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COLLECTION O F 

NORTH CAROLINIANA 



ENDOWED BY 

JOHN SPRUNT HILL 

of the class of 1889 









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Volume VIII 



THE 




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ALVMNIREVIEW* 



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OCTOBER, 1919 



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OPINION AND COMMENT 

State and County Council — University Day — Off to 

a Good Start — The Enlarged Program — More 

Effective Man Power — Community Service 

Contemplated — An Alumni Program 

STATE AND COUNTY COUNCIL HELD 

Three Hundred State and County Welfare Officers 

Hold Fine Inspirational Conference 

SCHOOL OF COMMERCE ESTABLISHED 

One Hundred and Twenty-five Students Enroll as 

Prospective Business Leaders 

FOOTBALL PROSPECTS 

Fifty Candidates Are at Hard Practice Under 

Campbell, Ramsey and Homewood 



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IN.C.CVRTIS OCL.1912 



PUBLISHED BY 

♦THE ALVMNI ASSOCIATION 



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Cy Thompson Says — 



WRITE TO US OR COME TO THE OFFICE OF THE OLD 

NEW ENGLAND MUTUAL 

FOR EXPERT ADVICE ABOUT THE NEW 

GOVERNMENT INSURANCE POLICIES 

If you were not in the service or if you need additional insurance, ask about our low cost com- 
mercial contracts for protection to credit, home and business. 

In addition to many other superior benefits, our new "Perfection" policies offer the most 
complete double indemnity and disability benefits. 

, Before you contract to BUY OR SELL see or write 'he old 

NEW ENGLAND MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO. 

CHARTERED 1835 BOSTON, MASS. 

CYRUS THOMPSON, Jr., Dist. Man. 
Patterson Building 

(OPPOSITE CAMPUS) 

Chapel Hill, N. C. 
"Perfection in Protection" 



The American Trust Company 

might be spoken of as the "Alumni Bank" — Word Wood, George Stephens, Paul Whitlock, 
the Lambeth boys — Walter and Charlie — John Huske, Phil Woollcott, Joe Hawthorne — all 
V. N. C. men. And we are coming some — over $10,0<"j,000.00 total resources. The biggest bank 
in the biggest banking center in North Carolina. 

But what we started out to say is, that we act as Executor, Guardian, Trustee, and in any 
trust capacity. You could not put your property or money in safer hands. It's decidedly the 
best way. If you contemplate creating a trust for any purpose, take it up with us. 



Resources over $10, 000, 000. 00 



AMERICAN TRUST COMPANY 

(THE SAFE EXECUTOR) 
CHARLOTTE, NORTH CAROLINA 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



Volume VIII 



OCTOBER, 1919 



Number 1 



OPINION AND COMMENT 



"The movement which has started here must inevi- 
tably make its impression on the life of the State. I 
am deeply grateful to every one 
State and who has attended. No one can go 

County Council away without the feeling that he 
has caught here ideas and inspira- 
tion, which, put in terms of action, will make living 
far better in this State than ever before. ' ' 

In these words Governor T. W. Bickett concluded 
the first session of the State and County Council held 
at the University during the week September 15-19. 
Three hundred public welfare workers representing 
seventy-six counties were present and carried out a 
program rarely equaled in seriousness and inspira- 
tional values. In bringing the conference to the Uni- 
versity under the joint auspices of the Governor of 
the State, the University, the Association of County 
Commissioners, and the State departments of Educa- 
tion, Health, Public Welfare, Taxation, and Roads, 
the University has laid the foundation for a service 
of untold value to North Carolina. 

□ □□ 

Last year, owing to the confusion incident to the 
inauguration of the S.A.T.C. and the outbreak of in- 
fluenza, no formal celebration of Univer- 
University sity Day was held. Plans for the cele- 
Day bration, this year, however, have been 

completed, and throughout the State and 
nation Carolina men are making unusual prepara- 
tions for especially happy gatherings. 

The celebration at the Hill will be held on Satur- 
day, October 11th, with Hon. P. D. Winston, 79, as 
principal speaker. In many of the towns, through 
the effort of Mr. A. M. Coates, secretary of the Gra- 
ham Memorial Committee, special meetings have 
been arranged in addition to the usual smokers and 
banquets and informal gatherings. 

In order that the big family of sons may hear from 
each other directly, The Review urges all secretaries 
to send it reports of the meetings in order that it may 
carry them in the November issue. And — it wishes 
Alma Mater and all her scattered sons many happy 
returns of the day. 



With 850 students enrolled during the spring term, 
921 during the session of the Summer School, and 
1,466 registered on October second, 
Off to a President H. W. Chase formally began 
Good Start the work of the new year, and the Uni- 
versity is off to a good start in what 
from every appearance has reason to be one of the 
most distinctive years in its history. 

The armistice is eleven months in the past. Many 
of the student body who forsook the class room for 
the field are back for the completion of their college 
training, and the University, with an enlarged pro- 
gram projected under a conscious sense of duty to 
North Carolina and the nation, has consecrated all of 
its power to make itself an inspiring, clear-visioned 
leader in the new era. 

ODD 

Unquestionably the new program has been projected 
upon an enlarged scale. All of its features have not 

been carried out, owing to the ex- 
The Enlarged treme difficulty in securing new men 
Program to fill positions in the faculty and the 

necessity of expanding slowly. But 
with the opening of the term the School of Com- 
merce, under the direction of Acting-Dean Carroll, 
begins the definite preparation of Southern students 
to take the part of trained business men in the eco- 
nomic and industrial life of the South. Similarly, 
the School of Applied Science, embracing particularly 
the fields of Chemical, Electrical, Sanitary, Soil, Civil, 
and Highway Engineering, begins the year with 
more than one hundred special students and the ad- 
dition of Phillips Hall, and has set itself the task of 
providing trained leaders in the increasingly im- 
portant subjects of engineering. It fully compre- 
hends the necessity of producing the expert engi- 
neer if the highways, railways, wharves, terminals, 
ship yards, water powers, mining projects, and sani- 
tation systems demanded of the new era, are to re- 
ceive their proper development. Engineers with 
thorough knowledge and careful training will be in 
great demand through the State and South, and the 
University must strive to meet this need, as other 
needs, in the fullest measure of her capacity. 



^^Z.C<,^~ 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



It is a very happy fact that the program does not 
fall short of providing for a more effective man- 
power — which, in part, furnishes the 
More Effective foundation for a finer mental and 
Man Power spiritual power. With the opening 

of the term Dr. E. A. Abernethy, 
recently returned from service overseas, assumes 
charge of the infirmary and control of the health of 
the student body. Professor T. J. Browne, recently 
a captain in the service and director of the training 
school for army physical directors, has been assigned 
the duty of seeing that every student receives some 
sort of physical exercise, and a new faculty commit- 
tee on Sanitation and Hygiene has been commissioned 
to see to it that the physical plant of the University 
and all quarters in which students are located are 
thoroughly hygienic and sanitary. For the first time 
in the history of the University the individual stu- 
dent and the community collectively are to receive 
the full empahsis of the necessity of maintaining 
sound health in a thoroughly wholesome, sanitary 
environment. Here, too, the program has been en- 
larged, and we believe, to unusually great profit. 

ODD 

Furthermore, the new program contemplates an 
enlarged social service to the State, as evidenced by 
the Social Workers' Conference 
Community Ser- held during the summer session 
vice Contemplated and the State and County Coun- 
cil held during the week August 
15-20 and attended by more than 300 State and 
county officials and welfare workers. In so far as 
community music and community drama contribute 
to the growth of a more wholesome community spirit, 
they too have been provided. 

ODD 

It is by no means The Review's intention to suggest 
that the present program has been fully carried out 

or that the immediate future will not 
Things Not require its material enlargment. Ow- 
Yet Done ing to the delay in the completion of 

Phillips Hall, provision for the "Office 
Machinery" previously referred to in these columns 
has not been provided and the business undertakings 
of the University, long sadly hampered for lack of 
room and incomplete organization, is still sorely 
lacking, and constitutes an imperative need. Further- 
more, plans for the renovation of the three oldest 
dormitories have been held up through failure of the 
State Architect to complete drawings, and the pro- 
posal to erect a new dormitory to take care of the 
rapidly increasing student body has for the same 



reason had to be held in abeyance. Similarly, the 
suggested development of parks and boulevards, is 
still under consideration with no immediate action in 
prospect. 

DDD 

The Review has purposely given the foregoing sum- 
mary of the year's program, and indicated some of 
the particulars in which it has not 
Your Opinion been fully carried out or completely 
Is Wanted developed for one cause or another. 

Consideration of this general sub- 
ject, however, of the part the University is to take in 
upbuilding North Carolina, leads inevitably to the 
conclusion that the co-operation of every alumnus is 
essential to the development and carrying out of any 
plan that may approximate completeness. And this 
co-operation, this statement of opinion, is eagerly 
sought by the University, and the columns of The 
Review are herewith opened to all alumni in the earn- 
est hope that comment will be immediately forth- 
coming. 

DDD 

To be specific, The Review believes it extremely im- 
portant that the alumni (together with the Univer- 
sity) begin to think about the following 
Cases In matters : 

Point 1. The advantages that would accrue to 

the University and to the State through 
conventions similar to the Good Roads Institute and 
State and County Council which could be entertained 
by means of the erection of a first class hotel in the 
village. 

2. The desirability of erecting on University 
ground a number of small, attractive dwellings for 
the use of members of the faculty. The congestion 
this year is almost insufferable, and the lack of houses 
seriously handicaps the administration in adding to 
the faculty. 

3. Does the University propose to extend its pro- 
gram for the education of women ? More than a thou- 
sand young women seeking higher education were- 
turned away from North Carolina colleges in Sep- 
tember because no provision was made for them. Shall 
more women be admitted to the University, and if so 
shall they be admitted to advanced classes only? 
Isn't a woman's building an absolute essential if the 
number of admissions is to be further extended ? 

4. Hasn't North Carolina enough at stake in the 
fields of industry and business organization to justify 
the immediate erection of an adequate building for 
the School of Commerce? 

5. Two years less than a centuary ago (1822) Ger- 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



rard Hall was completed and (we presume) ade- 
quately met the requirements of the University for 
chapel purposes. But that was 1822! Count the 
seats, "survey" the building as you will, the one big 
fact remains that only six hundred — a half — of the 
students now enrolled can be crammed into it, and it 
is the only auditorium we have. Pipe organ, stage, 
good chairs, proper lighting and ventilation — all are 
wanting. And that too when no more fitting mem- 
orial to the fifty-five sons who fell while fighting for 
the freedom of the world could be devised than a 
beautiful, completely appointed chapel. 

6. The South has yet to found a School of Social 
Science or Public Welfare. Today North Carolina is 
calling into service hundreds of workers in the fol- 
lowing groups : public health nurses, whole-time 
health officers, Red Cross workers, secretaries of cham- 
bers of commerce, Y.M.C.A. secretaries, county super- 
intendents of public welfare (100 are required by 
law), directors of play grounds, etc. All of them 
need a thorough grounding in the principles of so- 
ciety, yet, as we have indicated, no Southern univer- 
sity has provided the necessary instruction. 

7. Shall the University establish a Carolina press? 
We do not have in mind a revival of the physical 
plant of former days, but an incorporated organiza- 
tion through which work of distinctive merit such as 
that of the Columbia University or University of 
Chicago presses shall reach the public? 

8. Finally, shall we all co-operate — through 
thought, work, and money — in making the Univer- 
sity the great, useful institution which it can and 
should be? Again, we say, your opinion, your an- 
swer, is wanted. 

DDD 

Prom one of our most interested readers we have 
received the following pointed request: "Please give 

us more alumni notes. They are the 
More Alumni most interesting feature to us who 
Notes Wanted are on the outside." We heartily 

commend this request to all the 
alumni. Unquestionably the alumni note section of 
The Review is the most interesting to every Old 
Grad, and we want your assistance, Mr. Alumnus, 
to fill this section full. To date, you have been a rank 
slacker (with few exceptions) in this matter, and we 
call upon you to let us hear from you. We commend, 
by way of example, the action of Henry Clark Smith, 
'11, by means of which we have secured for this num- 
ber of The Review a full page of information en- 
titled "Carolina in the Mission Field." 



October first was moving day for The Review. R. 
W. Madry, '18, alumni editor and assistant business 

manager for the past fifteen months, has 
Moving entered the School of Journalism at Co- 
Day luinbia University and E. R. Rankin takes 

over his work. Frank P. Graham, '09, comes 
back to the "Hill" to be Dean of Students and to 
instruct in History. His name was not taken down 
from the mast head while he was in service, conse- 
quently the only change is that we expect copy from 
him from this on. Lenoir Chambers, Jr., '14, Direc- 
tor of Publications, joins the staff. In other par- 
ticulars the editorial board remains unchanged and 
will function — or not, as the case may be — as 
formerly. 

DDD 

The Review "points with pride" to its exten- 
sive list of advertisers and directs the attention of 

all alumni to the wares and ser- 
Our Advertisers vices they offer. The Review is 

grateful for this particular sort of 
assistance which it receives in making itself a going 
concern, and in turn it bespeaks for those who thus 
favor it the interest and patronage of its readers. 

DDD 

On Alumni Day at the recent commencement res- 
olutions were formally adopted looking to a. definite 

plan of alumni action during the year. 
An Alumni Some of these proposals are so worthy 
Program of consideration at University Day that 

they are repeated here with the hope 
that they may be carried out generally by the alumni. 

1. We heartily indorse the establishment of the 
Graham Memorial Building, believing that it will 
satisfy a real need in University life. We suggest 
that the alumni council adopt ways and means of 
bringing this matter to the attention of the alumni 
generally, and suggest that they set out the need for 
the building and the uses it will serve. 

2. That steps be taken leading to the establish- 
ment of a system for keeping on hand, available at 
all times, accurate information concerning all of the 
alumni. This bureau of information, established at 
the University, should keep in touch with the 
alumni and be able to furnish the correct address and 
other pertinent up-to-date information about every 
alumnus. 

3. That county alumni associations be organized 
in every county which does not at present have an 
association and wherever practicable outside the 
State. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



4. That steps be taken for increasing the circula- 
tion of The Alumni Review, so as to make this 
circulation more nearly commensurate with the size 
of the alumni body. 

5. That meetings of the local associations be held 
frequently throughout the year. 



(i. That an annual convention of class and local 
alumni secretaries be held. 

7. That support of the alumni to the Alumni Loy- 
alty Fund be enlisted as a regular policy. 

8. That a complete war record of alumni be com- 
piled. 



STATE AND COUNTY COUNCIL HELD 



Three Hundred State and County Welfare Officials Hold Fine 
Inspirational Conference 



The State and County Council, a conference of pub- 
lic welfare workers, was held at the University Sep- 
tember 15-19, attended by more than three hundred 
officials from seventy-six comities. Described by 
Governor Bickett, who presided, as destined to prove 
of inestimable value to the State, the council became 
an open forum where the new public welfare laws 
were explained by State officials and where county 
officials sought information and swapped experiences. 

Problems of public education, public health, taxa- 
tion, highways, and public welfare, most of which 
have arisen because of new laws and the new officials 
charged with carrying them into effect, were threshed 
out during four days of discussions. After every 
speaker the meeting was thrown open and questions 
were passed back and forth and views interchanged. 

Governor Bickett, in addition to presiding at most 
of the discussions, opened the council with an ad- 
dress in which he said that the greatest problem be- 
fore North Carolina today was the human problem. 

"One mistake we have made in North Carolina," 
said the Governor, "is that we have concentrated all 
our thought on machinery and on the raw material 
IV< I into the machinery and have paid too little at- 
tention to the human problem in business. I say to 
you that the most vital equation in any factory in 
North Carolina is the human equation. 

Governor Bickett also led a discussion on the reval- 
uation act, which he said ought to be called "An act 
to make the tax books of North Carolina speak the 
truth." and he reported that returns coming in 
showed that the truth was being told about the value 
of property. 

Further discussions of taxation and accounting 
problems were led by Judge George P. Pell, and A. 
J. Maxwell, of the State Corporation Commission, 
W. C. Boren, chairman Guilford County Commis- 
sioners; W. A. McGirt, chairman New Hanover 
County Commissioners ; George G. Scott, chairman 
State Board Public Accountancy, and Professor Bran- 
son, of the University. 



The system of procedure in the new juvenile courts 
was explained by Judge Charles N. Feidelson, of the 
Children's Court of Savannah, by R. F. Beasley, Sec- 
retary State Board of Public Welfare, by Mrs. Clar- 
ence W. Johnson, Director of the Child Welfare Di- 
vision of the State Board of Charities and Public 
Welfare, and by A. S. McFarlane, County Superin- 
tendent of Public Welfare in Forsyth County, pio- 
neer in this work in North Carolina. The largest 
individual group at the Council was the County Sup- 
erintendents of Public Welfare, and they perfected 
an organization of their own by electing R. F. Beas- 
ley, president, A. S. McFarlane, vice-president, and 
Mrs. Blanche B. Carr, secretary and treasurer. 

Public health work in the State was described by 
Drs. W. S. Rankin, A. J. Warren, B. E. Washburn, 
George M. Cooper, and Mrs. Kate Brew Vaughn, all 
of the State Board of Health, and the public health 
system of Ohio, stated by Dr. Rankin to be a model 
of its kind, was explained in detail by Dr. Allen W. 
Freeman, Commissioner of Health for Ohio. 

Frank Page, chairman of the State Highway Com- 
mission, aroused great interest when he said that 
$1,500,000 worth of road building machinery was 
coming to the State from the Federal Government. 
Highway discussions were led by W. L. Spoon and 
B. W. James, of the U. S. Bureau of Public Roads. 

Public education problems were discussed by E. C. 
Brooks, State Superintendent of Public Instruction, 
and by George Howard, Jr., superintendent of Edge- 
combe County Schools. 

In response to a widely-voiced demand the council 
was made a permanent institution and a committee 
was appointed by Governor Bickett to make plans for 
next year's meeting. This committee consists of Prof. 
E. C. Branson, chairman, A. T. Allen, Mrs. Clarence 
W. Johnson, W. C. Jones, and Dr. F. M. Register. 
The local committee which handled the council for 
the University consisted of Dr. E. C. Branson, Dr. 
L. R. Wilson, Dr. E. W. Knight, and Mr. C. T. 
Woollen. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



SCHOOL OF COMMERCE ESTABLISHED 



One Hundred and Twenty-five Students Enroll as Prospective Business 

Leaders 



Announcement was made by President Chase dur- 
ing the summer of the new School of Commerce, 
which started with an enrollment of 125 on Oc- 
tober 2nd. A four-j'ear course leading to a degree 
of Bachelor of Science in Commerce, the last two 
years of which will be almost completely technical 
in character, will be given by experts in business and 
commercial subjects. The appropriation for this 
school was made by the last Legislature. 

"The purpose and method of the School of Com- 
merce," said President Chase, "are based on the con- 
viction that the business training of former times, ac- 
quired through the prolonged and wasteful process 
of simple experience, is inadequate to meet changed 
conditions of the present day. The courses of study 
are designed to give a general grounding in the 
fundamentals of business and, at the same time, a 
definite and practical preparation for those who ex- 
pect to engage in any of the great lines of industrial 
and commercial activity." 

Unconditional entrance to the school is the same 
as for the College of Liberal Arts, which requires fif- 
teen units. Students twenty-one years of age and 
over who cannot fulfill the entrance requirements may 
be admitted as special students, but not as candidates 
for a degree. The first two years of the school will be 
broadly similar to Freshman and Sophomore work, 
but with added emphasis on Modern Languages, Com- 
mercial Geography, and History in relation to indus- 
try and business. 

In the third year courses will be offered in Ac- 
counting, Business Organization, Money and Bank- 
ing, Insurance, Transportation, Corporation Finance, 
Commercial Law, Labor Problems, Rural Economics, 
Practical French and Spanish, Advanced English 
Composition, the writing of technical papers, and 
Psychology. 

Included in the fourth year's work are Theories of 
Economic Reform, Advanced Accounting, Industrial 
Management, Public Finance, Foreign Trade, Inter- 
national Law, Markets and Marketing, Salesmanship 
and Sales Management, Advanced Commercial and 
Industrial Geography, Latin American History and 
Customs, Social Psychology, and Ethics. 

A part of the training will consist of attendance 
upon lectures given by representative business men 
of the State and of the South, and already a promis- 
ing list of North Carolina business men have agreed 



to give these lectures. These will be supplemented by 
government officials who are dealing with industrial 
problems. Representatives of the Tariff Commission, 
Federal Trade Commission, Census Bureau, and Bu- 
reau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce are among 
those who will come. 

During the summer between the Junior and Senior 
years, each student will be expected to spend his time 
working in an establishment in the line of business 
for which he is preparing. This may begin in the 
summer following the Sophomore year, as is the case 
now with the students who go to the National City 
Bank of New York. The University itself, in its busi^"" 
ness aspects, will be used as a working laboratory, 
particularly the offices of the Treasurer and the Busi- 
ness Manager. 

Mr. D. D. Carroll, Professor of Economics, has been 
appointed acting dean of the School of Commerce, 
and Professor Roy B. Cowin will be Associate Profes- 
sor of Accounting. Professor Cowin has taught ac- 
counting at the University of Michigan and the Uni- 
versity of Iowa, and lately has been in the accounting 
department of the post office department. 



NEW CAROLINA PHARMACISTS 

Four men from the University School of Pharmacy 
took the examinations before the State Board last 
June and became licensed pharmacists. These were : 
J. M. Buffaloe, Raleigh; G. L. Nye, Orrum; C. R. 
Wheeler, Whitsett; A. B. Bobbitt, Warrenton. Mr. 
Buffaloe led the class standing the examinations. 

The North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association has 
established a scholarship in the School of Pharmacy. 



WE ARE HAPPY TO BE CORRECTED 

In recent issues of The Review, the names of J. B. 
Oldham, '13, Jno. B. Bonner, '17, and B. C. Harrell, 
17, have appeared as being alumni who had fallen 
in service. The Review is glad to make the correction 
that tlie carrying of these names in the list of alumni 
who had died in service was an error, and that these 
alumni are alive and well. J. B. Oldham is farming 
near Chapel Hill. Dr. Bonner is practicing his 
profession, medicine, at Morehead City. B. C. Harrell, 
who is a veteran from the 1916 football team, has 
re-entered the University and is again on the Caro- 
lina varsity. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



HARD PRACTICE AT FOOTBALL 



Fifty Candidates are at Hard Practice Under Campbell, Ramsey 

and Homewood 



The Carolina football season, the first varsity sea- 
son since 1916, was started September 10th when 
fifty candidates assembled on the "Hill" to meet 
Head Coach Campbell and to begin the preliminary 
work-outs. Without delay Campbell threw his men 
into morning and afternoon practice daily and the 
squad was ready to begin scrimmaging exactly two 
weeks later. Two heavy games at the start of the 
season, Rutgers on October 4th and Yale on October 
11th, made stiff work necessary from the start. 

Three resident coaches have charge of the squad. 
Head Coach Thomas Campbell, who coached the 1916 
team to a victory over Virginia, learned his football 
under Haughton at Harvard. He was assistant coach 
at Harvard in 1913 and 1914, was head coach at 
Bowdoin in 1915, and was in charge of all ath- 
letics at the University in 1916 and 1917 until he 
entered the army. His record with the 1916 team 
was so satisfactory and his own bearing as a gentle- 
man and a sportsman made such a strong impression 
on the University that his return has been regarded as 
the start of a successful season. 

Assisting Campbell are Roy Homewood, '16, an end 
of four years' experience and assistant coach in 1916, 
and Graham Ramsey, '17, who played tackle, 1913 to 
1916. Homewood will have charge of the ends and 
Ramsey of the line men, and Campbell will have gen- 
eral supervision and will give particular attention 
to the backs. 

The squad that met these coaches contained six var- 
sity veterans from 1916 — Grimes and Harrell, guards, 
and Barden, a sub-guard, Proctor, end, Johnson, 
quarter, and Coleman, half-back. The one year resi- 
dence rule limited the candidates to the Freshman 
teams of 1916 and 1917 and the S.A.T.C. team of last 
year. Fortunately, some strong material was devel- 
oped on those teams. Blount, Brown, Shaw, Jacoby, 
and Dortch have been tried out at center, with 
Blount and Brown showing up best in the early work. 

Robbins, a 210-pounder from the 1917 Freshman 
team, has shown up well at tackle, and Allen Gantt, 
last year's captain, is another tackle of experience. 
Barden has been used at both guard and tackle, and 
Harrell, one of the veterans, has been shifted out to 
tackle. Whiting, Pritchard, Nichols, and Abernathy 
are other promising line men. 

Homewood will have to develop his ends from 



Proctor and Bell, both of whom had experience in 
1916, from Cochrane and Sims of the 1917 Freshmen, 
from Crayton, who has had some experience at Wash- 
ington and Lee ; from Woodall, of the basketball 
squad, and Aycock. The fight for the quarterback 
position should be a pretty one with Johnson from 
1916 and Pharr, a brilliant player from the S.A.T.C. 
team, the most favored. Smith, Mobley, and Susman 
are other candidates. 

Coleman, with his great punting and his experi- 
ence in 1916, is a leading backfield candidate. Fear- 
rington and Lowe both showed up well last year, and 
Spaugh, an 180-pound full back, was a star in his 
Freshman year, but has never had a chance at a var- 
sity team. Griffith, Harden, Tenney, Fulton, Wearn, 
and Abernathy have all displayed promise in the 
early practices. 

The material as a whole is light, but there is lots of 
speed, and rarely has more enthusiasm and earnest- 
ness been shown by any Carolina squad. 



TWENTY-NINE NEW DOCTORS 

Twenty-nine young physicians who received the 
first two years of their medical training in the School 
of Medicine of the University received license to prac- 
tice medicine in North Carolina at the State exami- 
nations held in June of this year. 

The five leading candidates in these examina- 
tions were U. N. C. men, their order being Doctors 
DeWitt Kluttz, N. C. Riddle, W. M. Coppridge, F. 
B. Marsh, H. W. Lyon. 

The list of Carolina men follows: Doctors N. B. 
Broughton, Raleigh ; G. M. Brooks, Salisbury ; J. V. 
Price, Madison ; G. C. Cooke, Winston-Salem ; A. H. 
Elliott, Thomwall; DeWitt Kluttz, Chester, S. C. ; 
N. C. Riddle, Sanford; W. A. Marlowe, Lucama; C. 
0. Delaney, Weddington ; F. B. Scruggs, Ruther- 
fordton ; J. W. Harbison, Morganton ; C. B. Squires, 
Charlotte; W. G Taylor, Greensboro; D. T. Tayloe, 
Washington ; H. M. Brinkley, Elm City ; F. C. Hub- 
bard, Wilkesboro ; B. B. McGuire, Norton ; W. H. Dix- 
on, Rocky Mount ; W. M. Coppridge, Roanoke, Va. ; 
H. W. Lyon, Windsor ; F. B. Marsh, Salisbury ; W. R. 
Sanford, Teer; G. F. West, Bynuni; L. N. Conoly, 
Shannon ; H. McG. Sweeney, Leaksville ; R. G. Wil- 
son, Swannanoa; K. H. Bailey, Wakefield; E. S. 
Suggs, Chapel Hill ; Frank Sabiston, Jacksonville. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



NORTH CAROLINA'S SURPASSING HUMAN WEALTH 



Below is given the address of welcome made by 
President Chase on Monday night, September 15, to 
the State and county officials and allied workers at- 
tending the State and County Council. It contains 
such a clear statement of the purpose of the Univer- 
sity to serve that it is reproduced herewith in full. 

It is my happy privilege to welcome to the University of 
North Carolina this group of men and women consecrated to 
the service of North Carolina. I speak not for myself alone, 
but for all of us whose daily lives center about this campus, 
when I say that we are glad and proud that you are here. 

From our hearts we want to say to you that all the re- 
sources of this campus are yours. They are yours not merely 
for the days that you are here, but whenever and wherever 
you can use them. For the University of North Carolina 
exists to serve the people of North Carolina. It is not the 
possession of its Faculty, or its Students, but of the people 
of the State. Those of us to whom its destinies are for the 
time entrusted are recreant to our trust if we do not recog- 
nize this fundamental truth. And so I bid you welcome to- 
night, not to anything which is ours, but to that which is 
already yours — yours as citizens of North Carolina, active in 
her service and in her upbuilding. In coming here you are but 
coming to your own. 

You have come together here at a time when North Caro- 
lina's long dark night of poverty seems forever past. No- 
where has wealth increased so swiftly; nowhere is prosperity 
more widespread. May I quote just a few facts which have 
been made here by Dr. Branson and his students. In 1910, 
the State 's farm, fruit and truck crops amounted to 143 
million dollars. Last year their value was 537 million dol- 
lars — our crops alone quadrupled in value in eight years. The 
cotton crop alone was worth 50 million dollars more in 1918 
than in 1910. Bank Savings deposits and time certificates 
grew from 22 million dollars in 1915 to 61 million dollars 
in December, 1918. In addition to this, subscriptions to 
Liberty Bonds and purchases of War Savings Stamps 
amounted to 163 million dollars — an amount which will bring 
into the state annually nearly 8 million dollars in interest. 
The official government figures show that North Carolina paid 
the federal government, in internal revenue taxes, 101 million 
dollars during the last fiscal year. This was more than twice 
as much as the amount paid by any other Southern State. 
In federal income and profit taxes alone we paid over 30 
million dollars — far more than any other Southern State. 
This follows naturally from the fact that as early as 1914, 
North Carolina was the leading industrial State of the South, 
and its lead has been increasing ever since. It leads all the 
South in the manufacture of cotton, furniture, and tobacco — 
in fact in the manufacture of tobacco North Carolina lends 
the entire country. 

Figures, I know, are sometimes dry, but surely not 
such figures as these. What an amazing story they 
tell! The story of a people emerging from poverty into 
affluence, of a State that must henceforth class herself, not 
as a poor relation, but as a well-to-do and influential member 
of the family circle. 

I have spoken of North Carolina 's material wealth. I 
need not mention to this audience that which is far more 
important — her surpassing human wealth. With a population 



whose proportion of native-born whites is higher than that 
of any other State in the country; whose temper in adversity 
the marvelous material progress of the State well indicates; 
whose sturdy and devoted patriotism needs no better illus- 
tration than the record of her soldiers in the great war — with 
such a people and such national resources, I say in all con- 
fidence that her destiny is higher even than we yet dream. 
Surely we cannot think of her future in anything but the 
biggest terms. 

But as we do this, and just in proportion as our faith 
in her future is real and vital and strong, we must think 
of the duties and responsibilities of her citizens, and espe- 
cially of her public servants like yourselves, in just as high 
terms. Prosperity brings opportunity, but it also brings 
obligation. It brings the obligation of making certain that 
North Carolina shall grow in spirit as well as in goods; that 
it shall never forget that duties, as well as privileges must 
fall equally upon all ; that within the reacn of every one of 
her citizens, there must be a full and free and happy life, 
in body, mind and soul. 

To such high purposes as these you, as servants of this 
State and of its counties, have devoted yourselves. Your 
duties are various, but they are linked by the golden thread 
of service to the people of North Carolina. You are plan- 
ning for the future of a State that is a-thrill with a vision 
of new opportunities and larger horizons — a State that has 
at last come into her own. It is a time whose temper calls 
for big things, that is impatient of anything short of the 
best. It is, I take it, precisely to match your minds together 
that you may find from each other's counsel what is the 
best, that you have come together. 

To you, on this your high mission, no formal word of 
welcome can convey the hospitality of our hearts. We can 
only pledge ourselves that, so far as in us lies, we will see 
to it that the young men whom we send from this campus out 
into the life of the State shall be men who have caught 
something of the vision of that greater and better citizenship 
which is yours. 



FRESHMAN FOOTBALL 

Freshman football will be under the direction of 
Lester E. Bond, an all-round athlete from the Uni- 
versity of Maine and former football coach at Mary- 
ville College, Tennessee. Indications are that many 
experienced high school and preparatory school ath- 
letes will be included in the Freshman class and ex- 
tensive efforts are being made by the athletic author- 
ities to train this material for future varsities. 

The big game on the Freshman schedule will be with 
the University of Virginia Freshmen at Charlottes- 
ville, November 22, the Saturday before Thanksgiv- 
ing. Another game has been arranged with Bingham 
School, and negotiations are under way for additional 
games with the University of Georgia Freshmen, the 
South Carolina Freshmen, Davidson Scrubs, and Oak 
Ridge. 



10 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



DEANS AND NEW APPOINTMENTS 



Following a meeting of the executive committee of 
the Board of Trustees in Raleigh, September 23rd, 
President Chase announced a division in the duties 
assigned to the dean, involving the appointment of 
Dr. George Howe as Dean of the College of Liberal 
Arts, the retention of Dr. A. H. Patterson as Dean of 
the School of Applied Science, and the creation of a 
new position to be known as Dean of Students, to 
which position was appointed Frank P. Graham, As- 
sistant Professor of History. 

"The University has now developed to a point at 
which the dulies of the deanship as they have been in 
the past cannot longer be performed satisfactorily by 
any one man," said President Chase, in speaking of 
the changes. "'The Dean of the College has been 
both a student and an educational official, and has 
had on his hands all matters of discipline, as well as 
all questions of educational policy concerning the aca- 
demic department. It has seemed best to redistribute 
the functions formerly attached to the Deanship of 
the College." 

Dean Graham, as new Dean of Students, will have 
in his charge all matters of student discipline so far 
as they concern the faculty. To this work he brings 
the equipment of intimate association with the Uni- 
versity and with the student body since 1905 and a 
record of marked success in dealing with men on the 
Carolina campus or anywhere else. A member of 
the class of 1909 and twice its president, he studied 
law at the University, taught in the Raleigh High 
School, served as Y. M. C. A. secretary at the Uni- 
versity, had two years of graduate work at Columbia 
and was instructor in History at the University until 
he enlisted in the Marine Corps, where he rose from 
private to first lieutenant. 

Dr. Howe, as Dean of the College of Liberal Arts, 
will have charge of matters of advice to students 
about courses, the formulation of courses of study for 
the college — in short, questions of educational policy 
and practice which concern the College of Liberal 
Arts. Dr. Howe has been head of the Latin depart- 
ment since 190:!, and has been a member of the ad- 
visory and executive committees of the faculty, and 
chairman of the curriculum committee. 

Professor Patterson, who is retained as Dean of the 
School of Applied Science, will have jurisdiction over 
matters concerning educational policies in that school. 

Additions to the faculty announced by President 
Chase were : 

To be Professor of Physical Educational and Di- 



rector of Physical Training — Thomas J. Browne. 
Graduate Springfield Y.M.C.A. Training School, B.S. 
Columbia University, M.A. New York University. 
Twelve years in charge of physical training at boys' 
high school. In charge physical training and athletics 
at Camp Gordon. Head of Central Army School for 
training physical training officers. 

To be Professor of Stratigraphic Geology — William 
F. Prouty, B.S. Syracuse University, M.A. Syracuse 
University, Ph.D. Johns Hopkins. Instructor in Ge- 
ology at Syracuse. Associate Professor and Profes- 
sor of Geology, University of Alabama. 

To be Associate Professor of Psychology — J. F. 
Dashiell, M.A. and Ph.D. Columbia University. In- 
structor and Assistant Professor of Psychology at 
Columbia, Princeton, Minnesota, and Oberlin. 

To be Assistant Professor of Drawing — Norman 
M. Paull, B.S. Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 

To be Associate Professor of Accounting — Roy B. 
Cowin, A.M. University of Michigan. Instructor and 
Assistant Professor of Accounting at Michigan and 
Iowa. Accountant, Wire Administration, Post Of- 
fice Department, Washington, D. C. 

To be Assistant Professor of Law — 0. O. Efird, 
A.B. Roanoke College, A.M. Princeton, LL.B. Har- 
vard. 

To be temporary Instructor in Histology — Dr. Jul- 
ian A. Moore. 

To be Adviser to Women — Mrs. Marvin H. Stacy. 

To take the place of Professor W. W. Rankin (on 
leave) — Arthur S. Winsor. 

Additions to the faculty announced after the com- 
mencement meeting of the Board of Trustees were : 

Professor of Rural Education — Edgar W. Knight. 
A.B. and A.M. Trinity, Ph.D. Columbia University. 
Instructor in History, East Carolina Training School. 
Professor of Education, Trinity College. Superin- 
tendent of Schools, Wake Comity. 

Professor of Community Music — Paul John Weaver, 
A.B. University of Wisconsin, Supervisor of Music 
in the St. Louis public schools. 

Assistant Librarian — Charles M. Baker, A. B. and 
A. M. Harvard. Instructor in English, Syracuse 
Univeisity. Graduate New York State Library 
School. Camp Librarian at Camps Jackson, Greene, 
and Meade. 

Assistant Porfessor of English in charge of Journ- 
alism — Clarence A Hibbard, A.B. and A.M. Univer- 
sity of Wisconsin. Professor of English and Dean 
of Foreign Students, Imperial University of Com- 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



11 



merce, Tokio, Japan. Associated Press correspond- 
ent in tour around the world. Special correspondent 
in Japan for Chicago Daily News. Contributor to 
The Outlook, The Bellman, etc. Assistant Professor 
of English and Journalism, Miami University. 

Returning from government service are Dr. James 
B. Bullitt, Professor of Histology and Pathology ; Dr. 
Oliver Towles, Associate Professor of Romance Lan- 
guages ; Dr. Henry M. Dargan, Assistant Professor of 
English; S. H. Hobbs, Jr., Assistant Professor of 
Rural Economics; H. R. Totten, Instructor in Botany, 
and Dr. C. W. Keyes, Instructor in Latin. 

Leaves of absence have been granted to Prof. Geo. 
M. McKie, Dr. S. E. Leavitt, who goes to South Am- 
erica for a year to study Spanish and commercial 
customs; to John W. Lasley, Jr., who goes to the Uni- 
versity of Chicago, and to W. W. Rankin, Jr., who 
goes to Columbia Universitv. 



DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC ESTABLISHED 

Prof. Paul John Weaver, for the past four years 
supervisor of music in the public schools of St. Louis, 
will be the new head of the department of music. 
Courses will be offered in Theory, Harmony, History, 
and the Appreciation of Music, all to be accredited to- 
ward the bachelor degree. It is expected that a con- 
servatory and special courses in music will develop 
soon. 

Mr. Weaver is a graduate of the University of Wis- 
consin, and has done graduate work there. In addition 
to his work in schools of St. Louis he has had much 
experience in song-leading under the auspices of the 
St. Louis Art League and the War Camp Community 
Service. He was organist at the Ethical Society and 
at the West End Presbyterian Church, two of the best 
posts in the city, and has given numerous recitals in 
St. Louis. He is a member of the American Guild 
of Organists. 



THIRTY-THREE NEW CAROLINA LAWYERS 

Thirty-three Carolina alumni received license to 
practice law in North Carolina in the examinations 
conducted by the State Supreme Court in August. 
Of these twenty-eight went from the University Law 
School. Miss Willie May Stratford, of Charlotte, won 
the prize offered by Chief Justice Walter Clark for 
the highest grade made in the examinations. The 
list follows : 

William Bryant Austin, Ashe ; Lee James Best, 
Harnett ; Norman Addison Boren, Guilford ; Nor- 
wood Bruce Bone}', Duplin ; Victor Silas Bryant, Jr., 
Durham ; William Washington Candler, Buncombe ; 



Frederick Jacob Cohen, Wayne; Ecery Byrd Denny, 
Rowan ; Mrs. Opal I. T. Emry, Halifax ; Samuel 
James Ervin, Jr., Burke ; Harley Black Gaston, Gas- 
ton ; Hugh Oliver Hanna, Guilford ; Hinton Gardner 
Hudson, Johnston ; Carl Britt Hyatt, Yancey ; Henry 
Daniel Litaker, Lincoln ; Elmore Mann, Hyde ; Dun- 
can Evander Mclver, Lee; Harris Phillips Newman, 
New Hanover ; Albert Oettinger, Wilson ; Miss Made- 
line Elizabeth Palmer, Mecklenburg; Elbert Sidney 
Peele, Martin; James William Pless, Jr., McDowell; 
William Dorsey Pruden, Chowan ; Beverly Sampson 
Royster, Jr., Granville; Miss Willie May Stratford, 
Mecklenburg ; Don Addison Walzer, Lexington ; Ray- 
mond Craft Maxwell, Wake; Owen Meredith Marsh 
burn, Wake; John Will Aiken, Catawba; Carl Le- 
roy Bailej r , Washington ; Joseph Ira Lee, Johnston ; 
George Murray Sudderth, Watauga; Edward Em- 
mett Sams, Wake. 

The School of Law has introduced an important 
change in that the curriculum has been extended to 
three years for the L. L. B. degree. Mr. 0. 0. Efird 
comes to the faculty as assistant professor, and it 
is planned to add one or more members to the faculty 
within a few years. The extension of the course to 
three years has been in contemplation for sometime 
and its consummation has been prevented only by 
war conditions. The faculty now consists of Dean 
McGhee, Professors Mcintosh and Winston, and As- 
sistant Professor Efird. 



LONDON IS NEW LIBRARIAN 
Henry M. London, of the class of 1899, has entered 
upon his duties as Legislative Reference Librarian, 
succeeding the late W. S. Wilson, who was also of the 
class of '99. Mr. London resigned the chief clerkship 
in the office of the Collector of Internal Revenue for 
the Eastern North Carolina District in order to take 
up the duties of Legislative Reference Librarian. 



DR. HERTY IN EUROPE 

Dr. Chas. H. Herty, formerly head of the depart- 
ment of chemistry in the University, now editor of 
the Journal of Industrial and Engineering Chem- 
istry, New York City, is in Europe for a few weeks, 
where he is engaged in purchasing for the dye con- 
sumers of this country a six months' supply of such 
dyes as are now needed but are not yet manufactured 
here. Dr. Herty, who is a former president of the 
American Chemical Society, has taken a special in- 
terest in the development of the self-contained Am- 
erican dye industry. It is expected that the manu- 
facture of all kinds of dyes will be in full swing in 
America within six months. 



12 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



ALUMNI URGED TO CELEBRATE UNIVER- 
SITY DAY 

The Review reproduces herewith the letter which 
the Alumni Committee of the Universitj^ has sent to 
alumni everywhere urging big celebrations of the 
126th anniversaiw of the founding of the University. 
This letter to the alumni follows : 

Dear Fellow Alumni : 

On the eve of her 126th anniversary the University sends 
heartiest greetings and good wishe8 to her alumni scattered 
throughout the State and nation. No other University Day 
has found Alma Mater more firm in the hearts and affections 
of her sons, nor surer of the path of service to the State which 
lies immediately before her. The oldest of the State Uni- 
versities in point of the opening of her doors, she is the young- 
est in her spirit of service and in her buoyant confidence that 
the big problems confronting her will be worked out in splendid 
fashion. 

In order that she may carry on her work with steadily grow- 
ing strength and vigor at a time when constantly increasing de- 
mands are being made on her by the State, she needs and 
must have the calm counsel and the unusually active support 
of her sons. 

What we suggest now is that you arrange a meeting of 
the local alumni for Saturday night, October 11th, or Mon- 
day night, October 13th, to talk over the affairs of the Uni- 
versity, its present problems and opportunities, its relation to 
your local community and to the State. The General Alumni 
Association at its meeting last commencement adopted a con- 
structive program of activities for this year. Based on this 
program we are enclosing for your consideration and action 
a few suggestions of ways and means by which your local 
'association may co-operate in the work of the University and 
the General Alumni Association. 

We ask especially that meetings be held in every county 
of the State, that not a single county be unrepresented in 
the gatherings which this year commemorate the laying of the 
cornerstone of the Old East Building in 1793. If the alumni 
of your county are at present unorganized, plan now to effect 
a live organization this time. 

The whole-hearted support of the people of the State, the 
enthusiastic co-operation of alumni, faculty, and students, and 
the realization that the present decade, following the war, will 
be the richest and most fruitful educationally in the nation's 
history, assure our Alma Mater of a genuinely great future. 
But we need your continued and active interest and participa- 
tion. We know we have it ! 

The day will be celebrated at the University on Saturday 
morning, October 11th. Hon. Francis D. Winston, of the class 
of 1879, will make an address at this time. You are cordially 
invited to be present. 

Do not postpone the meeting but let every association and 
every group of alumni, wherever two or three may be banded 
together, hold a meeting. Start the year off with a rousing cele- 
bration! 

To all of her sons wherever they may be the University 
sends her affectionate regard and heartiest God-speed! 

W. S. Bernard, '00, 
T. J. Wilson, Jr., '94, 
E. B. Bankin, '13, 

Committee. 
October 4, 1919. 



SUGGESTIONS TO LOCAL ASSOCIATIONS 

The suggestions made by the Alumni Committee to 
the local alumni associations are as follows : 

1. That a University Welfare Committee be appointed from 
each association, whose duty it shall be to devise and develop 
plans for extending the University 's interests locally, and upon 
whom the President of the University, or the Alumni Secre- 
tary, may feel free to call at any time. 

2. That plans be made for the establishment by your asso- 
ciation of an extension center, which will bring a series of 
lectures by members of the faculty to your community this 
year. 

3. That the support of your asociation be continued and 
extended to the Graham Memorial Fund, the Alumni Loyalty 
Fund, and The Alumni Beview. 

4. That the secretary of your local association be empow- 
ered to compile a complete record of the members of your as- 
sociation who were in service in the world war. This record 
will prove of great value both now and in the future. 

5. That the association encourage the participation of the 
high schools of your county in the interscholastic debating and 
athletic contests conducted each year by the University. 

6. That meetings of your association be held more fre- 
quently, that Carolina men may magnify the bond which 
unites them and come to know each other better. 



FOOTBALL SCHEDULE 

The schedule announced by Graduate Manager 
Woollen calls for eight games, five of them within 
the State, three of them at Chapel Hill. Greatest in- 
terest centers around the Virginia game, to be played 
this year at Chapel Hill on Thanksgiving Day, and 
the A. and E. game to be played in Raleigh October 
23rd, Thursday of Fair week. The Carolina- Virginia 
game has been played in Richmond every year since 
the contest was started with the exception of 1907 
when it was played in Norfolk. Playing it in Chapel 
Hill one year and Charlottesville the next marks an 
effort on the part of both universities to bring good 
football before the students of the universities. The 
A. and E. game is the first football contest between the 
two state institutions in years, and every indication 
points to a brilliant game in Raleigh. 

The complete schedule: 

Oct. 4 — Butgers, at New Brunswick, N. ,1. 

Oct. 11 — Yale, at New Haven. 

Oct. 18— Wake Forest, at Chapel Hill. 

Oct. 23— A. & E., at Baleigh. 

Nov. 1 — Tennessee, at Knoxville. 

Nov. 8— V. M. I., at Chapel Hill. 

Nov. 15 — Davidson, at Winston-Salem. 

Nov. 27 — Virginia, at Chapel Hill. 



"The Carolina Playmakers'* is the title of an il- 
lustrated article in the September issue of the Re- 
view of Reviews, which appreciatively portrays the 
work of the University in the field of community 
drama. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



13 



ATLANTA ALUMNI NOTES 

The Review is glad to carry the following Atlanta 
alumni notes which were forwarded by a member of 
the Atlanta Alumni Association : 

Shepard Bryan is the senior membei of the firm of Bryan & 

Middlebrooks, engaged in the practice of law with offices in 
the Candler Building. He was recently prominently mentioned 
and recommended for appointment as U. S. District Judge for 
the Northern District of Georgia. 

Dr. Michael Hoke is one of the most successful specialists 
in surgery in the whole southeast. His practice consists largely 
of orthopedic surgery, in which profession he enjoys a repu- 
tation throughout the country. 

V. A. Batchelor is engaged in the practice of law", with of- 
fices in the Third National Bank Building. He is prominent 
in business and social affairs of the city. 

Dr. E. G. Ballenger has built up a large and profitable busi- 
ness as physician in partnership with Dr. O. F. Elder, witli 
offices in the Healey Building. He has been appointed chair- 
man of the Sponsors and Maids Committee for the United 
Confederate Veteran 's Reunion. He was commissioned major 
in the Emory Hospital Unit and spent almost a year in the 
service in France. 

Daniel G. Fowle was commissioned captain at the first of- 
ficers ' training school at Fort McPherson and went overseas 
with the Eighty-Second Division in April, 1918. While at the 
front he was severely gassed and was only lately discharged 
from the hospital. He is now with the regular army and is 
temporarily stationed at Hattiesburg, Mississippi. 

Thomas S. Kenan is president of the Atlanta Cotton Oil Com- 
pany and of the Atlanta Fiber Company. He has been suc- 
cessful in business since taking up his residence in Atlanta. 

T. B. Higdon is engaged in the practice of law, with offices 
in the Hurt Building. He is a member of the American Bar 
Association, the Georgia Bar Association and the Atlanta Bar 
Association. He entered the Field Artillery Central Officers 
Training School at Camp Zachary Taylor, Louisville, Ky., where 
he was discharged after the signing of the armistice. 

L. B. Lockhart is a successful commercial chemist with 
laboratories at 33 1-2 Auburn Avenue. He is a member of the 
American Chemical Society and is prominent among the chem- 
ists of the city. On September 30th, 1916, he married Miss 
Louise Hamilton and they have a fine boy. 

< '. E. Betts is connected with the Mutual Life Insurance Com- 
pany of New- York, and is making a success at his business. 

John Y. Smith is engaged in the practice of law with offices 
in the Fourth National Bank Building. He is a member of 
the Legislature from Fulton County and enjoys a lucrative 
practice. 

.brume Moore, since his discharge from the Army, is prac- 
ticing law with his brother-in-law under the firm name of 
Evans & Moore, with offices in the Empire Building. He was 
a captain in the Eighty-third Regiment of the Seventh Division 
of the regular army and spent about eight months in France. 

J. W. Speas is sales manager of the National City Company, 
in the Trust Company of Georgia Building. He has been suc- 
cessful since entering business in the city and is one of the 
best known and best informed financial experts in the city. 

Albert Fore has recently moved to Atlanta and is with the 
Southern Bell Telephone Company. 

The unmarried contingent of U. N. C. alumni in Atlanta, 
including Dr. E. G. Ballenger, Jerome Moore, V. A. Batchelor, 



John Y. Smith, T. B. Higdon, J. W. Speas and Albert Fore, 
are among the active participants in the social life of the city. 
Mr. Speas has recently invested in a new car and is liberal in 
the use of it with his friends, both male and female. 



UNIVERSITY HAS FINE OPENING 

At 12 o'clock (noon) on October 2nd, the formal 
opening of the University w T as held in Memorial Hall, 
the entire student body and faculty being present and 
the invocation being made by Dr. W. D. Moss. 

President Chase began the exercises by giving the 
statistics of registration for the two days and a half, 
as follows : Freshmen 389 ; upperclassmen and pro- 
fessional students 687 ; Summer School students 
working for degrees 352 ; Summer Law students 38 ; 
total, duplicates included, 1,466, a net gain of more 
than 200 above any previous total registration for 
an entire year. 

Announcements were made by President Chase re- 
lating to changes in the faculty and the new program 
of work which the University is undertaking for the 
year, particularly in the fields of commerce, music, 
and physical welfare. The plan of organization of 
the Reserve Officers' Training Corps was explained 
by Major Frederick Boye, in charge of the local unit. 

In speaking to the students, President Chase wel- 
comed them to all that was fine and high in the life 
of Carolina and expressed as his highest wish for 
them that they might prove to be worthy associates 
of all the hosts of Carolina men who had preceded 
them. He urged that they be good citizens on the 
campus and develop into complete physical, mental, 
and spiritual manhood. 

Following President Chase. Dean of Students 
Frank P. Graham spoke feelingly of the world's need 
of men to replace the loss of youth and manhood in- 
cident to the war. The world, he declared, looked 
to the young manhood of America, particularly the 
college students, of today, to bring the world back to 
prosperity and variety. In addressing himself to the 
part Carolina men are to play in this world-rehabil- 
itation he emphatically declared that only the stu- 
dents who won clarity of mind, wholesomeness of 
spirit, and character here upon the campus, could be 
counted on to answer completely the tragic heart-cry 
of the world. 

The exercises were concluded by the benediction 
pronounced by Dr. Moss. 



Yale University has recently received the following 
bequests and gifts: $18,000,000 to $20,000,000 from 
the Sterling estate ; $1,854,000 from other sources ; 
and $673,316.94 from the Alumni Loyalty Fund. 



14 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 





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THE ALUMNI REVIEW 15 



ESTABLISHED 1916 



Alumni Coyalty fund 



"One for all, and all Tor one" 



Council: 

A. M. SCALES, '92 
LESLIE WEIL. '95 
L. R. WILSON, 99 
A.W.HAYWOOD, 04 
W. T. SHORE. 05 
J. A. GRAY, '08 




THE ALUMNI LOYALTY FUND 

Was established to provide a way by which every alumnus 
could contribute according to his ability to the general wel- 
fare of the University. 

A GOOD NUMBER FROM MANY CLASSES 

Have taken advantage of this opportunity and have con- 
tributed a total of $10,000. 

ARE YOU IN THIS NUMBER ? 

Or are you letting your class-mates or members of other 
classes lay the foundation of what is to be one of Carolina's 
great achievements — the building up of a great fund, the 
income from which can later be applied in ways that will 
multiply Alma Mater's usefulness a hundredfold. 

UNIVERSITY DAY IS A GOOD DAY 

On which to make a beginning, or to renew your contribu- 
tion. All contributions are payable to University Treasurer, 
at Chapel Hill. 



1G 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 

Issued monthly except in July, August, and September, by the Gen- 
eral Alumni Association of the University of North Carolina., 

Board of Publication 

The Review is edited by the following Board of Publication: 

Louis R. Wilson, '99 Editor 

Associate Editors: Walter Murphy, '92; Harry Howell, '95 ; Archibald 
Henderson, '98; W. S. Bernard, '00; J. K. Wilson, '05; Louis 
Graves, '02; F. P. Graham, '09; Kenneth Tanner, '11 ; Lenoir 
Chambers, Jr., '14; R. W. Madry, '18. 

E. R. Rankin, '13 Managing Editor 

Subscription Price 

Single Copies $0.20 

Per Year 1.50 

Communications intended for the Editor should be sent to Chapel 
Hill. N. C; for the Managing Editor, to Chapel Hill. N. C. All 
communications intended for publication must be accompanied with 
signatures if they are to receive consideration. 

OFFICE OF PUBLICATION, CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 

Entered at the Postoffice at Chapel Hill. N. C. as second class 
matter. 



THE UNIVERSITY IN LETTERS 



In a recent issue of The New Republic (Septem- 
ber 3) is an interesting and suggestive contribution 
by Professor J. M. Booker, of the English department. 
"Barbusse in Peace and War" is more than a sum- 
mary of the work of Barbusse — something more than 
a review of "We Others" — although it is both. It is 
a subtle study in contrast between the French atti- 
tude of mind and the American — shall I say? — habit 
of will. Dr. Booker points out that the "American 
reader" — presumably there is such a creature — is 
resolutely optimistic, and declines to look continually 
on the darker side of things — largely, one imagines, 
because his world is mostly in sunlght — and he would 
have to be very moody to go on a still hunt for the 
penumbra. Dr. Booker suggests that the American 
reader, who will swallow Barbusse in war time, will 
"pass up" his pessimism in the piping times of peace. 
Barbusse is an artist : he is concerned with getting 
his effects, not with telling stories typical of condi- 
tions in the United States, or even in France! Dr. 
Booker's interpretation is helpful. For we Ameri- 
cans need, as does no people with the enlightenment 
we enjoy, to appreciate art, whether cheerful or 
gloomy, and to recognize its value, beauty, and rar- 
ity — whether or not it gives us a thrill of "uplift" or 
spells joy, ease, and self-contentment. 



Another contribution from the pen of Dr. Booker 
is "Bugaboo" in the current Sewanee Review 
(July). We may, if we will, see in it a contest, single- 
handed, by the doughty American champion of the 



"Fourteen Points," with the entire German Cabinet. 
Surely that august body needs a very thick and soft 
cushion to protect them from the fourteen points dex- 
terously wielded by the Wilsonian champion. The 
article may be regarded as the definite assumption of 
the challenge thrown down by the German Cabinet 
(May 20th) in these words: "We do not believe that 
anyone in the United State will have the courage to 
claim that there can be found in the peace conditions 
one single trace left of President Wilson's pro- 
gramme." In a very business-like fashion Dr. 
Booker "places the Fourteen Points opposite the 
peace terms, ' ' and quite honestly draws the inevitable 
conclusions. His final conclusion is: "Only a single 
one of the Fourteen Points has not left a trace." And 
he is certain that the Cabinet's declaration is a case of 
German Bugaboo — "a case of attempting to scare our 
national conscience with the accusation of a crime 
that had never been committed." 



A recent article by S. R. Winters, '13, is found in 
the National Magazine: "National Forests as Rec- 
reation Grounds." Such an article, with arresting 
illustrations, is a genuine stimulus to American travel. 
It is highly appropriate just now — a sort of "See 
America First" slogan in itself. For North Caro- 
lina it now has an especial meaning, in view of our 
recently incorporated Appalachian forest reserve. 
Mr. Winters points out the startling fact that the 
National Forests embrace a total area of 156,000,000 
acres — an area commensurate with the combined 
states of Louisiana, Alabama, Florida, Georgia and 
Mississippi. These wonderful recreation grounds 
should be more widely known and appreciated than 
they are at present. 



Under Ihe title "Witchcraft in North Carolina," 
Dr. Tom Pete Cross, now of the University of Chi- 
cago and formerly professor of English in this Uni- 
versity, presents a critical and exhaustive study of 
North Carolina folklore. While connected with the 
University, Dr. Cross was a member of the North 
Carolina Folk-Lore Association, and the present pub- 
lication, which is issued in the July number of 
Studies in Philology, completes the investigations 
begun at that time. 



A publication which came from press in the sum- 
mer and which will prove of interest and value to 
many North Carolinians is a Directory of the State 
and County Officials of North Carolina, by H. M. 
London, '99, recently appointed legislative reference 
librarian of the North Carolina Historical Commis- 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



17 



sion. The booklet, as the title indicates, contains the 
names and addresses of North Carolina State and 
county officials and will be widely used throughout 
the State. 



Since the last issue of The Review three publica- 
tions in the Extension Leaflet series have been issued 
as follows: Sanitation in the South, by Thorndike 
Saville, Associate Professor of Sanitary Engineering 
in the University; (2) The Flag and America's 
Creed — A Manual for Teachers, by L. A. Williams, 
Professor of School Administration; and (3) Studies 
in Citizenship, by D. D. Carroll, Professor of Eco- 
nomics. The last named Leaflet has been prepared 
for the special use of Women's Clubs in North Caro- 
lina and will be employed as a guide to study in a 
detailed course in national, State, and local govern- 
ment. 



PHYSICAL TRAINING PROVIDED FOR ALL 
STUDENTS 

Seeking to overcome and prevent the large propor- 
tion of physical defects revealed by draft statistics 
and to raise the health standards of the entire student 
body, the University will this year start a new pro- 
gram of student health and physical 1 raining. Cap- 
tain Thomas J. Browne, professor of physical educa- 
tion and director of physical training, will be the chief 
agent in this campaign and some of the methods he 
will employ are a complete survey of the physical 
condition of entering students, corrective measures 
under expert advice, wholesome exercise through the 
medium of intra-mural games, and a strict adher- 
ence to public health rules. 

Captain Browne is well equipped for this work. 
For twelve years he was in charge of physical train- 
ing at a high school in New York City, working with 
3,500 boys. Entering the army, he was placed in 
charge of physical training and athletics at Camp 
Gordon, where his success was so marked that he was 
made head of the Central Army School for the train- 
ing of physical training officers. He there taught 
and directed the officers who themselves were respon- 
sible for the physical condition of the men. 

Freshmen on entrance to the University have for 
some years been required to undergo a physical ex- 
amination, but present plans call for a stricter exam- 
ination and compulsory exercise for the Freshmen to 
correct physical errors. This exercise will be under 
careful supervision, and examinations and reports will 
be made from time to time to check Tip the work. 

For all the men in the University not playing on 



varsity teams, a sj-stem of intramural games will be 
started, with this again under careful supervision. 
Soccer football, basketball, and tennis are among the 
games Captain Browne will rely on, and efforts will 
be made to reach the largest possible number of stu- 
dents. 



RESERVE OFFICERS TRAINING CORPS 
ORGANIZED 

Under the direction of Frederick Rove, Major, Cav- 
alry, U. S. A:, a Reserve Officers ' Training unit has 
been established with a probahh enrollment of be- 
tween 250 and 300 men who will be organized into a 
battalion of four companies. It is proposed that 
Major Boye will be assisted by a non-commissioned 
officer and eight upper classmen who held commis- 
sions in the Army during the war. 

The work of the unit is to be divided into three di- 
visions — practical, lectures and demonstrations, and 
conferences or classroom recitations. The practical 
work will be left largely for the summer camp and 
the theory of military subjects will be studied dur- 
ing the college .year. 

All members of the unit receive equipment, includ- 
ing clothing, shoes, etc., and after two years ser- 
vice are given commutation of subsistence at the rate 
of $12 per month. Time allotted to training in the 
four-year course is three hours per week for Fresh- 
men and Sophomores and five hours per week for 
Juniors and Seniors. Proper credit is given by the 
University for degrees. Students attending summer 
camp receive mileage and subsistence. 

Major Boye is admirably equipped to direct this 
work and he expects the batalion to give a fine ac- 
count of itself during the year. 



SUMMER SCHOOL HAD LARGE ENROLLMENT 

The thirty-second session of the University Summer 
School, June 2-1-August 7, enrolled 921 students from 
89 North Carolina counties, thirteen states, and two 
foreign countries. Of the total, 352 students were 
pursuing courses leading to degrees. Among the 
special features of the School were the presentation 
of the "Taming of the Shrew," under the direction of 
Prof. F. H. Koch; the holding of a Social Workers' 
Conference, directed by Prof. E. C. Branson, and 
the Musical Festival participated in by the student 
chorus and soloists and directed by Professor Gustav 
Hagedorn. 



Princeton alumni are maturing plans for the rais- 
ing of an additional endowment fund of $14,000,000. 



18 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



THE GENERAL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

of the 
UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 



Officers of the Association 

R. D. W. Connor, '99 President 

E. R. Rankin, '13 Secretary 

Executive Committee: Walter Murphy, '92; Dr. R. H. 
Lewis, '70 ; W. N. Everett, '86 ; H. E. Rondthaler, '93 ; C. W. 
Tillett, Jr., '09. 



WITH THE CLASSES 



1845 
— Dr. Alexander Boyd Hawkins of Raleigh, is the oldest living 
graduate of the University. He will soon be 95 years of age. 

1850 
— Col. Alfred Holt Garrigan is living on his plantation at 
Hope, Arkansas. Col. Carrigan was a member of the Arkansas 
Secession Convention, 

1853 

— Major N. E. Scales is living in Salisbury. Major Scales 
attained his military rank in the Confederate Army. 

1858 
— Wm. M. Coleman, formerly Attorney General of N. ('., is 
living in New York City, 
— Rev. Robert H. Marsh is living in Oxford. 

1859 
— Jas. P. Coffin and Geo. F. Dixon are living in Arkansas, 
Mr. Coffin at Batesville an<l Mr. Dixon at Wynne. 
— Capt. F. C. Robbins is practicing law at Lexington. 

1860 
— Gapt. Erasmus D. Scales is living at Paris, Texas. He 
attained the rank of captain in service of the Confederate 
Army. 

— Olin Wellborn formerly U. S. district judge for the State 
of California, is living in Los Angeles. Before his appoint- 
ment to the bench by President Cleveland he served in the 
House of Representatives as a member from Texas. 

1861 

— Major Edward J. Hale, of Fayetteville, is IT. S. minister to 

Costa Rica. 

— Maj. Charles M. Stedman, of Greensboro, has for a number 

of years represented the fifth N. C. district in the House of 

Representatives. 

1862 
— Thomas W. Taylor is a circuit judge in West Virginia. His 
home is at Huntington. 

— A. L. Fitzgerald, formerly chief justice of the Supreme 
Court of Nevada, is living at Carson City, Nevada. 

1870 
— Dr. R. H. Lewis is a senior member of the firm of Drs. Lewis, 
Battle & Wright, specialists of the eye, ear, nose, and throat, 
with offices in Raleigh. The class of '70, of which Dr. Lewis 
is a member, will celebrate its fiftieth anniversary next com- 
mencement. 



1874 
— J. Q. A. Wood, of Elizabeth City, is director of the Savings 
Bank & Trust Co. and the Electric Light and Power Co. 
He is president of the Elizabeth City Buggy Co. 

1877 
— Dr. Julian M. Baker, of Tarboro, is doing general practice 
in connection with his hospital work. 

1879 
— Dr. .J. M. Manning, who is practicing medicine in Durham, 
is now a city alderman. 

1880 
— Thos. H. Battle, trustee of the University, is at the head 
of the Rocky Mount Cotton Mills and is president of the 
National Bank of Rocky Mount. 

1881 
— J. Alton Mclver lias been for twelve years clerk of Superior 
Court of Moore County, at Carthage. 

1882 
— Dr. George L. Wimberly, Med. '82, is a physician of Rocky 
Mount. 

1883 

— Frank S. Spruill is an attorney of Rocky Mount. 

— Dr. Zeno Brown is practicing medicine in Greenville. 

1884 
— Thos. B. Wilder, Law 'N4, is trust officer of the Page Trust 
Co., at Aberdeen. 

1888 
— John A. Hendricks practices law at Marshall. For a num- 
ber of years he was special attorney for the Department of 
Justice, his work consisting in the investigation and prosecu- 
tion of land cases in the west. At Austin, Texas, he made 
the acquaintance of Col. Win. R. Davie, a state officer, who 
is a direct descendant of General William Richardson Davie, 
founder of the University. 
— T. A. Davis is a cotton broker of Wilson. 

1889 
— W. M. Farmer is cashier of the Citizen 's Bank of Wilson. 

1890 
— J. H. Bridgers is president of the Henderson Water Co., of 
Henderson, and is also practicing law. He is a member of 
the State Building Commission. 

— S. C. Bragaw, who was captain of the first football team 
Carolina ever put out, is now practicing law in Washington. 
He also pitched for the varsity baseball squad. Judge Bra- 
gaw resigned from the superior court bench in 1913. 
— P. L. Woodard is engaged in the mercantile business in 
Wilson. . 

1891 
— J. K. Norrleet, tobacconist of Winston-Salem, is a member 
of the State Highway Commission. 

— Judge Robert W. Bingham, of Louisville, Ky., owner of 
the Courier-Journal, succeeded Senator Duncan U. Fletcher 
as president of the Southern Commercial Congress. 
— A. S. Williams is practicing law in Wilmington. 
— Dr. J. Martin Fleming is practicing dentistry in Raleigh. 
He is a member of the state board of dental examiners. 
— Ben T. Green, of Franklinton, is engaged in tanning. 
— Dr. J. Vance McGougan, Med. '91, is practicing medicine 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



19 



in Fayetteville. He is remembered as a star right guard on 
the Carolina football team. 

— W. H. Long, Law '91, is an attorney and counsellor at law 
at Greenville. 

1892 

— Dr. Robert W. Smith is practicing medicine in Hertford. 
— A. M. Scales, second vice president of the Southern Life 
and Trust Co., Greensboro, and state senator from Guilford 
county, is chairman of the committee which is raising one 
million dollars for the schools and colleges of the State which 
are conducted under Presbyterian auspices. 

1893 
— F. C. Dunn is treasurer of the Lenoir Oil and Ice Co., of 
Kinston, and of the Caswell Cotton Mills. 

— Dr. H. W. Carter is an eye, ear, nose, and throat specialist, 
of Washington. 

— Dr. John A. Thames, Med. '93, has taken charge of the 
health work at Little Eoek, Arkansas, as city health officer. 
Dr. Thames served as a captain in the medical corps of 
the Army. 

— W. B. Snow is practicing law in Raleigh. 
— W. W. Vass, law '93, is cashier of the Wake County Sav- 
ings Bank, of Raleigh. 

1893 
— Perrin Busbee, of Raleigh, attends every Carolina-Virginia 
football and baseball game, no matter where it is staged. He 
is practicing law in Raleigh. 

1894 
— T. C. Leak, president and treasurer of the Roberdel Mfg. 
Co., Rockingham, was elected first vice-president of the North 
Carolina Cotton Manufacturers' Association at the annual 
meeting of this body in Asheville in July. 

— Dr. Hugh H. Atkinson practices his profession, medicine, 
in Brooklyn, N. Y. 

' — Bowman Gray is first vice-president of the R. J. Reynolds 
Tobacco Co., Winston-Salem. 

1895 
— Word H. Wood, president of the American Trust Co., Char- 
lotte, is now traveling in Europe as a member of an industrial 
commission representing the Southern Commercial Congress. 
Mr. Wood was recently re-elected president of the North 
Carolina Railroad for the ensuing year. 

— Chas. W. Home, merchant, farmer, and manufacturer, of 
Clayton, who is now president of the State Fair has made 
extensive plans for the largest State Fair which has yet been 
held. The Fair opens on October 21st at Raleigh. 
— Dr. L. D. McPhail is engaged in the practice of medicine 
at Rockingham. 

— J. E. Little is connected with the War Risk Insurance Bu- 
reau, Washington, D. C. 

— J. O. Carr, general counsel for the firm of Alexander Sprunt 
and Sons, cotton exporters, of Wilmington, sailed on Septem- 
ber 17th for Europe where he will visit Holland, France, 
Germany, and other countries to look after the export in- 
terests of this firm. 

— Leslie Weil is a member of the large mercantile firm of 
H. Weil and Bros., Goldsboro. 

— Murray Borden is assistant cashier of the First National 
Bank of Goldsboro. 

— F. B. McKinnie, of Louisburg, is cashier of the First Na- 
tional Bank. 



— S. T. Honeycutt, of Sinithfield, is register of deeds for 
Johnston county. 

1896 
— J. LeGrand Everett is engaged in the cotton mill business at 
Rockingham. He is secretary of the Roberdel Mfg. Co., the 
Midway Mills, and the Leak-Wall-MaeRae Mfg. Co. His son, 
LeGrand Everett, Jr., has entered the University. 
— C. W. Yates is manager of the Yates Book Store, of Wil- 
mington. 

— T. G. Mewborn, Law '96, former member of the legislature, 
is president of the Branch Banking and Trust Co., Wilson. 

1897 
— W. D. Carmichael, a former superintendent of the Durham 
city schools, and now manager of the W. Duke Sons & Co. 
Branch of the Liggett and Myers Tobacco Co., Durham, has 
two sons in the University, W. D., Jr., of the. class of '21, and 
Cartwright, of the class of '23. 

— Rev. Donald Mclver has been for a number of years pastor 
of the First Presbyterian Church of Burlington. 
— W. H. McNairy, superintendent of schools of Chester, S. O, 
acted as umpire for the State board of conciliation of South 
Carolina when this board settled the street ear strike in Green- 
ville in September. 

— Joe S. Wray returned in July from a year's service overseas 
in Army Y.M.C.A. work. While in the " Y " work Mr. 
Wray was on leave of absence from his duties as superin- 
tendent of the Gastonia schools. He has been superintendent 
of schools at Gastonia since the establishment of the graded 
schools there in 1901. 

— W. D. Grimes is a farmer, living near Washington. 
— R. H. Hubbard is in the cotton business in Wilmington. 
— F. B. Johnson is in the cotton and trucking business in 
Clinton. He was a member of the Carolina baseball varsity 
and is still a close and interested follower of University ath- 
letics. 

1898 

— Dr. J. B. Wright is associated with the firm of Drs. Lewis, 

Battle, and Wright, eye, ear, nose, and throat specialists, of 

Raleigh. 

— H. S. Hall, Law '98, a former president of the Mecklenburg 

County Alumni Association, is general sales manager of the 

Southern division of the General Fire Extinguisher Co., with 

headquarters at Charlotte. 

— Dr. G. E. Newby is a physician of Hertford. 

— Dr. John S. McKee, who served with the A. E. F. in France, 

has resumed the practice of medicine in Raleigh. He held 

the rank of captain. 

— J. D. Parker is practicing law in Sinithfield. 

— S. S. Holt is an attorney of Sinithfield. 

1899 
H. M. WAGSTAFF, Secretary, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
— C. S. Alston is president and manager of the Southern 
Motors Corporation, Charlotte. Mr. Alston is president of 
the Mecklenburg County Alumni Association and is looking 
forward to a big celebration on the part of this association 
on University Day. 

— Lieut. Col. W. C. Harllee, U. S. Marine Corps, served as 
director of the National Rifle Match at Caldwell, N. J. In 
the summer a civilian rifle team from North Carolina made an 
excellent record in this national match finishing 55 in a field of 
76. 



20 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



— Arthur Cobb holds the rank of captain in the ordnance de- 
partment of the army. He lives at Congress Hall Hotel, 
Washington. 

— Henry M. London has been elected Legislative Reference 
Librarian to succeed the late W. S. Wilson, who died De- 
cember LS, 191S, of influenza. Mr. London entered upon his 
duties August 1st. 

— Supt. Harry Harding, of the Charlotte city schools, was ap- 
pointed recently a member of the State High School Text- 
book Commission. The Charlotte city schools have enrolled 
this session more than seven thousand pupils. 
— Dr. T. M. Green is engaged in the practice of surgery in 
Wilmington. 

— K. G. Kittrell, who resigned the superiutendency of the 
Henderson schools last spring, which position he had accepted 
for the duration of the war, has resumed the practice of law 
at Henderson. 

— E. G. S. Davis is associated with the E. G. Davis & Sons Co., 
in the mercantile business at Henderson. Mr. and Mrs. 
Davis attended the reunion of '99 at the last commencement. 
— E. J. Barnes, law '99, is practicing law in Wilson. 
— W. T. Bost is associated with the Greensboro Daily News, 
in the capacity of Ealeigh correspondent and special feature 
writer. 

1900 
W\ S. BERNARD, Secretary, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
— Judge Sam E. Shull, of Stroudsburg, Pa., former star foot- 
ball player at Carolina, was on September 16th re-elected by 
a large majority, for a term of ten years, president judge of 
the court of common pleas of Monroe and Pike counties, Pa. 
— E. A. Metts, of Wilmington, is president of the Worth Co., 
wholesale grocers. 

■ — T. W. Davis, Law '00, who was discharged from the service 
last May, has resumed the practice of law in Wilmington. He 
held the rank of major in the judge advocate general 's de- 
partment. 
— Allen J. Barwick is practicing law in Raleigh. 

1901 
Dr. J. G. MURPHY, Secretary, Wilmington, N. C. 
— Wm. A. Murphy, M. D., holds the rank of major in the 
medical corps of the army. Formerly he was regimental sur- 
geon for the 311th Ammunition Train in the A. E. F. 
— H. D. Bateman is cashier of the Branch Banking and Trust 
Co., Wilson. 

— J. R. Conley, formerly a school man of the State, is now with 
the Durham Hosiery Mills. His work carries him periodically 
through the southwest. 

— Rev. Robert S. Satterfield is assistant editor of the Nash- 
ville Christian Advocate, Nashville, Tenu. 

— O. H. Sumpter is a circuit judge in Arkansas. His home 
is at Hot Springs. 

— Dr. J. G. Murphy is an eye. ear, nose and throat specialist, 
of Wilmington. 

— P. H. Busbee is practicing law in Raleigh. 
— W. H. Mizelle is editor and owner of the Weekly Herald, 
of Robersonville. He was engaged in school work until two 
years ago, when he entered the newspaper game. 
— C. A. Wyche is president of the First National Bank of 
Roanoke Rapids. 

— F. H. Brooks, of Smithfield, is judge of the recorder's court. 

1902 

I. F. LEWIS, Secretary, University Va. 

— Robert R. Williams, following his discharge from the ser- 



vice in June, resumed the practice of law at Asheville as 
a member of the firm of Jones and Williams. Throughout 
the war Mr. Williams served as a captain of Field Artillery, 
in the 316th Field Artillery Regiment. 

— Maj. W. W. Peirce has just received his discharge from 
the army where he served as commanding officer of the 105th 
Machine Gun Battalion, 30th Division, and is entering again 
into the practice of law at Goldsboro. The 105th Machine 
Gun Battalion, under command of Maj. Peirce, helped in the 
breaking of the Hindenburg line and made an excellent record 
throughout the war. 

— W. A. Blue is general manager of the Aberdeen and Rock- 
fish Railway, and is president of the Merchants and Farmers 
Bank of Aberdeen. 

— L. G. Fox, Phar. 'U2, is engaged in the drug business at 
Rockingham. He is proprietor of Fox 's Pharmacy. 
— J. L. Burgess, who was State botanist for four years, has 
been with the Department of Agriculture since 1909. Seven 
children now constitute the greater part of his family. 
— O. S. Thompson who has been with the Corporation Commis- 
sion for 13 years, was recently promoted to the position of 
tax clerk. He now has two children. 

— Dr. Claude Abernethy, who served with the A. E. F., has 
resumed the practice of medicine in Raleigh. He held the 
rank of captain in the medical corps. 

— A. H. Vann is secretary and treasurer of the Sterling 
Cotton Mills, of Franklinton. 

— B. B. Williams is practicing law in Warrenton. 

1903 
N. W. WALKER, Secretary, Chapel HU1, N. C. 
— N. W. Walker, professor of secondary education in the 
University and State high school inspector, is chairman of the 
State High School Text-book Commission. This commission 
was appointed recently by State Superintendent Brooks. 
— Geo. W. Willcox lives at Sanford and is engaged in farming. 
He represents Moore county in the house of the present Gen- 
eral Assembly. 

— Jos. B. Ramsey, lawyer of Rocky Mount, and president of 
the First National Bank of Rocky Mount, was elected presi- 
dent of the North Carolina Bankers' Association at the annual 
meeting of this association in Winston-Salem in August. 
— Dr. S. Dace MePherson is an eye, ear, nose, and throat 
specialist, of Durham, with offices in the Trust Bldg. 
— Dr. Wm. McKinney is part owner of the McKinney Pharm- 
acy, of Ayden. He practices medicine at Adyen. 

Floyd Uzzell, of Goldsboro, is a Wayne county farmer. 
— Harold Whitehurst is professor of English and French 
at Oak Ridge Institute. 

1904 
T. F. HICKERSON, Secretary, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
— W. C. Rankin is secretary and treasurer of the Stephens 
Company, developers of Myers Park, Charlotte. 
— Geo. F. Catlett is city chemist for Wilmington. 
— J. Vines Cobb, native of Old Sparta, Pitt county, is en- 
gaged in farming at Pinetops. 

— S. T. Peace is president of the First National Bank of 
Henderson. 

— Dr. E. B. Howie is practicing dentistry in Raleigh. 
— M. C. Staton is practicing law in Tarboro. He is the U. 
S. referee in bankruptcy for the eastern district of North 
( 'arolina. 

— W. P. Wood is vice-president ami part owner of the Eliza- 
beth City Buggy Co. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



21 



— L. E. Rudisill, lawyer of Lincolnton, was married on June 
^7tli, his bride being Miss Maude Ellen Mauney, also of Lin- 
colnton. 

1905 

W. T. SHORE, Secretary, Charlotte, N. C. 
— J. K, Wilson, who was the first man to subscribe to The 
Review when it launched forth upon its career, is practicing 
law in Elizabeth City. He is a trustee of the University. He 
held the rank of lieutenant commander in the Navy during 
the war. 

— Isaac C. Wright is practicing law in Wilmington. 
— Walter Clark, Jr., Law 'U5, formerly captain of infantry 
in the 30th Division, has located in Charlotte for the practice 
of his profession, the law. 

— Louis G. Rountree is a member of the firm of Rountree 
Bros., New York City, cotton factors and members of the 
New York Cotton Exchange. 

— Dr. R. P. Noble is practicing medicine in Raleigh. 
— B. K. Lassiter is postmaster of Oxford. His profession is 
the law. 

1906 
MAJ. J. A. PARKER, Secretary, Washington, D. C. 
— Norwood L. Simmons is manager of the Washington-Beau- 
fort Laud Co., of Washington, N. C. 

— W. L. Mann, lawyer of Albemarle and county attorney for 
Stanly County, is chairman of the recently appointed fair 
price committee for Stanly County. 

— Capt. Leroy F. Abernethy, cashier of the Consolidated Trust 
Co., of Hickory, and captain of the Hickory Reserve Militia 
took his company to Charlotte in August to assist in quieting 
the disturbance resulting from the strike of the car men. 
— Dermot Shemwell, of the firm of Foy and Shemwell, Lex- 
ington, served as captain in charge of the four companies 
of State troops called out for duty at Charlotte during the 
street car operatives strike in August. 

— Dr. Peter McLean, Med. '06, is a physician of Laurinburg. 
--Louis T. Moore is part owner of the Davis-Moore Paint 
Co., of Wilmington. 
— Dr. J. W. Tankersley is in charge of the Taukersley Sani 

torium, of Wilmington. He is doing surgery work alone. 

— W. C. Harris is judge of the city court of Raleigh. 
— H. C. Carter is an attorney of Washington. 
— J. A. Staton is a farmer and fertilizer salesman. His home 
is in Bethel. He is one of the county highway commissioners. 
He has two children. 

— Gilbert Crabtree, Phar. 'U6, is manager of the four drug 
stores of the Hicks-Crabtree Co., Raleigh. 

1907 
C. L. WEILL, Secretary, Greensboro, N. ('. 
— W. H. Duls married Miss Theresa Marshall in Dallas, Texas, 
on March 10, 1919. He is now in the legal department of 
the American Telephone and Telegraph Co. 
— Mr. and Mrs. Richard T. Fountain, of Rocky Mount, have 
announced the birth on August 3rd of Miss Susie Rankin 
Fountain. Mr. Fountain is a lawyer of Rocky Mounty, and is a 
member of the House of the present General Assembly, repre- 
senting Edgecombe county. 

— The wedding of Miss Annie Davis Powell and Mr. Stuart 
Grayson Noble took place August 11th at the home of the 
bride's parents, Judge and Mrs. Robert Powell, at Jackson, 
Miss. They are at home in Jackson where Mr. Noble is 
professor of education and head of the extension bureau 



in Millsaps College. During the past summer Mr. Noble was 

in Chapel Hill as a member of the Summer School faculty. 

— Dr. T. W. Dickson has resigned the deanship of Thiel 

College, Greenville, Pa., and accepted the position of associate 

professor of Latin at Syracuse University Syracuse, N. Y. 

— J. J. Wells is a civil and consulting engineer of Rocky 

Muunt. 

— E. B. Jeffress is manager of the Greensboro Daily News. 

— W. H. Royster is associated with the Royster Candy Co., of 

Raleigh. 

— Leslie Yelverton is a member of the firm of Yelverton 

Hardware Co., of Goldsboro. 

1908 

M. ROBINS, Secretary, Greensboro,N. C. 

— B. F. Reynolds is cashier of the Bank of Rockingham. 

He is also chairman of the board of county commissioners of 

Kichmond county; 

— Lloyd Ross is located at Gastonia and is engineer in charge 
of some road construction work for Gaston County. He 
saw service overseas in a regiment of engineers. 
— J as. A. Gray, vice president and treasurer of the Wachovia 
Bank and Trust Co., Winston-Salem, and state senator from 
Forsyth County, presided as president over the sessions of 
the North Carolina Bankers' Association at the annual meet- 
ing of this association held in Winston-Salem in August. 
— J. M. Archer is secretary and treasurer of the Fidelity 
Mfg. Co., cotton manufacturers, Charlotte. 
— H. V. Staton is part owner of the mercantile firm of J. 
R. Bunting 's Sons, of Bethel. He is also president of the 
Farmer 's and Merchant 's Bank and one of the county com- 
missioners. He has a five-year old child. 

— J. H. Coward is associated with the R. C. Cannon 's Sons ' 
department store, of Ayden, as part owner. 
— Tom L. Simmons, of Rocky Mount, is superintendent and 
general agent of the Southern Life and Trust Co., for the 
eastern district. 

— Phifer Fullenwider, Phar. '08, is a druggist, with the Rose 
Drug Co., of Rocky Mount. He will be remembered as a 
star pitcher on the varsity baseball team. He has a one- 
year-old child. 

1909 

O. C. COX, Secretary, Greensboro, N. C. 

— Mr. and Mrs. John A. Moore, of Lewistou, Montana, have 

announced the birth on July 30th of Miss Davis Elzora 

Moore. 

— Dr. Wm. B. Hunter, of Gastonia, county superintendent of 
public welfare of Gaston County, attended the State and County 
Council at Chapel Hill in September. Dr. Hunter was in ser- 
vice throughout the war serving as captain in the medical 
corps. He was connected for the most of the time with the 
105th Engineers, 30th Division. 

— L. L. Davenport, Law '09, is a member of the legal linn of 
Austin and Davenport, at Nashville. 

— C. G. Credle, superintendent of the Carthage graded schools, 
during July and August conducted summer schools for the 
Moore county teachers at Carthage and the Richmond county 
teachers, at Rockingham. 

— W. F. Strowd is connected with the contracting firm of 
T. C. Thompson and Bros. He is now at Macon, Ga., where 
he is bookkeeper and manager in charge of a large cotton 
mill construction job for this firm. 

— C. C. Bellamy, who is practicing law in Wilmington, is 
assistant city attorney. 



^2 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



Asphalt Pavements 

DURABLE =:= KCONOMICAL 

If you are interested in street or road construction 
we invite you to inspect our work in 
Durham (Asphalt Streets). 
Durham County (Asphalt and Concrete Roads). 
Raleigh and Wake County (Asphalt). 
Guilford County (Asphalt Roads). 
Greensboro. 
Rocky Mount. 
High Point. 
Henderson. 
Lumberton. 

Also roads built for United States Government: 
Army Supply Base, Norfolk, Va. 
Newport News — Hampton Highway, Newport 

News, Va. 
Camp Lee, Va. 

A representative will visit you and supply any in- 
formation or estimates desired. 

Robert G. Lassiter & Co. 

ENGINEERING AND CONTRACTING 

327 Arcade Building Norfolk, Va. 

1002 Citizens Bank Building Raleigh, N. C. 

First National Bank Bunlding Oxford, N. C. 



r- 



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The First National Bank 
of Richmond, Va., 



Commercial 
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Trust 
Department 



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with its resources of 
$36,000,000, is splen- 
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serve in all branches of 
Commercial Banking. 



The Trust Depart- 
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service. 

JNO. M. MILLER. Jr., President 
W. M. ADDISON, Vice-President 
CIIAS. R. BURNETT, Vice-President 
ALEX. F. RYLAND, Cashier 
THOS. W. PURCELL, Trust Officer 



Murphy's Hotel 

Richmond, Virginia 

The Most Modern, Largest, and Best Located Hotel 
in Richmond, Being on Direct Car Line to all 
Railroad Depots. 

The Only Hotel in the City With a Garage Attached. 

Headquarters for Carolina Business Men. 
European Plan $1.50 Up 



JAMES T. DISNEY, President 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



23 



— L. J. Poisson, law '09, is a member of the law firm of 
Carr, Dickson, & Poisson, of Wilmington, all three of whom 
are Carolina men. 

— G. U. Bancom, who is practicing law in Raleigh, has re- 
cently been made tax supervisor for Wake county. He has 
the record of being discharged from the service three dif- 
ferent times within fiO days. They were all "honorable" 
discharges, however. 

— E. H. Oettinger is general manager of the Oettinger depart- 
ment store, of Wilson. 

— John W. Umstead, Jr., formerly of Greensboro, is now- 
making his resilience in Tarboro. He is still connected with 
the Jefferson Standard Life Insurance Co., with the eastern 
part of the state as his territory. 

— Henry T. Clark is secretary and treasurer of the Scot- 
land Neck Cotton Mills. 

— Dr. E. L. Daniels, formerly of Goldsboro, is now located 
in New Bern, where he is a specialist of the eye, ear, nose 
:uid throat, 
— Robert S. McNeill is practicing law in Fayetteville. 

1910 
J. R. NIXON, Secretary, Edenton, N. C. 
— R. Grady Rankin is at the head of the Pinkney, Rankin, 
and Ridge cotton mills at Gastonia. He is a member of the 
board of county commissioners of Gaston county. 
— Dr. Charles S. Venable volunteered for aviation in 1917, 
was rejected and drafted for chemical warfare service. He 
became a captain and was in charge of semi-production of 
mustard gas at Cleveland, Ohio. He was mustered out of 
service last April and since that time has been in the faculty 
of the Mass. Institute of Technology, Boston. 
— First Lieutenant J. M. Venable, M. C, IT. S. A., was at- 
tached first to the 77th Division, was brigaded with the 
British in April of 1918, was in charge mobile surgical unit at 
St. Mihiel and Argonne-Meuse. He received a citation in 
army corps orders. He became attached to 3rd Division, Base 
Hospital 49, Army of Occupation, Germany. 
— E. W. Bryant, of Laurinburg, is engaged in farming. 
— B. F. Taylor is a wholesale grocer of Maxton. 
— Dickson McLean is a member of the law firm of Varser, 
McLean & Stacy, of Lumberton. In service, he held the rank 
of captain in the judge advocate general's department. 
— J. R. Nixon is superintendent of the Edenton public schools. 
— A. T. Moore, of Greenville, is county treasurer of Pitt county. 
— A. M. McKay is assistant cashier of the Murchison National 
Bank, of Wilmington. 

— Walter R. White is a druggist witli the Hunter Drug Co., 
of Warrenton. 

1911 
I. C. MOSER, Secretary, Asheboro 
— Capus Waynick is associate editor of the Greensboro Daily 
Record. At the time the armistice was signed Mr. Waynick 
was a candidate in the Central Officers' Training School at 
Camp Gordon. He finished the course and received a com- 
mission in the reserve corps. 

— Joseph Dawson, attorney of Kinston, is mayor of this city. 
— C. A. Vogler, recently judge of the municipal court of 
Winston-Salem, is now devoting his entire time to the prac- 
tice of law is a member of the firm of Craig and Vogler. 
— W. N. Everett, Jr., is engaged in the hardware business 
at Rockingham. On December 11, 1918, he received the com- 
mission of 2nd lieutenant in the reserve corps of Field Artil- 
lery from the F. A. C. 0. T. S., Camp Zachary Taylor, Ky. 



Statement of the Condition of 

The Fidelity Bank 

OF DURHAM, N. C. 

3&Cade to the ZNj>rth Carolina Corporation Commission 
at the Close of Business, Sept. 12, 1919 



RESOURCES 

Loans ami Investments $3,759,035.11 

Furniture and Fixtures 17,681.42 

Cash Items 847,421.37 

Cash in Vaults ami with Banks 763,893.55 

Overdrafts 842.79 

$5,388,874.24 

LIABILITIES 

Capital Stmk. $ 100,000.00 

Surplus 500,000.00 

Undivided Profits 107,596.17 

Interest Reserve 6,000.00 

Dunlends Unpaid 195.01 

Deposits 4,261,285.21 

Unearned Interest '. '. . 8,657.49 

Contingent Fund 5,140.36 

Borrowed Bonds 100,000.00 

Bills Payable 300,000.00 

$5,388,874.24 

B. N. DUKE, President INO. F. WILY, Vice President S. W. MINOR. Cashier 
1. D. KIRKLAND. Assistant Cashier INO. A. BUCHANAN. Assistant Cashier 



Ihe strength of this bank lies not alone in its Capital, Surplus, and Re- 
sources, but in the Character and Financial Responsibility 
of the men who conduct its affairs 



The Yarborough 



RALEIGH'S LEADING AND 
LARGEST HOTEL 

MAKE IT YOUR HOME WHEN 
IN RALEIGH 



B. H. Griffin Hotel Company 

Proprietors 



24 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



The O'Henry 

The Pride of Greensboro 



North Carolina's largest and finest 

commercial and tourist 

hotel 



200 ROOMS 



200 BATHS 



Thoroughly modern. Absolutely fireproof. 

Large sample rooms. Convention 

hall. Ball room. 



W. H. LOWRY 

Manager 



CABELL YOUNG 

Assistant Manairet 



A Fifth Avenue Shop at Your Door 



SHOWING 



Stylish Hats, Suits, Coats 
and Dresses 

We want you to know 

That it is our aim and desire to give you just 
the right merchandise at the right price. We 
will always strive to please you. When in 
Durham look our merchandise over whether 
you want to buy or not. 

STRAUSS-ROSENBERG'S 

FASHION SHOP FOR WOMEN 
DURHAM, N. C. 



— John Tillett is engaged in cotton manufacturing at Thoin 
asville as secretary and treasurer of the Jewel Cotton Mills. 
— C. P. Tyson is assistant secretary of the Tyson and Jones 
Buggy Co., Carthage. He was in service in the ordnance de 
partnient of the Army. 

— F. J. Duls, for three years a member of the baseball var- 
sity, is with the J. A. Taylor Co., wholesale grocers, of Wil- 
mington. 

— .E. G. Watkins is general manager of the Watkins depart- 
ment store, of Henderson. 

— Wm. T. Joyner, who held the rank of major with the A. 
B. P., 113th Field Artillery, has resumed t' e practice of law 
in the firm of Burgess and Joyner, Raleigh. 
— J. H. Blount is a member of the mercantile firm of Blount 
& Son, of Bethel. 

— Capt. Willie Wilson, of tie U. S. Army, is on furlough at 
his home in Greenville. 

— The Coker Cotton Sales Co. has been granted a charter by 
the Secretary of State, the incorporators being C. W. Gunter, 
'11, of Gastonia; W. H. Sary, '10. and A. L. M Wiggins, 
'1.'!, of Hartsville, S. C. ; and others. 



1912 



J. 



C. LOCKHART, Secretary, Raleigh, N. C. 
— John G. Nichols has resigned the position of State hank 
examiner which position he filled very acceptably and has be- 
come vice-president of the American Trust Co., Charlotte's 
largest banking institution. 

— J. D. Phillips is now engaged in the cotton mill business 
in Laurinburg. He saw service overseas. His rank was that 
of major and he was disbursing officer of the 81st division. 
— Jas. H. Rand holds the position of clerk in the office of the 
Wake County Register of Deeds, at Raleigh. 
— D. L. Turnage is secretary of the Greenville Oil and Ferti- 
lizer Co., at Greenville. He is also engaged in farming at 
Farmville. 

— W. W. Rankin, Jr., M.A. 1912, Assistant Professor of Mathe- 
matics in the University, has a year's leave of absence and is 
spending the time in taking special graduate work in mathe- 
matics at Columbia University. He holds a teaching fellow- 
ship at Columbia. 

— I. E. Carpenter, who was in the service for the past two 
years, with the rank of lieutenant, F. A., has resumed the 
practice of law in Maxton. 

— P. H. Gwynn, Jr.. superintendent of the Reidsville schools, 
was on the ''Hill'' for a brief stay in September in atten- 
dance upon the State ami County Council. 

— Claude Teague is now superintendent of the Sanford city 
schools. 

— C. K. Burgess has resumed the practice of law in Raleigh, 
having served with the A. E. F. as a member of the 113th 
Field Artillery, with the rank of first lieutenant. He is a 
member of the law firm of Burgess and Joyner. This firm's 
offices are in the Commercial National Bank Bhlg. 
— J. C. Lanier, Jr., is president of the Greenville Publishing 
Co., publishers of The Daily News. 

— Major Graham K. H.bbs, who was recommended for the 
D. S. C. and D. C. M. for valorous service overseas, has re- 
turned to his home in Clinton, where he is farming. 
— Dr. C. C. Henderson, Med. '12, is a physician of Mount Olive. 
— John C. Loekhart has been superintendent of the Wake 
county schools since last November. 
— W. Ransom Saunders, of Smithfield, manager of the Saun- 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



25 



(lers Garage, has been appointed chief marshal for the ap- 
proaching State Fair. 

— Dr. J. W. Wilkins is practicing medicine in Mount Olive. 
To show that he is doing A-l work, lie is responsible for the 
statement that not a single coffin has been sold in Mount 
Olive since the first of the year. 

1913 
A. L. M. WIGGINS, Secretary, Hartsville, S. C. 
— Dr. E. M. Coulter, formerly of the chair of American History 
and Political Science in Marietta College, Marietta, Ohio, is 
now in the faculty of the University of Georgia at Athens. 
During the past summer he was professor of American History 
in the University of Colorado at Boulder. Dr. Coulter re- 
tains his old-time enthusiastic ' ' pep ' ' for the class of 1913 
and Carolina. 

— Geo. L. Carrington lias been awarded a senior scholarship at 
the Johns Hopkins Medical School. 

— Robert O. Huffman is engaged in the hosiery manufacturing 
business at Drexel where he is a member of the firm of the 
Drexel Knitting Company. He is also interested in a hosiery 
manufacturing enterprise at Marion. 

— Geo. K. Freeman, of Goldsboro, held in service the highest 
rank held by any member of the class of 1913, that of lieuten- 
ant colonel. He was in service witli the infantry of the 30th 
Division. 

— Dr. W. S. Tillett held in service the rank of captain in the 
medical corps. He is now connected with the Johns Hopkins 
Hospital, Baltimore. 

— E. V. Kyser, native of Rocky Mount, now general superin- 
tendent of the Cincinnati Soap Works, has made a discovery 
which bids fair to revolutionize the soap-making industry. 
His discovery makes it possible for soap to be made at a sav- 
ing of 3 to 4 cents a pound. Mr. Kyser in August read 
papers before the scientific section of the American Pharma- 
ceutical Association at the meeting of this association in New 
York. 

— George Carmichael is cashier of the Page Trust Co. of Aber- 
deen. He was in service with the marine corps. 
— Rev. Theodore Partrick, Jr., rector of St. Phillips Chureh, 
Southport, is taking a course of study at the Episcopal Theo- 
logical Seminary, Fairfax county, Va. 

1914 

OSCAR LEACH, Secretary, Raeford, N. C. 

— M. R. Dunnagan, formerly city editor of the Winston-Salem 

Journal, has assumed his new duties as city editor of the 

Charlotte Daily Observer. 

— Wm. P. Whitaker, after serving as captain in the 113th Field 
Artillery, returned to his home town, Wilson, where he is 
again engaged in the practice of law. 

— Lucius H. Ranson holds the superintendency of public wel- 
fare for Mecklenburg county. He is located at Charlotte. 
He attended the State and County Council held at Chapel Hill 
in September. 

— Dr. H. S. Willis is with the Johns Hopkins Hospital, Bal- 
timore. . 
— J. Robert Prevatt is in the insurance business in Lumberton. 
— J. M. Peace is associated with the Southern Realty and 
Trust Co., of Henderson. 

— H. R. Kyser, Law '14, is engaged in the practice of law at 
Thomasville. Mr. Kyser is a native of Rocky Mount. 
— The marriage of Miss Marjory Dicklioff Evans and Mr. Wil- 
liam Nelson Pritchard, Jr., occurred July oth in Wilmington, 
Delaware. 




Hart SchafTner 

&?Marx 



AND 



Society Brand 
Clothes 



We feature these 
lines because they 
are known to be 
the best. & J- J- 



ftortcta Brrai dlmhrt 



Pritchard, Bright 

Durham, North Carolina 



Co. 



ELUS, STONE & COMPANY 

DURHAM, N. C. 

The best class of merchandise at very mod- 
erate prices. 

It is always a pleasure to see our Chapel 
Hill friends in the city, and have them visit 
our store. The Fall and Winter stocks of 
goods are now complete. It will be to your 
interest to look carefully through the line of 
New Suits, Coats and Wraps. 

New Dresses of Silks, soft Satins, and fine 
Silk Crepes; shown in the latest models. 

All kind of cotton piece goods. Wool and 
Silk Dress Fabrics, Hosiery and Kid Gloves ; 
Gossard Front-Lacing Corsets. 



26 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



Financial 
Independence 

Systematic saving and wise in- 
vestment lead to financial inde- 
pendence. 

To be able to save, you must 
know the value of saving— the 
limitless possibilities of using to 
advantage the money you accumu- 
late. 

We can point out to you these 
possibilities. 

We can give you information 
about and assist you in the wise 
selection of sound investments. 

Phil Woollcott. 



Bond Department 

American Trust Company 

Charlotte, N. C. 



1915 
DANIEL L. BELL, Secretary, Pittsboro, N. C. 
— The marriage of Miss Florence Estelle Fenner and Mr. 
Howard Clarence Conrad occurred October 6th at the Metho- 
dist Episcopal Church of Halifax. They are at home in Win- 
ston-Salem where Mr. Conrad is connected with the Hanes 
Rubber Co. 

— W. Raymond Taylor, of Louisburg, has received promotion 
to the rank of full professor of English at the Alabama Poly- 
technic Institute, Auburn, Ala. 

1916 
HUGH B. HESTER, Capt. and Adj. 12th F. A., Camp 
Travis, Texas 
— The class of 1916 has received, through the medium of The 
Alumni Review this announcement : Mr. and Mrs. Richard 
Davidson Moxley announce the marriage tjf their daughter, 
Marjory Louise, to Francis Foster Bradshaw, Lieut. F. A., 
U. S. A., on August 20, 1919, Louisville, Ky. At home 1332 
South Brook. 

— Chas E. Lambeth, joint manager with his brother, Walter 
Lambeth, '12, of the insurance department of the American 
Trust Co., Charlotte, is now traveling through Europe as a 
member of an industrial and commercial commission repre- 
senting the Southern Commercial Congress. 

1917 
H. G. BAITY, Secretary, Harmony, N. C. 
— Clyde N. Sloan is connected with the power piping de- 
partment of the General Fire Extinguisher Co., Charlotte. 
— E. S. Booth is connected with the Erwin Cotton Mills at 
Duke. 

— John M. Peirce, of Warsaw, is connected with the Acme 
Mfg. Co., fertilizer manufacturers, Wilmington. He was in 
service as first lieutenant of Field Artillery. 
— John W. Perdew is with J. W. Murchison & Co., large hard- 
ware dealers, of Wilmington. A son, William Edgar, was born 
to Mr. and Mrs. Perdew on May 29, 1919. 

1918 

W. R. WUNSCH, Secretary, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
— J. Minor Gwynn is principal of the Leaksville high school. 
He has developed considerable interest in athletics in this high 
school. 

— R. W. Madry, after serving the past year as director of the 
University's new service and as news editor of The Review 
has entered the school of journalism of Columbia University. 
— D. B. Kimball, Jr. is engaged in the automobile sales busi- 
ness at Henderson. 

— Ernest R. Warren is engaged in the practice of law at 
Gastonia, with offices in the Realty Bldg. 
— R. E. Price, editor of the Rutherfordton Sun, was appointed 
recently superintendent of public welfare of Rutherford 
county. He is chairman of the fair price committee for the 
county. 

. 1919 

H. G. WEST, Secretary, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
— The engagement of Miss Lucy Hanes and Mr. Thurmond 
Chatham, both of Winston-Salem, has been announced. The 
wedding is to take place this fall. 

— Luther Hodges, president of the class of 1919 during its 
senior year, is now private secretary to the general manager 
of the Marshal Field textile interests at Spray. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



27 



The Bank o/Chapel Hill 

Oldest and strongest bank in Orange County. 



Capital $25,000.00 

Surplus and Profits 37,00.00 



We earnestly solicit your banking 
business, promising you every service 
and assistance consistent with safe 
banking. ' ' It pleases us to please 
you. ' ' 



M. C. S. NOBLE President 

R. L. STROWD Vice-President 

M. E. HOGAN Cashier 




Snappy Clothes 

for the 
College Man 

Society and 
Stein Bloch Clothes 

for the young 

and those 
who stay young 



Vanstory Clothing Co. 

C. H. McKNIGHT, 'President and Manager 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



LIGGETT & MYERS 
TOBACCO CO. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 

FATIMA, CHESTERFIELD, AND 

PIEDMONT CIGARETTES 

VELVET AND DUKES MIXTURE 

SMOKING TOBACCO AND 

other well known brands of Smok- 
ing Tobacco, Cigarettes, and 
Chewing Tobaccos. 



Our brands are standard for qualify. 
They speak for themselves. 



Stocks and Bonds 

Non-Taxable In North Carolina 
Subject Sale, We Offer 



$5,000 North Carolina Railroad Stock 7 
per cent guaranteed. 

$20,000 North Carolina State 4 per cent 
Bonds, due 1933. 

$30,000 North Carolina State 4 per cent 
Bonds, due 1949-53. 

$100,000 High Grade 7 per cent preferred 
Stocks in strong local corporation. 

F. C. Abbott & Company 

Charlotte, N. C. 

Investments 



Local Telephone 238 



Long Distance 9957 



28 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



Dick 's Laundry Co. 

Greensboro, N. C. 



High-Class Launderers, French 
Cleaners and Dyers 

Prompt and Efficient Service 



is our motto 



Our reputation gained through years 
of experience speaks for itself. 

Send yours by Parcel Post 
We appreciate your patronage 



C. S. Pendergraft 

Chapel Hill Agent 



Drink 



Coca-Cola 



Delicious and Refreshing 



Quality tells the difference in the taste be- 
tween Coca-Cola and counterfeits. 

Demand the genuine by full name — nick- 
names encourage substitution. 

Get a bottle of the genuine from your 
grocer, fruit stand, or cafe. 



Durham Coca-Cola Bottling Co. 

DURHAM, N. C. 



II l± 



King's Business College 

RALEIGH AND CHARLOTTE 

North Carolina's Leading Business 
Colleges 



\A/oi-|f-AfJ Boxwood Sprays cut not to exceed fifteen 
inches long. Cash before shipment. 



long. 
A. B. PRICE 



925 Vireima Ave., S. W. 



Washington, D. C. 



Yackety Yacks, 19 16-' 17 

The Year Carolina beat Virginia in all meets. Handsome leather- 
bound volume. The last available. Price $2. 

G. D. CRAWFORD. Chapel Hill, N. C. 



RIDE WITH 

C. S. Pendergraft 

Pioneer Auto Man 

LEAVE ORDERS AT 

MABRY'S DRUG STORE 

HEADQUARTERS IN DURHAM 

THE BEST PLACE TO GET SOFT DRINKS, CIGARS 
AND CIGARETTES 

HEADQUARTERS IN CHAPEL HILL. NEXT TO 
BANK OF CHAPEL HILL 

Leave Chapel Hill 8.30 and 10.20 a. m. 

Leave Chapel Hill 2.30 and 4.00 p. m. 

Leave Durham 9.50 a. m., 12.40 p. m. 

Leave Durham 5.08 p. m., 8.00 p. m. 

OTHER TRIPS SUBJECT TO ORDER 



Four Machines at Your Service 
Day or Night 

PHONE 58 or 23 

Agent for 

Dick's Laundry, Greensboro, N. C. 



~~533iy 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



29 



M a rkham- Rogers Co. 

Clothiers, Tailors, Furnishers and Hatters. 

All the New Fall Styles at Reasonable 
Prices 

DURHAM, N. C. 



Special Agents for Nettleton and Hurley 

Shoes for Men, and Cousins and Grover 

Shoes for Women 

MAKE OUR STORE HEADQUARTERS 
WHILE IN DURHAM, N. C. 



Academy of Music 

DURHAM, N. C. 

Durham's Exclusive Theatre Playing All Leading 
Attractions 

WM. F. FREELAND, Manager 



Snider- JFletcfyex (To. 



WATCHES, DIAMONDS, AND 
JEWELRY 



110 W. MAIN ST. 



DURHAM, N. C. 



"Durham business School 



FULLY ACCREDITED 



GEN. J. S. CARR 
DR. J. M. MANNING 
R. L. FLOWERS 



!&oaro of divisors 

W. G. BRAMHAM 
W. J. BROGDEN 
GEO. W. WATTS 



For full particulars and handsome catalog, address 

MRS. WALTER LEE LEDNUM 

PRESIDENT 



sunidl Tlhie&ibrc 



DURHAM, N. C. 

HIGH CLASS PICTURES AND SPECIAL MUSIC 

YOU ARE ALWAYS WELCOME 

Open from 11:00 A. M. Until 11:00 P. M. 



THE CAROLINA MAN'S SHOE STORE 

Carr-Bryant 

High Grade Shoes with Snap and Style 



Carr-Bryant {F$oot & Shoe Co. 



106 West Main Street 



DURHAM, N. C. 



HICKS -CRABTREE CO. 

FOUR MODERN DRUG STORES 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 

Eastman Kodaks and Supplies 
Nunnally's Candies 

The place to meet your friends when 
in the Capital City 

GILBERT CRABTREE, Manager 



30 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



Odell Hardware Co. 

Greensboro, N. C. 

China, Cut Glass and Silverware 
Household Goods 

DEPENDABLE GOODS 

PROMPT SERVICE 

SATISFACTORY PRICES 



Guilford Hotel and Cafe 

NEWLY REMODELED 
RATES REASONABLE 
CENTRAL LOCATION 

Greensboro, North Carolina 



Cross and Linehan Co. 

Leaders in Clothing and Gents' 
Furnishings 

Raleigh, North Carolina 



(Loop er MZoRument 
(Lompan? 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Communicate with us regarding your 

needs for monuments or 

tombstones 



"EL-REES-SO" 

7c— 3 for 20c 

Mild, Fragrant, Delightful— Try One 

"JOHNT. REES" 

10c 

A Cigar of quality, smooth, mellow, soothing. Gives 
a restful finish to a perfect day 

EL-REES-SO CIGAR CO. 

Manufacturers of the Famous EL-REES-SO Cigar 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Clothes Made bi( Makers who 
%hqw fcr Men who %now 

and 5old bii 

6need=Markham=iJaiilor %g. 

S)urham, Jicrth Carolina 



10 tfls 

W. H. LAWRENCE AND T. H. LAWRENCE 
ASSOCIATED 



(Contractor and \Jjuila / er 

MAIN OFFICE: DURHAM, N. C. 



CONTRACTOR PHILLIPS HALL 
UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 



Broadway Cafe 

WE CORDIALLY INVITE YOU TO VISIT OUR 
CAFE WHEN YOU ARE IN GREENSBORO 

EXCELLENT SERVICE 

COURTEOUS TREATMENT 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



31 



A. E. LLOYD HARDWARE CO. 

DURHAM, N. C. 

All Kinds of Hardware, Sporting 

Goods and College Boys' 

Accessories 

GEO. W. TANDY, MANAGER 



if he *Jvoyal i^afe 

C/niversity students, faculty mem hers, and 
alumni visit the ^/coyal (jafe white in 
^Durham. Linden new ana* pro- 
gressive management. 
Special parlors 
for ladies 



9)urh 



urnani s 



■~ALoc/er/i Cafe 



Keep Physically Fit 



The young men of U. N. C. are wise enough 
to know that athletic exercise promotes sound 
health. Get in some game early. 

We can supply you with every essential in 
equipment for Football, Soccer, Basket Ball, 
Hockey, Skating, etc. 



Write for catalogue No. UC. 

ALEX TAYLOR & CO., Inc. 

Athletic Outfitters 
26 E. 42nd St., New York 




Hennessee 


Cafe 


A MODERN, UP-TO-DATE CAFE, WHERE YOU 


AND YOUR FRIENDS ARE 


WELCOME 


CLEANLINESS AND SERVICE 


OUR MOTTOES 




GREENSBORO, N. 


C. 
'1 



BAGLEY & ALDERMAN, Advertising 

LETTERWRITING, MULTIGRAPHING, PRINT- 
ING, ADVERTISING SIGNS, AND 
SPECIALTIES 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



C. C. HOOK, Architect 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 

TWENTY YEARS EXPERIENCE IN PLANNING 
SCHOOL AND COLLEGE BUILDINGS 



A. .A. TKluthr <Zo.,3no. 

Extend a cordial invitation to all students and 
alumni of the U. N. C. to make their store head- 
quarters during their stay in Chapel Hill. 

Complete Stock of 
New and Second-hand Books, Stationery, and 
Complete Line of Shoes and Haberdashery 
Made by the Leaders of Fashion, Al- 
ways on Hand 



When in Need 

of a Pocket Knife, Razor, Hone, Strop, Brush, 
Safety Razor, Blades, or tools of any kind, 
Paints, Varnishes, Brushes, Electrical Goods, 
and General Hardware, call on the 

Chapel Hill Hardware Co. 

THE STORE WHERE "QUALITY" COUNTS 



THE RESULT OF 28 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE 

LANG'S "ROGER C." CIGAR; TWO 

BRANDS: 7c and 10c 

A COMPARISON IS ALL I ASK 

ROGER C. LANG 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



32 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



R. BLACKNALL & SON 

DRUGGISTS 

NORRIS AND HUVLERS CANDIES 
G. BERNARD. Managfr 

Corcoran Street Durham, N. C. 



E. E. Bragg & Co. 

WALKOVER AND FLORSHEIM SHOES 
DURHAM, N. C. 



Model Laundry Co. 

DURHAM, N. C. 
EXPERT LAUNDRY SERVICE 



DURHAM ICE CREAM CO. 

Fancy Ices; Makers of Blue Ribbon Brand Ice Cream 
Receptions and Banquets a Specialty 

TELEPHONE No. 1199 



"SAY IT WITH FLOWERS" 
J. J. FALLON, Leading Florist 



Chapel Hill Agents: 

FOISTER'S ART STORE 

R. P. ANDREWS. People'. Bank 



Phone 1290 

214 E. Main Street 

DURHAM. N. C. 



PJg "TTTUI 



IfliJ 



;ati 



DURHAM, N. C. 

ARTCRAFT-PARAMOUNT PICTURES 

Orchestra Orchestra 



BROADWAY THEATRE 

DURHAM, N. C. 

THE HOUSE OF SPECIAL PHOTO-PLAY 

ATTRACTIONS 



w. 


M. 


NEWTON 


COMPANY 






DURHAM, 


N. C. 






DE LUXE CLOTHIERS 


t 


TOO 


YOUNG FOR 


OLD IDEAS" 



POLLARD BROTHERS 

DURHAM, N. C. 

STANDARD LINES OF HARDWARE 

AND SPORTING GOODS 



DURHAM CAFE 



VISIT US WHILE IN DURHAM 



Dwll&sunfii Slk@@ C® 

LEATHER GOODS CHEAPER 
DURHAM, N. C. 



FLOWERS FOR ALL OCCASIONS 

Durham Floral Nursery 

CHAPEL HILL AGENTS: EUBANKS DRUG CO. 



PRIDGEN & JONES CO. 

We Carry the Best Shoes: Edwin Clapp, Howard and 

Foster, and Heywood's 

Expert Fitters — A Cordial Welcome Awaits You 

107 W. Main St. DURHAM, N. C. 



C. W. KENDALL 

LADIES' WEAR STORE 
VISIT US WHILE IN DURHAM 



THE SELWYN 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 

Fireproof, Modern and Luxurious 

IN THE HEART OF EVERYTHING 

H. C. LARZALERE, Manager 



WELCOME 


TO 


STONEWALL HOTEL 


W. E. HOCKETT 


Manager 


CHARLOTTE, 


N. C. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



33 



Z5I)£ KrUvexsit? Jpress 

ZEB P. COUNCIL. Manager CHAPEL HILL. N. C. 

PRINTING, ENGRAVED CARDS 

QUALITY AND SERVICE 



PATTERSON BROS. 

DRUGGISTS 



AGENCY MORRIS CANDY 



THE REXALL STORE 






K 



ODAK SUPPLIE O 

Finishing for the Amateur. Foister ^^ 



GOOCH'S CAFE 

Anything to Eat 
CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 



CHAPEL HILL 
N. C. 



ANDREWS CASH STORE CO. 

Students and Faculty will find us ready to serve 
them with the latest styles in Walkover Shoes, 
Fancy Shirts, Tailored Suits, and general furn- 
ishings. Be convinced. Call and see. 



FOR NEAT JOB PRINTING AND TYPEWRITER 
PAPER CALL AT THE OFFICE OF 

The Chapel Hill News 



W. B. SORRELL 

JEWELER AND OPTOMETRIST 
CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 





(bssie ^Orc 


thers 






CALIFORNIA AND FLORIDA FRUITS 




TOBACCO AND 


CIGARS 




ICE 


CREAM PARLOR 


FRESH 


CANDIES 




"WE STRIVE TO 


PLEASE" 





Eubanks Drug Co. 

Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Agents for Nunnally's Candy 



HOUSEHOLD SUPPLY CO. 

CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 

We are prepared to save you money on your house- 
hold supplies. Let us know your needs. 



PICKARD'S HOTEL 

Headquarters for Carolina Alumni 

Returning to the Hill 

SPECIAL RATES. STUDENT BOARDERS. 



TEUctric Sfyoe Sl)op 

EXPERT SHOE REPAIRING 
CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 



Huffine Hotel 

Quick Lunch Counter and Dining Room — Clean 

Rooms $1.00 and Up 

NEAR DEPOT: GREENSBORO, N. C. 



WHITING-HORTON CO. 

THIRTY-ONE YEARS 
RALEIGH'S LEADING CLOTHIERS 



H. S. STORR & CO. 

Office Furniture, Machines and Supplies; Printers and 
Manufacturers of Rubber Stamps 
RALEIGH, N. C. 



DnMbmi Supply C@ 

MACHINERY, MILL SUPPLIES 
PHONE 753 RALEIGH, N. C. 



34 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



Five Points Auto Go. 


AUTOMOBILES 


Repairs, and Accessories 


Agents for 


Buick and Dodge Cars 


DURHAM, N. C. 

1 'i 



mBBnnfflEH 



High- Grade Furniture 

of Every Description at Reasonable 

Prices 

On Easy Terms 



CHRISTIAN & HARWARD 

CORCORAN STREET 
OPPOSITE THE POSTOFFICE 



The Seeman Printery 

Durham, N. C. 
Printing - Engraving - Bookbinding 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



35 




The "Constitution "of To-day — Electrically Propelled 



THE U. S. S. "New Mexico," the first 
battleship of any nation to be electri- 
cally propelled, is one of the most important 
achievements of the scientific age. She not 
only develops the maximum power and, 
with electrical control, has greater flexi- 
bility of maneuver, which is 
a distinct naval advantage, 
but also gives greater econ- 
omy. At 10 knots, her 
normal cruising speed, she 
will steam on less fuel than 
the best turbine-driven ship 
that preceded her. 



Figures that tell the 
Story of Achievement 



The electric generating 
plant, totaling 28,000 horse- 
power, and the propulsion 
equipment of the great super-dreadnaught 
were built by the General Electric Company. 
Their operation has demonstrated the superi- 
ority of electric propulsion over old-time 
methods and a wider application of this 
principle in the merchant marine is fast 
making progress. 



Length— 624 feet 
Width— 97 feet 
Displacement— 32,000 tons 
Fuel capacity — a million 

gallons (fuel oil) 
Power— 28,000 electrical 

horsepower 
Speed— 21 knots 



Six auxiliary General Electric Turbine-Gen- 
erators of 400 horsepower each, supply 
power for nearly 500 motors, driving pumps, 
fans, shop machinery, and kitchen and laun- 
dry appliances, etc. 

Utilizing electricity to propel ships at sea 
marks the advancement of 
another phase of the elec- 
trical industry in which the 
General Electric Company 
is the pioneer. Of equal 
importance has been its 
part in perfecting electric 
transportation on land, 
transforming the potential 
energy of waterfalls for use 
in electric motors, develop- 
ing the possibilities of electric lighting and 
many other similar achievements. 

As a result, so general are the applications 
of electricity to the needs of mankind that 
scarcely a home or individual today need 
be without the benefits of General Electric 
products and service. 



An illustrated booklet describing the "New Mexico," entitled. 

The Electric Ship," will be sent upon request. Address 

General Electric Company: Desk 44, Schenectady, New York. 




General Office 
Schenectady; N.Y. 




Sales Offices in 
all large cities 



36 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



Daniel Webster's Decision 



THERE come only a few great crises 
in men's lives. A few great decisions, 
and the course of a life — for better 
or worse, for large things or for small — is 
determined forever. 

Such a crisis came early to Webster. 

He had struggled up out of the hard con- 
ditions of the farm and was reading law in 
the office of Christopher Gore in Boston. 

* * * 

One day there came a letter that seemed 
like a great ray of sunlight. His father wrote 
him that the clerk of the Court of Common 
Pleas, back in the home state had died. 
iThe Chief Justice had decided to offer the 
place to Webster. 

It carried a salary of $1500 a year. 

In great elation he went to Mr. Gore 
with the letter. And Christopher Gore, 
wise and successful man of the world, dash- 
ed his enthusiasm with a single question: 

"You don't mean to accept it surely?" 
he asked. 

The wise few who sacrifice 
the present for the future. 

IN straightforward, kindly fashion he 
pointed out the truth to young Webster 
— that the few wise men who make larg 
successes in the world must learn to sacr 
fice the present for the future. 

The fifteen hundred dollars looked large 
to the young man, but the place that went 
with it led nowhere. 

And Daniel Webster had the wisdom to 
pass it by, and to make the struggle for 
larger training that leads to a really worth- 
while success. 

Comparatively few men in any genera- 
tion have that wisdom ; it is the business of 
the Alexander Hamilton Institute to dis- 
cover those men and to put at their com- 
mand the training that opens the way to 
commanding positions in business. 

95,000 men enrolled 

ITHIN the past ten years more than 
95,000 men have enrolled with the 



w 



Alexander Hamilton Institute ; a very large 
proportion of them are college graduates. 

They were men who realized that train- 
ing is the key to large things, and who 
were willing to invest a little in money 
and time for the sake of their future. 

They have been attracted to the Insti- 
tute by the fact that it has only one Course ; 
for ten years it has specialized in just one 
thing— training men for executive respon- 
sibility and success. To the man who knows 
one branch of business it gives the under- 
lying principles of all business ; to the man 
who has special training in one depart- 
ment it provides a grasp of the other de- 
partments. 

These 95,000 men are the living adver- 
tisement of the Institute ; the evidence that 
its Course is worth the investigation of any 
man who covets large rather than medio- 
cre success. 

Send for "Forging Ahead in 
Business" 

If you are a college man in your twenties or 
thirties or forties, who realizes that the larger prizes 
in business go to those who prepare themselves to 
grasp them, the Alexander Hamilton Institute is for 
you; you will find an appeal in its practical character, 
and in its fine application of scholarship to business. 
If you are an older man, to whom young men turn 
for advice, you owe it to them to familiarize your- 
self with an Institution that has helped 95,000 men 
to larger success. A I I 2-page book has been pub- 
lished to tell the story of the Institute. It is full of 
interest, and it is free. It is called "Forging Ahead 
in Business." Send for your copy today. 

ALEXANDER HAMILTON INSTITUTE 

197 Astor Place New York City 

Send me "Forging Ahead in Business" 1 
FREE. 

Name 

Print here 

Business 

Address _ 

Business 

Position 




THE ALUMNI REVIEW 87 

"Stimulating and Refreshing in the Extreme" 

THREE REMARKABLE BOOKS 

By George Frederick Gundelfinger, Ph.D. 
''A Pessimistic Carlyle-in-Miniature" 

THE ICE LENS (Drama). $1.25 Postpaid 

TEN YEARS AT YALE (Essays). $1.10 Postpaid 

THE NEW FRATERNITY (Fiction). $1.50 Postpaid 

We are bringing Mr. Gundelfinger's books to the attention of the readers of this particular periodical 
because we have not only been assured in advance that the "advertiser's message will be read," but have 
also been told that it will be read by "leaders in thought and action." 

Mr. Gundelringer's books are not being read by those "loyal" and popular Yale graduates who attend 
reunions regularly in order to indulge repeatedly in the degrading dissipations of their college days and 
who occasionally deposit a check in the Alumni Fund and then feel that they have done their bit for their 
Alma Mater, — But they have been read by several hundred "disloyal" alumni who are doing their utmost 
for the salvation, betterment and progress of Yale even though this involve the sacrifice of certain stagnant 
traditions which give the place that mellowness which precedes decay and in which the average graduate 
takes that pride which goeth before a fall. 

For a college or a university may encourage among its graduates a "loyalty" which is just as showy 
and unrighteous as was the "patriotism" of the German Empire. But an Alma Mater, like a Fatherland, 
may also have given birth to some sons whose thoughts are in advance of those of their easy-going brothers 
— sons who foresee impending calamities — sons who have salutary dreams, but who lack the courage 
which would bring them to pass — sons who are unconsciously awaiting the shocks that will arouse them 
into doing and daring. 

Mr. Gundelringer's books were the shocks that aroused Yale. "The most sensational and amazing 
arraignment of Yale or any other university ever published." The fact that the Yale Alumni Weekly de- 
clined to advertise, review or even refer to these books did not intercept the transmission of these shocks 
to Yale's "leaders in thought" who, after reading them, were immediately transformed into "leaders in 
action." This trilogy has worked and is working regenerative revolutions at the university; they have 
been the stimulus behind and the prophecy before the Great Post-Bellum Reconstruction recently voted 
by the Yale Corporation. 

However, these books were not written for Yale men only ; they were written because Mr. Gundel- 
finger went to college — not because he went to Yale. Despite the "distinguishing characteristics" claimed 
by various educational institutions, all colleges and universities are alike in that they have the same faults 
irrespective of their peculiar virtues. Mr. Gundelfinger has concentrated on DEFECTS in the modern aca- 
demic world, and it is for this reason that his books should be and will be read by "leaders in thought" at 
ALL places of higher learning in America. There is, to be sure, nothing new about his subject-matter ; 
it is his unique style which makes his books "conspicuous for their absence in the threadbare literature of 
education." Whether he uses the drama, the essay or the novel as medium he not only courageously opens 
the shutters on those deplorable conditions which all thinking alumni have observed and pondered over, but 
he focuses the light in such a way that it cannot fail to inflame dormant thinkers EVERYWHERE and im- 
pregnate them with the activities of reform and reconstruction. 

Lack of space prevents us from reprinting here all the unsolicited endorsements, positive and negative, 
which have been received from college presidents, officers, professors, alumni, undergraduates, editors, and 
book-reviewers all over the United States, — but we will gladly mail copies on request. 

THE NEW FRATERNITY 

Literature and Music 

Sewickley, Pennsylvania 

{Exclusive Publishers of Mr. Gundelfinger' s Works') 



38 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



The Corley Company 

Latest Dance Music on Victor Records 

These snappy dance records are ready whenever you are — Just put them on. 

Victor Double-face Record No. 18603 
"I'm Forever Blowing Bubbles" (Waltz). Played by Selvin Novelty Orchestra. 
"Yearning" (Medley Pox Trot). Played by Joseph C. Smith Orchestra. 

Victor Double-face Record No. 18602 
"Ev'rybody Shimmies Now" (Medley Pox Trot). 
' ' My Cairo Love ' ' ( Fox Trot ) . 

Both played by All Star Trio. 

Victor Double-face Record No. 18601 

"Coo Coo" (Pox Trot). 
"Who Did It?" (One Step). 

Both played by Joseph C. Smith's Orchestra. 

Stop in, let us play for you these and the latest popular songs from among the New 
Victor Records for October. 

The Corley Company, Inc. 

Durham, N. C. 




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The University of North Carolina 

1789 CHAPEL HILL 1919 



"Educationally the decade that follows the war will be, I believe, the 
richest and most fruitful in the nation's history." 

THESE PROPHETIC WORDS, written by the late Edward Kidder Graham while America was still at war, 
relate to today— the college year 1919-1920— to this very moment when North Carolina stands confronted 
with the problem of building its civilization upon sound, permanent foundations and when the South and 
the Nation, with newly opened channels of intercourse with the world at large, are planning for the complete 
fulfilment of their high mission among the nations. 

THIS FRUITFUL DECADE, JUST AT THE QUADRENNIUM of the war now ended, calls insistently for the 
TRAINED LEADER. 

THROUGH ITS NEWLY ESTABLISHED SCHOOL OF COMMERCE, its School of Engineering, and other 
schools and departments, the University offers the thoroughgoing, complete training for the sort of leadership 
which the new- day requires. 

COURSES ARE OFFERED IN BUSINESS ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT, Accounting, Foreign 
Trade Banking, Transportation, Political Economy, Business Law, Electrical Engineering, Chemical En- 
gineering Highway Engineering, Soil Investigation, Law, Medicine, Pharmacy, Journalism, Social Science, 
Government, Education, Music, and all subjects embraced in the College of Liberal Arts, the School of Ap- 
plied Science, the Graduate School, and the Summer School. 

Instruction through correspondence courses on a wide choice of subjects may be secured at low cost through the 
Bureau of Extension. 

ADDRESS THE PRESIDENT 

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

CHAPEL HILL 



Culture 



Scholarship 



Service 



Self-Support 



= THE 



!ftortl) (Tarolina (Lollege for domett 

Offers to Women a Liberal Education, Equipment for Womanly 
Service, Professional Training for Remunerative Employment 



The College offers four groups of studies lead- 
ing to the following degrees: Bachelor of Arts, 
Bachelor of Science, and Bachelor of Music. 

Special courses in Pedagogy; in Manual Arts; in 
Domestic Science. Household Art and Economics; in 
Music; and in the Commercial Branches. 

Teachers and graduates of other colleges provided 
for in both regular and special courses. 

Fall c Uerm Opens in September 



Equipment modern, including furnished dormitories, 
library, laboratories, literary society halls, gymnas- 
ium, music rooms, teachers ' training school, infirm- 
ary, model laundry, central heating plant, and open 
air recreation grounds. 

Dormitories furnished by the State. Board at 
actual cost. Tuition free to those who pledge them- 
selves to become teachers. 



Summer ^Uerm Begins in June 



For catalogue and other information, address 

JULIUS I. FOUST, President, GREENSBORO, N. C. 



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