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Full text of "The alumni review [serial]"

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THE ROYALL & BORDEN CO. 



Corner West Main and Market Streets DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA 

Sell all kinds of furniture and furnishings for churches, 
colleges and homes. Biggest stock of Rugs in the 
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ask the College Proctor or the editor of the "Review." 
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THE ROYALL & BORDEN CQ 



Capitalizing Income 



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alone for the wage earner. problems. 

The "Wachovia Trust Plan" offers a Ask for our booklet describing the plan. 



WACHOVIA BANK AND TRUST CO. 

Capital and Surplus $2,000,000.00 
Member Federal Reserve System 

WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 
ASHEV1LLE SALISBURY HIGH POINT 



Ch-T^l h 5 - 11 ' »•'*"' 



VOL. IX, No. 5 



FEBRUARY, 1921 



Alumni Review 

The University of North Carolina 




THK OLD FAST BUILDING WHOSE CORNERSTONE WAS LAID OCTOBER 12, 1793 



ALUMNI PRESIDENTS MEMORIALIZE THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY 

THE TRUSTEES WORK EOR THE WHOLE PROGRAM 

THE ALUMNI SHOW THEIR FIGHTING METTLE 

W. McK. FETZER HEADS CAROLINA ATHLETICS 

A. W. McLEAN BECOMES ASSISTANT SECRETARY OF 

THE TREASURY 



Wanted: Trained Men 

The University Agency has voted unanimously that the University needs 
a stronger and more healthy support from the citizens of North Carolina. It 
urges the State to become better acquainted with the conditions at its University, 
and to instruct its legislators to make the appropriation asked for by the 
authorities. ■ 

The University Agency realizes the fact that trained young men are the 
greatest asset to any state, and that an investment in higher education will bring 
m returns doubled many times. The future of the State is in the hands of the 
young men of today, and we implore the State to train them to the task. 

We are "doing our bit" by co-operating with Carolina students and alumni 
in protecting their credit, their homes and business interests. Write us or come 
to see us and let us serve you. 

The University Agency 

JEFFERSON STANDARD LIFE INSURANCE CO. 

CYRUS THOMPSON, Jr., Manager 

Special Agents 
BILL ANDREWS NAT MOBLEY 

"INDIVIDUAL SERVICE TO CAROLINA STUDENTS AND ALUMNI" 



THE AMERICAN TRUST CO. 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 
MEMBER FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM 



Acts as Executor, Administrator and 
Trustee for any purpose. 

Write for descriptive booklet, "What 
You Should Know About Wills and 
the Conservation of Estates." 



TRUST DEPARTMENT 

AMExRICAN TRUST COMPANY 

Resources More Than $12,000,000 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 

Volume IX FEBRUARY, 1921 Number 5 



To the Members of the General Assembly 
of North Carolina 

As presidents of the alumni associations of the North Carolina State College of 
Agriculture and Engineering, the North Carolina College for Women, the Eastern 
Carolina Training School, and the University of North Carolina, we respectfully 
memorialize the legislators of North Carolina in behalf of the colleges and the youth 
ol the State. The student bodies of these colleges have sent their simple message of 
urgent facts and critical needs to the people of North Carolina. We, the alumni of 
the state colleges, as constituent parts of the people, take up their message and send 
it to you for large consideration and statesmanlike action. 

In educational conferences, Kiwanis and Rotary clubs, women's clubs, college 
groups, intercollegiate groups, a chapter of the American Legion, Junior Order of 
American Mechanics, and public mass meetings all over North Carolina, an aggressive 
stand has been taken for decisive and adequate legislative action. The spirit and 
enthusiasm of these meetings, often expressed in resolutions, called for action that 
would provide for not only the thousands now crowding the colleges but also the 
coming flood of high school graduates who of themselves challenge your consider- 
ation and make necessary the minimum building program provided for in the $20,- 
000.000 bond issue for all state institutions, educational and charitable, as outlined 
by the public spirited Promoters of Education in North Carolina. 

\\ e petition you in the name of the scores of local alumni associations represent- 
ing thousands of citizens of North Carolina, committed to an adequate, farsighted 
building program, wherever and whenever they have met together; in the name of 
the boys and girls today crowded in and crowded out of the colleges of North Caro- 
lina, in the name of the 26,000 boys and girls in the high schools today ; and we re- 
spect fully petition you to hear their voices above the mistaken sounds of political 
expediency and the passing cry of temporary hard times. We petition you to vindi- 
cate constitutional equality and educational democracy in North Carolina. We pe- 
tition you to make permanent and worthy room for all the sons and daughters of 
North Carolina who will unceasingly come knocking at the college gates. 

R. D. W. Connor, President of the University of North Carolina Alumni Asso- 
ciation ; C. V. York. President of the North Carolina State College Alumni Associa- 
tion ; Laura Coit, President of the North Carolina College for Women Alumnae Asso- 
ciation; Josie Dorsett, President of the Eastern Carolina Training School Alumnae 
Association. 



156 THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



FIGHTING FOR THE FUTURE 

YOUR PART IN THE FIGHT 

One thousand students of the University of North Carolina in the largest mass meeting of the 
year enlisted : — 

1. — In the Cause of the Boys and Girls Crowded in and Crowded Out of the Colleges of North 
Carolina. 

2. — In the Cause of the 26,000 Boys and Girls Today in the High Schools of North Carolina. 

THE ISSUES DRAWN 

After months of a crusade in taking the facts to the people the far-reaching issues of the battle 
are drawn. Within the next six weeks the people of North Carolina in legislative action at 
Raleigh will : 

EITHER 

Fling wide the doors of welcome to the thousands of boys and girls who are 
knocking and will in rising tidal ranks continue to knock at the doors of 
opportunity ; 

—OR— 

For luckless hundreds of them, lock the doors of opportunity, put down the 
windows of hope, and throw away the key to the future. 

THE FIGHT IS FOR EQUALITY 

The fight for equal educational opportunity that has shaken the great State of North Carolina 
from the sand-reefs of Hatteras to the mountain-crested Tennessee line has now centered in the 
Legislative halls of the State Capitol. 

THE STATE IS THE BATTLE-GROUND— RALEIGH IS THE DECISION GROUND— 

THE ZERO HOUR HAS STRUCK 

THE FIGHT MUST BE PRESSED 
TO THE END 

The command is FORWARD! and the command must come from the people. The Legislature 
will go as far as the people pass up the word. 

CASH IN YOUR ALUMNI LOYALTY 

By sitting down today and writing to the legislators yourself and getting influential, public- 
spirited citizens back home to write to their representatives in the Legislature: — 

To SUPPORT the state-wide public educational program by a $20,000,000 bond issue. 

—AND THEREBY— 

To OPEN the doors of the colleges equally to all her sons and daughters 

A VOICE FROM THE FOLKS BACK HOME SPEAKS WITH THE POWER OF 
COMMAND AND THE COMMAND IS FORWARD! 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



157 



OPINION AND COMMENT 



The Alumni Associations Present the Issue 

Through the petition appearing on the preceding 
page, the presidents of the alumni associations of 
four of the State's institutions for higher learning 
have put the responsibility for the future of the 
State's institutions both charitable and educational 
up to the members of the General Assembly. With 
out reference to the action or inaction of the Budget 
Commission, or to any other officer of the State, they 
have gone direct to the legislature for building and 
maintenance programs which will provide for North 
Carolina's unfortunates and will enable the hosts of 
North Carolina boys and girls now thronging the 
high schools to enter college doors wherein they will 
find equipment and instruction sufficiently adequate 
to fit them for high service to their day and generation. 

□ □ n 

They Ask for a State in which the 
Youth may Grow to Full Stature 

In presenting this memorial, these men and women 
are but representative of the hundreds and thousands 
of forward-looking men and women who have caught 
a vision of a new and finer civilizat ion for North ( !aro- 
lina, who, like the late, far-visioncd Edward Kidder 
Graham, believe that this decade is to be the greatest 
decade, educationally and otherwise, that North Caro- 
lina has ever experienced. 

They know that North Carolina is astir from 
ocean to mountain to break away from her former 
limited life. 

They know that the present generation of high 
school students, of boys and girls in North Carolina 
colleges, of recent college graduates, of young ex-ser- 
vice men, of newly enfranchised women, is demand- 
ing the privilege of building for itself a State in 
which men and women can grow to full stature in 
every walk of life. 

They know that North Carolina, once bound by a 
pinching blighting poverty, is abundantly able at this 
hour to do adequately for her citizenship whatever 
she wants to do. 

They know that in mass meetings, conferences, 
clubs, and associations wherever her public voice has 
lifted itself to be heard, North Carolina has said that 
she wanted to do the right thing. 

They know that the fulfillment of the desire of the 
people who have spoken and of their children who are 
to follow after them, depends upon the statesman- 
ship and vision of the representatives of North Caro- 
lina now assembled at Raleigh. 

And knowing this, with a faith that will not be 
denied they have laid this memorial upon the knees 



of the members of the General Assembly of 1921 — 
the builders of North Carolina's great tomorrow. 

□ □ □ 
Governor Morrision Champions 
the Cause of a Greater State 

In courageous words that will be remembered by 
North Carolinians for many a year Governor Cam- 
eron Morrison in his inaugural address on January 
12 committed himself unreservedly to the following 
1 1 rogram of greater State building and called upon 
all patriotic men and women to assist him in carrying 
it forward. 

We must take humane care of all our defective and 
unfortunate people whose misfortunes are of a char- 
acter that they cannot care for themselves. 

We must throw around the home and life of our 
people an enlightened world's knowledege of preven- 
tive medicine, and make ceaseless war upon sickness, 
suffering, and death in this State. 

We must make the common schools for the training 
and education of our children as good as any in 
the world. 

It is no disgrace that our common schools have been 
so successful as to overcrowd our institutions of 
higher learning. But it will be a badge of shame and 
degradation if the higher institutions of learning are 
not promptly made adequate for the demands which 
the success of our effort to educate all the people 
have so rapidly made upon these institutions. 

We must have good surface roads in the State. 
The main highways must be of hard surface and de- 
pendable every day in the year. 

The credit of our State is in a most healthy condi- 
tion and those who are solicitous of future generations 
could not complain of the increase of our public in- 
debtedness for these great purposes when they re- 
flect that North Carolina has. heretofore created prac- 
tically no public debt for future generations to pay, 
and that we would, if this program is carried out, 
transmit to those who come after us a heritage nobler 
by far with the indebtedness than it would be with- 
out it. 

The reactionary will whimper to the timid that 
this is a bad time to expend so much money because 
of the depressed conditions of our whole business 
life. * * * Times are hard, but they do not ap- 
proach the severity of the conditions which we have 
met with courage in the past. 

North Carolina is one of the truly rich and great 
states of the Union, and nothing can keep prosperity 
from soon returning except our own cowardice and 
pessimism. 

□ □ □ 
We Hold the Future in Our Hands 

Did you ever stop to think why Esau sold his 
birthright? 

Cotton had slumped. Tobacco was in the cellar. 
Game was scarce. He couldn't pay his fertilizer bill. 
and taxes had just naturally wiped him out! 



158 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



And so, for a mess of pottage, he sold his 
birthright ! 

Today, according to Governor Morrison, "the reac- 
tionary will whimper to the timid that this is a bad 
time to expend so much money because of the de- 
pressed condition of our whole business life.'" To- 
day, the reactionary is whimpering to the faint- 
hearted let's sell the birthrights of our boys and 
girls, because it requires too much courage and vision 
to make the sacrifice for the permanent and enduring 
things of a great civilization. 

□ □ □ 

What the Boys and Girls 
Think About their Birthrights 

But the boys and girls of North Carolina, the thou- 
sands of young men who fought through the World 
War to make democracy safe, the hundreds and thou- 
sands of newly enfranchised women who underwent 
privation for the winning of the world's freedom, do 
not intend to be disposed of with a whimper. Backed 
by thousands of the forward-looking citizenship who 
wish their cause success, they are fighting for the op- 
portunity to live out well rounded lives in a North 
Carolina made ready for them. 

Their fighting attitude was definitely made known 
a few days ago by thirty members of the senior 
class of the high school of Henderson in the following 
resolutions placed in the hands of their Senator in 
the present General Assembly : 

The question of the educational fund for the col- 
leges of North Carolina is probably the paramount 
issue facing the legislature now in session. In view 
of this may we not submit for your attention a few 
facts concerning conditions existing in the Henderson 
high school. 

The class which graduated from the school in June, 
1920, was composed of 15 members. The class which 
will graduate in June, 1921, has as its enrollment 3'2 
or an increase of 100 per cent. 

By a canvass taken at the beginning of this school 
year it was found that practically the entire member- 
ship of the present senior class expect to enter some 
college. Present indications point to the fact that a 
part of them will find it necessary to go out of this 
State to secure their further education. 

The number of second year pupils is far beyond 
that of the seniors. The freshman class outnumbers 
the second year students by a considerable majority. 
Thus every year witnesses a substantial increase in 
the number of high school graduates, while our col- 
leges are at a standstill. 

In consideration of the above facts, we. the senior 
class of the Henderson high school, do humbly peti- 
tion you to cast your ballot and exert your influence 
in favor of the $18,000,000 fund for the educational 
institutions of North Carolina. 

□ □ □ 
Greensboro and High Point Lead the Way 

What wide-awake cities think about this business 
of building the finer State, of providing educational 



facilities for their children, was splendidly demon- 
strated by Greensboro and High Point on January 19. 
Recently Greensboro made a scientific survey of its 
school system. The survey revealed in detail the 
city's educational needs. The citizenship took the 
propostion up courageously and underwrote the pro- 
gram with an issue of $1,000,000 in bonds. 

The same day High Point, whose furniture fac- 
tories had been at a standstill for several months, 
decided that its children were its greatest asset and 
underwrote their education program with a bond 
issue of $600,000. 

In these two communities adequate educational fac- 
ilities are not set down in the ledger as liabilities but 
rather as what they are, dividend-yielding assets. 

And Guilford County, in which both cities are 
situated, had only recently voted a bond issue of $2,- 
000,000 for good roads ! 

□ □ □ 
This Is Our Fighting Line — Forward! 

The whole alumni campaign for the $20,000,000 
building fund for all State institutions has been an 
informational campaign among the people. The plan 
is to keep it an informational campaign to go rolling 
forward in aggressive public opinion. This aggres- 
sive public opinion will body forth in public action. 
The Central Alumni Committee has fought for three 
months persistently and openly, has tried to place the 
case before the people and will continue to place the 
case before the people. Its fighting policy has been 
to reach the people and have the people reach the 
legislature. 

But the campaign is more than a campaign of in- 
formation ; it is also a campaign of action. The peo- 
ple must know; the people must act. The people 
have acted in conference, rallies, and mass meetings. 
But action must continue. How about stirring up a 
mass meeting in your town and county? Get in 
touch with the Chairman (F. P. Graham) of the 
Central Committee and he will send you any speaker, 
information, suggestions, and plans that you want or 
need. The experience and results of conferences, 
rallies, and mass meetings have been inspiring to the 
whole State. Keep it moving. There is but one 
word passing down the fighting ranks : The word is 
Forward! 

In addition to mass meetings, have influential cit- 
izens to write to their representatives in the legis- 
lature. Telegrams from the home folks, across the 
Mississippi River to the delegates in Baltimore, nom- 
inated Woodrow Wilson in spite of the fact Bosses 
Murphy, Nugent, and Sullivan had the convention 
sewed up for Clark. Get letters, telegrams from in- 
dividuals to legislators and petitions and resolutions 
from every public spirited organization in your county 
pouring into Raleigh. We do not want to go to 
Raleigh except by way of public opinion. The chair- 
man of the Central Committee has had many sug- 
gestions for a bureau and an organized move on and 
demonstration in Raleigh. He has discouraged all 
such suggestions in the name of the committee and 
has continued to hold to the idea of a compaign of 
information and action of, for, and by the people. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



159 



You, alumnus and citizen, can get a dozen citizens 
into action by having them to send messages from the 
folks at home to their representatives in Raleigh. 

Before the sun goes down get your feet and mouth 
to moving, the ink to flowing, and the wires to hop- 
ping with the messages of progress and hope for 
North Carolina. Hit the center! It's still $20,000.- 
000 for men's colleges, women's colleges, white col- 
leges, colored colleges, technical colleges, teachers' col- 
leges, blind, deaf, and dumb institutions, schools for 
defectives, asylums for the insane. Twenty million 
dollars! for the State's most unfortunate people, those 
without sight, without hearing, without speech, and 
without reason; and for the State's most fortunate 
people, her boys and girls, her youth, her hope for 
tomorrow ! Twenty million dollars will come back 
to the people of North Carolina a hundred fold in 
the values of her resources and youth and spirit. The 
fight is clear and the lines are drawn : pessimism or 
faith, progress or faltering, action or reaction. The 
word is Forward ! Let's Go ! 

□ □ □ 

Cheer Up and Go to It! 

The Review is not a statistican. Neither is it a 
prophet. But it can and does say, cheer up and go 
to it! 

How come? Why it's simple: Cotton and tobacco 
have perked up ; furniture factories and cotton mills 
are running again ; the banks, bless 'em, turned loose 
the regular January dividends, salted down a tidy 
little sum as surplus, and "give out" the dope that 
the trifling amount of $463,118,896.22 was tucked 
away in checking and saving accounts and other forms 
of banking resources! 

And then "come along" the word from the Depart- 
ment of Agriculture that although the dear Old North 
State had dropped back from fourth to sixth place 
in the value of farm crops prodviced in 1920, still her 
smoke houses and barns were full and what had been 
made by scratching the soil totaled up (including 
huckleberries and mullen leaves) about $412,374.01)0. 

We plumb forgot the $.")00,000,000 or $600,000,000 
worth of manufactured truck our factories turned 
out, which, laid along side of the farm truck, ran up 
to something over $1,000,000,000. produced in 1920. 

And by gum, now that we come to think of it, there 
is that $250,000,000 of saving stamps and liberty 
bonds laid away that isn't worth a cent except to 
yield about $10,000,000 annually for pin money, and 
there is land, and stores, and houses, and mules, and 
automobiles, and everything else that the oppressive 
tax-grabbers put down on the books for above $3,000,- 
000,000 but which we wouldn't sell for that amount 
tomorrow, no, not by a long sight, even if we do 
howl that it is listed too high ! 

Again we say, cheer up and go to it! 



Thomas Walter Bickett 

In the matter of State building Thomas Walter 
Bickett, who retired from the office of Chief Execu- 
tive of North Carolina on January 12, has much 
marked up to his credit which lays the State he so 
splendidly served under tribute to him and furnishes 
him memories of things accomplished which will ever 
be cause for happiness to him. 

The Review will not attempt a catalogue of his 
many activities. But it will remember in the years 
to be that his voice rang sincerely and clear for a 
finer State to live in. He was a friend to the unfor- 
tunate and delinquent. He held it to be his high 
privilege to break down the isolation and cramping 
limitations of the country side. He carried the fight 
against disease deep into enemy territory. He under- 
wrote a system of professional training for teachers 
and the lengtheuing of public school term from four 
to six months. And with a courage and statesman- 
ship rarely exhibited in North Carolina political life 
he became the flaming, effective evangel of equality 
in taxation for every son and daughter of North 
Carolina. 

Two other things splendidly written into the re- 
cord are : His voice as our representative beyond 
the borders of the State was always heard with re- 
spect, and the fact that his hand was at the helm 
while the destinies of the State were being tried by 
the fires of the world conflagration, gave assurance 
and hope. 

As Thomas Walter Bickett takes up anew the work 
of a private citizen, the good wishes of The Review 
and Alma Mater go with him. 

□ □ D 

A Long Step Forward 

The news that William McKeithan Fetzer and his 
brother, Robert A. Fetzer, have been appointed re- 
spectively director of athletics and associate director 
has been hailed by alumni and students as a wise 
step. To this The Review cries Amen! 

Full details of the arrangement under which the 
two Fetzers assume the leadership of the Univer- 
sity's athletics will be found on another page. The 
athletic authorities have taken up again a policy out- 
lined in 1915, put into effect under T. J. Campbell, 
but interrupted by the war. This policy emphasizes 
the full scope of a full-time director with general 
oversight over all the working of athletic activities, 
lays special stress on the development of games among 
all the students, looks to the further development of 
high school athletics in the State, and calls for con- 
tinued devotion to the highest ideals of clean sport 
and sportsmanship. It goes further, because it seeks 
to cover more ground than the special qualifications 



160 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



of a football coach outlined in the December, 1920 issue 
of The Review ; but so far as football alone is con- 
cerned the two run almost parallel. The Review 
argued for a football coach "who knows the game and 
has proved that he can teach; who has the person- 
ality . . . ; who knows from intimate experience 
the conditions surrounding football at the University. 
in North Carolina, and in the South Atlantic states; 
who loves or can come to love the atmosphere of 
Chapel Hill and would like to live here ; and who is 
engaged on a long term contract . . . ." The 
extension of sports among all the students, the de- 
velopment of high school athletics, the insistence on 
the fine spirit of clean sportsmanship are so funda- 



mentally sound that no word here need be spent 
on them. 

From every possible angle the choosing of the 
two Fetzers, Bill and Bob, to direct such a policy 
is wisdom from on high. There is plenty of work 
for both, maybe too much; but that they can do the 
work is written in the records of both men. The older 
Fetzer, W. M., is known all over North Carolina and 
throughout the South for sound athletic teaching and 
high athletic ideals. Robert A. Fetzer has become 
known in Virginia, where most of his coaching has 
been, as an unusual type of conscientious, energetic 
leader. The two together should make the strongest 
coaching combination in the South. 



TRUSTEES WORK FOR THE WHOLE PROGRAM 

Confident that the day has come in North Caro- At the same time the commission recommended a 

lina when the University should be permitted to maintenance program of $425,000 for each of the 

carry into execution the program of expansion which two years instead of the $473,911 and $494,336 asked 

the State is demanding of it, the Board of Trustees for 1921 and 1922 respectively. 

at their winter meeting January 25 (after The Re- Without arguing the case here, it is self evident 

VIEW' had practically gone to press), adopted the fol- that the Trustees could not have performed their 

lowing resolution backing the entire building pro- duty as guardians of the University by following 

gram of $5,585,000 presented in the January issue any other method than the one indicated in the resolu- 

of The Review and formerly approved by the Execu- tion. Theirs is the inescapable duty of laying the 

tive Committee of the Trustees and the full Board needs of the University before the General Assembly 

at the special called meeting of December 30 : regardless of what the Budget Commission recom- 

Whereas, The Budget Commission, in reporting mended, 

its recommendations for the building program of the Theirs is the duty, for example, to show and show 

University, felt obliged, because of the statute under convinc i n gi Vj tna t no program which merely pro- 

which it was operating, to confine itself to a recom- . . . ... , ,, , , 

wmcii li was u F ioi g, vided for dormitories, dmmg hall, and classrooms, 

mendation concerning the building needs of the Um- ," ,. s ■ . ' 

versity for the next two years. could for one moment relieve the pressure of the 

And Whereas, The full building program of the Law Building, the Medical Laboratory, the Infirmary, 

University, as approved by the Trustees in special the Chapel, to mention only four of a half score of 

session on December thirtieth, is a program intended pressing instances. These buildings are already 

to be spread over a series of years, and has there- iammed bey ond capacity. To provide dormitories 

fore not been passed.on by any legislative body; ^ ^ ^ ^^ ^ ^ ^^ ^ ^ 

Be It Therefore Resolved by the Board ot lrus- ™.„„»i «.„ t a™ t^i^;™ 

tees of the University, That the President of the Present demand on the Chapel, the Law Building, 

University and the Legislative Committee of the the Chemistry Building, the Infirmary, and all others 

Board be and hereby are instructed to present this [ s to be increased to just that extent, 

full building program to the proper committees of Jf ig theh . d tQ show ^ no program of new 

the General Assembly now in session, and to request . „ „ .. 

tie General Assembly to provide at this session funds dormitory construction can atone for failure to reno- 

to carry out the full program of $5,585,000. vate the Old East, the Old West, the Old South, 

In presenting this resolution the Trustees had be- New East, New West dormitories which have served 
fore them the report of the Budget Commission as North Carolina from sixty to one hundred and twenty- 
submitted to the General Assembly on January 13 five years, and which today are in utter disrepair but 
in which the commission recommended the following can be made to serve the State for other generations 
building program for the next two years: if only they are given attention. 

* rah „* „i ,,t« *9fi<s ooo on Their duty is to show, and show convincingly, that 

Dormitories to care for 640 students $Jb.>,ow).uu •' _ 

Dining room, kitchen, and storage loo.ooo.oo the physical plant is not adequate, and that it can- 
Two classroom buildings fno'ooooo not be made adequate by adding to it in spots. The 

Heating, light, and water iuu,uuu.uu . _ - ,i • i 

Furniture 50,000.00 State, after putting off from year to year the job 

Faculty houses ^'onn'oo of building adequately, is today confronted with the 

Departmental equipment jU,UUU.uu e . . . , .-,■ 

Fire protection 25,000.00 task of correcting its past omissions and providing 

Total $990,000.00 courageously and amply for the future— whether 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



161 



with one, or two, or three, or a score of buildings! In taking this position, the Board justified the 

Theirs also is the duty to show the necessity for faith which the student body, the faculty, the alumni, 

annual maintenance which will provide adequate and the State have in it. The hour calls for definite 

equipment and instruction, without which the Uni- leadership, for constructive planning, for decisive ac- 

versity cannot hope to perform its splendid mission tion. The Trustees have shown all of these, and the 

of service to North Carolina. people will rally to their standards. 

ALUMNI SHOW THEIR FIGHTING METTLE 



The largest number of alumni meetings ever held 
in the State in any year in the history of the Univer- 
sity were held during the Christmas holdidays. These 
twenty-five meetings and more were all enthusiastic- 
ally devoted to the $20,000,000 building program for 
the State institutions. Whether in the cheering 
mountains of Caldwell County, or in the supposedly 
depressed cotton regions of Cabarrus or in the undis- 
mayed tobacco lands of Granville and Lenoir or 
whether to the northeast in Perquimans or toward 
the Atlantic on the Neuse, the spirit and resolution of 
all these meetings had the same common denomina- 
tor of determination and fighting spirit to put the 
whole program through and over all the odds of 
hard times, pessimism, and reaction. 

Caldwell Strikes Keynote 

Up in Caldwell County in the financially hard hit furniture 
town of Lenoir ("fourth largest furniture manufacturing 
town in the United States ' ' says the live local chamber of 
commerce) a fighting meeting was held by the alumni and 
students of all the North Carolina colleges, State and denomi- 
national, together with a large number of influential teachers, 
preachers, club women, members of the chamber of com- 
merce, business men, pillars in the churches, and non-col- 
lege citizens. The meeting was an aggressive business meet- 
ing to underwrite in vigorous public opinion the State's pro- 
gressive educational program. Horace Sisk, superintendent 
of schools, presided. Frank 1'. Graham of the University fac- 
ulty, outlined the needs and the plan, sounded the keynote 
and spoke in behalf of all the colleges and the youth of 
the State. A resolution was introduced by T. E. Story call- 
ing on the legislature to put through the entire building 
program. Former Lieutenant Governor W. C. Newland, a 
graduate of West Point, J. L. Nelson, a prominent business 
man, and the Baptist minister, a graduate of Wake Forest, 
all spoke strongly for the $20,000,000 bond issue. Talks 
were made by representatives of ten North Carolina colleges. 
Harold Corpening, of the student body, spoke clearly of the 
University's needs. The resolution was unanimously passed 
to back both the $20,000,000 building plan for the State insti- 
tutions and the program of the North Carolina Good Roads 
Association. Representative A. A. Blackwelder rose to the 
occasion, pledged his support to both programs and said if 
such meetings could be held in every county in North Caro- 
lina that the legislators instead of being afraid to vote for 
would be afraid to vote against the $20,000,000 investment 
in youth and the future greatness of the State 

Rutherford Rings True 

The alumni of Rutherfordton, Spindale, and their environs 
under the leadership of Kenneth Tanner and R. E. Price, 
joined forces with the alumni of State and church colleges, 
men's and women's colleges, and citizens of the region, in a 
banquet-conference on the crisis in the congested colleges of 
North Carolina. It was the largest such gathering ever 



held in the county says The Sun. Frank P. Graham, of the 
University faculty, presented the case of the colleges and 
sounded the call for action. Representatives of a half dozen 
colleges made vivid the needs and caught up the challenge for 
an agressive movement to meet the desperate situation. Senator 
Sol. Gallert and Representative C. F. Cline spoke in favor of 
liberal appropriations for State institutions. J. M. Carson, 
trustee, J. C. Cowan, Jr., of the student body, M. L. Edwards, 
Dr. W. S. Green, O. C. Ei-win, secretary of the chamber of 
commerce, and B. F. Dalton spoke in favor of the building 
program for State institutions and Superintendent Brooks ' 
educational policy. The North Carolina College for Women 
alumnae organized immediately after the meeting to join 
in the fight. 

President Chase Features Rockingham Meeting 

The Richmond County alumni held an enthusiastic meeting 
at the old Steele home in Rockingham where once lived Col. 
Walter L. Steele, one of the factors in the reopening of the 
University. Thomas C. Leak, president of the alumni associa- 
tion, acted as toastmaster. H. S. Everett, '20, spoke ably on the 
students' attitude to University problems. Carl Coley elec- 
trified the group with his impassioned talk on "Why I 
went to the University." Mr. Leak introduced W. N. Everett, 
as close to the problems of the University in his capacity 
of chairman of the board of visitors of the trustees and as 
the decisive personal factor in getting the award by the 
General Education Board for a temporary increase in salaries 
of University professors. Mr. Everett spoke of the far reach 
ing influence of the University, sketched its present needs and 
introduced President Chase. President Chase in a clear and 
able manner told the story of congestion in terms of out- 
grown college equipment, the expansion of the public schools, 
and raised the question as to what is going to be done about 
the situation. "Will the State provide more dormitories or 
will ambitious boys be compelled to give up thoughts of a 
University education?" At the conclusion of Dr. Chase's ad- 
dress the students gave the college yell for him and sang 
' ' Hark the Sound of Tar Heel Voices. ' ' Impromptu talks 
were made by Mrs. Lucy P. Russell, an honorary member 
of the association, Fred W. Bynum, Senator M. W. Nash, 
and L. J. Bell. T. C. Leak was elected president, W. N. 
Everett, Jr., vice-president, and Isaac S. London, seceretary 
and treasurer. 

Madison Stages Rousing Banquet 

Carolina alumni and students of Rockingham County, with 
invited guests including alumni and students of other col- 
leges, held their annual banquet at Madison on December 
29th. W. R. Dalton, of Reidsville, president of the associa- 
tion, was toastmaster. Greetings were spoken by W. E. Priee, 
of Madison, and response was given by A. D. Ivie, of Spray. 
Short speeches were made by the representatives of different 
colleges. Inspiring talks were made by Rev. P. H. Gwynn, of 
Leaksville, and Luther Hodges, of Spray. M. T. Smith, of 
Reidsville, proposed a constitution and by-laws for the as- 



162 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



sociation. The assembly drafted resolutions calling on the 
Rockingham County legislators to vote and work for the full 
appropriatiou needed by the University and the State col- 
leges. The Rockingham County alumni never miss holding 
a rousing banquet on University Day and another rousing 
banquet during the Christmas holidays. 

Hertford Organizes Association 

Amidst a setting that was fitting for the occasion Carolina 
alumni and students of Perquimans County held a banquet 
at Hertford on December 29th, and organized a county alumni 
association. Dr. R. W. Smith was elected president, and 
D. M. Field, Jr., was elected secretary. The alumni backed 
up solidly the campaign for higher education in the State, 
and adopted a resolution urging the representative of Per- 
quimans County in the legislature to give his full support 
to all measures providing for the better equipment of the 
State educational institutions. 

Lexington Holds General Meeting 

Alumni and students of the University, together with 
alumni and students of other institutions and business and 
professional men of Lexington, held an enthusiastic meeting 
on December 30th, and endorsed the campaign for higher 
education in the State. Dr. J. H. Cook, of the Faculty of 
the North Carolina College for Women, was the principal 
speaker. Brief talks were made by Captain F. C. Robbins, 
Z. V. Walser, G. W. Mountcastle, J. H. Cowles, and others. 
The meeting called on the Davidson County legislators to 
give their support to the educational program. 

Gastonia Has Splendid Banquet 

Carolina students and alumni of Gaston County with in- 
vited guests held their annual banquet at Gastonia on Decem- 
ber 31st. A. E. Woltz, president of the association, was 
toastmaster. H. C. Sisk, of Belmont, hoisted the tune of 
' ' Hark the Sound. ' ' Professor V fi. S. N n b lp was present 
as a guest of honor, and he made the principal address. 
Brief talks were made by John G. Carpenter, Senator Carl 
Carpenter, Solicitor George W. Wilson, Joe S. Wray, H. B. 
Gaston, and Charles T. Boyd. C. W. Gunter offered resolu- 
tions, which were adopted, calling upon the Gaston County 
legislators to work in the legislature for proper support for 
the University and other State institutions. A letter from 
President Chase to the alumni was read. A. E. Woltz was 
re-elected president ; Dr. T. C. Quickel was elected vice-pres- 
ident; E. R. Rankin, seeertary; and T. J. Brawley, treasurer. 
The occasion was one of the most enjoyable and largely at- 
tended of the annual banquets ever held at Gastonia. The at- 
tendance was seventy-five. 

Joint Banquet at Sanford 

The Lee County alumni of the University and the A. and E. 
college held a joint banquet at Sanford on January 3rd. C. 
L. Williams, of the Sanford bar, acted as toastmaster. Ad- 
dresses were made by Professor W. S. Bernard, of the Uni- 
versity faculty; Dr. W. A. Withers, of A. and E. College 
faculty; Dr. W. A. Monroe, Lee County representative in the 
legislature; and A. A. F. Seawell, of the Sanford bar. D. B. 
Teague introduced a resolution, which was adopted, heartilj' 
endorsing the movement for increased appropriations for 
higher education. The banquet was a successful affair, and 
was productive of aid for the cause of higher education in 
the State. 

Alumni Banquet at Statesville 

The Iredell County Alumni Association held its annual 
banquet in Statesville on January 10th. The movement to 



have the legislature make sufficient appropriation for the 
University received the enthusiastic backing of the Iredell 
alumni. Talks were made by Rev. G. V. Tilley, Rev. T. A. 
Groco, F. A. Sherrill, Cowles Bristol, L. W. McKesson, Dr. 
S. W. Hoffman, Dr. J. W. Davis, and others. Rev. G. V. 
Tilley, was elected president; Dr. S. W. Hoffman, secretary; 
and L. W. McKesson, treasurer. 

Oxford Endorses Program 

The Granville County Alumni Association held its annual 
banquet in Oxford on January 5th, and backed up in strong 
terms the campaign for proper equipment for the University 
and the State colleges. Judge W. A. Devin, presided as toast- 
master. F. P. Graham, of the University faculty, spoke 
forcefully of the present needs and their proposed solution. 
Among others who made speeches were B. K. Lassiter, of the 
board of trustees; Dr. F. P. Hobgood, president of Oxford 
college, and also a member of the board of trustees, and T. 
Lanier, one of Carolina 's famous pitchers of years gone by. 
A resolution was passed backing the whole $20,000,000 pro- 
gram for State institutions and the local bond issue of 
$75,000 for a high school building in Oxford. The Granville 
County Alumni Association was reorganized. It plans to 
take an active part in all matters relating to educational pro- 
gress. J. W. Horner was elected president, and G. B. Phillips 
was elected secretary and treasurer. 

Monroe for Progress 

The Union County alumni and students of the University 
staged their annual banquet in Monroe on December 26th. 
Ladies were present as guests. Also, the football team and 
the graduating class of the Monroe high school were guests. 
J. C. M. Vann was toastmaster for the occasion. Addresses 
were made by J. J. Parker, W. B. Love, G. L. Nisbet, B. C. 
Harrell, Oscar Abernethy, Gilliam Craig, S. G. Hawfield, A. 
G. Griffin, Earl Henson, and R. R. Hawfield. Messrs. Parker 
Love, and Nisbet appealed powerfully for the program for 
enlarging higher educational facilities in North Carolina. 
Officers were elected as follows : president, C. H. Hasty ; vice- 
president, Gilliam Craig; secretary and treasurer, Olin Me- 
Manus. The attendance at the banquet was seventy-five, and 
the affair was very enjoyable from start to finish. 

New Bern Rings Clear 

Seventy Craven County alumni, students, and prospective 
students of the University held a banquet at New Bern on 
December 30th. The occasion was the annual meeting of the 
county association. Ladies were present as guests. Larry 
I. Moore presided as toastmaster. F. P. Graham, of the 
University faculty, present as a guest of honor, sounded an 
appeal for immediate relief for higher education in North 
Carolina. The New Bern alumni took a solid stand behind 
the building program for all State institutions. Among those 
who made addresses were A. D. Ward, H. B. Smith, C. L. 
Abernethy, Romulus A. Nunn, Tom Moore, C. D. Bradham, and 
Guion Thomas. The affair was the most successful and most 
largely attended alumni gathering ever held in New Bern. 
It was productive of much good for the cause of higher educa- 
tion in North Carolina. 

Big Meeting at Winston-Salem 

Forsyth County alumni and students held an enthusiastic 
meeting at Winston-Salem on January 3rd. Burton Craige, 
president of the association, pointed out that the University 
could not adequately accommodate the number of students 
which she now has, much less the number who will be call- 
ing for admittance next year and the year after. Professor 
A. H. Patterson, of the University faculty, present as a 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



163 



guest of his home county association, pointed out that the 
University must either fix the number of students to be ad- 
mitted, or expand the institution so as to take care of all 
young people who desire to attend. He pointed out- that the 
only proper course was to expand the facilities of the Uni- 
versity so that every North Carolina youth could secure ad- 
mission who desired it. 

James A. Gray, of the board of trustees, former State 
Senator and a member of the budget comission, predicted a 
very careful consideration of University needs on the part of 
the legislature now in session. Others who made talks at 
the meeting were 'Walter Thompson, Dr. Howard E. Rond- 
thaler, A. H. Eller, of the board of trustees, Arthur Spaugh, 
Robbins Lowe, captain of the football team, and Charles 
Siewers. The affair, which took the form of a smoker, was 
attended by seventy-five or more alumni and students. It 
served to center attention on the University's needs and to 
bind together the alumni and students more firmly in bonds 
of fellowship. 

Kinston's Biggest Alumni Banquet 

Carolina alumni and students of Lenoir County and their 
invited guests held a very enthusiastic banquet at Kinston on 
December 30th. Dr. I. M. Hardy, president of the associa- 
tion welcomed the banqueters and introduced E. B. Lewis. 
who acted as toastmaster. C. F. Harvey spoke of the last- 
ing impress made upon the lives of students by the Univer- 
sity. G. V. Cowper called attention to some of the practical 
problems ahead. X. J. Rouse gave reminiscences of the days of 
Ayeoek, Alderman, and Mclver. Phillips Brooks introduced 
F. P. Graham, of the University faculty, who made a ring 
ing appeal to those present to support the campaign now on 
in the interest of adequate appropriations for higher educa- 
tion. The alumni voted to support whole heartedly the higher 
educational movement in North Carolina. E. J. Perry was 
elected president for the ensuing year, and R. T. Allen was 
elected secretary and treasurer. 

Buncombe Organizes Campaign 

The Buncombe County Alumni Association held its annual 
meeting in Asheville on January 17th. The main subject 
for discussion was the present condition of the University, 
and the immediate need for help. Haywood Parker, of the 
board of trustees, made a ringing appeal to the alumni to 
exert their best effort in behalf of adequate provision for 
the University and the State colleges. Resolutions were 
adopted by the association calling upon the Buncombe County 
legislators to vote for the five-year program outlined by Pres- 
ident Chase. C. B. Hyatt made a talk, as did also James S. 
Howell. R. R. Williams was elected president of the associa- 
tion; C. B. Hyatt, vice-president; G. G. Tennent, secretary, 
and Clarence Blackstock, treasurer. An executive commit- 
tee was appointed consisting of Henry T. Sharpe, Charles A. 
Webb, C. K. Hughes, James S. Howell, and J. G. Cowan. 
This executive committee will work in conjunction with the 
officers. The Buncombe alumni plan to be active in all 
matters relating to the University's welfare. 

General Meeting at Marion 

Alumni and students of the University and the State col 
leges, together with a number of prominent men of McDowell 
County, met in Marion on December 27th to consider the 
needs of the University and the other State institutions. I. V. 
Giles, of the University faculty, acted as chairman. Those 
making talks were J. W. Pless, Jr., M. S. Giles, J. E. Kanipe. 
S. F. Mauney. X. F. Steppe, and Miss Pauline Hawkins. The 
needs of the State institutions were thoroughly discussed at 



the meeting, and it was the vote of those present that they 
would do all in their power to secure proper provision by 
the legislature. 

Clinton Alumni Hold Banquet 

Sampson County alumni and students of the University in co- 
operation with the alumni and students of the' A. and E. 
College, the East Carolina Teachers' Training School, and 
the North Carolina College for Women held a banquet in 
Clinton on December 31st. The meeting was presided over 
by Mrs. Marion Butler. The principal addresses were made 
by Dr. L. R. Wilson, of the University faculty, and Pres- 
ident R. H. Wright, of the East Carolina Teachers' Train- 
ing School. Speeches were also made by J. V. Baggett, 
and J. E. Fowder. Resolutions were passed urging the Samp- 
son County legislators to lend their full support to the pro- 
gram to enlarge the State institutions of higher education. 
The committee which had charge of the meeting was com 
posed of S. H. Hobbs, Jr.. W. E. Matthews, J. R. Powell, 
and Miss Daisy Hunter. The meeting was an enthusiastic 
one, and the attendance was fifty. 

Salisbury Is In Line 

Carolina alumni and students of Rowan County held a 
smoker at Salisbury on January 4th. The meeting was pre- 
sided over by T. W. Andrews, and the attendance was sixty. 
Among those who made speeches were C. L. Coggin, L. O. 
Gregory, J. C. Busby, and Stable Linn. A resolution was 
passed asking the General Assembly to make proper and 
adequate provision for the University at this session. Rowan 
County is one of the most loyal alumni centers in the State, 
and plans are on foot for having more frequent meetings of 
the alumni in the future. Walter Murphy is president of the 
association, Stahle Linn vice-president, and C. L. Coggin is 
secretary and treasurer. 

Greensboro Carries On 

One hundred Carolina alumni and students of Guilford 
County held a splendid banouet in Greensboro on December 
30th. H. B. Ganter, president of the association, presided, 
and the principal address was made by Dr. W. C. Smith, of 
the faculty of the North Carolina College for Women. Dr. 
Smith made an inspiring and forceful address on the subject, 
' ' The Call of Carolina. ' ' Others who spoke were A. L. 
Brooks, Frederick Archer, E. D. Broadhurst, Earle Rives, S. I. 
Parker, and C. R. Wharton. An enjoyable feature was music 
by a quartet composed of Dave Kirkpatrick, W. H. Swift, 
Henry Foust, and John Wilson, Jr. Greensboro is in the 
thick of the fight stronger than ever in the cause of adequate 
higher educational facilities for the youth of North Carolina. 

Concord Holds Mass Meeting 

A rousing mass meeting in the interest of higher education 
was held in Concord on December 30th. L. T. Hartsell, Con- 
cord lawyer and member of the present State Senate, pres- 
ided, and the principal address was made by Dr. E. C. Bran- 
s_on, of the University faculty, who in an earnest talk pointed 
out the glaring needs of our institutions for higher education 
and showed by figures that North Carolina was a rich State 
and could very easily care for her institutions of higher ed- 
ucation. Others who spoke were: J. B. Robertson, A. S. 
Webb, C. E. Boger, Rev. A. S. Lawrence, and H. S. Williams. 

Goldsboro Lines Up 

The Wayne County Alumni Association held its annual ban 
quet in Goldsboro on December 29th. The banquet was 
largely attended by Wayne County alumni and it proved a 



164 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



helpful factoi in the cause of higher education in the State. 
Thos. O 'Berry, president af the association, presided, and the 
principal address was made by Dr. E. W, Knight, of the Uni- 
versity faculty. Among other who made talks were Win. 
Hosea and Talbot Parker, both of whom are students in the 
University. Joe A. Parker was elected president of the as- 
sociation. . 

Burlington Holds Banquet 

The Alamance County Alumni Association held a banquet 
in Burlington on December 30th. W. H. Carroll presided, and 
Prof. M. C. S. Noble, of the University faculty, made the 
principal address. Others who spoke were Dr. J. W. Lasley, Jr., 
also of the University faculty, and Boyd Harden, of the senior 



class in the University. The Alamance alumni planned in 
their meeting for definite action to aid in the campaign for 
adequate support for the University. The banquet was an en- 
joyable affair and the attendance was fifty. 

Lincolnton Enlists For Action 

The Lincoln County Alumni Association held a meeting and 
smoker on December 30th in Lincolnton. A. L. Quickel, lawyer 
and legislator, presided. A resolution was introduced by C. A. 
Jonas, endorsing President Chase's program, and this resolu- 
tion was passed unanimously. B. E. Lohr spoke of crowded 
conditions on the Hill. A. Nixon was elected president, R. J. 
Mauser, vice-president, and K. B. Nixon, secretary and 
treasurer. 



FETZER HEADS CAROLINA ATHLETICS 



Announcement was made by Graduate Manager 
Charles T. Woollen on Jan. 6 that William McKei- 
than Fetzer, at that time athletic director at the 
Carolina State College and former football and base- 
ball coacli at Davidson and at Fishburne and Staun- 
ton, had accepted the directorship of athletics at the 
University; and that his brother, Robert A. Fetzer, 
now coaching and teaching at Woodberry Forest 
School in Virginia, would be associated with him as 
associate director. 

Both men come to the University under a two- 
year agreement, but no announcement has been made 
as to the exact amount of their salaries. Mr. Woollen 
has said, however, that reports in several State news- 
papers that Bill Fetzer was to receive a salary of 
$7,000 were greatly exaggerated. The same reports 
credited North Carolina State College with paying 
Fetzer $6,500 but the Raleigh institution has denied 
that statement. Whatever Fetzer 's salary is, it will 
be borne by the Athletic Association and by alumni 
contributions, with no help or at least very little 
help from the University, which has not for many 
years paid any part of a coach's salary. 

What applies to the older Fetzer, applies likewise 
to his brother, Robert A. Fetzer. The two are to be 
closely associated in the complete direction of athletics 
at the University. Bill came to Chapel Hill early in 
January and started immediately on his new duties. 
Bob, however, is tinder a contract at Woodberry Forest 
and will not come to Chapel Hill until next 
September. 

Resuming the 1915 Policy 

Placing the Fetzer brothers in charge of athletics 
is a continuation of the athletic policy enunciated in 
1915, put into effect then, but since interrupted by 
the war. At that time a meeting of representatives 
of the alumni, faculty, and students outlined the 
policy thus : " . . . that a general director of 
athletics be secured of the highest type in ability and 
personality, to have administrative charge of athletics; 
that under his leadership especial emphasis be laid 
on the general participation by all students in 
athletics; that adequate facilities be provided for 
the whole student body to play games ; that 

competent instruction be provided in every branch of 
sport . . . that the development of high school 
athletics be encouraged by the alumni in co-operation 
with the alumni of other colleges, entirely apart from 
the consideration of where the students expect to at- 



tend college. . . . The meeting also expressed its 
desire to promote progress in athletics in the State 
and section through co-operating in every possible 




W. McK. Fetzer 

way with other colleges, and encouraging confidence 
and friendliness in all athletic relations." 

It was in pursuance of the above policy that Tommy 
Campbell became director of athletics in 191(i. The 
war upset plans and last year the inability to get the 
right leader further deferred the operation of the 
University's fixed ideal in athletic leadership. The 
appointment of Fetzer, and the association with him 
of his brother, mean that the policy has been resumed. 

Bill Fetzer to Coach Football 

In the definite working out of the policy Bill 
Fetzer will personally coach the varsity football 
team and baseball team. Bob will be intimately as- 
sociated with him in varsity football and will have 
charge of track athletics. It will be necessary to pro- 
vide a basketball coach. Major F. W. Boye, who has 
coached basketball for the past two years, will prob- 
ably be back next year, and if so, will almost certainly 
be in charge again. 

For the coaching of the freshman teams, every 
year becoming more important, complete plans have 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



165 



not yet been made. It is probable that a field coach 
for the freshmen football team will be appointed from 
University alumni, but both the Fetzers will be in 
close touch with him. will direct his woi-k, and will 
give some time to the freshman squad themselves. 
Freshman basketball and baseball will also have to 
be provided fur; freshman track can probably be 
handled by Boh Fetzer in conjunction with the var- 
sity track squad. 

General Athletics to be Stimulated 

In addition to varsity and freshman teams the two 
Fetzers will seek to develop a more general participa- 
tion in athletics of some kind by all the students. 
Exact details have not been worked out, but it is 
possible that an extension of the class-games system, 
better organized and made more general, will be fol- 
lowed out. The ideal sought is the general participa- 
tion by as many students as possible in exercise. 
Under the present understanding Bill Fetzer, as soon 
as he has familiarized himself with conditions at the 
University, will make recommendations. 

On the administrative end improvement is expected 

in many details of schedules, expenses, equipment, 
organization, and general efficiency. And also the 
two will be closely connected with the University's 
high school championship contests and will seek to 
develop high school athletics all over the State. 

Appointments Are Popular 

The appointment of the Fetzers has been hailed by 
students and alumni as the most important step 
taken in University athletics in many years. Bill 
Fetzer is easily the best known athletic leader in the 
State and one of the best known in the South. Bob 
has made a splendid reputation in Virginia, where 
he is better known than in North Carolina. Both have 
years of experience, have proved themselves capable 
teachers and leaders, and have gained a high reputa- 
tion for sportsmanship and fairness in their work. 
When there was doubt in 1919 about Campbell's re- 
turn. Bill Fetzer was first choice as his successor. 
Again last year lie was definitely sought, but thought 
best to remain another year at State College. The 
call for him this year from students and alumni was 
unmistakable; the coaching committee, consisting of 
Mr. Woollen, graduate manager, Dr. Charles S. .Man 
gum, chairman of the faculty committee on athletics. 
and Albert L. Cox. of Raleigh, representing the al- 
umni, was flooded with letters and personal requests 
for Fetzer as head of the athletic system, and the 
choice is unquestionabl3' a most popular one. 

Both Fetzers Are From Davidson 

Both the Fetzers are from Concord, and both at- 
tended Davidson College. Bill graduated in 1906, 
Bob in 1907. Bill was half hack at Davidson and 
played second hase on the baseball team. He played 
professional baseball with the old Carolina, the Caro- 
lina-Virginia, the Virginia, and the Western leagues. 
He was athletic director at Fishburne Military School 
for several years, held the same position at Staunton 
Military Academy for one year, went back to David- 
son as head coach in football and baseball for several 
years, and has been at State College for the past two 
years. He has been uniformly successful throughout 
his coaching career. His Davidson and State Col- 
lege teams have become known all over the South and 



in many other parts of the country, and he has been 
sought as coach by many institutions. 

Bob played end at Davidson, was assistant coach 
there in 1907, held the same position at Clemson in 
190S, and became coach at Woodberry Forest in 1909, 
where he remained for four years. Two of his teams 
won the State championship. lie has since taught at 
State College and has worked with the State Depart- 
ment of Agriculture. Last year he went back to 
Woodberry Forest, where he has again taken up 
coaching. He has also done much officiating in 
Virginia. Bob is married; Bill is single. 



ALUMNI LEGISLATORS 

Fifty-six Carolina alumni are members of the pre- 
sent General Assembly of North Carolina, there being 
12:! Senators and 33 Representatives. W. L. Long, 
president pro tern, of the Senate, is a member of the 
class of 1909, and Speaker Harry P. Grier, of the 
House, is a member of the Board of Trustees. The 
list follows : 

Senate— L. T. Hartsell, Concord; W. F. Taylor, 
Goldsboro ; Stanley Winborne, Murf reesboro ; H. W. 
Stubbs, Williamston; H. L. Swain, Columbia; W. H. 
S. Burgwyn, Woodland ; Paul Jones, Tarboro ; W. L. 
Long, Roanoke Rapids; F. B. McKinne, Louisburg; 
K. O. Burgwin, Wilmington; E. F. McCulloch, Jr., 
Elizabethtown ; Dr. J. V. McGougan, Fayetteville ; 
L. M Carlton, Roxboro ; Bennehan Cameron. Stag- 
ville; J. Elmer Long, Graham; M. W. Nash. Hamlet; 
C. X. Cox, Asheboro; F. L. Dunlap, Wadesboro; J. L. 
Delaney, Charlotte; W. H. Woodson, Salisbury; J. 
A. Scott, Jr., Statesville; C. E. Carpenter, Gastonia; 
Marcus Erwin, Asheville. 

House — W. N. Everett, Rockingham ; R. A. Dough- 
ton, Sparta ; Walter Murphy, Salisbury ; T. C. Bowie, 
Jefferson; J. H. Matthews. Windsor; F. O. Christo- 
pher, Murphy; Peyton MeSwain, Shelby; A. T. Grant, 
Jr.. Mocksville; E. J. Hill. Warsaw ; R. O. Everett, 
Durham: F. L. Fuller. Jr.. Durham; R. T. Fountain. 
Rocky Mount; A. E. Woltz, Gastonia; H. B. Gaston, 
Belmont; J. T. Exum, Snow Hill; J. A. Austin. High 
Point; C. G. Wright, Greensboro; N. A. Townsend, 
Dunn ; D. C. Barnes, Murf reesboro ; Oscar Leach, Rae- 
ford; II. P. Grier, Statesville; J. G. Dawson, Kin- 
ston : A. L. Quickel, Lincolnton ; J. A. Hendrix, Mar- 
shall ; Clayton Moore. Williamston; E. W. Pharr, Char- 
lotte; M.'V. Barnhill, Rocky Mount; E. H. Bellamy. 
Wilmington; A. H. Graham, Hillsboro; L. N. John- 
ston. Burgaw; Julius Brown, Greenville; W. C. 
Coughenour, Salisbury; H. G. Connor, Jr., Wilson. 



CAROLINA WINS DEBATE 

Carolina won by unanimous decision the debate 
with the University of Pennsylvania, held in Chapel 
Hill on January 1212nd. Carolina's representatives, 
upholding the affirmative side of the query, "lie- 
solved. That a federal law should be passed rigidly 
restricting immigration for a period of two years," 
were: C. T. Boyd, of Gastonia; C. D. Beers, of Ashe- 
ville; and T. C. Taylor, of Sparta. With this vic- 
tory, Carolina has won six out of seven debates with 
the University of Pennsylvania. 



166 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



ANGUS WILTON McLEAN ASSISTANT SECRE- 
TARY OF THE TREASURY 

Twenty-eight years ago. when a freshman at the 
University of North Carolin, I met Angus "Wilton 
McLean, and my recollection of him is that he was 
one of the most powerful giants I had ever seen. 
At that time he could stand flat-footed, with arms at 
right angles with his body, and permit small boys to 




Axons Wilton McLean 

"skin-the-cat" on them. I knew nothing of his men- 
tality, except that I heard my brother, Victor S. Bry- 
ant, say that he was very able, and clever. 

For the last several years I have been thrown in 
contact with Mr. McLean in Washington, where he 
is now serving as managing director of the War Fin- 
ance Corporation and Assistant Secretary of the 
Treasury, and find that he is still strong of mind 
and body. 

Mr. McLean is a fine type of North Carolinian. Be- 
ing a Presbyterian, a Scotchman, and a Democrat he 
fits in the Woodrow Wilson school of Democracy like 
the glove does the hand. He has sense, courage and 
determination, and there has never been a day since 
he left the University in 1892 that success did not 
crown his efforts. At law, his chosen profession, he 
moved rapidly forward, winning suits in court, and 
the confidence of his clients, and the esteem of his 
associates. Litigation did not fill the McLean pro- 
gram, and the town of Lumberton, where he lived, 
felt his influence in farming, banking and manu- 
facturing circles. There is a saying in Robeson 
County that everything he touches turns to money ; 
that may be an exaggeration but it comes pretty 
close to the truth. 

In Washington Mr. McLean has had time for pol- 
itics, and society. As a member of the War Finance 
Corporation he has gained a nation-wide reputation 
as a financier and student of business conditions and 
problems. He succeeded so well that Secretary Hou- 



ston practically forced him to the post of Assistant 
Secretary of the Treasury, a place of honor. 

Mr. McLean was born on a farm near old Floral 
College, Robeson County, April 20, 1870. He attended 
country and high schools and later the University. 

Personally Angus Wilton McLean is pure gold. 
There is combined in him a seriousness of demeanor, 
a canny sense of thrift, and a deep-seated patriotism. 
He is intensely sectional in that he believes in North 
Carolina and is always willing to help along any 
cause that contributes to her advancement. 

Mr. McLean's chief lieutenant in his career of 
lawyer, business man, and politician has been his wife, 
who. before her marriage, was Miss Margaret French. 
Three children adorn the McLean home — Angus Wil- 
ton, Jr., aged eight ; Margaret, aged five, and Hector, 
aged three months. 

These are the high spots in Mr. McLean's journey 
through life. Money making has been secondary, 
and easy with him. His schemes were made to help 
his community, his party, or his church. A country 
boy who worked hard, took or made his opportunity, 
and who kept growing, sums it up pretty well. — H. E. 
C. Bryant, '95, Washington staff of the New York 
World, correspondent of the Charlotte Observer. 



OUR OLDEST LIVING ALUMNUS 

Born in Warren County on January 26, 1825 ; 
graduating with the degree of A. B. from the Uni- 
versity of North Carolina at the commencement of 
1845 ; passing his 96th birthday in the enjoyment of 
health and strength at his home in Raleigh on Jan- 
uary 26, 1921 ; this is the lot of Dr. Alexander Boyd 
Hawkins, oldest living alumnus of the University of 
North Carolina. It is a far cry from his own stu- 
dent days and those of his college mates, Pettigrew, 
Ransom, Mangum, Steele, and Ruffin, to the pre- 
sent day of grace, but Dr. Hawkins spans all those 
years and takes a great pride now, as always, in his 
Alma Mater. 

President H. W. Chase sent this message to Dr. 
Hawkins: "May I take the liberty on behalf of the 
University of sending you hearty congratulations 
on this 96th anniversary of your birth? In you, our 
oldest alumnus, the University has a peculiar pride, 
and she wishes you many happy years yet to come." 

From the student bodv, through a committee com- 
posed of W. R. Berryhil'l, J. H. Kerr, Jr., and T. C. 
Taylor, went this message: "We, the youngest sons 
of Alma Mater, send her deepest joy and our glad 
affection to you her oldest son and our eldest brother 
in the tradition and spirit of Carolina on this your 
96th birthday." 

Eleven thousand alumni join with President Chase 
and the student body in wishing for Dr. Hawkins 
many more happy birthdays. 



Let us figure out a twenty million, thirty-six year, 
five per cent bond issue for the colleges and eleemosy- 
nary institutions of the State. Reduced to its simp- 
lest terms it means forty-eight cents a year per in- 
habitant. This is to say, forty-eight cents a year per 
inhabitant not only pays the annual interest on twenty 
millions of bonds but settles the debt in thirty-six 
years upon an amortization plan. — B. C. Branson. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



167 



THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

SUMMER SCHOOL 

THIRTY-FOURTH SESSION, 1921 

Standard Courses in the Regular Departments of the University. 

Cultural and Professional Courses leading to the A.B. and A.M. degrees. 

A Modern Department of Education offering numerous professional courses in Educational 
Psychology, School Administration, Supervision, Principles of Secondary Education, Tests and 
Measurements, Supervised Study, Rural Education, Primary, Grammar Grade, and High School 
Methods, Story Telling, Plays and Games, and Physical Education. 

Numerous Academic and Professional Courses of Elementary character for teachers who 
have not had previous professional training. 

High Class Recreational Features and Entertainments of an educational character. Lec- 
tures by noted Thinkers and Writers. Music Festival and Dramatic Performances. 

Able Faculty of Trained Specialists, Practical Teachers, Supervisors, and Superintendents 
of successful experience. 

Moderate Expenses — Rooms may be reserved any time after February 1st. 

Preliminary Announcement ready February 15th. Complete Announcement ready April 1st. 

For further information, address, 

N. W. WALKER, Director, Chapel Hill, N. C. 



Culture 



Scholarship Service 

THE = 



Self-Support 



ytorl[) Carolina (Lollege for Cornea 

Offers to Women a Liberal Education, Equipment for Womanly 
Service, Professional Training for Remunerative Employment 



The College offers four groups of studies lead- 
ing to the following degrees: Bachelor of Arts, 
Bachelor of Science, and Bachelor of Music. 

Special courses in Pedagogy; in Manual Arts; in 
Domestic Science Household Art and Economics; in 
Music; and in the Commercial Branches. 

Teachers and graduates of other colleges provided 
for in both regular and special courses. 



Equipment modern, including furnished dormitories, 
library, laboratories, literary society halls, gymnas- 
ium, music rooms, teachers ' training school, infirm- 
ary, model laundry, central heating plant, and open 
air recreation grounds. 

Dormitories furnished by the State. Board at 
actual cost. Tuition free to those who pledge them- 
selves to become teachers. 



Fall 'Uerm Opens in September 



Summer 'Uerm Begins in June 



For catalogue and other information, address 

JULIUS I. FOUST, President, GREENSBORO, N. C. 



168 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



Issued monthly except in -Inly August, and September, by the Gen- 
eral Alumni Association ot the University of North Carolina. 



Board of Publication 

THE Review is edited by the following Board of Publication: 

Louis R. Wilson, '99 ...Editor 

Associate Editors: Walier Murphy, '92; Harry Howell, '95; Archibald 

Henderson, '98; W. S. Bernard, '00; J. K. Wilson, '05; Louis 

Graves, '02; P. P. Graham, '09; Kenneth Tanner. '11; Lenoir 

Chambers, Jr., '14; R. W. Madry, '1«. 

B. R. Rankin, '13 Managing Editor 

Subscription Price 

Single Copies *°;°, 

Per Year 15 ° 

Communications intended for the Editor and the Managing Editor 
should be sent to Chapel Hill, N. ('. All communications intended for 
publication must be accompanied with signatures if they are to receive 
consideration. 

OFFICE OF PUBLICATION, CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 

Entered at the Postoffice at Chapel Hill, N. C. as second class 
matter. 



THE UNIVERSITY IN PRINT 



A Builder of The South, being the story of the 
life work of Daniel Augustus Tompkins. By George 
Tayloe Winston, LL. D. Garden City; Doubleday, 
Page & Company, 1920. 03 pp. Portrait D. Price 
$3.00. 

Daniel Augustus Tompkins, who died at Montreat in 
1914, was a commonwealth builder, and more — he was 
one of the builders of the New South. He was born 
in Edgefield, S. C, received his college training in 
the University of South Carolina, and his technical 
training in Rensselaer Institute. His apprenticeship 
in industrial enterprises was in Bethlehem, Pa., in 
engineering offices in New York City, and in construc- 
tive industrial experience in Germany. For fourteen 
years he lived in the North, but even in the dark days 
of the early eighties he visioned the magnificent manu- 
facturing possiblities of the South. In 1882 he turned 
his back upon the busy North, came back to the 
South, settled at Charlotte, and established a one-man 
business — a business that soon grew so large that his 
concern built 250 or more of our cottonseed oil mills. 
And he was almost equally busy organizing and build- 
ing cotton mills. 

We call him myriad-minded because he was inter- 
ested in almost every phase of life — in common schools, 
agricultural and engineering schools, in building and 
loan associations — primarily for the ownership of 
homes by mechanics — in newspaper ownership and 
editorial work, in text-book writing, in public speak- 
ing on almost every field of work and thought, in liter- 
ature, science, landscape gardening, domestic economy, 
birds and children. The most inspiring look into the 
soul of this remarkable man comes to us in his love for 
little children and young people. 

We are saying these things to call attention to Dr. 
George Tayloe Winston's recently published Life of 
D. A. Tompkins. The literary craftsmanship of this 
book is superb. Dr. Winston tells a fascinating story 
from lid to lid. The college student who does not read 
it has missed a large chapter of real culture. — Univer- 
sity News Letter. 



REGISTRATION REACHES 1473 

Official figures from the office of Dr. T. J. Wi'son, 
Registrar, effectively dispel a rumor that was widely 
circulated over the State to the effect that the tempo- 
rary business depression had caused many students to 
drop out of the University. 

Dr. Wilson reports that the total registration since 
the University opened last September has mounted 
to 1,473, the highest mark it lias ever reached in the 
whole history of the institution. The number of stu- 
dents who have dropped out for all reasons since 
September is 107 ; the number of new students who 
registered after the Christmas holidays is 70. The net 
loss since September therefore is 37, which Dr. Wilson 
says is less than the normal loss encountered every 
year. At the present time there are actually on the 
campus 1366 students, probably the largest number 
ever in Chapel Hill at any one time. 

The loss of 107 students since last September is due, 
Dr. Wilson says, to normal reasons, failure to keep 
up with work, unexpected personal and family causes, 
and such matters, all of which operate every year, but 
less this year than before. 

University records do not show that periods of de- 
pression in the past have caused any marked falling 
off in attendance. It has been pointed out that so- 
called "bad times" often has just the opposite effect, 
that is, more students go to college under such circum- 
stances than when money is plentiful and it is easy for 
a young man to get remunerative work. And all Uni- 
versity authorities are looking for a greater flood of 
applications next year than ever before. 



HIGH SCHOOL DEBATES 

To the present date 225 high schools have enrolled 
in the High School Debating Union for the State- 
wide contest on the query : ' ' Resolved, That the 
policy of collective bargaining through trade unions 
should prevail in American industry." The tri- 
angular debates will be held throughout the State on 
April 1st and the final contest for the Aycock Mem- 
orial Cup, the trophy provided by Carolina's inter- 
collegiate debaters, will be held at the University on 
April 14th and 15th. 

For the use of the schools taking part in the de- 
bates, the Bureau of Extension of the University has 
issued a 75-page handbook of debate material on the 
subject, entitled, Extension Series No. 40 "Collec- 
tive Bargaining." The contest this year is the ninth 
one to be conducted under the auspices of the Univer- 
sity, since the High School Debating Union was 
organized in the fall of 1912. 



BASKETBALL SEASON OPENS 
SUCCESSFULLY 

As The Review went to press the University basket- 
ball team had won its first three games with Durham 
Y.M.C.A., South Carolina, and Elon, was facing the 
first Trinity game, and was preparing to start on the 
longest and hardest trip ever taken by a University 
team. 

Practice was started immediately after Thanksgiv- 
ing under the direction of Major Frederick W. Boye, 
former West Point player, who coached last year. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



169 



Union National 
Bank 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 

Capital $200,000.00 

Surplus & Profits $235,000.00 
Resources $3,500,000.00 



We cordially invite the 
alumni and friends of the 
University of North Carolina 
to avail themselves of the fa- 
cilities and courtesies of this 
bank. 



D. P. TILLETT 
Cashier 



Conservative Investments 

We can uffer the following high grade 

preferred stocks just now at attractive 

rates in lots of 10 shares or more: 

25 shares Cabarrus Mill, 7 per cent 
preferred. 

LOO shares High Shoals, 7 per cent 
preferred stock. 

ION shares I lanes Rubber Company, 
7% per cent preferred. 

LOO shares Chadwick-Hoskins Mill, 8 
per cent preferred. 

50 shares Rhodhias Mill, 7 per cent 
preferred. 

loo shares McClaren Rubber Company, 
8 per cent preferred. 

50 snares Gilmers, Incorporated, 7 per 
cent preferred. 

10 shares Brown Williamson Tobacco 
Company, 7 per cent preferred. 

LOO Shares Tidewater Power Company, 
7 per cent preferred. 

50 snares P. H. Hanes Knitting Com- 
pany, 7 per cent preferred. 

"in shares R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Com- 
pany, 7 per cent preferred. 

LOO shares Hunter Commission & Man- 
ufacturing, 7 per cent preferred. 

LOO shares Belton Mill, 7 per cent 
preferred. 

50 shares Stonecutter Mill, 7 per cent 
[.referred. 

L50 shares Union Buffalo Mills, 7 per 
cent lirst preferred. 
The above stocks are sure to enhance 

at their present low levels, and at the 

same tun-- yon have a safe investment 

bearing a stated rate of dividend. 

F. C. Abbott & Co. 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 

INVESTMENTS 

Phone 238 Postal Phone 

Long Diat. 9957 



GENERAL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

of the 

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH 

CAROLINA 



Officers of the Association 

R. I>. W. Connor, '99 President 

E. K. Rankin. '13 Secretary 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE: Walter Mur 
phy, '92; Dr. R. H. Lewis, '70; W. N. 
Everett, '86; H. E. Rondthaler, '93; C. W. 
Tlllett, Jr., '09. 



1859 

— Eleven members of the famous class 
of 1859 survive today. Jas. P. Coffin, 
(if Batesville, Ark., who lias been for 
sixty years the leading spirit m keep- 
ing the class united, sends The Review 
the following list of the other ten sur- 
vivors: Capt. Jas. E. Beasley, Memphis, 
Tcnn ; Geo. P. Dixon, Wynne, Ark. ; Jas. 
P. Taylor, Angletdn, Texas; Dr. H. L. 
Rugeley, Bay City, Texas ; Capt. J. M. 
Fleming, Raleigh ; Lucius Friersou, 
Birmingham, Ala.; John Duncan, Col- 
umbus, Texas; Dr. Peter B. Bacot, Flor- 
ence, S. C. ; Capt. F. C. Robbins, Lexing- 
ton; Jas. G. Whitfield, Whitfield, Ala. 

1862 
— Hon. Chas. M. Stedman, of Greens- 
boro, will soon begin serving his sixth 
term as Congressman from the fifth N. 
C. district. 

1879 
— F. K. Borden is a banker and capitalist 
of Goldsboro. 

1881 
— R. W. Scott, of Haw River, and A. 
T. McCallum, of Red Springs, are mem- 
bers of the State Board of Agriculture. 
— F. B. Dancy has moved into his new 
home at 1117 X. Calvert St., Baltimore, 
Md. 

1883 
— J. Frank Wilkes is manager of the 
Mecklenburg Iron Works, at Charlotte. 
— Ed Chambers Smith is a capitalist of 
Raleigh. 

— R. A. Doughton, lawyer of Sparta and 
former lieutenant governor, represents 
Alleghany County in the House of the N. 
c. Legislature. He is chairman of the 
Souse finance committee. 
— F. S. Spruill, lawyer of Rocky Mount 
and former legislator and Universitj 
trustee, Is division counsel of the A. C. 
L. Railroad and general counsel of the 
X. ( '. Pine Associat ion. 

1885 
— Geo. Gordon Battle, of the law firm 
of O 'Gorman, Battle and Vandiver, 37 
Wall St., New York City, writes The 
Review as follows: "I am very much 
pleased with the January number of the 
Alumni Review, which I have just re- 
ceived, and which contains a picture of 



The Planters National 
Bank 

Rocky Mount, N. C. 



Capital, $300,000. Surplus and 
undivided profits over $350,000. 
Resources over three and a half 
million. 

Located in the center of the 
Eastern North Carolina tobacco 
belt, offers to you its services 
along all lines of banking. 4% 
interest on savings deposits. 



J. C. BRASWELL, President 
M. C. BRASWELL, Vice-Pres. 
MILLARD F. JONES, Cashier 
R. D. GORHAM, Asst. Cashier 

'The Bank of Personal Service" 



THE 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

OF 

RICHMOND, VA. 

with its resources of $36,000,000, 
is splendidly equipped to serve in 
all branches of Commercial Bank- 
ing. 

Trust Department 

The Trust Department offers 
unexcelled service. 



JNO M. MILLER. Jr. 
CHAS. R. BURNETT 
ALEX F. RYLAND 
S. P. RYLAND 
S. E. BATES. Jr. - 
JAS. M. BALL. Jr. 
THOS. W. PURCELL 



President 
Vice-Prei. 
Vice-Pres. 
Vice-Pres. 
Vice-Pres. 
Cashier 
Trust Officer 



170 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



THE BANK of 
CHAPEL HILL 



Oldest and Strongest Bank 
in Orange County 



Capital $25,000.00 

Surplus and Profits ... 45,000.00 



We earnestly solicit your banking 
business, promising you every service 
and, assistance consistent with safe 
banking. "It pleases us to please 
you." 



M. C. S. NOBLE, President 
R. L. STROWD, V-President 
M. E. HOGAN, Cashier 



STATEMENT 01' THE CONDITION 

OF 

THE FIDELITY BANK 
Durham, N. C. 

Made to the North Carolina Corpora- 
tion Commission at the Close of 
Business June 30, 1920 

Resources 
Loans and Investments. .$3, 864, 605. 84 

Furniture and Fixtures- 17,443.48 

Cash Items 329,999.97 

Cash in Vaults and with 

Banks 1,028,979.12 

Overdrafts Secured 1,643.18 

$5,242,671.59 

LtABILITrES 

Capital Stock $ 100,000.00 

Surplus 500,000.00 

Undivided Profits 133,227.61 

Deposits 3,710,886.28 

Bills Payable 445,000.00 

Bills Re-discounted 353,557.70 

$5,242,671.59 

Commercial and Savings 4% Com- 
pounded Quarterly in Our Sav- 
ings Department 

Authorized by its charter to act as 
administrator, guardian, trustee, agent, 
executor, etc. 

The strength of this bank lies not 
alone in its capital, surplus and re- 
sources, but in the character and fi- 
nancial responsibility of the men who 
conduct its affairs. 

B. N. DUKE, President 
JNO. F. WILY, Vice-President 
L. D. KIRKLAND, Cashier 
H. W. BORING, Asst. Cashier 



the Old South Building. This picture re- 
calls very vividly memories of my stu 
dent days at the University, back in the 
early eighties. ' ' 

— Rev. Jas. A. Bryan, pastor of the Thud 
Presbyterian Church of Birmingham, Ala., 
has been awarded the Birmingham News 
Loving Cup for 1920. He was the unani- 
mous choice of the seven judges chosen 
In make the award, as the citizen who 
performed the greatest service for Bir- 
mingham in 1920. Mr. Bryan has been 
since 1889 pastor of the same church in 
Birmingham. 

— George Howard is president of the 
Runnymede Mills, Inc., hosiery manufac- 
turers, at Tarboro. W. S. Howard, '97, is 
secretary and treasurer. 
— D. II. McNeill is engaged in farming 
at Vass. 

1886 
—Hon. E. W. Pou, of Smithfield, will 
shortly begin serving his tenth term as 
Congressman from the fourth N. C. dis- 
trict. 

— W. N. Everett, of Bockingham, repre 
sents Richmond County in the House of 
the N. C. Legislature. He is chairman of 
the House appropriations committee. 

1888 
— T. A. Davis is a cotton merchant of 
Wilson. 

— J. W. Alexander is a leading spirit in 
the commercial life of Spartanburg, S. C. 
— C. G. Foust is at the head of the firm 
of R. B. Spencer and Co., dealers in 
lumber, at Dublin, Texas. 
— R. L. Holt is president of the Glencoe 
Cotton .Mills at Burlington. 

1889 
— Junius Parker is chief counsel for the 
American Tobacco Co., with offices at 
111 Fifth Ave., New York City. 
— Dr. J. R. Harris has been for a number 
of years chief chemist for the Tennessee 
Coal, Iron and Railroad Co., at Ensley, 
Ala. 

1890 
—Rev. G. V. Tilley, pastor of the First 
Baptist Church of Statesville, was recent- 
ly elected president of the Iredell County 
Alumni Association. 

— J. B. Philbeck is principal of the Falls- 
ton high school. 

1891 
— A. S. Williams practices law in Wil 
mington, with offices in the Murchison 
Bank building. 

— J. K. Norfleet is a tobacconist of Win- 
ston-Salem, at the head of the Piedmont 
Warehouse. He is also a member of the 
stale highway commission. 
— R. G. Vaughan, Greensboro banker, was 
re-elected in January treasurer of the 
Greensboro chamber of commerce. 

1892 
— Rev. W. E. Rollins, a native of Ashe 
ville, is in the faculty of the Episcopal 



The 
Trust Department 



Of the Southern Life and 
Trust Company buys and 
sells high grade stocks and 
bonds. We have for sale 
some especially attractive 
preferred stocks. 



Trust Department 

Southern Life & Trust Company 

A. W. McALISTER, President. 
R. G. VAUGHN, First Vice-President. 
A. M. SCALES, General Counsel and 
Vice-President. 



A. A. KLUTTZ 
CO., Inc. 



Extends a cordial invitation 
to all students and alumni of 
U. N. C. to make their store 
headquarters during their stay 
in Chapel Hill. 

Complete Stock 

of books, stationery and a com- 
plete line of shoes and haber- 
dashery made by the leaders of 
fashion, always on hand. 



A. A. KLUTTZ CO., Inc. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



171 



Anchor Stores 
Company 

(The Ladies' Store) 



Presenting the newest 
fall models in ladies and 
misses ready-to-wear and 
millinery. Also a com- 
plete stock of silks, wool- 
en and cotton piece 
goods and notions. 



Anchor Stores 
Company 

109 W. Main St. 
Durham, N. C. 

Sells For Less. Sells For Cash. 



"It's Famous Everywhere" 
The 

Battery Park Hotel 

ASHEVILLE, N. C. 



In the heart of the 
Blue Ridge mountains, in 
the Land of the Sky. 
Centrally located in pri- 
vate park of 15 acres. 
Commands unobstructed 
views. Cuisine and serv 
ice unsurpassed. 

Rates and booklet will 
be sent upon request. 



S. J. LAWRENCE, Manager 



seminary, .it Alexandria, Va. 
— Walter Murphy, of Salisbury, repre- 
sents Rowan County in the House of the 
N. C. Legislature. Mr. Murphy is a 
former Speaker of the House. 
— F. L. Robbins is general manager oi 
the Mataoca Cotton Mills, at Petersburg, 
Va. 

1894 

— W. M. Allen is food and oil chemist 
for the N. C. Department of Agriculture, 
Raleigh. 

— J. M. Oldham is general agent fur the 
New York Life Insurance Co., at Char- 
lotte. 

— S. A. Hodgin has been for several years 
assistant postmaster of Greensboro. 

1895 
— Alex M. Winston, of the law firm of 
Allen, Winston and Allen, at Spokane, 
Washington, writes The Review as fol- 
lows : " 1 enjoy reading The Review and 
especially the notes of the classes from 
'9L! to '9o. 1 would like it if some of 
my friends of 128 years ago would drop 
me a line. Among these are Dick Lee, 
Perrin Busbee, Hacker Mebaue and Leslie 
Weil. The latter will remember the time 
we were all fined in the Phi Society for 
coughing down Wooten." 
— Chas. W. Home is at the head of the 
well-known Clayton mercantile firm of 
Ashley Home and Son. 
— L. M. Bristol is professor of sociology 
and economics in the University of Flori- 
da, at Gainesville. 

— F. B. McKinne, Louisburg banker, rep 
. resents his district in the State Senate. 
— L. C. Brogden is State supervisor of 
rural school for the State department of 
education, at Raleigh. 

1896 
— Dr. Walter V. Brem practices medicine 
in Los Angeles, a member of the firm of 
Brem and Zeiler, with offices in the Brock 
man building. I^r. Brem is a native of 
Charlotte. 

— A. H. Robbins is general manager of 
the Springstein Mills, of Chester, S. C. 
Col. Leroy Springs, '82, of Lancaster, S. 
('., is president of this corporation. 

1897 
— H. G. Connor, Jr., lawyer of Wilson, 
represents Wilson County in the House 
..f the N. C. Legislature. 
— A. H. Edgerton, of Goldsboro, is chair- 
man of the Wayne county board of edu 
cation. 

1898 
— F. W. Foscue has been engaged in 
banking for a number of years. He is 
cashier of the Bank of Jones, at Trenton. 
— H. C. Bear is a member of the whole- 
sale firm of I. M. Bear and Co., Wil- 
mington. 




The Young Man 



who prefers (and most young men do) 
styles that are a perfect blend of 
novelty and refinement has long since 
learned the special competency of this 
clothes shop. 



Pritchard-Bright & Co. 



Durham, N. C. 



The Equitable Life Assurance 
Society of the U. S. 

Assets over $600,000,000 

When you finish school and enter 
the business world it will give you 
greater Prestige if you have your 
Life Insured with a company of 
impregnable financial strength and 
a national reputation for faithful 
public service. 

The Equitable 

Offers a complete circle of protec- 
tion, a policy to meet every situ- 
ation. 

The Home Agency Co. 

Fred A. McNeer, Manager 

District Agents 

Life Insurance Department 

6th Floor 1st National Bank Bldg., 

Durham, N. C. 

Talk your insurance needs over 
with our Chapel Hill Agent. 
WITHERS ADICKES, 
18 Old East Bldg. 



172 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



Chas. Lee Smith. Pre*. Howell L. Smith. Sec'y 
Wm. Olivet Smith. Treas. 



Edwards and Broughton 
Printing Company 

Raleigh, N. C. 



Engraved Wedding Invitations, Christmas 
Cards, Visiting Cards and Correspon- 
dence Stationery 



Printers, Publishers and 
Stationers 



Steel and Copper Plate Engravers 



Manufacturers ol 

Blank Books and Loose Leaf 
Systems 



Ra wis- Knight Co. 

' ' Durham 's Style Store 

We extend a special invita- 
tion to our Chapel Hill friends 
to visit our store and view 
what's new in Fall and Winter 
wearing apparel. 

Fashion's very latest styles 
in Coats, Suits, Dresses and 
Smart Millinery. 

Beautiful Silks and Woolen 
Dresses in the most appealing 
styles. 

All the new weaves in cot- 
ton and woolen goods, silks, 
duvetyn. plush. Large line of 
silk and cotton hosiery. The 
home of Lady Ruth, Crown 
and Binner Corsets. Cente- 
meri Kid Gloves and Ashers 
Knit Goods. 

Mail orders promptly filled. 

Rawls-Knight Co. 

Durham, N. C. 



1899 

II. M. Waostaff, Secretory, 
Chapel Hill, N. C. 
— E. D. Broadhurst took a leading part 
in the campaign which resulted in the 
passage on January 18th of a million 
dollar bond issue for the Greensboro 
schools. 

— Dr. H. H. lvapp practices medicine in 
Winston-Salem. He is one of the leading 
figures in Twin City medical circles. 
— T. C. Bowie, Jefferson attorney, repre 
seats Ashe County in the House of the N. 
C. Legislature. Mr, Bowie is a former 
Speaker of the House. 
— Dr. E. A. Loekett, Winston-Salem phy- 
sician, was recently elected commander of 
the Clyde Boiling Post of the American 
Legion. Roy L. Heal, '11, was elected 
finance officer and Rev. Douglas Rights, 
'13, historian. Moses Shapiro, '16, was 
elected service and insurance officer. 
— Don Richardson is district manager for 
North Carolina and South Carolina of the 
Visible Measure Gasoline Dispenser Co. 
His headquarters are at 317 W. Trade St., 
Charlotte. 

1900 

\V. S. Bernard, Secretary, 
Chapel Hill, N. U. 

— J. W. Hinsdale, dr., is city attorney 
mi Raleigh. 

— Thos. D. Rice continues with the U. 
S. Bureau of Soils, Washington, D. C. 
— Thos. Hume is engaged in the gen- 
eral insurance business at Asheville. 
— W. E. Hearne is inspector for the 
southeastern states of the V. S. Bureau 
of Soils. 

1901 

.1. G. Murphy, Secretory, 
Wilmington, N. C. 
Milton Mcintosh is manager of the 
Charlotte branch office of the Mutual Life 
Insurance Go. of New York, with offices 
in the Trust building. 
— F. H. Brooks practices law in Smith- 
tield. 

— Ill the current volume of ''Who's Who 
in America ' ' appears the name of Rev. R. 
S. Satterfield. Mr. Satterfield is assistant 
editor of the Christian Advocate, the gen- 
eral organ of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, South, published at Nashville, 
Teim. 

1902 

I. P. Lewis, Secretary, 
University, Va. 

— The engagement of Miss Mildred Moses, 
of Chapel Hill, and Mr. Louis Graves, of 
New York City, has been announced. 
— Robert S. Hutchison is on the legal staff 
of the Southern Power Co.. at Charlotte. 
— W. T. Johnson is a member of the 
general insurance firm of Willis and 
Johnson, witli offices in the American 
National Bank building, Richmond, Ya. 
— J. L. Rurgess is botanist in charge of 



Clothes of Fashion 



CLOTHES MADE 

BY MAKERS WHO 

KNOW FOR MEN 

WHO KNOW 



Sold by 



Sneed-Markham- 
Taylor Co. 

Durham, N. C. 



High-Class 

Ready-to-Wear 

Apparel 



Ladies' Suits, Dresses, 
Coats, Wraps, Furs, Hos- 
iery, Underwear, Corsets, 
Piece Goods, Notions. 

DURHAM, N. C. 



Merchandise of Quality 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



173 



THE TRUST DEPARTMENT 



of the 



First National Trust Co. 



of Durham N. C. 



Offers you its services 
in all Trust matters, 
and invites your con- 
sideration. 



JAS. O. COBB, President 

J. F. CLASS. Treasurer 

JULIAN S. CARR, Vice-President 

W. J. HOLLOWAY, Vice President 

C. M. CARR, Chairman, Board of 
Directors 



"When He's Dressed Up 


He 


Looks Up" 




Fashion 




Park 




Has endeavored to appeal to 


the 


young men of our country 


and 


this is the reason Fashion 


Park 


suits are specially built, and 


spe- 


daily styled; and the minute 


you 


don one of these suits you begin 


to look up. 




HINE-MITCHELL CO., 


Inc. 


"The Style Shop" 




WINSTONSALEM, N. C 


' 



legume inoculation tor the N. 0. depart 
ment of agriculture, Raleigh. 
— J. E. Swain, Asheville lawyer and 
former solicitor, was named in January 
by Judge McKIroy as referee in a two 
million dollar breach of contract suit 
in which the Hardeway Contracting Co., 
and the Western North Carolina Power 
i 'o., are involved. 

— J. Hunter Wood is in charge of the 
New York office, at 82 Beaver St., of 
Alex Sprunt and Son, cotton exporters. 
— J. B. Cheshire, Jr., Ealeigh attorney, 
is president of the Wake County Alumni 
Association. 

1903 
N. W. Walker, Secretary, 
Cambridge, Mass. 
— Rev. Chas. E. Maddry has moved from 
Austin, Texas, to Raleigh and has taken 
up his work as corresponding secretary 
of the Baptist State Convention. His 
offices are in the Biblical Recorder build- 
ing, at Raleigh. 

— .1. Cox Webb is sales manager for 
North Carolina and Virginia of the P. S. 
Royster Guano Co. He lives at Norfolk, 
Va. 

— R. S. Gorhani is a druggist of Rocky 
Mount, manager of the firm of May and 
Gorham. 

— R. O. Everett, Durham lawyer, repre 
sents Durham County in the House of the 
N. C. Legislature. 

— G. G. Fallaway is at the head of the 
Traders Land Co., real estate dealers of 
Charlotte, with offices at 22 E. 5th St. 

1904 
T. F. Hickekson, Secretary, 
Chapel Hill, N. C. 
— S. T. Peace, Henderson banker, is one 
of the incorporators of the recently 
organized Farmers Leaf Tobacco Co., of 
Henderson. 

— Dr. J. E. Mann practices medicine at 
his home town, Fairfield. 
— J. T. Harris is superintendent of Dur 
ham Hosiery Mills No. 7, at Carrboro. 
— J. H. Vaughan is dean of the school 
of general science of the New Mexico A. 
and M. College, at State College, N. M. 
— J. H. Pearson, Jr., is in charge of the 
Charlotte office of the Western Electric 
Co., at 238 W. First St. 

1905 
W. T. Shore, Secretary, 
Charlotte, N. C. 
— Dr. J. B. Murphy continues his series 
nt' scientific investigations for the Rocke- 
feller Institute, New York City. 
— Dr. H. B. Chalfaut practices medicine 
at Mullica Hill, N. J, 
— Miss Julia Harris is in the faculty of 
Oxford College, Oxford, Ohio. She re- 
ceived the Ph.D. degree from Yale a d \\ 
years ago. 



LIGGETT & MYERS 
TOBACCO CO. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 

FATIMA, CHESTERFIELD 

AND PIEDMONT 

CIGARETTES 

VELVET AND DUKE'S 
MIXTURE SMOKING 

TOBACCO AND 
other well known brands of 
Smoking Tobacco, Cigarettes 
and Chewing Tobacco. 



Our brands are standard for 
quality. 

They speak, for themselves. 



Asphalt Pavements 



DURABLE ECONOMICAL 



if. you are interested in street or 
road construction we invite you to 
inspect our work in 

Durham (Asphalt Streets) . 

Durham County (Asphalt and Con- 
i ch' Roads) . 

Raleigh and Wake County (As- 
phalt). 

Guilford County (Asphalt Roads) . 

Greensboro. 

Rocky Mount. 

High Point. 

Henderson. 

Lumberton. 

Also roads built for United States 
Government: 

Army Supply Base, Norfolk, Va. 

Newport News — Hampton Highway, 
Newport News, Va. 

Camp Lee, Va. 

A representative will visit you and 
supply any information or estimates 
desired. 

Robert G. Lassiter & Co. 
Engineering and Contracting 

Home Office: Oxford, N. C. 
827 Arcade Building Norfolk, Va. 

1002 Citizens Bank Building 

Raleigh, N. C. 

American Exchange National Bank 
Building Greensboro, N. C. 



174 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



O. HENRY 



The Pride of Greensboro 



North Carolina 's largest and 
finest commercial and tourist 
hotel. 

300 Rooms 
300 Baths 

Thoroughly modern. Absolutely 
fireproof. Large sample rooms. 
Convention hall. Ball room. Ad- 
dition of 100 rooms completed 
September 1, 1920. 

W. H. Lowry Cabell Young 
Manager Asst. Manager 



Snappy Clothes 

for the 

College Man 



Society and 

Stein Bloch 

Clothes 

for the 

young and 

those who stay 

young 




#utirty Sroui) Clulbro. 



X)anstory Clothing Co. 

C. H. McKnight, Pres. and Mgr. 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



1906 
J. A. Parker, Secretary 
Charlotte, N. C. 
— Members of the class of '06 should send 
in any suggestions which they can make 
concerning the big fifteen-year reunion of 
their class next commencement to Walter 
B. Love, president of the class, at Monroe. 
— Two loyal members of '06 live in High 
Point and take a prominent part in the 
life of this thriving city: Dr. H. W. Mc 
Cain, physician, and Carter Dalton, at- 
torney. 

1907 
C. L. Weill, Secretary, 
Greensboro, N. C. 
— R. H. McLaiu, who is connected with 
the General Electric Co., lives at 5 Park- 
wood Boulevard, Schenectady, N. Y. 
— Dr. M. P. Cummings practices medi 
cine at Reidsville. He is a former mayor 
of the city. 

— Stanley Winborne, lawyer of Murf rces- 
boro, represents his district in the State 
Senate. 

— E. B. Jeffress, manager of the Greens- 
boro News, was elected in January vice 
president of the Greensboro ehamber of 
commerce. 

— G. S. Attmore, Jr., of New Bern, is as- 
sistant State bank examiner. 
— W. R. Dalton, Reidsville lawyer, is 
president of the Rockingham County 
Alumni Association. 

1908 
M. Robins, Secretary, 
Greensboro, N. C. 
— Mr. and Mrs. James A. Gray, of Win- 
ston Salem have announced the birth, on 
December 12th, of a son, James Alexan- 
der Gray, Jr. 

— W. W. TJmstead is connected with the 
Richmond leaf department of the Ameri- 
can Tobacco Co. He is located at 2806 
E. Franklin St., Richmond, Va. 

1909 
O. C. Cox, Secretary, 
Greensboro, N. C. 
— During the Christmas holidays, P. P. 
Graham, of the University faculty, ad- 
dressed alumni gatherings at Rutherford 
ton, Lenoir, Kinston, New Bern, and 
Oxford. 

— Jos. S. Mann is engaged in civil engi- 
neering work in Hyde County. He lives 
at Fairfield. 

— W. L. Long, lawyer of Roanoke Rapids, 
is president pro tern of the State Senate. 

1910 

J. R. Nixon, Secretary, 

Edenton, N. C. 

— L. A. Blackburn lives at 902 Atkinson 
Ave., Detroit, Mich. He is engaged in 
electrical engineering. 
— H. O. Graver is located at 805 Mt. 
Vernon Place, N. W., Washington, D. C. 



SMOKE 



Meditation 



' ' Your Sort of Cigar 



100% 

Smoke Satisfaction 



Most Popular Cigar 
in the South 



Write For Ihlt Catalog- 




THE ALUMNI REVIEW 175 



1, _ _ — . — - 


Murphy 1 

Richmond, 


s Hotel 

Virginia 


The Most Modern, Largest, 
in Richmond, Being on 
Railroad Depots. 

The Only Hotel in the City 


and Best Located Hotel 
Direct Car Line to all 

With a Garage attached. 




Headquarters for Carolina Business Men 
European Plan $1.50 Up 




JAMES T. DISNEY, President 



STATEMENT OF CONDITION 

THE BANK OF BELMONT I 

BELMONT, N. C 

AT CLOSE OF BUSINESS, SEPT. 13, 1920 

RESOURCES LIABILITIES 

Loans and Discounts $1,396,829.00 Capital Stock $ 47,300.00 

Overdrafts None Surplus 50,000.00 

Furniture and Fixtures $ 1,779.00 Profit Account 32,869.40 

Interest and Expense (Dr.) 14,671.76 Reserve for Interest 5,000.00 

Bond Account 6,296.00 Bills Payable None 

Cash and in Banks $ 581,219.72 Deposits 1,865,626.08 



$2,000,795.48 $2,000,795.48 

THE OFFICERS AND EMPLOYEES OF THIS BANK feel that courtesy to and co- 
operation with its patrons are prime essentials of modern banking service. Your account with 
this Bank means safety for the funds you carry. It means convenience in the use of that 
money. It means assistance in borrowing. It means acquaintance and knowledge where such 
things count. 

R. L. STOWE, President W. B. PUETT, Cashier 

"WE INVITE YOUR BUSINESS!" 



176 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



FIVE POINTS AUTO CO. 

AUTOMOBILES 

Repairs and Accessories 

Buick and Dodge Cars 
Goodyear and U. S. Tires 

G. M. C. Trucks 
Complete Stock of Parts 

FIVE POINTS AUTO CO. 

DURHAM, N. C. 



DRINK 




Delicious and Refreshing 

Quality tells the difference in 
the taste between Coca-Cola and 
counterfeits. 

Demand the genuine by full 
name — nicknames encourage sub- 
stitution. 

Get a bottle of the genuine 
from your grocer, fruit stand, or 
cafe. 

Durham Coca-Cola Bottling Co. 
Durham, N. C. 



— E. G. Norwood, Phar. '10, is general 

agent for the Reliance Life Insurance 

Co., at Bennettsville, S. C. 

— M. C. Todd is cashier of the Bank of 

Wendell, at Wendell. 

— Dr. J. A. Hartsell practices medicine 

at Concord. 

1911 

I. C. Mosek, Secretary, 

Asheboro, N. C. 

— K. B. Bailey is cashier of the Elm City 

Bank, at Elm City. He was married last 

summer. 

— C. E. Carpenter, of the law firm of 
Carpenter and Carpenter, Gastoaia, iep- 
resents Gaston County in the State 
Senate. 

— Mr. and Mrs. I. C. Moser, of Ashe 
boro, have announced the birth on i>ei i m- 
ber 18th of a son, Thadeus Hen don 
Tuttle Moser. 

— W. F. Taylor, lawyer of Goldsboro, 
represents his district in the State Senate. 
— Benjamin Carter Trotter and Miss 
Maud Gillikan were married on Decem- 
ber 29th. Mr. Trotter practices law at 
Spray. 

— R. G. Stockton was lately re-elected as 
president of the Winston-Salem chamber 
of commerce. R. M. Hanes, '12, and R. 
E. Follin, '98, were elected vice-presi- 
dents. 

— W. A. Dees, president of the class of 
11, practices law in Goldsboro, in the 
firm of Teague and Dees. 
— Dr. S. W. Thompson practices medicine 
at Wake Forest. 

— J. S. Boyce is in the insurance business 
at Gastonia, a member of the firm of 
Boyce and Ware. 

1912 
J. 0. Lockhart, Secretary, 
Raleigh, N. C. 
— Edwin T. Cansler, Jr., and Miss Nell 
Wisdom were married January 4th in 
Washington, D. C. They live in Char- 
lotte where Mr. Cansler practices his pro- 
fession, law. 

— B. E. Isley saw considerable action 
overseas as first lieutenant in the 15th 
Field Artillery, Second Division. Later 
he served for several months as instructor 
in the famous artillery school of the A. 
E. F. at Saumur, France. He lives now 
at 124 Armistead Ave., Hampton, Va., 
and is an auditor for the U. S. Shipping 
Board. 

— B. T. Denton is connected with the 
auditing department of the P. and N. 
Railway Co., at Charlotte. 
— E. G. W. Towers writes that he is now 
taking the cure in Asheville, located at 
1 1 2 Pearson Drive. 

1913 

A. L. M. Wiggins, Secretary, 

Hartsville, S. C. 

— R. W. Isley, former superintendent of 

the Sampson County schools and lately 



The Yarborough 



RALEIGH'S LEADING 

AND LARGEST 

HOTEL 



MAKE IT YOUR HOME WHEN 
IN RALEIGH 



B. H. GRIFFIN HOTEL 
COMPANY 



KODAK FINISHING 

As Qood as the Best 
Anywhere 



Over eighty per cent of our busi- 
ness is mail orders 



May we send you a price list? 



R. W. FOISTER 

BOX 242 
CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 



Universal Auto 
Company 

(Incorporated) 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 



North Carolina distributors for 
Paige Cars and Trucks. Dis- 
tributors for Samson Trucks and 
Tractors. 



PARTS AND SERVICE 



Virginia Distributors for Paige Cars and 

Trucks. Distributors for Chevrolet 

Cars and Trucks. 



TIRES AND BATTERIES 



The largest building devoted to the 

merchandising of motor cars 

and trucks in the South. 



Alumni and friends of the University of 

North Carolina are invited to 

communicate with us. 



COLO 




The ReiiIT shavin ? stick 





You needn't buy 
a new holder 

when your pen wears out 

NOR do you have to buy a new "Handy Grip" 
when your Shaving Stick is used up. 

Just get a Colgate "Refill" for the price of the 
soap alone. It screws in easily and quickly — like 
screwing an electric light bulb into a socket. The 
soap itself is threaded. There is no waste. 

Moisten the bit removed from the "Handy 
Grip" and press it upon the end of the "Refill." It 
will stick. 

There is no need of mussy rubbing in with the 
fingers when you shave with Colgate's. We took 
the rub out of shaving originally in 1903. 



COLGATE BC CO. 

Dept. 212 
199 Fulton Street, New York 



~~! 



The metal "Handy 
Crip," containing a 
trial size stick of Col- 
gale's Shaving S"op, 
sent for I Oc. When 
thetrialstick Isused up 
liau can buy thcColpate 
" Refills " threaded to 
fillhis Crip. 




178 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



MARKHAM-ROGERS 
COMPANY 



Clothiers Tailors, Furnishers and 
Hatters 

ALL THE NEW FALL 

STYLES AT REASONABLE 

PRICES 

DURHAM, N. C. 



ODELL/S, we 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 

China, Cut Glass and 
Silverware 

General line Sporting Goods 
Household Goods 

Dependable goods. Prompt 

Service. Satisfactory 

Prices 



HICKS-CRABTREE 
COMPANY 

FOUR MODERN DRUG STORES 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



Eastman Kodaks and Supplies 
Nunnallv's Candies 



The place to meet vour friends when 
in the Capital City 

GILBERT CRABTREE, Mgr. 



Cross & Linehan 
Company 

Leaders in Clothing and 
Gents' Furnishings 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



engaged in the insurance business at 
Clinton has taken up his work as prin- 
cipal of the Princeton high school. 
— Lieut. Col. Geo. K. Freeman, of Golds 
boro, is among the list of officers selected 
by the Pershing board as eligible for 
general staff duties. Others selected from 
North Carolina are Col. Joseph Hyde 
Pratt, of Chapel Hill, and Major Gordon 
Smith, of Raleigh. 

— Rev. Theodore Partrick, Jr., has lately 
become rector of the Episcopal church of 
Plymouth. 

— John F. Lynch is engaged in the mer- 
cantile business at Duke. 
— H. C. Petteway continues in the prac- 
tice of law at Lakeland, Fla. 
— A. R. Marks is engaged in the whole 
sale dry goods business at New Bern. 
— W. N. Post is now with the Guaranty 
Company of New York, at 421 Chestnut 
St., Philadelphia. 

Rev. Woodfin Grady Harry and Miss 
Mabel Bulloch were married January 5th 
.■it Bullochville, Ga. They live in New 
Orleans, where Mr. Harry is pastor of the 
Carrollton Presbyterian Church. 
— Major J. S. Simmons of the Medical 
Corps, U. S. Army, is in charge of the 
department laboratoiy, at Honolulu, 
Hawaian Islands. 

1914 
Oscar Leach, Secretary, 
Raeford, N. C. 
— W. N. Pritchard, Jr., is instructor in 
chemistry and geology in Cooper Union, 
New York City. He lives at Plainfield. 
N. J. 

— Dr. J. M. Steadman, Jr., is in the 
faculty of Emory University, Atlanta, Ga. 
— Dr. J. G. Pate practices medicine at 
Gibson. 

— Henry Clark Bourne and Miss Marion 
Frances Alston were married recently at 
Christ Church, Raleigh. Mr. Bourne 
practices law in Tarboro. 
— R. A. Reed is with th<? Wachovia Bank 
and Trust Co., Winston-Salem. 
— Jas. E. Holmes is superintendent of 
schools at Spray. 

— K. C. Royall practices his profession, 
law, in Goldsboro. 

— F. L. Webster is engaged in the inter- 
nal revenue service at Raleigh. 

1915 
D. L. Bell, Secretary, 
Pittsboro, N. C. 
— Thos. C. Boushall, acting vice president 
of the Brussels branch of the National 
City Bank, of New York, is spending a 
few days with his parents in Raleigh. Mr. 
Boushall was promoted to the rank of 
captain in service overseas. 
— P. L. White is connected with the 
Jefferson Standard Life Insurance Co., 
at Greensboro. 

— R. E. Parker is instructor in English 
in the University of Minnesota, at Minne 
a polis. 



A. E. Lloyd Hardware 




Company 




DURHAM, N. C. 


All 


kinds of hardware, sporting 


goods, 


and college boys ' acces- 


sories. 




Geo 


. W. Tandy, Manager 



SALMON, SHIPP 
AND POE 

DURHAM, N. C. 



CONTRACTORS 
AND 

BUILDERS 



CONTRACTORS NEW DORMITORY 
UNIVERSITY OF N.C. 



The Princess Cafe 

WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



WE INVITE YOU TO VISIT US 
WHILE IN WINSTON-SALEM 



A THOROUGHLY MODERN 
CAFE 



Cooper Monument 
Company 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Communicate with us regarding 
your needs for monuments or tomb- 
stones. 



So many men come to you 

to talk about their business 

What a satisfaction it is to find a man who can 



talk interestingly and helpfully about yours 



! 



ALL thru the week you are besieged 
with men who want to use your 
L time to their advantage. They have 
many reasons why you should do some- 
thing that will be of service to them. 

And only once in a long time does 
a man come who has an idea for you; 
who can make a suggestion based on the 
experience of someone else whose prob- 
lem was similar to yours; who takes as 
much satisfaction in talking about your 
interests, as most men take in talking of 
their own. 

You welcome such a friend; no man 
can have too many. Hence we feel a 
satisfaction in being able to add a man of 
that kind to your acquaintance. 

We would like to have you meet and 
know the representative of the Alexander 
Hamilton Institute in your vicinity. 

As a lawyer becomes a better counselor 
cay by day thru his experience with the 
problems of each new client, so the Insti- 
tute man grows in value to his friends, as 
man after man discusses frankly with him 
the special problems and opportunities of 
his own lite and business. 

750 business conferences 
a day 

Day in and day out the representatives of 
the Institute are in personal conference with 
at least 750 business men in everv sort of 
business. 

Men confide in them problems that or- 
dinarily would not be discussed outside 
the family circle. 

"I have been five years in this job and 
seem to make no progress," one will sav, 
"What would you do in a situation like 
miner" 

And because the Institute man has known 
other men in similar situations, he is able to 
give an answer based not on theorv but fact. 

"How can I get into business 
for myself" 

Many men ask that a. uestion . Too often 
they think the answer is merely a matter 
of capital, or of finding a partner, or of 
being sure of so much patronage. 



And the Institute man is able to point 
out that the reason so many business 
ventures fail, is because the men at the 
head have been departmental men and know 
only their own part in the Droblem of 
successful organization. 

Selling, accounting, corporation finance, 
factory and office management, transpor- 
tation, advertising, merchandising — each 
of these is a link in the chain. And many 
a chain that is otherwise strong breaks be- 
cause one link is weak. 




The representative of the Institute 
never intrudes; he never attempts to exert 
pressure. Every day applications for en- 
rolment in the Modern Business Course 
and Service are refused to men who, in 
the opinion of the Institute's representa- 
tive, are not equipped to profit by it. 

You cannot impose on him 

Among all the business men in your vicin- 
ity the Institute man is unique in this — he 
can only succeed as you are more successful. 
He literally has no interests that are apart 
from your interests. 

He has at his command all the research 
facilities of the Institute. Do not hesitate 
to call on him for any reasonable service. 
He represents an institution that owes its 
whole growth and prosperity to the growth 
and prosperity of the thousands of men 
whom it has enrolled. 

You have probably read some of the 
many advertisements of the Alexander 



Hamilton Institute in the leading magazines; 
and perhaps you have heard, thru acquain- 
tances, of the Institute representatives and 
their willingness to serve. But do you know 
what it is these men represent? Have you 
ever asked yourself, "What is the Alexan- 
der Hamilton Institute — what will it do 
for me?" 

"Forging Ahead in Business" 

There is a 1 1 6-page book published by the Institute 
just to answer such questions. It tells what the 
Institute has done for thousands of successful men, 
and what it can do fur you. It is a book which 
should be in every thoughtful bussiness man's 
library, and it will be sent without obligation. Just 
fill out the coupon below and mail it. 

Alexander Hamilton Institute 

936Astor Place, NewYork City 

Canadian Address: C.P.R, Bldg., Toronto 

Send re "Forging Ahead in Business" 

wh'ch I n-.ay keep without obligation. \Modern 

1 ' \Bunn*M/ 




Business 
Position ..... 



Copyright^ fQlf, Altxandir Hamilton Inititute 



ISO 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



Perry-Horton Shoe Co. 

Special Agents for Nettleton and 

Hurley Shoes for Men, and 

Cousins and Grover Shoes 

for Women 

MAKE OUR STORE HEAD- 
QUARTERS WHILE IN 

DURHAM, N. C. 



Strand Theatre 



DURHAM, N. C. 



HIGH CLASS PICTURES AND 

SPECIAL MUSIC— YOU ARE 

ALWAYS WELCOME 



Open from 11 A.M. Until 11 P.M. 



I. G. LAWRENCE 

W. H. LAWRENCE AND T. H. LAW 
RENCE ASSOCIATED 



CONTRACTOR 

AND 

BUILDER 

Main Office: Durham, N. C. 



CONTRACTOR FACULTY HOUSES 
AND LAUNDRY 

UNIVERSITY OP NORTH 
CAROLINA 



EDUCATION FOR 
BUSINESS 

Success in life means application of 
the fundamental principles of business 
taught in business college. There's 
nothing mysterious about it. It is 
merely applied common sense. The 
young man or young woman who 
trains now can enter business with 
practically a positive assurance of 
success. Don't you want to be a 
success in life? Then, why not begin 
your training NOW? 

Write for catalogue and full parti 
culars to 

Mrs. Walter Lee Lednom, Pres. 
DURHAM BUSINESS SCHOOL 

Durham, N. C. 



— C. L. Isley, Jr., is assistant superin 
tendent of health for the city of Mem- 
phis, Tenn. He also assists the chair 
of public health in the University of 
Tennessee. Mr. Isley was first lieutenant 
in military service during the war. 
— Chas. R. Daniel practices law in his 
home town, Weldon. 

— R. L. Brinkley practices his profes- 
sion, law, in Wilson. 
— C. E. Blackstock is a member of the 
legal firm of Rector, Blackstock and 
Taylor, with offices in the Technical 
building at Asheville. 
— Phil Woollcott, former Carolina track 
captain, is assistant manager of the bond 
department of the American Trust Co., at 
Charlotte. 

1916 

H. B. Hester, Secretary, 

Camp Travis, Texas 

— R. S. Yarboro is on the staff of the 

Georgia-Alabama Supply Co., at Eufaula, 

Ala. 

— J. Clyde Ray practices law at Hills- 
boro. 

— Dr. Edward F. Uzzell and Miss Marion 
Elizabeth Gunter were married September 
8th at Frederichin, New Brunswick, 
Canada. Dr. Uzzell practices medicine in 
Atlantic City, N. J. His address is 1101 
Pacific Ave. 

— Dr. Samuel Newman sailed on January 
19th for Europe as a member of a medi- 
cal relief mission, on the staff of Dr. 
Harry Plotz, discoverer of the typhus 
fever germ. Dr. Newman expects to be 
assigned to Poland, wnere he will interest 
himself particularly with problems of 
child relief. 

— Hazel Patterson is with R. G. Lassiter 
and Co., at Durham. 
— H. L. Crooke is engaged in chemical 
work with the food and oil division of 
the N. O. Department of Agriculture, 
Raleigh. 

— A. V. Anderson is with the Wilson In- 
surance and Realty Co., at. Wilson. 
— A. O. Bryan saw service overseas and 
following the armistice settled in Chicago 
for a time. He is now located at Elkin, 
where he is engaged in the lumber busi 
ness. 

— Dr. Julian A. Moore has entered into 
the practice of medicine in Wilmington, 
with offices at 710-11 Murchison building. 
Dr. Moore's specialty is surgery. 
— W. 0. Smith is treasurer of the Ed- 
wards and Broughton Printing Co., Ra- 
leigh. Mr. Smith saw service overseas 
as first lieutenant in the 318th Machine 
Gun Battalion, 81st Division. For extra- 
ordinary heroism in action north of 
Hauidmont, France, Nov. 9-10, 1918, he 
received the award of the Distinguished 
Service Cross and the Croix de Guerre 
with Palm. 



For up-to-date laundry 
service, call on us 

Durham Laundry Co. 

Durham, N. C. 



The Royal Cafe 



University students, faculty mem- 
bers, and alumni visit the Royal 
Cafe while in Durham. Under 
new and progressive management. 
Special parlors for ladies. 



DURHAM'S MODERN 
CAFE 



Hennessee Cafe 

C. C. Shoffner, Manager. 

A MODERN, UP-TO DATE CAFE, 

WHERE YOU AND YOUR 

FRIENDS ARE WELCOME 

CLEANLINESS AND 

SERVICE OUR 

MOTTOS 

342 and 344 S. Elm St. 

Greensboro, N. C. 



BROADWAY CAFE 



WE CORDIALLY INVITE YOU 
TO VISIT OUR CAFE WHEN 
YOU ARE IN GREENSBORO 

Excellent Service 

Courteous Treatment 



GREENSBORO, N. C. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



181 




Careful Attention 

T is with this earnest attention that we ex- 
ecute all orders, large or small, for the rep- 
utation of the Seeman Service, an asset that we 
jealously guard, is founded upon such princi- 
ples of rigid accuracy. 



THE SEEMAN PRINTERY, Inc. 

Printing Book Binding Multigraphing Engraving 

110-112 S. CORCORAN STREET DURHAM, N. C. 



182 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



CAPITALIZE YOUR TIME AND TALENTS 

By qualifying for a responsible business or civil 
service position while salaries are high. 

Our school is a member of the National Associa- 
tion of Accredited Commercia! Schools and is 
highly endorsed by everybody. Call or request a 
Catalogue. 

KING'S BUSINESS COLLEGE 
Raleigh. N. C. Charlotte, N. C. 



Gooch's Cafe 

Anything to Eat 
CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 



For neat job printing and type- 
writer paper, call at the office of 

Chapel Hill News 



W. B. SORRELL 

Jeweler and Optometrist 
CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 



"pickaros Kotel 

Headquarters for Carolina alum- 
ni returning to the Hill. 

Special rates for student board- 



Electric Shoe Shop 

Expert Shoe Repairing 
CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 



Model Laundry Co. 

DURHAM, N. C. 
Expert Laundry Service 



PR1DGEN & JONES COMPANY 

We carry the best shoes, Edwin 
Clapp, Howard and Foster, and Hey- 
wood's. 

Expert fitters — A cordial welcome 
awaits you. 
107 W. Main St. Durham, N. C. 



1917 

H. G. Baity, Secretary, 
Chapel Hill, N. 0. 
— Edward Onslow Bacon and Miss Rosa- 
lii- Asbury were married December 20th 
at .Morganton. They live at 414 Kings 
ton Ave., Charlotte. Mr. Bacon is en- 
gaged in cotton manufacturing at Char 
lotte. 

— W. T. Polk is studying law at Harvard. 
— J. W. Pless, Jr., is a member of the 
iaw firm of Pless, Winborne and Pless, 
at Marion. 

— Miss Minna Piekard is in the faculty 
of the Elizabeth City high school. 
— J. V. Baggett and J. T. Jackson have 
lately established a law partnership under 
the firm name of Baggett and Jackson, 
at 111 Court Square, Greensboro. 
— Lee Mullen, Phar. '17, is manager of 
the Gaston Drug Co., at Gastonia. 
— H. G. Harper, Jr., is associated with 
the Charlotte office of the Goodyear Tire 
and Rubber Co. 

— B. C. Harrell, captain of the Carolina 
football team of 1920, is director of com- 
munity boys' work at Chester, S. C. 

1918 

W. R. Wunsch, Secretary, 
Monroe, La. 
— Victor Silas Bryant and Miss Elizabeth 
Walker Scales were married January 26th 
at the home of the bride's parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. Alfred Moore Scales, in Greens- 
boro. They live in Durham, where Mr. 
Bryant practices law. 
— W. G. Burgess has lately resigned his 
captaincy of field artillery. He has left 
i lamp Pike and gone to Tampico to mix 
in oil. 

— W. D. McMillan, III, is instructor in 
English in the University. 
— H. V. Koonts was painfully injured in 
.■:ii elevator accident in Greensboro in 
December. Mr. Koonts was formerly as- 
sistant business manager of the Univer- 
sity and is now with the J. E. Latham 
Company, Greensboro. 
— W. R. Wunsch, until lately general 
secretary of the Y.M.C.A., is studying at 
( 'olumbia University. His studies include 
German and Journalism. — Tar Heel. 
— Robert W. Madry, former managing 
editor of the Alumni Review, has been 
since September 1st at work on the Paris 
edition of the New York Herald. His 
address is Maison Henry, 29 rue Cambon, 
Paris. 

1919 
II. G. West, Secretary, 
Thomasville, N. C. 
— W. C. Feimster, Jr., practices law in 
his home town, Newton. 
— Carlos Lowrance, of Catawba, has re- 
entered the University and is pursuing 
studies for the A. B. degree. 
— William Grimes and Miss Maude Hill 
Vosburgh were married December 29th. 



Budd-Piper Roofing Co. 

Durham, N. C. 

Distributors of JOHNS-MANV1LLE 

Asbestos Shingles and Rooling 

Barrett Specification Roofing 

Sheet Metal Work 

AGENTS FOR 



JgO||^ 



I n 

WELCOME TO 


STONEWALL HOTEL 


A. D. GANNAWAY, Manager 


CHARLOTTE, N. C. 

*i 4 



Campbell-Warner Co. 

PINE monuments 

REASONABLE PRICES. WRITE US 

Phoae 1131 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



(( 1 

CHAS. C. HOOK, ARCHITECT 


CHARLOTTE, N. C. 


Twenty years' experience in 


planning school and college build- 


nigs. 
i 'J 



The Peoples National Bank 

WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 

Capital $150,000 U. S. Depository 

J. W. Fries, Pres. W. A. Blaik, V.-P. 

N. Mitchell, Cashier 



Dillon Supply Co. 

Machinery, Mill Supplies 
RALEIGH, N. C. 



— ^ 



R. BLACKNALL & SON 

DRUGGISTS 
NORRIS AJVD HUYLER'S CANDIES 

G. Bernard, Manager 
Corcoran Street Durham, N. C. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



is.", 



Main Street Pharmacy 

LEADING DRUGGISTS 
Durham, N. C. 



Ralph J. Sykes Drug Company 

SOUTH ELM ST., NEAR DEPOT 
OPEN' ALL NIGHT 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Ol)£ ICniversit? Jpress 

Zer p. Council, Mgr. 
PRINTING, ENGRAVED CARDS 

QUALITY AND SERVICE 
CHAPEL HILL. N. C. 



PATTERSON BROS. 

DRUGGISTS 

Igencj Morris Candy The Rexall Store 

Chapel Hill. N. C. 



G)ss/e CXjrot/i 



ers 

CALIFORNIA AND FLORIDA 

FRUITS, TOBAOGA AND CIGARS. 

ICE CREAM PARLOR. 

FRESH CANDIES 
"We Strive to Please" 



POLLARD BROS. 

DURHAM, N. C. 

STANDARD LINES OF HARD 

WARE AND SPORTING 

GOODS 



(' 

Huffine 


11 

Hotel 


Quick Lunch Counter and Dining 
Room — Clean 


Rooms $1 .00 and Up 

Greensboro 
v — ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ 


Near the Depot 
. N. C. 
1. 



ANDREWS CASH STORE CO. 

Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Students and Faculty will find us ready 
tn s>Tve them with the latest styles in 
Walkover Shoes. Fancy Shirts. Tail- 
ored Suits, and general furnishings. 
Be eonvinced. Call and see. 



1920 

T. S. Kittrell. Secretary, 
Cambridge, Mass. 
— Don Daniel is studying medicine at the 
Medical College of Virginia, in Rich- 
mond. 

W. .1. Nichols is principal of the Claj 
ton high school. 



J. Frank Pickard 

HEAVY AM) FANCY 
GROCERIES 

Opposite Campus 
CHAPEL HILL. N. C. 



BAIN-KIMBALL CO. 

Makers of 

STANDARD MONUMENTS 
DURHAM. N. C. 



The Carolina Man's Shoe Store 

Carr-Bryant 

High Grade Shoes with Snap 
and Style 

Carr-Bryant Boot 4' Shoe Co. 

10fi W. Main Street Durham, N. C. 



R. L. BALDWIN CO. 

DURHAM, N. C. 



R. L BALDWIN CO. 



Will be pleased to have 
you make their modern 
department store your 
headquarters in Durham 



Our Stock °i Fall Goods is 
Now Complete 



The Selwyn Hotel 

CHARLOTTE. N. C. 

Fireproof. Modern and Luxurious 

IX THE HEART OF EVERYTHING 

11 C. Lazalere, Manager 



H. S. STORR CO. 

Office Furniture, Machines and Sup- 
plies. Printers and Manu- 
facturers of Rubber 

Stamps 
RALEIGH, N. C. 



Whiting-Horton Co. 

Thirty-three Years Raleigh's 
Leading Clothiers 



Snider-Fletcher Co. 

WATCHES, DIAMONDS. AND 
JEWELRY 



lln W. Main St. 



DURHAM, N. C. 



Flowers for all Occasions 

DURHAM FLORAL 
NURSERY 

Chapel Hill Agents: EUBANKS DRUG COMPANY 



Paris Theatre 

DURHAM, N. C. 

ARTCRAFT-PARAMOUNT 

PICTURES 

Orchestra Orchestra 



Broadway Theatre 

DURHAM, N. C. 

THE HOUSE OF SPECIAL 
PHOTO PLAY ATTRAC- 
TIONS 



Eubanks Drug Co. 

CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 
Agents for Nunnally's Candies 



The Chief Cause of Piles 




1EADING medical authorities agree 
^that the chief cause of hemorrhoids 
or piles is "straining". Straining is the 
direct result of constipation, that is, 
failure of the system to eliminate easily, 
regularly and thoroughly. 

It follows, then, that to prevent piles or 
to bring about their removal by non- 
surgical means, constipation must be 
overcome. 

The Nujol treatment of hemorrhoids or 
piles is in a large part the treatment of 
constipation — that is, to bring about easy, 
soft, regular elimination, in such a way 
as to make it unnecessary to "strain"; 
and also to avoid the injury to the tissue 
by dried out, hardened waste matter. 

Nujol not only soothes the suffering of 
piles, but relieves the irritation, brings 
comfort, and helps to remove them. 

Nujol has no unpleasant or weakening effects. 
Does not upset the stomach. Does not cause 
nausea or griping, nor interfere with the day's 
work or play. Is absolutely harmless and 
pleasant to take. Try it. 



Nujol 



REC. U.S. PAT. OFF. 



Relieves Piles 



Nujol is sold by all druggists in sealed bottles 
only, bearing the Nujol trade mark. 

If you are so unfortunate as to be afflicted with piles, send today for booklet "Constipation as 
a Cause of Piles", to Nujol Laboratories, Room 710 44 Beaver Street, New York City. 

(In Canada, address Nujol, 22 St. Francois Xavier Street, Montreal.) 



Name . . . 
Address . 



Testing House where 
Herrvh -s Explosives 
preparxl for the tests 
which r p,r i/y their sensi- 
tiveness and rate of de- 
tonation. 







< 



The Testing Ground 

In every high-explosives plant of the Hercules Powder Co. 
the tesfr'w^;- of dynamite plays an important part in the day's 
work. Just as the most modern and efficient dynamite 
machinery is never considered infallible; just as the sim- 
plest and most obvious process is never taken for granted; 
so the accuracy and uniformity of the finished product is 
never conceded without complete verification. 

Every lot of dynamite, after it has passed the chemical 
laboratories, must be tested repeatedly for sensitiveness by 
actual explosion before it is shipped. Upon the men in 
charge of this important work at the Testing Ground de- 
pends, in no small measure, the uniformly high quality of 
Hercules Explosives. 

It is because of this constant testing — this skillful verifica- 
tion of quality — that, wherever Hercules Explosives are 
used — in blasting out a stump or a mountain, in diamond 
mines or stone quarries, digging a ditch or changing the 
course of a mighty river — their power can always be de- 
pended upon by those who seek their aid. 

HERCULES 

Explosives Chemicals Naval Stores 



HERCULES POWDER CO. 

Chicago Salt Lake City *e Chattanooga 

Pittsburg, Kan. Pittsburgh, Pa. *?T St. Louis 
San Francisco New York f't Denver 



Hazleton, Pa. 

Joplin 
Wilmington, Del. 




A like scene may be viewed in large in- 
dustrial plants, at coal tipples, ore docks, or 
any other place where conservation of time 
and man power is essential. 

In developing the application of electricity 
to material handling machines the General 
Electric Company serves not only industries 
but all mankind by making it easier to have 
the world's goods brought to the con- 
sumer's door. 




©EMEEM, : jfcLEOMC 




We Solicit 

The business of going concerns, believing that 
we have ample resources and officials with 
ability to render Expert Banking Service. 

First National Bank 

Durham, N. C. 

Capital and Surplus Over One Million Dollars 



Proud You're a Southerner 7 

We are proud that the Pilot Company is a Southern institution 
and is aiding in the up-building of the South. 

Its "Complete Policy" is the last word in insurance protection. 
Write for particulars as to 

POLICIES AGENCY CONTRACTS TERRITORY 

Southern Life and Trust Company 



HOME OFFICE "The Multiple Line Company" GREENSBORO, N. C. 

CAPITAL $1,000,000.00 



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