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OPINION AND COMMENT 

Student Year With a Challenge— The Victor 

S. Bryant Bequest — A Carolina Will Club 

Teacher Salaries Standardized — What's 

Your Opinion? — University Day 

Messrs. Connor and Coates 

Graham Memorial Fund 

Dean Bradshaw 

AUSPICIOUS OPENING 

The University Begins Its 126th Year With 

Registration Surpassing That of Any 

Previous Year 

FOOTBALL PROSPECTS 

Fifty-five Candidates Are At Hard Practice 
Under Coaches Fuller and Hite 

LIBRARY RECEIVES BATTLE 

COLLECTION 



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PUBLISHED BY 

THE ALVMNI ASSOCIATION* 






*5 



The University Agency 



Representing' the greatest of the Southern life insurance companies, offers its services 
to students and alumni in protecting home and business interests. 

Tt asks the co-operation of every Carolina man who is interested in guaranteeing 
the fulfillment of obligations and in the upbuilding of the State and the South. The 
continued phenomenal growth of the JEFFERSON STANDARD will reflect itself in 
development of all interests in which you are concerned. 

A policy in the JEFFERSON STANDARD does double duty. Come to see us or let 
your home town agent of the Company serve you. 

Cyrus Thompson, Jr.,Mgr. 

UNIVERSITY AGENCY 
JEFFERSON STANDARD LIFE INSURANCE CO. 

CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 



THE AMERICAN TRUST CO. 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 
MEMBER FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM 



Acts as Executor, Administrator and 
Trustee for any purpose. 

Write for descriptive booklet, "What 
You Should Know About Wills and 
the Conservation of Estates." 



TRUST DEPARTMENT 

AMERICAN TRUST COMPANY 

Resources More Than $12,000,000 



Volume IX 



/ rp 






THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



OCTOBER, 1920 



Number 1 



OPINION AND COMMENT 



The student body, the sine qua nun of the Uni- 
versity, is back with half a thousand new men acad- 
emic and professional. As per 
A Student Year usual the student body is facing 
With A Challenge the year with confidence. The 
momentum of its tradition 
through a century and its typical self-mastery last 
year under new, difficult and congested conditions, 
bespeak its resolved conquest of all obstacles whether 
of making two beds grow where only one has grown 
before, or licking Virginia in football, winning the 
State championship in baseball and track, putting 
the infant Tar Baby on the trains and at the news- 
stands in terms of the largest circulation of any stu- 
dent publication in the southern states, having the 
Tar Heel quoted by the press from one end of the 
State to the other, making Gerrard Hall platform, 
by student initiative, the jumping off place and key- 
note sounding board in the four-cornered guberna- 
torial campaign; winning debates with Washington 
and Lee and Johns Hopkins, and sustaining an all- 
round record-breaking year in spirit and campus mor- 
als. The year was an illustration of a restored Caro- 
lina spirit that had reached over the rent and shad- 
ow of war and reestablished its old rootage and car- 
ried forward her great tradition. 

While a spirit of unrest and dissatisfaction swept 
over the colleges north, south and west the student 
body of the University kept its head and went on 
its way rejoicing to meet the difficult problems of 
congestion and readjustment. The news of numerous 
student strikes as aftermaths of the war and as by- 
products of bolshevism, came to a disinfectious stu- 
dent body intent not upon kicking against but upon 
assimilating its troubles and mastering its problems. 
When the issue of the right of the athletic manage- 
ment to impose a charge for the Virginia game on 
the home grounds was agitated, the student body, in- 
stead of going on a strike against taxation without 
representation, met in lively assembly and volun- 
tarily voted the additional tax upon themselves. 
When a Carolina baseball player interfered (clum- 
sily or otherwise) with the throw of the A. and E. 
Q catcher, the student body under the leadership of a 
■•half dozen students met in mass meeting and ex- 
Opressed unreserved regret to their sister college and 
« offered to cancel an overwhelming victory for a sub- 
• stitute game. This voluntary student action sent a 



responding thrill of sportsmanship over the A. and 
E. student body and they individually and variously 
carried the news to the State this summer, "They 
do things white at Carolina." 

The student body took over chapel and conducted 
it on practically a voluntary basis. For two quar- 
ters the substance of faculty talks and the liveliness 
of the student affairs transacted through the brief 
chapel clearing house held a full attendance and elic- 
ited vital interest. The registrar conducted the at- 
tendance records on the voluntary basis. Though the 
interest and attendance dropped in the spring, the 
students are committed to the student-conducted 
chapel as a successful experiment for improvement 
and development. To call the roll of the construc- 
tive enterprises and achievements of the Campus 
Cabinet, the Student Honor Council, and the class 
of 1920, is to mark the year 1919-20 with the high 
lights of an outstanding year for its post-war read- 
justment and its restoration and advancement of stu- 
dent government. The campus community set apart 
in their Orange County woods has been adjudged the 
most completely self-governing and self-functioning 
student democracy in the American college world. 

DDD 

In complete accord with the love and interest 
which the late Victor S. Bryant, '90, always mani- 
fested toward the University was 
The Victor S. the provision in his will for the 
Bryant Bequest establishment by the University of 
a loan fund for the use of worthy 
students who otherwise would be denied the oppor- 
unity of a college education. 

The purposes of the will and the method of its 
carrying out are made plain in the following words: 

Item 9 : Should there remain any funds or prop- 
erty after paying the amounts herein bequested and 
devised and setting aside the bequests herein made, 
then I give and bequeath to the University of North 
Carolina the sum of five thousand ($5,000.00) dol- 
lars (increased to $7,500 in a codicil which provides 
a like amount for the establishment of a similar fund 
for the North Carolina College for Women. — Editor) 
to be loaned with or without security at the rate of 
six per cent interest to worthy and needy young men 
seeking an education at said institution of learning. 
Should any of my sons or my grandchildren or 
my descendants, or any of the sons of my brothers or 
sisters or their descendants enter the University I 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



desire the interest on this fund to be used in paying 
their expenses while there without any obligation on 
their part to repay the same. 

In making this bequest Mr. Bryant not only rend- 
ered the University an additional service to the many 
by which his connection with it has always been 
characterized, but directed anew the attention of the 
alumni and the State to the tremendous importance 
of investing money in the training of young men 
and women. 

Through this bequest Mr. Bryant strengthened the 
arm of the University for its task and made per- 
manent his distinguished service to North Carolina. 

DDD 

Within the years gone by the University has been 
the beneficiary of a number of wills written by alumni 
who, realizing the service rendered them 
A Carolina in their student days, have sought to re- 
Will Club pay in some part their Alma Mater by 
materially aiding in carrying on the 
work of preparing others for lives of usefulness and 
service. Similarly, friends of the University have 
wisely added to Carolina's usefulness through be- 
quests. But while this is true, the fact remains that 
alumni and citizens of the State iu general have not 
learned the real significance of supporting the Uni- 
versity in this way. 

In October of 1916, this matter was brought defin- 
itely to the attention of Caroliua men by a special art- 
icle and editorial in The Review with the result 
that a large percentage of the class of 1916 wrote 
Carolina into their wills. Recently Charles Cason, 
formerly alumni secretary of Vanderbilt University, 
taking the suggestion from The Review, proposed to 
a group of Vanderbilt alumni at their annual dinner, 
the foundation of a Vanderbilt Will Club. A quo- 
tation from his proposal which should receive Hie 
consideration of every Carolina alumnus, follows: 

I propose a new club to which every alumnus and 
every citizen is eligible. Its name is to be the Van- 
derbilt Will (Tub. The first requisite for member- 
ship is to name Vanderbilt as a beneficiary in your 

will. The second is to get someoi Ise to do the 

same. 

A reputable magazine published the statement four 
years ago, that Harvard University was the benefi- 
ciary then of 600 wills already probated, and gave 
$10,000,000 as the minimum estimate of what these 
bequests would bring to Harvard on the death of the 
testators. There is a tradition around Boston that 
if a man there dies without making a bequest to 
Harvard he will be doomed to eternal punishment. 

Similar records of bequests exist at Yale, Prince- 
ton, Columbia and most of the other eastern univer- 
sities. A list of Yale endowments published in 1917 
showed 560 special -_;i fts totaling $17,500,000. Since 
that time there have been many large gifts Pi Yale. 
These endowments were not all bequests, but many of 
them were. A source of income for Yale of increas- 



ing magnitude and significance is the Alumni Fund, 
to which alumni make annual contributions. 

In the South we are acquiring the habit of wise 
giving, but not of willing. In that the East has set 
us many fine examples. Millions of dollars were 
willed last year to eastern universities, more perhaps 
to any one of the large ones than was willed in the 
entire South to all the southern universities com- 
bined. We cannot grow faster than our schools. 
And we are ready for phenomenal growth. We are 
no longer poor. Increasingly must we look to our 
own section and not to others for our education and 
for the support of our educational institutions. We 
should be ashamed not to. If the East seems to 
have more devoted men of great means than we have, 
we should show that we have a greater number of de- 
voted men of small means. 

Institutions built by many will do more good than 
those built by few. If one-half of Vanderbilt 's alum- 
ni should will to the University an average of $1,000 
each the total would exceed ' the recent $4,000,000 
gift to the Medical School. Think what such a de- 
mocracy of devotion would mean. Think what a liv- 
ing monument it would be and how it would elevate 
the life of this state and this section ! 

No matter how much or how little a person lias he 
can, without depriving dependents unduly, become a 
member of the Vanderbilt Will Club. More impor- 
tant than the wealth to will is the will to will. 

Vanderbilt lawyers write a great many wills ; they 
should insert a Vanderbilt paragraph into every one 
of them. Half of the testators would welcome the 
suggestion ; the other half would never see it. 

I do not think of membership in this club so much 
as a duty. I think of it as the greatest opportunity 
for the prolongation of life and for increasing service 
through coming generations that any man will ever 
have. 

We are soon forgotten ; our definite influences for 
good soon cease. There is no surer service after 
death than through institutions like Vanderbilt. 
There is no finer vestige of immortality. 

□ □□ 

Sometimes The Review concludes that it indulges 
in entirely too much preachment — too much hear- 
ing down on the heavy pedal. Conse- 
Too Much quently. it is with reluctance that at 
Preachment the beginning of the new year which 
has opened so auspiciously, it asks the 
alumni to forget football and reminiscence long 
enough to visualize some of the facts which the Uni- 
versity is facing in this year 1920-21. 

To begin with, it is folly for North Carolina to 
fail to provide adequate dormitories, recitation 
rooms, laboratories, and equipment for the proper ed- 
ucation of its sons and daughters. Nothing in the 
world is plainer than this. It is utter folly to turn 
away 1,000 students who have knocked in vain at the 
doors of the University since June 1st. But this is ex- . 
actly what we have done. The one thousand and first • ■ 
managed to get in recently after writing to twenty- > 
six different officers, houses, etc.. in the effort to get ** 
a room! And if he hadn't "'often that, no college in I 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



North Carolina could have taken him in and given 
him tlic courses he wanted, because the situation 
obtaining in Bethlehem 2,000 years ago obtains 

throughout the college towns of North Carolina to- 
day — there isn't room within the inn. As President 
Chase said in his address to tin' alumni in June, the 
capacity of every college in North Carolina should 
he doubled. Certainly the University's should he and 
immediately. 

DDD 

In the second place, the University must have more 
money for ils faculty. This matter has been talked 

about and dealt with in a 
Slangy, Yes. But partial way. hut it has never 
Read It been handled adequately. To 

the casual observer to whom 
numbers and buildings appeal, the first need 
of the University is an increased physical 
plant. But to the insider, to the man who loses sleep 
at night wondering how the driving power of the 
University is to be maintained, the real need of the 
University is unequivocal assurance that the fac- 
ulty is not to suffer attrition through resignations for 
larger rewards elsewhere, that it is not to become 
mediocre through failure to recruit itself from prom- 
ising material, and that it need not be distracted from 
the real work of instructing and inspiring the youth 
of the State by the uncertainties of its financial 
status. 

Here, gentlemen, is the big fact. With a salary 
scale for full professors of $3,600, after fifteen years 
of service, in contrast with salary scales elsewhere 
ranging from $12,000 (withoul any questions asked) 
for instructors up to $6,000 and $8,000 for professors, 
the present line-up cannot lie maintained indefinitely 
on hopes and promises. Under these conditions the 
twenty members of the faculty of the seventy-three 
of rank above instructors who have been sought by 
other institutions in the past eighteen months, can- 
not be held. Similarly, such losses in the headships 
of departments as those of Dean Stacy and Dr. 
Raper cannot he properly filled and likely young 
men. the sort essential to the upbuilding of expanding 
depart incuts, cannot he secured and worked into 
service. The demand for skilled, productive instruc- 
tors, iluc to the rush of students to the colleges of the 
country (Michigan enrolls 12,000 this winter.' ami to 
the failure of college men to enter the profession of 
teaching in recent years, forces Carolina into full 
competition with the big Universities and compels 

her to pay the price which they can afford. And it 
is unescapahle that she must pay it if she is to 
hold her own. Ami. finally, "you cannot make bricks 
without straw." 

We wouldn't he flippant for the world, hut "Boys, 
gel the money." "Step on it '." 



The third fact is ic the less vital. It is that 

the alumni are not alive to this situation. 

Tin: Review is not indulging in any 
Think It scare heads. Nor is it squealing. It's 
Over doing its best to watch the situation here 

on this hill in relation to the situations 
obtaining in North Carolina and the nation, and to 
tell the alumni about what its conclusions are. To 
its mind, the next six months are months of vital 
concern to this institution. What the alumni do 
for her, and what the State does for her, will, in a 
greater measure than in any corresponding period in 
her history determine what her service to North Car- 
olina shall be. 

Think it over. 

DDD 

The study of statistics of classes graduating at 
other institutions is always interesting in that it en- 
ables Carolina men to see how they 
What Is stack up with alumni hailing from 

Your Average? another campus. One of the most 
complete studies of this sort has re- 
cently been made by Andy Whhiery, secretary of the 
class of 1910 of Cornell University. Three hundred 
and fifty-two members of the class filled out the 
questionnaire. 

The findings which The Review' present here are 
those relating to salaries and incomes. The average 
salary for married men was $4,855; for single men 
$4.(1:27. The average income, including salary was, 
for married men, $5,7512; for single men $5,151. The 
highest salary was $30,000; the lowest $840. Twenty- 
one members received a salary of $10,000 to $15,000; 
four of $15,000 to $20,000; and seven from $120,000 
up. 

The most interesting classification, however, is that 
which indicates the average income by professions. 
When you have compared your income with that of 
your group, then take a look at the rewards of the 
teachers and you will better understand why for the 
past five years young men have slopped entering the 
teaching profession, ami why it is necessary today 
for Carolina to dig up some real money if she is to 
SUCCeed in turning some of the line fellows who are 

going into banking and manufacturing ami the pro- 
fessions into the class room. A few hundred dollars 
extra may hold the 40-year-ohl who has his house, 
his friends, his particular interests. I'.ul there's 
nothing doing when you start to lure the would-be 
recruit unless you have I he lure ! 

10— Bankers and Brokers $1 | . lM " 

16 Manufacturers 8,52 ' 

is Physicians' 7 > 944 

7— Architects 7,230 

::l Merchants 7 » 136 

•JO— Lawyers 5,905 

U— Salesmen 5 > 600 



THt ALUMNI REVIEW 



3 — Purchasing Agents o,600 

4 — Advertising 5,476 

5 — Newspaper •• 5,180 

5 — Accounts and Statistics 5,004 

(3 — Insurance 4,533 

14 — Farmers 4,461 

15 — Builders and Contractors 4,287 

7 — Veterinarians 3,921 

83— Engineers 3,724 

33— Teachers 3,137 

352— Members of Class $5,385 

□ □□ 

Two actions of the extra session of the legislature, 
August 10-26, of unusual significance to The Keview 
and which may be expected to 
Teacher Salaries affect profoundly the educational 
Standardized and governmental programs of 

North Carolina, were the under- 
writing of State Superintendent E. C. Brooks' salary 
scale for superintendents, principals, and teachers 
employed in the public schools of the State, and the 
elimination of any general property tax for State 
purposes. 

According to the new program of teacher pay, pro- 
fessional training and experience in teaching have for 
the first time been officially recognized and rewarded 
by the State. Beginning this year the monthly sal- 
aries for second grade, provisional A and B. and 
temporary certificates range from $45 to $60. Teach- 
ers holding elementary school certificates who have 
had no college training will receive from $65 to $85 
per month, the amount depending upon whether they 
are teaching for the first time or have had one, two, 
three or four years of experience. For teachers hold- 
ing the same certificate, but who have had the equiv- 
alent of one year of college training, the rewards 
rim from $75 to $95. Holders of higher certificates, 
primary, grammar, or high school who have had two 
years of college credit receive from $85 to $105 ac- 
cording to the length of service under five years. 
Graduates of normal schools or those having three 
years of college credit receive from $90 to $110, and 
graduates of A colleges receive from $100 to $133.33. 
The new schedule also underwrites so far as the State 
is concerned, the following annual maximum scale 
for principals and superintendents: Class A, $3,500; 
class B, $2,400; class C, $2,000; class D, $1,800; class 
E, $1,320. It is our understanding that these 
amounts can he, and in many instances are. increased 
by local tax districts or city school systems, the extra 
amounts being authorized by the local unit concerned 
rather than by the State. 

Through the adoption of this program the founda- 
tion has been laid for a definite forward movement 
in the professional equipment of North Carolina 
teachers. It has been long delayed, but its coming 
is none the less welcome and significant. 



The Review doubtless is not competent to pass 
judgment on the legislature for failure to levy a 
general property tax for State pur- 
What's Your poses. It has not gone into all the 
Opinion? intricacies of special franchise taxes, 

corporation and railroad taxes, inher- 
itance taxes, and income taxes out of which the State 
hopes to secure sufficient revenues for all State pur- 
poses. But in view of the fact that from the first day 
John White's colony set foot on Roanoke Island t<> 
this North Carolina has stood at the foot of the scale 
(or as near as she could get to the bottom without 
ruthlessly shoving South Carolina from the coveted 
position) in money spent for general State govern- 
mental purposes, it isn't particularly cheered by 
the prospect. In 1915 the amount spent per capita 
for these purposes was $1.76 in North Carolina while 
the average in the United States was $3.85. In 1919 
the amounts were $2.54 in North Carolina and $6.05 
in the United States. South Carolina plumbed the 
depths with $1.64 in 1915 and $2.40 in 1919. 

The Review's fear, and seemingly a well-grounded 
fear, is that the proposed revenues will not suffice for 
the adequate, thorough-going support of State insti- 
tutions, health programs, and other State-wide under- 
takings which must be more liberally financed in the 
future than they have been in the past if North Car- 
olina is to write the chapter of progress in her history 
that she is abundantly able to write if only those to 
whose hands her destinies have been committed will 
allow her to do so. 

DDD 

The next great day on the University calendar is 
Tuesday, October twelfth — University Day. It marks 
the 127th birthday of the University and 
University will be celebrated in hearty fashion by ev- 
Day cry alumnus everywhere. On the campus 

an attractive program as announced else- 
where will be carried out. In centers of population 
outside the State and in every town in North Caro- 
lina The Review trusts there will be a banquet or 
a smoker. Where regular officers are not provided, 
any interested alumnus may call together a committee 
of two or three men to undertake arrangements, make 
up the program, and see that the alumni come out. 

The Review has no fixed opinion as to what the 
program should be. It believes, however, that some 
alumnus, or several, should tell what the University 
is doing, what problems it is facing, and that plans 
should be considered for helping forward that work 
locally and in the State and the nation at large. If 
citizens are present at the meetings who are not 
alumni, it may be well to have them participate in 
the program. Their interest is worth cultivating as 
the University is their University also. 

If any alumnus desires facts concerning any par- 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



ticular subject such as the Graham Memorial Fund, 
the Alumni Loyalty Fund, the Carolina Playmakers, 
the Extension Service, the musical organizations, the 
new hotel, or the University in general, a post card 
to E. R. Rankin. Alumni Secretary, or any special 
officer will furnish the information. 

There is one suggestion, however, which The 
Review passes on from the meeting of the secretaries 
of local associations held here last February. Don't 
spend too much of the meeting in reminiscences, and 
when it comes to naming officers for the following 
year, select those who will carry out a constructive 
program throughout the year. 

nan 

The Review takes occasion to call the attention 
of the alumni to the programs of two alumni officers 
who for the year 1920-21 will be 
Messrs. Connor absent from the State in order to 
and Coates carry on studies at other institu- 

tions — Messrs. R. D. W. Connor. 
'99. President of the General Alumni Association and 
Secretary of the Board of Trustees, and Albert M. 
''oates. '18. Executive Secretary of the Graham Me- 
morial Fund. 

President Connor has been granted a leave of ab- 
sence by the North Carolina Historical Commission 
and has entered Columbia University to continue his 
study of history. Mr. Coates goes to Harvard to 
enter the Law School. 

The Review follows both of these loyal, effective | 
alumni workers with its very best wishes, and at the J 
same time it calls on other alumni to help fill the 
big gap in alumni activities which the temporary 
absence of these two men makes. 

ODD 

A letter from an alumnus who lets no day pass 
without thinking of ways for promoting the welfare 

of the University has the- following sug- \ 
A Fine gestion concerning the Alumni Loyalty 

Suggestion Fund. 

A life insurance agent asked me the other day 
whether or not the Alumni Loyalty Fund is incor- 
porated. The reason for this question is that a Uni- 
versity alumnus wishes to lake out a $5, 011(1 policy 
payable to the Alumni Fund. If the Fund is incor- 
porated the policy could be made payable directly to 
it : otherwise a trustee woidd have to be appointed. 

It occurs to me that the Loyalty Fund ought to be 
incorporated, and I believe there is a good idea in 
this suggestion. If the Fund should be incorpor- 
ated perhaps other alumni might he induced to take 
out life insurance policies for it. - 

The suggestion is now under consideration and an 
announcement relative to it will be made at an early 
date. In the meantime, send in a check to cover 
your contribution for the present year! 



As indicated in another paragraph Mr. Albert M. 
Coates has entered the Law School of Harvard Uni- 
versity and consequently has had to 
Graham Memo- give up his work as Executive Sec- 
rial Fund retary of the Graham Memorial 
Fund. According to the plans of 
the Committee Dr. Louis R. Wilson, Chairman of 
the faculty committee on the Fund, will continue Mr. 
( oates work, the next phase of which is concluding 
the campaign for subscriptions and proceeding with 
the selection of a site and plans for the building. In 
order that the campaign may be properly concluded 
every local director is urged to complete his work 
preferably by University Day, and every alumnus 
reached by The Review but not in touch with other 
alumni is asked to send in a subscription card. 

□ □□ 

Dr. Charles Lee Raper. for nineteen years pro- 
fessor of economics in the University and for eleven 
years clean of the Graduate School, 
Dr. Raper Goes tendered his resignation in June 
to Syracuse and has become professor of trans- 

portation in Syracuse University. 
Syracuse, Xew York. 

Dr. Raper 's departure from the University fac- 
ulty means the loss of a man who during a long 
period of teaching in North Carolina has made a 
record for high scholarship, for effective personal 
work with his students, and for personal and public 
service to his community, to the University, and to the 
State. 

A close student of history and economics. Dr. Raper 
in recent years has made special studies in trans- 
portation and taxation which, together with his pub- 
lications in these important fields, has caused him to 
be ranked as an authority in these subjects. He has 
been closely identified with tax reform movements in 
North Carolina and his services have frequently been 
sought by the general assembly is working out a 
program of taxation for the State. 

Outside of his classroom in which for nineteen 
years he came in contact with the majority of the 
upper classmen of the University, Dr. Raper has ex- 
erted an unusually fine influence upon the campus. 
For years he lectured to the students of the Bible 
Class at the Methodist Church, and as a member 
of the University Debate Committee was constantly 
at the service of the members of the societies engaged 
in inter-society and inter-collegiate debate. He was 
one of the first members of the committee on Uni- 
versity Extension, and in 1909 came to the headship 
of the Graduate School, from which he resigned in 
January, 1920. 

In all these positions and through his home, Dr. 
Raper served with high distinction and the best 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



wishes of The Review follow him in his new work. 
No announcement has been made by the University 
as to Dr. Raper's successor. 

DDD 

Mr. Francis F. Bradshaw, '16, the new dean of 
students, brings to his position qualities and experi- 
ences that eminently fit him for his im- 
Dean portant work. The son of a Presbyterian 

Bradshaw minister he has a life background in the 
task of guiding and adjusting human re- 
lationships. As waiter and headwaiter at Swain Hall 
he learned student life intimately from the inside. 
As president of the Student Council, General Secre- 
tary of the Young Men's Christian Association, and 
as first lieutenant in the Field Artillery. Mr. Brad- 
shaw has had just the experiences in campus and 
youthful leadership that prepare him and choose him 
for the student deanship. Dean Bradshaw has vital 
student contacts through his membership in the Phi 
Beta Kappa, Golden Fleece, Tau Kappa Alpha, Am- 
photerothen, Omega Delta, Epsilon Phi Delta, Inter- 
national Polity Club, and the Gimghouls, which rep- 
resent and head up the scholastic, forensic, literary, 
and general campus and social activities of the Uni- 
versity. Dean Graham, who, in addition to his 
work as teacher, administered in an unusually ef- 
fective manner the affairs of the office during the first 
year of its establishment, in recommending Mr. Brad- 
shaw as his successor, expressed the opinion and 
choice of faculty, students, and alumni. Dean Brad- 
shaw will give his fidl time to the deanship. The 
Review bespeaks for him a continuation of the high 
service which his career so richly promises. 

□ DD 

Throughout the eight years of its existence The 
Review has had little to say in its editorial or news 
columns about its ups and downs in 
Our the effort to make both ends meet finan- 

Advertisers eially. Some hard luck stories have 
been indulged in at several commence- 
ments which hark back to the launching of the enter- 
prise, bul the present business manager has kept the 
publication going after it once got definitely started. 

In this connection we take pleasure in bearing tes- 
timony to the assistance which our advertisers have 
rendered in enabling the management to keep The 
Review up to standard. Comment, news, alumni 
notes, advertising all have their part in a balanced 
program, and our advertisers have played their part 
handsomely. 

In return, it is but fair that the readers of The 
REvrEW — we mean you, Mr. Alumnus — should recog- 
nize this service. Consequently, when you have oc- 
casion to deal in such wares as our advertisers dis- 
play in these pages, deal with them, and tell them 
win- ! 



VICTOR S. BRYANT, TRUSTEE, DIES 

Alumni of the University and citizens of the State 
generally were shocked by press dispatches on the 
morning of September 2d carrying the announcement 
of the death of Victor S. Bryant, '90, of Durham, as 
a result of complications following an operation for 
appendicitis which he had undergone a week earlier. 

By University men, with many of whom he had 
been in close association, Mr. Bryant was regarded 
not only as a most successful member of the Durham 
bar, but as one of the most liberal leaders in North 
Carolina public life. At the time of his death he 
had just returned from attending the extra session 
of the legislature where he framed some of the most 
important measures of that body. In educational 
matters, Mr. Bryant always showed an active inter- 
est, and to him is to be attributed in large part the 
drafting of the legislation enacted by the general 
assembly of 1919 providing for the six months school 
term in North Carolina. Another evidence of his 
abiding interest in the educational enrichment of the 
State was the provision in his will of bequests to the 
University and the North Carolina College for 
Women of $7,500 each as loan funds, the income 
from which is to be loaned to worthy young men and 
women seeking a college education. In addition to 
his service in the recent legislature, Mr. Bryant was 
a member of the State Senate in 1911 and within 
recent months had been -a strong advocate of tax re- 
form and suffrage. 

Mr. Bryant's connection with the University has 
been of the intimate sort that has meant much to its 
usefulness and service to North Carolina. In 1901 
he became a member of the Board of Trustees, and 
since he has served as a member of the Executive Com- 
mittee. He has also served as a member of the Fi- 
nance Committee of the Board, and since the death 
of President Graham has served as the chairman of 
the two committees having charge of the Graham 
Memorial Fund and the selection of the president of 
the University. 

Mr. Bryant was a native of Mecklenburg County. 
having been born in Providence township on the 10th 
of December, 1867, a son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Bry- 
ant. He received the Ph. B. degree from the Univer- 
sity in 1890, and the following year was admitted to 
the practice of the law. He located in Roxboro, and 
in 1895 moved to Durham where he built up an un- 
usually large and lucrative practice. At the time of 
his death he was a member of the firm of Bryant, 
Brogden and Bryant, the other members of the firm 
being W. J. Brogden, '98. and Victor S. Bryant , 
Jr., '18. 



Dr. George Howe has been elected Associate Editor 
of The Classical Journal, the official publication of 
the Classical Association of the West and South. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



AUSPICIOUS OPENING 



The University Begins Its 126th Year With Registration Surpassing 
That of Any Previous Year 



Swinging forward into the second quarter of the 
second century of its existence the University on 
September 2:> flung wide its doors to receive the 
largest number of students who have ever gathered 
at Chapel Hill. 

Although classes were started and the formal ex- 
ercises of the 126th opening were held that morning, 
lines of incoming students were still besieging the 
registrar's office and the Y. M. C. A. was still busy 
finding rooms for late comers who could not crowd 
their way into the college dormitories where many 
rooms already are housing four students. 

The first two days of registration showed that 
1,122 students had already entered the University. 
Of these 390 are freshmen. The figures in both in- 
stances are higher than at the same time last year 
and the final total figures are expected to surpass the 
record-beating session of 1919-1920. 

Student organizations, beginning to function even 
before the University was formally opened, joined 
hands with the authorities to relieve congested con- 
ditions. The Campus Cabinet in its first meeting 
projected plans whereby class rooms will be kept open 
at night and especially fitted so that students may 
have quieter places for study than in the crowded 
dormitories. Members of the faculty and citizens of 
I Impel Hill who have never rented rooms are this 
year turning over space for students. "The con- 
gestion is worse than ever before," said President 
Chase, "but we hope that no student will be unable 
to find room." 

The opening exercises were held in Memorial Hall 
with addresses of welcome by President Chase and 
Francis Bradshaw, the new dean of students. "The 
age is face to face with the terribly .simple and yet 
absolutely fundamental question," President Chase 
told the students, "whether the destructive forces 
created by modern civilization shall gain the upper 
hand over its constructive achievements. Bolshevism 
and industrial unrest and moral confusion and red 
radicalism and city slums are just as truly creations 
of modern civilization as are the achievements of 
science, or good roads or public schools." President 
Chase continued : 

You are, then, going out into an age which will be 
concerned with problems which involve the very 
foundation of our social structure. You and young- 
men like you must evolve the answers. Your elders 
have, I think, been too much given over to the philos- 
ophy that holds that the problems of the world will 



settle themselves in the end, if only they are let alone 
strictly enough and long enough. It has been a com- 
fortable philosophy, hut it is not a philosophy that 
your age will tolerate. The march of exents will be 
too swift, the situation too critical, for drifting and 
temporizing. 

Your philosophy will necessarily be one of action, 
not one of passivity; and it will either, according as 
your action is well or badly conceived, raise humanity 
to a new level of achievement or involve mankind in 
a wreckage and a chaos in comparison with which the 
havoc wrought by the world war will be as nothing. 

It is the faith of this University that with men of 
your years and attainments character develops best. 
in an atmosphere of freedom. But the freedom in 
which the University believes is not freedom to do 
what one likes; it is the freedom to do what is liijht, 
to do it not because one is compelled to do it, but 
because he chooses to do it. Such a faith does not 
do away with responsibility; it puts the responsibility 
where it belongs, squarely on the man himself. It 
expects him to want to conduct himself as a fine citi- 
zen in a free community ; if he lacks this desire it 
holds him unworthy of membership in the company 
of Carolina men. 

There exists on this campus a mighty force, far 
stronger than that of codes and rules. That force is 
the force of public opinion, the opinion that grows out 
of the honor and the morality of this student body. 
It is swift to approve all that is fine and clean and 
noble, but it is stern and relentless when honor is 
violated, intolerant of all that is mean and ugly and 
low. I charge you, men of Carolina, cherish this pre- 
cious thing that is yours; grow it, develop it into 
something still finer and higher. . . . 

I have so strong a faith in the soundness and justice 
of the public opinion of this campus that I have come 
to this conclusion: A man who lives as the opinion 
of this campus holds that a Caro'ina man ought to 
live is exhibiting and developing those moral quali- 
ties, precisely the sort of character that the world 
outside this campus stands most in n I of. 

At, night the new students were welcomed to Ihe 
campus by the old students in the annual celebra- 
tion of "College Night." President Chase and Prof. 
Prank Graham welcomed the new men into the col 
lege activities and campus Leaders outline 1 some of 
the chances around them. ' William II. Bobbitt, of 
Charlotte, intercollegiate debater and Phi Beta Kappa 
honor man, discussed studies; Bailey Liipfert, of 
Winston-Salem, basketball and football player, talked 
on athletics; and W. R. Berryhill, of Charlotte, presi- 
dent of the senior class, described the honor system. 
Daniel P. Grant, editor of The Tar Heel, presided, 
and "Scrubby" Hives, varsity cheer leader, led in 
songs and cheers. 



10 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



FOOTBALL PROSPECTS 



Fifty-five Candidates are at Hard Practice Under Coaches Fuller and Hite 



Under the leadership of a new coaching; staff fifty- 
five members of the football squad which will face the 
1920 schedule started practice on Emerson Field 
September 6th, four weeks before they were to meet 
Wake Forest in the opening game, October 2d and five 
weeks before they journey to New Haven to throw 
their strength against the Yale line. 

Head Coach Myron E. Fuller and Assistant Coach 
Clay Hite were on hand to meet the candidates and 
Graduate Manager Charles T. Woolleen and Man- 
ager Donnell Van Noppen had already completed the 
final preparations for the start of the season. 

Fuller and Hite, with no waste of time, threw 
their men into two sessions of practice daily, morning 
and afternoon. At the end of the first week the 
squad was scrimmaging, and when the University 
opened two weeks later the preliminary ground had 
been covered and incoming students saw a team run- 
ning with remarkable smoothness and precision for 
so early in the season. 

Head Coach Fuller has already been introduced 
to alumni through The Review. A graduate of Yale 
in 1913, where he played at guard and tackle, he has 
had seven years' experience at Stevens, Colby, Haver- 
ford, Swarthmore, Hog Island shipyards, and West 
Virginia. He handled the line at West Virginia last 
year and was one of the men responsible for the re- 
markable showing that team made. 

His assistant, Clay Hite, was one of the best men 
on the West Virginia team last year, a four-year 
athlete who has won a place on several honorary 
teams and received favorable mention from Walter 
Camp last year for the All-American. He played 
quarter and half at West Virginia and will work 
especial^ with the backfield. Fuller himself, beside 
exercising general supervision, will work with the line 
men. 

The West Virginia team last year was noted for 
its fierce, aggressive and versatile attack ; and early 
observers on Emerson Field could see clearly that 
Fuller and Hite were going to follow the same pol- 
icy at Carolina. Few Carolina teams have started 
practice with as much speed and aggressiveness as 
Captain Harrell's 1920 team. From the first day 
almost the cry has been for speed and more speed, 
and every early indication pointed to the creation of 
a widely divergent attacking strength. 

In the squad are ten varsity veterans from Camp- 
bell's 1919 team. They are Captain Beemer Harrell 
and Grady Pritchard, tackles; Cline Cochran, end; 
David Jacobi, center; Robbins Lowe and Fred Pharr, 



quarters; Bob Griffith, Ed Tenney, and Abernathy. 
half backs; and Arthur Spaugh, full back. The let- 
ter men of last year who did not return were Cap- 
tain "Nemo'' Coleman, from the back field; Blount, 
at center ; Grimes, Robbins, and Barden, at guard ; 
Gant and Dortch, at tackle ; and Proctor, at end. 

Beside Cochran, who held down one wing position 
last year. Fuller has Crayton and Woodall, who were 
used in several games, Liipfert and Lewis, second- 
string ends, and two likely-looking youngsters in 
Hutchins and Fred Morris, from 1923, both strong, 
aggressive players. Captain Harrell and Pritchard 
give two experienced tackles for the line, though a 
shortage of guards may cause Fuller to shift Pritch- 
ard in nearer center. Hanby, a 190-pound tackle 
from the 1923 team, is receiving a lot of attention at 
tackle, and Whiting, Wright, and Meyer, all with 
scrub experience, are on hand. 

The loss of Grimes, Robbins, and Barden in the 
guard positions leaves a big hole in the center of the 
line. Roy Morris, captain of the remarkable 1923 
baseball team, has been worked in one position, and 
Owens, a substitute from last year, and Corbett, 
Heath, and Harman are other prospects. Jacobi, 
with his varsity experience, looks to have the call at 
center, with Bell of the second team and Linney, 
one of the best of the 1923 linemen, as understudies. 

The greatest strength of the team appears to be in 
the back field, where Lowe, Pharr, Spaugh, Tenney. 
Abernathy, and Griffith have all faced the fire of var- 
sity games. Lowe and Pharr have been used at 
quarter, with McDonald from 1923 and Wearn from 
the scrubs as substitutes. Spaugh played full back 
in all the games last year and was a powerful factor, 
particularly on defense ; Tenney was a regular half ; 
and Griffith and Abernathy developed fast enough 
to be used effectively in the last games. Harden, 
Smith, and Fulton, all of whom were used in some 
games last year, are on hand, and two promising 1923 
men in McGee and Williams. 

The squad as a whole looks lighter than last year, 
but is unquestionably faster and has shown ability to 
pick up the new system taught by Fuller and Hite. 



FOOTBALL SCHEDULE 

The varsity football schedule for 1920 is as fol- 
lows : 

October 2 — Wake Forest, at Chapel Hill. 
October 9 — Yale, at New Haven. 
October 16 — South Carolina, at Chapel Hill. 
October 21 — A. ami E., at Raleigh. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



11 



October 30 — Maryland, at Chape] Hill. 
November ii — V. M. I., at Chapel Hill. 
November 13 — Davidson, at Winston-Salem. 
November 25 — Virginia, at Charlottesville. 

This schedule, with four games at Chapel Hill 
and two others in North Carolina (Raleigh and Win- 
ston-Salem) offers several innovations. The Thanks- 
giving game with Virginia holds its place as usual, 
but in accordance with the home-and-home agreement 
it will be played on Lambeth Field in Charlottesville. 
It will mark the first time a Carolina football team 
ever invaded Charlottesville. 

The A. and E. game will take place on Thursday 
of Fair Week in Raleigh. It is early in the season 
for an important contest, but the certainty of big 
gate receipts, necessary to carry on the widening 
athletic activities, has an obvious advantage. 

As an opener the annual game with Wake Foresl 
holds its place. Especial interest is attached to this 
game, not only as indicating the caliber of the Tar 
Heels, but because of a change in the athletic policy 
at Wake Forest, which has brought James White, a 
former University of Virginia star, to the position 
of head coach. His work will be watched with inter- 
est. Davidson holds her usual position as the last 
game before the Virginia meeting. 

Two newcomers appear on the schedule, South Car- 
olina and Maryland. There is every reason why the 
universities of the two Carolinas should meet in ath- 
letic contests, and it is hoped by Graduate Manager 
Woollen to make this an annual game. South Caro- 
lina, after several years of uncertainty in football 
policy, has apparently straightened out her affairs 
and is making a fresh start under the guidance of 
Sol Metzger, one of the best-known coaches in Amer- 
ica, a former Penn player and a leader at Washington 
and Jefferson, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, and 
elsewhere. Head Coach Fuller has come in contact 
with his teams before and Assistant Coach Hite has 
played under him ; and both of them are looking 
for a great battle when Metzger brings his men to 
Chapel Hill. 

Maryland has had strong teams for several years 
under the coaching of "Curly" Byrd, who, as a 
Georgetown player met Carolina teams back in 190!) 
and 1910. Several State institutions in Maryland 
have been united under the name of the University 
of Maryland within the past year, and the combine 
is counted on to strengthen the athletic teams. 

V. M. I. has been an admired and respected oppon- 
ent for many years. Last season she won decisively. 



UNIVERSITY DAY EXERCISES 

The presentation of a valuable portrait of General 
William Richardson Davie, leading spirit among the 
founders of the University, will be the principal event 
of the 1920 celebration at Chapel Hill on University 
Day. October 12th. 

The portrait belongs to Mr. J. Alwyn Ball, of 
Charleston. S. C. It originally belonged to his wife, 
Emilie G. Fraser, now deceased, a great granddaugh- 
ter of General Davie. Wishing it to be kept in a 
place where its permanency would be assured and 
knowing the close relationship between General Davie 
and the University, Mr. and Mrs. Ball have planned 
for years that this portrait should finally rest in 
Chapel Hill. 

"During my wife's life," said Mr. Ball in a letter 
to President Chase, "I always told her that I would 
present it to the University after her death. . . . 
I would be much pleased if you would accept it for 
the University, for then I would know it was in good 
hands and would be carried down in history . . . " 

The presentation address will be made, at Mr. 
Ball's suggestion, by the Rev. William Way, of 
Charleston, and President Chase has asked J. 0. 
Carr, '95, of Wilmington, to accept the portrait for 
the University. Mr. Carr has centered a good deal of 
study on General Davie and has written extensively 
of him and of others of his day. 

The portrait is an exceptionally rare specimen of 
the work of the French artist, Chretien, of whose work 
only one other example is in the United States. It is 
understood that General Davie had the portrait done 
when he was on a visit to Paris. 



R. E. Coker, '96, of the United States Bureau of 
Fisheries and a frequent contributor to scientific 
journals, is the author of an exceedingly interesting 
article in the June number of the National Geograph- 
ic Magazine entitled Peru's Wealth-Producing Birds. 



NEW CAROLINA PHYSICIANS 

Twenty-eight Carolina alumni received license to 
practice medicine in North Carolina in the examina- 
tions conducted by the State board of medical exam- 
iners last June. Dr. W. I. Wooten, of Wilson, re- 
ceived the highest average, and thus was accorded the 
honor of class leader. The list follows: 

Doctors A. C. Banner, Mount Airy; W. J. B. Orr, 
Currie; O. B. Bonner, Raleigh; T. B. Henry, Wades- 
boro; John Harvey, Jr., Snow Hill; J. II. Fitzgerald, 
Philadelphia, Pa.; R. O. Lyclay, Brevard; M. A. 
Hatcher, Hamlet; W. T. Shaver, Badin ; J. P. Rous- 
seau, Winston-Salem; F. P. Wooten, Kinston ; W. I. 
Wooten, Wilson; G. W. Johnson, Wallace; Ben Gold, 
Shelby; B. J. Barrus, Clinton; G. L. Carrington, Dur- 
ham; R. B. MeKnight, Charlotte; W. B. Dewar, Ral- 
eigh; W. B. Kinlaw, Rocky Mount; A. L. O'Briant, 
Timberlake; R. B. Rankin, Kannapolis ; R. E. Brooks, 
Camden, N. J.; W. T. Harper, Wilmington; Z. B. V. 
Jones, Swan Quarter; J. K. Holloway, Raleigh; B. 
R. Lyon, Greensboro; Graham Harden, Burlington; 
E, W. Larkin, Charleston, S. C. 



12 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



LIBRARY RECEIVES BATTLE COLLECTION 



The University Library was the recipient in Aug- 
ust of some thirteen hundred books, pamphlets, peri- 
odicals, bound and unbound newspapers, engravings, 
and a number of scrap books and pamphlet cases of 
newspaper clippings from the library of the late 
Kemp Plummer Battle, '49, the titles being donated 
to the library by the Battle family. 

Through the receipt of this gift which, if a money 
value could be placed upon it would amount to sev- 
eral thousand dollars, the library has been strength- 
ened in four very important fields. First of all, the 
collection is particularly rich in publications relating 
to the University itself. It includes the rare early 
volumes of the Magazine, the most complete tile in 
existence of University Catalogues, rare commence- 
ment programs, copies of addresses delivered on Uni- 
versity occasions, and numerous single publications 
which Dr. Battle utilized in the preparation of his 
two-volume history of the University. 

The second distinctive field covered is that of North 
Carolina history. Among the more important publi- 
cations in this division are the Documents of the 
Convention of 1861 (excessively rare), the Ship 
Fraud Commission report, sessions laws of North 
Carolina from 1800 to 1815, bound volumes of North 
Carolina newspapers issued from 1860 to 1S65, re- 
ports of the various railroads of the State, early re- 
ports of tin' Board for Internal Improvements, jour- 
nals of the various constitutional conventions of 
North Carolina, and numerous pamphlets concerning 
North Carolinians and incidents in North Carolina 
history. 

The third division relates particularly to the Con- 
federacy and publications centering around it. The 
most important (and rarest) of these are two vol- 
umes of documents of the Confederate States, laws 
of the Confederate States, military orders of the day, 



Confederate imprints, and miscellaneous newspapers 
issued throughout the South during the period of 
the war. 

The fourth division comprises publications con- 
cerning the history of the Episcopal Church in North 
Carolina and of the Episcopal Church in America 
during the three decades preceding, embracing, and 
following the Civil War. A complete bound file of 
the Journal of the Convention of the North Carolina 
Diocese from 1817 to 1869, together with unbound 
numbers from 1S69 to date and copies of the Journals 
of the Eastern and Western Diocese, are included. In 
addition, there are a number of lives of Episcopal 
bishops, collections of sermons, and other interesting 
publications growing out of the Episcopal Church. 

In addition to these principal interests, the dona- 
lion covers other subjects. It also includes the re- 
mainder of the edition of Dr. Battle's two-volume 
history of the University, the proceeds from the fu- 
ture sales of which are to be used for the purchase of 
books for the department of history. 

In making this extremely valuable donation to the 
library the Battle family has enabled the University 
to conserve in large measure the library which Dr. 
Battle gathered together in his long life time, and to 
further the teaching of North Carolina and Southern 
history to which a large part of Dr. Battle's life was 
devoted. 

Another very important addition was made to the 
library's collection of North Caroliniana through the 
purchase in July of the library of Miss Christine 
Fisher, of Salisbury. This collection, which covered 
particularly the decades of 1810 to 1860, was gath- 
ered together by Miss Fisher's father, Hon. Charles 
Fisher, her brother, Colonel Charles F. Fisher, and 
her niece, the late Prances Tiernan (Christian Beid). 
Among the publications which number from 1,000 to 




HOME OF Till-; LATE HI;. KEMP PLUMMER HATTLE 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



13 



1,500 titles, were 20 odd volumes of bound news- 
papers, such as the National Intelligencer, the West- 
ern Carolinian (Salisbury) in 1820, unbound and in- 
complete files of the old South Atlantic Monthly 
(Wilmington), Dt Bow's Review, Southern Review, 
Southern Literary Messenger, and other State and 
Southern newspapers and periodicals bound and un- 
bound. Miss Fisher's father. Hon. Charles Fisher, 
was a prominent legislator and member of Congress. 
As a result, his library was rich in political publi- 
cations, a number of which related to politieal eon- 
tests in Western North Carolina. Miss Fisher's 
brother, Charles F. Fisher, was president of the West- 
ern North Carolina Railroad and he was the pos- 
sessor of a valuable tile of State and southern rail- 
road reports. The library of Mrs. Tiernan was rich 
in current magazines and books. 

One of the most interesting parts of the collection 
was that containing a number of letters from John 
C. Calhoun, manuscripts, treaties made by Western 
North Carolina Indians, and early deeds and legal 
papers, some of which bore the signature and official 
seal of Governor Martin. All in all the collection 
is a most unusual one and its acquisition adds greatly 
tq the value of the total North Carolina collection. 
The purchase was made possible through funds placed 
at the disposal of the library by Mr, John Sprunt 
Hill. '89, who for a number of years has contributed 
to the upbuilding of this section of the library. 



MRS. JAMES LEE LOVE DIES IN CAMBRIDGE 
News reached Chapel Hill on Sunday, September 
19th, of the death on that day in Cambridge, Mass.. of 
Mrs. James Lee Love, daughter of the late Mrs. Cor- 
nelia Phillips Spencer, and wife of Professor James 
Lee Love, '84, who, as teacher of mathematics has 
been a member of the faculties of the University of 
North Carolina and later of Harvard. 

-Mrs. Love lived for the first thirty years of her 
life in Chapel Hill and belonged to a family that has 

I ii intimately associated with the University for 

many years. Her mother, Mrs. Spencer, was long and 
prominently identified with the University and 
shared with Dr. Battle through her indefatigable 
work in the honor of bringing about the reopening of 
the University in 187.">. In recognition of these serv- 
ices of high distinction both to the University and to 
the State, Mrs. Love's mother was awarded the LL. I), 
degree by the University in later years and one of the 
dormitories at the North Carolina College for Women 
was named in her honor. 

Mrs. Love taught for several years al Peace Insti- 
tute but had been living in Cambridge for a number 
of years. When the railroad between University Sta 
tion and Chapel Hill was completed in 1882 exercises 
were held to celebrate the event and the mallet which 



Mrs. Love used in driving the last spike is now pre- 
served at the University. Surviving her are her hus- 
band. Professor James Lee Love, Miss Cornelia Love, 
of the University library, and Mr. Spencer Love, of 
Gastonia. 

Funeral services were held in Cambridge on Tues- 
day, September 21st, and before interment in the 
local cemetery here on Thursday a service, beautiful 
in its simplicity and attended by members of the 
University community and friends throughout the 
State, was held in the Episcopal Church, Dr. W. D. 
Moss, pastor of the Presbyterian Church, of which 
Mrs. Love was a devoted member in her girlhood, 
officiating. 



CHANGES IN THE FACULTY 

Many changes in the faculty went into effect as 
the 1920 session of the University opened. 

George M. McKie, Associate Professor of Public 
Speaking, who has had a year's leave of absence 
which he spent in western North Carolina has re- 
turned to resume his duties. Sturgis E. Leavitt, As- 
sociate Professor of Romance Language, who has been 
in South America for a year, also under a leave of 
absence, has returned ; and John W. Lasley, Associ- 
ate Professor of Mathematics, after a year's study at 
the University of Chicago, has rejoined the Depart- 
ment of Mathematics. 

Four members of the faculty have been granted 
leaves of absence. Professor Collier Cobb is spending 
his time working on geological problems on both sides 
of the Pacific Ocean. Dr. W. M. Dey, Professor of 
Romance Languages, is in France, both he and Pro- 
fessor Cobb being the first to receive leaves of ab- 
sence under the Kenan Fund. Professor Norman 
Foerster is in England on his sabbatical year. Pro- 
fessor N. W. Walker is studying at Harvard. 

The additions to the faculty announced at com- 
mencement were J. W. Matherly, Associate Professor 
of Commerce ; William Critz George, Associate Pro- 
fessor of Embryology and Histology; C. E. Green, 
Assistant Professor of Romance Languages; William 
P. Thrall, Assistant Professor of English: John B. 
Woosley, Assistant Professor of Economics; II. M. 
Taylor. Instructor in Chemistry; W. D. McMillan, 
Instructor in English. . 

During the summer the following men were added 
to the faculty and accepted at a meeting of the exe- 
cutive committee of the trustees in September: Fran- 
cis Bradshaw, '1li, to be Dean of Students in place 
of Professor Prank Graham, who has resigned his 
Deanship but remains in the History Department; 
John J. Davis, formerly at Virginia Polytechnic In- 
stitute, Assistant Professor of Romance Languages; 
Howard R. Hnse, Johns Hopkins, Assistant Profes- 
sor in Romance Languages; W. B. Jones, University 



14 



THE ALUMNI REViEW 



of Alabama, Assistant Professor of Physics ; Earle C. 
Peacock, Harvard, Assistant Professor of Account- 
Lag; Harry F. Latshaw, Instructor in Latin; Thomas 
H. Hamilton, Assistant Director of Music (Mr. Ham- 
ilton will give instruction in voice and piano) ; 
Charles W. Camp, Columbia University, Instructor 
in English ; A. C. Howell, Columbia University, In- 
structor in English. 

Associate Professor W. S. Bernard has been pro- 
moted to Professor of Greek. Professor Archibald 
Henderson has been named Head of the Department 
of Mathematics in place of .Professor Cain, who re- 
tired last year under a pension from the Carnegie 
Foundation. 

In the new School of Public Welfare Dr. Jesse F. 
Steiner, formerly Director of Educational Service 
with the American Red Cross, has been added to the 
faculty through the co-operation of the Red Cross. 

Professor Towles will act as head of the Depart- 
ment of Romance Languages and Professor Prouty 
of Geology in the absence of Professors Cobb and 
Dey. Dean Carroll will be temporary head of the 
Department of Economics until a successor to Dr. 
Raper is named. 



residences gives -still another means of entrance. The 
land on which the houses are built slopes and rolls 
down to the branch on the edge of Battle Park. It 
is partly wooded and when developed further in ac- 
cordance with plans already made will be one of the 
most beautiful spots around the University. 



PARK PLACE COMPLETED FOR FACULTY 
Building records in Chapel Hill were broken when, 
before the University opened in September, Business 
Manager Charles T. Woollen threw open for occu- 
pancy by members of the faculty the latest suburban 
development of the University, "Park Place," where 
in less than four months ten houses have been built 
and are now occupied by Professors Weaver, Carroll, 
Koch, Prouty, Dashiel, Winsor, Baker, and Hibberd, 
and Dean Bradshaw and Captain Boye, and their 
families. 

The new development came as a result of congested 
housing conditions among members of the faculty. 
With the town crammed to the last house and with 
new professors coming in the situation seemed des- 
perate until the Trustees transferred part of the 
University funds for the building of faculty houses 
On a rush order the houses were obtained, made-to- 
order, from the Aladdin Company and by importing 
carpenters daily from Durham and elsewhere in auto- 
mobiles were completed on scheduled time. 

"Park Place" is situated on University property 
that lies on the northern edge of Battle Park. A line 
drawn directly south from the home of Dr. Pratt 
meeting another line running east from the old Bat- 
tle home would include the whole development. A 
road has been constructed from the home of the 
Misses Moses, furnishing access from the west; anoth- 
er road from Franklin Street by Dr. Pratt's, fur- 
nishing access in that direction, and a third street 
from Franklin south between the Herty and Lawson 



NEW CAROLINA LAWYERS 

Forty-three Carolina alumni received license to 
practice law at the examinations conducted by the 
State supreme court in August. Of this 'number 
thirty-three went direct from the University Law 
School. Miss Kathrine Robinson, of Faye'tteville, 
was adjudged class leader on the basis of having sub- 
mitted the best paper handed in by any applicant 
for license. The list follows : 

J. Y. Baggett, Clinton ; G. A. Barden, New Bern ; 
F. O. Bowman, Berea, Ky. ; J. M. Brittain, Asheboro; 
L. H. Clement, Jr., Salisbury; C. R. Daniel, Weldon ; 
Hugh Dortch, Goldsboro; H. L. Fagg, Greensboro; 
W. C. Feimster, Jr., Newton; G. K. Freeman, Golds- 
boro; E. S. Hale, Mt. Airy; W. F. Harvey, Littleton; 
M. J. Hatcher, Mt, Olive ; J. B. Hill, Warsaw ; J. S. 
Howell, Asheville; H. M. Jackson, Clinton; M. M. 
Jernigan, Dunn ; J. C. Kennedy, Moltonville ; G. W. 
King, Charlotte; W. E. Matthews, Clinton; F. W. 
Orr, Charlotte; J. B. Palmer, Warrenton; J. H. Pay- 
lor, Laurinburg; R, F. Phillips, Raleigh; M. S. Rev- 
ell, Kenly ; Miss Kathrine Robinson, Fayetteville ; 
D. Shaw, Fayetteville; G. A. Shuford, Jr., Asheville; 
H. H. Walker, New Castle; G. A. Younce, Spencer; 
W. B. Umstead, Durham; -1. G. Roberts, Charlotte; 
Y. F. Williams, Faison ; C. H. Edwards, Goldsboro; 
S. R. Lucas, Wilson ; Miss Louise Alexander, Greens- 
boro ; Odie Ingram, High Point ; Eugene Mills, Ral- 
eigh; Jas. R, Patton, Durham; W. H. Pittman, Ral- 
eigh ; Paul F. Smith, Raleigh ; F. L. Webster, Wilkes- 
boro; Bryce Little, Wilson. 



RALEIGH MASQUE TO BE PRESENTED IN 
OCTOBER 

The pageant-drama, Raleigh, The Shepherd of the 
Ocean, by Frederick H. Koch, will be produced in 
Raleigh on October 111. 20, and 21, during the week 
of the State Fair. The pageant-drama was designed 
to celebrate the tercentenary of the anniversary of 
Sir Walter Raleigh's execution and its presentation 
will form a part of the larger celebration in this 
country and England of the Pilgrim Tercentenary. 
This is the first production to be given under the 
direction of the University and in co-operation with 
the Division of Community Drama of the Bureau of 
Extension. The performance is being produced by 
the people from Raleigh under the direction of Miss 
Elizabeth B. Grimball from Community Service in 
New York. It will be presented probably at the ball 
grounds and about five hundred people will partici- 
pate as actors in the performance. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



15 



SUMMER SCHOOL HAS RECORD ENROLL- 
MENT 

The largest number of students that ever studied 
anywhere in North Carolina in the summer was pres- 
ent in> Chapel Hill for the 33d session of the Summer 
School, June 22-August 5, and for the Summer Law 
School. The registration in the Summer School was 
1.147 ami in the Law School. 45, making a total of 
1,192. The women numbered 828. 

Director X. W. Walker called it the most success- 
ful Summer School in every respect ever conducted 
by the University. Beside the attendance figures, he 
said that the work was done better than he had ever 
seen it, the courses covered a wider range of sub- 
jects, and the attitude of teachers and students had 
been admirable. 

Among the features of the Summer School were 
a musical festival conducted by Professor Weaver 
and Mr. William Breach, with a chorus of 75 voices 
rendering an Indian cantata, "Hiawatha's Wedding 
Feast"; productions by the Carolina Playmakers of 
original North Carolina plays and of "Twelfth 
Night''; a course in citizenship culminating in an 
election and campaign on the ratification of the 
suffrage amendment wherein the women of the Sum- 
mer School were taught the practical step} in regis- 
tering and voting (suffrage won by a 3 to 1 margin) ; 
productions of Irish and Shakespearian plays by the 
Frank McEntee Company. 

A number of institutes were held during the sum- 
mer, including the new Public Welfare Institutes, 
which attracted widespread attention in and out of 
the State, the Child Welfare Institute, and the Com- 
muiiitv Service Institute. 



NEW CAROLINA PHARMACISTS 

Twenty-one students from the University School of 
Pharmacy became registered druggists at the exam- 
inations conducted by the State board last -June. P. 
•I. Melvin led the class in the examinations. The list 
follows : 

E. 1>. Bradley, with the Owen Drug Co., Winston- 
Salem; 11. L. Bizzell, druggist of Wallace: F. II. 
('line, druggist of Kannapolis; K. E. L. Dees, drug- 
gist at Burgaw ; T. J. Etheridge, with Worthy and 
Etheridge, Washington; D. D. Hocutt, druggist of 
Hillsboro; L. M. Ingram, with the Hart Drug Co., 
High Point; W. K. Johnson, manager of the West 
brook Drug Co., Rose Hill; (i. S. Kirby. Jr., with the 
Kirby Drug Co.. Marion; T. P. Lloyd, with the Eu- 
banks Drug Co.. Chapel Hill; V. I). Lea. with the 
Thomas Drug Co., Durham; A. R. Moore, member of 
the firm of Turlington and Morrison, Wilson; P. J. 
Melvin. with 11. R. Home and Sons Co., Payetteville ; 
M. B. Phillips, druggist of Concord; J. S. Pierce, 
with Kyser's drug store. Rocky .Mount; Miss T. K. 
Twitty. with Twitty's drug store. Rutherf ordton ; 
Irvine Walker, druggist of Reidsville ; II. W. Walker, 
with Walker's drug store. Norlina. 



GRAVES PROPERTY CHANGES HANDS 

The largest real estate deal that Chapel Hill has 
known in many years was announced in August in 
the sale by Mrs. Julia II. Craves (Mrs. Ralph H. 
Graves), of Philadelphia, of the Graves property on 
Cameron Avenue and Columbia Streets to John 
Sprunt Hill, of Durham, and W. S. Roberson, of 
Chapel Hill, who at the same time outlined plans 
for building on the rear. of the property twelve brick 
cottages to house students. 

The front part of the property on which are a 
cottage and a large house now occupied by Mrs. M. 
W. Daniel, will remain unchanged for the present. 

Contracts for two of the cottages were closed in 
August and Mr. Hill said they would be finished by 
Christmas. An immediate expenditure of some 
$30,000 is contemplated by the owners of "West 
Court." as the development is to be called, with the 
probability that a great deal more will be spent 
eventually. 

The plans for the building of cottages for students 
have been hailed by President Chase and Business 
Manager Woollen as the quickest possible relief to 
the housing situation of the campus and in town, 
which President Chase has said is "extremely crit- 
ical." 

"It is, so far as 1 I know, a unique plan in the 
South," said President Chase, "and it comes at a 
time when the University is looking everywhere for 
places to house students." 

The Graves property adjoins the University cam- 
pus and is in the direction in which further Uni- 
versity extension is planned. Columbia Street will 

1 xtended to run along the eastern, or campus, 

side of the property and old South Street will be 
opened up to run between the Raleigh and Pittsboro 
roads along the southern side of "West Court." 

The cottages will be one-story. 4-room buildings 
and will house eight students each. It is understood 
that the rent will be approximately the same as for 
college dormitories and the backers of the develop- 
ment say they can house students at about one-half 
the cos1 involved in the construction of a dormitory. 
A number of University alumni are interested in the 
development. 



COL. S. W. MINOR RECEIVES D. S. C. 

Press dispatches of September IS. under the date 
line of Danville. \'a.. carried the following story 
concerning Col. S. W. Minor: 

Col. S. W. Minor, who came here at the beginning 
of September from Durham, X. C, today received 
a distinguished service cross for valiant service to 
his country while in France. The medal arrived this 
morning consigned to Sergeant E. McDaniel, of the 
local recruiting station, and was duly delivered dur- 
ing the afternoon. Colonel Minor, who for 25 years 



1G 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



was affiliated with the North Carolina national guard 
was elevated to the rank of colonel soon after Amer- 
ica entered the lists and he commanded the 120th reg- 
iment, infantry, 30th division. Colonel Minor heard 
some weeks ago that the decoration had been author- 
ized. It is for generally effective work as the leader 
of his organization. The citation runs : 

"For exceptionally meritorious and conspicuous 
services as commander of the 120th infantry from 
the time of its organization and training to the com- 
pletion and combat operation. In the Yypres-Lys 
and Somme offensives he displayed at all times initia- 
tive and sound judgment. During the attack of the 
Hindenburg line near Belleaucourt, France, Septem- 
ber 29, 1918, and during subsequent advances he 
handled his regiment with distinction, capturing sev- 
eral towns, numerous cannon and many prisoners. 
He has rendered services of material worth to the 
American expeditionary forces.'' 



ALUMNI NOTES FROM PHILLIPS HALL 

Of last year's graduating class in Electrical Engi- 
neering two of the men have gone directly into the 
practice of their profession in the State. E. C. 
Ballentine is with the Carolina Power and Light- 
Company at Raleigh, and C. W. Burton is with the 
Southern Public Utilities Company at Winston- 
Salem. 

C. P. Bolick, C. M. Hazlehurst and W. E. Merritt 
are with the Westinghouse Electric and Manufactur- 
ing Company at East Pittsburg. P. P. Lynch, Jr., 
is with the Aluminum Ore Company at East St. 
Louis and William Neal is with the Standard Oil 
Company, New York City. 

R. D. Ballew, '18, is with the Westinghouse Elec- 
tric and Manufacturing Company, Detroit, Mich. W. 
C. Walke, '16, was with the Westinghouse Company 
for a time and is now field engineer of the rural en- 
gineering division of the State Highway Commission 
with headquarters at Chapel Hill. G. W. Smith, '16, 
is with the Carolina Shipbuilding Company, Wil- 
mington. W. H. Joyner, '16, is with the Western 
Electric Company, Chicago, 111. C. I). Taylor, '14, 
is with the Westinghouse Electric and Manufactur- 
ing Company, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

M. N. Oates, '14, is with the Consolidated Electric 
Light and Power Company, Baltimore, Md. J. W. 
Mclver, '13, is with the Edison Lamp Works, Har- 
rison, X. -J. J. M. Labberton, '13, is with the West- 
inghouse Electric and Manufacturing Company, East 
Pittsburgh, Pa. H. L. Parish, '12, is with the Elec- 
tric Supply and Equipment Company, Charlotte. 
F. Llorens, '11, is with the Santiago Electric Traction 
Company, Santiago, Cuba. W. B. Ellis, '11, is 
manager of the Southern Public Utilities Company, 
Greenville, S. C. F. V. Fuentes, '10, is superintend- 
ent of the Camaguey Electric Company. Camaguey, 
Cuba. 



F. M. Weller, '06, is superintendent of power sales 
of the Consolidated Gas Electric Light and Power 
Company, Baltimore, Md. R. H. McLain, '06, is in 
the power and mining engineering department of the 
General Electric Company, Schenectady, N. Y. C. 
N. Sloan, '17, is in the electrical contracting business 
at Charlotte, associated with the general engineering 
and contracting firm of Tucker and Laxton. Fred M. 
Laxton, '96, is at the head of this firm which is one 
of the largest of its kind in the Carolinas. 



LOUIS GRAVES WINS TENNIS CHAMPION- 
SHIP 

Loins Graves, '02, won the tennis championship of 
North Carolina in September when he defeated Pro- 
fessor P. 11. Winston on the courts of the Greens- 
boro Country Club, 7-5, 6-3, 1-6, 6-2. Professor Wins- 
ton had formerly held the title. Graves and Wins- 
ton, paired together, won the doubles championship, 
defeating Blair and McCauley, of Greensboro, in the 
final round. 

Mr. Graves spent the month of September in North 
Carolina, much of it in Chapel Hill, finishing a se- 
ries of articles for The World's Work on prohibition 
as it has worked out in Pennsylvania and North 
Carolina. A story by him, "Getting the Stuff in 
Carolina," printed in The New Republic, during the 
summer and copied in part by The Literary Digest, 
attracted widespread interest and elicited much edi- 
torial comment, both in the State and elsewhere. 
One writer in Musical America was so interested in 
the moonshine industry as outlined by Graves that 
he thought an opera ought to be written on the gen- 
eral subject. 

Mr. Graves has had several other stories published 
in the past few months, including fiction in Leslie'* 
Weekly and The Metropolitan, and casual essays in 
Harper's Monthly. He has written a series of articles 
called "An American in the Orient," based largely on 
the diary and letters of Willard Straight. This series 
is being published in the magazine Asia. Mr. Graves' 
New York address is 138 East 37th Street. 



Chief Justice Walter Clark, '64, of the North Car- 
olina Supreme Court, was the principal speaker at 
the unveiling of a tablet in memory of General James 
Johnston Pettigrew at Bunker Hill, Va., on Sep- 
tember 17, 1920. General Pettigrew, as alumni famil- 
iar with the history of the University will recall, 
was a member of the class of 1847 and was consid- 
ered one of the most brilliant students ever in attend- 
ance here. A classmate of the late Generals A. M. 
Scales and M. W. Ransom, he was wounded at the 
Battle of Falling Waters, Maryland, on July 4, 1863, 
and died thirteen days later. Judge Clark's address 
was published in various North Carolina daily papers 
Sunday, September 19th. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



17 



ESTABLISHED 1916 



Jflumni Coyalty fund 



Council: 

A. M. SCALES. "92 
LESLIE WEIL, '95 
L.R.WILSON. '99 
A.W.HAYWOOD, 04 
W. T. SHORE. 'OS 
J. A. GRAY. 08 



"One Tor all, and all Tor one" 




IS THE ALUMNI LOYALTY FUND A SUCCESS? 

WELL, YOU'VE SAID SOMETHING! 

Established in 1916, it amounted on June 14 to $10,500 

1915 added on Alumni Day 650 

1895 on its 20th anniversary pledged 2,500 

The total for the four years is $13,650 

Does this total include your contribution? Why not do 
as the Yale man did who found he had been guilty of the sin 
of omission? His letter follows: 

"Enclosed you will find my check for $10.00 for this year's Alumni 
Fund. Although I was graduated from Yale some few years ago 
I am ashamed to say this is the first contribution I have made to the 
Alumni Fund since leaving New Haven. Why I have not contributed 
before I cannot say. I think it must be charged up to negligence more 
than anything else, for the appeals that have come from my class agents 
have been forceful and convincing, and ought to have been responded to 
long ago. 

"As a non-giver who has not been helping to 'bear the load' I am 
glad to experience this change of feeling and be counted on the list of 
those who are giving annually to this most needed and democratic fund." 

Write Your Check and Send it To-day 

to 

THE TREASURER OF THE UNIVERSITY OF N. C. 



18 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 

Issued monthly except in July, August, and September, by the Gen- 
eral Alumni Association of the University of North Carolina. 

Board of Publication 

The Review is edited by the following Board of Publication: 

Louis R. Wilson. '99 Editor 

Associate Editors: Walter Murphv. '92; Harry Howell. '!>5; Archibald 

Henderson. '98; W. S. Bernard, '00; J. K. Wilson. '05; Louis 

Graves, '02; F. P. Graham, '09; Kenneth Tanner, '11; Lenoir 

Chambers, Jr., '14; R. W. Madry, '18. 

E. R. Rankin. '13 Managing Editor 

Subscription Price 

Single Copies ....$0.20 

Per Year - 1.50 

Communications intended for the Editor and the Managing Editor 
should be sent to Chapel Hill, N. C. All communications intended fcr 
publication must be accompanied with signatures if they are to receive 
consideration. 

OFFICE OF PUBLICATION, CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 

Entered at the Postomce at Chapel Hill, N. C, as second class 
matter. 



THE UNIVERSITY IN PRINT 



THE CONQUEST OF THE OLD SOUTHWEST 

Among books issued during the summer by mem- 
bers of the faculty one of especial interest to stu- 
dents of American history is the Conquest of the Old 
Southwest, by Dr. Archibald Henderson, '98, which 
carries on the title page by way of further descrip- 
tion of the book the subtitle The Romantic Story of 
the Early Pioneers into Virginia, the Carolinas, Ten- 
nessee, and Kentucky, 1740-1790. The volume (The 
Century Co., New York City, 1920. 395 pp. I). $3.00) 
treats of "the romantic and thrilling story of the 
southward and westward migration of successive 
waves of transplanted European peoples throughout 
the entire course of the eighteenth century," which 
Dr. Henderson characterizes as being "the history 
of the growth and evolution of American democracy." 
To add to its attractiveness the text is supplemented 
by numerous pictures, maps, facsimilies. and por- 
traits, among the last named of which may lie noted 
those of Daniel Boone, Richard Henderson, .lames 
Grant, Arthur Dobbs, Isaac Shelby, William Lenoir, 
Alexander Martin, Hugh Waddell, .lames Robertson, 
John Murray, and John Sevier. Bibliographies and 
bibliographical notes have received the particular at- 
tention of the author as has also a comprehensive in- 
dex of materials. 



A word of explanation is in order concerning the 
character of notices that will appear under the cap- 
tion The University in Print in this and future issues 
of The Review. First of all, the caption is suffici- 
ently broad to avoid the rather captious criticism once 
made of the heading The University in Letters: 
"that very little which was referred to in the col- 
umns could properly be styled 'letters', and that the 



caption excluded reference to publications in other 
fields, particularly the sciences." Hereafter "in 
print" will replace "in letters." This expression 
surely, takes in quite a good deal of territory, and 
will cover notices concerning books, monographs, and 
magazine articles published by alumni and members 
of the faculty; positions held by alumni and instruc- 
tors on editorial boards, magazines and newspapers; 
adddresses and participation in meetings and learned 
societies, and occasionally editorials or news articles 
appearing in other publications which relate to the 
University, its publications, or the published work of 
its faculty or alumni. 

In the second place, it is not the intention of The 
Review in carrying these notices — for they are to be 
mere notices, and nothing more — to present formal, 
critical reviews of books and magazine articles. It 
is merely to tell its readers that the University 
through its faculty and alumni, is alert in these par- 
ticular fields and that the work indicated has been 
done. It is taken for granted that if more extended, 
critical estimates are desired they will be sought in 
those publications, literary and scientific, or what 
not, in which such estimates usually appear. — Edi- 
tors. 



The State University and the New South is the 
title of a 104-page booklet just issued by the Univer- 
sity containing the Proceedings of the Inauguration 
of Harry Woodburn Chase as President of the Uni- 
versity of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, N. C, April 
28, 1920. The Inaugural Programme, the Order of 
Academic Procession, with the lists of delegates from 
learned societies, universities and colleges, together 
with the Inaugural Address of President Chase and 
the addresses of the various speakers who were heard 
on the platform in Memorial Hall and at the Inaug- 
ural Dinner, appear in the order of the exercises of 
the day. This attractively printed souvenir record 
of the Inauguration of President Chase was prepared 
for the press by Messrs. L. R. Wilson, '99, and Le- 
noir Chambers, '14. Copies have been mailed to all 
members of the Board of Trustees, and alumni may 
secure copies upon request to the Secretary to the 
President. 



R. W. Madry, 'IS. in charge of the news service 
of the University and managing editor of The Re- 
view in 1918-19, is now on the staff of the Paris edition 
of the New York Herald. Mr. Madry graduated from 
the Pulitzer School of Journalism of Columbia Uni- 
versity in June and has been on duty for the Herald 
in Italy, Switzerland, and France for the past three 
months. He will return to the United States in the 
near future. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



19 



Union National 
Bank 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 

Capital $200,000.00 

Surplus & Profits $235,000.00 
Resources $3,500,000.00 



We cordially invite the 
alumni and friends of the 
University of North Carolina 
to avail themselves of the fa- 
cilities and courtesies of this 
bank. 



D. P. TILLETT 

Cashier 



High Grade 
Investments 

Offered, Subject Sale 



$25,001. North Carolina suite 4s, due 

1949-53. 
* 5,000 First Mortgage Heal Estate 

Bonds mi s per rent basis. 

i l 000 Real Estate Mortgage Loan 

on 8 per cent basis. 
50 shares American Trust Company 

stock. 

20 shares I ii<I<-]»eiitlencp Trust * 'mti 

pany stock. 
10 shares Jewel Cotton Mill 7 per 

r-ent Preferred. 
50 shares Stonecutter Mill 7 per cent 

Preferred. 
50 shares I J. J. Reynolds Tobacco 

7 per cent Preferred. 
L00 shares Anderson Motor Company 

7 per rent Preferred. 
L00 shares I lanes Rubber Company 

7 1*2 per cent Preferred 

L00 shares BicClaren Rubber Company 

8 per cent Preferred. 

LOO shares Tidewater Power Company 

7 per cent Preferred. 
S3 shares Roanoke Mills 7 1-2 per 

i in: Preferred. 

Many tjood offerings in Southern 
-ii i 1 1 storks, 

F. C. Abbott & Co. 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 

INVESTMENTS 

Phone 238 Postal Phone 

Long Dint. 9957 



GENERAL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

of the 

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH 

CAROLINA 



Officers of the Association 



II. I>. W. Connor. '!>!> 
E. R. Rankin. ']3 



.President 
.Secretary 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE: Walter Mur- 
phy. 'ilJ ; Dr. R. II. Lewis, '70; W. N. 
Everett. 'S6; H. E. Rondthaler, '93: C. W. 
Tillett, Jr., '09. 



WITH THE CLASSES 

1879 
— H. W. Stubbs, of Williamston, has re- 
ceived the nomination of the Democratic 
party for State Senator from his dis- 
trict. 

1880 
— Thomas Hall Battle and Miss Mary 
Norcom Weddell will be married Oct. 
7th at Tarboro. They will live in Rocky 
Mount. Mr. Battle, a son of the late 
Dr. K. P. Battle, is president of the 
National Bank of Rocky Mount and the 
Rocky Mount Savings and Trust Go. and 
is treasurer of the Rocky Mount Cot- 
ton Mills. He is a member of the board 
of trustees of the University. 

1881 
— Dr. J. E. Brady has been for many 
years head of the Latin department in 
Smith College, Northampton, Mass. 
— Dr. W. D. Pemberton, physician of 
Concord, plans to attend the fortieth- 
year reunion of his class next commence- 
ment. 

— Thos. B. Lenoir is engaged in farm- 
ing at Yadkin Valley, near Lenoir. 

1882 
— Dr. J. M. Reece practices his pro- 
fession, medicine, at Elkin. 

1884 
— W. J. Lenoir, former mayor of Le- 
noir, is president of the Caldwell Motor 
Co., at Lenoir. W. L. Lenoir, '19, is 
treasurer of this corporation, and W. B. 
Lindsay, 'IS, is secretary. 

1886 
— W. N. Everett, of Rockingham, is the 
nominee of the Democratic party for 
representative of Richmond County in 
thi' next Legislature. 
— Clem G. Wright, of Greensboro, is a 
nominee of the Democratic party for 
the Legislature from Guilford County. 
— J. J. Jenkins, banker of Siler City, 

is the candidate of the Republican party 

for State Treasurer. He is a former 

sheriff of Chatham County. 

— E. B. Cline, former judge of the Su- 
perior Court, practices law in Eickory. 
— Dr. Win. .1. Battle, professor of class 
teal languages in the University of Tex- 



The Planters National 
Bank 

Rocky Mount, N. C. 



Capital, $300,000. Surplus and 
undivided profits over $350,000. 
Resources over three and a half 
million. 

Located in the center of the 
Eastern North Carolina tobacco 
belt, offers to you its services 
along all lines of banking. 4% 
interest on savings deposits. 



J. C. BRASWELL, President 
M. C. BRASWELL, Vice-Pres. 
MILLARD P. JONES, Cashier 
R. D. GORHAM, Asst. Cashier 

'The Bank of Personal Service" 



rr= 



THE 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

OF 

RICHMOND, VA. 

with its resources of $36,000,000, 
is splendidly equipped to serve in 
all branches of Commercial Bank- 
ing. 

Trust Department 

The Trust Department offers 
unexcelled service. 



JNO M. MILLER, Jr. 
CHAS. R. BURNETT 
ALEX F. RYLAND 
S. P. RYLAND 
S. E. BATES. Jr. - 
JAS. M. BALL, Jr. 
THOS. W. PURCELL 



President 
Vice-Pres. 
Vice-Pro. 
Vice-Pres. 
Vtce-Prcs. 
Cashier 
Trust Officer 



20 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



The 
Trust Department 



Of the Southern Life and 
Trust Company buys and 
sells high grade stocks and 
bonds. We have for sale 
some especially attractive 
preferred stocks. 



Trust Department 

Southern Life & Trust Company 

A. W. McALISTER, President. 
R. (i. VAUGHN, First Vice-President. 
A. M. SCALES, General Counsel and 
Vice-President. 



Independence Trust 
Company 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



Capital & Surplus, $1,600,000 
Member Federal Reserve System 



All departments of a well- 
regulated bank are maintained, 
among which are the Commer- 
cial, Savings, Collections, For- 
i iiih Exchange, and Trust, 
and we cordially invite free 
use of any of these depart- 
ments. 



J. H. LITTLE, President 

E. O. ANDERSON, Vice-Pres. 

E. E. JONES, Cashier 



as, at Austin, spent a part of his vaca- 
tion during the summer in Chapel Hill. 

1890 

— J. C. Braswell is president of the 
Planters National Bank of Rocky 
Mount. Mr. Braswell attended the thir- 
tieth-year reunion of his class, held last 
commencement. 

— J. W. Graham is proprietor of the 
Home Furnishing Co., at Aberdeen. 

1891 

— Dr. Chas. S. Mangum, professor of 
anatomy in the medical school of the 
University, conducted anti-typhoid cam- 
paigns for the State board of health 
during the summer in Gaston and Meck- 
lenburg Counties. 

— Dr. J. Vance McGougan, Med. '91, 
a leading physician of Fayetteville, is 
president of the recently-organized Ro- 
tary Club of Fayetteville. 
— O. L. Williams is engaged in the 
lumber and veneer business at Sumter, 
S. C. 

— J. S. Lewis, of Asheboro, is president 
of the First National Bank of Ashe- 
boro and of the Riverside Mills, of 
Worthville. 

1892 
— Walter Murphy, '92, and W. C. Cough 
enour, 'Il7, both of the Salisbury bar, 
are nominees of the Democratic party 
for the Legislature from Rowan County 
— Dr. J. McQ. Ledbetter is a well- 
known practitioner of medicine at 
Rockingham. 

1893 
— John F. Waltington is president of 
the Bank of Reidsville, at Reidsville. 

1894 
— L. N. Hickerson is superintendent of 
schools for Rockingham County. He 
lives at Wentworth. Mr. Hickerson was 
overseas in Y. M. C. A. service during 
the war. 

1895 
— W. E. Breese, lawyer of Brevard, is 
the only grandfather in the class of 
'95. Master Jack Hines, of Los Angeles, 
grandson of Mr. Breese, is now two 
years old. Mr. Breese 's son, W. E. 
Breese, Jr., is a student in the Uni- 
versity. 

— W. D. Merritt, lawyer of Roxboro, 
and once a famous end on the Carolina 
football team, is the nominee of the 
Republican party for Congress from the 
fifth district. 

— W. S. Pfohl is secretary and treas- 
urer of the Briggs-Shaffner Co., a ma- 
chine foundry of Winston-Salem. 
— Major J. E. Alexander, lawyer of 
Winston-Salem, is the nominee of the 
Republican party for associate justice 
of the State Supreme Court. 



THE BANK of 
CHAPEL HILL 



Oldest and Strongest Bank 
in Orange County 



Capital $25,000.00 

Surplus and Profits 45,000.00 



We earnestly solicit your banking 
business, promising you every service 
and assistance consistent with safe 
banking. "It pleases us to please 
you." 



M. C. S. NOBLE. President 
R. L. STROWD, V-President 
M. E. HOGAN, Cashier 



STATEMENT OP THE CONDITION 



THE FIDELITY BANK 
Durham, N.-C. 

Made to the North Carolina Corpora- 
tion Commission at the Close of 
Business June 30, 1920 

Resources 
Loans and Investments.. $3, 864,605.84 

Furniture and Fixtures.. 17,443.48 

Cash Items 32 9,999.97 

Cash in Vaults and with 

Banks 1,028,979.12 

Overdrafts Secured 1,643.18 

$5,242,671.59 
Liabilities 

Capital Stock $ 100,000.00 

Surplus 500,000.00 

Undivided Profits 133,227.61 

Deposits 3,710,886.28 

Bills Pavable 445,000.00 

Bills Re-discounted 353,557.70 

$5,242,671.59 

Commercial and Savings 4% Com- 
pounded Quarterly in Our Sav 
ings Department 

Authorized by its charter to act as 
administrator, guardian, trustee, agent, 
executor, etc. 

The strength of this bank lies not 
alone in its capital, surplus and re- 
sources, but in the character and fi- 
nancial responsibility of the men who 
conduct its affairs. 

B. N. DUKE, President 
JNO. F. WILY, Vice-President 
L. D. KIRKLAND, Cashier 
H. W. BORING, Asst. Cashier 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



21 



Bonds For 
Investment 



Many people are daily realiz- 
ing that bonds can be purchased 
now at prices seldom if ever 
equalled in the history of our 
country, and in denominations 
as small as $100. We particu- 
larly desire to serve the small 
investor and respectfully solicit 
his business. 

Trustees of estates, savings 
banks, large insurance com- 
panies and other experienced in- 
vestors, are steadily accumulat- 
ing the kind of securities we 
recommend. 

If you have funds for invest- 
ment in amounts large or small, 
consult us that we may have the 
opportunity to explain the un- 
usual opportunities that are 
yours today. 

Southern Security Service Co. 

Second Floor Grecnsbero National Bank Building 

Greensboro, N. C. 

B. P. WHARTON, President 

C. M. HENDERSON, V-Pres. R. B. WINDER. V-Pre». 

Phones 2691 -1238 



"It's Famous Everywhere" 
The 

Battery Park Hotel 

ASHEVILLE, N. C. 



In the heart of the 
Blue Ridge mountains, in 
the Land of the Sky. 
Centrally located in pri- 
vate park of 15 acres. 
Commands unobstructed 
views. Cuisine and serv 
ice unsurpassed. 

Rates and booklet will 
be sent upon request. 



S. J. LAWRENCE, Manager 



— Dr. Holland Thompson, of the fac- 
ulty of the College of the City of New 
York, visited at his old home in States- 
ville for a few weeks during the sum- 
mer. 

1896 
— W. H. Woodson, lawyer of Salisbury, 
.■ind former mayor of the city, has re 
ceived the nomination of the Democrat- 
ic party for State Senator from his 
district. 

— L. T. Hart sell, lawyer of Concord 
and member of the board of trustees of 
the University, is the nominee of the 
Democratic party for the State Senate 
from his district. 

1897 
— A. W. Mangum, accompanied by Mrs. 
Mangum and son, ' ' Dolph ' ' Junior, 
spent some time at his old home in 
Chapel Hill during the summer. Mr. 
Mangum is manager of a large cam- 
phor farm for the DuPont interests at 
Waller, Clay County, Florida. 
— W. H. Crawford is manager of the 
Salisbury branch of the Emerson- 
Brantingham Implement Co. 
— Dr. J. H. Judd, dentist of Fayette- 
ville, was elected president of the N. 
C. Dental Association at the meeting 
of this body held in Wilmington in the 
summer. 

— L. M. Lyon is located at Payette, 
Idaho, where he is engaged in the prac- 
tice of law. 

— James M. Carson, lawyer of Rut her 
fordton, is campaign manager for Hon. 
Zebulon Weaver, Law '94, of Asheville, 
who is the Democratic candidate to suc- 
ceed himself as Congressman from the 
tenth district. 

— D. B. Smith resigned in August as 
assistant district attorney for the wes- 
tern N. C. district, to devote his entire 
time to the practice of law in Charlotte. 
— Rev. Donald Mclver is pastor of the 
First Presbyterian Church at Burling- 
ton. 

— W. J. Homey is a certified public 
accountant, connected with J. D. High- 
tower, at Greensboro. 

— Dr. J. E. Hart, physician of Wades- 
boro, is chairman of the board of county 
commissioners for Anson County. 

1898 
— Rev. J. K. Pfohl is pastor of the 
Home Moravian Church, Winston-Sal- 
em. His church and Sunday school have 

ead ire than one thousand members. 

—Frank R. McNinch, Law '98, Char- 
lotte's first mayor under the commission 
form of government, has resigned the 
mayoralty and taken up work with the 
War ('amp Community Service. He is 
i" charge of the community service ac- 
tivities in the States of North Caro- 
lina, South Carolina ami Virginia. 




The Young Man 



who prefers (und must young men do) 
styles thai are ;i perfect blend of 
novelty and refinement has long since 
learned the special competency of this 
clothes shop. 



Pritchard-Bright & Co. 



Durham. N. C. 



The Equitable Life Assurance 
Society of the U. S. 

Assets, $599,423,919 

When you finish 

school anil enter the 
business world it will 
give you greater prestige 
if you have your LIFE 
INSURANCE with a 
company of impregnable 
financial strength and a 
national reputation for 
faithful public service. 

The Equitable 

Is such a company. It is repre- 
sented in Durham by 

The Home Agency Co. 

FRED A. McNEER, Manager 

Life Insurance Department 

6th Floor 1st National Bank Bldg. 

Our representative for Chapel 
Hill will be announced in this 
space next issue. See him before 
you buy insurance. 



po 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



Chas. Lee Smith, Pres. Howell L. Smith, Sec'y 
Wm. Oliver Smith. Treas. 



Edwards and Broughton 
Printing Company 

Raleigh, N. C. 



Engraved Wedding Invitations. Christmas 
Cards, Visiting Cards and Correspon- 
dence Stationery 



Printers, Publishers and 
Stationers 



Steel and Copper Plate Engravers 



Manufacturers of 

Blank Books and Loose Leaf 
Systems 



Rawls- Knight Co. 

' 'Durham 's Style Store 

We extend a special invita- 
tion to our Chapel Hill friends 
to visit our store and view 
what's new in Fall and Winter 
wearing apparel. 

Fashion's very latest stvles 
in Coats, Suits, Dresses and 
Smart Millinery. 

Beautiful Silks and Woolen 
Dresses in the most appealing 
styles. 

All the new weaves in cot- 
ton and woolen goods, silks, 
duvetyn, plush. Large line of 
silk and cotton hosiery. The 
home of Lady Ruth, Crown 
and Binner Corsets. Cente- 
meri Kid Gloves and Ashers 
Knit Goods. 

Mail orders promptly filled. 

Rawls- Knight Co. 

Durham, N. C. 



1899 
H. M. Waustaff, Secretary 
('Impel Hill, N. C. 
— R. D. W. Connor, secretary of the 
North Carolina Historical Commission, 
lias been granted a year's leave of all 
-line in order that he might pursue 
special studies in American history at 
Columbia University. 

— A. T. Hopper is office manager for 
the Marshal Field textile interests at 
Spray. 

— B. B. Lane is located at Tallahassee, 
Pla. He is engaged in educational 
work. 

—P. C. Barnhardt and P. A. Barn- 
hardt, both members of the class of 
'99, are joint proprietors of the Mor- 
row-Freeman Co., Norwood 's leading 
mercantile firm. 

— R. T. Poole, Law '99, lawyer of 
Troy, represents Montgomery County in 
the Legislature. 

1900 
W. S. Bernard, Secretary 
Chapel Hill, N. C. 
— T. J. Byerly is cashier of the Farm- 
ers Bank and Trust Co., the newest 
banking institution of Winston-Salem. 
Previous to coming to Winston-Salem 
eighteen months ago, Mr. Byerly was 
for several years connected with the Na- 
tional City Bank of New York. 
— P. A. Heilig is secretary and treas- 
urer of the Heilig-Deas Shoe Co., 
Salisbury. 

— Rev. Alfred R. Berkeley is rector of 
St. Paul 's Church, New Orleans, La. 
Mr. Berkeley attended the twentieth- 
year reunion of his class at commence- 
ment last June. He spent his vaca- 
tion during the month of August at 
Saluda. 

Miss Marcia Latham is in the faculty 
of Hunter College, East 68th St., New 
York City. 

— Geo. N. Coffey is State leader in 
county advisory work for the agricul- 
tural extension service of the State of 
Illinois. He is connected with the Uni- 
versity at Urbana. 

— Ed N. Smith is secretary and Ireas 
nrer of the Albemarle Grocery Co., 
wholesale, at Albemarle. 

1901 
Dr. J. G. Murphy, Secretary 
Wilmington, N. < '. 
— Mr. anil Mrs. John E. F. Hicks, of 
Goldsboro, have announced the birth of 
a son, John Miller Hicks. 
— J. S. Cook is engaged in the prac- 
tice of law and in banking at Graham. 
He is cashier of the Bank of Graham. 
—A. E. Woltz, '01, and C. B. Woltz, 
'15, have formed a partnership for the 
practice of law in Gastonia under the 
linn name of Woltz and Woltz. Mr. 



Clothes of Fashion 



CLOTHES MADE 

BY MAKERS WHO 

KNOW FOR MEN 

WHO KNOW 



Sold by 



Sneed- Markham- 
Taylor Co. 



Durham, N. C. 



High-Class 

Ready-to-Wear 

Apparel 



Ladies' Suits, Dresses, 
Coats, Wraps, Furs, Hos- 
iery, Underwear, Corsets, 
Piece Goods, Notions. 

DURHAM, N. C. 



Merchandise of Quality 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



23 



The Farmers Bank and 
Trust Company 

WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



Capital 



$250,000 



Open a savings account in this 
strong bank 

We pay 4 per cent interest 
compounded quarterly 

Checking Accounts Invited 

We Will appreciate the opportu- 
nity) to serve you 



Wm. J. Byerly. Pre*. Thos. J. Byerly. Cashier 

S. E. Hall, Vice President 

H. L. Stone, Mgr. Savings Department 







"When He's Dressed Up 


He 


Looks Up" 




Fashion 




Park 




Has endeavored to appeal to 


the 


young men of our country 


and 


this is the reason Fashion 


»ark 


suits are specially built, and 


spe- 


cially styled; and the minute 


you 


don one of these suits you b 


egin 


to look up. 




HINE-MITCHELL CO., 


Inc. 


" The Style Shop " 




WINSTONSALEM, N. C. 





A. E. Woltz was formerly in partner 
ship with State Senator A. <!. Mangum, 
'93, and Mr. C. B. Woltz was formerly 
in partnership with Solicitor Geo. \V. 
Wilson. 

— C. P. Crawley is cashier of the Rnnk 
of Norwood, at Norwood. 
— W. L. McKiiiiion, Ph. G. '01, is pres- 
ident of the Parsons Drug Co., at Wades- 
lioro. 

1902 
I. F. Lewis, Secretary 
University, Va. 
— Dr. (_'. M. Byrnes practices his pro 
fession, medicine, in Baltimore, Mil., 
with offices at 1207 E. Preston St. 
— T. J. Hill is n lawyer of Murphy. He 
is a director and vice president of the 
Cherokee Bank. 

— W. A. Bine is general manager of 
the Aberdeen and Rockrish Railway (Jo., 
at Aberdeen. 

— Louis Graves, of Neiv York, spent 
some time in Chapel Hill during the 
summer, 

1903 

N. W. Walker, Secretary 
Cambridge, Mass. 




— X. W. Walker, professor id' sec lar; 

education in the University, and director 
nf the Summer School, is at Harvard on 

a year 's leave of absence. 

— Jas. B. Thorpe is chief chemist for 
the United Alloy steel Corporation, :it 
Canton, Ohio. His address is I7:n; 
1 Seveland Ave., X. W., Canton. 
— R, O. Everett, of the Durham bar, is 
the nominee of the Democratic party 
for the Legislature from Durham ('nun 

ty- 

— W. P.. Ross is secretary ami treas- 
urer of the Piedmont Ire and Coal Co., 
.■it Greensboro. 



LIGGETT & MYERS 
TOBACCO CO. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 

FATIMA, CHESTERFIFLD 

AND PIEDMONT 

CIGARETTES 

VELVET AND DUKE'S 

MIXTURE SMOKING 

TOBACCO AND 

other well known brands of 

Smoking Tobacco, Cigarettes 

and Chewing Tobacco. 



Our brands are standard for 
quality. 

They speak for themselves. 



Asphalt Pavements 



DURABLE ECONOMICAL 

If you are interested in street or 
road construction we invite you to 
inspect our work in 

Durham (Asphalt Streets). 

Durham County (Asphalt and Con- 
rcte Roads). 

Raleigh and Wake County (As 
phalt). 

Guilford County (Asphalt Roads). 

Gri ensboro. 

Rocky Mount. 

High Point. 

Henderson. 

Lumber ton. 

Also roads built tor United States 
Government : 

Army Supply Base, Norfolk, Va. 

New port Neu b -Hampton Highv ay, 
Newport News, Va. 

Camp Lee. Va. 

A representative will visit you and 
tipply :in\ information or estimati s 
desired. 

Robert G. Lassiter & Co. 
Engineering and Contracting 

Home Office: Oxford, N. ('. 

:iu7 Aeade Building Norfolk, Va. 

10(12 Citizens Hank Building 

Raleigh, N. 0. 

American Exchange National Bank 
Building Greensboro, N. C. 



24 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



O. HENRY 



The Pride of Greensboro 



North Carolina 's largest and 
finest commercial and tourist 
hotel. 

300 Rooms 
300 Baths 

Thoroughly modern. Absolutely 
fireproof. Large sample rooms. 
Convention hall. Ball room. Ad- 
dition of 100 rooms completed 
September 1, 1920. 

W. H. Lowry Cabell Young 

Manager Asst. Manager 



Snappy Clothes 

for the 

College Man 



Society and 

Stein Block 

Clothes 

for the 

young and 

those who stay 

young 




#nrtrtj| Smni Clnlliro. 



'Vanstory Clothing Co. 

('. H. McEnight, Pres. and Mgr. 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



— J. J. Nichols is manager of the Ashe- 
ville Laundry Co., at Asheville. 

1904 
T. F. Hk'KERSON, Scent a iji 
Chapel Hill, N. C. 
— Dr. E. A. Herring has resigned as 
health officer of Wilmington and has 
accepted the chair of preventative med- 
icine in the medical department of the 
University of Georgia, at Athens. Dr. 
Herring is a native of Mississippi. 
— .1. H. Matthews, Law '04, of the 
Windsor bar, is the nominee of the 
Democratic party for the Legislature 
from Bertie County. 
— B. Y. Graves is secretary and treas- 
urer of the General Motor Co., at Mount 
Airy. J. H. Folger, '01, lawyer of 
Mount Airy, is president of this com- 
pany. 

1905 

W. T. Shore, Secretary 
Charlotte, N. C. 

— X. B. Starnes is chief geologist for 
the Phelps-Dodge Copper Corporation, 
at Morenei, Arizona. 
— J. E. Long, lawyer of Graham, is 
the nominee of the Democratic party 
for the State Senate from his disrict. 
— Dr. C. M. Walters practices his pro- 
fession, medicine, at Burlington. 
— W. A. Heartt is connected with the 
Eno Cotton Mills at Hillsboro. Mr. 
Heartt saw service overseas as first lieu- 
tenant of infantry with the 81st Di- 
vision. 

— Sam E. Welfare, Phar. '05, former 
president of the N. C. Pharmaceutical 
Association, conducts a drug business in 
Winston-Salem. 

— C. W. Bagby, lawyer of Hickory, is 
postmaster for the city. 
— J. F. Brower is auditor for the 
Wachovia Bank and Trust Co., Winston- 
Salem. 

1906 

John A. Parker, Secretary 

Charlotte, N. C. 

— Hamilton C. Jones, of the Charlotte 
bar, was appointed in August assistant 
district attorney for the western N. C. 
district. For the past seven years Mr. 
Jones had served as judge of the re- 
corder's court for the city of Charlotte. 
— Dr. T. Grier Miller, physician, has 
changed his address from 2026 Locust 
St., Philadelphia, to 110 S. 20th St., 
Philadelphia. 

— Dr. H. W. McCain is a leading phy- 
sician anil surgeon of High Point. 
— Aladdin Rosenbaeher is manager of 
the mercantile firm of Rosenbaeher and 
Bros., Winston Salem. 
— J. B. Goslen is editor of the Union 
Republican at Winston-Salem. 
— M. F. Teague, Phar. '06, is propri- 



SMOKE 



Meditation 



' ' Your Sort of Cigar ' ' 



100% 

Smoke Satisfaction 



Most Popular Cigar 
in the South 



Keep Physically Fit 




The young men of U. N. C. are 
wise enough to know that athletic 
exercise promotes sound health 
Get in some game early. 

We can supply you with every 
essential in equipment for Foot- 
ball, Soccer, Basket Ball, Hockey, 
Skating, Etc. 

Write for catalogue No. TJC 



Alex Taylor & Company, Inc. 

Athletic Outfitters 
26 E. 42nd St., New York 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



25 



KODAK FINISHING 

As Qood as the Best 
Anywhere 



Over eighty per cent of our busi- 
ness is mail orders 



May We send you a price list? 



R. W. F01STER 

BOX 242 
CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 



of or of Teague's Drug Store, at Ashe 
ville. 

—Dr. J. G. Anderson, M. 11. '06, prae 
tices medicine in Asheville. He lias 
three sons, who will some day enter the 
University. 

—.Matt H. Allen and Miss Charlotte 
Howard were married September 6th 
at Kinston. They live in Goldslioro, 
where Mr. Allen is engaged in the prac- 
tice of law as a member of the firm of 
Lnugston, Allen and Taylor. Mr. Allen 
served overseas as a major in the judge 
advocate general's department. 
— W. R. . I ones practices his profession, 
law, in Rockingham. 

— Julian S. Miller is editor of the Char- 
lotte News. 

1907 

('. L. Weill, Secretary 
Greensboro, X. < '. 

— .John .1. Parker, of Monroe, nominee 
of the Republican party for Governor, 
is making a very active campaign. His 
program for speaking dates carries him 
to practically every county in the State. 
— W. .1. Barker is secretary of the 
Holt, Gant and Holt Cotton Mfg. Co., 
at Altamahaw. 

— A. M. Secrest is president of the Union 
Drug Co. and the Secrest Motor Co. at 
Monroe. 



Anchor Stores 
Company 

(The Ladies' Store) 



Presenting the newest 
fall models in ladies and 
misses ready-to-wear and 
millinery. Also a com- 
plete stock of silks, wool- 
en and cotton piece 
g Is and notions'. 



Anchor Stores 
Company 

109 W. Main St. 
Durham, N. C. 

Sells For Less. Sells For Cas 



Murphy 's Hotel 

Richmond, Virginia 

The Most Modern, Largest, and Best Located Hotel 
in Richmond, Being on Direct Car Line to all 
Railroad Depots. 

The Only Hotel in the City With a Garage attached. 

Headquarters for Carolina Business Men 
European Plan $1.50 Up 



JAMES T. DISNEY, President 



2(3 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



FIVE POINTS AUTO CO. 

AUTOMOBILES 

Repairs and Accessories 

Buick and Dodge Cars 
Goodyear and U. S. Tires 

G. M. C Trucks 
Complete Stock of Parts 

FIVE POINTS AUTO CO. 

DURHAM, N. C. 



DRINK 




nfijn 

11 


I 


™ 


111 




,1 




Delicious and Refreshing 


Quality tells the difference in 
the taste between Coca-Cola and 
counterfeits. 


Demand the genuine by full 
name — nicknames encourage sub- 
stitution. 


Get a bottle of the genuine 
from your grocer, fruit stand, or 
cafe. 


Durham Coca-Cola Bottling Co. 
' ' 



1908 
II, Robins, Secretary 
Greensboro, N. C. 
— H. B. Gunter, a former editor-in-chief 
of the Tar Heel, is agency manager of 
the Southern Life and Trust Co., at 
Greensboro. 

— W. H. Britt is connected with the 
Wachovia Bank and Trust Co., at. Wins- 
ton-Salem. 

— Dr. O. P. Rein is professor of ro- 
mance languages in Lenoir College, at 
Hickory. Last year he was head of the 
mathematics department in Elizabeth 
College, Salem, Va. 

— L. P. Matthews practices law in Nor- 
folk, Va., with offices in the National 
Bank of Commerce building. 
— L. E. Hesterly, Ph. G. '08, is manager 
of the Justus Drug Co., at Henderson- 
ville. 

1909 
O. C. Cox, Secretary 
Greensboro, N. C. 
— W. G. Thomas, former Carolina font- 
ball captain, is connected with the 
Johnston Mills, and is located at otib' 
Broadway, New York City. 
— Rev. T. J. Polger is a Methodist min- 
ister of Buell, Oregon. 
— W. H. Strowd received the degree of 
Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin 
at the commencement in June. Dr. 
Strowd is head of the feed and fertil 
izer division of the State chemistry serv- 
ice of Wisconsin. 

— O. C. Cox, lawyer of Greensboro, was 
elected in August chairman of the Guil- 
ford County democratic executive com- 
mittee, succeeding Chas. A. Hines, Law 
'08, resigned. C. R. Wharton, '12, also 
of the Greensboro bar, was elected sec- 
retary. 

— Frank P. Graham spent the summer in 
study at Columbia University and has 
now returned to his post as assistant 
professor of history in the University. 
— F. E. Dalton is connected with the 
payroll department of the R. J. Rev 
nobis Tobacco Co., Winston Salem. 
— II. A. Stepp is teller with (he First 
Hank and Trust Co., Hendersonville. 
— Frank 1). Crawford is connecte 1 with 
the chemical department of the H. .1. 
Reynolds Tobacco Co, Winston-Salem. 

1910 
J. R. Nixon, Secretary 
Edenton, N. ('. 
— While overseas as ordnance sergeant 
in the 321st Infantry, 81st Division, H. 
(!. Reagan organized, financed and di- 
rected the famous doughboy musical 
comedy, "O You Wildcats." This 
show was voted the best of the 87 shows 
operating in the A. E. F. Mr. Reagan 
is auditor for the Battery Park Hotel, 
at Asheville. 



The Yarborough 



RALEIGH'S LEADING 

AND LARGEST 

HOTEL 



MAKE IT YOUR HOME WHEN 
IN RALEIGH 



B. H. GRIFFIN HOTEL 
COMPANY 



R. L BALDWIN CO 

DURHAM, N. C. 



Will be pleased to have 
you make their modern 
department store your 
headquarters in Durham 



Our Stock of Fall Goods is 
Now Complete 



R. L. BALDWIN CO. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



27 



The University of North Carolina 

Maximum Service to the People of the State 



A. THE COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS. 

B. THE SCHOOL OF APPLIED SCIENCE. 

(1) Chemical Engineering. 

(2) Electrical Engineering. 

(3) Civil and Road Engineering. 

(4) Soil Investigation. 

C. THE GRADUATE SCHOOL. 

D. THE SCHOOL OF LAW. 



E. THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE. 

F. THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY. 

G. THE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION. 
H. THE SUMMER SCHOOL. 

I. THE BUREAU OF EXTENSION. 

J. THE SCHOOL OF COMMERCE. 

K. THE SCHOOL OF PUBLIC WELFARE. 



WRITE TO THE UNIVERSITY WHEN YOU NEED HELP 

For Further Information Regarding the University, Address 

THOMAS J. WILSON, Jr., Registrar. 



(Eulture 



Scholarship 



>ervice 



Self-Support 



THE 



^tortl) (Larolina College for ^Pomen 

Offers to Women a Liberal Education, Equipment for Womanly 
Service, Professional Training for Remunerative Employment 



The College offers four groups of studies lead- 
ing to the following degrees: Bachelor of Arts, 
Bachelor of Science, and Bachelor of Music. 

Special courses in Pedagogy ; in Manual Arts ; in 
Domestic Science Household Art and Economics; in 
Music; and in tne Commercial Branches. 

Teachers and graduates of other colleges provided 
for in both regular and special courses. 



Equipment modern, including furnished dormitories, 
library, laboratories, literary society halls, gymnas- 
ium, music rooms, teachers' training school, infirm- 
ary, model laundry, central heating plant, and open 
air recreation grounds. 

Dormitories furnished by the State. Board at 
actual cost. Tuition free to those who pledge them- 
selves to become teachers. 



Fall 'Uerm Opens in September 



Summer 'Uerm Begins in June 



For catalogue and other information, address 

JULIUS I. FOUST, President, GREENSBORO, N. G 



28 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



THE TRUST DEPARTMENT 

of the 

First National Trust Co. 

of Durham N. C. 



Offers you its services 
in all Trust matters, 
and invites your con- 
sideration. 



JAS. 0. COBB, President 

J. F. GLASS, Treasurer 

JULIAN S. CARR, Vice-President 

W. J. HOLLOWAY, Vice-President 

C. M. CARR, Chairman, Board ol 
Directors 



The Bank of Belmont 

Belmont, N. C. 

Offers you its services in 
all lines of banking. 
Organized in 1 908 with 
a capital of $ 1 0,000, this 
Bank now has a capital 
and surplus of $100,000 
and its resources are 
$2,000,000. 



R. L. STOWE, President 

J. LEE ROBINSON, Vice-President 

W. B. PUETT, Cashier 



— S. R. Carrington is connected with 
the firm of Moors and Cabot, brokers, 
111 Devonshire St., Boston, Mass. 
— The class ol 1910 has four members 
in the Episcopal ministry. Rev. S. B. 
Stroup is at Hickory; Rev. A. Rufus 
Morgan is at Chester, S. C. ; Rev. L. N. 
Taylor is at Roanoke Rapids; and Rev. 
W. H. Ramsaur is a missionary in 
Africa. 

— Dr T. B. Weathcrly. Med. '10, is a 
specialist in diseases of the eye, car, 
nose and throat with offices at Id W. 
Grace St., Richmond. 
— Dr. Frank Wrenn, Med. '10, physician 
and surgeon, is located at Anderson, 
S. C. 

— Dr. S. Coopersmith is on the staff of 
the .Mercy Hospital, Market and Louis 
Avenue, Canton, Ohio. 
— R. R. Rogers, Law '111, lias severed his 
connection with the Pocomoke Guano 
Co., ;it Norfolk, Va., and has entere 1 
the hanking field at Murphy as cashier 
and director of the Cherokee Bank. 
— E. W. Pharr, Law '10, of the Char- 
lotte bar, is a nominee of the Democratic 
party for the Legislature from Mecklen- 
burg County. 

— J. H. Blount has moved from his home 
I own. Bethel, to Greenville, where he is 
manager of a large mercantile firm. 
— Joe R. Nixon, superintendent of the 
Edenton schools, served as director dur- 
ing the summer of the Lincoln County 
Summer School for teachers, at Edenton. 
— C. C. Garrett is engaged in the manu- 
facture of overalls at High Point. Mr. 
Garrett is a former star tackle for Car- 
olina and was captain of the 1910 foot- 
ball team. 

— W. H. Hathcock is connected with the 
Snuggs Lumber Co., at Albemarle. 
— R. V. Howell, Law '10, former guard 
ou the Carolina football team, prac- 
tices law in Troy. 

— Hugh Sowers is secretary of the Eaiie- 
McGavock Milling Co., flour and meal 
manufacturers of Asheville. 
— R. B. Boylin is editor of the Messen- 
ger and Intelligencer, at Wadesboro. 
— Chas. L. Bransford is general super 
iiitendcnt of furnaces for the Wood- 
ward Iron Co., at Ensley, Ala. 
— B. L. Fentress is a lawyer of Greens 
boro, a member of the firm of Fentress 
and Jerome. 

— Nixon S. Plummer, formerly city ed- 
itor of the Greensboro News, is now with 
the Washington bureau of the Netv 
York Herald. 

1911 

I. C. Moser, Secretary 

Asheboro, N. C. 

— Edgar W. Turlington is an assistant 
solicitor of the XJ. S. Department of 
State, Washington, D. C. His address 
is 2717 Quarry Road, N. W. He plans to 



MARKHAM-ROGERS 
COMPANY 



Clothierr, Tailors, Furnishers and 
Hatters 

ALL THE NEW FALL 

STYLES AT REASONABLE 

PRICES 

DURHAM, N. C. 



ODELL'S, 



INC. 



China, Cut Glass and 
Silverware 

General line Sporting Goods 
Household Goods 

Dependable goods. Prompt 

Service. Satisfactory 

Prices 



HICKS-CRABTREE 
COMPANY 

FOUR MODERN DRUG STORES 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 

Eastman Kodaks and Supplies 
Nunally's Candies 

The place to meet your friends when 
in the Capital City 

GILBERT CRABTREE, Mgr. 



Cross & Linehan 
Company 

Leaders in Clothing and 
Gen ts' Furnish ings 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



29 




Home of Universal Auto Company, Inc. 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 

THE LARGEST BUILDING DEVOTED TO THE MERCHANDISING OF 
MOTOR CARS AND TRUCKS IN THE SOUTH 



Virginia Distributor for Paige Cars and Trucks. Distributor 
for Chevrolet Cars and Trucks 

TIRES AND BATTERIES 



North Carolina Distributor for Paige Cars and Trucks. 
Distributor Samson Trucks and Tractors 



PARTS AND SERVICE 



30 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



Perry-Horton Shoe Co. 

Special Agents for Nettleton and 

Hurley Shoes for Men, and 

' lousins and Grover Shoes 

for Women 

MAKE OUR STORE HEAD- 
QUARTERS WHILE IN 

DURHAM, N. C. 



Strand Theatre 



DURHAM, N. C. 



HIGH CLASS PICTURES AND 

SPECIAL MUSIC— YOU ARE 

ALWAYS WELCOME 



Open from 11 A.M. Until 11 P.M. 



I. G. LAWRENCE 

W. H. LAWRENCE AND T. H. LAW- 
RENCE ASSOCIATED 



CONTRACTOR 

AND 

BUILDER 

Main Office: Durham, N. C. 



CONTRACTOR FACULTY HOfSES 
AND LAUNDRY 

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH 
CAROLINA 



EDUCATION FOR 

BUSINESS 

Success in life means application of 
the fundamental principles of business 
taught in business college. There's 
nothing mysterious about it. It is 
merely applied common sense. The 
young man or young woman who 
trams now can enter business with 
practically a positive assurance of 
success. Don't you want to be a 
success in life.' Then, why not begin 
your training NOW? 

Write for catalogue and full parti 
culars to 

Mrs. Walter Lee Lednum, Pres. 

DURHAM BUSINESS SCHOOL 

Durham, N. C. 



attend 1911 's tenth-year reunion next 
commencement. 

— Junius M. Smith is advertising man 
ager for the Universal Auto Co. and 
the Motor Co., al Winston Salem. 
— Rev. Israel Harding Hughes and Miss 
Josephine Bowen were married August 
14th in St. James Church at Hender- 
sonville. They live at Newport, R. I., 
where Mr. Hughes is vector of St. 
(ieorge's School. 

— J. L. Eason is head of the English de- 
partment in Grand Island College, Grand 
Island, Neb. 

— Roy Linney Deal, of the Winston- 
Salem bar, was recently elected chair- 
man of the Forsyth County democratic 
executive committee, succeeding R. G. 
Stockton, resigned. 

Cy Thompson studied insurance at 
Carnegie Tech, Pittsburg, this summer. 
He heads the Jefferson Standard Life 
Insurance University agency at Chapel 
Hill. 

— N. S. Mullican is county engineer for 
Davie County. He lives at Mocksville. 
— Eugene C. Ward practices law in 
Asheville, a member of the firm of 
Smathers and Ward. 
— Thos. P. Moore is assistant cashier 
of the Independence Trust Co., Char- 
lotte. 

1912 
J. C. Lockhart, Secretary 
Raleigh, N. C. 
— Beecher Tate Denton and Miss Teresa 
Louise Alexander were married Septem- 
ber 16th in Charlotte. They live at 624 
Seigle St., Charlotte. Mr. Denton is 
connected with the accountancy depart- 
ment of the P. and N. Railway. 
—Dr. M. A. Mclver, of Gulf, returned 
lately from Poland, where he had been 
for several months on the staff of a 
Harvard medical unit. 
— J. B. Clingman is superintendent of 
maintenance for the State Highway 
Commission. He is located at Raleigh. 
— Frank P. Barker is a member of the 
firm of New, Miller, Camack and Wing- 
er, with offices in the Gloyd building, 
Kansas City, Mo. Mr. Barker says that 
he would be pleased to have any Caro- 
lina men call on him when they are pass- 
ing through Kansas City. Mr. Barker 
was in service during the war and served 
overseas as a captain of field artillery. 
—Cyrus D. Hogue, Law '12, of Wil 
mington, was elected on September 4th 
commander of the North Carolina de- 
partment of the American Legion. ('. 
K. Burgess, ']2, of Raleigh, was re 
elected State adjutant, and A. L. Fletch- 
er, '06, was re-elected finance officer. 
— Dr. A. J. Warren has resigned as 
city health officer for Charlotte and has 
become connected with the Rockefeller 
Foundation. He expects to go to a for- 
eign field. 



For up-to-date laundry 


service, call on us 


Durham Laundry Co. 


Durham, N. C. 



The Royal Cafe 



University students, faculty mem- 
bers, and alumni visit the Royal 
Cafe while in Durham. Under 
new and progressive management. 
Special parlors for ladies. 



DURHAM'S MODERN 
CAFE 



Hennessee Cafe 

C. C. Shoffner, Manager. 

A MODERN. UP-TO-DATE CAFE, 

WHERE YOU AND YOUR 

FRIENDS ARE WELCOME 

CLEANLINESS AND 

SERVICE OUR 

MOTTOS 

:I42 and 344 S. Elm St. 

Greensboro. N. C. 



BROADWAY CAFE 

WE CORDIALLY INVITE YOU 
TO VISIT OUR CAFE WHEN 
YOU ARE IN GREENSBORO 

Excellent Service 

Courteous Treatment 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



31 




Careful Attention 

T is with this earnest attention that we ex- 
ecute all orders, large or small, for the rep- 
utation of the Seemen Service, an asset that we 
jealously guard, is founded upon such princi- 
ples of rigid accuracy. 



THE SEEMAN PRINTERY, Inc. 

Printing Book Binding A'lultigrap/ung Engraving 

110-112 S. CORCORAN STREET DURHAM, N. C. 



32 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



A. E. Lloyd Hardware 


Company 


DURHAM, N. C. 


All kinds of hardware, sporting 


goods, and college boys' acces- 


sories. 


Geo. W. Tandy, Manager 



SALMON, SHIPP 
AND POE 

DURHAM, N. G. 



ro\ TRACTORS 

AND 

BUILDERS 



CONTRACTORS NEW DORMITORY 
UNIVERSITY OF N. C. 



The Princess Cafe 

WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



WE INVTTK YOU TO VTRTT US 
WHILE IN WINSTON-SAIVEM 



A THOROUGHLY MODERN 
CAFE 



Cooper Monument 
Company 

RALEIGH, X. C. 

Communicate with ns regarding 
your needs for monuments or tomb- 
stones. 



— .J. C. Lassiter is superintendent of 
the .Madison scdiools. 

— Dr. B. R. Lyon practices his pro- 
fession, medicine, in his home city, 
Greensboro. Brockton R. Lyon, Jr., is 
now eighteen months old. 
— Dr. C. W. Armstrong is whole time 
county health officer for Rowan County, 
located at Salisbury. 
— A. D. Polger, lawyer of Dobson, is 
chairman of the Surry County demo- 
cratic executive committee. A. H. Wolfe, 
'10, president of the class of 1910 dur- 
ing its senior year and now superin- 
tendent of the Dobson schools is chair- 
man of the Surry County republican 
executive committee. 

— Wm, B. Cobb has resigned from the 
IT. S. Soil Survey and is now engaged 
in work for the State of Wisconsin. 
— F. W. Hossfield is engaged in the 
real estate business at Morganton. His 
In-other, W. E. Hossfield, practices law 
in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 
— H. S. Chambers is secretary and treas- 
urer of Clements-Chambers, Inc., a shoe 
linn of Aslieviile. 

1913 

A. L. M. Wiggins, Secretary 
Hartsville, S. C. 

— Dr. E. M. Coulter, associate 1 professor 
of history in the University of Georgia 
at Athens, spent some time during the 
summer at his home in Connelly Springs. 
— .J. A. Warren, University treasurer, 
made a brief visit to Atlanta, Ga., in 
September and reports that while in At- 
lanta he met up with a thirteener, 
Lowry Axley, who is now an attorney of 
( Iriffln, Ga. 

— C. B. Hoke is engaged in chemical 
work with the Dul'unt interests at Par 
lin, N. J. 

— It is now .lodge Kennedy and he is 
L913's second contribution to the erm- 
ine. Prank 11. Kennedy, of the Char- 
lotte liar, was elected in August judge 
of Hie city juvenile court. For several 
months be has been recorder pro tern. 
W. B. Petteway was 1913's first repre- 
sentative on Hie bench, and he is now 
judge of the Tampa, Fla., juvenile 
court. 

— W. X. 1'ost continues a New York 
banker. He is connected with the (.nat- 
ality Trust Co., at 140 Broadway. 
— H. W. Armentrout has been connect- 
ed with the Snow Lumber Co., at High 
Point, since he left the University. 
— Ceo. B. Mason practices law in (las 
tonia as a member of the firm of Ma- 
son and Mason. 

— J. W. Clinard is connected with the 
Catawba Creamery Co., Hickory. On 
June 5th he married Miss Rosa Collins 
at Hickory. 



Budd-Piper Roofing Co. 

Durham, N. C. 

Distributors of JOHNS-MANVILLE 

Asbestos Shingles and Rooling 

Barrelt Specification Roofing 

Sheet Mftal Work 

AGENTS FOR 




mcEr 




When in need 

When in need of a pocket knife, 
strop, hone, brush, safety razor, blades 
or tools of any kind, paints, varnishes, 
I 'rushes, electrical goods, and general 
hardware, call on the 

CHAPEL HILL HARDWARE 
COMPANY 

The Ston* Where "Quality" Counts 



(l 

CHAS. 


C. HOOK, 


^1 

ARCHITECT 


CHARLOTTE, N. C. 


Twenty 


years ' 


experience in 


planning 


school anc 


college build- 


nigs. 







The Peoples National Bank 

WINSTON-SALEM, N. 0. 

Capital $150,000 I'. S. Depository 

.1. \v. Pries, Pres. W. A. Blair, V. P. 

N. MiTeiiELi,, Cashier 



Dillon Supply Co. 

Marhinery, Mill Supplies 
RALEIGH, N. C. 



R. BLACKNALL & SON 

DRUGGISTS 
NORRIS AND HUYLER'S CANDIES 

G. Bernard, Manager 

Corcoran Street Durham, N. C. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



:;:; 




A Pioneer in the Stoker Field 



Westinghouse was one of the first among the pioneers in 
the stoker field. 

Although power stations have grown to enormous size, 
with sudden peak loads in some instances reaching as high as 
300 and 400 per cent normal rating, the remarkable fact re- 
mains that the design of the Westinghouse Roney Stoker remains today practically the same as it was thirty-three 
years ago and that it still retains its firm position in the combustion field. This speaks for the accuracy of the original 
design. The Boney Stoker is particularly suitable for stealy power demands with moderate overloads of 25 to 50 per 
cent, and it burns a wide range of fuels satisfactorily. Simple design, low first cost and ease of installation, strongly 
recommend it for plants of moderate size. Over three millisn horsepower have been installed. 

Industrial expansion, however, has wrought many changes in power plant practice since 1887.. Today mechanical 
stokers are called upon to burn everything from high-grade coals down to refuse. They are also called upon to meet 
the sudden and enormous steaming capacities. Hence, two additional stokers were added, and our line now includes 
the Chain Grate Stoker, particularly adapted to the burning of low-grade, higli-ash fuels; and the Underfed Stoker, 
which is unequalled in its ability to handle the sudden and enormous overload demands of central station service with 
tin- highest degree of efficiency. 

It is a fact of vital importance to the stoker buyer that we 
manufacture the three general types, because stoker applica- 
tion should be approached with an open mind and the stoker 
manufacturer should be guided in his recommendations purely 
by the facts that develop from a study of fuel and load re- 
quirements. 

Westinghouse Electric & Manufacturing Co. 
East Pittsburgh, Pa. 





Westinghouse 



:U 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



Main Street Pharmacy 

LtADING DRUGGISTS 
Durham, N. C. 



ANDREWS CASH STORE CO. 

Chapel Hill, N t . C. 

Students and Faculty will find us ready 
to s^rve them with the latest styles in 
Walkover Shoes. Fancy Shirts, Tail 
ored Suits, and general furnishings. 
Be convinced. Call and see. 



Ol)e XCnlversit? -press 

Zem P. Council, Mgr. 
PRINTING, ENGRAVED CARDS 

QUALITY AND SERVICE 
CHAPEL HILL, X. C. 



PATTERSON BROS. 

DRUGGISTS 

Agency Morris Candy The Rexall Store 
Chapel Hill, N. C. 



is see 



£Brotri 



ers 



POLLARD BROS. 

DURHAM, N. C. 

STANDARD LINES OP HARD- 
WARE AND SPORTING 
GOODS 



r, 

Huffine 


a 

Hotel 


Quick Lunch Counter and Dining 
Room — Clean 


Rooms $1 .00 and Up 


Near the Depot 


Greensboro 
^ . 


N. C. 

/ 



Ralph J. Sykes Drug Company 

SOUTH ELM ST.. NEAR DEPOT 
OPEN ALL NIGHT 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



CALIFORNIA AND FLORIDA 

FRUITS, TOBACCA AND CIGARS, 

ICE CREAM PARLOR, 

FRESH CANDIES 

"We Strive to Please" 



— Dr. R. C. .Sample, Med. '13, practices 
his profession, medicine, in his home 
town, Hendersonville. 
— T. M. Ramsaur is a certified public 
accountant of Baltimore. He is with 
the firm of Hasken and Sells. 

1914 

Oscar Leach, Secretary 

Raeford, N. C. 

— I. P. Love is in the faculty of the 

Georgia Military Academy, at College 

Park, Ga. 

— Lewis Angel is engaged in the lumber 
business at Franklin. 

— W. ('. Dowd, Jr., is managing editor 
of the Charlotte News. 
— Oscar Leach, lawyer of Raeford, has 
received the nomination of the Demo- 
cratic party for representative in the 
next Legislature from Hoke County. 
— Jas. Giles Hudson and Miss Anne Bell 
("'ruse were married July oth in Salis 
bury. Mr. Hudson is a member of the 
Salisbury bar. 

1915 
D. L. Bell, Secretary 
Pittsboro, N. C. 
— Ben Cummings and Miss Leona Priest 
were married August 3d at Ridgecrest. 
They live at Oak Ridge, where Mr. Cum 
mings is connected with Oak Ridge In- 
stitute. 

— J. A. Holmes, for the past year a 
member of the faculty of the Raleigh 
high school, was elected recently prin- 
cipal of the high school. 
— Dr. B. W. McKenzie practices medi- 
cine in his home city, Salisbury. 
— Paul F. McKane, Law '15, is an at- 
torney with offices in the Terminal build- 
ing, Oklahoma City. 

1916 
H. B. Hester, Secretary 
Camp Travis, Texas 
— Chas. L. Coggin and Miss Jennie O. 
Bias were married on July 8th at Trin 
ity Methodist Church, Charlotte. They 
live in Salisbury, where Mr. Coggin is 
engaged in the practice of law. 
-John Franklin Jan-ell and Miss Lucy 
Lottie Wright were married on Sep- 
tember 7th at Ezell, Va. They live in 
Athens, Ala. 

1917 
H. G. Baity. Secretary 
Chapel Hill, X. C. 
— D. N. Edwards is collected with the 
advertising department of the R. J. 
Reynolds Tobacco Co., Winston-Salem. 
— Dr. H. M. Sweaney, Med. '17, prac- 
tices his profession, medicine, in Dur- 
ham, with offices in the First National 
Bank building. 

— W. C. Suddreth is connected with the 
Kent-Coffey Mfg. Co., at Lenoir. 
— D. E. Mclver practices his profes- 
sion, law, in Sanford. 



The Selwyn Hotel 

CHARLOTTE. N. C. 

Fireproof, Modern and Luxurious 

I.N THE HEART OF EVERYTHING 

H. C. Lazalekk. Manager 



H. S. STORR CO. 

Office Furniture, Machines and Sup- 
plies. Printers and Manu- 
facturers of Rubber 

Stamps 
RALEIGH, N. C. 



Whiting-Horton Co. 

Thirty-three Years Raleigh's 
Leading Clothiers 



Flowers for all Occasions 

DURHAM FLORAL 
NURSERY 

Chapel Hill Agents: EUBANKS DRUG COMPANY 



Paris Theatre 

DURHAM. N. C. 

ARTCRAFT-PARAMOUNT 
PICTURES 



Broadway Theatre 

DURHAM. N. C. 

THE HOUSE OF SPECIAL 
PHOTO-PLAY ATTRAC- 
TIONS 



Eubanks Drug Co. 

CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 
Agents for Nunnally'e Candies 



/■ 

s 


nider- 


Fletcher 


.\ 

Co. 




WATCHES, DIAMONDS, 


AND 






JEWELRY 




1 1 

ir 


W. Main 


St. Durham, N. C. 
>J 



A college man analyzed 

his class 

to see how many could afford to subscribe to the Alumni Endowment Fund 



A GRADUATE of one of the 
I \ foremost colleges was asked 
X _A_ llJ conduct the alumni en- 
dowment campaign among the mem- 
bers of his class. He made an analysis 
of the ninety-six members, accord- 
ing to his estimate of their financial 
resources, dividing them into three 
groups. 

In the first group he included those 
to whom a gift of §300 would be 
impossible; fortv men made up 
this group. 

The second group included 
those to whom S300 would 
represent a maximum gift; there 
were' thirty-seven men in this 
group. The third groupincluded 
those who could give more than 
$300; there were nineteen men 
in this group. 

Why some college men earn 
so much more than others 

The members of that class have 
been out of college more than twenty 
year.-.; they are an average lot of hard- 
working, capable men. 

^ et less than a third of the whoie num- 
ber are earning more than a mere living. 
What is the explanation? 

Among these men, of course, are a good 
many teachers and ministers. Salary in 
their case, is no criterion of succes>. 

But with the men in business, and in 
most of the professions, income is one 
basis of measurement. And if you will 
analyze this class — or any other — you 
will find this striking fact : 

That the great majority have become 
settled in departmental places, while only 
• ne man here and there has gained the 
all-round knowledge of all departments of 
modern business that fits him to discharge 
high executive responsibility, or to engage 
in business on his own account. 

An institution for rounding 
out men 

The Alexander Hamilton Institute was 
called into being to meet a definite need. 



A group ot educators and business leaders 
had been impressed with the fact that 
modern business develops specialists but 
does not train executives. 

Thev determined to provide a Course 
and Service which would enable a man to 
add to his equipment a working knowledge 
of the departments of business outside his 



GROUP I 



40 Men 
for whom it was 
impossible to pay 

$300.oo 



GROUP 3 
19 Men 
who could afford 
to pay over 
S300.22 



GROUP 2 

37 Men 

who could 
barely pay 

$300.20 



own. To give the salesman, tor example, 
a working knowledge of accounting and 
office management; to give the inside man 
a working knowledge ofsales, merchandising 
advertising, corporation finance, etc. — in 
other words, an institution, whose business 
should be to round out men into full busi- 
ness leadership. 

In the succeeding years thousands of men, 
representing every kind of business and 
every department in business have enrolled 
in the Alexander Hamilton Institute, and 
have proved by their own experience its 
power to shorten the path to success. 

Great universities and 
great businesses 

No similar educational institution has 
ever received such high indorsement at the 
hands of educational authorities. In forty- 
tour leading universities and colleges, the 
books of the Institute are used as texts. 

And the indorsement of business is no 

Cop, right Iq20t AUxandtr Hamilton Inttitutt 



less "mphatic and impressive than the in- 
dorsement of the schools. In the U. S. 
Steel Corporation 545 Alexander Hamil- 
ton Institute men are at work; in th^ 
General Motors Corporation 335 men arc 
to be found; in the Goodyear Rubber 
Company 319; in the Standard Oil Com- 
pany 801. There is no great industry in 
the country which does not have some- 
where among its executives, large or small, 
men who have profited by the Modern 
Business Course and Service. 



Not money merely, 
but satisfaction 

The Alexander Hamilton Insti- 
tute does not base its claim for con- 
sideration upon its power to increase 
men's incomes. Increased income 
ana power follow naturally increased 
knowledge. But the real product of 
the Institute is self-satisfaction and 
self-confidence — the sense of con- 
tent that comes to a man when he 
knows he is making the most out of 
his life that he possibly can make. 



Evidence that the Institute can accom- 
plish thisresu't and has accomplished it for 
thousat.ds of men is contained in a book 
entitled 

" Forging Ahead in Business" 

Just what the Modern Business Course 
and Service is, just how it fits into your 
own personal needs; just what it has 
achieved for other men in positions similar 
to yours — all this is fully covered in "Forg- 
ing Ahead in Business." It is a guide to 
business progress well worth any thought- 
ful man's attention. And it is sent without 
obligation. Send for your copy todav. 

Alexander Hamilton Institute 

504 4stor Place New York City 



Send me "Forging Ahead in Business'* 
which I may keep without obligation. 




Print htrt 



Business 
Address 



Business 
Position..-. 



36 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



CAPITALIZE YOUR TIME AND TALENTS 

By qualifying for a responsible business or civil 
service position while salaries are high. 

Our school is a member of the National Associa- 
tion of Accredited Commercial Schools and is 
highly endoised by everybody. Call or request a 
Catalogue. 

KING'S BUSINESS COLLEGE 
Raleigh. N. C. Charlotte. N. C 



Gooch's Cafe 

Anything to Eat 
CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 



For neat job printing and type- 
writer paper, call at the office of 

Chapel Hill News 



W. B. SORRELL 

Jeweler and Optometrist 
CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 



"pickards "Hotel 

Headquarters for Carolina alum- 
ni returning to the Hill. 

Special rates for student board- 
ers. 



Electric Shoe Shop 

Expert Shoe Repairing 
CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 



Model Laundry Co. 

DURHAM, N. C. 
Expert Laundry Herviee 



DURHAM SHOE CO. 

Leather Goods Cheaper 
DURHAM, N. C. 



1918 

W. B. Wunsch, Secretary 
Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Peyton MeSwain, lawyer of Shelby, La 
.lie nominee of the Democratic party 
for representative of Cleveland County 
in tlic next Legislature. 
— 11. V. Wilson, Jr., is studying medi- 
cine at Hopkins. 

— Gordon S. Council is engaged in the 
cotton mill business at Rosemary. He 
is with the Rosemary Mfg. Co. 

Dr. W. B. Kinlaw is an interne in 
the Episcopal Hospital, at Philadelphia. 

Curtis Crissman married Miss Beulah 
Delle McGowan at the home of the 
bride's parents, Aug. :'.lst, at Swan 
Quarter. They are now residing in 

Macclesfield. 

1919 

11. <;. West. Secretary 

Thomasville, N. C. 

— H. B. Craig is connected with the 
White Furniture Co., at Mebane. He 
served twelve months overseas as first 
lieutenant of infantry with the A. E. F. 
— Gordon C. Hunter is connected with 
the American Exchange National Bank 
of Greensboro. 

—J. S. White, Ph. G. '19, is manager 
of the W. S. Wolfe Drug Co., at Mount 
Airy. 

— W. H. Williamson is engaged in bank- 
ing at Carthage, with the Bank of 
Moore. 

1920 

T. S. Kittrell, Secretary 
Henderson, N. C. 
— W. W. Meal of Louisburg, is attend- 
ing a training school conducted by the 
Standard Oil Co. He will graduate in 
February and go into the oil business. 
His present address is 40 East 32d St., 
Bayonne, N. J. 

— R. B. Gwynn is in New York with 
the National City Bank. He expects to 
be sent to London sometime in the next 
year. His address is 175 Hicks St., 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

.1. S. Babb, who holds a fellowship in 
geology in the University, spent some 
lime during the summer in geological 
work in Alabama. 

— W. H. Andrews is connected with the 
Jefferson Standard Life Insurance Co. 
— Ben Cone and Earle Spencer are tak- 
ing the course in business administra- 
tion at the Harvard graduate school. 
— Skinner Kittrell has entered the Har- 
vard law - school. 

— Henry Stevens has entered the Yale 
law school. 

— Harvey S. Terry is connected with 
the mercantile business of E. B. Terry, 
Inc.. at Rockingham. 

— P. J. Mclvin, who led the field in the 
recent Slate examinations in Pharmacy, 



is now with H. B. Hume and Suns, 
druggists of Fayetteville. 
— J. Bryan Gtfiswold is second vice 
president of the Griswold Insurance and 
Real Estate Co., of Durham. 
— Ralph Wilson and J. B. McLaiighlan 
are pursuing the textile course in the 
A. and E. College, West Raleigh. 
— Sidney Allen is manager of the in- 
surance department of the Citizens 
Bank and Trust Co., of Rosemary. All 
of the officers of this bank are Carolina 
men: John L. Patterson, '95, presi 
dent; J. A. Moore, '00, vice-president; 
F. L. Nash, '17, cashier. 



PRIDGEN & JONES COMPANY 

We curry th? best shoes, Edwin 
Clapp, Howard and Foster, and Hey- 
w IV 

Expert fitters — A cordial welcome 

a W ails you. 

107 W. Main St. Durham, N. C. 



r, ; 

WELCOME TO 


STONEWALL HOTEL 


A. D. GANNAWAY, Manager 


CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



Campbell-Warner Co. 

FINE MONUMENTS 

REASONABLE PRICES. WRITE US 

Phone 1131 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



J. Frank Pickard 

HEAVY AND FANCY 
GROCERIES 

Opposite Campus 
CHAPEL HILL. N. C. 



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The 


'AROLIKA 


Man's Shoe Stork 




Carr 


-Bryant 




High Grade 

al 


Shoes with Sn 
(I Style 


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Cart 


Bryant 


Boot $■ Shoe 


Co. 


L06 W 


Main Streel Durham 


N. C. 



BAIN-KIMBALL CO. 

Makers of 

STANDARD MONUMENTS 

DURHAM. N. C. 




Making Nitroglycerin* ' 
in a Hercules Plant 

The man who makes nitroglycerin in a Hercules 
Plant is the personification of concentration. No 
railroad engineer pays closer attention to his 
semaphore signals than does he to the thermo- 
meter of the nitrating tank. From the moment 
when he begins to feed glycerin into the acid 
in the tank until the operation is complete the 
thermometer is his guide. 

It is important that the temperature of the mixture in the tank 
be kept uniform. If glycerin is added too rapidly the 
temperature rises, if too slowly is falls. So with eye on 
thermometer and hand on valve controlling the glycerin 
flow the Hercules "N. G." maker follows the process 
minute by minute until its completion. 

To just such watchful care as this is the uqiform high quality 
of Hercules Explosives largely due. The men who work in 
the twelve Hercules plants realize the importance of the great 
tasks performed by Hercules Explosives. As a result, wher- 
ever these explosives are used — in the building of railroads or 
highways, in the mining of metals and minerals, to increase the 
crops on a farm or dig the foundation for a city hotjl — their 
giant power is never found lacking. 

Hercules Explosives are always dependable — uniform in qual- 
ity, high in power. 



HERCULES POWDER CO 



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Chicago 
Pittsburg, Kan. 
San Francisco 
Chattanooga 



St. Louis 

Denver 

Salt Lake City 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 



New York 
Hazleton, Pi. 
Joplin 
Wilmington, Del. 




HERCULES 
POWDERS 



* Nitroglycerin is made by combining, in exactly the prop \r proportions, 
glycerin -with a mixture of nitric an J sulphuric acids. The combination 
takes place in a tank equipped with brine coils (for cooling purposes) and 
agitators nuhich insure thorough agitation. 





Modern Motive Might 

MOUNTAINS, miles and minutes give 
way before electricity, the magic motive 
power. Properly applied, it drives giant loco- 
motives across the continental divide, tows 
ocean liners through the Panama Canal, or 
propels huge ships. 

Through good light, safe signals, and illumi- 
nated highways, it is making travel better and 
safer and also is increasing the usefulness of 
transportation methods on land, sea or in the air. 

In short, electricity is revolutionizing trans- 
portation, making it quicker, safer, more eco- 
nomical and reliable in all sorts of weather. 

And back of this development in electric trans- 
portation, in generating and transmitting ap- 
paratus as well as motive mechanisms, are the 
co-ordinated scientific, engineering and manu- 
facturing resources of the General Electric 
Company, working to the end 
that electricity may bet- 
ter serve mankind. 



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We Solicit 

The business of going concerns, believing that 
we have ample resources and officials with 
ability to render Expert Banking Service. 

First National Bank 

Durham, N. C. 

Capital mill Surplus Over One Million Dollars 



Proud You're a Southerner 1 

We are proud that the Pilot Company is a Southern institution 
and is aiding in the up-building of the South. 

Its Complete Policy" is the last word in insurance protection. 
Write for particulars as to 

POLICIES AGENCY CONTRACTS TERRITORY 

Southern Life and Trust Company 




HOME OFFICE "The Multiple Line Company" GREENSBORO, N. C. 

CAPITAL $1,000,000.00 



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