(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "The alumni review [serial]"

^A* 



.:■%*. < 






f: 



A***. 



^***1 



•T» 



'*'■#' 



? m •.. 



4 nc* 



#&? 



m 



^ % *£ 






i v ■ 



tpv „ 



4< ! 






'*¥**< 



Jt JtsJ" 



«*»■ 



S*»*- 



%t 



is 



Si 



m 



LV*- 



11 



-tlBEHTAS 



V?, 






library of 
<Ibc University of north Carolina 



C O I. I. K C T I O K ( ) F 

NORTH C A ROLINI A X A 



ENDOWED B Y 

JOHN S P R U N T HILL 

of the class of 1889 



VJT£. 






















THE ROYALL & BORDEN CO. 



Corner West Main and Market Streets DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA 

Sell all kinds of furniture and furnishings for churches, 
colleges and homes. Biggest stock of Rugs in the 
State, and at cheapest prices. CJIf you don't know us 
ask the College Proctor or the editor of the "Review." 
Call on or write for whatever you may need in our line. 

THE ROYALL & BORDEN CO. 



Comprehensive Service 

The services rendered by the modern TRUST COMPANY 
are so broad as to cover the financial needs of those in every walk 
of life. 

From the savings account of the youngster to the administra- 
tion and final settlement of the largest estate, it renders special- 
ized, trustworthy and uninterrupted service. 

The Trust Company can help you in any of your problems. 

WACHOVIA BANK AND TRUST CO. 

(The Largest and Strongest in the Carolinas) 

WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 

Capital and Surplus $2,000,000 Member Federal Reserve System 



ssu 



VOLUME VIII 



THE 



NUMBER 6 



m i i i n n n i w h i h h h h i n n a i i a a a ■ ■ m a i 



ALVMNIREVIEW 




MARCH, 1920 

OPINION AND COMMENT 
Alumni in Action — Tar Heel Program — Worth 
Thinking About — Buildings Underway — Course 
in Contemporary Civilization — Greater Spe- 
cialization Needed — Changing Center 
of Gravity 




15f 1 



ALUMNI HOLD CONFERENCE 
Presidents and Secretaries of Local Alumni Associa- 
tions Formulate a Program of Alumni Work 

INAUGURATION PROGRAM ANNOUNCED 

CLASS OF 1910 PLANS FOR ITS DECENNIAL 

REUNION 



o 



o 



o 



wm 



52 



TnI CCN/RTI.S DJL.I9U 



PUBLISHED BY 

THE ALVMNfl ASSOCIATION 



s 



Cy Thompson Says — - 

Today as Never Before 

' the average man is buying Life Insurance. New insurance written by all pood companies in 
191!> is equivalent to one-fourth of the total volume in force in 1918. It exceeds all the insur- 
ance in force in 1901. 

The first-chartered purely mutual American life insurance company had a glorious year. 
Its 1919 business increased nearly 90 per cent over the business of the year before. Its mortal- 
ity experience was the lowest in 51 years. 

The 1920 contracts and service carry the principle of mutuality to the logical and absolute 
limit. We offer the only perfectly mutual policy. This is a broad statement; but thorough in- 
vestigation will prove it. 

Before you contract to buy life insurance, or accept an agency contract, let us demonstrate 
what we mean by "Perfection in Protection." An opportunity awaits you. 

NEW ENGLAND MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO. 

CHARTERED 1835 BOSTON, MASS. 

CYRUS THOMPSON, Dist. Mgr. 

(OPPOSITE CAMPUS) 

Chapel Hill, N. C. 



THE AMERICAN TRUST CO. 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 

This Company serves in all Fiduciary Relations, such as: 

Executor of Wills — 

Our experience enables us to handle estates according to the legal requirements ; 

Our financial responsibility insures safety; 

Our disinterestedness eliminates family quarrels. 

Trustee by Appointment: 

Our financial connections enable us to keep funds invested to the best advantage, so 
as to earn the lai'gest income consistent with safety. 



Resources over $12, 000, 000. 00 



AMERICAN TRUST COMPANY 



(THE SAFE EXECUTOR) 
CHARLOTTE, NORTH CAROLINA 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



Volume VIII 



MARCH, 1920 



Number 6 



OPINION AND COMMENT 



The Review hailed the meeting' at the University 
of the local directors of the Graham Memorial cam- 
paign in November as one of the most 
Alumni heartening events in the history of the 
In Action University, because it saw in the coming 
together of the men assembled something 
that looked to the welfare and upbuilding of the 
University and a willingness and determination to 
see the particular undertaking in hand through to 
a successful ending. 

If .possible, it hails the assembling of the first an- 
nual conference of local alumni association presi- 
dents and secretaries, which was held at the Hill on 
the night of February 26th, with even greater pleas- 
ure; for it sees in this sort of reasoning together the 
prospect of a real program of unified, constructive 
alumni effort in behalf of Alma Mater. 

Particular attention is directed to the report of 
the meeting found on another page. Every alumnus 
should carefully study the program suggested and 
should assist in putting it into effective operation. 

ODD 

A close observer of the campus from time to time 
rinds his admiration challenged by some manifesta- 
tion of unusual loyalty or thoughtfulness 
Tar Heel on the part of an individual, a group, an 
Program organization, or a class. During the S. A. 
T. 0. the "Y" functioned in a manner 
that maintained Carolina traditions under exceeding- 
ly difficult conditions. In the fall of 1918 the class 
of 11)19 picked up the loose threads of former campus 
custom with distinct benefit to the University com- 
munity. More recently the Campus Cabinet, a new 
organization, without precedents or limitations, has 
put its collective finger on some particular spots in 
the academic life with gratifying results. 

The following program, taken from the Tar Heel 
of February 21st, under the title of "The Tar Heel's 
Program for the University's Development," is rep- 
resentative of the constructive thinking the above 
paragraph contemplates, and it is passed on to the 
alumni and trustees as worthy of their special con- 
sideration. 

The Tar Heel takes this opportunity to set before 



the students its program for the development of our 
rapidly-expanding University. 

1. Dormitory accommodations adequate for the 
comfortable housing of University students now and 
for the increase of several years to come. 

2. Increased, research and class-room facilities to 
be obtained only by a liberal building program of 
departmental buildings. 

3. Remodeling and modernizing of our antique 
structures. 

-1. Co-operation with the University by the stu- 
dent body in keeping the campus and dormitories 
clean. 

5. Co-operation with the University in keeping 
the campus unlined by unnecessary paths. 

(i. Co-operation with the University in bringing 
to the attention of responsible and earnest citizens of 
this State the present needs of the University; to 
do this by letter or by personal contact. 

7. A better acquaintance with the great body of 
tradition on which our University life is founded. 

8. A whole-hearted and sincere support of our 
honor system and all that it stands for. 

9. An increased observance of the fundamental 
rules of hygiene and the general caretaking of our 
bodies. 

10. Recognizing the continual sense of responsi- 
bility that should rest with every University man ; 
the knowledge that the University is represented 
solely through us and likewise judged through our 
actions. 

11. An observance of the more fastidious rides 
of conduct in our daily relations with each other; a 
complete resignation of former slight breaches of 
etiquette in the mess hall or at public gatherings. 
For by these things is a University man judged by 
the lay observer. 

12. To remember always to be loyal citizens of 
the finest community in the world; to cherish our 
relations with the University because of her fineness 
and truth, for what she has done and will do for us; 
to be University men and not "boys" or "village 
fellows." 

nan 

President M. L. Burton, of the University of Min- 
nesota, has recently tendered his resignation and on 
July 1st is to become president oi 
Worth Think- the University of Michigan. As 
ing About The Review understands it, the sal- 

ary which Minnesota offered to retain 
him was not less than that offered bv Michigan — it 



1S8 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



was actually more. But, according to the Minneosta 
Alumni Weekly, two other considerations brought 
about the deeision. The paragraph below explains: 

"The regents did everything possible to keep him, 
bul the $10,000 annual retiring allowance offered 
him by Michigan, and the Hill Auditorium, one of 
the finest in the country, won the day for Michigan. 
We have known that President Burton felt that he 
was severely handicapped at Minnesota by the lack 
of an auditorium where he could meet the students 
and faculty and cultivate among them an institu- 
tional consciousness and spirit. All this is immedi- 
ately available at Michigan, and at best he could not 
have hoped for equally desirable conditions at Minne- 
sota for five or six years." 

Read it, please, and note where the emphasis falls! 
Not on the $10,000 retiring allowance (President Bur- 
ton is around forty-five and his salary makes a com- 
fortable old age possible without a retiring allow- 
ance) but on the Hill auditorium — a place (mark the 
words) "where he could meet the students and fac- 
ulty and cultivate among them an institutional con- 
sciousness and spirit." 

The Carolina spirit! Whence does it spring? Had 
Graham and Stacy and their predecessors been without 
the platform in Gerrard Hall, would Carolina spirit 
be what it is today? Can the University and alumni 
aud trustees expect it to remain what it is or become 
more vital in the days ahead without a chapel or 
auditorium that will accommodate the student body? 
President Burton, through his action which speaks 
louder than words, says no. And as we slip into 
chapel these days— Gerrard Hall built in 1822 to 
accommodate only a handful of students — and note 
the presence of only 600 of the 1100 students and that 
too of Freshmen and Sophomores only, fifty per cent 
of whom will not reach graduation, we are forced to 
the same conclusion. 

Frankly, here is a serious matter, the effective an- 
swer to which is a modern auditorium. 

□ □□ 

In the foregoing paragraphs we believe the case 
has been stated for the need of a new auditorium. 

But it is not our purpose in this issue 
Buildings to mention specifically the need of build- 
Underway ings by which the University is sorely 

pressed. 
On the contrary, it is our purpose at this time 
merely to take stock of the building program which 
has recently been projected and will soon be under 
way. This, briefly, is as follows: (1) Ten houses 
for members of the faculty have been determined 
upon and the preliminary work of location has al- 



ready been begun; (2) Two dormitories have been 
authorized, and as soon as plans are submitted and 
approved work on them will be begun. 

The faculty houses, which will be located to the 
south of Franklin Street between the residences of 
Dr. Pratt and the late President Graham, will be in 
readiness by September. Unfortunately the dormi- 
tories will not. 

But with these plans definitely under way, the 
time is not far distant when the best thinking of 
which the University is capable, individually and col- 
lectively, will be required in formulating the build- 
ing program of the future. For the University has 
reached the final limits of expansion consistent with 
its present physical plant. This duty The Keview 
would place seriously upon every one who would 
have the University make its readjustments promptly 
and insure its proper functioning in the North Caro- 
lina of tomorrow. 

□ □□ 

Similarly we think the time opportune to direct 
attention to the necessity of reorganization within 
the University on its admiuistra- 
Greater Speciali- tive side, both in the field of in- 
zation Needed struetion and business organiza- 
tion. We hold no brief for sur- 
veys, as such; but with the addition of schools and 
officers aijd courses, the need for closer co-operation 
throughout the entire instructional staff is painfully 
obvious, and a thorough analysis should be made of 
the situation which would lead to a properly articu- 
lated, adequate system of procedure. 

On the business side, the necessity is even more 
obvious. Men around whom three or four or five 
offices have grown up find themselves overwhelmed 
with increased duties and whenever they have to give 
adequate thought to the performance of one set the 
others have to go neglected. As a result, no sustained 
planning can be thought through, and the machinery 
of the University, upon which both the educational 
and business programs of the institution necessarily 
depend, is slowed down at its very heart. 

We have on several former occasions pointed ouc 
the necessity for this particular sort of reorganiza- 
tion, for this provision of more minute subdivisions 
iu the present organization, and for additional men 
to take charge of them and to be held to a stricter 
accountability for the performance of their more 
highly specialized duties. In 1900, when the student 
body numbered approximately 500, deanships, com- 
mittee work, the management of publications, were 
not particularly burdensome. Similarly, the man- 
agement of the power plant, the dining halls, the 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



189 



buildings and grounds, the library, and other offices 
and buildings were comparatively simple. But with 
1,400 students and the corresponding expansion in 
the activities of every office on the campus, duties 
have multiplied more rapidly than additional officers 
have been supplied to take care of them, so much 
more rapidly, in fact, that at present the efficiency 
of the University is at the breaking point. 

The Review is in no sense an alarmist. But in 
this period in which the University is considering its 
immediate future, it would emphasize with all the 
power of which it is capable, that greater specializa- 
tion and correspondingly stricter accountability in 
the fields of academic and business organization are 
absolutely essential. 

DDD 

A study of the reports of the presidents and officers 
of other institutions is always stimulating and fre- 
quently highly profitable in 
Course in Con- that it affords the means of 

temporary Civilization comparing standards and 

noting new educational ten- 
dencies and movements. The recent report of Presi- 
dent Butler, of Columbia University, is especially 
rich in suggestion. Two observations, on a new 
course in contemporary civilization and the changing 
center of gravity in university studies, respectively, 
are particularly worthy of note and are given in 
full below. 

One of the notable educational advances of the 
year is the institution, under the faculty of Columbia 
College, of a course of instruction in contemporary 
civilization prescribed for all Freshmen. The object 
of this course is to give first year college students an 
outlook over the modern world, as well as a point of 
view that will enable them better to understand and 
to appreciate their subsequent studies. For those 
college students who are enamored of the cruder and 
more stupid forms of radicalism, early instruction 
in the facts relating to the origin and development of 
modern civilization and the part that time plays in 
building and perfecting human institutions, is of the 
greatest value. For those college students who are 
afflicted with the more stubborn forms of conserva- 
tism, early appreciation of the fact that movement 
and development are characteristic of life and that 
change may be constructive as well as destructive, is 
most desirable. The main purpose of the course is 
to lay a foundation for intelligent citizenship, and 
to enable undergraduate students to prepare them- 
selves to make decisions concerning public questions 
with intelligence and with conviction. It is not the 
purpose of this course to teach or to preach doctrine, 
but rather to show the movement of civilization in its 
great achievement of constructive progress. The con- 
tent of the course is drawn not merely from history, 



but from economics, politics, ethics and social science. 
This course is not to be the work of any one teacher 
or of any single department. Its syllabus has been 
elaborated by some thirty or forty undergraduate 
teachers working together, and it is now being carried 
on by sixteen teachers, five times a week, in sections of 
about twenty-five students each. The course requires 
a large number of books of reference and a wide range 
of reading on the part of those who take it. A special 
college stud}' has been provided, and through the 
generosity of alumni properly furnished and equip- 
ped with at least fifty copies of each book needed by 
students in this course. It is too early to estimate 
the full benefits of this undertaking, or perhaps even 
to point out the value of its method as an example in 
other fields of instruction; but it is certain that both 
teachers and students are deeply interested in the 
course and have strong faith in its usefulness and 
power of inspiration. 

DDD 

The center of gravity of a university's interest 
moves from point to point. The fundamental inter- 
pretative subjects, history, litera- 
Changing Center ture, and most of all philosophy, 
of Gravity of course retain their primacy 

amidst all change. Fifty years 
ago the center of gravity lay in the classical languages 
and literatures. It then moved, with results that 
were not entirely satisfactory, to the natural and ex- 
perimental sciences. From these it moved a little 
later to the field of social and political science, and 
there perhaps it rests at the present time, although 
in a state of unstable equilibrium. It seems likely 
that in the near future the most important subjects 
in Columbia University are to be public law, interna- 
tional relations, public health, chemical engineering, 
business administration, training economic advisers 
for industrial and financial institutions, and the 
teaching of French and Spanish. The political, eco- 
nomic, and purely business developments of the past 
decade, especially as these have been influenced by 
the war, combine to bring about this result. The 
work now being provided in these various subjects 
should be carefully examined and studied with a view 
to its improvement, strengthening and development, 
in order that there may be no lack of leadership when 
the increased demands are made upon us. 



VIRGINIA DROPS OUT OF TRIANGULAR 
DEBATE 

The triangular debating arrangement between 
North Carolina, Virginia, and Johns Hopkins has 
been changed this year by the dropping out of Vir- 
ginia and the substitution of Washington and Lee. 
The debate will take place May 1st, each institution, 
as usual, debating each of the other two. The query 
is: "Resolved, That a system of universal military 
training for young men should be adopted by the 
United States." 



190 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



ALUMNI HOLD FIRST ANNUAL CONFERENCE 



Presidents and Secretaries of Local Alumni Associations Formulate a 
Program of Alumni Work 



In order to formulate a more eomprelieusive plan 
of alumni assistance in the development and work 
of the University, a special conference of presidents 
and secretaries of local alumni associations was held 
at the University on the night of February 26th upon 
the call of R. D. W. Connor, President of the General 
Alumni Association, and the invitation of President 
Chase. The meeting was in the "Coop," the dele- 
gates being the guests of the University at a special 
dinner. 

A Program to Support 

The meeting was of the informal get-together sort 
and immediately got down to the consideration of 
definite alumni problems presented by President Con 
sior, President Chase, A. M. ('nates, E. R. Rankin, 
Howard Rondthaler, II. M. London, .1. W. Umstead, 
Jr., and L. R. Wilson. Open discussion followed, in 
which the following conclusions, in the form of 
adopted resolutions, were reached: 

1. That we approve the policy of a full-time, paid 
Alumni Secretary to devote all of his efforts to the 
advancement of alumni interests, and that the presi- 
dent be authorized to appoint a committee to meet 
in Raleigh within a short time to make definite plans 
for securing such Alumni Secretary. 

2. That we favor the holding of a conference of 
presidents and secretaries of local alumni associations 
at Chapel Hill during the fall of each year, and that 
we urge our fellow-officers of local associations to 
make every effort to attend. 

■\. That we urge the support and co-operation of 
the county alumni associations in carrying through 
tin program of development as set forth in the Feb- 
ruary number of The Alumni Review. 

4. That we heartily endorse the suggestion for a 
general catalogue of the University, that we bring this 
undertaking to the attention of our local alumni asso- 
ciations, and that we w T ill especially assist (1) through 
securing data regarding alumni and (2) through the 
sale of the catalogue locally. 

.">. That we call the attention of the local alumni 
associations to the pressing need for a new hotel at 
Chapel Hill, and urge the co-operation of these asso- 
ciations in advancing the movement for a new hotel. 

Full-Time Alumni Secretary to Be Employed 

The most important decision taken by the confer- 
ence was that of employing a whole-time Alumni 
Secretary and the establishment of an alumni office, 
with complete records, at the University. For this 
purpose $1,000 was pledged by the alumni present 
and President Connor named the following committee 



to perfect plans: H. E. Rondthaler, H. B. Stevens, 
.1. W. Umstead, Jr., Jos. B. Cheshire, Jr.. -I. R. Bag- 
get t. 

The following committee was appointed to prepare 
a report for the General Alumni Association on the 
results of the conference: W. M. Hendren, A. E. 
Woltz, E. R. Rankin. 

Other Important By-Products 

Other suggestions made in the course of the meet- 
ing, but not formally covered by resolutions, were: 
(1) That in the selection of local association presi- 
dents and secretaries, alert, aggressive men be chosen 
rather than those whom the association would like to 
honor but who would not advance the interests of 
the association and University; (2) That meetings 
be held more frequently (see Asheville plan below) 
and that at each meeting some definite proposal be 
considered; (3) That the alumni enlist the co-opera- 
tion of the local press in giving publicity to the 
work of the University: (4) That they assist in 
bringing the services of the University, such as those 
offered through the Bureau of Extension and other 
organizations, to the attention of the public; (5) That 
they make known the needs of the University and 
enlist the support of citizens and legislators ; and 
(6) That the loyalty and devotion of every alumnus 
be turned to good account in the support of the 
I Fniversity program of growth and service. 

Asheville Alumni Present Meeting Plans 

Judge II. B. Stevens and C. W. Johnson, of the 
Asheville association, presented the following plan 
which Asheville has recently adopted: 

Realizing that the University of North Carolina 
is a great public service corporation, the Asheville 
alumni believe that alumni everywhere can render a 
distinct service to the State by serving the University. 

They believe that this service has not hitherto been 
rendered for two reasons: 1st, because the Univer- 
sity was thought of as the object of the service rather 
than the means of making that service effective; and 
2d, because there was no machinery for. or program 
of such service. 

As the contemplated organization of the alumni 
will provide the machinery, the Buncombe County 
alumni suggest the following program as the mini- 
mum : 

1. That the alumni of every town and village form 
a Universitv Club. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



19] 



2. That alumni living outside of towns or villages 
shall be members of their nearest Club. 

3. That all Clubs shall meet at luncheon at least 
four times a year on dales set by the General Asso- 
ciation. (We strongly urge six or eight meetings. 

4. That alumni happening to be in towns other 
than their own on luncheon days are not only in- 
vited but are expected to meet with the local Club. 

•">. That each meeting for luncheon shall be limited 
to one hour. 

li. Thai each of these meetings have a definite ob- 
ject, as. for example, the Club might have as guests 
at a meeting in May, just before the high school closes, 
those Seniors in high school who intend to go to the 
University and all others who want to go to college 
in the fall but who have not decided where to go. 
A meeting in September might serve as a preparatory 
send-off to the boys going to the University. The 
meeting or, October 12th would celebrate the birthday 
of our Alma .Mater. A meeting during the holi- 
days would, as it does now. serve to bring together 
the older alumni and the home-coming boys. 

7. That the University be asked to send a circular 
letter to each Club in time for it to be read at the 
regular meetings, this letter to give the almuni in- 
formaion as to the progress and needs of the Uni- 
versity. 

The object of these suggestions is that the alumni 
form the habit of getting together in a happy, friend- 
ly way and talking about the University in its great 
work of service to the State. The University Clubs 



would thus serve as nuclei of public opinion and 
would help bring the University and its work closer 
to every citizen. The alumni would become known 
as alumni and would be consulted by boys wanting 
a higher education. 

General Association Discussed 
The organization and work of the General Alumni 

Association also came under discussion, the opinion 
prevailing that at present Alumni Day was not turned 
to account in a constructive way. Some provision 
should be made for reminiscence and good fellowship, 
but it was the sense of the meeting that these should 
not so predominate as they have heretofore to the ex- 
clusion of the Association's real business. 

Alumni Present 
In addition to President Chase, the following alum- 
ni were present: R. I). W. Connor. II. M. London. 
•I. B. Cheshire. Raleigh; H. E. Rondthaler, \Y. M. 
Hendren, Winston-Salem: P. 0. Glarkson, Charlotte: 
H. B. Stevens, C. W. Johnson. Asheville; A. E. 
Woltz, Gastonia; P. H. Gwynn. Leaksville-Spray ; J. 
R. Baggett, Lillington ; W. C. Wicker, Elon College: 
J. W. Umstead, Jr., Tarboro ; Collier Cobb, A. H. 
Patterson. L. R. Wilson, C. T. Woollen. E. R, Rankin, 
F. P. Graham. A. M. Coates, Chapel Hill. 



INAUGURATION PROGRAM ANNOUNCED 



The program of the exercises at the inauguration 
of President Harry YVoodburn Chase has been an- 
nounced by Dr. Archibald Henderson, chairman of 
the faculty inauguration committee. 

In genera! the exercises will follow closely the 
program of the inauguration of President Graham 
in 1915. The principal addresses, aside from the in- 
augural of President Chase, will be made by Presi- 
dent John Grier Hibben. of Princeton, Dean Charles 
R. Mann, of the University of Chicago, President E. 
A. Alderman, of the University of Virginia, Presi- 
dent W. L. Poteat, of Wake Forest College, and one 
speaker yet to be selected. 

An important change has been made in the time of 
the exercises. They will be in the afternoon. The 
change was made on account of the difficulties of 
train schedules, and though it is the first time im- 
portant exercises have been held at the University 
in the afternoon, the inauguration committee is very 
decided in thinking that a happy solution of a diffi- 
cult problem has been found. 

Under present plans the guests of the University 
will be served a light buffet luncheon at midday. 
They will then gather at the Alumni Building, where 



the academic procession will march to Memorial Hall 
The exercises proper will begin about 2 o'clock and 
will last, it is estimated, until about 4 to 4:30. At 
night a banquet will be served at which brief greet- 
ings will be heard from representatives of learned 
societies and other organizations. After the ban- 
quet a reception will be held in Bynum Gymnasium. 
The speakers for the banquet have not been chosen 
yet, as all the delegates have not been named. There 
is also one vacancy in the list of speakers on the 
program for the inaugural exercises, which Dr. 
Henderson announced would be filled soon. The 
program follows: 

INAUGURAL EXERCISES 

Governor Thomas II'. Bickett, presiding 

Invocation The Bight 'Reverend Joseph B. Cheshirt 

The Higher Education and Its Present Task: 

The College President ./<>/i» Griei Hibben, 

of Princeton University 

The Professional Schooi Dean Charles 11. Mann, 

of tic University of Chicago 

The Graduate School Tending 

Presentation of the Presihen-t ....Ex-President /•'. /'. Venabh 



192 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



Administration of Oath of Office 

Chief Justice Walter Clark 

Induction into Office Governor Thomas W. Biclcett 

Inaucural Address President Harry Woodburn Chase 

Greetings : 

State Universities President Edwin A. Alderman, 

of the University of Virginia 



Colleges of North Carolina President W. L. Potcat, 

of Wake Forest College 
Public Schools of North Carolina 

E. C. Broolcs, Superintendent of Public Instruction" 

Alumni IF. N. Everett 

Student Body E. E. White, Jr. 

Faculty Dr. Archibald Henderson 

Be\ediction The Eight Reverend Joseph B. Cheshire 



CLASS OF 1910 PLANS FOR ITS DECENNIAL REUNION 



Preparations are now being made by the class of 
1910 for its decennial reiuiion, which will be held at 
the next Commencement. The members of this class 
are planning to have a large attendance and to make 
their reunion a notable one. Secretary Joe R. Nixon, 
of Edenton, has recently sent a questionnaire to his 
classmates requesting information concerning their 
doings and whereabouts since graduation. From early 
returns to Secretaiy Nixon the following notes of 
interest are obtained: 

John O. Askew, Jr., is in the mercantile business 
at Harrelsville. 

W. L. Daniel is practicing law at Winton. He is 
president of the Farmers and Merchants Bank and 
is also interested in the mercantile business. During 
the past two sessions of the legislature he was assis- 
tant to the principal clerk of the House. He entered 
the service as a private and became second lieutenant 
of a machine gun company. 

W. B. Rodman Guion is practicing law at New 
Bern. He was in military service for two years. 

John A. Guion is a member of the law firm of 
Guion and Guion at New Bern. From 1915 to 1917 
he was with the legal department of the Norfolk and 
Southern Railroad. He served as second lieutenant 
of Field Artillery for six months on the Mexican 
border and as first lieutenant of the 11th Field Artil- 
ler ovearseas. His regiment took active part in the 
Mense-Argonne offensive. 

T. J. Hackney is with the Hackney Buggy Com- 
pany in Wilson. 

J. Edward Hughes is general manager of the Dare 
Lumber Company of Elizabeth City. Mr. Hughes has 
been connected since graduation with this lumber cor- 
poration, which is one of the largest in eastern North 
Carolina. 

Charles G. Mullen was one of four brothers to vol- 
unteer in the service. He held a commission as first 
lieutenant. He is now general manager of the Tampa 
Times, Tampa, Fla. 

T. T. Murphy is county superintendent of schools 
of Pender County and is also interested in farming. 
He lives at Burgaw. 

Paul M. Montague enlisted in the aviation section 
U. S. Signal Corps, in April, 1917, and was com- 
missioned first lieutenant the following September. 
He served with the First Pursuit Group of the A. E. 
F., on the Toul Front from May 18th to June 30th, 
1918, and on the Chateau-Thierry front from July 



1st to July 30th, 1918. From July 30th to November 
29th he was a prisoner of war. He secured his dis- 
charge from service February 4, 1919. 

Dr. T. F. Nisbet is practicing dentistry at Albe- 
marle, and is the father of four children — a boy, a 
girl, and twin daughters. 

R. Grady Rankin, of Gastonia, is president and 
active head of three cotton mills ; active vice-president 
of the Carolina Yarn Corporation, of Philadelphia; 
vice-president Gastonia Insurance and Realty Com- 
pany; a bank director and a member of the Gaston 
County board of commissioners. He married Miss 
Ruth Boyce iu 1913, and is the father of two child- 
ren, the younger R. Grady, Jr. 

W. Marvin Snider was with the Wachovia Bank 
and Trust Company of Salisbuiy for five years, and 
since that time has been president of Snider and 
Company, wholesale grocers, Salisbury. 

Leon G. Stevens is practicing law at Smithfield. 
He married Miss Ethel Gordon Sefton in 1912, and 
is the father of two boys and one girl. 

D. L. Struthers has been eity engineer of Wilming- 
ton since leaving Chapel Hill. He has also done engi- 
neering work with a number of drainage and con- 
struction companies. He married Miss Louise Val- 
lers in 1912, and is the father of three children — one 
son and two daughters. 

Dr. Hugh A. Thompson is practicing medicine in 
Raleigh. He was in active service from July, 1917, 
until discharged in July, 1919. He served as cap- 
tain in the U. S. Medical Corps, first with the British 
and later with the French forces. He married Miss 
Barbara Smith in England, February 25, 1919. 

Richard Urquhart is farming at Woodville. He 
married Miss Kate Nelson Fenner, of Halifax, and 
is the father of a boy and girl. 



TRACK TEAM SCHEDULE 
Graduate Manager Charles T. Woollen has an- 
noiuiced the following track schedule: 

April 7th — Dual meet with Trinity in Durham. 

April 24th — Three-cornered meet with Virginia 
and V. M. I. in Charlottesville. 

May 1st — North Carolina State meet in Chapel 
Hill. 

May 8th — South Atlantic Intercollegiate Athletic 
Association meet in Blaeksburg, Va. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



193 



CIVIL ENGINEERING ALUMNI NOTES 



Professor T. F. Hickerson, class of 1904, associate 
professor of civil engineering in the University, 
hands The Review the following- notes of interest 
concerning- former students of civil engineering in 
the University : 

W. L. Spoon, '91, is division highway engineer with 
the Bureau of Public Roads, "Washington, D. C. He 
is chief representative of the Government in the State 
of North Carolina on all federal-aid projects. 

Col. Ernest Graves, '00, of Washington, D. C, 
colonel of engineers, U. S. Army, received the D. S. M. 
for exceptionally meritorious and distinguished serv- 
ices during the war. He was charged with the con- 
struction of the Gievres storage depot and later was 
appointed engineer officer of the Intermediate Sec- 
tion, Services of Supply, where he was placed in 
charge of all construction projects west of Bourges. 
As engineer officer of Base Section No. 2, and of the 
Advance Section, S.O.S., he performed the duties 
with which he was intrusted in a conspicuously meri- 
torious manner. 

Brent Drane, '02, of Charlotte, is a specialist in 
town and suburban improvement with the firm of 
Blair and Drane. 

Robert G. Lassiter, '05, of Oxford, is president of 
Robert G. Lassiter and Co., construction engineers, 
with home offices at Oxford and branch offices in 
Norfolk, Raleigh, Durham and Greensboro. This 
company has done extensive contracting work in 
North Carolina and Virginia in municipal improve- 
ment of various kinds, chiefly road and street pave- 
ments. 

N. C. Hughes, Jr., '03, of Laurens, S. C, is county 
highway engineer of Laurens County, South Carolina. 
L. M. Ross, '08, of Gastonia, is county engineer of 
Gaston County. J. M. Costner, '09, of Jackson, Miss., 
is engaged in agriculture and live stock raising. R. 
T. Brown, '11, of Columbia, S. C, is chief of surveys, 
State Highway Commission of South Carolina. N. S. 
Mullican, '11, of Lexington, is county highway engi- 
neer of Davidson County. J. E. Wood, '11, of Eliz- 
abeth City, is first lieutenant engineers, U. S. Army. 
He is now stationed in Poland. T. M. Price, '12, is 
located at 202 14th Street, North, Seattle, Wash. He 
is a civil engineer with a construction company. C. 
R. Thomas, '12, is located at 11 E. Oilman St., Madi- 
son, Wis. He is a member of the civil engineering 
department, University of Wisconsin. D. L. Struth- 
ers, '10, is located at 11 N. 8th St., Wilmington. He 
is an advisory civil engineer with Geo. A. Fuller Co., 
Carolina Shipyard. 

J. B. Clingman, '12, of Raleigh, is chief mainten- 
ance engineer of the North Carolina State High- 
way Commission. S. E. Barbour, '13, of Clayton, 
is engaged in real estate and mercantile business. 
R. P. Coble, '13, was division engineer for the North 
Carolina State Highway Commission until Janu- 
ary 1st. He is now secretary and treasurer of the 
Atlantic Bridge Company, Roanoke, Va. J. L. 



Parker, '13, of Ahoskie, is engaged in general civil 
engineering work. J. L. Phillips, '13, of Kinston, is 
engaged in the practice of civil engineering. P. M. 
Smith, '13, is a civil engineer with the Southern 
Railway. His address is Box 117, Lexington, Ky. 
He is masonry inspector and draftsman on additional 
main track construction from Huffman, Ky., to Lan- 
sing, Ky. L. E. Whitfield, '13, of Clinton, is county 
engineer for Sampson Comity. Collier Cobb, Jr., 
'14, of Durham, is an engineer with Robert G. Las- 
siter and Company. He is superintendent in charge 
of eity paving, Durham. H. W. Collins, '14, of Camp 
Humphreys, Va., is captain of engineers, U. S. Army. 
R. A. Reed, '14, is with the Wachovia Bank and 
Trust Company, Winston-Salem. W. S. Wicker, '14, 
of Wilmington, is with the Atlantic Coast Line Rail- 
road, engineering department. 

E. J. Lilly, Jr., '15, of Camp Grant, 111., is first 
lieutenant in the U. S. A., with the 17th Machine 
Gun Battalion. R. P. Brooks, Jr., '16, of 6216 Howe 
St., Pittsburgh, Pa., is engineer for the C. and O. 
Telephone Companj-. C. L. Fore, '16, of Charlotte, 
is a member of the firm of Love and Fore. He was 
formerly engineer for the Southern Bell Telephone 
and Telegraph Company. R. M. Homewood, '16, of 
Raleigh, is engineer with Robert G. Lassiter and 
Company. He is superintendent in charge of con- 
structing the asphalt road from Raleigh to Gary. H. 
Patterson, '16, of Raleigh, is engineer with Robert 
G. Lassiter and Company. He is in charge of mate- 
rials on the Raleigh-Cary construction. J. H. Hale, 
'17, of Laurens, S. C, is with the Laurens County 
Highway Commission, engaged in construction of 
sand-clay roads. C. W. Higgins, '17, of Fort How- 
ard, Md., is a first lieutenant of aviation, U. S. A. 
W. G. Monroe, '17, native of Wilmington, who was 
recently a second lieutenant, Coast Artillery, is now 
with the record sales department of the Columbia 
Giaphaphone Co., Chicago, 111. 

R. W. Parks, '17, of Greensboro, is a highway en- 
gineer with the North Carolina State Highway Com- 
mission. G. Slover, '17, of Laurens, S. C, is a high- 
way engineer with the Laurens County Highway 
Commission. M. M. Williams, '17, of Winston-Salem, 
is highway engineer with the North Carolina High- 
way Commission. E. A. Griffin, '18, of Goldsboro, is 
secretary and treasurer of the A. T. Griffin Manu- 
facturing Company, lumber manufacturers. W. F. 
Morrison, '18, of Raleigh, is with the bridge design 
department of the North Carolina State Highway 
Commission. 



William II. Bobbitt, of Charlotte, a member of the 
Junior class, speaking on "The Present Crisis in 
American Democracy," won from a field of nine con- 
is the right to represent the University at the 
annual contest of the Southern Oratorical League, to 
be held in Lexingon, Kentucky. March 5th. 



194 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



GRAHAM KENAN DIES IN NEW YORK 

Graham Kenan, graduate of the class of 1904 and 
member of the Hoard of Trustees and Visiting Com- 
mittee in reeenl years, died of influenza-pneumonia 
in New York City on Thursday night. February 5th. 
a tier an illness of slightly less than two weeks The 
news of his death on the campus, where he had been 
particularly well and favorably known both as a 
student and alumnus, was received in a telegram to 
Prof. H. H. Williams, and came as a profound shock 
to the University. 

Mr. Kenan was born in Kenansville, Duplin Coun- 
ty, November 20, 1883, and was therefore in the 37th 
year of his age. His parents were James Graham 
Kenan and Annie (Hill) Kenan. He was educated 
in the public schools of his county, at Horner Military 
Academy, and at the University. He graduated in 
1904, was a student in the University Law School 
1904-05, and. received his license in 1905. Locating 
in Wilmington, he opened an office in his own name, 
and later formed partnerships with three University 
men under the firm names, respectively, of Kenan 
and Herring, Kenan and Stacy, and Kenan and 
Wright. Mr. Kenan continued as a member of the 
bar of Wilmington until the spring of 1918 when he 
removed to New York where he could give closer 
attention to his large interests there. 

On December 18, 1912, Mr. Kenan married Miss 
Sarah Kenan, a daughter of the late Capt. William 
Hand Kenan. Mrs. Kenan ; his mother, Mrs. James 
G. Kenan ; his sister, Miss Emily H. Kenan, of Wil- 
mington ; Dr. Owen Kenan, of New York; and Thos. 
S. Kenan, of Atlanta, survive him. Interment was in 
Oakdale cemetery, Wilmington, on Monday afternoon, 
February 8th, the University being represented at 
the funeral by Dean George Howe. 

In the death of Mr. Kenan the University not only 
sustains the loss of a most devoted alumnus, but of a 
representative of a North Carolina family whose 
service to the University throughout the years has 
been unusually distinctive. Mr. Kenan was a nephew 
of the late Colonel Thos. S. Kenan, thirty years a 
trustee of the University and twenty years president 
of the General Alumni Association, and a cousin of 
the late Mrs. Robert W. Bingham, founder of the 
present Kenan fund of the University. 



ALUMNI NEWS FROM DAVIE HALL 

\h-. W. C. Ooker, head of the department of botany 
in the University has given The Review the follow- 
ing news notes concerning alumni who specialized in 
botany while students in the University: 



H. A. Allard, elass of 1905, was the first assistant 
in the botany department after its organization. 
He came here from Massachusetts and largely made 
his expenses while in college. He was always an en- 
thusiastic naturalist and while here was generally 
known by the students as "Bull of the Woods." He 
enjoyed all phases of nature and his studies on in- 
sects have been continued as a side line. At present 
he .is one of the best known authorities of the United 
States on the notes of crickets and grasshoppers, and 
has published a beautiful paper in Country Lift in 
America on "Grasshoppers and Crickets and Their 
Notes." His main work, however, has been in 
botany. He went from here to the Department of 
Plant Industry of the U. S. Department of Agri- 
culture, Washington, and has made a name for him- 
self as one of the best research men they have. Mr. 
Allard is just now publishing a large paper with Dr. 
W. W. Garner, a South Carolinian — also of the De- 
partment — on the "Behavior of Flowering Plants as 
Affected by Light Duration." From what I can 
learn, this will be one of the most important contri- 
butions to the physiology of plants published in 
America in recent years. It opens a new field and 
places the authors in a very favorable position to 
interpret better than ever before the seasonal growth 
of plants and their natural distribution. 

N. A. Reasoner, class of 1917, was instructor in 
botany during 1917-18. After adventures in several 
fields he has settled down to active participation with 
his father in the management of the large Royal 
Palms Nursery, Oneco, Florida. Mr. Reasoner is 
particularly fitted for just this kind of work, and, 
with his interest in systematic botany and his train- 
ing in the general subject, will, I believe, be inter 
ested in placing his business on the higher scientific 
basis that distinguished the founders of the older 
nurseries in this country, such as P. J. Berckmans, 
Thomas Meehan, Peter Henderson, Downing Bros., 
and others. 

Ivey Lewis, class of 1902, began his study of botany 
here and then went to Johns Hopkins University for 
his doctor's degree. He is now professor of botany 
at the University of Virginia. He has made a repu- 
tation as a skillful investigator on the cytology of the 
lower plants and has published valuable papers. 

Curtis Vogler, class of 1919, was instructor in 
botany during 1918-19. He is now assistant plant 
breeder in the Pedigreed Seed Company, at Harts- 
ville, S. ('.. where he seems to have found exactly 
the kind of work he is best fitted for. He writes 
with great enthusiasm of his interest in his work, and 
will have the unique advantage in the future of being 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



195 



under the direction of Dr. H. J. Webber, whose repu- 
tation as a scientific plant breeder is not surpassed by 
any man in America. Dr. "Webber was for many years 
head of all the breeding- work of the U. S. Depart- 
ment of Agriculture, and is going to Hartsville this 
year from the Department's citrus fruit experiment 
station at Riverside, Cal. 



FULLER SELECTED AS COACH 

Myron E. Fuller, of Yale, line coach at "West Vir- 
ginia University hist fall and for seven years prior 
to that coach at various institutions in the northeast, 
will be head coach of the football team next fall, 
succeeding Thomas J. Campbell, of Harvard, who is 
giving up football for business. 

The announcement was made recently by Gradu- 
ate Manager Charles T. Woollen who said at the 
same time that there would be two assistant coaches, 
one especially for the backfield and the other prob- 
ably for ends. Negotiations are under way now for 
these men, one of whom at least will probably be a 
Carolina alumnus 

Fuller was in Chapel Hill early in February when 
he met Captain Harrel and 125 candidates for the 
1920 team. He is a giant of a man, tall, powerfullv- 
built, with an aggressive and magnetic personality, 
and he made a strong impression on the football men. 

"You need have no fear of a change in the system 
of football that you have used," Fuller said to the 
candidates. "There are no different systems in the 
fundamentals of football, and the basic principles that 
you learned under Campbell will serve you in good 
stead with me." 

Fuller comes to North Carolina with a record of 
long experience and marked success as a coach. A 
nalive of New York, he graduated from Yale in 
1911, where he was a guard and tackle on Freshman 
and varsity teams. He has coached every year since 
then. In 1912 and 1913 he was with Stevens Insti- 
tute at Hoboken and in 1914 and 1915 with Colby 
College, at "Waterville, Maine. Haverford School had 
him in 1916, Swarthmore College in 1917, and in 1918 
he coached at Hog Island Shipyard, near Philadel- 
phia. Last year he was line coach at West Virginia 
University. 

His 1914 Colby team is considered the strongest 
ever turned out in Maine and ran up 277 points to 
its opponents' 49. In addition to beating the Uni- 
versity of Maine, Bowdoin, and Bates, it beat Holy 
Cross 17 to and played the Navy a 21-31 game. 
The 1917 Swarthmore team was also of championship 
caliber in its class, beating Lafayette 56 to 0, Haver- 
ford 57 to 7, and playing Pennsylvania a 0-10 game. 



The "West Virginia team last fall was one of the 
best in the country. Although beaten by Pittsburg, 
it electrified the football world by defeating Prince- 
ton 25 to 0, and it won also from Rvitgers, 30 to 7, 
and from Washington and Jefferson, 7 to 0. The 
Mountaineers developed a remarkable offense. They 
made great use of an open attack, using formations 
from which always one receiver was left uncovered 
for passes and at the same time spreading out the 
defense so much that running plays gained a great 
deal of ground. 

A large amount of veteran material will be ready 
for the new coach next fall. Of the eighteen letter 
men, ten are certain to return and four more are 
probably coming. In addition the Freshman squad 
will send up a lot of strong material. 



BASEBALL STARTS APRIL FIRST 

Graduate Manager Charles T. Woollen has an- 
nounced a baseball schedule of twenty-two games, in- 
cluding contests with all the colleges in the State, 
three meetings with Virginia, and a northern trip 
with six dates, running as far North as the Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania. 

All of these games will be played between April 
1st and May 12th, which means that between those 
dates the team will be averaging several games each 
week. 

The first Virginia game will be played in Char- 
lottesville, April 10th, the second in Greensboro, 
April 24th, and the third in Chapel Hill, April 26th. 
The two A. and E. games will be played April 7th 
and 16th, the latter in Chapel Hill. The total sclud 
ule is as follows: 

April 1st— Guilford, at Chapel Hill. 

April 2d — Stevens Institute, at Chapel Hill. 

April 3d— Maryland State, at Chapel Hill. 

April 5th — Davidson, place uncertain. 

April Gth — Richmond College, place uncertain. 

April 7th — A. and E., at Raleigh. 

April 10th — Virginia, at Charlottesville. 

April 12th — Washington and Lee, at Danville. 

April 14th— Elon, at Chapel Hill. 

April 16th— A. and K., at Chapel Hill. 

April 19th— Wake Forest, at Chapel Hill. 

April 21st— Trinity, at Chapel Hill. 

April 24th — Virginia, at Greensboro. 

April 20th— Virginia, at Chapel Hill. 

April 29th — Georgetown, at Washington. 

April 30th — Catholic University, at Washington. 

May 1st — Maryland State, at Baltimore. 

May 3d — Haverford, at Haverford, Pa. 

May 4th — Swarthmore, at Philadelphia. 

May 5th — Pennsylvania, at Philadelphia. 

May 8th— Wake Sorest, at Wake Forest. 

May 12th— Trinity, at Durham. 



196 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



Baseball Prospects 
Coach William Lourcey arrived in Chapel Hill 
shortly after the middle of February lint regular 
!i : eball practice could not be started until after 
March 1st. An impressive squad of veterans headed 
by Captain Feimster was waiting- for him, including 
three veteran pitchers, Wilson, Joyner, and Llewelyn, 
and two catchers, Younce and Roberts. Other letter 
men included Corton and Milton, infielders, and 
Lewis, outfielder. McLean, infielder, and Saunders, 
outfielder, who were not eligible last year, are ex- 
pected to make good. Douglas, former first baseman 
at Trinity, Sweet man and Proctor, outfielders, Fields 
and Swift, pitchers, and Kirkman and Baker, in- 
fielders, are other players of experience who are 
counted on for effective work. 



hard fight, with Virginia winning, 37 to 31. It was 
the best played, most interesting, and, aside from the 
score, the most satisfying game Carolina has played 
lliis year except possibly the first Trinity game. 

Trinity 20, Carolina 19 

On March 1st in Bynum Gymnasium Trinity de- 
feated Carolina by the score of 20 to 19. In the early 
part of the season Carolina had defeated Trinity in 
Durham. 

Carolina Wins and Loses 
Carolina defeated A. and E. in Chapel Hill on 
March 3rd by the score of 42 to 12. In Raleigh on 
March 6th A. and E. defeated Carolina by the score 
of 32 to 21. This second game with A. and E. con- 
cluded Carolina's basketball season. 



MID-SEASON BASKETBALL 

Since the February issue of The Alumni Review 
the basketball team has played eight games, of which 
only two were turned in as victories. Included in 
the five were two games with Virginia, one lost de- 
cisively, the other after a desperate fight. 

North Carolina 26, Virginia 40 
The first Virginia game, played in Charlottesville 
February 7th, was lost by the decisive score of 26 
to 40. The result was a surprise, as the Tar Heels 
entered the contest favorites. Through nervousness, 
however, and over-anxiety they did not play the 
game that was expected of them. Virginia, on the 
other hand, played very fine basketball, probably 
the best they had shown during the season. 

North Carolina 27, Georgetown 36 
The fast Georgetown team, which has made a re- 
markable record this season, won from North Caro- 
lina. February 9th, in Washington, by the score of 
36 to 27. 

North Carolina 32, Catholic University 28 
With two substitutes in the line-up the next night 
Carolina looked fresher and stronger, Erwin and 
Griffith both adding a good deal of vigor to the game, 
and Catholic University was defeated, 32 to 28. 

North Carolina 24, Navy 36 
Carolina played possibly her' best game on the 
northern trip against the Navy, but she was up 
against the best team she met, and the game was lost, 
24 to 36, only after a bitter struggle. 

North Carolina 31, Virginia 37 
The second Virginia game, played in Raleigh Feb- 
ruary 27th before a large crowd, brought the usual 



GUBERNATORIAL CANDIDATES ON HILL 

With the determination of bringing all the guber- 
natorial candidates to Chapel Hill so that the student 
body might have a chance to look them over, the Cam- 
pus Cabinet, acting through its chairman, C. P. 
Spruill, Jr., wrote to the three candidates for the 
Democratic nomination, Max Gardner, Cameron Mor- 
rison, and Robert N. Page, in "February, inviting 
them to speak at the University. 

At the same time a letter was sent to Chairman 
Frank Linney, of the Republican committee, notify- 
ing him that the students woidd invite any Republi- 
can candidate as soon as he declared himself. 

A date was arranged for Max Gardner first and 
he spoke on February 25th to a crowd of students 
and members of the faculty that jammed Gerrard 
Hall to the. doors. Introduced by Dr. Archibald Hen- 
derson, Mr. Gardner drew a round of applause and 
cheers by saying that the last time he had appeared 
on the platform in Gerrard Hall was at a jubilee cel- 
ebration held by the victorious football team in 1905. 

He spoke for forty minutes and received close at- 
tention. Announcing his platform as "Life and more 
abundant life for all the people of the State," he 
devoted a large part of his time to an educational 
appeal. On national issues he came out for "drastic 
restrict ion of immigration for at least five years, 
deportation or jailing of those who are tearing at the 
vitals of the nation's life, and Americanization." 
Touching labor, he said: "This country cannot ex- 
pand under an autocracy of .labor any more than 
under an autocracy of wealth. The right of both 
labor and wealth to organize should be subject to 
law, or the one will lead to Bolshevism, the other to 
despotism. ' ' 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



197 



ESTABLISHED 1916 



Jflumni Eoyalty fund 



One for all, and all Tor one" 



Council: 

A.M. SCALES, '92 
LESLIE WEIL, '95 
L. R. WILSON. '99 
A. W. HAYWOOD, '04 
W. T. SHORE. 'OS 
J. A. GRAY, '08 




ARE YOU WORRIED BY THAT OLD, OLD QUESTION 

That will not down: How may I prove my loyalty to 
Alma Mater? Of course you are and will continue 
to be until you 

SEND YOUR CHECK TO THE ALUMNI LOYALTY FUND 

And do at least one of the following important things: 

1. Put the News Letter, the President's report, the Tar Heel, The Review, the Extension 
Bulletin, the Tar Baby — one or all — in the school or town library and hand copies of them to 
the local editor. 

2. Tell the teachers you meet with that they should attend the Summer School June-July. 
Send the names of the high school boj'S who should be on the Hill in September. 

3. Have you made your will f If you have not, make it and put Carolina in. If you have, 
and failed to include Carolina, add a codicil for her benefit. 

4. Endow one, two, or five fellowships in subjects of your choice with which the best men 
can be held in the Graduate School. 

5. Establish one, two, or five scholarships for students who cannot otherwise go to college. 

6. Endow any one of the fourteen unendowed sections of the library. Or give a lump sum 
for the immediate purchase of books. 

7. Studies in Philology has won a place in the scholarly world as a philological journal. 
An annual income of $500 will make its position permanent. 



IERE IT IS: GO TO ITI 



TEAR THIS OFF AND MAIL IT TO U. A. WARREN, TREAS. 



University of North Carolina Loyalty Fund: 

I will give to the Alumni Loyalty Fund $ 

payable of each year; at which time please send notice. 



annually 



I reserve the right to revoke at will. 



Name. 



. ( Class ) 



Address, 



Date_ 



198 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



THE ALUMNI RE VIEW 

Issued monthly except in July, August, and September, by the Gen- 
eral Alumni Association of the University of North Carolina. 

Board of Publication 

The Review is edited by the following Board of Publication: 

Louis R. Wilson, '99 Editor 

Associate Editors: Waller Murphy, '92; Harry Howell, '95; Archibald 
Henderson. '98; \V. S. Bernard, '00; J. K. Wilson, '05; Louis 
(1 raves, '02; F. P. Graham, '09; Kenneth Tanner, '11; Lenoir 
Chambers, Jr., '14; R. W. Madry, '18. 

K. R. Rankin, '13 Managing Editor 

Subscription Price 

Single Copies $0.20 

Per Year 1.50 

Communications intended for the Editor and the Managing Editor 
should be sent to Chapel Hill, N. C. All communications intended for 
publication must be accompanied with signatures if they are to receive 
consideration. 

OFFICE OF PUBLICATION, CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 

Entered at the Postoffice at Chapel Hill, N. O, as second class 
matter. 



THE UNIVERSITY IN PRINT 



An unusually interesting series of articles, involv- 
ing detailed research, has been appearing in The 
High School Journal. This series, entitled "The 
Academy Movement in the South," is written by 
Professor Edgar "W. Knight, whose work in second- 
ary education in North Carolina (Houghton, Mifflin 
Co.) is widely and favorably known. Part of an 
address given by Professor Knight before the North 
Carolina Teachers' Assembly, at Raleigh, N. C, No- 
vember 26, 1919, on "Public Education in the South; 
Some Inherited Ills and Some Needed Reforms," oc- 
cupies the leading position in School and Society for 
January 10, 1920 (vol. xi, No. 263). 



A new magazine, The Southern Review, edited by 
Mr. and Mrs. Leo Perla, has recently appeared. It 
is published in Asheville, North Carolina. The mag- 
azine, in its opening number (January. 1920), makes 
an appeal for "constructive thinking, the best thought 
that can be brought to bear on the grave problems 
that are menacing the future of America." The first 
issue carries, among others, contributions by Miss 
Mary Graves, Dr. C. Alphonso Smith, and Dr. Edwin 
A. Alderman. The second number (March) begins 
a Department of Rural Culture, edited by Miss Lulu 
M. Cassidy, former school supervisor for Orange 
County; and under this head appears in full Profes- 
sor E. C. Branson's "North Carolina's Scheme of 
Rural Development." The Alumni Review wel- 
comes the appearance of The Southern Review, with 
its constructive program of giving effective expres- 
sion to the South 's "will to service" for America. 



The annual report of W. A. Graham (class of 
1860), Commissioner of Agriculture, for 1919, af- 
fords stimulating reading. It is shown that, accord- 
ing to the United States Bureau of Crop Estimate, 
North Carolina ranks fourth. Since 1910 North Car- 
olina has risen from the twenty-second State as to 
value of crops to the fourth place, as indicated — a 
truly remarkable and gratifying evidence of agricul- 
tural development and advance. 



A bulletin useful for reference and to be relied 
upon for accuracy is the "Directory of the State 
and County Officials of North Carolina" (revised). 
It is one of the publications of the North Carolina 
Historical Commission, Legislative Reference Li- 
brary, and is the work of the head of the bureau, 
H. M. London (IT. N. C, class of 1899). 



A book which, for its intrinsic interest and local 
appeal, deserves a much fuller notice than space 
here permits, is "The 321st Infantry, 'Wildcats,' 81st 
Division," by Clarence Walton Johnson (A.B., U. 
N. C, 1912), Corporal H Co., 321st Inf. (R. L. 
Bryan Co., Columbia, S. G, 1919.) University of 
North Carolina alumni, in the order in which they 
appear on the official roster, are : Capt. Curtis By- 
num, Adjutant ; Second Lieut. Guy L. Neely ; First 
Lieut. Hal B. Ingram; Capt. Augustine W. Folger; 
First Lieut. Reynolds T. Allen; Capt. Henry L. In- 
gram ; Second Lieut. Thomas F. Borden ; Second 
Lieut. Robert L. Brinkley; First Lieut. Claude A. 
Cochrane ; First Lieut, Claude F. Andrews, and 
Capt. DeWitt R. Austin. In the successful "show," 
entitled "O U Wildcats," which was given in the 
large theaters of Paris, Tours, and Le Mans, one of 
the big "song hits" was entitled "The Bloody War," 
by Sergt. H. G. Reagan (U. N. C, class of 1914). 
Corporal Johnson's book is delightful to read, and 
is filled with accurate information, informing illus- 
trations, and official maps and data. In speaking of 
the attack of the 81st Division on November 9th, 10th 
and 11th (Armistice Day), General Pershing wrote: 
"The bearing of the division . . . showed the 
mettle of officers and men, and gave promise of what 
it would become as a veteran. With such a record, the 
division may return home proud of its service in 
France as a part of the A.E.F." 



An important contribution to the history of North 
Carolina is embodied in three quarto volumes, bear- 
ing the imprint of the Lewis Publishing Company 
(Chicago and New York, 1919). Volume I, by R. 
D. W. Connor (U. N. C, class of 1899), Secretary of 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



199 



the North Carolina Historical Commission, is en- 
titled: "The Colonial and Revolutionary Periods, 
1584-1783/' Volume II, by W. K. Boyd, Professor 
of History in Trinity College, is entitled: "The 
Federal Period, 1783-1860." Volume III, by J. G. 
deR. Hamilton, Alumni Professor of History in this 
institution, is entitled: "North Carolina Since 1860." 
No extended review in this place is permissible for 
lack of space. Attention is called to the features of 
this work especially deserving of attention, namely : 
the immense quantity and variety of some materials 
upon which the authors have drawn, materials which, 
in many cases, have not been drawn upon by those 
who have written the State's history; the scholarh* 
character of the work, each volume being written by 
a trained historian, deeplj- versed in the history and 
literature of the period; the careful citation of au- 
thority and the bibliographical lists, which should 
prove useful to students ; and the unaffected, straight- 
forward style of all three volumes, even though each 
is written by a different hand. In his volume, Mr. 
Connor's purpose, -as he states it in the preface, 
"has been to bring out more fully than has heretofore 
been attempted the relation of North Carolina to 
the British Empire in America of which it was a 
part;" and this he has done more fully and effective- 
ly than anyone who has preceded him. Professor 
Boyd's task was perhaps the most difficult of the 
three — for two reasons: First, that it lacked the 
romantic color and high narrative interest afforded, 
in the one case, by the founding of the colony and 
by the great drama of the Revolution, in the 
other by the war of the sections with its complex 
and stirring aftermath of reconstruction ; and sec- 
ond, that the Federal period has been less studied 
than any other period of our history. Much research 
was required for the production of this volume, and 
chapters of exceptional interest are: "Banking Prob- 
lems, 1804-1835," "Religious Development After the 
Revolution," and "Academies and Higher Educa- 
tion." The author of the standard work, "Recon- 
struction in North Carolina," had already established 
himself as the leading authority in the Civil War 
and post-bellum eras; and his interest in current 
political questions, constitutional reform, and large 
issues of public welfare give authority and force to 
the volume by Dr. Hamilton. Of particular interest 
are the chapters on "White Supremacy," "Educa- 
tional Development," and "Social Tendencies." 



These are: "The Susceptibility of Naturally Nephro- 
pathy Animals to Acute Mercuric Chloride Intoxi- 
cation" (Journal of Medical Research, volume xxxix, 
No. 4), March, 1919; "A Functional and Patholog- 
ical Study of the Chronic Nepln-opathy Induced in 
the Dog by Uranium Nitrate" (Journal of Experi- 
mental Medicine, vol. xxix, No. 5, May 1, 1919, with 
plates) ; and "On Occurence of Degenerative Changes 
in the Liver in Animals Intoxicated by Mercuric 
Chloride and by Uranium Nitrate" (Proceedings of 
the Society of Experimental Biology and Medicine, 
vol. xvi, 1919). These papers, the conclusions of 
which need not be summarized here, constitute con- 
structive evidence of continuation of the important 
researches in this field which Dr. MacNider has been 
conducting for a number of years past. 



More than 2,000 North Carolina boys and girls in 
250 high schools of the State are now at work in 
preparation for the, eighth annual contest of the High 
School Debating Union. 

The query which is to be discussed this year is : Re- 
solved, That the United States should adopt a policy 
of further material restriction of immigration. The 
triangular debates will be held over the State on 
April 9th, and the final contest for the Aycock Mem- 
orial Cup will be held at the University on April 22nd 
and 23rd. 

The High School Debating Union was organized by 
the University and the high schools in the college year 
1912-13. A great deal of interest is being manifested 
in the debates this year on the part of nearly all of 
the accredited high schools of the State. 



Fifteen Carolina alumni received license to practice 
law at the Supreme Court examinations in January. 
Twelve of these went direct from the University Law 
School. The list .follows : 

E. B. Bridges, Charlotte; Lyn Bond, Edenton; H. 
A. Jones, Greensboro; A. H. King, Burlington; D. B. 
Leatherword, Waynesville ; Z. V. McMillan, Red 
Springs; Miss Frances Mc.Kenzie, New Bern; S. D. 
Mc.Cullen, Goldsboro; E. J. Perry, Kinston ; F. O. 
Ray, Selma; R. B. Robbins, Lexington; B. E. Weath- 
ers, Shelby; C. E. Blackstock, Asheville; C. B. Woltz, 
Gastonia ; J. H. Rand, Raleigh. 



The results of research conducted by Dr. W. deB. 
MacNider, in the Laboratory of Pharmacology here, 
are embodied in his three papers, published in 1919. 



Dr. John M. Manly, head of the department of 
English at the University of Chicago and one of the 
most distinguished English scholars in the country, 
conducted a week's English seminar course the last 
week in February. His lectures centered around 
pre-Shakespearean drama, in which subject Dr. Man- 
ly is a recognized authority. 



200 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



THE GENERAL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

of the 
UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 



Officers of the Association 

R. D. W. Connor, '99 President 

E. R. Rankin, '13 Secretary 

Executive Committee: Walter Murphy, '92; Dr. R. H. 
Lewis. '70; W. N. Everett, '86; H. E. Rondthaler, '93; C. W. 
Tillett, Jr., '09. 



WITH THE CLASSES 

1859 
— Capt. J. E. Beasley, of Memphis, Term., is one of the few 
surviving members of the class of '59. Captain Beasley at- 
tained the rank of captain through service in the armies of 
the Confederacy. His business pursuits have been for the 
most part in the insurance field. Captain Beasley is a former 
member of the Memphis board of school commissioners. He 
attended the 50-year reunion of his class in 1909. 

1866 




General J. S. Carr, of Durham, 
President of the 1920 State Fair 

1879 
— C C. Covington is at the head of the C. C Covington Co., 
molasses importers of Wilmington. Mr. Covington is president 
of the New Hanover County Alumni Association. 

1880 
— George Green is secretary and treasurer of the F. H. 
Adams Cooperage Co., New Bern. This corporation manu- 
factures gum and Cottonwood slack barrel heading and staves. 
— E. R. Overman is president of the Overman Co., wholesale 
grocers of Salisbury, and is treasurer of the Boyden-Overman 
Co., cotton buyers. 

1881 
— Dr. W. D. Pemberton, well-known physician of Concord, has 
a son in the Unversity this year. 



1883 
—II. A. Tillett is general attorney for the Kepley-Bright Oil 
Co., at Dallas, Texas. 

— R. A. Doughton, lawyer of Sparta, has been elected vice- 
president of the Elkin and Alleghany railroad. 

1884 
— B. F. White is in the faculty of the University of California, 
at Berkeley. 

1885 
— George Gordon Battle, well-known lawyer of New York 
City, has accepted the national chairmanship of a campaign 
to raise one million dollars for Sweet Briar College, Virginia. 
— Col. J. H. Holt, of Burlington, is president of the Alamance 
Bank and Trust Co., vice-president of the Glencoe and Elmira 
mills, and secretary and treasurer of the Lakeside mills. 
— Herbert Rountree is engaged in the manufacture of the 
"Ideal" sweeping compound, at Oxford. 

1887 
— Louis M. Bourne and Haywood Parker are in law partner- 
ship under the firm name of Bourne and Parker, at Asheville. 

1888 
— C. G. Foust is at the head of the lumber firm of R. B. 
Spencer and Co., Dublin, Texas. 

— L. B. Edwards is connected with various financial and 
business enterprises at Live Oak, Fla. 



— Lake Moore is 
Muskogee. 



1889 

Oklahoma land owner. 

1891 



He lives at 



— Henry Staton, a native of Tarboro, is an attorney and coun- 
sellor at law with offices in the Union Trust Bldg., 80 Broad- 
way, New York City. 

— Wm. J. Andrews is a mechanical engineer, of Raleigh. 
— J. S. Lewds, of Asheboro, is president of the First National 
Bank of Asheboro. He is also president of the Riverside 
cotton mills of Worth ville. 

1892 
— W. C. Hammer, Law '92, of Asheboro, U. S. district attorney 
for the western N. C. district, is a candidate for the Demo- 
nut it- nomination for Congress from the seventh district. 
— Rev. W. E. Rollins, a native of Asheville, is professor of 
church history in the Episcopal Theological Seminary at Alex- 
andria, Va. 

— F. L. Rollins, formerly of Salisbury, is located at Peters- 
burg, Va., where he is at the head of the Mataoca Cotton 
Mills. 

— T. C. Everett, of Laurinburg, former member of the legisla-- 
ture, is engaged in farming in Scotland County. 



Walser is proprietor of the Cash Grocery Co., at Lex- 



— J. G. 

ington. 

1893 

— J. F. Hendren, attorney of Elkin, has been chosen general 
counsel of the Elkin and Alleghany railroad. 

1895 

— Dr. James Sawyer, formerly of Asheville, writes that his 
permanent address is Hotel Olmsted, Cleveland, Ohio. 
— W. L. Scott is manager of the credit department of the N. 
C. Public Service Co., at Greensboro. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



201 



Asphalt Pavements 

DURABLE =:= KCONOMICAU 

If you are interested in street or road construction 
we invite you to inspect our work in 
Durham (Asphalt Streets). 
Durham County (Asphalt and Concrete Roads). 
Raleigh and Wake County (Asphalt). 
Guilford County (Asphalt Roads). 
Greensboro. 
Rocky Mount. 
High Point. 
Henderson. 
Lumberton. 

Also roads built fcr United States Government: 
Army Supply Base, Norfolk, Va. 
Newport News — Hampton Highway, Newport 

News, Va. 
Camp Lee, Va. 

A representative will visit you and supply any in- 
formation or estimates desired. 

Robert G. Lassiter & Co. 

ENGINEERING AND CONTRACTING 

327 Arcade Building Norfolk, Va. 

1002 Citizens Bank Building Raleigh, N. C. 

First National Bank Building Oxford, N. C. 



r 



The First National Bank 
of Richmond, Va., 



Commercial 
Banking 



with its resources of 
$36,000,000, is splen- 
didly equipped to 
serve in all branches of 
Commercial Banking. 



Trust 
Department 



The Trust Depart- 
ment offers unexcelled 
service. 

JNO. M. MILLER. Jr., President 
W. M. ADDISON, Vice-President 
CHAS. R. BURNETT, Vice-President 
ALEX. F. RVLAND, Cashier 
TIIOS. W. PURCELL, Trust OJftcer 



Murphy's Hotel 

Richmond, Virginia 

The Most Modern, Largest, and Best Located Hotel 
in Richmond, Being on Direct Car Line to all 
Railroad Depots. 

The Only Hotel in the City With a Garage attached. 

Headquarters for Carolina Business Men 
European Plan $1.50 Up 



■J -»»■>■>•»■*■>-> ->-J «•£<•*■*■<>*-*■•>■>■>->■>>»'> WO >•>>■> >>(<t( I- 1'«> fr (•(■*»»*•*»•)• W-*-* ♦«**»**<■€•«■ <**■, 



3 



JAMES T. DISNEY, President 



202 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



Statement of the Condition of 

The Fidelity Bank 

OF DURHAM, N. C. 

JiCade to the ZACorlh Carolina Corporation Commission 
at the Close of Business, Sept. 12, 1919 



RESOURCES 

Loans and Investments $3,759,035.11 

Furniture and Fixtures 17, 681. -42 

Cash Items 847.421.37 

Cash in Vaults and with Banks 763,893.55 

Overdrafts 842.79 

$5,388,874.24 

LIABILITIES 

Capital Stock $ 100,000.00 

Surplus 500,000.00 

Undivided Profits 107,596.17 

Interest Reserve 6,000.00 

Dividends Unpaid 195.01 

Deposits 4,261,285.21 

Unearned Interest 8,657.49 

Contingent luind 5,140.36 

Borrowed Bonds 100,000.00 

Bills Payable 300,000.00 

$5,388,874.24 

B. N. DUKE. President JNO. F. WILY. Vice-President S. W. MINOR. Cashier 
L D. KIRKLAND. Assistant Cashier JND. A. BUCHANAN. Assistant Cashier 



The strength of this bank lies not alone in its Capital, Surplus, and Re- 
sources, but in the Character and Financial responsibility 
of the men who conduct its affairs 




Chas. W. Horne, of Clayton, 
President of the 1919 State Pair 



The Yarborough 



RALEIGH'S LEADING AND 
LARGEST HOTEL 

MAKE IT YOUR HOME WHEN 
IN RALEIGH 



B. H. Griffin Hotel Company 



Proprietors 



1896 
— J. Guy Rankin, a native of Asheville, continues in the bank- 
ing business at Campobello, S. C. 

— Dr. D. R. Bryson practices his profession, medicine, at 
Bryson City. 

— H. B. Peschau is engaged in the manufacture of ice at 
Wilmington. 

— R. G. Vaughn, of Greensboro, served as treasurer of the 
endowment commitee from the Presbyterian Synod of North 
Carolina, which was successful in raising by March 1st, one 
million dollars for the North Carolina schools and colleges 
conducted under Presbyterian auspices. A. M. Scales, '92, of 
Greensboro, was chairman of this committee, and J. Harvey 
White, '96, of Graham, was a member of the committee. 
— J. G. Hollowell is engaged in farming in Pasquotank Coun- 
ty, near Elizabeth City. 

1897 
— J. C. Holliday is a furniture dealer and undertaker at 
Clinton. 

— Cameron F. MacRae is a special assistant to the Attorney 
General of the United States. He is located at Asheville. 

1898 
— R. R. Ragan, of High Point, is one of the incorporators and 
principal owners of a newly organized cotton mill at High 
Point. 

— J. G. MeC'ormick is secretary and treasurer of the Acme 
Mfg. Co., manufacturers of fertilizers and acid phosphates, at 
Wilmington. 

— F. M. Pinnix, of Oxford, is editor of the Orphan's Friend. 
— T. N. Webb is secretary and treasurer of the Bellevue Mfg. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



203 



Co., cotton manufacturers, of Hillsboro. This mill is now 
making a large addition to its plant. 

1899 

H. M. Wagstapp, Secretary, Chapel Hill, N. C. 

— Jas. L. McNair is a successful business man of Laurinburg. 

He is interested in various Scotland County enterprises. 
— T. B. Kenan, Jr., is one of the leading business men of 
Atlanta. He is president of the Atlanta Cotton Oil Co., and 
is identified with other enterprises of the city. 
— B. B. Dougherty has been president of the Appalachian 
Training School at Boone since this institution was established. 
— W. A. Smith taught school at Norwood, Stanly County, for 
several years, following his graduation from the University, 
and then entered the cotton mill business at Albemarle. He 
has been engaged in this business at Albemarle since and 
is now assistant superintendent of the Wiscassett Mills. These 
mills, with 100,000 spindles, are among the largest in the 
State. 

— After leaving Chapel Hill, R. S. Satterfield took a degree 
at Vanderbilt University, Biblical Department, and, following 
that, spent fifteen years as a Methodist minister in Okla- 
homa. Since August, 1918, he has been located in Nashville, 
Tenn., as assistant editor of the Nashville Christian Advocate. 

1900 
W. S. Bernard, Seen tary, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
— Gaston L. Myers is engaged in the tailoring business in the 
Monticello Hotel building, Norfolk, Va. 

— W. Frank Bryan has been for a number of years in the 
faculty of Northwestern University, Department of English, 
at Evanston, 111. 

— Jos. Erwin Gant lives at Burlington and is engaged in the 
cotton mill business. 

— Ed N. Smith is secretary and treasurer of the Albemarle 
Grocery Co., wholesale, at Albemarle. 

— W. G. Wharton is credit manager of the Cone Export and 
Commission Co., Greensboro. He plans to attend the twentieth 
year reunion of the class of 1900 at Commencement. 

1901 
Dr. J. G. Murphy, Secretary, Wilmington, N. C. 
— C. C. Bobbins is superintendent of the Piedmont Mills Co., 
cotton manufacturers, of High Point. 

— Dr. C. A. Shore continues as director of the State laboratory 
of hygiene, Raleigh. 

— Rev. C. P. Coble has been since 1913 pastor of the First 
Presbyterian Church of High Point. Prior to 1913 he was in 
the Presbyterian ministry at Macon, Ga. 

— Dr. J. K. Hall, who is at the head of Westbrook Sanitorium, 
Richmond, Va., was elected secretary and treasurer of the Tri- 
State Medical Society, at the annual meeting of this medical 
body in Charlotte in February. 

1902 

I. F. Lewis, Secretary, University, Va. 
— R. P. Gibson, of Concord, travels in the North Carolina 
cotton mill belt in the interest of the Carolina Mill Supply 
Co., of Greenville, S. C. 

— Dr. J. S. Gibson is a physician and eye specialist of Gibson. 
— J. Frazier Glenn is a lawyer of Asheville, a former judge 
of the city police court. 

— Dr. Charles C. Orr, Med. '02, practices his profession, med- 
icine, in Asheville. In service he was a captain in the medical 
corps. 



The Bank o/Chapel Hill 



Oldest and Strongest bank in Orange County. 



Capital $25,000.00 

Surplus and Profits 40,000.00 

We earnestly solicit your banking 
business, promising you every service 
and assistance consistent with safe 
banking. "It pleases us to please 
you." 



M. C. S. NOBLE President 

R. L. STROWD Vice-President 

M. E. HOGAN Cashier 




>3* 



Snappy Clothes 

for the 
College Man 

Society and 
Stein Block Clothes 

for the young 

and those 
who stay young 



Vanstory Clothing Co. 

C. H. McKNIGHT, "President and Manager 
GREENSBORO, A/. C. 



204 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 




THE YOUNG MAN 

who prefers (and most young men do) styles that 

are a perfect blend of novelty and refinement has 

long since learned the special competency of this 
clothes shop. 

Pritchard, Bright & Co. 

Durham, North Carolina 



ELUS, STONE & COMPANY 

DURHAM, N. C. 

The best class of merchandise at very mod- 
erate prices. 

It is always a pleasure to see our Chapel 
Hill friends in the city, and have them visit 
our store. The Winter stocks of goods are 
now complete. It will be to your interest to 
look carefully through the Hue of New Suits, 
Coats and Wraps. 

New Dresses of Silks, soft Satins, and fine 
Silk Crepes, shown in the latest models. 

All kind of cotton piece goods, Wool and 
Silk Dress Fabrics, Hosiery and Kid Gloves; 
Gossard Front-Lacing Corsets. 



— Benj. Bell, Jr., formerly news editor of the Richmond, Va., 
Times-Dispatch, is now on the staff of Cecil, Barretto and Cecil, 
a well known advertising agency of Richmond. 
— J. B. Cheshire, Jr., lawyer of Raleigh, is president of the 
Wake County Alumni Association. 

— Dr. Richard N. Duffy, physician of New Bern, read a 
paper before the Tri-State Medical Association at the meet- 
ing of this medical body in Charlotte in February. 
— A. R. Hoover, of Concord, has embarked in the hosiery 
mill business and is now secretary and treasurer of the Hoover 
Hosiery Co. 

— The marriage of Miss Harriet Deaver and Dr. Emory Gra- 
ham Alexander took place February 17th at the home of 
the bride's parents in Philadelphia. They are at home at 
337 South 18th St., Philadelphia. 

1903 
N. W. Walker, Secretary, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
— N. Lunsford is engaged in the practice of law at Roxboro. 
— G. G. Gallaway is engaged in the real estate business at 
Charlotte, with offices at 22 E. 5th St. He is at the head 
of the Traders' Land Co. 

1904 
T. F. Hickerson, Secretary, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
— A. W. Latta is secretary and treasurer of the Gastonia Cot- 
ton Yarn Co., direct selling agents for twenty or more Gastonia 
cotton mill corporations, at Mariner and Merchant Bldg., 
Philadelphia, Pa. J. H. Daingerfield, '93, is president of 
this company. 

— W. W. Eagles is engaged in fanning at his home near 
Macclesfield. He is a member of the board of county com- 
missioners of Edgecombe County. 
— J. A. Hornaday is located at his home town, Liberty. 

1905 

W. T. Shore, Secretary, Charlotte, N. C. 
— H. H. Philips, lawyer of Tarboro, is solicitor of the Edge- 
combe County recorder 's court. 

— Chas. H. Sloan, formerly a chemist at Ensley, Ala., is now 
postmaster at his home town, Belmont. Mr. Sloan is vice- 
president of the Gaston County Alumni Association. 
— D. E. Henderson, Law '05, formerly an attorney of New 
Bern, is now in law practice at Charlotte, with offices in the 
Law Bldg. 

— H. S. Lewis practices his profession, law, in Suffolk, Va. 
—Oscar B. Carpenter, Phar. '05, of Gastonia, register of 
deeds of Gaston County, was elected in February vice-president 
and treasurer of the Mason cotton mills, located at Kings 
Mountain. 

1906 
Maj. J. A. Parker, Secretary, Charlotte, N. G. 
— A. H. McLeod, Law '06, is engaged in the automobile busi- 
ness at Lumbertqn. 

— J. E. Millis is secretary and treasurer of the Piedmont Mills 
Co., cotton manufacturers, of High Ponit. 
— W. B. Love, lawyer of Monroe, is president of the Union 
County Alumni Association. He is also president of the 
class of 1900. 

— Dr. Ben F. Royal practices medicine at Morehead City. He 
has been located at Morehead City for a number of years. 
— Chas. H. Keel is connected with the legal department of 
the Curtiss Engineering Co., builders of airplanes at Garden 
City, Long Island, N. Y. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



205 



— W. M. Crump is superintendent of the Vance cotton mills 
and general manager of the Salisbury cotton mills, at Salis- 
bury. • 
— Carter Dalton is engaged in the practice of law at High 
Point. He is associated with Col. Weseott Roberson, '00, under 
the firm name of Roberson and Dalton. 

1907 
C. L. Weill, Secretary, Greensboro, N. C. 
— S. H. Farabee is editor of the Hickory Daily Record, one of 
the newsiest of the State papers. 

— Dr. Geo. W. Shipp, Med. '07, physician of Newton, is county 
physician for Catawba County. 

— J. P. Douthit is engaged in farming and merchandising at 
Clemmons. 

— W. J. Barker is engaged in the cotton mill business at 
Burlington. Formerly he was located at Altamahaw. 
— L. W. Parker, formerly instructor in French in the Univer- 
sity, and more recently in the faculty of the University of 
Minnesota, is now connected with the S. M. Paxker Lumber 
Works, manufacturers of long-leaf yellow-pine lumber, 85-89 
Concord St., Charleston, S. C. 

— C. L. Weill is president of the insurance firm of Miller, 
Robins and Weill, at Greensboro. Marmaduke Robins, '08, is 
secretary and treasurer of this firm. 

— I. I. Davis is secretary of the Hartsell Mills Co. at Concord. 
The principal product of this company is damask, called 
' ' Colonial Damask. ' ' 

1908 
M. Robins, Secretary, Greensboro, N. C. 
— Raymond Chatham is an official of the Chatham Mfg. Co., 
manufacturers of woolen blankets at Elkin. Mr. Chatham's 
corporation filled large orders for blankets for the army 
during the war. 

— S. Singletary, Jr., is connected with the firm of N. A. Currie 
and Co., at Clarkton. 

— Fred I. Sutton, former mayor of Kinston, practices law in 
this city. 

— B. L. Banks is a lawyer of Gatesville and a member of 
the board of trustees of the University. 

— Lieut. Oscar R. Rand is attached to headquarters at Camp 
Gordon, Ga. 

— Judge W. P. Stacy resigned on March 1st as judge of 
the superior court of the eighth N. C. judicial district, and 
has resumed the practice of law in Wilmington. Judge Stacy 
received the appointment to the bench from Governor Craig 
on January 1, 1916. While on the bench he made the repu- 
tation of being one of the ablest superior court judges in the 
State. 

1909 
O. C. Cox, Secretary, Greensboro, N. C. 
— J. W. Umstead, Jr., is one of the incorporators of the Real 
Estate and Insurance Co., at Tarboro. Others of the incor- 
porators are Don Gilliam, '09, and Geo. A. Holderness, of the 
board of trustees of the University. 

— W. B. Jerman is assistant treasurer of the Virginia Trust 
Co., at Richmond. 

— Dr. J. M. Maness, former Carolina football star, practices 
medicine at Ellerbe. 

— J. A. Lindsay is engaged in the manufacture of parlor fur- 
niture at High Point. 



LIGGETT & MYERS 
TOBACCO CO. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 

FATIMA, CHESTERFIELD, AND 

PIEDMONT CIGARETTES 

VELVET AND DUKE'S MIXTURE 

SMOKING TOBACCO AND 

other well known brands of Smok- 
ing Tobacco, Cigarettes, and 
Chewing Tobaccos. 



Our brands are standard for qualify. 
They speak f or themselves. 



The O. Henry 



The Pride of Greensbo 



North Carolina's largest and finest 

commercial and tourist 

hotel 



200 ROOMS 



200 BATHS 



Thoroughly modern. Absolutely fireproof. 

Large sample rooms. Convention 

hall. Ball room. 



W. H. LOWRY 

Manager 



CABELL YOUNG 

Assistant Manager 



206 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



Markham-Rogers Co. 

Clothiers, Tailors, Furnishers and Hatters. 

ALL THE NEW SPRING STYLES AT REASON- 
ABLE PRICES 



DURHAM, N. C. 



F@iriry=IHI©irft©iffi SIk@© C® 

Special Agents for Nettleton and Hurley 

Shoes for Men, and Cousins and Grover 

Shoes for Women 

MAKE OUR STORE HEADQUARTERS 
WHILE IN DURHAM, N. C. 



Academy of Music 

DURHAM, N. C. 

Durham's Exclusive Theatre Playing All Leading 
Attractions 

WM. F. FREELAND, Manager 



HICKS -CRABTREE CO. 

FOUR MODERN DRUG STORES 
RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 

Eastman Kodaks and Supplies 
Nunnally's Candies 

The place to meet your friends when 
in the Capital City 

GILBERT CRABTREE, Manager 



1910 

J. R. Nixon, Secretary, Edenton, N. C. 

— D. S. Harris is engaged in farming at his home near Enfield. 
—The marriage of Miss Virginia Stanbaei and Mr. Paul 
Vernon Godfrey, Phar '10, took place January 2d, at Wash- 
ington, P. 0. They live at Spray, where Mr. Godfrey is 
engaged in the drug business. 

— C. B. Spencer is a lawyer of Swan Quarter, a member of 
the firm of Spencer ami Spencer. 

—Dr. A. M. Wooten, M. D., 1910, practices his profession, 
medicine, at Pinetops, Edgecombe County. 
— L. C. Warren, State Senator from Beaufort County, and 
president pro tern of the Senate, practices law in Washington. 
— Dr. Lee F. Turlington continues the practice of medicine 
at Birmingham, Ala., with offices in the Empire Bldg. 
— W. Marvin Snider continues as president of the Snider Co., 
wholesale groeers of Salisbury. 

— Dr. D. B. Sloan is now located in Wilmington, with offices 
in the Murchison National Bank Bldg. He is a specialist in 
diseases of the eye. 

— E. L. Franck is engaged in fanning at his home near Rich- 
lands, Onslow County. 

1911 
I. C. Moseb, Secretary, Asheboro, N. C. 
— W. E. Miller is witli Fogle Bros. Co., builders, of Winston- 
Salem. His work is draughtsmanship and estimating. 
— The engagement of Miss Sadie Thomas and Mr. John P. 
Walters, both of Charlotte, has been announced. Mr. Watters 
is connected with the Ford assembling plant in Charlotte. 
— Rev. J. G. Walker 's address is 1004 Buncombe St., Green- 
ville, S. C. Mr. Walker is a Presbyterian minister of Green- 
ville. 

— J. S. Cowles is on the staff of the Jacksonville, Fla., Times- 
I'nion. His address is Deland, Fla. 

— Paul Dickson is engaged in the insurance and real estate 
business at Raeford. He is agent for the New England Mu- 
tual Life Insurance Co. 

— C. M. Waynick is associate editor of the Greensboro Daily 
Record. Mr. Waynick received the commission of second lieu- 
tenant in the reserve corps, infantry, from the Central Officers 
Training School, Camp Gordon, Ga., on Nov. 30, 1918. 
— C. E. Mcintosh is superintendent of the Maiden schools. 

1912 
John C. Lockhart, Secretary, Raleigh, N. C. 
— K. R. King, Jr., practices his profession, law, in Greensboro. 
— W. P. Moore, following his discharge from the service, re- 
turned to Godwin, where lie is again superintendent of schools. 
— W. T. McLean is engaged in the lumber business at Thom- 
asville, Ga. "Mac" is a native of Raeford. 
— Walter Carter is engaged in engineering and contracting, 
electrical, at Salisbury. In service he was first lieutenant of 
engineers. 

— L. E. Stacy has been, since he left the ' ' Hill, ' ' chemist for 
the Wilkesboro tannery of C. C. Smoot and Sons Company, 
at North Wilkesboro. Mr. Stacy is married and has one 
son. 

— C. W. E. Pittman, former principal of the Wilmington high 
school, is engaged in the insurance business at Rocky Mount. 
— J. S. P. Fcnner is located at Rocky Mount, where he is 
engaged in the insurance business. He is secretary of the 
Rocky Mount Alumni Association. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



207 



What a United States Senator wrote 
to his son-in-law 



EVERY successful man in. business feels a 
responsibility lor the younger men with 
whom he is associated. 

How can he help them? 

Net by money. Not by influence. Help 
of this character defeats its own ends; it 
weakens rather than strengthens the man who 
receives it. 

Many of the leaders of American business 
have found a way to render more effective arid 
permanent help. They have investigated the 
Alexander Hamilton Institute and take ad- 
vantage of every opportunity t > recommend its 
training to their younger associates. 

What the Senator wrote 

SOME time ago a young business man in oneof 
the leading southern cities enrolled for the 
Institute's Modern Business Courseand Service. 

"My father-in-lnw i; Senator so and so from a 
neighboring stale." he said. "The Senator wrote 
me from Washington only a week ago urging me to 
enrol with the institute. 

"My wife and (lie Alexander Hamilton Institute 
are the only two blessings that the Senator has ever 
recommended to me in unqualified terms." 

He is one ef the many thousand young men 
who owe their business progress to the fact 
that some older man urged the importance of 
business training. 

The bigger the business, 
the more Institute men 

TWO facts stand out prominently to dis- 
tinguish the Alexander Hamilton Institute 
from every< ther institution of business training. 

The first is the unusual proportion of college 
men who have welcomed its training. Of the 
110,(100 men whom the Institute has enrolled 
in the ten years of its existence more than 
85 To are university graduates. 

The second fact is the widespread endorse- 
ment of this training afforded by the patronage 
of men in the nation's largest and most in- 
fluential industries. 



The heads of large businesses recognize that 
the future of their enterprises depends upon 
their ability to create new executives. 

The Advisory Council 

BUSINESS and educational authority of 
the highest type are represented on the 

Institute's Advisory Council. That Council 

consists r f: 

Frank A. Vanderlip, the financier; General 
Coleman dul'ont, the well known business 
executive; John Hayes Hammond, the em- 
inent engineer; Jeremiah \V. Junks, the 
statistician and economist; and Joseph trench 
Johnson, Dean of the New York University 
School of Commerce. 

How much is a year of 
your life worth ? 

THE Institute says to the salesman, the 
accountant, the superintendent or the 
engineer: 'You must know the fundamentals 
of every department of business if you are to 
supervise those departments — selling, mer- 
chandising, ndvi rtising,costs, accounting, office 
and factory management, corporation finance. 

To learn these by actual experience in each 
department will consume years of your life; 
here is a shorter, more direct route, based on 
the experience a:;d methods of the most suc- 
cessful men in business." 

The facts are in this book. 

WHETHER you areanoldcrman, interested in the success 
of your younger assoi idles; or a young man seeking a 
more direct route to lai - r r so 'cess and increased income, 
you should send for "Forging Ahead in Business". It is a lis 
page book giving all Hie facts, with a complete description 
of the Course and Service. Send fcr your copy today. 

Alexander Hamilton Institute 

362 Astor Place New York City 

■ ■■■B ■■ SDascanuaa ■ i ■ 

Send me "Forging Ahead in Business" 
without obligation. 



Name. 

Print here 

Business 

Address 

Business 

Position 




208 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



THE CAROLINA MAN'S SHOE STORE 

Can-Bryant 

High Grade Shoes with Snap and Style 



Carr-Bryant {F$oot & Shoe Co. 



106 West Main Street 



DURHAM, N. C. 



"EL-REES-SO" 

7c— 3 for 20c 

Mild, ■ Fragrant, Delightful— Try One 

"JOHNT. REES" 

10c 

A Cigar of quality, smooth, mellow, soothing. Gives 
a restful finish to a perfect day 

EL-REES-SO CIGAR CO. 

Manufacturers of the Famous EL-REES-SO Cigar 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Clothes Made by Makers who 
yinew for Men who %now 

and rfcld bq 

dneed=Markham=9ai(lor %o. 

£)urham, Vicrth Carolina 



W. H. LAWRENCE AND T. H. LAWRENCE 
ASSOCIATED 



Contractor and \Jjuilder 

MAIN OFFICE: DURHAM, N. C. 



CONTRACTOR PHILLIPS HALL 
UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 



— R. H. Johnston, cotton manufacturer of Charlotte, is one of 
the incorporators of the Easter Alfa;. Co., the latest cotton 
mill corporation for Selma. 

— Rev. F. B. Drane continues as a missionary of the Episcopal 
Church at Nenana, Alaska. 

— Born to Mr. and Mrs. Robert M. Hanes, of Winston-Salem, 
a son, Edwin Borden Hanes. 

— Dr. A. J. Warren, former assistant State health officer, has 
taken up his new duties as city health officer an I city physi- 
cian of Charlotte. 

— Graham K. Hobbs. of Clinton, has been appointed deputy 
collector of internal revenue for New Hanover, Brunswick and 
Pender counties. His headquarters are in the customs houso 
at Wilmington. 

— The marriage of Miss Frances Walker and Mr. Charles W. 
Broadfoot take place February 18th at Asheboro. They live 
in Fayettevillc, where Mr. Broadfoot is engaged in the prac- 
tice of law. 

— The marriage of Miss Marie Lentz and Mr. William Myera 
Jones took place February 25th at the Second Presbyterian 
Church, Charlotte. 

1913 
A. L. M. Wiggins, Secretary, Hartsville, S. C. 
— W. Raleigh Petteway, of Tampa, Fla., is the first member 
of the class of 1913 to become a judge. Judge Petteway 
was appointed in Deeember by the Goveni"r of Florida as 
judge of the juvenile court of Hillsborough County. 
— Robert W. Isley is superintendent of schools for Sampson 
County, and is located at Clinton. 

— J. B. Oldham is farming at his home near Chapel Hill. He 
saw service as a member of Co. K, 120th Infantry, 30th 
Division. On September 29, 1918, Mr. Oldham was wounded 
as the Hindcnburg line was broken. He spent several months 
in the hospital. 

— J. W. Carter is secretary and treasurer of the Oxford Ma- 
chine Shop and Garage Co., Inc., at Morganton. 
— F. H. Higdon is engaged in the wholesale grocery business 
in his home town, Franklin. 

—A. L. M. Wiggins, vice-president and managing director of 
the Trust Company of South Carolina at Hartsville, was re- 
cently elected vice-president and director of the Bank of Harts 
ville. 

— Announcement has been made that Eugene R. Clarkson and 
Lowry Axlcy, '13, have formed a partnership for the practice 
of law under the firm name of Clarkson and Axley, with 
offices in the Masonic Annex Bldg., Griffin, Ga. 
— Frank II. Kennedy, lawyer of Charlotte, is county chairman 
for Mecklenburg County of the Near East Relief organiza- 
tion. 

— S. R. Bivens, the father of 1913 's oldest son, is county farm 
demonstrator for Guilford County, located at Greensboro. 
— Arnold A. McKay, former of U. S. consul at Antafogasta, 
Chile, is now teaching English in the U. S. Naval Academy, 
Annapolis, Md. 

1914 
Oscms Leach, Secretary, Raeford, N. C. 
— John L. Henderson, Phar. '14, is manager and part owner 
of the City Drug Co., Burlington. 

— W. B. Townsend, following his discharge from service, lo- 
cated again in his home town, Red Springs, where he is en- 
gaged in business. 

— W. H. H. Cowles, Law '14, first lieutenant of coast artillery 
while the war was in progress, is now engaged in the practice 
of law at Statesville. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



209 




Someof the General Electric Company's 
Research Activities During the War: 

Suumarine detection devices 
X-ray tube for medical service 
Radio telephone and telegraph 
Electric welding and applications 
Searchlights for the Army and Navy 
Electric furnaces for gun shrinkage 
Magneto insulation for air service 
Detonators for submarine mines 
Incendiary and smoke bombs 
Fixation of nitrogen 
Substitutes for materials 



The Service of an Electrical 
Research Laboratory 

The research facilities of the General Electric Company are 
an asset of world-wide importance, as recent war work has 
so clearly demonstrated. Their advantages in pursuits of 
peace made them of inestimable value in time of war. 

A most interesting story tells of the devices evolved which substantially 
aided in solving one of the most pressing problems of the war— the sub- 
marine menace. Fanciful, but no less real, were the results attained in 
radio communication which enabled an aviator to control a fleet of flying 
battleships, and made possible the sending, without a wire, history- 
making messages and orders to ships at sea. Scarcely less important was 
the X ray tube, specially designed for field hospital use and a notable 
contribution to the military surgical service. And many other products, 
for both combatant and industrial use, did their full share in securing the 
victory. 

In the laboratories are employed highly trained physicists, chemists, 
metallurgists and engineers, some of whom are experts of international 
reputation. These men are working not only to convert the resources of 
Nature to be of service to man. but to increase the usefulness of electricity 
in every line of endeavor. Their achievements benefit every individual 
wherever electricity is used. 

Scientific research works hand in hand with the development of new de- 
vices, more efficient apparatus and processes of manufacture. It results 
in the discovery of better and more useful materials and ultimately in 
making happier and more livable the life of all mankind. 

{Booklet, Y-863, describing the company's plants, 
will be mailed upon request. Address Desk 37 




General Office 
Schenectady NY! 







Sales Offices in 95-140 1 
all large cities 



210 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



Odell Hardware Co. 

Greensboro, N. C. 

China, Cut Glass and Silverware 
Household Goods 

DEPENDABLE GOODS 

PROMPT SERVICE 

SATISFACTORY PRICES 



Guilford Hotel and Cafe 

NEWLY REMODELED 
RATES REASONABLE 
CENTRAL LOCATION 

Greensboro, North Carolina 



Cross and Linehan Co. 

Leaders in Clothing and Gents' 
Furnishings 

Raleigh, North Carolina 



Cooper Mlonument 
(TompatiY 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Communicate with us regarding your 

needs for monuments or 

tombstones 



— W. F. Credlc is now a banker of Swan Quarter. He is as- 
sistant cashier of the Hank of Swan Quarter. 
— T. T. Covington, Jr., is manager of the Covington Supply 
Co., dealers in building material at Laurinburg. 
— Dr. C. W. Eley, following his recent discharge from the 
service as first lieutenant in the medical corps, has located 
for the practice of medicine at suite 208, Hirn Bldg., Ports- 
mouth, Va. He limits his practice to dermatology ami urology. 
A son was bom to Dr. and Mrs. Eley on January :29th. 
— Harry B. Grimsley is now farming near Greensboro. In 
service he was first lieutenant in the 65th F. A., stationed 
at CanrD Kearney, Calif. 




W. B. Sanders, or Smithfield, 
Chief Marshal of the 1919 State Fair 

1915 
Daniel L. Bell, Secretary, Pittsboro, N. C. 
— Julius Johnston, lawyer of Yanceyville, is a member of 
the firm of Ivie, Trotter and Johnston. 

— J. L. Morehead is engaged in cotton manufacture at Char- 
lotte and Leaksville. 

— J. Shepard Bryan is principal of the Hemenway School, at 
Wilmington. 

— S. H. De Vault, who was at one time connected with the 
department of rural economics and sociology in the Univer- 
sity, is now located at 1219 M St. N.W., Washington, D. C. 
He writes that he is with the Census Bureau, engaged in 
tabulating the information collected during the recent census. 
— Claude B. Woltz has located in Gastonia for the practice 
of law. Mr. Woltz received license to practice law in January. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



211 



"Durham business School 

FULLY ACCREDITED 

3Joard of "Advisors 

GEN. J. S. CARR W. G. BRAMHAM 

DR. J. M. MANNING W. J. BROGDEN 

R. L. FLOWERS GEO. W. WATTS 

For full particulars and handsome catalog, address 

MRS. WALTER LEE LEDNUM 

PRESIDENT 



Snioer- JFUtcl)er (To. 



WATCHES, DIAMONDS, AND 
JEWELRY 



110 W. MAIN ST. 



DURHAM, N. C. 



Stannic! THaealLira 

DURHAM, N. C. 

HIGH CLASS PICTURES AND SPECIAL MUSIC 

YOU ARE ALWAYS WELCOME 

Open from 11:00 A. M. Until 11:00 P. M. 



Broadway Cafe 

WE CORDIALLY INVITE YOU TO VISIT OUR 
CAFE WHEN YOU ARE IN GREENSBORO 

EXCELLENT SERVICE 

COURTEOUS TREATMENT 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



CAPITALIZE YOUR TIME AND TALENTS 

By qualifying for a responsible business or civil service posi- 
tion while salaries are high. 

Banking, Bookkeeping, Gregg Shorthand, Touch Type- 
writing. Business Arithmetic, Business English, Commercial 
Law, Rapid Calculations, Spelling, Palmer Penmanship, 
Business Efficiency and Office Practice, taught by Spe- 

rinlists 

Our school is a member of the National Association of 
Accredited Commercial Schools and is highly endorsed by 
everybody. Call or request a catalog. 

King's Business College 

Raleigh, N. C. Charlotte, N. C. 



YACKETY YACK 1911 

I have a dozen copies of the 1911 Yackety Yack which 
I will sell at $3 each, or two damaged copies at $2 each. 
K. S. TANNER, Spindale, N. C. 



Yackety Yacks, 1916-'17 

The Year Carolina beat Virginia in all meets. Handsome leathe 
bound volume. The last available. Price $2. 

G. D. CRAWFORD, Chapel Hill. N. C. 



RIDE WITH 

C. S. Pender graft 

Pioneer Auto Man 

LEAVE ORDERS AT 

MABRY'S DRUG STORE 

HEADQUARTERS IN DURHAM 

THE BEST PLACE TO GET SOFT DRINKS, CIGARS 
AND CIGARETTES 

HEADQUARTERS IN CHAPEL HILL: NEXT TO 
BANK OF CHAPEL HILL 

Leave Chapel Hill 8.30 and 10.20 a. m. 

Leave Chapel Hill 2.30 and 4.00 p. m. 

Leave Durham 9.50 a. m., 12.40 p. m. 

Leave Durham 5.08 p. m., 8.00 p. m. 

OTHER TRIPS SUBJECT TO ORDER 



Four Machines at Your Service 
Day or Night 

PHONE 58 or 23 

Agent for 

Alamance Laundry, Burlington, N. C. 



212 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



"SAY IT WITH FLOWERS" 
J. J. FALLON, Leading Florist 



Chapel Hill Asents: 

FOISTER'S ART STORE 

R. P. ANDREWS. People's Bant 



Phone 1290 

214 E. Main Street 

DURHAM. N. C. 



W. M. NEWTON COMPANY 

DURHAM, N. C. 

DE LUXE CLOTHIERS 

"TOO YOUNG FOR OLD IDEAS" 



PAHS THEAT 



DURHAM, N. C. 

ARTCRAFT-PARAMOUNT PICTURES 

Orchestra Orchestra 



BROADWAY THEATRE 

DURHAM, N. C. 

THE HOUSE OF SPECIAL PHOTO-PLAY 

ATTRACTIONS 



DURHAM CAFE 



VISIT US WHILE IN DURHAM 



FLOWERS FOR ALL OCCASIONS 

Durham Floral Nursery 

CHAPEL HILL AGENTS: EUBANKS DRUG CO. 



C. W. KENDALL 

LADIES' WEAR STORE 
VISIT US WHILE IN DURHAM 



WELCOME TO 

STONEWALL HOTEL 

W. E. HOCKETT, Manager 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



In service Mr. Woltz had the rank of captain in the Q. M. C. 
He was in service for two years, nine months of which time 
he spent in France. 

— L. A. Blue, Jr., is engaged in the real estate and insurance 
business at St. Louis, Mo. His address is Apartment B-9, 316 
Laurel Ave. In service Mr. Blue was a first lieutenant of 
infantry, attached to the staff of Brigadier-General Geo. W. 
Mclver, '73, commander of the 161st Infantry Brigade of the 
81st Division. 

— Press dispatches in early February stated that B. F. Wellons, 
Charlotte lawyer, had been instrumental in a Catawba County 
cotton mill transfer which had netted him fifteen thousand 
dollars. 

1916 

Hugh B Hester, Secretary, Capt. and Adj. 12th F. A., 

Camp Travis, Texas 

The railroad problem has no terrors for J. M. Parker, '16, 
and W. M. York, '19, members of the faculty of the Greens- 
boro city schools, who yesterday walked from Chapel Hill to 
Greensboro, a distance of 52 miles. 

At 1:40 o'clock yesterday morning Messrs. Parker and York 
began their journey. They breakfasted in Mebane and paused 
for a rest following the meal. They dined at Elon College, 
where they secured another rest period, and they arrived in 
Greensboro at 7 o 'clock last night. — Greensboro News, Febru- 
ary 26th. 

— P. Cleveland Gardner practices law at Hominy, Okla. He 
and Miss Tazzie Lloyd, of Chapel Hill, were married during 
the past fall. 

— Zeb Vance Norman, Law '16, practices law in Plymouth. 
— W. B. Rouse practices law at New Bern. 
— Francis Bourne, of Asheville, served as captain of Battery 
E, 316th F. A., while the war was in progress. He was also 
acting major for a time. 

— G. C. Royall, Jr., is connected with the Royall-Borden Mfg. 
Co., manufacturers of the Royal elastic felt mattress, at Golds- 
boro. 

— S. R. Yarboro is manager of the Ford department of Foy 
and Shemwell, at Lexington. In service he was first lieutenant 
in the air service. 

— G. Mebane Long, former star on the Carolina basketball and 
football teams, is in the stock, bond and general investment 
business at Charlotte, a member of the firm of Crayton and 
Long. L. B. Crayton, Davidson College football coach of the 
past season, is Mr. Long's partner. 

1917 
H. G. Baity, Secretary, Ronda, N. C. 
— John N. Wilson, Jr., of Greensboro, who served overseas as 
first lieutenant in the 321st Machine Gun Battalion, is a stu- 
dent of law in the University. 

— "Nemo" Coleman, star Carolina football player and cap- 
tain of the team during the past season, has located in his 
home city, Asheville, where he is engaged in the real estate 
business with his brother. Coleman 's name stands high at 
Carolina, it having been his distinction to star in two Carolina- 
Virginia Thanksgiving contests, in which Carolina was victori- 
ous. In service ' ' Nemo ' ' was a first lieutenant of infantry in 
the 81st Division. He held a place in the backfield of the 81st 
Division team. 

— Geo. W. Tandy is manager of the hardware firm of A. E. 
Lloyd and Co., Durham. 

— Victor S. Bryant, Jr., has entered the practice of law in 
Durham as a member of the firm of Bryant, Brogdcn and 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



213 



A. E. LLOYD HARDWARE CO. 

DURHAM, N. C. 

All Kinds of Hardware, Sporting 

Goods and College Boys' 

Accessories 

GEO. W. TANDY, MANAGER 



<J/ie <Jvoual i^afe 

Xiniversity students, faculty members, and 
alumni visit the Jtoyal Cafe while in 
^Durham. Linden new and pro- 
gressive management. 
Special parlors 
for ladies 



£Dup/i 



up ham s 



^Axodepn Cafe 



Keep Physically Fit 



The young men of U. N. C. are wise enough 
to know thai athletic exercise promotes sound 
health. Get in some game early. 

We can supply you with every essential in 
equipment for Football, Soccer, Basket Ball, 
Hockey, Skating, etc. 

W 'rile for catalogue No. L/C. 



ALEX TAYLOR & CO., Inc. 

Athletic Outfitters 
26 E. 42nd St., New York 




Hennessee Cafe 

C. C. SHOFFNER, Manager 

A MODERN, UP-TO-DATE CAFE, WHERE YOU 

AND YOUR FRIENDS ARE WELCOME 

CLEANLINESS AND SERVICE 
OUR MOTTOES 

342 and 344 S. Elm St. 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



=n r? 



BAGLEY & ALDERMAN, Advertising 

LETTERWRITING, MULTIGRAPHING, PRINT- 
ING, ADVERTISING SIGNS, AND 
SPECIALTIES 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



CHARLES C. HOOK, ARCHITECT 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 

TWENTY YEARS EXPERIENCE IN PLANNING 
SCHOOL AND COLLEGE BUILDINGS 



A. .A. TKlutte <Zo.3vic. 

Extends a cordial invitation to all students and 
alumni of the U. N. C. to make their store head- 
quarters during their stay in Chapel Hill. 

Complete Stock of 
New and Second-hand Books, Stationery, and 
Complete Line of Shoes and Haberdashery 
Made by the Leaders of Fashion, Al- 
ways on Hand 



When in Need 

of a Pocket Knife, Razor, Hone, Strop, Brush, 
Safety Razor, Blades, or tools of any kind, 
Paints, Varnishes, Brushes, Electrical Goods, 
and General Hardware, call on the 

Chapel Hill Hardware Co. 

THE STORE WHERE "QUALITY" COUNTS 



THE RESULT OF 28 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE 

LANG'S "ROGER C." CIGAR; TWO 

BRANDS: 7c and 10c 

A COMPARISON IS ALL I ASK 

ROGER C. LANG 

GREENSBORO. N. C. 



2] I 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



1, 

R. 


BLACKNALL & SON 




DRUGGISTS 




NORRIS AND KLtLEH'S CANDIES 




G. BERNARD, Mutc.FI 


Corcoran Street Durham. N. C. 


L '1 



E. E. Bragg & Co. 

WALKOVER AND FLORSHEIM SHOES 
DURHAM, N. C. 



Model Laundry Co. 

DURHAM, N. C. 
EXPERT LAUNDRY SERVICE 



DURHAM ICE CREAM CO. 

Fancy Ices; Makers of Blue Ribbon Brand Ice Cream 
Receptions and Banquets a Specialty 

TELEPHONE No. 1199 



POLLARD BROTHERS 

DURHAM, N. C. 

STANDARD LINES OF HARDWARE 

AND SPORTING GOODS 



Dwlkaunfii Sfiaoe C© 

LEATHER GOODS CHEAPER 
DURHAM, N. C. 



PRIDGEN & JONES CO. 

We Carry the Best Shoes: Edwin Clapp, Howard and 

Foster, and Heywood's 

Expert Fitters — A Cordial Welcome Awaits You 

107 W. Main St. DURHAM, N. C. 



THE SELWYN 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 

Fireproof, Modern and Luxurious 

IN THE HEART OF EVERYTHING 

H. C. LARZALERE, Manager 



Bryant. Victor S. Bryant, '90, and \V. .1. Brogden, '98, are 
the senior members of this firm. 

— E. A. Kendall, who is with the branch bank of the National 
City Bank of X™ Ymk a1 Santiago, Chile, writes: "I have 
now rounded out my first year in Chile and am very well sat- 
isfied with conditions here. The branch here opened only a 
little more than a year ago, so I got in practically on the 
ground floor. On account of the unstable exchange in Chile 
banking here is much more complicated than in the States, so 
I am getting some valuable experience." 

1918 
W. K. WUNSCH, Secretary, Chapel Hill, N. C 
— Carolina friends of W. A. Erwin, Jr., of Duke, have learned 
with sorrow of the death of Mrs. Erwin, which occurred Feb- 
ruary L'lst at Duke. 

— M. R. Bobbins is located in his home town. Bocky Mount, 
where he is engaged in business. 

— E. A. Griffin is secretary and treasurer of the A. T. Griffin 
Mfg. Co., lumber manufacturers of Goldsboro. 
— Loo Carr is superintendent of schools at Teaehey. He is 
also a member of the h'ini of Carr and Turner, brokers in 
fruit and produce, with strawberries ;i specialty. 
— W. G. Burgess continues as captain in the 18th F. A., at 
Camp Pike, Ark. 

1919 
H. G. West, Secretary, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
— Thurmond Chatham, of Winston-Salem, lias been ehosen sec- 
retary ami assistant to the president of the Elkin ami Alle- 
ghany railroad. 

-Bobert Frazier is vice-consul of the United States at Chris- 
tiana, Norway. 




(Prink 



Coca-Cola 



Delicious and Refreshing 



Quality tells the difference in the taste be- 
tween Coca-Cola and counterfeits. 

Demand the genuine by full name — nick- 
names encourage substitution. 

Get a bottle of the genuine from your 
grocer, fruit stand, or cafe. 



Durham Coca-Cola Bottling Co. 

DURHAM, N. C. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



2 1 5 



Z5l)e l£ruversitv Jpress 

ZEB P. COUNCIL, Manasrr CHAPEL HILL. N. C. 

PRINTING, ENGRAVED CARDS 

QUALITY AND SERVICE 



PATTERSON BROS. 

DRUGGISTS 



AGENCY NORRIS CANDY 



THE REXALL STORE 



K 



GOOCH'S CAFE 

Anything to Eat 
CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 



(bssce dj rot hers 

CALIFORNIA AND FLORIDA FRUITS 

TOBACCO AND CIGARS 

ICE CREAM PARLOR FRESH CANDIES 

"WE STRIVE TO PLEASE" 



CHAPEL HILL 
N. C. 



ANDREWS CASH STORE GO. 

Students and Faculty will find us ready to serve 
them with the latest styles in Walkover Shoes, 
Fancy Shirts, Tailored Suits, and general furn- 
ishings. Be convinced. Call and see. 



FOR NEAT JOB PRINTING AND TYPEWRITER 
PAPER CALL AT THE OFFICE OF 

The Chapel Hill News 



W. B. SORRELL 

JEWELER AND OPTOMETRIST 
CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 



ODAK SUPPLIE R 

Finishing for the Amateur. Foister ^^ 



Eubanks Drug Co. 

Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Agents for Munnally's Candy 



THE PEOPLES NATIONAL BANK 

WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 

Capital $150,000.00 United States Depositary 

J. W. FRIES, Pres. Wm. A. BLAIR, Vice-Pres. 

N. MITCHELL, Cashier 



PICKARD'S HOTEL 

Headquarters for Carolina Alumni 

Returning to the Hill 

SPECIAL RATES. STUDENT BOARDERS. 



"Electric Sl)oe Sbop 

EXPERT SHOE REPAIRING 
CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 



Huffine Hotel 

Quick Lunch Counter and Dining Room — C'.ean 

Rooms $1.00 and Up 

NEAR DEPOT: GREENSBORO, N. C. 



WHITING-HORTON CO. 

THIRTY-ONE YEARS 
RALEIGH'S LEADING CLOTHIERS 



H. S. STORR & CO. 

Office Furniture, Machines and Supplies; Printers and 
Manufacturers of Rubber Stamps 
RALEIGH, N. C. 



Dill@im Supply C@ 

MACHINERY, MILL SUPPLIES 
PHONE 753 RALEIGH, N. C. 



216 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 




A Pioneer in the Stoker Field 

Westinghouse was one of the first among the pioneers in 
the stoker field. 

Although power stations have grown to enormous size, 
with sudden peak loads in some instanees reaching as high as 
300 and 400 per cent normal rating, the remarkable fact re- 
mains that the design of the Westinghouse Roney Stoker remains today practically the same as it was thirty-three 
years ago and that it still retains its firm position in the combustion field. This speaks for the accuracy of the original 
design. The Roney Stoker is particularly suitable for steady power demands with moderate overloads of 2.j to .30 per 
cent, and it burns a wide range of fuels satisfactorily. Simple design, low first cost and ease of installation, strongly 
recommend it for plants of moderate size. Over three million horsepower have been installed. 

Industrial expansion, however, has wrought many changes in power plant practice since 1887. Today mechanical 
stokers are called upon to burn everything from high-grade coals down to refuse. They are also called upon to meet 
the sudden and enormous steaming capacities. Hence, two additional stokers were added, and our line now includes 
the Chain Grate Stoker, particularly adapted to the burning of low-grade, high-ash fuels; and the Underfeed Stoker, 
which is unequalled in its ability to handle the sudden and enormous overload demands of central station service with 
the highest degree of efficiency. 

It is a fact of vital importance to the stoker buyer that we 
manufacture the three general types, because stoker applica- 
tion should be approached with an open mind and the stoker 
manufacturer should be guided in his recommendations purely 
by the facts that develop from a study of fuel and load re- 
quirements. 

Westinghouse Electric & Manufacturing Co. 
East Pittsburgh, Pa. 





Westinghouse 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



217 




-^ 



A Hercules Glazier 
Entering Top of 
Glaze Milliaith 
Car of Green Grain 



HERCULES 
POWDERS 



The 
Powder Maker 



Considering how important his work is to the 
public, it is fitting that more should be known 
about the powder maker and his job. 

The characteristics which fit him for his work 
are as largely mental as physical, and the 
work itself develops his acuteness of mind 
— his powers of observation, judgment, and 
decision. 

The powder worker trained in the school of the 
Hercules plants learns to take in all his surround- 
ings at a glance. If he enters one of the small 
buildings on a dynamite or black powder line noth- 
ing escapes him. He sees instantly ma.iv things 
which the casual observer might gaze at for minutes 
without noticing 

A large part of the explosives used in the United 
States, and much that is used in foreign countries, is 
made by the men in twelve Hercules plants — four for 
dynamite and eight for black blasting powder. 

Behind all our manufacturing industries and our rail- 
roads, behind all the useful and beautiful object* 
fashioned out of metals — from hob nails to scarf pins, 
and from steam shovels to limousines — stands the 
powder worker. Without the explosives he supplies 
— hundreds of millions of pounds annually — the 
miner's efforts to move the vast inert bodies of ore 
and coal would be as futile as the scratching of hands. 



HERCULES POWDER CO. 

Chicago St, Louis New York 

Pitt=buf™. Kan. Denver i: eton. Pa. 

San Francisco Salt Lake City Joplin 

Cli3tt3nooL'a Pittsburcb, Pa. Wilmington Del. 




218 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 




The Seeman Printery 

Durham, N. C. 
Printing - Engraving - Bookbinding 




THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

SUMMER SCHOOL 

THIRTY-THIRD SESSION JUNE 22— AUGUST 5, 1920 

' Standard Courses in the Regular Departments of the University. 

Cultural and Professional Courses leading to the A.B. and A.M. degrees. 

A Modern Department of Education offering numerous professional courses in Educational 
Psychology, School Administration, Supervision, Principles of Secondary Education, Tests and 
Measurements, Supervised Study, Rural Education, Primary, Grammar Grade, and High School 
Methods. Story Telling, Plays and Games, and Physical Education. 

Numerous Academic and Professional Courses of Elementary character for teachers who 
have not had previous professional training. 

High Class Recreational Features and Entertainments of an educational character. Lectures 
by noted Thinkers and Writers. Music Festival and Dramatic Performances. 

Able Faculty of Trained Specialists,- Practical Teachers, Supervisors, and Superintendents 
of successful experience. 

Moderate Expenses — Registration 922 in 1919 — Rooms may be reserved any time after 
February 15. 

Preliminary Announcement sent on request. Complete Announcement ready in April. 

For further in formal ion, address 

N. W. WALKER, Director 
CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 



(Tulture 



Scholarship Service 

THE = 



Self-Support 



!5tortb (Larolina (Lolkgefor^omen 

Offers to Women a Liberal Education, Equipment for Womanly- 
Service, Professional Training for Remunerative Employment 



The College offers four groups of studies lead- 
ing to the following degrees: Bachelor of Arts, 
Bachelor of Science, and Bachelor of Music. 

Special courses in Pedagogy; in Manual Arts; in 
Domestic Science Household Art and Economics; in 
Music; and in the Commercial Branches. 

Teachers and graduates of other colleges provided 
for in both regular and special courses. 



Equipment modern, including furnished dormitories, 
library, laboratories, literary society halls, gymnas- 
ium, music rooms, teachers' training school, infirm- 
ary, model laundry, central heating plant, and open 
air recreation grounds. 

Dormitories furnished by the State. Board at 
actual cost. Tuition free to those who pledge them- 
selves to become teachers. 



Fall ^erm Opens in September 



Summer ^Uerm Begins in June 



For catalogue and other information, address 



JULIUS I. FOUST, President, GREENSBORO, N. C 



Mi . . ■.■>/ 

•X. > :-,>■/ 







1 



** 



•:^. ' 



' % .-^r*i 






**~ : 



.5?.A 



A 



* 



•y»»' 



5 /*v 






% "*£ 



-*■■■■ * 




T 



<tf 



S 






*f<*l, 



T ^ 




.*" »VW % 



'- ^**. 



*rv 





<L 




S3p^-'* > ~iK; T *'''' '■fW : !*! 


r^. ■''^L' 1 '*!^- 'SIb. 1 ' 4f& 


i^.-¥ ^M^B t'-*5 


EL V* f Jfc 


%&. TKi 


t%4J 



** * ' 



•:■ x 



f.V 



^•^4 



i "^ wWfr 






- U> 



BS