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CY THOMPSON SAYS— 

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Raleigh, N. C. Raleigh, N. C. 



THE ROYALL & BORDEN CO. 



106 and 108 WEST MAIN STREET DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA 

Sell all kinds of furniture and furnishings for churches, 
colleges and homes. Biggest stock of Rugs in the 
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ask the College Proctor or the editor of the "Review." 
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THE ROYALL & BORDEN CO. 



Number 7 



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ALVMNIREVIEW 



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PUBLISHED BY 

* THE ALVMNI ASSOCIATION 



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Murphy's Hotel and Annex 



Richmond, Virginia 



The Most Modern, Largest, and Best 
Located Hotel in Richmond, Being 
on Direct Car Line to all Railroad 
Depots. 



Headquarters for College Men 



European Plan $1.00 Up 



JAMES T. DISNEY, Manager 




\ Engraved 
Wedding Invitations 



An unusually attractive 
line. Just the quietly ele- 
gant kind or the ones of 
fads and frills — "at any 
price you want to pay." 

If it's a secret, it 
will be safe here. 
Orders handled in our pri- 
vate consulting room or by 
residential appointment 
when requested. 

THESEEMANPRINTERY 

INCORPORATED 

DURHAM, N. C. 

Established 1885 



\ 



i_ 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



Volume V 



APRIL, 1917 



Number 7 



OPINION AND COMMENT 



ALUMNI DAY 



THERE IS 
WORK TO DO 



Alumni Day, June 5, is only forty-five days in the 
future. Take your blue pencil now and underscore 
the date. Include June 3 and 4 also, 
so that nothing can interfere with 
your being here. 

Why? Look up the special letters from individ- 
uals and committees to the classes which hold re- 
unions, and the special invitation from Alma Mater 
and your question will be fully answered. There is 
happiness in store for you and joy for your foster 
mother if you will only be here. 

nan 

But there is work to do — the best that upbuilds — 
that brings about the greater University. Planks in 
the building program follow: 

1. First of all, putting the Gen- 
eral Alumni Association on a new 
working basis, thinking through the problems which 
confront the University, and naming committees to 
carry through successfully the work planned. The 
day for alumni reminiscence, oratory, a little fun- 
making, and nothing more, is past The resources of 
the great, alert, alumni body must be mobilized for a 
greater University and State. 

2. Local Associations and classes must be more 
thoroughly organized through the Secretary and ap- 
propriate committees. 

3. The alumni catalogue must be put through 
the press in such a way as to furnish the maximum 
information about the alumni. 

4. A definite, thorough-going campaign must be 
instituted for returning more alumni at Commence- 
ment and at all University occasions which call for 
the presence of alumni. The time has come when 
Carolina should, in common with other universities, 
have a mid-term Alumni Day on which alumni can 
see the University at work. 

5. The Loyalty Fund has started splendidly, but 
permanent success cannot be secured upon the basis 
of individual effort. The alumni as a body must get 
behind the movement and work as a unit lor its 
steady growth. 

6. A bureau of appointments could tremendously 
assist older alumni as well as recent graduates in find- 
ing positions. 

7. If the Virginia game is to be played on the 



local gridiron, alumni co-operation is absolutely es- 
sential to real success. The committee should start 
to work June 6. 

8. For five years, less than five men have assumed 
the full responsibility of financing and editing the 
Review. The load should be distributed, now that 
the day of experiment is over. 

9. The benefits of the University should be 
brought to an increasingly large number of regular, 
summer, and correspondence students and to the 
people of the State at large through the Bureau of 
Extension. Alumni can furnish the medium through 
which this can be made possible. 

10. The people of North Carolina should know 
about the work and the needs of their University. 
Individual alumni have recently shown what impor- 
tant results may be achieved in this particular even 
when the effort expended is unorganized. Organized 
effort will insure still greater success. 

DDD 

You will soon be alumni. It is an open secret — 
that — there are just two kinds of alumni — live ones 
and "dead" ones. At least that is 
what the Minnesota Alumni Weekly 
says and it tallies with this paper's 
experience down to the minutest iota subscript. The 
Virginia Alumni News rather ingeniously finds five 
classes and prints a little poem about them (which 
read elsewhere) but the Badger State scribe really 
said something. 

Furthermore, you Go into one class, or Fall into 
the other. 

The live alumnus joins the local association, sees 
that it meets and does something, keeps the class 
organization in tip-tup form, keeps the General 
Alumni Association going, makes his reunion the at- 
traction of Commencement, sends his "fiver" to the 
Loyalty Fund — he starts with that and as he prospers 
he adds accordingly — and — of course takes the Re- 
view. 

No "dead" alumnus was ever found with a copy 
of the Review in his pocket or a receipt from the 
treasurer of the Loyalty Fund on his person. 

There is only one way in which you can make 
sure of being classed with (lie live ones — do as they 
have done. 



TO MEMBERS 

OF 1917 



172 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



What's all this ado about? Why it's for your 
good, not merely for Alma Mater's. At least this 
is the way the Minnesotan puts the case: 

A college course brings to the average man : 

The opportunities of a life time. 

The friendships of a life time. 

These can be easily wasted — and the man who fails 
to identify himself with the alumni and to keep in 
touch with the institution is missing what can never 
be replaced by later activity. 

The alumnus who really gets all that he might out 
of his college course is not the one who drops all con- 
nection with the University and never thinks of it 
again until some more loyal classmate pokes him up 
to get him out to the quarter-century reunion. 

Tour University days — members of 1917 — will 
soon be over. The years can live again only in mem- 
ory, but you can keep the memories fresh ; you can 
live in touch with the friends who have come to hold 
so large a place in your lives while making some re- 
turn to the University for the many benefits received. 
If you would not lose these good things that have 
come from your college associations you must join 
"the team" and keep in touch with the University 
and those whose doings are of such absorbing interest 
to you. Do not delay until you think you can afford 
it — the cost is slight while the years move fast and 
never return. 

DDD 

A recent number of the Yale Alumni Weekly is 
devoted entirely to a review of the Yale Alumni 

Fund which in June, 1916, 

ssr iBS T ded * its ? "°T 

o± a century. JNo wonder 
the editors spread the story from cover to cover — it 
is such a splendid one! 

Here are some of the big facts which challenge 
attention : 

Total Receipts (1891-1916) $1,366,359.79 

Interest on Principal Fund 232,862.84 

Gross Total. June. 1916 $1,609,222.63 

Expenses 27,871.17 

Net Total Receipts $1,572,351.46 

Given University for Income 702,137.89 

Accumulated Principal Fund 870,213.57 

$1.572, 351. 46 

In 1916 the receipts amounted to $146,280.53, of 
which $70,000 was appropriated for supplying cur- 
rent needs and the remainder was added to the per- 
manent endowment fund. 



WHERE THE 
MONEY GOES 



Would you like to know where the money goes 
which is appropriated for current needs ? It is an 
extremely suggestive story, which we 
take direct from the Yale editor's 
pen: 

1. A university cannot stand still. It must, be 
advancing or losing ground. The permanent endow- 
ments will hold the ground once gained; but it is 
the Alumni Fund and other unrestricted income that 
make possible new work and ever higher standards. 

2. The Alumni Fund forms a large part of Yale's 
general or unrestricted income. Here are a few il- 
lustrations of what this Fund makes possible : 

3. Until a few years ago no Yale professor re- 
ceived more than $3,750 a year in salary. All the 
salaries above that amount now (excepting a few 
largely endowed professorships) are paid from Uni- 
versity general funds. 

4. The Alumni Fund, devoted by special vote par- 
ticularly to increase in salaries, thus marks the dif- 
ference between mediocrity and distinction in Yale's 
faculty. 

5. Yale Democracy, beaten down to hardpan. is 
represented by the Bureau of Appointments. Last 
year 1,011 students at Yale earned about $250 apiece 
to help pay their own way. Many of them couldn't 
have done this if Yale hadn't helped them find jobs. 
The Bureau that does this was run by general funds 
until a recent endowment came in. This important 
work was made possible by such income as the Alum- 
ni Fund. It is now no longer a tax upon it. Here 
help for a few years made possible a permanent es- 
tablishment. 

(!. A few months before the war an American was 
sitting with a German scientist in a cafe in Vienna. 
"I want my boy to be a doctor," said the American, 
"where shall I send him to get the best preparatory 
training?" "Send him to the Sheffield Scientific 
School of Yale University," replied the German, 
"Yale's courses and laboratories in biology are the 
best in the world." Sheff was aided last year from 
general University funds to the extent of $18,825 
for increased salaries and $34,000 for general prog- 
ress. 

7. The new laboratories in biology and in physics 
give the courses of the College, Sheffield, and the 
Graduate School. They provide, too, for the brilliant 
scientific feats of those men who, right here at Yale, 
are adding to the field of human knowledge. 

8. The president of Dartmouth has this year come, 
to Yale to teach physics to Freshmen. A teacher 
from Groton — a red-blooded fellow who helps to 
coach the crew — and a professor from Princeton have 
come this year to teach them Latin and Greek. Fresh- 
men used to be taught chiefly by ill-paid and inex- 
perienced "instructors." Now sixteen professors and 
twenty-four assistant professors are teaching elemen- 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



173 



tary courses in the College alone. This gives far 
better results — and costs more money. 

□ □□ 

President Hadley answers the question: "(1) It 

enables Yale graduates in every station of life — men 

of moderate means as well as men 

™^™™J HE of lar 8' e means— to contribute ef- 
BIG POINTS? - . . = , . .,, . ,, 

iectively and visibly to the support 

of their Alma Mater. (2) It furnishes these contri- 
butions in the shape in which they are most needed. 
(3) It leads the graduates as a hody to take a more 
intelligent interest in and gain a more effective un- 
derstanding of the work and requirements of the uni- 
versity." 

The Yale Treasurer says the final word : "It is, of 
course, largely by the extent of the support accorded 
to a university by its own graduates that the world 
judges of the right of that university to seek the co- 
operation of others in planning for the future." 
Hear it ! 

□ □□ 

Carolina's record for the past year has been most 

heartening — something like $5000 already in. Are 

you one of the contributors? Here 

«^«^™ v is Carolina's opportunity. Send 

OPPORTUNITY , , . ™ ., /., . . , 

your check at once so that the total 

announced on Alumni Day may be the sort that will 

thrill every returning alumnus. 

DDD 

To all alumni, save the veterans of '61-'65, the cam- 
pus today would present a most unusual and sobering 
sight: Professors collecting and classi- 

MOBILIZING fying information for military pur- 
poses concerning the University's scat- 
tered sons, and the campus resounding nightly with 
commands incident to student drill. Elsewhere the 
story of this activity called forth in this solemn hour 
of national crisis is given. 

That Carolina will, in this event, prove true to her 
traditions, goes without saying. The walls of Me- 
nu >rlal Hall speak eloquently of her sons of other 
days, a testimony to whose valor is given in the fol- 
lowing note from the Baltimore Evening Sun of 
March 24: 

The University of North Carolina, like a num- 
ber of other institutions of learning all over the coun- 
try, is taking a census of its alumni and students with 
reference to their availability for service in the war. 
Blank questions are being sent to every man as to 
his age, business, military experence and ability to 
do any one of many things that would be useful in 
war. The work is being carried on by a committee 
of the faculty and alumni. 



"Every Carolina mau will do his duty," is its 
motto, and when we remember that almost the entire 
student body volunteered in the Civil War, how the 
Tarheels fought with Lee and Jackson and that the 
first officer killed in the Spanish War was a North 
Carolinian, a brother-in-law of Secretary Daniels, 
who will doubt that the motto tells the simple truth ? 

DDD 

But it is not necessary to turn to the records of 
the. past or to the columns of the press of neighbor- 
ing states for testimony. The pres- 

™£ K o«o£2L ence in recent weeks ^ North Caro- 
hna streets ot the University men 
tanned and erect from the months on the border is a 
vital testimony to the readiness of Carolina sons to 
serve whenever and wherever duty calls them. Of 
one and all, whether still within or without the ser- 
vice, who have kept vigil on the Texas plains, Alma 
Mater is justly proud. 

DDD 

Beginning October 1, 1917, the North Carolina 

High School Bulletin, published by the University 

and edited by Prof. N. W. Walker, 

A°MO^THLY wil1 Cease to be isSUed aS a q^rterly 
and will appear monthly during the 

school year. Its form will also be changed, and while 

it will remain primarily a secondary school journal 

it will cover more educational subjects than it has 

heretofore. Throughout its eight years of existence 

it has served the high schools well. The Review 

congratulates it upon the prospect of becoming even 

more useful. 

DDD 

"By their fruits ye shall know them." According 
to this yard stick it is to be expected that the So- 
cieties, sorely perplexed during the 

SOCIETIES E PaSt fiVe yearS ' ar6 ab ° Ut t0 hegln a 
new chapter in their history. The 

article by Mr. C. C. Miller appearing elsewhere, 
clearly indicates this. And furthermore, it will prove 
interesting reading to the men whose most cherished 
memories of the Hill are those which had their origin 
in the weekly meeting of these two splendid organi- 
zations. 

And, in reality, it is time for the Societies to come 
forward with something new, something constructive. 
Some twenty odd years ago they combined their li- 
braries with that of the University, laying the foun- 
dation for the present library with its 80,000 volumes 
and 800 current periodicals. In 1901 they contrib- 
iii d half of the fund for the beginning of the cata- 
loguing of the collection according to modern meth- 
ods. Some $2000 was provided by them in the course 



174 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



of five years for this purpose. Ten years ago they 
conveyed their holdings — some 12,000 or 15,000 
volumes — in fee simple to the University. In 1912 
they launched the High School Debating Union. 

All this is fine. Isn't it too fine, in fact, for the 
membership of today to rest in their labors? The 
Review believes that in the present stirring there is 
something prophetic of good for the future. 

□ □□ 

The Review calls attention to the following an- 
nouncement taken from a recent Tar Heel and to 
the article found elsewhere in 
ihis issue relative to the new Sun- 
day School Annex to be built by 
the local Methodist Church. 



PRESBYTERIAN 
CHURCH 



Mr. James Sprunt, of Wilmington, has given to 



the Presbyterian Church in Chapel Hill $30,000 to 
be used in building a new and enlarged church. Mr. 
Sprunt is one of the best known business men in the 
State and one of the most generous in all good works. 
He is a trustee of the University and has shown his 
deep interest in its welfare by helpful aid in its time 
of need. Among other things the series of Sprunt 
Historical Monographs was established through his 
generosity. 

He has made this gift of an adequate church be- 
cause of his belief in the far-reaching influence of 
the University and his desire to make this influence 
the highest and the best. It is given too as a loving 
memorial to his wife who had also felt a helpful liv 
Lag interest in the University as was shown by her 
own gifts out of her private means. 

The officers of "the church are taking immediate 
steps toward the fulfillment of these plans which all 
have so much at heart. 



THE SOCIETIES MAKE INNOVATIONS 



Di and Phi Men Change Constitutions to Meet the Demands of the New Day 



Straws indicate the way the wind is blowing. 

The following story from a recent Tar Heel is a 
straw. It establishes convincingly (as do the fuller 
details following it) the fact that the Societies, con- 
fronted in recent years with serious problems, and 
threatened with actual death, have resolutely set 
themselves to the task of maintaining their position of 
constructive leadership on the campus. 

The Dialectic Literary Society has caught the so- 
cial and festive disease and last Saturday night the 
august walls of Di Hall enclosed a scene of brotherly 
society that is unprecedented in the annals of literary 
and oratorical development at the University. For 
three solid hours the members of that learned body 
sat or stood around and swapped stories and smoked 
the muse-hallowed weed. The old gentlemen in their 
gilt frames may have frowned at first, but their looks 
must have changed to those of envy when joke and 
sandwich went round and inspired speeches flowed 
from the lips of a few gifted souls. The framed gen- 
tlemen no doubt knew the punch was not spiked, and 
so they rested secure and watched the scene with 
interest. 

Every seat, except those that were broken, was 
filled with an expectant member. The toastmaster, 
no less a person than Mr. Sharp, occupied a conspicu- 
ous position on the platform where all could see him. 
Professor Hamilton was the first speaker. In a 
short, friendly talk he congratulated the Society on 
the smoker, and applauded the decision that they 
should occur frequently in the future. Sam Ervin 



recited some choice bits of his delightful poetry, and 
Crawford eulogized the weed. Doc Harding, the 
man who flunks boys in first physics, gave a short talk 
and brought C. S. Harris into a dispute about grave- 
yards, both sides being upheld with learned skill. 
Marion Fowler spoke for a few minutes on the sub- 
ject of service. "He profits who serves" was given 
by Fowler as his motto. As an example of this he 
cited the inventor of the universal car, Mr. Ford. 

Professor Noble talked for a few minutes on the 
German situation and deplored the lack of prepared- 
ness shown by the United States. "We have no need 
of an army ? Neither did Belgium think she would 
ever use the 100,000 troops she was employing in 
holding down government jobs, but look at Belgium 
•today." Professor Noble was strongly in favor of 
the plan to have a battalion here. A. M. Lindau's 
talk on "Opinions" was particularly interesting. "The 
lack of opinions among college men is appalling," 
said he. "They are as scarce as grapes at the North 
Pole. Why can't we have the courage of convictions? 
When we give in to what the other fellow thinks, 
when we are afraid to have an opinion of our own, 
we tacitly admit our brains to be inferior." 

Goode was the last speaker. He spoke learnedly 
on the Valdese, their manners, customs, and especi- 
ally their good wine. He remarked parenthetically 
that a Ford should have more springs in the back 
seat — apropos, no doubt, of the wine. 

During the talks sandwiches and other gastronom- 
ical delicacies were passed around, and after the 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



175 



last the punch-bowl made its appearance. The dip- 
per, wielded by the muscular arm of Mr. Currie, 
soon supplied everyone with the nectar, a mixture 
peculiar to Hill festivities. The clink of the cups 
made a sweet accompaniment to the lighter conversa- 
tion that generally follows speeches, and when the 
cigars and cigarettes had been passed around every- 
one was at ease and the smoker was a pronounced 
success. 

In order to make fundamental changes to meet 
the requirements of the new day on the campus, it 
was first necessary to re-write the constitutions. The 
Phi did this in 1914-'15 ; the Di in 1916-'l7. One 
of the first things to "go" under the new order was 
the veil of secrecy covering the work of the Societies. 
Now it applies only to the ritual, and no dead weight 
is introduced into the membership by the joining of 
those whose chief interest was curiosity. Similarly 
the canvassing committees were instructed to limit 
their activities so that the membership should not be- 
come too unweildly. Both Societies also provided for 
the honorable discharge of members in good standing 
who wished to sever their relations, a privilege more 
demanded than taken advantage of in actual practice. 

Tn the Di one of the earliest reforms intended to 
create a renewed interest in debating, was the privi- 
lege of electing the subject to speak on. if the query 
chosen by the committee was not satisfactory. This 
was enacted in 1914, but the new constitution elimi- 
nates that part of it and gives to the query committee 
the additional power of selecting the speakers. Tn 
doing so it does not heed class distinction but en- 
deavors to choose those whom the committee knows 
to be interested in the subject. The committee chooses 
two speakers on each side with the liberty of choosing 
two more if it sees fit, shortening in this way the 
length of the debates and making them more inter- 
esting, reserving at the same time to every one the 
opportunity of speaking in the general debate which 
follows and which has been this year for the first time 
equally as important as the regular program. 

The new constitutions endeavor to make the meet- 
ings shorter and more lively not only by revising the 
program but by carrying the business, as far as pos- 
sible, to the adjourned meeting and to the committee 
room. Hence there is an increase in the powers and 
duties of the standing committees, and more time 
saved for debating in the regular meetings. 

Probably the most radical change effected within 
recent years is the statute enacted this year in the 
Di which provides for an informal smoker to be held 
near the beginning of each semester. The first of 
these sumkers held by the Di Society in February is 
described in the foregoing paragraphs. 



Nor have the movements of reform left entirelv 
intact the debating systems, either Intra-society, In- 
ter-society, or Inter-collegiate. The Freshman De- 
bate of the Di has been changed this year by lessen- 
ing the number of speakers from eight to four. Oa 
the other hand, in order to open the debating field 
to a greater number, the old Inter-Society Fresh- 
Soph Debate has been resolved into two, one Free- 
man and one Sophomore debate. 

In the field of Tnter-collegiate debating, the So- 
cieties have had for the past two years a debate with 
George Washington University, held just before 
Christmas, in addition to the Johns Hopkins-Vir- 
ginia-Carolina spring Triangular. For the Triangu- 
lar this Spring the Societies have chosen their de- 
baters on Compulsory Arbitration of Industrial Dis- 
putes according to the system established two years 
ago in which the affirmative and negative contestants 
debate the query delivering both an opening speech 
and a rejoinder. 

Considered as a whole the reforms have been suc- 
cessful. Both societies are sufficiently prosperous 
financially. New interest has been aroused in the 
work and a new spirit is noticeable this year which 
apparently indicates that the Societies have adjusted 
themselves to new conditions and are thriving in 
them. — C. C. Mitxer. 



WITH THE FACULTY 

President Graham spent the last week of March 
ami the first week of April in Washington and New 
York. He recently was chosen as a member of the 
executive committee of the Southern Educational 
Association. 

Professor E. C. Branson, of the Department of 
Rural Economics, was absent from the University 
from March 28 to April 15. He spent two weeks at 
Columbia University where he delivered a series of 
lectures in the Country-Life course given by Teachers 
College, and on his way South delivered two lectures 
l>efore the students of the University of Virginia. 

Dr. C. L. Raper attended the Southern Conference 
for Education and Industry at Macon. Ga., and pre- 
sented two papers on Taxation in the Southern States. 
Dr. Raper was secretary of one of the three sections 
of the Conference. 

R. H. Thornton, member of the Department of 
English and instructor in Journalism, attended the 
meeting of the American Association of Teachers of 
Journalism in Chicago, April 5-7. 

Dr. George Howe, of the Department of Latin, at- 
tended ;i meeting of the Classical Association of the 
Middle Wesl and South held at Louisville, Ky., April 
5-7. Dr. Howe is a vice-president of the Association. 



176 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 
CAROLINA RESPONDS TO THE CALL TO ARMS 



Students, Faculty and Alumni are prepared in Spirit for the Impending Conflict 



The call to arms finds Carolina men prepared in 
spirit for the threatening conflict. More than a thou- 
sand alumni have filled out and returned the informa- 
tion blanks sent last month to the two thousand whose 
addresses were available. About 75 per cent of these 
signify their readiness to accept service in any line 
for which they may be called. 

The fires of the past burn strongly in the hearts of 
the older alumni. A Confederate soldier writes, "I 
surrendered at Appomattox but if my country needs 
me I am ready immediately. I could shoot a Ger- 
man about as well as most of the boys but I don't 
believe I could run as fast as I once could." Another 
who was wounded at Gettysburg is "ready to re- 
sume today the duties which I dropped 52 years ago 
and I can stand at least a month's campaign in active 
service." Still another regrets that "at my age of 84 
years the War Department would not accept me, but 
I would like to march with the Allies into Berlin, 
send the Hohenzollerns to St. Helena, free the Ger- 
man people from that despotism and open the way for 
peace and civilization onoe more." One North Caro- 
linian, 67 years old, born in Missouri, educated at 
Virginia, but a life long resident of this state, asks 
to be rated among our men. He is vigorous and ac- 
tive and we welcome him and his assertion that "ser- 
vice should be based upon capacity to serve and not 
upon age alone." 

The sons of the men who were "first at Bethel and 
last at Appomattox" bear witness to their heritage 
of patriotism by their prompt and cheerful readiness 
to exchange home and business for the red panoply 
of war. Many offer not only themselves but their 
factories, their automobiles, their motor-boats, their 
hospitals and other equipment for government use. 
One offers to equip and man two motor boats for 
coast patrol. Many offer themselves for the danger- 
ous but thrilling work of the aviation corps. 

Favor Universal Service 

General Wood's insistent cry for Universal Service 
finds its echo in the hearts of many alumni. "I seem 
a useless sort of person," writes one, "pretty suc- 
cessful in my business, but ignorant of all military 
matters; not trained in anything that would serve 
the government in a crisis. But I am not too old to 
learn and will answer whenever called. We should 
have universal service." Again, "I am opposed to 
war, but my seven brothers and I prefer to fight 
rather than bear the horrible outrages perpetrated 



against us by the Germans. We should have univer- 
sal training, so that our service might be efficient and 
expert rather than haphazard and futile." A young 
lawyer knows "of no service for which I am quali- 
fied, but I am ready to answer the call. We need 
universal training and I rejoice at the voluntary or- 
ganization at the Hill to acquire such training." 

Five Hundred Men Drilling 

Last year the whole State of North Carolina sent 
less than sixty men to the Military Training Camp at 
Plattsburgh. This year nearly one hundred men 
from the University alone have made application to 
the War Department for this training. In order 
that they might derive the maximum benefit from the 
Plattsburgh experience these men organized a few 
weeks ago for voluntary drill during the remainder 
of the session. Co-incident with this came the omi- 
nous call for Congress to convene on April 2nd. In 
forty-eight hours this scant company had become a 
battalion ' of five hundred students and professors. 
Urgent appeals were made to the War Department 
for rifles and for an army officer as an instructor, but 
none could be spared to us immediately. This tem- 
porary failure could not dull the patriotic enthusiasm. 
Under the guidance of football Coach T. J. Camp- 
bell, aided by Professor Winston and a handful of 
others who have had some military experience at pre- 
paratory schools or at Plattsburgh the drill goes on. 
Modern rifles have not been secured hut the manual 
of arms is being taught with Civil War carbines, se- 
cured for us by Mr. R. W. Glenn of Greensboro. 
Though not an alumnus of this University he has 
given freely of his time and of his energy to aid us 
in this work. We wish to express to him thus public- 
ly our deep appreciation of his unselfish and helpful 
co-operation. 

We deplore the impending dislocation of our aca- 
demic life. But the die is cast. Our cause is just. 
The sons of North Carolina stand ready for the call. 
— J. B. Bullitt. 



DR. HENRY LOUIS SMITH SPEAKS 

Dr. Henry Louis Smith, of Washington and Lee 
University, spoke to the student body on Sunday 
night, March 25th, on "A Man's Personality." This 
was the second address in the series of Sunday even- 
ing talks by speakers from other colleges conducted 
by the Y. M. C. A. Dr. W. L. Poteat delivered the 
first of the series in February. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 
A LESSON IN PREPAREDNESS 



177 



University Library Obtains Photograph of Interesting Old Map of the Carolinas 



George Washington owned "An accurate map of 
North and South Carolina with their Indian fron- 
tiers, showing in a distinct manner all the rivers, 
swamps, marshes, bays, creeks, harbors, sandbanks, 
and soundings on the coast. With the roads and In- 
dian paths : as well as the boundaries or provincial 
lines, the several townships and other divisions of 
the land in both the provinces ; the whole from actual 
surveys by Henry Mouzon and others." Mouzon 
and his associates must have followed all the streams 
and roads for they have indicated not only the towns 
and villages, but the country ordinaries or wayside 
inns of that day, and the homes of the private citizens 
as well. 

This map is brought down to May 30, 1775, and 
George Washington's copy is cut and mounted on 
linen so as to fold into a size 9 by 12 inches, and 
fit into a small valise or knapsack or go into the pocket 
of saddle bags, while the map unfolded is 40 by 56 
inches in size. The American Geographical Society 
of New York owns this copy, and the Library of the 
University of North Carolina has just acquired a 
full sized photograph of it. 

On the original map are three labels. The first is 
written on a printed blank with an engraved border, 
evidently French of the 18th Century. 

Map of North and South Carolina and 
Indian Frontiers with Coast Soundings 
and Indian Paths, by Henry Mouzon and 
others. London, 1775. 

The next is an engraved label with the last line 
written in by hand: 

Perrier et Verrier 

Geographes du Roy 

et d"S Enfans de France 

Cour des Souries l'Hotcl de Soubise 

From Genl. Washington's Library 

and the third lal>el placed on it by the curator of 

maps, reads : 

American Geographical Society 

From 

Robert Lenox Kennedy, Esq. 

Donation 

No. 7A. Date. March 17, 1884. 

Of course our own neighborhood is the most inter- 
esting part of the map to us. There was no Chapel 
Hill then, but the homes of T. Loyde, J. Patterson, 
and Morgan, are shown; and the first two are occu- 



pied today by Lloyds and Pattersons, and the Morgan 
place is owned by the University which received it 
by the will of Mrs. James Pleasant Mason who was 
Mark Morgan's daughter. Hillsboro then, as now, 
was a mill center, and we have there, among others, 
Maddox's, Few's, Nasho's, Sinnott's, Wade's, Lows; 
and Strudwick, Emery, and Land are among the 
names of nearby dwellers in the county. The county 
is full of "Chapels," which are today Presbyterian 
and Baptist Churches, and on Flat River near Leeds 
Mill we find Tapley Ordinary. 

On or near the Indian Trading Path that runs to 
Edenton we find the names of Emery, Gibbs, Eyre, 
Hams, Benson, Granville, C. H., Burgh, Low, Haw- 
kins, Ord., Bute, C. H., Summer's Ord., Alston, 
Montfort, Brinkley, Williams, Forney, Col. McCol- 
loch. Sett's Ord., Halifax, Kinsbury, Bryan, Nor- 
fleet, Hill, Lockhart, Pollock, Dawson. A Weldon 
lived where is now the town of Weldon, and not far 
away was a Chapel with Edmondson's Ordinary. 

South of Charlottburg lives Cap. Polk while to 
the north we find Colon Alexander living near Alex- 
ander's Mill, and still to the northwest lives Col. 
Osborn. Near Salisbury is Whitehead's Mill. Wacho- 
vie or Dobbs Parish is shown around Salem and New 
Garden Meeting House is on the road from Salem to 
Hillsboro. 

In the Wilmington neighborhood we find the names 
of Roger Moore, Strudwick, Larkin, Williams, Col- 
lier, Hawes, Harrison, Quince, Kinnette, Swan, 
Heron, Rutherford Asche, McQuire, Dr. Green's 
Mill, Dry, Smith, Jones, Corbin, Burrows, Lilling- 
ton, Maxwell. Fayetteville does not exist but Cross 
creek is indicated. There is no town of Washing- 
ton, but there we have the home of the Bonners, 
There is no Goldsboro but the Whitfields live near 
Dobbs Court House. 

There are two inset maps, the Harbor of Port 
Royal and the Harbor and Bar of Charleston. 

In South Carolina we have Precincts instead of 
Counties. Among the names noted in Georgetown 
Precinct are Austin, Powell, Saxby, Paisley, Alston, 
St. Julian, Durant, Simmons, Kinloch, Galliard, 
Bryan, Romain, McFadian, Bond. Varner. 

In Charleston Precinct are Hugee, Alston, Lovick, 
Bull, Bridge, Pringle, Ausley, Izard. Godwin, Var- 
ii y, Feimster, En wick, Joor, Adams, Paisley, Por- 
clier, Rantoul, Inglis, Strother, Ash, Evans, Pruett, 
I >eas, Warring, Wicker, Boo, Fonts, and many others. 

In Cheraws Precinct are found Gordon, Burdick, 



178 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



Hanes, Husband, Mills, Story, Price, Holmes, Pur- 
vis, Fly, Culp, DeVane, Whitfield, Lohon, McNutt, 
Lee, Leonard, Dishaw, Smythe, and many others, 
chiefly along the streams. 

In Orangeburg Precinct are seen Pord, Lenox, 
Bradwiell, Downer, Beverly, Moles, Morrison, Beaty, 
Perkins, Galphin, Fairchild. Brady, Galliard. Saxe 
Gotha Township is one of the conspicuous settle- 
ments. . 

Ninety-six Precinct has Gervais, Kegg, Pickens, 
Lavvson, Langdon, Macmahon, Williamson. Edmands 
Duetts' Corners (now Due West), Boon's Fort, New 
Bordeaux of the French settlers, and Londonderry of 
the Palatines. 

In Camden Precinct we have Gatlin, Gallup, Culp, 
Colly, Alford, Ingram, Bellew, Coran, Fredericks- 
burg Township including Camden town and the Ca- 
tawba Nation with a trade of 144,000 acres, both of 
these being connected by trails with the Indian Trad- 
ing Path which comes out of North Carolina across 
Carraway Mountains, through Salisbury and Char- 
lotteburg and runs down to the country of the Chero- 
kees, Old Keohwee, near Toxawaw, to Echay, Tuge- 
loo, Tetohe, and Cussatee. 

A copy of the original map was brought to Chapel 
Hill by Professor Collier Cobb during the Christmas 
holidays, and through him the photograph was secur- 
ed. Another copy of this interesting and valuable 
map is in the Library of Congress at Washington. 



COMMENCEMENT PROGRAM 

The program for Commencement, June 3, 4, 5, 6, 
1917, as announced by the University, promises to 
be of genuine interest, and reports from the alumni 
indicate that the alumni features of the occasion will 
be of the worth while order. 

Reduced rates for the occasion have been secured 

from points in Virginia and North Carolina, and 

the train between University and Chapel Hill will 

make an extra trip for the Hill, leaving University 

at 9 :10 A. M. 

Sunday, June 3 

11 :00 A. M. Baccalaureate sermon, Dr. W. W. 
Moore, of Richmond. 

S:00 P. M. Sermon before the Young Men's 
Christian Association. 

Monday, June 4 

9 :30 A. M. Seniors form in front of Memorial 
Hall and' march to Chapel for prayer. 

10 :30 A. M. Senior Class-Day exercises in Ger- 
rard Hall. Orations by members of the graduating 
class in contest for M>angum medal. 



5 :30 P. M. Exercises under Davie Poplar. 

7 :30 P. M. Annual joint banquet of the Dialectic 
and Philanthropic Literary Societies in Swain Hall. 

9 :30 P. M. Anniversary meeting of the Literary 
Societies in their respective Halls. 
Tuesday, June 5 

10 :00 A. M. Class reunion exercises of the classes 
of 1857, 1867, 1887, 1892, 1897. 1902, 1907, 1912, 
1916. 

12:00 M. Alumni Conference and Business 
Meeting. The Alumni and the University : A Re- 
view of the Year. President Graham. 

1 :30 P. M. Alumni Luncheon in Swain Hall. 
( Tickets from E. R. Rankin, Secretary. Ladies 
invited.) 

4:00 P. M. Alumni Parade and Festivities. Em- 
erson Field. 

7:00 P. M. Class Get-Together Meetings, Din- 
ners, and Banquets. 

8 :00 P. M. Annual Meeting of the Board of 
Trustees in Chemistry Hall. 

8 :30 P. M. Annual debate between representa- 
tives of the Dialectic and Philanthropic Literary So- 
cieties. 

10 :00 P. M. Reception in the Bynum Gymna- 
sium by the President and Faculty. 
Wednesday, June 6 

10:45 A. M. Academic procession forms in front 
of the Alumni Building. 

1 1 :00 A. M. Commencement exercises in Me- 
morial Hall. Address by Secretary of War, New- 
ton D. Baker. Announcements by the President. 
Degrees conferred. * 



1902 PLANS FOR ITS 15-YEAR REUNION 

The class of 1902 will hold its fifteen-year reunion 
on June 5th, next. Arrangements are being made in 
preparation for the largest gathering ever held by 
any class which has been away from Chapel Hill as 
long as fifteen years. A committee is in charge of it 
and is making preparations to look after the men on 
their arrival, including a place for them to sleep; 
the class has been assigned the old South Building. 

Each member of the class is urged to immediately 
write R. S. Hutchison, at Charlotte, N. G, in regard 
to his coming to the reunion. 



TO MEMBERS OF THE CLASS OF 1907 

From T. Holt Haywood, of New York, president 
of the class of 1907, and chairman of the reunion 
committee, comes the following letter concerning the 
big ten-year reunion which this class will hold at the 
approaching commencement : 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



179 



The different members of the class of 1907, I am 
sure, will be gratified to know that the committee 
for working up 1907's ten-year reunion has met 
with a hearty response from the different members 
of the class. 

As chairman of the committee. I have written a 
circular letter to each individual member of the 
class, sending the letter to the last known address 
of each member. Several of these letters have been 
returned by the Post Office authorities, -as the per- 
sons to whom they were addressed could not be lo- 
cated ; so if any member did not receive one of thes° 
letters, he will know it is because we have not his 
correct address. 

We have, however, received responses from mem- 
bers of the class of 1907 who are residing as far south 
as Texas, and some who are living as far north as 
near the Canadian border, and it is gratifying to see 
how the different members are looking forward to 
being "On the Hill" again, some of them not having 
been there for ten years. 

Judging by the business letterheads of most of 
the replies we have received, the different members 
of the class of 1907 seem to be doing well in their 
respective avocations. An exceptionally large num- 
ber of the members seem to be specializing as minis- 
ters of the Gospel — we always knew that 1907 was 
a pious class, but did not know that its taste ran quite 
so strongly in this direction as recent developments 
have shown. 

If there are any members of the class of 1907 who 
have not advised whether or not they expect to be at 
the reunion, I would appreciate it most heartily if 
they would notify Mr. Thomas O'Berry, care of En- 
terprise Lumber Co., Mount Olive, N. C, who has 
kindly consented to take care of local arrangements. 

Your committee wants to urge upon each member 
to make every effort to be present at this reunion, 
and we will guarantee that an attractive programme 
will be arranged and that you will have a good time. 



1892 PREPARES FOR QUARTER CENTURY REUNION 

The class of 1892 is making plans for a great 
twenty-five year reunion at commencement. The 
class reunion committee has undertaken a campaign 
to secure a very large attendance at commencement 
from the 56 living members. This committee has 
furnished the Review with the following informa- 
tion of interest concerning the members of the class. 
This includes the roll of the living members, to- 
gether with the occupation and address of each 
member: 

Allen, W. M, chemist, Raleigh; Beall, F. EL, 
farmer, Jerusalem; Bennett, C. D., lawver, 116 
\V. Main St.. Oklahoma City. Okhi. : Buie, W. I >.. 
lawyer, Nashville, Ga. ; Burch, C. W.. address not 



known; Burroughs, J. W., Durham; Busbee, Perrin, 
lawyer, Raleigh; Caldwell, Archibald H., R. R. supt., 
Brevard ; Carson, H. O, physician, Grayson Co., 
Va. ; Clark, F. M., physician, Middleton; Connor, 
G. W., lawyer, Wilson; Corpening, L. E., farmer, 
Lenoir; Cox, W. G., salesman, Hertford; Dunn, F. 
C, manufacturer, Kinston; Edwards, A. J., phy- 
sician, Johnson City, Tenn. ; Everett, T. C, farmer, 
Laurinburg; Fearrington, Fred., address not known; 
Foust, T. R., teacher, Greensboro ; Gatling, B. M., 
lawyer, Raleigh ; Gattis, F. N., Raleigh ; Harvey, C. 
F., merchant, Kinston ; Holliday, R. W., druggist, 
Clinton ; Huggins, W. S., physician, Charlotte ; Hun- 
ter, R. B., Areola; Johnston, R. H., physician, 919 
N. Charles St., Baltimore, Md. ; Kernodle, J. L., 
physician, Alamance County; Laughing-house, Chas. 
O'H, physician, Greenville; Ledbetter, J. McQ., 
physician, Rockingham; McNeill, 1ST. R.. Raeford; 
Mebane, Frank G, lawyer, 45 Broadway, New York, 
N. Y. ; Merritt, L. H., physician, Forest City, Ar- 
kansas ; Murphy, Walter, lawyer, Salisbury ; Rhem, 
J. F., physician, New Bern; Robbins, F. L., manu- 
facturer, Charlotte ; Rodman, J. C, physician, Wash- 
ington ; Rollins, W. E., minister, Alexandria, Va. ; 
Ross, E. C, Stonewall ; Scales, A. M., lawyer, 
Greensboro ; Shannonhouse, Frank M., lawyer, Char- 
lotte; Sherrod, J. M., Battleboro; Simmons, Benja- 
min Taylor, Capt. U. S. A.; Smith, R. W., physi- 
cian, Hertford; Taylor, Alexander, address not 
known; Walser, J. G., Lexington; Whitehead, R. B., 
photographer, St. Louis, Mo. ; Willcox, F. L., lawyer, 
Florence, S. C. ; Willcox, J. M., farmer, Carbonton ; 
Yarborough, R. F., physician, Louisburg; Cheek, J. 
M., teacher, Sparta ; Davis, S. L , manufacturer, 
High Point; Guyer, S. J., teacher, Sonoma; Crowell, 
George H., minister, Arkadelphia, Ark. ; Baskerville, 
Charles, teacher-chemist, College of the City of New 
York; Collins, Plato, lawyer, Kinston; Darden, W. 
E., manufacturer, 425 S. 3rd St., Waco, Texas; Van 
Noppen, Leonard G, author, 120 Amsterdam Ave., 
New York, N. Y. 

Ilusbee, Harvey, Scales and Murphy are Trustees 
of the University. Connor was three times a member 
of the House of Representatives and was Speaker 
in 1913, is now a Superior Court Judge. Scales has 
been three times a member of the State Senate. 
Everett, Ferguson and Shannonhouse have been niem- 
bers of the House of Representatives. 

Murphy lias been a member of the House of Rep- 
resentatives seven times 'and was twice Speaker of 
the House. Baskerville was for some years a pro- 
fessor in the University and now is a professor in 
the College of the City of New York; he is a chemist 
of international reputation. Johnston is a prominent 
physician in Baltimore, Merritt in Arkansas, and 
Laughinghouse lias been president of the N. C. Medi- 
eal Society. Willcox is regarded as one of the lead- 
in- lawyers in Snnth Carolina. Bennett enjoys the 



ISO 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



same distinction in Oklahoma, Mebane has won fame 
and fortune in New York. Darden is one of the 
leading business men in Waco, Texas, Rodman, 
Rhem, Yarborough, Clark, Ledbetter, Smith, are all 
well known and highly honored members of the medi- 
cal profession in North Carolina, Carson is a lead- 
ing physician in south west Virginia and Edwards in 
Western Tennessee, Simmons is in the U. S. Army, 
Rollins and Crowell are ministers and teachers, the 
former in Virginia, the latter in Arkansas. 



ALMA MATER CALLS YOU HOME 

The University of North Carolina extends a hearty 
welcome to her classes scheduled to hold reunions at 
the approaching commencement. These classes are 
1916, 1912, 1907, 1902, 1897, 1892. 1887, 1867 
and 1857. Tuesday, June 5, has been selected as 
Alumni Day. 

The undersigned committee writes to assure you 
officially of the warm welcome which you will receive, 
and to offer its help in arranging for your reunion. 
A list of the members of your class., with their present 
addresses so far as the committee has been able to se- 
cure these, is inclosed in this letter. You are re- 
quested to inform the committee of any corrections 
that should be made in this list of members and ad- 
dresses. 

It is the custom for each class which holds a re- 
union to have a few minutes at its disposal at the 
general meeting on Alumni Day. Twenty minutes 
are allotted to each class, and during this time short 
talks are usually made by one or more members of the 
class. Your class representative should be chosen 
at once, and a complete program should be mapped 
out for the activities of your class during its stay on 
the Hill. This program should include, among other 
things, provision for one or more meetings of your 
class. A banquet or smoker or class dinner would be 
very appropriate. 

We sincerely hope you can attend the reunion. 
The University needs your presence and your class 
needs your presence. And, apart from your reunion 
and the pleasure which it will bring, you will thor- 
oughly enjoy the other features of commencement. 
The commencement exercises will extend from June 
3 to June 6. 

Be certain to come. Write to the undersigned 
member of the committee at once and tell of your 
plans to be present. W. S. Bernard, 

E. R. Rankin, 

Committee. 

THE SPRING FESTIVAL 

Preparation has begun for the Spring Festival, to 
be given on the University campus early in May. 



This year's festival will differ in several particulars 
from last year's. The elaborate pageant, appropri- 
ate for the commemoration of the tercentennial of 
Shakespeare's death, will not be repeated, but some- 
thing equally as worthy of the University and equally 
as expressive of the ability and interest of the stu- 
dents in dramatic representation is to take the place 
of the pageant. 

This year there will be both an afternoon and an 
evening program. The afternoon program will aim 
especially at giving expression to whatever original 
talent the community may possess for drama, songs, 
and dances. School children and others who live in 
Chapel Hill will contribute songs and dances, as they 
did last year, and University students will present 
whatever they are able to evolve in the way of pag- 
eants, pantomines, or one-act plays. In the evening 
there will be a Shakespeare play, presented by stu- 
dents. Twelfth Night, which has been selected for 
the performance, is well suited to the abilities of ama- 
teur players and, with Sir Toby and Sir Andrew, not 
to mention Maria and Malvolio, should be highly suc- 
cessful. 

The success of last year's festival gives confidence 
to those in charge of the arrangements this year. As 
last year, the general direction will be in the hands 
of the Department of English, but organizations such 
as the Omega Delta Dramatic Society and the Com- 
munity Club are expected to co-operate in making the 
festival a creditable expression of community life. 



STUDENTS TO CONTRIBUTE TO ALUMNI LOYALTY 
FUND 

Showing the sann spirit of liberality and tangible 
appreciation of the University's services that the leg- 
islature recently manifested in its educational appro- 
priations, the student body has given an eager re- 
sponse to the invitation of the Greater Council to 
have every student contribute to the Alumni Loyalty 
Fund. The idea of the Council in extending this 
opportunity to the students is not only to stimulate 
alumni by their example but to allow every student 
to give a concrete evidence of his desire to have a 
direct share in the increasing usefulness and greatness 
of the University. — Tar Heel. 



METHODISTS TO BUILD SUNDAY SCHOOL ANNEX 

On Tuesday night. March 13th, the Building Com- 
mittee of the Chapel Hill Methodist Church outlined 
plans for the construction of a Sunday School build- 
ing adequate to the needs of the present school and of 
the enlarged enrollment which is to be expected from 
the growth of the University. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



181 



The Committee is composed of Dr. H. M. Wag- 
staff, Dean Stacy, Mr. George L. Hackney, of Lex- 
ington, Mr. F. S. Lambeth, of Thomasville, Rev. 
N". H. D. Wilson, of Louisbnrg, Dr. D. B. Zollicoffer, 
of Weldon, Dr. L. E. Wilson, Mr. Clyde Eubanks, 
Mr. R. L. Strowd. Prof. N. W. Walker, Dr. E. A. 
Abernetby, Dr. C. L. Raper, and Rev. Walter Patten. 

The movement ha.* the support of the Western and 
Eastern Conferences as well as of the local congrega- 
tion, and it is proposed to erect a building which 
will take care of the Sunday School for a number 
of years. Later on the present church auditorium 
will be removed and when it is rebuilt the new audi- 
torium and the Sunday School building will form 
one large structure. Plans provide at present for 
an expenditure of $30,000. 

In recent years the school has been most success- 
ful in attracting a large number of the students, the 
student class under Dr. C. L. Raper numbering 250, 
with an average attendance of 125. The total enroll- 
ment of the school at present is 420. 



ATHLETICS 



Carolina has given unusually good account of her- 
self on the diamond up to the time of the Review's 
going to press. The opening game with Bingham 
was won 4-3 and against West Virginia the White 
and Blue piled up the big score of 10-5. In the game 
against Haverford the figures were larger still and 
there was considerable romping around the bases — 
12-2. 



WAKE FOREST TURNED TRICK 

The story of the Wake Forest engagement runs 
differently. Carolina started wrong, Powell yield- 
ing three runs before settling down. Ten innings 
were required to settle the count which went to Wake 
Forest 6-5. 

Carolina hit Worth freely throughout a loosely 
played game with the Presbyterians, winning 8-4. 
Barnes' home run with three on and a great catch 
by Weeks were the features. Llewellyn pitched steady 
ball all the way, errors being chiefly to blame for 
runs. 



YALE 4— CAROLINA 2 

On April 7th Yale defeated Carolina on Emer- 
son Field by the score of 4 to 2. Coleman pitched his 
first jrame of the season for Carolina and a feature 
of the game was a home run by Captain Barnes of 
Carolina. The attendance was large, many alumni 
being present. 



Carolina 

AB R H PO A E 

Stewart, cf 4 3 

Herty, ss 4 1 1 1 3 2 

Barnes, If 4 1 1 

Bennett, c 2 1 3 1 

Roberts, c 5 1 

Folger, lb 3 1 12 

Jennett, 2b 2 1 1 

Kirkman, 3b 2 1 1 1 

Weeks, rf 4 1 1 1 

Coleman, p 1 2 

Feimster, 3b 1 1 1 

Totals 27 2 6 27 9 5 

Yale 

AB R H PO A E 

Holden, cf 5 1 2 1 2 

Snell, 2b 5 1 

Legore, 3b , 5 1 4 

Shepley, lb' 2 9 

Rhett, rf 4 2 

Early, If 3 1 1 1 

Lyman, ss 3 1 2 

Munson, c 4 2 2 12 1 

Garfield, p 2 

Comerford, p 1 

Totals 34 4 4 27 9 2 

Score by innings : R 

Yale 001 102 000-^t 

Carolina 000 002 000—2 

Summary — Two-base hit, Herty. Home runs, Munson, 
Barnes. Stolen bases, Coleman, Stewart, Early, Holden, Snell, 

(2), Legore. Double play, Early to Shepley. Struck out, 

by Coleman 5, by Garfield 8, by Comerford 2. Bases on balls, 
off Coleman 3, off Garfied 2. Left on bases, Yale 8, Carolina 
6. Umpire, Pearson. 



CAROLINA 2— W. AND L. 

Carolina defeated Washington and Lee on April 
9th at Danville, Va., by the score of 2 to 0. The 
game was a pitcher's battle, with Powell of Carolina 
getting the best of it. 



CAROLINA 3— WOFFORD 

Carolina defeated Wofford on Emerson Field 
April 12th by the score of 3 to 0. 



FREDERICK PALMER SPEAKS 
Frederick Palmer, noted war correspondent, spoke 
to an audience of 700 persons on April 5th in Mem- 
orial Hall. He gave his lecture on the great war 
and showed pictures taken of the fighting around 
Verdun and at the Somme. The meeting was an in- 
spiring one. The Stars and Stripes adorned the 
rostrum of tbo hall and the University band played 
pal riotic airs. 



1SL' 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



THE ALUMNI R EV I EW 

Issued monthly except in July, August, and September, by the Gen- 
eral Alumni Association of the University of North Carolina. 

Board of Publication 

The Review is edited by the following Board of Publication: 

Louis R. Wilson, '99 Editor 

Associate Editors: Walter Murphy, '92; Harry Howell, '95; Archibald 
Henderson, '98; W. S. Bernard, '00; J. K. Wilson, '05; Louis 
Graves, '02; F. P. Graham, '09; Kenneth Tanner, '11. 
E. R. Rankin, '13 Managing Editor 

Subscription Price 

Single Copies $0.15 

Per Year 1.00 

Communications intended for the Editor should be sent to Chapel 
Hill, N. C; for the Managing Editor, to Chapel Hill, N. C. All 
communications intended fur publication must be accompanied with 
signatures if they are to receive consideration. 

OFFICE OF PUBLICATION, CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 

Entered at the Postoffice at Chapel Hill, N. C, as second class 
matter. 



THE UNIVERSITY IN LETTERS 



A most interesting pamphlet, "The Hampton 
Roads Conference," has recently been widely dis- 
tributed by the author, General Julian S. Carr (class 
of 1866). In this lecture, every important available 
source of information now known to be extant has 
been resorted to. This contribution to history has 
been commented on by leading magazines and news- 
papers in all parts of the United States. The author 
succeeds in refuting the oft-repeated and popular er- 
ror to the effect, that President Abraham Lincoln 
said to Mr. Alexander Stephens that if Union were 
written at the top of the articles of agreement, the 
Southern Commissioners might fill in the balance. 



The second edition has recently appeared of the 
useful and convenient handbook, published by the 
North Carolina Geological and Economic Survey, en- 
titled: "Some Facts and Figures about North 
( larolina and Her Natural Resources" (Edwards and 
Broughton Printing Co., Raleigh). This little book- 
let for pocket use is only 50 pages of length, but it 
contains an extraordinary amount of valuable in- 
formation — on such subjects as Forests, Good Roads, 
Drainage, Geology and Mineral Resources, Water- 
Powers and Fishing Industry. 



"A Laboratory Guide for Beginners in Geology" 
(New Era Printing Co., Lancaster, Pa.), by John E. 
Smith, Instructor in Geology in the University of 
North Carolina, is now available for the use of stu- 
dents. A book of some ninety pages, it contains an 
extraordinarily large number of problems for the use 



of geology classes beginning the subject ; and the exer- 
cises here collected are "intended to be used as sup- 
plementary to those usually found in texts." Tables 
of common minerals and of common rocks are given 
at the end. The main division of the guide are: 
Physiography, Structural Geology, Historical Geol- 
ogy, Agricultural Geology and Geography, Naviga- 
tion, and Minerals and Rocks. 



Useful by-products of the lectures in Post-Gradu- 
ate Medical Instruction, inaugurated by this Uni- 
versity during the summer of 1916, are two volumes 
embodying the principal subjects considered in these 
lectures. There are "Lectures in Pediatrics," one and 
two, by Dr. Louis Webb Hill, of Harvard University, 
and Dr. Jesse R. Gertley, of Northwestern Univer- 
sity, respectively. These handbooks are not only 
valuable for the practising physician: they contain 
the very information often needed imperatively by 
parents. Certainly, these booklets will repay study 
by the layman, especially by the interested mother. 
In themselves they demonstrate what the lectures 
themselves abundantly show, the value and utility of 
these post-graduates medical courses. 



A most interesting and instructive address, which 
mutatis mutandis, would have almost equal force and 
pertinency delivered in any county of North Caro- 
lina, is "Farm Prosperity in Forsyth" by Professor 
Branson, published and distributed by the Board of 
Trade of Winston-Salem. No convenient summary 
of the address can be made — other than the statement 
that it deals with both "the city and county ends of 
the problem" and gives an intensive summation of 
the local problem involved. The greatest value of 
such an address — a symbol of the survey now being 
made of the county — is the effect, as of a searchlight 
bringing clear before one the problems involved and 
clearly suggesting certain desirable remedies and re- 
forms entirely feasible of immediate and early appli- 
cation. Immense and never-ending is Professor 
Branson's patriotic labor, and though his strength 
were as the strength of ten, there would still be 
room in North Carolina for more work of this splen- 
did sort to be done by him. 



An event of importance in the educational year in 
North Carolina is the publication of the "Annual Re- 
port of the State Inspector of Public High Schools 
of North Carolina." The ninth report, by Professor 
Walker (class of 1903), for the year ending June 30, 
1916, has recently appeared from the office of the 
State Superintendent of Public Instruction. In the 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



183 



summary, it is recorded that last year new buildings 
for twenty schools were erected, or erecting, totaling 
a cost of $285,200. At the close of the school year, it 
appears that the cost of improvements made since 
last report (up to December, 1915) has been $348,- 
350. This volume is rich in facts and figures, indi- 
cative of our educational progress; and illustrations 
of especial interest are "The Chapel Hill School," 
the cooking and sewing departments in the Chapel 
Hill School, and the State champions — the Girls' Bas- 
ketball Squad of the Chapel Hill High School, 1916. 



Professor Wm. Cain, head cf the department of 
Mathematics, recently delivered a series of lectures 
to the students of Vanderbilt University, February 
26, 27, and 28, as Southern University Exchange 
Lecturer. Three of these lectures were on technical 
subjects. The first lecture dealt with Cohesion and 
Friction in Earth, appealing to the student in physics 
as well as to the engineering students; the last two 
lectures, with Earth Pressure and Eetaining Walls, 
being intended for engineering students only. The 
analytical work — along original lines — in extension 
of the subjects of the lectures, was printed in pam- 
phlet form and distributed among the students for 
future reference or study. 

The lecture on "Mathematics, Historically Con- 
sidered," was non-technical and dealt with the evolu- 
tion of mathematics, from the most elementary con- 
cepts and leading up gradually to the severely rigor- 
ous forms of the Greeks and Moderns. Stress was 
laid upon the contribution of mathematics to the 
world's progress and to Napoleon's dictum that it 
was a vital asset to the state. A large audience was 
present at the lecture. 

This "popular" lecture was likewise given in At- 
lanta to the students and others of the Georgia School 
of Technology. 

During his stay in Nashville, Professor Cain, a 
former Director of the American Society of Civil 
Engineers, spoke by special invitation at a luncheon 
of the civil engineers of Nashville. 

Many hospitalities were extended him by members 
of the Vanderbilt faculty. A cordial welcome was 
also extended him by the "Tech" during bis brief stay 
in Atlanta. 



•EXTENSIVE" READING FOR FRESHMEN 
At the beginning of the present term the Depart- 
ment of English, with the co-operation of the Library 
staff, inaugurated a new and liberal plan for induc- 
ing the freshman student to read good literature 
widely in accordance with his own predilections. 



Professor Norman Foerster. to whom belongs the 
credit for originating the idea, hopes that it may dis- 
arm the two prejudices, sometimes found among 
freshmen if not among upper-classmen, that the Li- 
brary is a side-issue and that "parallel reading" in a 
college course is either a nuisance or a farce. Oc- 
casionally an adroit student contrives to spend the 
whole of his first year on the campus in almost com- 
plete ignorance about the most important of scholastic 
buildings : and very many students, not appreciating 
the liberties involved in the theory of "parallel read- 
ing," regard such reading as an unrighteous and 
savorless task, to be deferred throughout term time 
until they must cover several thousand pages just be- 
fore examinations, at the perhaps negligible risk of 
bursting their brains. 

Yet students, like other rational men, are willing 
enough to browse among good books, and one of the 
best features of Mr. Foersters scheme is that it rec- 
ognizes the cultural value of browsing. The pastur- 
age consists of a thousand volumes placed on open 
shelves in the main hall of the library; and the mem- 
bers of the first-year class in English are informed 
that they are expected to read at large, taking books 
home if they like, for a minimum of four hours a 
fortnight. Instructors give no advice or prescrip- 
tions, unless at the student's request, but are satisfied 
with simple evidence that the reading has been done. 
The thousand volumes, to which the students are in- 
vited to suggest additions, are selected as humanly as 
possible, and the range is very wide. In addition to 
standard works in English and American literature, 
the shelves include translations from the works of 
foreign authors, ancient and modern ; a consider- 
able number of contemporary writers; and works, 
not eminently literary, in natural science, economics, 
history, government, etc. A limited amount of read- 
ing in current periodicals is accepted ; but the list of 
such magazines is restricted to the New Republic, 
Nation, Atlantic, Century, Harpers, New York 
Times Current History, North American Review, 
Review of Reviews, Scribners, World's Work, Un- 
popular Review, and Yale Review. 

Pedagogically, the plan has the advantage of leav- 
ing as much as possible to the student's own initiative 
and preference. Practically, it seems to be making 
hirn read: in three hours after the new shelves were 
established L50 volumes were taken our for home use, 
and in twenty-four hours nearly a third of the stock 
was in home circulation. 



Dr. L. IT. Williams. '11. is a surgeon in the U. S. 
Naval Hospital at Norfolk. 



184 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



FIVE RINDS OF ALUMNI 

A certain kind of graduate 
Consigns Virginia to her fate, 
And says in accents cold and calm : 
"For her I do not give a damn !" 

Another type alumnibus 

Is quite a different kind of cnss. 

"I love the dear old place !" he'll say. 

But never joins the G. A. A. 

A third species of loyal son 

Delights to have his nights of fun, 

At annual banquets he is seen, — 

Forgets Virginia in between ! 

A fourth returns to all the games, 
In accents loud his love proclaims. 
At Finals he is on the spot, — 
Is he a member ? No, he's not ! 

A fifth there is, — Allah be praised ! 
To him let monuments be raised ! 
He takes and reads the Alumni News 
And promptly pays his annual dues. 

— Virginia Alumni News. 



published here, is one of the few journals of its kind 
published by educational institutions. 



RADIO-ACTIVITY BY FRANCIS P. VENABLE 

The wonderful development of our knowledge of 
the nature and structure of matter through the dis- 
covery of radio-activity is only imperfectly treated in 
the ordinary courses in general chemistry. This brief 
treatise has been written to fill a want which must 
have been felt by many. If may also prove useful to 
busy men in other branches of science who wish to 
know something of radio-activity and have scant 
leisure in which to read the larger treatises. 

It is published by D. C. Heath & Co. 



LEADS THE SOUTH IN CHEMICAL RESEARCH 

The press service of the University recently sent 
out the following note relative to the amount of ma- 
terial contributed to periodical literature by the de- 
partment of chemistry: 

A recent number of Science gives a census of peri- 
odical literature pertaining to chemical research in 
the United States published in the years 1009-1010 
and 1014-1015. The University of North Carolina 
is one of 13 universities mentioned as having pub- 
lished ten or more articles during the first period, 
and is the only Southern university in the list. In 
the larger list, which includes all schools and bureaus 
that have published as many as five research articles 
in the same periods North Carolina is one of the 
four Southern State universities to be mentioned. 
The other three are Tennessee, Kentucky and Texas. 
The Journal of the Elisha Mitchell Scientific Society, 



CAPTAIN A. L. BULWINKLE DRILLS COMPANY 

Captain A. L. Bulwinkle, Law 1904, of Gastonia, 
has been drilling men between the ages of 16 and 40 
in Gastonia who are interested in securing military 
training. Between fifty and a hundred men have 
taken advantage of the opportunity afforded them. 



CLERK TO SENATE FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Lawrence MacRae, '97, of Winston-Salem, has re- 
cently been appointed chief clerk of the Senate Fi- 
nance Committee, to succeed Joseph F. Tayloe, of 
Washington, N. C. Mr. MacRae began his new 
duties upon the convening of the 65th Congress on 
April 2nd. 



COLLEGE NEWSPAPER MEN HOLD CONFERENCE 

While the Review is at press some thirty odd 
representatives of North Carolina college journals 
are holding a conference at the University. The 
meeting was arranged by Mr. R. H. Thornton, in- 
structor in Journalism. 



MARSHALS AND BALL MANAGERS CHOSEN 

The commencement marshals who have just been 
elected by their class mates of 1918 are: F. R. Farth- 
ing, chief; C. H. Herty; V. S. Bryant, Jr.; J. B. 
Linker ; W. G. Burgess ; W. H. Stephenson ; C. R. 
Williams ; L. P. Wrenn ; and R. C. deRosset. 

The ball managers are: J. R. Patton; J. B. Hill; 
S. J. Ervin; J. G. Ramsey; and G. B. Crowell, of 
1917; and Hugh Black; and J. C. Tayloe, of 1918. 



WORK BEGINS ON NEW POST OFFICE 

Work preliminary to the building of Chapel Hill's 
new post office began the second week in March. The 
MacNider lot, the site of the new building, is to be 
cleared off, and the building to be removed within 
the next fifty days. Then the building which is to 
cost about $50,000 will be erected. 



Dr. Louis R. Wilson, Director of the Bureau of 
Extension, attended the annual meeting of the Na- 
tional University Extension Association held in Pitts- 
burgh. Pa., April 11-14. He presented a paper on 
"Extension Work in Southern Universities." 



F. C. Shepard, '19, has been elected captain of the 
basketball team for 10l7-'18. Shepard played a star 
game at forward during the past season and was a 
sure scorer. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



185 



THE GENERAL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

of the 
UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 



Officers of the Association 

Julian S. Carr, '66 President 

E. R. Rankin, '13 Secretary 

THE ALUMNI 

E. R. RANKIN 13, Alumni Editor 



THE CLASSES 
1856 

—The Review is indebted to Jas. W. Horner, '03, of Oxford, 
for this note. "Judge Henry R. Bryan, of New Bern, spent 
some time recently with Mr. Wm. Henry Burwell at his home, 
'Berry Hill,' in Mecklenburg County, Virginia. They are mem- 
bers of the Class of 1856. They roomed together for four 
years at Chapel Hill and are perhaps the only living members 
of their class." 
— T. B. Slade is a teacher at Carrolton, Ga. 

1857 
— Col. Robert Bingham has been for years head of the 
Bingham School, Asheville, one of the South's oldest and 
best known preparatory schools. The Yackety Yack of 1915 
was dedicated to him. 

—William Pinckney McLean lives at Mount Pleasant, Texas 
He has had an active and useful career since graduation in 
1857, and is at present district judge. 

1865 
— James Petigrew Carson lives at 52 King Street, Charleston, 
S. C. He received the A. B. degree at Commencement of 1911. 

1866 
— Gen. Julian S. Carr is a member of a commission which 
is making a tour of the Orient. 

1868 
— H. P. Kingsbury, Col. U. S. A., has recently been retired 
from active service and lives in Washington, D. C. 
— A. W. Graham, of Oxford, holds an important legal posi- 
tion in the Government service in New York City. 

1871 
— Peter F. Pescud, a native of Raleigh, is engaged in the 
insurance business at New Orleans, La. 

1878 
— Rev. W. P. Cline, one of the founders of Lenoir College, 
Hickory, and former professor in that institution, is pastor 
of the Lutheran church at Irmo, S. C. 

—Charles K. Lewis is general agent for the Columbian Na- 
tional Life Insurance Company, with offices in the Porter 
Building. Memphis, Tenn. 

1879 
—Dr. R. B. Henderson is a physician and surgeon at Frank- 
linton. 

—Dr. Robert Lee Payne, a native of Lexington and a former 
president of the N. C. Medical Society, has for a number of 
years practiced as a physician and surgeon in Norfolk, Va. 
He is a member of the Virginia board of medical examiners. 

1880 
— Rev. R. B. John, of Smithfield. is the recently elected presi- 
dent of Carolina College at Maxton. 
— H. E. Faison is a lawyer of Faison. 



— Robert Ransom is farming in Northampton County, near 

Weldon. 

— Rev. J. H. Dixon is a Presbyterian minister at Charlotte. 

1881 
— F. B. Dancy is manager of the northern division of the 
F. S. Royster Guano Co., Baltimore, Md. 
— A. Nixon is register of deeds for Lincoh. County, locat- 1 
at Lincolnton. 

— H. B. Battle, Ph. D. '87, is head of the Battle Laboratory, 
Montgomery, Ala. 

1884 
— W. W. Long is director of agricultural extension work for 
South Carolina, at Clemson College, S. C. 
— T. A. Marshall is a member of the wholesale firm of Leak 
and Marshall, Wadesboro. 

— W. J. Lenoir, of Lenoir, is secretary and treasurer of the 
Lenoir Hardware Co. 

1885 
— George Howard is a prominent business man of Tarboro. 
— Wallace C. Riddick was inaugurated on February 22 as 
president of the North Carolina State College of Agriculture 
and Engineering, West Raleigh. 
— Alex J. Feild is editor of the State Journal, Raleigh. 

1886 
— Rev. Kirkland Huske is an Episcopal minister at Great 
Neck, N. Y. 

— Rev. Braxton Craig, who for the past three years has tra- 
veled the State of North Carolina in the interest of the Judson 
Centennial Fund, has been called to the pastorate of the First 
Baptist church at Timmonsville, S. C, and he has accepted 
and will move from Monroe at once. 

— C. T. Grandy is engaged in the wholesale business at 
Elizabeth City. 

1887 
— Gilliam Grissom, of Greensboro, was the candidate of 
the Republican party in the fifth N. C. district for Congress 
in the November elections. 

— W. K. Boggan is clerk of Superior Court for Anson County, 
at Wadesboro. 

1888 
— Thos. A. Davis is engaged in the cotton business at Wilson. 
— Dr. Wade H. Atkinson practices medicine in Washington, 
D. C. His office is at 1402 M. Street, N. W. 
— John A. Hendricks has resigned as United States Attorney 
for the Department of Justice and has opened offices for the 
practice of law at Marshall. 

— H. W. Lewis, a native of Lewiston, Bertie County, has 
practiced law at Atlantic City, N. J., for a number of years. 
— C. G. Foust is a loyal alumnus of the University at Dublin, 
Texas. He is a member of the firm of Spencer and Foust, 
engaged in the lumber business. 

— Ellison L. Gilmer, a captain in the U. S. Army, was until 
recently detailed as lieutenant colonel of the First North Caro- 
lina regiment. 

— R. L. Smith is a lawyer of Albemarle and is chairman of 
the County Democratic executive committee. He is a former 
president of the State Senate. 

1889 
— -Lake Moore is a land owner at Muskogee, Okla. His ad- 
dress is 513 S. 13th St. 

— J. Lee Crowell is a lawyer of Concord and a former mayor 
of the city. 
- E. B. Borden, Jr., is district superintendent of the Southern 



186 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



Cotton Oil Co., at Goldsboro, with the Goldsboro mill and a 
string of other mills under his authority. 
— Rev. D. J. Currie is a Presbyterian minister in Florida. 
— Mark Majette, who has been several times a member of 
the House of the N. C. Legislature, practices law at Columbia. 
— Geo. S. Steele is superintendent of Mill No. 2 of the Rober- 
del Mfg. Co., Rockingham. 

1890 
— R. B. Saunders is manager of the manufacturing depart- 
ment of the Tennessee Fertilizer Co., at Albany, Ga. 
— W. F. Shaffner is an officer of the Wachovia Bank and 
Trust Co., Winston-Salem. 

— Edgar Love is president of the Saxony Spinning Company 
at Lincolnton and the Gastonia Cotton Mfg. Co. at Gastonia. 

1891 
— J. P. McNeill practices law in Florence, S. C, a member 
of the firm of McNeill and Oliver. 

— N. A. Currie is president and treasurer of the mercantile 
firm of N. A. Currie and Co., Clarkton. 

— J. B. Mason is cashier of the Citizens National Bank of 
Durham. 

1892 
— Leonard Charles Van Noppen, lecturer and writer on Dutch 
literature, lives at Poinciana Apartments, 120 Amsterdam 
Avenue, New York City. 

— Dr. Charles Baskerville, a native of Columbus, Miss., and 
former Smith professor of general and industrial chemistry 
in the University, is head of the department of chemistry 
in the College of the City of New York. 

— Bart M. Gatling is a lawyer of Raleigh and is postmaster. 
— Frank C. Mebane is an attorney at law at 45 Broadway, 
New York City. 

— L. J. Lawrence, Law '92, is an attorney and counsellor at 
law at Murfreesboro. He is a former member of the Legis- 
lature. 

— Howard A. Banks has resigned as private secretary to 
Hon. Josephus Daniels, secretary ot the Navy, and has ac- 
cepted the associate editorship of the Sunday School Times, 
Philadelphia. 

— J. W. Brooks, a native of Elizabeth City and a member of 
the law class of 1892, is an attorney at law at Walla Walla, 
Wash. 

— F. L. Willcox, at one time University librarian, is one of 
the leading lawyers of South Carolina, located at Florence. 
He plans to attend '92's reunion. 

— Geo. H. Crowell, at one time superintendent of the High 
Point Schools, is now engaged in school work at Arkadelphia, 
Ark. 

— R. A. Crowell, Law '92, is clerk of Superior Court for 
Stanly County, at Albemarle. 

1893 

— Thos. D. Toy, a native of Norfolk, Va., is connected with 
the S. A. Salvage Co., 463 Broome St., New York. 

1894 
— R. L. Thompson is a cotton broker with offices 604 Banner 
Building, Greensboro. 

— Walter A. Bonitz is located in Pittsburg, Pa., with offices 
in the Empire Building. 

1895 
— Chas. L. Abernethy, Law '95, is a lawyer of New Bern 
and is solicitor of his district. 

— Alex M. Winston is engaged in the practice of law at 
Spokane, Washington. 



— J. N. Pruden is one of the leading lawyers of Edenton, a < 
member of the firm of Pruden and Pruden. 
— T. C. Leak is president of the Roberdel Mfg. Co., Rock- 
ingham. 

■ — Dr. W. Harvey Dixon, Med. '95, is a successful practicing 
physician at Ayden. 

— R. T. S. Steele is engaged in coal mining with the firm 
of Cochran and Co., Williamsport, Pa. 

1896 

— V. A. Batchelor is engaged in the practice of law with 
offices in the Third National Bank Building, Atlanta. He is 
a former president of the Young Men's Democratic League 
of Fulton County. 

— J. Sam White is secretary and treasurer of the Whits 
Furniture Co., Mebane. 

— R. G. Shannonhouse is an Episcopal minister at Edgefield, 
S. C. 

— J. LeGrande Everett is secretary of the Roberdel Mfg. Co., 
Rockingham. 

— W. R. Webb, Jr., is a member of the faculty of the Webb 
School at Bell Buckle, Tenn. 

— Henry T. Sharp, after residence in New York City and 
Denver, is located in Asheville where he is conducting a vigor- 
ous real estate business. 

— R. E. Coker is prominently identified with the U. S. Bureau 
of Fisheries, Washington, D. C. 

1897 

— -Cameron F. McRae is title attorney for the U. S. Depart- 
ment of Agriculture, located at Asheville. 
— G. E. Newby is a physician and surgeon at Hertford. 
— Wm. W. Boddie is a lawyer of Louisburg. 

1898 

— F. W. Miller is a chemist at Ensley, Ala. 

— Dr. H. E. Mechling, Med. '98, is president and general 

manager of the Swiss Cleaners and Dyers, Louisville, Ky. 

He is working on a plan to organize the Louisville Alumni 

Association of the University. 

— W. G Peace is a captain in the U. S. Army, stationed at 

Fort Caswell. 

— Geo. M. Ruffin is a successful physician of Washington, 

D. C. 

1899 
J. E. Latta, Secretary, 207 E. Ohio St., Chicago, 111. 
■ — Dr. F. W. Coker, who is professor of political science in 
the Ohio State University at Columbus, has been elected re- 
cently a member of the editorial board of the American 
Political Science Review. 

— Scott McReynolds is engaged in the pursuit of journalism 
in New York City. 

— Dr. Lynn Mclver, Med. '99, is a successful physician of San- 
ford. 

— Thomas S. Kenan, Jr., is a successful business man of 
Atlanta. He is president of the Atlanta Cotton Oil Co., the 
Atlanta Fiber Co., and the Kenan-McKay and Speir Cotton 
Co. 

— C. G. Hill is secretary and treasurer of the Amazon Cotton 
Mills, Thomasville. 

1900 
W. S. Bernard, Secretary, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
— Thad W. Jones, Jr., is a prominent lawyer of Weatherford, 
Okla. He was the nominee of the Republican party for Con- 
gress from his district in the recent elections. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



187 



— Gaston L. Myers is engaged in the insurance business at 
Norfolk. Va. 

— W. E. Hearn has for some time held the position of in- 
spector in the U. S. Soil Survey. 

1901 
Dr. J. G. Murphy, Secretary, Wilmington, N. C. 
— Dr. Eben Alexander practices his profession, medicine, in 
Knoxville, Tenn. 

— Philip H. Busbee practices law in his home city, Raleigh. 
— Dr. A. W. Graham practices medicine at Chisholm, Minne- 
sota. 

— A. W. Hardin is engaged in the manufacture of cotton at 
Talladega, Ala. 

— C. L. Glenn is a member of the firm of Buck and Glenn, 
Inc., Winston-Salem. 

— W. H. Gibson is secretary and treasurer of the National 
Lumber Co., Concord. 

— D. G. Fowle practices law in Atlanta with offices in the 
Third National Bank Building. 

1902 
R. A. Merritt, Secretary, Asheville, N. C. 

To members of 1902 : 

I regret the condition of my health has been such that I 
have been unable as secretary of the class to keep in touch 
with our class-mates. My health failed me while I was a 
member of the Faculty of The State Normal College in 
November, 1914, and it was later found that I had developed 
tuberculosis. My entire time since, with the exception of five 
short months, has been spent in sanitoria seeking a cure with 
varying degrees of success. 

Some of my class-mates, knowing the expenses connected 
with a prolonged treatment of the disease, and also well aware 
of the limited resources of a teacher, made known the facts 
in my case to other class-mates and all unexpected to me 
I received from the class this message, "We want to help 
you get well," accompanied by very substantial financial aid 
which has enabled me to take treatment under the best con- 
dition. This, it seems to me, is a fine example of the Uni- 
versity Spirit. My gratitude to my fellow class-mates of 
the class of 1902 is beyond the power of words to express. 
This kindly deed stirs up the deepest emotions of my soul. 
I doubt if any class in the history of the University has 
been quite so generous. I am under treatment at the Fair- 
view Cottage Sanitorium, Asheville, and hope that I am im- 
proving. 

With best wishes for a large Class Reunion in June, I am, 
Yours of the class of 1902, 

R. A. Merritt. 
Asheville, N. C, March 19. 1917. 

— Rev. Geo. P. Stevens expects to return to his mission work 
in Suchian, China, in August, 1917. He has spent more 
than a year on vacation in this country. 

— -A. Marvin Carr is first vice-president of the Durham Ho- 
siery Mills, with offices 88 Leonard St., New York. 

1903 
N. W. Walker, Secretary, Chapel Hill. X. C. 
— The marriage of Miss Helen Gardiner and Rev. B. F. 
Huske occurred April 9th in New Bern. Rev. Mr. Huske is 
pastor of Christ Church, New Bern, and is Chaplain of the 
North Carolina Naval Militia. 

— The wedding of Miss Annie Louise Wharton and Dr. Wal- 
ter F. Cole occurred March 20th in Greensboro. They are 



at home in Greensboro, where Dr. Cole practices his pro- 
fe^ion, medicine. 

1904 

T. F. Hickerson, Secretary, Chapel Hill, N. C. 

- -J. H. Pearson, Jr., of Morganton, was appointed a member 

o. c the board of trustees of the University by the last General 

Assembly. 

— Chas. P. Russell, a native of Rockingham, is on the staff 
of the Philadelphia Ledger. 

1905 

W. T. Shore, Secretary, Charlotte, N. C. 

— J. Kenyon Wilson, lawyer of Elizabeth City, has been called 

into service by the Federal Government as commander of the 

North Carolina Naval Militia. 

— Dr. A. D. Browne is Director of the department of physical 
education in the Oregon State Agricultural College, Corvallis, 
Oregon. 

— T. P. Cheshire is engaged in the cotton export business 
with the firm of W. Gordon McCabe Co., Charleston, S. C. 

1906 
John A. Parker, Secretary, Charlotte, N. C. 
— J. S. Kerr is with the Southern Bell Telephone Co. at 
New Orleans, La. 

— Hamilton C. Jones is a lawyer of Charlotte and is city 
recorder. 

— J. W. Winborne is a member of the law firm of Pless 
and Winborne at Marion. 

— A. H. Hoyle is a chemist with the Tennessee Coal, Iron 
and Railroad Co., Ensley, Ala. 

— A. H. Bahnson is president and treasurer of the Arista 
Mills, Winston-Salem. 

1907 
C. L. Weill, Secretary, Greensboro, N. C. 
— Dr. Clarence R. Farmer is a successful physician and 
surgeon at 573 West Lemon St., Lancaster, Pa. 
— -W. D. McLean is vice-president and secretary of the firm 
of Horton, McLean and Co., Inc., agents and brokers in 
insurance, stocks and bonds, Anderson, S. C. 
— Rev. W. A. Jenkins is pastor of the Methodist Church at 
Davidson. Formerly he was pastor at Dallas. 
— The marriage of Miss Daisy B. Allen', '06, and Mr. L. L. 
Brinkley, '07, occurred March 31st at the home of the bride's 
mother in Louisburg. Mr. Brinkley is with the State de- 
partment of agriculture engaged in soil survey work. 

1908 
Jas. A. Gray, Jr., Secretary, Winston-Salem. N. C. 
— J. W. Speas is connected with the Trust Company of 
Georgia, Atlanta, Ga. 

— F. I.. Huffman is engaged in the manufacture of furniture 
;it Marion. 

— E. W. S. Cobb is principal of the Columbus high school 
and superintendent of public instruction for Polk County. 
— G. V. Harper is engaged in the newspaper business at 
Miami. Fla. 

1909 
O. C. Cox, Secretary, Greensboro, N. C. 
— H. L. Perry is a successful lawyer of Henderson and a 
former mayor of the city. 

— Milo J. Jones is connected with the E. T. Robinson Oil 
Co., Inc., 219 ContinPM'.a! Building, Shreveport, La. 
— B. W. Jones is with the General Electric Co., his address 
being 312 Parkwood Boulevard. Schenectady, N. Y. 



188 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



1910 

J. R. Nixon, Secretary, Cherryville, N. C. 
—The engagement of Miss Florence Estelle Birdsall, of 
Jamaica, L. I., and Dr. John Manning Venable has been an- 
nounced. Dr. Venable has been on the Staff of St. Luke's 
Hospital, New York, for the past two and a half years. He 
expects to leave New York soon for San Antonio, Texas, to 
practice medicine. 

1911 

I. C. Moser, Secretary, Burlington, N. C. 
— The marriage of Miss Mary Ashby Warden and Dr. Louis 
Hicks Williams, U. S. N., occurred March 31st in the apart- 
ments of the bride's parents at the Wyoming Hotel, Wash- 
ington, D. C. I. R. Williams, '13, of Dunn, brother of Dr. 
Williams, was best man. 

—Rev. Joseph G. Walker is assistant pastor of the First 
Presbyterian Church of Greensboro. 

— W. T. Joyner is a member of the law firm of Burgess and 
Joyner, Raleigh. 

Editor Alumni Review, 
Dear Sir : 

Enclosed please find a check for $1, for which send me 
the Review for a year. At the end of that time remind me 
to send you another dollar, and so on, ad infinitum. 

I suppose I don't belong among the alumni, but my dollar 
is as good as theirs, and my interest in and love for the Uni- 
versity is as strong as that of any alumnus in the world. I 
was at Chapel Hill for only two years, but I couldn't love 
it any more if I had been at the laying of the first brick. 

Success to the University and the Review, and my regards 
through the latter's columns, to every member of my French 
classes in 1911 and 1912. Sincerely yours, 

Jno. N. Ware 
Sewanee, Tenn., March 23, 1917. 

1912 

C. E. Norman, Secretary, Columbia, S. C. 

" 'Top o' the morning to you !' fellow members of the class 
of 1912. Wake up and punch yourself. Can you realize the 
astounding fact that next June will mark the fifth anniver- 
sary of our graduation from the University of North Caro- 
lina? Sounds impossible, doesn't it? Truth! nevertheless. 
And now that you are thoroughly alive to the situation, we 
feel sure that you desire to make that reunion we are due to 
pull off one of the most pleasant and profitable occasions 
ever staged on the 'Hill.' " 

"President Drane's reunion committee wants every loyal 
1912 man on the 'Hill' when the curtain rises for the big 
show. The stunt committee, with 'Bob' Hanes in the lead, 
promises a program that will make you proud of old 1912 
and glad of the opportunity of coming 'back home' to meet 
the 'boys.' Alumni Day will be a red letter day for you, 
fellow class-mate, if you don't 'grat' the reunion." 

— C. K. Burgess is a member of the law firm of Burgess and 

Joyner, Raleigh. 

—J. Conrad Lanier, lawyer of Greenville, is president of a 

company recently organized to publish the Greenville Daily 

News. 

— Walter Carter is in charge of the electrical department of 

the firm of A. H. Guion and Co., Gastonia. 

— The marriage of Miss May Carmicahel and Dr. David Reid 

Murchison occurred April 18th in St. Luke's Episcopal Church 

Wilmington. 



— Chas. Spurgeon Cook is auditor of the Chatham Bank and 
Trust Co., a large banking institution of Savannah, Ga. 

1913 

A. L. M. Wiggins, Secretary, Hartsville, S. C. 
— A very interesting article by Douglas Rights, president of 
the class, entitled "Old South Building Historic Center of 
the State University" appeared in the Twin-City Sentinel on 
Jan. 20th. The conclusion to this article is reproduced here- 
with : 

"But return again to the venerable portals of the Old South. 
Let the old days live again. What a wonderful fellowship 
it fosters ! Recall the faces and scenes. 'Bob, don't you re- 
member the night "Pug" opened that box from home and we 
all went around? Just think, he is an Episcopal clergyman 
now.' 'Yes, and do you remember "Opie" in the corner 
room, who used to keep a live black snake for a pet? Well, 
he's a full-fledged doctor now, feeding pills, cutting them up, 
and all that sort of thing. And "Fuzzy," who would roll up 
across the hall when he thought the sophs were around ; 
well he's pleading cases now ; and "Crip," the rheumatic, 
who would have to ride to meals on his roommate's back, 
but who conquered rheumatism with optimism ; well, he 
is in the Phillippines now. instructing our little Brown 
Brothers, as he and ex-President Taft call them ; and "Huff" 
the scholar of the class, who instead of studying for exams 
would get out his fiddle and plug of tobacco and play the 
part of Nero; he's engaged in singing lullabys now, and 
running a hosiery mill as a side line ; and ' " 

"But this is becoming entirely too reminiscent for one just 
four years off 'the Hill' and away from the friendly shelter 
of the Old South Building." 

— The engagement of Miss Marian Jones and Mr. Banks H. 
Mebane, both of Greensboro, has been announced. 
— S. R. Bivens is engaged in teaching at Dabney and in farm- 
ing in Vance County, near Henderson. He has a son, Sam, Jr. 
— J. Ed. Bagwell is engaged in the cotton brokerage business 
at Henderson. 

— Miss Sadie Williams and Mr. B. R. Huske, Jr., were married 
April 10th at the home of the bride's parents in Augusta, 
Ga. They are at home in Fayetteville where Mr. Huske is 
a member of the firm of the Huske Hardware House. 
— Lowry Axley is engaged in teaching in the city high school 
of Warrenton, Ga. 

1914 
Oscar Leach, Secretary, Raeford, N. C. 
— Junius M. Smith is connected with the Charlotte News, at 
Charlotte. 

— Frank Drew, Jr., is engaged in the railway business at 
Live Oak, Fla. 
— R. T. Allen is engaged in the practice of law at Kinston. 

1915 

B. L. Field, Secretary, Louisburg, N. C. 
— The marriage of Miss Bertie Ragland Yancey and Mr. 
William Raymond Taylor occurred April 5 at Chase City, 
Va. They are at home in Auburn, Ala., where Mr. Taylor 
is instructor in English in the Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 
— Geo. R. Holton is engaged in practicing law at Winston- 
Salem. 

1916 
H. B. HESTER, Secretary, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
— C. A. Holland is with the Medina Gas and Fuel Co.. Bart- 
lesville. Okla. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



189 



— Daniel Reyner is a member of the third year class in the 
medical school of the University of Pennsylvania, at Phila- 
delphia. 

1917 

— The engagement of Miss Elise Lloyd and Mr. Geo. W. 
Tandy has been announced. The wedding is to occur April 
21st in Durham. Mr. Tandy, star center on Carolina's foot- 
ball team for the past four years and captain of the 1916 
team, is connected with the Lloyd Hardware Co., of Durham. 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦•i" ♦•:*♦♦»:":■••:•♦♦♦♦♦♦•:•♦ 



Greensboro Commercial School 



GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA 

BOOKKEEPING, SHORTHAND, TOUCH TYPE 
WRITING and the BUSINESS BRANCHES are 
our Specialty. School the year round. Enroll 
any time. Write for Catalogue. 

E. A. McCLUNG Principal 



* 
* 
♦ 



+•:•-:••:••:••:••:•♦♦:—:•>:••:••:••:••:••:• 



»J» *2**J**2* »!* »I* *t» »!« *J* Ami w w < i * »^« »ft tfr » * « 



Carolina Drug Company 

CHAPEL HILL. .\. C. 

FOR CAROLINA BOYS. THE HOME OF 
PURE DRUGS 

A. G. WEBB, Proprietor 



Asphalt Pavements 



DURABLE 



ECONOMICAL 



IF YOU ARE CONTEMPLATING STREET OR 

ROAD CONSTRUCTION, WE INVITE YOU 

TO INSPECT SOME OF OUR RECENT 

CONSTRUCTION IN 



RALEIGH 

OXFORD 

GUILFORD COUNTY 

WELDON 

ROCKY MOUNT 

LAURINBURG 

WILSON 



GREENSBORO 

WAKE COUNTY 

DURHAM 

WARRENTON 

LUMBERTON 

HENDERSON 

HIGH POINT 



SEE THE GREENSBORO-HIGH POINT HIGH- 
WAY—A 16-MILE STRETCH OF 
ASPHALT ROAD 

A Representative Will Visit You and Supply Any 
Information or Estimates Wanted 

Robert G. Lassiter & Co. 

ENGINEERING AND CONTRACTING 
First Nat'l Bank Bldg. Citizens Nat'l Bank Bldg. 

Oxford, N. C. Raleigh, N. C. 



"Che 

MODEL LAUNDRY 

OF DURHAM, N. C. 

Offers the Highest Quality of 
Service in One Day's Time. 



J. R. EVANS, Agent 



Chapel Hill, N. C. 



The Bank o/Chapel Hill 

The oldest and strongest bank in 
Orange County solicits your banking 
business. 



M. C. S. NOBLE H. H. PATTERSON 

President Vice-Preudent 



M. E. HOGAN 
Caihiei 



^l)e Kttiversit? "press 

ZEB P. COUNCIL. Manajer 

CHAPEL HILL. N. C. 

Printing 

QUALITY AND SERVICE 



ORDERS TAKEN FOR ENGRAVED CARDS OR 
INVITATIONS 



Eubanks Drug Co. 

Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Agents for Hunnally's Candy 



H. H. PATTERSON 

CHAPEL HILL. N. C. 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE AND FRESH 
GROCERIES AT ALL TIMES 



ESTABLISHED 1916 



Jflumni Loyalty fund 



"One for all, and all for one" 



Council: 

A. M. SCALES, '92 

E. K. GRAHAM. '98 

A. W. HAYWOOD, Jr.. 04 

J. A. GRAY, Jr.. '08 

D. F. RAY. '09 




This Fund is Now Rapidly 

Approaching the $5000 Mark 



The Steady Stream of Volunteers 
Gradually Swells the Great Total 



Don't Wait to be Conscripted; Obey that Impulse and Come Across Now! 



Provides a way for every man who wants to strengthen the University 

WHAT TPIS and perpetuate its spirit; makes it possible for a man to live on through 

Fl IND DOFS- * ts &°°d work, and to put back into the world a fair return on what he 

got out of it through an institution that helped him when he most 

needed help. 

„ ... , . -. D . „ . \ (1) Through an annual subscription. 

Two Ways to do this Big Business: j ^ Through a bequest in your will 

The size of the subscription, or of the bequest, is important, of course; but the main thing is to 
have a part in it: The fund in which every alumnus has a share. 

HERE! IT IS: GO TO IT! ««- TEAR THIS OFF AND MAIL IT TO E. R. RANKIN, Secretary 

University of North Carolina Alumni Loyalty Fund: 

I will give to the Alumni Loyalty Fund $ annually, 

payable of each year; at which time please send 

notice. I reserve the right to revoke at will. 

Name (Class) 

Address 

Date — 



Pickard's Transfer 

Chapel Hill. V C. 

FIRST CLASS LIVERY SERVICE AT ALL 
TIMES. GIVE US A TRIAL 

A. A. PICKARD .... Manager 



The Peoples National Bank 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 



Capital $300,000.00 
J. W. PRIES. Pres. 



M. S. LEWIS. Cashier 



United Stales Depositary 
Wm. A. BLAIR. Vic-Prcs 



The Model Market and Ice Co. 

Chapel Hill. N. C. 

All Kinds of Meats. Fish and Oysters in Season. 

Daily Ice Delivery Except Sunday 
S. M. PICKARD Manager 



Ice Cream and Frozen Desserts 

of all kinds. Special attention given University and 

College banquets and entertainments. Phone 178 

WARREN CREAMERY CO. 

PARRISH STREET DURHAM, N. C. 



A. .A. Tftlutt* (EcTJitc. 

SUCCESSORS TO A. A. KLUTTZ 

Extend a cordial invitation to all students and 
alumni of the U. N. C. to make their store head- 
quarters during their stay in Chapel Hill. 

Complete Stock of 
New and Second-hand Books, Stationery, and 
Complete Line of Shoes and Haberdashery 
Made by the Leaders of Fashion, Al- 
ways on Hand 



Just Test Our Better Clothes 

They're correct, clean-cut and 
crisp 

Sneed-Markham- Taylor Co. 

Durham, N. C. 

Clothiers, Furnishers, Hatters, and 
Regal Shoes for Men 



ANDREWS GASH STORE CO. CHAP N EU C H,LL 

Will save you from 3 to 5 dollars on your tailor- 
made suits. We also have in an up-to-date line 
of high grade gents' furnishings. Call to see us 
and be convinced. 



UNIVERSITY STUDENTS — 

'Che "ROYAL CAFES 

IN CHAPEL HILL as well as IN DURHAM 

APPRECIATE YOUR 'PATRONAGE 




FACTS 



United States Government 
Statistics Reveal That: 



Ninety per cent, of estates of over $5,000 are entirely dissipated in 
seven years. 

Nineteen out of every twenty fail to provide either for their old age 
or families. 

Over 8,000,000 women must work to live. 

Ninetv-five percent, of men engaged in business fail. 

Ninety per cent, ol children who enter school at age of six have to 

stop before completing the eighth grade, to go to work. 
Nine out often men leave no estate. 

Life insurance companies arc distributing more than $2,000,000 
per day. 

The surest way to provide against future misfortune is through Life Insurance, and no company can 

perform this service in a more satisfactory manner than the STATE Ml "IT \L — 73 years old. 
We need a lew dependable men as agents in this state. 

S. W. SPARGER, STATE AGENT 

704-5-6 FIRST NATIONAL BANK BUILDING. DURHAM. N. C. 



SEABOARD 

AIR LINE RAILWAY 

"The Progressive Railway of the South" 

SHORTEST, QUICKEST AND BEST ROUTE 

Richmond, Portsmouth-Norfolk, Va., and points 
in the Northeast via Washington, D. C, and 
Southwest via Atlanta and Birmingham. 

HANDSOMEST ALL STEEL TRAINS 
IN THE SOUTH 

Electrically lighted and equipped with electric 
fans. 

Steel electrically lighted Diners on all through 
trains. Meals a la carte. 



LOCAL TRAINS ON CONVENIENT 
SCHEDULES 



Extremely Low Winter Excursion Rates 

For rates, schedules, etc., call on your nearest 
agent, or 

CHARLES B. RYAN, G. P. A., JOHN T. WEST, D. P. A., 

Norfolk, V«. CHARLES R.CAPPS, 1st. V Pres.. Raleigh, N. C. 

Norfolk, Va. 



Odell Hardware 

Cr-*ri-ir"%«t-ix7 greensboro, 

WO I ■ ipdny NORTH CAROLINA 

Electric Lamps and Suppli 
Builders Hardwa e 



DEPENDABLE GOODS 

PROMPT SERVICE 

SATISFACTORY PRICES 



RIDE WITH 



C. S. Pender graft 

Pioneer Auto Man 



Headquarters in DURHAM: 
Al the Royal Cafe, Main Street, and Southern Depot 

Headquarters in CHAPEL HILL: 
Nest to Bank of Chapel Hill 

Leave Chapel Hill 8:30 and 10:20 a. m. 

Leave Chapel Hill 2:30 and 4:00 p. m. 

Leave Durham 9:50 a. m., 12:40 p. m. 

Leave Durham _ 5:08 and 8:00 p. m. 

OTHER TRIPS SUBJECT TO ORDER 

Four Machines at Your Service 
Day or Night 

PHONE 58 OR 23 



Telephone Nc 


i.477 


Opposite Po»t Office 


THi© 


IHIdlll&dl&y 2 


)ikiidn© 




DURHAM, 


N. C. 




Offical 


Photographer 


for Y 


Y., 1915 


AMATEUR WORK DEVELOPED & FINISHED 

— 'I 



1^ 

HILLC 


LINTHICUM, A. I. A. 


H. COLVIN LINTHICUM 




ASSOCIATE ARCHITECTS 




Specialty Modern 


School Buildings 


TRUST BUILDING, ROOMS 502-501 


PHONE 226 DURHAM, N. C. 
'■ 



Chapel Hill Hardware Co., inc. 

THE "HIGH STANDARD" STORE 

HEADQUARTERS FOR 

Pocket Cutlery, Safety Razors, Razors, 

Strops, Flash Lights, Oil Heaters, 

Paints and Kalsomines 

Tin Shop in Connection 



FOR NEAT JOB PRINTING AND TYPEWRITER PAPER 

CALL AT THE OFFICE OF 

THE CHAPEL HILL NEWS 



K 



ODAK SUPPLIE O 

Finishing for the Amateur. Foister ^^ 



The J. B. McCrary Company 

Municipal Engineers 

ATLANTA CHARLOTTE 



Consulting Engineers New Power Plant Univ. of North Carolina 



The J. B. McCrary Company serves the south as 
Municipal Engineers. We have nothing but ser- 
vice to sell. It is our business to devise munici- 
pal improvements. We plan, finance, construct 
and operate. We want to get in touch with 
every town or city needing improvements. We 
guarantee our service will produce dividends. 
Our experience covers twenty years. We will 
promptly give you all information. It will pay 
you to get in touch with us. Write 



HARRY W. LOVING, District Manager 

CHARLOTTE, :: :: :: NORTH CAROUNA 

OUR MOTTO: 
EXPERIENCE :: ORGANIZATION :: SERVICE 



^>!)£ "IFirst National 3£ank 

of "Durham, 5t. <£. 

"Roll of Honor" Bank 

Total Resources over Two and a Quarter Mil- 
lion Dollars 

WE KNOW YOUR WANTS 

AND WANT YOUR BUSINESS 



JULIAN S. CARR_ 
W. J. HOLLOWAY_ 



.President 
Cashier 



PATTERSON BROS. 

DRUGGISTS 

AGENCY NORR1S CANDY THE REXALL STORE 



J 



lited Number of S 



MEN'S FURNISHINGS OF QUALITY *"-• 

Shirts Less than Cost; Bath 
Robes now selling at Cost; Men's Collars, 2 for 25c — at 

S. BERMAN'S DEPT. STORE 



ilk 



CHAPEL HILL. N. C. 



ssssssssS 1 



J. D. Webb & Son 

Manfitters 
Clothing, Shoes and Furnishings 



For Spring: A Full Line of 

Cool Cloth Suits 

Horse Hide Shoes 



•THE QUALITY TELLS" 




END us any gar- 
ment or article 
you may have 

needing Dry Cleaning 

or Dyeing. 

We will do the work promptly, 
at small cost, and to your en- 
tire satisfaction. 

Send yours by Parcel Post, we 
pay return charges on orders 
amounting to $1.00. 

Mourning Goods Dyed in 24 to 
36 Hours 

COLUMBIA LAUNDRY CO. 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 
Phones 633-634 

Chapel Hill Agents: T. C. Wilkins and 
E. E. W. Duncan 14 and 15 Old West 



► ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦< 



THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

Maximum of Service to the People of the State 



A. 
B. 



THE COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS. C. 

THE SCHOOL OF APPLIED SCIENCE. D. 

(1) Chemical Engineering. E. 

Electrical Engineering. F. 

Civil and Road Engineering. G. 

Soil Investigation. H. 

I 



(2) 
(3) 
(4) 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL. 
THE SCHOOL OF LAW. 
THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE. 
THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY. 
THE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION. 
THE SUMMER SCHOOL. 



THE BUREAU OF EXTENSION. 

(1) General Information. 

(2) Instruction by Lectures. 

(3) Correspondence Courses. 

(4) Debate and Declamation. 

(5) County Economic and Social Surveys. 

(6) Municipal and Legislative Reference. 

(7) Educational Information and Assist- 

ance. 

WRITE TO THE UNIVERSITY WHEN YOU NEED HELP 



For information regarding the University, address 



THOS. J. WILSON, JR., Registrar. 



•S* •!* *I* »5* »I* *J* ^» *I* »!• *I* *5* *I* *I* »> *J* *•* *> »I* »I* *I* *•■• *** •!* ♦!* *»* *I* *** »2* *I* *I* *** *!• ••I* *I* ^* *I* *I* ^ •** ^* 
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* * 



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§ 



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The Southern 
Educational Bureau 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Operates throughout the 
Southwest. 

Has placed members in 32 
states. 

Salaries from $3,000.00 per 
year down. 

The demand for good men teach = 
ers exceeds the supply. 



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♦ 
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* Write us for full information free. * 

* * 
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-> * 

•2* ♦!• •£* •!♦ *** *t* *S* •!* *t* *J» •!* "J 4 *J* •!• *!• •!« *•!* *2* «J* »S* *£• ♦!• *5* •I 4 »2» ••♦ *!* *I* *l* •!•* •!♦ *I* *I* "J* *I* *2» *& *2» *2* *I* 



Successful Careers in Later 

Life for University 

Men 

Depend not wholly upon Football, Baseball, 
or other sports — 

But upon sheer pluck and ability to build the 
solid foundation of Success by Saving every 
possible dollar. 

It takes Men to participate in Football, Base- 
ball, etc., but it takes Greater Men to Build 
Successful Careers. 

Resolve to Start Saving Today. 

The Fidelity Bank 

North Carolina's Greatest Banking Institution 
DURHAM. N. C. 



DID THIS HAPPEN IN YOUR HOME? 



"Whew, it's hot !" said the tired business man as he landed on the top step 
of the porch and was welcomed by his smiling wife and two armsful of children. 

"Why, we don't mind it at all," objected the wife, with a knowing smile. 

"No," chimed in the kiddies, "we don't mind it at all." 

"You don't!" exclaimed the astonished husband. "You don't!" he re- 
peated. And he looked out at the people in the street to see if they were showing 
the effect of a sweltering day, as he was. They were! Thus reassured as to 
the condition of his mind he said : 

"Well, what do you do to overcome the heat," he asked. 

"That's easy," smiled the wife. "We's just had our afternoon treat of 
Pepsi-Cola." 

"Yes," peeped up little Jane, the youngest, "and it was just as cold as the 
icicle Jack put down my neck last winter." 

"Oh, I see," spoke up father, "got any left ?" 

Not at all fanciful is this little comedy of home life. It's just as true as 
true can be and it takes place in countless homes every bright mid-summer day 
when the sun is sweltering hot and all humanity feels that it would be far hap- 
pier if this planet were an iceberg. 

Pepsi-Cola, as you undoubtedly know, is not only tasty but cooling. It 
makes summer heat quit bothering you. Made of the purest fruit juices and 
other perfectly pure ingredients. That's why so many mothers use it as the 
only beverage fit for their growing children (luring the warm months. 



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