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Full text of "A Manual for the Use of the General Court"

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MANUAL. 



FOB TUS irSS OF TDK 



Gen^eh-a^l Court : 



GOKTAININO THB 



RULES AND ORDERS OF THE TWO BRANCHES, 



TOGETHBB WITH THE 

CONSTITUTION OF THE COMMOIirWEALTH, AND THAT 

OF THE UNITED STATES, 

AND ▲ 

List of the Executive, Legisi<ative, aivd JiiDiciAii 

Departments of the State Government, State 

Institutions an© their Officers, County 

Officers, and other Statistical 

Information. 



Prepared, pnrsnant to Orders of the Legislatnre, 

BY 

S. N. GIFFORD and GEO. A. MARDEN. 



BOSTON: 

WRIGHT & POTTER, QTATE PRINTERS. 
Corker Milk and Federal Streets. 

1876. 



:||ommontt;ealth of J|a»SHclt]isetti 



In Senate, May 19, 1875. 

Ordered, That the Clerks of the two branches cause to be 
prepared and printed, before the meeting of the next General 
Court, two thousand five hundred copies of so much of the Leg- 
islative Manual as may be deemed practicable, on the general 
plan of that of the present session. 

Sent down for concurrence. 

S. N. GIFFORD, Clerk, 

House of Representatives, May 19, 1875. 
Concurred. 

GEORGE A. MARDEN, Clerk. 



In Senate, January 25, 1876. 

Ordered, That the Clerks of the two branches cause to be 

printed and bound in suitable form, twenty-five hundred copies 

of the Rules and Orders of the two branches, with lists of the 

several Standing and Special Committees, together with such 

other matter as may be considered practicable in a Legislative 

Manual. 

Sent down for concurrence. 

S. N. GIFFORD, Clerk, 

House of Representatives, January 27, 1876. 

Concurred. 

GEORGE A. MARDEN, Clerk, 



I]SrDEX. 



Page 

Agricultural Library, 387 

Agriculture, Board of, 238 

Almshouse, State, 246 

Assayers of Ores, 241 

Assayer of Liquors, 241 

Attorney-Generals, since 1692, 211 

Auditors, since 1849, 211 

Barnstable County, OflScers, 231 

Battle flags, 395 

Berkshire County, Officers, 231 

Blind, Massachusetts Asylum for, 244 

Boston Athenaeum, 387 

Boston and Albany B^iilroad, State Directors of, . . 241 

Bristol County, Officers, 232 

Calendar for 1876, 397 

Cattle Commissioners, 241 

Census of Inhabitants in 1870 and 1875, and Legal Voters 

in 1865, 173 

Census of the United States, 1870, 171 

Cities in the Commonwealth, 142 

Colleges of the Commonwealth, 246 

Commissioners, &c., 240 

Committee Rooms, assignment of, 384 

Committees, Standing, of the Senate, .... 369 

Standing, of the House, 370 

Joint Standing, 373 

Joint Special, 380 

Common Pleas, Justices of the Court of, from 1820 to 1859, 222 

Congressional Districts, 147 

Constitution of Massachusetts, . . . . . . 33 

Constitution of the United States, 7 

Corporations, Commissioner of, 242 

Council Districts, 157 



4 Index. 

Page 

Councillors, . . . • 319 

Council Committees, 320 

Counties of Massachusetts, 102 

County Officers 230 

Court of Common Pleas, Justices of, from 1820 to 1859, . 222 

Court, Superior, of Judicature, from 1692 to 1775, . . 220 

Court, Superior, Justices of, since 1859, .... 223 

Superior, present Justices, 223 

Court, Supreme, since the Revolution, .... 220 
Supreme Judicial, present Justices, . . . .221 

Courts of Probate and Insolvency, 224 

Courts, Police, Municipal and District, .... 225 

District-Attorneys, 229 

District Courts, 226 

Dukes County, Officers, 232 

Education, Board of, 240 

Education, Board of, Secretaries of, since 1837, . . . 212 

Essex County, Officers, 233 

Executive Department, 319 

Fish, Inspector of, 241 

Franklin County, Officers, 233 

Gtas, &c.. Inspector of, 241 

Governors of Massachusetts, since 1620, .... 206 

Hampden County, Officers, 234 

Hampshire County, Officers, 234 

Harbor Commissioners, 241 

Health, Board of, 242 

House of Representatives, list of Members of, by Counties, 332 
List of Members of, alphabetical, their districts and 

residences, 343 

List of Members of, arranged by seats, . . . 361 

Officers of, 365 

Monitors of, 365 

Reporters of, 383 

Speakers of, from 1780 to 1874, 215 

Clerks of, from 1780 to 1874, 216 

Idiotic and Feeble-minded Youth, Mass. School for, . 244 

Inland Fisheries, Commissioners of, 241 

Insurance Commissioner, 240 



Index, 5 

Page 

Judiciary of Massacliusetts, 219 

Labor Statistics, Bureau of, 242 

Leather, Inspector of, . : 241 

Legislature, organization of, since 1780, .... 213 

Length of Sessions of, since 1832, .... 217 

laeutenant-Govemors of Massachusetts, since 1692, . . 208 

Liquor Commissioner, 241 

Lumber, Surveyor-General of, 241 

Lunatic Hospitals, Trustees of, 242 

Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, .... 243 

Massachusetts Historical Society, .*.... 388 

Member of Congress, vote for, 1875, 261 

Middlesex County, Offlcers, 235 

Mileage Schedule, 143 

Municipal Courts, 225 

Monitors of the House, 365 

Nantucket County, Offlcers, 236 

Norfolk County, Offlcers, 236 

Pilot Commissioners for Port of Boston, . . . .241 

Plymouth County, Offlcers 236 

Police Courts, 225 

Population of United States, 171 

Of Massachusetts, 173 

Postal Kegulations, ........ 203 

Post-Offlces in Massachusetts, 192 

Pot and Pearl Ashes, Inspector of, .... . 241 

President, vote for, in Massachusetts in 1872, . . . 166 

Prisons, Commissioners of, 240 

Public Lands, Commissioners on, 240 

Bailroad Commissioners, 241 

Representative Districts, . 158 

Rules and Orders of the Senate, 263 

Of the House, 279 

Joint, of the two branches, 307 

Savings Banks Commissioner, 241 

Secretaries of the Commonwealth, since 1780, . . . 210 

Senate Districts, 154 

Senate, list of Members of, with districts, residences, &c., 324 

List of Members of, alphabetical, .... 329 



6 Index. 

'. Page 

Senate, Arrangement of seats in, 328 

Senate, Officers of, . . . 331 

Senate, Reporters of, 383 

Senate, Presidents of, from 1780 to 1874, .... 213 

Senate, Clerks of, from 1780 to 1874 214 

Senators, United States, from Massachusetts, since 1789, . 209 

United States, Act regulating the time and manner 

of electing, 99 

Shire Towns. (See County Officers.) 

Soldiers* Messenger Corps, 390 

State Almshouse, 245 

State Charities, Board of, 240 

State House, 392 

State Industrial School for Girls, 243 

State Library, 386 

State Lunatic Hospitals, . ' 242 

State Officers, 1874, vote for, 250 

State Detective Force, 389 

State Primary School, 244 

State Prison, 244 

State Reform School for Boys, 243 

State Workhouse, 245 

Suffolk County, Officers, 237 

Towns and Cities, date of incorporation, original name, 

change of boundary, &c., 102 

Towns and Post-Offlces in Massachusetts, .... 192 

Treasurers of the Commonwealth, since 1780, . . . 210 
Trial Justices. (See County Officers.) 

United States, Constitution of, 7 

United States, Postal Regulations, 203 

United States, Population of, 171 

Valuation of the Commonwealth, in 1872, .... 183 

Voters, Legal, in 1865 173 

Vote for President, in Massachusetts, in 1872, . . .170 

Vote for President in 1872 166 

Vote for Members of Congress, 1874, 261 

Vote for State Officers, 1874, 250 

"Worcester County, Officers, 238 



CONSTITUTION 



OF THE 



UNITED STATES. 



CONSTITUTION 

OF THE 

UNITED STATES. 



PREAMBLE. 
ARTICLE I. 

Sbctton 1. LegiBlatiTe powers; in whom vested. 

Sect. 2. House of Representatires, how and by whom chosen ^ 
Qualifioations of a Representative — Representatives and direct taxes 
—how apportioned — Census— Vacancies to be filled — Power of 
choosingf officers, and of impeachment. 

Sect. 3. Senators, how and by whom chosen — How classified 
— State executive to make temporary appointments, in case, &o.— 
Qnaliflcations of a Senator — President of the Senate, his right to 
vote ~~ President pro /em., and other officers of Senate, how chosen— 
Power to try impeachments — When President Is tried. Chief Jus- 
tice to preside— Sentence. 

Sect. 4. Times, &e., of holding elections, how prescribed— One 
session in each year. 

Sect. 5. Each house the judge of membership — Quorum— Ad- 
Jonmments — Rules — Power to punish or exi>el — Journal — Time 
of adjournments limited, unless, &c. 

Sect. 0. Compensation— Privileges — Disqualification in cer- 
tain cases. 

Sect. 7. House to originate all bills for using revenue— Senate 
may amend — Veto — Bill may be passed by two thirds of each 
house, notwithstanding, &c. — Bill not returned in ten days — Pro- 
visions as to all orders, &c., except, &g. 

Sect. 8. Powers of Congress. 

Sect. 0. Provision as to migration or importation of certain per- 
sons—Habeas Corpus— Bills of Attainder or ex post facto laws — 
Taxes, how apportioned — No export duty — No commercial prefer- 
ences—No money drawn from treasury, unless, &c. — No title of 
nobility — Officers not to receive presents, unless, &c. 

Sbot. 10. States prohibited from the exercise of certain powen. 

9 



10 Constitution of the United States. 



ABTICLB II. 

Sbotiok 1. President ; his and the Vice-President's term of office 
—Electors of President; number, and how appointed — Who shall 
not be electors — President and Vice-President, how chosen — 
Qaalification of President — On whom his duties devolve in case of 
his removal, death, &c. — President's compensation — His oath. 

Sect. 2. President to be commander-in-chief — He may require 
opinion of, Ac, and mi^ pardon — Treaty-making^ power — Nomi- 
nation of certain officers — When President may fill vacancies. 

Sect. .3. President shall communieate to Congress — He may 
convene Congress and a<youm it, In case, Ac. ; shall receive ambas- 
sadors, execute laws, and oommission officers. 

Sect. 4. All civil offices forfeited for certain crimes. 

AKTICLE III. 

Section 1. Judicial Power — Tenure — Compensation. 

Sect. 2. Judicial power; to what cases it extends— Original 
jurisdiction of supreme court — Appellate — Trial by jury, except, 
&o. — Trial, where. 

Sect. 3. Treason defined — Proof of— Punishment of— At- 
tainder. 

ARTICLE IV. 

Section 1. Each State to give credit to the public acts, &c., of 
every other State. 

Sect. 2. Privileges of citizens of each State — Fugitives from 
justice to be delivered up— Persons held to service having escaped, 
to be delivered up. 

Sect. 3. Admission of new States — Power of Congress over 
. territory and other property. 

Sect. 4. Bepublican form of government guaranteed — Each 
State to be protected. 

ARTICLE V. 
Const£*utlon; how amended— Proviso. 

ARTICLE VI. 

Certain debts, &c., adopted — Supremacy of Constitution, treaties, 
and laws of the United States — Oath to support Constitution, by 
whom taken — No religious test. 

ARTICLE Vn. 
What ratification shall establish Constitution. 



Cofistitution of the United States. 11 

AMENDMENTS. 

I. —BeligiouB eBtablisliment prohibited — Freedom of speeehi 

of tlie press, and right to petition. 
II. — Right to keep and bear arms. 

III. •— No soldier to be quartered in any house, unless, fte. 
lY . — Right of search and seizure regulated, 
v.— Provisions concerning prosecution, trial and punishment-.- 
Private property not to be taken for public U8e,without,&c 
VI. — Further provision respecting criminal prosecutions. 
VII. —Bight of trial by jury secured. 

VIII. — Excessive bail, or fines and cruel punishments, prohibited. 
IX. — Rule of construction. 
X. — Same subject. 
XI. — Same subject. 

XII.— Manner of choosing President and Vioe>Fresident. 
XIII. — Prohibition of slavery. 

XIV. — Citizenship — Basis of representation — Certain persons not 
to hold cei-tain offices — Puljjiic debt inviolate — No clainu 
on account of slavery to bo paid — Power of Congress 
to enforce the article. 
XV. — Right of citizens to vote not to be denied or abridged on ac- 
count of, &c. — Congress to have power to enforce the 
article. 

WE, the people of the United States, in order to form a 
more perfect union, establish justice, insure domestic tran- 
quillity, provide for the common defence, promote the gen- 
eral welfare, and secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves 
and our posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitc- 

TION FOR THE UnITED StATKS OF AMERICA. 

ARTICLE I. 

Section 1. All legislative powers herein granted shall 
be vested in a congress of the United States, which shall 
consist of a senate and house of representatives. 

Sect. 2. The house of representatives shall be composed 
of members chosen every second year, by the people of the 
several states ; and the electors in each state shall have the 
qualifications requisite for electors of the most numerous 
branch of the state legislature. 

No person shall be a representative who shall not have at- 
tained to the age of twenty-five years, and been seven years a 



12 Canatitutian of the United States, 

citizen of the United States, and who shall not, when elected, 
be an inhabitant of that state in which he shall be chosen. 

Bepresentatives and direct taxes shall be apportioned 
among the several states which may be included within this 
Union, according to their respective numbers, which shall 
be determined by adding to the whole number of free per- 
sons, including those bound to service for a term of years, 
and excluding Indians not taxed, three fifths of all other 
persons.' The actual enumeration shall be made within 
three years after the first meeting of the congress of the 
United States, and within every subsequent term of ten 
years, in such manner as they shall by law direct. The num- 
ber of representatives shall not exceed one for every thirty 
thousand ; but each state shall have at least one represen- 
tative ; and until such enumeration shall be made, the state 
of New Hampshire shall be entitled to choose three, Mas- 
sachusetts eight, Rhode Island and Providence Plantations 
one, Connecticut five, New York six. New Jersey four, 
Pennsylvania eight, Delaware one, Maryland six, Virginia 
ten, North Carolina five, South Carolina five, and Georgia 
three. 

When vacancies happen in the representation from any 
state, the executive authority thereof shall issue writs of 
election to fill such vacancies. 

The house of representatives shall choose their speaker 
and other ofllcers ; and sliall have the sole power of im- 
peachment. 

Sect. 3. The senate of the United States shall be com- 
posed of two senators from each state, chosen by the legis- 
lature thereof, for six years ; and each senator shall have 
one vote. 

Immediately after they shall be assembled in consequence 
of the first election, they shall be divided, as equally as may 
be, into three classes. The seats of the senators of the first 
class. shall be vacated at the expiration of the second year; 
of the second class, at the expiration of the fourth year ; and 



Constitution of the United States. 18 

of the third class, at the expiration of the sixth year ; so that 
one third may be chosen every second year ; and if vacan- 
cies happen by resignation or otherwise, during the recess 
of the legislature of any state, the executive thereof may 
make temporary appointments, until the next meeting of 
the legislature, which shall then fill such vacancies. 

No person shall be a senator who shall not have attained 
to the age of thirty years, and been nine years a citizen of 
the United States, and who shall not, when elected, be an 
inhabitant of that state for which he shall be chosen. 

The vice-president of the United States shall be presi- 
dent of the senate, but shall have no vote unless they be 
equally divided. 

The senate shall choose their other officers, and also a 
president pro tempore, in the absence of the vice-president, 
or when he shall exercise the office of president of the 
United States. 

The senate shall have the sole power to try all impeach- 
ments ; when sitting for that purpose, they shall be on oath 
or affirmation. When the president of the United States 
is tried, the chief justice shall preside ; and no person shall 
be convicted without the concurrence of two thirds of the 
members present. 

Judgment, in cases of impeachment, shall not extend 
further than to removal from office and disqualification to 
hold and enjoy any office of honor, trust, or profit, under 
the United States ; but the party convicted shall neverthe- 
less be liable and subject to indictment, trial, judgment 
and punishment according to law. 

Seci. 4. The times, places and manner of holding elec- 
tions for senators and representatives, shall be prescribed 
in each state by the legislature thereof; but the congress 
may, at any time, by law, make or alter such regulations, 
except as to the places of choosing senators. 

The congress shall assemble at least uncc in every year, 



14 ConstitiUion of the United States. 

r 

and such meeting shall be on the first Monday in Decem- 
ber, unless they shall by law appoint a different day. 

Sect. 5. Each house shall be the judge of the elections, 
returns and qualifications of its own members, and a ma- 
jority of each shall constitute a quorum to do business ; 
but a smaller number may adjourn from day to day, and 
may be authorized to compel the attendance of absent 
members, in such manner, and under such penalties, as 
each house may provide. 

Each house may determine the rules of its proceedings, 
punish its members for disorderly behavior, and, with the 
concurrence of two thirds, expel a member. 

Each house shall keep a journal of its proceedings, and 
from time to time publish the "same, excepting such parts 
as may in their judgment require secrecy ; and the yeas 
and nays of the members of either house, on any question, 
shall, at the desire of one fifth of those present, be entered 
on the journal. 

Neither house, during the session of congress, shall, 
without the consent of the other, adjourn for more than 
three days, nor to any other place than that in which the 
two houses shall be sitting. 

Sect. 6. The senators and representatives shall receive 
a compensation for their services, to be ascertained by law, 
and paid out of the treasury of , the United States. They 
shall, in all cases, except treason, felony and breach of the 
peace, be privileged from arrest during their attendance at 
the session of their respective houses, and in going to and 
returning from the same ; and for any speech or debate in 
either house, they shall not be questioned in any other place. 

No senator or representative shall, during the time for 
which he was elected, be appointed to any civil office under 
the authority of the United States, which shall have been 
created, or the emoluments whereof shall have been in- 
creased during such time; and no person holding any 



Constitiition of the United States, , 15 

office under the United States shall be a member of either 
house during his continuance in office. 

Sect. 7. All bills for raising revenue shall originate in 
the house of representatives ; but the senate may propose 
or concur with amendments, as on other bills. 

Every bill which shall have passed the house of represen- 
tatives and the senate, shall, before it become a law, be pre- 
sented to the president of the United States ; if he approve, 
he shall sign it; but if not, he shall return it, with his ob- 
jections, to that house in which it shall have originated, 
who shall enter the objections at large on their journal, 
and proceed to reconsider it. If, after such reconsideration, 
two thirds of that house shall agree to pass the bill, it shall 
be sent, together with the objections, to the other house, 
by which it shall likewise be reconsidered, and, if approved 
by two thirds of that house, it shall become a law. But in 
all such cases, the votes of both houses sliall be determined 
by yeas and nays ; and the names of the persons voting 
for and against the bill, shall be entered on the journal of 
each house respectively. If any bill shall not be returned 
by the president within ten days (Sundays excepted) after 
it shall have been presented to him, the same shall be a law, 
in like manner as if he had signed it, unless the congress, 
by their adjournment, prevent its return, in which case it 
shall not be a law. 

Every order, resolution or vote, to which the concur- 
rence of the senate and house of representatives may be 
necessary, (except on a question of adjournment,) shall be 
presented to the president of the United States ; and, be- 
fore the same shall take effect, shall be approved by him, 
or, being disapproved by him, shall be re-passed by two 
thirds of tiie senate and house of representatives, accord- 
ing to the rules and limitations prescribed in the case 
of a bill. 

Sect. 8. The congress shall have power : — To lay and 
collect taxes, duties, imposts and excises, to pay the debts 



16 Constitution of the United States, 

and provide for the common defence and general welfare 
of the United States ; but all duties, imposts and excises 
shall be uniform throughout the United States : — To bor- 
row money on the credit of the United States : — To regu- 
late commerce with foreign nations and among the several 
states, and with the Indian tribes : — To establish an uni- 
form rule of naturalization, and uniform laws on the subject 
of bankruptcies throughout the United States : — To coin 
money, regulate the value thereof, and of foreign coin, and 
fix the standard of weights and measures : — To provide for 
the punishment of counterfeiting the securities and current 
coin of the United States : — To establish post offices and 
post roads : — To promote the progress of science and use- 
ful arts,by securing, for limited times, to authors and invent- 
ors, the exclusive right to their respective writings and dis- 
coveries : — To constitute tribunals inferior to the supreme 
court : — To define and punish piracies and felonies com- 
mitted on the high seas, and offences against the law of na- 
tions : — To declare war, grant letters of marque and repri- 
sal, and make rules concerning captures on land and water : 

— To raise and support armies ; but no appropriation of 
money to that use shall be for a longer term than two years : 

— To provide and njaintain a navy : — To make rules for 
the government and regulation of the land and naval forces : 

— To provide for calling forth the militia to execute the laws 
of the Union, suppress insurrections and repel invasions : — 
To provide for organizing, arming and disciplining the mili- 
tia, and for governing such part of them as may be employed 
in the service of the United States, reserving to the states, 
respectively, the appointment of the officers, and the au- 
thority of training the militia, according to the discipline 
prescribed by congress : — To exercise exclusive legislation 
in all cases whatsoever over such district, (not exceeding 
ten miles square,) as may by cession of particular states, and 
the acceptance of congress, become the seat of the govern- 
ment of the United States ; and to exercise like authority 
over all places purchased by consent of the legislature of the 



Constitution of the United States, IT 

state in which the same shall be, for the erection of forts, 
magazines, arsenals, dockyards and other needful buildings ; 
and to make all laws which shall be necessary and proper 
for carrying into execution the foregoing powers, and all 
other powers vested by this constitution in the goyernment 
of the United States, or in any department or officer thereof. 

Sect. 9. The migration or importation of such persons, 
as any of the states now existing shall think proper to ad- 
mit, shall not be prohibited by the congress prior to the 
year one thousand eight hundred and eight : but a tax or 
duty may be imposed on such importation, not exceeding 
ten dollars for each person. 

The privileges of the writ of habeas corpus shall not bo 
suspended, unless when, in cases of rebellion or invasion, 
the public safety may require it. 

No bill of attainder or ex post facto law shall be passed. 

No capitation or other direct tax shall be laid, unless in 
proportion to the census or enumeration, herein before 
directed to be taken. 

No tax or duty shall be laid on articles exported from 
any state. ^ 

No preference shall be given, by any regulation of com- 
merce or revenue, to the ports of one state over those of 
another ; nor shall vessels bound to or from one state, be 
obliged to enter, clear, or pay duties in another. 

No money shall be drawn from the treasury but in 
consequence of appropriations made by law ; and a regu- 
lar statement and account of the receipts and expendi- 
tures of all public money shall be published from time to 
time. 

No title of nobility shall be granted by the United States ; 
and no person holding any office of profit or trust under 
them, shall, without the consent of the congress, accept of 
any present, emolument, office, or title, of any kind what- 
ever, from any king, prince, or foreign state. 

2 



18 Constitution of the United States. 

Sect. 10. No state shall enter into any treaty, alliance, 
or confederation ; grant letters of marque and reprisal ; coin 
money ; emit bills of credit ; make any thing but gold and 
silver coin a tender in payment of debts ; pass any bill of 
attainder, ex post facto law, or law impairing the obligation 
of contracts ; or grant any title of nobility. No state shall, 
without the consent of the congress, lay any imposts or 
duties on imports or exports, except what may be absolutely 
necessary for executing its inspection laws ; and the net 
produce of all duties and imposts, laid by any state on im- 
ports or exports, shall be for the use of the treasury of 
the United States ; and all such laws shall be subject to 
the revision and control of the congress. No state shall, 
without the consent of congress, lay any duty of tonnage, 
keep troops, or ships of .war, in time of peace, enter into 
any agreement or compact with another state, or with a 
foreign power, or engage in war, unless actually invaded, 
or in such imminent danger as will not admit of delay. 

ARTICLE II. 

Section 1. The executive power shall be vested in a 
President of the United States of America. He shall hold 
his office during the term of four years ; and, together with 
the Vice-President, chosen for the same term, be elected 
as follows : — 

Each state shall appoint, in such manner as the legisla- 
ture thereof may direct, a number of electors, equal to the 
whole number of senators and representatives to which the 
state may be entitled in the congress : but no senator or 
representative, or person holding an office of trust or profit 
under the United States, shall be appointed an elector. 

The electors shall meet in their respective states, and vote 
by ballot for two persons, of whom one, at least, shall not 
be an inhabitant of the same state with themselves : and 
they shall make a list of all the persons voted. for, and of the 
number oi votes for each ; which list they shall sign and 



Constitution of the United States. 19 

certify, and transmit, sealed, to tlie^ seat of the goyernment 
of the United States, directed to the president of the senate. 
The president of the senate shall, in the presence of the 
senate and house of representatives, open all the certifi- 
cates, and tlie votes shall then he counted. The person 
having the greatest number of votes shall be the president, 
if such number be a majority of the whole number of elec- 
tors appointed : And if there be more than one who have 
such majority, and have an equal number of votes, then the 
house of representatives shall immediately choose by ballot 
one of them for president ; and if no person have a majori- 
ty, then from the five highest on the listf the said house 
shall, in like manner, choose the president : but in choos- 
ing the president, the votes shall be taken by states, the 
representation from each state having one vote ; a quorum 
for this purpose shall consist of a member or members from 
two thirds of the states, and a majority of all the states 
shall be necessary to a choice. In every case, after the 
choice of the president, the person having the greatest num- 
ber of votes of the electors shall be the vice-president. 
But if there should remain two or more who have equal 
votes, the senate shall choose from them, by ballot,^ the 
vice-president. [See Amendments, Article XII.] 

The congress may determine the time of choosing the 
electors, and the day on which they shall give their votes ; 
which day shall be the same throughout the United States. 

No person, except a natural born citizen, or a citizen of 
the United States at the time of the adoption of this con- 
stitution, shall be eligible to the office of president ; neither 
shall any person be eligible to that office who shall not 
have attained the age of thirty-five years, and been four- 
teen years a resident within the United States. 

In case of the removal of the president from office, or of 
his death, resignation, or inability to discharge the powers 
and duties of the said office, the same shall devolve on the 
vice-president; and the congress may by law proviie ibr 



20 Conatitiftion of the United States. 

the case of removal, death, resignation, or inability both of 
the president and vice-president, declaring what officer shall 
then act as president ; and such officer shall act according- 
ly, until the disability be removed, or a president shall be 
elected. 

The president shall, at stated times, receive for his ser* 
vices a compensation, which shall neither be increased nor 
diminished during the period for which he shall have been 
elected ; and he shall not receive, within that period, any 
other emolument from the United States, or any of them. 

Before he enter on the execution of his office, he shall 
take the following oath or affirmation : — 

** I do solemnly swear, (or affirm,) that I will faithfully 
execute the office of president of the United States, and 
will, to the best of my ability, preserve, protect, and de- 
fend the constitution of the United States." 

Sect. 2. The president shall be commander-in-chief of 
the army and navy of the United States, and of the militia 
of the several states, when called into the actual service of 
the United States. He may require the opinion, in writing, 
of the principal officer in each of the executive depart- 
ments, upon any subject relating to the duties of their re- 
spective offices, and he shall have power to grant reprieves 
and pardons for offences against the United States, except 
in cases of impeachment. 

He shall have power, by and with the advice and consent 
of the senate, to make,treaties, provided two thirds of the 
senators present concur ; and he shall nominate, and, by 
and with the advice and consent of the senate, shall appoint 
ambassadors, other public ministers and consuls, judges of 
the supreme court, and all other officers of the United 
States, whose appointments are not herein otherwise pro- 
vided for, and which shall be established by law : but the 
congress may by law vest the appointment of such inferior 
officers as they think proper in the president alone, in the 
courts of laWf or in the heads of departments. 



Constitution of the United States. 21 

The president shall have power to fill up all yacancies 
that may happen during the recess of the senate, by 
granting commissions which shall expire at the end of 
their next session. 

Sect. 3. He shall, from time to time, give to the con- 
gress information of the state of the Union, and recom- 
mend to their consideration such measures as he shall 
judge necessary and expedient; he may, on extraordinary 
occasions, convene both houses, or either of them, and in 
case of disagreement between them, with respect to the 
time of adjournment, he may adjourn them to such time 
as he shall think proper; he shall receive ambassadors 
and other public ministers; he shall take care that the 
laws be faithfully executed, and shall commission all the 
officers of the United States. 

Sect. 4. The president, vice-president, and all civil 
officers of the United States, shall be removed from office 
on impeachment for, and conviction of, treason, bribery, 
or other high crimes and misdemeanors. 

ARTICLE III. 

Section 1. The judicial power of the United States 
shall be vested in one supreme court, and in such inferior 
courts as the congress may, from time to time, ordain and 
establish. The judges, both of the supreme and inferior 
courts, shall hold their offices during good behavior, and 
shall, at stated times, receive for their services a compen- 
sation which shall not be diminished during their contin- 
uance in office. 

Sect. 2. The judicial power shall extend to all cases, 
in law and equity, arising under this constitution, the laws 
of the United States, and treaties made, or which shall be 
made, under their authority ; to all cases affecting ambas- 
sadors, other public ministers, and consuls; to all cases 



22 Constitution of the United States* 

of admiralty and maritime jurisdiction ; to controyersiea 
to which the United States shall be a party ; to controver- 
sies between two or more states ; between a state and cit- 
izens of another state ; between citizens of different states ; 
between citizens of the same state, claiming lands under 
grants of different states ; and between a state, or the citi- 
zens thereof, and foreign states, citizens, or subjects. 
[See Amendments, Article XI.] 

In all cases affecting ambassadors, other public minis- 
ters and consuls, and those in which a state shall be a 
party, the supreme court shall have original jurisdiction. 
In all the other cases before mentioned, the supreme court 
shall have appellate jurisdiction, both as to law and fact, 
with such exceptions, and under such regulations, as the 
congress shall make. 

The trial of all crimes, except in cases of impeach- 
ment, shall be by jury ; and such trial shall be held in the 
state where the said crimes shall have been committed ; 
but when not committed within any state, the trial shall 
be at such place or places as the congress may by law 
have directed. 

Sect. 3. Treason against the United States shall con- 
sist only in levying war against them, or in adhering to 
their enemies, giving them aid and comfort. No person 
shall be convicted of treason, unless on the testimony of 
two witnesses to the same overt act, or on confession in 
open court. 

The congress shall have power to declare the punish- 
ment of treason ; but no attainder of treason shall work 
corruption of blood, or forfeiture, except during the life 
of the person attainted. 

ARTICLE IV. 

Section 1. Full faith and credit shall be given in each 
state to the public acts, records, and judicial proceedings 
of every other state ; and the congress may, by general 



Constitution of the United States, 23 

laws, prescribe the manner in which such acts, records, 
and proceedings shall be proved, and the effect thereof. 

Sect. 2. The citizens of each state shall be entitled to all 
privileges and imnaunities of citizens in the several states. 

A person charged in any state with treason, felony, or 
other crime, who shall flee from justice, and be found in 
another state, shall, on demand of the executive authority 
of the state from which he fled, be delivered up, to be re- 
moved to the state having jurisdiction of the crime. 

No person held to service or labor in one state, under 
the laws thereof, escaping into another, shall, in conse- 
quence of any law or regulation therein, be discharged 
from such service or labor; but shall be delivered up on 
claim of the party to whom such service or labor may be due. 

Sect. 3. New states may be admitted by the congress 
into this Union; but no new state shall be formed or 
erected within the jurisdiction of any other state, nor any 
state be formed by the junction of two or more states or 
parts of states, without the consent of the legislatures of 
the states concerned, as well as of the congress. 

The congress shall have power to dispose of, and make 
all needful rules and regulations respecting the territory or 
other property belonging to the United States ; and nothing 
in this constitution shall be so construed as to prejudice 
any claims of the United States, or of any particular state. 

Sect. 4. The United States shall guarantee to every 
state in this Union a republican form of government : and 
shall protect each of them against invasion : and, on ap- 
plication of the legislature, or of the executive, (when the 
legislature cannot be convened,) against domestic violence. 

ARTICLE V. 

The congress, whenever two thirds of both houses shall 
deem it necessary, shall propose amendments to this con* 
stitution, or, on the application of the legislatures of two 



24 Constitution of the United States, 

thirds of the several states, shall call a conyention for 
proposing amendmeDts, which, in either case, shall be 
valid to all intents and purposes, as part of this constitu- 
tion, when ratified hy the legislatures of three fourths of 
the several states, or by conventions in three fourths 
thereof, as the one or the other mode of ratification may 
be proposed by the congress ; provided, that no amend- 
ment which may be made prior to the year one thousand 
eight hundred and eight, shall, in any manner, affect the 
first and fourth clauses in the ninth section of the first 
article; and that no state, without its consent, shall be 
deprived of its equal suffrage in the senate. 

ARTICLE VI. 

All debts contracted and engagements entered into be- 
fore the adoption of this constitution, shall be as valid 
against the United States, under this constitution, as un- 
der the Confederation. 

This constitution, and the laws of the United States 
which shall be made in pursuance thereof, and all treaties 
made, or which shall be made, under the authority of the 
United States, shall be the supreme law of the land ; and 
the judges in every state shall be bound thereby, any- 
thing in the constitution or laws of any state to the con- 
trary notwithstanding. 

The senators and representatives before mentioned, and 
members of the several state legislatures, and all execu- 
tive and judicial officers, both of the United States and of 
the several states, shall be bound, by oath or affirmation, 
to support this constitution; but no religious test shall 
ever be required as a qualification to any office or public 
trust under the United States. 

ARTICLE VII. 

The ratification of the conventions of nine states shall 
be sufficient for the establishment of this constitution, 
between the states so ratifying the same. 



Conttitution of the United States, 25 



ARTICLES, 

In addition to, and amendment of, the Constitution of the 
United States, proposed by Congressy and ratified by 
the Legislatures of the several States, pursuant to the 
Fifth Article of the original Constitution* 

I. Congress shall make no law respecting an establish- 
ment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; 
or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the pre&s ; or 
the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to pe- 
tition the government for a redress of grievances. 

II. A well-regulated militia being necessary to the se- 
curity of a free state, the right of the people to keep and 
bear arms shall not be infringed. 

III. No soldier shall, in time of peace, be quartered in 
any house without the consent of the owner, nor in time 
of war but in a manner to be prescribed by law. 

IV. The right of the people to be secure in their per- 
sons, houses, papers and effects, against unreasonable 
searches and seizures, shall not be violated ; and no war- 
rants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by 
oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place 
to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized. 

V. No person shall be held to answer for a capital or 
otherwise infamous crime, unless on a presentment or in- 
dictment of a grand jury, except in cases arising in the 
land or naval forces, or in the militia when in actual ser- 
vice in time of war or public danger ; nor shall any per- 
son be subject for the same offence to be twice put In jeep- 



26 Constitution of the United States, 

ardy of life or limb ; nor shall be compelled, in any crim- 
inal case, to be a witness against himself, nor be deprived 
of life, liberty or property, without due process of law ; 
nor shall private property be taken for public use without 
just compensation. 

VI. In all criminal prosecutions, the accused shall 
enjoy the right to a speedy and public trial, by an impar- 
tial jury of the state and district wherein the crime shall 
have been committed, which district shall have been pre- 
viously ascertained by law, and to be informed of the 
nature and cause of the accusation ; to be confronted with 
the witnesses against him; to have compulsory process 
for obtaining witnesses in his favor ; and to have the as- 
sistance of counsel for his defeivce. 

VII. In suits at common law, where the value in con- 
troversy shall exceed twenty dollars, the right of trial by 
jury shall be preserved, and no fact, tried by a jury, shall 
be otherwise re-examined, in any court of the United 
States, than according to the rules of the common law. 

VIII. Excessive bail shall not be required, nor ex- 
cessive fines imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishments 
inflicted. 

IX. The enumeration, in the constitution, of certain 
rights, shall not be construed to deny or disparage others 
retained by the people. 

X. The powers not delegated to the United States by 
the constitution, nor prohibited by it, to the states, are 
reserved to the states respectively, or to the people. 

XI. The judicial power of the United States shall not 
be construed to extend to any suit in law or equity, com- 
menced or prosecuted against one of the United States by 
citizens of another state, or by citizens or subjects of any 
foreign state. 



Constitution of the Unitei States. 27 

XII. The electors shall meet in their respective states, 
and vote hy ballot for president and vice-president, one 
of whom, at least, shall not be an inhabitant of the same 
state with themselves; they shall name in their ballots 
the person voted for as president, and, in distinct ballots, 
the person voted for as vice-president; and they shall 
make distinct lists of all persons voted for as president, 
and of all persons voted for as vice-president, and of the 
number of votes for each ; which lists they shall sign and 
certify, and transmit sealed to the seat of the government 
of the United States, directed to the president of the sen- 
ate ; the president of the senate shall, in the presence of 
the senate and house of representatives, open all the cer- 
tificates, and the votes shall then be counted ; the person 
having the greatest number of votes for president shall be 
the president, if such number be a majority of the whole 
number of electors appointed : and if no person have such 
majority, then from the persons having the highest num- 
bers, not exceeding three on the list of those voted for as 
president, the house of representatives shall choose im- 
mediately, by ballot, the president; but in choosing the 
president, the votes shall be taken by states, tlie represen- 
tation from each state having one vote ; a quorum for this 
purpose shall consist of a member or members from two 
thirds of the states, and a majority of all the states shall 
be necessary to a choice ; and if the house of representa- 
tives shall not choose a president, whenever the right of 
choice shall devolve upon them, before the fourth day of 
March next following, then the vice-president shall act as 
president, as in the case of the death or other constitu- 
tional disability of the president. 

The person having the greatest number of votes as vice- 
president shall be the vice-president, if such number be a 
majority of the whole number of electors appointed ; and 
if no person have a majority, then from the two highest 
numbers on the list, the senate shall choose the vice-pres- 



28 Constititticn of the United States. 

ident ; a quorum for the purpose shall consist of two thirds 
of the whole number of senators, and a majority of the 
whole number shall be necessary to a choice. 

But no person, constitutionally ineligible to the office 
of president, shall be eligible to that of yice-president of 
the United States. 

XIII. Sect. I. Neither slavery nor involuntary ser- 
vitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the 
party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within 
the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction. 

Sect. 2. Congress shall have power to enforce this 
article by appropriate legislation. 

XIV. Sect. I. All persons born or naturalized in the 
United States, and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are 
citizens of the United States, and of the state wherein 
they reside. No state shall make or enforce any law 
which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of cit- 
izens of the United States, nor shall any state deprive 
any person of life, liberty, or property without due process 
of law, nor deny to any person within its jurisdiction the 
equal protection of the laws. 

Sect. 2. Representatives shall be apportioned among 
the several states, according to their respective numbers, 
counting the whole number of persons in each state, ex- 
cluding Indians not taxed. But when the riglit to vote at 
any election for the choice of electors for president and 
vice-president of the United States, representatives in 
congress, the executive and judicial officers of a state, or 
the legislature thereof, is denied to any of the male inhab- 
itants of such state, being twenty-one years of age, and 
citizens pf the United States, or in any way abridged, ex- 
cept for participation in rebellion, or other crimes, the 
basis of representation shall be reduced in the proporticn 
which the number of such male citizens shall bear to the 



Constitution of the United /States. 29 

whole number of such citizens, twenty-one years of age, 
in such state. 

Sect. 8. No person shall be a senator or representa- 
tive in Congress, or elector of president or vice-president, 
or hold any office, civil or military, under the United 
States, or under any state, who having previously taken 
an oath as a member of Congress, or as an officer of the 
United States, or as a member of any state legislature, or 
as an executive or judicial officer of any state, to support 
the constitution of the United States, shall have engaged 
in insurrection or rebellion against the same, or given aid 
or comfort to the enemies thereof. But Congress may by 
a two thirds vote of each house remove such disability. 

Sect. 4. The validity of the public debt of the United 
States, authorized by law, including debts incurred for the 
payment of pensions and bounties for services in sup- 
pressing insurrection or rebellion, shall not be questioned. 
But neither the United States, nor any state, shall assume 
or pay any debt or obligation incurred in aid of insurrec- 
tion or rebellion against the United States, or any claim 
for the loss or emancipation of any slave ; but all such 
debts, obligations and claims shall be held illegal and void. 

Sect. 5. The Congress shall have power to enforce by 
appropriate legislation the provisions of this article. 

XV. Sect. 1. The right of citizens of the United 
States to vote shall i\pt be denied or abridged by the Uni- 
ted States, or by any state, on account of race, color, or 
previous condition of servitude. 

Sect. 2. The Congress shall have power to enforce 
this article by appropriate legislation. 

[Note. — The Articles of Confederation between the thirteen 
United States of America were agreed upon by delegates from the 
states, in Congress assembled, on the 15th of November, 1777, and 
were finally ratified by all the states, March Ist, 1781. On the 2l8t 
of February, 1787, the Congress of the Confederation recommended 



80 Constitution of the United States. 

that a Conrention of Delegates, to be appointed by the states, be 
held for the purpose of revising the Articles of Confederation. In 
accordance with this recommendation, delegates from the several 
states met together at Philadelphia, Monday, May 14th, 1787, and 
organized by choosing George Washington as their President. On 
the 17th of September, the Convention finally agreed to a proposed 
form of Constitution, wliich was transmitted to the Congress of 
the Confederation. By that body copies were transmitted to the 
several states, and the Constitution was ratified by Conventiona 
therein in the following order : — 

Delaware, December 7, 1787. 

Pennsylvania, .... "12, 1787. 

New Jersey, "18, 1787. 

Georgia, January 2, 1788. 

Connecticut, " 9, 1788. 

Massachusetts, . . • • February 6, 1788. 

Maryland, . ... April 28, 1788. 

South Carolina, .... May 23) 1788. 

New Hampshire, . . • • June 21, 1788. 

Virginia, " 26, 1788. 

New York, July 26, 1788. 

Elevtn states having ratified the Constitution, Congress pro 
eeeded to make all proper preparations for carrying it into efibct. 
The first Wednesday of January, 1789, was appointed as the time 
fbr choosing electors, the first Wednesday in February as the day 
on which they should vote for President and Vice-President, and 
the first Wednesday of March as the day on which the now Con- 
gress should assemble together. The members of the two houses 
of the new Congress met at New York at the time appointed, 
March 4th, 1789. A quorum of the House of Bepresentatives did 
not appear until the Ist of April, when a Speaker and a Clerk were 
chosen. A quorum of the Senate did not appear until April 6th, 
when a President pro tempore was chosen, for the purpose of 
counting the votes for President and Vice-President. On the same 
day, in presence of both houses, the returns of votes from the seV' 
eral states were opened and counted. George Washington was 
declared elected President, and John Adams Vice-President. The 
Senate then elected a President pro tempore^ and a Secretary, and 
both houses, being organized, proceeded to transact public business. 
On the 21st of April tlie Vice-President assumed his seat as Pres 
ident of the Senate, and on Thursday, April 30th, George Wash 
Ington was inaugurated President. The Constitution was ratified 
soon afterwards by the two remaining states ; by North Carolina, 
November 21st, 1789, and by Rhode Island, May 29th, 1790. 



Constitution of the United States. 31 

On the 26th of September, 1789, Congress proposed twelve arti- 
cles of amendment to the Constitution, ten of which (numbered in 
the preceding pages from one to ten) were finally ratified December 
16th, 1791. The eleventh article of amendment was proposed by 
Congress March 6th, 1794, and was declared by the President, in 
his message of January 8, 1798, to have been adopted by the requi- 
site number of states. The twelfth amendment was proposed by 
Congress December 12th, 18a3, and was adopted during the year 
1601. The thirteenth amendment was adopted by the Senate of the 
United States April 8th, 1864, by a vote of 38 yeas to 6 nays; and 
by the House on the 31st of January, 1866, by a vote of 119 yeas to 
66 nays. On the 18th of December, 1866, the Secretary of State 
made proclamation that it had been ratified by the requisite number 
of states. 

The fourteenth amendment was adopted by the Senate of the 
United States June 8th, 1866, by a vote of 33 yeas to 11 nays; and 
by the House on the 13th of June, 1866, by a vote of 138 yeas to 36 
nays. On the 21st of July, 1868, the Senate and House passed this 
concurrent resolution : — 

(* Whereas^ The legislatures of the states of Connecticut, Ten- 
nessee, New Jersey, Oregon, Vermont, West Virginia, Kansas, 
Missouri, Indiana, Ohio, Illinois, Minnesota, New York, Wiscon- 
sin, Tennsylvania, Rhode Island, Michigan, Nevada, New Hamp- 
shire, Massachusetts, Nebraska, Maine, Iowa, Arkansas, Florida, 
North Carolina, Alabama, South Carolina, and Louisiana, being 
three fourths and more of the iftveral states of the Union, iiave rat- 
ified the fourteenth article of amendment to the Constitution of 
the United States, duly proposed by two thirds of each house of 
the thirty-ninth Congress ; therefore 

** Resolved by the Senate, {the House of Representatives concur- 
rinffi) That said fourteenth article is hereby declared to be a part 
of the Constitution of the United States, and it shall be duly pro- 
mulgated as such by the Secretary of State.** 

Afterwards a proclamation was issued by the Secretary of State, 
in which It was declared that the amendqient had been ratified, and 
had become a part of the Constitution. 

The fifteenth amendment was adopted by Congress " on or about 
the 27th day of February, in the year 1869.'' On the 30th of March, 
1870, the Secretary of State proclaimed its ratification " by the 
legislatures of the states of North Carolina, West Virginia, Mas- 
sachusetts, Wisconsin, Maine, Louisiana, Michigan, South Caro- 
lina, Pennsylvania, Arkansas, Connecticut, Florida, Illinois, Indi- 
ana, New York, New Hampshire, Nevada, Vermont, Virginia, Al»> 
bama, Missouri, Mississippi, Ohio, Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota 



32 Constitution of the United States. 

• 

Bhode Island, Nebraska, and Texas, in all twenty-nine states,*' 
three fourths of the whole number. And the Secretary further 
proclaimed that it appeared firom official documents on file in his 
department, that *' the legislature of New York has since passed 
resolutions claiming to withdraw said ratification ; " ahd that " the 
legislature of Georgia has by resolution ratified the said proposed 
amendment.** The Secretary then certified that " the amendment 
aforesaid has become valid, to all intents and purposes, as a part of 
the Constitution of the United States.'' 



CONSTITUTION 

OB 

FORM OF GOVERNMENT 

FOR THB 

(Cnmainiiiroiiltli uf BlassoijinEtts* 



PREAMBLE. 

Objects of Government — Right of people to alter it — Body poli* 
tlo; how formed — Its nature — Duty of the people. 

PART I. — DECLARATION OF RIGHTS. 

Article 1. Equality and natural rights of all men. 

Art. 2. Right and duty of public religious worship — Protec- 
tion of the subject in his own mode of worsliip, unless, &c. 

Art. 3. Provisions in relation to public worsliip, election of pub- 
lic teachers, parochial taxes, &c., abolished by Art. XI. of the 
amendments. 

Art. 4. Right of self-government secured — Exercise of all 
pcwers not delegated, &c. 

Art. 5. Accountability of all officers. See. 

Art. 6. Services rendered to the public being the only title to 
peculiar privileges, hereditary offices are absurd and unnatural. 

Art. 7. Objects of government; right of people alone to insti- 
tate and change it. 

Art. 8. Right of people to cause their public officers to retire to 
private life. 

Art. 9. All, having the qualifications prescribed, equally eligible 
to office and equal right to elect. 

Art. 10. Right to be protected and duty to contribute correla- 
tive ^Taxation, founded on consent ~ Private property not to be 
taken for public uses, without, &o, 

3 33 



34 Constitution of Massachiisetts. 

Art. 11. Bemedies by recourse to law, to be firee, complete and 
prompt. 

Art. 12. Bights of persons held to answer for crimes — Bight to 
trial by jury in criminal cases, except, &c. 

Art. 13. Crimes to be proved in the vicinity. 

Art. 14. Bight of search and seizure regulated. 

Art. 15. Bi^ht to trial by jury, sacred, except, &o. 

Art. 16. Liberty of the press not.to be restrained. 

Art. 17. Bight to keep and bear arms ~ Standing armies danger- 
ous — Military power subordinate to civil power. 

Art. 18. Adherence to fundamental principles of piety, fto. i ne- 
cessary — Moral obligation^ of lawgivers and magistrates. 

Art. 10. Bight of people to assemble, to instruct representatives 
and petition legislature. 

Art. 20. Power to suspend laws or their execution — When and 
by whom exercised. 

Art. 21. Freedom of debate in the legislature. 

Art. 22. Frequent sessions, and olitjecta thereof. 

Art. 23. Taxation founded on consent. 

Art. 24. Expoatfcicto laws prohibited. 

Art. 25. Legislature not to convict of treason, or felony. 

Art. 26. Excessive bail or fines, and cruel punishments, pro* 
hibited. 

Art. 27. No soldier to be quartered in any house, unless, Ac. 

Art. 28. Citizens exempt from law-martial, unless, &c. 

Art. 29. Judges of supreme judicial court — Tenure of their 
offices— Salaries. 

Art. 30. Separation of executive, Judicial and l^slatire de- 
partments. 

PART II. — THE FRAME OF GOVERNMENT. 
CHAPT£B I.— The Legislative Power. 

Section I.— The General Cour^ 

Article l. Legislative department shall consist of, Ac. — Shall 
assemble every year — Style of. [See amendments. Art. X.] 

Art. 2. Governor's veto — Bill may be passed by two thirds of 
each house, notwithstanding. [See amendments. Art. I.J 

Art. 3. General Court may constitute Judicatories, courts of 
record, &c. — Courts, &c., may adminii^ter oaths. 

Art. 4, General Court may enact laws, &c., not repugnant to the 
Constitution; may provide for the election or appointment of of- 
lioers; prescribe their duties; impose taxes; duties and excises, to 
be disposed of for defence, protection, &c. — Valuation of estates, 
once in ten years, at least, while, &c. 



Constitution of Massachmetts. 85 

Sbotiok n. — The Senate, 

Abticlb 1. Senate. [See amendments, Art. XIII., XVI., XXH.] 

Art. 2. Senate the flrst branch — Word ** inhabitant " defined— 
Selectmen to preside — Return of votes — Inhabitants of unincor- 
porated plantations, who pay State taxes, may yote — Plantation 
meeting^ — Assessors to notify, &o. 

Art. 3. Governor and five of the ooundl to examine and count 
votes and issue summonses. 

Art. 4. Senate to be final Ju^g^ of elections, fto., of its own mem- 
bers —Vacancies how filled. [See amendments,A rt. X., XI V., XXIV.] 

Art. 5. Qualifications of a senator. [See amendments. Art. XIII., 
XXII.] ^ 

Art. 6. Senate not to adjourn for more than two days at a time. 

Art. 7. Shall choose its own ofilocrs and determine its rules. 

Art. 8. Shall try all impeachments — Oath in such case — limi- 
tation of sentence* 

Art. 0, Quorum. 

Section III. — Souse of EepreeentoHves. 

Article l. Annaal representation of the people. 

Art. 2. House. [See amendments, Art. XII., XIII., XXI.] 
Towns liable to fine, &c — Mileage. 

Art. 3. Elections by ballot — Freehold qoaliflcations. [See 
amendments, Art. XIII., XIV., XXI.] 

ART. 4. Qnalifloatiotts of a voter. [See amendments. Art. m., 
XX.] 

Art. 6. Representatives, when chosen. [See amendments, Art 
X., XV.] 

Art. 0. House alone can impeach — Senate to try. 

Art. 7. House to originate all money bills — Senate may amend. 

Art. 8. Not to adjourn for more than two days at a time. 

Art. 9. Quorum. [See amendments, Art. XXI.] 

Art. 10. House to Judge of returns, ftc, of its own members ; to 
ehoose its officers and establish its rules, &c.— May punish for cer- 
tain off'enoes — Members free from arrest, Ac. 

Art. 11. Senate's power in like cases — Governor and council 
may punish — General limitations— Trial may be by committee, or 
otherwise, 

GHAFTEB U. — THB EXBCUTITB POWEB. 

Section I.— The Cfovemor, 

Article 1. Governor — His title. 

Art. 2. To be chosen annually— Qaaliflmtione. (See amcMl- 
ments. Art. VII.] 



S6 Oomtiivtimi of MoBBOchuBetU. 

Abt. 3. How chosen, &c. [See amendments, Art. II., X., ZIV., 
XV.] 

Abt. 4. Power of governor, and of governor and council. 

Art. 5. Power as to proroguing the general court. [See aihend* 
ments, Art. X.] 

Art. 6. Governor and council may a^oum general court. In 
cases of disagreement, but not exceeding ninety days. 

Art. 7. Governor to be commander-in-chief— Limitation. 

Art. 8. Governor and council may pardon offences, except, &o.. 
but not before conviction. 

Art. 0. All Judicial officers, Ac, how nominated and appointed, 
[See araendracnts, Art. XIV., XVII., XIX.] 

Art. 10. Militia officers, how elected. [See amendments, Art 
V,] How commissioned — Manner of convening the electors — 
MsJor-gencrals, how appointed and commissioned — Vacancies, how 
filled, in case, &c. — Officers, duly commissioned, how removed. 
[See amendments Art. IV.] Adjutants, &c., how appointed — 
Present division of militia to stand until altered by law. 

Art. 11. Money, how drawn from the treasury, except, &o., and 
for whnt purpose. 

Art. 12. All public boards, &c., to make quarterly returns. 

Art. 13. Salary of governor — Salaries of Justices of supreme 
Judicial court — Salaries to be enlarged if insufficient, as the legis- 
lature shall Judge proper. 

Section II. — The Lieutanen^Oovemor, 

Article l. Lieutenant-governor; his title and qualifications — 
How chosen. 

Art. 2. Governor to be president of council, but to have no vote 
— Lieutenant-governor a member of, except, &c. — To preside in 
governor's absence. 

Art. 3. Lieutenant-governor to be acting governor, in case, &e. 

Section III. — The Council, 

Article, l. Council. [See amendments. Art. XVI.] 
Art. 2. Number ; from whom and how chosen — If senators 
become councillors their seats to be vacated. [See amendments, 

X., xni.,xvi.] 

Art. 3. Rank of councillors. 

Art. 4. No district to have more than two. [Obsolete.] 
Art. 6. Register of council — May be called for by the legislature. 
Art. 6. Council to exercise the power of governor, in case, Ac, 
Art. 7. Elections may be a(]Journed, until, &o. — Order thereof 
(See amendments, Art. XVI., XXV.] 



ConBtitution of Massachusetts. 37 

Section rV. — Secretary^ Treasurer^ <fc. 

Article l. Secretary, &c., by whom and how chosen. [See 
amendments, Art IV., XYII.] Treasurer ineligible for more than 
five Buccessive years. 

Art. 2. Secretary to keep records, to attend the goyemor and 

council, &c. 

CHAPTER III. —Judiciary Powers. 

Article l. Tenure of all commissioned officers to be expressed 
in tlieir commissions — Judicial officers, except, &c., to hold office 
during good behavior — But may be removed on address. 

Art. 2. Legislature, and governor and council, have right to 
require opinions of supreme judicial court, &c. 

Art. 3. Justices of the peace; tenure of their office to be seven 
years. 

Art. 4. Provision for holding probate courts. 

Art. 5. Causes of marriage, divorce, &c.,to be determined by 
governor and council until legislature make other provision. 

CHAPTER IV. — Delegates to Congress. [Obsolete.] 

CHAPTER V. — The University at Cambridge, and En- 
couragement OF Literature, &c. 

Section I.— The University* 

Article l. Harvard College — Powers, privileges, Ac, of the 
president and fellows confirmed. 

Art. 2. All gifts, grants, &c., confirmed. 

Art. 3. Who shall be overseers— Power of alteration reserved 
to the legislature. 

Section II.— The Encouragement of Literature^ ^c. 
Duty of legislators and magistrates. 

CHAPTER VI.— Oaths and Subscriptions, &c. 

Article 1. Oaths, &c. [Seeamendments,Art.VI., VII.] How 
administered. 

Art. 2. Plurality of offices prohibited to governor, lieutenant- 
governor, judge of supreme judicial court, &c., except, Ac — In- 
compatible offices. [See amendments, Art. VIII.] Bribery, &c., 
to operate as disqualifications. 

Art. 3. Value of money ascertained— Property qualifications 
may be increased. 

Art. 4. Provisions respecting commissions. 

Art. 6. Provisions respecting writs. 

Art. G. Continuance of former laws, except, &o. 

Art. 7. Habeas Corpus secured, and not suspended, except, Ac. 

Abt. 8. The enacting style. 



88 ConstittUion of Massachusetts, 

Art. 9. Officers of former governments continued, nntili &e. 
[Obsolete.] 
Art. 10. Provision for revising constitatlon. [Obsolete.] 
Art. 11. Provision for preserving and publishing tliia consti- 
tution. 

AMENDMENTS. 

Article 1. Bill, &c., not approved within five days not to be- 
come a law, if legislature adjourn in the mean time. 

Art. 2. General court empowered to charter cities — Provisos, 

Art. 3. Qualification of voters for governor, lieutenant-gov- 
ernor, senators and representatives. [See amei^ments. Art., XX.] 

Art. 4. Notaries public, how appointed and removed — Vacan- 
cies in the offices of secretary and treasurer, how filled, in case, &o. 
[See amendments, Art. XVII.] Commissary-general may be op- 
pointed, in case, &c. — Militia officers may be removed as the legis- 
lature may prescribe. 

Art. 5. Who may vote for captains and subalterns. 

Art. 6. Oath to be taken by all officers, or affirmation in case, &o. 

Art. 7. No other oath, except, &c., required. 

Art. 8. Incompatibility of offices. 

Art. 9. Amendments to constitution, how made. 

Art. 10. Commencement of political year; and termination •>» 
Keetings for choice of governor, lieutenant-governor, &c., when to 
be held — May be adjourned. [See amendments, Art. XV.] 

Art. 11. Third article of Declaration of Bights annulled — Reli- 
gious freedom established. 

Art. 12. Bepresentation in the legislature. [See amendments, 
Art. XXI.] 

Art. 13. Same subject. [See amendments, Art. XVI., XXI., 
XXII.] Possession of freehold not required. 

Art. 14. In elections of civil officers by the people, the person 
I having the highest number of votes to be elected. 

j Art. 15. Meetings for choice of governor, &c., to be held on the 

i Tuesday next after the first Monday in November — In case of failure 

; to elect representatives a second meeting may be held on fourth Mon- 

day. 

Art. 16. Councillors •— Provisions for electing; districting the 
State; qualifications, &c.; filling vacancies — Organization of the 
government without delay, how provided for. 

Art. 17. Secretary, treasurer, auditor and attorney-general — 
Provisions concerning mode of electing, qualifications,vacancies, &o. 

Art. 18. School moneys not to be appropriated to schools other 
than those conducted according to law, and not to be appropriated to 
religious sects for the maintenance exclusively of their own schools. 



Constitution of Massachusetts. 89 

Art. 10. Legislature to prescribe by law for election of ftheriffs, 
registers of probate, commissioners of insolvency, clerks of courts, 
and district attorneys by the people. 

Art. 20. Beading constitution in English, and writing, necessary 
qualifications of voters. 

Art. 21. House of Representatives — Census to be taken every 
tenth year, beginning in 1865 — Special enumeration of legal voters 
— Apportionment of representatives — Districts, how formed •— 
Qualifications of representatives — Quorum, &o. 

Art. 22. Senate — Census — Division into senatorial districts — 
Qualifications — Quorum, &c. 

Art. 23. Residence of two years required of naturalized citizens, 
to entitle to suffrage or make eligible to office. [See amendnents, 
Art. X:^VI.] 

Art. 24. Vacancies in the senate, how filled. 

Art. 25. Vacancies in the council, how filled. 

Art. 20. Article 23 of the amendments annulled. 

PREAMBLE. 

The end of the institution, maintenance and administra- 
tion of government, is to secure the existence of the body 
politic ; to protect it ; and to furnish the individuals who 
compose it with the power of enjoying in safety and tran- 
quillity their natural rights, and the blessings of life : and 
whenever these great objects are not obtained, the people 
have a right to alter the government, and to take measures 
necessary for their safety, prdsperity and happiness. 

The body politic is formed by a voluntary association of 
individuals ; it is a social compact, by which the whole 
people covenants with each citizen, and each citizen with 
the whole people, that all shall be governed by certain laws 
for the common good. It is the duty of the people, therefore, 
in framing a constitution of government, to provide for an 
equitable mode of making laws, as well as for an impartial 
interpretation, and a faithful execution of them ; that every 
man may, at all times, find his security in them. 

We, therefore, the people of Massachusetts, acknowledg- 
ing with grateful hearts the goodness of the great Legislator 
of the universe, in affording us, in the course of his provi- 



1 



40 Constitutian of Massachusetts. 

dence, an opportunity, deliberately and peaceably, without 
fraud, violence or surprise, of entering into an original, 
explicit and solemn compact with each other ; and of form- 
ing a new constitution of civil government for ourselves 
and posterity ; and devoutly imploring his direction in so 
interesting a design, do agree upon, ordain and establish, 
the following Declaration of Rights^ and Frame of Oov- 
ernmentf as tlie Constitution of the Commonwealth 
OF Massachusetts. 



PART THE FIRST. 

A Declaration of the Rights of the Inhabitants of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 

Article 1. All men are born free and equal, and have 
certain natural, essential and unalienable rights ; among 
which may be reckoned the right of enjoying and defending 
their lives and liberties ; that of acquiring, possessing and 
protecting property ; in fine, that of seeking and obtaining 
their safety and happiness. 

Art. II. It is the right as well as the duty of all men in 
society, publicly, and at stated seasons, to worship the Su- 
preme Being, the great Creator and Preserver of the uni- 
verse. And no subject shall be hurt, molested or re- 
strained, in his person, liberty or estate, for worshipping 
God in the manner and season most agreeable to the dic- 
tates of his own conscience ; or for his religious profession 
or sentiments ; provided he doth not disturb the public 
peace, or obstruct others in their religious worship. 

Art. III. As the happiness of a people, and the good 
order and preservation of civil government, essentially de- 
pend upon piety, religion, and morality; and as these 
cannot be generally diffused through a community, but by 
the institution of the public worship of God, and of public 



Constitution of Massaehusetts, 41 

instructions in piety, religion and morality : therefore, to 
promote their happiness, and to secure the good order and 
preservation of their government, the people of this Com- 
monwealth have a right to invest their legislature with 
power to authorize and require, and the legislature shall, 
from time to time, authorize and require, the several towns, 
parishes, precincts and other bodies politic, or religious 
societies to make suitable provision, at their own expense, 
for the institution of the public worship of God, and for 
the support and maintenance of public Protestant teachers 
of piety, religion and morality, in all cases where such pro- 
vision shall not be made voluntarily. [See Amendments, 
Article XI.] 

And the people of this Commonwealth have also a right 
to, and do, invest their legislature with authority to enjoin 
upon all the subjects an attendance upon the instructions of 
the public teachers aforesaid, at stated times and seasons, if 
there be any on whose instructions they can conscientiously 
and conveniently attend. [See Amendments, Article XI.] 

Provided notwithstanding, that the several towns, par- 
ishes, precincts, and other bodies politic, or religious 
societies, shall, at all times, have the exclusive right of 
electing their public teachers, and of contracting with them 
for their support and maintenance. [See Amendments, 
Article XI.] 

And all moneys paid by the subject to the support of pub- 
lic worship, and of the public teachers aforesaid, shall, if 
he require it, be uniformly applied to the support of the 
public teacher or teachers of his own religious sect or de- 
nomination, provided there be any on whose instructions he 
attends ; otherwise it may be paid towards the support of 
the teacher or teachers of the parish or precinct in which 
the said moneys are raised. [See Amendments, Article XI.] 

And every denomination of Christians, demeaning them- 
selves peaceably, and as good subjects of the Qommon- 
wealth, shall be equally under the protection of the law : 



42 Comtitubion of Massachtisetts. 

and no subordination of any one sect or denomination t> 
anothex shall ever be established by law. [See Amend- 
ments, Article XI.] 

Art IV. The people of this Commonwealth have the 
sole and exclusive right of governing themselves, as a free, 
sovereign, and independent State; and do, and forever 
hereafter shall, exercise and enjoy every power, jurisdic- 
tion and right, which is not, or may not hereafter, be by 
them expressly delegated to the United States of America, 
in Congress assembled. 

Art. v. All power residing originally in the people, 
and being derived from them, the several magistrates and 
officers of government, vested with authority, whether 
legislative, executive, or judicial, are their substitutes and 
agents, and are at all times accountable to them. , 

Art. VI. No man, nor corporation, or association of 
men, have any other title to obtain advantages, or partic- 
ular and exclusive privileges, distinct from those of the 
community, than what arises from the consideration of 
services rendered to the public ; and this title being in nature 
neither hereditary, nor transmissible to children, or de- 
scendants, or relations by blood, the idea of a man born a 
magistrate, lawgiver, or judge, is absurd and unnatural. 

Art. VII. Government is instituted for the common 
good, for the protection, safety, prosperity and happiness 
of the people ; and not for the profit, honor, or private in- 
terest of any one man, family, or class of men : Therefore 
the people alone have an incontestable, unalienable and in- 
defeasible right to institute government ; and to reform, . 
alter, or totally change the same, when their protection, 
safety, prosperity and happiness require it. 

Art. VIII. In order to prevent those who are vested 
with authority from becoming oppressors, the people have 



Constitution of Massachusetts. 48 

% right, at such periods and in such manner as they shall 
establish by their frame of goTernment, to cause their pub- 
lic officers to return to private life ; and to fill up vacant 
places by certain and regular elections and appointments. 

• 

Art. IX. All elections ought to be free ; and all the 
inhabitants of this Commonwealth, having such qualifica* 
tions as they shall establish by their frame of government, 
have an equal right to elect officers, and to be elected, for 
public employments. 

Art. X. Each individual of the society has a right to be 
protected by it in the enjoyment of his life, liberty and 
property, according to standing laws. He is obliged, con- 
sequently, to contribute his share to the expense of this 
protection ; to give his personal service, or an equivalent, 
when necessary : but no part of the property of any indi- 
vidual can, with justice, be taken from him, or applied to 
public uses, without his own consent, or that of the repre- 
sentative body of the people. In fine, the people of this 
Commonwealth are not controllable by any other laws 
than those to which their constitutional reprjesentative 
body have given their consent. And whenever the public 
exigencies require that the property of any individual 
should be appropriated to public uses, he shall receive a 
reasonable compensation therefor. 

Art. XI. Every subject of the Commonwealth ought 
to find a certain remedy, by having recourse to the laws, 
for all injuries or wrongs which he may receive in his per- 
son, property, or character. He ought to obtain right and 
justice freely, and without being obliged to purchase it ; 
completely, and without any denial ; promptly, and with- 
out delay ; conformably to the laws. 

Art. XII. No subject shall be held to answer for any 
crimes or offence, until the same is fully and plainly, sub- 



44 Constitution of Massachusetts. 

stontially and formally, described to him; or be com- 
pelled to accuse, or furnish evidence against himself. And 
every subject shall have a right to produce all proofs that 
may be favorable to him ; to meet the witnesses against him 
face to face, and to be fully heard in his defence by himself, 
or his counsel, at his election. And no subject shall be 
arrested, imprisoned, despoiled, or deprived of his property, 
immunities, or privileges, put out of the protection of the 
law, exiled, or deprived of his life, liberty, or estate, but 
by the judgment of his peers, or the law of the land. 

And the legislature shall not make any law that shall 
subject any person to a capital or infamous punishment, 
excepting for the government of the army and navy, with- 
out trial by jury. 

Abt. XIII. In criminal prosecutions, the yerification 
of facts, in the vicinity where they happen, is one of the 
greatest securities of the life, liberty, and property of the 
citizen. 

Art. XIV. Every subject has a right to be secure from 
all unrea^nable searches and seizures of his person, his 
houses, his papers, and all his possessions. All warrants, 
therefore, are contrary to this right, if the cause or founda- 
tion of them be not previously supported by oath or affir- 
mation ; and if the order in the warrant to a civil officer, 
to make search in suspected places, or to arrest one or 
more suspected persons, or to seize their property, be not 
accompanied with a special designation of the persons or 
objects of search, arrest, or seizure ; and no warrant ought 
to be issued but in cases, and with the formalities, pre- 
scribed by the laws. 

Aet. XV. In all controversies concerning property, and 
in all suits between two or more persons, except in cases in 
which it has heretofore been otherways used and practised, 



Constitution of Massachusetts. 45 

the parties have a right to trial by jury ; and this method 
of procedure shall be held sacred, unless, in causes arising 
on the high seas, and sueh as relate to mariners* wageS) 
the legislature shall hereafter find it necessary to alter it. 

Art. XVI. The liberty of the press is essential to the 
security of freedom in a state : it ought not, therefore, to 
be restrained in this Commonwealth. 

Art. XVII. The people have a right to keep and to 
bear arms for the common defence. And as, in time of 
peace, armies are dangerous to liberty, they ought ^ot to 
be maintained without the consent of the legislature; and 
the military power shall always be held in an exact subor- 
dination to the civil authority, and be governed by it. 

Art. XVIII. A frequent recurrence to the fundamen- 
tal principles of the constitution, and a constant adherence 
»to those of piety, justice, moderation, temperance, indus- 
try, and frugality, are absolutely necessary to preserve the 
advantages of liberty, and to maintain a free government. 
The people ought, consequently, to have a particular atten- 
tion to all those principles, in the choice of their officers 
and representatives : and they have a right to require* of 
their lawgivers and magistrates, an exact and constant ob- 
servance of them, in the formation and execution of the laws 
necessary for the good administration of the Common- 
wealth. 

Art. XIX. The people have a right, in an orderly and 
peaceable manner, to assemble to consult upon the com- 
mon good ; give instructions to their representatives, and 
to request of the legislative body, by the way of addresses, 
petitions, or remonstrances, redress of the wrongs done 
them, and of the grievances they suffer. 



46 Constitution of Massachusetts. 

Abt. XX. The power of suspending the laws, or the 
execution of the laws, ought never to be exercised but by 
the legislature, or by authority derived from it, to be exer* 
cised in such particular cases only as the legislature shall 
expressly provide for. 

Art. XXI. The freedom of deliberation, speech and 
debate, in either house of the legislature, is so essential to 
the rights of the people, that it cannot be the foundation 
of any accusation or prosecution, action or complaint* in 
any other court or place whatsoever. 

Abt. XXII. The legislature ought frequently to assem- 
ble for the redress of grievances, for correcting, strength- 
ening, and confirming the laws, and for making new laws, 
as the common good may require. 

Abt. XXIII. No subsidy, charge, tax, impost, or duties, 
ought to be established, fixed, laid, or levied, under any 
pretext whatsoever, without the consent of the people, or 
their representatives in the legislature. 

Abt. XXIV. Laws made to punish for actions done 
before the existence of such laws, and which have not been 
declared crimes by preceding laws, are ui^ust, oppressive, 
and inconsistent with the fundamental principles of a free 
government. 

Abt. XXV. No subject ought, in any case, or in any 
time, to be declared guilty of treason or felony by the 
tegislature. 

Abt. XXVI. No magistrate or court of law shall de- 
mand excessive bail or sureties, impose excessive fines, or 
inflict cruel or unusual punishments. 



Constitution of Massachusetts. 47 

Art. XXVII. In time of peace, no soldier ought to be 
quartered in any house without the consent of the owner; 
and in time of war, such quarters ought not to be made 
but by the civil magistrate, in a manner* ordained by the 
legislature. 

Abt. XXVIII. No person can in any case be subjected 
to law-martial, or to any penalties or pains, by virtue of 
that law, except those employed in the army or navy, and 
except the militia in actual service, but by authority of the 
legislature. . 

Art. XXIX. It is essential to the preservation of the 
rights of every individual, his life, liberty, property, and 
character, that there be an impartial interpretation of the 
laws, and administration of justice. It is the right of every 
citizen to be tried by judges as free, impartial, and inde- 
pendent as the lot of humanity will admit. It is, there- 
fore, not only the best policy, but for the security of the 
rights of the people, and of every citizen, that the judges 
of the supreme judicial court should hold their offices as 
long as they behave themselves well, and that they should 
have honorable salaries ascertained and established by 
standing laws. 

Art. XXX. In the government of this Commonwealth, 
the legislative department shall never exercise the execu- 
tive and judicial powers, or either of them ; the executive 
shall never exercise the legislative and judicial powers, oc 
either of them; the judicial shall never exercise the legis- 
lative and executive powers, or either of them : to the end 
it may be a government of laws, and not of men. 



48 Constitution of Massachusetts. 



iPART THE SECOND. 

The Frame of Government, 

The people, inhabiting the territory formerly called the 
Province of Massachusetts Bay, do hereby solemnly and 
mutually agree with each other, to form themselves into a 
free, sovereign, and independent body politic or state, by 
the name of The Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

CHAPTER I. 
THE LEGISLATIVE POWER. 

SECTION I. 

The General Court. 

Article I. The department of legislation shall be 
formed by two branches, a Senate and House of Represen- 
tatives, each of which shall have a negative on the other. 

The legislative body shall assemble every year, on the 
last Wednesday in May, and at such other times as they 
shall judge necessary ; and shall dissolve and be dissolved, 
on the day next preceding the said last Wednesday in May ; 
and shall be styled. The General Court of Massachu- 
setts. [See Amendments, Article X.] 

Art. II. No bill or resolve of the senate or house of 
representatives shall become a law, and have force as such, 
until it shall have been laid before the governor for his re- 
visal; and if he, upon such revision, approve thereof, he 
shall signify his approbation by signing the same. But if 
he have any objection to the passing of such bill or resolve, 
he shall return the same, together with his objections 



Constitution of Massachusetts. 49^ 

thereto, in writing, to the senate or house of representa- 
tires, in whichsoever the same shall have originated, who 
shall enter the objections sent down hy the governor, at 
large, on their records, and proceed to reconsider the said 
bill or resolve : but if, after such reconsideration, two 
thirds of the said senate or house of representatives, shall, 
notwithstanding the said objections, agree to pass the 
same, it shall, together with the objections, be sent to the 
other branch of the legislature, where it shall also be re- 
considered, and if approved by two thirds of the members 
present, shall have the force of a law : but in all such 
cases, the votes of both houses shall be determined by yeas 
and nays ; and the names of the persons voting for, or 
against, the said bill or resolve, shall be entered upon the 
public records of the Commonwealth. 

And in order to prevent unnecessary delays, if any bill 
or resolve shall not he returned by the governor within 
five days after it shall have been presented, the same shall 
have the force of a law. [See Amendments, Article I.] 

Art. III. The general court shall forever have full 
power and authority to erect and constitute judicatories 
and courts of record, or other courts, to be held in the name 
of the Commonwealth, for the hearing, trying, and deter- 
mining of all manner of crimes, offences, pleas, processes, 
plaints, actions, matters, causes, and things, whatsoever, 
arising or happening within the Commonwealth, or be- 
tween or concerning persons inhabiting, or residing, or 
brought within the same ; whether the same be criminal or 
civil, or whether the said crimes be capital or not capital, 
and whether the said pleas be real, personal, or mixed ; and 
for the awarding and making out of execution thereupon : 
to which courts and judicatories are hereby given and 
granted full power and authority, from time to time, to 
administer oaths or affirmations, for the better discovery 

i 



50 Constitution of Massachusetts, 

of truth in any matter in controyersy, or depending before 
them. 

Abt. IV. And farther, full power and authority are 
hereby giren and granted to the said general court, from 
time to time, to make, ordain, and establish, all manner 
of wholesome and reasonable orders, laws, statutes and 
ordinances, directions and instructions, either with penal- 
ties or without ; so as the same be not repugnant or con- 
trary to this constitution, as they shall judge to be for the 
good and welfare of this Commonwealth, and for the gov- 
ernment and ordering thereof, and of the subjects of the 
same, and for the necessary support and defence of the 
government thereof; and to name and settle annually, or 
provide by fixed laws for the naming and settling, all civil 
oflGlcers within the said Commonwealth, the election and 
constitution of whom are not hereafter in this form of gov- 
ernment otherwise provided for ; and to set forth the sev- 
eral duties, powers, and limits of the several civil and mil- 
itary officers of this Commonwealth, ^nd the forms of such 
oaths or affirmations as shall be respectively administered 
unto them for the execution of their several offices and 
places, so as the same be not repugnant or contrary to this 
constitution ; and to impose and levy proportional and rea- 
sonable assessments, rates, and taxes, upon all the inhab- 
itants of, and persons resident, and estates lying, within 
the said Commonwealth ; and also to impose and levy rea- 
sonable duties and excises upon any produce, goods, 
wares, merchandise, and commodities whatsoever, brought 
into, produced, manufactured, or being within the same ; 
to be issued and disposed of by warrant, under the hand 
of the governor of this Commonwealth for the time being, 
with the advice and consent of the council, for the public 
service, in the necessary defence and support of the gov- 
ernment of the said Commonwealth, and the protection 
and preservation of the subjects thereof, according to such 
acts as are, or shall be in force within the same. 



Constittttion of Massachusetts. 51 

And while the public charges of goyemment, or any 
part thereof, shall be assessed on polls and estates, in the 
manner that has hitherto been practised, in order that such 
assessments may be made with equality, there shall be a 
valuation of estates within the Commonwealth, taken anew, 
once in every ten years at least, and as much oftener as 
the general court shall order. 



CHAPTER I. 

SBOnON Q. 

Senate, 

Abticlb I. There shall be annually elected, by the 
freeholders and other inhabitants of this Commonwealth, 
qualified as in this constitution is provided, forty persons 
to be councillors and senators, for the year ensuing their 
election ; to be chosen by the inhabitants of the districts, 
into which the Commonwealth may from time to time be 
divided by the general court for that purpose : and the 
general court, in assigning the numbers to be elected by 
the respective districts, shall govern themselves by the 
proportion of the public taxes paid by the said districts ; 
and timely make known to the inhabitants of the Com* 
monwealth the limits of each district, and the number of 
councillors and senators to be chosen therein : provided, 
that the number of such districts shall never be less'than 
thirteen ; and that no district be so large as to entitle the 
same to choose more than six senators. [See Amend- 
ments, Articles XIII. and XVI.] 

And the several counties in this Commonwealth shall, 

until the general court shall determine It necessary to alter 

* the said districts, be districts for the choice of councillors 

and senators (except that the counties of Dukes Coun^ 

and Nantucket shall form one district for that puipose)| 



52 



Constitution, of Massachuaetta* 



and shall elect the following number for councillors and 
senators, viz. : — [See Amendments, Article XIII.] 



Saffolk, • 




six. 


York, 


Essex, . 




six. 


Dukes County and 
Nantucket, 


Middlesex, 




five. 


Hampshire, 




four. 


Worcester, 


Plymouth, 




. three. 


Cumberland, . 


Barnstable, 




one. 


Lincoln, . • 


Bristol, 




. three. 


Berkshire, 



two. 

one. 

fire, 
one. 
one. 
two. 



Abt. II. The senate shall be the first branch of the 
legislature ; and the senators shall be chosen in the follow- 
ing manner, yiz. : There shall be a meeting on the first 
Monday in April, annually, forever, of the inhabitants of 
ea6h town in the several counties of this Commonwealth, 
to be called by the selectmen, and warned in due course 
of law, at least seven days before the first Monday in 
April, for the purpose of electing persons to be senators 
and councillors ; and at such meetings every male inhab- 
itant of twenty -one years of age and upwards, having a 
freehold estate, within the Commonwealth, of the annual 
income of three pounds, or any estate of the value of 
sixty pounds, shall have a right to give in his vote for the 
senators for the district of which he is an inhabitant. And 
to remove all doubts concerning the meaning of the word 
** inhabitant," in this constitution, every person shall be 
considered as an inhabitant, for the purpose of electing and 
being elected into any office, or place within this State, in that 
town, district, or plantation, where he dwelleth, or hath his 
home. [See Amendments, Articles II., III., X., XIV., XV.] 

The selectmen of the several towns shall preside at such 
meetings impartially, and shall receive the votes of all the 
inhabitants of such towns present and qualified to vote for 
senators, and shall sort and count them in open town meet- 
ing, and in presence of the town clerk, who shall make a 
fair record, in presence of the selectmen, and in open town 



Constitution of Massachusetts, 53 

meeting, of the name of every person voted for, and of 
the number of votes against his name ; and a fair copy of 
this record shall be attested by the selectmen and the town 
clerk, and shall be sealed up, directed to the secretary of 
the Commonwealth for the time being, with a superscrip- 
tion expressing the purport of the contents thereof, and 
delivered by the town clerk of such towns to the sheriff 
of the county in which such town lies, thirty days at least 
before the last Wednesday in May, annually ; or it shall be 
delivered into the secretary's office seventeen days at least 
before the said last Wednesday in May ; and the sheriff of 
each county shall deliver all such certificates, by him re- 
ceived, into the secretary's office, seventeen days before 
the said last Wednesday in May. [See Amendments, Arti- 
cles II. and X.] 

And the inhabitants of plantations unincorporated, quali- 
fied as this constitution provides, who are or shall be em- 
powered and required to assess taxes upon themselves 
towards the support of government, shall have the same 
privilege of voting for councillors and senators, in the plan- 
tations where they reside, as town inhabitants have in their 
respective towns ; and the plantation meetings for that pur- 
pose shall be held, annually, on the same first Monday in 
April, at such place in the plantations, respectively, as the 
assessors thereof shall direct; which assessors shall have 
like authority for notifying the electors, collecting and re- 
turning the votes, as the selectmen and town clerks have 
in their several towns, by this constitution. And all other 
persons living in places unincorporated, (qualified as afore- 
said,) who shall be assessed to the support of government, 
by the assessors of an adjacent town, shall have the privi- 
lege of giving in their votes for councillors and senators, 
in the town where they shall be assessed, and be notified 
of the place of meeting, by the selectmen of the town where 
they shall be assessed, for that purpose, accordingly. [See 
Amendments, Article X.] 



54 Constitution of MasBochvsettB. 

Art. in. And that there may be a due conyentiou of 
senators on the last Wednesday in May, annually, the gov- 
ernor, with five of the council, for the time being, shall, 
as soon as may be, examine the returned copies of such 
records ; and fourteen days before the said day, he shall 
issue his summons to such persons as shall appear to be 
chosen by a majority of voters, to attend on that day, and 
take their seats accordingly : provided, nevertheless, that 
for the first year, the said returned copies shall be ex- 
amined by the president and five of the council of the for- 
mer constitution of government; and the said president 
shall, in like manner, issue his summons to the persons so 
elected, that they may take their seats as aforesaid. [See 
Amendments, Article X.] 

Art. IY. The senate shall be the final judge of the 
elections, returns, and qualifications of their own mem- 
bers, as pointed out in the constitution, and shall, on the 
said last Wednesday in May, annually, determine and de- 
clare who are elected by each district, to be senators, by a 
majority of votes : and in case there shall not appear to be 
the full number of senators returned, elected by a majority 
of votes, for any district, the deficiency shall be supplied 
in the following manner, viz. : The members of the house 
of representatives, and such senators as shall be declared 
elected, shall take the names of such persons as shall be 
found to have the highest number of votes in such district, 
and not elected, amounting to twice the number of senators 
wanting, if there be so many voted for, and out of these 
shall elect by ballot a number of senators sufficient to fill 
up the vacancies in such district ; and in this manner all 
such vacancies shall be filled up in every district of the 
Commonwealth ; and in like manner all vacancies in the 
senate, arising by death, removal out of the State, or other- 
wise, shall be supplied as soon as may be af^er .such 
vacancies shall happen. [See Amendments, Article X.] 



Constittition of Massachusetts. 55 

Art. y. Provided, nevertheless, that no person shall 
be capable of being elected as a senator, who is not seized 
in his own right of a freehold, within this Commonwealth, 
of the value of three hundred pounds at least, or possessed 
of personal estate to the value of six hundred pounds at 
least, or of both to the amount of the same sum, and who 
has not been an inhabitant of this Commonwealth for the 
space of five years •imAediately preceding his election, 
and, at the time of his election, he shall be an iLhabltant 
in the district for which he shall be chosen. [See Amend- 
ments, Article XIII.] 

4 

Art. VI. The senate shall haye power to adjourn 
themselves, provided such adjournments do not exceed 
two days at a time. 

Art. VIX. The senate shall choose its own president, 
appoint its own officers, and determine its own rules of 
proceeding. 

Art. YIII. The senate shall be a court, with full au- 
thority, to hear and determine all impeachments made by 
the house of representatives, against any officer or officers 
of the Commonwealth, for misconduct and maladministra- 
tion in their offices ; but, previous to the trial of every im- 
peachment, the members of the senate shall, respectively, 
be sworn, truly and impartially to try and determine the 
charge in question, according to evidence. Their judg- 
ment, however, shall not extend further than to remove 
from office, and disqualification to hold or enjoy any place 
of hcmor, trust, or profit, under this Commonwealth : but 
the party so convicted shall be, nevertheless, liable to in- 
dictment, trial, judgment and punishment, according to 
the laws of the land. 

Art. IX. Not less than sixteen members of the senate 
shall constitute a quorum for doing business. 



56 Con8titutio7i of Massachusetts. 



CHAPTER I. 

SECTION III. 

House of Representatives. 

Article f. There shall be in the legislature of this 
Commonwealth, a representation of the people, annually 
elected, and founded upon the principle of equality. 

Abt. II. And in order to provide for a representation of 
the citizens of this Commonwealth, founded upon the prin- 
ciple of equality, every corporate town containing one 
hundred and fifty ratable polls, may elect one representa- 
tive ;^ every corporate town containing three hundred and 
seventy-five ratable polls, may elect two representatives ; 
every corporate town containing six hundred ratable polls, 
may elect three representatives; and proceeding in that 
manner, making two hundred and twenty-five ratable polls 
the mean increasing number for every additional represen- 
tative. [See Amendments, Articles XII. and XIII.] 

Provided, nevertheless, that each town now incorpo- 
rated, not having one hundred and fifty ratable polls, may 
elect one representative ; but no place shall hereafter be 
incorporated with the privilege of electing a representa- 
tive, unless there are wiUiin the same one hundred and 
fifty ratable polls. 

And the house of representatives shall have power, from 
time to time, to impose fines upon such towns as shall neg- 
lect to choose and return members to the same, agreeably 
to this constitution. 

The expenses of travelling to the general assembly, and 
returning home, once in every session, and no more, shall 
be paid by the government, out of the public treasury, to 
every member who shall attend as seasonably as he can, in 
the judgment of the house, and does not depart without 
leave. 



Constitution of Massachusetts, 57 

Abt. III. Every member of the house of representa- 
tives shall be chosen by written votes ; and, for one year 
at least, next preceding his election, shall have been an 
inhabitant of, and have been seized in his own right, of a 
freehold of the value of one hundred pounds, within the 
town he shall be chosen to represent, or any ratable estate 
to the value of two hundred pounds ; and he shall cease to 
represent the said town immediately on his ceasing to be 
qualified as aforesaid. [See Amendments, Articles XIII. 
and XIV.] 

Akt. IV. Every male person, being twenty-one years 
of age, and resident in any particular, town in this Com- 
monwealth for the space of one year next preceding, hav- 
ing a freehold estate, within the same town, of the annual 
income of three pounds, or any estate of the value of sixty 
pounds, shall have a right to vote in the choice of a repre- 
sentative or representatives for the said town. [See 
Amendments, Article III.] 

Art. V. The members of the house of representatives 
shall be chosen annually in tlie month of May, ten days, at 
least, before the last Wednesday of that month. [See 
Amendments, Articles X. and XV.] 

Art. VI. The hguse of representatives shall be the 
grand inquest of this Commonwealth ; and all impeach- 
ments made by them shall be heard and tried by the senate. 

Art. VII. All money bills shall originate in the house 
of representatives ; but the senate may propose or concur 
with amendments, as on other bills. 

Art. VIII. The house of representatives shall have 
power to adjourn themselves ; provided such acUournment 
shall not exceed two days at a time. 



58 Constitution of MaBsachusetts. 

Abt. IX. Not less than sixty members of the house of 
representatives shall constitute a quorum for doing busi- 
ness. 

Art. X. The house of representatives shall be the 
judge of the returns, elections, and qualifications of its 
own members, as pointed out in the constitution; shall 
choose their own speaker, appoint their own officers, and 
settle the rules and orders of proceeding in their own 
house. They shall have authority to punish by imprison- 
ment every person, not a member, who shall be guilty of 
disrespect to the house, by any disorderly or contemptuous 
behavior in its presence ; or who, in the town where the 
general court is sitting, and during the time of its sitting, 
shall threaten harm to the body or estate of any of its mem- 
bers, for anything said or done in the house ; or who shall 
assault any of them therefor ; or who shall assault* or arrest, 
any witness, or other person, ordered to attend the house, 
in his way in going or returning ; or who shall rescue any 
person arrested by the order of the house. 

And no member of the house of representatives shall 
be arrested, or held to bail on mean process, during his 
going unto, returning from, or his attending, the general 
assembly. 

Art. XI. The senate shall have the same powers in the 
like cases ; and the governor and council shall have the 
same authority to punish in like cases : provided that no 
imprisonment, on the warrant or order of the governor, 
council, senate, or house of representatives, for either of 
the above described offences, be for a term exceeding thirty 
days. 

And the senate and house of representatives may try and 
determine all cases where their rights and privileges are 
concerned, and which, by the constitution, they have au- 
thority to try and determine, by committees of their own 
members, or in such other way as they may, respectively, 
think best. 



Constitution of Massachusetts. 59 



CHAPTER II. 

BXECUTIYE POWEB. 
SECTION I. 

Governor. 

Article I. There shall be a supreme executive magis- 
trate, who shall be styled — The Governor of the Com- 
monwealth OF Massachusetts ; — and whose title shall 
be — ffis Excellency. 

Art. II. The governor shall be chosen annually ; and 
no person shall be eligible to this office, unless, at the time 
of his election, he shall have been an inhabitant of this Com- 
monwealth for seven years next preceding ; and unless he 
shall, at the same time, be seized, in his own right, of a free- 
hold, within the Commonwealth, of the value of one thou- 
sand pounds ; and unless he shall declare himself to be of 
the Christian religion. [See Amendments, Article VII.] 

Art. III. Those persons who shall be qualified to vote 
for senators and representatives, within the several towns 
of this Commonwealth, shall, at a meeting to be called for 
that purpose, on the first Monday of April, annually, give 
in their votes for a governor, to the selectmen, who shall 
preside at such meetings ; and the town clerk, in the pres- 
ence and with the assistance of the selectmen, shall, in 
open town meeting, sort and count the votes, and form a 
list of the persons voted for, with the number of votes for 
each person against his name ; and shall make a fair record 
of the same in the town books, and a public declaration 
thereof in the said meeting ; and shall, in the presence of 
the inhabitants, seal up copies of the said list, attested by 
him and the selectmen, and transmit the same to the sheriff 
of the county, thirty days at least before the last Wednes- 



60 Constitution of Massachusetts, 

m 

day in May ; and the sheriff shall transmit the same to the 
secretary's office seventeen days at least before the said 
last Wednesday in May ; or the selectmen may cause re- 
turns of the same to be made to the office of the secretary 
of the Commonwealth, seventeen days, at least, before the 
said day ; and the secretary sliall lay the same before the 
senate and the house of representatives, on the last Wednes- 
day in May, to be by them examined ; and in case of an 
election by a majority of all the votes returned, the choice 
shall be by them declared and published ; but if no person 
shall have a majority of votes, the house of representa- 
tives shall, by ballot, elect two out of four persons, who 
had the highest number of votes,' if so many shall have 
been voted for ; but if otherwise, out of the number voted 
for; and make return to the senate of the two persons so 
elected ; on which, the senate shall proceed, by ballot, to 
elect one, who shall be declared governor. [See Amend- 
ments, Articles II., X., XIV., XV.] 

Art. IV. The governor shall have authority, from time 
to time, at his discretion, to assemble and call together the 
councillors of this Commonwealth for the time being ; and 
the governor, with the said councillors, or five of them, at 
least, shall, and may, from time to time, hold and keep a 
council, for the ordering and directing the affairs of the 
Commonwealth, agreeably to the constitution and the lawf 
of the land. 

Art. V. The governor, with advice of council, shall 
have full power and authority, during the session of the 
general court, to adjourn or prorogue the same to any time 
the two houses shall desire ; and to dissolve the same on 
the day next preceding the last Wednesday in May ; and, 
in the recess of the said court, to prorogue the same from 
time to time, not exceeding ninety days in any one recess ; 
and to call it together sooner than the time to which it may 
be adjourned or prorogued, if the welfare of the Common- 
wealth shall require the same ; and in case of any infectious 



Constitution of Massachusetts. 61 

disorder preyailing in the place where the said court is 
next at any time to convene, or any other cause happening, 
whereby danger may arise to the health or lives of the 
^ members from their attendance, he may direct the session 
to be neld at some other, the most convenient place within 
the State. [See Amendments, Article X.] 

And the governor shall dissolve the said general court 
on the daj next preceding the last Wednesday in May. 
[See Amendments, Article X.] 

Art. YI. In cases of disagreement between the two 
houses, with regard to the necessity, expediency, or time 
of adjournment, or prorogation^ the governor, with advice 
of the council, shall have a right to adjourn or prorogue the 
general court, not exceeding^iinety days, as he shall deter- 
mine the public good shall require. 

ABT..VII. The governor of this Commonwealth, for 
the time being, shall be the commander-in-chief of the army 
and navy, and of all the military forces of the state, by sea 
and land ; and shall have full power, by himself, or by any 
commander, or other officer or officers, from time to time, 
to train, instruct, exercise, and govern the militia and 
navy ; and, for the special defence and safety of the Com- 
monwealth, to assemble in martial array, and put in war- 
like posture, the inhabitants thereof, and to lead and con- 
duct them, and with them to encounter, repel, resist, 
expel, and pursue, by force of arms, as well by sea as by 
land, within or without the limits of this Commonwealth, 
and also to kill, slay, and destroy, if necessary, and con- 
quer, by all fitting ways, enterprises and means what- 
soever, all and every such person and persons as shall, at 
any time hereafter, in a hostile manner, attempt or enter- 
prise the destruction, invasion, detriment, or annoyance 
of this Commonwealth ; and to use and exercise over the 
amy and navy, and over the militia in actual service, tlie 



62 ConstittUion of MoBBochusetU. 

law-martial, in time of war or inyasion, and also in tim« 
of rebellion, declared by the legislature to exist, as occasioa 
shall necessarily require ; and to take and surprise, by all 
ways and means whatsoever, all and every such person or 
persons, with their ships, arms, ammunition and^other 
goods, as shall, m a hostile manner, invade or attempt the 
invading, conquering, or annoying this Commonwealth; 
and that the governor be intrusted with all these and otlier 
powers, incident to the offices of captain-general and com- 
mander-in-chief, and admiral, to be exercised agreeably to 
the rules and regulations of the constitution, and the laws 
of the land, and not otherwise. 

Provided, that the said governor shall not, at any time 
hereafter, by virtue of any power by this constitution 
granted, or hereafter to be granted to him by the legisla- 
ture, transport any of the inhabitants of this Common- 
wealth, or oblige them to march but of the limits of the 
same, without their free and voluntary consent, or the con- 
sent of the general court ; except so far as may be neces- 
sary to march or transport them by land or water, for the 
defence of such part of the State to which they cannot 
otherwise conveniently have access. 

Art. YIII. The power of pardoning offences, except 
such as persons may be convicted of before the senate, by 
an impeachment of the house, shall be in the governor, by 
and with the advice of council ; but no charter of pardon^ 
granted by the governor, with advice of the council, before 
conviction, shall avail the party pleading the same, not- 
withstanding any general or particular expressions con- 
tained therein, descriptive of the offence or offences 
intended to be pardoned. 

Art. IX. All judicial officers, the attorney-general, the 
Aolicitor-general, all sheriffs, coroners, and registers of 
probate, shall be nominated and appointed by the goy- 
ernor, by and with the advice and consent of the council; 






Constitution of Massachusetts. 6S 

and every such nomination shall be made by the goyemory 
and made at least seven days prior to such appointment. 
[See Amendments, Articles XIV., XVII., XIX.] 

Art. X. The captains and subalterns of the militia 
shall be elected by the written votes of the train-band and 
alarm list of their respective companies, of twenty-one 
years of age and UQwards ; the field officers of regiments 
shall be elected by the written votes of the captains and 
subalterns of their respective regiments; the brigadiers 
shall be elected in like manner, by the field officers of their 
respective brigades ; and such officers, so elected, shall be 
commissioned by the governor, who shall determine their 
rank. [See Amendments, Article T.] 

The legislature shall, by standing laws, direct the time 
and manner of convening the electors, and of collecting 
votes, and of certifying to the governor the officers elected. 

The major-generals shall be appointed by the senate and 
house of representatives, each having a negative upon the 
other ; and be commissioned by the governor. 

And if the electors of brigadiers, field officers, captains, 
or subalterns, shall neglect or refuse to make such elec- 
tions, after being duly notified, according to the laws for 
the time being, t^en the governor, with advice of council, 
shall appoint suitable persons to fill such offices. 

And no officer, duly commissioned to command in the 
militia, shall be removed from his office but by the address 
of both houses to the governor, or by fair trial in court 
martial, pursuant to the laws of the Commonwealth for the 
time being. [See Amendments, Article IV.] 

The commanding officers of regiments shall appoint their 
adjutants and quarter-masters ; the brigadiers their brigade- 
majors ; and the major-generals their aids ; and the gov- 
ernor shall appoint the adjutant-general. 

The governor, with advice of council, shall appoint all 
officers of the continental army, whom by the confedera- 



64 Canatitution of Massachusetts. 

tion of the United States it is provided that this Common- 
wealth appoint, — as also all officers of forts and garrisons. 
The divisions of the militia into brigades, regiments, and 
companies, made in pursuance of the militia laws now in 
force, shall be considered as the proper divisions of the 
militia of this Commonwealth, until the same shall be al- 
tered in pursuance of some future law. 

Abt. XI. No moneys shall be issued #dt of the treasury 
of this Commonwealth and disposed of (except such sums 
as may be appropriated for the redemption of bills of credit 
or treasurer's notes, or for the payment of interest arising 
thereon) but by warrant under the hand of the governor 
for the time being, with the advice and consent of the 
council, for the necessary defence and support of the Com- 
monwealth, and for the protection and preservation of the 
inhabitants thereof, agreeably to the acts and resolves of 
the general court. 

Art. XII. All public boards, the commissary-general, 
all superintending officers of public magazines and stores, 
belonging to this Commonwealth, and all commanding offi- 
cers of forts and garrisons within the same, shall, once in 
every three months, officially and without requisition, and 
at other times, when required by the governor, deliver to 
him an account of all goods, stores, provisions, ammuni- 
tion, cannon with their appendages, and small arms with 
their accoutrements, and of all other public property what- 
ever under their care, respectively; distinguishing the 
quantity, number, quality, and kind of each, as particularly 
as may be ; together with the condition of such forts and gar- 
risons ; and the said commanding officer shall exhibit to the 
governor, when required by him, true and exact plans of 
such forts, and of the land and sea, or harbor or harbors, 
adjacent. 

And the said boards, and all public officers, shall commu- 
nicate to the governor, as soon as may be after receiving 



Constitution of Massachusetts. 65 

* 

the same, all letters, despatches, and intelligences of a pub- 
lic nature, which shall be directed to them respectively. 

■ 

Abt. XIII. As the public good requires that the goy- 
ernor should not be under the undue influence of any of 
the members of the general court, by a dependence on 
them for his support — that he should, in all cases, act 
with freedom for the benefit of the public — that he should 
not have his attention necessarily diverted from that object 
to his private concerns — and that he should maintain the 
dignity of the Commonwealth in the character of its chief 
magistrate — it is necessary that he should have an honor- 
able stated salary, of a fixed and permanent value, amply 
sufficient for those purposes, and established by standing 
laws : and it shall be among the first acts of the general 
couft, after the commencement of this constitution, to es- 
tablish such salary by law accordingly. 

Permanent and honorable salaries shall also be estab- 
lished by law for the justices of the supreme judicial court. 

And if it shall be found that any of the salaries afore- 
said, so established, are insufficient, they shall, from time 
to time, be enlarged, as the general court shall judge proper. 



CHAPTER II. 

SECTION II. 

LUvtenant- Governor, 

Article I. There shall be annually elected a lieutenant- 
governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, whose 
title shall be — His Honor ; and who shall be qualified, in 
point of religion, property, and residence in the Common- 
wealth, in the same manner with the governor ; and the 
day and manner of his election, and the qualifications of 

5 



66 ConstittUion of Massachusetts. 

the electors, shall be the same as are required in the elec- 
tion of a govemoT. The return of the votes for this offi- 
cer, and the declaration of his election, shall be in the same 
manner ; and if no one person shall be found to have a 
mtgority of all the votes returned, the vacancy shall be filled 
by the senate and house of representatives, in the same 
manner as the governor is to be elected, in case no one person 
shall have a majority of the votes of the people to be gov- 
ernor. [See Amendments, Articles III., VI., X., XV.] 

Art. II. The governor, and in his absence the lieu- 
tenant-governor, sUall be president of the council, but 
shall have no vote in council ; and the lieutenant-governor 
shall always be a member of the council, except when the 
chair of the governor shall be vacant. 

Art. III. Whenever the chair of the governor shall be 
vacant, by reason of his death, or absence from the Com- 
monwealth, or otherwise, the lieutenant-governor, for the 
time being, shall, during such vacancy, perform all the 
duties incumbent upon the governor, and shall have and 
exercise all the powers and authorities, which, by this con- 
stitution, the governor is vested with, when personally 
present. 

CHAPTER n. 

SECTION ni. 

CouncUy and the Manner of settling Elections by the 

Legislature, 

« 

Article I. There shall be a council for advising the 
governor in the executive part of the government, to con- 
sist of nine persons besides the lieutenant-governor, whom 
the governor, for the time being, shall have full power and 
authority, from time to time, at his discretion, to assemble 



Constitution of Ma%8achuBett9. 67 

and call together ; and the goyernor, with the said council- 
lors, or five of them at least, shall and may, from time to 
time, hold and keep a council, for the ordering and direct- 
ing the affairs of the Commonwealth, according to the laws 
of the land. [See Amendments, Article XVI.] 

Abt. II. Nine councillors shall be annually chosen 
from among the persons returned for councillors and sen- 
ators, on the last Wednesday in May, by the joint ballot 
of the senators and representatives assembled in one 
room ; and in case there shall not be found, upon the first 
choice, the whole number of nine persons who will accept 
a seat in the council, the deficiency shall be made up by 
the electors aforesaid from among the people at large ; and 
the number of senators left, shall constitute the senate for 
the year. The seats of the persons thus elected from the 
senate, and accepting the trust, shall be vacated in the 
senate. [See Amendments, Articles X., XIII., XVI.] 

AsT. III. The councillors, in the civil arrangement* 
of the Commonwealth, shall have rank next after the lieu- 
tenant-governor. 

Art. IV. Not more than two councillors shall be chosen 
out of any one district of this Commonwealth. 

Art. y. The resolutions and advice of the coundl 
■hall be recorded in a register, and signed by the members 
present ; and this record may be called for, at any time, 
by either house of the legislature ; and any member of the 
council may insert his opinion, contrary to the resolution 
of the majority. 

Art. YI. Whenever the office of the governor and 
lieutenant-governor shall be vacant, by reason of death, 
absence, or otherwise, then the council, or the m^jor port^ 



68 Constitution of Massachusetts. 

of them, shall, daring such vacancy, have full power and 
authority to do and execute all and every such acts, mat- 
ters, and things, as the governor or the lieutenant-gov- 
ernor might or could, by virtue of this constitution, do or 
execute, if they, or either of them, were personally present. 

Aat. yil. And whereas the elections appointed to be 
made by this constitution, on the last Wednesday in May, 
annually, by the two houses of the legislature, may not be 
completed on that day, the said elections may be a^ourned 
from day to day, until the same shall be completed. And 
the order of elections /shall be as follows : The vacancies 
in the senate, if any, shall first be filled up ; the governor 
and lieutenant-governor shall then be elected, provided 
there should be no choice of them by the people ; and af- 
terwards the two houses shall proceed to the election of 
the council. 



CHAPTER II. 

SECTION IV. 

* 

Secretary^ Treasurer, Commissary, ^e. 

Abticlb I. The secretary, treasurer and receiver-gen- 
eral, and the commissary-general, notaries public, and 
naval officers, shall be chosen annually, by joint ballot of 
the senators and representatives, in one room. And, that 
the citizens of this Commonwealth may be assured, from 
time to time, that the moneys remaining in the public 
treasury, upon the settlement and liquidation of the public 
accounts, are their property, no man shall be eligible as 
treasurer and receiver-general more than five years suc- 
cessively. [See Amendments, Articles IV., XVII.] 

Abt. n. The records of the Commonwealth shall be kept 
in the office of the secretary, who may appoint his deputies, 



Constitution of Massachusetts. 69 

for whose conduct he shall be accountable, and he shall 
attend the governor and council, the senate and house of 
representatives, in person, or by his deputies, as they 
■hall respectively require. 



CHAPTER III. 

JUDIOIART POWSB. 

Abtiolb I. The tenure that all commission officers shall 
by law have in their offices, shall be expressed in their re- 
spective commissions. All judicial officers, duly appointed, 
commissioned and sworn, shall hold their offices during 
good behavior, excepting such concerning whom there is 
different provision made in this constitution : provided, nev« 
ertheless, the governor, with consent of the council, may re- 
move them upon the address of both houses of the legislature. 

Abt. II. Each branch of the legislature, as well as the 
governor and council, shall have authority to require the 
opinions of the justices of the supreme judicial court, upon 
important questions of law, and upon solemn occasions* 

Abt. III. In order that the people may not suffer fsom. 
the long continuance in place of any justice of the peace, 
who shall fail of discharging the important duties of his 
office with ability or fidelity, all commissions of justices of 
the peace shall expire and become void, in the term of 
seven years from their respective dates; and, upon the 
expiration of any commission, the same may, if necessary, 
be renewed, or another person appointed, as shall most 
conduce to the well-being of the Commonwealth. 

Abt. IV. The judges of probate of wills, and for grant- 
ing letters of administration, shall hold their courts, at such 
place or places, on fixed days, as the convenience of the 



70 Constitution of Maasaelmsetts. 

people shall require ; and the le^slature shallt Arom time 
to time, hereafter appoint such times and places; until 
which appointments, the said courts shall be holden at the 
times and places which the respective judges shall direct. 

Art. y. All causes of marriage, divorce and alimon7, 
and all appeals from the judges of probate, shall be heard 
and determined by the governor and council, until the 
legislature shall, by law, make other provision. 



CHAPTER IV. 

DELEGATES TO CONGRESS. 

The delegates of this Commonwealth to the congress of 
the United States shall, some time in the month of June, 
annually, be elepted by the joint ballot of the senate and 
house of representatives, assembled together in one room ; 
to serve in congress for one year^ tp commence on the 
first Monday in November then next ensuing. They shall 
have commissions under the hand of the governor, and the 
great seal of the Commonwealth ; but may be recalled at 
any time within the year, and others chosen and commis- 
sioned, in the same manner, in their stead. [Annulled by 
the adoption of the Constitution of the United States.] 



CHAPTER V. 

THE UNIYERSITT AT CAMBRIDGE, AND ENGOURAGBMSKT 

OF LITERATURE, &C. 

SECTION I. 

The University. 

Article I. Whereas our wise and pious ancestors, so 
early as the year one thousand six hundred and thirty-six, 
laid the foundation of Harvard College, in which univer- 



Constitution of Massachusetts. 71 

sitj many persons of great eminence have, by the blessing 
of GoD| been initiated in those arts and sciences which 
qualified them for public employments) both in church and 
state ; and whereas the encouragement of arts and sciences, 
and all good literature, tends to the honor of God, the ad- 
vantage of the Christian religion, and the great benefit of 
this, and the other United States of America, — it is de- 
clared, that the President and Fellows of Habyabd 
CoLLEOE, in their corporate capacity, and their successors 
in that capacity, their officers and servants, shall have, 
hold, use, exercise and enjoy, all the powers, authorities, 
rights, liberties, privileges, immunities and franchises, 
which they now have, or are entitled to have, hold, use, 
exercise and enjoy ; and the same are hereby ratified and 
confirmed unto them, the said president and fellows of 
Harvard College, and to their successors, and to their offi- 
cers, and servants, respectively, forever* 

Art. II. And whereas there have been, at sundry times, 
by divers persons, gifts, grants, devises of houses, lands, 
tenements, goods, chattels, legacies and conveyances, here- 
tofore made, either to Harvard College, in Cambridge, in 
New England, or to the president and fellows of Harvard 
College, or to the said college, by some other description, 
under several charters successively ; it is declared, that all 
the said gifts, grants, devises, legacies and conveyances, 
are hereby forever confirmed unto the president and fel- 
lows of Harvard College, and to their successors, in the 
capacity aforesaid, according to the true intent and mean- 
ing of the donor or donors, grantor or grantors, devisor or 
devisors. 

Art. III. And whereas by an act of the general court 
of the Colony of Massachusetts Bay, passed in the year 
one thousand six hundred and forty-two, the governor and 
deputy-governor, for the time being, and all the magis- 
trates of that jurisdiction, were, with the president, and a 
number of the clergy in the said act described, constituted 



72 Ccnstitution of MasBochusettB. 

the overseers of Harvard College ; and it being necessary, 
in this new constitution of government, to ascertain who 
shall be deemed successors to the said governor, deputy- 
governor, and magistrates ; it is declared, that the gov- 
ernor, lieutenant-governor, council and senate of this Com- 
monwealth, are, and shall be deemed, their successors; 
who, with the president of Harvard College, for the time 
being, together with the ministers of the congregational 
churches in the towns of Cambridge, Watertown, Charles- 
town, Boston, Roxbury and Dorchester, mentioned in the 
said act, shall be, and hereby are, vested with all the 
powers and authority belonging, or in any way appertain- 
ing, to the overseers of Harvard College ; provided, that 
nothing herein shall be construed to prevent the legislature 
of this Commonwealtli from making such alterations in 
the government of the said university, as shall be condu- 
cive to its advantage, and the interest of the republic of 
letters, in as full a manner as might have been done by the 
legislature of the late Province of the Massachusetts Bay. 



CHAPTER V. 

SECTION U. 

The Encouragement of Literature^ fc. 

Wisdom and knowledge, as well as virtue, diflUsed gen- 
erally among the body of the people, being necessary for 
the preservation of their rights and liberties ; and as these 
depend on spreading the opportunities and advantages of 
education in the various parts of the country, and among 
the different orders of the people, it shall be the duty of 
legislatures and magistrates, in all future periods of this 
Commonwealth, to cherish the interests of literature and 
the sciences, and all seminaries of them ; especially the 
university at Cambridge, public schools, and grammar 
schools in the towns ; to encourage private societies, and 



Constitution of Massachusetts. 73 

public institutions, rewards and imrounities for the promo- 
tion of agriculture, arts, sciences, commerce, trades, man- 
ufactures, and a natural history of the country ; to coun- 
tenance and inculcate the principles of humanity and gen- 
eral benevolence, public and private charity, industry and 
frugality, honesty and punctuality in their dealings ; sin- 
cerity, good humor, and all social affections and generous 
sentiments among the people. [See Amendments, Article 
XVIII.] 

CHAPTER VI. 

OATHS XTXJy SUBSCRIPTIONS ; INCOMPATIBILITT OF AND EX- 
CLUSION FBOM offices; pecuniary qualifications; 
commissions; writs; confirmation of laws; ha- 
beas corpus; the enacting sttle; continuance of 
officers; provision fob 'a future revisal of the 
constitution, &c. 

Article I. Any person chosen governor, lieutenant- 
governor, councillor, senator, or representative, and ac- 
cepting the trust, shall, before he proceed to execute the 
duties of hia place or office, make and subscribe the fol- 
lowing declaration, viz. : 

''I, A. B., do declare, that I believe the Christian reli- 
gion, and have a firm persuasion of its truth ; and that I 
am seized and possessed, in my own right, of the property 
required by the constitution, as one qualification for the 
office or place to which I am elected." [See Amend- 
ments, Article VII.] 

And the governor, lieutenant-governor, and councillors, 
shall make and subscribe the said declaration, in the pres- 
ence of the two houses of assembly ; and the senators and 
representatives, first elected under this constitution, before 
the president and five of the council of the former consti- 
tution, and forever afterwards, before the governor and 
ccuncil for the time being. 



■ 



74 Constitniian of Moi^achusetU. 

And ereiy person, chosen to either of the places or of- 
fices aforesaid, as also any person appointed or commis- 
sioned to any judicial, executive, military, or other office 
under the government, shall, before he enters on the dis- 
charge of the business of his place or office, take and sub- 
scribe the following declaration, and oaths or affirmations, 
viz. : 

*' I, A. B., do truly and sincerely acknowledge, profess, 
testify and declare, that the Commonwealth of Massachu- 
setts is, and of right ought to be, a free, sovereign, and 
independent State ; and I do swear, that I will bear true 
faith and allegiance to the said Commonwealth, and that I 
will defend the same against traitorous conspiracies and 
all hostile attempts whatsoever j and that I do renounce 
and abjure all allegiance, subjection and obedience to the 
king, queen, or government of Great Britain, (as the case 
maybe,) and every other foreign power whatsoever ; and 
that no foreign prince, person, prelate, state, or potentate, 
hath, or ought to have, any jurisdiction, superiority, pre- 
eminence, authority, dispensing or other power, in any 
matterj civil, ecclesiastical, or spiritual, within this Com- 
monwealth ; except the authority and power which is or 
may be vested by their constituents in the congress of the 
United States ; and I do further testify and declare, that 
no man, or body of men, hath, or can have, any right to 
absolve or discharge me from the obUgation of this oath, 
declaration, or affirmation; and that I do make this ac- 
knowledgment, profession, testimony, declaration, denial, 
renunciation and abjuration, heartily and truly, according 
to the common meaning and acceptation of the foregoing 
words, without any equivocation, mental evasion, or secret 
reservation whatsoever. So help me, God." 

'* I, A. B., do solemnly swear and affirm, that I will 
faithfully and impartially discharge and perform all the 
duties incumbent on me as , according to 

(he best of my abilities and understanding, agreeably to the 



Constitution of MassachiisettB. 75 

rules and regulations of the constitution, and the laws of 
the Commonwealth. So help me, God.'* [See Amend- 
ments, Article YI.] 

Provided, always, that when any person, chosen or ap- 
pointed as aforesaid, shall he of the denomination of the 
people called Quali^ers, and shall decline taking the said 
oatlw, he shall make his affirmation in the foregoing form, 
and subscrihe the same, omitting the words, ^^ I do swear ,** 
^^and abjure" ^^oath or^^ ^^and abjuration^" in the first 
oath; and in the second oath, the words, ^^ swear and;" 
and in each of them the words, '' So help me, God ; " sub- 
joining, instead thereof, '' This I do under the pains and 
penalties of perjury" [See Amendments, Article VI.3 

And the said oaths- or affirmations shall be taken and 
Bubscribed by the governor, lieutenant-governor, and coun- 
cillors, before the president of the senate, in the presence 
of the two houses of assembly ; and by the senators and 
representatives first elected under this constitution, before 
the president and five of the council of the former consti- 
tution; and forever afterwards before the governor and 
council for the time being ; and by the residue of the offi- 
cers aforesaid, before such persons, and in such manner, 
as from time to time shall be prescribed by the legislature. 

A&T. II. No governor, lieutenant-governor, or judge 
of the supreme judicial court, shall hold any other office 
or place, under the authority of this Commonwealth, ex- 
cept such as by this constitution they are admitted to hold, 
saving that the judges of the said court may hold the offices 
of justices of the peace through the state ; nor shall they 
bold any other place or office, or receive any pension or 
salary from any other state, or government, or power, 
whatever. 

No person shall be capable of holding or exercising at 
the same time, within this State, more than one of the fol- 
.lowing offices, viz. : judge of probate, sheriff, register of 



76 ConstittUion of MaasachtisettB. 

probate, or register of deeds ; and never more than any 
two offices, which are to be held by appointment of the 
governor, or the governor and council, or the senate, or 
the house of representatives, or by the election of the 
people of the State at large, or of the people of any county, 
military offices, and the offices of justices of the peace 
excepted, shall be held by one person. 

No person holding the office of judge of the supreme 
judicial court, secretary, attorney-general, solicitor-gen- 
eral, treasurer or receiver-general, judge of probate, com- 
missary-general, president, professor or instructor of Har- 
vard College, sheriff, clerk of the house of representatives, 
register of probate, register of deeds, clerk of the supreme 
judicial court, clerk of the inferior court of common 
pleas, or officer of the customs, — including, in this de- 
scription, naval officers, — shall at the same time have a 
seat in the senate or house of representatives ; but their 
being chosen or appointed to, and accepting the same, 
shall operate as a resignation of their seat in the senate or 
house of representatives ; and the place so vacated shall 
be filled up. [See Amendments, Article VIII.] 

And the same rule shall take place in case any judge of 
the said supreme judicial court, or judge of probate, shall 
accept a seat in council ; or any councillor shall accept of 
either of those offices or places. 

And no person shall ever be admitted to hold a seat in 
the legislature, or any office of trust or importance under 
the government of this Commonwealth, who shall, in the 
due course of law, have been convicted of bribery or cor- 
ruption, in obtaining an election or appointment. 

Abt. III. In all cases, where sums of money are men- 
tioned in this constitution, the value thereof shall be com- 
puted in silver, at six shillings and eight pence per ounce ; 
and it shall be in the power of the legislature, from time to 
Ume, to increase such qualifications, as to property, of the 



.jm 



Constitution of Massdchvsetts. 77 

persons to be elected to offices, as the circumstances of the 
Commonwealth shall require. 

Art. IV. All commissions shall be in the name of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, signed by the governor, 
and attested by the secretary or his deputy, and have the 
great seal of the Commonwealth affixed thereto. 

Art. V. AH writs, issuing out of the clerk's office in 
any of the courts of law, shall be in the name of the Com- 
monwealth of Massachusetts ; they shall be under the seal 
of the court from whence they issue ; they shall bear test 
of the first justice of the court to which they shall be re- 
turnable, who is not a party, and be signed by the clerk of 
such court. 

Art. VI. All the laws, which have heretofore been 
adopted, used, and approved in the Province, Colony, or 
State of Massachusetts Bay, and usually practised on in 
the courts of law, shall still remain and be in full force, 
until altered or repealed by the legislature ; such parts only 
excepted as are repugnant to the rights and liberties con- 
tained in this constitution. 

Art. YII. The privilege and benefit of the writ of 
habeas corpus shall be enjoyed in this Commonwealth in 
the most free, easy, cheap, expeditious, and ample man- 
ner ; and shall not be suspended by the legislature, except 
upon the most urgent and pressing occasions, and for a 
limited time, not exceeding twelve months. 

Art. YIII. The enacting style, in making and passing 
all acts, statutes, and laws, shall be, **Be it enacted by 
the Senate and House of Representatives, in General Court 
assembled, and by the authority of the same." 

Art. IX. To the end there may be no failure of justice^ 
or danger arise to the Commonwealth, from a change of 



78 Constitution of Massachvsetts. 

the form of government, all officers, civil and military, 
holding commissions under the government and people of 
Massachusetts Bay, in New England, and all other officers - 
of the said government and people, at the time this consti- 
tution shall take effect, shall have, hold, use, exercise, 
and eivjoj all the powers and authority to them granted or 
committed, until other persons shall be appointed in their 
stead; and all courts of law shall proceed in the execution 
of the business of their respective departments ; and all 
the executive and legislative officers, bodies, and powers 
shall continue in full force, in the ei^joyment and exercise 
of all their trusts, employments and authority ; until the 
general court and the supreme and executive officers under 
this constitution, are designated and invested with their 
respective trusts, powers, and authority. 

Abt. X. In order the more effectually to adhere to the 
principles of the constitution, and to correct those viola- 
tions which by any means may be made therein, as well as 
to form such alterations as from experience shall be found 
necessary, the general court, which shall be in the year of 
our Lord one thousand seven hundred and ninety-five, 
shall issue precepts to the selectmen of the several towns, 
and to the assessors of the unincorporated plantations, 
directing them to convene the qualified voters of their 
respective towns and plantations, for the purpose of col* 
lecting their sentiments on the necessity or expediency of 
revising the constitution, in order to amendments. 

And if it shall appear, by the returns made, that two 
thirds of the qualified voters throughout the State, who 
shall assemble and vote in consequence of the said pre- 
cepts, are in favor of such revision or amendment, the gen- 
eral court shall issue precepts, or direct them to be issued 
from the secretary's office, to the several towns, to elect 
delegates to meet in convention for the purpose aforesaid. 

The said delegates to be chosen in the same manner aad 



ConstittjUion of Massachusetts. 79 

proportion as their representatives in the second branch 
of the legislature are by this constitution to be chosen. 

Abt. XI. This form of government shall be enrolled on 
parchment, and deposited in the secretary's office, and be 
a part of the lavrs of the land; and printed copies thereof 
shall be prefixed to the book containing the laws of this 
Commonwealth, in all future editions of the said laws. 



ARTICLES OF AMENDMENT. 

Abticle I. If any bill or resolve shall be objected to, 
and not approved by the governor, and if the general court 
shall adjourn within five days after the same shall have 
been laid before the governor for his approbation, and 
thereby prevent his returning it, with his objections, as 
provided by the constitution, such bill or resolve shall not 
become a law, nor have force as such. 

Art. II. The general court shall have full power and 
authority to erect and constitute municipal or city govern- 
ments, in any corporate town or towns in this Common- 
wealth, and to grant to the inhabitants thereof such powers, 
privileges, and immunities not repugnant to the constitu- 
tion, as the general court shall deem necessary or expe- 
dient for the regulation and government thereof, and to 
prescribe the manner of calling and holding public meet- 
ings of the inhabitants in wards or otherwise, for the elec- 
tion of officers under the constitution, and the manner of 
returning the votes given at such meetings : provided, that 
no such government shall be erected or constituted in any 
town not containing twelve thousand inhabitants; nor 
unless it be with the consent, and on the application, of a 
majority of the inhabitants of such town, present and vot- 
ing thereon, pursuant to a vote at a meeting duly warned 



'1 



80 Constitution of Maaaachuaetts. 

and holden for that purpose : and provided, also, that all 
by-lawfl, made by such municipal or city government, shall 
be subject, at all times, to be annulled by the general court. 

AaT. III. Every male citizen of twenty-one years of 
age and upwards (excepting paupers and persons under 
guardianship), who shall have resided within the Common- 
wealth one year, and within the town or district, in which 
he may claim a right to vote, six calendar months next 
preceding any election of governor, lieutenant-governor, 
senators, or representatives, and who shall have paid, by 
himself or his parent, master, or guardian, any state or 
county tax, which shall, within two years next preceding 
such election, have been assessed upon him, in any towa 
or district of this Commonwealth ; and also every citizen 
who shall be by law exempted from taxation, and who shall 
be in all other respects qualified as above mentioned, shall 
have a right to vote in such election of governor, lieuten- 
ant-governor, senators, and representatives ; and no other 
person shall be entitled to vote in such elections. 

Art. ly. Notaries public shall be appointed by the 
governor in the same manner as judicial officers are ap- 
pointed, and shall hold their offices during seven years, un- 
less sooner removed by the governor, with the consent of the 
council, upon the address of both houses of the legislature. 

In case the office of secretary or treasurer of the Com- 
monwealth shall become vacant from any cause, during 
the recess of the general court, the governor, with the ad- 
vice and consent of the council, shall nominate and ap- 
point, under such regulations as may be prescribed by law, 
a competent and suitable person, to such vacant office, who 
shall hold the same until a successor shall be appointed by 
the general court. [See Amendments, Article XVII.] 

Whenever the exigencies of the Commonwealth shall 
require the appointment of a commissary-general, he shall 



Constitution of Massaehusetts. 81 

be nominated, appointed, and commissioned in such man- 
ner as the legislature may, by law, prescribe. 

All officers commissioned to command in the militia may 
be removed from office in such manner as the legislature 
may, by law, prescribe. 

Abt. y. In the elections of captains and subalterns of 
the militia, all the members of their respective comp\.ji8s, 
as well those under, as those above the age of twenty-Oi e 
years, shall have a right to vote. 

Abt. VI. Instead of the oath of allegiance prescribed 
by the constitution, the following oath shall be taken and 
subscribed by every person chosen or appointed to any 
office, civil or military, under the government of this Com- 
monwealth, before he shall enter on the duties of his office, 
to wit : — 

** I, A. B., do solemnly swear, that I will bear true faith 
and allegiance to the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
and will support the constitution thereof. So help me, 
God." 

Provided, That when any person shall be of the denom- 
ination called Quakers, and shall decline taking said oath, 
he shall make his affirmation in the foregoing form, omit- 
ting the wqrd ^* swear," and inserting, instead thereof, the 
word ** affirm," and omitting the words '^ So help me, 
God," and subjoining, instead thereof, the words ** This I 
do under the pains and penalties of perjury." 

Art. VII. No oath, declaration, or subscription, ex- 
cepting the oath prescribed in the preceding article, and the 
oath of office, shall be required of the governor, lieutenant- 
governor, councillors, senators, or representatives, to 
qualify them to perform the dtlties of their respective offices. 

Art. YIII. No judge of any court of this Common- 
wealth (except the court of sessions), and no person hold- 

6 



82 Constitution of Massachusetts. 

ing any office under the authority of the United States 
(postmasters excepted), shall, at the same time, hold the 
office of gdyernor, lieutenant-gorernor, or councillor, or 
have a seat in the senate or house of representatires of 
this Commonwealth ; and no judge of any court in this 
Commonwealth (except the court of sessions), nor the at- 
torney-general, solicitor-general, county-attorney, clerk 
of any court, sheriff, treasurer and receiver-general, regis- 
ter of probate, nor register of deeds, shall continue to hold 
his said office after being elected a member of the Congress 
of the United States, and accepting that trust ; but the ac- 
ceptance of such trust, by any of the officers aforesaid, shall 
be deemed and taken to be a resignation of his said office ; 
and judges of the courts of common pleas shall hold no 
other office under the government of this Commonwealth, 
the office of justice of the peace and militia offices excepted. ) 

Art. IX. If, in any time hereafter, any specific and par- 
ticular amendment or amendments to the constitution be ' 
proposed in the general court, and agreed to by a majority 
of the senators and two thirds of the members of the house 
of representatives present and voting thereon, such pro- 
posed amendment or amendments shall be entered on the 
journals of the two houses, with the yeas and nays taken 
thereon, and referred to the general court then next to be 
chosen, and shall be published ; and if in the general court 
next chosen, as aforesaid, such proposed amendment or 
amendments shall be agreed to by a majority of the sena- 
tors and two thirds of the members of the house of repre- 
sentatives present and voting thereon, then it shall be the 
duty of the general court to submit such proposed amend- 
ment or amendments to the people ; and if they shall be 
approved and ratified by a majority of the qualified voters, 
voting thereon, at meetings legally warned and holden for 
that purpose, they shall become part of the constitution of 
this Commonwealth. 



ConBtitution of Massachusetts. 83 

Art. X. The political year shall begin on the first 
Wednesday of January, instead of the last Wednesday of 
May; and the general court shall assemble every year on 
the said first Wednesday of January, and shall proceed, at 
that session, to make all the elections, and to do all the 
other acts, which are by the constitution required to be 
made and done at the session, which has heretofore com- 
menced on the last Wednesday of May. And the general 
court shall be dissolved on the day next preceding the first 
Wednesday of January, without any proclamation or other 
act of the governor. But nothing herein contained shall 
prevent the general court from assembling at such other 
times as they shall judge necessary, or when called to- 
gether by the governor. The governor, lieutenant-gov^ 
ernor, and councillors shall also hold their respective ofiices 
for one year next following the first Wednesday of January, 
and until others are chosen and qualified in their stead. 

The meeting for the choice of governor, lieutenant-gov- 
ernor, senators, and representatives, shall be held on the 
second Monday of November in every year ; but meetings 
may be ac|journed, if necessary, for the choice of represen- 
tatives, to the next day, and again to the next succeeding 
day, but no further. But in case a second meeting shall 
be necessary for the choice of representatives, such meet- 
ings shall be held on the fourth Monday of the same lAonth 
of November. [See Amendments, Article XV.] 

All the other provisions of the constitution, respecting 
the elections and proceedings of the members of the gen- 
eral court, or of any other officers or persons whatever, 
that have reference to the last Wednesday of May as the 
commencement of the political year, shall be so far altered 
as to have like reference to the first Wednesday of January. 

This article shall go into operation on the first day of 
October, next following the day when the same shall be 
duly ratified and adopted as an amendment of the constitu- 
tion ; and the governor, lieutenant-governor, councillors, 



84 OonstituUion of MassachuseUs. 

senators, representatives, and all other state officers, who 
are annually chosen, and who shall be chosen for the cur- 
rent year, when the same shall go into operation, shall 
hold their respective offices until the first Wednesday of 
January then next following, and until others are chosen 
and qualified in their stead, and no longer ; and the first 
election of the governor, lieutenant-governor, senators, 
and representatives, to be had in virtue of this article, shall 
be had conformably thereunto, in the month of November 
following the day on which the same shall be in force and 
go into operation, pursuant to the foregoing provision. 

All the provisions of the existing constitution, inconsist- 
ent with the provisions herein contained, are hereby wholly 
annulled. 

Art. XI. Instead of the third article of the bill of 
rights, the following modification and amendment thereof 
is substituted : — 

As the public worship of God, and instructions in piety, 
religion, and morality, promote the happiness and prosperity 
of a people, and the security of a republican government ; 
therefore, the several religious societies of this Common- 
wealth, whether corporate or unincorporate, at any meeting 
legally warned and holden for that purpose, shall ever have 
the right to elect their pastors or religious teachers, to con- 
tract with them for their support, to raise money for erect- 
ing and repairing houses for public worship, for the main- 
tenance of religious instruction, and for the payment of 
necessary expenses : and all persons belonging to any reli- 
gious society shall be taken and held to be members, until 
they shall file with the clerk of said society a written notice 
declaring the dissolution of their membership, and thence- 
forth shall not be liable for any grant or contract which may 
be thereafter made or entered into by such society : and all 
religious sects and denominations, demeaning themselves 
peaceably, and as good citizens of the Commonwealth, shall 



ConstittUion of Masaachtcsetts. 85 

be equally under the protection of the law ; and no subor- 
dination of any one sect or denomination to another shall 
ever be established by law. 

Abt. XII. In order to provide for a representation of the 
citizens of this Commonwealth, founded upon the principles 
of equality, a census of the ratable polls in each city, town 
and district of the Commonwealth, on the first day of May, 
shall be taken and returned into the secretary's office, in 
such manner as the legislature shall provide, within the 
month of May, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight 
hundred and thirty-seven, and in every tenth year there- 
after, in the month of May, in manner aforesaid: and each 
town or city having three hundred ratable polls at the last 
preceding decennial census of polls, may elect one* repre- 
sentative, and for every four hundred and fifty ratable 
polls, in addition to the first three hundred, one represen- 
tative more. [See Amendments, Article XIII.] 

Any town having less than three hundred ratable polls 
shall be represented thus : The whole number of ratable 
polls at the last preceding decennial census of polls, shall 
be multiplied by ten, and the product divided by three him- 
dred; and such town may elect one representative as 
many years within ten years, as three hundred is con- 
tained in the product aforesaid. [See Amendments, Article 

xin.] 

Any city or town, having ratable polls enough to elect 
one or more representatives, with any number of polls be- 
yond the necessary number, may be represented, as to that 
surplus number, by multiplying such surplus number by 
ten, and dividing the product by four hundred and fifty ; 
and such city or town may elect one additional representa- 
tive as many years, within the ten years, as four hundred 
and fifty is contained in tlie product aforesaid. [See 
Amendments, Article XIII.] 



86 Constitution ofMasaachimetts. 

Any two or more of the sereral towns and districts m^, 
by consent of a majority of the legal voters present at a le- 
gal meeting in each of said towns and districts, respective*- 
ly, called for that purpose, and held previous to the first day 
of July, in the year in which the decennial census of polls 
shall be taken, form themselves into a representative dis- 
trict, to continue until the next decennial census of polls, 
for the election of a representative or representatives ; and 
such district shall have all the rights, in regard to repre- 
sentation, which would belong to a town containing the same 
number of ratable polls. [See Amendments, Article XIII.] 

The governor and council shall ascertain and determine, 
within the months of July and August, in the year of our 
Lord one thousand eight hundred and thirty-seven, accord- 
ing to the foregoing principles, the number of representa- 
tives which each city, town and representative district is 
entitled to elect, and the number of years, within the period 
of ten years then next ensuing, that each city, town and rep- 
resentative district, may elect an additional representative ; 
and where any town has not a sufficient number of polls to^ 
elect a representative each year, then, how many years with- 
in the ten years, such town may elect a representative : 
and the same shall be done once in ten years thereafter, by 
the governor and council, and the number of ratable polls 
in each decennial census of polls, shall determine the num- 
ber of representatives which each city, town and represen- 
tative district may elect as aforesaid ; and when the num- 
ber of representatives to be elected by each city, town or 
representative district is ascertained and determined as 
aforesaid, the governor shall cause the same to be pub- 
lished forthwith for the information of the people, and that 
number shall remain fixed and unalterable for the period 
of ten years. [See Amendments, Article XIII.] 

All the provisions of the existing constitution inconsistent 
with the provisions herein contained, are hereby wholly 
annulled. 



ConstitiUion of Massachusetts. 87 

Abt. XIII. A census of the inhabitants of each city and 
town, on the first day of May, shall be taken and returned 
into the secretary's office, on or before the last day of June, 
of the year one thousand eight hundred and forty, and of 
every tenth year thereafter ; which census shall determine 
the apportionment of senators and representatives for the 
term of ten years. 

The several senatorial districts now existing shall be per- 
manent. The senate shall consist of forty members ; and in 
the year one thousand eight hundred and forty, and every 
tenth year thereafter, the governor and council shall assign 
the number of senators to be chosen in each district, accord- 
ing to the number of inhabitants in the same. But, in all 
cases, at least one senator shall be assigned to each district. 

The members of the house of representatives shall be 
apportioned in the following manner : Every town or city 
containing twelve hundred inhabitants, may elect one rep- 
resentative; and two thousand four hundred inhabitants 
shall be the mean increasing number, which shall entitle 
it to an additional representative. 

Every town containing less than twelve hundred inhab- 
itants shall be entitled to elect a representative as many 
times within ten years, as the number one hundred and 
sixty is contained in the number of the inhabitants of said 
town. Such towns may also elect one representative for 
the year in which the valuation of estates within the Com- 
monwealth shall be settled. 

Any two or more of the several towns may, by consent 
of a majority of the legal voters present at a legal meeting, 
in each of said towns, respectively, called for that purpose, 
and held before the first day of August, in the year one 
thousand eight hundred and forty, and every tenth year 
thereafter, form themselves into a representative district, to 
continue for the term of ten years ; and such district shall 
have all the rights in regard to representation, which would 
belong to a town containing the same number of inhabitants. 



88 Constitution of MasBo^huBeUs. 

The number of inhabitants which shall entitle a town to 
elect one representative, and the mean increasing number, 
which shall entitle a town or city to elect more than one, and 
also the number by which the population of towns, not en- 
titled to a representative every year, is to be divided, shall 
be increased, respectively, by one tenth of the numbers 
above mentioned, whenever the population of the Common- 
wealth shall have increased to seven hundred and seven- 
ty thousand, and for every additional increase of seventy 
thousand inhabitants, the same addition of one tenth shall be 
made, respectively, to the said number^ above mentioned. 

In the year of each decennial census, the governor and 
council shall, before the first day of September, apportion 
the number of representatives which each city, town and 
representative district is entitled to elect, and ascertain how 
many years, within ten years, any town may elect a repre- 
sentative, which is not entitled to elect one every year ; and 
the governor shall cause the same to be published forthwith. 

Nine councillors shall be annually chosen from among 
the people at large, on the first Wednesday of January, or 
as soon thereafter as may be, by the joint ballot of the sena- 
tors and representatives, assembled in one room, who shall, 
as soon as may be, in a like manner, fill up any vacancies 
that may happen in the council, by death, resignation or 
otherwise. No person shall be elected a councillor who 
has not been an inhabitant of this Commonwealth for the 
term of five years immediately preceding his election ; and 
not more than one councillor shall be chosen from any one 
senatorial district in the Commonwealth. [See Amend- 
ments, Article XVI.] 

No possession of a freehold, or of any other estate, shall 
be required as a qualification for holding a seat in either 
branch of the general court, or in the executive council. 

Abt. XIV. In all elections of civil officers by the people 
of this Commonwealth, whose election is provided for by tha 



Constitution of Massachtiaetts. 89 

constitution, the person having the highest number of Totes 
shall be deemed and declared to be elected. 

Abt. XY. The meeting for the choice of goyernor, lieu- 
tenant-governor, senators and representatives, shall be 
held on the Tuesday next after the first Monday in 
November, annually; but in case of a failure to elect 
representatives on that day, a second meeting shall be 
holden, for that purpose, on the fourth Monday of the 
same month of November. 

Art. XVI. Eight councillors shall be annually chosen 
by the inhabitants of this Commonwealth, qualified to vote 
for governor. The election of councillors shall be deter- 
mined by the same rule that is required in the election of 
governor. The legislature, at its first session after this 
amendment shall have been adopted, and at its first session 
after the next State census shall have been taken, and at its 
first session after each decennial State census thereafter- 
wards, shall divide the Commonwealth into eight districts 
of contiguous territory, each containing a number of in- 
habitants as nearly equal as practicable, without dividing 
any town, or ward of a city, and each entitled to elect one 
councillor: provided, however, that if, at any time, the 
constitution shall provide for the division of the Common- 
wealth into forty senatorial districts, then the legislature 
shall so arrange the councillor districts, that each district 
shall consist of five contiguous senatorial districts, as they 
shall be, from time to time, established by the legislature. 
No person shall be eligible to the office of councillor who 
has not been an inhabitant of the Commonwealth for the 
term of five years immediately preceding his election. The 
day and manner of the election, the return of the votes, 
and the declaration of the said elections, shall be the same 
as are required in the election of governor. Whenever there 
shall be a failure to elect the full number of councillors, 
the vacancies shall be filled in the same manner as required 
for filling vacancies in the senate ; and vacancies occasioned 



90 Constitution of Mass€u:hu8etts. 

by death, removal from the State, or otlierwise, shall be 
filled in like manner as soon as may be after such racancies 
shall have happened. And that there may be no delay in 
the organization of the government on the first Wednesday 
of January, the governor, with at least five councillors for 
the time being, shall, as soon as may be, examine the re- 
turned copies of the records for the election of governor, 
lieutenant-governor, and councillors ; and ten days before 
the said first Wednesday in January, he shall issue his 
summons to such persons as appear to be chosen, to attend 
on that day to be qualified accordingly ; and the secretary 
shall lay the returns before the senate and house of repre- 
sentatives on the said first Wednesday in January, to be 
by them examined ; and in case of the election of either 
of said officers, the choice shall be by them declared and 
published ; but in case there shall be no election of either 
of said officers, the legislature shall proceed to fill such 
vacancies in the manner provided in the constitution for 
the choice of such officers. 

Art. XVII. • The secretary, treasurer and receiver- 
general, auditor, and attorney-general, shall be chosen 
annually, on the day in November prescribed for the choice 
of governor ; and each person then chosen as such, duly 
qualified in other respects, shall hold his office for the 
term of one year from the third Wednesday in January 
next thereafter, and until another is chosen and qualified 
in his stead. The qualification of the voters, the manner 
of the election, the return of the yjotes, and the declaration 
of the election, shall be such as are required in the election 
of governor. In case of a failure to elect either of said 
officers on the day in November aforesaid, or in case of 
the decease, in the mean time, of the person elected as 
such, such officer shall be chosen on or before the third 
Wednesday in January next thereafter, from the two per- 
sons who had the highest number of votes for said offices 
on the day in November aforesaid, by joint ballot of the 



Comtitution of Massachusetts. .91 

«eDators and representatives, in one room ; and in case the 
office of secretary, or treasurer and receiver-general, or 
auditor, or attorney-general, shall become vacant, from 
any cause, during an annual or special session of the gen- 
eral court, such vacancy shall in like manner be filled by 
choice from the people at large ; but if such vacancy shall 
occur at any other time, it shall be supplied by the gov- 
ernor by appointment, with the advice and consent of the 
council. The person so chosen or appointed, duly qualified 
in other respects, shall hold his office until his successor is 
chosen and duly qualified in his stead. In case any person 
chosen or appointed to either of the offices aforesaid, shall 
neglect, for the space of ten days after he could otherwise 
enter upon his duties, to qualify himself in all respects to 
enter upon the discharge of such duties, the office to which 
he has been elected or appointed shall be deemed vacant. 
No person shall be eligible to either of said offices unless 
he shall have been an inhabitant of this Commonwealth 
five years next preceding his election or appointment. 

Art. XVIII. All moneys raised by taxation in the 
towns and cities for the support of public schools, and all 
moneys which may be appropriated by the State for the 
support of common schools, shall be applied to, and ex- 
pended in, no other schools than those which are conducted 
according to law, under the order and superintendence of 
the authorities of the town or city in which the money is 
to be expended ; and such moneys shall never be appro- 
priated to any religious sect for the maintenance, exclu- 
sively, of its own schools. 

Abt. XIX. The legislature shall prescribe, by general 
law, for the election of sheriffs, registers of probate, com- 
missioners of insolvency, and clerks of the courts, by the 
people of the several counties, and that district- attorneys 
shall be chosen by the people of the several districts, for 
fuch.term of office as the legislature shall prescribe. 



92 Camtitytian of Massachusetts. 

Aki. XX. No person shall have the right to vote, or 
be eligible to office under the constitution of this Common- 
wealth, who shall not be able to read the constitution in the 
English language, and write his name : provided, however^ 
that the provisions of this amendment shall not apply to 
any person prevented by a physical disability from com- 
plying witli its requisitions, nor to any person who now has 
the right to vote, nor to any person who shall be sixty 
years of age or upwards at the time this amendment shall 
take effect. 

Art. XXI. A census of the legal voters of each city 
and town, on the first day of May, shall be taken and re- 
turned into the office of the secretary of the Common- 
wealth, on or before the last day of June, in the year one 
thousand eight hundred and fifty-seven ; and a census of 
the inhabitants of each city and town, in the year one thou- 
sand eight hundred and sixty-five, and of every tenth year 
thereafter. In the census aforesaid, a special enumeration 
shall be made of the legal voters, and in each city said 
enumeration shall specify the number of such legal voters 
aforesaid residing in each ward of such city. The enu- 
meration aforesaid shall determine the apportionment of 
representatives for the periods between the taking of the 
census. 

The house of representatives shall consist of two hun- 
dred and forty members, which shall be apportioned 
by the legislature, at its first session after the return 
of each enumeration as aforesaid, to the several counties 
of the Commonwealth, equally, as near as may be, ac- 
cording to their relative number of legal voters, as as- 
certained by the nexj; preceding special enumeration ; and 
the town of Cohasset, in the county of ^Norfolk, shall, 
for this purpose, as well in the formation of districts, 
as hereinafter provided, be considered a part of the 
county of Plymouth; and it shall be the duty of the 



CanstitiUion of Massachusetts. 93 

■ecretary of the Commonwealth, to certify, as soon as may 
be after it is determined by the legislature, the number of 
representatives to which each county shall be entitled, to the 
board authorized to divide each county into representative 
districts. The mayor and aldermen of the city of Boston, 
the county commissioners of other counties than Suffolk, — * 
or in lieu of the mayor and aldermen of the city of Boston, 
or of the county commissioners in each county other than 
Suffolk, such board of special commissioners in each county 
to be elected by the people of the county, or of the towns 
therein, as may for that purpose be pr-ovided by law, shall, 
on the fitst Tuesday of August next after each assignment 
of representatives to each county, assemble at a shire town 
of their respective counties, and proceed, as soon as may be, 
to divide the same into representative districts of contiguous 
territory, so as to apportion the representation assigned to 
each county equally, as nearly as may be, according to the 
relative number of legal voters in the several districts of 
each county ; and such districts shall be so formed that no 
town or ward of a city shall be divided therefor, nor shall 
any district be made which shall be entitled to elect more 
than three representatives. Every representative, for one 
year ai least next preceding his election, shall have been an 
inhabitant of the district for which he is chosen, and shall 
cease to represent such district when he shall cease to be an 
inhabitant of the Commonwealth. The districts in each 
county shall be numbered by the board creating the same, 
and a description of each, with the numbers thereof, and 
the number of legal voters therein, shall be returned by the 
board, to the secretary of the Commonwealth, the county 
treasurer of each county, and to the clerk of every town in 
each district, to be filed and kept in their respective offices. 
The manner of calling and conducting the meetings for the 
choice of representatives, and of ascertaining their elec- 
tion, shall be prescribed by law. Not less than one hun- 
dred members of the house of representatives shall con* 



94 Constitution of Massaahu^etU. 

m 

stitute a quorum for doing business; but a less number 
may organize temporarily, ai^oum from day to day, and 
compel the attendance of absent members. 

Art. XXII. A census of the legal voters of each city 
and town, on the first day of May, shall be taken and re- 
turned into the office of the secretary of the Common- 
wealth, on or before the last day of June, in the year one 
thousand eight hundred and fifty-seven ; and a census of 
the Inhabitants of each city and town, in the year one 
thousand eight hundred and sixty-five, and of every tenth 
year thereafter. In the census aforesaid, a special enu- 
meration shall be made of the legal voters, and in each 
city said enumeration shall specify the number of such 
legal voters aforesaid, residing in each ward of such city^ 
•The enumeration aforesaid shall determine the apportion- 
ment of senators for the periods between the taking of the 
census. The senate shall consist of forty members. The 
general court shall, at its first session after each next 
preceding special enumeration, divide the Commonwealth 
intp forty districts of adjacent territory, each district to 
contain, as nearly as may be, an equal number of legal 
voters, according to the enumeration aforesaid : prdvidedf 
however, that no town or ward of a city shall be divided 
therefor ; and such districts shall be formed, as nearly aa 
may be, without uniting two counties, or parts of two or 
more counties, into one district. Each district shall elect 
one senator, who shall have been an inhabitant of this 
Commonwealth five years at least immediately preceding 
his election, and at the time of his. election shall be an in- 
habitant of the district for which he is chosen ; and he shall 
cease to represent such senatorial district when he shall 
cease to be an inhabitant of the Commonwealth. Not less 
than sixteen senators shall constitute a quorum for doing 
business; but a less number may organize temporarily,' 
adjourn from day to day, and compel the attendance of 
absent members. 



Constitution of Massachvsetts. dS 

Art. XXIII. No person of foreign birth shall bo enti- 
tled to vote, or shall be eligible to office, unless he shall have 
resided within the jurisdiction of the United States for two 
years subsequent to his naturalization, and shall be other- 
wise qualified, according to the constitution and laws of this 
Commonwealth : provided, that this amendment shall not 
affect the rights which any person of foreign birth possessed 
at the time of the adoption thereof: and provided, further, 
that it shall not affect the rights of any child of a citizen of 
the United States, born during the temporary absence of the 
parent therefrom. [See Amendments, Article XXVI.] 

Art. XXIV. Any vacancy in the senate shall be filled 
by election by the people of the unrepresented district, 
upon the order of a majority of senators elected. 

Art. XXV. In case of a vacancy in the council, from a 
failure of election, or other cause, the senate and house of 
representatives shall, by concurrent vote, choose some eli- 
gible person from the people of the district wherein such 
vacancy occurs, to fill that office. If such vacancy shall 
happen when the legislature is not in session, the governor, 
with the advice and consent of the council, may fill the 
same by appointment of some eligible person. 

Art. XXVI. The twenty- third article of the articles of 
amendment of the constitution of this Commonwealth, which 
is as follows, to wit : ** No person of foreign birth shall be 
entitled to vote, or shall be eligible to office, unless he shall 
have resided within the jurisdiction of the United States for 
two years subsequent to his naturalization, and shall be 
otherwise qualified, according to the constitution and laws 
of this Commonwealth : provided, that this amendment shall 
not affect the rights which any person of foreign birth pos- 
sessed at the time of the adoption thereof: &nd provided,, 
further, that it shall not affect the rights of any child of a 



96 Canatittition of MassachiLsetts. 

citizen of the United States, born daring the temporary 
absence of the parent therefrom/* Is hereby wholly annulled. 

[Note. —Soon after the Declaration of Independence, steps were 
taken in Massachusetts towards framing a Constitution, or Form of 
Government. Tlie Council and House of Representatives, or the 
General Court, of 1777-8, in accordance with a recommeudatiun of 
the General Court, of the previous year, met together as a Conven- 
tion, and adopted a form of Constitution ** for the State of Massa- 
chusetts Bay," which was submitted to the people, and by them re- 
jected. This attempt to form a Constitution having proved unsuc- 
cessful, the General Court on the 20th of February, 1779, passed a 
Hesolve calling upon the qualified voters to give in their votes upon 
the questions • Whether they chose to have a new Constitution or 
Form of Government made, and. Whether they will empower their 
representatives to vote for calling a State Convention for that pur- 
pose. A large mc^ority of the inhabitants having voted in the 
afSjrmative to both these questions, the General Court, on the 17th 
of June, 1779, passed a Besolve calling upon the inhabitants to meet 
and choose delegates to a Constitutional Convention, to be held at 
Cambridge, on the 1st of September, 1779. The Convention met at 
the time and place appointed, and organized by choosing James 
Bowdoin, President, and Samuel Barrett, Secretary. On the 11th 
of November the Convention adjourned, to meet at the Bepresentar 
tives' Chamber, in Boston, January 6th, 1780. On the 2d of March, 
of the same year, a form of Constitution having been agreed upon, 
a Besolve was passed by which the same was submitted to the peo- 
ple, and the Convention adjourned to meet at the Brattle Street 
Church, in Boston, June the 7th. At that time and place, the Con- 
vention again met and appointed a Committee to examine the re- 
turns of votes from tlie several towns. On the 14th of June the 
Committee reported, and on the 15th, the Convention resolved, 
**That the people of the State of Massachusetts Bay have accepted 
the Constitution as it stands, in the printed form submitted to their 
revision.'' ABesolve providing for carrying the new Constitution 
into effect, was passed, and the Convention then on the 16th of June, 
1780, was finally dissolved. In accordance with the Resolves referred 
to, elections immediately took place in the several towns, and the 
first General Court of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
met at the State House, in Boston, on Wednesday, October 25th, 
1780. 

The Constitution contained a provision providing for taking, in 
1795, the sense of the people as to the expediency or necessity of 
revising the original instrument. But no such revision was deemed 



Constitution of Massaehtisetta. 97 

neoessaiy st thi^t time. On the 10th of June, 1820» an Aet was passed 
by the General Court, oalling upon the people to meet In their ser- 
eral towns, and give in their votes upon the qoestion, ** Is it expedi- 
ent that Delegates should be chosen to meet in Convention for the 
purpose of revising or altering the Constitution of Government of 
this Commonwealth ? '^ A large minority of the people of the State 
having voted in favor of revision, the Governor issued a proclama- 
tion announcing the fact, and calling upon the people to vote, in ao- 
eordanoe with the provisions of the aforesaid Act, for delegates to 
the proposed Convention. The delegates met at the State Hoiise, 
In Boston, November 15, 1820, and organized by choosing John Ad- 
ams, President, and BenO^niin Pollard, Secretary, Mr. Adams, 
however, declined the appointment, and Isaac Parker was chosen 
In his stead. On the 0th of January, 1821, the Convention agreed 
to fourteen Articles of Amendment, and after passing a Resolve 
providing for submitting the same to the people, and appointing a 
Committee to meet to count the votes upon the sulject, was dis- 
solved. The people voted on Monday, April 19, 1821, and the Com- 
mittee of the Convention met at the State House, to count the votes, 
on Wednesday, May 24th, They made their return to the G^eral 
Court, and at the request of the latter, the Governor issued his 
proclamation on the 6th of June, 1821, announcing that nine of the 
fourteen Articles of Amendments had been adopted. These articles 
are numbered in the preceding pages from ofia to nine^ inclusive. 

The tenih Article of Amendment was adopted by the General 
Court during the sessions of the political years, 1829-30, and 1830-31, 
and was approved and ratified by the people. May 11th, 1831. 

The deventh Article of Amendment was adopted by the General 
Court during the sessions of the political years 1882 and 1833, and 
was approved and ratified by the people, November 11th, 1833. 

The twelfth Article of Amendment was adopted by the General 
Court during the sessions of the years 1885 and 1830, and was ap- 
proved and ratified by the people, November Hth, 1830. 

The tkhrteeidk Article of Amendment was adopted by the G^eral 
Court during the sessions of the years 1839 and 1840, and was ap- 
proved and ratified by the people, April 0th, 1810. 

The General Court of the year 1851 passed ui Aet ealling a third 
Convention to revise the Constitution. The Aet was submitted to 
the people, and a nuOority voted against the proposed Convention. 
In 1852, on the 7th of May, another Act was passed ealling upon 
the people to vote upon the question of calling a Constitutional Con- 
vention. A majority of the people having voted in fkvor of the 
proposed Convention, election for delegates thereto took plaoe in 
Kaiefa, 1868. The Convention met in the State House, In Boston, on 



98 Ciymtitvition qf Mas8aehu$M9. 

the 4th day of Hay, 1863, and organised by ehooBtaig Nathaniel P. 
Banks, Jr., I^resident, and William 8. Boblnson and jamea T. Bob- 
Inson, Seeretaiiea. On the Hit of Augiut, this Convantion agreed 
toaformofConBtitation, and on the same day waa dUsolTed, after 
haying provided for submitting the same to the people, and i^ 
pointed a Committee to meet to oonntthe rotes, and to make a re- 
turn thereof to the General Court. The Committee met at the time 
and place agreed upon, and found that the proposed Constitution 
had been rejected. 

The f ourieeaih J J^fiemiih, iixteenihf 9Wenieenih, elffMeenih, and 
nineteenth Articles of Amendment were adopted by the General 
Court during the sessions of 1864 and 1865, and were approved and 
ratified by the people, Hay 23, 1866. 

IhettpenHethftweniy'ftrstitaidtufeniif-^eoond Articles of Amend- 
ment were adopted by the G^eral Court of 1866 and 1867, and were 
approved and ratified by the people, May 1st, 1867. 

The twenty-third Article of Amendment was adopted by the Gen- 
eral Court of 1858 and 1859, and was approved and ratified by the 
people, Hay 0th, 18^9. 

The tfoerUy-fourth and twentu-fi/lh Articles of Amendment were 
adopted by the General Court of 1869 and 1860, and were improved 
and ratified by the people, Hay 17ih, 1860. 

The twentp-sixth Article of Amendment was adopted by the Gen- 
eral Court of 1862 and 1863, and was approved andrailfled, April 
«b,186S.i 



MeetioM for Senator 8 in Oongre%%. 99 



CSAFTSS €CXLT. 

km Acr to retgalftfee the Times end liuumr of bolding 
IMeotiom for Senators in Congress. 

Be a enacted by ike Senate and Bbuee tf RepreBenkh' 
twee qfihe United States ofAv^erica in Congress assemr 
bUd, That the legtslattnre cf each state ^hich shall be 
chosen next preoecfoig tbeexpiration of the time fbr whicSi 
any senator was elected to represent said State m Congress, 
shall, on the second Tnesdi^ after the meeting and organ* 
izatlon thereof, xMrooeed to elect a senator in Congress, in 
the place of snch senator so gomg out of office, in the fol- 
lowing manner : £adh house ehtf U opeifly, by a yiya roce 
YOte of each member pres^it, name one person for sen- 
ator in Congress .from saidetate, and the name of the per- 
son so voted for, who shall have amigori^ of the whole 
number of votes oast in each house, shall be entered on the 
journal of each house by the clerk or secretary thereof ; 
but if either house shall fail to 0ve such majori^ to any 
person on said di^, iSiat fiict ehall be entered on the jour- 
naL .At twelve o'clock, in0ridiBai,'on the day following 
that on which prooeedinge «re required to take place, as 
aforesaid, the members of the two houses shall convene in 
joint assembly, and the journal of each house shall then 
be read, and if the same person shall have received a ma- 
jority of all the votes in each house, such person shall be 
declared duly elected senator to represent said state in the 
Congress of the United States ; but if the same person 
shall not have received a majority of the votes in each 
house, or if either house shall have failed to take pro- 
ceedings as required by this act, the joint assembly sliall 
then proceed to choose, by a viva voce vote of each mem* 



■ .1 . ' ^ ^ : 



100 ElectxQM for Senators in Oongre9%. 

ber present, a person for the purpose aforesaid, and the 
person having a minority of all the votes of the said joint 
assembly, a majority of all the members elected to both 
houses being present and voting, shall be declared duly 
elected; and in case no person shall receive snch migority 
on the first day, the joint assembly shall meet at twelve 
o'clock, meridian, of each succeeding day during the ses- 
sion of the legislature, and take at least one vote, until a 
senator shall be elected. 

Sect. 2. Arid he ii fwrther efuteted^ That whenever, 
on the meeting of the legislature of any State, a vacancy 
shall exist in the representation of such State in the senate 
of the United States, said legislature shall -proceed, on the 
second Tuesday after the commencement and organization 
of its session, to elect a person to fill such vacancy, in the 
manner hereinbefore provided for the election of a senator 
for a full term ; and if a vacancy shall happen during the 
session of the legislature, then on the second Tuesday 
after the legislature shall have been organized, and shall 
have notice of such vacancy. 

Sbct. 8. And be it further enaetedt That it shall be 
the duty of the governor of the State from which any sen- 
ator shall have been chosen as aforesaid, to certify his 
election, under the seal of the State, to the president of 
the senate of the United States, which certificate shall be 
countersigned by the secretary of state of the State. Ap* 
proved July 2^, 1866. 






L. 



STATISTICS. 



HISTORICAL, STATE, COUNTY, DISTRICT, 
POST-OFFICE, Etc., Etc., Etc. 



151 

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136 Counties and Towns of Maaaachvsetts. 



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141 




•re's 

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142 



Cities in the Commonwealth. 



CITIES IN THE COMMONWEALTH, 

WITH THE DATE OF THEIB INCORPORATION. 



NAME. 

BoBton, ..... 
Balem, ..... 

LoweUy 

Cambridge, .... 
Kew Bedford, .... 
Woroeflter, . • . • . 

Lynn, 

Kewburyport, .... 
Springfield, .... 

Lawrenoe, 

Fall River, 

Chelsea, 

Taunton, 

Haverhill 

SomeryiUe, 

Fitchborg, . 

Holyoke, ..... 

Gloucester, ... . . 

Newton, 

Pittofield, 



Incorporated. 



Feb'y 

March 

April 

March 

March 

Feb'y 

April 

May 

April 

March 

April 

March 

May 

May 

April 

March 

April 

April 

June 

May 



23, 1822. 

23, 1836. 

1, 1836. 

17, 1846. 
0, 1847. 

2»« 18«8. 

0, 1849. 

24, 1851. 
12, 1852. 
21, 1853. 
12, 1854. 

18, 1857. 
11, 1864. 
10, 1860. 
14, 1871. 

8, 1872. 
17, 1878. 
28, 1878. 

2, 1878. 

1, 1875. 



MUeage Schedule. 



143 



MILEAGE SCHEDULE, 

ADOPTED BT THE HODSfi OF REPRESEMTATIVESi FEBBUABT 3, 1869, 
FOB THE PAYMENT OF HIUBAQE TO ITS HEMBBB8. 





{ 


OOUMTY OF BaBNSTABT.R. 








Miles. 


MUet. 


Barnstable,. ... 80 


Orleans, .... 100 


Brewster, . 






96 


Proyincetown, . 






126 


Chatham, . 






100 


Sandwich, . 






66 


Dennis, 






86 


Truro, 






120 


Eastham. . 
Falmoutn, . 






100 


Wellfleet, . 






. 110 






80 


Yarmouth, 






80 


Harwich, . 






90 




COClfTY OP 


Bebkshibe. 


Adams, . . . . 14D | 


NewAshford, . . . 150 


Alford, 






180 


New Marlborough, . 




180 


Beckel^ 






140 


Otis, .... 




. 170 


Cheshire, . 






160 


Peru, . 






160 


Clarksburg, 






146 


Plttsfield, . 






160 


Dalton, 






146 


Richmond, 






, 160 


Bgremont, . 
Ftorlda, 






180 


Sandlsfield, 






180 






136 


Savoy, 
Sheffield, . 






. 146 


Great Barrlngton 


» 




. 176 






186 


Hancock, . , 






, 166 


Stockbridge, 






. 170 


Hinsdale, . 






146 


Tyrlnffham, 
Washington, 






160 


Lanesborongh, . 






156 






. 146 


juee, • • 






165 


West Stockbridge, , 




. 165 


Lenox, . 






160 


Williamstown, . 




. 145 


Monterey, . 






. 176 


Windsor, . a 




. 166 


Mt. WasMngton, 


1 


, 190 




' COUNTY 01 


? Bristol. 


Acuflhnet, .... 56 


New Bedford, ... 66 


Attleborough, 






86 


Norton, 






85 


Berkley, 






40 


Baynham, . 
Rehoboth, . 






86 


Dartmouth, . 






60 






40 


DIghton, 






40 


Seekonk, . 






40 


Baston, 






26 


Somerset, . 






46 


Fairhayen, . 






60 


Swansea, . 






60 


FallRiycr, . 






56 


Taunton, . 






86 


Freetown, . 






50 


Westport, . 






. 66 


Mansfield, . 




. 


80 




DUKBS 


County. 


Chihnark, .... 100 


€k>snoId, .... 100 




• 


. 


. 100 


Tisbury, , 


• 


I 


. 100 



iU 



Mileage Schedule. 



OODNTT OF Essex. 









Miles. 


• 


Miles. 


Amesbury, . ; . . 45 


Marblehead, . 


20 


Andover, . 




25 


Metbuen, . . . . 


85 


Beverly, 




20 


Middleton,. 


25 


Boxford, 




80 


Nahant, . « . . 


16 


Bradford, . 




85 


Newbury, . . . . 


40 


Danvers, 




20 


Newburyport, . . ' 


40 


Essex 




,' 80 


North Andover, 


30 


Georgetown, 




80 


Peabody, . 


20 


Gloucester, . 


, 


85 


Bockport, . 


40 


Groveland, . 




86 


Rowley, . . . , 


85 


Hamilton, . 




25 


Balem, . . . ■ 


20. 


Haverhill, ; 




85 


Salisbury, . . . . 


40 


Ipswich, : ; 




80 


Baugus, ; ; . . 


10 


I^wrenee, .' i' 




80 


Swampscott, 


15 


Lynn, . i » . 




. 10 


Topsfield, . 


25 


Lynnfieid, : 
Manchester, ' i < 




16 


Wenhmn, . 


25 




25 


West Newbury, 


80 


County of 


Franklin. 




Anhfield, . . . . 1S5 


Leyden, 


. 120 


Bernardston^ 






. 115 


Monroe, . . • .' 


140 


Bucklarid, . 


< 




. 125 


Montague, . 


, 105 


Charlemont,' 






. 180 


New Salem, 


95 


Colrain,' .' 






. 125 


Northfield, 


, 100 


Conway, 


i 




120 


Orange, 


90 


Deerfield, . 


4 




115 


Bowe, ... 


,136 


Ervlng, 


1 i 




90 


Sheiburne, ' 


. 125 


Gill, . . . 


1 




. 105 


Shutesbury, 


. 116 


Greenfield, ., 






. 110 


Sunderland, 


110 


Hawley, 






, 135 


Warwick, . . . . 


96 


Heath, . 






. 135 


Wendell, . . . . 


95 


Leverett, 






. 110 


VVhately, . 


. 120 


County of 


Hampden. - 




Agawam, .... 100 


Montgomery, . 


. 120 


Blandford, . 




( ^ 1 


. 120 


Palmer, . . . . 


85 


Brimfiold, . 






85 


Bussell, . . . . 


. 120 


Chester, 






, 180 


Southwick, 


, 115 


Chicopee, . , 






, 105 


Springfield, . -. 


100 


Granville, . 






. 120 


Tolland, > 


125 


Holland^ 






90 


Wales,. • ^ , - , 


100 


Holyoke, 






. 110 


Westfield, . , . . 


. 110 


Longmeadow, . 






. 106 


West Springfield, . 
Wilbraham, 


100 


Lndlow, 






. 96 


90 


Monson, 






. 90 


■ 




County of : 


Hampshire. 




Amherst, . . . . 100 


Easthampton, . 


. 125 


Belchertown, . . . 96 


. Enfield, ... 


. 100 


Cliesterfteld," / .' . 186 


Goshen, 


. 125 


Cummington, 


i 


,• 


. 140 


Granby, i i * 


. 100 



Mileage Schedule. 



145 



Q-reenwich, . 
Hadley, 
Hatfield, 
Huntlnsfton, 
Middlefield, . 
Korthampton, 
Pelham, 
Plainfleld, . 



Acton, . 

Arlin^on, 

Ashby, 

Ashland, 

Bedford, 

Belmont, 

BiUerica, 

Boxborougb, 

Brighton, 

Burlington, 

Cambridge, 

Carlisle, 

Charlestown, 

Chelmsford, 

Concord, 

Dracut, 

Dunstable, 

Framingham, 

Groton, 

Hopkinton, 

Holliston, 

Hudson, 

Lexington, 

Lincoln, 

Littleton, 

Lowell, 

Maiden, 



Kantucket, 



Bellingham, 

Braintree, 

Brookline, 

Canton, 

Cohasset, 

Dedham, 

Dorchester, , 

Dover, . 

Foxborougb, 

Franklin, 

Hyde Park, 

liedfield. 



County op B-AMPsniRSi— Continued. 

Miles. 
90 
120 
120 
120 
]35 
115 
105 
140 



25 

5 

50 
25 
20 
10 
20 
30 

5 
15 

5 
20 

5 
30 
20 
35 
40 
25 
35 
30 
25 
35 

IQ 
20 
30 
30 
5 



County of Nantucket. 



County of Norfolk. 

30 
15 

6 
16 
25 
10 

5 
15 
25 
30 
10 
20 









Miles. 


Prescott, . . , . 90 


South Hadley, , 




a 


115 


Southampton, , 






120 


Ware, 






80 


Westhampton, . 






. 125 


Williamsburg, 




• 1 


125 


Wortbington, . . .135 


[DDLE8EX. 

Marlborough, ... 35 


Medford, . 






5 


Melrose, , 






5 


Natick, 






20 


Newton, . 






10 


North Reading, 






20 


Pepperell, . 






40 


Reading, . 






15 


Sherborn, . 






30 


Shirlt^y, . 






40 


Somerville, 






5 


Stoncham, . 






10 


Stow, . 






30 


Sudbury, . 






25 


Tewksbury, 






20 


Townsend, 






40 


Tyngsborough, 






35 


Wakefield, 






10 


Waltham, . 






10 


Watertown, 






10 


Wayland, . 






20 


Westford, . 






30 


Weston, . 






15 


Wilmington, 






20 


Winchester, 






10 


Woburn, . 






10 



120 



Medway, . 






30 


Milton, 






10 


Needham, . 






15 


Quincy, 






10 


Randolph, . 






15 


Sharon, 






20 


Stoughton, 






20 


Walpole, . 






20 


West Roxbury, 






5 


Weymouth, 






15 


Wrentham, 






25 



10 



146 



Mileage Schedule. 



County op Plymooth. 











Miles. 








Miles 


Abington 20 


Marshiield, ... 35 


Bridgewater, 






30 


Mattapoisett, 




55 


Carver, 






45 


Middleborough, 




35 


Duxbury, . 
East Bndgewatei 






40 


North Bridgewater, 




25 


$ 




25 


Pembroke, 






30 


Halifax, 






30 


Plymouth, . 






40 


Hanover, 






25 


Plympton, . 






35 


Hanson, 






25 


Rochester, . 






50 


Hingham, . 






20 


Scituate, . 






30 


Hull, . 






25 


South Scituate, , 






30 


Elingston, . 






85 


Warehara, . 






50 


Lakeville, . 






40 


West Bridgewater, 




25 


Marion, .... 50 




COUWTY OI 


' SUPPOLK. 


Boston, .... 5 


Revere, .... 6 


Chelsea, .... 5 


Winthrop 10 


County op 


Worcester. 


Ashbumham, ... 65 


Northborough, ... 86 


Athol, . 






80 


Northbridge, 






50 


Auburn, 








50 


North Brookfiel 


<J, 




70 


Barre, . 








55 


Oakham, . 






60 


Berlin, . 








85 


Oxford, 






60 


Blackstone, 








85 


Paxton, 






55 


Bolton, 








30 


Petersham, 






75 


Boylston, . 








50 


Phillipston, 






75 


Brookfield, , 








65 


Princeton, . 






60 


Charlton, 








65 


Ruyalston, . 






80 


Clinton, 








45 


Rutland, . 






60 


Dana, . 








80 


Shrewsbury, 






40 


Douglas, 








50 


Southborough, . 






30 


Dudley, 








60 


Southbridge, 






70 


Fitchburg, , 








60 


Spencer, . 






65 


Gardner, 








65 


Sterling, . 






45 


Grafton, 








40 


Sturbridge, 






70 


Hardwick, . 








80 


Sutton, 






55 


Harvard, 








35 


Tumpleton, 






75 


Holden, 








50 


Upton, 






45 


Hubbardstoi 


h ' 






75 


Uxbridge, . 






45 


Lancaster, . 








45 


Warren, 






75 


Leicester, 








60 


Webster, . 






60 


Leominster, 








60 


Westborough, , 






35 


Lunenburg, 








50 


West Boylston, 






50 


Men don. 








40 


West Brookfield 


» " 




70 


Milford, 








35 


Westminster, . 






55 


Millbury, . 








45 


Winchendon, . 






65 


New Braint] 


ree. 


. . 




70 


Worcester, 






45 



Note.— The towns incorporated since 1869 are not included In thia 
schedule. 



Congressional Districts. 



147 



CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICTS. 



Established 


BT Chapter 300 of the Ac 


TS OF 1872. 


DISTRICT No. 1. 


Towns. 


Population, 


Towns. 


Population, 




1870. 




1870. 


Plymouth Co. 




Barnstable Co.— Con, 




Carver, . . 


1,092 


Brewster, . 


1,259 


Duxbury, . 


2,341 


Chatham, . 




2,411 


Halifax, . 


619 


Dennis, . 




3,269 


Kingston, . 


1,604 


Eastham, . 




668 


Lakeville, . 


1,159 


Falmouth, 




2,237 


H^arion, 


896 


Harwich, . 




3,080 


Marshfield, 


1,659 


Mashpee, . 




348 


Mattapoisett, 


1,361 


Orleaps, . 




1,323 


Middleborough, 


4,687 


Provincetown, , 




3,865 


Pembroke, 


1,447 


Sandwich, 




3,694 


Plymouth, . 


6,238 


Truro, 




1,269 


Plympton, . 


804 


Wellflcet, 




2,135 


Rochester, . 


1,024 


Yarmouth, 




2,423 


Wareham, . 


3,098 


Bristol Co 






I^aniucket Co, 




Acushnct, 




1,132 


Nantucket, 


• 4,123 


DartmouUi, 
Fairhaven, 




8,367 
2,626 


Dukea Co. 




Fall River, 




26,766 


Chilmark, . 


476 


Freetown, 




1,372 


Edgartown, 


1,516 


New Bedford, . 




21,320 


Gay Head, . 


160 


Somerset, 




1,776 


Gosnold, . 


99 


Swansea, . 




1,294 


Tisbury, . 


1,536 


Westport, 




2,724 


Barnstable Co. 


Population, , 


131,090 


Barnstable, 


4,798 


« 




DISTRICT No. 2. 


BHstol Co. 




Bristol Co.— Con. 




Attlcborough, . 


6,760 


Dighton, . 


1,817 


Berkley, . 


744 


Baston, . 


3,668 



148 



Congressional Districts. 







DISTRICT 


No. 2.— Con. 






Towns. 


Population, 


Towws. 


Population, 




1870. 




1870. 


Bristol Cb.— Con. 




Norfolk Co. 




Mansfield, . 


2,432 


Braintree, 


8,948 


Norton* . 




1,821 


Canton, . 




8,879 


Ravnham, . 
Renoboth, . 




1,713 


Cohasset, . 




2,130 




1,895 


Foxborougb, , 




3,057 


Seekonk, . 




1,021 


Holbrook,t 




— 


Taunton, . 




18,629 


, Hyde Park, . 




4,186 






1 Milton, . 




2,683 


Plymouth Co. 




Norfolk, . 




1,081 


Abington, . 


9,308 


Qulncy, . 




7,442 


Bridffewater, 
Brockton,* 




8,660 


Randolph, 




5,642 




8,007 


Sharon, . 




1,508 


E. Bridgcwater 




3,017 


Stoughton, 




4,914 


Hanover, . 




1,628 


Walpole, . 




2,137 


Hanson, . 




1,219 


Weymouth, , 




9,010 


Hlngham, . 
Hull. . 




4,422 


Wrentham, 




2,292 




261 






Scituate, . 




2,350 


Population, . 


131,704 


South Bcltuate, 




1,661 






W. Bridgewater, 


1,803 







DISTRICT No. 8. 



Suffolk Oo. 

Ward 7, Boston, 

8, Boston, 

10, Boston, 

11, Boston, 

12, Boston, 

13, Boston, 



28,921 
11,278 
13,097 
14,617 
19,880 
8,536 



Sujffblk Cb.— Con. 
Ward 14, Boston, 

15, Boston, 

16, Boston, 

Population, . 



11,385 
14,851 
12,259 



134,824 



DISTRICT No. 4. 



JSiifolk Oo. 
Ward 1, Boston, 

2, Boston, 

3, Boston, 

4, Boston, 

5, Boston, 

6, Boston, 



25,484 
24,912 
14,990 
10,216 
14,166 
11,792 



Suffolk Co.— Con, 
Ward 9, Boston, 
Chelsea, . 
Winthrop, 
Revere, . • 

Population, . 



14,142 

18,547 

532 

1,197 

135,978 



■* J'ormerlj North Bridgewater. 



t New town, 1872. 



Congressional DiMrids, 



149 



DISTRICT No. 6. 



Towns. 


Population, 


TOWNB. 


Population, 




1870. 




1870. 


Eitex Co. 




Middlesex Cb.— Con.' 


■ 


Lynn, 
Kahant, 


28,233 


Maiden, . 


7,367 


475 


Medford, . 




5,717 


Saagus, 


2,247 


Melrose, . 




3,414 


Swampsoott, . 


1,846 


Bomerville, 
Stoneham, 




14,685 
4,513 


Middlesex Co. 




Wakefield, 




4,135 


Arlington, . 


8,261 


Waltham, 




9,065 


Belmont, . 


1,513 


Winchester, , 




2,645 


Bnrlington, 


626 


Wobum, . 




8,560 


Charlestown, . 
Everett, 


28,323 
2,220 






Population, . 


131,122 


Lexington,. 


2,277 







• 




DISTRICT No. 6. 




Essex Co. 




Essex Co. — Con. 




Amesbury, 




5,581 


Middleton, 


1,010 


Beverly, . 




6,507 


Newbury, 


1,430 


Boxford, . 




847 


Newburyport, . 


12,595 


Bradford, . 




2,014 


North Andover, 


2,549 


Danvers, . 




5,600 


Peabody, . 


7,343 


Essex, 




1,614 


Rockport, 


3,904 


Georgetown, 




2,088 


Rowley, . 


1,157 


Gloucester, 




15,389 


Salem, 


24,117 


Groveland, 




1,776 


Salisbury, 
Topsfield, 


3,776 


Hamilton, . 




790 


1,213 


Haverhill, . • 




13,092 


Weiiham,. 


985 


Ipswich, . 




3,720 


West Newbury, 


.2,006 


Lynnfield, . 
Manchester, 




818 
1,665 








Population, . 


131,289 


Marblehead, 




7,703 







DISTRICT No. 7. 



Essex Co, 
Andover, . 
Lawrence, . 
Methuen, . . 




Middlesex Co. 
Acton, 

Ashby, . . 
Ayer,* 



1,593 
994 



* New town. 



150 



Congressional Districts, 







DISTRICT 


No. 7.— Con, 




Towns. 


Population, 


Towns. 


Population, 




1870. 


• 


1870. 


Middlesex Co.— Con. 




Middlesex Co. — Con. 




Bedford, . 


849 


Reading, . 


2,664 


Billerica, . 




1,833 


Shirley, . 


1,451 


Boxborough, 




838 


Stow, ... 


1,813 


Carlisle, 




569 


Sudbury, . 


2,091 


Chelmsford, 




2,374 


Tewksbury, . 


1,944 


Concord, . 




2,412 


Townsend, 


1,962 


Dracut, 




2,078 


Tyngsborough, 
Westford, 


629 


Dunstable, . 




471 


1,803 


Groton, 




3,584 


Wilmington, . 


866 


Hudson, 




8,389 






Lincoln, 




791 


Worcester Co. 




Littleton, . 




983 


Berlin, 


1,016 


Lowell, 




40,928 


Bolton, . 


1,014 


Marlborough, . 




8,474 


Harvard, . 


1,341 


Maynard,* . 
North Reading, . 




942 


Lancaster, . • 


1,845 








Pepperell, . 


1,842 


Population, . 


131,636 



DISTRICT No. 8. 



Worcester Co. 




Middlesex Ob.— Con. 




Milford, 


9,890 


Wayland, . 


1,240 


Southborough, . 


2,135 


Weston, . 

Norfolk Co, 


1,261 


Middlesex Co. 




Brookline, 


6,650 


Ashland, . 


2,186 


Dedhara, . 


7,342 


Brighton, . 




4,967 


Dover, 


645 


Cambridge, 




39,634 


Franklin, . 


2,512 


Framingbam, . 




4,968 


Medfield, . 


1,142 


Holliston, . 




3,073 


Medway, . 


3,721 


Hopkinton, 




4,419 


Needham, 


3,607 


Natick, 




6.404 


Norwood,* 


- 


Newton, . 
Sherborn, . 




12,825 
1.062 


West Roxbury, 


8,683 








Watertown, 


4,326 


Population, . 


132,592 



DISTRICT No. 9. 



Worcester Co. 
Auburn, . 
Barre, 




Worcester Co.— Con. 
Blackstone, 
Boylston, . 



5,421 

800 



* New town. 



Congressimial Districts. 



151 



DISTRICT No. 9.— Con. 



Towns. 


Population, 


Towns. 


Population, 




1870. 




1870. 


Worcester Co. — Con. 




Worceater Co. — Con. 




Brookfield, 


2,627 


Rutland, . 


1,024 


Charlton, . 




1,878 


Shrewsbury, 




1,610 


Doaelas, . 
Dudley, 




2,182 


Southbridge, 




5,208 




2,338 


Spencer, . 




8,952 


Grafton, . 




4,594 


Sturbridge, 




2,101 


Hardwick, . 




2,219 


Sutton, 




2,699 


Holden, 




2,062 


Upton, 




1,989 


Hubbardston, . 




1,654 


Uxbridge, 




3,058 


Leicester, . 




2,768 


Warren, . 




2,625 


Mendon, . 




1,175 


Webster, . 




4,763 


Millbury, . 




4,397 


Westborough, . 




3,601 


New Bralntrec, . 




640 


West Boylston, 


2,862 


Northborough, . 




• 1,504 


West Brookfield, . 


1,842 


Northbridge, . 




8,774 


Worcester, 


41,105 


North Brookfieh 


3, . 


3,343 






Oakham, . 


• 


860 


Norfolk Co, 




Oxford, 


• 


2,669 


Bellingham, 


1.282 


T^nvfy^n 




646 
1,279 






Princeton, . 


• 


Population, . 


132,351 



DISTRICT No. 10. 



Franklin Co, 




Franklin C7o.— -Con. 




Ashfield, . 


1,180 


Sunderland, . 


832 


Bemardston, 




961 


Warwick, 


769 


Buckland, . 




1,946 


Wendell, . 


539 


Charlemont, 




1,005 


Whately, . 


1,068 


Colrain, 




1,742 






Conway, . 




1,460 


Hampshire Co, 




Deerfield, . 




3,632 


Amherst, . 


4,035 


Brving, 




579 


Belchertown, 




2,428 


Gill, . 




653 


Chesterfield, . 




811 


Greenfield, 




3,589 


Cummington, , 




1,037 


Hawley, . 




672 


Easthampton, 




3,620 


Heath, 




613 


Enfield, . 




1,023 


Leverett, . 




877 


Goshen, . 




368 


Ley den. 




518 


Granby, . 




863 


Monroe, 




201 


Greenwich, 




665 


Montague, . 




2,224 


Hadley, . 
Hatfield, . 




2,301 


New Salem, 




987 




1,594 


Northficld, 




1,720 


Huntington, , 




1,156 


Orange, 




2,091 


Middlefield, . 




727 


Rowe, 




581 


Northampton, 




10,160 


Shelbume, . 




1,582 


Pelham, . 




673 


Shutesbury, 


614 


Plain field. 




521 



152 



Congressional Districts. 



DISTRICT No. 10.— Con. 



Towns. 


Population, 


TOVNB. 


Population, 




1870. 




1870. 


Hampghire Co, — Con. 




Worcester Co. — Con. 




Prescott, . 


541 


Leominster, 


S,«94 


South Hadley, . 


2,840 


Lunenburg, 




1,121 


Southampton, . 


1,159 


Petersham, 




1,335 


"Ware, 


4,259 


Phlllipston, , 
Royafston, 




693 


Weethampton, . 


587 




1,354 


WilliamBDurg, . 


2,159 


Sterling, . 




1,670 


Worthington, . 


860 


Templeton, 
Westminster, , 




2,802 
1,770 


Worcegter Co. 




Winchendon, 




8,398 


Ashburnbam, . 


2,172 






Athol, 
Clinton, 


8,517 

6,429 

758 


Hampden Co. 




Dana,. 


Holyoke, . 


10,733 


Fitcbburg, . 
Gardner, . 


11,260 
3,333 


Population, . 


132,262 



DISTRICT No. 11. 



Berkshire Co, 
Adams, 
Alford, 
Becket, 
Cheshire, . 
Clarksburg, 
DaHon, 
Egremont, . 
Florida, . 
Great Barrington, 
Hancock, . 
Hinsdale, . 
Lanesborougb, 
Lee, . 
Lenox, 
Monterey, . 
Mt. Washington, 
New Asbford, 
New Marlborough, 
Otis, . 
Peru, . 
Pittsfield, . 
Richmond, 
Sandisfield, 
Savoy, 
Sheffield, . 
Stockbridge, 
Tyringham, 
Washington, 



JSerkfthire Co. — Con. 
West Stockbridge, . 
Williamstown, 
Windsor, . 

Hampden Co. 
Agawam, . . 
Blandford, 
Brimfield, 
Chester, . 
Chicopee, , 
Granville, 
Holland, . 
Lonemeadow, . 
Ludlow, . 
Monson, . 
Montgomery, . 
Palmer, . 
Russell, . 
Southwjck, 
Springfield, 
Tolland, . 
Wales, 
Westfield, 
West Springfield, 
Wilbraham, . 

Population, . 



1,924 

3,559 

686 



2,001 
1,026 
1,288 
1,253 
9,607 
1,293 

344 
1,342 
1,136 
3,204 

318 
3,631 

635 

1,100 

26,703 

509 

831 
6,519 
2,606 
2,380 



132,502 



Congressional Districts. 



153 



RECAPITULATION. 



District. 



Number 1, 

2, 

3 

4 

6, 

6 

7 

8 

« 

10 

11 

Total 



Population. 



ISl.OQO 
131,704 
184,824 
185,978 
131,122 
131,289 
131,686 
182,592 
182,351 
132,262 
132,502 



1,457,350 



154 Senate Districts. 



SENATE DISTRICTS. 

As Established by Chap. 120 of the Acts of 3866. 



[Average ratio for the State, 6,189.] 



SUFFOLK COUCfTY— Six Senators. 

First 2>i«<r<c<.— Chelsea, Revere, Winthrop, and Ward No. 1, Boston. 

Legal voters, 6,360. 
Second District.— Wat^b Nos. 2, 3 and 6, Boston. Legal voters, 8,697, 
Third District.— W&rdB Nos. 4 and 6, Boston. Legal voters, 6,195. 
Fourth District— WardB Nos. 8 and 9, Boston. Legal voters, 5,137. 
F^th District— Wards Nos. 10 and 11, Boston. Legal voters, 5,109. 
Sixth District.— W&rdB Nos. 7 and 12, Boston. Legal voters, 5,234. 

ESSEX COUNTY— Five Senators. 

First District — Lynn, Lynnfield, Marblehead, Nahant, Saugus and 

Swampscott. Legal voters, 6,855. 
Second District — Danvers, Hamilton, Mlddleton, Peabody, Salem, 

Topsfield and Wenham. Legal voters, 6,215. 
Third District — Andover, Boxford, Haverhill, Lawrence, Methuen 

and North Andover. Legal voters, 7,111. 
Fourth District — Amesbury, Bradford, Georgetown, Groveland, 

Newbury, Newburyport, Salisbury and West Newbury. Legal 

voters, 6,267. 
Fi/ih District — Beverly, Essex, Gloucester, Ipswich, Manchester, 

Bockport and Rowley. Legal voters, 6,624. 

MIDDLESEX COUNTY— Seven Senators. 

£irst District — Charlestown. Legal voters, 5,596. 

Second District— ArMugton^ Belmont, Everett, Maiden, Medford, 

Somerville, Waltham apd Watertown. Legal voters, 6,462. 
Third District. — Cambridge and Brighton. Legal voters, 5,810. 
Fourth District — Ashland, Framingham, HoUiston, Hopklnton, Natlck, 

Newton, Sherborn, Wayland and Weston. Legal voters, 6,258. 
FiJ^h District. — Acton, Ashby, Boxborough, Carlisle, Concord, Dun- 

stable, Groton, Hudson, Lincoln, Littleton, Marlborough, Pep. 

perel, Shirley, Stow, Sudbury, Townsend, Tyngsborough and 

Westford. Legal voters, 6,828. 



Senate Districts, 155 



Sirth 7)f«<Hc^— Bedford, Billerica, Burlingtbn, Lexington, Melrose, 
North Reading, Reading, Stoneham, Tewlcsbury, Wakefield, Wil- 
mington, Winchester and Woburn. Legal voters, 6,014. 

Seventh District. — Chelmsford, Dracut and Lowell. Legal voters, 5,967. 

WORCESTER COUNTY— Five Senators. 

Firnt 2H»<Hc<.— Worcester. Legal voters, 5,880. 

Second District. — Blackstone, Douglas, Grafton, Mendon, Milford, 
Northborough, Northbridge, Shrewsbury, Southborough, Upton, 
Uxbridge and Westborough. Legal voters, 6,883. 

Third District. — Auburn, Brookfield, Charlton, Dudley, Leicester, 
Millbury, Oxford, Southbridge, Spencer, Sturbridge, Sutton, War- 
ren and West Brookfield. Legal voters, 6,535. 

Fourth District. — Athol, Barre, Dana, Gardner, Hardwick, Holden, 
Hubbardston, New Braintree, North Brookfield, Oakham, Paxton, 
Petersham, Phillipston, Royalston, Rutland, Templeton and Win- 
chendon. Legal voters, 6,383. 

Fifth District.— AstibMrnhaxti, Berlin, Bolton, Boylston, Clinton, Fitch- 
burg, Harvard, Lancaster, Leominster, Lunenburg, Princeton, 
Sterling, West Boylston and Westminster. Legal voters, 6,574. 

HAMPDEN COUNTY— Two Senators. 

First District. — Brimfield, Holland, Monson, Palmer, Springfield, 
Wales and Wilbraham. Legal voters, 6,306. 

Second District. — Agawam, Blaiidford, Chester, Chicopee, Granville, 
Holyoke, Longraeadow, Ludlow, Montgomery, Russell, Southwick, 
Tolland, Westfield and West Springfield. Legal'voters, 6,024. 

HAMPSHIRE, FRANKLIN AND BERKSHIRE COUNTIES— 

Four Senators. 

Hampshire District. — Amherst, Belchertown, Easthampton, Enfield, 
Granby, Greenwich, Hadley, Hatfield, Northampton, Pelham, 
Prescott, South Hadley, Southampton, Ware, Westhampton and 
Williamsburg. Legal voters, 6,350. 

Berkshire and Hampshire District. — Alford, Becket, Egremont, Great 
Barrington, Lee, Lenox, Monterey, Mount Washington, New Marl- 
borough, Otis, Sandlsfield, Sheffield, Stockbridge, Tyringham, 
West Stockbridge, Chesterfield, Cummington, Goshen, Huntington, 
Middlefield, Plainfield and Worthington. Legal voters, 6,099, 

Berkshire District — Adams, Cheshire, Clarksburg, Dalton, Florida, 
Hancock, Hinsdale, Lanesborough, New Ashford, Peru, Pittsfield, 
Richmond, Savoy, Washington, Williamstown, Windsor, .Hawley 
and Monroe. Legal voters, 6,013. 



1 56 Senate Districts, 

Franklin 2>M<r<c<.— Athfleli, Bernardston, Buckland, Cfaarlemont* 
Golrain, Conway, Deerfield, Erving, Gill, Greenfield, Heath, 
Leverett, Leyden, Monta^pie, New Salem, Northfleld, Orange, 
Bowe, Bhelburne, Sbutesbury, Snnderland, Warwick* Wendell 
and Whately. Legal voters, 6,987. 

NORFOLK ANB PLYMOUTH COUNTIES— Six Senatobs. 

Fimt Norfolk i>i«<r<c<.~BrookUne, Roxbary Vmd West Rozbury. 
Legal voters, 6,235. 

Second Norfolk DintricU — Canton, Dedham, Norwood (except that 
part taken from Walpole), Dorchester, Dover, Milton, Needham 
and Quincy. Legal voters, 6,094. [The inhabitants of Hyde Park 
vote with Dorchester, Milton and Dedham.] 

Third Norfolk Z>i«^c<.— Belllugham, Foxborough, Franklin, Madfield, 
Medway, Norfolk, Randolph, Holbrook, Sharon, Stoughton, Wal- 
pole (including the voters of that part of Norwood taken from 
Walpole) and Wrentham. Legal voters, 6,084. 

FirtA IKymonth District.— Caxyer^ Duxbury, Kingston, Lakeville, Mar- 
ion, Mattapoisett, Middleborough, Plymouth, Plympton, Rochester 
and Wareham. Legal voters, 5,f 73. 

Second Plymonth ZX«<rict— Abington, Bridgewater, East Bridgewater, 
Halifax, Hansdn, Brockton, Pembroke and West Bridgewater. 
Legal voters, 5,878. 

Norfolk and Plymouth JHstrid. — Cohassat, Hanover, Hingham, Hull, 
Marshfield, Scituate, South Scttuate, Bralntree and Weymouth. 
Legal voters, 5,904. 

BRISTOL COUNTY— Three Senators. 

Fir»t IH8tri<^.—Ati\ehorought Easton, Mansfield, Norton, Raynham 

and Taunton, Legal voters, 6,058. 
Second Z>i«^ct.— Acushnet, Dartmouth, Fairhaven and New Bedford. 

Legal voters, 6,272. 
Third Diairict.— Berkley t Dighton, Fall River, Freetown, Rehoboth, 

Seekonk, Somerset, Swansea and Westport. Legal voters* 6,246. 

BARNSTABLE, DUKES AND NANTUCKET COUNTIES— Two 

Senators. 

Aland Diairict — Barnstable, Falmouth, Sandwich, Chilmark, Edgar- 
town, Gay Head, Gosnold, Mashpee, Tisbury and Nantucket. 
Legal voters, 4,558. 

Oape District. — Brewster, Chatham, Dennis, Eastham, Harwich, Or- 
leans, Provlncetown, Truro, Wellfleet and Yarmouth. Legal 
voters, 5,562. 



OnmcU Districts. 157 



COUNCIL DISTRICTS. 

As Established bt Chap. 221 of the Acts of 1866. 



[Each District oonBists of five Senatorial Districts.] 



I.— The Island District, Cape District, First Plymouth, Second and 
Third Bristol Districts. 

n.— The Second Plymouth, First Bristol, Norfolk and Plymouth, 
Second Norfolk and Third Norfolk Districts. 

m.— The Sixth Suffolk, First Norfolk, Third Middlesex, Fourth Mid- 
dlesex and Second Worcester Districts. 

ft 

IV.-»The First, Second, Third, Fourth and Fifth Suffolk Districts. 

v.— The First, Second, Third, Fourth and Fifth Essex Districts. 

VI.~The First, Second, Fifth, Sixth and Seventh Middlesex Districts. 

Vn.— The First, Third, Fourth and Fifth Worcester Districts, and 
the Franklin District. 

VUL— The Hampshire, First Hampden, Second Hampden, Berkshire, 
and Berkshire and Hampshire Districts. 



158 Representative Districts. 



REPRESENTATIVE DISTRICTS. 

As BsTABLtSHED by the County Commissioners of the several Coan- 
ties, other than Suffolk, and the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of 
Boston, for the County of Suffolk, pursuant to the 21st Article of 
Amendments of the Constitution, and Chap. 108 of the Acts of 1866; 
With the number of Legal Voters in each District (according to the 
census of 1865), and the number of Representatives to which said 
Districts are respectively entitled. 



[Average ratio for the State, 1,038 voters.] 



SUFFOLK COUNTY^ Thiriy'9ix RepreBentatives, 
District 

L— Boston, Ist Ward. Legal voters, 3,530. Three representatives. 

II.— Boston, 2d Ward. Legal voters, 3,085. Three representatives. 

IIL— Boston, 34 Ward. Legal voters, 3,050. Three representatives. 

IV. — Boston, 4th Ward. Legal voters, 3,076. Three representatives, 

v.— Boston, 6th Ward. Legal voters, 3,119. Three representatives. 

VI. — Boston, 6th Ward. Legal voters, 2,660. Three representatives. 

VII. — Boston, 7th Ward. Legal voters, 2,867. Three representatives. 

Vni. — Boston, 8th Ward. Legal voters, 2,877. Three representatives. 

IX.— Boston, 9tli Ward. Legal voters, 2,260. Two representatives. 

X.— Boston, 10th Ward. Legal voters, 2,546. Two representatives. 

XL — Boston, 11th Ward. Legal voters, 2,573. Three representatives. 

XII.— Boston, 12th Ward. Legal voters, 2,367. Two representatives. 
XUI. — Chelsea, Revere and Winthrop. Legal voters, '2,830. Three 
representatives. 

ESSEX COVNTY— Thirty-two Repreaentativei, 
District 

I.— Salisbury, Amesbury and West Newbury. Legal voters, 2,116. 
Two representatives, 
n.— Haverhill and Bradford. Legal voters, 2,802. Three represen 

tativcs. 
m.— Lawrence and Methuen. Legal voters, 3,247. Three represen 
tatives. 



BepresentcUive Districts^ 169 

District 

rv.— Andover and North Andover. Legal Toters, 1,240. One fep- 

resetitative. 
V. — G-eorgetown, Groveland and Bozford. Legal voters, 994. 

One representative. 
VI. — Newburyport and Newbury. Legal voters, 2,979. Three 
representatives. 
VII.— Ipswich and Rowley. Legal voters, 1,002. One represen- 
tative. 
Vm.— 'Gloucester and Essex. Legal voters, 2,902. Three represen- 
tatives. 
IX.— Rockport. Legal voters, 915. One representative. 
X. — Beverly, Manchester aod Hamilton. Legal voters, 1,992. 

Two representatives. 
XI. — ^Danvers and Wenham. Legal voters, 1,092. One represen- 

tative. 
Xn.— Peabody. Legal voters, 961. One representative. 
Xm.— Salem, 1st Ward, 2d Ward and 3d Ward. Legal voters, 2,035. 

Two representatives. 
XrV.— Salem, 4th Ward and 6th Ward. Legal voters, 1,036. One 

representative. 
XV. — Marblehead, and Salem, 5th Ward. Legal voters, 2,105. Two 

representatives. 
XVI. — Lynn, 4th Ward, andNahant. Legal voters, 1,079. One rep- 
resentative. 
XVn.— Lynn, 2d and 5th Wards. Legal voters, 1,220. One repre- 
sentative. 
XVin. — Lynn, 3d Ward, and Swampscott. Legal voters, 1,133. One 
representative. 
XIX.— Lynn, 1st Ward, 6th Ward and 7th Ward. Legal voters, 1,146. 

One representative. 
XX. — SauguB, Lynnfield, Middleton and Topsfleld. Legal voters, 
1,076. One representative. 

MIDDLESEX OOVSTY— Forty-one Representatives, 

District 

I.-— Charlestown, 1st Ward. Legal voters, 1,421. One representative. 

II. — Charlestown, 2d Ward. Legal voters, 2,015. Two representatives. 

in.— Charlestown, 3d Ward. Legal voters, 2,160. Two representatives. 

rv.— Somerville, Maiden and Everett. Legal voters, 3,020. Three 

representatives, 
v.— Medford. Legal voters, 1,031. One representative. 



160 Sepresentative Districts. - 

District 

VI.— Arlington and Winchester. Legal voters, 822. One repre- 
sentative. 
Vn.— Cambridge, Ist and 5th Wards. Legal voters, 1,247. One 

r.epresentative. 
Vni.— Cambridge, 2d and 4th Wards. Legal voters, 2,661. Three 
representatives. 
IX. — Cambridge, 3d Ward. Legal voters, 1,244. One represen- 

tatlve. 
X.— Newton and Brighton. Legal voters, 2,249. Two repre 

sentatives. 
XI.— Watertown and Belmont. Legal voters, 908. One repre 

sentative. 
Xn.— Waltham. Legal voters, 1,032. One representative. 
Xm. — Natick. Legal voters, 1,099. One representative. 
XIV.— Holliston and Sherborn. Legal voters, 939. One represen- 
tative. 
XV. — ^Hopkinton and Ashland. Legal voters, 1,187. One repre- 
sentative. 
XVI. — Framingham. Legal voters, 887. One representative. 
XVII.— Marlborough. Legal voters, 849. One representative. 
XVIII.— Hudson, Stow (including that part of Maynard formerly 
belonging to Blow), Boxborough and Littleton. Legal 
voters, 904. One representative. 
XIX. — Acton, Sudbury (including that part of Maynard formerly 
belonging to Sudbury) and Wayland. Legal voters, 986. 
One representative. 
XX. — Concord, Littleton and Weston. Legal voters, 910. One 

representative. 
XXI. — Lexington, Bedford, Burlington and Carlisle. Legal voters, 

808. One representative. 
XXn.— Woburn. Legal voters, 1,385. One representative. 
XXIII. — Stoneham, Wakefield and Melrose. Legal voters, 1,947. 

Two representatives. 
XXIV. — Reading, North Reading and Wilmington. Legal voters, 

1,012. One representative. 
XXV.— Chelmsford, Billerica, and Tewksbury. Legal voters^ 1,054. 

One representative. 
XXVI.— Lowell, 1st Ward, 2d Ward and 6th Ward. Legal voters, 

2,072. Two representatives. 
XXVn.— Lowell, 3d Ward. Legal voters, 836. One representative. 
XXVni. — Lowell, 4th Ward. Legal voters, 1,174. One representative. 
XXIX.— Lowell, 5th Ward. Legal voters, 1,068. One representative. 



Representative Districts. 161 

District 
XXX.— Dracut, Tyngsborough, Danstable and Westford. Legal 

voters, 986. One representative. 
XXXI.— Groton, Pepperell and Aycr (except that* part which for- 
merly belonged to Shirley). Legal voters, 098. One rep- 
resentative. 
XXXn. — Townsend, Ashby and Shirley (inclading that part of Ayer 
formerly belonging to Shirley). Legal voters, 1,029. One 
representative. 

WORCESTER COUNTY— 7%tr<y-on« Representatives. 
District 

I. — Ashburnham and Winchendon. Legal voters, 1,119. One rep- 
resentative. 
IL— Royalston and Athol. Legal voters, 1,031. One representa- 
tive, 
m. — Gardner and Templeton. Legal voters, 1,114. One represen- 
tative. 
IV. — Petersham, Dana, Phillipston, Hubbardston, Barre, Hardwick 
and New Braintree. Legal voters, 2,152. Two representa- 
tives. 
V. — Westminster, Fitchburg, Lunenburg and Leominster. Legal 
voters, 3,034. Three representatives. 
VI. — Lancaster, Bolton and Harvard. Legal voters, 996. One rep- 
resentative. 
VII.— Clinton, Berlin and Northborough. Legal voters, 1,058. One 

representative. 
VIII.— Sterling, West Boylston and Boylston. Legal voters, 1,020. 
One representative. 
IX. — Rutland, Holden, Princeton and Oakham. Legal voters, 1,088. 

One representative. 
X.— Worcester, 1st Ward, 2d Ward, 3d Ward, 8th Ward and Pax- 

ton. Legal voters, 2,983. Three representatives. 
XI.— Worcester, 4th Ward, 5th Ward, 6th Ward and 7th Ward. 

Legal voters, 3,053. Three representatives. 
XII. — Grafton and Shrewsbury. Legal voters, 1,104. One represen- 

tative. 
XIII. — Westborough and Southborough. Legal voters, 882. One rep- 
resentative. 
XIV. — Northbridge and Upton. Legal voters, 993. One representa- 
tive. 
XV. — Milford, Mcndon, Blackstone and Uxbridge. Legal voters, 
3,180. Three representatives. 

11 



162 RepresentcUive Districts. 

District 
XVI.— DouglaB, Webster, Dudley, Oxford, Sutton and Millbury. 

Legal voters, 3,164. Three representatives. 
XVn.— Auburn.aLeicester, Spencer, Charlton and Boutbbridge. Le- 
gal voters, 2,127. Two representatives. 
XVIII.— Sturbridge, Brookfield, North Brookfield, West Brookfield 
and Warren. Legal voters, 2,157. Two representatives. 

HAMPSHIRE COVTXTY— Seven Repre»entaHve». 

District 

I.— Easthampton, Huntington, Northampton, Southampton and 

Westhampton. Legal voters, 2,318. Two representatives, 
n. — Chesterfield, Cummington, Goshen, Middlefield, Plainfield and 

Worthington. Legal voters, 1,086. One representative, 
m.— Hadley, Hatfield and Williamsburg. Legal voters, 1,092. One 

representative, 
rv.— Amherst and South Hadley. Legal voters, 1,090. One repre- 
sentative. 
V. — Belchertown, Granby and Pelham. Legal voters, 1,022. One 

representative. 
VI. — Enfield, Greenwich, Prescott and Ware. Legal voters, 1,060. 
One representative. 

HAMPDEN COXJNTY— Twelve Representativet, 

District 

I. — Monson, Brimfield, Holland and Wales. Legal voters, 1,102. 

One representative, 
n. — Palmer and Wiibraham. Legal voters, 966. One representa- 
tive. 
HI.— Springfield, 1st Ward, 2d Ward and 3d Ward. Legal voters, 

2,009. Two representatives, 
rv. — Springfield, 4th and 6th Wards. Legal voters, 858. One rep- 
resentative, 
v.— Springfield, 5th Ward, 7th Ward and 8th Ward. Legal voters, 

1,281. One representative. 
VI. — Holyoke, Chicopee and Ludlow. Legal voters, 2,105. Two 

representatives. 
Vn. — Granville, Southwick, Agawam, West Springfield and Long- 
meadow. Legal voters, 1,676. Two representatives. 
Vm. — ^Westfield. Legal voters, 1,326. One representative. 
IX.— Chester, Blandford, Montgomery, Russell and Tolland. Legal 
voters, 917. One representative. 



Representative Districts, 1G3 

FRANKLIN COJJWTY—Swen Representatives. 
District 
I. — Warwick, Orange and New Salem. Legal voters, 1,008. One 

representative. 
n. — ^Montague, Sunderland, Leverett, Shutesbury and Wendell. 
Legal voters, 1,071. One representative, 
m. — GreenjQeld, Colrain, Leyden, Bernardston, G-ill, Northfield and 

Erving. Legal voters, 2,098. Two representatives. 
rV. — ^Deerfield, Shelbume, Whately, Conway, Ashfield and Hawley. 

Legal voters, 2,059. Two representatives. 
V. — ^Buckland, Charlemont, Heath, Bowe and Monroe. Legal voters, 
979. One representative. 

BERKSHIRE COUNTY— Ten Representatives. 
District 

I. — Hancock, Lanesborough, New Ashford and Williamstown. 

Legal voters, 971.- One representative. 
II. — ^Adams, Cheshire, Clarksburg, Florida and Savoy. Legal 

voters, 2,243. Two representatives, 
m.— Dalton, PHtsfield and Richmond. Legal voters, 1,923. Two 

representatives. 
rV. — Becket, Hinsdale, Peru, Washington and Windsor. Legal 
• voters, 902. One representative. 
V.-— Lenox, Stockbridge and West Stockbridge. Legal voters, 
1,003. One representative. 
VI. — Lee, Monterey, Otis and Tyringham. Legal voters, 1,318. One 

representative. 
Vn. — ^Alford, Egremont, Great Barrington and Mount Washington. 

Legal voters, 1,111. One representative. 
Vm.— New Marlborough, Sandisfield and Sheffield. Legal voters, 
1,095. One representative. 

NORFOLK COUNTY— (excluding Cohasset)— TYtwn^^n* Represen- 
tatives, 
District 
I. — Dedham.* Legal voters, 1,268. One representative. 
II. — West Roxbury. Legal voters, 991. One representative, 
m.— Roxbury, 2d Ward, 3d Ward, 4th Ward and 5th Ward. Legal 
voters, 3,485. Three representatives. 

[♦ The inhabitants of Hyde Park vote with Dorchester, Milton and 
Dedham. The inhabitants of the parts of Norwood taken from 
Dedham and Walpole respectively, vote in Norwood.] 



164 B^fyresentative Districts, 

District 
IV.— Roxbnry, 1st Ward. Legal voters, 998. One representative. 
V. — Dorchester.* 'Legal voters, 1,860. Two representatives. 
VI. — Qulncy. Legal ycters, 1,276. One representative. 
Vn.— Braintree. Legal voters, 777. One representative. 
Vm. — Weymouth. Legal voters, 1,84S. Two representatives. 
IX.— Randolph and Holbrook. Legal voters, 1,261. One reprosen- 

tative. 
X.— Stougfaton. L^:al voters, 1,020. One representative. 
XI. — Canton, Milton, Walpole (inclading that part of Walpole incor- 
porated into the towns of Norfolk and Norwood) and Sharon. 
Legal voters, 1,812. Two representatives. 
XH. — ^Fozborough, Wrentham, Medway and Norfolk (excepting those 
parts of the town formerly belonging to Walpole and Frank- 
lin). Legal voters, 2,007. Two representatives. 
XTTT. — Franklin (including that part of Franklin incorporated into the 
town of Norfolk) and Bellingham. Legal voters, 818. One 
representative. 
Xrv. — Needham, Medfield and Dover. Legal voters, 856. One repre- 
sentative. 
XV. — Brookline. Legal voters, 761. One representative. 

BRISTOL COUNTY— ^^A^n RepresentoHvet. 
District 

I. — Attleborough. Legal voters, 1,112. One representative, 
n. — Mansfield and Norton. Legal voters, 878. One representative, 
m. — Easton and Raynham. Legal voters, 987. One representative. 
IV.— Taunton. Legal voters, 3,086. Three representatives. 
V. — Seekonk, Rehoboth, Dighton and Berkley. Legal voters, 1,216. 

One representative. 
VI. — Somerset, Swansea and Freetown. Legal voters, 1,055. One 
representative. 
VII.— Fall River. Legal voters, 3,207. Three representatives. 
Vni.— Westport. Legal voters, 769. One representative. 
IX.— Dartmouth. Legal voters, 777. One representative. 
X.— New Bedford, let Ward, 2d Ward and 8d Ward. Legal voters, 

2,463. Two representatives. 
XI.— New Bedford, 4th Ward, 5th Ward and 6th Ward. Legal 
voters, 2,082. Two representatives. 
Xn.— Fairhaven and Acushnet. Legal voters, 950. One representa 
tlve. 

* See note on preceding page. 



Bepresentative Districts. 165 

PLYMOUTH COUNT Y—< with . Cohasset)— ^*/<«*n Representatives. 

District 

I. — Cohasset and Scitnate. Legal voters, 1,064. One representative. 
n. — Hingham and Hull. Legal voters, 931. One representative, 
m.— South Bcituate, Hanover and Hanson. Legal voters, 1,166. 

One representative. 
IV. — ^Marshfield, Pembroke and Halifax. Legal voters, 1,029. One 

representative, 
v.— Doxbury and Kingston. Legal voters, 986. One representa- 
tive. 
VI. — Plymouth, Carver and Plympton. Legal voters, 2,034. Two 

representatives. 
Vn. — Wareham and Marion. Legal voters, 855. One representative. 
Vlil. — Mattapoisett, Rochester and Lakeville. Legal voters, 987. One 
representative. 
IX. — ^Mlddleborough. Legal voters, 1,112. One representative. 
X. — Bridgewater and "West Bridgewater. Legal voters, 1,910. One 

representative. 
XI.— East Bridgewater and Brockton. Legal voters, 2,120. Two 

representatives. 
Xn.— Abington. Legal voters, 1,833. Two representatives. 

BARNSTABLE COUNTY— EigM Bepresentatives. 

District 

I.— Barnstable, Sandwich, Falmouth, Mashpee and Yarmouth. 

Legal voters, 3,238. Three representatives, 
n.— Dennis, Harwich and Brewster. Legal voters, 2,013. Two rep- 
resentatives. 
m. — Chatham and Orleans. Legal voters, 1,076. One representative. 
rV.— Eastham, Wellfleet, Truro and Provlncetown. Legal voters, 
2,006. Two representatives. 

DUKES COUNTY— One Bepresentaiive, 

District 

I. — Edgartown, Tisbury, Chilmark, Oay Head and Gosnold. Legal 
voters, 1,107. One representative. 

NANTUCKET COUNTY— One Representative. 

District 

I.— Nantucket. Legal voters, 809. One representative. 



166 



Vote for President^ in 1872. 



VOTE FOR PRESIDENT, IN 1872. 



Towns. 


Grant. 


Greeley. 


TOWKS. 


Grant. 


Greeley. 


Barnst'ble Co. 






Berkh.— CS^n. 






Barnstable, 


848 


63 


Washington, . 
W. Stockbridge, 


51 


35 


Brewster, . 


90 


4 


152 


113 


Chatham, . 


113 


89 


WiUiamstown, . 


808 


143 


Dennis, 


203 


23 


Windsor, . 


81 


41 


Eastham, . 
Falmouth, . 


05 
270 


12 

20 








Totals, . 


6,047 


3,391 


Harwich, . 


184 


20 








Mashpee, . 


43 


- 


Bristol Co. 






Orleans, 


184 


16 


Acushnet, . 


122 


- 


Provincetown, . 


840 


39 


Attleborough, . 


621 


114 


Sandwich, . 


339 


87 


Berkley, . 


126 


16 


Truro, 


93 


2 


Dartmouth, 


293 


9 


Wellfleet, . 


226 


17 


Dighton, . 


252 


20 


Yarmouth, . 


210 


11 


Easton, 


335 


204 








Fairhaven, 
Fall River, 


289 
2,100 


48 
839 


Totals, . 


2,703 


353 








Freetown, . 


125 


26 


Berkshire Co. 






Mansfield, . 


259 


117 


Adams, 


1,218 


342 


New Bedford, . 


2,311 


552 


Alford, 


35 


43 


Norton, 


209 


46 


Becket, 


116 


76 


Raynham, . 
Rohoboth, . 


176 


18 


Cheshire, . 


174 


69 


206 


— 


Clarksburg, 


92 


10 


Seekonk, . 


91 


46 


Dal ton, 


110 


92 


Somerset, . 


179 


18 


Egremont, . 


106 


86 


Swansea, . 


105 


16 


Florida, 


- 73 


15 


Taunton, . 


1,944 


609 


Gt. Barrington, . 
Hancock, . 
Hinsdale, . 


443 

80 

129 


219 

23 

139 


Westport, . • . 


260 


7 


Totals, . 


10,003 


2,605 


Lanesborough, . 


171 


67 








Lee, . 


407 


178 


Dukes Co. 






Lenox, 


159 


140 


Chilmark, . 


51 


24 


Monterey, . 
Mt. Washington, 


67 


58 


Edgartown, 


249 


40 


24 


24 


Gay Head, 


16 


- 


New Ashford, . 


17 


16 


Gosnold, . 


14 


- 


New Marlboro', . 


191 


149 


TIsbury, . 


226 


52 


Otis, . 
Peru, . 


65 
70 


66 
20 








Totals, . 


556 


116 


Pittsfield, . 


965 


. 827 








Kichmond, . . 


62 


41 


Essex Oo. 






Sandisfield, 


95 


80 


Amesbury, 


475 


195 


Savoy, 
Sheffield, . 


91 


22 


Andover, . 


451 


130 


227 


147 


Beverly, . 


779 


157 


Stockbridge, 


207 


87 


Boxford, . 


109 


22 


Tyringham, 


61 


23 


Bradford, . 


183 


111 



Vote for President^ in 1872, 



167 



Towns. 


Grant. 


Greeley. 


Towns. 


Grant. 


Greeley. 


ES8EX— Cbn. 






Frank.— Con. 






Danvera, . 


644 


106 


Northfield, 


167 


67 


Essex, 


ao5 


68 


Orange, . 


407 


61 


Georgetown, 


267 


107 


Rowe, 


86 


4 


Gloucester, 


1,151 


668 


Shelburne, 


250 


38 


Groveland, 


194 


02 


Shutesbury, 


101 


4 


Hamilton, . 


58 


88 


Sunderland, 4 . 


133 


30 


Haverhill, . 


1,498 


673 


Warwick, . 


110 


64 


Ipswich, 


822 


186 


Wendell, . 


78 


23 


Lawrence, . 


1,930 


1,864 


Whately, . 


101 


59 


Lynn, . 


2,778 


1,395 












Lyunfield, . 


71 


9 


Totals, . 


4,336 


1,030 


Manchester, 


198 


68 








Marblehead, 


746 


641 


Hampden Co. 






Methuen, . 


362 


191 


Agawam, . 


126 


87 


Middleton, . 


91 


44 


Blandford, 


103 


76 


Nahant, 


41 


22 


Brimfield, . 


128 


74 


. Newbury, . 


111 


6 


Chester, . 


131 


79 


Newburvport, . 
North Andover, 


1,061 


491 


Chicopee, . 


608 


468 


215 


117 


Granville, . 


104 


67 


Peabody, . 


586 


172 


Holland, . 


36 


15 


Bockport, . 


478 


176 


Holyoke, . 


652 


609 


Rowley, 


116 


60 


Lonnneadow, . 
Ludlow, . 


146 


46 


Salem, 


2,189 


811 


112 


21 


Salisbury, . 


423 


106 


Monson, . 


291 


125 


Saugus, 


255 


127 


Montgomery, . 


34 


20 


Swampscott, 


181 


89 


Palmer, . 


268 


159 


Topsfield, . 


133 


31 


Russell, . 


63 


36 


Wenham, . 


110 


27 


South wick. 


113 


101 


"W. Newbury, . 


223 


71 


Springfield, 


2,602 


1,447 








Tolland, . 
Wales, 


43 
125 


88 
31 


Totals, . 


18,622 


9,083 








Westfield, . 


701 


630 


Franklin Co. 






W. Springfield, 


210 


115 


Ashfield, . 


173 


47 


Wilbraham, . 


179 


76 


Bernardston, 
Buckland, . 


131 
186 


64 
69 








Totals, . 


6,565 


4,100 


Charlemont, 


191 


14 








Colrain, 


235 


86 


Hampshire Co. 






Conway, 


174 


83 


Amherst, . 


889 


179 


Deerfield, . 


377 


89 


Belchertown, . 


312 


77 


Erving, 


92 


13 


Chesterfield, . 


125 


25 


Gill, . 


100 


16 


Cummington, . 


144 


29 


Greenfield,. 


419 


167 


Easthampton, . 


843 


133 


Hawley, 


100 


6 


Enfield, . 


145 


24 


Heath, 


91 


10 


Goshen, , 


67 


2 


Leverett, . 


126 


84 


Granby, . 


120 


22 


Ley den, 


48 


89 


Greenwich, 


76 


— 


Monroe, 


33 


— 


Hadley, . 
Hatfield, . 


250 


41 


Montague, . . 


289 


61 


134 


15 


New Salem, 


138 


26 


Huntington, 


112 


66 





168 



Vote for President, in 1872. 



Towns. 


Grant. 


Greeley. 


Towns. 


Grant. 


Greeley. 


Hampr.— C!9ft. 






MiD'sEX— Con. 






Middlefield, 


70 


12 


North Reading, 


116 


23 


Northampton, . 


1,013 


481 


Pepperell, . 


241 


64 


Pelham, 


93 


18 


Reading, . 


413 


93 


Plaintield, . 


108 


- 


Bherborn, . 


110 


22 


Prescott, . 


60 


12 


Shirley, . 


152 


57 


South Hadley, . 


219 


100 


Somerville, 


1,169 


593 


Southampton, . 


144 


34 


Stoneham, 


531 


238 


Ware, . 


321 


131 


Stow, . 


111 


33 


Westhampton, . 


71 


7 


Sudbury, . 


138 


38 


WHiiamsbarg, . 


271 


153 


Tewksbury, 


122 


43 


Worthinf^u, . 


130 


32 


Townsend, 


251 


54 








Tyngsborough, . 
Wakefield,, 


81 


34 








Totals, . 


4,707 


1,583 


608 


171 








Waltham, .' 


873 


613 


Middlesex Co. 






Watertown, 


395 


164 


Acton, 


156 


63 


Wayland, . 


170 


- 


Arlington, . 




306 


182 


Westford, . 


203 


138 


Ashby, 




139 


29 


Weston, . 


158 


13 


Ashland, . 




276 


81 


Wilmington, 


93 


17 


Ayer, . 




172 


95 


Winchester, 


305 


142 


Bedford, . 




106 


26 


Woburn, . 


782 


603 


Belmont, 
Billerica, 




134 

245 


71 
53 










Totals, . 


26,570 


12,434 


Boxborough, 


37 


33 








Brighton, . 


348 


345 


Nantucket Co. 






Burlington, 


44 ^ 


47 


Nantucket, 


816 


22 


Cambridge, 


3,289 


1,753 








Carlisle, 


80 


20 


Norfolk Co. 






Charlestown, . 


3,014 


1,635 


Bellingham, 


148 


17 


Chelmsford, 


232 


62 


Braintree, . 


886 


346 


Concord, . 


272 


72 


Brook line, 


563 


241 


Dracut, 


192 


68 


Canton, 


313 


210 


Dunstable, . 


41 


26 


Cohasset, . 


241 


57 


Everett, 


291 


101 


Dedham, . 


445 


262 


Framingham, 


486 


138 


Dover, 


72 


27 


Groton, 


252 


1 


Foxborough, . 


339 


61 


Holliston, . 


367 


143 


Franklin; . 


315 


107 


Hopkinton, 


348 


312 


Holbrook, . 


2^4 


60 


Hudson, 


249 


89 


Hyde Park, 


482 


263 


Lexington, . 


220 


79 


Med field, . 


118 


45 


Lincoln, 


91 


9 


Med way, , 


356 


89 


Littleton, . 


130 


10 


Milton, 


252 


81 


Lowell, 


3,465 


1,673 


Needham, . 


347 


116 


Maiden, 


752 


243 


Norfolk, . 


111 


17 


Marlborough, . 


664 


533 


Norwood, . 


185 


54 


Maynard, . 


145 


26 


Quincy, . 


831 


354 


Medford, . 


673 


365 


Randolph, . 


314 


348 


Melrose, 


377 


164 


Sharon, 


141 


56 


Natlck, 


683 


449 


Stoughton, 


376 


276 


Newton, 


1,272 


285 


Walpole, , 


250 


106 





Vote for President^ in 1872. 



169 



Towns. 


Grant. 


Greeley. 


Towns. 


Grant. 


Greeley. 


Norfolk— Cicm. 




k 


Wo»sTER— Con. 






W. Roxbury, . 


703 


518 


Brookfield, 


820 


132 


Weymouth, 


802 


883 


Charlton, . 


200 


34 


W rentham, 


202 


59 


Clinton, . 


524 


298 








Dana, 
Douglas, . 


94 
146 


7 
86 


Totals, . i 


8,526 


4,142 








Dudley, . 


112 


144 


Plymouth Co. 






Fitchburg, 


1,284 


429 


Abington, . 


1,119 


360 


Gardner, . 


404' 


95 


Bridge water, 


255 


106 


Grafton, . 


341 


78 


Carver, 


84 


42 


Hardwick, 


152 


67 


Duxbury, . 


259 


78 


Harvard, . 


130 


76 


E. Bridgewater, 


307 


120 


Holden, 


225 


_ 


Halifax, 


84 


27 


Hubbardston, . 


168 


42 


Hanover, . 


184 


28 


Lancaster, . 


220 


31 


Hanson, 


124 


28 


Leicester, . 


269 


31 


Hingham, • 
Hull, . 


431 


129 


Leominster, 


698 


123 


30 


2 


Lunenburg, 


167 


16 


Kingston, . 


176 


79 


Mendon, . 


89 


50 


Lakeville, . 


100 


12 


Milford, . 


755 


492. 


Marion, 


131 


22 


Miltoury, . 


378 


146 


Marshfleld, 


150 


7 


New Braintree, 


89 


17 


Mattapoisett, 


228 


9 


Northborough, . 


202 


55 


Middleborough, . 


418 


122 


Northbridge, . 


310 


165 


N. Bridgewater, 


1,070 


272 


N. Brookfield, . 


405 


170 


Pembroke, . 


130 


- 


Oakham, . 


100 


20 


Plymouth, . 


730 


265 


Oxford, . 


243 


112 


Plympton, . 


72 


59 


Paxton, 


92 


25 


Rochester, . 


150 


4 


Petersham, 


147 


38 


Scituate, 


244 


112 


PhillipstoB, 


113 


3 


South Scituate, . 


164 


28 


Princeton, . 


130 


35 


Warcham, . 


207 


65 


Royalston, 


200 


4 


W. Bridgewater, 


156 


37 


Rutland, . 
Shrewsbury^ . 


117 
204 


22 
35 








Totals, . 


7,012 


2,013 


Southborough, . 


196 


9 








Southbridge, . 


316 


162 


Suffolk Co. 






Spencer, . 


380 


71 


Boston, 


16,710 


10,428 


Sterling, , 


• 


247 


37 


Chelsea, 


1,907 


674 


Sturbridge, 


\ • 


184 


— 


Revere, 


96 


49 


Sutton, 


> m 


184 


39 


Winthrop, . 


53 


19 


Templeton 
Upton, 


9 


292 
245 


60 
58 








Totals, . 


17,766 


11,170 


Uxbridge, . 
Warren, , 


• 
* • 


223 
269 


139 
123 


Worcester Co. 






Webster, . 


» • 


348 


274 


Asbburnham, . 


263 


67 


Westborough, . 


467 


88 


Athol, . 


532 


109 


W. Boylston, . 


300 


40 


Auburn, 


91 


18 


W. Brookfield, . 


196 


79 


Barre, . 


259 


77 


Westminster, . 


245 


69 


Berlin, 


143 


12 


Wlnchendon, . 


488 


72 


Blackstone, 


273 


282 


Worcester, 


4,366 


2,145 


"Rnltmi 


220 


4.f^ 








Boylston, . 


122 


%t/ 


Totals, . 


19,827 


7,153 



170 



Vote for President^ in 1872. 



POPULAR VOTE FOR PRESIDENT, IN 1872. 



STATES. 



Obamt. 



Orbelet. 



Repab. 
MfOority. 



Demo. 
Majority. 



Alabama, 
Arkansaa, 
California, 
Connecticut, . 
Delaware, 
Florida, . 
Qeorglti, , 
Illinoia, . 
Indiana, . 
Iowa, 
Kansas, . 
Kentucky, 
Louisiana, 
Maine, . . 
Maryland, 
Massachusetts, 
Michigan, . 
Minnesota, 
Mississippi, . 
Missouri, 
Nebraska, 
Nevada, . 
New Hampshire, 
New Jersey, . 
New York, . 
North Carolina, 
Ohio, 
Oregon, . 
I'cnnsylvanla, 
Rhode Island, 
South Carolina, 
Tennessee, 
Texas, . 
Vermont, 
Virginia,. 
West Virginia, 
Wisconsin, 

Totals, . 



90,272 
41,373 
54,020 
60,638 
11,115 
17,763 
62,550 

241,944 

186,147 

131,566 
67,048 
88,766 
71,663 

«6 1,422 
66,760 

133,472 

138,455 
55,117 
82,175 

119,196 

18,329 

8,413 

87,168 

91,656 

440,736 
94,769 

281,852 
11,819 

349,589 
13,665 
72,290 
85,655 
47,406 
41,481 
93,468 
32,315 

104,997 



8,697,070 



79,444 
37,927 
40,718 
45,880 
10,206 
15,427 
76,356 

184,938 

163,632 
71,196 
82,970 
99,995 
67,029 
29,087 
67,687 
59,260 
78,355 
34,423 
47,288 

151,434 

7,812 

6,236 

31,424 

76,456 

887,281 
70,094 

244,321 
7,730 

212,041 
5,329 
22,703 
94,391 
66,500 
10,927 
91,654 
29,451 
86,477 



2,834,079 



10,828 
8,446 

13,302 

4,758 

909 

2,336 

67,006 
22,516 
60,870 
34,078 

14,634 
82,335 

74,212 
60,100 
20,694 
34,887 

10,517 

2,177 

5,744 

15,200 

53,455 

24,676 

37,531 

4,089 

137,548 

8,336 

49,587 



80,554 
1,814 
2,864 

18,520 



849,021 



13,806 

11,229 
927 

82,238 



8,736 
19,094 



86,030 



PopvJation of the United States. 171 



POPULATION OF THE UNITED STATES-1870. 





Total 


Native 


Foreign 


States and Territobies. 


Population. 


born. 


bom. 


States. 








Alabama, 


996,992 


987,080 


9,962 


Arkansas, . 








484,471 


479,445 


6,026 


California, . 








560,247 


350,416 


209,831 


Connecticut, 








637,464 


423,816 


113,639 


Delaware, . 








125,015 


115,879 


9,136 


Florida, 








187,748 


182,781 


4,967 


Georgia, 








1,184,109 


1,172,982 


11,127 


Illinois, 








2,639,891 


2,024,693 


615,198 


Indiana, 








1,680,637 


1,639,163 


141,474 


Iowa, , 








1,191,792 


987,736 


204,057 


Kansas, 








864,399 


316,007 


48,392 


Kentucky, . 








1,321,011 


1,257,613 


63,398 


Louisiana, . 








726,916 


665,088 


61,827 


Maine, . 








626,916 


678,034 


48,881 


Maryland, . 








780,894 


• 697,482 


83,412 


Massachusetts, , 








1,467,351 


1,104,032 


363,819 


Michigan, . 








1,184,059 


916,049 


268,010 


Minnesota, . 








439,706 


275,009 


160,697 


Mississippi, . 
Missouri, 








827,922 


816,732 


11,191 








1,721,295 


1,499,021 


222,267 


Nebraska, . 








122,993 


92.245 


80,748 


Nevada, 








42.491 


23,690 


18,801 


New Hampshire, 








318,300 


288,689 


29,611 


New Jersey, 








906,096 


717,153 


188,943 


New York, . 








4,382,759 


3,244,406 


1,138,353 


North Carolina, 








1,071,361 


1,068,332 


3,029 


Ohio, . 








2,665,260 


2,292,767 


372,493 


Oregon, 








90,923 


79,323 


11,600 


Pennsylvania, 








3,521,791 


2,976,530 


646,261 


Rhode Island, 








217,353 


161,957 


65,396 


South Carolina, 








705,606 


697,522 


8,074 


Tennessee, . 








1,258,520 


1,239,204 


19,316 


Texas, . 








818,579 


758,168 


62,411 


Vermont, 








330,661 


283,396 


47,156 


Virginia, . 






•/ • 


1,225,163 


1,211,409 


13,764 


West Virginia, 








442,014 


424,923 


17,091 


Wisconsin, . 








1,054,670 


690,171 


364,499 


Total States, .... 


88,113,253 


82,640,907 


6,472,346 


Tebbitories. 








Arizona, 


9,658 


3,849 


6,809 


Colorado, 


89,864 


33,266 


6,599 



172 Population of the United States, 



Total 
States and Tebritories. _ 


Native 


Foreign 




i'opulatlOD. 


bom. 


bom. 


Territories— CStm. 








Dakota, 


14,181 


9,366 


4,815 


District of Columbia, . 




131,700 


116,446 


16,264 


Idaho, .... 




14,999 


7,114 


7,886 


Montana, 




20,695 


12.616 


7,979 


New Mexico, 




91,874 


86,264 


6,620 


Utah, . 




86,786 


66,084 


30,702 


Washington, 




23,966 


18,931 


6,024 


Wyoming, . 




9,118 


6,606 


3,613 


Total Territories, 


442,130 


348,630 


94,200 


ToUl United State 


B, . 38,666,988 


32,989,437 


6,566,646 



Legal Voters^ etc. 



173 



A LIST 

Of the Counties, Towns and Cities in the Commonwealth, 
with the Census of Inhabitants in 1870 and 1875, and 
of Iiesal Voters in 1865. 



COUNTEES AND TOWNS. 



Population. 



1870. 



Barnstable. 

Barnstable, . 
Brewster, 

ghatham, . . . 
>ennis, .... 
Eastham, . . • 
Falmouth, 
Harwich, 
Mashpee,* . 
Orleans, .... 
Provincetown, 
Sandwich, 

'J'ruro, .... 
Wellfleet, 
Yarmouth, • 

Totals, . 

Berkshire. 
Adams, .... 
Alford, .... 
Becket, .... 
Cheshire, . • 
Clarksburg, . 
Dalton, .... 
Egremont, 

Florida 

Great Barrington,. 

Hancock, 

Hinsdale, 

Lanesborough, . • 

Lee, .... 

Lenox, .... 

Monterey, 

Mount Washington, 

New Ashford, 

New Marlborough, • 



4,793 
1,259 
2,411 
3,209 

668 
2,257 
3,080 

348 
1,323 
3,865 
8,694 
1,269 
2,135 
2,423 



32,774 



12,090 

430 

1,346 

1,758 

686 

1,252 

931 

1,322 

4,320 

882 

1,695 

1,393 

3,866 

1,965 

653 

256 

208 

1,855 



1875. 



4,302 
1,219 
2,274 
8,309 

639 
2,211 
3,355 

278 
1,373 
4,357 
3,417 
1,098 
1,988 
2,264 



82,144 



15,760 

389 

1,329 

1,693 

670 

1,759 

890 

572 

4,385 

730 

1,671 

1,357 

3,900 

1,845 

703 

177 

160 

2,037 



Voters in 
1860. 



1,118 
811 
641 
872 
204 
642 
830 



484 
828 
887 
867 
612 
598 



8,834 



1,452 
112 
254 
317 
86 
283 
207 
167 
737 
179 
263 
250 
768 
868 
178 
55 
42 
807 



* Incorporated May 38, 1870. 



174 



Legal Voters^ etc. 



COUNTIES AND TOWNS. 



Population. 



1S70. 



1875. 



Voters in 
1865. 



Berkshire— Con. 

Otis, 

Peru, 

Pittsfield, . . . . 
Richmond, . . . . 

Sandiflfield 

Savoy 

Sheffield, . . . . 
Stoekbridge, . . . . 
Tyringham, • . . . 
Waahington, . . . . 
West Stoekbridge, 
Williamstown, 
Windsor, . . . . 



ToUIs, 

Acushnet, 

Attleborough, 

Berkley, . 

Dartmouth, . 

Dighton, 

EastOD, . 

Fairhaven, 

Fall River, . 

Freetown, 

Mansfield, 

New Bedford, 

Norton, . 

Raynham, 

Rehoboth, 

Seekonk, 

Somerset, 

Swansea, 

Taunton, 

Westport, 



Bristol. 



Totals, 



Ohilmark, 
Edgartown, 
Gay Head,* 
Gosnold, 
Tisbury, 

ToUls, 



Dukes. 



960 

456 

11,112 

1,001 

1,482 

861 

.2,535 

2,003 

667 

694 

1,924 

3,569 

686 



64,826 

1,132 
6,769 
744 
3,367 
1,817 
3,668 
2,626 

26,766 
1,372 
2,432 

21,320 
1,821 
1,713 
1,896 
1,021 
1,776 
1,294 

18,629 
2,724 



102,886 



476 
1,516 

160 

99 

1,536 



855 

443 

12,267 

1,141 

1,172 

730 

2,233 

2,089 

517 

603 

1,981 

8,683 

624 



68,265 

1,059 
9,224 
781 
3,434 
1,755 
8,898 
2,768 

45,340 
1,396 
2,666 

26,876 
1,595 
1,687 
1,827 
1,167 
1,940 
1,808 

20,429 
2,912 



131,052 



608 

1,707 

216 

116 

1,625 



3,787 



4,071 



225 

97 

1,529 

161 

308 

221 

480 

368 

147 

98 

272 

500 

190 

10,566 

286 

1,121 
282 
777 
844 
601 
664 

8,207 
363 
470 

4,546 
403 
386 
420 
223 
385 
812 

3,086 
769 

18,676 



154 
500 

26 
428 

1,107 



* Incorporated April 30, 1870. 



Legal Voters^ etc. 



175 



COUNTIES AND TOWNS. 



Population. 



1870. 



1875. 



Voters in 
1865. 



Essex. 
Amesbury, . 
Andover, 

Beverly, .... 
Bozford, 
Bradford, 
Dan vers, . 
Essex, .... 
Georgetown, . 
Oloucester, . 
Q-roveland, . 
Hamilton, 
Haverhill, 

Ipswich, .... 
Lawrence, 

Lynn 

Lynnfield, 

liancheBten . 

Marblehead, . 

Methuen, . 

Middletou, . 

Nahant, .... 

Newbury, 

Newburyport, 

North Andover, . 

Peabody,* 

Bockport, 

Rowley, .... 

Salem, .... 

Salisbury, 

Saugus, .... 

Swampscott, . 

Topsfield, 

Wenbam, 

West Newbury, . 

Totals, . 

Franklin. 
Ashfleld, 
Bernardston, . 
Buckland, 
Cbarlemont, . 
Colraln, .... 
Conway, . 
Deerfield, 



6,681 
4,873 
6,507 
847 
2,014 
6,600 
1,614 
2,088 

15,889 

1,776 

790 

12,092 
3,720 

28,021 

28,233 
818 
1,665 
7,703 
2,969 
1,010 
475 
1,430 

12,595 
2,549 
7,343 
3,904 
1,157 

24,117 
3,776 
2,247 
1,846 
1,213 
985 
2,006 



200,843 



1,180 
961 
1,946 
1,005 
1,742 
1,460 
3,632 



6,987 
5,097 
7,263 
884 
2,347 
6,024 
1,713 
2,214 

16,754 

2,084 

797 

14,628 
3,674 

34,907 

32,600 
760 
1,560 
7,677 
4,205 
1,092 
766 
1,426 

13,323 
2,981 
8,066 
4,490 
1,162 

25,955 
4,078 
2,578 
2,128 
1,221 
911 
2,021 



223,332 



1,190 
991 
1,921 
1,029 
1,999 
1,452 
3,414 



744 
804 

1,436 
196 
374 
868 
442 
414 

2,460 
384 
187 

2,428 
732 

2,668 

4,212 
176 
369 

1,675 

579 

167 

66 

343 

2,636 
436 
961 
915 
270 

3,501 
887 
426 
300 
307 
234 
485 



33,072 



349 
197 
387 
251 
380 
320 
525 



* Formerly South Danvers. 



176 



Legal Voters^ etc. 



COtJNTIBS AND TOWNS. 



Population. 



1870. 



1879. 



Voters in 
1865. 



Franklin— Con, 
Brving, . . . . . 

GlU, 

Greenfield, . . . . 

Hawley, 

Heath, 

Leverett, • . . . 

Leyden 

Monroe, 

Montague, . . . . 
New Sulem, . . . . 

Northfleld 

Orange, 

Rowe 

Sbelburne, . . . . 
Sbutesbury, . . . . 
Sunderland, . . . . 

Warwick 

Wendell, . . . . 
Wbately 

Totals, . . . . 

Hampden. 

Agawam 

Blandford, . . . . 

Brimfield 

Chester, 

Cbicopee 

Granville, . . . . 

Holland 

Holyoke, . . . . 
Lonsmeadow, 

Ludlow, 

Monson, . . . f . 

Montgomery 

Palmer, 

Russell, 

Soutbwick, . . . . 

Springfield 

Tolland 

Wales, 

Westlield 

West Springfield, . 
Wilbranam 

Totals, . . . . 



679 
653 

3,589 
672 
613 
877 
518 
201 

2,224 
987 

1,720 

2,091 
581 

1,582 
614 
832 
769 
539 

1,068 



82,635 



2,001 
1,020 
1,288 
1,253 
9,607 
1,293 

344 

10,733 

1,342 

1,136 

3,204 

318 
3,631 

635 

1,100 

26,703 

509 

831 
6,519 
2,606 
2,330 



78,409 



794 
673 

3,540 
588 
545 
831 
524 
190 

8,380 
923 

1,641 

2,497 
661 

1,590 
558 
860 
744 
503 
958 



33,696 



2,248 

964 

1,201 

1,396 

10,331 

1,240 

334 

16,260 

1,467 

1,222 

3,733 

304 
4,572 

638 

1,114 

31,053 

452 
1,020 
8,429 
3,739 
2,576 



94,293 



122 
160 
705 
178 
161 
215 
133 
50 
327 
277 
401 
502 
130 
338 
162 
211 
229 
156 
250 

7,117 



346 
324 
309 
279 

1,086 
328 
88 
747 
335 
272 
541 
92 
524 
120 
289 

4,238 
102 
164 

1,336 
378 
442 

12,330 



Legal Voters^ etc. 



177 



COUNTIES ANJy TOWNS. 




Vetera in 
1865. 



Hampshire. 

Amherst, 
Belchertown, 
Chesterfield, . 
Cammington, . • 
EasthamptoD, • 

Enfield 

Goshen, .... 

Granhy 

Greenwich, . 

Hadlev 

Hatfield, 
Huntington, . 
Middlefield, . 
Northampton, . • 
Pelham, .... 
Plainfleld, 

Prescott, . . • 
Soath Hadley, 
Southampton, 

Ware 

Westhampton, 
Williamsburg, 
Worthington, 



Totals, 



Middlesex. 
Acton, .... 
Arlington, 

Ashby, .... 
Ashland, * 
Ayer,* .... 
Bedford, 
Belmont, 
Billerica, 

Boxborough, . . • 
Brighton,! • 
Burlington, . • 
Cambridge, . • . 
Carlisle, .... 
Charlestown,! . • 
Chelmsford, . • 
Concord, . . * . 
Dracut, .... 
Dunstable, 
Everett,! 



4,036 


3,037 


2,428 


2,315 


811 


746 


1,037 


916 


8,620 


3,064 


1,028 


1,065. 


368 


340 


863 


812 


665 


606 


2,301 


2,126 


1,594 


1,600 


1,156 


1,006 


. 728 


603 


10,160 


11,108 


678 


633' 


621 


481 


641 


403 


2,840 


3,370 


1,159 


1,050 


4,257 


4,142 


687 


666 


2,159 


2,020 


860 


818 


44,888 


44,813 


1,603 


1,708 


8,261 


3,006 


094 


062 


2,186 


2,211 


- 


1,872 


840 


806 


1,618 


1,037 


1,833 


1,881 


838 


318 


4,067 


— 


626 


650 


80,634 


47,838 


569 


548 


28,823 


— 


2,374 


2,372 


2,412 


2,676 


2,078 


1,116 


471 


452 


2,220 


3,65L 



728 
607 
223 
332 
863 
242 
06 
282 
147 
427 
240 
282 
123 
1,800 
183 
170 
142 
862 
282 
620 
141 
416 
243 



7,668 



305 
471 
276 
363 

166 
218 
302 
102 
668 
140 

6,152 
122 

6,506 
416 
486 
401 
128 



* Incorporated Feb. 14, 1871. f Annexed to Boston May 21, 1878. 
t Annexed to Boston May 14, 1873. § Incorporated March 0, 1870. 

12 



178 



Legal Voters^ etc. 



COUNTIES AND TOWNS. 



POPUIJLTION. 



1870. 



1S75. 



Voters in 
1869. 



Middlesex— Ooh. 
Framlngham, . 

GrotoD, 

Hollieton, .... 
Hopkinton, .... 
Hudson,* .... 
Lexington, .... 

Lincoln, 

Littleton, .... 

Lowell, 

Maiden, t .... 
Marlborough, 

Maynard,! .... 
Medford, .... 

-Melrose, 

Natick, . . 

Newton, 

.North Reading, . . 
Pepperell, .... 
Reading, .... 
:Sherborn, .... 

Shirley 

Somerville, .... 
Stoneham, .... 

Stow, 

Sudbury, .... 
Tewksbury, .... 
Townsend, .... 
Tyngsborough, 
Waketield,§ .... 
•Waltham, .... 
•Watertown, .... 
Way land, .... 
Westford, .... 

Weston, 

Wilmington 

Winchester, .... 
Woburn 

Totals, .... 

Nantucket. 
Nantucket, .... 

Norfolk. 

Bellingham 

Braintree, 



4,968 

a,584 

8,078 

4,419 

8,389 

2,277 

791 

^83 

40,928 

7,367 

8,474 

6,717 

8,414 

6,404 

12,825 

942 
1,842 
2,664 
1,062 
1,451 
14,685 
4,513 
1,813 
2,091 
1,944 
1,962 

629 
4,135 
9,065 
4,826 
1,240 
1,803 
1,261 

866 
2,645 
8,560 



274,358 



4,123 



1,282 
3,948 



5,167 
1,906 
3,399 
4,503 
8,493 
2,505 

834 

950 

49,677 

10,843 

8,424 

1,965 

6,627 

3,990 

7,419 

16,105 

979 
1,924 
3,186 

999 
1,352 
21,868 
4,984 
1,022 
1,177 
1,997 
2,196 

665 
5,349 
9,945 
5,099 
1,766 
1,933 
1,282 

879 
8,099 
9,568 



284,072 



8,201 



1,244 
4,156 



887 
619 
694 
824 

385 

137 

204 

5,150 

1,358 

1,182 

1,031 
567 

1,099 

1,591 
241 
379 
567 
245 
272 

1,667 
787 
265 
323 
246 
481 
132 
643 

1,032 
690 
268 
825 
287 
204 
351 

1,385 



41,935 



809 



271 
777 



* Incorporated March 19, 1866. 
X Incorporated April 19, 1871. 



t Town divided in 1870. 
§ Formerly South Reading. 



Legal Voters^ etc. 



179 



COUNTIES AND TOWNS. 



POPDLATION. 



Norfolk— 0(9n. 

Brookline, . . . , 

Canton, . . . . , 

Cobasset, . . . , 

Dedham, . . . , 

Dorchester,* . . , , 

Dover, . . . , , 

Foxborough, . . . . 

Franklin, . . . , 

Holbrook, . . . , 

Hyde Park,t . . . , 

Medfield, . . . , 

Medway, . . . , 

Milton, . . . . , 

Needbam, . . . , 

Norfolk,! . . . , 

Norwood, § . , . , 

Qolncy, , , . . , 

Randolph 

Roxbury,* . . . , 

Sharon, . • . . , 

Stoagbton, . . . , 

Walpole, . . . , 
West Roxbury, II . 
Weymouth, ... 

Wrentham, . . . , 

Totals, . . . , 

Pltmodth. 

Abington, . . . , 

Bridgewater, . . . , 

Brockton,ir . . . , 
Carver, . • . . 
Duxbury, ... 
East Bridgewater, 

Halifax 

Hanover, . • . , 

Hanson, . . . . , 

Hingham, . . . , 
Hull, .... 

Kingston, . . . , 

Lakeville, . • . , 

Marion, . . . . , 

Marshfield, . • . , 



1870. 



6,650 
8,879 
2,130 
7,342 

645 
3,067 
2,562 

4,136 
1,142 
3,721 
2,683 
3,607 
1,081 

7,442 
5,642 

1,508 
4,914 
2,187 
8,683 
9,010 
2,292 



89,443 



0,308 
3,660 
8,007 
1,092 
2,341 
3,017 

619 
1,628 
1,219 
4,422 

261 
1,604 
1,159 

896 
1,659 



1875. 



6,675 
4,192 
2,197 
5,756 

650 
3,168 
2,983 
1,726 
6,316 
1,163 
4,242 
2,738 
4,548 

920 
1,673 
9,155 
4,061 

1,330 

4,842 
2,290 

9,819 
2,895 



88,239 



8,241 
3,969 
10,578 
1,127 
2,245 
2,808 

568 
1,801 
1,265 
4,654 

316 
1,569 
1,061 

862 
1,817 



Voters in 
1865. 



761 
573 
492 
1,268 
1,860 
136 
592 
548 



224 
707 
486 
495 



1,276 
1,261 
4,483 

285 
1,020 

468 

991 
1,843 

708 



21,525 



1,833 
629 

1,362 
260 
631 
758 
210 
414 
329 
865 
66 
854 
812 
245 
452 



* Annexed to Boston June 4, 1869. 

t Incorporated April 22, 1868. t Incorporated Feb. 23, 1870. 

II Annexed to Boston, May 29, 1878. § Incorporated Feb. 23, 1872.* 
II Name changed from North Bridgewatei% March 28, 1874. 



180 



Legal Voters^ etc. 



COUNTIES AJSTD TOWNS. 



Population. 



1S70. 



1S75. 



Votenin 
1S65. 



PLTMODTH—dim. 

Mattapoisett, .... 
Middleborough, . . • 
Pembroke, .... 



Plymouth, 

Plympton, 

Rochester, . 

Rockland,* . 

Scltnate, 

South Scituate, 

South AbingtOD,t . 

Wareham, 

West Bridgewater, 



TotaU, 



Boston, . 
Chelsea, . 
Revere, J . 
Winthrop, 

Totals, 



Suffolk. 



Worcester. 

Ashbumham, 
Athol, .... 
Auburn,. . . • 
Barre, .... 

Berlin 

Blackstone, . 
Bolton, .... 
Boylston, 
Brookfield, . 
Charlton, . . 
Clinton, .... 
Dana, .... 
iXouglas, . . • 
Dudley, .... 
Fltchburg^ 

Oardner, . . . 
Qrafton, .... 
Hardwick, 
Hapard, 

Holden 

Hubbardston, 



1,361 
4,687 
1,447 
6,288 
804 
1,024 

2,350 
1,661 

8,008 
1,803 



66,366 



250,526 

18,547 

1,197 

582 



270,802 



2,172 
8,617 
1,178 
2,572 
1,016 
5,421 
1,014 

800 
2,527 
1,878 
5,429 

758 
2,182 
2,388 
11,260 
3,383 
4,594 
2,210 
1,341 
2,062 
1,654 



1,361 
5,028 
1,890 
6,370 
755 
1,001 
4,203 
2,468 
1,818 
2,456 
2,874 
1,748 



60,862 



841,019 

20,605 

1,608 

663 



864,880 



2,141 
4,134 
1,238 
2,460 

987 
4,640 

987 

895 
2,660 
1,852 
6,781 

760 
2,202 
2,653 
12,289 
8,780 
4,442 
1,992 
1,304 
2,180 
1,440 



876 
1,112 

867 
1,539 

235 

800 

572 
428 

610 
800 



14,648 



88,890 

2,502 

188 

140 



86,720 



600 
708 
144 
688 
229 
799 
831 
194 
496 
429 
518 
198 
413 
280 
1,514 
507 
751 
838 
842 
858 
844 



* Incorporated March 9, 1874. f Incorporated March 4, 1876. 

X Name changec^ Arom North Chelsea March 24, 1871. 



Legal Voters^etc. 



181 



COUNTIES A2n> TOWNS. 



Population. 



1870. 



1875. 



Voters in 
18«5. 



WORCESTER- 

Lancaster, 
Leicester, 
Leominster, . 
Lunenburg, . 
Mendon, . 
Milford, . 
Hillbury, 
New Braintree, 
Northborough, 
Northbridge, . 
North Brookfield, . 
Oakham, 
Oxford, . 
Paxton, . 
Petersham, . 
Philllpston, . 
Princeton, 
Boyalston, . 
Rutland, 
Shrewsbury, . 
Southborough, 
Southbridge, . 
Spencer, . 
Sterling, . 
Sturbridge, . 
Satton, -. 
Templeton, . 
Upton, . 
Uzbridge, 
Warren, . 
Webster, 
Westfoorough, 
West Boylston, 
West Brookfield, . 
Westminster, 
Winchendon, . 
Worcester, . 



Can, 



Totals, 



1,846 

2,768 
3,894 
1,121 
1,176 
9,890 
4,397 

640 
1,604 
8,774 
8,843 

860 
2,669 

646 
1,336 

693 
1,279 
1,864 
1.024 
1,610 
2,135 
6,208 
8,962 
1,670 
2,101 
2,699 
2,802 
1,989 
8,058 
2,626 
4,768 
8,601 
2,862 
1,842 
1,770 
8,898 
41,105 

192,716 



1.967 
2,770 
6,201 
1,163 
1,176 
9,818 
4,529 

603 
1,398 
4,030 
8,749 

873 
2,93^ 

608 
1,203 

666 
1,063 
1,260 
1,030 
1,524 
1,986 
6,740 
6,461 
1,569 
2,213 
8,061 
2,764 
2,125 
8,029 
3,260 
6,059 
6,140 
2,902 
1,903 
1.712 
3,762 
49,265 

210,242 



823 

479 
864 
282 
268 
1,186 
618 
189 
811 
612 
600 
210 
616 
166 

. 806 
160 
277 
828 

. 234 
358 
338 
646 
629 
404 
425 
613 
607 
481 
467 
442 
815 
644 
422 
294 
•384 
619 
6,880 

31,780 



182 



Legal Voters^ etc. 



RECAPITULATION. 



COUNTIES. 




No. of 
Towns. 


POPDI^TION. 


Voters in 




1870. 


1875. 


1865. 


BamBtable, . , 


t • • 


14 


82,774 


82,144 


8,334 


Berkshire, 








81 


64,826 


68,265 


10,566 


Bristol, . 








19 


102,886 


181,052 


18,576 


DnkcB, . 








5 


8,787 


4,071 


1,101 


Essex, 


• • 






84 


200,848 


223,382 


83,072 


Franklin, . 








26 


32,685 


88,696 


7,117 


• 
Hampden, 








21 


78,409 


94,293 


12,880 


Hampshire, 








23 


44,888 


44,813 


7,668 


Middlesex, 








54 


274,858 


284,072 


41,935 


Nantncket, 








1 


4,128 


8,201 


809 


Norfolk, . 








24 


89,443 


88,239 


21,525 


Plymouth, 








27 


65,865 


69,352 


14,643 


Suffolk, . 








4 


270,802 


864,880 


86,720 


Worcester, 








58 


192,718 


210,242 


81,780 


Totals, . 


841 


1,457,852 


1,651,652 


246,182 



Valiuition of tJie Commonwealth. 183 



VALUAJION OF THE COfflONWEALTH. 



Established bt Chapter 259 of the Acts of 1872.* 



BARNSTABLE COUNTY. 









Tax of $1,000 








includ. Polls 


TOWNS. 


Polls. 


Property. 


at half a mill 
each. 


Barnstable, .... 


1,138 


$2,880,361 14 


$2 09 


Brewster, 






295 


800,893 33 


57 


Chatham, . 






613 


1,025,358 39 


85 


Dennis, . . 






829 


1,521,982 74 


1 22 


Eastham, 






178 


233,874 22 


21 


FalmoQth, . 






650 


1,293,695 74 


1 01 


Harwich, 






827 


1,083,774 41 


99 


Mashpee, 






69 


94,845 87 


08 


Orleans, 






404 


568,979 20 


50 


Provincetown, 






1,056 


2,102,071 83 


1 64 


Sandwich, . 






810 


1,444,517 43 


1 17 


Truro, . 






347 


298,893 69 


33 


Wellfleet, . 






583 


855.929 09 


74 


Yarmouth, . 






579 


1,610,171 50 


1 14 


Total, . 


< 


• 


8,378 


$15,815,348 58 


$12 54 



BERKSHIRE COUNTY. 



Adams, • • • . • 


2,900 


$6,679,320 34 


$4 98 


Alford, . 




120 


311,989 33 


22 


Becket, .... 




357 


490,644 00 


44 


Cheshire, . • . 




445 


881,121 33 


69 


Clarksburg, . 




153 


247,442 66 


21 


Dalton, .... 




307 


1,113,828 70 


74 


Egremont, . 




248 


579,198 41 


43 


Florida 




330 


206,957 00 


27 


Great Barrlngton, 




1,102 


4,963,402 75 


3 17 


Hancock, 




178 


495,515 29 


35 


Hinsdale 


458 


883,906 68 


70 



* This schedule constitutes the basis of apportionment for State and 
County taxes until the year 1882, unless hereafter changed by law. 



184 Valuation of the CommonweaUh. 



BERESHIBE COUNTY— COWCI.DDED. 



■ 






Tax of $1,000 








inclQd. PoUf 


TOWNS. 


Polls. 


Propertg^. 


at half a mill 
each. 


Lanesborough, • 


868 


$765,788 83 


♦?5J 


JLiCB, • • • < 




920 


1,725,051 50 


1 37 


Lenox, .... 




504 


1,492,673 83 


104 


Monterey, 




186 


808,160 16 


26 


Mount Washington, , 




62 


99,381 00 


08 


New Ashford, 




48 


109,439 00 


08 


New MarlboroQgh, 




604 


919,417 25 


74 


Otie, 




252 


825,529 00 


30 


Peru, . 






118 


197,715 36 


16 


Plttsfield, , 






2,484 


8,856,082 51 


5 92 


Richmond, 






295 


546,406 82 


44 


Sandisfield, . 






342 


546,026 32 


46 


Savoy, . 
Sheffield, 






209 


279,228 66 


25 






588 


1,367,702 91 


99 


Stockbridge, 






402 


2,659,644 32 


1 64 


Tyringham, 






130 


305,898 00 


28 


Washington, 






156 


290,378 50 


23 


West Stockbridge, 




523 


928,665 41 


75 


Williamstown, 




689 


1,718,937 65 


1 25 


Windsor, 




193 


314,619 66 


26 


Total, 


1 • 4 


» • 


15,579 


$40,610,072 48 


$29 24 



BRISTOL COUNTY. 



Acushnet, .... 


281 


$682,824 06 


$0 50 


Attleborough, 






1,285 


2,987,311 91 


2 22 


Berkley, 






396 


327,809 65 


27 


Dartmouth, , 








793 


2,340,476 23 


1 63 


Dighton, 








458 


867,692 24 


69 


Easton, . 








974 


2,903,498 20 


2 02 


Fairhaven, . 








661 


1,676,529 57 


1 22 


Fall River, . 








7,070 


27,518,445 21 


18 08 


Freetown, 








326 


841,817 93 


61 


Mansfield, , 








587 


884,314 40 


76 


New Bedford 


t < 






5«333 


25,488,267 65 


16 14 


Norton, . 








429 


827,559 67 


65 


Raynham, , 
Rehoboth, 








444 


1,177,491 29 


84 








441 


803,565 74 


65 


Seekonk, 








246 


606,265 33 


44 


Somerset, 








475 


979,892 78 


76 


Swansea, 


, 






328 


669,337 78 


52 


Taunton, 








4,855 


15,273,009 41 


10 50 


Westport, 








662 


1,526,688 68 


1 14 


Total, 


> 


■ 


1 • 


25,839 


$88,871,292 63 


$59 64 



ValuaiUyii of the Commonwealth. 185 

COUNTY OF DTJKE8 COUNTY. 



TOWNS. 


Polls. 


Property. 


Tax of $1,000 
Inclad. Polls 
at half a mill 
each. 


Chilmark, .... 

Edgartown 

Gay Head 

Gosnold 

TiBbury 


162 

480 

38 

26 

428 


$327,835 56 

1,206,113 77 

11,014 00 

162,514 00 

706,058 84 


$0 25 
88 
02 
10 
59 


Total, . . . . 


1,124 


$2,418,436 17 


$1 84 



ESSEX COUNTY. 



Ameebury 


1,793 


$2,331,694 62 


$2 13 


ADdoveri 






1,019 


3,406,297 79 


2 31 


Beverly, 






1,872 


5,849,009 33 


403 


Boxford, 






285 


817,822 79 


55 


Bradford, . 




• 


530 


1,103,752 84 


85 


Danvers, 






1,298 


2,927,161 51 


2 20 


Essex, . 






420 


943,770 71 


71 


Georgetown, 






582 


868,536 58 


76 


Gloucester, . 






8,496 


7,709,462 73 


6 82 


Groveland, . 






520 


774,183 26 


67 


Hamilton, 






198 


536,020 22 


88 


Haverhill, . 






3,967 


9,342,712 44 


6 92 


Ipswich, 
Lawrence, . 






815 


1,762,137 86 


134 






6,625 


18,570,198 36 


18 13 


Lynn, . 






7,568 


21,787,103 36 


15 29 


Lvnnfield, . 
Manchester, . 






211 


711,866 84 


48 






429 


1,219,013 64 


86 


Marblehead, . 






2,152 


8,388,539 78 


2 87 


Methaen, . , 






904 


1,987,472 13 


1 50 


Middleton, . 






285 


445,943 46 


35 


Nahant, . 






138 


5,565,328 53 


3 01 


Newbury, 






290 


882,549 55 


61 


Newburyport, 






3,218 


8,269,884 02 


6 98 


North Andover, . 






729 


2,196,427 34 


1 53 


Peabody, 






2,100 


5,427,619 59 


3 92 


Rockport, 






941 


1,688,770 59 


1 36 


Rowley, 






303 


546,301 01 


44 


Salem, . 






5,558 


25,382,251 19 


16 19 


Salisbury, . 






966 


1,903,012 04 


149 


Saugus, . 






612 


1,488,852 07 


1 04 


Swampscott, 






541 


2,104,515 38 


1 38 


Topsfield, . 






821 


755,450 34 


56 


Wenham, . , 






240 


504,944 95 


39 


West Newbury, , 




• • 


518 


1,129,092 87 


86 


Total, . 


» 1 


• 


51,234 


$144,827,699 78 


$101 90 



186 Valuation of the Commonwealth, 

FRAKKLIN COUNTY. 









Tax of $1,000 








Indad Polls 


TOWNS. 


Polls. 


Property. 


at half a mill 
each. 


Ashfield, .... 


332 


$558,337 62 


$0 46 


BcrnardBton, 






238 


478,234 80 


87 


Backland, . 






523 


602,238 16 


68 


Oharlemont, . 








251 


897,298 44 


34 


Colrain, . 








806 


729,502 68 


57 


Conway, 
Deerfield, 








877 


869,061 87 


65 








837 


1,464,055 28 


119 


Erving, . 








211 


260,911 42 


24 


Gill, . . 








194 


481,482 11 


35 


Greenfield, < 








888 


2,475,857 02 


176 


Hawley, , 








172 


171,115 66 


18 


Heath, . 








155 


312,175 72 


24 


Leverett, 








235 


870,054 70 


31 


Leyden, 








109 


251,343 33 


19 


Monroe, 








49 


63,609 96 


06 


Montague, . 








698 


1,007,781 91 


88 


New Salem, , 








262 


349,997 66 


32 


Northfield, , 








456 


789,612 10 


65 


Orange, . 








786 


1,122,926 29 


99 


Rowe, . 








158 


184,585 28 


18 


Bbelbnme, , 








374 


1,066,305 18 


75 


Shutesbury, , 








160 


209,984 00 


19 


Sunderland, 








206 


465,132 06 


35 


Warwick, , 








232 


258,329 35 


25 


Wendell, 








145 


206,909 42 


18 


Whately, . 








810 


802,511 69 


58 


Total, . 


1 1 


1 < 


f « 


8,729 


$15,949,353 71 


$12 80 



HAMPDEN COUNTY, 



Agawam, 

Blandford, 

Brimfield, 

Chester, 

Chicopee, 

Granville, 

Holland, 

Holyoke, 

Longmeadow, 

Ludlow, 

Monson, 

Montgomery, 

Palmer, . 

Russell, . 

South wick, 



483 
278 
313 
350 

2,387 

338 

94 

2,811 
356 
258 
672 
93 
818 
168 
292 



$965,323 95 
536,872 12 
717,093 08 
496,540 46 

4,379,262 85 
480,283 41 
146,605 88 

6,261,712 49 

1,209,609 84 
485,955 30 

1,393,765 94 
158,231 00 

1^412,195 71 
283,149 66 
729,392 87 



$0 76 
42 
64 
44 

3 51 
42 
12 

4 72 
82 
39* 

1 07 
13 

1 16 
23 
53 



Vdliuition of the Commonwealth, 187 



HAMPDEN COUNTY— Concluded. 



TOWNS. 


Polls. 


Property. 

• 


Tax of $1,000 
Inclad. Polls 
at half a mm 
each. 


Springfield, .... 
Tolland, .... 

Wales, 

Westfield, .... 
West Springfield, 
Wilbranam, .... 


7,140 
134 
222 

1,997 
688 
554 


$29,500,151 56 

302,583 66 

373,372 12 

5,163,347 03 

2,161,000 48 

883,278 57 


$19 16 

23 

31 

3 73 

1 49 

74 


Total, .... 


20,441. 


$58,039,727 97 


$40 91 





HAMPSHIRE COUNTY. 


t 


Amherst 


985 


$3,324,202 76 


$2 22 


Belchertown, 






584 


1,132,103 19 


89 


Chesterfield, . 






233 


405,371 16 


38 


Cummington, 






255 


391,155 65 


88 


EasthamptOD, 






778 


2,955,277 21 


1 95 


Enfield, . 






310 


716,497 09 


58 


Goshen, . , 






96 


150,824 50 


18 


Granby, 






236 


546,724 41 


41 


Greenwich, . 






193 


306,966 73 


26 


Hadley, . . , 
Hatfield, 






616 


1,480,119 87 


1 09 






426 


1,617,664 78 


1 07 


Huntington, . 
Middlefield, . 






278 


562,987 01 


44 






180 


425,189 66 


31 


Northampton, 






2,403 


7,349,272 04 


5 09 


Pelham, 






167 


203,607 00 


19 


Plainfield, . 






158 


278,990 75 


23 


Prescott, 






139 


217,396 88 


18 


South Hadley, , 






665 


1,960,330 07 


1 37 


Southampton, 






296 


588,242 98 


46 


\Vare, . 






892 


1,759,527 89 


138 


Westtiampton, 






127 


443,460 82 


30 


Williamsburg, . 






604 


1,535,881 78 


1 11 


Worthlngton, 






240 


373,670 88 


32 


Total, . 


i 


• 


10,806 


$28,725,415 06 


$20 59 



MIDDLESEX COUNTY, 



Acton, 


486 


$1,037,827 04 


$0 79 


Arlington, , 








869 


3,968,954 00 


2 58 


Ashby, . 








298 


538,289 02 


48 


Ashland, 








685 


1,149,051 92 


95 


Ayer, . 








492 


897,098 96 


72 


Bedford, 








228 


555,862 26 


41 


Belmont, 








486 


2,617,009 39 


1 60 


Billerlca, .... 


485 


1,565,065 74 


1 07 



188 Valtmtion of the CommonwedUh, 



MIDDLESEX COUNTY— OONCtDDBD. 










Tax of $1,000 








includ. Polls 


TOWNS. 


PoIU. 


Property. 


at half a mill 
each. 


Bozborongh, 


106 


$267,586 66 


$0 19 


Brighton, 
Barllngton, . 
Cambridge, . 






1,831 


7,137,224 78 


4 44 






2»1 


474,776 95 


35 






10,323 


45,646,076 22 


29 29 


Cariisle, 






164 


373,391 29 


27 


Charlestown, 






8,271 


28,314,873 65 


19 10 


Obelmsford, . 






600 


1,764,033 18' 


1 23 


Ooocord, 






646 


2,364,666 82 


157 


Dracut, . 






' 523 


1,391,920 72 


1 00 


Dunstable, . 






137 


326,185 22 


24 


Everett, 






654 


2,107,796 48 


1 44 


Framingham, 






1,244 


3,897,847 34 


2 68 


Groton, . 






466 


1,743,460 03 


1 15 


Holliston, 






856 


1,857,291 57 


IS 


Hopkinton, . 
Hudson, 






1,009 


2,079,868 55 






015 


1,296,966 72 


1 14 


Lexington, . 






625 


2,249,651 27 


1 50 


Lincoln, . 






230 


700,779 78 


49 


Littleton, 






248 


765,331 16 


52 


Lowell, . . . 






9,186 


27,811,128 12 


19 29 


Maiden, . 






1,945 


6,372,237 44 


434 


Marlborough, 






2,320 


2,699,682 30 


2 59 


Maynard, 
Medford, 






522 


916,118 50 


75 






1,530 


6,263,456 43 


4 08 


Melrose, 






881 


2,627,733 75 


1 83 


Natick, . 






1,863 


2,932,489 58 


2 48 


Newton, 






3,199 


19,244,632 61 


11 77 


North Reading, , 






263 


531,633 64 


41 


Pepperell, . 
Beading, . . 






526 


1,171,801 73 


88 






759 


1,702,763 48 


128 


Bherbom, 






267 


984,136 41 


65 


Shirley, . 






841 


927,209 84 


66 


Somervllle, . 






3,832 


13,372,478 79 


8 98 


Stoneham, . 






1,390 


2,104,304 51 


181 


Stow, . 






296 


777,846 60 


56 


Sudbury, 






330 


1,035,945 50 


71 


Tewksbury, . 






817 


984,172 58 


68 


Townsend, . 






611 


766,804 81 


71 


Tyngsborough, , 
Wakefield, . 






175 


816,817 86 


25 






1,488 


2,969,802 34 


2 29 


Waltham, . 






2,368 


8,021,324 14 


5 42 


Watertown, . 






1,150 


4,907,134 80 


3 17 


Wayland, . 






360 


703,298 23 


55. 


Westford, . 






534 


1,063,516 64 


83 


Weston, 






842 


1,327,178 64 


87 


Wilmington, . 






231 


513,090 74 


89 


Winchester, . 






772 


8,398,870 13 


2 18 


Woburn, 






2,627 


7,564,866 26 


5 26 


Total, . 


» i 


1 • 


72,889 


$241,090,862 02 


$163 83 



ValucUion of the OommonweaMh. 189 



NANTUCKET COUNTY. 



TOWKa. 


Pon». 


1 
Property. 


Tax of $1,000 
mclad. Polls 
at half a mill 
each. 


Nantucket, .... 


923 


$2,367,8&1 09 


$1 71 


Total, .... 


923 


$2,367,831 09 


$1 71 







» 


NORFOTiK COUNTY. 


• 


Bellinicbam 


844 


$516,726 93 


$0 44 


Braintree, 






1,092 


2,186,788 92 


1 70 


Brookllne, . 






1,522 


21,501,469 85 


12 13 


Canton, . 






947 


2,786,565 18 


1 95 


Cohasset, . , 






658 


1,937,175 89 


1 30 


Dedham, . , 






1,855 


4,829,464 96 


823 


Dover, . . 






167 


409,896 21 


30 


Foxborough, 






708 


1,505,936 49 


1 15 


Franklin, 






020 


1,582,983 09 


1 15 


Holbrook, 






425 


1,216,276 87 


86 


Hyde Park, . 






1,507 


4,898,294 61 


334 


Medfield, 






296 


848,688 81 


60 


Medway, 






905 


1,666,371 47 


138 


Milton, . i 






667 


6,452,958 68 


3 21 


Needham, . , 






976 


3,031,378 55 


2 09 


Norfolk, 






270 


474,490 49 


89 


Norwood, 






466 


1,188,850 41 


86 


Jiulnoy,. . . 






1,847 


4,929,736 34 


8 53 


Randolph, . 






1,102 


1,929,429 19 


157 


Sharon, . . , 






871 


8^,389 80 


02 


Stonghton, . 






1,191 


2,434,962 24 


1 88 


Walpole, 






632 


1,352,977 46 


98 


West KoxDnry, . 






2,310 


15,368,478 81 


9 28 


Weymonth, . 






2,510 


5,173,496 62 


8 99 


Wrentham, • 






646 


1,166,231 78 


89 


Total, . 


1 


• . 


23,224 


$89,211,016 66 


$58 77 



PLYMOUTH COUNTY. 



Abington, . . 
Bridge water, 
Carver, . 

Daxburv, . • 
East Bridgewater, 
Halifax, . 

Hanover, . . 
Hanson, . . 




$4,220,866 81 
2,391,899 09 

602,417 89 
1,180,932 56 
1,246,410 31 

837,558 21 
1,002,267 23 

602,514 51 



$8 64 
1 69 
46 
96 
1 07 
27 
75 
46 



190 Valuation of the Commonwealth. 



PLYMOUTH OOUNTY-CONCLDDED. 










Tax of $1,000 








inclad. Polls 


TOWNS. 


PoUs. 


Property. 


at half a mill 
each. 


Hingham, .... 


1,208 


$3,246,673 86 


$2 82 


Hull, .... 




78 


268,880 98 


17 


Kingaton, 




426 


1,428,796 16 


97 


Lakeville, 




818 


672,712 26 


46 


Marion,. 




237 


486,308 23 


87 


Marshfleld, . 




480 


827,907 29 


68 


Mattapoisett, 




858 


602,126 13 


60 


Middleborough, . 




1,822 


2,382,046 41 


1 92 


North Bridgewater, . 




2,294 


8,616,609 83 


3 01 


Pembroke, . 




895 


621,066 78 


68 


Plymouth, . 




1,443 


8,828,822 81 


2 74 


Plympton, . 




216 


810,922 84 


27 


Rochester, . 




801 


608,634 97 


42 


Scituate, 




668 


1,098,862 80 


91 


South Scituate, . 




458 


1,004,412 33 


76 


Warenam, . 




726 


1,163,960 63 


98 


>Ye8t Bridgewater, 




440 


860,497 97 


67 


Total, . 


» • 


17,604 


$34,185,886 88 


$26 §7 



SUFFOLK COUNTY. 



Boston, . 
Chelsea, 
Revere, . 
Winthrop, 



Total, 



61,148 

4,462 

843 

133 



66,076 



$638,870,631 46 

12,406,134 86 

1,016,118 29 

633,628 41 



$662,826,408 02 



$368 24 

8 78 

71 

86 



$878 08 



WORCESTER COUNTY. 





608 


$970,764 72 


$0 81 


Athol, . . . 






1,045 


2,098,389 64 


163 


Auburn, 








267 


632,348 99 


41 


Barre, . 








664 


1,916,826 66 


134 


Berlin, . 








278 


436,781 70 


37 


Blackstone, 








1,112 


2,801,719 66 


1 77 


Bolton, . 








286 


678,263 34 


45 


Boylston, 








198 


656,767 68 


39 


Brookfleld, . 








727 


1,210,256 71 


1 00 


Charlton, 








626 


1,022,738 26 


80 


Clinton, . 








1,261 


8,021,080 13 


222 


Dana, 


202 


278,117 83 


25 



Vcdtiation of the Commonwealth. 191 



WORCESTER COUNTY— Concluded. 









Tax of $1,000 




# 




indud. Polls 


TOWNS. 


Polls. 


Property. 


at half a mill 
each. 


DoQglas, .... 


598 


$972,710 86 


$0 81 


Dudley, . 








601 


996,905 48 


83 


Fitchburg, . 








3,317 


11.288,337 05 


7 62 


Gardner, 








968 


1,753,531 67 


1 41 


Grafton, 








1,006 


1,901,027 53 


151 


Hardwlck, , 








522 


1,168,036 78 


88 


Harvard, 








376 


1,036,539 10 


74 


Holden, . 








482 


934,992 56 


74 


Hubbardston 








439 


881,670 88 


69 


Lancaster, , 








425 


2,328,167 05 


144 


Leicester, 








708 


2,122,772 00 


148 


Leominster, . 








1,232 


2,961,363 92 


2 18 


Lunenburg, , 








815 


765,487 66 


56 


Mendon, 








806 


712,574 42 


53 


Milford, . 








2,662 


4,932,915 45 


3 94 


Millbury, . 








1,050 


1,958,885 07 


1 56 


New Braintree, , 






164 


592,433 93 


40 


Northborough, , 






878 


1,327,854 03 


89 


Northbridge, 






817 


1,936,368 26 


1 43 


North Brookfleld, 






1,109 


1,620,848 18 


141 


Oakham, 






231 


370,521 56 


31 


Oxford, . 








718 


1,310,451 78 


1 05 


Pazton, . 








198 


826,809 33 


27 


Petersham, 








310 


770,893 62 


56 


PhilUpston, . 








177 


298,445 00 


25 


Princeton, , 








808 


957,602 93 


66 


Royalston, 








848 


859,138 08 


63 


Rutland, 








268 


520,180 30 


41 


Shrewsbury, 






452 


1,104,404 99 


81 


Sonthborough, 






513 


1,391,240 48 


99 


Southbridge, 






1,250 


2,312,315 49 


1 85 


Spencer, 






1,101 


2,060,940 58 


1 64 


Sterling, 








445 


1,237,743 84 


88 


Sturbridge, 








646 


964,681 65 


78 


Sutton, . 








622 


1,195,893 65 


94 


Templeton, . 








736 


1,161,246 67 


98 


Upton, . 








529 


841,077 61 


71 


Uxbrldge, 








707 


1,862,082 21 


134 


Warren, 








714 


1,479,329 54 


1 14 


Webster, 








1,201 


2,216,306 08 


1 77 


Westborough, 






968 


1,981,057 26 


1 53 


West Boylston, 






697 


1,021,478 74 


89 


West Brookfleld, 






454 


831,177 83 


67 


Westminster, 






484 


876,810 69 


71 


Winchendon, 






1,027 


1,892,527 00 


1 51 


Worcester, . 






11,638 


37,263,867 13 


25 51 


Total, 


> 


• 


■ • 


51,240 


$124,212,169 49 


$91 28 



192 



Post-Offices in Massachusetts, 



TOWNS IN MAS.,«ACHUSETTS, 

WITH THS 

POST-OFFICES THEREIN. 



TOWNS. 

Abington, 

Actori) . 

Acuahnet, 

Adamtt 

Agarioam, 
A^fordt * 



P08T-0FFICBB. 

{ Abington. 
' t North Abington. 



,< 



'Acton. 

South Aoton. 

West Acton. 
,Bll0worth. 



i Acuahnet. 
Long Plain. 

S Adams. 
North Adams. 
Blackinton. 

iAgawam. 
Feeding Hills. 

. Alford. 



SAmesbury. 
South Amesbury. 
West Amesbury. 



Amheratt 



S Amherst. 
North Amherst. 
Soutih Amherst. 

( AndoTer. 
* j Ballard Vale. 



Andover, 

Arlington, . j AriiS|?^Height». 

( Ashbnmham. 
AaKbumhamt } Ashbum'm Dep*t. 
< Burrageville. 



TOWNS. 

Aahkind, 
Athol^ . 



POST-OFFICES. 

Ashland. 



SAthol. 
Athol Depot* 
South Atl 



spot. 

thoU 



AttUborought ■> 

Aiibumt . 
Aj/er, . . 



Attleborough. 
Attleboro* Falls* 
N. Attleborough. 
S. Attleboroughr 
Hebronville. 
.Dodgeville. 

Auburn. 

Ayer. 



Barnstable. 
West Barnstable. 
CentrevlUe. 
Barnitablet . ■{ Marston's Mills. 
Hyannis. 
Cotuit. 
.Osterville. 



Aahbpi 



» • 



Ashby. 



A ^x ji^ijt S Ashfleld. 

Aahfield, . • j gouth Ashfleld. 



Barren 



Becket, . 
Bedford, 



,< 



'Barre. 
Barre Plains. 



Smithville. 



.Coldbrook Sprigs. 



S Becket. 
North Becket. 
West Becket. 

. Bedford. 



Bekhertoum, . Belchertown. 

SBellingham. 
N. BeUingham. 
Caryville. 

■n^i^^* S Belmont. 

BelvMni, . .jwaverly. 



Post-Offices in Massachusetts. 



193 



TOWNS. 

Berkley, . . 
Scflin, • • « 
Bemardston, 

BeDtrlyt ■ • 

Billerica, . . 

Blackatone, . 

Blandfordi . 
Bolton, . . . 



POST-OFFICES. 

Berkley. 

Berlin. 
West Berlin. 

Bernardston. 

S Beverly. 
Beverly Farms. 
North Bevftrly. 

( Billerica. 

) North Billerica. 

SBlackstone. 
East Blackstone. 
MUlville. 

j Blandford. 

\ North Blandford. 

Bolton. 



Boston, . 



< 



Boston. 
South Boston. 
East Boston. 
Station A. 
Roxbury. 
West Roxhury. 
Jamaica Plain. 
Boylston Station. 
Roslindale. 
Brighton. 
Aliston. 
Dorchester, 
Mattapan. 
.Charlestown. 



Boxborough, . West Acton P. O. 

T>,^-A^A S Boxford. 

BoxJ-^a, . • i West Boxford. 

BoyUton, . . j ioylstoS Centre. 
Bradford, . Bradford. 

Braintrtt, . | goSth Briintree. 



TOWNS. 



Brewster, . 



POST-OFFICES. 

'Brewster. 
East Brewster. 
West Brewster. 
South Brewster. 



Briii\/leld, 



Brimfleld. 
East Brimfleld. 



Brockton,. • j cJ^^pSlo. 

SBrookfield. 
East Brookfleld. 
West Brookfleld. 



Brookline, 
Buckland, 
Burlington, 

Cambridge, •* 



Brookline. 
Buckland. 
Burlington. 

'Cambridge.* 
Cambridgeport.* 
N. Cambridge.* 

^East Cambridge.* 



Canton, 
Carlisle, 

Carver,. 



( Canton. 
* \ Pnnkapoag. 

. Carlisle. 

S Carver. 
North Carver. 
South Carver. 



( Charlemont. 
Oharlemont, . \ East Charlemont. 
i Zoar. 



CJiarlton, • 



Chatham, • 



Charlton. 
Charlton City. 
Charlton Depot. 

'Chatham. 

Chatham Port. 
' North Chatham. 

South Chatham. 

West Chatham. 



* Sub-office to Boston. Postage 2 cents from Boston. 
13 



194 



Post-Offices in Massachusetts, 



TOWNS. 



Chelm»/ordt .- 



POST-OFFICES- 

'ChelmBford. 

N. ChelmBford. 

Weet Chelmsford. 
L Middlesex VUl'ge. 



Chelsea, . . Chelsea Station.* 
Cheshire, . . Cheshire. 

S Chester. 
Chester Centre. 
North Chester. 

ryt. ^ ^ 7j i Chesterfield. 
Chesterfield, . j West Chesterfield. 

t Chlcopee. 
Chicopee, . . < Chicopee Falls. 
( Willimanset. 

CMlmart. .\^^£h. 

Clarkrimm, . | *^('^ AdSS P. O.) 
Clinton, . . Clinton. 

SCohasset. 
Nantask«t. 
Beech wood. 

IColrain. 
Adamsville. 
Elm Grove. 
Griswoldville. 
Shattucksville. 

n — ^ S Concord. 

Concord, . • j westvale. 



Conway, . . Conway. 
Cummington, < 



'^ Cnmmington. 
Cummington "W. 

Village. 
, Swift River. 



Dalton,, . . Dalton. 

r. S Dana. 

Dana, . . • j North Dana. 



TOWH8. 

DanverSy . 

Dartmouth, 

Dedham, . 
Deerfteld, . 

Dennis, . 

Dighton, . 

Douglas, . 

Dover, , . 
Dracut, . . 
Dudley, • 
Dunstable, 

Duxbury, ^ 



POST-OFFICES. 

Danvers. 
Danvers Centre. 
Danvers Port. 
^ Tapleyville. 

S Dartmouth. 
North Dartmouth. 
South Dartmouth. 

( Dedham. 

} West Dedham. 

Deerfield, 
South Deerfield. 



'Dennis. 

Dennis Port. 
. ^ East Dennis. 

South Dennis. 
. West Dennis. 

J Dighton. 
' I North Dighton. 

{ Douglas. 

* I East Douglas. 

( Dover. 

• j Chas. Riv. Village. 

. Dracut. 



Dudley. 
West Dudley. 

Dunstahle. 

Duxhury. 
West Duxbury, 
'. South Duxbury. 



I^ast Bridge- ^ jj. Bridgewater. 
water, . .^Mattfleld. 

„ .. ( Eastham. 

ISastham, . . j ^q^^ Eastham. 

JEasthampt'n, Easthampton. 

SEaston. 
North Easton. 
South Easton. 



* Postage 2 cents from Boston and its Stations. 



Post-Offices in Massachusetts, 



195 



TOWNS. POST-OFFICES. 

SEgremont. 
North Egremont. 
South Egremont. 



JSkJieldf 

JaTVinfff . 
EV€T€tty m . 

Fairhaven^ 
Fall River, 



Enfield. 

Erving. 

Essex. 

Everett. 

Fairhaven. 

I Pall River. 
I Steep Brook. 



r Falmouth. 
East Falmouth. 
Falmouth, . ^ North Falmouth. 
West Falmouth. 
Wood's Hole. 



FUchburg, 
Florida, . 



< Fitchburg. 

• I West Fitchburg. 

< Florida. 

* ( Hoosac Tunnel. 



f Foxborough. 
Foxborough, . < East Foxborough. 
( W. Foxborough. 

( Framingham. 
FramingKm, < S. Framingham. 
( SaxonviUe. 

c Franklin. 
Franklin, . . < Franklin City. 
( South Franklin. 



t^.^^*^,ii^ S Freetown. 

jrreetown,, • J East Freetown. 

Gardner, . . j go^uth Gkrdner. 
Oeorgetovon, . Georgetown. 
GiU, Gill. 



TOWNS. 

Olouce$ter, 

Goshen, . 
Go9nold, . 

Grafton, . 

Granby, . 
Granville, . 

Great Bar 
rington, . 

Greenfield, 

Greenwich, 

Groton, 

Groveland, 

Hddley, . 

HaHfax, . 
Hamilton, . 
Hancock, . 

Hanover, . 
Hanaon, . 



POST-OFFICES. 

Bay View. 

Gloucester. 
East Gloucester. 
West Gloucester. 
Lanesville. 
, Annisquam. 

Goshen. 



iGosnold. 
(Wood's Hole 
P. O.) 



'Grafton. 
New Eng. Village. 
Saundersville. 
Farnumsviilc. 

Granby. 

S Granville Corner. 
East Granville. 
West Granville. 

{ Great Barrington. 

< Housatonic. 

( Van Dusenville. 

I Greenfield. 

( Factory Village. 

< Greenwich. 

( Greenw'h Village. 

\ Groton, 

\ West Groton. 

I Groveland. 

I South Groveland. 

\ Hadley. 

( North Hadley. 

Halifax. 

Hamilton. 

Hancock. 



I Hanover. 

^ South Hanover. 

( West Hanover. 



Hanson. 
South Hanson. 



19G 



Post-Offices in Massachusetts. 



TOWNS. 

Uardwick, 
Harvard, . 



ffarwich, . 

Hatfield, . 
Haverhillt , 

:ffawley, 

.Heath, . . 

^Hingham, 

^Hinsdale, . 

Holden, • 

.Hcdbrook, . 
.lloUand, , 

.HollUioH, . 
iHdlyoke, .. 



POST-OFFICES. 

Hardwick. 

Harvard. 
Still River. 



r Harwich. 

I Harwich Port. 

J East Harwich. 

• ] North Harwich. 

South Harwich, 
t West Harwich. 

( Hatfield. 

* f North Hatfield. 

S Haverhill. 
East Haverhill. 
Ayer's Village. 

SHawley. 
South Hawley. 
West Hawley. 

. Heath. 

t Hingham. 
. ^ Hingham Centre. 
( South Hingham. 

. Hinsdale. 

{ Holden. 

• I Jeffersonville. 

. Holbrook. 
. Holland. 

iHolliston. 
East HoUiston. 
Braggville. 

I Holyoke. 

* / Ireland. 



SHopkinton. 
Woodville. 
Hayden Row. 

/Hubburdaton, Hubbardston. 

Hudson, . . Hudson. 

HtiH, - -. . iHull. 



TOWNS. 



POST-OFFICES. 



mnH.^, . j =r iT"- 



Hyde Park, 

Ipswich, . 
Kingston, . 
LakevUle, . 



Hyde Park. 
Readville. 

Ipswich. 

Kingston. 

Lakeville. 



T^ ^ *^ S Lancaster. 

Lancaster, . j Qq^^j, Lancaster. 

r r * f Lanesborough. 

Lanesb^\ . j Berkshire. 

Lawrente, . Lawrence. 

LSe, m . 



(Lee. 
. } East Lee. 
( South Lee. 



Leicester, . 

Lenox, . . 

Leominster, 
Leverett, . 



t Leicester. 
, } Cherrv Valley. 
( Rochdale. 

f Lenox. 
. } Lenox Furnace. 
( New Lenox. 



Leominster. 
N. Leominster. 



I Leverett. 
• i North Leverett. 



r . . { Lexington. 

Lexington, . j jjast Lexington. 



Leyden, 



Leyden. 



rj 1 \ Lincoln. 

Lincoln, . • j South Lincoln. 

Littleton, . . Littleton. 
Longmeadow, j e? iSJtgmeJdow. 
Lowell, . . . Lowell. 

Ludloxo, . • j Ludlow Centre. 



Post'Offices in Massachusetts. 



197 



TOWNS. 

Lunenbio'ff, 
Lynut • • 



POST-OFFICES. 

Lunenburg. 
Lynn. 



Lynnjield, . j L^SSfleMCentre. 



Jfalden, 



( Maiden. 
< Maplewood. 
( Linden. 



TkT^^ .w^7^ \ Mansfield. • 
MaMjitld, . j West Manflfleld. 

Marbleheadt . Marblehead. 

Marion, . • Marion. 

Marlborough, Marlborough. 

( Marshfield. 
MarshJUld, . ] North Marshfield. 
( East Marshfield. 

MattapoUett, . Mattapoisett. 

Maynard, . . Maynard. 

. Medfield. 



Medjleld, 
Medford, 

Medway, 

Melrose, 
Mendon, 



r Medford. 

West Medford. 

College Hill. 
.Qlenwood. 



'Medway. 
j East Medway. 
•1 West Medway. 
, RockviUe. 



Melrose. 
Melrose Highl'ds. 

Mendon. 



Methuen, . . Methuen. 

fMiddleborough. 

E. Middleboro*. 

MiddUboro\A N. Middleboro'. 

I S. Middleboro*. 

I Rock. 



TOWNS. 



POST-OFFICES. 



MiiliJU¥U>iti i MIddlefield. 
MxddUfield, . Bancroft. 



Middleion, 

« 

MUford. . 



. Middleton. 

( Milford. 
. } South Milford. 
( Hopedale. 

S Millbury. 



MiUon, . 



( Milton. 
. } East Milton. 
( Blue Hill. 



Monroe, 
Monaon, 



Monroe. 
Monson. 
'Montague. 



igu< 
Locks Villnge. 

Miller's Falls. 
.Riverside. 

Monterey, . . Monterey. 

Montgomery, Montgomery. 

Mt.Wa8h*gt*n, Mt. Washington. 

I^ahant, . . Nahant. 

c I7atick< 
Natick, . . • < South Natick. 
( Cochituate. 



ITeedham, . . « 



'Needhara. 

Wellesley. 

Grantville. 
iHighlandville. 



ITew Aah/ord, New Ashford. 
I^eto Bedford, New Bedford. 
i\r. Braintree, New Braintree. 



198 



Past'OfHces in JlassacAtf^ef/^ 



TO 



rXewMariboro*. 
I Hansville. 



I Sootfafield. 



'Coolewille. 
! New l^lefn. 



t ViHingtoa. 

fXewbory. 
K»^jwM*^ J ^*<^ Town. 

t South Byfield. 
Xevcburyport, XewbaryporL 



'Xewton. 

Xewtonville. 

Aobamdale. 

West Newton. 
. <{ Xewton Centre. 

Xewton L. Falls. 

Newton U. Falls. 

Chestnut Hill. 
^Newton Highrds. 



Nevion., 



I 



Xorfolk^ . 
y. Andoter, 



Norfolk. 



I\Mbmtr, . 
Aatedy, . 



t North Andover. j I^embroket . 
'( N. Andover Dep*t. 



y. BrookJUld, North Brookfield. 
y. Beading, . North Reading. 

• f Northampton. 

v>^/]L^ ./»^ J Florence. 

^orthampCn, < Leeds. 

1^ Loudville. 

yorthboro\ . Northboroogh. 

( Northbridge. 
yorthtfridge, \ X'thb'dge Centre. 
( WhitinsvJlie. 

SNorthfield. 
Northfield Farms. 
West Northfield. 



yortoiit 



Norton. 
Barrowsville. 



yoricood, . . Norwood. 



BeUnham^ 
PhiUipHon^ 

PUt^eld, . 

Haif^tld, 

Plymouth^ . 
PijfinptOHt 



\ Orange. 

* \ North Orange. 

!Oriean«. 
Ea«t Orleans, 
gouth Orleans. 

SOtis. 
Eart Otis. 
Cold Spring. 

« 

i Oxford. 
* ) North Oxford. 

fPahner. 
} Bond's Village. 
*] Thonidike. 
[Three Rivers. 

. Fsxton. 

(Peabodj. 

* f We«t Danvers. 

. Pelham. 

I Penfbroke. 
. ? North Pembroke. 
( East Pembroke. 

{ Pepperell. 

* i £ai»t Pepperell. 

. Peru. 

. Petersham. 

. PhilUpston. 

SPittsfield. 
West Pitisfleld. 
Colts ville. 

. Plainfield. 



C Plymouth, 
j South Plymouth. 
•]Chlltonville. 
[North Plymouth. 



( Plympton. 
"lynipton 6 
orth Plympton. 



. < Plympton Station 
<N 



Post-Offices in Massach'osetts. 



199 



TOWNS. 

PreacoU, . 



POST-OFFICES. 

i Prescott. 
* / North Prescott. 



Princeton^ . •< 



f Princeton. 
1 



East Princeton. 



} Wachusett V'lage. 
i^Mt. Wachusett. 

Provincetoumt Provincetown. 

'Atlantic. 

WoIIaaton. 
Quiney, . . < Quincy. 

Qiiincy Point. 
.West Quincy. 

iRaynham. 
North Raynham. 

. Reading. 

j Rehoboth. 

* I North Rehoboth. 

. Revere.* 

( Richmond. 

• \ Rich'nd Furnace; 

1 Rochester. 

* j North Rochester. 

. Rockland. 

( Rockport. 

• j Pigeon Cove. 

. Rovire. 

. Rowley. 

( Royalston. 
' \ South Royalston. 



Baynhamt 
B€<idinff, . 
BeTioboth, . 
BcvtfCf . . 
Eichmond, 

BochesteTt 

Bockland, 

Bockportt 

Boufe, . 
Bovoleyt 

BoyaUton^ 
Bu99eUt 

BtiUandf . 



Russell. 



( Rutland. 
. \ West Rutland. 
( North Rutland. 



TOWNS. 

SQlcn^t • • 
SaliBburfft 



Sandi^fiHd, 



Sandu^ht 



SaufftM^ 
Savof/t . 
Scituate, 

Seekonk, 

Sharon, 

Sheffield, 

Shelbume, 



Sherborn, . 
Shirley, 
* Sub-office to Boston. 



POST-OFFICES. 

. Salem. 

\ Salisbury. 
' \ East Salisbury. 

'Sandisfield. 
j New Boston, 
•"^Montville. 
.S. Sandisfleld. 

'Sandwich. 

East Sandwich. 

North Sandwich. 

South Sandwich. 

West Sandwich. 
,\ Monument. 

Pocasset. 

Waquoit. 

Spring Hill. 

Hatchville. 
. Mashpee. 

SSaugus. 
Saugus Centre. 
Clifton Dale. 

. Savoy. 

S Scituate. 
Scituate Centre. 
North Scituate. 

e Seekonk. (East 
. ? Providence,R.I.) 
( South Seekonk. 

( Sharon. 
* I East Sharon. 

c Sheffield. 
. ^ Ashley Falls. 
( Clayton. 

{Bardweirs Ferry. 
Shelbume. 
Shelburne Falls. 
East Shelburne. 

. Sherborn. 



( Shirley. 
• j Shirley Village. 



200 



Post-Offices in Massachusetts. 



TOWW8. POST-OFFICES. 

Shrewsbury. , Sbrewsbury. 
ShuUsbury, . Shatesbury. 
Somerset, . . Somerset. 

Somerville.* 

Rtmtsv^nu J ^*** Somerville.* 
SomertiUe, --^ n. Somerville.* 

.WestSomerviUe.* 
So. Abingion, So. Abington. 

' SoiUhatnpfn, Soutbampton. 

( Soutbborougb. 
Southboro\ . ^ Cordavllle. 
( Fay vUle. 

SotUhtoick, . Southwick. 

*«'"'. • • ! IfoXspencer. 

( Springfield. 
SpritiQ/leld, . J Indian Orchard. 
( Ashley Falls. 

( Sterling. 
Sterling, . . ^ West Sterling. 
i Pratt's Junction. 



Stockbridge, . < 
Stoneham, , Stoneham. 



'Stockbridge. 

State Line. 

Glen Dale. 
.Curtisville. 



iStoughton. 
East Stougbton. 
North Stougbton. 



Stow, 



• • • 



Stow. 

Rock Bottom. 



TOWNS. POST-OFnCES. 

S Sudbury. 
South Sudbury. 
North Sudbury. 

Sunderland, Sunderland. 



Sutton, . . . ' 



r Sutton. 
West Sutton. 
Manchaug. 
Wilkinsonville. 



Swampacott, . Swampscott. 

Swansea, . . j No?af Swansea. 

c Taunton. 
Taunton, . .< East Taunton. 
( Myricksville. 

'Templeton. 

T^.^'T^i^f^ J E*®* Templeton. 
Templeton, • S Baldwlns^lle. 

Otter River. 



Tewksbury, . Tewksbury. 
Tisbury, 



e Vineyard Haven. 
. \ West Tfsbury. 
( North Tisbury. 



Tolland, . 
Top^ld, . 

Townsend, 



Tolland. 

Topsfield. 

Townsend. 
Townsend Harb'r. 
West Townsend. 



i Truro. 
North Truro. 
South Truro. 



Tyngsboro\ . Tyngsborough. 
T)fringham, . Tyringham. 

Upton.. . .j^rirpton. 
* Sub-office to Boston. 



Post-Offices in Massachusetts. 



201 



TOITNS. 



POST-OFFICES. 



Uxbndffe,, •} North Uxbridge. 

ur^t^^^T^ S Greenwood. 
Wakejleld, . j Wakefield. 



Wales, . 



Wales. 



SWalpole. 
Eaet Walpole. 
South Walpole. 



WaUham, . . 


Waltham. 


WUTtt • • . 


Ware. 


Wareliam, 


'Wareham. 
East Wareham. 
West Wareham. 
Cohasset Narrows. 


Warren, . . 


, Warren. 
West Warren. 


Warudck, . . 


Warwick. 



Washington, . Washington. 

•a7^*„^„^,^ ( Watertown. 
Watertoum, • j Mount Auburn.* 

Wayland, . . Wayland. 
Webster, . . Webster. 

Wellfleet, . • } gouth Wellfleet 

w^n^ii i Wendell. 

wenaeu, . • j -vVendell Depot. 

WenTiam, , . Wenham. 

West Bridge' \ Oocbesset. 
taater, . . \ W. Bridgewater. 

W.Brookfteld, W. Brookfleld. 

W, Neuhury, West Newbury, 



TOWNS. 



POST-OFFICES. 



("West Springfield. 
West Spring-] Ashley ville. 
field, . . . I Mittineague. 
(. Agawam. 



West Stock- 
bridge, . . 



'State Line. 
W. Stockbrldge. 
West Stockbridge 
Centre. 



Westborough, Westborough. 

Westfleld, . . Westfield. 

( Westford. 
Wesliford, . . \ Forge Village. 
i Grauiteville. 

Westhampfn, Westhampton. 

i Westminster. 
Westmiii'r Depot. 
So. Westminster. 



Weston, 



Westport, 



Weston. 

'Westport. 

Westport Point. 

South Westport. 

Central Village. 
.Westport Harbor. 



{Weymouth. 
East Weymouth. 
North Weymouth. 
South Weymouth. 

WhaUfy, . • j East W^ately. 

iWilbraham. 
Collins Depot. 
So. Wilbraham. 

WUmington, . n. WiSSSgton. 



* Sub-office to Boat<m. 



202 



Post- Offices in Massachusetts. 



TOWNB. • P08T-0PFICEB. 

Winchendon, Wlnchendon. 
Winchester, . Wincheeter. 



Windsor, . 
Winthrop, . 

Wobum, , 

Worcester, . 



Windsor. 
East Windsor. 

Winthrop.* 



( Woburn. 
. \ East Wobnrn. 
( North Woburn. 



TOWMS. 



POST-OFFICES. 



'Worthlngton. 

WortMngton, Kne!^"*^"' 
.So. Worthlngton. 



Wrentham, . « 



Yarmouth, 



Worcester. 

* 6ab.office to Boston. 



'Wrentham. 

W. Wrentham. 

Plainville. 
. Sheldonville. 



r Yarmouth. 
\ Yarmouth Port. 
* I South Yarmouth. 
(.West Yarmouth. 



U. S. Postal JtegukUions. 203 



ABRIDGMENT OF THE U. S. POSTAL REGULATIONS. 



Arranged and prepared for the Manual by Omar Lorino, 
Superintendent of Money Order Division^ Boston. 



Letter Postage to any part of the United States, including Cali- 
fornia and the Territories, also including the Dominion of Canada, 
without regard to distance, three cents per half ounce, or fraction 
thereof; must be prepaid in full, or at once sent to the Dead Letter 
Office, Washington. Newfoundland six cents per half ounce, must be 
prepaid. 

All drop letters must be prepaid. The rate of postage on drop let. 
ters, at offices where free delivery by carrier is established, is two cents 
per half ounce, or fraction of a half ounce ; at offices where such free 
delivery is not established, the rate is one cent. 

Transient Printed Matter (samples of merchandise, books tod 
other printed matter), any number in one package, to one address, not 
exceeding four pounds in weight, one cent each ounce or fraction, pre> 
paid, to any part of the United States or Territories. Proof sheets 
same as above. 

Domestic rates to be prepaid on printed matter to the Canadas or 
the Provinces. Samples of merchandise ten cents each, packages lim- 
ited to eight ounces. 

Any toriting other than the simple direction upon an article of 
printed matter, or the envelope thereof, subjects the entire package to 
letter postage, and it is the Postmaster's duty to examine such matter. 

Circulars in one unsealed, envelope, one cent each ounce or fraction. 
A business card upon the envelope of a circular or other article of 
printed matter, does not increase the postage. Circulars for city deliv- 
ery, one cent each circular. 

Pamphlets, book manuscripts, maps, prints, engravings, blanks, let- 
ter envelopes, paper, in packages not exceeding four pounds in weight, 
one cent for each ounce or fraction. * 



204 



U. S. Postal Regulations. 



Seeds, cuttings, bulbs, roots and scions, and samples of mercban- 
dise, two cents each two ounces ; not to exceed twelve ounces in weight, 
otherwise letter postage will be charged. 

Letter postage to Great Britain, six cents per half ounce, prepaid. 
Unpaid, eleveit cents ; will be collected on delivery. 

Our own domestic rates pay postage in full to delivery in Great 
Britain of printed matter, seeds, cuttings, bulbs and samples. 

Newspaper Postage.— A new law went into effect January 1, 1875, 
by which publishers of newspapers and regular periodicals must pre- 
pay everything. For papers once a week and oftener, two cents per 
pound. Lees frequently, three cents per pound. 

Money Orders in sums not exceeding $50 on one order will be issued 
on deposits with the Postmaster at any Money Order Offices, which 
are now established at nearly all the large cities and towns in the 
United States, and also in any part of Canada, Switzerland, Great 
Britain, Ireland and Germany. Fees on domestic orders, on sums not 
exceeding $15, ten cents; over $15, and not exceeding $30, fifteen 
cents ; over $30, and not exceeding $40, twenty cents ; over $40, and not 
exceeding $50, twenty .five cents. 



The Money 

Abingrton. 

Adams. 

Amesbury. 

Amherst. 

Andover. 

Arlington. 

Ashland. 

Athol Depot. 

Ayer. 

Barnstable. 

Barre. 

Berlin. 

Boston. 

Brighton Station. 

Cambridge Station. 

Cambridgeport St'n. 

Charlestown Station. 

Chelsea Station. 



Order Qfflcea in Massachusetts are — 



Boston — Continued, 

East Boston Station. 

East Cambridge St'n. 

Jamaica Plain. 

Roxbury Station. 

South Boston Stat'n. 

Somerville Station. 

Stat'n A, South End. 
Brewster. 
Bridgewater. 
Brockton. 
Brookline. 
Canton. 
Chatham. 
Chicopee. 
Chicopee Falls. 
Clinton. 
Concord. 



Conway. 

Cummington. 

Dedham. 

East Bridgewater. 

East Douglas. 

Easthampton. 

Edgartown. 

Fall River. 

Fitchburg. 

Foxborough. 

Franklin. 

Gloucester. 

Great Barrington. 

Greenfield. 

Harwich. 

HaverhiU. 

Hinsdale. 

HoUiston. 



U. S. Postal Regulations. 



205 



Holyoke. 
Hopkinton. 
Hudson. 
Hyannig. 
Lawrence. 
Leo. 

Leominster. 
Lowell. 
Lynn. 

Marblehead. 
Marlborough. 
Maiden. 
Medway. 
Middleborough. 
Milford. 
Millbury. 
Milton. 
Monson. 
Montague. 
Nantucket. 
Natlck. 
Necdham. 
New Bedford. 
Newburyport. 
Newton. 
Newton Centre. 
* North Adams. 



Northampton. 

North Andover Depot. 

North Brookfield. 

Northiield. 

Orange. 

Orleans. 

Oxford. 

Palmer. 

Pittsfield. 

Plymouth. 

Provincetown. 

Quincy. 

Salem. 

Sandwich. 

Saxonville. 

Shelbnme Falls. 

Southborongh. 

Southbridge. 

South Framingham. 

South Gardner. 

South Hadley. 

South Hadley Falls. 

South Natick. 

South Yarmouth. 

Spencer. 

Springfield. 

Stoneham. 



Stoughton. 

Taunton. 

Templeton. 

Turner's Falls. 

Uz^^ridge. 

Vineyard Haven. 

Wakefield. 

Wales. 

Waltham. 

Ware. 

Warren. 

Watertown. 

Webster. 

Wellesley. 

Wellfleet. 

Westborough. 

Westfield. 

West Medway. 

Wilbraham. 

Williamsburg. 

Williamstown. 

Winchendon. 

Woburn. 

Worcester. 

Yarmouth Port. 



206 



Governors and Lieut. Governors, 



GOVERNORS AND LIEUT. GOVERNORS IN MASS. 



CHOSEN ^ANNUALLY BY THE PEOPLE. 
Governors of Plymouth Colony. 



1620 John Carver. 

1621 William Bradford. 

1633 Edward Winslow. 

1634 Thomas Prence. 

1635 William Bradford. 

1636 Edward Winslow. 

1637 William Bradford. 



1638 Thomas Prence. 

1639 William Bradford. 

1644 Edward Winslow. 

1645 William Bradford. 
1657 Thomas Prence. 
1673 Josiah Winslow. 
1681 Thomas Hinckley.* 



Deputy-Governors of Plymouth Colony. 



1680 Thomas Hinckley. f 

1681 James Cudworth. 



1682 William Bradford, 
1689 WilUam Bradford, 



to 1686 
to 1692 



CHOSEN ANNUALLY UNDER THE FIRST CHARTER. 



I 



Governors 

1629 John Bndicott4 
1629 Matthew Cradock.^ 
[1630 John Winthrop.J 

1634 Thomas Dudley. 

1635 John Haynes. 

1636 Henry Vane. 

1637 John Winthrop. 
1840 Thomas Dudley. 

1641 Richard Bellingham. 

1642 John Winthrop. 
1644 John Endicott. 



OF Massachusetts. 

1645 Thomas Dudley. 

1646 John Winthrop. 

1649 John Endicott. 

1650 Thomas Dudley. 

1651 John Endicott. 

1654 Richard Bellingham. 

1655 John Endicott. 
1665 Richard Bellingham. 
1673 John Leverett. 
1679 Simon Bradstreet. 



* Mr. Hinckley was Governor till the union of the colonies in 1692, 
escept during the administration of Andros. 

t Previously there was no Deputy-Governor, a Governor pro tern, 
being appointed by the Governor to serve in his absence. 

X By tne Royal Charter, which passed the seals March 4, 1628-9, Mat- 
thew Cradock was appointed the first Governor, and Thomas Goffe 
Deputy-Governor, both of whom had held the same offices before the 
Charter was granted. On the 13th of the following May, the same per- 
sons were re-chosen under the Charter; but they never came to New 
England. On the 20th of October, 1629, John Winthrop was chosen 
Governor, and John Humphry Deputy-Governor. On the 30th of 
April, 1629, John Endicott was appointed, in London, to be Governor 
of the Plantation in New England, and held the office until the arrival 
of the Governor (Winthrop), in 1630. 



Governors and Lieut. Governors. 



207 



Deptjty-Governoes 

1629 Thomas Goflfe,* / to 1629 

1629 John Humphry, . 1629 

1629 Thomas Dudley, . 1634 

1634 Roger Ludlow, . 1635 

1635 Richard Belllngham, 1636 

1636 John Winthrop, . 163T 

1637 Thomas Dudley, . 1640 

1640 Richard Belllngham, 1641 

1641 John Endicott, . . 1644 
1644 John Winthrop, . 1646 
1646 Thomas Dudley, . 1650 



OF Massachusetts. 

1650 John Endicott, . . to 1651 

1651 Thomas Dudley, . 1653 

1653 Richard Belllngham, 1654 

1654 John Endicott, . . 1655 

1655 Richard BeUingham, 1655 
1665 Francis Willoughby, 1671 
1671 John Leverett, . . 1673 
1673 Sam'I Symonds, to Oct., 1678 

1678 Oct., Simon Bradstreet, 1679 

1679 Thomas Danforth, . 1686 



AFTER THE DISSOLUTION OF THE FIRST CHARTER. 

Deputy-Governor of Massachusetts. 

1689 Thomas Danforth, to 1692. 



APPOINTED BY THE KING UNDER SECOND CHARTER. 



Governors of 

1692 May, Sir William Phipps. 
1694 Nov., William Stouffhion.t 

1699 May, Richard Coote, Earl of 

Bellamont. 

1700 July, William Stmghton, 

1701 July, The Council. 

1702 June, Joseph Dudley. 
1714-15 Feb., The Council. 
1714-15 March, Joseph Dudley. 

1715 Nov., William Tailer.t 

1716 Oct., Samuel Shute. 
1722-23 Jan., William Dwnmer, 
1728 William Burnet. 

1728 Sept., William Dummer. 



Massachusetts. 

1730 June, William Tailer. 
1730 Aug., Jonathan Belcher. 
1741 Aug., William Shirley. 
1749 Sept., Spencer Phips. 
1753 William Shirley. 

1756 Sept., Spencer Phipa. 

1757 April, The Council. 
1757 Aug., Thomas Pownal. 
1760 June, TJwmas Hutchinson. 
1760 Aug., Sir Francis Bernard, 

Bart. 
1769 Aug., ThomaB Hutchimon, 
1771 March, Thomas Hutchinson. 
1774 May, Thomas Gage. 



* Thomas Goffe never came to New England. John Humphry was 
elected, but did not serve. 

t Those whose names are printed in italics were Acting Governors. 

X In November, 1715, Elizeus Burgess was proclaimed Governor, he 
having had the appointment in March, 1714; but he never came over to 
perform his duties, and resigned .the office in 1716. 



208 



Governors and Idevt. Governors, 



Lieut. Governors of Massachubetts. 



1992 Win.8toaghtoii,toJal7, 1701 
1702 Thomas Povey, . 1706 
1706-06 Jan., vacancy to Oct, 1711 
1711 William Taller. 
1716 William Dummer. 



17S0 WlUiam Taller. 
1733 Spencer Phips. 
1758 Thomaa Hutchinson. 
1770 Andrew Oliver. 
1774 Thomas Oliver. 



SINCE THB REVOLUTION. 
1774 Oct., a Provincial Congress. | 1776, July, The Coancil. 



UNDER THE CONSTITUTION. 
Governors of Massachusetts. 



1780 John Hancock, . . to 1786 

1786 James Bowdoin, . 1787 

1787 John Hancock, Oct. 8, 1703 
1794 Samuel Adams, . 1797 
1797 Increase Sumner, June 7, 1799 
1800' Caleh Strong, . . 1807 
1807 Jas. Sullivan, Dec. 10, 1808 

1809 Christopher Gore, . 181(^ 

1810 Elbridge Gerry, . 1812 
1812 Caleb Strong, . . 1816 
1816 John Brooks, • . 1823 
1823 Wm. Eustis, Feb. 6, 1826 
1826 Levi Lincoln, . . 1834 
1834 John Davis, March 1, 1836 
1836 Edward Everett, . 1840 



1840 Marcus Morton, . to 1841 

1841 John Davis, . . 1843 

1843 Marcus Morton, . 1844 

1844 George N. Briggs, . 1861 
1861 George 8. Boutwell, 1863 

1863 John H. Clifford, . 1864 

1864 Emory Washburn, . 1866 
1866 Henry J. Gardner, . 1868 

1868 Nathaniel P. Banks, 1861 
1861 John A. Andrew, . 1866 
1866 Alexander H. Bullock, 1869 

1869 William Claflin, . 1872 
1872 William B. Washburn,* 1874 
1874 William Gaston, 



Lieut. Governors of Massachusetts. 



1780 Thos. Cushing, Feb. 28 to 1788 

1788 Bepjamin Lincoln, . 1789 

1789 Samuel Adanu,^ . 1794 
1794 Mo8€9 Gill, May 20, . 1800 

1801 Sam'l Phillips, Feb. 10, 1802 

1802 Edward H. Bobbins, 1806 
1807 Levi Lincoln.X . . 1809 



1809 David Cobb, . . to 1810 

1810 WiUiam Gray, . . 1812 
1812 William Phillips, . 1823 

1823 Levi Lincoln, Feb., . 1824 

1824 MarcM Mortotit July, 1826 
1826 Thomas L. Winthrop, 1832 
1833 Samuel T. ArmHrong, 1836 



* Resigned, May 1, 1874. Chosen U. S. Senator, April 17, 1874. 

t The Lieutenant-Governors whose names are in italics were Acting 
Governors also during vacancies in the office of Governor. 

X General William Heath was elected in 1806, and declined to accept 
the office. 



United States Senators. 



209 



1836 George Hull, . . to 1843 

1843 Henry H. CMlds, . 1844 

1844 John Reed, . . 1851 
1851 Henry W. Cuehman, 1853 

1853 Elisha Huntington, . . 1854 

1854 William C. Plunkett, 1855 

1855 Simon Brown, . . 1856 

1856 Henry W. Benchley, 1858 



1858 Eliphalet Trask, . to 1861 
1861 John Z.Goodrich,Mar.29,1861 



1861 John Nesmith. Sept., 
1863 Joel Hayden, . 
1866 William Olaflin, 
1869 Joseph Tucker, 
1873 Thomas Talltoty* 
1875 Horatio G. Knight, 



1862 
1866 
1869 
1873 
1875 



UNITED STATES SENATORS FROM MASSACHUSETTS, 

From 1789 to 1879. 



Caleb Strong, . . 1789-96 

Theodore Sedgwick . 1796-99 

Samuel Dexter, . . 1799-1800 

Dwight Booster, . . 1800-03 

John Quincy Adams, . 1803-08 

James Lloyd, . . 1808-13 

Christopher Gore, . 1813-16 

£li Porter Ashmun, . 1816-18 

Prentiss Mellen, . . 1818-20 

Eiyah Hunt Mills, . 1820-27 

Daniel Webster, . . 1827-41 

BufusChoato, . . 1841-45 

Daniel Webster, . . 1845-50 
Robert Charles Winthrop, 1850-51 

Robert Rantoul, Jr., . 1851-51 

Charles Sumner,t . 1851-74 

WilUam B. Washburn, 1874-76 

Henry L, Dawes, , 1875- 



Tristam Dalton, . . 1789-91 

George Cabot, . . 1791-96 

Bepjamin Goodhue, . 1796-1800 

Jonathan Mason, . . 1800-03 

Timothy Pickering. . 1803-11 
Joseph Bradley Vamum, 1811-17 

Harrison Gray Otis, . 1817-22 

James Lloyd, . . 1822-26 

Nathaniel Silsbee, . 1826-35 

John Davis, . . . 1835-41 

Isaac Chapman Bates, 1841-45 

John Davis, . . . 1845-53 

Edward Everett, . . 1853-54 

Julius Rockwell, . . 1854-55 

Henry Wilson, . . 1855-73 

George S. Boutwell, . 1873- 



Note.— Mr. Wilson was elected Vice.Pre8ident in 18T2 ; George S. 
Boutwell chosen to fill vacancy. 



* Acting Governor from May 1, 1874. 
t Charles Sumner died, March 10, 1874. 
chosen to fill vacancy, April 17, 1874. 

14 



William B. Washburn 



210 



Secretaries. — Treasurers. 



SECRETARIES. 



List of Persons who have held the office of Secretary 

OF THE Commonwealth, 

From 1780 to 1876. 



John Avery, . 


. 1780-1806 


John Q-. Palfrey, . 


1844-48 


JoDathan L. AnstiD, . 


1800-<» 


William B. Calhoun, . 


1848-51 


William Tudor, . 


1808>10 


Amaaa Walker, . 


1851-53 


Benjamin Homans, 


1810-12 


Ephraim M. Wright, . 


1853-56 


Alden Bradford, . 


1812-24 


Francis DeWitt, . 


1856-58 


Edward D. Bangs, 


1824-36 


Oliver Warner, . 


. 1858-76 


John P. Bigelow, 


1836-43 


Henry B. Peiree, . 


1876- 


John A. BoUes, . 


1843-44 







TREASURERS. 



List of Persons who have held the office of Treasurer 

AND Receiver-General, 

From 1780 to 1876. 



Henry Gardner, . 


1780-83 


David Wilder, . 


1837-42 


Thomas Ivers, 


1783-87 


Thomas Russell, . 


1842-43 


Alexander Hodgdon, . 


1787-92 


John Mills, . 


1843-44 


Thomas Davis, . 


1792-^7 


Thomas Russell, . 


1844-46 


Peleg Ccrffin, 


♦1797-1801 


Joseph Barrett, . 


1845-49 


Jonathan Jackson, 


1802-06 


Ebenezer Bradbury, 


1840-61 


Thompson J. Skinner, 


1806-08 


Charles B. Hall, . 


1851-63 


Josiah Dwight, . 


1808-10 


Jacob H. Loud, . 


1853-66 


Thomas Harris, . 


1810-11 


Thomas J. Marsh, 


1855-66 


Jonathan L. Austin, 


1811-12 


Moses Tenney, Jr., , 


1856-61 


John T. Apthorp, 


1812-17 


Henry K. Oliver, 


1861-66 


Daniel Sargent, • 


1817-22 


Jacob H. Loud, . 


186^71 


Nahum Mitchell, . 


1822-27 


Charles Adams, Jr., , 


1871-76 


Joseph Sewall, . 


1827-32 


Charles Bndicott, . 


1876- 


Hezeldah Barnard, 


1832-37 







* Secretary Avery had a warrant to take care of the Treasury on 
the resignation of Coffin, in 1803. 



r 



Attomey-Oenerala. — Auditor's. 



211 



ATTOBNET-GENERALS. 



List of Persons who have held the office of Attorney- 

Genekai^. 



UNDER 


THE PROVINCE CHARTER. 




Anthony Checkley, 




1092-1702 


John Orering, . 


1730-41 


Paul Dudley, 




1702-18 


Jeremiah Orldley, • 


1742 


Thomas Newton* . 




1718^1 


John Orering, . . • 


1748-48 


John Overing, 




1728-^ 


James Otis, 


1748 


John Read, . 




178a-S5 


Edmnnd Trowbridge, . 


1749-«7 


William Brattle, . 




1730 


Jeremiah Oridley, . 


1787 


WUliam Brattle, . 




1788 


Jonathan Sewall, . 


1707-89 


UNDER 


THE CONSTITUTION. 




Robert Treat Paine, 




1780-90 


John Henry Clifford, 


1854-68 


James Sullivan, . 




1790-1807 


Stephen Henry Phillips, 


1858-81 


Barnabas Bidwell, 




1807-10 


Dwight Foster, 


1861-84 


Perez Morton, 




1810-32 , 


Chester L Reed,t . 


1884-87 


James T. Austin, 




1832-43 


Charles Allen, . 


1867-72 


John Henry Clifford, 




*184»-63 


Charles R. Train, . 


1872- 


Rnfus Choate, 




1868-M 







* The office of Attomey-Oeneral was abolished in 184S, and re- 
established in 1840. 

t Resigned during the session of the Leglslatore of 1867. The 
vacancy was filled by the election of Charles Allen. 



AUDITORS. 



List of Persons who have held the office of Auditor of 

ACCOUNTS. 



[Established by Act of 1840.] 



David Wilder, Jr., 
Joseph Mitchell, . 
Stephen N. Oifford, 
Chandler R. Ransom, 
Charles White, . 



1849-64 I Levi Reed,* . 
1854-66 I JnUns L. Clarke, 
1866-66 , Henry 8. Briggs, 
1866-68 t Charles Endieott, 
1868-61 I Julius L. Clarke, 



• Resigned December 20, 1866. 



« 1861-66 

• 1865-66 

. 1866-70 

. 1870-76 

. 1876- 



212 Secretariea of Board of Education. 



SECRETARIES OF THE STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION. 



List of Persons who have held (he office of Secretabt 
OF THE State Board of Education. 

[See Act of 1837.] 



Horace Mann, . 
Barnaa Sears, . 



* 1837-48 
. 1848^66 



George S. Boutwell, . 1855^60 
Joseph White, . . 1800- 



OYganizaJtion of the Legislature. 



213 



ORGANIZATION OF THE LEGISLATURE, 



From 1780 to 1870. 



The first General Court, under the Constitution of the Common, 
wealth of Massachusetts, assembled at Boston, on Wednesday, October 

25. 1780, and was finally prorogated (having held three sessions) May 

19. 1781. From this time until 1832, the political year commenced on 
the last Wednesday in May ; and the General Court held two, and fre- 
quently three, sessions during each year. In 1832, by an amendment 
of the Constitution, the commencement of the political year was 
changed to the first Wednesday in January. 



Thos. CufiMxifSt reHgnedt 
Jeremiah Powell, . 
Jeremiah Powell, . 
Samuel Adams, 
Samuel Adams, 
Samuel Adams, 
Samuel AAxaxn^reHgnedt 
Samuel Phillips, Jr., 
Samuel Phillips, Jr., 
Samuel Adams, 
Samuel Phillips, Jr., 
Samuel Phillips, Jr., 
* Samuel Phillips, . 
Samuel Phillips, 
Samuel Phillips, 
Samuel Phillips, 
Samuel Phillips, 
Samuel Phillips, 
Samuel Phillips, 
Samuel Phillips, 
Samuel Phillips, 



SENATE. 




RESIDENTS. 




1780-81 


Samuel Phillips, 


1799-1800 




Samuel Phillips, , 


. 1800-01 


1781-82 


David Cobb, . 


. 1801-02 


1782-83 


David Cobb, . 


. 1802-03 


1783-84 


David Cobb, . 


. 1803-04 


1784-85 


David Cobb, . 


. 1804-05 


1785-86 


Harrison Gray Otis, 


, . 1805-06 




John Bacon, . 


. 1806-07 


1786-87 


Samuel Dana, . 


. 1807-08 


1787-88 


Harrison Gray Otis, 


, . 1808-09 


1V8&-89 


Harrison Gray Otis, 


. 1809-10 


1789-90 


Harrison Gray Otis, 


. 1810^11 


1790^1 


Samuel Dana, . 


. 1811-12 


1791-92 


Samuel Dana, . 


. 1812-13 


1792^3 


John Phillips, . 


. 1813-14 


1793-94 


John Phillips, . 


. 1814-15 


1794^5 


John Phillips, . 


. 1815-16 


1795^6 


John Phillips, . 


. 1816-17 


1796-97 


John Phillips, . 


. 1817-18 


1797-98 


John Phillips, . 


. 1818-19 


179^-99 


John Phillips, . 


. 1819-20 



214 



Organization of the Legislature, 



John Phillips, . . . 1820-21 

John Phillips, . . . 1821-22 

John Phillips, . . . 1822-23 

Nathaniel Silsbee, . . 1823-24 

Nathaniel Silsbee, . . 1824-25 

Nathaniel SUsbee, . . 182&-26 

John Mills, . . . 1826-27 

John Mills, . . . 1827-28 

Sherman Leland, . . 1828-20 

Samuel Latbrop, . . 1829-30 

Samael Lathrop, . . 1830-31 

Lcverett Saltonstall, . 1831 

William Thorndike, . 1832 

Be^j. T. Pickman, . . 1833 

Bepj. T. Pickman, . . 1834 
Benj. T. Pickman, dec*8ed, J 

George Bliss, . . . i 
Horace Mann, . 
Horace Mann, . 
Myron Lawrence, 
Myron Lawrence, 
Daniel P. King, 
Daniel P. King, 
Josiah Qnincy, Jr., 
Phineas W. Deland, re9i*dt 
Frederick Robinson, 

Josiah Qtiincy, Jr., • 1844 

Levi Lincoln, . . . 1845 

William B. Chlhoun, . 1846 

WilUam B. Calhoun, . 1847 



1835 

1836 
1837 
1838 
1839 
1840 
1841 
1842 

1843 



Zeno Scudder, 
Joseph Bell, . 
Marshall P. Wilder, 
Henry Wilson, 
Henry Wilson, 
Charles H. Warren, 
Charles Edward Cook, 
Henry W. Benchley, 
Elihu C. Baker, . 
Charles W. Upham, 
Charles W. Upham, 
Charles A. Phelps, 
Charles A. Phelps, 
William Claflln, . 
John H. Clifford, . 
Jonathan £. Field, 
Jonathan E. Field, 
Jonathan E. Field, 
Joseph A. Pond, . 
Joseph A. Pond, . 
George O. Brastow, 
Robert C. FitmsMf resifftied 
George O. Brastow, 
Horace H. Coolidge, 
Horace H. Coolidge, 
Horace H. Coolidge, 
Geo. B. Loring, . 
Geo. B. Loring, . 
Geo. B. Loring, . 



1848 
1849 
1850 
1851 
1852 
1853 
1854 
1855 
1856 
1857 
1858 
1859 
1860 
1861 
1862 
1863 
1864 
1865 
1866 
1867 
1868 

1869 

1870 
1871 
1872 
1873 
1874 
1875 



William Baker, Jr., 
Samuel Cooper, 
Edward McLane, . . . 
Edward Payne Hayman, 
George Elliot Vaughn, . 
Wendell Davis, 
John D. Dunbar, . . 
Nathaniel Coffin, . 
Marcus Morton, . . 
Samuel F. McCleary, 



CLERKS. 




1780-84 


Samuel F. Lyman, . 


1822 


1785-95 


Paul WiUard, . 


1823-29 


1796-99 


Charles Calhoun,^ . 


1880-42 


1800 


Lewis Josselyn* 


1843 


1801-02 


Charles Calhoun, . 


1844-50 


1803-05 


Chauncey L. Knapp, 


1851 


1806-07 


Francis H. Underwood, . 


1852 


1808-10 


Charles Calhoun, . 


1853-^4 


1811-12 


Peter L. Cox, . 


1855-57 


1813-21 


Stephen JT. GjflEbrd, 


1858- 



Organization of the Legislature* 



215 



HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. 



SPE A 

Caleb Davis, . . . 1780-81 

O&leh DsLvia, resigned, . 1781-82 

Nathaniel Gorham, . 1782 

Nathaniel Gorham, . 1782-83 

Tristram Dalton, . . 1783-84 

Tristram Dalton, . . 1784-85 

Nathaniel Gorham, . 1785-86 

ArtemasWard, . . 1786-87 

James Warren, , . 1787-88 

Theodore Sedgwick, . 1788-89 

David Cobb, . . . 1789-90 

David Cobb, . . . 1790-91 

David Cobb, . . . 1791-92 

David Cobb, . . . 1792-93 

Edward H. Robbins, . 1793-94 

Edward H. Robbins, . 1794-96 

Edward H. Robbins, . 1795-96 

Edward H. Robbins, . 1796-97 

Edward H. Robbins, . 1797-98 

Edward H. Robbins, . 1798-99 

Edward H. Robbins, 1799-1800 

Edward H. Robbins, . 1800-01 

Edward H. Robbins, . 1801-02 

John Coffin Jones, . . 1802-03 

Harrison Gray Otis, . 1803-04 

Harrison Gray Otis, . 1804-05 

Timothy Bigelow, . . 1805-06 

Perez Morton, . . . 1806-07 

Perez Morton, . . . 1807-08 

Timothy Bigelow, . . 1808-09 

Timothy Bigelow, . . 1809-10 

Perez Morton, resigned, 1810-11 

Joseph Story, . . . 1811 

Joseph Story, resigned, 1811-12 

Eleazer W. Ripley, . 1812 

Timothy Bigelow, . . 1812-13 

Timothy Bigelow, . . 1813-14 

Timothy Bigelow, . . 1814-15 

Timothy Bigelow, . . 1815-16 

Timothy Bigelow, . . 1816-17 

Timothy Bigelow, . . 1817-18 



KE s s. ^ 

Timothy Bigelow, . 
Timothy Bigelow, . 
Elijah H. Milla, resigned 
Josiah Quincy, 
Josiah Quincy, resigned 
Luther Lawrence, . 
Levi Lincoln, . 
William C. Jarvis, . 
William 0. Jarvis, . 
Timothy Fuller, 
William C. Jarvis, . 
William C. Jarvis, . 
William B. Calhoun, 
William B. Calhoun, 
William B. Calhoun, 
William B. Calhoun, 
William B. Calhoun, 
William B. Calhoun, 
William B. Calhoun, 
Julius Rockwell, . 
Julius Rockwell, 
Julius Rockwell, 
Robert C. Winthrop, 
Robert C. Winthrop, 
Robert C. Winthrop, 
George Ashmun, . 
Thomas Kinnicut, . 
Daniel P. King, 



1818-19 

1819-20 

1820-21 

1821 

1821-22 

1822 

1822-23 

1823-24 

1824-25 

1825-26 

1826-27 

1827-28 

1828-29 

1829-30 

1830 

1831 

1832 

1833 

1834 

1835 

1836 

1837 

1838 

1839 

1840 

1841 

1842 

1843 



Thomas Kinnicut, resigned, 1844 

Samuel H. Walley, Jr., . 1844 

Samuel H. Walley, Jr., . 1845 

Samuel H. Walley, Jr., . 1846 

Ebenezer Bradbury, . 1847 

Francis B. Crowninshield, 1848 

Francis B. Crowninshield, 1849 

Ensign H. Kellogg, . 1850 

Nathaniel P. Banks, Jr., 1851 

Nathaniel P. Banks, Jr., 1852 

George Bliss, . . . 1853 

Otis P. Lord, . '. . 1854 

Daniel C. Eddy, . . 1855 



216 



Organization of the Legislature. 



Charles A. Phelps, 
Charles A. Phelps, 
Julias Rockwell, . 
Charles Hale, 
John A. Goodwin, 
John A. Goodwin, 
Alexander H. Bullock 
Alexander H. Bullock 
Alexander H. Bullock 
Alexander H. Bullock, 



Andrew Henshaw, . 
George Richards Mlnot, . 
Henry Warren, • 11 
Nicholas Tillinghast, . 
Chas. Pinckney Sumner, 
Nicholas Tillinghast, . 
Chas. Pinckney Sumner, 
Benjamin Pollard, . 
Pelham W. Warren, 
Luther S. Cushing, . 





, 1856 


James M. Stone, . 


. 1860 




. 1857 


James M. Stone, . 


. 1867 




1858 


Harvey Jewell, . 


. 1868 




. 1850 


Harvey Jewell, • 


. 1869 




. 1860 


Harvey Jewell, . 


. 1870 




. 1861 


Harvey Jewell, . 


. 1871 




. 1862 


John E. Sanford, . 


1872 




. 1863 


John E. Sanford, . 


. 1873 




. 1864 


John E. Sanford, . ' . 


1874 




, 1865 


John E. Sanford, . 


1875 


CLERKS. 




1780-81 


Charles W. Storey, . 1844-50 


1782-91 


Lewis Josselyn, . . 1851-52 


792-1802 


William Schouler, . . 1853 


1803-05 


William Stowe, . . 1854 


1806-07 


Henry A. Marsh, . . 1855 


1808.^ 


W. E. P. Haskell, . . 1856 


1810-11 


William Stowe, . . 1857-61 


1812-21 


William S. Robinson, . 1862-73 


1822-31 


Charles H. Taylor, . . 1873-74 


1832-43 


George A. Marden, . 1874- 



Length of Legislative Sessions, etc. 217 



TABLE 



Showing the Length of the Sessions of the Legislature, and the 
Number of Representatives in each Tear since 1832. 



TE AB. 


Time of 
Heeting. 


Prorogued. 


Length of 
Session. 


No. of 
Reps. 


1832, .... 


January 4. 


March 24. 


80 days. 


528 


1833, . 










2. 


28. 


86 «• 


574 


1834, 










1. 


April 2. 


92 " 


570 


1835,* . 










7. 


8. 


92 «• 


615 


1836, . 










6. 


16. 


102 " 


619 


1837, . 










4. 


20. 


107 " 


635 


1838, . 










3. 


25. 


113 " 


480 


1839, . 










2. 


10. 


99 " 


521 


1840, 










1. 


March 24. 


84 " 


621 


1841, . 










6. 


18. 


72 " 


397 


1842,* . 










6. 


3. 


58 " 


336 


1843, . 










4. 


24. 


80 " 


352 



* There was an extra session of sixty-two days in 1835, to revise the 
Statutes; one of nine days'in 1842, to divide the Commonwealth into 
Congressional Districts; one of three days in 1848, to choose electors 
of President and Vice-President; one of eighteen days in 1857, to 
establish districts for the choice of Councillors, Representatives and 
Senators ; one of one hundred and thirteen days in 1859, to revise the 
General Statutes ; one of fourteen days in 1860, to consider the subject 
of the disease among the cattle of the Commonwealth ; one of ten 
days in 1861, to consider the duty of the Commonwealth in relation to 
public affairs, consequent upon the rebellion; one of eight days in 
1863, to provide for raising the quota under the call of the President of 
the United States of the 17th of October, 1863, for 300,000 men ; and one 
of thirty days in 1872, to consider what legislation is necessary by rea- 
son of the great fire in Boston, November 9 and 10. 



218 Length of Legislative Sessions^ etc. 



TE AB. 


Time of 
Meeting. 


Prorogued. 


Length of 
SeBsioQ. 


No. of 
Reps. 


1844 


January 3. 


March 16. 


74 days. 


321 


1846, . 








1. 


26. 


85 " 


271 


1846, . 








• 7. 


April 16. 


100 " 


264 


1847, . 








6. 


16. 


111 " 


255 


1848,* . 








5. 


May 10. 


127 " 


272 


1849, . 








8. 


2. 


120 " 


263 


1850, . 








2. 


3. 


122 •• 


297 


1861, . 








1. 


24. 


146 " 


896 


1852, 








7. 


22. 


137 " 


402 


1853, . 








6. 


25. 


142 " 


288 


1854, 








4. 


April 29. 


116 " 


310 


1855, . 








3. 


May 21. 


138 " 


380 


1856, 








1. 


June 6. 


158 ** 


329 


1857,* . 








7. 


May 80. 


144 «• 


367 


1858, . 








6. 


March 27. 


81 " 


240 


1859,* 








6. 


April 6. 


92 " 


240 


I860,* . 








4. 


4. 


92 " 


240 


1861,* 








2. 


11. 


100 " 


240 


1862, 








1. 


30. 


120 *• 


240 


1863,* 








«• 


29. 


113 " 


240 


1864, 








6. 


May 14 


ISO " 


240 


1865, 








4. 


17. 


137 " 


240 


1866, . 








3. 


30. 


147 •* 


240 


1867, 








2. 


Juno 1. 


150 " 


240 


1868, 








1. 


12. 


164 " 


240 


1869, 








6. 


24. 


170 •« 


240 


1870, 








6. 


23. 


170 " 


240 


1871, 








4. 


May 81. 


148 " 


240 


1872,* 








3. 


7. 


126 *♦ 


240 


1873, 








1. 


June 12. 


163 " 


240 


1874, 








7. 


30, 


175 " 


240 


1875, 








6. 


May 19. 


134 " 


240 



* See note on preceding page. 



Judiciary, 



219 



JUDICIARY. 



Judges of the Superior Court of Judi<iature of the Province of 
Massachusetts Bay^ from 1692 to 1775.* 



CHIEF JUSTICES. 



APPOINTED. LEFT THE BENCH. 


DIED. 


1092. 


William StoughtoD, . 


. 1701. 


Resigned. 


1701. 


1702. 


Isaac AddingtoD, 


. 1703. 


Resigned. 


1716. 


1708. 


Wait Winthrop, 


. 1717. 




1717. 


1718. 


Samuel Bewail, • 


. 1728. 


Resigned. 


1780. 


1729. 


Benjamin Lynde, 


. 1746. 




1745. 


1745. 


Paul Dudley, . 


. 1751. 




1761. 


1762. 


Stephen Sewall, 


. 1760. 




1700. 


1761. 


Thomas Hutchinbon, 


. 1769. 


Appointed Governor. 


1780. 


1709. 


Benjamin Lyude, 


. 1771. 


Resigned. 


1781. 


1772. 


Peter Oliver, . 


. 1775. 


Removed at Revolution. 


1791. 






JUDGES. 




1092. 


Thomas Danforth, 


. 1099. 




1699. 


1002. 


Wait Winthrop, 


. 1701. 


Resigned. 


1717, 


1002. 


John Richards, . 


. 1604. 




1694. 


1093. 


Samuel Sewall, . 


. 1718. 


Appointed Chief Justice, 


. 1730. 


1005. 


Elisha Cooke, . 


. 1702. 


Removed. 


1716. 


1700. 


John Walley, . 


. 1712. 




1712. 


1701. 


John Saffin, 


. 1702. 


Removed. 


1710. 


1702. 


John Hathorne, 


. 1712. 


Resigned. 


1717. 


1702. 


John Leverett, . 


. 1708. 


Resigned. 


1724. 


1708. 


Jonathan Corwin, . 


. 1715. 


designed. 


1718. 


1712. 


Benjamin Lynde, 


. 1729. 


Appointed Chief Justice. 


1746. 


1712. 


Nathaniel Thomas, . 


. 1718. 


Resigned. 


1718. 


1715. 


Addington Davenpoi 


rt, . 1736. 




1786. 



* The judges died in office, except where otherwise stated. 



220 



Judiciary, 



APPOINTED. I.EFT 

1718. Paul Dudley, . 

1718. Edmand Quincy, 

1729. John Cashing, . 

1733. Jonathan Remington; 

1736. Richard Saltonstall, 

1737. Thomas Greaves, 
1739. Stephen Bewail, 
1745. Nathaniel Hubbard, 
1745. Bei^amln Lynde, 
1747. John Gushing, • 
1752. Chambers Russell, 
1756. Peter Oliver, . 
1767. Edmund Trowbridge, 

1771. Foster Hutchinson, 

1772. Nathaniel Ropes, 
, 1772. William Cnshing, 

1774. William Browne, 



THE BENCH. DIED. 

. 1745. Appointed Chief Justice. 1751. 

1737. 
Removed. 1737. 

1745. 

1756. 
Resigned. 1747. 

Appointed Chief Justice. 1760. 
Resigned. 1748. 

Appointed Chief Justice. 1781. 
Resigned. 1775. 

1766. 
Appointed Chief Justice. 1791. 
Removed at Revolution. 1793. 
Removed at Revolution. 



1737. 
1733. 
1745. 
1756. 
1738. 
1752. 
1746. 
1769. 
1771. 
1766. 

in2. 
in5. 

1775. 

1774. 
1775. 
1775. 



Removed at Revolution. 
Removed at Revolution. 



1799. 
1774. 
1810. 
1802. 



Justices of the Superior Court of JudiccUure, tmd the Supreme 
JiuUcial Court of MctsscuiJiusetts sintfe the Revolution, 



CHIEF JUSTICES. 



LEFT THE BENCH. 
. 1776. 



APPOINTED. 

1775. John Adams, . 

1777. William Cushing, . . 1780. 

1790. Nathaniel Peaslee Sargent, 1791. 

1791. Francis Dana, . . . 1806. 
1806. Theophilus Parsons, . 1813. 
1814. Samuel Sewall,. . . 1814. 
1814. Isaac Parker, . . . 1830. 
1830. Lemuel Shaw, . . . 1860. 
1860. George Tyier Bigelow, . 1868. 
1868. Reuben Atwater Chapoian, 1873. 
1873. Horace Gray. 



NCH. 


DIED. 


Resigned.* 


1826. 


Resigned.! 


1810. 




1791. 


Resigned. 


1811. 




1813. 




1814. 




1830. 


Resigned. 


1861. 


Resigned. 





1878. 



* Mr. Adams never took his seat on the Bench, 
t Chief Justice Cushing resigned on being appointed one of the Jus- 
tices of the Supreme Court of the United States. 



Judiciary. 



221 



JUSTICES. 

APPOINTED. LEFT THE BENCH. DIED. 

1776. William Gushing, . . 1777. Appointed Chief Justice. 1810. 
Nathaniel Peaslee Sargent, 1700. Appointed Chief Justice. 1791. 



1775. 
1775. 
1775. 
1776. 
1776. 
1777. 
1782. 
1785. 
1790. 
1790. 
1792. 
1797. 
1800. 
1801. 
1801. 
1802. 
1806. 
1813. 
1814. 
1814. 
1815. 
1824. 
1825. 
1837. 
1842. 
1848. 
1848. 
1848. 
1850. 
1852. 
1853. 
1853. 
1859. 
1860. 



William Reed, . . . 1776. 

Robert Treat Paine, . . 1776. 

Jedediah Foster, . . 1779. 

James Sullivan, . . 1782. 

David Scwall, . . . 1789. 

Increase Sumner, . . 1797. 

Francis Dana, . . . 1791. 

Robert Treat Paine, . . 1804. 

Nathan Cushing, . . 1800. 

Thomas Dawes, . . 1802. 

Tbeophilus Bradbury, . 1803. 

Samuel Sewall, . . . 1814. 

Simeon Strong, . . . 1805. 

George Thacher, . . 1824. 

Theodore Sedgwick, . 1813. 

Isaac Parker, • . . 1814. 

Charles Jackson, . . 1823. 

Daniel Dewey, • . . 1815. 

Samuel Putnam, . . 1842. 

Samuel Sumner Wilde, . 1850. 

Levi Lincoln, . . . 1825. 

Marcus Morton, . . 1840. 



Superseded. 
Superseded. 



1780. 
1814. 
1779. 
1808. 
1825. 
1799. 



Resigned. 
Resigned.* 
Elected Governor. 
Appointed Chief Justice. 1811. 
Resigned. 1814. 

Resigned. 1812. 

Resigned. 1825. 

Removed. 1803. 

Appointed Chief Justice. 1814. 

1805. 
Resigned. 1824. 

1813. 
Appointed Chief Justice. 1830. 
Resigned. 1855. 

1815. 
Resigned. 1853. 

Resigned. 1855. 

Elected Governor. 1868. 

Elected Governor. 1864. 

1866. 

1847. 



Charles Augustus Dewey, 1866. 

Samuel Hubbard, . . 1847. 

Charles Edward Forbes, . 1848. Resigned. 

Theron Metcalf, . . 1865. Resigned. 

Richard Fletcher, . . 1853. 

George Tyler Bigelow, . 1860. 

Caleb Cushing, . . . 1853. 

Benj. Franklin Thomas, . 1859. 

Pliny Merrick, . . . 1864. 

Ebenezer Rockwood Hoar, 1869. Resigned.! 

Reuben Atwater Chapman, 1868. Appointed Chief Justice. 



Resigned. 1869* 

Appointed Chief Justice. 

Resigned.! 

Resigned. 

Resigned. 1867. 



* Mr. Justice Sewall resigned on being appointed Judge of tlie 
United States District Court for the District of Maine. 

t Mr. Justice Cushing and Mr. Justice Hoar resigned on being ap- 
pointed to the office of Attorney-General of the United States. 



222 



Judiciary, 



APPOINTED. LEFT 


THE BENCH. 


1S54. Horace Gray, Jr., . 


1873. Appointed Chief Justice 


1865. James Deniion Colt, 


1866. Resigned. 


1806. Dwlght Foster, . 


. 1869. Resigned.; 


1866. John Wells, 


* » 


1868. James Denison Colt, 




1800. Beth Ames, 




180d. Marcus Morton, • 




1873. Wm. C. Bndicott, . 




1873. Charles Devens, Jr., 





Justices of the Court of Common Pleas from its estahUshmeni in 

1820 unta its abolUion in 1859. 



CHIEF JUSTICES. 

APPOINTED. I£FT THE BENCH. 

1820. Artemas Ward, . . 1839. Resigned. 

1839. John Mason Williams, . 1844. Resigned. 

1844. Daniel Wells, . . . 1854. 

1854. Edward Mellen, . . 1859. 



DIED. 

1847. 
1868. 
1854. 





JUSTIC 


ISSX). 


Solomon Strong, 


1842. 


1820. 


John Mason Williams, . 


1839. 


1820. 


Samuel Howe, . 


1828. 


1828. 


David Cummins, • 


1844. 


1839. 


Charles Henry Warren. . 


1844. 


1842. 


Charles Allen, . 


1844. 


1843. 


Pliny Merrick, . 


1848. 


1844. 


Joshua Holyoke Ward, . 


1848. 


1844. 


Emory Washburn, , 


1847. 


1844. 


Luther Stearns Cushing, . 


1848. 


1845. 


Harrison Gray Otis Colby, 


1847. 


1847. 


Charles Edward Forbes, . 


1848. 


1847. 


Edward MelleQ, 


1854. 


1848. 


George Tyler Bigelow, . 


1850. 


1848. 


Jonathan Coggswell Per 


» 




kins, .... 


1859. 


1848. 


Horatio Byington, . 


1856. 



ES. 

Resigned. 1850. 

Appointed Chief JastSce. 1868. 

1828. 
Resigned. 1855. 

Resigned. 

Resigned. 1869. 

Resigned. 3867. 

1848. 
Resigned. 

Resigned. 1856. 

Resigned. 1853. 

Appointed to Sup. Ct. 
Appointed Chief Justice. 
Appointed to Sup. C't. 



1856. 



Judiciary, 



223 



APPOINTED. LEFT THE BENCH. 

1848. Thomas Hopkioson, . . 1849. Resigned. 

1849. Ebenczer Rockwood Hoar, 1855. 

1850. Pliny Merrick, . . . 1853. 

1851. Henry Walker Bishop, . 1859. 

1853. George Nixon Briggs, . 1859. 

1854. George Partridge Sanger, 1859. 

1855. Henry Morris, . . . 1859. 
1850. David Aiken, . . . 1859. 



Resigned. 
Appointed to Sap. C't. 



DIED. 

1856. 

1867. 
187L 
1861. 



Justices of the Superior Court since its establishment in 1859. 



CHIEF JUSTICES. 

APPOINTED. LEFT THE BENCH. DIED. 

1859. Charles Allen, . . . 1867. Resigned. 1869. 

US67. Seth Ames, . . . 1869. Appointed to Sup. C*t. 
1869. Lincoln Flagg Brigham, . 



JUSTICES. 



1859. Julius Rockwell, 

1859. Otis Phillips Lord, 

1859. Marcus Morton, Jr., 

1859. Seth Ames, 

1869. Ezra Wilkinson, 

1859. Henry Vose, 

1859. Thomas Russell, 

1859. John Phelps Putnam, 

1859. Lincoln Flagg Brigham, 
1867. Chester Isham Reed, 
1867. Charles Devens, Jr., . 

1860. Henry Austin Scudder, 
1869. Francis Henshaw Dewey, 
1869. Robert Carter Pitman, 

1871. John W. Bacon, 

1872. William Allen, . 

1873. P. Amory Aldrich, . 
1876. Waldo Colburn, 



1869. 
1867. 

1869. 
1867. 

1869. 
1871. 
1873. 
1872. 



Appointed to Sup. C't. 
Appointed Chief Justice. 



1869. 



Resigned. 



Appointed Chief Justice. 

Resigned. 

Appointed Justice of S. J. C. 

Resigned. 



224 



Judiciary, 



Present OivanlsatiOB of die Conrte. 



[All Judges in the Commonwealth are appointed by the Governor 
with the advice and consent of the Council, and hold office during good 
behavior.] 



i( 



<( 



(( 



Supreme Jttdiciai Court, 

Horace Gray, of Boston, Chi^ Justice, 
John Wells, of Brookline, Juttice, 
James D. Colt, of PitUfleld, 
Beth Adams, of Brookline, 
Marcus Morton, of Andover, 
William C. Endicott, of Salem, " 
Charles Devens, Jr., of Boston, ** 



Superior Court. 

Lincoln F. Brigham, of Balem, Chief Justice^ 

Julius Rockwell, of Lenox, Juttice, 

Otis P. Lord, of Salem, 

Ezra WilkiDson, of Dedham, 

John P. I^itnom, of Boston, 

Francis H. Dewey, of Worcester, 

Robert C. Pitman, of New Bedford, 

John W. Bacon, of Natick, 

William Allen, of Northampton, 

P. Emory Aldrich, of Worcester, 

'Waldo Colbum, of Dedham, 



4( 



4* 



(( 



(( 



(( 



(( 



(( 



(( 



4< 



Salary, $6,500 


(( 


6,000 


f4 


6,000 


f( 


6,000 


<( 


6,000 


i< 


6,000 


11 


6,000 


Salary, $6,300 


(( 


5,000 


(1 


6,000 


(( 


5,000 


<« 


5,000 


fi 


5,000 


«i 


6,000 


(4 


5,000 


« 


5,000 


(4 


5,000 


(4 


6,000 



Probate Courte and Courte of Insolvency. 

There is a Probate Court and a Court of Inbolyenct in each 

<coun^, distinct in their Jurisdiction, powers, proceedings and practice, 

but "having the same Judg^ and register. These courts are held by the 

. Judge -of probate and insolvency, appointed for the county ; but the 

.'Judges of the several counties may, in case of necessity or convenience, 

interchange services, and perform each other's duties. 

The names of the Judges, registers and assistant registers may be 
tfound among the list of County Officers. 



Judiciary, . 225 



Police CkmrU and Municipal Courts. 

Boston. — (Municipal Court.) Mcllen ChamberlaiD, Chief Juatice^ 
Joseph M. Churchill and William E. Parmenter, Associate Justices; 
salary, $3,000 each. Special Justice, William J. Foreaith. Clerks, 
William T. Connolly, civil side; salary, $2,600. John C. Lelgbton, 
criminal side; salary, $2,500. Highland District.— t/M«<«c€, Peter 
S. Wheelock, salary, $2,600. Special Justices, Solomon A. Bolster, 
Henry W. Puller. Clerk, Phineas B. Smith, Jr.; salary, $1,500. 
Dorchester District.— Justice, Joseph R. Churchill ; salary, $1,600. 
Special Justices, Qeorge M. Reed, George A. Fisher. Clerk, Robert 
T. Swan; salary, $1,000. West Roxbdrt District.— t/us^ice, John 
W. McKim; salary, $1,600. Special Justices, James M. F. Howard, 
George R. Fowler. Clerk, William Maccarty ; salary, $1,000. 
Brighton BiaTmcr. — Justice, Henry Baldwin; salary, $1,600. 
Special Justices, Frederick W. Galbraith, Michael W. Norton. Clerk, 
James H. Rice; salary, $1,000. South Boston District.— e7w»«c«, 
Robert I. Burbank ; salary, $2,000. Special Justices, Joseph D. Fal- 
lon, Benjamin F. Burnham. Clerk, Joseph H. Allen ; salary, $1,500. 
East Boston District. — Justice, Bei^jamin Pond; salary, $1,600. 
Special Justices, Roscoe H. Thompson, James L. Walsh. Clerk, 
Willard S. Allen; salary, $1,000. Charlestovn District.— (/u«^'ce, 
George W. Warren; salary, $2,000. Special Justices, Henry W. 
Bragg, Joseph H. Cotton. Clerk, Daniel Williams ; salary, $1,500. 

Cambridge. — Justice, JohnS. Ladd; salary, $1,800. Special Jus- 
tices, Woodward Emery, H. W. Muszey. Clerk, Thomas Mclntire, 
Jr. ; salary, $1^000. 

Chelsea. — Justice, Hamlet Bates ; salary, $1,800. Special Justices, 
Erastus Rugg, Bben Hutchinson. Clerk, Franklin O. Barnes; salary, 
$1,000. 

Ohicopee.— «/u«Mce, Edwin O. Carter; salary, $1,600. Special Jus- 
tices, Simon G. Southworth, Luther White. 

Fitchburo.— t/M««c«, Thornton K. Ware; salary, $1,300. Special 
Justices, David H. Merriam, Edward P. Loring. Clerk, George W. 
Cann; salary, $800. 

Gloucester. — Justice, James Davis ; salary, $1,600. Special Jus- 
tice, Elbridge G. Friend. 

ILa.\ekbiJjIm.— Justice, Henry Carter; salary, $1,800. Special Jus- 
tices, Alfred Kittredge, William E. Btunt. Clerk, Edward C. Dubois; 
salary, $1,000. 

15 



226 Judiciary, 

m 

HOLTOKE.— (TtMJice, Joseph P. Buckland; salary, $1,600. Special 
JusHceSt Porter Underwood, W. B. C. Pearsons. 

Lawb£nce.— x/iM^'ctf, William Stevens ; salary, $1,800. Special Jua- 
ticesy William H. P. Wright, Gilbert K. Hood. Clerks Henry P. Hop- 
kins ; salary, $1,000. 

Lee.— (7u9/ic«, Moses H. Pease ; salary, $800. Special Justices, 
James Bullard, Franklin W. Gibbs. 

'LO'WELJj.—JuaUcet Nathan Crosby ; salary, $2,200. Special Justicee, 
John Davis, Frederick T. Greenhalge. Glerkt Samnel P. Hadley; 
salary, $1,200. 

liYHV.—Justicet James R. Newhall; salary, $1,800. Special Jus- 
ticest Nathan M. Hawkes, Bollln E. Harmon. Clerk, Henry C. Oliver; 
salary, $1,000. 

Newburyport.— «/w«/<c«, William E. Currier; salary, $1,000. Special 
Juaticea, Henry W. Chapman, John N. Pike. Clerk, B. F. B&rtlett; 
salary, $600. 

SOMERVILLE.— c/tt«<ic«, Isaac Story; salary, $1,800. Special Jua- 
ticea, Alpheus R. Brown, George A. Bruce. Clerk, Lebbeus Stetson; 
salary, $1,000. 

Springfield (jurisdiction, Springfield, West Springfield, Wilhra* 
ham, Agawam and Longmeadow). — Juatice, James H.Morton; salary, 
$2,400. Special Juaticea, Alfred M. Copeland, Samuel B. Spooner. 
Clerk, Charles C. Spelman ; salary, $1,200. 

WiijijiAMaTOws.— Juatice, John R. Bulkley; salary, $800. Special 
Juaticea, Andrew M. Smith, Henry L. Sabin. 

Diatrict Courta. 

Central Berkshire (court held at Pittsfield; jurisdiction in Han* 
cock, Lanesborough, Peru, Windsor, Hinsdale, Dalton, Pittsfield and 
Richmond). — Juatice, Joseph Tucker; salary, $1,600. Special Jrts- 
ticia, Chas, W. Van De Mark, Lorenzo H. Gamwell. Clerk, Walter B. 
Smith; salary, $800. 

Northern Berkshire (court held at Adams ; jurisdiction in Adams, 
Clarksburg, Savoy, Florida and Cheshire).— t/u«Mc«, Jarvis Rockwell ; 



Judiciary. 227 

salary, $1,200. Special JusticeSt Frederick P. Brown, Nelaon H. 
Bixby. Olerkt Lyman M. Flagg; salary, $800. 

Southern Bbukshire (court held at Great Barrington; jurisdiotlon 
in SliefSeld, Great Barring^n, Egremont, Alford, Mt. Washington, 
Monterey and New Marlborough).-VM«Wc«, James Bradford; salary, 
$1,200. Special Justices, James H. Rowley, Bennselaer N« Oouch. 
Clerk, Thomas ^ggimi; salary, $600. 

First Pi.tmouth (court held at Brockton; Jarisdiction in Brockton, 
Bridgewater, East Bridgewater and West Bridgewater).-Vu«fic«, 
Jonas R. Perkins ; salary, $1,200. Special Justice, Chas. W. Sumner. 
Clerk, David L. CoweU; salary, $600. 

Second Pltmouth (court held at Ahington and Hingham; Jurisdic- 
tion in Abingtouj Rockland, Hingham, Hull, Hanover, Hanson, South 
Ahington and South Scituate).-Vu«^0, Jesse E. Keith; salary, $1,400. 
Special Justices, Zenas Jenkins, James S. Lewis. Clerk, Otis W. 
Soule; salary, $800. 

Third Plymouth (court held at Plymouth and,Scituate; Jurisdic 
tion in Plymouth, Kingston, Plympton, Pembroke, Duzbury, Marsh' 
field and Bclt,nate).—Ju8tice, Chas. G. Davis; salary, $1,400. Special 
Justices, Caleb W. Prouty, Wm. S. Danforth. Clerk, BenJ. A. Hath- 
away; salary, $800. 

Fourth Plymouth (court held at Middleborough and Wareham ; 
jurisdiction in Middleborough, Wareham, Lakevilie, Marlon, Mattapol- 
sett and Rochester). — Justice, Francis M. Vaughan; salary, $1,200. 
SpecivU Justice, Erastus B. Powers. Clerk, Wm. L. Chipman ; salar}', 
$700. 

First Northern Middlesex (court held at Ayer; Jurisdiction iu 
Ayer, Groton, Pepperell, Townsend, Ashby, Shirley, Wcstford, Little* 
ton and Bozborough).—Ju«^«, Levi Wallace; salary, $1,200. Special 
Justice, John Spaulding. Clerk, Qeo. W. Sanderson ; salary, $600. 

First Southern Middlesex (court held at South Framingham; 
Jarisdiction in Ashland, Framingham, Holli«ton, Hopkinton, Nattck, 
Sherborn, Sudbury and Wayland). — Justice, Constantine C. Esty; 
salary, $1,600. Special Justices, Lucius H. Wakefield, Edwin C. 
Morse. Oierk, Sidney A. Phillips; salary, $800, 



228 Judiciary, 

First Eastern Middlesex (court held at Maiden and Wakefield ; 
jurisdiction in Wilmington, North Reading, Reading, Stoneham, Wake- 
field, Melrose, Maiden, Everett and Medford).— t/M*ttc€, John W. Pet. 
tengill; salary, $2,000. Special Justice*, Thomas S. Harlow, Solon 
Bancroft. Olerk, Dexter Bucknam; salary, $1,000. 

CENTRAii Middlesex (court held at Concord ; jurisdiction'in Acton, 
Bedford, Carlisle, Concord, Lincoln, Maynard, Stow and Lexington). — 
JtuHce, John S. Keyes; salary, $1,200. Special Justices, Augustus E. 
Scott, Chas. Thompson. 

First Essex (court held at Salem ; Jurisdiction in Salem, Beverly, 
Danvers, Hamilton, Middleton, Topsfleld and Wenham). — Justice, 
Joseph B. F. Osgood; salary, $3,0<M). Special Justices, Daniel E. 
Safford, Nath'l J. Holden. Clerk, Samuel P. Andrews ; salary, $2,500. 

First Bristol (court held at Taunton; jurisdiction in Taunton, 
Rehoboth, Berkley, Dighton, Seekonk, Attleborough, Norton, Mans- 
field, Easton and Raynham). — Justice, Wm. H. Fox; salary, $2,000. 
Special Justices, Erastus M. Reed, William E. Fuller. Clerk, Laurens 
N. Francis ; salary, $1,200. 

Second Bristol (court held at Fall River; jurisdiction in Fall 
River, Freetown, Somerset and Swansea). — Justice, Josiah C. Blais- 
dell; salary, $2,000. Special Justices, Milton Reed, Bei^. El. Lovatt. 
Clerk, Augustus B. Leonard ; salary, $1,200. , 

Third Bristol (court held at New Bedford ; jurisdiction in New 
Bedford, Fairhaven, Acushnet, Dartmouth and Weetport). — Justice, 
Alanson Borden; salary, $1,800. Special JvAtices, Wm. W. Crapo, 
Francis W. Tappan. Clerk, Chas. H. Sanford; salary, $1,000. 

First Southern Worcester (courts held at Southbridge and Web- 
ster; jurisdiction in Sturbridge, Southbridge, Charlton, Dudley, Ox- 
ford and Webster). — Justice, Clark Jillson; salary, $1,200. Special 
Justices, Frederick W. Botham, William H. Davis. 

Second Southern Worcester (court held at Blackstone and 
Uxbridge ; jurisdiction in Blackstone, Uxbridge, Douglas and North- 
bridge). — Justice, Arthur A. Putnam ; salary, $1,500. Special Justice, 
Zadok A. Taft. 

Third Southern Worcester (court held at Milford; jurisdiction 
in Milford, Mendon and Upton). — Justice, Charles A. Dewey; salary, 
$1,600. Special Justices, James R. Davis, Chas. E. Whitney. 



Judiciary. 229 

First Eastern Worcester (court held at Westborough and Graf- 
ton; jurisdiction in Northborough, Southborough, Westborough and 
Qtrsifion).— Justice t W. Trowbridge Forbes; salary, $800. Special 
Justice^ Benj, B. Nourse. 

Second Eastern Worcester (court held at Clinton ; jurisdiction 
in Clinton, Berlin, Bolton, Harvard, Lancaster and Sterling).— ,/M««ce, 
Chas. G. Stevens ; salary, $1,200. Special JusUcet Christopher C. 
Stone. Clerks Frank E. Howard ; salary, $600. 

Central Worcester (court held at Worcester; jurisdiction in 
Worcester, Millbury, Sutton, Auburn, Leicester, Pnxton, W. Boylston, 
Boylston, Holden and Shrewsbury). — Justice, Hartley Williams ; 
salary, $3,000. Special Justices, Samuel Utley, George M. Woodward, 
Clerk, Theodore S. Johnson ; salary, $2,500. Assistant Clerk's salary, 
$1,000. 

East Norfolk (court held at Quincy; jurisdiction in Randolph, 
Bralntree, Cohasset, Weymouth, Quincy, Holbrook and Milton). — 
Justice, Everett C. Bnmpus; salary, $1,800. Special Justices, Jas. A. 
Tower, Solomon J; Beal. Clerk, J. White Belcher; salary, $1,000. 

Eastern Hampden (court held at Palmer; jurisdiction in Palmer, 
Brimfield, Monson, Holland and Wales). — Justice, James G. Allen; 
salary, $1,000. Special Justices, George Robinsen, Ira G. Potter. 

District Attorneys, 

[Elected by the several Districts for the terms of three years, ending 

January, 1878.] 

Northern District.— Middlesex County, Geo. Stevens, of Lowell; 
salary, $2,000. 

Eastern District.— Essex County, Edgar J. Sherman, of Law- 
rence; salary, $2,000. 

Southern District. — Bristol,* Barnstable, Dukes and Nantucket 
Counties, George Marston, of New Bedford; salary, $2,000. 

Sodth-Eastern District.— Norfolk and Plymouth Counties, Asa 
French, of Braintree ; salary, $2,000. 

Middle District. — ^Worcester County, Hamilton B. Staples, of 
Worcester; salary, $2,000. 



230 Judiciary, — County Officers. 

Western District.— Hampden and Berkshire Counties, Edward 
H. Lathrop, of Springfield; salary, $2,000. 

North- Western District.— Hampshire and Franklin Counties, 
Samuel T. Field, of Shelhurne : salary, $1,500. 

Suffolk County.— Oliver Stevens, of Boston; salary, $5,000. He- 
man W. Chaplin, First Assistant Attorney; salary, $3,000. Michael 
Norton, Second Assistant ; salary, $2,000. 



COUNTY OFFICERS. 



Sheriffs, Registers of Deeds and County Treasurers are elected by the 
people of the several Counties for terms of three years. The cur- 
rent triennial term of Sheriffs expires on the first Wednesday of 
January, 1878, and that of the Registers of Deeds and County 
Treasurers in January, 1877. 

Registers of Probate and Insolvency, and Clerks of Courts, are elected 
for tenns of five years The current term of the former expires in 
January, 1879; that of the latter in 1876. 

Registers of Deeds and Clerks of Courts are paid by fees. Sheriffs 
and County Treasurers are, by Sections 87 and 70 of Chapter 17 of 
the G-eneral Statutes, paid by fixed salaries. 

County Commissioners are elected one annually, and severally for terms 
of three years ; and two Special Commissioners are elected every 
third year, the current term ending in December, 1877. 

By Section 29 of Chapter 17 of the General Statutes, the County Com- 
missioners and Special Commissioners of the several Counties are 
paid a gross sum in full for their services and travel, the same to 
be apportioned to each, according to the number of days* service 
and actual amount of travel performed by each respectively. 

By the provisions of Section 33 of Chapter 120 of the G-eneral Statutes, 
the Governor, with the advice and consent of the Council, is re. 
quired to designate and commission a certain number of Justices 
of the Peace, as Trial Justices in the several Counties, to try crim- 
inal cnses. No Justice of the Peace not thus designated and com- 
missioned has any power or authority in criminal cases, except to 
receive complaints and issue warrants, for which no fees are to be 
allowed. 



County Officers. 231 

By the proylsions of Chapter 187 of the Acts of 1800, each Trial Justice 
holds office for the term of three years from the time of his desig- 
nation, unless such designation is sooner revoked, or unless his 
commissioTi as Justice of the Peace shall sooner expire. 

BARNSTABLE COUNTY—Incorporated, 1685. 

Shire Totcn, Barnstable. 

Salary. 

Judge of PirobaU and Insolvency— JoBeph M. Day, Barnstable, $1,000 

BegiHer of Probate and Insolvency— (Jh. Thacher, 2d, Yarmouth, 1,000 

Sheriff— lyawi^ Bursley, Barnstable 600 

Clerk of Courts — James B. Crocker, Yarmouth. 

County Treasurer — Charles H. Nye, Chatham, .... 500 

Register of Deeds — Smith K. Hopkins, Barnstable. 

County Commissioners (compensation, $1,800), — 

James 8. Howes, Dennis, . . Term expires, December, 1876 
Jonathan Higgins, Orleans, . . " ** ** 1877 

Joshua C. Robinson, Falmouth, . " " " 1878 

Special Commissioners — 

John W. Davis, Provincetown, . Term expires, December, 1877 
Watson B. Kelley, Harwich, . •• « «* 1877 

Trial Justices— jBxneB B. Crocker, Yarmouth ; Marshall S. Underwood, 
Dennis ; E Stowell Whittemore, Sandwich ; Theodore F. Basset, 
Hyannis; Smith K. Hopkins, North Truro; George T. Wyer, 
Wellfleet; ShubaelB. Kelley, Harwich Port; Raymond Ellington, 
Provincetown, 

BERKSHIRE COUNTY— Incorporated, 1761. 

Shire Tbum, Pittsfield. 

Salary. 

Judge of Probate and Insolvency — James T. Robinson, Adams, $1,200 
Register of Probate and Insolvency— A. J. Waterman, Pittsfield, 1,200 

5A«rl/— Graham A. Root, Pittsfield, 1,300 

Clerk of Courts— Henry W. Taft, Pittsfield. 

County Treasurer— George J. Tucker, Pittsfield, .... 1,500 
Registers of 2)c«d«— North District, Herbert A. Fuller, Adams ; Mid- 
dle District, George J. Tucker, Pltt«fie1d; South District, Isaac 
Secley, Great Barrington. 
County Commissioners (compensation, $1,700), — 

H. H. Richardson, Pittsfield, . Term expires, December, 1876 
Henry J. Bliss, South Adams, . " •« " 1877 

Justin Dewey, Jr., Gt. Barrington, " " " 1878 



232 County Officers. 

BERKSHIRE County— Coucluded. 

Special Commissioners — 

Darius W. Dunham, Washington, Term expires, December, 1877 
John Stallman, Lee, ..." " " 1877 

Trial Justices— WiUiaxn 8. Tucker, Lenox ; Henrj' J. Dunham, Stock- 
bridge. 

BRISTOL COUNTY— Incorporated, 1685. 

Shire TownSt Tadnton and New Bedford. 

Salar}'. 

Judge of Probata, and Insolvency — Edm'd H. Bennett, Taunton, $1,800 

Register of Probate and Insolvency— Wm. E. Fuller, Taunton, 1,800 

iS^Aeri/— William 8. Cobb, New Bedford, 1,200 

Clerk of Ckmrte— 81meon Borden, Fall River. 

County Treasurer — Q-eorge F. Pratt, Taunton, .... 1,500 

Registers of Deeds— TSoriYi District, Joseph E. Wilbar, Taunton ; 8outh 

District, Charles C. Sayer, New Bedford. 

County Commissioners (compensation $2,500), — 

Elisha Thornton, Jr., New Bedford, Term expires, December, 1876 

Guilford H. Hathaway, Fall River, " « " 1877 

Elisha T. Jackson, Taunton, " « " 1878 

Special Commissioners — 

George N. Crandall, Attleborough, Term expires, December, 1877 

Daniel J. Lewis, Fairhaven, . . " " " 1877 

Trial Justice — Mason Barney, North Swansea. 



DUKES COUNTY— Incorporated, 1683. 
Shire Toion, Edgartown. 



Salary. 
$500 
600 
400 
Fees. 
300 
200 



Judge of Probate and Insolvency— J, T. Pease, Edgartown, 

Register of Probate and Insolvency — ^H. Vincent, Edgartown 

/S^A^ri/f— Francis C. Smith, Edgartown, .... 

Clerk of Courts — Samuel Keniston, Edgartown, 

County Treasurer — Barnard C. Marchant, Edgartown, . 

Register of Deeds-John S. Smith, Edgartown, 

County Commissioners (compensation, $400), — 

David W. Mayhew, Tisbury, . Term expires, December, 1876 
Shubael Lyman Norton, Edgart'n, " " " 1877 

Asa Smith, Chilmark, ..." " " 1878 

Special Commissioners — 

Abraham Rodman, Gay Head, . Term expires, December, 1877 
Frederick S. Allen, Gosnold, . " " " 1877 

Trial Justice — Jeremiah Pease, Edgartown. 



County Officers. 233 



ESSEX COUNTY— Incorporated, 1634. 

Shire Towns, Salem, Lawrence and Newburyport. 

Salary. 
Judge of Probate and Insolvency— George P. Choatc, Salem, . $2,500 
Register of Probate and Insolvency — Abner 0. G-oodell, Salem, 2,000 

Assistant Register — ^E. D. Hines, Danvers, 1,500 

Sheriff— "RoTdAXo G. Herrick, Lawrence, 1,800 

Clerk of Courts— Alfred A. Abbott, Peabody. 

Assistant Clerk— Geo. R. Lord, Salem, 2,100 

County 71r«o*urtfr— Allen W. Dodge, Hamilton, . . . .1,800 
Registers of Deeds — Southern District, Ephraim Brown, Salem; 

Northern District, Abiel Morrison, Lawrence. 
County Commissioners (compensation, $4,000), — 

Zachariah Graves, Lynn, . . Term expires, December, 1876 
Joseph O. Proctor, Gloucester, . " «• " 1877 

James Kimball, Salem, . . " " " 1878 

Special Commissioners — 

Aaron Sawyer, Amesbury, . . Term expires, December, 1877 
Danl. W. Bartlett, Essex, . . " " " 1877 

Trial Justices— 3. Scott Todd, Rowley; Nath»l F. S. York, Rockport; 
William M. Rogers, Methuen ; Orlando B. Tenney, Georgetown ; 
(George H. Poor, Andover; George W. Gate, Amesbury; Henry 
Wardwell, Peabody; Orlando 8. Baley, Amesbury; William Nut- 
ting, Jr., Marblehead. 

FRANKLIN COUNTY— Incorporated, 1811. 

Shire Town, Greenfield. 

Salary. 

Judge of Probate and Insolvency — C. C. Conant, Greenfield, $1,400 

Register of Probate and Insolvency — F. M. Thompson, G'nfield, 1,400 

iS^A«r»;^— Solomon C. Wells, Greenfield 850 

Clerk of Cour<«— -Edward E. Lyman, Greenfield. 

County Treasurer — Bela Kellogg, Greenfield, .... 600 

Register of Deeds— Edw&rd Benton, Greenfield. 

County Commissioners (compensation, $1,200), — 

John M. Smith, Sunderland, . Term expires, December, 1876 

Carlos Batchelder, Conway, . •* •» " 1877 

Lyman G. Barton, Greenfield, . " " " 1878 

Special Commissioners — 

David L. Smith, Colrain, . . Term expires, December, 1877 

Beriah W. Fay, New Salem, . «« " " 1877 



234 County Officers. 

Franklin County— Concluded. 
Trial Justices— Wendell T. Davis and Almon Brainard, Greenfield; 
Hiram Woodward, Orange; Samuel D. Bardwell, Shelbume 
Falls; Joseph H. Root and George L. Barton, Montague; Albert 
Montague, Sunderland; John A. Winslow, Charlemont; Henry 
W. Billings, Conway. 

HAMPDEN COUNTY— Incorporated, 1812. 

Shire Toum, SpringfieIiO. 

Salary. 

Judffe of Probaie and Insolvency— Wm. B. Shurtleff, Spring- 
field, $1,800 

Register of Probate and Insolvency— Qamuel B. Spooner, 

Springfield 1,600 

/S^Aeri#— Addison M. Bradley, 1,250 

Clerk of Courts— Robert O. Morris, Springfield, . . . . 2,000 

County Treasurer— 'K. Wells Bridge, Springfield, . . . 1,500 

Register of Deeds — James £. Russell, Springfield. 

County Commissioners (compensation, $1,700), — 

Lawson Sibley, Springfield, . . Term expires, December, 1876 
John O'Donnell, Holyoke, . . " " " 1877 

Lucius F. Thayer, Westfield, . " " «' 1878 

Special Commissioners— 

8. C. Spellman, Wilbraham, . . Term expires, December, 1877 
Roland Parks, Russell, ..." '• «* 1877 

Trial Justices — Henry B. Lewis, Homer B. Stevens and Henry Fuller, 
Westfield; James M. Goodwin, West Granville; Daniel Granger, 
Cheshire. 

HAMPSHIRE COUNTY— Incorporated, 1662. 

Shire Toum^ Northampton. 

Salary. 

Judge of Probate and Insolvency— ^tanvicl T. Spaulding, . . $1,400 
Register of Probate and Insolvency — Luke Lyman, Northamp- 
ton, 1,400 

Sheriff— "RenrY A. Longley, Northampton, 1,0C0 

Clerk of the Courts— W. P. Strickland, Northampton, . . 1,600 
County Treasurer— Henry 8. Gere, Northampton, . . . 800 
Registet^ of Deeds— Henry P. Billings, Hatfield. 
County Commissioners — 

Elisha A. Edwards, Southampton, Term expires, December, 1876 
Elnathan Graves, Williamsburg, . " •» " 1877 

S. Mills Cook, Granby, ..." " «• 1878 



Oouvty Officers. 235 

Hampshire County— Conchided. 

Special OommUaionera — 

8. L. Parsons, Northampton, . Term expires, December, 1877 
C. B. Blood, Ware, ..." « " 1877 

Trial «/u«/ice«— Franklin D Richards, Ware; Edward A. Thomas, 
Amherst; Garfy Manson, Huntington; Charles Richards, Enfield; 
Franklin Dickinson, Belcherlown ; Nathan Morse, South Hadley ; 
A. Perry Peck and Haynes H. Chilson, Northampton; William 
G. Bassett, Easthampton ; Francis H. Dawes, Cummington. 

MIDDLESEX COUNTY— Incorporated, 1643. 

Shire ToicHS, Cambrtdge (East) and Lowell. 

Salary. 

Judge of Probate and Insolvenq/ — Geo. M. Brooks, Concord, $2,500 

Register of Probate and Insolvency— Sos, H. Tyler, East 

Cambridge, 2,000 

. l.dOO 

. 2,200 

. 2,500 

. 2,100 

. 2,000 



Assistant Register— Ibsolq F. Jones, East Cambridge, 

SheHf—CbSkTles Kimball, Lowell, 

Clerk of Courts — Theodore C. Hurd, Framingham, 

Assistant Clerk— John J. Sawyer, Somervillc, . 

County Treasurer— AmoB Stone, Charlestown, . 

Registers of Deeds— l^orth District, Joseph T, Thompson, Lowell; 
South District, Charles B. Stevens, Cambridge. 

County Commissioners* (compensation, $4,800), — 

Daniel G. Walton, Wakefield, . Term expires, December, 1876 
Harrison Harwood, Natick, . . " " " 1877 

J. Henry Read, Westford, . . " " " 1878 

Special Commissioners — 

Lyman Dike, Stonehnm, . . Term expiree, December, 1877 
Samuel Staples, Concord, . . *• " " 1877 

Trial Justices — George T. Higley, Ashland; B. Berkeley Johnson, 
Waltham; David Heard, Wnyland; Newton Morse, Natick; An. 
drew H. Briggs (Wyoming), Melrose ; Leonard Huntress (Special), 
Tewksbury ; James T. Joslin, Hudson ; George S. Littlefield, Win- 
chester; Parker L. Converse, Woburn; Ira O. Carter, Arlington; 
Jesse F. Wheeler, Watertown; William F. Siocum, Newton; 
Nahum Witherbee, Marlborough 

* The Jurisdiction of the County Commissioners of Middlesex ex- 
tends over Revere and Winthrop, in the county of Suffolk. 



286 Cmnty Officers. 



NANTUCKBT COUNTY— Incorporated, 1695. 

Salary. 

Judge of Probate and /fi«o/oency— Thaddeua O. Defriez, . ^500 

Register of Private and Insolvency — Samuel Swain, . . 600 

Sherif—Jofiiah F. Burrett, 300 

Clerk of Courts — Q-eorge W. Jenks. 

County Treasurer— SAmuel Swain. • 

Register of Deeda— William H. Macy. 

Trial Juetice—Thomaa B. Field. 

Note— The Selectmen of the town of Nantucket have the power 
and perform the duties of County Commissioners. The Treasurer of 
the Town is also County Treasurer. 

NORFOLK COUNTY— Incorporated, 1793. 

Shire Towny Dedham. 

Salary. 

Judge of Probate and Insolvency—Qeorge White, Quincy, . $2,000 
Register of Probate and /n«o/»«icy— Jona. H. Cobh, Dedham, 1,500 

Assistant Register — Jona. Cobb, 1,100 

Sheriff— John W. Thomas, Dedham, 1,200 

Clerk of Courts — Ernstus Worthington, Dedham. 

Assistant Clerk — Edgar H. Kingsbury, 1,500 

County Treasurer— Chauncy C. Churchill, Dedham, . . 1,800 
Register of Deeds — John H. Burdakin, Dedham. 
County Commissioners (compensation, $3,000), — 

Galen Orr, Needham, . . . Term expires, December, 1876 
James Humphrey, Weymouth, . " " " 1877 

Nathaniel F. Safford, Milton, . «' " " 1878 

Special Commissioners — 

J. Q. A. Field, Quincy, . . . Term expires, Dccember,1877 
George P. Morey, Walpole, . . *• " ** 1877 

Trial Justices — Emery Grover, Needham; Charles H. Drew, Brook- 
line; Charles H. Dbans, West Medway; Samuel Warner, Wren- 
tham ; Horace E. Ware, Milton ; Geo. W. Wiggin, Franklin ; John 
Merrill Brown, Stoughton. 

PLYMOUTH COUNTY— Incorporated, 1685. 

Shire Town^ Plymouth 

Salary. 

Judge of Probate and Insolvency — Wm. H. Hood, Middleboro', $1,500 

Register of Probate and Insolvency — D. E. Damon, Plymouth, 1,500 

Sheriff— '3 fiOieB Bates, Plymouth, 900 



County Officers. 237 

Pltmocth County— Concluded. Salary. 

Clerk of Cburte— William H. Whitman, Plymouth. 

Ckmnty TVeantrer^- William R. Sever, Plymouth, . . . $1,000 

Register of i?«erf«— William 8. Danforth, Plymouth. 

County Commiasioners (compensation $2,500), — 

William P. Corthell, Abington, . Term expires, December, 1876 
Charles H. Paine, Halifax, . . •• " " 1877 

Joseph T. Wood, Middleborough, " •• " 1878 

Special CommiaHonera — 

Jedediah Dwelley, Hanover, . Term expires, December, 1877 
Frederic Howard, Brockton, . •• " •• 1877 

Trial ./Ma<*ce«— Cornelius B. Wood, Middleborough ; William H. Os- 
borne, East Bridgewater; Otis W. Soule, Abington; James S. 
Lewis, Hingham; Caleb W. Prouty, Scituate; Jonas R. Perkins, 
Brockton; Arthur Lord, Plymouth. 



SUFFOLK COUNTY— Incorporated, 1048. 

, Salary. 

Judge of Probate and /n«o/oency— Isaac Ahies, Boston, . • . $4,000 

Register of Probate and /naofocncy— Partrick R. Guiney, Bos* 

ton, 8,000 

Assistant Register-^O, R. Brainard, 1,600 

/5A6rijf— John M. Clark, Boston 2,500 

Clerk of Supreme Judicial Court— John Noble. 

Assistant Clerk of Supreme Judicial Court— Kenry A. Clapp, 

Boston, , . . 2,500 

Clerk of Superior Court— (Civil Session)^^oaeph A. Willard, 

Boston, 2,500 

Assistant— ^dvrin A. Wadlelgh. 

Clerk of Superior Court ( Criminal Session)— John P. Manning, Boston. 

City and County Treasurer— Charles H. Dennie. 

Register of Deeds — Thomas F. Temple, Boston. 

Note.— In the City of Boston the Board of Aldermen have all the 
powers and duties of County Commissioners, except in relation to 
trials by jury and recovery of damages in such trials, in cases of laying 
out or discontinuing highways, and appeals from assessors for abate' 
ment of taxes. The Treasurer of the City of Boston is likewise County 
Treasurer. 



238 County OjJte9w%^ — Board of Agriculture, 

WORCESTER COUNTY— Incorporate*, l»l, 

Shire Towns, WoROESTEii and Fitchburq. 

Sahtf>\ 

Judge of Probate and Insohenci^ — ^Henry Ohapini Worcester, f 2)500 
Register of Probate and Insoivenq/^Charlea E. Steyene, 

Worcester, S,000 

Assistant Register — ^Frederick W. Boathwick, Worcester. 
Sheriff-^ \\iguBUiB B. R. Bprague, Worcester, .... 2,000 
Clerk of ObitW*— Joseph Mason, Worcester. 

Assistant Clerk— John A. Dona, Worcester, .... 2,100 
Second Assistant C7^A;— Elliott H. Peabody, Worcester. 
Register of 7?f e<2«>--Oharles A. Chase, Worcester. 
County Treasurer- 
County Commissioners (compensation, $4,000),-<- 

J. Warren Bigelow, Rutland, . Term expires, December, 1876 
Wm. O. Brown, Fitchburg, . . " " « 1877 

Henry a. Taft, tJxbridge, . . " " «« 1878 

Special Commissioners — , 

Bethuel Ellis, Winchendon, . . Term expires, December, 1877 
James R. Davis, Milford, . . " " " 1877 

Trial e/M««c«»— Edwin Woods, Barre; J. F. Hitchcock, Warren; 
Luther Hill, Spencer; E. Wyman Stone, Templeton; Chas. H. 
Merriam, Leominster; G-. Albert Williams, Hard wick; Thomas D. 
Brooks, Athol; Bethuel Ellis, Winchendon; Thomas E. Glazier, 
Gardner; Geo. S. Duell, Brookfield; Charles E. Jenks, Korth 
Brookfleld. 



BOARD OF AGRICULTURE. 



[Established by Act of April 21, 1852. See also chap. 220 of AcU of 
1803, and chap. 203 of Acts of 1866.] 



Members ex offlcUs* 

His Excellency Alexander H. Rice. 

His Honor Horatio G. Knight. 

Hon. H. B. Pierce, Secretary of the Commxtnvoealth. 

Hon. William S. Clark, President Mass. Agricultural CoUege* 

Charles A. Goessmann, State Agricultural Chemist. 



Board of AgricuUure. 



239 



Appointed fry the Governor and OomnciL 

Paul A. Chadbonme, of WnUamfltown, . Term expires, 1870. 

Marshall F. Wilder, of Boston* ....** " 1877. 

Leverett SaltonsUil, of Newton, ....«• •< 1878. 



M 



«• 



• * 



•• 



M 



(« 



*( 



<« 



<« 



Chosen fry flU Cbmi^ SodeOes. 

MassacbiuettB, Charles B. Sar^gent, of BrookUne, Term 
Essex, Oeorge B. Loring, of Salem, 
Middlesex, John B. Moore, of Oooeord, 

** North, Jonathan Ladd, of Lowell 
** Sonth, BlQah Perry, of Natick, . 
Worcester, O. B. Hadwen, of Worcester, . 
West, A. H. Holland, of Barre, . 
North, Stephen Bhepley, of Rtchbni;^ 
North-west, Ooortlon Sanderaon, of 

FIdUipston, .... 
Soath, Daniel Dwig^ of Dudley, 
South-east, William KnowHon, of 

Upton, 

Hampshire, Franklin and Hampden, Elnathan 

Oraves, of Williamshurg, 
Hampshire, Levi P. Warner, of Sunderland, 
Highland, Metcalf J. Smith, of Middlefield, 
Hampden, J. N. Bagg, of West Springfield, 

«* £ast» Horace P. Wakefield, of Monson, 
Union, Franklin C Knox, of Blandibrd, 
Franklin, Whitney L. Warner, of Snoderland, 
Deerileld Valley, E. C. Hawks, of Charlemont, 
Berkshire, Ensign H. Kelk>gg, of PittsfieM^ 
Hoosac Valley, Dan. T. Famnm, of So. Adams, 
Honsatonic, Henry S. €K>odale, at Mt. WashingtOD, 
Norfolk, EliphaleC Stone of Dedham, . 
Hingham, Solomon Lincoln, of Hingham, . 
Bristol, Edmund H. Bennett, o^ Taunton, . 

** Central, John A. Hawea, of Fairhaven, 
Plymouth, Charka 6. Davis, of Plymouth, . 
Marshfield, George M. Baker, of Manfafield, 
Bamsteble^ S. B. Fhimiey, of BamoUble, . 
Nantucket, Alex. Maey, Jr., of Nantucket, . 
Martha's Vineyard, HAton Vhieent, of Ed^vtown, 

Chaiies Li. FUnt, 



expires, 1877. 

" 1878. 

" 1879. 

•• 1877. 

" 1878. 

" 1878. 

" 1878, 

•• 1878. 



M 

M 



•« 



«• 



•< 



<• 



M 



M 



M 



M 



•• 
M 
M 

M 
M 
•* 
M 
M 
M 
M 
«• 
M 
M 
M 
M 
M 
M 



i8n. 
i8n. 



" 18W. 



1876u 

i8n. 

1878. 
18iV. 
1876. 
1877. 
1877. 
1878. 
1878. 
1870. 
1878. 
18n. 
1879. 
1878. 
1878. 
1878. 
1876. 
1877. 
1879. 
1877. 



240 Board of Education.^Commisaioners^ etc. 



BOARD OF EDUCATION. 



[Betaljlished by Act of April 20, 1837.] 



The Board consiets of the Governor and Lient.^Govemor, ex ojfficiU, 
and eight members, one to be appointed annually by the Governor and 
Counoil. 



Term expires, 1876. 
1877. 



Henry Chapin, Worcester, 
Alonzo A. Miner, Boston, 
Gardiner G. Hubbard, Cambridge, 
William Rice, Springfield, 
C. C. Ssty, li^ramingham, . . > 
Bdward B. Glllett, Westfield, 
Christopher P. Hussey, Billerico, . 
Phillips Brooks, Boston, 

Joseph White, Secretary and Treasurer. Office in the Library 

Samuel C. Jackson, Assistant Secretary. 

Abner J. Phipps^ West Medford, General Agent. 



(I 



<i 



%t 



<t 



it 



(t 



<( 



1878. 
1879. 
1880. 
1881. 
1882. 
1883. 



COMMISSIONERS, ETC. 



Insurance. — Stephen H. Rhodes, Boston. DepuJtyt Benjamin C. 
Dean, Lowell. Office, Ko. 33 Pemberton Square. 

« 

Board of Statk Charities.— F. B. Sanborn, Concord, Chair- 
man; Bdward Earle, Worcester; Moses Kimball, Boston; Nathan 
Allen, Lowell ; Charles F. Donnelly, Boston. Secretary f Sidney An- 
drews, Boston. Office, State House. General Agent, Stephen O. 
Wrightington, Fall River; Visiting Agent, Gardiner Tufts, Lynn. 

On Public Lands.— ^Franklin Haven, Boston; K.O.Pardy, Somer- 
ville ; Samuel D. Warren, Boston. 

On Prisons.— Stephen W. Bowles, Springfield, Chairman; H. 
W. B. Wightman, Lowell; Joseph Burnett, Southborough; Thos. G. 



Commissioners, etc, 241 

Howard, Boston, Secretari/. Office, State House. AdnUory Board, 
Miss Hannah B. Chickering, Dedham; Mrs. Pauline A. Durant, Need- 
ham; Mrs. Clara T. Leonard, Springfield. 

Savings Banks.— Jeremiah Gatohell, Blackstone. Office, State 
House. 

Inspector of Leather.— George 0. Hodgson, Salem. 

Inspector of Gas and Gas-meters.- Charles W. Hinman, Boston. 

Inspector-General of Fish.— William Cogswell of Salem. 

Inspector of Pot and Pearl Ashes.— Moody D. Cook, New- 
buryport. 

Sdryetor-GeneraIi of Lumber.— George W. Cram, Cambridge. 

On Pilots for the Port of Boston.— Jacob G. Pierce, Milton; 
Nathaniel Spooner, Boston. (Chap. 176, Acts of 1862.) 

Cattle.— Levi Stockbridge, Amherst ; Elisha F. Thayer, West 
Newton. 

State Directors of Boston and Albany Railroad (elected 
by Legislature).— Terms expire in 1876: J. H. Chadwick, Boston; 
Lewis R. Norton, Westfield ; Charles L. Wood, New Bedford. Terms 
expire in 1877: Francis B. Hayes, Boston; John Cummings, Wo- 
bum. 

Agent concerning Flats of B., H. and Erie R. R.— Edward 
S. Philbrick, Brookline. 

State Assaters of Ores and Metals.— S. Dana Hayes, Bos- 
ton ; Augustus A. Hayes, Boston ; Stephen P. Sharpies, Cambridge. 

Harbor Cobimissioners.— Josiah Quincy, Boston, Chairman; 
WiUiam T. Grammer, Wobum; F. W. Lincoln, Boston; Joshua N. 
Marshall, Lowell; Albert Mason, Brookline. 

State Liqdor Commissioner.— James F. Babcock, Boston. 

Railroad Commissioners.- Francis M. Johnson, Chas. F. Adams, 
Jr., Albert D. Brigge. derk, William A. Crafts. Office, No. 7 Pem- 
berton Square. 

Inland Fisheries.— Edward A. Brackett, Winchester; Asa French, 
Braintree; Theodore Lyman, Brookline. 

16 



242 Commissioners^ etc.-^State Institutions, 

Board of HsALTH.'-Henry I. Bowditcli, Boston; Robert T. Davis, 
Fall River; Richard Frothingham, Boston; David L. Webster, Boston ; 
John C. Hoadley, Lawrence; Thos. B. Kewhall, Lynn; Chas. F. 
Foliom, Boston, Secretary, 

Bureau of Labor BTATisncs.'^Carroll D. Wright, Boston. 
l>epiUy, George H. Long. Office, 33 Pemberton Bqaare. 

Commissioner of CORFORATioir8.-^Daniel A. Gleason. Office, 

State House. 



STATE INSTITUTIONS. 



LtlKATIO H08PITAL8. 

The government of each is vested in a Board of Five Trustees, one 
to be appointed annually by the Governor and Council, and the place 
of the senior member, as arranged in the following order, to be vacated 
each year< 

Warceiter. 

Henry Chapin, Worcester, 1876; John D. Washburn, Worcester, 
1877; Jas. B. Thayer, Milton, 1878; Robert W. Hooper, Boston, 1879; 
William 0. Lincoln, Worcester, 1880. 

Superintendent.^B&rnBxd D. Eastman, M. D. 

Taunton, 

€koiige Howland, Jr., Kew Bedford, 1876; Oliver Ames, fiaston, 
1877 ; Simeon Borden, Fall River, 1878 ; Le Baron Russell, Boston, 1870 ; 
Charles R. Atwood, Taunton, 1880. 

J9f^etintendent,^Yfillkam W. Godding, M. D. 

J/orthampton, 

Henry L. Babin, WilUamstown, 1876; Edmund H. Sawyer, Sasthamp^ 
ton, 1877; Edward Hitchcock, Amherst, 1878; Silas M. Smith, North- 
ampton, 1879; Adams C. Deane, Greenfield, 1880. 

Superintendent.— T^linj Earle, M. D. 



State Institutions. 243 



STATB REFORM SCHOOL FOR BOYS. 

M WeUborouffA, 

[Bstabliflhed, 1847.] 

The government consisto of a Board of Seven Tmstees, appointed by 
the Governor and C!oancll. 

Trtuieea.—'HoBeB H. Sargent, Newton, 1876; Alfred S. Wood worth, 
Boston, 1876; Wm. H. Baldwin, Boston, 1877; £11 A. Hubbard, Spring- 
field, 1877; Stephen G. Deblois, Boston, 1878; Samuel M. Griggs, 
Westborougfa, 1878; Sdwin B. Harvey, Westborough, 1878; John L. 
Cummings, Ashbornham, 1878. 

SuperinUndent'^Allen G. Shepherd. Treasurer. — Samuel M. 
Griggs. 



STATE nn>USTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS. 

Jit LatMtatUer*. 

[Sstablished, 1866.] 

The govtf nment is constituted like that of the State Reform School. 

rru«fe««.— Frank B. Fay, Chelsea, 1876; Robert O. Fuller, Cam- 
bridge, 1876; Miss Anna R. Faulkner, 1876; Joseph A. Allen, West 
Newton, 1877; Mrs. Mary S. Lamson, Winchester, 1877 ; Richard H. 
Stearns, Boston, 1877; Henry C. Greeley, Clinton, 1878; Lewis H. 
Bra^^ord, Fitchbuig, 1878; Mrs. Annie B. Richardson, Lowell, 1878; 
Harmon Hail, Saugus, 1879. 

Superinten.detU.'^'Loiing Lothrop. Treaturer. — ^Frank B. Fay, 
Chelsea. 



MASSACHUSETTS EYE AND EAR INFIRMARY. 

AtBostOH, 

[By Resolves 1872, chap. 28.] 

Two Trustees appointed by Governor. 

2Vu#<€e«.— Willard P. PiaiUips, Salem; Isaac N. Stoddard, Plymouth. 



244 Stdte Institutions. 



MAflSAOHUSETTS SCHOOL FOR IDIOTIC AND FEEBLE- 
MINDED YOUTH. 

At South Boiton, 

Board of Twelve Tnutees, six of whom are appointed by the Gov- 
emor and Council (chap. 150, Acto of 1850, and Resolves, chap. 60, of 
1861), viz. :— 

Chas. H. Waters, Groton; Henry G. Denny, Dorchester; Lewis 
AUen, Peabody; Edwin Morton, Boston ; Levi Howard, Chelmsford; 
John S. Damrell, Boston. 

Eight additional Trustees are appointed by the Corporation. 



PERKINS INSTITUTION AND MASSACHUSETTS ASYLUM 

FOR THE BLIND. 

At South BoBton, 

7V*u«to««.— Andrew P. Peabody, Cambridge; Francis Brooks, Med- 
ford; John S. D wight, Boston; J. Theodore Heard, Boston. 



STATE PRISON. 
At Charlestoton. 



Three Inspectors; one to be appointed annually by the Governor 
and Council, for a term of three years. 

Inspector*,— Jamea Pierce, Maiden, 1876; Estes Howe, Cambridge, 
1877 ; Ezra Parmenter, Cambridge, 1878. 

Warden^ Samuel E. Chamberlain, appointed December, 1871 ; l>€p 
uty-Warden, Almon Hale; Clerk, William Peirce; Phyaician, Jame < 
A. Latimer, M. D. ; Chaplain, S. Lewis D. Speare. 

Agent for IHscharffed Oonvictt.—Dat^el Russell. 



State InsHttUions. 245 



STATE ALMSHOUSE. 

The Board of Inspectors consists of three members; one member 
to be appointed annually. Salary, $100 per annnm, and travelling 
expenses. 

Tewkabury. 

InBpectore.—Qteo. P. Elliot, Billerica; Francis H. Nourse, Winches, 
ter; Daniel E. Safford, Hamilton. 

Superintendent, Thomas J. Marsh; Phyaickin, Joseph J>. Nichols; 
Assistant PhyHciant Helen M> Marsh ; Physician in charge of Insane, 
James M. Whittaker. 



By chap. 45 of the Acts of 1872, the state almshouses at Bridgewater 
and Monson were discontinued, and the buildings to be used for the 
following purposes : — 

STATE WORKHOUSE. 

At Bridgewater. 

Inspectors* — Joshua E. Crane, Bridgewater; J. White Belcher, Ran- 
dolph, 1877; Seabury W. Bowen, Fall River, 1878. 
Superintendent, Nahum Leonard, Jr. ; Physidan, Edward Sawyer. 

STATE PRIMARY SCHOOL. 

At Monson, 

Inspectors.'— "LewiB N. Gilbert, Ware, 1876; Enoch V. B. Holcomb, 
Chicopee, 1877 ; Samuel D. Brooks, Springfield, 1878. 
Superintendent and PAyfidan.—- Horace P. Wakefield. 



246 Colleges. 



COLLEGES IN MASSACHUSETTS, 

WITH TH£IR PRESIDENTS AND TRUSTEES. 



HARVARD COLLEGE. 

CORPORATION. 

Charubs W. Euot, PreHdent, 

FeUow9, 

John A. Lowell. Hon. George T. Bigelow. 

Bey. George Putnam. Francis Parkman. 

H<m. Frmels B. Crownlnshleld. 

Hon. Nathaniel Silsbee, TVeaswrer. 



^ BOARD OF OVERSEERS. 

Hon. Chas. Francis Adams, PreHdent of the Boards 



Charles W. Eliot, President of the University. 
Hon. Kathaniel Silsbee, Treasur&r of the Univ&rsity. 



Elective Members. 

[Term of office expires, June, 1876.] 

John C. Rox>e8. Rey. Phillips Brooks. 

Hon. Martin Brimmer. Hon. Wm. O. Endicoti. 

Henry W. Paine. 

[Term of office expires, June, 1877.] 

Hon. R. H. Dana, Jr. Edmund Quincy. 

Hon. Stephen Salisbury. James Elliot Cabot. 



Colleges. 247 

[Term of office expires, Jane, 1878.] 

Hon. D. E. Ware. Edward EL Clarke, M. D. 

George W. C. Noble. Rev. Alexander McKenzie. 

Le Baron Russell, ML. D. 

[Term of office expires, June, 1879.] 

Ralph Waldo Emerson. Rev. James F. Clarke. 

Henry Lee. Hon. Geo. F. Hoar. 

Hon. Francis E. Parker. 

[Term of office expires, June, 1880.] 

Hon. E. R. Hoar. * George O. fihattack. 

Theodore Lyman. Hon. John LowelL 

Bamuel A. Green, M. D. 

[Term of offiee expires, Jane, 188L] 

Hon. Charles F. Adams. William G. Russell. 

Alexander Agassis. Morrill Wyman, IC. D. 

Hon. John H. Clifford. 

Rev. Alexander McKenzie, Secretary of the Board, 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 

William S. Clark, President. 

Trustee: 

Hon. Marshall P. Wilder. Phineas Stedman. 

Charles G. Davis. Hon. Allen W. Dodge. 

Nathan Durfee. Daniel Needham. 

Henry Colt. Hon. William B. Washburn. 

George Marston, Henry L. Whiting. 

Charles C. Sewall. William Knowlton. 

John Cummings. Henry F. Hills. 

Trustees ex offlciis. 

His Exoelleney Alexander H. Rice. 

William S. Clark. President of the College, 

Hon. Charles L. Flint, 'Secretary of the Board of Agriculture, 

Hon. Joseph White, Secretary of the Board of Education. 



248 



Colleges, 



WILLIAMS COLLEGE. 
Paul A. Ohadboubne, D. D., LL. D., President. 

Trustees, 



Panl A. Ohadbonme. 
Rev. Mark Hopkins. 
Hon. Henry L. Sabin. 
Hon. Joseph White. 
Hon. ErastUB O. Benedict 
Hon. William Hyde. 
Bev. Nahum Gale. 
Rev. Robert R. Booth. 



Rev. Samuel Irenaeus Prime. 
Hon. Francis Henshaw Dewey. 
Samuel D. Warren. 
Rev. Ephraim Flint. 
Rev. Stephen H. Tyng, Jr. 
Giles B. Kellogg. 
James White. 
Arthur B. Graves. 



Hon. William E. Dodge. 

Hon. Joseph White, Treasurer and Secretary. 



AMHERST COLLEGE. 

CORPORATION. 

William A. Stearns, D. D., LL. D., President. 

Trustees. 



Henry Edwards. 
Hon. Jonathan C. Perkins. 
Hon. Alexander H. Bullock. 
Rev. William P. Paine. 
Hon. Henry Morris. 
Rev. Edward S. Dwlght. 
Hon. Alpheus Hardy. 
Nathan Allen. 



Hon. Edward S. Gillett. 
Rev. Richard S. Storrs, Jr. 
Samuel Bowles. 
Rev. Henry Ward Beecher. 
Rev. Roswell Hitchcock. 
Rev. Edmund K. Alden. 
Hon. John E. Sanford. 
Rufus 6. Kellogg. 



TUFTS COLLEGE. 
Hon. Israel Wabhbdrne, Jr., LL. D., Portland, Me., President. 

Trustees. 



Rev. Alonzo A. Miner, D. D. 

Charles Tufts, Esq. 

James O. Curtis, Esq. 

Rev. Thomas B. Thayer, D. D. 

Nathaniel Adams, Esq. 

Hon. Timothy T. Sawyer. 

Newton Talbot, Esq. 



Henry B. Metcalf. 
Normon C. Munson. 
Rev. Elmer H. Capen, A. B. 
Charles G. Pope, A. M. 
Zebulon L. White, A. B. 
Wm. H. Finney. 
Charles S. Forbes. 



Hon. Charles Robinson, Jr., Vice-President. 

Rev. Lucius R. Paige, D. D., Secretary. 

Hon. Richard Frothingham, LL. D., Treasurer. 



Colleges, 



249 



BOSTON UNIVERSITY. 
[20 Beacon Street.] 

CORPORATION. 

Bz-Governor William Olaflin, LL.D., President. 

Hon. George F. Gavitt, Vice-President. 

David Patten, S. T. D., Secretary. 

Abner I. Benyon, Esq., Treasurer. 

William P. Warren, S. T. D., Member ex officio. 



David Patten, S. T. D. 

Hon. Henry O. Houghton, A. M. 

Mf^or Joseph H. Chadwick. 

Daniel Steele, B. T. D. 

Bradford K. Peirce, S. T. D. 

Francis A. Perry, Esq. 

WiUiam G. Lincoln, Esq. 

Pliny Nickerson, Esq. 

Harvey Arnold, Esq. 

Abner I. Benyon, Esq. 

Hon. Jacob Sleeper. 

Bp. Isaac W. Wiley, S. T. D. 



Bp. Gilbert Haven. 
Joel B. Thomas, Esq. 
John W. Lindsay, 8. T. D. 
John H. Twombly, S. T. D. 
Hon. Liverus Hull. 
Leonard Whitney, Esq. 
Hon. George F. Gavitt. 
Edwin H. Johnson, Esq. 
William R. Clark, S. T. D. 
John Kendrick, Esq. 
Hon. William Claflin, LL.D. 
Alden Speare, Esq. 



DEPARTMENTS. 

School of All Sciences, 20 Beacon St., J. W. Lindsay, S. T. D., Dean. 
School of Theology, S6 Bromfleld St., J. E. Latimer, S.T.D., Dean. 
School of Law, 20 Beacon St., G. S. Hillard, LL. D., Dean. 
School of Medicine, East Concord St., I. T. Talbot, M.D., Dean. 
School of Oratory, 18 Beacon St., L. B. Monroe, A.M., Dean. 
College of Liberal Arts, 18 Beacon St., J. W. Lindsay, S. T. D., Dean. 
College of Music, Music Hall, E. Touij6e, Musical Director, Dean. 
College of Agriculture, Amherst, Mass., W. S. Clark, Ph.D., LL.D., D'n. 

W. F. Warreni LL. D., President, j c^ ^^^^^^ g,.^ g^^^^^ 

D. Patten, S« T. D., Registrar, ) 



250 



Vote for State Offlcer8-'1875. 



VOTE FOR STATE OFFICERS, 



For €k>Temor. 
BARNSTABLE COUBTTY. 



TOWNS. 


Rice. 


Gaston. 


Baker. 


Adams. 


PhlUlps. 


Barnstable, .... 


213 


193 


8 


1 




Brewster, . , 






68 


9 


mmm 


_ 


_ 


Chatham, . 






83 


23 


7 


_ 


— 


Dennis, 






115 


43 


11 


. 


— 


Eastham, . 






11 


41 


. 


^ 


— 


Falmouth, . 






186 


57 


5 


— 


-> 


Harwich, . 






79 


32 


61 


— 


1 


Mashpee, . 






26 


•- 


— 


» 


— 


Orleans, 






103 


24 


7 


. 


— 


ProvincetowD, , 






126 


86 


15 


— 


_ 


Sandwich, . 






188 


139 


37 


. 


^ 


Truro, . 






36 


4 


2 


^ 


. 


Wellfleet, . 






86 


30 


5 


_ 


^ 


Yarmouth, . 






119 


24 


23 


- 


- 


Totals, . 


» ■ 


•■ 


1,439 


665 


181 


1 


1 



BERKSHIRE COUNTY. 



Adams,'*' . . . . 


652 


505 


8 




2 


Alford, 




20 


53 


_ 


— 


^ 


Becket, 




79 


91 


— 


. 


_ 


Cheshire, . 




80 


148 


_ 


^ 


^ 


Clarksburg,. 




32 


17 


— 


.- 


— 


Dal ton, 




105 


128 


2 


_ 


^ 


Egrcmont, . 




82 


94 


8 


1 


— 


Florida, 




47 


27 


— 


— 


-. 


Great Barrington, 




297 


293 


9 


7 


- 


Hancock, 




86 


44 


~ 


— 


. 


Hinsdale,'*' . 




92 


73 


2 


1 


2 


Lanesborough, . 




124 


97 


— 


1 


— 


Lee, 


218 


235 


12 


3 


"■ 



* In Adams there were 30 votes, and in Hinsdale 6 votes, for "Alex- 
ander Rice," not counted for Alexander H. Rice. 



Vote for State Officers— 1875. 



251 



BERKSHIRE COUNTY— Coktinded. 



TOWNS. 


Klcc. 


Qaston. 


Baker. 


Adams. 


Phillips. 


Lenox, 


96 


126 


. 


_ 


, 


Monterey, . 




52 


66 


7 


1 


- 


Mt. Washington, 




14 


8 


— 


1 


— 


New Asfaford, . 




11 


22 


— 


— 


— 


New Marlborough, , 




86 


128 


2 


4 


- 


OtJs 




32 


59 


— 


1 


— 


Peru, . 




43 


17 


- 


- 


— 


Pittafield, . 




607 


808 


10 


4 


— 


Richmond, . 




43 


38 


— 


- 


— 


Sandisfleld, . 




58 


86 


— 


1 


— 


Savoy 




60 


50 


m. 


— 


— 


8heffi(>]d, . 




165 


142 


1 


-. 


— 


Stockbridge, 




151 


139 


1 


6 


- 


Tyrinffham, 
Washington, 




32 


42 


— 


— 


— 




38 


.28 


— 


— 


-• 


West Stockbridge, . 




110 


146 


- 


1 


- 


Wllliamstown, . 




203 


125 


15 


8 


— 


Windsor, . 




48 


40 


- 


— 


— 


Totals, . 


1 • 


3,757 


3,875 


72 


40 


4 



All others, 52. 



BRISTOL COUNTY. 



Acushnet, . . . . 


54 


33 


13 


_ 


^ 


Attleborough, . 






437 


248 


09 


2 


« 


Berkley, 






115 


30 


8 


— 


— 


Dartmouthr • 








184 


60 


45 


— 


— 


Dighton, 








115» 


42 


24 


• - 


- 


Easton, 








120 


96 


14 


- 


- 


Fairhaven, 








221 


125 


41 


- 


- 


Fall River, . 








1,558 


1,610 


8 


— 


- 


Freetown, . 








199 


44 


7 


— 


— 


Mansfield, . 








122 


93 


23 


— 


— 


New Bedfor 


a. . 






1,503 


1,431 


419 


1 


- 


Norton, 








109 


50 


2 


1 


- 


Raynham, 








102 


85 


59 


— 


— 


Rehoboth, 








106 


53 


29 


— 


— 


Seekonk, 








52 


53 


1 


— 


. 


Somerset, . 








107 


28 


18 


1 


— 


Swansea, 








59 


30 


9 


-> 


— 


Taunton, 








1,208 


994 


130 


4 


1 


Westport, 








219 


64 


32 


# ^ 


- 


Totals, 


1 « 


» 1 


1 • 


6,590 


5,164 


951 


9 


1 



All others, 1. 



252 



Vote for State Offlcers^^lSTB. 



DUKES COUNTY. 



TOWNS. 


Bice. 


Gaston. 


Baker. 


Adams. 


PbilUps. 


Cbilmark, .... 

Edgartown,. 

Gay Head, .... 

Gosnold, .... 

Tl«bury, . . . • . 


11 

108 

14 

8 

GO 


20 
70 

14 
40 


1 
8 


- 


2 


Totals, .... 


106 


150 


4 


- 


2 



ESSEX COUNTY. 



Amesbnry, .... 


265 


192 


18 


2 




Andover, . 






867 


188 


2 


7 


— 


Beverly, 






240 


181 


884 


12 


1 


Bozford, 






• 75 


80 


2 


_ 


_ 


Bradford, . 






120 


114 


1 


1 


_ 


Danvers, 






297 


228 


81 


_ 


10 


Essex, . 






144 


79 


18 


2 


_ 


Georgetown, 






214 


198 


80 


1 


1 


Gloucester, . 






608 


607 


178 


4 


— 


Groyeland, . 






118 


131 


22 


_ 


_ 


Hamilton, . 






34 


45 


8 


_ 


_ 


HaverblU, . 






847 


678 


57 


17 


1 


Ipswlcb, 






276 


212 


' 1 


1 


1 


Lawrence, . 






1,565 


1,751 


104 


3 


3 


Lynn, . 






1,096 


1,368 


293 


13 


10 


Lynnfleld, . 
Manchester, 






50 


26 


11 


— 


_ 






82 


78 


45 


_ 


_ 


Marblehead, 






295 


568 


114 


6 


8 


Metbaen, . 






840 


187 


7 


2 


^ 


Middleton, . 






89 


40 


15 


_ 


. 


Nahant, 






25 


45 


.m 


— 


— 


Newbury, . 






153 


57 


2 


1 


— 


Newburyport, . 






886 


929 


9 


3 


2 


North Andover, , 






201 


230 


2 


i- 


_ 


Peabody, . 






293 


251 


40 


4 


— 


Rockport, . 






N 202 


111 


96 


3 


— 


Rowley, 






93 


108 


• 


1 


— 


Salem, . 






1,358 


1,508 


75 


15 


_ 


Salisbury, . 






189 


130 


65 


8 


_ 


Saugus, 






164 


168 


20 


2 


_ 


Swampscott, 






121 


107 


10 


6 


_ 


Topsfield, . 






84 


55 


8 


^ — 


— ' 


Wenham, . 






56 


28 


16 


.. 


_ 


West Newbury, 






221 


110 


18 


- 


1 


Totals, . 


> 1 


. 


11,118 


10,738 


1,697 


109 


83 



All others, 51. 



Vote for State Officer8^1875. 



253 







FRAITKLDr COUNTY. 






TOWNS* 


Rice. 


Oaston. 


Baker. 

■ 1 1 1 


Adams. 


Phillips. 


Ashfield 


98 


41 


4 


34 


■•» 


Bernardston, 






65 


54 


80 


4 


«> 


Buckland, . . 






81 


140 


85 


7 


«> 


Charlemont, < 






69 


36 


40 


tfk- 


. 


CoIrain» 






119 


108 


12 


« 


m. 


Conw&j, 






107 


42 


7 


2 


^ 


Deerfleld, . 






103 


168 


6 


15 


^ 


Srving, 






29 


46 


20 


• 


- 


em, . . . 






66 


49 


7 


1 


1 


G-reenfieldi . 






167 


295 


84 


8 


^ 


Hawley, 






41 


8 


- 


dtt 


mm 


Heath, . 






60 


20 


. 


— 


^ 


Leverett, 






41 


63 


16 


8 


^ 


Leyden, 






21 


28 


U 


tfk 


•m. 


Monroe, 






16 


9 


« 


. 


m. 


MontasTQ^t • 






226 


197 


10 


1 


^ 


New Salem, 






69 


47 


14 




^ 


Northfield, . 






72 


104 


5 


1 


^ 


Orange, . . 






100 


144 


120 


2 


- 


Rowe, . 






52 


7 


■m 


— 


— 


Shelburne, . 






117 


71 


42 


« 


M» 


Shntesbnry, 






49 


26 


- 


- 


- 


Sunderland, • 






88 


81 


6 


16 


^ 


Warwick, . 






68 


87 


4 


« 


^ 


Wendell, . 






28 


59 


^ 


1 


— 


Whately, . 






60 


74 


2 


- 


wm 


Totale, . 


• 


» • 


1,900 


1,958 


428 


88 


1 



All otliera, 1. 







HAMPDEN COUNTY. 






Agawam, . • « . 


60 


108 


10 


1 




Blandford, . i 






72 


86 


1 


_ 


« 


Brimfield, . 






84 


68 


1 


8 


_ 


Chester, 






71 


96 


• 


— 


« 


Chicopee, . 






419 


439 


50 


11 


1 


Granville) • 






73 


113 


1 


<B 


.- 


Holland, 






28 


30 


» ^ 




.. 


Holyoke, . 






472 


634 


19 


11 


14 


Longmeadow, . 






77 


48 


1 




^ 


Lndlow, 






69 


29 


• 




^ 


Monson, 






223 


164 


4 




. 


Montgomery, 






22 


26 


- 


- 


- 


Palmer, 






223 


203 


85 


2 


— 


Russell, . , 






41 


46 


2 


^ 


^ 


Southwick, . 






87 


129 


— 


1 


1 









254 



Vote for State Officers^lSTB. 



HAMPDEN COUNTY— CoHTlKtJED. 



i, - 



TOWNS. 


Rice. 


Qaston* 


Baker. 


Adamst 


PhUlips. 


*Bprlngfield, » • • » 
Tolland, » • . . • 
Wales, . . t • • 
Westlield, .... 
West Sprtngfleld, . \ 
Wilbrafaam, 


1,845 

30 

58 

430 

144 

120 


1,588 

54 

44 

595 

131 

108 


58 

3 

46 

7 

3 


23 

17 
2 

4 


16 
4 


Totals, .... 


4,648 


4,673 


241 


83 


36 



All others, 13. 







HAMPSHTRB COUNTY. 






Amhefst, . . • • 


207 


190 


^ 


92 


^ 


Belchertown, 






142 


124 


14 


8 


— 


Chesterfield, 






81 


54 


1 


1 


- 


Cummington, 






64 


42 


2 


IT 


• 


Sasthampton, . 






184 


173 


4 


86 


3 


£nfield, 






75 


90 


» 


• 


» 


Goshen, . • 






86 





» 


a» 


• 


Granby. 
Greenwich, . 






85 


57 


1 


4 


. - 






64 


34 


» 


«ft 


— 


Hadley, 
Hatfield, . 






124 


67 


m. 


20 


>. 






103 


77 


2 


10 


1 


Huntington, 
Middlefield, 






69 


59 


- 


1 


» 






27 


13 


4 


10 


o 


Korthampton, , 






503 


592 


. 81 


64 


3 


Pelham. 
Plainfleld, . 






36 


24 


-■ 


1 


— 






56 


9 


.. 


- 


- 


Prescott, 






28 


81 


- 


-.. 


-■ 


South Hadley, . 






146 


160 


5 


1 


- 


Southampton, . 






58 


29 


11 


4 


» 


Ware, . 






210 


203 


12 


11 


— 


Westhatupton, 






40 


11 


7 


1 


- 


W^illiamsburg, 






112 


139 


5 


13 


- 


Worthlngton, 






71 


48 


- 


3 


— 


Totals, . 


• 


» % 


2,521 


2,244 


99 


312 


6 



AU others, 3. 



Acton, . 
Arlington, 
Ashby, 
Ashland, 



I. *■ s, 

V *- i 

«. b i> 



MIDDLESKX COUNTY. 



114 

242 

94 

63 



158 

281 

47 

101 



21 
2 

6 
96 



t 

6 



2 



Vote for State Officers'— 1875. 



255 



Mli>l>LB0EX COUNTT— CoifTifrcED. 




TOWNS. 


Rloe4 


Qtston. 


Baker. 


Adams. 


PhUUps 


Ayer, • « « « < 


94 


176 


87 


8 




Bedford, 






83 


72 


4 


1 


a* 


Belmonti . 






107 


118 


8 





« 


Billertca« . 






191 


87 


8 


1 


^ 


Boxborou^i 






23 


86 


1 




« 


BurliDtftoD, . 
Cambndge, . < 






83 


49 


8 


« 


. 






2,110 


2,900 


254 


51 


3 


CarilBle. 
Chelmsfordi 






67 


88 


1 


» 


. 






190 


128 




2 


„ 


Concordi 






160 


72 


12 


8 


1 


Dracut, 






78 


45 


m 


m 


^ 


Pun8table« . 
Everett, 






89 


69 


1 


« 


^ 






902 


187 


26 


8 


^ 


Framingbam, 






881 


477 


53 


7 


1 


Oroton, 






167 


62 


1 


. 


^ 


HoUlston, . . 






192 


244 


24 


1 


^ 


Hopkinton, . 
Hudson f 4 






168 


349 


74 




. 






119 


163 


28 


•4 


2 


Lexington, . 






182 


130 


5 


1 




Lincoln, « < 






60 


16 


6 


M 


^ 


Littletcnif . 






112 


50 


4 


« 


M 


Lowell, . i 






2,588 


2,533 


42 


m 


11 


Maiden, 






604 


316 


43 


82 


» 


liarlborongh, 






271 


436 


166 




2 


Maynardi . 






74 


70 


20 


1 


^ 


Ifedford, . 






410 


377 


21 


17 


1 


Melrose, . 






223 


134 


58 


8 




Katick,* . 






815 


519 




6 


8 


Newton, « 






1,109 


540 


47 


41 


3 


Korth Reading, . 






69 


33 


3 


m 




Pepperell, . . , 






185 


111 


IT 


1 


. 


Reading, 






267 


103 


84 


1 


^ 


Sherbom, « 






57 


89 


19 


^ 


^ 


Bbirley, 






140 


62 


2 


« 


-. 


Bomerville, . * 






755 


664 


44 


25 


12 


Btoneham, . 






869 


279 


19 


2 


2 


Stow, . 






58 


48 


4 


1 




Biidbttry, . 






108 


75 






^ 


Tewksbury, 






88 


55 


« 


1 


« 


Townsend, . 






206 


110 


13 


1 


« 


Tyngsborough, . 
Wakefield, . 






60 
262 


40 
192 


21 


1 
5 


15 


Waltham, . 






595 


597 


74 


6 


1 


Watertown, 






867 


266 


13 


7 




Wayland, . 






113 


151 


74 


3 


^ 


Westford, . 


1 * • 


129 


215 


27 


« 


« 



* In Katick there were 84 votes east for Williatn L Baker of Bev- 
erly, 



256 



Vote for State Offlcera~1875. 



MIDDLBSBX COUNTY— Oowcludbd. 



TOWNS. 



Bice. 



Oaston. 



Baker. 



Adams. 



PbUllps. 



Weston, . 
Wilmington, 
Winchester, 
Wobum, 

Totals, . 



43 
207 

eo9 



18 

87 

142 

689 



10 

5 

11 

47 



15,482 



14,005 



1,490 



1 
8 



252 



Bellinghatn, 






29 


44 


20 


4 


Braintree, . 






268 


388 


53 


1 


Brookline, . • 






506 


270 


2 


7 


Canton, 






218 


291 


24 


1 


Cohasset, . 






121 


46 


8 


8 


Dedham, 






850 


408 


8 


8 


Dover, . 






29 


29 


7 


. 


Fozborougb, 






188 


118 


20 


8 


Franklin, . 






04 


126 


79. 


1 


Holbrook, . 






185 


107 


26^ 


1 


Hyde Park, . 






246 


229 


82 


1 


Medfleld, . 






82 


41 


1 


2 


Medway, 






167 


191 


59 


14 


Milton, 






170 


79 


*. 


4 


Needham, . 






248 


159 


51 


5 


Norfolk, . 






27 


29 


14 


6 


Norwood, . 






107 


81 


87 


7 


Quincy, 
Bandolph, . 






309 


596 


90 


60 






266 


501 


29 


1 


Sharon, 






100 


103 


2 


1 


Stoughton, . 






286 


368 


88 


1 


Walpole, 






115 


161 


14 


1^ 


Weymouth, 






470 


510 


185 


6 


Wrentham, . 






104 


95 


6 


2 


Totals, .... 


4,609 


4,965 


795 


129 



16 



78 



All others, 94. 


NANTUCKET COUNTY. 




Nantucket, . 


» • 


879 


93 


1 


1 


- 




NORFOLK COUNTY. 





2 
4 



3 



1 
2 
1 
1 



16 



All others, 26. 



Vote for State Officers— 1875. 



257 



PLYMOUTH COUNTY. 



TOWNS. 



fiioe. 



Oaston. 



Baker. 



Adams. 



Phi]]lp8. 



Abington, . 
Bridgewater, 
Brockton, . 
Carver, 
Dazburv, . 
East Bridgewater, 
Halifax, 
Hanover, 
Hanson, 
Hingham, . 
Hall, . 
Kingston, . 
Lakeville, . 
Marion, 
Marshfleld, . 
Mattapoisett, 
Middleborough, 
Pembroke, . 
Plymouth, . 
Plympton, . 
Rochester, . 
Bockland, . 
Bcituate, 
South Abington, 
South Scituate, 
Wareham, . 
West Bridgewater, 

Totals, . 



18^ 


212 


176 


216 


561 


493 


33 


42 


117 


152 


116 


185 


45 


39 


65 


72 


49 


58 


828 


229 


18 


28 


149 


120 


47 


50 


101 


35 


84 


114 


184 


29 


296 


281 


49 


88 


452 


839 


42 


74 


80 


19 


208 


225 


154 


132 


144 


73 


1^? 


117 


130 


64 


64 



4,007 



8,566 



44 

23 

129 

2 

6 

47 

1 

71 

24 

13 

16 

1 
22 

3 

7 
13 
86 
19 

3 

100 

46 

32 

53 

7 



718 



2 

8 

1 

7 

1 

7 
1 



4 

16 



52 



27 
8 



9 



14 

1 



62 



All others, 10. 



SUFFOLK COUNTY. 



Boston, 
Chelsea, 
Revere, . 
Winthrop, . 

Totals, . 



13,171 


13,112 


857 


189 


1,186 


751 


175 


41 


58 


70 


8 


. 


26 


37 


7 


2 


14,391 


18,970 


1,047 


232 



36 

1 



37 



All others, 17* 



WOROBSTER COUNTY. 



Ashbumham, 
Athol, . 



157 
220 



186 
240 



42 
92 



2 
9 



17 



258 



Vote for State Officers—ISTS. 



WORCESTER COUNTY— Coktiwued. 



TOWNS. 


Bice. 


Gaston. 


Baker. 


Adams, 


Phillfps. 


Auburn, . . . . 


52 


82 




5 




Barre, . 








196 


178 


2 


1 


— 


Berlin, . 








73 


37 


17 


1 


6 


Blackstone, 








208 


328 


4 


_ 


^ 


Bolton, 








68 


95 


35 


4 


1 


Boylston, , 








73 


23 


— 


— 


. 


Brookfield, 








216 


213 


1 


4 


— 


Charlton, 


• 






149 


87 


2 


_ 


... 


Clinton, 








284 


392 


75 


2 


1 


Dana, . 








54 


45 


16 


_ 


_ 


Douglas, 
Dudley, 








110 


176 


9 


— 


— 








76 


169 


7 


_ 


I 


Fitchburg, . 








816 


706 


97 


6 


1 


Gardner, 








1^2 


230 


68 


6 


_ 


Grafton, 








260 


224 


13 


.. 


1 


Hardwick, . 








61 


52 


— 


3 


^ 


Harvard, 








90 


102 


1 


1 


_ 


Holden, 








104 


100 


2 


2 


m. 


Hubbardstoi 


]* • 






78 


90 


14 


_ 


_ 


Lancaster, , 








124 


69 


4 


.. 


_ 


Leicester, . 








191 


130 


.. 


3 


_ 


Leominster, 






281 


188 


218 


_ 


«. 


Lunenburg, 






95 


39 


4 


— 


. 


Mendon, 






54 


43 


12 


— 


. 


Milford, 






528 


668 


64 


— 


_ 


MiUbury, . 






214 


- 192 


6 


1 


~ 


New Bralntree, . 






54 


47 


— 


— 


_ 


Northboi'ough, , 






93 


77 


21 


16 


6 


Northbridge, 






245 


176 


21 


— 


""t 


North Brookfield 


, • 




197 


210 


43 


8 


V 


Oakham, 






72 


86 


_ 


_ 




Oxford, 








157 


222 


10 


16 


.. 


Paxton, 








67 


27 


— 


_ 


_ 


Petersham, , 








90 


87 


• 


1 


_ 


PhlUipston, . 








84 


15 


- 


— 


— 


Princeton, 








93 


41 


3 


.- 


1 


Royalston, 








136 


47 


5 


— 




Rutland, 








66 


45 


2 


. 


. 


Shrewsbury, 






134 


84 


, 5 


— 


-. 


Southborough, . 






58 


53 


41 


1 


.. 


Southbridge, 






215 


162 


15 


4 


3 


Spencer, 






225 


177 


8 


82 


— 


Sterling, 
Sturbrldge, . 








139 


102 


4 


1 


.- 








126 


125 


1 


1 


16 


Sutton, 








125 


159 


27 


.- 


1 


Templeton, 








158 


147 


2 


2 


— 


Upton, . 








151 


92 


80 


— 


— 


Uxbridge, 








190 


161 


2 


— 


— 


Warren, 








159 


168 


4 


29 


— 


Webster, 








219 


257 


66 


•2 


^ 



Vote for State Officers'— 1875. 



59 



WORCESTER COUNTY— Concluded. 



TOWNS. 


nice. 


Gaston. 


Baker. 


Adams. 


Phillips. 


Westborough, . 

West Boylston, . 

WestBrookfield, 

Vvestmlnster, 

Winchendon, 

Worcester, .... 


324 
174 

106 

190 

35ft 

.3,082 


241 
116 
102 
84 
207 
3,837 


56 
43 
15 
1 
47 
134 


1 
8 

2 

15 


3 
2 


Totals, .... 


12,512 


12,278 


1,391 


189 


44 



All others, 8. 



RECAPITULATION. 



COUNTIES. 



KIce. 



Gaston. 



Baker. 



Adams. 



Phillips. 



All 
others. 



Barnstable, 
Berkshire, 
Bristol, . 
Dukes, . 
Essex, . 
Franklin, 
Hampden, 
Hampshire, 
Middlesex, 
Nantucket, 
Norfolk, 
Plymouth, 
Suffolk, 
Worcester, 
Totals, 



1,439 

3,757 

6,590 

196 

11,118 

1,900 

4,648 

2,521 

15,482 

379 

4,699 

4°007 

14,391 

12,512 

83,639 



655 


181 


1 


1 


3,875 


72 


40 


4 


5,164 


951 


9 


1 


159 


4 


- 


2 


10,733 


1,697 


109 


38 


1,953 


428 


88 


1 


4,673 


241 


83 


36 


2,244 


99 


312 


6 


14,005 


1,499 


252 


73 


93 


1 


1 


- 


4,965 


795 


129 


16 


8,566 


718 


52 


62 


13,970 


1,047 


232 


37 


12,278 


1,391 


189 


44 


78,833 


9,124 


1,497 


316 



52 
1 

51 
1 

13 
3 

94 

26 

10 

17 

8 

276 



260 Vote for State Officers— 1875. 

For liieuteiiaiit-QoTemor. 

Horalio G. Knight of EaBthampton, 05,996 

John Quincy Adams of Quincy, 75,592 

WilUam P. Bartlett of Pittofield, 1,220 

All others, Ul 

For Beoretory of the Oommonwealth. 

Henry B. Pierce of Abington, . . ^ 96,477 

George H. Monroe of Boston, 76,197 

Israel W. Andrews of Danyers, 100 

All others 159 

For Treasurer and Beoeiver-Qeneral. 

Charles Endicott of Canton . 97,902 

Weston Rowland of Fairhaven, 74,766 

All others, 190 

For Auditor of the Oommonwealth. 

Julius L. Clarke of Newton 97,298 

John £. Fitzgerald of Boston, 75,611 

All others ' 131 

For Attomey-'Qeneral. 

Charles R. Train of Boston, 97,468 

George F. Verry of Worcester, 74,608 

H. B. Maglathlin of Duzbury, 190 

All others 257 

For Executive Councillors. 

District No. 1. 

Joseph K. Baker of Dennis 8,893 

Sylvanus B. Phinney of Barnstable, 5,448 

All others, 103 

District Ko. 2. 

Harrison Tweed of Taunton, 11,503 

Peter Butler of Quincy, 8,666 

All others, 197 



Vote for State Officers, etc.— 1875. 261 

District No. 3. 

A Idcn Leland of Holliston» 13,009 

Hugh J. Toland of Boston 11,113 

All others, 123 

District No. 4. 

Jnmes Stnrgis of Boston, 8,477 

Frederick O. Prince of Boston 6,871 

All others, 45 

District No. 5. 

Robert Couch of Newbnryport 13,553 

Joseph S. Howe of Methnen, 10,144 

All others, 2 

District No. «. 

George O. Brastow of Somerville, 14,147 

Alonzo V. Lynde of Melrose, 10,881 

All others, 106 

District No. 7. 

George Whitney of Royalston, 24,318 

All others, 3 

District No. 8. 

William O. Plunkett of Adams 11,995 

George L. Rice of Adams 10,578 

All others 13 



For Member of Congress.* 

District No. 1. 

William W. Crapo of New Bedford 9,553 

Charles G. Davis of Plymouth, 6,017 

All othei-s, 10 

♦ To fill vacancy caused by death of James Buffinton. 



EULES AND OEDERS 



OF 



THE SENATE 



RULES AND ORDERS OF THE SENATE. 



Of the Duties and Potoert of the President. 

Rule 1. To call the members to order and cause the journal of the 
preceding day to be read. 

Rule 2. To preserve order and decorum — ^To speak to points of 
order in preference toother members — To deelde all questions of order, 
subject to appeal — To rise in putting a question, etc., but may read 
sitting. 

Rule 3. To declare all votes ; if doubted, a return to be ordered. 

Rule 4. The President may vote on all questions. 

Rule 6. President to order the Teas and Nays If one-fifth of the 
members present require them. 

Rule 6. Concerning motions when a question is under debate, and 
the precedence thereof. 

Rule 7. Motions undebatable. 

Rule 8. President to name who may speak, when two or more 
members rise at once. 

Rule 9. President may name member to take his place — ^Limitation 
thereof. 

Rule 10. In absence of President, the senior member present to 
call the Senate to order — ^The election of a President pro tern, to be the 
first business. 

0/ the Rights^ JDuHea, and Decorum of Members. 

Rule 11. Members, when speaking, to address the President. 

Rule 12. Limitation as to speaking. 

Rule 13. Members not to interrupt another, except, etc. 

Rule 14. Members not to speak to a question after it is put to vote. 

Rule 15. Concerning the presentation of petitions, etc. 

Rule 16. All motions to be reduced to writing, if the President so 
direct. 

Rule 17. Concerning the reconsideration of votes. 

Rule 18. Bills, etc., to remain in Clerk's possession until the right 
of reconsideration has expired. 



1 



266 Rules and Orders of the Senate. 

Rule 19. Division of a question to bo. made if desired— Motion to 
strike out and insert. 

]EiDLE 20. Unfinished business to have the preference. 

Rdle 21. Members not to vote on questions where their private 
rights are concerned, distinct from the public interest. 

BtJl^ 22. Members' not to absent themselves without leave, unless, 
etc. 

BuiiE 23. Concerning the Yeas and Nays. 

0/ Committees. 

Rule 24. Requiring statements to be made to Committees relative 
to proposed alterations of laws. 

Rule 25. List of Standing Committees. 

Rule 26. Committees to be appointed by the President, unless, etc. 
— First named to be Chairman — Substitute to hold the same rank as the 
original member — In elections, the person having the highest number 
of votes to be Chairman. 

Rule 27. Order of question when motion is made to commit. 

Rule 28. Reports of Committees not proposing final action, and of 
Committees of Conference, to be made the order of the day for the auc- 
ceeding day. 

Rule 29. No other than Joint or Special Committees to occupy the 
Senate Chamber without leave. 

0/ Bills and Resolves.. 

Rule 30. Concerning reports on petitions, notice of the presentation 
of which has not been published. 

Rule 31. Restrictions on the introduction of. 

Rule 32. Bills and resolves, how to be written — not to be introduced 
by a member without leave — ^When introduced, on leave, to be com. 
mitted before second reading. 

Rule 33. Bills, etc., from the House, to be committed, unless re- 
ported by a joint committee. 

Rule 34. Bills, etc., not to be engrossed without three readings — 
Bills in the second and third readings to be made the order of the day 
for the succeeding day — Matters passed over, how disposed of. 

Rule 35. Bills and resolves involving expenditure of money to be 
referred to the Committee on the Treasury. 

Rule 36. Bills, etc., in their third reading, to be committed for 
examination. 

Rule 37. Engrossed bills, etc., to be committed for examination — 
Bills reported as rightly and truly engrossed not to be again read, 
unless, etc. 



Mules and Orders of the Senate. 267 

Rule 38. No engrossed bill to be amended except by unanimous 
consent. 

BULE 39. No rejected measure to be revived — This rule to apply to 
House as well as Senate measures. 

Elections by Ballot. 
Rule 40. Elections by ballot — time to be assigned therefor. 

Senate Library. 

Rule 41. Books to be in care of the Clerk — Clerk to keep account of 
all books delivered. 

Reporters. 
Rule 42. Reporters— seats for, to be numbered and assigned by lot. 

General RuZes* 

Rule 43. Seats not to be occupied by persons odier than members. 

Rule 44. Regulations respecting admission of persons to Senate 
Chamber and rooms adjoining. 

Rule 45. Cushing's Manual and Cushing's Law and Practice to 
govern when not inconsistent with Rules and Orders. 

Rule 46. Concerning the alteration, rescinding, etc., of rules. 



EULES AND OEDEES. 

[The dates under each Rule indi<:ate the years dH their adoption, 
and amendments thereto. 

The date 1817 denotes the time that the several rules, against which 
it is placed, were first preserved, as, previous to that year, they are 
not to be found*, although, from the Senate journal, it appears that 
they were printed. 

Rule 32 was adopted in 1825. If any others were adopted between 
1821 and-*26, no record can be found. 

Numbers enclosed in brackets indicate corresponding Rules of the 
House.] 

Of the Duties and Powers of the President, 

Rule 1. [1.] The President shall take the chair every 
day at the hoar to which the Senate shall have adjourned, 



268 Rules and Orders of the Senate. 

shall call the members to order, and on the appearance of 
a quorum shall proceed to business. 
[1831.] 

Rule 2. [2, 5.] He shall preserve order and decorum, 
may speak to points of order in preference to other mem- 
bers, and shaU decide all questions of order, subject to an 
appeal. He shall rise to put a question, or to address the 
Senate, but may read sitting. 

[1817; between 1821 and '26; 1831.] 

Rule 3. [3, 64.] He shall declare all votes ; but if any 
member rises to doubt a vote, the President shall order a 
return of the number voting in the affirmative, and in the 
negative, without further debate. 
[1831.] 

Rule 4. [4.] The President may vote on all questions. 
[1826.] 

Rule 5. [66.] When any member shall move that 
any question be taken by yeas and nays, the President 
shall take the sense of the Senate in that manner, pro- 
\'ided one-fifth of the members present shall so direct. 
[1817; 1852.] 

Rule 6. [78.] When a question is under debate, the 
President shall receive no motion but to adjommy to proceed 
to the consideration of the special assignment, to lay on the 
table, to postpone to a day certain, to commit, to amend, to 
refer to the next General Court, or to postpone indefinitely, 
which several motions shall have precedence in the order 
in which they stand arranged. 

[Between 1821 and '26; 1831; 1844; 1870.] 



Bules and Orders of the Senate. 269 

Rule 7. [67, 77.] The motions to adjourn, to lay on 
the table, to take from the table, and for the yeas and 
nays, shall be decided without debate. 
[1817; 1859; 1870; 1874.] 

RuiiE 8. [72.] When two or more members rise at 
once, the President shall designate which of these shall be 
entitled to the floor. 
[1831.] 

Rule 9. [7.] The President shall have the right to 
appoint a member to perform the duties of the chair, but 
such appointment shall not extend beyond three days. 
[1831; 1862; 1865.] 

Rule 10. [8.] In case of a vacancy in the office of 
President, or in case the President, or the member substi- 
tuted by*liim in accordance with Rule No. 9, shall be absent 
at the hour designated in Rule No. 1, the senior member 
present shall call the Senate to order, and shall preside until 
a President or a President pro tempore shall be elected by 
ballot, which shall be the first business of the Senate. 
[1831.] 



Of the Bights, Duties and Decorum of Members, 

Rule 11. [71.] Every member, when he speaks, shall 
stand in his place, and address the President. 
[1817; 1831; 1871.] 

Rule 12. [74.] No member shall speak more than 
once on one question, to the prevention of any other who 
has not spoken and is desirous to speak, nor more than 
twice without obtaining leave of the Senate. 
[1817.] 



270 Bules and Orders of the Senate. 

■ 

Rule 13. [73.] No member speaking shall be inter- 
rupted by another but by rising to call to order. 

[1817; 1831.] 

Rule 14. After a question is put to a vote, no member 
shall speak to it. 

[1817.] 

Rule 15. [35.] Every member presenting a Petition, 
Memorial or Remonstrance, shall indorse his name thereon, 
and, in the filing thereof, state briefly the nature and 
object of the instrument, and the reading of the same shall 
be dispensed with, unless specially ordered by the Senate. 

[1831.] 

Rule 16. [75.] Any motion shall be reduced to writ- 
ing, if the President so direct. 

[1817; 1844; 1871.]. 

Rule 17. [68, 69.] When a vote has passed, except 
on motions specified in Rule 7, it shall be in order for any 
member to move a reconsideration thereof on the same or 
the succeeding day, and such motion, if made on the same 
day, shall be placed first in the Orders of the Day, for the 
day succeeding that on which it is made; but if first 
moved on such succeeding day it shall be forthwith con- 
sidered; and when a motion for reconsideration is decided, 
that vote shall not be reconsidered: prot^idedj however ^ that 
a motion to reconsider a vote, upon any coUateral matter, 
shall not remove the main subject under consideration 
from before the Senate, but shall be considered at the time 
when it is made. 

[1817 ; between 1821 and '26 ; 1858.] 



Bides ayid Orders of the Senate. 271 

Rule 18. [15.] Bills, resolves and other papers, in 
reference to which any member has a right to move a 
reconsideration, (except petitions, enacted bills, orders of 
inquiry and orders of notice,) shall remain in the posses- 
sion of the Clerk until the right of reconsideration has 
expired; provided that the operation of this rule shall 
be suspended during the last week of the session. 
[1855; 1856; 1875.] 

Rule 19. [89.] A question containing two or more 
propositions, capable of division, shall be divided whenever 
desired by any member. A motion to strike out and insert 
shall be deemed indivisible. But a motion to strike out, 
being lost, shall neither preclude amendment nor a motion 
to strike out and insert. 
[1817; 1841.] 

Rule 20. [58.] The unfinished business in which the 
Senate was engaged at the time of the last adjournment, 
shall have the preference in the Orders of the Day, next 
after motions to reconsider, 
' [1830; 1870.] 

Rule 21. [61.] No member shall be permitted to vote 
or serve on any committee on a question where his private 
right is immediately concerned, distinct from the public 
interest. 

, [1855.1 

« 

Rule 22. No member shall absent himself from the 
Senate without leave, unless there be a quorum without 
his presence. 
[1817.] 

Rule 23. [62, 66.] "W^ienever a question shall be 
taken by yeas and nays, the Clerk shall <;all the names 



272 Itules and Orders of the Senate. 

of all the members, except the President, in alphabetical 
order, and every member present shall answer to his name^ 
unless excused before the vote is taken ; and no member 
shall be permitted to vote after the decision is announced 
from the chair. 

[1837; 1844.] 



Of Committees, 

Rule 24. [38.] It shall be the duty of every member 
of the Senate, who moves that any Standing Committee be 
instructed to inquire into the expediency of amending an 
existing law, to point out to such Committee, in writing, 
the amendment which he deems expedient, and to furnish 
a written statement of the facts and authorities in favor 
thereof to such Committee, if by them required. 

[1858.] 

EuLE 25. [21.] The following Standing Committees 
shall be appointed at the commencement of the fiirst ses- 
sion, to wit : — 

A Committee on the Judiciary; 

A Committee on Bills in the Third Beading; 
And each of these Committees shall consist of five members. 

A Committee on Matters of Probate and Chancery; 

A Committee on the Treasury ; 

A Committee on Engrossed BUls ; 

A Committee on Leave of Absence ; 
And each of these Committees shall consist of three members, 

[1831; 1836: 1840; 1844; 1847: 1863; 1864; 1870: 
1876.] 

Rule 26. [22, 23.] All Committees shall be appointed 
by the President, unless otherwise specially directed by the 
Senate, and the person first named shall be Chairman, In 



Hides and Orders of the Senate. 273 

all elections of Oomiuittees by ballot, the person having 
the highest number of votes shall act as Chairman. 

[1817 ; between 1821 and '26 ; 1631.] 

Rule 27. [86.] When a motion is made to commit 
any subject, and different Committees shall be proposed, 
the question shall be taken in the following order : A 
Standing Committee of the Senate — a Select Committee of 
the Senate — a Joint Standing Committee — a Joint Select 
Committee. 

[1844.] 

Rule 28. [55.] Reports of Committees, except such as 
do not propose final action, and Reports of Committees of 
Conference, shall, unless otherwise specially ordered, be 
placed in the Orders of the Day next succeeding that on 
which they shall be presented to the Senate. 

[1845; 1853.] 

Rule 29. [98.] No Committee shall be allowed to 
occupy the Senate Chamber without leave of the Senate. 

[1836; 1863.] 

Rule 30. [30.] No bill or resolve affecting the rights 
of individuals, or private or municipal corporations, or the 
Commonwealth, shall be reported to the Senate by any 
Committee, unless it shall be made to appear, to the satis- 
faction of the Committee, that notice had been given in 
the manner provided by law ; or unless such notice as the 
Committee shall direct shall have been given, and proper 
proof of the same placed before the Committee ; or unless, 
in the judgment of the Committee, no notice to the parties 
or the public is necessary. 

[1870.] 

18 



274 BtUes and Orders of tJie Senate. 

Rule 31. [46.] No bill aflfecting directly the legal 
rights of individuals or corporations, otherwise than as it 
affects generally the interests of the whole people of the 
Commonwealth, or the cities or towns to which it specifi- 
cally applies, shall be proposed or introduced, by amend- 
ment or otherwise, except by report of a Committee, 
upon petition duly presented and referred. 

[1875.] 



Of Bills and Resolves, 

Rule 32. [40, 45.] All bills and resolves shall be 
written in a fair, round hand, without interlineations, on 
not less than one sheet of paper, with suitable margins 
and spaces between the several sections or resolves. No 
bill or resolve shall be introduced by a member without 
special leave ; and all bills and resolves, when so intro- 
duced, shall be committed before they are passed to a 
second reading. 

[1844; 1857.] 

Rule 33. [43.] All bills and resolves from the House 
of Representatives, after they are read a first time, shall 
be committed to a Comndttee of the Senate, except when 
said bills or resolves shall have been reported by a joint 
committee. 

[1825.] 

Rule 34. [49, 56, 57.] No bill or resolve, or substitute 
therefor, shall pass to be engrossed without three read- 
ings on three several days ; bills and resolves in the first 
reading shall be read by their titles, unless otherwise 
ordered, and bills and resolves in the second and third 
readings shall be made the order of the day for the 
day next succeeding that on which leave shall have 
been given to read them a second or third time, and 



Bules and Orders of the Senate. 275 

the President shall order them accordingly. After being 
placed in the Orders of the Day they shall be disposed of 
in course ; and matters passed over in the Orders of the 
Day shall go to the foot of the list, and shall not be con- 
sidered till the next day. 

[1817; 1836; 1841; 1859.] 

EULE 35. [42.] All bills and resolves involving the 
expenditiu'e of public money, shall, after the first reading, 
be referred in course to the Committee on the Treasury, 
whose duty it shall be to report on their relation to the 
finances of the Commonwealth. 

[1871.] . 

Rule 36. [27.] All bills and resolves in the third 
reading shall be committed to the Committee on Bills in 
the Third Heading, whose duty it shall be to ascertain 
their relations to the Constitution, and any existing laws 
upon the same subject-matter, and to see that all such 
bills and resolves are correct in form. 

[1817; 1836.] 

Rule 37. [28, 50, 52.] All engrossed bills and resolves 
shall be committed to the Standing Committee on En- 
grossed Bills, whose duty it shall be carefully to compare 
the same with the bill as passed to be engrossed, and if 
found by them to be rightly and truly engrossed, they 
shall so indorse on the envelop thereof, and the final 
question shall be taken thereon without any further read- 
ing, unless, on motion of any member, a majority of the 
Senate shall be in favor of reading the same as engrossed. 

[1817; 1831.] 

Rule 38. [51.] No engrossed bill or resolve shall be 
amended. 

[1837.] 



276 EiUes and Orders of the Senate. 

Rule 39. [47.] When any measure shall be finally 
rejected, it shall not be revived except by reconsideration, 
and no measure 8ub§tantially the same shall be introduced 
during the session ; and this Rule shall apply as well to 
measures originating in the House as to those originating 
in the Senate. 

[1817— dispensed with in 1831, and revived in 1838 — 
amended in 1841; 1844.] 



Elections by Ballot 

Rule 40. [94.] In all elections by ballot, a time shall 
be assigned for such election, at least one day previous 
thereto. 

[1831.] 



Senate Library* 

Rule 41. The books belonging to the Senate Chaml>er 
shall be in the care of the Clerk, who shall keep an accu- 
rate list thereof; and no book shall be taken from the 
Senate Chamber by any person without giving notice 
thereof to the Clerk, who shall enter, in a book to be kept 
by him, the name of the book, and the name of the person 
taking the same. 

[1837.] 



Beporters* 

Rule 42. Seats for reporters shall be numbered, and 
assigned by lot, under the direction of the Clerk of the 
Senate. 

[1847.] 



BiUes andJOrders of the SencUe. 277 

General Bule9. 

Rule 43. [97.] No person not a member of the Senate 
shall be allowed to sit at the Senate table while the Senate 
is in session. 

• 

[1853.] 

Rule 44. No x>erson other than members of the legisla- 
tive and executive departments of the State government, 
and past members of the Senate, shall be allowed to be 
present in the Clerk's room, or the room intervening 
between that and the Senate Chamber, while the Senate 
is in session, or during the half hour immediately pre- 
ceding and following any session. 

[1870; 1875.] 

Rule 45. The Rules of Parliamentary Practice com- 
prised in Cushing's Manual, and the principles of par- 
liamentary law set forth in Cushing's larger work, shall 
govern the Senate in all cases to which they are appli- 
cable, and in which they are not inconsistent with the 
Standing Rules and Orders of the Senate, or the Joint 
Rules of the two bradches of the legislature. 

[1847 ; 1858.] 

Rule 46. [100.] Any Rule or Order, except the thirty- 
sixth, may be altered, suspended or rescinded, two-thirds 
of the members preseilt consenting thereto. 

[1817; 1841; 1848.] 



RULES AOT) ORDERS 



OF THE 



HOUSE OF EEPEESENTATIVES. 



RULES AND OEDEES 



OF THE 



HOUSE OF EEPEESENTATIVES. 



The Speaker. 

1. The Speaker shall take the chair at the hour to 
which the House stands adjourned, call the members to 
order, and on the appearance of a quorum proceed to 
business. 

2. He shall preserve decorum and order ; may speak 
to points of order in preference to other members; and 
shall decide all questions of order, subject to an appeal to 
the House. 

[With regard to appeals, see Bales 81 and 92.] 

3. He shall declare all votes, subject to verification 
as hereinafter provided. 

[See Rules 63 to 67.] 

4. In all cases he may vote. 

6. He shall rise to put a question, or to address the 
House, but may read sitting. 



' 



282 Bvles and Orders of the 

6. He shall each day examine the journal of the 
House. 

7« He may name a member to perform the duties of 
the chair for a period not exceeding two days at one time 

8* In case of a vacancy in the office of Speaker, or 
in case the Speaker or the member named by him in 
accordance with the preceding rule, is absent at the hour 
to which the House stands adjourned, the senior monitor 
present shall call the House to order, and shall preside 
until a Speaker pro tempore or a Speaker is elected by 
ballot, which shall be the first business in order. 

Monitors. 

9. Two monitors shall be appointed by the Speaker for 
each division of the House, whose duty it shall be to see 
to the due observance of the Rules and Orders, and on 
request of the Speaker to return the number of votes and 
members in their respective divisions. 

10. If a member transgress any of the Bules and 
Orders after being notified thereof by a monitor, it shall 
be the duty of such monitor to report the case to the 
House. 

[For duty of monitor in case of the absence of the Speaker, see 
Bale 8.] [See Rale 20.] 

Clerk. 

11. The Clerk shall keep the journal of the House. 
He shall enter therein a record of each day's proceedings, 
and submit it to the Speaker before the hour fixed for the 
next sitting. 

12. Every question of order shall be noted in the 
journal, and with the decision shall be entered at large in 



House of Representatives. 283 

an appendix which shall also contain the Knles and 
Orders of the House, and of the two branches. 

13. The Clerk shall prepare and cause to be printed 
ea^h day a calendar of matters in order for consideration ; 
followed by a brief minute of the preliminary proceedings 
of the previous day ; a list of matters lying on the table ; 
and such other memoranda as the House or the Speaker 
may direct. 

14. Any objection to the calendar shall be made and 
disposed of before the House votes to proceed to the con- 
sideration of the Orders of the Day. 

15. The Clerk shall retain bills and other papers, in 
reference to which any member has a right to move a 
reconsideration (except petitions, enacted bills, orders of 
inquiry and orders of notice), until the right of reconsid- 
eration has expired : provided, that the operation of this 
rule shall be suspended during the last week of the ses- 
sion. 

Members. 

16. No member shall stand up, to the inconvenience 
of others, while a member is speaking ; or pass unneces- 
sarily between the Speaker of the House and the member 
speaking ; or stand in the passages, or in the area in 
front of the chair. 

17. No member shall be absent more than two days 
without leave of the House. 

18. No member shall absent himself from the House 
without leave, unless there be a quorum without his 
presence. 

19. Papers in possession of a member obtaining leave 
of absence, or at the end of the session, shall be left by 
him with the Clerk. 



284 Bules and Orders of ike 

20. If a member is gnilty of a bieach of any of the 
Boles and Orders, he may be required by the House on 
motion to make satisfaction therefor, and, until he has 
done so, he shall not be allowed to vote or speak, except 
by way of excnse. • 

[Bee Bole 10.] 

Committees. 

21. At the beginning of the political year, eleven 
Standing Committees, to consist of seven members each, 
shall be appointed, as follows : — 

A Committee on the Judiciary ; 

A Committee on Matters of Probate and Chancery ; 

A Committee on Finance ; 

A Committee on Elections ; 

A Committee on Bills in the Third Reading ; 

A Committee on Engrossed BUls ; 

A Committee on County Estimates ; 

A Committee on the Pay Roll ; 

A Committee on Leave of Absence ; 

A Committee on Public Buildings ; 

A Committe on Rules and Orders. 

22. Unless other provision is made in any case, all 
committees shall be appointed by the Speaker, and the 
member first named shall be chairman. 

28. In case of the election of a committee by ballot, 
the member having the highest number of votes shall be 
chairman. 

24. No member shall be required to be on more than 
two committees at the same time, nor chairman of more 
than one. 

25. No member shall serve on any committee in any 



House of Representatives, 285 

question where his private right is immediately concerned 
distinct from the public interest. 

26. The Committee on Finance shall report in appro- 
priation bills, only such items of expenditure as are au- 
thorized by law, or such as the committee has been di- 
rected by the House to insert. 

27. The Committee on Bills in the Third Reading 
shall examine and correct the bills which are referred to 
it, for the purpose of avoiding repetitions and unconstitu- 
tional provisions, insuring accuracy in the text and refer- 
ences, and consistency with the language of existing 
statutes : provided^ that any change in the sense or legal 
effect shall be reported as an amendment. 

28. The Committee on Engrossed Bills shall carefully 
examine and compare engrossed bills, and report them 
rightly and truly engrossed, when found to be so, without 
delay. 

• 

29. When the object of an application, whether by 
petition, order, or bill introduced oti leave, can be secured 
without a special act under existing general laws, the 
committee to which the matter is referred shall report 
l^ave to withdraw, inexpedient to legislate, or ought not 
to pass, a« the case may be. 

30. No bill affecting the rights of individuals or pri- 
vate or municipal corporations shall be reported by a 
committee, unless notice has been given to all parties in- 
terested, by public advertisement or otherwise, without 
expense to the Commonwealth; or unless satisfactory 
evidence is produced that the parties interested have 
either received notice in writing, or have in writing 
waived notice. 



286 Bides and Orders of the 

31. On or before the twenty-second day of March, 
committeea shall make final report npon matters referred 
to them prior to that day, unless further time is granted, 
for cause. 

Committee of the Whole, 

32. When the House determines to go into a com- 
mittee of the whole, the chairman shall be appointed by 
the Speaker. 

83. The rules of the House shall be observed in a 
committee of the whole, so far as they may be applicable, 
except the rules limiting debate. A mo'tion to rise, re- 
port progress, and ask leave to sit again, shall be always 
first in order, and be decided without debate. 

Regular Course of Proceedings. 

Petitions f ^o., arid Reports of Committees, 

34* Petitions, memorials, remonstrances, and papers, 
of a like nature, and reports of committees, shall be pre- 
sented before the House proceeds to the consideration of 
the Order's of the Day, and the Speaker shall call on the 
several divisions for such papers. 

36. The member presenting a petition, memorial, or 
remonstrance, shall indorse his name thereon, with a 
brief statement of the nature and object of the paper, 
and the reading thereof shall be dispensed with, unless 
specially ordered. 

' Papers from the Senate, 

36. Papers from the Senate shall be laid before the 
House by the Speaker, and received for action conforma- 
bly to such of these Rules and Orders as are ax)plicable 
thereto, before the House proceeds to the consideration of 
the Orders of the Day. 



House of Representatives, 287 



Papers addressed to the House, not Fetitions, 

37. Papers addressed to the House or the General 
Court, other than petitions, memorials, and remonstrances, 
or those received from the Senate, may l>e presented by 
the Speaker, or by a member in his place, and shall be, 
read unless it is specially ordered that the reading be dis- 
pensed with. 

Orders of Inquh^, 

38. All motions contemplating legislation, when not 
founded upon petition, or upon bill proposed to be intro- 
duced on leave, shall be made in the form of an order of 
inquiry, which shall indicate the nature of the legislation 
proposed ; and if reference is made to any particular law, 
for amendment or otherwise, the order shall specify the 
chapter and section, as well as the subject to which it 
relates. 

Postponement to the Next Day on Bequest of a Member, 

39. The consideration of any order proposed for adop- 
tion, or of any request for leave to introduce a bill, shall 
be postponed without question to the day after that on 
which the order is proposed or .request made, if any mem- 
ber asks such postponement. 

Bills and Besolves, [See Rule 93.] 

40. Bills shall be fairly -vvritten in a legible hand, 
without material erasure or interlineation, on not less 
than one sheet of paper, with suitable margins and spaces 
between the several sections ; dates and numbers being 
written in words at length. 

41. If opposition is made to a bill before it is ordered 
to a second reading, the question shall be, " Shall this hill 
be rejected f " If no opposition is made, or if the question 



288 Btdes and Orders of the 

to reject is negatived, the bill shall go to its second read- 
ing without a question. 

42. Bills involving an expenditure of public money, 
shall, after their first reading, be referred to the Commit- 

,tee on Finance, for report on their relation to the finances 
of the Commonwealth. 

43. Bills from the Senate, after their first reading, 
shall be referred to a committee of the House, unless they 
were reported to the Senate "^^y a joint committee. 

44* Amendments, proposed by the Senate, and sent 
back to the House for concurrence, shall be referred to 
the committee which reported the measure proposed to be 
amended, unless such committee is composed of members 
of both branches. 

45* No bill shall be proposed ob introduced unless 
.received from the Senate, reported by a committee, or 
moved as an amendment to the rex>ort of a committee : 
provided, that the House may grant * special leave to a 
member to introduce a bill ; but when leave is asked for 
the introduction of a bill, it shall be read for information 
before the question is put on granting leave ; and if leave 
is granted, it shall be committed, before it is ordered to a 
second reading. 

46. No bill affecting directly the legal rights of indi- 
^viduals or corporations, otherwise than as it affects gen- 
erally the interests of the whole people of the Common- 
wealth or of the cities or towns to which it specifically 
applies, shall be proposed or introduced, by amendment 
or otherwise, except by report of a committee, upon peti- 
tion duly presented and referred. 



House of Representatives, 289 

47. When a bill, order, petition, memorial or remon- 
strance has been finally rejected, no measure substan- 
tially the same shall be introduced by any committee or 
member during the same session ; and if an amendment 
to a House bill is received from the Senate, which amend- 
ment is substantially the same as a bill which has been 
rejected by the House, the Speaker shall direct the Clerk 
to indorse on the paper that the House non-concurs in 
the amendment, and shall not entertain any motion for 
other action thereon. 

48. Bills in their third reading shall be referred to 
the Committee on Bills in the Third Beading for exam- 
ination, correction, and report. 

[See Bnle 27.] 

49. No bUl shall pass to be engrossed without having 
been read on three several days. 

60. Engrossed bills shall be referred to the Cfommit- 
tee on Engrossed Bills for examination, comparison, and 
report. 

[See Rule 28.] 

61* No engrossed bill shall be amended. 

62. Engrossed bills, reported by the Committee on 
Engrossed Bills to be rightly and truly engrossed, shall 
be put upon their passage to be enacted ; and engrossed 
resolves, when so reported, shall be put upon their pas- 
sage ; without further reading, unless specially ordered. 

63. Ko engrossed bill shall be sent to the Senate 
without notice thereof being given by the Speaker. 

10 



290 Btdea and Orders of the 



Orders of the Day, 

64. Bills from the Senate, after their first reading, 
when not referred to a committee of the House, and bills 
reported to the House by committees, to which no objec- 
tion is made or when the question of rejection is nega- 
tived, shall be placed in the orders for second reading on 
the next day. 

66 • Reports of committees not by bill or resolve shall 
be placed in the orders of the next day after that on 
which they are received from the Senate, or made to the 
House, as the case may be. 

66* Bills ordered to a third reading shall be placed 
in the orders of the next day tor such reading. 

67* After entering upon the consideration of the 
Orders of the Day, the House shall proceed with them 
in regular coui'se, as follows : Matters not giving rise to a 
motion or debate shall first be disposed of in the order in 
which they stand in the calendar ; after which the mat- 
ters that were passed over shall be considered in like 
order, and disposed of. 

68* When the House does not finish the consideration 
of the Orders of the Day, those which have not been 
acted upon shall be the orders for the next and each suc- 
ceeding day until disposed of, and shall be entered in 
the calendar, without change in their order, to precede 
matters added under Rules fifty-four, fifty-five and fifty- 
six. The unfinished business in which the House was 
engaged at the time of adjournment, shall have the pref- 
erence in the orders of the next day, after motions to re- 
consider. 



House of RepresentcUives, 291 



Special Rules affecting the Course of Proceedings, 

[For postponement of Order, etc., to next day, on request of a 
member, see Rule 39.] 

59. No matter which has been duly placed in the 
Orders of the Day shall be discharged therefrom, or con- 
sidered out of the regular course. 

60, If, under the operation of the previous question, 
or otherwise, an amendment is made at the second or 
third reading of a bill substantially changing the greater 
part of such bill, the question shall not be put forthwith 
on ordering the bill to a third reading or to be engrossed 
(as the case may be), but the bill, as amended, shall be 
placed in the orders of the next day after that on which 
the amendment is made, and shall then be open to further 
amendment before such question is put. In like manner, 
when, under the operation of the previous question or 
otherwise, an amendment is made in any proposition of 
such a nature as to chauge its character, as from a bill to 
an order, or the like, the proposition as amended shall be 
placed in the orders of the next day after that on which 
the amendment was made. 

Voting. 

81. No member shall vote in any question where his 
private right is immediately concerned, distinct from the 
public interest, 

62. Every member not prevented by interest, who is 
present in the House when a question is put, shall give his 
vote, unless the House, for sx>ecial reasons, excuse him. 
Members desiring to be so excused shall make application 
to that effect before the House is divided, or before the 
taking of the yeas and nays is begun. Such application 
may be accompanied by a brief statement of reasons by 



292 Bules and Orders of the 

the member making it, but shall be decided without de- 
bate. 

63. When a question is put, the sense of the House 
shall be taken by the voices of the members, and the 
Speaker shall first announce the vote as it ax)pears to him 
by the sound. 

64. If the Speaker is unable to decide by the sound 
of the voices, or if his announcement made thereupon is 
doubted by a member rising in his place for that purpose, 
the Speaker -shall order a return by divisions of the num- 
ber voting in the afi&rmative and in the negative, without 
further debate upon the question. 

[For duty of monitors in case of a division, see Rale 9.] 

66* When a return by divisions is ordered, the mem- 
bers for or against the question, when called on by the 
Speaker, shall rise in their places, and stand until they 
are counted. 

66* The sense of the House shall be taken by yeas and 
nays, whenever required by one-fifth of the members 
present. When the yeas and nays are taken, the roll of 
the House shall be called in alphabetical order, and no 
member shall be allowed to vote who was not on the 
floor when his name was called or before the roll-call was 
finished. 

jB7» The call for ,the yeas and nays shall be decided 
without debate. If the yeas and nays have been ordered 
before the question is put, the proceedings under Rules 
sixty-three, sixty-four and sixty-five shall be omitted ; if 
not, they may be called for in lieu of a return by divi- 
sions when the Speaker^s announcement is doubted by a 
member rising in his place, and if then ordered, the pro- 



House of Mepresentaiives. 293 

ceedings under Rules sixty-four and sixty-five shall be 

omitted. 

BeconsideraUon, 

68* When a vote has passed (except as provided in the 
next rule), it shall be in order for any member to move 
the reconsideration thereof on the same or the succeeding 
day, and such motion, if made on the same day shall (ex- 
cept in the last week of the session) be placed first in the 
orders of the next day after that on which it is made ; 
but if first moved on such succeeding day, it shall be 
forthwith considered : provided, however, that a motion to 
reconsider a vote upon any incidental or subsidiary ques- 
tion, shall not remove the main subject under consider- 
ation from before the House, but shall be considered at 
the time when it is made. 

69« When a motion for reconsideration is decided, that 
decision shall not be reconsidered, and no question shall 
be twice reconsidered ; nor shall any vote be reconsidered 
upon either of the following motions : 

to adjourn, 

to lay on the table, 

to take from the table ; or 

for the previous question. 

70. Debate on motions to reconsider shall be limited 

to thirty minutes, and no member shall occupy more than 

five minutes. 

[For rule requiring the Clerk to retain papers, except, &c., until 
the right of reoonsideration has expired, see Rule 15.] 

Rules of Debate. 

71. Every member, when about to speak, shall rise 
and respectfully address the Speaker, shall confine him- 
self to the question under debate, and avoid personality ; 
and shall sit down when he has finished. No member 
shall s])eak out of his place without leave of the Speaker. 



294 Mides and Orders of the 

72. When two or more members rise at the same time, 
the Speaker shall name the member entitled to the floor, 
preferring one who rises in his place to one, who does not. 

73. No member shall interrupt another while speak- 
ing, except by rising to call to order. 

74. No member shall speak more than once to the 
prevention of those who have not spoken and desire to 
speak on the same question, nor more than twice on the 
same question without leave of the House. 

Motions. 

75. Every motion shall be reduced to writing, if the 
Speaker so directs. 

76. A motion need not be seconded, and may be with- 
drawn by the mover if no objection is made. 

77* A motion to adjourn shall be always hrst .In 
order ; ~and that motion, and the motions to lay on the 
table and to take from the table, shall be decided without 
debate. 

[For application to be excused from voting, to be decided without 

debate, see Rale 62.] 
[For call for yeas and nays, to be decided without debate, see Rule 

67.] 
[For questions of order arising after the previous question Is moved, 

to be decided without debate, except on appeal, see Rule 81.] 

78. When a question is before the House, until it is 
disposed of, the Speaker shall receive no motion that does 
not relate to the same, except the motion to adjourn, or 
some other motion that has precedence either by express 
rule of the House, or because it is privileged in its na- 



House of Me^resentatives, 295 

ture; and he shall receive no motion relating to the 
same, except: — 

to lay on the table, See Rule 77, above. * 

for the previous question, See Rules 79-84, below, 
to close the debate at a specified 

time, See Rules 88, 34, below, 

to postpone to a time certain, See Rule 85, below, 

to commit (or recommit), See Rule 86, below, 

to amend, See Rules 87-00, below, 
to refer to the next General 

Court, 

or to postpone indefinitely, See Rule 91, below. 

which several motions shall have precedence in the order 
in which they are arranged in this rule. 

Previous Question. 

79. The previous question shall be put in the follow- 
ing form : "Shall the main qwestion he now put f " — and all 
debate upon the main question shall be suspended until 

the previous question is decided. 

• 

80. On the previous question, not exceeding ten min- 
utes shall be allowed for debate, and that only to give 
reasons why the main question should not be put, and no 
member shall speak more than three minutes. 

81. All questions of order arising after a motion is 
made for the previous question shall be decided without 
debate, excepting on appeal, and on such appeal no mem- 
ber shall speak more than once without leave of the 
House. 

[See Rule 92.] 

82. The adoption of the previous question shall put 
an end to all debate except as provided in Rule eighty- 



296 BtUes and Orders of the 

four, and bring the House to a direct vote upon pending 
amendments, if any, in their regular order, and then upon 
the main question. 

Motion to Close Debate at a Specified Time, 

83. A motion to close the debate at a specified time 
shall be put not less than thirty minutes before the time 
stated. 

[Bee {he next rule.] 

When Debate is closedj Ten Minutes alloicedy ^c, 

84* When debate is closed by ordering the previous 
question, or by a vote to close debate at a specified time, 
the member in charge of the measure under consideration 
shall be allowed to speak ten minutes, and may grant to 
any other member any portion of his time. 

Motion to Postpone to a time certain, 

86 • When a motion is made to postpone to a time cer- 
tain, and different times are proposed, the question shall 
first be taken on the most remote time; and the time 
shall be determined before the question is put on post- 
ponement, which may then be rejected if the House see 
fit. 

Motion to Commit 

SQ, When a motion is made to commit, and different 
committees are proposed, the question shall be taken in 
the following order : — 

a standing committee of the House, 
a select committee of the House, 
a joint standing committee, « 

a joint select committee; 

and a subject may be recommitted to the same committee, 
or to another committee at the pleasure of the House. 



House of BepresentoMves. 297 



Motions to Amend. 

87* A motion to amend an amendment may be re- 
ceived, but no amendment in the third degree shall be 
allowed. 

88. No motion or proposition of a subject diflferent 
from that under consideration shall be admitted under 
color of amendment. 

89. A question containing two or more propositions 
capable of division, shall be divided whenever desired by 
any member. When a motion to strike out and insert is 
thus divided, the failure of the motion to strike out shall 
not preclude amendment ; or, if the motion to strike out 
prevails, the matter proposed to be inserted shall be open 
to amendment before the question is taken on inserting it. 

90. In filling blanks, the largest sum and longest time 
shall be put first. 

Equivalent for Motion to Postpone Indefinitely, 

91. A motion to strike out the enacting clause of a 
bill shall be equivalent to a motion' to postpone indefi- 
nitely. 

Appeal. 

92. No appeal from the decision of the Speaker shall 
be entertained, unless it is seconded ; and no other busi- 
ness shall be in order until the question on the appeal 
has been disposed of. 

[See Rule 81.] 

Resolves. 

93. Such of these Rules and Orders as are applicable 
to bills, whether of the House or of the Senate, shall 
apply likewise to such Resolves as require the concur- 
rence of the Senate and approval by the Governor, in 



298 Bides and Orders of the 

order to become laws and have force as such. Except in 
Rule fifty-two, the word "bill" shall be equivalent to the 
word " resolve " in the same place. 

Elections by Ballot, 

94. A time shall be assigned for elections by ballot, 
at least one day previous thereto. 

Secret Session, 

96. All proceedings in secret session, and matters 
relating thereto, shall be kept secret until the House 
removes the injunction of secrecy. 

Seats. 
96. (1.) The desk on the right of the Speaker shall 
be assigned to the use of the Clerk and such persons as 
he may employ to assist him, and that on the left to the 
use of the Chairmen of the Committees on Bills in the 
Third Beading and on Engrossed Bills. 

(2.) The seat numbered 25, in the third division, shall 
be assigned to the use of the senior member of the House, 
and that numbered 24, in the fourth division, to the use 
of the oldest member of the House who is not the senior 
member. 

(3.) The seat numbered 11, in the first division, shall 
be assigned to the use of the Chairman of the Committee 
on the Judiciary, and that numbered 35, in the sixth divi- 
sion, to the use of the Chairman of the Committee on 
Finance. 

(4.) The following seats shall be assigned to the use of 
the monitors : — 
Those numbered 30 and 34, in the first division ; 

100 and 104, in the second division ; 
96 and 99, in the third division ; 
92 and 95, in the fourth division ; 
87 and 91, in the fifth division ; and 
15 and 19, in the sixth division. 



Hotise of Representatives, 299 

(5.) The first business in order after the appointment 
of standing committees and monitors is announced by 
the Speaker, shall be the drawing of the other seats 
upon the floor of the House. 

(6.) The Clerk shall call the roll of the members in 
alphabetical order, omitting the names of the Speaker, 
the senior member, the oldest member, the chairmen of 
committees herein before mentioned, and the monitors j 
and the drawing shall be had in presence of the House, 
under the supervision of a committee of three selected 
from the members mentioned in this paragraph. 

(7.) The seat assigned to any member, or drawn by 
him, shall be his seat for the year, unless an exchange is 
made and notice thereof given to the Sergeant-at-Arms 
within ten days from the day of the drawing. 

Privilege of the Floor. 

97. (1.) Every member shall have the privilege of in- 
troducing upon the floor of the House, to occupy (for that 
d%y) any seat then vacant not belonging to a member, or 
belonging to a member who is absent, not more than one 
person at the same time, such person not having any pri- 
vate interest in any measure before the legislature dis- 
tinct fix)m the public interest : providedy that in any case 
when by the exercise of this privilege on the part of 
some of the members, the vacant seats have been filled, 
and the Speaker so announces, the further exercise of the 
privilege shall be suspended for that day, or until one or 
more of the seats thus filled are vacated. 

(2,) The Speaker may also invite visitors, not inhabi- 
tants of this Commonwealth, without limit of number, to 
seats (not numbered) upon the floor of the House. 

(3.) Contestants- for seats in the House whose papers 
are in the hands of the Committee on Elections, may be 
admitted while their cases are pending, to seats to bo 
assigned by the Speaker* 



300 Bides and Orders. 

(4.) Senators, and the principal officers* in the Execu- 
tive and Judicial departments of the Civil Government 
of the Commonwealth; the Chaplains of both Houses and 
the Clerk of the Senate, shall be admitted to the floor 
whenever they may have occasion to visit the House, and 
may occupy any of the seats not numbered which they 
may find vacant, or any seats which may be assigned by 
the Speaker for their use for the time being. 

Representatives' Chamber. 

98. Use of the Bepresentatives' Chamber shall not be 
granted except by a vote of four-fifths of the members 
present. 

Parliamentary Practice. 

99. The rules of parliamentary practice shall govern 
the House in all cases to which they are applicable, 
and in which they are not inconsistent with these Rules 
and Orders, or the Joint Rules and Orders of the two 
branches. 

Suspension, Amendment and Repeal. 

100. Nothing in these Rules and Orders shall be dis- 
pensed with, altered or repealed, unless two-thirds of the 
members present consent thereto ; but this rule and rules 
thirty-nine, forty-eight and ninety-eight shall not be sus- 
pended, unless by unanimous consent of the members 
present. 



Blanks for orders, bills, reports, petitions, and indorsement of peti- 
tions, may be had on application to the Clerk, or at the document- 
room, and members are respectfully requested to use the same in the 
preparation of papers. 

* See list in the Blue-book. 



Index to Sulea and Orders. 801 



INDEX TO THE RULES AND OBDERS 



or THB 



HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. 



[The SigMeB refer to the ntunbers of the Rules.] 

A4joarn» motion to, 77, 78 
Admission to the floor, 97 
AMES^DMEN^T; 

to be reported by Committee on Bills In 9d Beading, 27 

of existing law, in order of inqairy, 38 

from Senate sent back for concurrence, 44 

bill may be moved as, 45 

private bill not to be moved as, 46 

bill once rejected, not to be renewed by Senate amendment} 47 

engrossed bill not to be amended, 51 

making substantial change, 60 

motions to amend, 78, 87 to 00 

When previous question is ordered, 82 

amendment to amendment, &c«, 87 

not to be admitted of a different subject, 88 

when question is divided, 89 

in filling blanks, largest sum, &c., 90 

striking out enacting clause, 91 

of Rules and Orders, 100 
Appeals from the decision of the Speaker, 2, 81| 92 

Ballot, elections by, 23, 94 



302 Index to Btdes and Orders of the 

BILLS: 

1* Preliminary, 

how to be written, 40 

motions conteniplating legislation) ftc, to be in form of order 

of inquiry, 88, 39 
how to be iutroduoed, 45; introduced on leave, ^id» 
restriction on introduction by leave, 46 

(" applications **) after February 22; 

see Joint Bute 20. 
agaln» when once rejected) 47 

3. Aa reported by Oommitteea. 

appropriation bills to contain certain Items only, 26 
restriction or regulation of reports, 29, 30, 47 
reports to be made before March twenty-second, 31 
when to be presented to the House, 84 

8. Before the second reading. 

if opposed, question on rejection ; otherwise, 2d reading, 41 
involving expenditures, referred to Oommittee on Finance, 42 
from the Senate, 86, 64 

referred to committee, &c., 43 
case of Senate amendments to House bill, 44 

4. Before the third reading, 

referred to committee, 48 
duties of committee, 27 
placed in Orders of tile Day, 56 

6. Jfter the third reading. 

not to be engrossed unless read on three several days, 40 

6. Jfter engroeament. 

referred to committee, 60 

duties of committee, 28 

not to be amended) 51 

passage to be enacted, 52 

notice to be given ; sent to the Senate, 63 

7. Proviaiona applicable at several atagea. 

arrangement of matters in Orders of the Day, 13, 58 
consideration of matters in Orders of the Day, 57 
matters not to be discharged from Orders of the Day, 5d 
amendment changing nature of a bill, 60 
Clerk to retain bills and other papers except, 8cc.) 15 
bills and papers in possession of members, 19 
effect of motion to strike out enacting clause, 91 
provisions respectUig bills also applicable to resolves, 93 



House of B^presentatives* 803 

Calendar, 18, 14, 68 
Clerk, 11, 12, 13, 16, 19, 47 
Commit, motion to, 78, 80 
COMMITTBBS: 

eleven standing committees to be appointed, 21 

to be appointed by Speaker, unless, &c., 22 

case of election by ballot, 23 

no member required to be on more than two, &c., 24 

no member to serve where his private right, &e., 26 

duty of Committee on Unance, 26 

on Bills in 8d Beading, 27 
on Bngprossed Bills, 28 

to report adversely in certain cases, 29 

notice to be given in certain cases, 80 

to make report on or before March twenty-second, 81 

DBBATE, BULBS OF, 71 to 91 

Speaker may speak to points of order, &c., 2 

matters to be disposed of without debate, 67, 02, 67, 81 

motions to be decided without debate, 77 

debate on motions to reconsider, 70 

motion to close debate, 78, 83, 84 
See J^evioua Question. 
Doubt; when a vote is doubted, 04, 05, 07 

Elections by ballot, 23, 94 

Engrossed Bills, Committee on, 28, 50; see £ill8* 

Excuse from voting, time for application for, 02 

finance. Committee on, 20, 42 

Journal of the House, 4, 11, 12 

KBMBBBS: 

not to stand up, &c., 10 

not to be absent, &c., 17, 18 

to leave papers with the Clerk, 19 

number of, upon each standing committee, 21 

first named to be chairman of committee, &c., 22 

having highest number to be chairman, &c., 23 

no member required to be on more than two committees, &e., 24 

no member to serve on committee where his private right, &c«, 26 

member presenting petition, &c«, to indorse hiB name, &e., 86 



304 Index to BtUes and Orders of the 

UEMBKRB^ConHnued. 

no member to vote where his private right, &c., 01 

every member to vote, except, &c., 02 

member aboat to speak, to rise and address tiie Speaker, &c., 71 

no member to interrupt another, &c., 78 

no member to speak more tiuui^once, Sec, 74 

seats of members, 90 

privilege of the flx>or, 07 
See Voting, 
Monitors, 8, 9, 10, 04 
Motions, 75 to 91 

Order; see QueHiona o/ Order; BuUtand Ordert, 
ORDBRS, generally, 29, 89 

once rejected, not to be renewed^ 47 

of inquiry, 16, 38 

of notice, 15 

of the Day, 13, 14, 54 to 00 

Petitions, 29, 84, 85 

once rejected, 47 
Postpone, to a time certain, motion for, 78, 85. See also 39 

indefinitely, motion for, 78, 91 
Previous question, 78, 79 to 82, 84 
Privilege of the floor, 97 

Questions of order, 2, 12, 73, 81 

Beading of papers, 5, 85, 37 

Recommit, motion for, 78, 80 

Reconsideration, 08, 09, 70 

Reports of committees (see BilU), 84, 54, 55 

Representatives' Chamber, 98 

Resolves, 93; see Bills, 

Rules and Orders, 2, 9, 10, 20, 100 

Seats, 90 

Secret session, 95 

Senate, papers from, 30, 43, 44, 45, 47, 64, 55 

engrossed bills sent to, 53 
SPEAKER, 1 to 

may name a member to perform the duties of the chair, 7 

absence of, 8 

to appoint monitors, 9 



House of Mepresentatives. 305 



QTRAKEBr^OonHnued. 

may direct as regards matters in calendar, 13 
to appoint committees, 22 

chairman of committee of the whole, 92 
to call on several divisions for petitions, &c., 84 
to lay before the House pikers from the Senate, 80 
may present papers not petitions, &c., 87 
to give notice of engrossed bill sent to Senate, 53 
to name member entitled to floor, 72 
may direct motion to be rednoed to writing, 76 
may Invite visitors to seats on the floor, 07 
&%e Rules of Debate ; Voting. 

Strike oat and insert, motion for, 89 
enacting danse, 01 

Snspension of Bales, 100 

Table, papers on, 18 

lay on, motion to, 77, 78 

take from, motion to, 77 
Third Beading, Bills in. Committee on, 27, 48; see BiUa, 

Undebatable matters and motions; see Debate. 
Unfinished basiness, 68 

Voting, 8, 4, 61 to 87 

Yeas and nays, 66, 67 

20 



JOINT ETJIiES AND OEDEES 



OF THE 



TWO * BRANCHES. 



JOINT RULES AND ORDEBS OF THE TWO BRANCHES. 



Rule 1. List of Joint Standing CommitteeB—No member of either 
House to act as couiLsel before any committee. 

Bdub 2. Joint Committees; how they may report— How their 
reports shall be written. 

BuiiE 3. Reports of Joint Committees may be recommitted by 
either House, except, etc.— All reports, after recommitment, to be made 
to the House which ordered the same. 

Rule 4. Reports of Joiut Committees on subjects referred to them 
from Standing Committees of either branch, to be made in the House 
where such reference is made. 

Rule 6. Clerk to indorse amendments made in Reports of Joint 
Committees over signature of chairman or member of committee. 

Rule 6. Report, leave to withdraw, to be made on petitions for 
legislation, which can be secured under general laws. 

RuiiE 7. Papers on their passage to be under the signature of the 
Clerks, except, etc. — ^Messages. 

Rule 8. Engrossed bills and bills ordered to be engrossed. 

RuiiE 9. Notice of bills, etc., rejected to be sent to the other branch. 

Rule 10. Bills that have passed to be enacted. 

Rule 11. Rule 10th, concerning bills, to be applied also to resolves. 

Rule 12. Resolves proposing amendments to the Constitution. 

Rule 13. President of the Senate to preside in Conventions — Con- 
ventions to be held in the Representatives' Chamber — Clerk of the Sen- 
ate to be Clerk of. 

Rule 14. An agreement to go into a Convention not to be altered 
or annulled, unless, etc. 

Rule 15. Restriction as to business of Conventions. 

Rule 16. Elections by joint ballot ; time to be assigned therefor. 

Rule 17. Convention for election of Senator under Act of Con- 
gpress; rule governing, etc. 

BuLE 18. Committees of Conference; how composed, and their 
reports. 

BuLE 19. Joint Committee to make final report on or before 
March 22. 



810 Joint Btdes and Orders, 



BULE 20. Concerning petitions, memorials, etc., presented after the 
twenty*8econd day of February. 

BuiiE 21. Concerning reports on petitions, notice of the presenta. 
tion of which has not been given. 

Rule 22. Bills and resolves affecting rights of individuals or cor- 
porations not to be Introduced, except, etc 

Bdle 28. Concerning the printing and binding of Documents. 



RuiiE 1. The following Joint Standing Committees shall 
be appointed at the commencement of the January ses- 



sion, VIZ. : — 



A Committee on Agricultui'e ; 
A Committee on Banks and Banking; 
, A Committee on Claims; 
A Committee on Education; 
A Committee on Expenditures ; 
A Committee on Federal Relations; 
A Committee on the Fisheries ; 
A Committee on Harbors ; 
A Committee on Insurance ; 
A Committee on the Library; 
A Committee on Manufactures ; 
A Committee on Mercantile Affairs ; 
A Committee on Military Affairs; 
A Committee on Parishes and Religious Societies; 
A Committee on Printing ; 
A Committee on Prisons ; 

A Committee on Public Charitable Institutions ; 
A Committee on Public Lands ; 
A Committee on Railroads; 
A Committee on Roads and Bridges; 
A Committee on the State House ; 
A Committee on Street Railways ; 
A Committee on Towns ; 
A Committee on Water-Supply and Drainage; 



Joiiit Rules and Orders. 311 

And each of said Committees shall consist of two on 
the part of the Senate, and five on the part of the House, 
except the Committee on Banks and Banking, the Com- 
mittee on Claims, the Committee on Harbors, the Com- 
mittee on Mercantile Affairs^ the Committee on Military 
Affairs, the Committee on Prisons, the Committee on 
Public Charitable lustitutious, the Committee on Kail- 
roads, the Committee on Street Railways, and the Com- 
mittee on Water-Supply and Drainage, which shall each 
consist of three members on the part of the Senate, and 
eight members on the part of the House ; and except the 
Committee on the Library, which, by law, is to consist 
of three on the part of each House; and except the 
Committee on Expenditures, which shall consist of the 
Committee on the Treasury of the Senate, and the Com- 
mittee on Finance of the House. • No member of either 
House shall act as counsel for any party before any com- 
mittee of the legislature. 

I 

Rule 2. The Joint Committees of the two Houses may 
report by bill, resolve or otherwise to either House, at 
their discretion; and all bills and resolves reported by 
them shall be fairly written in a legible hand, without 
material erasure or interlineation, on not less than one 
sheet of paper, with suitable margins, and spaces between 
the several sections ; dates and numbers being written in 
words at length. 

Rule 3. Reports of Joint Committees may be recom- 
mitted to the same Committees at the pleasure of the 
House first acting thereon, without asking the concurrence 
of the other branch ; and bills or resolves which have been 
previously acted on in one branch may be recommitted in 
the other without a concurrent vote, except when recom- 
mitted with instructions : provided, that, after such recom- 
mitment, report shall, in all cases, be made to the branch 
which shall have ordered such recommitment. 



312 JoirU Rules and Oi^ders. 

KuLE 4. Whenever a report is made from any Commit- 
tee to either House, and the subject-matter thereof is 
subsequently referred therein to a Joint Committee, such 
Committee shall report its action to the branch in which 
the original report was made. 

Rule 5. If any part of* the report of a Committee 
over the signature of the chairman or members of the 
Committee is amended in either branch, the Clerk of that 
branch shall indorse upon the report such amendment. 

Rule 6. Whenever upon any application for an Act of 
incorporation, or other special legislation, the purpose for 
which such legislation is sought can be secured under 
general laws, the committee to which the matter is 
referred shall, in all cases, report " leave to withdraw," or 
" inexpedient to legislate." 

Rule 7. All papers, while on their passage between the 
two Houses, may be under the signature of the respective 
Clerks, except bills and resolves in their last stage. Mes- 
sages may be sent by such person^ as each House may 
direct. 

Rule 8. After bills shall have passed both Houses to 
be engrossed, they shall be in the charge of the Clerks of 
the two Houses, who shall deliver the same to the Secre- 
tary of the Commonwealth, to be engrossed in the manner 
prescribed by law; and when engrossed, the said Clerks 
shall forthwith deliver the same to the Committee of the 
House of Representatives on Engrossed Bills; and when 
the same shall have passed to be enacted in that House, 
they shall in like manner be delivered to the Committee 
of the Senate on Engrossed Bills. 

Rule 9. If any bill, resolve or order, originating in 
one branch, is rejected in the other, notice thereof shall be 



• JoirU Bvles arid Orders. 813 

given, under the signature of the Clerk, to the branch in 
which the same originated. 

Rule 10. The Clerk of the House in which a hill orig- 
inated shall make an indorsement thereon, certifying in 
which House the same originated, which indorsement shall 
be entered on the Journals by the Clerks respectively. 

After said bills shall have passed both Houses to be 
enacted, the Clerk of the Senate shall lay them before the 
Gk)vemor for his approbation, and shall enter upon the 
Journal of the Senate the day on which the same were laid 
before the Governor. 

Rule 11. All resolves and other papers which are to 
be presented to the Governor for his approbation, shall be 
laid before him in the same manner as is prescribed in the 
case of bills. 

RuL^ 12. All resolves proposing amendments of the 
Constitution shall have three several readings in each 
House, and the final question upon adopting the same 
shall be taken by yeas and nays. 

Rule 13. The President of the Senate shall preside in 
Conventions of the two branches ; and such Conventions 
shall be holden in the Representatives^ Chamber; the 
Clerk of the Senate shall be Clerk of the Convention, and 
a record of the proceedings of the Convention shall be 
entered at large on tlie Journals of both branches. 

Rule 14. When an agreement has been made by the 
two branches to go into Convention, such agreement shall 
not be altered or annulled, except by concurrent vote. 

Rule 15. No business shall be entered on, in Conven- 
tion, other than that which may be agreed on before the 
Convention is formed. 



814 Joint Rules and Orders, 

RuLB 16. In all elections by joint ballot, a time shall be 
assigned therefor at least one day previous to such election. 

RULB 17. The joint assembly required to be held by 
the Act of Congress approved July 25, 1866, entitled, " An 
Act to regulate the times and manner of holding elections 
for Senators in Congress," shall be deemed a Convention 
of the two branches, and the proceedings therein shall be 
in accordance with the provisions of said Act. The Pres- 
ident of the Convention shall receive no motion on any 
day until one vote for Senator has been taken. After one 
vote for Senator has been taken, no motion shall be in 
order except a motion to adjourn, for a recess, or to pro- 
ceed to vote for Senator; and these motions shall have 
precedence in the order of their arrangement, and shall 
be decided without debate. If a motion is made for a 
recess, and different times are proposed, the question shall 
first be taken on the most remote time; and the time 
shall be determined, but without debate, before the ques- 
tion is put upon taking the recess. On either of the 
questions permitted by this rule the sense of the Conven- 
tion shall be taken by yeas and nays, whenever required 
by one-fifth of the members present. When the yeas and 
nays are taken, the roll of the Convention shall be called 
in alphabetical order, and no member shall be allowed to 
vote who was not on the floor when his name was called, 
or before the roU-caU was finished. The call for the yeas 
and nays shall be decided without debate. 

RuLB 18. Committees of Conference shall consist of 
three members on the part of each House, representing its 
vote; and their report, if agreed to by a majority of each 
Committee, shall be made to the branch asking the Con- 
ference, and may be either accepted or rejected; but no 
other action shall be had, except through a new Commit- 
tee of Conference. 



Joint Rules and Orders^ 315 

Rule 19. Joint Committees shall make final report 
upon all matters previously referred to them, on or before 
the twenty-second day of March, unless further time is 
granted for cause. 

Rule 20. All petitions, memorials and applications em- 
braced in the provisions of chapter 2 of the General Stat- 
utes, and chapter 91 of the Acts of the year 1862, which 
shall be presented after the twenty-second day of Febru- 
ary, shall be referred to the next General Court. This 
rule shall not be rescinded, amended or suspended, except 
by a concurrent vote of four-fifths of the members of each 
House present and voting thereon. 

Rule 21. No bill or resolve affecting the rights of 
individuals, or private or municipal corporations, shall 
be reported by a Committee, unless notice has been given 
to all parties interested, by public advertisement or other- 
wise, without expense to the Commonwealth ; or tmless 
satisfactory evidence is produced that the parties inter- 
ested have either received notice in writing, or have in 
writing waived notice. 

Rule 22. No bill or resolve affecting directly the legal 
rights of individuals or corporations, otherwise than as it 
affects generally the interests of the whole people of the 
Commonwealth, or of the cities or towns to which it spe- 
cifically applies, shall be proposed or introduced, by 
amendment or otherwise, except by report of a Commit- 
tee, upon petition duly presented and referred. 

Rule 23. The Committees on Printing may make regu- 
lations for the distribution of all documents printed or 
assigned for the use of the legislature not otherwise dis- 
posed of, such regulations to be reported to and subject 
to the order of the two branches. 



316 Joint Rules and Orders, 

Under the general order to print a report, bill or other 
document, the number printed shall be eight hundred, 
with the exception of the Governor's Inaugural Address, 
of which fifteen hundred copies may be printed without 
special order. 

Leave to report in print shall not be construed to 
authorize the printing of extended reports of evidence. 

No printing, except as aforesaid, and no binding or 
engraving shall be ordered, except upon the report of the 
Joint Committee on Printing, accepted by the legislature. 

Bills, reports and other documents, printed under the 
general order of either House, shall be distributed as fol- 
lows, to wit : Two copies to each member of the Senate 
and House of Representatives (to be placed on his file 
under the direction qf the Sergeant-at-Arms, if desired by 
the member) ; three copies to each Clerk in either branch, 
and three copies to each reporter in regular attendance, to 
whom a seat has been assigned in either branch ; twenty 
copies to the Executive; twenty copies to the Secretary's 
Office ; six copies to the State Library ; and when the 
document is the report of a committee, ten copies shall be 
assigned to the committee making the report. The Ser- 
geant-at-Arms shall preserve as many as may be necessary 
for the permanent files to be placed in the lobbies, and 
distribute the remainder under such regulations as may 
be prescribed by said Joint Committee. 



LIST OF THE 



tttniin mi |e$i§laiive |e)titrlietti| 



OF THE GOVERNMENT 



OF THE 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS, 



AND OFFICERS IMMEDIATELT CONNECTED THEREWITH, 
IflTH PLACES OF RESIDENCE. 



1876. 



EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT. 



His Excellency ALEXANDER H. RICE, of Boston, 

Hotel Brunswick, Boylston Street. 

His Honor HORATIO G. KNIGHT, of Easthampton, 

Hotel Brunswick. 



Council. 
District I — Joseph K. Baker, of Dennis. 

TJ. S. Hotel. 

II. — Harrison Tweed, of Taunton. 

At home. 

Ill — Alden Leland, of HoUiston. 

At home. 

IV.- James Sturgis, of Boston. 

77 Mt. Vernon Street. 

V. — Robert Couch,, of Newburyport. 

At home. 

VI. — George O Rrastow, of Somerville. 

At home. 

VII — George Whitney, of Royalston. 

American House. 

VIII. — William C. Plunkett, of Adams. 

JJ' S. Hotel. 



Private Secretary of the Governor, 

George H. Campbelx., of Boston, 84 Chester Square. 



1 



320 Executive Department, 



Committees of the GouneU. 

On Pardons, — ^His Honor the Uenteiumt-GoTenior, Mr. Le- 
land, Mr. Coach, Mr. Flankett, Mr. Tweed. 

On Finance. — ^His Honor the lieotenant-GoTemor, Mr. Whit- 
ney, Mr. Leland, Mr. Conch, Mr. Stniips, Mr. Pinnkett. 

On Bailroads and the Hoosae Tunnel, — ^His Homv the lien- 
tenant-OoYemor, Mr. Whitney, Mr. Brastow, Mr. Baker, Mr. 
Stnigis. 

On Harbon and PtAHe Lande. — ^Mr. Brastow, Mr. Conch, Mr. 
Leland, Mr. Baker, Mr. Tweed. 

On State Prieom. — ^His Honor the lientenant-OoYemor, Mr. 
Bnistow, Mr. Leland, Mr. Conch, Mr. Tweed, Mr. PlnnketL ' 

On WUtary Affairs, — ^Mr. Whitnej, Mr. Brastow, Mr. Leland, 
Mr. Baker, Mr. PlnnketL 

On Warrants. — ^Mr. Baker, Mr. Whitney, Mr. Stnrgis. 

On Accounts. — ^Mr. Stnigis, Mr. Conch, Mr. Tweed. 



W. H. D. Eaton, . • Executive Messenger. 

Charles F. A. Francis, . • Assistant Executive Messenger. 



iSecretars of ttft Commonfoealt^. 
Henbt B. Peirce, . . . of Abington. 

Abington. 

Benjamin C. Piper 1st Clerk, . . 16 Lonisbnrg Sqnare. 
William Harris, 2<< C^A, . . • WestBoxbniy. 



Executive Department, 



321 



Charles Endicott, of Canton. 

At borne. 



Daniel H. Rogers, Ist Clerk, 
Artemas Harmon, 2d Clerk, 
Joshua Fhippen, Cashier, . 
O. Arthur Adams, Assistant Clerk, 
David Wilder, Assistant Clerk, . 



Brooldine. 

Maiden. 

Salem. 

North Brookfield. 

Boston. 



Deputy Tax Commissioner. 



Daniel A. Gleason, 
Andrew J. Morton, Clerk, . 



Medford. 
Boston. 



^uHitor. 

Julius L. Clarke, of Newton. 

Edward S. Davis, 1st Clerk, Lynn. 

Augustus Brown, 2d Clerk, Salem. 

William D. Hawley, Maiden. 

Albert Caster, Quincy. 



Charles R. Train, of Boston. 

William C. Loring, Assistant AUomey'General, 

21 



Boston. 



322 Executive Department. 



(Kobtrnor's ^taff. 
Major-General James A. Cunningham, of Boston, 

AdjtUant- General. 

Colonel IsaftcF. Kingsbury, of Newton, AssisH Adjvtant-GeneraX, 
Colonel C. Fmnk Luther, of Adams, Assis*t Adjutant- General. 
Brlg.-Gen. Cornelius G. Attwood, of Boston, Inspector-General. 
Colonel Edward G. Stevens, of Clinton, Assis*t Inspector-General. 
Brig.-Gen. Wilmon W. Blackmar, of Boston, Judge-Advocate-Gen. 
Colonel Henry G. Parker, of Boston, AssisH Quartermaster- Gen. 
Brig.-Gen. William J. Dale, of North Andover, Surgeon-General. 
Colonel Joshua B. Treadwell, of Boston, Assis*t Surgeon-General. 

Aides-de- Camp. 

Colonel William V. Hutchings, .... Boston. 

Colonel William A. Tower, Lexington. 

Colonel Arthur T. Lyman, Boston. 

Colonel William P. Alexander, .... Springfield. 

Military Secretary. 
Colonel George H. Campbell, .... Boston. 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 



324 



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328 



SenatCj Arrangement of» 



ARRANGEMENT OF THE SENATE 



Hon. GEOROE B. LOEING, President, 



LEFT. 

1. Francis J. Parker. 

2. Francis D. Stedman. 

3. Eustace C. Fit2. 

4. E. C. Howard. 

5. Timothy J. Dacey. 

6. Henry W. Robinson. 

7. M. J. Flatley. 

8. Tilly Haynes. 

9. Charles Howes. 

10. Everett Robinson. 

11. Caleb Rand. 

12. Selwyn Z. Bowman. 

13. G^rge D. Robinson. 

14. Benjamin F. Wing. 

15. J. E. Fiske. 

16. William M. Gaylord. 

17. Byron Weston. 

18. Philip J. Tripp. 
19. 



RIGHT. 

1. John Sargent. 

2. George L. Davis. 

3. Albert Palmer. 

4. J. White Belcher. 

5. J. A. Harwood. 

6. Samuel D. Crane. 

7. E. A. Hunt. 

8. W. E. Livingston. 

9. Moses O. Ayres. 

10. Emery L. Bates. 

11. Peter M. Neal. 

12. Elisha Brimhall. 

13. John Cnmmings. 

14. Thomas F. Fitz Gerald. 

15. Horace H. Mayhew. 

16. Samuel S. Ginnodo. 

17. Edward L. Davis. 

18. Norman W. Shores. 

19. Jonathan Higglns. 

20. Hadyn Brown. 



Senate, Alphabetically. 



329 



SENATE, ALPHABETICALLY. 



Hon. GEORGE B. LORING (Second Essex District), 

PRESIDENT. 



Ayres, Moses O., . 
Bates, Emery L., . 
Belcher, J. W<hite, . 
Bowman, Selwyn Z., 
Brimhall, Elisha, . 
Brown, Haydn, 
Crane, Samuel D., . 
Cnmmings, John, . 
Dacey, Timothy J., 
Davis, Edward L., . 
Davis, George L., . 
Fiske, Joseph E., . 
Fitz, Eustace C, . 
Fitz Gerald, Thomas F., 
Flatley, M. J., 
Gaylord, William M., 
Ginnodo, Samuel S , 
Harwood, Joseph A., 
Haynes, Tilly, 
Biggins, Jonathan, . 



. Fourth Worcester 

. Third Worcester 

. Third Norfolk 

, Second Middlesex 

. Fifth Worcester 

. Fourth Essex 

. Fifth Suffolk 

. Sixth Middlesex 

. Second SuffoUc 

. First Worcester 

. Third Essex 

. Second Norfolk 

. First Suffolk 

. Sixth Suffolk 

. Third Suffolk 

. Hampshire 

. First Bristol 

. Fifth Middlesex 

. First Hampden 

. Cape 



District, 



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330 



Senate^ Alphabetically* 



Howard, Ezra 25i, . 
Howes, Charles, 
Hant, E. Atherton, 
Livingston, W. E., . 
Loring, George B., . 
May hew, Horace H., 
Neal, Peter M., 
Palmer, Albert, 
Parker, Francis J., . 
Hand, Caleb, . 
Robinson, George D., 
Robinson, Everett, . 
Robinson, Henry W., 
Sargent, John, 
Shores, Norman W., 
Stedman, Francis D., 
Tripp, Philip J., . 
Weston, Byron, 
Wing, Benjamin F., 



Island District* 

Fifth Essex 

Norfolk 4r Plymouth 

Seventh Middlesex 

Second Essex 

Franklin 

First Essex 

First Norfolk 

Fourth Middlesex 

First Middlesex 

Second Hampden^ 

First Plymouth 

Second Plymouth 

Third Middlesex 

Berkshire S^ Hampshire *• 

FouHh Suffolk 

Third Bristol 

Berkshire 

Second Bristol " 



(( 



(4 



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Note.— Second Worcester District not represented at time of pub- 
lishing the Manual. 



Officers of the Senate, 331 



OFFICERS OF THE SENATE. 



STEPHEN N. GIFFORD, Duxbury, . Clerk. 
HILTON F. HOSMER, Boston, . . Assistant Clerk, 
O. F. MITCHELL, Bridgewater, . . Sergeant-at-Arms, 
Rev. ISAAC DUNHAM, Bridgewater, Chaplain. 
S. W. EDGELL, . . . . . Doorkeeper. 
WILLIAM H. GRAVES, . . . Assistant Doorkeeper. 
WILLIAM H. JARVIS, . . . Messenger. 
PATRICK J. FEE, . . . . Messenger. 

J. C. ARMSTRONG Messenger. 

P. W. DUNNE, Messenger. 

W. H. GURNEY, Messenger. 

WILLIAM W. GRIFFIN, . . . Page. 
WILLIAM A. HODGDON, . . . Page. 



882 



House of Representatives^ 



HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, 

BY COUNTIES. 



COUNTY OF SUFFOLK. 



District. 



Name of Representative. 



Residence. 



l8t, . 



2d, . 



3d, . 



4th, . 



5th, . 



6th, . 



7th, . 



8th, . 



9th, . 



Andrew Hall, 
Henry B. Hill, . 
Ebenezer M. McFherson, 

Michael Carney, . 
Neil Doherty, 
Thomas Mooney, 

Thomas J. Oargan, 
Thomas L. Jenks, 
Nathaniel J. Rnst, 

Charles Hale, 
Samuel Talbot, Jr., 
Alexander Wadsworth, 

George A. Shaw, . 
John J. Murphy, . 
Michael Sullivan, 

Henry Lee, . 
David L. Webster, 
Robert D. Smith, 

Michael J. Croak, 
James F. Supple, 
Patrick Barry, 

C Daniel Noonan, . 
< William Woods, . 
C J. Franklin Appell, 

( Moses Kimball, . 
I James White, 



Boston. 
Boston. 
Boston. 

Boston. 
Boston. 
Boston. 

Boston. 
Boston. 
Boston. 

Boston. 
Boston. 
Boston. 

Boston. 
Boston. 
Boston. 

Boston. 
Boston. 
Boston. 

Boston. 
Boston. 
Boston. 

Boston. 
Boston. 
Boston. 

Boston. 
Boston. 



r" 



By Counties, 



833 



District. 



Kame of Represei iftxi*'* 



Residence. 



10th, . 

11th, . 

12th, . 
13th, . 



5 Joseph F. Paul, . 
I Albert E. Pillsbmy, 

Wallace F. Robinson, 
Stillman B. Allen, 
John H. Cook, 

5 Lyman S. Hapgood, 
I Alonzo "Warren, . 

Charles A. Rogers, 
Henry T. Holmes, 
Ensign Kimball, . 



Boston. 
Boston. 

Boston. 
Boston. 
Boston. 

Boston. 
Bostont 

Chelsea. 
Chelsea. 
Revere. 



COUNTY OF ESSEX. 



1st, 
2d, 

3d, 

4th, 
5th, 

6th, 

7th, 

8th, 



George W. Morrill, 
Enoch Sawyer, . 

Oliver T^lor, 
Jackson B. Swett, 
John B. Nichols, . 

Byron Truell, 
Edwin Ayer, 
Ebenezer Sawyer, 

Andrew Smith, . 

Sherman Nelson, 

Caleb B. Huse, . 
Michael Atkinson, 
Daniel D. Bailey, 

George Haskell, . 

John J. Babson, . 
Charles H. Pew, 2d, 
Daniel "W. Bartlett, 



Amesbnry. 
Salisbury. 

Haverhill. 
Haverhill. 
HaverhUl. 

Lawrence. 
Lawrence. 
Methuen. 

No. Andover. 

Georgetown. 

Newburyport. 
Newburyport. 
Newbury. 

Ipswich. 

Gloucester. 
Gloucester. 

Essex. 



884 



House of Representatives^ 



DlBtrlct. 



Name of Representative. 


Residence. 


• 

Henry Dennis, Jr 


Rockport. 


J John B.Hill, . . . . 
I David A. Preston, 


Beverly. 
Beverly. 


Charles B. Rce, .... 


Danvers. 


James £. T. Bartlett, . 


Peabody. 


J Charles S. Osgood, 
( Henry W. Putnam, . 


Salem. 
Salem. 


Henry G. Tnttle, . 


Salem. 


J John Freeto, .... 
I Nathaniel E. Lindsey, 


Marblehead. 
Marblehead. 


E. A. Ingalls, .... 


Lynn. 


Nathan M. Hawkes, . 


Lynn. 


Amos F. Breed, .... 


Lynn. 


Edwin Walden, .... 


Lynn. 


Otis M. Hitchings, 


Sangus. 



9th, . 

10th, . 

nth, . 
12th, . 

13th, . 

14th, . 

15th, . 

16th, . 
17th, . 
18th, . 
19th, . 
20th, . 



COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX. 



1st, . 


Francis E. Downer, . 


Boston. 


2d, . 


5 Benjamin F. Stacey, . 

I John B. Norton, .... 


Boston. 
Boston. 


» 
3d, 


5 Samuel D. Sawin, 

I Joseph W. Hill, .... 


Boston. 
Boston. 


4th, . 


C Charles G. Pope, 

< Theodore N. Foque, . 

C Alonzo H. Evans, 


Somerville. 

Maiden. 

Everett. 



By Counties. 



335 



District. 

1 


Name of Kepresentative. 


Besidence. 


5th, . 


Daniel W. Lawrence, . 




Mcdford. 


6th, . 


Samuel D. Hicks, 






Arlington. 


7th, . 


Solomon S. Sleeper, 






Cambridge. 


8th, . 


r Austin C. Wellington, 
< Leander M. Hannum, 
C Edward Kendall, 






Cambridge. 
Cambridge. 
Cambridge. 


9th, . 


Jeremiah W. Coveney, 






Cambridge. 


10th, . 


5 Isaac T. Burr, 
I Levi C. Wade, . 






Newton. 
Newton. 


nth, . 


Edward Whitney, 






Belmont. 


12th, . 


Frederick M. Stone, . 






Waltham. 


13th, . 


Warren A. Bird, . 






Natick. 


14th, . 


Ira W . Hoffman, . 






Holliston. 


15th, . 


E. A. Bates, 






Hopkinton. 


16th, . 


Frederick W. Clapp, . 






Framiugham. 


17th, . 


William A. Alley, . 






Marlborough. 


18th, . 


Edwin Amsden, . 






Hudson. 


19th, . 


Jonas S. Hunt, . 






Sudbury. 


20th, . 


Edward Cobum, . 






Weston. 


21st, . 


Webster Smith, . 






Lexington. 


22d, . 


Charles S. Converse, . 






Wobum. 


23d, . . 


5 Thomas Winship, 
\ Onslow Gilmore, . 






Wakefield. 
Stoneham. 


24th, . 


Charles H. Danforth, . 


« 


• 


Reading. 



336 



House of Representatives^ 



District 


Name of Bepresentative. 


Residence. 


25th, . 


John Knowles, .... 


Billerica. 


26th, . 


^ Charles A. F. Swan, . 
I John R. Southwick, . 


Lowell. 
Lowell. 


27th, . . 


ThomaR R. Garity, • . 


Lowell. 


28th, . 


Joel Knapp, 


Lowell. 


29th, . 


James D. Hartwell, . 


Lowell. 


30th, . 


James C. Woodward, . 


Dunstable. 


3l8t, . 


Amos J. Saunders, 


Pepperell. 


32d, . . 


Samuel Longley, .... 


Shirley. 



COUNTY OF WORCESTER. 



Ist, . 


Charles A. Loud, 


Winchendon. 


2d, . . 


William W. Fish, 


Athol. 


3d, . . 


H. C. Knowlton, .... 


Gardner. 


4th, . 


5 Henry S. Miner, .... 
\ S. S. Gleason, .... 


Phillipston. 
Hubbardston. 


5th, . 


C Henry F. Coggshall, . . • . 
< Francis C. Bo wen, 
C Adin C. Estabrook, 


Fitchburg. 

Leominster. 

Lunenburg. 


6th, . 


Jonathan C. Richmond, 


Harvard. 


7th, . . 


E. C. Shattuck, .... 


Berlin. 


8th, . 


George F. Howe, 


W. Boylston. 


9th, . 


Frederick Parker, 


Princeton. 



By Counties. 



337 



District. 



Name of Representative. 



Residence. 



10th, . 

r 

11th, . 

12th, . 

13th, . 

14th, . 

16th, . 

16th, . 

17tb, . 

18th, . 



c John W. Wetherell, 
< Samuel R. Hey wood, 
C John D. Washbnm, 

Oscar Bradley, Jr., 
Jeremiah Murphy, 
. Matthew J. McCafferty, 

John F. Searle, . 

B. Alden Nourse, 

Wesley L. Fiske, 

George G. Parker, 

Patrick Kennedy, 

, Charles C. Capron, 

Frederick T. Chase, 
I Fi-ancis Bufjbee, . 
George F. Daniels, 

David Prouty, 
Andrus March, . 

Charles Fuller, . 
John Wetherbee, . 



Worcester. 
Worcester. 
Worcester. 

Worcester. 
Worcester. 
Worcester. 

Grafton. 

Westboro*. 

Upton. 

Milford. 

Blackstone. 

TJxbridge. 

Webster. 
Webster. 
Oxford. 

Spencer. 
Charlton. 

Sturbridge. 
Warren. 



COUNTY OF HAMPSHIRE. 



Ist, . 


1 

5 Mark H. Spaulding, . 

( Tiafayette Clapp, .... 


Northamptoii. 
Easthampton. 


2d, . 


Orrin Bryant, .... 


Chesterfield. 


8d, • . 


Horace Cook, • • . • 


Hadley. 


4th, . 


Newton Smith, .... 


So. Hadley. 


6th, . 


Monroe Keith, .... 


Granby. 


6th, . 


Addison Sandford, 


Ware. 



22 



338 



House of Representatives^ 



COUNTY OF HAMPDEN. 



Dlstiiet 


Name of Representative. 


Besldenoe. 


1st, . 


Bice M. Keynolds, 






Mouson. 


2d, . . 


Charles L. Gardner, 






Palmer. 


3d, . . 


, Stephen E. Seymour, 
l Charles W. Richards, 






Springfield. 
Springfield. 


4th, . 


James Abbe, 






Springfield. 


6th, . 


C. C. Merritt, 






Springfield. 


6th, . 


J E. L. Kirtland, . 
I Charles A. Taylor, 






Holyoke. 
Chicopee. 


7th, . . 


J John M. Gibbons, 
( Thomas F. Cordis, 






Granville. 
Lougmeadow. 


8th, . 


Reuben Noble, . 






Westfield. 


9th, . 


George W. Granger, . 






Tolland. 



COUNTY OF FRANKLIN. 



1st, • 


Edward F. Mayo* 


Warwick. 


2d, . 


Joseph H. Root, , , , . 


Montague. 


3d, . . 


5 Lysander N. Brownell, 
I Calvin W. Sbattuck, . 


Colrain. 
Colrain. 


4th, . 


5 Alanson K. Hawks, . 

^ Eliphaz H.'Wood, . • . 


Sbelbume, 
Whately. 


6th, . 


Alanson W. Ward, 


Buckland. 



i«^M^«Mfc-i»i ««rj^ttM 



By Counties. 



339 



COUNTY OF BERKSHIRE. 



District, 


Name of Representative. 


Residence. 


1st, . 


Harvey M. Owen, 


Lanesboro'. 


2d, . 


J Charles H. Read, 

( Dallas J. Dean, .... 


Adams. 
Adams. 


3d, . 


J Ensign H. Kellogg, . 
( Solomon N. Russell, . 


Pittsficld. 
Pittstield. 


4th, . 


Monroe E. Ballon, 


Becket. 


5th, . 


John G. \yilson, .... 


W. Stockb'ge. 


6th, . 

• 


John P. Clark, .... 


Lee. 


7th, , . 


William I. Van Deusen, . 


Gt.Barringt*n. 


8th, . 


Albert W. Curtiss, 


Sheffield. 



COUNTY OF NORFOLK. 



1st, 
2d, 

3d, 

4ai, 

Cth, 

6th, 
7th, 

8th, 



\ 



John Doggett Cobb, . 

Joseph S. Ropes, . 

William S. King, 
Henry W. Fuller, 
Ebenezer Adams, 

William Morae, . 

Frederick P. Moseley, 
Gardner A. Churchill, 

John D. tVhicher, 

James T. Stevens, 

Elon Sherman, . 
William S. Wallace, . 



Dedham. 

Boston. 

Boston. 
Boston. 
Boston. 

Boston. 

Boston. 
Boston. 

Quincy. 

Braintree. 

Weymouth. 
W eymouth. 



340 



House of Representatives^ 



District 


Name of Kepresentative. 


Besldence. 


9th, . 


Seth Mann, 2(1, . 


Randolph. 


10th, . 


Warren P. Bu'd, .... 


Stonghton. 


11th, . 


( Eiyah A. Morse, .... 
( Edward L. Pierce, 


Canton. 
Milton. 


12th, . 


J David A. Partridge, . 
( Joseph A. Kingsbury, , 


Medway. 
Foxborongh. 


13th, . 


Davis Thayer, Jr., 


Franklin. 


14th, . 


James Mackintosh, 


Needham. 


15th, . 


Moses Williams, Jr., . 


Brookline. 



COUNTY OF BRISTOL. 



1st, 

2d, 

3d, 

4tli, 

5th, 
6th, 

7th, 

8th, 
9th, 

10th, 



Henry C. Read, . 

George R. Perry, 

Joseph W. White, 

George C. Wilson, 
Frederick Hathaway, 
William Watts, . 

Herbert A. Dean, 

Washington Read, 

C George 0. Fairbanks, 
< Weaver Osborn, . 
C Albion K. Slade, . 

Benjamin Gifford, 

George R. Reed, . 

J Joseph Buckminstcr, 
( Benjamin S. Batchelor, 



Attleborough. 

Norton. 

Raynham. 

Taunton. 
Taunton. 
Taunton. 

Berkley. 

Freetown. 

Fall River. 
Fall River. 
Fall River. 

Westport. 

Dartmouth. 

New Bedford. 
New Bedford. 



By Counties, 



341 



District. 


Name of Representative. 


Residence. 


11th, . 
12th, . 


J Hosea M. Knowlton, . 

( Giles G. Barker, .... 

Benjamin "White, 


New Bedford. 
New Bedford. 

Acushnet. 



COUNTY OF PLYMOUTH. 



1st, 




George W. Merritt, 


Scituate. 


2d, 




John D. Long, .... 


Hingham. 


3d, 




Joseph T. Hartt, .... 


So. Scituate. 


4th, 




Curtis B. Goodsell, 


Marshfield. 


5th, 




Eleazer E. Waterman, 


Kingston. 


6th, 




5 John Morissey, .... 
( Stephen C. Phinney, . 


Plymouth. 
Plymouth. 


7th, 




Isaac N. Hathaway, . 


Marion. 


8th, . 




Weston Howland, 


Mattapoisett. 


9th, . 




Isaac Winslow, .... 


Middleboro*. 


10th, . 




Ambrose Keith, .... 


Bridgewater. 


nth, . 




< Ziba C. Keith, .... 
I Isaac N. Nutter, .... 


Brockton. 
E. Bridgew*r. 


12th, . 


» « 


J George W. Reed, 

( Jesse H. Jones, .... 


So. Abington. 
Abington. 



COUNTY OF BARNSTABLE. 



1st, 



Isaac N. Keith, 
Samuel Snow, 
Daniel Wing, 



Sandwich. 

Barnstable. 

Yarmouth. 



342 



Representatives by Counties. 



District. 


Name of Representative. 


Besidence. 


2d, . 
3d, . 
4th, . 


J Luther Fisk,' .... 
/ Elisha Crocker, Jr., . 

Freeman Doane, .... 

J Isaiah A. Small, .... 
( Noah Swett, .... 


Dennis. 
Brewster. 

Orleans. 

Provincet'wn. 
Wellfleet. 



DUKES COUNTY. 



1st, 



Richard HoUey, . 



Edgartown. 



COUNTY OF NANTUCKET. 



1st, 



Joseph Mitchell, 2d, . 



• • 



Nantucket. 



House of Representatives. 



343 



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Bepresentativea, arranged by Seats. 361 



LIST OF REPRESENTATIVES, 



As Abranged by Seats. 



No. Nahb. 


No. 


1. 


29. 


2. Lee, of Boston. 


30. 


3. Adams, of Boston. 


31, . 


4. Morse, of Canton. 


32. 


5. Coveney, of Cambridge. 


33. 


6. Knowles, of Billerica. 


34. . 


7. Evans, of Everett. 


35. 


8. Pillsbury, of Boston. 


36. 


9. Bowen, of Leominster. 


37. 


10. Murphy, of Worcester. 


38. 


11. Pierce, of Milton. 


39. 


12. Load, of Winchendon. 


40. 


13. Fuller, of Boston. 


41.. 


14. Webstei:, of Boston. 


42. 


15.- Cordis, of Longmeadow. 


43. 


16. Bird, of Natick. 


44. 


17. Hannum, of Cambridge. 


45. 


18. Tmell, of Lawrence. 


46. 


19. Supple, of Boston. 


47. 


20. Capron, of Uxbridge. 


48. 


21. Rust, of Boston. 


49. 


22. Hoffman, of Holliston. 


50. 


23. Gardner, of Palmer. 


51. 


24. Wadsworth, of Boston. 


52. 


25. Hill, H. B., of Boston. 


53. 


26. McPherson, of Boston. 


54. 


27. Rogers, of Chelsea. 


55. 


28. Keith, of Bridgewater. 


56. 



Name. 
Sawyer, of Salisbury. 
Barry, of Boston. 
Allen, of Boston. 
Saunders, of Pepperell. 
Swan, of Lowell. 
Alley, of Marlborough. 
Kimball, of Boston. 
Knowlton, of N. Bedford. 
Jones, of Abington. 
Haskell, of Ipswich. 
Washburn, of Worcester. 
Williams, of Brookline. 
Sleeper, of Cambridge. 
Small, of Provincetown. 
Wellington, of Cambridge. 
Mann, of Randolph. 
Longley, of Shirley. 
Sawyer, of Methucn. 
Norton, of Boston. 
Winship, of Wakefield. 
Kendall, of Cambridge. 
Brownell, of Colrain. 
Ingalls, of Lynn. 
King, of Boston. 
Talbot, of Boston. 
White, of Boston. 
Smith, of Boston. 
Sawin, of Boston. 



362 BepresefrUatwes^ arranged by Seats. 



No. Nake. 

57. Swett, of Haverhill. 

58. Whicher, of Quincy. 

59. Owen, of LaneBborough. 

60. Shaw, of Boston. 

61. Cobb, ofDedham. 

62. Chase, of Webster. 

63. White, of Acushnet. 

64. Ballon, of Becket. 

65. Hnse, of Newburyport. 

66. Parker, of Milford. 

67. Osborne, of Fall River. 

68. Merritt, of Scituate. 

69. Parker, of Princeton. 

70. Shattnck, of Colrain. 

71. Reynolds, of Monson. 

72. Paul, of Boston. 

73. Doane, of Orleans. 

74. Woods, of Boston. 

75. Ropes, of Boston. 

76. Rice, of Danvers. 

77. Richmond, of Harvard. 

78. Fisk, of Dennis. 

79. Noonan, of Boston. 

80. Churchill, of Boston. 

81. Atkinson, of Newburyport. 

82. Downer, of Boston. 

83. Hawkes, of Lynn. 

84. Knapp, of Lowell. 

85. Fairbanks, of Fall River. 

86. Hill, J. W., of Boston. 

87. Danforth, of Reading. 

88. Heywood, of Worcester. 

89. Howland, of Mattapoisett. 

90. Keith, of Sandwich. 

91. Holmes, of Chelsea. 

92. Bird, of Stoughton. 

93. Prouty, of Spencer. 

94. Slade, of Fall River. 



No. Name. 

95. Lindsey, of Marblehead. 

96. Clark, of Lee. 

97. Fuller, of Sturbridge. 

98. Hitchings, of Saugus. 

99. 61ea6on,of Hubbardston. 

100. Dean, of Berkley. 

101. Read, of Freetown. 

102. Garlty, of Lowell. 

103. Howe, of West Boylston. 

104. Kennedy, of Blackstone. 

105. Sandford, of Ware. 

106. Bartlett, of Peabody. 

107. Winslow, of Middleboro*. 

108. Buckminster, of F. Rirer. 

109. Giflford, of Westport. 

110. Appell, of Boston. 

111. Hicks, of Arlington. 

112. Bugbee, of Webster. 

113. Gargan, of Boston. 

114. Stacey, of Boston. 

115. Walden, of Lynn. 

116. Bailey, of Newbury. 

117. Tuttle, of Salem. 

118. Converse, of Wobum. 

119. Watts, of Taunton. 

120. Richards, of Springfield. 

121. HoUey, of Edgartown. 

122. Cook, of Boston. 

123. Morrill, of Amesbnry. 

124. Mackintosh, of Needhatn. 

125. Granger, of Tolland. 

126. Osgood, of Salem. 

127. Mitchell, of Nantucket. 

128. Murphy, of Boston. 

129. Southwick, of Lowell. 

130. Hartwell, of Lowell. 

131. Root, of Montague. 

132. Breed, of Lynn. 



B^presentatives^ arranged by Seats. 863 



Ko. 


Name. 


No. 


133. 


Van Densen, of Great Bar- 


170. 




rington. 


171. 


134. 


Lawrence, of Medford. 


172. 


135. 


Carney, of Boston. 


173. 


136. 


Stone, of Waltliam. 


174. 


137. 


Dennis, of Rockport. 


175. 


138. 


Morissey, of Plymouth. 


176. 


139. 


Nelson, of Georgetown. 


177. 


140. 


Pew, of Gloucester. 


178. 


141. 


Merritt, of Springfield. 


179. 


142. 


McCaflferty, of Worcester. 


180. 


143. 


Jenks, of Boston. 


181. 


144. 


Hathaway, of Taunton. 


182. 


145: 


Sherman, of Weymouth. 


183. 


146. 


Freeto, of Marblehead. 


184. 


147. 


Hapgood, of Boston. 


185. 


148. 


Hunt, of Sudbury. 


186. 


149. 


Hale, of Boston. 


187. 


150. 


Putnam, of Salem. 


188. 


151. 


Sullivan, of Boston. 


189. 


152. 


Daniels, of Oxford. 


190. 


153. 


Hathaway, of Marion. 


191. 


154. 


Bartlett, of Essex. 


192. 


155. 


Batchelor, of N. Bedford. 


193. 


156. 


Cobum, of Weston. 


194. 


157. 


Goodsell, of IVIarshfield. 


195. 


158. 


Robinson, of Boston. 


196. 


159. 


Paitridge, of Medway. 


197. 


160. 


Wetherell, of Worcester. 


198. 


161. 


Hall, of Boston. 


199. 


162. 


March, of Charlton. 


200. 


163. 


Miner, of Phillipston. 


201. 


164. 


Smith, of South Hadley. 


202. 


165. 


Smith, of Lexington. 


203. 


166. 


Kellogg, of Pittsfleld. 


204. 


167. 


Coggshall, of Fitchburg. 


205. 


168. 


Whitney, of Belmont. 


206. 


169. 


Foque, of Maiden. 


207. 



NAmt. 
Wood, of Whately. 
Cnrtiss, of Sheffield. 
Knowlton, of Gardner. 
Nichols, of Haverhill. 
Keith, of Brockton. 
Moseley, of Boston. 
Gilmore, of Stoneham. 
Read, of Attleborough. 
Kirtland, of Holyoke. 
Wetherbee, of Warren. 
Searle, of Grafton. 
Fish, of Athol. 
Woodward, of Dunstable. 
Wallace, of Weymouth. 
Morse, of Boston. 
Taylor, of Chicopee. 
Clapp, of Easthampton. 
White, of Raynham. 
Cook, of Hadley. 
Clapp, of Framingham. 
Kimball, of Revere. 
Smith, of No. Andover. 
Hill, of Beverly. 
Keith, of Granby. 
Bryant, of Chesterfield. 
Wilson, of Taunton. 
Doherty, of Boston. 
Babson, of Gloucester. 
Hartt, of South Scituate. 
Estabrook, of Lunenburg. 
Bates, of Hopkinton. 
Ayer, of Lawrence. 
Phinney, of Plymouth. 
Shattuck, of Berlin. 
Nourse, of Westborough. 
Mooney, of Boston. 
Seymour, of Springfield. 
Taylor, of Haverhill. 



364 Representative^^ arranged by Seats, 



1 



No. Name. 

208. Kingsbury, of Foxboro'. 

209. Abbe, of Springfield. 

210. Reed, of So. Abiugton. 

211. Dean, of Adams. 

212. Wilson, of W.Stockbridge. 

213. Russell, of Pittsfield. 

214. Spaulding, of Northampton. 

215. Perry, of Norton. 

216. Thayer, of Franklin. 

217. Snow, of Barnstable. 

218. Read, of Adams. 

219. Barker, of New Bedford. 

220. Noble, of Westfleld. 

221. Nutter, of E. Bridge water. 

222. Burr, of Newton. 

223. Bradley, of Worcester. 



No. Name. 

224. Reed, of Dartmouth. 

225. Preston, of Beverly. 

226. SteTens, of Braintree. 

227. Wade, of Newton. 

228. Ward, of Buckland. 
229 Hawks, of Shelbnrne. 

230. Swett, ofWellfleet. 

231. Fiske, of Upton. 

232. Gibbons, of Granville. 

233. Mayo, of Warwick. 

234. Amsden, of Hudson. 

235. Croak, of Boston. 

236. Crocker, of Brewster. 

237. Waterman, of Kingston. 

238. Warren, of Boston. 



OFFICERS OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. 



GEORGE A. MARDEN, Lowell, . 

WM. s: SOUTHWORTH, Lowell, 

O. F. MITCHELL, Bridgewater, . 

Rey. ROB'T G. SEYMOUR, Boston, 

THOMAS J. TUCKER, Jr., 

EMERSON D. LAW, . 

E. M. ALEXANDER, . 

J. H. BREWSTER, 

THOMAS PLUNKETT, . 

EZRA T. POPE, . 

JOHN E. GILMAN, 

FRED. A. THAYER, . 

JOHN E. KILLIAN, 

J. OTIS WARDWELL, . 

CHARLES W. PHILBRICK, 

JAMES A. ATHY, . 

NAHUM M. TRIBOU, . 



. Clerk, 

. Assistant Clerk, 

. Serffeant'CU-Arms. 

. Chaplain. 

. Doorkeeper, 

. Assistant Doorkeeper. 

. Postmaster. 

. Messenger. 

, Messenger, 

, Messenger, 

. Messenger, 

, Messenger, 

, Messenger. 

, Messenger. 

. Messenger. 

. Page, 

. Page. 



MONITORS. 



First Division, .< 
Second Division, 5 
Third Division, . < 
Fourth Division, \ 
Fifth Division, ,\ 
Sixth Division, .< 



Messrs. ALLEY, of Marlborough, and 
BARRY, of Boston. 

Messrs. KENNEDY, of Blackstone, and 
DEAN, of Berkley. 

Messrs. GLEASON, of Hubbardston, and 
CLARK, of Lee. 

Messrs. LINDSEY, of Marblehead, and 
BIRD, of Stoughton. 

Messrs. HOLMES, of Chelsea, and 
DANFORTH, of Reading. 

Messrs. SUPPLE, of Boston, and 
CORDIS, of Longmeadow. 



COMMITTEES. . 



STANDING COMMIHEES OF THE SENATE. 



On the Judiciary. 

Messrs. Robinson, of Hampden. 

Dacey, % of Suffolk, 

Bowman, of Middlesex, 

£. Robinson, . , , , of Plymouth, 

Shores, of Berkshire, 

On Peobate and Chancery. 

Messrs. Robinson, of Hampden, 

HSggins, of the Cape District, 

E. Robinson, .... 0/ Plymouth, 

On the Treasury. 

Messrs. Cummings, of Middlesex, 

Belcher, of Norfolk, 

Livingston of Middlesex, 

On Bills in the Third Beading. 

Messrs. Fiske, of Norfolk, 

Fitss Gerald, of Suffolk, 

Brown, of Essex, 

Mayhew, of Franklin, 

Wing, of Bristol, 

On Engrossed Bills. 

Messrs. Belcher, of Norfolk, 

Ayres, of Worcester, 

Neal, of Essex, 

On Leaye of Absence. 

Messrs. Ayres, of Worcester. 

Bates, of Worcester, 

Shores, of Berkshire. 

24 



370 Standing Committees of the House. 



STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE HOUSE. 



On the Judiciary. 

Messrs. Fierce, of Milton. 

Hale, of Boston, 

. Gardner of Palmer. 

Smith of Boston, 

Washburn, of Worcester. 

Allen, of Boston. 

Hawkes, of Lynn, 

On Probate and Cuancert. 

Messrs. McCafferty, of Worcester. 

Fuller, of Boston. 

Swan, of LotoeU, 

Gargan, of Boston, 

Parker, of Milford. 

Seymour, of Springfield, 

Cobb, of Dedham, 

On Finance. 

Messrs. Kimball, of Boston. 

Hust, of Bo^on. 

Breed, of Lynn. 

Nichols, of Haverhill, 

Loud, of Winchendon. 

Converse, of Wobwm, 

Bean, of Adams, 

On Elections. 

Messrs. Pillsbury, of Boston, 

Sleeper, of Cambridge, 

Ward, of Bwkland, 

Hartt, of South Scituate, 

Downer, of Boston. 

Capron, ,,',,,, of Uxbridge, 

"Dean, of Berkley. 



Standing Committees of the House. 371 

On Bills in the Third Reading. 

Messrs. Pope, of Somerville, 

Perry, of Norton. 

Fuller, of Sturbtidge, 

Ballon, of Becket, 

Hoffman, of HolUston, 

Goodsell, of Marahfield, 

Tnttle, of Salem. 



On Engrossed Bills. 

Messrs. Wing, of Yarmouth. 

Sullivan, of Boston. 

White, of Raynham. 

Gibbons, of Granville. 

Fish, of Athol. 

Winslow, of Middleborottffh. 

Bird, of Natick. 



On County Estimates. 

Messrs. Small, of Provincetoum. 

. Hunt, of Svdbwy. 

Wood, of Wfiotely. 

Fiske, of Upton. 

Hitchings, of Saugtu. 

Kingsbury, of Foxborougk. 

Smith, ...... of South Hadley. 



On the Pay-Roll. 

Messrs. Wallace, of Weymouth. 

Gilmore of Stoneham. 

Read, of Attleborough. 

Bartlett of Peabody. 

March, of Charlton. 

Owen, of Lanediorouffh. 

Amsden, of Hudson. 



372 Standing Committees of the House. 

On Leave op Absence. 

Messrs. Bates, of Hopkinton. 

Reed, of DartmotUh. 

Freeto, of Marhlehead, 

Wetherbee, of Warren. 

Hathaway, of Taunton. 

Doane, of Orleans. 

Wilson, of West Stockbridge. 

On Public Buildings. 

Messrs. Hammm, of Cambridge. 

Doherty, of Boston. 

Preston, of Beverly. 

Keith, of Bridgewater. 

Hicks, of Arlington. 

Bugbee, ...... of Webster. 

Bryant, of Chester/hid. 

On Rules and Orders. 

Messrs. Hale, of Boston. 

Kimball, of Boston. 

Kellogg, of Pittsfeld. 

Pierce, of Milton. 

Noble, of Westjleld. 

Gargan, of Boston. 

Osgood, of Salem. 



t 



Special Committee, raised by Order op the House, on 
State Salaries and Expenditures. 

Messrs. Miner, of PhilHpston. 

Nutter, of East Bridgewater. 

Wade, of Newton. 

Ingalls, of Lynn. 

Partridge, of Medway, 



Joint Standing Committees. 373 



JOINT STANDING COMMITTEES. 



On Agriculture. 

Of the Senate. — Messrs. Harwood, of Middlesex, and 

Tripp, of Bristol. 

Of the Howe. — Messrs. Mayo, of Warwick, 

Smith, of Lexington, 
Granger, of Tolland, 
Nourse, of Westborough, and 
Mackintosh of Needham. 

On Banks and Banking. 

Of the Senate. — Messrs. Cummings, of Middlesex, 

Brimhall, of Worcester, and 
Parker, of Middlesex. 

Of the flbt«e.— Messrs. Babson, of Gloucester, 

Burr, of Newton, 
Stone, of Waltham, 
Evans, of Everett, 
Hapgood, of Boston, 
Lee, of Boston, 
Wetherell, of Worcester, and 
Osbom, of Fall River. 

On Claims. 

Of the Senate. — Messrs. Davis, of Essex, 

H. W. Robinson, of Plymouth, and 
Palmer, of Norfolk. 

Of the flbt««.— Messrs. H. B. Hill, of Boston, 

Miner, of Phillipston, 
Saunders, of Pepperell, 
Croak, of Boston, 
Webster, of Boston, 
Whitney, of Belmont, 
Buckminster, of New Bedford, and 
Hawks, of Shelbume. 



374 Joint Standing Committees. 

On Education. 

Of the Senate, — Messrs. Sargent, of Middlesex, and 

Crane, of Suffolk. 
Of the House, — Messrs. Kice, of Danvers, 

Clapp, of Eastbampton, 

White, of Boston, 

Wilson, of Taanton, and 

Keith, of Granby. 

On Federal Relations. 

Of the Senate, — Messrs. Palmer, of Norfolk, and 

Dayis, of Worcester. 

Of the House, — Messrs. Morissey, of Plymouth, 

Pillsbury, of Boston, 
Holmes, of T)helsea, 
Parker, of Milford, and 
Searle, of Grafton. 

On the Fisheries. 

Of the iS^no^e.— Messrs. Higgins, of the Cape Disti'ict, and 

Howes, of Essex. 

Of the House, — Messrs. Dennis, of Rockport, 

Fisk, of Dennis, 
McPherson, of Boston, 
Merritt, of Scituate, and 
HoUey, of Edgartown. 

On Harbors. 

Of the Senate,^MeBBTB, Fitz, of Suffolk, 

Howard, of the Island District, and 
Wing, of Bristol. 

Of the House, — Messrs. Rogers, of Chelsea, 

Jenks, of Boston, 
Mitchell, of Nantucket, 
Gifford, of Westport, 
Kendall, of Cambridge, 
Atkinson, of Newburyport, 
Hall, of Boston, and 
Hathaway, of Marion. 



Joint Standing Committees, 375 

On Insurance. 

Of the Senate, — Messrs. Hunt, of Norfolk, and 

Stedman, of Suffolk. 

Of the House, — Messrs. Paul, of Boston, 

Coyeney, of Cambridge, 
Knowlton, of New Bedford, 
Howe, of West Boylston, and 
Foque, of Maiden. 

On the Librart. 

Of the Senate,-^Messrs, Sargent, of Middlesex, 

Wing, of Bristol, and 

Shores, of Berkshire. 
Of the tiouae. — Messrs. Winship, of Wakefield, 

Sherman, of Weymouth, and 

Daniels, of Oxford. 

On Manvpactures. 

Of the Senate, — Messrs. Davis, of Essex, and 

Livingston, of Middlesex. 

Of the House, — Messrs. Chase, of Webster, 

Reynolds, of Monson, 
Morrill, of Amesbury, 
Partridge, of Medway, and 
Morse, of Canton. 

On Mercantile Affairs. 

Of the Senate, — Messrs. Crane, of Suffolk, 

Ayres, of Worcester, and 

Hand, of Middlesex. 
Of the flbtwa.— Messrs. Truell, of Lawrence, 

McPherson, of Boston, 

Shattnck, of Colrain, 

Wade, of Newton, 

Kirtland, of Holyoke, 

Stacey, of Boston, 

Thayer, of Franklin, and 

Longley, of Shirley. 



376 Joint Standing Committees, 

On Militabt Apfairs. 

Of the Senate,— lAtEETS, Fiske, of Norfolk, 

Davis, of Essex, and 
Weston, of Berkshire. 

Of the Souse. — Messrs. King, of Boston, 

Wellington, of Cambridge, 
Talbot, of Boston, 
Pew, of Gloucester, 
Wetherell, of Worcester, 
Lee, of Boston, 
Ingalls, of Lynn, and 
Swett, of Wellfleet. 



On Parishes and Religious Societies. 

Of the Sena<0.— Messrs. Belcher, of Norfolk, and 

Sargent, of Middlesex. 

Of the House. — Messrs. Slade, of Fall River, 

Murphy, of Boston, 
Bowen, of Leominster, 
Crocker, of Brewster, and 
Waterman, of Kingston. 

On Printing. 

Of the Senate. — Messrs. Fitz, of Suffolk, and 

Rand, of Middlesex. 

Of the Souse. — ^Messrs. Noonan, of Boston, 

Putnam, of Salem, 
Huse, of Newburyport, 
Sandford, of Ware, and 
Stevens, of Braintree. 



On Prisons. 

Of tJie Senate. — Messrs. Howard, of the Island District, 

Flatley, of Suffolk, and 
Tripp, of Bristol. 



Joint Standing Committees, Zll 

Of the JToiwc— Messrs. J. W. Hill, of Boston, 

Keith; of Brockton, 
Merritt, of Springfield, 
Appell, of Boston, 
Batchelor, of New Bedford, 
Nelson, of Georgetown, 
Watts, of Taunton, and 
Garity, of Lowell. 

On Public Charitable Institutions. 

Of the Senate. — Messrs. Stedman, of Safiblk, 

Belcher, of Norfolk, and 
Harwood, of Middlesex. 

Of the House, — Messrs. Kellogg, of Pittsfield, 

Reed, of South Abington, 
Churchill, of Boston, 
Haskell, of Ipswich, 
Carney, of Boston, 
Woods, of Boston, 
Bailey, of Newbury, and 
Barker, of New Bedford. 

On Public Lands. 

Of the Senate.^-MesBia, Bates, of Worcester, and 

Mayhew, of Franklin. 

Of the House. — Messrs. Cook, of Hadley, 

Parker, of Princeton, 
Howland, of Mattapoisett, 
Taylor, of Chicopee, and 
Cobum, of Weston. 

On Railroads. 

Of the S«ia<€.— Messrs. Palmer, of Norfolk, 

Haynes, of Hampden, and 
Davis, of Worcester. 



378 Joint Standing Committees. 

Of the House, — Messrs. Williams, of Brookline, 

Fairbanks, of Fall River, 
Heywood, of Worcester, 
Knapp, of Lowell, 
Noble, of Westfield, 
Osgood, of Salem, 
Moseley, of Boston, and 
Sawin, of Boston. 

On Roads and Bridges. 

Of the Senate. — Messrs. Howes, of Essex, and 

Gaylord, of Hampshire. 

Of the Hou8e,^-Me68TS, Kimball, of Revere, 

Woodward, of Dunstable, 
Read, of Freetown, 
Murphy, of Worcester, and 
Bartlett, of Essex. 

On the State House. 

Of the Senate.— Messrs. H. W. Robinson, of Plymouth, and 

Flatley, of Suffolk. 

Of the House, — Messrs. Adams, of Boston, 

Richmond, of Harvard, 
Norton, of Boston, 
Taylor, of Haverhill, and 
Spaulding, of Northampton. 

On Street Railways. 

Of the Senate, — Messrs. Hunt, of Norfolk and Plymouth, 

Brown, of Essex, and 
Fitz Gerald, of Suffolk. 

Of the Hotise. — Messrs. Shaw, of Boston, 

Barry, of Boston, 
Abbe, of Springfield, 
Cook, of Boston, 
Ayer, of Lawrence, 
Whicher, of Quincy, 
Hartwell, of Lowell, and 
Noonan, of Boston. 



Joint Standing Committees. 379 

On Towns. 

Of the Senate, — Messrs. Ginnodo, of Bristol, and 

Weston, of Berkshire. 
Of the House, — Messrs. Walden, of Lynn, 

Mann, of Randolph, 

Root, of Montagae, 

Snow, of Barnstable, and 

Russell, of Pittsfield. 

On Water-Supplt and Drainage. 

Of the S«iflrfc.— Messrs. Haynes, of Hampshire, 

Neale, of Essex, and 
Parker, of Middlesex. 

Of the flbM«€.— Messrs. Ropes, of Boston, 

Sawyer, of Methuen, 
Phinney, of Plymouth, 
Lawrence, of Medford, 
"Warren, of Boston, 
Clapp, of Framingham, 
White, of Acushnet, and 
Southwick, of Lowell. 



380 Joint Special Committees. 



JOINT SPECIAL COMMITTEES. 



On the Several Portions of the GKovemor's Address. 

On the Hoosac Tunnel. 

Of the Senate, — Messrs. Bowman, of Middlesex, 

May hew, of Franklin, and 
Fitz, of Suffolk. 

Of the House. — Messrs. Stone, of Waltham, 

Bradley, of Worcester, 
Keith, of Sandwich, 
Robinson, of Boston, 
Burr, of Newton, 
"Wadsworth, of Boston, 
Coggshall, of Fitchburg, and 
Bead, of Adams. 

On the Liquor Law. 

Of the Senate. — Messrs. Stedman, of Suffolk, 

Ginnodo, of Bristol, and 
Bates, of Worcester. 

Of the House. — Messrs. Fuller, of Boston, 

Hill, of Beverly, 
Nutter, of East Bridgewater, 
Gargan, of Boston, 
Knowlton, of New Bedford, 
Shattuck, of Berlin, 
Van Deusen, of Great Barrington, and 
Smith, of North Andover. 



1 

Joint Special Committees, 381 

On Statistics. 

Of the Senate. — Messrs. Brown, of Essex, 

Higgins, of the Cape District, and 

Fitz Gerald, of Suffolk. 
Of the House. — Messrs. Truell, of Lawrence, 

Jones, of Abington, 

Prouty, of Spencer, 

Knowlton, of Gardner, 

Ropes, of Boston, 

Richards, of Springfield, 

Morse, of Boston, and 

Sawyer, of Salisbury. 

On Constitutional Amendment». 

Of the 8enate.^Ues8T8. Robinson, of Hampden, 

Dacey, of Essex, 

Bo^vman, of Middlesex, 

E.'^^Robinson, of Plymouth, and 

Shores, of Berkshire. 
Of the Hotue.-^MessYB. Pierce, of Milton, 

Hale, of Boston, 

Gardner, of Palmer, 

Smith, of Boston, 

Washburn, of Worcester, 

Allen, of Boston, and 

Hawkes, of Lynn. 

On Woman Suffbage. 

Of the Senate— Messrs. Neal, of Essex, 

Ginnodo, of Bristol, and 

Fiske, of Norfolk. 
Of the House. '^Messrs. Stone, of Waltham, 

Jones, of Abington, 

Wade, of Newton, 

Osborn, of Fall River, 

Bowen, of Leominster, 

Rice, of Danvers, 

Knowles, of Billerica, and 

Rogers, of Chelsea. 



382 Joint Special Committees. 

On Redistrictino the State. 

Of the Senate/— Messrs. Crane, of Suffolk, 

Howes, of Essex, 
Harwood, of Middlesex, 
Brimhall, of Worcester, 
H. W. Robinson, of Plymouth, 
Gaylord, of Hampshire, and 
Weston, of Berkshire. 

Of the fliott*^.— Messrs. Kellogg, of Pittsfield, 

Hale, of Boston, 
Fairbanks, of Fall River, 
Swett, of Haverhill, 
Paul, of Boston, 
McCafferty, of Worcester, 
Whitney, of Belmont, 
Noble, of Westfleld, 
Pierce, of Milton, 
Jenks, of Boston, 
Clapp, of Easthampton, 
Norton, of Boston, 
Hill, of Beverly, 
Clapp, of Framingham, 
Fisk, of Dennis, 
Cui*tis8, of Sheffield, 
Heywood, of Worcester, 
Nutter, of East Bridgcwater, 
Seymour, of Springfield, 
Estabrook, of Lunenburg, 
Brownell, of Colrain, 
Fish, of Athol, 
Knowles, of Billerica, and 
Hall, of Boston. 



REPORTERS. 



IN THE SENATE. 



FRANK H. FORBES, . 
GEORGE C. BURPEE, . 
WILLIAM B. SMART, . 
F. I. GRAY, . 



THOMAS BRADLEY, 
A. M. BRIDGMAN, 



Boston Traveller* 
Boston Post, 
Boston Transcript, 
Boston Advertiser. 
Boston Herald. 
Boston Journal, 
Springfield Republican, 



WILLIAM B. SMART, . 

STEPHEN O'MEARA, . 

JAMES P. BACON, 
E. W. HAZEWELL, 
FRED. P. BACON, . 
A. M. BRIDGMAN, 



IN THE HOUSE. 

Boston Poet. 



. \ 



Boston Transcript* 
Boston Journal, 
Boston Herald. 
Boston Advertiser. 
Boston Traveller. 
Boston Globe, 
Springfield Republican* 



884 Assignment of Committee Rooms, 



ASSIGNMENT OF COMMITTEE ROOMS. 



EAST WING. 

BIGHT, ON ENTERIIfO FROM BEACON STREET. 

President of the Senate and Clerk of the Senate. 

{Bear of (he Senate CHamher.) 

No. 1. Clerk of the House. 

2. Committee on Mercantile Affairs. 

2. Committee on Insurance. 

3. Committee on the Fisheries. 

3. Committee on Public Lands. 

4. Committee on Harbors. 

6. Committee on the Judiciary. (Senate.) 
6. Committee on County Estimates. 

6. Committee on Roads and Bridges. 

7. Committee on Parishes and Eeligioas Societies. 
Committee on the Library. 

{In 1M L^rary.) 

Committee on the Hoosac Tnnnel Line of Bailroadd. 
Committee on Water-Supply and Drainage. 

{Boom J., BMemejvt.) 

Committee on Finance. 
Committee on Expenditures. 
Committee on the State House. 

{In Sergeant-at-Arma^ Qfflce.) 

Committee on the Labor Question. 
Committee on Towns. 

{In"SlueB9om,") 



1 



Assignment of Committee Booms. 385 



WEST WING. 



LEFT, ON ENTERING BEACON STREET. 



Speaker's Room between House and Council Chamber. 
No. 8. Committee on the Judiciary. (House.) 

9. Committee on Probate and Chancery. (House.) 

10. Committee on Kaih*oads. 
.1. Committee on Leave of Absence. 
.1. Committee on the Pay-Roll. 

11. Committee on Printing. 
L2. Committee on Education. 

L2. Committee on Probate and Chancery, (Senate.) 
L3. Committee on Banks and Banking. 

13. Committee on Manufactures. 
L4. Committee on Street Railways. 
L4. Committee on Claims. 

14. Committee on Military Aflfairs. 
L5. Committee on Public Charitable Institutions. 
L6. Committee on Elections. 
L6. Committee on Agriculture. 

Committee on Prisons. 

(In Room oppotite the AdJtUant-'GeneraVa Office.) 

Committee on the Liquor Law. 
Committee on Wotnan's Suffrage. 

(In the •* Green Boom.") 



25 



386 ' Notice to Members of the General Court, 



KOTICE TO MEMBERS OF THE GEXERAL COURT. 



STATE LIBRARY. 

The first section of the fifth chapter of the General Statutes 
provides that there shall be a State Library kept in the State 
House, for the use of the Governor, Lieutenant-Governor, the 
Council, the Senate, the House of Representatives, and such 
other officers of the Government and other persons as may from 
time to time be permitted to use the same. 

The Library is in the second story of the enlargement. 

REGULATIONS. 

The Library is open during the session of the Legislature, 
each day, without intermission, from. 9 a. m. to 5 p. m., except 
on Saturday p. m., when it is closed at 1 o'clock, for sweeping, 
dusting, etc. 

All persons may use the Library for consultation or reference. 

Members of the Legislature may enter any alcove»and consult 
or peruse any book at their pleasure. 

Members may take any of the miscellaneous books to their 
lodgings, and retain them for a reasonable time. 

The Statutes, Law Reports, State Papers, Journals, Diction- 
aries, Encyclopedias, etc., etc., may be taken to any part of the 
State House, but are not to be removed from it except in special 
cases. 

Any member wishing to have access to any or all parts of the 
Library, can be furnished with a key which will open every 
alcove, on application to one of the Assistants, the key to be 
returned before leaving the Library-room. 



Notice to Members of the General Court. 387 

Members taking books from the shelves are requested to be 
particularly careful to return them to their proper places, or to 
leave them on the tables, to be replaced by the attendants. 

No book is to be taken by a member from the library-room 
without its being charged to him. 

Books used at a hearing before a committee are to be charged 
to some member of the committee, or of the Legislature, and not 
to counsel or parties in the case pending. 

Any member having special occasion to use the Library in the 
evening, or at any hour after it is closed, can have access to it 
through one of the watchmen in charge of the building. 

OFFICERS. 

George O. Shattock, J. M. Manning, and Edwin P. Whipple, 
of Boston, Trustees; Joseph White, Librariatif ex officio; Sam- 
uel C. Jackson, Acting Librarian; Miss C. B. Jackson, Miss 
£. M. Sawyer, Assistants. 



AGpiCULTURAL LIBRARY. 

A valuable Agricultural Library, connected with the office of 
the Secretary of the Board of Agriculture, is also open at all 
hours of the day for the use of members of the Legislature. It 
is in the basement of the State House, in the rear. 



BOSTON ATHEN^UM. 

By the Act of the General Court incorporating the Proprietors 
of the Boston Athenaeum, it is provided that the Governor, 
Lieutenant-Governor, the members of the Council, of the Senate* 
and of the House of Representatives, for the time being, shall 
have free access to the Library of the said corporation, and may 
visit and consult the same at all times, under the same regula- 
tions as may be provided by the by-laws of said corporation for 
the proprietors thereof. 

The Boston Athenaeum is situated in Beacon Street, near the 
State House, and members who may wish to avail themselves of 



888 Notice to Members of the General Court. 

their privilege can receive a note of introduction to the Librarian 
)>7 applying to the Sa:geant-at Arms. 



MASSACHUSETTS HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

Section 6 of the Act of 1794, incorporating the Massachusetts 
Historical Society, provides that *< either branch of the Legisla- 
ture shall and may have free access to the library and museum 
of said society/* 



StcUe Detective Force. 



389 



ROSTER OP THE STATE DETECTIVE FORCE, 1875. 



NAMES. 



LooRtton. 



Qualified. 



Time of 
Service. 



Luther, Stephenson, 
Chief y 

Braley, Joseph G., 

Keith, David B., 

Knox, Joseph H., 

Pinkham, Hollis C, 

Wade, James P., 

Blood, John C, 

Crosby, John, Jr., 

Joslyn, Henry C, 

Wentworth, David L 

Oesting, Chas. A. W 

Day, Patrick 0., 

Philbrick, Chase, 

Warren, George W., 

Cnrrier, Festns C, . 
Innis, George H., 



Jr., 



Boston, 

Fall River, 

Boston, 

Boston, 

Boston, 

Boston, 

Lowell, 

Pittsfield, 

Holyoke, 

Boston, 

New Bedford 

Worcester, 

Lawrence, 

Deerfield, 

Fitchburg, 
Boston, 



1875. 
Mar. 



Aug. 



2, 
3, 
4 
3 



0, 

9, 
Nov. 26, 

1876. 
Jan. 8, 



Mos. Dye. 
10 



10 

10 

10 

10 

10 

10 

9 

9 

4 

4 

4 

4 

1 



29 
28 
29 
28 
26 
22 
6 



390^ SMiertf Messenger Corps. 



SOLDIERS' MESSENGER CORPS, 

For the Delivery of Messages, Letters, SttmU Paclutges, Circulars, 
etc., in this City and its immediate vicinity. 



Stations. 

1. ScoUay's Square. 

2. Comer of Water and Washington streets. 

3. Pemberton Square. 

4. Clarendon House.* 

5. Merchants* Bow, comer of State Street. 

6. Post-Offlce. 

7. Comer of Summer and Washington streets, and comer of 

West and Washington streets. 

8. Comer of Arlington and Boylston streets, and Providence 

Depot. 

9. Front of Boylston Market, on Washington Street. 

10. South-west comer of Court and Washington streets. Old 

State House. 

11. Comer of Winter and Tremont streets. 

12. Front of Merchants' Bank, State street. 

13. State House. 

14. Comer of Charles and Chestnut streets. 

15. Worcester Depot. 

16. Comer of Arlington and Beacon streets. 

17. Congress Street, comer of Post-office Square* 

18. Liberty Square. 

19. Opposite Horticultural Building, Tremont Street. 

20. Comer of Franklin and Washington streets. 

21. Lowell and Eastern depots. 

* Messenger No. 4 bae cards, with prfnted tariff for his station. 



Soldiers^ Messenger Corps. 391 

22. Athenaeum Building, Beacon Street. 

23. Front of Merchants* Exchange, State Street. 

24. Front of the Parker House, on School Street. 

Tariff.* 

To any point in Boston, north of Dover Street, and 

east of Berkeley Street, 15 cents. 

To any point in Boston, north of Dover Street, and 
east of Berkeley Street, with return letter or 
parcel, 25 cents. 

To any point in Boston, south of Dover Street (old 

city limits) , and west of Berkeley Street, . . 20 cents. 

To any point in Boston, south of Dover Street (old 
city limits), and west of Berkeley Street, with 
letter or parcel, 30 cents. 

To East or South Boston, Charlestown, Cambridge, 
Highlands, or any point out of Boston proper, 
per hour, 25 cents. 

Circulars delivered according to agi-eement. 
Extra messengers, to be paid by the day, may be had at the 

Superintendent's Office. 

Complaints, from any cause whatever, made to the Superin- 
tendent, at his office, 24 Pemberton Square, will secure prompt 

attention. 

D. O. BALCOM, Superintendent. 

* Messenger No. 4 has cards, with printed tariff for his station. 



892 The State House. 



THE STATE HOUSE. 



Tlie present State House was erected In 1795-7, upon land pur- 
chased of the heirs of John Hancock, by the town of Boston, for 
the sura of ^4,000, and conveyed by said town to the Common- 
wealth, May 2, 1795. The Commissioners on the part of the 
town to convey the " Governor's Pasture," as it was styled, to 
the Commonwealth, were William Tudor, Charles Jarvls, John 
Coffin Jones, "William Eustis, "William Little, Thomas Dawes, 
Joseph Russell, Harrison Gray Otis and Perez Morton. The 
agents for erecting the State House were named in the deed as 
follows: Thomas Dawes, Edward Hutchinson Robbins and 
Charles Bulfinch. 

The corner-stone was laid July 4th, 1795, by Governor Samuel 
Adams, assisted by Paul Revere, Master of the Grand Lodge of 
Masons. The stone was dra^vn to the spot by fifteen white 
horses, representing the number of States of the Union at that 
time. The building is 173 feet front ; the height, including dome, 
is 110 feet, and the foundation is about that height above the 
waters of the Bay. The dome is 53 feet in diameter, and 35 feet 
high. 

Extensive improvements, including a " new part," extending 
backward upon Mount Vernon Street, were made, chiefly under 
the dkection of a commission, in the years 1853, 1854, 1855 and 
1856. 

Under a Resolve of 1866, a commission was appointed to 
inquire and report concerning the whole subject of remodelling or 
rebuilding the State House. They reported three propositions, 
without deciding in favor of either. The first was a plan of 



TJie State Souse. . 393 

remodelling, at an expense of ^75,430 ; the second, a plan of 
remodelling, at an expense of ^59,872 ; and the third, a plan for 
a new building, at an expense of $2,042,574. The report of the 
commission was referred to the Committee on the State House of 
the session of 1867, who recommended a plan of alterations, at the 
estimated expense of $150,000 ; and by Resolve No. 84 of that 
year, the work was ordered to be executed under the supervision 
of a commission consisting of the President of the Senate and the 
Speaker of the House of Representatives, who were authorized 
by the same Resolve to expend $150,000, and by a subsequent 
Resolve $20,000 in addition. The President of the Senate died 
on the 29th of October, and thereafter the work was continued by 
the surviving commissioner. 

The work was commenced on the 2d day of July, and was so 
nearly completed, so far as the conveniences for the legislative 
department are concerned, that both branches of the General 
Court met on the first day of January, and continued their ses- 
sions substantially without interruption. The improvements 
consist of an almost enth-e reconstruction of the Interior of the 
building, except the " new part " before referred to as having 
been added from 1853 to 1856, whereby waste spaces are econo- 
mized, the access to the several parts of the building simplified 
and made much more convenient, additional height and commo- 
diousness given to a large part of the rooms, and a net gain of 
more than thirty rooms secured without extending the exterior 
walls of the building. Including the extension of the old, as 
well as the construction of the additional rooms, the contents of 
these apartments have been Increased from about one hundred 
and three thousand to about two hundred and sixty-five thousand 
cubic feet— a net gain of one hundred and sixty-two thousand 
cubic feet. 

The exterior Improvements consist p)1nclpally In the removal 
of a large number of supernumerary chimneys, and other excres- 
cences, which had marred and concealed the original well-ap- 
proved architectural proportions of the State House. Two new 
galleries were added to the Representatives* Hall, and Its finish, 
as also that of the Senate Chamber, were much Improved, while 
their general outline was retained. The Council Chamber, with 
the exception of the ceiling, which was frescoed, remains with Its 



1 



394 The State House. 

ancient finish nnchanged. The Governor's room was enlarged 
laterally, and additional height was also added by absorbing 
into it the old " green-room," which was directly above. A new 
*' green-room," a spacious hall, elegantly finished and well 
lighted and ventilated, fifty-six by thirty-seven feet, has been 
constmcted. The ceiling of the Doric Hall was raised two feet 
and finished in panels, and its fioor, and also those of the corri- 
. dors on either side of it, were laid with marble tile. Improve- 
ments were made in the basement story which entirely changed 
its character and utilized its waste places. Beside the space 
occupied by the heating and ventilating apparatus and two large 
fire-proof rooms, there are now in this story, in the old part, 
twelve good rooms. Openings are made in both wings between 
the main building and the addition, by which spacious corridors 
were secured, leading directly from the Mt. Vernon Street 
entrance, which by branch corridors are connected with each 
other, and give easy access to every part of the basement. The 
floors of the corridors in this story are also laid with marble tile. 
The whole is heated by steam, generated in three boilers located 
in an underground room outside of the walls, between the west 
wing and Hancock Avenue. Wann, fresh hydrated air, for 
ventilation, is supplied to every room by a fan propelled by 
a steam-engine, and the same engine runs an exhaust fan for 
removing the foul air from the halls and some of the principal 
rooms. A steam-pump forces water to the upper part of the 
building through large pipes, to which there is attached in the 
several stories more than a thousand feet of rubber hose, by 
which every room may be reached in case of fire. In addition to 
this precaution against fire, there is a steam-pipe leading to the 
dome, by means of which a fire there may be almost instantly 
extinguished. 

These improvements were- executed from the plans of the 
architects, Washburn & Son, and under their direct and constant 
supervision. Cost, including furniture, about ^250,000. 

The Legislature of 1868 made provision for reseating the Sen- 
ate Chamber and the Hall of the House, which improvements 
were made under the supervision of legislative committees, in 
season for the accommodation of the Legislature of 1869, at a cost 
of about $6,600. 



Tlie State Home. 395 



• The Battle-Flags. 
The colors of the several regiments and batteries of Massachu- 
setts which had served the country daring the War of the Rebell- 
ion, were returned to the State House on the 22d of December, 
1865. A full account of the interesting ceremonies of the occa- 
sion may be found in the Adjutant-Generars Report for the year 
1865. The colors were grouped ai'ound the pillars in the Doric 
Hall, where they remained until, by authority of Resolve No. 38 
of 1866, they were placed in the niches on the north side of the 
hall, and in the sides of the recess occupied by the Washington 
Statue, according to a plan" of A. R. Esty, Esq., architect, in 
whose charge the matter was placed by the Governor and Coun- 
cil. The flags are 269 in numbei^l94 being of infantry regi- 
ments, and 75 of cavalry and artillery. The cavahy flags are 
placed in the north-west angle niche of the hall ; the infantry 
flags in the "Washington Statue recess, and the artillery and bat- 
tery flags in the north-eastern niche. In the statue recess, the 
national colors are located in regular numerical order upon the 
lowest shelf on either side of the statue, commencing No. 1 next 
to cavalry flags, with the State and other colors in the back- 
ground. The flags are inclosed within mammoth panes of glass, 
and the openings are properly guarded by fencing. 

The Statue of "Washington, 

By Chantket, was placed in the State House in 1828 by the 
Washington Monument Association, at a cost of $15,000. 

In the pavement of the area near the statue are fac similes of 
certain Memorial Stones of the ancestors of Washington, from 
the parish church at Brington, near Althorp, Northamptonshire, 
England. They were presented by the Right Hon. Earl Spen- 
cer to the Hon. Charles Sumner, and by him to the Common- 
wealth, February 22, 1861. 

The Statue of Webster, 

By Powers, was erected upon the grounds in front of the State 
House, in 1859, by the Webster Memorial Committee, at a cost 
of ||tlO,000. 



396 The State House. 

The Statue of Mann, 
By Mtss Stebbins, was erected in 1865. 

Tlie Statue of Ez-Oovemor Andrew, 

By Thomas Ball, was placed in the Doric Hall in February, 
1872. 

Iiinooln and Sumner. 

Basts of President Lincoln and Senator Snmner have recently 
been placed in niches in the Doric Hall. 

Wilson and Boutwell. 

Busts of Senator Wilson and Mr. Seci-etary Boutwell have 
recently been placed in the Library. 



Calendar f<yr 1876. 







1876.11 i J, f'.l 

1 

I 
8 


1876.! i 

IJ 


J 


1 

! 


i 


f 


1 


t 

i 




%.|. 


1 






6 


v 


8 





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