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Full text of "The alumni review [serial]"

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CY THOMPSON SA YS*- 

WHAT ARE YOU WORTH? 

How much money has been and must yet be invested in your education to equip you to become an 
efficient producer? What is the present value of your life to your estate? How can you discount the 
loss to your family, your creditors, and society — should you not live to produce, repay, and provide? 

AS LONG AS MEN LABOR 

And as long as men are mortal. Life Insurance will always be the one instrument for nullifying 
the constant menace of the loss of the fruits of labor through Death. Hence, nothing can disorganize 
or supplant it. 

No substitute for Life Insurance exists — just as. there is none for fire insurance. There is no equal 
way by which a young man can protect his creditors and those who are or may become financially de- 
pendent upon him. It has no competitor. 

AMERICA'S FIRST 

The NEW ENGLAND is the oldest Massachusetts company and the first old line, legal reserve 
mutual company chartered in this country for the purpose of insuring lives. It offers superior service. 
Every provision and stipulation and precaution that can be devised to safeguard this Insurance and give 
it the richest potency is embodied in its policy contracts. 

Today while you are in sound health the opportunity is open to you. Let us help you to avail your- 
self of its lasting and comforting benefits. Toda y while you may, see us or write us. 

NEW ENGLAND MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO. 

BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 

CHARTERED 1835 



CYRUS THOMPSON, JR., Special Agent 
Raleigh, N. C. 



EUGENE C. McGINNIS, General Agent 
Raleigh, N. C. 



THE ROYALL & BORDEN CO. 



106 and 108 WEST MAIN STREET 



DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA 



Sell all kinds of furniture and furnishings for churches, 
colleges and homes. Biggest stock of Rugs in the 
State, and at cheapest prices. CJIf you don't know us 
ask the College Proctor or the editor of the "Review." 
Call on or write for whatever you may need in our line. 



THE ROYALL & BORDEN CO. 



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Volume IV 



Number 9 



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ALVMNIREVIEW 



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PRESIDENT GRAHAM, SECRETARY McADOO 
AND A FACULTY GROUP 



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LOWEST MORTALITY 

LOWEST riANAGEriENT EXPENSE 

CHEAPEST NET COST 

JOHN W. UMSTEAD, Jr. 

SPECIAL AGENT 

GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA 

Write for leaflet "The Best Form of Policy" 

W. B. UMSTEAD, Special Agent. CHAPEL HILL. N. C. 




MARK DESIGNED BY OTHO CUSHING 

POPULAR AMERICAN ILLUSTRATOR.TO IDENTIFY THE 

"QUALITY AND SERVICE" PRODUCTS OF 

THE SEEM AN PRINTERY,inc 

DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



Volume IV 



JUNE, 1916 



Number 9 



OPINION AND COMMENT 



A SUCCESS 
COMMENCE- 
MENT 1916 



many years. 



The commencement of 1916 in the general judg- 
ment appears to have been unusually happy and suc- 
cessful. Judged by the superficial 
standard of the number of people who 
came to the final exercises it was the 
most successful commencement in 
Memorial Hall could not hold the 
crowd that sought admission on Wednesday morning. 
The number of alumni who came back for Alumni 
Day on Tuesday was also surprisingly large. In 
spite of strenuous efforts to find out in advance how 
many alumni would attend the luncheon, the man- 
agement was overwhelmed at the last moment, and 
was unable to meet the extraordinary demand. The 
third section of the commencement — the dancing sec- 
tion — was also more largely attended than usual. 
Swain Hall, an immense floor, and used for the first 
time for dances, was crowded. More important than 
the size of the crowd at these functions was the happy 
and optimistic spirit that seemed to saturate the 
whole affair. Everybody seemed to be having a good 
time, and seemed to be glad to show it. 

DDD 

After a hundred and twenty commencements have 
set the seal of tradition deep into the order of exer- 
cises, they assume an air of immuta- 
bility. Change is not easy, and much 
change is perhaps not desired. There 
should always be a few people, a few 
institutions and a few functions that are fixed and 
known quantities, and not subject to experimentation 
and change. A wise man would not experiment with 
a commencement programme any more than he would 
with the Ten Commandments. At least not in the 
essentials, nor with malice aforethought. Fnusual 
things happen, however, in spite of all traditions and 
conventions, and even in commencements there is a 
chance for change, and for new records being made. 
One record likely to be famous in Carolina annals 
for a hundred years to come was the 1916 commence- 
ment address. Tlie content of the address was un- 
usually fine; but what distinguished it supremely 
among a century of competitors was its brevity. So 
far as our researches go, we find that the long distance 
record for this event was established some thirtv-odd 



NEW AND 

SPECIAL 

FEATURES 



years ago, and stands at three hours and twelve min- 
utes. We have been told by a thoroughly reliable 
alumnus that he heard this speech for the first fifty 
minutes, went home and ate a hearty meal, took his 
customary nap, then returned to Memorial Hall and 
heard twenty-five minutes of eloquent peroration. 
This speech was pronounced "a wonderfully great 
commencement address, though perhaps a trifle long, 
in view of the other elaborate exercises." Whether 
this is truly the long distance record may be in dis- 
pute; but the loving cup for brevity was presented 
to Secretary McAdoo in 1916, for a compact, intelli- 
gent, pertinent gem of a commencement address that 
covered the course in eighteen minutes. 

[Tip to tradition and to all aspiring orators: A 
good way to make a speech: make it short!] 

DDD 

Another pleasing feature of the 1916 commence- 
ment was furnished by General Julian S. Carr, of 

the class of 1866. This was the 
THE JULIAN fiftieth anniversary of General Carr's 
FELLOWSHIP graduation, and he celebrated the 

event in a manner characteristic of 
his loyalty, his generosity, and his wisdom. He en- 
dowed, with a gift of four thousand dollars, the Julian 
S. Carr Fellowship. This fellowship is to be awarded 
each year to a member of the rising junior class or 
senior class who has shown by the high quality of his 
college work that he is worthy of help, and who, dur- 
ing these first two years, has earned his own way 
wholly or in large part. It is estimated that this 
fellowship will yield annually enough to pay all of 
a student's actual expenses. 

nan 

The gift is wisely given, and the conditions make 
ir certain that it will be worthily bestowed. Literally 
hundreds of boys all over the State 
are now asking for help of any sort 
that will enable them to enter the University: they 
wan< scholarships, loans, jobs — anything that will 
give them a start. Before the new term opens there 
will be three hundred boys that will ask for a job 
waiting on a table at Swain Hall. Only forty can 
be accommodated. Then- will be two hundred ask- 



A WISE GIFT 



240 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



ing for tuition scholarships. Practically no scholar- 
ships remain open. One hundred and fifty men who 
have made good in the first year or in the second 
year in college will drop out because of lack of funds. 
Fellowships for the use of juniors and seniors, and 
scholarships for freshmen and sophomores are greatly 
needed, and can be so placed as to assure tremend- 
ously productive results. 

DDD 

Two of the reunion classes made gifts to the Uni- 
versity a feature of their home coming. Nineteen 
eleven presented the President with 

?9™?911 GIFTS a c ' lieck for ei % ht hundred and sixt y 
dollars, and pledges for the next re- 
union; 1906 presented a check for one thousand dol- 
lars. Both of these gifts were turned over to the 
rapidly rising Alumni Loyalty Fund. The class of 
1905, the originator of the plan, sent additional 
checks to the Treasurer, bringing its subscription to 
a total of nearly thirteen hundred dollars. 

DDD 

The class of 1910. the youngest of the alumni fam- 
ily, celebrated its arrival with two proposals, novel 



NINETEEN 
SIXTEEN 



among our alumni classes. It pre- 



sented the University with an endow- 
ment policy for twenty-five hundred 
dollars, that matures in ten years. At its tenth year 
reunion, it will turn over this sum to the college. In 
addition, each member of the class agreed to make 
the University a beneficiary in his will of some sum 
between one hundred and one million dollars. There 
are something less than one hundred men in the 
class. The idea is not that many men in the class can 
afford to will the whole million ; but that any man in 
the class can affoi'd to will a hundred. The class ex- 
pressed the belief that the man of small means would 
gladly leave a small amount if he thought he could 
do any good with it. The Alumni Fund offers the 
way. 

A man of faith in the class believes that the class 
can create a tradition to the effect that every Caro- 
lina man will leave the University at least one hun- 
dred dollars (through the Alumni Fund) ; a man of 
arithmetic in the class discovered that if a thousand 
men would leave a hundred dollars, it would mean as 
much in money and more in spirit than one man 
leaving a hundred thousand. 



President Edward K. Graham has gone to Cam- 
bridge, Mass., to represent the University at the open- 
ing of the new buildings for the Massachusetts Insti- 



tute of Technology. 



When all is said and done, and with all due re- 
spect to whomever and whatever respect is due, it- 
must be finally admitted that the real 

ABo'uT^mf feature of tne 1916 commencement 
was the reunion of 1911. The class 
of 1911 admitted it before they came, and they made 
good on it. They took no chances on having a fine 
time: they brought it with 'em. For a large part of 
two days, they owned all of the campus and the town, 
including a large sized tent, a local orchestra, an un- 
limited amount of good humor, a miscellaneous as- 
sortment of interior and exterior decorations (in- 
cluding seventy-five sailor suits, red socks, etc., as 
per illustrations). 

The whole community is indebted to 1911. It will 
be hard to wait five years for them to come back again. 

DDD 

What made the 1911 reunion a genuine success 

was prepa redness. Every little boy in the class now 

knows what that means. What 

£?J?£ T TT X*l A ?. : . „„ it means in class reunions is 

REUNION CLASSES, ., , , , . , . ,, 

LOOK! that somebody has to take hold 

of the class organization early, 

write letters, form a committee on programme and 

organization, and see to it that the reunion will be 

worth coming to. 

These classes are due for reunions next June: 
1916, 1857, 1867, 1887, 1892, 1897, 1902, 1907, 
1912. 

During the summer the alumni office will get the 
addresses of the men in these classes, and it wants to 
get the active assistance of all of them in getting 
every man in all of them back. 

DDD 

All indications point to a record breaking attend- 
ance in the summer school, which opens just as this 

NEW STUDENTS '^ ^ \° *""? ^ ' m f 

regular session, which opens the 

second week in September. The last issue of The 
Review gave helpful suggestions to the alumni who 
know of boys who want to come to the University, but 
lack the means. Full information is given in that 
article about the help the University can offer such 
boys. The demand for help far exceeds our ability 
to meet it ; three times as many worthy boys apply as 
can be helped. The alumni have a fine opportunity to 
help here. 

The alumni can be of the greatest possible assist- 
ance, too, in the matter of seeing that boys in their 
neighborhood who are going to college get the proper 
sort of information about the University; and in 
seeing that boys of ability, who ought to go to the 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



241 



University, are not diverted elsewhere by some trivial 
inducement. 

ODD 

This is the last issue of The Review for the cur- 
rent session. We will meet you once more when 
1916-17 opens. We've had a wonder- 
ABOl'T THE folly fine year in the University, and 
ITSELF we've tried to tell you about it, and to 

keep you posted on what is going on. 
We haven't succeeded as well as we mean to succeed 
in making The Review reflect the life and activities 
of the University ; but we mean to keep trying all the 
time to do that, and we are confident that with your 
continued help and co-operation we can succeed. 
Alumni publications sometimes do succeed ; more 
often they fail. The Review has been greatly en- 
couraged by two things: one is that it has paid its 
way on a reasonable subscription charge, and the 
other is that a large proportion of its subscribers have 
said that they like it, and get more than their money's 
worth. We will not be satisfied unless our subscribers 
do get more than they pay for. You can help The 
Review be what you would like it to be, in three def- 
inite ways: (1) by writing suggestions, criticisms, 
and brief articles of interest for it; (2) by telling 
other alumni about it, and telling us about them; 
(3) by paying your subscription — that up to this 
moment you may have forgotten. Au revoir. 



THE BACCALAUREATE SERMON 

The baccalaureate sermon, preached on Sunday, 
May 28, by Bishop J. H. McCoy, of Birmingham, 
Alabama, was the beginning of the one hundred and 
twenty-first commencement of the University, a com- 
mencement that was noted for the large crowds pres- 
ent, the enthusiasm and loyalty shown by the alumni, 
and the renown of the chief speakers. 

Taking as his subject Saint Paul's address upon 
Mars Hill, Bishop McCoy preached a masterly ser- 
mon on the infinite relationships of human life. His 
text was: "For in him we live and move and have 
our being." 

"It is only in the amplitude of our dwelling place, 
the reach of our relationships, that we measure our 
life," said Bishop McCoy, in beginning his sermon. 
Later lie declared: "Toil have never inventoried the 
reach of man's relationships until you reach his spir- 
itual relations, his religion, which brings him into 
contact with the divine. It looks as if we are provin- 
cial in our relations, our attachments; yet there is 
that strange contradiction that God has put into the 
heart — that longing for all spaces." 



Vesper Service 

On Sunday afternoon at 6 o'clock a vesper service 
was conducted on the campus under the Davie Poplar 
by Rev. W. D. Moss of the Presbyterian Church of 
Chapel Hill. The setting was beautiful and the 
service inspiring. The vesper service took the place 
in the commencement program of the sermon before 
the Young Men's Christian Association, which has 
occupied a place in previous years. 



SENIOR CLASS EXERCISES 

On Monday morning, May 29th, at 10:30 o'clock 
Gerrard Hall held a well filled audience, which had 
gathered to hear the senior class day exercises. An 
hour before this time the seniors had marched to 
chapel for prayers with Dr. Kemp P. Battle, of the 
class of 1849. For seventy years or more, Dr. Battle 
has witnessed the various classes go out from the 
University campus into their life work. In giving 
advice to the seniors, Dr. Battle said: 

"If you want to succeed in life, whatever you pro- 
fess to do, do well. The great word upon which suc- 
cess depends is reliability. Get the respect and con- 
fidence of your community and then you have re- 
liability." 

Permanent Officers 

Permanent officers of the class were elected as fol- 
lows : President, F. F. Bradshaw, of Hillsboro ; Sec- 
retary, H. B. Hester, of Hester; Treasurer, G. C. 
Royall, Jr., of Goldsboro. A committee on perma- 
nent organization was appointed : W. B. Umstead, of 
Bahama, chairman ; R. B. House, of Thelma : and 
F. 0. Clarkson. of Charlotte. 

Gift Presented 

The gift of the senior class to the University was 
presented by S. C. Pike, of Liberty. It took the 
form of an endowment insurance policy which will 
mature in ten years, the value of the policy to be 
$2,"i00.00. An annual fee of four dollars will be 
collected from each member of the class to secure 
this. 

In a stirring farewell. President F. F. Bradshaw 
emphasized the place the University held in the 
minds and thoughts of the seniors, and the love and 
loyalty for Alma Mater which each member should 
keep with him. He also urged upon the class the 
compelling duties of citizenship ahead of them. 
Mangum Medal Contest 

The seniors then turned the meeting over to Pres- 
ident Graham who presided at the Mangum Medal 
contest. The representatives of the class in this 
contest with their subjects were: W. B. Umstead, of 
Bahama, — "National Self-Consciousness in the 



242 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



United States'" ; F. O. Clarkson, of Charlotte, — ''The 
Soul of Mexico"; S. C. Pike, of Liberty, — "Amer- 
ica's Growth of Freedom."' The honor of winning 
the medal, the announcement of which was made 
Wednesday morning, fell to W. B. Umstead. 
Exercises Under Davie Poplar 
At 5 :30, under the Davie Poplar the closing ex- 
ercises of the senior class were held. The exercises 



were presided over by the class president and were 
witnessed by a large assemblage. The program was as 
follows : class history, S. C. Pike ; class statistics, W. 
B. Umstead ; class prophecy, W. C. Rymer ; last will 
and testament, T. C. Linn, Jr. ; class poem, R. B. 
House. The pipe was passed around and nineteen 
sixteen gave place to nineteen seventeen as leaders of 
the campus. 



ALUMNI DAY 



The Alumni Returning in Large Numbers Find the Day the Biggest and Happiest 
Occasion in Recent University History. 



Tuesday, May 30th, was Alumni Day and it was, 
in fact, as the alumni committtee had hoped that it 
would be, the "biggest, happiest day of commence- 
ment." Scores of alumni returning for their vari- 
ous class reunions and for the other features on the 
program for the celebration of Alumni Day found on 
the "Hill" what they were looking for — many of 
their old comrades and friends and a real good time. 
No day in the recent history of the University has 
been so thoroughly enjoyed from first to last as this 
Alumni Day. 

The exercises of Alumni Day were begun with the 
class reunions at 10:30 o'clock Tuesday morning in 
Gerrard Hall, Hon. Francis D. Winston presiding in 
his usual happy style. 

Class of 1866 

General J. S. Carr was the only member of the 
class of 1866 present, the other living members of 
the class, Senator W. R. Webb, of Tennessee, and 
A. F. Johnson, of Clinton, being unable to attend. 

He was introduced by Judge Winston as the "loyal 
son of the old University and devoted father of the 
new." 

General Carr expressed the great love which he 
had for his alma mater, saying that the call of "Come 
back to Carolina" was stronger than anything which 
had reached him on the Pacific coast. He referred 
feelingly to the fact that ten diplomas from the Uni- 
versity hung on the walls of the Carr home. He 
adjured the young men present that "we old alumni 
are committing into your hands the greatest trust in 
North Carolina." 

Class of 1886 

The class of 1886, celebrating its 30-year reunion, 
was back in a goodly company and in a great good 
humor. For this class Rev. N. H. D. Wilson, of 
Goldsboro, who was valedictorian upon the gradua- 
tion of his class, spoke. He referred to the loyalty 



of the members of the class of '86 and to their ac- 
complishments since they left the campus walls. The 
members of the class present on the stage were Rev. 
N. H. D. Wilson, Goldsboro; W. N. Everett, Bock- 
ingham: Clem G. Wright, Greensboro; Dr. L. J. 
Battle, Washington, D. C. ; W. S. Dunston, Birm- 
ingham, Ala. ; J. Bryan Grimes, Raleigh ; Dr. I. H. 
Manning, Chapel Hill ; W. H. Carroll, Burlington ; 
R. L. Stroud, Ctfapel Hill ; G. B. Patterson, Maxton. 
%+ + Class of 1891 

For an exhibition of original humor and native wit 
the palm of th'e reunion exercises must go to Senator 
G. H. Currie, of Clarkton, known to his classmates 
as "Punch," spokesman for the class of 1891. He 
made a ten-minute speech shot through with humor, 
jests, and witty comment, which brought forth thun- 
derous applause from the audience. Members of the 
class of '91 present were: G. H. Currie, Clarkton; 
N. A. Currie, Clarkton; Dr. C. S. Mangum, Chapel 
Hill; Wm. J. Andrews, Raleigh; G. M. Graham, 
Durham; Van Wyck Hoke, Raleigh. 
Class of 1896 

For the class of 1896, celebrating its twentieth 
year anniversary, with a good delegation present and 
with enthusiasm, George Stephens, of Charlotte, was 
spokesman. He gave a brief sketch of every member 
present. Those present on the stage were: George 
Stephens. Charlotte; J. S. White, Mebane; J. H. 
White. Graham ; F. F. Bahnson, Winston-Salem ; 
R. G. Allsbrook. Tarboro; W. R! Webb, Jr., Bell 
Buckle, Tenn. ; C. R. Emery. Weldon : J. R. Craig, 
Gastonia ; F. R. Harty, Charlotte ; Ralph Van Lind- 
ingham, Charlotte ; R. T. Wills. Greensboro ; Wescott 
Roberson, High Point. 

Class of 1901 

The class of 1901 came next. Dr. R. O. E. Davis, 
of Washington, D. G, presided, and E. C. Willis, of 
North Wilkesboro, was spokesman. Those present 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



243 




TI'.S ITS ouTH YHAR SINCE GRADUATION 



GEN. J. S. CARR, OF '60 





1901 II 



CLASS OF 1900 HACK ()N TI-IK "HILL" 





• l. WITH "PUNCH" CURRIE PRESENT 



VTEAR REUNION CLASS— 1915 



244 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



were: Dr. K. O. E. Davis, Washington, D. C. ; E. C. 
Willis, North Wilkeshoro; Herman Weil, Goldsboro; 
B. S. Skinner, Durham; J. R. Oonley, Durham; W. 

B. Speas, Winston-Salem; Dr. J. G. Murphy, Wil- 
mington; Dr. W. B. McNider, Chapel Hill; J. L. 
Harris, Baleigh ; H. D. Bateman, Wilson ; D. L. St- 
ela ir, Sanford. Before leaving the "Hill," this class 
made definite plans for working up a big twenty-year 
reunion in 1921. 

Class of 1906 

President W. B. Love, of Monroe, had charge of 
the reunion exercises of the class of 1006. He pre- 
sented the President of the University with a check 
for one thousand dollars as a gift from the class. The 
various members of the class present were introduced 
to the audience. Among those present were: W. B. 
Love, Monroe; John A. Parker, Charlotte; E. P. 
Diane, Charlotte; Dr. B. F. Royal, Morehead City; 
Dr. E. A. Abernethy, Chapel Hill ; B. B. Black- 
welder, Hickory; L. F. Abernethy, Hickory; A. H. 
Bahnson, Winston-Salem; F. A. Edinundson, New- 
land ; P. E. Seagle, Raleigh ; Hampden Hill, Ox- 
ford; H. C. Jones. Charlotte; S. T. Stancell, Nor- 
folk ; J. D. Proctor. Lumberton. 
Class of 1911 

Fifty members of the class of 1911 celebrated their 
reunion in great style throughout commencement but 
especially on Alumni Day. President W. A. Dees, of 
Goldsboro, presided over the exercises in Gerrard 
Hall. "One hundred men," Mr. Dees said, "gradu- 
ated in the class of 1911, and not one has died since." 
Secretary I. C. Moser, of Burlington, introduced his 
classmates to the audience and presented the Presi- 
dent of the University with a gift of eight hundred 
and sixty dollars in behalf of the class. The mem- 
bers present were: E. L. Williams, S. W. Thomp- 
son, Jr., E. C. Ward, W. C. George, Harry Solomon, 
K. B. Bailey, John Tillett, R. G. Stockton, Cyrus 
Thompson, Jr., Pat Deans, Edgar Turlington, R. H. 
Claytor, T. P. Clinton, H. A. Vogler, C.^A. Vogler, 
E. L. Pemberton, Jr., Talbot Johnson, D. Stowe 
Crouse, J. P. Watters, Odom Alexander, L. H. Wil- 
liams, W. M. Parsley, R. T. Brown, J. C. Moser, J. 
T. Dobbins, D. B. Bryan, W. F. Taylor, W. A. Dees, 
Alex. L. Field, W. B. Wyatt, Robt. F. Moseley, E. 
P. Warren, E. G. Watkins, Geo. Graham, M. White, 
E. J. Williams, J. G. Walker, S. E. Leonard, K. Tan- 
ner. E. R. Buchan, C. L. Williams, Henry Smith, 

C. E. Mcintosh, N. S. Mullican, E. F. McColloch, 
Jim Cheshire, Gus. Zollicoffer, Jerry Zollieoffer. 

Class of 1915 
The class of 1915 was represented by President 
R. G. Fitzgerald, of Hillsboro, as spokesman. He 



said that though young the class of 1915 was strong 
in its love for alma mater. Among the members of 
this class present were : R. G. Fitzgerald, Hillsboro ; 
T. C. Boushall, Raleigh; A. H. Carr, Durham; R. 
E. Parker, Raleigh; Miss Rachel Lynch, Chapel 
Hill; Miss Alma Stone, Raleigh; W. M. Sigler, Pin- 
ners, Va. ; D. L. Bell, Graham ; J. S. Bryan, Scott's 
Hill; H. C. Conrad, Winston-Salem; E. F. Conrad, 
Winston-Salem ; M. J. Davis, Warrenton ; ; J. T. 
Day, Chapel Hill ; E. D. Edgerton, Jr., Kenly ; P. 
H. Epps, Chapel Hill; A. L. Gaither, Statesville; 
Wade Kornegay, Chapel Hill ; F. B. McCall, Char- 
lotte; G. A. Mebane. Jr., Greensboro; H. C. Sisk, 
Waco ; W. P. M. Weeks, Washington, D. C. ; Z. L. 
Whitaker, Oak Ridge ; Phil Woollcott, Raleigh. 
Alumni Conference — The University and Progress 
At 12:30 an informal alumni conference on the 
topic "The University and Progress" was held. Pres- 
ident Graham lead in the discussion of this topic. He 
gave a brief review of the main happenings of the 
University year and spoke of the serious problems 
confronting the University in its growth and devel- 
opment. He spoke of the University student as the 
most important person connected with the institu- 
tion. Fifty per cent of the students earned fifty dol- 
lars or more towards defraying their expenses during 
the past college year. The University professor must 
be paid a higher salary, he declared. The true test 
of a professor's worth, he said, is productive scholar- 
ship. 

President Graham discussed the question of main- 
tenance. The point raised was: How widely ser- 
viceable, and how genuinely great, and how success- 
ful does North Carolina wish her University to be- 
come. It was more thon one hundred years after the 
founding of the University before a building on the 
campus was erected entirely by the State. The Uni- 
versity has grown far beyond her present limits of 
maintenance, accommodation, and physical equip- 
ment. 

Alumni Association Meets 

Immediately after the conference, a business meet- 
ing of the Alumni Association of the University was 
held. Gen. J. S. Carr, '66, of Durham, was re-elected 
president of the Association for the coming year, and 
E. R. Rankin, '13, of Chapel Hill, was elected sec- 
retary. Pledges were made amounting to about three 
hundred and fifty dollars to be paid on a debt in- 
curred several years ago. 

Luncheon A Big Success 

The Alumni Luncheon, held in Swain Hall at 1 :30 
o'clock Tuesday afternoon, was a splendid success. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



245 




HKST L,ORDS OF THE CAMPUS Ul'KIXC COMMENCEMENT— CLASS OF 1911 



Covers were laid for four hundred and fifty, and 
the Hall was more than filled. 

A spirit of good fellowship permeated the atmos- 
phere, and the luncheon itself was one of the most 
elaborate ever held at the University. Something 
laughable was occurring from the beginning until the 
end. Charlotte and Greensboro engaged in heated 
arguments over the Mecklenburg Declaration. Mutt 
and Jeff were there. Black-faced performers cracked 
jokes on local celebrities. 

The class of 1911, clad in sailor suits, fifty strong, 
were in evidence on almost every occasion. They 
gave yells and songs and did war dances contin- 
uously. 

Splendid music for the luncheon, as for all of the 
commencement exercises, was furnished by Don 
Richardson's orchestra of Xew York City. 

President Graham announced a gift of four thou- 
sand dollars from General Julian S. Carr, for a Uni- 
versity fellowship to lie given each year to some 
member of the junior class. 

After the luncheon the married members of 1 '- > 1 1 
played a game of baseball with the unmarried and 
defeated them. 



DI WINS DEBATE 
The annual inter-society debate was won by the 
Di Society, represented by II. 1'. Sharpe and C. B. 
Hyatt. The representatives of the l'hi Society were 
J. S. Siell and E. E. W. Duncan. The Phi had the 
affirmative and the I>i the negative of the query, "Re- 
solved, That all child labor legislation should be 
under federal control, constitutionality granted." 
Hon. 6. B. Patterson, of Maxton, a member of the 
class of is**';, presided over the dbeate. S. C. Pike. 
of the senior class, was secretary. The judges were 
Dr. C. L. Raper, Prof. A. C. Mfclntosh, and Dr. W. 



W. Pierson, Jr. The Bingham Medal was awarded 
to < '. B. Hyatt. This medal is given each year to the 
best debater in the commencement debate by Hon. 
R. YV. Bingham, '91, of Louisville, Ky., son of Col. 
Robert Bingham, and former mayor of Louisville. 
After the debate a reception was given in the By- 
num Gymnasium by the president and members of 
the faculty. The reception was largely attended. 



1912 PLANS FOR REUNION 

The class of 1912 is already making plans for its 
five-year reunion which will be held at commence- 
ment of 1917. It promises to have present a large 
crowd and to hold quite a successful reunion. The 
president of this class is F. B. Drane of Chena, 
Alaska, and the secretary is C. E. Norman, of Char- 
leston, S. C. A reunion committee has been ap- 
pointed to work in conjunction with the class officers, 
and this committee will have something highly inter- 
esting to sav to all members of 11112 at an earlv date. 



ALUMNI CANDIDATES FOR STATE OFFICES 

The following alumni id' the University were nom- 
inated in the Democratic primaries on June 3rd for 
places of importance in the State government: 

Governor, T. W. Bickett, Law '93, of Louisburg; 
Lieutenant Governor, O. Max Gardner, Law '07, of 
Shelby; Secretary of State. J. Bryan Grimes, of 
Raleigh, renominated; Superintendent of Public In- 
struction. Dr. J. Y. Joyner, of Raleigh, renominated. 

A second primary over the nomination for at- 
torney general will perhaps be held between .1. S. 
Manning, '79. of Raleigh, and Edmund Jones. 'Us, 
of Lenoir. 



Prof. G. M. Mclvie, associate professor of public 
speaking, is leaching in the Harvard Summer School. 



246 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 
COMMENCEMENT DAY 



Secretary William G. McAdoo Discusses the Significance of a Pan-American Policy, and 
One Hundred and Fifteen Degrees are Conferred. 



After the rain of the preceding day, the per- 
fed weather of Wednesday was happy augury for 
the commencement celebration. At eleven o'clock, 
the academic procession, to the music of Don "Rich- 
ardson's orchestra, inarched from the Alumni Build- 
ing to Memorial Hall — the brilliant and variegated 
colors of the academic gowns and hoods shining re- 
splendent in the brilliant sunlight. 

Following the prayer by the Rev. W. S. Long, 
President Graham introduced, to perhaps the largest; 
audience that ever assembled in the building, the 
speaker of the day, the Honorable William G. Mc- 
Adoo. Secretary of the U. S. Treasury. The sub- 
ject of the address, peculiarly appropriate at this 
moment in American history, was "The Significance 
of a Pan-American Policy." The address, which was 
read from manuscript and consumed in the reading- 
only eighteen minutes, carried with it the authority of 
one who has recently visited South America as the 
official representative of this government; who is 
devoting his best efforts to promoting better trade 
facilities for North and South America; and who, a 
little while ago, presided over the great Pan-Ameri- 
can Conference of Bankers at Washington City. 

Tlie speaker clearly pointed out that whatever the 
theorist may say as to the danger to Latin-America 
from the Monroe Doctrine, certain it is that the 
countries of Latin-America have now achieved a 
distinct position in the world's affairs. In regard to 
the attitude of the United States toward her sister 
republics, the speaker stated that no doubt remains, in 
the Latin-American world, that the United States has 
sought to treat all the governments of America on a 
basis of equality and co-operation. Not content with 
this traditional policy, we have gone still further to 
give solemn expression of it all to the entire world. 
"Under the lofty leadership of a man, endowed not 
only with serene vision of the historian intimately ac- 
quainted with the forces that have shaped our de- 
velopment, but with combinations of well-balanced 
judgments and creative statesmanship, we have de- 
termined to enter into a solemn pact with all the 
Republics of America, for the mutual guaranty of 
the integrity of all." 

In describing the Pan-American Financial Con- 
ference of 1915, which he himself acting for the 
United States had called, Mr. McAdoo stated that 
this and the recent sessions of the international high 



commission "have demonstrated the ability and the 
willingness of the people of the American continent 
to assist one another in the development of their 
marvelous natural resources." And in conclusion, 
the speaker impressively said : "I am most anxious 
that you should see the full significance of this move- 
ment. It means that the Americas are sounding a 
new note in international policy; that they have not 
only begun to see but are acting upon the principle 
that the welfare of each depends upon the prosperity 
of all. It is your duty as well as mine to hold high 
and unassailable this new concept of international 
relation. By so doing we will be performing a ser- 
vice to our own country, to the American continent, 
and to the civilized world." 

Medals, Prizes and Fellowships 

The following medals, prizes, and fellowships were 
announced : 

The William Cain Prize in Mathematics, C. S. 
Harris. 

The Eben Alexander Prize in Greek, J. M. Gwynn. 

The Early English Text Society Prize, E. W. 
Turlington. 

The Henry R. Bryan Prize in Law, R. H. Shu- 
ford. 

Prizes in North Carolina Colonial History, first, 
S. J. Ervin, Jr. ; second, F. H. Cooper. 

The Callaghan Scholarship Prize in Law, E. G. 
Mi,ck. 

The Le Doux Fellowship in Chemistry, J. W. 
Scott. 

The W. J. Bryan Prize in Political Science, S. 
H. DeVault. 

The Ben Smith Preston Cup, C. L. Snider. 

The Freshman Prize in English, F. A. Clarvoe. 

The English Poetry Prize, Moses Rountree. 

The Bingham Prize, C. B. Hyatt. 

The Mangum Medal, W. B. Umstead. 

The Bradham Prize, J. E. Turlington. 

Elected to Membership in Phi Beta Kappa Socie- 
ty, 1916, C. C. Miller, E. L. Mackie, II. G. Baity. 
A. McC. Elliott, C. S. Harris, J. E. Harris, W. W. 
Kirk, A. M. Lindau, W. T. Polk. Oliver Rand. 
Certificates 

French, Agnes Hyde Barton, Herschel Vespasian 
Johnson, William Barney Pitts. 

German, Thomas Calvin Linn, Jr. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



247 




CLASS OF 1896 ON THE "HIIX" AGAIN ENJOYS ITS 20-YEAR REUNION 



History, William Edward Pell. 
Pike, William Bradley Umstead. 



Samuel Clark 



Degrees in Course 

Degrees were conferred in course as follows : 
Bachelors of Arts — Joseph Henry Allred. Andrew 
Vance Anderson, Benjamin Franklin Auld, Herbert 
Victor Bailey, Hoke Barrymore Black, James Cor- 
naro Blaine, Hubert Morse Blalock, Luther Avon 
Blue. Jr., Edwin Brownring Borden. Jr., Francis 
Foster Bradshaw, Allen Thurman Castelloe, Francis 
Osborne Clarkson, William Borden Cobb. Frank 
Hodges Cooper, George Herman Cooper, Rush Floyd 
Crouse, Charles Rufus Daniel. Douglas Beaman Dar- 
den, Fred Hyams Deaton, Charles Xelson Dobbins. 
John Overton Dysart, Lee Henry Edwards, Graham 
Burwell Egerton, Leslie James Farmer, Walter Leon 
Goldston, Jr., Seddon Goode, Jr.. James Archibald 
Hardison, Jr., Joseph Johnson Harris. James Left- 
wich Harrison, Emory Cline Herman, Hugh Bryan 
Hester, Samuel Huntington Hobbs, Jr., Ernest Glen 
Hogan, Curtis Avent Holland, Robert Burton House, 
Hinton Gardner Hudson, Wade Russell Hunter, John 
Manning Huske, Herman Jernigan, Herschel Vespa- 
sian Johnson, John Haywood Jones, Edward Gray 
Joyner, John Archelaus Kent, William Wilson Kirk, 
McDaniel Lewis, Thomas Calvin Linn, Jr., Giles 
Mebane Long, Vann Ward McGb.ee, Luther Grier 
Marsh. Harry Miller, James Roy Moore, Carlyle 
Morris, Frank Wisconsin Xorris. Robert Newton 
Page, Jr., John Men-el Parker, William Edward 
Pell, Samuel Clark Pike. William Barney Pitts. 
William Isaac Proctor. Marius Emmctt Robinson, 
Jr., George Claiborne Royall, Jr., Beverly Sampson 
Royster, Jr.. William Cecil Rymer, Jacob Philip 
Shrago, Nbrinan Clifford Shuford, Roger Shore Sid- 

dall, Hubert McCree Smith. William Oliver Smith. 
Adam Treadwell Thorp. William Bradley Fmstead, 



Eleanor Watson, Robert Henry Winborne Welch, Jr., 
Fred Philips Wood. 

Bachelors of Science in Chemical Engineering — 
Lucius Coleman Hall, Oscar Asa Pickett. 

Bachelors of Science in Civil Engineering — Clyde 
Lathrop Fore, Roy McRae Homewood, Hazel Patter- 
son. 

Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering — 
Floyd Howard Elsom. William Henry Joyner, 
George Wallace Smith, William Capehart Walke. 
Marshall McDairmid Williams, Jr. 

Bachelors of Science in Medicine — James Gillespie 
Dickson, William Henry Harrell, Julian Alison 
Moore, Daniel Reyner, John Moorhaj Tamraz. 

Bachelors of Laws — Benjamin Franklin Aycock, 
Marvin Key Blount, Paris Cleveland Gardner, Julian 
Gilliam Hart, Oscar Leach, Ernest Grant Mick, 
Walter Bryan Rouse, Richard Harvey Shuford, 
Henry Clay Turner. 

Bachelor of Arts and Laws — Robert Thomas 
Bryan, Jr. 

Graduates in Pharmacy — Alman Byron Butler, 
Clarence Mason Miller, Roger Derrick Sanford, 
Jesse Eli Turlington, William Winston Wiggins. 

Doctor of Pharmacy — Arthur Levi Fischel. 

Masters of Arts — Hubert Walter Collins, Martin 
Joms Davis, Walter Leon Goldston, Jr., Seddon 
Goode, Jr., James Cunningham Harper, Edgar Long. 
John Riley Masterson, Walter Patten. 

Master of Science — Edward Yates Keesler. 

Doctors of Philosophy — Carnie Blake Carter. Vic- 
tor A Mine Coulter. 

Honorary Degrees 

In presenting the distinguished visitor for the de- 
gree of doctor of laws, Dr. Raper, Dean of the 
Graduate School, said: 

•Mr. President, I have the honor to present for 



248 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



the degree of doctor of laws. William Gibbs McAdoo, 
president and director of the Hudson and Manhattan 
Railroad Company, which operates that remarkable 
system of transportation widely known as the Hud- 
son Tube Service, connecting New York City with 
New Jersey; Secretary of the Treasury of the United 
States; member of the Federal Reserve Banking 
Board; distinguished for very unusual ability in the 
field of transportation and in the field of private 
and public finance." 

The audience was dismissed with benediction by 
the Rev. W. S. Long. 



LEGISLATIVE NOMINEES 

Among the alumni of the University who received, 
in the recent primaries, nominations for membership 
in the General Assembly of North Carolina for 1017 
were the following: 

Senate. — F. ( '. Harding, '93, Greenville; W. X. 
Everett, '8$, Rockingham; M. H. Allen, '06, Golds- 
boro; Lindsay C. Warren. '10, Washington; A. L. 
Bulwinkle, Law '04, Gastonia ; Chase Brenizer, Law 
'99, Charlotte; W. D. Pollock, '85, Kinston ; Stahle 
Linn, '07, Salisbury; J. S. McNider. '06, Hertford; 
W. L. Long. '09, Roanoke Rapids. 

House, — Walter Murphy, '92. Salisbury; Clem G. 
Wright, '86, Greensboro; R. A. Doughton, '83, 
Sparta; T. C. Bowie. '99, Jefferson: W. A. Dees, '11. 
Goldsboro; Carter Dalton. '06, High Point: J. C. 
Galloway, '07. Grimesland: R. W. Winston. Jr., '12, 
Raleigh; Edgar Love. '90. Lincolnton; J. L. Rob- 
erts, '14, Reidsville; L. P. McLendon, Law '12. Dur- 
ham: E. W. Pharr. Law '09. Charlotte. 



NEW CAROLINA PHARMACISTS 

Fourteen students in the LJniversity School of 
Pharmacy passed the State board in the examinations 
held June 6th in Raleigh. The total number to pass 
the board was twenty-seven. A University man. Vic- 
tor K. Overman, of Elizabeth City, made the highest 
average of all the applicants, and so won the Brad- 
ham prize, which is given each time to the leader in 
the examinations by Mr. C. D. Bradham, '90. of 
New 7 Bern. 

The list follows: 

P. M. Arps, Plymouth: A. B. Butler, Roseboro; 
J. N. Eubanks. Pittsboro; W. B. Gtirley, Windsor; 
C. G. Guion. Unionville; A. E. Hayes, Granite Falls; 
Walter Ilufham, Chadbourn : CM. Miller. Rock 
Hill. S. C; T. L. Mullen. Huntersville : V. K. Over- 
man. Elizabeth City; R. D. Sanford. Laurinburg; 
B. P. Scruggs. Rutherfordton ; W. W. Wiggins, 
Coats; Lowry R. Wilson, Gastonia. 



FACULTY CHANGES 

Mr. A. H. Patterson will return in the fall after 
a year's leave of absence and resume his duties as 
professor of physics and dean of the school of applied 
sciences in the University. 

Dr. J. M. Booker, associate professor of English, 
has been granted a leave of absence for next year by 
the hoard of trustees. He will spend the time in 
study abroad. 

Mr. John W. Lasley returns to the department of 
mathematics after a year's graduate study at Johns 
Hopkins University, where he held a fellowship. 

Mr. E. W. Turlington, instructor in Latin the 
past year, becomes instructor in English for next 
year. 

Mr. E. F. Parker, for the past four years in- 
structor in French, resigns this position to accept an 
instruc'torship and do graduate work for the degree 
of Ph. D. at Harvard. 

Mr. P. H. Epps, for the past year instructor in 
Greek, becomes instructor in both Latin and Greek. 

Dr. O. P. Rein, assistant professor of German for 
three years, resigns this position to take up work 
elsewhere. 

Mr. IT. W. Collins, instructor in mathematics for 
two years, will next fall enter the Massachusetts In- 
stitute of Technology for the pursuit of advanced en- 
gineering studies. 

Mr. W. C. George,, instructor in zoology, resigns to 
accept the professorship of biology at Guilford Col- 
lege. 

Mr. Edgar Long, instructor in English the past 
year, returns to his post as assistant professor of 
English in Erskine College, Due West, S. C. 

Mr. H. G. Merten. instructor in English, resigns 
to pursue graduate w y ork at the University of Chi- 
cago. 



PRESIDENT OF STATE ASSOCIATION 
John LI. Vaughan, of the class of 1904 and M. A. 
1905, head of the department of History and Eco- 
nomics in the New Mexico College of Agriculture and 
Mechanic Arts, at State College, was recently elected 
president of the New Mexico Educational Associa- 
tion. Mr. Vaughan is regarded as one of the strong 
school men of the Southwest. 



FROM FLORIDA 
Walter P. r'nller, of the class of 1915. offers as 
an excuse for not attending the one-year reunion of 
his class at commencement the following: "Born to 
Mr. and Mrs. Walter P. Fuller, on June 4th. a son, 
Henrv Walter Fuller." 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



249 




1"11 CELEBRATES ITS 5TH ANNIVERSARY IX MANNER BKFITTING ALMA MATER'S LARGEST GRADUATING CLASS 



SUMMER SCHOOL OPENS 
As The Review goes to press, the twenty-ninth 
session of the University Summer School for teachers 
is opening. The formal opening of the School is set 
for June 1<>. at which time Director W. W. Walker 
and Dean M. H. Stacy are scheduled to make ad- 
dresses to the student body. It is estimated that the 
number of students to register the first week will 
reach 700, and that the 1,000 mark will be reached 
before the close of the session. 



PROF. RIDDICK ELECTED PRESIDENT 

Prof. Wallace C. Riddick, of the class of 1885, 
was on May 30th elected president of the Agricul- 
tural and Mechanical College of North Carolina, at 
Raleigh, by the board of trustees of that institution. 
Prof. Riddick has been a member of the faculty of 
the A. and M. College continuously for the past 
twenty-four years. At first he taught all branches of 
engineering but later became head of tbe civil engi- 
neering department alone. For the past seven year* 
he has also been vice-presidnt of the college. His elec- 
tion lias been greeted with enthusiasm by Btudents 
and alumni of the A. and M. in the State. 



COACHING SCHOOL 
Tbe third session of the University Coaching 
School will begin August 15th and continue through 
September 13th. The school "Hers opportunity to 
prospective college students, to complete for college 
entrance, courses of study for which they would oth- 
erwise no! receive credit. Sophomores and Fresh- 
men who have failed to pass college examinations will 

also benefit by attending tin aching school. The 

instruction aims at a rapid review of the subject in 
hand supplemented by thorough teaching of the mosl 
essential facts and principles of the subject. 



The courses offered are in Latin, Greek, French, 
German, History, Mathematics and Physics. Infor- 
mation may be secured by correspondence with G. K. 
G. Henry, of the department of Latin, or W. W. 
Rankin, Jr., of the department of Mathematics. 



1905 NEWS NOTES 

Mr. W. T. Shore, of Charlotte, secretary of the 
class of 1905. sends The Review the following notes 
of interest. 

W. C. Cathey is assistant engineer of the Southern 
Railway, that is, in their civil engineering depart- 
ment, with address at present, box 116. Barbours- 
ville, Va. He sent secretary check on his class gift. 

Bill Miller, otherwise known as C. W. Miller, who 
did so well in the insurance business in Greensboro 
before he was taken sick, is now at Fort Bayard. 
New Mexico, care of Officers Infirmary. 

Mrs. Pelton, having changed her name since at 
Chapel Hill by the usual feminine process to Mrs. 
M. S. ( '. Smith, is engaged in literary work in New 
York City, as stated in the last issue of the Review, 
and she says: "Something, perhaps the Universality 
of the new name, stirred (her) to wield the pen 
more vigorously." She still receives royalties on 
the book she had published before she left the "Hill," 
-A Tar Heel Baron." Ami also, in 1910, the Chau- 
tauqua Press issued "Studies in Dickens;" in l'.Ul 
Thomas V. Crowell Co. published her "Dickens Day 
by Day:" in 1912 Mac.Millan Co. published another 
book by her called the "Spiril of the French;" in 
L913 the Crowell Company pul out another 
by her called "Twenty Centuries of Paris;" from 
L909 to L914 she was Associate Editor of the Chau- 
tauquan; and. in 1915 the New York Book Co. pub- 
lished her last hook called "The Ethel Morton 

Hooks." 



250 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 

Issued monthly except in July, August, and September, by the Gen- 
eral Alumni Association of the University of North Carolina. 

Board of Publication 

The Review is edited by the following Board of Publication: 

Louis R. Wilson, '99 Editor 

Associate Editors: Walter Murphy, '92; Harry Howell, '95; Archibald 
Henderson, '98; W. S. Bernard, '00; J. K. Wilson, '05; Louis 
Graves, '02; F. P. Graham, '09; Kenneth Tanner, '11. 
E. R. Rankin, '13 Managing Editor 

Subscription Price 

Single Copies $0.15 

Per Year 1.00 

Communications intended for the Editor should be sent to Chapel 
Hill, N. C; for the Managing Editor, to Chapel Hill, N. C. All 
communications intended for publication must be accompanied with 
signatures if they are to receive consideration. 

OFFICE OF PUBLICATION, CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 

Entered at the Postoffice at Chapel Hill, N. C, as second class 
matter. 



THE UNIVERSITY IN LETTERS 



R. O. Everett and Bruce Craven, — "Federal In- 
come Tax." Edwards & Broughton Printing Co., 
Raleigh, 1ST. C. 1916. 
The pnrpo.se in view in the preparation of this 
book, as explained in the Introduction, has been "to 
reduce the requirements of the new law to plain 
language so that any one by reading it may clearly 
grasp it and know his rights as well as his dnties 
under the law." This purpose has been carried out 
by the authors, by giving an analysis of the statute 
and an explanation of the various subjects to be af- 
fected by it. The statute is given in full, together 
with regulations and special rulings by the Treasury 
Department, followed by the Brushaber Case 'Con- 
structing the statute and the Sixteenth Amendment; 
and also by the prescribed forms for returns, and sta- 
tistics showing receipts under the law. 

Mr. Everett is a member of the Durham Bar, and 
an alumnus of the University, class of 1903. Mr. 
Craven is a member of the bar at Trinity, N\ C. 



Cain, William — "Earth Pressure, Retaining Walls 
and Bins." John Wiley and Sons, New York. 
1916. 
The theory of earth pressure as developed by 
Poncelet, Weyrauch, and others after Coulomb's 
"sliding wedge" hypothesis for the computation of 
earth thrust against a wall, and also Rankine's not- 
able theory of earth pressure, have all neglected the 
effect of cohesion which certainly exists for ordinary 
more or less compacted clayey earth, the material 
usually met with in practice. Theory has assumed 
the earth to be in all cases a perfectly granular mass 



similar to clean dry sand, endowed with friction but 
entirely devoid of cohesion. This is far from the 
chnracteristics of compacted clay which may even 
possess sufficient cohesion to stand alone vertically in 
a bank and cause no thrust at all against a wall. But 
cohesion is liable to be diminished by the action of 
moisture. This together with the fact that a large 
part of the cohesion in a soil when loosely deposited 
behind a wall is destroyed has led engineers to re- 
main on the side of safety and not rely on any co- 
hesion whatsoever. This large factor of safety, how- 
ever, is unscientific and uneconomical for many cases 
where the clay back of the wall is always compacted 
and drained. 

Professor Cain's book is the first and only treatise 
in English that gives the theory of coherent earth. 
This is a distinctive contribution to the literature of 
engineering and it seems to be the last word that 
needs to be said in connection with the theory of 
earth pressure. There yet remains to be established 
more accurate and reliable data on the co-efficient of 
cohesion for different earths, and these are now 
being determined by the United States Bureau of 
Standards in response to a plea by Professor Cain 
for such a series of tests. This book should bring 
about a more rational design of retaining walls and 
lead to a more intelligent treatment of such import- 
ant problems as pressures in foundations, bracing of 
trenches, pressure in tunnel linings, etc. 

This book contains 297 pages, 6x9; 99 figures and 
several valuable tables. There are six chapters and 
also an appendix containing two parts. 

Chapter I gives clearly the laws of friction and 
cohesion as applied to earth, tables of experimental 
data, and a thorough discussion as to the direction 
and distribution of stress. 

In Chapter II, for earth devoid of cohesion, com- 
plete graphical methods are given; in Chapter III, 
formulas are derived and further graphical methods 
.are established; in Chaper IV is given the complete 
design of a number of retaining walls of masonry or 
reinforced concrete of a variety of types, and a num- 
ber of tables are added for the ready use of con- 
structors. 

In Chapter V the subjects of earth pressures in 
coherent earth, stable slopes, foundations, the thrust 
against a retaining wall, the bracing of trenches and 
the pressures on tunnel linings are treated in great 
detail. 

The theory of bins is given in Chapter VI, and the 
attempt is made there to reach fairly good results on 
the subject of the thrusts on the walls of shallow 
bins filled with coal, etc. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



251 



The case of stresses in wedge-shaped reinforced 
concrete beams, which exist in the toes, heels and 
counterforts of reinforced concrete retaining walls, 
finds approximate solutions in Appendix I, where a 
number of diagrams are given to facilitate compu- 
tations. 

Professor Cain's book is comprehensive and not- 
able because of the original matter which it contains 
and the clearness of presentation. It is particularly 
nseful to students and of real value to the designer. 

T. F. HlCKERSOX, '04. 

Chapel Hill, N. C, May 15, 1916. 



POPULAR POST-GRADUATE WORK 

A novel experiment in University extension work 
begins in Raleigh next week when there will be given 
here the first of a series of lectures and clinics by 
Dr. Lewis Webb Hill, of Harvard University, expert 
on children's diseases, to a special class of local doc- 
tors. The following day he will give the same in- 
struction in Halifax county, going afterwards to 
Edgecombe, Wilson, Wayne, and Johnston, returning 
to Raleigh the beginning of the following week and 
continuing to make the rounds until the summer 
course is completed in seventeen weeks. By this 
method the practicing physicians in the section men- 
tioned will be enabled to obtain for an expenditure of 
$30 post-graduate instruction from a recognized ex- 
pert that will interfere but slightly with their work, 
that they could have otherwise received only by a 
trip North involving a number of weeks' time and 
several hundred dollars expense. 

This plan, which was worked out by Dr. Rankin 
of the Board of Health in consultation with other 
physicians and with the University authorities, is in 
operation in no other State in the Union. Yet its 
proposal has met with such an enthusiastic reception 
that there are already several other sections being 
arranged among State physicians, which will be sup- 
plied with lecturers as needed, and which may take 
up the line of work desired by the doctors themselves. 
With the extension of the plan, it should be possible 
in a few years for the progressive physician to keep 
abreast with the latest practice in departments thai 
are now given very largely to specialists and without 
interruption of his borne duties. 

The medical profession is that one which is sub- 
ject to most constant shift and change in method, the 
precedents in which soonest grow old, in which learn 
ing is Ieasi conclusive. As in the case of diseases of 
children, there are many of its branches which can 
be mastered only by the special post-graduate work 
and clinics which but a small proportion of its mem- 



bers have heretofore been able to afford. The idea 
of the State taking charge of this work by drawing 
the doctors together in co-operative effort after the 
manner of a farmers' institute is novel, but it looks 
to be sound to the core. In the beginning the plan has 
met with an enthusiastic reception from the profes- 
sion. It is one that promises more in its quiet way 
and for less cost from the mass of people benefited 
than anything we have seen suggested in a long- 
while. — Raleigh Times, June 2, 1916. 



DR. HENDERSON MAKES ADDRESS 

On May 19, as part of the official ceremonies in 
connection with the celebration of the one hundred 
and forty-first anniversary of the Mecklenburg Dec- 
laration of Independence, an historical address was 
delivered by Dr. Archibald Henderson to an overflow 
audience in the Hall of the Chamber of Commerce, 
Charlotte. This address, entitled "The Revolution in 
North Carolina in 1775," created a profound im- 
pression. On the basis of evidence strictly contem- 
poraneous, that is. of the month of May and the 
year 1775, Dr. Henderson demonstrated that the 
news of the Battle of Lexington reached Charlotte on 
May 19, 1775, new style. The significance of this 
historical discovery arises from the fact that, accord- 
ing to the evidence of the participants, it was on the 
day following the arrival of this news that independ- 
ence was declared. 



LAVENDER R. RAY 

Lavender R. Ray, a member of the class of 1S63, 
a Confederate veteran, and for many years a member 
of the Atlanta bar. died May 2Tth at his home in 
Atlanta following a stroke of apoplexy which came 
on his return from the Confederate Veterans' re- 
union in Birmingham. Mr. Ray was born in New- 
man, Georgia, December 15. 1842, and was thus 
73 years of age at the time of his death. 

He was a student in the University at the out- 
break of the Civil War. He enlisted in the First 
Georgia regiment, and served throughout the war, 
becoming a lieutenant in L865. At the close of the 
war. Air. Ray settled as a lawyer in Atlanta, where 

he had lived since. He served at various times as a 
member both of the house and senate of the Georgia 
legislature. At commencement of 1911, the Uni- 
versity conferred upon him. with others of his class, 
the A. B. degree. 



Dr. Chas. R. Turner. '95, is a dentist in Phil- 
adelphia and a member of the faculty of the Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania. 



252 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



IN CHINA 

Quentin Gregory, a native of Halifax and a mem- 
ber of the Class of 1902, is manager of the northern 
division of the British American Tobacco Company 
in China. Sis headquarters are at Tientsin. 



MEDICAL MEN RANK HIGH AT PENNSYLVANIA 

The first three places in the advanced standing list 
at the University of Pennsylvania went to Vann, Roy- 
ster, and Pate, former students of the University 
Medical School. The record of Carolina men at 
Pennsylvania has been consistently of this same high 
sort. 



DR. DAVIS IN CHARGE INVESTIGATION WORK 

Dr. R. 0. E. Davis, of the Class of 1901, is in 
charge of physical investigation for the Bureau of 
Soils, U. S. Department of Agriculture, Washington, 
D. C. He spent January and February last in 
California investigating the possibility of obtaining 
potash from kelp. As a result of his findings the 
manufacture of potash from kelp has since been 
commenced ou an extensive scale in several Pacific 
coast states. 



MADDRY GOES TO TEXAS 

Rev. Chas. E. Maddry, a member of the class of 
1903, for the past several years pastor of the Baptist 
Tabernacle, Raleigh, has accepted a call to the pas- 
torate of the Baptist Church of the University of 
Texas, at Austin, and has taken up his work there. 
Mr. Maddry won the Mangum medal in 1903. He 
has been very successful in the Baptist ministry and 
was regarded as one of the strongest preachers in the 
Baptist State Convention. 



PROFESSOR OF CHURCH HISTORY 

Wallace Eugene Rollins, a native of Asheville and 
a member of the class of 1892, is now professor of 
Church History at the Virginia Theological Semi- 
nary, Alexandria, Va. 



WHITAKER GENERAL MANAGER 

DeBerniere Whitaker, a member of the class of 
L891, fur sume time vice-president ami general man- 
ager of the Juragua [ron Company of Santiago do 
( !uba, has been appointed general manager also of the 
Spanish American Iron Co. at the same place. These 
two companies own f!7 per cent of the 3,245 million 
tons of visible iron ore reserves in Cuba and ship 
about eight-ninths of the annual production of the 
island. 



BALTIMORE ALUMNI NOTES 

F. B. Dancy, '81, is manager of the northern di- 
vision of the F. S. Royster Guano Co., Baltimore. 

W. L. Swink, '04, is a lawyer with offices in the 
Munsey Building. 

Dr. W. M. Marriott is pediatrician at the Johns 
Hopkins Hospital. 

Geo. S. Wills is head of the department of English 
in the Baltimore Polytechnic Institute. 

T. D. Rose, '10, is engaged in the electrical en- 
gineering business in the city. 

Dr. C. M. Byrnes, '02, is a successful physician of 
the city, with address 207 E. Preston St. 

J. M. Walker, '81, is in the U. S. internal reve- 
nue service. 

Capt. Isaac E. Emerson, '78, donater of the Em- 
erson Stadium to the University, is one of Balti- 
more's best known and wealthiest citizens. He is at 
the head of the Bromo-Seltzer Co., owns the Emerson 
Hotel, and has a large number of other business in- 
terests. 



TARBORO ALUMNI NOTES 

H. H. Philips, '05, is a lawyer, a member of the 
firm of Allsbrook and Philips. 

W. G. Clark, '97, is a merchant and farmer and is 
chairman of the board of county commissioners of 
Edgecombe. 

Henry Johnston, '90, a winner of the Mangum 
medal, has large farming interests in Edgecombe 
County. 

George Howard, '85, is a successful business man 
and is chairman of the board of commissioners of 
the Tarboro public schools. 

W. S. Howard. '97, is secretary and treasurer of 
the Runnvmede Cotton Mills. He is a member of 
the board of trustees of the University. 

Don Gilliam, '09, practices law in Tarboro, in the 
firm of Gilliam and Gilliam. 

. Geo. M. Fountain. '08, former shortstop on the 
Carolina baseball team, practices law in Tarboro. 

Dr. Julian M. Baker. '77, one of the first gradu- 
ates of the University following the re-opening after 
the Civil War. has a large practice as a physician in 
Tarboro and Edgecombe County. He is at the head 
of a hospital which has just been erceted in Tarboro. 

Dr. W. W. Green, M. D., '08, practices medicine 
in the firm of Drs. Baker and Green. 

R. G. Allsbrook. '96, practices law in the firm of 
Allsbrook and Philips. He is also solicitor of bis 
district and a member of the board of trustees of the 
University. 

M. C. Staton, '04, is a lawyer of Tarboro. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



253 



THE GENERAL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

of the 
UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 



Officers of the Association 
Julian S. Carr, '66 President 

E. R. Rankin, '13 Secretary 

THE ALUMNI 

E. R. RANKIN 13, Alumni Editor 

THE CLASSES 

1883 
— G. A. Mebane is engaged in the insurance business at 
Greensboro. 

— J. F. Wilkes is head of the Mecklenburg Iron Works. 
— H. H. Williams is professor of Philosophy in the Univer- 
sity. 

1884 
— Julian Wood is a fisherman, banker, and well known citi- 
zen of Edenton. 

— J. C. Roberts is a member of the faculty of the Colorado 
School of Mines, Golden, Col. 

— M. R. Hamer is treasurer of Converse College, Spartan- 
burg, S. C. 

— Heriot Clarkson, Law '84, of Charlotte, attended com- 
mencement. His son, F. O. Clarkson. was graduated this 
year. 

1885 
— Wallace C. Riddick. for a number of years head of the de- 
partment of civil engineering in the A. and M. College, 
West Raleigh, and vice-president of the college, was on 
May 30th elected president, to succeed Dr. D. H. Hill, re- 
signed. 

— George Gordon Battle is one of Xew York's leading law- 
yers, a member of the firm of O'Gorman, Battle and Vandi- 
ver, with offices 37 Wall Street. 
— E. G. Goodman is a physician of Southpurt. 

1886 

— W. S. Dunston is circulation manager of the Birmingham 

News, Birmingham, Ala. His home address is 406 St. 

Charles Ave.. West End. 

— Dr. I. H. Manning is dean of the medical school of the 

University. 

-Clem G. Wright, of Greensboro, is a Democratic nominee 

for the legislature from Guilford County. 

— Tyndall Cobb lives at Dothan, Alabama. He owns a 

Dothan newspaper and is a representative in Alabama of the 

Illinois Central Railway. 

— John F. Schenck is head of the Cleveland Mill and Power 

Co.. operators of cotton mills, at Lawndale. 

— J. J. Jenkins, of Siler City, is the Republican candidate 

for Congress from the fourth N. C. district. 

1887 
— H. F. Shaffner is an officer of the Wachovia Bank and 
Trust Co., Winston-Salem. 
— C. F. Smith is an Episcopal minister of Petersburg. Va, 

1888 
— O. D. Batchelor is a successful lawyer of Norfolk, Ya. 



— T. A. Marshall is a member of the firm of Leak and Mar- 
shall, wholesale dealers, Wadesboro. 
— E. P. Withers is a leading lawyer of Danville, Ya. 
— F. M. Harper is superintendent of the Raleigh city schools. 

1889 

— W. M. Curtis is a member of the faculty of the Greensboro 

C 'liege for Women, Greensboro. 

— H. G. Wood is a farmer and leading citizen of Edenton. 

— Herbert Clement is a capitalist of Mocksville. 

— Alexander Stronach is a judge in Samoa. 

1890 
— J. C. Braswell is cashier of the Planters Bank. Rocky 
Mount. 

— Chas. A. Rankin is engaged in the lumber business at 
Hallsboro. 

— J. W. Graham, of Aberdeen, attended the commencement 
exercises. 

— P. L. Woodard is merchandising at Wilson. 
— W. S. Battle. Jr.. is claim agent for the Norfolk and West- 
ern Railway Company. Roanoke, Va. 

1891 

— W. W. Davies practices law in Louisville, Ky. 
— Dr. C. S. Mangum is professor of anatomy in the Uni- 
versity. 

— G. H. Currie, "Punch," of Clarkton, attended the com- 
mencement exercises. On Alumni Day he spoke in behalf of 
'91. His remarks and wit brought forth great applause. 
— R. B. Redwine, of the firm of Redwine and Sikes, Monroe, 
attended the commencement exercises and the meeting of the 
board of trustees. 

— N. A. Currie is head of the mercantile firm of N. A. 
Currie and Company, Clarkton. 
— Wm. J. Andrews is a consulting engineer of Raleigh. 

1892 

— Geo. W. Connor is a judge of the X. C. Superior Court. 
His home is at Wilson. 

— F. L. Willcox, at one time University librarian, practices 
his profession, law. in Florence, S. C. 
— S. L. Davis manufactures furniture at High Point. 
— T. R. Foust is superintendent of the Guilford County 
schools, located at Greensboro. 

— Charles Baskerville. Ph. D., '94, is head of the department 
of chemistry in the College of the City of New York. 
— C. F. Harvey is one of Kinston's leading citizens and busi- 
ness men. He is manager of the mercantile firm of L. 
Harvey and Son Co. 

— Walter Murphy, of Salisbury, is a candidate on the Demo- 
cratic ticket in Rowan County for the House of the N. C. 
Legislature. Mr. Murphy was speaker of the House in 
1913. 

1893 
— Dr. H. E. Rondthaler is president of Salem College. Win- 
ston-Salem. 

— Dr. Michael Hoke, of Atlanta, Ga., is one of the most 
noted surgeons in his section of the South. 
— \i. Payson Willard is a leading business man of Wilming- 
ton. 

— F. C. Harding is a successful lawyer of Greenville, a mem- 
ber of the firm of Harding and Pierce. He is also a member 
of the State Senate. 

— \Y M. Allen is State food and oil chemist for North Caro- 
lina, located at Raleigh. 



254 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



— John Spencer Bassett, Law '93, is professor of History in 
Smith College, Northampton, Mass. He is the author of a 
text book in History and was at one time editor of the 
South Atlantic Quarterly. 

1894 

— Louis M. Swink practices law in Winston-Salem. 

— T. C. Smith, Jr., is head of the Dr. T. C. Smith Co., 

wholesale drug dealers of Asheville. 

— J. W. Yates is cashier of the Murchison National Bank of 

Wilmington. This bank is capitalized at one million dollars. 

— Lindsay Russell, Law '94, is a lawyer of New York. He 

is president of the North Carolina Society of New York. 

— W. B. Guthrie has been engaged since graduation in the 

practice of law at Durham. He is a member of the firm of 

Guthrie and Guthrie. 

1895 

— J. N. Pruden practices law in Edenton, a member of the 
firm of Pruden and Pruden. 

— John L. Patterson manufactures cotton at Roanoke Rapids. 
— E. W. Myers is city engineer of Greensboro. 
— R. T. S. Steele is engaged in coal mining at Williamsport, 
Pa. 

— F. B. McKinne attended the recent commencement. He is 
cashier of the Bank of Louisburg, and is one of Franklin 
County's leading citizens. 

— W. R. Kenan, Jr., is an electrical engineer of Lockport, 
N. Y. 

— J. E. Brooks, founder of the State Sanitorium for Tuber- 
culosis, is located at Blowing Rock and is practicing medicine. 

1896 

— R. E. Coker is with the U. S. Bureau of Fisheries, Wash- 
ington, D. C. His address is 1414 Webster Street. 
— D. F. Nicholson teaches pedagogy in the Greensboro Col- 
lege for Women. 

— W. C. Smith is professor of English in the State Normal 
College. He is also dean of the college. 

— F. F. Bahnson is with the Arista Mills and the Normalair 
Company, Winston-Salem. 

— Thomas Clarke is with Woodstock College, Woodstock, 
Md. He was ordained priest in 1915. 

— Ralph Van Landingham is head of the firm of John Van 
Landingham and Son, dealers in cotton and burlaps, Char- 
lotte. 

— R. T. Wills is secretary-treasurer of the Wills Book and 
Stationery Co., Greensboro. 

1897 

— W. S. Howard is secretary and treasurer of the Runny- 
mede Cotton Mills, Tarboro. 

— Mr. and Mrs. A. W. Mangum visited in Chapel Hill recently. 
Mr. Mangum is at the head of a large camphor farm at 
Waller, Clay County, Florida. 
— A. F. Williams is a physician of Wilson. 
— John H. Andrews is division freight agent for the Southern 
Railway, at Raleigh. 

— A. W. Belden is superintendent of the coke oven depart- 
ment of the Laughlin Steel Company, Woodlawn, Pa. 
— Warren W. Home is a popular druggist of Fayetteville. 

1898 
— C. R. Dey is engaged in the insurance business at Norfolk, 
Va. 

— R. H. Lewis, Jr., is a successful cotton mill man of Oxford. 
He is a member of the local school board. 



— Walter R. Thompson is head of the Children's Home, Win- 
ston-Salem. 

— T. N. Webb is connected with the Belle-Vue Manufactur- 
ing Co., Hillsboro. 

— F. W. Miller is chemist for the Alabama Coal, Iron and 
Coke Co., Talladega, Ala. 

1899 
— Marsden Bellamy practices law in Wilmington, a member 
of the firm of Bellamy and Bellamy. 

— E. D. Broadhurst, at one time superintendent of the 
Greensboro schools, is a successful lawyer of Greensboro. 
— J. S. Carr, Jr., of Durham, is president of the Durham Ho- 
siery Mills, a large textile corporation operating eight plants. 
— Capt. W. C. Harllee of the U. S. Marine Corps has charge 
of target prcatice at Winthrop, Md. He has recently organiz- 
ed more than one hundred rifle clubs in the district of 
Columbia, and has been the means for the developing of 
some expert riflemen. 

— F. W. Coker is professor of History and Political Science 
in the University of Ohio, at Columbus. His address is 70 
12th Ave. 

— H. M. London is deputy collector of internal revenue for 
the eastern district of North Carolina, located at Raleigh. 

1900 

W. S. Bernard, Secretary, Chapel Hill, N. C. 

— Graham Woodard is head of the Contentnea Guano Co., 
Wilson. He is a member of the board of trustees of the 
University. 

— Dr. F. B. Watkins is with the State Hospital, Morganton. 
— J. E. Gant is engaged in the cotton mill business at Altama- 
haw. 

— C. E. Thompson is a member of the law firm of Ward and 
Thompson, Elizabeth City. He is a member of the board of 
trustees of the A. and M. College. 
— H. C. Cowles, Jr., is a physician of New York City. 
— W._F. Bryan is associate professor of English in North- 
western University, Evanston, 111. 

— W. G. Wharton is with the Cone Export and Commission 
Co., Greensboro. 

—Sam E. Shull, LL. B., '01, is a lawyer at Stroudsburg, Pa. 
— N. C. Curtis, at one time instructor in drawing in the 
University, is professor of architecture in Tulane University, 
New Orleans. 

— J. J. Asbury is a chemist with the Tennessee Coal and 
Iron Co., Birmingham, Ala. 

— P. C. Collins is cashier of the Bank of Orange, Hillsboro. 
— I. F. Harris is biological chemist with the Arlington chemi- 
cal Company, Yonkers, N. Y. 

— F. G. Kelly is assistant chemist with the Tennessee Coal 
and Iron Co., Ensley, Ala. 

1901 
F. B. Rankin, Secretary, Rutherfordton, N. C. 
— Dr. Eben Alexander is one of the leading physicians of 
Knoxville, Tenn. 

— John L. Harris is associated with Chas. J. Parker, of 
Raleigh, in the school supply business. 

— C. P. Coble is pastor of the High Point Presbyterian 
church. 

— Dr. C. A. Shore, of Raleigh, is director of the State labora- 
tory of hygiene. 

— W. H. Gibson is secretary and treasurer of the National 
Lumber Company, Concord. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



255 



— Cameron McRae, of Chapel Hill, travels in the South for 

a dye corporation, the Arabol Co. He sells to cotton mills. 

— Metrah Makely is located at Belhaven. 

— J. C. Webb, of Hillsboro. attended the ten-year reunion 

of his class at commencmeent. 

— Herman Weil is manager of the Goldsboro Ice Co., Golds- 

boro. 

— C. D. Appenzeller is a member of the firm of the Appen- 

gold Co., dealers in X-ray and surgical supplies. 150 Nassau 

St., New York City. 

19.02 
R. A. Merritt, Secretary, Greensboro, N. C. 
— R. A. Lichtenthaler is a chemist with the Rhode Island 
agricultural experiment station, Kingston, R. I. 
— B. B. Williams practices law in Warrenton. 
— I. F. Lewis is professor of biology in the University of 
Virginia at Charlottesville. 

— Richard N. Duffy is a leading physician of New Bern. 
--A. M. Carr is an officer of the Durham Hosiery Mills. He 
is located in New Yrok City. 

— Julius F. Duncan, M. A. '03, practices law in Beaufort. 
— J. E. Swain is solicitor of his district and is a member of 
the firm of Wells, Swain, and Campbell, Asheville. 

1903 

X. \V. Walker, Secretary, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
— E. B. Clement is a dentist of Atlantic City. N. J. 
— G. H. Andrews is cashier of the Citizens National Bank, 
Raleigh. 

— Chas. E. Maddry has resigned the pastorate of the Baptist 
Tabernacle, Raleigh, and accepted the pastorate of the Baptist 
Church at the University of Texas, at Austin. 
— R. O. Everett, of the Durham bar, is the joint author with 
Bruce Craven, of Trinity, of a book entitled "Federal In- 
come Tax." This book is a plain presentation of the com- 
plex income tax for the business man and lawyer. It was 
issued from the presses of Edwards and Broughton. Raleigh. 
— D. F. Giles, Law '03, is superintendent of public instruction 
for Wake County, located at Raleigh. 

— Greene R. Berkeley is a successful physician of Norfolk, 
\'a.. with offices 209 Dickson Building.- 

— R. C. Morrow is on a four months vacation from his mis- 
sion school work in Mexico. He is at present in Atlanta, Ga., 
but will come to North Carolina soon. 

— Milton Calder is a successful banker of Wilmington, presi- 
dent of the American Bank and Trust Company. 
— H. H. Bennett is with the U. S. Soil Survey, Washington, 
D. C. 

— Warren Kluttz is superintendent of the Republic Iron and 
Steel Co., Thomas, Ala. 

1904 

T. F. Hickerson, Secretary, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
— L. S. Holt, Jr., is engaged in the manufacture of cotton at 
Burlington. 

— G A. Johnston is farming near Chapel Hill. 
— R. O. Miller is a bank cashier of Mooresville. 
— J. H. Winston is a member of the law firm of Winston. 
Payne, Strawn and Shaw, Chicago, 111. 

— -V. A. J. Idol is a successful banker of High Point, cashier 
of the Commercial Bank. 

— J. H. Matthews, Law '04, is a member <>t' tin- law firm of 
Winston and Matthews, Windsor. 

— Fred Archer has been for several years superintendent of 
the public schools of Selma. 



— Lawrence H. Jones is with the Independent Scale Com- 
pany, manufacturers of automatic computing scales, Ashe- 
ville. 

— A. W. Latta is secretary and treasurer of the Gastonia 
.Cotton Yarn Co., 405-6 Mariner and Merchants Building, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

— S. S. Heide is assistant chemist with the Tennessee Coal 
and Iron Co., Ensley. Ala. 

— W. A. Whitaker is teaching applied chemistry and metal- 
lurgy in the University of Kansas, Lawrence, and directing 
tin- division of State chemical research. 

1905 

W. T. Shore, Secretary, Charlotte, N. C. 

— R. G. Lassiter is head of the large engineering and contract- 
ing firm of Robert G. Lassiter and Co., with headquarters at 
Oxford. This firm's specialties are general contracting, munic- 
ipal improvements, asphalt pavements, and road building. 
— W. H. Oldham is superintendent of foundry furnaces, 
Tennessee Coal. Iron and Railroad Co., Bessemer, Ala. 
— P. H. Rogers. Jr.. is secretary and treasurer of the Caro- 
lina Fiber Co., paper manufacturers, Hartsville, S. C. 
— Dr. Frank McLain is instructor in hygiene in the College 
of the City of New York. 

— I. C. Wright is a well-known attorney of Clinton. He is 
a Mason and Odd Fellow, and treasurer of the board of 
stewards of the Methodist Church. 

— J. Kenyon Wilson attended the recent commencement exer- 
cises and the meeting of the board of trustees. He is a lawyer 
of Elizabeth City with offices 206-207 Kramer Building. 
— Ernest Sifford is with the Birmingham Testing Lobaratory, 
Birmingham. Ala. 

— R. W. Perry is a chemist with the Michigan Central testing 
laboratories. Detroit. Mich. 

— Geo. M. McXider is with the Corn Products Company, 
located at Greenville, S. C. 

1906 

John A. Parker, Secretary, Charlotte, N. C. 
— Dr. B. E. Washburn is directing the work of the Inter- 
national Health Commission in Trinidad. His address is 
Port of Spain. Trinidad. 

— Dr. E. A. Abernethy is a successful physician of Chapel 
Hill and a member of the board of trustees of the Univer- 
sity. 

— R. H. McLain is with the General Electric Co., Schenectady, 
N. Y. 

— R. E. Calder is with the Navassa Guano Co., at Wilming- 
ton. 

— A. II. Hoyle is a chemist at Ensley, Alabama. 
— F. M. Weller is engaged in the electrical engineering busi- 
ness at Baltimoi i 

— W. L. Grimes practices his profession, medicine, at Win- 
ston-Salem. 

— Frank P. Drane is succeeding as a consulting and analyti- 
cal chemist at Charlotte with laboratories 16 South Church 
Street. 

— H. C. Carter, Jr.. is a lawyer of Washington. He is city 
attorney. 

— P. E. Seagle, at one time a teacher in Oak Ridge Institute 
and later principal of the Wilmington high school, ha 
for several years representative in North Carolina of Ginn 
and Company, publishers. 

— Carter Dalton. of High P int, is a Democratic nominee for 
the legislature from Guilford County. 



256 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



— H. W. Littleton is a physician of Albemarle. 

— Ben F. Royal attended the ten-year reunion of his class at 

the recent commencement. He is a successful physician of 

Morehead City. 

— Charles Bransford is a chemist with the Tennessee Coal 

and Iron Co.. Ensley, Ala. 

1907 
C. L. Weill, Secretary, Greensboro, N. C. 
— N. R. Claytor is a Presbyterian minister of Milton. 
— J. H. D'Alemberte is with the Fisher Real Estate Co., Pen- 
sacola, Fla. 

— H. H. Hughes is an instructor in English at Columbia Uni- 
versity, New York. 

— Geo. M. McKie is associate professor of public speaking in 
the University. 

— E. W. Rankin practices his profession, medicine, at Con- 
cord. 

— Duncan P. Tillett is cashier of the Union National Bank. 
Charlotte. 

— J. C. Wiggins is a physician of Winston-Salem. 
— F. B. Stem, of Darlington, S. C, attended commencement. 
— C. S. Flagler, Med. '07, is a physician of Stroudsburg, Pa. 
— R. Apgar, Med. '07, is a physician at Seat Pleasant, Md. 
— Miss Daisy Allen is a chemist with the State laboratories, 
Raleigh. 

— R. C. Burns is with the Bon Air Coal and Iron Company, 
Allen's Creek, Term. 

1908 
Jas. A. Gray, Jr., Secretary, Winston-Salem, N. C. 
— J. M. Porter is treasurer of the Virginia Can Company, 
Buchanan, Va. 

— F. I. Sutton is a lawyer of Kinston and is mayor of the 
city. 

— S. T. Stancell is a lawyer of Norfolk, Va. 
— P. M. Williams is associated with the L. Moore Dry Kiln 
Company, of Jacksonville, Fla. His headquarters are at 
Wallace. 

— W. E. Yelverton is engaged in journalistic work in Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

— T. L. Simmons is successfully engaged in the insurance 
business at Rocky Mount. 

— Chas. A. Hines, Law '08, is a lawyer of Greensboro. He is 
chairman of the Guilford County Democratic executive com- 
mittee. 

— J. P. Goodman is claim agent for the Southern Railway 
at Asheville. 
— L. G. Southard, M. S. '08, is a lawyer at Union, S. C. 

1909 
O. C. Cox, Secretary, Greensboro, N. C. 
— R. D. Eames is helping DuPont make powder at Hopewell, 
Va. 

— -J. H. Allen attended commencement. He is now principal 
of the Reidsville high school. 

— H. C. Barbee teaches in the Durham city schools. 
— J. D. Ridenhour, of Salisbury, sells Majestic ranges in 
several states for the Majestic Mfg. Co., of St. Louis. 
— O. H. Yokely is engaged in the lumber business at Mt. Airy. 
— Duncan MacRae received the degree of Ph. D., 1916, at 
the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Boston, Mass. His 
major subject was physical or theoretical chemistry. 
— V. C. Edwards, Ph. D. '15, is associate professor of chem- 
istry in Wofford College, Spartanburg, S. C. His marriage 
occurred recently. 



— H. T. Clark is secretary and treasurer of the Scotland Neck 
Cotton Mill at Scotland Neck. 

— W. L. Long attended the recent commencement exercises. 
Mr. Long is a member of the law firm of Mason. Worrell and 
Long, Roanoke Rapids. He is also a member of the present 
legislature. 

— The engagement of Miss Helen Parker, of Warsaw, and 
Dr. Duncan De Vane Walker, of Macon. Ga., has been an- 
nounced. Dr. Walker is superintendent of a hospital at 
Macon, Ga. 

— W. H. Stroud is a chemist, head of feed and fertilizer 
control for the State of Wisconsin, at Madison. 

1910 

W. H. Ramsaur, Secretary, China Grove, N. C. 
— J. S. Patterson is engaged in the mercantile business at 
Chapel Hill with his father, H. H. Patterson, 70. 
— J. A. Everett is farming at Palmyra. 

— J. E. Crosswell is engaged in the cotton commission busi- 
ness at Darlington, S. C. 

— Lee F. Turlington is a successful physician of Birmingham, 
Ala. 

— Ernest Jones, formerly engaged in the electrical engineer- 
ing business at Central Gomez Mena, San Nicholas, Cuba, 
is now with the Westinghouse Electric Export Company, 
Havana, Cuba. His address is 520 Bonco Nacional, Havana. 
— W. A. Darden attended the recent University commence- 
ment. He returns next September to the University of 
Mississippi where he is instructor in the department of Eng- 
lish. Mr. Darden received the degree of M. A. from Colum- 
bia University in 1912 and is at present working for the Ph. 
D. degree from that institution. 

1911 

I. C. MosER, Secretary, Burlington, N. C. ■ 
— W. A. Dees, president of the class of 1911 and a member of 
the law firm of Teague and Dees, Goldsboro, is a nominee 
on the Democratic ticket for the legislature from Wayne 
County. 

— The marriage of Miss Harriet L. Ross and Mr. N. S. 
Mullican occurred April 14th at Winston-Salem. They live 
at Walnut Cove. 

— The engagement of Miss Cooper and Mr. A. A. Zollicoffer, 
both of Henderson, has been announced. 

— J. S. Cowles, formerly an attorney of Lexington, is now 
selling tobacco in Texas. 

— M. B. Wyatt is with the Durham Hosiery Mills, Durham. 
— H, L. Martin is with the General Electric Co., Schenectady, 
New York. 

— W. B. Ellis, Jr., is with the Southern Public Utilities Co., 
Winston-Salem. 

— K~arl B. Bailey is a lawyer, located at Elm City. 
— Jack Watters is foreman in No. 9 Nitrating House of the 
DuPont plant, Hopewell, Va. 

— Odom Alexander has been engaged since graduation in 
the real estate business at Charlotte. He was formerly with 
the Simmons Company but has recently branched out for him- 
self. 

— W. C. George, for the past several years instructor in Zool- 
ogy in the University, has resigned this position and has ac- 
cepted the professorship of biology at Guilford College. 
— J. Talbot Johnson, of Aberdeen, attended the five-year re- 
union of 1911, accompanied by his wife and baby. 
— Joe Dawson is a member of the firm of Dawson and 
Wooten, attorneys, Kinston. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



257 



— J. T. Dobbins, Ph. D., '14, is associate professor of chemis- 
try in the A. and M. College, West Raleigh. 
— W. M. Parsley is managing a hosiery mill at Forest City. 

1912 

C. E. Norman, Secretary, Charleston, S. C. 
— The marriage of Miss Lucile Towe and Mr. Cary Perry 
Quincy occurred May 24th in St. Luke's Church, Norfolk, Va. 
They are at home in Hertford. 

— R. W. Winston, Jr., of Raleigh, is a Democratic nominee 
for the legislature from Wake County. 

— F. B. Hooker has been since graduation engaged in the 
tobacco business at Greenville. 

— C. A. Roberson has been engaged in farming in Martin 
County since graduation. He is a member of the firm of 
G. L. Roberson and Son, planters, Robersonville. 
— C. E. Norman is during the summer supply pastor of St. 
Barnabas Lutheran Church, Charleston. S. C. He will return 
in the fall to Columbia for senior work in the Lutheran Theo- 
logical Seminary. Mr. Norman is president of the federation 
of Lutheran Young Peoples Societies of the South Carolina 
synod. 

— George P. Raney and James W. Morris, Jr., announce 
the formation of a co-partnership for the general practice 
of law, under the firm name of Raney and Morris, with 
offices in the Citizens Bank Building, Tampa, Florida. 
— PL B. Marrow is head of the Battleboro Schools. 
— L. E. Stacy, Jr., is a chemist with the Smoot tannery. North 
Wilkesboro. 

— F. P. Barker is practicing law in New York. 
— John R. Kenyon practices law in Charlotte with offices in 
the Arcade Building. 

— Cards have been issued announcing that Messrs. C. W. 
Fulwood and H. H. Hargrett have formed a partnership for 
the practice- of law with offices in the Golden Building, 
Tifton, Ga. Mr. Hargrett is mayor of Tifton, the youngest 
mayor that the city has ever had, he being 26 years of age. 
A local newspaper says that Mr. Hargrett is probably the 
youngest man holding such a position of responsibility in 
Georgia. 

1913 

A. L. M. Wiggins, Secretary, Hartsville, S. C. 
— The marriage of Miss Elizabeth Bunch and Mr. Horace 
Sisk will take place June 29th in High Point. They will take 
a wedding trip North and will attend the summer school of 
Columbia University before taking up their residence at 
Lenoir, where Mr. Sisk is superintendent of schools. 
— Two 1913 men received the degree of Ph. D. at the recent 
University commencement, V. A. Coulter and C. B. Carter. 
Both have specialized in chemistry. 

— C. B. Hoke is instructor in chemistry in the University. 
— M. T. Spears, of Liilington, attended commencement. 
— Walter Stokes, Jr., is agent for the New York Life In- 
surance Co., 718 Stahlman Building, Nashville, Tenn. His 
wedding occurred May 31st. 

— R. P. Coble is highway engineer for Lee County, located 
at Sanford. 

— E. H. Alderman, of Greensboro, plans to enter the Univer- 
sity medical school next September. 

— Lowry Axley, head of the department of English in the 
high school of Moultrie, Ga., recently had a poem to a 
in the Christian Observer, published at Louisville, Ky. A 
Boston publishing firm has asked him to submit his available 
poetical material for possible publication in book form. 



— Geo. L. Carrington, of Durham, will next September enter 
the University medical school. 

1914 
Oscar Leach, Secretary, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
— W. H. Harrell has completed the second year medical 
course in the University. 

— B. F. Aycock and Oscar Leach received the degrees of 
LL. B. at the recent commencement. 

— H. W. Collins, for the past two years instructor in mathe- 
matics in the University, will next year pursue advanced 
work in civil engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology. 

— Andrew Joyner, Jr., is witli the Clerk of Superior Court 
for Guilford County at Greensboro. 

— 'Wm. B. Campbell, Law '14, practices his profession in 
Wilmington with offices in the Murchison Building. 
— Collier Cobb is a road engineer with the State Highway 
Commission, Raleigh. 

— W. F. Credle is superintendent of schools for Hyde County, 
located at Swan Quarter. 

1915 

B. L. Field, Secretary, Oxford, N. C. 

— Thomas C. Boushall, for the past year general secretary of 

the University Y. M. C. A., has accepted a position with the 

National City Bank of New York. 

— C. M. Moore, M. A. '15, is connected witli the schools of 
Hunt County, Texas. His address is Greenville, Texas. 
— C. T. Smith, of Scotland Neck, has completed the second 
year medical course in the University. 
— G. F. Taylor is located at Manlius, N. Y. 
— Geo. W. Eutsler, Jr., of the faculty of the Newport News 
high school, has recently passed a U. S. Civil Service exami- 
nation and will soon be assigned to duty in the Phillippines. 
— Fuller Hill is with the John Bollman Co., San Francisco, 
Cal. 

— Preston H. Epps, M. A. '16, will next year be instructor 
in Latin and Greek in the University. For the past year he 
has been instructor in Greek. 

— E. F. Conrad will next year continue as principal of the 
Clemmons high school. 

— A. H. Carr is engaged in the cotton mill business at 
Durham, an officer of the Durham Hosiery Mills. 
— C. E. Blackstock, superintendent of the Hendersonville 
schools, is spending the summer at his home in Weaverville. 

1916 

H. B. Hester. Secretary, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
— F. F. Bradshaw, president of the class of 1916 for the 
past year and also permanent president of this class, will 
next year be general secretary of the University Y. M. C. A. 
— F. O. Clarkson will next year return to the University for 
the study of law. 

— J. O. Dysart will take graduate work leading to the M. A. 
degree in the University next year. 

— !•'. H. Cooper has accepted a position with the White Fur- 
niture Co.. Mebane. 

— Lee H. Edwards will next year teach science in the 
Winston-Salem high school. 

— A. T. Thorp will take up the study of medicine next fall, 
probably returning to the University for his course. 
— J. P. Shrago is city salesman for A. M. Shrago, wholesale 
dry goods and notions merchant, Goldsboro. 
— Hazel Patterson has accepted a position with the Southern 
Bell Telephone and Telegraph Co., at Atlanta, Ga. 






258 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



— R. M. Homewood is with R. G. Lassiter and Co.. engineers 

and contractors. He is at work in Wilson. 

— J. Frank Jarrell will next year teach in the Webb School. 

Bell Buckle, Tenn. He is attending the University Summer 

School. 

1917 
— E. S. Booth is receiving teller for the Durham Traction 
Co., Durham. 



NECROLOGY 

1860 

— Capt. Robert Philip Howell, of Goldsboro, died May 8th at 
the home of his daughter in Richmond, Va. Capt. Howell 
served throughout the civil war in command of Company A, 
27th North Carolina regiment. He was a native of Golds- 
boro and had spent his life in that city. Four sons of Capt. 
Howell are alumni of the University ; Logan D. Howell, '89, 
teacher and author of textbooks, of New York ; Col. Geo. P. 
Howell, '90, of the War College, Washington, D. C. ; Harry 
Howell, '95, superintendent of the Asheville schools ; Capt. 
R. P. Howell, Jr., '03, of the U. S. Army, stationed at Fort 
Shatter, in the Hawaian Islands. 

1883 
— Col. John Leighton Phillips, a member of the medical corps 
of the U. S. Army, died May 26th at the Walter Reed 
hospital, Washington, D. C. Col. Phillips was a son of 
Samuel F. Phillips, '41, once attorney general of North 
Carolina and later solicitor general of the United States. 
He had seen service in the medical corps of the army since 
1883. 



I Greensboro Commercial School 

f GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA 

? BOOKKEEPING, SHORTHAND, TOUCH TYPE- 
% WRITING and the BUSINESS BRANCHES are 

four Specialty. School the year round. Enroll 
anv time. Write for Catalogue. 



* 
* 



%, E. A. CLUNG 

I 

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Principal 



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tj .^. * 4 « •^ *f » a * »^< » 4 » * 4 « » 4 » » 4 . » # . » # * ... ... »„* ♦„* ... .,* ... ... » 4 , .^ ... ... »,» ... 

;.AAAAA V .;.AAA.;.AAAAAAAAAA.J,AAA.«. 



* 
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Raleigh Floral Company 

CHOICE CUT FLOWERS for ALL OCCASIONS 
Write, Phone or Wire Orders to Raleigh, N. C. 



* 
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AAAAAAAAAAAAA.:.AAAAAAAAA<«:..>AAAAAAAA.J.AAAAA 

Carolina Drug Company 

CHAPEL HILL, !N. C. 

FOR CAROLINA BOYS. THE HOME OF 
PURE DRUGS 

WEBB and JERNIGAN, Proprietors 



THE UNIVERSITY LAUNDRY 



COMPANY 



O. LeR. GOFORTH, Manager 

Appreciates the business 
of the students and of the 
alumn< when they are in 
Chapel Hill. Special rates 
given to students for all 
their laundry. A special 
two-day service operated. 



TELEPHONE No. 153 

and driver will call for your package 



ZEB P. COUNCIL, Manager 

CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 

Printing 

QUALITY AND SERVICE 



ORDERS TAKEN FOR ENGRAVED CARDS OR 
INVITATIONS 



Eubanks Drug Co. 

Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Agents for Nunnally's Cxndy 



H. H. PATTERSON 

CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE AND FRESH 
GROCERIES AT ALL TIMES 



ESTABLISHED 1916 



fllumni Coyaliy fund 



One for all, and all Tor one" 




THE MONTH'S MAIL 
EXTRACTS FROM LETTERS FROM ALUMNI 

"I will be one of five hundred to give $500 at any time before 1920." — D. B. W. 

"The alumni as a whole are very enthusiastic over this plan and it will only be a matter of a few 
years before the fund will amount to a sum which will be of great benefit to the University. I wish 
I were in a position to give ten times the amount of my pledge." — T. D. V. 

"I believe you will meet with splendid response and it gives me great pleasure to contribute my 
little mite— $50."— W. S. D., '86. 

"What grateful son of the University has not dreamed through the years of the day he would be- 
queath to it a legacy worthy of its worth to him ?" — C. G. F., '88. 

"A gratifying opportunity to express the appreciation that every alumnus must feel in return for 
the help and inspiration. which the institution has been to him." — T. B. F. 

"This idea will concentrate and intensify our interest in the growth of the University and our 
knowledge of its affairs." — H. B. G. 

"I heartily thank you for giving me the chance to express in this small way the deep affection 
I have for the University and the sense of gratitude I shall always have." — R. M. H. 

"I feel indebted to you for having provided the opportunity whereby we may all help in the won- 
derful work the University is doing." — S. L. 

"I wish I could make it a million. I believe this is the greatest all-round movement as far as the 
mass of the alumni are concerned, because nobody is debarred from lending aid." — S. E. M. 

"An excellent plan and one welcomed by every alumnus." — T. S. P. 

"I enclose my check and will be glad when I am in position to show my full interest and faith in 
the great work the University is doing." — R. G. S. 

"I hope I mav show more nearly the great love and gratitude that I have for my Alma Mater. 
— H. M. S. 

"It gives me a tremendous thrill thus to keep in touch with the abounding life of the University." 
— H. C. S. 

Can you afford not to be in this? Of course you will eventually; but why not now? 

Form of Subscription: 



University of North Carolina Alumni Loyalty Fund: 

I will give to the Alumni Loyalty Fund $ annually, 

payable of each year; at which time please send 

notice. I reserve the right to revoke at will. 

Name (Class) 

Address 

Date 



STATEMENT OP THE CONDITION 
OF 

THE FIDELITY BANK 

OF DURHAM. N. C. 

Made to the North Carolina Corporation Commission at the Close 

of Business 

SEPTEMBER 2, 1915 



Resources 

Loans and Investments $2,159,319.34 

Furniture and Fixtures 20,050.33 

Cash Items 20,640.40 

Cash in Vaults and with Banks _ 658,273.03 

$2,858,283.10 
Liabilities 

Capital Stock $ 100,000.00 

Surplus 400,000.00 

Undivided Profits 89,062.18 

Interest Reserve ..._ 6,000.00 

Deposits 2,221,720.92 

Bills Rediscounted 41,500.00 

$2,858,283.10 

The attention of the public is respectfully call- 
ed to the above statement. We will be pleased 
to have all persons who are seeking a safe place 
to deposit their active or idle funds, to call on or 
write us. 

B. N. DUKE. Pres. JOHN F. WILY, VIce-l'res. S. W. MINOR. Cashier 



SEE OUR NEW SPRING CLOTHES 

We can suit the Alumnus Man 
as well as the college man. 
The newest in Suits, Furnish- 
ings and Hats. 

Sneed-Markham- Taylor Co. 

Durham, N. C. 



X3l)e Tirst National !&ank 

of ~3>urr)am. 3t. <£.. 

"Roll of Honor" Bank 

Total Resources over Two and a Quarter Mil- 
lion Dollars 

WE KNOW YOUR WANTS 

AND WANT YOUR BUSINESS 



JULIAN S. CARR 

W. J. HOLLOWAY.. 



-President 
Cashier 



Ice Cream and Frozen Desserts 

of all kinds. Special attention given University and 

College banquets and entertainments. Phone 178 

WARREN ICE CREAM CO. 

PARR1SH STREET DURHAM, N. C. 



UNIVERSITY STUDENTS — 

<Uhe "ROYAL CAFES 

IN CHAPEL HILL as well as IN DURHAM 

APPRECIATE YOUR 'PATRONAGE 



MAKE MO MISTAKE UNSURE I IN THE 

STATE MUTUAL 

The Leading Massachusetts Company 

New policies embodying every desirable feature known to modern life insurance, including an exceptionally 
liberal disability clause. Dividend increase of from 25% to 38% over former scale. 


^ZZ. ±£L SAM ^-^ 




m*^ state wMi micijs ^ 


f State Agent. 704=5=6 First National Bank Building 

J — 'i 



SEABOARD 

AIR LINE RAILWAY 

"The Progressive Railway of the South" 

SHORTEST, QUICKEST AND BEST ROUTE 

Richmond, Portsmouth-Norfolk, Va., and points 
in the Northeast via Washington, D. C, and 
Southwest via Atlanta and Birmingham. 

HANDSOMEST ALL STEEL TRAINS 
IN THE SOUTH 

Electrically lighted and equipped with electric 
fans. 

Steel electrically lighted Diners on all through 
trains. Meals a la carte. 



LOCAL TRAINS ON CONVENIENT 
SCHEDULES 



For rates, schedules, etc., call on your nearest 
agent, or 

CHARLES B. RYAN, G. P. A., JOHN T. WEST. D. P. A.. 

Ntrf.ll, V.. CHARLES R. CAPPS. Vice-Pres., Raleigh, N. C. 
Norfolk, Va. 



So.nb it to JDick! 

Dick's Laundry Baskets leave 13 New West 
for Greensboro at 3:00 P. M. on Monday, Tues- 
day, and Wednesday. To be returned Wednesday, 
Thursday and Friday. 

T. O. WRIGHT 

GENERA L AGENT 
CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 



The Bank o/Chapel Hill 

The oldest and strongest bank in 
Orange County solicits your banking 
business. 



M. C. S. NOBLE 
President 



H. H. PATTERSON 
Vice-President 



M. E. HOG AN 
Caihiei 



"Half ayzXXi 

The Cafe Beautiful 
Newest and Best in Raleigh 

Prices Moderate 

Lavatories for convenience of out-of-town Guests 
We Take Care of Your Baggage Free of Charge 

215 Fayetteville Street— Next to Almo Theatre 

Under Same Management as Wright's Cafe 

Make this your headquarters when in Raleigh 



1 1 

Chapel Hill Hardware Co. 


Lowe Bros. High Standard Paints 

Calcimo Sanitary Wall Coating 

Fixall Stains and Enamels 

Floor Wax, Dancing Wax 

Brushes 


PHONE 144 


FRANKLIN AND COLUMBIA STREETS 

- ■" 



Odell Hardware 

Cnmnflnv qreensboro, 

VUI 1 ipdny NORTH CAROLINA 

Electric Lamps and Supplies 
Builders Hardware 



DEPENDABLE GOODS 

PROMPT SERVICE 

SATISFACTORY PRICES 



FOR NEAT JOB PRINTING AND TYPEWRITER PAPER 

CALL AT THE OFFICE OF 

THE CHAPEL HILL NEWS 



K 



ODAK SUPPLIE R 

Finishing for the Amateur. Foister ^^ 



RIDE WITH 



C. S. Pender graft 

Pioneer Auto Man 



Headqnarlen in DURHAM: 
At the Royal Cafe, Main Street, and Southern Depot 

Headquarters in CHAPEL HILL: 
Ned to Bank of Chapel Hill 

Leave Chapel Hill 8:30 and 10:20 a. m. 

Leave Chapel Hill _.. 2:30 and 4:00 p. m. 

Leave Durham 9:50 a. m., 12:40 p. m. 

Leave Durham 5:08 and 8:00 p. m. 

OTHER TRIPS SUBJECT TO ORDER 

Four Machines at Your Service 
Day or Night 

PHONE 58 OR 23 



Geo. C. Pickard & Son 

Chapel Hill, N. C. 

FIRST CLASS LIVERY SERVICE AT ALL 
TIMES. GIVE US A TRIAL 

A. A. PICKARD .... Manager 

I The Model Market and Ice Co. 

Chapel Hill, N. C. 

All Kinds of Meats. Fish and Oysters in Season. 

Daily Ice Delivery Except Sunday 
S. M. PICKARD Manager 



THE NEW FIRM 

IS,. 1\. TKlutte <Lo.,Unc. 

SUCCESSORS TO A. A. KLUTTZ 

Extend a cordial invitation to all students and 
alumni of the U. N. C. to make their store head- 
quarters during their stay in Chapel Hill. 

Complete Stock of 
New and Second-hand Books, Stationery, and 
Complete Line of Shoes and Haberdashery 
Made by the Leaders of Fashion, Al- 
ways on Hand 



HILL C. UNTHICUM, A. I. A. H. COLVIN LINTHICUM 

ASSOCIATE ARCHITECTS 
Specialty Modern School Buildings 

TRUST BUILDING, ROOMS 502-503 PHONE 226 DURHAM, N. C 



1, — — 

Telephone No 


. 477 Opposite Post Office 


Tin© 


Holl&dl&y 2 

DURHAM, N. C. 


ifemdn© 


Offical 


Photographer for Y 


Y., 1915 


AMATEUR WORK DEVELOPED & FINISHED 



CHAPEL HILL 
N. C. 



ANDREWS CASH STORE CO. 

Will save you from 3 to 5 dollars on your tailor- 
made suits. We also have in an up-to-date line 
of high grade gents' furnishings. Call to see us 
and be convinced. 



IS*3"3xS>«kSk8k8«»«h^8*3><5>3><3»ShS^^ 



The Peoples National Bank 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 



Capital $300,000.00 



United States Depositary 




J. W. FRIES, Pres. Wm. A. BLAIR, V-Pres. and Cashier 

J. WALTER DALTON. Asst. Cashier 



END us any gar- 
ment or article 
you may have 

needing Dry Cleaning 

or Dyeing. 

We will do the work promptly, 
at small cost, and to your en- 
tire satisfaction. 

Send yours by Parcel Post, we 
pay return charges on orders 
amounting to $1.00. 

Mourning Goods Dyed in 24 to 
36 Hours 

COLUMBIA LAUNDRY CO. 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 

Phones 633-634 

Chapel Hill Agents: T. C. Wilkins and 
E. E. W. Duncan 14 and 15 Old West 



♦♦< 



THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

Maximum of Service to the People of the State 

A. THE COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS. C. THE GRADUATE SCHOOL. 

B. THE SCHOOL OF APPLIED SCIENCE D. THE SCHOOL OF LAW. 

(1) Chemical Engineering. E. THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

(2) Electrical Engineering. F. THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY. 

(3) Civil and Road Engineering. G. THE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION. 

(4) Soil Investigation. H. THE SUMMER SCHOOL. 

I. THE BUREAU OF EXTENSION. 

(1) General Information. 

(2) Instruction by Lectures. 

(3) Correspondence Courses. 

(4) Debate and Declamation. 

(5) County Economic and Social Survey*. 

(6) Municipal and Legislative Reference. 

(7) Educational Information and Assist- 

ance. 

WRITE TO THE UNIVERSITY WHEN YOU NEED HELP 
For information regarding the University, address 

THOS. J. WILSON, JR., Regi.trar. 



Murphy f s Hotel and Annex 

Richmond, Virginia 

The Most Modern, Largest, and Best 
Located Hotel in Richmond, Being 
on Direct Car Line to all Railroad 
Depots. 

Headquarters for College Men European Plan $1.00 Up 

JAMES T. DISNEY, Manager 



CY THOMPSON SAYS— 

WHAT ARE YOU WORTH? 

How much money has been and must yet be invested in your education to equip you to become an 
efficient producer? What is the present value of your life to your estate? How can you discount the 
loss to your family, your creditors, and society — should you -not live to produce, repay, and provide? 

AS LONG AS MEN LABOR 

And as long as men are mortal. Life Insurance will always be the one instrument for nullifying 
the constant menace of the loss of the fruits of labor through Death. Hence, nothing can disorganize 
or supplant it. 

No substitute for Life Insurance exists — just as there is none for fire insurance. There is no equal 
way by which a young man can protect his creditors and those who are or may become financially de- 
pendent upon him. It has no competitor. 

AMERICA'S FIRST 

The NEW ENGLAND is the oldest Massachusetts company and the first old line, legal reserve 
mutual company chartered in this country for the purpose of insuring lives. It offers superior service. 
Every provision and stipulation and precaution that can be devised to safeguard this Insurance and give 
it the richest potency is embodied in its policy contracts. 

Today while you are in sound health the opportunity is open to you. Let us help you to avail your- 
self of its lasting and comforting benefits. Today while you may, see us or write us. 

NEW ENGLAND MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO. 

BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 

CHARTERED 1835 



CYRUS THOMPSON, JR., Special Agent 
Raleigh, N. C. 



EUGENE C. McGINNIS, General Agent 
Raleigh, N. C. 



THE ROYALL & BORDEN CO. 



106 and 108 WEST MAIN STREET 



DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA 



Sell all kinds of furniture and furnishings for churches, 
colleges and homes. Biggest stock of Rugs in the 
State, and at cheapest prices. CJIf you don't know us 
ask the College Proctor or the editor of the "Review." 
Call on or write for whatever you may need in our line. 

THE ROYALL & BORDEN CO. 



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