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Full text of "The alumni review [serial]"

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Library of 
The University of North Carolina 



COLLECTION OF 

NORTH CAROLINIANA 



ENDOWED BY 

JOHN SPRUNT HILL 

of the Class of 1889 



C^^-UT?. 



















This book must not be 
taken from the Library 
building. 







'^Pei 12.12, M. , 



VOL. X, No. 1 



OCTOBER, 1921 



Alumni Review 

The University of North Carolina 




CAMERON AVENUE LOOKING WEST FROM THE LAW BUILDING 



4 

7 



OUR OLDEST LIVING ALUMNUS 

BUILDING OPERATIONS ARE UNDER WAY 

FOOTBALL OUTLOOK IS PROMISING 

UNIVERSITY ADDS NEW FACULTY MEMBERS 

PRESIDENT COX TO THE ALUMNI 

THE PROPOSED ALUMNI CONSTITUTION 



Murphy's Hotel 

Richmond, Virginia 



(• J HE most modern, largest 
and best located Hotel in 
^chmond, being on direct 
car line to all c R^ilroad 
depots. 

THE only Hotel in the city 
with a garage attached. . \ 



Headquarters for Carolina 
Business Men 



JAMES T. DISNEY, President 

OPERATED ON EUROPEAN 
PLAN 



The Big Thing 
In College 

as in life is the start. 
Start off with a life in- 
surance policy. It is 
no longer a luxury but 
a necessity to the col- 
lege man. 

First: Place protec- 
tion on your life while 
you are young and able 
to get it. 

Second: Insure your 
education. 

Third: Create early 
the habit of saving. 

You have faith in your 
State and its enter- 
prises. Well, keep your 
business at home, and 
insure with 



The 
University Agency, Inc. 

JEFFERSON STANDARD LIFE 
INSURANCE COMPANY 

J. W. Umstead, Jr., Pres. 
W. H. Andrews, Jr., Sec. and Treas. 

AGENTS 

B. C. Brown I. H. Butt 

J. D. Dorsett P. A. Reavis, Jr. 

W. D. Harris 



Individual Service to Carolina 
Men" 






WHY NOT MAKE YOUR CONTRIBUTION TO 

THE ALUMNI LOYALTY FUND 

By means of an Endowment Insurance Policy? The volume 
of "bequest insurance" is growing by leaps and bounds. It's 
the safest and surest way of making a bequest. Policies from 
$250 to $50,000 may be had in the 

Southern Life and Trust Company 




HOME OFFICE 



"The Multiple Line Company" 
CAPITAL $1,000,000.00 



GREENSBORO, N. C. 




IS 

r 



i ! 



if 



r. j; v. is a a a in n 
ft -majajiM " 



in 




CAPITAL, SURPLUS AND PROFITS, $1,100,000 
RESOURCES OVER $6,000,000 



The First National 
Bank 

OF DURHAM 

A largo, up-to-date banking institution 
privileged to be of State-wide service, 
always at the disposal of the University 
of North Carolina, its faculty, student- 
body and alumni in the transaction of 
their banking matters. 



JULIAN s. CAEE, Presidenl 

W. .1. IIOLLOWAY, Vice Presidenl 

CLAIBOBN M. CAKJf, Vice -President 

SOTJTHGATE JONES, Cashier 

W. J. BBOGDEN, Attorney 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



The Trust Department 

OF THE 

First National Trust Company 

of Durham, North Carolina 



/^\FFERS safety and service in handling 
^" > of estates and trust funds and acts as 



executor, administrator, trustee, guard- 
ian and receiver. 



FIRST NATIONAL TRUST CO. 

JAS. 0. COBB, President JULIAN S. CARR, Vice-President 

W. J. HOLLOWAY Vice-President J. F. GLASS, Treasurer 

C. M. CARR, Chairman, Board of Directors 



Cy Thompson Says: 



crc Be Wise and oAetna-ize" 

Representing the three affiliated AETNA companies, I 
am located in my same old quarters, opposite the campus, next 
to the Presbyterian church. I am now in position to serve 
you in every line of insurance. 

Let me Aetna-ize your life ; your wife ; your income ; your 
home; your household goods; your merchandise; your auto- 
mobile — or go on your bond. 



Cy Thompson's Insurance Service 

AETNA LIFE INSURANCE CO., AETNA CASUALTY AND SURETY CO., 

ARTOMOBILE INSURANCE CO., 

of Hartford, Conn. 

"WE OCCASIONALLY DEAL IN DIRT" 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



Volume X 



OCTOBER, 1921 



Number 1 



OPINION AND COMMENT 



The New Year 

Thursday, October 6, begins the University's new 
year. In spite of the fact that it is the 128th, there 
is something new about it, something untried, unusual, 
that separates it from all the others that have gone 
before and that will follow after. 

In his opening remarks to the faculty, President 
Chase emphasized wherein the difference between the 
new year and the last lay : namely, that whereas last 
year the University looked to North Carolina to come 
to its support and strengthen its hands for doing a 
great work, this year the State looks to the Univer- 
sity, its trustees, its president, and its faculty, col- 
lectively and individually, to utilize to the limit the 
increased resources made available. 

It is, distinctly, a new year of challenge, of oppor- 
tunity, a year in which each member of the Univer- 
sity has the chance to make his work distinctive, a 
year in which to do the job is to achieve a double 
success for the University and the State. 

nan 

Think in the Terms of the University 

In enlarging upon this theme President Chase urged 
the faculty to approach its work not only with an 
unusual determination to make it highly distinctive, 
but to think of it in the terms of the University as 
a whole and of the service which the University 
should render North Carolina — advice that is em- 
inently sound and if followed will result in a more 
perfect functioning of the institution in the civiliza- 
tion which it was established to serve. 

DDD 

Opening of the University Delayed 

Owing to an unprecedented drought and consequent 
failure of the water supply of Chapel Hill, President 
Chase, on September 20, announced the postpone- 
ment for one week of the opening of the 128th session 
of the University and notified all prospective stu- 
dents to remain at their homes until October 4. In 
reaching this decision. President ('base was acting 
upon the advice of the local health authorities as- 
sisted by Dr. II. E. Miller, of the State Board of 
Health. 

For the first time in the experience of the present 
generation there has been an almosl total lack of 
rainfall since the middle of .May, with the result 
that Chapel Hill has been unusually hot and until 
recently has been dry as a bone. Gardens and crops 
have simply withered away, hundreds of shrubs, par- 
ticularly the hydrangeas, lilacs, and evergreens in the 
Arboretum and village yards, have died, and even pine 
and oaks in the forests along the roadside have suc- 
cumbed. 

Strowd's Creek, from which the presenl water sup- 
ply is secured, has been reduced to the size of a 
mere branch, and the lied of the second creek two 



miles northeast of Chapel Hill on the road to Dur- 
ham has not had a drop of water in it for the past 
six weeks. To meet the situation thus produced the 
trustees have authorized the laying of a temporary 
special six-inch pipe line to Morgan's Creek on the 
southwest with the expectation that this will relieve 
the famine until the autumn rains set in. Later, 
when the emergency is relieved, and increased funds 
are secured for the enlargement of the water supply 
and power plant, the temporary line will be made a 
part of the permanent installation and the intake and 
reservoir on Strowd's Creek will be abandoned. 

In order to make up for the time lost on account of 
the delayed opening it is proposed to eliminate the 
holidays scheduled for the Thanksgiving vacation. 
The faculty also was instructed to report for duty on 
September 26 for its first meeting of the year, to hold 
departmental meetings, perfect committee plans, and 
take care of all preliminaries essential to getting 
underway without further loss of time when the ses- 
sion did open. 

DDD 

University Day 

Wednesday, October 12, is destined to be another 
red letter day in the history of the University. It 
will mark the 128th birthday of the University and 
will not only be celebrated throughout the State and 
nation by enthusiastic alumni, but it will be made 
notable by a special celebration on the campus. In 
addition to the usual program carried out in Memorial 
Hall, ceremonies pertaining to the projection of the 
new building program will be carried out and the 
day will in a true sense, mark a new and highly im- 
portant point in the life of Alma Mater. 

For alumni in the towns and cities, both within 
the State and outside. The Review has no particular 
pi-ogram to offer. It thinks best, however, that every 
local association possible should arrange a banquet or 
smoker and that a program should be carried out 
which would include a discussion and thorough under- 
standing of the new task with which the University 
is confronted. North Carolina with its rapidly ex- 
panding life demands, and demands insistently, a 
more highly trained group of leaders as well as a gen- 
eral elevation of the intelligence of the whole mass 
of its citizenship. It looks to the University to render 
this greal service and the sons of the University 
should, as President ('ox indicates in his open letter, 
devote themselves anew to the support of the insti- 
tution in making good in this great undertaking. 

If any alumnus desires facts concerning any par- 
ticular subject relating to the University, such as the 
new road, the Alumni Loyalty Fund, the Extension 
service, the ueed of a new hotel, the Graham Memorial 
fund, or any other matter, a post-card to E. R. 
Rankin or any special officer will bring the desired in- 
formation. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



In addition to these subjects The Review wishes to 
emphasize again a suggestion made by the meeting of 
the secretaries of local associations held at the Uni- 
versity last year: namely, don't spend too much of the 
approaching celebration in reminiscences, and when 
it comes to naming officers for the following year, 
select those who can be counted on to devote them- 
selves to the larger program which the University 
is carrying out. 

□ □ □ 
New Constitution Formulated 

The attention of the alumni is drawn to another 
section of The Review in which is printed the pro- 
posed constitution for the General Alumni Associa- 
tion drafted by the special committee on alumni or- 
ganization appointed by President Connor at the meet- 
ing of the Association in Gerrard Hall in June. Inas- 
much as the Constitution is to become the working 
basis of the Association, it is highly important that 
before it is finally adopted it should be criticised by 
the members of the Association and that the final in- 
strument should be such as to lend itself to the full- 
est promotion of alumni activities. With the hope 
that suggestions will be made the committee on organ- 
ization calls for an expression of opinion and will con- 
sider any suggestions proposed and embody them if 
they seem workable in revised form in The Review 
for January. 

The committee has been unable as yet to carry out 
the further duty laid upon it of securing an alumni 
secretary and is maintaining the office through the 
services of Mr. E. R. Rankin, managing editor of 
The Review. 

DDD 

Our Advertisers 

At the beginning of its tenth year, The Review 
wishes to say its best thanks to the alumni and friends 
whose support has made possible its continued pub- 
lication. It particularly wishes to thank that mem- 
ber of the editorial board who each year for nine 
.years has sent a cheek of from $50 to $100 to insure 
the inclusion of additional pictures in special issues. 
And now that Lenoir Chambers has tied himself in 
with the Greensboro News and is no longer available 
for the athletic and other campus stories, it wishes 
to say how deeply he laid the publication and all 
of its readers under obligation to him for the past 
two years. To all of you, thanks, and then, thanks. 

In this connection we take pleasure in bearing tes- 
timony to the assistance which our advertisers have 
rendered in enabling the management, to keep The 
Review up to standard. Comment, news, alumni 
notes, advertising all have their part in a balanced 
program, and our advertisers have played their part 
handsomely. 

In return, it is but fair that the readers of The 
Review — we mean you, Mr. Alumnus — should recog- 
nize this service. Consequently, when you have occa- 
sion to deal in such wares as our advertisers display 
in these pages, deal with them, and tell them why ! 



NEW CAROLINA LAWYERS 

Forty-two Carolina alumni received license to prac- 
tice law in North Carolina at the examinations con- 
ducted in August by the Supreme Court. The total 
number to receive license was 77. The list follows : 

Howard Brantley, Spring Hope; B. W. Black- 
welder, Concord; N. R. Bass, Lucama; T. D. Cooper, 
Graham; J. L. Crowell, Jr., Concord; A. M. Carroll, 
Burlington; J. A. Dunn, Salisbury; P. B. Edmund- 
son, Goldsboro; J. W. Foster, Chapel Hill; J. M. 
Hammerly, Charlotte ; D. M. Hodges, Jr., Asheville ; 
J. J. Harris, Bunn; B. B. Holder, Pink Hill; L. W. 
Jarman, Seven Springs; S. D. Johnson, Angier; J. 
Y. Jordan, Jr., Asheville; B. B. Liipfert, Winston- 
Salem; J. E. McMichael, Winston-Salem; D. P. Mc- 
Kinnon, Rowland ; F. G. Miles, Warrenton ; Chas. 
L. Nichols, Brevard; J. E. Norris, Holly Springs; 
Eric Norfleet, Roxobel; J. M. Oglesby, Concord; 
Neal Y. Pha'rr, Charlotte; J. G. Proctor, Lum- 
berton ; M. B. Prescott, Ayden ; W. T. Polk, Warren- 
ton; G. D. Robertson, Asheville; Chas. Seligson, Ral- 
eigh ; W. W. Sledge, Weldon ; W. T. Shaw, Raleigh ; 
D. E. Scarborough, Hoffman; L. E. Teague, High 
Point ; S. 0. Worthington, Winterville ; J. A. Wilkins, 
Raeford; G. L. Wimberly, Rocky Mount; J. M. Peace, 
Henderson ; R. R. Hawfield, Monroe ; A. H. Combs, 
Columbia; T. T. Barnes, Lucama, and P. B. Eaton, 
Yadkinville. 



TO THE CAROLINA ALUMNUS 

Dear Fellow Alumnus: 

In two weeks it will be one hundred and twenty- 
eight years since William R. Davie with a mason's 
skill and a founder's vision laid the cornerstone of 
Old East Building. It will be one year since the 
alumni enlisted for the greatest single-year crusade 
in the whole history of public education. University 
Day last year was the trumpet-day of the great 
crusade. 

University Day is at hand again. Strike hands 
today with the local president in his immediate prepa- 
rations for a live alumni meeting. Where unorgan- 
ized, organize ! Where disorganized, reorganize ! 
Where well-organized, better organize, not merely in 
official machinery, but also in the spirit and activity 
of more vital loyalties and larger services to meet 
the needs of the community and to make the Univer- 
sity live in the hearts of the people. 

On this great foundation day Alma Mater's sons 
all over the world renew in brotherhood their affec- 
tionate loyalty to her life and spirit. In staunch 
groupings on that glad day let us assemble to her 
side and be unto her the strength from which she 
builds her dream of a greater commonwealth. 
Yours in filial fellowship, 
CENTRAL ALUMNI COMMITTEE : 

F. P. Graham, '09, 
E. R, Rankin, '13, 
L. R, Wilson. '99. 

Chapel Hill, N. C, September 30, 1921. 



Announcement was made on June 14 of the mar- 
riage of Miss Helen Hume, formerly of Chapel Hill, 
ami James C. Sanderson, of the School of Mines of 
the University of Minnesota, at Minneapolis. 



Professor N. W. Walker, acting-dean of the School 
of Education of the University, delivered a series of 
lectures on high school administration at the annual 
institutes for high school teachers held at Clarks- 
burg and Charleston, W. Ya., early in September. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



OUR OLDEST LIVING ALUMNUS 



Succeeding' to the mantle laid down last April 
by Dr. Alexander Boyd Hawkins (1845), of Raleigh, 
Colonel Alfred Holt Garrigan (1850), of Hope, Ark., 
is now at the age of 93 rears the oldest living 




Col. A. H. Carrigan, Class of 1850 

alumnus of the University of North Carolina. Col- 
onel Carrigan has played a prominent and patriotic 
part in war and peace and he holds the high regard 
of his fellow citizens in Hempstead County, Arkansas, 
and of all who know him. 

Colonel Carrigan was born April 15, 1828, in 
Alamance County, near Graham, the son of W. A. 
Carrigan, Alamance County merchant and farmer, 
and Nancy Holt Carrigan. He was prepared for 
college at a private school in Hillsboro and came 
to Chapel Hill in the fall of 1816. In his Hays 
at Chapel Hill he was a college mate of James 
Johnston Pettigrew (1847), Matt W. Ransom (1847), 
and Kemp Plummer Battle (1849), and was a pre- 
decessor of Zebulon Baird Vance (1855). Shortly 
after his graduation in 1850, he emigrated to Hemp- 
stead County, Arkansas, where he has since made 
his home. At the outbreak of the Civil War he 
offered his services to the state and served gallantly 
through that fierce struggle as lieutenant-colonel of the 
20th Arkansas Infantry, C. S. A. 

At the close of the Civil War Colonel Carrigan 
returned ' to Hempstead County and resumed the 
pursuits of a planter. He has filled numerous posi- 
tions of trust and responsibility. He was comity 
judge for two terms. He has served both in the 
House and Senate of the General Assembly of 
Arkansas. lie was a member of the Secession < ''in- 
vention of Arkansas and is now probably the only 
surviving member of any of the secession conven- 



tions of the southern states. He is a ruling elder in 
the Preslryterian church of Hope, Ark. 

Colonel Carrigan married Mary B. Moore, in Sep- 
tember of 1855 and of this union were born five 
children: W. A. Carrigan, Mineral Springs, Texas; 
A. H. Carrigan, Jr., Wichita Falls, Texas; Mary B. 
Carrigan, Dolph Carrigan and P. B. Carrigan, all 
of Hope, Ark. A. H. Carrigan, III, grandson and 
second namesake, of Wichita Falls, Texas, was first 
lieutenant of Company L, 142nd Infantry, U. S. A., 
and was killed in action in France in October of 1918. 
He was awarded posthumously the Distinguished 
Service Cross and the Croix de Guerre with Palm. 

Ten thousand alumni hail Colonel Carrigan as chief 
of Alma Mater's elan and wish for him many more 
vears of health and strength. 



NEW CAROLINA PHYSICIANS 

Thirty Carolina alumni received license to practice 
medicine in North Carolina in the examinations con- 
ducted by the State board of medical examiners in 
June at Raleigh. Dr. W. A. Kirksey, of the class of 
1913, made the highest average grade on the examina- 
tions. Dr. E. H. Alderman, also of the class of 1913, 
came second, and Dr. R. C. Mitchell, of the class of 
1917, made the third highest average. The total num- 
ber of physicians to receive license was 49. The list 
of Carolina alumni follows : 

Dr. W. A. Kirksey, Oxford; Dr. E. H. Alderman, 
Greensboro; Dr. R. C. Mitchell, Mt. Airy; Dr. A. C. 
Ambler, Asheville, Dr. V. S. Caviness, Gary; Dr. D. 
A. Cooper, Henderson ; Dr. T. A. Folsom, Asheville ; 
Dr. W. E. Futrell, Conway; Dr. J. N. Harney, Ply- 
mouth; Dr. W. L. Lambert, Moffitt; Dr. S. C. Nowell, 
Winfall; Dr. R. E. Perry, Mt. Olive; Dr. A. J. Smith, 
Black Creek; Dr. S. R. Taylor, Kinston; Dr. W. G. 
Wilson, Jr., Wilson's Mills; Dr. M. E. Baker, Lawn- 
dale; Dr. D. B. Cobb, Goldsboro; Dr. S. G. Corpen- 
ing, Brevard; Dr. G. R. Frye, Statesville; Dr. K. B. 
Geddie, Rose Hill ; Dr. J. J. Kirksey, Morganton ; Dr. 
I. H. Lutterloh, Sanford ; Dr. Hugh Parks, Harmony ; 
Dr. F. R. Robbins, Lenoir; Dr. Jas. E. Smith, Wind- 
sor; Dr. F. C. Smith, Louisburg; Dr. A. T. Thorp, 
Rocky Mount; Dr. F. R. Farthing, Boone; Dr. C. W. 
Millender, Asheville; Dr. M. A. Pittman, Ancon, 
Panama Canal Zone. The following alumni were 
granted license through reciprocity: Dr. F. 0. Bell, 
Linden; Dr. John W. Dyer, Higli Point; Dr. Chas. S. 
Xorburn, Acton. 



NATIONAL GUARD OFFICERS 

Carolina alumni who hold commissions in the re- 
organized X. ('. National Guard include: Lt. Col. J. 
II. .Manning, Kinston; Major G. K. Hobbs, Wilming- 
ton; 1st Lt. P. II. Gwynn, Jr., Reidsville; ('apt. V. 
I']. Everett, Plymouth; ('apt. M. B. Fowler, Durham; 
('apt. A. L. Fletcher, Raleigh; Major W. B. Hunter, 
M. ('., Gastonia; Maj. W. <;. Craven, ( t >. M. C, Hunt- 
ersville; Major -I. V. McGongan. M. C, Fayetteville ; 
.Major .1. E. Carter, Ord„ Mt. Airy; ('apt. B. S. 
Royster, Jr., Q. M. C, Oxford; Capt. H. ('. Dockery. 
Jr., J. A. (i. !>„ Charlotte; ('apt. T. C. Guthrie, Jr., 
J. A. G. 1)., Charlotte. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



BUILDING OPERATIONS ARE UNDER WAY 



Cornerstone of First New Building to be Laid by 
Masons as in Case of Old East in 1793 

Following the two-day meeting of the Trustee 
Building Committee of the University, at which Mr. 
Kendal, of McKim, Mead and White, was present, the 
following statement was given out to the press by 
President Chase concerning the building program : 

Announcement was made today of the laying of the 
cornerstone, on the University's birthday, October 12, 
of the first of the new buildings provided for the in- 
stitution by the action of the legislature last winter. 

This building is one of the four dormitories to be 
erected on the class athletic field, on the east edge of 
the campus and near the Emerson stadium. The four 
will accommodate 120 students each and will be com- 
pleted by the opening of the fall session of 1922, one 
year hence. 

Grand Lodge of Masons to Officiate 

The North Carolina grand lodge of Masons, with 
headquarters at Raleigh, will conduct the ceremonies. 
W. W. Willson, secretary of the grand lodge, has writ- 
ten President Chase that he would make an effort to 
get the organization out in full strength. The mem- 
bers will come over from Durham by automobile, as- 
semble in the hall of the local Masonic lodge in the 
village, and then, having donned their full regalia, 
will march to Memorial hall preceded by a band of 
music and followed by the student body in procession. 
After the University Day exercises the whole company 
will go to the site of the new building for the corner- 
stone laying. When this is over, the Masons will be 
guests at a luncheon in Swain Hall. 

Part of Program Almost Completed 

Though this ceremony October 12 will mark the 
formal inauguration of the University's building pro- 
gram, work has been in progress all summer. Eight 
faculty houses, two of eight rooms and six of six rooms, 
are nearly finished ; and six four-room houses for engi- 
neers, draughtsmen and other members of the con- 
struction force are well along toward completion. The 
grading of the mile-and-a-quarter railroad extension, 
leading from the present Carboro terminus to the 
rear of the campus, is practically done, and the rails 
will have been laid within six weeks. 

In a small village like Chapel Hill the labor situa- 
tion is always a difficult one and for a construction 
enterprise as great as the one now facing the Univer- 
sity it is necessaiy to import workmen. Before they 
come, however, m^ans must be found to house them. 
So a labor camp has been built out on the Pittsboro 
road. This is capable of sheltering about 200 men. 

Plans Ready for Proposed Buildings 

The engineer and the architect of the University 
have all their plans ready, much of the foundation 
material is on the ground, and now that the final de- 
cisions have been made on the location, the size, and 
the type of the buildings, the work of construction 
may go ahead. McKim, Mead and White of New 
York have acted, and will continue to act, as consult- 
ing architects. 



Two-Year Program Contemplated 

It was a two-year program that the legislature laid 
down last winter in appropriating $1,400,000 for new 
buildings at the University. The money was to be- 
come available on the first of last July. The present 
schedule calls for the completion of four dormitories, 
the history and social science buildings (for class- 
rooms), and the Swain Hall addition (for eating fa- 
cilities) by next fall. The second year will see the 
erection of another class room building, the building 
for the law school, one mjore, and possibly, depending 
on the amount of money left in the appropriation, 
two more dormitories. 

The Steele dormitory, built under the provisions of 
the old law giving the state architect jurisdiction over 
all state institutional buildings, will be ready for 
occupancy at the opening this fall. 



JUSTICE A. L. FITZGERALD PASSES 

Editor, Alumni Review : 

Under this cover I am enclosing two clippings that 
will interest you in common with all other University 
boys : one from the Reno Evening Gazette; a second 
from the Tonopah Times, both touching on the death 
of A. L. Fitzgerald of the class of 1862. 

Knowing him as the only alumnus of the U. N. C. 
in Nevada except myself, I wish to assure you that 
all the good things said of him are true and many 
more might be enumerated. He has been a guest 
in my home and together we have labored in Ma- 
sonic circles. He has honored the Hill duriug his 
residence in this state. Please see that due notice is 
given the University authorities of his passing and 
notice taken of his worthy career out in the world of 
strife and struggle. He was easily the most conspic- 
uous man of his years in this state. Right well the 
University may accord him a high place among her 
heroic soldier dead and among her citizens of great 
accomplishment. 

With loyalty to the Hill and all it means, I remain 

Yours in the faith, 
M. B. Aston, '96. 

Goldfield, Nevada, Sept. 1. 



CAPTAIN WATSON A CRACK SHOT 

Raleigh relatives of Captain William Randolph 
Watson, of Co. C. 50th Infantry of the American 
forces in Germany, have learned with great pride of 
his record as a marksman in the service, a shot who 
has won the championship in four armies. 

Captain Watson is a nephew of Miss Hilliai - d Hin- 
ton and C. L. Hinton, of Raleigh, and a graduate in 
1917 of the University of North Carolina, though a 
resident of Darlington, S. C. Recently he made the 
highest score for the best shot in the United States 
army, receiving a gold medal for his skill. He also 
took the prize for the best marksman in the British, 
French and Belgian armies and was given a gold foun- 
tain pen. His shooting is said to be marvelous. 

Captain Watson often has visited here and is known 
to many college mates at the University. W. T. Bost 
in Greensboro News, Sept. 22. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



FOOTBALL OUTLOOK IS PROMISING 



A football team with splendid material has often 
turned out to be a failure through unsatisfactory 
coaching-. And good coaching, for lack of proper 
human stuff to work on, has often led only to defeat. 
But competent coaching and good material together 
ought to bring victories, and at present Carolina seems 
to have both these prerequisites. Bill Fetzer is coach, 
with his brother Bob as assistant. Eight of the men 




W. McK. Ketzek 
Director of Athletics 

who started in last year's Virginia, game are back, in 
addition to other "letter men" who were substitutes 
in 1920 and several Eas1 and husky youngsters from 
last year's freshman team. And Blount, the center 
<>f the champion 1919 team, has returned. 

Now, The Review is making no prophecies. Proph- 
eey is dangerous in all things and in nothing more 
than in football. We do not know what our principal 
rivals for the South Atlantic palm have to offer. 
It may be an extraordinarily good year for them. 
There are some questions of eligibility that are not 
settled at this early date. One never knows what 
bad luck will befall in the way of injuries. All we 
venture to say is that, at the opening of the fall term, 
the football outlook is distinctly promising. 

The coming of Bill Fetzer to the University, as 
athletic director, has put new hope into alumni and 
students alike. To begin with, his record of success 



begets confidence. At both Davidson and State Col- 
lege he got fine results, sometimes with indifferent ma- 
terial. Within two or three years his reputation as 
a coach spread all over the South, and it is said that 
many institutions sent in a call for his services. 

Of course he knows the game. But that is only part 
of the story. He has the personal quality that puts 
fire and fighting spirit into the men he coaches, and 
makes them work together without shirking or jealous- 
ies. He is a native North Carolinian himself, and 
senses instinctively, as strangers often find it hard 
to do, just the kind of leadership and the kind of train- 
ing youths at Chapel Hill need. His achievement with 
the Carolina baseball team last spring gave a measure 
of his ability and sealed the confidence of the students 
in him. 

Bob Fetzer is the ever-present assistant of his older 
brother. It has been said that the work of the one 
fits in with the work of the other as a hand fits a 
glove. 

By the time this issue of The Review reaches its 
subscribers, the season's first game, with Wake For- 
est, will have been played. Next conies the Yale game 
at New Haven, October 8. The Yale game last year, 
though Carolina was defeated, was the bright spot in 
the 1920 record. The team put up a spirited fight 
and was highly praised by the football critics of the 
New York and Boston newspapers. The contest with 
State College comes Thursday, October 20, the big day 
of Fair Week, at Raleigh. Maryland is encountered 
at Baltimore Oct. 29, V". M. I. at Richmond Nov. 5, and 
Davidson at Winston-Salem, Nov. 12. 

The great event of the season, the Thanksgiving 
Day game with Virginia, will take place this year on 
our home grounds. Two years ago eight thousand 
people came to Emerson field for the Virginia game. 
Ten thousand is the estimate for this year's crowd. 
The new hard-surface road from Durham will lie 
open by then, making the trip an inviting one for 
automobilists. Arrangements have been made to erect 
temporary grandstands to take care of the overflow 
from the concrete stadium. 

From last year's varsity anil substitutes the fol- 
lowing men are back: Lowe (captain), Morris, Shep- 
ard, Poindexter, Pritchard, Jacobi, McDonald, Hutch- 
ins, Pharr, McGee, Kernodle, Liipfert, Cochran, Ten- 
ney, and Griffith. Of the 1920 scrubs there are: Dog- 
gett, Harmon, Murchison, Susman, Whedbee and 
Woodall. From the freshman team of a year ago are: 
Gillon, Pendergrass, Giersch, A. A. Johnston, Cates 
and Williamson, and from the sophomore team N. 
McN. Smith and Froneherger. Other candidates are: 
Fred .Morris. \V. 1. Johnson, Pittman and Hunnicut. 

The squad has grown to sixty-five candidates since 
Coach Fetzer sent out the call for practice in early 
September. Pour elevens have been made up; two of 
them have been sent into ;i scrimmage every after- 
noon, anil after a little while have given place to 
Hie other two. All this is preliminary — a means of 
selection. 

The dronghl has been a severe handicap to prac- 
tice, for it has killed tile jj-rass ami turned the field 
into an expanse of dry dust. One of the evening 
newspapers said the other day thai the University 
gridiron seemed more suited to camels, inured to the 
hardships of the desert, than to human beings. 



10 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



UNIVERSITY ADDS NEW FACULTY MEMBERS 



At commencement last June and on two occasions during the 
summer President Chase has announced a number of important 
additions to the faculty for the coming year. The list of 
those who begin service at the University for the fall follows: 

James Finch Royster, Ph.D., Kenan professor of English 
Philology. A.B. Wake Forest College, 1900; student, Uni- 
versity of Berlin, 1902 03 ; Ph. D. University of Chicago, 1907 ; 
instructor in English, University of Colorado, 1904-1907 ; 
professor of English, University of North Carolina, 1907- 
1914; professor of English, University of Texas, 1914-21 ; 
Kenan professor of English, University of North Carolina 
1921- 

Robert Diggs Wimberly Connor, Ph.B., Kenan professor of 
History and Government. Ph. B. University of North Carolina 
1899. Superintendent of Schools, Oxford, 1902; principal 
Wilmington high school, 1902 04; Secretary, North Carolina 
Historical Commission, 1903-21; Kenan professor of History 
and Government, University of North Carolina, i921- 

Louis Graves, A.B., Professor of Journalism. A.B. Uni- 
versity of North Carolina, 1902; on staff of the New York 
Times, 1902 06; author of short stories in Atlantic Monthly, 
Asia, . Saturday Evening Post, The Century, Harper's, The 
Metropolitan, The World's Work; professor of Journalism, 
University of North Carolina, 1921- 

Gustave Maurice Braune, C.E., Professor of Civil Engineer- 
ing. Washington and Lee University, 1888-1889; C.E., Boyal 
Polytechnical Institute, Dresden, Saxony, 1895; general engi- 
neering practice, 1896-1912; assistant professor Civil Engineer- 
ing, University of Cincinnati, Sept. 1912-February 1914; as- 
sociate professor of Civil Engineering and acting head of Civil 
Engineering department, January 1918 August 1921 ; profes 
sor and head of Civil Engineering department, University of 
North Carolina, 1921- 

Thornton Shirley Graves, Professor of English, A. B., Texas 
Christian University, 1906; Ph.B. University of Chicago, 1907; 
Ph. D. ibid., 1912; assistant professor of English, Texas 
Christian University, 1908 09; instructor in English, Univer- 
sity of Washington, 1912-13; assistant professor and professor 
of English, Trinity College, 1915-21 ; professor of English, 
University of North Carolina, 1921- 

Claudius T. Murchison, Ph. D., Associate professor of Bank- 
ing. A.B. Wake Forest College, 1911; assistant professor of 
Economics, Miami University, 1916-18; assistant professor of 
Economics, Hunter College, 1918-20; Ph.D. Columbia Univer- 
sity, 1919 ; assistant professor of Economics, New York Uni- 
versity, 1920-21 ; associate professor of Banking, University 
of North Carolina, 1921- 

Frank Carl Vilbrandt, Ph.D. Associate professor of Indus- 
trial Chemistry. A.B. Ohio State University, 1915; A.M. 
ibid., 1916; assistant in General Chemistry, ibid., 1917-18; 
instructor in Industrial Chemistry, ibid., 1918-21 ; associate 
professor of Industrial Chemistry, University of North Caro- 
lina, 1921- 

Maurice Taylor Van Hecke, Ph. D., J. D. Associate professor 
of Law. Ph.B. University of Chicago, 1916; J. D. ibid., 1917; 
assistant professor of Law, University nf West Virginia, 1920- 
21; associate professor of Law, University of North Carolina, 
1921- 

Horace B. Anderson, M. D. Associate professor of Path- 
ology; A.B. Wofford College, 1910; M. D. Jefferson Medical 
College, 1916; instructor in Pathology, ibid., 1916 1917; path- 
ological intern, Pennsylvania Hospital, 1917-20; associate pro- 
fessor of Pathology, University of North Carolina, 1921- 

Harold D. Meyer, A.M. Associate professor of Sociology 
and Economics. A. B. University of Georgia, 1915 ; A. M. 
ibid., 1916 ; professor of Sociology and Economics, State Nor- 



mal School (Georgia), 1916-21; associate professor of Socio- 
logy and Economics, University of North Carolina, 1921- 

F. B. Flournoy, A. M. Assistant professor of History. 
A. B. Washington and Lee, 1905 ; A. M. Columbia University, 
1912; instructor in History, ibid., 1916-18; Begional Economist, 
Department of State (Washington), 1918-21; assistant pro- 
fessor of History, University of North Carolina, 1921- 

Ernest Lloyd Mackie, A.M. Assistant professor of Mathe- 
matics. A.B. University of North Carolina, 1917; A.M. 
Harvard University, 1920 ; instructor in Mathematics, ibid., 
1920 21 ; assistant professor of Mathematics, University of 
North Carolina, 1921- 

Martin K. Brooks, A. M. Instructor in Bomance Languages. 
A.B. University of Kansas, 1911; A.M. ibid., 1912; instructor 
in French, University of Missouri, 1914-16; instructor in 
Spanish, California Polytechnic School, 1916-17; instructor in 
French, Harvard University, 1919 21; instructor in French, 
University of North Carolina, 1921- 

Murat H. Roberts, A. M. Instructor in Romance Languages. 
A. B. University of Tennessee, 1915 ; instructor in Romance 
Languages, Lincoln Memorial University, 1915-16; professor 
of French, East Tennessee State Normal School, 1916-20 ; A. M. 
Princeton University, 1921 ; instructor in Romance Languages, 
University of North Carolina, 1921- 

Harry Sylvanus Van Landingham, A. M. Instructor in 
French. A.B. Richmond College, 1912; A.M. ibid., 1916; 
instructor in Modern Languages, Fredericksburg State Normal 
College, 1914; Instructor in French, University of North Caro- 
lina, 1921- 

Thomas James Wilson, III, Instructor in French. A. B. 
University of North Carolina, 1921 ; instructor in French, ibid., 
1921- 

Holmes V. M. Dennis, III, Instructor in Latin. A. B. 
Princeton University, 1918 ; A. M. ibid., 1919 ; instructor in 
Latin, University of North Carolina, 1921- 

J. Fenton Daughterty, A. B. Instructor in Physics. A. B. 
Dickinson College, 1921 ; instructor in Physics, University of 
North Carolina, 1921- 

Paul Reber Dawson, A. M. Instructor in Chemistry. A. B. 
Clark College, 1916 ; A. M. University of North Carolina, 1921 ; 
instructor in Chemistry, ibid., 1921- 

Michael Arendell Hill, Jr., A. B. Instructor in Mathematics. 
A.B. University of North Carolina, 1920; instructor in Mathe- 
matics, ibid., 1921- 

Charles Dale Beers, A. B. Instructor in Zoology. A. B. 
University of North Carolina, 1921 ; instructor in Zoology, 
ibid., 1921- 

Homer Hoyt, Ph.D. Associate professor of Economics. A.B. 
University of Kansas, 1913; A.M. ibid., 1913; J.D. Univer- 
sity of Chicago, 1918; Ph.D. ibid., 1918; instructor in Eco- 
nomics, Beloit College, 1917 1918; professor of Economics, 
Delaware College, 1919-20 ; associate professor of Economies, 
University of North Carolina, 1921 22. 

Harvey F. Janda, C.E. Associate professor of Highway Engi- 
neering, University of Cincinnati, 1916-18; assistant professor 
of Civil Engineering, ibid., 1918-21; associate professor of 
Civil Engineering, University of North Carolina, 1921- . 

Robert H. Wettach, LL.B. Assistant professor of Law. A.B. 
University of Pittsburgh, 1917; A.M. ibid., 1918; LL.B. Har- 
vard, 1921 ; assistant professor of Law, University of North 
Carolina, 1921-22. 

John H. Bradley, Jr., A.B. Instructor of Geology. A.B. Har- 
vard University, 1921 ; instructor in Geology, University of 
North Carolina, 1921- . 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



11 



Harry W. Crane, Ph.D. Associate professor in Psychology. 
A.B. University of Michigan, 1909; A.M. University (if 
Michigan, 1910; Ph.D. University of Michigan, 1913; instruc- 
tor in Psychology, ibid., instructor in Psychology, Ohio State 
University; assistant professor of Psychology, ibid., associate 
professor of Psychology, University of North Carolina, 1921- 

Miss Nell Blair, in charge of the Library Reading Boom. 
Student at Martha Washington, 1910 1911; Montevallo 1911- 
1912; Institution de Essorts (Montreux, Switzerland), 1912- 



1913; assistant in San Francisco Public. Library, 1915-1917; 
assistant in University of Minnesota Library, 1917-1920; stu- 
dent Pratt Institute Library School, 1920-1921. 

Mr. H. A. Comer, General Secretary, Y. M. C. A.; B.S. Van- 
derbilt University, 1912 ; general secretary, Georgia School of 
Technology, 1912-1918; served in army two years; with the 
Y. M. C. A. in France five months after leaving army; state 
student secretary, Y. M. C. A., for Tennessee, 1920-21 ; gen- 
eral secretary, University of North Carolina, 1921- 



PRESIDENT COX TO THE ALUMNI 



Fellow Alumni: 

Let me use this opportunity to express my deep ap- 
preciation of the honor done me in selecting me as 
President of the General Alumni Association, and to 
assure you that my every effort will be to fill worthily 
the post to which I have been called. 




Col. Albert Cox, Class of 1904 

At its last meeting, the General Assembly, com- 
posed as it was of men of practical sense and vision, 
mode possible the physical re-building of the Uni- 
versity. Her alumni have the opportunity of bring- 
ing to the aid of their Alma Mater manifold and greal 
opportunities. Consider her vast possibilities. As her 
material possessions are being increased, her sons 
and daughters should awaken to the realization of 
her educational power and its possibilities to the State. 
The beginning now so well made is an excellent 
augury for future development, but there should 
be no letting up in carrying out the expansion so 
well begun. 

"I'is trite td call attention to the part played by edu- 
cation in the life of a people and the greatness of a 
State, hut sometimes the simplest lessons are the hard- 
est learned. To curtail or cheek such an educational de- 
velopment as we arc now experiencing would prove a 
terrible calamity to the State by imperiling the train- 
ing of her future leaders. The University is much 
more than a place where young men and young women 
may go for intellectual advancement. Standing as it 
does at the forefront of the country's educational in- 



stitutions it is the fountain head of the educational 
system of our State. Not alone then should we re- 
gard it for the pleasant memories of the times that 
there we dwelled, but should likewise consider it as 
a place from which ideals and the practical applica- 
tion of those ideals are daily issuing forth to surround 
our lives with material benefits and the happiness and 
satisfaction that thereof ensues. The University will 
achieve only so far as her sons and daughters desire 
such achievement obtained. What she is and what 
she does depends upon the attitude of us all. Her op- 
portunities then are ours. 

A great war has been fought and won; the peoples 
of the world are rapidly returning to normality. 
America stands upon an eminence in the eyes of the 
people of the world and a blinding glare of pitiless 
publicity lights up her every act. The peoples of the 
world, civilized and uncivilized, look to us for leader- 
ship. "What shall that leadership be? Shall we be 
content to sit idly by secure in selfishness, or shall we 
rather with earnest effort fit ourselves for that leader- 
ship the world requires? The answer rests with us. 
"We are Americans all, and will guide America's ac- 
tions whether good or bad. The inspiration of educa- 
tion can best fit us for the obligations and oppor- 
tunities about us. That education can best be ob- 
tained through the means of a larger and greater Uni- 
versity. Let us one and all resolve during the months 
to come to give to the University in thought and word 
and action, the best that is in us and so help her attain 
the heights where she belongs. A cessation of effort 
or endeavor to carry on now means disaster, and dis- 
aster is unthinkable. 

Albert L. Cox, '0-1. 

Raleigh, N. G, Oct. 5, 1921. 



JUDGE ADAMS GOES ON SUPREME BENCH 
Hon. W. J. Adams, for years a distinguished Su- 
perior Court Judge, has been elevated to the Supreme 
Court to fill the vacancy caused by the death of the 
Hon. "W. R. Allen. The appointment of Judge Adams 
gives universal satisfaction and makes the twenty-first 
alumnus of the University to sit on the Supreme 
Court of North Carolina, his predecessors being Judges 
Murphy, Toomcr, Daniel, Battle, Pearson, Manly, 
Rodman, Dick, Settle, Dillard, Ashe, Puffin, Davis, 
Avery. Cook. Shepherd, Clark. Walker. Manning and 
Stacy. 

Judge Adams is a graduate of the class of 1881, one 
of the notable classes since the Civil War. Among 
the members of this class were the late Charles D. 
Mclver. Dr. Robert P. Pell, former Congressman C. R. 
Thomas, Judge .1. D. Murphy, J. Y. Joyner, Leroy 
Springs, F. B. Dancy, N. J. Rouse, Dr. H. B. Battle, 
.1. Alton Mclver. A. Nixon, Dr. W. D. Pemberton, 
John M. Walker, and others who are well-known 
through the State and in other sections. 



12 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



THE PROPOSED ALUMNI CONSTITUTION 



In accord with the resolution passed by the Gen- 
eral Alumni Association of the University in session 
in Gerrard Hall on Tuesday, June 14, 1921, the spe- 
cial committee on alumni organization then appointed 
submits the following tentative Constitution and By- 
Laws for the criticism of the members of the Associa- 
tion. In order that suggested changes may be prop- 
erly considered, the committee calls upon the alumni 
of the University to submit in writing any desired 
changes to E. R. Rankin, Chapel Hill, N. C, who is 
acting as secretary of the committee. Immediate at- 
tention should be given to this matter as the committee 
desires to go over all suggestions in time to embody 
such of them as seem to it desirable for publication in 
the January issue of The Review. 

CONSTITUTION 

Article I 

NAME 

1. The name of this organization shall be the ''General 
Alumni Association of the University of North Carolina. ' ' 

Article II 
Objects 
1. The objects of the Association shall be to promote the 
growth and influence of the University; to cultivate the bond 
of sympathy and mutual helpfulness between the University 
and its alumni; to make helpful the relation between alumni 
and students in local communities; to unite the alumni in the 
advancement of educational pursuits; and to maintain Univer- 
sity ideals. 

Article III 

MEMBERSHIP 

1. Membership in the Association shall comprise: (1) active; 
( 2 ) honorary. 

2. The active membership shall consist of: (a) Graduates; 
(b) Former students who pursued courses leading to reg- 
ular degrees; (e) Students of the summer law school. 

3. The honorary membership shall consist of: (a) Trustees 
and ex-trustees; (b) Members and ex-members of the faculty; 
(e) Officers of the University. 

Article IV 
officers 

1. The officers of this Association shall consist of a presi 
dent, a first vice-president, a second vice-president, a secretary, 
a treasurer, and a board of directors. 

2. The president, the first vice-president, and the second 
vice president shall be elected by ballot, as provided in the 
by-laws. 

3. The secretary and the treasurer, which offices may be 
filled by one and the same person, shall be elected )>y the 
board of directors. 

4. The board of directors shall be appointed by the president, 
and shall consist of one representative from each congressional 
district within the State of North Carolina, anil one rep- 
resentative from the alumni living beyond the confines of North 
Carolina. 

5. The terms of office of the president and the vice-presi- 
dents, shall be one year and they shall be ineligible for 
reelection to succeed themselves. 

6. No officer of the Association, except the secretary, and no 
member of the board of directors shall receive compensation. 
The secretary shall bo paid a salary to be determined by the 
board of directors. 

Article V 

MEETINGS 

1. The annual meeting of the Association shall be held on 
Alumni Day of Commencement. 

2. Special meetings may be called by the board of directors. 

Article VI 

AMENDMENTS 
1. This constitution may be amended by two-thirds vote of 
the duly accredited members in attendance at any annual 
meeting. 



BY-LAWS 
Article I 

DUTIES OF OFFICERS 

1. It shall be the duty of the president to preside at all 
meetings of the Association and of the board of directors. 
He shall appoint the board of directors as provided in the 
constitution; he shall name all standing committees of the 
Association of which he shall be ex-officio a member; and shall 
perform such other duties as may be prescribed by the consti- 
tution or the by-laws and are usually imposed upon such office. 

2. The first vice president shall, in the event of the absence 
or disability of the president, perform the duties of the presi- 
dent, and shall be the personal representative of the president 
in that section of the State from which he is chosen. 

3. The second vice-president shall, in the event of the absence 
or disability of the president and first vice president, perforin 
the duties of the president, and shall be the personal rep- 
resentative of the president in that section of the State from 
which he is chosen. 

4. The secretary shall be the executive officer of the As- 
sociation and as such it shall be his duty: (a) To make and 
keep an official record of the transactions of the Association, 
and its board of directors; (b) To be the custodian of all 
papers and property of the Association, except such as are 
specified to be held by the treasurer; (c) To collect all assess- 
ments and dues, and deposit, them to the credit of the Associa- 
tion; (d) To cooperate with all standing or special committees 
of the Association; (e) To give notice of regular or special 
meetings, and to send out blank ballots for elections as here- 
inafter prescribed; (f) To attend to the correspondence of the 
Association, and (g) To perform such other duties as may be 
outlined by the board of directors. 

5. The treasurer shall have charge of the accounts of the 
Association and of all funds collected and deposited in the 
name of the Association, by the secretary. It shall be his 
duty: (a) To keep the funds which are not invested, in a 
bank or banks to be designated by the board of directors; 
(b) To disburse the funds of the Association as directed by 
the board of directors; (c) To take care of the investments 
of the Association; (d) To make a full and clear report to 
the annual meeting of the Association of all moneys received 
and disbursed. 

6. The offices of secretary and treasurer, may, in the dis- 
cretion of the board of directors, be filled by one person. 

7. The secretary and the treasurer shall be bonded in such 
amount as the board of directors may determine. 

8. The board of directors shall have general charge of the 
work of the Association and the individual members of the 
board are charged with the work of the Association in the 
districts they represent. 

Article II 

COMMITTEES 

1. The president shall appoint by January 1st, of each year, 
a nominating committee of five, which committee shall render 
its report to the secretary of the Association on or before the 
1st, day of March of each year. This committee shall nominate 
two men for the office of president, and two men each for the 
offices of first vice-president and second vice-president; in mak- 
ing the nomination for first vice president and second vice- 
president, the nominating committee shall provide for the elec- 
tion of a vice-president from each of the two great sections of 
the state, viz. : The eastern section and the western section. 

2. The president shall appoint a committee of three mem 
bers to canvas the votes cast in the election of officers. 

3. The president shall appoint an auditing committee to 
audit the accounts of the secretary and of the treasurer. 

Article III 

ELECTION OF OFFICERS 

1. There shall be an annual election for the offices of presi- 
dent, first vice-president and second vice-president. Voting 
shall be by printed ballot. 

2. The polls shall be placed at such places as may be desig- 
nated by the board of directors, and shall be open from the 
1st day of May until noon on Alumni Day. 

3. Only those members who have paid their dues for the 
fiscal year shall be entitled to vote. 

4. The secretary shall mail to the members of the Associa- 
tion on or before the 1st day of May of each year, a printed 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



13 



ballot containing names of those nominated by the nominating 
committee, together with the names of those nominated through 
a petition signed by fifty paid-up members of the Associa- 
tion, such petition having been filed with the secretary on or 
before the 1st day of April. 

Article IV 

DUES 
1. There shall be two classes of active members, as follows: 
(a) Annual, who shall pay $1.00 per year; (b) Life, who 
shall pay $100.00. 

Article V 

FISCAL YEAR 

1. The official and fiscal year of the Association will close 
on June 30 of each year. 

Article VI 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 

1. The official publication shall be The Alumni Review. 
Article VII 
life membership fund 
1. All moneys received from life memberships shall be in- 
vested only in such securities as are now, or which shall here- 
after be authorized for the investment of trust funds under 
the laws of North Carolina. The principal of this fund shall 
be kept intact, and only the income thereof shall be expended 
in such manner as determined by the board of directors. 

Article VIII 
amendments 
1. These by-laws may be amended by two-thirds vote of the 
members present at any annual or special meeting, but if 
voted upon at a special meeting, the membership must have 
had notice of the proposed amendment at least thirty days in 
advance of such meeting, by publication thereof in The Alumni 
Review or in such other manner as the board of directors 
may direct. 



PROFESSOR COBB MEETS ALUMNI IN FOR- 
EIGN LANDS 

Professor Collier Cobb reports upon returning from 
his investigations around the Pacific that he was con- 
stantly running into the field of labor of some Caro- 
lina man or woman who is a foreign missionary. First 
in the Fairbanks district of Alaska he met many of 
the friends of Fred Drane (1912), of Nenana, who was 
described by the Alaskans as a "good sourdough," 
the highest compliment they could pay him. In Japan 
he heard sung at Oita City the praises of W. A. Wil- 
son (1889), now a missionary at Okayama; and there 
he also heard many good things about S. A. Stewart 
of Hiroshima. In China the first missionary he met 
was R. T. Bryan (1882), dean of American mission- 
aries, upon whom the University has conferred a D.D. ; 
and Mrs. Thomas A. Hearn (Mary Jarman, 1911), 
also entertained him there. After graduating at St. 
Luke's Hospital, Jacksonville, Florida, Miss Jarman 
went to China and established a training school for 
nurses at Huchow. She married Ur. Hearn in 1918. 
Mrs. Hearn is now Editorial Secretary of the Nurses' 
Association of China and editor of the bi-lingual 
Quarterly Journal for Chinese Nurses. Lacy L. Lit- 
tle (1889) is in charge of extensive missionary opera- 
tions at Kiangyin, Ku, and Dr. George C. Worth 
( 1893) has charge of a large hospital there. George 
P. Stevens (1902) is at N. Kiang Su Pu, Teng Sim. 
Shangtung Province, China. Eugene Barnett is Y. 
M. C. A. Secretary at Hangchow. In Korea the Uni- 
versity has Mrs. J. P. Preston (Annie Wiley) at 
Soonchun, Chosen. 

Sbinjiro Kitasawa, A.M. (1910), took his Ph.D. at 
Johns Hopkins in 1914, and is now professor of eco- 
nomics at Waseda University, professor of economics 
at St. Paul's College, and lecturer on economics at 



Bunka School, Tokyo. He is also research professor 
of the Ohara Institute for the study of social prob- 
lems, Osaka. Dr. Kitasawa is author of a number of 
books, as "The Principles of Commerce," "Adver- 
tising," "The Labor Problem," "The Laborer Prob- 
lem," and "Recent Tendencies in Labor Movements." 

Seiji Shiki, A.M. (1917), is reporter for the Japan- 
ese Telegraph News Agency and secretary of The 
Tar Heel Club of Toyko. The club gave a bancpiet 
in honor of Professor Cobb. Mr. Shiki was recently 
married. 

Hiroshi Momiyama, A.M. (1917), is a leading states- 
man of the Constitutionalist party in Japan and a 
close associate of Marquis Okuma. 

Kiyoshi Nagano, A.M. (1918), is president of a 
big newspaper company publishing a number of daily 
papers on Kiushiu. His office is at Oita City. 

Yosushiro Naito (1917-18), is managing director of 
North and Rae, limited, a big drug firm in Yokohama. 

Kameichi Kato (1918), is with a big importing 
firm at 471 Fourth Avenue, New York. 



SUMMER SCHOOL DID FINE WORK 

One of the largest groups of students ever assembled 
in North Carolina during the summer was present 
in Chapel Hill for the 34th session of the Summer 
School, June 21-August 4, and for the Summer Law 
School. The registration of the Summer School was 
1,090 and of the Law School 54, making a total of 
1,144 for the combined registration. 

In spite of the unusual heat of the summer, Di- 
rector N. W. Walker considered the session the most 
successful in the University's history. Graduate stu- 
dents, teachers, and undergraduates pursuing courses 
leading to a degree maintained a high average of work, 
and the attitude of the faculty and teachers alike 
towards the new educational program of North Caro- 
lina was admirable. 

Among the features of the Summer School were a 
musical festival conducted by Professor Weaver con- 
sisting of two evening programs, the first being a 
miscellaneous program, and the second the opera II'- 
Trovatore; presentation by the Carolina Playmakers 
of three of their original plays, The Vamp, In Dixon 's 
Kitchen and The Miser, and an outdoor performance 
of Shakespeare's Much Ado About Nothing; a series 
of interesting lectures in rural education by State 
Superintendent O. A. Thomas, of Maine, and Dr. Lee 
L. Driver, Director of the Bureau of Rural Education 
of Pennsylvania ; a six weeks institute for North Caro- 
lina public welfare workers; and a special address by 
State Superintendent E. C. Brooks in which he set 
forth the new program which the State is carrying out 
in the public schools. 



Miss Edith Stedman Wilson, daughter of Dr. Henry 
\ \ni Peters Wilson of the department of Zoology of 
the University, and Dr. Thorndike Saville, associate 
professor of Sanitary Engineering in the University, 
wen- married on Saturday, September 10, at the 
Chapel of the Cross in Chapel Hill, Reverend Alfred 
Stratton Lawrence, rector of the church, officiating. 
Other members of the wedding party were Miss 
Bleanora Stansbury Wilson, Miss Eline von Borries, 
Henry Van Peters Wilson, Jr., Frank Porter Graham, 
and Wesley Critz George. 



14 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 

Issued monthly except in July. August, and September, by the Gen- 
eral Alumni Association ol the University of North Carolina. 

Board of Publication 
The Review is edited by the following Board of Publication: 

Louis R. Wilson, '99 Editor 

Associate Editors: Walter Murphy, '92; Harry Howell, '95; Archibald 

Henderson '98; W. S. Bernard, '00; J. K. Wilson, '05; Louis 

Graves, '02; F. P. Graham, '09; Kenneth Tanner, '11; Lenoir 

Chambers, '14; R. W. Mudry, '18. 

E. R. Rankin, '13 M anaging Editor 

Subscription Price 

Single Copies *?'?? 

Per Year 150 

Communications intended for the Editor and the Managing Editor 
should be sent to Chapel Hill, N. C. All communications intended for 
publication must be accompanied with signatures if they are to receive 
consideration. 

OFFICE OF PUBLICATION, CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 

Entered at the Posloffice at Chapel Hill, N. C, as second class 
matter. 



THE UNIVERSITY IN PRINT 



History and Government of New Mexico. By John 
H. Vaughan, A.M. 369 pages. Illustrated. Maps. 
D. State College, New Mexico, 1921. 

Under the title History and Government of New 
Mexico, John H. Vaughan, '04,' dean of the School of 
General Science and professor of history and eco- 
nomies in the New Mexico College of Agriculture and 
Mechanical Arts, has organized in a remarkably suc- 
cessful way the almost four centuries of New Mexican 
history in one continuous narrative at once brief, 
readable, and reliable, and has presented it in 
such form and language as to bring it within the 
grasp of boys and girls in the public schools of that 
state. In undertaking the work of preparing the 
volume, Dean Vaughan has taken into full account 
the results of historical and scientific research in the 
history of the Southwest during recent years and con- 
sequently the work differs interestingly at many points 
from current tradition preserved in local chronicles. 
Altogether the author has been most happy in the 
accomplishment of his purpose to present a thoroughly 
informing and readable book on this section of the 
great southwest. Dean Vaughan is also author of a 
Preliminary Report on the Archives "of New Mexico, 
and is now preparing a History of Education in 
New Mexico. 



NEW EXTENSION PUBLICATIONS 

Alumni of the University who are interested in fur- 
thering the work of the University Extension Division 
will be interested in three publications recently issued 
by the Division setting forth its activities for the pres- 
ent year. The titles are as follows: University Ex- 
tension Service, being Vol. I, No. 1, September 1, 
1921, of the University of North Carolina Extension 
Bulletin; Vol. I, No. 2, September 16, Extension Lec- 
ture Service; and Vol. I, No. 3, October 1, Corre- 
spondence Courses. In the first of the three publica- 
tions, a detailed statement of all the activities of the 
University Extension Division is made, and in the 
other two Bulletins, specific information is given relat- 
ing to the entire lecture and correspondence services 
carried on by the Division. 



It will be of interest to alumni to note that from 
this time on the Extension Leaflets which have been 
appearing for the last four years, have been discon- 
tinued, and that they, together with the Extension 
publications which have been issued in the Univer- 
sity Record series, have been merged under the new 
title Extension Bulletin, fourteeen numbers of which 
will appear during the year. Persons wishing to be 
placed on the mailing list should send a post-card 
request to the Director of Extension. 



UNIVERSITY HOLDS MEETINGS ON TOWN 
AND COUNTY GOVERNMENT 

A meeting that brought together prominent state, 
county and city officials of North Carolina and local 
government experts from other states was held in 
Chapel Hill September 19, 20 and 21. This was the 
first national regional conference on Town and County 
Administration, organized under the auspices of the 
University of North Carolina and the National Mu- 
nicipal League. 

On account of the present crisis in municipal and 
county finances in this State, the event had unusual 
significance. Mayors, city managers and county com- 
missioners told of their problems and got advice from 
one another at a series of round-table gatherings. 

One of the incidents of the conference was the read- 
ing by President Chase, at the opening session, of a 
letter from the President of the United States. Mr. 
Harding expressed pleasure that the University was 
bringing together experts to discuss these important 
problems, and said he saw in this an encouraging re- 
action from the habit of depending upon the national 
government for aid in local affairs. 

Among those who attended the conference were : E. 
C. Brooks, State Superintendent of Public Instruc- 
tion; Baxter Durham, State Auditor; Dr. W. S. 
Rankin, Secretary of the State Board of Health ; Mrs. 
Clarence A. Johnson, State Commissioner of Public 
Welfare; W. A. McGirt, highway commissioner of 
Wilmington ; Lionel Weil, chairman of the finance 
committee of the Goldsboro board of aldermen ; Mayors 
Cowan of Wilmington, Eldridge of Raleigh, Kiser of 
Greensboro, Hanes of Winston-Salem, Roberts of Ashe- 
ville, Walker of Charlotte, and Roberson of Chapel 
Hill ; City Managers Painter of Greensboro, Rigsby of 
Durham, Hemy of Hickory, and Wrenn of Reidsville ; 
T. B. Patten, chairman of the board of county com- 
missioners of Buncombe County; W. C. Jones, com- 
missioner of High Point; W. W. Dodds, secretary of 
the National Municipal League; Arthur N. Pierson, 
member of the General Assembly of New Jersey and 
an expert on local finance legislation ; Burke Hobgood 
of Durham, W. E. Ritter of Winston-Salem,, President 
W. L. Poteat of Wake Forest, Morris Knowles, city 
planning expert of Pittsburgh; Jeffries C. Grinnalds, 
city planning expert of Baltimore ; R. H. Ward, chair- 
man of the board of commissioners of Orange County; 
and Miss Hattie Berry, secretary of the North Caro- 
lina Good Roads Association. 

The Conference was arranged and conducted by Dr. 
Howard Oclum, head of the department of Public 
Welfare in the University. The North Carolina As- 
sociation of County Commissioners is to meet in Chapel 
Hill next August, and Dr. E. C. Branson, head of 
the department of Rural Sociology, is in charge of 
the arrangements for that. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



15 



WHO'S WHO IN WASHINGTON AND WHY 

Under the above heading the Post of Washington, 
D. C, of August 28, had the following to say about 
Eugene P. Hartley, chief statistician of the division 
of manufactures, bureau of the census : 

When Uncle Sam wants to take stock of the manu- 
factures and industries of this country he puts the 




E. F. Haiitley, Class of 1899 

man-sized job on the capable shoulders of Eugene F. 
Hartley, chief statistician of the division of manu- 
factures, bureau of the census. 

Once every five years a complete statistical inven- 
tory of all the manufacturing industries in the United 
States is taken by the government. This means 300,- 
000 reports from individual manufacturers on more 
than 80 different schedules or questionnaires, the di- 
rection of a field force of 1,000 special agents, and 
the preparation and analysis of the final reports pub- 
lished as the census of manufactures. Because of its 
great value to American industry in the future it 
will be taken every two years. 

Mr. Hartley has been engaged in census work for 
nearly twenty-two years, having risen through the 
successive grades in the census bureau. During this 
period he has collected census statistics in the field 
from Quoddy Head to the Golden Gate. He received 
his training under Mr. William M. Stewart, now di- 
rector of the census, whom he succeeded as chief stat- 
istician more than four years ago. 



CHANGES IN THE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 
AND DIVISION OF EXTENSION 

Changes which became effective in the School of 
Education and the Extension Division at t he begin- 
ning of September have been made as follows during 
the summer: M. ('. S. Noble, dean of the School of 
Education relinquishes active administration of the 
school and is succeeded as acting dean by Professor 



N. W. Walker, director of the Summer School and 
professor of Secondary Education. L. R. Wilson gives 
up the directorship of the Division of Extension and 
is succeeded by Chester D. Snell, assistant director 
since January, 1921. E. R. Rankin, Secretary of the 
High School Debating Union and assistant director, 
becomes associate director, while Miss Louise M. Ven- 
able becomes secretary of the Division, and Mrs. 
Walter J. Matherly succeeds Miss Eleanor Hoffmann 
as field secretary of the Bureau of Design and Im- 
provement of School Grounds. Dr. Howard W. Odum 
assumes charge of the Bureau of County and Munici- 
pal Reference, and Dr. J. P. Steiner heads the new 
Bureau of Community Organization. 

Dean Noble, in relinquishing the headship of the 
School of Education, retains his professorship in the 
school and will also devote himself to the preparation 
of a history of education in North Carolina since 
1840, a task which has been committed to him by the 
North Carolina Historical Commission and for which 
he is admirably prepared. 

Director Wilson, after organizing and bringing the 
Extension Division to its present status in the Uni- 
versity, returns to the administration of the Library 
and the editing of The Review. 



DR. CHASE ATTENDS CEREMONIALS 

Immediately before and after commencement Presi- 
dent H. W. Chase represented the University at two 
very significant academic celebrations in the south 
and north respectively. At the Centennial Celebra- 
tion of the University of Virginia he delivered one 
of the principal addresses, and on June 2nd he spoke 
as the representative of the colleges of the southeast 
at the inaugural exercises of President Angell of Yale 
University. Dr. Chase is to speak in behalf of south- 
ern institutions at the inauguration of President Far- 
rand at Cornell University on October 20. 



ALUMNI HEAD BIG ASSOCIATIONS 

Press dispatches in the course of the summer months 
carried information to the effect that several Carolina 
men had been elected to the responsible leadership of 
big associations in their line of profession or business. 

Agnew H. Bahnson, class of 1906, cotton manufac- 
turer of Winston-Salem, was elected president of the 
North Carolina Cotton Manufacturers' Association, in 
succession to Thos. C. Leak, class of 1895, of Rock- 
ingham, another of the State "s textile leaders. 

Alumni of the University have been leaders in the 
textile industry since the early days when in 1820 
Joel Battle, class of 1802, established at Falls of the 
Tar River (now Rocky Mount) one of the first cot- 
ton manufacturing establishments in the southern 
states. Incidentally, the plant established by Joel 
Battle in 1820 has grown into the present Rocky 
Mount Mills, managed by Thos. H. Battle, '80. 

John A. McRae, class of 1904, of the Charlotte bar, 
was elected president of the North Carolina Bar As- 
sociation, succeeding Thos. W. Davis, Law class of 
1900, of Wilmington. 

Barl M. Catling, class of 1892, Raleigh postmaster 
and a lawyer by profession, was reelected as president 
of the State League of Postmasters. 

A. L. M. Wiggins, class of 1913, identified with the 
( 'oker interests at Hartsville, S. C, was elected presi- 
dent of the Southern Retail Merchants' Association. 



1C 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



Union National 
Bank 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



Capital $200,000.00 

Surplus & Profits $252,000.00 
Resources $3,000,000.00 



We cordially invite the 
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Cashier 



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CHARLOTTE, N. C. 

INVESTMENTS 

Phone 238 Postal Phone 

Long Dist. 9957 



GENERAL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

of the 

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH 

CAROLINA 

Officers of the Association 

Albert L. Cox, '04 President 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE: Walter Mur- 
phy, '92; Dr. R. H. Lewis, '70; W. N. 
Everett, '86; H. E. Rondthaler, '93; C. W. 
Tillett, Jr., '09. 

WITH THE CLASSES 

1859 
— Jas. P. Coffin, of Batesville, Ark., who 
has been for more than half a century 
the leading spirit in keeping the class 
of 1859 united, writes that there are 
now ten survivors of the class and that 
with two or three exceptions all are en- 
joying a reasonably good state of health. 
The full list follows: Geo. F. Dixon, 
Wynne, Ark.; Jas. E. Beasley, Memphis, 
Tcnn.; Jas. P. Taylor, Angleton, Texas; 
F. C. Bobbins, Lexington; John Dun- 
can, Columbus, Texas; Lucius Frierson, 
Birmingham, Ala. ; Dr. Henry L. Rugeley, 
Bay City, Texas; Dr. P. B. Bacot, Flor- 
ence, S. C; Jas. G. Whitfield, Whitfield, 
Ala.; and Jas. P. Coffin, Batesville, Ark. 

1862 
— Judge Thomas W. Taylor, a native of 
Granville county, is now on the circuit 
bench of the State of West Virginia. He 
lives at Huntington. 

1864 

—Under the title of ' ' Sixty Years After- 
ward, " the News and Observer carried 
in July in three installments an inter- 
esting account by Chief Justice Walter 
Clark of his visit in the early summer 
to the Virginia battlefields. 
— General Jas. I. Metts, of Wilmington, 
was reelected in August as commander 
of the N. C. Division, United Confederate 
Veterans. General Metts is engaged in 
the wholesale grain business at Wilming- 
ton. 

— Judge Augustus Van Wyck prac- 
tices law at 44 Beaver St., New York 
City. Judge Van Wyck was formerly 
on the New York Supreme Court bench 
and was the nominee of the Democratic 
party for governor of New York against 
Theodore Roosevelt. 

1866 
— Durham entertained handsomely the 
Confederate Veterans of North Carolina 
at their annual convention in August. 
General Julian S. Carr, '66, commander 
of the Army of Northern Virginia, was 
the moving spirit in the big celebration, 
and L. P. McLendon, '12, Durham at- 
torney and chairman of the board of 
city school commissioners, was chairman 
of the general committee which had 
charge of all arrangements. 



The 
Trust Department 



Of the Southern Life and 
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sells high grade stocks and 
bonds. We have for sale 
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preferred stocks. 



Trust Department 

Southern Life & Trust Company 

A. W. McALISTER, President. 
R. G. VAUGHN, First Vice-President. 
A. M. SCALES, General Counsel and 
Vice-President. 



Independence Trust 
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CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



Capital & Surplus, $1,600,000 

Member Federal Reserve System 



A.11 departments of a well- 
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among which are the Commer- 
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and we cordially invite free 
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J. H. LITTLE, President 

E. O. ANDERSON, Vice-Pres. 

E. E. JONES, Cashier 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



17 



THE BANK of 
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Oldest and Strongest Bank 
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1881 
— Dr. B. F. McMillan, former legisla- 
tor, practices his profession, medicine, 
at Red Springs. 

— The Rouse Banking Co., of La Grange, 
is a Carolina bank. All of the officers 
are alumni. N. J. Rouse, '81, lawyer of 
Kinston, is president; T. R. Rouse, '84, 
is cashier; and J. P. Joyner, '82, is as- 
sistant cashier. 

— Dr. R. P. Pell, president of Converse 
College, Spartanburg, S. C, has been 
the guiding influence in the organiza- 
tions of the Citizens Educational As- 
sociation, which has for its object the 
advancement of education in South Caro- 
lina, from the primary through the Uni- 
versity. The Spartanburg Herald re- 
cently said : ' ' Spartanburg is proud of 
Dr. Pell as the head of the fine college 
which he has succeeded in placing among 
the foremost in the south ; Spartanburg 
is proud of him as one of the workers 
in the noble cause of education in South 
Carolina. ' ' 

— Judge W. J. Adams, of Carthage, re- 
ceived appointment on September 19 at 
the hands of Governor Morrison as As- 
sociate Justice of the Supreme Court of 
North Carolina in succession to the late 
Justice W. R. Allen. Judge Adams re- 
ceived the A.B. degree from the Univer- 
sity in 1881. He returned to Chapel Hill 
and studied law through the years 1882- 
83 and 1883-84, and then located in his 
home town, Carthage, for the practice 
of his profession. He continued in law 
practice until 1908 when he began his 
service on the Superior Court bench for 
his district. Judge Adams is held in 
general regard as one of the ablest jur- 
ists in the State. Before going on the 
Superior Court bench Judge Adams had 
represented his county in both branches 
of the General Assembly. He is 61 
years of age. 

1884 
— Jas. Lee Love, formerly of the Har- 
vard faculty, is now located at Gastonia 
where he is engaged in the cotton mill 
business as president of the Gastonia 
Cotton Mfg. Co. 

— Two leading Methodist institutions of 
learning in the State have alumni at 
their helm: Dr. S. B. Turrentinr, 'si, 
as president of the Greensboro College 
for Women, at Greensboro; and Dr. B. 
B. John, '80, as president of Carolina 
College, at Maxton. 

1885 

— Josephus Daniels, editor of tin- Raleigh 
News am] Observer and former Secretary 
of the Navy, delivered addresses at the 
meeting of t lie N. C. Cotton Manufactur 
its' Association, held at, Asheville in 
June, and at the meeting id' the X. < '. 
Press Association, held at Morehead 
( Sty in July. 



School 
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With which are consolidated The 
School Journal, established in 1874, 
and The Teachers' Magazine, es- 
tablished 1878. 

Edited by 
J. McKEEN CATTELL 

A weekly journal covering 
the field of education in rela- 
tion to the problems of Amer- 
ican democracy. 

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Greensboro, N. C. 



18 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



Chas. Lee Smith, Pres. Howell L. Smith, Sec'3 
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Manufacturers of 

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WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



1886 
— K. L. Strowd has been appointed act- 
ing postmaster at Chapel Hill, succeed- 
ing the late E. S. MacEae. 
— Among those visiting relatives and 
friends in Chapel Hill during the sum- 
mer were: Eev. N. H. D. Wilson, '86, 
and Mrs. Wilson, of Washington; and 
A. W. Mangum, '97, Mrs. Mangum, and 
A. W. Mangum, Jr., of Florida. 
— N. A. Sinclair, '86, J. Bayard Clark, 
'06, and E. H. Dye have recently formed 
a strong law partnership at Fayetteville 
under the firm name of Sinclair, Dye and 
Clark. Mr. Sinclair was for eight years 
solicitor of his district and was formerly 
a member of the State Senate. Mr. 
Clark practiced law at Elizabethtown for 
fifteen years and formerly represented 
Bladen County in the House of the N. C. 
Legislature. 

— Col. Junius B. West, attorney of Suf- 
folk, Va., has received the nomination 
of the Democratic party for lieutenant- 
governor of Virginia. After leaving the 
University, Col. West was for several 
years a school official in Virginia. Later 
he studied law at the University of Vir- 
ginia and, since obtaining his license, has 
practiced his profession at Suffolk. He 
has been for a long time prominent in 
Virginia politics. 

1887 
— Dr. D. T. Wilson has a year's leave of 
absence from his post in the faculty of 
the Case School of Applied Science, 
Cleveland, Ohio. 

1888 
— L. B. Edwards, capitalist of Live Oak, 
Fla., has been appointed secretary to 
Governor Hardee of Florida. 
— Eugene Withers is senior -member of 
the law firm of Withers, Brown and Ben- 
ton, with offices at 529 Main St., Dan- 
ville, Va. 

— Eev. T. J. Eskridge is pastor of the 
Highland Park Methodist Church, one 
of the most important charges in Chat- 
tanooga, Tenn. Mr. Eskridge is a na- 
tive of Shelby. 

— Julian H. Little, president of the In- 
dependence Trust Co., Charlotte, has 
been elected president of the Citizens 
Hotel Co., Charlotte's new million dol- 
lar hotel corporation. Directors other 
than Mr. Little include Eobert Lassiter, 
'98, cotton manufacturer, and Word H. 
Wood, '95, president of the American 
Trust Co. 

1889 
— Eev. W. M. Curtis is financial secre- 
tary of the Greensboro College for 
Women. 

— Junius Parker, chief counsel for the 
American Tobacco Co., New York City, 
was principal speaker at the meeting of 
the N. C. Bar Association, held at Char- 
lotte in July. 




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Durham, N. 0. 



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THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



19 



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— Rev. Lacy L. Little is on leave from 
his post as missionary to China and is 
spending some time at his home at 
Mangum. 

1890 
— W. S. Snipes, former head of the Pay- 
etteville schools, is now superintendent 
of the Dunn schools. 

— Dr. J. J. Philips, a native of Tarboro, 
practices medicine in Raleigh, with offices 
in the Tucker Building. His specialty is 
the diseases of children. 
— C. D. Bradham, '90, of New Bern, has 
been named by Governor Morrison as 
president of the Atlantic and North Caro 
lina railroad. W. Stamps Howard, '97, 
of Tarboro, is the new secretary. Di- 
rectors other than these two officers in- 
clude: H. D. Bateman, '01, Wilson; 
Courtney Mitchell, Law '07, Kinston; 
W. H. McElwee, '85, Raleigh; Dr. J. P. 
Patterson, '03, New Bern. 

1891 
— Van Wyck Hoke, of Lincolnton, was 
married last June. Attendance upon the 
reunion of the class of '91 last commence- 
ment was impossible, as Mr. Hoke was 
getting married about that time. 
— J. K. Norfleet, of Winston-Salem, has 
become associated with the leaf depart- 
ment of the R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. 
— P. H. Williams is president of the 
Savings Bank and Trust Co., Elizabeth 
City. This institution lately moved into 
its handsome new home. Mr. Williams 
was engaged in the hosiery manufactur- 
ing business for fifteen years. 
— Rev. J. L. Cuninggim is in the fac- 
ulty of the Southern Methodist Univer- 
sity at Dallas, Texas. He has attained 
considerable distinction as a Sunday 
school organizer and adminstrator. 

1892 
— J. B. Schulken is senior member of the 
law firm of Schulken, Grady and Toon, 
at Whiteville. 

— F. M. Shannonhouse practices law in 
Charlotte and was formerly recorder of 
the city court. 

— Bart M. Gatling, Raleigh postmaster, 
was reelected in August as president of 
the State League of Postmasters, at the 
meeting held in Hickory. 
— Dr. R. H. Johnston is now located at 
Wilson, where he is engaged in the prac 
tice of medicine, specializing in (lis 
eases of the eye, ear, nose and throat. 
Dr. Johnston moved recently from Tar- 
boro to Wilson. He practiced medicine 
for a number of years in Baltimore, Mil. 
— Speaking of A. W. McLean, '92, 
Senator F. M. Simmons said recently on 
the floor of the U. S. Senate: "Mr. 
McLean is one of the most remarkable 
men my State has produced. Less than 
50 years old he is one of the largest 
farmers in the South. He is tin- presi- 
dent of one large banking institution and 



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Extends a cordial invitation 
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20 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



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Book Exchange 

Taylor Agency 



vice-president of another. He has large 
interests in two of the largest textile 
manufacturing establishments in my 
State, and they have been successfully 
managed. He has built, practically out 
of his own resources, a railroad of some- 
thing over 50 miles and is operating it 
with success. In addition, he is one 
of the ablest lawyers in the State. ' ' 

1893 

— John A. Gilmer is connected with the 
internal revenue bureau at Washington, 
D. C. 

— V. H. Boyden, Law '93, holds a posi- 
tion with the U. S. Air Service, in a 
legal capacity, at Washington, D. C. 
— C. G. Peebles, formerly an attorney of 
Jackson, is now engaged in farming at 
Hubert, Ga. 

1894 
— Louis M. Swink is senior member of 
the law firm of Swink, Korner and 
Hutchins, at Winston Salem. 
— Rev. E. M. Snipes lives at Weldon and 
is presiding elder of the Warrenton dis- 
trict of the Methodist church. Mr. 
Snipes is a former Carolina football 
star. 

1895 
— Dr. W. J. Weaver practices his pro- 
fession, medicine, at Leicester. 
— Judge Thomas D. Bryson, of the Su- 
perior Court bench, and Miss Zulia 
Ketchie were married on July 16 at 
Mount TJlla. They make their home at 
Bryson City. 

— Dr. N. M. Watson is pastor of the 
First Methodist Church of Bristol, Temi. 
Dr. Watson is influential in the educa- 
tional work of the Holston Conference 
and is secretary of the board of educa- 
tion. 

— O. H. Dockery, Jr., Law '95, a na- 
tive of Rockingham, holds the rank of 
lieutenant-colonel in the adjutant-gen- 
eral's department, IT. S. Army. 
— Chas. F. Tomlinson is president of the 
Southern Furniture Exposition Build- 
ing Corporation, which has lately opened 
at High Point the biggest building of 
its kind in the world. 
— John L. Patterson, '95, Richmond, Va., 
A. H. Bahnsou, '06, Winston-Salem, and 
K. S. Tanner, '11, Spindale, were re- 
elected in July as members of the execu- 
tive committee of the N. C. Cotton Man- 
ufacturers ' Association. J. Harvey White, 
'96, of Graham, was named chairman of 
the committee on taxation, commerce and 
labor. R. G. Rankin, '10, of Gastonia, 
was named chairman of the committee 
mi finance, audit and cotton buying. 

1896 
— Heenan Hughes, Law '96, and Miss 
Annie Ray, both of Graham, were mar- 
ried on August 4. Mr. Hughes is a 
former mayor of the city. 



Our New Fall 
Styles 

in men's elothes are now com- 
plete. CAROLINA men are 
given a cordial invitation to 
call in and inspect our offer- 
ings of latest models and fine 
textures from fashionable 
clothes makers. A full line of 
gents' furnishings is always 
on hand. 



Sneed-Markham- 
Taylor Co. 

Durham, N. C. 



KODAK FINISHING 

As Qood as the Best 
Anywhere 



Over eighty per cent of our busi- 
ness is mail order 



May We send you a price list? 



R. W. FOISTER 

BOX 242 
CHAPEL HILL N. C. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



2l 



WANTED 

We want a responsible man 
as our local agent in every 
town or city over 500 popu- 
lation, to distribute VIRGINIA 
COALS from our mines direct 
to the consumer. 

This is a splendid opportu- 
nity for right man to establish 
a good legitimate business. 

In first letter give bank ref- 
erences and state financial 
responsibility. 

Address Miners, Box 152 
Roanoke, Va. 



Ra wis- Knight Co. 

' 'Durham 's Style Store 

We extend a special invita- 
tion to our Chapel Hill friends 
to visit our store and view 
what's new in Spring and 
Summer wearing apparel. 

Fashion's very latest styles 
in Coats, Suits, Dresses and 
Smart Millinery. 

Beautiful Silks and Woolen 
Dresses in the most appealing 
styles. 

All the new weaves in cot- 
ton and woolen goods, silks, 
duvetyn, plush. Large line of 
silk and cotton hosiery. The 
home of Lady Ruth, Crown, 
Modart and Binner Corsets. 
Centemeri Kid Gloves and 
Ashers Knit Goods. 

Mail orders promptly filled. 

Ra wis- Knight Co. 



Durhc 



N. C. 



— C. D. Koonce practices law at Chad- 
bourn ami is judge of the Columbus 
County recorder's court. He is a native 
of Onslow County. 

— H. A. Grady practices law at Clin- 
ton as senior member of the firm of 
Grady and Graham. He is a former 
mayor of Clinton and a past grand- 
master of the Grand Lodge of Masons. 
—Alumni of U. N. C. hi Chester, S. C, 
include: A. H. Bobbins, '96, cotton man- 
ufacturer; W. M. McNairy, '97, former 
superintendent of the city schools ; Rev. 
A. R. Morgan, '10, Episcopal minister; 
and B. C. Harrell, '17, executive secre- 
tary of the Y. M. C. A. S. W. Kluttz, 
'06, and Dr. DeWitt Kluttz, '15, are 
natives of Chester but they now live in 
Washington, D. C, and Washington, N. 
C , respectively. S. W. Kluttz is a news 
paper man and Dr. DeWitt Kluttz is a 
physician. 

1897 
— W. H. Austin is president of the mer- 
cantile firm of Austin-Stephenson Co., 
at Smithfield. 

— F. J. Haywood is secretary and treas- 
urer of the Brown and Norcott cotton 
mills at Concord. 

— S. Brown Shepherd, Raleigh lawyer, is 
president of the Raleigh Tobacco Ware- 
house Co. Among the directors are: 
John H. Andrews, '96, and Dr. Z. M. 
Caveness, '03. Frior to this year, no 
tobacco had been marketed in Raleigh in 
1 5 years. 

1898 
— J. G. McCormick lives in Wilmington, 
where he practices law and is also sec- 
retary and treasurer of the Acme Ferti- 
lizer Co. 

— Robert Lassiter, '98, of Charlotte, lias 
been named by Governor Morrison as a 
director of the North Carolina railroad. 
R. N. Hackett, '85, of North Wilkes- 
boro, has been named attorney. 
— George Knox Tate ami Miss Aurelia 
Josephine Vance were married on Septem- 
ber 6 in the Fourth Presbyterian Church 
of Greenville, S. C. They live at Mc- 
Adenville, where Mr. Tate is general 
superintendent of the Mi-Aden Mills. 
— H. H. McKay and G. K. Grantham, 
linth of Dunn, have lately entered into 
the drug business at Gastonia. Mr. Mc 
Kay has moved from Dunn to Gastonia 
and will have active charge of the Gas 
Ionia firm styled McKay and Grantham. 
Mr. McKay is :i member of the Phar 
maey Class of 1898 and Mr. Grantham is 
a member of the board of trustees of the 
University. 

1899 

H. M. Wagstajt, Secretary, 

Chapel Hill, X. C. 
— Henry M. London, '99, of Raleigh, was 
elected in August secretary and treas 
urer of the N. C. Bar Association, sue- 



R. L. BALDWIN CO. 

DURHAM, N. C. 



High-class Ready-to-wear Mil- 
linery, Dry Goods, Notions, 
Shoes. Trunks and Bags. 

We extend to you a cordial 
invitation to make this store 
your headquarters when in 
the city.' 
New Goods on Display Now 



R. L. BALDWIN CO. 



105 W. Main St. 



DRINK 




Delicious and Refreshing 

Quality tells the difference in 
the taste between Coca-Cola and 
counterfeits. 

Demand the genuine by full 
name — nicknames encourage sub- 
stitution. 

Get a bottle of the genuine 
from your grocer, fruit stand, or 
cafe. 

Durham Coca-Cola Bottling Co. 
Durham, N. C. 



22 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



I. G. LAWRENCE 

W. H. LAWRENCE AND T. H. LAW- 
RENCE ASSOCIATED 



CONTRACTOR 

AND 

BUILDER 

Main Office: Durham, N. C. 



CONTRACTOR FACULTY HOUSES 
AND LAUNDRY 

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH 
CAROLINA 



SALMON. SHIPP 
AND POE 

DURHAM, N. C. 



CONTRACTORS 

AND 

BUILDERS 



CONTRACTORS NEW DORMITORY 
UNIVERSITY OF N. C. 



, — . 

A. E. Lloyd Hardware 




Company 




DURHAM, N. C. 


All 


kinds of hardware, sporting 


goods, 


and college boys' acces- 


sories. 




Geo 


. W. Tandy, Manager 



Budd-Piper Roofing Co. 

Durham, N. C. 

Distributors of JOHNS-MANSVILLE 

Asbestos Shingles and Roofing 

Barrett Specification Roofing 

Sheet Metal Work 

AGENTS FOR 



LOR I 





ceeding A. B. Andrews, '93, of Raleigh. 
— Louis R. Wilson, '99, and Louis 
Graves, '02, both of the University fac- 
ulty, delivered addresses at the meeting 
of the* N. C. Press Association, held in 
Morehead City in July. 

1900 

W. S. Bernard, Secretary, 
Chapel Hill, N. C- 
— John A. Tate is a cotton merchant of 
Charlotte. 

— R. H. Staton, Law '00, lawyer of Hen- 
dersonville and former mayor of the city, 
has received appointment as postmaster. 
— M. W. Nash, Law '00, lawyer of Ham- 
let and member of the State Senate, has 
been appointed by Governor Morrison as 
solicitor of his district. 
— Walter Davis Siler and Miss Lida Loyd 
Alston were married on June 29 at Pitts- 
boro. They live at Siler City. Mr. Siler 
practices law at Siler City and is solicitor 
of the fourth judicial district. 
— J. W. Greening, of El Dorado, Ark., 
spent a day on the Hill in August. Mr. 
Greening was formerly engaged in rail- 
way business but is now a planter. An 
oil boom has struck the El Dorado sec- 
tion and Mr. Greening thinks the chances 
for striking oil on his property are rea- 
sonably good. 

— Major Ernest Graves, U. S. A. retired, 
is contributing a series of articles on 
football to the American Boy. In an- 
nouncing the series the editors of this 
magazine say: "One of the leading au- 
thorities on football, ' Big Bill ' Edwards, 
the famous Princeton player, recently 
named Major Graves as tackle on the 
Ail-Time Ail-American Football Team. 
Major Graves was captain of the West 
Point team in 1904 and has been a 
coach there nine seasons since. He was a 
coach at Harvard in 1907 and 1908." 
The editors recount Major Graves' 
valuable work in Mexico with General 
Pershing in 1916 and continue: "In 
the spring of the next year when America 
had declared war and all the Army was 
buzzing with gossip as to who would ac- 
company the Commander-in-chief on the 
first boat off to Europe, Graves' name 
was not mentioned. He was at El Paso, 
far from the center of influence. One 
day he got a telegram from General 
Pershing, telling him to report in Wash- 
ington. One of the first dozen men of 
the A. E. F. to walk down the gang 
plank on to European soil, he was in 
France during the rest of the war. And 
at the end he was awarded the Distin- 
guished Service Medal. ' ' 

1901 

J. G. Murphy, Secretary, 

Wilmington, N. C. 

— Dr. C. D. Appenzeller is a chiropodist, 

located at 4 Hudson street, Yonkers, 

N. Y. 



MARKHAM-ROGERS 
COMPANY 

Clothiers, Tailors, Furnishers and 
Hatters 

ALL THE NEW FALL 

STYLES AT REASONABLE 

PRICES 

DURHAM, N. C. 



ODELL'S, we 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 

China, Cut Glass and 
Silverware 

General line Sporting Goods 
Household Goods 

Dependable goods. Prompt 

Service. Satisfactory 

Prices 



HICKS-CRABTREE 
COMPANY 

THREE MODERN DRUG STORES 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 

Eastman Kodaks and Supplies 
Nunnally's Candies 

The place to meet your friends when 
in the Capital City 

GILBERT CRABTREE, Mgr. 



Cross & Linehan 
Company 

Leaders in Clothing and 
Gents' Furnishings 

RALEIGH, N. C. 




TIME TO THINK ABOUT 

CHRISTMAS 

AND YOUR NEEDS IN 

Individual Greeting 
Cards 

Business Greeting 
Cards 

Monogram Stationery 

Engraved Calling 
Cards 



"At Your Service" 




The Seeman Printery, Inc. 

Printing Engraving Office Supplies 

Durham, N. C. 



For Ideas, Information or Estimates address 
Department of Ideas and Service 




Like Renewing 

a Battery in a Flashlight 

PUTTING a "Refill" into Colgate's "Handy 
Grip" is easy and simple. The soap itself 
is threaded to screw into the socket. It's done 
in a moment. 

"Refills" cost you the price of the soap 
alone. Moisten the bit removed from the 
"Handy Grip" and stick it upon the end of 
the "Refill." There is no waste. 

Colgate's lathers freely; softens the most 
difficult beard; needs no mussy rubbing in 
with the fingers, and leaves the face cool and 
refreshed. 

Colgate's Shaving Stick not only produces 
the most soothing lather for the average 
man but it is a little more economical in use 
than powder and much more economical 
than cream. As we make all 
three, we can give you this 
impartial advice. 

COLGATE (X. CO. 

Depl. 212 
199 Fulton Street, New York 



The metal " Handy 
Grip," containing a 
trial size slid; of Col- 
gale's Shoeing Soap, 
sent for 10c. When 
the trial stick " used up 
you can buy the Colgate 
■■Refills." threaded to 
fit this Crip. 




24 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



Perry-Horton Shoe Co. 

Special Agents for Nettleton and 

Hurley Shoes for Men, and 

Cousins and Grover Shoes 

for Women 

MAKE OUR STORE HEAD- 
QUARTERS WHILE IN 

DURHAM, N. C. 



Bijou Theatre 

DURHAM, N. C. 



HIGH CLASS PICTURES AND 

SPECIAL MUSIC— YOU ARE 

ALWAYS WELCOME 



Open from 11 A.M. Until 11 P.M. 



COOPER'S 

MONUMENTS 

Communicate with me re- 
garding your needs for monu- 
ments or tombstones. Will 
gladly forward catalogue upon 
request. 

W. A. COOPER 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



ESSIE BROS. 

CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 

Students' Headquarters for Foun- 
tain Drinks and Smokes 



Agents for BLOCK'S CANDIES 



— Adolphus Staton, native of Tarboro, 
holds the rank of commander in the U. 
S. Navy. 

— Jackson Greer, former member of the 
State Senate, practices law at White- 
ville. He is county attorney and is 
solicitor of the county recorder's court. 
— Dr. John A. Terrell is the executive 
in charge of the campaign of the Inter- 
national Health Commission for the eradi- 
cation of disease. The offices of the com- 
mission are at 61 Broadway, New York 
City. 

1902 
I. P. Lewis, Secretary, 
University, Va. 
— J. C. Allison is secretary and treas- 
urer of the Raleigh Building and Loan 
Association. 

— Dr. C. 0. Abernethy practices medicine 
in Raleigh with offices in the Citizens 
National Bank Building. 
— Rev. O. W. Dowd was married during 
the past summer. He is now pastor of 
the Methodist church at Morehead City. 
— J. E. Swain, of Asheville, is serving at 
Charlotte under appointment of Superior 
Court as referee in a million dollar suit 
instituted by the Hardaway Contracting 
Co. against the Southern Power Co. 
— Chas. A. Jonas, '02, Lincolnton lawyer, 
and Thos. J. Harkins, '03, Asheville law- 
yer, have been named by District At- 
torney F. A. Linney as assistant dis- 
trict attorneys for the western N. C. dis- 
trict. 

— G. L. Jones, known to his college mates 
as "Bully" Jones, practices law in Ashe- 
ville as a member of the firm of Bourne, 
Parker and Jones. Until last fall he 
lived at his old home, Franklin, and 
was for several years solicitor of the 20th 
judicial district. 

1903 
N. W. Walker, Secretary, 
Chapel Hill, N. C. 
— S. B. McLean, lawyer of Maxton, is 
solicitor of the ninth judicial district. 
— J. J. Thrower is president of the J. 
J. Thrower Co., general merchants of 
Red Springs. W. B. Townsend, '14, is 
president of this firm. 
— Hugh Hammond Bennett and Miss 
Elizabeth Virginia Brown were married 
on July 16 at Washington, D. C. They 
live at Nantucket Apartment, 1418 W. 
St. N. W., Washington. Mr. Bennett 
holds a responsible position with the U. 
S. Bureau of Soils. 

1904 
T. F. Hickerson, Secretary, 
Chapel Hill, N. C. 
— At the meeting of the N. C. Bar As- 
sociation held at Charlotte in July, John 
A. MeRae, '04, of Charlotte, was elected 
president, succeeding Thos. W. Davis, 
Law '00, of Wilmington. 



HUTCHINS DRUG STORE 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 

A drug store complete in all respects 
located in the heart of Winston-Salem 
and operated by CAROLINA men, 
where up-to-the-minute service is main- 
tained, and where Alumni and their 
friends are always especially welcome. 

JAS. A. HUTCHINS, Manager 



The Royal Cafe 



University students, faculty mem- 
bers, and alumni visit the Royal 
Cafe while in Durham. Under 
new and progressive management. 
Special parlors for ladies. 



DURHAM'S MODERN 
CAFE 



The Princess Cafe 

WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



WE INVITE YOU TO VISIT US 
WHILE IN WINSTON-SALEM 



A THOROUGHLY MODERN 
CAFE 



BROADWAY CAFE 



WE CORDIALLY INVITE YOU 
TO VISIT OUR CAFE WHEN 
YOU ARE IN GREENSBORO 

Excellent Service 

Courteous Treatment 



GREENSBORO, N. C. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



25 



ESTABLISHED 1916 



fllumni coyaity fund 



Council: 

A. M. SCALES. '92 
LESLIE WEIL, '95 
L. R. WILSON. '99 
A.W.HAYWOOD. '04 
W. T. SHORE, 'OS 
J. A. GRAY, '08 



One for all, and all Tor one" 




Join the Alumni Loyalty Fund 

As an alumnus of Carolina yon are offered the opportunity of becoming a member of an 
association whose purpose is to 

Underwrite Alma Mater's Program 

Any contribution, no matter how small, is a sufficient qualification for membership. Do 
not hesitate to contribute whatever amount you feel able to give, as the idea back of the Fund 
is for everyone who has ever attended the University to contribute in accordance with his means. 

Will you -indicate your interest in what the Fund is doing for Carolina by joining the list 
of contributors this year? 

Will you help us show Dr. Chase we are back of him 10,000 strong? 



Please mail this coupon today 



Julius Algernon Warren, Treas. 
Alumni Loyalty Fund 
Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Enclosed find my Alumni Loyalty 
as follows : 

Name 


Fund Contribution for 1921, 


Check here 


$ 2.00 


$ 5.00 


$10.00 


$20.00 


Address 


$30.00 




$50.00 


Date Class... 




$ 





26 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



The Carolina Man's Shoe Store 

Carr-Bryant 

High Grade Shoes with Snap 
and Style 

Carr-Bryant Boot $ Shoe Co. 

106 W. Main Street Durham, N. C. 



W. B. SORRELL 

Jeweler and Optometrist 
CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 



Model Laundry Co. 

DURHAM, N. C. 
Expert Laundry Service 



Gooch's Cafe 

Anything to Eat 
CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 



PRIDGEN & JONES COMPANY 

We carry the best shoes, Edwin 
Clapp, Howard and Foster, and Hey- 
wood's. 

Expert fitters — A cordial welcome 
awaits you. 
107 W. Main St. Durham, N. C. 



(t i 

NEW LOCHMOOR HOTEL 




DURHAM, N. 


c. 


Invites 
Alumni 
welcome 
able ra 


the patronage of CAROLINA 
and assures them of a hearty 
Excellent service at reason- 
es. 


v 




'J 



For neat job printing and type- 
writer paper, call at the office of 

Chapel Hill News 



=•?* 



DURHAM BUSINESS SCHOOL 

Offers exceptional opportunities to those 
desiring training in the fundamental 
principles of business. 

Write for catalogue and full partic- 
ulars to 

Mrs. Ww.ti.. Lee Ledkum, President 
DURHAM, N. C. 



— Mr. and Mrs. E. A. Council, of More- 
head City, have announced the birth on 
May 2 of a son, E. A., Jr. Mr. Coun- 
cil is cashier of the Marine Bank. 
— Dr. W. P. Jacocks is now located at 
Galla Face Hospital, Colombo, Ceylon. 
Dr. Jacocks is director over a consider- 
able area for the health service of the 
International Health Commission. 
— John H. Vaughan is dean of the school 
of general science and professor of his- 
tory and economics in the New Mexico 
College of Agriculture and Mechanic 
Arts, at State College, N. M. This in- 
stitution was ranked by the U. S. Bu- 
reau of Education in 1912 as one of the 
half dozen leading agricultural colleges 
of the country. 

1905 
W. T. Shore, Secretary, 
Charlotte, N. C. 
— Jas. E. Barry, Law '05, former Caro- 
lina football star, practices law in Nor- 
folk, Va. 

— A. M. Noble, for the past four years 
chief judge of native affairs at Pago, 
Pago, American Samoa, has resigned this 
post and returned to his home at Smith- 
field, where he has resumed the practice 
of law. 

— Dr. G. C. Singletary practices medicine 
at his home town, Clarkton. He is a 
member of the local school board. Dr. 
Singletary was in the school business for 
several years and served as superintendent 
of the Burlington schools. 
— Rev. Francis A. Cox, lately ordained 
into the Episcopal ministry, sailed on Au- 
gust 18 from Vancouver for Shanghai, 
where he will take up his work in the 
foreign mission field. Mr. Cox, who was 
formerly a lawyer in Raleigh in part- 
nership with his brother, Col. Albert L. 
Cox, '04, saw service overseas as a first 
lieutenant of field artillery with the 82nd 
division. 

1906 

Maj. J. A. Parker, Secretary, 

Washington, D. C. 

— Roy M. Brown is field agent with the 

N. C. department of public wlefare, 

Raleigh. 

— J. W. Winborne practices law at Mar- 
ion in the firm of Pless, Winborne, and 
Pless. 

— J. S. Calvert is U. S. Consul at Basse 
Terre, Guadeloupe, French West Indies. 
— Julian S. Miller, one of the best known 
newspaper men in the State, has been 
for several years editor of the Charlotte 
Neius. 

— Ham C. Jones practices his profession, 
law, in Charlotte. Mr. Jones was form- 
erly judge of the Charlotte city court 
and, following that, was assistant dis- 
trict attorney for the western N. C. dis- 
trict. 



J. F. Pickard Store 

HEAVY AND FANCY 
GROCERIES 

Opposite Campus 
CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 



Electric Shoe Shop 

Expert Shoe Repairing 
CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 



ft A 

WELCOME TO 


STONEWALL HOTEL 


A. D. GANNAWAY, Manager 


CHARLOTTE, N. C. 
v. 1 



Campbell-Warner Co. 

FINE MONUMENTS 

REASONABLE PRICES. WRITE US 

Phono 1131 

RALEIGH, N. 0. 



CHAS. 


C. HOOK, 


ARCHITECT 


CHARLOTTE, N. C. 


Twenty 
planning 
ings. 


years ' experience in 
school and college build- 

' 



The Peoples National Bank 

WINSTON-SALEM, N. 0. 

Capital $150,000 U. S. Depository 

J. W. Fries, Pres. W. A. Blair, V.-P. 

N. Mitchell, Cashier 

J. M. Dean, Assistant Cashier 



Dillon Supply Co. 

Machinery, Mill Supplies 
RALEIGH, N. C. 



n 


R. BLACKNALL & SON 


DRUGGISTS 


Norms and Huyler's Candies 


G. Bernard, Manager 


Corcoran Street Durham, N. C. 

J- ' 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



27 



Main Street Pharmacy 

LEADING DRUGGISTS 
Durham, N. C. 



Huffine Hotel 

Quick Lunch Counter and Dining 

Room 

Rooms $1.00 and Up Near the Depot 

Greensboro, N. C 
J. R. Donnell, Prop, and Manager 



ANDREW'S CASH STORE 

CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 
Students and Faculty Headquarters 
for Cluetts, and E. & W. Shirts, Ral- 
ston and Walk Over Shoes, Sure Fit 
Caps. Hole-proof and Phoenix Hose. 
M. Moses Tailored Clothing, General 
furnishings. 

SERVICE— QUALITY— STYLES 
JACK ANDREWS' DEPARTMENT 



Obc XCttiversit? Jp rcss 

Zeb P. Council, Mgr. 

Printing, Engraved Cards 

QUALITY AND SERVICE 
CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 



BAIN-KIMBALL CO. 

Makers of 

STANDARD MONUMENTS 

DURHAM. N. C. 



HOTEL CLEGG 

Greensboro, N. C. 

opposite station 

Boohs *i 50 and Dp 

Cafe in Connection 

CAROLINA MEN WELCOME 



PATTERSON BROS. 

DRUGGISTS 

Agency Norris Candy The Rexall Store 
Chapel Hill, N. C. 



POLLARD BROS. 

DURHAM, N. C. 

STANDARD LINES OF HARD- 
WARE AND SPORTING 
GOODS 



— A. H. Bahnson, of Winston-Salem, was 
elected president of the N. C. Cotton 
Manufacturers' Association at the annual 
convention held in Asheville in July. Mr. 
Bahnson is president and treasurer of 
the Arista Mills, at Winston-Salem, and 
treasurer of the Mayo Mills, at Mayodan, 
and the Washington Mills, at Fries, Va. 
He has been engaged in cotton man- 
ufacturing since his graduation from the 
University in 1906. 

1907 

C. L. Weill, Secretary, 
Greensboro, N. C. 
— The Matheson firm of Charlotte phy- 
sicians will construct an eye, ear, nose 
and throat hospital. Dr. Henry L- 
Sloan, '07, is a member of this firm of 
specialists. 

—Mr. and Mrs. Duncan P. Tillett, of 
Charlotte, have announced the birth in 
August of a daughter, Wilma Inez. Mr. 
Tillett is cashier of the Union National 
Bank in his home city. 
— W. S. O'B. Robinson, Jr., sits at the 
head of the legal department of the 
Southern Power Co., Charlotte. Associ- 
ated with him in the legal department 
is Robert S. Hutchison, '02, of Charlotte. 
— S. G. Noble is head of the depart- 
ment of education and of the extension 
division of Millsaps College, at Jackson, 
Miss. During the summer he was in the 
faculty of Peabody College at Nash 
ville, Tenn. 

— S. H. Farabee, '07, editor of the Hick 
ory Record, was elected in July as sec- 
ond vice president of the N. C. Press As- 
sociation. R. E. Price, '19, editor of 
the Rutherfordton Sun, was elected treas- 
urer. E. B. Jeffries, '07, manager of the 
Greensboro News, resigned as secretary. 

1908 
M. Robins, Secretary, 
Greensboro, N. C. 
— Dr. L. L. Hobbs, Jr., is chief resident 
surgeon at the University hospital, Phil- 
adelphia. 

— W. E. Yelverton is with David Law- 
rence, Inc. He lives at 2815 Ordway St., 
Washington, D. C. 

— F. L. Dunlap practices law at Wades- 
boro and represents his district in the 
Shite Senate. 

— Announcement has been made of the 
engagement of Miss Ethel Terrell and 
Mr. Guy Weaver, both of Asheville. Miss 
Terrell was until recently superintendent 
of the Buncombe County schools. 
— M. L. Wright has resigned the sup<r 
intendency of the Chowan County schools 
at Edenton and has taken up his duties 
as head of the Carteret County schools 
at Beaufort. 

—Dr. J. B. Watson, M.D., '08, practices 
medicine in Raleigh with offices in the 
Citizens National Bank Building. 



The Selwyn Hotel 

-CHARLOTTE, N. C 

Fireproof, Modern and Luxurious 

IN THE HEART OF EVERYTHING 

H. C. Lazalere, Manager 



H. S. STORR CO. 

Office Furniture, Machines and Sup- 
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facturers of Rubber 
Stamps 
RALEIGH, N. C. 



Whiting-Horton Co. 

Thirty-three Years Raleigh's 
Leading Clothiers 



Snider-Fletcher Co. 

WATCHES, DIAMONDS, AND 
JEWELRY 

110 W. Main St. Durham, N. C. 



- Flowers for alt Occasions 

DURHAM FLORAL 
NURSERY 

Chapel Hill Agents: EUBANKS DRUG COMPANY 



Paris Theatre 

DURHAM, N. C. 

ARTCRAFT-PARAMOUNT 
PICTURES 



Orchestra 



Orchestra 



Broadway Theatre 

DURHAM, N. C. 

THE HOUSE OF SPECIAL 
PHOTO PLAY ATTRAC- 
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Euhanks Drug Co. 

CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 
Aiients for Nunnally'N Candies 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



— Chas. A. Hines, Law '08, Greensboro 
attorney, has been elected president of 
the recently organized Civitan Club of 
Greensboro. Other alumni "who are char- 
ter members of this club are : H. B. Gun- 
ter, '08, vice-president of the Southern 
Life and Trust Co.; C. R. Wharton, '12, 
attorney; G. B. Phillips, '13, principal 
of the Greensboro high school; Dr. J. W. 
Tnnkersley, '04, physician; T. R. Foust, 
'92, county superintendent of schools ; 
and T. Moody Stroud, '02, dry goods 
merchant. 

1909 
O. C. Cox, Secretary, 
Greensboro, N. C. 
— J. H. Little is with the General Elec- 
tric Co., at Charlotte. He lives at 509 
N. Graham St. He registered while in 
the University from Pinetops. 
— Dr. N. B. Cannady practices medicine 
at Laurinburg. He served overseas as 
a captain in the medical corps with the 
80th Division. 

— Chas. D. Mclver is engaged in the 
cotton business at Greensboro with the 
firm of J. E. Latham and Co. 
— J. H. McLain is now engaged in the 
practice of law at Gastonia. He has 
been located previously at Charlotte and 
at Union Springs, Ala. 
— The engagement of Miss Winifred ' 
Watkins Cousin, of Danville, Va., and 
Mr. Burney Simeon Warren, of Green- 
ville, Phar. '09, has been announced. 
The wedding will take place in the 
early fall. 

— The engagement of Miss Frances 
Brack and Mr. Joseph Graham Pitz 
Simons has been announced, and the 
wedding will take place in November 
at San Francisco, where Miss Brack lives. 
Mr. Fitz Simons is president and gen- 
eral manager of the Carolinas Auto Sup- 
ply House, Charlotte, one of the largest 
jobbers of automotive equipment in the 
south. In the World War Mr. Fitz 
Simons was in aviation service as first 
lieutenant. 

1910 

J. R. Nixon, Secretary, 

Edenton, N. C. 

— M. S. Beam, superintendent of the 

Newton schools, was married during the 

summer. 

— E. B. Beasley is cashier of the Bank 
of Fountain, at Fountain. 
— R. D. Eames is an official of the 
Eames-Luckett Corporation, distributors 
of U. S. official pictures of the World 
War, with headquarters at 155 E. Su- 
perior St., Chicago, 111. 
— B. F. Taylor is president of the firm 
of B. F. Taylor and Co., wholesale 
grocers of Maxton. He has been mar- 
ried five years and has two children, 
a boy and a girl. Will be glad to see 



any of the old-timers when they pass 
through Maxton. 

— Rev. and Mrs. Hoke Ramseur are on 
leave of absence from their posts as 
missionaries to Liberia and are visiting 
at Mr. Ramseur 's home in China Grove. 
Mr. Ramseur has been in Liberia for 
two years and Mrs. Ramseur has been 
a medical missionary there for six years. 
They will go back the first of the year. 

1911 
I. C. Mosek, Secretary, 
Asheboro, N. C. 
— Capt. John E. Wood, U. S. A., is 
engineer commissioner for the District of 
Columbia, with residence at 1014 16th 
St. N. W., Washington, D. C. He has 
charge of all engineering projects in 
the District. 

— Dr. John Warton Harris and Miss 
Margaret Ivey were married on Septem- 
ber 14 in Raleigh. They live in Balti- 
more. Dr. Harris is in the faculty ' of 
the medical school of Johns Hopkins 
University. 

— J. Allen Austin, High Point lawyer 
and a representative of Guilford County 
in the House of the N. C. Legislature, 
has been endorsed by the Democratic 
executive committee of High Point town- 
ship for the nomination for solicitor of 
the 12th judicial district. 
— W. M. Parsley has bought the inter- 
est of John F. Durham, '18, in the Char- 
lotte Wagon and Auto Co., and is now 
vice-president and treasurer of this com- 
pany. Mr. Parsley was formerly act- 
ively identified with the group of mills 
at Spindale, which are under the gen- 
eral management of Kenneth Tanner. 
He retains his interest in the Spindale 
mills but is located at Charlotte. 
— Rev. I. Harding Hughes, '11, and his 
father, Dr. N. C. Hughes, are head- 
masters of a preparatory school for boys, 
recently founded at Raleigh, styled the 
Saint Nicholas School. Dr. Hughes was 
formerly headmaster of the Trinity 
School at Chocowinity. Rev. Harding 
Hughes served for several years as chap- 
lain of St. George's School, Newport, 
R. I. Prospects for the new prepara- 
tory school have been pronounced good. 

1912 

J. C. Lockhart, Secretary, 
Raleigh, N. C. 

— Thos. B. Slade, of Hamilton, is en- 
gaged in farming and merchandising. 
He was married recently. 
— Luke Lamb has been named by Com- 
missioner A. D. Watts as chief of depu- 
ties in the State department of revenue 
at Raleigh. 

— C. R. Thomas is editor and manager of 
the Professional Engineer, a magazine 
published by the American Association 
of Engineers at 63 Adams St., Chicago, 



111. This magazine has 28,000 sub- 
scribers. 

— To the list of Carolina editors, pub- 
lished last spring in the Alumni Re- 
view, should be added the name of Rev. 
Frederick B. Drane, Episcopal mission- 
ary at Nenana, Alaska. Mr. Drane is 
editor and publisher of The Alaskan 
Churchman, ' ' published quarterly at 
Nenana in the interest of the church 's 
work in Alaska. ' ' Mr. Drane edits the 
' ' farthest north ' ' publication in North 
America, perhaps in the world. Mr. 
Drane is now on leave at his home in 
Edenton. Upon his return to Alaska 
he will take the place of archdeacon, 
made vacant by the death of Archdeacon 
Stuck. 

1913 
A. L. M. Wiggins, Secretary, 
Hartsville, S. C. 
— Two members of the class of 1913 
have entered the banking field and both 
have achieved success: Thos. H. Norwood 
as cashier of the National Bank of Golds- 
boro, and George Carmichael as cashier 
of the Commerical and Savings Bank 
of Franklinton. 

— The class of 1913 came prominently 
to the front in the medical examinations 
held in Raleigh in July, when Dr. Wm. 
A. Kirksey took first place and Dr. Ernest 
H. Alderman carried off second place. 
Dr. Kirksey is practicing medicine at 
Oxford and Dr. Alderman is in hospital 
service. Of further interest to alumni 
is the fact that Dr. R. C. Mitchell, '17, 
of Mount Airy, won third place in the 
examinations. 

1914 
Oscar Leach, Secretary, 
Raeford, N. C. 
— D. G. Kelly is engaged in the life in- 
surance business in Wilmington. 
— Mr. and Mrs. A. M. Worth, who have 
made their home in Wilmington for sev- 
eral years, have moved to Durham, where 
Mr. Worth is engaged in business. 
— Capt. H. W. Collins, Engineer Corps, 
U. S. A., visited the Hill in August. 
Capt. Collins, who served overseas in the 
77th Division, is stationed at Camp Dix, 
N. J. 

1915 
D. L. Bell, Secretary, 
Pittsboro, N. C. 
■ — Major Thomas Smith and Miss Net- 
tie Dixon were married recently in 
Greensboro. They live at Reidsville. Mr. 
Smith practices law and is secretary of 
the Reidsville chamber of eomerce. 
— Edward Yates Keesler and Miss Anne 
Dewey Chambers, both of Charlotte, will 
be married in the early fall. Mr. Keesler 
is associated with his father in the build- 
ing and loan business in Charlotte. He 
saw eighteen months service overseas as 
captain of field artillery. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



29 



1921 
C. W. Phillips, Secretary, 
Greensboro, N. C. 
— Members of the class of '21 will please 
send to C. W. Phillips, Secretary, 406 
Tate St., Greensboro, information as to 
their present whereabouts and activities. 
This information should be sent at an 
early date. 

— John Shaw and Lee Gregory are study- 
ing law at Harvard. They room together. 
— W. E. Berryhill is teaching in Baird 's 
School for Boys, Charlotte. 
— W. H. Bobbitt is connected with a 
law firm in Charlotte. He wDl continue 
his reading of law there. 
— Donnell Van Noppen is teaching mathe- 
matics in the Burlington high school. 
— A. G. Griffin is principal of the Ad- 
vance high school. 

— LeGette Blythe is in the faculty of the 
Greensboro high school. 
— Sihon Cicero Ogburn, Jr., and Miss 
Bessie Mae Bell were married in June 
at Raleigh. 

— A. C. Lineberger, Jr., is with the 
Aberfoy Mfg. Co., at Chester Pa. He is 
studying the mercerizing business. 

1922 
— Jay Bivens has located at Gastonia 
where he is engaged in the practice of 
law. 

NECROLOGY 
1857 
—Colonel Cadwallader Polk, A.B. 1857, 
died at Helena, Ark., July 9 in his 84th 
year. Col. Polk, who registered at the 
University from Columbia, Tenn., saw 
service in the Confederate armies, hold- 
ing the rank of colonel. He was a 
nephew of Bishop and Lieutenant Gen- 
eral Leonidas Polk, of the class of 1825, 
and a cousin of President James K. 
Polk, of the class of 1818. Col. Polk 
located in Arkansas as a planter at the 
close of the Civil War, and became one 
of the best-known men of eastern Arkan- 
sas. He spent his last years at Helena. 

1860 
—Major Charles Haigh, A.B. 1860, died 
July 16 at his home in Fayetteville, aged 
83 years. Major Haigh saw service 
throughout the Civil War, starting at the 
battle of Bethel. He became lieutenant- 
colonel in Confederate service. Follow- 
ing the surrender at Appomattox, Major 
Haigh returned to his home city, Payette 
ville, and established the hardware busi- 
ness, which he conducted to the day of 
his death. 

1861 
— Joseph Clinch Bellamy, A.B. 1861, 
died at Whitakers December 3 in his 
81st year. .Mr. Bellamy was in Con- 
federate service as an ordnance sergeant. 
He settled down to the life of a planter 



at the close of the war. He was a mem- 
ber of the State Senate in 1895 and was 
a member of the board of directors of 
the State hospital from 1895 until 1901. 

1862 
— Judge Adolphus Leigh Fitzgerald, A.B. 

1862, of Eureka, Nevada, died August 
31 at the home of his son in Boston, 
Mass., 80 years of age. After his grad- 
uation Judge Fitzgerald entered the 
army of the Confederacy and, following 
the close of the war, lie moved to Nevada. 
Soon after locating in Nevada, he was 
appointed circuit judge and afterwards 
was elected a member of the Supreme 
Court of Nevada and eventually became 
chief justice of this court. At the time 
(if his death he was dean of the supreme 
consistory, 33 degree Scottish Rite Ma- 
sons, southern jurisdiction. He was a 
native of Rockingham County. 

Judge Tim Ervin Cooper, one year be- 
hind Judge Fitzgerald, in the class of 

1863, a native of Mississippi, became 
chief justice of the Supreme Court of 
Mississippi. Judge Walter Clark, of the 
same college generation, class of 1864, 
is chief justice of the Supreme Court of 
North Carolina. Judge Augustus Van 
Wyck, of New York, also a member of 
the class of 1864, achieved distinction on 
the New York Supreme Court bench. 

— Colonel John Wetmore Hinsdale, A.B. 
1911 as 1862, died September 15 at his 
home in Raleigh, 78 years of age. In 
the Civil War Col. Hinsdale served on 
the staff of General Pettigrew and later 
became colonel of the 72nd Regiment of 
North Carolina troops. At the time of 
his death he was the ranking officer of 
N. C. troops. Col. Hinsdale had a long 
and noted career at the bar and had 
been for some years Raleigh's oldest 
lawyer as well as the only survivor of 
the famous Raleigh bar which included 
such figures as Judge George Strong and 
Bartholomew F. Moore. He was a former 
president of the N. C. Bar Association. 
His son, J. W. Hinsdale, Jr., was grad- 
uated from the University in 1900. 

1863 
— Capt. Edwin R. Outlaw died August 
lit at his home in Elizabeth City, aged 
si years. Capt. Outlaw was a student in 
the University in isr>!!-fi0. He served 
through the Civil War with the rank of 
captain in Confederate service. He set- 
tled down as a planter in Bertie county 
when the war was over, and later moved 
to Elizabeth City. His son, A. B. Out- 
law, is an alumnus of the University, 
class of 1914. 

1866 
— A. Ferdinand Johnson, A.B. 1911 as 
1866, died May 5 at his home in Clin- 
ton, 76 years of age. Mr. Johnson left 
the University to enlist in Confederate 
service. When the war was over he 



located in Clinton, where he was held 
always in highest esteem, and where he 
was engaged in the mercantile business 
and in banking until the time of his 
death. F. B. Johnson, his son, was 
graduated from the University in 1897. 

1868 
— Judge Thomas Alexander McNeill, 
A.B. 1868, died August 2 at Lumberton, 
79 years of age. Judge McNeill, a vet- 
eran of the Civil War, lived a long life 
of usefulness to his section and his State, 
and was one of Robeson County 's most 
distinguished sons. He was judge of 
Superior Court from 1896 to 1904, and 
was first president of the National Bank 
of Lumberton. His son, T. A. McNeill, 
Jr., is -an alumnus of the University, 
class of 1906. 

1889 
— Richard Burton McLaughlin died on 
December 2 at his home in Statesville, 
56 years of age. He was a student of 
law in the University in 1888-89. He 
located in Statesville after receiving his 
license and was engaged in the practice 
of law there until the time of his death. 
He was a member of the State Senate in 
1893 and again in 1903. 

1892 
— Robert Strange MacRae died at his 
home in Chapel Hill July 24, 73 years 
of age. Mr. MacRae was a special stu- 
dent in the University in 1891 92. He 
had been for many years a well-known 
and well-beloved Chapel Hill figure. 
Early in the Wilson administration he 
became postmaster and was holding this 
office at the time of his death. Chapel 
Hill 's handsome new postoffiee came 
about largely through his work and in- 
fluence. All of his sons are alumni of 
the University : Lawrence, of Greensboro ; 
Cameron, of Concord; Don, of Thomas- 
ville ; and Robert, Jr., of San Francisco. 

1895 
— James Norfleet Pruden died July 23 
at his home in Edenton, 48 years of 
age. -Mr. Pruden was a student in the 
academic department of the University 
in 1891-92, 1892-93, 1893-94, and he 
studied law in 1894 95. He practiced 
law continuously in Edenton after leav- 
ing the University. He had been for a 
number of years chairman of the board 
of school commissioners of Edenton and 
in this capacity had performed note- 
worthy service for his town and section. 
His daughter, Miss Lina Pruden, is a 
member of the class of 1922 in the 
University. 

1898 
—Walter Rice Thompson, B.S. 1898, died 
in the prime of his manhood on Septem- 
ber 20 at his home in Winston-Salem, 
aged 46 years. Mr. Thompson entered 
the school profession after his gradua- 



30 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



tion in 1898 and was a sehool official at 
Concord first and later at Greensboro. 
In 1908 he became the first superinten- 
dent of the Stonewall Jackson Training 
School at Concord. In 1914 he resigned 
this superintendency and became super- 
intendent of the Methodist Children 's 
Home at Winston-Salem, a connection 
which he retained until his death. Mr. 
Thompson achieved splendidly at every- 
thing to which he put his hand and his 
big, cheerful, strong influence is missed 
in many quarters. His son, Winbourne 
Thompson, is a student in the University, 
class of 1924. 

1900 
— William Jasper Christian, Jr., died 
September 1 at Durham. He was a stu- 
dent in the law school of the University 
in 1899-00. 

1901 

— Curtis Marley Muse, lawyer of Carth- 
age and one time member of the State 
Senate, died September 8 at his home. 
Mr. Muse was a student in the law 
school of the University in 1899-00. Dur- 
ing the war he was a special attorney 
for the Department of Justice. 

1908 
— Anna Hartwell Lewis died on March 
15. She was a graduate student in the 
University in 1907 08 and was a native 
of Goldsboro. 



1910 
— Dr. Oscar Eason, M.D. 1910, died June 
29 at Goldsboro, where he had been en- 
gaged for several years in the practice 
of medicine. 

1912 
— Randall Avera Winston, merchant of 
Warrenton, died on August 28 at Roan- 
oke, Va., 28 years of age. He was a 
student in the law school of the Uni- 
versity in 1911-12. 

1915 
— Miss Alma Kornegay, formerly a resi- 
dent of Chapel Hill, died on November 
15. She was a student in the class of 
1915 for one year. 

1917 
— Thomas Richard Dale died September 
4 at the public health hospital, Tuscon, 
Arizona. He saw service overseas as 
a member of Battery B, 329th Field 
Artillery. He contracted .tuberculosis 
while in service and never recovered. 
His home was at Morganton. Interment 
was at Arlington with full military 
honors.. 

1918 
— Mrs. Irene Graves Hanks died Novem- 
ber 20. She was a student in the law 
school of the University in 1917-18. 
— Thomas Battle Williams died on Sep- 
tember 3 in St. Louis, aged 26 years. 
He was a student in the law school of 
the University in 1916-17. In the World 



War he saw infantry service overseas 
and lately had been a student of jour- 
mi lism in the University of Missouri. 

1923 

— Jesse Willis Grainger died at New 
Bern on August 7, death coming as the 
result of an automobile accident. He 
was a student in the University in 1919- 
20 and 1920-21. 

— James Marion Parrott, Jr., died on 
August 6 at New Bern, death resulting 
from an automobile accident. He had 
been a student in the University for the 
past two years, a member of the class 
of 1923. 

JUSTICE W. R. ALLEN 
— Associate Justice William Reynold 
Allen died September 7 at his home in 
Goldsboro. Not an alumnus of the Uni- 
versity himself, Judge Allen had been 
for the past two summers a lecturer 
before the Summer Law School, and he 
was throughout his life a strong friend 
and supporter of the University, both in- 
side and outside df legislative halls. 
Judge Allen practiced law in Goldsboro 
for a period of years, became judge of 
Superior Court, and in 1910 was elected 
to a justiceship on the Supreme Court 
bench. W. R. Allen, Jr., his son, is an 
alumnus of the University, class of 1918. 
O. H. Allen, Jr., his second son, is a 
member of the class of 1923. 



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Scholarship Service 

THE = 



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Offers to Women a Liberal Education, Equipment for Womanly 
Service, Professional Training for Remunerative Employment 



The College offers four groups of studies lead- 
ing to the following degrees: Bachelor of Arts, 
Bachelor of Science, and Bachelor of Music. 

Special courses in Pedagogy ; in Manual Arts ; in 
Domestic Science Household Art and Economics ; in 
Music; and in the Commercial Branches. 

Teachers and graduates of other colleges provided 
for in both regular and special courses. 



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Fall c Cerm Opens in September 



Summer T?erm Begins in June 



For catalogue and other information, address 

JULIUS I. FOUST, President, GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Let Fatima smokers tell you 

Ask the newspaper men 



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MATHEMATICS 



SOCIOLOGY 



The University is particularly anxious to serve former students of the 
University and colleges who have been forced to give up study before re- 
ceiving the bachelor's degree. The correspondence courses this year are 
adapted to the needs of such students and teachers. All courses offered 
count toward the A.B. Tell your friends about these courses. 

Write today for full information to 

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UNIVERSITY EXTENSION DIVISION 
CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 






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Sell all kinds of furniture and furnishings for churches, 
colleges and homes. Biggest stock of Rugs in the 
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ask the College Proctor or the editor of the "Review." 
Call on or write for whatever you may need in our line. 

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Your Successor 



How will the successor to vour fortune conserve it? 



You nyide many mis-steps in investing, 
particularly in your younger days. But for 
them your fortune would be larger. Will 
your successor repeat? 

Here is a suggestion ; think it over : 

Give your successor a good investment 
training now. Establish an acquaintance 
with safe counsel and proper methods. This 
will avail much after vour demise. 



The way to accomplish this is to employ 
the "Wachovia Trust Plan" for creating, 
by installments, an independent estate for 
your successor, and let him or her attend 
to details in connection therewith. 

This plan will serve a double purpose : 
It will create a fortune that might otherwise 
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WACHOVIA BANK AND TRUST CO. 



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Capital and Surplus $2,000,000.00 
Member Federal Reserve System 

W1NSTON-SALEM, N. C. 
SALISBURY 



HIGH POINT 



university Lubrai*-, ' 



VOL. X, No. 2 >^*->v-» NOVEMBER, 1921 

We 

Alumni Review 

The University of North Carolina 








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PRESIDENT CHASE AND MAJOR GRAHAM HEAD THE ACADEMIC PROCESSION 

CAROLINA CELEBRATES HER 128th BIRTHDAY 
ALUMNI SEND GREETINGS TO ALMA MATER 
SUMMER BALL AND ATHLETIC ELIGIBILITY 

MANY ASSOCIATIONS HOLD MEETINGS 





Murphy's Hotel 

Richmond, Virginia 



CTHE most modern, largest 
and best located Hotel in 
^chmond, being on direct 
car line to all c Railroad 
depots. 

THE only Hotel in the city 
•with a garage attached. .: 



Headquarters for Carolina 
Business Men 



JAMES T. DISNEY, President 

OPERATED ON EUROPEAN 
PLAN 



The Big Thing 
In College 

as in life is the start. 
Start off with a life in- 
surance policy. It is 
no longer a luxury but 
a necessity to the col- 
lege man. 

First: Place protec- 
tion on your life while 
you are young and able 
to get it. 

Second: Insure your 
education. 

Third: Create early 
the habit of saving. 

You have faith in your 
State and its enter- 
prises. Well, keep your 
business at home, and 
insure with 



The 
University Agency, Inc. 

JEFFERSON STANDARD LIFE 
INSURANCE COMPANY 

J. W. Umstead, Jr., Pres. 
W. H. Andrews, Jr., Sec. and Treas. 

AGENTS 

B. C. Brown I. H. Butt 

J. D. Dorsett P. A. Reavis, Jr. 

W. D. Harris 



Individual Service to Carolina 
Men" 



WHY NOT MAKE YOUR CONTRIBUTION TO 

THE ALUMNI LOYALTY FUND 

By means of an Endowment Insurance Policy? The volume 
of "bequest insurance" is growing by leaps and bounds. It's 
the safest and surest way of making a bequest. Policies from 
$250 to $50,000 may be had in the 

Southern Life and Trust Company 



HOME OFFICE 




"The Multiple Line Company" GREENSBORO, N. C. 
CAPITAL $1,000,000.00 




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The First National 
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OF DURHAM 

A large, up-to-date banking institution 
privileged to be of State-wide service, 
always at the disposal of the University 
of North Carolina, its faculty, student- 
body and alumni in the transaction of 
their banking matters. 



JULIAN s. CARE, President 

W. .1. HOLLOWAT, Vice-President 

CLAIBOEN M. CAEB, Vice President 

SOUTHGATE JONES, Cashier 

W. J. BROGDEN, Attorney 



CAPITAL, SURPLUS AND PROFITS, $1,100,000 
RESOURCES OVER $6,000,000 



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