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Full text of "The alumni review [serial]"

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Library of the 
University of North Carolina 

Endowed by the Dialectic and Philan- 
tliropic Societies. 








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CY THOMPSON SA YS— 

"You Never Can Tell" - 



The chance of your becoming; temporarily or permanently impaired in 
health, from disease or injury, are many fold compared with the possitility of 
your not livingf. Until you have started a sufficient insurance estate nobody 
knows whether cr not you ever will. 

Are you counting on your perfectly good intentions or playing it "safety 
first"? 



You may protect your credit and your home 
by insuring your life now in the old, old 

NEW ENGLAND MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO. 

BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 

CHARIERED 183S 

CYRUS THOMPSON, JR., Special Agent EUGENE C. McGINNIS, General Agent 

Raleigh, N. C. Raleigh, N. C. 



THE ROYALL & BORDEN CO. 



106 and 108 WEST MAIN STREET DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA 

Sell all kinds of furniture and furnishings for churches, 
colleges and homes. Biggest stock of Rugs in the 
State, and at cheapest prices. ^If you don't know us 
ask the College Proctor or the editor of the "Review." 
Call on or write for whatever you may need in our line. 

THE ROYALL & BORDEN CO. 



Volume IV 



THE 



Number 4 



ALVMNI'REVIEW 



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JArNUARY, 1Q16 

OPINION AND COMMENT 

The President's Report — Impressions — Growth — 

Organization — Co-operation — The New and 

Deeper Loyalty — Other Pleasing Features 

— Splendid Leadership — Our Chief 

Concern 

THE Y. M. C. A. AT WORK 

Every Department is Actively Engaged in Construc- 
tive Work in the Upbuilding of the Campus 
and Community 

IN THE FIELD OF ATHLETICS 

Representatives of the Faculty, Alumni, and Student 

Body Approve the Idea of a Director of 

Athletics and Alumni Coaching 



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PUBLISHED BY 

THE ALVMNI ASSOCIATION 



1865 ^=== FIFTY YEARS ==^== 1915 

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%itc m\b XLnx^t Company 

of Ipbtlabelpbta 

LOWEST MORTALITY 

LOWEST HANAQEHENT EXPENSE 

CHEAPEST NET COST 



DUFFY & UM5TEAD, Inc. 

SPECIAL AQENTS 
GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA 

Write for leaflet "The Best Form of Policy" 




MARK DESIGNED BY OTHO GUSHING 

POPULAR AMERICAN ILLUSTRATOR.TO IDENTIFY THE 

-QUALITY AND SERVICE" PRODUCTS OF 

THESEEMAN PRINTERY.inc 

DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



Volume IV 



JANUARY, 1916 



Number 4 



OPINION AND COMMENT 



The President's Report for 1915, together with 
the reports of all the otficers of the University, com- 

prisine- 114 octavo pages of 
THE PRESIDENT'S ^^ ■, .. . m t? • 

REPORT matter relating to the Univer- 

sity, and by all odds the most 
helpful publication issued by the University in fur- 
nishing the alumni an intimate view of its activities, 
came from the press on January 10. Reprints of 
the individual reports of the President and the Di- 
rector of the Bureau of Extension are being mailed 
to all readers of The Review and copies of the full 
report will be mailed to alumni who express their 
desire for them. 

nan 

Four impressions which the reading of the vari- 
ous reports of the president and officers conveys are 

IMPRESSIONS ^°^'t^y °^ special note. They are: 
(1) That the University is experi- 
encing a remarkable growth in all of its departments 
and activities; (2) That the administrative work of 
the University is becoming more and more systemat- 
ically organized; (3) That a splendid spirit of co- 
operation permeates the faculty and student body in 
realizing the institution's ideals; and (4) That a 
new and deeper loyalty to the University is daily 
being evidenced by students, alumni, and the State 
at large. 

nnn 

Beginning with the freshman class, 307 students 
were enrolled during the fall of 191.5, while the reg- 
istration in the Graduate School reached 
84. In 1914 the total number of men 
working for advanced degrees was only 61. The 
grand total of all students enrolled during the year 
was 1882. They were distributed as follows: Reg- 
ular session 1123; Summer School 731; Correspond- 
ence division 28. In March and April, 1915, 250 
schools having membership in the Debating Union, 
contested in the presence of from 60,000 to 75,000 
people for the Aycock Memorial Cup, and on Decem- 
ber 22nd 300 schools had entered for the approaching 
contest in April, 1916. On December 31 the Library 
contained 76,250 volumes, and was regularly re- 
ceiving 700 periodicals and transactions of learned 
societies, not including the many North Carolina 



GROWTH 



weekly papers sent to its reading room. At Swain 
Hall 285,053 meals at 13>4 cents per meal were 
served during the first year of its operation, and by 
means of the Inaugural and Alumni luncheons serv- 
ed in it the fact was established that hereafter events 
calling for the serving of 500 or 600 persons at a 
time can easily be provided for. With the comple- 
tion of Emerson Field, the University came into the 
possession of an athletic field and equipment equaled 
by few institutions in the South. By means of con- 
tests in track athletics, baseball, basketball, and foot- 
ball, the University has greatly stimulated an interest 
among the students of North Carolina secondary 
schools in physical development. While no new 
buildings were erected on the campus during the 
year, the financial support for maintenance was in- 
creased $20,000 by the General Assembly, and the 
value of the University property reached the total 
of $1,154,025.78. 

nnn 

To the business man in the up-to-date business 
establishment, in which time cards are punched by 

ORGANIZATION ^^"^"^ employee, where every de- 
partment has a complete equip- 
ment of filing cabinets, typewriters, office furniture, 
etc., and where through house telephones the details 
of the work of every employee can be known by the 
superintendent within a moment, the internal organ- 
ization of the University may seem far from perfect. 
Nevertheless, very definite progress in the direction 
of a more thorough business organization within the 
University has been made during the year. In the 
Business Manager's office thorough up-to-date records 
concerning every activity of the physical plant are 
filed daily. Information, for example, concerning 
the number of meals served at Swain Hall for break- 
fast on a given day and their cost, is always avail- 
able. Similarly another set of records shows accur- 
ately the number of gallons of water pumped into the 
standpipe each hour of the day, together with the 
pounds of coal consumed in the power plant in the 
operation, and the number of gallons of water each 
pound of coal turns into steam. 

In a less detailed way, a notable organization has 
been perfected during the year in the Registrar's 
office, the School of Education, the Bureau of Ex- 



96 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



tension, and the Department of English, and definite 
systematic work has been started on the Ahimni Cat- 
alogue. Not all the office equipment and clerical 
assistance needed in any one department has by any 
means been secured. As a matter of fact, these 
things at present constitute one of the University's 
most serious lacks, but the work of the departments 
mentioned has been greatly facilitated, and through- 
out the entire University the machinery is being so 
organized as to meet as effectively as possible the 
rapidly enlarging work of the institution. The Uni- 
versity clearly realizes that nothing but the best meth- 
ods can be employed by it if it is to meet satisfac- 
torily the large task of service laid upon it, and it is 
preparing itself to meet the new demands in a thor- 
oughly eificient, biisiness-like way. 

nnn 

Reference has frequently been made in The Re- 
view to the many campus enterprises in which fac- 

CO-OPERATION ''^'^' Student body, and town have 
taken part. Rally -Day, the JMoon- 
light School CampaigTi, to mention only two cam- 
pus activities, splendidly illustrate the sort of co- 
operation which has become the rule on the Hill. 
Out in the State, the alumni in addition to the sup- 
port they have given to athletics, have assumed in 
many instances their share of responsibility in fur- 
thering the University's work. Throughout all the 
reports reference to this spirit constantly recurs 
and the impression deepens that much of the best 
achievement of the University is directly attributable 
to it. 

nnn 

That this spirit has extended also beyond the 
campus to the State at large, and that an increasing 
interest in the University is grow- 
ing throughout the State, is also 
evident. With this thought in mind, 
President Graham concludes his re- 
port to the trustees in the following words : 

It is with a profound sense of happiness that I 
report the conviction, fortified in many substantial 
ways, that the alumni, the students, and the public 
at large are taking a more continuoiis and sympa- 
thetic interest in the serious work of the University. 
Loyalty to the institution is losing none of the en- 
thusiasm that finds its occasional magnetic center in 
great athletic contests; but it is steadily receiving 
also a far deeper and richer interpretation. There 
have been, during the past year, many inspiring evi- 
dences that we are coming more and more to see that 
true loyalty to the University consists not merely in 
pride in the institution, nor merely in love for it as 



THE NEW 
AND DEEPER 
LOYALTY 



our alma mater ; but also, and mainly, in our personal 
devotion to the high things for which the institution 
stands, and our practical service in making these 
things prevail. This devotion we share with all good 
men everywhere, whose aim and ideals are kindred, 
and with every agency that seeks to make them effect- 
ive in the life of the State. The essential character 
of the institution is co-operation in its fullest and 
deepest sense. It is the institution for expressing in 
intelligent and constructive terms all of those varied 
aspects of human effort that make complete and uni- 
fied the life of the State. Adequate equipment, there- 
fore, to do its work with freedom and vigor it asks 
not in any selfish measure, but as the heart of the 
general good. If we view it in the lesser way of 
partisanship, whether friendly or unfriendly, we 
shall think too lightly of its mission, misconceive its 
true character and potential greatness, and so fail to 
give it the means to perform its function with the 
strength, the vision, and the confident faith neces- 
sary to the leadership committed to its care. 

nnn 

Two other features of the reports afford satisfac- 
tion of a genuine sort. The University's part in the 
development of the system of State 
T^r „ . „,^,„ JiisJi schools and the splendid work 

PLEASING ,.^1 ^r -Kr ^ A , 

FEATURES f '^' ^ " ^^^ ^^ f ^^. *« '^''^^P^f *°- 
day are things oi which every alum- 
nus can well be proud. In 1907 Prof. N. W. Walker, 
Professor of Secondary Education in the University, 
and State High School Inspector, assisted in drafting 
the acts which brought into being the present system 
of State-sujjported high schools. Since then he has 
devoted more than half his time to the inspection and 
supervision of the schools, and in his official sum- 
mary for the biennium 1913-'15, shows that on June 
30, 1915, there were 214 of these schools in the State 
with a total enrollment of 8,986 students. Eighty- 
seven of these were four-year high schools with 
4,979 pupils. The total expenditure for the mainte- 
nance of these was $196,545.6.5 in 1913, and $247,- 
253.59 in 1915. During the past two years fifty 
State high school buildings have been erected, cost- 
ing in round numbers, with the equipment added, 
about $700,000. Along with the high schools the 
farm life school movement has been stressed with 
the result that agricultural instruction is now given 
in 50 or more schools and special agricultural de- 
partments meeting the requirements of the farm-life 
school law have been established and equipped in 19. 
Nor has attention been centered merely upon the 
physical and financial support of these schools. Pro- 
fessor Walker has constantly assisted in the improve- 
ment of standards of teaching, has edited for the use 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



97 



SPLENDID 
LEADERSHIP 



of principals and teachers the High School Bulletin 
published by the University, and through the Sum- 
mer School and the School of Education, has aided 
greatly in the professional training of those who in 
large measure have taken charge of the schools. The 
University, in these and other ways, has given every 
aid possible to the perfection of the system, and re- 
joices that so much has been accomplished for the 
North Carolina high school boys and girls. 

nnn 

Thrice-repeated and merited commendation is be- 
stowed in the report of the President, the Dean of 
the College of Liberal Arts, and the 
Director of the Bureau of Exten- 
sion, on the Y. M. C. A., a summary 
of whose many activities appears elsewhere in this 
number of The Review. In other days the Societies, 
the Senior Class, the Student Council, or some other 
organization, may have been entitled to the first place 
in student leadership on the campus. That honor 
today unquestionably belongs to the Y. M. C. A. 
Its power for good on the campus is generally recog- 
nized, and it is doing for the University a work that 
no other organization can do. In view of this fact, 
it deserves more liberal support at the hands of the 
University and alumni, and a new Y. M. C. A. house, 
costing not less than $50,000, should be one of the 
buildings planned for in the very near future. 

nnn 

In May, 1914, The Review went at some length 
into the matter of University finances, especially in 
so far as it concerned the salaries of 
the teaching staff and the physical 
equipment which the University could 
place at the disposal of its instructors. At that time 
The Review was thoroughly convinced that this 
constituted one of the biggest problems which the 
University has to face. It is still of this opinion. 
Every alumnus who has considered the matter even 
superficially, is interested in it, and will doubly wel- 
come President Graham's discussion of it in the fol- 
lowing paragraphs entitled, in his report, "Our 
Chief Concern" : 

We cannot lay too much emphasis on the fact that 
as administrators of the welfare of the University, 
our chief concern is to conserve and steadily to in- 
crease the strength of the faculty. Every change 
made in the staff, however small the position affected, 
and however temporary the change, is important, be- 
cause it is a change in the fundamental source of the 
institution's vitality. It means a gain or a loss at 
the heart of its life. The work of a university has no 



OUR CHIEF 
CONCERN 



worth except as its faculty are workers of worth. Al- 
though the ability, energy, and ideals of the members 
of a faculty vary as they do in the members of any 
other profession, and although, in spite of this varia- 
tion, uniformity of salary in the various grades is 
essential, it is no less essential that men of unusual 
distinction be recognized and encouraged, and re- 
warded in every possible way by the faculty and the 
governing board. ~No price is too great to pay for 
the services of a great teacher, and no democratic 
commonwealth is rich enough in men or poor enough 
in means to part with a great teacher at any price. 
North Carolina has in the past decade given to half 
a dozen other states some of their foremost teachers 
and educational leaders. To let such men go as a 
deliberate contribution to the development of other 
states would be a form of spiritual generosity worthy 
of some praise; but to let them go because of a small 
dift'ereuce in salary is the most foolish of all possible 
public extravagances. 

It is not that the difference of a few hundred dol- 
lars determines where a professor will do his work. 
For every man that accepted a call to work with a 
higher salary elsewhere, three have refused such 
calls. The clear fact of importance is that the qual- 
ity of the faculty of an institution will eventually be 
determined by the salaries it pays. The quality of 
the new men it can get is, in the main, fixed by the 
same consideration. It is absolutely necessary that 
we have largely increased funds to increase the gen- 
eral scale of the faculty salaries, and to increase the 
maximum for the highest grade, in order to approach 
fairly the salary average of institutions of equal rank, 
and to enable our professors under higher cost levels 
to live with tolerable freedom. The faculty and the 
trustees should require, with jealous and impartial 
care, that service of distinction (varying in quality 
or degree in the different grades) be rendered al- 
ways as a basis for promotion ; but where such ser- 
vice is rendered the healthful development of the 
institution demands that it be assured certain and 
generous recognition. This service of distinction by 
the faculty is the source of absolutely all of the virtue 
in the work that the University does, and no institu- 
tional activity, and no superficiality of college life, 
however attractive, should obscure this central and 
fundamental truth. 

nnn 

The next three or four months are to be extremely 
busy ones for the University. Three hundred debates 
in as many communities in the 
State are to be held and the final 
contest is to be carried through 
here. Tnterscholastic meets in basketball, baseball, 
tennis, and track are also scheduled for high schools 
and the winners are to try for honors on the campus. 



CAN YOU BE 
DEPENDED ON? 



98 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



Members of the faculty will till no less than one 
hundred appointments at school commencements and 
other public meetings. The Glee and Dramatic clubs 
will go on their spring tours, and the Bureau of Ex- 
tension will be pushing its work of serving the State 
through all of its organized departments. The work 
for students in the Summer School has already be- 
gun, and the student body in September should be 
greater than it has ever been before. 

Here is an opportunity for alumni support. To 
help in arranging the details of the local events, 
whether in debate or athletics, to assist the Uni- 
versity in making helpful connection with the local 
community, to interest prospective students in the 
University — all of this will be extremely helpful to 
your alma mater. The Review asks the direct ques- 
tion : Can you be depended on to take a definite part 
in this work ? Your help is greatly needed and will 
be warmly appreciated. 

nnn 

An extremely interesting exhibit could be given at 
the Library, if the University were so minded, of 
instances in the line of publications in 



IN THE 
LEAD 



which Carolina has led other Southern in- 
stitutions. The High School Bulletin 
would constitute exhibit A. Georgia, Alabama, and 
Illinois, to mention a state not Southern, have fol- 
lowed in the order named with a similar publication, 
and last week Virginia followed with volume one, 
number one of a publication so nearly like the 
University's that Professor Walker could scarcely 
distinguish which was the old and which was the new. 
Since Secretary Eankin started the machinery of the 
Debating Union, South Carolina, Florida, Virginia, 
Kentucky, and Tennessee have fallen in line, and 
their publications could he placed in Exhibit B to- 
gether with the original bulletin on "Woman Suff- 
rage." Exhibit C has to do with the Bureau of Ex- 
tension publications. South Carolina got under way 
last year and sent a delegate to the first meeting of 
the National University Extension Association and 
did almost all but adopt Carolina's motto, "Write to 
the University when you need help," in its first Ex- 
tension Series. And now comes Virginia with Ex- 
tension Series, volume one, number one, along the 
lines of Bulletin number six in Carolina's series. 
Fourth and last exhibit — -Exhibit D — comprises a 
collection of popular alumni periodicals beginning 
with The Altimni Review in October, 1912, and 
running in order through the Alcalde j of Texas, the 
Virginia Alumni News, down through the Vander- 
bilt Alumnus which made its first appearance in Oc- 



tober of this year. The News Letter must not be for- 
gotten — Exhibit E. Clemson and the A. and M. of 
North Carolina have followed in hot pursuit, but 
with no hope of ever catching up with their sprightly 
predecessor ! 

nnn 

The class of 1915 at Vanderbilt University from 
all departments numbered two hundred men. Last 
WHAT A spring these men met just before say- 

CERTAIN ing farewell to the University and 

CLASS DID talked over what Vanderbilt had 
meant to them and what they hoped to mean to Van- 
derbilt. They determined to interpret their loyalty 
in terms of service. Then one hundred and fifty 
of them sealed the bond of fealty by agreeing to 
pay to the class secretary $100 each toward the en- 
dowment of Vanderbilt. $5.00 was to be paid the 
first year, $5 the second, and $10 each succeeding 
year till the whole was paid. This one class there- 
fore will turn over to the university the sum of 
$15,000. 

nnn 

What, as you look back on it, most vividly remains 
with you from the college teaching you had ? The 
jjresidcnt of one of the leading 
universities recently reported 
these five reasons for poor teach- 
ing in college: "too few instruc- 
tors are interested in education; too great absorption 
in specialization ; teachers are careless as to the man- 
ners, speech, conduct, sense of proportion of students ; 
a bad tradition that prevents inspection of work of 
young teachers ; a mischievous notion that a man who 
is master of his subject is thereby of necessity a good 
teacher." He recommends "supervision of the work 
of inexperienced teachers ; that mere lecturing should 
not be tolerated, much less mere di'oning; that pre- 
liminary and introductory explanations should be 
made to show students the purpose and method of a 
course; that the psychological and not the logical 
order be followed in presenting matter to students." 
What was the most impressively helpful thing you 
got in the college classroom? Write us a hundred 
words or so about it. 



IN THE MATTER 
OF TEACHING: 
A QUESTION 



CAROLINA MEN RECEIVE SCHOLARSHIPS 

Anouncement was recently made by the Divinity 
School of Harvard University that scholarships had 
been awarded to W. C. Furr, '15, and D. L. Rights, 
'13, for the coming year. The scholarships represent 
$300 and $350 respectively. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 
THE Y. M. C. A. AT WORK 



90 



Every Departmsnt is Actively Engaged in Constructive Work in the Upbuilding of the 

Campus and Community 



To perfect an organization so that it can continue 
without the organizer is the highest type of suc- 
cess. This Frank Graham achieved, and when he 
went to New York he left behind him the most effi- 
cient and capable cabinet of many years to carry 
on the work of the Y. M. C. A. for the year 1915-lG. 

Work Started Early 

A good number of the cabinet members received 
great inspiration at Blue Ridge. The memories of 
those '"mountain top experiences" had not dimmed 
before Lee Edwards had, through the Freshman 
Continuation Committee, written a personal letter to 
every high school student who had signified his in- 
tention of entering the University in the fall. These 
assurances of welcome and protfered aid were warmly 
responded to, greetings of real pleasure and interest 
taking place at University Station where a large 
number of the Committee met the incoming new 
men. 

Information Bureau Gives Assistance 

Curtis Crissman and J. R. Edwards operated a 
most efficient information bureau, securing perma- 
nent ai:d temporary rooms for the men who came 
unprcimrcd; locating rooms already engaged; and 
discovering lost suit cases and trunks. For three 
days I he bureau kept the lobby of the building filled 
with seeking and satisfied, and piloted many of the 
new men through the difficulties of registration. 

College Night 

On the night of the first day of recitation a gen- 
eral meeting of all students was held by the Y. M. 
C. A. in Chapel where student leaders explained the 
varied forms of college activities, recommending that 
the new men take part in the literary societies, dra- 
matic and glee clul«, journalism, athletics, campus 
and community religion. After this meeting the 
entire freshman class was invited to meet the faculty, 
young ladies of the town, and upper classmen at the 
library where K. C. Vaughan had prepared ever- 
greens and refreshments. 

Students Furnished Positions 

TTerman Jernigan arrived before college opened 
and had secured knowledge of all available positions 
for self-help students. A large number of places 
were filled and are continuing to be filled through his 
department. Daily calls for student help are being 



answered. Jernigan's department also keeps tab on 
what the careless lose and the honest find and thcreliy 
brings daily rejoicing to the losers of keys, books, 
jewelry, money, fountain pens, etc. 

Bible Study Enrollment 

The work of the Bible study department was aus- 
piciously launched by Dr. 0. E. Brown of Vander- 
bilt University, who delivered three addresses on' 
"The Principles that Should Guide a ifan in 
College Life," "Lining Up With Christian Forces," 
and "The Bible as a Factor in Preparation." 
Through an immediate follow-up campaign ^ferril 
Parker and William Steele, as heads of the depart- 
ment, enrolled 280 men. Later canvassing placed the 
enrollment well over the 300 mark. Twenty-four 
groups meet every Sunday at 12:30 P. iL in the 
dormitories and out in town to study the Lives and 
Teachings of Christ and Paul. Rev. W. D. Moss 
and Mr. Edgar Turlington lead normal groups for 
the leaders during the week. Through these groups, 
movements are put through for campus uplift and 
betterment and for the maintenance of standards and 
ideals. 

Weekly Meetings Held 

The system of one regular meeting of the Y. M. 
C. A. a week was continued by Robert House and he 
has had such speakers as Frank Graham, Rev. J. 
J. D. Hall, of Philadelphia, and Dr. W. S. Rankin 
of Raleigh, to speak to large audiences. Faculty and 
student leaders have held good meetings from week 
to week. Ex-secretary W. J. Bryan came to speak 
to the University community upon the invitation of 
the Y. M. C. A. on November 14th. Memorial Hall 
was filled twice to hear him. 

Barnett Pays Visit 

A big event of the year was the retiirn of Eugene 
E. Barnett, two years general secretary of the Y. 
M. C. A. here and for the past five j-cars general 
secretary of the Y. ^L C. A. at Planchow, China. 
He spoke to the students at Chapel Hill twice and to 
a packed house in Gcrrard Hall. Those who had 
known him noted his marked increased power; those 
who met him paid high tribute to Carolina's repre- 
sentative on the foreign field. During his visit three 
students volunteered for the foreign field. Clai- 
bourne Royall has made a good start in raising the 



100 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



foreign fund which is used in the partial support of 
Bamett in his present work. 

First Zone Activities 

Early in September Ealph Stockton and Francis 
Bradshaw reorganized and continued the six Sunday 
schools conducted by the students in recent years. 
Although these schools are from two and one-half to 
four miles in the country, the enthusiasm of the 
leaders and thirty odd teachers is unfailing and a 
splendid service is being devotedly rendered. 

Moonlight School Campaigns 

It was through these schools that the moonlight 
schools were organized and launched on November 
1, to run for one month. A call for volunteer teach- 
ers resulted in 110 responses. A principal was 
named for each school and a corps of teachers as- 
signed to each. An attractive program on the first 
night brought out 330 of the rural folk and five 
schools were begun with an enrollment of 218. 
Among this number were sixteen illiterates. Courses 
were given in reading, writing, arithmetic, English, 
history, spelling and civil government. The schools 
were conducted three nights in the week with an 
average attendance of 160 per night. Twelve of the 
illiterates were taught to read and write and many 
more were taught to add, subtract and multiply. 
Over sixty students took some active part in the 
work. Lantern lectures were given at the schools on 
The Life of Christ, Tuberculosis, Eye, Ear, Nose 
and Throat. 

The work of the schools was characterized by the 
unselfish enthusiasm and untiring interest of the 
students ; the hearty response and sincere apprecia- 
tion on the part of the rural folk, and the willing 
and generous co-operation on the part of the Com- 
munity Club and townspeople in giving their time 
and automobiles to take the teachers to the schools. 

The longer established and more permanent edu- 
cational work of the Association is being done 
through Chairman W. B. Pitts in the Negro Night 
School, which, with an enrollment of sixty-six and 
a corps of twelve teachers meets five nights in the 
week. On IMonday nights Cecil Rymer conducts an 
interesting debating society. The courses given are 
English, reading, writing, mathematics, spelling, and 
history. 

Last Spring, after the Mott meetings, Marion Fow- 
ler extended his work among the mill people of Carr- 
boro from a boy's club into a night school for every 
one. This year he has continued the work with ail 
excellent organization, and a strong and efiicient fac- 
ulty of fifteen. The enrollment is seventy-five, the 



average attendance being fifty-five. The school is 
conducted five nights in the week and prepares for 
the High School. Two debating societies among the 
young men have aroused keen interest. 

Evangelistic Campaign Planned 

For the spring term, Mr. Francis Miller, of the 
International Committee of the Y. M. C. A., is to 
be here February 4th, 5th, and 6th, for an evange- 
listic campaign. Mr. Trawick and Dr. Weatherford, 
both of the International Committee, have also prom- 
ised to visit the campus during the spring. 

Financial Statement 

On December 11th the receipts from the faculty, 
parents, alumni, the University, and the students 
amounted to $1,354.22 and the expenditures to 
$1,233.57. All payments are made by check, counter- 
signed by the advisory treasurer, Mr. J. A. Warren, 
with vouchers on file for every cent. A detailed 
statement of the finances of the Association for the 
year follows : 



RECEIPTS 

Members 

Parents 

Alumni 

Faculty 

Rent 

Lyceum 

U. of N. C 

Books 

Barnett fund 

Incidentals 



274.50 
36.00 

168.50 
39.00 
39.00 

250.00 

350.00 
20.85 
51.00 

125.37 



EXPENDITURES 

Speakers . . . .' $ 50.20 

Printing and stat'y- • 121.25 

Postage 67.00 

Reading room 17.70 

Buildmg 25.28 

Lyceum 259.15 

Secretary's salary . . 399.00 

Books 46.23 

Barnett fund 50.00 

Incidentals 197.76 



Total $1,354.22 



Total $1,233.57 

Balance $ 120.65 

Bills Due 75.00 



Balance $ 45.65 



Proposed Budget for 1915-'16 



RECEIPTS 
Members 


.$ 500.00 


Rents 


. 200.00 


Barnett fund 

Blue Ridge 


. 300.00 
. 300.00 
. 200.00 




. 100.00 


Faculty 

U. of N. C 

Lyceum 


. 150.00 
. 350.00 
. 400.00 



EXPENDITURES 



Expenditures 



$2,500.00 
.$3,245.00 



Deficit, '14-'15. 

Speakers 

Barnett fund . . 
Blue Ridge ... 

Reception 

Books 

Reading room 

Building 

Int. Com 

P'tg and sta'y . 

Postage 

Handbook . . . . 
Sec. salary . . . . 
Incidentals 
Lyceum 



Short $ 745.10 



.$ 524.10 

. 150.00 

. 300.00 

. 300.00 

36.00 

50,00 

. 30.00 

30.00 

35.00 

50.00 

15.00 

. 25.00 

. 1,200.00 

. 100.00 

. 400.00 

$3,245.10 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



101 



IN THE FIELD OF ATHLETICS 



Representatives of the Faculty, Alumni, and Student Body Approve the Idea of a Director 

of Athletics and Alumni Coaching 



Eepresentatives from the University faculty, 
alumui, aud students met at Chapel Hill on the night 
of Deeemher IS in the English Conference Eoom 
for the purpose of discussing the future athletic poli- 
cies of the University. While definite plans and 
names were informally talked over in connection 
with the football coaching for next year, it was not 
within the purpose or authority of the meeting to 
determine who the coach should be, but rather to lay 
plans for athletic development along large construc- 
tive lines. The selection of coaches rests with the 
Athletic Council, which is composed of Dr. C. S. 
Mangiim, of the faculty; Mr. A. L. Cox, of the 
alumni; and Mr. C. T. Woollen, the graduate man- 
ager. A number of alumni who were unable to be 
present sent letters setting forth their views. 

The meeting reached substantial agreement on the 
following policies: that alumni coaching be adopted 
as soon and as completely as alumni could be found 
able to take charge of the coaching; that a general 
director of athletics be secured, if possible, of the 
highest type in ability and personality, to have ad- 
ministrative charge of all athletics, and membership 
in the faculty ; that under his leadership especial em- 
phasis be laid on the general participation in athlet- 
ics; and outdoor sports as an essential part of educa- 
tion be encouraged and facilities be provided for the 
whole student body to play games; that the highest 
standards of sportsmanship be steadily insisted on, 
not only in theory, but in every detail of practice; 
that the insistence of the faculty on creditable 
scholastic standards for athletes be endorsed, and 
the support of alumni urged in maintaining these 
standards at all times; that competent instruction 
be provided for every branch of sport, and that 
the development of high school athletics be encour- 
aged by the alumni in co-operation with the 
alumni of other colleges, entirely apart from 
the consideration of where the students expect to 
attend college; and that the alumni may co-operate 
heartily and fully with authorities in putting these 
principles into full practice, future meetings such as 
this for consultation be called. The meeting also 
expressed its desire to promote progress in athletics 
in the State and section through co-operating in every 
possible way with other colleges, and encouraging 
confidence and friendliness in all athletic relations. 

With this platform as a basis for future action, the 



Athletic Council, through the Graduate Manager, 
has taken up the question of schedule for 1916 and 
is now at work attempting to carry out the general 
progTam proposed. Announcements of an interest- 
ing nature may be expected at an early date. 

Coach Trenchard Goes Into Business 

After three years of service as head coach at the 
University, T. G. Trenchard goes to South Carolina 
February 1st to enter the real estate and lumber 
business. Coming to the University in. 1913 im- 
mediately after Carolina had experienced the most 
disastrous season of her career, he resolutely set to 
work to rebuild the team and to put athletics, foot- 
ball especially, on a firmer basis. During his stay 
on the campus he has given himself unstintedly to 
the task, and although victory over Virginia has not 
been won, Carolina's football standing has steadily 
improved. The good wishes of the student body and 
alumni follow him in his new work. 

Attend National Collegiate Athletic Association 

Along with 157 other colleges and universities of 
the United States, Carolina was represented by Pro- 
fessors Howell and Patterson and Messrs. Wollen 
and F. P. Graham at the annual meeting of the Na- 
tional Collegiate Athletic Association which met at 
the Hotel Astor in New York on December 29. 
Dean L. R. Briggs, of Harvard, presided and stated 
the purpose of the meeting as being that of bettering 
intercollegiate athletics. The special topic which 
continued to come up for discussion was professional- 
ism in intercollegiate baseball. Dr. C. H. Herty, of 
the faculty athletic committee, was appointed as a 
member of the third athletic district commission, 
which concerns itself with athletic problems within 
a half dozen southeastern and southern states. 
Carolina to Meet Harvard 

According to annouccments made by the football 
managements of the University and Harvard, the 
White and Blue squad is to meet the wearers of the 
Crimson at Cambridge on October 14th, Carolina 
thereby having her first opponuiity of meeting Har- 
vard in a gridiron contest. Further announcement 
is also made that Princeton will be played early in 
the season if present plans work out satisfactorily. 

The complete schedule for Ifllfi has not been an- 
nounced, but Graduate Manager Woolen states that 
games have been arranged to date with Virginia, 



102 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



Harvard, Wake Forest, Georgia Teeh, V. M. I., 
Princeton, and Davidson. Games with Eichmond 
College and South Carolina are pending. V. M. I. 
and Wake Eorcst are to be played on the Hill and 
if South Carolina and Richmond College are sched- 
uled they will be played on Emerson Field. 

On account of the fact that the game with Harvard 
is scheduled for October 14, it will be impossible to 
have a home game on University Day. However, a 
special effort will be made to bring the alumni to the 
Hill for some of the games to be played here. The 
question of adequate railroad service for the games is 
now receiving consideration, and by September it is 
hoped that plans will be matured by which attend- 
ance at the games by large crowds can be made 

possible. 

Basketball 

By losing 22-27 to Wake Forest in Ealeigh on 
January 15th, Carolina closed the pre-examination 
period of her basketball season. Previous to the 
Wake Forest game she had won from Elon and 
Statesville Y. M. C. A. and had broken even with 
Durham Y. M. C. A. in a two-game engagement. 
The schedule for the remainder of the season follows: 

February 3, Maryville (Tenn.) at Chapel Hill. 

February 7, Virginia at Richmond. 

February 8, V. P. I. at Roanoke, Va. 

February 9. Roanoke College at Salem, Va. 

February 10, Randolph-Macon at Bedford, Va. 

February 11, Washington-Lee at Lexington, Va 

February 12, Virginia Military Institute at Lexington, Va. 

February 16, Davidson at Chapel Hill. 

February 19, Open. 

February 24, Guilford at Guilford. 

February 25, Statesville Y. M. C. A. at Statesville. 

February 25, Davidson at Statesville. 

March 1, Guilford at Chapel Hill. 

Baseball Schedule 

Carolina's baseball season, as announced by Man- 
ager Black, will begin on March 18th with Elon, and 
close with the Navy on April 29 at Annapolis. Be- 
tween these two dates fourteen games have been pro- 
vided and one or two dates still remain open. So far 
nine games have been scheduled for the Hill, the one 
with Virginia on April 3rd in all probability being 
the one reserved for the christening of Emerson 
Field. 

The schedule follows: 

March 18, Elon at Chapel Hill. 

March 24, W. Va. Weslyan at Chapel Hill. 

March 25, Oak Ridge at Chapel Hill. 

March 29, Wake Forest at Chapel Hill. 

April 1, Virginia at Greensboro. 

April 3, Virginia at Chapel Hill. 

April 4, Riclimond College at Chapel Hill. 

April 5, William and Mary at Chapel Hill. 

April 6 or 7, N. Y. Yankees at Chapel Hill. 



Apr 
Apr 
Apr 
Apr 
Apr: 
Apr: 
Apr: 
Apr 



1 18, Wake Forest at Rocky Mount. 

1 21, Penn. State at Chapel Hill. 

1 24, Davidson at Winston-Salem. 

1 25, Virginia at Charlottesville, Va. 

1 26, Catholic Univ. at Washington, D. C. 

1 27, Georgetown at Washington, D. C. 

1 28, Open. 

1 29, Navy at Annapolis, Md. 



Track Outlook for 1916 

The track schedule for this spring has been made 
public by Manager Frank Hackler. It consists of 
five meets, two of which will take place on the Hill. 
For the first time in four years Washington and Leo 
University will be met here. The date is April 22nd. 
This should be one of the best meets ever held in 
the State. Arrangements are being made to hold the 
State Meet on Emerson Field this spring. In addi- 
tion to the schedule of meets mentioned here it is 
likely that a relay team will be sent to Washington 
on February ISth to enter in a race against the 
Carlisle Indian team. 

The University track team has an unusual amount 
of good material this year. Among the letter 
men back are: Captain Patterson who runs the 
quarter mile; Smith, 220-yard dash; Johnson, 100 
yards; Homewood, pole vaulter; Ramsey, shot put- 
ter ; and Wright, who broke the State record in broad 
jump last year. Gannt, a University of Virginia 
letter man, is here this year also. Mr. C. T. Woollen 
states that a coach and general trainer will be se- 
cured as soon as posible. 

The schedule is as follows: 

April 8, Clemson College at Clemson College. 

April 15, Washington and Lee at Chapel Hill. 

April 22, V. P. L at Blacksburg. 

April 24, V. M. I. at Lexington, (Pending). 

April 29, State Meet at Chapel Hill. 

May 1, S. I. A. A. at Richmond or Baltimore. 

A. and M. Wins Cross Country Run 

In the four-mile cross country run held here 'No- 
vember 20th, A. and M. was victorious, winning by 
a margin of two points. Upchurch of Carolina finish- 
ed first with a time of 22 :15. Rand of Carolina came 
second, Init Nimnis was not able to finish better than 
eleventh. Goodson, Johnson and Capt. Millwcc, all 
of A. and M., finished third, fourth, and fifth, re- 
spectively and thereby won the race. The Durham 
road was used as the course with the start and finish 
in front of the post office. The score was as follows: 
A. and M., 12; Carolina, 14; Trinity, 24; Wake 
Forest, 27. 

This was the first State-wide race of the kind ever 
held in the State and all the teams present informed 
Manager Hackler of their desire to make the race an 
annual event. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



103 



ROBERT NEY McNEELY GOES DOWN WITH PERSIA 

Involving the question of diplomatic relations 
between the United States and Austria-Hungary, 
the death of Kobert Xey McXeely, Law '07, consul 
to Aden, as a result of the sinking of the Persia in 
Mediterranean waters on December 30, has become a 
matter of nation-wide interest and has brought to 
the heart of the University, of which he was a most 
worthy son, profound sorrow. 

McISTeely, who at the time of his death was en- 
route to Aden, Arabia, to which post he had been 



J!' ,.-j^^Bi 


WM 




if ^^1 




■1 



ROBERT NEY McNEELY 

appointed by President Wilson last October, was 
born in Jackson township, in Union county, on No- 
vember 11, 1883. In a family of eleven children, 
he was the third son. He received his early educa- 
tion at the College Hill and Waxhaw S3hools, and 
in 1905 he entered the University. After spending 
one year in the academic department, he began the 
study of law, winning the Shepherd Bryan prize for 
the best thesis in that subject in 1907. In the same 
year he received his license and began the practice 
of his profession at Monroe. In 1909 he represented 
his county in the lower house of the General Assem- 
bly, and in 1915 returned to the Legislature as a 
member of the Senate. His most distinctive service 
was the introduction and splendid work for a thor- 
ough-going State-wide primary law. 

By the student body and his colleagues in the 
General Assembly he was held in high esteem and in 
his passing the University is bereft of a son in whose 
career there was every evidence of splendid promise. 



HONORS AT GRADUATION 

By a recent vote, the faculty has established two 
distinctions to be awarded at commencement. These 
distinctions are to be known as Honors and Highest 
Honors in the division or field chosen by the student 
for concentrated study. The purpose is to stimulate 
scholarship by giving a broader point of view than 
that attained by a man who merely passes off, no mat- 
ter how creditably, a given number of courses. Stu- 
dents are to be encouraged to regard honors at gradu- 
ation as the highest academic honor attainable. Un- 
like Phi Beta Kappa, the attainment of honors is 
not dependent upon high numerical grades alone, 
though no student will gain the distinction unless all 
his work is of high quality. 

The chief feature of the plan consists in the trans- 
ference in the case of brilliant students, of responsi- 
bility from the lecturer to the student ; the emphasis 
is placed on the subject rather than on the course. 
Study groups are to be formed, conducted by students 
outside of class, where, in the society of older stu- 
dents in the same field and of members of the faculty, 
topics in literature, history, and science may be dis- 
cussed with no suggestion of text book or lectures, 
and a relationship established between the great fields 
of study comprising the curriculum and the questions 
arising from the intensely dramatic and significant 
life of today. In this relationship between the col- 
lege course and life, in the higher level of thought 
and conversation to be encouraged, and in the attempt 
to attain something like mastery of a field of thought 
instead of certain isolated courses, the new plan 
ought to prove, as President Graham remarks in his 
report, a "genuine stimulus to the intellectual life of 
the college." 

The following details of administration may be 
noted. All coiirses, in the minor subjects as well as 
the major, must be passed with high credit. In con- 
nection with the regular courses, a considerable 
amount of outside reading is expected, or such other 
supplementary work as may be prescribed by the de- 
partments, in every case closely related to the general 
plan of study mapped out by the student. In this 
work students will have the guidance and assistance 
of special instructors, the object being to stimulate 
interest in reading not required as a part of the reg- 
ular class work, for its culture value rather than for 
direct preparation for exariiinations. Near the close 
of the senior year a general final examination, oral or 
written or both, will be given. This examination 
will test the general knowledge of the candidate on 
the whole field of concentrated study, and will also 
test his proficiency in a special topic w^ithin the gen- 



104 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



eral field. The object of this examination, as of the 
prescriptions for parallel reading, is to secure better 
correlation of courses and relative mastery of the 
entire field. The entire plan thus seeks to adapt to 
local conditions certain admirable features of the 
English university system and of the Princeton sys- 
tem. 

The administration of the Honors courses is to 
be vested in a Committee on Degrees with Distinction 
of which Professor Edwin Greenlaw is the chairman. 



Lenoir, Pender, N^ew Hanover, Pamlico, Pasquotank, 
Perquimans, Polk, Rutherford, Stanley, Tyrrell, 
Yadkin, Yancey have one. 



NINETY-THREE COUNTIES ENTER THE DEBATING 
UNION 

Three hundred and twelve high schools in 93 
coTinties of North Carolina have enrolled with Secre- 
tary E. R. Rankin for the approaching triangular de- 
bates of the High School Debating Union which will 
be held over the State on March 31st. This is the 
largest enrollment in the Union's history and a great 
State-wide debate is expected. The schools winning 
their two debates on March 31st will send their teams 
to Chapel Hill to compete on April 13th and 14th in 
the final contest for the Aycock Memorial Cup. 

In preparation for the debates steady work is be- 
ing done in the high schools by prospective dehaters. 
This fact is evidenced by the many letters requesting 
material and other assistance which daily come to the 
Bureau of Extension. The query to be discussed is 
"Resolved, That the United States should adopt the 
policy of greatly enlarging its Navy." In order to 
aid the debaters, a 64 page bulletin on this subject 
was compiled and issued by the Bureau of Exten- 
sion. Three thousand copies of this have been sent 
to the high schools. 

Buncombe County leads the State with 13 schools 
enrolled. Robeson comes next with 12, and Guilford 
follows with 10. Alamance has 9 and Mecklenburg 
8. Johnston, Nash and Wake have 7 each. Gaston, 
Iredell and Union have 6 each. Beaufort, Durham, 
Cleveland, Moore, Northampton, Orange, Rocking- 
ham, Rowan, Scotland, Vance, Warren and Wayne 
have 5 schools enrolled each. Alleghany, Bladen, Ca- 
barrus, Chatham, Columbus, Duplin, Durham, For- 
syth, Granville, Hyde, Richmond, Wilkes and Wil- 
son follow with 4. Anson, Ashe, Caldwell, Carteret, 
Catawba, Davidson, Franklin, Gates, Halifax, Har- 
nett, Linclon, Macon, McDowell, Montgomery, Pitt, 
Sampson, Snrry and Wai^hington have 3 each ; Alex- 
ander, Bertie, Burke, Caswell, Cherokee, Craven, 
Dare, Edgecombe, Haywood, Henderson, Jackson, 
Lee, Martin, Onslow Person, Randolph, Stokes, 
Swain, Transylvania 2 ; and Camden, Chowan, Cum- 
berland, Currituck, Davie, Greene, Hertford, Jones, 



COMMISSION ON RACE PROBLEMS MEETS 

The University Commission for the Study of Ne- 
gro Problems in the South held its annual meeting 
at the University in the rooms of the North Carolina 
Club on January 5th. No formal program was pre- 
sented, but the commission, together with members 
of the University faculty, discussed a number of 
interesting questions concerning the betterment of 
the Negro in the South. Those participating in the 
discussions were: Dr. James F. Dillard, University 
of Virginia; W. M. Hunley (secretary), V. M. I.; 
Dr. Morse, University of South Carolina ; Dr. Pharr, 
Laiiversity of Florida ; Dr. De Loach, University of 
Georgia; Professor Scroggs, University of Louisian- 
na; Prof. W. S. Sutton (chairman). University of 
Texas; Dean Haskins, University of Tennessee; Dr. 
D. Y. Thomas, University of Arkansas; Dean Dos- 
ter. University of Alabama ; Prof. E. C. Branson, 
University of North Carolina. Members of the fa- 
culty as follows also spoke informally before the 
Commission: Professors L. A. Williams, Chase, 
Hamilton, L. R. Wilson, Walker, Henderson, Noble 
and Stacy. 



Y. M. C. A. TO HEAR FRANCIS MILLER 

Mr. Francis Miller of New York City and a mem- 
ber of the International Committee of the Y. M. C. 
A. will be in Chapel Hill for a series of evangelistic 
meetings on Feb. 4th., 5th., and 6th. The meetings 
will be characterized by personal work more than by 
addresses to large audiences. There will, however, 
be two public meetings, one on Friday night the 4th, 
and one on Sunday night the 6th. All the students 
and the University community will be welcomed to 
these meetings. 

The larger part of the evangelistic work will be in 
small group meetings in the dormitories, fraterni- 
ties, and Y. M. C. A. rooms. Mr. 0. B. Hinnant, of 
Wilmington, Boys work Secretary there, Mr. Roy 
John, General Secretary of the Clemson College Y. 
M. C. A., Mr. J. J. King, of the A. and M. Y. M. 
C. A., and Mr. W G Somerville, of Davidson, will 
be at the University with Mr. Miller. 



RALEIGH WINS FOR THE THIRD TIME 

The third annual football contest among the high 
schools of North Carolina resulted in the Raleigh 
high school team's winning the championship in the 
final game played with the Charlotte team at Chapel 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



105 



Hill on December 20th. The score was 6 to in 
favor of Raleigh. This is the third consecutive time 
that the Raleigh team has won the Stare champion- 
ship and the award of the loving cup. The Raleigh 
team was coached by G. B. Phillips, '13, teacher in 
the Raleigh high school, and the Charlotte team was 
coached by Marvin L. Ritch, '13, city attorney of 
Charlotte. A large number of schools took part in 
the contest this year and great interest was aroused 
over the State by it. 



tween the two institutions will be held in Washing- 
ton, D. C. next fall. 



FACULTY ATTENDED MEETINGS DURING 
HOLIDAYS 

The University was well represented at meetings 
of the learned societies of America during the Christ- 
mas holidays. Among the members who attended 
these various societies are the following: 

Doctors Norman Foerster and H. M. Dargan at- 
tended a meeting of the Modern Language Associa- 
tion, in Cleveland, 0., at which meeting Dr. Dargan 
presented a paper on "The Irony of Swift." 

Dr. Geo. Howe was in Princeton, N. J., to attend 
a meeting of the American Philological Asociation. 

Dr. W. D. McNider attended the meeting of the 
American Pharmacological Association, in Boston, 
ilass., where he presented a paper and was elected 
a member of the Council. 

Dr. E. C. Branson attended, and took an active 
part in, the meeting of the Race Commission, which 
met once in Durham, and once in Chapel Hill. 

Dr. W. C. Coker was in 'New York doing some 
private work in the Bronx Botanical Gardens. 

Dr. J. G. dcR. Hamilton was present at the meet- 
ing of the American Historical Association at Wash- 
ington, D. C. 



CAROLINA WINS FROM GEOGE WASHINGTON 

In the inter-collegiate debate between the Univer- 
sity of Xorth Carolina and George Washington Uni- 
versity held at Chapel Hill December 20th, Carolina 
was victorious, her representatives winning the unani- 
mous decision of the judges. Carolina's debaters 
were : R. B. House and A. II. Wolfe ; George Wash- 
ington was represented by P. Bryan ^lorehouse and 
Charles W. Jacobson. President E. K. Graham pre- 
sided over the debate and Oliver Rand acted as secre- 
tary. The judges were: Dr. T. P. Harrison, of A. 
and M. College,^ Dr. W. K. Boyd, of Trinity College, 
and Pres. W. A. Harper, of Elon College. This is 
the third debate held between Carolina and George 
Washington. Of the three debates, Carolina has won 
two and George Wahington one. Another debate be- 



PHI WINS SOPH-JUNIOR DEBATE 

In the annual Soph-Junior debate, held on the 
night of December 16, the Philanthropic Society 
won the decision on the query: Resolved, That the 
United States should adopt some policy of compul- 
sory military training for young men possessing the 
right to vote. The Phi, advocating the affirmative 
point of view, was represented by A. M. Coats, of 
Smithfield, and J. K. Holloway, of Raleigh, N. C. 
R. Edney, of Mars Hill, and C. B. Hyatt, of Boon- 
ville, represented the Di. Hugh Hester and R. L. 
Young were the officers of the debate. Dr. W. D. 
McNider and Messrs. R. H. Thornton and W. W. 
Pierson serving as judges. 



LAW CLASS BANQUETS 

On the night of December 16th forty-two students 
in the junior and senior law classes, together with 
their guests, held the annual banquet of the Univer- 
sity Law School. Richard H. Shuford, of Hickory, 
was toastmaster and R. O. Everett, of Durham, was 
alumni speaker. Other addresses were made during 
the seven course dinner by Dean L. P. McGehee and 
Prof. A. C. Mcintosh, of the Law School, Dean M. 
H. Stacy, of the University, and Z. V. Norman, D. 
L. Bell, and T. W. Ruffin, of the student body. 



AT THE PAN-AMERICAN SCIENTIFIC CONGRESS 

At the Pan-American Scientific Congress which 
met at Washington, D. C, December 27-January 7, 
and which was attended by more than 1100 
delegates from the twenty-one American republics, 
the University was represented by President Graham 
and Drs. Raper and Herty. President Graham, to- 
gether with Dr. Elmer E. Brown, spoke before the 
educational section of the Congress on "The Human- 
istic Side of LTniversity Extension work." Drs. Raper 
and Herty spoke respectively before the economic 
and chemical sections of the Congress. 

The University was the only institution from the 
South Atlantic States represented in the Congress, 
and its participation in it was such as to call forth 
from the press of the country unusually high com- 
mendation. 



At a recent meeting of industrial chemists, Dr. 
C. II. Herty was chosen to serve as chairman of the 
advisory committee which will have charge of the 
•National Exposition of Chemical Industries to be 
held in New York City in 1916. 



106 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



I g •■ ♦■ ♦■ ♦ •••••o»*»»i 



'•••♦■••♦•♦♦♦•• o < 



THE STATE-WIDE CAMPUS OF THE UN 

MAXIMUM SERVICE TO T 



A. The College of Liberal Arts. B. The School of Applied Science. C. The Graduate Sch 

G. The School of Education. H. The Sir 




WRITE TO THE UNIVERSF 



s« 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



107 



>••»♦•♦»< 



►m 



^ERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA IN 1915 

1 PEOPLE OF THE STATE 

D. The School of Law. E. The School of Medicine. F. The School of Pharmacy. 
ler School. L The Bureau of Extension. 



unty Church, Sunday School, Rural Home, 
i Heatth Purveys.- Community Service 
unty Teachers' Me^ting5 and RaWy 
Conducts 6 Rural Sunday 5chool5, 
.Students m 5 Moonlight ochoola, 
nducl5 a Night School at ^^e-^ 

Carrboro. 




WHEN YOU NEED HELP 



-Q 



108 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



THE ALUMNI R E V I EW 

Issued monthly except in July, August, and September, hy the Gen- 
eral Alumni Association of the University of North Carolina. 

Board of Publication 

The Review is edited by the following Board of Publication: 

Louis R. Wilson, '99 Editor 

Associate Editors: Walter Murphy, '93; Harry Howell, '95; Archib.ild 
Henderson, '98; W. S. Bernard, '00; J. K. Wilson, '05; Louis 
Graves, '02; F. P. Graham, '09; Kenneth Tanner, '11. 
D. R. Rankin, '13 Managing Editor 

Subscription Price 

Single Copies $0.15 

Per Year 1.00 

Communications intended for the Editor should be sent to Chapel 
Hill. N. C; for the Managing Editor, to Chapel Hill. N C. All 
communications intended ^ r publication must be accompanied with 
signatures if they are to receive consideration. 

OFFICE OF PUBLICATION. CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 

Entered at the Postoffice at Chapel Hill, N. C, as second class 
matter. 



AMONG CAROLINA'S M. D'S. 

News from Bnltimore concerning the work of C. 
M. Byrnes, '02, iiistrnctor in clinical neurology at 
Johns Hopkins University, and the press notices 
relating to the researches of J. B. Murphy, of the 
Bockefeller Institute, in the investigation and treat- 
ment of cancer, afford new evidence of the fact that 
since 1900 Carolina has sent into the study of medi- 
cine an unusually large number of students who 
are rapidly emerging as specialists in their partic- 
ular fields. 

Dr. Byrnes captured the Worth prize in the Uni- 
versity in his senior year, and a few years ago, 
while back on a visit to the Hill, turned aside from 
his medical investigations long enough to lecture 
to Professor Williams' class in "Philosophy 4." 
At that time he was a member of the medical faculty 
of the University of Virginia. In 1909 he returned 
to Johns Hopkins where he had received his degree 
in medicine and had served as demonstrator in 
anatomy during his medical course, to begin his 
brilliant work in neurology. He is a member of the 
leading scientific and medical societies of the country 
and a contributor to the best medical journals of the 
day. 

Dr. J. B. Murphy's specialty has been the inves- 
tigation of cancer. Becently at a meeting of the 
National Academy of Sciences held at the American 
Museum of National History in New York, Dr. 
Murphy reported on his work in this field. For some 
time he and his associates in the Rockefeller Insti- 
tute have been experimenting upon rats from which 
cancers have been removed with the X-Bay and 
have tried to stimulate the growth of the white cells 



that originate in the spleen and float in the lymph. 
He has found that the treatment has resulted in 
making the subjects immune to the return of the 
growth. 

Another Carolinian whose work in surgery is re- 
ceiving marked attention is Dr. John A. Pemberton, 
formerly of Fayetteville, but for the past eighteen 
months with the Mayo Brothers, at Rochester, Min. 

Dr. I. M. Boykin is with the American Ambu- 
lance Corps in Paris. 

Dr. Paul A. Petree is chief resident at the Bryn 
Mawr Hospital, at Brjn Mawr, Pa. 

Dr. N. F. Rodman has recently been appointed 
chief resident of the Presbyterian Hospital in Phila- 
delphia. 

Dr. J. Richard Allison is practicing at Hazelton, 
Pa. 

Dr. J. F. Kendrick is physician for the Dare 
Lumber Company at Buffalo City, N. C. 

Dr. W. P. Belk is resident physician at the Epis- 
copal Hospital in Philadelphia. 

Dr. Robert Drane is an instructor in the depart- 
ment of clinical medicine in the University of Wis- 
consin. 

Dr. Louis Hicks Williams recently stood the ex- 
aminations given by the Examining Board for posi- 
tions in the medical reserve corps of the Navy. He 
has the distinction of having made the highest grades 
recorded in the examination. He is now a member 
of the U. S. Naval Corps at Norfolk, Va. 



MR. ALFRED NOYES READS 

Mr. Alfred Noyes, so happily remembered for his 
former reading here more than a year ago, repeated 
that success with a program if anything more versa- 
tile. The robustness of his form, the enthusiasm of 
his personality, and infectious simplicity of his read- 
ing are singularly attractive and winning. The 
poem, which gives the title to his new volume, The 
Lord of Misrule, marked the high pitch of the even- 
ing's performance; but the finely-keyed "Song of 
Sherwood" and the radiant melodrama of "The High- 
waymen" won equal favor. But it is unnecessary 
to single individual poems and individual excel- 
lencies. ]\fr. Noyes lived up to his reputation, fully 
— which is no mean achievement. 



PROFESSOR BENJAMIN F. SLEDD THE UNIVER- 
SITY'S GUEST 

On the evening of November 30tli, Professor Slcdd, 
head of the Department of English of Wake Forest 
College, lectured in Gerrard Hall on "Impressions 
Abroad in War Times." For well nigh an hour and 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



109 



a half he held the undivided attention of the audience 
— with his narration of personal experiences, impres- 
sive word-painting of historic and literary shrines, 
acute observations on the temper and spirit of the 
nations at war, incisive comments on affairs and 
events, amusing anecdotes effectively told. So full 
with interesting matter was the lecture that it would 
be only unfair to attempt to resume it here. 

Suffice it to say that he brought certain ideas and 
impressions back from Europe, which were almost 
startling in their divergence from the "truths" which 
have already become stereotyped in popular con- 
sciousness. A particularly interesting feature of the 
evening was the reading of his own notable poem, "A 
Virginian in Surrey," which appeared in the London 
Times and brought him many attentions during his 
sojourn in England. The program was concluded 
with the reading of a fragment from his report to 
Kahn Foundation, under whose auspices he made his 
European tour. 



LECTURE DATES TO REMEMBER 

Alumni will do well to remember the following 
University lecture engagements: 

The MclNTair Lectures, March 3, 4, nad 5, by 
Frederick J. E. Woodbridge, Dean of the Graduate 
School of Columbia L'niversity. 

Weil Lectures on American Citizenship, March 
29, 30, and 31, by George Brinton McClelland, form- 
er Mayor of l^ew York. 

Lectures on Art and Literature, April 19, 20, and 
21, by Bliss Perry, Lowell Professor of Literature 
at Harvard University. 



MR. A. E. LOEW TO LECTURE 

Mr. A. E. Loew, lecturer at Oxford University, 
now in this country on leave of absence, will lecture 
before the Philological Club and advanced students 
in the various language departments on the evenings 
of January 27, 28, 29. The first lecture will con- 
cern itself with a recently discovered manuscript of 
Pliny the Younger, and will form the program of the 
January meeting of the Club. The titles of the other 
lectures are: "Ancient Book-making," and "How the 
Classics Came Down to us.". They will be illustrated 
with lantern slides. 



DR. HERTY IS RE-ELECTED PRESIDENT 

Dr. Charles Holmes Herty, head of the depart- 
ment of chemistry in the University, was notified dur- 
ing the holidays of his re-election as president of 
the American Chemical Society for the coming year. 



This is an unusually high honor as it is not the policy 
of the society to re-elect its presidents. 

Presidents of the American Chemical Society are 
nominated by the balloting of the 7,500 members of 
the society. The names of the four receiving the 
highest number of votes are then submitted to the 
council of the society, which consists of lOS members. 
The council chooses the president from these four 
leading candidates. 

Doctor Herty's policy during the past year has 
been devoted to the development of national self-con- 
tainedness in the chemical industry. 



STARS AND LETTERS AWARDED 

The following members of the football squad re- 
ceived stars or letters at a meeting of the Athletic 
Council in December: Stars — Parker, Reid, Dave 
Tayloe, Tandy, Cowell, F. Jones, Homewood, Ram- 
say, and Wright; Letters — Grimes, Boshamer, Mac- 
Donald, Hines, J. Tayloe, and Love. All recipients 
of stars or letters were given sweaters. 



BOOK EXCHANGE DISTRIBUTES EARNINGS 

Through the Book Exchange established by the 
University in September a refund of $538,58 was 
made to the students during the fall. This represent- 
ed a ten per cent rebate on the total business — $5,- 
385.82— done by Exchange. The Y. M. C. A. also 
sold $450 worth of books for the students on a 5 
per cent commission basis. 



Extension lectures have been delivered recently by 
members of the University faculty as follows : E. C. 
Branson, local chapter of U. D. C, Goldsboro, Jan. 
19th; J. M. Booker, woman's club of Louisburg, 
Jan. I7th; Collier Cobb, woman's club of Hender- 
son, Jan. 14th. E. A. Harrington will speak before 
the woman's club of Henderson, Jan. 28th. 

Dr. C. L. Raper has recently been chosen chairman 
of a permanent committee on Tax Education ap- 
pointed by the Conference for Education and Indiis- 
try in the South. 

Prof. E. C. Branson and Dr. L. A. Williams were 
contributors to the January number of the Educa- 
tional Monlhly, published at Athens, Ga. 

The Tar Heel for December 16, appeared as a 
Y. M. C. A. special. It set forth in a very compre- 
hensive way the activities of that organization. 

Professor Collier Cobb spent three days during 
November at Boone assisting in laying out the plan 
for future buildings on the campus of the Appala- 
chian Training School. 



110 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



THE GENERAL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

of the 
UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 



Officers of the Association 

Julian S. Carr, '66 President 

Walter Murphy, '92 Secretary 

THE ALUMNI 
E. R. RANKIN 13, Alumni Editor 



ALUMNI MEETINGS 

The Review is glad to record accounts of the meetings 
which were held by alumni and students in various localities 
during the holidays. The idea of holding meetings at Christ- 
mas time is growing in popular favor among Carolina men, 
and deservedly so. 



BURLINGTON 

The Alamance County alumni and students of the Univer- 
sity held an excellent banquet on the evening of December 
27th at the Piedmont Hotel, Burlington. The attendance was 
51, this including a number of ladies who were present as 
guests. 

W. H. Carroll, president of the County Alumni Association, 
was toastmaster. The principal speakers were: Dr. D. A. 
Long, former president of Antioch College, Ohio, and Union 
Christian College, Indiana, who spoke on the "Old Univer- 
sity"; L C. Moser, who advocated the establishment of a loan 
fund for Alamance boys ; D. L. Bell, who spoke on the "Pres- 
ent University;" Roy Homewood, president of the Alamance 
County Club of the University; E. S. W. Dameron ; Dr. 
Will Long; J. W. Lasley, Jr.; Joe G. Walker. The banquet 
was such an enjoyable affair that it was voted to have one 
during the holidays each year. 



GASTONIA 

The sixth annual joint banquet of the Gaston County 
Alumni Association and the Gaston County Club of the Uni- 
versity which was held at the Armington Hotel, Gastonia, on 
the evening of December 27th, proved to bt the most enthu- 
siastic gathering of Carolina men ever held m the county. The 
occasion was a delightful one in every respect. The atten- 
dance was 51, this consisting of alumni, students, and pros- 
pective students who are at present seniors in the County 
high schools. 

Geo. B. Mason was toastmaster and Rev. W. A. Jenkins 
made the invocation. Speeches were made by A. G. Mangum, 
lawyer and University trustee; Jno. G. Carpenter, lawyer and 
former State Senator ; A. E. Woltz, of the local bar, formerly 
bursar of the University; Rev. W. A. Jenkins, Methodist 
minister of Dallas ; W. W. Rankin, of the University faculty ; 
J. W. Atkins, editor of the Gastonia Gazette; Ray Armstrong; 
Dr. T. C. Quickel; Supt. J. S. Wray; Carl Carpenter; J. 
Robert Craig; R. C. Patrick; F. S. Wetzell; Alex McLean; 
Lester Sipe ; A. C. Lineberger, Jr. 

Officers elected for the ensuing year were : President, J. S^ 
Wray; Vice-President, F. S. Wetzell; Secretary-Treasurer, 
E. R. Rankin. The association unanimously went on record 
as favoring the adoption of the Alumni Loyalty Fund. 



GOLDSBORO 

The Wayne County Alumni Association and the Wayne 
County Club of the University held their annual banquet at 
Goldsboro on the evening of December 28th. Toastmaster 
Thomas O'Berry called the gathering to order and asked Rev. 
N. H. D. Wilson to invoke Divine blessings upon the gather- 
ing. 

For the alumni W. A. Dees was principal speaker. For the 
students G. C. Royall, Jr., M. E. Robinson, Jr., and W. R. 
Allen spoke. The speeches were all interesting and dwelt most- 
ly on matters of alumni and student co-operation in the Uni- 
versity's work. A number of high school seniors from the 
county schools were present as guests. They expressed them- 
selves as well pleased and stated that they would be at the 
banquet as University students next year. The Wayne County 
banquet was up to its usual high standard. 



KINSTON 

The Lenoir County Alumni Association held its annual 
banquet on the evening of December 30th in the hall of 
Hollywood Camp, Woodmen of the World, Kinston. Hon. 
H. E. Shaw, solicitor of the judicial district, presided as toast- 
master. The principal address was made by Prof. M. C. S. 
Noble, of the University faculty. He outlined very interest- 
ingly the work and ambitions of the University, and also 
touched on the needs of the University in its plans for de- 
velopment. Brief talks were made by E. B. Lewis, Felix 
Harvey, Clyde Dunn, G. V. Cowper, Jno. Dawson, Dr. W. 
T. Parrott, and McDaniel Lewis. Dr. Ira M. Hardy is presi- 
dent of the Association. 



LENOIR 

The Caldwell County Alumni Association, members and 
guests sixty strong, gathered at the Hotel Martin, Lenoir, 
on the evening of December 31st to do honor to their Alma 
Mater. This was their first banquet and it was carried 
through in magnificent style. That it will have its counterpart 
during holiday seasons of succeeding years goes without say- 
ing. 

James T. Pritchett was toastmaster for the occasion. The 
speakers were : J. G. Abernethy, president of the Alumni 
Association; Capt. Edmund Jones, who left the University 
in '63 to join Lee's army; Overton Dysart, a Carolina senior; 
Dr. L. A. Williams, of the Univershy faculty; Horace Sisk, 
superintendent of Lenoir's schools; Dr. A. A. Kent, pliysician 
and legislator; and T. E. Story, principal of the Oak Hill 
high school. The banquet was a splendid success in every 
way. It has forwarded the University's work in Caldwell 
County greatly. 



NEW BERN 

The Craven County alumni and students held a smoker at 
New Bern on the evening of December 30th. Wm. Dunn, Jr., 
of the local bar, presided over the meeting. Dr. Louis R. 
Wilson of the University faculty was the principal speaker. 
The gathering partook in the main of the nature of a general 
conference relative to University matters and methods of 
alumni co-operation. Among those participating in the dis- 
cussions were : Dr. J. F. Rhem, quarterback on the first Uni- 
versity football team, C. D. Bradham, D. E. Henderson, 
Harold Whitehurst, S. H. Basnight, and Parkhill Jarvis. 
Both the Craven County Alumni Association and the Craven 
County Club have large memberships. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



111 



SELMA 

A joint banquet of the Johnston County Alumni Associa- 
tion and the Johnston County Club of the University was 
held at the Wyoming Hotel, Selma, on the evening of Decem- 
ber 29th. H. G. Hudson, president of the Club, was toast- 
master for the occasion. The speakers from the alumni 
were J. D. Parker, of Smithfield, and Fred Archer, of Selma. 
For the students the speakers were A. M. Coats and Oliver 
Rand. Tlie banquet was entirely successful and was the 
means for arousing a greater interest in the University's work 
among the Johnston County alumni and students. A com- 
mittee was appointed to perfect a more active organization 
for the alumni, and it was voted to hold similar banquets 
annually. 



THE CLASSES 



— J. A. Hendricks has been U. S. special attorney for the 
Department of Justice since 1901. 

— F. M. Harper is superintendent of the Raleigh city schools. 
He is director from North Carolina of the National Edu- 
cational Association. 

1889 

— J. E. B. Davis is a merchant and farmer at Wendell. 
—Alex Stronach, of Raleigh, is making a good record as a 
judge in the Samoan Islands. 

— Logan D. Howell is one of the joint authors of the Howell- 
Williams Primer and Reader, which were recently adopted 
for use in the public schools of Virginia. 
^George S. W'ills is head of the department of English in the 
Baltimore Polytechnic Institute, Baltimore, Md. In taking 
out a subscription to the Review he writes, "I am glad of 
the opportunity through this medium to renew the touch 
which I was once able to maintain intimately with things 
at the Hill." 

1890 
— Charles Rankin is engaged in the lumber business at Halls- 
boro. 

— Wm. S. Battle, Jr., a native of Tarboro, is general claim 
agent of the Norfolk and Western Railway Co., at Roanoke, 
Virginia. 

— Dr. W. T. Whitsett has been for twenty-eight years head 
of Whitsett Institute, one of North Carolina's well known pre- 
paratory schools. He is a member of the board of trustees 
of the University. 

.1891 

— Dr. A. H. Patterson, professor of physics in the University, 
is this year with the International Arms Company. His ad- 
dress is Crown Hotel, Providence, R. I. 

— J. Volney Lewis is head of the Department of Geology in 
Rutgers College, New Brunswick, N. J. 
— T. C. Amick is professor of education in Elon College. 

1892 

— W. E. Rollins, a native of Asheville, is a professor in the 
Episcopal Seminary, Alexandria, Va. 

1893 

— James Thomas Pugh is a member of the law firm of Russell, 
Pugh and Kneeland. with offices Kimball building, 18 Tremont 
Street, Boston, Mass. 

— Attorney General T. W. Bickett, Law '93, is a candidate for 
the Democratic nomination for Governor of the State. It is 



predicted on all sides that he will be nominated and elected 
overwhelmingly. 

— W. P. Woolen is an officer in the U. S. Army, with the 
rank of Major. He is with the corps of engineers at Wash- 
ington Barracks, Washington, D. C. 

— J. A. Jones is superintendent of city schools at Griffin, Ga. 
He is chairman of the board of visitors to the University of 
Georgia. At one time he was superintendent of schools at 
Fayetteville. 

1894 
— Bowman Gray is vice-president of the R. J. Reynolds 
Tobacco Co., Winston-Salem. He is one of the leading fig- 
ures in this large organization. 

— Louis M. Swink is an attorney at law at Winston-Salem. 
— Benj. Wyche, at one time University librarian, is manager 
of the woman's department of the New York Life Insurance 
Co., at Asheville. 

1895 
— Alex M. Winston is practicing law at Spokane, Wash. 
— R. W. Allen, formerly superintendent of schools at San- 
ford, is now superintendent at Monroe. 

— Henry Clark Bridgers, LL. B. '95, is president of the East 
Carolina Railway, at Tarboro. 
— W. W. Dawson is living at Griffon. 

— James E. Baird is a railroad contractor at Morristown, 
Tenn. 

^Charles R. Turner is a dentist of Philadelphia and a mem- 
ber of the faculty of the University of Pennsylvania. His 
address is 3930 Locust St. 

^Dr. Holland Thompson is associate professor of history 
in the College of the City of New York. He is also editor- 
in-chief of The Book of Knowledge. 

— Harry Howell is superintendent of city schools at Ashe- 
ville. He is an associate editor of the Alumni Review. 
— R. T. S. Steele is engaged in coal mining at Williamsport, 
Pa. 

— Wm. D. Merritt, a former varsity football player, practices 
law at Roxboro. 

— H. E. C. Bryant is Washington correspondent for the 
New York World and the Raleigh Netvs and Observer. 
— Collin H. Harding has a legal position in the Solicitor's 
Office. Department of Agriculture, Washington, D. C. 
^R. E. Lee is a physician of Clinton. 

1896 
— Hugh Hammond is in the cotton manufacturing business at 
Columbia. S. C. 

— J. F. Nooe has been for several years engaged in the practice 
of medicine at Boerne, Texas. He is a regular reader of Thb 
Alumni Review. 

— Jas. A. Gwyn is assistant treasurer of the Arlington Com- 
pany, New York City. 

— M. B. Aston is with the Storm Cloud Mining Co., Goldfield, 
Nevada. 

— George Stephens is president of the American Trust Co., 
bankers, and the Stephens Co., real estate dealers and devel- 
opers of Myers Park, Charlotte. 

— President C. W. Briles of the State Normal School of 
Oklahoma, located at Ada, was a visitor to the Hill in the 
fall. He is a native of Davidson County. 
— A. H. Robbins, a native of Lexington, is superintendent of 
the Lancaster Cotton Mills, Lancaster, S. C. 

1897 

— W. H. McNairy is superintendent of city schools at Chester, 

s. c. 



112 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



—Robert W. Bingham, LL. B., '97, son of Col. Robert Bing- 
ham, '57, is a member of the law firm of Kohn, Bingham, 
Sloss and Spindle, Louisville, Ky. He is a former mayor 
of Louisville. 

— Miss Grace Noble and Mr. A. W. Mangum were married 
June 9th at the home of the bride's parents in Louisville, Ky. 
— A. W. Mangum is secretary-treasurer and general manager 
of the Florida Essential Oils Co., Waller, Fla. This firm is 
a branch of the Arlington Co., of New York City. 
—Robert H. Wright, president of the East Carolina Teachers' 
Training School, was elected president of the State Teachers' 
Assembly, at its meeting in Raleigh recently. 
—A. T. Allen, superintendent of the Salisbury schools, was 
elected vice-president of the State Teachers' Assembly at 
its recent meeting. 

— Joe S. Wray, superintendent of Gastonia schools, is presi- 
dent of the State Association of City Superintendents, elected 
recently during the meeting in Raleigh of the Teachers' As- 
sembly. 

— L. G. Eskridge is secretary and treasurer of the Newberry 
Hardware Co., Newberry, S. C. 
— T. L. Wright is a lawyer at Ardmore, Okla. 

1898 

— J. G. McCormick is secretary-treasurer of the Acme Manu- 
facturing Co., of Wilmington, manufacturers of high grade 
fertilizers and acid phosphates. 

— Chase Brenizer, Law '98, is senior member of the law firm 
of Brenizer, Black, and Taylor, at Charlotte. He was married 
recently. 

— F. A. Gudger is second vice-president of the Arlington 
Company, New York City. He is secretary of the New York 
City Alumni Association. 

— J. P. Breedlove is librarian of Trinity College. Durham. 
— Wm. C. Harllee is a captain in the U. S. Marines, with 
headquarters in Washington, D. C. 

— W. T. Usry, who completed his quadrennium as pastor of 
the Cherryville Methodist Church the past fall, is now teach- 
ing in Rutherford College. 

— J. F. Webb has been for several years superintendent of 
the Granville County schools, located at Oxford. 
— L. J. Bell is superintendent of the Rockingham public 
schools. 

— Archibald Henderson, professor of Pure Mathematics in 
the University, is vice-president and national director of the 
Drama League of America. 

1899 

J. E. Latta, Secretary, 207 E. Ohio St., Chicago, III. 
— R. A. Winston is with the U. S. Geological Survey. He 
was married a few months ago. 

— Dr. Virgil L. Jones is professor of English in the University 
of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Ark. 

— W. S. Crawford is manager of the Mebane Real Estate and 
Insurance Co. He is chairman of the Mebane scliool board. 
— T. C. Bowie, lawyer of Jefferson, is speaker of the House 
of the N. C. Legislature. 

— W. S. Wilson, legislative reference librarian of North Caro- 
lina, spent some time recently at Albany, N. Y., inspecting the 
state archives and legislative reference service of New York. 
— Adlai Osborne is an architect of Burlington. Formerly he 
was located at Charlotte. 



1900 

W. S. Bernard, Secretary, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
— J. W. Greening is agent at EI Dorado, Ark., for the Mis- 
souri Pacific Railway Co. 

— The marriage of Miss Fannie Black and Mr. J. F. Newell, 
Law '00. occurred December 30th in Charlotte. 
— Geo. Nelson Coflfey is located at Urbana, 111., and is assis- 
tant State leader for Illinois of County Agricultural .Advisers. 
He sends best wishes for the success of his Alma Mater. 
— David P. Dellinger, Law '00, lawyer of Cherryville, is a 
candidate for the Democratic nomination for the office of 
Commissioner of Labor and Printing. He was a member of 
the Legislature of 1913 and was reading clerk for the Legis- 
lature of 1915. 

1901 

F. B. Rankin, Secretary, Rutherfordton. N. C. 
— C. C. Robbins is vice-president and superintendent of the 
Piedmont Mills Co., High Point. 

— J. R. Conley, at one time superintendent of the Oxford 
schools, is teaching in the Durham high school. 
— Preston S. Gotten, a native of Pitt County and formerly of 
Norfolk, Va., is a member of the law firm of Morris, Garnett 
and Gotten, 52 William Street, New York City. 

1902 
R. A. Merritt. Secretary, Greensboro, N. C. 
— J. Frazier Glenn, LL. B., '02, is judge of the Asheville 
police court. 

— Robert R. Williams, a former Carolina debater, has been 
since 1907 a member of the law firm of Jones and Williams, 
Asheville. He is mentioned as a possible candidate for Con- 
gress from the tenth district. 

— J. H. Mclver has been for several years the popular super- 
intendent of schools at Wadesboro. 

— J. Hunter Wood is with Alexander Sprunt and Son, big 
cotton exporters. His address is 82 Beaver Street, New York 
City. 

— A. C. Kerley is superintendent of the Morganton graded 
schools. 

1903 
N. W. Walker, Secretary, Chapel Hill. N. C. 
— The marriage of Miss Edith Royster and Mr. Zebulon 
Vance Judd took place December 27th at the home of Mr. 
and Mrs. Jacques Busbee in Raleigh. They live at Auburn, 
Alabama, where Mr. Judd is head of the department of 
education in the Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 
— Harry P. Stevens has been for several years a hardware 
merchant at Smithfield. 

— Capt. R. P. Howell, Jr., corps of Engineers U. S. Army, 
has recently been ordered from Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, 
to Honolulu. 

— F. L. Foust is principal of the Pleasant Garden high school. 
His debaters won the Aycock Memorial Cup in the State- 
wide contest of the High School Debating Union in 1913. 
— R. O. Everett is a member of the law firm of Manning, 
Everett and Kitchin, Durham, N. C. 
— Rev. W. S. Cain is pastor of Grace Church, Asheville. 

1904 

T. F. HicKERSON, Secretary, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
— Addison G. Brenizer is one of Cliarlotte's leading physi- 
cians and surgeons. 
— T. G. Britton, LL. B. '04, is a lawyer of Houston, Texas. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



113 



— -Marshall C. Staton is an attorney of Tarboro. 
— The marriage of Miss Mattie Theodosia Ham and Mr. 
John A. McRae takes place January 22nd at the Methodist 
Church, Parkton. 

1905 
W. T. Shore, Secretary, Charlotte. N. C. 
— E. W. Martin is a traveling salesman with the Endicott, 
Johnson Co. His headquarters are in Florence, S. C. 
— P. B. Ledbetter, a native of Transylvania County, is a 
surgeon in the U. S. Navy, at present located at Las Animas, 
Col. 

— A. M. Noble, who was on the Samoan Islands for three 
years as an assistant to Judge Alex. Stronach, '89, has re- 
turned to this country. 

— R. P. Noble, formerly a physician of Ensley, Alabama, is 
now located in Raleigh where he is x-ray expert at Rex 
Hospital. 

— B. K. Lassiter, lawyer of Oxford, is chairman of the 
Granville County Board of Education. 

— The marriage of Miss Margaret Moore Hall, and Mr. 
Charles Henry Sloan took place December 2nd at Belmont. 
They live at Belmont. 

— L. B. Newell, M. D. '05, is a prominent physician of 
Charlotte. 

— T. J. Moore is head teller with the Murchison National 
Bank, Wilmington. 

1906 
John A. Parker, Secretary, Charlotte, N. C. 
— Roy M. Brown is head of the department of English in the 
Appalachian Training School, at Boone. 

— J. E. Millis is secretary and treasurer of the Piedmont 
Mills Co., High Point. 

— W. B. Love is an attorney at law of Monroe. He was at 
one time postmaster. 
— C. R. Wheatly is a prominent lawyer of Beaufort. 

1907 

C. L. Weill, Secretary, Greensboro, N. C. 
— The wedding of Miss Louise Hill and Mr. John C. Bower 
took place recently at the bride's home in Lexington. 
— John C. Bower is a lawyer of Lexington and solicitor of the 
twelfth judicial district. 

— L. L. Brinkley is with the soil survey of North Carolina. 
• — L. W. Parker, at one time an instructor in the University 
of North Carolina and later an instructor in the University 
of Minnesota, is with the Pillsbury Flour Mills at Harris- 
burg, Pa. 

— Wm. A. Jenkins ^s pastor of the Methodist church at 
Dallas. Mr. Jenkins won the Worth prize in 1907 and later 
was graduated from Yale. He was formerly a minister of 
the Congregational church at Sayville, N. Y. 
• — Stanley Winborne is a lawyer of Murfreesboro and a 
member of the General Assembly. 

— W. C. Coughenour, Jr., is a lawyer of Salisbury and a mem- 
ber of the General Assembly. 

— W. H. Royster is engaged in the candy manufacturing busi- 
ness at Raleigh. 

— C. L. Weill is a member of the insurance firm of Miller, 
Robins and Weill, at Greensboro. 

— J. J. Parker continues as a member of the firm of Stack 
and Parker, attorneys at law, Monroe. 



1908 
Jas. a. Gray, Secretary, Winston-Salem, N. C. 
— B. L. Banks, Jr., is a member of the law firm of Smith and 
Banks, at Gatesville. He writes, "The Review is such an 
acceptable publication that all alumni should subscribe." 
— H. B. Gunter, at one time editor of the Winston-Salem 
Journal, is superintendent of the publicity department of the 
Soutliern Life and Trust Co., Greensboro. 
— T. W. Andrews, president of the class of 1908, continues as 
the popular superintendent of the Reidsville schools. 
— The commission of W. P. Stacy as a judge of the Superior 
Court went into effect January 1st. Judge Stacy is the 
youngest judge on the North Carolina bench, being 31 years 
of age. 

1909 
O. C. Cox, Secretary, Greensboro, N. C. 
— Robert S. McNeill has tendered his resignation as assistant 
postmaster at Fayetteville in order to take up the practice 
of law. 

—The marriage of Miss Cora Lou Butt and Mr. Bruce H. 
Lewis took place December 27th in the parlor of the Langren 
Hotel, Asheville. They are residing at Liberty, where Mr. 
Lewis is principal of the high school. 

—John Hall Manning is practicing law in Kinston. Formerly 
he was located at Selma. 

— The marriage of Miss Mary Ballard Ramsey and Mr. 
Robert McArthur Wilson occurred December 22nd in the 
Church of tlie Good Shepherd, Rocky Mount. 
— Joe A. Parker is a leading real estate man of Goldsboro. 
— W. H. Strowd is with the chemical department of the 
College of Agriculture of the University of Wisconsin, at 
Madison, Wis. 

1910 

W. H. Ramsaur, Secretary, China Grove, N. C. 
—The marriage of Miss Maude Wilcox Smith and Mr. 
Walter Raleigh Baugess occurred December 29th at Jeffer- 
son. They live at Jefferson, where Mr. Baugess is a lawyer. 
—The marriage of Miss Christine Sylvester and Mr. Nere 
E. Day took place November 19th at Richlands. They live 
at Jacksonville where Mr. Day is a member of the law firm 
of Duffy and Day. 

— W. H. Ferguson, until recently principal of the Pilot Moun- 
tain high school, has accepted a position as farm demonstrator 
for Haywood County and is located at Wayncsville. 
— A. Rufus Morgan has charge of a mission school at Pen- 
land. 

— L. C. Kerr, formerly editor of the Sampson Democrat, is 
principal of the Garland high school. 

— J. A. Leitch, Jr., is principal of the Salisbury high school. 
— Lee F. Turlington is a physician and surgeon with offices 
1203-6 Empire Bldg., Birmingham, Ala. 

— D. McGregor Williams is engaged in electrical engineering 
work with the N. C. Electrical Power Co., Asheville. 
— D. B. Sloan is a physician of Ingold. 
— Hugh Sowers is in the insurance business at Asheville. 
— J. A. Highsmith, former principal of the Pomona high 
school, is this year taking work leading towards the degree 
of Ph. D. in Peabody College, Nashville, Tenn. He is 
specializing in Psychology and Education. 
— ^Thomas D. Rose is with the Consolidated Gas, Electric 
Light, and Power Co., of Baltimore, Md. He was married 
some months ago. 



114 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



— S. F. Teague is a lawyer of Goldsboro, a member of the 
firm of Teague and Dees. 

—J. C. Oates is with the Henderson Loan and Trust Co., 
at Henderson. 

—Dr. Robert Drane is an instructor in the medical depart- 
ment of the University of Wisconsin, at Madison. 

i9n 

I. C. MosER, Secretary, Burlington, N. C. 
— B. Grimes Cowper, until recently engaged in the insurance 
business at Raleigh, has accepted a position with the Standard 
Oil Co., in China. 

— Henry C. Dockery, Law '11, formerly of Rockingham, has 
taken up the practice of law in Charlotte with the firm of 
Morrison and McLean. 

— Earl Thompson is principal of the McAdenville high school. 
— Charles E. Hiatt has accepted a position as principal of the 
Pilot Mountain high school. 

— R. B. Hall is chemist with the Tennessee Copper Co., Cop- 
perhill, Tenn. Formerly he was with the DuPont Co., City 
Point, Va. 

— N. Spencer MuUican is highway engineer for Forsyth 
County. His address is Clemmons. 

— R. G. Stockton is a member of the law firm of Eller and 
Stockton, Winston-Salem. He is chairman of the reunion 
committee of the class of 1911. 

— W. A. Dees, president of the Class of 1911, is practicing 
law at Goldsboro, in the firm of Teague and Dees. 
— The marriage of Miss Virginia Garland Thompson and 
Mr. Cader Rhodes, Phar. '11, occurred November 18th. They 
live at Raleigh where Mr. Rhodes is connected with the 
Hicks Drug Co. 

^Dr. W. P. Belk is with the Episcopal Hospital, Pliiladelphia. 
— L C. Moser is practicing law in Burlington. 
— E. J. Wellons is practicing law in Smitlifield. 

1912 

C. E. Norman, Secretary, Columbia, S. C. 
— William Graves, now a student of law in the University, 
was chief speaker at a big Masonic banquet held New Year's 
night at Pilot Mountain. 

— B. L. Baker, LL. B. '12, lawyer of Cliarlotte, has been 
appointed session clerk to the House judiciary committee, 
Washington, D. C. 

— H. H. Hargrett is a member of the law firm of Smith 
and Hargrett. Tifton, Ga. 

— The marriage of Miss Clara Norwood MacNeill and Mr. 
Charles Randolph Thomas, Jr., took place December 29th 
in New York City. They reside at "Edgewood", Greenville, 
South Carolina. 

— Fred B. Drane, president of the Class of 1912, is a mission- 
ary with headquarters at Chena, Alaska. 

— B. T. Denton is with the Johnston Furniture Co., Charlotte. 
— Frank Tally is manager of the Randolph Grocery Co., at 
Randleman. 

— Chas. F. Cowell is with the Pamlico Chemical Co., of 
Washington. 

— Luke Lamb is with the U. S. Department of Justice, at 
present working in New Y'ork City. 

1913 

A. L. M. Wiggins, Secretary, Hartsville. S. C. 
— H. C. Petteway, formerly of the law firm of Hampton and 
Petteway, Ocala, Fla., has located at Lakeland, Fla., with 



offices in the Munn Bldg. He gives special attention to 
equity practice and corporation law. 

— -L. Berge Beam is superintendent of schools for Lincoln 
County. 

^F. R. Weaver is a chemist with the Western Cartridge Co., 
Springfield, 111. 

— Walter Stokes, Jr., of Nashville, Tenn., sends greetings to 
his fellow members of 1913 and hopes that the new year 
w 11 bring them much luck. 

— T. E. Story is principal of the Oak Hill high school. Lenoir. 
— W. G. Harry is studying for the ministry in the Presby- 
terian seminary at Columbia, S. C. He is also assistant pastor 
of the Presbyterian Church at New Brookland, S. C. 
— L M. Bailey is principal of the Jacksonville high school. 
— James H. Royster is a student in tlie Riclimond Medical 
College, Riclimond, Va. 

— L. L. Sliamburger is teaching in the Rocky Mount high 
school. 

1914 
Oscar Leach, Secretary, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
— Mead Hart is engaged in farming at his home near 
Mooresvillc. 

— W. F. Credle is superintendent of schools for Hyde 
County. He is located at Swan Quarter. 
— J. Robert Ross is with the Piedmont Hotel, Atlanta. Ga. 
— J. G. Leatherwood, Law '14, is an attorney at law at Green- 
ville, S. C. 

— Ben F. Aycock is a second year student of law in the 
University. 

— Oscar Leach is a second year student of law in the Uni- 
versity. 

— Roy B. McKnigbt is head of the department of science in 
the New Bern high school. 

— J. M. Steadman, Jr.. Grad. '14, is taking graduate work in 
the University of Chicago. 

— James Eldridge is principal of the Newland high school. 
He and Mrs. Eldridge are the possessors of a son, James 
Eldridge, Jr., who was born August 12th. 

IB!.-! 

B. L. Field, Secretary. Pittsboro, N. C. 
■ — H. D. Lambert is assistant agronomist of North Carolina. 
He is with the State Department of Agriculture, at West 
Raleigh. 

— Geo. W. Eutsler is taking graduate work in the University 
of Virginia. 

— W. P. Fuller has been promoted to the position of assistant 
general manager of the St. Petersburg Livestment Co., St. 
Petersburg, Fla. 

— Chas. F. Benbow, M. A. 'IS, is principal of the East Bend 
high school. 

Greensboro Commercial School 

GREENSBORO. NORTH CAROLINA 

BOOKKEEPING, SHORTIIAXD, TOUCH TYPE- 
WRITING and the BUSINESS BRANCHES 
are our Specialty. School the year round. 
Enroll any time. Write for Catalogue. 

E. A. McCLUNG Principal 



STATEMENT OF THE CONDITION 
OF 

THE FIDELITY BANK 

OF DURHAM.N. C. 

Made to the North Carolina Corporation Commission at the Close 

of Business 

SEPTEMBER 2, 1915 



Resources 

Loans and Investments ...._ $2,159,319.34 

Furniture and Fixtures 20,050.33 

Cash Items 20,640.40 

Cash in Vaults and with Banks 658,273.03 

$2,858,283.10 
Liabilities 

Capital Stock _ _...._ $ 100,000.00 

Surplus - 400,000.00 

Undivided Profits 89,062.18 

Interest Reserve 6,000.00 

Deposits _ _ 2,221,720.92 

Bills Rediscounted 41,500.00 

$2,858,283.10 

The attention of the public is respectfully call- 
ed to the above statement. We will be pleastd 
to have all persons who are seeking a safe place 
to deposit their active or idle funds, to call on or 
write us. 

B. N. DUKE. Pres. JOHN f . WHY. Vlce-Pres. S. W. MINOR. Cashier 



Our (&oo6 (Elot^cs 

Our Store is fairly loaded with new fall and 
winter wearables for men and boys. The newest 
in Suits and Overcoats, the newest in Furnishings 
and Hats. 

Sneed-Markham- Taylor Co. 

Durham, N. C. 



of "SDurbam, !Jl. (T. 

"Roll of Honor" Bank 

Total Resources over Two and a Quarter Mil- 
lion Dollars 

WE KNOW YOUR WANTS 

AND WANT YOUR BUSINESS 



JULIAN S. CARR 

W. J. HOLLOWAY.. 



-President 
Cashier 



Ice Cream and Frozen Desserts 

of all kinds. Special atteiuiiin given University and 

College banquets and entertainments Phone 178 

WARREN ICE CREAM CO. 

P.\RRISH STREET DURH.AM. N. C. 



UNIVERSITY STUDENTS — 

"Uhe "ROYAL CAFES 

IN CHAPEL HILL as well as IN DURHAM 

APPRECIATE YOUR 'PATRONAGE 



MAKE INO MISTAKE — IINSURE IIV' THE 

STATE MUTUAL 

Xh© L.eaclin£; Massachusetts Company 

New policies embodying every desirable feature known to modern life insurance, including an exceptionally 
liberal disability clause. Dividend increase of from 25</o to 389fc over former scale. 




State Agent. 704.5-6 First National Bank BIdg.. Durham. N. C. 



SEABOARD 

AIR LINE RAILWAY 

' ' The Progressive Railway of the South 

SHORTEST, QUICKEST AND BEST ROUTE 

Richmond, Portsmouth-Norfolk, Va., and points 
in the Northeast via Washington, D. C, and 
Southwest via Atlanta and Birmingham. 

HANDSOMEST ALL STEEL TRAINS 
IN THE SOUTH 

Electrically lighted and equipped with electric 
fans. 

Steel electrically lighted Diners on all through 
trains. Meals a la carte. 



LOCAL TRAINS ON CONVENIENT 
SCHEDULES 



For rates, schedules, etc., call on your nearest 
agent, or 

CHARLES B. RYAN, G. P. A., JOHN T. WEST, D. P. A., 

N«rfolk, Vi. CHARLES R.CAPPS.Vice-Pres., Rileifk, N. C. 

Norrolk, V>. 



Sen6 It to IDicK! 

Dick's Laundry Baskets leave 13 New West 
for Greensboro at 3:00 P. M. on Monday, Tues- 
day, and Wednesday. To be returned Wednesday, 
Thursday and Friday. 

T. O. WRIGHT 

GENERA L A GENT 
CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 



The Bank o/Chapel Hill 

The oldest and strongest bank in 
Orange County solicits your banking 
business. 



M.C. S NOBLE 
President 



H. H. PATTERSON 
Vice-Pre«ident 



M. E. HOGAN 
Cashier 



The Cafe Beautiful 
Newest and Best in Raleigh 

Prices Moderate 

Lavatories for convenience of out-of-town Guests 

We Take Care of Your Baggage Free of Charge 

215 Fayetteville Street — Next to Almo Theatre 

Under Same Management as Wright's Cafe 

Make this your headquarters when in Raleigh 



Odell Hardware 

C^r^rt-»r-».««-ix/ QREensboro, 
^i^CJi 1 lyjciriy north Carolina 

Electric Lamps and Supplies 
Builders Hardware 



DEPENDABLE GOODS 

PROMPT SERVICE 

SATISFACTORY PRICES 



Chapel Hill Hardware Co. 


Lowe Bros. High Standard Paints 


Calcimo Sanitary Wall Coating 


FIxall Stains and Enamels 


Floor Wax, Dancing Wax 


Brushes 


PHONE U4 


FRANKLIN AND COLUMBIA STREETS 

^ 'II 



FOR NEAT JOB PRINTING AND TYPEWRITER PAPER 

CALL AT THE OFFICE OF 

THE CHAPEL HILL NEWS 



K 



ODAK SUPPLIE O 

Finishing for the Amateur. Foister ^^ 



RIDE WITH 



C. S. Pender graft 

Pioneer Auto Man 



Headquarteri in DURHAM: 
At the Royal Cafe, Main Street, and Southern Depot 

Headquarters in CHAPEL HILL: 
Neil to Bask of Chapel Hill 

Leave Chapel Hill _ 8:30 and 10:20 a. m. 

Leave Chapel Hill 2:30 and 4:00 p. m. 

Leave Dui-ham _ _ 9:50 a. m., 12:40 p. m. 

Leave Durham ...._ 5:08 and 8:00 p. m. 

OTHER TRIPS SUBJECT TO ORDER 

Four Machines at Your Service 
Day or Night 

PHONE 58 OR 23 



Geo. C. Pickard & Son 

Chaptfl Hill, >. C. 

FIRST CLASS LIVERY SERVICE AT ALL 

TIMES. GIVE US A TRIAL 
A. A. PICKARD - - - - Manager 

The Model Market and Ice Co. 

Chapel Hill. N. C. 

All Kinds of Meats. Fish and Oysters in Season. 
Daily Ice Delivery Except Sunday 

S. M. PICKARD Manager 

THE NEW FIRM 

^.TA.. IKlutU (Lo„3nc. 

SUCCESSORS TO A, A. KLUTTZ 

Extend a cordial invitation to all students and 
alumni of the U. N. C. to make their store head- 
quarters during their stay in Chapel Hill. 

Complete Stock of 
New and Second-hand Books, Stationery, and 
Complete Line of Shoes and Haberdashery 
Made by the Leaders of Fashion, Al- 
ways on Hand 



|»«hS«S^^«^Sh8^«-8.^««S>«.«>«>^«.«h»«>^^«.«hSx»<Sk5>^^>^hSh®^^«| 



MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTIONS 



AT PRICES EXTRAOROINARY 



McClure's — 

Ladies 's World 

Everybody's 

Delineator 

American 

Woman's Home Companion 

Mother's Magazine 

Ladies' World 

McCall's and Pattern 

Harper's Magazine 

Everybody's 

Delineator 

World's Work 

Outlook 

Scribner's 

Century 

St. Nicholas, new... 

Collier's Weekly 

Harper's Monthly 



Price if boaghl by the copy 

To one 4:7 40 

address *4>^-^^ 

To one <t^ AH 

address U):'.UU 

aSi?eTs $3.60 

7a°a?e7s $3.60 



7,°,- $7.80 

a^d°d?e"ss $9.80 

To one 4 7 9n 
address >P' .^>J 

7,°,- $6.80 



Our price 

$1.50 
$2.00 
$2.00 

$1.50 
$5.00 

$6.00 

$4.50 
$5.00 



A postal request brings our complete catalogue. 
Si:nd all Ordkks to the 

Mutual Subscription Agency 



^^ITHCRSPOON BLOG. 



Philadelphia. Penna. 



The Peoples National Bank 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 



Capital $300,000.00 



Unilcd Slates Depositary 




J. W. HRIES. Pres, Wm. A. BI..\IR. V-Prcs. and Cashier 

J. WAI.TEK D.\LTON. .Asst. Clshicr 



END us any gar- 
ment or article 
you may have 

needing Dry Cleaning 

or Dyeing. 

We will do the work promptly, 
at small cost, and to your en- 
tire satisfaction. 

Send yours by Parcel Post, we 
pay return charges on orders 
amounting to $1.00. 

Mourning Goods Dyed in 24 to 
36 Hours 

COLUMBIA LAUNDRY CO. 

GREENSBORO. N. C. 
Phones 633-634 

Chapel Hill Agents: T. C. Wilhins and 
E. E. W. Duncan 14 and 15 Old West 



* 1' 



4> 
* 

* 

♦ 
* 



Raleigh Floral Company 

CHOICE CUT FLOWERS for ALL OCCASIONS 
Write, Phone or Wire Orders to Raleigh, N. C. 









Carolina Dru^ Company 

CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 

FOR CAROLINA BOYS. THE HOME OF 
PURE DRUGS 

WEBB and JERNIGAN, Proprietors 



Telephone No. 477 Opposite Post Office 

TUn© H©ladlay SMdli® 

DURHAM, N. C. 

Offical Photographer for Y. Y., 1915 

AMATEUR WORK DEVELOPED & FINISHED 



HILL C. LINTHICUM, A. L A. H. COLVIN LINTHICUM 

ASSOCIATE ARCHITECTS 
Specialty Modern School Buildings 

TRUST BUILDING. ROOMS 502-503 PHONE 226 DURHAM, N. C. 



WAVERLY ICE CREAM CO. 

DURHAM, . C . 
Manulacturers of all grades and flavors of Ice Cream 
for the Wholesale Trade. Write us what you need. 



APEL HILL 
N. C. 



ANDREWS GASH STORE GO. '" 

Will save you from 3 to 5 dollars on your tailor- 
made suits. We also have in an up-to-date line 
of high grade gents' furnishings. Call to see us 
and be convinced. 



/ QUALITY COUNTS \ 

That's why we have stuck to our 
policy of making only the best 

ATHLETIC SUPPLIES 

for all these years. We are in a position 
, , to give you better satisfaction than ever 
id before. 

LIVE STUDENTS WANTED TO ACT AS AGENTS IN SCHOOLS, CLUBS AND COLLEGES 




\ 



ALEX. TAYLOR & CO., Inc. 

Taylor Buiidina, 42nd Street, Opposite Hotel Manhattan 
NEW YORK CITY 



/ 



The O. LeR. Goforth Corpora- 
tion Announces: 

The Student Supply carries a full line of col- 
lege men's clothing, rain coats, hats, shoes, haber- 
dashery, typewriters, sweaters, athletic goods, 
and college specialties of all kinds. 

We carry a special line of Life Insurance and 
buy and sell Real Estate on commission. 

We are managers for The Academy of Music, 
Durham, N. C. Reserved seats on sale two days 
previous to all shows. The Academy of Music 
will be released to clubs or private parties by 
the night, on request. Carolina box reserved for 
Carolina boys. 

The best Automobile Service in Chapel Hill. 

Automobiles running every two hours between 
Chapel Hill and Durham. Four nice comfortable 
cars for hire at any time to suit your convenience. 

The University Laundry. 

We give specially reduced weekly rates to stu- 
dents. We are especially prepared to care for 
hotel and boarding house laundry. One day ser- 
vice for flat work. 

Managers of The Barbae Boarding House. 

Rates $15.00 to students and special rates to 
Alumni and traveling men. 

The O. LeR. Goforth Corporation 

Office: ROYAL CAFE Chapel Hill, N. C. PHONE NO. 60 

0. LeR. GOFORTH, Pres. aid M?i. I. H. BUn, Sec. and Treas. 



ZEB P. COUNCIL, Manager 

CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 

Printing 

QUALITY AND SERVICE 



ORDERS TAKEN FOR ENGRAVED CARDS OR 
INVITATIONS 



Eubanks Drug Co. 

Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Agents for Munnally's Candy 



H. H. PATTERSON 

CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE AND FRESH 
GROCERIES AT ALL TIMES 



THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

Maximum of Service to the People of the State 

A. THE COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS. C. THE GRADUATE SCHOOL. 

B. THE SCHOOL OF APPLIED SCIENCE. D. THE SCHOOL OF LAW. 

(1) Chemical Engineering. E. THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE. 

(2) Electrical Engineering. F. THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY. 

(3) Civil and Road Engineering. G. THE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION. 

(4) Soil Investigation. H. THE SUMMER SCHOOL. 

I. THE BUREAU OF EXTENSION. 

(1) General Information. 

(2) Instruction by Lectures. 

(3) Correspondence Courses. 

(4) Debate and Declamation. 

(5) County Economic and Social Surveys. 

(6) Municipal and Legislative Reference. 

(7) Educational Information and Assist- 

ance. 

WRITE TO THE UNIVERSITY WHEN YOU NEED HELP 
For information regarding the University, address 

THOS. J. WILSON, JR., Registrar. 



Murphy^ s Hotel and Annex 

Richmond, Virginia 

The Most Modern, Largest, and Best 
Located Hotel in Richmond, Being 
on Direct Car Line to all Railroad 
Depots. 

Headquarters for College Men European Plan $1.00 Up 

JAMES T. DISNEY, Manager 




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