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MEMBER FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM 



I Volume VII 



Number 6 



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OPINION AND COMMENT 



Kemp Plummer Battle — Enlarging the Program — 
Increased Support — Our Increased Responsi- 
bility — In Search of a President — Three 
Quarter System — Innovations at Col- 
umbia — Kenan and Loyalty Funds 
— Preserve Battle's Park — 
Assist the Debaters — War 
Records 

KEMP PLUMMER BATTLE 

LARGE CONTRIBUTIONS TO FUND 

Graham Memorial Movement in Full Swing — Entire 
State Practically Organized 

TRUSTEES FOR NEW TERM 

ROLL OF HONOR 



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PUBLISHED BY 

THE ALVMNI ASSOCIATION 



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THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



Volume VII 



MARCH 1919 



Number 6 



OPINION AND COMMENT 



The Review but expresses the feeling of every 
alumnus when it pays loving trilnitc to the charac- 
ter, services, and rare personalitv of 
KEMP 

PLUMMER ^^^ ^^^*^ Kemp Plummer Battle, mem- 
BATTLE ber of the class of 184!), President of 

the University from 187G to 1891, 
Alumni Professor of History from 1891 to 1907, 
and since then Professor Emeritus, who, on Feb- 
ruary fourth, died at his home in the village full of 
labors and held in the tenderest affection and love 
by all who had known him in his long distinguished 
career. 

Dr. Battle's services to the State were many and 
noted. But the one in which he justly took most 
pride, and for which he was the recipient of the 
State's enduring gratitude, was the task, inconceiv- 
ably difficult, of reopening and refounding the Uni- 
versity. The University, deprived by the Civil War 
and Reconstruction of all productive endowment, de- 
pendent upon an impoverished people in many in- 
stances indifferent to its needs and hostile to its sup- 
port, tainted with politics, the continuity of its ex- 
istence violently broken, was in a condition all but 
hopeless. Confronted with this situation. Dr. Bat- 
tle set himself to the task of the University's rehab- 
ilitation; and with limited funds, against bitter op- 
position, he refounded it, built by degrees a new 
sort of faculty, evolved new policies of service, and 
so wrought that when he retired from the presidency 
in 1891, he was able to hand over to his successor 
the new, modern University, State-supported, ready 
to be developed to meet the requirements of the new 
day. 

This achievement, at once so difficult and great, 
was attributable to something more than Dr. Battle's 
large ability and spotless character — his rare per- 
sonality. Through this he was able to remove the 
University from politics, to gain for it the support 
of all parties when party relations were bitter, and 
to eliminate political prejudice from the campus. 
It was his personality, likewise, rather than his 
learning, that made bis teaching of history inspira- 
tional and vital in the life of his students and en- 
abled them to retain the spirit of their revered 
teacber long after the information imparted in the 
class room had faded from their memory. 



Of the many (jualities blended in Dr. Battle's 
character the outstanding were devotion to duty, a 
high sense of responsibility, a driving energy, and 
a stern courage. These were tempered but in no 
sense impaired by a constitutional dislike of blind 
partisanship, a spirit of toleration for the opinions 
of others, a broad human sympathy which made him 
instinctively like people and hold in personal affec- 
tion an extraordinarily large number. Combinel 
with these, and dominating his whole life and 
thought, was a happy, Christian optimism which 
made life to him a thing of never-ending joy, and, in 
turn, made of his living a benediction to his com- 
munity. 

In characterizing him one instinctively recalls the 
happy portrayal of him by President Graham in his 
inaugural address as "the historian of her [the Uni- 
versity's] beroic past, on whose heart each syllable 
of her story is written — who lived through a period 
of bitterness without hate, who endured poverty 
without a regret, achieved honor without pride, and 
who now so deeply shares the eternal youth about 
him that age finds him with a heart so young and a 
life so full of affection and praise that he is the wit- 
ness of his own immortality." 

nan 

Two years ago upon the adjoui'ument of the Gen- 
eral Assembly, The Review summarized the prin- 
cipal enactments of the body relat- 
THE PROGRAM '"^ ^^ ^^® public welfare of North 
Carolina and voiced the opinion 
that no session of that body had ever wrought more 
wisely for the State than it. It took occasion to say 
that the Legislature gave evidence that it under- 
stood North Carolina's fundamental needs and had 
sufficient faith in the State's future to break the 
blighting habit of pleading poverty and to set the 
hue precedent of meeting them. 

At this hovir at which these lines are being writ- 
ten, the work of the body is just completed, and no 
general summary of its chief enactments has been 
written, but from the daily press reports it is ap- 
parent that the record of the session just ended is 
of an unusually high order. Provision has been 
made to secure a six months scbool term for all of 
North Carolina's public schools ; tbe submission to 



136 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



the people of ameudmeuts to the constitutiou pro- 
viding for an equitable system of taxation has been 
authorized together with plans for a complete re- 
vision of the revenue and machinery acts; a com- 
prehensive program for the improvement of public 
health properly backed by increased appropriations 
has been approved; legislation has been enacted 
looking to a more extensive State system of highway 
construction; and approximately $4,000,000 has 
been appropriated, to be supplemented by $1,000,000 
in bonds, for the support and permanent improve- 
ment of the State's educational and charitable in- 
stitutions. These fine achievements, not to mention 
others vitally significant to the citizenship of the 
State, indicate the character of the work of the body 
and point convincingly to a future for the State in- 
creasingly bright and hopeful. 

nnn 

Through the action of the Legislature the Univer- 
sity appropriation for maintenance for the next two 
TMPRTi' 4 swn y^^^^ ^^^ been increased from $165,- 
SUPPORT '^^^ *° $215,000 annually and $20,000 

has been authorized to wipe out a de- 
ficit which has arisen during the past two years in- 
cident to increased cost of operation under war con- 
ditions. Similarly the provision made by the Gen- 
eral Assembly of 1917 of a building fund of $100,- 
000 annually has been continued for the remaining 
three years of the five-year period. 

DDD 

That the University rejoices that the State gave 

it every dollar asked for, thereby showing the confi- 

-.,,x> ^»r^x.^ . deuce which the State reposes in 

OUR INCREASED . •,, , • t. . . 

RESPONSIBILITY ^^' &'°^^ without saving. It stat- 
ed its case clearly, showed ex- 
actly what use it wished to make of the increased 
support, and left the matter in the hands of the leg- 
islators with the result already stated. With these 
enlarged resources placed at its command, it be- 
comes the duty of the University to make every dol- 
lar count intelligently in carrying out the special 
part which has been assigned it in the constructive 
program of State upbuilding. 

DDD 

According to announcement in the February num- 
ber of The Review, the committee of Trustees ap- 

IN SEARCH OF P^^*^"^^ ^^'^^ ^<^r™°" ^l'^''"'} '" ^'^f "^ 
A PRESIDENT under special consideration tlie 

finding of a successor to President 
Graham, spent February 14th and 1.5t1i at the Uni- 
versity in consultation with members of the faculty 
and student body. A schedule of ten-minute, indi- 



vidual "hearings" was arranged through which Uni- 
versity opinion as to this all-important matter was 
sought. Dr. E,. H. Lewis and Messrs. Victor Bry- 
ant, W. ]Sr. Everett, George Stephens, and Charles 
Whedbee constituted the committee. 

The Review has no way of knowing what con- 
clusions the committee may have been enabled to 
reach as a result of these conferences, but it has ob- 
served both before and after the coming of the com- 
mittee one outstanding significant desire of the Uni- 
versity community. It wants, and wants tremen- 
dously a head to whom it can confidently look for 
etfective, inspiring leadership. The ideal of the 
University of North Carolina has always been ser- 
vice. It wants, and wants supremely such forceful, 
inspiring direction as will enable every class room, 
laboratory, department, organization, or school, to 
function to this end. 

The task, we concede, is a most difficult one, and 
its difiiculty is in no way lessened by the fact that the 
electing body is composed of 102 members, many of 
whom, through the force of circumstances have had 
but slight opi^ortunity to survey the field from 
which such a leader is to be drawn or to evaluate 
properly the qualities he should possess. 

nnn 

Alumni who have been following the trend of 

University thought there and on other American 

campuses throughout the war and since 

,.,, . „^„ demobilization will be interested in the 
QUARTER , , 1 ,. 1 . IT ^• 

SYSTEM notes taken from alumni publications 

appearing elsewhere in this issue un- 

That Car- 
olina is also passing through a period of introspec- 
tion and change has been indicated earlier in these 
columns. Possibly the most convincing evidence of 
this fact, however, was furnished by the faculty in 
February when it adopted the principle of intensifi- 
cation of courses and divided the academic year into 
three terms instead of two as heretofore. From ex- 
perience gained throua^h the S. A. T. C. and in the 
regular quarter since demobilization, the faculty vot- 
ed to make the three quarter system permanent and 
to insist on a higher gTade of work on the part of 
the students than heretofore. 

Another matter to which the University is giving 
consideration, but on w'hich it has taken no action, 
is that of extending the Summer term from six to 
ten or eleven weeks in order to enable teachers to de- 
vote more time annually to gTaduate or special 
studies and to assist undergraduates to shorten their 
stay at college. 



der the title "With Other Colleges." 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



137 



Educational institutions throughoiit the United 

States will watch with interest the experiment of 

Columbia University in adoptinc; 
INNOVATIONS ' . 

AT COLUMBIA psychological tests in admitting 

students. 

Under the new plan at Columbia, any student who 
wishes may still enter on the old basis — an entrance 
examination in secondary school subjects. He will 
have the option, however, of adopting another plan 
— presenting his preparatory school certificate and 
taking the Binet-Simon psychological tests. 

The Binet-Simon tests, which were used exten- 
sively in the army during the war, are tests princi- 
pally of intelligence rather than of information. 
Certain series of these tests are supposed to mark the 
standard which the freshman entering college should 
have attained. The person who passes them is be- 
lieved to be sufficiently alert and well balanced to 
profit by University training. Dr. E. L. Thorndike, 
who is in charge of the work, is quoted as pointing 
out that previous scholastic education, or lack of it, 
will not so much matter any longer. 

As the purpose of college training is not merely 
to collect information, examinations, it would seem, 
should not emphasize information exclusively. Any 
college teacher knows that intelligence, alertness, 
and soimdness are perhaps the most valuable quali- 
ties in a student. If the tests succeed in picking 
out the students who possess these qualities, they un- 
doubtedly will come into extensive use in educational 
institutions. 

Two other new departures for Columbia are the 
provision for frequent physical examinations of all 
students and the requirement of securing medical 
and surgical treatment to correct physical conditions 
contributing to ineffective study, and the holding of 
an assembly hour once a week to promote Columbia 
spirit and weld together the many elements which 
compose the every day life of the campus. 

nnn 

Eor the benefit of interested Alumni The Re- 
view draws attention to the status of the Kenan and 

..^^. .^, .^,^ Alumni Loyalty funds, as no 

KENAN AND J J ' 

LOYALTY FUNDS statement has recently been pub- 
lished concerning them. oSTo 
payment has been made by the Trustees of the Ken- 
an fund to the University, owing to the fact that the 
stocks and properties (mostly railroad) from which 
the income was to be derived were taken over by the 
United States Railroad Administration, which, up to 
the present, has authorized no distribution of divi- 
dends. Consequently the University is temporarily 
carrying the salaries of the professors placed upon 



the Kenan foundation on funds charged against the 
Kenan fund income when it is ultimately received. 
The situation has also been further complicated re- 
cently by the institution of a suit by the State of 
Kentucky against the University for $220,000 as an 
inheritance tax. The case is now in the hands of 
the legal authorities of the State and University and 
will come up for hearing later in the Spring. 

Contributions to the Alumni Loyalty Fund are 
constantly being received and on December 31st 
amounted to $7,950. Two vacancies in the council 
of the fund have been occasioned by the death of 
President Graham and Capt. Don F. Ray. So far 
no part of the fund has been applied for any partic- 
ular purpose, as the council wished it to assume 
larger proportions before making use of it. J. A. 
Warren, treasurer of the University, is authorized 
to receive donations. Send your check to him! 

nnn 

A suggestion has been made to The Review 
which it heartily approves and passes on to the 

Alumni relative to the purchase, pre- 
RATTf F^^ servation and development by the Uni- 
PARK versity of Battle's Park as a memorial to 

Kemp Plummer Battle. The Review 
does not know just what method of procedure should 
be taken to this end, but it is quick to see the ap- 
propriateness of the idea and the desirability of 
carrying it out to a happy completion. For years. 
Dr. Battle has devoted loving care to the woodlands 
and streams that bear his name. He has been their 
abiding, tutelary genius ; and nothing, we believe, 
would be more in keeping with his wish, than that 
the park, with which his name is inseparably linked, 
should be preserved and further developed. 

nnn 

The high school boys and girls in 185 villages and 
towns of the State, after preparation made difficult 

. „„ , „„ bv war conditions and the influenza, 

ASSIST THE ■.„ ^- • , • ,1, ^v, o. + 

DEBATERS "^ participate m the seventh state- 
wide debate of the Debating Union on 
Friday night, April fourth. Three weeks later, 
after being re-triangled, the double winners will meet 
throughout the State in a semi-final contest, and on 
May 2nd the double winners from these debates will 
come to the University for the finals. The subject 
for the series is compulsory military service for a 
period of one year on the part of all males prior to 
the age of 21. 

Inasmuch as these debates are a part of the Ex- 
tension work of the University, alumni are urged 
to aid in every way possible to make the local event 
fhe occasion of the year for the local high school. 



138 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



It isn't for The Eeview to suggest ways and means. 
It merely calls attention to the dates and the oppor- 
tunity. 

Now that many Carolina men are returning to 
civilian life, The Keview renews its request that 
every alumnus who has participated in 
the war send forward at once a record 
of his service. Although final plans 
have not been worked out for the compilation of 
Carolina's war record, data is being secured and 
it is hoped that a preliminary record, to be checked 
and completed in a later issue, may be issued in 
the spring. In order that the purpose of the pub- 
lication may not be defeated s§nd your record — even 
at the expense of your too sensitive modesty — now. 



WAR 
RECORDS 



LARGE CONTRIBUTIONS TO FUND 

The movement for the erection of a Graham Me- 
morial Building is progressing splendidly, Secretary 
Albert M. Creates states. With the organization of 
the entire State practically completed, the work is 
in full swing. Enthusiastic alumni meetings have 
recently been held in several towns in the State, in- 
cluding Raleigh, Winston-Salem and Leaksville- 
Spray, with the result that the local directors have 
appointed committees and organized plans for push- 
ing the movement to a successful conclusion. 

Among the large contributions to the fund recent- 
ly received are checks from IsTew York City, two of 
which represent sums of $2,000 each while three 
amounted to $1,000 each. Similarly many sub- 
scriptions of $1,000 have been received from alumni 
and non-alumni citizens of the State. 



CLASS RE-UNIONS 



Plans are on foot to make the class re-unions at 
commencement this year the best in the history of 
the institution. A special effort will be made to 
bring all the young alumni who have been in service 
back to visit alma mater. The following classes 
will have special re-unions, although every alumnus 
is urged to return and participate in the big general 
reunion: 1859, 1869, 1879, 1889, 1894, 1899, 1904, 
1909, 1914, 1918. 



SUMMER LAW SCHOOL 

The summer session of the University Law School 
will open earlier this year than usual, it has been 
announced by the law faculty. The session will 
open on Monday, June 9th, and come to a close on 
Friday, August 15th, extending through 10 weeks. 
It will end just before the bar examinations held by 



the Supreme Court at Raleigh on August 18th. 
The main purpose of the summer session is to offer 
a review, as complete as the limited time will per- 
mit, of the courses required by the Supreme Court 
for the bar examinations. Although opening as it 
will on the 9th of June, before the last quarter of 
the University ends on June 18th, the summer term 
will not conflict with the work of the reg-ular term. 



MEMORIAL SERVICE HELD 

Memorial services in honor of Marvin Hendrix 
Stacy, late Chairman of the Faculty of the Univer- 
sity, were held in Gerrard Hall Sunday afternoon, 
March 2nd. 

Dr. H. W. Chase, Chairman of the Faculty, pre- 
sided. A formal program arranged by a committee 
of the Faculty, was carried out. Rev. Euclid Mc- 
Whorter, of the local Methodist church, offered the 
invocation. "Integer Vitae" was sung by a mixed 
quartette. Dr. F. P. Venable, representing the 
Faculty; Albert M. Coates, representing the student 
body ; and Senator Dorman A. Thompson, represent- 
ing the citizens of the State, were the speakers. 
Many out-of-town relatives and friends were in at- 
tendance. 

In keeping with the plan of the University com- 
mittee on publications, the addresses delivered at the 
service will be published in the March issue of the 
University Record, a copy of which will be mailed 
to alumni. 



N. C. CLUB BEGINS NEW YEAR 

The North Carolina Club has elected new officers 
and announced its program for the spring. No meet- 
ings were held last fall on account of the S. A. T. C. 
regime. Much enthusiasm and interest is being 
manifested in the work this spring, as evidenced by 
the attendance at the first few meetings. Albert M. 
Coates, of Smithfield, is president, while J. V. Rag- 
gett, of Salemburg, is vice-president and secretary. 
"North Carolina, Urban and Industrial," is the 
general subject for discussion. The main discussion 
will be followed by short debates on the topic, which 
is a new feature of the program. 



Ail of the classes have had smokers since Christ- 
mas — the first of the session, since the S. A. T. C. 
made it impossible to hold them last fall. 



Both the Phi and Di literary societies have initi- 
ated many men since Christmas. All meetings are 
well attended and the debates are hotly contested 



and interesting. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



139 



KEMP PLUMMER BATTLE 



Kemp Plummer Battle, alumnus of the Univer- 
sity, tutor, lawyer, member of the secession conven- 
tion of 1862 and of the constitutional convention of 
1868, State treasurer, appointed State superintend- 




ent of public instruction, railroad president, second 
founder of the University of which he was president, 
then professor, trustee for fifty-one years, died at his 
home here on Tuesday, February 4, from heart fail- 
ure, after an illness of about a month, though he was 
confined to his bed for only a few days. 

Dr. Battle, whose father and grandfather were 
both University men, was born on a farm in Franklin 
County, North Carolina, December 19, 1831. His 
grandfather, Joel Battle, who matriculated at the 
University in 1798, built one of the first cotton mills 
in the State, in 1820, at the falls of Tar Eiver. His 
maternal grandfather, Kemp Plummer, was a dis- 
tinguished lawyer. His father, William Horn Bat- 
tle (A. B., 1820), was in succession reporter of the 
Supreme Court, judge of the Superior Court, Jus- 
tice of the Supreme Court, and Professor of Law in 
the University of North Carolina. 

Kemp Battle entered the University at the age of 
thirteen, and graduated in 1849, having with two 
others obtained first distinction in every examination 
in all his studies. He was likewise honored by his 
literary society — the Dialectic — with every oflice in 



the gift of his fellow members. Dr. Battle acted as 
tutor of Latin immediately after graduation ; and 
after serving in that capacity for one session, he was 
chosen tutor of mathematics, which position he held 
for four years. While a tutor in the University, 
Mr. Battle made his master's degree and completed 
the law course. He practiced law in Ealeigh with 
much success till 1876, when he was called back to 
the presidency of his alma mater. In the mean time 
he was a bank director, a road builder, a railroad 
president, a promoter of immigration, president of 
the State Agi-icultural Society and of a life insur- 
ance company. 

Dr. Battle's great work was the rehabilitation of 
the University after it had gone down in the general 
wreck of reconstruction. Of this service Dr. J. E. 
Brooks, in an address delivered a short time before 
Dr. Battle's death, said : "The work of the Univer- 
sity of North Carolina since 1876 must ever be the 
wonder and admiration of educators everywhere. 
In the days of its extreme poverty, when not enough 
money from all sources was available to pay teachers 
of known reputation. President Battle surroimded 
himself with such men as Prof. Ralph Henry Graves, 
Dr. George Tayloe Winston, Hon. John Manning, 
the Phillipses, Dr. Thomas Hume, Dr. Eben Alex- 
ander, Dr. Francis Preston Venable, Prof. William 
Cain, Prof. Joshua Walker Gore, Prof. Walter D. 
Toy, Prof. Henry Horace Williams, Dr. Henry 
Van Peters Wilson, Dr. Richard Henry Whitehead, 
and Dr. .Joseph Austin Holmes. It required wis- 
dom and a far-reaching analysis of men, to find and 
secure, without money, without promise of promo- 
tion, this array of immortals. Dr. Battle did this, 
not all at one time, to be sure, in the University's 
leanest days, and to him belongs the glory and honor, 
and he now has the esteem and love of every deep- 
dyed North Carolinian. In our Hall of Fame no 
name will be written above his. To have been a 
member of his University faculty was to be made 
a fellow of greatness, and you will have to go a long 
way to find a parallel to Dr. Battle's work. 

"Leaving out laboratories and fellowships, did Dr. 
Gilman do more with his fifteen millions of dollars 
to foimd and establish Johns Hopkins in 1876 than 
Dr. Kemp Plummer Battle did with nothing but his 
own vision and undaunted will in re-establishing the 
University of North Carolina that same year? 
Measured by their works, I challenge Johns Hopkins 
or any other contemporary institution of learning to 
match Charles Duncan Mclver, Charles Brantly 



140 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



Ajcock, Edwin Anderson Alderman, Josephus Dan- 
iels and James Yadkin Joyner, the first results of 
Dr. Battle's stewardship." 

By appeals to the alumni, and to patriotic men 
not alumni, through the press, by letter and by 
personal interview, Dr. Battle raised $20,000 for 
the revival of the University. At his urging, the 
General Assembly assigned for its annual support 
$7,500, being the interest on the land script fund 
of $125,000 given to the State by the national gov- 
ernment. These two funds enabled the institution 
to open its doors September 6, 1875. When called 
to the presidency of the University in 1876 he em- 
ployed his own credit to supply deficiencies in its 
treasury and made known its needs to the legis- 
lature. In 1881, in the face of organized and bitter 
opposition on the part of the presidents of three de- 
nominational colleges, he secured from the^egis- 
lature an annual appropriation of $20,000, the first 
annual appropriation ever given to the University by 
the State, whose constitution, in 1776, ordained its 
establishment. 

Again at Dr. Battle's urging, the General Assemb- 
ly, March 9, 1877, authorized the State Board of 
Education to establish a ISTormal School in connec- 
tion with the University for the purpose of training 
teachers of the common schools of the State. Two 
thousand dollars a year for two years was appropri- 
ated, and a like amount was authorized for colored 
teachers at other places. Three months later, the 
first summer school for teachers was opened at 
Chapel Hill. 

In June, 1890, the alumni of the University re- 
solved to establish a chair of history, and subscrip- 
tions were made which seemed to accomplish this 
purpose. It was later found that seven or eight 
thousand dollars were needed to complete the en- 
dowment. This sum was raised within the next six 
months through the efforts of President Battle, aided 
by Professor George T. Winston. The chair thus 
made possible was formally created by the trustees 
in February, 1891, and Dr. Battle, having concluded 
to retire from the presidency, was unanimously 
chosen Alumni Professor of History. 

In 1907 he became emeritus Professor of History, 
retiring on a Carnegie pension, merely withdrawing 
from teaching to take up the active work of writing 
a history of the University of North Carolina, which 
he published in two large volumes. President Al- 
derman of the University of Virginia declared that 
under Dr. Battle's wise and sympathetic direction 
the history department of the University enriched 
and invigorated the intellectual life of the institu- 
tion, causing history to be regarded by those under 



his g-uidance as no longer merely informational and 
conventional in value but a department of the great 
science of sociology. 

He was also the author of a valuable work on 
"The Trials and Judicial Proceedings of the ISTew 
Testament" and a "History of the North Carolina 
Supreme Court," besides a number of other minor 
publications. He left in manuscript a large volume 
of "Personal Reminiscences" besides a "History of 
the Parish of the Chapel of the Cross" and a "His- 
tory of Christ Church Parish, Raleigh." He was a 
tireless worker, and up to the last week of his life 
maintained a lively interest in current events. A 
few months before his death he published a valuable 
jaaper in the Kentucky Law Beview in answer to the 
attacks on the Supreme Court of the United States 
by Judge Wannamaker of the Supreme Court of 
Ohio, charging usui'pation in deciding acts of Con- 
gress unconstitutional. Dr. Battle shows that it is 
the plain duty of the Court under the Constitution 
and that the contrary doctrine would create a bi- 
ennial congressional despotism. He also had papers 
in the News and Observer, the Woman's Protest, and 
the last issue of the University Magazine before his 
death. 

On ISTovember 28, 1855, Mr. Battle married a dis- 
tant kinswoman, Martha Ann, daughter of James S. 
Battle, of Edgecombe County, and his home life was 
a singularly happy one. Their four sons, Kemp P. 
Jr., Thomas H., Herbert B., and William J., all of 
whom survive, have graduated at the University; 
and three sons of his only daughter, jSTellie 
(Mrs. R. H. Lewis), have also graduated here, the 
fourth and fifth generations to receive their educa- 
tion at the University. Another grandson, Kemp 
Davis Battle, the fifth generation of the name on the 
rolls of the University, graduated here in 1909, and 
two others, James Wilson Battle, and Hyman L. 
Battle, matriculated here and are now soldiers in 
France. Dr. Battle is survived by the sons and 
grandsons mentioned, all useful and prominent men, 
by a granddaughter, Mrs. John M. Booker, of Chapel 
Hill, and by eleven great grand-children. 

Dr. Battle received the degree of Doctor of Laws 
from Davidson College in 1882, and the same de- 
gree from the University of North Carolina in 1910. 

The interment took place at Raleigh on February 
6. Services were held in Gerrard Hall at 8 o'clock, 
Dr. H. W. Chase, Chairman of the Faculty ; Rev. R. 
Maynard Marshall, Rev. Euclid McWhorter, Rev. 
W. D. Moss, and Rev. E. L. Baskin taking part. 
The service in Raleigh was conducted by the Right 
Reverend Joseph Blount Cheshire, Bishop of North 
Carolina, the Rev. R. M. Marshall, Rector of the 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



141 



Chapel of the Cross, and the Rev. Milton A. Barber, 
Rector of Christ Church, Raleigh. 

The honorary pall bearers were: Professors H. 
W. Chase, H. H. Williams, W. D. Toy, H. V. Wil- 
son, A. H. Patterson, M. C. S. Noble, Edwin Green- 
law, H. M. Wagstatf and W. DeB. MacNider. The 
active pall bearers, members of the student council, 
were Luther H. Hodges, Emerson E. White, Bailey 
Liipfert, J. V. Baggett, Donnell Cobb, James S. 
White, and Victor S. Bryant, Jr. 

Collier Cobb. 



BASKETBALL SEASON CLOSES 

The basketball season which has just come to a 
close was notably successful for the Carolina quint. 
Ten of the fifteen games staged were won. Guil- 
ford, Elon, Wake Forest, V. M. I., Washington and 
Lee, Davidson, Charlotte Y. M. C. A., Camp Jack- 
son were defeated, while the Carolina team lost to 
A. and E., V. P. I., Durham Y. M. C. A., and Vir- 
ginia, two games being staged with each of the latter 
three. Carmichael and Lynch, forwards; Cuthbert- 
son and Morris, guards; and Liipfert, center, com- 
posed the first team, while Hodges, Griffith, and 
Brown showed up best for the scrubs. Rainey Cuth- 
bertson captained the quint. Jeff Bynum was man- 
ager. 

WITH OTHER COLLEGES 

From the three following sentences taken from the 
Llarvard Alumni Bulletin of February 27 it is quite 
clear that Harvard is passing through a period of 
close self-examination: "If the University can 
make its work more genuinely serviceable to the peo- 
ple of Massachusetts by changes in its admission re- 
quirements, it ought to give the most careful atten- 
tion to responsible proposals for such changes. 
* * * Has our curriculum grown top-heavy ? Do we 
oft'cr too manv courses and too little instruction ?" 



The following statistics of registration have been 
published by Columbia University as of Nov. 1, 
1918: S. A. T. C. and Naval Unit, 2,218; Colum- 
bia College, 408; Barnard College, 664; School of 
Law, 48 ; College of Physicians and Surgeons, 489 ; 
Schools of Mines, Engineering and Chemistry, 37; 
School of Architecture, 19 ; School of Journalism, 
39 ; School of Business, 40 ; Teachers College, 1,909 ; 
College of Pharmacy, 462; Graduate Faculties, 586; 
LTnclassified University, 7.5 ; Extension Teaching, 
3,822; A^e^ToW, 14,778. 



the war, the University of Iowa will run its summer 
school for a period of six weeks in 1919. The Uni- 
versity of Michigan contemplates similar procedure 
and will offer instruction in several departments 
such as Engineering and Medicine not formerly given 
in the summer term. Harvard University and the 
University of Virginia are also to have two sessions, 
totaling ten weeks. 



Columbia University alumni are raising $600,000 
to turn over to the University to meet the deficit 
incurred through loss of tuition and fees during the 
period of the war. 



The University of Iowa is planning a Students' 
LTnion as a memorial to its sons who fell in service 
during the war. The amount to be secured for its 
erection is set at $350,000. 



TRUSTEES ELECTED 

New trustees of the University for the term end- 
ing November 30, 1927, were elected at a joint ses- 
sion of the Senate and House of Representatives in 
Raleigh on Tuesday, March 4, as follows: 

J. L. Hyatt, Yancey; B. L. Banks, Gates; V. S. 
Bryant, Durham ; W. H. S. Burgwyn, Northamp- 
ton ; W. P. Bynum, Guilford ; R. S. Neal, Washing- 
ton; J. W. Graham, Orange; M. J. Hawkins, War- 
ren; R. S. Hutchinson, Mecklenburg; Frank A. Lin- 
ney, Watauga; Walter Murphy, Rowan; R. B. Red- 
wine, Union; A. A. Shuford, Jr., Catawba; C. L. 
Smith, Wake; A. E. Woltz, Gaston, E. J. Tucker, 
Person; H. A. Page, Moore; Z. V. Walser, David- 
son; Leslie Weil, Wayne; Charles Whedbee, Per- 
quimans; B. K. Lassiter, Granville; J. N. Wilson, 
Guilford ; F. D. Winston, Bertie ; Stable Linn, Row- 
an; W. C. Rufiin, Rockingham. 

For the term expiring November 30, 1925, John 
H. Manning, of Lenoir, was named in place of Henry 
A. London, while William Dunn, Jr., of Craven, 
takes the place formerly held by D. F. Ray. 

Succeeding the late Dr. Kemp P. Battle is George 
Grantham, of Harnett, and John K. Wilson, of Pas- 
quotank, succeeds himself, these terms expiring No- 
ember 30, 1923. 

J. M. Carson, of Rutherford, was named as his 
own successor; J. H. McMullan, Jr., of Chowan, 
succeeds R. C. Ellis, while D. Matt Thompson, of 
Iredell, was elected to succeed C. C. Loughlin, ex- 
piration of these terms being November 30, 1921. 



In order to provide additional training for those 
students who dropped out of college on account of 



The regular triangular Carolina-Virginia-Johns 
Hopkins debate will be held again this year, accord- 
ing to present plans. 



142 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 

Issued monthly except in July, August, and September, by the Gen- 
eral Alumni Association of the University of North Carolina. 

Board of Publication 

The Review is edited by the following Board of Publication: 

Louis R. Wilson, '99 Editor 

Associate Editors: Walter Murphy, '92; Harry Howell, '95; Archibald 
Henderson, '98; W. S. Bernard, '00; J. K. Wilson, '05; Louis 
Graves, '02; F. P. Graham, '09; Kenneth Tanner, '11. 

E. R. Rankin, '13 Managing Editor 

R. W. Madry, '18 News Editor 

Subscription Price 

Single Copies ^O-p 

Per Year 1-00 

Communications intended for the Editor should be sent to Chapel 
Hill. N. C; for the ManaginK Editor, to Chapel Hill, N. C. All 
communications intended for publication must be accompanied with 
signatures if they are to receive consideration. 

OFFICE OF PUBLICATION, CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 

Entered at the Postoffice at Chapel Hill. N. C. as second class 
matter. 



THE UNIVERSITY IN LETTERS 



Builders of Democeacy, By Edwin Greenlaw. 

Chicago: Scott, Foresman and Co., 1918. 

This book aims to serve the cause of democracy, to 
make it safe for the world, by giving to the children 
of our schools a clear conception of the democratic 
faith. Though planned for history and English 
classes, it is really a propagandist book — in the best 
sense. No one who has read it, whether child or 
adult, can fail to have a clearer and warmer sense of 
democratic citizenship, and of the essential partner- 
ship of England and America in the foundation of 
free government. Nearly a century and a half after 
our Eevolution began, we still find ourselves (in our 
public s(ihools) nursing the old feelings, prejudices, 
and misconceptions, partly on account of the short 
vision of our textbook makers. Through copious 
readable extracts from the writings of English and 
American authors — statesmen, historians, poets, 
novelists, etc. — linked by simple, clear, often inspir- 
by the editor — "Builders of Democ- 
tells the story as it should be told: how the 
cornerstone was laid centuries ago in the land of our 
old "enemy," how the structure rose painfully, not 
without accident, how the house of democracy took 
on expression as well as form, how we in America 
helped to build it through war and peace, finally how 
the underlying partnership of England and America 
has been transformed by the world war into open 
and avowed unity of purpose. All this is told in 
the middle and longest section of the book, entitled 
"The Builders and Their Work." Part one, "The 
Call to the Colors," shows how "more than the flag" 



mg comment 



racy 



goes by when our flag goes by, and analyzes this 
"more" in concrete terms. Part three, the last sec- 
tion of the book, "Soldiers of Freedom," is concern- 
ed with America's participation in the war — its in- 
cidents, its significance. 



EXTENSION SERIES NOS. 30 AND 31 

The North Carolina Club Year Book, 1917-1918 
(Extension Series No. 30), entitled "County Gov- 
ernment and County Affairs in North Carolina," is 
a most valuable publication. It represents a novel 
and suggestive departure — the detailed and intimate 
study, in a series of chapters each written by the 
most competent expert on the subject in North Car- 
olina, of the county, its affairs and government, as 
found at present in this State. The chief value of 
such a publication is that it bristles with suggestions 
and programs for improvement and retorm, as well 
as afi'ords a comprehensive and authoritative survey 
of the local field. 

"Compulsory Military Training" (Extension' 
Series No. 31) is of invaluable use to the contestants 
in the State-wide debate of the present year — the 
query being: Resolved, That the United States Gov- 
ernment should adopt a policy requiring one year of 
military training of all able-bodied men before they 
reach the age of 21. In addition, it will prove to 
be of great service to anyone wishing to be informed 
on the subject, which is now one of great general in- 
terest. It covers nearly 100 pages, and contains, in 
addition to brief and bibliography, pertinent ex- 
cerpts from recent and standard publications, 
speeches and periodical literature. 



A number of papers and publications, by alumni, 
which have recently appeared, deserve more space 
than it is possible to give them here. Three are by 
the expert newspaperman, who is also a talented 
writer and frequent contributor to periodicals, S. R. 
Winters. These are "A Carolina Rural Commun- 
ity Credit Union" (illustrated) in Commerce and 
Finance, July 10, 1918; "Marketing by Motor 
Truck" (illustrated) in The Field, July, 1918; 
and "Black Walnut and the War" in The Journal of 
Geography for 1919. The first article describes in 
an interesting way the workings of the Lowe's Grove 
Credit Union, Durham County, N. C, established 
largely through the initiative of Mr. John Sprunt 
Hill. The third article calls attention to the enorm- 
ous demand of the government in the manufacture of 
gun stocks and aeroplane propellers, for black wal- 
nut ; and the great aid rendered by the Boy Scouts 
in locating the trees, aggregating more than 15,000,- 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



143 



000 feet. The leading article in the February issue 
of System is "What Made Our Business G-row," 
bv Julian S. Carr, Jr., President, Durham Hosiery 
Mills. He has told a "true story'' of finance which 
is vivid and interesting ; and which contains valuable 
generalizations from his own experience on the most 
approved methods of "doing business." Recent pub- 
lications of Chief Justice Walter Clark, which bear 
the stamp of personality and exhibit the wide range 
of his mind, are: "Address to the Law Class at the 
University of North Carolina, 31 January, 1919;" 
"Infallible Government by the Odd Man" (.4 men- 
can Law Review) ; "Making Their Words of More 
Effect by their Traditions" {The Public) ; "Judicial 
Supremacy Without Warrant in the Constitution" 
{The Public) ; "Centennial of the Supreme Court — 
Respirase and Addresses — January 4, 1919 ;" and 
"History of the Supreme Court of North Carolina" 
{N. C. 'Booklet). 



Dr. Wiliam J. Battle, 1S88, Professor of Greek in 
the University of Cincinnati, has an article in a 
recent number of the Texas Review on Pan-German- 
ism in the Ages of Pericles: The Warring ISTations 
and Their Purposes. Dr. Battle shows that Athens 
had the ambition and methods of the modern Prus- 
sians, and that the Lacedemonians were the successful 
opponents of their ambitious projects. He supports 
this theory by quotations from Thucydides. 



In the American Magazine of Art (December, 
1918), there is an excellent article by Professor F. 
H. Koch, entitled "The Dakota Playmakers." In 
it are described in a vivid and attractive way the 
story of the founding of the organization known as 
the Dakota Playmakers, and the various produc- 
tions of that organization. The article is illustrated 
with six illustrations, several of which are unique 
and remarkable. As pertinent to his work here may 
be quoted the concluding sentence of the article : 
"From these communal strivings, perhaps a new art- 
form ; from these playmakers of the people a new 
poetry democratic — a fresh art-expression of the 
folk, rich and strange, and of enduring beauty." 



On Sunday, February 23, last, in a chain of 
metropolitan newspapers, appeared a syndicated in- 
terview by Edward Marshall with Dr. Charles H. 
Herty, formerly head of the chemistry department 
here and now editor of the Journal of Industrial and 
Engineering Chemistry. In this article Dr. Herty 
is described as "among the most eminent chemists of 
America, and therefore of the world." The article 



embodied the proposal to establish a great institu- 
tion for the promotion of chemical discovery. 
"There is today," said Dr. Herty, "no medium, no 
machine, through which humanity can assure itself 
of getting out of science, surely out of chemistry, the 
ultimate value of these things which are imiuediately 
at hand." Dr. Herty's proposal has received almost 
the universal endorsement of the chemical profession 
in America. 



"Child Welfare in North Carolina," a volume of 
314 pages, has been edited and in part written by 
W. H. Swift, class of '02. It bears the sub-title: 
"An Inquiry by the National Child Labor Commit- 
tee for the North Carolina Conference for Social 
Service," and is published by the National Child 
Labor Committee (New York, 1918). It is, just 
what it purports to be, a study of what is — the con- 
ditions in North Carolina today. After pointing 
out, in his introduction, the importance of certain 
needed remedial legislation, Mr. Swift recommends 
that the General Assembly of 1919 authorize the 
Governor to appoint a commission, the members 
serving without pay, to study all conditions and laws 
affecting children and report to the General Assemb- 
Iv of 1921. 



Brigadier General Samuel T. Ansell, Law '06, 
acting Judge Advocate General, was the principal 
spokesman at the annual dinner of the Harvard Club 
of Washington, D. C, on January 28th. He spoke 
on the Place and Influence of the College Man in the 
Recent War. The address, which is a fine interpre- 
tation of the part played b}' the college man in the 
war, is published in the Harvard Alumni Bulletin 
of February 20th. 



C. A. Shore, A. B. and M. A., is joint author with 
Dr. W. P. Hay, of Washington, D. C, of a very 
beautifully illustrated paper on "The Decapod Crus- 
taceans (crabs and shrimps) of Beaufort, N. C. and 
the Surrounding Region." The paper appears in 
the Bulletin of the U. S. Bureau of Fisheries, Vol. 
XXXV. Dr. Shore's part of the work was carried 
out some years ago at the Beaufort Laboratory dur- 
ing several summers. Dr. Hay has added material- 
ly to the descriptions and photographs, and the re- 
sult is a valuable publication which, will be used for 
manv vears bv those collecting on the southern coast. 



W. C. George, A. B., M. A., Ph. D., has published 
in a recent number (Vol. XXXV, No. 5) of the Bi- 
ological Bulletin, a paper on experimental embry- 



144 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



ology, entitled "Experiments on the Determination 
of the Fate of the Gray Crescent Material in the 
Frog Egg." The paper deals with the question as 
to whether the great organs of the embryonic body, 
such as the nervous system, are represented in the 
egg by particular parts of its substance. It is a re- 
port on work carried out in Princeton University, 
in which institution Dr. George was holding a fel- 
lowship when he entered the service. The investiga- 
tion is in line with work which Dr. George pursued 
for a couple of years in this University. 



Hamlin Garland, the author, whose works have 
portrayed life in the Middle West, gave a reading 
from his writings in Gerrard Hall on the night of 
March 6 th. 



Dr. Charles Lee Eaper, of the department of 
Economics, has taken an active part in the recent re- 
vision of legislation relating to taxation in North 
Carolina. Dr. Eaper has also been a frequent con- 
tributor to the daily press of the State on tax mat- 
ters, and has done much to inform the public on 
this extremely important subject. 



FACULTY RESOLUTIONS IN HONOR OF DR. BATTLE 

The death of Dr. Kemp Plummer Battle, former 
President, Professor Emeritus of the University of 
North Carolina, terminated a career which for more 
than half a century was devoted with loving zeal and 
rare intelligence to the service of the State and the 
University. 

He served his age as a lawyer, member of the 
Secession Convention, State Treasurer, railroad 
president, trustee of the University for fifty-one 
years, and finally as President of the University. 

In his last work he made his greatest contribution 
to the life of the State. It was a splendid act of 
patriotism and courage to revive the old University, 
desecrated by the ravages of war, overwhelmed by 
poverty and neglect, and threatened with ruin. 

In this work Dr. Battle took a leading part. He 
saved the University from the danger of political in- 
terference and made it once more the pride of the 
State. The imposing structure of later years was 
built on the foundation laid anew between 1876 and 
1891. 

The story of his life will record the efficient ad- 
ministration of offices of trust, but his record does 
not afford an adequate measure of the esteem in 
which Dr. Battle was held. He was also the object 
of affection based on his character as a man. In this 
character the dominant clement was the spirit of 



love. In the solution of his problems he was guided 
by this spirit. He demanded truth and justice, but 
for him justice was tempered by mercy. And so, he 
went through life working, helping, and striving al- 
ways to create an atmosphere of harmony. As his 
presence was a benediction, his memory will be an 
inspiration. F. P. Venable, I. H. Manning, J. G. 
deR. Hamilton, M. C. S. Noble, W. D. Toy, Collier 
Cobb, committee. 



SUMMER SCHOOL TO OPEN JUNE 24 

The University Summer School will not open this 
year until June 24, Director N. W. Walker has an- 
nounced. The change of date is due to the postpone- 
ment of commencement until June 18. Inquiries 
pertaining to courses and applications for rooms 
are coming in faster than usual. Dr. Walker sees no 
reason why this should not be the best session in the 
history of the school. It will come to a close on 
August 8th. 



NEW QUARTER OPENS MARCH 25 

The new quarter at the State University will open 
on March 25, when many former and new students 
just returning from the service are expected to regis- 
ter. The present quarter ends on March 24, exami- 
nations beginning on the 20th and extending through 
the 24th. Students entering at the beginning of the 
next quarter will be able to complete one-third of a 
year's work in whole instead of half units as formerly. 
The last quarter comes to a close on June 18 with 
Commencement Day. The total number of students 
registering since Christmas has reached 815, about 
150 more than were expected back this spring. Each 
day sees the return of some former student from the 
service who wishes to resume his course of study. 
Several overseas men have presented themselves re- 
cently. Second lieutenants are to be found in abun- 
dance about the campus, as well as many former 
navy, marine and aviation men. 

The Law and Pharmacy schools, which were well- 
nigh closed by the war, are now filled to overflowing, 
the number in the former being especially large. 
The Medical school shows a total registration of 50. 
Twenty-one gTaduate students are enrolled. The 
1918 class, with about 25 members back in college, 
presents perhaps the biggest come-back in years. 



Prospects for a winning baseball nine are especially 
bright. Captain Jack Powell has issued a call for 
candidates and spring practice is well under way. 
Ten letter men are back. The schedule, while not 
completed, contains some hard games. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 145 



ESTABLISHED 1916 

illuinni Coyalty Tund 

"One for all, and all Tor one" 



Council: 

A. M. SCALES, '92 
A.W.HAYWOOD. 04 
J. A. GRAY. Jr., "08 
W. T. SHORE, '05 




The General Assembly of North Carolina 

Has shown its faith in Alma Mater by cancelhng her indebt- 
edness of $20,000 and increasing her maintenance fund from 
$165,000 to $215,000 annually for the next two years. 

Twelve Carolina Men m New York City 

In the preliminary campaign for the Graham Memorial, sub- 
scribed a total of $ 1 0,000, thereby showing their faith in the 
student body. 

Carolina Men Throughout the World 

Have paid in a total of $7,950 to the Alumni Loyalty Fund. 

Do You Have a Similar Faith? 

If so, show it! Send your check to J. A. Warren, Treas- 
urer. Assist in the Graham Memorial Campaign. And — put 
Carolina in your will! 



146 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



THE GENERAL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

of the 
UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 



Officers of the Association 

E. D. W. Connor, '99 President 

E. B. Eankin, '13 Secretary 

Executive Committee: Walter Murphy, '92; Dr. E. H. 
Lewis, '70; W. N. Everett, '86; H. E. Eondthaler, '93; C. W. 
TiUett, Jr., '09. 

THE ALUMNI 

R. W. MADRY. 18, Alumni Editor 



• RollofRonor * 



J. W. Tomlinson, '03 

— Killed in action in France. 

H. D. Lambeth, '16 

— Wounded in action in France. He has been returned to 
the States, undergoing treatment at the Walter Eeed Hospital 
for a time, but is now at his home in Benson. He held the 
rank of lieutenant. 

aXATIONS 

Graham Kerr Hobbs, '12 

— Captain Graham Kerr Hobbs, of Clinton, this state, and a 
oflBcer in the famous "Wildcat" (Thirtieth) Division, com- 
manding Company H, 119th Infantry, has been cited for gal- 
lantry in action in France, and has been raised to the rank 
of major. The details of the story are contained in a recent 
story in the Wilmington Star. 

Although the Thirtieth Division, ivhieh contains the units 
of the North Carolina National Guard and is composed en- 
tirely of the guard of the Carolinas and Tennessee, trained 
at Camp Sevier, Greenville, S. C, Major Hobbs and his com- 
pany were stationed at Gamp Greene for a while. His com- 
pany (at that time Company K, Second North Carolina In- 
fantry) was one unit of the battalion of the North Carolina 
National Guard which was sent to Camp Greene for guard 
purpose as soon as ground was broken there looking toward 
the construction of a camp. The battalion, which had re- 
cently returned from the Mexican border and had not been 
mustered out of the service, was kept at Camp Greene until 
units of Forty-first Division arrived here to train, after which 
the Tar Heel unit was sent on to Camp Sevier to become part 
of the Thirtieth Division. 

Bryce Little, '20 

Field Army Clerk Bryce Little has been cited for his 
efiicient and loyal services to the chief of staff of the 30th 
Division. Mr. Little was anxious to get into the front line 
trenches, but his superiors thought his services in the head- 
quarters department too valuable to relinquish. The citation 
from John H. Herr, chief of staff, reads as follows: 

"1. I take great pleasure in commending you for your 
very efficient and loyal services as Chief Clerk and Confidential 
Secretary for the Chief of Staff and G-3 in this division. 
Your service has been at all times highly efficient, and you 
have been untiring in your efforts to render the workings of 



this office efficient. Your service has been such as to material- 
ly increase the prompt preparation and dispatch of important 
orders at critical times. The service rendered by you is in 
my judgment more valuable to the government than you could 
possibly have been as a lieutenant, although I am fully aware 
that you possess the necessary qualifications to make an 
efficient officer, and that only the fact that there was such a 
shortage of efficient Field Clerks rendered it undesirable for 
the government to commission you in the line. 

"2. To sum up, your service in this division has been of 
the highest grade of efficiency, and the cheerful rendition of 
your best efforts during long hours of successive days iu fight- 
ing when the strain was great is very highly appreciated by 
me as well as by Colonel Burnett, the G-3 of this division. 
Upon you has fallen the brunt of the supervision of the office 
work of the staff, and you have never failed us. ' ' 



FORSYTH ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

— -Members of the Forsyth County Alumni Association staged 
a most enjoyable banquet in Winston-Salem on the night of 
March 7th. Professor W. S. Bernard, of the University fac- 
ulty, was the principal speaker. He presented the cause of 
Graham Memorial Building. He was followed by Theodore 
Eondthaler, of Winston-Salem, a member of the senior class 
at the University, who spoke of the "E. K. " spirit which per- 
meates the student body at the University. Eev. J. Kenneth 
Pfohl, a classmate of Dr. Graham's, spoke briefly of his life 
and work. John W. Fries told -of the trying and faithful 
work of Dr. Battle, and Dr. E. P. Gray spoke of his class- 
mate. Professor Stacy. Eesolutions in honor of these three 
leaders of the University were presented and adopted. Bishop 
Edward Eondthaler, an honor guest, also spoke in highest 
terms of praise of Dr. Battle's life. 

It was announced that there are now more than 175 mem- 
bers of the Forsyth Association. Committees were appointed 
to assist A. H. Bahnson, the local director, in conducting the 
Graham Memorial campaign in Forsyth county. 

In addition to Prof. Bernard and Mr. Eondthaler from the 
University and Bishop Eondthaler and Prof. L. Lea White, 
guests, the alumnae and alumni present were as follows : 
Misses Callie Lewis and Maude Carson, Messrs. W. M. Hen- 
dren, A. H. Eller, P. A. Gorrell, J. K. Norfleet, W. R. Johnson, 
J. K. Pfohl, J. W. Fries, A. H. Bahnson, Herbert Vogler, E. 
C. Vaughn, E. F. Conrad, Ira W. Hine, Fred Brower, J. B. 
Goslen, Dr. W. L. Grimes, W. H. Britt, A. Eosenbacher, U. L. 
Stanford, L. B. Wall, H. C. Graver, H. E. Eondthaler, John L. 
Gilmer, Dr. E. P. Gray, C. A. Vogler, Eay Linebach, Claude 
Pfaff, B. C. Tavis, George Holton, Dr. A. M. Schultz, Paul 
B. Eaton, Thomas Wilson, C. E. Williams, F. M. Parrish, 
Raymond Parker, Virgil Wilson, M. E. Pfaff, E. A. Eeed, Dr. 
J. P. Fearrington and M. E. Dunnagan. 



ROCKINGHAM ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

— Members of the Eockingham County Alumni Association 
gathered around the banquet table on the night of February 
10th, enjoyed a splendid repast, then entered into the Graham 
spirit and pledged their material and moral support to the 
memorial movement. The get-together affair was held at 
Spray. All of the local alumni and many from all over the 
county were present. 

Hon. A. D. Ivie presided. He called on W. R. Dalton, Eev. 
W. J. Gordon, Professor Allen, Prof. P. H. G^vynn, Lieut. 
Price H. Gwynn, Jr., E. V. Hobbs, Mr. Womack, Mr. Smith, 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



147 



E. E. Emerson, H. C. Pace, Mr. Talliferio, Judge A. W. 
Dunn, and J. E. Mclver, all of whom made brief but inter- 
esting talks. A committee was appointed to draft suitable 
resolutions on the recent deaths of Professors Stacy and Battle. 

Subscriptions made at the meeting to the memorial fund 
amounted to $500, although a canvass of the entire county 
was planned for an early date. 

New ofScers of the association for the ensuing year were 
elected as follows: A. D. Ivie, president; W. R. Dalton, first 
vice-president; C. O. Michael, second vice-president; P. H. 
Gwynn, Jr., secretary; J. Benton Stacy, treasurer. 



WAKE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

— The Wake County Alumni Association held its annual ban- 
quet in Raleigh on Friday night, February 21st. Forty mem- 
bers were present. Chief Justice Walter Clark, president of 
the association, presented Judge R. W. Winston as toast- 
master. 

Interesting talks were made by E. F. Fountain, Dr. H. W. 
Chase, Dr. R. H. Lewis, and Albert M. Coates. The Graham 
Memorial movement was presented by Mr. Coates and it was 
determined to appoint a committee to raise part of the fund 
in Wake county. 

A resolution was adopted in apreciation of the services of 
the Wake county alumni who gave their lives in the recent 
war. Among these are Seymour Whiting, Fred Manning, 
Dudley Robbins, John Ray, J. Q. Jackson, Gaston Dortch, 
and Ben Dixon. 

New officers were elected as follows: Judge J. S. Manning, 
president; Major W. M. Joyner, vice-president; H. M. Lon- 
don, secretary and treasurer. 



WITH THE CLASSES 



1848 
— The following excerpt, taken from a long story in the Rock- 
ingham Post-Dispatch of recent date concerning Col. Oliver 
H. Dockery, law, pays a high tribute to the Richmond County 
man who has rapidly risen in military circles. He volunteered 
in the Spauish-Amerieau war in 1898, being made second lieu- 
tenant. His army career from then on carried him to all parts 
of the world. He trained many men in this country during 
the war and was ready to embark for France when the armis- 
tice was signed: "Colonel Dockery is the best known and has 
attained the highest rank and military distinction of any sol- 
dier produced by this country or section, in this war or in this 
generation. He would have made a bigger name for himself 
and his native State had the war lasted longer, because, with 
20 years of active service in the Regular Army, he was well 
equipped in the highest arts of leadership in the military pro- 
fession. ' ' 

1860 
— W. M. Coleman, former Attorney General of North Car- 
olina, is now living in New York City, 266 W. 121 St. 

1866 

— General Julian S. Carr is president of the First National 
Bank of Durham. 

1879 
— Capt. Isaac Emerson, manufacturer of the famous Bromo 
Seltzer and donor of the Emerson Athletic Field, resides in 
Baltimore. 

1882 
— A. W. McAlister is president of the Southern Life and 
Trust Co., of Greensboro. 



1883 

— F. A. SherrOl, of Statesville, president of the North Car- 
olina State Millers' Association, presided at a meeting of the 
millers held in Greensboro on January 23. 

1884 
— Julian Wood is prominently identified with banking and 
other business interests of Edenton. 

1885 
— Dr. W. C. Riddick, president of A. & E. State College, was 
elected President of the North Carolina Society of Civil Engi- 
neers for the ensuing year at a meeting held in Raleigh re- 
cently. 

1886 
— Rev. Kirkland Huske is a prominent Episcopal minister of 
Great Neck, N. Y. 

— F. F. Patterson is on the editorial staff of the Baltimore 
Sun. 

— Dr. Sterling Ruffin is a successful physician of Washington, 
D. C, his address being 1835 Connecticut Avenue. 
— W. C. Ruffin is president of a large cotton mill at May- 
odan. 

1887 
— W. H. McNeill is successfully engaged in farming at Car- 
thage. 

— Rev. C. F. Smith is a prominent Episcopal minister of 
Lynchburg, Va. 

1888 
— Julius C. Martin, of Asheville, is being urged for the office 
of U. S. District Judge for the Western district of North 
Carolina. 



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THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



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1889 
— H. G. Wood is prominently connected with various business 
activities of Edenton. 

— John Sprunt Hill, of Durham, was recently elected president 
of the State Forestry Association. 

1890 

— William S. Battle is a prominent railroad official of the 
Norfolk & Western system. He is located at Roanoke, Va. 
— V. S. Bryant is a member of the law firm of Bryant and 
Brogden, of Durham. He represented Durham County in the 
House in the last General Assembly. 

1891 
— Dr. Chas. S. Mangum is a member of the University medi- 
cal faculty. 

■ — R. G. Vaughan is president of the American Exchange 
National Bank, of Greensboro. 

1892 
— A. W. McLean, of Lumberton, president of the North Car- 
olina Bar Association, is now a member of the War Finance 
Commission Corporation at Washington. 

— Frank C. Mebane, a native of Hillsboro, is a prominent at- 
torney of New York City. 

— A. M. Scales is vice-president and general counsellor of the 
Southern Life and Trust Co. He is State Senator from Guil- 
ford County and has frequently been mentioned as a possible 
candidate for Governor. 

1893 
— Dr. Howard Rondthaler is president of the State Social Ser- 
vice Conference which convened in Raleigh in February. As 
district governor of Rotary Clubs, he addressed the Raleigh 
Rotary Club while in the Capital City. 

— A. B. Andrews is a prominent attorney and counsellor-at-law 
at Raleigh. 

1894 
— E. W. Brawley is president of a large cotton mill of Moores- 
ville. 

— Benjamin Wyche, of Charlotte, is special agent for the New 
York Life Insurance Co. 

— Maj. Owen Hill Kenan, medical reserve corps, is with the 
103rd Field Artillery, 26th Division, France. Major Kenan 
was in Paris when the war broke out and immediately joined 
the American ambulance corps. On the entry of America into 
the war he entered the medical reserve corps of the army. His 
division suffered severe casualties. 
— Louis M. Swink is a successful lawyer of Winston-Salem. 

1895 
— A. L. Quickel is chief clerk of the Judiciary Committee of 
the House, at Washington, D. C. He is a lawyer by profes- 
sion. He requests that The Revie'W be sent to him at Lin- 
colnton, N. C. 

1896 
— Edwin Clark Gregory, of Salisbury, aecompaniel by Mrs. 
Gregory, left recently for an extended trip for Cuba and 
Panama. 

— H. B. Peschau holds a lieutenant's commission in the navy, 
his address being U. S. Naval Ammunition Depot, Portsmouth, 
Va. Before entering the service he was a large ice manufac- 
turer of Wilmington. 

— Henry A. Grady, of Clinton, was recently elected Grand 
Master of the North Carolina Grand Lodge of Masons. 
— A. B. Kimball is being urged for the office of U. S. District 
Judge for the Western District of North Carolina. 
— J. Harvey White is president of the Travora Manufacturing 
Co., of Graham. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



149 



1897 
— D. B. Smith is a successful lawyer of Charlotte. He was a 
member of Carolina's first debating team in 1897, when his 
Alma Mater debated Virginia. 

— Dr. R. H. Wright is president of the East Carolina Teachers 
Training School, of Greenville, N. C. 

— A. W. Mangum is owner of a large camphor farm at Waller, 
Florida. 

— Ralph H. Graves, who went to Bed Cross headquarters in 
Washington last summer as a member of the Bed, Cross Mag- 
azine's editorial board, has returned to the Sunday editorship 
of the New York Times. 

— J. H. Dangerfield is manager of the Gastonia Cotton Yarn 
Co., 405-6 Mariner and Merchant Bldg., Philadelphia. Pa. 

1898 
— F. M. Pinnix is editor of the Orphans' Friend, a widely 
read journal. He is located at Oxford. 

— C. Stuart Carr is secretary and treasurer of the Eoyster 
Fertilizer Co., of Norfolk, Va. 

1899 

H. M. Wagstapf, Secretary, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
— Warren Kluttz is a chemist at Sheffield, Alabama. 
— Dr. E. A. Abernethy, formerly a prominent Chapel Hill 
physician, who volunteered early in the war and has been with 
the .303d Sanitary Train, Headquarters A. E. F., France, has 
been promoted from major to lieutenant colonel, according to 
a telegram just received by Mrs. Abernethy. Dr. Abernethy 
has been doing the work of a lieutenant colonel since last Sep- 
tember. He began his active overseas service last May, going 
over with an advance party of the 78th and 30th divisions. 
— H. P. Harding, of the Charlotte city schools, is president 
of the North Carolina Association of City School Superin- 
tendents. 

1900 
W. S. Bern.\kd, Secretary, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
— K. P. Lewis was recently made assistant secretary and 
treasurer of the Erwin Cotton Mills Co., of West Durham. 
— Dr. J. M. Lynch is a successful physician of Asheville. 
— William E. White is secretary and treasurer of the Travora 
Manufacturing Co., of Graham. 

1901 

Dr. J. G. MTJRPnr, Secretary, Wilmington, N. C. 
— A. E. Woltz is a member of the law firm of Mangum & 
Woltz, of Gastonia. He was University Bursar for several 
years. 

— Rev. F. B. Rankin, who has been doing Y. M. C. A. work 
since the early days of the war, is now located in this State 
and is engaged in securing work for returning soldiers. His 
mail should be forwarded to Rutherfordton. 

1902 

B. A. Merritt, Secretary, Greensboro, N. C. 
— E. G. Moss is engaged in work connected with the depart- 
ment of agriculture, at Oxford. 

— Wm. T. Johnson is a member of the general insurance firm 
of Willis Johnson, of Richmond, Va., American National 
Bank BuUding. 

1903 

N. W. W.\LKER, Secretary, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
— Zebulon Judd is head of the Department of Education of 
the Alabama Polytechnic Institute, Auburn, Alabama. 
— J. L. Morehead is a successful attorney of Durham. 
— Dr. S. Dace McPherson is a leading specialist of the eye, 
ear, nose and throat, of Durham. 



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150 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



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Statement of the Condition of 

The Fidelity Bank 

OF DURHAM, N. C. 

^^ade to the ^ACorth Carolina Corporation Commission 
at the Close of Business, Dec. 31, 1918 



RESOURCES 

Loans and Investments $2,971,015.18 

Furniture and Fixtures 10,200.0(1 

Cash Items 420,161.70 

Cash in Vaults and with Banks 837,050.40 

Overdrafts 3,302.46 

Trade Acceptances 1 ,233,793.90 



$5,481,589.64 
LI.VBILITIES 
Capital Stock $ 100, 



Surplus 
Undivided Profits 

Interest Reserve 

Dividends Unpaid 

Deposits „. 

Bills Payable 



Bills Payable Secured by Liberty Bonds ... 

Unearned Interest 

Blll.s Rediscounted 

Trade .\cceptances Rediscounted 

Contingent Fimd „ _ 



500 
93, 

6, 

4,003i 

100, 

60, 

8, 

90, 

506, 



000.00 
000.00 
782.79 
000.00 
632.21 
451.77 
000.00 
000.00 
657.49 
000.00 
065.38 
000.00 



$5,481,589.64 

B. N. DUKE, President INO. F. WILV. Vice-PtesidenI S. W. MINOR, Ceshier 
i. D. KIRKUMD, Assistant Cashier INO. A. BUCHANAN, Assistant Cashier 

Ttie strengtti of this bank lies not alone in its Capital, Surplus, and Re- 
sources, but in the Character and Financial Responsibility 
of the men who conduct its affairs 



1904 

T. F. HiCKEKSON, Secretary, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
— Dr. C. M. Walters is a successful dentist of Union Ridge. 
— J. Bis Kay, of Burnsville, has recently been appointed to 
the Superior Court bench to fill the vacancy caused by the 
death of Hon. M. H. Justice. 
— H. A. Gudger is a successful lawyer of Asheville. 

190.5 

W. T. Shore, Secretary, Charlotte, N. C. 
— Captain Walter Clark, who was captain of the Raleigh Com- 
pany — Co. B., 120th U. S. Infantry, 30th Division — having 
graduated some time since at the general staff college at 
Langres, near Verdun, France, has been assigned to the gen- 
era! staff and when last heard from was on special duty sent 
to Grenoble, Marseilles, Nice, and the Italian frontier. 
— Erection of a monument to the memory of Captain Ben 
Dixon, the commander of Company K, 120th Infantry, who 
died in front of his men in France with a bullet through his 
head after he had been twice wounded, has been launched in 
Raleigh by members of the 1903 class of Trinity College. He 
was a member of the 1905 University law class. The plans 
are to place the monument on the Trinity campus. 
— W. T. Shore, of Charlotte, is favoring a high school build- 
ing as a fitting memorial to Mecklenburg 's and Charlotte 's 
fallen soldiers. 

1906 
Capt. J. A. P.\RKER, Secretary, Douglas, Arizona 
— Major Matt H. Allen, formerly a popular member of the 
Goldsboro bar, is now stationed with the Third Division, A. 
E. F., in Germany. An of&eial document received by friends 
in Goldsboro shows that Major Allen, who has been acting 
as Judge Advocate, has been detailed as Superior Provost 
Court of the Kreis of Mayen. He gave up his law practice 
in Goldsboro shortly after America declared war and entered 
an officers ' training camp, where he received a commission 
as first lieutenant, was later made captain, and shortly after 
he arriving in France received a commission as major. 
— Brigadier General Samuel T. Ansell, acting Judge Advocate 
General U. S. Army, will deliver the annual address at the 
next meeting of the North Carolina Bar Association. 

1907 

C. L. Weill. Seerciary, Greensboro, N. C. 
— Lieut. Gov. Max 0. Gardner, law '07, recently represented 
the State as chief speaker on the occasion of the Washington 
birthday banquet to the Buncombe county men and women 
returned from war service, which was staged at Asheville. 
— Norman Hughes is located at Powell's Point. 

1908 

M. Robins, Secretary, Greensboro, N. C. 
— W. C. Woodard, Jr., is general agent for the Atlantic Life 
Insurance Co., his address being 120 N. Main St., Rocky Mount, 
N. C. 

— The engagement of Edgar N. Snow, of Greensboro, and 
Miss Grace Overman, of Salisbury, was announced February 
15. Mr. Snow is prominently identified with insurance in- 
terests in Greensboro. He was a member of the Carolina S. 
A. T. C. unit last fall. 

1909 

O. C. Cox, Secretary, Greensboro, N. C. 
— J. W. Hines, Jr., of Rocky Mount, was in the navy during 
the war. 

— H. P. Osborne is a member of the prominent law firm of 
Cooper, Cooper and Osborn, Atlantic National Bank Bldg., 
Jacksonville, Fla. He enlisted in the air service in Novem- 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



161 



ber, 1917, being ordered to the School of Military Aeronau- 
tics at Columbus, Ohio, in January, 1918. Eeceiving his com- 
mission on March 22nd, he was ordered to Kelly Field, Texas, 
where he was stationed until December, being officer of the 
117th Aero Squadron. During his last two mouths of service 
he was assistant personnel adjutant of the field in charge 
of the insurance and allotment section. 

1910 

J. R. Nixon, Secretary, Edenton, N. C. 
— Thomas Palmer Nash, Jr., of Elizabeth City, A. B. 1910, 
A. M. 1911, and Miss Edith Lyle Peatross, of Vicksburg, Miss., 
and Memphis, Tenn., were married at Memphis on March 1, 
1919. For the past several years Mr. Nash has been attached 
to the teaching staff of the Medical College of the University 
of Tennessee. Mr. Nash was at one time connected with the 
newspaper fraternity of the State, being a member of the 
staff of the Charlotte News. 

— S. F. Teague is a member of the successful law firm of 
Teague and Dees, of Goldsboro. 

1911 

I. C. MOSER, Secretary, Asheboro, N. C. 
— Robert M. Vanstory, of Greensboro, with a lieutenant's com- 
mission, has recently been transferred from Camp Taylor to 
Fort Sill, Okla. He served as instructor in field artillery at 
Camp Taylor. 
— W. L. Small is located at Elizabeth City. 

1912 

J. G. LoCKiiART, Secretary, Zebulon, N. C. 
— James S. Manning, Jr., was promoted to the rank of cap- 
tain in the 322ud Infantry in France before the armistice. 
— Horace Johnston is a successful cotton manufacturer of 
Charlotte. 

1913 
A. L. M. Wiggins, Secretary, Hartsville, S. C. 
— J. L. Phillips is a successful civil engineer of Kinston. 
— P. R. Bryau is now located at Wilson, Pennsylvania. Dur- 
ing the war he rendered valuable services to the government 
as a chemist in cue of the largest coke and benzol plants in 
the world. 

— Walter Stokes, Jr., is with the army of occupation in Ger- 
many. He was in the front line three and one-half mouths 
before the armistice. He now holds the rank of captain. 

1914 

Oscar Leach, Secretary, with the A. E. F. in France 
— R. L. Lashley is instructor in English in Georgia School of 
Technology, Atlanta, Ga., his address being 394 WiUiams 
Street. He received his M. A. degree here in 1917. 

1915 

Geo. W. Eutsler, President, 550 E. Jones St., Raleigh, N. C. 
— R. G. Fitzgerald was released from the service on De- 
cember first, one month before his commission was due. He 
was at Camp Stanley, Texas, where he had been sent from 
Camp Sevier, S. C. His address is Grimesland, N. C, and 
he wishes to hear from his classmates. 

— The following announcement has been received: Mr. James 
Yancey Paris announces the marriage of her daughter, Helen, 
to Dr. Carl Edgar Ervin, United States Naval Reserve Force, 
on Saturday, January the fourth, nineteen hundred and nine- 
teen. Rocky Mount, N. C. Dr. and Mrs. Ervin will be at 
home after January 15, Beaufort, S. C. 
— Claud A. Boseman, of Enfield, received the commission of 
second lieutenant at Camp Zachary Taylor in December and 
has been discharged from the service. 



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152 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 






Clothes Made bq Makers who 
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1916 

H. B. Hester, Secretary, A. E. F., France 
— Lieut. Robert B. House, who has been in the service over- 
seas but who for some time has been assigned as instructor in 
various training camps in this country, has been discharged 
from the service and has accepted a professorship with the 
Greensboro High School. 

— Phillip Woolcott, after nearly two years in the aviation 
service, has been honorably discharged and has returned to 
his home in Raleigh. He was a recent visitor to the Hill. 
He was instructor in the aviation camps overseas, being ordered 
to the front three days before the armistice was signed. 
— Lieut. McDaniel Lewis is with the army of occupation in 
Germany, Co. E, 11th U. S. Infantry. 

1917 

H. G. Baity, Secretary, A. P. O. 774, First Army G. O. 0., 

A. E. F., France 
— D. E. Eagle is pursuing his course in medicine at Johns 
Hopkins, Baltimore, Md., this year. 

— Lieut. Walter James, Law '17, is doing service overseas. 
— Rudolph Barnes, Pliarmaey '17, is in the Coast Artillery 
branch of the service. 

1918 
W. R. WnNSCii, Secretary, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
— Ensign Ralph D. Ballcw is now division officer for the 
0-type submarines and will have charge of this work during 
the fleet maneuvers south of Cuba this spring. His address 
is Division 8, Submarine Force, U. S. S. Savannah, care Post- 
master, New York. 

— Miss Winnie MeGlamery is a student at Goucher College, 
Baltimore, Md. Her only objection to The Review is "that 
it isn 't big enough. ' ' 

— Henry V. Koonts, who has been stationed at Camp Taylor, 
Ky., has been released from the service. He now occupies the 
position of assistant business manager of the University. 

1919 

— Eddie Merritt, who was inducted into service and sent to 
Camp Hancock in November, has returned to the Hill to re- 
sume his studies toward graduation. 

— Jack Powell, who had enlisted in Naval Aviation and was 
awaiting his call when the armistice was signed, has re- 
turned to college to graduate this spring. 

— G. A. Barden, coach of the freshman football team last 
season, played a great game at tackle in the Navy. He was 
a recent visitor to the Hill. 

1920 
— Private Myron Green was with the American army of 
occupation at Ardenau, Germany, on December 16. His 
company was under shell fire for six weeks. He entered the 
service last summer. 

— Brodie Jones, of Warrenton, is editor of the Warrenton- 
Halifax Times and editor and business manager of the Warren 
Record. 

— Sidney B. Allen, of Weldon, who received his commission 
at Plattsburg last summer, has been mustered out of the 
service. He has returned to the Hill. 

1921 

— William Bickett, who entered the officers ' training school 
at Camp Gordon, Ga., in October, has received an hon- 
orable discharge. 

— Donnel Van Noppen, who won a second lieutenant 's com- 
mission at Camp Perry, Ohio, and also a silver medal for 
marksmanship last summer, has been discharged and has re- 
turned to the Hill. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



153 



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Shirts, neckwear, underwear, hats, caps, and 
shoes. The be^ for the leail in everything that 
is right in quality, ^yle, and price. 

MARKHAM-ROGERS CO. 



Tailors, Furnishers and Hatters 



Durham, N. C. 




OH, BOY! 



\ 



This is going to be a big 
baseball year. All the vet- 
erans are going to be great 
fans this season. 

Think of the converts to good base- 
ball the 60,000 Taylor League Balls 
made in the camps over seas! 
All Taylor Baseball Equipment is 
way ahead of the ordinary. 
Get a catalog nov»— yesterday is 

past---tomorrow hasn't come — today's 

the time to do it. 

ALEX. TAYLOR & CO., Inc. 

26 E. 42nd St. New York City 

Opp. Hotel Manhattan 



ACADEMY OF MUSIC 

NEXT FRIDAY AND SATURDAY 
MARCH 28TH AND 29TH 

Return of the Spectacular Film-Show 



Matinees 
25c t 
$1.00 

D.WCRIFFITHS 'r,:'?' 

$1.50 



HEARTS OF IHE WORLD" IS MORE THAN A PiaURE 

PUY; it ISA world drama; it goes straight 

TOTHE HEABT.n IS THIS HUMAN cSuALtiy THAT 
MAKES 'HEARTS OF THE WORLD AS BIG AS MAMK'NO' 
CUABLES DABNTON HY.E„„,„j; ';,„: ; . 

■^Aa su/ecTesr toi/e story euen roc o 



SUPREME TRIUMPH 






El 
E 



n 



lOneMillionFi^htin^Mci 
TwentyThousand Hoises 
Miles of Aitillery / 
Maidi of Legions ' 

Souadrons or Aiiplanf s 
Fleets of Zeppelins [ 
iTIieDesbuctionofCities 
TheChar^eofthelank; 




Address 

WM. F. FREEUND 

Manager 

DURHAM, N. C. 




/ 



PICKARD'S HOTEL 

Headquarters for Carolina Alumni 

Returning to the Hill 

SPECIAL RATES. STUDENT BOARDERS. 



BROADWAY THEATRE 

DURHAM, N. C. 

THE HOUSE OF SPECIAL PHOTO-PLAY 

ATTRACTIONS 



Here is the story 


m figures of the 


EL-REES-SO'S Yearly Growth 


1913 


94,000 


1914 - -.... 

1915 


630,000 

1,435,000 


1916 - -... 


_ 5,305,000 


1917 


_ 15,000,000 


1918 Estimated _ 


25,000,000 


Ask You 


r Dealer 


EL-REES-SO 


CIGAR CO. 


MANUFACTURERS 


GREENSBORO. N. C. 



Odell Hardware Co. 

Greensboro, N. C. 

China, Cut Glass and Silverware 
Household Goods 

DEPENDABLE GOODS 

PKOMPT SERVICE 

SATISFACTORY PRICES 



A. A. IKlutU (lo,3nc. 

Extend a cordial invitation to all students and 
alumni of the U. N. C. to make their store head- 
quarters during their stay in Chapel Hill. 

Complete Stock of 
New and Second-hand Books, Stationery, and 
Complete Line of Shoes and Haberdashery 
Made by the Leaders of Fashion, Al- 
ways on Hand 



LIGGETT & MYERS 
TOBACCO CO. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 

FATIMA, CHESTERFIELD. AND 

PIEDMONT CIGARETTES 

VELVET AND DUKE'S MIXTURE 

SMOKING TOBACCO AND 

other well known brands of Smok- 
ing Tobacco, Cigarettes, and 
Chewing Tobaccos. 



Our brands are star^dard for quality. 
They speal^ for themselves. 



Asphalt Pavements 



DURABUK 



ECONOMICAL 



IF YOU ARE CONTEMPLATING STREET OR 

ROAD CONSTRUCTION, WE INVITE YOU 

TO INSPECT SOME OF OUR RECENT 

CONSTRUCTION IN 



RALEIGH 

OXFORD 

GUILFORD COUNTY 

WELDON 

ROCKY MOUNT 

LAURINBURG 

WILSON 



GREENSBORO 

WAKE COUNTY 

DURHAM 

WARRENTON 

LUMBERTON 

HENDERSON 

HIGH POINT 



SEE THE GREENSBORO-HIGH POINT HIGH- 
WAY—A 16-MILE STRETCH OF 
ASPHALT ROAD 

A Representative Will Visit You and Supply Any 
Information or Estimates Wanted 

Robert G. Lassiter & Co. 

ENGINEERING AND CONTRACTING 

Citizena Nat'l Bank Bldg. 



First Nat'l Bank BIdg 
Oxford, N. C. 



Raleigh, N. C. 



THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

Maximum of Service to the People of the State 

Spring Quarter of Eleven Weeks Begins March 25 
Summer School of Six Weeks Begins June 24 

General Instruction for the public through the following departments of the Bureau of 
Extension; (1) General Information; (2) Lectures and Study Centers; (3) Correspondence 
Courses; (4) Debate and Declamation; (5) County Economic and Social Surveys; (6) Mu- 
nicipal Reference; (7) Educational Information and Assistance; (8) Information Concern- 
ing the War and After the War Problems; (9) Package Library Service on all Important 
Topics of the Day. 

WRITE TO THE UNIVERSITY WHEN YOU NEED HELP 



For information regarding the University, address 

THOS. J. WILSON, JR., Registrar. 



The 

First National Bank 

OF DURHAM, N. C. 

''Roll of Honor" Bank 

Total Resources Over Five and a 
Quarter Million Dollars 




WE KNOW YOUR WANTS AND WANT 
YOUR BUSINESS 



JULIAN S. CARR 

W. J. HOLLOWAY. 



..President 

Cashier 



Dick 's Laundry Co. 

Greensboro, N. C. 



High-Class Launderers, French 
Cleaners and Dyers 

Prompt and Efficient Service 

is our motto 

Our reputation gained through years 
of experience speaks for itself. 

Send yours by Parce Post 
We appreciate your patronage 



C. 5. Pendergraft 

Chapel Hill Agent 



(Eulture 



Scl)olar5l)ip Service 

THE = 



Self-Support 



!5lortb (Tarollna State ^I^ormal (Lollege 

offers to Women a Liberal Education, Equipment for Womanly 
Service, Professional Training for Remunerative Employment 



The College offers four groups of studies lead- 
ing to the following degrees: Bachelor of Arts, 
Bachelor of Science, and Bachelor of Music. 

Special courses in Pedagogy ; in Manual Arts ; in 
Domestic Science, Household Art and Economics; in 
Music; and in the Commercial Branches. 

Teachers and graduates of other colleges provided 
for in both regular and special courses. 



Equipment modern, including furnished dormitories, 
library, laboratories, literary society halls, gymnas- 
ium, music rooms, teachers' training school, infirm- 
ary, model laundry, central heating plant, and open 
air recreation grounds. 

Dormitories furnished by the State. Board at 
actual cost. Tuition free to those who pledge them- 
selves to become teachers. 



Fall ^erm Opens in September 



Summer ^erm Begins in June 



For catalogue and other information, address 

JULIUS I. FOUST, President, GREENSBORO, N. C. 



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