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Library of 
The University of North Carol 



COLLECTION OF 
NORTH CAROLINA 








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Library building. 




THE ROYALL & BORDEN CO. 



Corner West Main and Market Streets 



DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA 



Sell all kinds of furniture and furnishings for churches, 
colleges and homes. Biggest stock of Rugs in the 
State, and at cheapest prices. Cflf you don't know us 
ask the College Proctor or the editor of the "Review." 
Call on or write for whatever you may need in our line. 

THE ROYALL & BORDEN CO. 



The Man of Business 



Whether employer or executive, professional man, manufacturer, jobber, 
retailer — in fact every person of affairs — whether still working toward a fixed 
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ties which lie in every course. 



The "Wachovia Trust Plan" will do it. 
It is carefully worked out by minds which 
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The Man of Business owes it not only 
to himself but to his family to become 
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our booklet. 



WACHOVIA BANK AND TRUST CO. 



ASHEV1LLE 



Capital and Surplus $2,000,000.00 
Member Federal Reserve System 

WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 
SALISBURY 



HIGH POINT 



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VOLUME IX 



THE 



NUMBER 3 



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DECEMBER, 1920 



OPINION AND COMMENT 

A Unique and Potentially Great Conference — The 

Concern of All Citizens — The State University 

and the State Colleges Belong to the State 

The Alumni and University Support 

A Definite Football Policy 

A MESSAGE TO THE PEOPLE OF NORTH 
CAROLINA FROM THE STUDENT BODY 

KEEP IT MOVING 

All Local Alumni Associations Are Urged to Hold 

Holiday Meetings 

VIRGINIA WINS 

In Second Game Ever Played by Old Rivals in 

Charlottesville, Carolina Loses 14 to 



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PUBLISHED BY 

THE ALVMNI ASSOCIATION 



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A Record Smasher 



In SEPTEMBER men and women in North Carolina applied to the JEFFERSON 
STANDARD for $5,265,750 life insurance — a record never before attained by any company 
operating in any Southern State. It is an unparalleled endorsement of the greatest of the 
Southern life insurance companies. 

UNIVERSITY MEN, through the UNIVERSITY AGENCY, applied for over $200,000 
during the month of September. We arc here to render service to Carolina students and 
alumni. We want your co-operation in protecting homes and business and in the upbuilding 
of the State. We thank you for the part you played in our September campaign. 

Come to see us and let's talk over your needs for protection now. Let us show you today 
how you can guarantee the fulfillment of your obligations of tomorrow. Write to us or call 
at our office opposite the campus. We have a plan for you — if you come in time. 

The University Agency 

JEFFERSON STANDARD LIFE INSURANCE CO. 

CYRUS THOMPSON, Jr., Manager 

Special Agents 
BILL ANDREWS NAT MOBLEY 

"INDIVIDUAL SERVICE TO CAROLINA STUDENTS AND ALUMNI" 



THE AMERICAN TRUST CO. 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 
MEMBER FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM 



Acts as Executor, Administrator and 
Trustee for any purpose. 

Write for descriptive booklet, "What 
You Should Know About Wills and 
the Conservation of Estates." 



TRUST DEPARTMENT 

AMERICAN TRUST COMPANY 



Resources More Than $12,000,000 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 

Volume IX DECEMBER, 1920 Number 3 



TO THE PEOPLE OF NORTH CAROLINA 

As part of the large company of your sons and 
daughters who today crowd the North Carolina colleges 
we wish to face facts with you. The main fact is that the 
public schools are turning out graduates in far larger num- 
bers than the colleges can take care of in a decent way. 
Over 3,000 will graduate from the high schools next 
spring. Even now students eat in shifts in Chapel Hill 
boarding houses, and are packed three and four in a room 
in the dormitories. Our congestion here is but representa- 
tive of the congestion in all the North Carolina colleges. 

We present these facts to you with their simple story 
of present urgent need of room in which to eat, sleep and 
study. We hope the churches build more buildings at the 
denominational colleges and the state builds more build- 
ings at the state colleges. 

The main fact is not our present congestion, critical 
as that is in fact and significance, but the larger concern is 
to make room for the boys and girls in the high schools 
who even now are treasuring in their hearts the hope of 
going to college in North Carolina. With belief in her 
greatness we trust that North Carolina will not close the 
door in their faces. 

In mass meeting assembled, 1,000 strong, we send 
this message of hope to the people of North Carolina with 
confident faith that the people, armed with the facts, will 
rise up to meet a big problem in a big way. 

THE STUDENT BODY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 
CHAPEL HILL, N. C, NOV. 5, 1920 



84 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



OPINION AND COMMENT 



A Unique and Potentially Great Conference 

The Educational Conference held in Greensboro 
under the auspices of and promoted by the Chamber 
of Commerce was a most significant educational gath- 
ering. In some respects it was unique in educational 
history. This conference, whose purpose was to tell 
the people the facts about the congested and crippled 
colleges of North Carolina, focused a citizen's move- 
ment. Governor Bickett eloquently voiced the educa- 
tional needs of the state. The hard-headed straight- 
thinking business men under the leadership of Mr. 
J. E. Latham quickly got down to elementals. Nine 
citizens present planked down $500 apiece as a nu- 
cleus of a $25,000 sum to give the people the facts. 
The nine are Mrs. R. J. Reynolds, and Messrs. J. E. 
Latham, R. G. Vaughan, A. M. Scales, John Spruut 
Hill, Clem Wright, Anonymous, Smith Richardson, 
and E. Sternberger. These nine public spirited citi- 
zens and those $4,500 represent in the interpretation 
of the state press a living faith that the people when 
given the facts will meet needs with action and will 
open equal doors to all their sons and daughters who 
wish to go to college in North Carolina. 

□ □□ 

What the Elementals Are 

The elementals which the members of the Greens- 
boro meeting are going to tell their fellow citizens 
about are these: , 

1. North Carolina boys and girls — 2308 of them — 
knocked in vain at the doors of the colleges of their 
first choice in September. They knocked and the 
doors were not opened. Instead of giving them 
bread, North Carolina handed them a stone ! 

2. From 1870, the year in which the United States 
Bureau of Education began to keep records, until 
1920, tlir total spent for the University, the A. & E., 
the various normal schools, the schools for the deaf, 
dumb, and blind, the colored A. and M. — for 50 
years — was only $22,344,640. Of this, leaving out 
an undistributed estimate for 1919-20 of $4,000,000. 
the University spent $4,252,479, the A. and E. 
$4,411,116, the normal schools $4,801,405, the schools 
for the deaf, dumb and blind $4,089,845, and the 
colored normal schools $789,795. 

3. North Carolina today has invested in her thirty- 
one colleges only $14,008,771, an amount wholly in- 
adequate to provide dormitories, classrooms, labora- 
tories, libraries, and other college equipment to take 
care of the 10,586 boys and girls enrolled. 

4. The total annual income of these thirty-one col- 
leges to be used for instruction, for lectures, for books, 
for technical journals, and for other means of in- 



struction and cultural enrichment, is the meager sum 
of $2,434,646, an amount less by $500,000 than the 
total working income of the University of Michigan 
alone. 

5. North Carolina college totals when compared 
with those of states to the north and west, show the 
two big facts that North Carolina does not give her 
boys and girls an equal educational chance with the 
boys and girls of other states, and that she fails to 
equip them completely for the big tasks of church 
and state which await their hand. 

□ □□ 
The People Take It Up 

The Greensboro Meeting — the phrase tells a story 
in itself. The only local fact about it is its name. 
The Greensboro meeting has been adopted by the 
state as the rallying center of a popular movement 
in the cause of youth and higher education in North 
Carolina. Parent-Teachers' Associations, Chambers 
of Commerce, Kiwanis Clubs, Rotary Clubs, state and 
district clubs, have endorsed and championed the 
program of the Greensboro Chamber of Commerce 
to carry the facts to the people about the congested 
colleges. News stories and editorials have taken up 
the movement all over North Carolina. 

The facts and challenge of the Greensboro meeting 
reached beyond the state and gripped the interest of 
Philander P. Claxton, United States Commissioner 
of Education, who digs up a century of facts in re- 
gard to North Carolina's neglect of public education. 

DDD 

The Concern of All Citizens 

The alumni of the University, both as alumni and 
as citizens of the State, should join this public-minded 
movement for a greater North Carolina. The pro- 
gram lends itself to the co-operation of all the alumni 
of all the colleges as alumni and alumnae who have 
not only had their chance in the colleges but also as 
citizens who purpose that their children and their 
children's children shall have an equal chance. 

□ □□ 
The University Alumni 

The following editorial appeared in Charity and 
Children in its issue of November 14th : 

The graduates of our University are devoted to 
their alma mater except in the matter of giving it 
their money. They urge the crying need of more 
room to take care of the students who are clamoring 
at the doors, but it never occurs to them that there is 
anyway to relieve the situation except through legis- 
lative appropriation. They swarm around Raleigh 
and pester the lawmakers with their tearful pleading 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



85 



for our beloved institution, and for the boys who are 
crying to come in, when they could lay down a mil- 
lion dollars to make room for these boys any morning 
before breakfast and never miss the money! We 
read the other day of a great state institution whose 
alumni made it a gift of three million dollars. The 
alumni of our State school are only generous with 
other people's money. We are not opposed to a rea- 
sonable appropriation to our University by the legis- 
lature, and we are fully aware that room ought to be 
made for everybody in North Carolina who wants to 
enter college, but that is not the subject of the present 
discourse. The text of this creed is the monumental 
stinginess of the University alumni. No class of our 
people are more prosperous than our University 
men. We have in mind now one man who clamors as 
loudly for legislative help as any man in the state, 
who has made a million dollars for himself, but so 
far as we know, has never put a brick on the ground 
at Chapel Hill! People are beginning to notice this 
tightfistedness on the part of the graduates of our 
University, and it has its effect on the legislators. 
Wake Forest. Trinity, and Davidson men stand by 
their institutions with their money as well as their 
mouths, but the University alumni as a rule provide 
for their alma mater only sweetened wind. 

□ □□ 
The State University and the State Colleges Belong 
to the State 
A question has been raised as to the source to 
which the state colleges should look for support. Ex- 
amination of the basic nature of the State University 
and the state colleges reveals them as vital parts of 
the state's educational system. The late President 
Graham has supremely interpreted for the nation the 
place and function of a state university in modern 
American democracy. His interpretation is an ac- 
cepted part of the philosophy underneath the Ameri- 
can state university in relation to the public schools 
and in relation to the life of the people. Democracy 
created the relation and President Graham revealed 
the relation in its logical vitality of life and in his 
vivid finality of phrase, unassailable to all the hosts 
of special pleaders and special interests who fight the 
public educational idea under many flags. 

DDD 

The Alumni and University Support 

To say that the University and the state colleges 
should be supported by their alumni is to beg the 
whole question of the nature of the state schools of 
higher education. To beg this question is to deny the 
democratic basis of public education. This denial 
can result from a failure to understand the demo- 
cratic ideas. But to sav in addition that these alumni 
have not supported the University at all is more than 
a failure to understand an idea, it is a failure to un- 
derstand the facts. These are the facts: 

r 

1. Alumni and their friends put up sixteen of the 
twenty-four University buildings. 



2. Alumni established four of the five loan funds 
which hundreds of North Carolina boys have used to 
stay in college. 

3. Alumni established the two lecture foundations, 
McNair and Weill, which bring to North Carolina an- 
nually the leading scholars and thinkers of North 
America. 

4. Alumni established the fund which provides half 
of the new books and periodicals which the Library 
puts annually at the disposal of the students ami 1 In- 
state at large. 

5. An alumnus built the athletic stadium, Emerson 
Field. 

6'. Alumni and students largely built the Y. M. C. 
A. building and help support it annually. 

7. Alumni, students, and friends have subscribed 
for a new social center building for the student body. 

8. Alumni and families of alumni have provided 
for twelve of the University professorships, notably 
the Kenan professorships and the alumni professor 
ships. This fund has saved to North Carolina some 
of the most distinguished scholars and investigators 
in America. 

9. Alumni, students, their families and friends (ex- 
cept for one gift from the state to relieve professors 
who served through the Civil War and the haphazard 
income from escheated lands ) supported the .Uni- 
versity for the first 88 years of its existence. 

10. An alumnus of the University endowed the 
Carr Chair of Philosophy in Trinity College, gave 
the grounds on which Trinity stands, contributed to 
and led the movement which recently raised $200,000 
for a memorial building to James H. Southgate, chair- 
man of the Board of Trustees of Trinity College, and 
himself an alumnus of the University. 

11. Alumni of the University, A. M. Scales and 
R. G. Vaughan, contributed to and led a movement 
which raised $400,000 for Davidson College. The 
Moravians of North Carolina entrusted their cam- 
paign for Salem to Howard Rondthaler, and Francis 
Osborne put through the Episcopal drives for St. 
Mary's and Sewanee. Alumni of the University in 
Chapel Hill and in the state rejoiced to contribute to 
the $840,000 fund for Wake Forest College and will 
take a generous part in the coming campaign for 
$700,000 for Trinity College. 

12. The University plant of $2,000.0(10, largely 
built by the alumni is the unreserved possession of 
the people of North Carolina, open to all who can 
crowd into her congested doors, among whom today 
are 478 Methodists, 355 Baptists, 235 Presbyterians, 
and 159 Episcopalians, here by their glad right as 
citizens in a democratic commonwealth. 

13. This University of the people is going to be- 
come the great University of the South, a peer of 
Wisconsin, Michigan, California and the other greal 



86 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



universities of the Western democracies in so far 
;is the people of North Carolina see the critical needs 
and take hold of their urgent opportunity now. 

nan 

General Education Board Affords Temporary Sal- 
ary Relief 

An announcement made by President Chase to the 
faculty on November 22nd which is of particular 
interest to the alumni is that the General Education 
Board through its officers in New York City has set 
aside a sufficient sum to increase the present salaries 
of the members of the University faculty approxi- 
mately twenty-five per cent for the fiscal year July 1 
to June 80, 1920-21. 

In giving this amount the Board made it clear that 
it was altogether a temporary adjustment to meet 
the extremely critical situation with which the Uni- 
versity has been confronted this year. 

Alumni will be gratified to know that the gift is a 
very unusual one. as only in one or two instances 
has the General Education Board broken its fixed 
rule of not making contributions to state-supported 
colleges. In this instance the character of the Uni- 
versity's work was recognized as so meritorious and its 
need of funds to hold its faculty together so urgent 
that the rule was broken. 

Messrs. R. D. W. Connor and W. N. Everett, of 
the alumni joined President Chase last January in 
presenting the matter to the Board. 

DDD 

The 1920 Tragedy 

The Thanksgiving defeat at the hands of Virginia 
brought to a close the most unsuccessful football sea- 
son since 1912. Of eight games played Carolina won 
only two, from Wake Forest 6 to 0, and from South 
Carolina, 7 to 0. She lost to Yale, 21 to 0; to A. and 
E., 13 to •■',; to Maryland, 13 to 0; to V. M. I., 23 to 0: 
to Davidson, 7 to ; and to Virginia 14 to 0. 

In the eight games Carolina scored 16 points to her 
opponents' 91. Three of those points were made by 
Lowe on a drop kick and one touchdown was made 
by Hanby's picking up a fumble and running 25 

yards across the goal line. In the entire seas mly 

one touchdown was made by the team's rushing the 
ball through an opposing team, or around its ends, 
or over its head. Eight games and one touchdown by 
the strength of the attack! It is doubtful if any 
other University team in Carolina football history 
had so weak an offense. 

On the other hand, this 1920 team had splendid 
qualities of spirit and sportsmanship. Captain I In r 
rell's men wanted to win just as much, and a great 
deal more, than anybody else wanted them to win, 
and individually and collectively they showed fine 
spirit. At a time when their world was falling about 



them, they preserved their unity, remained loyal to 
their coaches, and sought by every possible means to 
work out their salvation. There was no bickering, no 
grumbling, no let-down in morale, no fault of any 
kind to be found in the team's attitude toward itself 
and its job. 

From first to last the University backed the team 
to the limit. Every minute Captain Harrell knew 
that he had the support of fourteen hundred men, 
and their spirit rose highest and burned deepest when 
the situation was most critical. The finest cheering 
at the A. and E. game came from the Carolina root- 
ers toward the end when Carolina had no chance to 
win. The small group who could meet the high cost 
of the Charlottesville trip (after other students had 
tried to charter a freight train to go in box cars and 
to get trucks to ride 200 miles across country) under 
their valiant cheer leader, "Scrubby" Rives, gave a 
demonstration of tremendous and undying support 
that brought from a distinguished Virginia alumnus 
the statement that with such rooters he almost wished 
Carolina had won. 

On the team and in the student body the clear spirit 
of almost idealized athletics was present. But — the 
team could not win, could not show a driving attack, 
and could only strive to hold down the score. The 
tragedy lies in the fact that a group of men who 
ought to have been a strong team were not a strong- 
team. 

DDD 

What Was Wrong? 

It has been said that Carolina lost games because 
of the many injuries. It is true that the backfield 
men were repeatedly hurt and that it was impossible 
for any regtdar recognized varsity backfield to be 
held together for any appreciable time. It has been 
said too that Carolina had no star players. That may 
be true. There were no brilliant men on the squad, 
but there were ten letter men from last year's varsity 
which could and did gain ground. It has been said 
also that Carolina's opponents were unusually strong 
teams. That also may be true. V. M. I. was easily 
the best team in the South Atlantic States and de- 
cisively defeated Pennsylvania. Maryland had a 
strong team and won from Syracuse, who was rated 
one of the best in the country. Yale, A. and E., Vir- 
ginia, and Davidson all had strong teams, especially 
the first two. 

But the truth has not been reached yet. These are 
minor difficulties. If there are injuries, develop sub- 
stitutes. If there are no brilliant players, how about 
team work? If other teams are strong, why can't 
Carolina be sti'onger? Carolina alumni have stood 
for a good deal of losing in the past twenty years 
and they want some victories — fairly and cleanly 
won, of course, but victories just the same. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



87 



The Review believes that the chief fault for failure 
to win this year must fall on the coaching staff. The 
human material was present, the spirit of the squad 
and of the University was unquestioned, but the 
successful team was not created. To Head Coach 
Myron E. Fuller, who for his pleasing- personality, 
his fine influence, and his earnestness of purpose, 
must rank high among Carolina coaches, and to his 
assistant, Clay Hite, was handed a problem that be- 
cause of their unfamiliarity with local conditions was 
well nigh impossible of solution in three months. That 
fact must be taken into consideration, but alongside 
of that fact is the team's undeniable failure to win 
or to show driving strength. The Review believes 
that if there had been a keener appreciation of human 
values in handling the material, if the coaching had 
been more precise and definite and exact in small 
details, if the backfield coaching had been more thor- 
ough, and if the whole squad had been kept in better 
physical condition, the team would have been suc- 
cessful in winning at least a majority of its games. 
On these points it believes the crux of the situation 
lies and for these reasons chiefly it believes six games 
were lost. 

DDD 

A Definite Football Policy 

The 1920 football season must be marked a failure. 
It is over and done with, but it will be a failure multi- 
plied many times if from it Carolina does not draw 
lessons for the future. The Review believes it is 
speaking the wishes of the alumni when it says that 
now is the time, as nearly every year since football 
began in 1890 has been the time, for a Carolina sys- 
tem of football to be started and maintained year in 
and year out to the end that the especial peculiarities 
of the local situation may be turned to the best ad- 
vantage and that through them a high type of win- 
ning teams maj" be developed, not once in a decade, 
but every year and again and again. 

The continued fostering of high school football in 
the state, which has forged ahead in the past ten 
years, and the continued insistence on clean athletics 
and good sportsmanship must, lie maintained. In both 
respects the University has taken the lead. But sin- 
has not taken the lead, she has not even followed any 
definite policy, in the technical handling of material 
oner it has readied Emerson Field. There lies the 
difficulty: there lies the hope for the future. 

It is almost axiomatic, but none the less an ideal 
which has rarely been approached, that the destinies 
of Carolina football must be entrusted to a head coach 
(1) who knows the game and has proved that he can 
teach; (2j who has the personality to instill not only 
sound football knowledge but a terrible pride in one's 
self and a desperate fighting spirit, that grows like a 
soul to meet a desperate situation; (:i) who knows 



from intimate experience the conditions surrounding 

football at the University, in North Carolina, and in 
the South Atlantic states; (4) who loves or can come 
to love the atmosphere of Chapel Hill and would like 
to live here; and (5) who is engaged on a long term 
contract so that he can build up from year to year, 
establishing his own system, turning all details and 
all peculiarities into the working of that system, 
looking ahead and planning ahead always, sowing in 
one year and harvesting in another so that the total 
effect is always cumulative. These are simple mat- 
ters, but because they have not been attended to 
Carolina football has rarely kept pace with other Caro- 
lina achievements. If such policy is pursued, it is 
inevitable that in football as in every other respect the 
University will take her place where she belongs — 
at the top. 

□'□□ 

Coaches Must Know Conditions 

The heart of the matter is in knowing local con- 
ditions, in becoming a part of the Carolina atmos- 
phere, and in teaching the same kind of football year 
after year. The atmosphere of the University is not 
the atmosphere of New England colleges or middle 
western colleges or pacific coast colleges. The football 
situation in North Carolina and in the South Atlantic 
States is different from that in Massachusetts, Ohio, 
Michigan, and Texas. A leader of football must know 
these things and must know them so thoroughly that 
they have become subconscious knowledge. 

DDD 

Coaching Must Be Cumulative 

Above all, the effect of his teaching and leading 
must be cumulative. Captain Harrell, after three 
years of football, had to change his style of play radi- 
cally this .year and learn many things over again. So 
did all Carolina linemen. The result was not healthy. 
It would be better if Carolina football men learn the 
fundamentals when they are freshmen and gain in 
succeeding years from experience, always under the 
same system. The freshmen should be an integral 
part of the varsity, not in the sense that they are 
coached on the same field, but in the definite sense 
that they learn the same football so that when their 
time comes they shall not have to unlearn and learn 
again. Only thus can the less experienced material of 
North Carolina high schools be brought to a par with 
the more experienced material in, say, Virginia. Only 
thus can Carolina football grow from year to year. 

DDD 

Now Is the Time for Action 

The football situation at the University is not des- 
perate. It. is by no means hopeless. It has been bad 
because in the past it has been impossible to follow 



88 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



simple, fundamental principles of football policy. But 
that fact does not mean that those principles cannot 
be followed in the future. Football is too big an in- 
stitution, counts for too much in the life of the Uni- 
versity, is loved too much by the alumni, to be handled 
loosely. The establishment of a definite football policy 
and the adhering to that policy will surely lift Caro- 
lina football to a position where it will bring pride 
and genuine benefit to the University itself, to stu- 
dents, to alumni, to the State of North Carolina. The 
time is now. 

nan 

The Raleigh Pageant a Winner 

To the people of the state who saw the production 
of the Raleigh Tercentenary Pageant, "Raleigh, the 
Shepherd of the Ocean," there has been given a new 
vision of North Carolina. The pageant-drama of 
Raleigh, written by Professor Frederick H. Koch of 
the University, for the three hundredth anniversary 
of Raleigh's death, presented in dramatic form the 
brave ideals which led to the early settlement of the 
New World through the founding of the first settle- 
ment on Roanoke Island. To the imagination this 
drama appears as the first episode in a splendid 
pageant embodying the succeeding events of our dra- 
matic history. 

The production was a notable community achieve- 
ment, a challenge to the creative art of the state. The 
University and the city of Raleigh may well be proud 
of this demonstration of community co-operation in 
the production of a drama which fired the imagina- 
tion of the spectators with so much pride in the his- 
toric background of the past and the possibilities for 
dramatic achievement in the future. 



ATLANTA ALUIOTI NOTES 

T. B. Higdon, of the class of 1905, now a member 
of the Atlanta bar, sends The Review the following 
notes of interest concerning Atlanta alumni : 

Shepard Bryan is the senior member of the firm of 
Bryan & Middlebrooks, attorneys at law, with offices 
in the Candler Building. He is also the father of 
three of the prettiest and smartest little girls in the 
city : Marion Cobb, Florence and Mary. He lives at 
893 Peachtree Street. 

Dr. Michael Hoke is one of the most prominent and 
successful surgeons of the city and of the whole 
south. His specialty is orthopedic surgery and his 
patients come from all over the south and southeast. 
He has offices at 15 West Alexander Street and resides 
at 210 Peachtree Circle. Like Shepard Bryan, he 
specializes in girls at home, his children consisting of 
Miss Laura and Miss Lydia. 

Dr. Edgar G. Ballenger is one of our most suc- 
cessful and widely known physicians. He is a member 
of the firm of Ballenger & Elder, with offices ill the 
Healy Building. He is also prominent in the social 



affairs of the city. He is at present attending the 
session of the Fellows of the American College of 
Surgeons at Montreal. He lives at 128 Myrtle 
Street and has two children, Mary Clarke and Ed- 
gar, Jr. 

Van Astor Batchelor is engaged in the practice of 
law, with offices in the Citizens & Southern Bank 
Building. He lives at 165 Juniper Street and is 
prominent in the business and social affairs of the 
city. 

John Y. Smith is engaged in the practice of law, 
with offices in the Fourth National Bank Building. 
He is one of the eligible bachelors of the city and 
enjoys a very lucrative practice. 

Jerome R. Moore is engaged in the practice of law 
as a partner in the firm of Evins & Moore, with offices 
in the Atlanta Trust Company Building. Jerome also 
is still in the enjoyment of single blessedness but is 
liable to make a change any time. 

Thomas S. Kenan is president of the Atlanta Cotton 
Oil Company and has enjoyed a successful business 
career since coming to Atlanta. He lives at 85 West 
14th Street and equals the record of our alumni here 
for size of family, having three fine children, James 
G., Frank Hawkins and Sarah Cowles. 

L. B. Lockhart is the proprietor of a commercial 
chemical laboratory at 33 ^ Auburn Avenue. He is 
an active member of the American Chemical Society. 
His home is at 312 Myrtle Street and he holds the 
record among our local alumni for boys with three: 
L. B., Jr., James Hamilton and Gordon Brown, the 
last two being the only twins we are so far able to 
report among the alumni here. 

Clarence E. Betts is a professor in the Tech high 
school and is also connected with the local agency for 
the Mutual Life Insurance Company of New York. 
He lives at 160 Linwood Avenue and has two children, 
Mary Salome and Paul Heilig. 

W. C. Raper holds a position in the traffic depart- 
ment of the Southern Railway. He lives at 26 
Howell Place and has two girls in the family, Emma 
Lenora and Grace Carlton. 

The writer is still practicing law in the Hurt Build- 
ing, is still single with good prospects of continuing 
so and is still glad to see or hear from any alumnus 
of U. N. C. 

J. W. Speas, our youngest local alumnus, is sales 
manager of the National City Company and knows 
more about stocks and bonds than any other man in 
Atlanta. It is the opinion of his friends that his 
bachelorhood is approaching its close. 



DAVID BISPHAM GIVES CONCERT 

David Bispham, the well known dramatic baritone, 
gave a concert at the University November 8. Aside 
from the sheer artistry of his singing, Mr. Bispham 
gave especial pleasure by the nature of his program 
which could be understood by every one present, by 
the dramatic features of his singing, by his explana- 
tions of the separate selections, and by his distinctly 
pleasing personality. It was an unusual combination 
of a great singer and a man of common sense who 
knew how to use what he had. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



89 



KEEP IT MOVING 



AH Local Alumni Associations are Urged to Hold Holiday Meetings 



Other significant alumni gatherings reported since 
the last issue of The Review are the Watauga, Le- 
noir, Craven, Tarboro, and Rocky Mount meetings. 

The Watauga alumni met in Boone at the home 
of Roy M. Brown, 'Ob', and enthusiastically resolved 
to throw themselves into the general educational re- 
vival one of whose objectives is a University with 
room enough to feed and house the congested student 
body. R. M. Brown was elected president and I. G. 
Greer secretary. Those present were G. M. Suddreth, 
I. G. Greer, R. M. Brown, H. N. Blair, T. C. Baird, 
H. B. Berry, B. B. Dougherty, J. T. C. Wright, and 
Tracy Council. Plans were made to have another 
meeting during the Christmas holidays. Boone and 
Lenoir will likley co-operate in this meeting. 



The Kinston alumni had a small but spirited meet- 
ing and planned to join the State-wide movement in 
the cause of higher education. C. F. Harvey and 
Eli J. Perry were rallying spirits of this meeting 
and planned for a larger meeting Christmas time. 



The Craven county alumni held an informal smoker 
October 12th and went definitely at the problem of 
college congestion in North Carolina. Wm. Dunn, Jr., 
'01, heads a steering committee to make plans and 
get action. Nat Gooding is feeding the facts to the 
people in lively fashion. A general educational rally 
was discussed and referred to the committee. 



The active and public spirited alumni of Rocking- 
ham county in furtherance of their public educational 
program held a general educational rally at Went- 
worth early in December. The committee in charge 
was P. H. Gwynn, Luther Hodges, and W. E. Price. 
W. R. Dalton was elected president. 



Two significant meetings were held at Rocky 
Mount since University Day. At the first President 
Chase ably presented the facts of University con- 
gestion and suggested that Rocky Mount join in the 
State-wide publicity movement. A big barbecue fea- 
tured the occasion and everybody had a big time. 
Thomas H. Battle made a stirring speech, calling for 
concerted action. A steering committee was ap- 
pointed of which F. E. Winslow is chairman. With 
President Chase to put over the facts in a big way, 
Thomas Battle, '80, to drive home the local eonnect- 
tion with those facts, and Frank Winslow, Will 
Woodard and Wilkinson, Jr., to organize and steer 
the current released in the meeting, the Rocky Mount 
meeting gave a strong punch to the State-wide in- 
formational movement. 



None the less significant was the address of Dr. 
L. R. Wilson, Librarian, before the Current Topics 
Club of Rocky Mount. He presented in masterly ar- 
ray the facts concerning congestion in the University 
and all other colleges in North Carolina in relation 
to the whole matter of higher education in the United 
States. This address was so full of meat that E. C. 
Branson slapped the whole thing into the News Let- 
ter of November 24th, copies of which have been 
mailed to alumni. 



The Tarboro alumni under the spur of Stamps 
Howard and John Umstead had a lively meeting to 
consider the question of crowded dormitories at the 
University. The aforementioned men and G. A. 
Holderness of the state budget commission, a non- 
university man, but one of the most public spirited 
men in North Carolina, followed up this meeting by 
personally going through every dormitory in the Uni- 
versity one Saturday night between 8 and 11 P.M. 
They were amazed at two facts : first, the crowding 
of three and four men in a room, and second, the 
quietness of the dormitories. Tarboro will have an- 
other meeting Christmas. 



Alumni at Hillsboro, not content with holding a 
fine get-to-gether meeting, sent the following letter 
to 3,500 of their fellow alumni: 

Dear Fellow Alumnus : 

We wish to join you in the fellowship of Univer- 
sity alumni in the great cause of public education in 
North Carolina. We are back of the program for 
better public schools in North Carolina from the pri- 
mary through the University. North Cai"olina cannot 
afford to do anything less than provide normal teacher 
training, agriculture and engineering, collegiate and 
University education to meet the youthful aspirations 
and the urgent human needs of a great common- 
wealth. 

The State has come to the critical pass of turning 
out thousands of high school graduates with no pros- 
pect of room for them in the colleges and University. 

As University men we had our chance. We will 
not deny our sous and daughters, our younger broth- 
ers and sisters, the chance which belongs equally to 
them. We must see to it that the State provides suf- 
ficient and equal room for all. 

The fact of four men in a room is not a wholesome 
fact for growth and study. There should be only 
two. Last year there were three. This year there 
are four. Next year the University will have to put 
five in a room or turn them away. ' ' Congestion, not 
the University, will keep them out." 

Give the people the facts. 

Hillsboro Alumni Association. 

Committee: S. M. Gattis, Paul C. Collins, J. Che- 
shire Webb, T. Norfleet Webb, and W. A. Heartt. 



90 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



VIRGINIA WINS 



In Second Game Ever Played by Old Rivals in Charlottesville, 
Carolina Loses, 14 to 

Two touchdowns, one following ;i recovered fumble with Lowe, .McDonald, and Spaugh leading the attack, 

on the 7-yard line and one from a terrific drive for and two passes to Shepard and Morris helping. But 

50 yards, gave Virginia the 25th annual Thanksgiving a penalty hurt and Lowe's drop kick failed. In all 

football game between the Universities of North Caro- Virginia made 8 first downs to Carolina's 6 and com- 

lina and Virginia, 14 to 0. A single touchdown would pleted 2 out of 11 passes to Carolina's 3 out of 11. 

perhaps represent the strength of the two teams more Neither team showed much skill here, 

accurately; Virginia was better all around, and earned with „, lilling . difficu i t pmlt ing was frequent and 

her victory, hut she was only a trifle better and at iu the main Lowe (mtkicked Riuehart. A sharp wind 

the cd of the game she knew she had had the fight put ea ,. h team at a d i sadvanta g e in two quarters and 

of her lite. made catching dangerous, but Carolina might have 

In 1892 for the first game of football ever played gained ., distill( , t advant age if she had handled punts 

between Carolina and Virginia the Tar Heels jour- better 
neved to Charlottesville to fight under the shadow of 

the Old Rotunda. In 1920 the ancient pilgrimage was Lowe was Carolina's best ground gamer. Shepard 

resumed. The high cost of railroad travel kept many at end > Ca P tain Harre11 ' P°indexter, and Jacobi stood 

i . i j.1 j. ■ ■ ■ j e out in the line. Newman, Oppleman, and Riuehart 

students awav and the none-too-inspiring record of ' 11 

the season may have dampened the ardor of some of P la y ed wel1 for Virginia. The game was cleanly 
the alumni, but scores and scores of the Old Guard, P la y ed with tVw P" ialtles and no juries. 
to whom Thanksgiving Day means only the Carolina- The line-up: 
Virginia game, were on hand to lend support to Cap- 
tain Harrell's team. Six thousand persons, the Carolina Virginia 

largest number that ever attended a game in Char- .Shepard Newman 

lottesville, were crowded in the colonnaded stadium Left Eml 

and banked around the sides of Lambeth Field and ane ' ap ai " " """'" "" ■"■•"■—■ 

Lett Tackle 

the rich background of the game was further en- Poindexter Clarke 

riched by the atmosphere and spirit of the occasion. Left Guard 

The first touchdown in the second quarter had some Jacobi Hankins 

elements of a bad break about it. One of Rinehart's Center 

punts rolled back to the 7-yard line and McDonald Pritchard __.._™™. Fenwick 

was downed on the edge of the field. On the first ,, , , Hall 

play, when Hutchins tried to run out of bounds so Right Tackle 

that the ball could be brought nearer the center of Morris Miehie, Captain 

the field, he fumbled and Newman recovered. Rine- Right End 

hart ran into a stone wall, but Oppleman in two stabs ' ona 

gained 5 yards and on the fourth down Witt slipped , w Binehart 

off left tackle. Left Half 

But there was nothing of luck about the second Hutchins Oppleman 

score. In the fourth quarter, after both teams had Ri e ftt Half 

been unable to gain consistently all afternoon, Vir- Spaugh urn. 

<;inia from the center of the field suddenly unleashed 

a powerful drive. Oppleman for 8, a pass from Rine- 

. , T «««•«, ! Touchdowns— Witt. Riuehart. Goals— Hall, 2. Substitu- 

hart to Newman for 20, again Oppleman lor 8, and i . . ,, ,. ,. ,, „ „ , Q , , ,, ,, 

^^ ' tions tor Carolina — McGee for Spaugh, Spaugh tor McGee, 

Kinehart surged around end for the touchdown. It K ernodle for Hanby, Abernethy for Hutchins. Fulton for 

was a sudden and unexplainable attack, many times Abernethy, McGee for Fulton, Hutchins for Spaugh, Cochran 

as ferocious as any other of the game and for the for Morris, Owen for Poindexter, Tenney for McGee. For 

only time Virginia looked markedly superior. Virginia— Shackleford for iMcConncll, McComiell for Shackle- 

,, ., » ,, ,. .,, ford. Zundel for Dunn, Wood for Hankins, Blackford for 

I 1 or the greatest part of the time neither team , , _ . , _, „ , _ ' ... 

Clarke, .Stewart for Fenwick, Russell tor Oppleman, Oarring- 

could maintain a gaining pace. Carolina's greatest ton f[)1 . win _ Re f eree _McGofan, of Michigan. Umpire— 

efforl was in the third quarter when she advanced Donnelly of Trinity. Field Judge— Metzger of Springfield, 

from her own 27-yard line to Virginia's 35-yard line, Headlinesman — Fetzex of Davidson. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



91 



LOWE IS ELECTED CAPTAIN 

Robbins Lowe, of Winston-Salem, will lead the 
1!>-!1 football team. A meeting of all men who played 
in the Virginia game was held in Charlottesville 
Thanksgiving; night and Lowe was easily their first 
choice. His election as captain has been hailed on the 
campus and throughout the State as a tribute to his 
individual playing and to his capacity for leadership 
and Carolina men are looking to him to hlaze a new 
trail next year. 

Lowe has been a backfield man two years, playing 
both quarter and half back. He has been the best 
ground gainer on the team and this year did the bulk 
of the passing, all the punting, the kicking-off, and 
the goal kicking. He has also had some success at 
dropkicking. Rice Warren, the Virginia coach, 
placed him at quarter on his All-South-Atlantic team. 

Lowe is one of the best all-round men on the campus. 
Last year he played first base on the baseball team 
and led the team in hitting. He is now president of 
the athletic association, president of the German 
Club, a member of the Kappa Sigma fraternity, the 
junior order of the Gorgon's Head, and a number 
of other student organizations, and he is one of the 
most popular and most highly respected men on the 
campus. 



illustrate such qualities as courage, self-denial, self- 
restraint, resoluteness, patience, well-ordered atten- 
tion, loyalty to a cause and a distinct form of pa- 
triotic unselfishness. On with the game! Let the 
whistle blow ! May the best team win ! ! 



NORTH CAROLINA AND VIRGINIA 
President Edwin A. Alderman in connection with 
the Carolina-Virginia football game Thanksgiving 
made the following statement: 

No two American communities are bound together 
by stronger and finer ties than the State of North 
Carolina and the Commonwealth of Virginia. There 
are more natives of North Carolina now living in Vir- 
ginia than in any other state except North Carolina 
itself. Side by side they lie along a boundary line of 
three hundred and fifty miles, the longest single boun- 
dary between any two of the original thirteen states. 
Mighty bonds of common business interests tie them 
together. Shoulder to shoulder they fought for in- 
dependence under Washington and for local self- 
government under Lee. Acquainted with common 
disaster and struggle they are one now in the great 
processes of common prosperity and power. It is 
meet and proper that their younger sons from out 
their venerable, historic Universities should meet 
in generous rivalry in the forum and on the playing 
fields. They have so met for a generation and in such 
fashion as to gain for each other generous and chival- 
rous esteem and regard. They arc met today on Lam- 
beth Field, recalling in its fair outlines the sweep and 
beauty of ancient Greece, to lest each other's quality 
in the intensesl form of organized athletics. Their 
teams are pure and free from taint and their stand- 
ards are similar and high. The great game of foot- 
ball is to them not a frantic strugle with mere victory 
as the end, such as might fitly characterize a bull-fighl 
or a prize fight, but a contest in clean sportsmanship, 
primarily educational in character, and designed to 



MARYLAND WINS INITIAL GAME 
A series of sweeping end runs behind smooth in- 
terference broke down a crippled Carolina defense 
and Maryland on October 30 won the first game she 
has ever played in Chapel Hill, 13 to 0. One touch- 
down came from a fumble, the other after a steady 
march down the field, with wide end runs doing the 
damage. Maryland forced the play throughout and 
on two other occasions reached the 10-yard line. 

Carolina used an entire substitute backfield, the 
regulars all being injured. On offense the substi- 
tutes showed little power and it was only by forward 
passes that Carolina gained consistently. Eight out 
of eleven were completed, but when in a position to 
score the Tar Heels lacked the drive. McDonald, 
playing his first game at quarter, ran the team well ; 
McGee showed flashes of tip-top form, and Captain 
Harrell was a roek-wall in the line. The whole line 
was strong on defense. 



V. M. I. SCORES 23 TO 
The flying squadron from V. M. I., rated by many 
experts as the peer of any team in the South, won 
from the University, 23 to 0, in Chapel Hill on No- 
vember 6. Led by Leech, the best half back in the 
South, the brilliant backfield of the cadets swept 
around the Carolina ends and slashed off tackle for 
consistent gains, while the heav.y V. M. 1. line stood 
off all assaults and allowed Carolina only two first 
downs. Leech played a wonderfully versatile game, 
running, passing, punting, kicking a field goal, and 
being always a threat. Carolina showed the same lack 
of drive that she has shown all season, fumbled at 
critical moments, tackled sloppily, and showed good 
football only in stalwart defensive line play, in block- 
ing forward passes, with which V. M. I. had been 
able to gain against other opponents, and in a few 
instances of individual playing by Lowe, McGee, 
Spaugh, and Ilutchins. The largest crowd n\' the 
year was on hand, nearly 3.0(H) persons. 



DAVIDSON WINS 7 TO 
November was a month of humiliation for Caro- 
lina, and Davidson added her first victory since 1910 
when she won in Winstun-Salem. November 13. by 
the score of 7 to 0. An intercepted forward pass 
and one wide end run two minutes before the final 
whistle blew jrave the victory. Carolina, playing a de- 
fensive game throughout and kicking most of the 



92 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



time on the first down, carried the play into David- 
son territory for three-quarters of the game. Twice 
she had good chances to score and once reached the 
three-yard line, but the ability to gain a needed ten 
yards in four clowns was not present. As in nearly 
every game this year the Carolina backfield was cut 
up by injuries. Lowe punted well and Harrell was 
conspicuous in the line. 



STATE'S YOUNGEST ASSOCIATE JUSTICE 

If Walter P. Stacy, '08, who early in January 
is to become Associate Justice of the Supreme Court 
of North Carolina, knew that his old college chums 
were about to sit in judgment on him, he wouldn't 
become in the slightest exercised. Nor would he even 




.iiuge W. P. Stacy, '08, Who Becomes Associate 
Justice of the Supreme Court 

worry as to the outcome ; but, if he deemed it cor- 
rectly arrived at, would accept the result with that 
wondrously rare thing known as equanimity. 

There's Stacy for you — he never yet met a situation 
until the situation looked him up ; then he arises, looks 
it straight in the eye and acknowledges the introduc- 
tion. Very much then depends upon the situation. 

It looked to the political observers as if another 
would pick up the ermine dropped by Justice Brown 
into last June's Democratic primary. Not because 
those who had watched the work of Superior Court 
Judge W. P. Stacy failed to realize that here was a 
robust young man ripe for any position of trust which 
his State could give him; but they failed to realize 
that the State was ready for Stacy. 

Stacy did realize it. He has always known just 



how far he could reach without having to turn loose. 
It was so in the days when he and Duke Robins from 
the South Building ran their class and, through John 
J. Parker, the bigger part of the campus, not in- 
fested by the Ishmaelite, who denied fealty to all. 
If there were any way to prove it, a bet would here- 
with be offered that when Watt Stacy as a cooing 
infant stretched forth his hand for rattle, bottle or 
pacifier he got it. 

This man, folks, knows himself, and that's the 
simple, little secret of his steady, rapid progress. But 
that secret was not discovered by Stacy's telling, for 
without being at all inclined to hold out on his friends 
and acquaintances, he always finds out more from 
you than you from him. That's fair enough, too, — 
he can make better and more legitimate use of in- 
formation than most. 

Carolina men of Stacy's campus generation will 
remember him chiefly as student, debater and campus 
counselor. And yet when the need arose he played 
a good quality of football — another case of not rising 
to the situation and getting stiff before the latter was 
ready with its "pleased to meet you." In college 
days, so far as known, he never made a false move, 
although more than once he aided friends to recover 
from the effects of a stumble. 

As a legislator, which was his first public service, 
he kept his head level, didn't talk too much out of 
his mouth and became known as a young man who 
was willing to listen. As a Superior Court judge he 
was still quiet ; but this quietness, freedom from ec- 
centricities and speedy, though thorough, dispatch of 
business, made his work almost sensational. In al- 
most no time he was being heralded as the equal of 
the very best men on the bench. 

He goes to the Supreme Court with everybody who 
has watched him work convinced that his delivery of 
the goods will be made in the same unobtrusive, un- 
biased, and thorough fashion. — 0. J. Coffin, '09, Edi- 
tor Raleigh Times. 



NEW METHODIST CHURCH PROJECTED 

As a result of a movement started at the recent 
meetings of the Western North Carolina and North 
Carolina Conferences of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, South, a new Methodist Church for Chapel 
Hill has been projected to cost $150,000. The pro- 
posal embodies the following features: 

Each conference through its boards of missions 
and church extension is to appropriate $30,000. The 
General Boards at headquarters in Nashville, Tennes- 
see, are to be called on to appropriate $20,000, and 
the local church at Chapel Hill is to raise $20,000, 
making $100,000 from church sources. The remain- 
ing $50,000 is to be secured through individual con- 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



9a 



tributions on the part of Methodists throughout the 
State. 

In projecting this plant the church authorities have 
in mind a thoroughly modern church building with 
ample provision for Sunday School and social activ- 
ities. At the same time it is proposed to renovate 
the present parsonage in Chapel Hill and make the 
Methodist plant here one of the most complete in 
North Carolina. 



CHAPEL HILL DEFEATS MONROE 

The Chapel Hill high school football team annexed 
the title of State champions when it defeated the Mon- 
roe high school football team on Dec. 4 in a stubborn- 
ly contested, well played game on Emerson Field 
by the score of 14 to 0. Prior to this game Chapel 
Hill had won the eastern title and Monroe had won 
the western title. A great deal of interest was taken 
throughout the State in the contest, which was the 
seventh annual contest to be conducted under the 
auspices of the University committee on high school 
athletics. Twenty-two high school teams, fifteen in 
the east and seven in the west, entered the champion- 
ship series. Chapel Hill was coached by F. W. Mor- 
rison, of Carolina. Monroe was coached by C. W. 
Orton, of Colgate, and Herndon Hasty, of Carolina. 
In the past seven years Raleigh has won the State 
title three times, Charlotte twice and Chapel Hill 
twice. 



LEST WE FORGET 

Editor. The Review : 

Sir : — In the article headed Carolina vs. Virginia 
on page 56, Alumni Review for November, 1920, last 
sentence, first paragraph, it is stated, "It will mark 
the first time any Carolina team ever invaded the 
Virginia citadel." I take exception to that statement. 

In 1892 the Carolina team played Virginia at Char- 
lottesville and was defeated by a score of 30-18. I 
accompanied the team as a substitute but did no1 
play in the game. This was the only game North 
Carolina lost that season. In fact it was the only 
frame in which they were scored against. They re- 
venged themselves the same season in Atlanta on the 
Saturday after Thanksgiving, winning from Virginia 
by a score of 26-0. The captain of the team was 
Mike Hoke and the manager was Charles Baskerville. 
Very t ruly vours, 

W. P. Wooten, '93. 

Detroit, Mich., Nov. 30, 1920. 



COME, ELEVEN! 

"Come eleven! Come eleven!" 
No, you are wrong again. It isn't a crap game. 
and we are not talking to the bones. On the contrary, 
we happen to be talking to you. if by chance, you are 
one of the 210 combinations of flesh and bones, which 
go to make up eleven, that class which rolled high at 
its five-year reunion in 1916, and is now preparing 
to shake-'em-up for a show-down at its ten-year re- 
union in 1921. 

As the 18th amendment took the lip out of julep, 
the program committee is forced to forego the cus- 
tomary concoction of spiked lemonades and serenades 
and substitute therefore a safe and sane come-back, 
while the band plays: "The Camels are Coming." 

The white paper shortage, of course, will not allow 
a detailed account of the stunts to be pulled at this 
record-breaking reunion, .yet it might be both apropos 
and appetizing to mention one of the large features — 
the "big-eats," which will be held at "The Coop" 
(accent on the chicken). The prgram committee has 
already signed up Marse Henry, demon dean of the 
menu, to appease the wrath of the Pigera, the god- 
dess of the appetite. In the meantime, the accoustics 
committee has been successful in rounding up for this 
rapacious repast some notable Big Berthas. 

Conspicuous among whom is "Railroad" Smith. 
"Railroad," after a period of three years under 
government control, has returned to private owner- 
ship, whom, he says, he expects to bring witli him 
if she will come. Sherman was right about it, and 
"Railroad" is the same thing on wheels. 

"Tickets please! You must be trying to ride me,'' 
retorts "Railroad." 

" Tankus-in-Urbe, " a super-dread-drought of no 
mean capacity is booked to respond to the toast : 
"How Prohibition has forced me to become as sober 
as a judge — Judge Brockwell " 

A number of 1911 benedicts, late of the altar and 
picked at random, will speak extemporaneously on 
the subject: "Once Happy — Now Married." 

Between speeches, spare-ribs and spinach, Bill 
Ellis' tinkling cymbal and sounding brass band, di- 
rected by the peerless Jack Watters, compared to 
whom as a band leader Sousa is dying with St. Vitus 
dance, will furnish the latest jazz. Add to this Jos 
eph Gabriel Walker's ministerial band of wind instru- 
ments and refrain from yelling "eureka" with Archi- 
medes and Archie Dees, if you can. 
"Come eleven! Come eleven!" 



President Chase received word November 17 of the 
death of his father, Charles Merrill Chase, at George- 
town, Mass. He left immediately to attend the fun- 
eral. 



Dr. George Tayloe Winston, president of the Uni- 
versity from 1891 to 1895, also former president of 
the University of Texas and of the A. and E. Col- 
lege, was a visitor in Chapel Hill in November at the 
home of his son, Prof. P. H. Winston. 



94 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



LAWRENCE HOLT ESTABLISHES LOAN 
FUND 

President H. W. Chase announced on Oct. 27 that 
the University has received from Lawrence S. Holt, 
Jr., '04, of Burlington, a gift of $10,000 to be used in 
helping provide a college education for students who 
would not otherwise have the money to go to the 
University. 

The principal of the $10,000 will be established as 
a loan fund for worthy and needy students, and 
the income from these loans will be used for four 
scholarships which will be awarded annually to that 
member, man or woman, of each of the freshman, 
sophomore, junior, and senior classes who shall be 
judged the most needy, deserving, and worthy. "It 
is my wish," said Mr. Holt, in making the gift to 
President Chase, "that no person shall receive one 
of these scholarships who would otherwise be able to 
attend the University of North Carolina." 

The administration of the fund will be in the 
hands of the president, Business Manager Charles T. 
Woollen, and Dean M. C. S. Noble, of the school of 
education. President Chase pointed out, also, the 
double effectiveness of the gift which establishes a 
loan fund and provides scholarships at the same time. 
"It is a generously conceived and finely planned 
gift," he said, "and, so far as I know, is unique in 
the multiplied results it will achieve." 

Lawrence Holt has been in close contact with the 
University for many years. He has been prominently 
connected with cottoin manufacturing interests in 
Alamance county and now lives at Burlington. 



limit the number of those attending. Hereafter, ac- 
cording to the club's new policy, only students, 
alumni, members of the faculty, and their partners, 
will be invited to German Club dances. The club 
took the step ' ' with the deepest regret, ' ' but regarded 
some curtailment as necessary. 



A. S. M. KENNY DIES 

Augustus S. Merrimon Kenny, of Salisbury, a stu- 
dent at the University last year and the year before, 
died at the University Infirmary, November 2, follow- 
ing a critical illness of two weeks. He was buried 
in Raleigh. Members of the Kappa Sigma to which 
Kenny belonged, acted as pall bearers. The deceased 
was born in Raleigh and lived there and in Salisbury. 
He was a son of John B. Kenny and Mrs. Margaret 
Merrimon Kenny ; a grandson of former Chief Justice 
Merrimon, and a nephew of Mrs. Lee S. Overman. 



PHI SENDS MESSAGE TO WILSON 

The Philanthropic Society sent, through Secretary 
Daniels, a message of sympathy and faith to Presi- 
dent Wilson on November 9. "To us you represent 
the typical America," ran one sentence, "the exem- 
plar of Christian civilization ; and we confidently be- 
lieve that the cause will yet prevail and that America 
will not break faith with the dead and the future." 



GERMAN CLUB LIMITS DANCES 

Crowded conditions at University dances compelled 
the German Club to take steps, late in November, to 



MUSICAL CLUB ON TRIP 

The Musical Clubs of the University gave a series 
of concerts through the western part of the State in 
mid-November. Raleigh, Charlotte, Spartanburg, S. 
C, Salibury, Greensboro, and Winston-Salem were 
visited. Thomas H. Hamilton, assistant director of 
music, was in charge. 




North Carolina versus Virginia 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



95 



ESTABLISHED 1916 



fllumni Loyally fund 



Council: 

A.M. SCALES, '92 
LESLIE WEIL. '95 
L. R. WILSON. '99 
A. W. HAYWOOD. 04 
W. T. SHORE. 'OS 
J. A. GRAY. '08 



"One for all, and all for one " 




The Teacher's Mite 

The following letter was received early in November by the Editor of The 
Review. Read it. Then act in keeping with the fine spirit that fills it. 

Dear Friend: 

I wonder if the calls made upon your teacher-salary enable you to be in- 
telligently sympathetic with those of the teaching profession who, yearning to 
contribute to Alma Mater, yet find themselves ever facing the monthly re- 
minder — overdrawn ? 

Year by year I seem to have nothing to offer but service and the very lines 
of that service call more and more for rigid economy in matters financial. 

1 am enclosing my teacher's mite (perhaps it should be spelled might) — 
two checks of ten dollars each. If you think wise let one go to the Alumni 
Loyalty Fund, the other to the Graham Memorial. 



Write Your Check and Send it To-day 

to 

THE TREASURER OF THE UNIVERSITY OF N. C. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 

Issued monthly except in July, August, and September, by the Gen- 
eral Alumni Association of the University of North Carolina. 

Board of Publication 

The Review is edited by the following Board of Publication: 

Louis R. Wilson. '99 Editor 

Associate Editors: Walter Murphy. '92; Harry Howell, '95; Archibald 

Henderson. '98; W. S. Bernard, '00; J. K. Wilson, '05; Louis 

Graves, '02; F. P. Graham, '09; Kenneth Tanner, '11; Lenoir 

Chambers, Jr., '14; R. W. Madry, '18. 

E. R. Rankin. '13 Managing Editor 

Subscription Price 

Single Copies $0.20 

Per Year 1.50 

Communications intended for the Editor and the Managing Editor 
should be sent to Chapel Hill, N. C. All communications intended fcr 
publication must be accompanied with signatures if they are to receive 
consideration. 

OFFICE OF PUBLICATION, CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 

Entered at the Postoffice at Chapel Hill, N. C, as second class 
matter. 



THE UNIVERSITY IN PRINT 



RALEIGH, THE SHEPHERD OF THE OCEAN 

The book of the pageant-masque. Raleigh, the 
Shepherd of the Oceau, by Prof. Frederick H. Koch, 
of the University, has recently come from the print- 
ers (Raleigh, Edwards and Broughton, 1920. 95 
pp. illust. O., $2.00), and is an artistic success in 
appearance as well as in content. Done in brown 
with tlic coat of arms of Sir Walter Raleigh and his 
autograph in gold upon the cover, illustrated with 
a number of historical prints bearing upon the life 
of the great explorer, and containing the text in full, 
the book makes a valuable contribution to the liter- 
ature of the American Tercentenary Celebrations, of 
which the Raleigh pageant is among the most im- 
portant. 

The pageant is dedicated by Mr. Koch to the 
people of Raleigh in the following words : "To the 
citizens of the city of Raleigh in North Carolina, in- 
heritors of the brave spirit of the pioneer colonizer. 
Sir Walter Raleigh, who wrote just before his fall, 
'I shall yet live to see it an English nation.' " 

The pageant is designed not merely to present 
some of the shining incidents hi the life of the man, 
but also to suggest something of the larger signifi- 
cance of his contribution, to show forth Sir Walter 
Raleigh as representing the struggle of the English 
people for freedom from tyrant rule, as blazing the 
way for those who came after him to inherit the frui- 
tion of his vision of a brave New Yorld. 

The prints in illustration are by no means the least 
interesting part of the book. They represent, in addi- 
tion to the arms of Sir Walter and his autograph 
displayed on the cover, the only portrait of Raleigh 
published in his lifetime, which appeared first in "The 
History of the World," in 1617; the birthplace of 
Raleigh; Zucchero's Queen Elizabeth; "Indian 



Chiefs of Roanoke Island" and the "Arrival of the 
English at Roanoke Island," from DeBry's engrav- 
ings of the John White pictures; the "Defeat of the 
Spanish Armada, 1588," from the engraving of the 
tapestry hangings of the House of Lords; Wykeham 
Archer's drawings of Raleigh's cell in the Tower; 
and Jacques Busbee's "Site of Fort Raleigh on Roan- 
oke Island," now hanging in the Hall of History. — 
Xews and Observer. 



LIBRARY RECEIVES SOUTH AMERICAN 
BOOKS 

From South American universities and libraries 
the University of North Carolina has received as 
gifts for its library a number of valuable Latin- 
American books which come as a result of the South 
American trip of Dr. Sturgis E. Leavitt, of the Uni- 
versity faculty, recentlj' returned from sixteen months 
in Peru, Bolivia, Chile, Argentina, and Uruguay. 

One group of books, some thirtj' volumes, is ob- 
tained by the kindness of the rector of the University 
of Chile, Dr. Domingo Amunategui Solar. "The im- 
portance of this collection for the student of Spanish 
American literature and history can hardly be over- 
estimated," said Dr. Leavitt. "In Barros Arana and 
M. L. Amunategui, some of whose works are included, 
Chile counts two of its most distinguished historians ; 
as active leaders in political life they acutely interpret 
the thought and progress of their country." 

From the National Library of Chile are two sets of 
bibliography, one of them including twenty-six vol- 
umes. They are the gift of Carlos Silva Cruz, di- 
rector of the National Library, and of Ramon Laval, 
secretary. 

The gifts, aside from their actual value and their 
comparative rareness in this country, are considered 
important at the University as establishing a link be- 
tween the University of North Carolina and South 
American institutions. Dr. Leavitt has arranged also 
for the exchange of the University's scholarly jour- 
nals, Studies in Philology, The Elisha Mitchell Jour- 
nal, and The Sprunt Historical Publications, with sim- 
ilar journals in South America. Some years ago the 
Universitj- obtained a number of volumes from Har- 
vard on South America, and the present gift goes a 
long way toward building up an impressive South 
American section in the library. 



W. E. Yelverton, '08, formerly managing editor 
of the Raleigh News and Observer and later its Wash- 
ington correspondent, has accepted a position as 
State manager with the Consolidated Press Associa- 
tion, otherwise known as David Lawrence (Inc). 
Mr. Yelverton began his new duties in late Septem- 
ber and is handling the sales department of the Law- 
rence syndicate. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



Union National 
Bank 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 

Capital $200,000.00 

Surplus & Profits $235,000.00 
Resources $3,500,000.00 



We cordially invite the 
alumni and friends of the 
University of North Carolina 
to avail themselves of the fa- 
cilities and courtesies of this 
bank. 



D. P. TILLETT 
Cashier 



High Grade 
Investments 

Offered, Subject Sale 



na State 4s. doe 

><) First Mom-.- ;;«tat* 

- 
Seal Estate Mortgage Loan 
basis. 
.-.are* American Trust Company 
stock. 
20 shares Indeper.d'-r.'j'; Trust Com- 

J/any stock. 
10 shares Jewel Cotton Mil] 7 per 

.'red. 
50 shares Stonecutter Mill 7 per cent 

Preferred. 
50 shares K. J. Reynold* Tobacco 
7 per east Preferred. 

Anderson Mo'or Company 

7 p*: .' 

100 ftharex Hanes R -.-.pany 

li - r Company 

Pr*rf<rrr*-'l. 
100 - pany 

7 per eeofl Preferred. 
33 shares Koanoke Mills 7 12 per 
Preferred. 
Many good offerings in Southern 
■ 'V.-ks. 

F. C. Abbott & Co. 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 

INVESTMENTS 

Phone 238 Postal Phone 
Long DUt. 9957 



GENERAL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

of the 

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH 

CAROLINA 



Officers of the Association 

V.. K. Rankin, i . - cretary 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE: Walter Mor 
■ >t. It. H. Lewis, '70; W 
36; 11. E. Rondthaler, '93: C. W. 



1881 
— Charles K. Lewis is engaged in the in- 
surance business at Men ud. 
— P. B. Daney, retired fertilizer rnanu 

Baltimore. 

— Br. J. V. J 

farming in Lenoir Co imtj at Lagrange. 

He is chairman of the executive com- 
mittee of the Nor' i 1 obaeeo 

1884 
— AI. li. Hamer eontinni 

rnverse College, Spartanburg, 

1885 
— B. C. ilclver, formerly head of the 
public schools of Cheraw, S. C, is prm 
eipal of the Cameron high school. 

1887 
— W. K. Boggan is clerk .: 
eourt for Anson County at Wadesboro. 

1888 
— J. C. Eng gaged 

- at Louisville, Ky. 

He lives at 1345 8. 3rd St. 

1891 
— Judge K. \V. Bingham, of Louisville, 
Ky v is owner and publisher of the 

best known papers of the country. He 
owns and publishes the Louisville 
Times. 

1892 
— 1. C. Aiebane, lawyer of New fork 

.iiees fro.. 
Broadway to Z~ Cedai St. 

1893 
— B. Payson Wiliard is mans, 
large t,ag plant at W'ilming - 
. I Sack Company. 

1894 
— JJ. L. Thompson is engaged in the 
cotton brokerage business in New 
City. 

1895 
— A. L. Qniekel, lawyer of 1. 
was elected in November to rep 

nmty in the lower 
the General Assembly. 
— Hale K. Barling, Law '9-y, wj. 
sides at Chelsea, Vt., has jnat been 
elected to the Vermont House of Bep- 



The Planters National 
Bank 

Rocky Mount, N. C. 



Capital, $300,000. Surplus and 
undivided profits over $350,000. 
three and a half 
million. 

in the center <,: 
rn North Carolina 

g all lines of banking. '>'.', 



3. C. BBASWELL, President 
M. C. BBASWELL, Viee-Pres. 

MILLARD p. .\i>::.: 
R. D. GORIIAM. .-. 

"The Bank of Personal Service" 



THE 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

OF 

RICHMOND, VA. 

with its resources of $36,000,000, 
is splendidly equipped to serve in 
all branches of Commercial Bank- 



Tnul Department 

The Trust Department offers 
unexcelled service. 



M. MILLER. It. 
CHAS. R. BURNETT 
ALEX F. RYI 
S. P. RYLAND - 
S. E. BATES. Jr. - 
JAS. M. BALL, Jr. 
THOS. W. PURCELL 



Presideot 

Vice-Pf».. 
Vice-Pr-.. 
Vi«-P«. 
Vk, - 
- fjdtx, 
TroatOfear 



98 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



THE BANK of 
CHAPEL HILL 



Oldest and Strongest Bank 
in Orange County 



Capital $25,000.00 

Surplus and Profits 45,000.00 



We earnestly solicit your banking 
business, promising you every service 
and, assistance consistent with safe 
banking. "It pleases us to please 

Villi." 



M. C. S. NOBLE, President 
R. L. STROWD, V-President 
M. E. HOGAN, Cashier 



STATEMENT OP THE CONDITION 
OF 

THE FIDELITY BANK 
Durham, N. C. 

Made to the North Carolina Corpora- 
tion Commission at the Close of 
Business June 30, 1920 

Resources 
Loans and Investments..$3,864,605.84 

Furniture and Fixtures- 17,443.48 

Cash Items 329,999.97 

Cash in Vaults and with 

Banks 1.028,979.12 

Overdrafts Secured 1,643.18 

$5,242,671.59 

Liabilities 

Capital Stock $ 100,000.00 

Surplus - 500,000.00 

Undivided Profits 133,227.61 

Deposits 3,710,886.28 

Bills Payable 445.000.00 

Hills Re-discounted 353,557.70 

$5,242,671.59 

Commercial and Savings 4% Com- 
pounded Quarterly in Our Sav- 
ings Department 

Authorized by its charter to act as 
administrator, guardian, trustee, agent, 
executor, etc. 

The strength of this bank lies not 
alone in its capital, surplus and re- 
Bourcea, but in the character and fi- 
nancial responsibility of the men who 
(induct its affairs. 

B. N. DUKE, President 
.TNO. F. WILY, Vice-President 
L. D. KIRKLAND, Cashier 
II. W. BORING, Asst. Cashier 



resentatives for his third term. Pre- 
viously he served one term in the State 
Senate and was Lieuteant-Governor in 
1918-19. He is prominently mentioned 
for Speaker. 

1896 
— Dr. W. ('. Smith is dean of the fac- 
ulty and head of the department of 
English in the North Carolina College 
for Women, at Greensboro. 

1897 
— Cameron F. MaeRae has resigned as 
a special assistant to the Attorney Gen- 
eral in the Department of Justice, where 
for three years he was engaged in pass 
ing upon the title to land acquired by 
the United States for the Appalachian 
Forest Reserve, and has entered upon the 
practice of law in Asheville. 
— W. S. Howard is secretary and treas- 
urer of the Runnymede Mills, at Tar- 
boro. 

— Dr. T. M. Green is engaged in the 
practice of medicine in Wilmington. 
— Lawrence M. MaeRae is president of 
the Visible Measure Gasoline Dispenser 
Company of America. The general 
offices and factories of this corporation 
are at 700-800 W. Breckinridge St., 
Louisville, Ky. Mr. McRae's address 
is 7:24 W. Breckinridge St., Louisville, 
Ky. 

1898 
— R. W. Allen has resigned as superin 
tendent of the Monroe schools and has 
become superintendent of the schools of 
Alison county, at Wadesboro. 
— Rev. I. E. D. Andrews, formerly 
Presbyterian minister at Elizabeth- 
town, Ky., lias become pastor of the 
Presbyterian church at Westminster, 
S. C. 

— F. A. Gudger, of New York City, 
made a brief visit to Chapel Hill in 
November. 

1899 
11. M. Wagstajpf, Secretary, 
Chapel Hill, N. C. 
— C. B. Buxton is engaged in the cotton 
business at Dallas, Texas, as vice-presi- 
dent of the firm of H. L. Edwards and 
Co., Inc. 

— The Supreme Court of the United 
States has recently affirmed a decision 
of Judge Samuel E. Sliull of Strouds- 
burg, Perm., president judge of the 
courts of Monroe and Pike Counties, 
Pennsylvania. In this case Judge Sliull 
had to decide a vital question in rela- 
tion to inter-state and intra-state com 
tnerce. 

— T. Gilbert Pearson, of New York City, 
was recently elected president of the 
National Association of Audubon Socio 
ties. 

— R. C. Freeman, Law '99, practices 
his profession ill Dobson. 



The 
Trust Department 



Of the Southern Life and 
Trust Company buys and 
sells high grade stocks and 
bonds. We have for sale 
some especially attractive 
preferred stocks. 



Trust Department 

Southern Life & Trust Company 

A. W. McALISTER, President. 
R. G. VAUGHN, First Vice-President. 
A. M. SCALES, General Counsel and 
Vice-President. 



Independence Trust 
Company 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



Capital & Surplus, $1,600,000 

Member Federal Reserve System 



All departments of a well- 
regulated bank are maintained, 
among which are the Commer- 
cial, Savings, Collections, For- 
eign Exchange, and Trust, 
and we cordially invite free 
use of any of these depart- 
ments. 



J. H. LITTLE, President 

E. O. ANDERSON, Vice-Pres. 

E. E. JONES, Cashier 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



9!) 



Bonds For 
Investment 



Many people are daily realiz- 
ing that bonds can be purchased 
now at prices seldom if ever 
equalled in the history of our 
country, and in denominations 
as small as $100. We particu- 
larly desire to serve the small 
investor and respectfully solicit 
his business. 

Trustees of estates, savings 
banks, large insurance com- 
panies and other experienced in- 
vestors, are steadily accumulat- 
ing the kind of securities we 
recommend. 

If you have funds for invest- 
ment in amounts large or small, 
consult us that we may have the 
opportunity to explain the un- 
usual opportunities that are 
yours today. 

Southern Security Service Co. 

Second Floor Greensboro National Bank Building 

Greensboro, N. C. 

E. P. WHARTON, ('resident 

C H. HENDERSON, V-Pres. R. B WINDER, V-Pres. 

Phones 2691-1238 



"It's Famous Everywhere" 
The 

Battery Park Hotel 

ASHEVILLE, N. C. 



Iii the heart of the 
Blue Ridge mountains, in 
the Land of the Sky. 
Centrally located in pri- 
vate park of 15 acres. 
Commands unobstructed 
views. Cuisine and serv 
ice unsurpassed. 

Rates and booklet will 
be sent upon request. 



S. J. LAWRENCE, Manager 



1900 

W. S. Bernard, Secretary, 

Chapel Hill, X. ('. 

— J. A. Lockhart, lawyer of Wadesboro, 

delivered an Armistice D;ty address a1 

Monroe, November 11th. 

1901 
J. G. Murphy, Secretary, 
Wilmington, X. C. 
— J. W. Turrentine spent a day on the 
"Hill" the last of October. Mr. 
Turrentine has charge of a government 
plant for making potaslt from kelp at 
Suiumerland, Cal. While in Chapel Hill 
he spoke before the journal club, an or- 
ganization of students in the chemist i\ 
department. 

— Philip H. Busbee is engaged in the 
practice of law at Raleigh. 
— W. M. Stevenson is a member of the 
law firm of McColl and Stevenson, at 
BennettsviUe, S. C. 

— Dr. Eben Alexander practices medi- 
cine in Knoxville with offices at 415-16 
Holston Building. 

— H. T. Greenleaf is an official of the 
Xational Bank of Commerce at Norfolk, 
Va. 

1902 
I. F. Lewis, Secretary, 
University, Va. 
— T. C. Worth is engaged in banking 
at Durham as vice-president of the Dur- 
ham Loan and Trust Company. 
— B. S. Drane is engaged in civil engin- 
eering at Charlotte. 

1903 
N. W. Walker, Secretary, 
Cambridge, Mass. 
— Dr. Charles E. Maddry, baptist min- 
ister of Austin, Texas, and former pas- 
tor of the Baptist Tabernacle, Raleigh, 
has been elected corresponding secretary 
of the Baptist State Mission Board. 
Dr. Maddry has accepted this responsi 
ble position, and will soon be back in 
his home State. 

— William R. Holland continues as 
chemist for the Welsbach Company, at 
Gloucester City, X. J. 
— Henry C. Wall is a cotton manufac- 
turer nf Rockingham. 
— E. A. Hawes practices his profession, 
law, in his home town, Atkinson. 
— L. L. Parker is president of the Bank 
of Pageland, at Pageland, 8. C. 

1904 

T. F. Hickerson, Secretary, 

Chapel Hill, \. i' 

— L. B. Lockhart is head of the Lock- 

hart Laboratories, Atlanta, Git. 

— A. W. Latta is secretary ami treasurer 

of the Gastonia Cotton Yarn Co., 105-6 
Mariner ami Merchant Bhlg., Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 

— W. F. McCanless is superintendent of 
the Jonesboro schools. 




The Young Man 



who prefers (and most young men do) 

styles that are a perfect blend of 

novelty and refinement has long since 

learned the special competency of this 

■ ■lollies slmj> 



Pritchard-Bright & Co. 



Durham, N. C. 



The Equitable Life Assurance 
Society of the U. S. 

Assets, $599,423,919 

When you finish 

school and enter the 
business world it will 
give you greater prestige 
if you have your LIFE 
INSURANCE with a 
company of impregnable 
financial streugth and a 
national reputation for 
faithful public service. 

The Equitable 

Is such a company. It is repre- 
sented in Durham by 

The Home Agency Co. 

FRED A. McNEER, Manager 

Life Insurance Department 

nth Floor 1st National Bank Bldg. 

Our representative for Chapel 
Hill will be announced in this 
space next issue. See him before 
you buy insurance. 



100 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



Chas. Lee Smith, Pres. Howell L. Smith, Sec'y 
Wm. Oliver Smith, Treas. 



Edwards and Broughton 
Printing Company 

Raleigh, N. C. 



Engraved Wedding Invitations, Christmas 
Cards, Visiting Cards and Correspon- 
dence Stationery 



Printers, Publishers and 
Stationers 



Steel and Copper Plate Engravers 



Manufacturers of 

Blank Books and Loose Leaf 
Systems 



Rawls-Knight Co. 

' 'Durham 's Style Store ' ' 

We extend a special invita- 
tion to our Chapel Hill friends 
to visit our store and view 
what's new in Fall and Winter 
wearing apparel. 

Fashion's very latest styles 
in Coats, Suits, Dresses and 
Smart Millinery. 

Beautiful Silks and Woolen 
Dresses in the most appealing 
styles. 

All the new weaves in cot- 
ton and woolen goods, silks, 
duvetyn, plush. Large line of 
silk and cotton hosiery. The 
home of Lady Ruth, Crown 
and Binner Corsets. Cente- 
meri Kid Gloves and Ashers 
Knit Goods. 

Mail orders promptly filled. 

Rawls-Knight Co. 

Durham, N. C. 



1905 

W. T. Shore, Secretary, 
Charlotte, N. C. 
— Dr. Otho B. Boss practices his pro 
fession, medicine, in Charlotte, with 
offices at 309-311 Bealty Bldg. 
— Dr. Stroud Jordan, chief chemist for 
the American Tobacco Co., lives at 352 
Parkside Ave., Brooklyn, iSf. Y. 
— Dr. J. B. Nichols is on the staff of the 
Virginia State Hospital at Catawua 
Sanatorium, Va. 

1906 

J. A. Parker, Secretary 
Charlotte, N. C. 
— Bobert B. Beynolds and Mademoiselle 
DeNise D Arcy were married October 
0th in New York City. Newspaper dis- 
patches state that Mr. and Mrs. Bey- 
nolds will tour the world on a honey- 
moon and will live in Prance. 
— E. E. Gray, Jr., is located in his home 
city, Winston-Salem, as secretary and 
treasurer of the insurance Service Co., 
one of the largest, insurance agencies in 
the State. 

— C. A. Cochran, 'Uti, and W. Speight 
Beam, '14, have entered into legal part 
nership at Charlotte under the firm name 
of Cochran and Beam. The offices of 
the firm are at 305-307 Law Building. 

1907 

C. L. Weill, Secretary, 

Greensboro, N. C. 
— P. M. Weller is superintendent of 
power sales for the Consolidated Gas, 
Electric Light and Power Co., of Balti- 
more. 

— E. M. Highsniith is head of the de- 
partment of education in Meredith Col- 
lege at Baleigh. 

— C. M. Andrews, Phar. '07, is proprie- 
tor of the West End Drug Company at 
Hillsboro. 

1908 
M. Kobins, Secretary, 

Greensboro, N. C. 
— J. A. Pore, Jr., continues on the en- 
gineering staff of the Southern Bell 
Telephone Co., at Atlanta, Ga. He lives 
at 12 E. North Ave. 
— E. W. S. Cobb has been for a number 
of years superintendent of schools of 
Polk county. He lives at Columbus. 
— John L. Hathcock lately assumed the 
duties of superintendent of schools for 
Sampson county. His headquarters are 
at Clinton. 

— J. B. Palmer practices his profession, 
law, in Warrenton. 

1909 

O. C. Cox, Secretary, 

Greensboro, N. C. 

— B. W. Jones continues in electrical 

engineering with the General Electric 

Co., at Schenectady, N. Y. 



Clothes of Fashion 



CLOTHES MADE 

BY MAKERS WHO 

KNOW FOR MEN 

WHO KNOW 



Sold by 



Sneed- Markham- 
Taylor Co. 



Durham, N. C. 



High-Class 

Ready-to-Wear 

Apparel 



Ladies' Suits, Dresses, 
Coats, Wraps, Furs, Hos- 
iery, Underwear, Corsets, 
Piece Goods, Notions. 

DURHAM, N. C. 



Merchandise of Quality 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



101 



THE TRUST DEPARTMENT 



of the 



First National Trust Co. 



of Durham N. C. 



Offers you its services 
in all Trust matters, 
and invites your con- 
sideration. 



JAS. O. COBB, President 

J. F. GLASS, Treasurer 

JULIAN S. CARR, Vice-President 

W. J. HOLLOWAY, Vice-President 

C. M. CARR, Chairman, Board of 
Directors 



"When He's Dressed Up He 
Looks Up" 



Fashion 
Park 



Has endeavored to appeal to the 
young men of our country and 
this is the reason Fashion Park 
suits are specially built, and spe- 
cially styled; and the minute you 
don one of these suits you begin 
to look up. 



HINE-MITCHELL CO., Inc. 

"The Style Shop" 
WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



— S. Y. MeAden is engaged in the real 
estate business at Charlotte. Mr. -Mi- 
Aden saw service overseas in the ■» i st 
Division. 

— -W. F. Strowd is secretary and treas- 
urer of a cotton mil l corporation at 
Siluria, Ala. 

— J. B. Reeves is a member of the fac 
ulty, department of English, of Cornell 
University, at Ithaca, N. V. 
— John Hall Manning, lawyer of Bans- 
ton, and lieutenant colonel in the North 
Carolina National Guard, was married 
November 23rd at Jacksonville, Florida, 
his bride being Miss Jane Stillman. 

1910 

J. B. Nixon, Secretary, 
Edenton, N. C. 

— E. D. Eames is an official of the 
Eames-Luckett Corporation, publishers 
and distributors of world war books, 04 
W. Randolph St., Chicago, 111. 
— Henry Clark Bourne and Miss Marion 
Francis Alston were married November 
■'Mth in Raleigh. They live in Tail mm 
where Mr. Bourne is engaged in the prac 
tice of law. 

— J. E. Crosswell is engaged in the mer 
cantile business in Greenville, S. C. 
— I. S. London is editor of the Rocking- 
ham Post-Dispatcli at Rockingham. 
— Albert Stewart is engaged in bank- 
ing at Fayetteville with the Cumberland 
Bank and Savings Company. 
— Dr. Louis Belden is on the staff of 
the Bellevue Hospital, New York City. 
— R. G. Rankin is president of the re 
eently organized Kiwanis Club at Gas- 
tonia. G. B. Mason, '13, is secretary 
and treasurer. 

— R. A. Urquhart is engaged in fann- 
ing at Lewiston. 

— Dr. C. S. Venable married Miss Olive 
E. Bartlett on September 18th, and is 
now assistant director of technical re- 
search in the Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology, at Boston. 
—Dr. J. M. Venable married Miss Flor- 
ence E. Birdsall on June 5th and is a 
surgeon in Ran Antonio, Texas. 

1911 

I. C. Moser, Secretary, 
Asheboro, X. C. 

— William Murdoch Parsley and Miss 
Margaret McDaniel were married No 
member 20th in Rutherfordton. Mr. 

Parsley is engaged in t! tton mill 

business at Spindale. 
— W. R. Thomas is principal of the 
Miami, Fla., high school. 
— D. B. Bryan has withdrawn from the 
faculty of Richmond College where he 
was professor of education and has en- 
tered into business at Durham with the 
Chatham Furniture Company. 



LIGGETT & MYERS 
TOBACCO CO. 



MANUFACTURERS OK 

FATIMA, CHESTERFIFLD 

AND PIEDMONT 

CIGARETTES 

VELVET AND DUKE'S 
MIXTURE SMOKING 

TOBACCO AND 
other well known brands of 
Smoking Tobacco, Cigarettes 
and Chewing Tobacco. 



Our brands are standard for 
quality. 

The}) speak for themselves. 



Asphalt Pavements 



DURABLE ECONOMICAL 



If you are interested in street or 
road construction we invite you to 
inspect our work in 

Durham (Asphalt Streets). 

Durham County (Asphalt and Con- 
crete Roads) . 

Raleigh and Wake County (As- 
phalt). 

Guilford County (Asphalt Roads). 

Greensboro. 

Rocky Mount. 

High Point. 

Henderson. 

Lumberton. 

Also roads built for United States 
Government: 

Army Supply Base, Norfolk, Va. 

Newport News — Hampton Highway, 
Newport News, Va. 

Camp Lee, Va. 

A representative will visit you and 
supply any information or estimates 
desired. 

Robert G. Lassiter & Co. 
Engineering and Contracting 

Home Office: Oxford, N. C. 
327 Acade Building Norfolk, Va. 

1002 Citizens Bank Building 

Raleigh, N. C. 

American Exchange National Bank 
Building Greensboro, N. C. 



102 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



O. HENRY 



The Pride of Greensboro 



North Carolina 's largest and 
finest commercial and tourist 
hotel. 

300 Rooms 
300 Baths 

Thoroughly modern. Absolutely 
fireproof. Large sample rooms. 
Convention hall. Ball room. Ad- 
dition of 100 rooms completed 
September 1, 1920. 

W. H. Lowry Cabell Young 

Manager Asst. Manager 



Snappy Clothes 



for the 



College Man 



Society and 

Stein Block 

Clothes 

for the 

young and 

those who stay 

young 




Gmlrtg mmk mnlljrfl. 



'Vanstory Clothing Co. 

C. H. McEnight, Pres. and Mgr. 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



— Howell L. Smith, Law '11, is secre- 
tary of the Edwards and Broughton 
Printing Company, Raleigh. 
— Dr. J. W. Harriss is on the staff of 
the John Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, 
Md. 

— J. M. Shields is principal of the Tar- 
boro high school. Formerly he was 
principal of the Rocky Mount high 
school. 

— R. M. Vanstory is a member of the 
firm of W. A. Vanstory and Company, 
cotton dealers of Fayetteville. 
— Lowry Wilson, Phar. '11, and Miss 
Hand were married November 11th in 
the Presbyterian church of Lowell. Mr. 
Wilson is a druggist of Belmont. 
— J. W. Freeman is located at 209 York 
St., W., Norfolk, Va. 
— L. A. Linn, Phar. '11, is a druggist 
at Landis. 

1912 

J. C. Lockhakt, Secretary, 

Raleigh, N. C. 

— B. E. Cook is with the field office of 

the Atlantic Petroleum Co., at Broken 

Arrow, Okla. 

— S. Van B. Nichols lives at (>'> Central 
Park West, New York City. 
— Frank Talley is engaged in the mer- 
cantile business at Randleman. 
— Dr. A. J. Warren is making a health 
survey of the State of Kansas for the 
International Health Board. His head- 
quarters are at Topeka. 
— J. M. Daniel, Jr., practices law in 
Lexington. 

1913 

A. L. M. Wiggins, Secretary, 

llartsville, S. C. 

— Dr. V. A. Coulter is assistant pro- 
fessor of chemistry in the University 
of Mississippi, at University, Miss. 
— Geo. P. Wilson is in the faculty of the 
University of Wisconsin, department of 
English. He lives at 1223 W. Dayton 
St., Madison. 

— J. L. Phillips continues in civil en- 
gineering at Kinston. 
— C. R. Helsaback, Law '13, is practic- 
ing law and teaching school at Rural 
Hall. 

— M. R. Ingram is principal of the 
Ruffin high school. 

— A. A. McKay continues in the faculty, 
department of English, of the U. S. 
Naval Academy at Annapolis. 
— Rev. Theodore Partrick, Jr., is rector 
of the Episcopal church at Lumberton. 
Mrs. Partrick before marriage was Miss 
Watson Kasey, vice-president of the 
class of 1913. 

1914 

Oscar Leach, Secretary, 

Raeford, N. ('. 

— M. N. Dates is with the industrial 

power department of the Consolidated 



SMOKE 



Meditation 



' ' Your Sort of Cigar ' 



100% 

Smoke Satisfaction 



Most Popular Cigar 
in the South 



Write For Ihij (atalog- 




THE ALUMNI REVIEW 10i 



Murphy's Hotel 

Richmond, Virginia 

The Most Modern, Largest, and Best Located Hotel 
in Richmond, Being on Direct Car Line to all 
Railroad Depots. 

The Only Hotel in the City With a Garage attached. 

Headquarters for Carolina Business Men 
European Plan $1.50 Up 

JAMES T. DISNEY, President 



STATEMENT OF CONDITION 

THE BANK OF BELMONT 

BELMONT, N. C 

AT CLOSE OF BUSINESS, SEPT. 13, 1920 

RESOURCES LIABILITIES 

Loans an. I Discounts $1,396,829.00 Capital Stock $ 47,300.00 

Overdrafts None Surplus 50,000.00 

Furniture and Fixtures $ 1,779.00 Profit Account 3:2,869.40 

[nterest and Expense (Dr.) 14.671.70 Reserve for Interest 5.000.00 

Bond Account 6,296.00 Hills Payable None 

Cash and in Banks $ 581,219.72 Deposits >! 1,865,626.08 



$2,000,795.48 $2,000,795.48 

THE OFFICERS AND KMl'LOYEES OF THIS BANK feel that courtesy to and co- 
operation With its patrons are prime essentials of modern banking service. Your account with 
this Bank means safety for tlie funds yon carry. If means convenience in the use of that 
money. It means assistance in borrowing. It means acquaintance and knowledge where such 
things count. 

R. L. STOWE, President W. B. PUETT, Cashier 

"WE INVITE YOUR BUSINESS!" 



104 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



FIVE POINTS AUTO CO. 

AUTOMOBILES 

Repairs and Accessories 

Buick and Dodge Cars 
Goodyear and U. S. Tires 

G. M. C Trucks 
Complete Stock of Parts 

FIVE POINTS AUTO CO. 

DURHAM, N. C. 



DRINK 




Delicious and Refreshing 

Quality tells the difference in 
the taste between Coca-Cola and 
counterfeits. 

Demand the genuine by full 
name — nicknames encourage sub- 
stitution. 

Get a bottle of the genuine 
from your grocer, fruit stand, or 
cafe. 

Durham Coca-Cola Bottling Co. 



Gas Electric Light and Power Co., o." 
Baltimore. 

— W. S. Wicker who is engaged in rail- 
road engineering is located at 87 W. 
Peachtree St., Atlanta, Ga. 
— Samuel Iredell Parker and Miss Lou 
Morris were married November 9th at 
Concord. They live at Denim, Greens- 
boro, where Mr. Parker is engaged in 
the cotton mill business with the Cone 
interests. 

— M. Robinson is principal of the 
Teaeheys high school. 
— J Loyd Horton of Panuville was 
elected on November 2nd as judge of 
Superior Court for the fifth judicial 
district. Judge Horton, who is twenty- 
six years old, is the youngest judge on 
the bench, and is one of the youngest 
judges ever to sit on the bench in this 
State. 

— A. M. Worth is engaged in the auto- 
mobile business at Wilmington. 
— J. W. Mcintosh is a storage battery 
specialist with the Western Electric 
Co., Atlanta, Ga. 

— Andrew Joyner, Jr., continues as 
deputy clerk of superior court of Guil- 
ford county, at Greensboro. 

1915 

D. L. Bell, Secretary, 

Pittsboro, X. C. 

— Dr. C. E. Ervin is on the staff of tic 
( Jeorge F. Geisinger Memorial Hospital, 
Danville, Penn. 

— L. H. Kirksey, Phar. '15, and Miss 
Margaret Bristol were married October 
20th at Morganton. They live in Mor- 
ganton where Mr. Kirksey is druggist 
for the State Hospital. 
— Dr. C. L. Johnston is contract physi- 
cian to the Wind Rock Coal and Coke 
Co., at Wind Rock, Tenn. 
— Edmond Randolph is a newcomer in 
the home of Mr. and Mrs. Paul E. Me- 
Kane, of Oklahoma City. Mr. McKane is 
manager of the Oklahoma claim divi- 
sion of the Maryland Casualty Co. 
— Dr. Graham Harden practices his pro- 
fession, medicine, in Burlington. 
— J. R. Weaver is principal of the Clyde 
high school. 

— Dr. C. F. West is a physician and sur 
geon of Kinston. 

— Rev. J. R. Mallett is rector of Epis- 
copal churches at Walnut Cove and Mt. 
Airy. He and his sister, Miss Mabel 
Mallett, live at Walnut Cove. 
— John Mayo Jr., and Miss Irene Sin- 
clair were married November 23rd at 
Rowland. They live at Bethel where 
Mr. Mayo is engaged in farming. 
— R. E. Parker is instructor in rhetoric 
in the University of Minnesota, at Min- 
neapolis. He lives at 316 12th Ave., 
S. E. 



The Yarborough 



RALEIGH'S LEADING 

AND LARGEST 

HOTEL 



MAKE IT YOUR HOME WHEN 
IN RALEIGH 



B. H. GRIFFIN HOTEL 
COMPANY 



KODAK FINISHING 

As Qood as the Best 
Anywhere 



Over eighty per cent of our busi- 
ness is mail orders 



May We send you a price list? 



R. W. FOISTER 

BOX 242 
CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



105 



KNOWLEDGE IS POWER 

The men and women who are doing the big tasks of the world today are 
the men and women who know. 

Teachers in North Carolina schools who wish to increase their knowledge 
of school administration or of other subjects, have the opportunity of doing 
this while at work at their regular jobs. 

Courses Offered 

Courses in Economics, The Principles of Secondary Education. High 
Schoo' Methods, Educational Psychology, English Composition, English Liter- 
ature, The Teaching of English, Modern European History, American His- 
tory, Latin Composition and Literature, Higher Algebra, and Trigonometry 
may be taken through the Division of Home Study of the Bureau of Extension. 

Courses lead to the A.B. degree. Write for full information. 

THE BUREAU OF EXTENSION 

CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 



(Lulture 



Scholarship Service 

THE 



Self-Support 



^lortl) (Larolina College for ^Pomen 

Offers to Women a Liberal Education, Equipment for Womanly 
Service, Professional Training for Remunerative Employment 



The College offers four groups of studies lead- 
ing to the following degrees: Bachelor of Arts, 
Bachelor of Science, and Bachelor of Music. 

Special courses in Pedagogy; in Manual Arts; in 
Domestic Science Household Art and Economics ; in 
Music; and in tne Commercial Branches. 

Teachers and graduates of other colleges provided 
for in both regular and special courses. 



Equipment modern, including furnished dormitories, 
library, laboratories, literary society halls, gymnas- 
ium, music rooms, teachers' training school, infirm- 
ary, model laundry, central heating plant, and open 
air recreation grounds. 

Dormitories furnished by the State. Board at 
actual cost. Tuition free to those who pledge them- 
selves to become teachers. 



Fall 'Uerm Opens in September 



Summer 'TTerm Begins in June 



Fur catalogue and other information, address 

JULIUS I. FOUST, President, GREENSBORO, N. C. 



km; 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



MARKHAM-ROGERS 
COMPANY 

Clothiers Tailors, Furnishers and 
Hatters 

ALL THE NEW FALL 

STYLES AT REASONABLE 

PRICES 

DURHAM, N. C. 



ODELL'S, 



INC. 



China, Cut Glass and 
Silverware 

General line Sporting Goods 
Household Goods 

Dependable goods. Prompt 

Service. Satisfactory 

Prices 



HICKS-CRABTREE 
COMPANY 

FOUR MODERN DRUG STORES 

RALEIGH, NOKTH CAROLINA 

Eastman Kodaks and Supplies 
Nunally's Candies 

The place to meet your friends when 
in the Capital City 

GILBERT CRABTREE, Mgr. 



Cross & Linehan 
Company 

Leaders in Clothing and 
Gents' Furnishings 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



1916 

H. B. Hester, Secretary, 
Camp Travis, Texas 
— J. O. Dysart and Mrs. Dysart, for- 
merly Miss Agnes Barton, of the class of 
MM 7, and their six months old daughter, 
Beatrice, are now living in Columbia, S. 
(', where Mr. Dysart is engaged in the 
eotton business. They live at 1419 
Pendleton St. 

— W. T. Ra gland has become associated 
with Robert G. Lassiter and Co., in con- 
struction work, with particular atten- 
tion to the quarry side of the business. 
He is located for the present at Raleigh. 
— W. O. Smith is treasurer of the Ed- 
wards and Boughton Printing Co., Ral- 
eigh. 

— Dr. J. P. Rousseau and Miss Nell 
Horton, both of Winston-Salem, were 
married October 21st in Calvary Morav- 
ian Church, Winston-Salem. 
— W. Borden Cobb is engaged in bank- 
ing at Goldsboro. He is associated with 
the Wayne National Bank. 
— Rudolph Barnes, Phar '16, and Miss 
Thelma Barbour were married October 
19th at the home of the bride's mother 
in Clayton. 

— R. E. L. Cook received his discharge 
from the regular army in the early part 
of the summer. He passed the Tennes- 
see board and is practicing law in Nash- 
ville. 

— E. L. Veasey is principal of the Moy- 
ock high school at Moyock. 
— Carl D. Taylor who is connected with 
the sales department of the Westing- 
house Electric and Manufacturing Com- 
pany lives at 617 Gettysburg, St., Pitts 
burg, Penn. 

— W. T. Grimsley is secretary of the Se- 
curity Life and Trust Co., Greensboro, 
lie is commander of the Henry K. Burt- 
ner Post of the American Legion. 
— Briee Parker Beard and Miss Mildred 
Cameron Patterson will lie married in 
December at the home of the bride's 
mother at Blowing Rock. They will 
make their home in Salisbury .where Mr. 
Beard is engaged in business. 
— .1. Frank Love is engaged in cotton 
manfucturing at Lincolnton as head of 
the Saxony Spinning Company and the 
Love Mills, Inc. 

— Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Haekler, of Win 
ston-Salem, have announced the birth of 
a son, James Frank, Jr., weight nine 
and one half pounds. 

— Kenneth A. Kirby, Phar. '16, is man- 
ager of the Kirby Drug Co., wholesale 
druggists of Marion. 

— Geo. C. Meckel is connected with the 
Indiana Silo and Tractor Co., at Ander- 
son, Ind. His address is 312 W. 8th 
St., Anderson. 

— R. D. Sanford, Ph. G. '16, is manager 
of the Fox Drug Co., at Aberdeen. 



A. E. Lloyd Hardware 
Company 

DURHAM, N. C. 

All kinds of hardware, sporting 
goods, and college boys' acces- 
sories. 

Geo. W. Tandy, Manager 



SALMON, SHIPP 
AND POE 

DURHAM, N. C. 



CONTRACTORS 

AND 

BUILDERS 



CONTRACTORS NEW DORMITORY 
UNIVERSITY OF N. C. 



The Princess Cafe 

WINSTON SALEM, N. C. 



WE INVITE YOU TO VISIT US 
WHILE IN WINSTON-SALEM 



A THOROUGHLY MODERN 
CAFE 



Cooper Monument 
Company 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Communicate with us regarding 
your needs for monuments or tomb- 
stones. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



107 




Home of Universal Auto Company, Inc. 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 

THE LARGEST BUILDING DEVOTED TO THE MERCHANDISING OF 
MOTOR CARS AND TRUCKS IN THE SOUTH 



Virginia Distributor for Paige Cars and Trucks. Distributor 
for Chevrolet Cars and Trucks 

TIKES AND BATTERIES 



North Carolina Distributor for Paige Cars and Trucks. 
Distributor Samson Trucks and Tractors 



PARTS AND SERVICE 



108 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



Perry-Horton Shoe Co. 


Special Agents for Nettleton and 

Hurley Shoes for Men, and 

Cousins and Grover Shoes 

for Women 


MAKE OUR STORE HEAD- 


QUARTERS WHILE IN 


DURHAM, N. C. 



Strand Theatre 



DURHAM, N. C. 



HIGH CLASS PICTURES AND 

SPECIAL MUSIC— YOU ARE 

ALWAYS WELCOME 



Open from 11 A.M. Until 11 P.M. 



I. G. LAWRENCE 

W. H. LAWRENCE AND T. H. LAW- 
RENCE ASSOCIATED 



CONTRACTOR 

AND 

BUILDER 

Main Office: Durham, N. C. 



CONTRACTOR FACULTY HOUSES 
AND LAUNDRY 

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH 
CAROLINA 



EDUCATION FOR 

BUSINESS 

Success m life means application of 
the fundamental principles of business 
taught in business college. There's 
nothing mysterious about it. It is 
merely applied common sense. The 
yoking man or young woman who 
trains now can enter business with 
practically a positive assurance of 
success. Don't you want to be a 
success in life ? Then, why not begin 
your training NOW? 

Write for catalogue and full parti 
culars to 

Mrs. Walter Lee Ledndm, Pres. 
DURHAM BUSINESS SCHOOL 

Durham, N. C. 



— McDaniel Lewis is connected with the 
Mid Western Oil Co., and is located for 
the present in Kinston. 
— Lee H. Edwards is head of the science 
department in the Greensboro high 
school. 

— T. D. Blair is assistant agency man 
ager of the Southern Life and Trust Co. 
at Greensboro. 

— H. U. Turner, lawyer of Albemarle, 
is county solicitor for Stanly County. 
— R. E. Devereux, of the U. S. Soil Sur- 
vey, is now engaged in making a soil 
survey map of Buncombe County. He 
is located at Asheville. 
— C. L. Smith is located in Charlotte, 
where he is connected with the Char- 
lotte Motor Car Co. 

1917 

H. G. Baity, Secretary, 
Chapel Hill, X. C. 

— J. G. Eldridge is superintendent » > t' 
schools at Windsor. 

— Miss Janet Jordan is a new arrival in 
the home of Mr. and Mrs. Francis Jor- 
dan, jU8 N. Mendenhall St., Greensboro. 
— Edwin S. Hartshorn and Miss Mary 
English were married recently at the 
home of the bride's parents in Ashe- 
ville. Mr. Hartshorn is a lawyer of 
Asheville. 

— V. W. McGhee is principal of Whita- 
kcrs high school. 

— S. B. Smithey is dean and treasurer of 
the Mountain View Institute at Hays, 
N. C. 

— V. H. Idol is engaged in banking at 
Madison. 

— J. W. Hawthorne is cashier of the re- 
cently organized Bank of North Char- 
lotte. 

— P. D. Shamburger is engaged in the 
wholesale gasoline and oil business at 
Pine Bluff. 

— Aubrey M. Elliott is principal of the 
junior high school at Charlotte. 
— Jas. A. Capps, formerly in the fac- 
ulty of the Durham high school, is now 
in the faculty of Oak Ridge Institute. 
— Ralph Andrews is assistant cashier of 
the Peoples' Bank of Chapel Hill. 
— H. G. Hunter is a senior in the med- 
ical department of the University of 
Pennsylvania. 

— S. J. Ervin, Jr., president of the elass 
of '17. practices las profession, law, at 
Morganton. 

—Dr. F. C. Hubbard is located at States- 
ville, where he is engaged in the prac 
tice of medicine. 

— M. M. Williams, quarterback on the 
1916 football team, is supervisor for the 
State Highway Commission of road and 
bridge construction in Surry County. 
— A. C. Forney is connected with Earl 
Bros., crude rubber importers, 66 Broad 
St., New York. 



For up-to-date laundry 
service, call on us 

Durham Laundry Co. 

Durham, N. C. 



The Royal Cafe 



University students, faculty mem- 
bers, and alumni visit the Royal 
Cafe while in Durham. Under 
new and progressive management. 
Special parlors for ladies. 



DURHAM'S MODERN 
CAFE 



Hennessee Cafe 

C. C. Shoffner, Manager. 

A MODERN, UP-TO-DATE CAFE, 

WHERE YOU AND YOUR 

FRIENDS ARE WELCOME 

CLEANLINESS AND 

SERVICE OUR 

MOTTOS 

342 and 344 S. Elm St. 

Greensboro, N. C. 



BROADWAY CAFE 

WE CORDIALLY INVITE YOU 
TO VISIT OUR CAFE WHEN 
YOU ARE IN GREENSBORO 

Excellent Service 

Courteous Treatment 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



109 




Careful Attention 

T is with this earnest attention that we ex- 
ecute all orders, large or small, for the rep- 
utation of the Seeman Service, an asset that we 
jealously guard, is founded upon such princi- 
ples of rigid accuracy. 



THE SEEMAN PRINTERY, Inc. 

Printing Book Binding Multigraphing Engraving 

110-112 S. CORCORAN STREET DURHAM, N. C. 



no 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



CAPITALIZE YOUR TIME AND TALENTS 

By qualifying for a responsible business or civil 
service position while salaries are high. 

Our school is a member of the National Associa- 
tion of Accredited Commercial Schools and is 
highlu endorsed by everybody. Call or request a 
Catalogue. 

KING'S BUSINESS COLLEGE 
Raleigh, N. C. Charlotte, N. C. 



Gooch's Cafe 

Anything to Eat 
CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 



W. B. SORRELL 

Jeweler and Optometrist 
CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 



"pickaro's TKotcl 

Headquarters for Carolina alum- 
ni returning to the Hill. 

Special rates for student board- 



Electric Shoe Shop 

Expert Shoe Repairing 
CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 



Model Laundry Co. 

DURHAM, N. C. 
Expert Laundry Service 



For neat job printing and type- 
writer paper, call at the office of 

Chapel Hill News 



=5\ 



PRIDGEN & JONES COMPANY 

We carry the best shoes, Edwin 
Clapp, Howard and Poster, and Hey- 
wood's. 

Expert fitters — A cordial welcome 
awaits you. 
107 W. Main St. Durham, N. C. 



— Sigmund Blomberg is manager of the 
Racket Store, at Asheville. 
— C. K. Hughes is engaged in the prac- 
tice of law at Asheville, associated with 
Mark W. Brown, Law '98. 
— H. E. Allen is manager of the Ashe 
ville Transfer anil Storage Co., at Ashe- 
ville. 

— Blackwell Markham enters the third 
year medical class at Harvard Univer- 
sity this fall. 

— E. A. Dobbin is general manager of 
the crude drug firm of E. A. Dobbin 
and Co., Knoxville, Tenn. 
—Dr. G. F. West, Med. '17, practices 
medicine in Camden, N. J. His address 
is 4(18 Cooper St. He is on the staff of 
tin' Linden Street Hospital. 

1918 

W. R. WrxscH, Secretary, 

Chapel Hill, X. ('. 

— T. A. Foreman is manager of the 

Efird department store at Lenoir. lb' 

was married in October. 



WELCOME TO 

STONEWALL HOTEL 

A. D. GANNAWAY, Manager 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



Campbell-Warner Co. 

PINE MONUMENTS 

REASONABLE PRICES. WRITE US 

Phone 1131 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



J. Frank Pickard 

HEAVY AND FANCY 
GROCERIES 

Opposite Campus 
CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 



BAIN-KIMBALL CO. 

Makers of 

STANDARD MONUMENTS 
DURHAM, N. C. 



The Carolina Man's Shoe Store 

Carr-Bryant 

High Grade Shoes with Snap 
and Style 

Carr-Bryant Boot 4" Shoe Co. 

106 W. Main Street Durham, N. C. 



Budd-Piper Roofing Co. 

Durham, N. C. 

Distributors of JOHNS-MANVILLE 

Asbestos Shingles and Roofing 

Barrett Specification Roofing 

Sheet Metal Work 

AGENTS FOR 




LOSl 




When in need 

When in need of a pocket knife, 
strop, hone, brush, safety razor, blades 
or tools of any kind, paints, varnishes, 
brushes, electrical goods, and general 
hardware, call on the 

CHAPEL HILL HARDWARE 
COMPANY 

The Store Where "Quality" Counts 



Dillon Supply Co. 

Machinery, Mill Supplies 
RALEIGH, N. C. 



R. BLACKNALL & SON 

druggists 
Norms and Huyler's Candies 

G. Bernard, Manager 

Corcoran Street Durham. N. C. 



fl ?l 

CHAS. C. HOOK, ARCHITECT 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 


Twenty years' experience in 
planning school and college build- 
ings. 


v- 


" 



The Peoples National Bank 

WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 

Capital $150,000 U. S. Depository 

J. W. Pries, Pres. W. A. Blair, V.-P. 

N. Mitchell, Cashier 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



111 



Main Street Pharmacy 

LtADING DRUGGISTS 
Durham, N. C. 



<£>ssie cHrot/i 



ers 

CALIFORNIA AND FLORIDA 

FRUITS. TOBACCA AND CIGARS, 

ICE CREAM PARLOR, 

FRESH CANDIES 

"We Strive to Please" 



POLLARD BROS. 

DURHAM, N. C. 

STANDARD LINES OF HARD- 
WARE AND SPORTING 
GOODS 



Huffine Hotel 

Quick Lunch Counter and Dining 
Room— Clean 

Rooms $1.00 and Up Near the Depot 

Greensboro, N. C. 



Ralph J. Sykes Drug Company 

SOUTH ELM ST.. NEAR DEPOT 
OPEN ALL NIGHT 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



ANDREWS CASH STORE CO. 

Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Students and Faculty will find us ready 
to serve them with the latest styles in 
Walkover Shoes, Fancy Shirts, Tail- 
ored Suits, and general furnishings. 
Be convinced. Call and see. 



Obe XCniversitv flr&ss 

Zeu P. Council, Mgr. 

PRINTING, ENGRAVED CARDS 

QUALITY AND SERVICE 

CHAPEL HILL. N. C. 



PATTERSON BROS. 

DRUGGISTS 

Agency Xorris Candy The Rexall Store 
Chapel Hii.i.. X 



Anchor Stores 
Company 

(The Ladies' Store) 



Presenting the newest 
fall models in ladies and 
misses ready-to-wear and 
millinery. Also a com- 
plete stock of silks, wool- 
en and cotton piece 
goods and notions. 



Anchor Stores 
Company 

109 W. Main St. 
Durham, N. C. 

Sells For Less. Sells For Cash. 



R. L BALDWIN CO. 

DURHAM, N. C. 



Will be pleased to have 
you make their modern 
department store your 
headquarters in Durham 



Our Stock °i F°H (Joods is 
Now Complete 



R. L. BALDWIN CO. 



The Selwyn Hotel 

CHARLOTTE. N. C. 

Fireproof. Modern and Luxurious 

IN THE HEART OF EVERYTHING 

H. C. LAZALERE, Manager 



Whiting-Horton Co. 

Thirty-three Years Raleigh 's 
Leading Clothiers 



Snider-Fletcher Co. 

WATCHES. DIAMONDS, AND 
JEWELRY 

11" W. Main St. Durham, N. C. 



Flowers for all Occasions 

DURHAM FLORAL 
NURSERY 

Chapel Hill Agtots: EUBANKS DRUG COMPANY 



Paris Theatre 

DURHAM. N. C. 

ARTCRAFT-PARAMOUNT 

PICTURES 
ihestra Orchestr 



Broadway Theatre 

DURHAM, N. C. 

THE HOUSE OF SPECIAL 
PHOTO PLAY ATTRAC- 
TIONS 



H. S. STORR CO. 

Office Furniture, Machines and Sup- 
plies. Printers and Manu- 
facturers of Rubber 
Stamps 
RALEIGH, N. C. 



j sN 

Eubanks Drug Co. 


CHAPEL 


HILL. N. C. 


Agents for Nunnally'e* Candies 
i 1 



Nerve Control of the Organs of Elimination 

HowConstipationFollows a Derange- 
ment of the Mechanism, and How 
it Can Most Effectually be Relieved 



AT the rear of the abdomen lies 
/\ a great "plexus" or nerve 
center that works in a manner 
similar to a telephone central 
switchboard. It receives messages 
from nerves in various regions of 
the body and transmits them to 
minor nerve centers or "ganglia", 
which directly act on the muscles 
to be stimulated. Its principal 
function is to keep in operation 
various mechanical processes, of 
which the most important is the 
proper elimination of food waste. 

The presence of food waste in the 
colon ready for discharge causes a 
message to pass to this plexus. 
The plexus immediately forwards 
this message on to the smaller 
nerve centers which directly con- 
trol the muscles of elimination in 
the walls of the colon. 

Constipation results from failure 
of the colon muscles to respond 
to orders. These muscles may fail 
because the waste matter in the 
colon is hard and dry, or because 
of reaction from over-stimulation 
created by salts, pills, castor-oil, 



mineral waters, etc. They are 
"tired out" and unable to respond 
— just as a jaded horse can no 
longer respond to the whip. 

Nujol, unlike cathartics, works only on 
the waste matter and not on the system. 
It does not stimulate or harm, and there- 
fore is the safe and rational treatment for 
constipation. Nujol simply softens the 
food waste and keeps it at the proper con- 
sistency, making it easy for the muscles to 
pass it from the body in their normal way. 
In the same process it relieves the nerves 
of over-exertion and enables them to rest. 

Nujol actually prevents constipation be- 
cause it helps nature maintain easy, 
thorough bowel evacuation at regular 
intervals — the healthiest habit in the 
world. It does not cause nausea or grip- 
ing, nor interfere with the day's work 
or play. 

Nujol is absolutely harmless and pleasant 
to take. Try it. 

Nujol 



REG. U-S. PAT. OFF. 



For Constipation 

Sold by all druggists, in sealed bottles, bear- 
ing the Nujol trade mark. 



*In succeeding issues of this publication will appear other 
articles on the elimination of food waste, based upon 
the conclusions of leading medical authorities. 




Mail coupon for booklet "Constipation— Auto-Intoxication in Adults", to Nujol 
Laboratories, Standard Oil Co. (New Jersey), Room 703, 44 Beaver Street, New 
York. (In Canada, address Nujol, 22 St. Francois Xavier Street, Montreal.) 



Name. . . 
Address . 





HERCULES 
POWDERS 



Finishing Touch 

At the end of the Dynamite Line is the box pack- 
ing house. Here Hercules Dynamite receives its 
finishing touch. 

In this house three operations take place. The car- 
tridges are dipped in melted paraffine and made 
thoroughly moisture proof. They are given a final 
inspection. They are weighed and packed, and 
every effort is made to see that each box contains not 
an ounce less than its 25 or 50 pound of dynamite. 

The hands of the men who do this work are the last to touch, 
their eyes the last to see Hercules Dynamite before it reaches 
the scenes of its appointed tasks. Their care, their thorough- 
ness, supplies the final check necessary for the successful use of 
over fifty million pounds of Hercules Dynamite a year. 

* * * 

A farmer in Minnesota is clearing a field of stumps. A miner 
in Pennsylvania is bringing down a breast of coal. Engineers are 
driving a great tunnel through the heart of the Rockies. In a 
great city the foundation of a skyscraper is being carved out of 
solid rock. 

Hercules Dynamite is on the job in every case — dynamite which 
a few short weeks ago passed under the hands and eyes of men at 
the end of a Hercules Dynamite Line — dynamite which has made 
the name Hercules a synonym for dependability in explosives. 

HERCULES POWDER CO. 



Chicago 
Pittsburg, Kan. 
San Krancisco 
Chattanooga 



St. Louis 
Denver 

Salt Lake City 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 



New York 
Hazleton, Pa. 
Joplin 
Wilmington, Del. 




M 




In the Land 
of Perpetual Light 

TVTIGHT comes but light remains, 
™ for electricity knows no darkness. 

For electric light is no longer a lux- 
ury. In the forty years of its develop- 
ment it has become a necessity. It 
has made our streets safer and more 
attractive, blazed a trail for convey- 
ances on land, sea, and in the air, 
aided surgery and medicine in correct 
diagnosis and brought comfort and 
cheer to farm, factory, and home. 

The greatest contribution to better 
light has been the creation of the 
MAZDA Lamp. G-E research and 
engineering fostered this achievement. 
In addition the General Electric 
Company has designed and built all 
the apparatus essential in the science 
of illumination — for harnessing Na- 
ture's forces to generate current, for 
safely transmitting this current, and 
for applying it where perpetual light 
is desired. 

95-336H 




B&OT 



We Solicit 

The business of going concerns, believing that 
we have ample resources and officials with 
ability to render Expert Banking Service. 

First National Bank 

Durham, N. C. 
Capital and Surplus Over One Million Dollars 



Proud You're a Southerner? 

We are proud that the Pilot Company is a Southern institution 
and is aiding in the up-building of the South. 

Its "Complete Policy" is the last word in insurance protection. 

Write for particulars as to 

POLICIES AGENCY CONTRACTS TERRITORY 

Southern Life and Trust Company 




HOME OFFICE "The Multiple Line Company" GREENSBORO, N. C. 

CAPITAL $1,000,000.00 



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