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THE ROYALL & BORDEN CO. 

Corner West Main and Market Streets DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA 

Sell all kinds of furniture and furnishings for churches, 
colleges and homes. Biggest stock of Rugs in the 
State, and at cheapest prices. CJIf you don't know us 
ask the College Proctor or the editor of the "Review." 
Call on or write for whatever you may need in our line. 



THE ROYALL & BORDEN CO. 



Average Man's Problem 

The great problem for the average hampering his requirements for the 

man is to devise or discover a plan present. 

whereby he may create an independ- The "Wachovia Trust Plan" if ap- 

ent estate, separate from his business p H e d to individual conditions, which 

investment, that will enable him to i s eaS y to do, will accomplish a result 

look with equanimity upon a slowing which is the heart's desire of every 

up of business earnings or a period man. 

of depression. Ask for Qur booklet; then come in 

He wants to accomplish this without and talk it over. 

WACHOVIA BANK AND TRUST CO, 

Capital and Surplus $2,000,000.00 
Member Federal Reserve System 

WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 
ASHEVILLE SALISBURY HIGH POINT 



9m dgfeity Lubror:. 
/ ^ v 1 — tt, -, -, rr^ 1 



Chapel mil, IT. O. 



VOL. IX, No. 6 



MARCH, 1921 



Alumni Review 

The University of North Carolina 








A FEBRUARY SNOW SCENE ON THE CAMPUS 



DANIELS COMPLETES SERVICE AS NAVY CHIEF 

NOTABLE LECTURES AT THE UNIVERSITY 

HATCHER HUGHES WRITES SUCCESSFUL PLAY 

SPRING ATHLETIC INTEREST IS HIGH 



Wanted: Trained Men 

The University Agency has voted unanimously that the University needs 
a stronger and more healthy support from the citizens of North Carolina. It 
urges the State to become better acquainted with the conditions at its University, 
and to instruct its legislators to make the appropriation asked for bj the 
authorities. 

The University Agency realizes the fact that trained young men are the 
greatest asset to any state, and that an investment in higher education will bring 
in returns doubled many times. The future of the State is in the hands of the 
young men of today, and we implore the State to train them to the task. 

We are "doing our bit" by co-operating with Carolina students and alumni 
in protecting their credit, their homes and business interests. Write us or come 
to see us and let us serve you. 

The University Agency 

JEFFERSON STANDARD LIFE INSURANCE CO. 

CYRUS THOMPSON, Jr., Manager 

Special Agents 
BILL ANDREWS NAT MOBLEY 

"INDIVIDUAL SERVICE TO CAROLINA STUDENTS AND ALUMNI" 



THE AMERICAN TRUST CO. 

CHARLOTTE, N. C 
MEMBER FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM 



Acts as Executor, Administrator and 
Trustee for any purpose. 

Write for descriptive booklet, "What 
You Should Know About Wills and 
the Conservation of Estates." 



TRUST DEPARTMENT 

AMERICAN TRUST COMPANY 

Resources More Than $12,000,000 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



Volume IX 



MARCH, 1921 



Number 6 



OPINION AND COMMENT 



What the University Has Asked For 

What the University has asked of the present legis- 
lature for support and expansion, is a matter of 
simple record: sufficient income to hold its preseut 
faculty and to go into the open, highly competitive 
market for first-rate scholarly recruits to teach the 
youth of North Carolina ; and a building fund large 
enough to provide dormitories, dining halls, profes- 
sional buildings, classrooms, laboratories, libraries, 
apparatus, gymnasium, infirmary, auditorium, and 
other buildings and equipment to take care of the 
present frightfully overcongested conditions, and to 
make readv for a student enrollment of 3000 by 



September, 1926. 



DDD 



Basis of Request is Simple 

The ground upon which this request has been made 
is equally simple. In a word, it is that the University 
may be able to meet the demand which North Carolina 
young men and women are today making upon it and 
will be in increasing numbers making upon it for 
training for future citizenship. 

The program is not based on guesswork or mis- 
statement. The present student body overwhelms 
the present faculty and physical plant. Other stu- 
dents have sought admittance and were turned away 
for lack of room. The high schools have just begun 
to function, and the fact that there is something to 
aspire to beyond the high school, that careful training 
unlocks doors to larger usefulness, has recently and 
for the first time in the history of North Carolina, 
come definitely home to North Carolina youths in 
large numbers. 

What, personnel and what equipment will be re- 
quired to meet this demand have likewise not been 
arrived at through guesswork. There is nothing mys- 
terious in the method of calculating the number of 
instructors and dormitories required to teach and 
house a given number of students, or in estimating 
the seating capacity of classrooms and dining halls 
and auditoriums, or laboratory desks, or infirmary 
beds, or gymnasium lockers, or other building space 
or equipment for their use. The administration has 
made all of this; a matter of careful investigation, the 
building authorities of the State have passed upon tic 
physical cost, and a full bill of particulars has been 
placed in the hands of the Budget Commission and 
the legislature. 

□ □n 

Join Forces in Common Cause 

The way in which the University lias made its 
requesl is none the less simple, though possibly some- 
what unusual. It has, first of all, gone direct to the 
legislature with its specific needs. But at the same 
time it has made common cause with the other State 
institutions, both educational and charitable; and 
has lent its full influence to the common movement 



looking to their adequate upbuilding. It has carried 
this joint cause direct to the people, and has looked 
to the people for the underwriting of the complete 
program. It has fought unceasingly in order that 
all might be strengthened, and it will continue the 
fight until the end. 

DDD 

Our Purpose in the Fight 

Why the University has fought for and still fights 
for this program is likewise simple. 
. First of all, it has fought that its own arm might 
be strengthened to render the service to the State that 
only a thoroughly equipped, efficiently manned uni- 
versity can render. It has fought to hold its faculty 
together, to recruit its faculty with new men who can 
maintain and enlarge the University's usefulness to 
North Carolina. It has fought that it may, through 
the years that lie ahead, send forth fully equipped 
and ever-enlarging numbers of trained men and wo- 
men to become builders of a finer civilization. 

The same purpose has actuated it in joining forces 
with the other institutions. Time was when the forces 
which can set North Carolina free, which can make of 
her a State that needeth not to be ashamed in the 
sisterhood of states, stood apart. The day has come 
when, united, they must move upward from mud, and 
disease, and ignorance, and work out a civilization in 
which the new generation can grow to full stature in 
every walk of life. The great war broke through and 
cast into the discard many formulas which had pre- 
viously held the State's advance in check. It show- 
ed the value of large-scale co-operation and concen- 
tration upon the really vital, with the result that the 
greater welfare of the whole State has been placed 
above the particular welfare of any one agency en- 
gaged in promoting the common good. 

DDD 

The President's Report 

The President's Report for 1020, containing the 
report of President Chase to the Trustees and the 
reports of the deans and officers of the University, is 
recently from the press and should find its way into 
the hands of every alumnus. 

Four main impressions grow out of a careful study 
of the report: (1) From start to finish, 1920 was 
characterized by all those things which mark the 
steady growth of the University into a finer and 
greater institution of learning; (2) This distinctive 
development was effected in the face of almost in- 
tolerable physical limitations; (3) The results achiev- 
ed are attributable to a spirit of student and faculty 
loyally strong enough to overcome even the most try- 
ing obstacles; and (41 The planning for the future 
University in order that it may better serve North 
Carolina and tic cause of scholarship has been upon 
a more careful, thoroughgoing basis than ever before 



192 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



A Worth While Suggestion 

Inasmuch as The Review, in the article At Work 
for North Carolina appearing in the January number 
summarized the reports of the various officers of the 
University, it omits at this time further comment 
upon special activities or recommendations presented 
in the respective reports. But it does reproduce below 
as of particular significance, the following sugges- 
tion concerning the establishment of research fellow- 
ships. It is made by Dean Greenlaw of the Graduate 
School and is decidedly worth while: 

We should have the means, through State appro- 
priation or special endowment, for the establishment 
of a number of research fellowships and research 
assistantships. These fellowships should be distinct 
from the Teaching Fellowships already established in 
that they require no service from the holders except 
faithful study towards an advanced degree. They 
should pay from $500 to $1000 annually, should be 
open to men of proved ability, and should be for 
specific purposes. They should be named for great 
teachers who have made the University the center 
of inspiration and light that we reverence today. 
There should, for example, be an Elisha Mitchell Re- 
search Fellowship, to be awarded to a scientific depart- 
ment having a candidate of outstanding quality in 
the field in which it is capable of directing his work. 
There should be a Battle Memorial Fellowship in 
History, and a Graham Memorial Fellowship in 
Letters. Such foundations may well appeal to alumni 
or other citizens who wish to aid us in securing ad- 
vanced students of unusual promise. Research assis- 
tants, with stipends of $750 to $1000, should be ap- 
pointed from candidates of high quality who are able 
to co-operate with professors in carrying on research 
in a special field. Business organizations are ready 
to employ brilliant young graduates at salaries a 
few years ago unheard of. The very type of man 
who would, other things being equal, devote himself 
to research, is most certain to be confronted by the 
subtle temptations of salary and of worldly opinion. 
Our service depends upon our ability to hold the 
first-rate man not the second or third-rate. We 
should be as sure of our candidate as business is sure 
of its candidate. Given this assurance, we should be 
ready to help him get his start. 



BAPTISTS PLAN NEW CHURCH 

Under the leadership of Rev. Charles E. Maddry, 
'04, Corresponding Secretary of the Board of Mis- 
sions of the Baptist State Convenion of North Caro- 
lina, a movement has recently been started by the 
Baptist church of the State to build an institutional 
church at the University which will conserve the 
interests of the Baptist students on the campus and 
the membership of the town. 

As a first step in this program the church has 
bought the W. E. Lindsay store and the old hotel 
property on Columbia Street opposite the Roberson 
corner and is negotiating: for the MeDade residence 
on Franklin Street. 

In projecting the plan, Mr. Maddry brings to the 
undertaking a body of experience gained as pastor 
to the Baptist students at the University of Texas 
where he built an institutional church costing $200,- 
000 not including the price of lot and furnishings. 

While the stage of plan-drawing has not been reach- 



ed, Mr. Maddry contemplates a plant to cost from 
$125,000 to $150,000 which will take adequate care 
of the social and religious needs of the students of 
Baptist affiliation, and will doutbless provide for defi- 
nite instruction of students in religious and biblical 
subjects. 



RECALLS THE RUSH TO WAR IN '61 

Chairman, Graham Memorial Fund 
Dear Sir: 

The pledge card was received today which I here- 
with return with a small subscription which, when 
due, I hope I may be able to increase. 

Next to my service in the Confederate Army, my 
years as a student at the University are the most 
pleasant and satisfactory of my long life. I often 
think of my days there, and especially the closing 
days, when the war fever came and the students left 
by the hundreds to join the army. I shall never for- 
get the sorrow of the great Chancellor for all this, 
and the intense patriotism of his effort to overcome 
it. He was greatly honored and beloved by us all 
and regarded the greatest among men. I was among 
those who left the later part of April, 1861, being 
that far advanced in my junior year. My brother, 
Benjamin R. Holt, was in his senior year and re- 
mained for graduation. Several years ago I was very 
much gratified to receive my diploma, duly issued by 
the authorities and duly accredited by me a proud 
testimonial to our Confederate Arms, more valued 
than if issued upon a meritorious examination. 

With high regards, 

Sincerely, 

A. C. Holt, '62. 
Augusta, Ga., February 4, 1921. 



We have emerged from a war to whose service we 
dedicated the best of our young manhood, for the 
attainment of an object of which we interrupted their 
courses, sent them to battle and to death. And they 
went gladly and eagerly, that human liberty might be 
secure. There, if you like, was real sacrifice, borne 
lightly and cheerfully for a righteous human cause. 
And now that we sit safe at home because of what our 
youth did and suffered, now that the future because of 
them is ours to do with what we will, shall we deny to 
youth the best we have? Shall we pour out life and 
treasure to make democracy safe, and then falter and 
fumble at the little it costs to make it strong? If we 
have faith enough in a better world to fight for it, 
lave we not faith enough to pay for it? — H. W. Chase. 



While University officials can present the facts 
regarding University needs to busy legislators work- 
ing under high pressure, s.udents and graduates and 
parents of students have the extended acquaintance, 
the individual influence, the personal opportunity, to 
spread the truth about the University in a most ef- 
fective way. — Exchange. 



Professor H. H. Williams, of the department of 
philosophy, is the contributor of a 10-page review of 
The Education of Henry Adams. The review appears 
in the January issue of The Monist, a quarterly maga- 
zine devoted to the philosophy of science. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



193 



DANIELS COMPLETES SERVICE AS NAVY CHIEF 



By L. AMES BROWN, '10 



Unmindful of criticism, loyal to his own beliefs, 
Josephus Daniels has rounded out eight years' service 
as Secretary of the Navy. With Burleson, Houston, 
and William B. Wilson, he shares the distinction of 
uninterrupted cabinet service throughout the Wilson 
Administration. Xo one of this group has enjoyed 




joskphus Daniels, Fokmer Secretary of the Navt 

more completely the confidence of the President nor 
excelled him in aggressive loyalty in the stormy poli- 
tical times that preceded and followed the war. 

There has not been, nor is there likely to be in the 
near future, a dispassionate or impartial summing-up 
of the achievements of the Daniels' regime at the 
Navy Department. 

While the criticism against Mr. Daniels has been 
fervent, and the critics numerous, the outstanding 
feature of eight years of attack upon him by the shock- 
troopers of the Republican press is found in a certain 
simplicity of critical formula. The invariable process 
of the ciitics was to regard Mr. Daniels as the respon- 
sible and authoritative head of the Navy Department 
— the official who made the final decision — whenever 
any mistake was made. Upon such occasions it was 
quite clear, from all criticisms, that he completely 
dominated the Navy Department. 

Whenever any notable achievement of the Navy 
Department was under consideration, however, respon- 
sibility, authority and decision suddenly were with- 
drawn, under the working of this interesting critical 
formula, from the head of the Department and yielded 



nicely to some favored subordinate who leaped from 
obscurity to bask in temporary limelight. 

By the more customary standard, which holds the 
head of a department entirely responsible for mis- 
takes and gives him full credit for achievements, Mr. 
Daniels unquestionably will be appraised as time 
passes. 

To have been Secretary of the Navy throughout the 
war in itself assures Mr. Daniels of a conspicuous 
place in our national history. His standing is not 
dependent upon mere association with great events, 
however, but is a matter of revealed personal quality 
and of distinctive achievements. 

A man of singular placidity in his personal rela- 
tions, Mr. Daniels in public life proved aggressive to 
the point, of intrepidity. He has been a stormy petrel. 
Some of the most colorful and picturesque battles of 
the Wilson regime have swirled around bis figure. 
Critics have found him exceedingly unapologetic while 
associates knew him always as a stout hearted sup- 
porter. He has been subjected to attacks as bitter as 
those levelled against Mr. Wilson himself and has 
launched some of the hardest blows aimed at the 
opposition. The President has given evidence that 
he loved Daniels for the enmities that he had invoked. 
No one will ever damn him with faint praise. 

The scope and power of his work at the Navy 
Department is a part of the history of the war. His 
constructive part in administration and policy of the 
Navy, is too great to admit of cataloguing its details 
here. He shares with no one the responsibility of 
decisions made in the stress of great crises which were 
mighty factors in the outcome of the war. It matters 
little who originated the idea of the North Sea bar- 
rage or other distinctive conceptions that shaped 
naval history while the war was on. since to the head 
of the Department belonged the responsibility of de- 
cisions and to him should be accorded the laudation of 
their success. High up among his honors is the record 
that his insistence placed the Marines in the front 
line in Prance. 

Washington has been investigated inside out since 
the Armistice. Congressional inquisitors have had 
their fling at every screw and rivet of the war 
machine. The Daniels' record is unique in that it has 
been brightened rather than sullied by the investi- 
gations. One of these investigations had to do with 
the bestowal of Navy medals. When the evidence was 
in and the record complete, however, it was clear that 
nothing more substantial had been proved than the 
fact that Daniels shared Walt Whitman's attitude 
toward heroic unsuccess: 

' ' I play not a march for victors only. . . I play great 
marches for conquered and slain persons. 

"Have you heard that it was good to gain the day? 

"I also say it is good to fall . . . battles are lost in 
the same spirit in which they arc won. 

"T sound triumphal drums for tin' dead. ... I fling 
through my embouchures the loudest and gayest music to them. 

"Vivas to those who have failed, and to those whose war- 
vessels sank in the sea, and those themselves who sank in the 
sea. 

"And to all generals that lost engagements, and all over 
come heroes, and the numberless unknown heroes equal to the 
greatest heroes known. ' ' 

It is something to have come through with the 
Wilson Administration — all the way through. Apart 



194 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



entirely from thoughts of prestige and distinction, it 
must be a deep spiritual satisfaction to have followed 
out the full cycle of loyalty and to have drunk deep 
of every battle in which his leader engaged. Loyalty 
begets loyalty and Mr. Wilson's loyalty to Mr. Daniels 



has been something fine and splendid, endui'ing be- 
yond the severance of many strong ties and constitut- 
ing a background and contrast to the relations be- 
tween the President and men like House, Lansing, 
Bryan, Redfield and Garrison. 



NOTABLE LECTURES AT THE UNIVERSITY 



If education is promoted by contact with master 
minds, the University community has had its full 
share in the winter quarter which began with the open- 
ing in January. The past two months have been 
among the richest Chapel Hill has ever known in 
lectures, talks, special studies, and musical concerts. 

The list ranges through Professor Paul Shorey, of 
the University of Chicago, probably the leading Greek 
scholar in America; Prof. Charles H. Grandgent, of 
Harvard, the American authority on Dante and Italian 
literature ; Lorado Taft, distinguished American sculp- 
tor; Dr. Edward J. Wood, of Wilmington, fresh from 
personal contact with leading British medical men in 
British hospitals ; the Letz Quartet, ranked among the 
best in the musical world : Dr. James Alexander 
Robertson, perhaps the world authority on the Phillip- 
pines. 

It includes notable sermons by Dr. Charles B. Mad- 
dry, and Mr. W. T. Bost, the well known newspaper 
man and blockade preacher, and it reaches out to 
graphicallv interesting Ivceum lecturers provided by 
the Y. M. C. A. 

Prof. Shorey Delivers the McNair Lectures 

For the 1921 McNair lectures, made possible by 
the gift of John Calvin McNair. of the class of 1849, 
who wished University students to hear each year lec- 
tures to "show the mutual bearing of science and re- 
ligion upon each other and to prove the existence of 
attributes (as far as may be) of God from nature," 
came Prof. Paul Shorey, of the University of Chicago, 
a leader in American classical thought, with degrees 
from half a dozen universities to his credit, with an 
educational background involving one Greek univer- 
sity, several American, and three German univer- 
sities. He spoke February 18, 19, and 20. 

For his general subject he chose "Plato's Relation 
to the Religious Problem." The first night he dis- 
cussed "Plato and the Irreligion of Pseudo-Science;" 
the second night "Plato and Natural Theology;" and 
for his final lecture, "Plato and Ethical Religion." 
It was solid matter he spoke of. and the average 
s+udent had to work hard to follow. But those who 
did thought it tremendously worth while. Prof. 
Shorey fought in general for pure Platonism as against 
corrupted interpretations of Platonism. He spoke 
clearly, definitely, and freely ; he was not afraid to 
translate Plato into modern American slang; and he 
brought with him the authority one would expect 
from a speaker comincr on the same foundation that 
brought to Chanel Hill such men as Francis Smith, 
Patton, David Starr Jordan, Henry Van Dyke, Had- 
ley, Peabody, Vincent, Dewey, Woodbridge, Hugh 
Black, Conklin. 

Lorado Taft Brings a New Message 

Lorado Taft, who spoke to crowded houses in Ger- 
rard Hall, January 24 and 25, came as an apostle of 
art. sculptural art especially. It was a new event 



in campus life. Not only as a man who was himself 
a distinguished artist and who had definite achieve- 
ments to his credit, such as the great Fountain of 
Time in Chicago, but he spoke as one who knew his 
art and could talk interestingly about it and who 
was vivid with personality. 

He didn't simply lecture; nor did he simply show 
pictures. He did both and he did them with grace 
and charm and wit ; he seemed to be having fully as 
good a time as his audiences, which is saying a good 
deal. One night he showed a hundred masterpieces 
of sculpture, from ancient Greece through Roman 
and Italian artists up to modern French work. The 
other night he showed only American sculpture, rang- 
ing from its earliest beginnings through the moderns. 
Saint Gaudens, French, Manship, and others. 

Both nights he commented freely on every picture 
he showed. He would tell something about the artist 
and what he had tried to do, and then he would point 
out freely what he thought was well done, what badly 
done. He freshened his comments with humorous 
touches that were not fresh; he made no attempt to 
conceal his enthusiasms ; he was point-blank iu his 
criticism. 

It was. for. most of his audiences, a new world that 
he was discovering, and they seemed to think it an 
interesting world that might be examined a little more 
intimately. All in all, a notable event in the college 
year. 

Professor Grandgent Leads Dante Study 

Sharply different, but. also notable was the visit of 
Professor Charles H. Grandgent, head of the depart- 
ment of romance languages at Harvard, in early 
February. He came as the 1921 leader of the annual 
seminar course for students of English and the lan- 
guages, following the footsteps of Spingarn of 
Columbia, Mims of Vanderbilt, Alden of Leland Stan- 
ford, Manly of Chicago. 

For a week he lectured to forty special students, 
most of them graduates, who had prepared for his 
series on Dante. One night he spoke to the Philologi- 
cal Club on "The How and Why of Sneech;" another 
night he faced a general audience with "Inspiration: 
Poetic and Divine." This was concerned with the 
sources of Dante's inspiration. Technical, full of 
searching investigation, scholarly, it was also pleas- 
ing. The audience thought so. It seemed to know 
that it was listening to a man who had spent the 
better part of his life digging deep into Italian liter- 
ature, who knew as much about it, probably more, 
than any other man in America, and who could and 
did tell what he knew. 

The Letz Quartet Brings Real Music 

The Letz Quartet, the most notable offering of the 
year, gave a concert in Gerrard Hall, Feb. 15. It 
came to the University under the auspices of the 
musical department. Last year this department 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



195 



brought Sophie Braslau and David Bispham to Chapel 
Hill, both times losing- money. Money was lost again 
on the Letz Quartet, but less money, and it appears 
that the rapidly growing- musical taste among the stu- 
dents will in time overcome the obvious difficulties 
of bringing high-priced musical artists to such a small 
community. 

The Letz Quartet, now that the Kneisel Quartet 
has disbanded, ranks with the Flonzaley Quartet as 
the leader in this field among American artists. It 
was received joyously by a large audience. Despite 
the experience of being held up for several hours by 
a wreck between University Station and Chapel Hill, 
it gave a splendid concert, including selections by 
Beethoven, Schubert, Bizet, Debussy, Grainger, and 
others. The perfect blending of the four instruments, 
the sheer artistry and skill of Hans Letz and his three 
companions, and the clear beauty of the music com- 
bined to delight the audience. 

Dr. Robertson on the Philippines 

The Review went to press prior to the coming of 
Dr. James Alexander Robertson, who was to conduct 



a week's intensive course on the Philippines for cer- 
tain advanced students of History. Dr. Robertson 
was associated with the historical research depart- 
ment, Carnegie Institution, for several years, is assis- 
tant chief of the Far Eastern Division of the Bureau 
of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, is managing 
editor. of the Hispanic- Ame lean Historical Review, 
has been librarian of the Phillippine Library, Manila, 
and is accounted probably the leading American au- 
thority on the Phillippines. 

Other Speakers 

Dr. Edward J. Wood, of the class of 1899, now a 
practicing physician in Wilmington, spoke in Febru- 
ary before the Elisha Mitchell Scientific Society on 
"Some Debts to the British in Medicine." Dr. Wood 
has recently spent several months in England and 
has been associated with leading English doctors. The 
Rev. Charles E. Maddry, '03, preached in the Chapel 
Hill Baptist church in February and W. T. Bost, '99, 
Raleigh correspondent of the Greensboro Daily News 
but a blockade preacher on Sundays, preached in the 
Methodist church. Both had large audiences and were 
well received. 



HATCHER HUGHES WRITES SUCCESSFUL PLAY 



At last! A Carolina alumnus is the author of a 
Broadway success. Playmakers, take hope! "Wake 
Up, Jonathan!", now playing to full houses, is the 
joint work of Elmer A. Rice (The Elmer A. Reisen- 
stein who wrote "On Trial") and Hatcher Hughes, 
class of 1907. Hatcher Hughes, incidental^', is a 
man of two careers — three, if a captaincy in the A. E. 
F. counts. Before the war he taught, and he is now 
teaching, dramatic composition in Columbia Univer- 
sity. He began his academic career at Carolina, as 
instructor of English, a position he held for two 
years, resigning it after he took his M.A., in 1909. 

"Wake Up, Jonathan!" is a comedy. Jonathan 
Blake, a practical man, agressive, self-centered, and 
conceited to begin with, has suffered severely from the 
ravages of business success. To him money has be- 
come not only might but right. Why not?" He has 
bought men and women, luxury and obsequiousness. 
And yet he is not an unworthy man ; he is not an en- 
tirely unlikable man. His virility checks contempt; 
and his naive pomposity disarms hatred. Blown out 
to ridiculous proportions by his hundred millions. 
Jonathan rejoins his family that he had left years 
before. To rejoin is one thing; to reunite, that is 
quite different. 

The tenderness, sentiment, and imagination of his 
wife's nature have had a chance to blossom since the 
blight of Jonathan's egoism had lifted. These qual- 
ities have been continuously refreshed by the recol- 
lection of the lover she had rejected for Jonathan, 
the lover who was temperamentally her consort. In 
his memory she impressed the qualities they had in 
common upon her children, so that spiritually and 
mentally her children are his rather than Jonathan's. 

Alas for Jonathan! His wife is rather alar 1 thai] 

gratified by his impending condescension; his chil- 
dren reject him utterly. He their father! They 
scout the idea. They turn to the lover who lias, after 



the subtle ways of romance and of futile people, 
come back on the same evening, Christmas Eve, of 
course. This is obviously their father. 

Jonathan's realization of his false faith in the 
limitless power of money, enables his latent humanity 
to reawaken, restores the rights of a father and a hus- 
band, and sends the American audiences home senti- 
mental but happy. 

Sentimentality aside, the authors have posed a novel 
and interesting comic conflict, the issue between a 
father and his children; for Jonathan's big stake is 
not his wife's affections but a grip on the future 
through the control of his progeny and a hand in the 
shaping of their destinies. 

The play is not all sugared up. Only the ending 
is a bit st icky. The other two ills of American comedy 
the authors have entirely avoided. They have con- 
ducted the story purposely and skillfully; and they 
have nowhere lapsed into farce. 

The characters are somehow real enough; they 
speak real language; they are witty. The situations 
they get into are unexpected, yet natural. The play 
starts cerebration after the curtain falls; and it re- 
veals certain aspects of our life and traits of our 
people good-naturedly and without a flurry. 

As for Mrs. Fiske as Mrs. Blake— superb ! Mr. 
Dalton, who took the part of Jonathan, had played a 
similar role in the Broadway production of Barrie's 
"The Twelve-Pound Luck." His interpretation of 
Jonathan at times bordered on caricature. The rest 
of the east was adequate. 

Altogether, a downright good show. Mr. Hughes 
has another play coming oul later in the year. Of 
this he will be (he sole author. As he is a native North 

Carolinian, having 1 n born in Cleveland County, 

lie mighl he considered a candidate for the Patter- 
son ( 'up. — lohn M. Booker. 



196 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



SPRING ATHLETIC INTEREST IS HIGH 



Although snow was on the ground as The Review 
went to press, it was nevertheless a period of wide- 
spread athletic activity in basketball, football, track, 
and baseball. The aelual presence on the Hill of 
the new athletic director, W. McK. Fetzer, and the in- 
spiring record of the basketball team put new life into 
all branches of athletics during the winter months. 
Besides the teams carrying on their definite schedules, 
other teams were using the out-of-season period to pre- 
pare for spring work or for next fall's work. 

Basketball Takes the Lead 

The record of the basketball team thus far has been 
as follows : 

December 7 — Carolina 22, Durham Y. M. C. A. 16. 
January 14 — Carolina 34, South Carolina 15. 
January 19 — Carolina 37, Elon 12. 
January 26 — Carolina 22, Trinity 25. 
February 1 — Carolina 28, Virginia 26. 
February 2 — Carolina 29, Washington and Lee 25. 
February 3— Caolina 23, V. M. I. 38. 
February 4 — Carolina 22, Georgetown 38. 
February 5 — Carolina 26, Army 34. 
February 7 — Carolina 20, Rutgers 25. 
February 8— Carolina 30, Yale 32. 
February 9 — Carolina 24, Navy 50. 
February 10 — Carolina 38, Lynchburg Elks 15. 
February 13 — Carolina 44, Durham Y. M. C. A. 25. 
February 18 — Carolina 37, Davidson 20. 
February 19— Carolina 62, State College 10. 
February 23— Carolina 41, Trinity 19. 

The remaining games on the schedule were as fol- 
lows : 

February 26 — Carolina vs. Virginia. 
March 2 — Carolina vs. State College. 

In the event of Carolina's winning the second game 
with Trinity a third and deciding game was under 
consideration. Likewise if Virginia or State College 
were to win the second game, deciding contests were 
to be arranged by Manager Joe A. Person. 

Carolina Takes Long Northern Trip 

After winning early games from Durham, South 
Carolina, and Elon without great trouble, Carolina 
struck her first snag when she lost to Trinity in the 
Trinity gjm, 25 to 22. Liipfert, varsity center, was 
out of the game because of his law examinations, and 
the team did not show the form it exhibited later in 
the season. 

Beginning February 1, Captain Shepard and his 
men started on the longest and most difficult northern 
trip ever taken by a University team, or probably by 
any other southern team. Nine games were played in 
ten days with some of the strongest teams in the 
country. Three of these games were won, six lost. 
The record is nevertheless considered an excellent one 
when the strain of continuous traveling and playing 
is considered. Most pleasing has been the uniform tes- 
timony as to the high quality of the Tar Heels' play 
and the fine impression they made everywhere by 
their clean, spirited, clever playing and their general 
bearing. 



Hard games were won from Virginia and Wash- 
ington and Lee the first two nights. In the third 
game against V. M. I. Carolina held the lead until 
physical condition allowed the strong cadets to pull 
ahead in the second half. Against Georgetown Coach 
Boye used his substitutes for three-quarters of the 
time. The West Point, Rutgers, and Yale games 
were all close ; in each of them Carolina held the lead 
as long as the Tar Heels had the strength to keep up 
their speed. All were decided at almost the very end. 
The Yale game was lost in the last minute, after 
Liipfert sprained his ankle. Navy ran away from a 
tired team, but in their last games the Tar Heels won 
handily from Lynchburg Elks, captained by a former 
Carolina captain, Johnson. 

The northern trip was admittedly too big a mouth- 
ful. When it was planned, it was thought that two 
teams of almost equal strength could be taken, but 
the loss of Rouark and Douglass through scholastic 
difficulties and the decision of former Captain Billy 
Carmichael not to play this year deprived the squad of 
three strong players. It is felt, however, that the 
team made a splendid showing everywhere, won as 
many games as could have been expected under the 
circumstances, and enhanced the University's repu- 
tation for hard, clean athletics. 

Carolina Wins at Home 

Back home after the trip the Tar Heels showed un- 
usual form in winning their first three games from 
Durham, Davidson, and State College. Durham has 
beaten nearly all the best Y teams in the Carolinas, 
but was overwhelmed by Carolina. State College was 
swamped. Both these games were played without the 
services of Liipfert, but they showed clearly that the 
1921 team is probably the best basketball team that 
ever represented the University. In speed, skill, 
cleverness, accuracy, and clean playing (only 2 fouls 
were called against it in the State game, only 5 in 
the Davidson game), it ranks higher than any former 
Carolina team. 

With Liipfert playing center, Carmichael and Mc- 
Donald at forwards, Captain Shepard and Hanby at 
guards make up the best combination. With Liipfert. 
out, Carmichael goes to center, Shepard to forward, 
and Erwin to guard. All six men are unusual players. 
Morris, Woodall. Williams, and Eaton have been used 
as substitutes. The playing of Carmichael has been 
called the best exhibition in the south this year. 

Fetzer Has Winter Football 

Coach William Fetzer held four weeks of winter 
football practice in February. Fifty-five candidates 
reported. The work was light and no scrimmaging 
was done, but the new coach familiarized himself with 
most of the likely candidates for the 1921 team, taught 
them some of the principles he will use next fall, and 
in general prepared himself and his men for the next 
campaign. 

Track Work Starts 

Captain William A. Royall called a meeting of 
track candidates late in January to discuss plans for 
the coming season. Seventy-five men responded. Al- 
though definite announcement has not been made, it 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



197 



is probable that Kent Brown, of the University 
1'aenlty, former Pennsylvania high jumper, will coach 
the team. Cross country running was started in 
February, with Captain Royall leading a pack ever}- 
afternoon on a jaunt of two or three miles. 

Early Baseball Practice 

Coach Petzer ordered out all battery candidates 
February 11 for preliminary practice and was plan- 
ning to start general practice two weeks later. He will 
have as a nucleus for his squad Captain "Lefty" Wil- 
son and Llewellyn, veteran pitchers ; Lowe, first base ; 
McLean, second base; and Sweetman, outfielder. From 
last year's unusually fine freshman team, however, 
he will draw some of the most promising pla3 - ers of 
many years, including Roy Morris, catcher; Bryson 
and Bell, pitchers; Shirley, first base; McDonald, 
short stop ; Fred Morris, third base ; and Swink, Smith 
and Carmichael, outfielders. The general prospect is 
considered bright. 

Freshman Athletics 

The freshman basketball team, under the coaching 
of Billy Carmichael, has had a successful season. The 
record to date follows: 



Carolina 
Carolina 
Carolina 
Carolina 
Carolina 
Carolina 
Carolina 
Carolina 
Carolina 



Freshmen 28, Carolina Varsity 69. 

Freshmen 47, Oak Eidge 27. 

Freshmen 64, Greensboro High Sehool 9. 

Freshmen 73, Chapel Hill 33. 

Freshmen 28, Durham Y. M. C. A. 41. 

Freshmen 58, Oak Ridge 40. 

Freshmen 36, Augusta Military Academy 39. 

Freshmen 39, Woodberry Forest 23. 

Freshmen 28, Virginia Freshmen 18. 



THE REVIEW INTERESTS EVEN IN PARIS! 
Editor, The Alumni Review, 
Dear Sir: 

I received the three fall copies of The Review a few 
days ago, and simply couldn't do another thing until 
I had read all of them, which required several hours. 
It's quite natural that The Review should be more 
appreciated by one over here than at home, since it 
gives just the sort of news-summary that an alumnus 
wants, especially if he is in a foreign country. I 
think it's better than ever. Your editorials are 
particularly convincing,' and I notice that you are 
going hard for the Legislature. The advertisements 
are there, too, I see. 

I am still on the New York Herald, and like the 
work, although I'm frank to admit that I run into a 
few bumps, due mostly to the fact that the paper is 
edited in a foreign country. Luckily, I studied French 
for three years at the University and one year at 
Columbia, and at present I am able to read and speak 
the language fairlj- well. My work is on the out- 
side practically all of the time, and as I'm given all 
sorts of assignments, the experience is quite varied — 
just what I need. The Herald over here is a very 
conservative, high-toned sort of journal — thoroughly 
cosmopolitan, and consequently now and then some 
of my provincial expressions undergo the pruning 
process. I find that my experience as director of the 
University news service at Chapel Hill gave me an 
excellent background, without which I would hardly 
be able to hold down this job. 



I don't intend to make Europe my home, although 
I find the experience very interesting, and Paris is ray 
preference of all the cities I've seen in Europe yet. 
I think now I shall go back to the States some time 
this spring. 

I see Dr. Dey occasionally. Barney Pitts was 
here for several weeks during the Christmas season, 
and said that he was doiug a great business over here. 
He is representing an American paper firm, and makes 
trips to Europe several times a year. He returned to 
the States this month. Says Professor Horace Wil- 
liams' philosophy is still his best friend. Am keeping 
my eyes peeled for any alumni in Europe, and will let 
you know of any I see or hear of. 

Cordially yours, 

Robert Madry. '18. 
Paris, France, January 22, 1921. 



HIGH SCHOOL DEBATES 

On April 1 225 high schools in 90 counties will 
take part in the ninth annual triangular debating 
contest of the High School Debating Union. The 
final contest at the University will be held on April 
14 and 15, at which time the ninth annual inter- 
scholastic track meet and the sixth annual inter- 
scholastic tennis tournament will also be held. The 
debating, track, and tennis contests make up the Uni- 
versity 's High School Week. 

The High School Debating Union was inauguar- 
ated in the school year 1912-13, following plans and 
suggestions made to the two literary societies by 
C. E. Mcintosh, '11, now head of the Maiden schools. 
Since its inauguration, the Union has met with much 
success, and other states have taken up modifications 
of the plan, notably Virginia, South Carolina and 
Alabama. 

The subject to be discussed is collective bargaining 
through trade unions. This same subject is being dis- 
cussed this year by the Kansas High School Debating 
League, the Inter-Scholastic League of Texas, and the 
High School Debating Union of Alabama. The High 
School Debating Union of Alabama is under the di- 
rection of W. R. Taylor, '15, professor of English at 
Auburn. 



ALUMNI AT SPARTANBURG MEETING 

At the annual meeting of the Tri-State Medical 
Society held at Spartanburg, S. C, on February 16 
and 17, Dr. J. K. Hall, head of Westbrook Sena- 
torium, Richmond, Va., was unanimously re-elected 
secretary and treasurer of the society for the ensuing 
year. Carolina alumni on the program at this meet- 
ing were. Dr. T. M. Green, of Wilmington; Dr. A. 
G. Brenizer, of Charlotte; Dr. J. R. Allison, of Col- 
umbia, S. C. ; Dr. H. L. Sloan, of Charlotte; Dr. W. 
deB. MacNider, of the University faculty; and Dr. 1. 
P. Battle, of Rocky Mount. The meeting was re- 
garded as one of the most successful in the history of 
this society. 



In recognition of his special investigation in edu- 
cational subjects, particularly in the field of educa- 
tional tests, Dr. L. A. Williams, of the School of Edu- 
cation, has recently been elected to membership in 
the National Association of Directors of Educational 
Research. 



198 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



NOTES ABOUT FORMER STUDENTS IN 
CIVIL ENGINEERING 

George F. Catlett, '03, of Wilmington, is sanitary 
engineer for New Hanover County and the city of 
Wilmington, on sewage disposal, water purification, 
water supply investigation and general sanitary en- 
gineering work. From May, 1917 to July, 1919, he 
was a captain in the U. S. Army, and served one and 
a half years in France with the 26th Engineers, on 
water supply installations for the A. E. F. 

Collier Cobb, Jr., '14, is engaged in private engi- 
neering practice in Durham and other towns of the 
State on concrete construction, mainly pavement for 
streets and sidewalks. 

H. W. Collins, '14, is still a captain of engineers 
in the U. S. Army, with headquarters at Camp Dix, 
New Jersey. 

W. F. Hunter and C. B. Taylor, of the class of 
1920, have been employed by the N. C. State High- 
wax- Commission in the bridge department since June, 
1920. 

W. F. Morrison, '19, is with the N. C. State High- 
way Commission and in charge of the bridge design 
drafting room. Mr. Morrison has had a prominent 
part in the design and detailing of several important 
bridges in the State, one of which is the new reinforced 
concrete bridge across New Hope Creek on the Chapel 
Hill-Durham road now in process of construction. 
Recently he has gone to Albemarle to remain several 
weeks on inspection of the new arch bridge that is 
being erected over the Yadkin river. 

R. W. Parks, '17, is resident engineer for the divi- 
sion office of the State Highway Commission in 
Greensboro. 

W. L. Spoon, '91. is now consulting engineer of the 
firm of Spoon and Lewis, engaged in street and 
pavement design and general municipal engineering 
practice. 

John E. Wood, '11, remained in the U. S. Army 
after the war as first lieutenant of engineers and re- 
turned to Europe with certain military attachments 
for the period October, 1919 to December, 1920, with 
headquarters at Coblenz, Germany. He is now third 
assistant to the engineer commissioner of the District 
of Columbia, with jurisdiction over sewers, water- 
works and electric lights in the city of Washington 
and the District of Columbia. Wood's position is 
usually held by a civilian engineer but he was favored 
by a special act of Congress which allowed an army 
engineer (Wood) to hold the same. His residential 
address is 1014 16th St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 



CHEMISTS AT WORK 

J. Frank Wilkes, '83, lives at 140 W. Morehead 
Street, Charlotte, and is manager of the Mecklenburg 
Iron Works. 

W. H. Stroud, '09, M. S. and Ph. D. at the Univer- 
sity of Wisconsin in '13 and '20 respectively is chief 
chemist for the Wisconsin Department of Agriculture. 
He is in charge of the laws regulating the sale of feeds, 
fertilizers, etc. 

R. H. Souther, '20, is located at Greensboro, and 
is textile chemist and colorist for the Proximity Manu- 
facturing Co. 

Stroud Jordan, A. B., '05, M. S., '07, Ph. D., '09, 
formerly chief chemist for the American Tobacco 



Co., is now chief chemist for Henry Heide, Inc., con- 
fectioners and bakers supplies, New York. He lives 
at 352 Parkside Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Hal B. Ingram, '17, is chief chemist for Kluttz and 
Smith, engineers, of Concord, and is resident engi- 
neer at Monroe. 

V. C. Edwards, '09, Ph. D., '15, lives at 14 Terrace 
Place, Arlington, N. J., and is acting director of the 
Delta Laboratory, E. I. DuPont de Nemours and Co., 
Arlington, N. J. 

L. Cole Hall, '16, is chief chemist for the Hercules 
Powder Co., at Hattiesburg, Miss. 

B. L. Meredith, '18, formerly with the DuPont 
Laboratories at Wilmington, Del., has been transferred 
to their plant in South America. His address is 
DuPont Nitrate Co., Oficina Pena Grande, Iquique, 
Chile, S. A. 

L. G. Marsh is still with the Bureau of Mines at 
Pittsburg, Pa. He was on the Hill recently for a 
few days visit. 

W. B. Richardson, '19, is taking advanced chemical 
work at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 
Boston, Mass. 

E. B. Cordon, '20, is analytical chemist for Pratt 
and Lambert, paint and varnish manufacturers, at 
Buffalo, N. Y. He lives at 783 Elm wood Ave. 

F. H. Spry is teaching chemistry and physics in 
the Back Bay high school at Back Bay, Va. 

Woodford White is assistant professor of chemis- 
try at Clemson College, Clemson, S. C. 



PHARMACY ALUMNI NOTES 

R. S. Gorham, '04, is manager and stock holder in 
the May and Gorham drug store in Rocky Mount. 

I. W. Rose, Ph.G. '06, was commissioned last sum- 
mer as an examiner on the North Carolina Board of 
Pharmacy to complete the unexpired term of Frank 
S. Smith of Asheville. 

S. E. Welfare, '06, is proprietor of two drug 
stores in Winston-Salem, the Zinzendorf Pharmacy 
and Welfare's drug store. 

A. M. Secrest, Ph.G. '07, is owner of a large garage 
and a very handsome drug store, the Union Drug Com- 
pany, in Monroe. 

B. T. Dawson, '09, is half-owner of the Red Cross 
Pharmacy in Rocky Mount. 

S. B. Etheridge, '09, is a member of the firm of 
Worthy and Etheridge, Druggists, in Washington. 

B. S. Warren, '09, owns a drug store in Greenville. 
E. F. Callahan, '10, is now located in Laurinburg 

as prescriptionist in Everington's drug store. 

G. B. Finley, TO, is prescriptionist with the Lenoir 
Drug Company of Lenoir. 

C. O 'H. Home, '10, is proprietor of a drug store in 
Greenville. 

J. A. Hutchins, '10, is proprietor of a drug store in 
Winston-Salem. 

J. O. Temple, '10, is manager of Temple's drug 
store in Houston. 

K. E. Bennett, Ph.G. '12, is a member of the North 
Carolina Board of Pharmacy and serves as head ex- 
aminer for the section of chemistry. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



199 



P. H. Lumi, Ph.G. '13, is proprietor of Thompson's 
drug store at Winston-Salem. 

F. H. Marley, '14, has opened a new drug store in 
Lenoir. 

W. M. Fowlkes, '15, owns the Fowlkes Pharmacy 
in Rockingham. 

R. A. McDuffie, Ph.G. '15, is head prescript ion ist 
for Conyers and Fordham in Greensboro. 

R. T. Hood, '16, is one of the partners in J. E. 
Hood and Company of Kinston. 

J. 0. Cline, '17, owns a drug store in Granite Falls. 

J. B. Keener, '18, is manager of the Fairview Drug 
Company, Winston-Salem. 

E. L. Bradley, '21, is preseriptionist for the Owen 
Drug Company of Winston-Salem. 

J. S. Pierce, '21, is engaged as a preseriptionist in 
the Kyser drug store of Rocky Mount. 

Announcement has been made that the class of 
1916 from the School of Pharmacy will hold a re- 
union at commencent. Indications are that the re- 
union will be well attended by the members of the 
class. 



COLUMBIA ALUMNI NOTES 

William Howard Hooker, '19, of Greenville, is a 
senior in the Columbia University School of Journal- 
ism. He did not enter the School of Journalism until 
the beginning of the second semester last year, but 
he will graduate with the class of '21. His address 
is Livingston Hall, Columbia University. 

John Gibson, '19, of Gibson, is a senior in the 
School of Journalism. He expects to graduate in 
June. His address is Livingston Hall, Columbia Uni- 
versity. 

Julian Earle Harris, '17, of Henderson, is taking 
graduate courses in modern languages, working to- 
ward a Ph.D. degree. He took the M.A. degree in 
Columbia University last June. His address is 21 
Claremont Avenue, New York City. 

A. H. Combs, '17, of Columbia, is in the senior class 
in the School of Law. His address is Livingston Hall, 
Columbia University. 

Earle Spencer, '20, of Morganton, is in the School 
of Business Administration. His address is Hartley 
Hall, Columbia University. 

Miss Elizabeth Taylor, '20, of Morganton, is taking 
dramatic art in Sargent's School. Her address is 
66 West Tenth Street. New York City. 



MATHEMATICS TEACHERS HOLD MEETING 

The Association of Teachers of Secondary Mathe- 
matics of North Carolina held its annual meeting on 
February 4th and 5th at the North Carolina College 
for Women in Greensboro. Dr. J. W. Young, 
of Dartmouth, Chairman of the National Committee 
on Mathematical Requirements, was the chief speaker 
and the meeting was devoted entirely to the consider- 
ation of the reports of that committee. 

Dr. Young made two observations of particular 
interest to North Carolinians, namely, that North 
Carolina was the only Southern state in which an 
organized effort was being made to improve the quality 
of teaching of high school mathematics ; and that 



higher salaries and more time for study would have 
to be provided for mathematics teachers if the desired 
reforms in teaching are to be secured. He said also 
that we must demand that teachers of mathematics 
have certificates showing that they have had special 
preparation. 

Dr. A. W. Hobbs, of the department of mathematics 
of the University, was re-elected president of the 
association. 



THE REUNION OF '20 

Members of the class of 1920 plan to return in 
large numbers to the Hill for their reunion in 
June. Ben Cone, of Greensboro, T. S. Kittrell, of 
Henderson, and W. H. Andrews, Jr., of Chapel Hill, 
who are respectively president, secretary, and trea- 
surer of this class, met in Chapel Hill February 19 
and made preliminary plans relative to the reunion. 
These class officers expect 1920 to have from 75 to 
100 men present and they look forward to a big re- 
union in every respect. 



DR. WHEELER PERFECTS NEW 
THERMOMETER 

Some time ago Dr. A. S. Wheeler, of the department 
of chemistry, devised a thermometer for finding ac- 
curately and without correction the melting point or 
boiling point of organic compounds. It consists of a 
set of seven, each having a range of fifty degrees. 
A patent was taken out in Germany and a descrip- 
tion is given in the new catalog of Richter and Wilse, 
precision instrument makers of Berlin. Dr. Wheeler 
has just received word that Thomas and Co., of Phil- 
adelphia, will also make these thermometers and will 
describe them in their forthcoming catalog. No patent 
however will be applied for in this country ; thus any- 
one can make these thermometers. 



NEW. CAROLINA LAWYERS 

Twenty-two Carolina men received license to prac- 
tice law at the examination given by the State Su- 
preme Court on January 31st. The list follows: 

T. A. Jones, Jr., Asheville ; W. E. Hennessee, Salis- 
bury; W. R. Allen, Jr., Goldsboro; Jay Bivens, Aqua- 
dale; D wight Brantley, Spring Hope; F. E. Carlyle, 
Lumberton ; Leo Carr, Teachey ; E. T. Edwards, Polk- 
ton ; J. B. Hicks, Henderson : W. D. Harris, Sanford ; 

D. W. Isear, Wilson ; C. M. Llewellyn, Dobson ; M. C. 
Lisk, Mount Gilead ; J. A. Pritchett, Rawlings, Va. ; 

E. Iv. Proctor, Lumberton; J. C. Pittman, Gates; O. 
G. Rand, Garner; H. L. Stevens, Warsaw; W. B. 
Womble, Cary; W. B. Yelverton, Goldsboro; R. L. 
Whitmire, Hendorsonville; and E. McC. Currie, 
Favetteville. 



Dr. Samuel Newman, of Danville, has been 
appointed on the staff of Dr. Harry Plotz, the dis- 
coverer of the typhus fever Ererm. to s'O abroad on a 
commission of medical relief, which sailed the 19th of 
January to operate in central and eastern Europe. 
Dr. Newman has been assigned to Poland, his native 
country. A special feature article concerning the 
Americanization of Dr. Newman appeared in the News 
and Observer of Sunday, February 6, 



200 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



NEW MEMBERS OF FACULTY BEGIN WORK 

With the beginning of the winter quarter four 
new members of the Faculty began their work at the 
University. They are Dr. J. F. Steiner, professor of 
social technology; Dr. Frances Sage Bradley, of the 
Children's Bureau at Washington (Department of 
the Interior), who will be connected with the Univer- 
sity for one cpiarter only; Miss Evelyn Buchan, field 
supervisor of public welfare work ; and Chester D. 
Snell, assistant director of the Bureau of Extension. 

Dr. Steiner, who was added to the Faculty last 
year but was not able to come sooner, is from the na- 
tional headquarters of the American Red Cross where 
he has been national director of educational service 
and of the bureau of training for home service. He is 
a graduate of Heidelberg Theological Seminary, Tif- 
fin, Ohio, and holds an A.M. degree from Harvard 
and a Ph.D. from the University of Chicago. 

He has been a missionary to Japan, professor of 
English at the North Japan College, a lecturer at the 
University of Chicago and McCormick Theological 
Seminary, and professor of sociology at the Univer- 
sity of Cincinnati. He had several years of practical 
experience in welfare work as assistant superinten- 
dent of the stockyards district for the United Char- 
ities of Chicago and has been for the past few years 
one of the national leaders of the Red Cross. 

Dr. Bradley is one of the leading experts in the 
country on child welfare and has made frequent 
studies in this subject in a number of southern states. 
She is loaned by the Federal Government to the Uni- 
versity for a quarter's work in North Carolina. Miss 
Buchan comes to the University from the University 
of Chicago, but most of her practical work has been 
in Kentucky. 

Mr. Snell, a graduate student of Springfield Train- 
ing School and Columbia University, has been survey 
supervisor of North Carolina for the Inter-Church 
Movement and manager of the educational service of 
the Y. M. C. A. for the State. As assistant director 
of extension he will have particular charge over the 
correspondence courses and the lecture work at the 
University and will spend much time in the field. 



FOOTBALL SCHEDULE ANNOUNCED 

Graduate Manager Charles T. Woollen has an- 
nounced 1 lie football schedule for 1921 as follows: 
October 1, Wake Forest at Chapel Hill; October S, 
Yale at New Haven; October 1."), South Carolina at 
Columbia, S. C. ; October 20, State College at Raleigh ; 
October 2!), Maryland at Baltimore; November "). 
V. M. 1. unsettled; November 12, Davidson unsettled: 
November 24, Virginia at Chapel Hill. 

The opponents are exactly the same as last year, 
though in several instances the location of the game 
has been changed. Only two games are definitely 
settled for Chapel Hill, the first with Wake Forest 
and the last with Virginia. Two other games will 
be played in the State, the A. and E. game in Raleigh 
on Thursday of Fair Week, October 20, and the 
Davidson game. For the past several years Davidson 
and Carolina have met in Winston-Salem and last 
fall the attendance was encouraging. But the field is 
not fit to be played on and the crowd has been handled 
so poorly in the past two years that a change is con- 
templated. Charlotte has been anxious to get this 
game and has offered strong inducements. There is 



talk of a new field at Winston-Salem and promise of 
better handling of the crowd. The matter is at present 
a toss-up between the two. Davidson is willing to 
go to either city. 

V. M. I. has played in Chapel Hill for the past two 
years and next year wants and has a right to play 
the game in a Virginia city. Lexington, Norfolk, 
and Richmond, and even Lynchburg are possibilities 
with the chances favoring Norfolk. The South Caro- 
lina and Maryland teams both played in Chapel Hill 
last fall and next fall Carolina plays on their fields. 
Yale will be met in the Bowl. 

Many offers of games came to the University from 
such institutions as Princeton, Navy, Tennessee, Ala- 
bama, Washington and Lee, V. P. I., and others. 



THE REUNION OF '16 

Francis (). Clarkson, of Charlotte, sends The Re- 
view the following letter in reference to reunion plans 
of the class of '16 ; 

Notice is hereby given that when Alumni Day of 
the commencement of 1921 arrives. 1916 will be on 
hand according to plans which have been maturing 
since the commencement of 1916 when it was decided 
not to hold a reunion until five years had rolled 
around. The first reunion of the class will bring- 
back to the hill married men, single men, benedicts, 
bachelors, ex-soldiers, ex-sailors, ex-marines, children, 
wives, sweethearts, war-heroes, farmers, doctors, mer- 
chants, lawyers, preachers, teachers, bankers, brokers, 
rich men, poor men and politicians. 

Francis Bradshaw has advised the committee not 
to divulge any of the secrets connected with this mem- 
orable gathering. This much can be said, that the 
committee composed of Bill Umstead, Claib Royal I, 
Bob House and Oliver Smith have had their heads 
together several times of late and the members of 
the class will hear from them from time to time from 
now until we meet. 

Lest there be any uncertainty about the matter this 
letter has been written to advise you that the ante 
helium class will arrive. It is rumored that 1911 
will be on hand, also other classes. That 1916 will 
be there is a fact. 



PROFESSOR COBB WRITES OF WORK IN 
JAPAN 

Recent information received in Chapel Hill indi- 
cates that Prefessor Collier Cobb, now in Japan on a 
year's leave of absence under the Kenan Traveling 
Fund, is being given every facility by the Japanese 
for his study of shore-lines and shore-lines processes 
in relation to harbor development and maintenance. 

A postal card from him, which reached Chapel Hill 
despite being half destroyed in a mail car fire at 
Luverne, North Dakota, says that "Shore-lines and 
the latest word in engineering devices for their pro- 
tection are in evidence all around Japan. Incidentally, 
I am seeing volcanoes, geysers, hot springs, coal, 
copper, and iron mines, and oil fields. The Japanese 
are giving, me every facility for my studies. . . ." 



Will many of the sons and daughters, of the rich 
go elsewhere to college, and will some of the children 
of the less affluent parents go nowhere for high educa- 
tional training? The answer lies with the North Caro- 
lina legislature. — Exchange. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



201 



THE UPRISING OF THE PEOPLE 



North Carolina lias seldom witnessed a fleer demon- 
stration of her public spirit than that which shook 
the state eapitol the night of February 23. This 
citizens' movement was the topping off of meetings 
held this fall and winter from Watauga to Pasquo- 
tank — college folk, business folk, old people and 
young, chambers of commerce, Rotary and Kiwanis 
Clubs, women's clubs, American Legion, American 
Mechanics, Parent-Teachers Associations, high school 
students, courthouse conferences in New Hanover and 
Wake, and mass meetings of the people from the 
countrysides of Wentworth and from the crowded 
streets of Charlotte. There is probably no parallel 
popular uprising in the history of higher education 
in America or the world. In the words of the news 
headline "the state literally spoke" at the public hear- 
ing before the joint session of the finance and appro- 
priation committees of the house and senate. 

To the call of Alfred M. Scales, leader of the citi- 
zens' movement, five hundred men and women gath- 
ered from all over North Carolina. From back of Ashe- 
ville to Wilmington and Elizabeth City, they came in 
crusading spirit. The eapitol corridors resounded with 
the voices of those who spoke in a cause that had in 
relentless months gathered the thunder of the moun- 
tains and the roar of the unresting sea. Two hundred 
meetings and near a hundred more converged now in 
this final mass expression of the faith of the people of 
North Carolina. Resolutions, petitions, editorials, 
letters, telegrams, the work and prayers of women, the 
fighting and faith of men, and the aspirations and 
hopes of children back home all over North Carolina, 
focused their substance and their spirit in this great 
demonstration. 

Mrs. Charles C. Hook swept the meeting off its feet 
and electrified a larse part of North Carolina not 
merely by the fact of her beautiful presence and simple 
eloquence, not only because she spoke for the State 
Federation of Women's Clubs and the motherhood of 
North Carolina, not altogether by the magic invocation 
of a lamented and heroic spirit, but also because she 
voiced the mood and aspirations of North Carolina 
alive to this hour of her destiny. 

Captain Williams found his sentiments halted in ap- 
plause that was for more than his rugged character 
and stirring words, for more even than his gallant 
leadership of North Carolina boys overseas. Youth 
was there, before him. industrial, commercial and pro- 
fessional youth, city youth and sons of farmers. All 
found their voice in the militant young man out of 
the mountains. They stormed ensanguined heights 
with him and they stormed the joint committee with 
the same valorous faith. Back of the words of "Kail- 
road Williams" are fighting groups of people de- 
ployed in unbroken lines from the mountains 1o the 
sea. 

Whether it was Wharton for the civic chilis, or 
Dorman Thompson, of Statesville, son of a public 
school pioneer, or Mrs. Swift, of the State Parent- 
Teachers' Association, or Purser "of Charlotte's 
r)0.00f>." or Small, of the Elizabeth City Chamber of 
Commerce, or Wells, of the Pocky Mount Kiwanis 
Club, or Linn, of Rowan, or Xeweomb. of New Han- 
over, or Hobeood and Rondthaler, of the denomi- 



national colleges, or Riddle, of Burlington, editor of a 
denominational paper, these public spirited citizens 
all spoke with enthusiasm and conviction for a great 
cause. 

Covington, of Wilmington, man of wealth and many 
benefactions in church and community, came out of 
the evening of his retirement to ask the legislature of 
North Carolina to tax him for other peoples" children. 
Latham, of Greensboro, maker of himself and his 
fortune, in the name of the soldier son whom he nave 
to his country, plead in moving, simple words that 
the college doors that were closed to him be opened to 
others. 

When Thomas J. Harkins made his clear and telling 
address, he spoke as more than a citizen of Asheville 
and Republican leader, he spoke more strategically as 
the chairman of an educational committee backed by 
5300 Scottish Rite Masons in North Carolina. The 
few simple sentences of Dr. Pegram, of Canton, had 
the strength of thousands — 8,901 men to be exact — 
for to date forty-eight chapters of the Junior Order 
of American Mechanics, east and west, in city. town. 
tnd village, have definitely championed the $20,000,000 
six year building program for state institutions. 

Those who would rush down to Raleigh and cry 
"the party" whether in the false interest of political 
expediency or in the falser interest of concentrated 
wealth, to try to block this prosrram will run into the 
fact that the people of North Carolina have spoken in 
tones ringing clear above party, hard times, special 
interests, and reaction. Youth, womanhood, public 
spirited business, the press and organized public opin- 
ion are all on one side — the side of the asylums, hospi- 
tals, and colleges and the side of a common sense 
businesslike six year program. 

Those who would take the responsibility for block- 
ing this businesslike program, figured out and recom- 
mended by the state building commission, cannot plead 
"the party" in the face of such demonstrations of 
public opinion and are estopped from urging poverty 
on top of the fifty millions for roads. A state that 
can magnificently spend fifty millions on her body can 
spend twenty millions on her soul. 

Men of Raleigh, the eyes of the state are upon you. 
More people are listening to the coming roll call than 
any roll call since North Carolina enrolled her sons 
to win the war. With heroic faith the people ask you 
to invest twenty millions in the sons and daughters 
she would enroll to win the peace. — Exchange. 



But is it as a laborer alone that North Carolina 
is destined to be known in the sisterhood? Has she 
nothing to offer more to be desired than the goods 
that she owes to the strength of her workmen's mus- 
cles, fir the cunning of their hands? We hold that 
she has given more in giving her children than she 
ever will ^ive in offering her goods to the world. We 
hold that not all the products of her farms and 
forests and mines and factories ever will amount to 
as much as the worth of a single generation of North 
Carolina boys and girls, if the boys and girls were 
cultivated and prepared for service as assiduously as 
our other raw material. — Exchange. 



202 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



THE NEW PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

The new Presbyterian Church in Chapel Hill is a 
finished piece of work. The annex contains a Sunday 
School auditorium and two large rooms that are a de- 
lightful retreat for social purposes during the week. 
The church proper is colonial, has a splendid organ, 
and a seating capacity of 450. 

Those who had its construction in charge were for- 
tunate in the choice of the architect — Mr. Hobart 
Upjohn, of New York City. His grandfather drew 
the plans of the Episcopal Church that stands as a 
thing of beauty and joy in Chapel Hill. The grand- 
son carried on the apostolic succession of his house in 
the affectionate care lie bestowed on this church that 
takes its place gracefully beside its sister temple. One 
cannot worship within its walls without feeling the 
power of architecture on religion. 

The building is the gift of Dr. James Sprunt, of 
Wilmington, North Carolina, in memorial of his wife. 
Mrs. Sprunt had wished for years to make a contribu- 
tion to our life that should minister to the higher 
needs of the youna' people here seeking culture and 
growth. But she fell on sleep, her dream remaining 
unfilled. Her devoted comrade, however, whose un- 
wearied service in the causes of education and religion 
is known and treasured by our citizenry, went for- 
ward with the prouram ; and, when thi> form it was to 
take rounded itself out in his mind, he made known 
his desire to erect a house of worship. 

The church is a gift not only to the people of the 
Presbyterian faith but to the community and State; 
and we accept it with devout cratitude. 

We feel that the memory of the gift and giver will 
remain as a benediction in days to come; that to this 
hallowed place human lives will repair successfully 
for truth to sustain in the hours of perplexity, for 
moral guidance in the hours of wavering desire, and 
for a vision of perfection amidst the drab and prosaic 
and material currents of daily experience. 

The Baptist and Methodist denominations will soon 
erect similar edifices in Chapel Hill. If they are as 
successful in their architectural device as those who 
have preceded them the higher culture we call religion 
will look with a face that is unashamed on the fair 
countenance of intelligence on the campus. 

-W. D. Moss., 

■ 

REV. ALFRED S. LAWRENCE ACCEPTS CALL 

The Rev. Alfred S. Lawrence has accepted a call to 
the Chapel of the Cross, the Episcopal church at 
Chapel Hill, and assumed his new duties early in 
January. Mr. Lawrence was born in England, raised 
near Cambridge University, studied at Columbia Uni- 
versity, taught school both in England and in western 
North Carolina, has been rector at Hillsboro and Con- 
cord, and was archdeacon of the convocation at Ra- 
leigh. He is married and has five children. 



C. W. PHILLIPS VOTED BEST ALL-ROUND 
MAN 

C. W. Phillips, of Trinity, N. C, a member of the 
present senior class, was voted the best all-round man 
in the University at a recent contest held by The 
Carolina Magazine. He led Daniel L. Grant, of Snead's 
Perry, by 7 votes in a total of approximately 1,000 
cast. E. E. Rives, of Greensboro, was third choice, 
with Bailey Liipfert and Robbins Lowe, both of Win- 



ston-Salem, and John H. Kerr, Jr., of Warrenton, 
close behind. Fourteen men were nominated. Phil- 
lips has recently succeeded W. R. Wunsch, '18, as 
secretary of the Y.M.C.A. He has been prominent in 
Y. M. C. A. and literary society work, is a self-help 
student, a member of both the Student Council and 
the Campus Cabinet, and belongs to many honorary 
organizations. 



RESEARCH IN THE UNIVERSITY 

That a spirit of stimulating research abides on the 
campus of the University and has made itself evident 
through numerous scholarly investigations has long 
been an acknowledged fact to which testimony has 
been borne by many notices appearing in the pages of 
The Review. The most recent testimony however, 
and of the most convincing sort, is furnished through 
the University Record for August (Graduate School 
Series No. 2) entitled Research in Progress Julv, 
191 8- July, 1920. 

As indicated by the title, the summary, edited by 
Dean Greenlaw, of the Graduate School, records the 
various investigations upon which members of the 
faculty and graduate students have been engaged 
for the past two years — a record which embraces 
twelve departments and the names of sixtj r -seven in- 
vestigators and requires fifty-four pages for the 
detailing. 

One omission is noted in the summary, namely, that 
of investigations carried on in the field of the eco- 
nomic and social sciences. The University's studies 
in these fields are becoming more and more extensive 
and should be made of permanent record in this series. 



Dr. Archibald Henderson, head of the department 
of mathematics, has recently published a paper on 
The Teaching of Geometry. It appears as Extension 
Bulletin No. 39 of the University Record. Such a 
paper is especially appropriate at the present time 
on account of the great unrest among teachers of 
mathematics over the question of Geometry in the 
high schools. Professor Henderson points out the 
weak places in our present methods and shows how 
the subject can be taught so as to- carry the full weight 
of its purpose and lead the student into the realm of 
investigation, which is the aim of all education. 



During the summer of 1919 Professor Thorndike 
Saville, of the department of sanitary engineering, 
visited England and France on a Sheldon Traveling 
Fellowship in Engineering provided by Harvard Uni- 
versity. As a result of his investigations he has re- 
cently published two reports in Public Work, the 
articles appearing in the issues of January 8 and 15 
under the titles Notes on English Sewage Treat- 
ment and AVater Work Notes in Europe. 



In a 20-page paper appearing in Psychobioloc/y (Vol. 
II, No. 41 entitled Some Transfer factors in Maze 
Learning by the White Rat, Dr. J. F. Dashiel, Pro- 
fessor of Educational Psychology in the University, 
discusses the question as to the effect of habits formed 
upon the acquisition of new habits. The article, 
which is based on experiments carried out in the 
ps.vchological laboratory of Oberlin College, is illus- 
trated with eleven figures and several tables. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



203 



Use Your Spare Time 

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The University of North Carolina Offers Thirteen Courses by Mail 



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The University is particularly anxious to serve former students of the 
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Bachelor of Science, and Bachelor of Music. 

Special courses in Pedagogy; in Manual Arts; in 
Domestic Science Household Art and Economics; in 
Music; and in tne Commercial Branches. 

Teachers and graduates of other colleges provided 
for in both regular and special courses. 



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Fall 'Verm Opens in September 



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For catalogue and other information, address 

JULIUS I. FOUST, President, GREENSBORO, N. C. 



204 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



Issued monthly except in July August, and September, by the Gen- 
eral Alumni Association oi the LJniversitj of North Carol inn. 

Board of Publication 
The Review is edited by the following Board of Publication: 

Louis R. Wilson, '99 Editor 

Associate Editors: Waiver Murphy, '92; Harry Howell, '95; Archibald 

Henderson, '98; W. S. Bernard, '00; J. K. Wilson, '05; Louis 

Graves, '02; F. P. Graham, '09; Kenneth Tanner, '11; Lenoir 

Chambers, Jr., '14; It. W. Madry, '18. 

E. R. Rankin, '13 - Managing Editor 

Subscription Price 

Single Copies $0,20 

Per Year 1.50 

Communications intended for the Editor and the Managing Editor 
should be sent to Chapel Hill, N. C. All communications intended for 
publication must be accompanied with signatures if they are to receive 
consideration. 

OFFICE OF PUBLICATION, CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 

Entered at the Post office at Chapel Hill, N. C, as second class 
matter. 



THE UNIVERSITY IN PRINT 



Dr. E. M. Coulter, associate professor of history 
in the University of Georgia, has obtained a leave of 
absence for the remainder of the academic year. He 
will spend the time in collecting material for two 
works on which he is engaged in the history of Ken- 
tucky. One of these is a general history of Kentucky, 
the other a history of the Civil War and Reconstruc- 
tion in the same state. Professor Coulter attended 
the meeting of the American Historical Association at 
Washington, December 28th to 30th. In May last 
Professor Coulter read a paper before the Mississippi 
Valley Historical Association on Elijah Clarke's 
Foreign Intrigues and the Traus-Oconee Republic. 
This paper will appear in the Mississippi Valley His- 
torical Review. During the same month Professor 
Coulter read a paper before the Georgia Historical 
Association on Nullification in Georgia. It will ap- 
pear in the March number of the Georgia Historical 
Quarterly. 



Dr. Edwin A. Alderman is a contributor to the 
World's Work for December of an article entitled 
The Nation's Supreme Task. Recently Dr. Alderman 
has been made a member of the Council Table of the 
World's Work which is composed of fifteen notable 
Americans whose purpose is "to present in one place 
wise and informed thought and stimulating council" 
for the benefit of its readers. Among the notables are 
Charles W. Eliot, President Emeritus of Hai'vard ; 
Herbert Hoover; Franklin K. Lane, Ex-Secretary 
of the Interior; Henry Morgenthau, former ambassa- 
dor to Turkey; and William S. Sims, Rear Admiral 
United States Navy. 



The Library of the University is in receipt of a 
copy of a reprint from the American Law Review by 
Chief Justice Walter Clark, '64, entitled Exemption 
of Stocks from Taxation in Violation of the Consti- 
tution and Contrary to All Decisions of the Courts. 
Judge Clark concludes the paper with the following 
statement : " It appears clearly from the above author- 
ities that it is held uniformly always and everywhere 
— ubiquc, semper ct eadem — that the stock in the 



hands of shareholders is their individual property and 
that the capital stock, franchises and tangible prop- 
erty of the corporation are its property, that there is 
a distinct ownership by the two parties of a separate 
and distinct species of property and that the taxation 
of one does not exempt the property of the other 
from taxation. The cases say the opposite contention 
is 'specious.' " 



Dr. J. F. Steiner, for five years professor of Eng- 
lish in North Japan University, but now a member 
of the faculty of the School of Public Welfare of the 
University, discusses some Factors in Minimizing 
Race Friction on the Pacific Coast in the January 
issue of the Annals of the American Academy of 
Political and Social Science. Dr. Steiner is the author 
of the Japanese Invasion, published by A. C. Mc- 
Clurg, in 1918, and will bring out within the next 
few weeks through the Universi.ty of Chicago Press 
a new book entitled Education for Social Work. 



Two additional monographs on North Carolina his- 
tory have recently appeared in the James Sprunt His- 
torical Publications (Vol. XVII, No. 1) under the 
titles The Free Negro in North Carolina and Some 
Colonial History of Craven County. The first paper 
was prepared as a thesis in partial fulfilment of the 
requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in the 
University by R. H. Taylor, assistant professor of 
history at the Citadel, Charleston, S. C. The second 
paper was written by Francis H. Cooper, '16, and 
was awarded the second prize in the Colonial Dames 
contest in 1916. 



At the invitation of Daniel L. Grant, editor-in- 
chief of the Tar Heel, North Carolina college editors 
representing eleven institutions and sixteen student 
publications met ha Chapel Hill, February 5, and 
organized the North Carolina College Press Associa- 
tion. J. E. Cassell, of the Davidson College David- 
sonian was elected president ; Miss Marie Edgerton, 
of Salem College, first vice-president ; Carroll W. 
Weathers, of Wake Forest, second vice-president; L. 
D. Mahood, of Davidson, secretary ; and Miss Anne C. 
Fulton, of North Carolina College for Women, 
treasurer. 

The college editors arranged for an interchange of 
news, and for a contest among the newspapers and 
among the magazines. President Chase and Profes- 
sors Frank Graham and C. A. Hibbard spoke before 
the association. A second meeting will be held at 
Davidson in April. 



All that the University needs, all that she is asking 
for, is freedom to realize to the full her possibilities 
of service to the State. For this she asks, not because 
she is ambitious for herself, but because she is am- 
bitious for North Carolina, and because she is con- 
vinced that with ampler resources she can still more 
extend and vitalize her service to the State, because 
she verily believes that the State of North Carolina 
and her University are in very truth "partners in 
the supreme adventure of achieving in even fuller 
measure that democracy for which her sons so freely 
gave their lives — fellow workers in the same high 
cause, marching shoulder to shoulder toward the same 
shining goal, as they draw strength and guidance 
each from each." — H. W. Chase. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



205 



Union National 
Bank 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 

Capital ...$200,000.00 

Surplus & Profits $235,000.00 
Resources $3,500,000.00 



We cordially invite the 
alumni and friends of the 
University of North Carolina 
to avail themselves of the fa- 
cilities and courtesies of this 
bank. 



D. P. TILLETT 
Cashier 



Conservative Investments 

We ran offer the following high grade 
preferred stocks just now at attractive 
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25 shares Cabarrus Mill, 7 per cent 

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100 shares High Shoals, 7 per cent 

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100 shares Hanes Rubber Company, 

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100 shares Chadwick-Hoskins Mill, 8 

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50 shares Rhodhiss Mill, 7 .per cent 

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100 shares McCIaren Rubber Company, 

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50 shares Gilmers, Incorporated, 7 per 

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10 shares Brown Williamson Tobacco 

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100 Shares Tidewater Power Company, 

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50 shares P. H. Hanes Knitting Com 

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50 shares R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Com- 
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100 shares Hunter Commission & Man- 
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100 shares Bel ton Mill, 7 per cent 

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150 shares Union Buffalo Mills, 7 per 

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INVESTMENTS 

Phone 238 Postal Phone 

Long Dist. 9957 



GENERAL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

of the 

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH 

CAROLINA 



Officers of the Association 

K' ii \V. Connor, '99 President 

1*:. K- Rankin, '13 Secretary 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE: Walter Mur 
phy, '92; Dr. R. H. Lewis, '70; W. N. 
Everett, '86; H. E. Rondthaler, '93; C. W. 
Tillett, Jr., '09. 



WITH THE CLASSES 

1862 

— Col. John W. Hinsdale, of Raleigh, 
passed his 78th birthday on February 
4th. Col. Hiiisdale is a lawyer and a 
former president of the North Carolina 
Bar Association. He is probably the 
ulilcst ranking Confederate oftieer in the 
State. 

1873 
— General Geo. YV. Melver is stationed at 
Port Sloeum, N. Y. In the war, Gen- 
eral Melver commanded the 161st Infan- 
try Brigade, Slst Division. 

1881 
— Judge R. B. Boone, of Pawhuska, Okla., 
holds a district judgeship. 

1883 
— Rev. J. J. Harrell is pastor of the 
Presbyterian church of Bessemer City. 
— Dr. G. L. Wimberly practices his pro- 
fession, medicine, in Rocky Mount. 

1884 
— Jas. Lee Love, who was valedictorian 
of the class of '84, is with the War 
Risk Insurance Bureau, at Washington, 
ami was formerly in the faculty of Har 
yard University. He is president of the 
Gastonia Cotton Mfg. Co., Gastonia's 
nldest cotton mill, which was founded by 
his father, the late ('apt. R. C. G. Love. 

1885 
— Marion Butler, former U. S. Senator 
from North Carolina, is a member of the 
law firm of Butler and Vale, Southern 
Building, Washington, D. C. 
— Dr. C. S. Tate practices medicine at 
Ramseur. 

1886 
— Lt. Col. E. L. Gilmer, U. S. A., is 
stationed at Honolulu and is in command 
ol' I lie coast 'Ii ielises of Oallil. 

1888 
— L. B. Edwards is a capitalist of Live 
Oak, Fla. 

— Julian II. Little is president of the 
Independence Trust Co., at Charlotte. 

1889 
S. S. .Mann, is a lawyer of Swan Qtmr 
in ;ind is presidenl of the Bank of Hyde. 
— Geo. S. Steele, of Rockingham, is super- 
intendent of Mill No. 2 of the Roberdel 
Mfg. Co., at Entwistle. 



The Planters National 
Bank 

Rocky Mount, N. C. 



Capital, $300,000. Surplus and 
undivided profits over $350,000. 
Resources over three and a half 
million. 

Located in the center of the 
Eastern North Carolina tobacco 
belt, offers to you its services 
along all lines of banking. 4% 
interest on savings deposits. 



J. C. BRASWELL, President 
M. C. BRASWELL, Vice Pres. 
MILLARD F. JONES, Cashier 
R. D. GORHAM, Asst. Cashier 

"The Bank of Personal Service" 



THE 

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Trust Department 

The Trust Department offers 
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JNO M. MILLER. Jr. 
CHAS. R. BURNETT 
ALEX F. RYLAND 
S. P. RYLAND 
S. E. BATES, Jr. - 
JAS. M. BALL. Jr. 
THOS. W. PURCELL 



President 

- Vice-Pres. 

Vice-Pres. 

Vice-Pres. 

Vice-Pres. 

Cashier 

Trust Officer 



206 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



THE BANK of 
CHAPEL HILL 

Oldest and Strongest Bank 
in Orange County 



Capital $25y000.00 

Surplus and Profits. 45,000.00 



We earnestly solicit your banking 
business, promising you every service 
and assistance consistent with safe 
banking. "It pleases us to 
you." 



M. C. S. NOBLE, President 
R. L. STROWD, V-President 
M. E. HOGAN, Cashier 



STATEMENT OP THE CONDITION 
OF 

THE FIDELITY BANK 
Durham, N. C. 

Made to the North Carolina Corpora- 
tion Commission at the Close of 
Business June 30, 1920 

Resources 
Loans and Investments.. $3, 864, 605. 84 

Furniture and Fixtures.. 17,443.48 

Cash Items 329,999.97 

Cash in Vaults and with 

Banks 1,028,979.12 

Overdrafts Secured 1,643.18 

$5,242,671.59 

Liabilities ■ 

Capital Stock $ 100,000.00 

Surplus 500.000.00 

Undivided Profits 133,227.61 

Deposits 3,710.886.28 

Bills Payable 445.000.00 

Bills Re-discounted 353,557.70 

$5,242,671.59 

Commercial and Savings 4% Com- 
pounded Quarterly in Our Sav- 
ings Department 

Authorized by its charter to act as 
administrator, guardian, trustee, agent, 
executor, etc. 

The strength of this bank lies not 
alone in its capital, surplus and re- 
sources, but in the character and fi- 
nancial responsibility of the men who 
conduct its affairs. 

B. N. DUKE, President 
JNO. F. WILY, Vice-President 
L. D. KIRKLAND, Cashier 
II. W. BORING, Asst. Cashier 



1890 
— Col. Wm. S. Battle, Jr., is head of 
the claim department of the Norfolk and 
Western Railway Co., at Roanoke, Va. 

1892 
— F. H. Beall is proprietor of Belmont 
Farm, at Linwood. 

— F. C. Dunn is a cotton manufacturer 
of Kinston. 

1893 
— S. F. Austin practices law at Nash- 
ville, in the firm of Austin and Daven- 
port. 

— Victor E. Whitloek is a lawyer at 35 
Nassau Street, New York City. 
— Jno. M. Cheek is engaged in school 
work at Elk Creek, Va. 

1894 
— Lindsay Russell, Law, '9-4, practices 
law in New York City, with offices at 
32 Liberty Street. 

1895 
— D. K. McRae lives at Laurinburg and 
is engaged in farming in Scotland County. 
He is chairman of the Laurinburg board 
of school commissioners. 

1896 
— J. W. Canada is secretary and treas- 
urer of the Southland Farmer Publishing 
Co., Houston, Texas. 

— C. W. Briles, director of the State 
board of vocational education of Okla- 
homa, at Oklahoma City, writes that he 
is in hearty accord with the plans for 
adequate buildings and equipment, sup- 
port and maintenance, for the Univer- 
sity and the State colleges. 
— Henry T. Sharpe is a real estate broker 
of Asheville, with offices 317-318 Drhumor 
building. 

— Rev. R. G. Shannonhouse is rector of 
St. Matthews Church at Fitzgerald, Ga. 
He is raising funds to build a new 
church to be known as St. John's Church 
at Moultrie, Ga. 

— N. Tomlin, Med., '96, of Olin, is chair- 
man of the board of county commissioners 
of Iredell County. 

1897 
— A. W. Mangum has charge of a cam- 
phor farm for the DuPont interests at 
Green Cove Springs, Fla. 
— Burton Craige is a member of the law 
firm of Craige and Vogler, with offices in 
the Wachovia Bank building, Winston- 
Salem. C. A. Vogler, '11, as junior 
member of this firm. 
— W. A. Crinkley is cashier of the Citi- 
zens Bank of Blackstone, Va. 

1898 
— S. P. Cooper, of Henderson, has been 
elected president of the Henderson Cot- 
ton Mills and the Harriet Cotton Mills, 
to succeed his father, the late D. Y. 
Cooper. A. A. Zollicoffer, '11, has been 
elected secretary of the two corporations. 
— Rev. J. C. Seagle is rector of the 
Episcopal church of Brevard. 



The 
Trust Department 



Of the Southern Life and 
Trust Company buys and 
sells high grade stocks and 
bonds. We have for sale 
some especially attractive 
preferred stocks. 



Trust Department 

Southern Life & Trust Company 

A. W. McALISTER, President. 
R. G. VAUGHN, First Vice-President. 
A. M. SCALES, General Counsel and 
Vice-President. 



A. A. KLUTTZ 
CO., Inc. 



Extends a cordial invitation 
to all students and alumni of 
TJ. N. C. to make their store 
headquarters during their stay 
in Chapel Hill. 

Complete Stock 

of books, stationery and a com- 
plete line of shoes and haber- 
dashery made by the leaders of 
fashion, always on hand. 



A. A. KLUTTZ CO., Inc. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



207 



Independence Trust 
Company 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



Capital & Surplus, $1,600,000 

Member Federal Reserve System 



A.11 departments of a well- 
regulated bank are maintained, 
among which are the Commer- 
cial, Savings, Collections, For- 
eign Exchange, and Trust, 
and we cordially invite free 
use of any of these depart- 
ments. 



J. H. LITTLE, President 

E. O. ANDERSON, Vice-Pres. 

E. E. JONES, Cashier 



"It's Famous Everywhere" 
The 

Battery Park Hotel 

ASHEVILLE, N. C. 



In the heart of the 
Blue Ridge mountains, in 
the Land of the Sky. 
Centrally located in pri- 
vate park of 15 acres. 
Commands unobstructed 
views. Cuisine and serv 
ice unsurpassed. 

Rates and booklet will 
be sent upon request. 



S. J. LAWRENCE, Manager 



Dr. G. E. Newby practices his pro- 
fession, medicine, in his home town, 
Hertford. 

—Jas. D. Parker, '98, and G. A. Martin, 
'15, practice law at Smithfield under the 
firm name of Parker and Martin. 
— Fletcher Bailey is located at 95 E. 
North Ave., Atlanta, Ga. 

1899 

H. M. Wagstafp, Secretary, 
Chapel Hill, N. C. 
— Dr. E. J. Wood, physician of Wilming- 
ton, addressed the Elisha Mitchell Scien- 
tific Society at its 246th meeting in 
Chapel Hill February 8th on the sub- 
ject: "Our Debt in Medicine to the 
British. ' ' 

— T. C. Wagstaff, of Roxboro, and Miss 
Gertrude Home, of Washington, D. C, 
will be married this spring. 
— B. B. Dougherty has been since its 
organization president of the Appalachian 
Training School at Boone. 

1900 
W. S. Bernard, Secretary, 
Chapel Hill, N. C. 
— N. C. Curtis is now associated with 
the office of Moise H. Goldstein, architect, 
Title Guarantee building, New Orleans, 
La. Mr. Curtis was at one time in the 
faculty of the University. Later he was 
professor of architecture in the Ala- 
bama Polytechnic Institute, and in Tu- 
lane University. For the past three years 
he was in charge of instruction in de- 
sign in the school of architecture of the 
University of Illinois. 
— J. W. Greening is in railway service 
at El Dorado, Ark. 

— Dr. I. F. Harris is director of the 
Harris Laboratories, at Tuckahoe, N. Y. 
— J. A. Lockhart, formerly engaged in the 
practice of law in Wadesboro, has moved 
to Charlotte and entered into the prac- 
tice of law there. 

— W. F. Bryan is a professor in the 
department of English of Northwestern 
University, at Evanston, 111. 
— J. E. Gant, of Burlington, has charge 
of the Jewell Cotton Mills, at Jewell, Ga. 

1901 
J. G. Murphy, Secretary, 
Wilmington, N. C. 
— Jas. T. Dortch is located at 523 Cus- 
tom House, New York City. 
— W. H. Gibson is vice president of the 
National Lumber Co., at Concord. 
— R. W. Jordan is engaged in box manu- 
facturing at Emporia, Va. 

Dr. W. deB. MaeNider, Kenan Profes- 
sor of Pharmacology in the University, 
has recently been appointed by the 
American Medical Association as a mem 
ber of a committee on graduate train- 
ing in pharmacology. He has also re- 
ceived appointment as a member of the 
research committee of the National An- 
aesthesia Research Society. 




The Young Man 



who prefers (and most young men do) 
styles that are a perfect blend of 
novelty and refinement has long since 
learned the special competency of this 
clothes shop. 



Pritchard-Bright & Co. 



Durham, N. C. 



The Equitable Life Assurance 
Society of the U. S. 

Assets over $600,000,000 

When you finish school and enter 
the business world it will give you 
greater Prestige if you have your 
Life Insured with a company of 
impregnable financial strength and 
a national reputation for faithful 
public service. 

The Equitable 

Offers a complete circle of protec- 
tion, a policy to meet every situ- 
ation. 

The Home Agency Co. 

Fred A. McNeer, Manager 

District Agents 

Life Insurance Department 

6th Floor 1st National Bank Bldg., 

Durham, N. C. 

Talk your insurance needs over 
with our Chapel Hill Agent. 
WITHERS ADICKES, 
18 Old East Bldg. 



208 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



Chas. Lee Smith, Pres. Howell L. Smith. Sec'y 
Wm. Oliver Smith. Treas. 



Edwards and Broughton 
Printing Company 

Raleigh, N. C. 



Engraved Wedding Invitations, Christmas 
Girds, Visiting Cards and Correspon- 
dence Stationery 



Printers, Publishers and 
Stationers 



Steel and Copper Plate Engravers 



Manufacturers of 

Blank Books and Loose Leaf 
Systems 



Rawls-Knight Co. 

"Durham 's Style Store 

We extend a special invita- 
tion to our Chapel Hill friends 
to visit our store and view 
what's new in Fall and Winter 
wearing apparel. 

Fashion's very latest styles 
in Coats, Suits, Dresses and 
Smart Millinery. 

Beautiful Silks and Woolen 
Dresses in the most appealing 
styles. 

All the new weaves in cot- 
ton and woolen goods, silks, 
duvetyn, plush. Large line of 
silk and cotton hosiery. The 
home of Lady Ruth, Crown 
and Binner Corsets. Cente- 
meri Kid Gloves and Ashers 
Knit Goods. 

Mail orders promptly filled. 

Rawls-Knight Co. 

Durham, N. C. 



1902 
I. F. Lewis, Secretary, 
University, Va. 
— Announcement lias been made of the 
birth on February 19th of a daughter to 
Dr. and Mrs. E. G. Alexander, of Phil- 
adelphia. Dr. Alexander is a native of 
Charlotte, the son of Capt. S. B. Alex 
ander, '(ill. He is associated in the prac- 
tice of surgery in Philadelphia with Dr. 
John B. Deaver, his father-in-law. 
— E. G. Moss is in charge of the State 
agricultural experiment station at Ox- 
ford. 

— Geo. P. Stevens is a missionary at. 
Hsuchowfu, Ku, China. 
— John S. Henderson is with the West- 
inghouse Electric and Mfg. Co., at Syra 
cuse, N. Y. 

— Dr. I. F. Lewis, of the faculty of the 
University of Virginia, continues his in- 
terest in tennis and will this spring coach 
the Virginia tennis team. 

1903 
N. W. Walker, Secretary, 
Cambridge, Mass. 
— Kenneth Gant is secretary and trea- 
surer of the Neuse Mfg. Co., cotton 
manufacturers at Neuse. 
— Geo. W. Graham, Jr., is secretary and 
treasurer of the Interstate Milling Co., 
at Charlotte. 

— Governor Cameron Morrison has re- 
cently named R. O. Everett, '03, of Dur- 
ham, and A. W. McLean, '92, of Lum- 
berton, as members of the N. C. Cotton 
Commission, to investigate the cotton 
industry and co-operate with similar or- 
ganizations in other states for securing 
better marketing conditions. 
— Arch. D. Mouteath, Law, '03, has been 
for the past two years counsel of the 
real estate division of the United States 
Housing Corporation, Washington, D. C. 
It was through this corporation that real 
estate properties were acquired through- 
out the United State for war purposes. 

1904 

T. F. Hickerson, Secretary, 
Chapel Hill, N. C. 
— Dr. E. A. Herring is located at Au- 
gusta, Ga., where he holds the chair of 
preventative medicine in the medical 
school of the University of Georgia. 
—Dr. E. E. Randolph lives at 7U3 W. 
Morgan St., Raleigh, and is associate 
professor of chemistry in the State A. 
and E. College. 

— Alfred W. Haywood is a counselor at 
law in New York City with offices at 
(il Broadway. He lives at "36 W. 113th 
St. 

1905 
W. T. Shore, Secret urn. 
Charlotte, N. C. 
—I. C. Wright practices law in Wil- 
mington as a member of the firm of 



Clothes of Fashion 



CLOTHES MADE 

BY MAKERS WHO 

KNOW FOR MEN 

WHO KNOW 



Sold by 

Sneed-Markham- 
Taylor Co. 

Durham, N. C. 



High-Class 

Ready-to-Wear 

Apparel 



Ladies' Suits, Dresses, 
Coats, Wraps, Furs, Hos- 
iery, Underwear, Corsets, 
Piece Goods, Notions. 

DURHAM, N. C. 




THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



209 



THE TRUST DEPARTMENT 



of the 



First National Trust Co. 



of Durham N. C. 



Offers you its services 
in all Trust matters, 
and invites your con- 
sideration. 



JAS. O. COBB, President 

J. F. GLASS, Treasurer 

JULIAN S. CARR, Vice-President 

W. J. IIOLLOWAY, Vice President 

C. H. CARR, Chairman, Board of 
Directors 



'When He's Dressed Up He 
Looks Up" 



Fashion 
Park 



Has endeavored to appeal to the 
young men of our country and 
this is the reason Fashion Park 
suits are specially built, and spe- 
cially styled; and the minute you 
don one of these suits you begin 
to look up. 



HINE-MITCHELL CO., Inc. 

"The Style Shop" 
WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



Wright ami Stevens, with offices in the 

Southern building. 

— A. H. King practices law in Burling 

ton. 

— Norman W. Lynch, Phar. '05, is pro 

prietor of the Lynch Drug Co., Charlotte. 

1906 
J. A. Parker. Secretary, 
Charlotte, X. C. 
— Paul F. Faison and Miss Bohnschikiinn 
were married recently in Tientsin, China. 
.Mr. Faison has been connected with the 
diplomatic service in China for several 
years and is now T", S. Vice-Consul at 
Nanking. 

— Dr. S. T. Nicholson, Jr., practices med- 
icine at Clifton Springs, N. Y. 

1907 
C. L. Weill, Secretary, 
Greensboro, N. C. 
— Capt. A. L. Fletcher, of Raleigh, has 
become chief clerk to the State Insur- 
ance Commission. 

— O. V. Hicks is superintendent of the 
Murphy schools. 

— Hubert Hill is in the faculty, chemistry 
department, of the University of West 
Virginia; at Morgantown. 
— H. H. Hughes, is in the faculty of 
Columbia University, New York City. In 
service Mr. Hughes was a captain of 
infantry. 

1908 

M. Robins, Secretary, 

Greensboro, N. C. 

— B. L. Banks, Jr. practices law in 

Gatesville as a member of the firm of 

Smith and Banks. 

— Dr. J. Rush Shull moved from Cliff- 
side to Charlotte on January 1st and be- 
came associated with Dr. Otho B. Ross, 
'05, in the general practice of medicine, 
with offices 309-10-11 Realty building. 
Doctor and Mrs. Shull and children, Joe, 
Betty, and Billy live at 1707 E. 7th St. 
— At the annual meeting of the board of 
directors of the Southern Life and Trust 
Co., held recently in Greensboro, H. B. 
Gunter, '08, who has served as agency 
manager of the company, was elected 
third vice-president, and T. D. Blair, '16, 
wIki has served as assistant agency man- 
ager, was elected assistant secretary. 
Both of these alumni will continue In 
hold their respective posts as agency 
manager and assistant agency manager. 
— A. W. McAlister, '82, is president of 
the Southern Life and Trust Co. R. G. 
Vaughn, '91, is first vice-president and 
A. M. s.ales, '92, is second vice-president. 

1909 
O. C. Cox, Secretary, 
Greensboro, N. C. 
— Jas. R. Stevenson continues with the 
Stockyards National Bank, at South St. 
Paul, Minn. 
— J. B. Reeves is in the faculty of Cor 



LIGGETT & MYERS 
TOBACCO CO. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 

FAT1MA, CHESTERFIELD 

AND PIEDMONT 

CIGARETTES 

VELVET AND DUKE'S 
MIXTURE SMOKING 

TOBACCO AND 
other well known brands of 
Smoking Tobacco, Cigarettes 
and Chewing Tobacco. 



Our brands are standard for 
quality. 

The)) speak: f or themselves. 



Asphalt Pavements 



DURABLE ECONOMICAL 



If you are interested in street or 
road construction we invite you to 
inspect our work in 

Durham (Asphalt Streets). 

Durham County (Asphalt and Con- 
crete Roads). 

Raleigh and Wake County (As- 
phalt). 

Guilford County (Asphalt Roads). 

Greensboro. 

Rocky Mount. 

High Point. 

Henderson. 

Lumberton. 
Also roads built for United States 
Government: 

Army Supply Base, Norfolk, Va. 

Newport News — Hampton Highway, 
Newport News, Va. 

Camp Lee, Va. 

A representative will visit you and 
supply any information or estimates 
desired. 

Robert G. Lassiter & Co. 
Engineering and Contracting 

Home Office: Oxford, N. C. 
:V27 Arcade Building Norfolk, Va. 

1002 Citizens Bank Building 

Raleigh, N. C. 

American Exchange National Bank 
Building Greensboro, N. C. 



210 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



O. HENRY 



The Pride of Greensboro 



North Carolina's largest and 
finest commercial and tourist 
hotel. 

300 Rooms 
300 Baths 

Thoroughly modern. Absolutely 
fireproof. Large sample rooms. 
Convention hall. Ball room. Ad- 
dition of 100 rooms completed 
September 1, 1920. 

W. H. Lowry Cabell Young 

Manager Asst. Manager 



Snappy Clothes 

for the 

College Man 



Society and 

Stein Bloch 

Clothes 

for the 

young and 

those who stay 

young 




gnrtrty ScutH Ciuliwi. 



'Vanstory Clothing Co. 

C. H. McKnight, Pres. and Mgr. 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



nell University, department of English, 
at Ithaca, N. Y. 

— H. K. Klonts is engaged in the mer- 
cantile business at Lakeland, Fla. 
— DeWitt Quinn, Phar. '09, is engaged 
in cotton manufacturing at Shelby. 

1910 

J. R. Nixon, Secretary, 
Edenton, N. C. 

— J. C. M. Vann practices law in Monroe 
in the firm of Vann and Milliken. 
— Leon McCulloch is engaged in elec- 
trical engineering at Pittsburg and is 
located at 1246 Lincoln Ave. 
— Chas. A. Holden practices law in Paw- 
huska, Okla. 

— Jas. S. Patterson is assistant trust of- 
ficer of the First National Trust Co., at 
Durham. 

— John M. Reeves severed his connection 
with the Hunter Mfg. and Commission 
Co. on January 1st and entered the dry 
goods commission business on his own 
hook. He is a member of the firm of 
Reeves Brothers, at 55 Leonard St., New 
York City. 

— T. P. Nash, Jr. is in the faculty of 
Cornell Medical College, 28th St. and 
First Ave., New York City. 
— Jas. A. Hutchins, Phar. '10, is pro- 
prietor of Hutchins drug store, Winston- 
Salem. 

— W. M. Snider is at the head of the 
wholesale firm of Snider and Co., at Sal- 
isbury. 

1911 

I. C. Moser, Secretary, 

Asheboro, N. C. 

— Margaret Winston Leonard was born 
September 28th, the daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. S. E. Leonard, of Wilson. Mr. 
Leonard is superintendent of public wel- 
fare for Wilson county. 
— Dr. J. S. Milliken practices medicine 
in Pittsboro. 

— Dr. Wm. P. Belk practices medicine in 
Philadelphia and is located at 542 N. 
63rd. St. 

— Major Stuart W. Cramer, Jr., U. S. 
A., is stationed at Washington, D. C. 
He served overseas in the tank service 
during the war. 

— A new corporation is the University 
Agency, Inc., of Chapel Hill, recently 
chartered for life insurance business. J. 
W. Umstead, Jr., '09, of Tarboro, is 
president; Cyrus Thompson, Jr., '11, of 
Chapel Hill, is vice president and 
manager; W. H. Andrews, Jr., '20, of 
Chapel Hill, is secretary and treasurer. 
This agency represents the Jefferson 
Standard Life Insurance Co. 
— Odom Alexander has been engaged in 
the real estate business at Charlotte since 
graduation. 
— G. C. Mann is in charge of the bureau 



SMOKE 



Meditation 



"Your Sort of Cigar ' 



100% 

Smoke Satisfaction 



Most Popular Cigar 
in the South 



^AYLOkf 

v n/remier Qualiiu 
c»^uiprnenf^ 
TENNIS. GOLF 

BASE BALL 
TRACK. CAMP 

AUXTAYlORsO 




Book Exchange 

Taylor Agency 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 211 



Murphy* s Hotel 

Richmond, Virginia 

The Most Modern, Largest, and Best Located Hotel 
in Richmond, Being on Direct Car Line to all 
Railroad Depots. 

The Only Hotel in the City With a Garage attached. 

Headquarters for Carolina Business Men 
European Plan $1.50 Up 

JAMES T. DISNEY, President 



STATEMENT OF CONDITION 

THE BANK OF BELMONT 

BELMONT, N. C 

AT CLOSE OF BUSINESS, SEPT. 13, 1920 

RESOURCES LIABILITIES 

Loans and Discounts $1,396,829.00 Capital Stock $ 47.300.00 

Overdrafts None Surplus 50,000.00 

Furniture and Fixtures $ 1,779.00 Profit Account 32,869.40 

Interest and Expense (Dr.) 14,671.76 Reserve for Interest 5,000.00 

Bond Account 6,296.00 Bills Payable None 

Cash and in Banks $ 581,219.72 Deposits 1,865,626.08 



$2,000,795.48 $2,000,795.48 

THE OFFICERS AND EMPLOYEES OF THIS BANK feel that courtesy to and co- 
operation with its patrons are prime essentials of modern banking service. Your account with 
this Bank means safety for the funds you carry. It means convenience in the use of that 
money. It means assistance in borrowing. It means acquaintance and knowledge where such 
things count. 

R. L. STOWE, President W. B. PUETT, Cashier 

"WE INVITE YOUR BUSINESS!" 



212 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



FIVE POINTS AUTO CO. 

AUTOMOBILES 

Repairs and Accessories 

Buick and Dodge Cars 
Goodyear and U. S. Tires 

G. M. C. Trucks 
Complete Stock of Parts 

FIVE POINTS AUTO CO. 

DURHAM, N. C. 



DRINK 




Delicious and Refreshing 

Quality tells the difference in 
the taste between Coca-Cola and 
counterfeits. 

Demand the genuine by full 
name — nicknames encourage sub- 
stitution. 

Get a bottle of the genuine 
from your grocer, fruit stand, or 
cafe. 

Durham Coca-Cola Bottling Co. 
Durham, N. C. 



of vocational instruction of the exten- 
sion division of the University of Color- 
ado, at Boulder. 

1912 

J. C. Lockhart, Secretary, 
Raleigh, N. C. 
— Weldon Davis Egerton, of Louisburg, 
and Miss Katherine Crichton White, of 
Washington, D. C, will lie married on 
April 6th in Washington. 
— Cyrus Hoguc, Wilmington lawyer, is 
State commander of the American Legion. 
He is married. 

— E. H. Yelverton, former U. S. Vice 
Consul at London, is in Chapel Hill pur- 
suing special work. 

— Tom Moore is with the Johnston Mills 
Co , located at 820 James building, Chat- 
tanooga, Tenn. 

— R. H. Johnston is a cotton manufac- 
turer of Charlotte, secretary and trea- 
surer of the Johnston Cotton Mfg. Co. 
— W. W. Rankin, Jr., now instructor in 
mathematics in Columbia University, has 
accepted an offer to become professor of 
mathematics in Agnes Scott College, De- 
catur, Ga. 

— Samuel M. Gattis, Jr., and Miss Vir- 
ginia Charles Parris were married Jan 
nary 15th in Hillsboro. Mr. Gattis prac- 
tices law in Hillsboro in partnership 
with his father, Solicitor S. M. Gattis, 
'84. 

— William Graves and Mrs. Lena Davis 
Austin, both of Mt. Airy, were married 
January 29th at Baltimore, Md. Mr. 
Graves is a lawyer of Mt. Airy. 
— C. S. Cook is with Paine, Weber and 
Co., 25 Broad St., New York City. 
— L. N. Morgan is in the faculty, Eng 
lish department, of the University of 
Oklahoma, at Norman. 
1913 
A. L. M. Wiggins, Secretary, 
Hartsville, S. C. 
— G. B. Phillips, former superintendent 
of the Oxford schools but a banker at 
Oxford since last June, has taken up his 
new duties as principal of the Greensboro 
high school. 

— Walter Stokes, Jr., is in the insurance 
business with the New York Life In- 
surance Co., at Nashville, Tenn. 
— Dr. E. M. Coulter, associate professor 
of history and political science in the 
University of Georgia, is on a leave of 
absence for the remainder of the year 
and is spending the time in doing some 
historical work in the library of Con- 
gress. His address is 613 22nd St., N. 
W., Washington, D. C. 
— Dr. N. S. Vann practices medicine in 
Grand Rapids, Mich , with offices in the 
West Drug Store building, at 91-93 Mon- 
roe Ave. He writes ' ' I am homesick for 
the Hill, a place which will always have 
a warm spot in my heart." 



The Yarborough 



RALEIGH'S LEADING 

AND LARGEST 

HOTEL 



MAKE IT YOUR HOME WHEN 
IN RALEIGH 



B. H. GRIFFIN HOTEL 
COMPANY 



KODAK FINISHING 

As Qood as the Best 
Anywhere 



Over eighty per cent of our busi- 
ness is mail order 



May We send you a price list? 



R. W. FOISTER 

BOX 242 
CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 



Universal Auto 
Company 

(Incorporated) 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 



North Carolina distributors for 
Paige Cars and Trucks. Dis- 
tributors for Samson Trucks and 
Tractors. 



PARTS AND SERVICE 



Virginia Distributors for Paige Cars and 

Trucks. Distributors for Chevrolet 

Cars and Trucks. 



TIRES AND BATTERIES 



The largest building devoted to the 

merchandising of motor cars 

and trucks in the South. 



Alumni and friends of the University of 

North Caiolina are invited to 

communicate with us. 



COLG 




The Refill Shaving Stick 




-Jala! a "all I" a a a • 

i a ■ .a aa ■ a a • »« a a i a *a a a a a • ■ a a • a a » • ; 




llllllil 

aaTa*». iMM*>f 

i.SSiS>>»>*>. ■■'•"»•>'] 

Viiiir>»iHI<>> ta»a>j.a«ai< 

aai aaa aaaaiaaaa it aitiaiasr 

a, -Mini 

luiriiiuiu mi. ii«i- 

"iiiiiiHniMiiii !».•«•»«•*• 

<iMiiiiriiti<iiiiii>ii« 

IIIIIIIIIIIIUIII 

a as a » a a na miitu 
■ ■ 



ttfctttHr> 




Like putting 
a new bulb 
in a socket 



YOU don't have to buy a new socket when your 
electric light burns out. You merely screw in 
a new bulb. 

Putting a "Refill" Shaving Stick into the Colgate 
"Handy Grip" is just as simple and just as easy. 
The metal "Handy Grip" will last for years. Colgate 
"Refills" cost you the price of the soap alone. 
The soap itself is threaded to screw into the "Handy 
Grip," and the bit that is removed from the socket 
can be moistened and stuck upon the end of the 



"Refill." 



There is no waste. 

There is no need of rubbing the 
lather in with the fingers when you 
shave with Colgate's. We took the 
rub out of shaving originally in 1903. 

COLGATE &. CO. 

Depl. 212 

199 Fulton St., New York 



The metal" Handy Grip, "cow 
taining a trial size, stick of Col- 
gale's Shaving Soap, sent for 
10c. When the trial stick it 
used up you can buy the Colgate 
"Refills." threaded to fit thlt 
Crip. 




214 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



A. E. Lloyd Hardware 




Company 




DURHAM, N. C. 


All 


kinds of hardware, sporting 


goods, 


and college boys' acces- 


sories. 




Geo 


. W. Tandy, Manager 



SALMON. SHIPP 
AND POE 

DUKHAM, N. C. 



CONTRACTORS 

AND 

BUILDERS 



CONTRACTORS NEW DORMITORY 
UNIVERSITY OF N. C. 



The Princess Cafe 

WINSTON SALEM, N. C. 



WE INVITE YOU TO VISIT US 
WHILE IN WINSTON-SALEM 



A THOROUGHLY MODERN 
CAPE 



Cooper Monument 
Company 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Communicate with us regarding 
your needs for monuments or tomb- 
stones. 



— F. W. Morrison, superintendent of the 
Chapel Hill schools, is commander of the 
Chapel Hill post of the American Legion. 
— Dr. T. J. Summey, Med. '13, has re- 
sumed the practice of medicine in his 
home town, Brevard, after three and one 
half years spent in the army and in post 
graduate study. 

1914 
Oscar Leach, Secretary, 
Raeford, N. C. 
— J. F. Pugh is assistant secretary of the 
chamber of commerce of Norfolk, Va. 
His address is 1 Pelham Place, Norfolk. 
— L. H. Ranson is superintendent of pub- 
lic welfare for Mecklenburg County, lo- 
cated at Charlotte. 

— Born to Mr. and Mrs. Frank R. Owen, 
of Yadkin College, a daughter, Jennie 
Frances Owen, on January 29th. Mr. 
Owen is engaged in farming. 
— Jas. Eldridge is principal of the Snow 
Hill high school. 

— H. C. Long, Jr., is secretary and man- 
ager of the Rhyne -Anderson Mills Co., 
cotton manufacturers, at Troy. 
— M. R. "Mike" Dunnagan is city edi- 
tor of the Charlotte Observer. 
1915 
D. L. Bell, Secretary, 
Pittsboro, N. C. 
— Dr. C. E. Ervin is on the staff of the 
Geo. F. Geisinger Memorial Hospital, 
at Danville, Pa. 

— Dr. C. L. Johnston, of Wind Rock, 
Tenn., writes: "The list of prospective 
Carolina students from Tennessee has in- 
creased by one. My wife presented me 
with a son on November 13th. I tried 
singing him to sleep the other night with 
the song, 'When I'm an Old Alumnus.' 
It didn't work! Maybe it was not the 
song but my voice." 
— H. D. Lambert is located at 123 
Thomas St. N. W., Washington, D. C. 
— Dr. A. McR. Crouch lately spent some 
time in New York City, engaged in spe- 
cial study. He has now returned to Wil- 
mington where he is engaged in the prac- 
tice of his specialty, the diseases of chil- 
dren. He lives at 11 N. 5th St. 
— G. Allen Mebane, of Graham, is vice- 
president of the L. Banks Holt Mfg. Co., 
operators of a chain of cotton mills in 
Alamance County. 

— John D. Odom, lawyer of Rocky Mount, 
was elected recently solicitor of the 
Rocky Mount municipal court. 
— Rev. B. M. Walton until recently rector 
of Calvary Church, Wadesboro, is now 
rector of St. James Church, Lenoir. 
— J. V. Whitfield has lately received ap- 
pointment as U. S. Consul at Havana. 
— M. J. Davis, '15, E. G. Hogan, '16, 
and M. L. Stone, '20, are members of 
the faculty of the Wilmington high 
school. 



MARKHAM-ROGERS 
COMPANY 

Clothiers Tailors, Furnishers and 
Hatters 

ALL THE NEW FALL 

STYLES AT REASONABLE 

PRICES 

DURHAM, N. C. 



ODELL'S, inc 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 

China, Cut Glass and 
Silverware 

General line Sporting Goods 
Household Goods 

Dependable goods. Prompt 

Service. Satisfactory 

Prices 



HICKS-CRABTREE 
COMPANY 

FOUR MODERN DRUG STORES 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 

Eastman Kodaks and Supplies 
Nunnally's Candies 

The place to meet your friends when 
in the Capital City 

GILBERT CRABTREE, Mgr. 



Cross & Linehan 
Company 

Leaders in Clothing and 
Gents' Furnishings 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



"The second son 
the old man has turned over to us 



?? 




A REPRESENTATIVE of 
the Alexander Hamilton 
Institute included this 
paragraph in one of his recent 
reports : 

"At his request I 
telephoned to Mr. 
Blank, President 
of the big whole- 
sale hardware and 
mill - supply firm 
here. He said that 
his inquiry was for his son who had just 
graduated from the State University. This 
is the second son the old man has turned 
over to us." 

* * * 

And why? 

Why should a successful busi- 
ness man who has paid the ex- 
penses of sending his son thru 
a great university, seek to enrol 
that son immediately in another 
educational institution ? What 
has the Alexander Hamilton 
Institute to offer a man in the 
nature of post-graduate training? 

A working knowledge of busi- 
ness taught by business men 

THIS much: 
The university gives a man 
a background of general infor- 
mation; the Alexander Hamilton 
Institute gives him the specific 
tools with which he is to work. 

He may enter the sales depart- 
ment of a business, and if he 
does, his danger will be that he 
may become an expert salesman 
or sales manager and nothing 
more. Or he may enter the ac- 
counting department, and spend 
his life in that one department. 

This Institute gives him — out 
of the experience of the leaders 
of business — an all-round work- 
ing knowledge of ^//departments; 



sales, accounting, costs, factory 
and office management, trans- 
portation, advertising, corpora- 
tion finance and the rest. 

Department training makes 
department heads; only an all- 
round training fits a man for ex- 
ecutive responsibility over all 
departments, or for the conduct 
of a business of his own. 

Why every great industry 
has accepted it 

THIS is why so many successful 
men have recommended the 
Alexander Hamilton Institute to their 
college-bred sons. This is why 
24,054 corporation presidents have 
enrolled for its Course, many of them 
side by side with their younger asso- 
ciates. 

This is why you cannot name a great 
American business which has not its 
quota of Alexander Hamilton Institute 
men. There are enrolled in the: 

United States Steel 
Corporation. . . 545 

Goodyear Tire and 
Rubber Co. . . 346 

Standard Oil Co.. 80 1 



Western Electric 
Company. . . 



[90 




and so on thruout \m 

every nationally known organization. 

The greatest educators and 
business men 

"^TO school of commerce has an 
■^-^ abler Eacultyand Advisory Coun- 
cil than the Institute. 

Its Council is made up of Frank 
A. Vanderlip, the financier; General 
Coleman du Pont, the well-known 
business executive; John Hays Ham- 
mond, the eminent engineer; Jere- 
miah W. Jenks, the statistician and 
economist; and Joseph French John- 




son, Dean of New York University 
School of Commerce. 

And every phase of its training is 
presided over by men who have de- 
monstrated by the success 
of their own business ca- 
reers their right to train 
other men. 

Thousands of suc- 
cessful men, in 
every kindof busi- 
ness and every 
position in busi- 
ness, have tested 
the Modern Busi- 
ness Course and 
Service in their 
own experience, and proved its power 
to shorten the road to success. 

"Forging Ahead in 
Business" 

\ BOOK of 116 pages explains in 
■**• detail the Modern Business 
Course and Service of the Alexander 
Hamilton Institue. 

It tells just what the Course cov- 
ers; just how it is arranged, and pre- 
cisely how its training builds onto 
the foundation which the college or 
university lays. Many men have 
found in its pages a guide-post to a 
shorter and more direct path to suc- 
cess. 

To receive your copy of "Forging 
Ahead in Business," merely fill in 
the coupon and mail. 

Alexander Hamilton Institute 

937 AstorPlace, New York City 



Send me "Forging Ahead in Business" 
which I may keep without obligation. 




Name ... 



Business 
Address „ 



Burliness 
Position ,. 



Building 7V.fi/. 



Cofyrigh:, lq2: y Alexander Hamilton Institute 



216 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



Perry-Horton Shoe Co. 

Special Agents for Nettleton and 

Hurley Shoes for Men, and 

Cousins and Grover Shoes 

for Women 

MAKE OUR STORE HEAD- 
QUARTERS WHILE IN 

DURHAM, N. C. 



Strand Theatre 

DURHAM, N. C. 



HIGH CLASS PICTURES AND 

SPECIAL MUSIC— YOU ARE 

ALWAYS WELCOME 



Open from 11 A.M. Until 11 P.M. 



I. G. LAWRENCE 

W. H. LAWRENCE AND T. H. LAW- 
RENCE ASSOCIATED 



CONTRACTOR 

AND 

BUILDER 

Main Office: Durham, N. C. 



CONTRACTOR FACULTY HOUSES 
AND LAUNDRY 

UNIVERSITY OP NORTH 
CAROLINA 



EDUCATION FOR 
BUSINESS 

Success in life means application of 
the fundamental principles of business 
taught in business college. There|s 
nothing mysterious about it. It is 
merely applied common sense. The 
young man or young woman who 
trains now can enter business wjth 
practically a positive assurance of 
success. Don't you want to be a 
success in life? Then, why not begin 
your training NOW? 

Write for catalogue and full parti 
culars to 

Mrs. Walter Leb Lednum, Pres. 
DURHAM BUSINESS SCHOOL 

Durham, N. 0. 



1916 

H. B. Hester, Secretary, 
Gamp Travis, Texas 
— L. G. Marsh is assistant explosives 
chemist with the U. S. Bureau of Mines 
at Pittsburg, Pa. He lives at 4740 
Friendship Ave. He will attend the re- 
union of '16 at commencement. 
— Herman Cone is connected with the 
Proximity Mfg. Co., cotton manufac- 
turers of Greensboro. 
— J. J. Harris is in the faculty of Mc- 
Callie School, at Chattanooga, Tenn. 
— Walter B. Rouse and Miss Beatrice 
Hunter were married February 11th in 
New Bern. Mr. Rouse practices law in 
New Bern. 

— B. S. Royster, Jr., practices law in 
Oxford. 

— R. C. Vaughn is auditor for Forsyth 
County, at Winston-Salem. 
— W. S. Wilkinson, Jr., Rocky Mount at- 
torney, was recently chosen solicitor of 
the Nash County recorder's court. 
— A. T. Castelloe is engaged in banking 
at Aulander. 

1917 
H. G. Baity, Secretary, 
Chapel Hill, N. C. 
— W. B. Austin practices law at Jeffer- 
son in partnership with T. C. Bowie, 
under the firm name of Bowie and Austin. 
— One member of '17 writes : "I have 
just received the February number of 
The Alumni Review and enjoyed it 
very much. I find however that there are 
only half a dozen notes about members 
of '17, when the class of '17 should 
have a whole column. Please suggest to 
the members that they send in news 
notes about themselves to H. G. Baity, 
Secretary, Chapel Hill. I always turn 
first to the section of The Alumni Re- 
view which carries news notes of my 
classmates. ' ' 

— Dr. Kenneth Holloway, of Raleigh, 
holds an interneship in a Philadelphia 
hospital. 

— E. L. Mackie is a graduate student of 
Harvard University, specializing in 
mathematics. 

— Paul F. Smith practices law in Ra- 
leigh. 

— M. H. Randolph is principal of the 
Derita high school. 

— Four members of the class of 1917 se- 
cured liceuse to practice law at the last 
bar examination. W. R. Allen, Jr., of 
Goldsboro ; E. K. Proctor, of Lumberton ; 
H. L. Stevens, Jr., of Warsaw; and 
Oliver Rand, of Smithfield. 
— J. B. Hill is practicing law in Wil- 
mington associated with Judge E. K. 
Bryan in the Murchison Bank building. 
— Geo. M. Norwood is president of the 
Norwood Brick Co., at Goldsboro. 



For up-to-date laundry 


service, call on us 


Durham Laundry Co. 


Durham, N. C. 



The Royal Cafe 



University students, faculty mem- 
bers, and alumni visit the Royal 
Cafe while in Durham. Under 
new and progressive management. 
Special parlors for ladies. 



DURHAM'S MODERN 
CAFE 



Hennessee Cafe 

C. C. Shoffner, Manager. 

A MODERN, UP-TO-DATE CAFE, 

WHERE YOU AND YOUR 

FRIENDS ARE WELCOME 

CLEANLINESS AND 

SERVICE OUR 

MOTTOS 

342 and 344 S. Elm St. 

Greensboro, N. O. 



BROADWAY CAFE 



WE CORDIALLY INVITE YOU 
TO VISIT OUR CAFE WHEN 
YOU ARE IN GREENSBORO 

Excellent Service 

Courteous Treatment 



GREENSBORO, N. C. 



DIRECT ADVERTISING 



DESIGNING 



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A 

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B 
O 
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S 



Direct Advertising 



Offers seven distinct advantages of high 
importance to him who would expand 
his selling fields, or who, in his present 
territories, by intensive cultivation 
would make two sales grow where one 
was recorded before. 

1. Direct Advertising Is Individual. 
It reaches reader when he is receptive 
to the ever-new story of another day's 
mail. It is both his habit and desire to 
give to the mail his personal, undivided, 
interested attention. Whether it suc- 
ceeds in its mission depends on the care 
it received before mailing. 

2. Direct Advertising Is Timely. The 
new business condition that arises today 
can be treated tomorrow as circum- 
stances direct — through Direct Adver- 
ising. A special weather condition, a 
market change, a new line of goods, a 
special discount, any sudden variation 
from normal is readily and effectively 
treated by Direct Advertising. 

3. Direct Advertising is Flexible. It 
introduces the salesman or supplements 
his personal sale. It makes direct sales 
or influences the user to buy from the 
retailer. It covers a city, a state or a 
nation, limited only by the termini of 
transportation itself, whether train, 
steamer, pack mule or human burden- 
bearer. As sales and production de- 
mand, the Direct Advertising appeal can 
be reduced or increased in scope. It is 
at all times entirely under the control 
of the advertiser. 

4. Direct Advertising Is Selective. 
Simply make your own choice of buyers 
you wish to reach. The Postoffice De- 
partment will do the rest. With Direct 
Advertising you can winnow the inter- 
ested prospects from time- wasters and 
give your salesmen profitable calls to 
make. You can direct a repeated appeal 
to a selected individual and by sheer 
force of persistence and logic break 
down his resistance and create a 
"buyer." Or you can apply the same 
methods to a hundred, a thousand, tens 
of thousands, treating your mailing lists 
separately and making individual sales 
by a mass presentation — through the 
mails. 

5. Direct Advertising is Confidential. 
There is an intimacy about a message by 
mail, comparable only (and often su- 
perior) to the man-to-man meeting. 



Through Direct Advertising you can 
speak personally, give the message an 
individuality, talk to the reader on 
terms of mutual understanding. 

The strategy of competitive selling is 
in recording a sale while another is list- 
ing a prospect. Selling by mail opens 
a transaction between individuals. Your 
appeal and effort are not emblazoned 
broadcast for check-mating by rivals. 

6. Direct Advertising Is Economical. 
If there is waste, you are the waster. 
Printing, paper, postage and mailing 
operations represent an investment. 
But a wise choice of "prospects," ac- 
curate listing and careful mailing elimi- 
nate the hazard so that every message 
reaches its destination. Your appeal 
has its opportunity for a favorable au- 
dience. Then — is the message as effi- 
cient as the messenger? Thereon de- 
pends whether the sale will be effected. 
By its very economy, in Direct Advertis- 
ing, you have an automatically per- 
sisitent salesman. Some time your cus- 
tomer will be in the market. Those mail 
appeals which do not make actual sales 
are -doing invaluable ' ' missionary 
work," against the buying time. Then 
the order blank returns with the coveted 
business. 

7. Direct Advertising Is Forceful. 
You can marshal your appeals on paper 
without fear of interruption or disre- 
gard. On a single page you can com- 
press the study, the care and the em- 
phasis of months of preparation. There 
is no hesitation in making the appeal, 
no delay between explanation and sug- 
gestions, no interference aroused by the 
human desire to postpone judgment, 
ask questions or delay action. Within 
one cover is the influential appeal, the 
description and illustration, the order 
blank, the return envelope. Your story 
is told completely. Decisive action is 
made easy. Thus is Direct Advertising 
effective. 

oAt Tour Service 

The Seeman Printery, Inc. 

Durham, N. C. 




4 



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MULTIGRAPHING 



MAILING SERVICE 



218 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



CAPITALIZE YOUR TIME AND TALENTS 

By qualifying for a responsible business or civil 
service position while salaries are high. 

Our school is a member of the National Associa- 
tion of Accredited Commercial Schools and is 
highly endorsed by everybody. Call or request a 
Catalogue. 

KING'S BUSINESS COLLEGE 
Raleigh, N. C. Charlotte, N. C. 



Gooch's Cafe 

Anything to Eat 
CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 



W. B. SORRELL 

Jeweler and Optometrist 
CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 



Electric Shoe Shop 

Expert Shoe Repairing 
CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 



Model Laundry Co. 

DURHAM, N. C. 
Expert Laundry Service 



For neat job printing and type- 
writer paper, call at the office of 

Chapel Hill News 



r, 

"Pickaro's 


1 

l-fota 


Headquarters for Carolina alum- 
ni returning to the Hill. 

Special rates for student board- 
ers. 
1 >) 



PRIDGEN & JONES COMPANY 

We carry the best shoes, Edwin 
Clapp, Howard and Foster, and Hey- 
wood's. 

Expert fitters — A cordial welcome 
awaits yon. 
107 W. Main St. Durham, N. C. 



— Eli J. Perry is engaged in the prac- 
tice of law in Kinston. 
— Jas. R. Patton, Jr., practices law in 
Durham. 

— Geo. A. Shuford has entered upon the 
practice of law in Asheville. 
— C. B. Hyatt is in the faculty of the 
Asheville high school. 

1918 
W. R. Wunsch, Secretary, 
Monroe, La. 
— H. E. Marsh is a geologist with the 
Amerada Petroleum Corporation, Flor- 
ence, Kansas. 

— Dr. W. B. Dewar is on the staff of 
the Lyiug-In-Charity-Hospital, 11th and 
Cherry Sts., Philadelphia. 

1919 
H. G. West Secretary, 
Thomasville, N. C. 
— Max D. Abernethy and Miss Eliza- 
beth Hill, both of Raleigh, will be mar- 
ried on March 19th. Mr. Abernethy is 
a well known newspaper man of Raleigh. 
— Norman A. Boren practices law in 
Greensboro. 

— Frank Clarvoe is on the staff of the 
Oregon Journal, at Portland. 
— G. R. Frye, who is a senior in the Jef- 
ferson Medical College, has been admit- 
ted to membership in Alpha Omega Al- 
pha, Jefferson 's honor society. 
— L. H. Hodges is secretary to the gen- 
eral manager of the Carolina Cotton and 
Woolen Mills Co., at Spray. 
— W. T. Steele, of Nashville, Tenn., is 
spending the winter in school at Edin- 
burgh, Scotland. He is studying the- 
ology. 

1920 
T. S. Kittrell, Secretary, 
Henderson, N. C. 
— It 's time for everybody to begin think- 
ing about the big reunion at commence- 
ment. Shoot all suggestions in to T. S. 
Kittrell, at Henderson, and watch this 
column for further announcements. 
— Luke Umstead of the class of '20, is 
principal of the school at Holly Springs. 
— Bill Neal is in the offices of the Stan- 
dard Oil Co. He has completed his train- 
ing course in the New York offices. His 
address is 119 East Morehead St., Char- 
lotte. 

— G. D. Crawford is in the law school 
at Emory University, Ga. 
— C. R. Joyner, former Carolina pitcher 
now of the faculty of the Winston- 
Salem high school, has signed up for the 
coming baseball season with the Green- 
ville, S. C. club of the South Atlantic 
League. 

— Holt P. Faucette is president of the 
firm of Leathers, Wood and Co., whole- 
sale dealers in cigars, cigarettes, tobacco 
and candies, at Greensboro. 



Budd-Piper Roofing Co. 

Durham, N. C. 

Distributors of JOHNS-MANVILLE 

Asbestos Shingles and Roofing 

Barrett Specification Roofing 

Sheet Metal Work 

AGENTS FOR 








WELCOME TO 

STONEWALL HOTEL 

A. D. GANNAWAY, Manager 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



Campbell-Warner Co. 

PINE MONUMENTS 

REASONABLE PRICES. WRITE US 

Phone 1131 

RALEIGH, N. 0. 



o 


^ 


CHAS. 


C. HOOK, ARCHITECT 


CHARLOTTE, N. C. 


Twenty 


years ' experience in 


planning 


school and college build- 


mgs. 

v- 


V 



The Peoples National Bank 

WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 

Capital $150,000 U. S. Depository 

J. W. Fries, Pres. W. A. Blair, V.-P. 

N. Mitchell, Cashier 



Dillon Supply Co. 

Machinery, Mill Supplies 
RALEIGH, N. C. 



R. BLACKNALL & SON 

druggists 
Norms and Huyler's Candies 

O. Bernard, Manager 

Corcoran Street Durham, N. C. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



219 



in Street Pharmacy 

LEADING DRUGGISTS 
Durham, N. C. 



PATTERSON BROS. 

DRUGGISTS 

Agency Norris Candy The Rexall Store 
Chapel Hill, n. C. 



(bssie ^/jrot/i 



ers 

CALIFORNIA AND FLORIDA 

FRUITS, TOBACCA AND CIGARS, 

ICE CREAM PARLOR, 

FRESH CANDIES 

"We Strive to Please" 



POLLARD BROS. 

DURHAM, N. C. 

STANDARD LINES OF HARD- 
WARE AND SPORTINO 
GOODS 



. 

Hufnne 


Hotel 


Quick Lunch Counter and Dining 
Room — Clean 


Rooms $1 .00 and Up 


Near the Depot 


Greensboro 


, N.G 

J) 



Ralph J. Sykes Drug Company 

SOUTH ELM ST., NEAR DEPOT 
OPEN ALL NIGHT 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



ANDREWS CASH STORE CO. 

Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Students and Faculty will find us ready 
to serve them with the latest styles in 
Walkover Shoes, Fancy Shirts, Tail- 
ored Suits, and general furnishings. 
Be convinced. Call and see. 



Obe University ;press 

Zeb P. Council, Mgr. 

PRINTING, ENGRAVED CARDS 

QUALITY AND SERVICE 
CHAPEL HILL. N. C. 



— W. S. Justice is located at Peters- 
burg, Va. 

— C. H. Walker is assistant principal of 
the Poplar Branch high school. 
— Nathan Mobley who until recently was 
in the insurance business with the Uni- 
versity Agency at Chapel Hill, is now 
with the Travelers Insurance Co., at Char- 
lotte. 

— R. D. Williams and H. J. Campbell are 
with the Guaranty Trust Co., New York 
City. 

— Clem Elliott Markham and Miss 
Louise Marie Mayorga were married Jan- 
uary 5th in New York City. 
— Augustus Travis is on the staff of the 
Charlotte News. 

1921 
— Wm. Bickett has accepted a position 
in the trust department of the Wachovia 
Bank and Trust Co., Winston-Salem. 

NECROLOGY 

1860 
—Charles Edward Gay, A.B. 1860, died 
February 6th at his home in Starkville, 
Miss, 79 years of age. Deceased took 
part in the Confederate service and had 
been engaged in business pursuits since. 

1888 
— William Cain Ruffiu died February 
18th at his home in Winston Salem, 7,7, 
years of age. Deceased was one of the 
foremost cotton manufacturers in the 
State. He was secretary-treasurer and 
general manager of the Mayo Mills, at 
Mayodan, and of the Washington Mills, 
at Fries, Va. Deceased was a son of 
Chief Justice Thomas Ruffin, '44. He 
attended the University in 1884- '85. 



J. Frank Pickard 

HEAVY AND FANCY 
GROCERIES - 

Opposite Campus 
CHAPEL HILL. N. C. 



BAIN-KIMBALL CO. 

Makers of 

STANDARD MONUMENTS 
DURHAM. N. C. 



The Carolina Man's Shoe Store 

Carr-Bryant 

High Grade Shoes with Snap 

iiml Style 

Carr-Bryant Boot $ Shoe Co. 

106 W. Main Street Durham. N. C. 



The Selwyn Hotel 

CHARLOTTE, X. C. 

Fireproof, Modern and Luxurious 

IN Till'; HEART OF EVERYTHING 

II. C. Lazalere, Manager 



H. S. STORR CO. 

Office Furniture, Machines and Sup- 
plies. Printers and Manu- 
facturers of Rubber 
Stamps 
RALEIGH, N. C. 



Whiting-Horton Co. 

Thirty-three Years Raleigh's 
Leading Clothiers 



Snider- Fletcher Co. 

WATCHES, DIAMONDS, AND 
JEWELRY 

lln W. Main St. Durham, N. C. 



Flowers for ail Occasions 

DURHAM FLORAL 
NURSERY 

Chapel Hill Agenls: EUBANKS DRUG COMPANY 



Paris Theatre 

DURHAM, N. C. 

ARTCRAFT-PARAMOUNT 
PICTURES 



Orchestra 



( Orchestra 



Broadway Theatre 

DURHAM, N. C. 

THE HOUSE OF SPECIAL 
PHOTOPLAY ATTRAC- 
TIONS 



Eubanks Drug Co. 

CHAPEL HILL, N. 0. 
AlcuIs for !Niuuially*s Coiidien 




"Keep 
clean inside" 



"Scientists have found over 240 varieties 
of bacteria in the human intestine. 
They have estimated that the number 
of bacteria evacuated daily from the 
human system is one hundred and 
twenty trillion (120,000,000,000,000). 

"Though many of these bacteria are 
harmless and some even beneficial, there 
are a countless number which are capable 
of doing serious harm. If constipation 
exists, putrefaction follows, with the re- 
sult that many hitherto harmless strains 
of bacteria become malignant and pro- 
duce virulent poisons which are absorbed 
by the blood and carried to every 
body cell. 

Dangers of Constipation 

"So constipation becomes the root-evil 
of many serious ailments. It means a 
continuous poisoning of the entire body, 
in time leading to high blood-pressure, 
arterio- sclerosis, liver, bladder and 
kidney diseases, etc." 



Physicians Prescribe Nujol 

To train the bowels to normal, healthy, daily 
evacuations most physicians recommend Nujol. 

Nujol relieves constipation without any unpleas- 
ant or weakening effects. It does not upset the 
stomach, cause nausea or griping, nor interfere 
with the day's work or play. Instead of irritating 
or forcing the system, Nujol simply softens the 
food waste. This enables the many tiny muscles 
in the walls of the intestines, contracting and 
expanding in their normal way, to squeeze the 
food waste along so that it passes naturally out 
of the system. 

Prevents Constipation 

Nujol actually prevents constipation because it 
helps nature maintain easy, thorough bowel 
evacuation at regular intervals — the healthiest 
habit in the world. 

Nujol is absolutely harmless and pleasant to 
take. Try it. 

Nui ol 



REG. U-Sr^PAT. OFF. 



For Constipation 

Nujol is sold by all druggists in sealed bottles 
only, bearing the Nujol trade mark. 



Mail coupon for booklets "Constipation -- Auto Intoxication 
in Adults" and "Constipation in Advanced Years", to Nujol 
Laboratories, Standard Oil Co. ( New Jersey), Room 715 C , 44 
Beaver Street, New York. I In Canada, send to Nujol, IL St. 
Francois Xavier Street, Montreal.) 



Name 



Address 




Testing the strength of Hercules Dynamite in Ballistic 
Mortar House 

Vigilance That Begets 
Confidence 



A SPARK, a sputtering fuse, a report — and the recoil of a 
mortar, which hangs as a great pendulum, registers the 
energy stored in Hercules Dynamite. This simple but accu- 
rate test is only one of many which are employed by the 
Hercules Powder Co. to maintain the unfailing high and uni- 
form quality of Hercules Explosives. 

Before it is finally accepted as ready for commercial use a 
Hercules Explosive, no matter what its nature, must pass 
almost as many examinations as a boy about to graduate from 
high school. It is due to this unflagging vigilance on the part 
of the men who make them that the products of the Hercules 
Powder Co. occupy the enviable position they do in the fields 
of sport and industry. 

Among hunters and trap shooters, miners and quarrymen, 
engineers and contractors, Hercules Explosives enjoy a firmly 
established reputation for unusually high and uniform quality. 
This is the reason why they are called upon to perform so 
much of the work which can only be carried on efficiently 
and economically by the use of explosives. 



HERCULES 

Explosives Chemicals Naval Stores 

HERCULES POWDER CO. 



Chicago 
Pittsburg, Kan. 
San Francisco 
Chattanooga 



St. Louis 
Denver 

Salt Lake City 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 



New York 
Hazleton, Pa. 
Joplin 
Wilmington, Del. 





I 






Heat at the command 

of your finger tips 



CAN you imagine a fire in Chicago 
and New York benefiting from 
its heat ? Yet that is what virtually 
happens in the case of electric heat. 
A current is generated, sent miles 
across country and converted into 
heat, wherever desired — instantly 
available, easily controlled and con- 
centrated to the highest degree. 

Electric heating devices have util- 
ized this energy for domestic needs 
and have eliminated drudgery, re- 
duced fuel bills and fire risks, pro- 
moted cleanliness and simplified 
housekeeping. And in place of the 



grimy forge and the primitive bellows 
of yesterday, modern industry calls 
upon electricity to perform speedily 
and more efficiently the thousand and 
one tasks that require heat. 

The broad utilization of electric 
heat has only begun. The General 
Electric Company pioneered in foster- 
ing this energy to its present state of 
service, and it will continue to apply 
all its resources — research, engineering 
and manufacturing — to the end that 
electric heat may have an equal place 
with power and light as a universal 
benefit to mankind. 




,EAL ELEOTMC C0MOWY 






We Solicit 

The business of going concerns, believing that 
we have ample resources and officials with 
ability to render Expert Banking Service. 

First National Bank 

Durham, N. C. 

Capital and Surplus Over One Million Dollars 






Proud You're a Southerner? 

We are proud that the Pilot Company is a Southern institution 
and is aiding in the up-building of the South. 

Its "Complete Policy" is the last word in insurance protection. 
Write for particulars as to 

POLICIES AGENCY CONTRACTS TERRITORY 



Southern Life and Trust Company 




HOME OFFICE "The Multiple Line Company" GREENSBORO, N. C. 

CAPITAL $1,000,000.00 



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