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Full text of "The alumni review [serial]"

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COLLECTION (> 1 

NORTH C A R O L I N I A N A 

ENDOWED BY 

JOHN SPRDNT HILL 
of the class of 1889 



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THE ROYALL & BORDEN CO. 

Corner West Main and Market Streets DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA 

Sell all kinds of furniture and furnishings for churches, 
colleges and homes. Biggest stock of Rugs in the 
State, and at cheapest prices. CJIr" you don't know us 
ask the College Proctor or the editor of the "Review." 
Call on or write for whatever you may need in our line. 



THE ROYALL & BORDEN CO. 



THE OLD AND THE NEW 



THE OLD w ay of providing for the happiness of one's dependents was to make a will 
and appoint an individual as executor and trustee. The individual might have 
been efficient in his own business, but naturally was inexperienced and ineffi- 
cient in settling an estate. Consequently, litigation and poor management com- 
bined to make the estate shrink. 

THE NEW wav °f providing for the happiness of one's dependents is to make a will and 
name a Trust Company as executor and trustee, thus assuring the carrying out 
of one's wishes by an institution that makes a business of this service. 

Consult Our Officers on Trust Matters 

WACHOVIA BANK AND TRUST CO. 

CAPITAL AND SURPLUS $2,000,000 

Member Federal Reserve System 

WINSTON-SALEM mDTUrADnlmj SALISBURY 

ASHEVILLE NOR ™ CAROL1NA HIGH POINT 



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VOLUME VIII 



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NUMBER 3 



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ALVMNIREVIEW 




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Irvl CCVRTI3 D6L. 191J 



PUBLISHED BY 

THE ALVMNI ASSOCIATION 



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Cy Thompson Says 



WRITE TO US OR COME TO THE OFFICE OF THE OLD 

NEW ENGLAND MUTUAL 

FOR EXPERT ADVICE ABOUT THE NEW 

GOVERNMENT INSURANCE POLICIES 

If you were not in the service or if you need additional insurance, ask about our low cost com- 
mercial contracts for protection to credit, home and business. 

In addition to many other superior benefits, our new "Perfection" policies offer the most 
complete double indemnity and disability benefits. 

Before you contract to BUY OR SELL see or write the old 

NEW ENGLAND MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO. 

CHARTERED 183S BOSTON, MASS. 

CYRUS THOMPSON, Dist. Mgr. 

Patterson Building 

(OPPOSITE CAMPUS) 

Chapel Hill, N. C. 
' 'Perfection in Protection ' ' 



The American Trust Company 

might be spoken of as the "Alumni Bank"— Word Wood. George Stephens, John Nichols, 
Paul "Whitlock, the Lambeth boys — Walter and Charlie — John Huske, Phil Woollcott, Joe 
Hawthorne — all U. N. C. men. And we are coming some — over $14,000,000.00 total resources. 
The biggest bank in the biggest banking center in North Carolina. 

But what we started out to say is, that we act as Executor, Guardian, Trustee, and in any 
trust capacity. You could not put your property or money in safer hands. It's decidedly the 
best way. If you contemplate creating a trust for any purpose, take it up with us. 



Resources over $14, 000, 000. 00 



AMERICAN TRUST COMPANY 

(THE SAFE EXECUTOR) 

CHARLOTTE, NORTH CAROLINA 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



Volume VIII 



DECEMBER, 1919 



Number 3 



OPINION AND COMMENT 



In its November issue The Review presented an 
extensive statement of facts concerning the need on 
the part of American colleges and uni- 
An Educa- versities of immediately and exten- 
tional Crisis sively increased incomes for the pur- 
pose of holding present members of 
faculties and inducing well trained young men to 
enter the teaching profession and become the trainers 
of America's future leaders. During the month which 
has elapsed, college executives, trustees, and alumni 
have gone seriously into the consideration of the vital- 
ly important matter, with the result that special 
drives for increased funds have been launched in 
scores of institutions and definite programs for in- 
creasing salaries have been authorized. For these in- 
stitutions, at least, the outlook has become much 
brighter, and the fact that their constituencies have 
assured them of requisite support relieves, to a de- 
gree, what was, and still is, a most threatening pros- 
pect for the future of American higher educational 
institutions. 

□ □□ 

Of these institutions, Yale furnishes one of the most 
conspicuous examples. The action taken by the Yale 
Corporation at its mee.ing on Mon- 
Meeting the day, November 17th, is so illuminat- 
Issue at Yale ing and so suggestive of a proper un- 
derstanding of what should be done to 
solve the problem that the ou'line of the Yale pro- 
gram appearing in the Yale Alumni Weekly of No- 
vember 21st is given in detail below : 

The Yale Corporation at its meeting on Monday in- 
creased the normal salary scale for full professors do- 
ing full-time work of a satisfactory character (which 
has in the past been $4,000, $1,500, and $5,000) to 
$5,000, $6,000, and $7,000, with the understanding 
that $8,000 will be given in a very few cases to men 
of exceptional ability as teachers and productive 
scholars. It is belieyed that this action, which will be 
retroactive from July 1, 1919, places the average sal- 
ary scale for professors at Yale University above that 
of any other university in America, although in two 
or three other institutions a very small group of men 
receive as much as $10,000. Some full professors 
with whom special arrangements have been made will 
continue at lower salaries, but a majority will receive 



at least $5,000 or $6,000 a year. The vote passed by 
the Corporation is as follows : 

Voted, to approve the recommendations of the sal- 
aries committee that the following should be the 
normal salary standard, to be departed from only in 
exceptional cases : 

Professors, full time $5,000-$8,000 

Professors, part time $3,000-$6,000 

Assist, and assoc. professors $2,500-$4.500 

The salaries of the deans of the different schools 
were placed at from $6,000 to $8,000, depending upon 
the amount of work and responsibility devolving 
upon each. 

The Corporation adopted the following as the main 
criteria for determining salary increases within the 
normal scale : 

(a) Usefulness as a teacher. 

(b) Productivity and standing in the world of sci- 
ence, letters or art. 

(c) Public service, including service to the Uni- 
versity. 

(d) Executive responsibility and efficiency. 

These criteria were decided upon and the individ- 
ual salaries are being determined as a result of the 
following vote passed by the Corporation at its pre- 
vious meeting : 

Voted, to authorize the president and the chairman 
of the committee on educational policy in consultation 
with the deans of the college, the scientific school, and 
the graduate school to prepare a list of salary in- 
creases to be voted on at the next meeting, together 
with the criteria to be adopted in assignments to sal- 
ary grades, with the understanding that the deans of 
other schools will be consulted when the salaries of 
their professors are under consideration. 

Full-time instructors and assistant professors in 
the undergraduate schools doing satisfactory work 
had their salaries raised last spring — the former from 
the old $1,000-$1,600 to the new $l,250-$2,000 scale; 
the latter from $2,000, $2,500, and $3,000 to a new 
scale $500 higher for each grade. 

The total amount required to make the salary in- 
creases for the existing staff over what they have 
normally been in the past will be above $300,000, and 
when the salaries of new officers called for by the re- 
organization program are included, as well as the 
increases due to introducing the full-time staff in the 
Hospital, to the return of faculty men from govern- 
ment service, and to increased wages paid employees, 
etc., the total increase of the salary budget over last 
year will be about $500,000, 



80 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



Interest in North Carolina in campaigns for funds 
for educational and other purposes has been high in 
recent weeks, and there is cause for 
Denominational rejoicing that the membership of 
Campaigns 1 lie denominations concerned have 

responded in such splendid style. 
On December first the Presbyterian church announced 
that it was well on the way toward the $1,000,000 
goal which it had set for the endowment of its edu- 
cational institutions; and on the day previous — the 
first day of the last week of the special Baptist cam- 
paign for $75,000,000 ($6,000,000 of which goes to 
North Carolina Baptist schools, colleges, orphanages, 
etc.) — it was announced from State headquarters 
that $10,000,000 instead of the $6,000,000 would be 
raised. Other drives on the part of other denomina- 
tions are under way or are in prospect. This, as The 
Review sees it, is the proper way to meet the educa- 
tional crisis, and this means a brighter educational 
future for North Carolina. 

ODD 

Possibly no particular advantage is to be derived 
from the publication of the University's salary scale, 
or from a restatement of the fact that 
What Are We it needs today a greatly increased 
Going to Do building and maintenance fund to 
enable it to serve North Carolina 
adequately. Certainly there can be little stimulation 
of pride in the fact that twenty-five odd members of 
the faculty who have attained the rank of full pro- 
fessor receive rewards ranging from $2,650 to $3,250 
(the latter amount being received after fifteen years 
of acceptable service) and that only those who have 
been appointed to Kenan professorships or who hold 
particularly responsible administrative positions re- 
ceive slightly larger amounts. Likewise, the lack of a 
chapel to seat the student body, of recitation rooms 
to accommodate enlarged classes, of dormitories to 
house the increasing enrollment, of new buildings to 
house expanding departments and schools, acquires 
no inspirational values in the re-telling. Neverthe- 
less, the fact remains that the situation which is so 
acute throughout the nation is doubly acute here on 
this campus and that it must be met as Yale and the 
church institutions of North Carolina are meeting it 
and met immediately if Carolina's former standards 
are to be maintained and her proper growth and in- 
creased efficiency as a servant of North Carolina are 
to be assured. The Review points out this situation 
to the alumni, all of whom are vitally concerned, for 
their most serious and immediate consideration. 



Just as The Review went to press in November 
the special committee on Buildings and Grounds ap- 
pointed by the Trustees in June author- 
Buildings ized the immediate construction of two 
Proposed dormitories directly south of the South 
Building, and considered favorably the 
construction and operation of a University laundry. 
The site of the latter will be south of the present 
power plant. Both propositions were considered ex- 
tremely urgent, and it is gratifying that these proj- 
ects will probably be gotten under way at an early 
date. 

While the committee was in session it granted a 
hearing to the faculty committee on living conditions 
which appeared before it to urge the erection of the 
laundry, to secure for the use of the faculty the public. 
u ilities provided by the University at a lower rate; 
and particularly to urge the necessity of providing 
additional houses for faculty occupancy. It was 
brought out that with the advance in prices both of 
land and building material only three of the faculty 
who had been appointed to service later than 1910 had 
built and occupied their own homes; that all but four 
houses now rented by members of the faculty were 
built by other members of the facul y (rather than 
citizens of the town) from five to twenty years ago. 
It was also shown that there was no prospect of im- 
mediate building either on Ihe part of the faculty or 
residents of the town and that unless the University, 
which had free land at its disposal, undertook a def- 
inite building program, there was no hope of relief 
from the present intolerable overcrowded housing 
conditions. 

While no action was taken in the matter, serious 
consideration was given the proposal to erect not less 
than a dozen faculty houses to the east of the campus, 
and the matter is now under advisement. 

□ □n 

There are many causes for satisfaction in the out- 
come of the Thanksgiving game with Virginia. The 
score of course, because Tar Heels 
The Day and have held the short end through too 
The Game many years not to love to win, but 

also because the team won cleanly and 
deserved the victory. The privilege of acting hosts to 
a Virginia football team for the first time in twenty- 
eight years of football rivalry, and the pleasure of 
showing in unmistakable ways how much the Univer- 
sity and the state think of our fine relations. The 
healthy effect of a great game played before a student 
body that deserved that honor. The fine spirit every- 
where evident. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



81 



But chiefly because of the home-coming of the 
alumni and of their families and other friends of the 
University. They came to see football, and also, The 
Review is pleased to think, to renew a pleasant rela- 
tionship with the University. The very sight of them 
as they swept over the campus and through the 
streets of Chapel Hill and out to Emerson Field, the 
stir of their presence and the magnetism of their 
strength — the effect of all this on the University itself 
will be felt in many ways. Home-coming Day it was, 
and there ought to be more of them. Football justi- 
fies itself, justifies all the efforts and the expense 
when it produces such results. The tradition of the 
Carolina- Virginia contests has been enriched by the 
1919 game in Chapel Hill. Splendid football rivalry 
gave a fine exhibition. 

ODD 

Captain Coleman's 1919 football team will take its 
place in history as a team that fought best when the 
going was roughest, that rose to its 
The Team and greatest heights when faced with 
the Coaches crises, that was an ordinary team 
until a big occasion and an ancient 
rivalry demanded extraordinary efforts. It outdid 
itself on state occasions. A great football student 
once said that a football team exploded one time in a 
season. This team exploded twice, with greatest 
force against N. C. State, but with enough power 
left to explode again Thanksgiving Day. At other 
times it played in-and-out football. But give it a ter- 
rible task and it showed soul. For that reason its 
fame will surely last. 

And with the fame of the 1919 team will remain the 
personality of its head coach. The older alumni who 
have known him before by word of mouth know him 
now by his deeds. For he strode Emerson Field with 
his team and their playing was his coaching. On the 
campus as with his squad, both in 1916 and this year, 
he has been a power in University life. He came 
when athletics was badly disorganized, he built sol- 
idly and surely, he acted sanely and with sense of 
proportion, he was the gentleman always — and he 
reaped the inevitable reward. To younger alumni 
who assisted him, Graham Ramsey and Roy Home- 
wood, and for special work, George Tandy and C. R. 
Daniel, the University is grateful. But in the main, 
it was, as always, one man's job, and that man was 
Campbell. He has shown the University that scien- 
tific coaching, clean playing, and the best amateur 
spirit can go hand in hand, and he has left a name 
and a fame for the athletic authorities to hold up for 
years. 



A survey of the athletic situation at the end of the 
football season shows— what ? The home-coming game 
with Virginia apparently well estab- 
The Outlook lished under the best conditions that 
in Athletics have ever surrounded it ; the A. and E. 
game resumed on a firm foundation ; 
good spirit spreading throughout nearly all athletic 
relations with other institutions ; a record for straight 
dealing and clean playing, already high, lifted by the 
past season's work; efforts on the part of other in- 
stitutions of high standing to start and maintain ath- 
letic relations with the University ; a freshman squad, 
larger than the varsity, playing all season under its 
own coach and management; further sound and in- 
telligent work in developing high school athletics in 
the State ; greater interest in athletics among the gen- 
eral public than ever before — in all a good sight to 
look upon. 

To those alumni interested in Carolina athletics 
here is cause for satisfaction, but chiefly for con- 
structive efforts to maintain and improve the best 
features of athletic life in the University. Athletics 
plays too large a role to be managed carelessly and 
there are many problems ahead. Campbell is leaving. 
What of his successor? What of the football sched- 
ule? The University will play Virginia, A. and E., 
Davidson, and Wake Forest certainly. It would like 
one northern game and it would like to hold to the 
V. M. I. game. Two other games must be obtained. 
With whom? Or, another problem — in many north- 
ern colleges there is outcry against professionalism 
and ugly charges are being made. To help maintain 
healthy conditions in this part of the country is cer- 
tainly the University 's task. 

Here are matters in which alumni are interested. 
There are others, many others. It is an important 
time in the athletic history of the University, and 
alumni influence, as always, will count heavily. 

□ □□ 

On another page The Review carries a story of 
the meeting of the directors of the Graham Memorial 
Fund held in the dining room of 
Graham Memorial the University Inn on the night 
Directors Meet before the Carolina- Virginia 

game. And at this point it urges 
every alumnus to turn to the page and read the ac- 
count through to the very last letter; for it is an ac- 
count of a movement vitally important to every 
alumnus of the University and one in which every 
one should have a part. 

The Revusw purposely stresses the importance of 
the meeting. In the twenty-odd years of our knowl- 
edge of the University, this is the first time that a 



82 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



group of interested alumni have come together in a 
banquet-conference to consider a general University 
problem other than one affecting athletic or fraternity 
matters, and come with achievement to report and 
plans for future activity. 

It is also worth while to note when and where the 
banquet was held — on the night before the home- 
coming game and at nine o'clock in the dining room of 
the Inn. From now on Carolina must have a home- 
coming game annually. There were scores of alumni 
here on Thanksgiving Day who hadn't set foot on the 
campus in 5, 10, 15, and 20 years, and who were 
amazed at the new physical Carolina. Before the game 
was over they also caught the new spirit of the cam- 
pus and the gridiron. And remember the place anil 
the hour — the Inn, still doing business after innu- 
merable openings and closings — and at the hour of 
nine after supper for 100 regular boarders had been 
cleared away and the banquet could be prepared. 

What we are trying to say is: Hereafter, let's hold 
all such happy, forward-looking meetings in one of the 
cosy, folksy rooms of the Graham Memorial which 
we are going to build right away for our younger 
brothers and — ourselves. Hereafter, let's help the 
student body to a better campus social life, even if 
we did miss it, and hereafter when we come back for 
reunions or home-comings, or what-nots — let's meet 
each other and the campus citizenship in its inviting, 
hospitable lobby instead of the lobbies of the Yar- 
borough or the Jefferson ; for this is the one proper 
place. 

There is one final let's. Scores of towns and in- 
dividual alumni have made no response whatever to 
this proposal. Other towns have only partly com- 
pleted their campaigns. Let's remember that Har- 
vard is driving for $15,000,000 ; that Yale alumni 
subscribed $600,000 to their Loyalty Fund last year; 
that Vanderbilt far oversubscribed the amount she 
desired for just such a building as Carolina is plan- 
ning, that Trinity alumni have raised $60,000 for a 
memorial gymnasium — let's remember these things 
and oversubscribe the $150,000 before December 31st. 
Your local director or Mr. Coates wants your sub- 
scription now ! 

DDD 

The Review has four words for the alumni in this 
season of stock-taking and Christmas cheer. The 
first is, to glance back over the year 
Four Words to which began in turmoil and trag- 
the Alumni edy, and take heart in the achieve- 

ment of the months, one of the most 
striking illustrations of which is a new, fine-spirited 
student body of 1350 members. 



The second word is, to get squarely behind the Gra- 
ham Memorial campaign in these final days of De- 
cember and finish the work in worthy fashion. 

The third is, join with the home-coming students in 
a happy gat-to-gether meeting. You should hear the 
story of the "Hill" direct from the "boys," and 
when you hear, join with them in planning for the 
still .further enlargement of Alma Mater's influence 
and service. 

The Review learns that definite plans for holding 
these get-together meetings during the holidays have 
already been made at Monroe, Gastonia, and Lenoir. 

And the fourth, to every son and daughter of Caro- 
lina whose heart thrills at the mention of her name — 
is Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year ! 



REGISTRATION STATISTICS 

Registration statistics for the fall term which 
ended December 20 bring out several interesting facts. 

The enrollment by schools has been as follows : 
Undergraduate, 1058 ; Graduate, 35 ; Law, 139 ; Medi- 
cine, 63 ; Pharmacy, 55 ; Summer School credit work, 
352 ; total, 1702. The net total of students now on 
the campus is slightly above 1300. The number of 
women enrolled is 41. 

Ninety-two counties of the State contribute 9-1.7 
per cent of the student body. Those sending 10 or 
more follow: Alamance 21, Beaufort 16, Buncombe 
51, Burke 16, Cabarrus 19, Caldwell 11, Carteret 16, 
Catawba 36, Chatham 10, Craven 18, Cumberland 
18, Davidson 11, Durham 25, Edgecombe 17, For- 
syth 38, Franklin 13, Gaston 20, Granville 17, Guil- 
ford 67, Halifax 12, Harnett 16, Iredell 25, Johnston 

21, Lenoir 21, Mecklenburg 69, Nash 17, New Han- 
over 28, Orange 51, Pitt 18, Randolph 10, Richmond 

14, Robeson 15, Rockingham 15, Rowan 41, Sampson 

22, Scotland 11, Surry 15, Union 18, Vance 16, Wake 
42, Wayne 43, Wilkes 10, Wilson 20, Yadkin 12. 

Different religious bodies are represented as fol- 
lows: Methodist 432, Baptist 341, Presbyterian 238, 
Episcopal 152, Lutheran 30, Christian 26, Jewish 

15, Moravian 10, Roman Ca"tholic 10, Reformed 9, 
Universalis! 6, Disciples 4, Friends 4, Reformed 
Jewish 1, Unitarian 1, Union 1. 

As in former years the sons of more farmers are in 
attendance than of any other group. The numbers 
above 8 follow: Farmers 339, merchants 196, doctors 
78, manufacturers 77, lawyers 67, railroad men '58, 
public officials 46, salesmen 37, ministers 33, bankers 
30, teachers 30, mechanics 27, real estate dealers 21, 
contractors 23, insurance men 18, tobacconists 16, 
druggists 14, lumbermen 14, brokers 12, automobile 
dealers 11, editors and jewelers 8 each. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



83 



MEMORIAL FUND DIRECTORS MEET 



Directors from many Cities Report $104,000 Subscribed and Discuss 
Plans at Delightful Banquet 



In response to an invitation issued by the local di- 
rectors of the Graham Memorial Fund to directors 
throughout the state and nation, twenty-five alumni 
and friends in charge of local campaigns attended a 
banquet held in the University Inn on the night pre- 
ceding the Carolina- Virginia game and submitted re- 
ports showing that $104,000 had been subscribed for 
the Student Activities Building. President H. W. 
Chase welcomed the directors and emphasized the 
vital importance of providing such a building as is 
contemplated in order to stimulate and maintain the 
right sort of undergraduate campus democracy. 

James A. Gray Toastmaster 

James A. Gray, toastmaster of the occasion, in- 
troduced A. M. Coates, Secretary of the Fund, who 
reported on the status of the campaign prior to the 
meeting. Directors were then called on for reports, 
figures were revised, and at the end a total of $104,000 
of the $150,000 desired was announced. 

Campaign to be Pressed 

It was the sense of the meeting that the campaign 
should be vigorously pressed through December and 
that every community should be urged to go over the 
top in good form. Particular attention was paid to 
the report of L. J. Poisson, of Wilmington, who 
brought in the finest report from North Carolina, and 
to the plan adopted by the Charlotte alumni, who pro- 
pose securing $100 from every alumnus in Mecklen- 
burg county. Out of the first sixty-five approached 
with this proposition, — there are still a hundred odd 
to see — sixty agreed to the plan. Other facts of par- 
ticular interest to the directors were the contributions 
of the student body of $20,000 raised in one night and 
of $1:3,200 subscribed by twenty-four New York 
alumni. From this on, it was decided to ask that 
each alumnus or friend of the University should be 
asked to give a definite amount, to join the $100, the 
$250, the $500, the $1,000, the $2,500, or the $5,000 
class in making his subscription, the amount to be 
paid in installments running for at least two years. 

Directors in Attendance 

Present at the meeting were George Stephens and 
Leslie Weil, from the committee of the Trustees; 
Louis R. Wilson, H. W. Chase, E. V. Howell, and 
W. M. Dey, from the committee of the Faculty ; A 



M. Coates, Secretary, directors C. F. Harvey, of 
Kinston, A. H. London, of Pittsboro, C. W. Tillett, 
Jr., of Charlotte, K. S. Tanner, of Spindale, J. A. 
Gray, of Winston-Salem, Judge H. B. Stevens, of 
Asheville, J. W. Umstead, of Tarboro, P. H. Gwyiin, 
of Leaksville, W. S. Roberson, of Chapel Hill, D. K. 
McRae, of Laurinburg, Cameron McRae, of Concord, 
P. H. Gwynn, Jr., of Reidsville, J. V. Price, of Madi- 
son, R. D. W. Connor, of Raleigh, and as visitors O. J. 
Coffin, of Raleigh, E. C. Branson and M. C. S. Noble, 
of Chapel Hill. 

North Carolina Counties and Towns 
Below are given the reports as presented at the 
meeting. Reports from a number of cities such as 
Salisbury and Monroe were not presented as the cam- 
paign iu them was just being gotten under way; 
and in practically every case the report given is not 
final, but will be revised in the light of the work to be 
done before December 31st. All other towns having 
groups of alumni in them which are not included in 
the list below, and individual alumni living outside 
the state, are urged to send in reports at once. 

Director County or Town Amount 

II. M. Eobins Asheboro $ 61.00 

H. B. Stevens Asheville 50.00 

Melvin Robinson Atlantic 50.00 

C. C. Canady Benson 85.00 

E. II. Roue Bessemer City 20.00 

If. E. Shamburger ....Biscoe 10.00 

H. F. Pardue Boonville 32.62 

L. N. Johnston Burgaw 29.00 

W. S. Roberson .Chapel Hill 2,500.00 

Geo. Stephens .Charlotte 7,000.00 

G. C. Singletary Clarkton 20.00 

Jackson Greer .Columbus 40.00 

Cameron McRae .Concord 1,200.00 

N. A. Townsend Dunn 455.00 

V. S. Bryant Durham 4,660.00 

M. L. Wright Edenton 635.00 

R. H. Chatham Elkin 290.00 

D. L. Turnage Farmville 200.00 

Leslie Weil _Goldsboro 6,060.00 

Clem G. Wright Greensboro 2,690.00 

F. C. Harding .Greenville 1,200.00 

A. A. Shuford, Jr Hickory 655.00 

W. R. Bauguess Jefferson 63.00 

C. F. Harvey Kinston 1,822.50 

D. K. McRae Laurinburg 495.00 

P. H. Gwynn Leaksville-Spray 375.00 

J. T. Pritchett Lenoir 118.50 

J. R. Baggett Xillington 1,000.00 



84 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



Director County or Town 

T. W. Ruffin ^Louisburg 

T. A. McNeill, Jr. Lumberton 

J. V. Price Madison 

Ed. C. Ray McAdenville 

E. A. Gouncill Morehead City .. 

R. C. Cox Mt. Gilead 

H. D. Cooley Nashville 

B. K. Lassiter Oxford 

J. V. Cobb Pinetops 

A. H. London Pittsboro 

R. D. W. Connor Raleigh 

W. R. Dalton Reidsville 

J. L. Patterson Roanoke Rapids 

L. J. Bell Rockingham 

F. E. Window Rocky Mount .... 

J. McN. Smith Rowland 

J. Benton Stacy Ruffin 

K. S. Tanner Rutherfordton .. 

D. L. St. Clair Sanford 

Dr. R. C. Ellis Shelby 

J. A. Rudisill Southern Pines 

Theodore Partrick ....Southport 



Amount 

275.00 

750.00 

235.00 

95.00 

125.00 

5.00 

265.00 

, 704.00 

20.00 

150.00 

3,900.00 

220.00 

905.00 

900.00 

2,019.00 

140.00 

100.00 

1,300.00 

505.00 

, 67.00 

62.00 

67.00 

Dorman Thompson ....Statesville 1,200.00 

H. H. Powell Stantonsburg 150.00 

A. O. Joines Stratford 25.00 

J. W. Umstead, Jr Tarboro 2,000.00 

B. B. Vinson Thomasville 500.00 

J. S. Hargett .Trenton 300.00 

Cladius Dockery .Troy 49.00 

C. F. Kirkpatrick ......Wavnesville 65.00 

J. E. B. Davis Wendell 240.00 

L. J. Poisson Wilmington 10,000.00 

Graham Woodard Wilson 1,295.00 

A. H. Balinson Winston-Salem 5,870.00 



Out of State Cities 
Director County or Town 
Shepard Bryan Atlanta 



Amount 
170.00 
1,120.00 
3,100.00 



E. K. Kloman -Baltimore 

Miscellaneous 

Junius Parker New York 13,300.00 

A. W. McLean Washington 685.00 



Director 

M. Coates 



University Campus 
County or Town Amount 
Student body 20,000.00 



Total subscribed $104,225.87 

Total desired $150,000.00 



PERTINENT AND IMPERTINENT 

The following clippings bearing upon the critical 
situation confronting the colleges and universities may 
appear pertinent or impertinent, as the case may be : 

We must face the fact that being a professor in 
Harvard College is becoming an expensive and diffi- 
cult luxury. — Dean of the Graduate School of Har- 
vard. 




The Professor : ' ' Every One of Them Beats Mine ' ' 

(By courtesy of The New York Tribune and Yale Alumni 
Weekly) 



A professor teaches on his stomach. — Cornell 
Alumni Weekly. 

It is a very intellectual life I lead these days. My 
housework, mending, and care of the baby use up 
intellect fast. If the repairs on my house and fur- 
nace were in form for publication, they would bring 
me an honorary degree. The intellect-killing work of 
the class room is reduced to a minimum. I use my 
old notes and do not worry about lectures until the 
hour strikes. This is a great saving and keeps one 
fresh for the real work of life. . . . You can't 
squeeze blood out of a turnip; and you can't take a 
check for four thousand fifty-cent dollars and cash it 
in for four thousand dollars' worth of good groceries 
or good college teaching or good anything. Sooner or 
later there will be adjustment and the cheaper man 
will be doing the cheaper work. — A Poor Professor in 
School and Society. 

If all other methods fail, why not tip the college 
professor ! — Evening Post. 

Ben Tillett, English labor leader, says: "Wealth is 
unpaid wages." Perhaps that is the reason there are 
so many millionaire professors. — Vanderbilt Alumnus. 

One hundred and twenty-five thousand dollars will 
feed a professor and his family a million years. — 
Cornell Alumni Weekly. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



85 



CAROLINA WINS HOME-COMING GAME 



Before 8,000 Alumni, Students and Visitors the White and Blue Triumphs 

Over Virginia 6 to 0. 



Playing before the largest crowd that ever saw an 
athletic contest in North Carolina, more than 8,000 
persons, including the largest alumni reunion in the 
history of the University and the biggest flood of hu- 




Capt. Isaac Edward Emerson, of Baltimore, Md. A 

Native op Chapel Hill and Lotal Alumnus 

Whose Love for Alma Mater Prompted the 

Splendid Gift of Emerson Eield 



man beings that Chapel Hill ever dreamed of, Caro- 
lina defeated Virginia 6 to on Emerson Field in the 
twenty-fourth annual Thanksgiving game. Captain 
Coleman's clean forward pass to Lowe in the second 
period after Carolina by a great burst of offensive 
strength had driven the ball almost to the Virginia 
goal line was the measure of victory. 

It was the first time the two teams had met in North 
Carolina, it was the first time Carolina had won for 
two successive playing years, 1916 and 1919 (no 
games being played in 1917 and 1918), and the game, 
with all its rich background of the day, the crowd, 
the spirit, the home-coming, the clean playing, and, 
for Tar Heels, the victory, recorded unquestionably 



a high water mark in athletics for the University and 
for the State. 

Touchdown in Second Period 

The winning touchdown, centering around only a 
few minutes playing, came with a rush as the second 
period opened. On the first play of that period Lowe, 
whose running was the distinct feature of the game, 
raced from the center of the field 30 yards around 
right end and was thrown on Virginia's 20-yard line. 
With a touchdown in sight Spaugh in two mighty 
rushes and Abernathy in one crashed through to the 
7-yard line. Here Virginia stood firm but Captain 
Coleman and Lowe had another card and the Tar 
Heel leader shot a swift forward pass to Lowe who 
had sifted out to the left. No Virginia player was 
near him and he crossed the goal line untouched. 
Blount failed at goal. 

Virginia Dangerous in Fourth Quarter 

That was the measure of the scoring. For three 
cpaarters Carolina kept the fight in Virginia territory, 
driving deep and hard for other scores but without 
the sustained attack she had shown when she seized 
her best chance. Only in the fourth quarter did Vir- 
ginia threaten seriously. A Carolina fumble gave her 
the ball on the 20-yard line, and the crowd grew 
tense. Three line plunges found her two yards short 
of the required 10 yards, the fourth plunge was 
stopped short, and the ball went over on downs. 
Again, in the same quarter, a short kick by Coleman 
gave Virginia another chance from the 30-yard line. 
This time she elected another method and four times 
in succession tried forward passes which were either 
blocked or grounded. On one other occasion Virginia 
tried a drop-kick from the 35-j'ard line. 

At all other times Carolina held the upper hand 
and forced the play. When she could not gain, Cole- 
man 's long punts drove the play into enemy territory, 
and against the Tar Heel line and, with few excep- 
tions, around the ends, Virginia could make no head- 
way. 

Lowe Consistent Ground Gainer 

Carolina's best ground gaining was done by Lowe, 
who returned punts consistently for 10- to 30-yard 
gains and who three times broke loose for long runs 
from the rushing formation. Spaugh 's line plunging 



86 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



was also effective. The Carolina full back played 
sterling defensive football all season, but against Vir- 
ginia he was a notable attacking power. Except on 
the touchdown play Carolina was not successful with 
the forward pass, but she tried only a few. Virginia 
tried many and succeeded only once. 




Scene from the Game 

The Virginia attack was a disappointment. The 
Carolina line was expecting a hard drive against it, 
principally by Kuyk, but on no occasion was it badly 
punctured. A short end run by Rinehart was the best 
Virginia offensive play, and aside from Rinehart, 
Michie's play at right end was of high order. In the 
line Grimes, Gant, and Harrell stood out, especially 
Grimes, who broke through many times, and Proctor 
at right end guarded his position effectively. Captain 
Coleman's punting was erratic, being of great aid in 
the first half but uncertain in the second half. 

The line-up follows: 
CAROLINA VIRGINIA 

Cochrane Left End Rinehart, J. 

Harrell Left Tackle Newman 

Bobbins Left Guard Parrish 

Blount Center Hankins 

Grimes Right Guard Churchman 

Gant Right Tackle McGowan 

Proctor Right End Miehie 

Lowe Quarter Burnett 

Coleman Left Half Russell 

Griffith Right half Rinehart, H. 

Spaugh Full Kuyk, G. 

Substitutions: Virginia — Wood for Parrish, Deans for Rus- 
sell, Blakey for McGowan, Fenwick for Blakey, McGowan 
for Fenwick, Davis for Rinehart, J., Baker for Miehie, R. 
Parrish for Burnett, Craig for H. Rinehart, Russell for Deans, 
D. Kuyk for Russell. 

Carolina — Barden for Bobbins, Jacobi for Blount, Priteh- 
ard for Gant, Abernathy for Griffith, Tenney for Abernathy, 
Pharr for Tenney. 

Referee — Magoffin, of Michigan. 

Umpire — Donnelly, of Trinity. 

Head Linesman — Littlejohn, of West Point. 

Touchdown — Lou e. 

Time of quarters — 15 minutes. 



LATE-SEASON FOOTBALL 

Carolina and Tennessee Tie 
In a game featured only by the bad playing con- 
ditions Carolina tied Tennessee, November 1, in 
Knoxville, to 0. By all rights the Wake Forest 
game, played when Emerson Field was a swamp after 
two days of rain, should -have been enough for one 
season, but the Tennessee game was as bad. Tennessee 
was the aggressor in the first half and attempted three 
drop kicks. Carolina threatened in the second half 
when Pharr received a pass and ran deep into enemy 
territory. But fumbling and slipping made any at- 
tack difficult and the game developed into one soggy 
punt after another. Both teams left the field dissatis- 
fied with their own playing. 

Carolina showed the natural but regrettable reac- 
tion after the A. and E. game and was slow and slug- 
gish. 

V. M. I. "Wins 29 to 7 

What a speedy, well coached team at the top of its 
game can. do to heavier opponents suffering from a 
mid-season slump was illustrated on Emerson Field 
November 8, when the always popular V. M. I. cadets 
defeated Carolina 29 to 7. The game was a surprise 
to everyone, including V. M. I., but there could be 
no doubt as to the justice of the score. V. M. I. 
played very good football and Carolina played out alk 
the bad football it knew. 

The cadets showed a world of speed and keen inter- 
ference and hard driving play at all times. They 
scored twice in the first quarter, once by straight 
rushing and again when their speed-king, Leech, the 
best runner Carolina has played against this year, 
raced 65 yards. A long pass gave them a third touch- 
down in the second quarter, Leech kicked a field goal 
in the third quarter, and, not content with that much 
punishment, they scored a final touchdown in the last 
quarter. 

Carolina 10 — Davidson 
With Davidson in Winston-Salem, November 15, 
Carolina had her usual hard game, winning 10 to 0. 
To those who had not seen the team play any other 
games the Tar Heels showed nothing wonderful, win- 
ning by more careful play than by dash or brilliance. 
But as part of the entire season the game afforded 
cause for sound satisfaction. It showed undoubtedly 
that the team was coming back. Campbell's men were 
better in every particular than they had been against 
V. M. I. and football men knew that with ten days' 
rest before Thanksgiving there was ample time to re- 
cover the freshness and speed and elan which had 
been lost after the A. and E. game. The defensive 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



87 



play, too, was strong. Davidson showed her usual 
smart, spirited team, and she gained a great deal of 
ground in her own territory, but almost none at all in 
Carolina territory, and her forward passes were cov- 
ered closely. 

Carolina scored 3 points in the first quarter when 
she worked the ball well into Davidson territory and 
Lowe kicked, a drop-kick. The touchdown came in 
the fourth quarter as the result of hard driving, with 
Coleman and Spaugh carrying the bulk of the work, 
and Spaugh crossing the line on a well executed de- 
layed pass. Campbell handled his men carefully and 
used many substitutes. 

Harrell Elected Captain 
Beemer C. Harrell, of Marshville, left tackle dur- 
ing the past season, has been elected captain of the 
1920 football team. Harrell played guard in 1916, 
the last varsity year, and prior to that served two 
years on class teams. He is popular with the team 
and on the campus and his election has been hailed 
with great favor. 

Monograms Awarded 
The varsity monogram was awarded to eighteen 
players and to Manager Walter C. Feimster, Jr. The 
players -were W. A. Blount, of Washington, and D. 
B. Jacobi, of Wilmington, centers; William Grimes, 
of Raleigh, R. B. Robbins, of Lexington, and Graham 
Barden, of Burgaw, guards ; B. C. Harrell, of Marsh- 
ville, Allen Gant, of Burlington, Hugh Dortch, of Ral- 
eigh, and Grady Pritchard, of Chapel Hill, tackles; 
E. K. Proctor, of Lumberton, and Cline Cochrane, of 
Charlotte, ends; Robbins Lowe, of Winston-Salem, 
and Fred Pharr, of Charlotte, quarters; J. M. Cole- 
man, of Asheville, Bob Griffith, of Charlotte, 0. M. 
Abernathy, of Salisbury, Edwin Tenney, of Chapel 
Hill, half backs; and Arthur Spaugh, of Winston- 
Salem, full. 

Outlook for 1920 
Of these Coleman, Grimes, Harrell, Proctor, and 
Barden had received the N. C. before. Thirteen var- 
sity men are expected to return next year. Cole- 
man, Robbins, Proctor, Dortch and Barden will fin- 
ish this year but there is certain to be a lot of first- 
rate material on hand next fall, and the freshman 
squad, which has numbered more than 40 players, 
all season, includes several likely players. 

Question of Coach Unsettled 

The question of a coach remains unsettled. 
Thomas J. Campbell, who has piloted two successful 
teams, has completed his contract and has annuonced 
his intention of going into other business, but all 



the players who worked under him are keen for his 
return and the chance will undoubtedly be extended 
to him. There has been no more popular coach on 
the Carolina campus in years. 



CHAPEL HILL WINS CHAMPIONSHIP 

The Chapel Hill high school football team an- 
nexed the title of State high school football cham- 
pions by defeating the Greensboro highs on Emerson 
Field December 6th by the score of 78 to 0. The 
Chapel Hill highs had previously won the eastern 
title, and the Greensboro highs had won the western 
title. Ten high school teams took part in the elimi- 
nation series leading up to the final game. The con- 
test this year was the sixth annual contest to be con- 
ducted by the University committee on high school 
athletics. 



LIBRARY RECEIVES INTERESTING 
COLLECTION 

From the library of the late Col. A. B. Andrews, of 
Raleigh, a trustee of the University for many years 
and vice-president of the Southern Railway, the Uni- 
versity library has received a valuable gift of ap- 
proximately 600 volumes and 500 pamphlets. The 
present gift is a continuation of the generosity of the 
Andrews family which has already assisted the Uni- 
versity in extending its files of the Charlotte Observer 
and the Raleigh News and Observer. 

Included in the gift is much important material re- 
lating to the University itself, to the State of North 
Carolina, to the subject of railroads, and to general 
subjects. Early numbers of The Journal of the Elisha 
Mitchell Scientific Society and a volume of addresses 
delivered in the 1820 's and 1830 's before alumni 
associations and the literary societies are welcome 
additions. An interesting picture of the faculty in 
1888 is included, and a very rare copy of Vol. 1, 
No. 1, of the old Alumni Quarterly, of which only two 
numbers were issued. 

The material on the State contains many legisla- 
tive documents covering the period from 1860 through 
1875 and a comprehensive lot of clippings from the 
Wilmington newspapers covering the riot in Wilming- 
ton. Rumple 's History of Rowan County and other 
rare volumes are in the collection and many duplicate 
volumes by recent North Carolina authors on bio- 
graphical, historical, and literary subjects. 

The railroad material includes a number of de- 
scriptive publications relating to resorts and cities of 
North Carolina and of the South, as well as a score 
or more duplicates relating to N. C. railroad history. 



88 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 





George Stephens and Dr. N. M. Gibds, op the 1892 
Football Team 




Dr. J. M. Thompson, Max Gardner, Roy Abernetiiy, and 
Dr. Foy Roberson, all of the 1905 Football Team 




Thomas J. Campbell, Head Coach, University of 
North Carolina 



'Bill" Folger and Geokge Tandy, op the 1916 
Football Team 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 89 



ESTABLISHED 1916 

JUumni Loyalty fund 



One Tor all, and all Tor one" 



Council: 

A.M. SCALES. '92 
LESLIE WEIL, '95 
L. R. WILSON. '99 
A.W.HAYWOOD. '04 
W. T. SHORE. 'OS 
J. A. GRAY, '08 




THE ALUMNI LOYALTY FUND 

Was established to provide a way by which every alumnus 
could contribute according to his ability to the general wel- 
fare of the University. 

A GOOD NUMBER FROM MANY CLASSES 

Have taken advantage of this opportunity and have con- 
tributed a total of $10,000. 

ARE YOU IN THIS NUMBER ? 

Or are you letting your class-mates or members of other 
classes lay the foundation of what is to be one of Carolina's 
great achievements — the building up of a great fund, the 
income from which can later be applied in ways that will 
multiply Alma Mater's usefulness a hundredfold. 

DON'T LET THE YEAR END 

Without making a beginning, or renewing your contribu- 
tion. All contributions are payable to University Treasurer, 
at Chapel Hiil. 



90 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 

Issued monthly except in July, August, and September, by the Gen- 
eral Alumni Association of the University of North Carolina. 

Board of Publication 

The Review is edited by the following Board of Publication: 

Louis R. Wilson, '99 - Editor 

Associate Editors: Walter Murphy, '92; Harry Howell, '95; Archibald 
Henderson. '98; W. S. Bernard, '00; J. K. Wilson, '05; Louis 
Graves, '02; P. P. Graham. '09; Kenneth Tanner, '11; Lenoir 
Chambers, Jr., '14; R. W. Madry, '18. 

E. R. Rankin, '13 Managing Editor 

Subscription Price 

Single Copies '. $0.20 

Per Year 1 50 

Communications intended for the Editor and the Managing Editor 
should be sent to Chapel Hill, N. C. All communications intended for 
publication must be accompanied with signatures if they are to receive 
consideration. 

OFFICE OF PUBLICATION, CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 

Entered at the Postoffice at Chapel Hill, N. C. as second class 
matter. 



THE UNIVERSITY IN PRINT 



"The Navy and the Nation" (G. H. Doran Co., 
N. Y.) is a collection of war-time addresses by Jose- 
phus Daniels, Secretary of the Navy. In an introduc- 
tion by John Wilbur Jenkins, a concise statement is 
made of the principal achievements of the American 
Navy in the Great "War. The addresses themselves, 
which are singularly equal in quality, are representa- 
tive of a period of national stress, and they are ani- 
mated throughout by fervent patriotism, the energy 
of a youthful spirit, and the ideals which best have 
represented this country in the prosecution of the re- 
cent war. 



Lieutenant Drew S. Harper (class of 1911). This 
comprehensive work (G. H. Doran Co., N. Y., 1919) 
is fully illustrated. 



The latest issue, Volume XXXV, October, 1919, of 
the Journal, of the Elisha Mitchell Scientific Society 
is a double number, containing eight scientific papers 
in addition to an account of the proceedings of the 
eighteenth meeting of the North Carolina Academy 
of Science. Four of the papers are by members of 
the University faculty, one by H. V. Wilson, two by 
W. C. Coker, and one by A. S. Wheeler. 



The most extended and complete account of any of 
the military units especially connected with North 
Carolina, to come to this desk, is "The History of the 
105th Regiment of Engineers" (Divisional engineers 
of the "Old Hickory," otherwise 30th Division). This 
book was compiled by W. P. Sullivan and Harry 
Tucker. Many North Carolinians, and not a few 
alumni of the University, were associated with this 
regiment. Col. Joseph Hyde Pratt succeeded Briga- 
dier-General Harley B. Ferguson in command of the 
regiment ; and others associated with the regiment 
were Capt. Bascom L. Field (class of 1915), Major 
E. W. Myers (class of 1895), First Lieutenant Daniel 
McG. Williams (class of 1910), First Lieutenant Alex- 
ander Taylor (class of 1910), Major Reuben A. Camp- 
bell (class of 1891), Captain Sidney E. Buchanan 
(class of 1910), Captain Wni. B. Hunter (class of 
1909), Captain Thel. Hooks (class of 1901), Second 



Volume 16, Number 2, of the James Sprunt His- 
torical Publications contains two titles: "The Diary 
of Bartlett Yancey Malone," edited by W. W. Pierson, 
Jr., and "The Provincial Agents of North Carolina," 
by S. J. Ervin, Jr. Part of the diary of the Con- 
federate soldier is described as being valuable first 
hand material dealing with Southerners in Northern 
prisons. 



In Number 4, Volume XVI, of Studies in Philology 
for October, 1919, one of the three papers is by G. 
Kenneth G. Henry of the University faculty. The 
title is "Roman Actors" (pp. 334-82). 



The latest issue of the High School Journal (Vol- 
ume II, No. 8), for December, 1919, contains Part II 
of "The Academy Movement in the South" by Edgar 
W. Knight, and "American Beauties," by M. C. S. 
Noble. 



Professor Thorndike Saville of the department of 
Engineering and C. L. Weil are joint authors of an 
illustrated article appearing in a recent number of 
Engineering News. Professor Saville served as en- 
gineer at Langlej r field and laid out the water supply 
and sewage disposal systems of the camp. The article 
is entitled "Sewage-Treatment Works at Langlcy 
Field." 



"Fresh-water Mussels and Mussel Iudustries of 
the United States" is the title of a 90-page mono- 
graph by Robert E. Coker, '96, appearing in the Oc. 
tober number of the Bulletin of the U. S. Bureau of 
Fisheries. The monograph contains one plate in color, 
a map in color, and forty-six full-page illustrative 
plates. Mr. Coker is scientist in charge of biological 
investigations of the U. S. Bureau of Fisheries. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



91 



The November issue of the Journal of the American 
Chemical Society carries two articles from the chem- 
istry department, one by Dr. F. P. Venable and 1. W. 
Smithey on Zirconyl Compounds with the Oxy- Halo- 
gen Acids, and the other by Dr. Wheeler and S. C. 
Smith on The Reaction of Basic Reagents on ScL ill's 
Bases. I. The Chloralnitraniline Group. 



In School and Society (October 25, 1919) appears 
"The Great Tradition," being an address by E. A. 
Greenlaw before the California Association of High 
School Teachers. 



A recent publication from the department of Chem- 
istry is ' ' The Halogenation of Juglone : A New Type 
of Napthalene Dyes," by A. S. Wheeler and J. W. 
Scott, which appears in the Journal of the American 
Chemical Society, volume 41, p. 833 (1919). 



An interesting and suggestive paper, by Professor 
G. A. Harrer, is "Rome and Her Subject-Peoples," 
which appeared in the Classical Journal, vol. xiv, 
No. 9 (June, 1919), pp. 550-556. Professor Harrer 
reaches the conclusion: "Protection from foreign in- 
vasions, prohibition of civil strife in cities or between 
cities, the resulting feeling of security, the possibility 
of economic prosperity, combined with the Roman 
policy of non-interference with local ways of living, 
made the subject people content under Roman rule." 



"English, Science, and Engineering" (Doubleday, 
Page and Co., N. Y.), by J. L. Eason (class of 1911), 
and M.H. Weseen, a publication which has already 
been reviewed in these columns, has recently been 
adopted for classroom use at the Sheffield Scientific 
School, Case School of Applied Science, University of 
Virginia, Iowa State College, Pennsylvania State Col- 
lege, Syracuse University, Alabama Polytechnic In- 
stitute, University of Kentucky, Bucknell University, 
and the Rose Polytechnic Institute. 



A well written and serviceably bound book, or 
rather booklet, is the ' ' Narrative History of Company 
K, 321th Inf., 81st (Stonewall) Division," by John 
H. Workman, 1913, Cherryville, N. C. It concerns 
itself, in particular, with operations in the Vosges 
Mountains (Sept. 18-Oct. 19, 1918) and with the 
Meuse-Argonne offensive. Numerous illustrations in- 
cluding photographs and maps, enhance the booklet's 
attractiveness. It is to be remembered that the larger 
portion of the first draft (October 26, 1917) came 
from North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee. 



The roster bristles with the names of North Carolin- 
ians. If every company had so enthusiastic and ac- 
curate an historian as has Company K, the labors of 
Lieutenant House at Raleigh in compiling records of 
the Great War would be materially lessened and sim- 
plified. 



A practice book in sentence making, fresh from the 
presses of the Houghton, Mifflin Company, is "Sent- 
ences and Thinking," by Norman Foerster and J. M. 
Steadman, respectively professor of English here and 
associate professor of English at Emory University. 
Even a hurried inspection will convince one of the 
sensible character of the book, its healthfully prag- 
matic tone, its basic principle : ' '«earn first by think- 
ing, and then by doing." At every turn, we are 
shown — first, how not to do it, and second, how to do 
it; and numbers of problems in choice of words and 
sentence structure or correction are set the pupil, 
problems which he must work out for himself. The 
"samples" of good style and of approved modes of 
expression, while few in number, are well chosen, al- 
though limited to a somewhat narrow range of writers. 



At the meeting of the State Literary and Historical 
Association in Raleigh, November 20-21, Dr. J. G. 
de R. Hamilton, Alumni Professor of History in the 
University, was elected president for the year 1919-20. 
During the meeting the following papers were pre- 
sented by alumni: Walter Hines Page, Ambassador 
at the Court of St. James, prepared by Hon. A. W. 
McLean, Law '92, and read by Judge J. Crawford 
Biggs, '93 ; The Contributions of North Carolina Wo- 
men to the World War, by Dr. Archibald Henderson, 
'98; The Preservation of North Carolina's War Rec- 
ords, by R. B. House, '16 ; William J. Peele, Philoso- 
pher, by Judge R. W. Winston, 79 ; Edward Kidder 
Graham, Teacher and Interpreter of Modern Citizen- 
ship, by Louis R. Wilson, '99 ; Kemp Plummer Battle, 
by Professor W. C. Smith, '96. R. D. W. Connor, '99, 
Secretary of the Association, was re-elected for 
1919-20 and W. C. Smith was appointed a member of 
the executive committee. Dr. James Sprunt, a trus- 
tee of the University, presided throughout the meet- 
ing, the title of his presidential address being the 
Restoration of Jerusalem. 



The University Library is very anxious to secure 
a complete file of Stars and Stripes. If any of the 
readers of The Review have single copies or several 
issues of the publication, or complete files, the Library 
would be most glad to receive them. 



92 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



THE GENERAL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

of the 

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 



Officers of the Association 

R. D. W. Connor, '99 President 

E. R. Rankin, '13 Secretary 

Executive Committee: Walter Murphy, '92; Dr. R. H. 
Lewis, '70; W. N. Everett, '86; H. E. Rondthaler, '93; C. W. 
Tillett, Jr., '09. 



WITH THE CLASSES 

1859 
■ — Lucius Frierson has been engaged in banking at Birming- 
ham, Ala., for a long '"number of years. He is identified with 
the First National Bank of this city. 

1864 
— General Jas. I. Metts, of Wilmington, is at the head of 
the association of United Confederate Veterans of North 
Carolina. 

1867 
— Geo. If. Rose, former Speaker of the N. C. House of Repre- 
sentatives, is senior member of the firm of Rose and Rose 
at Fayetteville. His son, Chas. G. Rose, '00, is junior mem- 
ber of this firm. This firm is division counsel of the A. C. L. 
Railway. 

1868 
— Judge A. W. Graham, former Speaker of the House of the 
N. C. General Assembly, and lately special attorney for the 
Treasury Department, has been elected head of the new Cot- 
ton Exchange iu New York City. 

1870 
— Dr. Geo. T. Winston, former president of the University, 
who now lives in Asheville, was in Chapel Hill recently on a 
visit to his son, Prof. P. H. Winston, '02, of the faculty 
of the law school. 

1871 

— Dr. Hannis Taylor, former U. S. minister to Spain, is prac- 
ticing law in Washington, D. C. 

1879 
— Dr. I. M. Taylor, one of the best known physicians of the 
State, is proprietor of Broadoaks Sanatorium at Morganton. 

1881 
— Robert O. Holt, of the U. S. Internal Revenue Service, is 
agent in charge of the New York income tax division. His 
•address is 725 Riverside Drive, Apt. 6c, New York City. 
■ — Frank B. Dancy, sometime North Carolina State Chemist, 
lives in Baltimore, at 922 St. Paul Street. 
— Frank H. Stedman, former sheriff of New Hanover County, 
is now located at Fayetteville, where he is engaged in banking. 

1882 
— J. B. Schulken is a lawyer. He lives at Whiteville. 

1883 
— A. W. McAlister is one of Greensboro's most prominent 
business men. He is president of the Southern Life and Trust 
Co. 



— Ed Chambers Smith, Law '83, is a business man and promi- 
nent citizen of Raleigh. 

— John M. Avery is a successful lawyer, living in Dallas, 
Texas. 

— Frank A. Sherrill is proprietor of a large flour mill at 
Statesville. 

— Thos. M. Vance is a prominent lawyer in the State of 
Washington. He lives at North Yakima. 

1884 
— S. B. Turrentine is president of the Greensboro College for 
Women. 

— Jas. Lee Love is connected with the War Risk Insurance 
Bureau, Washington, D. C. 

1885 
— Rev. J. A. Bryan is pastor of the Third Presbyterian Church 
of Birmingham, Ala. 

— George Gordon Battle is a prominent lawyer of New York 
City, a member of the firm of O 'Gorman, Battle, and Van- 
diver, with offices at 37 Wall Street. 

— W. H. White, for a number of years a banker of Salisbury, 
is now with the American Aluminum Co., at Badin. 
— A. H. Eller is vice-president and trust officer of the 
Wachovia Bank and Trust Co., Winston-Salem. 

1886 
— Edward W. Pou, of Smithfield, is now serving his eighteenth 
year as a member of the U. S. House of Representatives. 
— Jno. M. Morehead, cotton manufacturer of Charlotte, was 
the nominee of the Republican Party for Congress to suc- 
ceed E. Y. Webb, Law '94, who resigned lately to become 
Federal Judge. 

— J. F. Barrett is practicing his profession, law, in Brook- 
lyn, N. Y. His address is St. George's hotel, Brooklyn. 
— Rev. N. H. D. Wilson is presiding elder of the Washington 
district, eastern conference of the M. E. Church, South. He 
lives at Washington. 

— Dr. Sterling Ruffin is one of the leading physicians of 
Washington, D. C. 

— Alex J. Feild lives in Washington, D. C, and is connected 
with the War Risk Insurance Bureau. 

— Gilbert B. Patterson, formerly a member of Congress, lives 
at Maxton and is a successful lawyer and planter. 
— E. B. Cliue retired from the Superior Court bench last year 
and is now practicing law at Hickory. 

1887 
— John M. Beall, formerly prominently connected in the rail- 
way world, is now at the head of the Pugh Printing Co., a 
large printing house of Cincinnati, Ohio. 

— V. W. Long is successfully engaged in the lumber busi- 
ness at Birmingham, Ala. 

— Henry R. Starbuck, formerly on the Superior Court bench, 
practices law in Winston-Salem. 

— Claudius Dockery, formerly U. S. Marshal for the eastern N. 
C. district, is now a planter at Mangum. He also practices 
law at Troy. 

1888 
— Frank M. Harper, of Raleigh, former superintendent of the 
Raleigh city schools, is engaged in the insurance business as 
representative of the Provident Life and Trust Co. 
— Wm. J. Battle is head of the department of Greek in the 
University of Cincinnati. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



93 



Asphalt Pavements 

If you are interested in street or road construction 
we invite you to inspect our work in 
Durham (Asphalt Streets). 
Durham County (Asphalt and Concrete Roads). 
Raleigh and Wake County (Asphalt). 
Guiiford County (Asphalt Roads). 
Greensboro. 
Rocky Mount. 
High Point. 
Htnderson. 
Lumbert-n. 

A'so roads built fcr United States Government: 
Army Supp*.y Base, Norfolk, Va. 
Newp rt News — Hampton Highway, Newport 

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Camp Lee, Va. 

A representative will visit you and supply any in- 
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Robert G. Lassiter & Co. 

ENGINEERING AND CONTRACTING 

327 Arcade Building Norfolk, Va. 

1002 Citizens Bank Building Raleigh, N. C. 

First Nuti.na. Bank Bunldmg Oxford, N. C. 



The First National Bank 
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The Trust Depart- 
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JNO. M. MILLER, Jr., President 
W. M. ADDISON, Vice-President 
CHAS. R. BURNETT.yice-Presidenl 
ALEX. F. RYLAND, Cashier 
THOS. W. PURCELL. Trust Officer 



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European Plan $1.50 Up 



JAMES T. DISNEY, President 



94 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



— John C. Engelhard is with the American Tobacco Co., leaf 
department, in Louisville, Ky. 

— S. Porter Graves, of Mt. Airy, is solicitor of the 16th judi- 
cial district. 

— J. Ernest Erwin is in the cotton manufacturing business at 
Morganton. He lias charge of the Alpine Mills. 
— Henry W. Davis, lawyer of Atlantic City, N. J., is U. S. 
Commissioner. 

— Rev. W. A. Wilson is a missionary of the M. E. Church, 
South, in Japan. 

1889 
— Junius Parker is counsel for the American Tobacco Co., 
Ill Fifth Ave., New York City. 

— John Sprunt Hill is a banker at Durham and a trustee of 
the University. 

— Thos. L. Moore is a prominent lawyer of Oklahoma. He 
lives at Muskogee and is division counsel of the Santa Fe 
Railroad. 

— Chas. A. Webb lives in Asheville and is U. S. Marshal for 
the western N. C. district. 

1890 
— Dr. Julius I. Foust is president of the N. C. College for 
Women, at Greensboro. 

— C. D. Bradham lives at New Bern and is at the head of 
the Pepsi-Cola Co. 
— H. W. Scott is a cotton manufacturer of Graham. 

1891 
— R. W. Christian is a successful gold miner in Alaska. 
— W. W. Davies practices law in Louisville, Ky. He was in 
the Red Cross and served abroad during the war. 
— J. Spottiswoode Taylor is a surgeon, U. S. Navy. 

1892 
— F. L. Willcox, successful lawyer of Florence, S. C, is divis- 
ion counsel of the A. C. L. Railway. 

— Rev. Wallace E. Rollins is professor of Church History in 
the Episcopal Seminary near Alexandria, Va. 
— S. L. Davis is engaged in the manufacture of furniture in 
High Point. 

— Dr. C. O'H. Laughinghouse, late a lieutenant colonel in the 
medical corps of the U. S. Army, has resumed the practice of 
medicine at Greenville. 

— J. F. Watlington is cashier of the National Bank of Reids- 
ville. 

— W. E. Darden is in the wholesale lumber business at Waco, 
Texas. 

1893 
— A. S. Barnard, captain of the "Varsity" '92, is a lawyer 
of New York, with offices at 54 William St. 
— Rufus L. Patterson is a capitalist of New York City, with 
offices at 511 Fifth Avenue. Formerly he was secretary of the 
American Tobacco Co. 

—Dr. N. M. Gibbs, Med. '93, of New Bern, who played left 
end on the football team of '92, was among the alumni pres- 
ent for the Carolina-Virginia game. 

— J. F. Gaither is in the mercantile business at Waco, Texas. 
— Judge J. Crawford Biggs, formerly on the Superior Court 
bench, is practicing law in Raleigh. 

— Rev. F. H. Argo is rector of an Episcopal church in Phila- 
delphia. 
— Dr. Charles Baskerville, formerly head of the department 



of chemistry in the University, is dean of the College of the 
City of New York. 

1894 
— Dr. J. R. Harris, native of Raleigh, is chief chemist for 
the Tennessee Coal, Iron and Railroad Co., at Eusley, Ala. 
— W. P. Hubbard, Law '94, is a prominent lawyer of San 
Francisco, with offices in the Mills Building. 
— W. M. Hendren is a prominent lawyer of Wiuston-Salem, 
a member of the firm of Manly, Hendren and Womble. He 
is president of the Forsyth County Alumni Association. 
— Rev. E. M. Snipes is presiding elder of the Warrenton dis- 
trict, eastern N. C. conference of the M. E. Church, South. 
He lives at Weldon. He was a member of the famous Carolina 
football team of '92. 

1895 
— Dr. H. H. Home is professor of the history of education in 
New York University. He lives at Leonia, N. J. 
— J. O. Carr, lawyer of Wilmington, is at the head of a group 
of Wilmington citizens who have recently purchased the Wil- 
mington Star. 

1897 
— Burton Craige i3 engaged in the practice of law at Win- 
ston-Salem, a member of the firm of Craige and Vogler. He 
is a native of Salisbury. 

— F. W. Miller is superintendent of the Semet Solvay Co., Ens- 
ley, Ala. 

1899 

H. M. Wagstaff, Secretary, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
— Dr. F. W. Coker is professor of political science in the Ohio 
State University, at Columbus, Ohio. 

— The John O 'Daniel Hosiery Mills, Inc., is one of Durham 's 
newest enterprises. Those interested in this manufacturing 
establishment are: J. S. Carr, Jr., '99; W. F. Carr, '03; C. 
McD. Carr, '05; A. H. Carr, '15; and General Julian S. Carr, 
'66. 

— Clyde R. Hoey, Law '99, of Shelby, was elected to Congress 
on December 16th to represent the ninth N. C. district. He 
occupies the seat made vacant when Congressman E. Y. Webb, 
Law '94, resigned to become federal judge of the western 
N. C. district. 

1901 
Dk. J. G. Murphy, Secretary, Wilmington, N. C. 
— Dr. R. O. E. Davis, of the Bureau of Soils, Washington, D. 
C, was in charge during the war of the Arlington laboratory 
of the Bureau of Soils. This laboratory was turned over to 
the War Department for work on nitrogen fixation problems. 
— Dr. J. M. Lilly, Med. '01, is a specialist in diseases of the 
eye, ear, nose and throat at Fayetteville. 

— H. T. Greenleaf is located at 841 Redgate Avenue, Norfolk, 
Virginia. 

— Dr. Aldert S. Root, physician of Raleigh, attended the 
Carolina-Virginia game. 

1902 
I. F. Lewis, Secretary, University, Va. 
— F. G. Kelly is assistant to the chief chemist of the Ten- 
nessee Coal, Iron and Railroad Co., at Ensley, Ala. 
— J. E. Swain, a member of the board of trustees, practices 
law at Asheville. 

— J. Hunter Wood is prominently identified with the Wil- 
mington firm of Alex Sprunt and Sons, cotton exporters. Mr. 




LI 
.%TAR B 




ILLUSTRATED— HUMOROUS 

The Tar Babv appeals to your support not on the grounds of loyalty and devotion, but simply 
on its merits, because we believe that every page will furnish you many pleasant minutes. 

The New University is just beginning to make its greatest achievments. The Carolina Tar 
Babv is one of the first examples of what a greater vision and desire to serve will produce. Won't 
you support it ? 

Send us your check for $1.50 and we will mail you the ten remaining numbers as they are 
issued during the college year. And whv not serd your friend a copy also? 

We are waiting for your subscription, so just pin that $1.50 to your letter and mail it NOW. 

THE CAROLINA TAR BABY, Chapel Hill, N. C. 

ERNEST H. ABERNETHY, Business Manager' 



FURWiTORE 



High-Grade Furniture 

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On Easy Terms 



CHRISTIAN & HARWARD 

CORCORAN STREET 
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SHOWING 

Stylish Hats, Suits, Coats 
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That it is our aim and desire to give you just 
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will always strive to please you. When in 
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you want to buy or not. 

STRAUSS-ROSENBERG'S 

FASHION SHOP FOR WOMEN 
DURHAM, N. C. 



96 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



I 



Statement of the Condition of 

The Fidelity Bank 

OF DURHAM, N. C. 

£HCade to the C\Corth Carolina Corporation Commission 
at the Close of Business, Sept. 12, 1919 



RESOURCES 

Loans and Investments $3,759,035.11 

Furniture and Fixtures 17,631.42 

Cash Items 847,421 37 

Cash in Vaults and with Banks 7b3,Sy3.55 

Overdrafts 842.79 

$5,388,874.24 

LIABILITIES 

Capital Stock $ 100.000 00 

Surplus 5O0.OU0.C0 

Undivided Profits 1U7.596.17 

Interest Reserve 6,000.1:0 

Dividends Unpaid 195.01 

Deposits 4,261,285.21 

Unearned Interest ". '. . 8,657.49 

Contingent Fund 5.14U.36 

Borrowed Bonds 100. Hot) 00 

Bills Payable 300.000.00 

S5,3S8,874.24 

B. N. DUKE. President 1N0. F. WILY, Vice President S. W. MINOR. Cashier 
L D. KIRKLANO, Assistant Cashier 1N0. A. BUCHANAN, Assistant Cashier 



The strength of this bank lies not alone in its Capital, Surplus, and Re- 
sources, but in the Character and Financial responsibility 
of the men who conduct its attairs 



The Yarborough 



RALEIGH'S LEADING AND 
LARGEST HOTEL 

MAKE IT YOUR HOME WHEN 
IN RALEIGH 



B. H. Griffin Hotel Company 

Proprietors 



Wood is with the New York office of this firm. 

— Dr. I. F. Lewis, of the faculty of the University of Virginia, 

was in charge of the teaching of botany at Woods Hole, Mass., 

during the summer. 

— Geo. B. Strickland is superintendent of schools at Old Fort. 

— Spier Whitaker, native of Ealeigh, is a prominent attorney 

of Birmingham, Ala. 

— Hal M. Barnhardt is engaged in the cotton yarn business 

at Utica, N. Y. 

1903 
N. W. Walker, Secretary, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
— N. W. Walker, professor of secondary education in the Uni- 
versity and State high school inspector, presided as president 
over the sessions of the North Carolina Teachers' Assembly in 
Raleigh, November 26-28. 

— Dr. K. P. B. Bonner practices his profession, medicine, at 
Morehead City. 

— J. Cox Webb is located at Norfolk, Va., where he is en- 
gaged in business. 

— E. M. Davenport is connected with the Greenville Supply 
Co., at Greenville. 

— Judge J. Bis Bay, of Burnsville, is judge of the 18th N. C. 
judicial district. 

— Wm. A. Graham is engaged in teaching in New York City. 
His address is Apt. IB, 219 Anderson Ave. 
— John J. London holds the rank of commander in the U. S. 
Navy. 

— Geo. C. Green, former pitcher on the Carolina baseball team, 
practices law at Weldon. He is a member of the board of 
trustees of the University. 

1904 
T. F. Hickekson, Secretary, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
— R. N. King is chief chemist for the Republic Iron and Steel 
Co., at Thomas, Ala. 

— John G. Carpenter, Law '04, attorney of Gastonia and former 
member of the State Senate from Gaston County, was among 
the alumni present for the Carolina-Virginia game. 
— D. Z. Cauble is construction foreman for the Tennessee 
Coal, Iron and Railroad Co. in the by-product plant of this 
corporation at Fairfield, Ala. 

— Graham Kenan, attorney of Wilmington, is a member of 
the board of trustees of the University and a member of the 
visiting committee. 

1905 
W. T. Shore, Secretary, Charlotte, N. C. 
— W. H. Oldham is superintendent of the blast furnace of the 
Tennessee Coal, Iron and Railroad Co., at Ensley, Ala. 
— Dr. L. B. Newell, M. D. '05, is a prominent physician of 
Charlotte. 

— C. L. Miller is chief chemist of the Semet Solvay Co., Ensley, 
Alabama. 

— N. A. Townsend, one of the best ends in Carolina football 
history, is engaged in the practice of law at Dunn as a mem- 
ber of the firm of Clifford and Townsend. 

— Dr. Stroud Jordan is chief chemist for the American To- 
bacco Co. His address is 544-60 Park Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
— W. C. Cathey is resident engineer at Lockhart, S. O, for the 
State Highway Department of S. C. 

1906 
Maj. J. A. Parker, Secretary, Charlotte, N. C. 
— Jno. G. Wood, Jr., is located at his home town, Edenton, 
where he has fishing interests. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



97 



— Dr. S. T. Nicholson, Jr., practices his profession, medicine, 
at Clifton Springs, N. Y. 

1907 
C. L. Weill, Secretary, Greensboro, N. C 
— The marriage of Miss Emily Elliott and Dr Henry Lee 
Sloan took place December 3rd at the home of the bride's 
parents in Linden. F. P. Graham, '09, was among those 
present for the wedding. Dr. and Mrs. Sloan are at home 
in Roanoke, Va. 

— Chas. L. Bransford is superintendent of the blast furnace of 
the Woodward Iron Co., Woodward, Ala. 

— W. S. Hunter is connected with the Decatur Car Wheel 
Works, Birmingham, Ala. 

— W. B. Dalton is engaged in the practice of law at Reids- 
ville. He is a member of the board of trustees of the Uni- 
versity. 

— G. S. Attmore, formerly a banker of New Bern, is now as- 
sistant State bank examiner, with headquarters in Raleigh. 
— J. A. Rudisill is superintendent of schools at Southern Pines. 
— R. B. Hardison is president of Hardison Bros. Co., Inc., 
cotton buyers and dealers in general merchandise at Morvcn. 

1908 
M. Robins, Secretary, Greensboro, N. C. 
— H. B. Connor is a chemist for the Tennessee Coal, Iron and 
Railroad Co., at Ensley, Ala. 

— T. R. Eagles is acting president of Howard College, Birm- 
ingham, Ala. 

—Chas. A. Hines, Law '08, is an attorney of Greensboro and 
is chairman of the Guilford County Democratic executive com- 
mittee. 

— J. A. Pore, Jr., is with the Southern Bell Telephone Co., 
at Atlanta, Ga. 

1909 

0. C. Cox, Secretary, Greensboro, N. C. 
— Don Gilliam is successfully engaged in the practice of law 
at Tarboro. 

— C. W. Howard, Jr., is a member of the firm of Andrews and 
Co., wholesale grocers, at Kinston. Mr. Howard was in busi- 
ness at Weldon formerly. 

1910 
J. R. Nixon, Secretary, Edenton, N. C. 
— Following his discharge from military service, in which 
he served as first lieutenant in the Medical Corps, Dr. J. M. 
Venable has resumed the practice of medicine in San Antonio, 
Texas. His addrss is 206 E. Locust St. 

— M. S. Rodriguez is located at Manati, province of Oriente, 
Cuba, where he is engaged in engineering work. 
— -J. D. Eason, Jr., practices his profession, law, at Whitehall, 
Montana. 

— Lenoir T. Avery is engaged in the manufacture of tobacco 
with the Export Leaf Tobacco Co., at Richmond, Va. During 
the war Mr. Avery saw active service overseas as first lieu- 
tenant of engineers. 

— W. A. Darden is in the department of English, U. S. Naval 
Academy. 

1911 

1. C. Moser, Secretary, Asheboro, N. C. 
— Gus Palmer, who wa3 formerly located at Carney's Point, 
N. J., is now located at Gulf in Chatham County. 




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New Dresses of Silks, soft Satins, and tine 
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^tc7l£AfjO\ 



98 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



LIGGETT & MYERS 
TOBACCO CO. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 

FATIMA, CHESTERFIELD, AND 

PIEDMONT CIGARETTES 

VELVET AND DUKE'S MIXTURE 

SMOKING TOBACCO AND 

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Our brands are standard for qualify. 
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200 BATHS 



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W. H. LOWRY 

Manager 



CABELL YOUNG 

Assistant Manager 



— A. C. Kimrey is assistant dairy husbandman for the N. 
C. Agricultural Experiment Station, West Raleigh. 
— Rev. I. Harding Hughes is chaplain of St. George's School, 
Newport, R. I., and is rector of St. Columba 's Church in the 
country near Newport. He writes, ' ' I still have a great de- 
sire to some day return to North Carolina and found a modern 
preparatory school for boys. This was President Graham 's 
plan for me to carry out. In the meantime I am very happy 
here. ' ' 

— M. A. White is connected with the Southern Life and Trust 
Co., at Greensboro. 

1912 

John C. Lockhakt, Secretary, Raleigh, N. C. 
— Dr. Roland S. Clinton is practicing his profession, medicine, 
at Gastonia. 

— The marriage of Miss Hallie Mae Belk and Mr. John Clar- 
ence Daughtridge, Law '12, took place November 14th at the 
home of the bride 's parents in Monroe. They are at home 
in Rocky Mount. 

— E. H. Yelverton, former U. S. Vice Consul at London, is a 
student of government and international law at Harvard. 
— P. H. Gwynn, Jr., attended the Carolina-Virginia game. 
Mr. Gwynn is superintendent of the Reidsville schools and is 
secretary of the Rockingham County Alumni Association. 

1913 

A. L. M. Wiggins, Secretary, Hartsville, S. C. 
— The Chapel Hill high school football team, coached by Fred 
W. Morrison, superintendent of the Chapel Hill schools, on 
December 6th won the State high school football champion- 
ship. 

The Chapel Hill Highs and the Greensboro Highs played 
the final game for the championship on Emerson Field, the 
score standing 78 to in favor of Chapel Hill. 

It is interesting to note in this connection that every State 
high school championship team since the beginning of the 
State-wide contests by the Extension Bureau in 1913 has been 
coached by a member of the class of 1913. Guy Phillips 
coached the Raleigh championship teams of 1913, 1914, and 
1915. Marvin Ritch coached the Charlotte championship teams 
of 1916 and 1917. Fred Morrison coached the Chapel Hill 
championship team of 1919. 

— J. M. Labberton is in the engineering department of the 
Westinghouse Co., at East Pittsburgh, Pa. 
— The marriage of Miss Louise Thornley Rankin and Mr. Al- 
bert R. Wilson, Jr., took place December 2nd at the home 
of the bride's parents in Pleasant Garden. They live in 
Greensboro, where Mr. Wilson is connected with the Vick 
Chemical Co. 

— J. L. Phillips is a civil engineer located at Kinston. 
■ — The marriage of Miss Gladys Eloise Teague and Mr. Ira 
W. Hine took place October 4th at the First Baptist Church 
in Winston-Salem. 

— A. L. M. Wiggins has been elected vice-president and 
managing director of the Trust Company of South Carolina, 
at Hartsville. He assumes his new duties January 1st but will 
retain his present connection with the Coker interests. 
— Clarence B. Hoke has the sympathy of his Carolina friends 
in the death of Mrs. Hoke, which occurred at Mr. Hoke's 
home in Lenoir in November. Mr. Hoke was formerly lo- 
cated at Kosmo, Utah, where he was engaged in chemical 
work, but he has concluded not to return to Utah and is at 
present at his home in Lenoir. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



99 



— L. L. Shamburger is engaged in brick manufacturing at 
Rocky Mount. 

— W. N. Post, following his discharge from service last De- 
cember, re-entered the banking profession in New York City. 
His address is 140 Broadway. In service Mr. Post, with 
the commission of second lieutenant, served last as an instruc- 
tor in the Field Artillery Central Officers' Training School, 
Camp Zachary Taylor, Ky. 

— Alvah L. Hamilton is a member of the faculty of the 
Walter Eeed high school, Newport News, Va. 
— Rev. W. G. Harry sends greetings of remembrance to mem- 
bers of the class of '13. He is now pastor of the Carrollton 
Presbyterian Church, New Orleans. His address is 7822 
Burthe St., New Orleans. 

— J. W. Mclver reports that he has moved his place of abode 
from 138 Orchard St., Newark, N. J., but that he is still con- 
nected with the publicity department of the Edison Lamp 
Works of the General Electric Co., Harrison, N. J. 
— Paul R. Bryan is assistant efficiency engineer for the Clair- 
ton by-product coke works of the Carnegie Steel Co., at Wilson, 
Pennsylvania. 

— Mr. and Mrs. H. C. Petteway, of Lakeland, Fla., announce 
the birth on November 30th of a son, Charles Hubert Petteway. 
— Rev. Theodore Partrick, Jr., is taking a special course at the 
Episcopal Theological Seminary, Alexandria, Va. 
— Miss Florence Franziole and Mr. John C. Busby were mar- 
ried recently in Nashville, Tenn. They are at home in Salis- 
bury, where Mr. Busby is engaged in the practice of law. 
— Rev. Douglas L. Rights, president of the class of 1913, has 
entered upon the pastorate of the Trinity Moravian Church 
at Winston-Salem. His war record is as follows: "Enlisted 
June 1, 191S at Camp Taylor, Ky. Commissioned first lieu- 
tenant and chaplain November 8, 1918. Assigned to base 
Hospital, Camp Jackson, S. C. Promoted to captain May 8, 
1919. Discharged from the service July 28, 1919." 
— Claude B. Woltz is studying law at Wake Forest. 
— R. W. Isley is superintendent of schools for Sampson County. 
He lives at Clinton. 

— J. O. Overcash is principal of the Philadelphus high school, 
near Red Springs. 

— J. Ed Bagwell is associated with the Watkins Hardware 
Co., of Henderson. 

— Robert Strange, who was discharged from the service in 
May.with the rank of captain, F. A., is now with the J. A. 
Taylor Co., of Wilmington, wholesale grocers. 
— A. R. Marks is part owner of the large wholesale dry goods 
firm of 0. Marks & Son, of New Bern. 

— T. S. Hughes, of Elizabeth City, recently launched forth 
into the wholesale grocery business. 

— F. M. Grice, Jr., is vice-president of the Sharber & White 
Hardware Co., of Elizabeth City. He has a nine-months-old 
boy as a recent addition to his family. 

— Wm. A. Burwell is owner of the Burwell Drug Co., of War- 
renton. 

— Mr. and Mrs. T. E. Story announce the birth of Thomas 
Edgar, Jr., August 21, 1919. Mr. Story is principal of the 
Oak Hill high school, Lenoir. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Robert C. Jurney have announced the birth 
of a son, James Albert, June 7, 1919. 

1914 
Oscae Leach, Secretary, Raeford, N. C. 
— Carl D. Taylor is a sales engineer for the Westinghouse Co., 
with headquarters in Pittsburgh. 



The Bank o/Chapel Hill 

OldeSt and Strongest bank in Orange County. 



Capital $25,000.00 

Surplus and Profits 39,000.00 

We earnestly solicit your banking 
business, promising you every service 
and assistance consistent with safe 
banking. "It pleases us to please 
you." 



M. C. S. NOBLE President 

R. L. STROWD Vice-President 

M. E. HOGAN Cashier 




Snappy Clothes 

for the 
College Man 

Society and 
Stein Block Clothes 

for the young 

and those 
who stay young 

Vanstory Clothing Co. 

C. H. McKNIGHT, "President and Manager 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



100 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



THE CAROLINA MAN'S SHOE STORE 

Carr-Bryant 

High Grade Shoes with Snap and Style 



Carr-Bryant {T$oot & Shoe Co. 



106 West Main Street 



DURHAM, N. C. 



"EL-REES-SO" 

7c— 3 for 20c 

Mid, Fragrant, Delightful— Try One 

"JOHNT. REES" 

10c 

A Cigar of quality, smooth, mellow, soothing. Gives 
a restful finish tj a perfect day 

EL-REES-SO CIGAR CO. 

Manufacturers of the Famous EL-REES-SO Cigar 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



"Clothes Made bi( Makers who 
Knew for Men who Pinow 

and 3dd bq 

tfneed=Markham=2aiilor "Co. 

Surham, Viorth 'Carolina 



I„ ©„ 1A^ 



W. H. LAWRENCE AND T. H. LAWRENCE 
ASSOCIATED 



Contractor and ' jDuilder 

MAIN OFFICE: DURHAM, N. C. 



CONTRACTOR PHILLIPS HALL 
UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 



— Dr. D. L. Knowles is located at Rocky Mount where he is 
engaged in the practice of his profession, medicine. 
— The marriage nf Miss Susan Asliby and Mr. William Sam- 
uel Wolfe, Phar. '14, took place November 19th at Central 
Methodist Church, Mount Airy. 

— James El Iridge is principal of the White Plains high school, 
in Surry county. 

— W. S. Wicker is on the engineering staff of the A. C. L. 
Railway Co., at Wilmington. 

— Lenoir Chambers, Jr., late a first lieutenant of the 54th TJ. 
S. Infantry, is director of publications for the University. 
— Capt. Hubert W. Collins, Engineer Corps U. S. Army, is re- 
maining in the service. He is stationed at the Engineer 
School, Camp Humphreys, Va. 

— Jas. E. Holmes is superintendent of the Spray schools. 
— Collier Cobb, Jr., who received a University assignment from 
the A. E. F., spent four months in the College of Municipal 
Engineering, University of Manchester, and in July passed the 
examinations in sanitary science as related to buildings and 
public works, and received his certificate from the Royal Sani- 
tary Institute, Birmingham, England. Mr. Cobb is now lo- 
cated at Durham as construction engineer with the firm of 
Robert G. Lassiter and Co. 

— Jesse F. Pugh is located in New Orleans where he is con- 
nected with the Goodyear Tire and Rubber Co. 
— Dr. Jas. G. Pate practices his profession, medicine, at Gib- 
son. 

— The wedding of Miss Cora Zetta Corpening and Mr. Wade 
Kornegay took place July 17, 1919, at the First Baptist Church 
of Mars Hill. They are at home at 708 Monteo St., Norfolk, 
Va. 

— Win. B. Campbell, Law '14, is an attorney of Wilmington. 
W. B., Jr., is 15 months old. 

— Rufus S. Shaw, Phar. '14, is a druggist with the North 
End Drug Store, of Scotland Neck. He is originally from 
Halifax. Since leaving college he has also sojourned at Farm- 
ville and Enfield. 

— Kenneth C. Royal has resumed the practice of law in Golds- 
biro, after serving with the A. E. F. as first lieutenant in the 
317th F. A. 

1915 
Daniel L. Bell, Secretary, Pittsboro, N. C. 
— Dr. C. L. Johnston is stationed at the Medico-Chi Hospital, 
18th and Cherry Sts., Philadelphia, Pa. Dr. Johnston plans 
to locate in the South, after leaving the hospital. 
— R. D. Dickson, Law '15, is a member of the law firm of 
Carr, Poisson and Dickson, at Wilmington. 
— W. R. Harding is taking advanced training in design en- 
gineering with the Westinghouse Co., at East Pittsburgh, Pa. 
— D. R. Martin is in the main office of the Westinghouse Co., 
at East Pittsburgh. He is in the sales department. 
— J. V. Whitfield is U. S. Consul at Montevideo, Uraguay, 
South America. 

— L. Bruce Gunter has resumed school work following his 
return from France, where he served in the A. E. F., and is 
again superintendent of the Wendell schools. 
— Dr. DeWitt R. Austin practices his profession, medicine, 
at Charlotte, with offices 809 Realty Bldg. 

— W. T. Strupe is assistant secretary of the Y. M. C. A. 
at Winston-Salem. 

— Dr. C. L. Johnston is resident physician in the Graduate 
Hospital, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. 
— Wade S. Dunbar is in the insurance business in Laurinburg. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



101 



M a rkham- Rogers Co. 

Clothiers, Tailors, Furni:hers and Hatters. 

All the New Fall Styles at Reasonable 
Prices 



DURHAM, N. C. 



Peinry H®iri®ini SHi©@ C@ 

Special Agents for Nettleton and Hurley 

Shoes for Men, and Cousins and Grover 

Shoes for Women 

MAKE OUR STORE HEADQUARTERS 
WHILE IN DURHAM, N. C. 



Academy of Music 

DURHAM, N. C. 

Durham's Exclusive Theatre Playing All Leading 
Attractions 

WM. F. FREELAND, Manager 



Snider- jFletcfyer (To. 



WATCHES, DIAMONDS, AND 
JEWELRY 



110 W. MAIN ST. 



DURHAM, N. C. 



il li 



Ti n= 



iDurfyam business School 

FULLY ACCREDITED 

!&oaro of ^3\.6vlsors 

GEN J S. CARR W G. BRAMHAM 

DR J. (VI MAN \ING W. J. KROGOEN 

R. L FLOwERS GEO. W. WATTS 

For full particulars and handsome catalog, address 

MRS. WALTER LEE LEDNUM 

PRESIDENT 



Sfemnndl Tfeaaitira 

DURHAM, N. C. 

HIGH CLASS PICTURES AND SPECIAL MUSIC 

YOU ARE ALWAYS WELCOME 

Open from 11:00 A. M. Until 11:00 P. M. 



Broadway Cafe 

WE CORDIALLY INVITE YOU TO VISIT OUR 
CAFE WHEN YOU ARE IN GREENSBORO 



EXCELLENT SERVICE 

COURTEOUS TREATMENT 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



HICKS -CRABTREE CO. 

FOUR MODERN DRUG STORES 
RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 

Eastman Kodaks and Supplies 
Nunnally's Candies 

The place to meet your friends when 
in the Capital City 

GILBERT CRABTREE, Manager 



102 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



Odell Hardware Co. 

Greensboro, N. C. 

China, Cut Glass and Silverware 
Household Goods 

DEPENDABLE GOODS 

PROMPT SERVICE 

SATISFACTORY PRICES 



Guilford Hotel and Cafe 

NEWLY REMODELED 
RATES REASONABLE 
CENTRAL LOCATION 

Greensboro, Nortb Carolina 



Cross and Linehan Co. 

Leaders in Clothing and Gents' 
Furnishings 

Raleigh, North Carolina 



(Looper 5ttonumerit 
dompanY 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Communicate with us regarding your 

needs for monuments or 

tombstones 



— The marriage of Miss Rachel Lynch and Mr. Eugene Simp- 
son took place June 17th in Chapel Hill. They are at home 
in Winston-Salem. 

— B. C. Parker is located at Marshville where he is cashier 
of the BaBnk of Marshville. He and Miss Rosa Blakeney, of 
Monroe, were married June 24th. 

— W. P. Mangum Weeks is now a law student in the Harvard 
Law School. He is president of the Cambridge Alumni Asso- 
ciation. 

— O. M. Marshburn continues in military service as captain 
of Field Artillery. He is stationed at Washington, D. C, and 
Ids address is 1342 Oak St., N. W., Washington. 
— The wedding of Miss Penelope Clary Brothers and Dr. Mark 
Alexander Griffin occurred October 15th at Edenton Street 
Methodist Church, Raleigh. They are at home at M irganton, 
where Dr. Griffin is on the medical staff of the State Hospital. 

EDITOR, THE REVIEW: 

SIR: I am now with Proctor and Gamble and am here 
erecting a 75 ton pulp mill in which we will manufacture 
pulp for paper from hull shavings, a by-product in the cotton 
seed oil industry. When the plant is completed I will be 
superintendent of it. 

On July 5th Miss Margy Dickoff Evans, of Louisville, Ky., 
and I were married. 
With best wishes, 

Yours truly, 
W. N. PRITCHARD, JR., '15. 
Augusta, Ga. 

November 23, 1019. 

— F. W. Carter is president of the J. W. Carter Co.,, a mer- 
cantile firm of Maxton. 

— Rev. A. R. Parshley, who returned recently from' overseas, 
where he served as a private in the 113th Field Artillery, has 
taken charge of the Episcopal Churches in Clinton, Faison, and 
Warsaw. 

— Geo. R. Pou, Law '15, is engaged in the automobile sales 
business at Smithfield. 

— Rev. B. M. Walton is rector of the Episcopal Church of 
Wadesboro. 

— H. C. Sisk is manager of the Quinn-McGowan Furniture Co., 
of Warsaw. 

— W. L. Thorpe, A. B. '15, Law '17, is an attorney of Rocky 
Mount. 

1916 
Hugh B. Hester, Secretary, Capt. and Adj. 12th F. A., Camp 

Travis, Texas 
— J. M. Glenn is county superintendent of schools for Gates 
County and is also superintendent of the Gatesville schools. 
— E. G. Hogan is with the R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., Win- 
ston-Salem. 

— John H. Jones is engaged in the cotton business at New 
Bern. 

— J. O. Dysart, who in service was a first lieutenant of the 
321st Infantry, is connected with the firm of M. C. Heath 
and Co., cotton brokers, at Columbia, S. C. 
— D. W. Royster is general manager of the Olive Hosiery 
Mfg. Co., at Shelby. 

— Miss Frances Howe Cheatham and Mr. James Allison Cooper, 
both of Henderson, were married September 17th at the 
church of the Holy Innocents, Henderson. 

— W. B. Blades, Jr., Law '16, of New Bern, is on of the In- 
corporators of the Blades Motor Co., a new corporation of 
New Bern. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



103 



Dick's Laundry Co. 



Greensboro, N. C. 



High-Class Launderers, French 
Cleaners and Dyers 

Prompt and Efficient Service 

it our motto 

Our reputation gained through years 
of experience speaks for itself. 

Send yours by Parcel Post 
We appreciate your patronage 



C. 5. Pender graft 

Chapel Hill Agent 



Drink 

Coca-Cola 

Delicious and Refreshing 



Quality tells the difference in the taste be- 
tween Coca-Cola and counterfeits. 

Demand the genuine by full name — nick- 
names encourage substitution. 

Get a bottle of the genuine from your 
grocer, fruit stand, or cafe. 



Durham Coca-Cola Bottling Co. 

DURHAM, N. C. 



CAPITALIZE YOUR TIME AND TALENTS 

By qualifying for a responsible business or civil service posi- 
tion whiie sa.aries are high. 

Banking, Bookkeeping, Gregg Shorthand, Touch Type- 
writing. Business Arithmetic, Business English, Co nmercial 
Law, Rapid Calculations, Spelling, Palmer Penmanship, 
Business Efficiency and Office Practice, taught by Spe- 
cialists. 

Our school is a member of the National Association of 
Accredited Commercial Schools and is highly endorsed by 
everybody. Call or request a catalog. 

King's Business College 

Raleigh, N. C. Charlotte, N. C. 



YACKETY YACK 1911 

I have a dozen copies of the 1911 Yackejy Yack which 
I will sell at $3 each, or two damaged copies at $2 each. 
K. S. TANNER, Spindale, N. C. 



Yackety Yacks, 19 16-' 17 

The Year Carolina beat Virginia in all meets. Handsome leather- 
bound volume. The last available. Price $2. 

G. D. CRAWFORD. Chapel Hill. N. C. 



RIDE WITH 

C. S. Pender graft 

Pioneer Auto Man 

LEAVE ORDERS AT 

MABRY'S DRUG STORE 

HEADQUARTERS IN DURHAM 

THE BEST PLACE TO GET SOFT DRINKS. CIGARS 
AND CIGARETTES 

HEADQUARTERS IN CHAPEL HILL: NEXT TO 
BANK OF CHAPEL HILL 

Leave Chapel Hill 8.30 and 10.20 a. m. 

Leave Chapel Hill 2.30 and 4.00 p. m. 

Leave Durham 9.50 a. m., 12.40 p. m. 

Leave Durham 5.08 p. m., 8.00 p. m. 

OTHER TRIPS SUBJECT TO ORDER 



Four Machines at Your Service 
Day or Night 

PHONE 58 or 23 

Agent for 

Dick 9 s Laundry, Greensboro, N. C. 



104 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



"SAY IT WITH FLOWERS" 
J. J. FALLON, Leading Florist 



Chapel Hill Agents: 

FOISTEH'S ART STORE 

R. P. ANDREWS. Peoples Bank 



Phone 1290 

214 E. M»m Street 

DURHAM. N.C. 



W. M. NEW TON COMPANY 

DURHAM, N. C. 

DE LUXE CLOTHIERS 

"TOO YOUNG FOR OLD IDEAS" 



PARIS THEATRE 

• DURHAM, N. C. 
ARTCRAFT-PARAMOUNT PICTURES 
Orchestra Orchestra 



BROADWAY THEATRE 

DURHAM, N. C. 

THE HOUSE OF SPECIAL PHOTO-PLAY 

ATTRACTIONS 



DURHAM CAFE 



VISIT US WHILE IN DURHAM 



C. W. KENDALL 

LADIES' WEAR STORE 
VISIT US WHILE IN DURHAM 



FLOWERS 


FOR ALL OCCASIONS 




Durham 


Floral Nursery 




CHAPEL HILL AGENTS: 


EUBANKS DRUG 


CO. 



1 .... 

WELCOME 


TO 


STONEWALL HOTEL 


W. E. HOCKETT 


Manager 


CHARLOTTE, 


N. C. 



— H. Victor Bailey is principal of the Winton high school. 
— Wm. E. Pell is teaching in the Raleigh high school and is 
studying law under his father, Judge Pell. He is faculty 
manager of athletics. 

— Wade R. Hunter is a member of the faculty of the Ashe- 
villo high school. 

— H^ke Black is a student in the Harvard Law School. His 
address is 376 Harvard St., Cambridge, Mass. 
— J. Me.rrell Parker is a member of the faculty of the Greens- 
boro high school. He coached the Greensboro highs in foot- 
ball the past season. 

— Win. B. Umstead has been appointed captain of the ma- 
chine gun company to be located in Durham under the re- 
organization plans of the N. C. National Guard. 
— W. L. Goldston, Jr., is a geological engineer, located at 
Ardmore, Okla. 

— O. A. Pickett is chemist in charge of the analytical and 
testing division, Hercules Powder Co., Kenvil, N. J. 
— Oliver M. Litaker, Law '16, who is with the General Ad- 
justment Bureau of New York City (for the adjustment of 
fire insurance losses), has been promoted to the rank of Staff 
Adjuster and transferred from their branch office in Syracuse, 
N. Y., to their branch office in Charleston, W. Va. His ad- 
dress is S03 Va. Land Bank Building. 

— Robert N. Page, Jr., is assistant cashier of the Page Trust 
Co., at Carthage. He was in service as a second lieutenant of 
aviation. 

— R. A. Monroe, who was recently discharged from the ser- 
vice, is now manager of a large mercantile firm in Laurinburg. 
— L. D. Rawlings is assistant manager *of the Wilson Ice and 
Fuel Co. 

— L. J. Farmer, of Wilson, is with the Tomlinson Co., deal- 
ers in hardware and implements. 

— J. P. Shrago is in the wholesale dry goods business in 
Goldsboro. 

— W. B. Rouse, law, '16, has resumed the practice of law in 
New Bern, after being discharged from the service. 
— R. T. Allen, Law '16, of Kinston, who made a splendid 
military record, especially in the marksmanship contests over- 
seas, has resumed the practice of law. He is associated with 
the firm of Cowper, Whitaker & Allen. 
— F. W. Hancock is practicing law in Oxford. 

1917 

H. G. Baity, Secretary, Ronda, N. C. 
— Following one year's service as first lieutenant in Coast 
Artillery, A. C. Forney returned to his work in the engineer- 
ing department of the Westinghouse Co., at East Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania. 

— Dr. John H. Bonner practices medicine at Morehead City. 
— The marriage of Miss Florence Hester Gurley and Mr. 
Russell L. Ginn took place November 19th at the home of the 
bride 's parents in Princeton. They live in Goldsboro where 
Mr. Ginn is engaged in the wholesale grocery business. 
— Since his discharge in August from the army, in which he 
served as first lieutenant of infantry, F. M. Crawford has 
been located at his home town, Cornelia, Ga. 
— Robert P. Brooks is connected with the Bell Telephone Co. 
of Pennsylvania. His address is 6216 Howe St., East Liberty 
Station, Pittsburgh. 

— Ray S. Toxey is a member of the firm of A. F. Toxey and 
Co., wholesale grocers of Elizabeth City. 

— Wm. C. Wright has re-entered the University and is a stu- 
dent in the Law School. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



105 



A. E. LLOYD HARDWARE CO. 

DURHAM, N. C. 

All Kinds of Hardware, Sporting 

Goods and College Boys' 

Accessories 

GEO. W. TANDY, MANAGER 



tJ/ie tJvoijal (Lafe 

Clniuersitt/ students, faculty members, and 
alum ni visit the %J\oyat Cafe tvhite in 
iDurham. Clatter neiv and pro- 
gressive management, 
special pa rears 
for ladies 

kQur/iani s ^ALodern (Lafe 



Keep Physically Fit 



The young men of U. N C. are wise enrich 
to know that alh'ehc exercise promt tes scur.d 
health. Get in some gam? early. 

We can supply you wnh every essential in 
equpment for Football, Soccer, Basket Ball, 
Hockey, Skating, elc. 



Write for catalogue No, UC. 

ALEX TAYLOR & CO., Inc 

Athletic Outfitters 
26 E. 42nd St., New York 




Hennessee Cafe 

A MODERN, UP-TO-DATE CAFE, WHERE YOU 
AND YOUR FRIENDS ARE WELCOME 

CLEANLINESS AND SERVICE 
OUR MOTTOES 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



BAGLEY & ALDERMAN, Advertising 

LETTERWRITING, MULTIGRAPHING, PRINT- 
ING, ADVERTISING SIGNS, AND 
SPECIALTIES 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



CHARLES C. HOOK, ARCHITECT 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 

TWENTY YEARS EXPERIENCE IN PLANNING 
SCHOOL AND COLLEGE BUILDINGS 



.A. ^. Iftluth? Co.3nc. 

Extend a cordial invitation to all students and 
alumni of the U. N. C. to make their store head- 
quarters during their stay in Chapel Hill. 

Complete Stock of 
New and Second-hand Books, Stationery, and 
Complete Line of Shoes and Haberdashery 
Made by the Leaders of Fashion, Al- 
ways on Hand 



When in Need 

of a Pocket Knife, Razor, Hone, Strop, Brush, 
Safety Razor, Blades, or tools of any kind, 
Paints, Varnishes, Brushes, Electrical Goods, 
and General Hardware, call on the 

Chapel Hill Hardware Co. 

THE STORE WHERE "QUALITY" COUNTS 



THE RESULT OF 28 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE 

LANG'S "ROGER C." CIGAR; TWO 

BRANDS: 7c and 10c 

A COMPARISON IS ALL I ASK 

ROGER C. LANG 

GRELN5BORO. N. C. 



106 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



R. BLACKNALL & SON 

DRUGGISTS 

NORRIS AND HDYLERS CANDIES 

G. BERNARD. Makacer 

Corcoran Street Durham. N. C. 



E. E. Bragg & Co. 

WALKOVER AND FLORSHEIM SHOES 
DURHAM, N. C. 



Model Laundry Co. 

DURHAM, N. C. 
EXPERT LAUNDRY SERVICE 



DURHAM ICE CREAM CO. 

Fancy Ices; Makers of Blue Ribbon Brand Ice Cream 
Receptions and Banquets a Specialty 

TELEPHONE No. 1199 



POLLARD BROTHERS 

DURHAM, N. C. 

STANDARD LINES OF HARDWARE 

AND SPORTING GOODS 



LEATHER GOODS CHEAPER 
DURHAM, N. C. 



PRIDGEN & JONES CO. 

We Carry the Best Shoes: Edwin Clapp, Howard and 

Foster, and Heywood's 

Expert Fitters — A Cordial Welcome Awaits You 

107 W. Main St. DURHAM, N. C. 



THE SELWYN 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 

Fireproof, Modern and Luxurious 

IN THE HEART OF EVERYTHING 

H. C. LARZALERE, Manager 



1918 
W. R. Wunsch, Secretary, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
— R. D. Ballew has recently been transferred from Pittsburgh 
to Michigan where he is industrial salesman for the Westing- 
house Co. His address is Westinghouse E. and M. Co., Dime 
Savings Bank BIdg., Detroit, Mich. During the war he was 
mi ensign in the submarine service. 
— E. F. Duncan is principal of the Mayodan high school. 

1919 

H. G. West, Secretary, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
— Wm. F. Stokes attended the Eastman Business College at 
Poughkeepsie last summer and at present is engaged in the 
mercantile business with his father at Stokes. 
— W. P. Andrews was on the "Hill" for the Thanksgiving 
game. He is connected with the Blue Ridge Power Co., at 
Flat Rock. 

— Norman A. Boren was in attendance upon the Thanksgiving 
game. He is pursuing the study of law at Columbia Uni- 
versity. 

— J. McN. Pate is engaged in the mercantile business at 
Laurel Hill. 



THE PEOPLES BANK 

WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 

Capital $150,000.00 United States Depositary 

J. W. FRIES, Pres. Wm. A. BLAIR, Vice-Pres. 

N. MITCHELL, Cashier 



1 : — : — ~ 1 

Five Points Auto Go. 


AUTOMOBILES 


Repairs, and Accessories 


Agents for 


Buick and Dodge Cars 


DURHAM, N. C. 

1 1, 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



107 



Ol)c l£ruvcrsit\> firzss 

ZEB P. COUNCIL. Manager CHAPEL HILL. N. C. 

PRINTING, ENGRAVED CARDS 

QUALITY AND SERVICE 



AGENCY INORRIN CANDY 



THE REXALL STORE 



K 



GOOCH'S CAFE 

Anything to Eat 
CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 



(sssie ^/jrof/iers 

CALIFORNIA AND FLORIDA FRUITS 

TOBACCO AND CIGARS 

ICE CREAM PARLOR FRESH CANDIES 

"WE STRIVE TO PLEASE" 



CHAPEL HILL 
N. C. 



ANDREWS GASH STORE CO. 

Students and Faculty will find us ready to serve 
them with the latest styles in Walkover Shoes, 
Fancy Shirts, Tailored Suits, and general furn- 
ishings. Be convinced. Call and see. 



FOR NEAT JOB PRINTING AND TYPEWRITER 
PAPER CALL AT THE OFFICE OF 

The Chapel Hill News 



W. B. SORRELL 

JEWELER AND OPTOMETRIST 
CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 



PATTERSON BROS. 

DRUGGISTS 



ODAK SUPPLIE O 

Finishing for the Amateur. Foister ^^ 



Eubanks Drug Co. 

Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Agents for Nunnally's Candy 



HOUSEHOLD SUPPLY CO. 

CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 

We are prepared to save you money on your house- 
hold supplies. Let us know yjur needs. 



PICKARD'S HOTEL 

Headquarters for Carolina Alumni 

Returning to the Hill 

SPECIAL RATES. STUDENT BOARDERS. 



Clectric Sl)ce S\)op 

EXPERT SHOE REPAIRING 
CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 



Huffine Hotel 

Quick Lunch Counter and Dining Room — C'ean 

Rooms $1.00 and Up 

NEAR DEPOT: GREENSBORO, N. C. 



WHITING-HORTON CO. 

THIRTY-ONE YEARS 
RALEIGH'S LEADING CLOTHIERS 



H. S. STORR & CO. 

Office Furniture, Machines and Supplies; Printers and 
Manufacturers of Rubber Stamps 
RALEIGH, N. C. 



Dllbnn Smipply €@ 

MACHINERY, MILL SUPPLIES 
PHONE 753 RALEIGH, N. C. 



108 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 




A Gateway — Electrical 



ONLY a forty-foot gateway bounded by two 
brick pilasters and ornamental lamps, but 
unlike any other gateway in the entire world. 

For back of it is the General Electric Company's 
main office building, accommodating 2300 em- 
ployees. And just next door is its laboratory 
with the best equipment for testing, standard- 
izing and research at the command cf capable 
engineers. Then down the street — a mile long 
— are other buildings where everything elec- 
trical, from the smallest lamp socket to the 
huge turbines for electrically propelled battle- 
ships, is made by the 20,000 electrical workers 
who daily stream through. 



What a story this gate would tell, if it could, 
of the leaders of the electrical industry and 
business, of ambassadors from other institu- 
tions and from foreign lands. 

The story would be the history of electric 
lighting, electric transportation, electric indus- 
trials and electricity in the home. 

This gateway, as well as the research, en- 
gineering, manufacturing and commercial 
resources back of it, is open to all who are 
working for the betterment of the electrical 
industry. 



Illustrated bulletin, Y-863, describing the company's 
several plmts, w.ll be mailed upon request. Address 
General Electric Company, Desk 43, Schenectady, N. Y. 




n©m 



General Office 
Schenectady.N.Y. 




? Company 



Sales Offices in 
all large cities. 



95-1001 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



109 





GREAT UNDERTAKINGS 

Westinghouse was foremost in harnessing 
this myster'ous force. T' e development of 
the Transformer dates back thirty-tl ree 
years. It came as a ne"essary adjunct to 
the development of t'~e alternating current 
system of power distribution introduced in 
this country by George Westinghouse and 
developed in spite of bitter and powerful 
opponents who claimed it to be a danger- 
ous and deadly agency. T'e transformer 
was absolutely necessary to change the 
high transmission voltage of alternating 
current to safe and practical limits for use 
in the home and factory. 

WORKED UNDER A PARTIAL HANDICAP 

Younger men must come forward and carry on the work t'eir 
great predecessors started. And those who wrought so successfully 
and so diligently then, did so under t^e disadvantages of t^eir 
time — the partial handicap of a limited training. They were largely 
self-taught. 

MEN TODAY BETTER EQUIPPED 

The technically-trained young man of today is fortunate in having 
a more adequate fundamental training; and when he leaves college, 
he has the additional advantage of being able immediately to enter 
some large manufacturing organization in which he can apply his 
technical knowledge along practical lines. 

WESTINGHOUSE BELIEVES IN HELPING 

YOUNG MEN TO SUCCEED 

The Westinghouse Electric & Manufacturing Company maintains 
a Graduate Course of practical training for the technical graduate. 
This course has improved with the years, and today it represents the 
most practical course of its kind in the electrical industry. It is just 
such a course as will best and most rapidly develop and fit the 
technical man for the work he will later be called upon to do. 

Westinghouse Electric & Manufacturing Co. 
East Pittsburg, Pa. 

Westinghouse 



110 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 




Our Christmas Wish 

for you is just 
real happiness with those you hold dear 

and 

twelve months of plenty for 

the New Year 



THE SEEMAN PRINTERY 

DURHAM, N. C. 




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The University of North Carolina 



1789 



CHAPEL HILL 



1919 



"Educationally the decade that follows the War will be, I believe, the 
richest and most fruitful in the nation's history." 

THESE PROPHETIC WORDS, written by the late Edward Kidder Graham while America was still at war, 
relate to today — the college year 1919-1920 — to this very moment when North Carolina stands confronted 
with the problem of building its civilization upon sound, permanent foundations and when the South and 
the Nation, with newly opened channels of intercourse with the world at large, are planning for the complete 
fulfilment of their high mission among the nations. 

THIS FRUITFUL DECADE, JUST AT THE QIJADRENNIUM f the war now ended, calls insistently for the 
TRAINED LEADER. 

THROUGH ITS NEWLY ESTABLISHED SCHOOL OF COMMERCE, its School of Engineering, and other 
schools and departments, the University offers the thoroughgoing, complete training for the sort of leadership 
which the new day requires. 

COURSES ARE OFFERED IN BUSINESS ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT, Accounting, Foreign 
Trade, Banking, Transportation, Political Economy, Business Law, Electrical Engineering, Chemical En- 
gineering, Highway Engineering, Soil Investigation. Law, Medicine, Pharmacy, Journalism, Social Science, 
Government, Education, Music, and all subjects embraced in the College of Liberal Arts, the School of Ap- 
plied Science, the Graduate School, and the Summer School. 

Instruction through correspondence courses on a wide choice of subjects may be secured at low cost through the 
Bureau of Extension. 

ADDRESS THE PRESIDENT 

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

CHAPEL HILL 



(Tulture 



Scholarship Service 

THE = 



Self-Support 



^tortl) (Tarolina (Lollege for Women 

Offers to Women a Liberal Education, Equipment for Womanly 
Service, Professional Training for Remunerative Employment 



The College offers four groups of studies lead- 
ing to the following degrees: Bachelor of Arts, 
Bachelor of Science, and Bachelor of Music. 

Special courses in Pedagogy; in Manual Arts; in 
Domestic Science Household Art and Economics; in 
Music; and in the Commercial Branches. 

Teachers and graduates of other colleges provided 
for in both regular and special courses. 



Equipment modern, including furnished dormitories, 
library, laboratories, literary society halls, gymnas- 
ium, music rooms, teachers' training school, infirm- 
ary, model laundry, central heating plant, and open 
air recreation grounds. 

Dormitories furnished by the State. Board at 
actual cost. Tuition free to those who pledge them- 
selves to become teachers. 



Fall *Uerm Opens in September 



Summer Tferm Begins in June 



For catalogue and other information, address 

JULIUS I. FOUST, President, GREENSBORO, N. C. 



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