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COLLECTION < > F 

NORTH CAR ( ) LINIAN A 



ENDOWED BY 

JOHN SPRUNT HILL 
of the class of 1889 



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VOLUME VIII 



THE 



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OPINION AND COMMENT 

A Glance Backward — The Campus Come-Back — 
We "View With Alarm" — Houses for Profes- 
sors — Why Not Do Likewise? — From An- 
other Angle — Wealth and Intelligence — 
The Rockefeller Christmas Gift — 
The President's Report — 
Alumni Conference 

THE FIRST YEAR AFTER THE WAR 
ALUMNI ASSOCIATIONS HOLD MEETINGS 
INAUGURATION PLANS ANNOUNCED 



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PUBLISHED BY 

THE ALVMNI ASSOCIATION 






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Cy Thompson Says- 



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THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



Volume VIII 



JANUARY, 1920 



Number 4 



OPINION AND COMMENT 



For vhe benefit of the alumni The Review is print- 
ing elsewhere a summary of the activities of the Uni- 
versity during 1919 — the first year after 
A Glance the war. All in all, the year, which began 
Backward in tragedy and confusion, has abundantly 
fulfilled the prophecy of the late Presi- 
dent Graham that, educationally, the years immedi- 
ately following the war would be the most distinctive 
in American educational history. The record of 
Carolina in 1919, the come-back of the institution. 
the forward projection of itself to meet the require- 
ments of 1920 and after, have been of a sort to hearten 
every alumnus anc are significant of positive good for 
North Carolina. 

□ □□ 

The outstanding achievement of the fall quarter is 
not the program of dormitory construction, as neces- 
sary as that is to the physical life of 
The Campus the University. It is not the success 
Come-back of the fund for the student center 
Memorial Building, as elemental as 
that is in the social needs of the campus. It is not 
the coveted victory over the University of Virginia, 
as glorious as that was in all its aspects. The pre- 
eminent fact of the year is the spirit of the student 
body and the tone of student life. This spirit and 
tone is the more heartening because it is in the na- 
ture of a come-back. 

Last year was a year of disaster in the life of the 
University. Death struck its heavy blows at critical 
hours. Disarrangement and confusion followed the 
transition from the military regime to the status of 
peace. The spirit and standards that crept into the 
campus last winter were not of the great tradition 
that Carolina men had builded through generations. 
There was a possibility, it was feared, that some of 
these things might fasten themselves or leave their 
sinister impress on the life of the college. 

But the undercurrents of the real Carolina were 
deep and strong. It was only a question of time for 
the assimilation of temporary abnormalities by the 
general health of the University. The past fall has 
been a period of the renascence of the Carolina spirit. 
Student government has reasserted itself in the com- 



pleteness of its standards, interests, and activities. 
The Student Honor Council has the undivided back- 
ing of the student body. The Campus Cabinet, re- 
organized and revitalized, has wrought mightily at 
the very heart of student life. The Young Men's 
Christian Association, in spite of its inadequate home, 
has exemplified and promoted the abundant life of the 
campus. The sentiment of the students backed the 
team against all odds of comparative scores, weight 
and power, and achieved victory with high sportsman- 
ship. The dances, through thoughtful student leader- 
ship, were a gracious expression of the tone of the 
year. The student body has not only come back, it is 
going forward. It is at once rebuilding and new- 
building in the deep things of the tradition and hope 
of Carolina. 

ODD 

While The Review "points with pride" to the rec- 
ord both of the institution as a whole and to the spirit 
of the student body in particular, and 
We "View while it would not appear unduly 

With Alarm" pessimistic, it is foz-ced to "view" 
with considerable "alarm" the diffi- 
culties which lie immediately ahead of the University 
in the form of needed buildings and increased salaries. 
With the growth of the public schools of the State 
and the increased wealth of North Carolina citizens 
generally, an enlarged enrollment in 1920-21 is to be 
expected. With reasonably wise handling, the stu- 
dent body can be depended on to give a good account 
of itself. But unless the University can increase the 
rewards of the teaching staff and enlarge the physical 
plant, and do both before September fifteenth, it will 
find itself confronted with difficulties which are frank- 
ly dangerous. Members of the University faculty re- 
turning from meetings of learned societies bring back 
with them the report of increased rewards and sharp 
competition for really worthwhile men. And Caro- 
lina cannot hope, to escape the effects of this compe- 
tition. 

Lack of dormitories, lack of class rooms, lack of 
laboratories, restricted space everywhere — is an old 
story, but an old story raised to the n-th power in 
1919. In 1920-21 it will reach the n-th plus, which 



116 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



(if there be such) isn't safe. The two dormitories 
which have been authorized will, in all probability, 
barely accommodate the natural increase in enroll- 
ment without affording one whit of relief from 
present conditions. 

The lack of space for classes and laboratories is, if 
anything, even more acute and rearrangement of 
schedules with lectures in the afternoon periods will 
not materially change the situation. Nothing short 
of a new recitation building and new quarters for 
some of the present departments will avail, and a 
building program which will provide them, in spite 
of all the difficulties in the way, at once. 

nan 

But the most pressing need is that for houses for 
the teaching staff of the University. Some of the 

findings of the faculty committee on 
Houses for living conditions have already been 
Professors given in these columns. They, and the 

additional ones given below, demand the 
instant attention of the administration and Trustees : 

1. Up to the present the faculty has financed its 
own housing propositions, only five of its members 
occupy dwellings owned by non-faculty residents of 
the village. 

2. Of the professors with families, appointed up to 
and including 1910, only three do not own their own 
homes. 

3. Of the professors with families appointed since 
1910 only two have built. 

4. Several have bought sites, hoping to build at a 
future date. 

5. At least eight families now cared for will find 
themselves without houses in September. 

6. Some of the families are living in houses long 
since condemned and abandoned, and intolerable in 
such bitter weather as that recently experienced. 

7. Three members of the faculty confronted with 
these conditions have informed the Business Manager, 
in writing, that unless the University can assure them 
by March 1st of a house for the next year they will 
accept positions elsewhere. These men have been 
secured with difficulty and it would be unthinkable 
for the University to let them go on this account. 

8. The University is needing several new men who 
can not be expected to accept the positions offered 
unless they can be assured of suitable houses. 

As The Review understands it the administration 
and the special committee of Trustees on the Devel- 
opment of University Buildings and Grounds have 
thoroughly canvassed the situation and are perfecting 
plans to meet the need. But the point The Review 
makes is that immediate action is necessary. The 
plan must be completed and adopted quickly and 
the houses must be in readiness in September. And 
with the brick supply of this building territory al- 



ready bought up until well on toward July, and with 
other building material and labor difficult to obtain, 
instant action is needed. 

DDD 

At various times in recent years the question has 
arisen in University circles whether or not it would 

be advisable to establish courses in so- 
Why Not Do cial service and public health in co- 
Likewise? operation with the State Board of 

Health and other allied organizations. 
The Review has been strongly of the opinion that 
such a step should be taken if the proper arrange- 
ments could be made. The following news note taken 
from the University of South Carolina Weekly News 
of December 24th sets forth the proposition in a 
clean-cut way and shows what action that institution 
has taken: 

The trustees of the University authorized at their 
meeting last Wednesday the establishment of a School 
of Social Service and Public Health. The new school 
will be conducted as a part of the extension work of 
the University, and will be open to all persons desir- 
ing work along such lines. 

The public health nurse is an indispensable part of 
a county health unit, and the Bureau of Child Hy- 
giene and Public Health Nursing of the State Board 
of Health has found the demand for these nurses 
greater than the supply of trained workers. At 
present many nurses are going to schools out of the 
State to secure the necessary training. 

The usual hospital course of two or three j r ears does 
not fit the nurse to meet the family and community 
problems which constitute a large part of the daily re- 
sponsibility of a public health nurse, nor does it sup- 
ply the requisite knowledge as to communicable dis- 
eases and the practice of preventive medicine, with its 
problems of housing, and sanitation. 

Graduate nurses will be given courses in the Uni- 
versity in modern social problems, rural social condi- 
tions, pedagogy, public speaking, nutrition, and the 
principles of public health nursing. Half of their 
time will be devoted to practical work in connection 
with the Richland County health unit, plans for 
which are now being perfected by the local authorities. 

DDD 

In the State press of December 31st the question 
presented in the foregoing paragraphs is illumined 
from another angle. This year the 
From An- University has appointed a sanitation 
other Angle committee, has placed a resident phy- 
sician in charge of the Infirmary, and 
has provided instruction for all members of the 
campus in physical education. The suggestions ap- 
pearing upon the above-mentioned date follow : 

Assistant Secretary A. J. Warren, of the State 
Board of Health, completing a survey of needs for 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



117 



health in the University community at Chapel Hill, 
recommends to Governor Bickett, chairman of the 
Board of Trustees, that the University appoint the 
very best obtainable professor of hygiene and public 
health. 

Dr. Warren would have health and hygiene taught 
in course and credits given in it as other studies. He 
would require the individual taking this course and 
in addition would make the professor health officer 
for the University and the township of Chapel Hill. 

Under Dr. Warren's direction a survey recently 
showed an inadequate plant at the University, though 
conditions are declared to be excellent on such ma- 
chinery as is afforded. There are two nurses, a 25-bed 
hospital, a private laundry being installed, and there 
are three shower baths to the 100 population. But 
there are open closets in abundance in the village, 
and fly-breeding on the campus is inevitable. 

"There are no gross errors of sanitation," the re- 
port says, and none that constitutes an imminent 
danger. "Sanitary conditions are about as good as 
can be under existing conditions," it continues. It 
will take education of the student body to correct 
conditions as they now exist. 

DDD 

Professor John Erskine, of the department of Eng- 
lish of Columbia University and recently Commis- 
sioner of Education in France with the 
Wealth and A.E.F., was the author in 1916 of a 
Intelligence volume the title essay of which was 
"The Moral Obligation to be Intelli- 
gent." The theme running through the four essays 
constituting the book was the moral use to which in- 
telligence might be put in rendering our admirations 
and our loyalties at once more sensible and noble. 

Since reading the volume we have frequently been 
upon the point of commending it to the alumni as 
furnishing a point of view from which men of Uni- 
versity training should approach the consideration of 
present-day situations and movements. Recently two 
facts of such far-reaching import have been brought 
to the attention of all North Carolinians that we find 
the moment particularly appropriate to commend the 
publication and to emphasize the sentiment expressed 
in the title. For, frankly, it is our duty to be intel- 
ligent. 

The two facts which have impelled us to this utter- 
ance are (1) That North Carolina has recently discov- 
ered that she is one of the foremost States in the na- 
tion in the production of agricultural wealth; (2) 
That her accumulations are being placed upon the tax 
books in such a way as to eliminate inequalities which 
have existed heretofore in the raising of revenues for 
government and the public good. The fact of the 
State's greatly increased wealth imposes the solemn 
duty of administering it in such a way as will con- 



tribute most to the real welfare of the people. The 
further fact that a revaluation measure has been per- 
fected which honestly attempts to equalize the con- 
tributions which citizens may make to the mainte- 
nance of government imposes the further duty of 
support of the measure on the part of intelligent men 
who look forward to a finer civilization. 

In stating our position we are not thinking in the 
terms of benefits which may accrue to the University 
if such action is taken. We have in mind the whole 
welfare program of North Carolina — roads, educa- 
tion, health, charitable institutions, and all that is de- 
pendent upon an adequate revenue equitably derived 
from our increased wealth. 

Again, let lis repeat, that as an agricultural wealth- 
producing State, North Carolina stands fourth in the 
nation with a total crop valuation in 1919 of $683,- 
000,000. In the same year we have added tremen- 
dously to our bank deposits and to various other forms 
of savings. And at the same time, we have evolved a 
system of providing revenue which strives for equity 
among the whole citizenship in the matters of gov- 
ernmental support out of which alone a finer State 
can be builded. Here, if we iinderstand Professor 
Erskine aright, is a situation in which the moral obli- 
gation of alumni of the University in particular and 
educated, forward looking citizens generally — the 
moral obligation of being intelligent is explicit. 

DDD 

The announcement on Christmas eve of a gift of 
$100,000,000 by John D. Rockefeller, half of which 
goes to the Rockefeller Foundation 
The Rockefeller and the other half to the General 
Christmas Gift Education Board, was of the sort to 
bring the American public to atten- 
tion, and to direct anew the minds of men to the 
menace of disease and the dangers incident to the 
threatened shortage of teachers in the institutions of 
higher learning in America. 

The $50,000,000 which goes to the Rockefeller 
Foundation is to be used as the funds of the Founda- 
tion have heretofore been used in the fight against 
disease. 

The $50,000,000 set aside for the General Educa- 
tion Board is given without special instructions as to 
its employment. It was accompanied, however, by the 
following significant statement from Mr'. Rockefeller : 

"The attention of the American public has re- 
cently been drawn to the urgent and immediate ne- 
cessity of providing more adequate salaries to mem- 
bers of the teaching profession. It is of the highest 
importance that those entrusted with the education of 
youth and the increase of knowledge should not be 



118 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



led to abandon their calling by reason of financial 
pressure or to cling to it amid discouragements due 
to financial limitations. It is of equal importance to 
our future welfare and progress that able, aspiring 
men and women should not for similar reasons be 
deterred from devoting their lives to teaching. 

"While this gift is made for the general corporate 
purposes of the Board, I should cordially indorse a 
decision to use the principal as well as the income as 
promptly and largely as may seem wise for the pur- 
pose of co-operating with the higher institutions of 
learning in raising sums specifically devoted to the 
increase of teachers' salaries." 

The Board holds its meeting on February 26th, at 
which time it will determine the policy to be followed 
in making awards. Secretary Wallace Buttrick states 
that heretofore it has been the policy of the Board to 
make awards to those institutions which raised similar 
funds. 

While the matter is pending alumni will quite nat- 
urally be interested in the disposition of the fund and 
will hope that Carolina may in some way profit by 
this unusually "intelligent" — to refer to Professor 
Erskine again — gift. 

DDD 

The President's Report, being the University 
Record for 1919, and containing President Chase's 

report to the Trustees, together with 
The Presi- the report of the various officers of 

dent's Report the University, is expected from press 

while the copy for this issue of The 
Review is in the hands of the printer. Consequently, 
a summary of it and the principal recommendations 
contained in the various reports, will be reserved for 
the February number. However, in order that alumni 
may have an opportunity to secure copies, notice is 
herewith given of its appearance, and it is suggested 
that this most informing publication be written for 
at once. Requests directed to the Secretary of the 
President will be promptly met. 

DDD 

A practice at a number of institutions in the coun- 
try — notably Yale — which The Review would like to 

see adopted by the University is that of 
Alumni holding, usually in mid-winter, a con- 

Conference ference of secretaries of the various 

classes and local alumni associations. It 
is out of such conferences that effective plans for 
alumni participation in the development of an insti- 
tution grow, and Carolina should not leave unused 
any means which will forward her future expansion. 
To this end, The Review offers the suggestion to 
President Connor and Secretary Rankin, that they 
call the secretaries of all alumni organizations to- 



gether at some early date, and that alumni activities, 
as such, be put on a real working basis. And at the 
same time it might be advisable for the Graham 
Memorial Committee, the Alumni Catalogue Commit- 
tee, and the Alumni Loyalty Committee, and any 
other interested alumni group to join the party. 
For there is work that needs to be done and organized 
alumni effort can be splendidly employed in the do- 
ing of it. 



FACULTY MEMBERS ATTEND MEETINGS 

During the Christmas holidays many members of 
the faculty attended professional meetings, associa- 
tions, and conventions in many cities in the North and 
West. 

Dr. W. D. MacNider attended the Federation of 
American Societies for Experimental Biology at Cin- 
cinnati. He read two papers on "The Effects of 
Acids and Alcalis on Kidney Function and Pathology 
in Normal and Nephropathic Animals" and "The In- 
fluence of the Age of ; an Animal as Shown by Its 
Ability to Regenerate Kidney Tissue Following an 
Injury." 

Drs. J. G. deR. Hamilton and W. W. Pierson at- 
tended the American Historical Association and the 
American Political Science Association at Cleveland. 
Dr. Pierson read a paper on "Alberdi's Views on the 
Monroe Doctrine. 

Professor D. D. Carroll went to Chicago for the 
American Economic Association and Dr. J. F. Dash- 
iell to Cambridge, Mass., for the American Psycho- 
logical Association where he read a paper on "The 
Need for Analytical Study of the Maze Problem." 

At the meeting of the National Collegiate Athletic 
Association in New York the University was repre- 
sented by Dr. Charles S. Mangum as its official dele- 
gate and E. V. Howell, Charles T. Woollen, and 
Thomas J. Browne as visiting delegates. Professor 
Browne also attended the meetings of the National 
Association of Physical Directors held in New York 
at the same time. 

Professor T. F. Hicker.son visited the laboratories 
of the Bureau of Roads at Washington, the Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania, and Columbia University. 

Dr. L. A. Williams attended a meeting in St. Louis 
of those universities at which the United States Bu- 
reau of Education has established research stations, 
North Carolina being one of six thus far. Professor 
Thorndyke Saville investigated hydraulic laboratories 
at Cornell, Harvard, Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology, Renssalaer, and Worcester Tech. 

Professor Collier Cobb attended the meeting of the 
American Geological Association in Boston. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



ll't 



THE FIRST YEAR AFTER THE WAR 



The record of the University during the first year 
after the ending of the war is such a distinctive one 
that it has seemed good to the management of The 
Review and the News Letter to summarize it for the 
benefit of the alumni and citizens of the State in 
general. Accordingly, Mr. Lenoir Chambers, of The 
Review staff, has set forth the work of 1919 in the 
following paper to which the attention of the readers 
of The Review is particularly directed. The account 
first appeared in the News Letter for December 24, 
1919.— Editor. 

Breaking the Record 

The full-term students now registered at the Uni- 
versity of North Carolina number 1,350. Counting 
those students who took work during the 1919 Sum- 
mer School entitling them to credit toward a Univer- 
sity degree, the number is 1,702. Counting other stu- 
dents registered during the Summer School, the total 
number of students of all kinds who have enrolled at 
the University since the 1919 commencement is 
2,271. 

Of the students who are at the University now, 
94.7 per cent are North Carolinians, representing 92 
counties. This is the widest distribution of students 
within the State the University has ever known. 
Mecklenburg leads all other comities with 69 students, 
Guilford following closely with 67. Other counties 
with large representations are Buncombe with 51; 
Orange, 51; Wayne, 43; Wake, 42; Rowan, 41; For- 
syth, 38 ; Catawba, 36 ; New Hanover, 28 ; Durham. 
25 ; Iredell, 25. 

The Summer School of 1919 had a total enrollment 
of 921, of whom 273 were men and 648 women. Three 
hundred fifty-two students were studying for Univer- 
sity credit, 569 were taking normal and preparatory 
courses. North Carolina furnished 869 of the 921 
enrolled, and 89 counties were represented. Thus in 
the Summer School only 11 counties were not repre- 
sented and in the regular session the number was re- 
duced to 8. 

A Manifest Democracy 

Classified according to religious affiliations, more 
than half the University students are either Method- 
ists or Baptists, with the Methodists leading 432 to 
341. Presbyterians follow with 238 and Episcopa- 
lians with 152. The remainder represent 12 other re- 
ligious bodies, the largest single group being only 
30 strong. 

The fathers of these students represent nearly 
every business or profession to be found in a State 
that extends from the mountains to the sea and that 
offers a wide diversification of interests. The democ- 
racy and universality of the student body is every- 
where evident on the campus. Farmers lead with 
339 sons at the University, and merchants follow with 
196. Thirty-three ministers have sent their sons to 
Chapel Hill. Other vocations in the list include 



plumbers, butchers, bakers, florists, fishermen, lumber- 
men, shipbuilders, tanners, moving picture men, mil- 
lers, hotel managers, barbers, photographers, mechan- 
ics, tobacconists, liverymen, orchardists, stock dealers, 
druggists, telegraphers, doctors, manufacturers, law- 
yers, railroad men, public officials, salesmen, bankers, 
teachers, real estate dealers, contractors, insurance 
men, brokers, automobile dealers, editors, jewelers, 
bookkeepers, engineers, dentists, auditors, architects, 
and dealers in naval stores. 

The number of women now studying at the Uni- 
versity, not counting those who attended Summer 
School, is 41. Unavoidable housing difficulties in 
Chapel Hill resulted this fall in the rejection of a 
number of other applications. The scope of the work 
undertaken by these women shows the breadth of the 
educational appeal to their sex. Three are studying 
law, three are in medicine, two in pharmacy, three 
are taking graduate work in English, and one gradu- 
ate work in Latin. One woman is taking a course in 
electrical engineering, for the very good reason that 
the course desired could not be found in any woman's 
college in the United States. 

Training for Leadership 

The methods, habits, and traditions of living in this 
student community are those of a normal democratic 
community. The students have their own govern- 
ment, in which student sentiment and thought, inter- 
preted by specially elected student representatives, 
control the action of life on the campus. They have 
their activities, covering all things that normal young 
persons are interested in, from religious groups to 
athletic teams, from scholarship and debating clubs 
to social organizations, from musical and dramatic 
associations to military units. They publish and con- 
trol in every way a weekly newspaper, the Tar Heel; 
a monthly literary magazine, the University of North 
Carolina Magazine; a bi-weekly humorous paper, the 
Tar Baby ; an annual of college activities, the Yackety- 
Yack; and, through their Y.M.C.A., a handbook of 
information for new students and a directory of the 
students and the faculty of the University. 

They have their own Y.M.C.A., which they manage 
and finance, and their own secretary. Through their 
Y.M.C.A. they carry on a score of activities of value 
to the life of the community — religious occasions and 
Bible study work among the students, welfare work 
among the negroes of the community, Sunday school 
teaching and management in the country churches of 
Orange County, Boy Scout work in Chapel Hill. 
They have their social department, they arrange a ly- 
ceum course for the students, they maintain informa- 
tion bureaus, self-help bureaus, lost-and-found bu- 
reaus, they do any and everything they find to be of 
service to the life of the community. 

The students have their debating societies, the Dia- 
lectic and the Philanthropic, with more than a cen- 
tury's traditions of public speaking. This year they 
have thrown one of them into an open forum for dis- 
cussion of any matter of importance to the University. 



120 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



The other they have organized into a legislative as- 
sembly, modeled after the lower house of the Gen- 
eral Assembly at Raleigh. Bills and resolutions are 
presented as' the State legislators present them at 
Raleigh, and the committee work, the readings and the 
debating are carried on precisely as their model car- 
ries them on. The two societies debate against each 
other and, uniting, they debate against other univer- 
sities on matters of national moment. During the 
last twenty-five years the University has won 70 per 
cent of its debates against institutions ranging from 
Pennsylvania to New Orleans. 

Of the students at the University approximately 
200 are dependent upon their own efforts for the 
money to keep them at college. They are self-help 
students, they are working their way through college. 
Ninety of them are waiters at the University dining 
halls, the others do many kinds of work, from solicit- 
ing as agents to stenographic, secretarial, and clerical 
work, from teaching and tutoring to chopping wood, 
firing furnaces, working in stores, in restaurants, any- 
where they can find work that will pay them. They 
are among the most valuable students in the Uni- 
versity. 

Physical Well-Being 

For these and all students the University this year 
has taken significant steps toward the improvement 
and preservation of student health. A new physician 
of experience has been placed in charge of the Univer- 
sity Infirmary. A professor of physical education has 
been added to the faculty, with general supervision 
over the play and recreation of the student body. 
Freshmen are closely examined for physical defects 
and wherever possible proper exercises are directed 
to overcome the difficulty. All freshmen are required 
to take athletic work as part of their regular college 
work. Other students are provided with greater op- 
portunity for sports than ever before. A system of 
campus athletics is being developed that will give 
every student in college the chance to play any sound, 
healthy game that he wants to play — all to the end 
that the standards of health and physical develop- 
ment may be raised. 

The Carolina Club 

The North Carolina Club, a volunteer organization 
to which any member of the University is eligible, has 
made an intensive study of the economic, social, civic, 
and industrial problems of North Carolina during 
the last five years. It has published the results of its 
investigations in three volumes, the last one being 190 
pages in length on the subject of County Government 
and County Affairs in North Carolina. This year it 
has taken for its program the working out of a plan 
of State reconstruction, following the lead of Gov- 
ernor Bickett's State Reconstruction Commission. So 
well known has its work become, so highly regarded 
are its investigations of North Carolina problems, that 
Mr. E. C. Branson, chairman of the Steering Com- 
mittee of the club, was chosen as a member of the 
State commission and Mr. J. V. Baggett, the club 
president, was invited as a student representative to 



sit with the commission at all its meetings. Other 
student representatives were invited to sit with the 
committees of the commission at their investigations 
and meetings. This is volunteer student work. Mem- 
bers of the faculty are club members if they so choose, 
but the investigations and reports are the work of 
students. 

Physical Expansion 

The University has shown substantial physical 
growth during the last year. Nearing completion 
now and available for occupancy early in the new 
year is the new physics building, Phillips Hall, one 
of the largest structures on the campus and a model 
in every way for the purposes planned. Here will be 
the headquarters of the School of Applied Science, 
the home of pure physics, of electrical engineering 
and civil engineering. In the town of Chapel Hill, 
but closely connected with University life, the new 
post office and the new Presbyterian church will be 
ready for use early in the new year. 

Two new dormitories are projected and planned 
for the next collegiate year. Together they will hold 
175 students. Their location south of the famous 
old South Building will open up a new area of Uni- 
versity expansion. New plans have been agreed upon 
for the creation of a new fraternity center on the 
western side of the campus where eventually all the 
fraternity houses will be placed. Five of the frater- 
nities are planning to build in the spring. A laundry 
for the University community and a hotel for Chapel 
Hill are two additional building projects coming in 
the near future. 

New Schools and Courses 

Within the University curriculum growth and de- 
velopment are evident in many places. The present 
college year has seen the beginning of a School of 
Commerce, born out of the demands of the people of 
the State for more and better business training, in- 
tenser, more comprehensive acquaintance with the 
keen business world of present-day industrialism. 

A four-year course leading to the degree of Bach- 
elor of Science in Commerce has been started, the first 
two years broadly comprehensive, the last two more 
technically bound up with such fundamental business 
subjects as accounting, money and banking, business 
organization, insurance, transportation, corporation 
finance, industrial management, foreign trade, sales- 
manship, business psychology, markets and marketing, 
and other kindred subjects. 

Besides the courses of study, a lecture program 
has been arranged, which will bring well known busi- 
ness men of the State and the South to speak before 
the students. Representatives of the Tariff Commis- 
sion, the Federal Trade Commission, the Census Bu- 
reau, and the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Com- 
merce will outline to the school business problems 
from a national point of view. During the summer 
between the junior and senior years each student will 
be expected to spend his time working in an estab- 
lishment in the line of business for which he is pre- 
paring. In its first year the school has enrolled 150 
students, 117 of whom are freshmen and sophomores. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



121 



In addition to the School of Commerce, the present 
3 r ear has seen the beginning of a new School of Music. 
now organized as a department of music. Lectures 
on the history, theory, and appreciation of niusic will 
be given as regular elective courses, and encourage- 
ment and guidance for musical undertakings by com- 
munities throughout the State will be furnished 
through the Bureau of Extension. The department 
will have supervision of the group music of the stu- 
dents, and eventually instruction in music will be 
given. 

Professional Schools 

Other departments of the University have shown 
growth in many ways. The Law School, with a long 
record of service behind it, has a larger enrollment 
than ever before. It has added a new member to its 
teaching staff, and the course has been increased from 
two years to three. The lengthened course, which is 
in keeping with the practice of the most successful 
law schools in the country, is a direct effort to give a 
more thorough training in the fundamentals of law, 
and at the same time to present some courses which 
will emphasize phases of the practical work of the 
lawyer. One hundred and four students are enrolled 
in the Law School, of whom 84 are first- year students. 
Included in the list are three women. 

The other schools have seen a similar increase in 
students preparing for professional work. Of 55 stu- 
dents in the School of Pharmacy, 43 are first-year 
students, the largest junior class the school has known. 
The other 12 are seniors. The small senior class is due 
to unsettled conditions during the war years. The 
total enrollment in this school is approximately the 
same as in the last pre-war year, but the marked in- 
crease in first-year students would indicate a corre- 
spondingly marked increase in the total enrollment 
next year. The Medical School has had the same ex- 
perience. The total enrollment is not only larger but 
two hundred students are taking pre-medical work; 
which again would indicate that next year the school 
will have more students than it can take care of. 

University Publications 

As a publishing and magazine center the University 
now issues eight regular periodicals. The University 
Record contains the catalogue, the President's report, 
and other official records of the University. Studies 
in Philology is a quarterly edited by the language de- 
partments of the University. It has a circulation 
among highly distinguished scholars and learned so- 
cieties both in the United States and Europe. The 
Journal of the Elisha Mitchell Scientific Society has 
the same high rank among the scientific bodies of the 
country. The Carolina Chemist is published by the 
Chemistry department. The James Sprunt Historical 
Publications are published periodicall.y by the North 
Carolina Historical Society. The High School Journal 
is a monthly published by the School of Education. 
The News Letter is published weekly by the Univer- 
sity for the Bureau of Extension, and The Alumni 
Review is published by the Alumni Association of 
the University. 



Library Facilities 

The University Library had on its records up to 
August 15, 1919, a total of 88,316 volumes, which in- 
cludes 5,165 volumes acquired during the previous 
year. It does not include, however, three important 
acquisitions since August, the Weeks collection, and 
the gifts of the family of the late Col. A. B. Andrews 
and of E. V. Zoeller, which are now being catalogued. 
As these amount to more than 10,000 volumes, the Li- 
brary at the present time has very close to 100,000 
volumes. This makes it one of the three largest li- 
braries in all the Southern States. Down the sweep 
from Washington all the way out through Texas, 
there are only two other libraries about the sam? size. 
but it is doubtful if either of the other two has ma- 
terial of the same value from a literary or historical 
point of view. 

The Weeks collection, added within the last year, is 
the largest and most complete collection of literature 
on North Carolina history in existence. It includes 
books, pamphlets, bound and unbound periodicals, 
bound and unbound newspapers, maps, reports of 
State officers and State institutions, and is a gold 
mine of tremendous value to historical students. 

Swinging out from its own buildings at Chapel 
Hill, refusing to be bound by the stone walls of its 
campus, the University has continued during the past 
year the work of carrying its educational resources to 
the people of the State. As the head of the State edu- 
cational system, it seeks not only to link itself with all 
other parts of that system but to go through and be- 
yond the system to the people themselves for whom 
and by whom it was created and to whom its leader- 
ship will always call. The Bureau of Extension has 
continued its work in many directions, and has inau- 
gurated important new services. 

State and County Council 

Co-operating with the Governor of the State, the 
State Association of County Commissioners, and the 
State Departments of Education, Health, Highways, 
Public Welfare, and Taxation, the University held in 
September a four-day conference for the benefit of 
North Carolina public welfare workers. More than 
three hundred of these workers were in attendance, 
and every session of the conference was devoted to the 
consideration of some topic of vital importance to the 
common weal of the State. Governor T. W. Bickett 
presided throughout the conference and a number of 
out-of-state speakers participated. Seventy-six coun- 
ties of the State were represented. Provision has 
been made for the continuation of the council in 
1920, and special instruction in several subjects will 
be provided for in the Summer School prior to its as- 
sembly next August. 

Country Home Comforts 

At the request of the State Highway Commission 
the Bureau of University Extension has organized the 
division of Country Home Comforts and Conveniences 
under the direction of Prof. P. H. Daggett, assisted 
by a group of engineering experts from the University 



122 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



faculty. The division will advise and assist in pro- 
viding rural communities with water supply systems, 
electric light and power plant, mutual telephone sys- 
tems, and better sanitation. Authority for the work 
comes from an act of the General Assembly of 1917 
which commissioned the Highway Commission to pro- 
mote these country home comforts and conveniences. 
Though the work was not started until late in the 
fall, the division has already undertaken several 
projects in the utilization of natural water powers 
and has much work ahead of it. Its investigations 
and work are free of all charge. 

Serving the Club Women 

New and far-reaching strides have been made dur- 
ing the last year in the University's work with wo- 
men's clubs, continued now by Miss Nellie Roberson. 
Three distinct groups are reached by this branch of 
the Bureau of Extension : ( 1 ) Individuals requesting 
suggestions for study and reading and desiring in- 
formation for use in patriotic, civic, and social activ- 
ities, (2) Women's clubs choosing their own subject 
for literary or historical study and asking for out- 
lines and material to use in preparation of club meet- 
ings, and (3) Clubs adopting the outline programs 
published by the University Extension Bureau and 
officially adopted by the North Carolina Federation of 
Women's Clubs. 

The scope and reach of the work may be seen, in 
part, in figures. The outline program on the His- 
torical Background and Literature of the Great War, 
prepared by Mrs. T. W. Lingle, was studied by 806 
women enrolled in 42 clubs representing 30 North 
Carolina towns and 4 States. Seven hundred and 
fifty books and 250 pamphlets were issued to club 
members. The program on Americanization, also pre- 
pared by Mrs. Lingle and adopted by the State Fed- 
eration, is now being studied by 75 clubs with a total 
membership of 1,316. Forty of the clubs, with a mem- 
bership of 672, are located in 32 North Carolina 
towns ; thirty-five clubs, with a membership of 644, 
are from other States. Four hundred books and 
pamphlets were loaned for use in this course during 
September and October alone. In October a course 
on Citizenship, prepared by Professor D. D. Carroll, 
was issued and thus far 7 clubs with an enrollment of 
78 have adopted it. Thus within the last year 121 
women's clubs with a total membership of 2,210, 
more than half of whom are North Carolinians, have 
studied the courses prepared for them by the Wo- 
men's Clubs Division of the Bureau of Extension. 
The Library has co-operated by sending to these clubs, 
at their request, more than 1,200 books and many 
additional pamphlets. 

Serving the High Schools 

Reaching out in other ways to the people of the 
State, the University has continued its high school 
debates and athletic contests. The seventh annual 
contest of the High School Debating Union was held 
at the University with representatives from 41 high 
schools present. A total of 180 schools, representing 
75 counties, participated in the preliminary contests. 
Unsettled conditions due to the war and the influenza 



cut into the number as against that of previous years, 
but there is every reason to believe that this year the 
eighth contest will include 300 schools. Restricted 
Immigration is the debate subject for the current 
year. A 90-page handbook for the debaters will be 
issued by the University, containing outlines and ar- 
guments on both sides of the query with abundant 
references to other sources of information. 

Last year State high school championship con- 
tests .were conducted in football, basketball, tennis, 
track, and baseball. This year the football champion- 
ship, just completed, aroused more interest in the 
State than ever before. The contests are conducted as 
the seasons for them arrive. 

Reconstruction Work 

The whole force of the University's extension lec- 
tures and general publicity resources, which during 
the war period had been thrown into the problems of 
the causes of the war, was, upon the armistice and 
demobilization, shifted in a new direction and thrown 
into the new problems attending reconstruction, citi- 
zenship, and the regathering of the strength of the 
nation for its new tasks. Community centers were 
organized at Winston-Salem, Salisbury, Kinston, New 
Bern, and Goldsboro for the special consideration of 
these questions. Pamphlets, bulletins, and leaflets de- 
scribing methods of procedure and suggesting fields 
of study were prepared and issued. Besides the 
News Letter with its 50 issues a year, and an average 
circulation of more than 12,000, the Bureau of Ex- 
tension published fourteen pamphlets with a com- 
bined circulation of more than 45,000. The number 
of lectures delivered by members of the faculty on 
these and other subjects was approximately 175 ; the 
number of articles of every sort published in vari- 
ous periodicals all over the country was approxi- 
mately 70. 

Alumni Loyalty 

Alumni loyalty, alumni faith and hope in the Uni- 
versity, alumni determination that the University 
shall press forward to greater and greater service to 
the people of the State, have been exemplified this 
year in the interest shown in the University's devel- 
opment, in wise counsel and sound advice, and in re- 
sponse to the Graham Memorial campaign. More 
than $100,000 has been given by alumni and friends 
for the erection of a student activities building in 
memory of Edward Kidder Graham, the late presi- 
dent. The campaign is being pushed now toward the 
$150,000 mark and from its success thus far there ap- 
pears no doubt of the ultimate goal. To the Alumni 
Loyalty Fund the contributions also have been liberal. 
For Alma Mater her sons retain the love that sprang 
from the realization of their debt to her. 



Two basketball games were played before the 
Christmas holidays, Carolina winning from Durham 
Y. M. C. A., 40 to 30, and from Leaksville Y. M. C. 
A., 35 to 22. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



123 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATIONS HOLD MEETINGS 



The Review is glad to record herewith brief ac- 
counts of holiday meetings which were held by local 
alumni associations : 

Gastonia 

The Gaston County Alumni Association and the Gaston 
County Club of the University held their annual get-together 
meeting in the lobby of the Central Graded School at Gas- 
tonia on December 31st. About fifty alumni, students and 
prospective students were present, and the occasion which 
took the form of a smcker this year was a very delightful one. 

Joe S. Wray, president of the association, acted as toastmas- 
ter. After a brief speech of welcome, Bay Armstrong, David 
Houser, A. C. Lineberger, Jr., and C. T. Boyd were called 
upon for a few words. In a short talk A. G. Mangum de- 
scribed the service which the University is rendering the State 
at large. B. B. Bankin traced the growth of the University 
during the last decade. Frank P. Graham, dean of students, 
was present as a guest of honor and made the principal talk 
of the evening. Mr. Graham spoke on several subjects of 
University concern. His talk was heard with keen interest. 

Officers were elected for the Alumni Association as follows : 
President, A. E. Woltz, '01, of Gastonia; Vice-President, C. 
H. Sloan, '05, of Belmont; Secretary, E. B. Bankin, '13, of 
Chapel Hill. 

Monroe 

The Union County Alumni Association held its annual ban- 
quet on the evening of December 29th at the Hotel Joffre, 
Monroe. Hon. B. B. Bedwiue, president of the association, 
presided over the banquet as toastmaster. The speakers were 
Frank P. Graham, dean of students in the University, W. B. 
Love, J. J. Parker, Gilliam Craig, and B. W. Lemmond. The 
occasion was a most enjoyable one and it was felt that Uni- 
versity interests in Union County had been materially ad- 
vanced through this coming together of the University 's sous 
and daughters. Present-day students of the University, mem- 
bers of the Union County Club, took part in this occasion with 
the alumni. 

W. B. Love, '06, was elected president for the ensuing year 
and Miss Sarah Bedwine was elected secretary. Miss Bedwine 
has the record of being the first woman to hold office in a 
county alumni association. 

Raleigh 

More than half a hundred alumni gathered at the assembly 
rooms of the Chamber of Commerce in Baleigh on the evening 
of November 26th for a Carolina banquet. The majority of 
those present were alumni engaged in school work, who were 
in Baleigh for the annual meeting of the State Teachers ' 
Assembly. Present also were several members of the Wake 
County Alumni Association. 

This banquet was in the nature of a get-together occasion. 
Judge Eobert W. Winston acted as toastmaster, and brief 
addresses were made by President Chase and Prof. M. C. S. 
Noble. The occasion and the remarks of Judge Winston, Dr. 
Chase, and Prof. Noble were greatly enjoyed by all who were 
present. Each year a banquet of Carolina alumni is held at 
the meeting of the assembly, and the occasion this year was 
voted one of the best which have yet b;eu held. 



Reidsville 

Secretary P. H. Gwynn, Jr., of the Bockingham County 
Alumni Association, sends The Beview the following account 
of the banquet of this association on January 2nd : 

The University alumni of Bockingham County met January 
2nd in Beidsville at their annual holiday banquet. The sup- 
per was well attended by Carolina men from all parts of the 
county. Each alumnus was privileged to bring a friend, and 
the presence of many ladies and other guests added greatly to 
the pleasure of the evening. Places were provided for eighty, 
and there were very few vacant chairs when the supper began. 

On the speakers ' program was an address of welcome by 
Mayor Cummings, of Beidsville, with a response by P. H. 
Gwynn, of Leaksville-Spray, and addresses by A. M. Coates 
and Dr. A. H. Patterson, of Chapel Hill. A. D. Ivie, of Leaks- 
ville, president of the association, was toastmaster. Mayor 
Cummings in his address of welcome traced briefly the growth 
of the University from its foundation and paid tribute to its 
wonderful work in the State. Mr. Gwynn pointed out clearly 
and forcefully the duty of the Carolina man in the new day 
which is dawning in the State. 

Mr. Coates, representing the Graham Memorial Fund, made 
a powerful appeal for support of the fund which is to be used 
to provide a students' activities building for the boys on the 
campus. Dr. Patterson took up a discussion of the ' ' Carolina 
Spirit" which he defined as a blend of scholarship, fellow- 
ship, and sportsmanship. In a highly instructive and enter- 
taining manner he described the rapid progress of the Uni- 
versity in the past few years, and outlined the problems she 
now faces as a result of that phenomenal growth. Following 
these addresses, several of the alumni and guests were called 
on for short talks. 

A movement was launched to double the county's subscrip- 
tion to the Graham Memorial Fund, and W. B. Dalton, of 
Beidsville, a trustee of the University, moved that a commit 
tee be appointed to devise ways and means to give financial 
assistance and backing to deserving boys and girls in the 
county who desired a college education, but were unable to 
pay for same. Both proposals met with unanimous approval. 

Smithfield 

A very delightful banquet of the Johnston County Alumni 
Association was held in Smithfield on the evening of December 
26th. A large number was present, including alumni and stu- 
dents, and the occasion was greatly enjoyed. Leon G. Stevens 
is president of this association and A. M. Coates is secretary. 
Informal talks were made by a number of the alumni and stu- 
dents present. 

Tarboro 

The new Farrar hotel in Tarboro was the scene on December 
10th of a brilliant banquet by the Edgecombe County Alumni 
Association of the University. Forceful speeches were made 
by A. M. Coates. of the University; Geo. A. Holderness and 
J. W. Umstead, Jr., both of Tarboro. Subscriptions were 
taken for the Graham Memorial Fund and the sum of $2,425.00 
was given by seventeen contributors. To those interested in 
this fund the encouraging feature of the meeting was the fact 
that every person present made liberal subscriptions, not only 
the alumni, but fathers of boys who are now at the Univer- 
sity made subscriptions for their sons. 



124 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



INAUGURATION PLANS ANNOUNCED 



Dr. Harry Woodbum Chase will be formally in- 
augurated as president of the University on Wednes- 
day, April 28th. This announcement was made, fol- 
lowing a joint meeting of the faculty and trustees' 
committees on the inaugural plans in the Governor's 
office, January 7th. 

Further plans as announced by the faculty commit- 
tee call for President Chase's induction into office 
with ceremonies and in the presence of an assemblage 
of distinguished scholars and representatives of schol- 
arly societies and institutions and of State institutions 
in every respect worthy of the dignity and signifi- 
cance of the occasion. 

In general, the plans, which are tentative, will fol- 
low closely the details of President Graham's inau- 
guration in 1915. One important change has been 
announced. The exercises will be held in the after- 
noon. Difficulties in train schedules which made it 
inconvenient for guests to arrive in time caused the 
committee on arrangements to start the exercises at 
1 :30. Special Pullmans will be provided so that visi- 
tors may get away at night without trouble. 

The specially invited guests will include delegates 
from all the leading colleges and universities of the 
United States and from all the learned and scholarly 
societies, the trustees and alumni of the University, 
the faculties of all the institutions in the State and 
the city and county superintendents. For these 
guests a buffet luncheon will be held in the Peabody 
Building on the morning of the 28th. 

At 1:30 the academic procession will start from 
the Alumni Building and march to Memorial Hall. 
Governor Bickett will preside at the exercises. Fol- 
lowing an invocation there will be three addresses by 
men of national reputation on the general subject of 
•"The Higher Education and Its Present Task." One 
speaker will discuss the college, another the profes- 
sional school, and the third the graduate school. 

The formal induction into office will follow. The 
presentation of President Chase will be made by Dr. 
Venable. Chief Justice Walter Clark will administer 
the oath of office and Governor Bickett will induct the 
new president into office. President Chase will then 
deliver his inaugural address. 

Greetings will follow from representatives of the 
State universities, of the colleges of the State, of the 
public schools, the alumni, the faculty, and the stu- 
dent body. The benediction will close the formal ex- 
ercises. All the addresses will be strictly limited in 
time, and the committee estimates that the exercises 



will be completed by four or four-thirty in the after- 
noon. 

At night a dinner will be given in Swain Hall to 
the guests of the University and afterward there will 
be a reception in Bynum Gymnasium. 

In accordance with the above plans invitations are 
being sent to many of the most distinguished and 
best known scholars and university men in the coun- 
try and all indications point to the day's being a 
notable one in the history of the University. 

The trustees' committee on the inauguration is com- 
posed of Judge Francis D. Winston, chairman ; A. H. 
Eller, Charles Lee Smith, W. P. Bynum, and Julian 
S. Carr. The faculty committee is composed of Dr. 
Archibald Henderson, chairman, and Professors Pat- 
terson, Howe, Wheeler, Daggett, Hamilton, L. R. 
Wilson, and Tov. 



PHILLIPS HALL AND POST OFFICE 
COMPLETED 

With the beginning of the winter quarter Phillips 
Hall, the new home of Physics, Civil and Electri- 
cal Engineering, and Mathematics, became available 
for use. A few of the class rooms in the building were 
used during the fall, and, on the other hand, part of 
the building is not finished yet, notably the big audi- 
torium. But more than half of it was being used with 
the beginning of the new year and the remainder will 
be used as it is completed. 

The building is one of the largest, probably the 
handsomest, and certainly the best constructed on the 
campus. It is located on Cameron Avenue between 
the Peabody Building and Memorial Hall, and it 
covers part of the site formerly occupied by the old 
Commons Hall. In architecture Phillips Hall is 
Tudor-Gothic, or English Collegiate. It is constructed 
of re-enforced concrete, finished in red tapestry brick 
with white limestone trimmings, and it is a notable 
addition to the architectural beauty of the buildings 
on the campus. 

There are three floors, and the top of the roof is 
also used in astronomical work. The building has a 
freight elevator and provision has been made for the 
installation, at some future date, of a vacuum clean- 
ing system. 

Electrical Engineering has most of the ground floor. 
There are a large dynamo room, a storage battery 
room, a standardization laboratory, instrument rooms, 
a radio room, and a high tension laboratory. Civil 
Engineering has a hydraulic laboratory and blue 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



i2o 



printing room on this floor, and the Physics Depart- 
ment has an electrical and magnetic laboratory. In 
addition, there is a general workshop, research rooms, 
janitor's room, and locker room. 

On the second floor are offices for the Mathematics, 
Electrical Engineering, and Physics Departments 
and an auditorium with a seating capacity of three 
hundred. Physics has an apparatus room, a photo- 
graph dark room, and general and private labora- 
tories and class rooms for all the departments in the 
building. There is a seminar room for Mathematics 
and an instrument room for Civil Engineering. 

On the third floor are offices for Civil Engineering, 
a drawing room with a capacity of three hundred and 
smaller rooms for drawing, two lecture rooms, a pho- 
tometer room for illuminating tests, a room for as- 
tronomical instruments, a room for the assistants, 
and a library for the departments in the building. 
On top of the roof is a platform with an iron railing 
for use by students of astronomy. 

In all its details the building has been very care- 
fully planned and there are few more complete, bet- 
ter constructed buildings of this type anywhere in 
the country. Special effort has been made to have 
the building fire-proof and every corner has been 
definitely planned for the purpose for which it will 
be used. 

The cost was $125,000, the money coming from the 
building sum of $500,000 granted by the Legislature 
in 1917. Dean Patterson was chairman of the build- 
ing committee and becomes director of the building. 

The Post Office 

Postmaster Robert S. MacRae, of Chapel Hill, 
opened his new post office the first of the year. The 
new building is on the old MacNider lot, directly 
across Franklin street from the Battle dormitory. It 
is much larger than the old building, and is more 
modern and more convenient in every respect. 



GRADUATE MANAGER ANNOUNCES FOOT- 
BALL SCHEDULE 

Graduate Manager Woollen has announced the 
football schedule for 1920. Eight games will be 
played, the most important being those with Yale, 
North Carolina A. & E., and Virginia. Four games 
will be played in Chapel Hill, which is the largest 
number to be played before the student body in a 
generation. 

Compared with the 1919 schedule, there are two 
changes. Rutgers and Tennessee drop off the list 
and Maryland State College and South Carolina take 
their places. One northern game was all that was de- 
sired and accordingly the Yale game was retained in- 



stead of the Rutgers game. Regret has been expressed 
at losing the game with Tennessee, but it was a long 
trip and an inaccessible place. Maryland State Col- 
lege has not been on the Tar Heel schedule before, 
but the 1919 team made an enviable record, defeating 
Virginia among others, and for the coining season 
Maryland will be on the Princeton schedule. There 
is every reason why the State institutions of the two 
Carolinas should meet and it is the evident intention 
of the athletic authorities to hold this game and try 
to develop it into an annual affair. 

The four games to be played at Chapel Hill are 
with Wake Forest, South Carolina, Maryland State, 
and V. M. I. Particular interest is attached to V. M. 
I. because of. the large-sized defeat the Cadets handed 
to the Tar Heels last season. The Virginia game will 
be in Charlottesville on Thanksgiving Day, Davidson 
holds her usual date in Winston-Salem, and A. & E. 
at Raleigh during fair week has become a fixture. 
The complete schedule follows : 

October 2, Wake Forest, at Chapel Hill. 

October 9, Yale, at New Haven. 

October 16, South Carolina, at Chapel Hill. 

October 21, A. & E., at Raleigh. 

October 30, Maryland State, at Chapel Hill. 

November 6, V. M. I., at Chapel Hill. 

November 13, Davidson, at Winston-Salem. 

November 25, Virginia, at Charlottesville. 



PARIS MEDAL RECEIVED 

In appreciation of services rendered by the Univer- 
sity of North Carolina in the war, the University of 
Paris has sent to Carolina a handsome bronze medal. 
On one side of the medal, which is about six inches in 
diameter, is a representation of some of the old build- 
ings at the University of Paris and these words — "Fi- 
delissimae Sorori Universitas Parisiensis Dicavit. " 
On the other side is a picture of Justice with her 
sword and the words — "Scientia Instrumentum Jus- 
titiae Libro Ense— 1914-1918." The medal will be 
placed in the Library. 



RESEARCH STATION IN EDUCATION 
ESTABLISHED 

The United States Bureau of Education has estab- 
lished a research station at the University of North 
Carolina. Dr. L. A. Williams, of the School of Edu- 
cation, is the director, and Dean Noble and Dr. 
Knight have been named as special collaborators. All 
three of them, in addition to their work at the Uni- 
versity, become dollar-a-year men, working also for 
the government. 



126 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 

Issued monthly except in July, August, and September, by the Gen- 
eral Alumni Association of the University of North Carolina. 

Board of Publication 

THE Review is edited by the following Board of Publication: 

Louis R. Wilson, '99 Editor 

Associate Editors: Walter Murphy, '92; Harry Howell, '95; Archibald 
Henderson. '9ft; W. S. Bernard, '00; J. K. Wilson, '05; Louis 
Graves, '02; P. P. Graham, '09; Kenneth Tanner, '11; Lenoir 
Chambers, Jr., '14; R. W. Madry, '18. 

E. R. Rankin, '13 Managing Editor 

Subscription Price 

Single Copies $0.20 

Per Year 1.50 

Communications intended for the Editor and the Managing Editor 
should be sent to Chapel Hill, N. C. All communications intended for 
publication must be accompanied with signatures if they are to receive 
consideration. 

OFFICE OF PUBLICATION, CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 

Entered at the Postoffice at Chapel Hill, N. C, as second class 
matter. 



THE UNIVERSITY IN PRINT 



Just off the press of Johns Hopkins University is 
the volume by Jacob H. Hollander, Professor of Polit- 
ical Economy in that institution, entitled "Ameri- 
can Citizenship and Economic Welfare, - ' being the 
Weil Lectures delivered here in 1919. In handsome 
and gracious style, the volume is dedicated "To the 
long succession of teachers and students who for many 
years by visit and residence have maintained at Bal- 
timore and Cliapel Hill the best traditions of academic 
interchange." The volume needs no review in these 
columns, as the lectures were heard here. But it is 
well to recall that the author deals with the citizen as 
producer, as employer, and as taxpayer. And the 
specific titles of the three chapters of the work are: 
"The Weal of the Nation," "The Laborer's Hire," 
and "The Sinews of Peace." A single quotation 
seems particularly fitting : "In our own day the im- 
perious call is for economic guidance. May I add 
that this is pre-eminently true of the young men of 
the South. In economic affairs, your problems are 
greater, your opportunities are larger, your respon- 
sibilities are more immediate. Barely emerged from 
the shadow of a great economic change, the course of 
economic diversification still in early stage, a land 
and a people whose powers have not been imagined — 
you face tremendous potentialities awaiting the touch 
of leadership and knowledge to spring into force." 



H. Brimley, Curator of the State Museum; and C. S. 
Brimley, Naturalist, was already printed and the 
materia] all ready for binding, the whole edition was 
destroyed by the fire which burned Mr. Uzzell's plant. 
This report, reprinted and brought up to date, by the 
inclusion of additional matter, now appears as "The 
Birds of North Carolina," being volume IV of the 
publications of the North Carolina Geological and 
Economic Survey. It is a quarto volume of 3S0 pages, 
containing in addition to a descriptive list of the 
birds, a brief historical sketch of North Carolina 
ornithology, and an account of the work of the State 
Audubon Society, by T. G. Pearson, and a sketch on 
life zones and bird distribution by C. S. Brimley. 
The volume is lavishly illustrated, a feature being 
twenty-four magnificent colored plates. The State 
Audubon Society appropriated the necessary funds 
to have prepared the original drawings and paintings 
with which it is illustrated. A cursory examination 
of this excellent publication leaves no doubt that it 
will fulfill the purpose expressed by the editor: "to 
place in the hands of interested persons a book of 
ready reference which will be of assistance to them in 
acquiring further information regarding the birds 
of North Carolina ; and also to preserve in permanent 
form the hitherto widely scattered data relative to 
the distribution and occurrence of the many rare 
species that have been found to occur within the 
borders of the State." 



Faculty and students of the University voting 
January 13th with 700 colleges in a nation-wide ref- 
erendum on the League of Nations, gave strong sup- 
port to President Wilson's stand for ratification of 
the treaty of peace and the League of Nations with- 
out amendments or reservations. 

Out of a total of 1,166 votes cast, 719 backed the 
president and only 16 opposed the ratification of the 
treaty and the league. Two hundred and seventy- 
five favored a compromise suggested to the intercol- 
legiate treaty referendum by Senator Hitchcock. 

As between the faculty and students the vote 
showed no marked difference of opinion. Of 69 votes 
cast by the faculty, 46 favored the President's stand 
and 11 the Hitchcock compromise. Not a single mem- 
ber of the faculty opposed the treaty and league un- 
reservedly. 



hi 1913, when the report on the birds of North Car- 
olina, prepared by T. Gilbert Pearson, '99, Secretary 
of the National Association of Audubon Societies; H. 



The trustees of the University of South Carolina 
have requested Governor Cooper to secure from the 
Legislature favorable consideration of a plan to build 
immediate^ six additional houses for faculty use. 
The amount of monev asked for is $60,000. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 121 



ESTABLISHED 1916 



fllumni Loyalty fund 



"One for all, ana all for one" 



Council: 

A. M. SCALES, '92 
LESLIE WEIL, '95 
L. R. WILSON, '99 
A.W.HAYWOOD, '04 
W. T. SHORE, '05 
J. A. GRAY. '08 




THE ALUMNI LOYALTY FUND 

Was established to provide a way by which every alumnus 
could contribute according to his ability to the general wel- 
fare of the University, 

A GOOD NUMBER FROM MANY CLASSES 

Have taken advantage of this opportunity and have con- 
tributed a total of $10,000, 

ARE YOU IN THIS NUMBER ? 

Or are you letting your class-mates or members of other 
classes lay the foundation of what is to be one of Carolina's 
great achievements — the building up of a great fund, the 
income from which can later be applied in ways that will 
multiply Alma Mater's usefulness a hundredfold. 

START THE NEW YEAR RIGHT 

By making a beginning, or by renewing your contribution. 
All contributions are payable to University Treasurer, at 
Chapel Hill. 



128 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



THE GENERAL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

of the 

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 



Officers of the Association 

R. D. W. Connor, 99 President 

E. R. Rankin, '13 Secretary 

Executive Committee: Walter Murphy, '92; Dr. R. H. 
Lewis, '70; W. N. Everett, '86; H. E. Rondthaler, '93; C. W. 
Tillett, Jr., '09. 



WITH THE CLASSES 

1866 
— General Julian S Carr, of Durham, was elected recently 
chairman of the Mount Mitchell Park Commission. It is 
proposed by the commission to erect a monument on Mount 
Mitchell in honor of Dr. Elisha Mitchell. Among other mem- 
bers of this commission are former Governor Locke Craig, '81 ; 
Chas. A. Webb, '89; J. S. Holmes, '90; and Dr. Geo. T. 
Winston, '70. 

1879 
— A. W. E. Capel has sold the Capelsie Cotton Mills, of Troy, 
which were under his management, and intends retiring from 
active business. 

1881 
— John M. Walker has resigned from the service of the gov- 
ernment and has connected himself with the banking firm of 
J. S. Wilson, Jr. and Co., of Baltimore. While in the service 
of the government Mr. Wilson was in charge of the verifica- 
tion of all income and excess profit tax returns in the Balti- 
more division, which comprises the States of Maryland, Dela- 
ware, parts of Virginia and the District of Columbia. 
— Frank B. Dancy, retired chemist and fertilizer manufac- 
turer of Baltimore, made a brief visit to Chapel Hill recently 
and was the guest of Prof. M. C. S. Noble, '81, dean of the 
School of Education in the University. 

1882 
— W. B. Rodman is general counsel of the Norfolk Southern 
Railway Co. and of the John L. Roper Lumber Co., at Nor- 
folk, Va. 

1884 
— Heriot Clarkson, Law '84, formerly solicitor of his judicial 
district, practices law in Charlotte. 

— Dr. W. W. Long is director of farm extension for South 
Carolina, and is located at Clemson College. 
— John N. Wilson is senior member of the law firm of Wilson 
and Frazier, with offices in the Banner Building at Greensboro. 
C. C. Frazier, '09, is junior member of this firm. 

1885 
— F. C. Bi'yan is traffic manager for the Allis-Chalmers Co., 
Milwaukee, Wis. 

— R. S. Neal is engaged in farming at Somerset plantation 
near Creswell. 

—Dr. Wallace C. Riddick is president of the N. C. State Col- 
lege of Agriculture and Engineering at West Raleigh. 

1886 
— Herbert W. Jackson is a banker of Richmond, Va., presi- 
dent of the Virginia Trust Co. 



1887 
— W. S. Wilkinson is engaged in the insurance and real es- 
tate business at Rocky Mount. 

1889 

— H. G. Wood is in the insurance business at Edenton. 

1891 

— Five hundred students of the University turned out January 
14th in response to a call to fight a forest fire that threatened to 
sweep Battle's park and the eastern end of Chapel Hill. 
Forming in skirmish lines they swept through the woods under 
the leadership of Deans A. H. Patterson, '91, and F. P. Gra- 
ham, '09, beating down the flames which, fed by a high wind, 
shot through the underbrush with alarming speed. At the 
end of an hour and a half they had the fire under control, but 
not until between 40 and 50 acres had been swept clean of 
leaves, grass, undergrowth, and many small trees. 
— -W. H. Wills is connected with the Produce News. 6 Harrison 
St., New York City. 

1892 
— A. W. McLean, of Lumberton, who is now acting managing 
director of the War Finance Corporation, Washington, D. C, 
has been named by the Secretary of the Treasury as special 
adviser to the Cuban delegates who are now attending the 
second Pan-American financial conference in Washington. 
— A. M. Scales, of Greensboro, recently gave a rabbit hunt 
and barbecue to about 50 or 60 boys of the First Presbyterian 
Church, Greensboro. This occasion is enjoyed annually by 
Mr. Scales ' Sunday school class. 

— Frank C. Mebane announces that he has removed his office 
from 80 Broadway to 66 Broadway, New York City, where he 
will continue the general practice of law. 

1893 

— C. O. McMichael has moved from Wentworth to Winston- 
Salem, where he is now a member of the legal partnership of 
McMichael, Johnson and Hackler. W. Reade Johnson, Law 
'09, and J. Frank Hackler, '16, are the other members of this 
firm. 

— F. C. Harding, attorney of Greenville and member of the 
State Senate, is a candidate for the democratic nomination 
for lieutenant governor of the State. Mr. Harding is one of 
the incorporators of the Greenville and Shelmerdine Railway, 
recently organized to connect Greenville and Shelmerdine, 
both towns in Pitt County. 

— Dr. Douglas Hamer, physician, practices his profession at 
McColl, S. C. He has a son in the University. 

1894 
— Former Congressman E. Y. Webb, Law '94, has assumed 
his duties as Federal Judge of the western N. C. district. 
— Dr. Chas. Roberson practices his profession, medicine, at 
Greensboro, with offices in the Benbow Arcade. 
— Dr. J. S. Bassett, Law '94, professor of History at Smith 
College, Northampton, Mass., was elected secretary of the 
American Historical Association at its recent meeting in 
Cleveland. 

— W. E. Holt, Jr., is engaged in the manufacture of cotton at 
Lexington. 

1895 
— Thos. D. Warren, of New Bern, recently relinquished the 
duties of district attorney for the eastern N. C. district. He 
held a recess appointment to this office. 
— Chas. F. Tomlinson, of the Tomlinson Chair Co., High Point, 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



12!l 



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The Trust Depart- 
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JNO. M. MILLER, Jr., President 
W. M. ADDISON. Vice-President 
CHAS. R. BURNETT. Vice-President 
ALEX. F. RYLAND, Cashier 
THOS. W. PURCELL. Trust Officer 



Murphy's Hotel 

Richmond, Virginia 

The Most Modern, Largest, and Best Located Hotel 
in Richmond, Being on Direct Car Line to all 
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JAMES T. DISNEY, President 



130 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



was re-elected in November president of the Southern Furni- 
ture Manufacturers Association, at the meeting of this body 
in Asheville. 

— W. E. Breese is practicing law at Brevard as a member of 
the firm of Gash and Breese. He is county attorney and is a 
former mayor of Brevard. 

— H. E. C. Bryant is at the head of the Washington bureaus 
of the Charlotte Observer and the New York World. 

1896 
— Louis I. Guion is a successful farmer at Lugoff, S. C. He 
is a dealer in Hereford cattle and in hay and grain. 
— H. B. Heath is at the head of the firm of H. B. Heath and 
Co., cotton merchants of Charlotte. 

— Walter H. Woodson practices law in Salisbury and is a 
former mayor of the city. 

— The latest town to be incorporated in North Carolina is 
Myers Park, Charlotte 's suburban development, planned and 
developed by George Stephens, head of the Stephens Co. 
— Dr. Walter V. Brem, who held in service the rank of major 
in the medical corps, is engaged in the practice of his profes- 
sion in Los Angeles, with offices at 1210 Brockman Bldg. Dr. 
Brem paid a brief visit to the "Hill" in October, renewing 
his friendships of college days. 

1897 
— W. G. Clark is one of the incorporators of the Edgecombe 
Realty and Insurance Co., at Tarboro. 

— R. V. Whitener is manager of the Southern branch of the 
Baltimore Belting Co., at Spartanburg, S. C. 
— D. B. Smith, attorney of Charlotte, has assumed his new du- 
ties as assistant district attorney for the western N C. district. 
He succeeds Congressman Clyde R. Hoey, Law '99. The mar- 
riage of Miss Esther Lotton and Mr. Smith took place in Char- 
lotte last summer. 

1898 
—Harry S. Lake is at the head of the Lake Sales Co., 1974 
Broadway, New York City. 

— R. R. Ragan is secretary and treasurer of the Beeson Hard- 
ware Co., at High Point. 

—Prank Page is chairman of the N. C. State Highway Com- 
mission, Raleigh. 

— Dr. John Hill Tucker is now an eye specialist with offices 
at 6 and 7 MeKinnon Bldg., Charlotte. 

— Geo. K. Tate holds the position of general superintendent 
of the McAden Mills, large cotton manufacturers, at Mc- 
Adenville. 

— C. S. Carr is treasurer of the F. S. Royster Fertilizer Co., 
Norfolk, Va. He is also a member of the board of directors 
of this corporation. 

1899 

H. M. Wagstam, Secretary, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
— M. W. Satterfield is a member of the mercantile firm of 
Wilburn and Satterfield, Roxboro. 

— F. G. Payne is a traveling auditor with headquarters at 
Ronnoke, Va. 

—Ed C. Ray is connected with the McAden Mills at McAden- 
ville. 

— The marriage of Miss Mary Perry and Mr. Robert Gilliam 
Kittrell took place December 31st in the First Presbyterian 
Church of Henderson. Mr. Kittrell is a member of the law 
firm of Kittrell and Kittrell, at Henderson, and is a former 
member of the Legislature from Vance County. 



— Eugene F. Hartley is chief statistician of manufactures in 
the census bureau, Washington, D. C. 

— Rev. Francis M. Osborne, who recently completed the rais- 
ing of a $250,000 endowment fund for St. Mary's School at 
Raleigh, has been elected to the chair of theology at the Uni- 
versity of the South, Sewanee, Tenn. Mr. Osborne has taken 
up his new duties. 

— P. A. Gorrell was recently elected president of the Win- 
ston-Salem Board of Trade for the ensuing year. 

1900 
W. S. Bernard, Secretary, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
— Col. Ernest Graves, Engineer Corps, U. S. Army, is now 
stationed at Washington, D. C. 

— Frank Bennett, of Wadesboro, left tackle on the Varsity foot- 
ball teams of '98, '99, '00, and '01, was host to the members 
of the victorious Carolina football team at a dinner given in 
their honor December 19th in Chapel Hill. 
— Graham Woodard is at the head of the Contentnea Guano 
Co., at Wilson. He is a member of the board of trustees of 
the University. 

— T. T. Allison is business manager of the chamber of com- 
merce at Charlotte. 

1901 

Dr. J. G. Murphy, Secretary, Wilmington, N. C. 

— A. E. Woltz, of the law firm of Mangum and Woltz, Gas- 

tonia, is the newly elected president of the Gaston County 

Alumni Association. 

1902 
I. F. Lewis, Secretary, University, Va. 
— J. C. Nash has the management of the Columbia Naval 
Stores Co., Savannah, Ga. 

— E. G. Mclver is general superintendent of Erwin Mills, No. 
4, at West Durham. 

— Major Reston Stevenson has returned to his post as profes- 
sor of chemistry at the College of the City of New York. 
— Louis Graves is spending a few weeks in Chapel Hill. He 
served overseas as captain of infantry and, following the 
armistice, was engaged in newspaper work with the Army. 
He has recently published articles in the Atlantic Monthly and 
the Saturday Evening Post. 

1903 

N. W. Walker, Secretary, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
— R. B. Ricaud practices law at Bennettsville, S. C. 
— Judge Frank Smathers is a member of the law firm of Thomp- 
son and Smathers, with offices in the Real Estate and Law 
Bldg., Atlantic City, N. J. 

—Dr. Hamner C. Irwin, Med. '03, formerly with the Mayo 
Bros, clinic at Rochester, Minn., has returned to Charlotte and 
is now engaged in the practice of surgery in that city. 
— The marriage of Miss Hilda Way and Mr. Thomas Lenoir 
Gwyn took place at the home of the bride's parents, Dr. and 
Mrs. J. Howell Way, at Waynesville, on December 20th. Mr. 
Gwyn, whose home is at Springdale, Haywood County, is a 
successful man of affairs, and is chairman of the board of 
county commissioners for Haywood County. 
— R. S. Stewart, attorney of Lancaster, S. C, was on De- 
cember 9th re-elected mayor of the city. 

— Zebulon Judd is director of the school of agricultural edu- 
cation at, the Alabama Polytechnic Institute, Auburn, Ala. 
He is also director of the summer school of this institution. 





TAR BABY 




ILLUSTRATED— HUMOROUS 

The Tar Baby appeals to your support not on the grounds of loyalty and devotion, but simply 
on its merits, because we believe that every page will furnish you many pleasant minutes. 

The New University is just beginning to make its greatest achievements. The Carolina Tar 
Baby is one of the first examples of what a greater vision and desire to serve will produce. Won't 
you support it? 

Send us your check for $1.50 and we will mail you the ten remaining numbers as they are 
issued during the college year. And why not send your friend a copy also? 

We are waiting for" your subscription, so just pin that $1.50 to your letter and mail it NOW. 

THE CAROLINA TAR BABY, Chapel Hill, N. C. 

ERNEST H. ABERNETHY, Business Manager 



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GILBERT CRABTREE, Manager 



132 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



Statement of the Condition of 

The Fidelity Bank 

OF DURHAM, N. C. 

ZtCade to the tf^orth Carolina Corporation Commission 
at the Close of Business, Sept. 12, 1919 



RESOURCES 

Loans and Investments * 3,7 i^'2oi'iJ 

Furniture and Fixtures 㣥,:,, 

Cash Items 847,421. 37 

Cash in Vaults and with Banks 763,893.55 

Overdrafts 842.79 

$5,388,874.24 

LIABILITIES 

Capital Stock $ 100.00000 

Surplus 500,000.00 

Undivided Profits 107,596.17 

Interest Reserve 6,000.00 

Dividends Unpaid 195.01 

Deposits . • 4,261,285.21 

Unearned Interest 8,657.49 

Contingent Fund 5,140.36 

Borrowed Bonds 100,000.00 

Bills Payable 300,000.00 

$5,388,874.24 

B. N. DUKE. President INO. F. WHY, Vice President S. W. MINOR. Cashier 
L D. KIRKLAND, Assistant Cashier INO. A. BUCHANAN, Assistant Cashier 

The strength of this bank lies not alone in its Capital, Surplus, and Re- 
sources, but in the Character and Financial Responsibility 
of the men who conduct its affairs 



The Yarborough 



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Proprietors 



1904 
T. F. Hickerson, Secretary, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
— C. Dunbar is secretary and treasurer of the Guilford Gro- 
cery Co., wholesale grocers of High Point. 
— Theo. G. Britton is engaged in the real estate business at 
Houston, Texas. 

— General William Kuffin Cox, father of Col. Albert L. Cox, 
'04, of Raleigh, died December 2Gth in a Richmond, Va., hos- 
pital. General Cox was at the time of his death the ranking 
surviving officer of the Confederacy. He planned and executed, 
at the head of his troops, the last charge at Appomattox. 
— Since leaving the ' ' Hill " V. A. J. Idol has been engaged 
in banking at High Point. He is cashier of the Commercial 
National Bank, High Point's biggest bank. On January 2nd 
this financial institution increased its capital and surplus to 
the point where, taken together, they now are one million 
dollars. 

1905 
W. T. Shore, Secretary, Charlotte, N. C. 
— T. D. Meares, Jr., is an agent for the Internal Revenue 
Service, located at Wilson. 

— A. M. McLean is an agent for the Internal Revenue Ser- 
vice, located at Wilmington. 

— C. H. Mebane, Law '05, editor of the Greensboro Patriot, 
is prohibition director for North Carolina. 
— Dr. Poy Roberson, of Durham, was recently elected presi- 
dent of the Durham-Orange Medical Society for 1920. 
— The marriage of Miss Willie May Stratford, Law '19, and 
Mr. William Thomas Shore, '05, occurred December 18th in 
Charlotte. They make their home in Charlotte where Mr. 
Shore is engaged in the practice of law. Mr. Shore is a for- 
mer president of the Mecklenburg County Alumni Association. 

1906 
Maj. J. A. Parker, Secretary, Charlotte, N. C. 
— W. M. Upchurch is employment manager for the Durham 
Hosiery Mills. He edits Durable-Durham Doings, a monthly 
bulletin published by and for the employees of the Durham 
Hosiery Mills. 

— B. Mabry Hart is one of the incorporators of the Edge- 
combe Realty and Insurance Co., at Tarboro. 
— E. Clark, Jr., is connected with the S. A. L. Railway Com- 
pany at Weldon. 

— R. H. McLain is with the General Electric Co., his address 
being 111 Wendell Ave., Schenectady, N. Y. 
— J. W. Winborne is engaged in the practice of law at Marion 
as a member of the firm of Pless and Winborne. 
■ — Dr. John Berry has resigned as deputy medical director of 
the Pennsylvania State Sanatorium for Tuberculosis at Ham- 
burg, Pa., and expects to locate in North Carolina for the 
general practice of internal medicine. 

— Carter Daiton, lawyer of High Point, is president of the 
newly organized High Point Rotary Club. 

— Wm. M. Wilson, for some years a member of the Charlotte 
bar, has gone to New York City where he is identified witli 
the cotton cloth brokerage business. 

— Roy M. Brown, of the faculty of the Appalachian Training 
School at Boone, has bought one-half interest in the Watauga 
Democrat. 

— R. L. Gash, Law '06, is practicing law at Brevard and is 
judge of the recorder 's court of Transylvania County. 
— W. G. Bramham, Law '06, lawyer of Durham, is president of 
the newly organized Kiwanis Club of Durham. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



133 



1907 f 

C. L. Weill, Secretary, Greensboro, N. C. 
— J. Holland Morrow, Law '07, of Gastonia, travels for the 
Gastonia Cotton Yarn Co., Inc., of Philadelphia. 
— The wedding of Miss Florence Harriss and Mr. John Frank 
Spruill took place December 31st in Salisbury. They are at 
home in Lexington where Mr. Spruill is a prominent attorney. 
Mr. Spruill is secretary of the Davidson County Alumni As- 
sociation. 

— The marriage of Miss Emily Patterson Elliott and Dr. Hen- 
ry Lee Sloan took place recently at the home of the bride 's 
parents in Linden. They are at home in Charlotte, w-here Dr. 
Sloan is associated with Doctors J. P. Matheson and C. N. 
Peeler, specialists in diseases of the eye, ear, nose and throat. 
— Rev. Wm. A. Jenkins, who served as a chaplain in the Army, 
is now pastor of Trinity M. E. Church, South, Charlotte. His 
residence is at 4 Jackson Terrace. 

— E. B. Jeffress, head of the Greensboro Daily News, is presi- 
dent of the newly organized association of North Carolina 
daily newspapers. 

— Thos. 'Berry is general manager of the Enterprise Lumber 
Co., manufacturers of North Carolina yellow pine at Mount 
Olive. 

1908 

M. Robins, Secretary, Greensboro, N. C. 
— James A. Gray on January 1st became actively identified 
with the R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. as vice-president and 
director. Mr. Gray was formerly vice-president and treasurer 
and director of the Wachovia Bank and Trust Co., Winston- 
Salem. He continues as vice-president and director of the 
Wachovia Bank and Trust Co., with which financial institu- 
tion he has been closely associated since leaving the Univer- 
sity in 1908. 

— D. Dell Withers, a native of Charlotte, is engaged in T. M. 
C. A. work at Roanoke, Va. 

— H. B. Gunter is secretary of the Southern Life and Trust 
Co., Greensboro. 

— Drury M. Phillips is investigating Fullers Earth in Florida 
for the Texas Company, of Houston, Texas. His present ad- 
dress is Quiney, Fla. 

1909 
O. C. Cox, Secretary, Greensboro, N. C. 
— Jos. G. Fitzsimmons is president and general manager of 
the Carolinas Auto Supply House, Charlotte. 
— Paul R. Capelle, Law '09, is assistant cashier of the First 
National Bank of Rocky Mount. He was married on De- 
cember 26th. 

— Dr. D. D. Walker practices medicine in Macon, Ga., with 
offices at 621-22 Bibb Realty Bldg. 

— Wade A. Montgomery is treasurer of the Carolinas Auto 
Supply House, Charlotte. 

— Dr. and Mrs. J. M. Maness, of Ellerbe, have announced the 
birth of a son. 

— Ronald B. Wilson is director of public health education for 
the North Carolina State Board of Health at Raleigh. 
— Jas. R. Stevenson is with the Stockyards National Bank, 
220 Exchange Bldg., South St. Paul, Minn. Mr. Stevenson 
saw active service overseas in the A. E. F. 
— B. W. Jones continues with the General Electric Co. His 
address is 316 Glenwood Blvd., Schnectady, N. Y. 
— D. D. Oliver is a member of the firm of Oliver Bros. Co., 
at Fort Lauderdale, Fla. 




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goods are now complete. It will be to your 
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New Dresses of Silks, soft Satins, and fine 
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All kind of cotton piece goods, Wool and 
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Gossard Front-Lacing Corsets. 



134 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



LIGGETT & MYERS 
TOBACCO CO. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



FAT1MA, CHESTERFIELD, AND 

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VELVET AND DUKE'S MIXTURE 

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W. H. LOWRY 

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— W. H. Stroud is chemist in charge of the food and fertilizer 
inspection division of the State department of agriculture, 
Madison, Wis. 

— W. L. Wetzel], Phar. '09, who is engaged in the cotton mill 
business, with the Armstrong chain of mills at Gastonia, is one 
of the incorporators of the Mildred Cotton Mills, a newly 
formed Gastonia corporation. 

1910 
J. R. Nixon, Secretary, Edenton, N. C. 
— Louis Lipinsky, formerly at the helm of the Bon Marche, 
large ladies department store of Wilmington, and a former 
president of the Wilmington Merchants Club, now lives in 
Charlotte where he is treasurer and managing director of the 
Little-Long Co., a large and long-established department store. 
— J. A. Highsmith is in the faculty of the department of edu- 
cation of the North Carolina College for Women at Greensboro. 
— The marriage of Miss Mary Settle Boyd and Mr. Clement 
Coote Browne took place November 18th at the home of the 
bride's parents in Washington, D. C. They make their home 
in Wilmington. 

— Thos. D. Rose is a member of the firm of Rose Bros., at 
Payetteville. 

— J. E. Croswell is a member of the firm of the Croswell Co., 
general merchants at the Woodside Mills, Greenville, S. C. 

1911 

I. C. Moser, Secretary, Asheboro, N. C. 
— Rev. J. G. Walker is pastor of the Third Presbyterian 
Church of Greenville, S. C. 

— J. C. Daughtridge, Law '11, is manager of the Daughtridge 
Tractor Co., Rocky Mount. 

— F. E. Vogler is engaged in the undertaking business at 
Winston-Salem. 

— The marriage of Miss Julia Bryan Jones and Mr. Jere 
Zollicoffer took place in December at Centenary Methodist 
Church, New Bern. They live at Henderson where Mr. Zolli- 
coffer practices law. 

—Fred S. Wetzcll, '11, and E. E. Groves, '18, both natives of 
Gastonia, have organized the Groves Yarn Agency, Inc., at 
Philadelphia. This agency will handle cotton yarn products 
of Southern mills. 

— W. B. Ellis, Jr., a native of Winston-Salem, has been ap- 
pointed manager of the Greenville, S. C, branch of the South- 
ern Public Utilities Co. 

— Dr. D. B. Bryan is professor of education in Richmond Col- 
lege, Richmond, Va. 

— Junius M. Smith, for the past year editor of the automo- 
bile section of the Charlotte News, has resigned this position 
to become advertising manager of the Motor Company, at 
Winston-Salem. 

— Dr. John W. Harris, a native of Reidsville, is on the staff of 
the Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 
— Geo. W. Rhodes is principal of the Newport high school. 

1912 
John C. Lockhart, Secretary, Raleigh, N. C. 
— The marriage of Miss Gladys Baker and Mr. William Holt 
Oates occurred December 13th in the Church of the Good 
Shepherd, Jacksonville, Fla. They are at home in Hender- 
sonville. 

— Dr. C. H. Hemphill is engaged in the practice of medicine 
at Chapel Hill. 

— -Fred H. Hemphill is now located in New York City. 
— Dr. Roland S. Clinton, who saw service overseas as a cap- 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



135 



tain in the medical corps, is engaged in the practice of medi- 
cine at his home town, Gastonia. 

— L. P. MeLendon, attorney of Durham, and former major 
of the 113th F. A., has been elected president of the Young 
Men 's Christian Association of Durham. 

— Robert M. Haues on January 1st took up his new duties as 
vice-president and director of the Wachovia Bank and Trust 
Co., Winston-Salem. Prior to this Mr. Hanes was actively 
identified with the Hanes Rubber Co., Inc., tire manufacturers 
of Winston-Salem. In service Mr. Hanes held the rank of 
major and served overseas with the 113th F. A. Mr. Hanes 
was recently elected president of the Twin-City Club. 
— John C. Whitaker, who has been engaged in the tobacco 
manufacturing business since his graduation from the Univer- 
sity, lately became employment manager of the R. J. Rey- 
nolds Tobacco Co., Winston-Salem. 

— Announcement has been made of the engagement of Miss 
Marjorie Marie Lentz and Mr. William Myers Jones, both of 
Charlotte. Mr. Jones is on the staff of the Carolina Automo- 
tive Trade Association at Charlotte. He served overseas as 
first lieutenant of infantry and was in service for 23 months. 
— Cyrus D. Hogue, lawyer of Wilmington, has resigned as com- 
mander of the Wilmington post of the American Legion, and 
has become a candidate for county solicitor of New Hanover 
. County. 

1913 

A. L. M. Wiggins, Secretary, Hartsville, S. C. 
— R. Gray Merritt is with the Hunter Mfg. and Com. Co., 
58-60 Worth St., New York City. 

— Dr. T. J. Summey, Med. '13, physician of Brevard, served 
overseas as an officer of the Medical Corps. 
— The marriage of Miss Susan Ashby and Mr. William Samuel 
Wolfe, Phar. '13, took place November 20th at Central Meth- 
odist Church, Mount Airy. Mr. Wolfe is engaged in the drug 
business at Mount Airy. 

— The marriage of Miss Nina Adele Shaw and Mr. Lowry 
Axley occurred December 25th at Ashland City, Tenn. They 
are at home in Griffin, Ga., where Mr. Axley is engaged in the 
practice of law. 

— T. B. De Loache is engaged in the real estate business at 
Burlington. 

— Frank H. Kennedy, lawyer of Charlotte, has recently been 
elected vice-chancellor commander of Mecklenburg Lodge No. 
90, Knights of Pythias. 

— F. L. Fry is engaged in the general insurace business at 
Greensboro. 

— Geo. P. Wilson, formerly in the faculty of Indiana Univer- 
sity, is now head of the English department at Bessie Tift 
College, Forsyth, Ga. 

— John R. Kenyon, Law '13, lawyer of Charlotte, is one of 
the incorporators of the Independence Motors Co., a new 
automobile enterprise at Charlotte. Another of the incorpora- 
tors is Carl D. Moore, Law '12, of Charlotte. 

1914 

Oscar Leach, Secretary, Raeford, N. C. 

— Miss Julia Alexander, Law '14, attorney of Charlotte, is 

the only woman lawyer to appear before the N. C. Supreme 

Court. 

— Rev. Jas. P. Burke, formerly of Bessemer City but now in 
charge of the Episcopal Church at Reidsville, was ordained to 
the priesthood of that faith in St. Phillips Church, Durham, 
on December 21st. 



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Surplus and Profits 40,000.00 



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M. C. S. NOBLE President 

R. L. STROWD Vice-President 

M. E. HOGAN Cashier 




Snappy Clothes 

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Society and 
Stein Block Clothes 

for the young 

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Vanstory Clothing Co. 

C. H. McKNIGHT, President and Manager 
GREENSBORO. N. C. 



136 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



THE CAROLINA MAN'S SHOE STORE 

Carr-Bryant 

High Grade Shoes with Snap and Style 



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106 West Main Street DURHAM, N. C. 



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Manufacturers of the Famous EL-REES-SO Cigar 
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ASSOCIATED 



Contractor and \Jjuitder 

MAIN OFFICE: DURHAM, N. C. 



CONTRACTOR PHILLIPS HALL 
UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 



— The marriage of Miss Mildred Butt and Mr. Henry Cyrus 
Long took place December 6th at Knoxville, Tenn. Mr. Long 
has resigned as secretary of the Park Yarn Mills at Kings 
Mountain, and has become secretary and local manager of the 
Rhyne-Anderson Mills at Troy. 

— Miss Willie McDonald Barrett and Mr. John Albert Holmes 
were married December 2:ird in the Presbyterian Church at 
Matthews. They make their home in Raleigh where Mr. Holmes 
is a member of the faculty of the Raleigh high school. Mr. 
Holmes served overseas in the 81st Division. 
— The marriage of Miss Ruby Melvin and Mr. James Frank 
Love took place January 1st at the home of the bride 's par- 
ents in Fayetteville. They live at Goldsbovo where Mr. Love 
is a member of the faculty of the Goldsboro high school. 
— Dr. Frank D. Conroy is connected with Johns Hopkins Hos- 
pital in Baltimore. Dr. Conroy was a student at Hopkins 
when the war began and he went to France with the Hopkins 
hospital unit. Hopkins awarded him the M. D. degree on his 
return. 

— Oscar Leach is a member of the law firm of Currie and 
Leach at Raeford. 

— Miss Janice Elaine Abernethy arrived on December 31st in 
the home of Mr. and Mrs. L. L. Abernethy, at Camden, S. C. 

1915 

Daniel L. Bell, Secretary, Pittsboro, N. C. 
— Fred M. Patterson, of Concord, a former captain of the 
Carolina baseball team, who saw active service overseas as a 
member of the 113th F. A., is now a first year medical student 
in the University. 

— A. T. Weatherly, principal of the Reidsville high school, 
was married during the past fall. 

— Dr. C. S. Norburn, Med. '15, is associated with the, hos- 
pital of the Drs. Mayo at Rochester, Minn. 
— Geo. B. Whitaker, formerly cashier of the Merchants Na- 
tional Bank, Winston-Salem, on January 1st became treasurer 
of the Wachovia Bank and Trust Co, Winston-Salem. 
— Walter P. Fuller is located at St. Petersburg, Fla., where 
he is engaged in the real estate business. 

— C. N. Dobbins is with the Empire Gas and Fuel Co., Tulsa, 
Oklahoma. 

— W. L. Goldston, Jr., who held in service the rank of 2nd 
lieutenant of field artillery, is connected with the Empire Gas 
and Fuel Co., at Ardmore, Okla. 

1916 
Hugh B. Hester, Secretary, Capt. and Adj. 12th F. A., 
Camp Travis, Texas. 
— L. C. Hall is connected with the Hercules Powder Co., at 
Wilmington, Del., in the capacity of chemist. 
— The marriage of Miss Laura McPherson Tabor and Mr. Burr 
Coley Brock took place December 23rd at the home of the 
bride's parents near Morganton. They live in Winston-Salem, 
where Mr. Brock is engaged in the practice of law with offices 
in the O 'Hanlon Bldg. 

— The Edward S. Reid Company, cotton yarn brokers of 
Charlotte, has, opened a New York office at 366 Broadway, 
with Edward S. Reid, Jr., former Carolina fullback, in charge. 
—J. M. Parker, '16, and W. M. York, '18, both of the fac- 
ulty of the Greensboro high school, made brief visits to Chapel 
Hill during the holidays. 

— J. Gerald Cowan has been commissioned first lieutenant of 
Asheville Cavalry, Troop B, North Carolina National Guard. 
Mr. Cowan saw service overseas as first lieutenant in the 
artillerv of the 81st "Wildcat" Division. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



137 



— John M. Huske is connected with the insurance department 
of the American Trust Co., Charlotte. 

— E. B. House is in charge of the collection of records of the 
world war for the N. C. Historical Commission. 
— The marriage of Miss Johnsie Alexander Graves and Mr. 
Robert Newton Page, Jr., took place December 31st in the First 
Presbyterian Church of Carthage. They live in Carthage 
where Mr. Page is assistant cashier of the Page Trust Co. 
— M. E. Robinson is a member of the firm of the Builders 
Supply Co., Goldsboro. 

— F. Boyden Nims is a member of the faculty of the Staun- 
ton Military Academy, Staunton, Va. 

— Dr. Julian A. Moore, who during the past fall was an in- 
structor in the medical department of the University, is now 
chief resident physician at the Garfield Memorial Hospital, 
Washington, D. C. Dr. Moore led the field in the examinations 
of the national medical examining board held in Philadelphia 
last summer. 

— John Haywood Jones, who is engaged in the cotton business 
at New Bern, was recently elected president of the New Bern 
country club. 

— C. A. Holland is with the Amerada Petroleum Corporation 
at Tulsa, Okla. 

— W. B. Kendrick is with the Marland Refining Co., Porca 
City, Okla. 

— W. F. Howell is with the Empire Gas and Fuel Co., working 
from Texas to Kansas. 

1917 
H. G. Baity, Secretary, Ronda, X. C. 
— V. H. Idol is assistant cashier of the Bank of Madison, at 
Madison. 

— C. V. Ferguson is principal of the Bethany high school at 
Summerfield. 

— The wedding of Miss Carolyn Thomas Farthing and Dr. 
Benjamin Jones Lawrence took place December 3rd in Durham 
Dr. Lawrence is a physician of Raleigh. 

— The marriage of Miss Florence Hester Gurley and Mr. 
Russell L. Ginn took place November 20th at the home of the 
bride's parents in Princeton. They are at home in Goldsboro. 
— The marriage of Miss Doris Marie Ball and Hilary H. Craw- 
ford, Law '17, first lieutenant of infantry, IT. S. Army, took 
place December 14th in Atlanta, Ga. Lieut. Crawford, who 
is a native of Waynesville, saw service overseas in the 81st 
"Wildcat" Division and has remained in the regular army. 
— The marriage of Miss Alice Celinda Gray and Mr. John O. 
Wood took place December 25th at Marshall. They are at 
home in Webster where Mr. Wood is superintendent of schools. 
Mr. Wood received the commission of first lieutenant from the 
first Oglethorpe training camp and served overseas in the 
infantry of the 81st "Wildcat" Division. 
— H. G. Baity is principal of the Ronda high school. 
— J. T. C. Wright is principal of the Unionville high school. 
— Jas. E. Hoover, of the firm of Kirk and Hoover, consulting 
geologists, Tulsa, Okla., has been engaged in geological work 
from Texas to Kentucky during recent months. 
— The marriage of Miss Frances Virginia Price and Mr. 
Francis C. Jordan took place November 27th. The ceremony 
was performed by Rev. J. Reginald Mallett, '15, in Holy 
Trinity Episcopal Church, Greensboro. They now live at 223 
Elm Street, Holyoke, Mass. Mr. Jordan is learning the paper 
game in the home office and mills of the American Writing 
Paper Co., at Holyoke. He is connected with the export de- 



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PRESIDENT 



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Broadway Cafe 

WE CORDIALLY INVITE YOU TO VISIT OUR 
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EXCELLENT SERVICE 

COURTEOUS TREATMENT 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



138 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



Odell Hardware Co. 

Greensboro, N. C. 

China, Cut Glass and Silverware 
Household Goods 

DEPENDABLE GOODS 

PROMPT SERVICE 

SATISFACTORY PRICES 



Guilford Hotel and Cafe 

NEWLY REMODELED 
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Greensboro, North Carolina 



Cross and Linehan Co. 

Leaders in Clothing and Gents' 
Furnishings 

Raleigh, North Carolina 



Cooper 5ttonument 
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RALEIGH, N. C. 

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partment and will have charge of exports to Spanish-speaking 
countries when he finishes his training. 

— The marriage of Miss Margaret Little and Mr. Leighton 
Blount took place January 3rd at the home of the bride's 
parents in Robersonville. They arc at home in Greenville, 
where Mr. Blount is engaged in business. 

1918 

W. R. Wunsch, Secretary, Chapel Hill, N. C. 

— K: Kato is in charge of iron ore developments at Talladega, 

Ala. The property that he has charge of is owned by Japanese 

interests. 

— Ray Armstrong is head of the department of manual train- 
ing in the Goldsboro high school. 

— R. W. Madiy, who is now a student in the school of journal- 
ism of Columbia University, was in Chapel Hill for a brief 
visit during the holidays. 

— W. R. Wunsch, secretary of the University Y. M. C. A., at- 
tended the Des Moines meeting of the world's student confer- 
ence of the Student Volunteers of America, held December 
31-January 4. Mr. Wunsch was accompanied by six Univer- 
sity students, Donnell Van Noppen, Greensboro; S. H. Willis, 
High Point; G. D. Crawford, Cornelia, Ga.; W. H. Andrews, 
Speed; J. L. Cobb, Mount Olive; and C. W. Phillips, Trinity. 

1919 

H. G. West, Secretary, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
— Owen Fitzsimmons is located at Clover, S. C, where he is 
associated with the Clover Cotton Mills. 

— Jennings J. Rhyue is principal of the Asheboro high school. 
— Norman A. Boren began the practice of law in Greensboro 
on January 1st. 

— Miss Madeline Palmer, Law '19, is editor of the community 
paper of the Erlanger Cotton Mills, at Lexington. 

1920 

— The marriage of Miss Gertrude Merrimon and Mr. William 
Thompson occurred December 11th in West Market Street 
Methodist Church, Greensboro. They are at home in Goldsboro. 
— The engagement of Miss Ethelda Armstrong and Mr. Plato 
Durham, both of Gastonia, has been announced. March 9th is 
to be the time for the wedding. Mr. Durham is engaged in the 
cotton business. 

NECROLOGY 

1857 
— Eranklin Smith Wilkinson, A. B. 1857, died November 14th 
at the home of his son, W. S. Wilkinson, '87, in Rocky Mount. 
Deceased was 86 years of age at the time of his death, and 
had been engaged in teaching throughout his life. A move- 
ment is on foot among his former students to erect a memorial 
in his memory for his services to education. 

1860 
—Eugene Stuart Martin, A. B. 1860, died December 17th at 
his home in Wilmington, aged 79 years. Deceased served as 
a lieutenant in the armies of the Confederacy. After the war 
between the States he entered upon the practice of his pro- 
fession, law, at Wilmington, and continued in active practice 
until a few years before his death. He was one of the few 
surviving members of the class of 1860. He was deeply in- 
terested in astronomical observations and investigations. 

1862 
— Charles Wetmore Broadfoot, A. B. 1911 as of 1862, died 
in November at his home in Fayetteville, aged 77 years. De- 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



139 



Dick 's Laundry Co. 



Greensboro, N. C. 



High-Class Launderers, French 
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Prompt and Efficient Service 

is our motto 

Our reputation gained through years 
of experience speaks for itself. 

Send yours by Parcel Post 
We appreciate your patronage 



C. 5. Pendergraft 

Chapel Hill Agent 



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King's Business College 

Raleigh, N. C. Charlotte, N. C. 



YACKETY YACK 1911 

I have a dozen copies of the 1911 Yackety Yack which 
I will sell at $3 each, or two damaged copies at $2 each. 
K. S. TANNER, Spindale, N. C. 



Yackety Yacks, 19 16-' 17 

The Year Carolina beat Virginia in all meets. Handsome leather- 
bound volume. The last available. Price $2. 

G. D. CRAWFORD. Chapel Hill. N. C. 



Drink 



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DURHAM, N. C. 



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HEADQUARTERS IN CHAPEL HILL: NEXT TO 
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140 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



"SAY IT WITH FLOWERS" 




J. J. FALLON, 


Leading 


Florist 




Chapel Hill Aeents: 

FOISTER'S ART STORE 

R. P. ANDREWS. People'. Bank 


Phone 1290 
214 E. Main 
DURHAM, 


Street 
N.C 



w 


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ceased held the rank of colonel in the Confederate Army. He 
was a lawyer by profession and practiced in his home city, 
Fayetteville, for a long number of years. 

1864 
—Thomas Capehart, A. B. 1911 as of 1864, died August 30th 
at his home near Kittrell. Deceased was a captain in the 
armies of the Confederacy. After the war between the States 
he became a planter and merchant. He was 79 years of 
age.. 

1868 
— William Simpson Pearson, A. B. 1868, lawyer of Morganton, 
died December 11th at Charlotte, aged 70 years. Deceased was 
at one time U. S. consular agent at Palermo, Italy. He was 
for a number of years engaged in the newspaper business, and 
served one term as director of the Charlotte assay office. 

1891 

— Dr. John Gray Blount, well-known physician of Washington, 
and member of the board of trustees of the University, died 
December 10th at his home in Washington. Deceased was a 
student in the University during the years 1887-88 and 1888-89. 
He was at one time president of the State board of medical 
examiners. 

1893 
— Dr. Edgar Reid Russell, of Asheville, specialist in diseases 
of the eye, ear, nose and throat, died November 27th, aged 
50 years. Deceased was a student in the medical department 
of the University during the year 1892-93. He was one of 
the most successful and widely known members of the medical 
profession in the South. 

1908 
— Dr. Robert Rufus Bridgers, A. B. 1908, died in November in 
New Mexico. Deceased was a native of Wilmington and had 
gone to New Mexico in search of health. 

1913 
—Joe Yongue Caldwell, A. B. 1913, died December 24th at 
the home of his father, L. C. Caldwell, in Statesville, 27 years 
of age. Deceased was a lawyer by profession. He was the 
first graduate of the class of 1913 to meet death. 



The current Tale Review contains a thought-pro- 
voking article: "Industrial Partnership," by Dr. J. 
M. Booker. The article is phrased with distinction; 
and probes close to the secret of current industrial un- 
rest. What is the remedy — the remedy for the loss 
of the joy of the laborer in creation, slain by the 
machine, the industrial god — and demon — of the 
epoch ? Is it the Plumb plan ? Or the Leitch plan — 
a significant illustration of the workings of which is 
the chain of hosiery mills owned and directed by our 
own alumni, the Carrs of the younger generation, an 
illustration which Professor Booker inadvertently 
omits to mention? Or the Anderson plan? To the 
last Professor Booker is inclined: "The only way so 
far suggested that has a chance of satisfying this 
[building] instinct, in our opinion, is partnership — 
and not alone a share in the profits, but a share in 
the profits plus (and this to us seems the more vital 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



141 



A. E. LLOYD HARDWARE CO. 

DURHAM, N. C. 

All Kinds of Hardware, Sporting 

Goods and College Boys' 

Accessories 

GEO. W. TANDY, MANAGER 



University students, faculty members, and 
alumni visit the Jioyat Cafe while in 
3)urham. Cinder new and pro- 
gressive management. 
Special parlors 
for ladies 

^Durham' s ^VLodern (Safe 



Keep Physically Fit 



The young men of U. N. C. are wise enough 
to know that athletic exercise promotes sound 
health. Get in some game early. 

We can supply you with every essential in 
equipment for Football, Soccer, Basket Ball, 
Hockey, Skating, etc. 



Write for catalogue No. UC. 

ALEX TAYLOR & CO., Inc 

Athletic Outfitters 
26 E. 42nd St., New York 




Hennessee Cafe 

A MODERN, UP-TO-DATE CAFE, WHERE YOU 
AND YOUR FRIENDS ARE WELCOME 

CLEANLINESS AND SERVICE 
OUR MOTTOES 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



BAGLEY & ALDERMAN, Advertising 

LETTERWRITING, MULTIGRAPHING, PRINT- 
ING, ADVERTISING SIGNS, AND 
SPECIALTIES 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



CHARLES C. HOOK, ARCHITECT 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 

TWENTY YEARS EXPERIENCE IN PLANNING 
SCHOOL AND COLLEGE BUILDINGS 



A. ^A. TKlutte <Zo.3nc. 

Extend a cordial invitation to all students and 
alumni of the U. N. C. to make their store head- 
quarters during their stay in Chapel Hill. 

Complete Stock of 
New and Second-hand Books, Stationery, and 
Complete Line of Shoes and Haberdashery 
Made by the Leaders of Fashion, Al- 
ways on Hand 



When in Need 

of a Pocket Knife, Razor, Hone, Strop, Brush, 
Safety Razor, Blades, or tools of any kind, 
Paints, Varnishes, Brushes, Electrical Goods, 
and General Hardware, call on the 

Chapel Hill Hardware Co. 

THE STORE WHERE "QUALITY" COUNTS 



THE RESULT OF 28 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE 

LANG'S "ROGER C." CIGAR; TWO 

BRANDS: 7c and 10c 

A COMPARISON IS ALL I ASK 

ROGER C. LANG 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



142 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



R. BLACKNALL & SON 

DRUGGISTS 

NORKIS AND htYLERS CANDIES 

G. BERNARD. Maimagfr 

Corcoian Street Durham. N C- 



POLLARD BROTHERS 

DURHAM, N. C. 

STANDARD LINES OF HARDWARE 

AND SPORTING GOODS 



PRIDGEN & JONES CO. 

We Carry the Best Shoes: Edwin Clapp, Howard and 

Foster, and Heywood's 

Expert Fitters — A Cordial Welcome Awaits You 

107 W. Main St. DURHAM, N. C. 



THE SELWYN 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 

Fireproof, Modern and Luxurious 

IN THE HEART OF EVERYTHING 

H. C. LARZALERE, Manager 



E. E. Bragg & Co. 

WALKOVER AND FLORSHEIM SHOES 
DURHAM, N. C. 



Model Laundry Co. 

DURHAM, N. C. 
EXPERT LAUNDRY SERVICE 



DURHAM ICE CREAM CO. 

Fancy Ices; Makers of Blue Ribbon Brand Ice Cream 
Receptions and Banquets a Specialty 

TELEPHONE No. 1199 



LEATHER GOODS CHEAPER 
DURHAM, N. C. 



matter), plus a share of the control." Another sig- 
nificant illustration of progressive thought close at 
hand, to which Professor Booker likewise fails to call 
attention, is the "platform" of the Hon. R. N. Page, 
former congressman, who is an avowed candidate for 
the governorship. 



■The Drama for November, 1919, contains an article: 
"The Challenge of the Theatre Today to the Colleges 
and Universities" bj r Professor Frederick H. Koch. 
With approval the author cites the following from an 
unnamed critic: "I cannot but feel that here (that is, 
in theatrical experiments in our universities quite in- 
dependent of professional endeavor), rather than in 
the present-day professional stage, lies the real hope 
for the future of the theatre in this country." The 
work of the Carolina Playmakers, under Professor 
Koch's competent direction, furnishes a striking illus- 
tration of the best type of work of this kind now be- 
ing done in the United States. 



With the January number, the High School Jour- 
nal of the University begins its third volume under 
the editorship of Prof. N. W. Walker. The present 
number contains the following extended articles by 
members of the faculty: Reference Books for High 
Schools, by Dr. L. R. Wilson and Prof. C. M. Baker ; 
The Academy Movement of the South, by Dr. E. W. 
Knight ; Observations on the Teaching of Algebra, 
by Dr. A. W. Hobbs. Drs. L. A. Williams, E. W. 
Knight, and Norman Forester contribute a number 
of School Notes, Book Reviews, and Notes for the 
English Teachers' Column. 



Tommy Campbell, who coached the football team 
last fall and also in 1916, was one of the special 
coaches taken to California by the Harvard football 
team for its New Year's game with Oregon. 

Campbell, who is a former Harvard player and 
assistant coach, is counted a wonder in backfield coach- 
ing. He was present with the Harvard squad at the 
beginning of the past season before the Carolina 
squad had assembled and had a hand in starting the 
Crimson backfield on its victorious season. In the 
middle of the season he returned to Cambridge for a 
few days, saw Harvard play one game and gave ad- 
vice to his friend, Bob Fisher, the Harvard head 
coach. When Harvard began preparations for the 
long trip to the Pacific coast, Fisher again sent for 
Campbell and took him on the trip for special work 
with the backfield. The success of the Harvard team 
in its victory over Oregon was received by athletic 
authorities there as striking testimony to Campbell. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



143 



Ol)£ 2£ raver/sit? fircss 

ZEB P. COUNCIL, Manager CHAPEL HILL. N. C. 

PRINTING, ENGRAVED CARDS 

QUALITY AND SERVICE 



PATTERSON BROS. 

DRUGGISTS 

AGENCY NORRIS CANDY THE REXALL STORE 



K 



GOOCH'S CAFE 

Anything to Eat 
CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 



(Essie tJjrof/iers 

CALIFORNIA AND FLORIDA FRUITS 

TOBACCO AND CIGARS 

ICE CREAM PARLOR FRESH CANDIES 

"WE STRIVE TO PLEASE" 



CHAPEL HILL 

N. C. 



ANDREWS CASH STORE CO. 

Students and Faculty will find us ready to serve 
them with the latest styles in Walkover Shoes, 
Fancy Shirts, Tailored Suits, and general furn- 
ishings. Be convinced. Call and see. 



FOR NEAT JOB PRINTING AND TYPEWRITER 
PAPER CALL AT THE OFFICE OF 

The Chapel Hill News 



W. B. SORRELL 

JEWELER AND OPTOMETRIST 
CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 



ODAK SUPPLIE O 

Finishing for the Amateur. Foister " 



Eubanks Drug Co. 

Chapel Hill, N.C. 

Agents for Munnally's Candy 



THE PEOPLES NATIONAL BANK 

WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 

Capital $150,000.00 United States Depositary 

J. W. FRIES, Pres. Wra. A. BLAIR, Vice-Pres. 

N. MITCHELL, Cashier 



PICKARD'S HOTEL 

Headquarters for Carolina Alumni 

Returning to the Hill 

SPECIAL RATES. STUDENT BOARDERS. 



"Electric Sfyce Sl)op 

EXPERT SHOE REPAIRING 
CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 



Huffine Hotel 

Quick Lunch Counter and Dining Room — Clean 

Rooms $1.00 and Up 

NEAR DEPOT: GREENSBORO, N. C. 



WHITING- HORTON CO. 

THIRTY-ONE YEARS 
RALEIGH'S LEADING CLOTHIERS 



H. S. STORR & CO. 

Office Furniture, Machines and Supplies; Printers and 
Manufacturers of Rubber Stamps 
RALEIGH, N. C. 



Dnll@ia Supply C®o 

MACHINERY, MILL SUPPLIES 
PHONE 753 RALEIGH, N. C. 



144 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 




Motor-generator set mounted on crane 
supplying power for lifting magnet. 



Electricity- 



Electrically- heated glue- pots 

are used in pattern shops 

and elsewhere. 




the Master Force in Manufacturing 

THE marvels of electricity have revolutionized our manu- 
facturing industries. With belts and pulleys replaced 
by electric motors operating automatic — almost human — 
machines, many a slow and tedious process has been 
eliminated. The factory worker's task of yesterday is made 
pleasant by his command of this magic power. 

The Crane Company's plant at Chicago — electrical through- 
out — is a model of industrial efficiency. Its 10,000 horse- 
power of driving energy is brought by three small wires 
from a distant power plant. Thrn electricity drives the 
machinery which handles the coal for heating, cuts the 
steel, sifts the sand and sorts the material — in fact does 
everything from scrubbing the floor to winding the clock. 

Such an institution is marvelous— superhuman— made thus 
by the man-multiplying force of electricity. The General 
Electric Company has been instrumental in effecting this 
evolution. First, by developing successful electric generating 
and transmission apparatus to furnish economically this 
modern form of power. Secondly, through many years of 
active co-operation with hundreds of manufacturers, it has 
mastered the art of applying the use of electrical energy to 
a multitude of needs. And finally, through branch offices 
and other distributing channels, its products are made 
accessible to all. 



Machine operated by motor 

attached to lamp socket 

scrubs floors. 




Sales Offices in. 
all large cities. 



At 



■WL 



Hauling materials with train operated 
by electric automobile motors. 



95-109-1 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



145 



WHERE GENERAL WASHINGTON CAMPED 

General Washington and his Colonial Troops once camped in 
the little valley now occupied by the town of East Pittsburgh. 

About a centurj- and a half later, another general — a leader and 
organizer of industry — George Westinghouse entered this same val- 
ley, and on the same site, established one of the largest single 
manufacturing organizations in the world — the Westinghouse Elec- 
tric and Manufacturing Company. 

Now an army of 30,000 men and women work where General 
Washington camped. 

A DEVELOPMENT WHICH REVOLUTIONIZED 
POWER HOUSE PRACTICE 

It was in this historic valley that the first commercially suc- 
cessful turbine-driven Alternating-Current Generator was developed 
under the direction of George Westinghouse. It was tested in the 
East Pittsburgh Shops in 1896. The splendid operation of this, 
and two duplicate machines installed a year later, sounded the 
death knell of the reciprocating steam engine — then in almost uni- 
versal use. 

The steam turbine has effected remarkable savings — one of the 
most evident of which is floor space — the turbine-generator occupying 
from one-fourth to one-sixth the space occupied by the reciprocating 
engine. In our large cities, with floor space valued at thousands of 
dollars a square foot, this is a consideration of great importance. 

Ever since its organization, the Westinghouse Electric & Manu- 
facturing Company has been foremost in the development of steam 
and electrical apparatus. 

Westinghouse Electric & Manufacturing Co. 
East Pittsburgh, Pa. 



30.000 K. W. Wcs'inghouse Tandem Compound 
Turbine-Generator 






fWESTINGHOUSI 
ELECTRIC 



1 W 



■h J 



r;T- 



■ixm&L. 



i 



146 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 




:: fi 



The Seeman Printery 

Durham, N. C. 
Priuting - Eugraving - Bookbinding 




The University of North Carolina 



1789 



CHAPEL HILL 



1919 



"Educationally the decade that follows the War will he, I believe, the 
richest and most fruitful in the nation's history. " 

THESE PROPHETIC WORDS, written by the late Edward Kidder Graham while America was still at war, 
relate to today — the college year 1919-1920 — to this very moment when North Carolina stands confronted 
with the problem of building its civilization upon sound, permanent foundations and when the South and 
the Nation, with newly opened channels of intercourse with the world at large, are planning for the complete 
fulfilment of their high mission among the nations. 

THIS FRUITFUL DECADE, JUST AT THE QUADRENNIUM of the war now ended, calls ins'stently for the 
TRAINED LEADER. 

THROUGH ITS NEWLY ESTABLISHED SCHOOL OF COMMERCE, its School of Engineering, and other 
schools and departments, the University offers the thoroughgoing, complete training for the sort of leadership 
which the new day requires. 

COURSES ARE OFFERED IN BUSINESS ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT, Accounting, Foreign 
Trade, Banking, Transportation, Political Economy, Business Law, Electrical Engineering, Chemical En- 
gineering, Highway Engineering, Soil Investigation, Law, Medicine, Pharmacy, Journalism, Social Science, 
Government, Education, Music, and all subjects embraced in the College of Liberal Arts, the School of Ap- 
plied Science, the Graduate School, and the Summer School. 

Instruction through correspondence courses on a wide choice of subjects may be secured at low cost through the 
Bureau of Extension. 

ADDRESS THE PRESIDENT 

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

CHAPEL HILL 



Culture. 



Scholarship Service 

THE = 



Self-Support 



^tortb Carolina (Lollege for ^Pomen 

Offers to Women a Liberal Education, Equipment for Womanly 
Service, Professional Training for Remunerative Employment 



The College offers four groups of studies lead- 
ing to the following degrees: Bachelor of Arts, 
Bachelor of Science, and Bachelor of Music. 

Special courses in Pedagogy ; in Manual Arts ; in 
Domestic Science Household Art and Economics; in 
Music; and in the Commercial Branches. 

Teachers and graduates of other colleges provided 
for in both regular and special courses. 



Equipment modern, including furnished dormitories, 
library, laboratories, literary society halls, gymnas- 
ium, music rooms, teachers' training school, infirm- 
ary, model laundry, central heating plant, and open 
air recreation grounds. 

Dormitories furnished by the State. Board at 
actual cost. Tuition free to those who pledge them- 
selves to become teachers. 



Fall 'Uerm Opens in September 



Summer ^Uerm Begins in June 



For catalogue and other information, address 

JULIUS I. FOUST, President, GREENSBORO, N. C 



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