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Full text of "The alumni review [serial]"






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THE RQYAL L & BORDEN CO. 

Corner West Main and Market Streets DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA 



Sell all kinds of furniture and furnishings for churches, 
colleges and homes. Biggest stock of Rugs in the 
State, and at cheapest prices. ^If you don't know us 
ask the College Proctor or the editor of the "Review." 
Call on or write for whatever you may need in our line. 

THE ROYALL & BORDEN CO. 



Investments of Character 

We are prepared to furnish securities which possess in high degree the fol- 
lowing essentials of a good investment: 

1. Margin of safety. 

2. Good rate of income. 

3. Stability of market value. 

4. High loan value. 

5. Rcg'ularit.y and promptness in payment of interest. 

6. Suitable denoniinations and choice of maturity dates. 

The securities we recommend are not speculative in any sense and have 
been selected with the same care we use in making other loans. 

Write for special circular and suggestions. 

WACHOVIA BANK AND TRUST CO. 

BOND DEPARTMENT 
WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



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VOLUME VIII 



THE 



NUMBER 7 




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•ALVMNIREVIEW 



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APRIL, 1920 

OPINION AND COMMENT 
The Year of Opportunity — Placing Responsibility — 
There Are 10,000 of Us— Three Interests at 
Work — Here's Where We Come In — Let's 
Snap Something Up — Why Not Under- 
write Ideas? — From Gerrard Hall 
to North Carolina 

INAUGURATION PLANS COMPLETED 

Noted Educators and Representatives from Many 

Institutions and Societies Are to Participate 

GUBERNATORIAL CANDIDATES SPEAK 

Gardner, Morrison and Page Address University 

Students, With Parker to Follow 

FIRST REUNION OF THE CLASS OF 1919 



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PUBLIrSHED BY 

THE ALVMNI ASSOCIATION 



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Cy Thompson Says — 

Today as Never Before 

the average man is buying Life Insurance. New insurance written by all good companies in 
1919 is equivalent to one-fourth of the total volume in force in 1918. It exceeds all the insur- 
ance in force in 1901. 

The first-chartered purely mutual American life insurance company had a glorious j^ear. 
Its 1919 business increased nearly 90 per cent over the business of the year before. Its mortal- 
ity experience was the lowest in 51 years. 

The 1920 contracts and service carry the principle of mutuality to the logical and absolute 
limit. We offer the only perfectly mutual policy. This is a broad statement; but thorough in- 
vestigation will prove it. 

Before you contract to buy life insurance, or accept an agency contract, let us demonstrate 
what we mean by "Perfection in Protection." An opportunity awaits you. 

NEW ENGLAND MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO. 

CHARTERED 1835 BOSTON. MASS. 

CYRUS THOMPSON, Dist. Mgr. 

(OPPOSITE CAMPUS) 

Chapel Hill, N. C. 



THE AMERICAN TRUST CO. 

CHARLOTTE. N. C. 

This Company serves in all Fiduciary Relations, such as: 

Executor of Wills — 

Our experience enables us to handle estates according to the legal requirements; 

Our financial responsibility insures safety; 

Our disinterestedness eliminates family quarrels. 

Trustee by Appointment: 

Our financial connections enable us to keep funds invested to the best advantage, so 
as to earn the largest income consistent with safety. 



Resources over $12, 000, 000. 00 



AMERICAN TRUST COMPANY 

(THE SAFE EXECUTOR) 
CHARLOTTE, NORTH CAROLINA 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



Volume VIII 



APRIL, 1920 



Number 7 



OPINION AND COMMENT 



Alumni who read the President's report for 1919, 
*ho have followed closely the editorials and news 
notes iu this publication, and who 
The Year of have visited the Hill during the pres- 
Opportunity ent academic year, have accepted the 
fact — for it is absolutely inescapable 
—-that this is a big critical year in Carolina's history. 

Through the months the University's tremendous 
task of meeting the situation — of expanding and 
building to meet the demands of the hour — has stead- 
ily unfolded and impressed itself upon the adminis- 
tration, the faculty, and trustees. Living quarters 
for the faculty, dormitories for the student body, re- 
citation rooms and new buildings for the departments 
and schools, equipment for laboratories, larger appro- 
priations for libraries, additional members for the 
administrative and instructional staffs, together with 
increased salaries for maintenance in every depart- 
ment, all have been matters of daily concern. The 
job has been received as a mammoth one, and con- 
stant thought and untiring effort have been concen- 
trated upon the performance of it. 

DDD 

This task, this tremendously important job, has, 
to date, rested upon the shoulders of the President, 

the faculty, and the trustees. It has 
Placing Re- not been placed directly upon the 
sponsibility shoulders of the alumni, nor will it, 

nor should it be. But while this is 
true, a profound sense of responsibility should rest 
upon the alumni in so far as they are able to assist 
in the performance of this task or in the carrying out 
of a definite alumni program which will contribute 
to the total completeness of the University's big un- 
dertaking. 

nnn 

It isn't our purpose to argue the point whether or 
not it is the duty of an alumnus of a State-supported 
institution to help build and equip and 
There Are maintain it for the highest possible 
10,000 of Us service to the commonwealth. We 
know too well that what we paid into 
the treasury in tuition and fees did not begin to 
equal the values we received from the Universitv. 



Nor do we propose, merely because it is the dxity of 
the State to make prompt and adequate provision for 
every need of the institution, to deny ourselves the 
privilege of assisting Alma Mater in rendering a 
greater and finer service to our fellow citizens. Car- 
olina is our Alma Mater, and having none other, we 
propose to share in the tasks to which she devotes her- 
self. 

It is our purpose, however, to say that this big 
task does rest in part upon the alumni, and that the 
present opportunity of assisting at this particularly 
important moment is too splendid to be allowed to go 
by unutilized. 

It is our purpose to say, fellow alunuii, that we 
are ten thousand strong. We have had some part, as 
an alumni organization, in placing Alma Mater in 
the first place among Southern institutions, and we 
expect to keep her there ! 

It is our purpose to say to the administration and 
the trustees there is a big, worth-while part in this 
big, constructive, forward-looking program that's 
ours. It belongs to us, and we are going to put our 
part of it through! 

DDD 

The State is at work (too slowly, it is true, and 
suffering from the conviction that it is poor) on its 
part of the job. In 1919 it wiped 
Three Inter- out a $20,000 deficit and added $50,000 
ests at Work to the maintenance fund for the carry- 
ing out of specific objects presented 
for the consideration of the legislature. 

The trustees — not every one of the whole 102, but aU 
collectively — are doing their part. In the past twelve 
months we have known numbers of them to attend 
committee meeting after committee meeting and to 
make contributions of value to every subject imder 
consideration. Every specific matter brought to their 
attention has been thoughtfully received, and they 
have served, in season and out of season, and in re- 
peated instances at great loss of time and expense, 
in devising means by which the realization of all of 
Carolina's hopes may be attained. 

Furthermore, the faculty has been at work. In 
spite of the comparatively stationary (and therefore 



224 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



shrinking) salary scale, of the lack of comfortable liv- 
ing conditions, of overcrowded recitation rooms and 
laboratories, it has eagerly accepted the challenge 
which the student body of 1400 members presents. 
It has been decidedly on the job and has placed no 
limit on the assistance which it could give in putting 
the big progi-am through. 

nnn 

In this big endeavor, the question will not do\vn ; 
Where do we alumni come in'? Haven't we a part? 
Certainlj^ we have, and here it is. It 
Here's Where is ours : 

We Come In (1) To complete immediately the 

subscriptions to the Graham Me- 
morial Building. This makes for the enrichment of 
the campus life of our sons and brothers. 

(2) To imderwrite in the next sixty days a first- 
class $250,000 hotel that will enable the University 
to entertain its guests suitably and at the same time 
provide for our own comfort when we are at the Hill. 

(3) To get behind the Alumni Loyalty Fund and 
pile up a principal of at least $100,000, the income of 
which, when that amount has been reached, can be 
used in assisting the Universitj' in carrying out par- 
ticular undertakings which cannot be financed in 
other ways. 

(4) To put a full-time, full-paid alumni secretary 
at work on the job of making the General and Local 
Aluimii Associations going concerns. He shouldn't 
have to spend all his time collecting his salary in 
$1 and $2 driblets, but should be financed in such 
a way as to be free to map out and direct the real 
constructive work in which the alumni should be 
engaged. He should keep his eye on the needs of 
the campus which it is the particular duty of the 
alumni to meet, and he should see that every such 
alumni undertaking was speedily put through. 

nnn 

Don't get the idea from these paragraphs that 
The Review is having a case of nerves. It is 
merely looking at things straight 
Let's Snap and is definitely striving to fix alum- 

Something Up ni attention on facts. 

The President's Report in De- 
cember presented more ideas yearning for real- 
ization on the campus than any four which 
ever preceded it. Every page contained a 
recommendation that, if acted upon favorably, 
would spell immediately an infinitely greater 
usefulness for Carolina in the life of the 
State. In the light of those recommendations the 
University needs thousands of doUars that the State, 



the trustees, the faculty (God save them) cannot 
provide. 

Thej' are the sort of things that the alumni should 
underwrite. They are the sort of things that live 
alumni in other institutions — and that, too, right here 
in North Carolina — snap up. Without troubling 
any one to look up the report to discover what they 
are, here are a' few of them. Get .your check book 
and underwrite one or a pai't of one. We recom- 
mend $1,000 a shot. 

nnn 

Two thousand dollars is needed to incorporate the 
University Press and start it to work at once. We 

don't mean the old Babcock that Her- 
Let's Become bert Guntcr and Nixon Plummer and 
Publishers Isham King and others of the merry 

student-printer tribe wore out j'ears 
ago. We mean that Carolina become a publisher as 
Yale, and Chicago, and Columbia, and Princeton have 
through their respective presses, and that her imprint 
appear on all her publications. Why let the Weil 
lectures, for example, bear the imprint of the Johns 
Hopkins Press and add to the scholarly reputation of 
that University, or the McNair lectures paid for out 
of Carolina funds appear with the imprint of a New 
York firm? Why give G. P. Putman's Sons the credit 
of bringing out "Education and Citizenship" by the 
late President Graham, when for a comparatively 
small sura these publications and all the publications 
regularly issued by the University could bear its own 
imprint and thereby promote its scholarly standing 
throughout America? Why? Why, simply this. If 
this $2,000 is taken out of University fimds it 
means that some other University undertaking already 
underway will have to be cut, some other equally im- 
portant task will have to go undone. 

nnn 

Through the department of Dramatic Literature 
tlie University has the opportimity to catch the atten- 
tion of the Nation. The Raleigh Mas- 
Let's Put que, conceived of as a part of a great 
On a Show English-American tercentenary celebra- 
tion and presenting in dramatic form 
the story of Raleigh's first settlement in America, has 
been written for months. Brilliant scenes of the Eng- 
lish court and hnsy harbors, songs of daring seamen, 
glimpses of the primeval Carolina forests, the mystery 
of the lost colony, have deftly been woven into picture 
and verse. It is a masterpiece in the field of commu- 
nity dramatic art. Harvard University has just given 
its distinguished Professor Baker, of its department 
of dramatic literature, six months' leave of absence 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



225 



to write a similar production concerning the settle- 
ment of the Pilgrim Fathers at Plymouth, has pro- 
vided a fund to enable him to go to Europe to collect 
any information that may add to the effectiveness of 
the presentation, and all New England is looking for- 
ward with keen expectancy to this great tercentenary 
celebration. But for the lack of a guarantee of 
$1,000 — not the actual cash, itself, but for the 
guarantee imtil the gate receipts are in — the celebra- 
tion of the event which gave North Carolina and the 
South its great historical distinction, must, seemingly, 
fail. 

DDD 

In Greensboro the other day I'cpresentatives from 
four of the Southeastern States served notice on the 
Interstate Commerce Commission that 
Let's Buy they were going to fight to a finish 
Some Books the question of establishing ports of 
export on the South Atlantic seaboard. 
The Southern Railway later promised its support. 

The School of Commerce of the University which 
has enrolled between 150 and 200 men in the first year 
of its existence and which is definitely setting about 
supplj'ing trained men to captain the industrial and 
financial imdertakings of the State and South, started 
in September with no books. Think of it — no books 
and periodicals on the infinite subjects of business and 
finance. The President and triistees "surveyed" the 
budget and appropriated $250 (it bought 80 volumes 
at most) as a starter. Here, gentlemen, is a defuiite 
spot to cover with a thousand dollar check. It could 
much better be $5,000 down with an additional $5,000 
placed at interest as endowment. 

nnn 

Surveys, investigations, records attained by Caro- 
lina students at other universities, point to one eon- 
elusion. The University stands at 
Let's Fill the the forefront of Southern institu- 
Graduate School tions. Today it has the oppoi'- 
timity to dominate the South in 
the matter of graduate study. But it needs graduate 
scholarships and fellowships such as Northern insti- 
tutions ai-e awarding daily to Southern students if 
it is to hold graduate students here. Six Carolina 
men ought to provide $1,000 each for this purpose 
next year, thereby adding twelve men to the Graduate 
School in 1920- '21. The daily press of March 28 
carried this note: "Seventeen scholarships, ranging 
from $5,000 to $45,000 (as endowment foundations) 
in memory of Princeton men who fell in the war, have 
been established in the University. The University 
hopes eventually to establish a scholarship in the 



name of each of the 146 men on the Princeton honor 
roll." There you are. That means that some South- 
ern graduate student who could be trained here on 
this campus will complete his work in New Jersey 
rather than in North Carolina, or failing that, will 
receive no graduate training whatever, and therebj^ 
continue to limit the source of supplj^ of available men 
for professorial positions in the State and South. A 
cheek for $1,000 will hold two such men right here, 
and applications all the way from Texas to Virginia 
for just such an opportunity are cluttering up the 
mails daily. 

nnn 

Why all this? We think we can tell you. Some- 
times the impression gets out that the administration 
and faculty is a slow, unimagina- 
Why Not Under- tive bimch. It doesn't celebrate. 
write Ideas? It isn't progressive. It isn't on 

the job 1 

The legislature of North Carolina is conservative. 
Its formula for financing any University project is : 
Start it, show results, then we will finance it. It isn't 
like the industrial concern which maintains an experi- 
ment division. It puts its money on a sure thing. 

After the faculty has thought through a project 
like the University press and the plan fails because 
the legislature does not meet for a year, and then 
demands proof positive of its value, enthusiasm in 
originating plans quite naturally cools. The profes- 
sor who spent every available moment for 18 months 
in writing and perfecting the Raleigh Masque, who 
put all the skill and beauty evidenced by the Carolina 
Playmakers into this remarkable composition, isn't 
apt to write the Masque of the Edenton Tea Party 
on another chance. No, not much. And he isn't 
peeved, either. He didn't write the Masque for 
money, but he does want to see his work, which will 
easilj' compare with the production under preparation 
by the Harvard professor, given adequate presenta- 
tion here in the State whose capital bears the name 
of the great Sir Walter Raleigh. The Dean of the 
Graduate School cannot be blamed if he doesn't 
develop new plans when the executive has through 
necessity to tell him that the ones alreadj' perfected 
have to be held back for lack of funds. And so on. 

nnn 

And, sometimes, they get away. Ideas, sizzling 
hot ones at that, outlined here on the campus, are 

sometimes snapped up by others when they 
One Got might just as well have been underwritten 
Away here. A case in point is the Bureau of 

Community Recreation. Back in 1910 or 
1912 Professor Noble saw the value of a collection of 



226 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



slides and films for the use of the schools and rural 
communities of the State. Later the Bureau of Ex- 
tension elaborated the idea after having seen the woi-k 
of Wisconsin in this field. It put the recommendation 
in its annual report and urged its ado])tion for two 
or three years. Later it picked up a copy of the 
Independent and saw the story which S. R. Winters 
told (with illustrations) of the State Boai'd of Health 
and its movies at work in the sticks of Durham Comity. 
And one March morning following the adjournment 
of the legislature of 1917 it found that the Bureau of 
Community Recreation, under the supervision of vari- 
ous State departments, at Raleigh, the fundamental 
principle of which is the educational moving picture, 
was establi-shed with an appropriation of $25,000 an- 
nually ! One had gotten away ! 

nnn 

Fortunately, we can illustrate in a happier way. 
We can show the constructive side of the picture. 
We haven't forgotten that there have 
This Looks been quite a good many underwriters 
Better of the right sort. The idea of Univer- 

sity Extension was current on the cam- 
pus some time before actual work in this field began. 
Dr. Edwin Minis, back in 1910 and 1911, wrote about 
it, spoke about it, worked out a detailed report on the 
desirability of beginning it. But with a budget that 
admitted of no additional expenditures, the plans 
could not be carried out. 

In 1912 the Alumni established The Review. In 
doing this they made lumecessary the four alumni is- 
sues of the Record in which alumni matters had pre- 
viou.sly been recorded. This left temporarily a fund 
of $600 with which to imderwrite the extension idea! 
This $600, released through alumni support, under- 
wrote the package library service of the University, 
made permanent the High School Debating Union, and 
paved the way for all the extension activities which 
have followed in its train. 

Or, again, and more recently in 1918-19 an 
alumnus who watches such opportunities as those 
mentioned and who has allowed no year in the last 
five to pass without giving the University from $500 
to $1200 for such purposes, ofi'ered to back the idea 
then current on the campus of an institute for the 
Public Welfare Workers of the State. The State 
and County Council of September, 1919, was the 
outgrowth of that idea, which, in turn, has led directly 
to the co-operation between the LTniversitj' and the 
Southern Division of the Red Cross in its Institute 
for Public Welfare Workers this summer and the 
establishment of a School of Public Welfare in Sep- 
tember of this year. 



We don't want to overdo this thing. But the daily 

press here in North Carolina has recently furnished 

the final point to these observations for 

Everybody's the consideration of alumni. On March 



Doing It 



Elon College announced the com- 



pletion of its drive for $250,000 endow- 
ment. Just a little earlier A. M. Scales and R. G. 
Vaughan announced the completion of the Presby- 
terian drive for $1,000,000 in the State, which yielded 
Davidson $400,000. Last fall the Baptists of North 
Carolina raised over $6,000,000 in one week, of 
which Wake Forest is to receive a good share. In 
the last week of March the 1000 alumni of A. & E.— 
we number 10,000 — decided to put $30,000 into chimes 
in memory of their fallen brothers. And in forty- 
eight hours, March 23-26, the City of Durham went 
over the top with $111,000 as its part in a woman's 
building for Trinity College to be erected in memorj- 
of the late James H. Southgate (U. N. C. '80), to 
match a second $100,000 to be contributed by Mr. 
Duke and a third $100,000 by Trinity alumni. 

nnn 

Prom Chapel Hill the gilbernatorial candidates 
have annoiuiced their platforms and issued their pleas 
to the State. The Review car- 
From Gerrard Hall ried in its last issue the ac- 
To North Carolina count of Max Gardner's ad- 
dress. It carries in this issue 
the account of the appearance of Cameron Morrison 
and Robert N. Page. It hopes eventually to carry the 
Republican rcplj' of John J. Parker. 

What has happened is this : with a vitally important 
State campaign coming on, cTiock-full of clear-cut 
issues, the student.s of the T'niversity, expressing 
themselves through the Campus Cabinet, announced 
to all who liiitened, and particularly to the candi- 
dates, that they were interested in this campaign and 
wanted to know what it was all about and especially 
what manner of men were running for governor, what 
they looked like and what tlie.y stood for. An invita- 
tion was sent to all the candidates to speak to the stu- 
dents. 

The response was as immediate and as cordial and 
gracious as the invitation. Seizing the psychological 
situation, good politicians that they were, the Demo- 
cratic candidates announced their platforms to North 
Carolina from the rostrum of Gerrard Hall. It was, 
they knew, one spot in North Carolina from which 
thej- could reach every county. They faced the most 
representative audience they could hope for in the 
State. The}' came to the buyers and showed their 
wares. They were received with gratitude and listen- 
ed to with fairness, intelligence, and sympathy. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



227 



It has been an interesting event in North Carolina 
politics. It is one more bit of evidence that the most 
wide-awake, keenly analytical, and saneh* progressive 
student body in any Southern institution walks the 
Carolina campus. 

■ nan 

On another page we print the announcement of the 
election of Dr. H. W. Odum, chairman of the com- 
mittee of Deans of Emory Univer- 
School of sity, to the headship of the new 

Public Welfare School of Public Welfai-e which is 
to be established in September. We 
also print the annoimcement of the Summer School 
Institute for public welfare workers, which will be 
held on the campus this summer, in which Dr. Odum 
and other members of the faculty will co-operate with 
the Southern Division of the American Red Cross. 

In bringing Dr. Odum to Chapel Hill, a scholar of 
high attainment and large experience as an educator 
and college administrator in the South, in making this 
highly important connection with the Red Cross, and 
in establishing the School of Public Welfare, the Uni- 
versity has again given splendid evidence of its ability 
to discover and develop fields of service that properly 
cultivated must inevitably yield North Carolina great 
profit. 

nan 

May 5 and 6 have been chosen by the educational 
interests of North Carolina for an extremely impor- 
tant meeting of educators and citi- 
An Important zens to consider in detail the big 
Meeting educational problems confronting 

North Carolina today. 

In view of the fact that 700 schools of the State are 
closed for lack of teachers, that salaries offered for 
work in the schoolroom cannot compete with those in 
other fields and consequently cannot be expected to 
draw competent recruits to the cause, it is high time 
that those who recognize public education as the 
foundation on which the State's welfare depends, 
should get together and work to the one great end of 
saving the school to North Carolina. 

nnn 



In the last issue of The Review attention was called 
to the pressing need for reorganization within the 

University, both in respect of the 
At Work on business administration and of the 
Reorganization administration of the teaching staff'. 

The officers of the institution have 
not been blind to this need. Throughout the present 
session they have been studying the situation, laying 



plans to meet it, and bringing forward certain meas- 
ures as first steps in the solution of the problem. 

On the side of business reorganization the matter 
is still in the stage of study and disevLssion. The 
method of attack will certainly lead to a better work- 
ing program in the very near future. 

On the side of educational reorganization impor- 
tant measures have already been adopted and are 
being put into operation. At the opening of the 
session the President announced the appointment of 
a Dean of Students to take over all matters of student 
conduct, which had formerly centered in the Dean 
of the College of Liberal Arts. The latter was further 
released for the duties that belong more properly to 
his office bj' the transfer of the control of absences to 
the Registrar and of the supervision of chapel to a 
committee. 

At a recent meeting of the faculty the Advisory 
Committee recommended, and the faculty adopted, two 
additional measures designed to extend to all the imits 
of the LTniversity certain methods of administration 
ali'eady recognized and in force in the professional 
schools. The following paragraphs from the report of 
the committee embody these measures : 

It is proposed to recognize the several schools which 
make up the University as having final authority in all 
matters which concern themselves alone, such as curri- 
culum, courses of instruction, co-operation of depart- 
ments, etc. In order to make effective such authority, 
it will be necessary to define the membership of each 
faculty by assigning every member of the teaching 
staff to a seat in one or more faculties, and to dele- 
gate to the Deans of the schools the responsibility of 
calling and presiding over their respective faculties. 

It is further proposed to constitute through ap- 
pointment by a Dean a representative Administrative 
Board for each school, whose function it shall be to 
carry out the will of its faculty, to study the needs 
of the school, and to plan for its growth and develop- 
ments. 

In commenting on these propositions, the committee 
stated that it was of the opinion that : 

These measures will relieve the general faculty of 
much detail which properly belongs to special groups 
of the staff only; that they will shift from the Presi- 
dent's office many minor matters of administration 
which now tend to interfere with the larger and more 
important questions of general policy with which the 
President must at all times be concerned; that they 
will distribute more equitably the burden of com- 
mittee work, doing away with some committees al- 
together, and preventing the overlapping of others, 
while at the same time securing more effective handl- 
ing of routine business through reference of such 
matters to men more directly concerned and better in- 
formed on the problems of their own particular school ; 
that they will aid the President and the general 



228 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



faculty in the formulation of policy ; and that they 
will be of service to the business management of the 
University in determining- and administering the 
budget. 

The Review is not the organ of any special publish- 
ing company nor has it ever considered itself as a 
book agent. But recently it has 
A List Worth happened to read two books in the 
Looking at field of office management it wishes 

it might have read years ago. 

Inasmuch as the majority of the alumni are engaged 
in business enterprises and particularly becaiise an 
miusually large number of new corporations are 
being formed b.y North Carolinians, we have asked the 
School of Commerce to prepare a list of books on busi- 
ness management and commerce appearing elsewhere 
in this issue. Look it up. You may find a title that 
will be jiLSt what you need to put more steam into 
your job. 



WAR RECORD OF COLONEL WOOTEN 

The Review is very glad to carry herewith a state- 
ment of the war record of Colonel William Preston 
Wooten, Engineer Corps, U. S. Army, a native of 
Lenoir Coimty and a member of the class of 1893 : 

Colonel Wooten organized, recruited, trained and 
commanded the l-4th Engineers from May 10, 1917. 
to July 6, 1918. He took the regiment abroad in 
July, 1917. This regiment under his command was 
one of the four reviewed bj' King George V in London, 
Aug. 15, 1917, the first foreign troops to march 
through London since 1688. His regiment was loaned . 
to the British, landed at Boulogne August 18, 1917, 
and three days later was in camp at Boisleux-au- 
Mont, six miles south of Arras and within five miles 
of the front. It took over the work of distributing by 
light railwaj' supplies from the railhead at Boisleux 
and Beaumetz-les-Loges direct to batteries and to 
points 1,000 yards from extreme front. His regi- 
ment was the first of the American troops to take 
over work at the front. After nine months at the 
front during which time it had taken part in the bat- 
tle of Cambrai and in the Somme defensive, the regi- 
ment was ordered on May 19, 1918, to camp near 
Calais for work in a quieter region. 

Colonel Wooten was relieved from command of the 
regiment July 6, 1918, and made chief engineer, 
Third Corps. In this capacity, he took part in Aisne- 
Marne, Oise-Aisne, and Meuse-Argonne campaigns, 
and the march to the Rhine. On January 22, 1919, 
he was appointed chief engineer. Third Army (Army 
of Occupation in Germany) and continued as such 
until his return to the United States in July, 1919. 
Previous to the signing of the armistice, every day of 
his service abroad had been field service, all but aljout 
two months of which had been spent at the front. 

Colonel Wooten was awarded the Distinguished 
Service Medal, his citation reading as follows: "Wil- 



liam P. Wooten, cohmel, Engineer Corps, United 
States Army. For exceptionally meritorious and dis- 
tinguished services. He served with credit as com- 
manding officer of the 14th Railway Engineers dur- 
ing the operations of that regiment on the British 
front. Subsequently, while corps engineer of the 
Third Arm.^- Corps, by his energy, foresight, and skill 
in accomplishing important engineering works, he 
contributed materially to the successful operations 
of his corps. Later, when appointed engineer of the 
Third Arm}', he performed important duties in a most 
creditable manner." 

For his services with the British army he was made 
a Companion of the Order of St. Michael and St. 
George by His Majesty the King of England for 
"unusually meritorious services to the Allied cause." 

Colonel Wooten is now stationed at Detroit, Michi- 
gan, in charge of the survey of the Great Lakes. He 
has also been detailed as the United States engineer 
to act in conjimction with a Canadian engineer in 
making a suiwey of certain portions of the St. Law- 
rence River, looking to the improvement of this river 
to secure navigation from Ontario to Montreal, and in 
preparing a project for sea-going vessels and for the 
developing of water-power. 



CLASS OF 1915 PLANS FOR REUNION 

D. L. Bell. attorne.y of Pittsboro, secretary of the 
class of 1915, writes The Review as follows concern- 
ing the five-year reunion of this class, which will be 
held at the approaching commencement : 

We are planning to have a big reunion of the class 
of 1915 this year. All alumni who were ever members 
of the class, irrespective of whether they graduated, 
are cordially invited to come back for this occasion. 
A committee on arrangements has been appointed as 
follows : Phil Woollcott, American Trust Company, 
Charlotte; J. S. Bryan, 208 S. Fourth St., Wilming- 
ton ; and R. E. Parker, 208 W. Edenton St., Raleigh. 
Every member of the class who plans to be present 
should write some member of the committee or the 
class secretary. We want to have the biggest reimion 
ever held at the University ; and we are planning to 
make it worth while for every 1915 man to attend. 



GOVERNOR BICKETT SPEAKS 

Governor Bickett was present for the spring "tap- 
ping" of the Golden Fleece, held in Gerrard Hall, 
March 30th. The students chosen were : John P. 
Washburn, of Lillington ; Beemer Harrell, of Marsh- 
ville ; John D. Shaw, of Laurinburg ; Daniel L. Grant, 
of Snead"s Ferry; William H. Bobbitt, of Charlotte; 
Carlyle Shepard, of W^ilmington, and John H. Kerr, 
Jr., of Warrenton. President Chase was also 
"tapped". Governor Bickett spoke to an audience 
that crowded Gerrard Hall to the eaves on "Scales 
and Yardsticks, or The Importance of Values", a 
plea for the old-fashioned virtues. 



THEALUMNIREVIEW 229 



Inauguration of President Chase 

April 28 



THE INAUGURAL EXERCISES 

GOVERNOR THOMAS W. BICKETT, Presiding 

INVOCATION 

The Kight Reverend Joseph B. Cheshire 
THE HIGHER EDUCATION AND ITS PRESENT TASK 

Thk College — John Grier Hibben, President of Friucctiin J'mverfiitti 

The Professional School — Charles R. Mann, Chairman Advi.^ori/ Board. War Plans 
Division. War Deparinient 

Thi: Graduate School — Abbott Lawrence Lowell, Prrsidnif of Harvard T'niversity 
PRESENTATION OF THE PRESIDENT 

Francis P. Venable, E.r-Prcsidcnt of tin I'nivcrsifij of North Carolina 
ADMINISTRATION OF THE OATH OF OFFICE 

Walter Clark, Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of North Carolina 
INDUCTION INTO OFFICE 

Thomas W. Bickett, Governor of North Carolina 
INAUGURAL ADDRESS 

Harry Woodbnrn Chase, Presielent of the Fniversitij of North Carolina 
GREETINGS 

Froji the State Universities — Edwin A. Alderman, President of the University of 
Virginia 

From the Colleges of North Carolina — William L. Poteat, President of Wake Forest 
College 

From the Public Schools of North Carolina — E. C. Brooks, Superintendent of Public 
1 nstruction 

From the Alumni — W. N. Everett 

From the Faculty — Archibald Henderson, Professor of Pure Mathematics 

From the Student Body — E. E. Wliite, Jr., of the Senior Class 

BENEDICTION 

The Rifrht Reverend Joseph B. Cheshire 

SCHEDULE OF EXERCISES 

12:30 P.M.— BulTet Luncheon for delegates at Phillips Hall 
1 :00 P.M. — The Academic Procession, from the Alumni Buildiii<r to Memorial Hall 
1 :.3n P.M.— The Inauoural Exercises, Memoi-ial Hall 
7:00 P.M.— The Inaugural Dinner, Swain Hall 
9 :30 P.M. — The Inaugural Reception, Bynum (iymnasium 

TICKETS TO INAUGURAL DINNER 

Tickets to the Inaugural Dinner will be on sale at Phillips Hall at $L50. Alumni and 
their friends are expected to be present. 



230 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



INAUGURATION PLANS COMPLETED 



Noted Educators and Representatives From Many Institutions and 
Societies are to Participate 



Complete plans for the formal inauguration of 
President Harry Woodburn Chase on Wednesday, 
April 28th, the program of which is announced on 
another page, show that the day will be one of the 
most notable in the whole history of the University. 

Surrounding the new president when he repeats the 
oath of oiSce after Chief Justice Walter Clark will be 
a company of distinguished scholars, university lead- 
ers, representatives of learned bodies, alumni, stu- 
dents, and friends that will rank with any such gath- 
ering in the State. 

The formal exercises in Memorial Hall, the central 
feature of which will be President Chase's inaugural 
address, will be marked also by addresses from Presi- 
dent Lowell, of Harvard, President Hibben, of Prince- 
ton, Dr. Mann, of the War Department, President 
Alderman, of the University of Virginia, President 
Poteat, of Wake Forest, and others. 

Attending the exercises will be delegates and rep- 
resentatives from scores of colleges, universities, and 
learned societies from all over the country. Invita- 
tions have been sent to 26 i educational institutions, 
to 57 learned societies, to 14 professional schools, and 
to 5 educational boards. At the banquet after the 
inauguration greetings will be heard from many of 
these delegates. 

Personal invitations have been sent also to thou- 
sands of North Carolinians, alumni and friends of the 
University, and preliminary reports and estimates 
indicate that the gathering of North Carolinians in 
Chapel Hill on April 28th will be the greatest home- 
coming the University has known in her century and 
a quarter of existence. 

By shifting the exercises to the afternoon, an inno- 
vation for public affairs at the University, the com- 
mittee in charge of the inauguration thinks it 
has added greatly to the convenience and comfort of 
the visitors. By limiting sharply the time allowance 
on the addresses the committee thinks also that the 
exercises will move along with life and interest to the 
very end. 

The delegates to the inauguration, who are the 
guests of the University, Will be entertained at a buffet 
luncheon served by the co-educational students in 
Phillips Hall at 12:30. All such delegates will 
arrive in the morning and will be escorted immedi- 
ii'ely to that building. They will go from there to 



the neighborhood of the Alumni Building, at which 
the academic procession will form at 1 :30. 

This procession, which will be one of the largest and 
most inclusive features of the day, will include the 
student bodj', the alumni, county and city superin- 
tendents and public school teachers, all State oiScers 
and members of the general assembly, the trustees of 
the University, the delegates, the faculty, and the 
platform group. Many of these will be in cap and 
gown. 

The formal exercises at Memorial Hall, with Gov- 
ernor Bickett presiding, will begin at 1 :00 P. M., and 
the committee has estimated that they will be con- 
cluded by 4.00 or 4.30. An intermission will follow 
before the banquet at Swain Hall. Here further 
greetings will be extended to the University by dele- 
gates from other institutions. Present plans call for 
a large number of these, but in each case it is under- 
stood that the time will be short. 

Immediately after the banquet a public reception 
will be given by the University in Bynum Gymna- 
sium, at which there will be music and probably 
dancing. 

Detailed plans are being made now for the com- 
fort and convenience of the visitors who are expected 
to come to Chapel Hill for the day. Special trains 
will be I'un from east and west to Chapel Hill, and 
at night special Pullmans will be arranged to carry 
away those delegates who have to leave. A part of 
Phillips Hall will be used entirely as a rest 
room for women. Local arrangements are being made 
to provi.le food for the visitors. The details of all 
these plans will be announcd as soon as they are de- 
finite. 



SECRETARY COLBY IS COMMENCEMENT 
SPEAKER 

Secretary of State Bainbridge Colby will be the 
chief speaker at Commencement. President Chase 
made the announcement four days after the Senate 
had confirmed his nomination. The personality of 
the new secretary and his reputation as a speaker, no 
less than the fact of his presence at Chapel Hill on 
a date so close to both the Democratic aiad Republican 
national conventions, will assure an unusual interest 
in the 1920 Commencement. The date on which he 
will appear is June 16th. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



231 






O. Max Gakdxek, Law 'OH 



Cameron Morkison 



Robert N. Page 



GUBERNATORIAL CANDIDATES AT CHAPEL HILL 



Gardner, Morrison and Page Speak Before Student Body, 
with Parker to Follow 



From the rostriiiii of Gerrard Hall the candidates 
for Democratic iioininatioii for the governorship. 
Max Gardner, Cameron Morrison, and Robert N. 
Page, appearing one by one at the invitation of the 
students, February 25th, March 5th, and March 11th, 
have announced the platforms on which they are run- 
ning and have made their biggest appeal for support 
broadcast to the entire State. John J. Parker, the 
Republican candidate, will follow them, speaking 
from the same platform, April 17th. 

By force of circumstances perhaps, by reason of the 
representative audience they knew was facing them, 
by the advantage of touching all North Carolina 
by touching Chapel Hill, the candidates seized upon 
Gerrard Hall as their jumping-off trench from which 
they sought to win the State, and voters who had been 
wanting to know where the candidates stood heard 
from Chapel Hill Gardner's plea for a more abundant 
life, Morrison's analysis of the taxation situation, and 
Page's outline for a business-like administration. 
They are waiting, as The Review goes to press, for 
Parker's reply. 

Max Gardner's speech has been reported in a pre- 
vious issue of The Review. Cameron Morrison, fol- 
lowing him a week later, took the bit in his teetli 
and attacked the whole problem of taxation. The 
important thing about the taxation program in North 



Carolina, he said, was the whole program and not one 
part of it. 

"The revaluation act is a temporary relief mea- 
sure," he declared, "and too much attention has been 
paid to it alone. The adoption of the income-tax 
amendments, which I favor, is more important. The 
consideration of the program as a whole is the most 
important thing of all." 

Money for State purposes, Mr. Morrison thought, 
.should come from special taxes now used, from inher- 
itance taxes and licenses and from the proposed in- 
come tax, but no property tax should be levied for 
State purposes. All property taxes should be con- 
trolled by local units of government, thereby assuring 
them the local self-couti'ol which has been the corner- 
stone of the Democratic party since its foimdation. 

On other issues Mr. Morrison backed the President, 
endorsed Governor Bickett and his administration 
with slight reservations, favored the League of Na- 
tions, favored the repeal of war taxes, favored spread- 
ing war costs over rising generations, denounced so- 
cialism, sovietism, and all other isms, and scored 
the Republican party on its national and State record 
on various matters. 

Mr. Morrison spoke at great length and with vigor 
and directness. A crowd that filled Gerrard Hall re- 
mained attentive for the two hours. "It was the 



232 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



most intellipeiit audience I liave ever addreissed, " Mr. 
Morrison said afterward. 

The last Democratic speaker, Mr. Page, appeared 
March 11th, and was greeted by the same capacity 
crowd of students that had listened to his predeces- 
sors. On the taxation probleais of the State he re- 




,l0IIN J. P.MiKER, '07 

endorsed tlie revaluation act and tlie income-tax 
amendments, and on other matters went further into 
details than the other speal\ers. 

"I favor laws which will enable the State to place 
a lower rate of taxation on productive forms of prop- 
erty than on consumptive forms of property. Im- 
proved machinerj', whether on farms or in factories, 
that is producing wealth for the State, should be taxed 
at a lower rate than those forms of property that 
administer only to the pleasure of the owner. I also 
believe that a lower tax i-ate should be placed on all 
homes occupied by owners in order that home-owning 
may be encouraged among the people. ' ' 



DEAN HOWE LECTURES AT S. C. UNIVERSITY 

Dr. George Howe, Dean of the college of liberal 
arts and head of the Latin department, spent a week 
in early March at the University of South Carolina de- 
livering a series of lectures before the University. The 
Universities of Virginia, North Carolina, South Caro- 
lina, and Vanderbilt University have an exchange 
professorship plan by which a member of the faculty 
of each institution goes each spring to another insti- 
tution in the group to deliver special lectures in his 
field of work. Later in the spring Dr. J. C. Metcalfe, 
of Virginia, will speak in Chapel Hill. 



LATHAM AND McLEAN ADDRESS STUDENTS 
IN SCHOOL OF COMMERCE 

The School of Commerce has invited a number of 
successful business men to speak before the students 
of the school on business subjects. J. E, Latham, 
of Greensboro, was the first of these, speaking March 
4th on "Merchandizing in Cotton". He was followed 
by A. W. McLean, director of the War Finance Cor- 
poration, on April 1st, who discussed "Training for 
Foreign Trade." Other men who will appear before 
the school this spring are Eugene Hartley, chief sta- 
tistician of manufactures o^' the Census Bureau, John 
C. Whitaker, employment manager of the R. J. Rey- 
nolds Ti baceo Co., and L. E. Nichols, assistant State 
Commissioner of Labor and Printing. 

Mr. Latham explained in detail the business of a 
cotton merchant. He traced the relation between the 
merchant and the cotton itself from the planting 
through the buying and shipping to the delivery. 

Mr. McLean described the methods of the War Fi- 
nance Corporation in helping finance foreign busi- 
ness. He said the greatest need in the development 
of foreign trade is trained young men, and he thought 
the South. ]iartieularly North Caroliiui, was admir- 
ably situated now for the extension of foreign busi- 
ness. 



SUMMER ACTIVITIES AT CHAPEL HILL 

The southern division of the Red Cross has joined 
forces with the University in the establishment of 
public welfare institutes in the 1920 summer school. 
A special six-weeks course for North Carolina coimty 
superintendents of public welfare will be given, and 
a twelve-weeks course, including two weeks of field 
work, for Red Cross secretaries and social workers of 
all kinds, including Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A. 
secretaries, settlement workers, boy scout and camp 
fire girl workers, playground directors, probation of- 
ficers, and directors of charity organizations. 

Lecturers who will be sent to the summer school for 
these institutes include: Dr. Samuel McCune Lind- 
say, of Columbia University; Dr. Bernard Glueck, 
of the New York School of Social Work ; Dr. Frank 
Watson, director of the Pennsylvania School of So- 
cial Work; Dr. E. L. Morgan, Dr. J. C. Steiner, Dr. 
Philip Klein, and Miss Kathryn Farra, all of the 
Red Cross, and many others. 

Other activities of the University during the sum- 
mer include the second meeting of the State and 
county council, the North Carolina Road Institute, 
a special institute for secretaries of commercial or- 
ganizations, as well as the usual courses in the sum- 
mer school. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



233 



THE FIRST REUNION OF THE CLASS OF 1919 



Hilton G. West, of Chapel Hill, secretary of the 
class of 1919, sends to his classmates the following 
letter concerning the one-year reunion of this class 
which will be held at commencement : 

■'Can you realize that we are alumni?" asked one 
"19 man of another. The man who asked this ques- 
tion was one of the forty-five 1919 men now on the 
campus, all of whom find it difficult to realize that 
they are alumni. No doubt the men who didn't come 
back to college for one more year, who know that 
the business world is different from the life of the 
campus, have realized that they are alunnii — so the 
apparent thing to do is "get-together." 

The object of the custom for having the first re- 
union one year after graduation is just this : to provide 
a chance for the men who are still on the "Hill" 
and the men who have had one year's experience in 
the business world to get-together, to exchange ex- 
periences and ideas, to re-cement friendships formed 
in undergraduate days, to spend a few delightful 
spring days together in Chapel Hill again. 

With forty-five '19 men already present there is 
a nucleus for such a reunion as "Old Davie" has 
never before looked down upon. Nineteen-nineteen, 
starting out 324 strong and ending some 84 strong, 
has the distinction of being the real "War Class" of 
the University. Alrcad.v her number is scattered to 
the four winds. But she was ever praised for her 
come-back, and now '19 has the chance to literally 
"comeback," and, as in the past, the job will not be 
half-heartedlj' done. 

On Monday, June 14th at 9:00 P.M., the class of 
'19 will re-assemble in the same place — "The Coop" 
— around a banquet table, which, in charge of Miss 
Elizabeth Lay, will even surpass the senior banquet 
of last year, at which time it was agreed that at each 
reunion just such a banquet was to be held. Harold 
Williamson, permanent vice-president, will be toast- 
master in the absence of Jack Powell, president, who 
is with the National City Bank, at Montevideo, 
Uruguaj'. 

Tuesdaj-, June 15th, Alumni Day, the class of '19 
will have as many special tables reserved and decor- 
ated as are needed at the alumni luncheon. Tuesday 
afternoon, '19 will meet the class of 1910 in a base- 
ball game on Emerson field. 

These special things for the class of 1919, together 
with many other events of commencement, promise to 
be of such a nature that no man can afford to miss 
them. The annex to the Inn, known at present as 
"The Graduate Club," with its sleeping porch, run- 
ning water and club room will be the headquarters 
of 1919. 

There are at present forty-five members of the 
class of 1919 on the "Hill." This class is the real 
war class of the University, and original 1919 men 
may now be found ranging from the sophomore class 
to graduate standing. A large number are in the 
professional schools. Nineteen-nineteen men are 



found still taking an active part in nearly every phase 
of college activity, as the following statistics will 
show : 

William Banks Anderson, Haw River, is pursuing 
advanced work preparatory to entering Johns Hop- 
kins iledieal School next year. He is at present an 
assistant in Zoology. 

John Lee Aycock, Raleigh, is private secretary to 
Dr. Edwin Greenlaw, and editor-in-chief of The 
Blue Ridge, a magazine published by the class in 
English 21. 

Jefferson C. Bynum, Washington, D. C, is an as- 
sistant in the geological department, and is pursuing 
work leading to his Master's degree. 

Harvey J. Campbell, Burlington, is assistant treas- 
urer of the LTniversit.y. 

Thomas Pugh Dawson, Conetoe, is a candidate for 
the Ph.C. degree, and an assistant in the chemistry 
department. 

Walter C. Feimster, Jr., Newton, is in the Law 
School. Feimster was manager of the football team 
last fall, and is at present captain of the varsity 
baseball team. 

John Wesley Foster, Cool Spring, is managing the 
Universitj' Book Exchange and is a student in the 
Law School. 

Nathan G. Gooding, New Bern, and Hilton G. West, 
are business manager and assistant editor-in-chief, 
respectively, of The Tar Heel. They and Enoch Price 
and John Aycock are preparing to go into journal- 
ism. Price is an instructor in mathematics, as is 
Charles M. Hazelhurst, Wilmington. 

Edwin S. Lindsay, Tryon, is a fellow in English 
and an assistant in the new music department. 

E. Owen Roberts, Biltmore, is a candidate for his 
bachelor's degree and is showing up well as catcher 
on the varsity nine. 

Theodore E. Rondthaler, Winston-Salem, is a fellow 
in English and a member of the University orchestra. 

Miss Elizabeth Lay is an assistant in the Carolina 
Playmakers department, and is pursuing work lead- 
ing to a master's degree. 

George Alexander Younce is president of the Ath- 
letic A.ssociation, catcher on the varsity nine, and a 
student in the Law School. 

In the Law School are also : Hugh D. Baker, Jr., 
Rocky Mount ; Graham A. Barden, Burgaw ; Hugh 
Dortch, Goldsboro; Paul B. Edmundson, Goldsboro; 
William E. Hennessee, Salisbury; Daniel M. Hodges, 
Asheville; Clement M. Lewellyn, Dobson; Forrest G. 
I\Iiles, Warrenton ; John H. Paylor, Laurinburg ; and 
George L. Wiraberly, Jr., Rocky Mount. 

In the IMedical School are: Thomas P. Brian, Hert- 
ford ; Vernon L. Eley, Richmond, Va. ; Carey L. Har- 
rington, Greenville, and Samuel R. Norris, Jackson- 
ville, Fla. 

Other '19 men on the Hill are: Frank D. Bell, 
Tuxedo ; Chester W. Burton, Greensboro ; George T. 
Colvard, Jefferson ; Grover C. Dale, Seven Springs ; 
Harry T. Davis, Beaufort; Clement Eaton, Winston- 
Salem ; Edgar B. Jenkins, Nashville. 



234 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



DR. ODUM HEADS PUBLIC WELFARE SCHOOL 



The appointment of l)i-. Howard W. Oduni, Dean 
of the College of Liberal Arts and chairman of the 
Council of Deans at Emory University, Atlanta, as 
Kenan Professor of Sociology and dii-ector of the new 




Dr. Hotvakd W. OnuM 

School of Public Welfare was announced March 21st 
by President Chase. 

Dr. Odum will move to Chapel Hill early in the 
summer. He will have charge of the public-welfare 
courses to be started in the University in the summer 
school and he will lay the foundations for the first 
School of Public Welfare in the South. 

Preliminaiy outlines of the scope of the new school, 
also announced by President Chase, show that it will 
be concerned with problems of instruction and educa- 
tion in citizenship, in vocational and professional 
training for social and public welfare work, and in 
University and social research. 

"It is a new venture in the South," said President 
Chase, "but its needs have been shown so clearly, 
especially within the past few years, that there can 
be little question of its possibilities. The work of the 
school will be closely connected, of course, with other 
work in the University, such as education, history, 
economics, and commerce." 

To his new position Dr. Odntn will bring a large 
amount of definite training and experience. A South- 
ern man, a native of Walton, Ga., he received his 
early training at Emory College, taught in a high 
school and later for three years in the University of 
Mississippi. His graduate work was done at Clark 



University and at Columbia University. Prom Co- 
lumbia he received his Ph. D., winning at the same 
time the Grant Squires award for the best sociological 
study published in the United States for a period of 
five years. 

The next three j'ears Dr. Odum spent as research 
expert for the bureau of municipal research in Phila- 
delphia, involving studies in the city's public schools 
for the bureau of public charities and for the depart- 
ment of health which he himself organized. 

In 1913 Dr. Odum came south again, becoming pro- 
fessor of educational sociology at the University of 
Georgia and director of the summer school. At the 
same time he served as a member of the board of 
education of the Atlanta city schools and as a mem- 
ber of the Clarke County board of education. 

In 1918 he entered the service of the Red Cross 
and for a j'ear was director of the bureau of home 
service for camps and camp cities in the southern 
division. "There can be no question that Dr. Odum 
exhibited in this service a rare judgment of men and 
exceptional executive ability," is a comment from 
Joseph C. Logan, assistant manager of the southern 
division of the Red Cro.ss. "He showed a bigness of 
mind and character which inspii-ed loyalty and confi- 
dence and enabled him to woi-k cordially with other 
people without losing his own objectives." 

When the reorganization and enlargement of Em- 
ory University was undertaken in the spring of 1919, 
Dr. Odum assumed charge of the reorganization, his 
title being dean of the college, his duties practically 
those of chairman of the faculty. President Chase 
has received a letter from three of his colleagues at 
Emory, Dean Franklin N. Parker, of the School of 
Theology, Dean Edgar H. Johnson, of the School of 
Law, and Dean Theodore H. Jack, of the Graduate 
School, testifying to the success which Dr. Odum made 
of his work at Emory and congratulating the Uni- 
versitj- of Noi-th Carolina on obtaining his services. 
The student council at Emory made special efforts to 
liave him retained there. 

Dr. Odum is the author of "Social and Mental 
Traits of the Negro," "Folk-Songs and Poetry," 
"Religious Folk-Songs," and other books. He is con- 
tributing editor to the Journal of Race Development 
and the Journal of International Relations. He has, 
in addition, contributed frequently to such periodicals 
as the Annals of the American Academy of Political 
and Social Science, the American Journal of Religious 
Psychology and Education, and the Journal of Amer- 
ican Polk-Lore. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



233 



ESTABLISHED 1916 



jllutiinj Coyalty Tund 



"One for all, and all for one" 



Council: 

A.M. SCALES, -92 
LESLIE WEIL, '95 
L. R. WILSON. '99 
A. W. HAYWOOD. '04 
W. T. SHORE, 'OS 
J. A. GRAY. -08 




ARE YOU WORRIED BY THAT OLD, OLD QUESTION 

That will not down: How may I prove my loyalty to 
Alma Mater? Of course you are and will continue 
to be until you 

SEND YOUR CHECK TO THE ALUMNI LOYALTY FUND 

And do at least one of the following important things: 

1. Put the Neivs Letter, the President's report, the Tar Heel, The Review, the Extension 
Bulletin, the Tar Baby — one or all — in the school or town libi-ary and hand copies of them to 
the local editor. 

2. Tell the teachers you meet with that they should attend the Summer School June-July. 
Send the names of the high school boys who should be on the Hill in September. 

3. Have you made j-our will ? If you have not, make it and put Carolina in. If you have, 
and failed to include Carolina, add a codicil for her benefit. 

4. Endow one, two, or five fellowships in subjects of your choice with which the best men 
can be held in the Graduate School. 

5. Establish one, two, or five scholarships for students who cannot otherwise go to college. 

6. Endow any one of the fourteen imendowed sections of the library. Or give a lump sum 
for the immediate purchase of books. 

7. Studies in Philology has wou a place in the scholarly world as a philological journal. 
An annual income of $.500 will make its position permanent. 



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payable of each year; at which time please send notice. 



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236 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 

Issued monthly except in July, August, and September, by the Gen 
eral Alumni Association of the Universitj' of North Carolina. 

Board of Publication 

The Review is edited by the following Board of Publication: 

Louis R. Wilson, '99 Editor 

Associate Editors: Walter Murphy. '92; Harry Howell, "95; Archibald 
Henderson. '9S; W. S. Bernard. '00; J. K. Wilson, '05; Louis 
Graves, '0'2 ; F. P. Graham. '09; Kenneth Tanner, '11; Lenoir 
Chambers, Jr., '14; R. W. Madry, '18. 

E. R. Rankin, '13 Managing Editor 

Subscription Price 

Single Copies $0.20 

Per Year 1-50 

Communications intended for the Editor and the Managing Editor 
should be sent to Chapel Hill, N. C. All communications intended for 
publication must be accompanied with signatures if they are to receive 
consideration. 

OFFICE OF PUBLICATION, CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 

Entered at the Postoffice at Chapel Hill, N. C, as second class 
matter. 



PROFESSOR WALKER'S WORK IS CHANGED 

The decision of the General Edneation Board to 
place two men instead of one on the work of inspec- 
tion of high schools in North Carolina will enable 
Professor N. W. Walker, who has been the sole inspec- 
tor for fifteen years, to devote more time to his work 
in the School of Education. The field and statistical 
work of the inspector has been assumed by J. Henry 
Highsmith, who becomes associated with the State 
Department of Education. 

Professor Walker will continue that part of the 
work related to the stimulation of teaching in the 
high schools, and he will also give courses in secon- 
dary education at the University. He will continue 
other duties at the University, including the director- 
ship of the Summer Scliool and the editorship of 
The High School Journal. 

During Professor Walker's term of service the num- 
ber of high schools has increased from 177 to 391, the 
number of four-year high schools from 17 to 250, the 
number of teachers from 323 to 1,172, and the num- 
ber of pupils enrolled from 6,398 to 23,665. 



CAROLINA ACTOR MAKES HIT 

Under the title of "Who's Who on the Stage," the 
New York Times of Sunday, February 8th, has the 
following to say of Sidney Blackmer, class of 1914: 

Sidney Blackmer, the newest juvenile to flash across 
the theatrical horizon, established himself rather firm- 
ly on Monday night by his performance as Maxine El- 
liott's nearl.v wayward son in "Trimmed in Scarlet." 
Blackmer has had rather an astonishinglj^ small 
amount of stage experience, in view of the importance 



of his present role. He played his first part only 
three years ago, and much of the intervening period 
was taken up by war service. 

Blackmer, as most persons who have heard him are 
aware, is a Southerner, hailing from Salisbury, N. C. 
He made rather a half-hearted essay at the law at 
the University of North Carolina, largel.v with the 
hope of satisfying family ambitions, and then broke 
away to try his. luck in the theatrical field, which he 
had long been regarding with considerable eagerness. 
He appeared first in a small role in Mr. Ames's pro- 
duction of "The Morris Dance" at the Little Theatre, 
.just three seasons ago, and when that piece went un- 
der he toured with the Ben Greet Players for the re- 
mainder of the season, playing romantic leads in half 
a dozen or more Shakespearean plays, 

A season's tour as the leading .iuvenile of "The 
Thirteenth Chair." followed by several months as 
leading man of the erstwhile municipal stock company 
at Northampton, completed his experience prior to the 
war. Enlisting as a private, he won his commission 
as a lieutenant of artillery, and after considerable 
overseas service he returned here as an artillery in- 
structor at various camps. After his discharge he 
followed Henry Hull in the leading role of "39 East," 
then completing its run at the Broadhurst, and this 
]iart was the last that he played prior to his engage- 
ment with Miss Elliott. 

He was touring as the featured member of a "39 
East" company when William Hurlbut, author of 
■'Trimmed in Scarlet," went on a scouting expedi- 
tion into New Jersey to see him. A variet.y of players 
had already been tried for the role of the youth in 
that play, and Miss Elliott was on the point of sending 
to England for an actor when Hurlbut discovered 
Blackmer. Miss Elliott, albeit with serious doubts in 
her mind, gave him his trial, and he has emerged 
with honors second only to those won by the star. 
Blackmei', incidentally, is the only American in Miss 
Elliott's supporting company. 



WILMINGTON WINS BASKETBALL 
CHAMPIONSHIP 

Wilmington High School won the State basketball 
championship from Charlotte, 31 to 27, in the finals 
of the best and most exciting contest the Bureau of 
Extension has ever conducted. The finals in the 
eastei-n championship brought Wilmington and Wil- 
son together, with Wilmington the winner, 46 to 31. 
In the western series, Charlotte defeated Lexington, 
28 to 16, and the champions of the east and west met 
March 19. All these games were played in Bynum 
Gymnasium. 

Previous to the final games, twenty-two schools 
had, by their early season records, qualified for the 
elimination series. Seeretaiy Rankin reports wider 
interest in basketball among the high schools than 
there has ever been before. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



237 



GRADUATE SCHOOL ANNOUNCES PROGRAM 



The announcement that eighteen University Teach- 
ing; Fellowships, pajiug five hundred dollars to eacli 
holder, are offered for the year 1920-1921, is the first 
step in the program of development which the Gradu- 
ate School of the University proposes. Already appli- 
cations for these fellowships have come not only from 
North Carolina but from a number of Southern States, 
some as far away as Texas. The followships impose 
no additional burden on the budget, since the funds 
for their support are found by combining the sums 
allowed various departments for strident assistants. 
Each fellow will do approximately half the work of 
an instructor, the remainder of his time being devoted 
to study for an advanced degree. The departments 
will secure, through competition, a higher quality of 
service than w^as possible under the old plan, while a 
group of able young men, graduates of this University 
and other colleges and universities, will be enabled to 
carry on advanced study in a number of important 
departments. 

The tentative program for the development of the 
Graduate School during the next five years contains 
other items. 

First, it is based upon a clear recognition of the 
opportunity- now given, through the increased pay 
and respect certain to come to college teachers as a 
result of the present agitation, to make such teaching 
truly a learned profession. Not mere numbers, but 
higher standards of scholarship and training, a clearer 
idea of the relation of learning to life, a better service 
to high schools and colleges made possible through 
these standards and this relationship, are means by 
which the power and usefulness of advanced work at 
the University are to be increased. 

The program recognizes, also, the strategic position 
occupied by this University. For more than a cen- 
tury there have lived at Chapel Hill scholars who have 
been possessed of the passion for research. This idea 
of service, not only through teaching but also through 
the advancement of learning, is an inheritance of in- 
calculable value. The Graduate School is established 
upon a long record of scholarly work, widely recog- 
nized for its sincerity and worth, constituting paid- 
in capital stock as a basis for further expansion. No 
other Southern institution possesses so high a record. 
Under proper conditions, there is no reason why bril- 
liant students from everj' section of the South should 
not come here for advanced work. Such a develop- 
ment would increase enormously the prestige of the 
University, would be in line with the tradition of a 
century at Chapel HiU, and would be of untold ad- 



vantage to the cause of education throughout the 
South. It needs no great endowments at the start. 
It does need, however, careful planning by which 
each year shall see definite progress. Hence the five- 
year program now under consideration. 

Among immediate needs are the following : 

1. The foundation of additional fellowships, such 
as memorials in honor of great teachers. These fel- 
lowships should require no service on the part of 
the holders, who should give their entire time to 
study. Yoimg men just finishing their undergraduate 
course have not the funds necessary for further study. 
Many a brilliant man who would distinguish himself 
in scholarship finds the temptation to engage at once 
in business too strong to resist. Every department of 
the University interested in graduate work should 
have from one to four or five of these endowed fellow- 
ships. 

2. There should be an immediate increase in the 
resources of the library for the needs of advanced 
students. Here, too, special endowments are neces- 
sary. For some departments, such as language and 
literature, political and social science, and the like, 
the library is the laboratory. No matter how able 
the professors in these departments, they are helpless 
without the books on which their scholarly work de- 
pends. Since Chapel Hill is not near any great 
library, the need is the more urgent, not only for ad- 
vanced students but for holding in our faculty our 
productive scholars. 

3. Further support of the journals of research 
now maintained by the University — the Elisha 
Mitchell Journal, Studies in Philology, and the 
Sprunt Historical Monographs. No small part of the 
reputation of the University in the world of learning 
has been won through these journals. Their pros- 
perity is related immediately to the Graduate School ; 
they are its organs of publicity ; they show the quality 
and the extent of the scholarly work without which 
no Graduate School is possible. 



Captain Beemer Harrell began in March a four- 
weeks' spring training for football candidates. Forty 
men reported for practice, many of them from last 
fall's large freshman squad. Assisting Captain Har- 
rell were several varsity ijlayers. Cochrane working 
with the ends, Pritchard with the tackles, Jacobi with 
centers, and Griffith with backs. Most of the work 
was of a rudimentary nature. Toward the end of the 
training period scrimmages were held. 



238 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



THE GENERAL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

of the 

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 



OfScers of the Association 

R. D. W. Connor, '99 President 

E. R. Rankin, '13 Secretarj- 

Executive Committee: Walter Murphj', '92; Dr. R. H. 
Lewis, '70; W. N. Everett, '86; H. E. Rondthaler, '93; C. W. 
TiUett, Jr., '09. 



WITH THE CLASSES 

1868 
—A. W. Graham, former judge of the Superior Court of 
North Carolina, is president of the American Cotton and 
Grain Exchange, Inc., 17 Wall Street, New York City. 

1879 

— Lindsay Patterson, Law '79, has been engaged in the 
practice of law .it Winston-S.alem since he left the University. 

1881 
— R. 0. Holt is in charge of the income-tax department of the 
New York division, U. S. Internal Revenue service, with head- 
quarters in the 0. S. Customs House, New York City. 
— Dr. A. C. Dixon, of Los Angeles, California, famous as a 
minister of the Baptist denomination both in the United 
States and England, will preach the baccalaureate sermon 
at the Greensboro College for Women on May 23d. 

1882 

— Judge Frank A. I>auiels, of Goldsboro, lias been a member 
of the Superior Court bench of the State for a number of 
years. 

1883 
— F. A. Sherrill is one of the leading citizens of StatesviUe. 
He is president of large flour mills. 

1884 

— W. J. Lenoir, hardware merchant and banker of Lenoir, is 
servmg his third term as mayor of the city. 

1885 

— Dr. W. C. Riddick, president of the State College of Agri- 
culture and Engineering at West Raleigh, has been appointed 
by President Wilson to membership on the board of visitors of 
the United States Naval Academy. 

— Z. V. Walser, attorney of Lexington, and former attorney 
general of the State, is campaign manager in North Carolina 
of General Leonard Wood's candidacy for the Republican 
nomination for President. 

— Julius C. Martin practices his profession, law, in Asheville, a 
member of the firm of Martin, Rollins and Wright. 
— A. W. Long, for many years a member of the faculty of 
Princeton University, has retired from teaching and will make 
his future home on the Ransom Road, Red Bank, N. J., thirty 
miles from New York. 

— Jas. C. Roberts holds a chair in the Colorado School of 
Mines at Golden, Col. 

— A. H. Eller is vice-president and trust officer of the Wachovia 
Bank and Trust Co., Winston-Salem. 

1886 

— R. L. Strowd is a capitalist of Chapel Hill. 

— J. J. .Jenkins, banker of Siler City, is the nominee of the 

Republican party for State treasurer. 



— Dr. Lewis J. Battle, physician of Washington, D. C, ^vrites: 
' ' Good luck and best wishes to The Review. I see many 
Chapel Hill boys here. They all look fat, rosy and prosjierous. 
Whenever we meet, there is lots of talk about University days." 

1888 
— Rev. W. A. Wilson is a Methodist Missionary in Japan. 
His address is 113 Kuuitomi, Okayama, Japan. 
— Eugene Withers, former mcmlK-r of the State Senate of Vir- 
ginia, practices law in Danville, Va.. at 529 Main St. 

1889 
— W. S. Roberson, mayor of Chapel Hill, is one of the in- 
corporators of the Gaston Textile Co., a recently organized 
cotton mill corporation. 

— Chas. A. Webb, lawyer of Asheville, is U. S. Marshal. He 
owns the Asheville Citizen. 
— John Sprunt Hill is a leading capitalist of Durham. 

1890 

— W. F. Shaffner is manager of the firm of W. F. Shaffner 
and Co., dealers in stocks and bonds, Winston-Salem. He plans 
to attend the thirty-year reunion of his class at commence- 
ment. 

— Rev. G. V. Tilley is pastor of the First Baptist Church of 
StatesviUe. 

1891 
— R. P. Johnston, of Asheville, was graduated from West 
Point in 1893. He saw service in the regular army until 1906, 
when he resigned his commission of captain and returned to 
private life. Upon the declaration of war by the United 
States on April 6, 1917, he offered his services to the govern- 
ment. He was sent to Camp Funston, Kansas, where he became 
lieutenant colonel of the 314th Engineers, 89th Division. In 
the spring of 1918 he became colonel of the 314th Engineers. 
He took this regiment overseas and commanded it through 
the St. Mihiel drive, the Meuse-Argonne offensive, and until 
after the armistice was signed. His regiment forced three 
crossings over the Meuse river on the night before the armis- 
tice was signed. 

— Maj. Geo. E. Butler practices his profession, law, in Clinton. 
— J. B. Mason is cashier of the Citizens National Bank, Dur- 
ham. 

— Shepard Bryan, native of New Bern, is one of the most 
prominent lawyers of Atlanta, Ga. 

1892 
— F. C. Dunn is secrotan- and treasurer of the Kinston Cotton 
Mills at Kinston. This corporation recently increased its 
capital stock to one-half million dollars. 

— L. A. Blue, Law '92, is a New Hanover County farmer, with 
residence in Wilmington. 

— H. F. Sea well. Law '92, of Carthage, is the nominee of the 
Republican party for attorney general. 

1893 

— On March 2oth Salem College, of which institution Howard 
E. Rondthaler is president, put on a campaign for $400,000. 
The object of the campaign, which is succeeding well, is to 
provide for an enlargement of the facilities of the college. 
— A. H. Koonce practices his profession, law, in Chapel HOI. 

1894 

— T. C. Smith is president of the Dr. T. C. Smith Drug Co., 

Asheville. 

— J. W. Yates is vice-president of the Murchison National 

Bank, of Wilmington. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



239 



Asphalt Pavements 

OURABUti ■=:=. liCOMOMICAU 

If you are interested in street or road construction 
we invite you to inspect our work in 
Durham (Asphalt Streets). 
Durham County (Asphalt and Concrete Roads). 
Raleigh and Wake County (Asphalt). 
Guilford County (Asphalt Roads). 
Greensboro. 
Rocky Mount. 
High Point. 
Henderson. 
Lumberton. 

A'.sQ roads built for United States Government: 
Army Supply Base, Norfolk, Va. 
Newport News — Hampton Highway, Newport 

News, Va. 
Camp Lee, Va. 

A representative will visit you and supply any in- 
formation or estimates desired. 

Robert G. Lassiter & Co. 

ENGINEERING AND CONTRACTING 

327 Arcade Building Norfolk, Va. 

1002 Citizens Bank Building Raleigh, N. C. 

First National Bank Building Oxford, N. C. 



8 



•23 



The First National Bank 
of Richmond, Va., 



Commercial 
Banking 



Trust 
Department 



with its resources of 
$36,000,000, is splen- 
didly equipped to 
serve in all branches of 
Commercial Banking. 



The Trust Depart- 
ment offers unexcelled 
service. 

JNO. M. MILLER. Jr., President 
W. M. ADDISON, Vice-President 
CHAS. R. BURNETT. Vice-President 
ALEX. F. RYLAND, Cashier 
THOS. VV. PURCELL. Trust Officer 



•♦**S 





Murphy' 

Richmond, 


's Hotel 

Virginia 


Ihe Most Modern, Largest, 
in Richmond, Being on 
Railroad Depots. 

The Only Hotel in the City 


and Best Located Hotel 
Direct Car Line to al 

With a Garage attached. 




Headquarters for Carolina Business Men 
European Plan $1.50 Up 




JAMES T. DISNEY. President 



240 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



Statement of the Condition of 

The Fidelity bank 



OF DURHAM, N. C. 



t^ade to the t?^orth Carolina Corporation Commission 
at the Close of Business, Sept. 12. 1919 



RESOURCES 

Loans and Investments $3,759,035.11 

Furniture and Fixtures 17,681.42 

Cash Items 847,421.37 

Cash in Vaults and with Banks 763.893.55 

Overdrafts 842.79 

$5,388,874.24 

LIABILITIES 

Capital Stock $ 100,000.00 

Surplus 500,000.00 

Undivided Profits 107,596.17 

Interest Reserve '.'. 6,000.00 

Dividends Unpaid 195.01 

Deposits 4,261,285.21 

UnCiirned Interest '. ' . 8,657.49 

Contingent Fund 5,140.36 

Borrowed Bonds : 100,000.00 

Bills Payable 300,000.00 

$5,388,874.24 

B. N. DUKE. Ptraidint JNO. F. WILV. Vic«-President S. W. MINOD. Cashiei 
L D. KIRKLAND. Assistant Cashier MO. A. BUCHANAN. Assistant CasMn 

The strength of this bank lies not alone in its Capital, Surplus, and Re- 

sources, but in the Character and Financial Responsibility 

of the men who conduct its affairs 



The Yarborough 



RALEIGH'S LEADING AN.D 
LARGEST HOTEL 

MAKE IT YOUR HOME WHEN 
IN RALEIGH 



B. H. Griffin Hotel Company 



Proprietors 



1895 

— Dr. C. E. Turner, of Philadelphia, is dean of the dental 
department of the University of Pennsylvania. 
— F. L. Carr. of Wilson, has large fanning interests in Greene 
County. 

— Dr. J. E. Hart, physician of Wadesboro, has been for the 
past seven years chairman of the board of county commis- 
sioners of Ansou County. 

— G. H. Morris is a member of the lumber firm of W. H. 
Westall and Co., Asheville. 

1896 
— Mrs. Geo. W. Vanderbilt in March sold to a corporation 
headed by George Stephens, Charlotte capitalist, practically 
the entire village of Biltmore, the consideration involved being 
about one million dollars. In addition to the village, the 
corporation acquired two hundred acres of land which, it is 
understood, will be developed into a great residential park. 
— John H. Andrews is division freight agent for the Southern 
Railway at Raleigh. Formerly he was with the Southern Rail- 
way in a similar capacity at Greensboro. 

1897 
— James Adderton is cashier of the Commercial and Savings 
Bank of Lexington. This financial institution has doubled its 
capital stock since the first of this year. 

— Dr. A. F. Williams is joint owner of the Wilson Sanatorium 
at Wilson. 

1898 
— Walter Thompson is superintendent of the Methodist Chil- 
dren's Home, Winston-Salem. 

— Jas. M. Carson practices law at Rutherfordton as a member 
of the firm of Morrow and Carson. He is a former member 
of the State Senate. 

— Chase Brenizer, Law '98, attorney of Charlotte, is one of 
the incorporators of the Building and Investment Co., a 
Charlotte corporation recently chartered to erect and rent 
buildings. 

— 0. M. Suttle, formerly in law practice at Corpus Christi, 
Texas, has returned to his home town, Shelby. 

1899 

H. M. Wagstaff, Secretary, Chapel Hill, N. C. 

— The Durham Hosiery Mills, all of whose officials are Uni- 
versity alumni, with J. S. Carr, Jr., as president, have lately 
let the contract for the erection of a one-million-dollar silk 
plant in Durham. This plant will be five stories high and will 
be the equal of any silk hosiery plant in the United States. 
— G. R. Swink is a member of the law firm of Swink and 
Fentress at Norfolk, Va. 

— Supt. H. P. Harding, of the Charlotte Schools, was host 
at a house warming given in early April on the occasion of 
the opening of the new high school at Charlotte. 
— E. V. Patterson, formerly of Charlotte, is now with E. I. 
duPout deNemours and Co. His address is Room 9120 duPont 
Bldg., Wilmington, Del. 

— Polk Gray has been engaged in the drug business at States- 
ville since he left Chapel Hill. 

— Marsden Bellamy is practicing law in Wilmington. 
— J. P. Bunn is an attorney of Rocky Mount. 

1900 

W. S. Bernard, Secretary, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
— J. A. Moore is president of the Patterson Mfg. Co., cotton 
manufacturrs of Roseraarv. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



2il 



— Thos. Hume is district manager of the Penn. Mutual Life 

Insurauce Co., at Asheville. 

— C. E. Thompson is a member of the law firm of Thompson 

and Wilson, of Elizabeth City. 

— W. W. Home is part owner of the H. R. Home and Sons 

Drug Co., of Fayetterille. 

— Chas. G. Rose is practieing law in Fayetteville. 

1901 
Dr. J. G. MuKPUY, Secretary, Wilmington, N. C. 
—J. W. Turrentine, Ph.B. 1901; M.S. 1902; Ph.D. (Cornell) 
1908, publishes an article entitled "Potash from Kelp: the 
Experimental Plant of the TJ. S. Department of Agriculture, 
Preliminary Paper," in the Journal of Industrial and En'gi- 
neering Chemistry, "Volume XI, p. 864 (1919). The article 
is descriptive of the work done at the plant at Santa Barbara, 
Cal., of which he is director. 

— T. L. Kirkpatrick, Law '01, former mayor of Charlotte, is 
president of the Wilmington-Charlotte-Asheville Highway As- 
sociation. 

— R. W. Lemniond, Law '01, of Monroe, is corresponding 
secretary of the Wilmington-Charlotte-Asheville Highway As- 
sociation. 

— J. S. Atkinson is president of the Atkinson Co., wholesale 
grocers, at Elkin. 

— Reginald Bailey is general manager of the firm of Bailey 
Bros., tobacco manufacturers of Winston-Salem. 
— C. L. Mosteller is manager of the Patriek-Mosteller Co., 
wholesale grocers of Hickory. 

— Edwin L. Brown, Jr., has been president of the Brown 
Book Co., Asheville, since this firm was organized. 

1902 

I. F. Lewis, Secretary, University, Va. 

— Mr. and Mrs. F. H. Lemly announce the birth of a son, F. 

H. Lemly, Jr., on February 4th. Mr. Lemly now resides at 

1863 Wyoming Ave, Washington, D. C. 

— A recent issue of the Enfield Progress reports that ' ' Dr. 
Chauncey Highsmith, our oldest and best kno\vn dentist, has 
closed his dental offices here and moved to Gastonia to open 
dental offices in that city." 

— N. C. Curtis is professor of drawing in the University of 
Illinois, at ITrbana. 

— Major Reston Stevenson who was formerly at work for the 
French Government in the chemical warfare service, has re- 
ceived his discharge from the service and is again in the 
faculty of the College of the City of New York. 
— A. S. Hanes is president of the Hanes Rubber Co., Inc., 
manufacturers of the Hanes brand of tires, Winston-Salem. 
— J. E. Swain, former solicitor of his district, practices law as 
a member of the firm of Wells and Swain, Asheville. 

1903 

N. W. Walker, Secretary, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
— H. C. Wall, of Rockingham, recently donated a $3,000 lot 
to the trustees of the Carnegie Library of Rockingham. The 
library will be erected on this lot. 

— Graham H. Andrews is cashier of the Citizens National Bank, 
Raleigh. He is, also, vice-president of the Raleigh Savings 
Bank and Trust Co. 

— J. J. Nichols is manager of the Asheville laundry, at 
Asheville. 

— Jos. B. Ramsey, president of the First National bank of 
Rocky Mount, was elected president of the State Bankers' 
Association at the last meeting of this body. 



The Bank o/Chapel Hill 



Olde^ and ^ronge^ bank in Orange County. 



Capital $25,000.00 

Surplus and Profits 40,000.00 

We earnestly solicit your banking 
business, promising you every service 
and assistance consistent with safe 
banking. "It pleases us to please 
you. ' ' 



M. C. S. NOBLE President 

R. L. STROWD Vice-President 

M. E. HOGAN Cashier 




Snappy Clothes 

for the 
College Man 

Society and 
Stein Block Clothes 

for the young 

and those 
who stay young 



Vanstory Clothing Co. 

C. H. McKNIGHT. "President and Manager 

GREENSBORO. N. C. 



242 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 




THE YOUNG MAN 

who prefers (and most young men do) styles that 

are a perfect blend of novelty and refinement has 

long since learned the special competency of this 
clothes shop. 

Pritchard, Bright & Co. 

Durham, North Carolina 



ELUS, STONE & COMPANY 

DURHAM, N. C. 

The best class of merchandise at very mod- 
erate prices. 

It is always a pleasure to see our Chapel 
Hill friends in the city, and have them visit 
our store. The Winter stocks of goods are 
now complete. It will be to your interest to 
look carefully through the line of New Suits, 
Coats and Wraps. 

New Dresses of Silks, soft Satins, and fine 
Silk Crepes, shown in the latest models. 

All kind of cotton piece goods, Wool and 
Silk Dress Fabrics, Hosiery and Kid Gloves; 
Gossard Front-Lacing Corsets. 




— Tom Pemberton, Phar. '03, is proprietor of a dairy farm 
near Greensboro, called the Pemberton Dairy Farm. 

1904 

T. F. HiCKERSON, Secretary, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
— W. A. Whitaker, formerly in the faculty of the University 
of Minnesota, is secretary and treasurer of the Standard Com- 
mercial Tobacco Co., 120 Broadway, New York City. 
— Jno. A. McRae, former member of the State Senate, prac- 
tices law in Charlotte as a member of the firm of Stewart 
and McRae. 

— E. S. W. Dameron, attorney of Burlington, has been ill for 
several months and is now undergoing treatment at Johns 
Ilopkina Hospital. 

— A. Hall Johnson, lawyer of Asheville, recently tendered his 
resignation as chairman of the Buncombe County Democratic 
executive committee. 

— C. J. Ebbs, of Marshall, is county tax supervisor for 
Madison County. 

— T. D. Morrison is a member of the firm of T. S. Morrison 
and Co., Asheville. 

— Thos. J. Moore is cashier of the Greenville Banking and 
Trust Co., at Greenville. 

— A. W. Grady is secretary and treasurer of the Durliam Trac- 
tion Co., Durham. 

1905 
W. T. Shore, Secretary, Charlotte, N. C. 
— Charles Ross, lawyer of Lillington, has assumed the manage- 
ment of the campaign of Hon. Robert N. Page for the Demo- 
cratic nomination for Governor. Mr. Ross is well known as an 
experienced organizer, legislator, business man, attorney, and 
Democrat. Among those who are assisting Mr. Ross in the 
management of Mr. Page 's campaign are J. B. Cheshire, Jr., 
'02, and A. J. Barwick, '00, both attorneys of Raleigh. 
— T. G. Faucette is cashier of the First National Bank of 
Mt. Airy. 

— The marriage of Miss Nellie Pender and Mr. Andrew 
Jackson Moore occurred April 7th at the Jarvis Memorial 
church, Greenville. Mr. Moore is assistant cashier of the 
Greenville Banking and Trust Co. 

— W. T. Shore, lawyer of Charlotte, is one of the incorporators 
of the Roseland Cotton Mills Co., a recently organized cotton 
mill corporation of Charlotte. 

— Frank R. Bailey is vice-president of the firm of Bailey Bros., 
tobacco manufacturers of Winston-Salem. 

• — Thos. H. Cash is principal of the North and Fairview graded 
Schools at Winston-Salem. 

— W. B. Spoas, of Winston-Salem, has been for a number of 
years superintendent of the Forsyth County schools. 
— Vonno L. Gudger, former member of the Carolina football 
team, has been engaged in the practice of law at Asheville 
since he left Chapel Hill. . 

1906 
Maj. J. A. Pakkee, Secretary, Charlotte, N. C. 

— Immediately after Lieut.-Gov. O. Max Gardner, candidate 
for the Democratic nomination for Governor of the State, 
spoke in Gcrrard Hall on February 5th, a "Gardner for Gov- 
ernor" Club was organized, 427 students signing up to support 
the present lieutenant-governor, who is also a former star 
Carolina football player. T. C. Taylor, of Sparta, mountain 
political leader and president of the Gardner Club, stated 
early in April that Mr. Gardner's strength on the campus had 
doubled since the petition was circulated in February. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



243 



—Dr. D. C. Absher, iled. '06, a native of Mount Airy, who has 
recently taken diarge of the city health department at Kinston, 
spent 1919 in Siberia, a major in command of U. S. Army Hos- 
pital No. 4. He was stationed far in the interior of Asiatic 
Russia, about two thousand miles from the coast. The force 
with which he served was made up of troops from America 
and other allied countries. 

— T. P. Cheshire is with the well-known cotton firm of W. 
Gordon McCabe and Co., at Charleston, S. C. His address is 
14 Lamboll St., Charleston. 

— Announcement has been made of the formation of a partner- 
ship by Jas. W. Osborne and W. S. Thomson for the practice of 
law, at 100 Broadway, Xew York City. 

— Carolina friends of Samuel T. Ansell, attorney of Washint;- 
ton, D. C, and former acting judge advocate general of the 
U. S. Army, will be grieved to learn of the death of his father, 
which occurred March 18th at Barco. 

— W. T. Wilson, Law '06, has been engaged in the practice of 
law at Winston-Salem since he left Chapel Hill. His offices are 
in the O'Hanlon Bldg. 

— Leroy F. Abernethy is cashier of the Consolidated Trust Co., 
Hickory. 

— Jj. Clayton Grant is practicing law in Wilmington. 
— Jas. D. Proctor is practicing law in Lumberton. 
— I. W. Rose, Phar. '06, is owner of the Rose Drug Co., of 
Rocky Mount. He is vice-president of the State druggists' 
.association and is president of the Rocky Mount association of 
University alumni. 

1907 

C. L. Weill, Secretary, Greensboro, N. C. 

— Dr. T. W. Dickson is in the faculty of Syracuse University, 
department of Greek, Syracuse, N. Y. 

— John J. Parker, of Monroe, received the nomination of the 
Republican party for Governor of the State on March 3d, 
from the Republican State Convention, assembled in Greens- 
boro. In college Mr. Parker was twice president of his class, 
president of the Phi Beta Kappa society, an intercollegiate 
debater and winner of the Mangum Medal. 

— Dr. J. Mell Thompson, former star football and baseball 
player at Carolina, practices his profession, medicine, at 
Mebane. 

— Roby C. Day, who lives at 2815 Quarry Road N.W., Wash 
ington, D C, spent a short while in Chapel Hill early in March. 
Mr. Day travels in Virginia and the Carolinas in the interest 
of Ujiderwood and Underwood, makers of stereographs. 
— W. H. Pittman has been chief clerk to the State superin- 
tendent of public instruction since July, 1916. A five-year-old 
daughter is the third member of his family. 
— Dr. G. H. Macon, Med. '07, is practicing medicine in War- 
renton. 

1908 

M. Robins, Secretary, Greensboro, N. C. 

— E. Oscar Randolph, professor of Geology in the A. and M. 
College of Texas, at College Station, writes: "Life and work 
go well with us here in Texas. This is a great and promising 
State in many ways. I am finding my students in engineering 
geology and in petroleum geology exceedingly interested in 
their work because both of Ihese elements of activity are prom- 
inently before our people now. In addition to classroom and 
laboratory work we take our geology students direct to the oil 
fields and there help them study field operations and refining 
methods first hand. ' ' 



LIGGETT & MYERS 
TOBACCO CO. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 

FATIMA, CHESTERFIELD. AND 

PIEDMONT CIGARETTES 

VELVET AND DUKE'S MIXTURE 

SMOKING TOBACCO AND 

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Out brands are standard for qualify. 
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hotel 



200 ROOMS 



200 BATHS 



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Large sample rooms. Convention 

hall. Bail room. 



W. H. LOWRY 

Manaeer 



CABELL YOUNG 

Assistant Manaeer 



244 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



FURMIIURE 



High-Grade Furniture 

of Every Description at Reasonable 

Prices 

On Easy Terms 



CHRISTIAN & HARWARD 

CORCORAN STREET 
OPPOSITE THE POSTOFFICE 

DURHAM, N. C. 



A Fifth yl Venue Shop at Your Door 



Great Clearance Sale 

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STRAUSS-ROSENBERG'S 

FASHION SHOP FOR WOMEN 
DURHAM, N. C. 



— T. M. Hiiies is general manager of the Salisbury Ice and 
Fuel Co. 

—Dr. Erasmus H. Kloman, '08, is a well-knonn and suc- 
cessful physician of Baltimore. 

— R. O. Piekard was twice cited in general orders for valor 
at St. Mihiel and in the Mcuse-Argonne offensive. In serrice 
he was first lieutenant of infantry. He is with the R. J. Rey- 
nolds Tobacco Co., Winston-Salem. 

— J. W. Speas is manager of the AtUiuta, Ga., branch of the 
National City Company, with offices in the Trust Company of 
Georgia building. 

— Dr. J. B. Wliittiugton, Ph. G. '08, practices medicine in 
Winston-Salem. 

— Raymond Parker, former renter on the Carolina football 
team, practices law in Winston-Salem. In service he was a 
second lieutenant of field artUlery. He served as an instructor 
in fire discipline in the F. A. C. O. T. S., Camp Zachary 
Taylor, Ky. 

— DeWitt Quinn is with the Ella Mfg. Co., cotton manufac- 
turers of Shelby. 

— J. B. Palmer is mayor of Warreuton. 

— W. C. Woodard, Jr., of Rocky Mount, is general agent for the 
eastern part of the State for the Atlantic Life Insurance Co. 

1909 
0. C. Cox, Secretary, Greensboro, N. C. 
—Bruce H. Lewis has accepted the sup^riatendency of schools 
at Ridgeway, S. C. 

— John T. Johnston is on the staff of the Wilmington Star. 
— S. N. Clarke is associated with Clarke & Sons, general mer- 
chants of Tarboro, as part owner. 

— H. Leslie Perry is vice-president of the Land, Money and 
Insurance Co., of Henderson. 

— 0. H. Yokley is an official of the Mt. Airy Furniture Co., 
furniture manufacturers at Mt. Airy. 

— Frank D. Crawford is connected with the R. J. Reynolds 
Tobacco Co., flavoring department, Winston-Salem. 
— J. W. Hines is secretary and treasurer of the Monroe Ice 
and Fuel Co., at Monroe. 

— H. A. Stepp is teller of the First National Bank and Trust 
Co., Hendersonville. 

1910 
J. R. Nixon, Secretary, Edenton, N. 0. 
— Rev. A. Rufus Morgan, who is at present an Episcopal min- 
ister at Barnwell, S. C, will on May 1st take up his new 
duties at rector of St. Marks Episcopal Church at Chester, S. C. 
— J. H. Carter, Law '10, has resigned as postmaster at Mount 
Airy. He will devote his attention to his law practice and 
other interests. 

— L. J. Poisson, Law '10, attorney of Wilmington, has been 
elected vice-president of the Wilmington Kiwanis Club. 
— C. C. Barbee, who was formerly in the faculty of the Sa- 
vannah high school is now located at East Durham. 
— Don C. MacRae has received his appointment as deputy col- 
lector of internal revenue from the department at Washington. 
He has been assigned to High Point as a starting point. 
— Rev. T/. H. Ramsaur is a missionary for the Episcopal 
Church in Africa. 

— A. H. Wolfe, of Dobson, is at the head of the Republican 
party organization in Surry County. He is superintendent of 
the Dobson schools and is also interested in farming and in 
the practice of law. 

— E. C. Bivens has been engaged in the practice of law at 
Mount Airy since he left Chapel Hill. He is mayor of the 
city. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



245 



— Rev. S. B. Stroup, rector of the Church of the Ascension, 
Hickory, is dean of the eouvocation of Morganton, synod of 
Sewanee. He is the father of two boys. 

1911 
I. C. MosER, Secretary, Asheboro, N. C. 
— Announcement has been made of the engagement of Miss 
Sue Kitchin and Mr. William Thomas Joyner, both of Kaleigh. 
The wedding will take place on April 17th. 
—The Stonecutter Mills, with .$1,2.50,000 capital stock sub- 
scribed, is the latest cotton mill corporation to be organized by 
K. S. Tanner, of Spindale. This mill will be located at Spin- 
dale, where the most of Mr. Tanner's other mill interests lie. 
It will have 20,000 spindles and 500 looms and will manufac- 
ture fine fancy colored goods. A complete modern village will 
be built for the new mill. 

— Dr. J. .\. Speight practices medicine at Rocky Mount. 
— J. N. Stinsou, Phar. '11, who was formerly engaged in the 
drug business at Mount Airy, has moved to Spartanburg, S. 
C, where he is engaged in tlie drug business. 
— J. S. Boj'cc is a member of the insurance tirm of Boyce and 
Ware, at Gastonia. 

— John A. ICcKay, formerly in the faculties of the Austin, 
Texas, and Atlanta, Ga., high schools, is a third-year student 
in the Johns Hopkins University medical department. His 
address is 520 N. Broadway, Baltimore. 

— L. B. Whitaker is with the Oceanic Underwriting Agency, 
■17 Beaver St., New York City. 

— Dr. Eugene R. Cocke, practices medicine in Asheville. In 
service he was captain in the medical department of the 30th 
division. He saw service from June 23, 1917, until April 7, 
1919. He was gassed on Sept. 29, 1918, in the battle of the 
Hindenburg line. 

— Joe Rogers is manager of the foreign department of the 
R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., Winston-Salem. 
— Joseph Dawson, an attorney, is mayor of Kinston. 

1912 
John C. Lookh.\kt, Secretary, Raleigh, N. C. 
— The marriage of Miss Bertha Rogers and Mr. William White 
Rogers took place March 20th at Wilson. They are at home 
at Pikeville, where Mr. Rogers is superintendent of schools. 
— J. D. Phillips, of Laurinburg, who served in the 81st division 
with the rank of major, has been elected commander of Scot- 
land County Post No. 50 of the American Legion. 
— H. H. Hargrett, attorney of Tifton, Ga., was in Chapel Hill 
on Sunday afternoon, March 13, in company with R. W. Win- 
ston, Jr., '12, and K. R. Ellington, '11. 

— Miss Virginia Center Nichols, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Spencer Van B. Nichols, of Now York City, was born January 
13, 1920. 

— Dr. A. J. Warren has assumed his duties as health officer 
of Charlotte. 

— W. F. Hendrix is in the railway business at Norfolk, Va. 
He is located at 107 Plume St., where he is ticket agent. 
— K. E. Bennett, Ph. G. '12, is proprietor of the Bryson City 
Drug Co., at Bryson City. He represents his district in the 
State Senate. 

— G. M. Atwater, Phar. '12, who was formerly engaged in the 
drug business at Elizabeth City is now in the drug business 
at Washington. 

— H. C. Graver, formerly engaged in banking at Winston- 
Salem, ia superintendent of schools at East Bend. 
— W. E. Hossfeld practices law at Des Moines, Iowa. 



Five Points Auto Co. 


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DURHAM, N. C. 




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Demand the genuine by full name— nick- 
names encourage substitution. 

Get a bottle of the genuine from your 
grocer, fruit stand, or cafe. 



Durham Coca-Cola Bottling Co. 

DURHAM. N. C. 



246 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



Markham-Rogers Co. 

Clothiers, Tailors, Furnishers and Hatters. 

ALL THE NEW SPRING STYLES AT REASON- 
ABLE PRICES 

DURHAM, N. C. 



P@ir]ry=IHI©rit®ini Sllii©® C®o 

Special Agents for Nettleton and Hurley 

Shoes for Men, and Cousins and Grover 

Shoes for Women 

MAKE OUR STORE HEADQUARTERS 
WHILE IN DURHAM, N. C. 



Academy of Music 

DURHAM, N. C. 

Durham's Exclusive Theatre Playing All Leading 
Attractions 

WM. F. FREELAND, Manager 



HICKS -CRABTREE CO, 

FOUR MODERN DRUG STORES 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 

Eastman Kodaks and Supplies 
Nunnally's Candies 

The place to meet your friends when 
in the Capital City 

GILBERT CRABTREE,. Manager 



1913 

A. L. M. Wiggins, Secretary, HartsviUe, 8. C. 
— Aimouncemeut has been made of the engagement of Miss 
Mary Taylor and Mr. Robert Strange, both of Wilmington. 
The wedding will take place April 21st. 

— George Carmieliacl has toiulcred his resignation as cashier of 
the Page Trust Co., at Aberdeen, and has become cashier of 
the Commercial Bank and Trust Co., of Franklinton. 
— Frank H. Kennedy, lawyer of Charlotte, has recently been 
elected recorder pro tem of the Charlotte city court. 
— Dr. L. O. Grumpier is engaged in the practice of his pro- 
fession, medicine, at Danville, Va. 

— L. B. Rhodes continues as chemist mth the State Depart- 
ment of Agriculture, at Raleigh. 

— V. A. Perrett is with the Blalock-Allen Auto Co., Wades- 
boro. 

— Miss Margaret Berry, attorney of Charlotte, is assisting in 
the campaign of the North Carolina Good Roads Association 
for membership. She is district representative. 
— C. B. Woltz has entered into law partnership for civil prac- 
tice with Solicitor Geo. W. Wilson, at Gastonia. 
— L. W. Henderson is with the McGhee-Joyner Co., in the 
mercantile business at Franklinton. He has a two-year-old 
daughter. 

1914 
OscAE Leach, Secretary, Raeford, N. C. 
— Geo. V. Strong is practicing law in Philadelphia and is 
teaching constitutional law at the University of Pennsylvania. 
— W. C. Dowd, Jr., is managing editor of the Charlotte News. 
— W. P. Horton, Law '14, lawyer of Pittsboro, is a member 
of the State Senate. 

— A. A. Long is principal of the Cooleemee high school. 
— Paul R. Raper, Law '14, is engaged in the practice of law 
at Lexington. 

— Lucius H. Ranson, of Charlotte, superintendent of public 
welfare of Mecklenburg County, made a visit to Chapel Hill 
in March. 

— .J. A. Walker is a civil engineer with the lirm of Pegram, 
Ellerbe and Reynolds, Winston-Salem. 
— Fred H. May, of Lenoir, is editor of the Lenoir News. 
— Henry C. Bourne is an attorney of Tarboro. 

1915 
Daniel L. Bell, Secretary, Pittsboro, N. C. 
— Albert Ray Ncwsome writes that he is pleased with his work 
as head of the department of History in the Bessie Tift Col- 
lege, Forsyth, Ga. Another alumnus, Geo. P. Wilson, '13, is 
head of the department of English in this institution. Bessie 
Tift College is conducted under the auspices of the Baptist 
.denomination of Georgia. 

— C. E. Blackstock is practicing law at Asheville. His address 
is 400 Gates Bldg. 

— Dr. A. MeR. Crouch is assistant health officer of Wilming- 
ton. 

— Paul F. McKane, Law '15, is manager of the Oklahoma 
claim division of the Maryland Casualty Co., with offices in 
the Terminal Bldg., Oklahoma City. 

— W. W. Smith, Phar. '15, is president and manager of the 
W. W. Smith Drug Co., Greensboro. 

— J. Shepard Bryan is in business at Wilmington. His address 
is 208 S. 4th St. 

— P. H. Epps is in the faculty of the Boys High School, 
Atlanta Ga. His address is 19 Elbert St. 
— E. D. Edgerton is in the mercantile business at Kenly. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



247 



"The secret of success in life 

— said DISRAELI 

^^ is for a man to be ready for 
his opportunity whe?i it comes'^ 



»> 



IF any institution in 
America knows from per- 
sonal experience the sound- 
ness of that statement it is 
the Alexander Hamilton 
Institute. 

Every year the Institute 
has the privilege of discus- 
sing their business prob- 
lems intimately with a great 
many thousand different 
men. And one fact stands 
outprominentlyinall those 
discussions : 

Work ; ambition ; loyalty — all 
these will carry a man gradually 
toward his goal. 

But the really big successes come 
to those men who have made them- 
selves ready in some special way, 
and when that opportunity comes, 
have the knowledge and the self- 
confidence to reach out and graspit. 

$7,000 in one hour 

RECENTLY an engineer, col- 
lege trained, told his experi- 
ence. He was employed in Spring- 
field, Mass., at a salary of 53 ooo 
a year. He learned that an im- 
portant company in New York 
was seeking a manager for the 
Philippines, and presented himself 
in the President's office. 

There was no question about his 
fitness, from an engineering stand- 
point. The question was whether 
his knowledge of b;isiness was suf- 
ficient fir th» variety of problems 
that woul cnt themselves. 



"Test me," he said to the Presi- 
dent. "Send out to your files and 
bring in questions of the sort I will 
be expected to handle. For a year 
I have been fitting myself for an 
opportunity like this under the 
guidance of the Alexander Ham- 
ilton Institute. 

"I have studied the fundamen- 
tals of selling and advertising of 
costs and accounting, of traffic, for- 
eign trade, and corporation finance. 
Give me a chance to show what I 
have Lamed." 

At the end of the interview the 
contract was signed at a salary of 
$lo,ooo a year. In that single 
hour his income jumped ^7,000 
— because he was ready for his op- 
portunity ■when it arrived. 

Thousands of men have 
shortened the path to success 

SINCE its establishment the 
Alexander Hamilton Institute 
has enrolled many thousands of men 
representing every kind of business 
and every department in business. 

35^ of them were university 
graduates. 

Most of them would have at- 
tained ultimate success even with- 
out the Institute. But the Insti- 
tute did for them what it did for 
the man whose story is quoted 
above ; it saved wasted years ; it 
laid before them the experience and 
methods of the moft succesful mtn 
in modern business and said: "Use 
these as your own ; fit yourself for 
your opportunity as adequately as 
tho you had spent years in moving 
from, one department oi business to 



another, mastering each by the slow 
process of practical experience." 

The Advisory Council 

THESE men, whom the Insti- 
tute has already trained, are 
sufficient proof of what its training 
may do for you. 

The other reason for your con- 
fidence is found in tho men behind 
the Institute — the Advisory Coun- 
cil — consisting of: 

Frank A. VandcrVp, the finan- 
cier j General Coleman duPont, the 
well known businesa executive; John 
h^ys Hammond, the eminent engi- 
nc-r; Jeremiah W. Jenks, the statis- 
tician and economist ; and Joseph 
French Johnson, Dean of New York 
University School of Commerce. 

Send for this book 

IT will pay you, as it has paid so 
many thousand other college 
men, to learn all the facts about the 
Institute. They are printed in a 
1 16-page book "Forging Ahead in 
Business." It is a book worth 
adding to your business library and 
it will be sent without obligation. 
Send for your copy today. 

Alexarjder Hamilton Institute 
363 Astor Place, N\w York City 



Send me "ForKlnp Ahead in 
Biiaines^i" without obligation. 




Business 
Address.... 



Businris 
i-oyition 



248 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



THE CAROLINA MAN'S SHOE STORE 

Can-Bryant 

High Grade Shoes with Snap and Style 



Can-Bryant ^oot & Shoe Co. 



105 West Main Street 



DURHAM, N. C. 



"EL-REES-SO'* 

7c— 3 for 20c 

Mi:d, Fragrant, Delightful— Try One 

*'JOHNT. REES" 

lOc 

A Cigar of quality, smooth, mellow, soothing. Gives 
a restful finish to a perfect day 

EL-REES-SO CIGAR CO. 

Manufacturers of the Famous EL-REES-SO Cigar 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



"Clothes Made bi( Makers who 
^new for Men who ^ncw 

and Md bq 

6need=Markham=^aiikr ^o, 

S)urham, Tiorlh 'Carolina 



LAWHEKCl 

W. H. LAWRENCE AND T. H. LAWRENCE 
ASSOCIATED 



(contractor and ^Jjuilder 

MAIN OFFICE: DURHAM, N. C. 



CONTRACTOR PHILLIPS HALL 
UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 



— W. D. Prudcn, Jr., is practicing law at Edenton. 
— M. J. Davis, of Warrentnn, is district distril)utor for the 
U. and J. carburetor. 

— E. Fuller Conrad is engaged in tlie real estate business at 
Winston-Salem. He is senior member of the firm of Conrad 
and James. He plans to attend liis class reunion at commence- 
ment. 

— H. C. Sisk is manager of the QuinnMcGowan Furniture Co., 
at Warsaw. 

— J. V. Whitfield is vice-consul of the United States at Monte- 
video, Uraguay. 

— Leighton Blount is with the mercantile firm of Blount & 
Son, of Bethel. 
— John L. Mayo, of Bethel, is engaged in farming. 

1916 

Hugh B. He.ster, Secretary, Capt. and Adj., 12th F. A., Camp 

Travis, Texas 
— Dispatches in the State press in March carried the informa- 
tion that T. C. Linn, Jr., of Salisbury, who has been with a 
relief party in the Armenian country for a year, is to sail at 
an early date for a trip around the world. 
— Wm. T. Grimsley has been elected treasurer and acting sec- 
retary of tha Secu/ity Life and Trust Co., Greensboro 's new 
insurance company. 

— J. Frank Love is secretary and treasurer of the Saxony 
Spinning Co., manufacturers of combed yarns, at Lincolnton. 
Edgar Love, '90, is president of this corporation. 
— O. K. Merritt, who served overseas as first lieutenant of 
field artillery, is engaged in furniture manufacture in his 
liome town, Mt. Airy. 

— Robert C. Vaughn, of Winston-Saleni, has recently been ap- 
pointed by Governor Bickett as auditor of Forsyth County. 
— Lieut. Wra. C. Eymer mysteriously disappeared from Camp 
Benning, Colimibus, Ga., on January 27th, and has not been 
seen or beard from since. Lieutenant Eymer spent fourteen 
months overseas. Mrs. Eymer was, before marriage. Miss 
Annie Jungermann, formerly assistant librarian of the ITni- 
vcrsity. 

— Chas. E. Lambeth has been elected president of the Char- 
lotte Aero Club, the membership of which is made up of 
former aviators. Mebane Long is vice-president and Don 
Harris secretary and treasurer. Other Carolina men who are 
charter members of this club are: Phil Woollcott, John Tillett, 
John L. Morehead, John P. Watters, F. O. Clarkson, John G. 
Nichols, Joo G. Fitzsinunons, Bryon C. Scott. 
— Fred H. Deaton is secretary and treasurer of the Carolina 
Motor Co., Statesville. 

— Eoy Moore is a member of the firm of the Lenoir Book Co., 
Lenoir. 

— F. F. Bradshaw has resigned his commission as second lieu- 
tenant of field artillery and has become corporation clerk in 
tlie ofiiee of Secretary of State, J. Bryan Grimes, at Raleigh. 

1917 

H. G. Baity. Secretary, Eonda, N. C. 

— Dr. John H. Bonner, formerly of Morehead City, is now 

located at Aurora. 

• — H. A. Schiffman is an optometrist of Greensboro. 

— Jas. A. Capps is teaching French in the Durham high school. 

He makes frequent visits back to the ' ' Hill. ' ' 

— C. K. Hughes is connected with the Bankers Trust and Title 

Insurance Co., Asheville. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



249 






/ 



\ 

J, 







1 iV.K .-^.l*' 



*-. *^J I,*. ^ 



'- ^03v^»«»ri.i 



" i.a^ ' 




A casting for one of the 
huge water-wheel driven 
generators installed in the 
Mississippi River Power 
Company's plant at Keo- 
kuk. This installation will 
ultimately consist of thirty 
of these machines, givinga 
total capacity of 216,000 
kilowatts (300,000 horse- 
power). It is the largest 
hydro-electric development 
in the worKI. The General 
Electric Company builds 
generators for water-wheel 
drive in sizes ranging from 
37', to 32.500 kilowatts and 
the apgreeale capacity of 
G-E units now in successful 
operation is in excess of 
four million horse-power. 



Gee 



General Office 
Schenectady. N.Y. 









*-l— .1 



■yjr -p'^. 



Mississippi River Pcfwer 
roi>n3any, ICcokuk, Iowa 






■^^'/«s*3 



Utilizing Nature's Power 

ELECTRICAL energy generated by water 
power has grown to be one of our greatest 
natural resources — and we have only begun to 
reach its possibilities. It mines and refines our 
ores, turns the wheels of industry, drives our 
street cars and lights our cities and towns. The 
power obtained from Nature saves many million 
tons of coal every year. 

At first the field of its utilization was limited by the 
distance electricity could be transported. But soon re- 
search and engineering skill pointed the way to larger 
and better electrical apparatus necessary for high-voltage 
transmission. Then ingenious devices were invented 
to insure protection against lightning, short-circuits, etc., 
which cause damage and interrupt the service. And now 
all over the country a network of wires begins to appear, 
carrying the magic power. 

The General Electric Company, whh its many years' 
experience, has played a great part in hydro-electric 
development. By sucessfuUy co-ordinatingthe inventive 
genius of the company and its engineering and manu- 
facturing abilities, it has accomplished some of the 
greatest achievements in the production and application 
of electrical energy. 

The old mill wheel of yesterday has gone. Today the 
forces of immense volumes of water are harnessed and 
sent miles away to supply the needs of industry and 
business and the comforts of the home. 




:ctric 



TTTl'^'/ Sales Offices in 






all large cities. 



250 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



Odell Hardware Co. 

Greensboro, N. C. 

China, Cut Glass and Silverware 
Household Goods 

DEPENDABLE GOODS 

PROMPT SERVICE 

SATISFACTORY PRICES 



Guilford Hotel and Cafe 

NEWLY REMODELED 
RATES REASONABLE 
CENTRAL LOCATION 

Greensboro, North Carolina 



Cross and Linehan Co. 

Leaders in Clothing and Gents' 
Furnishings 

Raleigh, North Carolina 



dooper 522onument 
(LompariY 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Communicate with us regarding your 

needs for monuments or 

tombstones 



— S. G. Hodgiii is eugageil in the real estate ami general brok- 
erage business at Kansas City, Mo. His address is 1840 
Pendleton Ave. 

— H. E. Allen is manager of the AslieviUe Transfer and Stor- 
age Co., at Asheville. 

— Clias. A. Thomjjson is in business in Goldsboro. 
— J. X). McGlohorn is assistant cashier of the Bank of Ayden. 
— H. D. Hardison, law '17, who is practicing law in Tarboro, 
is also mayor of .this city. 

— Harry Slirago is in the wliolesale ilry goods business in 
Goldsboro. 

— Russell Ginii is in the wliolesale grocery business in Golds 
boro. 

1918 
W. R. WUNSCH, Sccrctarii, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
— Dr. John N. Gardner, a native of Shelby, is on the staff of 
the Robert B. Green hospital at San Antonio, Texas. 
— Dr. Frank B. Marsh is engaged in the practice of his pro- 
fession, medicine, at Salisbury. 

— I. W. Smilhey, instructor in chemistry in the University, is 
also editor of the Carolina Chemist. 

— L. P. Wrenn is engaged in the wholesale grocery business 
at Mount Airy. 

— J. Minor Gwyun is principal of the LeaksviUe high school. 
— ^E. E. Price, editor of the Rutherfordtou Sun, was elected 
president of the Western North Carolina Press Association at 
the meeting of this body in Asheville on March 20tli. 
— E. R. Warren, lawyer of Gastonia, has received appoint- 
ment as chairman of the Gaston County hoard of elections. 
— W. H. Stephenson is studying law at Harvard. He is sec- 
retary of the Cambridge Alumni Association. 
— Peyton McSwain i>ractices law at Shelby. 
— W. B. Lindsay is with the Kent-Coffey Mfg. Co., furniture 
manufacturers of Lenoir. 

— Rev. B. J. Howard is pastor of the East Chatham' field of 
the N. C. Christian Conference, at Jonesboro. 
— W. H. Currie, former pitcher on the Carolina baseball team, 
is engaged in farming operations and in lumber manufac- 
turing at Carthage. 

Editor, The Review: 

Sir: Will you please enter my name on the mailing list 
of the Alumni Review for the coming year. I am getting 
thirsty for a little of the old ' ' University Spirit ' ' and I 
feel sure that a look-in on The Review will aid me in quench- 
ing this thirst. 

Very sincerely, 

W. G. Burgess, '18. 
Capt. 18th F. A., 
Camp Pike, Ark. 

— W. Fred Morrison is with the State Highway Commission, 

his address being 116 W. Edenton St., Raleigh. 

— Watt W. Eagle is assistant curator of the State Museum, 

at Raleigh, his address being 116 W. Edenton St. 

— Jesse Bowers is with the mercantile firm of Bowers Bios., of 

Washington. 

— Howard Bowen is with the Pamlico Chemical Co., of Wasli- 

ington. 

— Isaac Schwartz is with the advertising department of the 

News and Observer. 

1919 
H. G. West, Secretary, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
— The marriage of Miss Estelle Petree and Mr. Norman A. 
Boren took place April 14th in Greensboro. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



251 



'2!)url)am !6u5lness School 

FULLY ACCREDITED 

!&oar6 of "ZAivlsors 

GEN. J. S. CARR W. G. BRAMHAM 

DR. J. M. MANNING W. J. BROGDEN 

R. L. FLOWERS GEO. W. WATTS 

For full particulars and handsome catalog, address 

MRS. WALTER LEE LEDNUM 

PRESIDENT 



Snl5er- jFletcl)er (Lo» 



WATCHES, DIAMONDS, AND 
JEWELRY 



110 W. MAIN ST. 



DURHAM, N. C. 



Sitiraini(dl Tlhiaaftir© 

DURHAM, N. C. 

HIGH CLASS PICTURES AND SPECIAL MUSIC 

YOU ARE ALWAYS WELCOME 

Open from 11:00 A. M. Until 11:00 P. M. 



Broadway Cafe 

WE CORDIALLY INVITE YOU TO VISIT OUR 
CAFE WHEN YOU ARE IN GREENSBORO 

EXCELLENT SERVICE 

COURTEOUS TREATMENT 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



CAPITALIZE YOUR TIME AND TALENTS 

By qualifying for a responsible business or civil service posi- 
tion while salaries are high. 

Banking, Bookkeeping, Gregg Shorthand, Touch Type- 
writing:. Business Arillimetic. Business English. Commercial 
Law, Rapid Calculations, Spelling, Palmer Penmansliip, 
Business Efftciency and Office Practice, taught by Spe- 
cinlists. 

Our school is a member of the National Association of 
Accredited Commercial Schools and is highly endorsed by 
everyhodij. Call or request a catalog. 

King's Business College 



Raleigh, N. C. 



Charlotte, N. C. 



YACKETY YACK 1911 

I have a dozen copies of the 1911 Yackety Yack which 
I will sell at $3 each, or two damaged copies at $2 each. 
K. S. TANNER, Spindale, N. C. 



RIDE WITH 

C. S. Pendergraft 

Pioneer Auto Man 

LEAVE ORDERS AT 

MABRY'S DRUG STORE 

HEADQUARTERS IN DURHAM 

THE BEST PLACE TO GET SOFT DRINKS. CIGARS 
AND CIGARETTES 

HEADQUARTERS IN CHAPEL HILL: NEXT TO 
BANK OF CHAPEL HILL 

Leave Chapel Hill 8.30 and 10.20 a. m 

Leave Chapel Hill 2.30 and 4.00 p. m 

Leave Durham 9.50 a. m., 12.40 p. m 

Leave DLirhnm 5.08 j5. ni., 8.00 p. ni 

OTHER TRIPS SUBJECT TO ORDER 



Four Machines at Your Service 
Day or Night 

PHONE 58 or 23 

Agent for 

Alamance Laundry, Burlington, N, C. 



Yackety 


Yacks, 1916-' 


17 


The Year Carolina bea 
bound volume. 


Virginia in all meets. Handsome leather- 
The last available. Price $2. 


G. D. CRAWFORD. Chapel HUl. N. C. 





252 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



"SAY IT WITH FLOWERS" 




J. J. FALLON. 


Leading 


Florist 




Chapel Hill Agents: 

FOISTERS ART STORE 

R. P. ANDREWS, People's Bank 


Phone 1290 
214 E. M;,m 
DURHAM. 


Street 
N.C. 



IQ) A\ id: 



.IS THEATIRE 

DURHAM, N. C. 

ARTCRAFT-PARAMOUNT PICTURES 

Orchestra Orchestra 



BROADWAY THEATRE 

DURHAM, N. C. 

THE HOUSE OF SPECIAL PHOTO-PLAY 

ATTRACTIONS 



DURHAM CAFE 



VISIT US WHILE IN DURHAM 



C. W, KENDALL 

LADIES' WEAR STORE 
VISIT US WHILE IN DURHAM 



w 


M. 


NEWrON 


COMPANY 






DURHAM, 


N. C. 






DE LUXE CLOTHIERS || 


' 


TOO 


YOUNG FOR 


OLD IDEAS" 
'1 



FLOWERS 


FOR ALL OCCASIONS 




Durham 


Floral Nursery 




CHAPEL HILL AGENTS: 


EUBANKS DRUG 


CO. 



WELCOME 


TO 


STONEWALL HOTEL 


W. E. HOCKETT 


Manager 


CHARLOTTE, 


N. C. 



— Max U. Abeiiiethy is city editor of the Raleigh Tiin-cs. 
— V. B. Moiitcastle continues with the brokerage firm of Roth- 
wcll antl Co., Times Bldg., New York City. His business is 
tlijit of boosting the stock fnarket ever upward. 
— J. A. Courtney, Jr., is connected with the Catawba Cream- 
ery Co., at Hickory. 

— ir. O. Dickerson, Jr., has resigned as deputy collector of 
internal revenue and is engaged in the cotton business at 
Rutherfordton. 

— Fred J. Cohn has tiiken up the practice of law in Goldsboro. 
— .1. P. Sawyer is engaged in the ;iutuniol)ile business in 
.V.slieville. 

— B. L. Mercditli is a clieniist witli the E. I. duPont de Ne- 
mours and Co., Wilmington, Del. 

— E. O. Cunnnings is attending Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology as a candidate for the Ph. D. degree. He spe- 
cializes in chemistry. 

—A. C. Cecil, Ph. C. '19, is with the Vick Chemical Co., 
Greensboro, in the capacity of pharmaceutical chemist. 
— R. H. Sawyer is engaged in the automobile business in Ashe- 
ville. 

— H. G. Smith is an analytical chemist in the laboratory of 
the Buckeye Cotton Oil Co., Atlanta, Ga. 
— J. S. Murray is with the Emerson Drug Co., Baltimore, Md. 
— C. R. Wlicelcr, Phar. '19, is with the Wilson Drug Co., at 
Wilson. 

— Miss Winnie McGlamery, A. B. Goucher College, '19. is 
secretary for Haverford College, Haverford, Pa. 

1920 

— Kenneth Grigg is in the cotton brokerage business at Lin- 
colutou. 

— Allen M. Martin is a student in the Wharton .School of 
Commerce and Finance, University of Pennsylvania. His ad- 
dress is 3o29 Locust St. 

— The Gastonia Cotton Company is the latest firm to embark 
in the cotton brokerage business at Gastonia. C. C. Arm- 
strong and Plato Durham, '20, are members of this firm. 
— W. Brodie Jones is editor and manager of the Warrenton 
liccord. 

— John Stancill is located at Rockingham, where he is con- 
nected with the Bank of Rockingham. 

— Spencer Thorne, lawyer of Rocky Mount, has taken up his 
new duties as private secretary to Congressman Edward W. 
I'ou, at Washington, D. C. 

NECROLOGY 

1858 
—James Stadlcr Hill, A. B. 1858, died November 22d at 
his home in Elk Park, aged 87 years. Deceased had been en- 
gaged in teaching throughout his life and was a former su- 
perintendent of the Surry County schools. 

1869 

— Capt. Edmund Jones, well-known citizen and attorney of 
Lenoir, died at his home February 25th, aged 70 years. De- 
ceased was a veteran of the Civil and Spanish-American wars, 
and a captain of the Second N. C. Infantry in the latter war. 
He was a son of the late Edmund Jones, one of the iirst 
settlers to locate in the Happy Valley of the Yadkin. He 
represented Caldwell County five times in the legislature and 
was a member of the board of trustees of the University from 
1893 until 1901. He attended the fiftieth anniversary of the 
graduation of his class last Commencement. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



253 



A. E. LLOYD HARDWARE CO. 

DURHAM, N. C. 

All Kinds of Hardware, Sporting 

Goods and College Boys' 

Accessories 

GEO. W. TANDY, MANAGER 



tVAe Kjvoual L^a/e 

TU-niuersiti/ students, faculty members, and 
alumni visit the xJ\.oyal Qafe while in 
S)urham. Linden neuf and pro- 
gressive management. 
Special parlors 
for ladies 



S)urh 



urham s 



•^Aioc/ern Qafe 



Keep Physically Fit 

The young men of U. N. C. are wise enough 
to know ihat athletic exercise 'promotes sound 
health. Get in some game early. 

We can supply you with every essential in 
equipment for Football, Soccer, Basket Ball, 
Hockey, Skating, etc. 

IV rite for catalogue No. UC. 

ALEX TAYLOR & CO., Inc 

Athletic Outfitters 
26 E. 42nd St., New York 




Hennessee Cafe 

C. C. SHOFFNER, Manager 

A MODERN, UP-TO-DATE CAFE, WHERE YOU 

AND YOUR FRIENDS ARE WELCOME 

CLEANLINESS AND SERVICE 
OUR MOTTOES 

342 and 344 S. Elm St. 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



BAGLEY & ALDERMAN, Advertising 

LETTERWRITING, MULTIGRAPHING, PRINT- 
ING, ADVERTISING SIGNS, AND 
SPECIALTIES 
GREENSBORO, N. 0. 



A.^. IKlutU (TcHnc. 

Extends a cordial mvitation to all students and 
alumni of the U. N. C. to make their store head- 
quarters during their stay in Chapel Hill. 

Complete Stock of 
New and Second-hand Books, Stationery, and 
Complete Line of Shoes and Haberdashery 
Made by the Leaders of Fashion, Al- 
ways on Hand 



When in Need 

of a Pocket Knife, Razor, Hone, Strop, Brusfi, 
Safety Razor, Blades, or tools of any kind, 
Paints, Varnishes, Brushes, Electrical Goods, 
and General Hardware, call on the 

Chapel Hill Hardware Co. 

THE STORE WHERE "QUALITY" COUNTS 



THE RESULT OF 28 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE 

LANG'S "ROGER C." CIGAR; TWO 

BRANDS: 7c and 10c 

A COMPARISON IS ALL I ASK 

ROGER C. LANG 

GREENSBORO. N. C. 



CHARLRS 


C. HOOK, 

CHARLOTTE, N 


ARCHITECT 

c. 


TWENTY YEARS EXPERIENCE IN PLANNING 
SCHOOL AND COLLEGE BUILDINGS 



254 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



R. BLACKNALL & SON 

DRUGGISTS 

NORRIS AND HUYl-EIR'S CANDIES 



G. BERNARD. MANACrR 



Corcoran Street 



Durham, N. C. 



E. E. Bra^^ & Co. 

WALKOVER AND FLORSHEIM SHOES 
DURHAM, N. C. 



Model Laundry Co. 

DURHAM, N. C. 
EXPERT LAUNDRY SERVICE 



DLRHAM ICE CREAM CO. 

Fancy Ices; Makers of Blue Ribbon Brand Ice Cream 
Receptions and Banquets a Specialty 

TELEPHONE No. 1199 



POLLARD BROTHERS 

DURHAM, N. C. 

STANDARD LINES OF HARDWARE 

AND SPORTING GOODS 



Dimirliiisiinfii bin©® 

LEATHER GOODS CHEAPER 
DURHAM, N. C. 



PRIDGEN & JONES CO. 

We Carry the Best Shoes: Edwin Clapp, Howard and 

Foster, and Heywood's 

Expert Fitters — A Cordial Welcome Awaits You 

107 W. Main St. DURHAM, N. C. 



THE SELWYN 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 

Fireproof, Modern and Luxurious 

IN THE HEART OF EVERYTHING 

H. C. LARZALERE, Manager 



1885 
— Dr. Echvard Chauncy Register, well-known physician of 
Charlotte and prominent throughout the medical profession of 
the South, died February 18th, at the Charlotte Sanatorium, 
aged 59 years. Dr. Register was a native of Rose Hill, Duplin 
County, and was a student in the University during the years 
1881-82 and 1882-83. He was a former president of the State 
boai-d of medical examiners, the North Carolina Medical Soci- 
ety, and the Tri-State Medical Association. He established the 
Charlotte Medical Journal in 1891 and served as editor of 
this publication until the time of his death. 

1891 

— Charles Johnston M^errimon died March 17th at Memphis, 
Tenn. Deceased was a native of Raleigh and was a lawyer by 
profession. 

1899 

— George Pierce Long died February 26th at his home in 
Gainesville, Fla., aged 44 years. Deceased was a native of 
Chapel Hill but had made his home since early manhood at 
Gainesville, where he was engaged in the lumber business. He 
was a student in the University during the years 1895-1896 and 
1897-98. 



The Review knows, fellow alumni, that you are a 
busy bunch. For your special use it has asked the 
School of Commerce to prepare a list of books which 
might be of service to you. If any of these titles ap- 
peal to you, have your local bookstore order them, or 
order direct from some dealer, .such as G. P. Putnam's 
Sons, 2 West 45th St., New York, N. Y. In some in- 
stances the price may have been advanced. These are 
as of August, 1919. 

Business Oragnization and Jtanagement — Robinson: "Or- 
ganizing a Business," La Salle Extension Univ., $2.00. 
Knoeppel : ' ' Installiug Efficiency Methods, ' ' Industrial Man- 
agement Library, $3.00. Jones : ' ' The Administration of In- 
dustrial Enterprises," Longmans, $2.00. Gowin: "Develop- 
ing Executive Ability, ' ' Ronald Press, $3.00. 

Marketing and Salesmanship — Ivey: "Elements of Retail 
Salesmanship," Macmillan, $2.25. Pisk: "Retail Selling," 
Harpers, $1.50. Nystrom: "The Economics of Retailing," 
Ronald Press, $3.00. 

Foreign Trade and Exchange — Hough: "Practical Export- 
ing, ' ' American Exporter, $4.00. Escher : ' ' Foreign Exchange 
Explained, ' ' Macmillan, $1.50. 

Business Finance — Lough : ' ' Business Finance, ' ' Ronald 
Press, $4.00. Ettinger and Golieb: "Credits and Collections," 
Prentice Hall, $2.00. 

Business Law — Spencer : ' ' Manual of Commercial Law, ' ' 
Bobbs Merrill, $3.00. 

Accounting — Paton and Stevenson: "Principles of Account- 
ing," Macmillan, $3.25. Church: "Manufacturing Costs and 
Accounts," McGraw Hill, $5.00. 

Advertising — Hess: "Productive Advertising," Lippin- 
eott, $2.50. Adams: "Advertising and Its Mental Laws," 
Macmillan, $1.50. 

Business Statistics — Copeland: "Business Statistics," Har- 
vard University Press, $3.75. Babson: "Business Barometers," 
Babson Institute, $2.00. 

Labor and Employment Problems — Leitch : ' ' Man to Man, ' ' 
Forbes, $2.00. Marot: "The Creative Impulse," Button, 
$1.50. Link: "Employment Psychology," MacmiUan, $1.50. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



255 



I3l)e KnlversltY Jpress 

ZEB P. COUNCIL. Manager CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 

PRINTING, ENGRAVED CARDS 

QUALITY AND SERVICE 



PATTERSON BROS. 

DRUGGISTS 

THE REXALL STORE 



AGENCY NORRIS CANDY 



K 



GOOCH'S CAFE 

Anything to Eat 
CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 



(bssie cijrotheps 

CALIFORNIA AND FLORIDA FRUITS 

TOBACCO AND CIGARS 

ICE CREAM PARLOR FRESH CANDIES 

"WE STRIVE TO PLEASE" 



APEL HILL 
N. C. 



ANDREWS GASH STORE GO. '" 

students and Faculty will find us ready to serve 
them with the latest styles in Walkover Shoes, 
Fancy Shirts, Tailored Suits, and general furn- 
ishings. Be convinced. Call and see. 



FOR NEAT JOB PRINTING AND TYPEWRITER 
PAPER CALL AT THE OFFICE OF 

The Chapel Hill News 



W. B. SORRELL 

JEWELER AND OPTOMETRIST 
CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 



ODAK SUPPLIE Q 

Finishing for the Amateur. Foister ^^ 



Eubanks Drug Co. 

Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Agents for Nunnally's Candy 



THE PEOPLES NATIONAL BANK 

WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 

Capital $150,000.00 United States Depositary 

J. W. FRIES, Pres. Wm. A. BLAIR, Vice-Pres. 

N. MITCHELL, Cashier 



PICKARD'S HOTEL 

Headquarters for Carolina Alumni 

Returning to the Hill 

SPECIAL RATES. STUDENT BOARDERS. 



"Electric Sl)oe Sl)op 

EXPERT SHOE REPAIRING 
CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 



WHITING- HORTON CO. 

THIRTY-ONE YEARS 
RALEIGH'S LEADING CLOTHIERS 



H. S. STORR & CO. 

Office Furniture, Machines and Supplies; Printers and 
Manufacturers of Rubber Stamps 
RALEIGH, N. C. 



Dnlfoiffi Supply C(0)o 

MACHINERY. MILL SUPPLIES 
PHONE 753 RALEIGH, N. C. 





Huffi 


ne 


Hotel 




Quick Lunch Counter and Dining Room- 
Rooms $1.00 and Up 
NEAR DEPOT: GREENSBORO, N. 


-C'.ean 
C. 



256 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 





A Pioneer in the Stoker Field 

Westi-UgLouse was one of the first among the pioneers in 
the stoker tield. 

Although power stations have grown to enormous size, 
with sudden peak loads in some instances reaching as high as 
30 Oand 4U0 per cent normal rating, the remarkable fact re- 
mains that the design of the Westinghouse Roney Stoker n-niains today practically the same as it was tliirty-three 
years ago and that it stUl retains its firm position in the combustion field. This speaks for the accuracy of the original 
design. The Roney Stoker is particularly suitable for steady power demands with moderate overloads of 25 to 50 per 
cent, and it burns a wide range of fuels satisfactorily. Siniple design, low first cost and ease of installation, strongly 
recommend it for plants of moderate size. Over three miUion horsepower have been installed. 

Industrial expansion, however, has wrought many changes in power plant practice smce 1887. Today mechanical 
stokers are called upon to burn everything from high-grade coals down to refuse. They are also called upon to meet 
the sudden and enormous steaming capacities. Hence, two additional stokers were added, and our line now includes 
the Chain Grate Stoker, particularly adapted to the burning of low-grade, high-ash fuels; and the Underfed Stoker, 
which is unequalled in its ability to handle the sudden and enormous overload demands of central station service with 
the highest degree of efficiency. 

It is a fact of vital importance to the stoker buyer that we 
manufacture the three general types, because stoker applica- 
tion should be approached with an open mind and the stoker 
manufacturer should be guided in his recommendations purely 
by the facts that develop from a study of fuel and load re- 
quirements. 

Westinghouse Electric & Manufacturing Co. 
East Pittsburgh, Pa. 





Westinghouse 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



257 





MEI^ULBS 
POWDEI(S 



The Dynamite Maker 
and the Food Supply 



The dyT.am-te maker's service to all of us does not consist 
solely of placing explosives in the hands of the miner for the 
production of our coal and metals. The labor of these men 
in the Hercules plants is also closely connected with the most 
fundamental of all industries — agriculture. Their vpork helps 
to provide the food that nourishes us. 

With the increase in the country's population, new agricul- 
tural lands are required to sustain it, and these are being se- 
cured by reclaiming our vast an-as of stump and swamp land. 
Hercules Dynamite is being used extensively in developing 
these sources of food supply that have hitherto lain dormant 
and unproductive. 

The sixty million acres of swamp land in this country — now 
a menace to public health — await the product of the dynamite 
maker to transform them into fertile, productive farms. It 
has been stated by Government authorities that one man with 
dynamite can dig as much ditch as six men with picks and 
shovels. 

In many sections of the country, our Agricultural Service 
Men are demonstrating the use of explosives to land owners 
and contractors. If you desire further information, write the 
Agricukural Department of the Company at Wilmington, 
Delaware. "Progressive Cultivation", a 68-page booklet, 
gives full information about the use of explosives for agricul- 
tural purposes. 

HE^pULES POWDEJ{^ CO. 



Chicago 


St. Louis 


New York 


Pittaborg, Kan. 


Denver 


Hazlcton. Pa. 


San Francisco 


Salt Lake City 


Joplin 


Chattanooga 


Pittsburgh. Pa. 


Wilmington. Del 



258 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 




The Seeman Printery 

Durham, N. C. 
Printing - Engraving - Bookbinding 




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THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

SUMMER SCHOOL 

THIRTY-THIRD SESSION JUNE 22-AUGUST 5, 1920 

Standard Courses in the Regular Departments of the University. 

Cultural and Professional Courses leading to the A.B. and A.M. degrees. 

A Modern Department of Education offering numerous professional courses in Educational 
Psychology, School Administration, Supervision, Principles of Secondary Education, Tests and 
Measurements, Rural Education. Primary, Grammar Grade, and High School Methods, Story 
Telling, Plays and Games, and Physical Education. 

Numerous Academic and Professional Courses of Elementary character for teachers who 
have not had previous professional training. 

High Class Recreational Features and Entertainments of an educational character. Lectures 
by noted Thinkers and Writers. Music Festival and Dramatic Performances. 

Able Faculty of Trained Specialists, Practical Teachers, Supervisors, and Superintendents 
of successful experience. 

A Twelve Weeks' Institute for Public Welfare Workers. Write for Special Bulletin. 

Moderate Expenses — Registration 922 in 1919 — Rooms may be reserved any time. 

Preliminary Announcement sent on request. Complete .'Knnouncement ready in April. 

For further information, address 

N. W. WALKER, Director 
CHAPEL HILL. N. C. 



(EuUurc 



Scl)olar5l)ip Service 

=^=THE = 



Self-Support 



l!^ortl) (LaroUna (LoUege for Women 

offers to Women a Liberal Education, Equipment for Womanly 
Service, Professional Training for Remunerative Employment 



The College offers four groups of studies lead- 
ing to the following degrees: Bachelor of Arts, 
Bachelor of Science, and Bachelor of Music. 

Special courses in Pedagogy; in Manual Arts; in 
Domestic Science Household Art and Economics ; in 
Music; and in the Commercial Branches. 

Teachers and graduates of other colleges provided 
for in both regular and special courses. 



Equipment modern, including furnished dormitories, 
library, laboratories, literary society halls, gynuuu- 
ium, music rooms, teachers' training school, infirm- 
ary, model laundry, central heating plant, and open 
air recreation grounds. 

Dormitories furnished by the State. Board at 
actual cost. Tuition free to those who pledge them- 
selves to become teachers. 



Fall '^erm Opens in September 



Summer 'Cerm Begins in June 



For catalogue and other information, address 

JULIUS I. FOUST, President, GREENSBORO, N. C. 






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