Carolina men teaching 
geology are White, '94, at Harvard, Pogue, '0G, at 
Northwestern, and Randolph, '09, at the College of 
Charleston. These men were all assistants in geology 
in their senior years. 

In mining are Whitaker, '94, Aston, (Oaudell, 
Foust, Little, Oliver, Roberts, Phillips, and others. 
In the U. S. Geological Survey and in the Bureau of 
Mines several valuable papers have been prepared by 
University men. — Collier Cobb. 



Y. M. C. A. ACTIVITIES 



The Student Y. M. C. A. Makes Itself a Vital Force in the Religious and Social 

Life of the Community 



It is not a far call from Chapel Hill to the heights 
of Blue Ridge. It was there in June that the Caro- 
lina delegation in conference with the college men of 
the South made definite the program of activities for 
the present college year. The natural wonder of the 
Appalachian vistas and the spiritual reality of world- 
visioned men were not altogether lost in the Associa- 
tion prospectus. 

SUMMER AND THE OPENING 

Soon after the conference closed C. E. Ervin, W. 
P. Fuller, and the committee on new students be- 
gan writing personal letters of welcome to the pros- 
pective freshmen and followed up these letters with 
handshakes as the new men waited in the course of 
changing cars at University Station for Chapel Hill. 
Lee Edwards, Jacob Skrago, Roger McDuffie, and 
the information bureau handled suit cases, located 
trunks, pointed out rooms, supplied temporary beds, 
and guided many expectant lads through the patient 
process of registration. 

On college night student leaders in debate, jour- 
nalism, athletics, dramatics, student government, and 
campus religion, presented a six-slided view of college 
activities. Following this meeting the faculty and 
student body co-operated with Chairman Woollcott 
in giving a reception in the Library to the entire 



freshman class. The next day classes began and the 
work of the year was on. 

SELF-HELP 

Lee Edwards, of the self-help department, made 
a thorough canvas of the town gathering up the 
odds and ends of permanent and occasional jobs. Ed 
Warrick continuously secured positions through the 
fall. 

MEMBERSHIP 

While Tom Linn was helping an American Con- 
sul in Italy through the war pressure, Lee Edwards 
took his place in the membership campaign and ran 
the membership up to approximately 400 members, 
1G2 of whom were paid members on December 22nd. 

BIBLE STUDY 

Bible study was organized the previous spring. 
The leaders met several times for a study and dis- 
cussion of Home's book, "The Leadership of Bible 
Study Groups." Chairman Tom Boushall kept in 
touch with the leaders through the summer, and when 
college opened, organized them into three normal 
classes led chiefly by Rev. W. D. Moss and Rev. 
Walter Patten. Dean Cranford of Trinity made a 
strong address at the Bible Study Rally, the first 
gun in the campaign which enrolled 390 men, These 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



97 



men were apportioned among the twenty-six groups 
which meet every Sunday at 12 :30 in all of the dor- 
mitories and four of the fraternity halls. Frank 
Shamburger, secretary of the Bible study department, 
has kept a record of the attendance reports which 
have been made by the group secretaries at the T. 
M. C. A. office. The average attendance has been over 
150 men. These Bible study groups are not only de- 
votional in nature but also seek to relate the ideals 
of Christ to such things as the honor system, ath- 
letics and the everyday life of the college. 

IN THE COUNTY 

The rural work has to do with Sunday schools, a 
corn club, community social, singing, and welfare 
gatherings. Two of the schools have become self- 
supporting; on occasions they are visited by students 
and addressed by members of the faculty. Five 
others are manned by J. M. Parker, Francis Brad- 
shaw. B. B. House, Harry Brockman, F. Cooper 
E. T. Campbell, C. F. Crissman, B. M. Lackey, B. 
B. McDade, N. A. Reasoner, L. J. Pace, and E. E. 
Duncan. Rankin's Chapel gave a Community 
Christmas tree to the children of the neighborhood. 
Ephesus gave a general tree to the country side. The 
student teachers at Clark's Chapel started a move- 
ment to have the different communities raise funds 
for organs. Two organs have already been secured. 
Last spring a union picnic was held at which Prof. 
Noble and Mr. Brown of the State agricultural de- 
partment delivered addresses relative to country life 
problems. Plans are formed for another union pic- 
nic featured by fried chicken, games, addresses, and 
a general welfare conference. Mr. W. D. Moss is 
an inspirational force in this work. Every Saturday 
afternoon he meets with the teachers and discusses 
with them the International Lesson. 

WORK WITH TIIK REGEOES 

The work among the negroes is concerned with 
Sunday schools, a night school, faculty lectures, and 
social study. W. C. Rymer has succeeded H. S. Wil- 
lis, '14, as "the student apostle to the colored people." 
The Sunday school teachers are Hubert Smith and 
Cecil Rymer. The night school teachers are A. M. 
Lindau, Parker, Hunter. C. A. Boseman, J. W. 
. R. H. Welch, S. F. Telfair, and Harry Renn. 
Rymer was Santa Clans on Christmas Eve to eighteen 
night school boys. 

BOY CLUBS 

Harry Renn has reorganized the boys of Chapel 
Hill into a Boy's Scout Club and Marion Fowler 
has started a boys club among the boys of Carrboro. 
The mill boys lost the football game to the scouts but 



have challenged them to a debate. Queries have been 
submitted. Francis Bradshaw has merged his corn 
club organization into the more recent and more ef- 
fective county organization of corn clubs. Through 
the Sunday schools he continues to co-operate in this 
work. 

FINANCES 

On December 22nd receipts for the fall were $1,- 
(171 and disbursements amounted $1,00S. All ex- 
penditures and receipts are entered and classified by 
columns in a record book. Not one cent is paid out 
except by check. Every bill is "O. K.ed" by the 
secretary or a committee chairman and every check 
is signed by the student treasurer and countersigned 
by the faculty advisory treasurer, Mr. J. A. Warren, 
bursar of the University. Returned checks are filed 
with the bills by numbers which correspond on the 
stub, the check, and the filing envelope. The record 
book and the files are a permanent record which wel- 
comes inspection. 

FRESHMAN ADVISORY SYSTEM 

One of the most promising new features of asso- 
ciation activity is the freshman advisory system, 
which supplements the work of the faculty advisors. 
This work which is yet in the experimental stage is 
headed by W. P. Fuller, president of the associa- 
tion. He has developed the idea into a carefully 
conceived plan of large possibilities. Thirty of the 
leading men in college are holding up his hands in 
this interesting movement and practically all of them 
have an active sense of responsibility in making the 
life here mean something more to every new man. 

RELIGIOUS MEETINGS 

The religious meetings under the aggressive di- 
rection of Francis Clarkson and Claude Boseman are 
testing out the venture of concentrating on the Tues- 
day night meeting and alternating weekly talks be- 
tween the students and faculty speakers. The plan is 
proving worth while. The attendance runs up and 
down, ranging from groups of twenty-five to packed 
houses. The out-of-state speakers have had crowds 
numbering from 300 to 600. Dr. W. D. Weatherford. 
International Secretary. Mr. C. G. Hounshell, of the 
Student Volunteer Movement, Mr. A. C. Harte, Na- 
tional Secretary of the Student Movement of India, 
and Dr. W. S. Hall, of North Western University, 
have brought forthright messages on the battles for 
character, the conditions in Asia, and the sex life of 
man. Chairman Clarkson has a schedule of meetings 
arranged for the spring term. This schedule includes 
a five weeks' study of "Present Forces in Negro 
Progress" under the expert leadership of Prof. E. C. 
Branson. 



98 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



THE UNIVERSITY IN INDUSTRIAL CHEMISTRY 



In 1907 in the June or special "Southern" num- 
ber of the World's Work, appeared the statement that 
a saving of $13,000,000 annually had been effected 
in the turpentine industry of the South by the per- 
fection of the Herty cup and method of resin collect- 
ing. 

Further evidence of the part played in Southern 
industrial development by scientific laboratories, and 
especially by the laboratory of the department of 
chemistry of the University, is afforded in the fol- 
lowing extracts taken from an open letter by Dr. C. 
H. Herty, Smith Professor of Chemistry in the Uni- 
versity, to President Fairfax Harrison, of the South- 
ern Railway. The letter appeared in the State press 
of January third, and answers, in part, the question 
whether Southern Universities, through their de- 
partments of chemistry, are actively aiding or at- 
tempting to aid in the industrial development of the 
Si hi lb as similar departments in the German univer- 
sities have done in Europe. 

"Your broader question as to general co-operation 
between the) laboratories find industries, finds, I 
think, a sympathetic answer here in this department, 
though there are still many defects in that co-opera- 
tion which should exist if both parties to the co-oper- 
ation are to profit to the greatest extent. 

"The bulk of our work has been devoted naturally 
to the training of undergraduates. The men who 
have emphasized chemistry in their undergraduate 
work have gone into industries where they have prov- 
ed their value in aiding in the chemical control of 
many of our Southern industries. This is notably 
the case in the iron and steel districts lying around 
Birmingham, Alabama. The chief chemist at Ens- 
ley and many of the chemists in his laboratory, the 
superintendent of the Somet-Solvay by-products 
plant at Ensley, the superintendents of the Alys fur- 
nace at Birmingham and the Republic furnace at 
Thomas, Alabama, and many of the chemists in their 
laboratories are all graduates of the chemical depart- 
ment of this University. 

"A few of our graduates have been able to remain 
here and carry on research work. One of these is 
now the head research chemist for the American To- 
bacco company; another is engaged in research on 
wood turpentine at Macon, Ga., still another is now 
associate professor of chemistry at the North Caro- 
lina Agricultural and Mechanical college. Such il- 
lustrations could be multiplied ; but the point which 
concerns you is the character of the research they 
were engaged in while they were being trained here. 
This has been twofold in its character. 

"In part it has been in pure science, though it is 



difficult to make any real distinction between pure 
and applied science, for what seems to be of only theo- 
retical interest at one time often becomes the most 
vital, practical matter later. Such research and its 
publication in pure science are duties every univer- 
sity owes to the increase and diffusion of knowledge. 

"Side by side with these researches in pure science, 
there have been completed and still are being carried 
on here numerous lines of investigation having a 
direct bearing on the industries, the material for 
many of these researches being furnished by interest- 
ed corporations. 

"Drs. Venable and Bell are engaged in rare earth 
work, on material furnished by the Welsbach com- 
pany. North Carolina is richer in such rare earths 
than any other Southern State. 

"Dr. Wheeler has been working on anthranalic 
acid, one of the intermediate products in the artifi- 
cial preparation of indigo. 

"In my own work in co-operation with two of our 
students, a simple and rapid but accurate method 
has been worked out for use by our cottonseed oil 
mills enabling any of these at a very slight cost to 
maintain complete chemical control of their opera- 
tions. Many of the mills sent representatives to this 
laboratory a few summers ago for full instruction in 
the method, which the University offered to every 
mill in the South. 

"We are trying to determine the character of the 
changes involved in the cooking of foesil resins in 
varnish making. This great industry is based upon 
this procedure. At present it is carried out on a 
purely empirical basis. Real progress in this indus- 
try must be based upon a more scientific basis than 
now exists. This work is being carried on in co- 
operation with a large varnish firm of New York 
City, which supplies us with the raw material and 
the product cooked by its experienced men in the 
factory. 

"A number of researches have been completed or 
are in progress in the field of clear resins. In this 
work we have been aided in two ways : 

"First, in having authentic, fresh specimens fur- 
nished us direct from the woods by the turpentine 
operators. 

"Second, by a scholarship supported during the 
past five years by a large soap company. This schol- 
arship has paid practically all the living expenses of 
one of our senior students each year, he in turn de- 
voting his research to this field so important to soap 
makers. 

"Such types of research as above mentioned con- 
stitute only a beginning of the co-operation which T 
hope will exist between this laboratory and our 
Southern industries." 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



99 



THE UNIVERSITY'S REACH 



Any attempt to tabulate the extent of the Univer- 
sity's service to the State must of necessity end in 
failure, because its influeuce is not a tangible thing 
which can be reduced to figures or represented by 
statistical maps. However, The Review gives here- 
with a statistical table to accompany the statistical 
map appearing on the center pages of this issue in 
order that the information presented there pictorial- 
ly may be made more accessible for easy reference. 
This table shows only four of the many ways in 
which the University touches the life of the State. 

It shows (1) the number of students in atten- 
dance from each county during the fall term, 1914, 
of the University; (2) during the recent ses- 
sion of the Summer School; (3) the number of 
schools per county enrolled in the Debating Union ; 
and (4) the number of lectures delivered per county 
by members of the faculty during the twelve months 
preceding December 15. 



Alamance . . 
Alexander 
Aleghany, . . 

Anson 

Ashe 

Avery 

Beaufort, . . . 

Bertie 

Bladen 

Brunswick . . 
Buncombe . . 

Burke 

Cabarrus . . . 
Caldwell .... 
Camden 
Carteret . . . 
Caswell 
Catawba . . . 
Chatham . . . 
Cherokee . . . 
Chowan 

Clay 

Cleveland . . 
Columbus . . 
Craven 
Cumberland 
Currituck . . 

Dare 

Davidson . . 

Davie 

Duplin 
Durham . . . 
Edgecombe . 
Forsyth 
Franklin . . . 

Gaston 

Gates 

Graham . . . . 



Regular 
Students 


Summer 
Students 


Debate 
Centers 


Lectures 
Delivered 


22 


15 


6 


2 


6 




2 


I 


4 




2 


I 


6 


5 


1 




3 


1 








1 


1 


3 


i" 


5 


4 


3 


7 


7 




1 




3 


5 


2 


i 




1 




38 


12 


6 


1 


12 


3 


1 




3 


3 


3 




12 


■ 2 


3 


1 




5 


1 




2 


3 






2 


3 






11 


7 


2 




8 


7 


3 


2 


1 


1 


2 




4 


2 


1 
1 


1 


15 


3 


5 


2 


3 


9 


2 


1 


9 


7 


2 


1 


10 


8 


1 






2 


1 


3 


1 


1 


2 




15 


6 


2 




3 


1 


1 




16 


7 


1 


2 


24 


19 


3 


3 


10 


18 


2 




3i 


9 


2 


2 


8 


10 


4 


4 


20 


15 


8 




2 


4 


3 


1 






1 


1 



Granville 18 

Greene 1 

Guilford 35 

Halifax 12 

Harnett 5 

Haywood 7 

Henderson II 

Hertford 3 

Hoke 3 

Hyde 3 

Iredell 11 

Jackson 5 

Johnston 22 

Jones 3 

Lee 7 

Lenoir 12 

Lincoln 4 

Macon 7 

Madison 5 

Martin 3 

McDowell 5 

Mecklenburg 44 

Mitchell 

Montgomery 5 

Moore 3 

Nash 9 

New Hanover 13 

Northampton 5 

Onslow 4 

Orange 47 

Pamlico 6 

Pasquotank 5 

Pender 6 

Perquimans 4 

Person 4 

Pitt 9 

Polk 

Randolph 9 

Richmond 4 

Roberson 10 

Rockingham 9 

Rowan 21 

Rutherford 4 

Sampson 12 

Scotland 5 

Stanly 6 

Stokes 1 

Surry 16 

Swain 

Transylvania 

Tyrrell 2 

Union 15 

Vance 6 

Wake 49 

Warren 4 

Washington 2 

Watauga 3 

Wayne 27 

Wilkes 10 

Wilson 16 

Yadkin 8 

Yancey 3 



19 


4 


4 


7 


2 




13 


5 


7 


13 


3 


1 


3 


2 




4 


3 






4 


1 




2 


1 


4 




1 


2 


1 




7 


5 
3 


2 


16 


S 


4 


4 






3 


2 




7 


1 


I 


7 


1 


1 


2 


3 


1 


1 






5 


1 




11 


2 


1 


16 


7 


2 


5 


2 


1 




3 


2 


5 


5 


I 


9 


1 


3 


16 


2 




1 


1 




40 


2 


12 


3 




1 


1 


1 




4 


1 


1 


3 


1 


1 


7 


2 


2 


9 


2 


5 


1 


1 




4 


3 




3 


2 




23 


S 


4 


2 


3 


1 


8 


3 


1 


4 


1 


2 


10 


2 


6 


5 


5 




3 


1 
2 




4 


4 


1 


1 


2 




1 


2 


3 


1 




1 


5 


2 




4 


2 


1 


26 


S 


10 


6 


3 




2 






3 






14 


7 


3 


1 


2 




2 


2 


2 


1 


1 


I 


2 


1 





100 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



THE STATE-WIDE CAMPUS OF THE UNIVEB 

MAXIMUM SERVICE TO T 



A. The College of Liberal Arts. 



B. The School of Applied Science. C. The Graduate Schc 
G. The School of Education. H. The Su 



fo3 ai 

ASHE 



■ ALLEGHANY { D , 6 



■*E3 ■3' , v<' 

WATAUGA 1 
f 



|OI j £ 

: STOKES ! B 
I 



a io at 

WILKES 

oe 



t 



fas a 

MADISON "•> 
V—'d38 "13 J D 5 ■ 11 \0 1 



SURRY 

1 0«* «| • 02 

|>v»-*-4 ^ 

i yadkVn Josibs. j 

OJ *1 ) FORSYTH? 

! 

i5 r— 

012 BS^.^ > V IREDELL ;•. r-- J ■ © I 

D BURKE V« ^\ ° 5 ' S - s i D *vlDSON' 

/ CATAWOA ^ i^ROWAN ^ 



-• ;P1 y \ d12b3V^ > — v iredell r\ r-- 3 ■© 



I »1 



©2 



/oj 



D~ Students per County During Regular Term. 

Total Attendance,98£; /Attendance from North Carolina (90 Counties) 9 
■ — Students per County During Summer Term. 

Total Attendance, 595; Attendance from North Carolina (<39Gountie§) 5 
O — High School Debating Union Centers. 

Total Debating Center 5,2S 7; Students Enrolled in 89 Counties, 
• — Extension Lecture Centers. 

Total Lectures Delivered in 5 8 Counties, 132: 



WRITE TO THE UNIVERSF 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



101 



ITY OF NORTH CAROLINA, DECEMBER 1914 



E PEOPLE OF THE STATE 



D. The School of Law. E. The School of Medicine, 
ner School. I. The Bureau of Extension. 



F. The School of Pharmacy. 



■ 2 

4GHAM 



, VILLEJ^V! / 

C !D47»D^04 j^/ j 



caswell) pei 

J02«2 



m7 !DI8 

PERSON 1*19 
J GRAN 



JD6 I 



6 p>x NORTHAMPTON J I ( D GATES 
iJTo I WARREN i \OS "16 * 

!2? \o3 •' nis x-p; 



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bak 



J^W^'L* 



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WHEN YOU NEED HELP 



102 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 
HOME COUNTY STUDIES 



The Department of Rural Economics and Sociology Acquaints University Students 

With Home County Conditions 



Last September, Mr. E. C. Branson began his 
work in Rural Economics and Sociology in the Uni- 
versity of North Carolina. To say it in the simplest 
way, his department is devoted to studies of country 
wealth and welfare. 

In particular, it concerns North Carolina first and 
most of all — the economic and social problems of the 
State ; the forces and agencies, tendencies, drifts and 
movements that are helping or hurting the develop- 
ment of our commonwealth. 

The students in these courses are learning to take 
the round-about and the forward look ; and to be con- 
cerned about the North Carolina that is and is to be. 
There are five phases of the work. 

1. The formal courses in Rural Economics and 
Sociology, each three hours a week, furnish a back- 
ground of interpretation for the conditions, causes 
and consequences discovered in studying the home- 
counties and the mother-state. 

2. The laboratory problems keep the office head- 
quarters thronged with students, off and on, all day 
every day: such problems as the per capita produc- 
tion of food and feed in North Carolina counties; 
home-raised food and feed deficits in Pitt, Nash, 
Edgecombe, Orange, Wayne, Wake, Davidson and 
Buncombe; the food-producing and the wealth-re- 
taining power of North Carolina counties; the three 
typical farm systems of the State; bringing our un- 
cultivated areas into productive uses ; home-owner- 
ship and tenancy in North Carolina; farm land as- 
sessments in North Carolina; race segregation; 
church and Sunday school surveys in Durham and 
Orange counties ; and so on and on. Here are real 
problems, less exciting but more important than 
politics. 

3. The various county clubs and the North Caro- 
lina club are exploring the economic and social prob- 
lems of the home-counties and the mother-state, fol- 
lowing the study-outlines given in the new Home- 
County Club Study Bulletin ; a bulletin by the way, 
that has been called for in nearly every State in the 
Union. 

4. Extra campus clubs of similar sort are organ- 
izing here and there in the State ; and sooner or later 
will be at work in every county. Mr. Branson is 
called for in every direction, by the teachers, min- 
isters, business men and boards of trade. He has 



made fifteen addresses at various points in the State 
since September first. 

In the end, the county clubs will be issuing twenty- 
five page bulletins, giving to the farmers and business 
people, teachers and preachers, a simple running nar- 
rative of their studies and discoveries. Already the 
county clubs are getting into the home papers with 
the surprises they run against in their studies. 

5. The University News Letter has every week a 
column or two of items about things that develop in 
the laboratory work of the students. "Carolina Club 
Notes" are chips from an academic workshop. Here 
is accumulated, concentrated information about the 
State that cannot be duplicated elsewhere. Or so 
correspondents are saying as they call for full files of 
the paper. 

Mr. Branson spent five weeks in Wisconsin last 
summer. He is called to Wyoming next summer to 
exploit this Know-Your-Home-State Idea at our Uni- 
versity. Instead, he will be at work in the University 
Summer School at Chapel Hill the full session with 
the teachers of the State. 



DR. HERTY PRESIDENT OF THE AMERICAN CHEM- 
ICAL SOCIETY 

An honor of the very highest sort was conferred 
daring the holidays upon Dr. Charles H. Herty, 
Smith Professor of Chemistry of the University, by 
the American. Chemical Society in that he was elected 
to the presidency of that organization for the year 
1915. 

Dr. Herty's election to this position of leadership 
in an organization having a total membership of 7,- 
220 follows a record of distinguished achievement in 
the field of chemistry and conspicuous service as a 
member of the council of the society running back 
for a number of years. 

Of the eighteen men who have filled this high posi- 
tion only two have been from the South, Dr. F. P. 
Venable, former president of the University being 
the other Southerner to receive this honor in 1905. In 
this connection it is worthy of note that no other insti- 
tution in the country except Columbia University 
has furnished the society as many as two presiding 
officers. Dr. Herty's immediate jjredecessor was Dr. 
T. W. Richards, of Harvard University. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 
COMMUNITY SERVICE WEEK 



103 



Carolina Leads the Way in the Upbuilding of a Better State 



The contribution to the State of the idea of Com- 
munity Service Week, which originated with Presi- 
dent Graham while speaking at a school rally in 
Mecklenburg in the fall of 1913, is something which 
the University takes genuine pleasure in marking 
down to the credit of one of her sons. Other com- 
munities and States have had their clean-up days and 
civic fairs and road days, but North Carolina is the 
first to have gone on record for a state-wide observ- 
ance of a week or part of a week devoted exclusive- 
ly to the study of vital community and country prob- 
lems. 

40,000 COPIES OF THE HANDBOOK 

One of the features contributing to the success of 
the week throughout the State was the distribution 
of a 40,000 edition of the handbook pi-inted by the 
State Department of Education. Here again the 
University gave valuable aid to the cause. It fur- 
nished the editor of the handbook, who by drawing 
upon the resources of the library and the North Caro- 
lina Club as well as by calling upon members of the 
( 'oinmunity Service Week Committee, was able to 
bring out a comprehensive publication suited to the 
varied needs of an alert, forward-looking State. 

THE FACULTY TAKE PAST 

Backing up the idea as originated by President 
Graham, the Faculty of the University entered en- 
thusiastically into the support of the movement and 
participated as follows in the celebration of the week, 
December 3-5 

President Graham spoke at Hillsboro on "County 
Progress and Co-operation." Professor Branson 
made the following addresses during the week: At 
Rocky Mount on Monday night, "Community Ser- 
vice and Citizenship" ; at Raleigh on Tuesday after- 
noon before the North Carolina Literary and His- 
torical Association, "The Vital Study of a County" : 
at Meredith College on Wednesday morning, "Wo- 
man's Citizenship" ; at Wilmington Thursday night 
before the Chamber of Commerce, "The Spirit of 
Community Service Week"; on Friday morning at 
the high school to the county and city teachers, "The 
Larger Citizenship," and on Friday afternoon he 
made brief talks at the Union and Isaac Bear schools. 

lira ii Stacy went to Wilkesboro for two speeches. 
Professor Walker was at Warrenton Saturday morn- 
ing and delivered an address, "The School and the 
Community." Professor Judd took part in the cele- 



bration at Raleigh and spoke on Saturday, "Drawing 
Power, a Measure of School Efficiency." 

The title of Professor Bernard's address at Green- 
ville was "The Wealth Producing and Wealth Re- 
taining Power of Pitt County." 

Professor Noble spoke at Bonlee on "The Schools 
of Scotland," and Professor L. A. Williams addressed 
the county teachers of Pender County on "The Waste 
of Illiteracy." 

THE STUDENTS CONTRIBUTE 

Last year four hundred students aided in the clean- 
up work of the town and campus. Their most def- 
inite contribution was in assisting the town in the 
gravelling of an eighth of a mile or more of its main 
street. This year this special work was continued 
by one squad of workers under Dr. J. H. Pratt, 
while three other squads cleaned alleys in the busi- 
ness section, laved out walk ways and improved the 
grounds around Swain Hall, and made more attrac- 
tive and comfortable the walk wavs in Battle's Park. 



CORRESPONDENCE COURSES 

"Educated as a school teacher, but now a news- 
paper editor, I find my training deficient in the field 
of economics. Kindly advise whether any of the 
courses which you offer would enable me in some de- 
gree to remedy this deficiency." 

"I am a graduate of and have had nearly 

one year at U. N. C. I have been teaching as prin- 
cipal of graded schools in for five years, 

but it is my ambition to be one of the State's High 
School men. I am married and must stay at home. 
Please advise." 

Requests similar to these (they could be multi- 
plied many fold by drawing upon the letter files of 
the Bureau of Extension) constitute the reason why 
the LTniversity has gone seriously into the work of 
offering instruction by correspondence. 

Primarily the work offered in the correspondence 
courses is intended for teachers. Through these 
courses and the larger offering of the Summer School, 
provision has been made by which a thorough knowl- 
edge of the branches taught in the schools of the 
State can be gained and that too at times and at 
cliai-iies which suit alike the convenience and the pur- 
ses of North Carolina teachers. Furthermore cer- 
tain of the courses lead directly to regular University 
degrees and enable those pursuing them to carry on 



104 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



regular University work which would be impossible 
otherwise and thereby materially lessen the actual 
time teachers have to spend away from their daily 
task in attendance at college. 

But while these courses will naturally be more 
widely pursued by teachers than any other class, 
they have also been designed to meet the needs of 
men and women engaged in many other callings. 
They may be taken with profit by many who are 
not seeking college degrees or special training for 
the schoolroom, but who desire to make themselves 
more proficient in the task which they are performing 
daily. It is the University's hope that this number 
may also be large. 

The instruction offered by correspondence is em- 
braced in thirty-three courses and taught by mem- 
bers of the University faculty as follows: one credit 
course in drawing, two non-credit courses in econo- 
mics, three credit and three non-credit courses in 
education, five non-credit courses in engineering, two 
credit courses in English, two credit courses in geo- 
logy, one non-credit course in German, four credit 
courses in Greek, two credit and two non-credit 
courses in history, two credit and one non-credit 
courses in Latin, two non-credit courses in mathe- 
matics. One non-credit course in civics is scheduled 
to <begin in September, 1915. 

The charges for these courses has been kept ex 
ceedingly low. A registration fee of $2 is charged 
all matriculates and special fees of $3.00 and $5.00 
are charged for non -credit and credit courses re- 
spectively. 



UNIVERSITY MEN IN THE STATE GOVERNMENT 

The following men who have been regular students 
at the University or in attendance at the Law or 
Summer Law School are in public service for the 
State : 

Executive Department: Locke Craig, Governor. 

Department of State: J. Bryan Grimes, Secretary 
of State; William S. Wilson, Corporation Clerk. 

Department of Education: J. Y. Joyner, Superin- 
tendent of Public Instruction ; C. E. Mcintosh, Chief 
Clerk: K W. Walker, State Inspector of High 
Schools ; L. C. Brogden, State Supervisor of Ele- 
mentary Schools ; E. E. Sams, Supervisor of Teacher 
Training. 

Department of Justice: T. W. Bickett, Attorney- 
General. 

Board of Public Charities: A.' C. McAllister, 
member. 

North Carolina Geological Board: Locke Craig, 
Chairman, ex officio; M. R. Braswell, member; E. 



W. Myers, Assistant Hydrographer ; W. L. Spoon, 
Engineer ; J. S. Holmes, Forester. 

Board of School Examiners: J. Y. Joyner, Chair- 
man, ex officio; E. E. Sams, Secretary; N. W. Walk- 
er, W. A. Graham, Z. V. Judd, members. 

State Board of Health: Chas. O'H. Laughing- 
house, E. J. Wood, A. A. Kent, R. H. Lewis, mem- 
bers; W. P. Jacocks, State Director of Hookworm 
Commission ; W. H. Kibler, Field Director of Hook- 
worm Commission. 

State Laboratory of Hygiene: C. A. Shore, Di- 
rector; Miss Daisy Allen, Chemist. 

Department of Agriculture : W. A. Graham, Com- 
missioner; Elias Carr, Secretary; J. L. Burgess, 
Agronomist; G. M. Garren, Assistant Agronomist; 
W. M. Allen, Food Chemist; L. L. Brinkley, Assist- 
ant Chemist; J. Q. Jackson, Assistant Chemist; E. 
G. Moss, Co-operative Assistant in Tobacco Investi- 
gations ; R. W. Scott, Jr., Superintendent Edge- 
combe Test Farm. 

Historical Commission: J. Bryan Grimes, Chair- 
man; R. D. W. Connor, Secretary; W. J. Peel, M. 

C. S. Noble. 

Library Commission : L. R. Wilson, Chairman ; 
J. Y. Joyner. 

Judicial Department: Supreme Court Judges — 
Walter Clark, Chief Justice; Piatt D. Walker, As- 
sociate Justice. 

Superior Court Judges — R. B. Peebles, F. A. 
Daniels, H. P. Lane, W. J. Adams, E. B. Cline, 
Geo. W. Connor, H. W. Whedbee, W. A. Devin, T. 
J. Shaw, W. F. Harding. 

Solicitors — J. C. B. Ehrinhaus, C. L. Abernethy, 
R. G. Allsbrook, H. E. Shaw, N. A. Sinclair, S. M. 
Gattis, S. P. Graves, F. E. Alley, W. D. Siler, 
Homer L. Lyon, S. B. McLean, J. C. Bower, Hayden 
Clement, T. M. Newland, Michael Schenk, J. E. 
Swain, G. L. Jones. 

United States Congress: E. W. Pou, C. M. Sted- 
man, H. L. Godwin, E. Y. Webb, J. J. Britt. 

Legislative Department: President pro tern of the 
Senate — O. Max Gardner; Speaker of the House — 
E. R. Wooten. 

Senate — J. S. McNider, Harry Stubbs, Mark Ma- 
jette, H. A. Gilliam, F. C. Harding, A. D. Ward, 
Ezra Parker, W. B. Snow, C. O. McMichael, C. M. 
Muse, R. N. McNeely, John A. McRae, B. B. Miller, 
Dorman Thompson, C. A. Jonas, O. Max Gardner, 

D. F. Giles, R. L. Ballou, Zebulon Weaver. 
House— R. A. Doughton, F. E. Thomas. T. C. 

Bowie, J. B. Clark, Dr. A. A. Kent, F. W. Bynum, 
D. Witherspoon, N. L. Eure, W. L. Long, F. M. 
McKav, Stanley Winborne, Thomas McBryde, A. A. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



105 



F. Seawell, E. E. Woo ten, R. S. Hutchison, Jacob 
Battle, W. P. Stacy, T. W. Mason, W. L. Small, 
J. ( '. Galloway, J. L. Roberts, W. C. Coughenour, 
C. M. Faircloth, J. C. M. Vann, C. A. Douglas. 

M. II. Allen. 



UNIVERSITY MEN IN PUBLIC HEALTH WORK 

The recent publication of Bulletin No. 20, 1914, 
of the United States Bureau of Education, on the 
Rural School and Hookworm Disease, written by 
Dr. John A. Ferrell. formerly of the North Carolina 
State Board of Health, and at present Assistant Di- 
rector-General of the International Health Commis- 
sion, with headquarters at Washington, D. C, and the 
announcement that Dr. B. E. Washburn, Jlealth 
Officer of Nash County, has been chosen by the 
Rockefeller Foundation to assume charge of 
health work in portions of South America, bring 
into prominence the fact that the University is 
playing a conspicuous part in the State and nation in 
the advancement of medicine and public health. The 
achievements of these members of the younger medi- 
cal alumni also bring to notice the modern spirit 
which dominates the medical profession. They show 
that whereas formerly, departments of medicine turn- 
ed out private practitioners, more recently the Uni- 
versity has sent an unsually large per cent of its 
medical students into the new fields of medical re- 
search and public health. The University has bad 
marked success in impressing its students with the 
significant fact that finding the cause of disease and 
preventing it is if anything more important than cur- 
ing the disease after it has manifested itself. 

Annnii: its former students who have this newer 
conception of medicine and whose work is attracting 
wide recognition on account of its distinctive char- 
acter, the University at present numbers the follow- 
ing: 

State Board of Health: Drs. R. II. Lewis, Charles 
O'H. Laughinghouse, Edward J. Wood, A. A. Kent, 
members; W. P. Jacocks, State Director of Hook- 
worm Commission; XV. 11. Kibler, Field Director of 
Hookworm Commission. 

State Laboratory of Hygiene: Dr. C. A. Shore, 
Director: Miss Daisy F!. Allen. Chemist. 

Whole-Time County Health Officers: Dr. D. C. 
Alisber. of Vance; Dr. S. W. Hurdle, of Rocking- 
ham. 

International Health Commission: Dr. John A. 
Ferrell, Assistant Director-General, formerly State 
Director of Hookworm Commission; Dr. P. W. Cov- 
ington, Utility Field Director, formerly Field Di- 
rector of Hookworm Commission: Dr. B. E. Wash- 



burn, Field Director for Foreign Service, formerly 
Field Director of Hookworm Commission and 
Whole-Time Health Officer of Xash. 

United States Public Health Office: Dr. Marshall 
( '. Guthrie, < Ihief Quarantine Officer of the Panama 
('anal Zone; Dr. R. A. Herring, Quarantine Officer 
at Ellis Island and Special Investigator of Pellagra 
at Columbia, S. C. 

Rockefeller Institute, New York City: Dr. James 
Murphy; Specialist in the Study of Cancer. 

In addition to these, Drs. C. L. Pridgen, of Wil- 
mington, II. L. Sloan, of Lincolnton, and G. F. 
Leonard, of Georgia, have until quite recently served 
the State as members of the Hookworm Commission. 



THE CALL TO LEADERSHIP 

In determining the choice of his career, the am- 
bitious boy of yesterday, today, and forever, con- 
sciously or unconsciously, brings under review the 
record of the men in his community or of his ac- 
quaintance whose achievement has been crowned with 
distinction. If these men have wrought well as min- 
isters, or lawyers, or physicians, or tillers of the 
soil, or statesmen, or what not, their calling, honor- 
crowned, becomes a powerful determining influence 
as to what the boy's life work shall be. 

Since 1795, the first year in which the doors of the 
University swung open to the ambitious youth of 
North Carolina, the weekly work and the traditions 
of the Dialectic and Philanthropic Literary Societies 
of the University have constituted an influence of 
this career-making sort second to none in the State. 

Today, on this century-old campus, are 982 
boys — 918 of them sons of North Carolina. Of 
these, 430 gather weekly in the halls of these mothers 
of men. As they gather there, whether to discuss the 
problems of the day, or to master the rules of parlia- 
mentary procedure, or to gain a clearer insight into 
human thought and desire, or to strive for collegiate 
or intercollegiate honor — as they gather there in the 
forward-looking hours of youth, kindly faces of Uni- 
versity founder and trustee and teacher and elder 
brother, ranged round the walls of these sacred balls 
of faine. smile down on them, and silent voices speak 
out of the past calling to service for home and State 
and nation. 



Dr. L. R. Wilson addressed the Library Associa- 
tion of Salisbury on December 29th. His subject 
was "The Library in Community Building." 



The V. M. C. A. Hook Exchange handled 1,730 



books during the fall term. 



106 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 

To be issued monthly except in July, August, and Septem- 
ber, by the General Alumni Association of the University of 
North Carolina. 

Board of Publication 

The Review is edited by the following Board of Publication : 

Louis R. Wilson, '99 Editor 

Associate Editors: Walter Murphy, '92; Harry Howell, '95; 
Archibald Henderson, '98; W. S. Bernard, '00; J. K. 
Wilson, '05; Louis Graves, '02; F. P. Graham, '09; Ken- 
neth Tanner, '11. 
E. R. Rankin, '13 Managing Editor 

Subscription Price 

Single Copies $0.15 

Per Year 1.00 

Communications intended for the Editor should be sent to 
Chapel Hill, N. C. ; for the Managing Editor, to Chapel Hill, 
N. C. All communications intended for publication must be 
accompanied with signatures if they are to receive considera- 
tion. 

OFFICE OF PUBLICATION, CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 

Entered at the Postoffice at Chapel Hill, N. C, as second 
class matter. 



REGISTRATION JAN. 15, 1915-1000 



UNIVERSITY MEN MEASURED BY THE STANDARD OF 
' WHO S WHO" 

"Who's Who In America," published by A. K 
Marquis & Company, of Chicago, is a reference book 
to be found on the reference shelves of practically 
every library -and daily editorial sanctum in the coun- 
try. It contains the biographical "story" of the 
leading authors, scientists, statesmen, etc., of the 
present generation and is an absolute essential to the 
person or paper or institution which requires ac- 
curate information or quick notice about xVmerica's 
leading men. 

Volume VII of this publication, being the issue 
for 1914-15, contains the names of 190 residents of 
North Carolina of whom 122 are natives of the State. 
Of this latter number 58 are alumni of the Univer- 
sity — a total of nearly 50 per cent of the native resi- 
dents in North Carolina who are listed in the publi- 
cation. The total number of University alumni re- 
corded both resident and non-resident, is 98, and the 
number of non-alumni faculty members is 19. 

The list of University alumni and of non-alumni 



members of the faculty follows. The names of alumni 
who have died since the preceding issue of the pub- 
lication are marked with a star (*). Former mem- 
bers of the faculty no longer connected with the Uni- 
versity are marked with an(x). 

ALUMNI 

E. A. Alderman, Eben Alexander, A. C. Avery*, 
C. B. Aycock*, Charles Baskerville, John S. Bassett, 
Herbert B. Battle, George G. Battle, Kemp B. Bat- 
tle, Kemp B. Battle, Jr., Richard H. Battle*, 
Thomas II. Battle, William J. Battle, Thomas W. 
Bickett, J. C. -Biggs, D. A. Long, Lucius B. McGe- 
hee, William W. McKenzie, William de B. Mac- 
Xider, James S. Manning, John M. Morehead, An- 
drew H. Patterson, R. L. Payne, T. Gilbert Pearson, 
E. L. Pell, Eobert P. Pell, A. L. Phillips, William 
B. Phillips, Edward W. Pou, Edward C. Register, 
Robert Bingham, James J. Britt, Marion Butler, 
Julian S. Carr, Walter Clark, Collier Cobb, George 
iST. Coffey, Robert E. Coker, R. D. W. Connor, 
Charles A. Cook, Locke Craig, Josephus Daniels, 
Hayne Davis, A. Caswell Ellis, John M. Faison, J. 
I. Foust, Thomas S. Fuller, H. L. Godwin, Robert 

B. Glenn, Edward K. Graham, J. Bryan Grimes, 
William A. Graham, Edward J. Hale, Archibald 
Henderson, John W. Hinsdale, Herman H. Home, 
Charles H. Johnston, Robert D. Johnston, James Y. 
Joyner, William W. Kitehin, Charles OIL Laughing- 
house, Guy Carlton Lee, J. V. Lewis, Richard H. 
Lewis, Howard E. Rondthaler, John C. Rodman, 
Sterling Rufhn, Lindsay Russell, A. M. Scales, Paid 
Schenck, H. F. Seawell, W. B. Sheppard, Mabel S. 

C. P. Smith, James H. Southgate, Charles M. Sted- 
man, Henry J. Stockard*, Robert Strange*, Hannis 
Taylor, Isaac M. Taylor, Charles R. Thomas, Au- 
gustus Van Wyck, Alfred M. Waddell*, Piatt D. 
Walker, Edwin Y. Webb, John M. Webb, William 
R. Webb, Stephen B. Weeks, William T. Whitsett, 
James N\ Williamson, Jr., Olin Weill >orn, E. B. 
Wilcox, Henry H. Williams, George S. Willis, Ed- 
win M. Wilson, George T. Winston, Edward J. 
Wood, Robert H. Wright. 

FACULTY (NON-ALUMNl) 

Charles W. Bain, Eugene Branson, William Cain, 
Charles W. Dabney (x), David H. Dolley (x), Karl 
P. Harrington (x), Charles H. Herty, Joseph A. 
Holmes (x), A. R. Ledoux (x), John M. McBryde, 
Jr. (x), Edwin Minis (x), Joseph H. Pratt, Charles 
L. Raper, Hubert A. Kovster (x), Charles A. 
Smith (x), H. A. Tolman (x), Francis P. Venable, 
Richard H. Whitehead (x), Henry Van P. Wilson. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



107 



PUBLICATIONS AND ADDRESSES 

From the report of the President of the University 
for 1914, the fact is again abundantly evidenced that 
the members of the University facility are productive 
in the fields of scholarly research. Their activities 
in this respect for the year have been as follows: 

Books published: Bain's First Latin Book, by 
('has. W. Bain, published by D. C. Heath & Com- 
pany; Essays for College Men, by Norman Foerster, 
published by Henry Holt & Comany; English Let- 
t< rs, by Edwin Greenlaw, published by Scott, Fores- 
man <ir Company; Reconstruction in North Carolina, 
by J. G. deB. Hamilton, published by Longmans, 
Green & Company; European Dramatists, published 
by Stewart & Kidd Company, and The Changing 
Drama, published by Henry Holt & Company, by 
Archibald Henderson. 

Booklets and Handbooks: A Dictionary of Thera- 
peutic Terms and Common Diseases, by J. G. Beard; 
0, orgia Farms and Folks, and A Syllabus of Home- 
Gounty Club Studies, by E. C. Branson; A Pocket 
Dictionary of Common Rocks and Rock Minerals, by 
Collier Cobb; Use of the Abney Hand Level, and 
Steel Over-shot Water Wheels and Pumps for Pri- 
vate Water Supplies, by T. F. Hickerson; Ship 
Subsidies, by E. B. Bankin ; -North Carolina High 
School Handbook, by 1ST. W. Walker; Public Discus- 
sion and Debate, and Com*nvunity Service Week Bul- 
letin, by L. B. Wilson. 

Papers read before learned societies and articles 
contributed to periodical literature, 115. 

Commencement addresses, extension lecturers, and 
other public addresses, 164-. 

Begular publications maintained by the faculty: 
Volume XI of Studies in Philology; Volume XIII 
of the Sprunt Historical Publications; Volumes 
XXIX and XXX of the Journal of the Elisha 
Mitchell Scientific Society; and Volume V of the 
North Carolina High School Bulletin. 



AMERICAN MEN OF SCIENCE 
In 1010, J. McKeen Cattell, Professor of Psy- 
chology in Columbia University and editor of 
Science, brought out a second edition of "American 
Men of Science," the "Who's Who" guide book con- 
cerning the leading Americans in twelve distinct sci- 
entific fields. In this publication a total of 4,000 
names was included, 1,000 of which were starred as 
representing the 1,000 men who stood out as the most 
distinguished scientists of America. 

From a special table indicating the distribution of 
this first or leading 1,000, it appeared that the South 
was entitled to only 30, as follows: Virginia 10, 



North Carolina 7, Louisiana 4, Texas 4, Alabama 2, 
West Virginia 2, Tennessee 1. South Carolina, 
Georgia, Florida, and Mississippi were without rep- 
resentation. 

A further fact brought out by the publication, so 
far as North Carolina was concerned, was that of 
the 7 of this leading group attributed to North Car- 
olina 6— F. P. Venable, Charles H. Herty, J. E. 
Mills, A. S. Wheeler, II. V. Wilson, and W. C. 
Coker — were connected with the University and 1 — 
F. L. Stevens — was connected with the A. and M. 
Of the total 4,000 scientists listed in the publication, 
36 were accredited to the University as alumni or as 
members of the faculty past or present. On the same 
basis 20 others were accredited to other colleges and 
institutions in the State. 



JOHN R. MOTT COMING 

One of the most significant announcements ever 
made in connection with the University Y. M. C. A, 
is that recently given out to the effect that Dr. John 
B. Mott, the recognized world-leader of student re- 
ligious organizations has been secured to speak before 
the association during a three-day series of meetings 
February 12 to 14. 

Dr. Mott, in the opinion of the foremost men of 
America, Europe, and Asia, is one of the greatest 
men of modern times. President Wilson, Secretary 
Bryan, Yuan Shai Kai, Harper's Weekly, big busi- 
ness, and Yale University have sought him out for 
unusual distinction. He has more continuous points 
of contact with the world than any other man alive 

and has addressed more diverse | pie and larger 

bodies of students than any man who ever lived. The 
University will have a new vision and the student 
body will sound new sources of spiritual life in 
the presence of this man whose mastering mission is 
to make Christ real in the hearts of men everywhere. 



LECTURES FOR THE SPRING TFRM— 1915 
Notice was given in the last issue of The Review 
concerning the unusually fine lecture schedule offered 
by the University for the spring term of 1915. In 
order that alumni and visitors away from the Hill 
may plan to be present for some of these lectures the 
completed schedule, with specific dates, is here given: 
The M-Xair Lectures, by Dr. John Dewey, pro- 
fessor of Psychology in Columbia University, Febru- 
ary 5, 6, and 7. 

The American Government Series Lectures, by Ex- 
President William Howard Taft, March 17, is, 
and 19. 



108 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



The Southern Exchange Foundation Lectures, by 
Professor William Thornton, Dean of the School of 
Engineering of the University of Virginia, March 
22-27. 

Lecture on the American Drama, by Dr. Richard 
Burton, professor of English in the University of 
Minnesota and president of the Drama League of 
America, April 7. 

Lectures ou the Argentine Republic and The Re- 
lations between North and South America, by Am- 
bassador Romulu S. Naon, of the Argentine Re- 
public-, May 11, 12, and 13. 



Wake Forest 2, Carson and Newman 2, Virginia 
Christian 2, Clemson, Earlham, Elon, Fredericks- 
burg and Wesleyan one each. 



FROM THE UNIVERSITY TO THE SCHOOLROOM 

Seventy-one men received degrees at the com- 
mencement in 1911:. Sixteen of these are now pur- 
suing graduate or professional work, twelve at Chapel 
Hill, four at other universities. 

Of the other fifty-five men, forty are teaching. 
Three are instructors or assistants at the University, 
one is in a private school in Virginia, two are instruc- 
tors at the Agricultural and Mechanical College at 
Raleigh, one is instructor in the South Carolina Med- 
ical College, cine in the State School fur the Blind at 
Raleigh. 

The other thirty-three men are all teaching in the 
public schools of North Carolina, the great majority 
of them in the State high schools. And the class of 
191-1 is not exceptional in this respect. 

The specialist in Higher Education in the Bureau 
of Education at Washington pronounces this a record 
which few state universities can duplicate. — News 
Letter, December 9, 1914. 



GROWTH OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

The present enrollment in the Graduate School of 
the University is the greatest in its history, being 61 
for the year, of which number 45 are now taking 
courses in the regular session. The largest previous 
enrollment in the school was 42 in 1913. The aver- 
age enrollment for the years 1906 to 1912 was 26. 

Of the present number 40 are candidates for the 
degree of Master of Arts, 3 Master of Science, 2 
Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering, 10 Doctor 
of Philosophy, and 6 are special. The grouping as 
to the major subjects pursued by the graduate stu- 
dents is as follows: Botany 1, Chemistry 6, Civil 
Engineering 2, Economics 10, Education 14, Elec- 
trical Engineering 2, English 11, Geology 3, History 
3, Latin 1, Mathematics 3, Philosophy 2,- Physics 2, 
Zoology 1. Universities and colleges represented by 
these students are as follows: University of North 
Carolina 38, Guilford 5, Lenoir 3, East Texas 3, 



APPROPRIATIONS FOR BUREAUS OF EXTENSION 

Bulletin No. 19, for 1914, of the United States 
Bureau of Education, entitled "University Extension 
in the United States," gives the following interesting 
information concerning institutions engaged in ex- 
tension activities: 

Institutions conducting extension work 51 

Institutions offering correspondence courses 32 

Institutions conducting extension lectures 33 

Institutions directing debating and discussion 21 

Among these institutions the following special ap- 
propriations for maintenance have been made by the 
State and governing boards concerned : 

APPROPRIATIONS FOE 1913-14 FOR EXTENSION 

Arizona $ 10,000 

California 13,000 

Iowa 20,000 

Kansas 13,000 

Minnesota 40,000 

Missouri 12,500, 

Texas , 45,000 

Washington 12,000 

Wisconsin + 1S5,000 



WHAT THEIR FATHERS ARE 

According to the profession or occupation of their 
fathers, the students of the University this year are 
divided as follows: Farmers 289, Merchants 132, 
Lawyers 68, Doctors 60, Manufacturers 50, Public 
Officers 30, Ministers 26, Real Estate Dealers 23, 
Insurance Agents 22, Lumber Dealers 18, Teachers 
17, Railroad Men 17, Bankers 17, Contractors 17, 
Traveling Salesman 15, Druggists 12, Tobacco Deal- 
ers 11, Liverymen 9, Mechanics 7, Brokers 7, Edi- 
tors 5, Bookkeepers 4, Printers 3, Fishermen 3, Civil 
Engineers 3, Carpenters 3, Laborers 3, Butchers 2, 
Nurserymen 2, Jewelers 2, Hotel Keepers 2, Engi- 
neers 2, Chemist 1, Photographer 1, Promoter 1, 
Mason 1, Librarian 1, Blacksmith 1, Undertaker 1, 
Optician 1, Ranchman 1, Boarding House Keeper 1, 
Purchasing Agent 1. 



PHARMACY SCHOOL RECORDS 

Registration in the School of Pharmacy for 1914- 
15 shows the largest enrollment in the history of the 
School, 55 being present. Of this number 27 are 
first year, 14 second year, 5 third year, and 9 special 
students. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



109 



Since the department was organized in 1897, it 
has trained a total of 550 students. Of these, 400 
have completed the first year's work and 150 the 
first and second year's work. Degrees have heen 
Taken by 60. 

Prof. E. V. Howell, Dean of the School, is a mem- 
ber of the American Pharmaceutical Association and 
a regular contributor of papers at the annual meet- 
ings of the Association. 

Prof. J. G. Beard is Secretary of the North Caro- 
lina Pharmaceutical Association and editor of the 
annual volume of Proceedings. 

I. W. Rose, of Rocky Mount, a member of the 
class of '06, is a member of the State Board of Ex- 
aminers. 



THE UNIVERSITY DRAMATIC CLUB 

The men in the Dramatic Club started off this fall 
to do something not attempted before — to put on 
i heir play before Christmas — and this they did, pro- 
ducing Bernard Shaw's famous comedy "Arms and 
the Man" in Gerrard Hall, December 4, when the 
Thanksgiving dances were on. 

The Tar Heel said of the performance "Playing 
far above the standard expected by even the most ar- 
dent admirers of dramatics, the University Dramatic 
( 'lull made a splendid impression Friday night. The 
play was a rich comedy full of laughs all the way 
through. A packed house greeted the actors and 
there was an abundance of well deserved applause." 

During the intermission between acts Dr. Archi- 
bald Henderson, of the faculty, who is Shaw's bio- 
grapher, gave an appreciative talk on the actors and 
the way in which they put over "the comedy which 
made Shaw his reputation as a popular dramatist." 

The following Monday, December 7, the Club 
played at'St. Mary's School ; on the 8th in Goldsboro, 
being the first to open the new High School Audito- 
rium: and on the 9th in Washington in the new 
theatre. At all towns the alumni entertained the 
men royally. At St. Mary's they had the novel 
pleasure of taking- dinner with Dr. Lay in the school 
dining hall, while at Washington the Halcyon Club 
gave a 'lance in their honor. 

In February the management is planning a trip 
tn the western part of the State — taking in the larger 
towns. 

The stars seem to be Charlie Coggins, Law '16, and 
Bruce Webb. '18. The Raleigh News and Observer 
says, "The Carolina Dramatic Club is an amateur 
organization but if it had a few more like Messrs. 



Coggins and Webb it could shade a whole lot of 
professional organizations on tour." 

The cast is composed of Charlie Coggins, of Salis- 
bury, who is playing his third year, being the famous 
Jones of "What Happened to Jones" presented three 
seasons ago. He plays Blutschli or "The Chocolate 
Soldier." W. P. M. Weeks, '15, of Washington, D. 
('.. another third year star, plays Major Pettkoff. 
Leon Applewhite, 18, of Wilson, plays the role of 
Sergius. H. V. Johnson, '16, of Charlotte, as Niko- 
la, was also a member of the 1912-13 cast. Bruce 
Webb, '18, of Asheville, as Louka, W. D. Kerr, '15, of 
Greensboro, of last year's east as ( 'atherine and B. S. 
Meredith, '18, of Newbern, as Raina, completed the 
cast with the exception of J. L. Harrisom '16, of 
Raleigh, who plays a minor role as a Russian officer 
and acts in the useful capacity as property man and 
stage manager. 

The officers of the club are: J. M. ('ox, president; 
J. S. Bryan, vice-president ; W. O. Smith, secretary- 
treasurer; F. O. Clarkson, manager; E. B. Marsh, 
assistant manager; G. M. McKie and J. M. Booker, 
faculty directors. 



GOOD ROADS CONFERENCE 

One of the most successful meetings held at the 
University during 1913-14 was the Good Roads Con- 
ference which met March 17-19 under the auspices 
of the North Carolina Geological and Economic Sur- 
vey and the Departments of Geology and Civil Engi- 
neering of the University. The purpose of the con- 
ference was that it should serve as a clearing house 
for road building problems in North Carolina. Forty- 
five visitors, most of whom were road engineers and 
superintendents from twenty-two counties of the 
State, were in attendance, and the meeting was suc- 
cessful far beyond the expectations of its promoters. 

A SECOND CONFERENCE PLANNED 

A second conference is being planned for the 
present year, and, in accord with a resolution passed 
at the first meeting, the conference is to become a 
permanent thing. 

DISTINCTIVE INSTRUCTION IN EOAD ENGINEERING 

Appreciation of the character of the work done by 
the University in training road engineers has just 
been shown by the Barber Asphalt Paving Company 
of Philadelphia which has included it in a select list 
of twenty institutions to each of which it offers a 
cash prize of $50 to be awrded to that member of the 
senior class in civil engineering who presents the best 



110 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



paper ou some subject pertaining to bituminous 
roads or pavements. 

UNIVERSITY ROAD ENGINEERS 

Among the former students of the University now 
engaged in road engineering, are the following: W. 
L. Spoon, of Alamance County, senior engineer of 
the Office of Public Roads, Washington, D. C. ; 
Brent S. Drane, of Mecklenburg County, chief engi- 
neer in charge of municipal improvements and road 
surveys; R. G. Lassiter, of Granville, contractor in 
charge of pavement construction in Raleigh ; Charles 
R. Thomas, Jr., of Chicago, 111., associate editor of 
Engineering and Contracting; N. C. Hughes, Jr., 
highway engineer of Halifax County, R. T. Brown, 
highway engineer of Orange County; R. P. Coble, 
highway engineer of Lee County; J. B. Clingman, 
highway engineer of Madison County, James V. 
Price, superintendent of roads in Rockingham 
County; J. L. Phillips, of Lenoir County, and Pey- 
ton Smith, of Lynchburg, Va. 



DEBATING UNION STATISTICS 

To the native love of debating and "hankering" 
after an argument which is ever latent in a Tar 
Heel, the University lends encouragement, direction, 
and organization. The High School Debating Union 
of North Carolina is an organization which serves 
not only the boys and girls of the State but which 
reaches out to the men and women, the cities, towns, 
hamlets, and rural communities as well. 

Preparations for the third annual State-wide con- 
test of the Debating Union are now going on in 227 
schools of the State. All the way from Poplar 
Branch in the East to Franklin in the West, stu- 
dents, more than 1,500 in number, are working 
away on the preliminary contests to decide who shall 
represent the different schools. Ninety counties have 
schools enrolled in the Union. Gaston County leads 
the field with an enrollment of 8 schools; Mecklen- 
burg and Wayne come next with 7 schools; Bun- 
combe, Alamance, Johnston, Bladen, Cleveland, 
Scotland, Guilford, Iredell, Wake, Robeson and 
Nash have five schools enrolled each. 

The only counties which are not represented are: 
Bertie, Caswell, Hoke, Jones, Madison, Mitchell, 
Pamlico, Tyrrell, Washington, and Watauga. 

The enrollment this year of 227 schools represent- 
ing 90 counties shows a considerable increase over 
last years' enrollment of 150 schools representing 
64 counties. 

Membership in the Union is open to all secondary 
schools in the State. The list is now made up of 



19 private schools, 73 city schools, and 135 rural 
and State high schools. 

The triangular debates will be held throughout the 
State on March 26th, and the final contest for the 
Aycock Memorial Cup will be held in Chapel Hill 
on April 9th. The total audiences in the 227 com- 
munities will number at least 50,000. 



THE UNIVERSITY'S INTEREST IN PUBLIC DISCUSSION 

One of the most obvious privileges of a free citizen 
is that of active participation in public discussion. 

To enable the citizen of North Carolina to enjoy 
this privilege, the University is working in at least 
two ways: first, through the Extension Bureau in 
initiating and promoting throughout the State high 
school debate and public discussion clubs ; and second, 
in providing means for practice at the University 
itself. 

All Freshmen registered as candidates for the A. 
B. degree are required to take Public Speaking I, a 
course which is concerned largely with the discussion 
of subjects of current interest. — News Letter, De- 
cember 15, 1914. 



WHERE THE STUDENTS ARE PREPARED 

Of the entering class at the University this year, 
286 in number, 181 are from the public schools of 
North Carolina, 6 from public schools of other States, 
56 from private schools of this State, and 19 from 
private schools of other States, while 22 come from 
colleges and universities. Omitting from considera- 
tion those from colleges and universities, 71.1 per 
cent are from public and 2S.9 per cent from private 
schools. One hundred and fourteen public and 
twenty-four private schools of this State, six public 
and thirteen private schools of other States, and thir- 
teen colleges and universities are represented in the 
entering class. 



STUDENT CHURCH AFFILIATION 

According to church affiliation the student body of 
the University this year is divided as follows : Pres- 
byterian 155, Baptist 234, Episcopal 116, Methodist 
290, Christian 23, Hebrews 15, Lutheran 15, Roman 
Catholic 6, Friends 6, Moravian 6, Universalist 3, 
German Reformed 3, Unitarian 1, Adventist 1, Holi- 
ness 1, Armenian 1, Congregational 1, and All 
Saints 1. 



Dr. Archibald Henderson is spending the month 
of January at the University of Chicago studying 
mathematics. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



111 



NEW METHOD OF SELECTING RHODES SCHOLARS 

On account of alterations in the administration of 
the scholarship system at Oxford University, the trus- 
tees of the fund have changed the method of selecting 
Rhodes scholars throughout the United States. In 
the past, scholars have been elected from all the 
states for two successive years, while in the third year 
none were chosen. According to the new arrange- 
ments, the elections will be spread over three years, 
the scholars being selected from thirty-two states each 
year. For this purpose, the forty-eight states have 
been divided into three groups of sixteen each. 



NO GAMES IN NEUTRAL TERRITORY 

By a ruling of the faculty of the University of 
Virginia, no football games will hereafter be played 
by Virginia, except the Carolina-Virginia game, off 
the home grounds of itself or its opponents. An ex- 
ception is made in the case of Carolina until the 
Emerson field is completed. 



THE YACKETY YACK GETS UNDER WAY 
Under the guidance of G. A. Mebane, Jr., edi- 
tor-in-chief, the Yackety Yach for 1915 is taking 
form. In excellence it promises to rank with the 
best which have been issued. The business mana- 
gers are Oscar Leach and 0. C. Nance. 



Prof. Collier Cobb attended as a charter member 
the first meeting of the Association of American Uni- 
versity Professors. The meeting was held in New 
York City. Other members of the faculty elected 
to membership in the Association are Drs. A. S. 
Wheeler and Edwin Greenlaw. 

The following members of the faculty participated 
in alumni meetings during the holidays: Professors 
Branson and Stacy, at Goldsboro ; Professors Pat- 
terson and L. P. Wilson, at Gastonia ; and Professor 
( dlili. at Lillington. 

I'r. George Howe attended the meeting of the 
American Philological Association at Haverford, 
Penn., during the holidays. 

Drs. Oliver Towles, J. M. Booker, and P. H. Han- 
fordj attended the recent meeting of the Modern Lan- 
guage Association of America at New York City. 

Dr. C. L. Paper was present at the annual meet- 
ing of the American Economic Association at Prince- 
ton, N. J. 

The Y. M. C. A. conducts a "lost and found" bu- 
reau for the campus. Forty articles were returned 
to owners in this way during the fall. 



"The Vascular Response of the Kidney in Acute 
Nephritis " is the title of a recent contribution by 
Dr. W. DeB. MacNider to the Journal of Pharma- 
cology. 

Carolina and the State Normal at Greensboro 
have pledged themselves jointly to build a cottage on 
the Blue Ridge Conference grounds. 

The new Episcopal rectory has recently been com- 
pleted on Rosemary Street and is now occupied by 
Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Homer W. Starr. 

The star course for 1914-15, under the manage- 
ment of the Y. M. C. A., offers five attractions. 



NECROLOGY 

1893 

— -Robert M. Davis, sometime superintendent of the Tar- 
boro city schools, died at his home in Tarboro on September 
21st. 

1900 
— David Spier Whitaker, third son of the late Judge Spier 
Whitaker, of Raleigh, died at his home in Denver, Colorado, 
on October 29th, of pneumonia. 

1905 
— -James Wardlaw Scroggs, a lawyer of Charlotte, was found 
dead in his office on November Sth. Death was due to heart 
trouble. 

Mr. Scroggs was a graduate of Trinity College, and a 
student in the University law school during the years 1903- 
'05. He was a man of brilliant mind and a constant student. 

1908 ^ 

— Ernest Cofield Ruffin died at the Parkview Hospital, Rocky 
Mount, on November Sth. He had undergone a successful 
operation for appendicitis and the outlook was hopeful until 
the time of his death, which was caused by a clot of blood's 
going to his heart. 

As superintendent of schools at Battleboro, Rich Square, 
and Lenoir, Mr. Ruffin made a name for himself as one of 
the abler school men of the State. He took the law course 
at Chapel Hill during the Summer and Fall of 1913, and at 
the time of his death was located in Tarboro for the prac- AjP 

tice of law. 

A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A »J« A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A •V 

I FOR NEAT JOB PRINTING AND TYPEWRITER PAPER I 

% CALL AT THE OFFICE OF * 

THE CHAPEL HILL NEWS % 

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1 Raleigh Floral Company 

% CHOICE CUT FLOWERS for ALL OCCASIONS | 
Write, Phone or Wire Order* to Raleigh, N. C. 



CHAPEL HILL AGENTS 
Wiley M. Rogers, Jr. Miguel Eliat 



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