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Full text of "The alumni review [serial]"

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I'ibrary of 
(Ll]e University of Uorth darolina 



COLLECTION O F 

NOKTH CAROLINIAN A 



ENDOWED BY 

JOHN SPRUNT HILL 
of the class of 1889 






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THE ROYALL & BORDEN CO. 



Corner West Main and Market Streets DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA 

Sell all kinds of furniture and furnishings for churches, 
colleges and homes. Biggest stock of Rugs in the 
State, and at cheapest prices. ^If you don't know us 
ask the College Proctor or the editor of the "Review." 
Call on or write for whatever you may need in our line. 

THE ROYALL & BORDEN CO. 



Do You Need Help in Your 
Financial Plans? 

Under existiiig conditions, the making of his finaneial ])]ans and arrange- 
ments is one of the most ditfienlt tasks confronting tlie bnsiness man. He can- 
not be too well advised, and if he has established banking relations with a 
strong, service-giving institution like the Wachovia Bank and Trust Company, 
and has jjut himself into a position where he can draw upon its accunudated 
business knowledge and experience, he is especially fortunate. 

We shall l:)e glad of tlip opportunity to serve yon in any way in our jiower. 

Capital and Surplus $2,000,000.00 
Member Federal Reserve System 

WACHOVIA BANK AND TRUST CO. 

WINSTON-SALEM ASHEVILLE SALISBURY HIGH POINT 

NORTH CAROLINA 



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VOLUME VIII 



THE 



NUMBER 9 



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Ilj I M M M M M B PI i B I M W ■ H M 1 1 M II M W IH W 1 1 M ■ I B W ■ ■ ■ M 1 1 ■ ■ IMj M MB n p^ 



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ALVMNIREVIEW 



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OPINION AND COMMENT 

A Notable Event — Roland S. Morris — Getting Down 
to Brass Tacks — Study These Figures — Har- 
vard Has An Easy Job — A Brick and 
Mortar President — Hard Facts — 
What is the Answer? — Vir- 
ginia Starts Something 

ALUMNI DAY 

Reunions of Classes Ranging From 1860 to 1919 
Feature the Celebration of Alumni Day 

COMMENCEMENT DAY 

Ambassador Morris Delivers Baccalaureate Address 
165 Degrees are Conferred 



STATE UNIVERSITY FINANCES 



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PUBLI^SHED BY 

* THE ALVMNI ASSOCIATION 



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L 



Cy Thompson Says — 



After ten weeks of strenuous study in the School of Life Insurance Sales- 
manship at Carnegie Tech, he will be back on the Hill about September 1st 
with a message for you. 

In the meantime do not forget the 



Jefferson Standard Life Insurance Company 



Cyrus Thompson, Jr., Mgr. 

UNIVERSITY AGENCY 



THE AMERICAN TRUST CO. 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 

This Company serves iu all Fiduciary Relations, such as : 

Executor of Wills — 

Our experience enables us to handle estates according to the legal requirements ; 

Our financial responsibility insures safety; 

Our disinterestedness eliminates family quarrels. 

Trustee by Appointment: 

Our financial connections enable us to keep fimds invested to the best advantage, so 
as to earn the largest income consistent with safety. 



Resources over $12,000,000.00 



AMERICAN TRUST COMPANY 

(THE SAFE EXECUTOR) 

CHARLOTTE, NORTH CAROLINA 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



Volume VIII 



JUNE, 1920 



Number 9 



OPINION AND COMMENT 



The 125th I'ommeiR'cmciit e'elebratcd June 1:5-16 
was notable in two very ilefinite i)artieuhirs : (1) 
Rarely has a baccalaureate address met 
A Notable with more instant and unanimous ap- 
Event proval than that delivered by Hon. Ro- 

land S. Morris, Ambassador to Japan ; 
and (2) Never has the University, as represented by 
Trustees, alumni, and faculty, been more completely 
committed to a program involving immediate expan- 
sion on the part of the institution adequate to the 
needs of North Carolina. In still another respect it 
was also most notable. In graduating the class of 
1920 the University sent from the campus into the 
activities of the State 156 men and women, and there- 
by set for itself a record, both as to numbers and as to 
quality of campus citizenship. 

nan 

Ambassador Morris filled the appointment of Sec- 
retary of State Bainbridge Colby, who was detained 
in Washington by imperative business. 
Roland S. His coming and his whole performance 
Morris were of the sort to cheer the hearts of 

men. With a background of distin- 
guished service for three years in Tokyo, and 
with a simple directness which appealed to 
everyone, he had the courage to tell the grad- 
uating class that even in these days of the profiteer 
and "America for Americans," the secret of success- 
ful living, for nations as well as individuals, is the 
standard contained in the century-old paradox that 
the man wIkj would find his life must lose it. 

nnn 

Alumni Day was notable in that practically every 
word spoken at the Alumni business meeting, at the 
Alumni Luncheon, and at the meet- 
Getting Down ing of the Trustees on the night of 
To Brass Tacks Alumni Day, related to the press- 
ing needs of the University and the 
necessity of combined, unremitting effort to carry out 
a program which will enable the University to play 
its full part in the rapidly-expanding life of the State. 

The accounts of Alumni Day and of the Luncheon 
(which appear elsewhere), indicate clearly what 



these needs are and what must lie done to meet them 
adequately. President Chase sounded the first note 
when he declared in his address to the alunuii that the 
University had reached, under )iresent conditions, 
the absolute and final limit of its resources in every 
direction ; that it stood today facing a blank wall 
which the implements at its command simpI^' will not 
suffice to scale ; that not only the University, but every 
college in North Carolina, needed to double its ca- 
pacity instantly to meet the full educatioind require- 
ments of the State. 

nnn 

In su]iport of these propositions President Chase 
drew upon the record of the j-ear for an array of 
facts the seriousness of which cannot 
Study These be minimized and which every alum- 
Figures nus and citizen of the State must rec- 
ognize and act upon if the situation is 
to be properly handled. 

Seven hundred and ninety-five men roomed in 
dormitories last .year which were intended to be occu- 
pied by onl.y 469. Crowding in the town was on the 
same scale and Swain Hall and the Inn (which it was 
hoped would never be called into use again) carried 
an over-capacity load of 300. 

Last fall a number of classes met under the trees 
on the campus. In the laboratories three shifts oc- 
cupy the desks daily instead of the one which form- 
erly met in the afternoon. Lectures have had to be 
crowded into afternoon periods, and class rooms have 
had to be used so steadily as to make proper ventila- 
tion impossible. 

But this is only a part of the story. With 3,000 
graduates this May from the State supported public 
high schools against 100 in 1908, the number of fresh- 
men seeking admittance this fall adds to the impos- 
sibility of the situation. Two thousand students are 
seeking admi.ssion this September and already every 
room on the campus has been filled, while there are 
on file for places in the Medical School almost twice 
as manj' applications as can be filled. 

nnn 

Bad as the situation for the regular term is, that 



308 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



of the summer session is, if anything', worse. In 1919- 
20 seven hundred school houses 
Isn't This A in North Carolina were not 

Pretty Howdy Do? opened for lack of teachers. Of 
the 17,500 white teachers in the 
schools, 2,000 were so poorly trained that the State 
Department of Education could not give them its 
lowest grade certificates. And yet, in the face of this 
appalling situation in a State which stands 44th from 
the top among its 48 sisters when ranked in the terms 
of educational eiSeiency, the Director of the Summer 
School has had to turn away 500 teachers. Here, cei-- 
tainly, is "a pretty howdy do." 

nnn 

The Harvard Alunuii Bulletin for June 10 contains 
a statistical table and an editorial which present Car- 
olina 's plight in another light. 
Harvard Has According to this table Harvard 
An Easy Job has 10.6 per cent fewer freshmen in 
1919-20 than she had in 1913-14 and 
19 per cent fewer than in 1915-16. Yale, for the same 
dates, suffered a loss of 4.3 and 11.9 per cent, respec- 
tively, while Princeton had two freshmen less in 
1919-20 then she had in 1913-14 and thirty-three more 
than in 1915-16. 

In other words, Harvard and Yale, from which we 
hitherto have drafted our instructors and with whom 
on account of the exceeding scarcity of new teaching 
material, we are in competition, have only one finan- 
cial problem — that of securing funds to raise salaries. 
Harvard is just completing a $15,000,000 drive and 
has raised her salary scale to $6,000 to $8,000 for full 
professors with all other ranks in proportion. Pui'- 
thermore, she has no extensive building program to 
take care of because she already has ample buildings 
and Massachusetts high schools are not just beginning 
to function as are ours. She is not forced to catch 
up witli a belated building program, but Carolina is. 
And there is the rub, or, rather, the blister imder 
the rub. 



nnn 

No comfort is to be had from a comparison with 
the Middle Western State Universities. IMichigan, for 

example, has its buildings, and 
A Brick and owing to the fact that it has a 

Mortar President mill-tax scheme, and values have 

recently increased, its mainten- 
ance fund is amply taken care of. Minnesota is not 
so fortunate in its building program. Like us, it is 
sorely pressed for buildings, but imlike us it already 
has had appropriated some $6,000,000 to provide the 



buildings with. So mucii building is in pros])('ct that 
President Burton, who recently resigned to become 
President of the University of Michigan, gave as one 
of the reasons for leaving Minnesota, the fact that he 
"didn't want to be a brick and mortar President"! 
The president of Carolina must of necessity be this 
and a money raiser as well. 

nnn 

One significant statement made by President Chase 
in his address to the alumni was that in spite of the 
competition between institutions 
The Lure of for teachers, and in spite of the 

"Larger Fields" fact that salary scales elsewhere 
in institutions of our class ranged 
from $500 to $1,000 on an average above those paid 
here, the faculty had remained practically intact. 
This, to be sure, is fine and many of the members of 
the facult.y may be counted on to continue their serv- 
ice to the University regardless of offers elsewhere. 

But there is another side to this picture. Diiring 
the pi'esent year we drew one instructor from an 
institution which since hfs coming to us, has increased 
salaries 50 per cent. Last fall still another member 
of the faculty refused an offer involving a 20 per 
cent raise above what he was receiving here. In 
xipril, the president of that institution announced an 
average raise for 1920-21 of 29 per cent over 1919-20 
salaries. And only recently a professor receiving the 
minimum full professorship salary here of $3,000 
turned down an offer of a professorship at $3,600, 
which, for 1920, as a resi;lt of an endowment drive 
and a gift of $400,000 from the General Education 
Board for salaries, has been increased to $5,000! 
Guessed wrong, maj'be, but now that salary scales 
elsewhere are being announced and the differences 
between the salaries here and elsewhere are more 
marked, we may expect more men to do as Smith and 
Mims and Herty and Ro.yster before them did — go to 
"larger fields" or "fields in which the grass grew 
longer." 

nnn 

To substantiate what has just been said, attention 
is directed to the salary scales of two institutions 

which are not so far away as not to 
Hard Facts know about Carolina's work — and to 

want some of its workers. On April 
7, President Thompson, of Ohio State University, an- 
nounced the following scale : Professors, $4,000 to 
$(),000; assistant professors, $1,800 to $3,300; instruc- 
tors, $900 to $2,700. His announcement also carried 
the information that 127 professors receive an average 
salary of $4,139; that 81 assistant professors (the 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



30!) 



rank of associate professor has been abandoned by the 
institution) receive an average of $2,601; and 110 in- 
structors an average of $1,788. The statement also 
frankly recognizes the fact that the average salary for 
])rofessors is not as high as that of Michigan and Chi- 
cago and concludes with this sentence: "The budget 
has been adopted early in order that new instruction 
as provided maj' be secured at an earl\- date and those 
who are iinwilling to accept the appointments as pro- 
vided may have as much time as possible for negotia- 
tion elsewhere." 

The other scale is that of the Universit.y of Texas, 
which runs as follows: Professors, $4,250 to $5,000; 
associate professors, $3,250 to $3,750 ; adjunct pro- 
fessors, $2,400 to $3,000 ; instructors, $1,800 to $2,200. 

nan 

What, then, is the answer to this situation ? Presi- 
dent Chase suggested the doubling immediately of 

the University plant. Another speaker 
What Is urged the welding together of the alum- 

the Answer ni into an organization that would 

bring all of its combined influence to 
bear upon the State to meet the situation. Another 
proclaimed the doctrine that the State was rich and 
that the young men should be called on to work out 
its destiny. 

From these and many other suggestions one big 
fact emerges. Unless every one interested in the Uni- 
versity lines up squarely behind a big-scale program 
and works unfalteringly to put it across — trustees, 
administration, faculty, student body, alumni — Caro- 
lina will inevitably fall behind her sister imiversities, 
and to stand still today, is, more than it has ever been 
before, to recede. And that, for Carolina, is unthink- 
able. 

DDD 

Organization and work are absolutely essential to 
this program. They need, however, to be supple- 
mented in one other particular — giving. 
One Other We do not hesitate to say that an 
Essential alumnus of a State-supported university 
should contribute of his means to its 
welfare. We do say it and are prepared to maintain 
the ])ro|K)sition through thick and thin. We grant, 
of course, that the burden of support is upon the 
State. But that does not relieve the alumnus from 
co-operation. 

There are a number of ways in which alumni can 
rightfully contribute to their alma mater. It is al- 
ways in order to give to distinctively alumni projects 
such as the Alumni Loyalty Fund and the Graham 



Memorial Fund. Similarly, the opportunity is con- 
stantly offered for underwriting the expense of special 
investigations or research which the University could 
not otherwise undertake, but which, if successfully 
carried out, would add greatly to its scientific or 
scholarly standing. And there is always the privilege 
of establishing scholarships, fellowships, lectureships, 
etc., from which individuals or the whole student bodj- 
may profit, but which the State cannot supply. 

Another fact which should not be lost sight of, too, 
is that an hour can come in the life of an institution, 
just as in that of a business concern, when the lack of 
ready cash spells disaster. When such an hour ar- 
rives — sometimes midwaj- between legislative sessions 
— a gift for some specific purpose (such as that of the 
Kenan professorships, for example) may mean the sal- 
vation of the institution. 

nnn 

Recently it was our privilege to attend a meeting of 
the Association of Alunuii Secretaries held in the Stu- 
dents' Union Building of the Univer- 
Michigan As sity of Michigan, a building costing 
An Example $1,200,000 erected by 17,000 of the 
43,000 alumni of the Univer.sity of 
Michigan through contributions ranging from 50 
cents to $10,000. During the discussion centering on 
the topic of alumni giving, the following summary 
of large alumni gifts to the University of Michigan 
was made by the secretarA- of that institution : 

Alunmi Memorial Hall $150,000.00 

Hill Aurlitorium 2fli\00(,'.00 

Martha Cook Dormitory for Women ."jOO. 000.00 

Betsy Barbour Dormitory 200,000.00 

Barbour Fellowship for Oriental Women .... 100,000.00 
Barbour Property in Detroit for Oriental 

Women .300,000.00 

Clements Library of Americana and Build- 
ing to be Built 600,000.00 

Michigan Union 1,200,000.00 

Alumnae House 18,000.00 

Hudson Professorship 100,000.00 

La Monte (telescopes) 50,000.00 

$3,418,000.00 

nnn 

What the alumni of any State University do by 
way of example is always stimulating. Certainly 
this record of Michigan is of the 
Virginia Starts pe])])ei-y sort. It is the story of 
Something something big already achieved. 

A recent ainioimcement made by 
the University of Virginia is to the effect that the 
alumni of that institution will present their Alma 
Mater with a birthday gift of $3,000,000 in 1921 
when she celebrates her centennial anniversarv. 



;no 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



Oiu'-third of the amount will g'o to provide increased 
salaries, oue-thii'd to provide buildings, and one- 
third to the improvement of the entire present plant. 
The alumni offiee, which through its splendid or- 
ganization made a great reputation for itself among 
American universities through its activities connected 
with the American Universit.y Union in Paris, is 
thoroughly organized to push the matter to comple- 
tion. 

nnn 

In so far as words can express the feeling of the 
University over the retirement of Professor William 
Cain from the headship of the De- 
Professor Wil- partment of Mathematics and his 
liam Cain acceptance of a retiring beiietit from 

tlie Carnegie Foundation in order 
that he may prosecute special investigations in his 
tield of study, that service was beautifully performed 
by President Chase on Commencement Day. 

In making the official announcement, and in con- 
veying to Professor Cain the appreciation of the 
Trustees for his long distinguished service to the 
University, he expressed his feeling as one of sorrow 
mingled with joy : of sorrow, because Professor Cain 
was terminating a notable service in the classroom ; 
of joy beeaiLse his retirement from the classroom made 
possible increased devotion to scientific investigation 
in which Professor Cain had achieved high distinction. 

The Review does not attempt to add to President 
Cliase's statement. But it does take this opportunity, 
as the representative of the alumni who for the past 
thirty-one years have known Professor Cain as teach- 
er, scholar, gentleman, to voice the high esteem in 
which he is held bj' them today, and to assure him of 
their affectionate regard in the days to come. Through 
sound teaching, scholarly investigation, and rich per- 
sonalit.y his contribution to the University and to the 
advancement of mathematical science, particularly in 
the field of engineering, has been at once extensive 
and signal. 

nnn 

The Review undertakes no summary of the year 
so far as the activities of the alunnii are concerned. 
However, it does point with consider- 
"We Point able pride to several incidents grow- 
With Pride" ing out of alumni activity which fea- 
tured the commencement occasion. 

The first is the record of the infant alumni group, 
1920. This cla.ss since December, 1918, has served the 
University as few classes have been privileged to 
serve their Alma Mater. It was its opportunity to 
maintain Carolina traditions during a period of dis- 



organization and shock and to lift to a higlu>r level the 
ideals of the campus. Furthermore, it has perfected 
a permanent organization from which alunuii per- 
formance of high order may be exiiected, the first 
objective of which is the provision of a s]ilendid por- 
trait of the late President Graham for the Graham 
Memorial building. 

The classes of 1910 and 1860 are to be commended 
for quite a different matter. Through the activity of 
Maj. W. A. Grahm, '60, the record of that class has 
been brought up to date and j)ut into print, a task 
that has required long, painstaking effort, the com- 
pletion of which adds to the total completeness of the 
records of her sons which the University is attempting 
to compile. Similarly the class of 1910, through a 
committee consisting of Joe R. Nixon, J. H. Boushall, 
and L. N. Taylor, has issued a most distinctive rec- 
ord of its 192 members since commencement ten 
years ago. 

Two of the classes holding reunions came bearing 
gifts to the Alumni Loyalty Finid. Nineteen fifteen 
returned with .$650 and 1895, at its 25th anniversary, 
pledged $2,500, thereby setting a precedent for 
quarter-century classes. 

nnn 

The Review wishes to lay special emphasis upon 
the following matters of interest to the alumni which 
should receive attention during the sum- 
Announce- mer. 

ments 1. Messrs. E. R. Rankin and Beemer 

Harrell will represent the University in 
the interest of new students ; of increased support for 
The Review ; and of information concerning alumni 
for use in the compilation of almuui records. 

2. Mr. A. M. Coates is assisting the alumni office 
in securing information concerning the war service 
records of University men. 

3. Subscriptions due either to the Graham Memo- 
rial Fund or Alumni Loyalty Fund should be sent 
to the treasurer of the University. 



MEDICAL ALUMNI NOTES 

The following physicians, graduates this year of 
the University of Pennsylvania, have accepted hos- 
pital appointments, as follows : R. Mathews, Presby- 
terian Hospital, Philadephia ; W. Fewell, J. Fewell, 
and R. 0. Lyday, Philadelphia General Hospital, 
Philadelphia; R. B. McKnight, Methodist Hospital, 
Philadelphia ; W. B. Dewar, Pennsylvania Hospital, 
Philadelphia; W. B. Kinlaw, and J. K. Holloway, 
Episcopal Hospital, Philadelphia ; G. Joluiston and 
D. C. Arnold undecided. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



311 



baccalaureate sermon by chancellor 
Mccormick 

The opening day of the 125th commencement, Smi- 
day, Jnne 13, was mai'ked by two sermons, the bac- 
calaureate by Dr. Samuel Black McCormick, Chan- 
cellor of the University of Pittsburgh, and the Y. M. 
C. A. vesper sermon by Dr. W. D. Moss, of the Chapel 
Hill Presbyterian Church. The seniors in cap and 
gown attended both of these in a bodj-, the first in 
Gerrard Hall, the second on the campus under the 
Davie Poplar at twilight. 

Chapel Hill has rarely known a more beautiful day. 
The first warm rush of summer, tempered and soft- 
ened by breezes which rustled through the high tree 
tops of the giants of the campus, brought out a 
crowd which filled the chapel to the doors in the 
morning and which spread itself in a huge circle, 
row on row around Parson Moss in the afternoon. 

Dr. McCormick 's sermon was a powerful and 
searching appeal to the men and women of Carolina 
to resist to the utmost the present-day attack on all 
established institutions and to carry forward to ful- 
fillment the dream-s of their fathers for religion, for 
freedom, and for the future of America. 

"As that man is greatest who becomes the servant 
of all, so only can America achieve greatness by be- 
coming the servant of all the nations," said Dr. Mc- 
Cormick. "America must be content to develop itself 
as a comitry within the boundaries set for America, 
but as a people and as a nation America will attain 
to its God-intended destinj^ only as the arms of the 
people are extended wide and the hands of the people 
are full of blessing, abundantly and generously ex- 
pended upon all people who need sympathy and kind- 
ness and help." 

Vesper Services Held 

The last rays of the sun were shining through the 
trees on the campus as the seniors, their families, rela- 
tives, and friends gathered to hear the vesper sei-mon 
of Dr. Moss. Taking his text from the familiar verse, 
"I will lift up mine eyes to the hills from whence 
cometh my help," Dr. Moss told the seniors that 
their Jives would be made up of living in the valley 
and on the hill tops, in the valley witli the dead 
level of experience, with its limitation and change 
and desire, and on the hills with their wholesomeness, 
their universal sweep, their calmness, strength, and 
vision. 

"You will have to live in the valleys, for that is 
existence," said the "Par.son." "But don't fail to 
turn to the hills for their breadth of vision and in- 
spiration. ' ' 



CLASS DAY EXERCISES 

Dominating the campus for the last time the Class 
of 1920 finished on Monday evening vmder the Davie 
poplar their class historj-, reviewed their career, made 
their last will and testament, and turned over the 
campus to the rising seniors. 

The final day of leadership on the campus began 
at 9 :30 with a farewell chapel service in Gerrard Hall 
conducted by Professor H. H. Williams and Rev. W. 

D. Moss. This service over, the class later returned to 
the chapel to present the class gift, which is to be 
an oil portrait of the late President Graham, and to 
hear the contests for the Mangum Medal. Thomas C. 
Wolfe presented the gift and Messrs. J. P. Wash- 
burn, Thomas J. Brawlej', Columbus A. Hoyle, and 
F. L. Townsend contested for the oratorical distinc- 
tion. 

At 5 :30, under the Davie poplar, with hundreds of 
friends and alumni present to witness the last scene, 

E. E. White read the class history, R. B. Gwynn an- 
alyzed and interpreted the class statistics, Thomas 
C. Wolfe read the class poem, Thomas S. Kittrell 
presented the last will and testament, and F. J. Liip- 
fert looked beyond the present in the role of class 
prophet. J. P. Washburn, president of the class, lit 
the pipe of peace, spoke the last word of coiuisel to 
his classmates, and turned the guardianship of the 
campas over to W. R. Berryhill, president of the 
senior class-to-be. 



FIRE DESTROYS BUSINESS HOUSES ON 
FRANKLIN STREET 

The business section of Chapel Hill suffered from a 
disastrous fire on the early morning of June 22 which 
completely destroyed a row of frame stores on Frank- 
lin street between the Kluttz store and Tankersley res- 
idence. The stores were occupied by Foister's book 
and art shop. Peace's barber shop, Gooch's cafe, 
Pendergraft's grocery store, and a store room used 
by the Kluttz Company. In addition, space on the 
second story and in the rear of several of these stores 
was being used to store furniture belonging to stu- 
dents, professors, and citizens of Chapel Hill. The 
stock of Foister's store was saved, but all other stock 
and all the buildings were leveled to the groimd. The 
total damage was estimated at $35,000, about half of 
it covered bj' insurance. 

All the buildings were old landmarks m Chapel 
Hill, the Macaulay building (used by Pendergraft) 
being a familiar sight to manj' generations of Carolina 
men. Gooch's cafe, scene of many a midnight ham- 
and-egg, was another familiar haunt. 



312 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 







KEPKESEXTATIVES OF THE CLASSES OF 1S7U, 1900, l'J05, AND 1915 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



313 



ALUMNI DAY 



Reunions of Classes Ranging From 1860 to 1919 Feature the 
Celebration of Alumni Day 



Featured by the class reuiiiwis of ten of Alma 
Mater's most loyal classes, ranging from 1860 to 
1919, by President Chase's clear presentation of the 
vital, pressing needs of the University to the General 
Alumni Association, by the response made by the 
alumni in taking steps for a reorganization of their 
Association on a business-like basis, by the Alumni 
Luncheon, by the splendid performance of the Caro- 
lina Playmakei's, and by the faculty reception, the 
celebration of Alumni Day on Tuesday, Jime 15th, 
proved a most happy and profitable commencement 
occasion. 

Business Meeting of Alumni Association 

The General Alumni Association held its annual 
meeting in Gerrard Hall on the morning of Alumni 
Day, with R. D. W. Connor, president of the asso- 
ciation, presiding. President Chase spoke on the 
needs of the University. The University must imme- 
diately, he said, double her present plant, if the de- 
mands which the State is making on her now are to 
be met. 

E. R. Rankin, secretary of the Association, made a 
report on the work which has been done during the 
past year in the keeping of records of the alumni. 
The new features consist of card-index systems for 
all the living alumni of the University. These 
card-index .systems for keeping records of the alumni 
are ari-auged alphabetically, geographically, and ac- 
cording to classes. 

Dr. L. R. Wilson pointed out the great needs which 
the University faces now, first, in lack of buildings 
and equipment, and, second, in lack of money with 
which to pay adequate salaries to the members of 
the faculty. He showed especially how a working 
organization of alumni could be of vast help to Alma 
Mater. He called on the members of the General 
Alumni Association to make of their Association an 
effective, business-like organization dedicated to aiding 
Alma Mater in the solvuig of her pressing problems. 

President Connor made a report on behalf of the 
committee which has been at work for some time on 
plans for a reorganization of the General Alumni 
Association. The plan proposed involves the securing 
of a full-time, reasonably well-paid Alumni Secretary 
to devote all of his time to developing the work of the 
county alumni associations and the General Alumni 
Association. The financial aspect of the plan as pro- 



posed, would be met bj^ a two dollar membership fee 
for membership in the General Alumni Association. 
The Association went on record as unanimously en- 
dorsing this report made by President Connor and 
the plans for a reorganization of the General Alumni 
Association. 

A motion offered by Judge Francis D. Winston was 
passed, to the effect that the president of the General 
Alumni Association appoint a committee of eleven 
alunmi to present to the Legislature the matter of 
providing a dormitory at the University for women 
students. 

R. D. W. Connor was re-elected president of the 
General Alumni Association, and B. R. Rankin was 
re-elected secretary. 

The Alumni Luncheon 

The Alumni Luncheon was held in Swam Hall at 
one o'clock. Walter Murphy, of Salisbury, a mem- 
ber of the class of 1892 and long a member of the 
board of trustees, acted as toastmaster. Responses 
were made at the Alumni Luncheon by representa- 
tives of all the classes holding reunions. 

Class of 1860 

Major W. A. Graham responded for the class of 
1860, which was celebrating its sixtieth-year reimion. 
This class is known as the Confederate class of the 
University. Ninety-two of its ninety-three members 
entered the armies of the Confederacy and fought in 
the Civil War. Present for the reunion were: R. A. 
Bullock, Henderson; Capt. Tom W. Davis, Raleigh; 
Capt. John H. Thorpe, Rocky Moimt; Major W. A. 
Graham, Raleigh. 

Class of 1870 

Dr. Richard H. Lewis made the response for the 
class of 1870, which was celebrating its half-century 
reunion. Dr. Lewis pointed out that members of this 
class have played a notable part in the life of the 
State since the year 1870. Present for the reunion 
were : Dr. D. A. Long, Graham ; J. P. Rives, Battle- 
boro; Dr. R. H. Lewis, Raleigh. 

Class of 1880 

Thomas H. Battle, of Rocky Mount, spoke for the 
class of 1880. Mr. Battle made an effective talk in 
which he advocated that in view of the great needs 
of the University the next Legislature be asked to 



314 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



appropriate a half-million dollars annually for theB 
maiiitfiiance of the University, and to authorize a'^ 
building program of five million dollars. The fol-': 
lowing members of the class were present : R. B.' 
John, Maxton ; H. E. Faison, Clinton ; H. J. Faison, 
Faison; M. C. S. Noble, Chapel Hill; Thomas H. 
Battle, Rocky Mount; W. A. Betts, Olaiita, S. C ; 
Thos. C Brooks, Roxboro; James Moore, Raleigh. 

Class of 1890 

The class of 1890 celebrated its thirtieth year re- 
union with eight members present, as follows : J. C. 
Braswell, Rocky Mount; Judge Stephen C. Bragaw, 
Washington ; J. S. Holmes, Chapel Hill ; W. F. Shaff- 
ner, Winston-Salem; J. B. Philbeck, Shelby; Rev. G. 
V. Tilley, Statesville ; John W. Graham, Aberdeen ; 
V. S. Bryant, Durham. Judge Stephen C. Bragaw, 
captain of the first football team of the University, 
made the response for the class of 1890. The class 
held a meeting at the home of Mr. J. S. Holmes, in 
Chapel Hill. 

Class of 1895 

J. 0. Carr was the speaker for the class of 1895 
which celebrated its quarter-century reunion. He 
announced on behalf of the class a gift of $2,500 
to the Alumni Loyalty Fund. This gift is the hand- 
somest one which the Alumni Loyalty Fund has ever 
received. Members of the class of 1895 jiresent for 
the rexmion were: Leslie Weil, Goldsboro ; J. 0. 
Carr, Wilmington ; W. D. Merritt, Roxbf)ro ; Harry 
Howell, Raleigh; L. C. Brogden, Raleigh; John L. 
Patterson, Richmond, Va. ; F. L. Carr, Wilson; J. N. 
Pruden, Bdenton ; P. B. McKinne, Lonishurg; W. 
B. Guthrie, Durham; A. H. Price, Salisbury. The 
members of the class held a baniiiict on tlic evening of 
Alumni Day. 

Class of 1900 

Ten members of the class of 1!)0() celebrated the 
twentieth-year reunion of their class. W. S. Bernard 
spoke in behalf of the class. Members present were : 
A. J. Barwick, Raleigh;' T. D. Rice, Washington, D. 
C. ; Geo. C. Green, Weldon ; J. A. Moore, Roanoke 
Rapids; W. S. Bernard, Chapel Hill; K. P. Lewis, 
West Durham ; Rev. A. R. Berkeley, New Orleans ; Dr. 
R. B. Lawson, Chapel Hill ; P. C. Collins, Hillsboro ; 
W. E. Hearn, Washington, D. C. 

Class of 1905 

The class of 1905, known as the class which started 
the Alumni Loyalty Fund, came to its fifteenth-year 
reunion with thirteen members present. W. T. Shore, 
secretary of the class, made the response at the Ali;ra- 



ni Luncheon. Members of the class present for the 
reunion were : I. C. Wright, Wilmington ; W. T. 
Shore, Charlotte; Dr. 0. B. Ross, Charlotte; C. T. 
Woollen, Chapel Hill ; Dr. F'oy Roberson, Durham ; J. 
J. T.vson, Childersburg, Ala.; W. A. Heartt, Hillsboro; 
Miss Kate Meares, Columbia, S. C. ; J. K. Wilson, 
Elizabeth City; Miss Julia Harris, Oxford, Ohio; B. 
K. Lassiter, Oxford; A. H. King, Burlington; Dr. C. 
M. Walters, Burlington. 

Class of 1910 

Twenty-five members of the class of 1910 came back 
to Chapel Hill to celebrate their decennial reunion. 
Several members of the class were accompanied by 
wives and children. D. B. Teague, president of the 
class, made the response at the Alumni Luncheon. 
Among the features of entertainment for this class 
was a baseball game with the class of 1919, which 
stood at the end of the first inning, when rain inter- 
vened 1-0 in favor of 1910. The class held a banquet 
on Tuesday evening at "The Coop." 

Members of the class of 1910 jtresent for the re- 
union were: D. B. Teague, Sanford ; J. R. Nixon, 
Edenton; R. G. Rankin, Gastonia; Dr. D. B. Sloan, 
Wilmington ; Dr. L. deK. Beldin, Woodlawn, Penn. ; 
Dr. J. M. Veuable, San Antonio, Texas ; J. S. Patter- 
son, Chapel Hill; H. 0. Craver, Washington, D. C. ; 
D. M. Williams, Asheville; R. A. Urquhart, Wood- 
ville; J. D. Eason, Jr., Washington, D. C. ; E. L. 
Franck, Richlands ; A. A. Pickard, Chapel Hill ; Dr. 
Robert Drane, Savannah, Ga. ; S. F. Teague, Golds- 
boro ; John H. Boushall, Raleigh ; 0. A. Hamilton, 
Goldsboro ; H. E. Stacy, Lumberton ; Rev. L. N. Tay- 
lor, Roanoke Rapids ; H. P. Vreeland, Charlotte ; I. G. 
Greer, Boone : C. C. Barbee, East Durham ; A. H. 
Wolfe, Dobson; Rev. S. B. Stroup, Hickory; T. J. 
Hackney, Wilson. 

Class of 1915 

Eighteen members of the class of 1915 celebrated 
their fifth-year reunion. R. G. Fitzgerald, president 
of the class, spoke at the Alumni Luncheon, and made 
announcement on behalf of the class of the gift of 
$(i50 to the Alumni L(n-alty Fund. Members of the 
class present were : Phil Woolcott, Charlotte ; R. G. 
Fitzgerald, Lillington ; D. L. Bell, Pittsboro ; F. B. 
McCall, Charlotte; J. S. Bryan, Wilson; M. J. Davis, 
Warrenton ; H. A. Carroll, Chapel Hill ; A. R. New- 
s )me, Forsyth, Ga. ; D. E. Clinard, Winston-Salem; 
]\Irs. Rachel L. Simpson, Winston-Salem ; P. L. White, 
Greensboro; G. Allen Mebane, Graham; A. T. Weath- 
erly, Graham; A. H. Carr, Durham; Miss Alma Stone, 
Chapel Hill; R. E. Little, Jr., Wadesboro ; R. E. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



315 




1910 COMES BACK WITH 25 MEMBERS 



Parker, Raleigh; W. R. Taylor, Auburn, Ala. An 
enjoj'able feature of the reunion of the class of 1915 
was the class meeting and smoker held on Tuesday 
evening. 

Class of 1919 

The class of 1919, celebrating its first-year reunion, 
had for a pleasant reunion feature a banquet, served 
at "The Coop" on Monday evening, at which thirty- 
five members were present. Luther H. Hodges, of 
Leak-sville, president of the class during its senior 
year, made the response in behalf of the class at the 
Alumni Luncheon. He pledged the loyal support of 
the class to Alma Mater in all of her efforts. 

Playmakers Present Plays 

The Carolina Playmakers presented at the Play- 
house on the evening of Alumni Day two folk plaj^s, 
entitled: "Dod Gast Ye Both," and "The La.st of 
the Lowrics." These performances were given in hon- 
or of the alumni and were thortnigliiy enjoyed by all 
]iresent. 

The closing feature of Alumni Day was the recep- 
tion given to the members of the senior class by the 
president and faculty at ten o'clock in the evening at 
Bynum Gymnasium. 



STANTON BYRD McKINNON MEMORIAL 
MEDAL ESTABLISHED 

Among the prizes annoimced by President Chase 
at commencement was a new one, the Stanton Byrd 
McKinnon memorial medal, the gift of Mrs. Graham 
McKinnon, of Rowland. The medal will be a me- 
morial to her husband, Graham McKinnon, of the 
class of 1888, and to her son, Stanton Byrd McKinnon, 
who was preparing to enter the University when he 
died of pneumonia last j^ear. The younger McKinnon 
had done unusual work in English and had planned 
to center his college work around that subject. The 
medal will be awarded annually tf) that member of 
the freshman class who has made the highest grade 
in English. The first winner was D. R. Hodgin. 



Dean George Howe has recently been appointed 
an associate editor of the Classical Journal. 



JUDGE STACY IS NOMINATED FOR 
SUPREME COURT 

Judge Walter P. Stacy, of Wilmington, a member 
of the class of 1908, was nomhiated in the Democratic 
primaries on July .Srd for associate justice of the 
Suijremc Court of Xortli Carolina. Judge Stacy, 
ff)ilovving his graduation from the University, prac- 
ticed law in Wilmington for several .years in partner- 
ship with the late Graham Kenan. He received 
ai)])ointment to the Superior Court bench from 
Governf>r Craig in 191(i, and was later elected to 
the bench. He resigned this commission on March 
1st of this vear. 



316 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



COMMENCEMENT DAY 



Ambassador Morris Delivers Baccalaureate Address — 
165 Degrees Are Conferred 



Substituting' in splendid fashion for Secretary 
Bainbridge Colb.y, who was detained in Washington 
at the last minute by important business, Roland 
Morris, American Ambassador to Japan, just arrived 
in Amei-ica on a vacation, told a crowd that overflowed 
Memorial Hall at the 125th commencement exercises 
that the principle of luiselfish service applied to 
America's international relations was the chief hope 
for the establishment of the friendliest relations be- 
tween America and Japan. 

"If we are to realize our best national develop- 
ment, ' ' Ambassador Morris said, ' ' we must apply the 
same rules as in the development of the individual. 
Unselfish service is the only principle for the develop- 
ment of the best in an individual and in a nation, and 
the international relations of the country in the fu- 
ture should be based on that principle. ' ' 

It was a typical Carolina commencement, with the 
Sim shining full blast on the huge crowd that surged 
across the campus. Orange County turned out her 
usual quota of coimtry folk, and hitching posts and 
parking space for Fords were at a premium for many 
hundreds who were out for a picnic day of fun. The 
alumni were back in large numbers from Ma,ior 
Graham and 80-year-old boys of 1860 down to the 
youngsters of '19, back for their first re-union and 
almighty • proud of their standing too. Mothers, 
fathers, brothers, sisters, cousins, aunts, and best girls 
of the graduates helped swell the crowd, and every- 
body asked everybody else "Isn't it hot?" and passed 
on without stopping for an answer. 

Secretary Colby's failure to come did not upset a 
single plan. As a matter of fact no one at Chapel Hill 
knew of the change in speakers until Secretary Dan- 
iels, down to see his son, Worth Bagley Daniels, grad- 
iiate, rode up to Alumni Building thirty minutes be- 
fore the procession was to start and introduced Am- 
bassador Morris to. President Chase. The speech was 
well delivered and well received, the Ambassador mak- 
ing the personal hit of the day with his pleasant man- 
ner, his clear address, his sturdy exposition of fun- 
damental principles of conduct, for the individual and 
for the nation ; and President Chase uiidoiibtedly ex- 
pressed a imiversal sentiment when he said that Mr. 
Morris' kindness in substituting at the last moment 
was one of the most splendid gifts ever made to the 
Universit.y. 

The exercises were preceded with the usual acade- 



mic parade, the seniors in front, then the trustees and 
alumni, followed bj' the faculty, with President Chase, 
Secretary Daniels, Mr. Morris, and Governor Biekett 
at the rear. At Memorial Hall the procession tele- 
scoped on itself and the platform group marched in 
first between opened ranks of graduates. 

The Rev. B. L. Baskin, of the local Baptist Church, 
opened with the invocation, and President Chase in- 
troduced Secretary Daniels, who in turn introduced 
Mr. Morris as fully qualified to appear before a North 
Carolina audience because an alumnus of the Univer- 
sity, William A. Graham, Secretary of the Navy, had 
sent Commodore Perry to open the doors of Japan to 
western influences, and because Mr. Morris had come 
to Asheville, N. C, for his wife. 

Professor Cain Retires From Service 

Following the address. President Chase made the 
announcements about changes in the faculty. Of es- 
pecial interest was the news of the retirement from 
active teaching of Professor William Cain, since 1889 
Professor of Mathematics, and the election of Pro- 
fessor Archibald Henderson as his successor. Pro- 
fessor Cain has been offered and has accepted a pen- 
sion from the Carnegie Foundation and stops teaching 
after 31 years at the University and many more at 
other institutions. 

New Kenan Professors Announced 

Announcement of the election of three new Kenan 
professors was also made bj- President Chase, who said 
that the policy formally adopted by the Trustees 
■'provides that Kenan Professorships shall be awarded 
on the basis of distinctive and outstanding work in 
productive scholarship, in teaching, in organization 
and administration, and in service to the University 
and the State." 

The three new Kenan Professors are William C. 
Coker "for productive scholarship . . . natural- 
ist of merit ; author of many admirable papers in 
his field"; Henry Horace Williams, "for outstand- 
ing merit as a teacher; for thirty years a vital influ- 
ence in the lives of students who have come under his 
teaching and in the life of the University ' ' ; Louis 
Round Wilson, "for distinguished service to the Uni- 
versity and the State ; translator of the extension 
idea into practice; creator of an extension service 
without parallel in the South." 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



317 




ISSO's REUNION REPRESENTATION 



Record Class Receives Degrees 

Diplomas were handed to 165 graduates by Gov- 
ernor Bickett, who cited to the graduates the example 
of Robert E. Lee and Judge Armistead Burwcll as 
instances of the power of a good name. Included 
among the graduates were thirteen women. 

Dr. C. L. Raper presented for honorary degrees 
Alexander Graham, of Charlotte, and Francis D. 
Winston, of Windsor, for the L.L. D degree, and Wil- 
liam C. Smith, of the North Carolina College for 
Women, and James M. McBryde, Professor of Eng- 
lish at Tnlane University, for the Litt. D. degree. 

Faculty Changes Announced 

The following promotions in the faculty were an- 
nounced by President Chase : 

From Acting Dean to Dean of the Schof)] of Com- 
merce — D. D. Carrol] ; from Associate Professor to 
Professor, of English — John Manning Booker ; of 
Civil Engineering — Thomas Felix Hickcrson ; of 
French — Oliver Towles; of History — William W. 
Pierson ; of Psychology — John F. Dashiell ; from As- 
sistant Professor to Associate Prf)fessor, of English — 
Henry M. Dargan ; of Mathematics — John W. Lasley 
and Allan W. Hobbs. 

President Chase also announced the following addi- 
tions to the faculty for next year: J. W. Matherly, 
Associate Professor of Commerce, A. B., William 



Jewell College, 1915 ; M. A., Washington TTniversity, 
1916; Teaching Fellow in Economies,, University of 
Minnesota, 1916-17; Teaching Assistant, University 
of Chicago, 1918; Professor of Economics, George- 
town College, 1919. 

William C. George, Associate Professor of Embry- 
ology and Histology ; A. B., University of North Car- 
olina, 1911; A.M., 1912; Ph.D., 1918; Instructor in 
Zoology. University of North Carolina, 1913-16; Pro- 
fessor of Biology, Guilford College, 1916-17; Fellow 
in Biology, Princeton University, 1917-18 ; Acting 
Professor of Zoology, University of Georgia, 1918-19; 
Professor of Histology and Embryology, University 
of Tennessee, 1919-20. 

C. E. Green, Assistant Professor of Romance Lan- 
guages ; A. B., Syracuse Univei'sity, 1915; A.M., 
1916; Instructor in Romance Languages, Syracuse 
University, 1916-18; Instructor in Spanish, Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania, 1918-19 ; Assistant Professor of 
Modern Languages, University of Nebraska, 1919-20. 

William F. Thrall, Assistant Professor of English; 
A. B., McKeudee College ; Ph. D., University of Chi- 
cago, 1920; Head of the Department of English and 
Registrar, McKendee College, Lebanon, 111. 

John B. Woosley, Assistant Professor of Econom- 
ics; A. B., Guilford College, 1912; A. B., Haverford, 
1913 ; Teaching Fellow in History and Economics, 
Haverford, 1913-14; A.M., Haverford, 1914; Profes- 



318 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 




18!)5 RETURNS WITH lf2,50() FOR THE ALUMNI LOYALTY FUND 



sor of History and Economics, Gnilford College, 1917 ; 
Principal Jamestown High School, 1919-20. 

H. M. Taylor, Instructor in Chemistry; B. S., Uni- 
versity of North Carolina. 

William Dongald McMillan, Instructor in English; 
A. B., University of North Carolina; A.M., ibid. 

Fellowships Awarded 

Fifteen of the twenty University Teaching Fellows 
for 1920-21 were announced as follows, each draw- 
ing $500 for the Fellowship : J. N. Couch, Assistant 
in Botany; A. B., University of North Carolina, 1919 ; 
Assistant in Botany, 1919-20; graduate student, 1919- 
20. Thomas P. Dawson, Ph. C, University of North 
Carolina, 1920; Analytical Chemist, Government 
Service, 1918. Paul R. Dawson, A. B., Clark College, 
1916 ; Assistant Bio-Chemist, Pellagra Hospital, U. 
S. Public Health Service, 1917 and 1919-20. R. A. 
Lineberry, B.S., Guilford College, 1920. Samuel 
Clement Smith, A. B., Guilford College, 1918 ; A. M., 
University of North Carolina, 1920. Abraham Mau- 
rioe Wolfson, B. S., University of Florida, 1920 : As- 
sistant, ibid, 1918-20. Albert Pettigrew Elliott, A. B., 
William and Mary, 1919; M. A., ibid, 1920; Assist- 
ant in English, ibid, two years. Francis Julius Liip- 
fert, Jr., A. B., University of North Carolina, 1920. 
Joseph Felix Spainhour, Jr., A. B., University of 
North Carolina, 1920. Josiah Smith Babb, A. B., 
University of North Carolina, 1920 ; Assistant in Phy- 
sics, 1918-19 ; Assistant in Geology, 1919-20 ; Instruc- 



tor in Chapel Hill High School, 1919-20. Walter B. 
Jones, A. B., University of Alabama, 1917 ; Assistant 
in Geology, ibid., 1916-17 and 1919-20. Keener Chap- 
man Frazer, A. B., Wofford College, 1920. John Cal- 
vin McWhorter, A. B., Simmons College, 1920 ; Mi- 
chael Areudell Hill, Jr., A. B., University of North 
Carolina, 1920. Roy J. Morton, A. B., Elon College, 
1920. 

The following resignations have taken place : Thom- 
as James Browne, Director of Physical Education ; 
Clinton W. Keyes, Instructor in Classics; James S 
Moffatt, Instructor in English ; Herman Schoeler, In- 
structor in English ; J. C. Bynum, Instructor in Min- 
eralogy; H. M. Sharp, Instructor in Physics. 

Leaves of absence have been granted to Norman 
Foerster, Professor of English, and Nathan Wilson 
Walker, Professor of Secondary Education. 

Medals, Prizes, and Degrees 

The following metlals, prizes, and fellowships were 
anuoimced and degrees awarded to the following: 

The William Cain Prise in Mathematics — C. Edwards. 
The Eben Alexander Prize in Greek — F. D. Bell. 
The Early English Text Society Prize — Frances Womljli'. 
Tlic Cnlhifihan SeJioUirnhi/) Fri~r in Law — Katliarinc McD. 
Robinson. 

The Ledoux Fellowship in Chemistry — T. M. Andrews. 
The Hunter Lee Harris Medal— W. L. Blythe. 
The Ben Smith Preston Cup — N. G. Gooding. 
' The Julian S. Carr Fellowship — W. R. Berryhill. 
The Burdick Prise in Journalism — Philip Hcttk'nian. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



319 




1890 CELEBRATES ITS SOth YEAR REUNION 



Tlw Stdiitoii Byrd McKinnnn Memorial Mcda! in Frcshmiiii 
English — D. K. Hodgin. 

The WiUiam J. Bryan Prise in Political Science — M. H. 
Patterson. 

The Bradhiim Prise in Plmrmacy — Dorothy E. Foltz. 

The Mildred WiUiams Buchan Scholarship in Phiolosophy — 
M. H. Patterson. 

The Bingham Pri.:e—W. H. Bobbitt. 

The Mangum Medal — F. L. Townsend. 

Elected to Jlembership in the Phi Beta Kappa Society, 
1920 — J. L. Cook, President; 0. D. Beers, Secretary; C. L. 
G. Ashby, W. R. Berryhill, W. L. Blythe, W. H. Bobbitt, C. 
T. Boyd, Mary L. Cobb, R. M. Davis, H. Edmundson, W. A. 
Gardner, W. P. Hudson, H. A. Patterson, F. C. Shepard, 
R. S. Shore, H. D. Stevens, J. 6. Tucker, Louise M. Venable, 
T. J. Wilson, III. 

Elected to Associated Menilicrsliip in the Society of Sigma 
Xi, 1920— T. M. Andrews, J. N. Couch, I. V. Giles, B. Mark- 
ham, S. C. Smith, I. W. Smithey, J. L. Stuckey, H. R. Tottcn. 

Certificates in Economics — R. B. Gvvynn, S. I. Parker. 

Certificates in Zoology — W. W. Kirk. 

Honors in Language and Literature — F. .1. Liipfert, .Tr., 
U. P. Spruill, Jr. 

Bachelors of Arts — Sidney Broaddus Allen, William Banks 
Anderson, Ola Blanche Andrews, William Henry Andrews, .Jr., 
Josiah Smith Babb, Charles Wortlcy Bain, Hugh (Jlifton 
Black, William Augustus Blount, Thomas Johnson Brawley, 
Henry Cowles Bristol, Leo Hcartt Bryant, William Horace 
Butt, Benjamin Cone, George Dewey (Jrawford, Grover Cleve- 
land Dale, Donald Suead Daniel, Worth Bagley Daniels, James 
Edward Dowd, Calvin Ransome Edney, Houston Spencer Ever- 
ett. 

Rachel Freeman, Nathan Green Gooding, Theodore Alex- 
ander Graham, Robert Bruce Gwynn, Leo Heartt Harvey, 
Michael Arondell Hill, Jr., Columbus Alonzo Hoyle, Lawrence 
Wooten Jarnmii, Edgar Bry;in Jenkins, Robert DuVal .Jones, 



Jr., Claude Reuben Joyner, William Shipp Justice, William 
Robert Kirkman, Thomas Skinner Kittrell. 

James Horace Lassiter, Samuel Bayard Lee, Saut'ord Martin 
Lee, William Figures Lewis, Francis Julius Liipfert, Jr., Ro- 
land Prince MeClamroch, John Brown McLaughlin, Jr., George 
Weaver Mann, Kate deRosset Meares, Olin Bain Michael, Na- 
than Mobley, James Samuel Moore, Oliver Early Moore, Rob- 
ert Franklin Moseley. 

William James Nichols, Horace Nims, Thomas Lilley Pace, 
James Jerome Pence, James Davis Poag, Will Nelson Poin- 
dexter, Jr., Clifton Addison Poole, Vera Pritehard, Claude 
Clinton Ramsay, Moses Rountree, John William Sexton, Mildred 
Irene Sherrill, Henry Belk Simpson, Bryan Webb Sipe, Joseph 
Felix Spainhour, Jr., Rutus Arthur Spaugh, Earl Montgomery 
Spencer, Corydon Perry Spruill, Jr., Marvin Lee Stone. 

Elizabeth Murphy Taylor, Everett Simon Teague, Harvey 
Stansill Terry, Daniel Dewey Topjiing, Joseph Barber Towler, 
Calvert Rogers Toy, Richard Stanford Travis, Jr., Luther Wiley 
Umstead, Louise Manning Venable, Carl Hampton Walker, 
John Pipkin Washburn, Frank Lowrance Wells, Edwin Emer- 
son White, Ralph Devereux Williams, Samuel Hood Willis, 
Ralph Harper Wilson, Thomas Clayton Wolfe, Jake Garrett 
Woodward. 

Bachelors of Arts in. Edueatiun — Cordelia Camp, Sylvia L. 
Arrowood Latshaw, Harry Franklin Latshaw. 

Bachelors of Science in Chemistry — Eilward Broad Cordon. 
Roy Hobart Souther, ]'"'letcher Humphries Spry, Haywood Mau- 
rice Taylor, Woodford White. 

Bachelors of Science in Civil Engineering — Cary Buxton 
Taylor, John Bruce Yokley. 

Bachelors of Science in Electrical Engineering — Edwin 
('harlton Balentine, Clarence Pinkney Bolick, Chester Winthrop 
Burton, Charles Mortimer Hazlchurst, Percy Philip Lynch, Jr., 
William Edward Merritt, William Webb Ncal. 

Bachelors of Science in Geology — Holt Pebbin Faucette. 

Baehilors of Science in Medicine — Leslie Edwaid Chappcll, 



320 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 




DR. LOUIS R. WILSON 



PROP. H, n. WILLIAMS 



w. 0. coke;i 



Ernest Walton Clark, Jr., Francis Mann Clarke, Davis Alex- 
ander Cooper, Vernon Lyndon Eley, Alfred Wilson Hamer 
James Meredith Ketehie, William Blount Norment, Samuel 
Eoyall Norris, James Lewis Poston, Eobert Alexander Boss, 
Eli Eiehard Saleeby, John Cotton Tayloe, Earl Runyou 
Tyler. 

Bachelor of Arts and Laws — Dennis Bryan Leatherwood. 

Bachelors of Laws — Graham Arthur Barden, Frederick Os- 
car Bowman, Edwin Breathed Bridges, Frederick Jacob Cohn, 
James Millar Coleman, Charles Eufus Daniel, Katherine Me- 
Diarmid Robinson. 

Graduates in Pharmacy — Delma Desmond Hocutt, Laurance 
Munsey Ingram, Guy Smith Kirby, Vernon Duncan Lea, Perry 
Jenkins Melvin, John Clayton Mills, Fred Marion Patterson, 
Millard Bro\vn Phillips, Harry Wilbur Walker. 

Pharmaceutical Chemist — Thomas Pugh Dawson. 

Masters of Arts — Kazno Ibara, Harry Towles Davis, William 
Clement Eaton, William Wilson Kirk, Saichiro Kita, Joe Bur- 
ton Linker, William Dongald MacMiUan, 3d, Herman Earl 
Marsh, James Claudius Peel, Margaret Gray Perry, Sanmel 
Clement Smith, Thomas Edgar Story, Jasper Leonidas Stuckey, 
Rosser Howard Taylor, Lennie Marie Ward, Hilton Gwaltney 
West, Prances Womble. 

Masters of Science — Isaac Vilas Giles, David Haughton 
Jackson. Ernest Neiman. 



MUSIC DEPARTMENT CONCLUDES SPLENDID 

YEAR WITH PRESENTATION OF 

"THE MIKADO" 

The climax of the first year of organized music in 
Die University was reached May 21 witli the produc- 
tion of Gilbert and Sullivan's opera, "The Mikado," 



under the direction of Paul J. Weaver, Professor 
of Music. 

Memorial Hall, which has seen many sights in its 
day, had one of the largest crowds of the year that 
night, on hand to see the first musical comedy, chorus 
and all, on which the memorial tablets have ever 
looked down. A cast of nine principals, a male chorus 
of twenty, a female chorus of twenty, and an orchestra 
of eleven pieces combined to make the largest musical 
undertaking the University has known, and the suc- 
cess of the production, it is hoped, will lead to others 
of a similar nature. 

Professor Weaver, in charge of the production, paid 
especial attention to the music, and Mrs. Weaver to 
the dramatic work. The principals were : Mrs. G. A. 
Harrer, Misses Alma Stone, Lou Shine, and Aline 
Hughes, and Messrs.^ James Howell, I. B. Newman, 
LeGrand Everett, Charles Nichols, and George Hunt. 
The costumes were unusually effective and the entire 
production went across with a sure and increasing 
success. 

Professor Weaver has had charge of the Glee Club 
and Orchestra this year and both of them, under his 
direction, have been lifted to a high level of achieve- 
ment. The Orchestra particularly has come to occupy 
a definite position on the campus, where it has co- 
operated time and time again this year with other 
University productions and events. Two trips, of a 
week each, have been taken hy the Glee Club, one in 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



321 



the western and the other in the eastern part of the 
State, and in addition Professor Weaver has made a 
number of extension lectures on community music 
and has conducted several community sings, notably 
in Raleigh and in Rocky Moiuit. 

Four courses in music were offered during the year, 
in appreciation of music, in the history of music, in 
sight singing and ear training, and in harmony. At 
the Summer School further progress will be made in 
music through the work of Mr. William Breach, 



formerly of Rochester, N. Y., now director of public 
school and community singing in Winston-Salem, who 
is giving courses in voice and piano, and in puMic 
school music. Professor Weaver has added courses in 
community music and in sight singing, and will di- 
rect a production of "Hiawatha's Wedding Feast" 
at the Summer School. 

Plans are being made now toward the obtaining of 
teachers of voice and instrumental nnisic for the 
University in the near future. 



STATE UNIVERSITY FINANCES 



The Review reprints below two studies recently 
appearing in the University News Letter dealing with 
the amoimts invested by the various States in their 
State Universities and with the funds with which 
they maintain them annually. The studies cover the 
college year 1918-19 and are based on the reports of 
the State universities to the Federal Bureau of Edu- 
cation and on answers to inquiries sent out by the 
Department of Rural Economies and Sociology of this 
University. Massachusetts, Maryland, and New 
Hampshire maintain no State imiversity or college 
of liberal arts at State expense in whole or in part. 
No reports have been secured so far from Mississippi, 
Missouri, and Vermont. These studies so vitally 
concern the University that The Review reprints 
them in full in the hope that each alumnus and 
Trustee will give them most careful consideration. — 
Editor. 

STATE UNIVERSITY PLANTS 

Carolina is the oldest State university in America. 

On paper it is as old as the Declaration of Independence, 
having been provided for in the Halifax Constitution of 1776. 
As old as the Federal Constitution, having been charterea 
by the State Legislature in 1789. 

The cornerstone of the first building was laid in 1793, and 
two years later the doors of Carolina swung open to students. 

In very fact Carolina is the oldest State university in the 
Union. 

The oldest but not the richest in campus properties — in land- 
values, buildings, apparatus, and equipments. Among the 
forty-one States reporting in 1918-19, she stood twenty-fourth 
from the top of the column. 

The latest authoritative summary makes North Carolina by 
long odds the richest State in the South in per capita wealth. 
Nevertheless six Southern States outrank us in the value of 
university plants, as follows: 

1. Texas $2,941,535 

2. Virginia ^2,432,560 

3. Georgia 2,000,000 

4. Tennessee 1,662,889 

5. Oklahoma 1,.'358,365 

6. Alabama 1,480,000 

7. North Carolina 1,355,000 



It is reasonable for Texas and Virginia to stand ahead of 
us in university properties. Texas is five times the size of 
North Carolina, and her people are nearly twice as many, 
while the civilization of Virginia is around a half century 
older than ours. 

Outstripping Carolina 

But we had a running start of Georgia by eighty years or 
so. Nevertheless, her university plant overtops ours by more 
than six hundred thousand dollars in value! 

And a running start of Alabama by forty years or so, but 
her university plant at Tuscaloosa already outvalues Carolina's 
plant at Chapel HUI, and the Alabama legislature has recently 
authorized a million-dollar fund for campus buildings, equip- 
ments, and extension. Even Mississippi has just appropriated 
$700,000 for university buildings and equipments and .t300,00C 
for annual maintenance! 

As for Tennessee, Carolina's fair daughter, she outstrips 
the mother State by $300,000 in university properties. 

And Oklahoma in less than twenty years has created a univer- 
sity plant worth $200,000 more than ours, wliile her annual ap- 
propriation for maintenance is nearly $150,000 a year greater. 

Gasoline and Culture 

At present North Carolina has 54 cents per inhabitant in- 
vested in university properties — and 50 dollars per inhabitant 
invested in automobiles ! 

In 125 years we have built up a university plant worth one 
and a third million dollars. In ten years we have bought up 
a hundred million dollars worth of motor cars! 

We are buying motor cars faster than any other State in 
tlie Union, says the National Automobile Chamber of Com- 
merce — fifty milUon dollars worth a year! A hundred and 
forty thousand dollars worth a day, including Sunday. 

We are skyrocketing toward the top of the automobile col- 
umn; but in common school and university investments we 
soar aloft like Icarus of old, like ' ' Darius Green and his 
riyiug Machine ' ' ! 

But in the end the lift and level of Carolina's civilization 
will be measured by the brain power of her people and not 
by the gas engine power of her motor cars. 

The classroom, dormitory, and mess hall space of the Uni- 
versity need to be doubled. 

Her 1500 students in the regular college and summer 
school terms already demand almost exactly twice the space 
available today — to say nothing of the future. 

Nothing but buildings and eiiuipment and working income 
limit the ability of the University to serve the State. The 



322 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



University is a tried and at last a proven agency of developing 
democracy and nothing limits its power to serve the State but 
the will of her people to equip it for service. 

We could just as easily have 5,000 as 1,500 students here, 
if only the State would provide the facilities. 

Rip van Winkle 

We are not abaslied by the way tlie Middle Western and 
Pacific coast States have outstripped us in university invest- 
ments and supporting funds — by Michigan 's eight-million-dollar 
plant, or Wisconsin 's nine-million-dollar plant, or Minnesota 's 
elevon-million-dollar plant, or California 's si.xteen-million- 
dollar plant. 

But when six Southern States move on ahead of us in uni- 
versity properties, and foiu' in university maintenance funds — 
little Arizona among tlie number — we begin to wonder whether 
or not Carolina with all her wealth will be content to idle 
along the way in the march of Southern commonwealths. 

And the Federal Education Bureau reports eight Southern 
States ahead of us in university properties or State mainten- 
ance funds — in one or the other or both particulars: they 
are Arizona, Oklahoma, Georgia, Alabama, Tennessee, Ken- 
tucky, Virginia, and Texas. 

North Carolina has been lovingly called tlie Kip van Wiidde 
of the States. 

What wa.s once said in love Ijy one of her own sons, may 
soon be said in derision by aliens and strangers. 

UNIVERSITY SUPPORT 

In State appropriation for maintenance in 1918-19 North 
Carolina ranked twenty-third among the forty-four States 
that maintain State universities or colleges of liberal arts. 
Which is to say, twenty-two States support their State uni- 
versities more liberally. Four of these are Southern States as 
follows : 

North Carolina $194,106 

Arizona 2:!9,747 

Kentucky 299,096 

Oklahoma ;i6.i,4.55 

Texas 8:i9,.'i65 

Our State appropriation for tlie calendar year 1918 was 
$165,000; for the calendar year 1919 it was $215,000. The 
college year running from July to .July was thus supported 
by two legislative appropriations, one smaller and the other 
larger than $194,166. 

But bulk totals are never a fair liasis on wliich to compare 
States. Reducing these State ajipropria.tions to per capita 
amounts per year, whites alone considered, the table stands as 
follows ; 

North Carolina 11 cents 

Oklahoma \',', 

Kentucky 14 

Texas 22 , 

Nebraska 5'A 

Arizona 80 

Eleven cents a year is what on an average the University 
of North Carolina costs a white inhabitant — less than that if 
he has less than $400 worth of property on the tax books. 
Less than three cents if he has less than $100 on the tax 
list! And only fifteen cents if he has $500 on the tax list! 
Eleven cents is less than a movie show ticket nowadays. 
A single pound of middling cotton pays a man's University 
tax in tliis State for iicnrly four years; a single ]iound of 



average tobacco, for nearly six years ; and a single bushel of 
corn for nearly twenty years! 

Great University Areas 

Thirteen States of the Union give more than a half-million 
dollars each to their universities. Seven of these, more than 
a million, and one of these, Illinois, more than two million 
a year! 

Except New York, all these States are in the Middle West 
and the Rocky Mountain regions. They believe in university 
culture and technical training, in high schools, elementary 
schools, in schools of every grade and sort. They show their 
faith by their works, and a pocket-book faith is the real article. 

But when it comes to total working incomes, which include 
fees, gifts, endowment proceeds and the like, the figures are 
amazing. They run beyond two million dollars for seven of 
these State universities ; over three millions for five of them ; 
and over four millions for the University of California. 

We've a long way yet to go in North Carolina in common 
school, high school, technical school, and University support. 



Rank 
1. 

O 

:!. 

4. 
5. 
6. 



9. 

10. 

11. 

12. 

13. 

14. 

15. 

16. 

17. 

18. 

19. 

20. 

21. 

22 

23. 

2t. 

25. 

26. 

27. 

28. 

29. 

."iO. 

31. 

32. 

33. 

34. 

35. 

36. 

37. 

38. 

39. 

40. 

41. 



State University Support 

University State Appropriation 

Illinois .$2,056,933 

California 1,845,488 

Minnesota 1,675,978 

Wisconsin 1,591,765 

Ohio 1,4.56,934 

Michigan 1,059,000 

Iowa 1,050,500 

Texas 8w39,365 

New York— Cornell 788,835 

Nebraska 685,691 

Kansas 664,500 

Washington 625,012 

Indiana 614,000 

Penn. State College 459,677 

Utah 381,673 

Oregon 363,760 

Oklahoma 363,4.55 

Colorado 362,900 

Kentucky 299,696 

Arizona 239,747 

Idaho 225,837 

Montana 220,000 

North Carolina 194,166 

Arkansas 189,109 

Tennessee 183,280 

South Dakota 157,500 

North Dakota 154,335 

Virginia 150,000 

Louisiana 135,000 

Nevada 133,097 

Maine 127,500 . 

N. J.— Rutgers 117,040 

South Carolina 109,979 

Wyoming 105,309 

Georgia 95,000 

New Mexico 85,487 

West Virginia 85,000 

Florida 63,850 

Alabama 62,500 

Del. State College 47,530 

K. I. State College 40,000 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



323 



PROFESSOR CAIN RETIRES 

After thirty-one years as Professor of Mathematics 
at the University and many more years as a teacher 
at other institutions and as a practicing engineer 
Professor William Cain has retired on an allowance 
from the Carnegie Foundation. The announcement, 
made by President Chase, at commencement, aroused 
wide interest, not only from the long roll of students 
who have worked with Professor Cain, but from nu- 
merous others who have known of his signal achieve- 
ments in the field of mathematics and engineering. 

"It is with sorrow and joy that I make this an- 
nouncement," said President Chase, "so.rrow because 
the University is losing the services of a great teacher 
who has labored long in her behalf ; and joy because 
he is now able to devote all his time and energy to 
the things in which he is most interested. The Uni- 
versity is not officially associated with the Carnegie 
Foundation, and the fact that Professor Cain is one 
of the small group picked for this honor is pleasant 
proof to all of us of the high esteem and respect with 
which the educational and scientific world regards 
Professor Cain. On behalf of the Trustees I am in- 
structed to express to Professor Cain the gratitude 
which this University has, and always will have, for 
him, and the deep appreciation of his splendid serv- 
ices." 

Professor Cain will be i>iicceeded as head of the 
Department of Mathematics by Professor Archibald 
Henderson. 

Professor Cain, or Major Cain, as he has been 
known in Chapel Hill, came to the University in 1889, 
and has been head of the Department of Mathematics 
from the day he arrived, thirty-one years ago, imtil 
the present. Into the daily task of instruction he has 
poured the vigor and enthusiasm of a great teacher 
and the ripened scholarship of a student who has 
kept in close touch with his profession all over the 
world and has dug out for himself much that he 
could not get in any other way. "During all his 
years of service he has consistently .stood for high pro- 
fessional ideals and standards." said President Chase. 

As a mathematician and as an engineer Professor 
Cain has won for himself a reputation that is rec- 
ognized by research workers and technical engineers 
as authoritative in his field, and his advice has been 
sought frequentl}' by engineers, not only from the 
United States, but from many European countries 
and from Aastralia. He has been called the greatest 
master of the science of engineering ever produced 
in the South, and he is a recognized authority every- 



where on such subjects as bridges, arches, dams, bins, 
reenforced conci-ete, retaining walls, and earth pres- 
sure. 

Among Professor Cain's books, many of them pub- 
lished in Van Nostrand's Science Series, are: A 
Practical Theory of Voussoir Arches; Maximum 
Stresses in Framed Bridges; Voussoir Arches Ap- 
plied to Stone Bridges, TuiuielSy Domes, and Groined 




PROFESSOR WILLIAM CAIN 

Arches; Theory of Solid and Braced Elastic Arches; 
Symbolic Algebra and Notes on Geometry; Steel-Con- 
crete Arches and Vaulted Sfrurtiires; Earth Pressure, 
Retaining Walls, and Bins, and others. In addition, 
Professor Cain has contributed jiapers, reports, and 
bulletins on these and allied subjects to many scien- 
tific meetings and periodicals. 

Professor Cain's theories have been put into prac- 
tice in the construction of the water-works system of 
New York City, in many operations by the Pennsyl- 
vania Railroad, and in the computations of the engi- 
neers for the arches of the Brooklyn Bridge and many 
other bridges. 



324 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 

Issued monthly extent in July. August, and September, by the Gen- 
eral A'umni Association of the University of North Carohna. 

Board of Publication 

The Review is edited by tlie following Board of Publicati(ui : 

Louis R. Wilson. '99 Editor 

Associate Editors: Walter Murphy. '92; Harry Howell. '95; Archibald 

Henderson. '98; W. S. Bernard, '00; J. K. Wilson, '(15; Louis 

Graves, '02; P. P. Graham, '09; Kenneth Tanner, '11; Lenoir 

Chambers, Jr., '14; R. W. Madry, '18. 

E. R. Rankin, '13 Managing Editor 

Subscription Price 

Single Copies *0-20 

Per Year 1-50 

Communications intended for the Editor and the Managing Editor 
should be sent to Chapel Hill, N. C. All communications intended fcr 
publication must be accompanied with signatures if they are to receive 
consideration. 

OFFICE OF PUBLICA.TION, CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 

Entered at the Postoffice at Chapel Hill, N. C, as second class 
matter. 



THE UNIVERSITY IN PRINT 



In the "Roads aucl Streets" issue (June, 1920) 
of Engineering and Co.'tracting appeal's an impor- 
tant contribution by T. P. Hickerson, Professor of 
Civi.' "^.ngineering, entitled, "A New Field Method for 
Locatins. '''ircular Curves by Deflections from the P. 
I." B\ the use of this new and original method of 
handlir,;' an engineering problem of great practical 
importanc!^, many advantages are secured, not the least 
being the reduction of time by one-half, according to 
the author's claim. Accompanying the paper are three 
elaborate tables, fully worked out. In form for con- 
venient use in the field, the article, with subjoined 
tables, will soon be placed at the disposal of all the 
State Highway Departments throughout the country. 



crties of the nitrotoluenes. The investigation, which 
has now been in jirogress for two years, bears directly 
on two important industries, explosives and dyes. 
In November and December last, four papers were 
published in the Journal of Industrial and Engineer- 
ing Chemistry reporting progress up to July, 1919. 
Other papers are now in preparation dealing with 
further work since that date. Two of the luiblica- 
tions, one by J. M. Bell and J. P. Sawer (B. S. 1919), 
and one by J. M. Bell and C. H. Herty, Jr., (B. S. 
1918), have recently been translated into French and 
published in Monitenr Scientifique (April, 1920) an 
important monthly journal in general science. 



• In The Psychological Review (vol. 27, No. 2, March, 
1920) appears an extended paper, "A Comparison of 
Complete versus Alternate Methods of Learning Two 
Habits," by Professor J. F. Dashiell, of the Depart- 
ment of Psychology. The experimental work, which 
forms the basis of the paper, was done in the Oberlin 
College laboratory. It was f(nind that, by employing 
two methods, defined as the Complete and Alternate, 
learning by the Complete method is more economical 
than learning by the Alternate method. The experi- 
ments, which were conducted over a long period of 
time, are fully illustrated by accurate charts and 
diagrams. 



Interesting evidences of the work of Frederick H. 
Koch in the stimulation of the dramatic interest in 
our midst as in the production of folk plays, are 
afforded by recent articles in the Theatre Arts Mag- 
mine (vol. iv, No. 2, April, 1920). This is an "edi- 
torial review" from an article by Professor Koch, 
entitled "Folk Playmaking, " in which it is pointed 
out that members of Professor Koch's class in dra- 
matic comi:)osition have already written folk plays 
based upon the rich material native to North Carolina. 
In The English Journal (May, 1920) is an article 
contributed by Professor Koch, "The Creative In- 
stinct and Playmaking", — being a paper read at the 
meeting of the North Carolina English Teachers' 
Association at Greensboro, N. C, May 2, 1919. After 
a broad survey of the dramatic literature of the world, 
in its relation to the problem of stimulating popular 
imagination, the author describes what has already 
been accomplished here, and points forward to the 
greater possibilities which the future holds. "As did 
the Greeks and our far-seeing Elizabethan forebears," 
fuiely says Professor Koch, "so should we, the people 
of this New Day, find a fresh interpretation of our 
awakened folk consciousness in new dramatic forms 
adequate to express the ideals of our new democrae.y, 
of our rebirth in liberty, of our larger conception of 
the kingdom of humanity." 



At the request of the National Research Council 
a studj- was undertaken by Dr. James M. Bell and 
his students of the freezing points and thermal prop- 



One of the two most significant addresses delivered 
at the meeting of the Good Roads Association in 
Asheville on June 17th last is now in print for dis- 
tribution : " A Progressive Program for Building and 
Maintaining a Great Primary System of State High- 
ways in North Carolina," by Mr. John Sprunt Hill 
(U. N. C, class of 1889), of Durham. In order to 
raise the needed sums for this great and progressive 
project, Mr. Hill proposes that this generation raise 
.$50,000,000, spread out over a period of twenty years 
at the rate of two and a half million dollars each 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



325 



j-ear, by means of direct ad valorem tax of five cents 
on the hundred dollars valuation, and the remainder 
raised b}' issuing "long-tei'm road bonds'" at a rate 
not to exceed two and a half million dollars per year. 
In this vigorous address the author says: "Let us 
truthfully and honestly and strongly and attractively 
place the whole facts and the whole argument before 
our people. We will then be sure to lift the vision 
of our lawmakers away from county lines, penny-wise 
economj' and mud turtle philosophy." 



In The Biblical World (vol. liv, No. 2, March, 1920) 
appears a striking article : ' ' The Second Coming and 
the Kingdom,'" by the Rev. F. H. Argo (U. N. C, 
class of 1898), of the Memorial Church of the Holy 
Nativity, Rockledge, Pennsylvania. In the author's 
view, the "coming" througliout the Gospel is a spir- 
itual coming. 



The issue of School and Society for May 29, 1920 
(vol. xi, No. 283) contains as its leading article the 
inaugural address of President Chase: "The State 
University and the New South. ' ' 



The fourth of the interesting and suggestive series 
of papers by Professor G. A. Harrer, of the Depart- 
ment of Latin recently appeared in The American 
Journal of Philology (vol. xli, No. 1, January-March, 
1920), with the title: "Tacitus and Tiberius." In the 
light of the authorities uijon which Tacitus drew, and 
on the basis of recent works, which Professor Harrer 
cites, he concludes that "Tacitus did not create the 
Tiberius whom he describes," "did not himself in- 
vent his various characteristics," and indeed, "some- 
times expresses a view more favorable to Tiberius 
than does his source." 



The latest issue of Studies in Philology, entitled 
"Elizabethan Studies: Fifth Series" (vol. xvii. No. 
2, April, 1920) contains seven papers, varying in 
value and interest, and dealing with Scott, Shakes- 
peare, Spencer, Milton, the Elizabethan theatre, the 
"metaphysical poets," and William Elderton, Eliz- 
abethan actor and ballad writer. It is a pleasure to 
see again the name of Professor Thornton S. Graves, 
of Trinitj' College, as a contributor of one of his 
stimulating and thoughtful papers on the Elizabethan 
theatre — after the temporary interruption of such ac- 
tivities, entailed by his patriotic service as captain in 
the A. E. F. 



ueetion with this department, which he has conducted 
since the first issue of the Alumxi Review. Uui'ing 
this period it has been a matter of pleasure and pride 
to call public attention to the contributions, whether 
great or small, of the members of the faculty here, 
and of the sons and daughters of the University scat- 
tered to the far ends of the earth. If the space was 
limited, the task by no means an easy one, certainly 
the effort was always made to give due credit and 
to do full justice to the useful, interesting, and valu- 
able contributions of all those who constitute the 
greater miiversity of todaj'. 

Archibald Henderson. 



Note: — With this issue, the undersigned, in re- 
sponse to the call of new duties, ceases his active con- 



With attendance sweeping up to the 1,200 mark, 
a limit fixed onlj' by the capacity of the University 
to accommodate students, the 33d session of the Uni- 
versity of North Carolina Summer School swung into 
its second week on June 28, facing a more varied ac- 
tivity than Chapel Hill has ever known in any one 
summer. 

In addition to the more than 700 North Cai'olina 
teachers who are studying courses in education and 
the 400 students taking i-egular college courses, a 
series of institutes has been announced lasting almost 
to the very opening of the University for the 126th 
session next fall. The public welfare institutes, con- 
ducted jointly by the University and the Southern Di- 
vision of the Red Cross for social workers of all kinds, 
will continue until September 13, the last two weeks 
iconsisting of field work away from Chapel Hill. 

A special child welfare institute will be con- 
ducted July 5-10 imder the auspices of the National 
Child Welfare Association, with Mrs. Ira D. Has- 
brouch, field secretary of the association, in immedi- 
ate charge. The commercial secretaries of North Car- 
lina, secretaries of chambers of commerce, boards of 
trade, and other industrial and civic bodies, will hold 
an institute, August 9-14, the first of its kind in 
this State. 

Overlapping that institute will come another, the 
commimity service institute, at which W. C. Crosby, 
secretary of the North Carolina community sei'vice 
bureau, will have his 40 field agents for a conference 
and discussion of their problems. At the same time 
the second meeting of the State and coimty council 
will be held, August 17-19, with representatives from 
many of the State and countj' departments which are 
closelj' connected, present for a rehashing on both 
sides of the difficulties of their work. 

The new public welfare institutes, the beginning of 
the school of public welfare in the Universitj', have 
attracted a large number of social workers. 



326 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



THE GENERAL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

of the 
UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 



Officers of the Association 

B. D. W. Connor, '99 President 

E. E. Rankin, '13 Secretary 

Executive Committee: Walter Murphy, '92; Dr. R. H. 
Lewis, '70; W. N. Everett, '86; H. E. Eondthaler, '93; C. W. 
Tillett, Jr., '09. 



WITH THE CLASSES 

1845 

— Dr. Alexander Boyd Hawkins, of Raleigh, who in 1845 re- 
ceived the degree of Bachelor of Arts at the hands of Gov- 
ernor William Alexander Graham, class of 1824, is not only 
the oldest living alumnus of this University, but he is without 
doubt one of the oldest living graduates of any institution in 
the country. At the same commencement, when Dr. Hawkins 
received his degree, a distinguished son of the University sat 
on the rostrum of Gerrard Hall. James Knox Polk, of the 
class of 1818, then President of the United States, had returned 
to visit his Alma Mater and to receive from her the degree of 
L.L.D. Many more years of health and strength to Dr. 
Hawkins ! 

1854 

— Col. John P. Cobb, one of the few surviving members of 
the class of 1854, lives at Tallahassee, Pla. 

1863 

— Judge Olin Wellborn, a native of Georgia and a captain in 
the armies of the Confederacy, a former Congressman, was for 
many years on the federal bench as U. S. District Judge for 
the southern district of California. He has now retired from 
the bench and lives at Beverly Hills, Calif. 

1864 

— General James I. Metts, of Wilmington, was re-elected 
commanding general of the North Carolina division. United 
Confederate Veterans, at the annual reunion held in Fayetfe- 
ville in June. 

1866 

— General Julian S. Carr, of Durham, attendeil commence- 
ment. Within a few days after commencement General Carr 
went to San Francisco, where he attended the Democratic Na- 
tional Convention as one of the delegates-at-large from North 
Carolina. 

1870 

— Dr. W. J. McKay is pastor of the First Presbyterian Church 
of Sumter, S. C. 

1879 

— Judge Francis D. Winston, of Windsor, Dr. J. M. Manning 

of Durham, Judge J. S. Manning and E. P. Maynard, of 

Raleigh, attended commencement. 

— F. K. Borden is president of the Wayne National Bank at 

Goldsboro. 



1880 

— 11. E. Faison is a lawyer of Clinton, a member of the firm 
of Faison and Robinson. 

1881 

— A. T. McCallum, of Red Springs, is engaged in farming 

in Robeson County. He is a member of the State Board of 

Agxiculture. 

— W. C. Alderman lives at Vernon, Texas. 

1882 

— Under tlie heading the "Gome-Back of Leroy Springs," 
the ClMiiotle Observer makes editorial announcement that Col. 
Leroy Springs, of Lancaster, S. C, becomes a director of the 
American Trust Co., Charlotte 's leading banking institution, 
of which Word H. Wood, '95, is president. Colonel Springs 
moved from Charlotte to Lancaster in 1888. He is one of the 
most successful cotton manufacturers in the South. His home 
mill at Lancaster has more spindles under one roof than any 
other cotton mill in the country, 140,000. 

— Rev. F. N. Skinner is rector of the Episcopal Church of 
Martin's Point, S. C. 

1885 

— Josephus Daniels, Law '85, Secretary of the Navy, attended 
commencement, bringing with him Roland Morris, Ambassador 
to Japan, who delivered the commencement address. Worth 
Daniels, son of Secretary Daniels, was in the graduating class 
of '20. 

— A. D. Ward practices his profession, law, in New Bern. 
He is a former member of the State Senate. 

1886 

— W. A. Self, lawyer of Hickory, is president of the Catawba 
County Alumni Association. 

— Clem G. Wright, of Greensboro, attended commencement. 
Mr. Wright is a nominee of the Democratic party for the 
Legislature from Guilford County. 

— Rev. Braxton Craig is pastor of the First Baptist Church 
of Farmville. 

— W. N. Everett, of Rockingham, attended the commencement 
exercises and the meeting of the board of trustees. He is the 
nominee of the Democratic party for representative of Rich- 
mond County in the next Legislature. 

1887 

— Haywood Parker, of Asheville, attended the eommencenient 

exercises and the meeting of the board of trustees. 

— D. M. Reece practices his profession, law, at Yadkinville. 

1888 

— Dr. Wni. .J. Battle, for the past several years professor of 
Greek in the University of Cincinnati, has resigned this posi- 
tion and has accepted the post of professor of classical lan- 
guages in the University of Texas, at Austin. Dr. Battle, 
who is a native of Chapel Hill, a son of the late Dr. K. P. 
Battle, '49, formerly was for many years in the faculty of 
the University of Texas. He served as dean of that institu- 
tion and as acting president. 

— J. E. Erwin is secretary and treasurer of the Alpine Cotton 
Mills, at Morganton. 

— J. W. Alexander is engaged in the real estate business at 
Spartanburg, S. C. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



327 



Asphalt Pavements 

OURABUK =:= KCOINOMICAU 

If you are interested in street or road construction 
we invite you to inspect our work in 
Durham (Asphalt Streets). 
Durham County (Asphalt and Concrete Roads). 
Raleigh and Wake County (Asphalt). 
Guilford County (Asphalt Roads). 
Greensboro. 
Rocky Mount. 
High Point. 
Henderson. 
Lumberton. 

Also roads built for United States Government: 
Army Supply Base, Norfolk, Va. 
Newport News — Hampton Highway, Newport 

News, Va. 
Oamp Lee, Va. 

A representative will visit you and supply any in- 
formation or estimates desired. 

Robert G. Lassiter & Co. 

E.NCilN BERING AND CONTRACTING 

327 Arcade Building Norfolk, Va. 

1002 Citizens Bank Building Raleigh, N. C. 

First National Bank Building Oxford, N. C. 



S- 



The First National Bank 
of Richmond, Va., 



Commercial 
Banking 



Trust 
Department 



with its resources of 
$36,000,000, is splen- 
didly equipped to 
serve in all branches of 
Commercial Banking. 



The Trust Depart- 
ment offers unexcelled 
service. 

JNO. M. MILLER, Jr., President 
W. M. ADDISON, Vice-President 
CHAS. R. BVRNETT., Vice-President 
ALEX. F. RYLAND, Cashier 
THOS. W. PURCELL, Trust Officer 



•a 



Murphy's Hotel 

Richmond, Virginia 

The Most Modern, Largest, and Best Located Hotel 
in Richmond, Being on Direct Car Line to all 
Railroad Depots. 

The Only Hotel in the City With a Garage attached. 

Headquarters for Carolina Business Men 
European Plan $1.50 Up 



JAMES T. DISNEY, Presidtnt 



328 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



Statement of the Condition of 

The Fidelity Bank 

OF DURHAM, N. C. 

^Made to the U^orth Carolina Corporation Commission 
al tlie Close of Business, Sept. 12. 1919 



RESOURCES 

Loans and Investments $3,759,035.11 

Furniture and Fixtures ^^'^^J-^^ 

Cash Items' ^'^l-UHl 

Cash in Vaults and with Banks 763,893.55 

Overdrafts 842.79 

$5,388,874.24 

LI.VBILITIES 

Capital Stock $ 100,000.00 

Surplus 500,000.00 

Undivided Profits 107,596.17 

Interest Reserve 6,000.00 

Dividends Unpaid 195.01 

Deposits 4,261,285.21 

Unearned Interest 8,657.49 

Contingent Fund 5,140.36 

Borrowed Bonds 100,000.00 

Dills Payable 300,000.00 

$5,388,874.24 

B. N. DUKE. PrBsidenl INO. F. WIIV. Vice-Ptesident S. W. MINOR. Cashier 
L. D. KIRKLAND. AssislanI Cashier INO. A. BUCHANAN, Assistanl Cashiei 



The strength of this bank hes not alone in its Capital, Surplus, and Re 

sources, but in the Character and Financial Responsibility 

of the men who conduct its affairs 



The Yarborough 



RALEIGH'S LEADING AND 
LARGEST HOTEL 

MAKE IT YOUR HOME WHEN 
IN RALEIGH 



B. H. Griffin Hotel Company 

Proprietors 



1889 

— W. E. Borden is vice-piesl lent of the Wayne National Bank 
at Golilsboni. 

1891 

— The marriage of Miss Byrde Dailey and Mr. William Gaston 
Cox took place June 5th in Burlington. Tliey live in Burlington, 
where Mr. Cox is buyer for the Liggett and Myers Tobacco 
Co. Mr. Cox is a native of Hertford. He is a former repre- 
sentative of Perquimans County in the House of the N. C. 
Legislature. 
— G. H. Cnrrie practices his profession, law, at Clarkton. 

1892 

— Walter Murphy, of Salisbury, attended the commencement 
exercises and the meeting of the board of trustees. He was 
toastmaster at the Alumni Luncheon on Alumni Day, June 
15th. 

— C. F. Harvey is at the head of the mercantile firm of L. 
Harvey & Son Company, Kiuston. Mr. Harvey is local di- 
rector for the Graham Memorial Fund. He has been a mem- 
ber of the board of trustees of the University for a immber 
of years. 

— S. L. Davis, furniture manufacturer of High Point, is one 
of tlie incorporators of the recently organized High Point 
Housing Corporation. 

1893 

— At the recent commencement of Salem College, President 
Howard E. Eondthaler announced that the campaign for a 
$-lUU,UUO endowment fund for the college had been quite suc- 
cessful, and that subscriptions received had exceeded the 
amount asked for. 

1894 

— Hallett S. Ward, Law '94, lawyer of Washington, in the pri- 
maries on June 5th received the nomination of the Democratic 
party for Congressman from the first district. 
— W. M. Hendren, of the law firm of ilauly, Hendren and 
Wonible, Winston-Salem, was one of the speakers before the 
N. C. Bar Association at the meeting of this association in 
Asheville in June. 

— T. Bailey Lee practices law at Burley, Idaho, a member of 
the firm of Lee and Thomas. 

— J. M. Oldham, prominent insurance man of Charlotte, was 
elected in May, grand high priest of the Grand Chapter of 
Royal Arch Masons of North Carolina. 

— Hale K. Darling, Law '94, former lieutenant-governor of 
Vermont, practices law at Chelsea, Vt. 

1895 

— George H. Carpenter, superintendent of schools in Texar- 
kana, Texas, has resigned to enter the real estate business. He 
has caught the oil fever. 

— Aubrey L. Brooks, prominent lawyer of Greensboro, con- 
tested in the primaries on June 5th with Senator Lee S. 
Overman, for the Democratic nomination for the U. S. Senate. 
— Murray Borden is assistant cashier of the Wayne National 
Bank, at Goldsboro. 

— Thos. D. Warren, New Bern lawyer and chairman of the 
Democratic State executive committee, attended the Democratic 
National Convention at San Francisco as one of the North 
Carolina delegates-at-large. 
— J. O. Carr, lawyer of Wilmington, attended the Democratic 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



3-29 



National Convention at San Francisco as a delegate-at-large 
from the State. 

— T. C. Leak, of Rockingham, was elected president of the 
N. C. Cotton Manufacturers' Association at the meeting of this 
body in Asheville on June 25 and 26. Alumni who were on 
the program for this meeting included: E. G. Eankin, '10, 
of Gastonia; E. S. Parker, Jr., Law '94, of Graham; W. C. 
Kuffiu, '8(5, of Mayodan; John L. Patterson, '95, of Rich- 
mond, Va. 

1896 

— Geoi-ge Stephens, of Charlotte, attended the commencement 
exercises, and the meeting of the board of trustees. 

1897 

— F. J. Haywood is treasurer of the Brown Mfg. Co., and 

Noreott Mfg. Co., at Concord. 

— Ben S. Guion .and Miss Claudie Cashwell were married June 

2d at the home of the bride 's parents in Statesville. They 

live at Gastonia, where Mr. Guion is engaged in the electrical 

contracting business. 

— L. J. P. Cutlar, furniture manufacturer of Marion, is mayor 

of the city. 

— W. H. McNairy has been engaged for a immber of years in 

school work in South Carolina. He is superintendent of the 

Chester schools. 

— A. W. Mangum has charge of a large camphor plantation 

at Waller, Clay County, Florida. 

1898 

— G. S. Ferguson, Jr., practices his profession, law, in Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

1899 
H. M. Wagstapf, Secretary, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
— Dr. Joel Whitaker, former star Carolina fullback, is a spe- 
cialist in diseases of the eye, ear, nose and throat, at Indian- 
apolis, Ind., with offices in the Hume-Mausur Bldg. 
— Capt. J. K. Ross is connected with the TJ. S. Public Health 
Service in the capacity of assistant executive officer with 
headquarters in Atlanta. 

— Jones Fuller is senior member of the law firm of Fuller, 
Reade and Fuller, at Durham. 

— T. C. Bowie, '99, former speaker of the House of the N. C. 
Legislature, and Wra. B. Austin, '18, are engaged in the prac- 
tice of law together, under the firm name of Bowie and Austin, 
at Jefferson. 

1900 
W. S. Bernard, Secretary, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
— The engagement of Mrs. Adeline Mitchell and Mr. William 
Stanley Bernard has been announced, the wedding to take 
place in July. Mr. Bernard is associate professor of Greek in 
the University and is well known to Carolina alumni. 
— Thos. W. Davis, Law '00, is assistant general counsel of the 
Atlantic Coast Line Railway, at Wilmington. 

1901 
Dr. J. G. MuRPuy, Secretary^ Wilmington, N. C. 
— At the meeting of the State Medical Society held in Char- 
lotte in April, two members of the class of '01, Dr. C. A. 
Shore, of Raleigh, and Dr. J. G. Murphy, of Wilmington, were 
signally honored through being placed on the State board of 



The Bank o/Chapel Hill 

Olde^ and ^ronge^ bank in Orange County. 



Capital $25,000.00 

Surplus and Profits 40,000.00 

We earnestly solicit your banking 
business, promising you every service 
and assistance consistent with safe 
banking. "It pleases us to please 
you." 



M. C. S. NOBLE President 

R. L. STROWD Vice-President 

M. E. HOGAN Cashier 




-€^ 



Snappy Clothes 

for the 
College Man 

Society and 
Stein Block Clothes 

for the young 

and those 
who stay young 



Vanstory Clothing Co. 

C. H. McKNIGHT, 'President and Manager 
GREENSBORO. N. C. 



330 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 




THE YOUNG MAN 

who prefers (and most young men do) styles that 

are a perfect blend of novelty and refinement has 

long since learned the special competency of this 
clothes shop. 

Pntchard, Bright & Co. 

Durham, North Carolina 



ELUS, STONE & COMPANY 

DURHAM, N. C. 

The best class of merchandise at very mod- 
erate prices. 

It is always a pleasure to see our Chapel 
Hill friends in the city, and have them visit 
our store. The Spring stocks of goods are 
now complete. It will be to your interest to 
look carefully through the line of New Suits, 
Coats and Wraps. 

New Dresses of Silks, soft Satins, and fine 
Silk Crepes, shown in the latest models. 

All kind of cotton piece goods, Wool and 
Silk Dress Fabrics, Hosiery and Kid Gloves ; 
Gossard Front-Lacing Corsets. 



modical exaiiiiiiers. Dr. (Shore is State bai'teriologist, ami Dr. 
.\Iurpby is a leading specialist of Wilmington. 
— The secretary of this class reports that plans are now being 
perfected looking towards an excellent and well-attended 
twenty-year reunion at commencement of 1921. 
— Homer L. Lyon, lawyer of Whiteville and solicitor of his 
judicial district, in the primaries on June 5th received the 
largest number of votes east for any candidate for the Demo- 
cratic Congressional nomination in the sixth district. As The 
Review goes to press, Mr. Lyon and Hon. H. L. Godwin, Law 
'96, the incumbent, are contesting in the .second prinuiry 
for the nomination. 

— H. D. Bateman is cashier of the Branch Banking ami Trust 
Co., at Wilson. 

—J. C. Webb, of Hillsboro, A. E. Woltz, of Gastonia, and 
Dr. J. G. Murphy, of Wilmington, attended commencement. 
— Dr. D. A. Dees practices his profession, medicine, at Bayboro. 
— H. W. Hand lives at 1612 Taylor St., Columbia, S. C. 
— Cameron MacRae is Southern sales manager of the Arabol 
Mfg. Co., of New York City. The product of this corpora- 
tion is used by cotton mills. Mr. MacRae 's headquarters are 
at Concord. 

— B. T. Cowper is general agent of the Maryland Life Insur- 
ance Co., at Raleigh. 

—Luke Stevens and Miss Vivian Bartlett were married June 
6th in Elizabeth City. They live in Staunton, Va., where Mr. 
Stevens is in the faculty of the Staunton Military Academy. 

1902 

I. P. Lewis, Secretary, University, Va. 

— Dr. C. D. Kellam, late a captain in the medical corps, prac- 
tices medicine in Norfolk, Va., with offices at 216 W. Free- 
mason St. 

—Dr. John A. Ferrell, Director for the United States of 
the International Health Board, delivered recently a series 
of lectures on Public Health Administration before the Johns 
Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health. Dr. Ferrell 
was awarded the degree of Doctor of Public Health by the 
Johns Hopkins University on June 24, 1918. 
— E. K. Gulley is engaged in business at Sylvester, Ga. 
— I. F. Lewis is professor of biology in the University of Vir- 
ginia, at Charlottesville, Va. 

— R. R. Williams, lawyer of Asheville, made the address of 
welcome to the N. C. Bar Association upon the occasion of 
the meeting of this association in Asheville in June. 

1903 

N. W. Walkek, Secretary, Chapel Hill, N. C. 

— Wm. A. Graham, formerly headmaster of the Warrenton 
high school and late a major in the infantry of the 30th 
Division, has accepted the position of superintendent of the 
Wilmington city schools and the New Hanover county schools, 
Mr. Graham has spent the past year in study at Columbia 
University. 

— Dr. E. B. Clement and Miss Nona Raleigh were married 

June .5th at Green Park. The bride is from Norwalk, Conn. 

The groom, a native of Salisbury, is a physician of Atlantic 

City. Dr. and Mrs. Clement are spending the summer at 

Kanuga Lake. 

— H. R. Weller is connected with Garrett and Co., at Norfolk, 

Va. 

— Thos. S. Fuller, Law '03, is engaged in the practice of law 

at 61 Broadway, New York City. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



331 



— E. S. Gorham is proprietor of tlie drug firm of May and 
Gorhain at Rocky ilouut. 

— A. D. Ivie, of Spray, is senior member of tlie law firm of 
Ivie, Trotter aud Jolinston. This firm lias offices at Spray, 
Beidsville and Yaueeyville. Mr. Ivie is former member of the 
State Senate. He is president of the Eoekiugliam County 
Alunuii Association. 

— R. C. Morrow is at the head of an industrial .school, con- 
ducted under the auspices of the Presbyterian Church, at Coyo- 
acan, D. F., Mexico. He writes that on May oth in the fifth 
inter-seholastic track meet ever held in Mexico, his boys won tlie 
trophy cup. 

— Hal. V. Worth, of the lumber firm of Oldham and Worth, 
is the newly-elected president of the Raleigh Rotary Club. 
— The Muntgomery Advertiser on May 30th announced that 
Zebulon Judd had resigned as director of the school of edu- 
cation and of the summer school of the .\labama Polytechnic 
Institute, and had accepted the position of county superintend- 
ent of education for Montgomery County. Upon his assump- 
tion of the duties of this office a banquet was tendered him 
by leading business men of Montgomery. Mr. Judd went to 
Alabama five years ago from the University, where he was 
professor of rural education. He has achieved national prom- 
inence through work done in his chosen field, rural education. 
— Rev. B. F. Huske is chaplain witli the U. S. Naval Hospital 
at Norfolk, Va. 

1904 
T. F. HicKERSON, Secretary, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
— A. L. Bulwinkle, Law '04, lawyer of Gastonia and a former 
major in the ll,'5th Field Artillery, is the nominee of the Dem- 
ocratic party for Congress from the ninth district. 

1905 

W. T. Shore, Secretary, Charlotte, N. C. 
— Frank R. Bailey and Miss Almaryne Smith were married 
on June 22d at the Home Moravian Church in Winston-Salem. 
Mr. Bailey is a tobacco manufacturer, a member of the firm 
of Bailey Bros. 

— A. M. Noble is connected with the department of native 
affairs at Pago Pago, American Samoa. 

— Rev. A. S. Peeler is pastor of Zion Reformed Church at 
Lenoir. 

1906 
John A. Pakker, Secretary, Charlotte, N. C. 
— W. V. Pryor is located at Sapulpa, Okla. 

— Dr. W. H. Kibler practices medicine in his home town, 
Morganton. 

— I. S. London is editor and proprietor of the Rockingham 
Post-Dispatch. 

1907 

C. L. Weill, Secretary, Greensboro, N. C. 
— Kay Dixon and Miss Elizabeth Williamson were married 
May 5th at the home of the bride 's parents in Asheville. They 
live in Jacksonville, Fla., where Mr. Dixon is vice-president of 
the United States Trust Co. Mr. Dixon is a native of Gastonia. 
— Dr. W. W. Green practices his profession, medicine, in Tar 
boro. He is in partnership with Dr. Julian M. Baker, '77, 
one of the best known members of the medical profession in 
the State. 

— J. B. James practices law in Greenville. He is a former 
mayor of the city. 



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TOBACCO CO. 



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CABELL YOUNG 

Assibtant Manager 



332 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



Five Points Auto Go. 

AUTOMOBILES 

Repairs, and Accessories 



Agents for 

Buick and Dodge Cars 



DURHAM, N. C. 




Drink 



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Durham Coca-Cola Bottling Co. 



— .J. A. Riulisill, formerly supcrinteiuU'iit of schools at Routlicrn 
Pines, has moved to his old home at Clierryville, where he is 
now secretary and treasurer of the Beam Lumber Co. 

1908 

M. KoiiiNS, Secretary, Greensboro, N. C. 
— Early in the war Dr. J. W. Davis, of Statesville, volunteered 
and received a commission as first lieutenant in the medical 
corps. He was assigned to the surgical department and served 
as surgeon in va'rious base hospitals in this country. He was 
promote<l to captain at Camp McClellan and shortly thereafter 
went overseas, where he served first with Base Hospital No. 
9. He was soon promoted to major and served for a time with 
Base Hosjjital No. 63. 

He went to Berlin with the American Military Mission 
shortly after the armistice. He returned later to Coblenz and 
served mth Evacuation Hospital No. 27, Trier, Germany, as 
chief of surgical service until the A. E. F. was replaced by 
the A. P. in G. 

Shortly after his discharge last September, the Carpenter- 
Davis Hospital was organized in Statesville. Dr. Davis is 
general surgeon in this hospital. 

— J. P. Goodman is claim agent for tlie Southern Railway 
Co., at Asheville. 

— O. O. Cole, who is engaged in the oil business, lives at C34 
Summerlea Street, Pittsburg, Pa. 

— Jas. A. Gray, of Winston-Salem, W. C. Couglieuour, of Salis- 
bury, and G. T. Whitley, of Smithfield, attended commencement. 
— Manlius Orr is assistant manager of the Latin- American di- 
vision of the export department of the Goodyear Tire and 
Rubber Co., Akron, Ohio. Mr. Orr saw service overseas in .the 
World War. 

1909 

O. C. Cox, Secretary, Greensboro,, N. C. 
— Dr. W. H. Wadsworth, Med. '09, practices medicine at Con- 
cord. 

— Dr. Fred Brunell Spencer, M. D. '09, and Miss Olive Aber- 
nethy were married June 9th in the First Methodist Church of 
Salisbury. Dr. Spencer practices medicine in Salisbury. 
— Dr. Alton Cook Campbell and Miss Bessie Giley were mar- 
ried June 3d in New York City. They live in Ealeigh, where 
Dr. Campbell practices medicine. In service Dr. Campbell 
served as a captain in the medical corps and his bride was a 
Red Cross nurse. 

— Dr. Duncan MacRae and Miss Rebecca Devereux were mar- 
ried on June 23d at the home of the bride's parents in Nor- 
folk, Va. Dr. MacRae is a research chemist with the Westing- 
house Company at East Pittsburgh. 

— E. R. Oettinger, prominent merchant of Wilson, presided 
as president over the annual meeting of the North Carolina 
Merchants' Association, held in Asheville on June 17th and 
18th. 

— J. M. Costner is engaged in agricultural pursuits in Missis- 
sippi. He is joint proprietor of the Morney Lespeileza plan- 
tation near Jackson. He was married recently. 
— W. P. Grier, principal of the Gastonia high school, demon- 
strated the fact that he can not only teach but preach Sun- 
day morning, May 16th when he filled the pulpit of Main 
Street Methodist Church, Gastonia, in the absence of Rev. A. L. 
Stanford, the pastor. Mr. Grier 's subject was ' ' The Chris- 
tian Flag. ' ' Mr. Grier is president of the class of 1909. 
— Henry Leslie Perry and Miss Flora MeKinnon were married 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



n:3;5 



in May at the home of the bride's parents. They live in 
Henderson, wliere Mr. Perry is an attorney. 
— Editor, The Eeview: 

Sir: Beware the Sinn Feiners! At one of the recent 
high school debates on immigration a speaker who had care- 
fully studied the Extension Department's handbook scored a 
home run by announcing with tragic earnestnestncss that 485';'< 
of all the Irish emigrants in the United States are insane! 

As Cousin Togo used to say, "Hoping you are the same,'' 
I am, 
Rocky Mount. K- !>• Battle. 

1910 
J. K. Nixon, Secrclary, Edeuton, N. C. 
— Members of the class of '10 present for the reunion en- 
joyed a bancjuet on the evening of Alumni Day. Twenty-five 
members were present, all of whom had something to say. 
Plans were made for raising a gift from the Class to the 
Alumni Loyalty Fund, resolutions were passed expressing af- 
fection and good vrill for Rev. Hoke Eamsaur, in Liberia, 
and memorial mention was made of the deceased members 
of the class, W. R. Edmonds, J. H. Johnston, and Lee Daven- 
port. John H. Boushall, of Raleigh, was elected permanent 
treasurer of the class. 

— Mimbers of 1910 's baseball team at commencement were: 
O. A. Hamilton, Dr. D. B. Sloan, R. G. Rankin, J. R. Nixon, 
Dr. J. M. 'Venable, Dr. L. deK.Beldeu, Dr. Robert Drane, D. 
M. 'Williams, and C. E. Teague. 

— The last news received from Rev. Hoke Bamsaur brings the 
information that he and Miss Sarah Conway were married in 
June at Cape Mount, Liberia, 'West Africa. 
— 'W. P. Henley is secretary and treasurer of the Pilot Milling 
Co., manufacturers of flour, corn meal and feedstuffs, at Pilot 
Mountain. 

— Dr. J. T. McKinney is a physician, located at 519 MacBain 
building, Roanoke, Va. 

— Richard Eames and Miss Betsy Bailey were married June 
17th in Houston, Texas. Mr. Eames, a native of Salisbury, 
is engaged in business at Chicago. His bride is a daughter of 
Col. Geo. M. Bailey, a North Carolinian who has been for 
many years editor of the Houston Post. 

— S. S. Nash, a native of Tarboro, is located at 15 E. 38th St., 
New York City. 

— Leslie 'Wilson, M. A., 1912, a native of Gastonia, holds a 
position in the faculty of the Raleigh high school. 
— E. S. Delaney is engaged in the practice of law at Char- 
lotte. He is also interested in the real estate and insurance 
business. 

— T. D. Rose is manager of Rose Bros. Bonded Warehouse, 
at Fayetteville. 

— 'W. B. Rodman, Jr., lawyer of Washington, is mayor of the 
city. 

— J. D. Easoii, Jr., has given up his legal business at White- 
hall, Montana, and has located in Washington, D. C, for the 
practice of law. He is associated with Mr. W. Gwynn Gard 
iner, former commissioner of the district. His business address 
is 1102-6 Woodward Bldg. Mr. Eason states that he is well 
pleased with prospects in the capital city. 

— Dr. John Manning 'Venable and Miss Florence Estelle Bird- 
sail were married on June 5th in New York City. They make 
their home in San Antonio, Texas, where Dr. 'Venable practices 
his profession, medicine. 

— Chas. G. Mullen is general manager of tlu^ Tampa Daili/ 
Times, at Tampa, Fla. 



moiDmin 



High-Grade Furniture 

of Every Description at Reasonable 

Prices 

On Easy Terms 



CHRISTIAN & HARWARD 

CORCORAN STREET 
OPPOSITE THE POSTOFFICE 

DURHAM, N. C. 



A Fifth ylvenue Shop at Your Door 



Final Clearance Sale 

On All Suits, Coats, Dresses, Skirts, Petti- 
coats, Underwear, Millinery and Hosiery. 

All Silk Dresses 1-4 to 1-3 Off 

Entire Stock of Coats Half Price. One Lot 
Cotton Dresses, $9.75, Values to $25.00 

Entire Stock of Skirts 1 -4 Off. One Lot of 
Beautiful Hats, $5.00, Values to $25.00 

STRAUSS-ROSENBERG'S 

FASHION SHOP FOR WOMEN 
DURHAM. N. C. 



334 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



Markham-Rogers Co. 

Clothiers, Tailors, Furnishers and Hatters. 

ALL THE NEW SPRING STYLES AT REASON- 
ABLE PRICES 



DURHAM, N. C. 



Special Agents for Nettleton and Hurley 

Shoes for Men, and Cousins and Grover 

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MAKE OUR STORE HEADQUARTERS 
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Academy of Music 

DURHAM, N. C. 

Durham's Exclusive Theatre Playing All Leading 
Attractions 

WM. F. FREELAND, Manager 



HICKS -CRABTREE CO. 

FOUR MODERN DRUG STORES 
RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 

Eastman Kodaks and Supplies 
Nunnally's Candies 

The place to meet yoor friends when 
in the Capital City 

GILBERT CRABTREE, Managpr 



— Dr. G. C. Battle, Med. 'lU, practices medicine in Aslieville. 
— O. A. Hamilton, recently elected superintendent of the Wilm- 
ington city schools and New Hanover county schools, has 
tendered his resignation and will continue as superintendent 
of the Goldsboro schools. 

1911 

I. C. MO.SEB, ScfrrUirii, Ashelioro, N. C. 




li. (i sUh k 1 (IN 



— R. G. Stockton, lawyer of Winston-Salem, is the new presi- 
dent of the Winston-Salem Board of Trade. 
— The class of 1911 has given permission that word be passed 
along that its tenth year reunion will be held next commence- 
ment. The reunion will be a wonderfully big affair, it is stated, 
one in keeping with the bigness of the class numerically upon 
its graduation and in keei^ing with the substantial achieve- 
ments of its members since commencement day of 1911. Right 
well remembered in Chapel Hill are the gala attire, sailor 
suits and red socks, and the Big Tent and the class spirit at- 
tendant upon the come-back of 1911 in 1916. 
— .Junius M. Smith and Miss Emmie Echols were married 
June 9th .it the home of the bride 's parents in Columbus, Ga. 
They make their home in Winston-Salem, where Mr. Smith is 
engaged in the automoliile business. 

— Dr. J. R. Allison is on the staff of the U. S. Naval Hospital, 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

— C. L. Williams is in law partnership with his brother, Warren 
Williams, '14, under the firm name of Williams & Williams, 
at Sanford. He is the nominee of tlie Democratic party for 
the State Senate in his district. 

— Carl E. Carpenter, lawyer of Gastonia and a member of 
the law firm of Carpenter and Carpenter, is the nominee of 
the Democratic party for the State Senate from his district. 
— h. F. Ross is one of the incorporators of the Ross Mfg. Co., 
a new lumber corporation of Asheboro. 

— Robert Moore Vanstory and Miss Marie Pemberton were 
mariied June 24th in the First Presbyterian (Jhureh of Black 
Mountain. They make their home in Fayetteville, where Mr. 
Vanstory is engaged in the cotton business. 
— W. C. Guess is located at Waxahachie, Texas, where he 
is professor of history in Trinity College. 

— E. F. McCulloch, Jr.. practices law in Elizabethtown, as a 
member of the fii'ui of Siiudair and McCulloch. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



335 



— Sam E. Leonanl is suprriiitcnilciit of inil)Iic welfare for 

Wilson County. 

— Dr. W. C. George has returned from Memphis, where last 

year he was a member of the fatuity of the medical college of 

the Uuiversity of Tennessee. He is now in the faculty of 

the medical department of the University. 

— Dr. P. W. Fetzer, who for the iiast two years has been on 

the staff of the Willard Parker hospital, New York City, is 

now engaged iu the practice of medicine at Mayodan. 

1912 

John C. Lockiiakt, Secretary, Raleigh, N. C. 
— William Walter Rankin, Jr., and Miss Ella Arnold Lambeth 
will be married in October. This engagement w'as announced 
recently by Mr. and Mrs. Prank S. Lambeth, of Thomasville. 
Mr. Rankin, who was formerly assistant professor of mathe- 
matics in the University, is now in the faculty of Columbia 
Uuiversity. 

— Graham K. Hobbs and Miss Hattic Borden Pemberton were 
married June 10th in the Church of the Covenant, Wilmington. 
Among the groomsmen were Seddou Goode, '17, of Clinton, and 
Dr. David Sloan, '10, of Wilmington. 

— J. T. Reece, of Yadkinville, is superintendent of the Yadkin 
county schools. 

— The marriage of Miss Theodosia Hayncs and Mr. Alexander 
Taylor took place June 19th at Longmeadow, Mass. They live 
in Morganton. 

— Dr. W. W. Falkener practices medicine in Richmond, Va. 
— Paul C. Garrison, Law '12, and Miss Willie Jennctte were 
married June 1st in Mount Olive. They live in Goldsboro, 
where Mr. Garrison is engaged in the insurance and real 
estate business. 

— Tom Slade is a member of the firm of T. B. Slade & Sou. 
merchants and planters of Hamilton. 

— Dr. A. J. Warren, city health officer of Charlotte, was 
recently elected president of the Southeastern Sanitary Asso- 
ciation. 

— J. W. Morris, Jr., is a member of the law firm of Raney 
& Morris, with offices in the Citizens Bank building, Tampa, 
Fla. 

— Dr. F. P. .James has received his discharge from the Navy, 
in which he held the commission of lieutenant, senior grade, 
medical department, and is now engaged in the practice of 
medicine at Laurinburg. 

— Wm. P. Bivens practices law at South Hill, Va. In service 
ilr. Bivens secured his commission as second lieutenant of fiehl 
artillery from the F. A. C. 0. T. S., Camp Taylor, Ky. 

1913 
A. L. M. Wiggins, Secretary, Hartsville, S. C. 
— Rev. Douglas LcTell Rights and Miss Cecil Burton were 
married June 15th in Trinity Methodist Church, Kontland, 
Ind. They live iu Wiustou-Salem, where Mr. Rights is a 
Moravian minister. Mr. Rights is president of the class of 
li)i:i. 

— Dr. E. M. Coulter, a.ssociate professor of history in thr 
University of Georgia, read a paper entitled "The Nullifica 
tion Movement in Georgia, 18'28-1833," before the Georgia 
Historical Association at the annual meeting of this body in 
the State capital, Atlanta, on May 22d. 

— M. W. Blair is an official of the Woodburu Oil Corporation, 
704 Ninth St., Wichita Falls, Texas. 

— Dr. A. S. Oliver is a physician and surgeon of Benson. 
— Sara Joyner, weight ten pounds, arrived on June 2.3d in 



Education for Business 

Success in life means the ajiiilication of the funda- 
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merely applied common sense. The young man or 
\oung woman who trains now can enter business witli 
practically a positive assurance of success. Don't 
> ou want to be a success in life? Then, why not begin 
your training NOW? 

Write for catalogue and full particulars to 

MRS. WALTER LEE LEDNUM, President 

DURHAM BUSINESS SCHOOL 

DURHAM, N. C. 



Snider- JFletc^er (Lo . 



WATCHES, DIAMONDS, AND 
JEWELRY 



110 W. MAIN ST. 



DURHAM, N. C. 



Sftiraimdl TlnKeaftir© 

DURHAM, N. C. 

HIGH CLASS PICTURES AND SPECIAL MUSIC 

YOU ARE ALWAYS WELCOME 

Open from 11:00 A. M. Until 11:00 P. M. 



Broadway Cafe 

WE CORDIALLY INVITE YOU TO VISIT OUR 
CAFE WHEN YOU ARE IN GREENSBORO 

EXCELLENT SERVICE 

COURTEOUS TREATMENT 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



;j:j6 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



THE CAROLINA MAN'S SHOE STORE 

Carr-Bryant 

High Grade Shoes with Snap and Style 



Can-Bryant ^oot & Shoe Co. 

106 West Main Street DURHAM, N. C. 



''EL-REES-SO" 

7c— 3 for 20c 

Mid, Flagrant, Delightful— Try One 

"JOHNT. REES" 

lOc 

A Cigar of quality, smooth, mellow, soothing. Gives 
a restful finish to a perfect day 

EL-REES-SO CIGAR CO. 

Manufacturers of the Famous EL-REES-SO Cigar 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



=LI 



Clothes Made bi( Makers who 
^now for Men who Pinow 

and 6oli bi( 

6need=Markham=^aiilor ^o. 

Qurkam, Viorth 'Carolina 



La ^Ji0 

W. H. LAWRENCE AND T. H. LAWRENCE 
ASSOCIATED 



Contractor and ^Jjuilder 

MAIN OFFICE: DURHAM, N. C. 



CONTRACTOR PHILLIPS HALL 
UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 



the home of Mr. and Mrs. E. W. Joyner, at Hertford. 

— Geo. K. Freeman, late a lieutenant colonel in the infantry 

of the 30th Division, is studying law at the University. 

— Charles Craig Phillip.s, .second son of Mr. and Mrs. G. B. 

Phillips, of Oxford, was born May 28th. 




FIF:Lns L. EULE.SS 

— Fields Euless is the leading division superintendent of the 
National Life and Accident Insurance Co. He has been located 
at Dallas, Texas, since leaving the University, in 1913. 
— H. R. Totten is instructor in botany in the University. In 
service Mr. Totten served as second lieutenant in the SKitli 
Field Artillery. 

— S. T. Stougli, of Cornelius, is one of the incorporators of 
the Farmers Company, a company organized to operate cotton 
gins and cotton seed oil mills. 

— Win. J. Cook is cashier of the First State Bank of Pensa- 
cola, Pensacola, Okla. 

— Peyton Smith is a civil engineer with the Southern Railway. 
He is masonry inspector and draftsman on additional main 
track construction from Huffman to Lansing. 
— T. J. Hoover is located at St. Michaels, Md. 
— Robert O. Huffman has been since 1913 secretary -treasurer 
and general manager of the Dresel Knitting Mills, at Drexel, 
near Morganton. 

— The Oxford Machine Shop and Garage Company is Mor- 
ganton 's latest automolillc enterprise. J. W. Carter is secre- 
tary and treasurer. 

— Dr. Martin A, Hatcher is located at 101 Main St., Norfolk, 
Va. 

— Horace Sisk has been for the jiast several years superin- 
tendent of the Lenoir schools. 

— Robert C. .lurney is now making a soil survey map of 
Guilford County for the U. S. Bureau of Soils. His address 
is 116 Price St., Greensboro. 

1914 

Oscar Leach, Secretary, Baeford, N. C. 
— Jas. T. Pritchett, lawyer of Lenoir, is mayor of the city. 
— B. F. Aycock practices his profession, law, in Fremont. 
— The marriage of Miss Isla Belle Marshall and Mr. Dallas 
Cecil Kirby, Law '14, took place June lOth at Friends 
Church, High Point. They live at Winston-Salem where Mr. 
Kirby practices law. 

— Dr. Forrest Elliott is engaged in the practice of medicine 
at Lincolnton. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



337 



io9.n 




General Office 
Schenectady; NYi 



•7v=^>?r?y Sales Offices in 
ii ii y aU large cities 



338 



THE, ALUMNI REVIEW 



Odell Hardware Co. 

Greensboro, N. C. 

China, Cut Glass and Silverware 
Household Goods 

DEPENDABLE GOODS 

PkOMPT SERVICE 

SATISFACTORY PRICES 



Guilford Hotel and Cafe 

NEWLY REMODELED 
RATES REASONABLE 
CENTRAL LOCATION 

Greensboro, North Carolina 



Cross and Linehan Co. 

Leaders in Clothing and Gents' 
Furnishings 

Raleigh, North Carolina 



(Looper itlonument 
(LompauY 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Communicate with us regarding your 

needs for monuments or 

tombstones 



— J. G. Feezor, aftef coniploting a successful year's work as 

superintendent of the Stem schools, is spending his vacation 

at his home in High Rock. 

— Dr. D. L. Knowles practices his profession, medicine, in 

Rocky Mount. He is married. 

— J. A. Holmes and R. W. Holmes, both of Graham, and L. R. 

Johnston, of Haw River, attended commencement. 

— H. C. Sisk, after having been engaged in the furniture bu.si- 

ncss at Wilson and Warsaw for the past year, is now located 

at Belmont, whc.re he is superintendent of schools. 

— The engagement of Miss Virginia Farmer and Mr. Edward 

Manning Hardin, both of Wilmington, has been announced. 

Tlie wedding will take place in the fall. 

— W. R. Thomjison is superintendent of the Chatham county 

schools. He is located at Pittsboro. 

1915 

D.\NiEL L. Bell, Srcrcfarii, Pittsboro, N. C. 

— John A. Wilkins is a member of the firm of the Hoke High- 
land Co., merchants of Racford. 

— Dr. Hugh Smith, Med. '1.5, practices medicine at Hartsville, 
S. C. 

— Frank L. Nash is located at Rosemary, where he is cashier 
of the Citizens ' Bank of Rosemary. 

— Dr. Mercer C. Parrott is engaged in the general practice 
of medicine at Kinston. 

— C. E. Blaekstock practices law in Asheville. During the 
war he served as tirst lieutenant in the 317th F. A. 
— J. Vance Rowc, of Trenton, is editor and proprietor of the 
Jones County Enterprise. 

— The engagement of Miss Mary Joseph O 'Brien and Mr. 
Thomas Yancey Milburn, both of Durham, has been announced. 
The wedding will take place in the early fall. 
— E. V. Kyser, Phar. '15, was recently elected to the faculty 
of the Queen City College of Pharmacy, Cincinnati, Ohio. For 
some time he has been chemist for a large soap manufacturing 
company in Cincinnati. 

— The marriage of Miss Ruth Estelle Bateman and Mr. Luby 
Alexander Harper took place June 2.?d at New Bern. 
— Sidney Blackmer has achieved much distinction as an actor 
in New York City. He lives at the Buckingham, .5th Ave. 
and 50th St. 

— Walter P. Fuller is a member of the Fuller Realty Agency, 
St. Petersburg, Fla. 

— R. G. Fitzgerald has become superintendent of the Harnett 
county schools, at Lillington. 

— G. L. Nisbet, secretary of the Monroe chamber of com- 
merce, writes: "November 18, 1920, will be the one hun- 
dredth anniversary of the death of General William Richardson 
Davie, whose l>ody is buried at the old burying ground at 
Waxhaw Presbyterian Church in Lancaster County, South 
Carolina. General Davie as founder of the North Carolina 
University, as commanding general in the war of the Ameri- 
can Revolution, as ambassador to France and as a citizen and 
leader of thought, exerted a tremendous influence upon the 
history of the Carolinas. Would it not be most appropriate 
to honor his memory with some kind of exercises at his tomb?" 

1916 

Hugh B. Hester, Sccretarti. Capt. and Adj., 12th F. A., 
Camp Travis, Texas. 

— O. K. Merritt is engaged in the manufacture of furniture at 
Mount Airy. He is connected with the Mt. Airy Furniture Co. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



339 



r^ 


YACKETY 


YACK 


1911 




I have 


a dozen copies of the 1911 Yackety Yac 


k which 


I will sell 


at $3 each, or two 


damaged copies at $2 


each. 




K. S. TANNER 


, Spindale 


,N.C. 





Yackety Yacks, 1916-'17 

The Year Carolina beat Virginia in all meets. Handsome leathf r- 
bound volume. The last available. Price $2. 

G. D. CRAWFORD. Chape! Hili. N. C. 



CAPITALIZE YOUR TIME AND TALENTS 

By qualifying for a responsible business or civil service posi 
lion while sitlaries are high. 

Banking. Bookkeeping. Gregg Shorthand. Touch Type 
writing. Business Arithmetic, Business English, Commercial 
Law, Rapid Calculations. Spelling. Palmer Penmanship. 
Business Efficiency and Office Practice, taught by Syf 
cio lists. 

Our school is a member of the National Association of 
Ac'crpdited Commercial Schools and is highly endorsed by 
everybody. Call or request a catalog. 

King's Business College 



Raleigh, N. C. 



Charlotte, N. C. 



RIDE WITH 

C. S. Pendergraft 

Pioneer Auto Man 

LEAVE ORDERS AT 

MABRY'S DRUG STORE 

HEADQUARTERS IN DURHAM 

THE BEST PLACE TO GET SOFT DRINKS. CIGARS 
AND CIGARETTES 

HEADQUARTERS IN CHAPEL HILL. NEXT TO 
BANK OF CHAPEL HILL 

Leave Chapel Hill 8.30 and 10.20 a. m. 

Leave Chapel Hill 2.30 and 4.00 p. :n. 

Leave Dtirham 9.50 a. m., 12.40 p. ni. 

Leave Dtirham 5.08 p. m., 8.00 p. m. 

OTHER TRIPS SUBJECT TO ORDER 



Four Machines at Your Service 
Day or Night 

PHONE 58 or 23 

Agent for 

Alamance Laundry, Burlington, N. C. 



J "^ 




r 



1920 JOINS RANKS OF TIIK .\LU1INI 



340 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



"SAY IT WITH FLOWERS" 
J. J. FALLON, Leading Florist 



Chapel Hill Ae<-nl5: 

FOISTER'S ART STORE 

R. P. ANDREWS. People's Bank 



Phone I Z90 

214 E. M.m Street 

DURHAM. N. C 



W. M. NEWrON COMPANY 

DURHAM, N. C. 

DE LUXE CLOTHIERS 

"TOO YOUNG FOR OLD IDEAS" 



PAEi; 



'nr'pi 



:atj 



iniJ 

DURHAM, N. C. 

ARTCRAFT-PARAMOUNT PICTURES 

Orchestra Orchestra 



BROADWAY THEATRE 

DURHAM, N. C. 

THE HOUSE OF SPECIAL PHOTO-PLAY 

ATTRACTIONS 



DURHAM CAFE 

VISIT US WHILE IN DURHAM 



FLOWERS FOR ALL OCCASIONS 

Durham Floral Nursery 

CHAPEL HILL AGENTS: EUBANKS DRUG CO. 



C. W. KENDALL 

LADIES' WEAR STORE 
VISIT US WHILE IN DURHAM 



WELCOME TO 

STONEWALL HOTEL 

W. E. HOCKETT, Manager 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



— Margaret Belts Lewis arrived on May 27th in the home of 
Mr. and Mj-s. McDaniel Lewis, of Greensboro. 
— On June 11th at the First Presbyterian Church of Fayette- 
ville, Miss Mary Starr Cook became the bride of Mr. Joseph 
Strange Huske. In service Mr. Huske held tlic rank of ma.ior 
in field artillery. He is associated with his father in the Huske 
Hardware House, at Fayetteville. 

— F. F. Bradshaw, E. B. House, and W. 0. Smith, all of 
Raleigh, F. O. Clarkson, of Charlotte, E. G. Hogan, of Chapel 
Hill, and Herman Cone, of Greensboro, were visitors to Chapel 
Hill for eommencement. 

— The reunion committee of this class has already begun to 
make jilans for the five-year reunion of 1916 wliich will be 
helil next commencement. 

— Chas. J. Moore is a member of the firm of the Carolina 
Distributing Co., wholesale grocers of Washington. 
— Rev. Boston M. Lackey, a native of Lincolnton, is rector of 
the Episcopal church at Gatesville. He was married in Jan- 
uary. 

— J. Frank Love and Miss Margaret Dover were married June 
5th at Shelby. They live at Lincolnton, where Mr. Love is 
secretary and treasurer of the Saxony Spinning Co. 
— W. J. Capehart is located in his home town, Boxobel, where 
he is cashier of the Bank of Roxobtd. 

— W. F. Brinkley is connected in a legal capacity with the 
Georgia-Alabama Power Co., Albany, Ga. 

— Arthur L. Fishel, Phar. '16, and Miss Lyda Pearl Riggsbee 
were married on June 16th, in the West Durham Baptist 
Church. They live in Winston-Salem at 524 W. Second St. 
Mr. Fishel is connected with Owen "s drug store. 
— R. B. House, of Raleigh, collector of war records for the 
North Carolina Historical Commission, is teaching history in 
the A. and E. Summer School. 

— B. F. AuUl is connected with the Federal board for voca- 
tional education at Denver, Col. He writes that he will attend 
1916 's fifth-year reunion next commencement. He lives at 1549 
Washington St., Denver. 

1917 

H. G. Baity, Secretary, Ronda, N. C. 
— Howard D. Sharpe and Miss Flora Garrett were married 
May 2(ith at the home of the bride 's parents in Burlington. 
Mr. Sharpe has been for some time representative of the Prov- 
ident Life Insurance Co., at Burlington. 

— W. T. Polk, of Warrenton, has entered the University Law 
School. 

— S. I. Parker is with the Cone Export and Commission Co., 
Greensboro. He lives at the Revolution hotel. 
— A postal card from T. C. Linn, Jr., written from Constan- 
tinople on May 19th, stated that he was leaving next day for 
Egypt and thence for a trip around the world. 
— Dr. C. B. Squires, Med. '17, is on the staff of the Episcopal 
Hospital, Front St. and Lehigh Ave., Philadelphia. 
— E. C. Klingman is engaged in the insurance field in Greens- 
boro. 

— Dr. W. A. Marlowe practices his profession, medicine, at 
Walstonburg. 

— Dr. Wm. Coppridge is on the staff of Watts Hospital, 
Durham. 

— C. R. Edney is in the faculty of Mars Hill College at Mars 
Hill. 

— F. C. Jordan is now located at 107 W. Fisher Ave., Greens- 
Ijoro. 
— Henry Grady Goode and Miss Mary Luella Creamer were 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



341 



A. E. LLOYD HARDWARE CO. 

DURHAM, N. C. 

All Kinds of Hardware, Sporting 

Goods and College Boys' 

Accessories 

GEO. W. TANDY, MANAGER 



tyAe Uvoual L^afe 

T/niversifi/ students, faculty memSers, and 
alumni visit the %Jvoyal Qafe while in 
^Durham. Cinder new and pro- 
gressive management. 
Special parlors 
for ladies 



S)ur/i 



ur/iani s 



■^Lodern Qafe 



Keep Physically Fit 

The young men of U. N. C. are wise enough 
to know that athletic exercise promotes sound 
health. Gel in some game early. 

We can supply you with every essential in 
equipment (or Football. Soccer, Basket Ball, 
Hockey, Skating, etc. 

Write for catalogue No. UC. 

ALEX TAYLOR & CO., Inc. 

Athletic Outfitters 
26 E. 42na St., New York 




Hennessee Cafe 

C. C. SHOFFNER, Manager 

A MODERN, UP-TO-DATE CAFE, WHERE YOU 

AND YOUR FRIENDS ARE WELCOME 

CLEANLINESS AND SERVICE 
OUR MOTTOES 

342 and 344 S. Elm St. 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



BAGLEY & ALDERMAN, Advertising 

LETTERWRITING, MULTIGRAPHING, PRINT- 
ING, ADVERTISING SIGNS, AND 
SPECIALTIES 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



CHARLES C. HOOK, ARCHITECT 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 

TWENTY YEARS EXPERIENCE IN PLANNING 
SCHOOL AND COLLEGE BUILDINGS 



A. ^. IKlutU (TcUnc. 

Extends a corilial invitation to all students and 
alumni of the U. N. C. to make their store head- 
quarters during their stay in Chapel Hill. 

Complete Stock of 
New and Second-hand Books, Stationery, and 
Complete Line of Shoes and Haberdashery 
Made by the Leaders of Fashion, Al- 
ways on Hand 



When in Need 

of a Pocket Knife, Razor, Hone, Strop, Brush, 
Safety Razor, Blades, or tools of any kind, 
Paints, Varnishes, Brushes, Electrical Goods, 
and General Hardware, call on the 

Chapel Hill Hardware Co. 

THE STORE WHERE "QUALITY" COUNTS 



THE RESULT OF 28 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE 

LANG'S "ROGER C." CIGAR; TWO 

BRANDS: 7c and 10c 

A COMPARISON IS ALL I ASK 

ROGER C. LANG 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



342 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



R. BLACKNALL & SON 

DRUGGISTS 

NORRIS AMD MUYLER'S CAMDIES 
O. BERNARD. MANiACrn 

CoRCORAM Street Durham. N C 



E. E. Bra^^ & Co. 

WALKOVER AND FLORSHEIM SHOES 
DURHAM, N. C. 



Model Laundry Co. 

DURHAM, N. C. 
EXPERT LAUNDRY SERVICE 



DURHAM ICE CREAM CO. 

Fancy Ices; Makers of Blue Ribbon Brand Ice Cream 
Receptions and Banquets a Specialty 

TELEPHONE No. 1199 



POLLARD BROTHERS 

DURHAM, N. C. 

STANDARD LINES OF HARDWARE 

AND SPORTING GOODS 



Duiifflniainni SSn®© C®o 

LEATHER GOODS CHEAPER 
DURHAM, N. C. 



PRIDGEN & JONES CO. 

We Carry the Best Shoes: Edwin Clapp, Howard and 

Foster, and Heywood's 

Expert Fitters — A Cordial Welcome Awaits You 

107 W. Main St. DURHAM, N. C. 



THE SELWYN 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 

Fireproof, Modern and Luxurious 

IN THE HEART OF EVERYTHING 

H. C. LARZALERE, Manager 



married April 28th in Washington, D. C. Tliey make their 
home at 1634 19th St., N.W., Washington. Mr. Goode holds 
a position as claim examiner in tlie treasury department. 

1918 

W. R. WUNSCH, Secretary, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
— Watt Martin, Jr., is engaged in the tobac-eo manufacturers' 
supply business at Winston-Salem. He is connected with 
Watt Martin, Inc. 

— Members of the class of 1918 present for commencement 
were: A. M.- Coates, H. E. Marsh, J. L. Stuckey, W. B. 
Kirkmaii, H. A. Cox, C. P. Crissman, J. S. Terry, H. V. 
Koontz, J. B. Linker, Leo Carr, V. S. Bryant, Jr., and J. M. 
Gwynu. 

— Jasper L. Stuckey and Miss Anabel Stephenson were married 
on June 23d at the home of the bride's parents in Fremont. 
Mr. Stuckey holds a position with the N. C. Geologic and Eco- 
nomic Survey. 

— Hyman Battle is connected with the Rocky Mount Mills at 
Rocky Mount. 

— J. P. Sawyer, Jr., is engaged in the automobile business at 
A.sheville. 

1919 

H. G. West, Secretary, Thomasville, N. C. 
— Roy Wingate Boling and Miss Lena Christian Browne were 
married on June Kith at Biscoe. They are at home in Apex. 
— H. G. West, who during the past year has been a graduate 
student in the University is now editor of tlic Thomasville 
Times. 

— Miss Madeline Palmer, Law '19, and Mr. Edmond W. Mo- 
C'rary were married on May 16th. They live in Lexington. 
— C. G. Hutchins is connected with the Stonestreet & Davis 
Co., clothiers and haberdashers. Fort Worth, Texas. 
— Gordon Hunter is connected with the American Exchange 
National Bank, Greensboro. 

— S. J. Calvert is connected with the Eepulilic Tobacco Co. and 
is located at San Jose, Central America. 

— W. C. Feimster, Jr., captain of the varsity baseball team for 
11120, plans to enter upon the practice of law at Newton in 
the fall. 

— Eddie S. Merritt anil Miss Dorothy Hunt were married on 
.'\pril 17tli in Wilmington. 

— J. S. Babb will return to the LTniversity next fall. He 
liolils a teaching fellowship in Geology. 

1920 

T. S. KiTTRELL, Secretary, Henderson, N. C. 
— John Waslilnirn, president of 1920 during its senior year, 
luis gone to New- York where he has taken up his duties with 
tlie National City Bank. He will shortly go to London and 
tlience to China :is tlic representative of this l)anking institu- 
tion. 

— R. H. Souther has a position as chemist with the Proximity 
.Mills, Greensboro. 

— G. D. Crawford has gone to New York City, where he is 
connected with the National City Bank. 
— Frank O. Ray practices his profession, law, in Selma. 
— C. P. Bolick has gone to East Pittsburgh, Pa., where he is 
connected with the Westinghouse E. and M. Co. 
— Emerson White sailed on June 23d for London, where he has 
become connected with the International Banking Corporation, 
at 36 Bishop 's Gate. 

— J. F. Spainhour, Jr., of Morganton, has accepted a fellow- 
sliip in Englisli in the University for next year. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



343 



ZEB P. COUNCIL. Mana8«T CHAPEL HILL. N. C. 

PRINTING, ENGRAVED CARDS 

QUALITY AND SERVICE 



PATTERSON BROS. 

DRLGGISTS 

AGENCY NORRIS CAINDY THE REXALL STORE 



K 



GOOCH'S CAFE 

Anything to Eat 
CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 



(Sssle i^rothers 

CALIFORNIA AND FLORIDA FRUITS 

TOBACCO AND CIGARS 

ICE CREAM PARLOR FRESH CANDIES 

"WE STRIVE TO PLEASE" 



CHAPEL HILL 
N. C. 



ANDREWS GASH STORE GO. 

students and Faculty will find us ready to serve 
them with the latest styles in Walkover Shoes, 
Fancy Shirts, Tailored Suits, and general furn- 
ishings. Be convinced. Call and see. 



FOR NEAT JOB PRINTING AND TYPEWRITER 
PAPER CALL AT THE OFFICE OF 

The Chapel Hill News 



W. B. SORRELL 

JEWELER AND OPTOMETRIST 
CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 



ODAK SUPPLIE C 

Finishing for the Amateur. Foister w 



Eubanks Drug Co. 

Chapel Hill, N.t;. 

Agents for Nunnally's Candy 



THE PEOPLES NATIONAL BANK 

WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 

Capital $150,000.00 United States Depositary 

J. W. FRIES, Pres. Wm. A. BLAIR, Vice-Pres. 

N. MITCHELL, Cashier 



PICKARD'S HOTEL 

Headquarters for Carolina Alumni 

Returning to the Hill 

SPECIAL RATES. STUDENT BOARDERS. 



"Electric Sl)oe Sl)op 

EXPERT SHOE REPAIRING 
CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 



Huffine Hotel 

Quick Lunch Counter and Dining Room — C'.ean 

Rooms $1.00 and Up 

NEAR DEPOT: GREENSBORO, N. C. 



WHITING- HORTON CO. 

THIRTY'-ONE YEARS 
RALEIGH'S LEADING CLOTHIERS 



H. S. STORR & CO. 

Office Furniture, Machines and Supplies; Printers and 
Manufacturers of Rubber Stamps 
RALEIGH, N. C. 



Dnlfoim Suapply Coo 

MACHINERY, iMILL SUPPLIES 
PHONE 753 RALEIGH, N. C 



344 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 




A Pioneer in the Stoker Field 



Westiiighonse was one of the first among the pioneers in 
the stoker fiekl. 

Although power stations have grown to enormous size, 
with sudden peak loads in some instances reaching as high as 
300 and 4U0 per cent normal rating, the remarkable fact re- 
mains that the design of the Westinghouse Eoney Stoker remains today practically the same as it was thirty-three 
years ago and that it still retains its firm position in the combustion field. This speaks for tlie accuracy of tlie original 
design. The Roney Stoker is particularly suitable for stea ly power demands with moderate overloads of 25 to 50 per 
cent, and it burns a wide range of fuels satisfactorily. Simple design, low first cost and ease of installation, strongly 
recommend it for plants of moderate size. Over three millini horsepower have been installed. 

Industrial expansion, however, has wrought many changes in power plant practice since 1887. Today mechanical 
stokers are called upon to burn everything from high-grade coals down to refuse. They are also called upon to meet 
the sudden and enormous steaming capacities. Hence, two additional stokers were added, and our line now includes 
the Chain Grate Stoker, particularly adapted to the burning of low-grade, high-ash fuels; and the Underfed Stoker, 
which is unequalled in its ability to handle the sudden and enormous overload demands of central station service with 
the highest degree of efficiency. 

It is a fact of vital importance to the stoker buyer that we 
manufacture the three general types, because stoker applica- 
tion should be approached with an open mind and the stoker 
manufacturer should be guided in his recommendations purely 
liy the facts that develop from a study of fuel apd load re- 
(|uirements. 

Westinghouse Electric & Manufacturing Co. 
East Pittsburgh, Pa. 





Westinghouse 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



345 





HEI{CULES 
POWDERS 



The 
Nitroglycerin Wheeler 



No baby tucked in its cushioned carriage ever had more 
watciifiil care and skillful attention than the nitroglycerin 
wheeler gives the concentrated power carried in his rubber- 
tired wagon. 

Back and forth he pushes it between the nitroglycerin store 
house and the mixing house. He follows a sniooth planked 
walk made exclusively for his use. At one eiiti of his trij; 
the buggy is filled. At the other he pours the nitroglycerin 
into a mixing machine by means of the long rubber tube 
attached to the buggy. With this act he gives life and 
power to Hercules Dynamite. 

Soon, before the breath of this modern Hercules, great 
motintains fade away; rivers change their courses; waste and 
arid lands are changed to fertile fields; metals and minerals, 
all important in our modern life, are blown from the earth. 

The man with the nitroglycerin buggy plays an iinportant 
part in supplying the enormous force necessary to produce 
the coal and other minerals and metals which are the pillars 
of our iTiatcrial civilization. Look around you as you read 
this. Wherever you may be you will find, if you trace it 
back, that dynamite made possible luost of the necessities 
and conveniences on which your eye will fall. And a very 
large part of the dynamite used in this country bears the 
name Hercules. 

HEI^ULES POWDEI{^ CO. 



Chicago &l. Louis 

PittsbuTE. Kan. Denver 

San Francisco Salt Lake City 

Cliattanoosa Pittsburgb, Pa, 



New York 
Hazleton. Pa. 

/oplin 

VVilininuIon, Del. 






THE ALUMNI REVIEW 




The Seeman Printery 

Durham, N. C. 
Printing - Engraving - Bookbinding 




The University of North Carolina 

Maximum Service to the People of the State 



A. THE COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS. 

B. THE SCHOOL OF APPLIED SCIENCE. 

(1) Chemical Engineering. 

(2) Electrical Engineering. 

(3) Civil and Road Engineering. 

(4) Soil Investigation. 

C. THE GRADUATE SCHOOL. 

D. THE SCHOOL OF LAW. 



E. THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE. 

F. THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY. 

G. THE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION. 
H. THE SUMMER SCHOOL. 

I. THE BUREAU OF EXTENSION. 

J. THE SCHOOL OF COMMERCE. 

K. THE SCHOOL OF PUBLIC WELFARE. 



WRITE TO THE UNIVERSITY WHEN YOU NEED HELP 

For Further Information Regarding the University, Address 

THOMAS J. WILSON, Jr., Registrar. 



(Lulturc 



Scl)olarsl)ip 



jervice 



Self-Support 



THE 



^ortl) (LaroUna (LoUegefor^omen 

offers to Women a Liberal Education, Equipment for Womanly 
Service, Professional Training for Remunerative Employment 



The College offers four groups of studies lead- 
ing to the following degrees: Bachelor of Arts, 
Bachelor of Science, and Bachelor of Music. 

Special courses in Pedagogy; in Manual Arts; in 
Domestic Science Household Art and Economics; in 
Music; and in the Commercial Branches. 

Teachers and graduates of other colleges provided 
for in both regular and special courses. 



Equipment modern, including furnished dormitories, 
library, laboratories, literary society halls, gymnas- 
ium, music rooms, teachers ' training school, infirm- 
ary, model laundry, central heating plant, and open 
air recreation grounds. 

Dormitories furnished by the State. Board at 
actual cost. Tuition free to those who pledge them- 
selves to become teachers. 



Fall 'Uerm Opens in September 



Summer '^erm Begins in June 



For catalogue and other information, address 

JULIUS I. FOUST, President, GREENSBORO, N. C 



THE ROYALL & BORDEN CO. 

Corner West Main and Market Streets DURHAM. NORTH CAROLINA 

Sell all kinds of furniture and furnishings for churches, 
colleges and homes. Biggest stock of Rugs in the 
State, and at cheapest prices. ^If you don't know us 
ask the College Proctor or the editor of the "Review." 
Call on or write for whatever you may need in our line. 



THE ROYALL & BORDEN CO. 



Do You Need Help in Your 
Financial Plans? 

Under existing conditions, the making of his financial plans and arrange- 
ments is one of the most difficult tasks confronting the business man. He can- 
not be too well advised, and if he has established banking relations with a 
strong, service-giving institution like the Wachovia Bank and Trust Company, 
and has put himself into a position where he can draw upon its accumulated 
business knowledge and experience, he is especially fortunate. 

We shall be glad of the opportunitj- to serve you in any way in our power. 

Capital and Surplus $2,000,000.00 
Member Federal Reserve System 

WACHOVIA BANK AND TRUST CO. 

WINSTON-SALEM ASHEVILLE SALISBURY HIGH POINT 

NORTH CAROLINA 



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