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CY THOMPSON SAYS— 

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Volume V 



THE 



Number 6 








mmiiii 









I 



ALVMNIREVIEW 



OPINION AND COMMENT 
Building the Larger State — To the Builders Con- 
gratulations — What We Receive — In Re the 
Bond Issue — Assist in the State-Wide De- 
bate — What Do you Read Between the 
Lines?— Is the $141 Standard High 
Enough? — "Is the Young Man 
Safe?"— "If You Do Not 
First Succeed" 

LETTERS AND EDITORIALS RELATING TO 
THE BOND ISSUE 




ATHLETIC INTEREST IS HIGH 
Carolina Takes a New Stride in Realm of Athletics 

PROGRESSIVE STEPS TOWARDS A GREAT 
UNIVERSITY 

Fifteen Ways in Which Alumni Can Aid Carolina 



O 



o 



o 



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M. CO V K T I £, DEL. 1912 



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PUBLISHED BY 

THE ALVMNI ASSOCIATION 



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^J 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



Volume V 



MARCH, 1917 



Number 6 



OPINION AND COMMENT 



Knowing the unquestioned resources of North 
Carolina, fully recognizing the imperative need of 

providing for increased permanent 
BUILDING THE improvements and annual support 
LARGER STATE , v ., „, , , , ,. , j 

for the States educational and 

eleemosynary institutions, taking counsel of its faith 
in the future rather than of its fears, the Legislature 
of 1917 authorized an issue of $3,000,000 in bonds 
to be expended over a period of five years for the 
institutions mentioned, and provided, through its 
regular appropriations, more liberally than any pre- 
vious Legislature for their annual support. 

Similarly, with scant attention to legislation of 
the usual political sort, and through the enactment of 
forward looking laws affecting the certification of 
teachers, the extension of public school terms, the 
building of school houses, the teaching of agriculture 
in elementary schools, the support of high schools 
and public health work, the care of dependent classes, 
the removing of economic disabilities of farm and 
home builders, the building of roads, and the care 
of the State's criminals, it gave evidence that it un- 
derstood North Carolina's fundamental needs and had 
the courage to break the blighting habit of pleading 
poverty and to set the fine precedent of meeting them. 

Furthermore, in providing for a tax commission to 
study, outline, and present to the people an equitable 
system of taxation, it indicated the method by which 
the constructive forces released by its enactments 
could be adequately fostered in making North Caro- 
lina the Great State in the Sisterhood of States that 
she can and should be. In one and all of these ways, 
it showed itself to be a discerning, far-visioned body 
and wrote itself down as the most sanely constructive 
Legislature in the annals of the State. 

nnn 

That the University as an instrument in this splen- 
did program of upbuilding, received funds more com- 

mensurate with her needs than 
TO THE BUILDERS, ev€p bef ff fl ^ Re _ 

CONGRATULATIONS .' - 

view genuine cause lor grati- 
tude. But its chief joy is not merely that Alma 
Mater's arm has been strengthened for the part of 
the task assigned her, but rather that after these many 
years North Carolina has gained her own consent to 
cease to be the "poor relation" of the other states, and 



to use wisely her ample resources in the working out 
of a finer civilization within her borders. 

To Senator Holderness, as Chairman of the Joint 
Committee on Appropriations, who thought through 
the situation which the expanding life of the State 
had created, to his colleagues who thought with him 
and supported him in his superb planning, and to 
Governor Bickett, who used the influence of his great 
office and the power of his own stirring eloquence in 
visualizing the situation before the people, the Re- 
view offers its heartiest congratulations ; and though 
it is no prophet, nor the son of a prophet, it confi- 
dently expects these gentlemen one and all, to witness 
as the result of their sound business judgment and 
statesmanship, a transformation in the life of North 
Carolina more profound and far reaching than they 
have even hoped. 

To all sons of the University who as members of 
the Legislature or otherwise devoted themselves to 
the working out of these measures, the Review car- 
ries Alma Mater's greeting and approval. In their 
work she sees anew the fruitage of her labor — the 
teaching of the one supreme duty of service to all. 

nnn 

Through the action of the Legislature the Univer- 
sity receives $165,000 annually for the next two 
years for maintenance and $100,000 

W i^ WE annually for five years for building an! 
RECEIVE J . . J . ~, ° .. 

permanent improvements. Ihese are the 

amounts asked for by the University, and now that 
they have been secured, it becomes its duty to make 
every dollar count tellingly in carrying out the special 
part which it has been assigned in this constructive 
work. The University rejoices in the confidence re- 
posed in it by the Legislature, and pledges itself to 
the assumption of its full responsibility. 

nnn 

As already indicated, the Legislature, by an all 

but unanimous vote in the Senate and with but 14 

votes in opposition in the House, pass- 

IN RE THE ef j on March 5th the bill providing 

BOND ISSUE $3000000 j n bondg _ Qf thig amount) 

something above $1,500,000 goes to the State's higher 
educational institutions of which $500,000 goes to 
the University. 



144 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



While the bill was in passage, opposition, led by 
Dr. E. T. Vann, Educational Secretary of the Bap- 
tist State Association; Dr. W. L. Foteat, President 
of Wake Forest; Eev. Walter Johnson, Missionary 
Secretary; Dr. Livingston Johnson, ex-Missionary 
•Secretary; Eev. H. C. Moore, Editor of the Biblical 
Recorder; and Dr. Charles E. Brewer, President of 
Meredith College, developed against the measure, a 
considerable part of which related to the University. 
The nature of this opposition was such that the 
Eeview wishes every alumnus to have first hand 
knowledge of it. To this end it reprints elsewhere the 
open letters, editorials, and printed statements in 
which it was voiced and the two letters of President 
Graham in answer thereto, and directs the attention 
of every alumnus to them. 

nan 

On March 30th, the high school boys in 350 vil- 
lages and towns of the State will debate, under the 



ASSIST IN THE 
STATE-WIDE DEBATE 



guidance of the Debating 
Union, the question of gov- 



ernment ownership of the 
railroads. In the respect that this is a part of the 
Extension work of the University, alumni are urged 
to aid in every way possible to make the local event 
the occasion of the year for the local high school. It 
isn't for the Eeview to suggest ways and means. 
Carolina men know too well how to make things go 
for that. But this is merely a reminder of the date 
and the opportunity. 

DDD 

The Eeview finds no occasion to comment on the 
questions raised in the opposition. President Gra- 
ham's letters leave no room for 
ReT BETWEEN ^her comment on the essential 
THE LINES? tacts. It does find occasion, how- 

ever, to bring forward to this 
section the concluding paragraph of the editorial in 
the Biblical Recorder of March 7th to show how the 
editor of that paper and those associated with him 
in opposing tne bonds (we are convinced they are not 
representative of the rank and file of their denomi- 
nation in this opposition) feel about the matter. 

Again, we reassert our approval of reasonable ap- 
propriations to our State colleges, our hearty friend- 
liness to them and to the high-minded men at their 
head, and our great hesitancy in criticizing this bond 
issue through fear of wounding valued friends, or of 
hurting, in some slight degree, our great institutions. 
But we could not remain silent and keep peace with 
conscience. We cannot resist the feeling that, under 
all the circumstances, the bond issue was a philan- 



thropic, political, and educational blunder. We are 
certain that its advocates erred in not taking the 
public into their confidence before thrusting the bond 
issue upon our statute books. We anticipate that 
there will be no little feeling on the matter all over 
the State and we should not be surprised if the next 
Legislature, under pressure of public sentiment, 
should rescind the order for the issuance of these 
bonds after 191S. In this event, only a million dol- 
lars having been issued and expended by that time, 
the remaining two million dollars may be withheld. 
We shall see what we shall see. 

DDD 

On second thought there is one comment the Ee- 
view will make. It grows out of the question : "How 
is it that the annual cost per pupil 

STANDARD &t Wake . Forest C ° 1Iege iS $U1 

HIGH ENOUGH? w bile it is $245 at Chapel Hill?" 

President Graham's answer to 
that question is given elsewhere and shows that in 
reality the net cost per pupil at Carolina is only 
$167, and that the figures would be considerably 
nearer Wake Forest's $141 per pupil if the Uni- 
versity did not maintain the Extension Bureau, pub- 
lish the News Letter, Studies in Philology, The 
Sprunt Monographs, The Mitchell Journal, The High 
School Bulletin, bear a part of the expense of the 
office of the High School Inspector, and meet numer- 
ous other demands which by the very nature of 
things are not made upon a private institution, but 
which are of a state university. 

The comment it would make is that the $141 per 
student yardstick by which the leaders mentioned 
would judge state-supported colleges with state func- 
tions to perform, might more properly be applied to 
private colleges with private functions, and even then 
it is a standard far from the ideal. The fine work 
which Wake Forest is doing, in spite of its lack of 
money, could, we are sure and would be intensified 
if by any possible means she could invest $175 or 
$200 or $250 per year in every student who entered 
her gates instead of $141. No college in North Caro- 
lina, whether State or private, is spending money 
carelessly, extravagantly. Nor does any one have 
too much to spend. Our chief concern should be, 
not to hold up the $141 yardstick, with its attendant 
limitations, as the "reasonable support" and standard 
for higher education, but to advance it whenever 
and wherever possible. The Eeview does not have 
it in its heart to hold back at Carolina's limit — $167 
— any of the twenty-one other Southern state-sup- 
ported universities and colleges of agriculture which 
receive more per student than Carolina does, nor the 
several colleges in North Carolina which receive 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



145 



more. On the contrary it wishes added strength to 
the arm of one and all. 

" □□□ 

One is frequently asked about student life and con- 
duct at the University. The recent report of the 

President of the University dis- 
"IS THE YOUNG cusses & j n tne opinion of the 
MAN SAFE?" -n „ f ., . , ,, 

Keview, as well as m that ot the 

college officials, student conduct was never on so 
high and healthful a plane. A letter from a student 
(a Sophomore) to his mother is better evidence than 
any college official or outside observer could possibly 
give. We take the liberty of quoting it here, because 
it is about a matter of great and fundamental concern. 

And every day, college life grows finer and finer, 
and bigger and bigger. Like every Freshman, I 
came to Carolina filled with a mixed feeling of appre- 
hension and determination, expecting to be sudden- 
ly untied from all good influences and example, and 
thrust into a community of somewhat infidels. I 
came braced for a struggle. * * * On the other 
hand, Carolina was waiting with open arms to take 
me in and give me all the very best and finest, — to 
grow me. For that, I thank the Y. M. C. A. And 
now, I am able to help receive other men who entrust 
themselves to Carolina. 

I was talking the other night with a Freshman 
who came from a staunch Baptist minister's home, 
having been urged to go anywhere but to that State 
University. He was just as amused at himself as I 
was over the curious ideas that he had had about .what 
Carolina was going to be like. I guess there is not 
a man on the campus but feels the influence indi- 
r sctly or directly of the Y. M. C. A., even though it 
be only through the general spirit of the campus. As 

for that spirit, D ■ R told me last summer 

that he had seen more manifestations of religious 
faith on the Carolina campus than anywhere else he 
had been. And, of course, that's not all of it. The 
fellows are a wholesome sort, not studious or "inter- 
ested" enough, to be sure, but nevertheless very demo- 
cratic, thoughtful, prudent, mature, frank, modest, 
usually vigorous, generous — of everything but money, 
and very careful of that — appreciative, to a certain 
extent, and, above all, honorable. 

So T consider Carolina an exceptionally good place 
in which to live, and have high hopes for her future. 

ODD 

Accumulating evidences speak eloquentlj of the 

power (if alumni cooperation. The one defect, at 

present, however, is that this 

™™suc cef „ t . f :'■■'" '■■■:■>■"<-<! «J» r 

University is receiving from the 
alumni is unorganized. A committee here, an indi- 



vidual there, a class or local association does some 
fine piece of work in class A style. The result is 
exceedingly beneficial to the University. But the 
big permanent assistance which the University should 
receive, today, tomorrow, and continuously, is want- 
ing. The University looks for it in vain and suffers 
accordingly, simply because the alumni are unor- 
ganized and have no effective way of applying their 
combined power. 

The organization of 1911 gave an intimation of 
what might be done; but it disintegrated because 
it lacked sticking quality. It allowed the time on 
Alumni Day which it should have devoted to con- 
structive planning to be consumed in more or less 
humorous speech-making. There were extenuating 
circumstances, to be sure. But the result was fatal. 

The Review herewith issues the case to the 
Thoughtful to take the matte: up again in June. 
Let the alumni host come to Commencement deter- 
mined to put "commence" not only in Commence- 
ment, but in the big Alumni Drive which must start 
somewhere around June 5th. 

DDD 

A large number of the alumni have no doubt hesi- 

tated to subscribe to the Alumni Loyalty Fund from 

the feeling that it might not 
ALUMNI LOYALTY b d ^ t u ld 

FUND: A SUCCESS , , 

not amount to enough to be 

worth the small trouble of going into it. They have 
felt that the idea of a fund in which all, or practi- 
cally all, of the alumni had some part, however small 
or large, was an ideal scheme. 

But they have felt that it was nothing but an 
ideal scheme; that the plan would not work. 

There were others, however, who had faith in it 
as a working proposition, and the events of the past 
year completely and happily prove that they are 
right. The Fund is now approaching the five thou- 
sand dollar mark. There are five hundred alumni 
that have a part in it to the amount of from one to a 
hundred dollars each. The subscriptions in the 
form of annual pledges, from January first of this 
year to the present, that have been paid in, amount 
to six hundred dollars. Within the week before this 
copy of the Review goes to press, one subscription 
of a hundred dollars, two of fifty, and three of 
twenty-five have come in. All of this has come with- 
out urging, and as a voluntary expression of the 
desire of the alumni to create, as the years go by, a 
splendid memorial of their love for the University, 
their desire to assist her in the work of building up a 
great University for a great State, and their gratitude 
for what she gave to them. 



146 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



The Review would like to see this Fund grow to 
ten thousand dollars hy the time of the class re-unions 
in June. It would especially like to see the list of 
subscribers increased to two thousand. Do not hold 
back because your subscription is small. It is not 
the thought of the Fund to have any one make undue 
sacrifices for it. The amount is not the essential 
point. Some alumni can subscribe a thousand dol- 
lars a year as easily as others can subscribe a dollar. 
The present student body of the University expect to 
make a subscription, even while they are in college. 
Some of the alumni prefer to give a flat sum, rather 
than an annual subscription. This is all the same 
thing. It simply means that they capitalize their 
annual subscription. Neither method or the amount 
is the important matter. The great idea is for every 
alumnus to have a part in it, no matter who he is, 
nor where he lives, nor what the amount is. Carried 
out in this spirit, this Fund will rival the great 
alumni funds of Yale and Cornell, will inspire an 
unequaled loyalty and enthusiasm among our alumni 
as well as produce a working and steadily growing 
endowment through all the years to come. 

nnn 

At the Alumni Luncheon last Commencement an- 
nouncement was made that General Julian S. Can* 
had established a fellowship to yield 
$300 to be awarded to that member of 
the rising junior or senior class who 
had earned his way through college during the first 
two years, and whose scholarship and other qualities 
gave promise of the highest sort. Recently Dean 
Stacy gave out the names (the amount being divided) 
of A. M. Coates and J. B. Linker as the recipients of 
the honor for 1917-18. 

The Review doesn't have the opportunity of fac- 
ing as many members of the student body in the class 
room as it should like. Its work is of a different sort. 
Consequently it is denied the intimate, first hand as- 
sociation with individual students which is one of 
the rewards of college professors. But in various 
ways it has from time to time crossed the trail of 
these two winners in a most meritorious contest — 
making one's way through college and at the self- 
same time evincing those qualities of scholarship and 
leadership that are distinctive. 

It calls to mind Coates at the library mastering 
the material for Inter-Society debates. His side 
has won a time or two. It remembers that for a 
year he was one of the efficient understudies in Mr. 
Woollen's office — a place where there is always some-, 
thing to do, and where Coates did his task well. And 
it seems to remember that at Christmas, 1916, when 
the University was taking holiday, a telegram with 



SUPPOSE 
YOU DO IT 



Coates' signature, reached one of the faculty calling 
for an enthusiastic speech at an alumni-home-coming- 
student celebration in Coates' home town at which 
Coates was the quiet, effective master of affairs. And 
just the other night he won the honor of representing 
Carolina in the state-wide oratorical peace contest. 

The Review first saw Linker (some three years 
ago) putting the "tar" on the Tar Heel — he was 
in charge of the old Babcock press at the print shop 
which Eric Abernethy installed and set running back 
about ninety-five. The next time he was helping in 
the launching of the Review's lively contemporary, 
the News Letter. He did his best by it and it was 
not his fault that it could not qualify as a winner in 
a beauty contest. And then last fall he was called 
home for sometime. The Review missed him. Every- 
body did for that matter, who had things to print. 
And then he reappeared in the class room and at his 
case again after an interval during which he had 
sounded the depths of one of the profoundest human 
experiences — the loss of a father. 

The Review has frequently contemplated the na- 
ture of General Carr's philanthropic acts and has 
always found pleasure in them. In some way it can- 
not escape the conviction that in this instance he 
bested his best. It also occurs to the Review that 
some one else might do exceedingly well to establish 
other foundations of this or a similar nature. Sup- 
pose vou do it ! 

nnn 

Elsewhere we reprint the address made by Presi- 
dent Graham at the inauguration of President Wal- 
lace Riddick, at Raleigh, on Feb- 



A STATEMENT 
OP ATTITUDE 



ruary 22nd. We reprint it not be- 
cause we have a penchant for re- 
producing speeches and printing lengthy articles, be- 
cause we emphatically do not, but because it presents 
the University's attitude of mind and heart toward 
the other colleges of the State in performing the 
special educational task which has been laid upon 
it. We call the attention of the alumni and citizens 
of the State to it. 

nnn 

"Progressive Steps toward a Great University" is 

the title of a feature article to be found midway in 

this issue. Alumni are ex- 

FEATURE ARTICLE P e . cte< ! to read everything in 

this issue — certainly the ex- 
change of letters between Dr. Vann and President 
Graham in re the bonds, and particularly this fea- 
ture article. It is intended for you, personally. 
Read it. Think about it. Put your thought into 
such action as will assist in bringing the "Great 
University" into existence. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



147 



LETTERS AND EDITORIALS RELATING TO THE BOND ISSUE 



On Tuesday, February 27th, Senator Holderness, 
chairman of the Appropriations Committee of the 
Senate, introduced a bill providing for $3,000,000 
in bonds to be expended during the next five years for 
permanent improvements by various State institu- 
tions. Of this amount $500,000 was to go to the 
University, $500,000 to the State Normal, $300,000 
to the North Carolina State College of Agriculture 
and Engineering, $200,000 to the Eastern Carolina 
Training School, $50,000 to the Appalachian 
Training School, $40,000 to the Cullowee Normal, 
$60,000" for the School for the Deaf and Dumb, 
$50,000 for the Stonewall Jackson Training School, 
$500,000 as a loan fund to the State Board of Edu- 
cation for school houses, $25,000 for the Agricultural 
and Technical School for Negroes, $10,000 for the 
State Normal for Negroes, $200,000 each for the 
State Hospitals at Raleigh and Morganton, and 
$125,000 for the Goldsboro Hospital, $50,000 for a 
storage warehouse at Raleigh, $40,000 for fire protec- 
tion apparatus, and $150,000 for the Tuberculosis 
Sanatorium. 

On Wednesday Governor Bickett supported the 
measure in a special forceful message to the Legisla- 
ture. On Thursday it passed its final reading in the 
Senate and on Friday a special hearing was given 
by the Joint Committees of the Senate and House 
at which President W. L. Poteat, Secretary R. T. 
Vann, Dr. Livingston Johnston, Secretary Walter 
Johnson, President Charles E. Brewer, and Editor 
II. C. Moore were present to be heard in opposition 
to the measure. Remarks were made by Preside it 
Poteat, Dr. Johnson, and Dr. Vann. On the mon; 
ing of the same day an article bearing the following 
title "Enters Objections. A Few Questions Apropos 
of the Proposed Bond Issue Asked by Dr. R. T 
Vann," appeared in the News and Observer. Satur- 
day morning, March 3rd, in the same paper appeared 
a further letter by Dr. Vann and a letter by President 
Graham. On Monday, March 5th. the bill passed in 
the House. In the Biblical Recorder of March 7th an 
editorial entitled "Three Millions in Bonds." and 
"An Open Letter to Governor Bickett," by President 
Poteat, appeared relative to the subject. Dr. Living- 
stun Johnston presented his views in the News and 
Observer and the Greensboro Daily Nevs of March 
4th and 11th respectively. 

The Review reprints below the letters of Dr. 
Vann and President Graham; an extract from the 
editorial of March 7th ; President Graham's answer 
to the extract, with comment by the editor, in the 



l-!il)h',-<il Recorder of March 14th. These letters 
and extracts cover the range of the opposition to the 
bond issue and President Graham's answer to the es- 
sential points in it relating to the University. — 
Editoe. 

ENTERS OBJECTIONS 

To the Editor: 

Not having had the opportunity of seeing the bill 
authorizing these bonds, I cannot discuss the merits 
of that measure in particular. From my personal 
knowledge, however, of some of the gentlemen be- 
hind the bill I do not in the least doubt that every one 
of them is doing what he considers best for the State. 

But may not an interested taxpayer, in a small 
way, ask a few questions suggested by this rather 
novel policy ? 

( 1 ) Why should the matter have been postponed 
until the last week of the Legislature's session before 
it was seriously broached? The average taxpayer will 
certainlv ask why so important a measure — one of 
the most important of the whole session — should 
have been sprung and rushed through at the very last 
without giving the people time to express themselves. 
There are doubtless good reasons in the minds of the 
proponents of the measure for this unusual proce- 
dure. Would they mind enlightening the ignorant on 
the subject? 

(2) I learn that of the $3,000,000 proposed, 
about $1,500,000 is to go to the higher institutions 
and only $500,000 to the common schools. The State 
is already paying every year for its higher education- 
al institutions something over $640,000, and nearly 
$95,000 more must be added to this sum from 
certain other funds, not including fees received 
from students. But it is paying out only a little 
over $800,000 a year for the public schools, though 
these receive from the counties about a million dol- 
lars more. So there is expended annually on the 
3,000 students in these higher institutions $735,- 
000, while the 626,000 little children in the com- 
mon schools receive only about $1,800,000 a year, 
about two and a half times as much as is spent 
on the 3,000. Is this just to the mass of the little 
ones? Is it wise as an educational policy? Ts it 
not an attempt to build a splendid superstructure 
on a foundation of cornstalks? Every fairly well 
informed school man in this State knows that the 
weak spot in our school system is not in the colleges 
but in the common schools. 

(3) Are these higher institutions economically 
administered? I am not prepared to say thai they 
are not, and \ certainly would not intimate thai there 
is any graft in their management. But a calculation 
made two years ago by one of our most intelligent 



148 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



men shows that the annual cost per student in the 
State's higher institutions is a little more than double 
that per student in the denominational institutions. 
Moreover, while the University receives $195,000 a 
year in donations, and ought to receive at least $50,- 
000 in fees from its students, making $245,000, one 
of our leading denominational colleges with about 
half the number of students receives only $86,000 
annually from all sources ; and while the Normal 
receives $100,000 a year besides $15,000 extra for 
the last two years, a denominational woman's college 
in the State with about five-sevenths of the number 
of pupils the Normal has, receives less than $70,000 
a year from all sources. If it be said that the grade 
of work done at the State schools is superior to that 
of the other two referred to, it may be answered that 
the students from the man's college enter the higher 
universities of the North on exactly the same terms 
as those from the University, that its law and medi- 
cal departments rank with about everybody as at least 
the equal of those at the University, and that its 
medical department was pronounced by the Carnegie 
Foundation one of the only two worthy medical col- 
lege departments in the South, the other being in 
Louisiana. As for the women's colleges, experts here 
and in the North have both recently placed the de- 
nominational institution a year above the Normal in 
grade, and the graduates of the denominational col- 
lege are the only graduates in the State so far that 
have been permitted to take the A. M. degree from 
Harvard or Radcliffe in only two years. So, I raise 
the question, why should so much more be spent per 
student at the State institutions than in the denomina- 
tional colleges t 

(4) Do the State's higher institutions antagonize 
the denominational schools ? This writer has the 
honor of counting the presidents of the four State 
colleges among his friends and does not believe that 
a single one of the gentlemen would knowingly in- 
jure any private school. And yet, the talk is common 
and persistent all over the State that there is an un- 
necessary and unjustifiable antagonism against the 
denominational schools on the part at least of the 
agents or friends of those run by the State. First, 
in the matter of issuing scholarships. If necessary, 
this writer could cite scores and hundreds of instances 
where young men and women who were prepared to 
enter a denominational college were enticed away at 
the last hour by the offer of a four year scholarship 
at a State institution, though the students preferred 
the denominational schools and had prepared to enter 
them. Why should such a policy be pursued? Sec- 
ond, it is commonly said all over the State that these 
scholarships are frequently given to students whose 
parents are amply able to educate them. Third, 
numbers of school superintendents educated at the 
Stftte institutions use their utmost endeavors to turn 



every student away from the denominational colleges 
to those of the State. And fourth, a number of our 
high school men say they are actually afraid to have 
a certain one of the University officials visit their in- 
stitutions at all because they fear he would seek to 
turn their pupils to State institutions. This is the 
feeling ; I do not know whether there are any grounds 
for it. 

(5) Would the State colleges be willing to furnish 
at all the names of the recipients of scholarships? 
Nobody would insist on the publication of them. But 
is there any good reason why any citizen should not 
know the beneficiaries of the taxes that this citizen 
pays ? 

(6) What is the attitude of the State's education- 
al authorities in general to its Christian colleges? 
Ought not the State to recognize and encourage the 
cooperation of private high schools and colleges in 
the great work of training its people ? A former 
president of the University told an honored friend of 
the writer that there was "no use for Wake Forest 
College;" and a distinguished lawyer openly made a 
similar statement on the streets of Raleigh a few 
years ago. And the same opinion has been expressed 
by less responsible persons time and again. If this 
is the sentiment of the controlling educational au- 
thorities and the leading friends of the State's higher 
educational institutions, we ought to know it ; if it is 
not, it seems to me that those who have a riaht to 
speak with authority ought to disavow it. 

The denominational colleges today have enrolled 
probably two-thirds of the total number of college 
students in the State. These institutions are contrib- 
uting this valuable service without money and with- 
out cost to the State. Is it just to the good people 
who after paying their rightful part of the taxes for 
the support of the State institutions, but who never- 
theless believe in distinctly religious education, to 
have their institutions slaughtered by the State, and 
is it wise for a great State to deprive itself of so valu- 
able a contribution to its educational work by either 
ruthlessly or neglectfully destroying the privately 
supported school ? R. T. Vann. 

Raleigh, N. C. 



PRESIDENT GRAHAM'S LETTER 

His Reply to Questions of Dr. R. T. Vann Given in an 
Open Letter 

To the Editor: 

It is due President Graham to publish the follow- 
ing letter which I take great pleasure in doing. It 
will be observed that in the article referred to 
"agents or friends" and not officials of the institu- 
tions were charged with doing the things mentioned. 
It is pleasant for me to say that no one who knows 
Dr. Graham would ever suspect him of the act com- 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



11t» 



plained of ; and possibly my own assurance on that 
point, left my statement open to misconstruction on 
the part of sonic who do not know Dr. Graham. I 
should like to add further that I do not believe the 
presidents of our institutions would countenance the 
thing complained of should it come under their knowl- 
edge. 

Let me say, finally, that no statement of mine with 
respect to the lateness of this bond issue was meant 
to reflect upon any member of the joint committee 
on appropriations, an opinion which T sought to ex- 
press in the article itself. The only thing meant was 
that it comes as a surprise to those who remember the 
plans pursued eight years ago when a similar bond 
issue was proposed beforehand and discussed in the 
public press. R. T. Yann. 

Kaleigh, 1ST. C. 



OPEN LETTER TO DR. R. T. VANN 
My Dear Dr. Vann: 

I have just read your article in today's .\ ews and 
Observer. You ask for a statement in regard to 
two points that concern me as an official administer- 
ing the affairs of an institution of all the people, and 
I gladly make answer with clearness and with all the 
emphasis that you will Be good enough to read in 
the following simple words: 

( 1 ) "Do State institutions antagonize the denom- 
inational colleges?" 

For myself I make answer that no act, attitude or 
feeling of mine has been other than genuine and 
deeply sympathetic toward the denominational schools 
and colleges. My whole creed and practice is that 
we all are at work on the same problem, and that no 
success in the field of education in North Carolina 
genuinely won can work anything other than good 
for every other worker in that field. I can say to 
you without reservation that every forward step made 
by any institution, from the elementary school to the 
college — private, denominational or public — gives 
me as deep pleasure as if it were made by the one 
with which I chance to be associated. 

Having said this, it is not necessary for me to add 
that I have not "inticed" students from any college. 
On the contrary, in hundreds of cases when told by 
applicants that the reason I should give them scholar- 
ships was that they had one elsewhere, I have replied 
that that was a good reason why I should not. To en- 
tice any student away from another college would vio- 
late every principle that animates my life and my 
interpretation of the relation of this institution to 
the State, and every policy and practice of its eon- 
duct. 

(2) "Would the State colleges be willing to fur- 
nish at call the names of the recipients of scholar- 
ships '." 

.Most assuredly. Not onlv so, but 1 desire noth- 



ing so much as to have every citizen of North Caro- 
lina interested in the work of the University and in 
its administration and service and intelligently cri- 
tical of every detail of its administration. Every- 
thing about its business belongs to all of the citizens 
of the State whose institution it is. Every detail 
of its business is published in annual statements wide- 
ly distributed to the people of the State. We are not 
only willing to "furnish on call" the names of holders 
of these scholarships, but we do annually furnish 
them to the Board of Internal Improvements, and 
they are audited by the State's official auditor, and 
made publicly available. No possible objection can 
exist to the publication of names of holders of free 
tuition here from our point of view, for none has free 
tuition except such as hold endowed scholarships, and 
those created by the law of North Carolina. 

I trust you will call on me for any information 
of anv sort concerning the University of North Caro- 
lina that interests you. Knowledge of its affairs is 
as open to you as to me, and may I not hope that with 
the fuller knowledge there will come to us all, work- 
ing together in the splendid common task that invites 
and challenges us, a growing depth of sympathy and 
a common inspiration that will make the unified 
educational forces of the State factors in the single 
supreme issue that confronts us ? 

With esteem and best wishes. 



Chapel Hill, N. C. 



Faithfully yours, 

Edward K. Graham. 



THREE MILLION DOLLARS IN BONDS 

There is another thing a great many people would 
like to know, especially in view of the alleged need 
of a big bond issue. How is it that the cost in the 
State's higher educational institutions is so much 
greater than it is in the non-State colleges of standard 
grade ? To illustrate : How is it that the annual cost 
per pupil at Wake Forest College is $141 while it is 
$245 at Chapel Hill? And why does the Greens- 
boro Normal require per pupil $2 to every $1 at 
Meredith College per pupil, the latter being recog- 
nized as doing a higher grade of work than (he form- 
er? We do not reflect upon the management of any 
of our State institutions — not in the least; doubtless 
they arc doing their best. But the tax payer, before 
endorsing bonds, would like to know how it is that 
equal or better work is being done at less expense by 
non-State colleges. Let us all think together and 
work together, without bitterness, at our common 
task. — Biblical Recorder, March 7. 



PRESIDENT GRAHAM'S LETTER 

President Edward K. Graham, of our Slate Uni- 
versity at Chapel Hill, wrote us on March 8 the fob 



150 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



lowing courteous and illuminating letter which we 
gladly print in full on our editorial page : 

My Deae Doctor Moore : 

In an editorial in this week's Biblical Recorder — 
and in an article from Doctor Poteat in the same 
issue — the statement is made that the annual cost per 
pupil at Wake Forest College is one hundred and 
forty-one dollars, whereas it is two hundred and 
forty-five dollars at the University of North Caro- 
lina. 

I have no criticism to make of you, or President 
Poteat, for saying that the cost per pupil here is two 
hundred and forty-five dollars, because you take this 
figure from the table given in my annual report. 
There is a point about the figure, however, to which I 
wish to call your attention, and which you will readi- 
ly recognize as entirely doing away with the conclu- 
sion drawn in making the comparison with Wake 
Forest. The figure of University cost was taken from 
the government report, and the government report, in 
■ figuring income, included building operations, gross 
cost of maintaining the dining hall and power plant, 
as well as summer school operations and extension 
activities. 

The Wake Forest figure is, of course, computed on 
the basis of net working income, and does not include 
a number of activities that are carried on here. The 
estimate made for Wake Forest is made on the proper 
basis for estimating actual cost per student. Figur- 
ing on that same basis, and using the same govern- 
ment figures, but deducting building operations and 
counting only the net cost of such public service oper- 
ations as the power plant, dining hall, etc., our net 
working income per student is one hundred and sixty- 
seven dollars per year, and not two hundred and 
forty-five dollars. This estimate of a hundred and 
sixty-seven dollars includes extension activities, and 
a number of other important activities that properly 
fall upon us and do not fall upon Wake Forest. 

The reason we used the government table just as 
it stood was because it put us in comparison with 
other State Universities, and the figures, we assume, 
are such as form a proper basis for comparison. You 
will notice, if you examine the table, how well we 
show up from the point of view of economy with 
other well-managed institutions. So far as I know, 
the testimony of this table is borne out by the testi- 
mony of every expert and board that has ever criti- 
cally ex.nmined the affairs of these institutions. 

I am confident that you and Doctor Poteat will 
welcome the explanation of why the figures, as quoted 
in the Recorder, are so widely apart, because I am 
confident that you, as a citizen of the State, will be 
as glad as I am to know that, on a basis of comparison 
with Wake Forest, this institution is economically 
managed. 

In regard to the point that the instiutticn should let 



the State know what is to be done with the money 
they are to receive, I entirely agree. In presenting 
the matter for the University, I gave the whole bud- 
get ; an estimate of its needs down to the last penny. 
These estimates were not in round figures, nor made 
in any haphazard way. In the item for building re- 
pairs, for instance, the estimate was made on builders' 
estimates, and showed each item of expenditure. A 
large number of copies of these estimates in detail 
were made and distributed among the members of the 
.Appropriations Committee three or four weeks ago 
when I was called before them. An outline of these 
requests in detail, was given to the newspapers, and 
printed. 

I have proceeded in the past, and shall proceed in 
the future, on the assumption that any criticism of the 
management of our affairs, financial or otherwise, is 
made in a spirt of sympathetic co-operation and I 
shall welcome such criticism, for I fully realize that 
no one can possibly benefit from it so much as we. 
Every dollar that we can save through a wiser and 
more economical management is just that much gain. 
With esteem and best wishes, 

Cordially yours, 

Edward K. Graham, 

President. 



We consider Dr. Graham a high-minded, clean- 
souled gentleman who is incapable of sinister action 
or even of ulterior motive, both in private life and in 
the discharge of public duty. We, therefore, accept 
without question his explanation of the difference 
which we noted in the comparative cost of educating 
a student at Chapel Hill and at Wake Forest And 
we cheerfully recognize that Dr. Graham in his ad- 
mirable report gave in detail, as he says, the needs of 
the larger University which he hopes ere long to see. 
For President Graham we have had, and we have 
no word of criticism. 

But we opposed the bond issue on the grounds 
which we gave and which, we presume, need not be 
reiterated here. 

Though the proponents of the bond issue accom- 
plished their immediate object, it was a grievous mis- 
take for them to rush the measure through the re- 
cent Legislature during its last week without taking 
into their confidence the people who must pay the 
bills. Failure to let the public consider the merits 
of the proposition was, to say the least, a species of 
ragged politics and sinister statesmanship. — Biblical 
Recorder. March 14. 



The Y. M. C. A. at its recent business meeting 
elected the following officers for the coming year: 
W. T. Steele, president; W. E. Wunsch, vice-presi- 
dent; W. H. Stephenson, secretary; Theodore Eond- 
thaler, treasurer. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 
ATHLETIC INTEREST IS HIGH 



151 



Carolina Takes a New Stride in the Realm of Athletics 



Since the coming of Coach Campbell to the Uni- 
versity last fall, Carolina has taken a new stride in 
the realm of athletics. This is partly seen in the 
fact that Virginia has been defeated in both football 
and basketball. 

The football season last fall, though not as suc- 
cessful as some of the preceding years, is regarded 
by the average North Carolinian as the most success- 
ful since 1905 — the last time a North Carolina foot- 
ball team beat Virginia. And the credit of this suc- 
cessful season is given in a large measure to Coach 
Campbell and his able corps of assistants. They 
began the season with a squad of inexperienced men, 
but on Thanksgiving Day sent one of the strongest 
football teams on the field that every represented 
( 'arolina. 

Getting Ready for Thanksgiving Day 

But the battle cry of "On to Richmond," which 
has been sung throughout the State by both alumni 
and students for many years will not be heard next 
year. It will be "On to Chapel Hill," where the 
1917 classic will be staged. The bringing of this 
famous game to Chapel Hill will give thousands of 
North Carolinians the opportunity of witnessing the 
South's biggest game — one which is looked forward 
to by the many patriotic alumni all over this and 
other states. The preparation for this game has al- 
ready be«'un. At the first call for volunteers for 
spring training, some 50 or 60 candidates responded, 
and Coach Campbell, assisted by some of last years' 
veterans, has been putting the squad through some 
strenuous training since the first of March. Light 
scrimmages are held daily and will be continued until 
warm weather interferes. 

Basketball Season Was Successful 

The basketball season which closed March 3, with 
a 55 to 28 victory over Guilford, was one of the most 
successful in the history of basketball at the Univer- 
sity. Coach Peacock, like Coach Campbell, began the 
season with a squad of inexperienced men — there 
U-int: only one old man on the team — but by the mid- 
dle of the season had developed the material into 
a reliable team. Five out of the eight games were 
won — such strong teams as V. P. I., V. M. I. and 
Virginia being defeated. The team lost only one 
game on the home floor, being defeated by the strong 
Davidson quint in the second game of the season. 
The credit for this successful season must be given 



to Coach Peacock, whose untiring efforts developed 
what appeared to be a losing team into a winning 
team, and all the more credit is due because it was 
the lightest college or university team in the South. 
Baseball Season Starts 

Along with the successes in football and basket- 
ball, there is expected to be a very successful baseball 
season. Coach Hearn has been hard at work on the 
squad for the past few weeks drilling them into shape 
for the coming strenuous season. The team will be 
weakened to some extent because of a lack of veterans 
of last year's team. Nevertheless there is promise 
of a reliable team. Powell, who showed up so well 
last year as a freshman, will probably be the main- 
stay of the pitching staff. Barnes, who last year, be- 
cause of his heavy hitting, became known as "Home 
Run Rudy," is again in the outfield and seems to 
have started off in midseason form. Pippin, who 
last year was forced to quit the game on account 
of an injury, has fully recovered and is making a 
strong bid for an outer garden position. The sched- 
ule for the coming season is one of the hardest 
ever arranged for a Carolina team, there being 23 
games including one each with Colgate and Yale, 
three with Virginia, and four with Georgia. 
Track Men Are at Work 

In track athletics, there is promise of one of the 

best teams that Carolina ever sent into a meet, and it 

is expected to do its part against Virginia, a meet 

with whom is pending for April 21. If this meet is 

not held, however, there will be a chance to compare 

the relative strength of these two teams when the 

South Atlantic Meet is held at Charlottesville, Va., 

on May 12. There are at present over 50 candidates 

out for the different positions. The track, like the 

baseball team, will be handicapped to some extent 

because of the loss of such stars as Long, Johnson, 

Homewood and Patterson, members of last year's 

team. 

Class Athletics Takes On New Life 

Along with the increased interest and success of 
the varsity teams, there is a renewed interest in the 
class athletics. This branch of athletic activities, 
which has heretofore been looked upon as rather un- 
important, has been put on a new basis, and a cham- 
pionship cup is to be given to the class which shows 
best ability in all branches of athletics. Besides put- 
ting class activities on a new scale, Coach Campbell 



152 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



plans to inaugurate the tug-of-war as another branch 
of class athletics. 

In general, it may be said that this year has mark- 
ed the beginning of a new era in athletics at the 
University. Coach Campbell has put that spirit 
into athletics that was so noticeable in the game last 
Thanksgiving — that never quitting spirit which is 
behind all hard won victories. And this is the spirit 
that thousands of North Carolinians believe has 
come to stay. 



COLLEGE WEEK-END IS NOW FULLY ARRANGED 

Greensboro's "college" week-end is fully program- 
med. The events which have been announced by fhe 
committee of young men of the chamber of com- 
merce which has interested itself in the promotion 
of the plan, center about the great occasion of the 
meeting at baseball here of the Universities of North 
Carolina and Virginia. That game is to be on the 
afternoon of April 14, and the week-end festivities 
will conclude that night w T ith the Virginia-Carolina 
dance, an event which is projected for greater signi- 
ficance than before. 

The juniors and seniors of the State Normal Col- 
lege and the Greensboro College for Women will be 
the special guests of a reception Friday afternoon, 
April 13, in the Country Club. That afternoon, too, 
a game of college basketball will be played in tbe Y. 
M. C. A. That night, the Glee Club and orchestra 
of the North Carolina University will join the 
Greensboro and Normal chorus in giving a musical 
entertainment in the Municipal theatre. Saturday 
morning, a hop will be given in the M. and M. Club 
ball room in honor of visitors. Saturday afternoon 
the big game will be played and Saturday night, the 
dance will occur. 



LEGISLATURE APPOINTS NEW TRUSTEES 

By the appointment of twenty additional trustees 
of the University, in accordance with an act of the 
recent session of the Legislature, twenty counties 
hitherto not represented on the board of trustees gain 
representation. Appointments to succeed themselves 
have been made of nineteen trustees whose terms ex- 
pire this year, and eleven new trustees have been 
appointed to fill vacancies in the board caused by 
death or resignation. The trustees now number 102, 
and are drawn from all sections of the State. 

The trustees appointed to succeed themselves, for 
a term ending Nov. 30, 1925, are as follows: David 
C. Barnes, Hertford ; E. A. Abernethy, Orange ; J. 
S. Carr, Durham ; Josephus Daniels, Wake ; A. W. 
Graham, Granville; J. Bryan Grimes, Pitt; J. S. 



Cuningham, Durham; L. T. Hartsell, Cabarrus; 
Perrin Busbee, Wake; J. W. Hinsdale, Jr., Wake; 
F. P. Hobgood, Granville; W. Stamps Howard, 
Edgecombe; Paul Jones Long, Northampton; H. A. 
London, Chatham ; G. M. Pose, Cumberland ; G. C. 
Green, Halifax; James Sprunt, New Hanover; A. 
W. McLean, Robeson; George Stephens, Mecklen- 
burg. 

The trustees appointed to fill vacancies are : D. F. 
Ray, Cumberland ; Stanley Winborne, Hertford ; 
George A. Holderness, Edgecombe; Chase Brenizer, 
Mecklenburg; George Pritchard, Madison; J. L. 
Patterson, Halifax ; C. G. Wright, Guilford ; C. A. 
Jonas, Lincoln ; A. H. Price, Rowan ; Claudius 
Dockery, Montgomery; Leonard Tufts, Moore. 

The twenty additional trustees appointed in ac- 
cordance with the new act of the Legislature are 
R. L. Haymore, Surry ; H. P. Grier, Iredell ; J. G. 
Blount, Beaufort ; J. Iv. Warren, Jones ; A. L. James, 
Scotland; K. E. Bennett, Swain; T. C. Bowie, Ashe: 
R. L. Smith, Stanley; Julius Duncan, Carteret; S. 
R. Hoyle, Lee; J. H. Pearson, Jr., Burke; E. L. 
Gaither, Davie; W. M. Person, Franklin; J. C. Kit- 
trell, Vance; J. S. Mann, Hyde; A. A. Shuford, Jr., 
Catawba ; E. J. Tucker, Person ; Frank Linney, 
Watauga; I. P. Davis, Dare; B. L. Banks, Jr., 
Gates. 



GEORGE MALLETT MACNIDER 

George Mallett MacNider, B. S. 1905, died "from 
an attack of pneumonia February 27th in Atlanta, 
Ga., aged 31 years. At the time of his death he was 
a chemical engineer with the National Corn Pro- 
ducts Co., located at Greenville, S. C. He had been 
at one time in the chemistry service of the State De- 
partment of Agricultiire, Raleigh. The funeral was 
conducted from the Episcopal Church of Chapel Hill 
and interment was in the local cemetery. Deceased 
is survived by his wife, and by his mother and 
brother, Dr. W. B. MacNider, bo'th of Chapel Hill. 



WILLIAM LEWIS JEFFRIES 

William Lewis Jeffries, A. B. 1910, Ph. D. 1915, 
died March 9th from gas poisoning at Wilmington, 
Vermont, aged 28 years. Mr. Jeffries was for sev- 
eral years instructor in chemistry in the University. 
He resigned in the fall of 1915 to accept a position 
as consulting chemist with the E. I. DuPont de 
Nemours Powder Co., of Wilmington, Del. At the 
time of his death which was caused by inhaling fumes 
of chlorine gas, he was engaged in inspecting a wood 
pulp plant. Funeral services were conducted from 
the Broadway Baptist Church, Knoxville, Tenu. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



153 



FOR WHAT MILITARY SERVICE ARE YOU BEST PREPARED? 



CAROLINA'S INTERCOLLEGIATE INTELLIGENCE BUREAU 
WISHES IMMEDIATE INFORMATION 



The outstanding lesson of the Great War is the fact that battles are no longer fought by "mere armies, but by 
nations in arms." Organization of the business, the industry and the science of the whole people is essential for suc- 
cessful defense or offense. As a part of the great movement of preparation the colleges of the United States have 
formed the Intercollegiate Intelligence Bureau. This organization is sanctioned by, but in no way controlled by the 
Federal Government. Each institution has its local committee which purposes to gather from its students and alumni 
data concerning those portions of their education and experience as might be fuseful in case of war. These facts will 
be classified according to the various kinds of training, and will be kept on file by the committee at each institution. 
When war forces the national government to call into its service its civilian engineers, doctors, chemists, clerks, tele- 
graph operators, linguists and a multitude of other men of special training, these records will establish instant touch 
between the "man and the job." 

Harvard, Yale, Princeton, Columbia, Pennsylvania, and many others are already pressing forward in this work. 
North Carolina must not lag behind. Your Alma Mater calls upon you to fill out and return promptly the accom- 
panying blank form. Do so even though you may not feel that you can give active service. Communicate immedi- 
ately with : 



J. B. BULLITT, Chairman, J. H. PRATT, 
A. H. PATTERSON, A. S. WHEELER, 

T. F. HICKERSON, P. H. WINSTON, 



Committee. 



UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 



Name 

Mail Address 

Place of birth 

Height 

Present Business 



..ft. 



Weight 



□ 



..Telegraph Address 

...Bate of birth 

lbs. Health 



] □ 



Alumnus University Officer 
Class Of 



SPECIAL TRAINING 
Tut a cheek (VI in front of any service in which you have had any training. Underline any in which you feel especial 
Interest Add anything you may know or do that might be of service to the government but which is not given in the lists 
below. 



NAVAL AND MILITARY 
Regular 
Militia 

Training Camp or Cruise 
Officer's Reserve Corps 



Munitions 

(manufacture or inspection) 



BUSINESS, SCIENTIFIC, MISCELLANEOUS 
A vmtion 

Clerical work (bookkeeping, stenography, etc.) 
Chemistry 
Engineering (civil, mining, electrical, topographical, mechanical, etc.) 



Foreign Languages (read... 



. spoken. 



Foodstuffs (hotel, restaurant, merchant, etc.) 

Manufacturing (munitions, machinery, textiles, etc.) 

Medicine (dentist, nurse, pharmacist, surgeon, etc.) 

Mechanics (gunsmith, blacksmith, electrician, etc.) 

Transportation (conductor, engineer, contractor, superintendent, shipper, pilot, 

seaman, ship builder, etc., etc. 
Telephone or Telegraph (operator, lineman, manager, etc.) 

Miscellaneous - — 



Could you supply the government in emergency any equipment, such as factory . automobile motorboal 

truck . wireless outfit horses, motorcycle , etc.? 

can you swim? ride horseback? drive horses? drive n car or motor cycle? run a launch?.. 

adjust the parts of a car or launch V 

How much have you travelled in foreign countries? 



State your occupations, sports and other activities since leaving college, especially during the past two years 

On reverse side of this sheet give particulars regarding Items checked or underlined above. 

In case of war will you accept government service along lines In which you have special training as indicated above?... 

How soon after the call could you be ready for service? - 



154 THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



PROGRESSIVE STEPS TOWARDS TH 



FIFTEEN WAYS IN WHICH 



The State has provided $165,000 annually for two years for maintenance and $100,000 annually 
association, or friends whom you may interest) in making Alma Mater further effective is sug 

1. Put the News Letter, the President's Report, the Tar Heel, the Review, the Extern 

2. Tell the teachers you meet with that they should attend the Summer School June-Ju 
September. 

3. North Carolina has a rapidly increasing number of men of means who can honor th 
yourself the instrument through which their co-operation is secured. 

4. Have you made your will % If you have not, make it and put Carolina in. If you 1 

5. Subscribe to the Alumni Loyalty Fund. This is the big fund to which every one is to 

6. Send a check to support any of the following publications : News Letter, Extension ] 
Start at least with 

7. Establish one, two, or five scholarships for students who cannot otherwise go to collej 
for investment which at six per cent will yield the necessary \ 

8. Endow one, two, or five fellowships in subjects of your choice with which the best met 
yield annually, at six per cent 

9. Endow any one of the following unendowed sections of the Library : Botany, Econom 
Latin, Mathematics, Pharmacy, Philosophy, Romance Literatures (French, Italian, Spanish), 
Or give a lump sum for the immediate purchase of books. Let this be what you will. The endo-v 
or $1,000? 

10. Studies in Philology has won a place in the scholarly world as a philological journ 
position permanent. Twice the amount indicated will be better 

11. The South needs a scholarly, influential medium for the exchange of educational ide 
School of Education, with co-operation which it can command, can launch the publication if thl 
dowment of $8,333 

12. Possibly your interest is in athletics. Class fields have to be provided for the 1,20( 
future. You never knew the Athletic Association to have a balance at the bank, did you % Writ* 

13. Or, would you prefer to see the campus (which has a wonderful natural beauty) be 
Suggested amounts are 

14. The Y. M. C. A. building was erected in 1904 and was inadequate then. The dema 
is one of the great opportunities which the campus offers some one who wishes to affect prof oui 

15. Various universities have special schools which are famous the world over, as the S 
Pennsylvania. Why shouldn't Carolina have such a school — a School of Carolina Life — which 
nomic, social, and religious life of the State. It would be invaluable to North Carolina at this c 
scope of the work the school undertakes 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 155 



MAKING OF A GREAT UNIVERSITY 



JJMNI CAN AID CAROLINA 



: five years for buildings. This is the State's part. Your part (or that of your class, local 
ted below. Write The Review for information and act on one of the suggestions immediately. 

1 Bulletin — one or all— in the school or town library and hand copies of them to the local editor. 
Send in their names and also the names of the high school boys who should be on the Hill in 

selves and the State by contributing of their wealth to the serious work of the University. Make 

5, and failed to include Carolina, add a codicil for her benefit. 

a contributor. The amount % That rests with you. 

ietin, High School Bulletin, Mitchell Scientific Journal. The amount? 

$ 10-$25-$50-$100 

Send the check annually, or, preferably, give the University an amount 

$60-$120-$300 

n be held in the Graduate School. This endowment should be sufficient to 
- $2 50-$500-$l,200 

Education, Engineering (Civil), English Literature, Geology, German, 
iral Economics, Zoology. At present they receive only $70 each per year, 
mt should yield annually at least $300. Why not make the lump sum $500 
$300-$500-$l,000 

An annual income of $500 from an $8,333 endowment fund will make its 

$500-or-$8,333 

such as is supplied by journals of the type of the Educational Review. The 
mey is available. It will require an annual contribution of $500 or an en- 

$500-or-$8,333 

udents who are now here and for the hundreds who will come in the near 

1,rkfor $50-$100-$250-$500-$l,000 

le one of the distinctively beauty spots of America 1 It can be made such. 

$100-$500-$l,000-$5,000-$10,000 

for a modern student Association building or Union is imperative Hoc 

r the finer life of the student body $75,000-or-$100,000 

field Scientific School at Yale and the Wharton School of Finance at " 
hid center here all studies having to do with the cultural, historical, eco- 
cal period in its expanding life. The amount required will depend on the 
$100,000-$250,000? 



156 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 

Issued monthly except in July, August, and September, by the Gen- 
eral Alumni Association of the University of North Carolina. 

Board of Publication 

The Review is edited by the following Board of Publication: 

Louis R. Wilson, '99 Editor 

Associate Editors: Walter Murphy, '92; Harry Howell, '95; Archibald 
Henderson, '98; W. S. Bernard, '00; J. K. Wilson, '05; Louis 
Graves, '02; F. P. Graham, '09; Kenneth Tanner, '11. 
E. R. Rankin, '13 Managing Editor 

Subscription Price 

Single Copies $0.15 

Per Year 100 

Communications intended for the Editor should be sent to Chapel 
Hill, N. C; for the Managing Editor, to Chapel Hill, N. C. All 
communications intended f^r publication must be accompanied with 
signatures if they are to receive consideration. 

OFFICE OF PUBLICATION, CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 

Entered at the Postoffice at Chapel Hill, N. C, as second class 
matter. 



THE UNIVERSITY IN LETTERS 



J 



A STATEMENT OF ATTITUDE 

(By President Graham at the inauguration of President Wallace Riddick, 
February 22d. ) 

Me. President : 

I come to-day, commissioned to extend to you, on 
behalf of the State's colleges, our heartfelt greetings 
and congratulations. And if I speak without refer- 
ence to any particular sort of college, it is because my 
thought of welcome today brooks no division. 

It is an easy commission — one to which my hand 
and heart eagerly responds, and I hasten to say 
why. It is because, under the most fortunate cir- 
cumstances, you are summoned to assist in the work- 
ing out of a task that calls for the best in the great- 
est of men. I believe that to be the happiest good 
fortune that may befall a worker on this planet: to 
assist in the solution of a supreme problem, when the 
problem is clear and his fellow- workers sympathetic, 
eager and enthusiastic. It is the call and chart of the 
great career, and we salute you, Mr. President, and 
welcome you with all the full strength of a brother's 
welcome. 

College leaders are more fortunate and happy in 
these days of personal friendliness and peace than 
in the militant and robust period of our fathers. In 
those heroic days, the representatives of sweetness 
and light, whatever other high crimes and misde- 
meanors they might have been guilty of, could never 
have be°n accused of thinking of each other more 
highly than they ought to think. 

I remember, even in my own experience, encoun- 
tering a relic of the ancient antagonism still left in 
student consciousness. Some years ago, a certain 
college president was coming to speak to our Y. M. 
C. A. The head of the Association told me that he 



did not know with whom to lodge him. "Why not 
with me," I said, "I shall be delighted." "Well," 
replied the boy, "I thought of that; but he is going 
to spend the night, and, being heads of different edu- 
cational institutions, I did not know how you'd get 
along together." 

That time, fortunately for the happiness and pro- 
ductive efficiency of all of us, has passed. I have 
given the whole matter very particular consideration, 
and I think I am prepared to say that there is not a 
college president in the State, no matter how zealous 
in good works, who would wish to turn the other 
presidents over to the benevolent culture of the State 
Penitentiary. 

You come in a period of larger, clearer view than 
was permitted to those fine fighters whose educational 
spears knew no brother. That you find your work in 
an era of personal friendliness and esteem is a matter 
for genuine congratulation; but even more signifi- 
cant and inspiring is the fact that you come at a 
period so tremendous in educational importance that 
it demands and will receive from our educational 
leaders something more than personal friendliness, 
absence of suspicion and distrust, exclusive devotion 
to our own special tasks. The common task of all 
of us is bigger than any of us, and it calls for the 
united, aggressive, whole-souled and complete co- 
operation of us- all. There is no division in the chal- 
lenge that comes to the educational forces in this 
State, and no part of that challenge is a summons to 
defend any sect or section of it in a partial or parti- 
san" manner. 

"But all in their unlikeness blend, 
Confederate to one golden end." 

Every college and every educational force, what- 
ever its source of inspiration, and whatever its aim 
and method, has the right to, and needs the support 
and encouraging strength of, every other. The suc- 
cess of one means the success of all in their common 
effort that the State may take a foremost place in the 
production of all those values that men hold precious 
— most of all the higher values in human life. 

I spoke of the supreme moment in which you come 
to your work here. I do not refer to the war, nor 
mean that the war gives it especial significance. Al- 
though I do not doubt, should occasion arise and the 
call come to your young men, that they would do as 
their fathers did before them : lay the world away, 

. . . . and pour out the red 
Sweet wine of youth ; give up the years to be, 
Of work and joy, and that unhoped serene 
That men call age." 

I do not doubt it. I know that they would. But 
what concerns me now is not the obligation that our 
youth have to us and to the State in the face of this 
terrifying spectacle. What transfixes my attention 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



157 



is the obligation that we and the State have to them 
in their full and wholesome development, and, 
through them, to the future. The red sky of the 
ruin of war marks clear before our eyes once more 
the magnitude of the world-old task of civilization — 
its present passing physical task, and its permanent 
spiritual task — says startling things to us in this 
section of the globe that we call "North Carolina" — 
chiefly in that it throws into sharply cut relief the 
sky-line of our country's standards and the world's 
and our own. 

It is not for me to mark where we stand, nor to ex- 
plain it and justify it. Let us accept the fact that 
our competition is not now in our own local past, 
but in the open forum and markets of the nation; 
that the ultimate issue of this or any war is not in 
the trenches, but in the schoolrooms of the world ; 
that the ultimate aim and standard of the civilization 
of which we are a part, and that we represent here, 
is, and is more and more to be, the complete and 
abundantly productive life which Jesus Christ fore- 
shadowed, and that Christianity and democracy were 
evolved in simple and very truth to put into practice; 
that full and free equality of opportunity to develop 
toward it is the right of every individual within the 
State ; that the State exists for that and that alone 
and, no matter what the cost, that a state that does not 
assure it commits the unpardonable sin against its 
youth and its own ideals; that any statesmanship not 
founded on it is empty and barren, for there can be 
no sovereign democratic state without the fullest 
equality of opportunity through education. North 
Carolina, in spite of every obstacle can have, and will 
have, precisely that amount and quality and kind of 
education that she really wants to have, and the 
place she takes in the sisterhood of states and nations 
is implicit in that choice. 

To put through education this mother State of ours 
where, by every natural right of resource and genius, 
she should be — foremost in the things for which she 
exists ; to hold no sacrifice too dear to accomplish that, 
is the supreme common task of all her colleges, the 
central task of business, statesmanship and patriot- 
ism, to which we welcome you today. 

Through you may this institution "stand on the top 
of the high places, by the way places of the path, 
may she cry out at the entry of the city, at the coming 
in at the doors," her message to the sons of men. 

We have the certain faith that there will be no 
peace here without victory, Mr, President, And we 
greet yon and felicitate you on a task that will call 
forth your courage, your patience, and your great 
powers. 

"Teuton or Celt or whatever we be 
We are each all Dane, in our welcome to thee." 



YOUR COMMITTEE WANTS YOUR EAR, 1912 

Attention, Fellow Classmates of Nineteen Twelve! 
This is the year for our five-year reunion. We want 
to make it the best reunion ever held on the "Hill." 
Will you help ? 

The class of 1911 achieved wonderful success last 
year for two reasons. The members of the class, as 
one man, backed the movement. The men in charge 
believed that commencement is for the alumni and 
not solely for the graduating class. The students 
have the campus to themselves the whole year. Com- 
mencement, however, is the open season for the old 
birds that have flown the coop, and the game should 
be plentiful this year. Let us all go home and roost 
one more time. 

The committee on arrangements proposes to make 
this gala event the greatest in the history of the class, 
and, of its kind, in the history of the University. 
The committee, however, is powerless to do more 
than to arrange for our pleasure. It is up to us 
to go there and put the deal through. Aside from 
the fact that it is an expression of our love for and 
loyalty to our Alma Mater, the reunion has as its 
object the pleasure of the members of the class and 
their friends — everybody on the Hill. All who enter- 
ed with or later became members of the class are ex- 
pected to be there. 

Begin right now to make your arrangements to be 
there with your family — if you have one. If you 
have not, be there anyway. Fred Drane wants to 
drive his doa; team from Alaska, where he is big boss 
of a mission as large as North Carolina. Lingo 
Wang, lately appointed Commissioner of Education 
for the entire Republic of China, is coming over to 
consult Billy Noble on a few points that bother him. 
And we almost forgot to say that Dr. W. E. Wakely 
has promised to let Bill Wakely, Junior, "run down" 
from Orange, N. Y., for a tryout with the summer 
training squad of track and football material. 

You simply cannot afford to miss the bis; gathering. 
We are counting on every member of the class. We 
count you. Be there. — Publicity Committee. 



James L. On-, of the class of 1912, is instructor in 
physical education in the University of Cincinnati. 



CATALOGUE FOR 1916-17 COMES FROM PRESS 

The University Catalogue for the current session 
has just come from the press. Its arrangement, its 
appearance, its size are practically the same as last 
year, but new matter reprcsentinsr the steady expan- 
sion of the University in its various activities find=? 
}>v >ner place in its pages. 

The Catalogue together with the President's Re- 
port affords a comprehensive view of what the Uni- 
versity is doing. They should be in the hands of all 
forward-looking alumni. 



158 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



THE GENERAL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

of the 
UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 



Officers of the Association 

Julian S. Carr, '66 President 

E. R. Rankin, '13 Secretary 

THE ALUMNI 

E. R. RANKIN 13. Alumni Editor 

GENERAL ASSEMBLY NOTES 

Forty-seven alumni of the University are members of the 
General Assembly which adjourned its meeting in Raleigh 
early in March. The list is as follows : 

Senate— A. G. Deweese, '03; W. N. Everett, '86; Jas. A. 
Gray, Jr., '08; Jas. D. Gregg, Med. '97; F. C. Harding, '93; 
C. A. Jonas, '02 ; Stahle Linn, '07 ; J. Elmer Long, '03 ; W. L. 
Long, '09; J. S. McNider, '06; Ezra Parker, '14; W. M. Per- 
son, '88 ; W. D. Pollock, '85 ; A. M. Scales, '92 ; L. C. Warren, 
'10; M. H. Allen, '06; K. E. Bennett, Phar. '12; Chase Bren- 
izer, Law '99; W. H. S. Burgwyn, Law '08. 

House— B. C. Brock, '17; Ambrose Clark, '91; A. McA. 
Council, '81; W. D. Cox, '09; Carter Dalton, '06; I. P. Davis, 
'10; W. A. Dees, '11; R. A. Doughton, '81; J. C. Galloway, 
'07; L. Clayton Grant, '05; S. R. Hoyle, '09; R. G. Kittrell, 
'99; Edgar Love, '90; J. H. McCall, '09; L. P. McLendon, 
Law '12; J. R. McCrary, Law '97; J. H. Matthews, Law '04; 
Walter Murphy, '92; E. W. Pharr, Law '11; G. M. Pritchard, 
'07; H. L. Swain, '19; J. L. Roberts, '15; H. W. Stubbs, '81; 
G. W. Sutton, '08; G. R. Ward, '03; Stanley Winborne, '07; 
R. W. Winston, Jr., '12; C. G. Wright, '86. 

Walter Murphy, '92, was speaker of the House of Repre- 
sentatives, and F. C. Harding, '93, president pro tern of the 
Senate. Lieutenant-Governor O. Max Gardner, Law '06, pre- 
sided over the sessions of the Senate. 

Alexander Lassister, Law '93, was chief clerk of the House. 
Thos. Moore, '12, and R. R. King, Jr., '12, were assistant 
clerks, and David P. Dellinger, Law '99, was reading clerk. 
C. L. Coggins, '16, was clerk to judiciary committee No. 2. 

The General Assembly has submitted a call to the people 
for a Constitutional Convention. It is interesting to note that 
so far as is known Dr. K. P. Battle, '49, is the only living 
member of the Convention of 1861 ; Maj. Jno. W. Graham, 
'57, the only living member of the Convention of 1868; and 
Capt. F. C. Robbins, '59, one of the five living members of 
the convention of 1875. 



THE CLASSES 

1851 

Editor, The Review, 
Dear Sir: 

I presume that it might interest my Alma Mater to know 
that her loyal son and alumnus, Wm. Marshall Richardson, of 
the class of 1857, is living at the age of 86 in Ocala, Fla. Dr. 
W. K. Lane, 1901, is here also. Long live the Old North 
State ! Yours respectfully, 

W. M. Richardson, '51. 
Ocala, Fla., March 2, 1917. 



1852 
— Dr. Richard H. Lewis, A. M. '55, and M. D. '56 University 
of Pennsylvania, lives in Kinston at the age of 84. The new 
high school building at Kinston is called the Richard H. 
Lewis building in his honor. 

1855 

Editor, The Review, 
Dear Sir: 

My heart has been with Chapel Hill ever since I took my 
diploma there in 1855. I was glad to spend a good deal of 
time and effort as a trustee. I'll be present at commencement, 
if the Lord permits. 

Yours forever, 

(Rev.) A. D. Betts. 
Greensboro, N. C, March 3, 1917. 

1879 
— R. B. Parker is engaged in farming at Enfield. 

1882 
— H. B. Peebles is engaged in the lumber business at Wood- 
waid, Oklahoma. 

— Octave Battle is engaged in farming in Edgecombe County 
near Tarboro. 

1883 

— H. L. Battle is engaged in cotton manufacturing at Man- 
chester, N. H. 

1896 
— Louis I. Guion, former star football player at Carolina 
and member of the famous team of 1892, has been appointed 
a director and vice-president of the federal land bank at 
Columbia, S. C. Press discpatches have the following to 
say of him: 

"L. I. Guion, vice-president, Lugoff, S. C, is a student of 
economics, a farmer, a cattle breeder, and a man of large 
affairs. He is well known to the progressive agricultural 
thought in his state, and is an authority on live stock, and 
principles and practice of agriculture in his section. Upon 
leaving college, he began the study of cotton manufacturing, 
and for the purpose of mastering the business worked in 
textile mills in North Carolina and New England." 
— F. M. Laxton is a member of the engineering and con- 
tracting firm of Tucker and Laxton, Charlotte. 

1897 
— Louis Cutlar is manager of the McDowell Furniture Co., 
at Marion. He formerly had an interesting career in Mexico 
and the West. 

— L. M. Lyon, Law '97, is a lawyer of Payette, Texas. 
— Dr. C. S. Venable, med. '97, is practicing medicine at 
Charlottesville, Va. 

1898 
— Cape. W. G. Peace, U. S. A., is stationed at Fort Caswell. 
— Bartley Skinner is engaged in the banking business at 
Kuttawa, Ky. 

1900 
W. S. Bernard, Secretary, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
— W. Henry Bagley, for a number of years business manager 
of the Raleigh News and Observer, has moved to Fort Worth, 
Texas, where he is managing director of the Fort Worth 
Record. 

— Rev. A. R. Berkeley, formerly rector of the Holy Com- 
munion Chapel, Philadelphia, is now rector of St. Paul's 
Episcopal Church, New Orleans, La. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



159 



— W. H. Battle is engaged in farming near Albemarle. 

— S. J. Adams has been elected Exalted Ruler of the Raleigh 

Lodge of Elks. 

— Jackson Greer, Law '00, is practicing law at Whiteville. He 

is a former member of the Legislature. 

1901 

Dr. J: G. Murphy, Secretary, Wilmington, N. C. 
— The wedding of Miss Ellen Phifer Gibson and Mr. Cameron 
MacRae occurred February 20th in All Saints Episcopal 
Church, Concord. They are at home in Concord. 
— Milton Mcintosh has been for some time successfully en- 
gaged in the life insurance business at Charlotte. 
— The address of Emmett C. Gudger has been changed 
from Radio, Va., to U. S. Ship Mayflower, Washington, D. C. 
— W. A. Graham, Jr., is engaged in farming in Lincoln 
County near Lincolnton. 

— Orlando H. Sumpter is a successful lawyer of Hot Springs, 
Arkansas. 

— H. D. Bateman is cashier of the Branch Bank at Wilson. 
— Dr. W. B. MacNider, of Chapel Hill, is professor of 
Pharmacology and Bacteriology in the University Medical 
School. 

— H. L. Lyon is a lawyer of Whiteville and is solicitor of his 
district. 

— J. C. Webb is a member of the mercantile firm of H. W 
and J. C. Webb, Hillsboro. 

1902 

R. A. Merritt, Secretary, Asheville, N. C. 
— F. G. Kelly is located at Ensley, Ala., and is a chemist 
with the Tennessee Coal, Iron and Railroad Co. 
— R. B. Chastain is located at Douglas, Ga., where he is 
engaged in the practice of law. 
— Julius F. Duncan is practicing law at Beaufort. 
— W. S. Prior is a chemist at Ensley, Ala. 
— W. T. Johnson is an accountant located at 709 E. Grace 
St., Richmond, Va. 

1903 
N. W. Walker, Secretary, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
— The March number of the Missionary Survey contains 
the following reference to R. C. Morrow, '03 . 

Prof. Morrow, of Montemorelos, Mex., has been generously 
loaned to Tex.-Mex. this year by the Foreign Mission C}m- 
mittee. His presence and efficient service has been a sourc? 
of great strength to us this year. The coming of little Pauline 
as a Christmas gift in the Morrow family was one of LK' 
bright events to Tex.-Mex. in the closing days of 1916. 
— Dr. J. W. Willcox is a physician at Laurel Hill. 
— Dr. A. L. Plummer, Med. '03, practices medicine at Denton 
and is manager of the Denton Drug Co. 
— H. M. Bell, Phar. '03, is a prominent business man of Wind- 
sor. 

— L. L. Parker is cashier of the Bank of Pageland, Pageland. 
S. C. 

— J. Vines Cobb lives in Tarboro and is manager of the 
Vinedale Farms at Pinetops. 

— Capt. H. H. Broadhurst, U. S. A., is Commandant of Cadets 
in the N. C. State College of Agriculture and Engineering, 
West Raleigh. 

— C. E. Stuart, formerly of Wins f on-Salem, is located at 
Coats where he is assistant cashier of the Bank of Coats. 
— D. W. Royster is with the Olive Hosiery Mills at Shelby. 
— J. G. Dees is an attorney at law of Bayboro. 



— H. M. Robins is a successful attorney and counsellor at 

law of Ashboro. 

— S. E. McNeely is cashier of the Bessemer City Bank, at 

Bessemer City. 

— Dr. G. R. Berkeley is a successful physician of Norfolk, 

Va., with offices 209 Dickson Building. 

— The marriage of Miss Douglas Hill and Mr. James Lathrop 

Morehead occurred February 24th in Durham. 

— J. H. McAden is a successful business man of Charlotte. 

—Dr. Chas. E. Moore, Med. '03, is a successful physician of 

Greensboro. 

1904 
T. F. HiCKERSON, Secretary, Chapel Hill, N. C. 

— W. C. Rankin is secretary and treasurer of the Stephens 
Co., Charlotte. 

— Dr. Evander M. Mclver is a physician of Jonesboro. 
— W. A. Whitaker is a member of the faculty of the Univer- 
sity of Kansas at Lawrence, Kansas. 

— S. G. Haigh is engaged in the cotton manufacturing business 
at Fayetteville. 
— C. Dunbar is engaged in the grocery business at High Point. 

1905 

W. T. Shore, Secretary, Charlotte, N. C. 
— P. H. Rogers, Jr., is engaged in the paper manufacturing 
business at Hartsville, S. C. 

— Brainier Gilmer is a lawyer of Waynesville He was mar- 
ried recently. 

— R. B. Wilson is editor of the Waynesville Courier. 
— Miss Imogene Stone is a member of the faculty of Sophie 
Newcomb College, New Orleans, La. 

— H. H. Jacobs is located at 315 W. 98th St., New York City. 
— Dr. E. B. Howie is a well-known and successful dentist 
of Raleigh. 

1906 
John A. Parker, Secretary, Charlotte, N. C. 
— J. J. Tyson is a chemist at Bessemer, Ala. 
— J. A. Rudisill is superintendent of the Biscoe Schools. 
— Julian S. Miller is editor of the Charlotte News. 
— Victor L. Stephenson is on the staff of the New York 
Evening Post. 

— J. M. Grainger, M. A. '06, teaches English in the Virginia 
State Normal College, Farmville, Va. He is the father of 
six children. 

— Dr. Ben F. Royal is a successful physician of Morehead 
City. 

— Dr. F. C. Whitaker, Med. '06, is a practicing physician of 
Enfield. . 

— The marriage of Miss Florence Kidder and Mr. Louis 
Toomer Moore occurred November 22nd at Wilmington. 

1907 

C. L. Weill, Secretary, Greensboro, N. C. 
— W'm. T. McGowan is located at Timmonsville, S. C. 
— E. McK. Highsmith is associate in the department of edu- 
cation in the Southwest Texas State Normal School at San 

is, Texas. 
— T. Holt Haywood is in charge of the cotton goods depart- 
ment of the commission firm of Frederick Vietor and Achelis, 
65 Leonard Street, New York City. 

— W. Barney Pitts is instructor in Spanish in the Chattanooga 
high school. 

— Roby Council Day is located at 3600 Park Place, N. W., 
Washington, D. C. 



1(30 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



— L. R. Hoffman is a member of the faculty of Horner 
School, Charlotte. 

— A. M. Secrest, Ph. G. '07, is proprietor of the Union Drug 
Co., at Monroe. 

1908 
Jas. A. Gray, Jr., Secretary, Winston-Salem, N. C. 

— P. M. Williams travels for the L. Moore Dry Kiln Co., of 

Jacksonville, Fla. His home is at North Wilkesboro. 

— H. B. Connor is a chemist of Greeley, Ala. 

— E. H. Gorham, Law '08, practices law in Morehead City. 

— Chas. A. Hines, Law '08, is an attorney of Greensboro and 

is chairman of the county Democratic executive committee. 

1909 
O. C. Cox, Secretary, Greensboro, N. C. 
— Dr. S. W. Hurdle practices his profession, medicine, at 
Spray. 

— Dr. B. K. Blalock has located in North Charlotte for the 
practice of medicine. Formerly he practiced in Norwood. 
— D. D. Oliver continues to reside at Fort Lauderdale, Fla., 
where he is engaged in the mercantile business. He is mar- 
ried. 

— Fred Finger, Phar. '09, is proprietor of the Kings Mountain 
Drug Co., at King's Mountain. 

— Frank Strowd is manager of the Orange Lumber Co., 
Chapel Hill. 

— The engagement of Miss Frances Fleming, of Statesville, 
and Mr. Boyd Mullen. Ph. G. '09, of Huntersville, has been 
announced, the wedding to take place in April. 

1910 

J. R. Nixon, Secretary, Cherryville, N. C. 

— C. Cazette Barbee is a member of the faculty of the 

Savannah high school, Savannah, Ga. 

— Rev. L. N. Taylor is an Episcopal minister at Stovall. 

— H. E- Stacy practices law at Lumberton. 

— Geo. S. Daniels is connected with the Wayne National Bank, 

Goldsboro. 

1911 
I. C. MosER, Secretary, Burlington, N. C. 
— C. L. Williams has been engaged in the practice of law at 
Sanford since graduation. His firm is Williams and Williams. 
— F. E. Wallace is practicing law at Kenansville. 
— K. S. Tanner is general manager of the Cleghorn and 
Spencer cotton mills at Rutherfordton and the Florence mills 
at Forest City. 

— M. A. White is assistant actuary for the Southern Life and 
Trust Co., at Greensboro. 
— W. E. Boone is located at Denton. 

— J. Talbot Johnson is a member of the law firm of Johnson 
and Johnson at Aberdeen. 

1912 

C. E. Norman, Secretary, Columbia, S. C. 
— E. F. Rimmer is with the R. R. Beatty Drug Co., Charlotte. 
— Benj. E. Cook is with the Atlas Supply Co., Muskogee, 
Okla. 

— A. M. Atkinson is a civil engineer of Enfield. 
— Robert M. Hanes is manager of the Crystal Ice Co., at Win- 
ston-Salem and Statesville. 

— Jas. W. Morris, Jr., is a member of the law firm of Raney 
and Morris, Tampa, Fla. 

— B. Vance Henry is successfully engaged in the practice 
of law at Wadesboro. 



— E. G. W. Towers is with the civil engineering department 
of the Southern Railway Co., at Charlotte. 

1913 

A. L. M. Wiggins, Secretary, Hartsville, S. C. 
— Banks Mebane is engaged in the practice of law at Graham. 
— Jackson Townsend is a chemist with the Arthur D. Little, 
Inc., laboratories, Boston, Mass. 

— Dr. R. E. Stevens, Med. '13, is practicing medicine at San- 
ford, Fla. 

— A. L. M. Wiggins has been recently elected president of the 
Hartsville, S. C, Chamber of Commerce. 

— W. G. Harry is completing his second year in the Presby- 
terian Theological Seminary at Columbia, S. C. 
— Julius Horney, Law '13, is an attorney at law at Canton. 

1914 

Oscar Leach, Secretary, Raeford, N. C. 
— The secretary of the class wishes to secure news notes 
concerning the various members, and he requests that each 
1914 man send him information as to his present whereabouts 
and occupation. Also if you know anything of interest con- 
cerning some classmate, send it. But be sure to send in- 
formation about yourself at once to Oscar Leach, Secretary, 
Raeford, N. C. 

— D. L. Knowles is a medical student in the University of 
Pennsylvania, at Philadelphia. His address is 3611 Locust St. 
— Malcolm N. Oates is with the New York office of the West- 
inghouse Electric Co. His address is 70 Riverside Drive. 
— L. R. Johnston continues a member of the faculty of Oak 
Ridge Institute, at Oak Ridge. 

— W. R. Williams is a member of the law firm of Williams 
and Williams, Sanford. 

— Harry B. Grimsley is an attorney at law of Greensboro. 
— F. L. Webster is engaged in the insurance business at 
Wilkesboro. 

1915 

B. L. Feild, Secretary, Wilson, N. C. 
— The marriage of Miss Martha Laura Finley and Mr. 
Charles MacDonald Coffey, Jr., occured February 28th in the 
Presbyterian Church at North Wilkesboro. Among the 
groomsmen was Mr. W. H. H. Cowles, of the city. 
— J. Shepard Bryan is principal of the Hemenway Grammar 
School. Wilmington. 

— W. D. Pruden, Jr., 'IS, of Edenton, is a second year stu- 
dent in the Harvard Law School at Cambridge Mass. 
— W. W. Clarke is teaching in the Milton high school. 
— C. Robinson is principal of the Leggett School near Tarboro. 
— W. K. Reid, of Gastonia, is with the Southern Express 
Co., at Chattanooga, Tenn. 

— F. W. Carter is a member of the firm of the J. W. Carter 
Co., Maxton. 

— W. L. Thorpe, who received license to practice law in Feb- 
ruary, has located at Nasvhille. 

— Rev. B. M. Walton is an Episcopal missionary in Porto 
Rico. 
— Rev. G. S. Duncan is a Methodist minister at Bon Air, Tenn. 

1916 

H. B. Hester, Secretary, Chapel Hill, N. C. 

— J. H. Allred is principal of the Rockingham high school. 
— The engagement of Miss Elizabeth Sherrill and Mr. Fred 
H. Deaton, both of Statesville, has been announced. Mr. 
Deaton is secretarv-treasurer of the Carolina Motor Co. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



161 



1918 

— The marriage of Miss Elizabeth Barton and Mr. William 
Allen Erwin, Jr., occurred March 10th in St. Luke's Episcopal 
Church. Jacksonville, Fla. 
— Chas. Z. Flack is city clerk of Forest City. 
— H. F. Makepeace is secretary-treasurer of a lumber manu- 
facturing company at Hamlet. 

1919 

— A. H. Hatsell is teaching at Dixon. 



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Greensboro Commercial School 

GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROEINA 

BOOKKEEPING, SHORTHAND, TOUCH TYPE 
WRITING and the BUSINESS BRANCHES are 
our Specialty. School the year round. Enroll 
any time. Write for Catalogue. 

E. A. McCLUNG Principal 



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♦ * $ <"fr | X | *4'$»>&< " fe't»*'>fr& | M " M'<' < fr*^**4 | fr ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦* & 



Carolina Drug Company 

CHAPEL HIIL. N. C. 

FOR CAROLINA BOYS. THE HOME OF 
PURE DRUGS 

A. G. WEBB, Proprietor 
!»»♦♦»»♦ ♦♦♦•♦♦♦♦♦ * »»<i 



Asphalt Pavements 



DURABLE 



ECONOMICAL 



IF YOU ARE CONTEMPLATING STREET OR 

ROAD CONSTRUCTION, WE INVITE YOU 

TO INSPECT SOME OF OUR RECENT 

CONSTRUCTION IN 



RALEIGH 

OXFORD 

GUILFORD COUNTY 

WELDON 

ROCKY MOUNT 

LAURINBURG 

WILSON 



GREENSBORO 

WAKE COUNTY 

DURHAM 

WARRENTON 

LUMBERTON 

HENDERSON 

HIGH POINT 



SEE THE GREENSBORO-HIGH POINT HIGH- 
WAY—A 16-MILE STRETCH OF 
ASPHALT ROAD 

A Representative Will Visit You and Supply Any 
Information or Estimates Wanted 

Robert G. Lassiter & Co. 

ENGINEERING AND CONTRACTING 

First National Bank Building 

OXFORD, N. C. 



"Uhe 

MODEL LAUNDRY 

OF DURHAM, N. C. 

Offers the Highest Quality of 
Service in One Day's Time. 



J. R. EVANS, Agent 



Chapel Hill, N. C. 



The Bank o/Chapel Hill 

The oldest and strongest bank in 
Orange County solicits your banking 
business. 



M. C. S NOBLE 
President 



H. H. PATTERSON 
Vice-President 



M. E. HOGAN 
Cuhiei 



ZEB P. COUNCIL, Mananer 

CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 

Printing 

QUALITY AND SERVICE 



ORDERS TAKEN FOR ENGRAVED CARDS OR 
INVITATIONS 



Eubanks Drug Co. 

Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Agents for Nunnally's Candy 



H. H. PATTERSON 

CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE AND FRESH 
GROCERIES AT ALL TIMES 



ESTABLISHED 1916 



fllumni Coyalty fund 



"One for all, and all for one " 



Council: 

A. M. SCALES, '92 

E. K. GRAHAM, '98 

A. W. HAYWOOD, Jr., '04 

J. A. GRAY, Jr., '08 

D. F. RAY, '09 




New Subscribers Enrolled During February — Not Previously Acknowledged: 



1909 T. N. V. Barnhill 

1902 I. P. Battle 
1890 J. C. Braswell 

1910 B. H. Bunn 
1899 J. P. Bunn 

1910 J. C. Daughtridge 

1907 R. F. Fountain 

1903 R. S. Gorham 

1908 W. 



1915 J. D. Odom 
1904 J. B. Ramsey 
1906 I. W. Rose 
1908 T. L. Simmons 
1883 F. S. Spruill 
1887 W. S. Wilkinson 

1916 W. S. Wilkinson, Jr. 
1883 G. L. Wimberley, Jr. 

C. Woodard, Jr. 



All of these came from one town — Rocky Mount. 

How did it happen? 

Battle and Simmons got busy; that's the complete 
story. 

They got some Loyalty Fund Cards and gave the alum- 
ni in Rocky Mount the chance they wanted. 

Dunn, Greensboro, Rocky Mount Who is next? All it 
takes is two or three alumni with a lot of "pep" and 
a little time. 

A dozen towns during April, and the whole State by 
June. 

This is the way to do it, and the time is NOW! 



1897 J. A. Long / LATER: Asheville, under the leadership of Thos. Hume and Harry 

1915 T. K. Stockard \ Howell, has lined up for this. We need your town! Come on now. 



WHAT THIS 

FUND DOES: 



Provides a way for every man who wants to strengthen the University 
and perpetuate its spirit; makes it possible for a man to live on through 
its good work, and to put back into the world a fair return on what he 
got out of it through an institution that helped him when he most 
needed help. 



Two Ways to do this Big Business: 



(1) Through an annual subscription. 

(2) Through a bequest in your will. 



The size of the subscription, or of the bequest, is important, of course; but the main thing is to 
have a part in it: The fund in which every alumnus has a share. 



IERE IT IS: GO TO IT! »*- 



TEAR THIS OFF AND MAIL IT TO E. R. RANKIN, Secretary 



University of North Carolina Alumni Loyalty Fund: 

I will give to the Alumni Loyalty Fund $ annually, 

payable of each year; at which time please send 

notice. I reserve the right to revoke at will. 

Name . '. (Class) 



Address 



Date 



Pickard's Transfer 

Chapel Hill, N. C. 

FIRST CLASS LIVERY SERVICE AT ALL 
TIMES. GIVE US A TRIAL 

A. A. PICKARD ... - Manager 



The Peoples National Bank 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Capital $300,000.00 United Slates Depositary 

J. W. FRIES, Pres. Win. A. BLAIR, Vice-Prcs. 

M. S. LEWIS, Cashier 



The Model Market and Ice Co. 

Chapel Hill, N. C. 

All Kinds of Meats. Fish and Oysters in Season. 

Daily Ice Delivery Except Sunday 
S. M. PICKARD... Manager 



Ice Cream and Frozen Desserts 

of all kinds. Special attention given University and 

College banquets and entertainments. Phone 178 

WARREN CREAMERY CO. 

PARRISH STREET DURHAM, N. C. 



|»^><^<»^><§>3«S>^><S><S><t>^<^<^<e*S><$<S>^^ 



A. .A. Tftluth? (Tclnc. 

SUCCESSORS TO A. A. KLUTTZ 

Extend a cordial invitation to all students and 
alumni of the U. N. C. to make their store head- 
quarters during their stay in Chapel Hill. 

Complete Stock of 
New and Second-hand Books, Stationery, and 
Complete Line of Shoes and Haberdashery 
Made by the Leaders of Fashion, Al- 
ways on Hand 



Just Test Our Better Clothes 

They're correct, clean-cut and 
crisp 

Sneed-Markham- Taylor Co. 

Durham, N. C. 

Clothiers, Furnishers, Hatters, and 
Regal Shoes for Men 



CHAPEL HILL 
N. C. 



ANDREWS CASH STORE CO. 

Will save you from 3 to 5 dollars on your tailor- 
made suits. We also have in an up-to-date line 
of high grade gents' furnishings. Call to see us 
and be convinced. 



UNIVERSITY STUDENTS — 

Vhe 'ROYAL CAFES 

IN CHAPEL HILL as well as IN DURHAM 

APPRECIATE YOUR PATRONAGE 




FACTS 



United States Government 
Statistics Reveal That: 



Ninety per cent, of estates of over $5,000 are entirely dissipated in 
seven \-ears. 

Nineteen out of every twenty fail to provide either for their old age 
or families. 

Over 8,000,000 women must work to live. 

Ninetv-five per cent, of men engaged in business fail. 

Ninety per cent, of children who enter school at age of six have to 

stop before completing the eighth grade, to go to work. 
Nine out often men leave no estate. 

Life insurance companies are distributing more than $2,000,000 
per day. 
The surest way to provide against future misfortune is through Life Insurance, and no company can 

perform this service in a more satisfactory manner than the STATE MUTUAL— 73 years old. 
We need a few dependable men as agents in this state. 

S. W. SPARGER, STATE AGENT 

704-5-6 FIRST NATIONAL BANK BUILDING. DURHAM. N. C. 





SEABOARD 

AIR LINE RAILWAY 

"The Progressive Railway of the South" 

SHORTEST, QUICKEST AND BEST ROUTE 

Richmond, Portsmouth-Norfolk, Va., and points 
in the Northeast via Washington, D. C, and 
Southwest via Atlanta and Birmingham. 

HANDSOMEST ALL STEEL TRAINS 
IN THE SOUTH 

Electrically lighted and equipped with electric 
fans. 

Steel electrically lighted Diners on all through 
trains. Meals a la carte. 








LOCAL TRAINS ON CONVENIENT 
SCHEDULES 








Extremely Low Winter Excursion Rates 

For rates, schedules, etc., call on your nearest 
agent, or 

CHARLES B. RYAN, G. P. A., JOHN T. WEST, D. P. A. 

Norfolk, Va. CHARLES R. CAPPS. 1st. V-Pres., Raleigh, N. C. 

Norfolk, Va. 




'1 



Odell Hardware 

Comnflnv oreensboro, 
WUrnpciny north Carolina 

Electric Lamps and Supplies 
Builders Hardware 



DEPENDABLE GOODS 

PROMPT SERVICE 

SATISFACTORY PRICES 



RIDE WITH 


C. S. Pender graft 


Pioneer Auto Man 


Headquarters in DURHAM: 
Al the Royal Cafe, Main Street, and Southern Depot 


Headquarters in CHAPEL HILL: 
Next to Bank of Chapel Hill 


Leave Chapel Hill _ 8:30 and 10:20 a. m. 

Leave Chapel Hill 2:30 and 4:00 p. m. 

Leave Durham 9:50 a. m., 12:40 p. m. 

Leave Durham _._ . .5:08 and 8:00 p. m. 


OTHER TRIPS SUBJECT TO ORDER 


Four Machines at Your Service 
Day or Night 


PHONE 58 OR 23 



Telephone No. 477 Opposite Post Office 

Tfin© H®flladlsij Stadn® 

DURHAM, N. C. 

Offical Photographer for Y. Y., 1915 

AMATEUR WORK DEVELOPED & FINISHED 



HILL C. LINTHICUM, A. I. A. H. COLVIN LINTHICUM 

ASSOCIATE ARCHITECTS 
Specialty Modern School Buildin gs 

RUST BUILDING, ROOMS 502-503 PHONE 226 DURHAM, N. C 



Chapel Hill Hardware Co., inc. 

THE "HIGH STANDARD" STORE 

HEADQUARTERS FOR 

Pocket Cutlery, Safety Razors, Razors, 

Strops, Flash Lights, Oil Heaters, 

Paints and Kalsomines 

Tin Shop in Connection 



FOR NEAT JOB PRINTING AND TYPEWRITER PAPER 

CALL AT THE OFFICE OF 

THE CHAPEL HILL NEWS 



K 



ODAK SUPPLIE Q 

Finishing for the Amateur. Foister " 



The J. B. McCrary Company 

Municipal Engineers 

ATLANTA CHARLOTTE 



Consulting Engineers New Power Plant Univ. of North Carolina 



The J. B. McCrary Company serves the south as 
Municipal Engineers. We have nothing hut ser- 
vice to sell. It is our business to devise munici- 
pal improvements. We plan, finance, construct 
and operate. We want to get in touch with 
every town or city needing improvements. We 
guarantee our service will produce dividends. 
Our experience covers twenty years. We will 
promptlv give you all information. It will pay 
you to get in touch with us. Write 



HARRY W. LOVING, District Manager 

CHARLOTTE, :: :: :: :: NORTH CAROLINA 



EXPERIENCE 



OUR MOTTO: 
ORGANIZATION 



SERVICE 



Ol)£ ~$ix$X National ^Battk 

of "Durham. 3t. <£. 

"Roll of Honor" Bank 

Total Resources over Two and a Quarter Mil- 
lion Dollars 

WE KNOW YOUR WANTS 

AND WANT YOUR BUSINESS 



JULIAN S. CARR.._ 
W. J. HOLLOWAY_ 



-President 
Cashier 



PATTERSON BROS. 

DRUGGISTS 

AGENCY NORRIS CANDY THE REXALL STORE 



=V 



MEN'S FURNISHINGS OF QUALITY * Lim ; ted N k umb " rf B Si, !| 

Shirts Less than Cost; Bath 
Robes now selbng at Cost; Men's Collars, 2 for 25c — at 

S. BERMAN'S DEPT. STORE 

CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 



J. D. Webb & Son 

Manfitiers 

Clothing* Shoes and Furnishings 



w 

For Spring: A Full Line of 

Cool Cloth Suits 

Horse Hide Shoes 



•THE QUALITY TELLS* 




END us any gar- 
ment or article 
you may have 

needing Dry Cleaning 

or Dyeing. 

We will do the work promptly, 
at small cost, and to your en- 
tire satisfaction. 

Send yours by Parcel Post, we 
pay return charges on orders 
amounting to $1.00. 

Mourning Goods Dyed in 24 to 
36 Hours 

COLUMBIA LAUNDRY CO. 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 
Phones 633-634 

Chapel Hill Agents: T. C. Wilkins and 
E. E. W. Duncan 14 and 15 Old West 



THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

Maximum of Service to the People of the State 



A. 
B. 



THE COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS. C. 

THE SCHOOL OF APPLIED SCIENCE. D. 

(1) Chemical Engineering. E. 

Electrical Engineering. F. 

Civil and Road Engineering. G. 

Soil Investigation. H. 



(2) 
(3) 
(4) 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL. 
THE SCHOOL OF LAW. 
THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE. 
THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY. 
THE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION. 
THE SUMMER SCHOOL. 



I. THE BUREAU OF EXTENSION. 

(1) General Information. 

(2) Instruction by Lectures. 

(3) Correspondence Courses. 

(4) Debate and Declamation. 

(5) County Economic and Social Surreys. 

(6) Municipal and Legislative Reference. 

(7) Educational Information and Assist- 

ance. 

WRITE TO THE UNIVERSITY WHEN YOU NEED HELP 



For information regarding the University, address 



THOS. J. WILSON, JR., Registrar. 



A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A. A A A »** A A A A A A A 
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The Southern 
Educational Bureau 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Operates throughout the 
Southwest. 

Has placed members in 32 

states. 

Salaries from $3,000.00 per 
year down. 

The demand for good men teach= 
ers exceeds the supply. 

Write us for full information free. 



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♦t**t**I* •£* »J* *!* *t* *!* *•* ♦** *** *** *♦* *** *** ♦*« ♦*•• •*♦ *♦* *I* *** *!* ** 4 *** *t* **■* *■»**** *»■* *■** *2* ♦J**** *2* *J* ♦** *2* *2**2» •!* 



Successful Careers in Later 

Life for University 

Men 

Depend not wholly upon Football, Baseball, 
or other sports — 

But upon sheer pluck and ability to build the 
solid foundation of Success by Saving every 
possible dollar. 

It takes Men to participate in Football, Base- 
ball, etc., but it takes Greater Men to Build 
Successful Careers. 

Resolve to Start Saving Today. 

The Fidelity Bank 

North Carolina's Greatest Banking Institution 
DURHAM, N. C. 




PEPJKola 

—the healthful and DEE-licious drink for everybody who has a thirst! Why 
not tell your grocer : "A case of PZPSI-Cola"? Have it at home all the time. 




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