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C O I, L E C T r O N O F 

NORTH CAROLINIAN A 



ENDOWED BY 

JOHN SPRUNT HILL 

of the class of 1889 






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THE ROYALL & BORDEN CO. 

Corner West Main and Market Streets DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA 

Sell all kinds of furniture and furnishings for churches, 
colleges and homes. Biggest stock of Rugs in the 
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ask the College Proctor or the editor of the "Review." 
Call on or write for whatever you may need in our line. 



THE ROYALL & BORDEN CO. 



Comprehensive Service 

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WACHOVIA BANK AND TRUST CO, 

(The Largest and Strongest in the Carolinas) 

WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 

Capital and Surplus $2,000,000 Member Federal Reserve System 



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AIMNIREVIEW 



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FEBRUARY, 1920 



OPINION AND COMMENT 
The Annual Report for 1919-~The President's Rec- 
ommendations — The University and the State — 
The University and the South — Looking 
Forward — Trustee Enactments — Mark 
the Day— Why Not Pick It Up?— 
Do You Believe This? 

TRUSTEES HOLD IMPORTANT MEETING 

Adopt Policy for the Use of the Kenan Fund and 
Plan for the University's Development 



ALUMNI INVADE MONTEVIDEO 



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PUBLISHED BY 

THE ALVMNI ASSOCIATION 



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Cy Thompson Says- 



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This Company serves in all Fiduciary Relations, such as : 

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Resources over $12, 000, 000. 00 



AMERICAN TRUST COMPANY 

(THE SAFE EXECUTOR) 
CHARLOTTE, NORTH CAROLINA 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



Volume VIII 



FEBRUARY, 1920 



N 



umDer 



OPINION AND COMMENT 



The President's Report for 1919, copies of which 
may be secured from the Secretary of the University, 

produces the total impression of 
The Annual Re- being unasually informing, and 
port for 1919 the record of accomplishment set 

forth in it is of the sort to be 
thoroughly heartening. Among the achievements of 
the year the following are very significant: (1) The 
fine come-back of the student body; (2) A total en- 
rollment, June to December, of 2,271; (3) The es- 
tablishment of the School of Commerce, of depart- 
ments of Music and Physical Welfare, and of the 
office of Director of Publications; (4) The further 
projection of the University's service through the 
State and County Council and new Divisions of the 
Bureau of Extension; (5) The strengthening of the 
faculty through the addition of some dozen or more 
new men to the instructional staff; and (6) A defi- 
nite stock-taking under the administration of Presi- 
dent Chase of the requirements of the University's 
future. 

n D n 

In his first report to the Trustees, President Chase 
has presented with marked clarity and conviction the 

immediate and future needs of 
The President's the University. These, to men- 
Recommendations tion them in the order of their 

importance, are: (1) To provide 
adequately for the increasing stream of North Caro- 
lina youth who seek a college education; (2) To pro- 
ject a building program at once which will enable all 
students entering the University to secure their train- 
ing in a suitable phjsical environment; (3) To in- 
sure the faculty homes and living salaries ; (4) To 
reorganize the basiness machinery of the University 
in such fashion as to secure a proper fimctiouing of 
all the administrative and executive offices; (5) To 
establish a chair of Sociology with a view to the de- 
velopment of a School of Public Welfare; and (6) To 
project the University along those particular Hues 
which will enable it to give North Carolina increas- 
ingly effective service and to fimction generally as 
one of the South 's great and typical institutions. 



The spirit which actuates the University in calling 
upon the State for such support as will insure the 
realization of such a program is, as 
The University always in the past, to enable it to 
And the State give illumined leadership and finer 
service to the State. In speaking 
of this particular point. President Chase says : 

It is because of no desire for her own aggrandize- 
ment that the University asks from the people of 
the State a serious consideration of her needs. All 
that she asks for herself she earnestly desires for 
everj^ institution of learning within the borders of 
the State; the opportimity to do effectively the work 
which the State has asked her to do. It is a work 
whose importance must inevitably increase in the 
years ahead, and it matters tremendously to the State 
that it be well done. The State, to a far greater 
degree than ever before, is in a position to make sure 
that it is well done. 

For North Carolina is no longer a poor State. With 
her crop yield for the year totalling well over half 
a billion dollars, with her business entei'prises so pros- 
perous that she paid the federal government in in- 
ternal revenue taxes more than a hundred million 
dollars for last year — more than twice the amount 
paid by anj' other Southern State — with her savings 
deposits totalling over sixty millions, her funds in- 
vested in Liberty Bonds and War Savings Stamps 
over a hundred and sixty millions, she has in the 
last few years trebled and quadrupled her wea.h. 
She is abundantly able to provide for the legitimate 
needs of any undertaking in which she whole-heart- 
edly believes. That she does whole-heartedly believe 
in the cause of education her record during her dark 
days of poverty makes clear. That in her days of 
prosperity she will waver from her high idealism is a 
belief which no i-easonable man can for a moment 
entertain. 

DDD 

President Chase's ideal for the University does 
not end with full service to the State, but carries over 

into the South at large. To quote 
The University him further : 
And the South It is because of such facts as these 

that mj' own conviction constantly 
deepens that the next great creative chapter in the 
history of the nation is to be written here in the South. 
Hei-e is now the real center of that pioneering spirit 
which has made America possible. Here old dreams 
are being realized and most wonderfully exceeded. 



152 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



and with each new step the horizmi bniatleii.s. Here, 
as nowhere else, life has not set and hardened, but is 
flowing freely towards new and higher things. Here 
a people American in blood, in traditions, and in 
ideals, is facing with growing joy and confidence a 
future of limitless possibilities. 

But laud, and industrial wealth, and natural re- 
sources, are not by themselves suiflcient to make 
real the South 's potential spiritual and material 
leadership. Her greatest asset, without which all 
the rest is vain, is that great throng of eager youth 
which crowd her schools and colleges. Not to give 
them the best is to deny our faith in the future. 
To fit them for the ojiportunity which will certainly 
be theirs, to train them in body, in. mind, and in 
spirit: to see to it that to individual competency is 
added i)ublie-mindedness, and to public-mindcdness 
an abiding sense of spiritual realities — this is the 
one s\ire means l)y which we can build securely the 
greater South. 

Somewhere in the South there must inevitably 
grow up an institution which typifies, and serves, 
and guides, this new civilization — an institution shot 
through with the spirit of service, broad and (piick 
in its sympathies, practical in its training for the 
practical things of that life which in its astounding 
complexity confronts the new generation, insistent 
always that whatever is done shall be well done, 
stressing without cease the values that inhere in a 
liberal education so that its sous may know how to 
live as well as how to earn a living, resolutely kee])- 
ing in the foreground those si^iritual values by which 
alone a State can endure. My dream for the Uni- 
versity of North Carolina is that she be nothing less 
than this. 

D D D 



Apart from the sense of distinctive achievement 
Avhicli a reading of the various reports conveys, a 
careful study of the rectmnuendatidus 
Looking made by the deans and other officers of 
Forward the institution will lead to the conviction 
that unusual consideration has been given 
to the present condition and future development of 
the University. Changes, developments, expansions, 
new policies, have been presented in keeping with a 
program which includes increased revenues and a 
I'apidly-growing student body. 

Among the recommendations which may profitably 
be mentioned here (the list is by no means exhaustive 
and is given for the sake of illustration) are: {D 
The future expansion of those departments which 
deal with the subjects of government, politics, and 
social sciences; (2) The offering of courses in archi- 
tecture, mining engineering, and forestry: (3) The 
provision of a laboratory for accoimting, a reading 
room for the School of Commerce, and the addition to 
the School of instructors in business organization, 
marketing, and foreign trade: (4) The founding of 



graduate fellowships; (5) The issuing of a law 
journal and the addition of a librarian by the Law 
School; (6) The creation of a department of biological 
chemistry in the School of Medicine, and the addition 
of an associate professor in each department of the 
School as now constituted; (7) The addition of an 
instructor in the School of Pharmacy to strengthen 
the work given in pharmaceutical chemistry ; ( 8 ) The 
more" careful accrediting of high schools and the bet- 
ter preparation of teachers for positions in the citj' 
and State school systems; (9) The addition of an ad- 
ministrative olBeer in the Bureau of Extension to have 
direction of the divisions of home study, lectures, and 
community centers; (10) The addition of courses in 
library administration and the adoption of a defuiite, 
comprehensive plan for the collection of material re- 
lating to North Carolina; (11) The provision of ad- 
ditional apparatus and equipment in the gymnasium 
that will promote the physical welfare of the student 
body. 

Particular reference is not made here to the report 
of the Business Manager other than to record the 
fact that this officer's report swells the refrain run- 
ning throughout the reports of all the other officers — 
namely, the inescapable, ever present, serious need of 
space — cla.ss room space, laboratory space, dining 
room space, dormitory space, office space, library 
space, space for everything, ad infinitum. 

D D D 

Enactments of the Board of Trustees at the meet- 
ing in Raleigh on January 27, add convincing evi- 
dence to the fact that that body is 
Trustee closely following every phase of the 

Enactments University's work and doing every- 
thing within its jiower to assist in the 
University's proper development. 

Among the most important measures adopted at 
the meeting (a detailed accoimt of which appears 
elsewhere in this issue') were: (1) The increasing of 
the salaries of the members of the faculty; (2) The 
;:doption of a policy for the use of the Kenan Fund: 
(3) The approval of a building program to relieve 
the distressing .sitviation in faculty housing: (4) The 
approval of plans for the inauguration of President 
Chase on April 28; (5) The authorization of the Gra- 
ham Memorial Committee to continue the campaign 
for funds and plan for the erection of the Student 
Acti^^ties Building: (6) The authorization of the 
appointment of a committee to consider the ad\isa- 
bility of the establishment of a University Press ; and 
(7) The authorization of the establishment of a chair 
of Sociology. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



153 



Reference was made in the January Review of the 
desirabilily of holding during the winter an alumni 
officers' conference at the University. On 
Mark another page is to be found a call issued 

The Day by President Connor, of the Ahmnii Asso- 
ciation, urging all presidents and secre- 
taries of local associations to attend such a confer- 
ence here on the night of February 26. A get-to- 
gether dinner will be served at 7 -MO P.M. and the 
ofScers will consider various measures by which the 
participation of the alumni in the growth and work 
of the University may be increased. 

From The Review's point of view this movement 
is very essential to the complete success of any pro- 
gram which the University may undertake, so essen- 
tial, in fact, that it urges you, Mr. President or Hon, 
Secretary, to mark the date and come. 

n n D 

The University has recentlj- been in receipt of a 
verj' interesting letter in which there is a request for 
instruction during two weeks in the 
Why Not summer in subjects suitable for secre- 

Pick It Up? taries of chambers of commerce. If 
such courses can be arranged an at- 
tendance of 40 or 50 secretaries is guaranteed. The 
letter is interesting from another ])oiiit of view than 
that of the desirability of providing particular courses 
of instruction for this special gi-oup. It raises the 
question — as a matter of fact the ([uestion never 
downs — where are the forty or fifty secretaries of the 
chambers of commerce to stay in Chapel Hill while 
pursuing the proposed short courses ? Where are they 
to Stay? 

Time was when the answer to this question — a 
modern adequate hotel — might not have been a pay- 
ing proposition, but The Review believes that time 
has passed. There isn't a month in the year that 
some special conference or event which would tax 
the capacity of such a hotel could not be brought to 
Chapel Hill, to the profit of the visitors, the Univer- 
sity, and the stockholders. 

"When such a sure thing is lying around loose, why 
df)esn "t someone pick it up ? 

D n D 

"Public school teachers represent » cause. That 
i-ause is education. No class of public servants render 

a larger service, or show a better spirit 
Do You Be- than the school teachers, college and 
Have This? university professors. They with the 

trustees and various educational boards, 
represent America's most important i-ausi-." 



Before you read further, we respectfully query: 
Do you believe this, Mr. Alumnus? And if so, what 
are you doing about it in North Carolina"? 

The paragraph above is taken from volume one of 
Educational Issues, a new journal issued in Indian- 
ai)olis, Ind., by a group of educators who do believe 
that education is America's most important cause, 
and who, to the exclusion of such obsessions as the 
H.C.L., $683,000,000 crop yields, 40 per cent divi- 
dends, etc., have undertaken to promote it. The 
journal, with the directness of the central west, gets 
right down to the brass tacks of taxation for schools, 
underpaid teachers, teaeherless schools, teachers' pen- 
sions, local Americanization, and other equally vital, 
])resent-day, Indiana educational matters. 

Recently we have been wondering if it might not 
be profitable for such a group to bestir itself in North 
Carolina to this same end ? We do not mean that it 
should agitate for the mere sake of agitation, that it 
should be radical or bolshevistic, but that it should 
seriously attempt to atlvance, in a united, vigorous 
wa}', this oue all-important cause. 



UNIVERSITY CHEMISTS WORK FOR GOV- 
ERNMENT 

Acting at the request of different departments of 
the government, Dr. James M. Bell and Dr. A. S. 
Wheeler, both of the Department of Chemistry of the 
University, have been conducting chemical investi- 
gations which it is thought may have important in- 
dustrial and commercial results. 

Dr. Bell's work is being done in conjunction with 
the division of chemistry and chemical technology 
of the National Research Council and is concerned 
with the properties of the nitrotoluenes, which are 
largely used in the manufacture of both high ex- 
plosives and dyes. The first results are published in 
the November issue of the Journal of Industrial and 
Engineering Chemistrij, of New York, and later re- 
sults were published in the December issue. As- 
sisting Dr. Bell in this work have been several stu- 
dents, including James P. Sawyer, of Asheville; E. O. 
('Ummings, of High Point; C. H. Herty, Jr., of Chapel 
Hill; Woodford White, of Newton; P. H. Spry, of 
Backbay, Va., and E. B. Cordon, of Waynesboro. 

Dr. Wheeler's work is concerned with kelp oil 
and is a branch of work started b.y the Bureau of Soils 
during the war when the potash situation became 
acute. Dr. J. W. Turrentine, '01, formerlj' of Bur- 
lington, who is now working for the government in 
the Bureau of Soils, is directing the whole series of 
investigations in many laboratories over the country. 



154 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



TRUSTEES HOLD IMPORTANT MEETING 



Adopt Policy for the Use of the Kenan Fund and Plan for the University's 

Development 



At the January meeting of the Board of Trastees 
held in Raleigh on the 27th, the following business 
was transacted and the aceorapanying reports ap- 
proved : 

Report of Executive Committee 

1. That the following increases in the salary scale 
be ordered to be effective from January 1, 1920 : 
Full professors, $350 annually ; associate and assist- 
ant professors, $250 ; instructors, 10 per cent. 

2. That such of the endowment f\nuls of the I'ni- 
versity as the Finance Committee may approve of for 
the purpose, not to exceed $100,000, be invested in 
the erection of dwelling houses . . . for the pro- 
fessors of the University, upon terms to be approved 
by the Finance Committee. 

This emergency measure is made necessary by the 
fact that every available bit of living space in town is 
occupied ; that no building has gone on since the war 
began, and that the present condition of the market 
and of salaries is such that faculty members are not 
at present able to build for themselves. At least six 
faculty families will be without space at the end of 
the year, and there is no way of taking care of new 
additions to the faculty. It is not proposed that the 
University should enter upon a permanent and large 
building program. On the other hand, the measure 
above mentioned is recommended as an emergency 
measure, with the idea in mind that just as soon as 
conditions become more normal, facult.v members shall 
be encouraged to buy and build. The houses which 
will be constructed will always be in demand by new 
people and by younger members of the faculty who 
will not be able to build for themselves. 

3. That there be established in the Faculty a Chair 
of Sociology, whose holder shall both give instruction 
in sociology and shall head up those forms of exten- 
sion work which have to do with public welfare in the 
State, and in which the University can co-operate with 
the State Departments concerned. So far as instruc- 
tion in sociology is concerned, it is clear that public 
education in the future must concern itself rather de- 
finitely with training for citizenship. This increased 
emphasis is being placed on such subjects by institu- 
tions of higher education throughout the coimtry. So 
far as the proposed extension work is concerned, it is 
evident that the increased attention which is being 
paid by the State to various forms of social legislation 
necessitates that the State make some provision for 
training the workers in the various fields of public 
welfare. It would seem that this is the natural and 
logical fimction for the University to assume, and it 
would also seem impoi-tant that the need should be 
met as soon as possible. 

4. That the President be aiithorized to nominate to 
the Board of Trustees a Board of Governors of the 
University of North Carolina Press, to consist of a 



director, a business manager, five members of the fac- 
ulty, and three members of the Board of Trustees, 
who shall be authorized to investigate full.y the feasi- 
bility of establishing a University of North Carolina 
Press, and to report to the Executive Committee,, 
which shall have full authority and power to act upon 
said report. 

The University has not under contemplation the 
establishment of the physical equipment of a press, 
but an arrangement with commercial firms, through 
which the UniversitA'"s own imprint will appear on 
all its printed matter. What really is in mind is a 
centralizing and systematizing of the publication 
which the University now carries on. There is no 
University in the South which maintains a Univer- 
sit.y Press, save Sewanee, whose output is rather lim- 
ited. The advantages to the University would be 
those of increased publicity and dignity given to its 
publications. 

Report of the Committee on the Use of the 
Kenan Fund 

At the annual meeting in Jiuie of the Board of 
Trustees a motion was introduced and passed pro- 
viding that a committee of three trustees, to be ap- 
pointed by the chairman, the president of the Uni- 
versity and two members of the faculty, to be chosen 
by the faculty, be instructed to recommend at the 
January meeting a policy for the use of the Kenan 
Fimd. From the trastees, Messrs. R. D. W. Connor, 
Haywood Parker, and J. K. Wilson were appointed. 
The facult.v elected as its representatives Drs. Howe 
and L. R. Wilson. 

The committee siibmits the following report: 

The general policy recommended by President Gra- 
ham and adopted previously bj' the trustees calls for 
the creation of Kenan Professorships at a salarj- above 
the automatic scale, to be awarded as a mark of dis- 
tinction, the professorships to be given on an indi- 
vidual, and not on a departmental or school basis. 
That is, if a given individual is chosen as, say, Kenan 
Professor of Gi'eek, it does not follow that on his 
withdrawal another Kenan Professor of Greek need 
be appointed. 

In the endeavor to make this policy somewhat more 
specific, but with the conviction that the whole policy 
should be left suflicientl.v flexible to adjust itself to 
future needs as they ma.v arise, the committee makes 
the following recommendations : 

1. That Kenan Professorships be awarded on the 
basis of distinctive service in au.v legitimate field of 
University endeavor; this to be interpreted as in- 
eluding teaching ability; productive scholarship in 
one's general field of learning; service to the Univer- 
sit.y and the State ; success in the work of oi'ganization 
and administration ; and other achievement of marked 
value to the Univereity. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



15b 



2. That the method employed in the selection of 
Kenan Professors shall be the same as that employed 
in the selection of other members of the facultj'. 

3. That the minimum salary of Kenan Professors 
be maintained at the relative point at which it was 
first established, that is, at a figure $500 above the 
maximum salary of a full professor on the automatic 
salary scale, and that, as heretofore, the maximum be 
not fixed. 

4. That a sum of not more than $10,000 of the 
Kenan Fund may be iLsed in any one year for the pur- 
pose of establishing Kenan Professorships for the term 
of one j'ear, affording opportunity for stiidy and in- 
vestigation, the holders of such professorships to be 
relieved from their usual University duties during 
the year, and the salary of such professorships to be 
that paid the incumbents at the time of their appoint- 
ment. Appointment to such a temporary Kenan Pi-o- 
fessorship shall not be deemed a promotion in rank oi' 
in salary, and the regular salary released by the ap- 
pointment of an incumbent shall be used, in whole or 
in part, for the provision of a proper substitute dur- 
ing his absence. The holder of such a Kenan Profes- 
sorship shall be under obligation to remain in the ser- 
x-ice of the University for at least two j^ears after the 
conclusion of his appointment. Only professors, asso- 
ciate and assistant professors shall be eligible to such 
appointment, and no member of the faculty shall be 
eligible more frequently than once in every five years. 
The holders of such Kenan Professorships shall be se- 
lected as Kenan Professors in general are selected. 

Report of the Committee on the President's 
Inauguration 

At the June meeting of the Trustees the Governor 
was authorized to appoint a committee of the Board 
who should, in co-operation with a faculty committee, 
arrange for the inauguration of the president. The 
Governor appointed from the Board of Trustees the 
following committee : Francis D. Winston, chairman, 
Messrs. A. H. Filer, Charles Lee Smith, W. P. By- 
num and Julian S. Carr. The faculty committee is 
composed of Dr. Archibald Henderson, chairman, and 
Professors Patterson, Howe, Wheeler, Daggett, Ham- 
ilton, L. R. Wilson, and Toy. 

At a meeting of the committee in Raleigh on Janu- 
ary 7 it was voted to hold the inauguration on Wed- 
nesday, the 28th of April, and tentative plans for the 
exercises were submitted and approved. 

Because of the inconvenient train schedules, it was 
decided to hold the exercises at 1 :30 in the afternoon, 
instead of in the morning, and to follow the inaugural 
exercises by a dinner in Swain Hall and a reception 
in the gymnasium. It was decided to invite delegates 
from the leading colleges and universities of the coim- 
try, and from the Learned Societies, and to include 
as guests the Trustees and alumni of the University, 
the faculties of all colleges in the State, and the city 
and county superintendents. 

The Governor will preside at the exercises. Three 
brief addresses on The Higher Education and Its 
Present Task will be made by men of national repu- 
tation. President Hibben, of Princeton, will discuss 
the College ; Dean Charles R. Mann, of the University 
of Chicago, at present Chairman of the Advisory 



Board of the War Plans Division of the War Depart- 
ment, will discass the Professional School; and the 
third speaker, the Graduate School. 

Dr. Venable will present the President, to whom 
the oath of office will be administered by Chief Jus- 
tice Walter Clark, and induction into office by Gov- 
ernor Bickett will follow, followed in turn by the in- 
augural address. 

President Alderman, of Virginia, will deliver greet- 
ings from the State imiversities of the country, and 
President W. L. Poteat from the colleges of the State, 
and Superintendent E. C. Brooks from the public 
schools of the State. Greetings will also be tendered 
by representatives of the alumni, the faculty and the 
student body. 

The speakers whose names appear above have ac- 
cepted and the names of other speakei's will be an- 
nounced as soon as acceptances are received. 

Building Program Approved 

The action of the Committee on the Development 
of University property in providing for the laying out 
of a quadrangle to the south of the South Building 
and erecting thereon, at once, two dormitories; also 
the immediate erection of a laimdry, was approved, as 
was also ;ts recommendation for a boulevard along 
where now runs the Raleigh road, and the erection 
thereon of a number of faculty houses. The recom- 
mendations of this committee with regard to clearing, 
parking, and draining the Mason Farm were also 
adopted. 

Graham Memorial Campaign Continued 

The Graham Memorial Committee was authorized 
to continue the campaign for the completion of the 
fund to $150,000, and in the meantime to proceed 
with the consideration of plans and the selection of 
a site for the building. 

Messrs. R. S. Neal, E. C. Brooks, and Perrin Busbee 
were appointed a committee to draft resolutions of 
respect upon the death of the late J. G. Blount, a 
member of the Board of Trustees. 

The Board elected the following members of the 
Executive Committee for 1920-1923 : Victor S. Bry- 
ant, William P. Bynum, Julian S. Carr, Josephus 
Daniels, and R. D. W. Connor. 

The following members were present: Thomas H. 
Battle, E. C. Brooks, Victor S. Bryant, Perrin Bus- 
bee, Julian S. Carr, R. D. W. Connor, John S. Cim- 
ingham, Wm. R. Dalton, Claudius Dockery, R. A. 
Doughton, W. N. Everett, G. K. Grantham, J. Bryan 
Grimes, C. Felix Harvey, M. J. Hawkins, John Sprunt 
Hill, F. P. Hobgood, George A. Holderness, James L. 
Hyatt, J. C. Kittrell, Richard H. Lewis, J. H. McMul- 
lan, Jr., John H. Manning, Walter Murphy, R. S. 
Neal, HajTvood Parker, W. M. Person, James D. 
Proctor, Charles Lee Smith, D. Matt Thompson, E. J. 
Tucker, Leslie Weil, J; K. Wilson, Francis D. Win- 
ston, Clem G. Wright. . 



Dr. J. G. deR. Hamilton, Alumni Professor of His- 
tory, has recently been appointed a lecturer to the 
International Polity Clubs by the Institute of Inter- 
national Education. 



156 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



ALUMNI INVADE MOTEVIDEO 



The Review priuts below parts of a letter from 
Robert C. deRossett, '18, of Wilmiugtou, who is now 
living in Montevideo, Uruguay, where he is in the 
employ of the National Citj' Bank of New York. 
Also in that same branch bank are two other alumni. 
Jack Powell, "19 (former baseball captain), and El- 
liott Cooper, '18. J. V. Whitfield, '15, is another ad- 
dition to the Tar Heel colony in Montevideo. He is 
in the consular service. A telegram from this group 
of four young alumni to the University on last Uni- 
versity Day attracted a great deal of attention in 
Chapel Hill. The letter, in part, follows: 

Counting J. V. Whitfield's wife there are five darn 
good sho' null' Tar Heels in this little country — I 
mean "real" Tar Heels from Chapel Hill. Powell, 
of the class of '19, and Cooper and I of '18 are with 
the Bank. Whitfield is vice-consul, and is having his 
trials with drunken seamen, etc. At one time all of 
us were under one roof but the Fates have now decreed 
it otherwise and Powell and I are the only two left to 
hold down the "Senora's. " The Whitfields have 
moved out to the edge of the city, and Coop is with a 
native family, making a daring attempt to learn 
"River Platte" Spanish. We are all fixed up as 
nicely as possible and the Whitfields have succeeded 
in getting a house for the first of April. . . . 

Montevideo, among other things, is a very famous 
summer resort to which visitors flock from Buenos 
Aires and the whole blooming surrounding country. 
And just at present the whole business is in full swing. 
Christmas is the "highest" part of the season and 
that memorable day is now only a week off. And, gee, 
but it is hot. But all the beaches are very pretty and 
I suppose we will spend the greater part of the "Day 
of Daj's" in our bathing suits. Not only are the 
beaches in full blast, but the whole country is in "sea- 
son." Just now the wool crop is entering the market 
and is bringing big prices. The Germans and the 
French are vicing with each other to see which can 
pay the biggest prices for wool. The pace that they 
have set is too hot for the American and British 
buyers and most of them can be found at the "English 
Club" at any hour of the day. And old Uruguay is 
making more money than she ever made before. 

This is a great little country and you don't have to 
stay here very long before you will begin to admire 
her. She isn't much larger than North Carolina and 
only has 1,400,000 inhabitants. Still she has a per 
capita wealth of about .$1,800. Everj'body appears to 
have mouej' and most of them believe in spending it. 
They don't manufacture a thing and practically all 
articles that. a person must buy are imported. The 
duties are very high too and as a consequence the 
prices are awful. A fellow has to have a certain 
amount of money even to buy cigarettes. But the 
fact that every article that Uniguay uses is imported 
reacts to her advantage in many ways. Her civiliza- 
tion is far ahead of most of the South American coun- 



tries and she is absolutely up to date in every way. 
We are able to buy practically any article here that 
we can in the States and in some cases the article that 
we buy here is superior to the one that we would buy 
back home. Ilel'e in Montevideo you can buy your 
favorite shaving soap, toothbrush and cigarettes just 
the same as you can in Durham. You can buy Fa- 
tima cigarettes from any little two-by-four cigar 
stand in the city. The only difference is in the price — 
it's a bit more here. 

The fellows are having the hardest time of the lot 
with Spanish. Say, it's a crime the way that the peo- 
ple in the States think that Spanish is easy. I'll bet 
that I have had half a dozen people sa3' to me that 
"you'll be able to pick it up easily" — but no such a 
thing. Of course a person can study for half an 
hour and learn "buenos dias," "buenos noches," etc., 
and he might be able to get what he wanted to eat. 
But when it comes to carrying on an intelligent con- 
versation in the lingo — well, it is about the toughest 
thing that I ever tackled. It might be an easy lan- 
guage in Spain, but the way these people talk down 
here resembles the way that the people of Madrid 
speak about as much' as the two varieties of potatoes 
resemble each other — they are entirely dift'erent. And 
I would advise anyone coming to these parts to learn 
it well before coming down. But we are handicapped 
by the fact that so much English is spoken in this 
River Platte district. There are thousands of English 
here and more over in the Argentine. Some of the 
families are in their third and fourth generation and 
still speak English in their homes. All of the stores 
usually have someone who can speak English and all 
the educated natives speak it. But a man likes to be 
spoken to in his own mother tongue and if we are to 
do business among these people, we have got to learn 
to speak to them in their mother tongue — that's all 
there is to it. 

Here at the Branch all is going well. Powell is 
down in the Bookkeeping Department, Cooper is in the 
Collections and I am in the Credit — all of us working 
like fiends. For diversion we play tennis, swim and 
play golf. There are all sorts of facilities here for 
having a good time and we take advantage of them 
most of the time. J. V. Whitfield is around the corner 
from us at the Consulate and is having some rich and 
rare expei'iences. He is secretly, we believe, gather- 
ing together the best lot of funnj^ stories in the world 
and will spring them on you fellows some day. 

The news from the Hill is great, and life has been 
imbearable since Thanksgiving as we are all in sus- 
pense over the outcome of the game. . . . Hope 
Mr. Woollen was able to finance the feeding of the 
miiltitude that must have been there. 



Dr. E. \V. Knight, of the School of Education, 
is the contributor of tlie leading article in School 
and Society for January 10. The article is entitled 
"Public Education in the South: Some Inherited 
Ills and Some Needed Reforms." 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



157 



To the Presidents and Secretaries of Local Alumni 
Associations 
Dear Fellow Alumni : 

At the meetings of the General Alumni Association 
of the University of North Carolina held in Chapel 
Hill last commencement, a resolution was passed 
unanimously favoring the holding sometime diiriug 
the college term each year of a conference of the offi- 
cers of the local alumni associations of the University. 
Pursuant to the resolution passed at this time, a call 
is hereby' issued for a conference of the presidents and 
secretaries of the local alumni associations, to be held 
in Chapel Hill on the evening of February 26th. 

The ke\Tiote of this meeting will be : " Effective Or- 
ganization of the Local Alumni Associations," and 
the discussions will center around practical ways and 
means for increasing the cohesion, the co-operation, 
and the usefulness of the local alumni associations. 
It is evident that there now exists over the State and 
elsewhere a great deal of fine spirit for the University. 
Alumui have given notable instances of their love and 
loyalty for Alma Mater and of their faith in her fu- 
ture. But it is felt that this fine spirit is at present 
largely unorganized, that the local alumni associa- 
tions, logical units that thej^ are for alumni concentra- 
tion and effort, do not now ftmction in the vital man- 
ner necessary, and it is felt that from this conference 
a definite program may be worked out which will pro- 
vide for excellent results. 

President Chase has invited the presidents and sec- 
retaries attending the conference to be present for a 
supper at the University Inn on February 26th, at 
7:30 o'clock. The business meeting will follow the 
supper. 

In order that the purpose of the conference may 
be fulfilled, in order that a clearly defined program 
for the county alumui associations may be worked out, 
it is important that everj' president and secretary be 
present at the conference. We itrge, therefore, that 
you make your plans now to attend. The University 
will make ample provision for the entertainment of 
alumni attending this conference, but you should 
notifj' E. R. Rankin, Secretary, of your intention to 
attend. 

With best wishes, 

FaithfuUj- yours, 

R. D. W. Connor, President. 

Raleigh, N. C, Jan. 26, 1920. 



CAROLINA MAKES AMERICANS 

As showing the influence of the University on a 
foreign-born student The Review prints below a 
letter written by Samuel Newman, Med. '15, to The 
Evening World, New York City. Tli,e Evening 
World has been publishing a series of letters from 
foreign-bom Americans showing what America has 
done for them. Newman spent several years at 
the University and will be well remembered by 
alunuii who were here from 1912 to 1915. The 



iiiedieal school referred to in the letter is the Uni- 
\ersiy of Virginia. The letter follows : 

•'Ten years ago I was released from Fort Alexis, 
a political prison in Warsaw, Poland, and was 
ordered to leave Russia. 1 landed in New York and 
immediately established myself in the radical move- 
ment on the east side. After a few months' resi- 
dence in the country I had already become convinced 
that the United States was a capitalistic state which 
must be overturned by the same revolutionary means 
to whicli 1 bad lieen accustomed in Russia — propa- 
ganda and terror. 

''An uncle of mine who is completely assimilated 
into American life invited me to visit him in North 
Carolina. A choice between the east side and the 
Universitj- of North Carolina presented itself to me. 
I chose the University. The process of deradiealiza- 
tion and Americanization proceeded within me very 
rapidlj' and unconsciously. It was like the physical 
and moral growth of the child which proceeds 
imperceptibly but surely and steadil.v. My college 
career was marked by membership in an exclusive 
honorary fraternity, influential leadership in re- 
ligious and cultural activities, hotly contested 
literary prizes, and the social good-will of the 
faculty. 

"A few yeai's later I found mj-self among the 
graduating class of a most prominent medical school 
in a very conservative university. In that institu- 
tion — attended mostly by the sons of old American 
families — I was again given the fullest recognition. I 
was editor of the Vnivcrsiiy Magazine, was invited to 
address student audiences, and to join a social fra- 
ternitj-. I won the love of a beautiful and highly 
cultured Southern young lady to whom I liave given 
my immigrant name. 

"When the United States entered the World War 
I was among the verj- first to offer my services on 
the perilous seas, and, like Nathan Hale, m.y regret 
was that I had onlj^ one life to offer for my country. 
When the war ended I was found useful to be 
re-engaged in the task of reconstruction. My sphere 
of usefulness and influence in the future is to be 
determined bj- mj- own eff'orts and volition, the 
conditions imposed upon me not being any difl'erent 
than those imposed upon native Americans. 

"In this successful experiment of Americaniza- 
tion two factors mutually interacted. First, an 
open, receptive, non-dogmatic mind. Second, tra- 
ditional, genuine American qualities of fair play, 
equal opportunity and appreciation of merit. Any 
scheme for Americanization will depend on the 
proper interaction of these two factors." 



158 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



BUNCOMBE ALUMNI HOLD BANQUET 

The Buucombe Coimty Alumni Associatiou held its 
annual holiday banquet on the evening of December 
28th at the Battery Park Hotel in Asheville. Seventy 
alumni and students came together for this holiday 
affair, and the occasion proved a most enjoyable and 
profitable one. Haywood Parker, '87, acted as toast- 
master. Addresses were made by R. R. Williams, 
Prof. G. .M. McKie, Judge H. B. Stevens, and Chas. 
G-. Teunent, representing the alumni. Responses were 
made by Jas. S. Howell, "Nemo" Coleman, Thos. C. 
Wolfe, and Sam Cathey, representing the students. 
Judge Henry B. Stevens was elected president to 
succeed Haywood Parker. Chas G. Tennent was 
chosen secretary. 

The entire gathering heartily endorsed Prof. Mc- 
Kie 's suggestion that four meetings of the association 
be held each year. Secretary Tennent reports that 
Carolina is getting a stronger hold on the hearts of 
Asheville people than any other college or imiversity. 



CALDWELL ALUMNI HOLD BANQUET 

The Caldwell County Alumni Association held its 
annual banquet on December 31st in the dining hall 
of Davenport College at Lenoir. Eighty alumni and 
friends of the University were present and the oc- 
casion was a highly successful one. Jas. T. Pritchett, 
'14, attorney of Lenoir, acted as toastmaster. Presi- 
dent H. W. Chase was present as guest of honor, and 
he made the principal address of the evening. He 
spoke of the life and spirit at Carolina, of the work 
and needs and plans of the Universitj', and was heard 
with keen interest by all present. Others who made 
tallis were President J. B. Craven, of Davenport Col- 
lege ; Horace Sisk, superintendent of the Lenoir 
schools, and Thomas Warren, president of the Cald- 
well Coimtv Club. 



FACULTY ESTABLISHES NEW GENERAL 
COURSE 

The faculty has established this year a new course 
for Freshmen and Sophomores in the College of Arts 
known on the schedule as the General Course. It is 
to consist of a series of lectures, one each week, con- 
tinuing throughout the year on certain general topics 
designed to aid the student in making the most of 
his college course. The outline of the course is as 
follows : 

Freshman Year: 1. Introduction to college (dis- 
cussions of the purposes of collegiate study, making 
the best use of one's time, relation of extra-curricu- 



lum activities to studies, methods of study, use of 
books and the library, etc.). 2. Personal and Com- 
mimity Health. 3. Introduction to certain elementary 
questions of philosophy. 

Sophomore Year: 1. The Field of Natural Science. 
2. The Field of Political and Social Science. 3. The 
Field of Literature and Art. 

The lectures of the first year will concern themselves 
with the difficult matter of "breaking into college," 
with the adjustment to the new environment and to 
the new point of view of University work. The lec- 
tures of the second year will seek to acquaint the stu- 
dent with the three great fields of collegiate study in 
order to aid him in discovering where his individual 
tastes and abilities lie before he elects his line of 
special work in the advanced courses. 

It is, further, the purpose of the faculty in this 
course to put before the students in their first years 
the best lecturers of the University. Each quarter is 
under the direct supervision of one professor, who will 
enlist for particular topics in his series the services 
of the men best fitted by training and experience to 
lecture on those subjects. The introductory course 
for Freshmen is in charge of the President of the 
University. 

The value of the plan, if it proves a success, is three- 
fold. It establishes a contact in the first two years 
between students and faculty which in many cases 
hitherto has had to be postponed imtil the Jimior year. 
It makes easier the shift from high school to college 
and lessens the dangers that too often result from 
the sudden removal of home restraints and from the 
bewilderment of new activities, new studies. It re- 
veals the relations of departments of study, over- 
comes to some extent the tendency to pigeonhole 
courses, and makes possible a wiser selection of studies 
for the Jiuiior and Senior years. 



SOUTHERN EXCHANGE LECTURES RE- 
SUMED 

The Southern University Exchange Lectureships, 
which were discontinued for the period of the war, 
are now to be resumed. Dr. John C. Metcalf, Linden 
Kent Professor of English Literature in the Univer- 
sity of Virginia, will lecture at Chapel Hill; Dr. 
George Howe, Professor of the Latin Language and 
Literature, will lecture at the Universitj' of South 
Carolina ; Professor Josiah Morse, of the chair of Psy- 
chology and Philosophy, at the University of South 
Carolina, lectiires at Vanderbilt; and Dr. B. B. 
Yomig, Pi-ofessor of Romance Languages at Vander- 
bilt, lectures at Virginia. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



159 



BASKETBALL SEASON WELL UNDER WAY 

Since the January issue of The Review the bas- 
ketball team has played seven games, winning from 
Durham Y, Guilford, Trinity, and Davidson, and 
losing to Durham Y, Charlotte Y, and Davidson. 

Before the Christmas holidays Carolina won from 
Durham, 40 to 30. The second game, plaj'ed in 
Durham, was won by the Y. M. C. A., 34 to 30. The 
score at the end of the red-hot game was a tie at 
30 all. In an extra five minute period Durham added 
four points while holding Carolina to her former 
score. The third and deciding game of the Durham 
series was pla.ved in Bj-num Gj^mnasiiim and Cap- 
tain Carmichael's men won the rubber by taking 
the long end of a 28 to 27 score. Three times in 
the last few minutes the score was tied and it was 
onlj' by Carmichael's remarkably sure foul shooting 
that the game was won. He shot 14 goals out of 
19 tries. Liipfert at .center played a strong floor 
game and shot six field goals. 

On the first extended trip, January 15, 16, 17, 
Carolina won first from Guilford in Greensboro, 53 
to 20. It was the best exhibition the team has shown 
this season and led Greensboro newspapers to call 
the Univei-sity team the best ever seen in Greens- 
boro. The score in the first half was close, Carolina 
leading 15 to 13. But in the second half a whirl- 
wind jiassing game was started and the big score 
was piled up rapidly. Liipfert and Carmichael 
played brilliantly and the whole team showed the 
best results of the short passing game. 

In Davidson the next night after leading in the 
first half Carolina lost to the Presbyterians, 31 to 
20, and the next night to the Charlotte Y. M. C. A., 
40 to 32. In both games the team was clearly 
outplayed, but only after a hard fight. On the 
Charlotte team were two former Carolina captains, 
Mebane Long and W. R. Cuthbertson. 

January 24th Carolina won from Trinity on the 
Trinity floor, 36 to 25. It was the first time the 
two institutions have ever met in basketball and 
an unusual amount of interest was attached to the 
game. Carolina led throughout, but only by a close 
score and after desperate fighting. The short 
passing game of the Tar Heels again showed its 
possibilities, with Liipfert, Douglas, and Shepard 
showing to advantage all over the floor. The entire 
Carolina team showed more life, spirit, and deter- 
mination than in any other game. 

With Liipfert temporarily out of the game Caro- 
lina did not look so strong against Davidson on the 
29th, though she won, 23 to 22, on the home floor. 
After working forward to what looked to be a safe 



margin in the second half Carolina allowed Davidson 
to rally and run up to almost a tie score. 

The line-up has varied often in these games, but 
at the present writing the most satisfactory group- 
ing would appear to be with Liipfert at center. 
Captain Carmichael and Shepard at forwards, 
Douglas and Morris or Rourk at guards. Douglas 
has plaA'ed at center in some of the games. Griffith 
appears the next best forward and Erw'in and 
Bro■^^^l have shown good form at the guard posi- 
tions. 



BLOUNT ON ALL SOUTH ATLANTIC 

W. A. Blount, center on the University' of North 
Carolina football team last fall, has been placed on 
an All South Atlantic team picked by Charles A. 
Bernier, head coach last year at V. P. I. Beruier's 
selection was published in the Richmond News- 
Leader and will be published in Spalding's Gride 
as the official All South Atlantic team. 

Concerning Blount, Bernier wrote as follows: 
"For a pivot man Blount, of the University of North 
Carolina, plaj'ed the most consistent game, and was 
by all odds the best passer of the mediocre array 
of centers. On the defense he played a keen, alert 
game. He had a tendency to play the roving game 
a little too much, perhaps, but, with Crisp and 
Dudack flanking him. this fault might be termed as 
an advantage." 

Other Carolina players receiving favorable men- 
tion were Grimes at guard and Tenuey and Coleman 
at half back. 

The team was made of Homewood, N. C. State, 
and Davis, Washington and Lee, ends ; Hall, V. 
P. I., and Bethel, Washington and Lee, tackles; 
Dudack, Georgetown, and Crisp, V. P. I., guards; 
Blount, North Carolina, center; Maloney, George- 
town, quarter; McQuade, Georgetown, and Leech, 
V. M. I., half backs, and Kuyk, Virginia, full. 



DR. PRATT TO RESUME DUTIES SOON 

After four months of .serious illness in Durham 
Dr. Joseph Hyde Pratt, director of the North Caro- 
lina Geological and Economic Survey, returned to 
his home in Cliapel Hill late in January. He expects 
to be able to resume his duties shortly. 

Dr. Pratt, late colonel of the 105th Engineers of 
the 30th Division, became unwell in September. He 
was taken to a hospital in Durham, where for many 
weeks he was critically ill. It was not until shortly 
before Christmas that a definite turn for the better 
was noted. His return to his home has been a source 
of interest and delight to his friends. 



IGO 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



WITH OTHER COLLEGES 

Governor Westmoreland Davis, of Virginia, has re- 
centl.y been requested to have the Legislature appoint 
a commission to consider the merging of tlie Medieval 
College of Richmond and the School of Medicine of 
the University of Virginia, in order that they might 
properly qualify for the receipt of $4,000,000 which 
has been tentatively offered by the Rockefeller Foiui- 
dation. 

In outlining a plan of reconstruction for the 
University of Virginia on Founder's Day, President 
Alderman emphasized the necessity of providing: 
the expansion of the School of Medicine, particularly 
in the field of public welfare; the further develop- 
ment of the School of Commerce and Finance; the 
expansion of the School of Engineering; the crea- 
tion of new schools in the Social Sciences ; the 
establishment of a Division of University Extension; 
the enlargement of the activities of the department 
of Chemistry : the development of a well organized 
department of Physical Training. 

The General Educational Board has announced an 
appropriation of $500,000 towards a fund of $2,- 
000,000 for the establishment of a Graduate School 
of Education at Harvard University. 

Trinity College (Durham. N. C.) has recently an- 
nounced the receipt of the following gifts: $24,000 
from Messrs. Benjamin N. and James B. Duke to the 
current expense account for increase of salaries and 
employment of new teachers ; $60,000 in subscriptions 
to the Alumni Memorial Gymnasium, an undertaking 
begmi befoi-e the war, especially significant now be- 
cause of nu)re than a thousand Trinity men who 
served in the war, twenty-two of whom gave their 
lives, and because it is the first general large move- 
ment on the part of the alumni to help meet the ma- 
terial needs of the College; $5,000 from the late B. D. 
Heath, of Charlotte; $1,000 for the Elisha Cole 
Scholarship, founded by his sons, Messrs. E. A. and 
E. M. Cole, of Charlotte ; $1,000 for a scholarship es- 
tablished by Mr. S. G. Ring and family, of Kerners- 
ville, as a memorial to John T. Ring, of the class of 
1916, who died on a battlefield in France; $1,000, 
given by Dr. John W. Neal, of Monroe, for a loan 
fund in memory of John W. Neal, Jr., ex- '22, who 
was a member of the S. A. T. C. imtil the close of 
the war, re-entered as a college student after the war. 
and died April 18. 1919 ; $1,000 from Reverend G. W. 
V^ick. '11, and wife, the first contribution toward the 
A. D. Betts Loan Fund for the use of young preachers, 
in memory of Dr. A. D. Betts, who every year for a 
long period sent along with a cheering and affection- 
ate letter a contribution for the education of some 



young preacher; $1,000 from the will of Mrs. Grattan 
Williams, of Castle Hayne. 

The registration of Cohxmbia I'niversity is 21,170. 
It is distributed as follows: Summer, 9,500; extension. 
7,441; Columbia College, 1,698, including a freshman 
class of 602, which is the largest by far in the history 
of the College: Teachers" ('ollcge, 2,532; graduate 
<'olleges, 1,026; Law School, 468; Business, 229: Phar- 
macy, 461; Medicine, 899; Mines, 151; Journalism, 
115; Architecture, 52; unclassified, 97. Of the 602 
entering Columbia College, 235 were admitted on the 
psychological tests. 

At a meeting of the National Council of Phi Beta 
Kaiijia chapter at Harvard University September 9- 
10, charters were granted to the following institu- 
tions: Trinity College, Durham. N. C. ; Hunter Col- 
lege, New York Cily ; University of Oklahoma; and 
Whitman College, Walla Walla. Wash. 

The Georgia Legislature at its recent session in- 
creased its ajipropriation for the medical department 
of the University of Georgia from $30,000 to $55,000. 
Of the new funds, the sum of $20,000 is to be used to 
establish a course in Public Health and Hygiene and 
the sum of $5,000 is to be added to the general in- 
come of the department. 



DR. RAPER RESIGNS DEANSHIP 
Dr. Charles Lee Raper, head of the Department 
of Economics in the University, and dean, since 
1909, of the Graduate School, has resigned from 
the deanship of the school and has been succeeded 
by Dr. Edwin Greenlaw, head of the Department 
of English. 



Debating is now running high in the Phi General 
Assembly. The old dried-and-cut speech is no longer 
known to its members. They are really learning to 
think and debate on their feet. Even the freshmen 
venture on the floor now. They are no longer modest 
when they want to say anything. In fact, it 's a hard 
matter to keep three or four fi-om debating at the 
same time. 

All this is due, not to the men, but to the new as- 
sembly plan. It is attractive to them for it contains 
life. The men who go to the meetings now are not 
forced to get on the floor and be under the embarrass- 
ment of talking whether they have anything to say 
or not. The.y are not fined if the>' do not get up and 
attempt to say something on a subject absolutely 
foreign to them. The result is that the debates are 
now live find interesting. The men who are interested 
in the particular bills debate on those bills — and de- 
bate with enthusiasm because thev are interested. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 161 



ESTABLISHED 1916 



Jflumni Coyalty Tund 



"One for all, and all for one" 



Coaneil: 

A. M. SCALES. '92 
LESLIE WEIL, '95 
L.R.WILSON, '99 
A.W.HAYWOOD, 04 
W. T. SHORE, 'OS 
J. A. GRAY. '08 




THE ALUMNI LOYALTY FUND 

Was established to provide a way by which every alumnus 
could contribute according to his ability to the general wel- 
fare of the University. 

A GOOD NUMBER FROM MANY CLASSES 

Have taken advantage of this opportunity and have con- 
tributed a total of $10,000. 

ARE YOU IN THIS NUMBER P 

Or are you letting your class mates or members of other 
classes lay the foundation of what is to be one of Carolina's 
great achievements — the building up of a great fund^ the 
income from which can later be applied in ways that will 
multiply Alma Mater's usefulness a hundredfold. 

START THE NEW YEAR RIGHT 

By making a beginnings or by renewing your contribution. 
All contributions are payable to University Treasurer, at 
Chapel Hill. 



162 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 

Issued monthly except in July, August, and September, by the Gen- 
eral Alumni Association of the University of North Carolina. 

Board of Publication 

The Review is edited by the following Board of Publication: 

Louis R. Wilson, '99 Editor 

Associate Editors: Walter Murphy. '92; Harry Howell, '95; Archibald 
Henderson. '98; W. S. Bernard, '00; J. K. Wilson, '05; Louis 
Graves, '0'2 ; P. P. Graham, '09; Kenneth Tanner, '11; Lenoir 
Chambers, Jr., '14; R. W. Madry, '18. 

E. R. Rankin, '13 Managing Editor 

Subscription Price 

Single Copies *0.20 

Per Year '■■^° 

Communications intended for the Editor and the Managing Editor 
should be sent to Chapel Hill. N. C. All communications intended for 
publication must be accompanied with signatures if they are to receive 
consideration. 

OFFICE OF PUBLICATION, CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 

Entered at the Postoffloe at Chapel Hill, N. C, as second class 
matter. 



THE UNIVERSITY IN PRINT 



Soil Erosion in the South, by R. 0. B. Davis, '01, 
(U. S. Department of Agriculture Bulletin 180) is 
a study of erosion in the section of the country 
where it is most pronounced, based on personal 
observations in most of the Southern and South- 
eastern States. It is pointed out that the destruc- 
tion of natural growth and the emplojonent of clean 
cultivation on hilly land without pi'oteetion from 
erosion, results in the removal of soil material by 
water more rapidly than it is formed and in an 
irregular way. Owing to soil and climatic conditions 
of the South, this section is especially susceptible 
to excessive erosion. The economic condition and 
type of agriculture are also contributing causes. 

Dr. Davis also has an article in American For- 
estry for September, 1919, entitled Erosion in 
Appalachian and Piedmont Regions, in which the 
subject of erosion is treated in a somewhat popular 
way, with special refei-enee to the relation of 
erosion to forest cover. The effect of climate on 
soil erosion and the peculiar soil formations and 
types of agriculture in the eroded regi' us are 
pointed out. The article is well illustrated from 
photographs showing the evil effects of excessive 
erosion. The subject as treated by Dr. Davis is of 
great interest to the student of geology and geogra 
phy, to the farmer, to the forester, and to the student 
of economics as well. 



W. C. George and H. V. Wilson, {Bulletin Bureau 
of Fisheries, Vol. XXXVI, 1919). The paper em- 
l)odics the dissertation of Dr. George (A. B. 1912) 
for the Ph. D. degree in this University. 



Dr. H. S. Willis (A. B. 1914) has two recent 
publications on tht^ experimental study of tubercu- 
losis, entitled "Further Experiments on the Influ- 
ence of Protein Intoxication on Tuberculosis Infec- 
tion in Guinea Pigs," and "The Origin and Rela- 
tionships of the Bronchial Artery in the Guinea 
Pig." The papers appear in the American Review 
of Tuberculosis, Vol. Ill, 1919. 



Dr. Jas. B. Murphy (B. S. 1903) of the Rocke- 
feller Institute for Medical Research, well known 
for a series of brilliant investigations in the fields 
of experimental biology and pathology, has several 
papers in the Journal of Experimental Medicine for 
1919. They treat, for the most part, of observa- 
tions and experiments which demonstrate that it is 
possible to alter the degree of immunity to cancer 
in animals, and which greatly increase our know- 
ledge of the factors that bring about such immunity. 



Immigration Restriction is the title of Extension 
Series Record No. 34, and is the handbook edited by 
E. R. Rankin, '13, for the use of high school pupils 
participating in the annual contest of the High 
School Debating Union. Seventy-five copies of the 
handbook have been ordered bj- the Debating Union 
of the high schools of West Virginia which has asked 
to be allowed to adopt it for its 1920 contest. 



The U. S. Bureau of Fisheries has published a 
paper, illustrated with eleven plates, on the Sponges 
of Beaufort (N. C.) Harbor and tlie Vicinity by 



A valuable study, of importance quite beyond the 
size of the bulletin, is "A Study of the Public Schools 
in Orange County, North Carolina." This study of 
the count.y schools by the School of Education was 
made at the request of the Board of Education of 
Orange County; and the Professor of School Admin- 
istration, L. A. Williams, was placed in charge of the 
work. Valuable assistance in procuring information 
was furnished by J. A. Capps, E. L. Daughtrj% R. F. 
Moseley, J. R. Weaver, and F. W. Morrison, the last 
named the superintendent of the Chapel Hill School. 
This valuable stud.y, bristling with facts and sug- 
gestions, and filled with illustrations that really "il- 
lustrate" conditions, must prove of real service to the 
Board of Education, clearly pointing out, as it does, 
the various lines of progress, improvement, and re- 
form which should be followed. Every county would 
be greatl.y benefited by the issuance of such a study. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



163 




Generator room of one of the hydro- 
electric plants which supply power 
totheC. M. &St. I'. 



The Power of Electricity 
in Transportation 



Seine Advantages of 
Railroad Electrification 

Saving the Nation's coal. 

Lower maintenance costs. 

Greater reliability and fewer 
delays. 

Ability to haul smoothly 
heavier trains at higher 
dpeed. 

Operation of electric locomo- 
tives unaffected by extreme 
cold 

Ability to brake trains on 
descending grades by re- 
turning power to the trolley 



ELECTRICITY has leveled out 
the Continental Divide. The 
steam locomotive, marvelous asit is 
after a century of development, can- 
not meet all of the present demands 
for transportation facilities Its 
electric rival has proved to be far 
superior. 

On the mountain divisions of the 
Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul 
Railway— the v/orld's greatest elec- 
trification—giant electric locomo- 
tives today lift an ever increasing 
freight tonnage over the mile-high 
Rockies and also make traveling 
clean and comfortable. They utilize 
the abundant energy of distant 
waterfalls and then, by returning 
some of this power to the trolley, 
safely brake the trains on descend- 
ing grades. And their capabilities 
are not impaired by excessively 
cold weather when thesteam engine 
is frozen and helpless. 



Electricity is the power which 
drives the trains of New York 
City's subway and elevated sys- 
tems. It operates the locks and 
tows the ships through the Panama 
Canal. It propels the Navy's lat 
est super-dread naught, the New 
Mexico. Electric mine locomotives 
have replaced the slow- moving 
mule and the electric automobile 
has also come to do an important 
service. Such achievements were 
made possible by the extensive 
research and manufacturinB; activi- 
ties of the General Electric 
Company 

Electricity has become the uni- 
versal motive power. It has con- 
tributed efficiency and comfort to 
every form ot transportation service 
and in this evolution General Elec- 
tric apparatus has played a large 
part — from mighty electric locomo- 
tives to the tiny lamp for the auto- 
mobile. 




General Office 
Schenectady; N.Y 



Tn^'^^vT' ^^^^ Offices in 






all lai^gc cities 



164 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



THE GENERAL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

of the 

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 



OfScers of the Association 

R. D. W. Connor, '99 President 

E. E. Banlcin, '13 Secretary 

Executive Committee: Walter Murphy, '92; Dr. E, H. 
Lewis. '70; W. N. Everett. '86; H. E. Eondthaler, '93; C. W. 
Tillett, Jr., '09. 

WITH THE CLASSES 

1845 
— Dr. Alexander Boyd Hawkins, of Ealeigh, the oldest living 
alumnus of the University, passed his 95th birthday on Jan- 
uary 25th at his home in Ealeigh. Among those attending 
the eel3bration of Dr. Hawkins ' birthday was Hon. John W. 
Graham, '57, of Hillsboro. 

1865 
— El'v. W. C. Prout, for twenty-six years rector of Christ 
Church, Herkimer, N. Y., has resigned this charge and is now 
rector of the Episcopal Church at Middleville, N. Y. Upon 
his leaving Herkimer he was presented with a basket of flow- 
ers and a gold pur.sc of $575 as a visible token of esteem by 
citizens of the town. 

1879 
— Dr. J. M. Maiming, of Durham, has received appointment 
as State medical director of the Modern Woodmen of America. 

1882 

— Dr. Collier Cobb was principal speaker at the annual ban- 
quet of the Johnston County Alumni Association held in 
Smithfield on January 26th. Among other speakers were 
J. D. Parker, '98, of Smithfield; Bennett Nooe, Jr., of 
Clayton; and W. M. Sanders. P. 0. Ray, '20, president of 
the Johnston County Club, served as toastmaster. 

1883 

— R. A. Doughton, of Sparta, lawyer and legislator, is one 

of the incorporators of the Elkin and Alleghany railroad, 

which was recently granted a charter by the Secretary of 

State. 

— Wm. K. Brown is an attorney and counsellor at law at 

Birmingham, Ala., with offices ]14 21st St. 

1886 

— P. F. Patterson is on the editorial staff of the Baltimore 
Sun. 

— 0. C. Bynum is engaged in the handling of cotton goods, 
with offices in the Postal Telegraph Bldg., San Francisco, 
Calif. 

— J. M. Morehead came out second in the N. C. Mid-winter 
Gun Meet held in .January at Pinehurst. 

1887 

— Jas. P. Barrett has resigned as an agent for the internal 
revenue service in New 'I'ork City and is now a member of 
the firm of Barrett and Brown, income-tax specialists, 800 
Southern Bldg., Washington, D. C. 

1888 
— Rev. St. Clair Hester continues as rector of the Church of 
the Messiah, Greene and Clermont Aves., Brooklyn, N. Y. 



1889 

— G. 8. Wills is in the faculty of the Baltimore Polytechnic 
Institute, Baltimore. Md. 

1890 
— Edgar Love, cotton uiMmifacturer of Lincolnton, is chair- 
man of the democratic executive committee for the ninth N. 
C. Congressional district. 

1891 
— Judge R. W. Bingham, former mayor of Louisville, Ky., 
practices law in Louisville. He is owner of the Courier- 
Journal. 

— J. Spottiswoode Taylor is a commander in the U. S. Navy, 
identified with the Bureau of Medicine and Surgery. 

1893 
— E. W. Lehman, secretary of the Rosemary Mfg. Co., at 
Rosjmary, became secretary of the Roanoke Rapids Board 
of Education in Januai'y upon the removal of John L. Pat- 
terson, former secretary, to Eichmond. 

— Thos. D. Toy is engaged in business in New York Citv, at 
324 W. 76th St. 

— E. M. Wilson has been connected with the Havcrford School 
at Haverford, Pa., for the past twenty-five years. He has 
been headmaster of this well-known preparatory school for 
the past seven years. 

— A. H. McFadycn is located at the S. C. Edison Co. Hdq. 
Camp, at Kernville, Calif. 

— Announcement has been made that Judge J. Crawford Biggs, 
'93, of Ealeigh, will manage the campaign of Lieut. Gov. O. 
Max Gardner, Law '06, of Shelby, for the democratic nomi- 
nation for Governor of North Carolina. Judge Biggs has 
served many years in the democratic ranks. He is recognized 
as an astute politician, as well as an able lawyer. 

1894 

— Dr. Chas. H. Wliite, formerly in the faculty of Harvard 

University, is now a consivlting geological engineer with 

offices in the Mills Bldg. at San Francisco. Dr. White served 

as a captain of ordnance while the war was in progress. 

— .J. V. Pomeroy is engaged in the cotton brokerage business, 

at Charlotte. 

— Bowman Gray h- vice-president and director of the E. J. 

Reynolds Tobacco l_'o., Winston-Salem. 

— J. L. Gilmer, '94, and his brother, Powell Gilmer, direct the 

large Gilmer department stores in Winston-Salem and other 

North Carolina and Virginia cities. It has been announced 

that Gilmers, incorporated, has become a part of the United 

Retail Stores Corporation of New York, and wall soon have 

a very large expansion. 

1895 
— Little Miss Beulah Hawkins, of Morganton, has presented 
President Wilson with a pair of red woolen socks, the result 
of her own knitting. H. E. C. Bryant forwarded the socks 
to the President for Miss Haw-kins and stated to the Presi- 
dent : ' ' You maj' never have worn red woolen socks when 
you were a boy but 1 can tell you lots about them. I never 
wore a thread of ' store bought ' socks or clothing until after 
I entered the University of North Carolina." Mr. Bryant 
assured President Wilson that there is some virtue in the 
curative qualities of red woolen. He has received from Mrs. 
Wilson a note saying that the red woolen socks from North 
Carolina have cheered, touched, and amused the President. 
— John L. Patterson, vice-president and manager of tne Rose- 
mary Mfg. Co., maimfacturers of cotton damasks at Rose- 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



165 



Asphalt Pavements 

DURABLE =:=. liCOINOMICAU 

If you are interested in street or road construction 
we invite you to inspect our work in 
Durham (Asphalt Streets). 
Durham County (Asphalt and Concrete Roads). 
Raleigh and Wake County (Asphalt). 
Guilford County (Asphalt Roads). 
Greensboro. 
Rocky Mount. 
High Point. 
Henderson. 
Lumberton. 

Also roads built for United States Government: 
Army Supply Base, Norfolk, Va. 
Newport News — Hampton Highway, Newport 

News, Va. 
Camp Lee, Va. 

A representative will visit you and supply any in- 
formation or estimates desired. 

Robert G. Lassiter & Co. 

E\(;INEEKIN(; AND CONTRACTING 

327 Arcade Building Norfolk, Va. 

1002 Citizens Bank Building Raleigh, N. C. 

First National Bank Building Oxford, N. C. 



The First National Bank 
of Richmond, Va., 



Commercial 
Banking 



with its resources of 
$36,000,000, is splen- 
didly equipped to 
serve in all branches of 
Commercial Banking. 



Trust 
Department 



The Trust Depart- 
ment offers unexcelled 
service. 

JNO. M. MILLER. Jr., Presided 
W. M. ADDISON', Vice-President 
CHAS. R. ^\5R-SRtt .Vice-President 
ALEX. F. RYLAND, Cashier 
TIIOS. \V. PURCELL, TriislOMr" 



Murphy s Hotel 

Richmond, Virginia 

The Most Modern, Largest, and Best Located Hotel 
in Richmond, Being on Direct Car Line to all 
Railroad Depots. 

The Only Hotel m the City With a Garage attached. 

Headquarters for Carolina Business Men 
European Plan $1.50 Up 



JAMES T. DISNEY. President 



166 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



M a rkham- Rogers Co. 

Clothiers, Tailors, Furnishers and Hatters. 

All the New Fall Styles at Reasonable 
Prices 

DURHAM, N. C. 



P©irrj=H®irit®ini SSn©© C®o 

Special Agents for Nettleton and Hurley 

Shoes for Men, and Cousins and Grover 

Shoes for Women 

MAKE OUR STORE HEADQUARTERS 
WHILE IN DURHAM, N. C. 



Academy of Music 

DURHAM, N. C. 

Durham's Exclusive Theatre Playing All Leading 
Attractions 

WM. F. FREELAND, Manager 



HICKS -CRABTREE CO, 

FOUR MODERN DRUG STORES 
RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 

Eastman Kodaks and Supplies 
Nunnally's Candies 

The place to meet your friends when 
in the Capital City 

GILBERT CRABTREE, Manager 



raar3', has moved his resilience to 1111 Grove Ave., Eiehmond, 
Va." 

— Chas. F. Tfimlinson, chairman of the board of school com- 
missioners at High Point is heading a campaign for a great 
enlargement of the Furniture City's school facilities. 
— G. B. AVills is located at 101 Park Avenue, New York City. 

1896 

— E. S. Smith, lawyer of Raeford, is mayor of the town. 

— .John- H. Andrews is division passenger agent of the Southern 

Railway, located at Greensboro. 

1897 

— Ralph H. Graves is Sunday editor of the New York Times. 

— R. G. Caudle is engaged in mining engineering at Cowles, 

Nev. 

— A. W. Belden is superintendent of the coke-oven depart- 

meut of the Jones and Laughlin Steel Co., Woodlawn, Pa. 

1898 

— Francis A. Gudger, secretary of the New York City Alumni 
Association, is now connected with the Goldwyn Pictures Cor- 
poration at 469 Fifth Avenue, New York City. 
— Jas D. Parker is a member of the legal firm of Parker and 
Parker at Smithfield. 

1899 
H. M. Wagstaff, Secretary, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
— A. Burwell is a member of the Burwell-Walker Co., Char- 
lotte, distributers for the Carolinas of Chalmers and Dort cars. 
— H. D. George, Law '99, is connected with the George Mfg. 
Co., cotton manufacturers of Cherryville. 

— W. H. Daggett is engaged in mining engineering at Green- 
field, Nev. 

— Eugene F. Hartley holds the position in the census depart- 
ment of chief statistician for manufactures. 
— J. S. Carr, Jr., has been elected president and C. McD. 
Carr, '05, vice-president of the Carr-olina Automatic Machinery 
Co., a new corporation of Durham. This firm will sell knit- 
ting machines with two newly invented appliances which are 
expected to mean a saving of labor and materials. 

1900 

W. S. Bernard, Secretary, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
— A. A. Shuford, cotton manufacturer of Hickory and head 
of the Shuford group of mills at this place, is at the head of 
a new Hickory cotton mill corporation, organized in January. 

1901 
Dr. J. G. Murphy, Secretary, Wilmington, N. C. 
— Dr. W. W. Craven practices his profession, medicine, at 
Huntersville. 

— Emmett C. Gudger, a native of Asheville, holds the rank 
of commander in the U. S. Navy. 

— Adolphus Staton, a native of Tarboro, holds the rank of 
commander in the U. S. Navy. 

— S. G. Lindsay is connected with the Fidelity Bank at 
Durham. 

— .J. W. Turrentine is with the U. S. Bureau of Soils at Santa 
Barbara, Cal. He has succeeded in working out a commer- 
cial process for extracting potash from kelp. The success 
of the process depends, however, on the sale of a very absorb- 
ent charcoal, wliich is a by-product. 

1902 
I. F. Lewis, Secretary, University, Ta. 
— W. T. Johnson is a member of the firm of Willis and 
Johnson, general '.nsurance agents, Richmond, Va. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



The Southern Review 



Here's what Josephiis Daniels, Irvin Cobb, and other prominent men think of The South- 
ern Review: 

"I am very happy to see you begiiming the pub- "The time seems ripe for a Southern monthly of 

lieation of The Southern Eeview and I have examined high tdass and the publishers of The Ecview appear 

this first issue with pleasure and interest and profit. to have the capacity to avail themselves of the oppor- 

It is a splendid number and gives promise of such tunity which is beckoning." — Raleigh News and Ob- 

discussion of topics of interest as will make it valu- server. 

able and worthy of a large circulation. ' ' — Josephus Raleigh, N. C, Jan. 17, 1920. 

Daniels. 

' ' The Southern Seview makes interesting appeal 

"The South has ceased to be sectional in the Civil to all those who believe the South should support at 

War sense of the term, but it still is and always will least one standard literary periodical. You have a 

be a distinct section of the country, a land withm a great oppoi-tunitv and indications are that you are 

land, with its own charm, its inimitable local color and taking full advantage of it."— Clark Howell, Editor 

its peculiar contribution to make to American national fin; Atlanta Constitution. 
life and thought. I believe that The Southern Review, Atlanta Ga. Jan. 17 1920. 

therefore, has a great privilege and a valuable service 

to perform in serving as a national organ for that "The Southern Revieiv is an attractive publication, 

vast body of constructive thought and purpose which The South needs just such a magazine. We wish 

resides in the South, and, of course, it has my cordial the enterprise success." — Memphis Commercial Ap- 

good wishes and every hope for its success." — Irvin peal. 
S. Cobb. Memphis, Tenn., Jan. 17th, 1920. 

The Southern Review will be pleased to send sample copy of the first number containing the articles 
by Dr. Alderman and Dr. C. Alphonso Smith to any readers of The Alumni Review who would like to examine 
it. Just fill in the blank below. 

Haywood Building, Asheville, N. C. 

Please send me copy of The Southern Eeveiew, the national Southern magazine, containing articles by Dr. 
Alderman and Dr. Smith. 

Name 



Add 



ress... 



WANTED 

Traveling Representatives 



Men and Women— To Book Radcliffe Chautauquas from Coast to Coast 

Every American Community feels the "urge" for just such a campaign of Americanization as that which 
the Radcliffe Chautauqua System is conducting this year throughout the entire United States. 
The lecture subjects are: 
A— THE UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT 

How It Was Born. 

The Purpose of Its Founders. 

The Principle Upon Which It Is Built. 
B— THE MAKING OF AN AMERICAN 

The Stuff of Which He Is Made. 

His Duties and Obligations. 

His Rights and Privileges. 
C— A TOWER OF BABEL or UNITED AMERICA 

The necessity for eliminating that confusion of tongues and ideas that threatens to tear our 

people asunder. 

The necessity for strengthening that universal spirit of good will and mutual confidence that 

will bind our people closer together. 

More than thirty thoucsand of the leading business and professional men of seventeen hundred towns and cities scattered 
through thirty-nine States, from Coast to Coast, have signed contracs for Radcliffe Chatauqua engagements for 1920. 

Booking Agents, devoting their entire time to traveling, securing the signatures of responsible business men on contracts 
for Radcliffe Chautauqua engagements, are earning from $2,500 to $6,500 a year, and have two weeks in midsummer and two 
weeks m midwinter for vacation if desired. 

Men and Women, between thirty and forty-five years of age, desiring an unlimited opportunity for social service and 
possessing that degree of culture, education and business abilitty that inspires confidence, will find the booking of Radcliffe 
Chautauquas a work that brings not only good financial compensation, but also an enduriug satisfaction. 

No application will be considered without personal interview. Write for appointment. 

W. L. RADCLIFFE 

The Radcliffe Chautauqua System New Masonic Temple, Washington, D. C. 



1H8 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



Statement of the Condition of 

The Fidelity Bank 

OF DURHAM, N. C. 

JHCade to the thCorth Carolina Corporation Commission 
al the Close of Business, Sept. 12. 1919 



RESOURCES 

Loans and Investments $3,759,035.11 

Furniture and Fixtures 17,681.42 

Cash Items 847,421.37 

Cash in Vaults and with Banks 763,893.55 

Overdrafts 842.79 

$5,388,874.24 

LIABILITIES 

Capital Stock * 100,000.00 

Surplus 500,000.00 

Undivided Profits 107,596.17 

Interest Reserve 6,000.00 

Dividends Unpaid 195.01 

Deposits 4,261,285.21 

Unearned Interest 8,657.49 

Contingent Fund 5,140.36 

Borrowed Bonds 100,000.00 

Bills Payable 300,000.00 

$5,388,874.24 

t. N. DUKE. Presidenl INO. f. WILV. Vice-Fresidtnt S. W. MINOR, Cashitt 
L D. KIRKLAND. Assistant Cashiw INO. A. BUCHANAN. Assistant Cashier 



Tlie strength of this bank lies not alone in its Capital, Surplus, and Re- 
sources, but in the Character and Financial Responsibility 
of the men who conduct its affairs 



The Yarborough 



RALEIGH'S LEADING AND 
LARGEST HOTEL 

MAKE IT YOUR HOME WHEN 
IN RALEIGH 



B. H. Griffin Hotel Company 

Proprietors 



— G. T. Cochrane, Phar. '02, is engaged in the insurance busi- 
ness at Thomasville. 

— T. C. Oliver is at the head of the Oliver Quartz Co., miners 
and manufacturers of industrial minerals, with main offices in 
Charlotte. This company's specialties are talc and quartz. 
— J. C. Nash, of Savannah, was a member of a committee of 
business men from 24 States appearing in January at a Senate 
hearing at Washington to urge the retention of the present 
raters on goods shippeil from the Middle West by way of 
South Atlantic ports. 

— J. C. Exuni has been president of the First National Bank 
of .Snow Hill since this financial institution was organized. 
.A.lthough Mr. E.\um 's bank was organized at Snow Hill less 
than five years ago, it now has assets of over one million 
dollars. 

1903 
N. W. Walker, Secretary, Chapel Hill, N. C 
— Win. A. Graham saw active service overseas as major in the 
I20th Infantry, 30th Division. Mr. Graham was twice cited 
for bravery. To Mr. Graham belongs the honor of being the 
first field officer to establish his headquarters beyond the Hin- 
denburg line. He is now engaged in school work in New 
York City, his address being Apt. IB, 219 Anderson Ave. 
— Rev. H. K. McFadyen is pastor of the First Presbyterian 
Church of Cameron, Texas. 

— J. W. Horner is at the head of the Horner Bros. Co., mer- 
chants of Oxford. He is also at the head of the Anchor Stores 
Co., a corporation which operates department stores in Win- 
ston-Salem, Durham, and Rocky Mount. 

— Harold Whitehurst, of New Bern, is now a member of the 
faculty of Oak Ridge Institute. 

— S. E. McNeely, formerly engaged in banking at Gastonia, 
is now with the Security Savings Bank at Charlotte. 

1904 
T. F. HicKERSON, Secretary, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
— .lohn A. MacBae, attorney of Charlotte, was recently elected 
vice-president of the Charlotte Bar Association. 
— Col. Albert L. Cox is at the head of the Raleigh Baseball 
Association. He announced some few weeks ago his accep- 
tance of the presidency of the Association. 
— Capt. W. G. Craven, Q. M. C, is now stationed at Fort Bliss, 
Texas. 

— At the annual meeting of the Wayne County Medical So- 
ciety held in Goldsboro in January, Dr. W. H. Smith was 
elected president for the ensuing year. 

— Following his discharge from the service, in which he served 
as a captain in the medical corps. Dr. G. B. Morris returned 
to his home at Mount Olive, where he is again engaged in 
the practice of medicine. 

— E. R. Wainwright is engaged in mining engineering at Pitts- 
burgh, Pa. 

1905 
W. T. Shore, Secretary, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
— Julian C. Hines is teacher of physics in the Wra. L. Dickin- 
son high school, at Jersey City. 

— A. M. McLean, attorney, former U. S. internal-revenue 
agent, is now a memljer of a Greensboro firm which renders 
service to federal taxpayers. 

— Dr. H. B. Chalfant, Med. '05, practices medicine at Mullica 
Hill, N. J. 

— J. W. Cannon, Jr., is secretary and treasurer of the Cannon 
Mfg. Co., cotton manufacturers ■ at Kannapolis. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



The Bank o/Chapel Hill 



OldeS and ^ronge^ bank in Orange County. 



Capital $25,000.00 

Surplus and Profits 40,000.00 



We earnestly solicit your banking 
business, promising you everj' service 
and assistance consistent with safe 
banking. "It pleases us to please 
you." 



M. C. S. NOBLE President 

E. L. STROWD Vice-President 

M. E. HOGAN Cashier 




Snappy Clothes 

for the 

College Man 

Society and 
Stein Block Clothes 

for the young 

and those 
who stay young 

Vanstory Clothing Co. 

C. H. McKNIGHT, "President and Manager 
GREENSBORO. N. C. 




Hart SchafFner 

^Marx 



AND 



Society Brand 
Clothes 



We feature these 
lines because they 
are known to be 
the best. ^ j» j* 



vsrlftB Bmft d i itnf i 



Pritchard, Bright ^ Co. 

Durham, North Carolina 



ELUS, STONE & COMPANY 

DURHAM, N. C. 

The best class of merchandise at very mod- 
erate prices. 

It is always a pleasure to see our Chapel 
Hill friends in the city, and have them visit 
our store. The Winter stocks of goods are 
now complete. It will be to your interest to 
look carefully through the line of New Suits, 
Coats and Wraps. 

New Dresses of Silks, soft Satins, and tine 
Silk Crepes, shown in the latest models. 

All kind of cotton piece goods, Wool and 
Silk Dress Fabrics, Hosiery and Kid Gloves; 
Gossard Front-Lacing Corsets. 



170 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



LIGGETT & MYERS 
TOBACCO CO. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 

FATIMA. CHESTERFIELD, AND 

PIEDMONT CIGARETTES 

VELVET AND DUKE'S MIXTURE 

SMOKING TOBACCO AND 

other well known brands of Smok- 
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Chewing Tobaccos. 



Our brands are standard for qualify. 
They speak, for themselves. 



The O. Henry 



The Pride oj Greensboro 



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commercial and tourist 

hotel 



200 ROOMS 



200 BATHS 



Thoroughly modern. Absolutely fireproof. 

Large sample rooms. Convention 

hail. Ball room. 



W. H. LOWRY 

Manager 



CABELL YOUNG 

Assistant Manager 



— M. L. Caunoii is president of the Cannon Mfg. Co., manu- 
facturers of cotton textiles at Kannapolis. 
— Dr. T. W. M. Long, Med. '05, practices medicine at Roa- 
noke Eapids. Dr. Long was instrumental in the campaign a 
few years ago which entirely rid Roanoke Rapids of mos- 
quitoes and malaria. 

— Irving C. Long has been for a numl)er of years connected 
with the Cone Export and Commission Co., Greensboro. 
— Pqul W. Sehcnck, Law '0.5, of Greensboro, is general agent 
for North Carolina for the Provident Life and Trust Co. of 
Philadelphia. 

1906 
M.\j. J. K. P.^RKER, Secretary, Charlotte, N. C. 
— Dr. B. E. Washburn is in public health work with the In- 
ternational Health Board with headquarters at Kingston, 
Jamaica, British West Indies. 

— Thomas Clark is professor of chemistry in Loyola Univer- 
sity, New Orleans, La. 

1907 
C. L. Weill, Secretary, Greensboro, N. C. 
— Claude W. Rankin is general agent for the United States 
Fidelity and Guaranty Co., at Fayetteville. 
— Junius 6. Adams, Law '07, has returned to the practice 
of law at Asheville. While a major in the Judge Advocate 
General 's department, Mr. Adams served overseas for a time 
as a member of a liquidation commission for the U. S. Gov- 
ernment. 

— W. P. Skinner is engaged in the automobile and acces- 
sories business at Elizabeth City. 

— Dr. John D. Pemberton, a native of Fayetteville, is as- 
sociated with the hospital of the Drs. Mayo at Rochester, Minn. 
— D. R. Shearer is a consulting electrical engineer at Johnson 
City, Tenn. 

— Dr. G. F. Leonard is bacteriologist for C. R. Squibb and 
Sons, New Brunswick, N. J. 

1908 

M. Robins, Secretary, Greensboro, .N. C. 
— J. B. Coghill represents the General Electric Co., with 
offices in the Charleston National Bank Bldg., Charleston, W. 
Va. 

— Lloyd M. Ross is county engineer for Gaston County, and 
is located at Gastonia. 

— 0. O. Cole is connected with the West Virginia Oil Co., 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

— J. A. Fore, Jr., is with the Southern Bell Telephone Co., 
at Atlanta, Ga. His address is 12 E. North Ave., Apt. D., 
Atlanta, Ga 

1909 
0. C. Cox, Secretary, Greensboro, N. C. 
— John W. Umstead, Jr., of Tarboro, left with President 
Chase in January a cheek for $1,000. "The gift of the class 
of 1909 to the Alumni Loyalty Fund," he said. This step 
marked the fulfillment of a pledge made by the class of 1909 
at its reunion last commencement. 

— Henry T. Clark is secretary and treasurer nf the Scotland 
Neck Cotton Mills, at Scotland Neck. 

— Dr. W. B. Chapin, Med. '09, practices his profession, medi- 
cine, at Townsville. 

— Dr. .T. A. Keiger, formerly of the Government Health Ser- 
vice, has returned to Raleigh from Philadelphia, where he 
pursued special work at the University of Pennsylvania for 
several mouths 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



171 



Take a class of men ten years 

out of college 



TEN PERCENT of them will have made a 
distinct success; sixty percent will be doing 
fairly well. And thirty percent will be earning no 
more than had they never been to college. 

Why.'' What separates the successful ten percent 
from the other ninety.' 

The Alexander Hamilton Institute knows some- 
thing about the answer to that question; ti r in the 
past ten years it has enrolled more th.m 110,000 
progressive men in its Modern Business Course and 
Service. 

And more than 

55% were college graduates 

THE DIFFERENCE between large success in 
business and mediocre success is not chiefly a 
difference in native ability nor in the willingness to 
work. 

It consists usually in training, and in self-con- 
fidence which specific practical training gives. 

Here is a quotation from the letter ot a college 
man, typical of many which the Institute has 
received : 

"You may be interested in knowing that two and 
a half months' study of your Course has given me 
more self-confidence than the time spent in the 

University of only seven years ago. 

To that study of the Courseand the self-confidence 
which it bred I am directly indebted for my 
recognition and promotion in this bank." 

110,000 self-confident men 

No COLLEGE man expects his arts course to 
fit him to practice medicine or law. He re- 
alizes that special training is necessary for those 
professions. 

Modern business, also, deserves to be thought of 
as a profession. 

It has as many departments as the human body 
has organs. A man may know selling and be 
utterly ignorant of costs and accounting. He may 
be able to organize an oilice and know nothing of 
corporation finance. He may be an engineer and 
■ Ivertising and merchandising m.:y be Greek to him. 



The business of the Alexander Hamilton Institute 
is to give men quickly and systematically a working 
knowledge of all these departments. 

That its training is thoroly practical is proved by 
the experience of 1 10,000 men who with its help 
have gained mastery of business and self-confidence; 
and by the character and standing of 

The men behind the Institute 

THE highest business and educational author- 
ity is represented in the Institute's Advisory 
Council. That Council consists of: Frank A. Van- 
derlip, the financier; General Coleman duPont, the 
well known business executive; John Hays Ham- 
mond, the eminent engineer; Jeremiah W. Jenks, the 
statistician and economist; and Joseph French John- 
son, Dean of t' e New York University School of 
Commerce. 

Surely a training so directed, a training which has 
meant so much to i 10,000 other men is worth an 
evening of your investigation. It is worth at least 
the little effort required to 

Send for " Forging Ahead 
in Business" 

EVERY man who wants to cut short the years 
of routine progress; every man who is ambitious 
to increase his mastery of business and his self-con- 
fidence in business, should add this I 1 6-page book 
to his library. It is called "Forging Ahead In 
Business" and it contains information ot unusual 
value. There is a copy for every reader ot this pub- 
lication. Send for your copy now. 

Alexander Hamilton Institute 



009 Aster 


Place 




New York City / 


sJ) 


Send me ' 
obligation 


' Forging 


Ahi 


ead 'n Business"* without S; 


n 


Business 






Print Hart 














Business 
Position 











Key 297 



172 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



THE CAROLINA MAN'S SHOE STORE 

Carr-Bryant 

High Grade Shoes with Snap and Style 



Carr-Bryant ^oot & Shoe Co. 

106 West Main Street DURHAM, N. C. 



''EL-REES-SO" 

7c— 3 for 20c 

Mi'.d, Fragrant, Delightful— Try One 

"JOHNT. REES" 

lOc 

A Cigar of quality, smooth, mellow, soothing. Gives 
a restful finish to a perfect day 

EL-REES-SO CIGAR CO. 

Manufacturers of the Famous EL-REES-SO Cigar 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



'Clothes Made bi{ Makers who 
^now for Men who Pinow 

and dcld bi{ 

6need=Markham=^aiilor "Co. 

S)urkam, Tiorth 'Carolina 



EKCE 



W. H. LAWRENCE AND T. H. LAWRENCE 
ASSOCIATED 



Contractor and iJjuilder 

MAIN OFFICE: DURHAM, N. C. 



CONTRACTOR PHILLIPS HALL 
UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 



— H. K. Klonts is located at Live Oak, Fla., where he is en- 
gaged in business. 

— Dr. V. C. Edwards is research chemist for E. I. duPont de 
Ncmour" and Co.. bi their laboratory at Gibbstown, N. J. 
He ti.'^s had several promotions sinfe he went with this cnnijiany, 

1910 
.). R. .Nixon, Siirretnrji. Edenton, N. C. 
— ■Rev. .J. A. MacLeaii. .Ir., a native of Fayetteville, was 
formally installed on January 25th as pastor of the First Pres- 
byterian Church of Morganton. 

— L. J. Poisson. Law '10, is a nieniher of the law firm of 
Carr, Poisson and Dickson at Wilmington. 
— W. \. Schell is connected with the Hathcock Paint Co., 22 
W. Adams St., Jacksonville, Fla. 

— H. E. Stacy, State Senator from Robeson County, is a mem- 
ber of the law firm of McLean. Varser, McLean and Stacy, 
at Lumberton. 

— J. C. M. Vann. lawyer of .Monrnc and chairman of the 
Union County democratic executive committee, has been se- 
lected as the choice of Union County democrats for the Con- 
gressional nomination from the seventh N. C. District, to 
succeed Hon. L. D. Robinson, who will retire. 
— John M. Reeves, who is connected with the Hunter Mfg. and 
Com. Co., 58-60 Worth St., New York City, was recently 
elected a director of the Mills Mfg. Co., cotton manufac- 
turers, Greenville, S. C. 

— John H. Boushall, trust officer of the Raleigh Savings aud 
Trust Co., at Raleigh, has been instrumental in the establish- 
ment in the Capital City of the Raleigh Foundation. 
— O. A. Hamilton, superintendent of schools at Goldsboro, 
spoke recently before the Goldsboro Woman 's Club on ' ' The 
Physical Side of the Goldsboro Schools. ' " 

1911 
I. C. MosER, Secretary, Asheboro, N. C. 
— Eugene C. Ward practices law in Asheville as a member 
of the firm of Smathers and Ward. 

— Geo. W. Rhodes has withdrawn from the school business 
and is now located at Newport as cashier of the Bank of 
Newport. 

— Dr. Ij. H. Williams has withdrawn from the Navy medical 
serrice aud is now located at Goldsboro, where he is engaged 
in the practice of medicine. 

— Faisou Witherington is now located at Mount Olive. He 
is one of the incorporators of the Duplin Supply Co., a gen- 
eral mercantile firm. 

— E. L. Williams has been for a number of years engaged in 
the iiracticc of law in New York City, at 52 William St. 
— Dr. W. C. George is a member of the faculty of the L'niver- 
sity of Tennessee Medical School, his address being 718 
Union Ave., Memphis, Tenn. Dr. George will be in Chapel 
Hill next year as a member of the faculty of the University 
Medical School. 

— The stork recently paid a visit to Dr. and Mrs. J. T. Dob 
bins, of Chapel Hill, leaving a daughter. 
— The Elmore Co. is the latest cotton mill corporation to be 
organized by K. S. Tanner at Spindale. This mill will engage 
in the mercerizing of fine skein yarns. 

— J. Talbot Johnson, lawyer of Albemarle, is mayor of the 
town. 

— The marriage of Miss Minnie B. Long and Mr. Wilbam 
Ira Ward took place January 15th in the First Presbyterian 
Church of Graham. Mr. Ward is a lawyer of Graham and 
is an ex-mayor of the town. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



173 



BOMLDTOllE 



High-Grade Furniture 

of Every Description at Reasonable 

Prices 

On Easy Terms 



CHRISTIAN & HARWARD 

CORCORAN STREET 
OPPOSITE THE POSTOFFICE 

DURHAM, N. C. 



A Fifth yJvenue Shop at Your Door 



Great Clearance Sale 

NOW ON ALL 

Suits, Coats, Dresses, Furs 
Millinery 

You Save from yA to yo 

Come early and make your selection while our 
stock is complete 

STRAUSS-ROSENBERG'S 

FASHION SHOP FOR WOMEN 
DURHAM, N. C. 



"2Durl)am business Scl)Ool 

FULLY ACCREDITED 

^oar6 of '!3V6vlsors 

GEN. J. S. CARR W. G. BRAMHAM 

DR. J. M. MANMING W. J. BROGDEN 

R. L FLOWERS GEO. W. WATTS 

For full particulars and handsome catalog, address 

MRS. WALTER LEE LEDNUM 

PRESIDENT 



Sni6er- JFletcl)er (to. 



WATCHES, DIAMONDS, AND 
JEWELRY 



110 W. MAIN ST. 



DURHAM, N. C. 



Sitirsiinidl THiKesiltir© 

DURHAM, N. C. 

HIGH CLASS PICTURES AND SPECIAL MUSIC 

YOU ARE ALWAYS WELCOME 

Open from 11:00 A. M. Until 11:00 P. M. 



Broadway Cafe 

WE CORDIALLY INVITE YOU TO VISIT OUR 
CAFE WHEN YOU ARE IN GREENSBORO 

EXCELLENT SERVICE 

COURTEOUS TREATMENT 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



174 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



Odell Hardware Co. 

Greensboro, N. C. 

China, Cut Glass and Silverware 
Household Goods 

DEPENDABLE GOODS 

PROMPT SERVICE 

SATISFACTORY PRICES 



Guilford Hotel and Cafe 

NEWLY REMODELED 
RATES REASONABLE 
CENTRAL LOCATION 

Greensboro, North Carolina 



Cross and Linehan Co. 

Leaders in Clothing and Gents' 
Furnishings 

Raleigh, North Carolina 



(TompariY 



RALEIGH, N. C. 

Communicate with us regarding your 

needs for monuments or 

tombstones 



(Loop er Mlonument 



— Alex. L. Feilcl, '11, who for the past two years has boon 
a member of the Research Dept. of the National Carbon Co., 
Inc., Cleveland, was transferred on December 1 to the Elec- 
tro Metallurgical Co. at Niagara Falls, N. Y., to take up im- 
portant metallurgical investigations. Both of the above 
plants are owned and operated by the Union Carbide and Car- 
bon Co., Inc., Forty-Second St. Bldg., New York, N. Y. 
Before entering the Union Carbide organization Mr. Feild 
was associated for three and a half years with the U. S. Bu- 
reau of nines, with headquarters first at Pittsburgh, Pa., and 
later at Minneapolis, Minn. 

1912 
John C. Lockh.\rt, Secretary, Raleigh, N. C. 
— Spencer Van B. Nichols is a member of the firm of Chas. 
Hardy, Inc., Park Bow Bldg., New York City. 
— Henry B. Marrow is superintendent of schools at Smithfield. 
— S. M. Gatlis, Jr., is engaged in the practice of law in his 
home town, Hillsboro. 

— E. G. W. Tow'ers is now a patient in the U. S. Hospital at 
Oteen. Mr. Towers writes that he has been in the hospital 
since his return from France and says he expects to spend 
several more months there. 

— "W. J. Crutehfield is located at St. Matthews, S. C. 
— H. L. Parish, Jr., formerly assistant secretary of the 
Durham Traction Co., at Durham, has become assistant busi- 
ness manager of the Toledo, Ohio, branch of Henry L. Do- 
herty and Co., owners and operators of traction and public 
utility systems. 

— J. W. Freeman, formerly principal of the Temperanceville, 
Va., high school, is now located in Norfolk, Va., at 209 Y'ork 
St. W. 

— Wilson Warlick practices his profession, law, at Newton. 
— L. E. Stacy is chemist for the C. C. Smoot and Sons Co. 
Tannery at North Wilkesboro. 

— Eugene F. Rimmer, druggist of Charlotte, has organized a 
new corporation styled the E. P. Rimmer Drug Co., of Char- 
lotte. 

— L. P. McLendon, attorney of Durham, has become trust 
officer and secretary of a new trust company at Durham, the 
First National Trust Co., organized as an adjunct to the First 
National Bank of Durliam. 

1913 

A. L. M. Wiggins, Secretary, Hartsville, S. C. 
— Alvah L. Hamilton is in tlie faculty of the Walter Reed high 
school at Newport News, Va. 

— F. R. Weaver is now located in Greensboro at 260 Benbow 
Arcade. 

— R. W. Wall, Law '1.'!, is engaged in the practice of law 
at Newland. 

1914 
0.sc.\R Leach, Secretary, Raeford, N. C. 
— J. W. Battle is a chemist of Montgomery, Ala. He is con- 
nected with the laboratory of his father, Dr. H. B. Battle, '81. 
— Jas. T. Pritchett, attorney of Lenoir, is commander of the 
Lenoir post of the American Legion. 

— J. G. Leatherwood, Law '14, resumed the practice of law 
at Greenville, S. C, following his discharge from service last 
summer. He has offices in the Masonic Temple at Greenville. 
— H. A. Pendergraph is new business manager of the Athens 
Railway and Electric Co., Athens, Ga. 
— Dr. A. M. Schultz, dentist of Greenville, is now with the 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



175 



Dick^ s Laundry Co. 



Greensboro, N. C. 



High-Class Launderers, French 
Cleaners and Dyers 

Prompt and Efficient Service 

is our motto 

Our reputation gained through years 
of experience speaks for itself. 

Send yours by Parcel Post 
We appreciate your patronage 



C. 5. Pendergraft 

Chapel Hill Agent 



CAPITALIZE YOUR TIME AND TALENTS 

By qualifying for a responsible business or civil service posi- 
tion while salaries are high. 

Banking, Bookkeeping, Gregg Shorthand. Touch Type- 
writing. Business Arithmetic, Business English, Commercial 
Law, Rapid Calculations, Spelling, Palmer Penmanship, 
Business Efficiency and Office Practice, taught by Sjje- 
cialists. 

Our -school is a member of the National Association of 
Accredited Commercial Schools and is highly endorsed by 
everybody. Call or request a catalog. 

King's Business College 

Raleigh, N. C. Charlotte, N. C. 



YACKETY YACK 1911 

I have a dozen copies of the 1911 Yackety Yack which 
I will sell at $3 each, or two damaged copies at $2 each. 
K. S. TANNER, Spindale, N. C. 



Yackety Yacks, 19 16-' 17 

The Year Carolina beat Virginia in all meets. Handsome leather- 
bound volume. The last available. Price $2. 

G. D. CRAWFORD. Chapel Hill. N. C. 



Drink 



Coca-Cola 



Delicious and Refreshing 



Quality tells the difiference in the taste be- 
tween Coca-Cola and counterfeits. 

Demand the genuine by full name — nick- 
names encourage substitution. 

Get a bottle of the genuine from your 
grocer, fruit stand, or cafe. 



Durham Coca-Cola Bottling Co. 

DURHAM, N. C. 



RIDE WITH 

C. S. Pendergraft 

Pioneer Auto Man 

LEAVE ORDERS AT 

MABRY'S DRUG STORE 

HEADQUARTERS IN DURHAM 

THE BEST PLACE TO GET SOFT DRINKS. CIGARS 
AND CIGARETTES 

HEADQUARTERS IN CHAPEL HILL: NEXT TO 
BANK OF CHAPEL HILL 

Leave Chapel Hill 8.30 and 10.20 a. m. 

Leave Chapel Hill 2.30 and 4.00 p. m. 

Leave Durham 9.50 a. m., 12.40 p. m. 

Leave Durhain 5.08 p. m., 8.00 p. in. 

OTHER TRIPS SUBJECT TO ORDER 



Four Machines at Your Service 
Day or Night 

PHONE 58 or 23 

Agent for 

Dick's Laundry, Greensboro, N, C. 



176 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



"SAY IT WITH FLOWERS" 
J. J. FALLON, Leading Florist 



Chapel Hill Agents: 

FOISTER'S ART STORE 

R. P. ANDREWS. People's Bank 



Phone 1290 

214 E. M>in Stieel 

DURHAM. N. C. 



PARES THEATRE 

DURHAM, N. C. 

ARTCRAFT-PARAMOUNT PICTURES 

Orchestra Orchestra 



BROADWAY THEATRE 

DURHAM, N. C. 

THE HOUSE OF SPECIAL PHOTO-PLAY 

ATTRACTIONS 



DURHAM CAFE 

VISIT US WHILE IN DURHAM 



C. W. KENDALL 

LADIES' WEAR STORE 
VISIT US WHILE IN DURHAM 



w 


M. 


NEWrON 


COMPANY 






DURHAM, 


N. C. 






DE LUXE CLOTHIERS 


' 


TOO 


YOUNG FOR 


OLD IDEAS" 



FLOWERS 


FOR ALL OCCASIONS 




Durham 


Floral Nursery 




CHAPEL HILL AGENTS: 


EUBANKS DRUG 


CO. 



WELCOME 


TO 


STONEWALL HOTEL 


W. E. HOCKETT 


Manager 


CHARLOTTE, 


N. C. 



State Board of Healtli. 
school cbilflren. 

— F. L. Webster is in the federal income ta.\ service at Raleigh. 
He served overseas as a member of the :117 F. .\.. 81st Di- 
vision. 

— W. .T. Long is engaged in farming at Garysburg. 
— H. L. Cox served during the war as chief chemist of the 
Keuvil, N. J., branch of the Hercules Powder Co. He is now 
pursuing graduate work in the University of Chicago. 

1915 

D. L. Bell, Secretary. Pittsbnro, N. C. 

— A. H. Carr, of the Durham Hosiery Mills corporation, is 

chairman of the board of directors of the newly established 

Bank of Carrboro. 

— W. C. Walke is connected with the Bureau of Extension of 
the University. His work is with the engineering service of 
the division of country home comforts and conveniences. 
— P. L. White is principal of the Woodland high school. 
— The marriage of Miss Alice Lorraine McKenzie and Mr. 
William Trent Raglaud took place September 24th at St. 
Luke 's Episcopal Church, Salisbury. Mr. Raglaud has busi- 
ness interests near Wilson, where he and his father own a 
granite quarry. 

1916 
Hugh B. Hester, Secretary, Capt. and Adj. 12th F. A., Camp 

Travis, Texas 
— S. C. Cratch, Law '16, attorney of Hamlet, is commander 
of the Hamlet post of the American Legion. 
— Clyde Fore is located at 604 Realty Bldg., Charlotte. 
— W. F. Brinkley, lawyer of Lexington, is secretary of the 
Le-xingtou Chamber of Commerce. 

— Rev. Walter Patten, Grad. '16, is pastor of the Methodist 
Church of Greenville. 

— F. O. Clarkson, of the law firm of Clarkson, Taliaferro and 
Clarksou, Charlotte, was recently elected secretary and treas- 
urer of the Charlotte bar association. 

— The marriage of Miss Margaret Ivathryu Nowell and Mr. 
Lenox Daniel Rawlings took place October 16th at Wilson. 
They live at Wilson, where Mr. Eawlings is manager of the 
local ice plant. 

— 0. A. Pickett is in charge of the analytical laboratory of the 
Hercules Powder Co... Dover, N. J. 

— E. G. Hogan is principal of the Aberdeen high school. H. 
W. Doub, '12, is superintendent. 

1917 
H. G. Baity, Secretary, Eonda, N. C. 
— R. B. Starr is assistant cashier of the Farmers Bank and 
Trust Co., at Greeurille. 

— S. B. Tanner, Jr., is one of the incorporators of the North 
Carolina Motors Corporation at Charlotte. Another of the 
incorporators is E. T. Cansler, Jr., Law '12. 
— Arthur L. Tyler is manager of the Rocky Mount branch 
of the Anchor Stores Co. 

— D. Eugene Eagle is a second year medical student at Johns 
Hopkins University. His address is 518 N. Broadway, Bal- 
timore, Md. 

— H. J. Eenn is a tobacco buyer for the Liggett and Myers 
Tobacco Co., located for the present at MunfordviUe, Ky. 
— Lieut. Fabius Shipp has been appointed to take charge of 
the post office at Antwerp, Belgium, for the American army 
of occupation. 
— R. W. Sparger is engaged in business at Mount Airy. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



171 



A. E. LLOYD HARDWARE CO. 

DURHAM, N. C. 

All Kinds of Hardware, Sporting 

Goods and College, Boys' 

Accessories 

GEO. W. TANDY, MANAGER 



Clniversifi/ students, facutfi/ members, and 
alumni visit t/te f/ioi/al Qafe while in 
iDar/iam. Clnden new and pro- 
gressive management. 
Special parlors 
for ladies 



9)urh 



urhani s 



^toc/ern L-afe 



Keep Physically Fit 

Th» young men of U. N, C. are wise enough 
to know (hat aihielic exercise promotes sound 
heailh. Get in some game early. 

We can supply you wiih every essential m 
equpment for Football, Soccer, Basket Ball, 
Hockey, Skatmg. etc. 

Write for catalogue No. UC. 

ALEX TAYLOR & CO., Inc. 

Athletic Outfitters 
26 E. 42nd St., New York 




Hennessee Cafe 

A MODERN, UP-TO-DATE CAFE, WHERE YOU 
AND YOUR FRIENDS ARE WELCOME 



CLEANLINESS AND SERVICE 
OUR MOTTOES 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



BAGLEY & ALDERMAN, Advertising 

LETTERWRITING, MULTIGRAPHING, PRINT- 
ING, ADVERTISING SIGNS, AND 
SPECIALTIES 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



CHARLES C. HOOK, ARCHITECT 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 

TWENTY YEARS EXPERIENCE IN PLANNING 
SCHOOL AND COLLEGE BUILDINGS 



A. ^. IKlutU (Tclnc, 

Extends a cordial invitation to all students and 
alumni of the U. N. C. to make their store head- 
quarters during their stay in Chapel Hill. 

Complete Stock of 
New and Second-hand Books, Stationery, and 
Complete Line of Shoes and Haberdashery 
Made by the Leaders of Fashion, Al- 
ways on Hand 



When in Need 

of a Pocket Knife, Razor, Hone, Strop, Brusfi, 
Safety Razor, Blades, or tools of any kind, 
Paints, Varnisfies, Brushes, Electrical Goods, 
and General Hardware, call on the 

Chapel Hill Hardware Co. 

THE STORE WHERE "QUALITY" COUNTS 



THE RESULT OF 28 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE 

LANG'S "ROGER C." CIGAR; TWO 

BRANDS: 7c and 10c 

A COMPARISON IS ALL I ASK 

ROGER C. LANG 

GREENSBORO. N. C. 



178 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



R. BLACKNALL & SON 

DRUGGISTS 

NORRIS AND MUYI-ER'S CANDIE& 
G. BERNARD. 



lANAOFR 



Corcoran Street 



Durham, N. C. 



E. E. Bra^^ & Co. 

WALKOVER AND FLORSHEIM SHOES 
DURHAM, N. C. 



Model Laundry Co. 

DURHAM, N. C. 
EXPERT LAUNDRY SERVICE 



DURHAM ICE CREAM CO. 

Fancy Ices; Makers of Blue Ribbon Brand Ice Cream 
Receptions and Banquets a Specialty 

TELEPHONE No. 1199 



POLLARD BROTHERS 

DURHAM, N. C. 

STANDARD LINES OF HARDWARE 

AND SPORTING GOODS 



e C®c 



Dunrlhisiinni c 

LEATHER GOODS CHEAPER 
DURHAM, N. C. 



PRIDGEN & JONES CO. 

We Carry the Best Shoes: Edwin Clapp, Howard and 

Foster, and Heywood's 

Expert Fitters — A Cordial Welcome Awaits You 

107 W. Main St. DURHAM, N. C. 



THE SELWYN 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 

Fireproof, Modern and Luxurious 

IN THE HEART OF EVERYTHING 

H. C. LARZALERE, Manager 



— D. B. Hill is associated with the J. II. Peiree Mfg. Co., lum- 
ber manufacturers of Warsaw. 

— Jno. M. Peiree is now a traveling salesman for the Acme 
Fertilizer Co., with headquarters in Wilmington. 
— F. K. Blaylock is a research chemist for E. I. duPont de 
Nemours and Co., at their Jackson plant, Wilmington, Del. 
— L. G. Marsh is with the Bureau of Mines, as a physical 
chemist, at Pittsliurgh, Pa. 

1918 

W. E. WUNSCH, Secretary, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
— Henry V. Koonts, of Chapel Hill, assistant business ma'i- 
ager of the University, is commander of the Chapel Hill post' 
of the American Legion. 

— W. Fred Morrison is mth the bridge engineering depart- 
ment of the State Highway Commission in Raleigh. His 
address is 618 Hillsboro St. 

— W. W. Eagle is assistant curator of the North Carolina 
State Museum in Ealeigh. He lives at 618 Hillsboro St. He 
intends taking up the study of medicine next fall. 

1919 
H. G. West, Secretary, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
— N. G. Gooding is taking special work in journalism in the 
University. He is business manager of the Tar Seel. 
— Horace Nims is principal of the Mountain Island high 
school, Gaston County. 

— The engagement of Miss Mary Belle Eicks and Mr. George 
L. Grantham, both of Fairmont, has been announced, the 
wedding to take place in February. 

— ^W. B. Richardson is teaching general science in the Wil- 
mingtcar high school. 



Five Points Auto Co. 


tUTOMOBILES 


Repairs, and Accessories 


Agents for 


Buick and Dodge Cars 


DURHAM, N. C. 

' 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



179 



ZEB P. COUNCIL. Manager CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 

PRINTIING, ENGRAVED CARDS 

QUALITY AND SERVICE 



Eubanks Drug Co. 

Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Agents for Munnally's Candy 



PATTERSON BROS. 

DRUGGISTS 

AGENCY INORRIS CANDY THE REXALL STORE 



THE PEOPLES NATIONAL BANK 

WINSTON-SALEM, N.~ C. 

Capital $150,000.00 United States Depositary 

J. W. FRIES, Pies. Wm. A. BLAIR, Vice-Pres. 

N. MITCHELL, Cashier 



K 



ODAK SUPPLIE 



Finishing for the Amateur. Folster 



PICKARD'S HOTEL 

Headquarters for Carolina Alumni 

Returning to the Hill 

SPECIAL RATES. STUDENT BOARDERS. 



GOOCH'S CAFE 

Anything to Eat 
CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 



"Electric Sl)oe Sbop 

EXPERT SHOE REPAIRING 
CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 



^ssie iJjrot/iers 

CALIFORNIA AND FLORIDA FRUITS 

TOBACCO AND CIGARS 

ICE CREAM PARLOR FRESH CANDIES 

"WE STRIVE TO PLEASE" 



Huffine Hotel 

Quick Lunch Counter and Dining Room — Clean 

Rooms $1.00 and Up 

NEAR DEPOT: GREENSBORO, N. C. 



CHAPEL HILL 
N. C. 



ANDREWS GASH STORE CO. 

students and Faculty will find us ready to serve 
them with the latest styles in Walkover Shoes, 
Fancy Shirts, Tailored Suits, and general furn- 
ishings. Be convinced. Call and see. 



WHITING-HORTON CO. 

THIRTY-ONE YEARS 
RALEIGH'S LEADING CLOTHIERS 



FOR NEAT JOB PRINTING AND TYPEWRITER 
PAPER CALL AT THE OFFICE OF 

The Chapel Hill News 



H. S. STORR & CO. 

OfiSce Furniture, Machines and Supplies; Printers and 
Manufacturers of Rubber Stamps 
RALEIGH, N. C. 



W. B. SORRELL 

JEWELER AND OPTOMETRIST 
CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 



Dnlfom Supply C©o 

MACHINERY, MILL SUPPLIES 
PHONE 753 RALEIGH, N. C. 



180 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 




POWDEI(S 



^HE string of low, heavily barricaded 

buildings, widely separated but linked 

together by a narrow tramway, is called 

the dynamite line. On ten such lines the Hercules 

Powder Co. turns out over 50,000,000 pounds of 

dynamite in an average year. 

The absence of noise and bustle, of whirring wheels 
and clanking steel, makes a striking contrast to the 
usual accompaniment of manufacturing production on 
a large scale. In little rubber-tired buggies the nitro- 
glycerin is delivered to the mixing house just as it is 
needed, and with equal precision and dispatch the 
other ingredients arrive via the tram line. From here 
the dynamite is forwarded in bulk and passes from one 
small building to another until the last process is com- 
plete and the finished product reaches the storage 
magazines. 

****** 
A spark, a sputtering fuse, and the energy stored in 
these little cartridges of dynamite springs forth with a 
mighty roar to do our bidding, wliethcr it be to re- 
move a mountain or a stump ; to provide copper for 
our pennies or for our miles of electric wires, steel for 
our pen points or for our railroads; to mine coalfor our 
factories and hearth fires or jewels for our adornment. 

The power supplied to our industries by the makers of 
explosives, these deft and careful workers on the dyna- 
mite line, will produce enough materials to build a city 
every day. 



HE1{<:ULES POWDEI{^ CO, 



Chicago 
Pilt^burg. Kan. 
San Francisco 



Cbananoosa 
St. Louis 
Denver 



Salt Lake City 
Pittsbursh. Pa. 
New Vorlc 



Hazleton, Pa, 
Jonlin 
W'Imingion. Del 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



181 




Three 400 k\\„ 3600 r.p.m. 
Steam Turbine Generator 

I'XITS. 

Performance 

Lead Kxv 300 

Steam Pressure 

Lbs. Gauge 125 

Super-Heat 

Degrees F 

VaeuuDi in Hg 27 

L1)S. per Kw. Hr 22.0 

Efficiency Ratio 54.1 



Engineering Achivement 



Westinyhouse Success Is UasccI On lis Pio- 
neer Work and Development in Mechanical 
and Electrical Etliiinriring 

A comparison of tlie Bankiue Cycle Efficiency of the first 
commercial turbine-generator installed in this country in 
1899 and the modern turbine-generator shows a remarkable 
advance in the art of steam turbine building. 

It is a noteworthy fact that this first commercial instal- 
lation opened a new era in tlie gi-neratiuu and a]iplicati(]n 



Westinghouse Electric & 
Manufacturing Co. 

East Pittsburgh, Pa. 



of power — bringing into being the central station with its 
now indi.speu.-^able service to humanity. The steam turljine 
has cut thee world 's fuel consumption by millions of tons 
yearly. It has etfc'cted incalculable savings in labor and 
transjiortation. 

The steam turbine as a prime mover was introduced and 
developed in this country by George Westinghouse. 

Write for Circular 1501, "An Historical Review of Steam 
Turljine Progress, ' ' by Francis Hodgkinson, Chief Engi- 
neer, Machine Works. 



Three 30,000 kw. 750-1.500 
r.p.m., cross-compound 
Turei.ne Generator T^nit.s 

Performance 

Lead Kw 26505 

Steam Pressure Lbs 233.] 

Super-Heat, Degs. F 124.3 

Vacuum in Hg 28.85 

Lbs. per Kw 11.274 

Eff. Ratio 75.66% 

Since this picture was 
taken a three-cylinder com- 
pound 60,000 kw. unit baa 
been installed, which has a 
Rankine cvcle effieiencv of 
77.7%. 




W^stin^eKie 



182 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 




The Seeman Printery 

Durham, N. C. 

Printing - Engraving - Bookbinding 




THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

SUMMER SCHOOL 

THIRTY-THIRD SESSION JUNE 22.-AUGUST 5, 1920 

Standard Courses in the Regular Departments of the University. 

Cultural and Professional Courses leading to the A.B. and A.M. degrees. 

A Modern Department of Education offering numerous professional courses in Educational 
Psychology, "^"hool Administration, Supervision, Principles of Secondary Education, Tests and 
Measurements, Supervised Study, Rural Education, Primary, Grammar Grade, and High School 
Methods, Story Telling, Plays and Games, and Physical Education. 

Numerous Academic and Professional Courses of Elementary character for teachers who 
have not had previous professional training. 

High Class Recreational Features and Entertainments of an educational character. Lectures 
by noted Thinkers and Writers. Music Festival and Dramatic Performances. 

Able Faculty of Trained Specialists, Practical Teachers, Supervisors, and Superintendents 
of succcessful experience. 

Moderate Expenses — Registration 922 in 1919 — Rooms may be reserved any time after 
February 15. 

Preliminary Announcement ready February 15. Complete Announcement ready April 1st. 

For further information, address 

N. W. WALKER, Director 
CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 



(Eulture 



Scl)olarsl)ip 



>ervice 



Self-Support 



THE 



^ortb (LaroUna (ToUegefor'U^omeR 

offers to Women a Liberal Education, Equipment for Womanly 
Service, Professional Training for Remunerative Employment 



The College offers four groups of studies lead- 
ing to the following degrees: Bachelor of Arts, 
Bachelor of Science, and Bachelor of Music. 

Special courses in Pedagogy; in Manual Arts; in 
Domestic Science. Household Art and Economics; in 
Music; and in Ifle Commercial Branches. 

Teachers and graduates of other colleges provided 
for in both regular and special courses. 



Fall l^erm Opens in September 



Equipment modern, including furnished dormitories, 
library, laboratories, literary society halls, gymnaa- 
iuni, music rooms, teachers' training school, infirm- 
ary, model laundry, central heating plant, and open 
air recreation grounds. 

Dormitories furnished by the State. Board at 
actual cost. Tuition free to those who pledge them- 
selves to become teachers. 



Summer 'Uerm Begins in June 



I'or catalof'ue and other information, address 



JULIUS I. FOUST, President, GREENSBORO, N. C. 



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