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THE ROY ALL & BO RDEN CO. 

Corner West Main and Market Streets DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA 

Sell all kinds of furniture and furnishings for churches, 
colleges and homes. Biggest stock of Rugs in the 
State, and at cheapest prices, tfllf you don't know us 
ask the College Proctor or the editor of the "Review." 
Call on or write for whatever you may need in our line. 



THE ROYALL & BORDEN CO. 



The State's Leading Bank and Trust Co. 

places its proven facilities at your disposal. Accounts of individuals, firms and corporations so- 
licited on favorable terms. We are in position to extend credit to North Carolina business in- 
terests in addition to the credit received at local banks. 

Our deposits on June 15, 1918, were $13,296,166.68. and on August 15, 1919. they were 
$21,177,844.19. Our resources are over $25,000,000.00. 

Constant growth is the proof of good service 

WACHOVIA BANK AND TRUST CO. 

Member Federal Reserve System 

WINSTON- SALEM „„,_. „.„,,„,, SALISBURY 

Acurwii i c- NORTH CAROLINA U iru D r,.K.T 

ASHEVILLE HIGH POINT 



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ALVMNIREVIEW 




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OPINION AND COMMENT 



Endowment Campaigns — Objective Presented — A 
National Concern — Where We Stand — Build- 
ings Needed— Is This Our Best?— The Way 
Out — University Day — The Right 
Spirit 

UNIVERSITY'S BIRTHDAY CELEBRATED 

The Celebration of the 126th Anniversay of the Lay- 
ing of the Cornerstone of the University Proves 
Most Inspiring Occasion 

ALUMNI MEETINGS HELD 

Alumni in North Carolina and Other States Hold 
Big Meetings in Celebration of University Day 

CAROLINA WINS FROM A. AND E. 

First Football Game Between the Two Institutions 
Since 1905 Goes to Carolina by Score of 13 to 12 



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PUBLISHED BY 

THE ALVMNI ASSOCIATION 






=*3 



Cy Thompson Says 



WRITE TO US OR COME TO THE OFFICE OF THE OLD 

NEW ENGLAND MUTUAL 

FOR EXPERT ADVICE ABOUT THE NEW 

GOVERNMENT INSURANCE POLICIES 

If you were not in the service or if you need additional insurance, ask about our low cost com- 
mercial contracts for protection to credit, home and business. 

In addition to many other superior benefits, our new "Perfection'' policies offer the most 
complete double indemnity and disability benefits. 

Before you contract to BUY OR SELL sec or write 'he old 

NEW ENGLAND MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO. 

CHARTERED 1835 BOSTON, MASS. 

CYRUS THOMPSON, Dist. Mgr. 
Patterson Building 

(OPPOSITE CAMPUS) 

Chapel Hill, N. C. 
"Perfection in Protection" 



The American Trust Company 

might be spoken of as the "Alumni Bank" — Word Wood, George Stephens, Paul Whitlock, 
the Lambeth boys — Walter and Charlie — John Huske, Phil Woollcott, Joe Hawthorne — all 
U. N. C. men. And we are coming some — over $10,000,000.00 total resources. The biggest bank 
in the biggest banking center in North Carolina. 

But what we started out to say is, that we act as Executor, Guardian, Trustee, and in any 
trust capacity. You could not put your property or money in safer hands. It's decidedly the 
best way. If you contemplate creating a trust for any purpose, take it up with us. 



Resources over $10,000,000.00 



AMERICAN TRUST COMPANY 



(THE SAFE EXECUTOR) 
CHARLOTTE, NORTH CAROLINA 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



Volume VIII 



NOVEMBER, 1919 



Number 2 



OPINION AND COMMENT 



The attention of the American public was strik- 
ingly caught in the first days of October by the nation- 
wide drive on the part of Harvard 
Endowment alumni for an increased endowment of 
Campaigns from $15,000,000 to $20,000,000. The 
press of the nation recorded the daily 
progress of the drive, and, as the campaign continued, 
analyzed the situation at Harvard which made neces- 
sary the spectacular appeal for assistance. 

"While Harvard was putting on this campaign, Yale 
was taking stock of the $18,000,000 legacy recently re- 
ceived plus $600,000 contributed in 1918-19 to the 
Yale Alumni Loyalty Fund ; Princeton was projecting 
a drive for $14,000,000 ; and Cornell, which received 
$1,500,000 during the summer for increasing her sci- 
entific laboratories, was announcing a campaign for 
$5,000,000. 

□ □□ 

In stating the purposes for which the income from 
the endowment will be used at Harvard, the Alumni 

Bulletin of October 2nd enumerates the 
Objective following : A fifty per cent salary in- 
Presented crease ($600,000 income from) $12,000,- 

000 ; A mobile fund to be kept unpledged 
to meet opportunities which arise for special work or 
the obtaining of exceptional teachers ($50,000 income 
from) $1,000,000; Salaries of physical instructors 
for physical education ($12,500 income from) 
$250,000; Dental School, salaries for teachers, eighty 
per cent of whom are now unpaid ($50,000 income 
from) $1,000,000; Addition to staff in industrial 
chemistry (50,000 income from) $1,000,000. In addi- 
tion to these amounts $1,000, 000 is wanted to match a 
similar amount offered by the General Educational 
Board for the founding of a Graduate School of Edu- 
cation, and new chemical laboratories are to be con- 
structed at a cost of $1,000,000. The Bullet in states 
that each of these needs is in its way fundamental 
to keep Harvard moving forward and to prevent her 
slipping back. 

In commenting on the drive at Ithaca, the Cornell 
Alumni News of September 25th makes clear the use 
to which its increased income will be put in the fol- 
lowing questions : ' ' Do Cornell alumni want a faculty 



composed of mediocre and obscure men, of no stand- 
ing in the academic world, engaged in the mere rou- 
tine of reading old lectures and making text-books to 
eke out their scanty salaries'? Or do the alumni want 
a group of virile, wide awake scholars and teachers, 
in every way abreast of their subjects, who are big 
enough, in addition to their efficient teaching, to keep 
Cornell in the front rank of scholarly productive uni- 
versities?" r— 1 i—| [— 1 

The Yale Alumni Weekly of October 10th elaborates 
the same idea in the following detailed analysis ap- 
pearing in its leading editorial and in- 
A National sists that the situation of better pay or 
Concern consequent deterioration in unversi y 

faculties is nothing short of a serious 
national concern : 

"The public statement regarding faculty salaries 
and the cost of living, issued early this week by the 
presidents of Harvard, Yale, and Princeton, brings 
squarely to the fore the real issue in American educa- 
tional life today. The wages of our instructing staffs 
are inadequate to the economic demands of the times. 
The only way to stem the tide away from teaching, 
which this condition is certain to result in, is 
promptly to appreciate the situation and raise faculty 
salaries to an amount that will be adequate. College 
professors, never overpaid as professional incomes go 
for the same class of men, today cannot live on their 
salaries. The universities now realize that this situa- 
tion must not be allowed to continue and are appealing 
to their own and the general public for means for 
relief. 

"A clear-cut diagnosis of the situation here brought 
out by our university presidents was given to the 
graduates at one of the commencement dinners by a 
speaker from the Senior class. He remarked on the 
fact that a class in the mid-nineties contributed at 
graduation about 20 teachers to the University, 
whereas but two teachers had come from the last three 
classes. The present undergraduate generation was 
reaping the benefits of the mid-ninety teaching in- 
terest. Rut what would be the condition in 1940? 
The only answer to this question was that, unless 
more Yale men were attracted to teaching, the future 
Yale faculty would be recruited from the outside. 
The presidents of Harvard, Yale, and Princeton now 
say that even that source is likely to become fruitless 
— there is grave likelihood of not being able, pres- 
ently, to recruit sufficient men of the proper calibre 
for university w-ork to man the faculties. 



44 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



"This situation has long been forecasted by univer- 
sity heads of departments who have been looking for 
new men with whom to build up their faculties. It 
has become the universal experience that it is more 
and more difficult to find promising young chemists 
and engineers, specialists in economics and govern- 
ment, the old type of scholar in literature and the 
arts. Modern conditions have thinned the ranks. A 
young scientific man, unless he is exceptionally situ- 
ated, will not refuse to choose a ten-thousand-dollar 
industrial offer over a four-thousand-dollar faculty 
chair — and it is not always true that the college can 
pay as much as that. There is no particular mystery 
about all this. The times pinch the salaried man. If 
such a man can secure a comfortable living for his 
family in the world of affairs it is not extraordinary 
that he should leave an impossibly-underpaid college 
job to secure it. The tragedy is that so many have 
done it and that, unless relief comes, so many more 
will follow. 

' ' The universities now propose to face this situation 
in a business-like way. The need is for faculty-salary 
increases on a substantial scale. Harvard will devote 
most of its $15,250,000 fund now being raised, for 
this purpose. Princeton will use at least half of its 
$14,000,000 fund for it, Yale has as yet started no 
fund. Yale proposes to increase her faculty salaries 
first and raise the money to put them on a permanent 
footing, afterward. We are able to state that before 
the end of the present calendar year, the Yale Cor- 
poration will vote a substantial, if preliminary, raise 
in professorial salaries retroactive to October 1. The 
way to meet the teaching situation now facing all the 
educational institutions of the country, is to make the 
salaries square with the times. We are glad to sav 
that Yale will do it." 

DDD 

The Review has intentionally set forth at length 
the foregoing financial prospects of the institutions 
mentioned and it urges every trustee 
Where We and alumnus of the University to ponder 
Stand carefully the situation presented in 

them. There is no escaping the fact that 
American universities must materially increase their 
salary scales if they are to continue to attract and 
retain scholarly teachers. The economic pull into 
more remunerative fields has become so strong that 
not to meet it as Harvard and Yale and Princeton 
and Cornell are preparing to meet it and as Michigan 
and Minnesota have already met it — they have added 
$350,000 and $175,000 to their salaries respec- 
tively, for the current year — means mediocrity and 
disaster ahead. Heroic measures must be taken to 
meet the situation, and these institutions, with fine 
understanding of what is involved, have committed 
themselves to the only policy that insures a success- 
ful solution of the case. 

The Review is aware, of course, that the State has 
recently increased the University's appropriations 



both for maintenance and construction. It is also 
aware that within the past five years a total increase 
has been made in the salary scale varying from twen- 
tj*-five to thirty per cent. But the big fact remains 
that today the present instructional staff is underpaid, 
that there are several authorized chairs in the 
University unfilled, simply because the salaries which 
we can offer will not attract properly qualified men, 
and that the building program of the campus is not 
beginning to keep pace with the size of the rapidly 
growing student bod}*. 

DDD 

The building program of which we make mention 
and which must be immediately gotten under way in 

order to avert grave injury to the Univer- 
Buildings sity should concern itself with two pro- 
Needed jects, each of which in its own way is 

vitally important. Thirteen hundred stu- 
dents are on a campus which can domicile less than 
half that number. Three and four students are 
crowded into a room and the upper floors of stores 
and other quarters not particularly desirable for 
student occupancy have been called into use. Effec- 
tive study under these conditions is obviously diffi- 
cult, and there is little use in coming to college unless 
an opportunity for application under favorable con- 
ditions is assured. To relieve the situation and to 
take care of the numbers that will inevitably increase 
rapidly, calls for dormitories, and calls for them now. 
Additional class-room space is equally imperative. 
More men require more recitation halls, and larger 
classes require larger rooms. During the first week 
of the term several classes had to meet out on the 
campus, and in others students had to stand because 
they overran the seating capacity. Furthermore, Ger- 
rard Hall will hold less than half the student body 
and consequently the University has no place ade- 
quate for a general assemblage of the entire student 
group. 

President Chase has appointed a faculty committee 
to consider the other phase of the situation as it af- 
fects the living conditions of the faculty. Twelve or 
fifteen new instructors have had to be placed in the 
village this fall with the result that every available 
house, whether desirable or not, has been called into 
service. If men were available for some of the po- 
sitions mentioned above which still remain unfilled, 
it would be impossible for the University to secure 
them because it cannot find homes in which to place 
them. Rents, quite naturally, have risen in response 
to the demand, and, again, the meager salaries have 
been rendered still more restricted in the necessities 
which they will provide. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



45 



Through this committee, and a committee from the 
Trustees previously appointed, .action of some sort 
and at no distant day, is contemplated and must at 
all hazards be secured. 

[Just as The Review goes to press, it is informed 
that the erection of two dormitories has been au- 
thorized.] 

DDD 

Before leaving this extremely vital consideration, 
we wish to say a final word about another aspect of 

the building situation, or rather, the re- 
Is This pair and upkeep of the buildings on the 
Our Best? campus as it now exists. Several years 

ago we took particular occasion to voice 
our pleasure in the development of the Arboretum. 
The reclamation of the former unsightly crawfish bog 
into the distinctive beauty spot of the University is 
an accomplishment requiring sustained interest and 
the employment of illumined study and planning. 
We also found genuine pleasure in the erection of the 
gateway at the western entrance to the campus. And 
we recall a once distinctive entrance to the South 
Building, and the repainting of the interior of the 
chapel which, in a way, was quite satisfying. But, 
strive as we may, we cannot find that in the score of 
years we have known the University the appearance 
of its interiors has steadily pursued the direction of 
an ascending aesthetic curve. Of course we recognize 
the difference between the transformation which can 
be wrought by rain and sun and flowers and that by 
hammer and trowel and saw; but — and this is what 
we are attempting to say just now — we recognize the 
difference in the plan, or lack of plan (?) lying back 
of both. 

DDD 

We clearly understand that to point out defects in 
an existing order without at the same time proposing 

remedial measures rarely leads anywhere. 
The Way In Mississippi, to the far south of us, a 
Out state-wide campaign has recently been 

concluded for better salaries for teachers 
in all the schools and colleges with the result that in- 
creases have been secured all along the line. In the 
case of the State University, salaries for full profes- 
sors were raised 40 per cent and placed at $3,600 an- 
nually. At Yale and Brown a part of the Alumni 
Loyalty Fund has been used to supplement the sal- 
aries of special groups of instructors, and, as already 
indicated, at Harvard and Princeton and Michigan 
and Minnesota the alumni or the states themselves 
have shown the way out. 



Messages from alumni and accounts of alumni meet- 
ings held throughout the country around University 
Day, bear testimony to the fact that love 
Univer- for Alma Mater grows with the passing 
sity Day years and that loyalty to her and intelli- 
gent interest in her future are more pro- 
nounced today than they have ever been before. 

Here on the Hill the day was fittingly observed on 
Saturday, the eleventh. President Chase reviewed 
the figures of registration, announcing that 1,283 stu- 
dents were present on the campus and that the total 
registration when students pursuing credit courses 
in the Summer School and Summer Law School were 
(according to regular custom) included, was 1,676 — 
over 400 more than were registered in the entire high 
record year, 1916-17. 

Francis D. Winston, '79, speaker of the day, pic- 
tured the reopening of the University in 1875 and 
contrasted its position then after the throes of the 
Civil War and reconstruction with its commanding 
place today. 

DDD 

No report has been made in The Review of the 
progress of the Graham Memorial campaign since the 
June issue. At that time, Secretary 
Let's Com- Coates, reporting direct to the alumni 
plete This on Alumni Day, announced that pledge 
cards had been received totaling $70,- 
000. During the summer, and particularly during 
October, a number of enthusiastic alumni meetings 
have been held in the larger cities of the State with 
the result that subscriptions have gone well towards 
$120,000. 

While this report indicates progress towards the 
ultimate goal and fine work on the part of a num- 
ber of local committees, there remains much to be 
done yet to finish the campaign in a thoroughly satis- 
fying way. In some towns the committees appointed 
have not arranged local campaigns and consequently 
alumni and friends have not had an opportunity to 
make their contributions. Wherever this has been 
the case, and in all centers where final reports have 
not been made, we urge immediate action. And if 
you are an isolated alumnus and have no local asso- 
ciation through which to make your contribution, send 
your pledge direct to Secretary A. M. Coates. And — 
do it immediately ! 

In order to wind the campaign up successfully all 
local directors have been urged to hold meetings and 
put on drives within the next two weeks and report at 
a general meeting of directors in the Y.M.C.A. build- 
ing at 8:30 o'clock on the night before Thanksgiving. 
Entertainment for the night will be provided and a 



46 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



smoker will be held at which plans will be perfected 
for a final report to the alumni next day at the hour 
of the game. Again, we say, be here, and let's finish 
this splendid piece of work. 

nnn 

There were other things beside the score of the 
A. and E. game. Carolina men everywhere will hail 

a great victory. Carolina and State Col- 
The Right lege men alike, North Carolinians all, 
Spirit will hail a greater victory for fine sport 

and sound athletics than any touchdown 
can indicate. Hard, clean playing, generous cheering 
on both sides, quick recognition of brilliance, and 
good feeling all around — these were the ear-marks of 
the greatest athletic victory either institution ever 



won. A State College back who had dodged his way 
fifty yards through, the entire Carolina team save 
one man was laid low by that man in a tackle that 
must have shaken his teeth. As he rose, he reached 
and patted his opponent on the back, helped him to 
his feet, and grinned broadly. It was as though he 
bad said — "You kept me from a touchdown and you 
knocked me silly, but it was a darned good play." 
Such -spirit on the field and surrounding the whole 
business of the resumption of athletics should mean 
the beginning of a long period of high-toned athletic- 
rivalry. To those who have worked long for this day 
and who by infinite patience and good sense have 
brought it about, we say "Good work!" The two 
State institutions working together can blaze a new 
trail for sound athletics in the State and South. 



THE UNIVERSITY'S BIRTHDAY CELEBRATED 



The Celebration of the 126th Anniversary of the Laying of the Corner- 
stone of the University Proves Most Inspiring Occasion 



Featured by a splendid address from Judge Francis 
D. Winston, of the class of 1879, by the report of a 
most promising outlook for the year by President 
Chase, by the reading of the "In Memoriam" list by 
Dean George Howe, and by the messages of love and 
loyalty and cheer from Carolina's far-scattered sons, 
the celebration of University Day which was held this 
year on Saturday, October 11th, in commemoration of 
the 126th anniversary of the laying of the cornerstone 
of the University, proved a most inspiring occasion. 

The procession consisting of the speaker, the mem- 
bers of the faculty, and the students by classes, 
formed at the Alumni Building at 10:45 o'clock, and 
the exercises were begun in Memorial Hall at 11 :00 
o'clock. Following the invocation by Rev. E. H. Mc- 
Whorter, of the Methodist Church, and the singing 
of "America," President Chase introduced Judge 
Winston, referring to him as one of Carolina's mos' 
devoted sons and as Hinton James the Second, the 
first student of the University after the reopening. 

Judge Winston's Address 
•Judge Winston said in part : 

On September 6th, 1875, the doors were re-opened. Our little 
band of three score students and half dozen professors gathered 
together on that beautiful autumn day in Gerrard Hall to per- 
form the simple yet solemn ceremony of thankfulness to Al- 
mighty God for rekindling the fires of learning upon these 
ancient altars. Here Gaston and Hooper had spoken ; Polk and 
Pettigrevv, and Benton and King had studied ; Olmstead, An- 
drews, Hawks and Phillips had taught. Here for nearly a 
hundred years love and beauty and virtue; courage and cour- 



tesy and honor; all the graces of queenly womanhood and all 
the strength of heroic manhood, had exhaled the fragrance of 
the finest civilization of earth. For such there is no death. 

I shall not minutely detail the work of those who revived 
our Alma Mater. It came again to life a happy mingling of 
old forces with the new. There was a recall to sons who had 
gone to complete their education in universities in other states, 
Graves, Grandy and Winston, who became in the new Univer- 
sity the ideals and exponents of modern manhood and modern 
learning. With them came Phillips, Hooper, and Kimberly of 
the old school. Of these Phillips alone was on guard when 
reconstruction closed the institution. He, with Winston and 
Graves, then sophomores, had stood seven years before in 
mourning garments amid the ruin and desolation attending the 
falling asleep of the old giant. It was fitting that they should 
assist in the awakening. 

I need not call the roll of those who laid these enduring 
foundations then and since. Most of them have finished the 
trials of life and returned their talents to the Master. My 
mind and heart hold them now in reverence even as they were 
then, when as friends and students we worked together within 
these sacred walls and within this peaceful village. Let me 
recall some of them as they pass in majestic pageant before 
me: Andrew Mickle, essence of integrity; W. P. Mallett, good 
physician and upright gentleman; John Wesley Carr, thrifty 
merchant, steadfast friend, modest citizen; Foster Utly, thor- 
ough workman, strong, thoughtful and true ; H. B. Guthrie, 
genial, friendly, sympathetic; Paul C. Cameron, majestic figure 
of southern planter, citizen and patriot ; Walter Leak Steele, 
scholar, wit and humorist, thrifty in private life, generous in 
public life, and true as steel in every relation; David Miller 
Carter, with battle axe of Richard and scimitar of Saladin ; 
Joseph J. Davis, whose pure and upright heart was wiser than 
the wisdom of any brain; David Worth, modest and generous; 
William L. Saunders, strong, brave and wise; De Berniere 
Hooper, quiet, refined anil scholarly; Charles Phillips, massive 
and vigorous in mind, heart and body, fond of food, folks and 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



47 



books; Aclolphus W. Mangum, eloquent, sympathetic and sensi- 
tive; Ralph Henry Graves, whose splendid genius was later ex- 
tinguished but not before his name had been inscribed among 
the few immortals; John Manning, whose pure, unselfish char- 
acter, warm sympathy for worth, and impressive teaching, en- 
deared him to all his pupils; William H. Battle, small in 
stature but large in heart and mind, every ounce of sterling 
gold; Kemp P. Battle, gentle, devoted, tactful, purposeful, 
faithful; George T. Winston, positive, fearless, combative, con- 
structive; and last with tender affection, one who passed away 
in a distant State, whose mind and heart ever abode within the 
village of Chapel Hill and the sacred precincts of this hallowed 
spot, daughter of the old University and loving genius of the 
new, Mrs. Cornelia Phillips Spencer. 

The reborn University began at once to prepare for the 
mighty establishment we now have here, which is hourly grow- 
ing in usefulness and power, and in the affection and confi- 
dence of the people; to weed out the briars and stubble of a 
past age and to prepare the soil for the magnificent crop 
we annually garner. It toiled in confident hope for the dawn- 
ing of this day when its agencies for intellectual and practical 
usefulness are touching and moulding the every day life of 
every man, woman, and child in North Carolina. It longed to 
see the weak and penniless enter its doors and leave them strong 
and rich in character and purpose to dignify and bless hu- 
manity by their ministrations. 

It dreamed of a day when an indigent youth under the shad- 
ows of Mt. Mitchell, leaving his mountain home would wearily 
walk the long journey to this sacred spot and knock for ad- 
mittance at its doors and gain glad welcome, and enter with 
high hope; and within its walls by his own unaided efforts lift 
his struggling soul to sublimest heights, and leaving here in 
honor become famous as an artist and throw upon canvas the 
glories and beauties his mighty spirit had gathered in the sun- 
shine and shadows of our eternal hills. Its daily prayer to 
Almighty God was to hasten the day when it would became an 
' ' Institution where any person might find instruction in any 
subject." Its hopes have ripened, its dreams have become 
realities, its prayers have been answered. Esto Perpetua. 

In Memoriam 

A most reverent moment is that when Carolina 
stands uncovered to hear the list of her fallen suns. 
The list given by Dean Howe for the year past is as 
follows : 

Benjamin Pranklin Dixon, .Law 1905, of Raleigh, killed in 
action in Prance, October, 1918. 

Gaston Dortch, Law 1914, of Goldsboro, killed in action in 
Prance, October, 1918. 

Barney Cooper Moffitt, class of 1916, of Sanford, died in 
service October, 1918. 

Bryan G'amerqp Murchison, class of 1913, of Charleston, S. 
C, died in service at Quantico, Virginia, October, 1918. 

James William Scott, Ph. D. 1918, of Greenwood, S. C, died 
in October, 1918. 

Jacob Tomlinson, class of 1903, of Wilson, killed in action 
in France, October, 1918. 

John Graham Young, class of 1867, of Winston-Salem, died 
in October, 1918. 

William Tamerlane Moore, class of 1917, of Parmville, died 
in service at Fort Oglethrope, October 12, 1918. 



Larry Templeton, Jr., class of 1922, of Charlotte, died in 
service at Chapel Hill, October 12, 1918. 

William Preston Ragan, class of 1898, of High Point, died 
October 13, 1918. 

Joseph Henry Johnston, class of 1910, Chapel Hill, killed in 
action in France, October 15, 1918. 

Lewis Lester Spann, class of 1918, of Granite Falls, died in 
service at Camp Hancock, October 15, 1918. 

Kenneth McCoy Scott, class of 1921, of Charlotte, died in 
service at Chapel Hill, October 17, 1918. 

William Theophilus Dortch, class of 1885, of Goldsboro, died 
October 18, 1918. 

Edward Kidder Graham, class of 1898, of Chapel Hill, died 
October 26, 1918. 

Edwin Smith Pou, class of 1919, of Smithfield, died in ser- 
vice in France, October 28, 1918. 

Archibald E. Henderson, class of 1863, of Yanceyville, died 
in November, 1918. 

Horace Baxter Cowell, class of 1917, of Washington, killed 
in action in France, November 9, 1918. 

Hubert MeCree Smith, class of 1916, of Hendersonville, killed 
in action in France, November 10, 1918. 

Edward Griffith Bond, class of 1911, of Edenton, killed in 
action in France, November 10, 1918. 

Frank Cox Lewis, class of 1899, of Kinston, died in De- 
cember, 1918. 

Alexander Davis Betts, class of 1855, of Greensboro, died De- 
cember 15, 1918. 

Branner Gilmer, class of 1904, of Waynesville, died Decem- 
ber 18, 1918. 

Charles Newton Simpson, Jr., Pharmacy 1901, of Monroe, 
died December 18, 1918. 

William Sydney Wilson, class of 1899, of Baleigh, died De- 
cember 18, 1918. 

Joseph Norcum Sweeney, class of 1905, of Wilmington, died 
January 9, 1919. 

John Howie Dixon, class of 1880, of Charlotte, died January 
12, 1919. 

Marvin Hendrix Stacy, class of 1902, of Chapel Hill, died 
January 21, 1919. 

John Preston Miller, class of 1902, of Winston-Salem, died 
in February, 1919. 

Henry Sloan, class of 1879, of Ingold, died February 3, 1919. 

Kemp Plummer Battle, class of 1849, of Chapel Hill, died 
February 4, 1919. 

Howard Haywood, class of 1881, of Raleigh, died February 
10, 1919. 

Edwin D. Foxhall, class of 1859, of Tarboro, died Feb- 
ruary 14, 1919. 

Henry Pear Masten, class fo 1909, of Winston-Salem, died 
in March, 1919. 

William Joseph Peele, class of 1879, of Raleigh, died March 
28, 1919. 

Willis Bruce Dowd, class of 1882, of New York City, died 
April 9, 1919. 

James Turner Morehead, class of 1853, of Greensboro, died 
April 11, 1919. 

Robert Amsi Merritt, class of 1902, of Greensboro, died 
April 14, 1919. 

Roland Headon Haves, class of 1895, of Pittsboro, died 
July 26, 1919. 



48 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



Charles Ernest Shuber, class of 1885, of New York City, 
died August 18, 1919. 

Albert Marvin Carr, class of 1902, of Durham, died Septem- 
ber 21, 1919. 

Alumni Remember Alma Mater 

The following messages received from alumni and 
friends were read by President Chase: 

The North Carolina College for Women sends you heartiest 
greetings on this anniversary occasion. We take pride in your 
splendid record of service, and bid you God-speed as you face 
the new day with us. — Faculty and Students of the North 
Carolina College for Women, Greensboro. 

Two hundred and thirty Mecklenburg alumni send greetings 
and best wishes to Alma Mater. We rejoice in the strength of 
her youth. — C. S. Alston, President; F. O. Clarkson, Secretary, 
Charlotte. 

On this one hundred and twenty-sixth anniversary the Guil- 
ford County Alumni Association sends heartiest greetings and 
best wishes to its Alma Mater. — O. C. Cox, Secretary, Greens- 
boro. 

Alumni in Montevideo send greetings to Alma Mater. — 
Powell, Cooper, Whitfield, deBossett, Montevideo. 

Heartiest greetings to our University on her 12(ith birthday. 
Our support and hearty co-operation are hers. — Rockingham 
County Alumni Association, Eeidsville. 

Anson County Alumni Association sends greetings and best 
wishes for even greater achievements. — W. L. McKinnon, Presi- 
dent, Wadesboro. 

Caldwell County Alumni Association sends greetings and 
best wishes to Alma Mater on her anniversary. — Horace Sisk, 
President, Lenoir. 

Eocky Mount alumni at annual banquet send loving greet- 
ings to our Alma Mater and wish for her and our president the 
highest measure of success. — Paul Fenner, Secretary, Eocky 
Mount. 

Our hearts are with you in your celebration today. — The 
McKies, Asheville. 

Wayne County Alumni Association sends greetings to Alma 
Mater, looking forward to her increasing power for good 
throughout our State. We pledge our full support to the pro- 
gram outlined by our far-seeing president. — W. F. Taylor, Sec- 
retary, Goldsboro. 

We rejoice with our Alma Mater on this her anniversary. — 
Robeson County Alumni Association, Lumberton. 

Loyal alumni of Scotland County send greetings to officers, 
faculty and students on this anniversary. — Maxcy L. John, 
Laurinburg. 

Edgecombe alumni send heartiest greetings to their Alma 
Mater. May the current year be the greatest in her history. — 
W. Stamps Howard, President; J. W. Umstead, Jr., Secretary, 
Tarboro. 

Carolinians at Harvard send greetings and hearty congratu- 
lations to Alma Mater upon her one hundred and twenty-sixth 
anniversary. May she begin auspiciously this new era in her 
service to the State and nation. — Mangum Weeks, President, 
Harvard Alumni Association, Cambridge, Mass. 

Carolina alumni at Westinghouse send their regards from 
Pittsburgh 's smoke to an ever-remembered Alma Mater. — 
Labberton, McEae, Forney, Harding, Taylor, Martin, Ballew, 
Pittsburgh. 

Best wishes for continued prosperity and waxing usefubiess 
of the University. — Charles Baskerville, New York City. 



Heartiest congratulations to our Alma Mater on her one 
hundredth and twenty-sixth anniversary. — W. E. Webb, Sr., 
W. E. Webb, Jr., Thos. A. Webb, J. Frank Jarrell. 

Carolina men assembled at Columbia University send to Alma 
Mater their heartfelt greetings and best wishes on her one 
hundredth and twenty-sixth anniversary.— W. W. Eankin, Jr., 
W. T. Polk, B. W. Madry, A. H. Combs, Bruce Webb, Earle 
Harris, Norman Boren, J. M. Gibson, David Brady. 



MRS. CHARLES PHILLIPS 

The death of Mrs. Phillips on October 4 removed 
from our community its oldest member, one univer- 
sally beloved, and associated with the University 
throughout its entire history. Bom at the Falls of 
Tar River, near the present town of Rocky Mount, 
N. C, November 5, 1824, Laura Caroline Battle was 
the youngest of the eleven children of Joel Battle, 
who was educated at the University of North Caro- 
lina, where he matriculated in 1798. 

Joel Battle's father, Elisha Battle, was a member 
of the constitutional convention of 1776 that ordained 
the University. Her brothers, William H. Battle, 
Richard H. Battle, Christopher Columbus Battle, and 
Isaac Battle, were students here. Her father-in-law, 
Dr. James Phillips, was head of the department of 
mathematics, and his brother, Samuel Phillips, a pro- 
fessor in the Law School. Her husband was a pro- 
fessor in the University for thirty years. Two of her 
sons were graduates of the University, and one of 
them was professor of agricultural chemistry and 
mining here. Two of her grandsons are among the 
recent graduates, while a grandson from Texas and a 
great granddaughter from Panama have just entered 
the Freshman class. One of her brothers, Judge Wil- 
liam H. Battle, was dean of the law school, and to 
her nephew, the late Dr. Kemp P. Battle, more than 
to any other one man, is due the honor of reviving the 
University in 1875. Nephews and great nephews, 
Battles, Lewises, Cobbs, Homes, have graduated here 
and served well their day and generation. 

Miss Laura Battle came to Chapel Hill in 1844 to 
make her home with her oldest brother, Judge William 
H. Battle. From that home she was married to 
Charles Phillips, tutor of mathematics, 1847. It was 
from the same beloved home that she was borne by a 
group of youthful kinsmen on October o, 1919, to rest 
beside the husband whom -she survived thirty years. 

As legislators, trustees, professors, tutors, and stu- 
dents, the men of her blood have served the Uni- 
versity with rare devotion. 



The Extension Leaflet, A Course on "Americaniza- 
tion," prepared last year by Mrs. T. W. Lingle, is 
now being studied by 1,200 women in 66 clubs. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



49 



ALUMNI MEETINGS HELD 



Alumni in North Carolina and Other States Hold Big Meetings in Cele- 
bration of University Day 



In celebration of the one hundred and twenty-sixth 

anniversary of the founding of tthe University, meet- 
ings of local alumni associations were held through- 
out the State and in other parts of the nation. 
The Review records herewith accounts of the various 
meetings and banquets which were held by Carolina 
men in celebration of this anniversary occasion : 

Boston 

Characterized by an atmosphere which mingled traditions 
of the Davie Poplar and the Boston Tea Party, and paying 
tribute to the late Edward K. Graham and to John Harvard, 
the Cambridge Alumni Association celebrated the University 's 
126th birthday by a dinner at the Parker House in Boston on 
October 11th. Mangum Weeks, '15, third year law student at 
Harvard, was elected president, and W. H. Stephenson, '18, 
first year law student, was elected secretary. It was voted to 
have two more alumni assemblages this year. Twenty-one 
Carolina men are now at Harvard. 

Charlotte 

The Mecklenburg County Alumni Association held its an- , 
nual banquet in celebration of University Day on the evening 
of October 13th in the assembly room of the Chamber of Com- 
merce at Charlotte. The alumni present pledged $2,650 to the 
Graham Memorial Fund and made plans for starting immedi- 
ately an active campaign for this fund with the end in view 
of raising an average of $100 for each of the 230 alumni in 
the county. The alumni unanimously went on record as favor- 
ing the issuance of $800,000 in bonds for the public schools 
of Charlotte. The alumni further decided to throw their full 
support to the proposition of the providing of sufficient funds 
for carrying on the welfare work of the city and county. 

Fred MeCall, vice-president of the association, presided over 
the meeting in the absence of C. S. Alston, president. L. H. 
Ranson spoke in regard to welfare work in the city and county. 
C. W. Tillett, Jr., was named chairman of a committee to assist 
worthy boys in financial need to enter the University. Major 
W. E. Robertson was made chairman of a committee to gather 
statistics about members of this alumni association who were 
in service. W. T. Shore made a report on the Mecklenburg 
alumni who gave their lives in the service of their country. 
These were : J. O. Ranson, F. L. Costner, J. S. Curry, and 
Joe Orr. 

Albert M. Coates, secretary of the Graham Memorial Fund, 
was present and made an address to the alumni which was 
heard with keen interest. Officers of the association were 
elected as follows: President, H. P. Harding, '99; vice-presi- 
dent, J. S. Cansler, '14; secretary, E. Y. Keesler, '15. 

Durham 

The Durham County Alumni Association held a splendid 
banquet at the Hotel Malbourne, Durham, on the evening of 
October 17th. W. F. Carr presided as toastmaster, and seventy- 
five alumni were present. Mr. Carr extended personal words 
of welcome to President Chase, Dr. W. P. Few, president of 



Trinity College, and Dr. W. H. Pegram, professor emeritus of 
Trinity College. He then presented General Julian S. Carr, 
who extended a welcome on behalf of the University alumni. 

Victor S. Bryant took charge of the program for the Gra- 
ham Memorial Fund. He introduced Albert M. Coates, secre- 
tary of this fund, who made an able address to the alumni on 
the matter of the memorial to the late President Graham. 
Committees were appointed to push the campaign in Durham 
to an early successful conclusion. 

President Chase made a timely address to the alumni in 
which he outlined the probable course of the University's de- 
velopment in the. next few years and made mention of the needs 
which are being encountered. Among others who spoke were 
R. O. Everett, W. J. Brogden, Dr. Few, and Marion Fowler. 

W. J. Brogden, '98, was elected president of the association, 
and K. P. Lewis, '00, was elected secretary. 

Edenton 

The Chowan County Alumni Association met in Edenton on 
the evening of October 13th and spent a pleasant social hour. 
An organization was perfected and plans were made following 
the suggestions sent out by the alumni organization committee 
of the University. M. L. Wright, '08, was elected president 
and Joe R. Nixon, '10, was elected secretary. Secretary Joe 
Nixon reports that this association "has much love for and 
faith in its Alma Mater." 

Fayetteville 

The Cumberland County Alumni Association held its annual 
meeting in celebration of the founding of the University in the 
rooms of the Chamber of Commerce at Fayetteville on October 
15th. Mr. Geo. M. Rose presided over the gathering. The 
principal feature of the gathering was an address by President 
H. W. Chase, who was heard with unusual interest by the alumni 
and friends of the University present as he told of the work 
and the needs of the University. It was the first visit of 
Doctor Chase to Fayetteville since he became president and 
his welcome was a most hearty one from the Cumberland 
County alumni. A substantial sum was subscribed to the Gra- 
ham Memorial Fund by those present at the gathering. 

Greensboro 

Two hundred alumni and invited guests met at the O. Henry 
Hotel, Greensboro, on the evening of October 18th, the occasion 
for the gathering being the annual banquet of the Guilford 
County Alumni Association. Topics of vital University con- 
cern were discussed and the meeting was characterized by social 
fellowship of a very fine type. 

John W. Umstead, Jr., was toastmaster for the occasion. 
E. D. Broadhurst paid a beautiful tribute to his college mate, 
Edward K. Graham, who "dreamed wonderful dreams for the 
boys of North Carolina. ' ' A. M. Coates spoke in laudatory 
vein of the late Dr. Graham, tracing the life of that educator 
and educational statesman. President Chase spoke briefly, re- 
ferring admiringly to the work of Dr. Graham, his predecessor. 
He told of the necessity of perpetuation of the Carolina spirit 
and was sure the Graham Memorial would play a large part in 
such an undertaking With a total enrollment of 1303, Presi- 



50 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



dent Chase told his hearers that the University is simply bulg- 
ing over, every available bit of dormitory space being packed, 
while the overflow in the town of Chapel Hill is most noticeable. 
J. W. Umstead, Jr., '09, is president of this association, 
and O. C. Cox, '09, is secretary. 

Lenoir 

The Caldwell County Alumni Association held an enthusiastic 
meeting on October 13th in celebration of the founding of the 
University. There was a large attendance and the occasion 
proved a happy one, the alumni voting solidly to back the Uni- 
versity in her endeavors. Secretary J. T. Pritchett, of the 
association, sends The Review a copy of the following reso- 
lutions which were unanimously adopted by the association: 

"Resolved, That we hereby approve and endorse the action 
of the Board of Trustees in electing Dr. H. W. Chase presi- 
dent of the University. Three-fourths of the alumni present 
had been students of the University during the years that 
Doctor Chase was a member of the faculty and he was favorably 
known to the others, by reputation. We feel that the vacancy 
caused by the untimely death of the lamented Graham, has 
been wisely and worthily filled. We extend to Dr. Chase our 
heartiest congratulations, and our best wishes in the great 
work he has undertaken, assuring him of our continued loyalty 
in all things to the cause of the University.'' 

Lexington 

The Davidson County Alumni Association at its annual meet- 
ing in Lexington on October 13th celebrated the University 's 
birthday in fitting style, and decided that hereafter there should 
be two associations in Davidson County, one centering around 
Thomasville and the other around Lexington. Abbott's Creek 
is to be the dividing line. Officers of the Lexington branch 
were chosen as follows: President, J. F. Spruill, '07; vice- 
president, L. A. Martin, '09; secretary, W. F. Brinkley, '17; 
treasurer, Don Walser, Law '19. The Davidson County alumni 
were pleased with the University 's splendid opening and 
pledged themselves to close co-operation through the year. 

Raleigh 

The Wake County Alumni Association celebrated the 12(ith 
anniversary of the founding of the University with a banquet 
at the Y.M.C.A. building in Raleigh on October 14th. Present 
as special guests of honor at the banquet were President H. W. 
Chase, Secretary A. M. Coates, of the Graham Memorial Fund, 
and Dr. Alexander Boyd Hawkins, a graduate of the class of 
1845, the oldest living alumnus of the University. 

Judge J. C. Biggs presided over the banquet in the absence 
of Judge J. S. Manning, president of the association. Dr. 
Hawkins gave some interesting reminiscences during the course 
of winch he told of the visit which President James K. Polk 
made to the University, his Alma Mater, in 1847. President 
Polk was accompanied by John Y. Mason, Secretary of the 
Navy, and Lieutenant Maury, afterwards Commodore Maury, 
of geographical fame. 

President Chase and Secretary Coates made addresses to the 
one hundred alumni present and received assurance of the con- 
tinued hearty support to the University in all of her under- 
takings by the Wake County Alumni Association. The alumni 
present planned a lively time in support of their team at the 
Carolina-State College football game. 

Officers for the ensuing year were elected by the association 
as follows: President, J. B. Cheshire, Jr., '02; vice-president, 
A. J. Barwick, '00; secretary, H. M. London, '99. During 



the course of the evening the sum of $2,600 was subscribed to 
the Graham Memorial Fund by the alumni present. This was 
in addition to $70(1 which had been previously subscribed. 

Washington 

Organization of the alumni of the University living in Wash- 
ington, D. C, was effected on October 13th at a smoker given 
at the home of Secretary of the Navy Daniels. A. W. McLean, 
Law '92, of Lumberton, was elected president ; Dr. Sterling 
Ruffin, '86, vice-president, and Dr. R. O. E. Davis, '01, secre- 
tary and treasurer. An executive committee composed of 
Judge M. C. Elliott, Dr. L. J. Battle, Eugene F. Hartley and 
Secretary Josephus Daniels was named. The gathering of 
Carolina men was addressed by Mr. McLean and Secretary 
Daniels, and substantial pledges were made by the alumni 
present to the Graham Memorial Fund. There are a large num- 
ber of alumni in Washington, and the association plans to hold 
meetings at regular intervals. The gathering this time, at 
which the organization was effected, was a delightful one. 

Wentworth 

The Rockingham County Alumni Association held its an- 
nual dinner and business meeting in Wentworth ou October 
10th. A. D. Ivie acted as toastmaster and the occasion was 
a most happy one. Various subjects were discussed, such as the 
county welfare work, Graham Memorial Fund, and industrial 
relations in the county. The association took a constructive 
stand on all matters pertaining to the welfare of the University 
in the county, and appointed a welfare committee to establish 
extension centers and to make further plans for extending Uni- 
versity interests locally. This committee consists of W. C. 
Ruffin, Luther Hodges, C. O. MeMichael, B. H. Stacy, and P. 
H. Gwynn, Jr. The association voted to hold a banquet during 
the Christmas holidays. A. D. Ivie, '02, of Leaksville, is 
president of the association, and P. H. Gwynn, Jr., '12, of 
Reidsville, is secretary. 

Wilmington 

The New Hanover County Alumni Association held an en- 
thusiastic meeting and banquet at the Masonic Temple in Wil- 
mington on October 9th. Special features of the meeting were 
a powerful appeal to the alumni for their continued, sustained 
interest in all matters pertaining to the University by Prof. 
E. C. Branson, of the University faculty, an address by A. M. 
Coates, secretary of the Graham Memorial Fund, and the an- 
nouncement of a gift of $2,500 to the memorial fund by C. C. 
Covington, '79. Officers of the association were elected as fol- 
lows: C. C. Covington, president; vice-presidents, Dr. J. G. 
Murphy, '(II, ami C. W. Worth, '82; secretary, L. J. Poisson; 
treasurer, Harry Solomon, '11. Plans for frequent meetings of 
the alumni were discussed and the newly elected officers were 
empowered to call a meeting in the near future which would 
again take up matters of vital interest to the alumni and the 
University. L. J. Poisson was appointed head of a committee 
to make a canvass for the memorial fund. The meeting and 
banquet proved a very delightful and inspiring occasion. 



MAYNARD WINS FAME IN AVIATION 
Belvin W. Maynard, of the class of 1917, first lieu- 
tenant in aviation, U. S. Army, achieved great dis- 
tinction in October through leading the Army trans- 
continental air race from Roosevelt Field, Mineola, 
X. Y., to San Francisco, Cal., and return. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



51 



CAROLINA WINS FROM A. AND E. 



First Football Game Between the Two Institutions Since 1905 Goes to 
Carolina by Score of 13 to 12 



Fourteen years ago, in 1905, Foy Roberson's team, 
with Komy Story and Roy Abernethy as its strong 
points, fought A. and M. to a to tie in Raleigh. 
On October 23rd, "Nemo" Coleman's team took up 
the story again and in the greatest game of football 
seen in North Carolina in many a day, defeated North 
Carolina State, 13 to 12. 

Romy Story is gone, but Foy Roberson held one of 
the line-sticks and Roy Abernethy sat on the sidelines. 
They saw tho largest croud ever assembled at any 
football game in Ihis State — more than 5,000 paid ad- 
missions. They saw a game that for rip-snorting ex- 
citement, ups and downs and thrills, hero-stunts and 
heart-breakers, will rank high on the list of Carolina 
victories. They saw Pritchard break through the line, 
block a punt, recover the ball, and fall over the line 
with the touchdown that tied the score, and they saw 
Blount send the ball spinning over the bar with the 
point that gave the margin of victory. 

Fine Feeling Exhibited 

The resumption of football relations with A. and E. 
was marked by a fine show of feeling on both sides. 
No teams ever fought harder, but it was straight, 
clean football. The cheering sections were quick to 
recognize good football by either team, and the alumni 
and the whole State seemed glad that the two insti- 
tutions had come together again. 

Carolina jumped into the game with a quickness 
that almost took away the breath. A rush of line at- 
tacks, a slippery 20-yard return of a punt by Cole- 
man, and an accurate forward pass from Coleman to 
Pharr brought the touchdown in the first few minutes. 
The punt-out for the goal failed. Just before the first 
quarter ended, Faucette caught a punt and raced up 
the side-lines 50 yards before he was thrown. Two 
driving line plays, a successful forward pass, and 
Faucette dived through center for the first A. and E. 
touchdown. Gurley failed at goal. The half ended 
6 to 6, and it was anybody's game. 

Beginning the second half A. and E. received the 
kick-off and Gurley made the rim of the day. He 
caught the ball on his own 20-yard line and ran to 
the Carolina 5-yard line, nearly 80 yards. A plunge 
netted nothing but Homewood, brother of Roy Home- 
wood, assistant Carolina coach, received a pass for 
the second A. and E. touchdown. Again, Gurley 
failed at goal. Toward the end of the third quarter 



came Pritchard 's great play and the victory. The 
fourth quarter was bitterly fought. Carolina threat- 
ened twice but did not have the drive and in the last 
few minutes the Techs with a succession of forward 
passes advanced well up the field and reached the 
25-yard line where a drop kick failed. Campbell 
freshened up his team with substitutes toward the 
end and Grimes and Robbins were the only two men 
who played the entire game. 

The two teams were very nearly even but Carolina 
won because she was a more finished team. State 
College had greater rushing power but she fumbled 
badly and nearly every fumble was recovered by Car- 
olina. The lesson of the Wake Forest game had sunk 
in. Carolina showed a rugged defense against a 
heavier opponent and she took advantage of every 
misplay and worked best when the work counted most. 
Pharr ran the team with his usual coolness and care ; 
Coleman was a conspicuous figure as long as his phy- 
sical condition permitted him to play, and Spaugh and 
Tenney did splendid defensive work. Grimes, Prit- 
chard, and Blount were the strong points in the line. 
Gurley, Homewood, and Faucette starred for the 
Techs. 

The line-up : 

NORTH CAROLINA STATE 

Cochrane left end Homewood 

Harrell left tackle Weathers 

Bobbins left guard Floyd 

Blount center Whitaker 

Grimes right guard Young 

Pritchard right tackle Bipple 

Proctor right end Kirkpatrick 

Pharr quarter Faucette 

Coleman left half Pierson 

Tenney right half Gurley 

Spaugh full Murray 



Score by periods : 

N. C 

A. and E 



0—13 
0—12 



Substitutions — Smith for Pharr, Mobley for Smith, Gantt for 
Pritchard, Dortch for Harrell, Griffith for Tenney, Lowe for 
Coleman, Sims for Cochrane, Woodall for Proctor, Jacobi for 
Blount, Fearrington for Spaugh, Harden for Tenney. State — 
Hill for Murray, McMurray for Kirkpatrick, Park for Murray. 
Touchdowns — Pharr, Pritchard, Faucette, Homewood. Goals 
from touchdown — Blount. Time of periods, 15 minutes. Of- 
ficials — referee, Barry of Georgetown; umpire, Magoffin of 
Michigan ; headlinesman, Williams, of Virginia. 



52 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



MID-SEASON CONTESTS 

North Carolina, — Rutgers, 19 

In the first game of the season, the first varsity 
game since Thanksgiving, 1916, Carolina lost to Rut- 
gers, 19 to 0. The game was played in New Bruns- 
wick, N. J., October 4th. A fumble on the first play 
gave Rutgers the ball within easy scoring distance 
and the first touchdown came quickly. In the second 
quarter French, a Rutgers back, broke loose for 50 
yards and the third touchdown was made in the same 
quarter after a series of short line plays in which 
the superior weight of the Rutgers line told heavily. 
No further scores were made. Carolina outplaying 
Rutgers generally in the second half. 



North Carolina, 7— Yale, 34 

Another long northern trip deprived the team of a 
good deal of needed practice and Carolina lost the 
second game to Yale in New Haven, 34 to 7. Yale 
made only two touchdowns in the first half, one of 
them coming after a fumble in the first few minutes 
of play, but the heavier Blue line, with the large 
number of first rate substitutes available, wore out 
Carolina in the second half and a total of 34 points 
was rolled up. 

Carolina's touchdown came in the last few minutes 
of play in a manner that seemed to confuse northern 
newspaper writers. Lowe, substituting for Coleman, 
punted from Yale's 40 yard line. The punt was 
partly blocked but rolled across the goal line where 
Pharr fell on it while the Yale team looked on. The 
ball became free as soon as it was partly blocked by 
Yale. | 

Coleman's punting and Tenney's all-round work 
stood out for Carolina. There was no discourage- 
ment at Chapel Hill at the result of the game. It was 
a hard experience for the team but it handled itself 
very well against a powerful opponent and it learned 
defensive play that came in good stead later. 



North Carolina, 6 — Wake Forest, 
The first game against a Southern team, and the 
first on Emerson Field, was played October 18, Wake 
Forest being defeated 6 to 0. Weather conditions 
were very bad. Twenty-four hours of steady rain 
had changed the field into a swamp, and sure running 
and holding the ball were almost impossible. Caro- 
lina gained a lot of ground and five times advanced 
to within scoring distance, only to fumble. The de- 
fense was entirely satisfactory as Wake Forest made 
only two first downs, and was never within the 30- 
yard line. Harrell, Grimes, and the two ends broke 
up most of the plays before they had started. 

The lone touchdown came in the fourth quarter 
when the ball was advanced by a sustained attack by 
Tenney, Pharr, and Lowe from the 40-yard line to 
the 1-yard line. Tenney carried it over, but Pharr 
could not lift the waterlogged ball over the bar for 
the additional point. 



COLEMAN ELECTED CAPTAIN 

Just before the Yale game the Carolina football 
squad elected as captain James M. ("Nemo") Cole- 
man, of Asheville. half back and one of the best 
punters who ever wore a Carolina uniform. Coleman 
learned football on class teams, and played on the 
1916. varsity before he went into the Army. He played 
in France on the 81st Division team. He is 24 j ears 
old, 5 feet 10 inches, and weighs 163 pounds. In the 
spring of 1917 he was one of the varsity pitchers and 
broke up a Virginia game in Greensboro by driving 
out a two-bagger in the tenth inning. Coleman is a 
member of the Kappa Sigma fraternity, is well liked 
and respected on the campus, and his election has 
met with much favor. 



HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL CONTEST 

The North Carolina high school football champion- 
ship contest will be played on Emerson Field as early 
in December as arrangements can be made. 




CAROLINA HOLDS YALE 



YALE BREAKS THROUGH 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 53 



THE TAR HEEL HOMECOMING 

THE CAROLINA-VIRGINIA GAME 

of 1919, at Chapel Hill, on Thanksgiving Day Will be the Biggest 
Alumni Gathering since 1793 

A letter will be .sent to every alumnus with complete information on all arrangements, ap- 
plication forms for tickets, and seating plans of the stands. 

TIME AND PLACE 

2 :00 P.M.. Emerson Field, Chapel Hill, Thanksgiving Day. 

OFFICIALS 

Referee — C. M. Barry, Georgetown. 
Umpire — Paul P. Magoffin, Michigan. 
Head Linesman — E. J. Donnelly, Trini'y. 

TICKETS 

Admission, $1.50; reserved grandstand seats, $0.50. A drawing of the stands showing 
the position of every seat will be mailed to every alumnus, together with application 
forms. The students and alumni will have first choice of the seats. 

TRAINS 

Arrangements are being made for special trains : 

(a) One from Charlotte and adjacent points. 

(b) One from Winston-Salem, Greensboro, and adjacent points. 

(c) One from Virginia. 

(d) One from Goldsboro. Raleigh, and adjacent points. 

(e) One from south central and eastern part of the State. 

(f) Others as needed. 

STANDS 

The concrete stands on Emerson Field seat 2,500. Temporary wooden stands to seat 
2,500 more persons are being erected on opposite side of the field. Standing room avail- 
able at the ends of the field. 

FOOD 

Swain Hall and University Inn will serve a buffet luncheon all day long. Ample pro- 
vision will be made for the maximum crowd. The fraternities will hold luncheons for 
their alumni and friends. 

ROOMS 

No attempt will be made to provide sleeping quarters for visitors. The University 
buildings and the town are full now. Hotels in Durham and Raleigh will of course be 
available. 

LADIES' BUILDING 

The Peabody Building will be turned over entirely to women for the day. 

DANCE 

A dance will be given in Durham Thanksgiving night. 



54 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 

Issued monthly except in July, August, and September, by the Gen- 
eral Alumni Association of the University of North Carolina. 

Board of Publication 

The Review is edited by the following Board of Publication: 

Louis R. Wilson, '99 Editor 

Associate Editors: "Walter Murphv, '92: Harry Howell, '95; Archibald 
Henderson, '98; W. S. Bernard, '00: J. K, Wilson, '05; Louis 
Graves, '02; F. P. Graham, '09; Kenneth Tanner, '11; Lenoir 
Chambers, Jr., '14; R. W. Madry, '18. 

E. R. Rankin, '13 Managing Editor 

Subscription Price 

Single Copies $0.20 

Per Year 150 

Communications intended for the Editor and the Managing Editor 
should he sent to Chapel Hill, N. C. All communications intended for 
publication must be accompanied with signatures if they are to receive 
consideration. 

OFFICE OF PUBLICATION, CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 

Entered at the Postoffice at Chapel Hill, N. C, as second class 
matter. 



THE UNIVERSITY IN LETTERS 



Uuder a new form and with a fresh access of energy, 
The Tar Baby onee more takes its place in the life of 
Chapel Hill as a publication to be read — and dis- 
cussed — and reckoned with. Surely, its appearance — 
for though ostensibly a re-appearance, its new dress 
and tone give it the air of true novelty — is a sign of 
the newer sophistication and greater flexibility of the 
student mind upon our campus. Comedy connotes 
culture ; and the sense of the comic is the mark of a 
growing sense of self-perception. It is well for the 
lighter sides of life to be caught and thrown upon the 
screen for the moment's delectation. If some of the 
anecdotes bear the earmarks of antiquity, it may be 
urged in extenuation that there are only nine — is it 
nine? — original jokes. If the taste of some of these 
jeitx d'esprits is questionable, their appearance in cold 
type may serve as the best and readiest reminder that 
print is not always the best medium for inexpensive 
witticisms. The clipping bureau has done its work 
well ; and a number of clever publications are ef- 
fectively levied upon for contributions which enhance 
the general readability of the magazine. The pictorial 
embellishments play a large and welcome part; even 
more illustrations would meet with a larger measure 
of appreciation. 



An important contribution, from Robert B. Coker 
(B.S. 1896; M.S. 1897), in charge of Scientific In- 
quiry, United States Bureau of Fisheries, is the publi- 
cation : "Habits and Economic Relations of the Guano 
Birds of Peru." This paper is No. 2298, from the 



Proceedings of the United States National Museum, 
vol. 56, pp. 449-511, plates 53-69. No report to cover 
the ground of the present paper has ever hitherto been 
made ; and the report has the additional value due to 
the fact that the subjects discussed came under the 
author's personal observation in the course of investi- 
gations carried on from December, 1906, to August, 
1908, for the Peruvian government. "The following- 
pages, " says the author in his introduction, "deal 
more particularly with the habits and significance of 
birds that were observed to possess economic import- 
ance, but they comprise also some account of other 
species which are associated with the useful birds as 
are essential for an understanding of the conditions 
of life of the birds and their economic significance." 



HIGH SCHOOLS WILL DISCUSS IMMIGRATION 

The High School Debating Union will have for its 
query this year the following, Resolved, That the 
United States should adopt a policy of further ma- 
terial restriction of immigration. The contest will 
be carried on this year as it has been for the past 
seven years, with the schools grouped in triangles and 
the winners of both affirmative and negative sides 
coming to Chapel Hill for the final debates. 

The Aycock Memorial Cup, donated by the intercol- 
legiate debaters of the University, will be awarded to 
the winning school, together with the honor of the 
State championship. The triangular debates will be 
held the latter part of March and the final contest 
earl j' in April. 



CONCERNING THE BINGHAM BEQUEST 

Three interesting developments in the Bingham 
Bequest have recently been noted: (1) Attorney Gen- 
eral James S. Manning represented the University at 
Louisville on October 7 in an effort to prevent the 
State of Kentucky from collecting an inheritance tax 
levied against it of $219,000. The matter is still 
pending. (2) Press dispatches of September 27 an- 
nounced that the heirs of the estate residing in New 
York were instituting proceedings to secure a reduc- 
tion of the assessment of the estate from $103,000,000 
to $55,000,000. (3) In early October the faculty 
elected Professors L. R. Wilson and George Howe to 
serve, with President Chase, and Messrs. R. D. W. 
Connor, Haywood Parker, and J. K. Wilson, appointed 
by the Trustees at Commencement, as a joint commit- 
tee to determine upon a policy for the utilization of 
the Bingham Bequest and a method of selecting 
Kenan professors. The committee is instructed to 
report to the January meeting of the Trustees. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 55 



ESTABLISHED 1916 



fllumni Coyalty fund 



"One for all, and all Tor one " 



Council: 

A. M. SCALES, '92 
LESLIE WEIL, '95 
L. R. WILSON, '99 
A.W.HAYWOOD, 04 
W. T. SHORE, '05 
J. A. GRAY, '08 




THE ALUMNI LOYALTY FUND 

Was established to provide a way by which every alumnus 
could contribute according to his ability to the general wel- 
fare of the University. 

A GOOD NUMBER FROM MANY CLASSES 

Have taken advantage of this opportunity and have con- 
tributed a total of $10,000. 

ARE YOU IN THIS NUMBER ? 

Or are you letting your class-mates or members of other 
classes lay the foundation of what is to be one of Carolina's 
great achievements — the building up of a great fund, the 
income from which can later be applied in ways that will 
multiply Alma Mater's usefulness a hundredfold. 

DON'T LET THE YEAR END 

Without making a beginning, or renewing your contribu- 
tion. All contributions are payable to University Treasurer, 
at Chapel Hill. 



56 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



THE GENERAL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

of the 
UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 



Officers of the Association 

R. D. W. Connor, '99 President 

E. R. Rankin, '13 Secretary 

Executive Committee: Walter Murphy, '92; Dr. R. H. 
Lewis, '70; W. N. Everett, '86; H. E. Rondthaler, '93; C. W. 
Tillett, Jr., '09. 



WITH THE CLASSES 

1845 
Editor, The Review: 

Sir : I am very much pleased with your invitation to 
revisit Chapel Hill on University Day. I wish I were equal 
to the journey, for there is nothing which would give me 
greater pleasure than to visit again the scenes I remember 
so well. 

Sincerely yours, 

A. B. HAWKINS, '45. 
Raleigh, N. C. October 10. 1919. 

1859 
— Jas. P. Coffin is chairman of the board of directors of 
The First National Bank of Batesville, Ark. Mr. Coffin writes 
that recently he passed his 81st milestone. 

1860 
— The sale of the Fayetteville Observer to a stock company 
lias been announced. This paper, which is the oldest one in 
the State, was edited for many years by Major E. J. Hale, 
now U. S. Minister to Costa Rica. 

1866 
— General Julian S. Carr, of Durham, attended the annual 
reunion of United Confederate Veterans held in Atlanta early 
in October. General Carr is commander of the Department 
of Northern Virginia. General Carr tendered a reception in 
honor of the North Carolina Veterans which, says Colonel 
Bennehan Cameron, of Stagville, who also attended the re- 
union, was the most delightful feature of the Atlanta gather- 
ing. 

1879 
— Capt. Isaac E. Emerson, who donated the Emerson Stadium 
to the University, owns the Emerson Hotel, Baltimore, and 
the Bromo-Seltzer Works, of Baltimore. 

— Dr. Richard B. Henderson is a prominent physician of 
Franklinton. Dr. Henderson has the sympathy of his friends 
in the death on August 17th of Mrs. Henderson. 

1880 
— The class of 1S80 will celebrate the 40th anniversary of 
its graduation at the next commencement of the University. 
The class of 1880 was one of the first classes to graduate 
from the University following the re-opening after Recon- 
struction days. Members of this class have been successful 
in many lines of endeavor since leaving college; they will 
no doubt muster full strength for this reunion occasion. 

1881 

— John M. Walker is in the U. S. Internal Revenue Service, 
income tax division, and is located at 315 Custom House, 
Baltimore, Md. 



1882 

— Chas. W. Worth, president of the Cape Fear Machine Works, 
of Wilmington, is supervisor of re-valuation for New Hanover 
county. 

1884 

— M. R. Hamer is located at Spartanburg, S. C, where he is 
treasurer of Converse College. 

— Gen. Zeb V. Walser, of Lexington, is state campaign direc- 
tor for the Roosevelt Memorial Association. 
— Prof. Collier Cobb taught during the past summer in the 
University summer school and later met with the Association 
of American State Geologists on their field trip through North- 
ern Alabama. 

— Rev. A. R. Shaw has accepted a professorship in the Presby- 
terian Theological Seminary at Louisville, Ky. 

1885 
Editor, The Review: 

Sir : It would have given me great pleasure to attend 
the celebration of University Day in Chapel Hill on October 
11th. It was, however, impossible for me to leave New York 
on account of urgent professional engagements. I take the 
keenest interest in everything relating to my old University, 
and am anxious to aid and co-operate in every way in my 
power. 

Faithfully yours, 

GEORGE GORDON BATTLE, '85. 

New York, N. Y., Oct. 13, 1919. 
— A. W. Long is a teacher, retired, and editor of text books. 
He lives at Point Pleasant, N. J., and was for a number of 
years a member of the faculty of Princeton University. 

1886 

— The marriage of Miss Jessica Vann, of Wilmington, and 
Dr. William Alexander Graham, of Charlotte, took place Octo- 
ber 15th in Louisburg. Doctor and Mrs. Graham are at home 
at 15 West 7th Street, Charlotte. 

— Ellison L. Gilmer, a native of Greensboro, is a colonel in 
the Coast Artillery Corps of the U. S. Army. His address is 
Box 361, Newport News, Va. 

— W. S. Dunstan, formerly circulation manager of the Bir- 
mingham News, is now manager of The Democrat, at Little 
Rock, Ark. 

1888 

— Rev. Kirkland Huske is an Episcopal clergyman, located at 
Great Neck, N. Y. 

— A partnership for the practice of law has recently been 
formed at Albemarle by R. L. Smith, '88, and Clyde Gooch, 
under the firm name of Smith and Gooch. 

1889 

— Alex. Stronach, formerly judge in Samoa, is a law writer, 
located at Great Neck, Long Island, New York. 

1890 

— W. S. Battle, Jr., is general claim agent of the Norfolk and 
Western Railway Company, with offices at Roanoke, Va. 
— R. B. Saunders has charge of the Armour Fertilizer Works 
at Albany, Ga. 

— Col. Geo. P. Howell, corps of Engineers, U. S. Army, is 
now stationed at Wheeling, W. Va., in charge of the engineer- 
ing work of that district. 





LI 
TAR BABY 




The Tar Baby is Carolina's new humorous magazine. It has been reviewed favorably with 
such college comics as the Harvard Lampoon, Yale Record, and Cornell Widow. You know the 
quality of these magazines from your reading of the "With the College Wits" department in 
Judge. 

The Tar Baby has been received with great enthusiasm on the campus. Its subscription 
list is already greater than the combined lists of all other undergraduate publications on the 
Hill. Ask your son or friend here what he thinks of it. 

The Tar Baby fills a long-felt need to enliven the campus. Also it furnishes the alumni and 
people of the State with the very cream of wit and cartoons. 

The Tar Baby appeals to your support not on the grounds of loyalty and devotion, but simply 
on its merits, because we believe that every page will furnish you many pleasant minutes. 

The Tar Baby is not a magazine of local interest only, but can be enjoyed by anyone who ap- 
preciates a good joke. This is proven by the large number of subscribers from other college 
communities, and from people over the State. 

The New University is just beginning to make its greatest achievments. The Carolina Tar 
Baby is one of the first examples of what a greater vision and desire to serve w'ill produce. Won't 
you support it? 

Send us your check for $1.75 and we will mail you the twelve remaining numbers as they are 
issued during the college year. And why not send your friend a copy also? 

If you want a sample copy before you subscribe, write us. 

We are waiting for your subscription, so just pin that $1.75 to your letter and mail it NOW. 



THE CAROLINA TAR BABY 

ERNEST H. ABERNETHY, Business Manager 

CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 



J 



58 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



1891 
-J. Volney Lewis is professor of geology in Rutgers College 
and the State University of New Jersey, at New Brunswick, 
N. J. 

— J. M. Morehead is engaged in engineering work with the 
Union Carbide Co., New York City. He lives at Bye, N. Y. 

1892 

— A. W. McLean is a member of the National War Finance 

Corporation, Washington, D. C. Mr. McLean was appointed to 

this important post by President Wilson some time ago. He 

is now acting managing director of the corporation. 

— C. Felix Harvey, prominent merchant and citizen of Kin- 

ston, was host to Vice President Marshall on the occasion of 

the latter 's visit to Kiuston on October 7th. 

— Dr. Geo. H. Crowell, winner of the Mangum Medal upon 

his graduation from the University in 1892, is now president 

of Howard Female College, Gallatin, Tenii. 

1893 
— Victor E. Whitlock is engaged in the practice of law in 
New York City, a member of the firm of Holm, Whitlock" 
and Scarff, at 35 Nassau St. 

— F. C. Harding, lawyer of Greenville, State Senator from 
Pitt County^ and former president pro tern of the Senate, is 
a candidate for lieutenant-governor. 

— J. A. Jones has been superintendent of the schools of 
Griffin, Ga., for several years. Recently he served a term as 
a member of the Board of Visitors of the University of' 
Georgia. 

1894 
— A. Caswell Ellis is professor of the philosophy of educa- 
tion in the University of Texas. He lives at 2629 Wichita 
St., Austin, Texas. 

— F. W. Thomas, Law '94, is engaged in the practice of law 
at Asheville with offices in the Drhumor Bldg. He is referee 
in bankruptcy. 

— Dr. Richard E. Lee, Med. '94, is engaged in the practice of 
his profession, medicine, at Lincolnton. 

1895 
— John L. Patterson, who with his brother Mr. S. F. Patter- 
son, put the towns of Roanoke Rapids and Rosemary on the 
map as important textile centers, is now planning more fame 
for his community. He is secretary of the local school board 
which has secured the authorization of a quarter of a million 
dollar bond issue for a high school building in Roanoke Rapids. 
The plans are now being drawn. 
— Wm. D. Merritt is a successful lawyer of Roxboro. 

1896 
Editor, The Review: 

Sir: Please send me The Review this year. When I 
resigned my position as professor of education in the Oklahoma 
Agricultural and Mechanical College to take the position of 
director of vocational education for Oklahoma, I lost track 
of the publication and have not seen it lately. 

W. C. McAlister, of the class of '95, has an office in the 
state capitol across the hall from me. Mr. McAlister is chair- 
man of the State Election Board and a member of the State 
Senate. He has been a member of the State Senate for a 
number of years. Very truly yours, 

CHAS. W. BRILES, '96. 
Oklahoma City, Okla., Oct. 15, 1919. 



— A. H. Robbins, formerly superintendent of the large plants 
of the Lancaster Cotton Mills, Lancaster, S. O, has moved 
tj Chester, S. O, where lie has assumed the management of 
the Springstein Mills, a cotton manufacturing corporation of 
which he is one of the principal owners. 

— Robert L. Gray enjoys the unusual distinction of editing 
two daily papers in the same city. He is holding down that 
double job in Newport News, Va., doing the editorial writing 
for both the morning and afternoon papers. 
— J. Ro.bert Craig is secretary and treasurer of the Cocker 
Machine and Foundry Co., at Gastonia. 

— M. B. Aston lives at Goldfield, Nevada, where he is engaged 
in the mining of gold. Mr. Aston has prospered in his pro- 
fession. 

— Robert E. Coker is in charge of scientific inquuiry for the 
U. S. Bureau of Fisheries, Washington, D. C. 
— Dr. John F. Nooe is located at Boerne, Texas, where he 
is engaged in the practice of medicine. Dr. Nooe, who is 
a native of Shelby, has lived in Texas for a number of 
years. 

— James A. Gwyn is assistant director of sales for the Ar- 
lington Works of the E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Co. His 
address is Room 4136, DuPont Bldg., Wilmington, Del. Until 
recently he lived in New York City. 

1897 

— Wm. Starr Myers, teacher and journalist, is a member of 
the faculty of Princeton University. His address is 104 Bay- 
ard Lane, Princeton, N. J. 

— T. J. Creekmore is engaged in the automobile business. His 
home is in Norfolk, Va., though he is located at present in 
Smithfield. 

— Wm. A. Crinkley is assistant cashier of the Citizens Bank 
of Blackstone, Va. 

— D. J. Craig is secretary and treasurer of the Henkel-Craig 
Livestock Co. at Statesville. 

1898 

— Milton C. Elliott, formerly judge, now advisory counsel 
for the U. S. Trade Commission, practices law in Washington 
with offices at 532 Southern Building. 

— P. W. Foscue is cashier of the Bank of Jones at Trenton. 
— P. D. Gold, Jr., is engaged in the insurance business in 
New York City. He is located at 1465 Broadway. 
— Emmett E. Sams, formerly secretary of the state board of 
examiners and institute conductors, has located in Winston- 
Salem for the practice of law. 

— Robert E. Follin is engaged in the fire insurance and bond 
business at Winston-Salem as a member of the Follin Co. 
— Francis A. Gudger is general manager of the Arlington 
Works of the E. I. DuPont de Nemours and Company, at 
Wilmington, Del. 

1899 

H. M. WAGSTAFF, Secretary, Chapel Hill, N. C. 

— Warren L. Kluttz has been successful in the iron and steel 

business in Alabama. He is now general manager of the 

Sheffield Iron Corporation, Sheffield, Ala. 

— E. D. Broadhurst is a prominent lawyer of Greensboro, a 
member of the firm of Justice and Broadhurst. 
— A. C. Miller is engaged in farming. He lives in Winston- 
Salem. 

— P. A. Gorrell is a tobacconist of Winston-Salem, associated 
with the management of the Farmers' Warehouse. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



59 



Asphalt Pavements 

DL'RABLE: =:= ECONOMICAL 

If you are interested in street or road construction 
we invite you to inspect our work in 
Durham (Asphalt Streets). 
Durham County (Asphalt and Concrete Roads). 
Raleigh and Wake County (Asphalt). 
Guilford County (Asphalt Roads). 
Greensboro. 
Rocky Mount. 
High Point. 
Henderson. 
Lumberton. 

Also roads built for United States Government: 
Army Supply Base, Norfolk, Va. 
Newport News — Hampton Highway, Newport 

News, Va. 
Camp Lee, Va. 

A representative will visit you and supply any in- 
formation or estimates desired. 

Robert G. Lassiter & Co. 

ENGINEERING AND CONTRACTING 

327 Arcade Building Norfolk, Va. 

1002 Citizens Bank Building Raleigh, N. C. 

First National Bank Bunlding Oxford, N. C. 



r- 



The First National Bank 
of Richmond, Va., 



Commercial 
Banking 



Trust 
Department 



with its resources of 
$36,000,000, is splen- 
didly equipped to 
serve in all branches of 
Commercial Banking. 



The Trust Depart- 
ment offers unexcelled 
service. 

JNO. M. MILLER. Jr.. President 
W. M. ADDISON, Vice-President 
CHAS. R. BURNETT. Vice-President 
ALEX. F. RVLAND, Cashier 
THOS. W. PURCELL, Trust Officer 



<y- 



Murphy's Hotel 

Richmond, Virginia 

The Most Modern, Largest, and Best Located Hotel 
in Richmond, Being on Direct Car Line to all 
Railroad Depots. 

The Only Hotel in the City With a Garage Attached. 

Headquarters for Carolina Business Men. 
European Plan $1.50 Up 



JAMES T. DISNEY, President 



60 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



Statement of the Condition of 

The Fidelity Bank 

OF DURHAM, N. C. 

ZXCade to the 3\£orth Carolina Corporation Commission 
at the Close of Business, Sept. 12, 1919 



RESOURCES 

Loans and Investments $3,759,035.11 

Furniture and Fixtures 17,681.4- 

Cash Items * A7 Al\\l 

Cash in Vaults and with Banks 763.S93.55 

Overdrafts 842.79 

$5,388,874.24 

LIABILITIES 

Capital Stock $ 100,000.00 

Surplus 500,000.00 

Undivided Profits 107,596.17 

Interest Reserve 6,000.00 

Dividends Unpaid 195.01 

Deposits 4,261,285.21 

Unearned Interest 8,657.49 

Contingent Fund 5,140.36 

Borrowed Bonds 100,000.00 

Bills Payable ■ 300,000.00 

$5,388,874.24 

B. N. OUKE. President INO. F. WILY, Vice President S. W. MINOR, Cashier 
L. 0. KIRKUND. Assistant Cashier INO. A. BOCHANAN. Assistant Cashier 

The strength of this bank lies not alone in its Capital, Surplus, and Re- 
sources, but in the Character and Financial Responsibility 
of the men who conduct its affairs 



The Yarborough 



RALEIGH'S LEADING AND 
LARGEST HOTEL 

MAKE IT YOUR HOME WHEN 
IN RALEIGH 



B. H. Griffin Hotel Company 

Proprietors 



— Dr. Henry H. Kapp, Med. '99, is a prominent physician 
of Winston-Salem. He lives at 642 Holly Avenue. 

1900 
W. S. BERNARD, Secretary, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
— W. E. Hearn is Inspector of Soil Survey work in Maryland, 
Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama 
and Florida for the Bureau of Soils, United States Department 
of Agriculture, Washington, D. C. 

— Thad W. Jones, Jr., practices his profession, law, at Weather- 
ford, Okla. 

— C. E. Thompson is an attorney at law of Elizabeth City, 
a member of the firm of Thompson and Wilson. J. K. Wilson, 
'05, is the other member of this firm. 

— Fanning Craig is located at Windsor where he is engaged 
in the practice of law. He writes The Review that he is 
pleased with the October number of this publication. 
— J. Leak Spencer, treasurer of the Highland Park Mfg. Co., 
cotton manufacturers of Charlotte, was chairman of the en- 
tertainment committee for a large delegation of British cotton 
men who passed through Charlotte in October en route to the 
World Cotton Conference at New Orleans. 

1901 
DR. J. G. MURPHY, Secretary, Wilmington, N. C. 
— Dr. Eben Alexander, son of the late Dean Eben Alexander, 
is one of the leading physicians of Knoxville, Tenn. 
— C. A. Wyc.he is president of the First National Bank of 
Roanoke Rapids. He is chairman of the Roanoke Rapids 
board of education, which is now making plans for the erec- 
tion of a quarter million dollar high school building. 
— The marriage of Miss Mar3 - Clark Smith and Mr. John Elias 
Fais6n Hicks took place October 7th in the chapel of St. Mary 
the Virgin at the Thompson Orphanage, Charlotte. They live 
in Goldsboro where Mr. Hicks is a member of the drug firm 
of Hicks and Hawley. 

— Dr. R. O. E. Davis, of the Bureau of Soils, Washington, 
D. C, published in American Forestry for September a paper 
on ' ' Erosions in the Appalachians and Piedmont Regions. ' ' 

1902 
I. F. LEWIS, Secretary, University, Va. 
— In a quiet home wedding at Morganton on October 9th, Miss 
Sarah Grant Claywell became the bride of Mr. Robert S. Hutch- 
ison, of Charlotte. Mr. Hutchison who is a member of the Char- 
lotte bar, has spent much time in Morganton in the last few 
years as legal advisor of the Southern Power Company in the 
developments of this corporation near Morganton. 
— Dr. John A. Ferrell is Director for the United States of 
the International Health Board, under the Rockefeller Foun- 
dation. His offices are at 61 Broadway. 

1903 
N. W. WALKER, Secretary, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
— J. J. Skinner, of the Bureau of Plant Industry, U. S. De- 
partment of Agriculture, Washington, D. C, has been awarded 
by The Franklin Institute, of Philadelphia, its Edward Long- 
streth Medal of Merit for his paper on ' ' Soil Aldehydes, ' ' 
which appeared in the Journal of the Franklin Institute in 
five issues, from August to December, 1918. These papers of 
Mr. Skinner 's made up, in the opinion of the Franklin In- 
stitute authorities, a valuable contribution to the science of 
agricultural chemistry. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



61 



1903 

— Col. Robert P. Howell, Corps of Engineers, U. S. Army, is 
now in charge of the engineering district of Little Rock, Ark., 
and is stationed in that city. 

— L. L. Parker is president of the Bank of Pageland, S. C. 
— Dr. Fred M. Hanes, of Winston-Salem, was elected presi- 
dent of the Eighth District Medical Society at the meeting 
of this body held in Greensboro in September. 
— T. L. Gwyn, of Canton, chairman of the board of county 
commissioners of Haywood County, has probably the largest 
stock farm in the state. A shipment of beef cattle weighing 
660,000 pounds was made in September from his farm and the 
farm of the Haywood County sheriff. 

— E. M. Rollins, of Henderson, is both superintendent of 
schools and superintendent of public welfare of the county of 
Vance. 

— Zebulon Judd, professor of education in the Alabama Poly- 
technic. Institute at Auburn, is also director of the Summer 
School, which has just had a successful session. 
— Frank L. Foust during the past summer became county 
superintendent of schools for Hoke County. 
— Dr. J. W. Tankersley, Med. '03, physician and surgeon of 
Wilmington, is to return to Greensboro, his old home, for the 
practice of his profession. 

1904 

T. F. HICKERSON, Secretary, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
— Frederick Archer, superintendent of the Greensboro schools, 
made an address early in October before the Fayetteville 
parent-teacher association on the organization and possibilities 
of a parent-teacher society. 

— Harry B. Frost, of Providence, R. I., is publisher of The 
Manufacturing Jeweler, a weekly trade journal devoted to 
jewelers' interests. 

— Julian Taliaferro is engaged in the textile business at Leaks- 
ville as president of the Leaksville Woolen Mills. This cor- 
poration has recently increased its capital stock with the 
object in view of establishing a branch plant at Paw Creek, 
Mecklenburg County. 

— E. W. Barnes is engaged in the drug business at King 's 
Mountain as manager of the Mauney Drug Co.. wholesale and 
retail druggists. 

— John H. Vaughan, M. A. '05, is dean of the New Mexico 
Agricultural and Mechanical College at State College, N. M. 
Mr. Vaughan has been in the faculty of this institution for a 
number of years. 

— Burton H. Smith is resident agent of the General Electric 
Co., at Norfolk, Va. 

— W. H. Pace, Law '04, lawyer of Raleigh, who received lately 
his discharge from the service as major in the judge advocate 
general's department, has entered upon his new duties as an 
assistant attorney for the Bureau of War Risk Insurance. He 
is an immediate assistant to the chief counsel of the insurance 
bureau. 

— E. A. Council is cashier of the Marine Bank at Morehead 
City. 

1905 
W. T. SHORE, Secretary, Charlotte, N. C. 
— S. S. Heiile, of Ensley, Ala., is chief chemist of the By- 
product Coke Plant of the Tennessee Coal, Iron and Railroad 
Co. Mr. Heide is secretary of the Birmingham Alumni Asso- 
ciation. 




Hart SchafTner 

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goods are now complete. It will be to your 
interest to look carefully through the line of 
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New Dresses of Silks, soft Satins, and fine 
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All kind of cotton piece goods. Wool and 
Silk Dress Fabrics, Hosiery and Kid Gloves; 
Gossard Front-Lacing Corsets. 



62 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



LIGGETT & MYERS 
TOBACCO CO. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 

FATIMA, CHESTERFIELD, AND 

PIEDMONT CIGARETTES 

VELVET AND DUKE'S MIXTURE 

SMOKING TOBACCO AND 

other well known brands of Smok- 
ing Tobacco, Cigarettes, and 
Chewing Tobaccos. 



Our brands are standard for qualify. 
They speak for themselves. 



The O' Henry 

The Pride of Greensboro 



North Carolina's largest and finest 

commercial and tourist 

hotel 



200 ROOMS 



200 BATHS 



Thoroughly modern. Absolutely fireproof. 

Large sample rooms. Convention 

hall. Ball room. 



W. H. LOWRY 

Manager 



CABELL YOUNG 

Assistant Manager 



— Dr. Jas. B. Murphy, who was a major in the Medical Corps 
of the Army while the war was in progress, has again taken up 
medical research for the Rockefeller Institute, New York 
City. 

— Dr. A. F. Nichols is engaged in the practice of his profes- 
sion, medicine, at Roxboro. 

— C. McD. Carr is treasurer of the Durham Hosiery Mills. 
This corporation is the largest manufacturer of hosiery in 
the country. 

1906 

MAJ. J. A. PARKER, Secretary, Charlotte, N. C. 
— P. M. Weller is connected with the Consolidated Gas Electric 
Light and Power Company of Baltimore, Md. 
— J. S. Kerr is connected with the Cumberland Telegraph and 
Telephone Co., New Orleans, La. 

— G. F. Crocker is with the Southern Cotton Oil Co., at Sea- 
board. 

1907 
C. L. WEILL, Secretary, Greensboro, N. C. 
— Stuart G. Noble, professor of education in Millsaps College, 
Jackson, Miss., was director of the campaign which has just 
resulted in a substantial increase in salary for all faculty 
members in all colleges of Mississippi. 

— J. C. Galloway, of Grimesland, is a farmer and member of 
the General Assembly. 

— J. H. D'Alemberte is an official of the Realty Corporation, 
Pensacola, Pla. 

— J. C. Carson is superintendent of schools for Stokes County, 
He lives at Germanton. 

— L. A. Martin, Law '07, lawyer of Lexington, is supervisor 
of the census for the seventh congressional district. 

1908 
M. ROBINS, Secretary, Greensboro, N. C. 
— Charles Julian Vinson is a new arrival in the home of Mr. 
and Mrs. Barnard B. Vinson, of Thomasville. 
— Oscar R. Rand is in the TJ. S. Army as first lieutenant, 
infantry. He is stationed at Camp Gordon, Ga. 
— Bailey T. Groome is editor of The Review, a weekly journal 
of Charlotte. 

— W. H. Britt, who was formerly engaged in public school 
work, is now with the Wachovia Bank and Trust Co., Winston- 
Salem. 

1909 

O. C. COX, Secretary, Greensboro, N. C. 
— Wade A. Montgomery is treasurer of the Carolina Auto 
Supply House, wholesale dealers in automobile equipment, 
Charlotte. 

— R. S. Scott is connected with the firm of Williams and 
Shelton Co., importers and jobbers of dry goods, Charlotte. 
— Dr. Duncan MacRae is a research chemist with the Westing- 
house Electric and Mfg. Co., at East Pittsburg, Pa. 
— J. B. Reeves is head of the English department in West- 
minster College at Fulton, Mo. 

— Dr. B. K. Blalock is engaged in the practice of his profes- 
sion, medicine, at North Charlotte. 

— The adjutant general announced recently that John Hall 
Manning, of Kinston, had accepted the lieutenant-colonelcy 
of the infantry regiment in the new N. C. National Guard. 
— The marriage of Miss Mary Settle Boyd, of Washington, 
D. C, and Mr. Clement Coote Brown, of Wilmington, has been 
announced. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



63 



— Oscar A. Hamilton lias recently gone from the principal- 
ship of the Greensboro high school to the superintendency of 
the Goldsboro schools. 

1910 

J. B. NIXON, Secretary, Edenton, N. C. 

— L. Ames Brown, who was captain in the U. S. Army during 
the war and was later detailed as chief intelligence officer of 
the U. S. Shipping Board, has been elected first vice-president 
of the Thomas F. Logan, Inc., Advertising Agency, at 680 
Fif tli Avenue, New York City. Mr. Brown 's headquarters 
are at 401 Hibbs Building, Washington, D. C. 
— Dr. Bobert Drane, who held the rank of captain in service 
and was one of the first American medical officers overseas, 
has located at Savannah, Ga., as an X-ray specialist. 
— D. L. Boyd, Jr., a native of Waynesville, has become adver- 
tising manager of the Baleigh Times. Mr. Boyd is a news- 
paper and advertising man of experience. 

— R. R. Rogers, Law 1910, is in the fertilizer business at Nor- 
folk, Va. He is secretary of the Berkley Chemical Co., the 
Norfolk Fertilizer Co., and the Hampton Guano Co. He is 
assistant secretary of the Pocomoke Guano Co. and the Im- 
perial Co. 

— C. H. Hasty, Law '10, former football and baseball player 
for Carolina, and now a hardware merchant at Monroe, is 
coaching the Monroe high school football team. 
— Richard Dixon is now located at his home town, Edenton. 
In service he was a captain of the 113th Field Artillery. 
— Isaac P. Davis is engaged in the fire insurance business at 
Wilmington, connected with the Manhattan Co., Inc. 
— E. C. Bivens, Law '10, is engaged in the practice of law 
at Mt. Airy and is mayor of the city. 

— Ernest Jones is connected with the Frank Robins Co., of 
Havana, Cuba, in the capacity of sales engineer. 
— B. H. Bunn is engaged in the tobacco business at Rocky 
Mount. 

— O. W. Hyrnan is a graduate student at Princeton. I lis 
address is 31 Graduate College, Princeton, N. Y. 

1911 
I. C. MOSER, Secretary, Asheboro, N. < '. 

— A group of cotton mill men including Kenneth Tanner, of 
Spindale, and John Tillett, of Thomasville, recently bought 
up the Clover Mills Company, of Clover, S. S., one of the 
best established cotton mills of South Carolina. Under the 
reorganization, Mr. Tanner is president of the corporation 
and Mr. Tillett is secretary and treasurer. Mr. Tillett will 
have active charge of this mill and will continue to have active 
charge of the Jewell Cotton Mills at Thomasville. 
— Dr. W. P. Belk, formerly first lieutenant in the Medical 
Corps, attached to Base Hospital 23, A. E. F., was a visitor 
to the ' ' Hill ' ' recently. Doctor Belk was overseas in Red 
Cross work long before the United States entered the war. 
He is now in Philadelphia, where he is taking a special course 
in surgery. It is his intention to locate in Charlotte for tin' 
practice of his profession. 

— Rev. John A. MacLean is pastor of the First Presbyterian 
Church of Morganton. 

— Earl V. Patterson is officer in charge ordnance textile sec- 
tion of the Boston Zone Supply Office of the U. S. Army. He 
is negotiating officer. 
— George Graham, who lives at 1001 South Boulevard, Char- 



The Bank o/Chapel Hill 

Oldest and Strongest bank in Orange County. 



Capital $25,000.00 

Surplus and Profits 37,000.00 

We . earnestly solicit your banking 
business, promising' you every service 
and assistance consistent with safe 
banking. "It pleases us to please 
you. ' ' 



M. C. S. NOBLE President 

It. L. STROWD Vice-President 

M. E. HOGAN Cashier 




Snappy Clothes 

for the 
College Man 

Society and 
Stein Bloch Clothes 

for the young 

and those 
who stay young 

Vanstory Clothing Co. 

C. H. McKNIGHT, "President and Manager 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



fi4 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



"EL-REES-SO" 

7c— 3 for 20c 

Mi:d, Fragrant, Delightful— Try One 



(( 



JOHNT. REES" 

10c 

A Cigar of quality, smooth, mellow, soothing. Gives 
a restful finish to a perfect day 

EL-REES-SO CIGAR CO. 

Manufacturers of the Famous EL-REES-SO Cigar 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Clothes Made by Makers who 
Jlnow for Men who %now 



and dold bn 



$need=Markham=9ai(lor %o. 

Surkam, Viorth "Carolina 



W. H. LAWRENCE AND T. H. LAWRENCE 
ASSOCIATED 



Contractor and djuilder 

MAIN OFFICE: DURHAM, N. C. 



CONTRACTOR PHILLIPS HALL 
UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 



Broadway Cafe 

WE CORDIALLY INVITE YOU TO VISIT OUR 
CAFE WHEN YOU ARE IN GREENSBORO 

EXCELLENT SERVICE 

COURTEOUS TREATMENT 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



lotte, is now connected with the Goodyear Tire and Rubber 
Co., at their Charlotte office. 

— J. L. Eason is head of the department of English at Grand 
Island College, Grand Island, Nebraska. Mr. Eason 's text- 
book, ' ' English, Science and Engineering. ' ' is being widely 
used in institutions of engineering. 

— Odom Alexander, of Charlotte, is in Europe, on an industrial 
and commercial mission representing the Sout' ern Commercial 
Congress. 

— Roy L. Deal is now engaged in the practice of law at 
Winston-Salem, with offices at 601 O 'Hanlon Building. Mr. 
Deal writes Secretary "Ike" Moser as follows: "I was dis- 
charged from the Army about midsummer, after eighteen 
months of service on this side, and decided not to go back 
to my old job as attorney in the Federal Department of Jus- 
tice but to return to N. C. and hoist my own emblem. I 
was in the Judge Advocate General's department of the army 
and served all the way from lieutenant to major . . So far 
I haven 't accomplished much in the world but to become the 
father of the finest little baby girl that ever aroused the 
household at midnight. Believe me, I 'm proud of that 
though. ' ' 

— I. C. Moser is junior member of the law firm of Hammer 
and Moser at Asheboro. District Attorney W. C. Hammer, 
Law '92, is the senior member of this firm. Mr. Moser writes 
that he is pleased with the outcome of the Carolina-State Col- 
lege game, and says he hopes this game will be made an an- 
nual event. 

— T. M. Broadfoot, M. A. 1911, is superintendent of schools at 
Mabank, Texas. 

1912 
• J. C. LOCKHART, Secretary, Raleigh, N. C. 
— The marriage of Miss Gertrude Reece and Mr. Alonzo Dil- 
lard Folger took place October 13th at the home of the bride 's 
parents in Dobson. They make their home in Dobson where 
Mr. Folger is engaged in the practice of law as a member 
of the firm of Folger, Jackson and Folger. 

— A. M. Atkinson is engaged in surveying and drafting at 
Enfield. He writes that he is also mayor of the town. 
— The Sevier Cotton Mills, of Kings Mountain, were re-or- 
ganized lately, and are now under the presidency of R. H. 
Johnston, of Charlotte. 

— Dr. Wm. E. Wakely is practicing his profession, medicine, 
as physician and surgeon, and is located at 420 Main St., 
Orange, N. J. 

— John C. Lockhart, of Raleigh, is superintendent of schools 
for Wake County. 

■ — C. Walton Johnson is community boys' work secretary of 
Asheville. He is directing a community program fostered 
by the Asheville Rotary Club and promoted by the Asheville 
Y. M. C. A. Mr. Johnson saw service in France as a member 
of the 321st Infantry, Slst Division. He has prepared a 
history of the 321st Infantry and this is now in press. 
— Wm. B. Cobb is now at Lake Geneva, Wis., where he is at 
work for the U. S. Bureau of Soils as a scientist in soil sur- 
vey. 
Editor, The Review : 

Sik: Greetings from the golden west! This is a great 
country. I have been out here since last Spring and like it 
very much. My best wishes to the University and to my friends 
of 1912 or thereabouts. 

T. M. PRICE, '12. 
202 14th Avenue North, Seattle, Wash. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



65 



Markham-Rogers Co. 

Clothiers, Tailors, Furnishers and Hatters. 

All the New Fall Styles at Reasonable 
Prices 

DURHAM, N. C. 



Peary H©irtaa Bho® C® 

Special Agents for Nettleton and Hurley 

Shoes for Men, and Cousins and Grover 

Shoes for Women 

MAKE OUR STORE HEADQUARTERS 
WHILE IN DURHAM, N. C. 



Academy of Music 

DURHAM, N. C. 

Durham's Exclusive Theatre Playing All Leading 
Attractions 

WM. F. FREELAND, Manager 



Snider- JF letcl)ex (To. 



WATCHES, DIAMONDS, AND 
JEWELRY 



110 W. MAIN ST. 



DURHAM, N. C. 



"Durham business School 

FULLY ACCREDITED 

3£oaro of TAovisors 

GEN. J. S. CARR W. G. BRAMHAM 

DR. J. M. MANNING W. J. BROGDEN 

R. L. FLOWERS GEO. W. WATTS 

For full particular and handsome catalog, address 

MRS. WALTER LEE LEDNUM 

PRESIDENT 



Steumdl TIbieaftir© 

DURHAM, N. C. 

HIGH CLASS PICTURES AND SPECIAL MUSIC 

YOU ARE ALWAYS WELCOME 

Open from 11:00 A. M. Until 11:00 P. M. 



THE CAROLINA MAN'S SHOE STORE 

Can-Bryant 

High Grade Shoes with Snap and Style 



Carr-Bryant {F$oot & Shoe Co. 



106 West Main Street 



DURHAM, N. C. 



HICKS -CRABTREE CO. 

FOUR MODERN DRUG STORES 
RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 

Eastman Kodaks and Supplies 
Nunnally's Candies 

The place to meet your friends when 
in the Capital City 

GILBERT CRABTREE, Manager 



66 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



Odell Hardware Co. 

Greensboro, N. C. 

China, Cut Glass and Silverware 
Household Goods 

DEPENDABLE GOODS 

PROMPT SERVICE 

SATISFACTORY PRICES 



Guilford Hotel and Cafe 

NEWLY REMODELED 
RATES REASONABLE 
CENTRAL LOCATION 

Greensboro, North Carolina 



Cross and Linehan Co. 

Leaders in Clothing and Gents' 
Furnishings 

Raleigh, North Carolina 



(Loop er 5ttonumertt 
(LorrtpariY 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Communicate with us regarding your 

needs for monuments or 

tombstones 



1913 
A. L. M. WIGGINS, Secretary, Hartsville, S. C. 
— Robert Strange, veteran of the world war, former captain 
in the Sixth Field Artillery Brigade headquarters of the Sixth 
Division, has been made captain of the Wilmington Light In- 
fantry under the National Guard reorganization plans. Mr. 
Strange is now a business man of Wilmington, with the 
wholesale firm of J. A. Taylor. 

— Dr. E. M. Coulter, formerly professor of history in Ma- 
rietta College, Marietta, Ohio, is now located at Athens, Ga., 
where he is in the faculty of the University of Georgia, depart 
ment of history. 

— Paul A. Bennett is manager of the Bennett-Simpson Shoe 
Co., Winston -Salem. 

— Arnold A. McKay, U. S. Counsul at Antofagasta, Chile, is 
now on leave and is visiting his parents in Robeson County 
near Maxton. The 1913 contingent on the "Hill" expects 
a visit from him before he returns to South America. 
— Frank H. Kennedy practices his profession, law, in Char- 
lotte, with offices in the Lawyers' Building. 
— A. L. M. Wiggins is now the head of a family in which 
there are three children, the youngest of whom, a boy, was 
born in October. 

— Major J. S. " Steve ' ' Simmons, Med. '13, who has been chief 
of the laboratories at the Walter Reed Hospital in Washing- 
ton, D. C, has been transferred to Denver, Colorado, where 
he will be chief of the tuberculosis laboratories of the U. S. 
Government. 

— Horace Sisk, superintendent of the Lenoir schools, during 
the past summer conducted county summer schools for teachers 
at Lenoir, for the Caldwell County teachers, and at Jefferson, 
for the Ashe County teachers. 

— T. A. DeVane has received his discharge after having been 
in the army for two and one-half years, and is now located 
at Red Springs where he is engaged in the lumber business 
with his father and uncle. 

1914 
OSCAR LEACH, Secretary, Raeford, N. C. 
— George V. Strong has located in Philadelphia at 1316-18 
Widener Building for the practice of law. He extends a 
cordial invitation to all University men to drop in to see 
him when they are in Philadelphia. During the war Mr. 
Strong held the rank of major in Field Artillery. 
— M. N. Oates is with the Consolidated Gas, Electric Light and 
Power Company of Baltimore, Md. 

— A. M. Worth is in the automobile business at Wilmington. 
— H. C. Long, Jr., has entered the cotton mill business and 
is now located at King's Mountain where he is treasurer of 
the Sevier Cotton Mills. 

— Henry L. Cox is an assistant in chemistry at the Univer- 
sity of Chicago. His address is 5515 Ingleside Ave., Chi- 
cago. 

— J. A. Holmes, after his A. E. F. experiences, has returned 
to his former work as a teacher. He is head of the mathe- 
matics department of the Raleigh high school and coach of 
the football team. 

— Jas. T. Pritchett is engaged in the practice of law at Le- 
noir. Mr. Pritchett was a captain of infantry while the war 
was in progress. 

— Miss Lucy Robertson and Mr. Ben F. Aycock were mar- 
ried on October 15th at the home of the bride's parents, 1363 
Monroe St., Washington, D. C. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



67 



Dick 's Laundry Co. 



Greensboro, N. C. 



High-Class Launderers, French 
Cleaners and Dyers 

Prompt and Efficient Service 

is our motto 

Our reputation gained through years 
of experience speaks for itself. 

Send yours by Parcel Post 
We appreciate your patronage 



C. 5. Pendergraft 

Chapel Hill Agent 



CAPITALIZE YOUR TIME AND TALENTS 

By qualifying for a responsible business or civil service posi- 
tion while salaries are high. 

Banking, Bookkeeping, Gregg Shorthand. Touch T> pe- 
writing, Business Arithmetic, Busi ness English, Commercial 
Law, Rapid Calculations, Spelling, Palmer Penmanship, 
Business Efficiency and Office Practice, taught by Spe- 
cialists, 

Our school is a member of the National Association of 
Accredited Commercial Schools and is highly endorsed by 
everybody. Call or request a catalog. 

King's Business College 

Raleigh, N. C. Charlotte, N. C. 



^Vanfp rl Boxwood Sprays cut not to exceed fifteen 
ClllLCU inches long. Cash-before shipment. 



A. B. PRICE 



925 Vir 8 iniaAve„ S. W. 



Washington, D. C. 



Yackety Yacks, 191 6-' 17 

The Year Carolina beat Virginia in all meets. Handsome leather- 
bound volume. The last available. Price $2. 

G. D. CRAWFORD. Chapel Hill, N. C. 



Drink 



Coca-Cola 



Delicious and Refreshing 



Quality tells the difference in the taste be- 
tween Coca-Cola and counterfeits. 



Demand the genuine by full name- 
names encourage substitution. 



-nick- 



Get a bottle of the genuine from your 
grocer, fruit stand, or cafe. 



Durham Coca-Cola Bottling Co. 

DURHAM, N. C. 



p=========^r~====~S^^ 


'■ 


RIDE WITH 


j 


C. S. Pendergraft 




Pioneer Auto Man 


; 


LEAVE ORDERS AT 




MABRY'S DRUG STORE 




HEADQUARTERS IN DURHAM 


i ' 


THE BEST PLACE TO GET SOFT DRINKS. CIGARS 
AND CIGARETTES 




HEADQUARTERS IN CHAPEL HILL: NEXT TO 
BANK OF CHAPEL HILL 




Leave Chapel Hill 8.30 and 10.20 a. m. 

Leave Chapel Hill 2.30 and 4.00 p.m. 

Leave Durham 9.50 a. m., 12.40 p. m. 

" Leave Durham 5.08 p. m., 8.00 p. m. 


.:: 


OTHER TRIPS SUBJECT TO ORDER 


Four Machines at Your Service 
Day or Night 


PHONE 58 or 23 

: 

Agent for 

Dick's Laundry, Greensboro, N. C. 








;;; 



liS 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



"SAY IT WITH FLOWERS" 
J. J. FALLON, Leading Florist 



Chapel Hill A 8 enls: 

FOISTER'S ART STORE 

R. P. ANDREWS. People's Bank 



Phone 1290 

214 E. M.m Street 

DURHAM, N. C 



PARIS THEATRE 

DURHAM, N. C. 

ARTCRAFT-PARAMOUNT PICTURES 

Orchestra Orchestra 



BROADWAY THEATRE 

DURHAM, N. C. 

THE HOUSE OF SPECIAL PHOTO-PLAY 

ATTRACTIONS 



DURHAM CAFE 



VISIT US WHILE IN DURHAM 



C W. KENDALL 

LADIES' WEAR STORE 
VISIT US WHILE IN DURHAM 



WELCOME TO 

STONEWALL HOTEL 

W. E. HOCKETT, Manager 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



w 


M. 


NEWTON 


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DURHAM, 


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DE LUXE CLOTHIERS 


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Durham 


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CHAPEL HILL AGENTS: 


EUBANKS DRUG 


CO. 



1915 
DANIEL L. BELL, Secretary, Pittsboro, N. C. 
— Walter P. Fuller is editor of the Manatee River Journal, 
at Bradentown, Fla. 

— The marriage of Miss Virginia Moir and Mr. George B. 
Wliitaker took place October 14th at the Centenary Church, 
Winston-Salem. They are at home in Winston-Salem where 
Mr. Wliitaker is cashier of the Merchants National Bank. 
— J. M. Cox is connected with the DuPont Engineering Co., 
at Detroit, Mich. 

— A new corporation, chartered in October, is the Royal 
Theater, Raleigh. The incorporators are: W. P. Wliitaker, 
Jr., '15, of Wilson; C. K. Burgess, '12, of Raleigh; and W. 
T. Joyner, '11, of Raleigh. 

— Roscoe E. Parker, who went to France as a captain in the 
81st Division, is now teaching in the Raleigh high school, 
being head of the English department. 

— E. J. Lilly, Jr., is an army officer. He is first lieutenant, 
17th Machine Gun Battalion, stationed at Camp Grant. 
— Phil Woollcott was on the ' ' Hill ' ' recently. He is now 
connected with the bond department of the American Trust 
Co., Charlotte. 

— A. R. Newsome is professor of history in the Bessie Tift 
College, Forsyth, Ga. 

1916 

HUGH B. HESTER, Secretary, Capt. and Adj. 12th F. A., 

Camp Travis, Texas 
— G. Wallace Smith spent a day on the ' ' Hill ' ' recently. 
He is now assistant electrical engineer for the Carolina Ship- 
building Corporation at Wilmington. He lives at 106 N. 
6th St., Wilmington. 

— The marriage of Miss Helen Ingram Matthews, Law '16, 
and Mr. John Jacob Barnhardt took place October 18th in 
Charlotte. They live in Concord. 

— W. Borden Cobb is connected with the Wayne National Bank 
of Goldsboro. 

— R. A. Wellons, lawyer of Smithfield, had an active career 
in aviation in service. One of his feats was that of thread- 
ing the bridges across the Mississippi river at St. Louis. 
— From a friend at Chapel Hill conies an inquiry for the 
address of Mr. Herschel Johnson. It is No. 3 Brek Hall, 
Cambridge, Mass. Mr. Johnson has resigned his commission 
as captain in the army and is a civilian again. On his return 
from France he was undecided as to whether he would remain 
in the army or not. Having always had a penchant for the 
law, the pen finally proved mightier, in influence, than the 
sword, and he laid his armor by and went to Harvard where 
he is now armed and equipped with law books. — The Charlotte 
Observer. 

1917 
H. G. BAITY, Secretary, Harmony, N. C. 

— S. J. Ervin, Jr., president of the class of 1917, is a stu- 
dent in the Harvard Law School. His address is 36 Bigelow 
St., Cambridge, Mass. 

— Henry G. Harper, Jr., is branch salesman for the Goodyear 
Tire and Rubber Co., at Charlotte. 

— A. M. Lindau is a student in the Harvard Law School. His 
address is 13 Chauncey St., Cambridge, Mass. 
— C. H. McCurry is connected with the Great Western Sugar 
Co., at Longmont, Col. 

— S. I. Parker is connected with the Cone Export and Com- 
mission Co., Greensboro. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



69 



A. E. LLOYD HARDWARE CO. 

DURHAM, N. C. 

All Kinds of Hardware, Sporting 

Goods and College Boys' 

Accessories 

GEO. W. TANDY, MANAGER 



Clniversity students, faculty members, and 
aiumni visit the Jtoyal (3afe while in 
^Durham. Cinder netv and pro- 
gressive management. 
Special parlors 
for ladies 



9)ur/i 



urnani s 



^fyLoc/ern i^afe 



Keep Physically Fit 



The young men of U. N. C. are wise enough 
to know that athletic exercise promotes sound 
health. Get in some game early. 

We can supply you with every essential in 
equipment for Football, Soccer, Basket Ball, 
Hockey, Skating, etc. 



Wrilefor catalogue No. UC. 

ALEX TAYLOR & CO., Inc 

Athletic Outfitters 
26 E. 42nd St., New York 




Hennessee Cafe 

A MODERN, UP-TO-DATE CAFE. WHERE YOU 
AND YOUR FRIENDS ARE WELCOME 

CLEANLINESS AND SERVICE 
OUR MOTTOES 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



BAGLEY & ALDERMAN, Advertising 

LETTERWRITING, MULTIGRAPHING, PRINT- 
ING, ADVERTISING SIGNS, AND 
SPECIALTIES 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



C. C. HOOK, Architect 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 

TWENTY YEARS EXPERIENCE IN PLANNING 
SCHOOL AND COLLEGE BUILDINGS 



.A. A. IKlutte (lo.,lnc. 

Extend a cordial invitation to all students and 
alumni of the U. N. C. to make their store head- 
quarters during their stay in Chapel Hill. 

Complete Stock of 
New and Second-hand Books, Stationery, and 
Complete Line of Shoes and Haberdashery 
Made by the Leaders of Fashion, Al- 
ways on Hand 



When in Need 

of a Pocket Knife, Razor, Hone, Strop, Brush, 
Safety Razor, Blades, or tools of any kind, 
Paints, Varnishes, Brushes, Electrical Goods, 
and General Hardware, call on the 

Chapel Hill Hardware Co. 

THE STORE WHERE "QUALITY" COUNTS 



THE RESULT OF 28 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE 

LANG'S "ROGER C." CIGAR; TWO 

BRANDS: 7c and 10c 

A COMPARISON IS ALL I ASK 

ROGER C. LANG 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



70 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



R. BLACKNALL & SON 

DRUGGISTS 

NORHIS AND HUVLERS CANDIES 

G. BERNARD. Manac.fr 

Corcoran Street Durham, IM C. 



E. E. Bragg & Co. 

WALKOVER AND FLORSHEIM SHOES 
DURHAM, N. C. 



Model Laundry Co. 

DURHAM, N. C. 
EXPERT LAUNDRY SERVICE 



DURHAM ICE CREAM CO. 

Fancy Ices; Makers of Blue Ribbon Brand Ice Cream 
Receptions and Banquets a Specialty 

TELEPHONE No. 1199 



POLLARD BROTHERS 

DURHAM, N. C. 

STANDARD LINES OF HARDWARE 

AND SPORTING GOODS 



Diuurlinainni Sin®© C® 

LEATHER GOODS CHEAPER 
DURHAM, N. C. 



PRIDGEN & JONES CO. 

We Carry the Best Shoes: Edwin Clapp, Howard and 

Foster, and Heywood's 

Expert Fitters — A Cordial Welcome Awaits You 

107 W. Main St. DURHAM, N. C. 



THE SELWYN 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 

Fireproof, Modern and Luxurious 

IN THE HEART OF EVERYTHING 

H. C. LARZALERE, Manager 



1918 
W. R. WUNSCH, Secretary, Chapel Hill, N. 0. 
— Marion B. Fowler is engaged in banking at Durham with 
the Durham Loan and Trust Co. 

— Miss Maud Craig Carson is teaching in the Winston-Salem 
high school. After the present session has been concluded, 
she plans to enter training for work as a missionary in China 
or Japan. 

1919 
H. G. WEST, Secretary, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
— Kenneth Mouutcastle is pursuing graduate work at Yale, 
a candidate for the M. A. degree. 

— David Townsend is engaged in farming at Rowland. 
— C. K. Torrence is engaged in the cotton mill business at 
Gastonia as superintendent of the Ozark Mills. 
— H. B. Gaston and E. B. Denny, both members of the law 
class of 1919, who received license to practice law in August, 
have located at Gastonia for the practice of their profession 
and have formed a partnership under the name of Gaston 
and Denny. 

— M. 0. Dickerson, Jr., of Rutherfordton, has resigned the 
position of deputy collector in the revenue service and has 
entered the cotton business. 

1920 
— Frank S. Spruill, late a captain in the 52nd Infantry, has 
gone to Ranger, Texas, to engage in the oil business. 
— Spencer Thome, lawyer of Rocky Mount, has entered upon 
his duties as secretary to congressman Edward W. Pou, at 
Washington. 

NECROLOGY 

1885 
Charles Ernest Shober died August 18th in New York City, 
aged 57 years. Deceased was a native of Salisbury and was 
a student at the University in 1881-82. He was for a num- 
ber of years a star with Lillian Russell. 

1895 
Roland Headon Hayes, prominent lawyer of Pittsboro, died 
July 26th in a Richmond, Va. hospital, 52 years of age. De- 
ceased was a native of Moore county and a student in the 
University during the years 1891-92 and 1892-93. He had 
several times represented Chatham county in the legislature. 

1902 
Albert Marvin Carr, B.S. 1902, second son of General 
Julian S. Carr, of Durham, died September 21st at the New 
York Hospital, New York City. Deceased was first vice- 
president and sales manager of the Durham Hosiery Mills. 
He was one of the most widely known and popular of the 
younger Carolina alumni. In college he was a member of 
the football team and was captain for a season. 

1908 
—William Jacob Hicks, Ph. C. 1908, died October 3rd at 
his home in Goldsboro, aged 39 years. Deceased had been 
in declining health for several years. 

1920 
— William Leonard Lindsay died October 12th at the home 
of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Lindsay, in Chapel Hill. 
Deceased had been in ill health for a year, following an 
attack by influenza in the fall of 1918. Deceased was a 
student in the University during the year 1916- '17. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



71 



Z3l)£ Kntversit? Jp r ** 5 

ZEB P. COUNCIL, Manager CHAPEL HILL. N. C. 

PRINTING, ENGRAVED CARDS 

QUALITY AND SERVICE 



PATTERSON BROS. 

DRUGGISTS 



AGENCY .NORMS CANDY 



THE REX Al I STORE 



_ 



K 



ODAK SUPPLIEQ 

Finishing for the Amateur. Foister ^^ 



GOOCH'S CAFE 

Anything to Eat 
CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 



(Essie tJjrotAers 

CALIFORNIA AND FLORIDA FRUITS 

TOBACCO AND CIGARS 

ICE CREAM PARLOR FRESH CANDIES 

"WE STRIVE TO PLEASE" 



CHAPEL HILL 
N. C. 



ANDREWS CASH STORE GO. 

Students and Faculty will find us ready to serve 
them with the latest styles in Walkover Shoes, 
Fancy Shirts, Tailored Suits, and general furn- 
ishings. Be convinced. Call and see. 



FOR NEAT JOB PRINTING AND TYPEWRITER 
PAPER CALL AT THE OFFICE OF 

The Chapel Hill News 



W. B. SORRELL 

JEWELER AND OPTOMETRIST 
CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 



Eubanks Drug Co. 

Chapel Hill, N.C. 

Agents for Munnally' & Candy 



HOUSEHOLD SUPPLY CO. 

CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 

We are prepared to save you money on your house- 
hold supplies. Let us know your needs. 



PICKARD'S HOTEL 

Headquarters for Carolina Alumni 

Returning to the Hill 

SPECIAL RATES. STUDENT BOARDERS. 



"Electric Sfyoe Sbop 

EXPERT SHOE REPAIRING 
CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 



Huffine Hotel 

Quick Lunch Counter and Dining Room — Clean 

Rooms $1.00 and Up 

NEAR DEPOT: GREENSBORO, N. C. 



WHITING-HORTON CO. 

THIRTY-ONE YEARS 
RALEIGH'S LEADING CLOTHIERS 



H. S. STORR & CO. 

Office Furniture, Machines and Supplies; Printers and 
Manufacturers of Rubber Stamps 
RALEIGH, N. C. 



DnMbini Suapply C® 

MACHINERY, MILL SUPPLIES 
PHONE 753 RALEIGH, N. C. 



7l» 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 




The "Constitution" of To-day— Electrically Propelled 



THE U. S. S. "New Mexico," the first 
battleship of any nation to be electri- 
cally propelled, is one of the most important 
achievements of the scientific age. She not 
only develops the maximum power and, 
with electrical control, has greater flexi- 
bility of maneuver, which is 
a distinct naval advantage, 
but also gives greater econ- 
omy. At 10 knots, her 
normal cruising speed, she 
will steam on less fuel than 
the best turbine-driven ship 
that preceded her. 

The electric generating 
plant, totaling 28,000 horse- 
power, and the propulsion 
equipment of the great super-dreadnaught 
were bui'.t by the General Electric Company. 
Their operation has demonstrated the superi- 
ority cf electric propulsion over old-time 
methods and a wider application of this 
principle in the merchant marine 13 fast 
making progress. 



Figures that tell the 
Story of Achievement 

Length-624 feet 
Width— 97 feet 
Displacement— 32,000 tons 
Fuel capacity — a million 

gallons (fuel oil) 
Power— 28,000 electrical 

horsepower 
Speed— 21 knots 



Six auxiliary General Electric Turbine-Gen- 
erators of 400 horsepower each, supply 
power for nearly 500 motors, driving pumps, 
fans, shop machinery, and kitchen and laun- 
dry appliances, etc. 

Utilizing electricity to propel ships at sea 
marks the advancement of 
another phase of the elec- 
trical industry in which the 
General Electric Company 
is the pioneer. Of equal 
importance has been its 
part in perfecting electric 
transportation on land, 
transforming the potential 
energy of waterfalls for use 
in electric motors, develop- 
ing the possibilities of electric lighting and 
many other similar achievements. 

As a result, so general are the applications 
of electricity to the needs of mankind that 
scarcely a homo or individual today need 
be without the benefits of General Electric 
products and service. 



An illustrated booklet describing the "New Mexico," entitled, 
' The Electric Ship," will be sent upon request. Address 
General Electric Company, Desk 44, Schenectady, New York. 




General Office 
Schenectady; N.Y 





Sales Offices in 
all large cities 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



73 



Why have 33,000 College Men 

enrolled in the 

Alexander Hamilton Institute? 

THE President of the largest in- lying all business, and its training fits a man for 
StitUtion of its kind in America the sort of executive positions where demand 

-a man still in his forties- was com- always outmns sup e'y- 

meriting on his own experience in The splendid privilege of 

business. saving wasted years 

"When I graduated from college I supposed ("\NE of the tragedies of the business world is that 

I was equipped with the training necessary to V-^ so many college men spend so many of the best 

business success," he said. V carb of their lives in d? in £ tasks vvhich the y know are 

below their real capacities. 

"As a matter of fact I had nothing more than it is the privilege of the Institute to save those wasted 
a bare foundation I discovered that fact even years — to give a man in the leisure moments of a few 
in my first job, and for weeks I spent my even- months the working knowledge of the various depart- 
ing in a night school trying to master the ele- ments of m ° de ™ business which would ordinarll y take 

* 6 _ .. i him years to acquire. 

ments ot cost-finding and accountancy. , » . 

That the Institute's Modern Business Course and 

"Later as I made my way up toward executive Service actually achieves this splendid result, that its 

„„-;,;.-,„„ T ( n ,,„A I «o„JaJ •■„ lr„„,,, »v,„ t..~A„ training is practical and immediately applicable to the 

positions 1 round 1 needed to know the tur.da- „,„ui „„ t u .1 j t ot nan 

r 1 r 1 j i_ j- • r j problems ot every business, the records of 95,000 

mentals ot sales and merchandising, ot adver- business men, in every kind of business, prove, 
tising and factory management, of office 

organization and corporation finance. £ t least you will Want 

These I picked up from books as best I could. the facts 

Probably my college training made it easier for __.,_„,, „ , . , . 

• .1 u * .v. 11 U vkKY college man in business is interested in busi- 

me to acquire them; but the college training H, ness trainin | He h ; nterested in it either as a 

alone certainly was not an adequate preparation factor in his own progress; or as a factor in the prog- 
for business in my case. I doubt if it is for ress °f the younger men associated with him, who are 

any man." constandy turning to him for advice. 

To put all the facts regarding the Modern Business 
More than 95,000 men Course and Service in convenient form the Alexander 

Hamilton Institute has prepared a 116-page book, en- 
in ten years titled "Forging Ahead in Business". It tells concisely 

T TTT , . . . tt -l t • an d specifically what the Course is and what it has 

Hk. Alexander Hamilton Institute was not done for other men. There is a copy of this book 
founded early enough to be of service to free for every college man in business; send for your 
this man ; but it grew out of an appreciation of c0 Py to-day. 
the needs of men of just this type. » , , TX ., T 

Alexander Hamilton Institute 

In the ten years of its existence the Institute 193 Astor Place New York City fp\ 

has enrolled more than 95,000 men who are — — tv- 

to-day making more rapid progress in business Send me "Forging Ahead in Business" Kf" 

kr • F R F F o^^ 

ot its training. * 

Name 

Of these 95,000 no less than 33,000 are ivi»i'i«"" 

graduates of colleges and universities. Address 

This is the Institute's mark of distinction — that 
its appeal is to the unusual man. It has only 
one course, embracing the fundamentals under- Position. 



74 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 




Monogram and Fraternity Stationery 
Calling Cards 
Wedding Invitations 



THE SEEMAN PRINTERY 

DURHAM, N. C. 




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The University of North Carolina 



789 



CHAPEL HILL 



1919 



"Educationally the decade that follows the war will be, I believe, the 
richest and most fruitful in the nation's history." 

THESE PROPHETIC WORDS, written by the late Edward Kidder Graham while America was still at war, 
relate to today — the college year 1919-1920 — to this very moment when North Carolina stands confronted 
with the problem of building its civilization upon sound, permanent foundations and when the South and 
the Nation, with newly opened channels of intercourse with the world at large, are planning for the complete 
fulfilment of their high mission among the nations. 

THIS FRUITFUL DECADE, JUST AT THE QUADRENNIUM of the war now ended, calls insistently for the 
TRAINED LEADER. 

THROUGH ITS NEWLY ESTABLISHED SCHOOL OF COMMERCE, its School of Engineering, and other 
schools and departments, the University offers the thoroughgoing, complete training for the sort of leadership 
which the new day requires. 

COURSES ARE OFFERED IN BUSINESS ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT, Accounting, Foreign 
Trade, Banking, Transportation, Political Economy, Business Law, Electrical Engineering, Chemical En- 
gineering, Highway Engineering, Soil Investigation. Law, Medicine, Pharmacy, Journalism, Social Science, 
Government, Education, Music, and all subjects embraced in the College of Liberal Arts, the School of Ap- 
plied Science, the Graduate School, and the Summer School. 

Instruction through correspondence courses on a wide choice of subjects may be secured at low cost through the 
Bureau of Extension. 

ADDRESS THE PRESIDENT 

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

CHAPEL HILL 



(Eultura 



Scholarship 



>ervice 



Self-Support 



THE 



^tortb (Tarolina (Lollegefor^Pomen 

Offers to Women a Liberal Education, Equipment for Womanly 
Service, Professional Training for Remunerative Employment 



The College offers four groups of studies lead- 
ing to the following degrees: Bachelor of Arts, 
Bachelor of Science, and Bachelor of Music. 

Special courses in Pedagogy; in Manual Arts; in 
Domestic Science. Household Art and Economics; in 
Music; and in '.ne Commercial Branches. 

Teachers and graduates of other colleges provided 
for in both regular and special courses. 



Equipment modern, including furnished dormitories, 
library, laboratories, literary society halls, gymnag- 
ium, music rooms, teachers' training school, infirm- 
ary, model laundry, central heating plant, and open 
air recreation grounds. 

Dormitories furnished by the State. Board at 
actual cost. Tuition free to those who pledge them- 
selves to become teachers. 



Fall ^Cerm Opens in September 



Summer TZerm Begins in June 



For catalogue and other information, address 

JULIUS I. FOUST, President, GREENSBORO, N. C. 






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