(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "The alumni review [serial]"

I 












-.'^ I 




BH 
■BHHHsbK 




■ 

****** ■■■■■ 

B 

■hi 




^ 



2f3 



t_!^* 



-£ 




«' 



<£ 





HSU! 

HI 



HraKl 

lis 










Library of 
The University of North Carolina 



COLLECTION OF 

NORTH CAROLINIANA 



ENDOWED BY 

JOHN SPRUNT HILL 

of the Class of 1889 






-2 



v.H 



C.?o 




This book must not be 
taken from the Library 
building. 



*f Sill 



SEP 361 



L'fcrary 



THE ROYA LL & BORDEN CO. 

Chapel Hill St., Opposite Grand Central Garage DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA 



Sell all kinds of furniture and furnishings for churches, 
colleges and homes. Biggest stock of Rugs in the 
State, and at cheapest prices. Cfllf you don't know us 
ask the College Proctor or the editor of the "Review." 
Call on or write for whatever you may need in our line. 



THE ROYALL & BORDEN CO. 



How Complete is Our Service? 



As complete as your financial 
needs. From the handling of a 
savings account to the administra- 
tion of a large estate, from the exe- 
cution of an order for the purchase 
of securities to the underwriting of 
an issue of bonds, The Wachovia is 
able to serve you. 

Here under one roof we can meet 



your every financial need. The 
facilities of our various depart- 
ments are at your service. If your 
requirements are in the field of 
commercial banking or if you need 
advice on matters of trust, if you 
wish to open a personal checking 
account or to rent a safe-deposit 
box, you have merely to call on The 
Wachovia. 



t» WACHOVIA 

BANK AND TRUST COMPANY 



Winston-Salem 
Asheville 



NORTH CAROLINA 



Raleigh 



High Point 
Salisbury 



FOR EVERY FINANCIAL NEED 
Commercial Banking---Trusts---Savings---Safe Deposit- --Investments-- -Insurance 



University i^iorMy, . , 



VOL. XI, No. 5 



FEBRUARY, 1923 



Alumni Review 

The University of North Carolina 




THE CHAPEL HILL BAPTIST CHURCH NOW UNDER CONSTRUCTION 



THE PRESIDENT'S REPORT 



ALUMNI HOLD MANY HOLIDAY BANQUETS 



COL. J. BRYAN CRIMES DIES 



HEARD AND SEEN AROUND THE WELL 



Murphy's Hotel 

Richmond, Virginia 



CTHE most modern, largest 
and best located Hotel in 
^chmond, being on direct 
car line to all c Railroad 
depots. 

THE only Hotel in the city 
'with a garage attached 



Headquarters for Carolina 
Business Men 



JAMES T. DISNEY, President 



OPERATED ON EUROPEAN 
PLAN 



^^\Qdei^bilt TtfaS 

JhirlyJo 



'ouvilifireei east ai fkrkAvenue 
OXev/y*x&QiL\( 




AN HOTEL OF DISTINCTION 

WITH MODERATE TARIFF 

WALTON H. MARSHALL 
Manager 




The Bon Air-Vanderbilt 

Augusta, Georgia 



Two picturesque golf courses. 
Tennis. Horseback riding. 
Motoring. 300 rooms, each 
with bath. Management un- 
der the direction of the Van- 
derbilt Hotel, New York. 




American Tubular Steel Combination Desk 



American Tubular 
Steel Desks 



High Grade Steel Frame Desks 
of Different Styles used in the Best 
Schools. Stock of Combination 
Desks carried in Charlotte Ware- 
house for immediate delivery. 

Full Line of Auditorium Chairs 
and other School Furniture. 

Samples and Prices submitted on 
Request. 



Blackboards, Crayon, Erasers, Globes, Etc.. 
also carried in stock 



Write for catalogue 



/■N 1» CI JO If** 119 Brevard Court 

Carolina ochool oupply Co. charlotte, n. c 




i4- 




1 



s n a MJJ 




CAPITAL, SURPLUS AND PROFITS, $1,100,000 
RESOURCES OVER $6,000,000 



The First National 
Bank 

OF DURHAM 

A large, up-to-date banking institution 
privileged to be of State-wide service, 
always at the disposal of the University 
of North Carolina, its faculty, student- 
body and alumni in the transaction of 
their banking matters. 



JULIAN s. CARE, President 

W. J. HOLLOWAY, Vice-President 

CLAIBORN M. CARR, Vice-President 

SOUTHGATE JONES, Cashier 

W. J. BROGDEN, Attorney 



The Trust Department 

OF THE 

First National Trust Company 

of Durham, North Carolina 



o 



FFERS safety and service in handling 
of estates and trust funds and acts as 
executor, administrator, trustee, guard- 
ian and receiver. 



FIRST NATIONAL TRUST CO. 

JAS. 0. COBB, President JULIAN S. CARR, Vice-President 

W. J. HOLLOWAY Vice-President J. F. GLASS, Treasurer 

C. M. CARR, Chairman, Board of Directors 



WHY NOT MAKE YOUR CONTRIBUTION TO 

THE ALUMNI LOYALTY FUND 

By means of an Endowment Insurance Policy? The volume 
of "bequest insurance" is growing by leaps and bounds. It's 
the safest and surest way of making a bequest. Policies from 
$250 to $50,000 may be had in the 

Southern Life and Trust Company 




HOME OFFICE "The Multiple Line Company" GREENSBORO, N. C. 

CAPITAL $1,000,000.00 

A. W. McAlister, President A. M. Scales, Second VicePresident 

R. G. Vaughn, First Vice-President H. B. Gunter, Third Vice-President 
Arthur Watt, Secretary 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



Volume XI 



FEBRUARY, 1923 



Number 5 



OPINION AND COMMENT 



What the University Is Asking For 

In its last issue The Review set forth in general 
terms what the University was asking of the legis- 
lature for the next biennium. Since then, the definite 
figures have been furnished the alumni through a 
special pamphlet entitled Budget Requests, 1923-25, 
sent out by the Alumni Secretary. For convenience 
the detailed analyses of the requests are summarized 
on another page, and, likewise for convenience, the 
totals are stated here: $2,317,380 was asked for 
buildings during the biennium, and $715,175 for 
1923-21 and $765,040 for 1924-25 for maintenance. 

n n □ 

The Budget Commission's Answer 

The answer of the Budget Commission, which was 
presented in a lengthy summary covering all State 
institutions and undertakings, was reported to the 
legislature on January 20. According to the report 
$1,650,000 (a cut of $667,380) is recommended as a 
building fund for the University ; $650,000 (a cut of 
65,175) is recommended for maintenance for 1923-24; 
and $675,000 (a cut of $90,040) for 1924-25. 

On the day following the submission of the report 
Raleigh papers carried the statement that although 
the Commission had signed the general report, the 
right had been reserved by one member to advocate 
the further cutting of items in the recommendations 
for various institutions, and that a similar opinion 
was held by other members of the Commission. 

□ □ D 

President Chase's Statement 

On the receipt of the answer made by the Com- 
mission, President Chase issued the following state- 
ment: 

The report of the Budget Commission shows clearly 
that the program entered upon two years ago for the 
expansion of the State's institutions is to be contin- 
ued, and it is gratifying to see that funds are avail- 
able to make this possible on a sound basis, with pro- 
vision for the setting up of a sinking fund to retire 
the bonds provided to cover the cost of permanent 
improvements. 

For the spirit of the Commission's report there 
will, 1 am sure, be hearty approval. North Carolina 
is rapidly coming to regard her institutions of higher 
education as opportunities for the wise investment of 
public funds, from which she may confidently expect 
immense returns. 

At the same time the University finds itself, so far 
as the maintenance recommendations of the Commis- 
sion are concerned, in a difficult situation. The main- 
tenance budget which was laid before the Commission 
was the result of weeks of careful study and of con- 
ferences with every . department and administrative 



officer of the institution. The final figures which 
were laid before the Commission were the result of a 
serious attempt to state the lowest amount on which 
this important branch of the State's business could be 
adequately conducted for the next two years. The 
whole request, before it went to the Commission, had 
been cut and trimmed to the lowest point at which it 
seemed safe to undertake the task. 

A cut of ten per cent in a budget so closely cal- 
culated is a serious matter. The quality of instruc- 
tion given to students must, of course, be maintained. 
But, in addition to this, the University is being called 
upon to render a great many services such as the ex- 
tension of its summer school to twelve weeks, in re- 
sponse to a demand from the teachers of the State ; 
the building up of its extension work, which cannot 
at present meet adequately anything like the demands 
upon it; the strengthening of its library to meet the 
increased demands upon it by students and faculty. 

And, obviously, the more building operations it 
conducts the larger must be its funds for upkeep of 
its grounds and for the keeping in condition of its 
material plant. A ten per cent reduction in a budget 
already reduced to the lowest terms compatible with 
business-like operation means that the University 
must hold back and sacrifice many important lines of 
service during the two-year period. 

The building fund which is recommended is an in- 
crease of $160,000 over that available for the last two- 
year period. This is gratifying, but I do not believe 
that the seriousness of the material conditions at the 
I niversity is generally recognized. In the housing 
and teaching of students the University is relatively 
where it was two years ago, except that it has made 
considerable progress in cleaning up the overcrowded 
conditions in its dormitory rooms. Aside from this 
it has not gained appreciably on the situation. I have 
not yet had time to consider the matter carefully, but 
I suspect that if the Commission's recommendations 
are followed it will be necessary, in order to keep up 
with the rising tide of increasing numbers, to spend 
the entire sum in new construction, leaving nothing 
for the reworking of the old buildings on the campus, 
which are in very bad shape and urgently need a 
thorough renovation and fireproofing. 

To mention another item, the University urgently 
needs a permanent water supply, with a reservoir and 
dam. For the past two years it has been able to open 
in the fall only through the installation of temporary 
lines. Such a permanent supply would be expensive, 
and with the absolutely necessary building construc- 
tion I do not now see how it is possible, nor can a 
number of other important improvements be made 
which are badly needed at once. 

The Budget Commission has done a careful and 
laborious piece of work, and, as I have said, with the 
spirit of its report there will be hearty agreement. 
But I do think that the public should know just the 



122 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



situation in which its recommendations would result 
so far as the progress of the University during the 
nest two years is concerned. 



□ □ □ 



A Further Word 



The foregoing statement by President Chase does 
not require any elaboration on the part of The Re- 
view. However, The Review does want to empha- 
size certain facts concerning the requests made of the 
legislature, and the effect the reduction will inevi- 
tably have if they stand as reported. 

The Review has recently had occasion to contrast 
the way in which the work of the University is car- 
ried on now and that, say, of six or ten years ago. 
President Chase refers to the change in his report 
(copies of which are now being mailed to alumni). 
Time was when the president and the executive com- 
mittee handled all the business affairs of the Univer- 
sity and the general faculty legislated, in the main, 
concerning the curriculum. Today, every school or 
division of the University is organized under its spe- 
cial faculty and administrative board or directorate, 
and the heads of these boards meet regularly every 
two weeks with the president and other administra- 
tive officers. As a result, every phase of the Univer- 
sity's work receives first the closest scrutiny of the 
individual school or department which it particularly 
concerns, and then is reviewed by the central admin- 
istrative committee. 

It is in this manner that the present budget for 
buildings and maintenance has been arrived at. Ex- 
act methods have been employed in making it out, 
and it represents what the University must have if it 
does the work which North Carolina, through its high 
schools, its teachers, its classes of business men, its 
women's clubs, its civic organizations, and its offices 
of State, is demanding of it. It has asked for noth- 
ing but that which the necessities of the State require, 
and on which the State can confidently look for a 
definite, profitable return. 

DDD 

What the Cut Will Do 

There are still other things about the recommend- 
ation that we wish to say. Some three or four years 
ago the editor of this publication was called on, among 
others, to meet with the Trustees of the University of 
South Carolina who were on an inspection trip to the 
University. We explained to the group the way in 
which the Library was administered, went into the 
plans and details of the Extension work, pointed out 
what function The Review performs in the life of 
the alumni and the University, and then sat in with 
the visitors at dinner in Swain Hall to see how the 
University handled that plant. Everything up to 
this point went smoothly. On the way back from the 
dining hall one of the visitors asked us if we would 
show him through the old dormitories. We clutched 
desperately at our heart, gasped, staggered, and tried 
to feign heart failure, in order to escape. But to no 
avail. We knocked on the door of a room in Old 
West, watched the expression of amazement spread 
over the countenance of the visitor, heard him ask 
the occupants, "Where do you bathe?", heard their 
answer, "In the Gym," and then broke out on to the 



campus to hear his verdict: "The boys at Columbia 
would not live in such quarters." 

We also remember Paul Whitlock's report to Gov- 
ernor Morrison two years ago ; and what we remember 
most vividly of all is that in the summers of 1921 and 
1922 these same century-old, bathtub-less-woefully- 
out-of-repair dormitories — Old East, Old West, the 
South Building — were crowded by North Carolina 
women who had taught nine months in North Carolina 
schoolrooms and were having to spend their vacation 
attending Summer School. 

To our mind that is the limit, but it is the sort of 
thing that the cut in the building budget must inevi- 
tably entail. It is the price in physical discomfort 
which the women teachers of North Carolina youth 
must pay when every dollar has to be spent for space 
rather than space and proper equipment. If the cut 
stands, it is inevitable that a choice will have to be 
made, and, judging from the past, the things that are 
and have been, some of them for 128 years, will have 
to remain as they are and were ! 

Shall We Stand and Wait 
and Hope, or Shall We Serve? 

The Review is also mindful of what a maintenance 
budget is like from which an allotment for contin- 
gencies and new undertakings is largely eliminated. 
In the University it is inevitable that the first con- 
sideration is instruction. That will have to be main- 
tained and will be maintained. But plans of devel- 
opment, possibilities which arise in a living organism 
such as the University is, which call for instant action 
if they are to yield their finest results, will have to 
wait. And, in many instances, die ! As Shakespeare 
said, "there's the rub." 

This institution, this University of North Carolina 
that has blessed and is blessing the State in countless 
ways, and which today has the opportunity of enlarg- 
ing its usefulness to a growing, forward-pressing 
citizenship, will, if the sort of cut indicated is made, 
to that extent, have to stand and wait and hope, 
instead of serve ! 

The President's Report 

As this issue of The Review reaches the alumni it 
will be accompanied by a copy of President Chase's 
Report to the Trustees. Although comment is made 
elsewhere on the report, every alumnus is urged to 
read it from the beginning to end. It summarizes in 
a most striking way the work of the University for 
the past two years, and sets forth the nature of the 
task to which the University must commit itself in 
the future. It is not a long document, it is conven- 
iently paragraphed, it tells an absorbingly interesting 
story of an institution which is making about the 
liveliest history we know of, and it is sent to you, 
fellow alumni, to be read ! 

□ □ □ 
J. Bryan Grimes 

Usefulness, efficiency, loyalty — these were the three 
characteristics of the late J. Bryan Grimes which so 
distinctly stampt his personality upon the State. One 
editorial writer listed him among "the five most use- 
ful and partiotic men in North Carolina"; another 
was deeply impressed by the fact that in a long and 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



123 



successful political career, his "only machine" was a 
record of efficient public service ; while all who knew 
him paid tribute to his sense of loyalty. 

Nothing which effects the welfare of North Caro- 
lina — politics, agriculture, transportation problems, 
history and literature, education — was foreign to his 
interest ; ever}- institution which he served — the State 
Government, the North Carolina Agricultural Society, 
the North Carolina Good Roads Association, the 
North Carolina Historical Commission, the Univer- 
sity of North Carolina — is more useful to the people 
of North Carolina today because of his passion for 
efficient service ; while hundreds of men and women 
in all parts of North Carolina today are happier be- 
cause of memories of his unflinching loyalty to 
friends, convictions, and ideals. 

His Alma Mater is daily witnessing in her own life 
and work concrete evidence of these three character- 
istics of her son. He was the first member of the 
Board of Trustees to insist that the old haphazard 
methods of campus development should yield to a defi- 
nite carefully thought-out plan. The present build- 
ing committee, of which he was chairman and to the 
work of which he gave so liberally of his time and 
thought, was the result of his suggestion and per- 
sistent advocacy. Steadfastness in his convictions of 
the right in a student-faculty controversy during his 
student days, prevented his graduation from the Uni- 
versity, but his broad tolerance of honest differences 
of opinion — another striking characteristic of the 
man — did not permit that fact to dim in a single de- 
gree his affection and loyalty to this institution. He 
had three great passions, and one of them was his 
Alma Mater.— R. D. W. C. '99. 

DDD 

W. N. Everett Succeeds Colonel Grimes 

Satisfaction of an unusual sort, which is shared to 
the fullest by The Review, is felt by the University 
in the appointment, by Governor Morrison, of W. N. 
Everett, '86, as the successor of Col. J. Bryan Grimes 
as Secretary of State. For j'ears, as a member of 
the Board of Trustees, and particularly in the last 
two years as a member of the Trustee Building Com- 
mittee, Mr. Everett has rendered the University con- 
spicuous service. Similarly, as a member of the leg- 
islature, Mr. Everett has established a record as a 
most effective legislator, and North Carolina can look 
forward to his incumbency of office with the absolute 
assurance that it will find in him a public servant of 
the finest type. 

The Medical School Situation 

The Board of Trustees of the University held their 
regular January meeting in Raleigh on Thursday, 
the 25th, at 11 o'clock. The principal matter under 
discussion was that of the proposed medical school. 
A delegation from Charlotte was heard which pre- 
sented Charlotte's offer of a hospital and grounds 
valued at three quarters of a million dollars and an 
annual appropriation of $50,000 for maintenance. 
In the event Charlotte's offer was not accepted, the 
delegation urged that the Trustees hear the offers of 
other North Carolina cities and proceed at once to 
the establishment of a sorely needed medical school. 
The Board also received the majority and minority 
reports of the committee appointed in June to study 



the medical school situation. The majority report, 
supported by four of the members, favored Durham. 
The minority report, supported by two members, fav- 
ored Charlotte. The only practical result of the dis- 
cussion, which continued from 11 o'clock until three, 
and from 8 till midnight, was the enlargement of the 
committee by the addition of Josephus Daniels, R. 0. 
Everett, and J. J. Parker, who, with the original 
members, are to arrange another meeting of the 
Board to be held on February 6th at which time dele- 
gations from other cities will be heard. It is the hope 
of the Board that as a result of this meeting a site 
may be selected and a plan for the establishment of 
the school may be adopted for submission to the legis- 
lature. The sentiment of the meeting, as far as it 
can be said to have crystallized at all, was in the direc- 
tion of proceeding at once with the location and equip- 
ment of the school by the University, irrespective of 
any proposal hitherto made. 

DDD 

An Important Athletic Announcement 

An announcement concerning the future of ath- 
letics made by Graduate Manager Woollen in which 
alumni will find great satisfaction is that contracts 
have been renewed with William and Robert Fetzer 
whereby the}' will continue to have charge of the 
athletic program of the University for the next five 
years. The arrangement has been concluded by the 
Athletic Association and it is contemplated that as a 
result of the renewal of the contracts not only will 
attention be given the direction of the teams, but 
particularly attention will be given to the participa- 
tion in some form of athletics of every member of the 
student body. Under the new contract Robert Fetzer 
succeeds William as Director of Athletics, and will 
have charge of the general athletic program in which 
the entire student body will be involved. William 
Fetzer will confine his work principally to the coach- 
ing of the varsity teams. 

The Review has previously expressed its appreci- 
ation of the fine, intelligent service which the Uni- 
versity has received from this athletic directorate. 
With the new rules adopted by the Southern Con- 
ference providing for a strictly amateur athletic pro- 
gram, and with the Fetzer brothers in charge, the 
campus may confidently expect an athletic develop- 
ment which is sound, intelligent, and in keeping with 
the best of the University's traditions. 



The Way Libraries Grow 

From Public Libraries for January The Review 
copies a note concerning an additional gift from a 
member of the board of trustees of the University of 
Michigan to the library of that institution : 

"W. W. Bishop, librarian of the University of 
Michigan, who has been in Europe on a purchasing 
tour for the university, reports that he has bought 
the Vignaud library, composed of 20,000 volumes and 
a large number of pamphlets, maps and charts. Two- 
thirds of the library is devoted to literature and his- 
tory and is intended to be added to the Clements his- 
torical collection at Ann Arbor. The- purchase was 
made possible largely through the generosity of W. L. 
Clements of Bay City, Michigan, to whom the uni- 
versity is already indebted for the library of Ameri- 



124 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



cana which is valued at half a million dollars, as well 
as the magnificent building which will house the col- 
lection, costing about as much more." 

This excerpt is interesting for two reasons. First, 
it emphasizes the timeliness of purchasing books 
abroad. Exchange rates are unusually low and 
hundreds of libraries which contain publications that 
must be secured second-hand have been thrown on 
the market. Libraries which fail to secure them now 
will not have the opportunity to secure them again 
at any price. It is interesting for the further reason 
that it illustrates what a splendid service an alumnus 
or member of the board of trustees can render not 
only an institution, but a state and country. The 
Clements library of Americana is one which adds spe- 
cial distinction to a university that has few equals in 
the country and cannot be overlooked by any scholar 
whose work relates to the early history of America. 

DDD 

We Remind You of June 10-13 

When this copy of The Review reaches you, fellow 
alumnus, particularly if you happen to be of the class 
of 1898 which is planning a big 25th anniversary 
this commencement (or another class holding a re- 
union in 1923) the snow may be lying thick on the 
ground, and your thoughts may be far away from the 
grass and the oaks, and the old well, and the bell 
tolling away in the tower of Old South. 

But come another daj r , and the crocuses and the 
jonquils will be popping up, the spiraea and the iris 
will be aglow, the roses and the woodthrush will have 
come, and then — June ! 

By way of reminder, we set down the dates here — 
June 10-13. And on another page, two of them, in 
fact, to quicken your memory, we reproduce pictures 
of faces and scenes of the happy days you spent here 
twenty-five years ago. And we bid you — come ! 



WORD FROM LITTLE OLD NEW YORK 

Carolina men in New York are preparing to get to- 
gether to organize formally an alumni association. 
The date is February 9th and the occasion will be a 
dinner at the Aldine Club, 200 Fifth Avenue. Those 
concerned will please take this as final notice and be 
present. An organization committee composed of 
George Gordon Battle, Junius Parker, Alfred W. 
Haywood and Robert W. Madry has sent letters to 
all alumni on the regular list. This list, however, is 
not complete and alumni will greatly assist by send- 
ing names and addresses to Robert W. Madry, 548 
Riverside Drive, New York City. An interesting 
program is being planned and there may be some 
surprises. 

The University has in New York more alumni than 
in any city outside North Carolina, and they have 
played a prominent role in the making of local his- 
tory. Circular letters requesting a summary of their 
activities have been sent all on the regular list for 
New York State, and answers to these and informa- 
tion to be obtained at the alumni dinner will be used 
as material for an article to appear in The Review 
for March. 

Meanwhile, note may be made of the recent activi- 
ties of some of the New York alumni. Edward 
Locke Williams, formerly with the law firm of Cra- 



vatti & Henderson, has recently been made a partner 
in the firm of Cotton and Franklin. 

L. Ames Brown, formerly a Washington newspaper 
man, is now with the advertising firm of Thos. F. 
Logan and Co., 680 Fifth Avenue. "Coach" Thos. G. 
Trenchard is living at 99 Meserole Avenue, Brooklyn. 
Sidnej' A. Blackmer, who starred last season in The 
Mountain Man, is again taking the leading role in a 
Broadway production. Harvey Campbell and his 
side-kick, Ralph D. Williams, both of '19. are with 
the Guaranty Trust Company. 

Alvah H. Combs, '17, is with a prominent Wall 
Street law firm. His brother, Joe, '24, is taking 
medicine at Columbia University. John M. Gibson, 
'19, editor of School Neivs, is on leave of absence in 
Europe. He finds at present that German marks are 
much cheaper than dollars. Philip Hettleman, '21, 
is with the firm of Ames Emerich & Co. Kameichi 
Kato, '18, who has returned from Japan after marry- 
ing a Japanese girl who was graduated from Elon 
College, is head of the New York offices of the Kuhara 
Mining Co., Ltd. He lives at 520 West 114th Street, 
William Clark Doub-Kerr is an instructor in French 
in Columbia University. 

"Bill" Folger, who carried Carolina to victory 
over Virginia at Richmond in 1916, is winding up a 
course in the School of Journalism at Columbia. M. 
R. Dunnagan, '14, city editor of the Charlotte Ob- 
server, now on leave of absence, is attending the 
School of Journalism and "doing" New York inci- 
dentally. Jonathan Daniels is taking law at Colum- 
bia. Lucius H. Ranson, Superintendent of Public 
Welfare for Mecklenburg County, is here on a year's 
leave for study. John Terry, '18, is editor of School 
in Gibson's absence and is also taking Ph.D. work 
at Columbia. 



NEW METHODIST PARSONAGE COMPLETED 

On the site of the old Carr home next to the west 
corner of Franklin and Columbia streets, the Metho- 
dist Church of the village has recently completed a 
beautiful new parsonage as the first unit of the en- 
larged building program for Chapel Hill of the Metho- 
dist Conferences of North Carolina. The building is 
of colonial style, of common red brick, laid in Flemish 
bond and raked joints. It has the conventional en- 
trance porch, and porches at the east and west ends 
connected with the front porch by uncovered brick 
terraces, with flower boxes built into the buttresses 
of the steps leading to all three of the porches. Large 
windows, glass doors, and three small pointed dormer 
windows across the front slope of the roof carry out 
the colonial idea. 

In addition to providing a home for the pastor, 
one of the chief purposes of the building is that of 
furnishing an attractive center for the Methodist stu- 
dents in the University. The first floor is splendidly 
adapted to this purpose, and already a general re- 
ception to the student body, a dinner for the men of 
the local church, and meetings of large groups repre- 
senting various interests of the student body and con- 
gregation have been held in it. Its appointments and 
furnishings have been selected with the utmost care 
and taste, and altogether it is furnishing a most de- 
lightful home atmosphere. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



125 


















FACES AND SCENES FAMILIAR TO THE MEMBERS OF THE CLASS OF 1898 WHO ARE TO CELEBRATE THE 25TH 

ANNIVERSARY OF THEIR GRADUATION IN JUNE 

1898: Top center, left to right, Ex-President Battle and President Alderman; left side, top to bottom, Professors Manning, 
Hume, Gore, Alexander, and Whitehead; right side, top to bottom. Professors Venable, Cain, Toy, Williams, and Cobb; lower 
center, the residences of Professors Alexander and Gore. 



126 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



THE PRESIDENT'S REPORT 



Some Facts and Figures You Should Know in 
the President's Report 

Two hundred and thirty-nine more students 
than one year ago, 427 more than two years ago. 

Expected increase in next two years, at least 
500. 

Completed in last two years : Four dormi- 
tories, housing -180 students altogether; Saund- 
ers Hall, a classroom building for history, com- 
merce, economics, rural social science, and pub- 
lic welfare ; 14 residences for faculty ; recon- 
struction of Memorial Hall to make it a good 
auditorium ; a railway spur into the rear of the 
campus; heating, lighting, and sewerage exten- 
sions ; a laundry that takes care of all Univer- 
sity work ; various smaller projects. 

To be completed : Murphey Hall, the lan- 
guages building, within a few weeks ; Manning 
Hall, the law school building, in the spring. 

Bequest of H>50,000 to University bv Robert 
K. Smith. 

Kenan Fund law suit won by University in 
courts of Kentucky. 

Enrollment in graduate school doubled in ten 
years, now 279. 

University elected a member of American 
Association of Universities, a body made up of 
24 leading institutions of the country and in- 
cluding, in the South, only the universities of 
North Carolina and Virginia. 

Number of high school graduates in North 
Carolina doubled from 1916 to 1919, and doubled 
again from 1919 to 1922. Will reach between 
5,000 and 6,000 this next summer, creating great 
pressure upon the University and . the colleges 
of the State. 

Minimum needs of the University in next two 
years : Three men 's dormitories housing 360 
students altogether; a dormitory for women, 
housing 75; 3 teaching buildings — chemistry, 
geology, general ; a permanent water supply ; 
renovation of old buildings ; space for general 
student recreation and exercise; heating and 
lighting extensions ; new water lines and sewers. 



The President's Report 

Many of the facts and figures contained in Presi- 
dent Chase's report have been chronicled from time 
to time in the daily press and are familiar to the 
readers of The Review. But the report deals also 
with higher educational problems which are not so 
well known and which will appeal to every University 
alumnus as deserving thoughtful attention. 

"Much has been said during the last few months," 
he writes, "regarding the question of whether too 
many students are going to college. The problem is 
one which has as yet more than academic interest for 
North Carolina, which has today, with all their rapid 
growth, less than half as many students enrolled in its 
colleges (including those for colored students) as has 
a representative Middle Western state like Iowa, with 



a trifle less than North Carolina's population. This 
State still ranks decidedly low in the proportion of 
its population enrolled in institutions in higher 
education. 

"Dean Royster has expressed in his report an atti- 
tude with which I am in full accord, in stating that 
our problem at present is less that of decision as to 
who shall go to college than that of determining who 
shall remain in college. In other words, the Univer- 
sity, as a public institution, must articulate with the 
public high schools of the State ; their product is its 
raw material. It cannot, as privately endowed insti- 
tutions may do, restrict its number of those whom it 
admits. It must, however, make certain that students 
are not allowed to remain in college as idle pensioners 
on the public funds. It should give every one ample 
time and opportunity to demonstrate that lie is 
worthy of a training given largely at State expense, 
but it should not burden its rolls with those of proven 
incapacity or lack of worth." 

Administrative Machinery Reorganized 

President Chase tells of the thorough reorganization 
of the University's administrative machinery. A 
modern system of accounting has been installed. A 
new method of registration and the payment of fees 
has been worked out. 

"As the complexity of the educational task of the 
institution has increased, it has proved necessary to 
leave to the jurisdiction of its various schools many 
matters that formerly came before the general faculty. 
The dean of each school has therefore selected an 
administrative board, whose business it is to think 
definitely about the problems of its particular school, 
to initiate legislation in matters affecting that school, 
and to plan for its future. In order to correlate these 
activities, stated meetings of the entire group of ad- 
ministrative officials were inaugurated this fall, and 
have already shown their value. Such groups as 
these, with definite responsibilities and intimate op- 
portunities for managing the problem of the par- 
ticular phase of university life which they represent, 
tend not only to facilitate the handling of routine, but 
is a very definite way to stimulate thought with re- 
gard to future policies and programs." 

Graduate School Doubles 

One of the high lights in the progress of the Uni- 
versity, as reviewed by President Chase, is the growth 
of the Graduate School. This year it has an enroll- 
ment of 279 students. The report of Edwin Green- 
law, dean of the Graduate School, shows that nearly 
100 research projects of all sorts are under way. It 
is largely achievement in research that brought to 
the University the honor, this last fall, of election to 
membership in the American Association of Univer- 
sities. No institution is admitted to this body until 
there has been made a most careful scrutiny of its 
standard of work and the scholarly quality of its 
achievements. 

"The departments of Civil Engineering and Elec- 
trical Engineering have been made a School of 
Engineering, which is trying out a most interesting 
and successful experiment for its junior students in 
cooperation with the industries of the State. The 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



127 



School of Pharmacy, as a result of recent State legis- 
lation regarding the educational qualifications of 
pharmacists, has increased twenty-five per cent in en- 
rollment this year, and must be developed steadily 
from now on. The Law School has now its three-year 
course in full operation, and will take a further step 




W. N. Everett, '86 
Recently Appointed Secretary of State 

forward in 1923 by requiring a year's college work 
as a prerequisite to its courses. The School of Com- 
merce, with an enrollment of 400, is defining its work 
with clarity and is meeting a real need in the life of 
the State. The School of Applied Science is con- 
sidering the development of a number of courses lead- 
ing to applied science degrees, not hitherto offered. 

"The School of Education, unfortunate in the loss 
of Prof. L. A. Williams, has been fortunate in the 
selection of Prof. M. R. Trabue to succeed him. The 
school is training more and more men each year for 
the teaching profession, and its program for the future 
is clear-cut. The central problem of the Medical 
School is too well-known to you to require discussion 
here. One of the gratifying experiences of the last 
year has been the wide-spread testimony to the effec- 
tiveness and high standards of the work of the present 
two-year school which has come to us from every side. 

"The College of Liberal Arts, the heart of the Uni- 
versity, is enrolling this year a larger proportion of 
the total of University students than at any time 
since we emerged from the war. Dr. Howe, who 
served effectively as dean of the college for three 
years, resigned last spring in order to devote his full 
time to the duties of bis department, and was suc- 
ceeded by Dr. Royster, who brings to the office finali- 
ties which insure his success, and who has already 
justified your selecting him for this important post. 
I cannot dismiss the resignation of Dr. Howe without 
a word of appreciation of the fine spirit and the de- 
votion which always characterized his work." 

Needs of University Stated 

The last part of President Chase's report relates 
the present needs of the University. He tells of the 
bad overcrowding, and how the influx of students 
from the high schools has more than kept even with 
the provision of new accommodations. 

"The growth of the high schools of North Caro- 



lina," he writes, "is one of the most amazing chap- 
ters of North Carolina history. In 1916 for the first 
time the number of graduates from public high schools 
in the State reached one thousand. By 1919 this 
figure had doubled. This spring it had doubled again, 
reaching over four thousand, and next spring it will 
be between five and six thousand. Between five and 
six times as many public high school graduates will 
be fitted for college in this year as seven years ago! 
Such is the result of the wise policy of the State 
toward its public schools. 

"Nor is there the slightest indication that higher 
education is in any way a diminishing interest to 
high school graduates. Last spring a careful survey 
made by the University, including over two thousand 
high school seniors in the majority of the counties of 
the State, showed that over 70 per cent were planning 
to go to college, and that over 60 per cent would al- 
most certainly go this year. In the light of these 
facts, a most conservative estimate of the University's 
growth during the two years to come shows that we 
should prepare for an increase of 500 students during 
the period, or 250 a year. 

"This means that instruction must be provided 
sufficient in amount and quality to maintain and, 
wherever possible, to improve the quality of instruc- 
tion now given. It is vital that the teaching power 
of the University should not diminish, but should in- 
crease year by year. The average cost of instruction 
during the two-year period has been $227 per student. 
To provide proper instruction for 500 additional stu- 
dents is a task which, on the basis of the most careful 
departmental estimate, cannot be undertaken for less 
than $200 per additional student during the period, 
especially as some departments must be considerably 
strengthened. 

"It is possible to do what should be done at this 
figure only because the needs of many departments, 
for the moment, are less for full professors than for 
younger men, and the slightly lower amount per stu- 
dent should therefore be regarded by no means as 
setting a precedent, but as the reflection of a tempo- 
rary condition. 

"The Division of Extension must be strengthened. 
Its funds have proven insufficient to meet the de- 
mands made upon it, nor can faculty members, bur- 
dened with regular teaching duties, with the best will 
in the world, care adequately for the growing demand 
for correspondence and extension courses. Teachers, 
and business men especially are demanding instruc- 
tion of a character that can only be given in extension 
courses held at convenient points in the State, and 
men whose duty it is to give such instruction are 
urgently needed." 

One of the innovations for which the President says 
provision must be made is a twelve-weeks, instead of 
six-weeks, summer session. There is an insistent de- 
mand for this from the teachers of the State. 



ROY MORRIS SUCCEEDS BLOUNT, RESIGNED 

William A. Blount, captain-elect of the 1923 foot- 
hall team, has accepted a responsible position with 
the Liggett -Myers Tobacco Company and will not re- 
turn in the fall to pilot the varsity. Roy Morris, who 
has played left end for the past three seasons, and who 
is captain of the baseball team this spring, has been 
elected in Blount's place. 



128 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



ALUMNI HOLD MANY HOLIDAY BANQUETS 



Numerous and highly enthusiastic banquets and 
get-together occasions were held by alumni and stu- 
dents during the recent holiday season. The Re- 
view records herewith brief accounts of these meet- 
ings and banquets: 

Asheville 

Linking together the past, the present, and the future, Caro- 
lina alumni, students, and prospective students of Buncombe 
County had a gala time at their annual holiday banquet in 
Asheville on December 30. Thos. S. Rollins, retiring presi- 
dent, acted as toastmaster and among the speakers were grid- 
iron stars of former days such a3 Lyle Jones, "Nemo" Cole- 
man, George Stephens, R. R. Williams and Robert R. Reynolds, 
and gridiron stars of today, ' ' Goat ' ' Randolph and Pierce 
Matthews. D. L. Grant, Alumni Secretary, was present as a 
guest of honor and as one of the principal speakers. Others 
on the program were C. B. Hyatt, Marcus Erwin, Judge R. M. 
Wells, Robert E. Follin, visiting alumnus from Winston-Salem, 
T. J. Harkius, Jas. Howell, Bingham McKee, Sam C'athey, 
H. G. Reagan, Irwin Monk and Jack Felmet. Officers were 
elected: C. B. Hyatt, president; George Robertson, vice presi- 
dent ; and C. K. Hughes, secretary and treasurer. 

Charlotte 

A rousing banquet was held in Charlotte on December 29 
by Carolina alumni, students, and high school seniors present 
as guests. The attendance was more than one hundred and 
much enthusiasm was in evidence throughout the banquet. 
Hamilton C. Jones, president of Ihe local association, acted as 
toastmaster and addresses were made by Judge W. F. Hard- 
ing, J. J. Parker, Dr. Alexander Graham, J. R. Purser, Jr., 
Henry Duls, W. A. Lillycrop, and J. P. Trotter. 

Clinton 

The Sampson County Alumni Association held its holiday 
banquet at Clinton on December 29. L. C. Kerr, retiring sec- 
retary, had spared no effov's to make the affair successful, and 
his diligence was rewarded. Fitzhugh Whitfield, who acted as 
toastmaster, was elected president of the association and Miss 
Fannie E. Vann was elected secretary. Speakers included H. 
E. Faison, Dr. E. G. Lee, Col. C. M. Faircloth, Dr. J. D. Kerr, 
Jr., T. M. Lee and Miss Fannie E. Vann. 

Concord 

At a banquet of the Cabarrus County Alumni Association 
held at Concord on December 27, L. T. Hartsell, Concord law- 
yer, member of the board of trustees and former legislator, 
was elected president, and M. H. Wolff was elected secretary. 

Fayetteville 

The Cumberland County Alumni Association held its annual 
holiday banquet on December 28 in Fayetteville at Mrs. E. J. 
Hale's on Haymount. The occasion was one of pleasure and 
profit to the forty alumni and students present. John H. Cook 
was toastmaster and the speakers included Col. Geo. M. Kose, 
Dr. J. V. McGougan, C. G. Rose, Judge N. A. Sinclair, H. T. 
Kelly and Robert Felton. This association is one of the strong- 
est in the State. 

Gastonia 

With good feeling and good cheer reigning supreme, and 
with an attendance of one hundred, the Gaston County Alumni 
Association and the Gaston County Club held their annual 
joint holiday banquet at Gastonia on December 28. Present 
as guests were the seniors in the high schools of the county. 
A. E. Woltz, retiring president, acted as toastmaster and the 
principal address was made by Prof. W. J. Matherly, of the 
University faculty. Other speakers included Jas. Lee Love, 
of Philadelphia, a member of the class of 1884, who was the 
first Gaston County man to graduate from the University after 
the Civil War; W. P. Grier, superintendent of the Gastonia 
schools; H. A. Query, editor of The Gastonia Gazette ; H. L. 
Kiser, president of the Gaston County club; S. N. Boyce, Gas- 
tonia banker and chairman of the county board of education; 
Rev. J. W. C. Johnson, Episcopal minister; and John G. Car- 
penter, Gastonia lawyer and solictor of the fourteenth judicial 



district. Officers were elected: Dr. T. C. Quickel, president; 
R. G. Rankin, vice president; E. R. Rankin, secretary; and 
Thos. J. Brawley, treasurer. 

Goldsboro 

The Wayne County Alumni Association and the Wayne 
County Club held their annual joint holiday banquet at Golds- 
boro on December 28. Joe A. Parker, retiring president, 
opened the meeting but later turned it. over to W. A. Dees, 
newly elected president. The principal address of the occasion 
was made by Prof. D. D. Carroll, of the University faculty. 
Several of the alumni, including W. F. Taylor and Leonard 
Epstein, made short talks. The occasion was most enjoyable 
to the large number of alumni and students present. Wayne 
County is a strong Carolina center. 

Greenville 

The Pitt County Alumni Association held its annual holiday 
banquet at Greenville on December 29, with S. O. Worthington 
acting as toastmaster and with Prof. W. S. Bernard, head of 
the department of Greek in the University and a native of 
Pitt County, as the principal speaker. Other speakers included 
Dr. Chas. O'H. Laughinghouse and F. C. Harding. The ban- 
quet was well planned and the entire occasion was most en- 
joyable and inspiring to the alumni, students, and guests 
present. 

Henderson 



The Vance County Alumni Assoeiatio 
banquet at Henderson on December 30. 
one young lady, Miss Aline Hughes, 
R. G. S. Davis acted as master of cerei 
included J. C. Kittrell, of the board of 
W. D. Horner, Robert Taylor, Dr. R. T. 
Hughes and A. J. Harris. Many more 
the future are expected by members of 

Hertford 



i held its first annual 
Twenty-four men and 

ittended the banquet. 

onies and the speakers 

trustees, S. T. Peace, 
Upchurch, Rev. I. W. 

enjoyable banquets in 

this association. 



The Perquimans County Alumni Association held its annual 
holiday banquet at Hertford on the evening of December 29. 
The occasion was most enjoyable to the alumni and high school 
seniors who were present as guests. Among those who made 
speeches were Dr. T. A. Cox, Dr. G. E. Newby, J. S. McNider, 
D. M. Feild, Jr., Silas Whedbee, and B. F. Bray. Officers 
were elected: Dr. T. A. Cox, president; Dr. G. E. Newby, 
vice president ; and Silas Whedbee, secretary. 

Lenoir 

The Caldwell County Alumni Association held its annual 
holiday banquet at Lenoir on December 29. Jas. T. Pritchett 
acted as toastmaster and speeches were made by J. R. Conley, 
F. A. Grissette, Clyde Hedrick, and Frederick Dula. Mr. Con- 
ley predicted that twenty-five years from today North Carolina 
would be the center of the cotton industry of the world. He 
urged that young men should prepare themselves to take lead- 
ing parts in the development of the textile industry in this 
State. 

Lexington 

Carolina alumni and alumna* of the N. C. College for Women 
held a joint banquet at Lexington on December 28. Z. V. 
Walser acted as toastmaster and the principal address was 
made by Prof. R. D. W. Connor, of the University faculty. 
Others speakers were E. C. Byerly, H. G. West, Grady Leonard, 
Clyde Hunt and B. A. Livengood. Officers were elected: J. 
M. Daniel, Jr., president; E. S. Welborn, vice president; H. G. 
West, secretary; and J. R. Raper, Jr., treasurer. 

Mount Airy 

With Solicitor S. Porter Graves acting as toastmaster and 
with students of former days and students of the present time 
mingling together in the best of good fellowship, the Carolina 
men of Surry County and their invited guests held a most 
enjoyable banquet at Mount Airy on December 28. Dr. 
W. ( '. George, of the University faculty, made the prin- 
cipal address and other speakers were A. D. Folger, J. H. 
Folger, E. C. Bivens, Wm. Graves, W. L. Reece and Manly 
Llewellyn. Officers were elected: J. H. Allred, president; J. 
F. Hendren, viee president; and R. W. Sparger, secretary and 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



129 



treasurer. An executive committee was chosen composed of 
Chas. E. Hiatt, A. H. Wolfe, J. S. Atkinson, R. A. Freeman 
and O. H. Yokley. 

North Wilkesboro 

A pleasant gathering of the holiday season at North Wilkes- 
boro was the annual meeting of the Wilkes County Alumni 
Association, which this year took the form of a smoker and 
was held on December 28. J. A. Rousseau presided and the 
speakers included Henry Reynolds, P. M. Williams, Horace 
Sisk, W. R. Wilkins, j" R. Weaver, L. E. Stacy, Jr., Mack 
Brown, Paul Caudill and Richard Deans. 

Rockingham 

The Richmond County Alumni Association held its annual 
holiday banquet at the strong Carolina center of Rockingham 
on December 27. W. N. Everett, Jr., president of the local 
association, presided as toastmaster and the speakers included 
W. X. Everett, present Secretary of State, Geo. S. Steele, F. 
W. B3'num, W. R. Jones and Houston Everett. The banquet 
was an inspiring occasion to the large number of alumni and 
students present. This association has a students loan fund 
with which worthy students are assisted in their quest for an 
education. Isaac S. London is secretary and treasurer of the 
association. 

Rocky Mount 

The Rocky Mount Alumni Association held an enjoj-able 
barbecue supper on December 29. The committee making 
arrangements for the supper was composed of T. L. Simmons, 
L. L. Gravely and W. C. Woodard, Jr. M. R. Robbins, presi- 
dent of the association, was toastmaster and talks were made 
by Thos. H. Battle and others of the alumni present. The 
occasion was most enjoyable to the alumni, students and high 
school seniors present as guests. 

Smithfield 

Carolina alumni and students of Johnston County held a 
banquet at Smithfield on December 27. N. C. Barefoot, presi- 
dent of the Johnston County Club, presided as toastmaster 
and the principal address was made by Prof. N. W. Walker, 
of the University faculty. Other speakers included J. D. 
Parker, of the Smithfield bar, and A. M. Noble, also of the 
Smithfield bar, who lately assumed his duties as judge of the 
Johnston County recorder 's court. The occasion was a most 
enjoyable one to the alumni and students present. 
Sparta 

At a meeting of the Alleghany County Alumni Association 
held at Sparta on December 29, R. A. Doughton, Sparta at- 
torney, veteran legislator and House leader, was elected presi- 
dent and R. F. Crouse, also of the Sparta bar, was elected 
secretary. 



Spray 

The Rockingham County Alumni Association held a splendid 
banquet at Spray on the evening of December 28. Rev. W. J. 
Gordon, president of the association, was toastmaster and the 
principal address was made by D. L. Grant, Alumni Secretary. 
Among others who spoke were A. D. Ivie, Luther Hodges, 
Mrs. B. F. Mebane, Miss -Mary Gwynn, and Elton Vest. This 
association is making splendid progress on building up a stu- 
dents loan fund. Fifty alumni, students and guests were 
present. 

Troy 

The Montgomery County Alumni Association was organized 
at a banquet held in Troy on the evening of December 28. 
Claudius Dockery was elected president and W. A. Cochran 
was elected secretary. Plans are in preparation to make this 
association of great service to the University. 

Waynesville 

Alumni of Haywood County met at a holiday banquet in 
Waynesville on December 29 with Alumni Secretary D. L. 
Grant present as a guest of honor and principal speaker. The 
actual organization of the county association was deferred 
until the Easter holidays, and a committee was appointed to 
make arrangements for a big meeting then. This committee 
is composed of T. L. Gwyn, W. J. Hannah, and Hugh Mease. 

Wilson 

The Wilson County Alumni Association was organized at an 
enjoyable banquet held at Wilson on December 28. Sixty-five 
alumni were in attendance and good fellowship reigned su- 
preme. Judge Geo. W. Connor was toastmaster and principal 
speaker of the occasion. Other speakers included Lee Wood- 
ard, Giles Winstead, F. L. Carr, Dr. L. J. Smith, S. E. Leonard, 
J. Shepard Bryan and John T. Barnes. Officers were elected: 
Judge Geo. W. Connor, president; Graham Woodard, vice 
president; Bryce Little, secretary; and A. V. Anderson, 
treasurer. 



Announcement has been made by the athletic au- 
thorities of the University of Virginia that Earl 
Neale has been secured as the successor of Thomas 
Campbell as football coach for 1923. In addition to 
having made a wonderful reputation as coach of the 
football squads at West Virginia Wesleyan, Marietta, 
and Washington and Jefferson, Neale 's record of eight 
seasons with the Cincinnati Reds shows that he has a 
thorough knowledge of baseball. 




The \ t f.w Methodist Parsonage at Chapel Hill 



130 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



COLONEL J. BRYAN GRIMES DIES 



Colonel John Bryan Grimes, for nearly twenty- 
three years Secretary of State for North Carolina, 
died in Raleigh, January 11th, 1923. He was born 
in Raleigh, June 3rd, 1868, of distinguished parents. 
His father, General Bryan Grimes, of Pitt county, 
was a brave officer in the Army of Northern Virginia 
during the war between the States, and his mother, 
Charlotte Emily Bryan Grimes, was a daughter of 
John Heritage Bryan of New Bern, North Carolina, 
a prominent lawyer and popular representative in 
the State legislature and national congress. 

During his early boyhood he lived at Grimesland, 
in Pitt county, where he was taught by private 
tutors. Later he attended the Raleigh Male Academy 
where he was taught by Fray and Morson, two promi- 
nent classical teachers of that day. He next at- 
tended Trinity school at Chocowinity, and Lynch 's 
school at High Point, in both of which he was taught 
by men of high reputation as teachers of the classics. 
He entered the University of North Carolina in Sep- 
tember, 1882, and became a member of the class of 
1886. 

Among his classmates were many who afterwards 
became prominent and useful citizens in the work of 
developing and building up the State. They were 
then college boys just from home, full of hope and 
enthusiasm, dreaming confidently but in a vague sort 
of way of the time when they would bid Alma Mater 
goodbye and go out into the world to serve their 
native State. Little did any one of them dream, how- 
ever, that the definite thing ahead of Bryan Grimes 
was a call to the high position of Secretary of State, 
that one of his opponents on the State ticket in one 
election would be his classmate, Robert L. Strowd, 
then of Chatham now of Orange County; and that 
after a long and honorable career as a public officer, 
his successor would be another classmate, William 
N. Everett, of Richmond County. 

In 1900 his political party organized for the fight 
of its life to regain entire control of the affairs of 
State. The ticket was led by Charles B. Aycock, 
and J. Bryan Grimes was named as Secretai'y of 
State. His party was triumphant, and four times 
since Colonel Grimes has been nominated and elected. 

As a public officer he made a conspicuous success. 
Careful in keeping up with every detail, indefatig- 
able in sticking to his work, prompt in his corre- 
spondence, and most kindly in dealing with those 
who went to him on business, he made an ideal and 
consequently popular public servant. 

During his years of service he was ever equal to 
any new demand made by the growth of business in 
his office. This is clearly shown by his administra- 
tion of the automobile system which was made a part 
of his duty as Secretary of State. So well did he 
organize and conduct that great department that it 
has worked from the very beginning as smoothly as 
if it had been connected with the office from time 
immemorial. 

Prior to his election as Secretary of State he had 
been chairman of the Democratic Executive Commit- 
tee of his county, and in 1893 Governor Elias Carr 
made him a member of his staff with the rank of 
Colonel, by which title he was known all over North 
Carolina. 

In 1909 he was appointed a trustee of the Univer- 



sity of North Carolina and held that position con- 
tinuously until his death. As a trustee he labored 
with the love and devotion of a loyal son of the 
University. He began the movement to appoint a 




J. Bryan Grimes, '86 
Secretary of State 1901-1923 

committee on buildings and grounds which was to see 
that improvements on the campus should be along 
definite lines, and at the time of his death was serving 
as chairman of the Trustee Building Committee which 
has charge of the present program of University ex- 
pansion. In fact he was a practical, constructive 
trustee, always looking forward toward system and 
order in all things connected with the University. 
For years he was a member of the Executive Com- 
mittee of the Trustees, serving with zeal, ability, and 
enthusiasm. 

For several years preceding his death he was Chair- 
man of the North Carolina Historical Commission, a 
position for which he was eminently fitted because of 
his intense devotion to his native State and his in- 
terest in State and national history. He was the 
author of several historical publications, Abstracts of 
North Carolina Wills, North Carolina Wills and In- 
ventions, and a Reprint of Bricknell's Natural His- 
tory of North Carolina, which are of great value to 
the student of history seeking light on the laws, cus- 
toms, habits, and social conditions of our State in the 
far away years of the past. He was an active mem- 
ber of the State Literary and Historical Association, 
and President of the North Carolina Society of Sons 
of the Revolution. 

At the time of his election as Secretary of State he 
was engaged in farming in Pitt county and continued 
his interests in farming through life. He was alwaj's 
active in advancing the interests of the farmer. He 
was a member of the Farmers' Alliance, the State 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



131 



Grange, the Farmers' Union, and an active worker 
in the North Carolina Agricultural Society. For a 
short while (1899-19U0) he was a member of the State 
Board of Agriculture, and at one time President of 
the North Carolina Tobacco Growers Association, and 
at the time of his death he was a member of the Board 
of Directors of the Tobacco Growers Cooperative 
Association, by virtue of appointment by the Gov- 
ernor. 

He was a loyal Mason, a Knight of Pythias, a mem- 
ber of the Junior Order United American Mechanics, 
and was ever faithful in all his fraternal obligations. 



He was a communicant of Christ Church, Raleigh. 
He was twice married and is survived by his second 
wife and four children. 

In closing this brief sketch of the life of Colonel 
Grimes it may be well to quote the words of one of 
our prominent citizens, addressed to the writer: 
"Colonel Grimes is dead. I am grieved. The people 
have lost a faithful and most efficient officer, the Uni- 
versity a devoted, loyal friend, and the State has lost 
one of its very best citizens. He had capacity, char- 
acter, and courage. His loss is a blow to us." 

M. C. S. NOBLE. 



HEARD AND SEEN AROUND THE WELL 



It would almost seem that we are getting out a 
new sport every time another issue of The Review 
comes from the press. This time it is soccer. The 
game is being taught the freshmen by Coach Alex- 
ander. The plan is to develop more teams after the 
first, from the freshman class, is thoroughly familiar 
with the game. Soccer and Tag Football now hold 
the field for out-door sports. Tag Football was fin- 
ally put on the map last year by the codification and 
publication of rules by the Campus Cabinet. So far 
as a mere spectator can ascertain any number may 
play and any costume may be worn. Officials are not 
necessary. The game is very like the real thing ex- 
cept that tagging is substituted for tackling. 

The Laundry a Big Success 

Chapel Hill is ordinarily regarded as a quiet slum- 
bering village rather than a center of industry. How- 
ever, the past twelve months have seen the organiza- 
tion and perfection of a rather large piece of indus- 
trial machinery. A compulsory laundry fee to the 
contrary-not-withstanding the University laundry is 
today a favorite of the students and is generally re- 
garded as the best example of efficiency the village 
affords. 

A building costing $30,000.00 ; equipment $29,- 
700.00 ; supplies, $2,500.00 ; delivery equipment 
$2,000.00; hot water system $2,000.00. During the 
last twelve months : Pieces cleaned 2,000,000 ; pieces 
lost 169 ; paid out for less $276.40 ; persons employed 
65 ; students on pay-roll 20, earning a total of 
$3,000.00 a year. This little industry is such a com- 
plete model that it has even a house organ, "The 
Laundryette." 

Now Look Pleasant, Please 

Do you remember the way you once stood around 
in front of the gymnasium or the library and had 
your picture taken in all the different clubs you had 
accumulated during four years? Well, the same old 
process continues and any day now you may see shiv- 
ering county clubs or bashful bedraggled cabinets, 
boards, fraternities, etc., trying to look comfortable, 
capable, or exclusive as they wait on a January day 
for an unbelievably dilatory photographer that can- 
not get himself satisfied as to the costume or ex- 
pression of anyone. But never again will one have 
his likeness spread over so many pages of heavy 



shiny paper, so there is a general spirit of good humor. 
Winter may bring bad weather overhead, but 
Coach Bob's wooden track out on Emerson Field is 
pounded continually by the many feet of those that 
have their hearts set on the honor of the State 
Olympic. 

Fifty-fifty Is the Score 

In our first chain debate honors were even. South 
Carolina won a two to one decision over us and we 
enjoyed a three to nothing over Oglethorpe. Caro- 
lina was defending the negative of a proposal to have 
the United State remit the allied debts. This same 
team will later have at least one more debate on this 
query. The fee voted last quarter was collected upon 
registration for this quarter and has made possible 
this enlarged program. 

Self-Coaching Seems to Work 

Our basket-ball team continues an unbroken string 
of victories. Many alumni and others know of the 
record of the team. However, there is a peculiar fact 
about this wonder-team that is not generally known. 
The team is coached under what one of the players 
called last year "the soviet system." By this was 
meant that most of the coaching was done by mem- 
bers of the team. Since the R. O. T. C. was abolished 
and its commandant, Major Boye, was transferred 
to other duties, the basket-ball team has not had 
what one might call a "major coach." Coach 
Bill was its mentor last year and while he did 
much to preserve the unity of the quint, most of 
its tactics and strategy were worked out by the 
players themselves. This year Norman Shepard has 
been appointed coach. Shepard is a class-mate of 
many of the players and with all his expert knowl- 
edge of the game will undoubtedly contribute much 
to the success of the team. However, the nature of 
his relationship to the members of the team is unique 
in the history of coaching and this year again it 
might be said that we will have a "soviet system." 
Yet appearances would indicate that the season will 
be another victory. One is led to wonder if this sort 
of thing happens very often. 



Another Milestone Passes 

One bright morning last week the town of Chapel 
Hill felt itself slip past another milestone when a 
plow dug into the ground over which Tankersley's 
Cash Store had done business for more than six college 



132 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



generations. The little old grey box has been moved 
to one side now and will be destroyed as soon as the 
proprietor, Will Tankersley, has moved his business 
into one of the two ground floor store rooms of the 
brick building now rising on the site of the old struc- 
ture. This most recent addition to the brick fronts 
of main street will be forty-two feet in width and 
will have, in addition to the ground floor, twelve 
comfortable rooms on the upper floor, a welcome con- 
tribution to the housing need. This dramatic episode 
of progress on the main street attracted an interested 
audience whose appreciation was heightened by learn- 
ing that the outgrown store had been erected by the 
present owner's grandfather, Sidney Barbee, ten or 
twelve years before the Civil War. A jewelry store 
back in 1857, a fancy grocery for the last twenty- 
eight years, fire-wood in another month or so — 
tempus fugit. 

Frat and Non-Frat Grades 

The Registrar's report of grades for the quarter 
just passed contains the following tables of interest 
to alumni : 

Fraternity 1921 1922 

Beta Theta Pi 3.05 3.45 

Delta Kappa Epsilon 3.2(5 3.63 

Pi Kappa Phi 3.43 3.74 

Delta Tau Delta 3.55 3.25 

Zeta Psi 3.(51 3.38 

Kappa Sigma 3.64 3.62 

Sigma Phi Epsilon 3.65 3.54 

Sigma Chi 3.6y 3.47 

Pi Kappa Alpha 3.72 4.27 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon 3.75 3.77 

Sigma Nu 3.80 3.54 

Kappa Alpha 3.82 3.79 

Theta Chi , 3.89 3.29 

Phi Delta Theta 4.02 3.86 

Alpha Tau Omega 4.30 3.57 

Only five fraternities made a better average this 
fall than in '21. All the remaining ten did poorer 
work this year. The fraternity men say that this 
bad record is due to the constantly multiplying 
duties of rushing freshmen during the long season. 
The frat's fall from grace is still further emphasized 
by the following comparison: 

Fall 1921 Fall 1922 

General fraternity average 3.50 3.63 

General academic average 3.64 3.58 

While the fraternties have done much poorer work 
this fall the non-fraternity man has improved to such 
degree as to raise the general student average. The 
whole campus reflects the return of "normalcy." 
The fraternity man says he will not be able to return 
to normal unless "rushing" activities can be cut 
down. 

Shades of Pettigrew and Newsome 

The most powerful lever at work to raise the stand- 
ard of work done is the "upper ten." that percent- 
age of students that make the honor roll. There are 
149 such folk on the campus this year and out of 
these 149 who average a "two" or better there are 
nine who did not condescend to make anything lower 
than a one — shades of Pettigrew and Newsome ! 
These gods of the classroom are as follows: W. J. 
Cocke, Asheville; J. F. Cooper, Clinton; Mabel 
Couch, Chapel Hill; Henry Duls, Charlotte; H. D. 
Parcell, Tampa, Fla. ; H. G. Klingenschmitt, Lock- 
port, N. Y. (made 6 l's in E.E.) ; Y. Maeshima, 
Tokio, Japan ; C. U. Smith, Capron, Va. ; Jules Welch, 
Waynesville. 



Then, too, A. Cory of Kinston and C. F. McRae 
of Asheville "spoiled" their ones by making one hor- 
rible two each. Well, the old world may get demor- 




1898: Br.x Booth Crowing for President Alderman 
and Future President Graham 

alized and students may not study, but there are 
some here on this Hill that certainly are on the job. 

Major Cain Goes Hunting 

The admirers of Major Cain have had the pleasure 
of reading about the medal presented him in New 
York. However, that triumph is not the only proof 
of the Major's abounding youth. An afternoon's 
hunt and a nice bag of birds evidence the continued 
steadiness of hand and eye and the heart of youth. 

Eat While They Study (?) 

"Eat while you study" is the slogan of a new stu- 
dent enterprise, and about nine p. m. its minions sally 
forth for a round of the dorms. Their baskets tilled 
with sandwiches and cake are said to be always 
empty by ten o'clock. 

January Magazine 

The campus thinks that the January number of the 
Carolina Magazine is the best in several years. Edi- 
torial interest in the remodeling of the Liberal Arts 
curriculum, a survey of the opportunities for young 
men in North Carolina, a defense of southern culture 
as being "living rather than reading," the romance 
of fifty millions in roads, "Wealth and Willingness 
Making North Carolina the Empire State of the 
South," and more poetry than has been seen assem- 
bled in one spot in this State for some time ; these are 
some of the features of a good issue. It is construc- 
tive, State-wide in its interest, and unusually varied. 
The next issue is announced as an "Odd Number" 
satirizing local customs and personalities. It re- 
mains to be seen whether a good board can produce 
the most difficult of things, good satire. Will the 
number be really good or merely vindictive? Will 
it be a campus satire or a published accumulation of 
petty grudges? It's a fine editorial staff and there 
is universal hope that they will not be shipwrecked 
on this big task.— F.F. B."'16. 



THt ALUMNI REVIEW 



133 



BUDGET REQUESTS, 1923-24 AND 1924-25 

President Chase, on December 21, appeared before the State Budget Commission and presented the following re- 
quests for maintenance and buildings for the next biennium. The various items are fully explained in Budget Requests, 
1923-24 and 1924-25, mailed to all alunmi in January. 



Maintenance Fund Estimates for the Biennium 1923-24—1924-25 



ESTIMATED EXPE1 3) 



Increase Over 
Previous Year 



Increase Over 
Previous Year 



Salaries, Teaching Staff 

Salaries, Administration 

Supplies, Laboratory and Departmental 

Supplies, Printing, Communication, Etc., Repairs- 
Administration 

Travel 

Physical Plant: 

Grounds, Arboretum and Campus 

Buildings : 

Salaries and Wages 

.Materials and Supplies 

Heat, Water aud Light 

Truck Expense 

Library 

Gj mnasium 

Infirmary 

Extension 

Publications 

Research 

Commencement 

Practice School—. 

Advertising 

Memberships 

Lectures and Sermons 

High School Survey 

News Service 

Chapel 

Y. M. C. A 

Summer School 

Press 



Contingent Fund- 
Total.. 



ESTIMATED INCOME 



516, 935.00 
59,370.00 
39,310.00 

7,900.00 
4,000.00 

19,300.00 

26,500.00 

35,000.00 

20,000.00 

3,500.00 

55,125.00 

11,500.00 

8,750.00 

65,685.00 

17,500.00 

1,500.00 

3,500.00 

1,000.00 

3,000.00 

750.00 

2,000.00 

2,000.00 

500.00 

500.00 

6,000.00 

30,000.00 

2,000.00 

40,000.00 



73.S30.00 
11,175.00 
13,310.00 

1,400.00 
1,000.00 

4,300.00 

8,500.00 

15,000.0" 

3,000.00 

500.00 

13,900.00 

4,000.00 

750.00 

26,752.00 

2,500.00 

500.00 

1,500.00 



150.00 
500.00 



2,500.00 
15,000.0 I 
2,000.1 



549,435.00 
60,170.00 
43,810.00 

7,925.00 
4,000.00 

19,550.00 

31,500.00 

45,000.00 

25,000.00 

3,500.00 

60,525.00 

11,500.00 

8,750.00 

70,975.00 

17,500.00 

1,500.00 

3,500.00 

1.000.00 

3,000.00 

750.00 

2,000.00 

2,000.00 

500.00 

500.00 

6,000.00 

30,000.00 

2,000.00 

40,000.00 



32,500.00 

800.00 

4,500.00 

25.00 



250.00 

5,000.00 

10,000.00 

5,000.00 

5,400.00 



5,290.00 



$ 983.125.0i i 



$1.051,890.00 



1923-24 



Increase Over 
Previous Year 



Increase Over 
Previous Year 



Tuition: 

Academic 

Law 

Medicine 

Pharmacy 

Laboratories 

Sales of Publications 

Registration Fees 

Gifts 

Red Cross Teaching Fund..... 

Endowment Fund 

Endowment Kenan Teaching Fund.. 
Interest, Discounts, Etc 



State Appropriation Needed 
Total 



68,000.00 
8,500.00 

6,000.00 
5,000.00 

35,000.00 
2JIO0.00 

53,400.00 
1,500.00 
3,300.00 

15,000.00 

07.750.00 
2,500.00 



$ 8,000.00 

51 M i.l III 



13,000.00 
5,400.00 

1,000.00 
300.00 



76,000.00 
9,000.00 
6,000.00 
5,000.00 

40,000.00 
2,000.00 

58,800.00 
1,500.00 
3,300.00 

15,000.00 

67,750.00 
2,500.00 



207,950.00 
715,175.00 



286,850.00 
765,040.00 



$ 983,125.011 



$1,051,890.0 



$ 8,000.00 
500.00 



5.000.00 
5,400.00 



Building and Improvement Fund, 1923-25 



Permanent Water Supply..... $ 180,000.00 

Three Dormitories at $118,250 364,750.00 

Chemistry Building and Equipment 536.000.00 

Geology Building and Equipment 214,800.00 

Women's Building and Equipment 224,000.00 

Class Room Building ami Equipment 185,000.00 

Remodeling Old Buildings 250,000.00 



Campus Grading, Roads, etc.. 

Furniture and Fixtures .. 



50,000.00 

04,000.00 

Sewers, Heating, Lighting Extensions 125,000.00 

Permanent Equipment 83,830.00 

Grounds for Student Recreation and Exercise.. 50,000.00 



Total $2,317,380.00 



134 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 

Member of Alumni Magazines Associated 

Issued monthly except in July : August, and September, by the Gen- 
oral Alumni Association of the University of North Carolina. 

Board of Publication 
The Review is edited by the following Board of Publication: 

Louis R. Wilson, '99 Editor 

Associate Editors: Walter Murphy, '92; Harry Howell, '95; Archibald 

Henderson, '98; W. S. Bernard, '00; J. K. Wilson, '05; Louis 

Graves, '02; P. P. Graham, '09; Kenneth Tanner, '11; Lenoir 

Chambers, '14; R. W. Madry, '18. 

E. R. Rankin, '13 Managing Editor 

Subscription Price 

Single Copies $0.20 

Per Year 1.50 

OFFICE OF PUBLICATION, CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 

Entered at the Postomce at Chapel Hill, N. C, as second class 
matter. 



get such a true reflection from speeches in Congress 
or from editorials in newspapers. They are mere 
bubbles on the surface. The real thing is found in 
the doings and thoughts of men like Quincy Mills. 

— L. G. 



THE UNIVERSITY IN PRINT 



THE STORY OF QUINCY MILLS 

Under the title of "One Who Gave His Life," 
James Luby has written and Putnam's has published 
(G. P. Putnam's Sons, New York. 1923. Pp. 490. 
$4.50.) the story of Quincy S. Mills, a graduate of 
the University in the class of 1907, who was killed 
in an attack on the German lines, between Chateau- 
Thierry and Fere-en-Tardenois, July 26, 1918. 

The letters from Mills while he was at the front 
give a war picture which is surpassed in vividness by 
few if any of the many thousands of printed reports 
of the great struggle. He wrote for his family, not 
for publication ; but he was the newspaper man 
through and through, and his narratives bear the 
mark of both his reporter's instinct and his years of 
newspaper training. 

While anybody would be interested in this volume, 
which contains nearly five hundred pages and is 
handsomely printed, it makes a special appeal to the 
ahunnus or the student of the University of North 
Carolina. For Mills' life here on the campus is cov- 
ered thoroughly and sympathetically. One reads of 
his part in college activities, and there are reproduced 
a number of his contributions to the Tar Heel, the 
Magazine, and the Annual — fledgling efforts at writ- 
ing, yet giving promise of the talent that he displayed 
later in his work for the New York Evening Sun. 

Chapter VII of Mr. Luby's book begins: "Mills 
was not the man to cry preparedness to other people 
and remain inactive himself." The present reviewer 
has good reason to recall this, for he knew Mills well 
in the Plattsburg training days. The young editorial 
writer of the Evening Sun was passionately devoted 
to the cause of the Allies and for a long time before 
April 1917 he was eager to see America take up arms. 
He asked nothing better than to do his part as a 
fighter. The chance came, and he did his part nobly. 
He gave his life. 

If I had a son who was too young to take part in 
the war, but who was now approaching manhood, I 
know of no book I should rather have him read than 
this one. For it shows America in America's best 
mood. I am not acquainted with any other volume 
where one can see reflected so clearly the spirit that 
animated the country in 1917 and 1918. You don't 



RALPH H. GRAVES LEAVES THE TIMES 

Ralph H. Graves, '97, has resigned from the Sun- 
day editorship of the New York Times to go with the 
Doubleda\*-Page Conipanj', publishers. He will have 
charge of their syndicate, which distributes stories, 
articles, books in serial form, and other features. 
After February 1 his headquarters will be the main 
offices of the company in Garden City, a Long Island 
suburb of New York. 

After his graduation Mr. Graves stayed on in the 
University two years, serving as librarian and taking 
his Master's degree. In 1899 he went to New York 
and became a reporter on the Times. Ever since, 
except for three or four years that he spent with the 
Evening Post, he has been a member of the Times 
staff. For a long time he did reporting and copy- 
reading. Then he was in turn assistant managing 
editor, city editor, and Sunday editor. 

Possibly the most notable work that he did for the 
Times in all these years was to captain that great 
newspaper's correspondents at national political con- 
ventions. His name did not appear in connection 
with this work, but it was known to insiders that 
the capable presentation by the Times of the con- 
vention news was due chiefly to his guiding brain. 

He would take command of ten or a dozen corres- 
pondents at Chicago or San Francisco, or wherever 
the place was, and direct their every movement from 
the time the delegates gathered to the minute of ad- 
journment. He gave out their assignments to them; 
determined what news should be played up ; kept in 
constant touch with the leading figures of the conven- 
tion ; solved difficult problems of telephone and tele- 
graph communication. It was gruelling work. For 
four or five days at a time there would be hardly any 
sleep for him. The Times always came out with all 
the news there was — many people thought with more 
and better news than any other newspaper in the 
country. 

One instance that New York newspaper men relate 
about Mr. Graves shows his resourcefulness. During 
the last Democratic convention in San Francisco some 
accident happened to the direct telephone wire across 
the continent. He got into communication with one 
of the high telephone officials in British Columbia, 
and in a few minutes his voice was going over a wire 
that traversed the Canadian Rockies and led through 
Montreal to the Times office in New York. This wire 
was reserved for several minutes at a stated hour just 
before the paper went to press every night. It en- 
abled the Times to get absolutely the latest news. 

He has become a notable figure in newspaper circles 
in the metropolis, being a member of the Century 
club, the Dutch Treat club, and the Coffee House. 
He and Miss Frances Griffith, of Charlotte, were 
married in 1906. 

Mr. Graves' father, Ralph H. Graves, was professor 
of mathematics in the University until his death in 
1889. His grandfather, John de Berniere Hooper, 
and his great-grandfather, William Hooper, were also 
members of the faculty here. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



135 



ESTABLISHED 1916 



Alumni Loyalty fund 



"One Tor all, all Tor one" 



Council: 

A. M. SCALES. '92 
LESLIE WEIL. '95 
L. R. WILSON. '99 
A. W. HAYWOOD. '04 
W. T. SHORE. '05 
J A. GRAY. '08 




They Invested in Youth 

In the last six years the late J. H. Hewitt. '99. and Victor S. Bryant, '90, left 
bequests to the University the income from which is used to enable worthy young 
men to enter and remain within the doors of the University. A gift of $10,000 has 
been made by L. S. Holt, .Jr. for the same purpose. 

These men, whose service to youth will continue long after their day and gener- 
ation, have chosen this method of serving. There are hundreds of other ways 
through which the lives of the student body of today and tomorrow can be enriched. 
One of these is 

THROUGH 

The Alumni Loyalty Fund 



PUT CAROLINA IN YOUR WILL. PILL OUT COUPON. TEAR OFF. AND SEND TO 



JULIUS A. WARREN, Treas. 


CHECK HERE 


Alumni Loyalty Fund, 

Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Enclosed find my Alumni Loyalty Fund contribution for 1923, 
as follows : 

Name 




$ 2.00 
$ 5.00 
$ 10.00 
$ 15.00 
$ 20.00 
$ 25.00 
$ 50.00 
$100.00 








Address . 















136 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



Union National 
Bank 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



Capital $200,000.00 

Surplus & Profits $252,000.00 
Resources $3,000,000.00 



We cordially invite the 
alumni and friends of the 
University of North Carolina 
to avail themselves of the fa- 
cilities and courtesies of this 
bank. 



D. P. TILLETT 
Cashier 



Southern Mill 
Stocks 

All recent reports show an 
improvement in money condi- 
tions and in returning demand 
for cotton goods. 

Just now is a good time to buy 

SOUTHERN MILL STOCKS 
We have several very good 
offerings indeed at this time, 
at prices which should show 
good profits as the mill business 
becomes adjusted again. 

Send for special list. 

F. C. Abbott & Co. 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 

INVESTMENTS 

Phone 238 Postal Phone 

Long Dist. 9957 

Twenty-Three Years Experience 



GENERAL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

OF THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH 

CAROLINA 

Officers of the Association 

Walter Murphy, '9:2 President 

D. L. Grant, '21 Secretary 

WITH THE CLASSES 
1851 

— Dr. W. M. Richardson, who is the 
oldest living alumnus of the University 
of North Carolina save only one, writes 
from West Palm Beach, Fla: "Can 
you tell me whether Colonel Alfred Holt 
Carrigan, of Hope, Ark., a member of 
the class of 1850, the senior alumnus of 
our association, is enjoying good health? 
My own health is very good. ' ' 

1880 
— The late Lindsay Patterson, Law '80, 
a son of Rufus L. Patterson, '51, was 
the brother of Louis M., '79, Prank F., 
'86, Andrew H., '91, Rufus L. Jr.. '93, 
John L., '95, and Edmund V., '99. 
Seven alumni brothers from one family 
is believed to be the record at the Uni- 
versity. 

1883 
— The Raleigh News and Observer of 
January 11 carried the following ac- 
count of the adjournment of the House 
of Representatives on January 10 in 
honor of the birthday of K. A. Dough- 
ton, former lieutenant governor, Uni- 
versity trustee, and veteran legislator 
from Alleghany County : ' ' Represent- 
ative R. A. Doughton was GO years old 
yesterday. Honors have eome thick 
upon the grizzled warrior of the Lost. 
Provinces in the 30 years since he came 
to the House in 1887, then a young man 
of thirty just reaching what the old 
timers of that day declared was the 
fullness of his manhood, but none of 
them has seemed to touch him so deeply 
as did the ovation that broke around 
him yesterday when Lindsay Warren 
moved that the House adjourn in his 
honor. Nobody seems to think of him 
as having birthdays. They are for child- 
ren, and -jiot for stern-faced, steely- 
eyed veterans of a long series of legis- 
lative battles — and victories. But when 
Lindsay Warren called attention to the 
fact that 60 years ago yesterday Rufus 
A. Doughton saw the light of day, tu- 
mult broke loose and for a quarter of 
an hour the veteran legislator was the 
center of an eddying tide of congratu 
lation. Much water lias run under the 
bridge and some over it since Mr. 
Doughton came to Raleigh 36 years ago. 
In the General Assemblies of 1887, 
1889 and 1891 he became a power, but 
it was not until 1909 when he returned 
from a period of political inactivity 



The Fidelity Bank 

With Total Resources of Over 

Six Million 
Dollars 

Solicits Your Account 



Four per cent, compound 
interest on savings 

No account too small to 

receive our careful 

attention 



The Fidelity Bank 

Durham, N. C. 



T. C. Thompson 
and Bros. 

INCORPORATED 1895 

General Contractors and 
Builders 

Birmingham, Ala. 
Charlotte, N. C. 



Now Building the 
"Greater University' 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



137 



Chat. Lee Smith, Pres. Howell L. Smith, Sec'] 
Wm. Oliver Smith, Treas. 



Edwards and Broughton 
Printing Company 

Raleigh, N. C. 



Engraved Wedding Invitations. Christmas 
Cards, Visiting Cards and Correspon- 
dence Stationery 



Printers, Publishers and 
Stationers 



Steel and Copper Plate Engravers 



Manufacturers of 

Blank Books and Loose Leaf 
Systems 



Save Your 
Money 



Buy bonds and protect your 
own and your family 'a future. 

Bonds are safe and marketable 
and can be obtained to yield up 
to 7 per cent. 

Consult your banker regarding 
the bonds this company sells. 



HENDERSON-WINDER 
COMPANY 

INVESTMENTS 

Greensboro National Bank Bldg. 

Greensboro, N. C. 



after his retirement as lieutenant gov- 
ernor in 1S97, that he came into his 
full power of leadership. Since then he 
has ruled the House with an iron hand, 
though rarely asserting his power. 
'Isn't he any older than that?' a legis- 
lative iledgling asked incredulously 
when Mr. Warren has finished his brief 
tribute yesterday. He is no older than 
that. Eastward from Sparta the road 
is rough and the winter winds are harsh. 
They tear into the eyes ami harden 
them, wringing youth out of them. The 
Governor looks like most of his people 
look, only perhaps more so. He has 
been coming over the Gap for many, 
many years. But the muscles down 
under the weathered exterior of the Old 
Tiger are like steel. Take him walking 
across the hills of Alleghany and he 
will walk the life out of many younger 
men. There is iron in him, and lie is 
not an old man. He will never be old, 
perhaps, because there are no old people 
in his family. Some day, twenty years 
hence, maybe, he ma}' begin to feel the 
grip of the years, but not now." 

1886 
— W. N. Everett, merchant and farmer 
of Rockingham, former mayor of his 
home city, several times representative 
of his county in the General Assembly, 
long prominent in University councils 
as a strong factor in the deliberations 
of the board of trustees, assumed the 
duties of the office of Secretary of State 
for North Carolina on January 16. the 
oath of office being administered to him 
by Associate Justice W. P. Stacy, '08, 
of the Supreme Court. Mr. Everett re- 
ceived appointment to this office from 
Governor Cameron Morrison to fill the 
unexpired term of the lamented Col. J. 
Bryan Grimes, also a member of the 
class of 1886. who had performed in 
splendid fashion the duties of this offfie 
since 1901. Mr. Everett found it nec- 
essary to resign from his seat in the 
present General Assembly in order to 
accept the office of Secretary of State. 
In the General Assembly he held the im- 
portant post of chairman of the ap- 
propriations committee of the House of 
Representatives. 

1887 
— W. K. Boggan is located at Wades- 
boro, where lie is clerk of superior court 
for Anson County. 

1888 
— The Gidnej brothers who I'll college 
in 1887 are in bhe west. Samuel E. Gid- 
ney is a lawyer, practicing with his son 
at Muskogee, Oklahoma, the firm name 
being Gidney and Gidney. Charles C. 
Gidney is a physician at Plainview, 
Texas, and is also president of the First 
National Bank of Plainview. The 



The 
Trust Department 



Of the Southern Life and 
Trust Company buys and 
sells high grade stocks and 
bonds. We have for sale 
some especially attractive 
preferred stocks. 



Trust Department 

Southern Life & Trust Company 

A. W. McALISTER, President. 

B. G. VAUGHN, First Vice-President. 
A. M. SCALES. General Counsel and 

Vice-President. 



The Yarborough 



RALEIGH'S LEADING 

AND LARGEST 

HOTEL 



MAKE IT YOUR HOME WHEN 
IN RALEIGH 



B. H. GRIFFIN HOTEL 
COMPANY 



138 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



THE BANK of 
CHAPEL HILL 



Oldest and Strongest Bank 
in Orange County 



Capital $25^000.00 

Surplus $50,000.00 



We earnestly solicit your banking 
business, promising you every service 
and assistance consistent with safe 
banking. "It pleases us to please 
you." 



M. C. S. NOBLE, President 
R. L. STROWD. V.-President 
M. E. HOGAN. Cashier 



Smoke 

PINEHURST 

HAV-A-TAMPA 

LA PALINA 
CORTEZ 



All Sizes 
10c and Up 



I. L. Sears Tobacco Co. 

Phone 1323 

Durham, N. C. 



brothers registered from Shelby when 
matriculating. 

1892 
— Walter Murphy, of Salisbury, repre- 
sentative of Rowan County in the House 
of Representatives, has been named by 
Speaker John G. Dawson, '08, as chair- 
man of the House appropriations com- 
mittee, to succeed W. N. Everett, '86, 
who became Secretary of State. 

1893 
— W. P. Hubbard, lawyer of San Fran- 
cisco, writes concerning the death of 
O. C. Bynum: "O. C. Bynum, of the 
class of 1886, died on October 15 in San 
Francisco, where he had been engaged 
for several years in the cotton goods 
business. Dr. J. A. B. Fry, of the South 
Methodist. Church, of Stockton, Cali- 
fornia, formerly of Moore County, ofri- 
ated at the funeral. All the pallbearers 
were North Carolinians now in business 
in San Francisco. They were: Vernon 
W. Long, of the Class of '87, in the 
lumber business; T. W. Harris, repre- 
senting the American Tobacco Company; 
A. P. Edwards, with the Durham Hos- 
iery Mills; and "William P. Hubbard, 
attorney at law. Mr. Bynum leaves a 
widow, two sons and a daughter. ' ' 
— V. E. Whitlock practices law in New 
York with offices at 222 Fulton Street. 
— J. F. Watlington is engaged in bank- 
ing at Reidsville as president of the 
Bank of Reidsville. Dr. J. W. McGehee, 
'02, physician of Reidsville, is vice 
president. 

1895 
— The Charlotte Observer recently said 
editorially: "Dr. Holland Thompson, 
professor of history in the College of 
the City of New York, back home for a 
brief spell after an extended absence, 
saw many evidences of progress in this 
State and was deeply impressed with 
the development of its industrial inter 
ests. He saw abundant tokens that North 
Carolina 'is soon destined to be one of 
the greatest States in the Union,' and if 
he had tarried for a while that he could 
have had opportunity to cover more ter- 
ritory, lie might have arrived at the con- 
clusion some of us hold, that it is al- 
ready the 'greatest.' Dr. Thompson 
was particularly impressed with the edu- 
cational advancement, not only at the 
University, but throughout every county 
in the State. ' ' 

1896 
— J. LeGrande Everett, cotton manufac- 
turer and railway executive of Rocking- 
ham, was chosen deputy grand master of 
the North Carolina Grand Lodge of 
Masons at the annual meeting held in 
Raleigh in January. 

1897 
— R H. Hubbard has been connected for 



KODAK FINISHING 

As Qood as the Best 
Anywhere 



Over eighty per cent of our busi- 
ness is mail order 



May we send you a price list? 



R. W. FOISTER 

BOX 242 
CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 



The Guilford Hotel 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 

Located in the heart of 
Greensboro, and operated on 
the European plan, modern 
in every respect, the Guilford 
Hotel extends a hearty invi- 
tation to Carolina Alumni to 
make it their headquarters 
while in the city. You are 
always welcome. 

We have one of the best 
and most talked about Cafe- 
terias in North Carolina. 

Our motto is excellent ser- 
vice and our prices are rea- 
sonable. 



Guilford Hotel Company 

M. W. Sterne, Manager 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



139 



i^onaress 
J(aU 

Washington, D. C. 



Under the Dome of the 
United States Capitol, 
with the most beautiful 
location in Washington, 
extends a hearty welcome 
to Carolina Alumni. 



Rates under the European plan, 
$2.50 and up. Rates under the 
American plan, $5.50 and up 



S. A. MANUEL, 
President and General Manager 



Asphalt Roads 
and Streets 

Durable and Economical 



If you arc interested in streets or 
roads we invite you to inspect our 
work. See the Asphalt Highways built 
hy us recently: Rocky-Mount-Nash 
ville Highway, Raleigh Cary Highway. 
Durham toward Hillsbnro, Durham 
toward Roxhoro, Greensboro to High 
Point, Guilford County, Gibsonville 
Road, Guilford County, Archdale Road, 
Guilford County, Thomasville Road, 
Guilford County, Guilford Station Road 
and many others. This work speaks for 
itself. 

A representative will visit you and 
supply any information or estimate! 
desired. 

Robert G. Lassiter & Co. 
Engineering and Contracting 

Home Office: Oxford, N. C. 
327 Arcade Building Norfolk, Va. 

1002 Citizens Bank Building 

Raleigh, N. C. 

American Exchange National Bank 
Building Greensboro, N. 0. 



the past fifteen years with the D. L. 
Gore Co., wholesale grocers of Wilming- 
ton. For the past four years he has 
been sales manager for this firm. He 
lives at 304 North 15th Street, Wilming- 
ton. 

— Victor M. Graves is with the T. Holt 
Haywood department of the firm of 
Frederick Victor and Achelis, cotton 
goods commission merchants of New 
York. His residence address is 127 West 
58th Street. 

1898 
— P. C. Whitlock, Charlotte attorney, has 
prepared at the request of Governor 
Morrison a measure which will be intro- 
duced in the General Assembly, provid- 
ing for the creation of a State depart- 
ment of commerce and industry. 
— J. W. Canada is located at Houston, 
Texas, where he is secretary and treas- 
urer of the Southland Farmer Publishing 
Co., publishers of The Southern Farmer. 

1899 
H. M. Wagstaff, Secretary, 
Chapel Hill, N. C. 
— Z. V. Turlington, Law '99, lawyer of 
Mooresvillc, represents Iredell County in 
the House of the N. C. Legislature. 
— R. A. Nunn, lawyer of New Bern, is 
city attorney. 

1900 
W. S. Bernard, Secretary, 
Chapel Hill, N. C. 
— P. A. Heilig is engaged in the mer- 
cantile business at Salisbury. 
— Dr. R. B. Lawson, director of physical 
education in the University, is president 
of the North Carolina Physical Educa- 
tion Society. 

1901 
J. G. Murphy, Secretary, 
Wilmington, N. C. 
— Jos. E. Avent, who was for several 
years superintendent of schools at Max- 
ton, Morganton, and Goldsboro, and later 
was professor of education in the State 
Normal College, Radford, Va., is now 
president of Martha Washington College, 
Abingdon, Virginia. Mr. Avent did his 
graduate work in Teachers College, Col- 
umbia University. He is now also en- 
gaged in a piece of investigation for the 
committee on teachers colleges of the Na- 
tional Council of Education. N. E. A., as 
to the work of summer schools in state 
teachers colleges. 

— C. L. Mosteller, wholesale merchant of 
Hickory, was recently elected president 
of the Consolidated Trust Co. L. F. 
Abernethy, '06, formerly a famous full- 
back on the Carolina football team, is 
cashier of this thriving Hickory banking 
institution. 

— Wm. Davis writes from St. Paul; 
"Pictures in The Review add greatly 
to its value. The man who pays for 




The Young Man 



who prefers (and most young men do) 
styles that are a perfect blend of 
novelty and refinement has long sinco 
learned the special competency of this 
Hothes shop. 



Pritchard-Bright & Co. 



Durham, N. O. 



Ra wis- Knight Co. 

' 'Durham 's Style Store ' ' 

We extend a special invita- 
tion to our Chapel Hill friends 
to visit our store and view 
what's new in Fall and 
Winter wearing apparel. 

Fashion's very latest styles 
in Coats, Suits, Dresses and 
Smart Millinery. 

Beautiful Silks and Woolen 
Dresses in the most appealing 
styles. 

All the new weaves in cot- 
ton and woolen goods, silks, 
duvetyn, plush. Large line of 
silk and cotton hosiery. The 
home of Lady Ruth, Crown, 
Modart and Binner Corsets. 
Centemeri Kid Gloves and 
Ashers Knit Goods. 

Mail orders promptly filled. 

Rawls-Knight Co. 

Durham, N. C. 



140 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



Correct Equipment 

FOR ALL 

Athletic Sports 




The Quality we served your 
Daddy with 

THE BOOK EXCHANGE 

Agency for 

Alex Taylor & Co. 

INC. 
New York 



PENDY 

Dean of Transportation 



All History of the Bus be- 
gins and ends with Pendy 

He is the pioneer jitney man 
and the one that brought the 

$1.00 Fare to 50c 

Alumni are invited to keep 

this price down to 50 cents 

by riding in 

THE RED BUS 

See and ride in the Red Bus 
Pendy controls the price 

SCHEDULE 
Leave Chapel Hill Leave Durham 



8:30 A.M. 
10:50 A.M 
2:15 A.M. 
4:00 P.M. 
7:00 P.M. 
9.00 P.M. 



10:00 A.M. 
11:40 A.M. 

3:10 P.M. 

5:08 P.M. 

8:00 P.M. 
10:30 P.M. 



them is certainly public spirited and 
loyal. ' ' 

1903 
N. W. Walker, Secretary, 
Chapel Hill, N. C. 
— Thos. J. Harkins, lawyer of Asheville 
and assistant U. S. district attorney, is 
a 33rd degree Scottish Rite Mason and 
is inspector general of his jurisdiction. 

1904 
T. F. Hickerson, Secretary, 
Chapel Hill, N. C. 
— Lawrence S. Holt. Jr. is located in 
his home city, Burlington, where lie is a 
member of the firm of Lawrence S. Holt 
and. Sons, proprietors of the Aurora 
Cotton Mills at Burlington and the Gem 
Cotton Mills at Gibsonville. 
— V. A. J. Idol was elected in January 
vice president and trust officer of the 
Commercial National Bank of High 
Point. Mr. Idol has served as cashier 
and a member of the board of directors 
for a number of years. This banking 
institution has resources of more than 
seven and a half million dollars. 

1905 

W. T. Shore, Secretary, 
Charlotte, N. C. 
— Stroud Jordan is one of the leading 
Carolina alumni engaged in the pro- 
fession of chemistry. He received the 
A.B. degree from the University in 1905. 
the M.S. degree in 1907, and the Ph.D. 
degree in 1909. For two years after he 
received his doctor's degree from Caro- 
lina, he served as instructor in general 
chemistry in the Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology at Boston. From 1911 
until 1920 lie was chief chemist for the 
American Tobacco Co. During the world 
war he held rank in the chemical war- 
fare .service as captain. He served in 
France as assistant corps gas officer of 
the Sixth Army Corps and as division 
gas officer of the 88th Division. He is 
now chief chemist for Henry Heide. Inc.. 
313 Hudson Street, New York. Dr. 
Jordan has been since 1919 national 
president of the Alplii Chi Sigma Fra- 
ternity (professional chemical). The 
most of Dr. Jordan's work since he left 
college lias been of a developmental na- 
ture in chemical engineering. He has 
published articles in the leading chem- 
ical journals of the country. 

1906 
J. A. Parker, Secretary, 
Washington, D. C. 
— II. H. Allen is engaged in the practice 
of law at Raleigh, with offices in the 
Commercial .National Hank Building. 
— T. A. McNeill, formerly a star half- 
back on the Carolina football team, and 
now a lawyer of Lumberton, has assumed 
his duties as solicitor of the ninth 



Fall Clothing 

The Store 
For 

Correct 

C lot ties 

^/iats ana 

Sneed-Markham- 
Taylor Co. 

Durham. N. C. 



DRINK 




Delicious and Refreshing 

Quality tells the difference in 
the taste between Coca Cola and 
counterfeits. 

Demand the genuine by full 
name — nicknames encourage sub- 
stitution. 

Get a bottle of the genuine 
from your grocer, fruit stand, or 
cafe. 

Durham Coca-Cola Bottling Co. 
Durham, N. C. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



141 



Five years out of college and 
deep in a rut 



a 



What hope is therefor me?" he asked 



HE graduated in 1912 from 
one of the best of New 
England's colleges, and found 
a job in a big Eastern busi- 
ness. 

For a year or two things 
seemed to go very well; he 
moved from one subordinate 
job to another at nominal ad- 
vances in salary. Then sud- 
denly progress stopped. After 
being out of college five years 
he lost his self-confidence, 
lost his enthusiasm, almost 
lost his hope. 

One day by chance he was 
introduced to a representa- 
tive of the Alexander Ham- 
ilton Institute. The Insti- 
tute man has shared the con- 
fidences and perplexities of 
thousands of business men, 
and almost unconsciously the 
younger man began explain- 
ing his problem. The result 
of that conference is best set 
forth in the letter which the 
young man wrote two years 
later. 

"My self-confidence in- 
creased; ray earning 
power doubled" 

"It is now two years since I 
enrolled with the Alexander 
Hamilton Institute; I call it 
the best decision I ever made. 



Next to that is the decision provide a more direct path to sue- 
to leave the corporation where cess - 

I had allowed myself to be- 35% were university 

come merely a cog in the graduates 

machine. Mv self-confidence AI . ., ., „.~ .., 

J Altogether more than 3o% of the 

and courage have increased men who enrolled with the Insti- 

infinitely. and incidentally tute have been graduates of Ameri- 

my rate of pay in the period can universities and colleges. 

of one year has nearly dou- Year by year the Alexander 

bled. For the first time since Hamilton Institute has become 

I left college I feel that I am more and more wideI y accepted as 

equipped to make real prog- the out ^nding post-graduate 

, . m .1 T training in practical business, 
ress in business, lo the In- 
stitute is due most of the "Forging Ahead in 
credlt -" Business" 

The Alexander Hamilton For the sake of creating a wider 

Institute was founded by a knowledge of the Institute among 

group of business leaders who college men— both employers and 

realized that modern busi- employed-we have set aside sev- 

, , . , eral thousand copies of "Forging 

ness tends to produce special- ., ,. ■„ „ ,, 

. c *" Ahead in Business, a 118-page 

ists, but is not developing book that tells in detail what the 

executives. Institute is and does. 

f. j~. We should like to place a copy 

in the hands of each reader of this 

^ ne " roduct publication; the coupon below will 

The Institute has but one bring your copy immediately upon 

Course; its purpose is to give receipt of your address. 

men, in reading and specific . , . I¥ .. T 

..... 7. ,, Alexander Hamilton Institute 

training by the case system, ,„ . _, _ T _, , _. 

„ , , , , , 681 AstorPlace,New York City 

an all-round knowledge of 

pvpn . rlonarfmont r»f Kiieinacc Send me "Forging Ahead in Business' 

e\er\ department OI OUSlIiesS. which I may keep without obligation \>g$zz 

By serving years in each 

department of business, the Name mm'j££ 

average man could, if he chose. Buaineaa 
gain this training by practical 
experience. 

It's the business of the Institute 

to save these wasted years; to Pactum 




Canadian Address, CPU. Building, Tnrnnin; Australian Address, ^2 Hunter Street, Sydney 



L'opvrltjht, Alexander Hamilton Institute 



142 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



Pollard Brothers 
HARDWARE 



Phone 132 

120 W. Main St. 
209-11 Parrish St. 



Durham, N. C. 



ODELL'S, inc 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 

China, Cut Glass and 
Silverware 

General line of Hardware, 

Sporting Goods and 

Household Goods 

Dependable goods. Prompt 

Service. Satisfactory 

Prices 



Perry-Horton Shoe Co. 

Special Agents for Nettleton and 

other Standard Makes for Men 

and Women 

Shoes and Hosiery 

MAKE OUR STORE HEAD- 
QUARTERS WHILE IN 

DURHAM, N. C. 



Snider-Fletcher 
Company 

Watches, Diamonds and 
Jewelry 

110 W. Main St. Durham, N. C. 



judicial district. He succeeded S. B. 
McLean, '04, who held the office for 
eight years and is now engaged in farm- 
ing near Charlotte. 

1907 
C. L. Weill, Secretary, 
Greensboro, N. C. 
— Rev. W. A. Jenkins, who was formerly 
pastor of Methodist churches at David- 
son and Charlotte, and who was in ser- 
vice during the world war as a chaplain, 
is now pastor of the Central Methodist 
Church of Concord. 

— O. V. Hicks is superintendent of 
schools at. Tabor aud is also engaged in 
the practice of law at this town. 

1908 
M. Robins, Secretary, 
Greensboro, N. C. 
— John G. Dawson, lawyer of Kinston 
and representative of Lenoir County, 
was elected speaker of the House of 
Representatives of the General Assembly 
at the opening of the present session. 
- — The many Carolina friends of F. L. 
Huffman, '08, and Robert U. Huffman, 
'13, both of Morganton, learn with re- 
gret of the deatn of tneir father, S. 
Huffman. Mr. Huffman, who was one of 
the leading citizens of Morganton and 
Burke County, died on December 23. 
— W. C. Raper is connected with the 
traffic department of the Southern Rail- 
way Co., at Atlanta, Ga. 
— S. H. Lyle, Jr. is secretary of the 
board of trade at his home town, Frank- 
lin. He is also president of the Frank- 
lin Realty Co. and secretary-treasurer of 
the local building and loan association. 

1909 
O. C. Cox, Secretary, 
Greensboro, N. C. 
— W. L. Long, lawyer of Roanoke Rap- 
ids and member of the State Senate, 
has been reelected president pro tern of 
the Senate. Mr. Long was president pro 
tem of the State Senate of 1921. 
— F. J. Blythe is a member of the firm 
of Blythe Bros., paving contractors of 
Charlotte. This firm is now concluding 
an extensive paving contract in Char- 
lotte. 

— Jno. A. Moore is principal of the 
Stantonsburg high school. 

1910 

J. R. Nixon, Secretary, 
Edenton, N. C. 
— Alfred Clarence Piekard and Miss 
Louise Coffey were married on December 
28 in Morganton. They live in Chapel 
Hill, where Mr. Piekard is engaged in 
the mercantile business as owner and 
manager of the J. F. Piekard Store. 
Mrs. Piekard is secretary of the summer 
school and secretary to Prof. N. W. 



THE UNIVERSITY 
CAFETERIA 



By courteous and pleasing ser- 
vice the University Cafeteria has 
won its way into the hearts of a 
great many students and alumni. 

The same service that made the 
Cafeteria popular last year is 
being rendered again this year. 



Come in and Try Our Meals 



HUTCHINS DRUG STORE 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 

A drug store complete in all respects 
located in the heart of Winston-Salem 
and operated by CAROLINA men, 
where up-to-the-minute service is main- 
tained, and where Alumni and their 
friends are always especially welcome. 

JAS. A. HUTCHINS, Manager 



DILLON SUPPLY CO. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Mill Supplies 
Machinery 

Modern Machine Shop, Auto 

Cylinder and Crankshaft 

Grinding 



HICKS-CRABTREE 

COMPANY 

THREE MODERN DRUG STORES 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 

Eastman Kodaks and Supplies 
Nunnally's Candies 

The place to meet your friends when 
in the Capital City 

GILBERT CRABTREE, Mgr. 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



143 



COOPER'S 

MONUMENTS 

Communicate with me re- 
garding your needs for monu- 
ments or tombstones. Will 
gladly forward catalogue upon 
request. 

W. A. COOPER 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



Chapel Hill Hardware 
Company 

Cutlery, Paints, Oils, House- 
hold Supplies, Tools 

Phone 144 



BUDD-PIPER ROOFING 

DURHAM. N. C. 

CONTRACTORS 



CO. 



Johns-Manville Asbestos Roofing 
and Shingles. Slate, Tin and Tile 
Roofing. 

A few of our jobs in Chapel Hill 
are: Dormitories B, C, D and E 
History and Language Buildings 
Physics and Engineering Building 
University Laundry ; Sprunt Me- 
morial Church ; New Baptist 
Church, etc. 

CONTRACTS SOLICITED ANY- 
WHERE IN STATE 



BROADWAY CAFE 

WE CORDIALLY INVITE YOU 
TO VISIT OUR CAFE WHEN 
YOU ARE IN GREENSBORO 

Excellent Service 

Courteous Treatment 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Walker, director of the summer school 
and acting dean of the school of edu- 
cation. 

— J. H. Carter, who has been engaged 
successively as a lawyer at his home city, 
Mt. Airy, as postmaster of Mt. Airy, as 
a newspaper editor first of Mt. Airy 
and later of Elkin, has entered Union 
Seminary at Richmond, Va.. in prepara- 
tion for the Presbyterian ministry. 
— Rev. J. A. McLean, Jr., has resigned 
the pastorate of the First Presbyterian 
Churcli of Morganton and has taken up 
his duties as pastor of the First Pres- 
byterian Church of Greenwood, S. C. 
— S. S. Nash, Jr., is with the investment 
firm of Durfey and Marr, dealers in 
stocks and bonds, Raleigh. 

1911 

I. C. Moser, Secretary, 
Asheboro, N. C. 
— The Charlotte Observer recently car- 
ried the following news article concern- 
ing Stuart W. Cramer, Jr. : " Stuart W. 
Cramer, Jr., who arrived in the city re- 
cently from Washington to spend the 
holidays with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Stuart W. Cramer, will leave today for 
Greenville, S. C, where he will spend 
several months. Mr. Cramer will enter 
the Judson mill to seture first hand and 
practical experience in the manufacture 
of fine colored goods, in which the Jud- 
son mill is preeminent in the south. 
Later Mr. Cramer will be associated with 
his father, who is president of the 
Cramerton mills at Cramerton. Mr. 
Cramer has a wide circle of friends in 
Charlotte who will be interested to know 
that he will return here permanently 
after an absence of a number of years 
spent in the United States Army." 
— Except for the interval spent in ser- 
vice during the world war Fitzhugh 
Whitfield has been engaged in the prac- 
tice of law continuously at his home 
town, Clinton, since 1911. He saw ac- 
tive service overseas as a captain in the 
119th Infantry, 30th Division. He has 
been since 1920 chairman of the demo- 
cratic executive committee of Sampson 
County. Recently he was elected presi- 
dent of the Sampson County Alumni 
Association. The Hate press lias car- 
ried within the past few months a brief 
history written by Captain Whitfield of 
tl.e political life of William Hufus King, 
of the class of 1S05, a native of Samp- 
son County, who b°came Congressman, 
Ambassador, United ."Mates Senator from 
Alabama, and Vice President of the 
United States. 

— Rev. I. Harding Hughes, who at pres- 
ent is one of the headmasters of the St. 
Nicholas School, Raleigh, has accepted 
a call to become rector of Holy Trinity 
Episcopal Church, Greensboro. 

Dr. Eugene R. Cocke practices his pro- 



Whiting-Horton Co. 

Thirty-five Years Raleigh's 
Leading Clothiers 



PRIDGEN & JONES COMPANY 

We carry the best shoes, Edwin 
Clapp, Howard and Foster, and Hey- 
wood's. 

Expert fitters — A cordial welcome 
awaits you. 
107 W. Main St. Durham, N. C. 



Gooch's Cafe 

Offers to Alumni and Stu- 
dents a Cafe and Service 
second to none in the State. 
Established in 1903. 



Chapel Hill, N. C. 



The 
Laundry Department 

OF THE 

University of North Carolina 



Makes every possible effort 
to serve you efficiently. 
Here will be found the 
most complete and modern 
of laundries. Show your 
interest by visiting the 
laundry to know that we 
regard your interest and 
comfort. 

Yes indeed we sew on 
the buttons 



The Laundry Department 



144 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



WELCOME TO 


STONEWALL HOTEL 


F. DORSETT, Manager 


CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



Eubanks Drug Go. 

Reliable Druggist* 

CHAPEL HILL, N. O. 



Z3b* Knivarslt? "press 

Zeb P. Counoil, Mgr. 

Printing 

QUALITY AND SERVICE 
CHAPEL HILL, N. 0. 



Flowers for all Occasions 

DURHAM FLORAL 
NURSERY 

Chapel Hill Agents: EUBANKS DRUG COMPANY 



Electric Shoe Shop 

Expert Shoe Repairing 
CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 



W. B. SORRELL 

Jeweler and Optometrist 
CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 



PATTERSON BROS. 

DRUGGISTS 

Agency Norris Candy The Rexall Store 
Chapel Hill, N. 0. 



WHITE HOUSE CAFE 


"Feeds You Better" 


Headquarters for 


Carolina 


Men 




CHAPEL HILL 


N. C. 



fession, medicine, at Aslieville. 

— Geo. E. Wilson is president of the 

Wilson Motor Co., Charlotte. 

— A. B. Deans is manager of the Wilson 

Cotton Mills Co., at Wilson. 

1912 

J. ('. Lockhart, Secretary, 
Raleigh, N. C. 
— Prank P. Barker is engaged in the 
practice of law at Kansas City, asso- 
ciated with the firm of Miller, Caniack, 
Winger and Reeder. In sendee during 
the world war Mr. Barker was a captain 
in the 322nd Machine Gun Battalion of 
the 86th Division and later served as 
instructor in the Machine Gun Training 
Camp at Augusta, Ga. He married Miss 
Mildred Claibourne Buchanan, of Louis- 
ville, Ky., on June 1, 1918. Mr. and 
Mrs. Barker have three children. Frank 
P., Jr. will enter the University in the 
class of 1937. Mr. Barker writes: 
' ' My latch string is always on the out- 
side for any of the Tar Heel boys. ' ' 
— S. Van B. Nichols saw service during 
the world war as a lieutenant of the U. 
S. Navy. He was flag lieutenant and 
aide to Rear Admiral Henry P. Bryan, 
U. S. N. He was also a member of the 
United States Naval Mission to Brazil, 
on the staff of Admiral Capertm. Since 
the war, due to the state of his health, 
Mr. Nichols has been forced to retire 
from most of his active business con- 
nections, but he retains membership in 
the New York firms of Hardy and Co., 
bankers, and Hamilton and Wade, insur- 
ance. His office address is No. 1 Liberty 
Street, New York, and his residence ad- 
dress is Blufholme, South Norwalk, 
Conn. He married Miss Virginia Center 
Ward, of New York. Mr. and Mrs. 
Nichols have one daughter, Virginia 
(.'enter Nichols. 

— Louie Alex Swicegood and Miss Mary 
Ivy Kluttz were married on January 13 
at Salisbury. They make their home in 
Salisbury, where Mr. Swicegood practices 
law. 

— J. C. Lanier is engaged in the practice 
of law at Greenville. 
— J. T. Reece is county superintendent 
of schools for Yadkin County. He lives 
at Yadkinville. 

1913 
A. L. M. Wiggins, Secretary, 
Hartsville. S. C. 
— Albert Rosenthal Marks and Miss 
Ethel Guckenheimer were married on 
January 16 at Savannah, Ga. They live 
in New Bern, where Mr. Marks is en- 
gaged in the wholesale dry goods business 
as a member of the firm of O. Marks 
and Son. 

- — H. C. Petteway has been engaged for 
a number of years in the practice of law 
at Lakeland, Fla. He is mayor of the 
city. 



A. KLUTTZ CO., INC. 

Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Books, Stationery, 
Groceries 



DURHAM BUSINESS SCHOOL 

Offers exceptional opportunities to those 
desiring training in the fundamental 
principles of business. 

Write for catalogue and full partic- 
ulars to 

Mrs. Walter Lee Lednum, President 
DURHAM, N. C. 



The Peoples National Bank 

WINSTON SALEM, N. 0. 

Capital $150,000 U. S. Depo»itory 

J. W. Fries. Pres. W. A. Blaib, V.-P. 

J. M. Dean, Cashier 

Taylor Simpson, Assistant Cashier 



R. BLACKNALL & SON 

DRUGGISTS 
NORRIS AND HUYLER'S CANDIES 

O. Bernard, Manager 



Corcoran Street 



Durham. N, C. 



Campbell-Warner Co. 

FINE MONUMENTS, BUILDING STONE 

REASONABLE PRICES. WRITE US 

Phono 1131 

RALEIGH, N. 0. 



HOTEL CLEGG 

Greensboro, N. C. 

OPPOSITE STATION 

Rooms $1.50 and Up 

Cafe in Connection 

CAROLINA MEN WELCOME 



FALL GREETINGS 

As the town grows, so do we, and we 
invite Faculty, Students, Citizens, and 
.-ill others to give us a look before 
making any Fall purchase. 

ANDREW'S CASH STORE 



The J. F. Pickard Store 

A. C. PICKARD, Owner 

HEAVY AND FANCY 
GROCERIES 

Opposite Campus 
CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 



THE 



O.Henry 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 
THE WM. FOOR HOTELS CO. 



Wm. Poor, President 

E. E. Robinson, Vice-President-Treasurer 

J. G. Rovitson, Secretarj- 

W. II. Lowry, Manager 

DIRECTORS 

A. M. Scales 
Clem G. Wright 



^ 



THE O. HENRY 
Greensboro, N. C. 



THE CLEVELAND 
Spartanburg, S. C. 



THE SHERATON 
High Point, N. C. 



THE ARAGON 

Jacksonville, Fla. 



New Hotels Now Building in 
Charleston, S. C. 
Charlotte, N. C. 



A Little Field 
Well Tilled 



Never think that your print- 
ing orders are too small for us 
to handle, or to submit to our 
expert craftsmen. 

The small orders for print- 
ing, under our careful atten- 
tion, will by their elegant ap- 
pearance and consistent quali- 
ty, attract attention to your 
business. 

The smaller the business, the 
greater care is necessary to 
foster and keep it growing. 
Good printing helps to empha- 
size superiority in quality, and 
the other kind leaves the oppo- 
site impression. 

Whether your printing runs 
into two figures or six, give it 
the care that will get full value 
out of it. Make your printing 
your representative. 

Yours in the past, present 
and future. 



HE SEEMAN PRINTERY 
INCORPORATED 

Printers in 

Durham. North Carolina 
Since 1885 



146 



THE ALUMNI REVIEW 



— T. A. DeVane is engaged in the lumber 
business at Red Springs. During the 
world war he saw service overseas as a 
first lieutenant of infantry. 
— Dr. T. J. Summey, physician of Bre- 
vard, is commander of the Pisgah post 
of the American Legion. 

1914 
Oscar Leach, Secretary, 
Raeford, N. C. 
— W. C. Lord was with the DuPont Co. 
first at Hopewell, Va., and then at Ole 
Hickory, Tenn., from 1915 until 1919. 
From 1919 until 1920 he was with the 
General Motors Corporation. He re- 
turned to the employ of the DuPont Co. 
in 1920 and was stationed for a time at 
Arlington, N. J. He has been located 
for the past year at Kingsport, Tenn., 
in charge of the salvaging and disposal 
of the entire inventory and real estate 
of the DuPont Co. at this point. The 
plant at Kingsport was the one time 
Federal Dye and Chemical Co. He 
writes : "If my classmates of 1914 are 
as interested to know what I have been 
doing as I am to know what they have 
been doing, the efforts of The Review 
in gathering and publishing information 
will be well appreciated. ' ' 
— F. L. Webster practices his profession, 
law, in Winston- Salem. 

1916 
F. H. Deaton, Secretary, 
Statesville, N. C. 
— J. S. Huske is engaged in the hard- 
ware business at Fayetteville as treas- 
urer of the Huske Hardware House. Mr. 
Huske, with the rank of major, is now 
since the elevation of Col. Albert L. 
Cox, '04, to a brigadier generalship, 
chief in command of the 116th Field 
Artillery of the organized reserves. 
— Lieutenant James G. Dickson, U. S. 
N., and Miss Mary Taylor Pressly were 
married on December 27 at Newport 
News, Va. Dr. Dickson has been on the 
faculty of tiie Naval Medical College in 
Washington but was recently transfer- 
red to the hospital ship, "Relief." 
— E. F. Powell is located at his home 
town, Whiteville, where he is cashier of 
the Bank of Whiteville, the largest and 
strongest bank of Columbus County. 
— D. W. Hunter is engaged in the sale 
of textile machinery, connected with the 
Charlotte office of the Saco-Lowell Shops. 
— J. Frank Love, cotton manufacturer 
of Lincolnton, was recently elected 
president of the Kiwanis club of Lin- 
colnton. 

1917 
H. G. Baity, Secretary, 
Raleigh, N. C. 
— The engagement of Miss Alwilda 
Chadwick Van Ness and Mr. Ezra Pres- 
ton Andrews has been announced. The 



wedding will take place at Charlotte in 
April. Mr. Andrews is now located at 
Greensboro, where he is engaged in the 
iron and steel business. 
— Jno. M. Peirce is located at his home 
town, Warsaw, where he is president of 
the John -M. Peirce Mfg. Co., manufac- 
turers of sash, doors, blinds and lumber. 
— C. L. Tate is located at his home town, 
Chadboum, where he is cashier of the 
Bank of Chadboum. 

1918 
W. R. Wunsch, Secretary, 
Monroe, La. 
— R. W. Madry, who served during war 
days as managing editor of The Alumni 
Review, is now located in New York, 
where he is on the reportorial staff of 
The New York Herald. Mr. Madry 
spent a year or more at Paris, where 
he was connected with the Paris edition 
of The Herald. His New York address 
is 548 Riverside Drive. 
— C. H. Herty, Jr. who was formerly 
shortstop on the Carolina baseball team, 
is now an instructor in chemistry at the 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
and is this year a candidate for the 
doctor's degree at that institution. 
— William Elmer Matthews and Miss 
Anna Mathilda Jones were married on 
July 26 at Cincinnati, Ohio. They live 
at Clinton, where Mr. Matthews is en- 
gaged in the practice of law. 

1919 
H. G. West, Secretary, 
Thomasville, N. C. 
— Thurmond Chatham is treasurer of the 
Chatham Mfg. Co., manufacturers of 
woolen blankets at Winston-Salem and 
Elkin. He made a business trip to Eu- 
rope recently. 

— John Aycock, following a year spent 
in the Pulitzer School of Journalism, 
Columbia University, is now assistant in 
the editorial department of Scott Fores- 
man and Co., publishers, at. Chicago. He 
spent the holidays at his home in Ral- 
eigh. He writes that he finds his work 
most interesting. His address is 623 S. 
Wabash Ave. 

— David Townsend and Miss Lolita 
Lytch were married on December 20 in 
the First Baptist Church of Rowland. 
They make their home at Raynham, 
where Mr. Townsend is engaged in 
farming. 

— John Dalton is senior member of the 
firm of Dalton Bros., dealers in shoes, 
hosiery, notions and dry goods at Forest 
City. 

— Webb Durham is superintendent of the 
Roseland Spinning Co. at Lincolnton. 
— Reynolds Cuthbertson is engaged in 
banking at his home city, Charlotte. He 
is with the Independence Trust Co. 
— B. W. Blackwelder is engaged in the 



practice of law at Concord as a member 
of the firm of Palmer and Blackwelder. 
— H. J. Campbell is with the Guaranty 
Company of New York. He lives at 676 
Riverside Drive. 

— J. A. Courtney, Jr. is a member of 
the firm of the Carolina Audit Co. of 
Hickory. He was married in August, 
1919, and is the proud father of two 
girls. 

— John M. Gibson has a leave of absence 
from his duties as associate editor of 
School, 156 Fourth Avenue, New York, 
and is spending this year in Ger- 
many, pursuing courses at Berlin Uni- 
versity. During his absence John S. 
Terry has taken over his duties on 
School. 



MARKHAM - ROGERS CO. 

Clothes Tailored at Fashion 
Park 

DURHAM, N. C. 



CHAS. C. HOOK, ARCHITECT 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 
Twenty years' experience in 
planning school and college build- 
ings. 



Dermott Heating 
Company 

Durham, N. C. 

HEATING SYSTEMS 

Steam, Hot Water or Vapor 

Durham Home Heating 
Systems 

Engineers and Contractors 



BLUE RIBBON BRAND 


ICE CREAM 




SHERBETS 




FANCY ICES 




PUNCH 




Durham Ice Cream 


Co. 


Durham, N. C. 





(Eulture Scholarship Service Self-Support 

THE 

ytov tl) Carolina (Lollege for ^Pomen 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 

An A-l Grade College Maintained by North Carolina for the Education of the Women of the 

State 

The institution includes the following div- (b) The Faculty of Mathematics and 



lsions : 



Sciences. 



„ „ „ T ., , . , (c) The Faculty of the Social Sciences. 

lst-The College of Liberal Arts and 2nd-The School of Education. 
Sciences, which is composed of : 3rd— The School of Home Economics, 

(a) The Faculty of Languages. 4th — The School of Music. 

The equipment is modern in every respect, including furnished dormitories, library, labora- 
tories, literary society halls, gymnasium, athletic grounds. Teacher Training School, music 
rooms, etc. 

The first semester begins in September, the second semester in February, and the summer 
term in June. 



For catalogue and other information, address 

JULIUS I. FOUST, President, Greensboro, N. C. 



THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH 
CAROLINA PRESS 

ANNOUNCES THE PUBLICATION OF 



The Journal of the Elisha Mitchell Scientific Society (Quarterly) $3.00. 

Studies in Philology (Quarterly) $3.00. 

The High School Journal (Monthly from October to May) $1.50. 

The North Carolina Law Review (Quarterly) $2.00. 

The Journal of Social Forces (Bi-monthly) $2.50. 

The James Sprunt Historical Publications (Semi-annually) $2.00. 

The University of North Carolina Extension Bulletin (Issued 14 times a 

year). Write for special titles and prices. 
The University News Letter (Weekly) . Free to residents of North Carolina. 
Send check for subscriptions to 



THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA PRESS, 

CHAPEL HILL. N. C. 



>s& 



ftiEsi 



Sg&i 




saw 






■I 






HH 


HHHHb 


HI 


H 






gSgSl 


















He 


EnfiS 


Bj 




HP 




j?tC* tj«*< 






SHvHB 


HI 




HjHBJHJ 




BSbb 


Sal 


BESseS 

rats «ft 



hh9 

^HHHHH 



hH 



wS 



VSi 




3s 







a 












- 









■ 



'