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Full text of "The alumni review [serial]"

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THE ROYALL & BORDEN CO. 



Corner West Main and Market Streets DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA 

Sell all kinds of furniture and furnishings for churches, 
colleges and homes. Biggest stock of Rugs in the 
State, and at cheapest prices. ^If you don't know us 
ask the College Proctor or the editor of the "Review." 
Call on or write for whatever you may need in our lioe. 



THE ROYALL & BORDEN CO. 



The Provisions of Your Will Faithfully 

Carried Out 

It is the earnest desire of every thoughtful owner of property ti> make it of niaxinmui 
use after his death, to members of his family dependent upon it, and in support of char- 
ities and causes in which he may be specially interested. 

He knows best the needs of each beneficiary and can himself most wisely distribute 
his estate ; he should therefore assure an exact execution of his wishes by appointing a 
responsible trust company executor of the will and trustee of the estate. 

In the hands of this company his cherished purposes will be faithfully carried out 



ani] his estate carefully safeguarded 



WACHOVIA BANK AND TRUST CO. 

Capital and Surplus $2, 000, 000 
Member Federal Reserve System 

WINSTON-SALEM ^,r^D-rLJ r- ao^m .m a SALISBURY 

Acufx/ii 1 c- NORTH CAROLINA uir-ij orMM-r 

ASHEVILLE HIGH POINT 



Volume VII 



THE 



Number 8 



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M I MMH W W UPI WmMH I l II M I M M I i TTT ll ■ ■ Ml H I ■ II I 1 1 ff 





ALIMNIREVIEW 



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MAY, 1919 



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OPINION AND COMMENT 

Our Greatest Concern — University Development — 
How Others Do Things— Back to the Hill— Caro- 
lina's War Record — Office Machinery Again 
— Athletics and Public Health — Subscrip- 
tion Price Advanced — Alumni Assis- 
tance Desired — Graham Memorial 
Fund 

BIG PLANS FOR COMMENCEMENT 

Ten Classes to Hold Special Reunions, But All Alum- 
ni Urged to Attend General Reunion — 
Dates June 15-18 

GRAHAM MEMORIAL CAMPAIGN 

To Be Pushed to a Speedy and Successful Conclu- 
sion — Final Drive On 



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PUBLISHED BY 

THE ALVMNI ASSOCIATION 



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Cy Thompson Says- 



GLAD to be Back, with Headquarters at Chapel Hill, and to 
Offer You Life Insurance Service 

IN ADDITION to the highest cash and paid up insurance values and most liberal options pro- 
vided in our regular policies, the new 

PERFECTION POLICY 
issued by the old New England Mutual contains the most far-reaching Total Disability and Double 
Indemnity clause offered by any company. 

INVESTIGATE 
this policy and our superior service before you contract to buy or sell life insurance. (We have an 
attractive agency proposition for the right man.) 

NO PREMIUM to pay if you lose your eyesight or two limbs; or if, prior to age 65, you become 
mentally or physically disabled. 

MONTHLY LIFE INCOME of ten dollars per month per thousand to you for loss of eyesight 
or limbs; or for duration of complete disability not covered by specific loss. These special provisions, 
which are simply and clearly stated in the contract, do not affect the normal dividends, values and 
the full payment of the final claim. 

DOUBLE INDEMNITY for death by accidental means, including drowning. 

Call on us or write for information. Let us tell you about "Perfection in Protection." 

NEW ENGLAND MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO. 
BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 

CHARTERED 1835 

CYRUS THOMPSON, Jr., Dist. Man. EUGENE C. McGINNIS, Gen. Agt. 

Patterson Building Commercial National Bank Bldg. 

Chapel Hill, N. C. Raleigh, N. C. 

NOTE: To the "laddie in khaki": Hold Uncle Sam's Insurance. Glad to show you how. 



Sales Letters never knock 
at a business man's office, 
nor wait outside for ad- 
mittance. 

With this advantage the printed 
salesman should present a first- 
blush appearance in keeping with 
its message. 



Planning and designing 
is only a part of the 
Seeman Service 




THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



Volume VII 



MAY 1919 



Number 8 



OPINION AND COMMENT 



The Review has purposely refrained from saying 

anything- relative to the most momentous question 

now l)efore the University — the 

^^^o^dxt'^'^^^'^ election of a president to direct it 
CONCERN / . , . 

to a higher destiny in the sister- 
hood of universities, and to make it a greater, more 
serviceable institution to Xorth Carolina. 

However, it believes that as the organ of the 
alumni, it has the right to express directly and as 
positively as it can the opinions which it holds. 

First of all, it would make clear the fact which 
it believes is generally accepted in educational circles 
today: Carolina is the most alert university in the 
South. 

In the second place, the University's income has 
been more than doubled in the past six years and its 
responsibilities to the State of Xorth Carolina are 
correspondingly increased. 

In the third place, its student body and faculty 
and alumni have become accustomed to respond to 
distinctive leadership and feel a profound pride in 
Carolina's achievements. 

Furthermore, the new order ushered in by the 
war, calls for wide vision and large ability on the 
part of educational leaders and especially on the 
part of the president of this aggressive, effective 
University. 

In view of these facts, it is the duty of the Trus- 
tees (a most difficult duty, to be sure) to select as 
president such a man as will through his training, 
achievement, ability, and character, insure the con- 
tinuation of this sort of inspiring leadership. 

The Review has previously commented on the 
difficulty necessarily experienced by such a large 
body as that of the Trustees in applying proper 
standards in the selection of a president. Unfortu- 
nately it has no specific formula to offer. But it 
does emphasize with all the power it possesses the 
importance of the selection, and the absolute ne- 
cessity of laying aside all considerations other than 
those which will insure the University the sort of 
leadership indicated ; for Carolina must go foi'ward. 
This, we believe, is what the alumni would have us 
in all seriousness sav. 



Considerable comment has recently appeared in 

the State press concerning the proposal made by 

Col. J. Brvan Grimes (see another 

SevSSpment P^^^^) ^« '^^^ Trustees to develop 
the 550-acre tract oi land belong- 
ing to the University and lying to the south of the 
campus. Interest has also been expressed in a plan 
proposed by Mr. John Sprunt Hill for the develop- 
ment of the land lying immediately east of the 
campus. 

The Review has not carefully studied the pro- 
posed suggestions, hut it heartily commends the gen- 
eral principle involved in the proposals. The Uni- 
versity has reached the point where it must provide 
for definite, extensive expansion. The first require- 
ment to this end is to develop an artistic, workable 
plan which will bring harmony and beauty (as far 
as they can be secured at this late date) into the 
present grouping of buildings and will insure an 
aesthetic future extension of the campus. 

We believe that the late President Graham pro- 
vided for a tentative plan looking to this end, but 
it did not reach full maturity. Entirely too much is 
at stake for the matter to he further delayed, and posi- 
tive, constructive action should be immediately 
taken. 

nnn 

Readers of The Review may have observed that 

in recent issues frequent reference has been made to 

how other colleges and universities 

following excerpt irom the Min- 
nesota Alumni Weekly to indicate the terms in 
which Minnesota legislators visualize building pro- 
grams : 

Tuesday, April 1, the House endorsed the Uni- 
versity program by adopting it by a practically unan- 
imous vote. On the question of the ten-year build- 
ing program the vote was 91 to 9 and on the regular 
liudget the vote was unanimous — without the reduc- 
tion of a single item. The building program car- 
ried with it authority for the Board of Regents to 
issue certificates of indebtedness to the amount of 
$560,000 a year for a period of ten years — $6,600.- 
000 in all. 



It 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



The vote was particularly gratifying to President 
Burton and others elosely connected with the T^ni- 
versity, and was a vindication of the practice of 
going and frankly asking for what is needed for the 
ITniversity to make it of the highest use to the people 
of the State. 

nan 

Present indications point to a big home-coming 
on the part of the alumni June 15-18. For two 
vears war has cut the attendance at 



BACK TO 
THE HILL 



Commencement and interest has centered 
in other things. During the war period 
thirty-six alumni have lost their lives in the service 
of their country, and approximately 2, .500 have worn 
the uniform. But with victory won, and the troops 
returning to their homes, there is a genuine longing 
on the part of all the niemhers of the big Carolina 
family to come back home. 

To make the reunions of this year — the Victory 
reunion — thoroughly happy for all, the University 
has set aside alumni headquarters and will spare no 
pains to make all returning Carolina men comfort- 
able while here. Information as to particulars can 
be found in other columns of this issue, and E. R. 
Eankin, Secretary of the Alumni Association, is pre- 
pared to give alumni any assistance desired in ar- 
ranging for the stay on the campus. And The Re- 
view is always at the service of the alumni for any 
aid that it can give. 

nnn 

In an earlier issue The Review expressed the 
hope that Carolina's war record might be summar- 
ized in a special number before the 
CAROLINA'S T f .1, TT t ^ * 1 

WARRECORD <;>"'. "^^. the year. Unfortunately, a 

heginning has only ]ust now r>een 
made in assembling information, owing to the fact 
that the University could not secure the services of 
any one earlier to prosecute the work. Mr. A. M. 
Coates has undertaken the task and alumni will be 
called on at an early date to give information con- 
cerning their participation in the war. When the 
request comes, please let your answer be full and 
prompt. 

nnn 

On another page The Review carries a communi- 
cation from Dr. A. S. Wheeler, of the Department 

of Chemistrv, relative to the edi- 
OFFICE MA- , ■ , ,.,V T rim nir \ ■ 

/-TiTii.TT^r.-,r »/-. .T».T tonal entitled Umce Machinery 
CHINERY AGAIN . .,,.,. -tn 

appearing in the April issue. Dr. 

Wheeler makes the point, and supports it with a 
very interesting statement of facts, that the Alumni 
Building cannot be made into an acceptable Admin- 
istration Building, l)ut that it should 1)0 used exclu- 



ATHLETICS AND 
PUBLIC HEALTH 



sively for recitation purposes. He urges the erec- 
tion of an adequate Administration Building whi^'h 
will take care of all present administrative offices 
and will admit of the expansion in the University's 
business which may be expected in the future. It 
is undoubtedly true that the office space of practic- 
ally all the new buildings is too limited, and in the 
future more liberal space for this purpose should l)e 
provided. 

nnn 

At various times throughout the year The Review 
has expressed the hope that with the return to normal 
college activities, the University 
would lay more emphasis than 
formerly upon general atliletics 
and public health. At the risk of repetition, we re- 
turn to the subject again, because it is so tremend- 
ously important, and — it is so easy to go back to the 
old ways. Carolina needs to teach the student body 
the importance of personal physical well-being and 
public welfare. The Carolina-Virginia game will 
take care of itself, but every day emphasis should 
be placed upon being on the tennis courts, or class 
fields, or the track, or in the gymnasium, or on a 
long hike. There is no such thing as a vicarious ex- 
ercise. You take it, and get the benefits from it, 
or you fail to take it, and pay the penalty. 

Similarly, it is highly important that the Uni- 
versity, through the proposed Health Director, em- 
phasize the necessity of University men knowing 
more and caring more about public health conditions. 

With the return of Coach Campbell, and the ad- 
dition of a Health Director and Dr. Thorndike Sa- 
ville, an expert sanitary engineer, the University 
should make a notable contribution to the student 
body and State in these particulars. 

nnn 

An announcement which The Review very re- 
luctantly makes is that with the conclusion of the 

l>r('scnt academic vear the sub- 
SUBSCRIPTION ' • . . n 1 1 1 

PRICE ADVANCED ^'•'•>l'fi"" P^^e Will be advanced 

from $1.00 to $1.50 per year. 
This step is forced upon the management which is 
confronted with a $500 deficit for the present year 
incident to the tremendously increased cost of print- 
ing during the past eighteen months. For seven 
years The Review has been issued at the same 
price — $1.00 per year — while prices for all that 
enters into its publication have steadily climbed 
until they are double what they were when The Re- 
view was established in 1912. 

With the increased subscription and rlic jii'esent 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



189 



ALUMNI 

ASSISTANCE 
DESIRED 



advertising, it is hoped tiiat the standard of the 
publication may be maintained or definitely im- 
proved; and for these reasons the management takes 
the step indicated. 

While making this announcement, we urge every 
alumnus who is in arrears for The Review for the 
year to remit at once so that further expense may 
not be incurred in sending statements. 

nnn 

Every year the assistance of alumni is sought in 
securing the attendance of a large Freshman class. 
This year, as the campaign gets under 
way, it becomes apparent that the en- 
rollment of new men in September 
may be considerably reduced xinless 
.special elfort is put forth. The big, outstanding dif- 
ficulty in the way of a large enrollment is that the 
prospective freshmen are not in the high schools. 
The number of seniors in the high schools of the 
State this year is only half what it was last. The 
draft, influenza, and scarcity of labor last fall se- 
verely cut high school attendance on the part of the 
older boys, and consei[uently the number of those who 
are prepared for college is correspondingly reduced. 
This fact makes it especially desirable that ahimni 
give all assistance possible in securing the Univer- 
sity's full quota of those who are prepared. Any in- 
formation of this sort will be gratefully received by 
.Mr. A. M. Coates, who is in chai'ge of this particular 
work for the University. 

nnn 

On another page we print the list of directors of 

the Graham Memorial Fund campaign in North 

■Carolina towns and the larger cities in 

..T...^nT . . other states, and reproduce a letter to 
MEMORIAL , ,. T, . 1 ^, ,. , 

FUND them from rresident (. onnor oi the 

Alumni Association. The important 
l;i>ur in this campaign is at hand, and every alumnus, 
whether a director or not, should see to it that the 
local campaigii is vigorously pushed and that gen- 
erous contributions are secured. Alumni day is less 
than three weeks off, and noir is the time to act. 
Read the letter, cooperate with your director, and 
hring the campaign to a magnificent end. 

And in doing this, get the proper perspective. 
Harvard has the Harvard Union ; Brown, the Brown 
T'uion; and the University of Pennsylvania, Hous- 
ton Hall. Michigan has put $750,000 into such a 
building. Cornell is asking for $1,000,000 for a 
^lemorial Hall. Minnesota proposed $1,250,000. 
Vanderbilt expects to secure $300,000 in May, and 
has only recently secured through alumni $1,000,000 



as an endowment fund. This is the first call Carolina 
has made in fifteen years for a big university need. 
Let the answer i>e emphatic and let the amount be 
largely oversubscribed. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE OF TRUSTEES MEETS 

At a meeting of the Executive Committee of the 
Board of Trustees of the University in Raleigh on 
April 4th, a committee of five was appointed to in- 
vestigate the proposal to develop the 550-acre tract 
of woodland immediately south of the University 
campus. 

Governor Bickett appointed as members of the 
committee J. Bryan Grimes, of Raleigh ; George 
Stephens, of Charlotte ; James A. Gray, of Winston- 
Salem ; John Sprunt Hill, of Durham ; and Haywood 
Parker, of Asheville. The committee is to report its 
findings to the Board of Trustees at the regular meet- 
ing. The idea suggested by Secretary of State 
Grimes, is to build homes for professors and to build 
other structures, provide a park and develop property 
in accordance with the potential needs of the Uni- 
versity. 

Prof. Saville Elected 

Prof. Thorndike Saville was elected associate pro- 
fessor of sanitary engineering at the University. He 
comes with a fine record, having received degrees 
from Harvard, Massachusetts Institute of Technol- 
ogy and Dartmouth, and having served in the engi- 
neering corps of the United States Army as first lieu- 
tenant. 

Visiting Committee Appointed 

Stanley Winborne, of Murfreesboro, and Zeb V. 
Walser, of Lexington, were named as members of 
University visitors' committee, other members being 
W. N. Everett, of Rockingham ; Graham Kenan, of 
New York ; Clem G. Wright, of Greensboro, and J. 
C. Kittrell, of Henderson. 

Attending the meetings were Governor Bickett, 
Secretary of State Grimes, Attorney General James 
S. Manning, Francis D. Winston, of Bertie County; 
John W. Graham, of Hillsboro; Dr. R. H. Tjcwis, 
Dr. Chas. Lee Smith, and R. D. W. Connor, of Ral- 
eigh, and H. W. Chase, chairman of the University 
faculty. 

Professor Branson Kenan Professor 

Prof. E. C. Branson, of the department of Rural 
Economics and Sociology, was made a Kenan pro- 
fessor. 



Dr. George Howe, of the department of Latin, at- 
tended a meeting of the Classical Association of the 
Middle West and South at Atlanta, April 10-12. 



190 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



TEN CLASSES PREPARE FOR REUNIONS 



Big Plans are Under Way for Reunions of Maximum Interest at Commencement 



Extensive plans are being made on the "Hill" for 
the return of the classes, ranging from 1859 nntil 
1918, which will hold special reunions at the ap- 
proaching commencement. The committees in charge 
of the reunions from the respective classes urge that 
every member of the classes of 1859, 1869, 1879, 
1889, 1894, 1899, 1904, 1909, 1914, and 1918, make 
detailed plans in advance to be present at the re- 
unions, which this year promise to be more import- 
ant and interesting than ever. In addition, every 
alumnus, no matter whether his class holds a special 
reunion or not, is urged to be present for the com- 
mencement exercises, and for the general gathering 
of the alumni which will be held on Tuesday morn- 
ing, June 17th, Alumni Day, in Gerrard Hall. 
Service Men to be Back 

A feature of special interest at this commence- 
ment will be the Victory Eeunion of alumni from 
service. This special feature will come on the af- 
ternoon of Alumni Day. Every Carolina man who 
was in military service — and the list of Carolina 
men in service numbers more than 2,250 — is espe- 
cially urged to be present at this time and partici- 
pate in this Victory Reunion. The program which 
is being worked out for this occasion will be of such 
a nature as to make this Victory Eeunion a feature 
of keen interest to every alumnus. 

Alumni Conference Scheduled 

The program for commencement which has re- 
cently been announced includes many features which 
will strongly appeal to alumni. A special program 
for Alumni Day has been arranged, this varying 
somewhat from the program of former Alumni Days. 
The special reunion exercises of the various classes 
will not be held in Gerrard Hall on the morning of 
Alumni Day as heretofore, but in their place a meet- 
ing of the General Alumni Association has been 
called for 10 :45 Tuesday morning, in Gerrard Hall. 
President Connor, of the General Alumni Associa- 
tion, will preside over this meeting, and the program 
of this general conference of the alumni will include 
a review of the year's activities by Dr. ?I. W. Chase, 
chairman of the faculty, and brief talks on the Gra- 
ham Memorial Fund, the Alumni Loyalty Eund and 
the Alumni Review. In addition, it is expected 
that plans of importance will be made at this con- 
ference for furthering in a systematic fashion the 
work of the General Alumni Association throughout 



the State and country. Every alumnus who can 
possibly be present is urged to attend this meeting. 
The Alumni Luncheon will be held at 1 :00 o'clock 
in Swain Hall. As a feature of the luncheon, there 
will be short talks by representatives of the ten, 
twenty-five, forty and fifty-year reunion classes. At 
4 :00 o'clock in the afternoon the Victory Reunion 
of the alumni from service will be held. At 5 :00 
o'clock on Emerson Field and on the class field, there 
will be baseball games between the different classes 
holding reunions. The meeting of the Board of 
Trustees will be held in Chemistry Hall at 8 :00 
p.m. The inter-society debate will be held in Ger- 
rard Hall at 8 :30 o'clock. The exercises of Alumni 
Day will be concluded with a reception to the Senior 
Class at 10:00 p.m. in the Gymnasium. 

Banquet Halls and Quarters Provided 

Adequate arrangements are being made to take 
care for the physical well-being and comfort of all 
alumni returning to commencement. All of the 
alumni returning to class reunions will be housed to- 
gether in various sections of the dormitories. 

General headquarters will be established at Uni- 
versity Inn, and every alumnus is expected to reg- 
ister there upon his arrival. In addition, the classes 
holding special reunions will have special headquar- 
ters in the dormitories. Placards will be put up 
denoting each particular class headquarters. Dormi- 
tories have been assigned for the use of the special 
reunion classes as follows: 1859 — Infirmary; 1869 — 
Infirmary; 1879— Old East; 1889— Old East; 
1894— Old East; 1899— Old West; 1904— Old 
West; 1909— Pettigrew; 1914— Battle; 1918— 
Carr. 

Circle These Dates 

Make plans now for the reunions at commence- 
ment and pass the word to your friends, clients, cus- 
tomers, patients, or whomsoever it may concern, 
that on June 15-18 you will be attending the alumni 
reunions and the commpncement exercises at Chapel 
Hill. 

COMMENCEMENT, 1919 

The program for commencement for June 15, 16, 
17, and 18, 1919, is given as follows for the bene- 
fit of all those who plan to be present : 
Sunday, June 15 

11:00 A.M. Baccalaureate Sermon liy Dr. J. 
E. White. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



191 



8 :00 P. M. Vesper Service. 

Monday, June 16 

9 :30 A. M. Seniors loriu in front of Memorial 
Hall and march to Chapel for prayers. 

10 :30 A. M. Senior Class-Day exercises in Ger- 
rard Hall. Orations by meml)ers of the gradiiatini;' 
class in the contest for the Mangum Medal. 

4 :30 P. M. Historical Pageant. 

7 :30 P. M. Closing exercises of the Senior Class. 

9 :30 P. M. Anniversary meetings of the Liter- 
ary Societies in their respective halls. 
Tuesday, June 17 

10 :45 A. M. Meeting of the (Icneral Alunmi 
Association at Gerrard Hall. 

1 :00 P. M. Alumni Luncheon. 

4 :00 P. M. Victory Reunion of the Alumni from 
Service. 



5 :00 P. M. Baseball games between the reunion 
classes — Emerson Field and Class Field. 

8 :00 P. M. Annual meeting of the Board of 
Trustees in Chemistry Hall. 

8 :30 P. M. Annual Debate between representa- 
tives of the Dialectic and Philanthropic Literary 
Societies. 

l():(io p. M. Faculty Reception in the Gymna- 
sium. 

Wednesday, June 18 

10 :45 A. M. Academic procession forms in front 
of Alumni Building. 

11:00 A.M. Commencement exercises in Mem- 
orial Hall. Commencement address by Hon. Frank- 
lin K. Lane, Secretary of the Interior. Announce- 
ments by the President. Degrees conferred. Pre- 
sentation of Bibles. Benediction. 



DURHAM WINS THE AYCOCK CUP 



Miss Aura Holton and Leo Brady Defeat Miss Sudie Creech and William Hosea 
of the Goldsboro High School, in Seventh Annual Contest 



The seventh annual iinal contest of the High 
School Debating Union came to a very successful 
conclusion on May 2nd in Memorial Hall, when 
Leo Brady and Miss Aura Holton, representing the 
Durham high school, triumphed over all others and 
won the award of the Aycock Memorial Cup. Their 
opponents in this final debate were Miss Sudie 
Creech and William Hosea of the Goldsboro high 
school. The query was: Resolved, That the Govern- 
ment of the United States should adopt a policy of 
requiring one year of military training of all able- 
bodied men before they reach the age of 21. Gohls- 
boro advocated the affiriuative and Durham defended 
the negative. 

This year's contest, in point of interest and keen 
enthusiasm shown by the contestants and the spirit 
of good sportsmanship evidenced, was one of the most 
notable in the history of the LTnion. One hundred 
and sixty-four youthful debaters representing forty- 
one high schools came to the University for the final 
contest. Their stay at the University was a very 
enjoyable one and the knowledge of the L^niversity 
which they received will prove helpful to them and 
to the University. The debaters represented all 
sections of the State. One delegation came from as 
far east as Dare County. There were present sev- 
enty-five girl debaters. 

The dates of May 1st and 2nd were set apart as 
"High School Week" in the Universitv's calendar. 



Other features of this week were the seventh annual 
inter-scholastic track meet and the fourth annual 
inter-scholastic tennis tournament. 

The Preliminaries 

The 1(54 debaters who participated in the final 
contest had all been successful in their triangular 
debates on April 4th, in which series 720 debaters 
representing 180 schools in 7.5 counties participated. 

The first general meeting of debaters and teachers 
was held in the auditorium of the Peabody Building 
on Thursday afternoon. May 1st. Professor X. W. 
Walker presided over this meeting and extended a 
hearty welcome to the visitors. This year for the 
first time there were rejoinders in the first prelim- 
inaries, which were held on Thursday night. There 
were twelve sections and each team was paired off by 
lot with an opposing team. From each section one 
affirmative and one negative team were chosen for 
the second preliminary on Friday morning. May 
2nd. The schools which had teams making the sec- 
ond preliminary on the affirmative were: Carthage, 
Angier, Louisburg, Roanoke Rapids, Durham, Au- 
lander, Belhaven, Mount Olive, Lincolnton, Golds- 
boro, Winston-Salem and Advance; on the negative: 
Rockingham, Mount Olive, Louisburg, Canton, 
Bethel, Newton, Stony Creek, Durham, Clemmons, 
Selma, Jfoiint Gilead and Elizabeth City. The schools 
having teams in the second preliminary, both affirm- 



192 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



ative and negative, were : Durham, Mount Olive and 
Louisburg. 

Final Debate 

The audience which came to hear the final debate 
on Friday evening, May 2nd, between Durham and 
Goldsboro^ filled Memorial Hall to its capacity. It 
has been estimated that the audience numbered 2,000 
persons. Dr. H. W. Chase, chairman of the Fac- 
ulty, presided over the debate. Dr. Chase expressed 
the University's gratification at having the visitors 
present from the high schools and pointed out the 
splendid value of the High School Debating Union 
as a developer of enlightened public discussion in our 
democracy. 

The speakers on both sides presented their argu- 
ments forcefully and to such good effect as to draw 
forth rounds of applause from the large audience. 
The rejoinders were spirited, and throughout the 
debate the speakers gave exhibition of having an 
accurate knowledge of the issues involved in the 
query. The decision of the judges, Messrs. H. H. 
Will'iams, L. P. McGehee, c' L. Raper, D. D. Car- 
roll and W. S. Bernard, was unanimous in favor of 
the negative. 

Professor N. W. Walker, chairman of the High 
School Debating Union committee, presented the 
Ayeock Memorial Cup, the trophy provided by the 



inter-collegiate debaters of the University, to the 
winners. Professor Walker paid tribute to the high 
school forces of the State who had made the debates 
a success this year in spite of great difiiculties 
brought about by the war and influenza epidemic. 
He spoke of the purposes of the Debating Union. 

This year for the second time, gold medals appro- 
priately inscribed and bearing the University's seal, 
were presented to the four debaters who participated 
in the final debate. Established by President Gra- 
ham and Dean M. C. S. ISToble last year, these medals 
were continued this year by Dean IVoble and the 
Secretary of the Union. 

Dean A. H. Patterson presented the medals and 
cups to the winners in the inter-scholastic track meet. 
Dean Patterson referred to each medal winner a» one 
who had rendered service of a distinctive sort. 

Immediately after the debate a reception was 
tendered the visitors Ity the Di and Phi societies in 
Bynum Gymnasium. This was the closing feature 
in the program of entertainment. 

Success of the Debating Union 

Since its organization in 1913, the High School 
Debating Union has met with remarkable success. 
It has grown and has carried with it helpful results 
for debaters, the schools, the communities and the 
University. 



GRAHAM MEMORIAL CAMPAIGN 



To be Pushed to a Speedy and Successful Conclusion — Final Drive Started May 19 



With the view of pushing the Graham Memorial 
Campaign to a speedy and successful conclusion, 
R. D. W. Connor, president of the General Alumni 
Association, has sent out letters to the directors nf 
the movement, as follows : 

The most important period in the campaign for the 
Graham Memorial Fund has arrived ; the time in 
which the plans of the Central Committee must be 
carried to a successful end. 

The final success of this sjjlendid movement, yo\i 
can easily see, depends on you and your fellow Direc- 
tors. In order that your report may be on time ami 
that your community may go over the top in a big- 
way, the Central Committee is asking that you 
start your final drive the week beginning Monday, 
May 10, and that you push it without let up to a 
successful conclusion. 

The reports of the Directors of the Graham Memo- 
rial Fund will be a feature of Alumni Day at Chapel 
Hill, and T trust that when vours is read out from 



the platform it will represent the real (^arolina way 
of putting across a big Carolina movement. 

I also wish to urge the necessity of large subscrip- 
tions if the desired amount is to be secured. This is 
the first time in fifteen years that Alumni or citizens 
have been called on for this sort of aid, and certainly 
no cause was ever worthier than the honoring of the 
life and work of Edward Kidder Graham in a way 
that will fill the University's greatest present day 
need. 

In presenting this ]ihase of the subject, keeji in 
mind that the senior class now in the University 
averaged practically $100 ]ier mem'ber, and that other 
subscriptions went to $200 and $.500. What shall be 
the response of the Alumui and citizens to this chal- 
lenge of the college boys ? The terms of pa>'ment 
make large subscriptions ])ossible, and the fact that 
they may be made in Lil>erty Bonds makes possible 
still larger contributions. 

The Alumni of the University and interested citi- 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



UK', 



zcns of the state are counting on you in this extremely 
iuipiu'tant undertaking. 

The list of state directors follows: Abbots'burg — 

E. E. Craven; Altauiahaw — J. E. Gant ; Albemarle 
— R. L. Smith ; Ahoskie — J. Roy Parker ; Ashboro — 
H. M. Robins; Asheville — Henry B. Htevens ; Atlan- 
tic — Melvin RcVbinson; Aurora — W. A. Thompson; 
Bayboro — Z. V. Rawls; Beaufort — Julius F. Dun- 
can ; Belmont — 'Charles H. Sloan ; Benson — C. C. 
Canady: Bethel — J. A. Staton; Biscoe — M. E. Sham- 
l.erger ; Boone — Roy M. Brown ; Boonville — H. F. 
Pardue; Bryson City — K. E. Bennett; Burgaw — T. 
N. Johnston ; Canton — T. L. Gwyn ; Carthage — 'C. G. 
Credle; Catawba — Oscar Sherrill ; Cerro Gordo — J. 
R. Williamson ; Chapel Hill— W. S. Roberson ; .Char- 
lotte — George Stephens; Clarkton — Dr. G. C. Single- 
tary; Clitfside— Dr. J. Rush Shull ; Clinton— F. B. 
Johnson; Coats — W. W. Wiggins; Columbia — H. L. 
Swain ; Culberson — O. G. Anderson ; Cullowhee — A. 
C. Reynolds; Currituck — A. M. Simmons; Dunn — 
X. A. Townsend ; Durham — V. S. Bryant ; Edenton 
— M. L. Wright; Elizabeth City— J. 'c. B. Ehring- 
haus; p]lizabethtown — K. F. ilcCullimgh, Jr.; Elkin 
— R. H. Chatham ; Enfield — A. M. Atkinson ; Fair- 
field — J. D. ilann ; Farmville — D. L. Turnage ; Four 
Oaks — B. I. Tart; Franklin — R. D. Sisk; Gastonia 
—A. E. Woltz; Gatesville— B. L. Banks, Jr. ; Golds- 
boro — Leslie Weil ; Greensboro — ^C. G. Wright ; 
Greenvill^-C. F. Harvey; Grifton- Dr. W.M\ 
Dawson ; Grimesland — Z. L. Edwards ; Hickory — 
A. A. Shuford, Jr.; High Point— Thos. J. Gold, 
Hillsboro — T. N. Webb; Jacksonville — I. M. Bailey; 
Jamestown — E. J. Coltrane ; Kinston — C. F. Har- 
vey; Leaksville — P. H. Gwynn; Lenoir — Capt. J. T. 
Pritchett ; Lexington — W. F. Brinkley ; I>illington — 
J. R. Baggett; Lincolnton — Edgar Love; I^ouisburg 
— T. W.'^Ruffin; McAdenville-^Ed. C. Ray; Madi- 
son — J. V. Price ; Marion — D. E. Hudgins ; Marshall 
— John D. Hendricks ; Mayodan — W. C. Ruffin ; 
ilebane — W. S. Crawford ; Milton — Rev. N. R. Clay- 
tor; Monroe — W. B. Love; Mooresville — R. O. Mil- 
ler ; Morehead City — E. A. Council ; Mount Airy — 
John Folger ; Mount Gilead — R. C. Cox ; Mount 
Holly — H. A. Rhipee; Mount Olive — Thomas O'- 
Berry; Murphy— T. J. Hill; N^ashville— Harold D. 
Cooley; New Bern — Wm. Dunn, Jr.; Newland — R. 
W. Wall ; ISTewton- C. E. Mcintosh ; North Wilkes- 
boro— E. .C. Willis; Norwood— Joe A. Lilly; Old 
Fort — G. B. Strickland; Oxford — Ben K. Lassiter ; 
Pactolus — W. C. Chauncey; Pantego — J. P. Clark; 
Pembroke — R. H. Livermore ; Pineto])s — J. ^'. 
Cobb; Pittsboro — A. H. London; Pleasant Garden — 

F. L. Forest ; Plymouth — Z. V. Norman ; Polkton — 



D. W. Smith; Pollocksville— J. H. Bell; Raeford— 

E. S. Smith ; Randleman — Frank Talley ; Raleigh — 
R. D. W. Connor; Reidsville— W. ' R. Daltou; 
Roanoke Rapids — John L. Patterson ; Rockingham — 
L. J. Bell; Rocky Mount — F. E. Winslow; Rocky 
Point — M. W. Nelson; Rowland — J. McN. Smith; 
Roxboro — Dr. A. F. Nichols; Ruifin — J. Benton 
Stacy ; Rural Hall — Thomas Wilson ; Salisbury — 
Stable Linn; Sanford — D. L. St. Clair; Selma — N. 
E. Ward ; Shelby— Dr. R. C. Ellis ; Smithfield— F. 
H. Brooks; Southern Pines — J. A. Rudisill ; Soutli- 
|iort — Rev. Theodore Patrick; Spindale — K. E. Tan- 
ner; Stantonsburg — Dr. H. H. Powell; Statesville — 
Dorman Thompson ; Stoneville — Leland Stanford ; 
Stratford — A. O. Joines ; Swan Quarter — C. B. Spen- 
cer; Teachey — Leo Carr; Thomasville — B. B. Vin- 
son; Trenton — J. S. Hargett ; Troy — ^Claudius Dock- 
ery; Tryon — W. T. Lindsey; Warrenton — B. B. Wil- 
liams; Washington — Harry McMullan; Waynesville 
— C. F. Kirkpatrick; Weldon— G. C. Green; Wen- 
dell— J. E. B. Davis; Wentworth—C. 0. McMichael; 
West Durham — K. P. Lewis; Whiteville — Jackson 
Greer; Williamston — Clayton Moore; Wilmington — 
J. O. Carr ; Wilson — Graham Woodard ; Wilson Mills 
— S. T. Liles ; Winston-Salem — A. H. Bahnson ; 
Woodland— W. H. S. Burgwyn ; Yadkinville— D. M. 
Reece ; Yanceyville — Julius Johnston ; Zebulon — Dr. 
G. S. Barbee. " 



OFFICE MACHINERY SUGGESTED IS INADEQUATE 

Editob, Alumni Review: 

Sie: — I have just read your editorials on Meeting 
the Issue, etc., with considerable interest. Permit 
me to express the conviction that your editorial on 
Office Machinery does not adequately present the sit- 
uation. You will agree with me that the adminis- 
tration is the heart, in one sense, of the University, 
and only by having this adequately housed and or- 
ganized can our best work be done. I know that the 
chemical department has often suffered owing to the 
lack of proper business arrangements of the adminis- 
tration. 

The University is certain to have a great growth. 
The Alumni Building, if designed for administra- 
tion purposes, has been a gross failure, recognized 
as such even by visitors, to say nothing of us who 
suffer. No rearrangements of the Alumni Building 
will ever fill the bill. It is not large enough to start 
with and the tearing out and putting in of partitions 
will never be anything but makeshifts. However, if 
the building is abandoned, it will serve very well in- 
deed as a recitation hall, excellent rooms being pos- 
sible even in the basement. 



194 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



A nnieh larger building for administrative pur- 
poses is necessary for the future University and it 
would be criminal not to look well ahead. Such a 
building must provide for the following purposes 
and others doubtless may be thought of: 

Main Floor — President's office, president's wait- 
ing room, president's secretary, treasurer's office, 
treasurer's brick vault, business manager's office, 
business manager's waiting room, business manager's 
secretary, several offices for deans, registrar's offices, 
faculty room (one purpose only), a room for small 
receptions. 

Second Floor — Several faculty committee rooms, 
various publication offices, general mailing room, 
book liinding room, ample store rooms for publica- 
tions. 

Basement — Electrical shop, electrical store room, 
carpenter shop, lumber stock room, plumber's shop, 
plumber's store room, superintendent of grounds and 
buildings, shipping room, receiving room, elevator. 

When you consider that these rooms should l)e 
large enough to provide for expansion within each 
room as time goes on, you can reailily see the neces- 
sity for a large building. Such a building should be 
an imposing one easily recognized as one of special 
importance. It should have a tower with a clock. 
An excellent site would be the location of the Inn 
and the old Chapel Hill Hotel, though it should be 
set considerably back from the street. 
Yours for progress, 

A. S. WUEELKK. 

Chapel Hill. X. C, April 24, 191i). 



CAROLINA MEN ASSEMBLE IN PARIS 

An interesting get-together meeting of the Caro- 
lina men stationed in Paris was recently held in the 
French capital, according to information contained 
in a communication from Pvt. Curtis F. Crissman, 
Sorbonne University, A. P. 0. 702, Paris, France. 
The following men were present at the meeting: 

Lowry Axley, '13, 1st Lt., 161st Inf. 

Henry R. Totten, '13, 2nd Lt., 31Sth F. .\. 

Thomas C. Boushall, '15 (civilian). International 
Banking Work. 

George F. Taylor, "15, Sgt., 5th Division, Labo- 
ratory. 

W. P. Wicker, "15, Pvt., 1st class, 33rd Engi- 
neers. 

Joseph J. Harris, '16, Pvt, Co. E., 105th Engrs. 

J. L. Cockerham, law '16, Xavy. 

Curtis F. Crissman, 'IS, Pvt., 1st class. 

Walter E. Wiles, '19, Sgt., Ist class, ^l. D. Q. 
il. Depot No. 8. 



Chas. J. Taylor, '1!», Sgt., 322nd Inf. 

E. F. Parker, 2nd Lt., 305 M. G. Battalion (was 
formerly instructor in French at the University). 

The following list contains the names of those 
known to lie in Paris who were unalde to attend the 
meeting : 

Secretary of the Xavy Josephus Daniels, Lt. H. 
G. Baity, Captain Curtis Bynum, Sgt. Aubrey El- 
liott. Sgt. Bill Graves, Sgt. P. E. Green, Private H. 
G. Singleton, Bill Keesler, Lieut. Bruce Carraway, 
.Tohn Hall Manning, .lei'rv Zollicotfer, Allison 
C'ooper. 

Most of the aliove list are in school in Paris, Pri- 
vate Crissman writes. He was detailed (not elected) 
as secretary of the Paris Alumni Group. He expects 
to work up a big meeting of the Carolina alumni in 
Paris at some early date. The men will l)e there in 
school until the end of June. 



THE REVIEW WITH THE MEN IN SERVICE 

Dixring and since the war the managers of The 
Review have made every reasonable effort to send 
it to Carolina men in the service both at home and 
abroad wherever the address could be ascertained. 

Conclusive proof of this statement is furnished 
in the following message from Capt. Arnold Sham- 
askin, of the Medical Corps, with the 53rd Infantry, 
A. E. F., France: 

"Though I have neglected to inform you about the 
change in my address since I left the States in Jiily, 
1!)1S, the Alumni Review has reached me every- 
wliere I was in France. In the Vosges mountains, on 
the Verdun front, and in the rest areas this publi- 
cation has always found me somehow. As I do not 
expect to be back home within the next six months. 
von will kind]\- send The Review to me.'' 



EXPANSION OF GROUNDS PROPOSED 

The Executive Committee of the Board of Trus- 
tees of the University of Xorth Carolina yesterday 
appointed a committee to investigate and report at 
the June meeting of the Board of Trustees on the 
feasiliility of developing 550 acres of woodland ad- 
joining the campus of the University. The scheme 
has long been advocated by Col. J. Bryan Grimes, 
member of the Executive Committee, who argues 
tlu' growing congested conditions of the campus as a 
reason for the needed expansion. 

The committee to investigate is composed of Col- 
onel Grimes ; Mr. George Stephens, of Charlotte ; 
Mr. James A. Gray, of Winston-Salem ; Mr. .lolin 
Sprunt Hill, of Durham; and ilr. Haywood Parker, 
of .Vsheville. 

Colonel Grimes hail written letters to the Trustees 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



195 



of the University and many of the alumni proposinji 
the expansion idea. Likewise, he has secured from 
virtually all the universities of the country diagrams 
of their campus and Iniildings, with expressions of 
opinion as to expansion. 

The University men showed marked eagerness for 
the scheme, while the university authorities of other 
states were almost united in the opinion that had 
there been earlier foresight of present conditions the 
trend would have been toward expansion rather than 
toward centralization of the college community about 
the principal buildings. 

Colonel Grimes' Letter 

Colonel Grimes' scheme as set forth in his letter 
to the University men, follows: 

"Adjoining the 48-acre campus tlic University of 
North Carolina owns 550 acres of woodland. A.s 
this land is well set in magnificent oaks, its scenic 
beauty is not surpassed in central Xorth Carolina. 

"For many years I have felt that the University 
should develop this property. Many of the older 
universities are now hampered by grounds that are 
too small and arc making efforts to secure more space 
and breathing room. 

"The University should be our educational center 
and a sentiment is fast growing to observe the inten- 
tion of the Constitution (Article 9, Section 14), and 
at no very distant day we may expect to see not only 
additional biiildings, but new schools, institutions 
and colleges clustered around a greater University. 

"The University of Xorth Carolina, with grounds 
second to no institution in America, is scrambling its 
buildings into a congested area, while it has hundreds 
of imused acres suitable for building sites. 
Expand Toward South 

"Instead of pressing and crowding towards the 
village street, it shoidd handsomely expand toward 
the south, as the original plans contemplated. 

"It would be greatly to the interest of the Univer- 
sity to have a large park laid off on the south side of 
the campus. In this park, between the avenues and 
streets, permanent park spaces running the full 
length of the property could be laid off. Squares ad- 
joining the present campus would be reserved for 
future University buildings. Future fraterntiy and 
club houses could be arranged for on open squares. 
A residential section could be developed with large 
(one or two-acre) lots, giving a rural or suburban 
effect and each residence could face an open square, 
or parked place. These large lots could be leased on 
long, easy terms as home sites for professors, student 
apartment houses, student homes, etc. In time it 
might be found a good investment to build houses to 
lease to professors. A section could be divided into 
residential lots that could be let in long leases for 
homes for desirable people. Such a residential park 



would attract people of means, who desired homes 
in quiet, cultured and intellectual surroundings. 

"If other institutions or colleges should be con- 
nected with the University there are hundreds of 
acres for their location. 

Have Landscape Gardener 

"A competent, broad-minded and sympathetic 
landscape architect could lay otf college and park 
grounds unequalled anywhere in this country. 

"The avenues, parks, squares, circles and vistas 
would liear names of men associated with University 
life and history. 

"Besides the direct material benefits to the Uni- 
versity from such a University and residential park, 
the indirect benefit to the whole State would be gTcat, 
as each student would be influenced by the spacious- 
ness and beauty of his surrounding and would carry 
these ideals back to his home with him. 

"With the new era that has dawned for the Uni- 
versity, now is the time for this development." — 
Xeirs and Observer, April 5. 



WILSON WINS TENNIS TOURNAMENT 

The Wilson high school, represented by William 
Finch and Eaymond Matthews, was the winner of 
the fourth annual inter-scholastic tennis tournament 
held at the University on May 2nd. The Wilson 
high school won both in sinoles and doubles. Two 
trophy cups will be awarded the Wilson high school. 
Other schools taking part in the inter-scholastic ten- 
nis tournament were : Charlotte, Durham and Riath- 
erford College. 



FRIENDSHIP WINS TRACK MEET 

The Friendship High School won the seventh an- 
nual interscholastic track meet of the State held at 
the University on May 2nd. The Friendship con- 
testants piled up a total score of 49 points, followed 
by Chapel Hill with 27, Hillsboro 9, High Point 6, 
and Huntersville 3. 



CARMICHAEL TO CAPTAIN QUINT 

Billy Carmichael, of Durham, was recently elected 
captain of the Carolina basketball team for next sea- 
son. Carmichael played a star game at forward dui-- 
ing the past two seasons and led his teammates in the 
number of points scored this season. 

With the splendid material already on hand, in 
addition to several former varsity men who will be 
back in college next fall, the Carolina squad of next 
season will undoubtedly be stronger than the past 
season's team, which is saying a good deal, for the 
past season was a great success. 



196 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 

Issued monthly except in July, August, and September, by the Gen- 
eral Alumni Association of the University of North Carolina. 

Board of Publication 

The Review is edited by the following Board of Publication: 

Louis R. Wilson, '99 '. Editor 

Associate Editors: Walter Murphy, '92; Harry Howell, '95; Archibald 
Henderson, '98; W. S. Bernard, '00; J. K. Wilson, '05; Louis 
Graves, '02; F. P. Graham, '09; Kenneth Tanner, '11. 

E. R. Rankin, '13 Managing Editor 

R. W. Madry, '18 News Editor 

Subscription Price 

Single Copies $0.15 

Per Year 1-00 

Communications intended for the Editor should be sent to Chapel 
Hill. N. C; for the Managing Editor, to Chapel Hill. N. C. AH 
communications intended for publication must be accompanied with 
signatures if they are to receive consideration. 

OFFICE OF PUBLICATION, CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 

Entered at the Postoffice at Chapel Hill. N. C. as second class 
matter. 



THE UNIVERSITY IN LETTERS 



"Keynote Studies in Keynote Books of the Bible'' 
(Fleming H. Revell Co., New York and Chicago, 
1919), by C. Alphonso Smith, Head of the Depart- 
ment of English in the United States Naval Academy, 
embodies the James Sprunt Lectures delivered at 
T'nion Theological Seminary, Richmond, Va., in 
March, 1917. This lectureship was founded by Mr. 
James Sprunt of Wilmington, N. C, through the do- 
nation of the sum of thirty thousand dollars in 1911. 
The aim of the lectures is to bring the Bible "home to 
men's business and bosoms," and the sacred books 
dealt with are Genesis, Esther, Job, Hosea. John's 
Gospel, Romans, Phillippians, Revelation. These 
chapters are preceded by an introductory essay, ''The 
Keynote Method," setting forth the guiding principle 
of the work. In each book, the author seeks to dis- 
cover and to exhibit "some central and commanding 
thought that gives coherence and vitality to the 
whole." The author is emboldened to employ this 
method of criticism because he believes that "the 
time is surely coming when all great literature will 
be studied in this way." The first chapter of Gene- 
sis, according to the author, abolished mythology 
rliriiugliout the civilized world, it "announced unity, 
order, and progression in nature.'' The chapter mi 
Esther is a striking piece of literary criticism and 
analysis; for the author conclusvively shows that 
Esther meets Poe's requirement of the modern short 
story and, so, stands as a sort of anticipation of this 
"modern" form of art. "As in Genesis, so in Esther, 
such character is a type but also an individual ;" and 
it is these type qualities which are chiefly stressed. 



Esther is conceived as "a bit of constructive ideal- 
ism faultlessly conceived and faultlessly embodied." 
Job wrought out in the forge of his own experience 
the great truth expressed by Froude: "The moral life 
of man is like the flight of a bird in the air. He is 
.sustained only by effort, and when he ceases to exert 
himself he falls." With the saying, "Though he slay 
me, yet will I trust him," the book passes at once 
"from the category of the Greek drama, governed by 
remorseless fatality, to the plane of the Shakespearean 
drama, where personal will and faith and hope have a 
chance to win out over an imposed and implacable 
doom." The central thought of Hosea Professor 
Smith finds in the words : "For I desired mercy, and 
not sacrifice ; and the knowledge of God rather than 
burnt offerings'' : and from Hosea may be said to 
date a religion that "has God at its center and glad 
service as its expression." And so — following the 
method outlined in the opening chapter — the author 
g(H^s through each of the remaining books — John, 
Romans, Philippians, Revelation. The volume is 
stimulating in thought, rich in suggestive compar- 
isons, and packed with literary allusions at once in- 
dicative and illustrative. 



A volume just from the Princeton University 
Press is Socialism and American Ideals by William 
Starr Myers (U. X. C, class of 1897), Professor of 
Politics in Princeton University. The college 
mates of Professor Myers at Chapel Hill will read 
with interest the dedication : "To the memory of 
Samuel Selden Lamb in partial fulfilment of a 
mutual promise made at dear old Chapel Hill." 
Lamb was a brilliant young law student, who was 
]>aid the high honor of election to the editorship oi 
The Tar Heel; and his early death cut short a career 
which was truly brilliant in its promise. 

In regard to the book's general thesis. Professor 
Myers declares that Socialism is fundamentally un- 
American, since it is in violation of the basic prin- 
ciples of American democracy. It is, he avers, in 
(onflict with the idea of equality of opportunity. So- 
cialism he finds to mean a substitution of govern- 
mental judgment for that of the individual and for 
individual ambititm as well. "The ideal or object of 
the Ignited States is to give equality of opportunity for 
each individual to work out his or her own salvation 
in a political, a moral or an economic sense." Social- 
ism would lielp people in spite of themselves; and 
this, he maintains, inevitably pauperizes and atro- 
phies human character. In both Socialism and 
Pacifism, which he lumps together, the essential idea 
is that the individual should meutallv 'lie down' and 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



icn 



'let George do it." " In additiou, he tiiids Socialism 
i;ot only essentially un-Amei'ican but essentially un- 
democratic. "A democraoy," he says, ''means a 
government by public opinion, and this opinion is the 
result of the co-operation impulse or community feel- 
ing of the people of a free country — a people who are 
given the opportunity to think for themselves, and 
are not thought for by a divinely constituted govern- 
ment." Whereas Socialism means the "substitution 
of government or official judgment for that of the 
individual.'' 



PEACE-MAKING IN CAROLINA 

The following appeared in The Neir Repuhlic of 
^fay lOtb, which speaks for itself: 

Sir: I have recently received a ))ublication which 
seems interesting enough to warrant my calling it to 
your attention. It is the report of a "Peace Confer- 
ence" held at the University of North Carolina. 

There is a class in the University known as English 
21, a course in English composition under the direc- 
tion of Dr. Edwin Greenlaw. Three months ago this 
class was organized into a Peace Conference. Dif- 
ferent groups were created to represent the various 
nations. The various issues of indemnities, bounda- 
ries and a League of Nations were investigated by 
the delegates of the different "nations," and a report 
was made to the conference as a whole. Here there 
was discussion — and a final settlement by vote. What 
the conference decided upon has been made into the 
pamphlet which attracted my attention. 

r do not propose to compare North Carolina's 
peace settlement with what has been done in Paris 
( though, in my ovni judgment, North Carolina might 
stand the comparison). There are other conferences 
ahead of ns. Doesn't the North Carolina plan pro- 
\-ide a good pattern for other universities ? 

C. R. Sawyer. 



THE ALUMNI LUNCHEON 

The Alumni Luncheon will be held at 1 :00 o'clock 
on Alumni Day, Tuesday, June 17, at Swain Hall. 
This occasion promises to he one of the most inter- 
esting and enjoyable features of commencement. 
Ladies are invited. The jn-ice per plate is one dollar. 
Reservations may l)e secured from E. R. Rankin. 
Secretary. 



Chas. T. Woollen, business manager of the Uni- 
versity and graduate manager of athletics, was sig- 
nally honored in his election as first vice-president of 
the South Atlantic Inter-Collegiate Athletic Associa- 
tion at the annual meeting of this organization. 



BASEBALL SEASON A SUCCESS 

The baseball season, which came to a close on May 
14, was a most successful one for the Carolina team, 
in spite of the loss of the Virginia series. Of the 21 
games played, 12 were won, seven were lost, and two 
were tied. Carolina scored 89 runs to her opponents' 
67 tallies. Especially successful was the Northern 
trip, four out of the si.x contests being victories for 
the university squad. 

All of this year's squad, with the exception of 
Herty, Powell and Bryant, will return to college next 
fall. With such an aggregation on hand, together 
with the large number of first year men who will be 
eligible for the team next season, it is confidently ex- 
pected that Carolina will have one of the strongest 
teams in the South when the spring of 1020 opens. 

To Coach William Lourcey, who not only worked 
hard with the players at all times, but taught them 
some baseball, goes much of the credit for putting out 
this season's winning team. 

Luther Hodges, manager of the squad, also co- 
operated with the men whenever possible. 

The scores of all the games played this season fol- 
low : 

ilarch 29 — Carolina, 4; Oak Ridge, 0. 

April 2 — ^Carolina, 7 ; Camp Bragg, 0. 

April 4 — .Carolina, 4; Elon, 1. 

April 5 — ^Carolina, 4; Durham Moose. 1. 

April 7 — Carolina, 2 ; N. C. State, 1. 

April 9— Carolina, 1 ; Elon, 4. 

April 10— Carolina, 5 ; V. P. I., 0. 

April 12 — ^Carolina, 1 ; Virginia, 2. 

April 14 — .Carolina, 3; Virginia, -3 (10 innings). 

April 19 — ^Carolina, ; Moose, 2. 

April 21 — Carolina, 4; Davidson, 3 (1.5 innings). 

April 22 — Carolina, 7; Virginia, 1. 

April 23 — Carolina, 9 ; Hampden-Sidney, 3. 

April 24 — ^Carolina, 13; Va. Medicals, 1. 

April 25— Carolina, 5; W. & L., 6. 

April 26 — .Carolina, 4; Johns-Hopkins, 13. 

May 3 — ^Carolina, 4; Virginia, 11. 

May 7 — Carolina, 5 ; South Carolina, 0. 

May 9 — Carolina, 4; Wake Forest, 7 (15 innings). 

May 10 — ^Carolina, 0; Trinity, (15 innings). 

May 14 — ^^Carolinas, 3 ; Trinity, 2. 

Carolina's total percentage in games, .632. 

The squad was composed of the following : Powell, 
Robbins, Roberts, Younce, Saunders, Feimster, Joy- 
ner, Lewis, Bryant, Tenney, Herty, Wilson, Milton, 
Fields, Swift, Cordon, Sims, McLean. 

The team as a whole was at bat 703 times and 
secured 140 hits, making a percentage of .199, and 
as a whole the team fielded .923. 



198 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



THE GENERAL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

of the 
UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 



Officers of the Association 

E. D. W. Connor, '99 President 

E. R. Rankin, '13 Secretary 

Executive Committee: Walter Murphy, '92; Dr. R. H. 
Lewis, '70; W. N. Everett, '86; H. E. Rondthaler, '93; C. W. 
Tillett, Jr., '09. 

THE ALUMNI 

R. W. MADRY, '18, Alumni Editor 



• RollofRonor * 



John V. BrooKshire, '18 

— Wounded iu France just before the Armistice. Was an 
ambulance driver. He entered the second Oglethorpe Camp. 
CITATIONS 

Robert Bruce Mason, '13 

— Awarded the Distinguished Service Cross for extraordinary 
heroism in action. He held the rank of captain in the 1st 
Machine Gun Battalion, 3d Division. His colors received the 
French decoration of the Legion of Honor. Durham was his 
home. 

William Oliver Smith, '16 

— Received an Army citation and awarded the Croix de Guerre 
with the Palm, by order of Marshall Petain, Commander-in- 
Chief of the French Army, for extraordinary heroism in action. 
The citation reads : 

"First Lieutenant William O. Smith, 318th Machine Gun 
Battalion. An officer brave and full of dash. On the 9th 
and 10th of November, 1918, he led his section with the waves 
of infantry. Taking a position in the German lines, he de- 
fended the captured ground against superior forces during a 
violent counter attack in the course of which he was twice 
wounded. ' ' 

In this battle the 318th Machine Gun Battalion, commanded 
by Major E. J. Lyman, was serving with the 20th French 
Army Corps. Nine members of this Battalion were decorated 
— two, Lieutenant Smith and Private Murphy, receiving army 
citations carrying the Palm in addition to the War Cross. 

Lieutenant Reynold T. Allen, '16, of the 321st Infantry, in 
a recent letter to his brother, Connor Allen, said of his Uni- 
versity classmate : ' ' Oliver carried off many honors in the 
Meuse-Argonne Drive. He was not with my regiment but 
I heard about it. It is true that he was captured but only 
after being wounded to such an extent that the Boche refused 
to kill him when they had the opportunity because they ad- 
mired )iis bravery. He volunteered to cover the withdrawal 
of a company which was about to be annihilated by a German 
battalion. He did this with eight men, all of whom were 
killed or wounded. He fought to the last though wounded." 

Andrews Scroggs Nelson, '16 

— Awarded the French Croix de Guerre in recognition of heroic 
conduct in action. He was a member of the '16 law class. 
Had been overseas 12 months and held the rank of first lieuten- 
ant. He is at present at his home in Lenoir, N. C. 



Edward Lee Spencer, '17 

— Awarded the Distinguished Service Cross for extraordinary 
heroism in action in France. He entered the first Oglethorpe 
Camp in the spring of 1917. Returned from overseas in Febru- 
ary and is now at Camp Upton, N. Y. 

J. Graham Ramsay, '17 

— Awarded the French Croix de Guerre in recognition of heroic 
conduct in action on last September 28. He held the rank 
of first lieutenant. 

Lieutenant Ramsay returned from overseas service this 
spring and is at present on the Hill. 



WITH THE CLASSES 

1857 

— Col. Robert Bingham, head of the Bingham Military School, 
of Asheville, said to be the University 's oldest living alumnus, 
addressed a mass meeting of the alumni in Asheville on April 
17, when plans were made for the starting of the Graham 
Memorial Campaign in that city. 

1859 

— This class holds its 60-year reunion at Commencement. 
Every member is urged to be on hand. 

1860 

— E. S. Martin is a lawyer of Wilmington and chairman of 
the Board of Trustees of the Wilmington Public Library. 

1869 

— The 50-year reunion of '69 will be held during the coming 
Commencement, June 15-18. Every member will do his best 
to be present. 

1877 
— Dr. Julian M. Baker, a prominent physician of Tarboro, 
who entered the University as a junior with its re-opening 
in 1875, promises to be present for Commencement. He entered 
at the same time as the members of the class of '79, who 
hold a reunion this year. Dr. Baker is very anxious to meet 
all of his old classmates again and insists that all now living 
return to the Hill to help celebrate. 

1879 

— All members of '79 are urged to be present for the 40-year 
reunion to be held during the coming Commencement, June 
15-18. 

1882 
— Dr. E. A. Alderman is president of the University of Vir- 
ginia. 

— Dr. B. F. McMillan, of Red Springs, a former legislator, is 
now a practicing physician of Red Springs. 

1884. 
— Dr. Alpheus Fields is a practicing physician of Norfolk, Va. 

1885 
— R. S. Neal is owner of Somerset Plantation, of Creswell. 

1886 

— Dr. Lewis J. Battle is a prominent physician of Washington, 
D. C. He regrets that the reunions of '86 are not held more 
frequently. 

1888 
— Dr. W. J. Battle is head of the department of Greek, of 
the University of Cincinnati, Ohio. 
— J. C. Martin is practicing law in Asheville. 

1889 

— Members of '89 will return to Chapel Hill during Com- 
mencement Week, June 15-18, for the reunion. Write your 
classmates to come along. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 199 



ESTABLISHED 1916 

Jllumnj Coyalty fund 

"One for all. and all Tor one" 



Council: 

A. M. SCALES. '92 
A. W. HAYWOOD, '04 
J. A. GRAY, Jr., '08 
W. T. SHORE, 'OS 




THE ALUMNI LOYALTY FUND 

Was established to provide a way by which every alumnus 
could contribute according to his ability to the general wel- 
fare of the University. 

A GOOD NUMBER FROM MANY CLASSES 

Have taken advantage of this opportunity and have p^id in 
a total of $8000. 

AT YALE UNIVERSITY EVERY CLASS 

Is largely represented in this sort of annual giving. Last 
year 75% of the class of 1878 contributed to the Y^le fund; 
71% of the class of 1893; 86% of the class of 1912; 82% 
of the class of 1893s; 71% of the class of 1883; 76% of 
the class of 1883s; 54% of the class of 1903. 

THE WAR HAS GIVEN US ALL A 
NEW VISION OF SERVICE 

Carolina needs your service^ no matter how small the 
amount. Will you render it? Send your contribution to 
the University Treasurer. 



200 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



— W. S. Eobersou is mayor of Chapel Hill. He is also 
manager of the Chapel Hill Insurance and Realty Co. 

1891 

— W. G. Cox resides in Hertford. 

— Prof. J. V. Lewis is head of the department of Geology of 
Rutgers College, New Brunswick, N. J. 

— J. M. Morehead, of New York City, was major on the 
General Staff of the U. S. Army, and was stationed in Wash- 
ington during the war. He was attached to the War Indus- 
tries Board, being connected with the Explosives Department, 
giving particular attention to T. N. T. He was discharged on 
January 9th. Spray, N. C, was formerly his home. 

1892 

— Dr. Chas. Ba.skerville is head of the department of Chemis- 
try of the College of the City of New York. 
— Jno. A. Hendricks, law '92, is practicing law at Marshall. 

1893 

— DeB. Whitaker is vice-president and general manager of 
the Spanish-American and Jaragua Iron Co., of Santiago, 
Cuba. 

1894 
— The members of '94 will turn out in full force and return 
to Chapel Hill for the coming Commencement, June 15-18. 

1895 

— W. M. Hendren, law '95, of Winston-Salem, is president of 
the Tmn-City Club. He is also president of the Forsyth 
County Alumni Association. 

1896 
— J. H. Andrews recently removed from Mobile, Alabama, to 
Greensboro, where he is division freight agent of the Southern 
Railroad lines. 

— T. D. Bryson, of Bryson City, is a judge of the superior 
court. 

1897 
— Rev. J. C. Seagle has moved from Mount Verno, N. Y., his 
former residence, to Brevard, N. C. 

— Dr. A. F. Williams, of Wilson, is one of the proprietors of 
the Wilson Sanitorium. 

— Col. Sidney W. Minor, who commanded the 120th Infantry 
regiment in France, upon his arrival in America was placed 
in command of the Sixtieth Brigade. He has returned to his 
home in Durham, following the hearty "welcome home" cele- 
brations accorded the 120th and demobilization thereafter. 

1898 
— Paul C. Whitlock, who has held the position of trust officer 
with the American Trust Company for a number of years, 
has resigned his connection with the Trust Company and will 
devote his time to his profession, the practice of law, associat- 
ing himself with T. C. Bowie, who will relinquish his practice 
at Jefferson, N. C, to locate in Charlotte. Mr. Bowie is also 
a Carolina alumnus. 

— Milton C. Elliot on February 28th resigned his position as 
counsel of the Federal Reserve Board to engage in the prac- 
tice of law at Washington, D. C. 
— H. S. Lake is living iu New York City. 

— R. S. Busbee is secretary of the Atlantic Fire Insurance Co., 
of Raleigh, N. C. 

1899 
H. M. Wagstaff, {Secretary, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
— The class of '99 from all indications will have a good rep- 
resentation at Commencement. Write every other member to 
meet you in Chapel Hill, June 15-18. 
— .1. D. Grimes is a member of the law firm of Ward & Grimes, 



of Washington, N. C. He writes that he will certainly return 
to the Hill Commencement, for the '99 class reunion. 

1900 

W. S. Bernard, Hecretarii, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
— W. H. Battle is engaged in the general mercantile business 
at Badin. 

— Col Ernest Graves is at staff headquarters, Neuf Chateau, 
France, Section Engineer, Advance Section, A. E. F. When 
last heard from he was in charge of 40,000 men — whites, 
blacks, and German prisoners, who were working the roads 
through northern France. 

— Rev. T. A. Cheatham is rector of the Episcopal Church of 
Pinehurst. 

1901 
— Jas. T. Dortch, of Oklahoma City, Okla., held the rank of 
major in the Army during the war, being in charge of the 
Personnel Office at Camp Pike, Ark. 

— Captain Edward Mills, associate professor of Chemistry at 
the University from 1904 to 1910, and a member of the chemis- 
try department of the University of South Carolina since the 
latter date, has been promoted to the rank of major in the 
department of gas and liquid fire. Prof. Mills has been in 
France since early last spring and is on leave of absence from 
the South Carolina University. 

1902 
I. F. Lewis, Secretary, University of Virginia 
— J. Frazier Glenn is a prominent lawyer of Asheville. He is 
judge of the City Court. 

1903 
N. W. Walker, Secretary. Chapel Hill, N. C. 
— R. 0. Everett is a successful attorney of Durham. 
— J. E. Pearson, of Holly Springs, is practicing law. 
— -John J. London is now commander in the Navy, on the U. 
S. S. Columbia, care Postmaster, New York. When war was 
declared, he was on shore duty under the Bureau of Ordnance, 
as a Naval Inspector of Ordnance, for the South Eastern Dis- 
trict, with headquarters at Raleigh, being given additional 
duty as Navy recruiting oflSeer for North Carolina, at Ra- 
leigh. He was transferred to duty with the Battleship Fleet 
as navigator of the U. S. S. New Jersey in March, 1918. He 
was again transferred in September, 1918, this time to duty 
as Executive Officer of the U. S. S. Columbia, which was en- 
gaged in convoy duty out of New York. Commander London 
sends word to the Review that the four Carolina men holding 
the rank of lieutenant commander at the beginning of the 
war have all been promoted to commander. 
— J. H. Folger, law '03, is a member of the law firm of Folger. 
Jackson & Folger, of Mount Airy. 

— Rev. W. .7. Gordon is an Episcopal minister of Spray. 
—Geo. R. Ward is a .successful attorney of Wallace. 

1904 

T. F. HiCKERSON, Secretary, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
— This class will have its 15-year reunion during the com- 
ing Commencement and all members are urged to attend. 
— W. P. Wood is vice-president of the Elizabeth City Buggy 
Company. 

1905 
W. T. Shore, Secretary, Charlotte, N. C. 
— P. H. Rogers, Jr., is associated with the Carolina Fiber Co., 
of Hartsville, S. C. 

— J. Kenyon Wilson, who held the rank of lieutenant com- 
mander in the Navy during the war, being on the U. S. S. 
Rhode Island, has resumed the practice of law in Elizabeth 
City. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



201 




If you can't come this way to your 
Reunion, take a jitney or the 
Limited— but come! June 15-18, 1919 



202 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



1905 

— Lieut.-Col. Sidney C. Chambers, of the 113th Artillery, has 
been discharged from the service and has resumed the prac- 
tice of law in Durham. He has recently been elected city 
attorney to succeed J. L. Morehead, '03. 

— Dr. J. B. Cranmer is a practicing physician of Wilmington. 
— Lionel Weil is a member of the mercantile firm of H. 
Weil and Co., of Goldsboro. 

— Thos. J. Moore has removed from Wilmington to his old 
home at Greenville, N. C, and is now cashier of the Green- 
ville Banking and Trust Co. 

1906 
C-\PT. J. A. Pakker, Secretary, Charlotte, N. C. 
— Isaac S. London is editor and proprietor of the Rockingham 
Post-Dispatch. 

— W. M. Upehurch is manager of the Employment Bureau of 
the Durham Hosiery Mills. 

1907 
C. L. Weill, Secretary, Greensboro, N. C. 
— C. S. Barker, Med. '07, is a practicing physician of New 
Bern. 

— S. G. Koble is head of the Department of Education at 
Millsaps College, .Jackson, Miss. 



R. BLACKNALL & SON 

DRUGGISTS 

NORRIS AND HUYLER'S C/XNOIES 

G. BERNARD. Maniaofr 

Corcoran Street Durham, N. C. 



Greensboro 
Commercial School 



Offers through its courses of 
instruction unusual opportuni- 
ties to young men and women 
who are seeking to equip 
themselves for business success 

For full information, address 



Greensboro Commercial School 

Greensboro, N. C. 



1908 

M. EoBiNS, Secretary, Greensboro, N. C. 
— L. P. Matthews is an attorney of Norfolk, his address being 
Larchmont, Norfolk, Va. 

— J. G. Dawson, law '08, of Kiuston, was a representative 
from Lenoir County in the last legislature. 
— The double wedding of Miss Grace Overman, of Salisbury, 
to Edgar Norris Snow, of Greensboro, and Miss Kathryn 
Overman, of Salisbury, to Gilbert Foster Hambley, also of 
Salisbury, both daughters of Senator Lee S. Overman, was 
celebrated at the Overman homestead in Salisbury on April 
30. It was one of the most brilliant social events of the State. 
— T. M. Hines is located at Salisbury. 

— 0. O. Cole is successfully identified with the chemical en- 
gineering profession. His new adilress is 620 Copeland St., 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

1909 

0. C. Cox, Secretary, Greensboro, N. C. 
— Commencement week will find the members of '09 here in 
full force for their 10-year reunion. Write the others to 
meet you. 

— C. W. Tillett, Jr., is chairman of the reunion committee of 
his class and earnestly requests the full co-operation of every 
member of '09 in making the coming get-together affair a 
great success. He was mustered out of the service several 
months ago, holding the rank of captain. 

— W. L. Long is an attorney of Roanoke Rapids. He repre- 
sented Halifax County in the senate in the last General As- 
sembly. 

— Edwin Watkins is engaged in the mercantile business at 
Henderson. 

— Duncan McRae writes that he will most assuredly return 
to the Hill for the '09 reunion at Commencement. He is now 
with the National Lamp Works of the General Electric Co., 
his address being Research Bldg., Westinghouse E. and M. Co., 
East Pittsburg, Pa. 

— Boiling Hall is successfully engaged in farming and agri- 
cultural extension work in Waynesville, N. C. 
— E. R. Oettinger is manager of the Oettinger Department 
Store, of Wilson, one of the largest firms in the city. 
— Born to Mr. and Mrs. E. S. Scott, of Charlotte, a son, in 
February. 

— Joe G. Fitzsimmons, recently discharged from the service, 
is now engaged in the automobile business. 
— W. L. Currie is with the Carolina Power and Light Co., of 
Raleigh. 

— C. W. Howard is secretary and treasurer of the Howard 
.Jobbing Co., of Weldon. 

— Dr. Robert Drane, of Edenton, has been discharged from 
the service. He held the rank of captain. 
— L. A. Blackburn is a successful electrical engineer, his ad- 
dress being Carney 's Point, N. J., Box No. 5. 

1910 

J. R. Nixon, Secretary, Edenton, N. C. 
— Eugene E. Barnett, Carolina's representative at Hankchow, 
China, continues to do a great and important work in this 
missionary field. The student body recently contributed a 
large sum to the annual fund raised to support this work. 
— Lindsay C. Warren, who was president pro tempore of the 
senate during the last legislature, is now practicing law in 
Washington. 

— Miss Clara Louise Nathan and Louis Lipinsky, the former 
of Charlotte and the latter of Wilmington, were married in 
Charlotte in April. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



203 



— O. W. Hyman is registrar-bursar of the College of Medicine 
of the University of Tennessee. 

— Prof. T. B. Eagles, instructor in mathematics at the Htate 
University from 1910 to 1913, has been elected acting presi- 
dent of Howard college, of Birmingham, Ala., during the re- 
lease from active service of Acting President J. C. Lawson. 
Professor Eagles was head of the mathematics department and 
treasurer of the college prior to taking up his new duties. 

After receiving his A. B. degree at the University in 1908, 
he taught for some time in Catawba College, at Newton. 
From Newton, he went to Bethany College, in West Virginia, 
where he taught until he returned to the University in 1910 to 
become instructor. He received his M. A. degre at this insti- 
tution in 1912. In 191.3 he was offered the chair of mathema- 
tics in Howard college, and has been prominently identified 
with the life of this institution for the past six years. 
— H. O. Craver is a successful instructor in the schools of 
North Fork, W. Va. 
— C. C. Barbec is located at Savannah, Ga. 

1911 

I. C. JIosER, Secretary, .\shboro, N. C. 
— H. \. Vogler is with the Wachovia Bank and Trust Co., 
of Winston-Salem. 

— Joseph Daw-son was recently elected mayor of Kinston. 
— Rev. J. G. Walker is assistant pastor of the Greensboro 
Presbyterian Cliurch. 

1912 

J. C. LOCKHART. Secretary. Zebulon, N. C. 

— Sgt. William Graves is taking a four month 's course at 

Sorbonne University, Paris. He has been on duty with the 

famous 30th division. 

— William Myers Jones, of Charlotte, is with the A. E. F. 
in France. 

— B. S. Young, of Durham, is with the Export Leaf Tobacco 
Co., of Danville, Va. 

— A. D. Folger is a partner in the law firm of Folger, Jackson 
& Folger, of Mount Airy. 

— W. T. McLean is engaged in the manufacture of lumber at 
Thomasville, Ga. 

— Miss Hattie Covington and Dr. Fairley P. James, lieutenant 
senior grade, U. S. N., were married in Laurinburg on Febru- 
ary 18, 1819. They now reside in New York. 
— A. H. Graham holds the rank of Captain with the A. E. F. 
— W. H. Chllds has recently been elected city attorney of 
Lincolnton. 

— C. W. Higgins is a member of the law firm of Doughton 
and Higgins, of Sparta. He was in an officers' training camp 
when the armistice was signed. 

— Lieut. Eugene F. Rimmer is with the A. E. F. in France. 
— Dr. R. H. Baynes is located in New York City and is with 
the Hurdle Mills. 

— A. W. Graham, Jr., is a successful lawyer of Oxford. He 
was president of the class of 1912. 

— L. N. Morgan is a member of the English department of 
the University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma. 
— E. H. Yelverton is United States vice consul at London. 

1913 

A. L. M. Wiggins, Secretary, Hartsville, S. C. 
— H. C. Pettway is a member of the law firm of Peterson & 
Pettway, of Lakeland, Fla. 

— Louis M. Bourne is a member of the law firm of Bourne, 
Parker & Morrison, of Asheville, the latter two members of 
the firm being also Carolina men. 
— W. S. Coulter, law '13, is an attorney of Burlington. 



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204 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



DURHAM ICE CREAM CO. 

Makers of Blue Ribbon Brand Ice Crear 
Receptions and Banquets a Specialty 
TELEPHO.M; No. 1199 



PERRY-HORTON CO. 

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UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 



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For full particulais and handsome catalog, address 

MRS. WALTER LEE LEDNUM 

PRESIDENT 



— Theodore Patrick, Jr., accepted a call to the Episcopal 
Church at Southport after the war and now resides there. 
— S. R. Winters is special Washington correspondent for the 
News and Observer, his address being 603 District National 
Bank building. 

— Corporal John H. Workman, Co. K, 324 Infantry, A. E. F., 
A. P. 0. 791, is now an instructor in the 8th Corps School of 
2,.500 students, where a good deal of college work is being 
done. He expects to reach the states during the late summer. 
— Miss Willie Carter and Edwin Badger Hart were married 
in March. 

— Chaplain Douglas L. Rights, stationed at Camp Jackson, S. 
C, made a tour over South Carolina in the interest of the 
recent Victory Loan. 

— E. Vernon Kyser, pharmacy, '13, formerly of Eocky Mount, 
HOW general superintendent of the Cincinnati Soap Company, 
Cincinnati, Ohio, has made important discoveries in the manu- 
facture of soap, which will effect, it is claimed, the saving of 
from three to four cents per pound. The large manufacturing 
plant in which he has been chief for several years has taken 
over the right of production. Mr. Kyser is also a lecturer 
in the department of Chemistry of the University of Cincinnati. 
He was formerly an assistant in pharmacy in the University. 
— W. Raleigh Pettaway was recently released from the ser- 
vice and has resumed the practice of law with offices in Pett- 
way Bldg., Tampa, Fla. 

— H. C. Miller, A. M. '13, is head of the Department of 
Education of Lenoir College, his address being 206 12th Ave., 
Hickory, N. C. 

1914 

Oscar Le.\ch, Secretary, A. E. F., France. 

— The members of 1914 will meet in Chapel Hill for their 

first five-year reunion during the coming Commencement. 

Everyone is urged to attend. 

— Collier Cobb, Jr., with the A. E. F., is studying engineering 
at the University of Manchester, England. 

— Isaac R. Strayhorn is prosecuting attorney in the Durham 
Township Court. 

— H. L. Cox is a chemist, and is located at Kenvil, N. J. 
— H. S. Willis enlisted in the medical reserve corps in De- 
cember, 1917, and was detailed to continue his studies in 
medicine at the Johns Hopkins University, S. A. T. C, 
last October. His address is 2022 Mt. Royal Terrace, Bal- 
timore, Md. 

— Private Hardy A, Carroll is with the A. E. F. in France, 
his address being 6th Train Headquarters and Military Police, 
A. P. O. 777. Wliile in the deciding drive north of Argonne 
his officers recommended him for a commission in the 
chemical warfare service. He passed examination for same 
on the 10th of November, but the armistice on the 11th held 
up his bars. 

1915 
D. L. Bei.l, Secretary, Pittsboro, N. C. 
— E. S. Fitzgerald has been elected principal of the Belmont 
High School for next term. He is at present in the office 
of the county superintendent of public instruction of Pitt 
County. 

— Pvt. L. B. Gunter is with the A. E. F., Co. F, 322 Inf., A. 
P. O. 791, Laignes, France. 

— W. C. Doub Kerr as been appointed Noyes scholar in ro- 
mance at the University of Chicago, a special military honor 
in recognition of linguistic service with the army in America 
and France. 

— In a letter from Captain Edward Y. Keesler to his mother, 
Mrs. Edward L. Keesler, of Charlotte, is given an interesting 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



205 



account of a visit fiom the King and Queen of Belgium to 
Chaumont, France, wliere Captain Keesler is stationed. 

Prior to the coming of the King and Queen, Captain Keesler 
took a ride to General Pershing's chateau to get the lay of the 
land for parking a number of cars when the King and Queen 
arrived. The royal party expected to take a number of side 
trips, which Captain Keesler was to investigate ahead of time. 
The King and Queen expected to arrive March 19 in an 
aeroplane but the weather was bad and they reached Chaumont 
the following day in their ear, the King driving and Queen 
sitting beside him. 

On Thursday, Captain Keesler had seven ears lined up at 
the general 's chateau and Captain Keesler was the pilot who 
led the procession. Chaumont was decorated with flags and 
banners and the streets were lined with French and American 
soldiers, who presented arms with fixed bayonets as the King 
and General Pershing alighted. They returned to General 
Allen 's chateau for lunch. General Allen is in command of 
the Eighth Army Corps. The band in the yard played the 
Belgium national air. The royal party had luncheon at 
General Allen's headcjuarters and the others lunched at the 
officers ' mess at the Eighth Army Corps. 

— Announcement has been made of the engagement of Miss 
Louise Nickerson, of Easton, Md., to John Lindsay More- 
head, of Charlotte, the wedding to take place in the early 
summer. Mr. Morehead was in the aviation branch of the 
service and received his training at Park flying field, Memphis, 
Tenn., being commissioned lieutenant and was afterwards in- 
structor at Souther Field, Americus, Ga. He was recently 
mustered out of the service and holds an important position 
with the Leaksville Woolen Mills. 

— Lieut. H. A. Whitfield, who was wounded by gas in the 
fighting around Chateau Thierry and laid up in the hospital 
for quite a while, has returned from overseas and has resui 
the practice of law in Chapel Hill. 

1916 

Hugh B. Hester, Secretary, 12th F. A., A. E. F., German 

— Oliver M. Litaker, law '16, who before entering the i 
held the position of cashier of the First National Bank 
Thomasville, N. C, was released from active service in Januai-y 
and has accepted a position with the General Adjustment 
Bureau (for adjustments of fire insurance losses), of New 
York City, and is located in their branch office at iiS White 
Memorial Building, Syracuse, N. "i'. 

— Lee Edwards, who entered the navy as pharmacist 's mate, 
third class, last May, was mustered out of the service in 
February. 

— Sergt. Fred M. Patterson is now a patient at Walter Beed 
Hospital, Washington. He lost a leg while serving in the 
113th Field Artillery in the St. Mihiel drive. He was honor 
guest at an informal reception at the National Press Club 
shortly after his arrival at the hospital. 

"Sergt. Fred M. Patterson, 113th Field Artillery, now in 
Ward fi.'i and a former graduate of the University of North 
Carolina, is another of our baseball stars. Patterson, while 
a member of the University's baseball team, made an enviable 
record and became known throughout the state, which resulted 
in his being elected captain in 1916. 'But I guess I am 
through now; my left pin is gone; but it's great sport,' 
says the sergeant; 'but I have to wait for my artificial limb 
and learn the orthopedic slide to second base before I am a 
free man '. ' ' 

— .Toe Huske was promoted to the rank of major before the 
armistice. 



===~=a 



PATTERSON BROS. 

DRUGGISTS 

AGENCY INORRIS CANDY THE REXALL STORE 



CHAPEL HILL 
N. C. 



ANDREWS CASH STORE GO. 

students and Faculty will find us ready to serve 
them with the latest styles in Walkover Shoes, 
Fancy Shirts, Tailored Suits, and general furn- 
ishings. Be convinced. Call and see. 



WE WELCOME YOU AT 

Lloyd's Hardware Store 

WHEN IN DURHAM 
GEO. W. TANDY Manager 



K 



ODAK SUPPLIE O 

Fuiishmg for tbe Amateur. Foister ^^ 



^l)e ICnlverslt^ Ipr ess 



ZEB P. COUNCIU M.DM« 



CHAPEL HILL. N. C. 



Printing quality and service 



PARIS THEATRE 

DURHAM, N. C. 

ARTCRAFT-PARAMOUNT PICTURES 

Orchestra Orchestra 



Dnlfoim Supply C©. 

MACHINERY, MILL SUPPLIES 
PHONE 753 RALEIGH, N. C. 



"SAY IT WITH FLOWERS" 
J. J. FALLON, Leading Florist 



Chapel Hill AgenU: 

FOISTER'S ART STORE 

R. P. ANDREWS. People'i Bonk 



Phone IZ90 

214 E. M.inStiMi 

DURHAM. N. C. 



206 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 




Hart Schaffner 

^Marx 



AND 



Society Brand 
Clothes 



We feature these 
lines because they 
are known to be 
the best, jt ^* ^ 



frortrtB Snm5 (Elottiri 



Pritchard, Bright ^ Co. 

Durham, North Carohna 



Stalement of the Condition of 

The Fidelity Bank 

OF DURHAM, N. C. 

^TiiCade to the ^orth Carolina Corporation Commission 
at the Close of Business, Dec. 31. 1918 



Furniture and 
Cash Items 



Fixtures 



RESOURCES 

Loans and Investments _ $2,971,015.18 

" " 16.L!00.00 

420,161.70 

837,056.40 

3,362.46 

1,233,793.00 

$5,481,589.04 



Cash in Vaults and with Banks 

Overdrafts 

Trade .Acceptances - 



LIABILITIES 

Capital Stocli 

Surplus 

Undivided Proflls 
Interest Reserve 
Dividends Unpaid 

Deposits 

Bills Payable .... 

Bills Payable Secured b\ Liberty Bonds 

TTnearned Interest 

Bills Rediscounted 

Trade .Acceptances Rediscounted 

Contingent Fund 



if 100,000.(111 

500.000.00 

93,782.7!! 

6,000.0(1 

7,632.21 

4.003.451.77 

100.000.00 

60,000.011 

S,l!57.49 

00,000.00 

500.005. :iS 

6,000.00 

$5.4S1.5S!).04 



B. N. DUKE. President INO. F. WHY. Vice-Fiesident S Vt. MINOR. Cashier 
L. D. KIRKLAND. Assistant Cashier INO. A. BUCHANAN. Assistant Cashier 

The strength of this bank lies not alone in its Capital, Surplus, »nd Re- 
sources, but in the Character and Financial Responsibility 
of the men who conduct its affairs 



1917 

H. G. B.\ITY, Secretary, A. P. O. 774, First Army, 

C. O. O., A. E. F., France 

— Lieut. Lewis Thorpe is with the 76th Field Artillery, A. P. 

0. 740, A. E. F., France. 

— Francis C. Jordan, of Greensboro, who has been serving as 
United States consul to Me.xieo during the war, has returned 
home to resume civil life. He was refused entrance into the 
service on account of a bad knee. 

— Carl B. Hyatt, 305 Central Ave., Nevada, Mo., writes as 
follows : ' ' My leg is improving slowly. It will probably be 
a year, however, before I can walk in the slightest. But I 'm 
happy to have a leg, and I'm feeling especially good just 
now, for there is a big, strapping youngster called Carl Battle 
Hyatt, over there in the cradle yelling the utmost. He weighs 
nine pounds; arrived December 26 and has made himself 
known ever since. ' ' 

1918 
W. R. WuNSCH, Secretary, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
— The class of 1918 seriously threatens to break a record. It 
is planning to have the largest attendance at the coming 
first year reunion of any class that the University has turned 
out. Every member is urged to return and thereby make the 
first post graduation get-together affair a greater success. 
About 25 members are on the Hill at present and it is ex- 
pected that fully 7o more will be here, making the total 
over 100. 

— J. L. Stuckey, with the A. E. F., is studying Geology at 
the University of Grenoble, France. 

— E. E. Groves is taking a business course at Poughkeepsie, 
N. Y., his address being care Y. M. C. A. 
— W. H. Snell is with the Tennessee Coal and Iron Co., Ensley 
works, Birmingham, Ala. He was on the Hill on May 2nd. 
— Willard C. Goley, who was seriously injured by gat while 
with the A. E. F. in France, has returned to his home in 
Graham. He has fully recovered and is now with the Internal 
Revenue Service. 

— First Lieut. W. 6. Burgess is with the Army Artillery School, 
A. P. 0. 704, A. E. F., France. He is a member of the 81st 
Division of the .316th Artillery. 

1919 

— N. G. Gooding, who was in service at Camp Hancock, Ga., 
Camp Hdq. Co., was mustered out of the service this spring 
and has resumed his work toward graduation. 
— G. A. Harden entered the Navy in June, 1918, and was re- 
leased in February, 1919, being stationed at the Charleston, 
S. C, Navy Yard. 

1920 
— Frank S. Spruill, Jr., of Rocky Mount, who is with the A. 
E. F. overseas, holds the rank of Captain. He is a member 
of the 52nd Infantry, 6th Division. He was commissioned at 
Fort Oglethorpe as second lieutenant, being later promoted to 
first lieutenant. 

— Walter L. Lenoir is engaged in the banking business in 
Lenoir. He was under orders to attend the officers ' school 
at Camp Gordon on November 15, which order was cancelled 
when the armistice was signed. 

— C. W. Phillips is with the Headquarters Motor Transport 
Corps, Camp Sevier, S. C. 

— R. Stanford Travis, who enlisted in the Navy in September, 
has been released and has returned to the Hill. 

1921 

— Olin McManus is with Co. B, .lO Pioneer Infantry, A. E. 
F., France. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



S07 



— Oscar Aberncthy is with Co. C, 36 Pioneer Inf., A. E. F., 

France. 

— Lieut. B. A. Simms, of Talledaga, Ala., who was stationed 

with the 383 Infantry, Camp Wadsworth, S. C, is back in 

college, having been mustered out of service. 



NECROLOGY 



1853 

Col. James Turner Morehead, the oldest member of the 

Greensboro bar and one of the ablest lawyers of the State, 
died at his home in Greensboro, on Friday night, April 11, 
following a short illness from pneumonia. He was 82 years 
of age. Throughout the war between the states he served with 
distinction, being promoted from lieutenancy on up to the 
colonelcy of the 53rd North Carolina regiment. His last en- 
gagement was at Hare's Hill, Petersburg, where he was taken 
prisoner after invading the lines of the enemy. He was thrice 
wounded during the war. At the end of the war he returned 
home and was one of the leaders in the great work of recon- 
struction. In 1866 he served in the house of commons from 
Guilford County. From 1872 to 1875 he served as senator 
from Guilford and when Lieutenant-Governor Caldwell be- 
came governor was elected president of the senate and dis- 
charged the duties of lieutenant governor. In 1882 he again 
served in the senate the people of Guilford, and was often im- 
]iortuiiod liy his party to accept higher honors, but refused. 

1888 
— Sheriff H. M. Eowe was stricken with apoplexy on June 
29 and died on August 4, 1918. He lived in Wilson, N. C. 

1904 
—The death from influenza at Atlanta on Wednesday, Dec. 
18th, of Branncr Gilmer brought sorrow to a very wide circle 
of friends. He was 33 years of age, the only son of former 
Attorney General and Mrs. Robert D. Gilmer, and inherited 
brains and character from both sides of the house. On his 
mother's side he was a lineal descendant of James R. Love, 
pioneer and patriot, and chief land-holder of early Western 
North Carolina. Branner Gilmer graduated from the public 
school at Waynesville, N. C, and spent a year at the famous 
Bingham School at Asheville and a year at the State A. and 
M. College at Raleigh. Then followed four fruitful years at 
the State University where he was a member of Psi chapter 
of the Sigma Nu Fraternity and graduated with the degree 
of LL. B. Pursuing post graduate work in law for a year 
at George Washington University at the Capital, he received 
the degree of Master of Laws. He passed the North Car- 
olina examination for law license before he was 21 and re- 
ceived the license on his 21st birthday. In association with 
his distinguishd father and later with Mr. Felix Alley also, 
he was for about eleven years actively and successfully en- 
gaged in law practice at Waynesville, appearing in noted 
cases and earning high praise for his skill in the presentation 
of eloquent argument before the juries of Haywood county. 

Appointed early in 1918 to a most responsible position with 
the Department of Justice of the United States at Atlanta, he 
exerted his legal talents with signal ability toward the winning 
of the war. Surviving him, besides his father, mother ard 
sister, are his wife, who was Miss Maud Duval Semmes, of 
Memphis, a relative of the famous Admiral Semmes, and their 
child. Greater fame and usefulness surely awaited Branner 
Gilmer, a reflection which adds to the grief felt for his loss. 
He had a great heart and he loved and was beloved by his 
fellow-men. Whitehead Kluttz. 



'Clothes Made bi{ Makers who 
^ncw for Men who Pinow 

and 6old bi( 

6need=Markham=^ai(lor ^o. 

S)urham, Vicrth "Carclina 



The Bank o/Chapel Hill 



Oldeft and Stronger bank in Orange County. 

Capital and Surplus over $36,000. 
Resources over four hundred thousand dollars. 



M.C. S.NOBLE 
Prefiden 



R. L. STROWD 
Vice-PieiideDt 



M. E. HOCAN 
Caihicr 



TJ.niversiti/ studenfs, facu/ft/ members, and 
alitmni visit the <Jioi/al Safe while in 
iOurham. Cinder new and pro- 
gressive management, 
especial parlors 
for ladies 



CHARLES C. HOOK 
ARCHITECT 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 

TWENTY YEARS EXPERIENCE IN PLAN- 
NING SCHOOL AND COLLEGE 
BUILDINGS 



208 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



FIFTY— 

and tortured by regrets 

" \ ^O you suppose, " cried Napoleon, New York, General Coleman duPont, the 

I ■ as he stood with Gourgaud on well-known business executive; John Hays 

^ ^ St. Helena, "do you suppose Hammond, the eminent engineer; Jeremiah 

when I wake at night I have not bad mo- W. Jenks, the statistician and economist; and 

m^ut^—when I thhik of what I was and Joseph French Johnson, Dean of the New 

,.,„,, York University school oi Commerce. 
what 1 am^ 

He was fifty ; and at fifty the race of men The remarkable percentage 

divides into two groups. There is the group of College men 

of those who look back ccmfortablv over the r^ f ., . ., t„„fif„#-o'o 

- . two tacts are noteworthy in the Institute s 

years, knowing that each year has yielded record. In the first place the average age of 

its measure of progress. the men enrolled with it is slightly over thirty. 

And there is the other group — the men Not to boys is its appeal, but to mature men, 

who think: "If onlv I had it to do over who reach the age when they realize that their 

again, how much better I could do it." careers will be made or marred by the record 

They look back and say to themselves: of the few years just ahead. 

*'There was the turning; if only I could The second striking fact is the very large 

have seen it in time." To such men the Proportion of college men enrolled. Over 

. , . 1 . -J. u J i u j-u .S3 /o or them are college graduates, 

night brings its bad moments — when they ^ " 

think of what they are and what they might , You, who read this page, may have reached 

, . the point in your career where you want to 

have been. , .i \ c u j i i 

make the next tew years yield double progress. 

To increase the number of men who, at q^ ^.,,^ ^^^^ ^^ ^^^ ^^^^ ^,. ^„,j^g^ ^^„ ^^ 

fifty, can be satisfied with their careers, is ^^^^ younger men are frequently turning for 

the business of the Alexander Hamilton advice. 

Institute. Yn either case you owe it to yourself to know 

85,000 men enrolled something more of the character and achieve- 

ments of this great educational force. 

The Alexander Hamilton Institute was found- 

edtenyearsago,withthespecificpurposeofgiv- A free book WOrth sending for 

ing men the all-round knowledge of Modern For the information of college men who 

Business that fits them for executive responsi- are interested in better business the 

.... Institute has set aside a certain nura- 

"'"''■• ber of its 112-page book "Forging 

It does formeninbusiness what thelawschool Ahead in Business." 

does for men in law; or the medical school for It is worth an evening's careful reading 

men in medicine. ""'' '* '^ iree. The coupon will bring 

' ^ ■ ■ e ''; send for your copy today. 

It has only one Course; it otters no training tor 

specialized positions of limited opportunity. ALEXANDER HAMILTON INSTITUTE 

In a ten-year period 85,000 men have H9 Ast..r_Place ^ew York City 

enrolled in its Modern Business Course and — — — ^ ^ 

Service. They are representative of every Send me "Korging Ahead in Business" FREE 

stratum and phase of business. More than 

'^ Name 

13,000 are corporation presidents. Flint here 

Business and educational authority of the Business 

, I T • > Address 

highest type are represented in the Institute s 

Advisory Council. 

This Council consists of Frank A. Vander- n,,.;— .. 

lip. President of the National City Bank of Position 




THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



209 



READY! 

Sprightly Spring Suits that will keep a man 
abrea^ of the season— and a little ahead of it, 
too. " Vidlory Suits" with a dash and go that 
wins out anywhere, especially in early Spring. 

Shirts, neckwear, underwear, hats, caps, and 
shoes. The be^ for the lea^ in everything that 
is right in quality, ^yle, and price. 

MARKHAM-ROGERS CO. 



Tailors, Furnishers and Hatters 



Durham, N. C. 




OH, BOY! 



\ 



\ 



This is going to be a big 
baseball year. All the vet- 
erans are going to be great 
fans this season. 

Think of the converts to good base- 
ball the 60,000 Taylor League Balls 
made in the camps over seas! 

All Taylor Baseball Equipment is 

way ahead of the ordinary. 

Get a catalog now— yesterday is 

past---tomorrow hasn't come — today's 

the time to do it. 



ALEX. TAYLOR & CO., Inc. 

26 E. 42nd Si. New York City 

Opp. Hotel Manhattan 



/ 



HICKS^ DRUG STORES 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 

Eastman Kodaks and Supplies 
Nunnally's Candies 

The place to meet your Carolina friends 
when in the Capital City 



WHITING-HORTON CO. 

THIRTY YEARS RALEIGH'S LEADING 
CLOTHIERS 



WEEGHT'S CAFE 

THE RIGHT PLACE TO EAT WHEN IN 
RALEIGH, N. C. 



PICKARD'S HOTEL 

Headquarters for Carolina Alumni 

Returning to the Hill 

SPECIAL RATES. STUDENT BOARDERS. 



BROADWAY THEATRE 

DURHAM, N. C. 

THE HOUSE OF SPECIAL PHOTO-PLAY 

ATTRACTIONS 



Odell Hardware Co. 

Greensboro, N. C. 

China, Cut Glass and Silverware 
Household Goods 

DEPENDABLE QOODS 

PROMPT SERVICE 

SATISFACTORY PRICES 



^.^. IKlutU dcHnc. 

Extend a cordial invitation to all students and 
alumni of the U. N. C. to make their store head- 
quarters during their stay in Chapel Hill. 

Complete Stock of 
New and Second-hand Books, Stationery, and 
Complete Line of Shoes and Haberdashery 
Made by the Leaders of Fashion, Al- 
ways on Hand 



Here is the story 


n figures of the 


EL-REES-SO'S Yearly Growth 


1913 - 




94,000 

630,000 

1,435,000 

5,305,000 

15,000,000 

25,000,000 


1914 - 

1915 _.. . 





1916 




1917 -.... 




1918 Estimated 




Ask Youi 


Dealer 


EL-REES-SO 


CIGAR 


CO. 


MANUFACTURFRS 


GREENSBORO. N. C. 



210 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



LIGGETT & MYERS 
TOBACCO CO. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 

FATIMA. CHESTERFIELD, AND 

PIEDMONT CIGARETTES 

VELVET AND DUKE'S MIXTURE 

SMOKING TOBACCO AND 

other well known brands of Smok- 
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Chewing Tobaccos. 



Our brands are standard for qualify 
They speak, for themselves. 



Asphalt Pavements 



DURABLE 



KCONOMICAU 



IP YOU ARE CONTEMPLATING STREET OR 

ROAD CONSTRUCTION. WE INVITE YOU 

TO INSPECT SOME OF OUR RECENT 

CONSTRUCTION IN 



RALEIGH 

OXFORD 

GUILFORD COUNTY 

WELDON 

ROCKY MOUNT 

LAURINBURG 

WILSON 



GREENSBORO 

WAKE COUNTY 

DURHAM 

WARRENTON 

LUMBERTON 

HENDERSON 

HIGH POINT 



SEE THE GREENSBORO-HIGH POINT HIGH- 

W/iY— A 16-MILE STRETCH OF 

ASPHALT ROAD 

A Representative Will Visit You and Supply Any 
Information or Estimates Wanted 

Robert G. Lassiter & Co. 

ENGINEERING AND CONTRACTING 
First Nat'l Bank Bldg. Citizen* Nat'l Bank Bldg. 



Oxford, N. C. 



Raleigh, N. C. 



THE UNIVERSITT OF NORTH CAROLINA 

Maximum of Service to the People of the State 

Summer Law School of Ten Weeks Begins June 9 
Summer School of Six Weeks Begins June 24 

General Instruction for the puTolic through the following departments of the Bureau of 
Extension; (1) General Information; (2) Lectures and Study Centers; (3) Correspondence 
Courses; (4) Debate and Declamation; (5) County Economic and Social Surveys; (6) Mu- 
nicipal Reference; (7) Educational Information and Assistance ; (8) Information Concern- 
ing War and After-the-War Problems; (9) Package Library Service on all Important Topics 
of the Day. 

WRITE TO THE UNIVERSITY WHEN YOU NEED HELP 



For information regarding the University, address 

THOS. J. WILSON, JR., Registrar. 



Th 



\e 



First National Bank 

OF DURHAM, N. C. 

""Roll of Honor" Bank 

Total Resources Over Five and a 
Quarter Million Dollars 




WE KNOW YOUR WANTS AND WANT 
YOUR BUSINESS 



JULIAN S. CARR 
W. J. HOLLOWAY 



..President 
Cashier 



mraonnmi 



High- Grade Furniture 

of Every Description at Reasonable 

Prices 

On Easy Terms 



CHRISTIAN & HARWARD 

CORCORAN STREET 
OPPOSITE THE POSTOFFICE 



(Eulture 



Scl)olar5l)ip Service 

THE = 



Self-Support 



!!^or tb (Tarollna State (Lollege for "^omen 

Offers to Women a Liberal Education, Equipment for Womanly 
Service, Professional Training for Remunerative Employment 



The College offers four groups of studies lead- 
ing to the following degrees: Bachelor of Arts, 
Bachelor of Science, and Bachelor of Music. 

Special courses in Pedagogy ; in Manual Arts ; in 
Domestic Science Household Art and Economics; in 
Music; and in '.ne Commercial Branches. 

Teachers and graduates of other colleges provided 
for in both regular and special courses. 



Equipment modern, including furnished dormitories, 
library, laboratories, literary society halls, gymnas- 
ium, music rooms, teachers ' training school, infirm- 
ary, model laundry, central heating plant, and open 
air recreation grounds. 

Dormitories furnished by the State. Board at 
actual cost. Tuition free to those wbo pledge them- 
selves to become teachers. 



Fall '^erm Opens in September 



Summer '^erm Begins in June 



For catalogue and other information, address 

JULIUS I. FOUST, President, GREENSBORO, N. C. 



{^r. 



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