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Full text of "The alumni review [serial]"



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CY THOMPSON SAYS— 

To Our PolicijJwlders: 

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If you are not fully iusured, now is an opportune time to increase your protection. You 
may secure a more liberal contract now than you can get later — if the United States becomes 
seriously involved in active warfare in Europe. Now, as never before, you need life insur- 
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Today — as always — delays are dangerous. There is satisfaction in security. We want 
to tell you about the superior service we have to offer. See us or write us now. 

NEW ENGLAND MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO. 

BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 

CHARTERED 183S 

CYRUS THOMPSON, JR., Special Agent EUGENE C. McG/NNJS, General Agent 

Raleigh. N. C. Raleigh, N. C. 



THE ROYALL & BORDEN CO. 

106 and 108 WEST MAIN STREET DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA 

Sell all kinds of furniture and furnishings for churches, 
colleges and homes. Biggest stock of Rugs in the 
State, and at cheapest prices. ^If you don't know us 
ask the College Proctor or the editor of the "Review." 
Call on or write for whatever you may need in our line. 



THE ROYALL & BORDEN CO. 



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Volume V 



THE 



Number 9 



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ALVMI'REVIEW 



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JUP>i'E, 1Q17 



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OPINION AND COMMENT 

Commencement 1917 — Keep the Torch Bright — To- 
day's Task — Don't Forget the Program — Mathe- 
matics Conferences — The Summer School 
at Work 

ALUMNI DAY 

Many Alumni Return for the Celebration of Alumni 
Day — Seven Classes Hold Reunions 

COMMENCEMENT DAY 

Secretary Baker Delivers Stirring Commencement 
Address and Secretary Daniels Presents Di- 
plomas — 161 Degrees are Conferred 

CAROLINA'S REPRESENTATION AT 
OGLETHORPE 

Two Hundred and Fifty Carolina Men Have Organ- 
ized the University of North Carolina 
Oglethorpe Club 



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PUBLISHED BY 

THE ALVMNI ASSOCIATION 



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THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



Volume V 



JUNE, 1917 



Number 9 



OPINION AND COMMENT 



There is only one word to say about the Com- 
mencement just ended : it was of the most satisfac- 
tory sort and will long be remember- 
ed as the most patriotic in the history 



COMMENCE- 
MENT 1917 



of the University. Memorial Hall has 
never been more packed by visitors, never have so 
many flags bedecked the platform and seats, and 
from the campus gates never have gone so many 
graduates — 161 — to take up the tasks of the day. 
And then the fact that si-xty-five of the members of 
1917 were absent iu service, lifted the event entirely 
above that of any preceding years in thoughtful 
seriousness. 

Coupled with this was the rare personality and 
thrilling eloquence of Secretary Baker. His address, 
pitched in the key of patriotic duty, produced a pro- 
found impression on the vast audience who heard it 
and furnished the fitting climax to the University's 
most notable year. 

nnn 

The sous of the University have never been held 
back by Alma Mater when duty called them to the 
front. She has sent them forth 
TORCH BRIGHT pi'omptly into the thick of the 
tight, taking just pride in the man- 
ner in which they acquit themselves. And today 
marks no change in her custom. 

Whether in war or peace, Carolina lays no claim 
to a right to existence except as an agency for cre- 
ative service for the State, the nation, and humanity. 
So she sends forth those sons who depart equipped 
as best she can equip thena for the battle front, and 
brings within her walls those who later are to become 
the builders of a new civilization. The latter duty, 
while not apparently as pressing as the former, is 
none the less important, as is eloquently expressed in 
the following sentences from Secretary Baker's ad- 
dress to the members of the class of 1917 who sat 
before him iu Memorial Hall : 

"Whatever the exertion, don't let the lamp of 
learning go out. Some will stay here because it isn't 
their turn to go. There is work to do if we are to 
rehabilitate the civilization of the world. 
The minutes must be fruitfully filled. After the 
war fifteen or twenty million men will have been kill- 
ed, enormous numbers maimed and physical resources 



wasted. . . . All forms of ancient tradition are 
going to be dissolved. There will be new forms of 
government. Our own will be adjusted to the newer 
ideals. There is need of trained men to solve the 
problem. When the war is over, there will be laurels 
for every hero of war and of peace and opportunity 
for each of us to serve mankind if we have spent our 
lives in the preparation of our souls." 

nnn 

Growing out of this necessity is the University's 

inunediate task: seeing to it that every young man 

in J^orth Carolina under 21 who is prop- 

TASK ^^'^^ qualified has the opportunity this 

year of attending college and receiving 

such instruction as will fit him for the future. 

Fortunately, the duty does not fall upon the Uni- 
versity singly, but upon every alumnus as well. The 
University cannot reach every student who should be 
in college, but the alumni can. Carolina confidently 
lo(jks to the alunmi for this assistance. 

nnn 

On .Vlunuii Day. K. D. W. Connor, '99, was chosen 
President of the Alumni Association for 1917-18, 
DON'T FORGET '''"^ ^^ executive committee consist- 
THE PROGRAM "'?' "^ Walter Murphy, '92, Dr. K. 
ir. Lewis, '70 W. X. Everett, '86, 
H. E. Kondfhaler, '93, and C. W. Tillett, Jr., '09, was 
named through which it is the Association's purpose 
to bring to the University informed, intelligent as- 
sistance in the building of a greater University. 

At the very outset, the Review would again call 
.the attention of the Association to the fifteen ways 
mentioned in the March issue by means of which this 
object can be greatly advanced. 

The I^niversity needs just such support as is set 
forth in that positive constructive program. Look 
it up elsewhere in this issue and begin at once to 
give it. 

nnn 

The Review calls attention to a new and most 
successful undertaing by the department of Mathe- 
matics — the holding of conferences 



MATHEMATICS 
CONFERENCES 



of ^L^ortli Carolina teachers who are 
engaged in teaching mathematics 
in the schools, and also those who are training teachers 



i-2S 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



in the colleges. No fact is better known in iinder- 
i;-raduate circles than that the per cent of men who 
fail iu mathematics is constantly high. The depart- 
ment has set about changing this condition in so 
far as it can be done by reaching a better under- 
standing as to the preparation of pupils. At Greens- 
boro in April the first conference was held under the 
leadership of Messrs. W. W. Eankin and J. W. 
r.aslcy, of the faculty. A second conference is to be 
held at Chapel Hill during the Summer School. 

nan 

With seven hundred stwlonts registered at the end 
of the first week, the ITniver.sity Summer School, 

under the direction of Mr. 
THE SUMMER ,„ „ t ^\ a 

SCHOOL AT WORK ^^ "^ker and the Summer 
School faculty ot sixty-seven 
members, has got down to serious work and the 
prospects are that the term will be the most success- 
ful in the school's history. The enrollment in the 
graduate and educational courses is especially grati- 
fying. 

The important fact for the alumni to bear in mind 
is that the term is just at its beginning and there is 
still time to interest other teachers to enter. Three 
institutes of two weeks each are being held, two of 
which may still be entered to advantage. Let this 
fact be made known in vour community. 



DR. WALTER W. MOORE PREACHES GRADUATING 
SERMON 

The exercises of the one hundred and twenty-sec- 
ond commencement of the University began at 11 
o'clock on Sunday, June 3rd, at which hour the 
baccalaureate sermon was delivered by T)r. Walter 
W. Moore, President of the Union Theological Semi- 
nary, of Richmond, Va. 

After referring to his former visits to the Uni- 
versity, and especially to a baccalaureate sermon he 
preached here twenty-six years ago. Dr. Moore an- 
nounced that he would preach a simple narrative 
sermon, suggested to him the past week by a former 
student of the University. He told the story of 
Samson in a clear, forceful, and eloquent manner, 
piiinting out some of the mistakes of Samson's life 
that are to lie particularly guarded against today, 
both by the individual and the nation. Tlis text was 
Judges 13:5 — "He shall begin to deliver Israel out 
of the hands of the Philistines." 

T)r. Moore declared that tbe story of Samson had 
often been misinterpreted. He disposed of the sun- 
god myth attributed to the story of Samson and show- 
ed that the theory was absurd. Pie thought the mysti- 
cal nature of Samson was also poorly based in fact, 



but preferred to think of the Danite as a simple hu- 
man being. 

Consequently, he interpreted the story from five 
angles — Samson's home and his outlook on the world, 
his physical and intellectual gifts, his misuse of his 
marvelous gifts, the resulting fruitlessness.of Sam- 
son's gifts, and the cavise of his failure. 

Samson became the popular hero of his home local- 
ity on account of his physical strength and daring. 
Like Frederick the Great, he also rejoiced in the 
triumphs of his wit. He was an uproaring wag and 
a practical joker, with the Philistines the butt of his 
jokes. They were the slow intellectuals of the plain 
compared with the nimble-witted Israelites of the 
hills. 

Dr. Moore next told of the misuse of the Israelite's 
marvelous gifts. To enable him to fulfil his divine 
mission, he was gifted with supernatural strength, 
l)ut he did not realize his mission. Misery and dis- 
aster followed his marriage. Over against his spec- 
tacular feats, passionate outbursts, and abundant wit, 
were his sensuality, self-will, and shallowness. Final- 
ly, he tampered with his solemn vow as a Nazarite. 

Because of Samson's lack of seriousness and self- 
control, his powers were unregulated, his exploits 
spasmodic, he was always indulging his own humor, 
and he failed to follow up his successes. His was a 
life all marred, a brilliant disappointment, a splen- 
did failure. He did not master his age because he 
did not master himself. It is only when we submit 
to restraints that we find spiritual rest. Christianity 
has the power that enables men to achieve. 

Yesper services, conducted by Rev. W. D. Moss, 
of the Presbyterian Church, were held in Gerrard 
Ifall at <) o'clock imder the auspices of the Young 
^Jt-n's Christian Association. 



CLASS DAY EXERCISES 

Class Day, 1017, difi'erent from all other class 
days in the history of the University, in that 51 meni- 
liers of the Senior Class were absent at Fort Ogle- 
thorpe, began according to the custom of years on 
Monday, June 4th, with jn final prayer service in the 
chapel. Dr. Battle, '40, led in the devotions and in 
his parting admonition insisted that the class should 
cultivate the quality of reliability, which, according 
to his interpretation, meant the cultivation of the 
mind, cultivation of heart, and tbe forming of right 
habits. He also urged upon them strict punctuality 
in the various engagements of life. He expressed to 
the class the University's appreciation of its excel- 
lent conduct during its stay on the campus and ask- 
ed it to keep alive the traditions and ideals of the 
University. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



229 



Class Gift 

At 10 :30 the public exercises of the class began 
in Gerrard Hall, with Carl B. Hyatt, presiding. Vir- 
ginins Faison Williams presented the class gift 
which took the form of notes totaling $2,500 to be 
paid after four years. 

Mangum Medal Contest 

President Hyatt delivered the farewell address to 
the class, at the conclusion of which President Gra- 
ham took charge and proceeded with the Mangum 
Medal Contest. The two representatives of the class 
were Robert Marion Ross, Jr., of Shelby, of the 
Dialectic Society, and John Spencer Stell, of Raleigh, 
of the Philanthropic Society. Mr. Ross spoke on the 
subject, "What Shall our Policy Be After the War ?" 
Mr. Stell's theme was "America's N^ew Nationalism." 

Around the Davie Poplar 

With ranks thinned by the absence of many mem- 
bers who had entered various forms of the Fed- 



eral service, sixty-five Seniors marched to the Davie 
Poplar at 5 :30 for the last exercises of the class and 
a final whiti' of the class pipe. Six young ladies were 
in the number. 

R. il. Ross presented the class history, reviewing 
the life of the class throughout its four years on the 
campus. It was especially notable for the reason 
that it was graduating more members than any other 
class in the history of the University and that it was 
sending into the service of the Federal government 
more memljers than the senior class of any other 
Southern institution. H. D. Sharpe humorously set 
forth the statistics of the class and was followed by 
A. M. Elliott and E. S. Hartshorn with class pro- 
phecy and last will and testament. A. M. Lindau, 
poet for the class throughout the years, read the class 
poem. The pipe then went the rounds, and nineteen 
seventeen gave place to nineteen eighteen. The class 
day exercises were among the most interesting occas- 
ions of the kind held during recent commencements. 



ALUMNI DAY 



Many Alumni Return for the Celebration of Alumni Day— Seven Classes Hold Reunions 



With interest centered principally around the re- 
union exercises of the various classes, the alumni con- 
ference and business meeting, and the alumni lunch- 
eon, the celebration of Alumni Day, Tuesday, June 
5th, proved to be one of the big features of the re- 
cent commencement. 

The exercises of Alumni Day were begun with the 
class reunions at 10 :30 o'clock Tuesday morning, in 
Gerrard Hall. Judge Francis D. Winston, of the 
class of 1879, presided in his usual happy fashion. 
In his opening remarks Judge Winston referred to 
the fact that the University has such a large per- 
centage of its students and alumni engaged in produc- 
tive industrial work and in agriculture. The Uni- 
versity, he said, also has more students enrolled in 
the military training camps than any other Southern 
institution. 

Class of 1857 

For the first time in the University's history a 
sixty-year class reunion was held at commencement. 
The class of 1857 was represented by Major John W. 
Graham, of Hillsboro, and Col. Robert Bingham, of 
Asheville. Major Graham made a brief talk in which 
he spoke of the conditions and the life of the campus 
when he entered the University sixty-four years ago. 
Col. Bingham paid a tribute to President Graham, 
declaring that he stood on the shoulders of his giant 
predecessors, and related some reminiscences of the 



Civil War. He stated that his class had 69 men to 
graduate and that all of them entered the Confeder- 
ate armies. 

Class of 1887 

The class of 1887 was represented by Dean L. P. 
McGehee, of the University Law School, Senator W. 
M. Person, of Louisburg, W. H. McNeill, of Car- 
thage, and A. M. Simmons, of Currituck. Dean 
McGehee presided and each member present spoke 
briefly. Dean McGehee reviewed the achievements 
of his class and referred to the 17 graduating ora- 
tions delivered by its members. 

Class of 1892 

The class of 1892 celebrated its quarter-century 
reunion in fitting style. Frank C. Mebane, of New 
York, presided at the exercises, and Hon. Walter 
Murphy, of Salisbury, Speaker of the House in the 
North Carolina Legislature, was spokesman for the 
class. The class of 1892, he said, has always been 
devoted to the University, and now has several mem- 
bers on the board of trustees. He spoke of the twen- 
ty-five years which had elapsed since the class left 
Chapel Hill and stated that there were 56 members 
living now, these scattered from the Atlantic to the 
Pacific and from the Canadian line to the Mexican 
border. 

Mr. Murphy introduced his classmates present: 
Judgt; (ieo. W. Connor, Wilson; Fred L. Willcox, 



230 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



Florence, S. C. ; C. F. Harvey, Kiiiston ; Perrin 
Busbee, Raleigh; Senator A. M. Scales, Greensboro; 
and F. C. Mebane, New York. "The University," 
said Mr. Murphy 
of the commonwealth." 



is the greatest and richest asset 



Class of 1897 

H. G. Connor, Jr., of Wilson, presided at the exer- 
cises of the class of 1897, which celebrated its twen- 
tieth year reunion. It was this class which instituted 
inter-collegiate debating at the University. The mem- 
bers present for the reunion were: H. G. Connor, 
Jr., Wilson; W. D. Carmichael, Durham; J. A. 
Long, Haw Kiver; Lionel Weil, Goldsboro; S. B. 
Shepherd, Ivaleigh; Eev. Donald Mclver, Burling- 
ton; John H. Andrews, Mobile, Alabama; A. W. 
Belden, Woodlawn, Pa. ; and R. R. Ragan, High 
Point. Rev. Donald Mclver spoke of the members 
now passed away, and S. B. Shepherd spoke briefly. 

Class of 1902 

The class of 1902 came next, holding its fifteen- 
year reunion. R. S. Hutchison, of Charlotte, told 
of the achievements of this class. Over half the 
members are now in learned processions. Fifteen 
have been lost by death. Three members are Uni- 
versity trustees. Senator C. A. Jonas, of Lincolnton, 
made a brief talk. Others present were : J. B. Chesh- 
ire, Jr., Raleigh; Ivey F. Lewis, Uiiiversity, Va. ; 
Dean M. H. Stacy, Chapel Hill; Dr. C. O. Aber- 



nethy, Raleigh; Prof. P. H. Winston, Chapel Hill; 
and E. G. Moss, Oxford. 

Class of 1907 

Twenty members of this class were present for 
1907's ten-year reunion, which was one of the most 
successful reunions held. T. Holt HajTvood, of New 
York, presided and introduced J. J. Parker, of 
Monroe, as si^okesman for the class. Mr. Parker 
presented the University on behalf of the class with 
a gift of one thousand dollars for the purpose of 
erecting a flag pole and flag as an "appropriate 
emblem of the union of our University with the life 
of the nation." Other members present were : 
Dr. M. P. Cummings, Reidsville; E. B. Jef- 
fress, Greensboro; J. F. Spruill, Lexington; G. M. 
McKie, Chapel Hill ; C. V. Cannon, Ayden ; L. R. 
Hofl'man, Lowell ; J. B. Douthit, Kernersvllie ; Thos. 
O'Berry, Goldsboro ; Stable Jjiim, Salisbury ; W. J. 
Barker, Altamahaw; Dr. M. A. Bowers, Tliomas- 
ville; W. S. Dickson, Greensboro; L. W. Parker, 
Harrisburg, Pa. ; Miss Alice Harper, Raleigh ; C. L. 
Weill, Greensboro; D. P. Tillett, Charlotte; J. B. 
James, Greenville; C. C. Sharpe, Kernersville. 

Class of 1912 

C. E. Norman, of Columbia, S. C, presided over 
the exercises of the class of 1912 which had gathered 
to celebrate its fifth year reunion. Eighty-five mem- 
bers of this class graduated in 1912. Mr. Norman 




CLASS UF 189J CKLEBRATES ITS 25TH VICAR REUNION 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



231 



announced the gift of $410.00 to the Alumni Loyalty 
Fund from the class. A. W. Graham, Jr., of Ox- 
ford, declared that the class would do its full duty 
to the coimtry in this time of war. It already had 
a large number of men at Fort Oglethorpe. L. P. 
McLendou, of Durham, spoke briefly. 

Others present for the reunion were: C. S. Cook, 
Savannah, Ga. ; C. L. Gates, Red Springs ; C. F. 
Cowcll, Washing-ton; W. P. Moore, Godwin; J. P. 
Fenner, Scotland Neck ; J. C. Lockhart, Dunn ; W. 
B. Cobb, Washington, D. C. ; D. L. Turnage, Green- 
ville; R. W. Bobbitt, Henderson; T. M. Price, Ra- 
leigh; S. G. Parker, Kinston; Dr. -C. H. Hemphill, 
Chapel Hill. 

This class subsequently held a meeting and elected 
new officers to take the places of Messrs. Drane and 
Norman, president and secretary, respectively, who 
had resigned. A. W. Graham, Jr., of Oxford, was 
elected president and J. C. Lockhart, of Dunn, secre- 
tary. 

Alumni Conference 

At 1 :00 P. M. President Graham lead an alumni 
conference on the subject : "The Alumni and the Uni- 
versity : A Review of the Year." "Intelligent interest 
in the affairs of the University has been one of the 
finest things in University history for the past year," 
he said. He asserted that the alumni factor in this 
country had hardly been toiudied, and stated that a 
big principle was needed along the line of which to 
project future work and evolve a practical program. 



President Graham stated that the registration for 
the year was the largest yet known — 12.39, and point- 
ed out that the number of men to receive degrees on 
the following day would be the largest in the Uni- 
versity's history — 161. The plans for future devel- 
opment of the University were briefly sketched and 
many small but important gifts of the alumni re- 
ferred to. He spoke of the work of the institution 
in relation to the war and declared that young men 
under 21 shoiild remain in college, continue their 
work, and so prepare for the big tasks which must 
come after the war. The alumni were asked to aid 
in seeing that men remain in college, where possible. 
President Graham read a telegram which he had re- 
ceived, as follows : 

Two hundred and fifty alumni and students at 
Fort Oglethorpe send congratulations. May Alma 
Mater continue to be of greatest service to state and 
nation throughout the war in which we hope to do 
onr part. — Graham Ramsey, W. G. Burgess, Mc. 
Daniel Lewis, Committee. 

Chattanooga, Tenn., June 4, 1917. 

To this the following reply was sent: 

Our country is today first in the thought of every 
Carolina man. You who are the first of us -to oiler 
yourselves in her service are now foremost in our 
minds and hearts. Wlien your names are called to- 
day, we answer, "Alosent in the line of service." Your 
Alma Mater, grateful for the love you bear her and 
the sti'ength you inspire in her, sends you in happi- 




COL. ROBERT BINGHAM AND MAJ. JOHN W. GRAHAM REPRESENT THE CLASS 
OF 1857 AT THE 60-YEAR REUNION 



232 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



ness and confidence her deepest aft'ection. — Alumni 
of the University of North Carolina. 
Chapel Hill, K C, June 5, 1017. 

Other telegrams received were: 

University of North Carolina Ahunni Association 
of Western Pennsylvania sends greetings. — R. W. 
McCulloch, President. 

Pittsburgh, Pa., June 5, 1917. 

God bless you every one and keep Alma Mater 
for ever a mightv moving force for righteousness. — 
W. W. Boddie. 

Odessa, Texas, June .5, 1917. 

Alumni Association Meets 

Immediately following the conference a business 
meeting of the Alumni Association was held. R. D. 
W. Connor, '99, of Ealeigh, was elected president of 
the Association for the coming year. A committee of 
five was appointed to draft a constitution and submit 
a plan of action for the Association. 
Luncheon a Success 

The Alumni Luncheon held in Swain Hall at 
1 ::30 o'clock, Tuesday afternoon, was a decided suc- 
cess. Judge Francis D. Winston presided as toast- 
master, and the speakers were as follows : Hon. Wal- 
ter Murphy, Salisbury; Senator A. M. Scales, 
Greensboro; Hon. R. L. Haymore, Mount Airy; 
Ivey F. Lewis, University, Va. ; Dr. R. P. Pell, 
Spartanburg, S. C. ; and A. W. McLean, Lumberton. 



After the luncheon a baseball game was played be- 
tween a picked alunmi team and the senior team. 
The alunmi team was victorious. 
Phi Wins Debate 

The annual inter-society commencement debate on 
Tuesday evening was won by the Phi Society, repre- 
sented by J. V. Raggett and A. M. Coates. The rep- 
resentatives of the Di Society were C. J. Pruett and 
W. M. York. The Di had the affirmative and the 
Phi the negative of the query : Resolved, That all 
corporations engaged in Inter-State Commerce should 
be required to take out a federal charter — constitu- 
tioiuility waived. ' Hon. Francis D. Winston presided 
over the debate. C. B. Hyatt, of the senior class 
acted as secretary. The judges were Professors H. 
M. Wagstatf, W. S. Bernard, and P. H. Daggett. 
The Bingham Medal was awarded to A. M. Coates. 
Tills medal is given each year to the best debater in 
the commencement debate by Judge R. W. Bingham, 
'91, of Louisville, Ky. 

After the debate the annual reception was given 
in the Bynum Gymnasium by the president and 
members of the faculty. 



PRESIDENT GRAHAM GOES TO WASHINGTON 

On July 1, President Graham will go to Washings 
ton to meet with educational commissions from Can- 
ada and England to consider the relation of education 
to the war. , I 




CI, ASS UK vm cki.i-;bkati;s its 5th yicar KiaiNKiN 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



233 



COMMENCEMENT DAY 

Secretary Baker Delivers Stirring Commencement Address and Secretary Daniels Presents 

Diplomas— 161 Degrees are Conferred 



With Memorial Hall 'filled to overfiowing with 
patriotic North Caroliniaus assembled in response to 
Frt'sideiit Graham's call to make commencement day 
a great patriotic occasion, Secretary of War Newton 
i). Baker, in an address distinguished by its force and 
eloquence, described vividly the present world crisis, 
and sent the one hundred and sixty-one Carolina sons 
and daughters receiving degrees out into the great 
conflict to do honorably their bit for home, state, 
and nation. 

The formal exercises of the day began at lU -A') 
with the marching of the academic procession across 
the campus to Memorial Hall where Dr. Walter W. 
Moore, of the Union Theological Seminary, of Kicli- 
mond, offered the invocation. President Graham 
then happily introduced Secretary Baker. 
Secretary Baker Speaks 

Declaring that the American people had sud- 
denly been confronted with new world conditions, 
with the necessity of laying the foundation of a new 
civilization to replace that which had been swallowed 
up in the present world war, Secretary Baker said 
that America had joined herself to the liberty-loving 
nations of the earth in the task of clearing the ground 
for the new day. This had been made inevitable by 
the fact that within the old civilization it had been 
possible for a leading nation to hold treaties as 
'•mere scraps of paper," to ply the sea in the guise of 
an assassin, and to rain death from the air upon inno- 
cent nou-combattants. 

Foundations of New Civilization 

In speaking of the new civilization which the fu- 
ture is to know, Secretary Baker said the foUosving 
principles must enter into its foundation : First, Liiat 
when nations make treaties, they must keep them. 
A man who gives his word must hold it inviolate. 
These treaties must be enforced by an international 
tribunal. Second, a new principle must be establish- 
ed in regard to the foundation of the states them- 
selves. That view or doctrine which holds for the ag- 
grandizement of the state, the welfare of the state, 
the wealth and trade of the state above that of indi- 
viduals composing the state ; that thing which places 
the state above the citizen; that holds life and prop- 
erty must be sacrificed to make the state more power- 
ful, must be stamped out. The new prinicple must 
be accepted that states exist only for the benefit of 
the people who erect them and who sustain the state. 
.\ny form of government which separates itself from 



rlie people is unsafe; it is on a basis or principle 
whicli is iutolerate to mankind. 

Unly at the Beginning 

As to the war, Mr. Baker thought we were only at 
the beginning of this great effort. "No man can tell 
how long it will last. Anyone could be blindfolded 
and turned loose in the vast audience in this house 
and touch men who will be on the battle fields within 
a year. Some will go, others will stay here. But 
there is work for all to do now and after the war is 
ove)-." 

Keep Learning's Lamp Burning 

But while many were to be called into varied forms 
of service. Secretary Baker declared the college, as 
the conserver of learning, should not let the torch of 
learning grow dim. "Whatever the exertion, dou't 
let the lamp of learning go out," exhorted the speak- 
er. "Some will stay here, because it isn't their turn 
to go. There is work to do, if we are to rehabilitate 
the civilization of the world. Kegard all time as a 
minute given to you on guard. You are not parad- 
ing as a sentinel, but you are a sentinel. The minutes 
must be fruitfully filled. After the war fifteen or 
twenty million men will have been killed, enormous 
numbers maimed and physical resources wasted. The 
war is costing $60,000,000 to $70,000,000 a day and 
10,000 men. 

"All forms of ancient tradition are going to be 
dissolved. There will be, after the war, new forms 
of government. Our own will be adjusted to the 
newer ideals. There is need of trained men to solve 
the problem. When the war is over, there will be 
laurels for every hero of war and of peace and op- 
portunity for each of us to serve mankind if we have 
spent our lives in the preparation of our souls." 

Secretary Daniels Presents Diplomas 

Secretary of the Navy Josephus Daniels, was then 
introduced by President Graham and spoke briefly 
to the graduating class before presenting the di- 
plomas. His special admonition to the class was to 
respect and cherish traditions, but not to be afraid 
of establishing new precedents when they meant 
progress and liberty. 

Degrees Conferred 

Degrees were then conferred in course to the num- 
ber of Kil, sixty-five of whom, whose names are 
marked with an asterisk, were absent in service. 



234 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



Bachelors of Arts — *William Keynold Allen, 
'•■'Frank Ewing AUred, Gladys Love Avery, *Hennan 
Glenn Baity, *James Carl Barnard, Troy Thomas 
Barnes, William Braddy Barnes, Agnes Hyde Bar- 
ton, William Ernest Bird, *Milton Clyde Campbell, 
*William Jonathan Capehart. James Arthur Capps, 
David Vance Carter, Harold Stevens Clark, *Alvah 
Jlaif Combs, '* James Gerald Cowan, *Farrell Moffatt 
Crawford, *Gordou Bryan Crowell, Ernest James 
Dail, '^Wilson Bitting Balton, Kobert Eddins De- 
vereux, *P]dgar Alexander Dobbin, *Early Edward 
Walters Duncan, Daniel Eugene Eagle, Paul Blaine 
Eaton, *David Nesbit Edwards, John Grady El- 
dridge, Aubrey McCoy Elliott, *Samuel James Er- 
vin, Jr., Clyde Vestal Ferguson, Henry Grady Goode, 
'"Coffey Harlan Gryder, '^Leroy, Parks Gwaltney, Jr., 
*Henry Green Harper, Jr., Beemer Clifford Harrell, 
*Charles Spurgeon Harris, Julian Earle Harris, 
John Bright Hill, John McCraven Holbrook, Jack- 
son Kenneth Holloway, Willie Frederick Howell, 
Hubert Henry Huff, *Clintou Kelly Hughes, Harry 
Grimmett Hunter, Carl Britt Hyatt, * John Franklin 
Jarrell, Aaron Oscar Joines, Francis Cameron Jor- 
dan, Everett Allan Kendall, Frank Erwin Kendrick, 
James Edwin King, Callie Agnes Lewis, Alfred 
Milton Lindau, Clifford Handy McCurry, James 
Carlisle McLeod, Ernest Lloyd Mackie, Blackwell 
Markham, *Clyde Caswell Miller, Mary Scales Mil- 
ler, *Henry Bascom Mock, Frederick Boyden Nims, 
Jr., *George Mcintosh Norwood, *George Farrar 
Parker, *Samuel Iredell Parker, James Ralph 
Patton, Jr., John William Perdew, Ely Jackson 
Perry, Minna Thelma Pickard, "'^William Tan- 
nahill Polk, *Edward Knox Proctor, *James 
nahill Polk, *Edward Knox Proctor, *Jaraes 
Graham Eamsay, *01iver Gray Rand, Marion 
Herbert Randolph, *John Oliver Eanson, ISTor- 
man Anderson Reasoner, John Calvin Reid, *Robert 
Hamilton Riggs, Robert Marion Ross, Jr., *Frank 
1 )udley Shamburger, Howard D. Sharpe, Bernard 
Andrew Siddall, Isabel Sloan, John Leroy Smith, 
Sherman Bryan Smithey, Charles Edison Snoddy, 
'"Drury Spruill Spain, "'^Edward Lee Spencer, John 
Spencer Stell, *Willis Clyde Suddreth, Simpson 
Bobo Tanner, Jr., ''^Samuel Fowle Telfair, Jr., 
* Lewis Summer Thorp, Elbert Lambert Veazey, 
■* William Randolph Watson, Jr., Wilbert Freeman 
Wellons, Virginius Faison Williams, *John Oscar 
Wood, James Thomas Carr Wright, Theodore Oran 
Wright. 

Bachelors of Science in Cliemical Engineering — 
*ITal Burkhead Ingram, *Roy Byuum Isley, *Oscar 
voiiKochtitzky Merritt, *Raiidall Worth Sparger, 
George Rabv Tennent. 



Bachelors of Science in Civil Engineering — 
* Robert Plato Brooks, Jr., Joseph Watkins Hale, 
*Charles Williams Higgins, George Slover, *Macon 
McCorkle Williams. 

Bachelors of Science in- Electrical Engineering — 
Adger Carter Forney, Earl James O'Brient, *Clyde 
Xeeley Sloan, Thomas Wright Strange. 

Bachelors of Science in Medicine — William An- 
drew Horsle}- Gantt, William Francis Hill, James 
.lackson Kirksey, Roy Colonel Mitchell, Eugene 
Sifax Sugg, William Grimsley Taylor. 

Bachelors of Laws — Daniel Long Bell, '^Robert 
Loyd Briukley, Francis Osborne Clarksou, Henry 
Wellington Cobb, Jr., John Tucker Day, *Frank 
Hackler, Edwin Shotts Hartshorn, "^Clinton Kelly 
Hughes, Grover Adlai Martin, *Beverley Sampson 
Royster, Jr., *Hillary Goode Winslow. 

Bachelors of Arts and Laws — *Owen Meredith 
Marshburn, Thomas White Ruft'in, Moses Shapiro, 
Robert Candler Vaughn. 

Graduates in Pharmacy — *Louis Myron Bobbitt, 
George Byrd, *William George Nelson. 

Masters of Arts — Frank Field Allen, George Wash- 
ington Bradshaw, *Elizabeth Breazeale, '*Edgar Clin- 
ton Brice, Robert Frederick Brown, ''''Clayton Calvin 
Carpenter, *Harris Copenhaver, *Charles Nelson 
Dobbins, *Prestou Herschel Epps, *Benjamin 
Franklin Evans, Samuel Huntington Hobbs, Jr., 
John Albert Holmes, Robert Law Lasley, James 
Strong Moffatt, Jr., *Hiroshi Momiyama, Elmer 
Andrew Wright. 

Masters of Science — *Troy Monroe Andrews, 
'"Frederick Royster Blaylock. 

Doctors of Laws — Secretaiy of War Newton D. 
Baker, Honorable Samuel A'Court Ashe. 

Medals, Prizes, Fellowships., Certificates, and Honors 

The following medals, prizes, fellowships, certifi- 
cates, and honors were announced: 

The William Cain Prize in Mathematics — W. F. 
Morrison. 

The Kerr Prize in Geology — Charles Nelson Dob- 
bins. 

The Ebcn Alexander Prize in Greek— II. V. Wil- 
son, Jr. 

The Early English Text Society Prize— J. S. 
Moffatt, Jr. 

The Henry R. Bryan Prize in Law — D. L. Bell. 

The Wortii Prize in Philosophy — R. F. Moseley. 

The Callaghan Scholarship Prize in Law — R. L. 
Brinkley. 

The LeDoux Fellowship in Chemistry — J. W. 
Scott. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



235 



The scholarship in Oi-oanic Chemistry — B. L. 
Meredith. 

The W. J. Bryan Prize iu Political Science — A. 
M. Coates. 

The Hunter Lee Harris Medal — Harris Copen- 
haver. 

The Ben Smith Preston Cup— W. T. Polk. 

The Freshman Prize in English — P. E. Greene. 

The English Poetry Prize— 6. G. Kand. 

The Julian S. Carr Fellowship — A. M. Coates, J. 
B. Linker. 

The Bingham Prize — A. M. Coates. 

The Mangum Medal — E. M. Ross, Jr. 

Elected to Membership in Phi Beta Kappa Society 
1917 — H. E. Marsh, J. B. Linker, Ray Armstrong, 
J. M. GwjTon, C. H. Herty, Jr., J. B. John, Ernest 
Neiman, Albert Oettinger, W. H. Stephenson, H. 
V. Wilson, Jr. 

Economics — J. G. Eldridge, E. A. Kendall. 

Electrical Engineering — W. R. Harding. 

French — F. C. Jordan, J. L. Smith. 

German— J. T. C. Wright. 

Greek— B. Markham, C. C. Miller. 

Histor\ — T. T. Barnes, W. B. Barnes, P. B. 
Eaton, C". B. Hyatt, A. M. Lindau, T. O. Wright. 

Latin— C. C. Miller, J. T. C. Wright. 

Rural Economies — A. O. Joiues, ]M. H. Randolph. 

Zoology — B. Markham. 



Honors iu Language and Literature — A. M. El- 
liott. T. E. Harris, C. C. Miller, H. B. Mock. 

Promotions and Announcements 

President Graham announced the following 
changes and promotions in the faculty for 1917-18: 

J. H. Johnston, Assistant Professor of Education, 
R. L. James, Assistant Professor of Drawing, and H. 
M. Dargan, Instructor in English, were granted leave 
of absence. Mr. Dargan was promoted to Assistant 
Professor of English. 

J. G. Beard, Assistant Professor of Pharmacy, 
was promoted to the rank of Associate Professor. 
W. W. Pierson, Instructor in History, and R. H. 
Thornton, Instructor in English, were promoted to 
the rank of Assistant Professors in their respective 
departments. 

The following new appointments were made: Dr. 
Edward Mack, Jr., of Princeton, Instructor in 
Chemistry ; Mr. Blackwell Markham, Instructor in 
Biology; Mr. Leslie P. Brown, Instructor in Ro- 
mance. 

The exercises were concluded with the benediction. 



ERNEST GRAVES IN FRANCE 

Captain Ernest Graves, 1900, of the U. S. Army 
Engineering Corps, arrived in France during the 
week June -3-9 as a member of General Pershing's 

staff. 



CAROLINA'S REPRESENTATION AT OGLETHORPE 



Two Hundred and Fifty Carolina Men Have Organized the University of North Carolina 

Oglethorpe Club 



Carolina's representatives at Oglethorpe, out- 
numljering those of any other Southern institution 
at the Training Camp, have settled down to the seri- 
ous business of preparing to become officers. For the 
following interesting account of the Carolina men, 
the Review is indebted to McDaniel Lewis, '16, and 
W. G. Burgess, '18. 

In the Officers' Training Camp at Fort Ogle- 
thorpe, Georgia, the University of Korth Carolina 
has a representation of one-tenth of the entire en- 
rollment of more than 2, .500 men. These men, num- 
bering 250 at the latest count, assembled a few days 
ago, and organized the University of North Carolina 
Oglethorpe Club. The organization was perfected 
during one of the brief intervals between drills, and 
the first meeting was marked by a great display of 
enthusiasm both for Alma Mater and Old Glory. Be- 
tween the singing of "Hark the Sound of Tar Heel 
Voices," and yells led by the veteran cheer leader, 



Charlie Coggins, a basis was formed when Graham 
Ramsay, a member of this year's senior class and 
star tackle on the team that won from Vriginia last 
fall, was elected president, and W. G. Burgess, a 
junior class man, was elected secretary. For cheer 
leader, Chas. Coggins, the star on the Dramatic Club, 
for four years a most wonderful leader of college 
yells, was chosen to direct the voices that sang and 
yelled for Carolina, though, engaged for the most of 
the time here in giving military commands and dis- 
cussing war problems. The activities of the Club 
will consist mainly in getting together at night, and 
in the moonlight when opportunity is given, to sing 
"I'm a Tar Heel Bred," in answer to songs from 
Clemson, Vanderbilt, University of South Carolina, 
and other colleges. 

Pond and Graves, Alumni, are Officers 
The representation consists not only of students 
but even a larger number of alumni, especially men 



236 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



of the classes which graduated within the past several 
years. When the picture of the Chapel Hill group 
was taken, in the center was Captain Pond, Caro- 
lina's most distinguished army officer in camp. 
George B. Pond, of the class of 1S99, is a regular 
army captain. Louis Graves, of the class of 1902, is 
a captain in the Reserve Corps. Both have been ac- 
tive in getting the men together and starting things 
for the candidates for commissions who came from 
Carolina. A good number of the delegation from 
the University are men of success in business, but 
most of them are young men just starting oiit in life, 
who answered their country's call just as they were 
beginning to see success in the next year or so. The 
students here were given credit for their work be- 
fore they left the "Hill," the faculty assuring them of 
support and co-operation and meeting them squarely 
in this crisis. The senior class has the greatest num- 
ber present. 

Leads in Number Present 

The University has the largest representation in 
camp of any educational institution, so far as the 
writers can ascertain. State College, Trinity, David- 
son, Wake Forest, Elon and other ISTorth Carolina 
schools are well represented, while Clemson, Univer- 
sity of South Carolina, Citadel, Charleston, Vander- 
bilt. University of Tennessee, Tennessee Military In- 
stitute, Sewanee, and many others have large dele- 
gations seeking commissions in the Officers' Reserve 
Corps. Every man in camp says he knows more than 
any other man. Tar Heel, Gamecocks, and Volun- 
teers mix very well, and new friendships are being 
constantly formed. Xorth Carolina men are taking 
leading parts and are making good. The work is 
very hard, constant drill, practice and study, but all 
do it in the spirit of service to humanity, to Uncle 
Sam, and democracy. 

Athletic Stars in Evidence 

Besides men who have made great records for 
Carolina in these ways there are many men in camp 
who have done themselves proud in fighting for Caro- 
lina on the gridiron and baseball diamond, and mak- 
ing records on the track. Some of them who have 
no fear of Kaiser Wilhelm are : 

Graves, '02, quarter; Folger, '16, fullback, all 
South Atlantic; Winston, '12, end all South Atlantic; 
Cowell, '14, guard, all South Atlantic; Home- 
wood, '16, end, all South Atlantic, '13, '14, '15; 
Huske, '14, end, all South Atlantic, '12; Ram- 
say, '17, tackle, all Southern, '16, all South Atlantic, 
'14, '15; Allen, '14, quarter; Long, '16, quarter; 
Tayloe, guard, all South Atlantic; Wright, '16j end; 



Williams, '18, quarter; Ranson, '17, end; Coleman, 
'17, half-back. 

Of the baseball team there are men as follows: 

Hart, '16, catcher; Folger, '17, first base; Lewis, 
'16, third base; Hardison, '16, first base; Coleman, 
'17, pitcher. 

The following track men are here : 

Woolcott, Winston, Ranson, Folger, Long, Black, 
Homewood, Wright, Webb, Blue, Upchurchj Parker. 

Cy Long, '14, is a second-lieutenant in the regular 
army, and is stationed at Fort Oglethorpe. 

Twenty-Four Carolina Men in Company Seven 

Company Seven with 24 men leads the camp com- 
panies in number of Carolina men. At present Bill 
Folger is acting as sergeant in Company Seven. There 
are many men whose names are not on the roll of 
the Carolina Club, but more than likely their names 
would swell the number by 30 or 40. 

Every ISTorth Carolina town of considerable size 
has a representative here. Raleigh, Charlotte, 
Greensboro, Asheville, and Wilmington lead, follow- 
ed by delegations from Kinston, Wilson, Salisbury, 
Durham, Goldsboro, and other towns. 

Find Army Life Attractive 

The men are taking easily to army life and train- 
ing. Most all take advantage of Saturday after- 
noons and Sundays to visit Chattanooga. The work 
is so intensive during the week that the young men 
need a lot of recreation. Drills and lectures occupy 
most all of the day from reveille at 5:15 to tattoo at 
9 :30. The Chattanooga people have opened their 
hearts in welcome to the men and have given them 
entertainment in various ways. The boys have to 
buy cigarettes at camp because a law in Tennessee 
prevents their sale in the Volunteer State. A matter 
the folks at home should know is that mail for those 
attending camp is not to be addressed to Fort Ogle- 
thorpe, Georgia, but to Chattanooga, Tenn., with 
designation of number of company, training camp, 
military branch. The men are too busy as a rule to 
write long letters, but they are determined to let the 
folks at home hear from them when they get on the 
battle front. 

Who the Men Are 

Geo. B. Pond, '99, Captain U. S. A., Louis 
Graves, '02, Captain U. S. R. 

First Company: Homewood, R. M., '16, Taylor, 
Alexander, Carter, W., '12. 

Second Company: Dalton Wilson, '17, Black, H. 
B., '18, Craig, T. J., '18, Martin Watt, '16, Duncan, 
E. E. W., '17, Hartsell, A. H., 'IS, Lutterloh, I. H., 
*19, Fergiison, C. V., '17, Thorpe^ W. L., '15, Yel- 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



237 



vei-tou, W. 15., 'IS, Anderson, A. V., 'Hj, Pugb. J. 
F., '15, Trov, E. B., '04, Reynolds, G. S., '08." ' 

Third Company: Joyner, W. T., '11, Wright. R. 
H., Jr., 'IG, Hart, Julian, '1(3, Brooks. E. P.. '17, 
Eouse, R. H., '15, Little, C. M., '14. Carpenter, C. 
C, Mock, H. B., '17. 

Fourth Company: Hackler, J. F.. '1(3 Law, Boney, 
K B., '18 Law, Love, J. F., '14 Law, Royall, G. C., 
Jr.. '16, Cansler, J. S., '14, Townsend, W. B., '14, 
Williams, M. M., '17, Carmichael, W. C, '16, Coun- 
cil, Gordon, '18. 

Fifth Company: Brinkley, R. L., '17, Dai'gan, 
Prof. H. M., Spain, D. S., Jr., '17, Rymer, W. C, 
'16, Upchurch, F. D., '18, Spencer, E. L., '17, Lilly, 
E. J., Jr., '14, Allen, R. T., '14, Blue, L. A., Jr., 
'16, Smith, W. 0., '16, Woltz. C. B.. '15, Barnard, 
J. C, '17. 

Sixth Company: Ridenhour, J. D., '09, Carra- 
way, Bruce H.. '16 Law. Merritt, O. K., '17, Hilts, 
E.'L., '19, McKinnon, D. P., Isley, R. B., '17, 
Cooke, E. E. L., '17 Law, Grimselv. H. B., '15, 
Allred, F. E., '17, Huske, J. S., '16,' Kirk, W. W., 
'16, Leach, Oscar, '14, Erwin, W. A., Carter, J. E., 
'13, Daniel, Chas., '16. 

Seventh Company: Taylor, R.. '18, Ramsey, G., 
"17, Lewis, McD., '16, Loughlin, C. C, '06, Harper, 
H. G., Jr., '17. Woollcott, Phillip, '15, Folger, A. 



W., '17 Law, Johnston, J. T., '09 Bryan, Shep., '15, 
McClamrock, R. P., '18, Hawkins, U. V., '19, Phil- 
lips, F. D., '14. Cowles, W. H., '14, Clements, Don., 
'09. Ingram, H. L., '19, Jones, W. M., '12, Hughes, 
J. W.,'^'12, Baity, H. G., '17, Smith, C. B., '17, 
Blackstoek. C. E., '15, Rovall, K. C, '15, Coggin, 
Chas., '16, Hardison, J. A.. Jr., '16. 

Eighth Company: Bolirk, C. P., '18, Carter, J. 
W., '13. Carpenter, J. E., '12. Coleman, H. G., '12, 
Craig, G. W., '16, Craig, H. B.. '19. Cliapman, L., 
'18, Crawford, R. H.. '17, Cowell, H. B., '16. Dud- 
ley, D. W., '19, Dunbar, W. S.. 'i:,. Long, G. M., 
'16. Miller, C. C, '17, Perry. B. H., '06. Proctor, 
E. K.. '17. Raper, W. E.. "'18. Sc-ott, R. B., '13, 
Spear. M. T.. '13. Sloan, C. X. '17, Turbvfill, J. 
M., '15. 

Xinth Company: Cratch, S. C, '16 Law, Hayne, 

C. D.. '12, Phillips, J. D., '12. Bumoarner, E. L.. 
'18. Wood, J. O.. '17, Crowell, C. B., '17. Harris, 

D. R., '15, Parker, G. F.. '17. Thorpe, L. S., '17, 
Leatherwood, J. G., '14. White, M. A.. '11. Horton, 
H. C. '18. Taylor, J. C. '16, Perrv, H H.. '18, 
Riggs, R. H., '17. 

Tenth Company: Erwin, S. J., '17. Morrison. A. 
T., '07, Harrison, T. L., '16, Woodley, S. S., '18, 
Borden, T.. J., '19, Meyer, L. B., '16, Whitaker. W. 
(CoxTixrED ox Page 239) 




MEMBERS OF CLASS OF 1917 AT FORT OGLETHORPK 



238 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 

Issued monthly except in July, August, and September, by the Gen- 
eral Alumni Association of the University of North Carolina. 

Board of Publication 

The Review is edited by the following Board of Publication: 

Louis R. Wilson, '99 Editor 

Associate Editors: Walter Murphy, '92; Harry Howell, '95; Archibald 
Henderson, '98; W. S. Bernard, '00; JT. K. Wilson, '05; Louis 
Graves, '02; F. P. Graham, '09; Kenneth Tanner, '11. 
E. R. Rankin, '13 Managing Editor 

Subscription Price 

Single Copies $0.15 

Per Year 1.00 

Communications intended for the Editor should be sent to Chapel 
Hill, N. C; for the Managing Editor, to Chapel Hill, N. C. All 
communications intended for publication must be accompanied with 
signatures if they are to receive consideration. 

OFFICE OF PUBLICATION. CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 

Entered at the Postoffice at Chapel Hill, N. C, as second class 
matter. 



The mechanical make-up of this volume, with its 
large paging, wide margin, and clear printing, is to be 
commended. In particular the photographic repro- 
ductions are admirably done. 



THE UNIVERSITY IN LETTERS 



Students of Palaeography will be much interested 
in a volume which has recently been published under 
the joint authoriship of George Howe, Professor of 
Latin in the University, and E. K. Rand, Professor 
of Latin at Harvard. This volume, "The Vatican 
Livy and the Script of Tours," is an extract from the 
memoirs of the American Academy in Eome, vol. I. 
Bergamo, 1917. 

An elaborate and painstaking chronological argu- 
ment and a study of the script prove that the manu- 
script of Livy, Vaticanus Reginensis 702, is to be 
dated somewhat earlier than the period of Alcuin, 
and that the Bamberg Bible was produced in Alcuin's 
time. By these conclusions a fact of great impor- 
tance in the history of handwriting is brought out, 
namely that the script of Tours, from which the com- 
mon Roman type of today is derived, was well de- 
fined by the time Alcuin assumed charge of the 
monastery of Tours. The chronological study fur- 
thermore aifords a basis for determining the approxi- 
mate date of a large class of manuscripts. Follow- 
ing this study there is presented a discussion of the 
handwriting of the various scribes of the Livy manu- 
script, and their individual peculiarities. A sum- 
mary of this part of the work is given in two tal)les. 

The volume is concluded with fourteen photo- 
graphic facsimiles of pages from several manuscripts, 
principally from the Vatican Livy. The pages of the 
Livy, which are reproduced in the same size as the 
original, illustrate not only the handwriting of this 
manuscript as a whole, but also the handwriting of 
each of its scribes. 



The Prince of Parthia, a five-act tragedy, by 
Thomas Godfrey, with an extended introduction, his- 
torical, biographical, and critical, by Dr. Archibald 
Henderson, came from the press of Little, Brown & 
Company on April 14 in commemoration of the one 
hundred and fiftieth anniversary of the original pro- 
duction of the first play by an American produced in 
America by professional players. 

The original and only edition of Godfrey's play 
ever published, which likewise includes his poems, 
was brought out by his fellow-poet, the Reverend 
ISTathaniel Evans, in 1765. This edition is excessive- 
ly rare and virtually unprocurable. The present edi- 
tion is primarily due to the interest and researches 
of Dr. Henderson. In an extended introduction, 
which is itself a monograph, he for the first time 
narrates the fascinating story of young Godfrey's 
life, and paints the artistic and literary background of 
society, in the cultured circles of Philadelphia and 
Wilmington, against which the figure of the yoiing 
poet and dramatist stands forth radiant and distinct. 

At this time when a concerted effort is being made 
by the drama league of America and other forces, to 
project the American drama into the focus of national 
consciousness, the publication of the play is an event 
of unusual importance. 



A recent publication put forth by the Textile Club 
of New York City, of which T. Holt Haywood, '07, 
is president, contains interesting contributions by the 
president of the club and by Lawrence S. Holt, Jr., 
'04. In his "President's Letter," Mr. Haywood 
points out that this club has a "wonderful opportun- 
ity in gathering into its membership men who are 
giving their life's work to the advancement of the 
textile industry, and men who stand for the highest 
ideals in the particular industry which they repre- 
sent. . . . The great European business said 
these colors and chemicals (for dye stuffs) could not 
be made in this country, but our chemists and dye 
men are performing this task, with the colors they 
have so far undertaken, just as well as, if not better 
than, it has ever been done in Europe." In his ex- 
cellent and informing article, "Some Aspects of Our 
Export Trade," Mr. Holt says that "the greatest 
gains in our exports of textiles have been to Central 
and South America and the West Indies. . . . 
Certain it is that the fields most promising for our 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



239 



cultivation lie in this direction. . . . Far from 
congratulating ourselves upon the advance made we 
should redouble our efforts to increase what moderate 
gains we have made and take every precaution that 
we do not lose it quicker than it was secured." 



Eugene F. Hartley, '99, for seventeen years a 
member of the Bureau of the Census, has recently 
been appointed chief statistician for the manufac- 
turers division of the Federal Bureau of the Census. 
In addition to his work in the Bureau, Mr. Hai-tley 
has maintained a lively interest in yachting and is 
a member of the Capital Yacht Club. 



DR. W. J. BATTLE GOES TO CINCINNATI 

After serving the University of Texas for twenty- 
four years. Dr. William J. Battle, '88, at different 
times professor of Greek, dean of the faculty, and act- 
ing-president, has resigned to fill the chair of Greek 
at the University of Cincinnati. His resignation be- 
comes effective September 1 at which time he will 
beo-in his duties at Cincinnati. 



DR. RAPER HONORED 

Dr. Charles Lee Baper, Dean of the Graduate 
School of the University and head of the depart- 
ment of Economics of the University since 1901, 
was honored May 23rd by Lenoir College, with the 
degree of doctor of laws. 



PROFESSOR COBB RECEIVES DEGREE 

Professor Collier Cobb, of the department of Geo- 
logy, was the recipient at the recent Wake Forest 
Commencement of the degree of Doctor of Science. 



DR. HENDERSON RECEIVES DEGREE 

At the recent commencement of the Universitv of 
the South, Dr. Archibald Henderson, of the depart- 
ment of Mathematics, was given the degree of Doctor 
of Civil Laws. 



BROADHURST AND LONDON ON THE HILL 

Captain H. H. Broadhurst, U. S. A., and Lieuten- 
and John J. London, U. S. ~N., accompanied Secre- 
taries Baker and Daniels to Chapel Hill for the exer- 
cises on commencement day. These two officers left 
the University in 1901 and entered respectively 
West Point and Annapolis. Graduating with the 
class of 1905 at the two institutions, both Captain 
Broadhurst and Lieutenant London entered their 
chosen fields. When they returned on this occasion 
they came back as aides to the heads of the fighting 
forces of the nation. 



Lieutenant London, a native Tar Heel, was as- 
signed to duty in Raleigh last July in charge of the 
Naval Kecruiting Station and in the early fall Cap- 
tain Broadhurst went to Kaleigh as commandant 
at A. & E. College. Since their separation at Chapel 
Hill and prior to their assignments here, both offi- 
cers saw service together in the Phillippine Islands 
and when Lieutenant London was at the training 
station in Chicago, Captain Broadhurst was on duty 
at Fort Sheridan. 

Carolina's Representation at Ogletliorpe 

(Continued fbom Page 237) 

P., Jr., '14, Cowper, B. T., Jr., '11, Dowd, W. C, 
Jr., '14, Boss, T. H., '02, Cobb, T. K., '18, Sham- 
burger, Frank, '17, Stevens, H. L., '17, Mills, . ., 
'14, Croswell, J. E., '10, Boykin, R. S., '17, Tel- 
fair, S. F., '17, Rand, O. G.', '17, Guthrie, T. C, 
'14, Allen, Matt H., Boykin, Stanley, '13, Stein, L. 
J., '1.5, Alderman, Harris, '17. 

Eleventh Companv : Ranson, .J. O., '17, Crowell, 
R. J., '18, Higgins,' W. C, '17, Polk, W..T., '17, 
Marshburn, O. M., '16, Peele, E. S., '14, Johnston, 
Prof. J. H., '09, Pruden, W. D., '15, Davis, A. C, 
'IG Law, James, W. J., '17 Law. 

Twelfth Company: Parker, S. L, '17, Combs, A. 
IL, '17, Xooe, Bennet, Jr., '12, Clement, L. H., '18, 
Scott, B. C, '17, Crawford, F. M., '17, Thomas, 
Wyatt, '15, Foster, Robert, '19, Liles, E. F., '19, 
Hester, Hugh, '16, Upchurch, F. D., '18, Dunlap. 
F. L., '08, Houston, R. S., '15, Taylor, E. R., '14, 
Conyers, Joe, '18. 

Thirteenth Company: Solomon, Harry M., '11, 
Jones, T. A., Jr., '16, Hancock, F. W., '16, Wilson, 
Jno. K, '17, Lewis, Meriwether, '18, Shepard, F. 
C, '19, Cowan, J. G., '16, Ray, D. F., '09, Allen, 
W. R., Smith, H. M., '16, Allred, J. H., '16, Simp- 
son, W. A., '07, Heartt, W. A., '05. 

Fourteenth Company: Dobbins, E. A., '17, Chesh- 
ire, J. W., '11, Royster, B. S., '16, Webb, C. B., 
'18, Tayloe, J. C, '18, Campbell, M. C. '17, Hyder, 
T. J., "'18, Totten, H. R., '13, Lewis, J. G.,' '10, 
Winslow, H. G., '16, Devane, T. A., '13, Craig, Gil- 
lam, '13, Graham, A. H., '12, Hardison, J. H., '17, 
Weathers, B. E., '18. 

Fifteenth Company: Lockhart, J. A., '00, Bur- 
gess, W. G., '18, Norwood, G. M., '17, Watson, W. 
R., Jr., '17, Winston, R. W., '12, Gattis, Sam, '12, 
Spruill, Frank, '20, Copenhaver, H., '17, Dysart, J. 
0., '16, Michael, T., '15, Dimmick, G. B., '18, 
Hoover, W. J., '16, Wood, F. P., '16, Paty, B. F., 
'15, Hughes, Clinton, '17, Clingman, E.'c, '17, 
Wilkinson, W. S., .Jr., '16. Bynum, Curtis. '03. 



240 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 




THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



241 



THE GENERAL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

of the 
UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 



Officers of the Association 

R. D. W. Connor, '99 President 

E. R. Rankin, '13 Secretary 

Executive Committee: Walter Murphy, '92; Dr. R. H. 
Lewis, '70 ; W. N. Everett, '86 ; H. E. Rondthaler, '93 ; C. W. 
Tillett, Jr., '09. 

THE ALUMNI 

E. R. RANKIN, 13, Alumni Editor 



ALUMNI AS GOVERNORS 

Twenty-four alumni of the University have sat in the 
Governor's chair at Raleigh. The list as furnished The 
Review by Mr. Walter Murphy, '92, is as follows: 

William Miller of the class of 1806, was the first Governor 
of North Carolina who was a University man. He was in 
office in 1815-16-17. Since then the office has been filled by 
the following University men: John Branch, 1818 to 1820; 
H. G. Burton, 182S to 1827 ; John Owen, 1829-30 ; D. L. Swain, 
1833 to 35; R. D. Spaight, Jr., 1836 to 38; J. M. Morehead, 
1843 to 45 ; W. A. Graham, 1847 to 49 ; Charles Manly, 1849 
to 51; Warren Winslow, 1854 to 55; Thomas Bragg, 1855 to 
59; John W. Ellis, 1859 to 61; H. T. Clark, 1861 to 62; Z. 
B. Vance, 1862 to 65; T. R. Caldwell, 1870 to 74; Z. B. 
Vance, 1877 to 79; A. M. Scales, 1885 to 89; T. M. Holt, 
1891 to 93; Elias Carr, 1893 to 97; D. L. Russell, 1897 to 
01; C. B. Aycock, 1901 to 05; W. W. Kitchin, 1909 to 13; 
Locke Craig, 1913 to 17; T. W. Bickett, 1917. 

ALUMNI AS ATTORNEY GENERALS 

Twenty alumni of the University have served as Attorney 
General of North Carolina. This list, as also furnished The 
Review by Mr. Walter Murphy, '92, is as follows : 

William Miller was likewise the first Attorney General of 
North Carolina educated at the University. He was in office 
in 1810. Since then the following University men have filled 
this office: G. H. Burton, James F. Taylor, R. M. Saunders, 
J. R. J. Daniel, Hugh McQueen, Spier Whitaker, Edward 
Stanly, B. F. Moore, William Eaton, Matt W. Ransom, J. B. 
Batchelor, W. A. Jenkins, Sion H. Rogers, W. M. Coleman, 
W. M. Shipp, Thos. S. Kenan. Z. V. Walser, T. W. Bickett, 
James S. Manning. 

THE CLASSES 

1849 

— Dr. Kemp Plummer Battle furnishes The Review with 
the following reminiscence concerning "The University and 
the Danish Islands": 

Captain Johnson Blakely, who obtained high distinction in 
the War of 1812 was, when very young, left an orphan and 
was kindly cared for and educated by Solicitor General Jones, 
the ancestor of many of our best citizens. He was at this 
University in 1797, one of the best in his class and in his So- 
ciety. He entered the Navy as a midshipman and rose to be 
the commander of the ship of war, Wasp, in which he cap- 
tured the British ship. Reindeer, and other vessels, and was 



lost at sea. The Philantliropic Society has a life-like por- 
trait of him. 

While Captain Blakely was on his last voyage his only 
child, Maria Edney Blakely, was born in New York. The 
General .\ssembly of North Carolina appropriated $600 a 
year for her education. She was said to be very pretty and 
vivacious. 

Her mother married Dr. .Abbott of Christiansted, capital 
of St. Croi.x, and her daughter lived with her until her mar- 
riage to Barron Joseph von Bretton, M. D., May 19, 1841. 
Maria died March 2nd, 1842, at the age of 27. She rests 
in the cemetery of Christiansted. Her grave was in Danish 
soil for 75 years. 

1859 

— Capt. J. E. Beasley, a Civil War veteran and Captain, lives 
in Memphis, one of the most highly regarded citizens of the 
city. He is a former chairman of the Memphis board of 
school commissioners. 

1892 

— A. M. Scales is second vice-president of the Southern 
Life and Trust Co., Greensboro. He is a trustee of the 
University and a member of the State Senate. His pro- 
fession is law. 

— R. B. Hunter is farming at Areola. 
— W. E. Darden is engaged in manufacturing at Waco, Texas. 

1893 

— Rufus L. Patterson is a well-known and successful figure 
in New York finance. His address is 511 Fifth Avenue. 
— M. A. Peacock is engaged in the practice of law at Florence, 

s. c. 

— L. C. Glenn, Grad. '93, is head of the Department of Geol- 
ogy in Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tenn. 
— E. W. Lehman is secretary of the Rosemary Mfg. Co., 
large cotton mill operators, at Roanoke Rapids. 
— Dr. A. J. Edwards is a prominent physician at Bristol, 
Tenn. 

1894 

— Thos. Bailey Lee is engaged in the practice of law at 
Butte, Montana. 

— Wm. B. Guthrie practices law in Durham with offices in 
the First National Bank Building. 

— W. E. Holt, Jr., is general manager of the Wennonah Cot- 
ton Mills Co., Lexington. 

1895 

—John L. Patterson, of Roanoke Rapids, attended the recent 
commencement. He is a member of the board of trustees. 

1896 

— Walter H. Woodson, lawyer of Salisbury, was recently re- 
elected mayor of the city. 

—A. H. Robbins is superintendent of the Lancaster Cotton 
Mills, Lancaster, S. C. 
— W. V. Brenn, Jr., is located at Los Angeles, California. 

1897 

— A. W. Belden is chemical engineer in charge of coal and 
coke products of the Alequippa Iron Works, Woodlawn, Pa. 
—Born to Mr. and Mrs. A. W. Mangum, of Waller, Clay 
County, Florida, a son, Dolph Mangum, Jr., January 12, 1917. 
— W. D. Carmichael is manager of the W. Duke Sons & Co. 
branch of the Liggett and Myers Tobacco Co., Durham. 



242 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



1898 

— P. C. Whitlock is a successful lawyer of Charlotte. He is 
trust officer of the American Trust Co., Charlotte. 
— Frank R. McNinch. Law '98, lawyer of Charlotte, was re- 
cently elected mayor of the city. 

— Dr. E. G. Ballenger, med. '98, is a highly successful physi- 
cian of Atlanta, Ga. 

1899 

J. E. L.\TTA, Secretary, 207 E. Ohio St., Chicago. 111. 
— B. B. Lane practices his profession, law, at Stark, Fla. 
— Dr. John Robert Carr is located at Hooper, Col. 
— Capt. G. B. Pond, U. S. A., is stationed at the Fort Ogle- 
thorpe training camp for the Officers' Reserve Corps. 
— W. S. Wilson, is legislative reference librarian for North 
Carolina, at Raleigh. 

1900 

W. S. Bernard, Secretary. Chapel Hill, N. C. 

— Graham Woodard is engaged in the fertilizer business at 
Wilson, his firm being the Contentnea Guano Co. 
— Dr. C. S. Sloan practices his profession, dentistry, at Wal- 
lace. 

— .\. T. Grant, Jr., is a lawyer of Mocksville and former 
member of the Legislature. 

1901 

Dr. J. G. Murphy, Secretary, Wilmington, N. C. 

' — .\. W. Hardin is engaged in the cotton manufacturing 
business at Talladega, .Ala. 
Editor Alumni Review, 
Dear Sir : 

I am attending the Citizen's Training Camp at Fort Logan 
H. Roots, Arkansas, and I am very anxious to continue re- 
ceiving the Review, so kindly mail my copy to address given 
below. 

So far as I have been able to find out I am the only Tar 
Heel in this camp of 2500 men, and there is no former stu- 
dent of the University, but several Bingham boys. Even 
though I have been far away from North Carolina for several 
years. I feel the keenest interest in everything that affects 
, the University and the State. 

Yours truly, 
- , - J. T. DORTCH, '01. 

1st Troop, 12 Regiment, 
Citizens Training Camp. 

Fort Logan H. Roots, Arkansas. 

1902 

R. .\. Merritt, Secretary Greensboro, N. C. 

—Fred H. Lemly is engaged in ranching. His address is 

Travis Club, San '.Antonio, Texas. 
,— R. A. Lichtenthaeler is located at 45 Lake Place, New 

Haven, Conn. 

— M. H. Stacy, dean of the college of liberal arts in the Uni- 
versity, delivered the address at the closing exercises of 

Peace Institute on May 22nd. 
r, — Dr. Eugene P. Gray is a successful physician of Winston- 

Stilem with offices in the Wachovia Bank building. 

^H. M. Earnhardt is engaged in. the cotton yarn business 

at New Hartford, N. Y. 

. — Dr. Claude D. Kellam practices medicine at Norfolk. Va., 

with office suite 642-45 Monroe building. 



1903 

N. W. Walker, Secretary, Chapel Hill, N. C. 

— Frank S. Hassell is successfully engaged in the practice of 

law at Wilson. 

— Dr. W. C. Rice, M. D. '07, practices medicine at Sydney, 

Florida. 

• — R. B. Ricaud is a lawyer at Bennettsville, S. C. 

— W. H. Webb is engaged in the hosiery mill business at 

Hillsboro. 

— Milton Calder is a well-known banker of Wilmington, 

president of the .\tlantic Bank and Trust Co. 

— John Henry Mc.^den is a business man and capitalist of 

Charlotte. 

1904 

T. F. HirKERSON, Secretary, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
— V. A. J. Idol is cashier of the Commercial National Bank, 
of High Point. 

— S. G. Haigh is secretary of the Holt-Williamson Mfg. Co., 
Fayetteville. 

— Dr. R. A. Herring is connected with the U. S. Public 
Health Service. 

— \. W. Haywood is successfully engaged in the practice of 
law in New York. 

1905 

W. T. Shore, Secretary, Charlotte, N. C. 

— C. M. Carr is treasurer of the Durham Hosiery Mills, 

Durham. 

— Dr. P. B. Ledbetter is a surgeon in the U. S. Naval Service, 

stationed at Great Lakes, 111. 

— H. W. Davis is engaged in the mercantile business at 

Salisbury with the firm of V. Wallace and Sons. 

— J. K. Wilson, lawyer of Elizabeth City, is in the Federal 

naval service, his rank being lieutenant-commander. 

— A. M. Noble, at one time located at the United States Naval 

Station, Samoa, is now engaged in the practice of law at 

Smithfield. 

— Roger G. Lewis is located at Stanford, Texas. 

1906 

John A. Parker, Secretary, Charlotte, N. C. 

— .\. H. Hoyle is with the Tennessee Coal Iron and Railroad 

Co., Ensley, Ala. 

— J. E. Minis is engaged in the hosiery mill business at 

High Point. 

— W. C. Harris, lawyer of Raleigh, was recently re-elected 

judge of the city police court. 

1907 
C. L. Weill, Secretary, Greensboro, N. C. 

— E. B. Jeflfress is business manager of the Daily Nczvs, 

Greensboro. 

— Geo. M. McKie, associate professor of public speaking in 

the University, is a member of the faculty of the Harvard 

Summer School. 

— Dr. M. P. Cummings, mayor of Reidsville, attended the 

'07 reunion at Commencement. 

— Dr. J. V. Dick. M. D. '07, practices his profession at 

Gibsonville. 

— Dr. M. A. Bowers is a successful physician of Thomas- 

ville. 

— Chas. J. Katzenstein practices law at 220 Broadway, New 

York. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



243 



— L. \V. Parker is vvitli the Pillsbury Flour Mills at Harris- 
burg, Pa. 

1908 
Jas. a. Grav, Jr., Secrcliiry, Winston-Saleni, i\. C. 

— F. I. Sutton, lawyer of Kinston, is mayor of the city. 
He is also secretary of the Chamber of Commecrc. 
— W. E. Yelverton is director of the Harris-Ewing Photo- 
graphic News Service. 

— Fred Elliott is instructor in chemistry in the .\le.xia liigh 
schools, Mexia, Texas. 

— W. C. Woodard, Jr., is general agent of the .\tlantic Life 
Insurance Co., at Rocky Mount. 

— Dr. C. S. Barker practices medicine at Trenton, N. C. 
— Dr. G. H. Macon practices medicine at Warrenton. 
— H. H. McKeown is superintendent of the Mocksville 
schools. 

1909 
O. C. Cox, Secretary, Greensboro, N. C. 

— F. K. Borden, Jr., is engaged in the brick manufacturing 
business at Goldsboro. 

— C. F. Kirkpatrick is continuing his study of medicine in 
Richmond, Va. 

— F. P. Graham, C. W. TiUett, Jr., and F. E. Winslow at- 
tended commencement. 

— A. E. Lloyd, Jr., is with the British-.\merican Tobacco Co., 
at Shanghai, China. 

— The marriage of Miss Mary Hutchison, of Lexington, and 
Mr. John Alexander Lindsay, of High Point, occurred in 
April. They are at home in High Point, where Mr. Lindsay 
is secretary and treasurer of the Lindsay Table Co. 
— H. K. Klonts is with Fairbanks, Morse, and Co . Inc., 
594-96 Whitehall St., Atlanta, Ga. 

— Dr. W. E. Lester, Med. '09, is practicing medicine at Lake- 
view, S. C. 

— 'Dr. J. M. Maness, M. D. '09, of Rockingham, is whole- 
time health officer for Richmond County. 
— Wallace H. Strowd is a member of the faculty of the Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin at Madison. 

1910 

J. R. Nixon, Secretary, Cherryville, N. C. 

— Leon G. Stevens is engaged in the practice of law at Smith- 
field. 

— Dr. Hugh A. Thompson practices his profession, medicine, 
in Raleigh. 

— F. W. Cappelmann, Law '10, is engaged in tlie practice of 
law at Columbia, S. C. 

— Dr. Bascom L. Wilson is a physician in the U. S. Medical 
Reserve Corps, Washington, D. C. 

— J. D. Barbour is engaged in business at Clayton and is 
secretary of the local school board. 

— T. T. Murphy is superintendent of schools for Pender 
County at Burgaw. 

— Dr. L. deK. Belden is with the Roosevelt Hospital, New 
York. 

— S. R. Carrington is with the Dictaplione Co.. at Boston, 
Mass. 

— Chas. L. Bransford is a chemist at Gadsden, .\la. 
— Chas. A. Holden practices law at Clinton, Okla. 
— Dr. John Manning Venable practices medicine in San .An- 
tonio, Texas. 

— R. C. Dellinger is connected with the Southern Bell Tele- 
phone Co., at Jackson, Miss. 



1912 

J. C. LocKHART, Secretary. Dunn, N. C. 

— R. W. Bobbitt for the past two years superintendent of the 
Keysville, Va., schools has accepted the superintendency of 
the Erlanger schools at Lexington for next year. 
— Clarence E. Norman will be married soon and will sail for 
Japan as a missionary. 

— The marriage of Miss Margaret Lyle Spurgeon and Dr. 
.\ndrew Jackson Warren, both of Hillsboro, occurred June 
12th. 

— D. L. Turnage is with the Greenville Oil and Fertilizer 
Co., at Greenville. 

— Mrs. Charles Brantley Aycock has announced the engage- 
ment of her daughter, Mary Lily, to Lennox Polk McLendon, 
of Durham. 

— A. D. Shore is engaged in the manufacture of soft drinks, 
at Petersburg, Va. 

1913 

A. L. M. Wiggins, Secretary, Hartsville, S. C. 

— Douglas L. Rights, of Winston-Salem, attended the recent 
commencement. President Rights asks that every 1913 man 
begin to plan now to be present at the big reunion of his class 
ne.xt commencement. 

— J. S. Hunter holds the position of chief clerk to the divi- 
sion manager of the Santa Fe Railway at Los Angeles, Cal. 
— The marriage of Miss Annie Louise Alexander and Mr. 
John Speight Hunter occurred May 8th at the home of the 
bride's parents in Los Angeles, California. Their home is at 
968 Wilshire Place, Los Angeles. Mr. Hunter is at the 
Presidio training camp for the Officers' Reserve Corps in 
San Francisco. 

— J. L. Pliillips, civil engineer of Kinston, was married in 
April. 

— S. H. Basnight continues to be engaged in the hardware 
business at New Bern. 

— Ira W. Hine who until recently has been with the Wachovia 
Bank and Trust Co., Winston-Salem, is now a member of 
the firm of the Cook-Mitchell Co., Inc., clothiers and fur- 
nishers, of the same city. 

— W. B. Rodman, Jr., lawyer of Washington, is in the Federal 
naval service, his rank being lieutenant. 

— J. B. Farrior is with the Southern Bell Telephone Co., at 
Atlanta, Ga. 

1911 

I. C. MosER, Secretary, Burlington, N. C. 

— Lyman B. Whitaker is engaged in the insurance business 

at 209 Security building, St. Louis, Mo. 

— J. S. Cowles travels for the R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., 

with headquarters at Lake Charles, La. 

— Odom Alexander has been since graduation engaged in the 

real estate business at Charlotte. 

— Dr. Wm. P. Belk is serving with the American Hospital 

Corps in France. 

— S. W. Cramer, Jr., of Charlotte, a graduate of the United 

States Military Academy at West Point, is a first-lieutenant 

in the U. S. Army. 

■ — E. C. McLean is with the Egyptian Deity Cigarette Co., 

New York. 

— Roger B. Hall is a chemist with the Mellon Institute, 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 

— Born to Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Spencer Tanner, a son, 

Kenneth Spencer Tanner, Jr., May 23, 1917. 



244 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



— The marriage of Miss Lola Harward and Mr. D. R. Blalock 
occurred recently at the home of the bride's parents near 
Durham. 

— John M. Labberton, who is connected with the Westing- 
house Electric Co., East Pittsburgh, Pa., was married recently. 

1914 

Osc.\R Le.^ch, Secretary, Chattanooga, Tenn. 

— The following members of the class of 1914 are at the 
Officers' Reserve Training Camp at Fort Oglethorpe, Ga. ; 
R. T. Allen, Lewis Angel, J. S. Cansler, E. S. Peele, W. P. 
Whitaker, Jr., J. F. Love, K. C. Royall, J. F. Pugh, T. C. 
Guthrie, and Oscar Leach. 

— T. M. Andrews is with the Tennessee Coal, Iron and Rail- 
road Co., at Ensley, Ala. 

— Dr. C. W. Eley is an interne in the University of Pennsyl- 
vania Hospital, Philadelphia. 

— L. C. Williams, M. A. '14, is a member of the law firm of 
Rogers and Williams, Ahoskie. 

— Cyrus Long is a lieutenant in a regiment of the regular 
army stationed at Fort Oglethorpe, Ga. 

1915 

B. L. Field, Secretary, Weldon, N. C. 

— E. D. Edgerton and G. E. Edgerton are both farming at 

their home near Kenly. 

— W. T. Ragland is with the Rowan Granite Co., Salisbury. 

— Dr. A. McR. Crouch, Med. '15, is State Epidemiologist 

with the State Board of Health, Raleigh. 

— D. A. Bigger, Med. '15, is a senior in the Jefferson Medical 

College, Philadelphia, Pa. 

1916 

H. B. Hester, Secretary, Chapel Hill, N. C. 

— Al 6:15 on Wednesday, June 6th, Adam Thorpe, Glenn 
Hogan, Johnnie Huske, Sam Hobbs, Bob Vaughn, Moses 
Shapiro, Dave Tayloe, Heck Clarkson, and F'rancis Brad- 
shaw assembled in the porch of the "Shack." The front of 
the "Shack" bore the legend "1916 Feeds Here at 6:15." 
On the table in the lounging room were voulmes of the Tar 
Heel for the last two years, a copy of the '16 Yackefy-Yack, 
and the Class Register. The latter is a new wrinkle. It is 
a limp leather photo album with black pages. At the top of 
each page in red ink is the motto of the class, "Service, 
Loyalty, Good-Fellovvship." The pages are lined off with 
white and space provided for name, date, occasion, and re- 
marks. These are written in white pencil. This book re- 
mains at the Hill in the hands of who ever happens to be 
the most permanent resident. Every sixteen man who passes 
through registers. This same book also holds clippings and 
snapshots of the members of the class. At reunion there will 
be a history of the class in this one volume. 

After all men had registered the table was attacked and 
demolished. There followed a delightfully informal good 
time with discussion of the financial standing of the class 
insurance, much reminiscencing, and many thoughts of the 
thirty-eight members of the class who are now in active 
military training or service. Messages to the men at Ogle- 
thorpe were drafted. 

1917 
H. G. B.MTv, Secretary, Chattanooga, Tenn. 

— W. E. Byrd has accepted the superintendency of the Wilkes- 
boro schools for next year. 



— B. C. Harrell has accepted the position of principal of the 
Shelby high school for ne.xt year. 
— T. W. Ruffin was married in March. 

— Ray S. Toxey is assistant to the president of the Virginia 
Carolina Navigation Co., Inc., 120 Broadway, New York. 
— H. L. Crooke is with the Tennessee Coal, Iron and Railroad 
Co., Ensley, Ala. 

— J. Thomas Wilson is witli the Wilson Lumber Co., at 
Rural Hall. 

— Oliver M. Litaker after passing the Supreme Court exami- 
nation for license to practice law last August, located in 
Thomasville, where he is now cashier of the First National 
Bank of Thomasville. 

1918 
— Wilbur H. Currie is secretary of the Bismark Hosiery 
mills, Carthage. 

— H. F. Makepeace is secretary and treasurer of the Make- 
peace Sash and Door Co., Hamlet. 



NECROLOGY 



1852 
—Dr. Richard Henry Lewis, A. B. 1852, A. M. l^^SS, M. D. 
University of Pennsylvania 1856, died May 15th at his ho'^ie 
in Kinston, aged 84 years. He served in the Civil War us 
Captain of Co. K, 15th N. C. Troops, C. S. A. Dr. Lewis 
spent most of his life as a teacher and was from 1889 to 
1892 president of Judson College. Three of his sons surviv- 
ing are alumni of the University : Col. W. F. Lewis, '86, sur- 
geon U. S. A.; F. C. Lewis, '99, of Kinston; and E. B. Lewis, 
'95, of Kinston. 

— James Jeremiah Slade, A. B. 1852, died at his home in 
Columbus, Georgia, May 7th. He fought under General Lee 
as captain in the Confederate States Army, was several times 
a representative in the Legislature of Georgia, and was 
mayor of Columbus. For many years he was president of a 
flourishing female School (St. Elmo). He was a son of 
Rev. Thomas B. Slade, of the class of 1820, who instituted 
the Columbus Female Institute, the first female school of 
high rank in Georgia. 

1860 
— William Edwin Holt, manufacturer, banker, and one of the 
State's wealthiest citizens, died May 26tli at his home in 
Lexington, aged 77 years. He was born in Alamance County, 
and was a student in the University during the years 1856-57 
and 1857-58. Mr. Holt was officially connected with a large 
number of cotton mills and other enterprises in Piedmont 
North Carolina. Among those surviving the deceased is his 
son, W. E. Holt, Jr., '94, of Lexington. 

1893 

— Dr. Samuel McKee Crowell, a native of Union County and 
a student in the medical department of the University dur- 
ing the year 1892-93, died at his home in Charlotte, May 29th, 
aged 48 years. Deceased was one of Charlotte's foremost 
physicians and a public-spirited citizen. 

1914 

— Lewis Banks Payne, of Norfolk, Va., died May 7th at the 
Jefferson Hospital in Philadelphia, aged 23 years. At the 
time of his death he was a senior in Jefferson Medical Col- 
lege. He was a student in the University during the years 
1910-11 and 1911-12. Interment was at Norfolk. Among those 
who survive the deceased are his father. Dr. Robert Lee 
Payne, '79, and brother. Dr. Robert Lee Payne, Jr., '04. 



ESTABLISHED 1916 



Jlluitinj Coyalty fund 



Council: 

A. M. SCALES, '92 

E. K. GRAHAM, '98 

A. W. HAYWOOD, Jr., 04 

J. A. GRAY, Jr., '08 

D. F. RAY, '09 



One for all, and all for one" 




$5,000 Was Received the First Year. Send Your Check and Then 
Do Any of the Following Important Things: 

1. Put the News Letter, the President's Report, the Tar Heel, the Review, the Extension Bulletin — one or all — 
in the school or town library and hand copies of them to tlie local editor. 

2. Tell the teachers you meet with that they should attend the Summer School June-Juh'. Send the names 
of the high school boys who should be on the Hill in September. 

3. North Carolina has a rapidly increasing number of men of means who can honor themselves and the State 
by contributing of their wealth to the serious work of the University. Make yourself the instrument through which 
their co-operation is secured. 

4. Have you made your will? If you have not, make it and put Carolina in. H you have, and failed to in- 
clude Carolina, add a codicil for her benefit. 

5. Send a check to support any of the following publications: News Letter, Extension Bulletin, High School 
Bulletin, Mitchell Scientific Journal. 

6. Establish one, two, or five scholarships for students who cannot otherwise go to college. 

7. Endow one, two, or five fellowships in subjects of your choice with which the best men can be held in the 
Graduate School. 

8. Endow any one of tlic fourteen unendowed sections of the Library. Or give a lump sum for the immediate 
|)urchase of books. 

9. Studies in Philology has won a place in the scholarly world as a philological journal. An annual income of 
$500 will make its position permanent. 

10. The South needs a scholarly, influential medium for the exchange of educational ideas, such as is supplied 
by journals of the type of the Educational Reviezv. The School of Education, with co-operation which it can com- 
mand, can launch the publication if the money is available. 



lERE IX IS: GO TO ITI «*- 



XEAR THIS OFF ANO MAIL IT TO E. R. RANKIN. Secretary 



University of North Carolina Alumni Loyalty Fund: 

I will give to the Alumni Loyalty Fund $ annually, 

payable of each year; at which time please send 

notice. I reserve the right to revoke at will. 

Name 



-(Class) 



Add 



ress_ 



Date. 






* 



* 
* 



* 
* 

* 



An Intelligent Person May Earn $100.00 
Monthly corresponding for newspapers; $40 
to $50 moutlily in spare time; experience un- 
necessary; no canvassing subjects suggested. 
Send for particulars. N.^tional Press Bu- 
reau, Room 2603, Buffalo, N. Y. 






I Greensboro Commercial School 

t GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA 



BOOKKEEPING, SHORTHAND, TOUCH TYPE 
WRITI.MG and the BUSINESS BRANCHES are 
our Specialty. School the year round. Enroll 
anytime. Special summer rates. 

Write for Catalogue. 

E. A. McCLUNG Principal 



Carolina Dru^ Company 

CHAPEL HILL, .N. C. 

FOR CAROLINA BOYS. THE HOME OF 
PURE DRUGS 

A. G. WEBB, Protkietor 



Asphalt Pavements 



OURABUK 



KCOlNOiWICAU 



IF YOU ARE CONTEMPLATING STREET OR 

ROAD CONSTRUCTION, WE INVITE YOU 

TO INSPECT SOME OF OUR RECENT 

CONSTRUCTION IN 



RALEIGH 

OXFORD 

GUILFORD COUNTY 

WELDON 

ROCKY MOUNT 

LAURINBURG 

WILSON 



GREENSBORO 

WAKE COUNTY 

DURHAM 

WARRENTON 

LUMBERTON 

HENDERSON 

HIGH POINT 



SEE THE GREENSBORO-HIGH POINT HIGH- 
WAY—A 16-MILE STRETCH OF 
ASPHALT ROAD 

A Representative Will Visit You and Supply Any 
Information or Estimates Wanted 

Robert G. Lassiter & Co. 

ENGINEERING AND CONTRACTING 
First Nat'l Bank Bldg. Citizens Nat'l Bank Bldg. 

Oxford, N. C. Raleigh. N. C. 



"Uhe 

MODEL LAUNDRY 

OF DURHAM, N. C. 

Offers the Highest Quality of 
Service in One Day's Time. 



J. R. EVANS, Agent 



Chapel Hill, N. C. 



The Bank o/Chapel Hill 

The oldest and strongest bank in 
Orange County solicits your banking 
business. 



M. C. S. NOBLE H. H. PATTERSON 

PresideDt Vice-President 



M. E. HOGAN 

C»(hier 



ZEB P. COUNCIL. Manager 

CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 

Printing 

QUALITY AND SERVICE 



ORDERS TAKEN FOR ENGRAVED CARDS OR 
INVITATIONS 



Eubanks Drug Co. 

Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Agents for Nunnally's Candy 



H. H. PATTERSON 

CHAPEL HILL. >. C. 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE AND FRESH 

GROCERIES AT ALL TIMES 



Pickard's Transfer 

Chapel Hill, N. C. 

FIRST CLASS LIVERY SERVICE AT ALL 
TIMES. GIVE US A TRIAL 

A. A. PICKARD - - - - Manager 



The Peoples National Bank 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 
Capital $300,000.00 United Stales Deposilary 

J. W. FRIES, Pres. Wm. A. BLAIR, Vicc-Pres. 

M. S. LEWIS, Cashier 



The Model Market and Ice Co. 

Chapel Hill, N. C. 

All Kinds of Meats. Fish and Oysters in Season. 

Daily Ice Delivery Except Sunday 
S. M. PICKARD _..._ Manager 



Ice Cream and Frozen Desserts 

of all kinds. Special attention <»'ven University and 

College banquets and entertainments. I'hone 178 

WARREN CREAMERY CO. 

PARKISH STREET DURHAM, N. C. 



|J^«>«^h»^xS><JxJh$>«kS«Sk$xJh$k8^^.«^«$^kS>«^8h8>«x5>«-SkS^^^ 



A. ^. IKlutU (Lclfnc. 

SUCCESSORS TO A. A. KLUTTZ 

Extend a cordial invitation to all students and 
alumni of the U. N. C. to make their store head- 
quarters during their stay in Chapel Hill. 

Complete Stock of 
New and Second-hand Books, Stationery, and 
Complete Line of Shoes and Haberdashery 
Msde by the Leaders of Fashion, Al- 
ways on Hand 



Just Test Our Better Clothes 

The\''re correct, clean-cut and 
crisp 

Sneed-Markham-Taylor Co. 

Durham, N. C. 

Clothiers, Furnishers, Hatters, and 
Regal Shoes for Men 



CHAPEL HILL 

N. C. 



ANDREWS CASH STORE GO. 

Will save you from 3 to 5 dollars on your tailor- 
made suits. We also have in an up-to-date line 
of high grade gents' furnishings. Call to see us 
and be convinced. 



U Li: 



UNIVERSITY STUDENTS — 

T/,e TiOYAL CAFES 

IN CHAPEL HILL as well as IN DURHAM 

JPPRECIATE YOUR 'PATRONAGE 




FACTS 



United States Government 
Statistics Reveal That: 



Ninety percent, of estates of over $.5,000 are entirely dissipated in 

seven 3'ears. 
Nineteen out of every twentv fail to provide cither for their old age 

or families. 
Over 8,000,000 women must work to live. 
Ninetv-five per cent, of men engaged in business fail. 
Ninet}' per cent, of children who enter school at age of six have to 

stop before completing the eighth grade, to go to work. 
Nine out often men leave no estate. 

Life insurance companies are distributing more than $2,000,000 
per da}-. 
The surest wav to provide against future misfortune is through Life Insurance, and no company can 

perform this service in a more satisfaetor\- manner than the STATE MUTU4L — 73 years old. 
We need a few dependable men as agents in this state. 

S. W. SPARGER, STATE AGENT 

T04-S-e FIRST NATIONAL BANK BUILOiNO. DURHAM. N. C 





SFABOARD 

AIR LINE RAILWAY 

"The Progressive Railway of the South" 

SHORTEST, QUICKEST AND BEST ROUTE 

Richmond, Portsmouth-Norfolk, Va., and points 
in the Northeast via Washington, D. C, and 
Southwest via Atlanta and Birmingham. 

HANDSOMEST ALL STEEL TRAINS 
IN THE SOUTH 

Electrically lighted and equipped with electric 
fans. 

Steel electrically lighted Diners on all through 
trains. Meals a la carte. 






LOCAL TRAINS ON CONVENIENT 
SCHEDULES 






Extremely Low Winter Excursion Rates 

For rates, schedules, etc., call on your nearest 
agent, or 

CBARLES B. RYAN, G. P. A., JOHN T. WEST, D. P. A. 

Ntrf<.Ik,V». CHARLES R.CAPPS.lsl.VPres., Raleijh, N. C. 

Norfolk, Va. 





Odell Hardware 

C^r^r-t-ir-^i^ 1-1X7 QReensboro, 

^^1_>I 1 ipciri^ NORTH CAROLINA 

Electric Lamps and Supplies 
Builders Hardware 



DEPENDABLB GOODS 

PROMPT SERVICE 

SATISFACTORY PRICES 



RIOE WITH 



C. S. Pender graft 

Pioneer Auto Man 



Headqnarteri in DURHAM: 
Al the Ro;al Cafe, Main Street, and Southern Depot 

Headqiiarlers in CHAPEL HILL: 
Ned to Bank of Chapel Hill 

Leave Chapel Hill 8:30 and 10:20 a. m. 

Leave Chapel Hill 2:30 and 4:00 p. m. 

Leave Durham 9:50 a. m., 12:40 p. m. 

Leave Durham 5:08 and 8:00 p. m. 

OTHER TRIPS SUBJECT TO ORDER 

Four Machines at Your Service 
Day or Night 

PHONE 58 OR 23 



Telephone No. 477 Opposite Po»l Office 

Th<B Holadlay Stadln® 

DURHAM, N. C. 

Offical Photographer for Y. Y., 1915 

AMATEUR WORK DEVELOPED & FINISHED 



HILL C. UNTHICUM, A. I A. H. COLVIN UNTHICUM 

ASSOCIATE ARCHITECTS 
Specialty — Modern School Buildinga 

TRUST BUILDING, ROOMS 502-503 PHONE 226 DURHAM, N. C. 



I 



Chapel Hill Hardware Co., Inc. 

THE "HIGH STANDARD" STORE 
HEADQUARTERS FOR 

Pocket Cutlery, Safety Razors, Razors, 

Strops, Flash Lights, Oil Heaters, 

Paints and Kalsomines 

Tin Shop in Connection 



FOR NEAT JOB PRINTING AND TYPEWRITER PAPER 

CALL AT THE OFFICE OF 

THE CHAPEL HILL NEWS 



K 



ODAK SUPPLIE 



Finishing for the Amateur. Foister 



s 



The J. B. McGrary Company 

Municipal Engineers 

ATLANTA CHARLOTTE 



Consulting Engineers New Power Plant Univ. of North Carolina 



The J. B. McCrary Companj' serves the south as 
Municipal Engineers. Ve have nothing but ser- 
vice to sell. It is our business to devise munici- 
pal improvements. We plan, finance, construct 
and operate. We want to get in touch with 
every town or citv needing improvements. We 
guarantee our service will produce dividends. 
Our experience covers twenty years. We will 
promptly give vou all information. It will pa}- 
j'ou to get in touch with us. Write 



HARRY W. LOVING, District Manager 

CHARLOTTE, NORTH CAROUNA 

OUR MOTTO: 
EXPERIENCE :: ORGANIZATION :: SERVICE 



Xb\)Z S'xxsX National ^ank 

of 'X)url)am. !Jt. (T. 

"Roll of Honor" Bank 

Total Resources over Two and a Quarter Mil- 
lion Dollars 

WE KNOW YOUR WANTS 

AND WANT YOUR BUSINESS 



JULIAN S. CARR.._ 
W. J. HOLLOWAY.. 



-President 
Cashier 



PATTERSON BROS. 

DRUGGISTS 

AGENCY NORRIS CANDY THE REXALL STORE 



MEN'S FURNISHINGS OF QUALITY ^.^'"l'^'^ T'';^ °'^''l 

Shirts Less than Cost; Bath 
Robes now sell<ng at Cost; Men's Collars. 2 for 25c — at 

S. BERMAN'S DEPT. STORE 

CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 



J. D. Webb & Son 

Manfitters 
Clothing, Shoes and Furnishings 



For Spring: A Full Line of 

Cool Cloth Suits 

Horse Hide Shoes 



"THE OUALITY TELLS' 




END us any gar- 
ment or article 
you may have 

needing Dry Cleaning 

or Dyeing. 

We will do the work promptly, 
at small cost, and to your en- 
tire satisfaction. 

Send yours by Parcel Post, we 
pay return charges on orders 
amounting to $1.00. 

Mourning Goods Dyed in 24 to 
36 Hours 

COLUMBIA LAUNDRY CO. 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 
Phones 633-634 

Chapel Hill Agents: T. C. Wilkins and 
E. E. W. Duncan 14 and IS Old West 



|^^^^^^^^^>^^>^^x^^^>^<^^^^^^^^4 



THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

Maximum of Service to the People of the State 



A. THE COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS. C. 

B. THE SCHOOL OF APPLIED SCIENCE. D. 

(1) Chemical Engineering. E. 

(2) Electrical Engineering. F. 

(3) Civil and Road Engineering. G. 

(4) Soil Inyestigation. H. 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL. 
THE SCHOOL OF LAW. 
THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE. 
THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY. 
THE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION. 
THE SUMMER SCHOOL. 



I. THE BUREAU OF EXTENSION. 

(1) General Information. 

(2) Instruction by Lectures. 

(3) Correspondence Courses. 

(4) Debate and Declamation. 

(5) County Economic and Social Surreys. 

(6) Municipal and Legislative Reference. 

(7) Educational Information and Assist- 

ance. 

WRITE TO THE UNIVERSITY WHEN YOU NEED HELP 



For information regarding the Uniyersity, address 



THOS. J. WILSON, JR., Registrar. 



New York Life Insurance 
Company 



Money for Education 



Many young men and women secure money for 
their education through life insurance. President 
Garfield was a notable example. All through his 
conspicuous career he paid frequent and high tribute 
to the New York Life Policy on which he borrowed 
money that put him through college and started him 
on the road to success. New York Life policies in 
addition to the usual provisions, provide free insur- 
ance and a life income in advent of disability by 
accident or disease ; double indemnity for fatal travel 
accidents. 

Women written on the same basis as men with 
same disability benefits. For particulars and rates 
address, 

BENJAMIN WYCHE, Special Agent 

603 Commercial Bank Building 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



Successful Careers in Later 

Life for University 

Men 

Depend not wholly upon Football, Baseball, 
or other sports — 

But upon sheer pluck and ability to build the 
solid foundation of Success by Saving ever^ 
possible dollar. 

It takes Men to participate in Football, Base- 
ball, etc., but it takes Greater Men to Build 
Successful Careers. 

Resolve to Start Saving Today. 

The Fidelity Bank 

North Carolina's Greatest Banking Institution 
DURHAM, N. C. 



HER PARMR SAVED THE DANCER 



"If only it was not so hot," sighed the pretty girl as she tried to manipulate 
her handkerchief so as to absorb the perspiration without rubbing the powder 
off her nose. "If only it was not so hot the dancing would be lovely. But I feel 
like a rag and look like a beet." 

"You look — you look," hesitated the youth, trying to summon courage and 
poetic fancy at the same time, "like a dewy rose to me." Then embarrassed at his 
gallant attempt, he hurried on with: "But I'll soon make you feel as fresh and 
sweet as you look, for that big punch bowl is full of the finest drink you ever 

tasted." 

"Aly, you certainly think a lot of it," said the girl rather condescendingly. 
"Are you sure it's all right for me to drink? What is the name of this wonderful 
elixir?" 

"Of course it's all right for you to drink it. Mother gives it to the children 
to keep them well during this warm weather, and they served it at the church 
social the other night ; but I shall not tell you the name, not until after you have 
tasted it." 

"Well, what do you think of it?" the young man asked a couple of minutes 
later. 

"It's wonderful ! It tastes so good, and I'm beginning to feel like dancing 
all night. Please tell me the name of it right away, please, and I'll give you the 
next dance.'' 

"That's a bargain. It's Pepsi-Cola, the heat killer!" 



CY THOMPSON SAYS— 

To Our Policyholders: 

If you are insured under a ]Srew England Mutual policy issued prior to April 6, 1917, 
you are privileged to engage in military or naval service of the United States, on land or sea, 
in any part of the world, without the payment of an extra premium. Any conditions in the 
contract to the contrary have been waived by the Company. 

If you are not fully insured, now is an opportune time to increase your protection. You 
may secure a more liberal contract now than you can get later — if the United States becomes 
seriously involved in active warfare in Europe. ISTow, as never before, you need life insur- 
ance for the protection of home and business. 

Today — as always — delays are dangerous. There is satisfaction in security. We want 
to tell you about the superior service we have to offer. See us or write us now. 

NEW ENGLAND MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO. 

BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 

CHARTERED 1835 

CYRUS THOMPSON, JR., Special Agent EUGENE C. McGlNNIS, General Agent 

Raleigh, N. C. Raleigh, N. C. 



THE ROYAL L & BORDEN CO. 

106 and 108 WEST MAIN STREET DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA 

Sell all kinds of furniture and furnishings for churches, 
colleges and homes. Biggest stock of Rugs in the 
State, and at cheapest prices. ^If you don't know us 
ask the College Proctor or the editor of the "Review." 
Call on or write for whatever you may need in our line. 



THE ROYALL & BORDEN CO. 



<l >' 



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