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Full text of "America heraldica : a compilation of coats of arms, crests and mottoes of prominent American families settled in this country before 1800"

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AMERICA HERALDICA 



A COMPILATION OF 



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PROMINENT AMERICAN FAMILIES 

SETTLED IN THIS COUNTRY BEFORE 1800 



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EDITED BY E. DE Vf VERMONT 
ILLUSTRATED BY HENRY RYKERS 



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Entered. according to Act of Congress, in the year l8S6. by 

E. DE V. VERMONT, 
in th.; office of the Librarian cf Congress, at Washington. 

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Letter-press by Haiglu S: Dudley, 
Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 



FINAL ERRATA 



Preface — Page VIII., last paragraph of the foot-note. The Appendix gives much more fully than had 
been promised the list mentioned. 
Page XI., Line 27. For Ricdstap read Rictstap. [Misprint repeated in the first sheets of the 



book.] 
Page XL, Line 
Column 



37, 

3S, 

42. 

44. 

50, 

53- 

75. 

106, 

108, 

109, 

III, 

113. 
n8, 
119, 
128, 
128, 
129, 
140, 
143. 
143. 
157. 
159. 
159^ 
162, 
162, 
164, 
165. 
168, 
170, 



For Sicben niacher's read Sicbenvtacher. 

For maculd read macula. 

For /., 612, read //., 612. 

For Bcthnnc read Bcthunc. [Through the whole notice.] 

¥or pelletd x&diA pclletce. 

For d' Hantcrive read d'Hauterivc. 

For valdc read valde. 

Fory'i' read ye. 

For Twnshcnds read Townshoids. 

For Savior read Saviour. 

For cinque-fields read cinque-foils. 

For erased read couped. 

For chequey read chequy. [Misprint repeated four or five times.] 

For quarterly read quartered. 

For coitrant read trippant. 

For Wainii'rights read Wainwright. 

Suppress vested before arm. 

For ermine read ermines. 

For si'jcant read segrcant. 

For ar(? read w. 

For i-z>/'j read exists. 

For displayed read elevated. 

For Poietien read Poictiers. 

Read gules, on a canton, azure, a crescent, etc. 

For scjeant read sejant. 

For in point read z« /'(rjf. 

For Ormande read Ormonde. 
Line before last. For f?7?z. read erminois. 

21. Yor rayonc'c read rayonnce. 
Two lines before last. For Coorkington read Workington. 
Line 26. For Motto given read Si sit prudcntia. [If there be prudence.] 

1. The Motto is translated : Press close upon those who take the lead. 
47. For Quartered read Quarterly. 

2. For Lowthroppe read Loictkroppcs. 



Line 10. 
6. 



4- 

28. 

last. 

20. 

14. 



29. 



last. 



23- 
6. 



31- 



PREFACE 




HE reader does not expect the author, or, rather, compiler of this work to expatiate, 
in solemn periods, upon the anti-democratic features of heraldic devices, such a dis- 
cussion having become, indeed, too comnionplace to deserve the least notice from 
intelligent and thoughtful people. 

No, it is not in any way true that the preservation in the archives of a few 
American families, and the outward use they may desire to make of the coats of 
arms belonging to them legitimately, could, at any time, l)ecome a peril to our republican institutions. 
Nor is it truer that the popular form of our national and state constitutions necessitates the 
suppression of such heirlooms ; nor could our lawgivers, by thus acting, succeed in installing on a 
forced footing of social equality the descendant of ten generations of personages distinguished for their 
courage, their learning, their high moral and intellectual standing, and the self-made and newly-enriched 
citizen, born, as it were, of yesterday, to all the refinements of life and of thought, and boasting of 
his being "his own proud ancestor." Before the civil law, in the midst of the duties as well as 
of the privileges of public life, absolute and undoubted equality. But in History, in the Past, 
nearly always in social intercourse, imperious, logical, needed classification, which no protest can either 
evade or destroy.* 



Far be from us. the thought of enunciating here any personal opinion — of developing a theory. 
We sim]5ly wish to state a fact, — a clear, self-evident fact. — however unpalatable it may seem to many 
of our fellow-citizens. But such a fact made itself apparent, in all its possible consequences, from 
the earliest days of our young repubhc, and still we find that the Washingtons, the Adamses, the 
Franklins, the Jays, the Livingstons, and many others among the founders of our liberties, used daily 
their own armorial bearings, and did not conceal their satisfaction in thus connecting the Present with 
an honored Past. 

Why should we then — we, their descendants, enjoying now the \vork of their wcll-.spent lives — 
assume the right of interpreting differently the result of their thoughtful deliberations? They did not 
erase the Past, but linked it by firm ties to the Future. Gentle blood they did not proscribe, as 
did the French Convention, but they placed it, as it were, at the pinnacle, well in view — not as a 



""Free to every one to have esteem or contempt for gentle blood. Euripides preferred to it riches; Me- 
nander, virtue; Plato, glory; Aristotle, talent; Socrates, wisdom; St. Jerome, holiness. In a word, every one m.ay 
place gentle descent on a different point of the scale of comparison. But, that will leave it a fad. It does exist 
with its political history in the past, and its decided social influence in the present." — Gr.vMER DE C.\SS.\(.;n"AC : llis- 
toirc dcs Classes A'obles. 



VI P R E F A C E 

master, but as an honored guest. And nowhere more than amongst the descendants of the Virginia 

Cavaliers, of the gentlemen of the "Mayflower" and of Winthrop's expedition, and of New fork's 

aristocratic Knickerbockers, was fountl that true spirit of libertv the practical working t)f which made 
us all what we are.* 

Let us therefore follow, with meekness of heart, such worthy and decisive examples. And, even 
should we not belong to the favored few, let us concede ungrudgingly to every family of old and 
gentle descent among us the right to preserve and use freely these relics of the past — not as the toys 
of a sickly vanity, but as an inheritance of unblemished honor, as the visible tokens of an unforgotten, 
never-to-be-sullied familv recortl, saying with old Homer : " Our ancestors we must gladden, never 
sadden, by our lives." 



II 

S, therefore, all men of a sedate mind and of good common sense recognize that a crusade 
against armorial bearings, in this country, is not to be countenanced or even thought of, 
let us turn our attention to the real danger in the matter, refusing to di,scuss any 
longer the advisability of proscriptive measures. 

It is a well-known fact that, besides the few heraldic emblems brought over 
from the old countries by some of the first cmigrants.f there are to be found in 
America thousands of armorial devices used without a twinge of conscience hv families with absolutely 
no right to bear any coat of arms, and knowing the fact to be such. 

Far back in the X\'III. century' we find the counterfeiters' work begun, and, in Boston itself, 
— in cultured, high-toned Boston — a number of fifth-rate arti.sts, struggling for a bare j^ittance, and bent 
on finding it at any risk, began to circulate, to suit the fanc)' of their wealthy patrons, coats of arms, 
invented as well as painted or engra\-ed by themselves the origin of which is to be found either in 

" It is not out of place to remark here that each State of the Union, as soon as it obtains its admission into 
the national body politic, has at once a coat of arms designed — mostly, we regret to say, on an unheraldic and some 
what too picturesque a style — for use as a state emblem on its banners and seals. 

Even in modern times, official notice has often been taken of family coats of arms, as in the case of the New 
Capitol at Albany, where we find sculptured above the six dormer windows opening on the large middle court the 
armorial devices of the families of Stuyvesant, Schuyler, Livingston, Jay, Clinton, and Tompkins, every one of these 
families having furnished to the Empire State several distinguished public servants. 

t It should be remembered that those men of pluck and decision, who sought in a foreign land that 
religious or political liberty which was denied them at home, — the Cavaliers of Virginia, the Puritans of New Eng- 
land, the Huguenots exiled from cruel France — were, most of them, men of good family; for, in those days, a large 
sum of money was required to equip a vessel, or even just to pay for passage on such a long voyage, and to 
provide means of subsistence when arrived at one's destination. 

Let us quote here, in reference to the social status of the New England emigrants, a very conclusive argu- 
ment inserted by W. H. Whitmore, the father of American heraldry, in his review of SlllRLEV's Noble and Gentle Men 
of England. It will show to the reader how many of the emigrants of the XVII. century, although styded merchants 
or yeomen, may have belonged, and, in fact, probably did belong, to families of gentle blood, entitled to coat-armor. 

" Few points seem less investigated," writes JMr. Whitmore, " than the origin and position of the farmers and 
merchants of England after the cessation of tlie Wars <A the Roses. We find repeated instances of gentlemen by 




PREFACE VII 

some heraldic cyclopsedia, consulted at random, or, more frequently, in the ever-fertile imagination of 
the inventor. 

Of course, our own century, especially in its second half, during this astounding period of 
material prosperity enjoyed since the late war, has opened, and still opens, a wide door to such unpun- 
ishable forgeries. Vanity had to be satisfied ; the nouveaux riches had to be smuggled, some way or 
other, into the charmed circle ; and so the jewelers, the stationers, the carriagemakers, insisted on 
granting, of their own accord, to their vainglorious clients, some of the far-famed heraldic devices of 
the European grandees.* Thus, it came to pass, that all through Great Britain, Ireland, France, and 
the Netherlands, new and unexpected branches began to spring out of ancient genealogical trees, this 
miraculous connection being usually established under the weak pretense of similitude in the patro- 
nymic surnames. 

Since then, all the Derbys, the Buckinghams, the Spencers, the Hamiltons, the Churchills, the 
Grays, and tutti quanti, enjoying on American soil such high-sounding appellations, believe themselves, 
or try to have themselves believed, to be the true and undoubted possessors of the coats of arms 
borne by the mighty Dukes and Earls of Old England, f Better still, or, rather worse, hundreds of 
families amongst us, having kept, with the care of true-blue Protestants attached to the Bible of their 
fathers, a clear record of their descent, both paternal and maternal, attempt, nowadays, to graft them- 
selves, boldly and bodily, upon some aristocratic tree, trying thus to forget, and to have others forget, 
the humble, perhaps even menial origin of their forefather, the emigrant. 

birth engaging in the commerce and the manufacture of the larger cities. We find, also, many examples of the 
division of lands, whereby the younger sons of good families became freeholders, and thus dropped socially, a grade, 
to the rank of yeomen. We are still without data, however, to show whether this was the rule or the exception. 

" To us the question is an important one. The great emigration hither [New England] was that led by Win- 
throp ; and, as we have tried to prove, it contained a considerable proportion of gentry, recognized as such prior to 
their removal. The remainder of the colonists were undoubtedly yeomen, tradesmen, and mechanics, but most evi- 
dently not of the lowest class. 

" In fact, if we were to accept Macaulay's picture of the country gentleman of the day we should consider 
them as of the superior class. A large majority of them, as witnessed by our early county records, could read and 
write ; they were capable of self-government, and were prompt to devise satisfactory solutions for the problems pre- 
sented by their new life. We doubt if as much could be said of five thousand colonists now to be taken from the 
lower classes of England. 

" Hence our abiding faith that the result of all investigation in England will result to the credit of our 
ancestors, will establish the value of their heraldic evidences, and free them from the suspicion of that weakest form 
of vanity, the assumption of a false social position." 

* Mr. Cussans, in his Hand Book of Heraldry, p. 307, writes : 

" There are probably more assumptive [heraldic for bogus~\ arms borne in America than anywhere else. Nor 
are the bearers of such arms to be so much blamed as the unscrupulous, self-styled heralds, who supply them. The 
advertising London tradesmen, who profess to find arms, are, for the most part, less anxious to give themselves the 
trouble of examining the requisite documents — even if they possess the necessary ability to do so, which many cer- 
tainly do not — than they are of securing the fee. If, therefore, they cannot readily find in the printed pages of 
Burke, they do not hesitate to draw from the depth of their ' inner consciousness,' as Carlyle expresses it. Many 
American gentlemen, consequently, engrave their plate and adorn the panels of their carriages with heraldic insignia 
to which they have no right whatever ; and this, too, tlwugh they may have an hereditary claim to arms as ancient 
and honorable as those of a Talbot or a Hastings. Nor have native professors of the science been behindhand in 
distributing their worthless favors. The names of Thomas Johnson, John Coles, and Nathaniel Hurd, (Boston 
heraldic painters of the XVIII. century), are notorious in New England as those of manufacturers of fictitious arms 
and pedigrees." 

fAs far back as 1807, the notorious Rev. Samuel Peters, in his Life of Hugh Peters, asserted, without taking 
the trouble of furnishing any proofs nor authentic data, that, in the time of Cromwell, many scions of the noblest 
houses of Old England came over here to escape the rule of the Protector, and that their descendants still graced 




PREFACE 
III 

^g^^tjifHERE lies evidently the danger, if systematically falsifying family traditions and gene- 
alogical connections may be termed a danger. Here it is that honest men ought to 
come to the front, helping thus to rescue poor, naked, unguarded Truth, obstinately 
pushed back into her native well. 

Some countries, conservative but not blindly retrograde in most of their insti- 
tutions, never ceased to protect, by force of law, heraldic property on the same basis 
and for the same reasons that they defend any other form or kind of private property. 
And if, in our land, public opinion, as yet but imperfectly enlightened on the subject, may not 
be ready to accept the creation of a Herald's or a Jiidge-at-Arms office, whose interference should 
prevent or punish any wrongful assumption of coat-armor, it seems to us all the more important that 
impartial, studious, and high-minded experts, — as thoroughly versed in the intricacies of genealogical 
problems as in the arduous work of deciphering heraldic enigmas, — should volunteer to pass judgment 
on these matters, presenting, in due time, for public discussion, the results of their minute inquiries 
concerning the exact status of American families making use of coats of arms and crests. 

Thus would be collected, under the glaring and unrelenting light of public opinion, and with 
the help of every fair-minded and competent citizen, a complete and final list of American families, 
emigrated before 1800, and having proved peremptorily their ancestral right to coat-armor. 

Such a task has been attempted in these pages. 

Their author does not follow in the footsteps of any similar publication — none such having ever, 
to his knowledge, been systematically compiled in this country. A few indefatigable workers, busy in 
other fields of literary labor, collected, it is true, since 1851, many of the documents we have wrought 
here into a whole, and, to the survivors of this small company of investigators, — one of them a thorough 
scholar in matters heraldic — we address now our hearty and well-deserved thanks. Their names will 
be found often inscribed in the bibliographical part of each separate notice, and reference to their 
valuable works thus indicated. 

And now it would seem that, these few preliminary remarks having established fully our aim 
and purpose, we should leave this book to its fate, habent sua fata libelli, did we not feel it our 
clearly-set duty to notice and to contradict, in a few short paragraphs, a most curious error, found 



this land with their presence. Thus, the Rev. Historian (?) mentions the following personages as having taken refuge 
in New England : 

1. A certain Thomas Seymour (of the Ducal house of Somerset); 

2. Three brothers of Lord Stanley, Earl of Derby ; 

3. A certain William Russell (of the Ducal house of Bedford); 

4. A Pierrepont, legal heir to the (now extinct) Duchy of Kingston; 

5. A Montague, a younger scion of the Earls of Sandwich ; 

6. A Graham (of the Ducal house of Montrose) ; 

7. A Clinton, of the Earls of Lincoln ; etc., etc. 

We shall have occasion to discuss several of these descents still persisted in, in this century, and made more 
conspicuous by the fact of some Americans of that name having reached prominent situations among us. At the 
end of this work will be found a list of over fifty American families having assumed the coats of arms of Peers of 
the British Empire. 



PREFACE IX 

upon the lips of the great majority of our fellow-citizens, and having thus obtained — in spite of its 
utter absurdity, — the force and popularity of an axiom. 



IV 




^E hear it constantly repeated in America, that every family surname, and, 
especially, every surname of a Britannic or of an Irish origin, is entitled 
to certain armorial devices ; and that such a coat of arms does exist 
somewhere, at the disposal of the patient searcher. In other words, that, 
if, at some remote or more recent period, a Jones, a Brown, a Smith, 
having distinguished himself in the service of the state, or in the favor 
'f "Y of the sovereign, was granted, by royal letters patent, some sort of 

armorial devices, from that day and hour, every living, or yet-to-be-born, Jones, Brown, or Smith, can 
lay his hand, at his good pleasure, upon the said coat of arms, and adopt it as his family emblem. 

We can hardly be expected to discuss with any amount of seriousness a fiction so radically 
opposed to truth and common sense. We shall, therefore, settle the question in a very few words, 
borrowed from the vocabulary of European heraldic science. 

A coat of arms is and remains the exclusive property of that person who either established his 
prescriptive right to it — being a gentleman 0/ old race, — or received it in more recent times by royal 
deed of concession. Only his lineal descendants,* not his collateral relatives, can pretend to it ; and 
his own brother [we speak here, of course, of the conceded, not of the prescriptive right to coat- 
armor] is no more entitled to it than any other confessed pretender. 

If the branch thus distinguished becomes extinct, the collateral relatives may inherit the family 
estates, if such an entail has been provided for, or if, in the absence of any will, they come first in 
the line of succession ab intestato. But, in no case does that coat of arms come over to these col- 
lateral relatives, except through a clear and especial manifestation of the royal good pleasure expressed 
in a new and distinct concession. 



Be it, therefore, well understood by all the Browns or Brownes of the United States, that the 
fact of our inserting in this compilation the coats of arms having descended, in a regular line, to the 
Brownes or Browns of Salem, of Watertown, of Rye, would not justify them in taking forcible pos- 
session of said coats of arms if they count not amongst the direct issue of the original Brown of 
Salem, Watertown, or Rye. 

And, if the Smiths of Scarsdale, if the Andrews of Farmington, if one of the many Anderson 
families of New York, have been made prominent in the same manner by regular grants of armorial 
bearings, let us protest against all the Smiths, the Andrews, and the Andersons, whose names crowd 



* Maternal descent from a gentlewoman can not give a right to coat-armor to the descendant of a man not 
having inherited nor being himself the grantee of armorial bearings. Cussans so expresses this absolute rule, fre- 
quently violated in this country : 

" If an ignobilis, that is, one without armorial bearings, were to marry an heiress, he could not make use of 
her arms ; for, having no escutcheon of his own, it is evident that he could not charge her shield of pretence, neither 
would their issue — being unable to quarter — be permitted to bear their maternal coat." — CusSANS : Hand Book of 
Heraldry, p. 757. 



X PREFACE 

the directories of our large cities, adopting for their note paper, their plate, their carriages, these old 
heirlooms of royal creation, having descended to people of the self-same surname. 

Let them remember, instead, and keep wisely in a privileged corner of their memory, this absolute 
principle : That " Only a direct ancestor, having borne by right a coat of arms, can give his descend- 
ants a similar privilege, and obtain for them an honest footing amongst the Americans entitled to coat- 
armor." No half rule on the matter; it is all or nothing. To violate this absolute law, governing 
despotically every heraldic assumption, would be only to add ridicule to untruth ; and, with the pro- 
gressive enlightenment of their fellow-citizens on the subject, such psendo-gtxA^xX.y would soon be found 
out and treated as it deserves to be — with perfect and justified contempt. 

In settling this question in such a decisive, and, perhaps, somewhat uncharitable manner, the 
author of America Heraldica gives one more positive proof of his strong will not to add unduly 
one cubit to the stature of any American citizen ; but only to recognize in every one what is his 
by birthright — cuiqtie stitim, — completing and rendering manifest to the public mind a classification 
already established by facts and data. 



V 



:^OMING to the end of this long introduction, we wish to point out, in this last division: 

1ST. What class of candidates to armorial honors our researches include. 
2D. What period of time these researches comprehend. 

3D. What systematic procedure has been applied to the present classification. 

First. 

Desirous to insert in this volume no documents but those of a general interest, we 
have concentrated our attention upon the families whose origins are comprised in the following enu- 
meration : 

A. Families descending from titled noblemen. 

B. Families descending from European landed gentry. 

C. Families descending from personages having occupied high offices in their native country, 
or in the Colonies of the New World. 

D. Families descending from the Lords of the Manors of New York. 

E. Families descending from the leading Huguenot exiles. 

F. Families descending from the gentlemen mentioned in the Boston Gore Roll of Anns, as 
usin-- already armorial bearings in 1700-1720.* 




* The Gore Roll of Arms is a collection of ninety-nine coats of arms, painted by hand, and having been once 
the property of a Boston carriagemaker, by the name of GORE, who lived in the early part of the last century, and 
consigned in a book the armorial bearings of his most prominent customers. A complete description of this valuable 
document is found in the Boston Heraldic Journal, of August, 1865. It has always been admitted that the coats of 
arms included in this compilation were, to a large extent, bona fide, and deserved to be treated as such. 



PREFACE XI 

These five headings include Knickerbockers, Cavaliers, Puritans, Quakers, Huguenots — the main 
springs from which flowed, all over this wide continent, the fertilizing waters of emigration and civi- 
lization. 

Second. 

All families whose coats of arms are found in America Heraldica were settled in North 
America before A.D. 1800. 

Third. 

Our researches were governed by the following rules : 

Being given a family making use of armorial bearings, we enquired, first of all, after the name 
of the first emigrant, direct ancestor of that family. Having obtained also the date of his emi- 
gration, we set to work to find out : 

A. What had been his European origin, and whether he belonged, by well-established lineal 
descent, to a family entitled to coat-armor. 

B. Such a family being found to have existed, at the stated time, in the Old World, we had 
to trace the origin of its coat of arms, whether it came in its possession by prescriptive right, — as to 
gentlemen of old lineage, — or had been granted, in later times, by the sovereign. 

In Great Britain and Ireland, the records of the London College of Heralds (for England), of 
the Edinburgh Lyon Herald (for Scotland), of the Dublin Ulster King-at-Arms (for Ireland), easily 
settle almost all doubtful questions, with the help of the old Visitations,* especially important in the 
matter of prescriptive right to coat-armor. 

In France, since the Edict of 1696, an official compilation has been made by d'Hozier, Judge 
at-Arms under King Louis XIV., and by his heirs and successors in office. The National Library, 
in Paris, contains, in a perfect state of preservation and classification, these highly valuable manu- 
scripts, always open to the student's examination. 

In Holland, in Belgium, in Switzerland, [a republic with an old, highly-esteemed aristocracy], 
there exist several private compilations of great worth, as, for example, those of Colonel Van der 
Duzen, of F. W. Goethals, of J. B. Riedstap, the latest edition of whose book, just issued, contains 
one hundred thousand names. 

In Germany, where everything is marvellously tied up with red tape and ruled by militarism, 
the three Gotha Almanacs and Sieben macher's Neu Wappenbuch furnish all needed information. Of 
course, we only mention here the leading and most recent works, not forgetting Burke's, Berry's, De 
Brett's, and other English cyclopaedias and armories. Each continental country possesses, besides, some 
official source of information, open to the interested parties if not to the student. 

C. We must acknowledge that we sometimes have deviated from the matheinatical course laid 
down in the two preceding paragraphs, but only in the case of those families whose emigrant ancestor 

*The Heralds Visitations were made for the purpose of examining the right by which the persons within the 
respective heraldic provinces bore arms or were styled Esquires or Gentlemen. The results of these official inquiries 
were carefully collected, and subsequently recorded in the College of Heralds. The earliest visitation which we 
possess took place in 1528-29, by order of a commission granted and executed by Thomas Benoilt, Clarcncieux ■ 
although informal visitations were made in the reigns of HENRY the FOURTH, Edward the FOURTH, and HENRY 
the Seventh, of which only fragments remain. Until 1687, when the last visitation was made, they were regularly 
couducted every twenty or thirty years. 



XII P R E F A C E 

occupied, in the young colonies, a position of sucli importance that he could hardly have imperiled 
his influence and prestige for the meagre satisfaction of assuming fraudulent marks of gentility. We 
recognize, therefore, as conclusive proofs of a right to coat-armor, such family relics as : Seals, 
impressions of seals, plates, old engravings, tombstones, — all these being well authenticated as contem- 
poraneous with the first emigrant, or, may be, the generation that succeeded immediately him. 

But, whenever such proof is admitted, instead of a clear, direct, complete pedigree, connecting 
the American stock with an, European family in possession of coat-armor, we state the fact in detail, 
and leave the reader to be the final judge in the case. 

And now, as a last and parting word of preface, let us open this record — a work of patience, 
care, and strict impartiality — by staring, that the coats of arms herein inserted have all been chosen 
without any regard to the fact of the bearers of any of them being subscribers or not; also, that 
no compensation of any kind has been accepted for insertion of notices or coats of arms. 

E. UE V. \'ERMONT. 







AMERICA HERALDICA. 



PLATE I. 





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AMERICA HERALDICA 



Xivingston 



Sir Bernard Burke, in his Gen. History of Extinct 
Peerages, etc., gives a special notice to the American 
Livingstons, whose pedigree goes clearly back to 
the Scotch .Livingstones, Earls of Linlithgow 
and Earls of Calendar. 

The direct ancestor of the New York Livingstons 
was the Rev. fohn Livingstone, born in Scotland in 
1603, exiled to Holland on account of his religious 
convictions. His descendant, Robert Livingstone, 
born in 1654, came over to America about 1676, and 
was granted by Governor Thomas Dongan, in 1683, 
the manorial estate of the family. After the death of 
the third Lord, these immense estates were divided in 
four shares. 

The Livingstons quarter: i and 4, Linlithgow; 
2, Hei'burn ; 3, Calendar. They use the Linlith- 
gow crest and motto. 



Crest : A derai-Hercules, wreathed 
about the head and middle; in his 
dexter hand, a club in pale ; in the 
sinister, a snake : all proper. 




Motto : Si je puis. [If I can.] 



The Book of Family Crests, II., 290. 

G. R. Howell: Heraldry in England and America, 18S4. 

Sir Bernard Burke : Gen. Hist, of Dormant, Abeyant, 

atid Extinct Peerages of the British Empire, iSSj, p. 610. 
DwiGHT : The Strong Genealogy, iSji. 
Pearson: Genealogy of the First Settlers in Albany, i8j2. 



IDan Cortlanbt 

Stephanns van Cortlandt came over from the 
Netherlands, and obtained, in 1697, the grant of the 
Manor of Cortlandt, New York. 

It is claimed by several authors (Bolton, etc.), that 
the family is issued from the Dukes of Couriande, in 
Eastern Europe ; but the arms are absolutely different, 
and we do not hear that the family itself asserts such 
pretensions. They are simply of good Dutch blood. 



Crest : A star, gules, between 
two wings displayed ; the dexter, 
argent ; the sinister, sable. 



Motto : Virtus sibi mmms. [Virtue its own re- 
ward.] 




T. Gwilt-MapLESON : Hand Book of Heraldry, i8ji. 
Mrs. Martha J. Lamb : History of the City of New York, 

/., 275. 
J. B.. HolGATE: American Genealogy, ij^. 
BOLTON : History of Westchester Co., N. Y. 
Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 

etc., 18S3. 



Bolton : History of Westchester Co., N. Y. 

T. GwiLT-MaflESON : Hand Book of Heraldry, l8§l. 

Mrs. Martha J. Lamb: History of the City of New York, 

I., 14.3. 
J. B. RiEDSTAP: Armorial Universel, cd. of 186 1. 
Heraldic Journal, II., 192. 



H 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



Hrcber 



Humphrey Archer, of Umberslade, county War- 
wick (1527), was the twelfth descendant of Fulbert 
L'Archer, who came over to England with William 
the Conqueror. 

John Archer, who obtained the grant of the 
Manor of Fordham, N. Y., in 1671, and was the 
first Archer emigrating to America, was the grand- 
son of the above-named Humphrey. 



Crest : Out of a mural coronet, or, the 
head of a dras'on, argent. 



MuTTO: Sola bona quee honesta. [No good things 
but noble ones.] 

Bolton : History of Westchester Co., N. K, //., 515. 
Heraldic Journal, 1S65-6S. 
W. Berry : Encyclopedia Heraldica, 1828. 
The Book of FA^^Lv Crests, II., 13. 
Sir Bernard Burke : Gen. Hist, of Dormant, Abeyant, 
and Extinct Peerages of the British Empire, i88j, p. p. 




/Iftorris 



This coat of arms was used by Lewis Morrls, 
Lord of the Manor of Morrisania, New York, in 
1697. The emigrant was of Welsh extraction, the 
family originating from Tintern, county Monmouth. 
Welsh spelling of the name : Maior Rys, or the 
Great Rys. 

There is another, also well known family of Mor- 
RLsEs, descendants of Amos Morrls, of East Haven, 
Ct. 



Crest : A castle in flames, proper. 

Motto: Tandem vincitiir. [He con- 
quered at last.] 



Mrs. Martha J. Lamb: History of the City of New York, 

/., 5/0. 
BolTOX : History of Westchester Co., N. Y., //., 4jj. 




T. Gwilt-Mapleson : Hand Book of Heraldry, l8yi. 
W. H. Whitmore : The American Genealogist, 187s. 
Sir Bern.\RD Burke : The General Armory of England, 

etc., jS8j. 
The Book of Family Crests, II., 335. 
The Rousseau Collection of Book Plates, N. Y. 
Memoranda of the Descendants of Amos Morris. of East 

Haven, Ct. 



Ibeatbcote 



The sixth son of Sir Gilbert Heathcote, Knight, 
of Chesterfield in Scarsdale, county Derby, England, 
was Colonel Caleb Heathcote, the emigrant, who ob- 
tained, in 1 70 1, the grant of the Manor of Scarsdale, 
in the province of New York. A branch of the 
English Heathcotes enjoyed the now extinct title 
of Baron Aveland. The English Heathcotes 
count still amongst the landed gentry of counties 
Huntington and Stafford. 



Crest : On a mural coronet, 
azure, a pomeis of the shield, be- 
tween two wings displayed, er- 
mine. 



W. Berry : Encyclopecdia Heraldica, 182S. 

Heraldic Journal, 1865-68. 

The Book of Family Crests, II., 233. 

Sir Bernard Burke: Gen. Hist, of Dormant, Abeyant, 

atid Extinct Peerages of the British Empire, iSSj. 
Sir Bern.ARD Burke : Gen. and Herald. Hist, of the 

Landed Gentry of Great Britain and Ireland, i8jc). 




lp>bilipse 



The Philii'SES of Philipsboro' , who count among 
the manor Lords of old New York, obtained their 
grant in 1693. The grantee of the letters patent 
was Vrederijek Felypsen, the emigrant, who had 
come from the Netherlands. Genealogists have 
attempted to trace the family to the Felvpses, of 
Bohemia; but, in the earlier generations, the ped- 
igree seems hardly substantiated. 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



15 




Great analogy exists between the coat of arms 
used actually by that family and the armorial devices 
of the Phillips of county Norfolk, settlers in Mas- 
sachusetts. The Gore Roll of Arms furnishes the 
other shield. 



Crest : A demi-lion, rampant, issuing 
from a French Viscount's coronet, ar- 
gent, ducally crowned, or. 



Motto: Quod tibi vis fieri facias. [Do as you 
would he done by.] 



Bolton : History of Westchester Co., N. F., /., 508; II., 418. 
Mrs. Martha J. Lamb : History of the City of New York, 
I., 2 JO. 

Comp. tuith Gore's Roll of Arms, No. 6j. 
Heraldic Journal, II., 192; III., 79. 
New England Genealogical and Historical Regis- 
ter, X., 25. 



l^an IRensselaer 

Kiliacn van Rensselaer, the emigrant, came from 
Nieukirk, Gelderland, in the Netherlands, to New 
Amsterdam, in 1637. 

An e.xample of his coat of arms (with quarterings 
added) is preserved on a stained glass window of the 
Old Dutch Church, in Albany. 

The Van Ren.sselaers founded the manor of Van 
Rensselaerwyck, and its first owner was called the 
Patroon, on account of his extensive real estate in- 
terests. 



Crest : A high basket, from which 
issue flames : all proper. 




Mrs. Martha J. Lamb: History of the City of Nen^ York, 

I., 14.0. 
J. B. HOLGATE: American Genealogy, l8jl,p.33. 
Bolton : History of Westchester Co., N. Y. 
T. Gwilt-Mapleson : Hand Book of Heraldry, iSyi. 
Heraldic Journal, 1865-68. 
Pearson : Genealogies of the First Settlers of Albany. iSji. 



Scbu^ler 



Philip Pieterscn Schuyler emigrated in 1650, and 
became one of the largest land owners, by patent, of 
the Albany district, then called Bevenvyck. 

His son was the first mayor of Albany (1686-94). 

The family possesses still plate bearing the coat of 
arms we publish ; and the hallmark on that plate 
shows that it was manufactured before 1650. 



Crest : A hawk close : proper. 



G. W. Schuyler : The Sdutykr Family, i8S^. 

Heraldic Journal, III., 144. 

Mrs. Martha J. Lamb: History of the City of Nciu York, 

/-, 153- 
Joel Munsell: The Schuyler Faviily, i8j 4. 
W. H. WhiTMORE: The At)icrican Genealogist, l8/§. 
G. R. Howell: Heraldry in England a?id America, 1884. 
Mrs. Grant: Memoirs of an American Lady, iSj6. 




Moobbull 



Motto : Nicmand zo7idcr. 
(the cross).] 



[No one without it 



The family possesses a very elaborate and com- 
plete achievement of its arms. Its ancestry is 
traced to Walter dc Wahull (1297). The emi- 
grant, Richard Woodhull, came from Thenford, 
countv Nrirthampton, England, and settled in Ja- 
maica, L. I. He died in 1690. We read that 



i6 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



the titled branch of the family, the Lords Crewe of 
Steexe, accept the relationship. 



Crest : Two wings, gules, out 
of a ducal coronet, or. 



Heraldic Journal, II., 113. 

W. H. Whitmore : Tlie Americmi Genealogist, i8ys. 

W. Berry : Encyclopedia Heraldica, 1828. 



mip 




The family originates with Rtdoff de Kvpe, a 
Norman lord, whose estates were close to Alengon. 
The emigrant, Isaac Kype (1657), obtained a large 
grant of land in the New York colony. 

It was erected as a manor, by patent dated 16SS, 
for his descendants, Jacob and Hendricks, under the 
name of Kypsburg. 



Crest : A demi-grififin, argent, hold- 
ing, in his paws, a cross, gules. 




Hppleton 



Motto : Vestigia mdla retrorsum. [No steps 
backward.] 



One of the best substantiated pedigrees it has 
been our pleasure to look over in America is that 
of Saiimel Appleton, the emigrant, who came over 
from Little Waldingfield, county Suffolk, England, in 
1635, and settled in Ipswich, Mass. 

He descended ixom. John Appleton (1395). 

The ancestral estate was Holbrook Hall, county 
Suffolk. 



Crest : An elephant's head, sable, 
eared, or ; in the mouth a snake, vert, 
coiled about the trunk. 




Motto : Dijficiles sed fricctiioscB. 
fruitful.] 



[Hard but 



Isaac Appleton Jewett: Memoir of Samuel Appleton, 

of Ipswich, Mass., 1850. 
Monumental Memorials of the Appleton Family, 

1S67. 
A Genealogy of the Appleton Family, 1874. 
Her.\ldic Journal, I., 97. 
Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 

etc., 1883. 
W. Berry : Encyclopedia Heraldica, 1828. 
Burke : Heraldic Illustrations, II., 104. {18^5). 
The Book of Fa.mily Crests, II., 12. 



New York Genealogical and Biographical Record, 

III., 99. 
W. H. Whitmore : The American Genealogist, i8y§. 
Bolton : History of Westchester Co., N. Y., II., ^4.1. 
Mrs. Martha J. Lamb: History of the City of New York, 

I; 137- 
J. B. HolgaTE: American Genealogy, l6g {i8§i). 



ffairtaj 



Jo/m Contee Fairfax, M.D., of Hampton, Md., 
is recognized, by the English heraldic authorities, 
as the real and actual Lord Fairfax of Caiiicroii 
(Scotland). 

The descendant of William Fairfax, the emigrant 
(1720), Thomas Fairfax, died in Virginia (1782), 
and the title passed to his .son, the Rev. Bryan 
Fairfax, who was confirmed in England, in iSoo, 
as Eighth Baron Fairfax of Cameron. 



Crest : A lion, passant, guardant, 
sable. 




Motto: Farijac. [Say-Do.J 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



17 



Edward D. NeilL: The Fairfaxes of England and America 

in the XVII. a?id XVIII. Centuries, 1868. 
Evelyn Philip Shirley : The Noble and Gentle Men of 

England, jd ed., 1866. 
W. H. WhitmoRE : The American Genealogist, iSjS. 
Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of E7igland, 

etc., 1883. 
The Book of Family Crests, II., 170. 



Burke : Heraldic Illustrations, p. gi {iS^j). 
New England Genealogical and Historical Regis- 
ter, XXXI., 153. 
Prince's Chronological History of New Ejiglayid, Ijj6. 



/Iftontgomer^ 



JBulF^le^ 



Peier Bulkley, the emigrant (1635), descended 
from a family of gentle blood, settled in county 
Bedford, England, in which the names of Peter 
and Edward were, and are still, generally used. 
The BuLKLEY-s figure on Prince's list (Boston, 
1736), as Esquires. The father of the emigrant, 
the Rev. Edward Bulkley, D.D., was born in 
Woodhill, county Bedford, in 1582. 

Another tradition connects the American Bulk- 
leys with Thomas Bulkley, from Ware, county 
Salop, England. 

The charges are those of the Irish Viscounts 
Bulkley — colors different. 

A Pennsylvania family of Buckleys (emigrant, 
Phineas Buckley, of London, 1713), bears the same 
arms, crest, and motto, as the Bulkleys of New 
Enarland and New York. 



Crest : A bull's head, erased, per 
pale argent and sable. 



Motto : Nee temerc, nee timide. [Neither rashly 
nor timidly.] 



The Book of Family Crests, II., 72. 

Cotton Mather's Magnalia, I, 400. 

Heraldic Journal, I., jy. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 

etc., 188s. 
W. Berry : Encyclopcedia Heraldica, 1S28. 
L. B. Thomas : Genealogical Notes, l8jy. 




The acknowledged head of one of the many 
branches of the world-famed house of Montgom- 
ery of Scotland, H%igh Montgomery of Brigend, 
reached East Jersey and settled there at the end of 
the XVII. centuiy. The rights of his lineal de- 
scendants to the coat of arms of the Montgom- 
ERiES, Earls of Eglinton, etc., etc., have been rec- 
ognized by L3'on, King-at-Arms of Scotland. 



Crest : A cubit arm, vambraced 
and embowed, grasping, in its hand, 
a broken spear: all proper. 



Motto: Gardes bicn! [Guard well!] 



Thomas Harrison Montgomery : A Genealogical His- 
tory of the Family of Montgomery, i86j. 

T. W. Gwilt-Mapleson : Hand Book of Heraldry, 1851. 

W. H. Whitmore: The American Genealogist, i8jS- 

Sir Bernard Burke: The General Armory of England, 
etc., l88j. 

The Book of Family Crests, II., 333. 




Bbell 



The founder of the American family of Pell 
came from Walter Willingsby, county Lincoln,. 
England. His name was Thomas, and he obtained, 
in 1666, the patent of the Manor of Pelham, N. Y. 

We find the name of Pell, impaling Clarke, in 
the (Boston) Gore Roll of Arms, No. 65. The 
name of Edward Pell is found on the same roll. 



i8 



AMERICA HERALDICA 




facing a very imperfect painting of the same 
shield. A tablet, dated 1697, in Trinity Church, 
New Rochelle, bears the same devices. 



Crest : On a chaplet, vert, flowered, 
or, a pelican of the last, vulned, gules. 



Deus Aviicus [God our friend] ; and, 
Mca Spes est in Deo. [My hope is in 
God.] 



Bolton : History of Westchester Co., N. Y. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 

etc., 1SS3. 
The Book of Family Crests, II., 36S. 
Gore's Roll of Arms, No. 65 (1701-1725). 



Mottoes 



jfranklin 



Benjamin Franklin used this coat of arms as his 
seal. So did his brother John. We have seen an 
identical bookplate, having belonged to the latter. 

William Franklin, the Governor of New Jersey, 
used a similar seal. It is believed that the Frank- 
lin brothers obtained the grant of these arms on 
acaount of the high offices they held under the royal 
governors. 

Their ancestor, Josiah, the emigrant, was a yeo- 
man, and came over from county Northampton in 

1655- 

These arms are those of the Franklyns, of county 
Devon, England. 



Heraldic Journal, II., 97. 

New York Genealogical and Biographical Record, 

III., 117. 
W. Berry : Encyclopedia Heraldica, 1828. 
Sir Bernard Burke : The Geiieral Armory of England, 

etc., 1883. 
The Book of Family Crests, II., 187. 



iC^elbam 



This family traces its pedigree back to Walter de 
Pelham (1292). 

The emigrant, Herbert Pelham, born 1601, came 
over to Cambridge, Mass., in 163S, and died in 
1676, or thereabout, leaving, besides his New Eng- 
land possessions, patrimonial estates in Sussex and 
Lincoln counties, England. His own seal gave the 
exact imprint of the coat of arms we reproduce. 



Crest : A peacock in his pride. 

Motto: Vincit amor patrice. [Love 
of country conquers.] 



Heraldic Journal, III., 84. 

W. Berry : Encyclopcedia Heraldica, 182S. 

Evelyn Philip Shirley : The Noble and Gentle Men of 
England, 1S66. 

New England Genealogical and Historical Regis- 
ter, XXXIV., 285. 

The Book of Family Crests, II., 360. 

Sir Bernard Burke ; Heraldic Illustratioiis, 11. , 1S4.S. 

Col. Chester : The Pelham Family, i8-jg. 





Crest : A dolphin's head in pale, 
argent, erased, gules, finned, or, be- 
tween two branches, vert. 



Motto : Exempluni adest ipse homo. [Conduct 
marks the man.] 



IRuseell 



The emigrant, Richard Russell, came over from 
county Hereford, England, where he was born in 
161 1. 

His son, the judge of probate, James Russell, 



riuj- 




EUHAH^ 




|{v 



VSSELJL 




VTCHIRSOR 








'*« 



T 



Yr^ Q 




E 



ILIOT 




i k> i 



% 



H01Py2DYKE 





OWELL 




E 



SI2E3R^SOR 




\SHOV 




\x 



OHP 





ATH^P 



f^, 



k!7ALISBYKy 




YJLE:y\ 




W<?r5>^J-^Yy^EP^, PI NX. 



^ ,r^ r 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



^9 



used an identical seal. Let us remark that this 
family is in no way connected with the Russells, 
Dukes of Bedford. 



Crest : A demi-lion, rampant, col- 
lared, sahle, studded, or, holding a 
cross of the shield. 



Heraldic Journal, IV., 32. 

W. Berry : Encydopcedia Heraldica, 1828. 

The Book of Family Crests, IL, 408. 

Prince's Chronological History of New England, 1736. 




Hutc/iinson Family Known as the " Hutcldnsons of Lin- 
colnshire" i8§j. 

ViCOMTE DE MaGNY : Nobiliaire Universel de France, 1866. 

Joseph L. Chester: Notes Upon the Ancestry of Williajn 
Hntclnnson and Anne Marhiry, 1866. 

Heraldic Journal, II., 83, 171, 783. 

The Hntclnnson Family Descendant from Bernard Hutchin- 
son, of Cowlan, Ejigland, i8jo. 

W. H. Whitmore: The American Genealogist, 1875. 

Bolton : History of Westchester Co., N. Y., //., jo. 

Sir Bernard Burke: The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1883. 

W. H. Whitmore: Genealogy and Descendants of William 
Htttchinson and Thomas Oliver, 186^. 

Burke : Heraldic Illustrations, //., 184.5. 

The Book of Family Crests, II., 247. 

Prince's Chronological History of New England, 1736. 



Ibutcbinson 



The record of this remarkable family, as far as 
coat-armor is concerned, does not seem to have met 
with the approval of English heralds. However, 
we find this coat of arms on various family tomb- 
stones in Church Hill Old Burying Ground, Bos- 
ton. 

Also, on the will of Samttel Hutchinson (1667), 
brother of William, the emigrant. Also, used as a 
seal, by Governor Hutchinson, in 1769. The same 
devices are reproduced on Gores Roll of Arms as 
that of E lis ha Hutchinson, Colonel, also Chief 
Justice of the Court of Common Pleas, 171 7. 



Cre.st : Out of a ducal coronet, a 
cockatrice, vert, combed, beaked, wat- 
tled ffules. 



Mottoes : A. Gerit crucem fortiter. [He car- 
ries his cross vahantly.] 
B. Nihil humani alienum. [Nothing 
human is foreign (to me).] 



Gore's Roll of Arms, No. 4.0. 

The Book of Brothers. History of the Hutchin- 
son Family, 1852. 

Peter O. Hutchinson: Narrative of a Tour Made in the 
County of Lincoln, England, in October, 183 j, for the Pur- 
pose of Hunting Up Some Memorials of that Branch of the 



tripng 





This well-known family has its coat of arms in 
Gores Roll, as borne by Rebecca Tyng, widow of 
Governor Dudley, in 1722. 

Plate is also in existence, with old hall-marks, 
bearing the same devices. However, the family 
name is ignored by the leading English works on 
heraldry. 

Crest : A wolf's head, erased (sable 
*/a or proper?). 



Gore's Roll of Arms, Nos. 72-79. 

T. Gwilt-Mapleson : Hand Book of Heraldry, 1831. 

Heraldic Journal, 1865-68. 



Dancock 

The emigrant, Nathaniel Hancock, who settled 
in Cambridge, Mass., and died in 1652, is not 
proved to have ever claimed arms. 

Most probably, the grant of armorial devices was 
obtained by his descendant. Governor Johti Han- 



20 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



COCK, on account of the high offices he filled suc- 
cessively. 

John Hancock was one of the signers of the 
independence. His seal reproduces the arms we 
publish. 



Crest : A cock, gules, holding a 
dexter hand, couped at the wrist, 
argfent. 



Heraldic Journal, II., gg. 

Sir Bernard Burke : Heraldic Illustrations, II., 1845. 

W. Berry : Encydopadia Hcraldica, 1828. 

The Book of Family Crests, II., 224. 




Xowell 

The emigrant, Percival Lowle, came over in 
1639. 

The complete genealogy, back to Walter Lowle, 
of Yardley, county Worcester, England, and the 
afferent rights to coat-armor, were endorsed by the 
heralds in their Visitations of 1573, 1591, 1623. 

John Lowell, the author, uses the crest B as his 
own. We have seen his bookplate [collection of 
Richard C. Lichtenstein, Esq.]. 



Crests : A. A stag's head, cabossed, 
or. Between the horns, a pheon, azure. 
B. A covered cup, or. 




lEbornb^f^e 



William Thorndyke lived in Little Carleton, 
county Lincoln, in 1539. We find his descendants 
mentioned in the Heralds' Visitation of 1634 for 
county Lincoln. 

The emigrant, John Thorndyke, reached Amer- 
ica in 1633. 



Crest : A damask rose, stalked 
and leaved : proper. Nestling at 
the bottom of the stalk, a beetle 
(scarabcBus) : proper. 



Motto : Rosa inter spinas nasnmtur. [Among 
thorns roses bloom.] - 



Heraldic Journal, I., 52. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 

etc., 1883. 
The Book of Family Crests, II., 461. 




Motto : 
tunity.] 



Occasionem cognosce. [Catch the oppor- 



Heraldic Journal, I., 26. 

W. Berry : EncyclopCBdia Hcraldica, 1828. 

The Book of Family Crests, II., 296. 



Mintbrop 



The Wixthrops descend from an old Welch 
family, tracing its ancestry back to Adam Wm- 
thrope, of Lavenham, county Suffolk. A grant 
of arms (1592) was obtained by John Wynethrop, 
of Groton Hall, county Suffolk. The coat of arms 
given by us is that contained in Gore's Roll of 
Arms, as used in 1701, by Deane Winthrop, sixth 
son of Governor Winthrop. 

We find it reproduced on the seal used by the 
Governor himself. The blazon inscribed on the 
grant of arms, mentioned above, is not absolutely 
similar to the arms actually used by the family. 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



21 




4M. Crest : On a mount, vert, a hare,' 
courant : proper. 



Sir Bernard Burke : TIic General Armory of England, 
etc., 1883. 

The Book of Family Crests, II., 162. 

New England Historical and Genealogical Regis- 
ter, XXXIX., 365. 



Motto : Spes vincit thronum. [Hope conquers 
power.] 



Gore's Roll of Anns, No. i. 

Rob. C. Winthrop: Life and Letters of John Winthrop of 

the Massaehitsetts Bay Company, 1864.-6^. 
Geo. T. Chapman : A71 Account of the Temple Family, With 

Notes and Pedigrees of the Families of Boivdoin, Bradford, 

Winthrop, and Nelsoti, l8jl. 
Pedigree of the Family of Winthrop, 1S74. 
Heraldic Journal, I., 18. 

W. H. WhitMORE: American Genealogist, l8y^. 
The Book of Family Crests, II., 503. 
Prince's Chronological History of Nezv England, 1736. 



IDoar 



A widow, Johanna Hoar, was the first emigrant 
of that name. She died at Braintree, in 1661. 
We find this coat of arms on the tomb of Lieu- 
tenant Daniel Hoar, in an old Concord church- 
yard. 

The bookplate of George Hoar (Rousseau collec- 
tion) bears substantially the same devices. 

The English authorities furnish similar coats, with 
insisrnificant modifications. 



lEliot 



The Eliots of Saint-Geinnans, county Devon, 
England, count amongst the oldest families of 
England. To them belonged the now-extinct Earl- 
dom of St. Germans. They trace their origin to 
Sir William de Aliot, who came over with the 
Conqueror. 

The emigrant, John Eliot, is well known as the 
Apostle of the Indians. He reached America in 
16.^1. 



Crest : An elephant's head, argent, 
collared, arules. 



Motto : Occu7'rent nubes. [Troubles will come.] 



William H. Eliot, Jr., and W. S. Porter: Genealogy 

of the Eliot Family, 1834. 
W. H. Whitmore: The American Genealogist, 1875. 





Cre.st : An eagle's head, erased, ar- 
gent, a ring, or, in its beak. 



Heraldic Journal, 1865-68. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 

etc., 1883. 
The Book of Family Crests, II., 239. 



Emerson 



The emigrant, Nathaniel Emerson, was born in 
England, and died in Ipswich in 171 2. 

He came from Foxton, county Durham, Eng- 
land. 

We find his tombstone, still well preserved, in 
the Old Ipswich Cemetery, and bearing the armo- 
rial devices we publish. 

That coat of arms was granted this family by 
King Henry VIII. 



22 



AMERICA HERALDICA 




Crest : A lion, rampant, vert, be- 
zant^e, holding a battle-axe, gules, 
headed, argent. 



Motto: In te, Doviine, speravi ! [In thee, O 
Lord, have I trusted !] 



Heraldic Journal, I., 90. 

W. Berry : Encyclopedia Hcraldica, 1828. 

The Book of Family Crests, II., 164. 



Xorb 



Thomas Lord emigrated from London to New 
England in 1635. 

We find on the will of his widow, Dorothy 
(1669), a seal reproducing the coat of arms pub- 
lished herein. These devices correspond exactly 
with those given by Burke and Berry to the 
family of Lord, or Laward. 



Cre.st : A demi-bird, with wings 
expanded, sable. On its head two 
small horns, or. The dexter wing, 
gules, lined, argent. The sinister 
wing, argent, lined, gules. 



Heraldic Journal, I., 43. 

Edward ElbRIDGE Salisbury: Seventeen Family Pedi- 
grees, from Family Memorials, l88j. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1883. 

The Book of Family Crests, II., 279. 

See the HYDE Ge7iealogy, 186^. 




Xatbrop 



The coat of arms of this well-known family is 
found in Gore's Roll of Arms; also, on a monu- 
ment erected in the Granary Burying Ground, 



Boston, to the memory of the brave Captain La- 
THROP, killed by the Indians in 1675. 

The emigrant was the Reverend John Lathrop, 
or rather Lowthroppe, of Cherr)' Burton, county 
York, England, who, having joined the dissenters, 
was harshly persecuted, and finally took refuge in 
America in 1630. He was in Barnstable, Mass., 
in 1639. This pedigree is clear and complete. 



Cre.st : A fighting cock : proper. 



Gore's Roll of Arms. No. 8g. 

Th. BrIDGMAN : Inscriptions from Momiments in the Gran- 
ary Burying Ground, Boston, 18^6. 

Th. Bridgman : The Pilgrims of Boston and Their Descend- 
ants, p. jgi. 

John Farmer : A Genealogical Register of the First Set- 
tlers of New England, i82g. 

Rev. E. B. Huntington: Genealogical Memoirs of tlie Lo- 
throp, lathrop Families, i88.f.. 




SalisburiP 



Among the early emigrants of that name, we 
find Edward Salisbury, second son of Sir Henry 
Salisbury, Bart, (creation of 1609). 

Of the same stock, tracing back to the Salus- 
burys of Wales, we find John Salisbury, who 
died in Boston in 1702. Of course, this family is 
not in any way connected with the Cecil Gas- 
coignes. Marquesses of Salisbury. 



Crest : Two lions, rampant, 
•com'battant, argent, ducally 
crowned, or, supporting a cres- 
cent of the last. 



Motto : Sat est prostrasse Iconi. [It is enough 
to have conquered a lion.] 




AMERICA HERALDICA 



23 



Edward Elbridge Salisbury: Seventeen Family Pedi- 
grees from Family Memorials, 1885. 

S. V. TaLCOTT : Genealogical Notes of New York and New 
England Families, i88j. 

Sir Bernard Burke : Tke General Armory of England, 
etc., 1883. 

The Book of Family Crests, II., 411. 



who emigrated in 1633, and came over to Massa- 
chusetts Bay, with a large retinue of servants, 

His arms are found on the will of Edmund 
QuiNCY, the third ; also, on a silver chalice, be- 
queathed to a Braintree church. 

The family is in no way connected with the 
QuiNCEYS, Earls of Winchester. 



IT^ler 



The emigrant, Thomas Tyler, who came over 
from Budleigh, England, was not entitled, as far 
as is known, to any coat of arms. Heraldic de- 
.vices were granted to the brothers Andreiv and 
William Tyler, his lineal descendants, by the 
London Heralds' College, in 1774. Their direct 
descendants are the only American Tylers entitled 
to coat-armor. 



Crest : A demi-mountain-cat, rampant, 
ffuardant, erminois. 





A plume of three ostrich 



Motto : Sine maculd macla. 
ished.] 



[A shield unblem- 



W. H. Whitmore: The American Genealogist, i8ys. 
Heraldic Journal, III., 178. 

Edward Elbridge Salisbury: Sevejtteen Family Pedi- 
grees, from Family Memorials, l88§. 
W. Berry : Encyclopedia Heraldica, 1828. 
Prince's Chronological History of New England, 1736. 



Mottoes : A. Deo, patricB, amicis. [God, coun- 
try, friends.] 
B. Pari quce sentiat. [Speak thy 
mind.] 



Heraldic Journal, III., 83. 

T. Gwilt-Mapleson : Hand Book of Heraldry, 1852. 

W. Berry : Encyclopmdia Heraldica, 1828, Vol. H. 

Sir Bernard Burke: The General Armory of England, 

etc., 1883. 
The Book of Family Crests, II., 473. 
Austin's Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island, 1886. 



Hlejanber 



This family descends from Major General Wil- 
liam Alexander of Islay, of revolutionaiy fame, 
whose pretentions to the Scotch Earldom of Stir- 
ling seem to have been clearly established, but 
were not, after all, accepted by the House of 
Lords. The areneral died in 178^. 



Cre.st : A lion, passant, gules. 




(SiuinciP 



Motto : Semper fidelis. [Ever faithful.] 



Edmzmd Quincy, of Wigsthorpe, county North- 
ampton, England, had a son, also called Edmund, 



Heraldic Journal, 1865-68. 

T. Gwilt-Mapleson: Hand Book of Heraldry, 1831. 



24 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



New York Genealogical and Biographical Record, 

XL, 13. 
Sir Bernard Burke : Tlie General Arviory of England, 

etc., 1883. ■ 
The Book of Family Crests, II., 445. 



be Xance^ 



Etrenne de Lanci, Vicomte de Laval et Noiroian, 
near Caen, in France, fled religious persecution, 
and emigrated to America in 16S1. He bore a 
slightly different shield from that adopted by his 
descendant, the Honorable James de Lancey, of 
Mamaroneck (1744), down to our times. 



Crest : A sinister arm, vambraced 
and embowed, holding the pennon of 
the shield. 




Motto : Cerium pclc volo Jincm. 
sure end.] 



[Aim at a 



Heraldic Journal, 1865-6S. 

Bolton : History of Westchester Co., N. Y., I., 4.78. 

Mrs. Martha J. Lamb : History of the City of Ni 

/•. 543- 
J. B. HolgatE: American Genealogy, i8ji. 
D'Hozier : Armorial General de France, ijoo and ijoS. 
Le Nobiliaire de Picardie, 1693. 
Borel d'Hauterive: A>in!iaire de la Noblesse, i8j§. 
J. B. RiEDSTAP: Armorial Universcl, ed. of 1 86 1. 



York, 



6e Ipeipster 



In spite of the Hollandish aspect of the name 
the family claims French origin, and certainly 
some of its scions existed in the neighborhood 
of Rouen, and perhaps also in Touraine. 

The shield is peculiar, and would be called in 
French it r cnquerre, as it has color on color, a 



violation of the most important heraldic rule. 
Such a violation is not, however, altogether un- 
frequent ; and has often its cause in some mem- 
orable family incident. 

Johannes de Peyster, the emigrant, came over 
from Haarlem, Netherlands, to New Amsterdam, 
in 1652. He was one of the six citizens who as- 
sociated together for the purpose of drawing the 
first charter of New Amsterdam. 

The two sheep, argent, are a recent addition to 
this coat of arms. 



Crest : An arm vambraced 
and embowed. The hand proper 
holdinar a sword fesswise. 



Mottoes : [In Holland] : Honor csl prcnihnn 
virttUis. [Honor the reward of 
valor.] 
[Now] : Diim spiro, spcro. [Whilst 
I breathe I hope.] 



Bolton : History of Westchester Co., N. Y. 

Mrs. Martha J. Lamb : History of the City cf Neiu York, 

I., 420. 
Rev. C. W. Baird, D.D. : The Huguenot Emigration in 

America, 1885. 
T. Gwilt-Mapleson : Hand Book of Heraldry, iSji. 
J. B. Riedstap: Armorial Universcl, ed. of 1S61. 




Barclay 



The American Barclays proceed from the emi- 
grant, John Barclay, himself one of the Bar- 
clays of Urie, a renowned Scotch stock, which 
has furnished baronets in Scotland and princes 
(the Barclays de Toll)i) on the continent of 
Europe. 

The pedigree is clear and undisputed, and traces 
back to King Bruce, of Scotland, and King 




DE'JU ARCEY 





MlEXARDEK. de(9 eystej^ 




Af(GLAY 






EEK^pAH 





UIOTOR 




TVYYESART 




VDL.OW 



i 



3 




B 



LEECKEIP^ 




A]P(]P^r2 




vqvEy^ 




>^SWOJLD 




mCLAIJR^ 




AKPIREIR^ 




yTHEJ^V]P(p 

E. de V. VeJRSBORT, Editor 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



25 



Henry III., of England. The emigrant was 
Royal Governor of East New Jersey in 1731, 
and the third son of Colonel David Barclay of 
Urie. 



Bolton : History of Westcluster Co., N. Y., I., 54.7. 
S. V. Talcott: Genealogical Notes, i, 1883. 
J. B. HOLGATE : American Genealogy, 75 {iS^l). 
Pearson: Genealogy of the First Settlers in Albajiy, 1872. 



Crest: A sword in pale, argent, hilt 
jsJAi^ and pomel, or. 



«JL. 



Motto: Crux Ckristi nostra corona. 
cross of Christ our crown.] 



[The 



New York Genealogical and Biographical Record, 

III., 22. 
T. Gwilt-Mapleson : Ha7id Book of Heraldry, 1851. 
J. B. RiedstaP; Armorial Universel, 1861. 
The Book of Family Crests, II., 25. 
Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 

etc., 1883. 



JSeekman 

The family originates with Cornelius Beekman, 
of Cologne, Germany (1478). Driven away by 
religious persecution, they settled in Hasselt, Ove- 
ryssel, in the protestant Netherlands. The emi- 
grant, William Beekman, came over to New Am- 
sterdam in 1647. 

Another family of Beeckman (with a f) came 
over to America, in 1638, from Hamelward (Bre- 
men), and took service with the Van Rensselaers. 



Crest : Three feathers on a helmet 
of steel, represented in profile. 



Mrs. Martha J. Lamb: History of the City of New York, 

I; 386. 




"im 



This well-known family belongs to the French- 
Huguenot emigration. The Jays originated from 
the Castle of Montonneaw, in the Poictou prov- 
ince. They settled afterwards — at least, the direct 
ancestors of the American Jays did — in La Ro- 
chelle, and from there fled to England on account 
of religious persecution. 

Later, a descendant of the refugee, Augustus 
Jay, came over to America, and settled in West- 
chester Co., N. Y. (1745). 

We find some resemblance with the shield of 
the Jays of county Devon, and also with that of 
the mysterious Jay, mentioned in Gores Roll of 
Arms, No. 6. 



Crest: [Since the emigration]. A 
cross, sable, on a calvary of three steps : 
proper. 



Motto : Deo duce perseverandum. [With God 
our leader, we must strive.] 



Bolton : History of Westchester Co., N. Y. 

Mrs. Martha J. Lamb : History of the City of New York, 
H.,387. 

New York Genealogical and Biographical Record, 
VII., no. 

G. R. Howell: Heraldry in England and America, 1884. 

D'HozIER : Armorial Gin&al de France, 1700. 

Charles Sagging: Trc'sor Hcraldique on Mercurc Armo- 
rial, 16^7. 

J. B. RiEDSTAP: Armorial Universel, 1861. 

Le p. Anselme: Histoire GifnMogique and Chronologique 
des Grands Officiers dc la Couromie, ed. of 1731. 

Rev. C. W. Baird, D.D. : The Hugiicjiot Emigration in 
America, 1885. 




26 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



Clinton 



Three of our New York governors bore these 
arms; one with full right to them — the Admiral 
George Clinton, Royal Governor (1743-53). The 
two others only had, to our knowledge, a pos- 
sible claim to this shield, which is that of the 
English Clintons, Earls of Lincoln and Dukes 
of Newcastle. 

George Clinton, godson of the admiral above 
named, was the first State Governor {ini). That 
he had some blood relationship with his god- 
father's family has been often asserted. We find 
Governor de Witt Clinton, his descendant, using 
the same arms on his bookplate [Rousseau col- 
lection]. 



Crest : Out of a ducal coronet, 
gules, a plume of five ostrich 
feathers, argent, banded by a rib- 
bon, azure. 

A. Loyalti n'a honte. [Loyalty never 
shames.] 

B. (Used by De Witt Clinton) : Cara 
patria, carior libertas. [Dear the 
country, dearer liberty.] 



T. Gwilt-Mapleson : Hand Book of Heraldry, 1851. 

Heraldic Journal, IV., 96. 

Evelyn Philip Shirley : The Noble and Gentle Men of 

Etigland, ijg. 
Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 

etc., 1883. 
The Book of Family Crests, II., 345. 




Mottoes : 



Stui^vesant 



Peter Stuyvesant, the famed Governor of the 
New Netherlands (1647), was the son of a Fries- 
land clergyman. His sister, Anne, was the wife 
of Lazarus Bayard. 

He brought over these arms. 




Crest : Out of a prince's coronet, 
or, a demi-stag, salient and contoum^ : 
proper. 



Motto : Jove prcestat fcsderi. [Let us have the 
gods for our allies.] 

G. R. Howell: Heraldry in England and America, 6, 

1884. 
Mrs. Martha J. Lamb: History of the City of New York, 

I., 130. 
T. Gwilt-Mapleson : Hand Book of Heraldry, 1851. 
J. B. Riedstap : Armorial Universel, ed. of 1 861. 



Xu&Iow 



The Ludlow family derives its name from the 
town of Ludlow, in Shropshire, England. In 
1349, Sir Laurence de Ludlowe founded the 
Monastery of St. Mary White-Friars, in that 
town. 

The emigrant, Gabriell Ludlow, who came over 
to New York in 1694, was issiied from a branch 
of the family settled, since the XIV. century, at 
Hill Deverill, in Wiltshire. 

To the same family belonged Lieutenant Gen- 
eral Sir Edmund Ludlow of Maiden Bradley, 
who died in exile (1693) for having voted the 
death of Charles I. The Earldom of Ludlow 
(extinct, 1842) was in the family. A complete 
pedigree to date exists in the archives of the 
New York Ludlow family. 

In the older engravings, the animals charged 
on the shield have always been found to be 
martens, not bears. 



Crests : A. A demi-bear, rampant. 
B. A lion, rampant. 




AMERICA HERALDICA 27 

Motto : Spero infestis, metuo secundis. [In ad- Greswolde of Malvern Hall, near Lyme Regis, 
varsity, I hope ; in prosperity, I fear.] England. 



Bolton : History of Westchester Co., N. Y., II., 425. 

Mrs. Martha J. Lamb: History of the City of New York< 
II., 446. 

Sir Bernard Burke: The General Armory of England, 
etc., i88j. 

Sir Bernard Burke : Gen. and Herald. Hist, of Dor- 
mant, Abeya?it, Forfeited, atid Extinct Peerages of the 
British Empire, 1883, p. j'i'j. 

The Book of Family Crests, II., 297. 



Marten 




Crest : A greyhound, passant : 
proper. 



Mrs. Martha J. Lamb : History of the City of New York 

II., 612. 
The Descendants of Matthew Griswold, 1856. 
W. H. Whitmore : The American Genealogist, z8jj. 
W. Berry : EncyclopcBdia Heraldica, 1828. 
Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1883. 




The emigrant, John Warren, belonged to the 
Warrens of Poynton, county Chester, a younger 
branch of the Earls of Warren, now extinct. 
He came over in 1640, with Winthrop, from 
Head, county Devon. 

Another emigrant, Richard Warren, probably 
of the same stock, came over in 1653. 



Crest : A demi-eagle, displayed. 



Motto : Virtus mihi scutum. [Virtue my shield.] 



John C. Warren : Genealogy of Warren, 1858. 

W. H. Whitmore : The American Genealogist, 1875. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 

etc., 1883. 
Prince's Chronological History of New England, 1736. 



©riswolb 

We have here a clear pedigree. 
Matthew Griswold, the emigrant, came to Say 
Brook in 1639. He descended from Sir Matthew 



(Barbiner, (5ar6ner 

The original Gardiners and Gardners seem 
to have borne in the old country very similar 
coats of arms, and both spellings are frequently 
found in old records of the same families. 

In America, the same state of things seems to 
have existed, as we find the identical coat of 
arms (the one we give in this work) borne, with 
slight modifications, by some branches of the 
Gardiner and Gardner stock. 

The tomb of Chief Justice John Gardner of 
Rhode Island (1767), shows the coat of arms we 
insert, except the crest, none being visible. This 
eminent citizen was son of the emigrant, Joseph 
Gardner (i 669-1 726). 

Lion Gardiner reached Boston in 1635. In 
1639 he took possession of his principalty of 
"Gardiner's Island," and made it a real little 
kingdom. On his seal (1636) we find the crest 
as sole device. 

On the tomb of his descendant, David Gar- 
diner, the fourth Lord — 1691-1751 — is found the 
coat of arms we give here. 

We notice in Burke the same arms as belong- 
ing to the Reverend Richard Gardiner, D.D., 
Canon of Christ Church, Oxford (died 1670). 



28 



AMERICA HERALDICA 




Crest [On a seal of Lion Gar- 
diner] : A pelican, sable, vulning it- 
self, gules. 



Motto (In English authorities) : Deo non for- 
tuna. [Trusting in God, not in chance.] 

It is contested, with some authority, that Lio7i 
Gardiner, of Gardiner's Island, was entitled to 
the above coat of arms, and the best known 
family of Gardiner, and that presenting, at the 
same time, the clearest English pedigree, is that 
descending from Joseph Gardiner, of Rhode 
Island. This gentleman came over by way of 
Holland, in 1650-51. His father, Sir Thotnas 
Gardiner, Knight, had fought for Charles I. 
The family coat of arms we give here as an 
extra engraving, having obtained it too late for 
insertion in our regular plates. Here is the he- 
raldic description of both coat and crest : 



Arms : Or, on a chevron, 
gules, between three griffins' 
heads, erased, azure, two 
lions counterpassant of the 
field, or. 

Crest : A Saracen's head 
couped at the shoulders : 
proper. On the head a cap, 
turned up, gules and azure, 
crined and bearded, sable. 



SSleecP^er 




Motto : Pnesio pro patria. 
country.] 



[I stand for my 



Mrs. Martha J. Lamb : History of the City of New York, 

I., 570; II., 635. 
J. B. HOLGATE: American Genealogy, iS^i. 
Sir Bernard Burke : The Ge^ieral Armory of England, 

etc., 1883. 
The Book of Family Crests, II., 192, 193. 
Heraldic Journal, TIL, 113. 



Jan Jansen Bleecker came over to New Am- 
sterdam, from Meppel, province of Overyssel, 
Netherlands, in 1658. 

He was mayor of Albany (1700), and married 
a daughter of Rutger Jacobson. 

He seems to have been quite wealthy, — and 
the arms have been in the family from the 
time of the emigration. 



Crest : A pheon, or. 



Bolton : History of Westchester Co., N. V., //., 710. 
Pearson: Genealogies of the First Settlers of Albany, i86g. 




Xuquer 



The L'EscuYERS, of the family of L'Escuyer, 
Lords of Muret, cl good French parliamentary 
stock (i. e., having occupied high positions in the 
Paris Parlemenl), originate from Northern France 
and Paris. 

They emigrated to Holland for religious mo- 
tives. 

Later, one of them, Jan L'Escuyer, came over 
to the New Netherlands in 1658, and settled on 
Long Island, part of his estate being still in the 
possession of his descendants. 

From him came all the Luquers or Luqueers 
now in the United States. 



Crest : A demi-lion, rampant, gules. 




AMERICA HERALDICA 



29 



Motto : Invidiam fortuna donat. [Fortune be- British army, and finally settled on this side of 
gets envy.] the ocean. 

His son, John, was a U. S. Senator for New 
Jersey (1791-98). 



d'Hozier : Armorial General de France, ijoo and ijoS. 

J. B. RiEDSTAP: Armorial Universel, ed. of 1 861. 

T. G. Bergen ; The Bergen Family, 1876. 

B. F. Thompson: History of Long Island, N. Y., 184.3. 




Crest : A martlet, sable. 



Sainclair, or Sinclair 

The emigrant, Robert Sinclair, came to New 
York in 1677. He was son of James Sinclair, 
a lineal descendant of the Earls of Orkney and 
Caithness (Scotch Peers). 

R. H. Ludlow, Esq., of New York, has in his 
possession a silver tankard having belonged to 
the early American Sinclairs, and bearing the 
arms we afive. 



Crest : A swan, argent, collared and 
chained, or, beaked, gules. 




Motto : Fight. 



Bolton : History of Westchester Co., N. Y., //., 424. 
Miscellanea Genealogica, III., 172. 
Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 
etc., 188^. 



Motto : Nee sorte nee fata. [Neither by 
chance nor by fate.] 



Burke : Heraldic Illustrations, II., 108 {1845). 

S. V. Talcott : Genealogical Notes of New York and New 

England Families, i88j. 
W. Berry : Encydopcedia Heraldica, 1828. 
The Book of Family Crests, II., 408. 



Hmor^ 



IRutberfurb 



The father of the emigrant was Robert Amory, 
of Bunratty, Ireland (1600). Jonathan Amory, 
the emigrant, moved to the Carolinas, where he 
held high offices, and died in 1699. 

His son settled in Boston. From him come 
all the Amorys in Ireland and America descend- 
ing from the Amorys of Bunratty. 

A copy of the arms was obtained by the 
family, from the Ulster Herald, in 1864. 



Crest : An eagle's head, erased, or. 



Motto : Fidelis et suavis. [Faithful and gentle]. 




The pedigree of this family is clearly estab- 
lished back to Robert Rutherfurd, of Scotland 
(1140). 

In the last century. Sir John Rutherfurd's 
son, Walter, came over here as an officer in the 



Amory Amistead : Amory, i8§6. 

W. H. WhitmorE: The American Genealogist, 1875. 

Sir Bernard Burke: The General Armory of England,. 

etc., 1883. 
W. Berry : Encydopcedia Heraldica, 1828. 
The Book of Family Crests {see Armory), p. 14. 



30 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



SSetbune 



On a seal affixed to the deed of partition of 
the estates of Norden Pedrik, of Marblehead 
(1723), we find the arms of George Bethune, 
the emigrant, who came over from Scotland, and 
appears to have belonged to the family of B£- 
THUNE of Balfour, county Fife. [The family 
claims anterior French origin.] 

The son of the emigrant married Miss Mary 
Faneuil, of Boston. 



Crest : An otter's head, erased : 
proper. 




Motto : Ddbo7inaire. 



J. L. Weisse: Genealogical Charts and Records of the 

Families of Bi'thune and Faneuil, 1866. 
W. H. WhITMORE : The American Genealogist, 187$. 
W. Berry : Encyclopiedia Heraldica, 1828. 
The Book of Family Crests, II., 39. 



Heraldic Journal, III., 167. 

New England Genealogical and Historical Regis- 
ter, XXXIII., 432. 

Sir Bernard Burke : 77^^ General Armory of England, 
etc., 1883. 

Prince : Genealogical History of New England, 1736. 



Coffin 



Hrnolb 



Tristram Coffyn was born at Brixton, county 
Devon, England, in 1605. He emigrated to Bos- 
ton in 1642, and died in 1681. 

The coat of arms we publish was kept in the 
family from the time of the emigration. Another 
coat of arms was granted to Sir Isaac Coffin, 
a descendant of Tristram, a noted loyalist and a 
deserving naval officer. 

The coat of arms we give has never, to our 
knowledge, been proved to have been regularly 
granted, or endorsed by the Heralds Visitations, 
but it has been in the family since the emi- 
gration. 

The English Coffins place the crosses of the 
shield saltiretuise instead of crosswise. 



These arms are found on the tomb of Oliver 
Arnold (died, .1770), in the Old North Church- 
yard, at Providence, R. I. 

The emigrant, William Arnold, the youngest 
son of Thomas Arnold, of Cheselbourne, county 
Dorset, England, came to Hingham, Mass., in 
1635. A complete pedigree of the family is in 
existence. 




Crest : A pigeon close, or, be- 
tween two roses : proper. 



Motto : Post tenebras, speramus Imnen dc lu- 
mine. [After darkness we hope the brightest 



light] 



Crests : A. K demi-tiger, argent, 
pellets, holding in its paws a fire-ball : 
proper. 

B. A lion, rampant, gules, holding 
between its paws a lozenge, or. 



Motto : Mihi gloria ccssitm. 




Cyrus Woodman : 77;^ Memoirs and Journals of Rev. 
Paul Coffin, D.D., 1855. 

Genealogy of the Early Generations of the Cof- 
fin Family in New England, 1870. 

Heraldic Journal, III., 49. 

New England Genealogical and Historical Regis- 
ter, XXXV., 276. 

W. H. Whitmore: The American Genealogist, TS75. 



AMERICA HERALDICA. 



PLATE IV, 




i pBHSH 



mo]P^Y 




ETHVnE 




T^ROLD 







o 






'Vff' 



*«rStrtO;r2si«»?.^i:>3;Wt.^i *'«^-> 



c 



OFFin 




J^WSTE?^ 



VJ H A 



SE 




LiAliA 



jUhAKE w©E1iCH 



E>^ 




D 



VSRAHESQ. 




Do 



DqE 



[(> 



AW]P^I2CE 




q 



I Li 02 AH 




(rfi 



EFF]P(IES 




SASCAIP^ERE 




u 



EVET^ETT 




14 



=^-p>,w 



■p. J,V\^r^- - ^^ 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



31 



Brewster 



The genealogists do not agree upon the origin 
of this noted New England family. Steele names 
William Brewster, an inn-keeper of Scrooby, 
county Suffolk, England (1620), as the first emi- 
grant, whilst Savage insists on John Brewster, 
of Portsmouth (1665), as being the head of the 
family. In doubt, the New England Brewsters 
have adopted English arms, duly recorded in 
Burke. 



Crest : A bear's head, erased, azure. 




Motto : Veritd soyet ma garde. 
guard.] 



[Truth be my 



T. Gwilt-Mapleson : Hand Book of Heraldry, 1852. 
VV. H. Whitmore : The American Genealogist, 18^5. 
Sir Bernard Burke : 77/1? General Armory of England, 

etc., 1883. 
Rev. Ashbel Steele : The Chief of the Pilgrims, or the 

Life and Time of William Brewster. 
The Book of Family Crests, II., 62. 



Cbase 



Aquila Chase, mariner, was a descendant of 
the family of Chase, or Chause, long settled 
in Suffolk, which, in the reign of Henry VII., 
came into Buckinghamshire, and settled at Ches- 
ham. He was in New England, with his brother 
Thomas, about 1636-7. 

In 1639, Aquila Chase was a grantee of 
Hampton. 

The shield is found in the Visilalions of county 
Berks for 1634. 

Chief Justice Chase was a descendant of Aquila 
Chase. 




Crest : A demi-lion, rampant, or, 
holdinsf a cross of the shield. 



Motto : Forward! 



Nahum Chase : The Pedigree of Chase, 1867. 

Geo. B. Chase : A Genealogical Memoir of the Chase Fam- 
ily, i86g. 

Heraldic Journal, IV., 153. 

W. H. Whitmore: The American Genealogist, i8';§. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1883. 

Record Office, London : Domestic Papers of Charles I. 



H)rake 



John Drake, of the original company organized 
by King James I., in 1606, to colonize New 
England, belonged to the family of Drake of 
Ashe, county Devon, England. 

He came over to Boston in 1630. 

Of course, Admiral Drake's arms, granted to 
him for especial services on the seas, are totally 
different from the example we give. We have 
seen, in the Rousseau collection, a bookplate of 
a descendant of John Drake, William. Walker 
Drake. 



Cre.sts : A. An eagle dis- 
played, gules. 

B. A dexter arm, erect, 
proper, holding a battle-axe, 
sable, headed, argent. 



Mottoes : A. Sic parvis magna. [Thus com- 
paring great things with small.] 
B. Tim^e tryeth Tryst. 



Bolton : History of Westchester Co., N. Y., //., ^26. 
S.Gardner Drake: A Genealogical and Biographical Ac- 
count of the Family of Drake in America, 184.;. 




32 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



W. H. VVhitmore : The American Genealogist, i8j5. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 

etc., 1883. 
Burke : Heraldic Illustrations, II., loj {184s). 
The Book of Family Crests, II., 108. 



Belcber 



The emigrant, Andrew Belcher, settled in the 
Massachusetts Colony in 1639. 

We find the coat of arms of his son, Andrew 
Belcher, commissary general of the province, on 
the Gore Roll of Arms (171 7). The grandson of 
the emigrant, Jonathan Belcher, was governor of 
Nova Scotia, and used the same shield on his 
seal (1760). 

The family came from the Belchers of Kings- 
wood, county Wilts, England. 



Crest : A greyhound's head, erased, 
ermine. 



Motto : Loyal an mort. [True to the dead.] 



Gore's Roll of Arms, No. 37. 

W. H. Whitmore: The American Genealogist, iSjS. 

Heraldic Journal, III., p. 61. 

The Book of Family Crests, II., 34. 

Prince: Genealogical History of New England, 1736. 




Du Maresq, was a commander in the Royal Brit- 
ish Navy, and crossed frequently the ocean, bring- 
ing Huguenot emigrants over to New England. 
In 1 716, he married, in Boston, a Miss Susannah 
Ferris, and began the American family of Du- 
maresq. 

Burke endorses this pedigree. 



Crest : A bull, passant, guardant : 
proper. 




Motto : Dzim vivo spero. 
there's hope.] 



[While there's life 



A Sketch of the Family of Du Maresq, 1875. 
W. H. Whitmore: The Americaji Genealogist, 1875. 
Heraldic Journal, III., 97. 

Sir Bernard Burke: The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1883. 



S)obge 



The emigrant, William Dodge, came over from 
Cheshire, England, to Salem, in 1629. He was 
issued from an old Kentish stock, — the only of 
the name noticed in Burke. 

Several patents, granting arms or confirming 
preceding grants, are preserved in the family to 
this day. 



2)umare8q 



Before 1291, a Norman family of Dumaresq 
settled on the island of Jersey, and a clear record 
of its pedigree from William Dumaresq (1390) 
is still preserved. 




Crest : A demi-sea-lion, azure, col- 
lared and finned, or. 



Robert Dodge : Meeting of the Dodge Family, in Salem, 

Mass., i87g. 
Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 

etc., 1883. 



One of the descendants of the above, Philip The Book of Family Crests, II., 145. 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



33 



Xawrence 

Sir Robert Laurens, of Ashton Hall, county 
Lancaster, England, lived there in 1 1 9 1 . His de- 
scendant, Sir John Lawrence, had his estates 
confiscated in 1499. A direct descendant of his, 
John Lawrence, died in 1538. 

The American family of Lawrence claims, as 
its direct ancestor, Henry Lawrence, said to have 
been the son of the above John, and who had 
himself three sons, John, William, and Thomas, 
who emigrated, the two first, in 1635, the third 
before 1650. 

The male descendance of John is extinct. Wil- 
liam settled in Flushing, L. I., and Thomas, who 
had settled first at Newtown, L. I., purchased, 
later, the whole of Hell Gate Neck. He died 
in 1703. His will shows the imprint of a seal 
bearing the arms we give. 

The motto B is furnished by Burke as be- 
longing to English Lawrences, bearing the 
same coat of arms, and still represented in the 
gentry of Great Britain. 



Crest : A demi-turbot, in pale, gules, 
the tail upwards. 



Mottoes : A. In crtice salus. [In the cross 
is salvation.] 
B. Qucero, invenio. [I seek, I 
find.] 



Xawrance 

These arms were given to Lawrance, of Lon- 
don, goldsmith, by William Dethick, Garter, in 

1594- 

They are admitted to be the arms of the 
family of Lawrance, of Pennsylvania. 

The emigrant ancestor, Thomas Lawrance, had 




joined very early the Society of Friends, and 
died in 1775, in the province of New Jersey. 



Arms : Argent, a cross, 
raguly, gules ; on a chief, 
azure, three leopards' heads, 




^ 



11 

\.5>^ Z'Z/Z 



^ 



Crest : A demi-turbot, in 
pale, gules, the tail up- 
wards. 

Motto : In cruce salus. 



Mercy Hale Stowe -. A General Memoir of the Family of 
Lawrence, with a Direct Male Line from Sir Robert Lau- 
rens, of Lancashire {ugi), down to John Lawrence, of Wa- 
tertown {i6j6), 1856. 

John Lawrence: The Genealogy of the Family of John 
Lawrence, of Wisset, County Suffolk, and Watertown, 
N. E., 1857. 

Thomas Lawrence: General History of the Family of 
Lawrence, 18^8. 

The Will of William Lawrence and Other Wills 
(1783-1848), i860. 

Lawrence Buckley Thomas : Genealogical Notes, 1877. 

J. B. Holgate : America?i Genealogy, 1851. 

New York Genealogical and Biographical Record, 
IIL, 121. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1883. 

Burke : Heraldic Ilhistratiotis, II., 63 {1845). 

The Book of Family Crests, II., 279. 



©ilman 



Edward Gilman, of Hingham, county Norfolk, 
England, came over to Hingham, Mass., in 1638, 
with wife, children, and several servants. Mr. 
Whitmore writes: "We find the American family 
(of Gilman) entitled to the arms they bear, as 
they have not been challenged by the English 
branch, still existing." 



34 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



The English crest furnished by Berry is differ- 
ent from the one we publish from family records. 

The colors of the shield and charges have 
been changed, in the Norfolk branch, to : Ar- 
ge7it, a man's leg, etc., sable. The Gloucester- 
shire GiLMANS still preserve the original colors, 
which we give. It is a well-known fact that 
such changes were often used as marks of ca- 
dence. 



Crest : Out of a cap of mainte- 
nance, a demi-lion, rampant : proper. 




Mottoes : A. Espdrance. [Hope.] 
B. Si Deus, quis contra. 
with us, who against?] 



[If God 



Rev. Francis Blomfield: History of Norfolk, lyjg. 
Arthur Oilman : History of That Branch of tJie Gilman 

Family Descending From Jolm, of Exeter, N. H., l86j. 
Arthur Gilman : Genealogy of the Gilman Family in 

England and America, 1 86^. 
Arthur Oilman : 772^ Gilman Family, i86g. 
Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 

etc., i88j. 
W. H. Whitmore: The American Genealogist, i8'/§. 
Heraldic Journal, I., 151. 
W. Berry : Encydopcedia Heraldica, 1828. 



Jeffries 



The emigrant, David Jeffries, came over in 
1677, from Rhoad, Wilts, England, to Boston. 
A bookplate of last century, engraved by Cal- 
lender, reproduces the arms we give, and which 
are that of the Jefferyes of Clifton Home- 
castle, county Worcester, England. We do not 
know of any established connection between the 
English and American pedigrees. 

The Jaffrays — a totally distinct family, settled 
in New Hampshire — seem to have blended origin 



and armorial bearings with that of the above 
Jeffries, of Boston. 



Crest : On a rock, argent, a 
castle, or, the two end towers 
domed. 



Heraldic Journal, HI., 23. 

Prince: Genealogical History of New England, 1736. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 

etc., 1883. 
The Book of Family Crests, H., 254. 
S. G. Drake: Tlie History and Antiquities of Boston, 1856. 




/Iftascarene 



In 1535, lived in Castres, in southern France, 
a family of gentle blood and strong protestant 
convictions. Its chief was Martin Mascarene, 
whose descendants had to fly on religious mo- 
tives, and took refuge in England, where they 
were naturalized. 

Later, Jean Paul Mascarene came over to 
America in 1711, as an English officer. He 
settled in Boston, and we find there his tomb- 
stone, with arms engraved, in the old Granary 
Burying Ground (1760). A Mascarene family 
still exists in southern France with a similar 
coat of arms. 



Crest : A golden mullet. 



Motto : Non sola mortali luce radior. [I do 
not shine thro' mortal light only.] 



Heraldic Journal, II., 125. 

J. B. Rietstap: Armorial Universel, ed. of i86i,p. 685. 




AMERICA HERALDICA 



35 



Rev. C. W. Baird, D.D. : Tlie Huguenot Emigration in 

America, 1885. 
Bachelin-Deflorenne : Etat Present de la Noblesse Fran- 

qaise, ed. of 18J3. 
S. G. Drake: The History and Antiquities of Boston, i8§6. 



of William Miner, of Chew Magna, England, 

(1585). 

His coat of arms was acknowledged in 1606, 
by the Clarencieux Herald. It is borne by the 
Enghsh family of Mynors. 



Xeverett 




Crest: A naked arm, couped at 
the elbow : proper — holding a lion's 
gamb, erased, sable. 



Thomas Leverit came over to Boston in 1663, 
from Boston, England. His son. Governor John 
Leverett (1682), used these arms as his seal. 
He was, moreover, knighted by King Charles II. 

The family was accepted in 1564 by the her- 
alds in their Lincolnshire Visitations. 

The tombstone of John Leverett (1724) pres- 
ident of Harvard College, bears the same de- 
vices. The Gore Roll of Arms gives as iden- 
tical the arms of Mrs. Anna Sedgwick Leverit, 
widow of the governor (1703). 

It is singular that Berrj^ gives this same coat 
of arms to the Levers, of county Lancaster. 



Crest : A hare, courant : proper. 



Nathaniel B. ShuRTLEFF: A Genealogical Memoir of 
Elder Thomas Leverett, of Boston, 1850. 

A Memoir, Biographical and Genealogical, of Sir 
John Leverett, Kt., Governor of Massachusetts, 
AND of His Other Descendants, 1856. 

Heraldic Journal, I., 29, 84. 

W. H. WhitmorE: The American Genealogist, i8jS- 

W. Berry : Encyclopcedia Heraldica, 1828. 

S. G. Drake: The History and Antiquities of Boston, 1856. 




Motto : Spero tit fidelis. [I hope because 
faithful] 



W. H. WhitmorE: Pedigree of Miner, 1868. 
Heraldic Journal, I., 168. 
W. Berry : Encyclopcedia Heraldica, 1828. 
The Book of Family Crests, II., 329. 



Hnberson 



Alexander Anderson was the first wood en- 
graver of note and merit established in America. 

Born in Great Britain, in 1775, his bookplate 
— by himself — reproduces his ' arms ; and we have 
copied them from an example in the collection 
of J. E. Mauran, Esq., of Newport, R. I. 

A similar coat of arms was granted (Temp. 
Edward VI.) to a Henry Anderson, of New- 
castle, gentleman. We presume that he was the 
ancestor of Alexa7ider Anderson. 



Crest : A falcon's head, of the shield. 




Motto : Vigila. [Watch !] 



/Iftiner 

The emigrant, Thomas Miner, was living in 
Stonington, Ct., in 1683. His father was son 



Sir Bernard Burke: The General Armory of Englatid, 
etc., 1883. 

W. Berry : Encyclopcedia Heraldica, 1828. 

Richard C. Lichtenstein'S Collection of Book Plates, Bos- 
ton, 1886. 



36 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



SSolton 



Robert Bolton, of county York, England, had 
for a grandson Adam Bolton, of Brockhouse, 
England (1570). The grandson of the latter, 
John Bolton, of Brockhouse, Blackburn, county 
Lancaster, was the emigrant. His descent froin 
gentle blood is undiscussed. 



Crest: The falcon of the shield. 



Motto : Aymez loyaltd. [Love loyalty.] 



Heraldic Journal, II., no. 

W. H. Whitmore: The American Ge?iealogisi , iSyg. 

Robert Bolton : Genealogical and Biographical Account 

of the Family of Bolton in England attd America, 1862. 
New York Genealogical and Biographical Record, 

IX., 5- 
The Book of Family Crests, II., 49. 




J. B. RiETSTAP: Armorial Universel, ed. of 1861. 
Bolton : History of Westchester Co., N. Y., II., J22. 
New York Genealogical and Biographical Record, 

III., 30. 
d'Hozier : Armorial Gdn&al de France, MS. 



Cruger 



The family claims to be of Danish origin, and 
to belong to the baronial family of Von Cruger. 

The emigrant, John Cruger, came over here 
from Holland in i588. He brought over an 
iron seal, bearing engraved the coat of arms we 
publish. It is still in existence. Also, a family 
Bible of the same epoch, still in the possession 
of the family. 



Crest : A demi-greyhound : proper : 
gorged, or. 




Motto : Fides. [Faith !] 



SSartovp 



General Bertaut, from French Brittany, fled 
religious persecution after the massacre of the 
St. Bartholomew day (August, 1572). He went 
to Holland, then to England. 

The emigrant was his lineal descendant, and 
claimed kinship with the French Seignezirs de 
Frdaville, Coiircelles, etc. 

Rietstaps Armorial gives a slightly different 
coat of arms to the French de Bertauts. 



Crest : Issuing from a ducal cor- 




onet, a cross, radiant, or. 



New York Genealogical and Biographical Record, 

VI., 75- 
T. Gwilt-Mapleson : Hand Book of Heraldry, 1 8^1. 
J. B. RiETSTAP: Armorial Universel, ed. of 1 861. 



Brown oi iR^e 



The emigrant, Thomas Browne of Rye, county 
Sussex, England, came over to Concord, Mass., 
in 1632. 

The connection is not established with the 
family of Sir Slcphen Browne, Mayor of Lon- 
don in 1439, the arms of whom we reproduce. 
The same shield is, however, found on the tomb, 
in Westchester county, of the Rev. Marmaduke 
Brown, a descendant of Thomas, the emigrant. 



AMERICA HERALDICJA 



37 




Crest : A buck's head, erased : 
proper — attired and ducally gorged, 



Motto : Suivez raison. [Follow reason.] 



Heraldic Journal, II., 14. 

Bolton : History of Westchester Co., N. Y., II., 714. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The Gejieral Armory of Etigland, 

etc., 1883. 
The Book of Family Crests, II., 68. 



2)isbrow 

The family known here as the Disbrows, of 
Mamaroneck, N. Y., claim descent from General 
Desborough, who married the sister of the Pro- 
tector. 

The emigrant, Peter Disbrow, came from 
county Essex, England, in 1666, and settled in 
Rye, N. Y. 

We find trace of this family in English works 
on heraldry only under the spellings Desbrowe 
and Desborough. Two crests are furnished by 
these authors. The coat of arms itself has been 
preserved in the family since the emigration. 



Culler 




We find the emigrant, Hendricks Cuyler, in 
Albany in 1664, where he and his descendants 
prospered, and occupied high positions in the 
city government. 

The CuYLERS of England, baronets in county 
Herts, having come over with William III., 
bear the same arms and crest, indicating clearly 
a common origin. 



Crest : On a mural crown, or, a 
battle-axe : proper and erect. Above 
it, two arrows, saltierwise, or, pointed, 
argent; the points downwards. 



Pearson: Genealogies of the First Settlers in Albany, iSyi. 
'^'s.yfj York Genealogical and Biographical Record, 

IV., 77. 
Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of Engl&nd, 

etc., 1883. 
The Book of Family Crests, II., 129. 
O'Callaghan'S History of the New Netherlands. 




Crests: A. A bear's head, couped, 
sable, muzzled, or. 
B. A talbot's head, erased. 



Morant : History of Essex Co., England. 

Bolton : History of Westchester Co., N. Y., I., 4.^8. 

Sir Bernard Burke : Tlie General Armory of England, 

etc., 1883. 
The Book of Family Crests, II., 141. 



Coutant 

On February 6, 1695, letters of denization 
were delivered, under the seal of the province 
of New York, to Jean Coustant, a Huguenot 
refugee of good family, who settled in West- 
chester county. 

His descendants have kept a clear pedigree 
from him down, and a full pedigree, also pre- 
served, from the emigrant back to the founder 
of the family, Thibaut oT'Ercuis, dit Coustant, 
or, Coutant, who died in 1293. Mr. Borel 
d'Hanterive, in his Amiuaire de la Noblesse 
Frangaise, has given the full genealogy of the 



38 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



French Coustants, now known on the other 
side as Counts Coustant d'Yanville {s not 
sounded). 



W. H. Whitmore: The American Genealogist, 18^5. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 

etc., 1883. 
The Book of Family Crests, II., 331, 339. 




Crest: A French count's coronet. 



Motto : A Coustant labeur ne couste. [No 
work too hard for Coutant.] 



Bolton : History of Westchester Co., N. Y., I., 5^5. 
d'Hozier: Armorial Ghiiral de France, Province de Paris, 

I., 18, 676. 
Le Pere Anselme : Histoire G^nMogique et Chronologiqtie 

des Grands Officiers de la Couronne, III., 5/^, A. 
Borel d'HauterivE: Anmiaire de la Noblesse Francaise, 

i86g, p. 2g8; 1871-72, p. 162. 
Bachelin-Deflorenne : Etat Present de la Noblesse Fran- 

qaise, ed. of 187 j. 



/Iftonroe, m^unroe 

-' . ■ // . . . - 

The emigrant, the Reverend Henry Munro, 
was issued from the prominent family of Mun- 
ro, or Monro, Lairds of Killachoan, in Scot- 
land, and his lineal ancestor was Sir Robert 
MuNRO of Fowles. 

The emigrant came over in 1757, as a mili- 
tary chaplain, and settled in America. 



Crest : An eagle displayed. In 
his beak, a laurel sprig : proper. 



Motto : Dread God. 



P. Doddridge : The Ancient Family of Munroe, 1796. 
John Goodwin Locke : The Book of Lockes, 1853. 
New York Genealogical and Biographical Record, 
IV., 122. 



/Iftunsell 




The origin of the English family of Maun- 
SELL goes back to Sir Philip de Maunsell, who 
came over with the Conqueror. The barony of 
Mansel is found in Biirke's Extinct Peerages, 
with the same arms ; and we remark, in Shir- 
ley s Noble and Gentle Men of England, the ex- 
istence of the gentle family of Maunsell, of 
Thorpe Malsor, county Northampton. Another 
branch — always with the same arms — settled in 
county Limerick, Ireland. 

Jacob Munsell, who settled, in the last cent- 
ury, at Windsor, Ct, was the emigrant-ancestor 
of the Albany publisher. The connection is 
probable, but not absolutely proved with the 
English family. 

We find a Robert Mansell, gentlentan, in 
Virginia, in 1621. 



Crest : A cap of maintenance, 
in flames at the top:' proper. 



Motto: Quod vult, valdg^ vult. [A will of his 
own.] 



New York Genealogical and Biographical Record, 
XL, 53- 

New England Historical and Genealogical Regis- 
ter, XXXIV., 246. 

Stile's History of Ancient Windsor, Ct., i8^g. 

Evelyn Philip Shirley : The Noble and Gentle Men of 
England, 1866. 

SiR Bernard Burke; Gen. History of Dormant, Abeyant, 
Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages of the British Empire, 
1883. 

W. H. Whitmore: The American Genealogist, 1875. 

The Book of Family Crests, II., 319. 




AMERICA HERALDICA. 



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AMERICA HERALDICA 



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Iprepost 



The Prevosts, Seigneurs de la Javeliire and de 
la Simonie, in the province of Poictou, France, 
emigrated, for religious motives, to Geneva, 
Switzerland, where the family still exists and 
prospers. A branch of the same stock removed 
to the protestant Netherlands, and, later, to 
North America, where they also prospered. 

We have imprints of seals and letters, a cent- 
ury old, received from the European branch of 
the family, and leaving no possible doubt as to 
the connection. 

The Prevosts, English baronets, of county 
Herts, descending from Sir George Prevost, 
Governor-general of Canada, a hundred years ago, 
bear the same arms, and are considered as close 
relations by both the Swiss and American 
branches. 

[The mural crown in the crest is sometimes 
replaced by a marquess' coronet] 



Crest : Out of a mural crown, 
or, a demi-lion, rampant, azure. 



Armorial de Geneve. 

Bolton : History of Westchester Co., N. Y., /., 6g. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of Great 

Britain, etc., i88j. 
J. B. Rietstap: Armorial Universel, 1861. 
d'Hozier : Armorial Ghi^ral de France, ijoo, MS. 
The Book of Family Crests, II., 384. 




WanM^cl^ 



Cornelius Berents Van Wyck came over in 
1660, to the New Netherlands, from his native 
village of Wyck, near Teck, Holland. 

The name figures on the nobiliaries of Hol- 



land, and the first generation succeeding the emi- 
grant appears to have made use of the arms we 
give. 

Crest: A ducal coronet. 

Motto : Ore et corde idem. [Word and 
thought alike.] 



Mrs. Martha J. Lamb: History of the City of New York, 

//., 4.01). 
W. F. G. L. Van der Dussen and M. P. Smissaert: 

Genealogical Charts of the Netherlatid Race, 1 86^-7 Z- 
J. B. Rietstap: Armorial Universel, i88s. 



lp)ierrepont 



James Pierrepont was the first emigrant of 
the name, and settled at Ipswich, Mass. The 
arms we give are in the family from the first 
American generations. 

These arms are those of the Pierreponts, 
Earls Manvers and Dukes of Kingston [ex- 
tinct]. Mr. Whitmore, always strict, and even 
severe, in such matters, declares that he sees no 
impossibility "nor absurdity in trying to trace 
the emigrant to a common origin." 



Crest : A lion, rampant, sable, 
between two wings, erect, argent. 



Motto : Pie repone te. [Calmly rest.] 



Account of the Celebration of the iooth Anni- 
versary OF the Wedding of John Pierpont and 
His Wife, 1867. 

W. H. Whitmore : The American Genealogist, 1875. 




46 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



Sir Bernard Burke : Gen. History of the Dormant, Abey- 
ant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages of the British Em- 
pire, i88j. 

The Book of Family Crests, II., 313. 



IDan IDoorbees 

Sieveti Coerte Van Voor Hies came over to 
the New Netherlands, in 1660, from the hamlet 
of Hies, near Ruinen, Drenthen province, Hol- 
land. 

He settled at Flatlands, L. I. 

In 1872, an extract of the arms was delivered 
to the family by an heraldic office in London. 

Colonel Van der Dussen furnished the same 
coat of arms to the Reverend J. C. Schenck, 
as being that of the Voorhis family of Holland. 



Crest: A tower of the shield. 



Motto : Virtus castellum ine2im. [Virtue my 
stronghold.] 




received the concession of the domain since 
called Pennsylvania, and his son and grandson 
after him were the proprietary governors of 
Pennsylvania. John Penn, the grandson [1760- 
1830], was the last hereditary governor. His 
son, Richard, married in Philadelphia, and left 
descendants. 

Same arms, etc., as the Penns of Stoke Park, 
county Berks, England. 



Crest : A demi-lion, rampant, ar- 
gent, gorged with a collar, sable, 
charged with three plates. 



Motto : Dtim clarum rectum teneam. [So long 
as I shall keep the right way.] 



Heraldic Journal, III., 135. 

A Pedigree and General Notes, from Wills, Etc., 
OF THE Distinguished Family of Penn, of Eng- 
land and America, 1871. 

W. Berry : Encydopizdia Heraldica, 1828. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The Gejieral Armory of England, 
etc., 1883. 

The Book of Family Crests, II., 369. 

W. H. Whitmore : 77^^ American Genealogist, i8-j5. 




Elias W. Van Voorhis : Notes on the Ancestry of General 

Wm. Roe Van Voorhis, of Fishkill, N. ¥., 1881. 
T. G. Bergen : The Bergen Family, i8j6. 
Documentary History of New York, III., p. 36. 
E. B. O'Callaghan : New Netherland Register [1626-1674]. 
Thompson's History of Long Island. 
Van der Weyde's Collection of Maps, 1760. 



Ipienn 



The seal used by the celebrated Quaker, Wil- 
liam Penn, showed the armorial bearings we re- 
produce. They were borne, before him, by his 
father, Vice-Admiral William Penn. The son 



1f3a^ 



The Hays, of Eastchester, N. Y., claim descent 
from James Hay, of Netherinch, Scotland, one 
of the followers of the Pretender, who escaped 
to this country in 1745. 

One of the crests and the motto are found 
in Burke as being those of the Hays, Earls of 
Erroll. 

The three shields of the coat of arms, the 
motto, and the crest A, were given in 9S0 to 
a rustic Scot, who, with his two sons, saved 
King Kenneth HI., of Scotland, from being de- 
feated by the Danes. As a reward, the King 
ennobled the three peasants, and gave them so 



DICA. 



PLAiM 





xviXtm 



RD^EWS 




ELxU 




ELLmQHArR 




y^RJLEY 




C 



of^m 




';&LTORSTALL 





l-(5^Vr2CEY 



C 



H)0cUOr2ElR 





Je^VJP^ET 



Tc 



#" # 




fOWRSEOD 



►]py_q^HT 




RSLOW 




ES!2PLE 




VSH^IRC^ 





)0cYEr2PO]RX 



F^TE 



;R)^J^\Y>^J^, PINX. 



E J V.Vf- Ti-'^ 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



41 




much land as a falcon from a man's hand flew 
over till he settled. 



Crests : A. A falcon, rising : 
proper. 

B. An ox yoke, in bend, or. 



Motto : Serva jugum. [Keep the yoke.] 



Bolton: History of Westchester Co., N. Y., II., 1861. 

Eaton's History of Reading, Mass., gi-2. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 

etc., 1883. 
The Book of Family Crests, V., 166, 231-2. 



Hnbrews 

A genealogy has been published, in 1872, of 
John Andrews and his wife Marys descendants 
in 4-i"erica. It states that John Andrews came 
over and settled at Farmirigton, Ct, in 1640. 

A family tombstone, with the coat of arms 
we give here, is found in the Old North 
Churchyard, at Providence, R. I. (1751)- These 
arms, which were thus borne by a descendant of 
John Andrews, are those of the Andrews of 
Winwick and Charwelton, in the county of 
Northampton, England, who were made baronets 
in 1 64 1 [baronetcy extinct in 1801]. 



Crest : A Saracen's head, in pro- 
file, couped at the shoulders : proper. 
From the ear hangs a golden pen- 
dant. 




W. H. Whitmore: The American Genealogist, iSys. 
Heraldic Journal, III., 161. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 
■ etc., 1883. 
The Book of Family Crests, II., 11. 



Bell 

The Gore Roll of Arms, in giving the devices 
we publish, is sustained by a tombstone in the 
Newport, R. I., churchyard (1737). erected to 
the memory of William Bell. 

No identical devices, in Burke or Berry, at- 
tributed to the English Bells. However, we 
notice a great similarity between the coat of 
arms we give here and the armorial bearings of 
a Bell, Lord Chief of the Exchequer, in 1577. 

The motto is that inscribed on the bookplate 
\_Lichtenstein Collection^ of Charles H. Bell, of 
New England. 



Crest: A falcon, with wings ex- 
panded, ermine. 



Motto : Nee queer ere honor em nee spernere. 
[Neither seek nor disdain honors.] 



Gore's Roll of Arms, No. gy. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 

etc., 1883. 
W. Berry : Encyclopcedia Heraldica, 1828. 
Evelyn Philip Shirley : The Noble and Gentle Men of 

England, 1866. 




Motto : Virtute et for tuna. [By valor and 
good fortune.] 



A. H. Andrews & Co.: Genealogical History of John and 
Mary Andrews, with a List of 2000 of Their Lineal De- 
scendants, l8j2. 



SSelUnGbam 



Richard Bellingham was Royal Governor of 
Massachusetts in 1641. Born in 1590, in Bos- 



42 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



ton, county Lincoln, England, he was made 
Probate of his native town. 

In the same neighborhood [in England] is to 
be found yet a family bearing the same arms. 
We find them, here, on a seal affixed to a 
deed signed in 1650 by William Bellingham, a 
son of the Governor. 

Burke furnishes us with the crest. Drake gives 
a stag's head and neck in profile. 



Crest : A stag's head, cabossed, 
argent, attired, or, between two 
branches, vert. 



Motto : Amicus amico. [A friend to a friend.] 



Heraldic Journal, I., 67. 

W. Berry : Encyclopedia Heraldica, 1828. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 

etc., 1883. 
The Book of Family Crests, II., 35. 
S. G. Drake: The History and Antiquities of Bostoti, 18^6. 
Essex Institute Historical Collections, XIX., 307. 




Brinlei^ 



The Gore Roll of Arms, also a tombstone in 
King's Chapel Burial Ground, Boston, ascribe 
these arms to the descendance of Thomas Brin- 
LEY, of Exon, England, whose son, Francis Brin- 
ley, came over from Datchett, county Bucks, 
England, to Newport, R. I., and died in 1719. 

Part of his descendants remained loyal to the 
English crown, and had to fly back to England. 

Burke and Berry give other arms to the 
Brinleys, mentioned in their works. 



Gore's Roll of Arms, No. §8. 

Prince's Chronological History of NeT.v England, 1736. 

New England Genealogical and Historical Regis- 
ter, XXXVIL, 381. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The Getieral Armory of England, 
etc., 1883. 

S. G. Drake : The History and Antiquities of Boston, 1856. 

Heraldic Journal, II., 31, 32. 

Bridgeman'S King's Chapel Burial Grotmd, 2ig~28. 



Corwin 



The name is variously spelt. The emigrant 
was George Curwen, who came over in 1638, 
from Workington, England, to Salem, Mass. 

The connection seems well established with the 
family of Curwen, the shield of which the 
American Corwins are using. We do not believe 
much, however, in the Hungarian origin of the 
family — descending, as their historian states, from 
the Corvini, Madgyars of great warlike repute. 



Crest : A unicorn's head, erased, 
sable. 



Motto (Of the English Curwens) : Si je ridtais. 
[If I was not] 



Edward Tanjore Corwin : The Corwin Genealogy in 

the United States, l8j2. 
Heraldic Journal, I., 145. 

W. H. WhitmorE: The American Genealogist, l8ys- 
T. Gwilt-Mapleson : Hand Book of Heraldry, 1831. 
W. Berry : Eticyclopcedia Heraldica, 1828. 
The Book of Family Crests, II., 128. 
Essex Institute Historical Collections, XVII., 

331-48. 




Crests : A. An escalop, gules [^Gore^. 

B. A lion, rampant, ducally gorged 
[old seal]. 

C. A lion's head, erased, ducally 
crowned [^Drake^. 



Saltonstall 

Among the best names inserted in the Gore 
Roll of Arms, we find, under No. 24, that of 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



43 



Gordon Saltonstall, Governor of the colony of 
Connecticut in 1742. 

The family has a clear pedigree to Gilbert 
Saltonstall, or Saltonston, of Halifax, county 
York, England, and to his son, Richard, Lord 
Mayor of London in 1597. 

The eldest son of the Mayor, Samuel Salton- 
stall, came over to New England in 1630, but 
returned to England, where he died. His son, 
Richard, settled in Ipswich, Mass. 

The seal of the Governor above named gave 
the armorial devices we reproduce. 

The various bookplates of the family, which 
we have seen in the Rousseau, Erving, and 
Lichtenstein collections, had no motto. 




Crest : Issuing from a mar- 
quess' coronet, or, a demi-eagle, 
displayed, azure. 



Motto : Gloria. 



A Genealogical Table of the Family of Chaun- 

CEY, 1787. ■ 
W. ChauncEY Fowler : Memorials of the Chaunceys, 1858. 
Heraldic Journal, I., 187. 

W. H. Whitmore: The America?i Gejiealogisi, i8j§. 
W. Berry : Encyclopcedia Heraldica, 1828. 
S. G. Drake: The History and Antiquities of Boston, 18^6. 
Lichtenstein's Collection of Book Plates. 




Crest : Out of a ducal coronet, 
or, a pelican's head, azure, vulning 
itself, gules. 



Phippen'S Tabidar Pedigree of the Saltonstall Family. 
Heraldic Journal, I., 160. 

Gore's Roll of Arms, No. z/j. [impaling Wittingham]. 
W. Berry : Encyclopcedia Heraldica, 1828. 
The Book of Family Crests, II., 411. 
S. G. Drake: The History and Antiqidties of Boston, 1856. 
New England Genealogical and Historical Regis- 
ter, XXV., 78-81. 



Cbaloner 



Cbaunce^ 



This family possesses a clear pedigree back to 
the X. century. Charles de Chauncey came 
over with the Conqueror. His lineal descendant, 
George Chauncey, of New Place and Yardley- 
bury, county Hertford, England, died in 1625, 
leaving several children. 

His fifth son, Charles Chauncey, came over, 
in 1638, to New England. In 1654, he was 
made second President of Harvard College, and 
died in 1671. 



Savages Genealogical Dictionary does not reg- 
ister the name of any Chaloner. However, we 
find elsewhere, that a Ninyam Chaloner was 
made freeman of Rhode Island in 1 736 ; and, 
in the Newport, R I., churchyard, we find the 
tombstone — with arms cut in — of (probably) the 
same Ninyam Chaloner (1752). 

The shield is that of the Chaloners, of county 
York, and the crest that of the Challenors, of 
county Sussex. 

In the Lichtenstein Book Plate Collection we 
find the same devices used by A. D. Chaloner, 
M.D. The second motto is his; the first, that 
of the original family of English Chaloners. 



Crest : A wolf, statant, argent, 
a broken spear stuck through his 
body. 



Mottoes : A. Sictit qucercics. [Like an oak.] 
B. Garde la Foy. [Keep the faith.] 



Heraldic Journal, IV., &■]. 

Sir Bernard Burke : Ge7i. and Herald. Hist, of the 
Landed Gentry of Great Britain and Ireland, l8jg. 




44 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



Burke : Heraldic Ilhistrations, II., 85. 
The Book of Family Crests, II., 91. 



JSurnet 



William Burnet, the emigrant. Governor of 
Massachusetts in 1728, was son of the Right 
Rev Dr. Gilbert Burnet, the famed Bishop of 
London under William III. [The family is a 
branch of the Scotch Burnets, divided in Bur- 
nets of that Ilk and Burnets of Lees.'] 

Alexander Burnet, the greatgrandfather of the 
emigrant, was Laird of Lees. 



circumstances, Penii Townsend (about \']ii), oc- 
cupied several high offices in the Commonwealth. 
His tomb, without coat of arms, exists still, in 
the Old Granary Burying Ground, in Boston. 

We may say, however, that it appears that 
the Boston Townsends are accepted as relations 
by the Marquess of Townshend [family name, 
Fz7/z>rj-^^«flr^TowNSHEND], the head of the an- 
cient lineage of the T'wnshends of Rainham, 
county Norfolk, England. 



Crest : A stag, passant : proper. 





Crest : A dexter hand, pruning 
a vine : proper. 



Motto : Virescit vulnere virtus. [Virtue flour- 
ishes from a wound.] 



S. G. Drake: The History and Antiquities of Boston, 1856. 

Heraldic Journal, II., 61. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 

etc., 1883. 
The Book of Family Crests, II., 75. 
Hinman's Connecticut Settlers, 4.11. 



Motto : Hcec generi incrementa fides. [Faith 
gave these honors to our race.] 



Charles Henry Townshend : The Townsend Family of 
Lynn, in Old and Neiu England, 1882. 

New England Genealogical and Historical Regis- 
ter, XXIX., 97. 

W. H. Whitmore : The American Genealogist, 1875. 

Henry F. Waters: Notes on the Townsend Family, i88j. 

W. Berry : Encyclopedia Heraldica, 1828: 

Evelyn Philip Shirley : The Noble and Gentle Men of 
England, 15J {1866). 

The Book of Family Crests, II., 467. 



tTownsenb 



A cousin of Governor Winthrop, Thomas 
Townsend, emigrated, in 1637, from London to 
Lynn, Mass. A tombstone, found in the King's 
Chapel Burying Ground, in Boston, bears the 
devices we publish ; but there is no absolute 
proof that it was the tombstone of a descendant 
of Thomas Townsend. 

A descendant of William Townsend, another 
emigrant, who reached Boston in 1634, in poor 



asrigbt 



It is established that Henry Bright, who set- 
tled in Watertown, Mass., in 1630, was entitled 
to these arms, granted, in 161 5, to the Brights, 
of St. Edmunds, county Suffolk, England. 



Crest : A dragon's head, vomiting 
flames : proper — collared and lined, or. 




AMERICA HERALDICA 



45 



Harris's Watertown, Mass., Epitaphs, 7. 

Heraldic Journal, I., 81. 

H. Bond : Family Memorials, etc., of the Early Settlers of 

Watertown, Mass., l8sS- 
J. B. Bright : The Brights of Co. Suffolk, England, 1858. 
Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 

etc., 1883. 
The Book of Family Crests, II., 63. 



Minslow 



Five sons of Edward Winslow, of Dwitwich, 
county Winchester, England, emigrated to New 
England. One of them, Edward Winslow, came 
over on the Mayflower, and became third Gov- 
ernor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, after 
William Bradford. 

We find, in the King's Chapel Burial Ground, 
in Boston, a .Winslow tombstone, with the de- 
vices we reproduce. 

At the beginning of the XVIII. century, Jo- 
siah Winslow, a descendant of the Governor, 
was making public use of the arms we give. 

Crest : The trunk of a tree, 
throwing out new branches : all 
proper. 

Motto : Decerptce flores. [Plucked flowers.] 



Th. Bridgman's King's Chapel Burial Ground, Boston, 18^3. 

Mr. and Mrs. David Parsons Holton: Winslow Me- 
morial, i8jj. 

New England Genealogical and Historical Regis- 
ter, XXV., 355. 

Prince's Chrojiological History of Boston, 1736. 

Barry's History of Hanover, p. 443. 

Gore's Roll of Arms, No. go. 

Jacob B. Moore: Memoirs of American Governors, /., 
131, 38. 



ITemple 




ily, claims common origin with the great Eng- 
lish house of Temple, from which was issued 
Lord Palmerston. This claim is generally ac- 
cepted by expert genealogists. 

The arms we give reproduce the seal of Sir 
Thomas Temple, Bt, Governor of Acadia in 
1671. 



Crest : Issuing from a ducal cor- 
onet, or, a martlet, sable. 



Motto : Templa quam dilecta ! [Temples, how 
beloved !] 



New England Historical and Genealogical Regis- 
ter, X., 73. 

Heraldic Journal, I., 92; II., 185 ; III., 43. 

W. H. Whitmore: The American Genealogist, i8y§. 

W. Berry : Encyclopedia Heraldica, 1828. 

Sir Bernard Burke : Gen. Hist, of the Abeyant, Dormant, 
Forfeited, and Exti?ict Peerages of the British Etnpire, 1883. 

W. H. Whitmore's Account of the Temple and Bowdoin 
Families, 1856. 

Chapman's Temple Genealogy, 1871. 



CuBbing 



This well-known Bostonian family, which has 
blended its individuality with the Bowdoin fam- 



This family is traced back to Thomas Gush- 
ing, of Hardingham, Hingham, county Norfolk, 
England. 

His descendant, Matthew, married in 1663, and 
had four sons. They all five came over to 
Hingham, Mass. This family, connected with the 
best Boston families, occupied a number of public 
offices. One of their descendants was Member 
of Congress in 1774. 



Crest : Two lion's gambs, erased, 
sable, supporting a ducal coronet, 
or, from which hangs down a hu- 
man heart, gules. 




46 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



Gore's Roll of Arms. No. 86. 

New England Historical and Genealogical Regis- 
ter, Anno 1865. 
Heraldic Journal, IV., 123. 
Prince : Chronological History of Boston, IJ36. 
S. G. Drake : The History and Antiquities of Boston, i8§6. 
Gushing Genealogy, 1865. 



Cbute 



Savenport 



The Reverend John Davenport, tbe emigrant, 
son of John Davenport, of Coventry, England, 
has a clearly-connected pedigree from the Da- 
venports of Davenport, an ancient family, of 
county Salop, England. 

The descendants of Captain Richard Daven- 
port, of Salem, who came over from Wey- 
mouth, county Dorset, England, can claim the 
same origin. 

On the will of Francis Davenport we find a 
stag's head, cabossed, used as a crest, instead of 
the well-known Davenport crest. 



Crest : A man's head and neck, 
couped. Around the neck a rope : 
all proper. 




The family of Chute [old spelling, Choute] 
descends from Alexa^ider Choute, Lord of the 
Manor of Taunton (1268). 

Lionel Chute, Jr., and his son, James, came 
over, together, in 1635, to Ipswich, Mass., where 
they settled. 

Same arms as the Chutes of Chute Hall, 
county KeiTy. 



Crest : A dexter cubit arm in 
armor, the hand gauntleted, grasp- 
ing a broken sword, in bend, sin- 
ister : proper — hilt and pomel, or. 



Motto : Fortune de guerre. [Fate of war.] 



HaMMETT Papers, Ipswich, Mass., 5J. 

New England Historical and Genealogical Regis- 
ter, xni., 123. 

Gore's Roll of Anns, No. 62. 

Heraldic Journal, I., 142. 

Evelyn Philip Shirley : The Noble and Gentle Men of 
England, 1866. 

The Book of Family Crests, II., g6. • 




Motto : Audentes for tuna juvat. [Fate helps 
the bold.] 



IRapaljie 



A. Benedict Davenport : A History and Genealogy of the 
Davenport Family, in England and America {l 086-1 8§o), 
1851. New Edition, i8j6. 

Evelyn Philip Shirley : The Noble and Gentle Men of 
England, 1866. 

W. H. Whitmore : The American Getiealogist, i8y§. 

Heraldic Journal, I., 36. 

New England Historical and Genealogical Regis- 
ter, XXXIV., 25. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The Ge?ieral Armory of England, 
etc., 18S1. 

S. G. Drake : The History and Aiitiquities of Boston, 1856. 

Bolton : History of Westchester Co., N. Y., IT, 513. 



This family — of .French origin — descends from 
noble homme Gaspard Colet de Rapalye, from 
the neighborhood of Chdtillon stir Loire, France, 
who fled religious persecution in 1548, and took 
refuge in Holland. 

His descendants, George and William Janseii 
de Rapaljie, emigrated, in 1623, to the New 
Netherlands. 

The name is spelt also, here, Rapalye, Ra- 
pelye. 



x.lVlLnU .. ^.^^lAL^UIUa 





Kft) 



ftPAtJIE 



XJH 




OJLCOTT 




ELAr^O 



C 



OLDER 




ARDS 




3^0P 




ISI2ITt^of,§ 



CAJ^DALE 




EqC\ETT 




CIi^£I2CK^ 







j.i^napsoR 



yL 



I^ITOEY 




TRABQ^S 





UKER 



II. 



EiOcDE 




ERDELL 




ICOLL 



iR' 'J\Y>' -.n" X. 



E.cieVVr 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



47 




Crest : Issuing from a ducal cor- 
onet, or, on a high hat of dignity, 
azure, three bars of the first. The 
hat surmounted with six ostrich 
feathers, or and azure. 



Rev. C. W. Baird, D.D. : The Huguetwt Emigration in 

America, I., 1^2, i88§. 
Riker's Anjials of Newtown, N. Y., 26y-8o. 
Bolton : History of Westchester Co., N. Y., II., "ji. 
J. B. HOLGATE : Americaji Genealogy, l8£i. 
Prime's History of Long Island, N. Y., 358. 
T. G. Bergen's King County, N. Y, Settlers, 2ji. 



Molcott 



Henry Wolcott, second son of JoJiJi Wol- 
COTT of Tolland, county Somerset, England, emi- 
grated in 1630, and settled in 1635, at Windsor, 
Ct. He inherited Galdon Manor, Tolland, by 
decease of his brother, Christopher. 

The emigrant bore the arms coming to his 
family from Sir John de Walcott (tempo, Rich- 
ard II.). 



Crest: A bull's head, erased, ar- 
gent, armed, or, ducally gorged of 
the last. 



Motto : Ntdlius addictus jttrare in verba mag- 
istri. [Following no leader's judgment] 



Mrs. Martha J. Lamb : History of the City of New York, 

n.,357- 

Edward Elbridge Salisbury : Family Memorials, 1885. 

Samuel Wolcott : Memorial of Henry Wolcott, 1 881. 

Evelyn Philip Shirley: The Noble and Gentle Men of 
England. 

New England Historical and Genealogical Regis- 
ter, XXXVI., 16. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of Englattd, 
etc., 1883. 




The Book of Family Crests, II., 480. 
Stiles' History of Windsor, Ct., 825. 



2)elano 

Philippe de la Noye, or de la Noue, of 
noble French descent, came to America from 
Leyden, Holland, in the good ship Fortuna, be- 
fore 1635. 

His grandson, Jonathan Delano, settled at 
Tolland, Ct., in 1722. 

The family coat of arms, brought over by the 
emigrant, is that of the celebrated Huguenot 
warrior, Captain de la Noue, called Bras de fer 
[arm of iron], who was himself issued of the 
ancient family of de la Noue, of Brittany. 

No crest is recorded — crests being but seldom 
used in French heraldic display. 



L. P. Waldo : Early History of Tolland, Ct., 114.. 

Edward Chauncey Marshall: Ancestry of General 
Grant, i86c). 

J. B. RiETSTAP : Armorial Universel, 1884.. 

Cf. : Several Works on the Huguenot Emigratio?i to the Prot- 
estant Netherlands ajid to North A merica. 



Colben 



The bookplate of Cadwalader Colden, seen in 
the Lichtenstein and Rousseau collections, show 
the devices we reproduce. On the portrait of 
the celebrated Royal Governor we find the same 
coat of arms, which has always been accepted 
as being the justified property of the American 

COLDENS. 

The emigrant, the Reverend Alexander Col- 
den, came from Scotland to Pennsylvania in 
1 710, and settled later in New York. 



48 



AMERICA HERALDICA 




Crest : A stag's head, cabossed, or. 



Motto : Fais bien, crains rien. [Do well, fear 
nought] 



New York Genealogical and Biographical Record, 

IV., i6i. 
Heraldic Journal, IV., 45. 
Mrs. Martha J. Lamb : History of the City of New York, 

1878. 
Purple's Colden Genealogy, l8jj. 
Timothy Alden: Collection of American Epitaphs, 1814. 



Motto : Probum non poluitet. [The honest 
man never shames.] 



Livermore's History of Block Island, R. I., 275. 

T. Gwilt-Mapleson : Hand Book of Heraldry, 1851. 

Bolton : History of Westchester Co., N. Y., I., 716. 

Evelyn Philip Shirley : The Noble and Gentle Men of 
England, 1866. 

W. Berry : Encyclopcsdia Heraldica, 1828. 

Collin's Peerage, vn., js6 {1779). 

Sir Bernard Burke: Gen. Hist, of the Dormant, Abey- 
ant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages of the British Empire, 
1883. 

The Book of Family Crests, II., 413. 



ICbroop 



Sanbips, or Sanbs 

Henry Sandys, the emigrant, who came over 
in 1633—38, from Reading, Berks, and settled 
and died in Boston, was probably the son — next 
to the youngest — of Edwin Sandys, who died 
Archbishop of York, in Elizabeth's time. His 
brother, George, was Resident Treasurer, and his 
brother. Sir Edwin, London Treasurer of the 
Virginia Company. 

The son of the emigrant. Captain James San- 
dys, or Sands, was one of a number of settlers 
who bought Block Island, in 1660. 

The line of descent may be therefore consid- 
ered as established from the Sandys family of 
Ombersly Park, county Worcester, England ; and, 
since the first years of their stay in the New 
World, the Sands made use of the armorial 
bearings we give, which came to them from the 
above English family. 



Crest : A griffin, segreant, per 
fess, or, and gules. 




The last of the recognized baronies of Scrope, 
in the Peerage of England, became extinct in 
1630. It was the Barotiy of Bolton; and it 
was claimed later unsuccessfully, the political 
strifes of the time preventing full justice to be 
rendered to the heir of the last Lord Scrope 
OF Bolton. 

Among his descendants was Colonel Adrian 
Scroop, the regicide, who was executed at Cha- 
ring Cross in i66o. His son, Adrian, insecure 
in his person and property, with the paternal 
past following him everywhere, fled to Hartford, 
Ct., in 1660, and assumed the name of William 
Throop, to escape pursuit from his father's ene- 
mies. He changed, at the same time, the 
Scrope arms \aztire, a bend, or\ for the arms 
we reproduce here. Later, the emigrant settled 
at Bristol, R. I. 

The line of descent is clear to the well-known 
New York Governor, Enos T. Throop, and to 
other descendants, now living, of William Throop. 



Crest : A naked arm, grasping 
coiled serpent : all proper. 




AMERICA HERALDICA 



49 



Motto: Debita facere. [They did their duty.] 



Henry R. Stiles: History of the Regicides. 

E. D. Larned : History of Windham County, Ct., iSy/f. 

O. D. HiNES'S Early Lebanon, 1880. 

Rt. Rev. D. Huntington: Memories, etc.. With Genea- 
logical Notes, 1857. 

New England Historical and Genealogical Regis- 
ter, X., XHL, XIX., XXIX., etc. 

W. Berry : Encydopcedia Heraldica, 1828. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1883. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The Gen. Hist, of the Dorma^it, 
Abeyant, and Extinct Peerages of the British Empire, 
1883. 



He settled later and died at Norwich, Ct, 
where his name figures amongst the thirty-five 
early proprietors of that city, inscribed on what 
is called the " Uncas Monument." 

One of his descendants visited England in 
1 75 1, and instituted heraldic researches concerning 
his family, and succeeded in tracing it back to 
William Smith, Bishop of Litchfield (1492). 

The arms are recognized by the Heralds! Col- 
lege as those of John Smyth, of New Castle 
under Lyme, county Stafford. 

Pedigrees inserted in the Visitation of 16 14 
confirms the above fine of descent and the right 
to coat-armor. 



Smith of Scarsbale 

Colonel William Smith, Chief Justice and Pres- 
ident of the province of New York, who 
brought over and made use of these arms, was 
born at Hingham Fenn, county Northampton, 
England, in 1 654. 

He died in his Manor House of St. George's, 
Westchester county, N. Y., in 1704. 

These arms are those given by Burke to the 
Smiths of Ed7mtndthorpe, county Leicester. 



Crest : Out of a ducal coronet, or, 

an Indian goat's head, argent, eared, 

^ sable, bearded and attired of the first. 








^j^XJl 



Arms : Barry of six, er- 
mine and gules, a lion ram- 
pant, ducally crowned, sable. 



W/^ Crest : An heraldic tiger, 
passant, argent, wounded on 
the shoulder, gules. 

Motto : A vise la Jin. 
[Think of the end.] 



Memorial History of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, 1842. 
Sir Gilbert Dedhick's Gifts, 162, fol. 249. 
Grazebrook'S Smith Heraldry. 
Plymouth Colonial Records, I., 79-142, etc. 




Bolton : History of Westchester Co., N. Y., //., 22y. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 

etc., i8%3. 
The Book of Family Crests, II., 431. 



Smitb of morwicb 

The emigrant, the Reverend Nehemiah Smith, 
came over to Connecticut, with the Davenport 
and Eaton Company, in 1636. 



Xeggett 



Gabriel Legget, or Leggit, of Scotland, was 
in the New York province in 1676, where he 
married, and died in 1697. 

He was the patentee of the large estate of 
West Farms, and appears to have made use of 
the coat of arms we give, and which has been 
kept and borne by his numerous descendants. 



50 



AMERICA HERALDICA 




Crest : A. A sirene : proper. 
B. A cherub's head : proper. 



Mottoes : A. Jesus hominum salvator. [Jesus, 
the Savior of mankind.] 
B. Cara patria, carior libertas. [Dear 
my countiy, dearer liberty.] 



Dr. Peter L. Schenck: Memoir of Johannes Scheuck, 

1876. 
A. D. Schenck, U.S.A.: The Rev. Williavi Selmick, His 

Ancestry and His Dcscenda7its, i88j. 
]. B. RiETSTAP: Armorial Universel, ed. of 1861. 
COL. Van DER DuSSEN'S Report on the Heraldic Origin of 

the Scliencks of America. 
T. G. Bergen : King's County, N. Y., Settlers, 24.^. 



Bolton : History of Westchester Co., N. Y., //., 44.6. 
T. Gwilt-Mapleson : Hand Book of Heraldry, 1851. 
Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of E7igland, 

etc., 1881. 
The Book of Family Crests, II., 282. 



lEbompson 



Scbenck 



The ancient family of Schencks, in America, 
is divided into two branches, represented at the 
head of each by Roelof and Jan Martense 
Schenck, of Nieu Amersfoort, now Flatlands, 
Long Island, N. Y., who emigrated from Utrecht, 
Holland, in 1650. Through their grandfather, 
the famous General Peter Schenck Von Ny- 
DECK, they descended from the ancient family of 
Toutenburg, and, more closely, from the branch 
of Nydeck, or Nydeggen. 

Johannes Schenck, who, at the age of twenty- 
seven years, emigrated from Middleburg, Holland, 
in 1683, and settled at Bushwick, Long Island, 
is admitted to have belonged to the same stock. 

We give, properly quartered, the arms of the 
two famihes: i and 4, Toutenburg; 2 and 3, 
Nydeggen. 



Crest : A demi-lion, or, langued, 
gules, armed, azure, issuing from a 
German baron's coronet, or. 



The Blyenbeck and Afferden Branches of the 
Family of Schenck Van Nydeck, 1885. 




These arms were brought over, in this country, 
by John Thompson, who reached Long Island, 
by way of Holland, in 1634. He was the son 
of the Reverend William Thompson, of county 
Lancaster, England ; and the shield is that of 
the extinct barony of Haversham, once belong- 
ing to an ancient family of county Herts. 

We have seen various bookplates of members 
of this family in the Rousseau collection, 
amongst which that of William Thompson and 
Robert Thompson. 



Crest : Out of a ducal coronet, 
a cubit arm, erect, habited, azure. 
In the hand, proper, five ears of 
wheat, or. 



Mottoes : A. In luminc Ince. [Shine in the 
light.] 
B. Ante victoriam ne cane tritimph- 
um. [Before victory do not sing 
thy triumph.] 



Benj. F. Thompson : History of Long Island, N. K, //., 4.25. 
Mrs. Martha J. Lamb: History of tlie City of New York, 

II, 637. 
Sir Bernard Burke: Gen. Hist, of Dormant, Abeyant, 

Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages of the British Empire, 

1883. 
The Book of Family Crests, II., 460. 




AMERICA HERALDICA 



51 



milbitne^ 



The emigrant, Henry Whitney, who came 
over in 1649, was the son of Thomas Whitney, 
of North Church, Herts. He settled in Con- 
necticut. 

The family claims descent from Eustace Whit- 
ney (1066). Such a family certainly did exist 
in that part of England from whence the emi- 
grant came. 

There is also an Irish family of Whitney, 
with different armorial bearings. 



Crest : A bull's head, couped, 
sable, armed, argent, the points 
gules. 




Motto : Magnanimiter crucem sustine. 
the cross with magnanimity.] 



[Bear 



A Branch of the Whitney Family, 1858. 

Henry Austin Whitney : Incidents in the Life of Samuel 

Whitney, of Marlboro, Massachusetts {17J4), i860. 
Memoranda Relating to the Families of the Name 

OF Whitney in England. 
Stephen M. Phcenix : The Whitney Family Book, 1878. 
Sir Bernard Burke: The General Armory of England, 

etc., i8%i. 
The Book of Family Crests, XL, 496. 



Strang's 



The emigrant, Daniel de l'Estrange, a French 
protestant, escaped persecution after the revocation 
of the Edict of Nantes, in 1685, and reached 
America, from London, in 1688. 

The French [still existing] Marquises de l'Es- 
trange bear a very similar coat of arms. So 
do the Stranges of the English gentry, one 
branch of whom is connected with the early 




Stanleys, Earls of Derby. The arms in the 
latter case are identical, denoting clearly the ex- 
istence of but one stock, both in France, Eng- 
land, and America. 

In America, the Strang's settled, and became 
large landowners, in Rye and Yonkers, West- 
chester county, N. Y. 



Crest : A lion of the shield, or. 



Rev. Charles W. Baird : History of Rye, N. Y., 444. 
Bolton : History of Westchester Co., N. V., I., 716. 
Gen. Eben. W. Peirce : The Strang- or Strang's Family. 
Bartow Genealogy, Part //. 
Sir Bernard Burke : Gen. Hist, of the Dormant, Abeyant, 

Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages of the British Empire, 

1883. 
POPLIMONT : La France H&aldigue. 
Bachelin-Deflorenne : Etat Priseiit de la Noblesse Fran- 

^aise, ed. of i8jj. 
GraNDMAISON : Dictionnaire H&aldique. 
J. B. RiETSTAP: Armorial Utiiversel, 1885. 
The Book of Family Crests, II., 448. 



IRijhet 



Some of the lineal descendants of Hans, Lord 
of Ryckers, in Germany, in the time of the 
first Crusade (1096), emigrated to the New 
Netherlands, from 1638 to 1663. 

Their names were Abraham, Gysbert, Ryner, 
and Hendrick Rycker. The spelling of the 
name became, in Holland, Rijker, and, angli- 
cized, returned to Ryker or Rykers. 

The early American generations made use of 
the coat of arms, but without motto. 



Used as Crest: A steel helmet, 
in profile. 




Motto : Hilariter. [Merrily.] 



52 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



Jas. Ryker, Jr. : A^mah of Neivtcnvn, N. Y., 2gg. 
Pearson : Genealogies of the First Settlers in Albany, 1861). 
J. B. RiETSTAP: Armorial Uiiiversel, 1885. 
RiKER Genealogy, 185 i. 



accepts the American branch as belonging to the 
family of Reade, Baro7iels of Shipton Court, 
county Oxon. 



IReabe 



Lawrence Reade, of the family of Reade of 
Wenbttrn, county Devon, England, came to the 
New York province in the first years of the 
last century. 

He and his descendants always made use, un- 
challenged, of the coat of arms we give. 

The township of Red Hook, Dutchess county, 
N. Y., took its name from the Reade family. 



Crest : A stag's head, erased : proper 
— ducally gorged, or. 





Arms : Gules, a saltire, be- 
tween four sheaves, or. 

Crest : On the stump of 
a tree, vert, a falcon rising : 
proper — belled and jessed, or. 

Motto : Cedant arma toga. 
[Let arms yield to the gown.] 



Charles R. Dodd : The Peerage, Barojietage, etc., of Great 
Britain and Ireland, l8tfl. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The Extant Peerages and Baronet- 
cies, etc., i88j. 

Burke : Heraldic Illustrations, II., 85. 

The Book of Family Crests, II., 393. 



Motto : D2i7}t spiro, spero. [Whilst I breathe 
I hope.] 



Mrs. Martha J. Lamb: History of the City of New York, 

IL, -'7#- 
Sir Bernard Burke : Tlie Gejieral Armory of England, 

etc., 1883. 
The Book of Family Crests, II., 393. 



IReab 

We think that the coat of arms used by the 
Hon. George Read, signer of the Independence, 
and Chief Justice of Pennsylvania, borne in the 
present day by his descendant, Gejieral Meredith 
Read, late U. S. Minister to Greece, will be of 
some interest to our readers, and we give it as 
an extra illustration. 

We must mention that Sir Bernard Burke 



milen6ell 



The emigrant. Evert Jansen Wendell, came 
from Emden, East Friesland, now Hanover, be- 
fore 1642. His family was originally from Ryn^ 
land, or, Delftland, whence they fled to avoid 
the religious persecution of the Duke of Alva. 

In 165 1 the emigrant removed to Fort Orange 
[Albany]. He was then an Elder of the Old 
Dutch Church, and the arms we give were 
placed on the east window as a memorial to 
his virtues as a man and a citizen. 

The Old Dutch Church, of Albany, was de- 
molished in 1806, but the window preserved 
with arms and inscription. 

The Hon. facob Wendell, grandson of the 
emigrant, made use of the same arms. 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



53 




Crest : The galleon of the arms. 



Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of Etigland, 

etc., 1881. 
W. Berry : EncydopcBdia Heraldica, 1828. 



Pearson : Genealogies of the First Settlers of Albany, i86g. 
J. R. Stanwood: The Dutch Ancestry of the Late facob 

Wendell, of Portsmouth, N. H., 1882. 
Edward Elbridge Salisbury : Family Memorials, 1885. 
Heraldic Journal, I., 49. 
S. V. Talcott : Genealogical Notes of New York and New 

England Families, i88j. 
Prince's Chronological History of New England, 1736. 
Mrs. Grant : Memoirs of an American Lady, 184.6. 
S. G. Drake : The History and Antiquities of Boston, 1856. 



^aUet=lprevo8t 



The emigrant, John Nicoll, Esquire, M.D., of 
West Caldershire, from Edinburgh, Scotland, set- 
tled, in 1734, in Orange county, N. Y. 

The arms the family bear are those of the 
Nicolsons, Scotch baronets, creation of 1637. 
Burke mentions these arms, but without crest 
or motto. 

No such arms of Nicolls or Nicolsons are 
registered at the English or Scotch heraldry 
offices. It is so declared by the actual members 
of the family, in perfect good faith. 

It is but fair to state that plate brought by 
the emigrant himself bears these same arms, as 
does also a very old family portrait. 

^^fe S^^^^ Crest : A sun splendant, or. 
Motto : Sublimiora peto. [I seek higher things.] 



W. L. Nicoll: The Nicoll Family of Orange Co., N. Y., 
1886. 



This family has added to its name of Mallet 
that of Prevost, on account of the marriage — at 
the time of the Revolution — of Henry Mallet 
with Jane G. Prevost. It is a generally-adopted 
custom, in Switzerland, to thus add the surname 
of the wife to that of the husband. 

The Mallets de Graville, a Norman family of 
great antiquity, represented to the present day 
amongst the landed gentry of Great Britain, had 
for chief of one of its branches, in 1530, Jacques 
Mallet, of Rouen, who had to leave hurriedly 
his fatherland on account of his religious convic- 
tions. He settled in Geneva, then ruled by Cal- 
vin. His descendant, General Paul Henry Mal- 
let-Prevost [issued from the marriage of Henry 
Mallet and Jane G. Prevost], who had taken 
service with the last French Bourbon kings (be- 
fore 1792), fled for his life, and took refuge in 
Frenchtown, N. J. His eldest son, General An- 
drew Mallet-Prevost, settled in Philadelphia. 

The uncle of the emigrant was created Count 
de Mallet, for his high literary attainments. 



Arms : Azure, a fess, be- 
tween two cinque-fields, in 
chief, and a trefoil slipped, 
in base, or. 







1^ 



K. 






y^ 



Crest : A demi-chamois : 
proper. 

Motto : Force d'en haul. 
[Strength from on high.] 



54 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



SSrown of milatertown 

John Browne was Alderman of Stamford, 
county Lincoln, England, in 1376. 

The coat of arms herein presented was granted 
to his lineal descendant, Christopher Browne, in 
1480. 

A direct connection united that Christopher 
Browne with Abraham Browne, of Hakendon, 
county Suffolk, the emigrant. 



Crest: A stork's head, couped 
and nowed at the neck, between 
two wings, argent. 



Apprendre a mourir. [Learn how to 





Motto : 
die.] 



Arms : Argent ; on a bend, 
sable, doubly coticed, of the 
same, three eagles, displayed, 
of the field. [A crescent, 
sable, as mark of cadence.] 

Cre.st : An eagle displayed, 
argent. On the wings, two 
bars, sable. 



Gore's Roll of Arms, No. 44.. 

Prince's Chrotiological History of New England, 1736. 

Genealogy of a Portion of the Browne Family, 

1851. 
Browne Family Letters, 1871. 
W. H. Whitmore : The American Genealogist, i8j^. 
W. Berry : Encyclopcedia Heraldica, 1828. 
The Book of Family Crests, II., 67. 



Heraldic Journal, IV., 26. 

S. G. Drake : The History afid Antiquities of Boston, 1856. 

Henry Bond : Family Memorials, etc., of the Early Settlers 

of Watertown, Mass., 1855. 
Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of Englatid, 

etc., 1881. 
The Book of Family Crests, II., 67. 



Browne of Salem 

We find in Gore's Roll of Arms the armorial 
bearings of Captain John Browne of Salem, 
"Merchant." 

His ancestry in the Old Country is not traced 
except in so far that, previous to 171 8, he is 
known to have borne the arms of the Brownes 
of county Lancaster, England. 

The crest of that family, furnished by Berry, 
completes the indications of Gore, generally re- 
liable [see Preface]. 



Coolibge 



This family, — under the various spellings of 

COOLIDGE, COOLEDGE, CoLYNGE, CoLLYNGS, COL- 

lyns, — shows a clear pedigree to Thomas Co- 
LYNGE, of Arrington (1495). 

The emigrant, John Cooledge, youngest son 
of William Cooledge, of Cottenham, England, 
was born in 1604. He came over to Water- 
town, where he settled, and died in 1691. His 
descendants intermarried with the best New Eng- 
land families. 

A full pedigree of the family is preserved to 
this day, and has been published. The Collyns,. 
of county Hereford, England, are in possession 
of the same coat of arms. 



Crest : A demi-grifi&n, segr6ant, 




AMERICA HERALDICA. 



PLA. 




Ungwu-£orm 



'ATERTOWN 




OOLIDG^E 




J^DDOCK^ 




V^ST^EH, 




VDLEY 




VJP^TIS 




EARE 




ERISOR 




^Jtitci-^ 




AYDEr^ 




TODDA)^ 




HEERE 




JLES 




0]P^I2C^ 




YSTSAR 




{ilLUASUS 



"^^WEI^S, PIN.X. 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



55 



Motto : VirhUe et fide. [By valor and faith.] 



Henry Bond : Family Memorials, etc., of the Early Settlers 

of Watertown, Mass. 
S. G. Drake: The History and Antiquities of Boston, i8§6. 
Burke : Heraldic Illustrations, //., 1845. 
The Book of Family Crests, II., 108. 
Clark's Watertown Genealogies, JJ. 
Harris's Watertown Epitaphs, 14. 



Crabboc^? 



This family originates from Carmarthen, Eng- 
land, where lived Matthew (/) Craddock, father 
of Matthew {11.^ Craddock, early Governor of 
the Massachusetts Bay colony, whose seal repro- 
duces the armorial devices we give. 

The Cradocks of Quorn Court, England, still 
figure [with the same arms] amongst the landed 
gentry. 



who died in 1540, at Owslebury, Hampshire, 
England. The family estate was that of Swath- 
ling, in the same county. 

The greatgrandsons of Richard, Prichard and 
Stephe7i, both of Bishopstoke, came over in 
1638, the latter returning to England in 1647. 
The descendants of both settled in New Eng- 
land. Governor William Dummer, and Chief 
Justice John Dummer, both of Massachusetts, de- 
scended from Richard. 

We give, in colors, the original Dummer coat 
of arms, although it is believed that the Richard 
fii-st named was really a Pyldren, who had 
manied a Matilda Dummer, an heiress, and as- 
sumed her name. 

According to Gores Roll of Arms, Governor 
William Dummer bore, in 1723, the arms which 
we give in the text, and which are properly 
Pyldren arms, borne (in 1711), according to 
Burke, by a Co. Hants family of Dummer. The 
same crest used for both shields. 




Crest : A bear's head, erased, sable, 
billet^e, and muzzled, or. 



Motto : Nee tetnere, nee timide. [Neither rashly 
nor timidly.] 



New England Historical and Genealogical Regis- 
ter, VIII., 25 ; IX., 122 ; X., 231. 

Heraldic Journal, I., 5. 

Prince's Chronological History of New Ejigland, iyj6. 

S. G. Drake : The History and Antigziities of Boston, i8j6. 

W. Berry : Encyclopcedia Heraldica, 1828. 

Sir Bernard Burke : Gen. and Herald. Hist, of the 
Landed Gentry of Great Britain and Ireland, i8jg. 

The Book of Family Crests, II., 119. 




^--W 



Arms : Azure, a fleur-de-lis, 
or. On a chief of the second, 
a demi-lion of the first. 

Crest : A demi-lion, azure, 
holding in his dexter paw a 
like fleur-de-lis. 



E)ummer 



The direct ancestor of the Dummers, of New 
England, is Richard Pyldren, alias Dummer, 



Col. Chester's Dumtner Genealogy, 1881. 
Edward Elbridge Salisbury : Family Memorials, 1885. 
Heraldic Journal, II., 34. 

New England Historical and Genealogical Regis- 
ter, XXXV., 254. 
W. H. WlIITMORE: The American Genealogist, 1875. 
Gore's Roll of Arms, No. jy. 
Essex Institute Historical Collections, XXI., 77. 



56 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



2)uble^ 



Thomas Dudley, the emigrant, came over in 
1630. 

His father was Captain Roger Dudley, who 
did not belong to the Dukes of Northumberland 
branch of the Dudley family. Nor is it proved 
that the above Thomas Dudley was really, as 
claimed since, nephew of the third Lord Dud- 
ley. The seal he used on his will (1654) did 
not show the forked tail, but it bore a crescent 
for difference. 

On the contrary, on the seal of Joseph Dud- 
ley, son of the emigi'ant and Governor of Mas- 
sachusetts (i 702-1 715), we find the forked tail 
and no crescent. 

According to Gore's Roll of Arms, the color 
of the lion of the shield was azure; whilst the 
Dudley lion [original] is vert. We use the color 
most generally adopted in this country, by the de- 
scendants of Thomas Dudley, of Roxbury, Mass. 



Crest : A lion's head, erased. 



Motto : Nee gladio, nee arcu. [Neither by 
the sword nor by the bow.] 



GOKE's Roll of Arjiis, No. 60. 

Heraldic Journal, I., 35. 

Dean Dudley : The Dtidley Genealogy and Family Rec- 
ords, 184.8. 

Geo. Adlard : Tke Sutton-Dudleys of England, and the 
Dudleys of Massachusetts, in New England, 1862. 

J. B. Moore : Memoirs of Am.erican Governors, 184.6. 

S. G. Drake: The History a7id Antiquities of Boston, i8§6. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The Dormatit, Abeyant, etc., Peer- 
ages of the British Ejnpire, i88j. 





the ship Lion, are those of the Curteis family, 
of Kent and Sussex, in England. 

We can simply state here that this same coat 
of arms seems to have been used from the start 
by the descendants of that William Curtis, who 
is admitted to have come from London or 
county Warwick. 



&S^ Crest : A unicorn, passant, or, 
between two trees, leaved : proper. 



Motto (Of English origin) : Gradatim vitici- 
mtis. [We conquer by degi-ees.] 



Heraldic Journal, I., in. 

S. C. Clarke : Records of Some Descendants of William 
Curtis, i86g. 

John T. Barry: Historical Sketch of the Town of Han- 
over, Mass., i8§j. 

New England Historical and Genealogical Regis- 
ter, XVI., 137. 

W. Berry : Encyclopcedia Heraldica, 1828. 

The Book of Family Crests, II., 128. 



S)eane 

John and Walter Deane, two brothers, sup- 
posed, with some authority, to have come from 
Taunton, county Somerset, England, reached 
Taunton, New England, in 1637. 

Their connection with the Denes of Dene- 
lands, county Devon, the arms of whom are 
used by many of their descendants, is not yet 
fully established, but may count amongst the 
most interesting claims of the kind. 



Curtis 



The arms we give,i?^borne by William Curtis, 
who came over in 1632, to New England, on 




Crest: A demi-lion, rampant, or, 
in the dexter paw a crescent, gules. 



c^^^slZ^^b^ 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



57 



Motto (Not known to have been used in 
this country) : Forti et fideli nihil difficile. [For 
the strong and the faithful, nothing too hard.] 



William Reed DeanE: Brief Memoirs of John and Wal- 
ter Deane, iS^g. 

S. H. Emery : Ministry of Taunton, Mass., iS^j. 

New England Historical and Genealogical Regis- 
ter, III., IX., XVIIL, XXV., XXXVII. 

Sir Bernard Burke: The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1881. 

The Book of Family Crests, II., 136. 



ritcb 



2)eni8on 



An emigrant of that name, William Denison, 
reached New England in 1631. In 1673, Major 
General Daniel Denison, his descendant, made a 
will and affixed to it a seal bearing the armo- 
rial devices we give. 

The grandson of that Daniel Denison, John 
Denison, was buried in 1747, in the Ipswich 
burying ground, and his tombstone bears the 
same coat of arms. 

Burke, in whose works we find the colors, at- 
tributes these arms to a North-of-Ireland family. 



Crest : A dexter arm, embowed, 
vested, vert, the hand, proper, 
grasping a cimeter, also proper. 



Motto : Domus grata. [Beloved home.] 




Two brothers, Thomas and James Fytche, 
came from Bocking, county Essex, England, to 
New England, in the ship Defiance, in 1638. 

Thomas settled in Norwalk, Ct, and was the 
ancestor of Thomas Fitch, the Governor of his 
native colony, who made constant use of the 
arms we give. 

The Reverend James Fitch, a distinguished di- 
vine, states in his autobiography that his family 
was of old Saxon blood, and that his greatgreat- 
grandfather had become by descent owner of - 
large estate near Braintry (Braintree), in coun 
Essex, England. 

A complete pedigree is in the possession 
the descendants of the above emigrants, and ■ 
roborates fully these statements. 



Crest: A leopard's head, 
bossed, or, across the mou 
sword : proper — hilted, gul 



Mottoes : A. Prompt et certain. [Prom 
sure.] 
B. Spes juvat. [Hope assists ) 



Edwin Hall: Records of Norwalk, Ct., 184.'/. 
Alden's American Epitaphs, IV., ijp. 
Th. WeSTCOTT : Life of John Fitch, 185^. 

Heraldic Journal, III., 31. 

W. H. WhitmORE : The American Genealogist, 1875. 

Evelyn Philip Shirley : The Noble and Gentle Men of 

England, 1866. 
W. Berry : Encyclopcedia Heraldica, 1828. 
The Book of Family Crests, II., 177. 




Heraldic Journal, I., 91. 

New England Historical and Genealogical Regis- 
ter, XXIII., 312. 

J. D. Baldwin and William Cleft : Record of the De- 
scent of Captai7i George Denison, of Stonington, Ct. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1881. 

The Book of Family Crests, II., 139. 



lOa^ben 



The statements concerning this family have 
been, so far, somewhat conflicting. All genealo- 



58 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



gists, however, agree on this point : that the 
name was anciently spelled Hoidon, Heydon, 
Heiden, Haydon, Hayden. Brothers of the 
same name, known to have emigrated here in 
the XVII. century, wrote the family surname in 
different ways. 

William Hayden, said to have belonged to 
the Haydons, of county Norfolk, England, came 
to Dorchester, Mass., in 1630, and settled, later, 
at Windsor, Ct. He is supposed to have 
brought over the arms we give, using, as his 
crest, the crest of the second coat of arms, en- 
graved below in the text. 

Those second armorial devices were, without 

V doubt, used by another emigrant of the 

ne, Joh7i Hayden, of Braintree, who settled 

Saybrook, Ct. (1664). According to these 

s, that John Hayden should have come from 

family of Hayden, of Walford, county 

ts, England. 

Arms : Argent, on a band, 
azure, three eagles displayed. 



—-p Crest : A talbot, passant, 
^ argent, spotted, sable. 

Mottoes : A. Quo fata va- 
cant. [Wherever the fates 
call.] 

B. Fcrvie en Foy / [Stead- 
fast in the faith.] 



H. R. Stiles : Genealogy of the Hayden Family, 75 (iS^g). 
H. R. Stiles: History of Ancient Windsor, 6sj (rS^p). 
Rev. H. E. Hayden : Hayden Genealogy (in preparation). 
Col. Bulwer: Pedigree of the Haydon or Hayden Fa?nily. 
Harleian Collection of MSS. 
Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 

etc., 1881. 
The Book of Family Crests, II., 232. 






of Boston, Mass. (171 2), and that of Da^iiel 
Stoddart, a naval officer of the same port 
(1723). The crest only differs. 

In 1639, Anthony Stoddard was admitted to 
citizenship in Boston, and occupied soon a 
prominent situation in the community, as did 
his descendants after him. The emigrant and 
his family made constant use of the arms we 
give, and which were recognized in the London 
Visitation, of 1568, to George Stodd.art, Gen- 
tlemafi, of that city. We have seen the book- 
plate of John F. Stoddart, bearing the same 
devices — the crest A and the motto B. 



Crests : A. A demi-unicorn, ermine, 
issuing from a ducal coronet, or. 

B. A sinister arm, embowed, vested, 
gules, holding in its hand the stalk of 
a flower : proper. 



Mottoes : A. Refulgent in tenebris. [They 
glitter in the dark.] 
B. Festi?ia lefite. [Use despatch, 
but cautiously.] 

Gore's Roll of Arms, Nos. 28 and Ji. 

Prince's Chronological History of New Englmid, ijjd. 

D. W. Patterson : John Stoddard, of Wethersfield, Conn., 
and His Descendants (16^2-18^2). 

Genealogy of the Descendants of Anthony Stod- 
dard, OF Boston, 1849. 

Charles A. and Elijah W. Stoddard: Anthoriy Stod- 
dard, of Boston, Mass., and His Descendants, 186$. 

Henry Bond : Family Memorials, etc., of the Early Settlers 
of Watcrtown, Mass., i8s§. 

S. G. Drake : The History and Antiquities of Boston, 1856. 

W. H. Whitmore: The American Genealogist, 18J5. 

Burke : Heraldic Illustrations, //., 83, 184.5. 

Sir Bernard Burke : Tlie General Armory of Eiigland, 
etc., 1884. 

The Book of Family Crests, II., 446. 



Stobbart 

The Gore Roll of Arms gives us, as identical, 
the coat of arms of Simeori Stoddard, Esqtcire, 



6reene 

A descendant of the Greenes of Greene's 
Norton, county Northampton, England, John 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



59 



Greene, came over from Salisbury, county 
Wilts, to Boston, in 1635. His ancestry is 
traced back to Robert Greene of Gillingham 

(1545)- 

Sir Bernard Burke states that this John 
Greene was a companion of Roger Williams, 
and a party to the Providence purchase from 
the Indians. A family tombstone, in the King's 
Chapel Burial Ground, Boston, shovirs the same 
devices ; as does also the bookplate of Gardiner 
Greene (born 1753), who married a sister of 
Lord Lyndhurst. 

The crest A is that found on the tombstone. 
The family uses more generally the crest B. 



Crests : A. A dove holding a sprig 
of olive. 

B. A buck's head, erased, or. 



Motto : Nee timeo, nee sperno. [I neither fear 
nor despise.] 




On the Plymouth Charter, granted in 1620, is 
found the name of Edward Giles of Bowden. 

We find that Edward Giles, the emigrant, 
was admitted a freeman of Massachusetts in 
1634. 

Some very old drawings of the arms we give 
are in the possession of the Mountfort family, 
of Boston. 



Crest : A lion's gamb, erased and 
erect : proper — charged with a baton, 
or, holding an apple branch, vert, 
fructed, or. 




Motto : Liber tas et 
country.] 



patria. [Liberty and 



John Adams Vinton : The Giles Memorial, 1864.. 

W. H. Whitmore: The American Genealogist, 1875. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 

etc., 1884. 
The Book of Family Crests, II., 199. 
LichtENSTEIN'S Collection of Book Plates, 1886. 



New England Historical and Genealogical Regis- 
ter, IV., 75. 

W. H. Whitmore: The American Genealogist, i8js- 

Narragansett Historical Register, II., 137-44. 161- 
77, 253-65. 

WiLKINS Updyke : History of the Episcopal Church in 
Narraga7isett, R. I., With Genealogies, etc., 377-8 {1847). 

Sir Bernard Burke: The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1884. 

Evelyn Philip Shirley : The Noble and Gentle Men of 
Ejigland, 1866. 

The Rousseau Collection of Book Plates. 

Burke : Heraldic Illustrations, II., 86. 

The Book of Family Crests, II., 212. 



©lies 

Sir Edward Giles was Knight of Bowden, 
county Devon, at the time of the Heralds' Visi- 
tation of 1620. 



Xoring 



At the Old Granary Burial Ground, in Bos- 
ton, is found a tombstone of the Loring family 
bearing the devices we give. 

The emigrant was Thomas Loring, who came, 
in 1635, from Axminster, county Devon, Eng- 
land, to Hingham, Mass. 

The same arms were borne in 1344, by Sir 
Nigel Loryng, of Chalgrave, county Bedford, 
one of the founder Knights of the Garter. 



Cre.st : Out of a bowl, or, five 
quills, erect, argent. 




6o 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



Motto : Faire sans dire. [To act without 
words.] 



Th. Bridgman : The Pilgrims of Boston, etc., With Inscrip- 
tions From Monuments in the Granary Burial Ground, 
350-7 {1856). 

Th. Bridgman : Epitaphs From Copp's Hill Burial Ground, 
Boston, 231-3 (1851). 

S. G. Drake : The History and Antiquities of Boston, 1856. 

New England Historical and Genealogical Regis- 
ter, VII., 163, 326. 

Lichtenstein'S Collection of Book Plates, 1886. 

Sir Bernard Burke: The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1884. 

The Book of Family Crests, II., 294. 



X^man 



The emigrant, Richard Lyman, came over 
from High Ongar, county Essex, England, in 
1 63 1, and settled at Hartford, Ct, where him- 
self and many of his descendants were promi- 
nent in public affairs. 

The pedigree of Richard Lyman is clearly 
traced back to Thomas Lyman of Navistoke, 
county Essex, who died there in 1509. 

We give the quarterings, as borne in this 
country, by the head of the Lyman family. 
The first and fourth quarters are for Lyman, 
the second for Lambert, the third for Osborne. 



Crest : A demi-bull, argent, at- 
tired and hoofed, or, langued, 
ffules. 



Mottoes : A. Quod verum tutum. [Truth is 
secure.] 
B. Esse quam videri. [Rather be 
than pretend.] 




HiNES' Lebanon, Ct., Address, 1880. 
W. H. HURD : History of New London, Ct., 1882. 
Litchfield, Ct., County History, 1881. 
Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1884.. 



MilUams 



Coleman's Lyman Genealogy, i8j2. 
Dickinson's Ly7nan GeJieahgy. 



Many of the descendants of Robert Williams, 
the emigrant, who came over from Norwich, 
England, in 1638, and settled at Roxbury, Mass., 
have adopted for their coat of arms the devices 
we give, sustained in that by the genealogist of 
the family. 

Of late, a distinguished Boston gentleman, 
well versed in heraldic lore, has raised serious 
doubts concerning the authenticity of this coat 
of arms, in so far as the American Williamses 
are concerned. It is the coat of arms of the 
Williamses of county Flint, whence sprang Oli- 
ver Cromwell (alias Williams), greatgreatgrand- 
son of Morgan Williams, of Newchurche, Gla- 
morganshire. However, the crest used here is 
different, and is found, to our knowledge, in no 
English works on heraldr)', as belonging to any 
Williams family. 

Crests : A. [Used in America] : 
A fighting cock. 

B. [Belonging to the shield in 

Burke, etc.] : A demi-lion, rampant, 

double queued argent, langued, gules, 

charged with three gouttes de poix, 

holding in the paws a spear erect, azure, ringed 

at the bottom, or. 



Mottoes : A. Cognosce occasionem. [Know the 
occasion.] 
B. V fi7io Dwy y fidd [What God 
willeth will be.] 




AMERICA HERALDICA 



6l 



MilUams of Boston 



SSacon 



John Williams, of Boston, qualified "Inspector 
General of North America" a title which might 
appear now somewhat ambitious, was the son of 
Jonathan Williams, of Salem, Mass., whose an- 
cestors came from Wales to the colonies at an 
unknown date. 

John Williams received, in 1767, a special 
grant of coat-armor from the Heralds' College 
of London, England, confirming the arms we 
give here as an engraving in the text, to his 
descendants, as well as to the other descendants 
of his father, Jonatha7i Williams; also, to Isaac 
Williams, only surviving brother of Jonathan, 
and paternal uncle of the grantee, and his de- 
scendants. 

The claim is recognized by Sir Bernard Burke. 



Arms : Or, a lion rampant, 
gules, on a chief, azure, two 
doves rising, argent. 




Crest : An eag 
expanded : proper. 



wings 



Motto : Y cadam a'e cypr- 
wym. [The mighty and cun- 
ning.] 



Nathaniel Bacon, and a cousin of his, bearing 
the same surname, both showing a clear descent 
from the Bacons of Suffolk, to which belonged 
Lord Verulam, Viscou?it St. Albans, the great 
Bacon, Lord Keeper, came over to Virginia be- 
fore 1644, and obtained large estates there. In 
1675 Nathaniel Bacon led an insurrection against 
the profligate Royal Governor Berkeley. De- 
feated, he died soon after of fever and disap- 
pointment. 

The pedigree of the Virginia Bacons is ac- 
cepted as complete and authentic. It connects 
them with the Bacons of Redgrave, Premiers 
Baronets of England. 



Crest: A boar, passant, ermine, 
armed and hoofed, or. 



Motto : Mediocria fir ma. [Mediocrity is stable.] 



New England Historical and Genealogical Regis- 
ter, XXXVII., 189. 

J. Bacon : Bacon's Descendants, 181J.5. 

J. Lewis Peyton: History of Augusta County, Va., p. 20, 
1883. 

Evelyn Philip Shirley : The Noble and Gentle Men of 
England, 1866. 

W. Berry : Encyclopcedia Heraldica, 1828. 

The Book of Family Crests, II., 20. 

Sir Bernard Burke : Gen. Hist, of Dormant, Abeyant, 
Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages of the British Empire, 
1883. 




Stephen W. Williams : The General History of the Fam- 
ily of Williams in America, and More Particularly of the 
Descent of Robert Williams, of Roxbury, 18^7. 

A. D. Weld French : T/ie Surnames and Coats of Arms 
of the Williamses, With An Account of Robert Williams, 
of Roxbury, and Some of His Descendants, 1884.. 

Thoresby's Ducatus Leodiensis. 

W. H. Whitmore : The American Genealogist, i8js. 

Sir Bernard Burke; The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1884.. 



Carroll 



Burke recognizes two different branches of the 
famed O'Carroll family as having settled in 
Maryland. 

They both proceed from the Lords of Ely 



62 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



O'Carroll, and from Sir Maolroona O'Carroll, 
chief of his name, knighted in 1603. 

Charles O'Carroll, the emigrant-ancestor of 
the best known of the two branches, was grand- 
son of Sir Maolroona O'Carroll, and received 
a grant of sixty thousand acres of land in the 
Maryland colony. His direct descendant, Charles 
Carroll, signed the Declaration of Independ- 
ence. 

The other Carrolls, of Maryland, came over 
from Spain, by way of St. Kitts, West Indies 
(temp. Queen Anne). They use the same arms 
and crest. 




Crest : A horse's head, sable, maned, 
or, bearing a plume, or and gules. 



Genealogy of the Caverley Family (1116-18S0). 
Dwight's Strong Genealogy, 8sg. 
Brown's West Simsbury, Ct., Settlers, 56. 
Runnell'S History of Sanborntott, N.H., II., log. 




Crest: On the stump of an oak 
tree, sprouting, a hawk rising: all 
proper — belled, or. 



Motto : In fide et in bello forte. [Strong 
both in faith and war.] 



Old Kent, the Eastern Shore of Maryland, 137-158. 
Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 

etc., 1884.. 
The Book of Family Crests, II., 75. 
Lichtenstein's Collection of Book Plates. 



Claiborne 



(Eaverlip 



This coat of arms was confirmed in 1544 to 
Sir Anthony Calverley, direct ancestor of the 
American Caverleys, or Caverlys. The com- 
mon ancestor was Hugh Calverley (1403), who 
bore, however, different arms. The emigrants, 
two brothers, George and Charles Caverly, came 
over in 1635. 

The pedigree is clear back to the ancestor 
having received confirmation of the devices we 
give. 

Burke gives different arms to the Calverleys 
he mentions. 



William Clayborne, the emigrant, was the 
second son of Sir Edward Clayborne, or Cle- 
burne, of county Westmoreland, and was one of 
the colonial officers appointed in 1621 by the 
London Company for Virginia, and for many 
years Secretary of the colony. 

The coat of arms we give was recognized in 
several Visitations of the Heralds. In Burke we 
find it described under the name of Cliburne 
of Cliburne, county Westmoreland. 

We have seen an ancient bookplate of the 
Clebornes, of Virginia, identical in every re- 
spect, except the motto, found as given (^5). 



Crest : A dove and olive branch. 




Mottoes : A. Pax et copia. [Peace and plenty.] 
B. Virtute invidiam vincas. [By vir- 
tue thou wilt conquer envy.] 



Rev. Edward D. Neill : The Foimders of Maryland, j8, 

177 {.18761 
Ch. Campbell : History of the Colony of Virgmia, 324.-5 

[1860]. 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



63 



Rev. Philip Slaughter : History of Bristol Parish, Va., 

1877. 
Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 

etc., 1884. 
LiCHTENSTElN's Collection of Book Plates, 1886. 



IpeiPton 



Sir Henry Peyton, fourth son of Sir Thomas 
Peyton, M. P. for Dumvich, in 1557, was mem- 
ber of the London Company, to whom King 
James granted, in 1609, a charter to colonize 
Virginia. His nephew, John Peyton, was the 
first of the name to come over to America 
(1622), and he settled there in 1644. 

Another branch of that same original stock of 
Peytons, of Isleham, county Cambridge (created 
baronets in 161 1, title dormant since 1812), was 
Robert Peyton, a grandson of Sir Robert, the 
first Baronet. 

According to Burke, the Peytons of Virginia 
claim to be entitled to the baronetcy of Peyton 
of Isleham. 



Crest : A griffin, sejant, or. 




Motto : Patior, potior. [I endure, 
I enjoy.] 



and in Maryland, connects it with the Lowndes 
of Overton, county Kent, England, now repre- 
sented, according to Burke, by the Lowndes of 
Hassell Hall, county Chester. 

The emigrant, Charles Lowndes, came over 
in 1730, from St. Kitts, West Indies, to South 
Carolina. His branch of the family is now ex- 
tinct. 

From the same stock descended the emigrant 
to Maryland, Christopher Lowndes, who came 
over from England about 1 740 and built " Bo- 
stock House" on the heights above Bladensburg. 



Crest [Of both branches] : A lion's 
head, erased, or, gorged with a chap- 
let, vert. 



Motto : Mediocria firvta. [Mediocrity is se- 
cure.] 



George B. Chase : Historical and Genealogical Memoir on 
the Family of Lowndes, 1876. 

New England Historical and Genealogical Regis- 
ter, XXX., 141. 

Martin's History of Chester, Pa., 494-5. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The Geiieral Armory of England, 
etc., 1884. 

Sir Bernard Burke : Gen. and Herald. History of the 
La?ided Gentry of Great Britain and Ireland, 1879. 

Burke : Heraldic Illustrations, II., 1845. 




New England Historical and Genealogical Regis- 
ter, XXXV., 145. 

J. Lewis Peyton: History of Augusta County, Va., p. 
J20-22, i88j. 

Bishop Meade : Old Churches, Ministers, and Families of 
Virginia, II., 466. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1884. 

The Book of Family Crests, II., 373. 



A very complete pedigree of this family, set- 
tled for a century and a half in South Carolina 



IRicbolson 



The family of Nicholson, of Virginia, was 
founded there by the emigrant, Robert Nichol- 
son, who was granted five hundred acres of land 
in Charles City county, Va., in 1655. 

His descendant, Francis Nicholson, was Gov- 
ernor and Captain General of South Carolina 
(1693-94), and received, as a royal grant, the 
arms we give, which are duly inserted in Burke, 
etc. 



64 



AMERICA HERALDICA 




Crest : A demi-man, habited in 
a close coat, azure, the buttons and 
the cuffs of the sleeves turned up, 
or, his face and hands, proper, 
armed with a headpiece and gor- 
get, argent, the beaver open, hold- 
ing in the dexter hand a sv/ord erect, proper, 
hilt and pommel of the second, and in the sin- 
ister hand a bible open, clasps, argent. 

Motto : Deus mihi sol. [God, my sun.] 



New England Historical and Genealogical Regis- 
ter, XXXIX., 72. 

R. A. Brock . The Huguenot Emigration to Virginia, 1886. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1884. 

W. Berry : EncyclopcBdia Heraldica, 1828. 

The Book of Family Crests, II., 347. 




Crest : On a mural coronet, argent, 
a cock, or, beaked, barbed, and mem- 
bered, gules. 



Edward Elbridge Salisbury : Family Memorials, jys- 
455 {1885). 

New England Historical and Genealogical Regis- 
ter, I., 345 ; IL, 167; IV., 185. 

Lucius R. Paige : History of Cambridge, Mass., 1877. 

Cotton Mather's Magnalia, 1820. 

Collection of Manuscripts of the N. E. Historical 
Society. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1884.. 

S. G. Drake: The History and Antiquities of Boston, 1856. 



Xubwell 



(5ookin 



The first English ancestor of that family 
whose name has been preserved was Arnold Go- 
kin, of county Kent (tempo. Henry VII.), the 
father of Thomas Goolkyne of Bekesbourne, 
both named in the Heralds Kent Visitalion 
for 1 6 1 9. 

The family seat was transferred to Ripple 
Court, always in county Kent, by John Gookin, 
son of the above, and father of Daniel Gookin, 
the emigrant (in Virginia, 1621-22). 

Major General Daniel Gookin, who resided in 
Virginia from 1630 to 1644, was a son of the 
preceding, and the ancestor of all the American 
Gookins. He settled finally, and died, at Cam- 
bridge, Mass. (1648-1686). 

A Charles Gookin, of the same family, was, 
under William Penn, Acting Proprietary Gover- 
nor of Pennsylvania, in 1709. 



This old family, extinct in America, in the 
male line, came over in 1650, to Virginia, from 
Somersetshire, England. We have in our posses- 
sion a bookplate of Philip Ludwell, of Green 
Springs, Va., dated 1751, and reproducing the 
devices we give. 

The pedigree is clear, but we fail to find the 
coat of arms in either of the usually-consulted 
English authorities. 

No crest is known to have belonged to the 
family, or to have been used by any of its 
members. 

Motto : / pensieri stretti e il viso sciolto. [Re- 
served in thought, acute in judgment.] 



Heraldic Journal, III., 95. 

New England Historical and Genealogical Regis- 
ter, XXXIII., 220. 
Lee's Ludwell Genealogy, i8jg. 
Bishop Mead's Old Churches, Families, etc., of Virginia. 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



65 



IRanboIpb 



Colonel William Randolph, of "Turkey Island" 
the alleged founder of the distinguished family 
of the name in Virginia, came over from Yorks- 
town in 165 1. 

He bore, and his descendants after him, the 
coat of arms of the Randolphs of Biddenden, 
county Kent, England ; and when John Ran- 
dolph was a member of the Middle Temple, 
he used openly these arms as belonging to him. 

The impression of the seal of Edward Ran- 
dolph (1683) shows the devices we give, as do 
also numerous ^bookplates, all dated far back 
into the XVIII. century, and which we have in 
our possession.- 

The Heraldic Journal mentions, also, a totally 
different family. 



Crest : An antelope's head, couped, 
holding in its mouth a stick, or. 



Motto : Pari qua sentiat. [Speak thy mind.] 



Heraldic Journal, I., 23 ; III., 48. 
New England Historical and Genealogical Regis- 
ter, XXXVH., 155. 
Charles Campbell: History of the Colony of Virginia, 

629-30- 

Bishop Meade's Old Churches, Ministers, and Families of 

Virginia, I., Ij8. 
R. A. Brock : The Huguenot Emigratio?i in Virginia, 1886. 
Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 

etc., 1884.. 




f^age 



their descendants occupied important offices in 
their adopted country. The emigrant died in 
1692, and his tombstone, bearing the devices we 
give, still exists in the Episcopal churchyard, at 
Williamsburg, Va. 

It is claimed that Colonel Page was the son 
of Thomas Page of Sudbury, Parish Harrow, 
county Middlesex, England, and that he was 
born there in 1628. The Virginian Pages would 
be thus related to the Pages, Baronets of Green- 
wich, county Kent. 

We have in our possession the bookplate of 
"Francis Page, of the Inner Temple, Esquire" 
1703. ) . 



Crest : Out of a ducal coronet, a 
demi-griffin, both per pale, or and 
gules, counterchanged. 



Motto : Spe labor levis. [Hope lightens work.J 



R. A. Brock : The Huguenot Emigration to Virginia, 1886. 
R. Channing M. Page: The Page Family in Virginia, 

1883. 
Meade's Old Churches, Ministers, and Families of Virginia. 
Sir Bernard Burke: The General Armory of England, 

etc., 1884. 
The Book of Family Crests, H., 359. 




Car^ 



Colonel John Page, and his wife, Alice Lar- 
KiN, emigrated to Virginia, about 1650, and 



Colonel Miles Cary, fifth in descent from 
William Cary, Mayor of Bristol, England, in 
1546, and son of Colonel Myles Cary, emigrated 
to Virginia in 1650. Since that time himself 
and his descendants were constantly in possession 
of the confidence and esteem of their Virginia 
fellow-citizens. 

The Carys are of Devonshire stock, and de- 
scend from Adam de Karry, Lord of Castle 
Karry, county Somerset, who lived in 1198. 



66 



AMERICA HERALDICA 




Several titles have been granted to various 
branches of the family. They are nearly all 
extinct. 

The motto B is found on the bookplate, in 
our possession, of Miles Gary, of Virginia [son 
or grandson of the emigrant]. 



Crest : A swan : proper — wings 
elevated. 



Mottoes : A. Comme je trove. [As I find.] 

B. Sine Deo careo. [Without God 
I am in want] 



Heraldic Journal, I., 74. 

Cary Memorials, 1874. 

Bishop Meade's Old Churches, Ministers, and Families of 

Virginia, /., /J.58. 
!<.. A. Brock : The Huguenot Emigration in Virginia, 1886. 
Phil. Slaughter's Life of Randolph Fairfax, i8j8. 
Sir Bernard Burke : Gen. Hist, of the Dormant, Abeyant, 

Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages of the British Empire, 

1883. 
Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 

etc., 1884. 
The Book of Family Crests, II., 88. 
£velyn Philip Shirley : The Noble and Gentle Men of 

Ejigland, 1866. 




Crest : A garb, or, banded, 
vert, between two wings, sable. 



•z man droit. [Respect my 



Motto : 
right] 



Heraldic Journal, III., 96. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 

etc., 1884. 
The Book of Family Crests, II., 325. 



Xee of IDxrGinia 



This well-known Virginia family claims to de- 
scend, by clear pedigree, from the Lees of 
Langley and Colon, county Salop. Richard Lee, 
High Sheriff of county Salop in 1479, is the 
common ancestor of these English and Virginia 
Lees. The Baronetcy of Lee of' Langley is ex- 
tinct (1660). 

We have in our possession various bookplates 
having belonged to various members of that 
family. They all reproduce the devices we give. 

The colors of the English family are different. 
We give both in our Index. 



/Iftibbleton 



Arthur Middleton was Governor of South 
'Carolina in 1725. His eldest son returned to 
England and settled there. The son of this son 
was created a baronet in 1804. The baronetcy 
became extinct in i85o. 

The other children of Arthur Middleton re- 
mained in this country. They bear with full 
right the arms of the Middletowns, of county 
Suffolk, here given. 




Crest: A squirrel cracking the fruit 
of an oak branch: all proper. 



Motto : Non incatitus futuri. 
of the future.] 



[Not heedless 



%ee (®tber) 



From the Lees of Lee, county Chester, there 
settled before the time of Henry III., came the 

Earls of Litchfield as younger line. 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



07 



The chief line removed from Lee to Darnhall, 
in the same county [temp. Charles I.], and be- 
came extinct in the male line at the decease of 
General Charles Lee, the American Revolu- 
tionary General. 



Arms : Argent, a chevron, 
between three leopards' faces, 
sable. 




Crest : On a ducal coronet, 
or, a leopard's face, sable. 

Motto : Fide et constantia. 
[By fidelity and constancy.] 



Edward C. Mead: Genealogical History of the Lee Family 
of Virgijiia, 1868. 

C. F. Lee and J. Packard, Jr.: A Record of the Descend- 
ants of Colonel Richard Lee, of Virginia, i8j2. 

W. H. WhiTMORE: The Atnerican Genealogist, i8js. 

New England Historical and Genealogical Regis- 
ter, XL, 329; XXVL, 61 ; XXVIIL, 394. 

Bishop Meade : Old Churches, Ministers, and Fa?nilies of 
Virginia, II., /JJ. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1884.. 

Sir Bernard Burke : Gen. Hist, of the Dormant, Abeyant, 
Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages of the British Empire, 



In Rykers History of Newtown we find men- 
tioned a William Howard, who came over to 
Long Island, N. Y., in i56o, and reached the 
age of one hundred. 

Other Howards, descending from a tailor at 
Aylesford, county Kent, England, settled in 
New England (1632-1696). 

We give here the arms borne by the first- 
mentioned family of Howard. 



Crest : A lion, rampant, argent, 
holding a cross of the shield. 



Motto : Sola virtus invicta. [Virtue alone is 
invincible.] 



Lawrence Buckley Thomas : Genealogical Note, 1877. 
Evelyn Philip Shirley : The Noble and Getitle Men of 

England, 1866. 
Cutler H. Jarvis: A Genealogical Rsicord of All the 

Known Descendants of Thomas and Susannah Howard, 

1884.. 
Burke : Heraldic Illustrations, II., 6j, 104. 
Sir Bernard Burke : Gen. Hist, of Dormant, Abeyant, 

Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages of the British Empire, 




IDuger 



1[3owar6 

The descendants of Sir Henry Howard of 
England claim a common origin with the How- 
ards, Dukes of Norfolk. 

The third son of Sir Henry married a Miss 
Rebecca Ownings, and from this marriage are is- 
sued the Howards known as the Howards of 
Baltimore and Washington. 



The English heraldic authorities state in pre- 
cise terms that the coat of arms we give was 
granted in 1771 to Daniel Huger, of South 
Carolina. 



Crest: A sprig; thereon a Vir- 
ginia nightingale : all proper. 



Motto : Ubi liber tas, ibi patria. [Where is 
liberty, there is my country.] 




68 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



Heraldic Journal, III., 47. 

W. Berry : Encyclopedia Heraldica. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Artnory of England, 

etc., 1884. 
The Book of Family Crests, II., 245. 



IFrvine, or Hrving 

All the Scotch Irvings, Ervings, Ervines, Ir- 
vines, or Irwines, claim descent from William 
de Irwin, whom King Robert Bruce appointed 
his cupbearer. The chief line, now known as 
Forbes-Irvine, is issued from Drum, county- 
Aberdeen, and bears neither quarterings nor bor- 
dure — the last, most certainly, a mark of ca- 
dence. 

The emigrant, William Irving, bom in 1731, 
came over from Scotland in 1763, and always 
made use of the family coat of arms. So did 
his son, Waslmigton Irving. 

We have s-^en a bookplate of the emigrant, 
by Callender, of £5oston. But we fail to find 
in any English or Scotch authorities the crest 
used by the American Irvings, and which we 
give here as crest A. The crest B is the orig- 
inal family crest. 

Crests : A. A dexter arm, in ar- 
mor, fessways, holding a sword erect, 
hilted and pomeled, or. 

B. A sheaf of nine holly leaves, 
vert. 

Motto : Sub sole, sub umbra, virens. [Grow- 
ing in sunshine or shade.] 



"Heraldic Journal, III., 23. 

Bolton : History of Westchester Co., N. V., II., 741. 
The Rousseau Collection of Book Plates. 
Evelyn Philip Shirley : The Noble and Gentle Men of 

England {1866). 
Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 

etc., 1884. 
The Book of Family Crests, II., 251. 




©reaves, or ©raves 

Among the New England prominent men 
mentioned in Prince's Chronological History, Edi- 
tion of IJ36, we find a Thomas Graves, of 
Charlestown, Mass., mentioned as Esquire or 
Gentlemafi. He descended from the emigrant, 
Thomas Graves, one of the original grantees of 
the Massachusetts Company (1628). 

On the tombstone of the first-named Thomas 
Graves, M.D., buried in 1746 (aetet. 63), in 
the Charlestown Burial Ground, we find the 
arms we give. They are those of the Greaves, 
of county Kent, and of St. Leonard's Forest, 
county Sussex, England, with the martlet added 
as mark of cadence. 

The Greaves of Greaves, county Derby, recog- 
nized in the time of Henry III., are the head 
of the family and bear these armorial devices. 

There is a baronial title in the English family. 



Crest : An eagle displayed, or, 
winged, gules. 



Motto : Aquila non capiat muscas. [An eagle 
does not catch mice.] 

Heraldic Journal, I., 47. 

Thos. B. Wyman : Genealogies, etc., of Charlestown, Mas- 
sachusetts, /<?7p. 

S. G. Drake : Tlie History and Antiquities of Boston, p. §4 
{1856). 

Sir Bernard Burke: The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1884. 

The Book of Family Crests, II., 211. 

Burke : Heraldic Illustrations, II., p<? {184s). 

Evelyn Philip Shirley : The Noble and Geiitle Men of 




Stetson 



The ancestor of the Stetson family in 
America was Robert Stetson, commonly called 




TETSOr? 




AIRWEAThiE]^ 








voj^KS 




SK£ 




YTTUE 




»1-[I]P(LEY 



OTTOR 




Fj^ITIBG^ 




OaTAQVE 




ll2DE]P^h[ILL 



EBTWOKTF\ 




'%mfft 




ILKIUSOU 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



69 



Cornet Stetson, because he was Cornet of the 
first Horse Company raised in Plymouth colony, 
Massachusetts, in the year 1658-59. 

It is claimed by the descendants of Cornet 
Stetson [some of whom spell their name Stut- 
son] that their common ancestor came from 
county Kent, England. Certain it is that the 
coat of arms we give was found among the 
papers of the emigrant, and must have, there- 
fore, an authentic origin. 

We find no trace of it in the English he- 
raldic authorities. 




Crest: A lion's head, erased, gules, 
billet^e, or. 



Bolton : History of Westchester Co., N. Y., /., 4.38. 
Prince's Chronological History of New England, 1736. 
Rev. S. Orcutt: History of Hartford, Ct. 
Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 

etc., 1884.. 
The Book of Family Crests, II., 172. 




Crest : A demi-griffin, or. 



Motto : Virtus nobilitat omnia. [Courage en- 
nobles everything.] 



John S. Barry : A Genealogical and Biographical Sketch 
of the Name and Family of Stetson, iS^y. 

John S. Barry : Historical Sketch of the Town of Hanover, 
Mass., 1883. 

Samuel Deane : History of Scituate, Mass., 1831. 



jFairweatber 



Sumner 



The emigrant, William Sumner, of Bicester, 
county Oxford, England, came over in 1635, 
and was the ancestor of Increase Sumner, the 
Governor of Massachusetts, whose bookplate, 
bearing the devices we give, was seen by us 
in the Rousseau Collection. 

These arms are those of the county Surrey 
and county Kent Sumners, and old portraits of 
the emigrant are adorned with the same devices. 



Crest : A lion's head, erminois, du- 
cally gorged, or. 



Motto : In medio tutissimus ibis. [In the 
middle path thou shalt be safest.] 




Joseph Fa^erweather, from the Fayerweath- 
ERS of Brissett, county Suffolk, England, counts 
amongst the first settlers of Norwich, Ct. 

Although the descendants of the above-named 
emigrant now spell their name Fairweather, 
they must be distinguished from the English 
Fairweathers, who bear a radically different 
coat of arms. 

Some of the descendants of Joseph Fayer- 
weather settled in Westchester county, N. Y. 



William H. Sumner : Memoir of Increase Sumner, Gov- 
ernor of Massachusetts, 1854.. 

Rev. Evarts Scudder: In Memory of Hon. Increase 
Sumner, of Great Barrington, Mass., iSji. 

W. H. Whitmore: The American Genealogist, 18J5. 

Th. Bridgman : The Pilgrims of Boston, etc., 1856. 

Appleton's Sumner Genealogy, i8yg. 

New England Historical and Genealogical Regis- 
ter, VIII., 128; IV., 300. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1884. 

The Book of Family Crests, II., 451. 



70 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



Storrs 



The emigrant of the name was Samuel Storrs, 
fourth son of TJio7nas Storrs of Sutton-ctim- 
Lound, Nottinghamshire, England. 

He was born in 1640, emigrated to New 
England in 1663, and settled at Barnstable, 
Mass. 

The arms we give are the reproduction of im- 
prints from seals brought over by the emigrant 
himself. 

We find no such arms to the name of Storrs 
in English heraldic authorities. 



Crest : A unicorn's head, erased, ar- 
'i(M gent, armed and maned, or. 





Crest : On the point of a triangle, 
sable, an estoile, or. 



^c^si^seS) 



Motto : Made virtute, sic itur ad astra. 
tue aiding, the stars can be reached.] 



[Vir- 



Albert a. Fiske : The Fiske Family, 1865. 

Essex Institute: A Genealogy of the Fiske Family, i86y. 

Henry Bond : Family Memorials, etc., of the Early Settlers 
of Watertown, Mass., i8§§. 

Heraldic Journal, HI., 120-5. 

New England Historical and Genealogical Regis- 
ter, IV., 180; XL, 221-2. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1884.. 

The Book of Family Crests, II., 177. 



Charles Storrs : Tlie Storrs Family, 1886. 
N. Goodwin : Genealogical Notes, etc., 215, 220. 
Centennial Celebration of Longmeadow, Mass., 
With Genealogies, 1883. 



XTuttle 



Jfiske 



The coat of arms we give is that borne by 
the FiSKES of Stradhaugh, Laxfield, county Suf- 
folk, England, from Simon Fiske [tempo. Henry 
IV.] to Nicholas Fiske, "Professor of Physics" 
who received a grant of confirmation, with the 
special crest we give, in 1633. 

Robert Fiske, who married Sybil Gold, and 
became the progenitor of the New England 
Fiske, was fourth in descent from the Simon 
Fiske named above. 

We have seen a bookplate [identical] of Sam- 
uel Fiske, in the Erving Collection. 



William and Elizabeth Tuthill, his wife, 
came over from New England in 1635. It is 
asserted that they came from the Tuthills of 
Peamore, county Devon, England, and that they 
used constantly the arms we give. 

On the tombstone of Mary Tuttle [Tuthill 
was changed early to Tuttle], in Copp's Hill 
Burial Ground, Boston, we find the same arms 
(1705), also extant in Gore's Roll of Arms, as 
the armorial devices of Zechariah Tuttle, of 
Boston, Lieutenant of Castle William, in 1721. 

Motto furnished by English authorities. 



Crest : On a mount, vert, a bird : 
proper — in the beak a branch of 
olive, vert, fructed, or. 



Motto : Vincere aut mori. [Conquer or die.] 




^ %' ^ 




J^LSTJ^ET 





mm. 



12DSAY 





JLJJ^ESE 



ODDlRqrOR 




vjfy}!^ 



A^ 



OVKTFOT^ 




L)0J^OR 




ECKL 




EJ^RLCK- 




OqC^ESl^LL 



^ 




RDICOTT 








ns 



OST2AS 




H 



opi^ms 




|]C(E SCOTT 

E.deVVEF 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



71 



Heraldic Journal, II., 132. 

The Tuttle Family of Connecticut, 1883. 

Joseph F. Tuttle : William Tuttle, of New Haven, Ct., 

1873- 

Chas. C. Dawson: Family Records and Biographical 
Sketches, 1874. 

New England Historical and Genealogical Regis- 
ter, VIIL, 132; XXL, 132. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England' 
etc., 1884.. 

The Book of Family Crests, II., 466. 



Cotton 



Shirley 



William Shirley, the Royal Governor of 
Massachusetts (1740), belonged, undoubtedly, to 
the Shirleys of Wislon, county Sussex, a 
branch of the noble house of Ferrers. 

His son, Thomas Shirley, a Major General 
in the English Army, was Governor of the Lee- 
ward Islands, and created a baronet in 1786. 
The baronetcy of Shirley (of Oakhall, county 
Sussex), became extinct in 1815, at the death 
s.p. of the second baronet. 



Crests : A. A man's head : proper 
— wreathed with laurels, vert. 

B. A Saracen's head in profile : 
proper — wreathed about the temples, 
or and azure. 




A younger scion of the family of Cotton, of 
county Cambridge, England, the Reverend John 
Cotton, born in 1584, came over to Boston in 
1633. He was the son of Roland Cotton, a 
lawyer, who traced his pedigree to Walter Cot- 
ton, who died in 1445, the common ancestor 
of the Cottons of Landwade, baronets (161 5), 
extinct (1863), and of the American Cottons. 

We have seen the bookplate [identical] of 
Philadelphia L. Cotton, a descendant of the 
Reverend John Cotton, mentioned above. 

Drake gives a correct pedigree in his folio 
edition, but an incorrect coat of arms. 



Crest : A griffin's head, erased, 
argent. 



Motto : Fidelitas vincit. [Fidelity conquers.] 



Cotton Mather's Magnalia, B. III., 14. 

H. J. SOMERBY: The English Ancestry of the Rev. John 

Cotton, of Boston, 1868. 
W. H. Whitmore : The American Genealogist, 1875- 
Heraldic Journal, IV., 49. 

S. G. Drake : The History and Antiquities of Boston, 1856- 
Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 

etc., 1884.. 
The Book of Family Crests, II., 117. 




Motto : Honor virtutis prczmium. [Honor the 
reward of valor.] 



Heraldic Journal, II., n6. 

New England Historical and Genealogical Regis- 
ter, X., 47. 
Prince's Chro?iological History of New Engla?id, J736. 
S. G. Drake: History and Antiquities of Boston, 1836. 
Evelyn Philip Shirley : The Noble and Gentle Men of 

England, 1866. 
^ Bernard Burke : The General Armory of Etigland, 
. 1884. 

! : Heraldic Illustrations, II., 70. 
ook of Family Crests, II., 424. 



mabiting 



The Reverend Samuel Whiting, D.D., the 
emigrant, came from Boston, county Lincoln, 
England, to North America, in 1636, and died 
at Lynn, Mass., in 1679. 

He was the son of John Whiting, Mayor of 
Old Boston (1600 and 1608). The family arms 
were verified at the Heralds Visitation of 16 19. 



72 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



An early ancestor of the family was William 
Whiting, also of Old Boston, whose name is 
found on a Subsidy Roll (tempo, Edward III.). 

The bookplate we saw in the Lichtenstein Col- 
lection had no motto. 



Mottoes : A. Disponendo me, non mutendo me. 
[Influencing me, not changing me.] 
B. ^quitas actionum, regula. [Jus- 
tice the rule of actions.] 




Crests: A. A lion's head, erased, or. 
B. A bear's head : proper. 



Cotton Mather's Magnalia. 

Thompson's History of Boston, England, ^jo. 

S. G. Drake: The History and Antiquities of Boston, i8§6. 

W. Whiting : Memoir of the Rev. Samuel Whiting, D.D., 
187J. 

W. H. WhitmorE: The American Genealogist, 1875. 

Heraldic Journal, I., 160. 

N. Goodwin : Genealogical Notes, etc. 

New England Historical and Genealogical Regis- 
ter, XXIV., 86. 

Prince's Chronological History of New England, ijjd. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 
etc., i8Z^. 



/Iftontague 



The complete pedigree of Richard Montague, 
the emigrant, who settled in Maine in 1646, 
shows him to be descended from Robert Mon- 
tague of Bovency and Dorney, county Bucking- 
ham, England. 

The Montagues of Bovency belonged to the 
noble race of Montacute, from which sprung 
so many titled houses, famed in English history : 
the original Earls of Salisbury (extinct), the 
Dukes of Montague (also extinct), and the 
actual Dukes of Manchester. 

The mottoes are those used by the two lead- 
ing English houses of the race of Montacute. 



Crest: A griffin's head, erased, sable. 




G. W. Montague : The Montague Genealogy (in prepara- 
tion), 1885. 

S. E. TiTCOMB : Early New England People, 268 {1882). 

New England Historical and Genealogical Regis- 
ter, XIX., 318. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1884. 

Sir Bernard Burke: Gen. Hist, of Dormant, Abeyant, 
Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages of the British Empire, 
1883. 

The Book of Family Crests, II., 331. 



XElnberbill 



John Underhill, Gentlemati, ■ an officer by 
profession, and belonging to the Underhills of 
Wolverhampton, county Stafford, England, came 
over to- Boston in 1630, and acted actively and 
successfully towards the suppression of the neigh- 
boring Indians. 

A branch of the family settled later in the 
New York province, and possessed important es- 
tates in Westchester county. 



Crest : On a mount, vert, 
hind lodged, or. 



Bolton : History of Westchester Co., N. Y., //., 404. 

S. G. Drake : The History and Antiquities of Boston, 1856. 

Ch. W. BaIRD: History of Rye, Westchester Co., N.Y., rRyi. 

Bartow Genealogy, 174-6. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of E 

etc., 1884.. 
The Book of Family Crests, II., 474. 




AMERICA HERALDICA 



73 



Milson 



Mentwottb 



Here we find a clear pedigree back to Wil- 
liam Wilson of Wellsbourne, county Lincoln, 
Gentleman, who died in 1587, at Windsor, Eng- 
land, and has his tombstone in the chapel of 
this famous castle. 

His son, the Reverend William Wilson, D.D., 
a Canon of H. M.'s Royal Chapel, was buried 
there in 161 5. 

His grandson, John Wilson, was born in 
1588. His mother was a niece of the famous 
Puritan Archbishop Grindal. He married Eliza- 
beth, daughter of Sir John Mansfield. 

He was the first pastor of the first church of 
Boston, where he settled, finally, in 1635. He 
was one of the members of Governor Win- 
throp's expedition. 

The Wilsons of Wellsbourne coat of arms is 
recorded in the Heralds Lincolnshire Visitatio7is 
(i 564-1 592). The arms are found on the will 
of the Rev. [ohn Wilson. 



Elder William Wentworth, the emigrant, 
who came to Boston in 1628, is acknowledged 
to have descended from a younger branch of 
that great house of Wentworth, who received 
the grant of so many noble titler . Earls of 
Strafford, Marquesses of Rocking lam, etc., etc. 

The direct, early ancestor of the emigrant was 
Thomas Wentworth, of North Elmsall, county 
York, who died in 1522. His greatgreatgrand- 
son was William Wentworth of Ravendale, 
father of the emigrant. 

Historically, the family descends from William 
DE Wentworth of Wentworth (tempo. Henry 
HI.). 



Crest : A grifiin, passant, wings 
elevated, arg-ent. 



Motto : En Die7i est tout. [In God is all.] 





Crest : A lion's head, erased, ar- 
gent, guttle de sang. 



Motto (Of English origin) : Res nan verba. 
[Acts, not words.] 



' Salisbury: Family Memorials, 1885. 
~orical and Genealogical Regis- 
-07. 
'. 192. 
ory of the First Church in Boston, 

il., 182. 
£ : The General A rmory of Engla7id, 

MiLY Crests, II., 502. 



Heraldic Journal, III., 170. 

A General Me.moir and Biographical Account of 

William Wentworth, etc., 1850. 
John Wentworth, LL.D. : The Wentworth Genealogy 

1878 

New England Historical and Genealogical Regis- 
ter, IV., VI., VII., VIII., XVIII., XIX., XXII., XXVI. 

New Hampshire Historical Society Collections, 
v., 238-42. 

W. H. Whitmore: The American Genealogist, iSy§. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1884.. 

Sir Bernard Burke : Gen. Hist, of the Dormant, Abeyant, 
Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages of the British Empire, 
J 883. 

The Book of Family Crests, II., 491. 



MilP^inson 



In September, 16 15, the coat of arms we 
give was granted to Lawrence Wilkinson, 



74 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



Esquire of Farye on the Hill, son of Lazmcelot 
Wilkinson, Esquire of Kyo, county Durham, 
England. The grantee settled, later, on his 
estate of Harpsley House, same county. 

His grandson, Lawrence Wilkinson, came 
Ov-'^r to Providence, R. I., where he settled in 
1652. He had been a Lieutenant in King 
Charles' army, and had to seek a refuge, over 
the seas, when the Cromwellians reigned su- 
preme. 



Crest : Out of a mural crown, 
gules, a demi-unicorn, segr^ant, er- 
minois, erased : proper — armed and 
maned, or. 



Motto : Nee rege, nee populo, sed titroque. 
[Neither for king, nor for people, but for 
both.] 



Heraldic Journal, I., 58. 

Updyke's Narragansett, R.I., Churches, 237-8. 

Wilkinson Genealogy, 1869. 

Burke : Heraldic Illustrations, II., 8g {iS/j.^). 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 

etc., 1884.. 
The Book of Family Crests, II., 499. 




We must state that Sir Bernard Burke most 
positively opposes this theory. 

Admitting it to be at least doubtful, we shall 
simply state that the arms we give are those of 
all the descendants of that Sir Richard Wil- 
liams, Kt., who, at the desire of Henry VHI., 
and in consequence of some family connection 
with Cromwell, Earl of Essex, assumed the 
name of Cromwell. 

It may be interesting to note that the male 
descent of the Protector became extinct in 182 1, 
by the death of Oliver Cromwell, Esq., of 
Cheshunl Park. 



Crest : A demi-lion, rampant, ar- 
gent, passed in the dexter paw a 
gem ring, or. 



Motto: Pax qucsritur bello. [Peace is ob- 
tained by war.] 



Bolton : History of W'stchester Co., N. V., II., 725. 

Ch. W. Baird : History of Rye, Westchester Co., N. V., 

45S-9. 
Dwight'S Strong Genealogy, 160. 
Evelyn Philip Shirley : The Noble and Gentle Men of 

England, 1866. 
Sir Bernard Burke : Gen. and Herald. History of the 

Landed Gentry of Great Britain and Ireland, i8jg. 
Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 

etc., 1884.. 
The Book of Family Crests, II., 124. 




Cromvpell 



It is presumed, but not fully proved, that the 
American Cromwells descend from Colonel fohn 
Cromwell, a brother of the Protector. 

According to the same probabilities, Joan 
Cromwell, and her brother, John Cromwell, 
who emigrated to the New Netherlands, — about 
1650 — and settled at Long Neck, Westchester 
county, should be held to have been the 
daughter and the son of said Colonel John 
Cromwell. 



SSa^arb 



Anne Bayard, sister of C 
vesant, arrived from Holi. 
dam, in 1747, a widow with 
zar, Nicholas, and Petrus. 

Her husband, Baltliazar Laza 
of French Huguenot stock, 



vojs .^nA ^ iCA. 




OSnWELL 




AYA]RP 




OYI?TAin 





Fj^ELPS 




OOSEVELfT 




VAV. JL® OT^ 




COTT 




VjOcn^lTm?(T 




YAUKYlx^T 







OPHjOcSTZ 




Rqb^^ 




m. % 



OObSEY 





I-jIPPF" 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



75 



Nicholas Bayard, a protestant minister from 
Paris, having fled religious persecution. 

The coat of arms of that eminent Dutch- 
French family in no way resembles that of the 
famous Chevalier Bayard du Terr ail, "without 
fear or reproach," who belonged to a family of 
the Dauphin^ province. 

Rietstap gives similar devices to the Bayards 
of French Picardy. 



Crest : A demi-unicorn, argent. 




Motto : Honor et justitia. 
[Honor and justice.] 



Bolton: History of Westchester Co., N. Y., II.. -jog. 
Rev. Ch. W. Baird : The Huguenot Emigration in A merica 

1885. 
Mrs. Martha J. Lamb : History of the City of New York, 

I., 34.3, 6g6. 
New York Genealogical and Biographical Record, 

X., 36, XVI., 49. 
J. B. Rietstap : Armorial Universel, eds. of 1 861 and 188^. 



jfountain 



The family of Fountain, of New York, has 
been quite renowned for the longevity of its 
members. 

The emigrant came over in 1650, and died at 
the age of one hundred. His son, Moses Foun- 
tain, died cetat. one hundred and four. 

They established descent from the Fountains, 
or FouNTAYNES, of Bawcombe and Stokenham, 
county Devon, England, whose arms they bear. 
John Fountain, of the latter place, probably 
the father of the emigrant, was confirmed in his 
rights to coat-armor in the Visitation of 1620. 




Crest: An eagle's head, erased, 
holding in its beak a snake : all 
proper. 



Bolton : History of Westchester Co., N. Y., II., 737. 

Clute'S History of Staten Island, N. Y., 381-2. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 

etc., 1884.. 
The Book of Family Crests, II., 18?. 



be la ifontaine 

The Fontaine family, of Virginia, is issued 
from Jean de la Fontaine, a French gentil- 
homine of the Province of Maine, who was mar- 
tyred in 1563, with his wife and his eldest son, 
on account of his protestant faith. 

His direct descendant, the Rev. Peter Fon- 
taine, ordained a Priest of the Anglican Church 
by the Bishop of London, emigrated in Virginia 
in 1 716. Died without issue. The name was, 
however, perpetuated in the colony by the de- 
scendants of his brother, the Reverend Francis 
Fontaine. 

The family intermarried with the best Virginia 
blood. 



Arms : Argent, a fesse em- 
battled, between two elephants' 
heads, erased, with tusks de- 
pressed, in chief, and in base 
a three-masted ship, with sails 
and pennant spread. 

Crest: An elephant's head, 
erased. 




76 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



Memoirs of a Huguenot Family, i6 and S. 
Chart of the Fontaine and Maury Families. 
Bishop Meade : Old Churches, Ministers, and Families of 

Virginia. 
R. A. Brock : Huguenot Emigration in Virginia, 1886. 



IRoberbeau 

Isaac Roberdeau, a Huguenot refugee, fled 
from La Rochelle, France, shortly after the re- 
vocation of the Edict of Nantes (1685), and 
reached the Island of St. Kitts in the West In- 
dies. He married a Miss Mary Cuningham, of 
old Scotch parentage, and settled, later, in the 
New Jersey colony. 

The arms we reproduce were engraved on a 
piece of plate, bearing a hall-mark of 1699, and 
brought over by the emigrant to this country. 

The general MS. French Armorial of D' Hosier 
gives other arms to the Roberdeaux it men 
tions. However, as the work was begun in 
1696 only, and does not contain any family 
whose chief left France for religious causes, this 
non-insertion does not throw any serious doubts 
on the noble origin of the descendants of Isaac 
Roberdeau. 



Crest : A demi-greyhound, ram- 
pant : proper. 



Ne cede malis. [Yield not to misfor- 




MoTTO : 
tunes.] 



Roberdeau Buchanan: Genealogy of the Roberdeau Fam- 
ily, i8j6. 



The English 
emigi'ant, who 



Ipbelps 

origin of William 
reached Boston ii 



settled, later, at Windsor, Ct., is not established 
with all desirable precision. It is generally be- 
lieved that he came from Exeter, county Devon, 
England, although some family records show him 
to have been the son of John Phelps 0/ Neth- 
er-Tyne, county Northumberland. 

Mr. Whitmore gives Porlock, county Minne- 
head, county Somerset, as the emigrant's native 
place. As for the arms, they are said to have 
come over with the original William Phelps. 

Many other Phelpses, not connected with the 
one above mentioned, emigrated, later, to the 
American colonies. 



Crest : A wolf's head, erased, 
azure. 



Veritas sine timore. [Truth without 




Motto : 
fear.] 



H. R. Stiles: History of Ancient Windsor, Ct., i8sg. 
New England Historical and Genealogical Regis- 
ter, XXV., 190. 
Oliver S. Phelps : Genealogy of Othniel Phelps, etc., 1862. 
Phelps' Letters on the Phelps Family, i8y8. 
PhceNIX'S Whitney Genealogy, /., 732. 
NOAH A. Phelps : History of Simsbury, etc., Ct., 184.$, 
T. Gwilt-Mapleson : Hand Book of Heraldry, 1851. 



IRoosepelt 



Phelps, 
1630, 



the 
and 



Claes Martensen van Roosevelt came from 
the protestant Netherlands, to New Amsterdam, 
in 1651. 

From the start this distinguished family took 
a prominent part in the public affairs of the 
colony, and prospered materially to a remarkable 
extent. 

The arms we give were used from the first 
generation down to the present day, and have 
never been challenged. 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



77 




Crest : Three ostrich's feathers, 
per pale, gules and argent. 



Motto : Qui plantavit curabit. [The One who 
planted it will take care of it.] 



Mrs. Martha J. Lamb: History oftlte City of New York, 

II., 766. 
J. B. HOLGATE: American Genealogy, Ij6 {184.8). 
W. H. WhitmorE : The American Genealogist, i8ys- 



IDan mort 



The Van Norts of New York descend from 
the famous Admiral of the Netherlands, Oliver 
Van Noort, the first sailor who ever passed 
through the Straits of Magellan. 

The arms we give were conferred to him, and 
they are found on his tombstone, in the church 
of Schoonhaven, in Holland. 



Scott of IDirginia 

The arms we give are found on the book- 
plate of the illustrious Lieutenant General Win- 
field Scott, of Virginia, and are borne by many 
distinguished Scottish families, amongst which 
the Dukes of Buccleugh. 

The grandfather of the General was the emi- 
grant, and came over after the battle of Cullo- 
den, in 1746, having taken sides with the young 
Pretender. His elder brother was slain on that 
same battlefield. The emigrant practised law in 
Virginia. His son, William, married a Miss 
Anna Mason, and died in 1791. 

General Winfield Scott was baptized Wing- 
field [a good Virginia name], but after the 
battle of Lundy's Lane his name is found 
spelled Winfield. 



Crest: A dexter hand: proper — 
holding a broken lance, gules. 



Mottoes : A. Amor patria. [Love of country.] 
B. (Found on a bookplate of Henry 
Lee Scott, son of the General.) 
Amo. [I love.] 





Crest : A globe, argent ; the con- 
tinent marked, gules. Above it, a 
Dutch three-masted ship, sails un- 
furled, pennants flying : all proper. 



Jurisprudentia Heroica de Jure Belgarum Circa 
Nobilitatem et Insignia, cum gratia et privilegio ad noven- 
nium Alberti et Isabella, Emulgatum, 14 Decetnbri, 1616, 
106, ZIJ. 

The First Annual Dinner of the Holland Society 

OF New York, 1886. 
W. F. G. L. Van der Dussen and M. P. Smissaert: 

Genealogical Charts of the Netherland Race {i86§~i8yj). 
" B. RiETSTAP: Armorial Universel, 188J-86. 



Edward D. Mansfield : Life of Winfield Scott, 1852. 

Antiquity of the Name of Scott, 1868. 

Bishop Meade's Old Churches, Ministers, and Fatnilies of 

Virginia, II., 208. 
Sir Bernard Burke: The General Armory of England, 

Scotland, etc., 1884. 
Sir Bernard Burke : Peerage, Baronetage, and Knightage 

of the British Empire, 1885. 



Scott of OLong llslanb 

The greatgreatgrandson of Sir Reginald Scott 
of Scott's Hall, county Kent, England, came 
over and settled at Ashfardun, Long Island. 



78 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



This emigrant, John Scott by name, in a peti- 
tion, states "that his father sold, in 1641, an 
estate, worth ^2,200 per annum, and lent ^14,- 
300 to King Charles I., in whose service he 
lost his life." After this event, Joh^i Scott was 
sent over the seas by the Cromwellians ; and, 
having lived but a short time in New England, 
he settled in Long Island, having bought, it is 
said, one-third of the whole Island. 



Arms: Argent, three Cath- 
erine wheels, sable, a bordure 
engrailed, gules. 

Crest : A demi-griffin, se- 
gr^ant, sable, beaked and 
legged, or. 

Motto (Of a European 
branch of the same stock) : 
Amo. [I love.] 



Heraldic Journal, I., 103-6. 

Hutchinson Papers (Old Edition), 380. 

George R. Howell : History of Southampton, N. Y., 2"/^. 

New York Genealogical and Biographical Record, 

11., 174. 
Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1884. 




ii)an Sittart 



This family may be said to belong as well to 
the English as to the Dutch aristocracy. It is 
descended from William Van Sittart, of Dant- 
zic, whose son, Peter Van Sittart, followed 
the fortunes of the Prince of Orange, and 
settled in England. 

His descendants are known, in England, as 
the Van Sittarts of Shottesbrook, county Berks. 

We have seen the bookplate of Nicholas Van 




Sittart, an American Van Sittart, and found 
it conform. 

The Rt. Hon. Nicholas Van Sittart of Shot- 
tesbrook was created Lord Bexley in 1822 (peer- 
age extinct, 185 1). 

Crest: An eagle's head, 
couped at the neck, between 
two wings elevated and dis- 
played, sable; the latter rest- 
ing upon two crosses, patties, 
argent. 

Mottoes : A. Fata viam inveniant. [The fates 
will find a way.] 
B. Grata quies. [Rest is grateful.] 



The Rousseau Collection of Book Plates. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 

etc., 1884. 
Sir Bernard Burke : Gen. Hist, of Dormant, Abeyant, 

Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages of the British Empire, 

1883. 
The Book of Family Crests, XL, 476. 



lt)an Hist 



Joris Stevensen Van Alst, from Bruges, in 
the catholic Netherlands, flew persecution and 
came over to New Amsterdam, where he mar- 
ried, in 1652. 

The name figures on the registers of the 
Dutch nobility, as seen below. 



Crest : Issuing from a coronet, 
or, two wings, addorsed, gules. 



Jas. Riker, Jr.: Annals of Newtozvn, Quee?is Co., N. Y., 
With a Particular Account of Long Island Fa mi lies, 380-3 
{1852). 




AMERICA HERALDICA 



79 



W. F. G. L. Van der Dussen and M. P. Smissaert: 
Genealogical Charts of the Netherland Races {i86£—j8jj). 

F. W. GCETHALS : Dictionnaire G^nialogique et Hiraldique 
des Families Nobles du Royaume de Belgique, i88j. 



Ipolbemus 



The emigrant, the Rev. Johannes Theodore 
PoLHEMUs, belonged to the Polheim family. 
from the protestant Netherlands, and had latin- 
ized his name, as was the universal custom, on 
entering holy orders. 

He first went from Holland to Brazil, prob- 
ably as a Chaplain, and reached New Ams- 
terdam in 1654. 



Crest : A demi-lion, holding a 
wheel of the shield. 




We find that the English line divided into 
the PopHAMS of Popham, county Hants, — the 
original house, — and the Pophams of Huntworth, 
county Somerset. Both branches have no male 
representative living. 

The Pophams of Shanklin, Isle of Wight, 
bear the same arms. 



Crest : A buck's head, erased : proper. 



Bolton : History of Westchester Co., N. Y., II., 24.0. 

Miscellanea Genealogica and Heraldica. New Se- 
ries. III., 58. 

Burke : Heraldic Illustratio?ts, II., 7^. 

Sir Bernard Burke: The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1884. 

The Book of Family Crests, XL, 381. 




Teunis G. Bergen: Genealogy of the Lefferts Family, 

1878. 
Jas. Riker Jr.: Annals of Newtown, Queens Co., N. Y., 

With a Particular Account of Long Island Families (1852). 
Teunis G. Bergen: Register of the Early Settlers of 

Kings County, N. Y, 1881. 
W. F. G. L. Van der Dussen and M. P. Smissaert: 

Genealogical Charts of the Netherland Race {186J-187J). 



lP>opbam 



We have here a clear pedigree from Gilbert 
Popham, of county Hants, England (1200), to 
the emigrant, William Popham, who came over 
to New York, in 1716, and settled on large 
estates in Westchester county. 

His son. Major General William Popham of 
Scarsdale, was President of the Cincinnati So- 
ciety. 



MooIseiP 



The emigrant, George Woolsey, said to have 
descended from a near relative of Cardinal 
WoLSEY, the famous Prime Minister of Henry 
VIII. of England, was born in 1610, in county 
Suffolk. He came over to the New Nether- 
lands in 1623, and settled, later, at Flushing, 
Long Islaiiu. He died in 1698, leaving descend- 
ants entitled to his arms. 



Crest : A naked arm, embowed, 
grasping a shinbone : all proper. 



Bolton : History of Westchester Co., N. Y, II., 765. 
New York Genealogical and Biographical Record, 
IV., 143; v., 12, 76, 139; VI., 24. 




AMERICA HERALDICA 



Benjamin F. Thompson: History of Long Island, N. F., 

II., 437- 
Sir Bernard Burke : The Gejteral Armory of England, 

etc., 18S4. 
The Book of Family Crests, II., 506. 



Sbippen 



The emigrant of the name was Edward Ship- 
pen of Boston, England (1688), whose brother 
was the Rev. William Shippen, Rector of Stock- 
port, county Chester. 

The emigrant joined the Quakers, and became, 
later. Mayor of Philadelphia. 

We have seen several bookplates of his de- 
scendants bearing the devices we give. 

They are not to be found under that name 
in the English heraldic authorities. 



Crest : A bird, sable ; in its beak 
an oak leaf, vert. 



Thos. Balch : Letters and Papers Relatiiig to the Provincial 

History of Pennsylvania, etc. 
Heraldic Journal, III., 16-8: IV., 1-20. 
Buchanan's Shippen Ge7iealogy, iSjy. 
G. A. Hanson: Old Kent, Md., 1876. 




Seton 



The complete pedigree of this illustrious house 
shows that its common ancestor. Sir Christopher 
Seton, "the Good," married the sister of King 
Robert Bruce, whom he had rescued in battle. 
From this cause he obtained the right of bear- 
ing on his shield the royal tressure of Scotland. 
The three crescents of the shield are there 



either to commemorate the participation of the 
Setons in the Crusades, or to indicate simply 
the form of the three original estates of the 
Setons, in East Lothian, Scotland. 

From Sir Christopher descended the Dukes of 
Gordon, the Earls of Winton, of Szitherland, of 
Eglinto7i, of Dumferline, the Viscounts of King- 
ston, the Baronets of Abercorn, €tc., the Lairds 
of Touch, Cariston, etc., and, finally, but not 
least, the Lairds of Pai'broath, the present head 
of whom is at the same time the chief of the 
American Setons, and resides in the state of 
New York. 
. He is recognized as such by the Earl of 
Winton and Eglinton, actual head of the house 
of Seton, and descends in direct line from Wil- 
liam Seton of Parbroath, in Fifeshire, Scotland, 
who came to New York before 1758. 

General Patrick Gordon, Royal Governor of 
Pennsylvania (1726-36), was also of the Seton 
blood, and quartered the Seton arms on his 
official seal. 



Crest : Out of a ducal coronet, 
or, a wyvern, segrdant, vert, spout- 
ing fire, of the first. 



Motto : Hazerd zit forward. [Forward at any 
hazard.] 



Alexander Nisbet: Essay on the Ancient and Modern 
Use of Armories, iji8. 

Froissart's Chronicles: Ch. i^and ch. i^g. 

George Seton [of Cariston] : Life of Alexa?ider Seton, 
Earl of Dumferline and Last Catholic Chancellor of 
Scotland. 

Stevens : Records of the Cha^nber of Commerce of New 
York. 

Lorenzo Sabine: The Loyalists of the American Revolu- 
tion. 

MONSIGNOR Seton, D.D. : Mevwir, Letters and Journals 
of Elizabeth Seton, i86c). 

Sir Bernard Burke : All His Heraldic Compilations, 
and. Particularly, for Setons of New York, in Peerage 
and Baronetage {l88j and Following Years), Under Se- 
ton of Abercorn, Bart., Their Nearer Kin. 




LKi 



.ALiVlUA. 




OWEbb 




'^vy^is 





lEbD 



^-\v> 





AYAqE 



m 



1, 



ILLOVGHBY 




^T^CH 




00ST2E 




ASSy)cbb 




YHCHOn 






uooDSEbb ^lEnninqTon 




jOlWSOH 




Y^LEJ^ 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



8l 



ITnglis 



1E)owell 



The emigrant, John Inglis, came from Scot- 
land, and belonged, it is claimed, to the Inglises 
of County Lanark. He settled first in the West 
Indies, later in Philadelphia, where he married, 
in 1736, a Miss Catherine MacCall. His high 
standing as a descendant of an old Scottish 
stock is shown by his being elected President 
of the St. Andrew Society of Philadelphia. 

He left eleven children ; — and we have repro- 
duced his arms from a bookplate having be- 
longed to him. 

Another Inglis, the Reverend Charles, Rector 
of Trinity Church, New York, from 1777 to 
1783, caused the same arms to be engraved on 
his wife's tombstone, in old St. Paul's church- 
yard. 

A later James Inglis, D.D., born in Phila- 
delphia in 1777, was Pastor of the first Presby- 
terian Church of Baltimore. 

There is but one coat of arms used — with 
slight differences — by the many branches of the 
Inglis family of Scotland. 



Crest : A demi-lion, rampant ; 
proper — in the dexter paw a 
mullet, or. 




The emigrant, Edward Howell, one of the 
founders of Southampton, Long Island, in 1640, 
is recognized by Sir Bernard Burke to have 
been the owner of the Manor of Westbury-in- 
March, Gibbon, county Buckingham, England, 
which manor he sold in 1639, when he emi- 
grated to America. 

His eldest son, Major John Howell, died in 
1696, and his tombstone, bearing the arms we 
give, is still extant in the cemetery of South- 
ampton, Long Island. The devices were found 
on the seal of the emigrant, still preserved by 
his descendants. 

Used as a Crest : A steel helmet in profile. 

Motto : Tenax propositi. [Firm of purpose.] 



The First Book of Records of the Town of South- 
ampton, L. I. 

Geo. R. Howell: The Early History of Southampton, 
L. I., With Genealogies, 24.1-9 {1866). 

Sir Bernard Burke : T/ie General Armory of England, 
etc., 1884.. 

Lipscombe's History of Buckinghamshire, HI., 53 (in Sup- 
plement). 



Mottoes : A. Rede faciendo securus. [Safe in 
acting right.] 
B. Invictus maneo. [I remain un- 
conquered.] 



New York Gfnealogical and Biographical Record 

II., 24. 
Francis S. Drake: Dictionary of American Biography, 

1872. 
New Jersey Collections, 184. 
Pennsylvania Historical Magazine. 
Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 

etc., i88a. 



Sturgis 



Sir Bernard Burke states himself that the 
emigrant, Edward Sturgis, who came over from 
England to Charlestown, Mass., in 1634, and 
settled, later, at Yarmouth, was a descendant of 
Roger Sturgis, Esquire, of Clips ton, county 
Northampton (1530). 

The emigrant was the son of Philip Sturgts 
of Hanningto7i, county Northampton, England. 

We have seen a Sturgis bookplate [identical]. 



82 



AMERICA HERALDIC A 




Crest ; A talbot's head, or, eared 
sable. 



Motto : Esse quam videri. [To be rather than 
to appear.] 



T. W. Stuart's Life of Captain Nathan Hale, iS§, 202. 
Rev. Edward Everett H.a.le : Genealogical History of 

the Hale Family. 
ThOS. B. Wvman : Genealogies and Estates of Charlcstotvn, 

Mass., i8jg. 
Rev. E. M. Stone: History of Beverly, Mass., 184.J. 
Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 

etc., 1884.. 
The Book of Family Cre.sts, II., 220. 



Heraldic Journal, IV., 132. 

Dean Dudley: Illustrated Archeeological and Genealogical 

Collections, 1861. 
Lichtenstein'S Collection of Book Plates, 1886. 
Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 

etc., 1884. 



IDale, or IDales 

Robert Hales, who belonged to the Hales 
of Ttimball, county Kent, England, reach ed Mas 
sachusetts in 1632, and settled at Charlestown. 
His descendants dropped the final s, which he 
himself did not use constantly. 

That misspelling brought some confusion in 
the researches concerning the English ancestry 
of this family, which was often and wrongly ac- 
cepted as descending from Thomas Hale (not 
Hales), who emigrated from Hertfordshire, Eng" 
land, and settled in Newburyport, Mass., in 
1635- 

Crests : A. An arm embowed in 
armor : proper, — garnished, or, and 
bound about with a ribbon, gules, 
holding an arrow of the shield. 

B. A serpent : proper — entwined 
round five arrow-shafts, or, headed, 
sable, feathered, argent, one in pale, four saltire- 
wise. 

Mottoes: A. Vis unita fortior. [United force 
the stronger.] 
B. Vera sequor. [I follow truth.] 



rielb 




After a vast amount of discussion and re- 
searches, it seems proved now that Robert 
Field, who settled at Flushing, Lono; Island, in 
1645, was the son of William Field of Sozvcrby 
and North Otiram, in the parish of Halifax, 
England, himself the son of Williain FiKi.n of 
Great Norton, county York. 

This William was the son of John Field of 
Norton, who lived in 1577. It is asserted that 
the same John Field was the famous astrono- 
mer to whom the arms we give, — which be- 
longed before him to the Fields of Norton 
and Ardsley — where confirmed in 1558, with the 
addition of the peculiar crest we insert below. 
The American branch is recognized bv Burke. 



Crest : A dexter arm, issuing 
out of clouds, fessways : proper — 
habited, gules ; holding in the 
hand, also proper, a sphere, or. 



Motto [On the bookplate of David Dudley 
Field] : Sans Dieii rien. [Without God, nothing.] 



Bolton : History of Westchester Co., N. Y., /.. ?7^. 
Henry M. Field : The Family of the Rev. David D. Field, 

D.D., of Stockbridge, Mass., i860. 
Osgood Field : A Gejieral Sketch of the Family of Field 

of the West Riding, County York, and of Flushing and 

Newtown. L. I., i86j. 
Appendix to the Field Genealogy, 1864. 
W. H. Whitmore: The American Genealogist, iSjS- 




AMERICA HERALDICA 



83 



■The Rousseau Collection of Book Plates. 

New England Historical and Genealogical Regis- 
ter, XVII., XVIII., XXII., XXXV. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1884.. 

The Book of Family Crests, II., 175. 



Savage 



Metmore 



Thoiiias Whitmokf, whose name has been cor- 
rupted by his descendants to Wetmore, came in 
this country in 1625, according to a genealogical 
record made in 1792; but the first notice found 
of him, this side of the ocean, is in 1639-40, 
at Wethersfield, Ct. He subsequently removed 
to Hartford and Middletown, in the same col- 
ony, and died in 1681 {cetet. 68). 

The coat of arms which we give has been 
used by the descendants of Thomas Whitmore 
for over a century and a half. In 1726 already, 
the Reverend J. Wetmore, of Rye, N. Y., made 
use of identical devices. 

This family is not to be confounded with the 
other Wiiitmores, or Whittemores, in America 
before 1700, as these families appear never to 
have claimed coat-armor. 



Crest: Upon the stump of an 
oak tree, sprouting to the dexter, 
a falcon, close : all proper. 



Motto : Virtus, libertas, patria. [Courage, lib- 
erty, country. | 




In Kings' Chapel Burial Ground, in Boston, 
is found the tombstone of Major Thomas Sav- 
age, the emigrant of the name, who died in 
1 68 1 {atet. 75). It bears the arms we give, as 
do several seals used by immediate descendants 
of Thomas Savage. 

In Gores Roll of Arms are found the arms 
of another Thomas Savage, son of the emigrant, 
who lived in Boston in 1720. 

From him descended James Savage, the famed 
New England genealogist. 

These arms are the ancient armorial devices 
of the Savages of Rock Savage and Clifton, 
county Chester, England. 

The Earls Rivers (ext. 1728) bore the same 
arms. 



Crest: Out of a ducal coronet, 
or, a lion's gamb, erect, sable. 



Motto : A te pro te. [From thee, for thee.] 



Gore's Roll of Arms, No. 66. 

Th. Bridgman : Memorials of the Dead of Boston, With 

Transcripts of Inscriptions in the King's Chapel Burial 

Ground, 2g6 {1853). 
Wyman's Charlestown, Mass., Genealogies, II., 847. 
S. G. Drake : The History a?id Antiquities of Boston, 1856. 
Burke : Heraldic Illustratio7ts, II., 97. 
W. H. Whitmore : Elements of Heraldry, 1866. 
Sir Bernard Burke : Gen. Hist, of Dormant, Abeyant, 

Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages of the British Empire, 

1883. 
Sir Bernard Burke: The General Armory of England, 

etc., 1884. 
The Book of Family Crests, II., 414. 




James C. Wet.MORE : The Wetmore Family in America, 

1861. 
W. H. Whitmore: Tlie American Ge?iealogist, 1873. 
Chas. W. Baird : History of Rye, Westchester Co., N. Y., 

495-6- 

New England Historical and Genealogical Regis- 
ter, XIV., 136. 

PhcenI.v's Whitney Genealogy, II., i66j. 



mamougbb^ 



Deputy Governor Francis Willoughby emi- 
grated to New England in 1638; returned, and 



84 



AMERICA HERALDIC A 



was appointed Commissioner of the Royal Navy 
in 1652; was M.P. 1658; emigrated again, and 
settled in New England in 1662 ; was Royal 
Deputy Governor from 1665 until 1671. 

He belonged to the noble family of Wil- 
LOUGHBY of Parkafn, and was the son of Col. 
William Willouohby 0/ Portsmoiith, county 
Hants, Eneland. 



Crest : The head of a sav- 
age, couped and affronts, or, 
between two wings displayed, 
per pale, argent and azure. 



Motto : Vci'ite sans peu?-. [Truth without fear.] 




families settled in county Cornwall, between' 
Barnstable and Falmouth, England. 

We give the motto of another branch of the 
Hatch family, remarking that all the Hatch 
coats of arms mentioned in the English author- 
ities on heraldry indicate a common origin, 
being nearly alike in every respect. 



Crest : A demi-lion, rampant, 
or. Between the paws a sphere, 
a cross, pattee fitch^e, stuck 
therein. 




Motto : For lis valor e et armis. 
through valor and weapons.] 



[Strong 



Edward Elbridge Salisbury: Family Memorials, 1885. 

Evelyn Philip Shirley : The Noble and Gentle Men of 
E^igland, 1866. 

S. G. Drake : The History and Antiquities of Boston, 1856. 

New England Historical and Genealogical Regis- 
ter, XXX., 67. 

Sir Bernard Burke : Gen. Hist, of Dormant, Abeyant, 
Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages of the British Empire, 



New England Historical and Genealogical Regis- 
ter, XIV., 197-99. 

Fletcher's Hatch Genealogy, 1850, iSyg, i88j. 

Deane's History of Scituate, Mass., 2jg-8o. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England^ 
etc., 1884.. 

W. Berry : Encyclopcedia Heraldica, 1828. 

The Book of Family Crests \a different crest], II., 229. 



Ibatcb 



IRoome 



From the Hatches, of county Cornwall and 
county Surrey, England, descended the emigrant, 
Thomas Hatch, who came over in 1633, with 
his wife and several children, and possessed of 
sufficient means. He was made a freeman of 
Massachusetts colony, and settled, finally, in 
Barnstable in 1 64 1 . 

Christopher Hatch of Buswistock, county 
Cornwall, had his coat of arms confirmed in 
1620, at a Heralds Visitation of that date. He 
descended from Jeffrey Hatch (temp. Edward 
HI.). It is admitted that the emigrant, Thomas 
Hatch, and his wife, were both issued from 



We find the coat we give granted in 1772, 
by the royal authority, to a member of that 
Roome family of Newport, R. I. 

In 1638, we find a John Roome living at 
Portsmouth, R. I. He was made a freeman in 
1 64 1, and died 1663, in a prosperous financial 
condition. 



Crest : A dexter arm, em- 
bov/ed, holding in the hand a 
caduceus : both proper. 




AMERICA HERALDIC A 



85 



Austin's Rhode Island Genealogical Dictio7iary (in prepara- 
tion), 1886. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1884. 



Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 

etc., 1884. 
The Book ok Family Crests, II., 476. 



lt)assall 



lp)^ncbon 



Samuel and William Vassal:,, both members 
of the original Massachusetts Company (1627), 
bore a distinguished part in the early history of 
the colony. William soon quarreled and left. 
Then Sa7nuel retired also to the Barbadoes. 
Later (1723), a descendant of Samuel, Leonard 
Vassall, came to Boston, settled there, and had 
a large family. He is still represented in the 
female line, but his male representatives are to be 
found in England. Burke says of the New Eng- 
land Vassalls, "That they descend from John 
Vassall, Alderman of London, who equipped 
and commanded two ships of war against the 
Spanish Armada." 

The Vassalls remained loyal to the English 
crown. 



Crest : A ship rigged and 
masted : proper. 




William Pynchon, or Pinchyon, came over 
with Governor Winthrop, and was amongst the 
patentees of the Massachusetts colony (1627). 
He is said to have descended from the Pinch- 
YONS of Writtle, county Essex, whose ancestor, 
Nicolas Pynchon, was once Sherif of London. 
The Essex Visitation, of 1558, confirms the 
statement to some extent. 



Crest : A lion [or a tigerj's 
head, erased, argent. 



Heraldic Journal, II., 49. 

Prince's Genealogical History of New Etigland, 1736. 

Baldwin's Candee Genealogy, 183-204. 

S. V. TaLCOTT : Genealogical Notes of New York and New 
England Families, 1883. 

New England Historical and Genealogical Regis- 
ter, XX., XXXVIL, XXXVIII. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1884. 

The Book of Family Crests, II., 276. 




Mottoes : A. ScBpe pro Rege, semper pro Re- 
publica. [Often for the King, al- 
ways for the country.] 

-X B. Every bullet has its billet. 

■■>'■> ^.-. y. '^ ^'' r^ - . -'.- 

Th. Bridgman : Memorials, etc.. With Inscriptiofis From 
the King's Chapel Burial Ground, 1833. 

W. H. WhitmORE: The Ajnerican Genealogist, 1875. 

Ed. Doubleday Harris : The Vassalls of New England 
and Their Immediate Descendants, 1862. 

Heraldic Journal, II., 17. 

New England Historical and Genealogical Regis- 
ter, XVII., 56 ; XXXV., 39. 



Macb 



John Ward, a Cromwellian officer, is men- 
tioned in the records of Newport, R. I., as 
being settled there in 1673. A descendant of 
his, Governor Richard Ward, of Rhode Island, 
has his tombstone, with the armorial bearings 
we give, in the old Newport churchyard. 

We find also a William Ward, settled al- 
ready, in 1639, at Sudbury, Mass. 



86 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



And, finally, Andreiv Ward, iecei\-ed a free- 
man of Watertown, Mass., in 1634, accompanied 
the Da\'enport and Eaton expedition to Connect- 
icut, and settled there. It is well known that 
this colony was only composed, at the start, of 
men of high standing and respectable connec- 
tions. The descendants of the last-named Ward 
settled also in Westchester county, N. Y., and 
made constant use of the arms we give. 



Crkst : A wolf's head, erased : 
proper — langued, gules. 




We find Sir John Godsei.i., Kt., mentioned 
in public deeds in 1 548 ; and other branches of 
the family, with the .same arms, are mentioned 
in the Heralds Visitation for Essex (161 2) and 
Somerset (1623). 



Cri-:.st : A griffin's head, erased, 
per pale, argent and sable, beaked, 
or. 



MoTiD: Per criLccm ad cce/iim. [Through the 
cro.ss to heaven.] 




Mottoes: Non nobis so/iiw. | Not for our- 
selves alone.] 
Sub cruce salus. \ In the cross is 
salvation. I 



Bolton : History of Westchester Co., N. Y., /., 2^^. 

New York Genealogical and BrociRAPnicAL Reccjrd, 
VI., 123. 

W. H. Whitmore: The American Genealogist, iSy^. 

New England Historical and Genealogical Regis- 
ter, XXII., 115. 

John Ward : Memoir of Lieutenant Colonel Sam. IFard, 
etc., i8js. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1884. 

TiiK Book of Family Ckestk, II., 484. 



DODD's History of East Haven, Ct., 120-21. 

J. B. Burke : A Visitation of the Seats afid Arms of the 
Noblemen and Ge7itlei)ien of Great Britain, 6p {i8§j). 

The Essex Visitation of 1612 [Harleian Society Col- 
lections'], 4yj. 

The Somersetshire Visitation of 1623 [Same Collec- 
tion'], 5/. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1884. 

RobSON'S Heraldry, i8jo. 

The Book of Family Crests, II., 203. 



lp)ennington 



(Boobsell 



The emigrant, Thomas Gousell, or Goodsell, 
was at Bradford in 1667 — settled, later, in New 
Haven, where he married a daughter of Samuel 
Hemmingway, of that city. Thomas Goousei.i. 
came over as a youth, from county Flint, the 
native county of his family, who had possessed 
estates for several centuries at " Iscoyd Park," 
county Flint, and also in county Salop, England. 



Ephraim Pennington, whose pedigree is clearly 
traced to the Penningtons of Pe7inington, county 
Lancaster, came over and settled at New Haven, 
Ct., in 1643. His only son, Ephraim (the sec- 
ond), passed over to New Jersey, and settled in 
Newark. 

Of the same stock belong the Lords Muncas- 
ter of Castle' Cumberland. 



Crest : A mountain cat, pas- 
sant, guardant : proper. 




HEn^jDICA. 




>AC012 




/A]f^hLi 



^jOiVEjyaY 



LAYBOT^E 





^ ^1 EYTOK 






WM 



Ix, 



OWRDES 




)ICtph80n 




VDWELL 






1^ 



IDDhETOR 




%.^)l« 




AGE 





jOfJ^Y 



OWA^ 




AMERICA HERALDIC A 



87 



Mottoes: A. (Over the crest): Firm, vigilant, S.G.Drake: Tltc History and Antiquities of Boston, iSs^i. 

,. ' Heraldic JouRNAi,, I., 22. 
ctctwc 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of EnglaYid, 

B. (Under the shield) : Viiicit amor ^^^^ jgg^_ 

patriee. [Love of country con- The Book ok Family Crests, II., 392. 

quers.] 



New England Historical and Genealogical Regis- 
ter, XXV., 286. 

Fuller's Worthies of England. 

Evelyn Philip Shirley : The Noble and Gentle Men of 
Engla7id, 1866. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1884. 

DODD'S Peerage, Baronetage, and Knightage, etc., 1841. 

The Book of Family Crests, II., 33S. 



Butler 



IRawson 



In the Visitation of York, 1585, a pedigree 
of the Rawsons of Nidd Hall, county York, is 
given, beginning, with Richard Rawson, Esquire 
of Frysto7i (temp. Richard II.). To that family 
it is claimed belonged Edward Rawson, Secre- 
tary of the Colony of Massachusetts Bay (165 1- 
1686), who came over from Gillingham, county 
Dorset, England, to Newbury, Mass., in 1636-7. 

The emigrant used as his seal the devices we 
give, as is shown to this day by many imprints 
in his correspondence with the governors of the 
time. 



Crest : A raven's head, couped, 
sable, guttee, or; in its beak an 
annulet, g-ules. 




Motto : Laus virtufis actio. 
praise of courage.] 



[Deeds are the 



Sullivan S. Rawson : The Rawson Family, 1849. 
W. H. Whitmore: The American Genealogist, i8js- 
Ellery B. Crane : The Rawson Family, iSjS- 
New England Historical and Genealogical Regis- 
ter, III., 297. 



Thomas Butler was one of three brothers, 
belonging to the ancient House of Ormonde, 
who came over about 1698, with ample means 
and a retinue of servants, and settled at South 
Berwick, Me., New England. Among his closest 
friends Thomas Butler counted Governor Went- 
worth. Sir William Pepperell, Hon. John Hill, 
Captain Ichabod Plaisted, and such famed colo- 
nists and royal governors. 

In various deeds, still in the possession of his 
descendants, the emigrant, his sons and grand- 
sons, are always qualified gentlemen, the meaning 
of such a word being, at that time, conclusive 
of their right to coat-armor. 

The family dates back to the time of Henry 
II., and to Theobald Walter, Chief Butler of 
Ireland. 



Crest : Out of a ducal coronet, 
or, a plume of five ostrich feath- 
ers, argent. Therefrom issuant a 
falcon, rising, of the last. 



Motto: Coinme jc trouve. [As I find.] 



Geo. H. liuri.ER; Thomas Butler and His Descendants, 

1SS6. 
John L. Siblkv : History of the Town of Union, Me., etc., 

i8si. 
City Records of Kittery, Me. 
SiK Bernard Burke: The General Armory of England, 

etc., 1884.. 
The Book of Family Crests, II., ■;■/. 
Dodd's Peerage, Baronetage, and Knightage of Great Britain 

and Ireland, etc., 1841. 




AMERICA H E R A L D I C A 



/IftontGomer^ 



The arms we give in our Plate I. have been 
used in this countr}^ by several members of the 
Montgomery family, but not by the leading 
branch, whose notice we give in full on page 
1 7. We add here a description of the arms of 
the MoNTGOMERVs of Lainshatv, represented now 
by the American Montgomeryk of Brigend, the 
real and regular heirs to the Earldom of Eglin- 
ToN. The facts of the case can be briefly told 
as follows. 

Hzigh, fifth Earl of Eglinton, was the last of 
that title in the male line of the Montgomery 
family. About to die childless, and feeling no 
sentiment of affection for his kinsman and nat- 
ural heir, Sir Neil Montgomerie of Lainshaw, 
he obtained, in 1 6 1 1 , a new grant of his earl- 
dom [according to Scottish customs], and made 
Sir Alexander Seton [son of his aunt, the 
Countess of Winton] heir of his estates and 
titles. HiLgh died in 161 2, but it took three 
more years to obtain, through court influence, 
from James VL, a charter, confirming Sir Alex- 
ander Seton in the honors, dignities, etc., of 
the former Earls of Eglinton. 

Of course, the Montgomeries of Lainshaw 
never agreed to that spoliation ; and it is legall}'' 
ver\- doubtful if the present Earl of Winton is 
entitled to the Earldom of Eglinton. 

Actuallv, John T. Montgomery, Esquire, of 
Philadelphia, is the head of the house of Mont- 
gomery, as well in America as abroad, having 
succeeded, in the direct line, the Sir Neil 
Montgomerie of Lainshaiv, above mentioned. 

The original arms of that family do not bear, 
therefore, the double tressure flory-counterflory of 
the Setons, as indicated in our colored plate, 
and are to be blazoned as follows : 

Arms: Quarterly — First and fourth quarterly 
quartered. First and fourth, azure, a bend, be- 
tween six crosses, crosslets, fitch^e, or, for Mar; 



second and third, gules, a fret, or, for Lyle. 
Second and third grand quarters — argent, on a 
fess, azure, three stars of the first, for Mure of 
Skeldon. En surtout : quarterly — first and fourth, 
azure, three fleurs-de-lis, or, for Montgomery ; 
second and third, gules, three rings, or, gemmed 
azure, for Eglinton. 

Crest : A cock, rising : proper. 

Mottoes : A. Gardez bien. 

B. (Special to the Lainshaw branch.) 
An I may. 



Jaffre^ 



Referring to our notice (page 34) of the Jek- 
FRiES family, we wish to give here a separate 
notice to the Jaffreys of New Hampshire, who, 
although extinct in the male line, are still repre- 
sented — as stated in oui- first notice — by the 
Jeffries of Massachusetts. 

The Jaffrays of King's Wells, county Kin- 
cardine, Scotland, were represented in New Eng- 
land, at the end of the XVII. century, by 
George Jaffkey, of Portsmouth, N. H., Speaker 
of the Assembly of his adopted colony, who 
died in 1707. His son, George, married a daugh- 
ter of the first David Jeffrie.s. Their daughter, 
Sarah, married her cousin, David Jeffries, and 
the grandson of that David, George J. Jeffries, 
assumed the name of Jaffrey in 1802, in ac- 
cordance with the will of his granduncle, George, 
the last Jaffrey in that line. 

We understand that the arms of the Jaf- 
freys, and not the arms of the Jeffries, are 
used by the descendants of that George Jaffrey 
(Jeffries). They will be found engraved and 
blazoned in our Appendix. 

Seals, plates, letters of the time, confirm the 
above statements, which are accepted by Burke. 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



©ilpin 



This well-known Pennsylvania family traces 
back its heraldic origin to the year i2o5, under 
the reign of King John, when its common an- 
cestor, Richard de Gilpyn of Kentmere, county 
Westmoreland, having slain a wild boar, which 
was doing great mischief in that neighborhood, 
adopted for his arms the devices we give. The 
eldest branch of the family continued to reside 
at "Kentmere" until the civil wars of Charles 
First's time, when the owner of the estate, 
having served ardently the Royalist cause, had 
to flee before the Cromwellian wrath. He died 
in exile, and without issue. The castle still ex- 
ists as a picturesque ruin, and the legend of 
the wild boar is still told to visitors. 

Joseph Gilpin, the colonist, was the descend- 
ant in the sixteenth generation from the above- 
mentioned Richard de Gylpin. His father, 
Thomas, first a Colonel in the Parliamentary 
Army, joined, later, the Society of Friends, 
amongst whom he was, for forty-nine years, a 
preacher of renown. His son, Joseph, was at- 
tracted to the New World by Penn's purchase. 
In 1695-96 he landed in Pennsylvania, with 
wife and children, and began courageously to 
open his purchased tract of land to cultivation 
and civilization. He died in 1741 ; and, until 
1869, the old homestead was still in the pos- 
session of the Gilpin family. 



Crest : A dexter hand, embowed 
in armour, holding in the hand, 
proper, a laurel [anciently a pine\ 
branch, vert. 




Cumberland and Westmoreland Antiquarian and 
ArcH/EO logical Society : Gilpin Memoirs and Pedi- 
gree, i8yg. 

FUTHEY AND COPE : History of Chester County, Pa., 570. 

Simpson : Lives of Eminent Philadelphians, §8. 

British Museum : Harleian MSS., 1234, 1374., 14.57. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1884. 

PapwORTH and MORANT : An Ordinary of British Ar- 
morials, 1874. 

The Book of Family Crests, II., 200. 



1l3oliPol[?e 



The original colonist was Edward Holyoke, 
from Tamford, county Stafford, England, who 
came over to Massachusetts in 1639. 

The arms we give are found on the will of 
his grandson, Elizar Holyoke (1711). The lat- 
ter was the father of President Edward Hol- 
yoke, of Harvard College, whose son. Dr. Ed- 
ward Atigustus Holyoke, lived to be one hun- 
dred years old. 



Arms : Azure, a chevron, 
argent, coticed, or, between 
three crescents of the second. 




Crest : A crescent, argent. 



Motto : Dictis factisque simplex. [Sincere in 
word and deed.] 



E Gilpin Family in England and America, 1852. 
40LS0N and Burn: History and Antiquities of the 
nties of Westmoreland and Czimberlarid, 135 {1777). 



Heraldic Journal, II., 180 ; IV., 90. 

EmmERTON and Waters : Gleanings from English Rec- 
ords, 57 {1880). 

S. G. Drake : The History and Aniiqaities of Boston, 1856. 

S. V. Talcott : New York and New England Families, §68. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1884. 



90 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



Malwortb 



The Walworth family, of Connecticut and 
New York, claims descent from William Wal- 
worth, the celebrated Lord Mayor of London 
(1374-1380), who was knighted for his daring 
exploits, terminating in the death of Wat Hil- 
liard, alias Wat the Tyler (temp. Richard II.). 

The colonist, and progenitor of all the Wal- 
WORTHS in America before 1800, was William 
Walworth, who came to New London, Ct, in 
1689, for the purpose of introducing English 
farming upon "Fisher's Island" then owned by 
General Fitz John Winthrop. He came from 
county Middlesex, England ; and the arms we 
give have always been in possession of the 
family, who has obtained confirmation from the 
College of Heralds, London. 



Crest : A cubit arm, vested or, cuffed, 
argent ; the hand grasping a dagger, em- 
brued, gules, pomel and hilt, or. 




England, who came to Cambridge, Mass., and 
died in 1725 



Arms : Quarterly, gules and 
sable, a cross patt^e, quarterly, 
ermine and or ; on a chief of 
the last a demi-rose streaming 
rays between two pelicans 
vulning themselves of the 
first. 




Crest : A talbot's head, ar- 
gent, collared, azure, studded, 
edged, and ringed, or. 



Motto : Semper fidelis, [Ever faithful.] 



Heraldic Journal, II., 121. 

S. G. Drake: The History and Antiquities of Boston, 1 8^6. 

New England Historical and Genealogical Regis- 
ter, v., 174. 

Paige's History of Cambridge, Mass., ^Sg. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of Etigla7id, 
etc., 1884. 

The Book of Family Crests, II., 50. 



Motto : Strike for the Laws. 



FrOISSART'S Chronicles, chap. IX. 
Hume's History of England. 
CaULKINS : History of New Londo7i, Ct.,J4§. 
Walworth's Hyde Genealogy, /., 530-4.6. 
Sir Bernard Burke : The General Ar7nory of England^ 
etc., 1884. 



Bonner 

Captain Johtt Bonner, the designer of the 
early map of Boston, is buried in the Granary 
Burying Ground, Boston, under a tombstone 
bearing the arms we give. 

He was the son of Joh?i Bonner, of London, 



Jobnes 



The Edward Johnes, who sailed from Yar- 
mouth, England, with Winthrop's fleet, in 1629, 
and reached Charlestown, Mass., in 1630, showed 
clear heraldic connection with Sir Francis Johnes, 
Lord Mayor of London in 1620. The family 
was issued from county Salop [Shropshire] ; and 
the coat of arms we give was granted to it in 
1 6 ID. The crest was used by another branch of 
the same stock, settled in county Berks. 

In 1635, Richard Johnes of Dindee, county 
Somerset, father of the first colonist, came ovi 
also, and settled at Charlestown. 

Edward Johnes was elected to several ir 
tant functions in the body politic, and 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



91 




documents he is styled Mr., as a man of birth 
and means. In 1644 he removed to Southamp- 
ton, L. I., where he died in 1660. 

His descendants have prospered in New York 
State and as far down South as Maiyland and 
Virginia, where they spell the name generally 
Johns. 



Crest : A lion rampant, or, sup- 
porting an anchor, azure, flukes of 
the first. 



Motto : Vince malum bono. [Conquer evil 
with good.] 



Edward R. Johnes ; The Johnes Family of Southampton, 

L. I., 1886. 
The First and Second Books of Records of the 

Town of Southampton, L. I., 1^77-77. 
^"^YMAN's Charlcstown, Mass., Genealogies, I., s6j. 
.>.EV. L. B. TkOMAS ; The Johns Family of Maryland, loi. 
Rev. L. B. Thomas: Genealogical Notes, 1877. 
Geo. R. Howell: History of Southampton, N. Y., 2s6. 
Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 

etc., 1884.. 
Papworth and Morant: An Ordinary of British Ar- 

■>norials. 1874. 
The Book of Family Crests, II., 257. 



Hmbler 



The Amblers, a prominent Virginia family, 
are known to have come from Leeds, county 
York, England, where the father of Richard 
Ambler, the emigrant, was Sheriff of the county 
(1721). The colonist settled in Yorktown. 

Tombs of the family bear the arms we give, 
quartered v Hh those of the Jaquelin family, 
the emigra ' aving married Elizabeth Jaquelin, 
of an olo uenot family. 




S.jgS^.:iejCiea 



^- ^- 



Arms : Sable, on a fess, or, 
between three pheons, argent, 
a lion, passant guardant, gules. 

Crest : Two dexter hands, 
conjoined, sustaining a royal 
crown. 



Bishop Meade's Old Churches, Ministers, and Families of 

Virginia, I., loj. 
R. A. Brock : Huguenot Emigration i?i Virginia, XV. 
Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 

etc., 1884.. 




Johnstone 



The Scotch Earldom of Hartfell and Mar- 
guisate of Annandale are stated by Burke to 
be dormant titles since 1 792. They are claimed 
by two different Scotch families ; and it is 
firm!}' believed, on this side of the ocean, that 
full researches could establish the legitimate heir 
of these Scotch f^itles and valuable estates to be 
an American citizen. 

At any rate, three different families of John- 
stone, or Johnston [they have all dropped the 
final e\ claim, in this country, descent from the 
JoHNSTONES of county Dumfries, t. ""rst posses- 
sors of the Earldom and Marquisate a. /e men- 
tioned. 

A North Carolina family of repute and dis- 
tinction, descending from Goverjtor Gabriel John- 
ston (1734), uses the arms we give. His 
brother, John, Surveyor General of the province, 
was the father of Governor Samuel Johnston, a 
leading statesman of North Carolina, who died 
in 18 16. 



92 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



A family of Johnston, descended, it is 
claimed, from a son of one of the last Mar- 
quises, settled in Maryland and Virginia, where 
we find a William Johnston marrying a Miss 
Chew. 

Finally, the descendants of the venerable Dr. 
John Johnston, who reached America in 1685, 
and settled soon at Amboy, N. J., assert that 
seals and other tokens of gentle birth point to 
their clear descent from the Marquises of An- 
nandale. The children and grandchildren of Dr. 
John Johnston — himself a physician of great re- 
pute in his time — occupied positions of trust, 
and intermarried with several of the best New 
York families. 

We have seen bookplates from these various 
branches of the parent stock, and, although dif- 
ferent in details and ornamentation, they have 
been found identical in tinctures and charges. 



Crest : A winged spur, or. 




Motto : Ntmgtiam non para- 
tus. [Never unprepared.] 



England, a son of Henry Boylston, of Litch- 
field, who had an estate at Weston, in Stafford- 
shire, and was a brother of Boylston of Boyls- 
ton, county Derby. The colonist died in 1653, 
at Watertown, Mass., where he had settled. 

The bookplate of Doctor Boylston, the foun- 
der of the Boylston Medical Library, of Cam- 
bridge, bears the arms we give. 



Arms : Gules, six cross cross- 
lets, fitch^e, argent, three, two, 
and one ; on a chief, or, three 
pellets, charged — the centre 
one with a flezir-de-lis, the 
others, each, with a lion, pas- 
sant g-uardant. 



S. G. Drake : 77^1? History and Antiquities of Boston, 1856. 

Heraldic Journal, III., 23. 

Henry Bond : Genealogies and History of li'atertozvn, 
Mass., po. 

New England Historical and Genealogical Regis- 
ter, VII., 145. 

T. B. WymaN : CharlestovjR, Mass., Giihalogies, J., 105. 

Sir Bernard Burke : Tke General Armory of England, 
etc., 1SS4. 




William A. Whitehead -. Contributions to the Hist, y uf 

Perth Amboy, N.J., 1856. 
MacRee'S Life of James Tredell, 33-4.0. 
Rev. L. B. Thomas : Genealogical Notes, "^Sjy. 
Wheeler's Eminent North Caroliniam, 120-1. 
New York Genealogical and Biographical Record, 

v., 172. 
Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 

etc., 1884.. 
Sir Bernard Burke- Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and 

Extinct Peer'' ^ s of the British Empire, 1866. 
The Boo" Family Crests, II., 11. 
T. DEBREi I : The Royal Kalendar for ijg6. 



Boiplston 



The New England Boylstons descend from 
Thomas Boylston, a clothworker, of London, 



©allatin 



The Gallatins were a noble family in Savoy, 
in 1228, and settled in Geneva in 15 10. They 
were officially recognized as nobles in Austria, 
in 1 710, and the arms we give appear in the 
" Deed of Recognition." [Original in the New 
York Historical Society.] These arms are pre- 
scriptive, and have been used by the family 
from time immemorial. They were recognized 
(1771) by d' Hazier de Serigny, Judqe-at-Arms 
of King Louis XV. 

Albert Gallatin, the celebrate statesman, 
was a direct scion of this anci. house, and 
came to America in 1 780. He ght with 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



93 



him these arms, which were reproduced upon 
his seal ring and bookplates. 

The original motto, "Pro patria devoti" was 
abandoned by Albert Gallatin, in favor of his 
own motto, given below. Standard authorities 
give to the ancient Gallatins as a crest : 
"Deux proboscides d' astir." 



New England Historical and Genealogical Regis- 
ter, XXXIL, 275. 

S. G. Drake : The History and Antiquities of Boston-, rS^d. 

Heraldic Journal, 1865-1868. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of Ejigland^ 
etc., 1884. 

The Book or Family Crests, II., 81. 



Crest : A French count's coronet. 



Scbieffelin 



Motto : Persevere. 



GaLIFFE : Armorial Ge?tevois, 14. 

GalifFE : Notices G^n^alogiques stir les Families Genevoises. 

Baron DE Zur LaubEN : Tableaux Pittoresques de la 

Suisse, II., ^j//., 
SaINT-AlLAIS : Annuaire Historique de V Ancienne Noblesse 

de France, 2^4. 
Etrenne de la Noblesse ou Etat Actuel des Fa- 

MiLLEs Nobles de France pour les Armees, 1778, 

1781. 

ENCYCLOPyEDIA BrITANNICA, X., 38. 



Campbell 



The arms we give here are those of the 
Campbells of Ardentiuny, county Argyle, cadets 
of Ardkinglas, and are found on the seal used 
by John Campbell, of Boston (1696). He was 
Postmaster of Boston for many years, and pro- 
prietor of the "Boston Newsletter," the first 
newspaper published in the colonies. 

Arms : Gyronny of eight, 
sable and or. a bordure of 
the second charged with eight 
crescents of the first ; a mart- 
let, sable, on the dexter gyron, 
or, for difference. 

Crest : Two oars of a gal- 
ley in saltire : proper. 

Motto : By sea and land. 




Jacob Scheuffelin, the first colonist of the 
name, and the ancestor of all the American 
Schieffelins, came over in 1746, from Southern 
Germany. It is believed that the family was of 
Swiss extraction, as, in 15 18, Conrad Scheuf- 
felin, the ancestor of Jacob, emigrated from 
Norlingen, in Bavaria, to Switzerland, where he 
owned several "fiefs" [noble estates], and died 
in Geneva, leaving descendants who became 
prominent in cantonal affairs. It is believed, by 
competent genealogists, that the Scheuffelins, 
in settling in Switzerland, simply returned to 
the land of their ancestors. 

The family Bible of the Schieffelins, dated 
1650, and in the possession of an American 
member of the family, shows that the name 
was altered from Scheuffelin to Schieffelin 
sometime during the XVIII. century. 

Jacob Schieffelin, of Philadelphia, the son of 
the emigrant, married a Lawrence, of New 
York, and remained loyal to the English crown. 



Crest : A holy lamb, passant, 
i,rov'r.ed wiih giory, a ' earing 
cross, staff, and pennc 'er. 



Motto : Per fidein et constantiani. 
and firmness.] 



Rev. L. B. Thomas: Genealogical Notes, etc., ijy 

GaliffE : Armorial Genevois. 

GalIFFE : Histoire des Families Genevoises. 




94 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



Cbampernon 



Captain Francis Champernon, the emigrant to 
New England, who settled at Kittery, Ports- 
mouth, and York (o. 1686), was grandson of 
Gawine Champernowne, Esquire, of Dartington, 
county Devon, a descendant of the Chamfer- 
NOWNES of Clist Champernowne, county Devon, 
and Modbury, same county. He was related to 
Sir Htimphrey Gilbert, who had grant of the 
first patent for planting an English colony in 
America, and who first set up the English 
colors, in evidence of sovereignty, at St. Johns, 
Newfoundland. 



Arms : Gules, a saltire, vair, 
between twelve billets, or. 




Crest : A swan, sitting : 
proper — holding in its beak 
a horseshoe, or. 



EmmERTON and Waters : Gleanings from English Rec- 
ords, 1880. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 
1856. 

The Book of Family Crests, II., 92. 



scendants of Symon Dickenson of Bradley 
(161 2), a direct descendant himself of Hugh De 
Kenson (1475), supposed to be issued from the 
Norman Lord Gautier de Caen (io65). The 
pedigree stands solid only from John Dickenson 
of Leeds (1525) down to the various colonists, 
grandsons of the above-mentioned Symon Dicken- 
son of Bradley. Of- these, Walter, Henry, and 
John (sons of Charles Dickenson of London) 
emigrated in Virginia in 1654, and found the 
families of Dickenson in that province, in 
Maryland, and in Pennsylvania. 

As we first indicated, it is claimed that Na- 
thaniel Dickenson [in Boston in 1629] and 
Philemon Dickenson [in Salem, Mass., 1637] 
are also descendants of Hugh de Kenson, and 
fully entitled to bear his arms. We leave that 
question opened for further researches in special 
works and reviews. The coat of arms was con- 
firmed in 1625 to some kinsman of the original 
Dickensons of Bradley. 



Crest : A stag's head, erased [some- 
times couped], or. 

Motto : Esse quain videri. [Rather 
be than pretend.] 



The Dickenson Family, 1865. 

New England Historical and Genealogical Regis- 
ter, XVI., 263. 

Essex Institute Historical Collections, XXI., 69. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The Getieral Armory of Etigland, 
etc., 1SS4. 




©ichenson 



nest effort has been made to connect 
families of that name with a parent 
stock, one and the same, for all these 

scattered through the country, 
r it seems that conclusive proof has 
obtained in favor of the various de- 



Xinsee 



The arms we give here are the arms of the 

Lindsays of Kirkforther, county Fife. They 

were constantly borne by the descendants of 

Captain John Linzee, who commanded the Brit- 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



95 



ish sloop-of-vvar "Falcon" at the Battle of Bun- 
ker Hill. He had married in Boston, in 1772, 
Miss Susanna Inman, of a well-known New 
England family. Many of their descendants are 
to be found in North America. 



Arms : Gules, a fess, cheeky, 
argent and azure, between 
three mullets, in chief, and a 
hunting horn, in base, of the 
second. 

Crest : An ostrich with a 
key in its bill. 

Motto : Patientia vincit. 
[Patience conquers.] 



Heraldic Journal, IV., 38. 

S. G. Drake : The History and Antiquities of Boston, 1856. 
Papworth and Morant: An Ordinary of British Armo- 
rials, i8j^. 
The Book of Family Crests, II., 289. 




Xipncb 



In a period of one hundred and sixtj'-nine 3/ears, 
eighty-four members of that same family presided 
over the municipal affairs of Galway. 

Dominick Lynch, the colonist, a descendant 
of this long line of prominent citizens, had pre- 
viously settled at Brussels, in the Catholic Neth- 
erlands, whence he reached New York in 1783, 
already in possession of a very large fortune. 
His descendants married into the Livingston, 
Montgomery, and Tillotson families, and enjoyed, 
from the start, a high standing in the New 
York business and social community. 



Crest : A lynx, passant, coward. 



Motto : Semper Jidelis. [Ever faithful.] 



T. Gwilt-Mapleson : Hand Book of Heraldry, 1852. 

Hardiman's History of Galway, 1820. 

History of Duchess Co., N. Y. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1884.. 

W. Berry : Encyclopedia Heraldica, 1828. 

Papworth and Morant: A^i Ordinary of British Her- 
aldry, iSj/f.. 

The Book of Family Crests, II., 299. 




The Lynches of Galway, Ireland, are de- 
scended, it is stated, from Sir Hugo de Lynch 
(1066), and, later, from Andrew de Lynch, to 
whom Henry II. gave large possessions in Ire- 
land. Tradition says that the bravery of one of 
the early ancestors of the family, present at the 
siege of Linz, Austria, determined the arms and 
motto of the Lynches of Galway. At all 
events, their influence over aifairs of that city 
was preponderant during the XV., XVI., and 
XVII. centuries. From Dominick Lynch, sur- 
named Dominick "Double" who obtained in 1484 
the Charter of Galway, a succession of Lynches, 
all of the same stock, occupied the Mayoralty. 



/Iftartin 



A tombstone in the Copp's Hill Burial 
Ground, in Boston, bears the devices we give, 
which are found also used as a seal in 1700 by 
Michael Martin, of Boston, son of the emi- 
grant, Richard Martyn, of Portsmouth, in Pis- 
cataqua, in New England. 

These armorial devices are those of the Mar- 
TYNS of Exeter and Kemys, county Pembroke 
(temp. Henry I.). 



96 



AMERICA HERALDICA 




Arms : Argent, two 
gnles. 



bars, 



Crest : An estoile, gules. 



Guy M. Fessenden: A Genealogical Memoir of the De- 
scendants of William Bradford, etc., l8§0. 

S. G. Drake: The History and Antiquities of Boston, 1856. 

Moore : Memoirs of American Governors, I., j88. 

New England Historical and Genealogical Regis- 
ter, VII., IX. 

Wyman's Charlestown, Mass., Genealogies, I., ri§. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1884.. 

The Book of Family Crests, II., 58. 



Heraldic Journal, II., 7, 81. 

T. B. Wyman ; Charlestown, Mass., Genealogies, II., 6§8. 

Sir Bernard Burke: The Ge?ieral Armory of E7igland, 

etc., 1884.. 
The Book of Family Crests, II., 315. 



/flbatber 



JSrabforb 



Researches made in the second half of this 
century have established the fact that Governor 
William Bradford, who came over in the May- 
flower in 1620, was born in Austerfield, county- 
York, in 1588. His father, whose ancestors had 
belonged, undoubtedly, to the county family of 
the name, had been reduced by circumstances to 
adopt the trade of printer. About 1608 William 
went over to Holland with the persecuted Pu- 
ritans, joined the Pilgrims, and came over to 
America with the first hundred colonists. The 
noble story of his life needs no comment. We 
understand that the arms of William Bradford 
are found in the little church of Austerfield, 
icounty York. 



Crests : A. A stag's head of the 
shield. 

B. A double-headed eagle, displayed. 



Motto : Fier et sage. [Proud and wise.] 




The arms we give are attributed by Burke to 
the Mathers of May tone, county Armagh, Twy- 
ford, county Derby, and New Orleans, in the 
United States of America. The same arms were 
confirmed in 1575 to the Mathers of Seacroft, 
county York. 

Another family of Mathers, ancestors of the 
Rev. Cotton Mather [his grandfather. Rev. Rich- 
ard Mather, was the emigrant of the name], 
is stated to have borne only slightly different 
arms, and to have come from Lowton, county 
Lancaster. 

In the Cotton Mather arms the fess is wavy 
and charged with three lionels rampant. The 
crest is a lion sejant. 




Arms : Ermine, a fess em- 
=S?> battled, gules. 

',j.'^.|.^-.:T-.-.^.:.-^.j.'| Crest: A hand erect, is- 

TXT-n-aTlirLl suing from a cloud, holding 

an arrow, point downwards : 






all proper. 



Sir Bernard Burke: The Genera! Armory of England, 

etc., 1884. 
Heraldic Journal, I., 21. 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



97 



The Mather Genealogy, 1848. 

New England Historical and Genealogical Regis- 
ter, v., 460 ; VI., 20. 
Mrs. Martha J. Lamb: History of the City of New York, 

I; 338. 

S. G. Drake : The History and Antiquities of Boston, i8§6. 



SSalcbe, or SSalcb 

John Balche, Sheriff of county Somerset, Eng- 
land, in 1392, had among his descendants George 
Balche or Balch (1536), whose second son, 
John, born in 1579, came over to America in 
1623, with Captain Robert Gorges. We find his 
name amongst the Pilgrims settled at Salem in 
1629. Another member of the same family, the 
Rev. Thomas Balch, emigrated to Annapolis, 
Md., before 1690. He was a direct descendant 
of Robert Everard Balch of St. Audries, 
county Somerset. From him descend the 
Balches, of Philadelphia, etc., etc. Sir Bernard 
Burke gives the arms we reproduce as belong- 
ing both to the Somersetshire family, at the pre- 
sent day, and to the Balches of North Amer- 
ica. The Visitation of the Heralds, in 1623, 
confirmed the rights of the Balches of Norton, 
county Somerset, to bear coat-armor and to be 
styled gentlemen. 

In 1787 the elder branch was represented by 
the Rev. Edward Balch, J. P. of St. Audries, 
near Bridgewater, Somersetshire. It is said to 
be extinct since 1814. 



Crest : Out of a ducal coronet, 
or, a demi-griffin : proper. 



Mottoes : A. [Over the shield] : Ubi libertas, ibi 
patria. [Where is liberty, there 
is my country.] 
B. [Under the shield] : Not laws 
of mati, but laws of God. 




Harleian MSS., 1141, L. 122; 1445, L. 167b, etc. [Brit- 
ish Museum.] 

EmmertON and Waters : Gleanings From English Rec- 
ords About New England Families, 7 \i886\. 

S. G. Drake : The History and Antiquities of Boston, 18^6. 

New England Historical and Genealogical Regis- 
ter, IX., 233. 

Hinman'S Early Puritan Settlers of Connecticut, 1 12. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 
etc., i88if.. Supplement. 

Papworth and Morant: An Ordinary of British Armo- 
rials, i8j^. 



/Iftiller 



The arms we give have been for over one 
hundred and seventy-five years in the possession 
of the descendants of Samuel Miller, of New 
England, who married the daughter of Joseph 
Belcher, of Boston, and was a man of large 
means. His son, Ebenezer, who became a distin- 
guished clergyman, graduated at Harvard College 
in 1722. 

The English family bearing these arms de- 
scends from Nicholas Miller, Sheriff of county 
Kent (tempo. Charles I.). Baronetcy extinct in 
1714. 



Arms : Ermine, a fess gules, 
-,_- — ^, . between three wolves' heads, 

l.-^S.s*K erased, azure. 




Crest : A wolf's 
erased, azure. 



head. 



Heraldic Journal, L, 39. 

T. B. Wyman'S Charlesiown, Mass., Genealogies, II., 668. 
Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1884.. 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



Ifojcroft 



The FoxcROFTS came originally from Foxcroft, 
county Lancaster, England. Later, they are 
found in Halifax, Yorkshire ; and the Harleian 
MSS., No. 4360, gives a full pedigree of this 
ancient house. 

Daniel Foxcroft, Mayor of Leeds, county 
York (1665), was the father of Francis Fox- 
croft, an ancestor of the New England Fox- 
CROFTS, who married in this country in 1682. 
Both his sons occupied honored positions in the 
community, the eldest one, Francis, as Judge of 
Probate, the second, Thomas, as Pastor of the 
First Church, Boston. His granddaughter mar- 
ried Lieutenant Governor Phillips, of Andover. 

The imprint of the seal used by these two 
brothers in witnessing a will, in 1730, confirms 
the heraldic connection between the Yorkshire 
and the New England Foxcrofts. 

No ancient crest is found to that name. 



Thoresby's Ducatus Leodiensis. 

POULSON'S Beverlac. 

New England Historical and Genealogical Regis- 
ter, VIII., 171, 260. 

Paige's History of Cambridge, Mass., §4.8. 

S. G. Drake : The History and Antiquities of Boston, y^g 
{1856). 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England^ 
etc., 1884. 



Ipbippen 



The Phippens, of Salem, descend, in the four- 
teenth degree, from Henry Fitzpen of St. Mary- 
Ottery, county Devon, England [cf. Visitation 
of Cornwall, 1620]. 

The founder of the American branch of that 
very ancient family was David Fitzpen, great- 
greatgrandson of that Henry. He settled at 
Hingham, Mass., in 1635, and removed later to 
Boston, where he died in 1650. 




Arms : Argent, two bars 
sable ; in chief three escallops 
of the second. 

Crest : A bee volant, in 
pale, or, winged, vert. 



Heraldic Journal, IV., i. 

Phippen Genealogy, 1868. 

Emmerton and Waters : Gleanings from English Rec- 
ords, j886. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1884.. 

The Book of Family Crests, II., 179. 



2)uSSois 

ChrMen Du Bois, a Huguenot gentilhomme of 
French Flanders, lived at Wicres, near Lille, the 
largest city in Northern France. The leading 
family of the name in that vicinity, and that to 
which he evidently belonged, was that of the 
Du Bois, Seigneurs de Beaufermez, and de Bourse, 
two old family estates. 

Two sons of Chrdtien decided successively to 
come over to the New Netherlands, after having 
escaped religious persecution, the first, Louis, at 
Mannheim, on the Rhine, the second, Jacques, 
at Leyden, in the Protestant Netherlands. 

Louis embarked in 1660, with his wife and 
two sons, for New Amsterdam, and settled first 
at Wiltwyck, in the ^sopus country (now 
Kingston). He lived thirty-six years in his 
adopted land, and left seven sons to keep up 
the name. 

Jacques came over in 1675 only, died a year 
later, leaving only three sons. He had settled 
at Fishkill. 



^2 



;5oi 



^ 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



99 




Crest : Between two tree 
stumps, vert, the lion of the 
shield. 



Motto : Tiens ta foy. [Hold to thy faith.] 



Town Records or Wicre, Departement du Nord, 

France. 
d'Hozier MSS. : Provinces of Picardy a7id Flanders, i6g6- 

iji6. 
J. B. RiETSTAP: Armorial Universel, ed. of 1861. 
Bi-Centenary Reunion of the Descendants of Louis and 

Jacques Du Bois, at New Paltz, N. Y., 1876. 
Ch. W. Baird : The Huguenot Emigration in America, i88§. 



Sears 



The devices here given, accepted by Burke as 
belonging to the American Sears, are said to 
have been the arms of Johti Savers, a promi- 
nent Colchester, England, citizen, who died there 
in 1509. 

The family seems to have taken root in the 
Protestant Netherlands, where the father of the 
emigrant, John Bourchier Sears, was born. His 
mother was a Van Egmond, from one of the 
most illustrious Holland houses. Richard Sears, 
the emigrant, died in 1676, at Yarmouth, Mass., 
where he had settled. 



Arms : Gules, a chevron ar- 
gent, between three eaglets : 
proper. On a chief, ermine, 
an escallop, between two mul- 
lets of the first. 




Crest : An eagle displayed : 
proper. 



Mottoes : A. Exaltat humiles. [He upholds 
the humble.] 
B. Honor et fides. [Honor and 
fidelity.] 



Heraldic Journal, II., 137. 

Sears' Pictures of Olden Times, With Genealogies, i8sj. 
S. G. Drake: The History and Antiquities of Boston, 18^6. 
Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1884.. 



Stoct^ton 

Richard Stockton, the founder of this cele- 
brated New Jersey family, belonged to the 
Stocktons of Malpas, Co. Chester, England, 
which counted amongst its distinguished members 
a Lord Mayor of London (1470). 

The colonist emigrated to Long Island pre- 
vious to 1670. He brought with him a consid- 
erable fortune, and was able in 1680 to pur- 
chase six thousand four hundred acres of land, 
in one tract, where stands now Princeton, N. J., 
and its famous college. 

In 1682-83 the first settlement upon this vast 
estate was consummated. In 1705, Richard 
Stockton died, leaving several children, from 
whom descended Richard Stockton, the signer 
of the Declaration of Independence, Commodore 
Stockton, etc., etc. The American Stocktons 
are recognized by Burke, in his edition of 1884. 



Crest : A lion, rampant, sup- 
porting an Ionic pillar. 



Motto : Omnia Deo pendent. [All things rest 
on God.] 



New Jersey Historical Collections. 

J. B. Moore : Memoirs of Atnerican Governors, li 




100 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



Pennsylvania and New Jersey Genealogical Asso- 
ciation, 1882. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1884.. 

The Book of Family Crests, II., 446. 



Sewall 



The arms here given were engraved, by Na- 
thaniel Hurd, under the portrait of the Rev. 
Samtiel Sewall, of Boston. He descended from 
Henry Sewall, once Mayor of Coventry, Eng- 
land. 

The greatgrandson of the above Henry, also 
Henry by name, was sent to New England in 
1634. Chief Justice Samuel Sewall belonged to 
that stock. The same arms are borne by the 
Sewells of Newport, Isle of Wight. 



Arms : Sable, a chevron, be- 
tween three bees, argent. 




Crest: A bee, or. 



Heraldic Journal, L, 68. 

New England Historical and Genealogical Regis- 
ter, I., III. 

Bridgman's Granary Burial Ground, 128-J2. 

Miss S. E. Titcomb : Early New England People, 214.. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1884.. 



commences with Miles Greenwood, whose arms 
are given in the document, and correspond with 
the devices we reproduce. 

This Miles Greenwood had a son, Nathaniel, 
born in 1631, who came over to Boston, New 
England, in 1654. The latter's grandson, Samuel 
Greenwood, had built in 1722 a family tomb, 
on Copp's Hill, and its slab bears the family 
arms, with some slight mistakes due to the 
workman or sculptor. 

These arms are clearly attributed, by Edmond- 
son, to "the Greenwoods of Yorkshire and of 
Norwich, 1594." That date marks, more prob- 
ably, a confirmation than a grant, as this very 
ancient family is traced back to 1154, by Tho- 
resby, in his Ducattis Leodiensis. 



Crest : A mullet, between two 
duck's wings, elevated : all sable. 



Motto : Ut prosim. [May I be useful.] 



R. ThORESBY : DucatJis Leodiensis, i6y {1715). 

J. C. Brooks, "Somerset" Herald: Collection of York- 
shire Pedigrees, No. I, Collection of Arms. 

Isaac Heard, " Garter " : Miscellaneous Pedigrees, I., 
221; Collection of Arms. 

J. Edmondson: Complete Book of Heraldry [Addenda'], 
1780. 

Heraldic Journal, IL, 78. 

New England Historical and Biographical Regis- 
ter, XIV., 171 ; XXII., 303, etc. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1884. 

The Book of Family Crests, II. , 213. 




©reenwoob 



A pedigree of this ancient Norwich family is 
preserved at the College of Heralds, London. It 



Spottswoob 



The' Spottswoods, of Virginia, descend from 
Gov. Alexander Spottiswood, who reached Vir- 
ginia in 1 710, succeeding Gov. Edward Nott. 
He was the son (or grandson) of Sir Robert 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



lor 



Spottiswood, Lord President of the Court of 
Sessions, Scotland, himself the son of Archbishop 
Spottiswood. 

The Spottiswoods of that Ilk bear on the 
chevron "a boar's head, couped, or." 



Arms: Argent, a chevron, 
gules, between three oak trees 
eradicated, vert. 

Crest : An eagle rising, 
gules, looking to the sun in 
its splendor. 

Motto : Patior td potiar. 
[I suffer so as to succeed.] 




Cranstoun [created, 1609; peerage extinct or 
dormant, 1869]. The dates seem very close to- 
gether to admit of four generations, but the 
common origin is not denied. 



Crest : A crane, passant. 




Motto : Dum vigilo euro. [Care- 
ful while watching,] 



Heraldic Journal, III., 59. 

Austin's Rhode hlajid Ge7tealogical Dictionary, 1886. 

Sir Bernard Burke : Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and 

Extinct Peerages of the British Empire. 
Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 

etc., 1884. 



Bishop Meade's Old Churches, Ministers, and Families of 

Virginia, I., i6§. 
Slaughter's Histories of St. Mark's and of St. George's 

Parishes. 
Charles Campbell : Genealogy of the Spottswood Family 

in Scotland and i?i Virginia, 1868. 
Sir Bernard Burke: The General Armory of England, 

etc., 1884.. 
The Book of Family Crests, II., 438. 



Cranston 

On the tombstone of John Cranston [or 
Cranstoun], Esquire, Governor of the Colony of 
Rhode Island (ob. 1680), and on that of his son, 
John Cranston, also Governor of the same col- 
ony {ob. 1727), both buried in the Old Newport 
(R. I.) Burial Ground, we find the arms we 
give, recognized by Burke as belonging to the 
Cranstouns of Rhode Island. 

The inscription points out that the deceased 
descended from James Cranston, Clerk Chaplain 
to Charles I. ; also, that the first-named Gov- 
ernor was the greatgrandson of the first Lord 



lUsber 



The devices we give, recognized by Burke as 
belonging to the Ushers of New Hampshire, 
U. S. A., are borne by the descendants of Heze- 
kiah Usher, who was already settled in Massa- 
chusetts in 165 1. 

His son. Lieutenant Governor John Usher, 
one of the Proprietors of New Hampshire 
(where he died in 1726), made use or a seal 
bearing these arms. 

They are borne also by the Ushers of Feath- 
erstone, county York, England. 



Arms : Argent, three lions' 
paws, couped and erect, sable ; 
"^ a crescent for difference. 




Crest : A lion's paw, 
couped and erect, sable. 



102 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



Heraldic Journal, IL, i68. 

New England Historical and Genealogical Regis- 
ter, XXIII, 410. 

Brook's History of Medford, Mass., 556. 

W. H. Whitmore'S Brief Genealogy of Usher, i86g. 

T. B. WyMAN'S Charlestown, Mass., Genealogies, IL, p7p. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Artnory of Etigland, 
etc., 1884. 



Calvert 

The founders of Maryland were two brothers, 
Cecil Calvert, Second Baron Baltimore, of Bal- 
timore, Ireland, and Leonard Calvert, employed 
by his brother to be first Proprietary Governor 
of the young colony. Their father, having 
gained the full confidence of King Charles I., 
rose from an humble origin to the rank of 
Irish Peer and Privy Councillor, an office in 
which he maintained even after his transfering 
his religious allegiance to the Roman Church. 
The promised grant of concession was signed 
in 1632, and the province named in honor of 
Queen Henrietta Maria, daughter of the good 
French King, Heniy IV. 

The fifth baron returned to the Established 
Church, and the seventh Lord Baltimore, dying 
at Naples in 1771, without issue, the title be- 
came extinct. 



Crest : Out of a ducal coronet, 
or, two staves, with pennons flying 
to the dexter side : the dexter, or ; 
the sinister, sable. 



Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 

etc., 1884.. 
The Book of Family Crests, II. , 81. 




Motto : Fatti maschi, parole femine. 
are males, words are females.] 



[Deeds 



Heraldic Journal, IV., 21. 

Rev. Ed. D. Neill; The Fotinders of Maryland, 1876. 
Sir Bernard Burke : Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and 
Extinct Peerages of the British Empire, 1866. 



Mortbington 



These arms — those of the Worthingtons of 
Worthington, county Lancaster, England, and of 
various other branches of the same family — are 
borne in New England by the descendants of 
Nicolas Worthington, first of Saybrook (1650), 
later of Hartford, Ct. He died in Massachusetts 
in 1683. His descendants possess plate with 
very old hallmarks bearing the same devices. 

The Worthingtons of Maryland claim descent 
from the same Lancashire family, but not 
through the above-named Nicolas. 



Arms : Argent, three dung- 
forks, sable. 

Crest : A goat, passant, ar- 
gent, holding in his mouth an 
oak branch, vert, fructed, or. 

Motto : Virtute dignus 
avorum. [Worthy of his an- 




cestors' valor.] 



Heraldic Journal, IV., 71. 

Goodwin's Genealogical Notes, 264. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The Ge?ieral Armory of England, 

etc., 1884. 
The Book of Family Crests, II., 509. 



SSrabstreet 



The first uf the name in this country, Simon 
Bradstreet, who succeeded Governor Leverett 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



103 



in 1679, came over in 1630 from Hoebling, 
county Lincoln, where his father, Simon Brad- 
street, was Minister. He used the arms we 
give as his seal. 

Another family of Bradstreets springs from 
Htimphrey Bradstreet, who came from Ipswich, 
England, in 1634. 



Crest : An arm in armor em- 
bowed, the hand grasping a scim- 
itar : all proper. 



Motto : Virtute et fion vi. [By courage not 
(brute) strength.] 



Heraldic Journal, I., 102. 

S. G. Drake: The History and Antiquities of Boston, 1856. 

Jacob B. Moore: Memoirs of American Governors, I.,j88. 

New England Historical and Genealogical Regis- 
ter, Vn., 312; IX., 113. 

HammETT'S Papers o?i Ipswich, Mass., 32. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1884.. 




MlUis 



George Wyllys, born at Fenny Compton, 
county Warwick, came to New England in 
1638, and settled at Hartford, Ct. 

The arms we give are copied from the im- 
pressions of the seal of Samuel Willis, son of 
the above (1684), and from the portrait of his 
greatgrandson, George Willis, Secretary of the 
colony of Connecticut (i 735-1 796). 



Arms : Argent, a chevron 
"^ between three mullets, gules. 




Crest : A falcon, wings ex- 
panded : proper — belled, or. 



Heraldic Journal, II., 40. 

New England Historical and Genealogical Regis- 
ter, XXXVIL, 33. 

Porter's Hartford, Ct., Settlers, 23. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1884.. 

The Book of Family Crests, II., 501. 



Brattle 

The arms we give are found on the seal of 
Thomas Brattle, who was for twenty years 
Treasurer of Harvard College, and died in 1713. 

His father. Captain Thomas Brattle, the 
founder of the American family of the name, 
married a Miss Tyng, in 1657, and had three 
sons and four daughters. He died in 1683, pos- 
sessed of a very large fortune. 

Curious to say, we do not find the arms we 
give under the name of Brattle in any Eng- 
lish work on heraldry. However, the family of 
Batten, or Battyn, of Exeter, bears the same 
devices. Is there any common origin ? We do 
not pretend to answer this question. 

As for the arms given by Mr. S. G. Drake, 
in his History and Antiquities of Boston, they 
are found in Burke as borne by a family of 
Brattle. But they have no analogy with the 
coat we give, as having been used by the orig- 
inal Brattles. 



Heraldic Journal, III., 42. 

S. G. Drake: The History and Antiquities of Boston, l8§6. 

Papworth and Morant : An Ordinary of British Ar- 
morials, i8j/f.. 

Th. Bridgman: Inscriptions, etc., from the Granary Burial 
Ground, Boston, 1856. 

T. B. Wyman : Charlestown, Mass., Genealogies, /., j/p. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1884. 



IBensbaw 



The Henshawes 0/ Henshaw, county Chester, 
England, are represented in New England [in 



104 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



spite of Burkes affirmation that the family is 
extinct in the male line] by the descendants of 
Joshua and Daniel Henshaw, who were brought 
over here at an early age so as to deprive 
them of their lawful inheritance. 

They arrived in America, circa 1654. A full 
pedigree of the Henshaw family, including the 
two colonists, was prepared officially in 1701, 
and is kept at the Heralds' College, London. 



Arms : Argent, a chevron, 
between three heronshaws, 
sable. 




proper — 
elevated, 



Crest : A falcon : 
belled, or, wings 
preying on a mallard's wing, 
argent, guttle de sang. 



ily may have branched off, as the arms it bears 
— since the first colonist's time — are the arms at- 
tributed by Burke to the Ap-Rice family of 
Wales. 

A seal, in possession of the above Sidney 
Breese, reproduced the crest we give. 

The Breeze, or Brees, arms in Burke are 
totally different. 



Crest : A boar's head, erect, 
argent, pellet^e, between two oak 
branches, vert, fructed, or. 



Edward Elbridge Salisbury : Family Memorials, 4.75-8. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1884. 

Papworth and Morant: An Ordinary of British Ar- 
morials, 1874. 




Heraldic Journal, IV., 123. 

Miscellanea Genealogica et Heraldica for 1867. 

New England Historical and Genealogical Regis- 
ter, XXII., 105. 

T. B. Wyman'S Charlestown, Mass., Genealogies, I., 4^5. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of E7igland, 
etc., 1884. 



Breese 



Sidney Breese, bom at or near Shrewsbury, 
county Salop, England, belonged to the English 
Navy as a Purser, and is known to have settled 
in New York as early as 1733-34. His father 
was a merchant of Shropshire, and his grand- 
father a rector in Wales. That brings the fam- 
ily back to the middle of the XVH. century, 
and to that very portion of Great Britain from 
whence sprung the v/ell-known family of Ap- 
Rice, or Ap-Rkys, from which the Breese fam- 



JSurnbam 

Thomas Burnam, or Burnham, as he later 
signed his name, was bom in 161 7, and emi- 
grated in 1635 to the Barbadoes. Later (1649), 
owing to political troubles, the emigrant reached 
Connecticut, where he settled at Hartford, and 
owned large estates. He was a lawyer by pro- 
fession, and a man of education and energy. 

The ancient family of Burnam of Hatfield 
Court, in ■ Herefordshire county, England, now 
extinct, in the old country, in the direct male 
line, was represented in 1570 by another Thomas 
Burnam, without much doubt a lineal ancestor 
of the emigrant. 

It is admitted in England, at the present day, 
that the Burnams of Hatfield Court are now 
represented by the United States Burnhams. 




AMERICA HERALDICA 105 

Motto : Recta sed ardua. [Straight but hard.] 



Crest : A leopard's head, erased : 
proper. 



Roderick H. Burnham : Genealogical Records of Thomas 
Burnham, etc. 2d edition. 1884.. 

Hinman'S Connecticut Settlers, 412-418. 

Rev. Pettigrew : Episodes in the Life of an English Chap- 
lain, j6o. 

W. Berry : Encyclopedia Heraldica, 1828. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1884. 

The Book of Family Crests, II., 75. 



Lord Lindsay: Lives of the Lindsays, i84g-i 858. 

George Seton : Scottish Heraldry, i86j. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 

etc., 1884. 
George Crawford: The Peerage of Scotland, etc., iji6. 



©orbon 



ILinbsa^ 



The forefather of the vvell-known family of 
Lindsay of Virginia, was the Rev. Daniel 
Lindsay, who settled in Northumberland county, 
Virginia, in 1645. He was the elder son of 
Sir Hierome Lindsay of the Mount, Lord-Lion- 
King-at-Arms to James VI. of Scotland, — the 
said Sir Hierome being the fourth Lindsay 
who had held that high ofSce. 

He was the elder son of the celebrated David 
Lindsay, Minister of Leith and Bishop of Ross, 
the King's Chaplain, and his Ambassador on 
several important occasions. His grandfather was 
Alexander Lindsay of Edzell, and a cousin to 
the Lindsays, Earls of Crawford and Balcarres. 
As such, his descendants bear as second and 
third quarters the Abernethy arms, found in 
the Crawford shield. 

We have seen a clear pedigree, down to the 
present generation, recognized, moreover, in the 
"Lives of the Lindsays," a book of immense 
erudition, published in Scotland. 



Crest : A cubit arm in armor, in 
pale, holding in the hand a sword 
erect, argent. On the point a pair 
of balances of the last. 




These arms are given by Burke to the Gor- 
dons of South Carolina. They show that these 
Gordons descend from the Gordons of Beldor- 
nie, themselves issued from Adam Gordon, Dean 
of Caithness, fourth son of the first Earl of 
HuNTLY [at least, such is the Burke theory of 
this family]. 

These are not the arms of Major-General 
Gordon, Governor of Pennsylvania, greatgrandson 
of fohn Gordon, Laird of Britmore, descending 
from the Gordons, Lairds of Strathaven, a 
scion of the Setons, Lords of Gordon and 
Huntly. 



Arms : Quarterly — First, 
azure, on a fess, argent, be- 
tween three boars' heads, 
couped, or, a wolfs head, 
couped, sable. Second, or, 
three lions' heads, erased, 
gules, for Badenoch. Third, 
or, three crescents, within a 
double tressure, flory, coun- 
terflory, gules, for Seton. 
Fourth, azure, three frases, 
argent, for Eraser. 



Crest : A hart's head, affront^e : proper. 
Motto : Animo. [Courageously.] 




io6 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1884. 

Sir R. Douglas: The Peerage of Scotland, etc., 181J. 

George Seton : The Law and Practice of Scottish Her- 
aldry, i86j. 

The Book of Family Crests, II., 206. 



Cobbington 



Among the members of the Massachusetts 
Company (1627-28) appears the name of Wil- 
liam CoDDiNGTON, whose Seal on a letter ad- 
dressed by him — during his term of office as 
Governor of Rhode Island — to Governor Leverett, 
of Massachusetts, reproduces the arms we give. 

These arms are those attributed by English 
works on Heraldry to the Codringtons of 
Wroughton, Co. Wilts, England. The colonist 
came over, it is said, from Boston, Co. Lincoln, 
Enarland. 



Crest : A dragon's head, gules, 
between two wings, chequey, or 
and azure, issuing out of a du- 
cal coronet of the second. 



Motto : Immersabilis est vera virhis. [True 
valor cannot be sunk.] 




(green 

These arms, belonging to the Greens of 
Cos. Hereford and Nottingham, and of Awkley 
Hall, Co. York, England, were used by John 
Green of Slow (1688), and by his brother. Bar- 
tholomew Green (1678). 

The grandfather of both, John Green, came 
over in 1632 and settled at Charlestown, Mass. 
Percival Green, of Cambridge, concerning whose 
origin so much has been written, may have be- 
longed to the same family. 



Arms: Argent, on a fess, 
azure, between three pellets, 
each charged with a lion's 
head, erased, of the first, a 
~^ griffin, passant, between two 
escalops, or. 

Crest : A woodpecker, pick- 
ing a shaft, couped, raguly and 
erect : all proper. 



Heraldic Journal, IV., m. 

S. Abbott Green : Percival and Ellen Green, i8'/6. 

T. B. Wyman's Charlestown Genealogies, I., ^j§. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 

etc., 1884. 
The Book of Family Crests, II., 212. 




S. G. Drake : The History and Atttiguities of Bosto?i, i8§6. 

Austin's Rhode Island Genealogical Dictionary, J 886. 

T. Gwilt-Mapleson : Ha7id Book of Heraldry, 1852. 

Evelyn Philip Shirley : The Noble and Gentle Men of 
England, 1866. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The Landed Gentry of Great Brit- 
ain and Irelatid, 1874. 

Sir Bernard Burke ; The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1884. 



/Iftountfort 



The MouNTFORTS, of Boston and of Portland, 
spring from Edmtind Mountfort, who was a 
London merchant, who settled in Boston in 
1656. His brother, Henry, accompanied him; 
and a third brother, Benjamin, joined them in 



AMERICA HERALDIC'A 



107 



1675, but died without issue. The only son of 
Henry, Ebenezer, died also without issue (1716), 
so that the Mountforts of New England all 
descend from the above-mentioned Edmund. 

The tombstone of his son, John, is found in 
the Copp's Hill churchyard, Boston (1724), bear- 
ing the arms we give, ' which belong to the 
famous English house of Mountfort of Beam- 
hurst Hall, county Stafford, claiming descent 
from Simon de Montfort, Earl of Leicester. 

A pedigree exists tracing descent to another 
Simon Mountfort (1633), who was the father 
of the colonists. 




Charles W. Baird : 
Charles W. Baird : 



Arms : Argent, a vine stock, 
sable, laden with grapes, gules. 



History of Rye, N. V., 4.6'j. 

History of the Huguenot Emigration, 



Bolton : History of Westchester Co., N. Y., //., jj^.. 
d'Hozier: Armorial Ghiiral de France, MSS., i6g6-ij20. 




Crests : A. A lion's head, erased 
. . . [found on the tombstone]. 

B. A plume of five feathers [used 
by the English branch]. 



Clarhson 



S. G. Drake : The History and Antiquities of Boston, 1856. 

Heraldic Journal, II., 80. 

Th. Bridgman : Epitaphs, etc., from the Copp's Hill Burial 

Ground, Boston, iS^i. 
Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 

etc., 1884. 
Sir Bernard Burke : Dortnant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and 

Extinct Peerages of the British Empire, 1866. 



0uion 



Louis GuiON, Ecuyer [esquire], the founder of 
the American Guion family, fled from La Ro- 
chelle, France, his native place to escape reli- 
gious persecution, and reached England four 
years before the revocation of the Edict of 
Nantes. He emigrated later, to America, and 
settled at New Rochelle in 1687. 



The New York and Philadelphia Clarksons, 
with others of their blood, are descended from 
the Rev. David Clarkson, of Bradford, county 
York, England, Fellow of Clare Hall, Cam- 
bridge, w^ho married a daughter of Sir Henry 
Holcroft, Knt. of county Essex. Their son, 
Matthew Clarkson, was the founder of the 
family in America. He came over to New 
York in 1687, was Secretary of the Province 
from 1689 to the time of his death, 1702. His 
son, David, is the ancestor of what is generally 
known as the New York Clarksons, who inter- 
married w^ith the best families of the colonies. 
His grandson. Dr. Gerardus Clarkson, was the 
ancestor of the Philadelphia Clarksons. 



Crest : An eagle's head, erased, 
between two wings, addorsed, 
sable. 




io8 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



New York Genealogical and Biographical Record, 

X., 156. 
Mrs. Martha J. Lamb: History of New York City, 385. 
Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 

etc., 1884. 



Dan S)u^n 



This family is of Dutch-French origin. The 
DE Dines emigrated to Holland, on account of 
religious persecutions, and, in 1649, O"^^ of the 
descendants of the Huguenot Gerrit Cornelisse 
Van Duyn, came from Zvvoll, Overyssell, Nether- 
lands, to Long Island, North America, where he 
settled. 



to the Pecks of Belton, county York, thus es- 
tablishing an authentic pedigree of twenty gene- 
erations. There exists, also, a tombstone of 
Captain Samtiel Peck, of Rehoboth (0. 1736), 
bearing, engraved, the same arms, undoubtedly 
the legitimate armorial devices of the Pecks of 
Hinzham and their descendants. 



Crest : Two lances, or, in sal- 
tire, headed, argent, pennons hang- 
ing to them, or, each charged with 
a cross, form^e, gules, the spears 
enfiled with a chaplet, vert. 



Motto (Of an English branch) : Crux Christi 
salus mea. [The Cross of Christ my salvation.] 





Arms : Quarterly — First and 
fourth, gules, a cross, flory, or. 
Second and third, argent, three 
torteaux. 

Crest : A greyhound's head, 
erased, argent. 



Rijker's Newtown, L. I., jgj. 

New York Genealogical and Biographical Record, 

X., 155- 
Teunis G. Bergen : Kings Co., N. Y., Settlers, jjo. 



ipecP^ 



Joseph Peck, of Hingham, England, a brother 
of the Rev. Robert Peck, of that place, came 
over to Hingham, New England, in 1638. Mr. 
H. G. Somerby has clearly traced these brothers 



Ira B. Peck: A Genealogical History of the Descendayits of 
foseph Peck, etc., 1868. 

W. H. WhitmoRE: The American Genealogist, l8j§. 

Chapman's Peck Ge?iealogy, 187';. 

New England Historical and Genealogical Regis- 
ter, XXXII., 83 ; XXXIIL, 438. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1884.. 

The Book of Family Crests, II., 367. 



lEIIer^ 



The founder of the American family of that 
name was William Ellery, who came from 
Bristol, England, and settl'»'i in Gloucester, 
Mass., in 1663. The origin of the family is 
thought to be French, although the arms we 
give are found in Btirke to the names of El- 
dres or Eleris. 

The arms are found in this country on the 
seal of Benjamin Ellery of Newport, the son 
of the colonist, who occupied a prominent and 
wealthy position in the Rhode Island colony 
(1669-1746). Several ancient tombstones of va- 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



109 



rious members of the family bear the same de- 
vices. 



Arms : Per chevron, azure 
and argent, a bordure, en- 
grailed, or. 

Crests: A. (On an old 
family bookplate) : A stag, 
-eourant. 

B. (In Burke) : A winged 
globe. 



Harrison Ellery : MSS. Memorials of the Ellery Family, 

1881. 
Heraldic Journal, I., 177, 182. 
New York Historical Magazine, IV., 183. 
T. B. Wyman: Charlestown, Mass., Genealogies, I;3Ji. 
Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of EnglaTid, 

etc., 1884.. 




Iberdct^ 



Henry Herrick, claimed by family biographers 
to have been the fifth son of Sir William 
Herrick of Beaumanor, Co. Leicester, Eng- 
land, knighted in 1605, Ambassador to Turkey, 
etc., settled at Salem, Mass, in 1629. 

Another family of Herricks, settled at South- 
ampton, L. I., cannot claim connection with the 
Salem Herricks, nor, it appears, with their Eng- 
lish parentage. 



Crest : A bull's head, couped, ar- 
gent, horned and eared, sable, gorged 
with a chaplet of roses : proper. 



Motto : Virtus omnia nobilitat. [Virtue (or 
.courage) ennobles everything.] 




Jedediah Herrick: A Genealogical Register of the Name 

and Family of Herrick, etc., 184.6. 
Herrick Genealogy, 1885. 

Poore's Historical and Genealogical Researches, 143. 
Sir Bernard Burke : The Gefieral Armory of England, 

etc., 1884. 



El? 



There were three distinct settlements of Elys 
in this country in the XVII. century. Nathaniel 
(1635), near the present city of Springfield 
Mass. ; Richard (1660), on the banks of the 
Connecticut River; Joshua, (1685), at Trenton, 
N. J. There is an unsubstantiated tradition that 
these three, or, at least, the two first named 
were brothers. One fact, however, is constant, 
that is, that all three brought over veiy similar 
coats of arms, the number of fleiirs-de-lis only 
differing. 

Richard Ely brought over a ring given him 
by the King of France, and engraved with his 
arms. And old tankard of Nathaniel Ely bears 
the same arms ; but only three fleurs-de-lis. 
We find in English heraldic authorities that the 
only coat of arms registered to a family of 
Elly, or Ely, is the one we give here, with 
the crest, taken from Burke. 



Arms : Argent, a fess, en- 
grailed, between six fleurs-de- 
lis, gules. 

Crest : An arm, erect, 
couped below the elbow, hab- 
ited, argent, grasping in the 
hand, proper, a fleur-de-lis, 
sable. 




no 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



The Ely Reunion, Held at Lyjne, Ct., iSyg. 

New England Historical and Genealogical Regis- 
ter. XXXV., 236. 

Sir Bernard Burke : Tke General Armory of England, 
etc., 1884.. 

Papworth and Morant: An Ordinary of British Armo- 
rials, iS-j/f.. 



Coggesball 



(5ibb6 



Sir Henry Gibbs of Honington, Co. Warwick, 
son of Sir Ralph Gibbs, and grandson of Robert 
Gibbs, all of the same estate, was the father of 
Robert Gibbs, a prominent Boston merchant, the 
emigrant (1660), whose grandson, also Robert 
Gibbs, was buried (1769) in the Old North 
Burial Ground, at Providence, R. I., where the 
arms we give can be seen on his tombstone 
and on that of his wife, daughter of Colonel 
Joseph Whipple. 



The arms we give are taken from a seal af- 
fixed to a letter written by John Coggeshall, 
Secretary of the Colony of Rhode Island (1677). 
He was the first President of that colony under 
the patent (1647-48), and filled several offices 
of honor and trust. 

The Coggeshalls of Milton and Bengali, 
Co. Suffolk, England, whose arms he bore, 
were descendants of a younger brother of Sir 
John de Coggeshall, of the Manor of Codham, 
Wethersfield, Co. Essex, knighted by Edward 
the Black Prince in 1337. The common an- 
cestor, Sir Thomas de Coggeshall, held the 
Manor of Little Coggeshall Hall, Co. Essex, in 
the reign of King Stephen. 




^ Arms : Sable, three battle- 
axes, in pale, argent. 

Motto (From Burke) : Te- 
nax propositi. [Firm of pur- 
pose.] 



Heraldic Journal, HI., 165. 

Wyman'S Charlestown, Mass., Genealogies. 

J. W. Gibbs : Gibbs Genealogy, i8jg. 

William Gibbs : Family Notices, 184.5. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 

etc., 1884.. 
The Book of Family Crests, H., 198. 




Crest: A stag, lodged, sable, 
attired, or. 



Heraldic Journal, II., 45. 
Morant's Essex, II., 162. 

Connecticut Archives, Colonial Boundaries, I., 104, log. 
Austin's Rhode Island Genealogical Dictionary, 1886. 
Newport, R. I., Historical Magazine, 1883, 195. 
Orcutt's History of Stratford, Ct. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1884. 



lEnbicott 



John Endicott came over to Massachusetts in 
1628 with a commission as Governor of the 
colony. He laid the foundation of Salem on 
the same year. The arms we give are engraved 
under an old protrait of this eminent colonist 
and statesman. 

It has always been a matter of dispute 
whether Conant, Endicott, or Winthrop, is to 
be called the "First Governor of Massachusetts." 

The English origin of John Endicott is not 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



III 



known with any degree of certainty, and the 
arms we give are found in no English work on 
heraldry. 



A lion's head, erased : 



S. G. Drake : The History and Antiquities of Boston, 1856. 
Heraldic Journal, I., 67. 

Jacob B. Moore : Memoirs of American Governors, 184.6. 
New England Historical and Genealogical Regis- 
ter, I., 263. 
Dunstable's Massachusetts Bi-Centenary, 18^5. 




(5olb 



The arms we give were borne by Major 
Nathan Gold, who came from St. Edmonds- 
bury, South of England, during the reign of 
King Charles II., and who was amongst those 
who obtained the famous " Charter of Connect- 
icut. " 

We remark that these same arms are given by 
Burke, as impaled by St. John, on a monument 
for his wife Mary, daughter of Sir Nathan 
Gold [notice the coincidence of names], knt, in 
Lenthorp Church, England. 



Arms : Or, on a chevron, 

between three roses, azure, 

three pineapples [sometimes 

~^ thistles], slipped of the first. 




Crest : An eagle's head, 
erased, azure. In the beak 
a pineapple, or. 



Edward R. JohnES: The Johnes of Southampton, L.I. 
Gold's History of Cornwall, Ct., 284.. 
Hinman's Connecticut Settlers, ist ed., 220. 
Orcutt'S History of Stratford, Ct. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1884. 



Mainwngbt 



The Wainwrights, of Ipswich, Mass., showed 
by the arms they bore constantly, from the time 
of their emigration, that they belonged to the 
Wainwrights of Dudley, Co. Worcester, England. 
The colonist, Francis Wainwrights', came proba- 
bly from Chelmsford, Co. Essex. Seals, and 
tombstones in the Ipswich Burial Ground, are 
numerous and convincing as to the rightful own- 
ership of this coat of arms by the American 
Wainwrights, of Salem, and their descendants. 



Crest : A lion rampant, argent, 
holding an ancient axe, handle of 
the first, headed, or. 



Felt's History of Ipswich. 

Heraldic Journal, I., 18, 89, no. 

Prince's Chronological History of New England, 1736. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 

etc., 1884. 
The Book of Family Crests, II., 480. 




Cbecf^leiP 



The colonists of that name, Samuel and An- 
thony Checkley, were sons of William Check- 
ley of Preston Capes, North Hants, England. 

We find the name of Anthony Checkley on 



112 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



Gores Roll of Arms; also, a stone, with the 
same devices, on the tomb of Dean Richard 
Checkley (1742), in the Granary Burial Ground, 
Boston. 

The only similar [but not identical] arms to 
be found in English authorities are those of 
Henry Chichele, Archbishop of Canterbury, and 
of his brother, Robert, Lord Mayor of London 
(141 1). 



\^^^{ 




Arms: Argent, a chevron, 
between three mullets, or. 



S. G. Drake : The Checkley Family, 184.8. 

New England Historical and Genealogical Regis- 
ter, XV., 13. 

W. H. Whitmore: The American Genealogist, 1875. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1884. 

Papworth and Morant: An Ordinary of British Ar. 
morials, 1874. 



tEbomas 



Philip Thomas, a direct descendant of the 
famous Rice ap Griffith^ of an ancient Welsh 
family, who was beheaded in 1531, an attainted 
of high treason, left Bristol, England, in 165 1, 
and came to Lord Baltimore's province of Mary- 
land. He settled on the Chesapeake Bay, and 
joined the Society of Friends previous to his 
death. He left five children behind him, 
amongst whom one son, Samuel Thomas, who 
left issue, and is the ancestor of that particular 
Thomas family in America. 




Crest : On a branch of a tree, 
lying fessways [at the dexter end 
some sprigs, vert], a raven, wings 
expanded, sable. 



Rev. Lawrence B. Thomas : Genealogical Notes, 1877. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Ar^nory of England, 
etc., 1884. 

W. Berry : Encyclopedia Heraldica, 1828. 

Papworth and Morant : An Ordinary of British Ar- 
morials, 1874. 



Cbester 

Leonard Chester of Blabie, Co. Leicester, 
England, of the same family as Sir Robert 
Chester [tempo. Henry VHL], came over to 
Connecticut, where he was buried in 1648. 

The devices we give are found on a seal used 
by one of his descendants. Colonel John Chester, 
who distinguished himself at Bunker Hill. 



Arms : Ermine, on a .chief, 
sable, a griffin, passant, or, 
armed, argent. 

Crest : A dragon, passant, 
argent. 

Motto : Vincit qui patitur. 
[He conquers who suffers,] 



Heraldic Journal, II., 44. 

Nichols' History of Leicestershire, IV., pi. II., §2. 

Bond's History of Watertown, Mass., 7JS- 

Hinman's Connecticjit Settlers, 557. 

New England Historical and Genealogical Regis- 
ter, XXII., 338. 

Sir Bernard Burke-. The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1884. 

The Book of Family Crests, II., 95. 




%xu,u 






AMERICA HERALDICA 



ir 



IDophins 



These arms present a special interest, as they 
were granted by the Royal Government, in 
1764, to an American citizen, Captain Joseph 
Hopkins, of Maryland. 

He cannot positively be indentified, but was 
probably the Captain Hopkins mentioned in the 
Diary of the Siege of Detroit, in MunselPs His- 
torical Series, No. 4. The editor, Mr. F. B. 
Hough, appends a note stating that the said 
Captain Hopkins "had charge of a Company of 
Rangers, and in the numerous skirmishes and sor- 
ties that occurred during the siege is often men- 
tioned as having had the command." 



Cheymew family, and found only in Glover s 
Ordinary of Arms [statement reproduced in 
Papworth's Odinary of British Armorials^. 

They are found on the seal used by John 
Chew, said to be a Cadet of the Chews of 
Chewton, Co. Somerset, England, He was a 
member of the Virginia House of Assembly 
in 1623. 



Arms : Gules, a chevron, 
argent ; on a chief, azure, 
three leopards' faces, or. 





Crest : On a wreath, or and 
sable, a rock ; over the top a 
battery in perspective ; thereon 
the French flag hoisted; an offi- 
cer of the Queen's Royal Amer- 
ican Rangers on the said rock, 
sword in hand : all proper. 



Motto : Liter primos. [Among the first.] 



Heraldic Journal, I., 38. 

Rev. Lawrence Buckley Thomas : Genealogical Notes, 

89 I1877I 
Bishop Meade's Old Churches, Ministers and Families of 

Virginia, I., 4.60. 
S. DE Witt Bloodgood : The Sexagenary, or Recollections 

of the Revolutionary War, 1866. 
Rev. Edward D. Neill : The Founders of Maryland, i8j6. 
Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 

etc., 1884. 
St. James' Magazine for April, 1865. 



Rev. L. B. Thomas : Genealogical Notes, 1877. 
Papworth and M GRANT: An Ordinary of British Ar- 
morials, 1884. 



Iprescott 



In 1638, John Prescott of Shevington, in the 
parish of Standish, Lancashire, England, left Eng- 
land to avoid religious persecutions. His great- 
grandfather, James Prescott of Shevington, was 
one of the gentlemen of Lancashire who were 
required, by an order of Queen Elizabeth, dated 
August, 1564, to keep in readiness horsemen and 
armor. 

The colonist, who settled in 1640, at Water- 
town, Mass., had served under Cromwell. He 
brought over coat of mail, armor, and weapons, 
and used all these implements of war against 
the ever-troublesome Indians. 



Cbew 



These arms are attributed by English heraldic 
authorities not to the Chew name, but to a 




Crest : A vested arm, couped, erect, 
vested, gules, cuffed, ermine, holding in 
the hand a pitchpot, sable, fired : proper. 



114 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



Motto : Vincii qui patitur. [He conquers 
who suffers.] 



Miss S. E. TitcOiMB: Early New England People, 1882. 

New England Historical and Genealogical Regis- 
ter, VI., 274; XXII., 225. 

Prescott Genealogy, 1870. 

Alden'S American Epitaphs, II., jp. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1884. 

The Book of Family Crests, II., 384. 



JSarher 



Cogbill 



Rowland Barker of Woolerton, Co. Salop and 
Co. Worcester, England, was granted the coat of 
arms we give in 1582. 

His son, James, sailed for New England in 
1634, from Harwick, Essex Co., England. He 
died at sea, and his son James Barker, is the 
ancestor of the Rhode Island Barkers. 

His name is among those appearing in the 
Royal Charter, granted in 1663, by Charles II. 
In 1678 he was elected Deputy-Governor of the 
Colony of Rhode Island. He died in 1702. 

This family is absolutely distinct from the 
Barker family of Massachusetts, mentioned in 
Gores Roll of Arms. 



John CoGHiLL, the emigrant, the son of Mar- 
madtike Coghill of Tintergate, Co. York, Eng- 
land, came over to Virginia in 1664. 

He descended from the Coghills of Coghill, 
Co. York, and of Bletchington, Co. Oxford. Sir 
Thomas Coghill, of that place, was High Sher- 
iff of the County in 1633. 



Arms : Gules, on a chevron, 
argent, three pellets ; a chief, 
sable. 

Crest : On a mount, vert, 
a cock, or, wings expanded. 

Motto : Non dormit qui 
custodit. [He who watches 
never sleeps.] 





Motto : 
salvation.] 



Crest : On a rock, argent, a falcon, 
close, or. 



In Deo solo salus. ■ [In God only is 



Newport Historical Magazine, 1880, 37. 
Miscellanea Heraldica and Genealogica, II., 4.96. 
Austin : Rhode Island Genealogical Dictionary, 1886. 
Sir Bernard Burke : The Landed Gentry of Great Britain 

and Ireland, i8y6. 
Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 

etc., 1884.. 
The Book of Family Crests, II., 26. 



IRogers 



John H. Coghill: The Family of Coghill, 187^. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 

etc., 1884. 
The Book of Family Crests, II., 105. 



These arms arc borne by the descendants of 
the Rev. Nathaniel Rogers, who reached Bos- 
ton in November, 1636, and settled, later, at 
Ipswich, Mass. It was long an admitted fact 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



115 



amongst the members of this family that their 
American ancestor was the grandson of John 
Rogers, the compiler of the first authorized edi- 
tion of the English Bible, the pioneer of the 
. English Reformation, and its first martyr, he 
being burned at the stake under Queen Mary's 
reign, in 1555. But, in 1861, the researches of 
Col. Chester destroyed the foundations of that 
family tradition. The father of the Nathaniel 
above mentioned was the Rev. John Rogers, of 
Dedham. 

The arms we give, borne for many genera- 
tions by several Rogers families descending from 
Nathaniel are those of the Baronets Rogers oJ 
Wisdome, county Devon. 



Arms : Argent, a chevron, 
gules, between three roebucks, 
passant, sable, attired, and 
gorged with ducal coronets, 
or. 

Crest : On a mount, vert, a 
roebuck, passant : proper — at- 
tired and gorged with a ducal 
coronet, or, between two 
branches of laurel, vert. 



Motto : Nos nostraque Deo. [Us and ours to 
God.] 



S. G. Drake : The History and Antiquities of Boston, 1856. 
Genealogical Memoir of the Family of the Rev. 

Nathaniel Rogers, 185 i. 
Joseph Lemuel Chester : John Rogers, etc., 1861. 
W. H. WhitmORE: The American Ge?tealogist, 1875. 
Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 

etc., 1884. 
The Book of Family Crests, II., 402. 




family, is brought down from A. D. 1128, and 
includes the famed Michael Scott, known as the 
"Wizard;" and, at an earlier date, Robert Scott, 
ancestor of the Dukes of Buccleugh. 

The emigrant, John Scott, arrived at New 
York about 1700. He was commandant of Fort 
Hunter, and obtained a grant of land in that 
vicinity. It is satisfactorily and clearly proved 
that he was the third son of the first Baronet ; 
that his eldest son, who also obtained a grant 
in the same vicinity, was John Scott; whose 
only child was Gen. John Morin Scott, Secre- 
tary of State of the State of New York; whose 
only surviving son was Lewis Allaire Scott, 
also Secretary of State of the State of New 
York ; whose only son was John M. Scott, 
Mayor of Philadelphia ; whose eldest son, Lewis 
Allaire Scott, Esq., of Philadelphia, is still 
living. 



Crest : A lion's head, erased, gules. 



Motto : Tace aut face. [Act or be silent.] 



Lives or Eminent Philadelphians (now deceased). 

Deeds, Etc, in Possession of the Family in America. 
SIMMS : History of Schoharie Co., N. Y., ij6, etc. 
O'Callaghan : Documents Relating to the Colonial History 

of New York, 775, 776. 
New York Genealogical and Biographical Record, 

IV., 188. 
Douglas : Baronage of Scotland, I., pp. j03-jo6., fol. Edin- 

burg, I7g8. 
Playfair's : British Fatnily Antiquity, vol. 8., Tit. Scott. 
Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 

etc., 1884. 




Scott of Hncrum 

The lineage of the Scotts, Baronets of An- 
■I- ■ Roxburgshire, Scotland, a still prosperous 



2)arIington, 2)arling 

The colonists, Abraham and John Darlington, 
came over to Pennsylvania at a date anterior to 



ii6 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



1 71 1. They were the sons of Job and Mary 
Darlington of Darnkall, Co. Chester, England, 
and the arms we give belonged to that famil}^ 

The Darling family, of Massachusetts, Con- 
necticut and New V^ork, claims descent from 
the Darlings of London, England, who are en- 
titled, according to English authorities, to the 
same arms, with a different crest, however, the 
gutties also being or instead of d'eau. To that 
family belonged Samtcel Darling of Ncwltave7i 
(b. 1695, d. 1750), who removed from Provi- 
dence, R I., to the above-named city. 

The above-named colonist descended from 
Darling, a founder' of the American family of 
Darling, which intermarried with the best blood 
of New England. 

A seal bearing the arms we give has already 
been in the family for a long time. 

The arms attributed by Burke to Lieut. Gen. 
Sir Ralph Darling, G. C. H., are of recent ori- 
gin, and are not to be accepted as those of the 
colonial Darlings. A book concerning that fam- 
ily is to be published soon by Gen. C. W. Dar- 
ling, the scholarly Secretary of the Oneida His- 
torical Society, at Utica, N. Y. 



Arms : Azure, guttle or 
[sometimes d'ean'\ ; on a fess 
of the last three cross cross- 
lets, fitch^e, gules. 




t h % k 



< Ti"iTi ' rji- 



Crests [Darlington] : A 
winged pillar. 

[Darling] : A female figure : 
proper — habited in a loose 
robe, argent, the body pink ; 
flowing round her a robe, 
azure ; holding in the dexter 
hand a cross crosslet, fitch^e, 



Sesqui-Centennial Gathering of the Clan Darling- 
ton, 1853. 

Cope's Genealogies of Pennsylvania, 68, l/j.8, 208. 

T. B. Wyman'S Charlestown, Mass., Genealogies. 

S. G. Drake: The History and Antiquities of Boston, i8§6. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1884. 

W. Berry : Encyclopedia Heraldica, 1828. 

Papworth and Morant: An Ordinary of British Armo- 
rials, i8j4. 

The Book of Family Crests. 



be Curson 



The colonist, Richard de Curzon, who appears 
to have belonged to the Lords Scardale branch 
of the ancient Curzon family, was bom in Eng- 
land in 1726. He came to New York, where 
he married, and where he finally settled and died. 
His son removed to Baltimore, where the family 
has since intermarried with several of the best 
Maryland families. 

The emigrant brought with him a long and 
complete parchment pedigree, compiled by Eng- 
lish authorities, and dated 1711 ; also, seals and 
plate, bearing the devices we give. 



Arms : Argent, on a bend, 
sable, three popinjays, or, col- 
lared, gules. 

^ Crest : A popinjay, rising, 
or, collared, gules. 

Motto : Let Curzon holde 
what Curzon helde. 




gules ; in the sinister a book : proper. 



Motto : Cruce dum spiro spero. [While I 
breathe I hope in the cross.] 



Sir William Dugdale: The Baronage of England, i6-j 5-6. 
Sir Bernard Burke-. The Peerage, Baronetage, and 
Knightage of the British Empire, 1885. 





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AMERICA HERALDICA 



117 



Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1884.. 

Papworth and MoranT: An Ordinary of British Ar- 
morials, i8j,f.. 

J. Edmondson: Baronagicum Genealogicum, iy6/f.-84. 

The Book of Family Crests, II., 128. 



XCbatcber 



Here is a clear pedigree from the Rev. 
Thomas Thacher, or Thatcher, born at Salis- 
bury, England, in 1620, and belonging without 
contest to the Thatchers of Ringmer, Co. Sus- 
sex, originally of Co. Essex {Visitation of i6j^. 

The arms we give are found on the seal of 
a letter written in 1676, by the first Thomas 
Thatcher, of Boston, to his son, Peter, in 
London. Such a seal exists still. 



Arms : Gules, a cross, mo- 
line, argent, on a chief, or, 
three grasshoppers: proper. 




Crests : A. A Saxon 
sword : proper. 

B. A grasshopper: proper. 



in Co. Stafford, England. The family traces its 
descent to the Foulques of the House of An- 
jou in France. 

This Gerard Fowke, who came over to Vir- 
ginia in Cromwell's time, held the office of Gen- 
tleman of the Bedchamber to Charles I., an 
office hereditary in the family. 

The founder of the Virginia family settled in 
Westmoreland County. 



Crests : A. An Indian goat's head, 
erased, argent. 

B. A dexter arm, embowed, habited, 
vert, cuffed, argent, holding in the 
hand an arrow, or, barbed and 
flighted of the second, point down- 
wards. 



Motto : Arma tuentur pacem. [Arms secure 
peace.] 



K. M. Rowland : The Virginia Cavaliers {Southern Biv- 
ouac for May, 1886]. 

Hayden's Glassel Genealogy (in preparation), 1885. 

Bishop Meade's Old Churches, Ministers and Families of 
Virginia, II., 4.82-3. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1884. 




S. G. Drake : The History and Antiquities of Boston, i8§6. 

New England Historical and Genealogical Regis- 
ter, VIII., 177 

Heraldic Journal, IV., 77 

Bond's History of Watertown, Mass., 601. 

Sir Bernard Burke: The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1884. 



Ifowfte 



Gerard Fowke, the colonist, was the sixth son 
•of Roger Fowke of Brewood Hall and Gunston, 



SSalbwin 



The colonist, Sylvester Baldwin, came over 
from Aston Clinton, Co. Bucks, England (1638), 
where his ancestry is traced four generations 
back. He died at sea, on his voyage here, but 
his sons settled in Connecticut. 

His connection with the Baldwins of Dalton 
in Furness, Co. Lancaster, is fully established. 
The present English house of the name quarters 
the devices we give with the Atkinsons arms. 
We supply the motto of the English branch. 



ii8 



AMERICA HERALDICA 




Arms: Argent, a chevron, 
ermine,, between three hazel 
sprigs, vert. 

// Crest : A squirrel, s^jeant, 

or, holding a hazel sprig, vert. 

Motto : Vim vi repello. 
[I repulse force by force.] 



Notes on the Ancestry of Sylvester Baldwin, 1872. 

New England Historical and Genealogical Regis- 
ter, XXVI, 294. 

Hinman'S Connecticut Settlers, 113. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1884. 

The Book of Family Crests, II., 23. 



IBurriP 



The founder of the American family of 
Hurry, Samuel Hurry, reached the United 
States in 1795, at the age of seventeen, and his 
descendants have counted among the prominent 
New York citizens. 

This Samuel Hurry was the third son of 
Jokn Hurry, of Liverpool, a wealthy and in- 
fluential shipowner, himself descending from the 
Hurrys of Great Yarmoulk, Co. Norfolk, in 
which county, as well as that of Suffolk, they 
owned estates. They were the commercial leaders 
in that active community, and distinguished them- 
selves in its municipal and political affairs. The 
courage, energy, and perseverance displayed by 
the Hurrys of Great Yarmouth to obtain the 
repeal of the iniquitous Corporation and Test 
Acts are matters of history. 

Samuel, who had arrived in one of his father's 

own ships, obtained rapidly, in Philadelphia, a 

. marked position in the business world, and acted 



as agent between the United States and the 
English shipowners in the adjustment of claims 
resulting from the War of 181 2. During a visit 
to Liverpool, England, he died, and was buried 
there. 

The Hurrys are connected by blood with the 
Cliftons, Ives, Bracey, Watts, and other Nor- 
folk families. 

The arms we give were borne by the Hurrys 
of Great Yarmouth, and are recognized by 
Burke as belonging to the family. 

The distinguished Charles John Palmer, F.S.A., 
known on the other side as the "Sage of the 
Eastern Counties," thinks that the Norfolk 
Hurrys are descended from the ancient Scottish 
family of Urrey. The name of Urri occurs in 
old Norfolk County Records as far back as 
1267. 



Crest : A harpy. 



Mottoes : A. Sans tache. [Unspotted.] 

B. Nee arrogo. nee dubito. [Neither 
pretend nor doubt.] 



Memorials of the Family of Hurry, 1873. 

C.J. Palmer: Perlustration of Great Yarmouth. 

Hume's History of England, VII., 4pj. 

Browne's History of the Highland Clans. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1884. 

Papworth and Morant: An Ordinary of British Ar- 
morials, i8y4. 

The Book of Family Crests, 1847. 




JSarton 



These arms were on the official seal of Robert 
Barton, of London, brother of Dr. John Bar- 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



119 



TON, of Salem, Mass., from whom this family de- 
scends. He came over from England in 1672, 
bringing with him a parchment bearing the same 
arms, and still preserved in the family. They 
belonged to the Bartons of Threxton Hall, Co. 
Norfolk, England. 




Crest: A griffin, -s^jeant : proper 
— winged, gules, beak and fore legs, 




Arms : Ermine, on a fess, 
gules, three annulets, or. 



Li.,i,i,i.i|f^ Crest: A griffin's head, 



xixa 






erased : proper. 

Motto : For lis est Veritas. 
[Truth is strong.] 



Heraldic Journal, IV., 130. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1884. 



IRorton 

Two brothers, John and William Norton, the 
first a clergyman, came over in 1635, from Co. 
Bedford, where the family estate, Sharpenhoe, 
was situated, to Ipswich, Mass. 

There is an old MS. pedigree of the Norton 
family, prepared in 1632 by John Philepott, Som- 
erset Herald, which gives, in a rather romantic 
fashion, a so-called history of the Nortons, of 
Bedfordshire, tracing them back to Normile, a 
Norman, allied to the Valois, whose son. Sir 
John Norton, came over with the Conqueror. 

The family is mentioned in the official Visita- 
tions of i6j^ for counties Hertford and Bedford. 



Heraldic Journal, II., i. 

Herald and Genealogist, Part XV., 276. 

New England Historical and Genealogical Regis- 
ter, XIII., 225. 

T. B. Wyman's Charlestown, Mass., Genealogies, II., 710. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1884.. 

The Book or Family Crests, II., 350. 



SSruen 

Obadiah Bruen, son of John Bruen, Esquire 
of Stapleford, Cheshire, England, was a freeman 
of Plymouth Colony in 1640. He removed to 
New London, and later, the family, or at least, 
the main branch of it, is found settled in West- 
chester County, New York. 

The pedigree is clear and complete, and the 
arms we give are those attributed by Biorke to 
the Bruens of Stapleford. 



Arms : Argent, an eagle 
displayed, sable. 

Crest : A fisherman, per 
pale, argent and sable, each 
several article of dress coun- 
terchanged. In the dexter 
hand a fisherman's staff; in 
the sinister a net, thrown 
over the shoulder, or. 




120 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



A. M. Bruen, M. D. : The Singular Life of John Bruen, 

1857. 
Bolton : History of Westchester Co., N. Y., II., 24.9. 
Hinde'S Bruen Family History. 
Hinman's Early Connecticut Settlers, jji. 
Sir Bernard Burke: The General Armory of England, 

etc., 1884. 
The Book of Family Crests, II., 69. 



Brenton 

The devices we give here are given by Burke 
as the arms of the Brentons of Hertfordshire, 
England. 

They are still borne, with augmentation, by 
English naval commanders of the same name, all 
descended from William Brenton, of Boston, 
emigrated to New England in 1634, and who 
was later Governor of Rhode Island. 



Barb 



Benoist Bard, Ecuyer, of the Isle of Rh6, 
France, took refuge in England, in 1685, at the 
time of the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes. 
One of his sons, Pierre Bard, came over to 
New York in 1706. He was known as Colonel 
Bard, as he commanded a Regiment of Her 
Majesty's Foot in the Province of New Jersey. 
He occupied other high offices in the colony. 

Other descendants of Benoist Bard, the Hu- 
guenot refugee, started families in England. 

The Bards in America intermarried with the 
Marmion (of Delaware), de Normandie, Cru- 
GER, Belcher, Sands, etc., families. 



Crest : An arm in armor, em- 
bowed, the hand, proper, grasping 
a sword, argent, hilt and pommel 
or. 





Arms : Argent, a chevron, 
gules, between- three martlets, 
sable. 

Crest : Out of a naval 
crown, or, a swan, argent, 
guttde de sang [English 
branch]. 

Motto : Go through. 



S. G. Drake : The History and Antiquities of Boston, J28. 

Heraldic Journal, III., 173. 

Rhode Island Historical Society Collections, III., 

287. 
Austin's Rhode Island Genealogical Dictionary, 1886. 
Sir Bernard Burke: The General Armory of England, 

etc., 1884. 
The Book of Family Crests, II., 61. 



Motto : Fidite virtuti. [Confide in valor.] 



be IRormanbie 



Mrs. Martha J. Lamb: II., 305, etc. 

Book of Commissions for the Province of New Jer- 
sey, AAA. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1884. 

Papworth and Morant: An Ordinary of British Ar- 
morials, 1874. 



Jean de Normendie, Seigneur de la Motte, of 
an ancient Picardy (France) family, was the 
father of Laiirent de Normendie, Royal Lieu- 
tenant of the city and fortress of Noyon, who 
joined the Reform and retired to Geneva {circa 
1546-49), Their descendants occupied high offices 



HERALDICA 



121 



in the Swiss Republic. One of them, Andrd de 
NoRMANDiE, failing to lead his political party as 
his family was wont to do, left Geneva and en- 
tered the service of the first King of Prussia. 
He was treated by that sovereign with great 
consideration and honor, and there are letters 
still extant, in America, showing how highly he 
was esteemed by his adopted king. 

That AndrS came over, in 1708, to America 
and took up a grant of land on the Delaware, 
near Bristol. His brother, Jean Antoine de Nor- 
MANDiE, accompanied him. There still exist de- 
scendants of the name in this country. 




Arms: Paly of six, argent 
and sable, on a bend, or, a 
teal's head, erased, azure. 

Crest : A lion's gamb, erect 
and erased, or, grasping three 
bur leaves, vert. 




Crest : A plume of three ostrich 
feathers : proper. 



J. G. Galiffe : Notices G^nMogiques sur Its Families Gene- 

voises, i8jo. 
]. G. Galiffe : Armorial Genevois. 
President d'Hozier: Armorial G^n&al de France, MSS., 

j6g6-i'/2o. 
Le Pere Anselme: Histoire Chronologique, etc., des 

Grajids Officiers de la Couronne, ed. of 174.5. 
J. B. RietstaP: Armorial Universel, 1886. 
J.J. Weiss : Histoire des Protestants en France, etc. 



SSurwell 



The emigrant. Major Lewis Burwell, of the 
BuRWELLS of Co. Bedford and Co. Northampton, 
England, settled on Carter's Creek, in Gloucester 
County, Virginia, in 1640. 

Tombstones of the founder and of various 
members of his family still bear the devices we 
give. 

We have seen bookplates of the family iden- 
tical in tinctures and charges. 



Bishop Meade : Old Churches, Ministers aiid Families of 

Virginia, I., 353, 2po. 
R. A. Brock : The Burwell Family \In tlu Richmond, Va., 

" Standard," of June 18-25, i88i\. 
Burwell Family Picnic, 1870. 
Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 

etc., 1884.. 



Eipre 



George Eyre of Keveton, Co. Nottingham, 
England, came over to New Jersey in 1727, and 
settled there. 

He was the greatgrandson of Sir Gervaise 
Eyre of Newbold, Co. Derby, and Keveton, Co. 
Notts, a direct descendant of Baron William Le 
Eyr of Hope, Co. Derby [tempo. Henry HI.]. 

There is another family of Eyres, whose foun- 
der in America, John Eyre, came over in 1718. 
There is extant a letter of his, with a seal re- 
producing the following devices: Arms: "Ar- 
gent, a chevron, ermine, between three escalops, 
gules." Crest: "A demi-lion, rampant." These 
arms are attributed by Burke to the Eyres 
of Co. Norfolk, a family in no way connected 
with the ancient family of Co. Derby. 



122 



AMERICA HERALDICA 




Ckest : On a cap of maintenance, 
proper, a booted and armed leg, 
couped at the thigh, quarterly, ar- 
gent and sable, spur, or. 



Motto : Virtus sola invicta. [Virtue alone un- 
conquerable.] 



New England Historical and Genealogical Regis- 
ter, X., XIV., XV. 

Nathaniel ChaunceY: Private Genealogy of the Darling 
Family. 

Paige's History of Cambridge, Mass., §74.. 

Walworth's Hyde Genealogy, //., 1162. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1884. 



Pennsylvania Magazine, III., 1879. 

Smith's History of Delaivare Co., Pa., 4.62. 

Martin's History of Chester, Pa., /j.g. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 

etc., 1884. 
The Book of Family Crests, II., 169. 



Matts 



1barlaf?enben 



Richard Harlakenden was born- in 1568. He 
bought of the Earl of Oxford the Priory of 
Earles Colne, Co. Essex, and married, in 1792, 
Margaret Hubert. He died in 1631. He had 
eleven children, of whom Roger Harlakenden, 
the second son, and Mabel Harlakenden, the 
eighth daughter, after the decease of their 
parents, came to New England, sailing from 
London in the "Defence" in 1635. They settled 
at Boston, Mass., where Mabel married Governor 
Haynes. 



Arms : Azure, a fess, er- 
mine, between three lions' 
heads, erased, or. 




Q ^'^;^^.^;^>;> 



\{ rr-T 1 1 1 T 




1^ Crest : Between the attires 
of a stag, or, an eagle, re- 
guardant, wings expanded, 
argent. 



Robert Watt, son of John Watt of Rose Hill, 
— then near now within the built-up City of 
Edinburgh, Scotland, — Lord of Sessions, etc., etc., 
emigrated to New York towards the close of 
the XVH. century. He added an j- to the fam- 
ily name at the time that his wife's family, the 
Nicolls, dropped the s from their surname, calling 
themseh'es Nicoll. 

Robert Watts acquired great influence, and his 
eldest son, John Watts, was President of the 
King's Council, and first President of the New 
York Hospital. He was very wealthy, and re- 
maining true to the crown, his property was 
confiscated by the Patriots in 1776. He died in 
exile. His son, John Watts again, last Royal 
Recorder of the City of New York, founded 
and endowed the Leake and Watts Orphan 
House, in his native city. 



Crest: A cubit arm, erect, issuing 
from a cloud. In the hand a branch 
of olive : all proper. 



Motto : Servire forti non deficit telum. [A 
brave man never wants a weapon for his 
use.] 



Mrs. Martha J. Lamb: History of the City of New York, 
I., 507-8. 




AMERICA HERALDIC A 



[23 



James Ferguson: O71 the American Loyalists, [repub- 
lished in LittelVs Living Age?^ 

Sabine's American Loyalists. 

Local Memorials, Relating to the de Peyster and Watts 
Family, Connected with Red Hook Township, Duchess 
Co., N. v., 1881. 

Sir Bernard Burke: The Peerage, Baronetage, and 
Knightage of Great Britain and Lreland, 1850. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1884.. 



Blaise 



lOa^nes 



Johi Haynes of Copford Hall, Co. Essex, 
England, reached Boston in 1632, settled at 
Cambridge, and was elected Governor of Massa- 
chusetts in 1635. Upon his removal to Connec- 
ticut he was elected govei"nor of that colony in 
1639, and died in office in 1654. 

His sons remained in England, or returned, 
later, to their father's native land, all but one, 
Joseph Haynes, who settled and died at Hart- 
ford, Ct. His only son died without issue. 



Arms : Argent, three cres- 
cents, barry, und^e, azure and 
~^ gules. 




Crest : A stork rising : 
proper. 



Heraldic Journal, L, 50. 

Morant's History »f Co. Essex, England, IL, ig6. 

Nathaniel ChaUNCEY: Private Genealogy of the Darling 

Family. 
Moore's Memoirs <f American Governors, I.,JII. 
Porter's Hartford, Cotin., Settlers, 6. 
Sir Bernard BuRKE: The General Armory of England, 

etc., 1884. 



William Blake, third and eldest son of Robert 
Blake of Over Stowey, Co. Somerset, England, 
was born in 1594. 

He resided first at Aisholt, a parish adjoining 
Over Stowey, where the Blakes were Lords of 
the Manor, Patrons of the Church, and owners 
of most of the land. In the year 1630, Will- 
iam Blake, sold his inteixst in the family prop- 
erty to one of his brothers-in-law, and came over 
to New England, where he settled. 

The Blakes of Over Stowey, Somersetshire, 
descend in direct line from the Blakes of 
Wiltshire, mentioned for the first time in the 
Wiltshire Roll of Stibsidies, granted to Edward 
the First (1286). 

William Blake, father of Humphrey Blake, 
the first of the family who seated himself in 
Over Stowey, had his arms — the devices we give 
— recorded in the Heralds' Visitation of Hamp- 
shire, in 1530. 

The English pedigree is now complete, and 
built on solid ground, thanks to the researches of 
the distinguished Boston Heraldist, W. H Whit- 
more, Esq., and of the late Horatio C. Somerby, 
Esq., the accomplished genealogist. 



Crest : On a chapeau, gules, turned 
up, ermine, a martlet, sable. 



W. H. WhitmorE: a Record of the Blakes of Somerset- 
shire, 1881. 

James Blake's Aimals, ij4g-iys^- 

Samuel Blake : Blake Genealogy. [Incorrect as far as 
the English pedigree is concerned.] 

New England Historical and Genealogical Regis- 
ter, XL, 181 ; XV., 110; XXL, 291. 

S. G. Drake : The History and Antiquities of Boston, i8§6. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England 
etc., 1884. 

W. Berry : Encyclopcedia Heraldica, 1828. 

PaPWORTH and MoraNT: An Ordinary of British Ar- 
morials, i8j4. 

The Book of Family Crests, IL, 44. 




124 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



Ibunt 

Thomas Hunt of Shrewsbury, Co. Salop, was 
a Colonel in the Parliamentary service, and High 

Sheriff of his county (1656). One of his younger 

sons, Thomas Hunt, removed to Westchester 

County, New York, where, in 1667, he received 

the patent of the "Grove Farm" estate, near 
Rye. 



Arms : Per pale, argent 
and sable, a saltire, coun- 
tcrchanged. 

Crest : A lion's head, erased, 
per pale, argent and sable, col- 
lared, gules, lined and ringed, 
or. 




of arms they brought over is substantially that 
of the present Barttelots of Stopham, and their 
kinship is admitted by the present head of the 
elder branch. Sir Walter B. Barttelot, Bart., 
of Stopham. 

Thomas settled in Watertown, Mass., and was 
known as Ensign Thomas. He left no male 
issue. Richard and John settled in Newbury, 
Mass. Some of their descendants acquired great 
wealth and influence in the country of their 
adoption. 



Crests: A. A swan, couchant, 
argent, wings endorsed, argent. 

B. A castle with three turrets, 
sable. 

[Both crests are used as one 
by the English branch.] 



Motto : Mature. 




Bolton's History of Westchester Co., N. F., //., 738. 
Rev. Charles W. Baird: History of Rye, N. Y., 4.77. 
W. Berry : Encyclopedia Heraldica, 1828. 
Sir Bernard Burke: The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1884. 



Levi Bartlett: Sketches of the Bartleti Family, etc., 1876. 
S. G. TiTCOMB : Early New England People, 184. {1882). 
Emery's Newbury, Mass., ji. 
Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 

etc., 1884.. 
The Book of Family Crests, II., 28. 



Bartlett 



Richard Barttelot — a descendant of Adam 
Barttelot, Esquire of Brian, who came over 
with William the Conqueror — was heir to the 
estate of Stopham, Co. Sussex, and died in 
France, in 15 18, leaving four sons. William, the 
eldest, succeeded to his father's estate, and Ed- 
mund, another son, inherited the Ernely estate 
in the same county. He had four sons : Ed- 
mund, who succeeded him, and Richard, John 
and Thomas who left Ernely in 1634, and are 
stated to have come to America. The coat 



Xemmon, or Xemon 

Gores Roll of Arms gives these devices to 
Joseph Lemon, of Charlestown, Mass., who emi- 
grated before 1680 from Dorchester, Co. Dorset, 
England. He brought over a similar seal, with 
a different crest, however. In the Charlestown 
Burial Ground we find a tombs'or.p of a grand- 
son of the colonist, also with the same shield. 

The Lemons, Lemans, or Lemmons, of Co. 
Herts and Co. Norfolk, England, bear the same 
arms. 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



f25 




Arms : Azure, a fess be- 
tween three dolphins, hau- 
riant, argent; an annulet of 
the last for difference. 

Crest: In a lemon tree, a 
pelican feeding her young : 
proper — in her nest, or. 



Bishop Meade's Old Churches, Ministers and Families of 

Virginia, I., 2j8. 
K. M. Rowland: The Virginia Cavaliers [In the May, 

1886, number of Southern Bivouac]. 
R. A. Brock ; The Huguenot Emigration in Virginia, 1886. 
Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 

etc., 1884.. 



Xlsle 



Heraldic Journal, L, 48. 

T. B. Wyman: Charlestown, Mass., Genealogies, 614.. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The Peerage, Baronetage, and 

Knightage of Great Britain, etc., 188^. 
Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 

etc., 1884.. 
The Book of Family Crests, II., 284. 



H)igGe6 



The DiGGESES were of an old family in Co. 
Kent, England, and one of them, John Digges, 
was County Sheriff in 1433. 

His descendant. Sir Dudley Digges, was named 
by Charles I., one of the twenty-three persons 
who formed a Council of Superintendents over 
Virginia. 

Edward Digges, one of his sons, came over 
to Virginia, where he settled, and left descend- 
ants in Warwick County. One of them, Cole 
Digges, who died in 1700, named his place near 
York, " Childham Castle," after the ancestral seat 
of the DiGGESES in England. 



Crests : A. An eagle's leg, couped 
from the thigh, sable ; issuant there- 
from three ostrich feathers, argent. 

B. A double-headed eagle's heads, 
sable. 




John Lisle, one of the Regicides, belonging 
to the ancient family of Lisle of Wodyton and 
Moyles Court, Co. Hants, England, took refuge 
in New England, reaching Boston, Mass., in 
1640. 

Of the English family was Alice, widow of 
John Lisle, Esq., of Moyles Court, who was 
beheaded, at the age of eighty, by order of 
Judge Jeffries (1685). 



Arms: Or, on a chief, ar- 
gent, three lions, rampant, of 
the first. 




Crest : A stag, trippant : 
proper — attired, or. 



New England Historical and Genealogical Regis- 
ter, XXXIX., 63. 

Berry's Co. Genealogies, of Co. Hants. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1884. 

Papworth and Mo RANT: An Ordinary of British Ar- 
morials, 1 8"/ 4. 

The Book of Family Crests, II., 290. 



126 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



/Ilba^ 



John May, the colonist, came from Mayfield, 
Co. Waterford, and belonged to the ancient 
family of May of Faunt, Co. Sussex, England, 
and \vas master of the ''James" a vessel which, 
as early as 1635, sailed between London and 
New England. 

He finally settled at Roxbury in 1640. 

The Mays of Haunt, Sussex, are said to 
have been originally of Portuguese origin, but 
to have settled for centuries in Sussex, where 
they occupied several times the office of High 
Sheriff. The arms of this family are mentioned 
in the Visitations. 



Arms : Gules, a fess be- 
tween eight billets, four in 
chief and four in base, or. 




□ D n D 



7 



an a a 



Crest : Out of a ducal 
coronet, or, a leopard's head, 
couped : proper. 

Motto : Vigilo. [I watch.] 



HI.). The branch of Duxbury, Co. Lancaster, 
from which the emigrant descended, originated 
with Htigk Standish (tempo. Edward I.), and 
adopted the reformed religion. 

The records of the parish of Charley, with 
which the family estate is connected, were ex- 
amined recently by the agents of the American 
Standishes; and, it is said, "that these records 
were easily deciphered with the exception of the 
years 1584 and 1585, the very dates about which 
Captain Myles Standish is supposed to have 
been born ; the parchment-leaf which contained 
the registers of the births of these years being 
wholly illegible, and showing evident traces of 
having been tampered with." 

Myles was educated to the military profession, 
and early received a commission as Lieutenant of 
Queen Elizabeth's forces on the continent, in aid 
of the Dutch. He soon joined the English refu- 
gees at Leyden, and shared the fate of the 
"Mayflower" expedition (1620). 

He left numerous descendants of his name. 



Crest : A cock, argent, combed 
and wattled, gules. 




A Genealogy of John May, 1878. 

W. T. Davis: Ancient Landmarks of Plymouth, Mass., 184.. 

Sir Bernard Burke: Tlie General Armory of England, 

etc., 1884. 
British Museum: Harleian MSS., Visitation Co. Leicester, 

i6ig. 



Stephen M. Allen : Miles Standish and his Monument at 

Duxbury, i8ji. 
Plymouth Colony Records, II., 37. 
Davis's Landmarks of Plymouth, Mass., 250. 
Windsor's History of Duxbury, Mass., j 20. 
Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 

etc., 1884.. 
The Book of Family Crests, II., 440. 



StanMsb 



Captain Myles Standish, the celebrated Pil- 
grim Father, born in Lancashire {circa 1584), 
descended from Thurston de Standish (tempo. 



Ipaine 



John Paine, the colonist, belonged to the 
Paines of Market Bosworth, Co. Leicester, and 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



127 



Paine, Co. Suffolk, England, and made use on 
his seal of the devices we give. 

In 1672, JoJm Paine is known to have re- 
moved from Boston, Mass., to the Colony of 
Rhode Island. Later, he was imprisoned for 
having accepted and tried to make use of a 
patent of some land contested between the two 
colonies. 



Arms : Argent, on a fess 
engrailed, gules, between three 
martlets, sable, as many mas- 
cles, or; all within a bordure 
engrailed of the second, be- 
zantee. 




Crest : A wolf's head, 
erased, azure, charged with 
five bezants, saltireways. 



Heraldic Journal, III., 189. 

Austin's Rhode Island Genealogical Dictionary, 1886. 
Livermore's History of Block Island, R. I., J4.1. 
Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 
etc., T884.. 



IDamersle^ 



William Hamersley, a grandson of Sir Hugh 
Hamersley, Knt, Mayor of London (1627), and 
one of the great merchants of the English me- 
tropolis, came to America in 1716, as an oificer 
in the Royal Navy. His letter of appointment 
(dated 1700), is still in the possession of the 
New York Hamersleys. 

William married a Dutch lady, and settled in 
New York as one of its leading merchants, 
Vestiyman of Trinity Church (i 731-1752), he 
was buried in its burial ground. 

His son, Andrew Hamersley, was commis- 



sioned in the British Army, but resigned at his 
father's request, and married a greatgranddaughter 
of Sir George Gordon, of the New Jersey Gor- 
dons. Having remained a tory, the Revolution 
impaired his fortune, but it was soon reestab- 
lished with the help of two large inheritances in 
the West Indies. 

A brother of William Hamersley, the colo- 
nist, went to Maryland, and one of his descend- 
ants, Hugh Hamersley, was a trustee of the 
province, as executor of the will of the last 
Lord Baltimore. That branch intermarried with 
the Washingtons of Virginia. 

The arms we give are those of the Hamers- 
leys of Staffordshire, confirmed in 16 14. 



Crest : A demi-grifSn, or, hold- 
ing between the claws a cross 




crosslet, fitch^e, gules. 



Motto : Honore el amore. [With honor and 
love.] 



Maitland's History of London, II., 1662. 

Mrs. Martha J. Lamb: History of the City of New York, 
II., 2og. 

Whitehead's History of E. N.fersey. 

Sir Bernard Burke: The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1884. 

Papworth and Morant: An Ordinary of British Ar- 
morials, 1824. 

The Book of Family Crests, II., 223. 



Scbermerborn 

The ancestor of this New York family was 
Jacob Jacobsen Schermerhooren, born in 1622, in 
Water land, Holland. His father was still living 
in 1656, at Amsterdam. 

Jacob Jacobsen came over to Beverwyck (Al- 
bany), in 1636, and traded so successfully and 



128 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



extensively that he left a large estate for the 
time, amounting to 56,882 guilders. 

His descendants occupied, frequently, positions 
of trust in the government of the colony. It is 
said that the arms we give were granted in 
1 66 1 by Governor Stuyvesant to Petrus Scher- 
MERHORN, for Valuable services rendered to the 
New Netherlands. 

The mount, or mole, are unquestionably the 
arms of the town of Schermerhorn, in North 
Holland, whence the family originated, and the 
arms of which [with augmentation] were later 
granted to one of its members. 

Another coat of arms, used by some descend- 
ants of that same colonist, is not sustained by 
any such strong proofs of authenticity, as its 
origin does not go further back than 1843. 



Arms : Azure, on a mount, 
vert, a tree of the last. 

Crest : A Dutch count's coro- 
net. 

Motto : Industria semper cres- 
cam. [By industry will I always 
increase.] 



Pearson's Genealogies of the First Settlers of Albany, 160. 

WatersON'S Antigtca Manhattanica, i8og. 

New York Genealogical and Biographical Record, 

II., 22. 
Pearson's Schenectady, N. Y., Settlers, 158. 
Talcott's New York and New England Families, 224. 




He called his estate " Prestwould" after the 
Leicestershire Estate that had belonged so long 
to his family. 

The Skipwiths descend from Robert de Es- 
totville. Baron of Cottingham {tempo William 
the Conqueror). They possessed large estates in 
Cos. Lincoln and Warwick ; and a baronetcy — 
that of Newbold — was conferred to a Sir Ful- 
war Skipwith, and became extinct in 1790. 
The Baronetcy of Prestwould (created, \(i'i'i) still 
xists, however, having been inherited by Sir 
Grey Skipwith [of the Virginia family]. He 
left a younger brother in Virginia, who lives on 
the paternal estates. 



Crest : A reel or turnstile : proper. 



Motto : Sans Dieu je ne puis. [Without God 
I can do nothing.] 



Rev. L. B. Thomas : Genealogical Notes, 1880. 

Rev. Philip Slaughter : History of Bristol Parish, Va. 

225 {1879). 
K. M. Rowland : The Virginia Cavaliers [In the May, 

1886, number of Southern Bivouac^ 
Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England 

etc., 1884.. 
Sir Bernard Burke: Peerage, Baronetage, and Knightage 

of the British Empire, 1885. 




IPeirce 



Slf^ipwitb 



During Cromv/ell's Protectorate, the grandson 
of Henry Skipwith, a distinguished poet of the 
Elizabethian period, took refuge in Virginia, and 
settled there in the county of Middlesex. 



A branch of the family of Peirce, of Co. 
Northumberland, England, removed to Ireland 
{tempo Elizabeth). They settled at Glencanny 
on Hillywater, two miles from Enniskile7i, and 
were known for their devotion to the English 
crown. In 1737, Edward Peirce, of that fam- 
ily, sailed to America, and settled in Pennsyl- 



AMERICA HERALDICA. 



PLATE 




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CVICKAJ^ 




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AMERICA HERALDICA 



129 




Arms: Argent, a fess, hu- 
raett^e, gules, between three 
ravens, wings displayed, sable. 



Crest : A 
olive branch 



dove with an 
in its beak. 




A peacock's head, erased : 



Coffin's History of Newbury, Mass., jop. 
Maine's Historical Records, I., 192. 
Merril Genealogy, In preparation, 1884 [Pages commu- 
nicated]. 
Poore's Historical and Genealogical Researches, ii§. 



Fred. Clifton Peirce : Peirce Genealogy, 1880. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1884. 

Papworth and Morant: An Ordinary of British Ar- 
morials. 1874. 



/Ifterrill 



John and Nathaniel Merrill — brothers — came 
from Salisbury, Co. Wilts, England, to Ipswich, 
Mass., in 1633, and settled at Newbury, in the 
same colony, among the first settlers of that 
town. 

They are said to be descended from the Hu- 
guenot family of de Merle, who escaped to 
England after the St. Bartholomew Day (August, 
1572). This family of de Merle belonged to 
the Auvergne nobility, having had its ancestral 
estate near Place-de-Dombes, in that province. 

The emigrant made use of the arms we give 
which are different [although the crest is the 
same] from the Merrill arms as given by the 
English works of heraldry. 

We have seen imprints of the seal of one of 
the emigrant's grandsons, affixed to a deed dated 
1726. The devices were exactly those we give. 



lC>nnce 



The emigrant was John Prince, Ruling Elder 
of the Church of Hull, Massachusetts, who 
came from a family ranking among the gentry 
of Co. Berks, England. 

His father was the Rev. John Prince, Rector 
of East Shefford, in the above-mentioned county ; 
and the English heraldic works show that the 
arms we give were granted in 1584 to the 
Princes of Shrewsbury and Abbey Foregate, Co. 
Salop. 

A member of the American family, the Rev. 
Thomas Prince, obtained in 1710 an official 
copy of the original grant. 



Arms: Gules, a saltire, or, 
a cross, engrailed, ermine, over 
all. 

Crest : Out of a ducal cor- 
onet, or, a cubit arm, habited, 
gules, cuffed, ermine, holding 
in the hand, proper, three 
pineapples, gold, stalked and 
leaved, vert. 




130 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



Heraldic Journal, I., 7. 

New England Historical and Genealogical Regis- 
ter, v., 37S. 

Dudley's Archceologkal and Genealogical Collections, pi. IV. 

Essex Institute Historical Collections, XIV., 249. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 
etc., J884.. 

The Book of Family Crests, II., 385. 




Crest : An eagle displayed, with 
two heads, per pale, embattled, 
*^«h argent and gules. 

Motto : Dominus providebit. [The Lord will 
provide.] 



/IftcWict^ar 



It is stated, with some authority, that a 
younger son of the well-known Scotch family of 
Boyle, having emigrated to Germany in the 
XIV. century, was entrusted with special powers 
by the then reigning Emperor of Germany, and 
sent to rule over a far-off portion of his vast 
domains, with the title of "Vicarius," then often 
used by provincial governors throughout the so- 
called Holy Roman Empire. His posterity, 
having returned to Scotland, adopted as its dis- 
tinctive appellation the name of Mac-Vickar 
(son of the Vicar), under which the descendants 
of the original Boyle, Imperial "Vicarius," are 
known, in the present dzys. 

Later, at the time of the great Scotch emi- 
gration to Northern Ireland, the family of Mc- 
Vickar took root in Belfast, whence came over, 
in 1780, the colonist, John McVickar, one of 
the leading and wealthiest merchants of New 
York during the Revolutionary period and at the 
time of the War ofti8i2. His name is found 
associated with the; j)rincipa! commercial and 
philanthropic enterprises of the time. He brought 
cfver and uSjfd the arms we give, which are 
those of th^ Boyles_^ Shewalton, Co. Ayr. . 
The Boyles ' are represented in the Scottish 
Peerage by the Earls of Glasgow, the Earls of 
Cork and Orrery, and the Earls of Sliannon. 



Mrs. Martha J. Lamb : History of the City of New York, 

II., 517. 
Rev. William A. McVickar : The life of the Rev. John 

McVickar [of Columbia College'] i8j2. 
T. Gwilt-Mapleson : IIa?id Book of Heraldry, 1852. 
Sir Bernard Burke : Peerage, Baronetage, and Ktiightage, 

etc., 1887. 
Sir Bernard Burke : The General Artnory of England, 

etc., 1884.. 
The Book of Family Crests, II., 56. 



IRicbarbs 



The Gore Roll of Arms gives these arms to 
the wife of fohn Richards, one of His Majes- 
ty's Counsellors, in the Province of Massachu- 
setts, He used these arms as his seal, and so 
did his father, Thomas Richards, of Dorchester. 

These arms are also found on the tombstone 
of fames Richards, of Hartford, Ct, (1680). 

They are the arms of the Richards of East 
Bagborough, Co. Somerset, England. 



Arms : Argent, a fess, fu- 
silly, gules, between two bar- 
rulets, sable. 




Crest : A paschal lamb, 
passant, argent, staff and 
banner : proper. 




AMERICA HERALDICA 



131 



Heraldic Journal, I., 156. 

Rev. a. Morse: Register of Descendants of Puritans, 1861. 

Hinman's Connecticut Settlers, 1st ed., 226. 

Sir Bernard Burke: Tke General Armory of England, 

etc.. 
The Book o-p^^f^T^^STS, II., 397. 



oyTjM^T^-e 



Philip S. Gregory: Records of the Family of Gregory, 
1886. 

Bond's History of Watertown, Mass., 262. 

New England Historical and Genealogical Regis- 
ter,' XXIII., 304. 

Greenwood's Gregory Genealogy, i86g. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1884. 

J. Browne : History of the Highland Clans, IV. {1858). 



©regor^ 



Gregor Macgregor, of the Clan Gregor, 
fourth son of Gregor McAnecham of Glenur- 
quhay, is recognized as the founder of the fam- 
ily of Gregorie, or Gregory, in Scotland and 
America. . His' descendant, James MacGregor, 
settled on the Boyne in 15 10, and his son, 
James, was surnamed Gregorie. The family 
settled at Aberdeen, and furnished successively 
to the scientific world some of the most distin- 
guished savants of that and the following cen- 
tury. 

David Gregorie of Kinairdy, greatgrandson of 
the above James Gregorie (b. 1625, d. 1720), 
was the father of the James Gregorie who suc- 
ceeded his brother David as Professor of Mathe- 
matics at the University of Edinburgh, when 
the latter removed to Oxford. His second son, 
William Gregory, emigrated to Massachusetts, 
and died there in 1740. The elder line of the 
descendants of David Gregorie of Kinairdy is 
now represented by the descendants of William 
Gregory, the emigrant. 




A. A sphere, and, in 
above, the word Altius 



Crests : 
an escroU 
[Higher]. 

B. A tree shooting out a branch 
or branches. 



Sbeaffe 

The arms we give are found on a seal which 
was used in 1713 by Jacob Sheaffe, of Boston. 
We find also a tricking of arms (1698), of 
Curwin impaling Sheaffe, and it is identical. 
The different emigrants of the name all came 
from the Sheaffes of Cranbrook, Co. Kent, 
England. 

The Boston branch began with William 
(1685), whose greatgrandson, also William, was 
the father of Sir Roger Hale-Sheaffe, Bart., 
of the British Army, a noted loyalist, who mar- 
ried Margaret Coffin, cousin of that other 
noted loyalist, Sir Isaac Coffin, R. N. He 
died in 1851, .f. /., and the baronetcy was ex- 
tinct. His arms, as given by Burke, are quite 
different from that borne by our Jacob Sheaffe, 
and by his descendants, known as the New 
Hampshire branch. 



Arms : Ermine, on a chev- 
ron, gules, between three pel- 
lets, three garbs, or. 




Motto : Non deficit alter. 
wanting.] 



[Another is not 



Heraldic Journal, IV., 81. 
Sabine's American Loyalists. 
T. B. Wyman's Charlestoum, Mass., Genealogies, //., 856. 



132 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



Brewster's Rambles Around Portsmouth, N.H., 126. 
New England Historical and Genealogical Regis- 
ter, IV., 310. 



Mottoes : A. Luceo, non tiro. [I shine, I do 
not bum.] 
B. Quocunque jeceris, stabit. [Wher- 
ever you may cast it it will 
stand.] 



IRasav 

The founder of the family of Rasay, or 
Rasey, in America, was Malcolm Macleod, 
youngest brother of John Macleod, Laird of 
Rasay, who came to this country in 1753, and 
purchased land near Bennington, Vt., where he 
died and was buried in 1777. On his tombstone 
was engraved the inescutcheon we give, which 
was granted by the Young Pretender to the 
Macleods of Rasay, in recognition of the free 
and courageous hospitality offered him by the 
famous Malcolm, a cousin of the Clan Chief, 
and an intimate and devoted companion of the 
unfortunate Prince Charles Edward Stuart. 

It will be remarked that the coat of arms 
given by Burke, as that of the Rasays, is quite 
different from the one we reproduce — the ines- 
cutcheon even put aside. In fact, the Burke 
shield was granted in 1772 to some Macleod, 
who probably gave particular cause for satis- 
faction to the Hanoverian Dynasty, whilst the 
devices we give — and which were found on the 
colonist's seal — are acknowledged in PapwortKs 
Ordinary of Arms as the ancient shield of this 
distinguished Scottish family. 

The present family of Rasey, in America, 
possesses a clear pedigree up to the emigrant, 
Malcolm Macleod of Rasay. 



Papworth and MoranT: An Ordinary of British Ar- 
morials, 18^4.. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of Etigland, 
Scotland, etc., 1884.. 

Browne : History of the Highlands and Highland Clans. 

Maclaughlan: History of the Scottish Highlands. 

McIan : Costumes of the Scottish Clans, with Historical 
Notes, etc. 

The Stuart Papers. 



Snelling 



William. Snelling, the youngest son ' of 
Thomas Snelling of Chaddlewood, Co. Devon, 
England, was a physician in Newbury, Mass., in 
1651. 

His seal on his will (1674) reproduces the 
arms we give, and his line of descent seems 
clear and precise. It is mentioned in the Her- 
alds Visitation for Co. Devon (1620). 






L^J 



Arms: Argent, three grif- 
fins' heads, erased, gules, a 
chief, indented, ermine, a mul- 
let, sable, for difference. 




Crests: A. The sun in his splen- 
dor. 

B. A demi-raven, sable, issuing 
from a ducal coronet, or. 



Heraldic Journal, II., 10. 
Bridgman's Copp's Hill Epitaphs, 214. 
Strong's Genealogies, 6jl. 

Sir Bernard Burke: The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1884. 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



133 



In 1665, at the Convention called together at 
Hempstead, Long Island, by Governor Nicolls, 
to decide on the government of the Province, 
under English supremacy, yo/m Hicks represented 
Hempstead, his adopted home. 

It is stated that this /oAn Hicks was a close 
relation [probably a nephew] of Robert Hicks, 
born in England, and who settled in Scituate, 
Mass., before 1630. That Robert was the great- 
grandson of Thomas Hicks of Tortwort, Co. 
Gloucester, England, which estate he inherited 
from his father, John Hicks, himself descended 
from that Sir Ellis Hicks, who was knighted 
by Edward, the Black Prince, in 1356. 

The grandson of John Hicks, of Hempstead' 
mentioned above, was Whitehead Hicks, Mayor 
of the City of New York from 1766 to 1776: 
later, appointed a Judge of the Supreme Court. 

Elias Hicks, the Apostle of the Society of 
Friends in America (born, 1748), belonged to 
these Hempstead, L. I., Hickses. 

Samuel Hicks, one of the leading New York 
merchants of the beginning and middle of this 
century, remained faithful to the belief and the 
peculiarities of the Society of Friends. 

The Hickses of New England and New 
York show thus a clear common origin with 
the Baronets Hicks-Beach of Beverston, Co. 
Gloucester, the present representative of whom 
is one of the leading English statesmen of our 
time. 



Crest : A buck's head, couped at 
the neck, or, gorged with a wreath 
of laurel : proper. 




Benj. F. Thompson: History of Long Island, N. K, i8jg. 

Mrs. Martha J. Lamb: History of the City of New York, 
/., 227, 763. 

Valentine's Manual of the Common Council of New York 
City, 1853. 

W. Berry : Encyclopcedia Heraldica, 1828. 

Sir Bernard Burke : Peerage, Baronetage, and Knightage, 
1887. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The Landed Gentry of Great Britain 
and Ireland, etc., iSy^. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1884. 

Papworth and MORANT: An Ordinary of British Armo- 
rials, 1874. 

The Book of Family Crests, II., 237. 



Stileman 



On the Heralds' Visitation of Hampshire 
(1634) appears the name of Elias Stileman, the 
ancestor of the New England family of the 
name, thus descended from the Styllemans, or 
Stylmans, of Cos. Wilts and Berks, a younger 
branch of the Stylmans of Steeple Ashton, Co. 
Wilts. 

The emigrant filled prominent public oflSces in 
Salem, where he died in 1662. His son, Elias, 
settled at Portsmouth, N. H. 



Arms: Sable, a unicorn, 
passant, or, on a chief of the 
second, three pallets of the 
first. 

Crest : A camel's head, 
erased, azure, billet^e, muz- 
zled, collared, lined and 
ringed, or. On the collar 
three hurts. 




Mottoes : A. Tout en bonne heure. [All in 
good time.] 
B. Tout bien ou rien. [All well 
or nothing.] 



Emmerton and Waters : Gleanings From English Rec- 
ords, 1880. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1884.. 

The Book of Family Crests, II., 450. 



134 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



XEilben 



From manuscripts in the possession of the late 
Sir John Maxwell Tylden, Knt, of Milsted, 
Co. Kent, England, it appears proven that a 
branch, of that ancient family [which traces back 
to Sir Richard Tylden (tempo. Henry II.)] 
went from Tenderden, Co. Kent, to Co. Sussex 
in the early part of the XVII. century; also, 
that another branch emigrated to America — the 
colonist, Nathaniel Tilden, being a cousin of 
Sir Richard Tylden, who died in 1639, in Eng- 
land. 

Elder Nathaniel Tilden [the American branch 
.spells the name uniformly with an i instead of 
y\ arrived to and ^ settled at Scituate, Mass., be- 
fore 1628. He had seven children, all born in 
England. Chosen Ruling Elder of the first 
church in Scituate, in 1634, he died in 1641. 

All the American Tildens descend from the 
above-named Nathaniel, undoubtedly a scion of 
the Kentish house of Tylden. The colonist 
himself was a son of Joseph Tylden, one of the 
London Merchant Adventurers. 



Crest : A battle-axe, erect, entwined 
with a snake : all proper. 




Motto : Truth and Liberty. 



brook, married in Boston {circa 1665), a grand- 
daughter of Governor Hutchinson. 

He brought over with him and used the 
armorial bearings we give, found also on the 
tombstones of various members of the Vernon 
family in the Old North Burial Ground, at 
Newport, R. I. (1721-1 737). 



Arms: Or, on a fess, azure, 
three garbs of the field. 

Crest : A demi-Ceres : 
proper — vested, azure. In 
the dexter hand a sickle : 
also proper. And in the 
sinister a garb, or. Wreathed 
about the temples with wheat. 



Motto: Semper ut te digna seqnare. [Ever 
strive for noble things.] 



Miscellanea Genealogica and Heraldica, III., 4. 
New England Historical and Genealogical Regis- 
. ter, XXX., 312. 
Austin's Rhode Island Genealogical Dictionary, 1886. 
ElleRY'S Ver7ion Genealogy. 
Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 

etc., 1884.. 
The Book of Family Crests, II., 477. 




Dean's History of Scihiate, Mass., j§j. 

Tilden Genealogy, In preparation, 1886. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 

etc., 1884-. 
Sir Bernard Burke : The Lajided Gentry of Great Britain 

and Ireland, i8jg. 
The Book of Family Crests, II., 473. 



IDernon 



Daniel Vernon, the colonist, said to be de- 
scended from the Vernons, old Earls of Ship- 



:iBett8 



Richard Betts, of Newtown, Long Island, 
who took part, as a delegate from Newtown, to 
the Hempstead Convention, in 1665, was the 
first colonist of the name. It is known that his 
second son, Thomas Betts, made use of the 
arms we give ; and he is described in deeds of 
the time as gentleman, i.e., entitled to coat- 
armor. This use of a coat of arms, being an- 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



135 



terior to the first known attempt of manufactur- 
ing arms in this country, gives a prima facie 
right to the descendants of the above Richard 
Betts [or, rather, Thomas, as the elder branch 
is extinct in the male line] to use the said 
arms, which are those of the Betts of Wor- 
tham, Co. Suffolk, without the bordure, en- 
grailed, gules, used by that branch of the family. 



Crest : Out of a ducal coronet, or, 
a buck's head, gules, attired, or, 
gorged with a collar, argent. 



Motto : Malo mori quam fcsdari. [I had 
rather die than be dishonored.] 





Arms : Azure, on a chevron 
between three cock-pheasants, 
close, or, as many cross cross- 
lets, sable. 

Crest : A unicorn's head, 
erased, per fess, argent and 
or, armed and maned, coun- 
terchanged, gorged with a 
chaplet of laurel, vert. 



Mrs. Martha J. Lamb : History of the City of New York, 

1880. 
Geo. R. H DWELL: Heraldry in England and America, 6, 

{1884). 
Sir Bernard Burke : T/ie General Armory of England, 

etc., 1884. 
The Book of Family Crests, II., 465. 



Mrs. Martha J. Lamb : History of the City of New York, 

I., 22J. 

RyKER'S Annals of Newtown, L. I., 373. 

Teunis G. Bergen's Settlers of Kings Co., L. /., N. Y.,35. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1884. 

Papworth and Morant: An Ordinary of British Ar- 
morials, i8j4. 

The Book oi<- Family Crests, II., 39. 



lEompfiins 



Governor Tompkins, once Vice-President of the 
United States, is better known as the New 
York State War Governor during the War of 
1812. 

His arms — those of the Tompkinses of Mor- 
nington, Co. Hereford, England — are sculptured 
in the large open court of the New Capitol, 
at Albany, receiving thus a kind of official con- 
firmation. 



Xlo^b 



In 1679, Jam,es Lloyd, Esquire, of Boston, 
son of Sir fohn Lloyd of Bristol, England, 
succeeded, partly by purchase, partly in right of 
his wife, Grizzle Sylvester, daughter of the 
original proprietor, to the estate called, later, 
the '^ Manor of Lloyd's Neck," on Long Island. 

His son, Henry, second Lord of the Manor, 
married in 1708 a daughter of John Nelson, 
Esquire, of Boston. 

The arms we give have been constantly used 
by the first American ancestors of the family, 
and ever since by their descendants. Seals, plate, 
old portraits, dating from the XVII. century 
and the beginning of the XVIII., bear all the 
same devices. 

The arms of this family are officially accepted 
by Burke. 



136 



AMERICA HERALDICA 




Crests : A. A bird rising, or- 
B. A pelican, or, feeding her 
young : proper. 




Crest : A leopard's head, erased, 
or, langued, gules. 



Mottoes : A. / live and die for those I love. 
B. Please God I live, I'll go. 



Heraldic Journal, II., 88 ; III., 73. 
Thompson's History of Long Island, 326. 
Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1884. 



James Geer: An Historical Sketch and Genealogy of 
George and Thomas Geer, 1621-1856 {i8§&). 

Hinman's Connecticut Settlers, ist ed., 178. 

Hurd'S History of New London Cotmty, Ct., §2§. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1884. 

Papworth and Morant: An Ordinary of British Armo- 
rials, 1874. 



mHanton 



(Beer 

George and Thomas Geere, sons of fonathan 
Geere of Heavitree, Co. Devon, were born in 
England in 1621-23. They were left orphans 
when quite young, and were brought up by an 
unnatural uncle. Wishing to become possessor of 
the considerable estate the lads were heirs to, he 
contrived to have them kidnapped and placed 
on board an American-bound ship, the captain 
acting as his accomplice. The boys, not yet 
out of their teens, reached Boston, without re- 
sources or friends, in 1635, but soon managed to 
place themselves in comfortable circumstances. 

Their descendants settled in other parts of 
New England and multiplied and prospered. The 
New York branch of the Geer family [name 
also spelled Geere, Gear, Gere] counted among 
its prominent members, the late Rev. George 
Jarvis Geer, Rector of St. Timothy's Church, 
New York City. 

The arms we give are recognized by Burke 
as those of the Geeres of Devonshire. The 
family descends from Gery of Royston, Co. 
Herts (1509). 



These arms are found on the tombstone of 
the wife of George Wanton [1726], in the Old 
North Burial Ground, at Newport, R. I. 

Governor John Wanton [1734], and his son, 
Governor Gideon Wanton [1745], both of Rhode 
Island, used the same devices on their official 
seals. 

These are the arms of the Wantons of Co. 
Huntingdon, England. 



Arms : Argent, a chevron, 
sable. 

Crest [From Burke] : A 
plume of seven ostrich 
feathers : three argent, two 
sable, and two vert. 



Heraldic Journal, II., 46; III., 64. 

Austin's Rhode Island Genealogical Dictionary, 1886. 

Barlett'S Wanton Genealogy, iSy8. 

Updyke's Narragansett, R. /., Churches, J05. 




AMERICA HERALDICA 



f37 



Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 

etc., 1884.. 
The Book of Family Crests, II., 484. 



Cbanbler 



The first settler in New England, in this 
branch of the family, was Williafn Chandler, 
of Roxbury, who came over in 1637. His 
grandson, John Chandler, moved to Worcester, 
Mass., and was appointed first Chief Justice of 
the Court of Common Pleas. 

The arms we give are from a bookplate of 
John Chandler, Jr., son of the above-mentioned 
Chief Justice. The original was engraved by 
Nathaniel Hurd, presumably, on good authority. 

The family originated from Co. Essex, Eng- 
land. Burke gives these arms to the London 
Chandlers. 



and Etherstone Castle, Co. Northumberland. 
Reginald brought with him five sons and two 
daughters. 

We find also in the Old Burial Ground, at 
Charlestown, Mass., the tombstone [with the arms 
we give] of the wife of Richard Foster, Junior 
[1724]. He was the grandson of William Fos- 
ter, known to have been in Charlestown, about 
1650. 

These arms, crest and motto, are those of the 
Fosters or Forsters of Brickhill, Co. Bedford, 
and the Bogue, Co. Lancaster, also represented 
by the Fosters, of Jamaica, in the West Indies. 

Various ancient silver articles with the Foster 
arms are preserved in America, among others 
a large tankard, with the arms beautifully en- 
graved and the tinctures clearly indicated. It is 
in the possession of Edward Ingersoll Browne, 
of Boston, the lineal descendant of the Brownes 
of Watertown, a full notice of which family is 
found page 54, and completed in our Appendix. 




Crest : A pelican, sable, in her 
piety, vert. 



Heraldic Journal, I., 72. 

Geo. Chandler : The Chandler Family, i8y2. 

New England Historical and Genealogical Regis- 
ter, XV., 339; XXXIII., 68, 202. 

Winsor's History of Dux bury, Mass., 241. 

Wall's Worcester, Mass., 62. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1884. 

The Book of Family Crests, II., 92. 




Crest : An arm in armor em- 
bowed, holding in the hand a 
broken tilting spear : proper. 



Motto : Si fractus fortis. [If broken, still 
strong.] 



Joseph Foster : Foster Genealogy, i88s- 

Heraldic Journal, I., 56. 

Wyman's Charlestown, Mass., Genealogies, I., j62. 

New England Historical and Genealogical Regis- 
ter, I., XX., XXV., XXX. [Concerns also several other 
branches of the FOSTER stock.] 

Sir Bernard Burke .- The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1884. 



Jfostet 



Reginald Foster of Little Badow, Co. Essex, 
England, landed at Ipswich, Mass., in 1638. He 
belonged to the Foster family of Bamborough 



Ifrencb 



Among the principal persons of the name of 
French, who, according to early records, arrived 
in New England, from England, previous to the 



r 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



year 1640, appears the name of John French, 
who died in Braintree, Mass., August 6, 1692. 

Printed and oral statements, as well as armo- 
rial bearings, confirm his Scotch descent. 

The coat of arms, in the possession of the 
family from the time of emigration, is that 
given here. With a change in the tinctures, 
these are the arms of the Frenchs of Thorni- 
dikes and Frenchla^id, Co. Berwick. 



Arms : Argent, a chevron 
between three boars' heads, 
erased, azure. 




Crest : A flenr-de-lis. 

Motto : Nee timeo, nee 
sperno. [Neither fear nor 
despise.] 



The descendants of Daniel, the elder son of 
the emigrant, remained faithful to the British 
crown during the Revolutionary struggle, and 
suffered largely in their fortune, on that account. 

On the other hand, the descendants of Pierre 
JouET, the second son of the emigrant, who 
settled in Virginia, were ardently engaged on 
the Revolutionary side, one of them, Captain 
Jack JouET, by hard riding, in May, 1781, ap- 
prising the fugitive Virginia Legislature, then sit- 
ting at Charlottesville, of the approach of the 
British under Tarleton. Matthew Jouet, a son 
of that Jack, who settled in Kentucky, was a 
painter of great renown in his time. 



Crest : A pelican in her piety ; 
proper. 




A. D. Weld French : French Genealogy, 1885. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1884.. 

PaPWORTH and MORANT: An Ordinary of British Ar- 
morials, i8y4. 



R. A. Brock : The Huguenot Emigration in Virginia, 1886. 
Denais's Armorial de V Anjou, II., sig. 
d'Hozier: MSS. [At the National Library, Paris], Prov- 
ince d' Anjou, 1^5, ppj. 
AUDOUYS: MSS. [Bibliotlieque d'Angers], 994, p. 98. 
MSS. Gencien and Gahory [Also in the Angers Library]. 



Jouet 



Daniel JoOet, eldest son of Daniel JoOet of 
the Isle of Re, France, left France, for religious 
motives, in the autumn of 1686, for Plymouth, 
England, from whence he sailed for Rhode 
Island. He descended, without doubt, from the 
noble family of Jouet, of the Province of An- 
jou, feudal Lords of the Seigneuries of La Saul- 
laye and Piedouault. One of his ancestors, Ga- 
briel JoOet, was Mayor of the City of Angers 
in 1623. Before that, a Jouet had occupied 
high functions at the Court of the French 
Kinsrs. 



Shaats 

The emigrant, Dominie Gideon Schaets, be- 
came in 1652 the second Minister of the Dutch 
Church at Beverwyck (Albany). He was brought 
over, in 1650, by the Dutch East India Com- 
pany. 

Gideon Schaets was born in Beest, Holland, 
in 161 1. One of his sons, Bartholomeus, became 
Chamberlain of the Government (or Stadt) 
House, at New Amsterdam, and he is men- 
tioned by Washington Irving in his humorous 
histoiy of New York. 

In 1858 the family was known to have in its 



AMERICA HERALDIC A 



139 



possession an ancient coat of arms, painted on 
wood before 1 700. 



Arms: Gules, two schaats 

(Dutch for skates), sable, 

~~^ quartered with : azure, a cres- 




Crest : A 
horse, salient. 



demi - wingred 




Pearson's Genealogies of the First Settlers of Albany, 160. 
O'Callaghan's History of the New Netherlands. 



Arms : Gules, on a mount, 
vert, a demi-wolf, issuing from 
a rock on the sinister side : all 
argent. 

Crest : A demi-lion, ram- 
pant : proper. 



Dr. Slaughter's History of St. Mark's Parish, lyy. 

W. Berry's Sussex Pedigrees, 120. 

Sir Bernard Burke : Extinct and Dormant Baronetages, 

1870. 
Sir Bernard Burke .- The General Armory of England, 

etc., 1884.. 
W. P. VVii.liams-Freeman : MS. Family Pedigree. 



Milliams of Dirginia 

William Williams, the colonist of the name, 
came to Virginia about the beginning of the 
XVII. century, and settled in Culpeper County, 
where he died. His grandson, James Williams, 
was a Major in the Revolutionary Army, and 
Major-General Commanding the Virginia Militia, 
in 181 2. His issue is still settled in Culpeper 
and Orange counties, Virginia. 

The colonist was a grandson of Peere Wil- 
liams, Esquire, Clerk of the Estreats under King 
Charles II. The eldest son of that Peere Wil- 
liams was the father of Sir Hutchins Williams, 
Bart., of Clapton, Co. Northampton, and The 
Friars, Chichester, Co. Sussex, England. 

The baronetcy became extinct in 1764 in the 
person of the third baronet. Sir Booth Wil- 
liams, High Sheriif of Co. Northampton in 1764. 
The family is now represented in England by the 
family of Williams-Freeman. 



IDowIanb 

The late Colonel Chester, the distinguished her- 
aldist and genealogist, states that he believes 
that the Howlands of America came from the 
same stock as the Joh^i Howland of Newport 
Ponds, later of London, to whose son. Bishop 
Richard Howland of Peterborough, were granted, 
by letters patent, dated June 10, 1584 {tempo 
Elizabeth), the arms we give. 

The original painting from which these arms 
were copied dates from the early generations of 
Howlands in this country. 

Recent investigations seem to point towards 
the exact English origin of Arthur, Henry, and 
John Howland, probably brothers, the original 
colonists of the name in this country. John is 
the best known as having come over on the 
"Mayflower." That John Howland remained a 
Puritan. Arthur and Henry were Quakers. The 
first settled at Marshfield, Mass. ; the second, 
who arrived circa 1625, finally settled at Dux- 
bury. 



140 



AMERICA HERALDICA 




Crest : A lion, passant, sable. 



proper — pommel and hilt, or. Motto: Nee aspera 
terretit. [Nor do difficulties terrify.] ' " 

We know of no descendants of Sir William 
Johnson having settled in this country. 



Franklyn Rowland: A Brief, etc., History of Arthur, 
Henry, aTid John Howland, etc., 1885. 

Bolton's History of Westchester Co., N. Y., //., 54.^. 

New England Historical and Genealogical Regis- 
ter, XXXIV., 192. 

Thatcher's History of Plymouth, Mass., I2g. 

Winsor'S History of Dzixbury, Mass., 26^. 

Sir Bernard Burke: The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1884. 



JobnBon 



William Johnson, the adopted son of his ma- 
ternal uncle, Admiral Sir Peter Warren [then 
Captain Warren], came over to New York in 
1742, at the age of twenty-three, to improve the 
wild property bought in the Mohawk country 
by the brilliant young naval officer. 

From his humble beginning as a farmer and 
a dealer in furs and small wares, William John- 
son became a wealthy merchant, a government 
contractor, a general in the armies of New 
York, and a Baronet of the British realm. 

After describing the arms we give, and which 
were used by Sir William Johnson, Bart.., of 
Johnson Hall, New York, and Twickenham, Co. 
Middlesex, Burke states "that, subsequently to 
this registration of arms, a pedigree was accepted 
by Betham, Ulster, deducing the family from 
Thomas O'Neill, called MacSlane, or Johnson, 
and from the O'Neills of Dungannon ; and the 
coat of O'Neill was allowed, viz.: 'Arms: Ar- 
gent, two lions, counter-rampant, supporting a 
dexter hand, gules ; in chief three estoiles of the 
last, and in base, a salmon, naiant, in water: 
proper. Crest: An arm, gules, encircled with a 
ducal crown, or, the hand grasping a sword : 




Arms : Gules, on a chev- 
ron, between three fleurs-de- 
lis, argent, three escallops of 
the field. 



^ Crest : An arm, couped at 
the elbow, erect, holding an 
arrow : proper. 

Motto : Deo regique debeo. 
[I owe all to God and King.] 



Mrs. Martha J. Lamb: History of the City of New York, 

I., 586. 

Sir Bernard Burke : Peerage, Baronetage and Knightage, 

etc., 1887. 
Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England 

etc., 1884. 



Clevelanb 



In 1 85 1 an eminent English antiquarian wrote 
to Bishop A. Cleveland Coxe, of Buffalo, 
N. Y., "that the Clevelands of America were 
descended from William: Cleveland, who re- 
moved from York to Hinckley in Leicestershire, 
where he was buried — a very old man — in 1630. 
His son, Thomas, became Vicar of Hinckley, the 
family estate. One of his sons was John Cleve- 
land, the poet. Another son, Thomas, may 
have been the father of Moses Cleveland, the 
emigrant, who came in 1635, from Ipswich, Suf- 
folk Co., England, to Massachusetts." 

The arms we give were granted to Sir Guy 
de Cleveland, who commanded the English 
spearmen at the battle of Poictien. . 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



141 



There is also a tradition that a Cleveland of 
Hinckley came over to Virginia with Skipworth 
and Herrick. He was later (1653) at Salem, 
Mass. 



Arms: Per chevron, sable 
and ermine, a chevron, en- 
grailed, counterchanged. 

Crest : A demi old man, 
habited, azure, having on his 
head a cap, gules, turned up, 
with a hair front, holding in 
his hand a spear, headed, ar- 
gent, on the top of which is 
fixed a line, proper, passing 
behind him and coiled up in 
the sinister hand. 



MoiTOES: A. Pro Deo et patria. [For God 
and Fatherland.] 
B. Semel et semper. [Once and al- 
ways.] 



James Butler Cleveland : A Genealogical Register of 

the Descendants of Moses Cleveland, 1881. 
E. J. Cleveland : Cleveland Genealogy [In preparation] 

1886. 
T. B. Wyman : Cliarlestown, Mass., Genealogies, I., 2ip. 
Sir Bernard Burke : Tke General Armory of England, 

etc., 1884.. 
The Book of Family Crests, II., 102. 




Seabur^ 



Bishop Seabury, of the Protestant Episcopal 
Church, who was the first consecrated Bishop of 
the freed colonies [having received consecration 
in Scotland in 1784], was a lineal descendant of 
Joh7i Seaberry, of Boston, Mass., an early emi- 
grant who belonged to the family of Sedborough 
of Porloke, Co. Devon, England, the spelling of 
the surname having been thus twice changed. 



The arms of the late Bishop exist on memo- 
rial windows in St. Attdrew's Church, at Aber- 
deen, Scotland, and in the Chapel of the Berke- 
ley Divinity School, at Middletown, Ct. 



Crest: An ibex of the shield. 

Motto : Super a alia tenere. 
[Hold to the Most High.] 



Bolton's History of Westchester Co., N. K, //., 375- 

Updyke's Narragansett, R.I., Churches, Jjg. 

Sir Bernard Burke: The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1884. 

Papworth and Morant: An Ordinary of British Ar- 
morials, 18J4.. 




lOoIcombe 



The family of Holcombe, settled for centuries 
upon the estate of Hull, Co. Devon, England, 
seven descents of which are recorded in the 
Heralds Visitations of 1620, sent several of its 
members over to America between 1630 and 
1695. 

The first colonist of the name, Thomas Hol- 
combe, came to New England in 1630, with the 
Rev. John Warham's Company, and settled finally 
at Windsor, Ct., where he died in 1657. The 
arms and the motto we give have been pre- 
served especially in that branch of the family. 

Two brothers of the name, John and Jacob 
Holcombe, Quakers of the following of Penn, 
settled in Pennsylvania circa 1695. 

A few years previous the Virginia branch of 
the family was founded by a John Holcombe, 
who came over in 1680. 

We have seen a very complete pedigree of 
the Holcombes of Devonshire, starting from John 
Holcombe, Knight (XI. century), and including 



142 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



the father of the emigrant first named, Thomas 

HOLCOMBE. 

Arms : Azure, a chevron, 
argent, between three men's 
heads in profile, couped at 
the shoulders, or, wreathed 
^^ about the temple, sable and 
of the second. 

Crest: A man's head, full- 
faced, couped at the breast : 
proper — wreathed around the 
temples, or and azure. 




Motto : 
titude.] 



Veritas et fortitudo. [Truth and for- 



HoLcoMBE Genealogy, 1876. 
Stiles's History of Windsor, Ct., 665. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of E7igland, 
etc., 1884. 



Stougbton 



Captain Israel Stoughton, who came over to 
Massachusetts in 1632, and was made a freeman 
of the colony in 1633, was one of the founders 
of Dorchester, Mass., and the commander in 
chief of the Massachusetts troops in the Pequot 
War. 

His son, William Stoughton, a Governor of 
the Massachusetts Bay Province, used the arms 
we give on his official seals, and the same de- 
vices are found on his tombstone in the Old 
Dorchester Burial Ground. 

They are the arms of the Stoughtons of Co. 
Kent, England. 




Arms : Argent, on a sal- 
tire, gules, between four 
door staples, sable, an es- 
callop, or. 

Crest : A demi-lion, 
rampant : proper — hold- 
ing an escallop, or. 



Heraldic Journal, I., 10. 

S. G. Drake: The History and Antiquities of Boston, 1856. 
[Not for the arms given, which are wrong.] 

New England Historical and Genealogical Regis- 
ter, v., 350; XV., 350. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1884.. 



SSiPtb 



Colonel William. Byrd, the first of his name 
and family in Virginia, son of John Byrd, of 
London [of the old family of Broxton, Co. 
Chester, dating tempo. Richard II.], was bom in 
1652, and came to Virginia a youth, as the 
legatee of his maternal uncle. Captain Thomas 
Stegge, merchant, landed proprietor and mem- 
ber of the Council. He patented large tracts 
of land, including the present site of the City 
of Richmond, and settled himself on his fine 
estate of Westover. 

His son, William Byrd of Westover, was well 
known as a writer, a philanthropist, and an 
active public man. He founded the City of 
Richmond, Major William Mayo being associated 
with him in that enterprise (1737). We have 
copied exactly his bookplate in our possession, 
leaving off the quarterings. 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



143 




Arms : Argent, a cross, 
flory, between four martlets, 
gules, on a canton, azure ; a 
crescent of the field for dif- 
ference. 



A bird, rising. 



Crest : 
grules. 



Motto : Nulla 
culpa. [To turn pale at no 
crime.] 




Crest : A greyhound's head, erased, 
per fess, sable and argent. 



Chas. p. Keith's Provincial Councillors of Pennsylvania. 

Watson's Ayinals of Philadelphia. 

Proud's History of Pennsylvania. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The Landed Gentry of Great Britain 

and Ireland, l8jc/. 
Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 

etc., 1884.. 
The Book of Family Crests, II., 86. 



R. A. Brock: The Huguenot Emigration in Virginia, 8, 

{1886). 
Sketches and Recollections of Lynchburg, Va., 

299-305. 
Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 

etc., 1884.. 



Carpenter 



Samuel Carpenter, of the Carpenter family 
of Co. Sussex and Co. Surrey, England, came 
over to Philadelphia in 1683. He was a member 
of the Provincial Council from 1687 until his 
death (1714), and Treasurer of the Province of 
Pennsylvania from 1685 to 171 1. He was named 
by William Penn, in his will, as the Trustee of 
his property in America. 

It is proved that the colonist came from 
Horsham, Co. Sussex, England ; also that the 
arms we give were constantly used by his early 
descendants, if himself, as a Quaker of the 
strictest kind, objected to such "toys of human 
vanity." 

One of the greatgrandsons of the emigrant, 
settled in Jamaica, W. I., brought back from 
England a certified copy of the family arms, 
procured from the London Heralds College. 



jfit3=t)ugb 



This very ancient family, settled in Cos. Ox- 
ford and York, England, from the time of Ed- 
ward III., sent one of its members. Colonel 
William Fitz-Hugh [born 1651] to Virginia, 
where he colonized a portion of King George 
County, calling his seat Bedford. He was law- 
yer, planter, merchant, and shipper, and founded 
a family worthy of his abilities. 



Arms: Azure, three chev- 
ronels in base, interlaced, or, 
a chief of the last. 




Crest : A griffin, s6j,e4nt, 



Motto : Pro patria sem- 
per. [Always for my coun- 
try!] 



Bishop Meade's Old Churches, Ministers and Families of 

V'.rginia, //., ig2. 
R. A. Brock : The Hugicenot Emigration in Virginia, 44. 



144 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



Turner's History of the Phelps and Gorham Ptirchase, j6j. 
Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1884. 



©gben 



S^monbs 



Here we are in presence of a clear pedigree, 
the family of Samuel Symonds, who settled at 
Ipswich, Mass. (circa 1630), having been estab- 
lished for twenty generations back, at Croft, in 
Lancashire, and Stratton, in Staffordshire. 

The arms we give were exemplified in 1625 
to Richard Symonds, a brother of Samuel Sy- 
monds, as being "the ancient arms of the Sy- 
monds of Great Yeldam, Co. Essex, and of 
Newport, Co. Salop, Gentlemen." 

The Church of Great Yeldam, Co. Essex, 
contains a fine brass in memory of Richard 
Symonds. 

The first wife of the emigrant was Dorothy 
Harlakenden, of the Harlakendens of Earls 
Colne, also in Co. Essex, whose cousin, Roger 
Harlakenden, was the founder of the Harla- 
kenden family in America. 



Arms: Azure, a chevron, 
engrailed, between three tre- 
foils, slipped, or. 

Crest : Out of a mural 
coronet, chequey, argent and 
azure, a boar's head of the 
first, crined, sable. 




Motto : Moriendo vive. 
[In dying, live.] 



Heraldic Journal, I., 45. 

Harleian MS., 1542 [In the British Museum]. 

Richard's Symonds Heraldic Collections [Printed by the 

Camden Society]. 
Sir Bernard Burke: The General Armory of Englind, 

etc., 1884. 



The founders of this family — so highly con- 
nected through New England, New York and 
New Jersey — were two brothers, John and Rich- 
ard Ogden, who 'emigrated before the middle of 
the XVII. century, and settled in New England 
as architects and master-builders. They erected 
the first stone church on- Manhattan Island, in 
1642, while New York — then called New Am- 
sterdam — was still under Dutch rule. They were 
afterwards employed at Elizabethtown (now 
Elizabeth) and Newark, N. J. Their descendants 
have been prominent in politics, in commerce, and 
in the learned professions. The name signifies the 
vale of oaks — Oak-deane : contracted or corrupted 
into Ock-den, and, finally, Ogden. The arms 
used by the family are those granted by Charles 
II. to John Ogden for faithful services to the 
late Kin?, his father. 



Crest : An oak tree : proper — 
a lion, rampant, against it. 

Motto : Et si ostendo non jacto. 
[Showing is not boasting.] 



Mrs. Martha J. Lamb: History of the City of New York, 
I., loj, Jig ; //., 726. 

New Jersey Archives: Documents Relating to the Colo- 
nial History of the State from i6ji to 1776. 

Walter Barrett's Old Merchants of New York. 

Henry Ogden's Complete Pedigree of the Ogden Family. 

Sir Bernard Burke: The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1884. 



Sbute 

Colonel Samuel Shute, who succeeded Joseph 
Dudley as governor of Massachusetts (1716-1723), 
belonged to a family long settled in Co. Cam- 




AMERICA HERALDICA 



H5 



bridge. He descended from Robert Shute of 
Hogginton, or Hollington, who was in 1579, 
created Second Baron of the Exchequer. Colonel 
Samuel Shute served under the Duke of Marl- 
borough, and was wounded in one of the prin- 
cipal battles in Flanders. He died unmarried at 
the age of 80 (1742). His brother, John, was 
created, in 1720, Viscount Barrington. 

John, the son of Lord Barrington, married a 
daughter of Florentius Vassall. A sister of 
Governor Shute, Mary Shute, married Henry 
Yeamans. So that the Shutes were connected 
from the start with leading Massachusetts fam- 
ilies. 



Arms : Per chevron, sable 
and or ; in chief two eagles 
displayed of the last. 




Crest : A griffin, sejant, 
or, pierced in the breast 
with a broken sword-blade, 
argent, vulned, gules. 



grant of land in Ulster, Ireland, and settled near 
Hillsborough, Co. Down. The coat of arms we 
give has since been painted in the Hillsborough 
Church. 

Matthew Forsyth, the son of James, was born 
at Hillsborough in 1699, and was the fourth in 
descent from the Robert who came over from 
Scotland. Matthew crossed the ocean in 1732, 
settling at Chester, N. H., and bringing with him 
a large amount of valuables. 

Among his descendants are found several dis- 
tinguished southerners, and also the Chevalier 
Thomas Forsyth de Fronsac, decorated with the 
Order of St. Louis, at the investment of Thion- 
ville by the Allies and French princes, in 1792. 
The American writer of poetry, Frederic Gregory 
Forsyth "de Fronsac" is the grandson of the 
valiant Chevalier. 



Crest: A demi-griffin, segreant, 
vert, armed and maned, sable. 



Motto : Instaurator ruinte. [Reconstructor of 
a ruin.] 




Heraldic Journal, II., 32-34. 

Sumner's History of E. Boston, Mass., 2J4.. 

Chase's History of Haverhill, Mass., 278. 

Sir Bernard Burke ; The General Ar^nory of England, 

etc., 1884.. 
The Book of Family Crests, II., 425. 



IforsiPtb 



Whyte'S History of Georgia. 

New Hampshire Historical Collections, 1776. 

Granite Monthly Magazine, VIII. 

Chase's History of Chester, N. H. 

Pedigree of the Forsyths of Ecclesgreig. (Hughes 

& Mitchell, London.) 
Dufaure'S Notes sur les Emigres. 
Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 

etc., 1884.. 



The Forsyths, of Chester, N. H., and of the 
South, are issued from Robert Forsyth, third son 
of David Forsyth, Laird oj Dykes, who was 
Lord Commissioner of Revenue for Glasgow, 
Scotland, in 1594. That Robert received, in 
161 8, as an ex-officer in the Royal Army, a 



Ipepperell 



The colonist, William, Pepperell, was a native 
of Tavistock, near Plymouth, Co. Devon. He 
made use of the coat of arms we give, and 



146 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



lived at Kittery, where he acquired a large for- 
tune as a merchant. His son, William, also a 
distinguished merchant, was a member of the 
Council for thirty-two years, and, for his success 
in capturing Cape Breton, in 1745, was created 
a Baronet. He died in 1759. 

His only son, Andrew Pepperell, died before 
him (1751), and that title ceased with the first 
possessor. His grandson by his only daughter 
Elizabeth, William Sparhawk, assumed the name 
and arms of Pepperell, and was created a 
Baronet (1774). The second baronetcy expired 
in 1 8 16, at the death of that Sir William, 
whose only son, William Royal Pepperell, had 
died in 1798. Descendants through the three 
married daughters of William Pepperell (the 
Baronet of the second grant) still remain in this 
country. 

Arms : Argent, a chevron, 
gules, between three pine 
cones, vert. On a canton, 
azure, a fleur-de-lis, or. 

y^ Crest : Out of a mural 
crown, argent, with laurel 
leaves, proper, in the em- 
brasures, an arm in armor 
embowed, holding a banner, 
argent. 

Mottoes : A. (Above the crest) : Peperi. [I 
have brought forth.] 
B. (Under the arms) : Virttcte parta 
ttiemini. [Defend what is acquired 
by valor.] 



Heraldic Journal, I., 183. 
Maine Genealogist and Biographer, 20 (1875). 
Nev/ England Historical and Genealogical Regis- 
ter, XIII., 138. 
S. E. TiTCOME : Early New England People, 265. 
Sir Bernard Burkk : Extinct Baro7ietage, etc., 1864. 




Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 

etc., 1884.. 
The Book of Family Crests, II., 370. 



IRawle 

Francis Rawle, who, with his son, Francis, 
landed at Philadelphia, in June, 1686, emigrated 
to escape the religious persecution, which, as 
Quakers, they had been suffering at home. 

He belonged to the Rawle family, Lords of 
the Manor of Tresparrett, a moiety of the 
Parish of St. Juliott, in Cornwall. That family 
was seated at Hennett in St. Jtiliott as early as 
the reign of Edward IV. (circa 1460). The 
arms we give are still affixed to the ancient 
manor house at Hennett, Cornwall. 

The colonist, Francis Rawle, was a "First 
Purchaser," under William Penn, of two thousand 
five hundred acres of land in Pennsylvania, by 
deeds dated March, i68i He founded the col- 
ony, or community, of the " Plymouth Friends," 
and died, an aged man, in 1697. Francis 
Rowle, Junior, held many important offices in 
the Colony, and wrote several pamphlets on 
leading questions of political economy. 



Arms : Sable, three swords 
in pale, the middlemost 
pointed in chief, argent. 

Crest : An arm in armor 
embowed : proper — the hand 
gauntletted, grasping a sword, 
argent, hilt, or. 

Motto : Made virtute. 
[Increase in valor.] 



Besse'S Sufferings, /., 7(5?. 

Lyson's Magna Brittania {ed. 1814), III., 113. 




AMERICA HERALDICA 



H7 



Pennsylvania Magazine of History, etc. (See Reg- Philipott's Villan Cajitiamtm, J22. 



istry of Arrivals), VIII., 338. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1884. 

Papworth and Morant: A71 Ordinary of British Ar- 
morials, iSyjf.. 

The Book of Family Crests, II., 392. 



Halsted's History of Kent, II., igi. 

Ireland's History of Kent, IV., 384. 

William Berry: Visitation of Kent {161 g). 

Papworth and Morant: An Ordinary of British Ar- 
morials, 1874. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1884. 



ITilgbman 



The Tilghman family of the Hermitage, Kent 
Co., Eastern Shore of Maryland and of Phila- 
delphia, is descended from Richard Tilghman, 
or Tylgham, who owned "Holloway Court" in 
the Parish of Snodland, Co. Kent, England, 
{tempo Henry .IV.], and in whose family that 
estate had been as early as the reign of Edward 
III. [1326-1371]. 

A descendant in the sixth generation of the 
said Richard Tilghman, also named Richard, 
emigrated in 1661 to the Eastern Shore of 
Maryland, having bought the Manor of Canter- 
bury, which he called "The Hermitage." It is 
still in the possession of the family. His grand- 
son, Edward Tilghman, the distinguished lawyer, 
removed to Philadelphia and founded the branch 
of the family still residing there. 

The colonist came over, it is stated, in conse- 
quence of political troubles, he having sustained 
openly the cause of the exiled Charles II. 



~^ Arms : Per fess, sable and 
argent, a lion, rampant 
reguardant, counterchanged, 
crowned, or. 

[This is from Burkes de- 
scription. The family always 
used a double-queued Hon.] 

Crest (Of the Tilghman - Huskissons) : A 
demi-lion, sejant, sable, crowned, or. 

Motto (Of the same English branch) : Spes 
alit agricolam. [Hope feeds the husbandman.] 




ITuckerman 



The colonist of the name, John Tuckerman, 
son of Thomas Tuckerman, of Co. Devon, 
England, arrived at Boston, Mass., in 1654. 

The arms we give have been constantly used 
by the descendants of that John Tuckerman, 
and are also found on the tomb of Bishop Peter 
Tuckerman, buried in the Duchy of Brunswick, 
Germany. The Bishop belonged to the Devon- 
shire Tuckermans, and had been tutor to the 
son of the Duke of Brunswick. 



Arms : Vert, on a bend 
[sometimes on a chevron], 
engrailed, argent, between 




■"^ three arrows of the last, 
three human hearts, gules. 



"-J—^^ 



Crest : Issuing from a du- 
cal coronet, or, a human 
heart, gules. 



Mottoes : A. (Original) : Tout cceur. [All 
heart] 
B. (More recent) : Paratus et fidelis. 
[Ready and faithful.] 



S. G. Drake : The History and Antiquities of Boston, i8§6. 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



mauiart) 



lP>rovoo8t 



The family of Willard of Eastbourne, Co. Sus- 
sex, England, originally surnamed Villiard, and 
originating from Caen, in Normandy, was seated 
in Co. Sussex since tempo Edward III. A 
younger branch settled later in the southwesterly 
part of Kent, within a few miles of the borders 
of Sussex, and held an estate in the Hundred 
of Branchley and Horsmonden. There lived and 
died (in 1617) Richard Willard, father of Cap- 
tain Simon Willard, the colonist, who came 
over from Horsmonden to Boston, in 1634, with 
wife and children. He settled at Cambridge, 
Mass., and is known to have been possessed of 
ample means. 

He was, later, one of the founders of Con- 
cord, and was for thirty-five years a Member of 
the General Court of the Colony. He made use 
of the arms we give. 



Arms : Argent, a chevron, 
ermines, between three jars 
or flasks [or fish-wheels] : 




proper. 

Crest : A griffin's head, 
erased, or. 



Mottoes : A. Gaudet patientia duris. [Patience 
rejoices through hardships.] 
B. Ubi libertas, ibi patria. [Where 
is liberty there is my country.] 



Joseph Willard: The Willard Memoir, 1858. 
W. H. WhitmORE: The American Genealogist, 1875. 
S. E. TiTCOMB : Early New England People, 1882. 
Sir Bernard Burke : The General Ar^nory of England, 
etc., 1884.. 



The arms we give were those borne by the 
Venerable and Right Reverend Samuel Provoost, 
First Protestant Episcopal Bishop of New York. 
He descended in the fifth degree from the 
original colonist, David Provoost, a Huguenot, 
who came over in 1638 to New Amsterdam by 
way of Holland, where his family had settled at 
first. The Provoosts, or, rather, Prevosts, or 
Provosts (as they must have been called in their 
native land), came, originally, from Normandy, 
where the name is still largely represented. 

Our example is copied from a bookplate of 
the Bishop, engraved by Maverick, in 1769, and, 
undoubtedly, copied from old and trustworthy 
family documents. The Bishop married, in 1766, 
Miss Maria Bousfield ; but the impalement 
found on his shield does not represent the arms 
given by Burke to the Irish family of Bous- 
field. We are, therefore, induced to think that 
we have here a clear example of French her- 
aldry, showing, not a marriage, but the juxta- 
position of two shields, having belonged succes- 
sively, to the Provoost name in Europe. 

Of course, the Bishop used a miter as his 
crest. The crest we give is furnished us from 
another source. 



Arms : Party, per pale. 
First : Argent, three arrows, 
points upward, each one 
enfiled through a pierced 
mullet, sable. Second : Az- 
ure, a bar, between two 
chevrons, or. 



Crest: An arm embowed in armor, the hand, 
proper, grasping an arrow fessways. 

Motto : Pro libertate. [For liberty's sake.] 




AMERICA HERALDICA 



149 



New York Genealogical and Biographical Record, 

VI., 1,24; XVIIL, I, 3. 
Purple's Notes of the Provoost Family, iSjS- 
Ch. W. Baird'S History of Rye, N. Y., 488. 



Seipmour 



The colonist, Richard Seymour, who settled at 
Hartford, Ct., in 1639, was undoubtedly de- 
scended in the third generation from Sir Ed- 
ward Seymour, the brother of Lady Jane Sey- 
mour the third wife of Henry VHI. His 
father was Lord Edward Seymour of Berry 
Pomeroy, Co. Devon, and his brother was Sir 
Edward Seymour, Knight-Baronet. 

On the seal of the emigrant were reproduced 
the arms we give, which are the original arms 
of the Seymours, not yet quartered with the 
royal devices. 



Arms : Gules, two wings 
conjoined in lure, or. 

Cre.st : Out of a ducal 
coronet, or, a phoenix of 
the last, issuing from 
flames : proper. 




Motto : Foy pour devoir. 
[Fidelity my duty.] 



®ti8 

The colonist, John Otis of Glastonbury , Co. 
Somerset, came over to New England in 1635, 
and settled at Hingham, Mass. He was the an- 
cestor of the great patriot John Otis, and of 
Harrison Gray Otis, third Mayor of Boston. 
The arms we give were constantly borne by the 
members of this numerous family, and are attri- 
buted by the English heraldic authorities to the 
Ottys, Otes, or Ottetes family of Shipdon. 



Arms : Argent, a saltire, 
engrailed, between four cross 
crosslets, fitch^e, azure. 

Crest : An arm embowed, 
vested, gules ; the hand, 
proper, holding a branch 
of laurel. 



Horatio N. Otis : A Memoir of the Family of Otis, 1850. 

S. G. Drake: The History atid Antiquities of Boston, 1856. 

Freeman's History of Cape Cod, Mass., I., 271 ; //., 88. 

Horatio N. Otis: A Memoir of the Otis Family of New 
Hampshire, l8§l. 

Glover's Ordinary of Arms [British Museum MSS.}. 

Papworth and MoranT: A?i Ordinary of British Armo- 
rials, iSj/f.. 




J. Hammond Trumbull's Memorial History of Hartford, 

Ct., I., 258. 
Geo. W. Ball : The Descendants of Joshua Porter, 17-18 

{1882). 
Sir Bernard Burke: Peerage, Baronetage and Knightage 

of the United Kingdom, 1887. 
Sir Bernard Burke: The General Artnory of England, 

etc., 1884. 



Ip^arsons 



The Parsons family of Co. Oxford, England, 
of the Island of Barbadoes, W. I., and of Bos- 
ton, bear the arms we give, which were those 
of Sir Thomas Parsons of Great Milto?i, Ox- 
fordshire, knighted in 1634 by King Charles I. 



150 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



The first of the name in this country was 
Joseph] Parsons, of Springfield, Mass., in 1636. 
A brother of his, Benjamin Parsons, appears 
soon in the annals of New England, and both 
are said to have come, in 1630, with Mr. 
Pynchon from Great Torrington, near Exeter, 
Co. Essex, England. 



Arms : Gules, two chev- 
ronels, ermine, between three 
eagles displayed, or. 




Crest : An eagle's leg, 
erased at the thigh, or, stand- 
ing on a leopard's face, gules. 



S. G. Drake : The History and Antiquities of Boston, 1856. 

New England Historical and Genealogical Regis- 
ter, I., 236; XII., 176. 

Holt's Parsons Genealogy. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1884. 

The Book of Family Crests, IL, 363. 



Poultneys of Miserton, Co. Leicester and Co- 
York, one of whose ancestors, Thomas Poultney 
(1442-1507), was High Sheriff of the County, 
tempo Edward IV. 

Arms: Argent, a fess, dan- 
cett^e, gules; in chief three 
leopard's heads. 

Crest : A leopard's head, 

^ guardant, erased at the neck, 

sable, gorged with a ducal 
coronet, or. 

Motto : Vis 7inita for tier. 
[United strength the stronger.] 



Arthur Collins: Peerages of England, IV.; also, Supp., 

I., 158 {1750). 
Rev. L. B. Thomas : Genealogical Notes, 123 {187 f). 
Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 

etc., 1884.. 
The Book of Family Crests, II., 382. 




lEbwarbs 



lp)0ultnei^ 



The colonist of the name. Richard Poultney, 
came to America in 1730, bringing with him 
his son, Thomas, bom in England in 1710. 
The latter married a Miss Thomas, of the Mary- 
land family of the name, and his descendants 
married into the leading families of that state 
and of Virginia. 

Thomas Poultney was a Quaker, and, as such, 
held in small esteem all distinction of rank or 
birth. It is, hov/ever indisputable that Richard 
Poultney and his son descended from the 



From William Edwards, Gentleman, born 
1620, who, coming from Gloucester, England, 
settled in Hartford, Ct., in 1639, the pedigree of 
the Edwards family in America for ten genera- 
tions is without a flaw. William- Edwards bore 
the coat of arms we give : It appears on his 
seal, on the silver devised by the will of Jona- 
than Edwards ; and its use has been constant 
in the family since. 

He was the only son of Richard Edwards, 
Fellow of Oxford, one of the Chaplains to 
Queen Elizabeth, who came from Wales to Lon- 
don in 1580. Richard Edwards, Miles, a Mas- 
ter of the Knights Hospitallers, A.D. 11 28, bore 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



151 



the same arms. President Edwards, Aaron 
Burr, Pierrepont Edwards, and many prominent 
men were of this family. And many of the 
leading families of America have, by marriage, 
the Edwards blood. The rank of Chief of the 
Wyandots, of the Mohawk Tribe of the Iroquois 
(Onge-Honwe) Nation, with a Turtle for Totem, 
conferred on Jonathan Edwards, at a conference 
at Stockbridge, March i, 1754, is still extant in 
this family in the person of Tryon Hughes Ed- 
wards, Esqture, of Maryland. 



Arms : Per bend, sinister, 
ermine and ermines. Over 
all, a lion, rampant, or. 

Crest : A demi-lion, ram- 
pant, or, holding between the 
paws a castle, argent. 

Motto : Sola nobilitas vir- 
tus. [Valor, sole nobility.] 



Memorial History of Hartford County, Ct., I., 237, 

etc. 
Papers in Custody of T. H. Edwards and Wm. Fitz- 

HUGH Edwards, Trustees of Jonathan Edwards MSS. 

and Papers. 
The Tuttle Family. 
History of the Descendants of John Dwight 

1035-43- 
Histoire des Chevaliers Hospitaliers de St. Jean. 
Cod. Dipl. Geros. 

Schoolcraft's Indian Tribes of the United States. 
Talcott's New York and New England Families, 506-sog, 
Hinman's Puritan Settlers, 3og, etc. 
Life and Works of President Edwards. 
Goodwin's Genealogical Notes, 4.8-68. 
Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 

etc., 1884.. 




ily settled at Crosthwaite, in the Parish of Ron- 
aldkirk, in the county of York, in the sixteenth 
century. Beverley Robinson, the tenth son of 
John Robinson, for a few days President of 
Virginia, removed to New York, and married 
Susanna, second daughter and coheiress of Fred- 
erick Philipse. He was a zealous loyalist, and 
went to England in 1783, where he died. Many 
of his descendants remained there : others settled 
in New Brunswick. His eldest grandson, Bev- 
erley, returned to New York, and settled there. 
There are many branches of this large family in 
Virginia and Canada. 

There are several variations in the arms as 
given in the books. We give the traditional 
arms from the seal of Col. Beverley Robinson, 
which impales Philipse. 



Arms : Vert, on a chevron, 
argent, between three roe- 
bucks, trippant, or, as many 
trefoils, slipped, gules. 

Crest : A roebuck, trip- 
pant, or. 

Motto : Proper e et pro- 
vide. [Hasten and foresee.] 



Mrs. Martha J. Lamb: History of the City of New York, 

/., 604. 
Bishop Meade's Old Churches, Ministers and Families of 

Virginia, I., jy8. 
Sir Bernard Burke : Peerage, Baronetage and Knightage, 

etc., 1887. 
Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 

etc., 1884. 
The Book of Family Crests, IL, 401. 




IRobinson 



A MS. pedigree, constructed by the late Sir 
John Beverley Robinson, Bart., and Frederick Phil- 
ipse Morris, Esq., derives the descent from a fam- 



2)uet 



This Royalist family emigrated to Antigua in 
Cromwell's time. Its chief, at the beginning of 



152 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



the XVII. century, was John Duer, who mar- 
ried Frances, daughter of Sir Frederick Frye, 
lived chiefly in London and Devonshire, but had 
large estates in Antigua and Dominica. His sec- 
ond son, William, came to New York about 
the middle of the last century, where he mar- 
ried Katharine, second daughter and coheiress of 
Gen. William Alexander, Lord Stirling. He 
was an officer in the Revolutionary Army. He 
left many descendants. 

These arms [given in Burke to the surname 
of Dever] have always been borne by the fam- 
ily. There is in existence a manuscript history, 
written by the late William A. Duer in 1847. 



Arms : Ermine, a bend, 
gules. 



IRicbolson 




Crest : A dove and olive 
branch, argent. 



Mrs. Martha J. Lamb: History of the City of New York, 
II., iji, 284., etc. 

Glover's Ordinary of Arms, Cotton MS. Tiberius, E.G. 

Papworth and MoranT: An Ordinary of British Ar- 
morials, iSj/f. 

Sir Bernard Burke: The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1884.. 



The Sir Francis Nicholson, mentioned, page 
63, as having received a grant of coat-armor as 
a reward for his meritorious services as a Royal 
Governor in Virginia, Maryland, Nova Scotia, 
South Carolina, died in 1728, and had never 
been married. 

The original coat of arms of the family, which 
we give, Plate XVII., has been preserved and 
used, in this country, by the descendants of his 
nephew, John Nicholson, whose two sons, James 
and Samuel, both took service in the Revolu- 
tionary Navy. 

Samuel Nicholson died a senior officer in 
1813. He had married a niece of Sir John 
Temple. His brother, James, resigned after the 
war, and settled in New York, where he mar- 
ried a daughter of Albert Gallatin. 

Crest : A demi-lion, issuing from a triple-tur- 
reted castle : all proper. 

Motto : Generositate. [By generosity.] 



Mrs. Martha J. Lamb: History of the City of New York. 

Bishop Meade's Old Churches, Ministers and Families of 
Virginia. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory of England, 
etc., 1884.. 

Papworth and Morant : An Ordinary of British Ar- 
morials, z8j4. 




APPENDIX 



REMARKS 

The reader will kindly notice : 

First — That no heraldic description is repeated in the Appendix that has already been 
printed in the book proper, except in case of error, or when another coat 
of arms is attributed to the same family. 

Second — That the engravings of coats of arms and crests found in the text [both in the 
book proper and in the Appendix] are simply tricked, i. e., the charges, 
etc., are drawn according to description, but without systematic attempt to 
show the tinctures by regular shadings. 

Therefore : For the design, trust to the engraving ; for the tinctures, 
trust to the blazoning only. 

Third — That in stating Same Arms as . . . the editor simply means that such and 
such Nobleman or Baronet, of an extant or extinct family, — or such and 
such leading County family still extant — bear or have borne the same arms 
he gives, with due differences, marks of cadence, quarterings, etc., with this 
remark, that, if quartered, the arms are to be found in the first quarter, 
or, en surtout. 

Fourth — That, in indexing, the prefixes De, De la, Du, Van, have been printed after 
the name. 



AMERICA HERALDICA. 



PLAIJL 




'^OfQf 




LEXAf^DEJ^ 





yK^WEtWATEJ^FOWR 




^^mmrnffrw^ 



h 



iviriqsTOR 




AI]RFAX 




E 



LIOT 




H' 



VTCh|IR§OrE 




^ 






G 



VAI2 \JORXLARDT 




EEK.^AR 




VAR U/YCHL 





.}(. 



VA121\EBSSELAE]\ 



1 



IChj^OLSOa 




w, 



r2Th(]F^P 





®VI-f 



^OOLSEY 



GENERAL ALPHABETICAL INDEX 



CONTAINING 



-WITH ALL NEEDED CORRECTIONS AND ADDITIONS- 



THE BLAZONING, OR HERALDIC DESCRIPTION, OF ALL COATS OF ARMS 

CONTAINED IN THE PLATES; 

ALSO 

A SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF OLD AMERICAN FAMILIES 

{NOT MENTIONED IN THE BOOK ITSELF) 
HAVING BORNE SINCE THEIR EMIGRATION THE ArMS OF THE NOBILITY AND GeNTRY OF EuROPE 

WITH Notices, Engraved Coats of Arms, Crests and Heraldic Descriptions. 



BbCrCrOmb^. arms : Arg., on a chevron, gu., between 
three boars' heads, erased, az., an 
antique crown, or. 

Crest : A cross, calvary, gu. 

Motto : In cruce salus. [In the cross 
is salvation.] 

Gen. and Hist. Rem. : Burke men- 
tioned these arms as granted to the 
Abercrombies of South Carolina, 
in 1778, some younger branch of 
the Abercrombies of that Ilk, Co. 
Banff, Scotland. 

Same Arms as the Baronets Aber- 
CROMBY of that Ilk [less the antique 
crown]. 

Arms : Arg., a chevron, gu., between three 
boars' heads, couped, within an orle 
of eight cross crosslets, fitch^e, az. 

41 ^/^>^| Ltl Gen. and Hist. Rem. : These are the 
I / \ 11 arms of Robert Aldworth, Mayor 

of Bristol, England (1609), Patentee 
of Pemaquid (1632). His daugh- 
ter, Elizabeth, married Giles El- 
BRIDGE, also of Bristol, also a Pat- 
entee of Pemaquid. Their son, Thomas, held Court as 
Lord Proprietor of Pemaquid (1647). [E. E. Salis- 
bury : Family Memorials, I., 142.'] 




Hleyan&er. arms: Quarterly— ist: Or, a human heart, 
Page 23. Plate III. crowned, gu. 2nd: Arg., a lym- 
phad, sails furled and flags flying, sa. 3d : Az., a tower, 
triple turreted, arg., voided of the field. 4th : Vert, a 
fish, naiant, arg. 
Add. and Corr. : The above arms are attributed by T. 
Gwilt-Mapleson [1852] to Alexander of /slay. But 
the real arms, borne by General ALEXANDER, Earl of 
Stirling [who left no male issue], are given in our Plate 
XVn., and the crest and motto of the Earldom of Stir- 
ling are found here. 

Plate XVII. Arms: Quarterly — ist and 4th: Per 

pale, arg. and sa., a chevron, and, in 
base, a crescent, all counterchanged. 
2nd and 3d: Or, a lymphad, sa., 
sails furled and flags flying, be- 
tween three cross crosslets, fitch^e, 
gu., for Mac Donald. 
Crest : A bear, sejant, erect : proper. 
[A beaver was used by General 
Alexander, Earl of Stirling, and 
is found on his plate.] 
Motto : Per mare, per terras. [By sea and by land.] 




aiSt [IDan], Arms : 

Page 78. Plate XL 

Hmbler. 

Page 91. 



Az., a bend, arg. 



156 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



Plate XVII. 




HmOr^. Arms : Barr}', nebulae [and not undde, as in 
Page 29. Plate IV. our example], of six, arg. and gu., a 
lion, passant, of the last, in chief. 
Add. and Corr. : This family used, successively, three 
different coats of arms and crests: One, given above, 
and taken from a tricking inserted in the HERALDIC 
Journal, II., loi ; another, more ancient still, and said 
to have been brought, in 1 686, by Jonathan Amory, 
when he came over to South Carolina. This second 
one is blazoned: "ARMS: Az., on a bend, arg., three 
eagles displayed, gu., within a bordure, or." Then 
comes the third, inserted in the edition of BURKE's 
- Genera! Armory for 1884., where it is blazoned as fol- 
lows : 

Arms: Barry, nebulee, of six, arg. and 

gu., a bend, az. 
Crest: Out of a mural crown, or, a 
talbot's head, az., eared, of the 
first. 
Motto : Tu ne cede mails. [Yield not 
to misfortunes.] 



HnbCrSOn. arms : Or, on a chevron, gu., between 
Page 35. Plate V. three hawks' heads, erased, arg., 
three acorns, slipped, of the last ; on a canton, sa., 
three martlets, of the third. 

HnbrCWS. arms : Gu., a saltlre, or, surmounted of 
Page 41. Plate VI. another, vert. \Not cotised, vert, 
as in our example.] 

HppICtOn. Arms: Arg., a fess, sa., between three 
Page 16. Plate I. apples, gu., slipped and leaved, vert- 

Add. and Corr. : Some- 
times the apples are 
shown erect, instead of 
hanging down. The 
crest, given page 16, 
ought to show " the 
serpent coiled around 
the trunk before enter- 
ing the mouth." We give it here more exactly. 
Another crest is: Out of a ducal coronet, or, three pine- 
apples, vert, the top purfled, or. 
Original motto : E malo bonum. [Good from evil.] 

HptbOrp. Arms: Per pale, nebulae, arg. and sa., two 
mullets, pierced, in fess, counter- 
changed. 
Gen. and Hist. Rem.: The tombstone 
of Charles Apthorp [1758], in the 
King's Chapel Burial Ground, Bos- 
ton, shows the devices we give, un- 
known to Burke, Edmonson, Cttillim, 
Berry, but found in Papworth's 
Armorials as belonging to Sir Wil- 





liam Ap-Thomas, and the Thomas family of Busa- 
verne, Cornwall. This Charles APTHORP descended 
from John APTHORP, the emigrant. [HERALDIC 
Journal, II., 14; S. G. Drake's Hist, and Antiq. 

of Boston, 1856 ; WeNTWORTH GENEALOGY, I., 300.] 

HrCbCr. arms : Az., three arrows, or [generally repre- 
Page 14. Plate I. sented points downward]. 

Same Arms borne by the Barons Umberslade, Co. War- 
wick (Ext. 1778). 

HrnOlb. Arms: Gu., a chevron, ermine, between three 
Page 30. Plate IV. pheons, or. 

Add. and Corr.: Motto: Ut vivas vigila. [To live, 
watch.] 

Same Arms as the Arnolds of Pole brook, Co. Northamp- 
ton. [Walford'S Co. Families.'] 

iJSaCOn. Arms: Gu., on a chief, arg., two mullets, sa.. 
Page 61. Plate IX. pierced, of the second. 

Same Arms as the Bacons of Redgrave, Co. Suffolk, Pre- 
miers Baronets of England (Cr. 1611). 

!®aICb6. ' Arms: Barry of six, or and az., on a bend, en- 
Page 97. Plate XIII. grailed, gu., three spear-heads, arg. 

Add. and Corr.: A more complete. and correct statement 
as to the origin of the Philadelphia and Maryland 
Balches has been furnished us too late for insertion in 
the regular notice. It states that their ancestor, the 
Rev. Thomas Balch, who emigrated to Maryland be- 
fore 1690, was a descendant of William Balch of High- 
am, Co. Somerset, born a?ite 1476, and that he did not 
belong to the St. Audries branch. 

The tnotto used more generally is : Coeur et courage 
font I'ouvrage. [Heart and courage do the work.] 

Balbwin. 

Page 117. 

Barclay 

Page 24 



Arms : 

Plate III. 



Crests : 



Gu., a chevron, arg., between three 
crosses, patt6e, arg. [not or, as in 
our example]. 
Add. and Corr. : These arms were 
inserted in Gwilt-Mapleson's Hand 
Book of Heraldry, to which sub- 
scribed, in 185 1 : Anthony BAR- 
CLAY, Esquire, and Mrs. WaLD- 
burg-Barclay. 

The real arms of , the Bar- 
clays of Urie and Allardice are : 
Quartered — ist and 4th: Az., a 
chevron, arg., between three crosses, 
patties, of the last, for Barclay. 
2nd and 3d : Or, a fess, wavy, gu., 
between three boars' heads, erased, 
sa., for Allardice. 

A. A mitre, or, for Barclay. 

B. A naked arm, holding in the hand a scimitar, 

proper, for Allardice. 




AMERICA HERALDICA 



157 




Same Arms as the Barclays of A liar dice and Urie, Co. 
Kincardine, who claim the Earldoms of Airth, Sirath- 
ern, and Menteath. 

!l6arJ). Arms : Sa., on a chevron, between ten martlets. 
Page 120. Plate XV. arg., four and two, in chief, one, 
two and one, in paint, five, pellets. 

iBarl^Cr. arms : Az., five escallops, in cross, or. 
Page 114. Plate XV. 

Same Arms as the Barkers of Albright on Hall, Co. Staf- 
ford. [Walford's Co. Families^ 

BartbOlOmeW. arms: Arg., a chevron, engrailed, be- 
tween three lions, rampant, sa. 
■^/^ Gen. and Hist. Rem. : William Bar- 
tholomew of Burford, probably- 
descended from the BARTHOLO- 
MEWS of Warborougk, Co. Oxford, 
England, came over to Boston, in 
1634, with Mrs. Anne Hutchinson, 
the Rev. John Lothrop, and their 
party. A tombstone of the BAR- 
THOLOMEWS of Burford, England (1667), bears the 
arms we give. [Geo. W. Bartholomew : Record of 
the Bartholomew Family, iSSs^^ 

!^artICtt. Arms : Sa., in chief, three sinister gauntlets. 
Page 124. Plate XV. pendent, arg., tasseled, or. 

Add. and Corr. : Falconer's gloves are here meant, not 
the ordinary gauntlets. In the American branch the 
gauntlets are often charged : Two and one, instead of 
in chief. 

Same Arms as the Baronets Barttelot of Stopham, Co. 
Sussex. 

Barton, same arms as the bartons of Threxton 
Page iiS. Hall, near Watton, Co. Norfolk. 

[Walford's Co. Families.'] 

iBartOW. arms : Or, on a bend, sa., between six annu- 
Page 36. Plate V. lets, gu., three plates. 

©avarb. arms: Az., a chevron, between three escal- 

Page 74. Plate XL lops, or. 



Beehman. arms : 



Page 25. Plate III 
Also, Plate XVII. 



Gu., a griffin, segr6ant, or, holding 
between the paws an Esquire's 
helmet, arg. [and not, as in our 
example, a lion's face, az.]. 

Add. and Corr. : These arms, 
granted in 1761, by the Her- 
alds' College, to one Beek- 
MAN, Merchant, in London, 
are not those used by the 
American Beekmans. We 
give, in Plate XVII. , the real and actual Beekman 
arms, as found in the official communications of the 
emigrant, William Beekman, Governor of South River, 
with Peter Stuyvesant, in New Amsterdam. 




Same arms found in the Chronyck Van Zeelandt (Am- 
sterdam, 1696). 

Arms : Az., a running brook, in bend, wavy, arg., between 
two roses, or. 

Crest : Two wings, addorsed. 

Motto : Mens conscia recti. [Mind conscious of the right.] 

Same Arms as the Barons Beekman of Belgium. 

BelCbCr. arms : Paly of six, or and gu., a chief, vair. 

Page 32. Plate IV. 

Same Arms as Sir Edward Belcher, Knt., C. B. [Wal- 
ford's Co. Families.'] 

!BClI. Arms : Az., a chevron, ermine, between three 
Page 41. Plate VI. bells, or. 

Bellingbam. arms: Arg., three bugle-horns, sa.. 
Page 41. Plate VI. stringed and garnished, or. 1 

Same Arms as the Baronets Bellingham of Castle Bel- 
lingham, Ireland (Cr., 1796). 

BetbUne. arms: Quartered — ist and 4th : Az., a fess, 
Page 30. Plate IV. between three mascles, or, for 
Bethune. 2nd and 3d : Arg., a chevron, sa., charged 
with an otter's head, erased, of the first, for BalfoUR. 

Same Arms as the Baronets Bethune of Kilconquhar, Co. 
Fife (Cr., 1835). 

HBCttS. Arms: Sa., on a bend, arg., three cinquefoils. 

Page 134- Plate XVI. gu. 
Same Arms as Betts of Wortham Hall, near Diss, Co. 

Suffolk. [Walford's Co. Families.] 

UBIaCftWCU. Arms: Paly of six, arg. and az. ; on a chief, 
gu., a lion, passant guardant, or. 

Crest : A swan's head and neck, 
erased, arg., ducally gorged, or. 

Gen. and Hist. Rem. : The colonist, 
John Blackwell, Deputy Gov- 
ernor of Pennsylvania, used the 
arms we give in his letters to Wil- 
liam Penn [1688]. He belonged, 
evidently, to the Blackwells of 
Sprouston Hall, Co. Norfolk, who 
bear these devices. [N. Y. Gen. 
AND BioG. Record, VIII., 348.] 

Arms : Arg., a chevron, between three garbs, sa. 

Page 123. Plate XV. 

JSICCCkCr. Arms: Per pale, az. and arg. On the 1st: 
Page 28. Plate III. Two chevronels, embattled counter- 
embattled, or. On the 2nd : A sprig of roses, vert, 
flowered, gu. 

Add. and Corr. : A distinguished amateur heraldist in 
Albany has in his possession Bleecker arms thus 
described : 

Instead of the rose branch, an oak branch, with 
acorns. 

The crest of that shield is : A bleecker, or bleacher's 




158 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



brush, above an inverted chevron, embattled. Under 
neath that shield, the date 1530 is found. 

150iS [3)U]. Arms : Arg., a lion, rampant, sa., armed 
Page 98. Plate XIII. and langued, gu. 

SOltOn. Arms: Sa., a falcon, close, arg., armed, or; on 
Page 36. Plate V. the breast, a cross. 

Add. and Corr.: The Rev. Robert BOLTON did not in- 
herit his arms, but adopted them after he had satisfied 
himself about his pedigree. 

Bonner. 

Page 90. 

©Orlant). arms : Barry of six, arg. and sa. [sometimes 
gu.], a boar, rampant : proper. 

Crest: A broken tilting spear: proper. 

Motto : Press through. 

Gen. and Hist. Rem. : The Gore Roll 
of Arms gives us these devices as 
belonging to the John BORLAND, 
whose will (1726) bears the same 
coat of arms as a seal. [HERALDIC 
Journal, II., 89; Gore's Roll of 
Arms, No. 85 ; Wyman'S Charles- 
town, Mass., Genealogies, I., gg ; 
Prince's Chronological History of 
New England, 1736.'] 




ffioi^lston. 

Page 92. 

Brat)for&. arms : 

Paee 06. Plate XIII. 



Arg., on a fess, sa., three stags' 
heads, erased, or. 



BrabStrCCt. arms: Arg., a greyhound, passant, gu. ; 

Page 102. Plate XIV. on a chief, sa., three crescents, or. 
Same Arms as the Baronets Bradstreet of Stacumnie, 

Co. Kildare. 
Brattle. Arms : Gu., a chevron [sometimes engrailed]. 

Page 103. Plate XIV. or, between three battle-axes, in 

pale, arg. 
Add. and Corr. : We find, also, the following arms, at- 
tributed to the Brattle family, of Boston, by S. G. 

Drake, in his Hist, and Antiq. of Boston [1856]. They 

are the only arms given by Burke. 
Arms: Or, a boar, passant, gu. 
Crest: [Blazoned, page 103]. 

BreeSe. arms : Arg., on a fess, az., three boars' heads. 
Page 104. Plate XIV. couped, or; in chief, a lion, passant, 
gu. 

BrentOn. same arms as the Baronets Brenton, of 
Page 120. Co. Hereford (Cr. 1812). 

Brewster, arms: Sa., a chevron, ermine, between 
Page 31. Plate IV. three stars, arg. 

Add. and Corr. : We think interesting to quote the fol- 
lowing from the Plymouth Plantation, by the Rev. Ash- 



bel Steele : " William Brewster spent the next eigh- 
teen or twenty years in Nottinghamshire, and held, 
under Government, the Post of Scrooby; and, there- 
fore, occupied as his home the Manor House of 
Scrooby. In 1605, he left the Established Church, and 
opened the Manor House as the place of worship for 
the Separatists. Went to Holland in 1608. In 1618, 
left Holland, and, in 1620, sailed for America on the 
" Mayflower y 
Same Arms as the Brewsters of Ashford Lodge, Co. 
Essex. [Walford'S Co. Families.'] 

Briflbt. Arms : Sa., a fess, arg., between three escal- 
Page 44. Plate VI. lops, or. 

Brinle^. arms: Per pale, sa. and or, a chevron, be- 
Pagc 4e. Plate VI. tween three escallops, all counter- 
changed, within a bordure, arg, charged with eight 
hurts. 

BtOmfiell). Arms : Sa., on a chevron, arg., three broom 
sprigs, vert ; on a canton, or, a 
spear's head, az., embrued, gu. 
CREST: A demi-tiger, az., armed and 
tufted, or, holding, erect, a broken 
sword, arg., hilted, or. 
"^^Gen. and Hist. Rem. : The emigrant, 
Edward Bromfield of Haywood 
House, near New Forest, in Hamp- 
shire, England, reached Boston, 
where he settled, in 1675. He 
used on his seal the devices we give, 
and died in 1734 [atat, 86]. [HER- 
ALDIC Journal, III., 187; Bridg- 

MAn'S King's Chapel Burial Ground, 254; N. E. HiST. 

AND Gen. Register, XIII,. XXV,, XXVI.] 

Brooke. arms: Or, a cross, engrailed, per pale, gu. 
and sa. 
Crest : A sword, erect, arg., hilted, or, 
entwined by two serpents, respect- 
ing each other: proper. Round 
the hilt in a scroll, bearing the 
MOTTO: Nee cestu, nee astu. [Neither 

by passion nor by craft.] 

•s j > i^Gen. AND HiST. Rem.: These arms — 
^i ^^^^^ those of the BROOKES of Gateford, 

Co. York, England — are borne by 
the descendants of John BROOKE, 
who emigrated from Hagg, in the 
township of Honly, Co. York, to 
Pennsylvania, in 1699, to escape re- 
ligious persecution, being a Quaker. 
He brought with him a patent from William Penn, for 
seven hundred and fifty acres of land, afterwards created 
in Montgomery Co., Pennsylvania. [Besse's Suffer- 
ings, II., 152 ; Rev. L. B. Thomas: Genealogical Notes, 
etc.] 








AMERICA HERALDICA 



159 



3ISrOWnC of IRse. arms : Sa., three lions, passant, in 
Page 36. Plate V. bend, between two double cotises, 
arg. 
Add. and Coer. : The lions ought to be placed bendways. 
A bust of the Rev. Marmaduke BROWNE is to be 
found in the Newport, R. I., burying ground, with the 
arms we give at the head of the inscription. 
The motto is spelled [wrongly] Suivez raizon. 

Browne of salem. 

Page 54. 

Browne of MatertOWn. Arms : Per bend, arg. and 
Page 54. Plate VIII. sa., three mascles, in bend, counter- 
And Plate XVII. changed. 

Add. AND CORR. : We give in Plate XVII., the actual 
Browne coat of arms. By an extraordinary circum- 
stance, the same family received two totally different 
grants of arms : the one we give in quarters i and 4 of 
Plate XVII., being the older; the second given in Plate 
VIII., dating from 1480. The additional shield is bla- 
zoned as follows : ■ 

Quarterly ist and 4th: Sa., three mallets, arg., three 
and one ; 2nd and 3d : As above. 

Bruen. 

Page iig. 

BUlfinCb. Arms : Gu., a chevron, arg., between three 
garbs, or. 

Crest: A dexter arm, couped below 
the elbow, erect, and grasping a 
baton : proper. 

Gen. and Hist. Rem. : The first colo- 
nist was Adino BULFINCH, who set- 
tled in Boston, 1681, and was a man 
of importance. In King's Chapel 
inscriptions are found the arms we 
give. [S. G. Drake's Hist, and 
Antiq. of Boston, 66 j (7 ^56).] 




Bulhle?. 

Page 17. 



Arms : Arg., a chevron, between three bulls' 
Plate I. heads, cabossed, sa. 

Add. and CORR. : The crest ought to 
be : Out of a ducal coronet, or, a 
bull's head, arg., armed, of the first 
[as given here]. 

The founder of the American 
family came from Odell [not Wood- 
hill], Co. Bedford. 



Same Arms as the Viscounts Bulkeley of Cashel ; Baro- 
nets BULKELEY, or, rather, Williams-Bulkeley of 
Penryhn, Co. Carnavon. 

BUrtie. Arms : Erm., a cross, gu. ; in the dexter can- 
ton, a lion, rampant, sa. 





Crest : A mountain-cat, sejant, gu. and 
arg. : proper — collared and chained, 
or. 
Motto : Ung roy, ungfoy. ung loy. 

^. ^'^N. AND Hist. Rem.: The descend- 

^ie^ ants of Robert BURKE, in Sudbury, 
Mass., in 1640, are said to use these 
arms. 
Same Arms as the Baronets BURKE of 
Marble Hill, Co. Galway. 

With a field, or, instead of er- 
minois, these are or were the arms 
of the Burkes, Earls of Clanricarde of the Viscounts 
Galway, of the Lords Leitrim, Tyaguin, Bophin, and of 
Sir Bernard BURKE, Ulster-King-of-Arms. 

Burnet, arms : Arg., three holly leaves, in chief, vert. 
Page 44. Plate VI. and a hunting horn, in base, sa. 
stringed and garnished, gu. 

Add. and Corr. : In the crest, the hand ought to hold a 
pru7iing knife : proper. 

Same Arms as the Baronets BuRNET of Leys (Cr. 1626), set- 
tled, since 1324, in Cos. Aberdeen and Kincardine, Scot- 
land. 



L chevron, or, between three 
heads, erased, arg. \Burke 



Burnbam. arms: Gu., 

Page 104. Plate XIV. lions' 
says or]. 

Burwell. 

Page 121. 

Butler. Arms: Or, a chief, indented, az. 

Page 87. Plate XII. 
Same Arms as the Butlers, Marquises of Ormande, etc. 

B^fiel^. Arms : Sa, [or az.], five bezants, in saltire, a 
chief, or [or arg.]. 
Crests: A. A demi-lion, rampant. 

B. A cross crosslet, fitch^e, 
sa., between two palm 
branches, vert. 
EN. and Hist. Rem.: Nath'l Byfield, 
the colonist, arrived in New England 
in 1674, from Long Ditton, Co. Surrey, 
where his father was a prominent 
divine. The Rev. Charles Chauncey 
preached his funeral sermon in 1733. 
It has been published. He was Judge 
of the Vice-Admiralty and of H. M.'s 
Council. [Heraldic Jour., II., 126.] 

Paly of six, or and sa., a bend, coun- 
terchanged. 




Bi?rb. 

Page 142. 

Calvert, arms : 

Page 102. Plate XIII. 



Add. and Corr. : In the crest of Lord Baltimore, the pen- 
nons should be : the dexter, or, the sinister, sa. But, 
the Calverts used to bear two pennons, as engraved 
by us, the dexter, erm., and the sinister, pean. 

Same Arms as the Calverts, Baron Baltimore (Ext. 1771). 



i6o 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



Campbell. 

Page 93. 
Carpenter. arms : Arg., a greyhound, passant, and a 

Page 143. Plate XVI. chief, sa. 
Carroll. arms: Gu., two Hons, combatant, arg., sup- 
Page 61. Plate IX. porting a sword, point upwards ; 

proper — pommel and hilt, or. 
Add. and Corr. : The tinctures we give are those of the 

original O'Carrolls of Ely O' Carroll, ancestors of the 

Maryland CarrOLLS. The latter simply reverse the 

tinctures. 
Car?. Arms: Arg., on a bend, sa., three roses, of the 

Page 6s. Plate IX. field, leaved, vert. 
Gen. and Hist. Rem. : There is a branch of the same 

English stock, using the same arms, settled in New 

England. [Tombstone of Samuel Cary, Esq. (1740), in 

the Burial Ground, Charlestown, Mass.] 
Same Arms as the present Viscounts Falkland, and of the 

extinct .ffar/j of Dover (Ext. 1765). Also, of the extinct 

Earls of Monmouth (Ext. 1 661). 

CaVerl?. arms: Gu., a Pegasus, salient, arg., winged 

Page 62. Plate IX. and maned, or. 
CbalOner. arms: Sa., a chevron, between three cheru- 

Page 43. Plate VI. bim's heads, or. 
Same Arms as the Baronets Chaloner of Guisborough, Co. 

York (Ext. 1640). 

Cbampernon. 

Page 94. 

CbanMer. arms: Chequey, arg. and az., on a bend. 
Page 137. Plate XVI. engrailed, sa., three lions, passant, 
or. 

Add. and Corr.: The coat of arms, obtained in 1775, 
from the Heralds College, London, by the Rev. Th. B. 
Chandler, D.D., of Elizabeth Town, N. J., bears az., 
instead of gu., in the chequey of the field [as it is in 
Burke\ 

Motto : Ad morte^n fidelis. [True unto death.] [GEO. 
Chandler: The descendant of Wm. and Annie Chand- 
ler, of Roxbury, Mass., 1883^ 

CbarnOCl?. arms: Arg., on a band, sa., three cross 
crosslets, fitch^e, of the first. 

Crest : A lap-wing : proper. 

Motto : Soyez content. [Be happy.] 

Gen. and Hist. Rem.: These arms 
were borne, in America, by the Cap- 
tain John Charnock, a Boston mer- 
chant (1710). [Heraldic Journal, 
HI., 107.] 

Same Arms as the Baronets Char- 
NOCKE of Halcot, Co. Bedford. 





CbaSe. arms : Gu., four crosses flory [sometimes cross- 
Page 31. Plate IV. lets], two and two, or ; on a canton, 
az., a lion, passant, of the second. 

Add. and Corr. : The arms of this family were recorded 
in the Visitation of Bucks [not Berks, as stated in our 
notice], in 1634. The arms and crest there given were 
the armorial bearings of Nathan CHASE of Htmdrich, 
Chesham, cousin to the ernigrant. 

The descendants of Aquila and Thomas CHASE are 
the only CHASES in America entitled to the arms we 
give. William CHASE, who came with Winthrop, and 
settled at Yarmouth, Cape Cod, did not belong to the 
Co. Buckingham family of CHASE. 

CbaUnCe?. arms : Gu., a cross, patonce, arg. ; on a 
Page 43. Plate VI. chief, az., a lion, passant guardant, 
or. 
IAdd. and Corr. : English authorities 
say : On a chief, or, a lion, passant, 
guardant, az. It is decidedly to be 
preferred to our example, which 
puts color on color. Be it, how- 
ever, distinctly understood that it 
is not our error. 
The Crest appears to have always been [as given here] : 
Out of a ducal coronet, or, a griffin's head, gu., charged 
with a pale, az., between two wings, displayed, of the 
last, the inward part of the wings of the second. 
The Motto Gloria was used only by the son of Commo- 
dore Chauncey. The motto affixed to the arms of 
Charles CHAUNCEY (1777) is Sublimis per ardua tendo 
[I aim at lofty things through difficulties]. It seems 
the only well authenticated motto attached to the 
name. 

Cbeclile?. 

Page III. 

CbeSebrOUgb. arms: Gu.. three crosses, patt6e, in 
fess, arg., between as many water 
bougets, or. 
Crest: A demi-lion, rampant, gu., 
holding between the paws a cross, 
patt^e, or. 
Mottoes [In England] : Fidei coticula 
crux. [The cross the 
touchstone of faith.] 
[In America] : Virtus vera 
nobilitas. [Virtue, true 
nobility.] 

Gen. and Hist. Rem. : William Chesebrough, the emi- 
grant, reached Boston in 1630, settled, later at Stoning- 
ton, where he was the first settler. The tombstone of 
his greatgrandson, David Chesebrough, bears the de- 
vices we give [Stonington church-yard, 1782]. [HER- 
ALDIC Journal, II,, 86 ; Stonington, Ct., Centenary, 
28^; Wetmore Genealogy, //j.] 




AMERICA HERALDICA 



i6i 




Cbester. 

Page 112. 

(tbcw. 

Page 113. 

(LbiCbeStCr. arms : Chequy, or and gu., a chief, vair. 
Crest : A heron, rising, with an eel in 

the beak: proper. 
Motto : Firm en foy. [Firm in faith .] 
Gen. and Hist. Rem. : We find these 
arms and crest [without motto] in 
Gore's Roll of Arms, No. 52, at- 
tributed to Robert Chichester, 
who had come over to Boston, be- 
fore 1708, from Raley, Co. Devon, 
England. 
Same Arms as the Chichesters, 
Lords Belfast ; Marquesses and 
Earls of Do7iegal, Lords Temple- 
MORE ; Baronets of Raleigh, Co. Devon ; also, Baronet of 
Greencastle, Co. Donegal (Ext. 1847). 

The peers quarter these arms, and use as motto : 
Invitum sequitur honor. [Honor follows though un- 
sought.] 

Cbilb. Arms : Gu., a chevron, engrailed, ermine, be- 
tween three eaglets, displayed 
[sometimes close], arg. 
Crest : An eagle, with wings expanded, 
arg., entwined around the neck, with 
a snake, whose tail is waved over 
his back : all proper. 

Motto : hnitari gua7n invidere. [Copy 

rather than envy.] 

Gen. AND Hist. Rem.: The emigrant, 

Ephraitn CHILD, reached America 
in 1630, with his nephew, Benjamin 
Child. This shield is said to have 
always been in the family. {Gene- 
alogy of the Child, Childe, and Childs 
Family, 1881 ; Evelyn P. Shirley : Noble and Gentle 
Men of England, 1S66.] 
Same Arms as the Earls of Tylney (Ext. 1784); Baronets 
Child of Lew fie Id and Stallington Hall, Co. Stafford. 

CbUtC. Arms : Gu., sem6e of mullets, or, three swords, 
Page 46. Plate VI. barwavs, proper, the middlemost 
encountering the other two ; a canton, per fess, arg. and 
az. [sometimes vert] ; thereon a lion of England \or, 
and not per fess, az. and arg., as in our example]. 

Same Arms as the Baronets CHUTE of Surrenden, Co. 
Kent (Ext. 1721). 

(tlarftSOn. arms : Arg., on a band, engrailed, sa., three 
Page 107. Plate XIV. annulets, or. 

(Claiborne. arms: Arg., three chevronels, interlaced. 
Page 62. Plate IX. in base, sa. ; a chief and a bordure 
of the last. 




Clepclanb. 

Page 140. 

dtntOn. Arms: Arg., six cross crosslets, fitch6e, sa. ; a 
Page 26. Plate III. chief, az., two mullets, or ; a cres- 
cent for difference. 

Add and Corr. : The mullets ought to be pierced gu., or 
of the field. 

We have obtained the following complete details con- 
cerning the ancestry of Governor George CLINTON [the 
second] ; It appears that a letter of General James 
Clinton, among the George CLINTON papers, in the 
State Library at Albany, not only mentions the friend- 
ship that existed between Charles Clinton [his father, 
and the first who came to this country] and Admiral 
George CLINTON, Royal Governor of New York — who 
was the second son of the S'x'Kth. Earl of Lincoln, — but 
it states that the Admiral allowed that they were of one 
family, as one branch of the family was lost at the time 
of the civil wars. All other members of the house of 
Clinton are accounted for but a certain William, grand- 
son of the Second Earl of Lincoln. It is said that he 
fled to the continent after the battle of Naseby, in 1645. 
Five years later, he went to Scotland, in the service of 
Charles II., took refuge in Ireland, after the defeat of 
Worcester in 1651, and died shortly afterwards. His 
only son, James, died also in Ireland, and his (James') 
only surviving son, Charles Clinton, came to America 
in 1728. He brought the arms we give, engraved on 
his seal, and in his last will recommended his arms to 
be engraved on his tomb. 

Same Arms as the Clintons, Earls of Hunthigdon (Ext. 
1354). The ZumiO^-'^'&lMKWs, Dukes of Newcastle- 
under-Lyme, bear the same arms, quartered with Pel- 
HAM (see page 18). 

CObbinQtOn. arms: Arg., a fess, embattled counter- 
Page 106. Plate XIV. embattled, sa., between three lions, 
passant, gu. 

Same Arms as the Baronets Bethell Codringtons (Cr. 
1876). 

Coffin. Arms : Vert [sometimes az\ between four 
Page 30. Plate IV. plates [sometimes bezants], five 
cross crosslets, arg. [sometimes or]. 

Same Arms as the Coffins of Portledge House, near 
Bideford, Devon. [Walford's Co. Families^] 

(TOOQCSball. Arms : Arg., a cross, between four escal- 
Page 110. Plate XIV. lops, sa. 

(COQbill. Same Arms as the ancient arms of the Baro- 
Page 114. nets COGHILL of Coghill, Co. York. 

They now bear: Ermine, a chevron, between' three 
cocks, gu., quartering CRAMER. Same Crest and 

Motto. 
COQSWCll. Arms : Arg., a cross, between four escallops, sa. 



l62 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



Crest : A stag, lodged, sa., attired, or. 
Motto : Nee spemo, nee timeo. 
Gen. and Hist. Rem.: John Cogs- 
well, the ancestor of the COGS- 
WELLS in America, was a son of 
Edward COGSWELL of Westbury 
Leigh, Co. Wilts, England. He 
came over in 1635, and settled at 
Ipswich, Mass. The family came 
originally from Co. Essex, and was 
called, usually, Coggeshall. The 
pedigree is clear and undisputed. 
In America, the families of COGS- 
WELL and Coggeshall are absolutely distinct ; but 
the arms are the same, as they both start from a com- 
mon origin. [E.O.Jameson: The Cogswells in Amer- 




ica, li. 



:■] 




COlbCn. Arms: Gu., a chevron, arg., between three 
Page 47. Plate VIL Stags' heads and necks, erased and 
cabossed, or. 

COlmSn. Arms : Az., upon a pale, rayori^e, or, a lion, 
rampant, gu. 
Crests: A. A demi-lion. 

B. A caltrap, or, between two 
wings, arg. 

^^.^ p ''^'^- and Hist. Rem.: These arms are 

\ a W /y^ found in a volume of an American 
clergyman, the Rev. Benjamin COL- 
man (London, 1728). They are the 
arms of the Suffolk COLMANS, to 
which belonged William. Colman, 
who emigrated in 1673, and was the 
son of Matthew Colman of Satterly, 
near Beckles, Co. Suffolk. 



COnOVCr. arms: Arg., a cross, az., a canton, three 
(Couwenhoven.) leopards' faces, erased, gu. 

Crest : A leopard's face, of the shield, 
between two wings, addorsed ; the 
dexter, arg., and the sinister, az. 

Gen. and Hist. Rem.: Wolfert Gerit- 
sen Couwenhoven, the common 
ancestor of the American CONO- 
VERS, came, in 1630, from Amers- 
fort, near Utrecht, in the Nether- 
lands, to Long Island. [Teunis 
G. Bergen's Early Settlers of Kings' 
Co., N. Y.; Nobiliaries of the 
Netherlands?^ 



(EOOftC. Arms: Or, a chevron, compony, az., and the 




first between three cinquefoils of the 
second. 

Crest: A unicorn's head, or, between 
two wings, endorsed, az. 

Gen. and Hist. Rem. : These arms — 
those of the COOKES of Gidea Hall, 
Co. Essex — are given in Gore's 
Roll of Arms, No. j6, to Elisha 
Cooke of Boston, son of the colonist, 
Richard CooKE, who came over to 
Massachusetts, and died there in 
171 5. One of his daughters married 
Richard MiDDLECOTT. 



COOUbge. arms : Vert, a grififin, segrdant, or. 
Page 54. Plate VIII. 




Coplei?. Arms: 




Arg., a cross, moline, sa. 

Crest : Out of a ducal coronet, or, a 
plume of four ostrich feathers, arg. 

Motto : In cruce vinco. [By the cross 
I conquer.] 

Gen. and Hist. Rem.: The famous 
painter, Johi Singleton COPLEY, 
born in Boston, in 1737, and his 
father before him, bore the arms we 
give. His son, Lord Lyndhurst 
(Ext. 1863), obtained a grant of arms 
slightly different. [HERALDIC JOUR- 
NAL, IV., 176.] 

Same Arms as the Baronets COPLEY of 
Sprotborough, Co. York (Cr. 1778), 
quartering MOYLE. 



(tOrtlanbt [IDan]. arms : Arg., the four wings of a 
Page 13. Plate I. windmill, conjoined, saltirewise, sa.. 

And Plate XVII. voided, gu., between five mullets, 

placed crosswise, of the last. 
Add. AND CORR. : Olof was the first 
emigrant of the Van Cortlandt 
name. He came, in 1636, to the 
New Netherland, and there are still 
extant imprints of the arms he bore, 
taken from his own seal. We give the only exact re- 
production of these arms in our plate XVII. The crest 
placed in this appendix is also the original crest of the 
colonist. The wings have been added later by the 
Yonkers branch. 




Arms: 



Arg., a fret, gu. ; on a chief, az., a 
crescent of the first for difference. 



Corwin. 
Curvoen. 

Page 42. Plate VI. ADD. AND CORR. : English authorities 
' say fretty, instead of a fret, as in our example. 
Same Arms as the Baronets CURWEN of Cqorkington, Co. 
Cumberland (Ext. 1664), descended from Gospatric, 
Earl of Northumberland. 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



163 



Cotton. Arms : Sa., a chevron, between three griffins' 

Page 71. Plate X. heads, erased, arg. 
Same Arms as the Baronets COTTON of Landwade, since of 

Madingley, Co. Cambridge (Cr. 1641). 

(TOUtant. arms: Quartered— ist and 4th: Gu., three 
Page 37. Plate V. fieurs-de-lis, or ; on a canton, arg., 
an estoile, sa. 2nd and 3d : Gu., a tree, eradicated, or ; 
on a chief, arg., a crescent, sa. 

CrabbOCft. Arms : Arg., on a chevron, az., three garbs. 

Page 55. Plate VIII. Or. 

Add. and Corr. : Matthew Cradock, the Massachusetts 

Governor, spelt his name with one d. 
Same Arms as the Cradocks, .6an7«.y //owi/^w (Ext. 1874). 

(EranStOn, arms : Gu., three cranes, within a bordure. 

Page loi. Plate XIII. embattled, arg. 
Same Arms as the Barons Cranstoun (Ext. or dormant 

since 1869.) 

(TrOmWClI. arms: Sa., a lion, rampant, arg. 

Page 74. Plate XI. 

CCUQCr. Arms : Arg., or a bend, az., between two grey- 
Page 36. Plate V. hounds, proper [sometimes sa.], 
three martlets, or. 

Add. and Corr. : Burke gives these arms to the English 
family of Crugg, or Crugge, with the following Crest : 
A falcon's head, couped, arg., collared, gu., wings en- 
dorsed, bendy of four, or and sa. 

Curtis. Arms : Arg., a chevron, between three bulls' 

Page 56. Plate VIII. heads, cabossed, sa. [the bulls' 

heads, sometimes, gu.]. 
Add. and Corr.: In English authorities, the trees of the 

crest Sire four, instead of two, in number. 
Same Arms as the Curteis of Appledon, Co. Kent, now of 

Windmill Hill, Co. Sussex. [Walford's Co. Families^ 

Cur3on [be]. 

Page 116. 

Same Arms as the Curzons, Barons Scarsdale, and the 
CURZONS, Barons de la Zouche; also the Baronets CUR- 
ZON of Water Perry, Co. Oxford (Ext. 1 750). 

CUSbiriQ. Arms: Quartered — 1st and 4th: Gu., an 
Page 45. Plate VI. eagle, displayed, arg. 2nd and 3d : 
Gu., three dexter hands, couped and erect, arg. ; a can- 
ton, chequy, or and az. 

Culler. Arms: Per pale, embattled, gu. and az., an 
Page 37. Plate V. arrow, in bend, or, barbed and 

flighted, arg., point upwards. 

Add. and Cork.: The English Baronets Cuyler of St. 



John's Lodge, Co. Herts, are descendants of that same 
Hendricks CUYLER who settled at Albany in 1664. One 
of his descendants, Cornelius, espoused the Royal cause, 
in 1776, and was rewarded by a baronetcy. 

The motto of the English CUYLERS is: Deo,non sa- 
gittis fido. [I confide in God, not in arrows.] 
Same Arms as the Barotiets Cuyler, of St. John's Lodge, 
Co. Herts. 

Darlington. \ 
Darling. \ 

Page 115. 

Davenport. arms: Arg., a chevron, between three 
Page 46. Plate VI. Cross crosslets, fitch^e, sa. 

Add. and Corr. : The singular and authentic crest we 
give in the text is supposed to have been borne on the 
helmets of the Master Sergeants, in their perambula- 
tions through the Peke Hills and the forests of Leek 
and Macclesfield, to the terror of the numerous gangs 
of banditti, who infested, in former times, these wild 
districts. 

The original motto of the DAVENPORTS was : Fear 
God, honor the Kittg — hardly a motto to be borne by 
the American Davenports. 

Same Arms as the Davenports of Capesthome, near Con- 
gleton, Cheshire. [Walford's Co. Families.] 

DeanC. arms: Gu., a llon, couchant, guardant, or; on 
Page 56. Plate VIII. a chief, arg., three crescents, of the 
field. 

Delano, arms : Arg., fretty, sa. ; on a chief, gu., three 
Page 47. Plate VII. wolves' heads, erased, or. 

DeniSOn. arms: Arg., on a chevron, engrailed, gu., 
Page 57. Plate VIII. between three torteaux, an annu- 
let, or. 

Add. and Corr. : The arm in the crest ought to be erect, 
and not embowed, as in our example. 

DiCftenSOn. arms : Vert, a cross, between three hinds' 
Page 94. Plate XIU. heads, erased, [sometimes couped,] 



Arms : Gu., on a cross, arg., five double-headed 
Page 125. Plate XV. eagles' heads, erased, sa. 
Same Arms as the Baronets Diggs of Chilham and Woot- 
to7i Court, Co. Kent. 

DiSbrOW. Arms : Arg., a fess, between three bears' 
Page 37. Plate V. heads and necks, erased [sometimes 
couped], sa., muzzled, or. 



Diywell. arms : 



Arg., a chevron, gu., between three 
fleurs-de-lis, sa. 



164 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



Crest: A lion's gamb, couped, az., 
grasping an eagle's leg with a wing 
conjoined to it. 
Gen. and Hist. Rem. : Arms of Colo- 
nel John DixWELL, Governor of Do- 
ver Castle. [Heraldic Journal, 
I., 109.] 
Same Arms as the Baronets DiXWELL 
V ■—-'-'-^ -'^-'^' ^ g-f Colon Hall, Co. Warwick ; the 

•M A an f Baronets of Terlingham, Co. Kent ; 

^/ \^ the Baronets of Barliam, Co. Kent 

(all titles extinct.) 





IDObgC. Arms : Barry of six, or and sa. Over all, on a 
Page 32. Plate IV. pale, gu., an eye, arg., weeping and 
dropping, or. 

Add. and Corr. : The original arms were charged on the 
pale with a female breast, arg., dropping milk : proper. 

©rSftC. Arms : Arg., a wyvern, wings displayed and 
Page 31. Plate IV. tail nowed, gu. 

Add. and Corr. : Samuel Gardmer DRAKE, the historian, 
gives as his 

Crest : An Indian, in full war costume ; a bow in his dex- 
ter and an arrow in his sinister hand. 

Motto : The oldest in the family is : Aquila nan captat 
muscas. [An eagle does not catch flies.] 

Same Arms as the Baronets Drake of Ashe, Co. Devon 
(Ext. 1733), and the Baronets of Shardeloes, Co. Bucks 
(Ext. 1660). 

SUblCl^. Arms: Or, a lion, rampant, double-queued, az. 
Page 56. Plate VIII. 

Add. and Corr. : The lion of the Dudley shield is always 
az., but it is sometimes double-queued, vert. 

Same Arms as the Dudleys, Dukes of Northumberlatid ; 
Earls of Warwick ; Earls of Leicester : Baronets of Wil- 
linghani House, Co. Cambridge ; Baronets of Clayton, 
Co. Northampton (all these titles, except the one be- 
fore last, are extinct). 

2)uer. 

Page 151. 

ISUmareSq. arms : Gu., three escallops, or ; a mullet 
Page 32, Plate IV. of the last, in chief, for difference. 

©UmmCr. arms : Az., a crescent, between six billets. 
Page 55. Plate VIII. — three, two and one, — or. 

Add. and Corr.: The Dummer ancestry has been clearly 
traced by H. F. Watson, Esq., to the XI. century, In 
the notice, read Richard, 7tot Pritchard. 

2)upn [IDan]. 

Page lo3. 

j£00^. Arms: Sa. [Sometimes gu. and even purple), 
three old mens' heads, couped at 




the shoulder, arg., crined : proper. 
Crest: A long cross crosslet, sa., and 
a dagger, arg., hilted, or, saltirewise. 
Motto: Crux mihi grata quies. [The 

cross is my pleasing hope.] 
Gen. and Hist. Rem.: Borne by the 
descendants of the Rev. William 
Eddye, Vicar of the Church of St., 
Dunstan, Cranbrook, Co. Kent, a 
native of Bristol. His son, Johii 
Eddy, came over to New England 
in 1630. He is supposed to have 
resided in Boxted, Co. Suffolk, England, and he settled 
in Watertown. He was styled Gentleman, by Gov. 
Winthrop, in a visit he made to him with Captain Stan- 
dish. {The Eddy Family, 1884; BOND'S Hist, of 
Watertown, Mass., 2oj ; N. E. HiST. AND Gen. Regis- 
ter, VIII, 201.] 

j£bCn. Arms : Gu., on a chevron, between three garbs, 
or, banded, vert, as many escallops, 
sa. 
Crest : A dexter arm, in armor em- 
bowed, couped at the shoulder, 
proper, the hand grasping a garb, 
bendwise, as in the arms. 

^ Motto : Sic sit prudentia. [So be pru- 
dence.] 
Gen. and Hist. Rem. : These are the 
arms of a Maryland family, as given 
by Burke to the Baronets Eden of 
West Auckland, Co. Durham. The 
baronetcy was created in 1776. 
The Lords AUCKLAND are of the same family. 

Ebwarbs. 

Page 151. 

Eds. Arms : Arg., three eels, naiant, az. 

Crest: A dexter arm, in armour, 
fessways, couped, holding a cutlass, 
enfiled with a boar's head, couped : 
all proper. 

Gen. and Hist. Rem. : Samuel Eels 
of Hingham, on his will, dated 1705, 
imprinted the arms we give. He 
was the son of John Eels of Dor- 
chester and Newbiiry. The same 
seal has been used by several of his 
descendants. [Heraldic JOURNAL, 
II., 9-] 



j£liOt. Arg., a fess [and not a bend, as in our first exam- 
Page 21. Plate II. pie], gu., between two bars-gemelle. 
Also, Plate XVII. wavy, sa. [sometimes az.] 
Add. and Corr.: Our Plate XVII. gives the correct arms. 
Same Arms as the Eliots of St. Germans, the motto of 





AMERICA HERALDICA 



165 



Per fess, indented, or and vert, on a 
bend, engrailed, az., three lions, pas- 



whom is : Prcecedentibus insta. The earldoml of St. 
Germans (Cr. 1874), is not extinct. 

lElIer?. 

Page 108. 
Page 109. 

lemerson. arms 

Page 21. Plate II. 

sant, arg. 
Add. and Cork. : The lions should be placed bendways. 

jEnMCOtt. Arms : Arg., on a fess, az., between three 
Page no. Plate XIV. fusils, gu., a griffin, passant, or. 

]£^rC. Arms: Arg., on a chevron, sa., three quatrefoils. 

Page 121. Plate XV. Or. 

Same Arms as the Eyres of Lindley Hall, near Nuneaton, 
Co. Warwick. [Walford's Co. Families.'] 

Jflirfay. arms: Or, three bars-gemelle, gu., sur- 

Page 16. Plate I. mounted of a lion, rampant, sa. 

And also Plate XVII. Add. AND CORR. : The Plate XVII. 

contains the correct arms. 

Same Arms as the Baronets Fairfax of the Holmes, Co. 

Roxburgh ; the Baronets Ramsay-Fairfax. 

yairWCatber. ) arms: Gu., six blllets, or— three, 
3faKrWeatber. J two, and one; on a chief of the 

Page 69, Plate X. second, a lion, passant, vert. 
IflClb. Arms : Sa., a chevron [sometimes engrailed], be- 

Page 32. Plate XII. tween three garbs, arg. 

JfiShC. Arms: Chequy, arg. and gu., on a fess, sa., five 
Page 70. Plate X. [sometimes only three] mullets, 
voided, of the third, or. 

JfitCb. Arms : Vert, a chevron, between three lions' 
Page 57. Plate VIII. heads, erased, or. 

3fit3=1bugb. 

Page 143. 

jfontaine [be la]. 

Page 75. 

JfOrSlptb. Arms : Arg., a chevron, engrailed, gu., be- 
Page 145. Plate XVI. tween three griffins, segr6ant, vert, 
armed and membered, sa. 

3f06tCr. Arms : Arg., a chevron, vert, between three 
Page 137. Plate XVI. bugle-horns, sa., stringed, gu. 

Same Arms as the Fosters of St. Andrews, Co. Bedford. 
[Walford's Co. Families.] 

jfOUntain. arms : Arg., three bendlets, gu. ; over all. 
Page 75. Plate XI. on a canton, az., a lion, passant, or. 

JfOWhe. Arms : Vert, a fleur-de-lis, arg. 

Page 117. Plate XV. Same Arms as the Baronets FoWKE 
of Lowesby, Co. Leicester. 



Ifowler. 




foycroft. 

Page gS. 

3fran??Iin, 

Pag. 



Arms : Az, on a chevron, between three lions, 
passant guardant, or, as many 
crosses, form^e, sa. 
Crest: An owl, arg., ducally gorged, 

or. 
Gen. and Hist. Rem : The emigrant, 
Philip Fowler, arrived in 1634, and 
settled at Ipswich, Mass. [The 
Fowler Family, l88j ; The De- 
scendants of Capt. Wm. Fowler, of 
Newhaven, Ct., iS^o.] 
Same Arms as the Baronets FowLER 
of Harnage Grange, Co. Salop (Ext. 
1773)- 

Arms : Az., a chevron, between three foxes' 
Plate XIII. heads, erased, or. 



Arms : Arg., on a bend, between two lions' 
Plate I. heads, erased, gu., a dolphin, em- 

bowed, of the field \yiot or, as in our example], between 
two martlets, close, or. 
Add. and Corr. : The motto [given by Burke] of the 
Governof of New Jersey was : Pro rege et patria. [For 
King and Country.] 

JrehC. Arms : Sa., two bars, or ; in chief, three mullets, 

of the last. 
Crest : A bull's head, couped at the 

neck, sa., attired, collared and lined, 

or. 
Motto : Libert as. 
Gen. and Hist. Rem. : The Heraldic 

Journal (II., 130), gives these arms 

as being engraved on a tomb at the 

Granary Burying Ground, Boston ; 

date : 1675. 
Sa.ME Arms as the Baronets Freke of 

West Belney, Co. Norfolk (Ext. 

1764); and the Evans-Freke, 

Lords Carbery. 

frencb. 

Page 137. 

(Ballatin. arms : Az., a fess, arg., between three bezants. 

Page 92. Plate XI 11. 

(Barbiner. arms : Sa., a chevron, ermine, between two 
Page 27. Plate III. griffins' heads [not affront^e, as in 
our example], in chief, and a cross, patt^e, arg., in base. 

Add. and Corr. : Some English authorities make the 
minor charges or, instead of arg., as in our example. 

(Barbiner of 1R. if. same arms as the Baronets Gar- 
Page 2S. DINER of Roche Court, near Farn- 

ham, Co. Hants (Cr. 1783). 




(Barfielb. arms : 



Or, three bars, gu. ; on a canton, er- 
mine, a cross, form^e, of the second. 



i66 



AMERICA HERALDICA 




Crest: Out of a ducal coronet, or, a 

cross, calvary, gu. 
Gen. and Hist. Rem.: These arms 
form the first quarter and original 
devices of the Garfields of Tud- 
dvigton, Co. Middlesex. Benjamin 
Garfield, of that place, had some 
trouble concerning his coat of arms, 
with the Heralds, in 1663. The 
emigrant, Edward GARFIELD, or 
Garfeild, who died at Watertown, 
Mass., in 1672, is supposed to have 
been related to the above Benjamin. 

He was the direct ancestor of President GarfiELD. 

[N. E. Hist, and Gen. Register, XXXVII. , 253 ; 

Bond's Hist, of Watertown, 2ji.'] 

(Beer. Arms : Gu., two bars, or, each charged with three 
Page 136. Plate XV. mascles, az. On a canton, of the 
second, a leopard's face, of the third. 

Same Arms as the Baronets Geary of Oxonheath, Kent 
(Cr. 1782), except that the Baronets charge the canton, 
arg., with an anchor, sa., as an honorable augmentation 
for naval services. 



(Bibbs. Crest 

Page no. 




Three broken tilting spears, or, — two in 
saltire, and one in pale, — ensigned 
with a wreath, arg. and sa. 

Same Arms [except tinctures] as the 
GiBBS of Aldenham Park, Co. Herts. 
[Walford's Co. Families^ 



^^31®^®® 



(Biles. Arms : Per chevron, arg. and az., a lion, rampant. 
Page 59. Plate VIII. counterchanged, collared, or. 

(Biltnan. arms : Sa., a man's leg, in pale, couped at the 
Page 33. Plate IV. thigh, arg. 

Add. and Corr. : As stated in the notice, the American 
Gilmans, descending from Edward Gilman of Co. Nor- 
folk, are entitled to the Norfolk Co. Gilmans' tinctures, 
which are : 

Arg., a man's leg, in pale, couped at the thigh, sa. 

(Bilpin. Arms : Or, a boar, passant, sa. 

Page 89. Plate XIII. Same Arms as the Baronets Gilpin 
of Hockliffe Grange, Co. Bedford, except that the Baro- 
nets bear in chief : two roses, gu., barbed and seeded : 
proper. 

(Bolt). 

Page III. 

GOOCb. Arms : Paly of eight, arg. and sa., a chevron, of 
the first, between three greyhounds. 





of the second, spotted, of the field. 

Crest : A greyhound, passant, arg., 
spotted and collared, sa. 

Motto : Virtute et fide. [Through 
courage and fidelity.] 

Gen. and Hist. Rem. : Arms of the 
Virginian, Major William. GOOCH, 
buried in the Yorktown, Va., burial 
ground (1655). They are the arms 
of the GOOCHES of Co. Norfolk, 
England. 

Same Arms as the Baronets GooCH 
of Clewer Park, Co. Berks. 

(BOObriCb ((BOObribge). arms : Arg., a fess, sa. in 
chief, three cross crosslets, fitch6e, 
of the last. 
Crest : A blackbird : proper. 
Gen. and Hist. Rem.: Copp's Hill 
Churchyard, Boston, contains the 
tombstone of a member of the 
GOODRIDGE family, bearing the 
arms we give, cut in the first quar- 
ter of the XVIII, century. We 
find that Walter GUTRIDGE married 
in 1696, and died in 1730. He was 
a sea-captain, and gave to a Boston 
church a piece of plate bearing the same arms. [HER- 
ALDIC Journal, II., 82 ; N. E. Hist, and Gen. Regis- 
ter, XVII., 357, XVIII., 53; Talcott'S N. Y. and 
N. E. Families, 5/^.] 

(BOObSell. Arms: Per pale, gu. and az. ; on a fess, 
Page 86. Plate XII. wavy, arg., between three crosses, 
form^e, or, three crescents, sa. 

Same Arms as the Godsals of Iscoyd Park, near White- 
church, Co. Salop. 

(BOOftin. Arms : Gu., a chevron, ermine, between three 
Page 64. Plate IX. crosses, or. 

(Borbon. 

Page 105. 

(Braves. ) arms: Gu., an eagle displayed, or [some- 
(BreaVeS. \ times crowned, arg.] ; a martlet, of 

Page 68. Plate X. the second, for difference. 
Add. and Corr. : The exact meaning of the motto is : 

An eagle does not catch flies. 
Same Arms as the Barons Graves (Cr. 1794). 

(Breen. 

Page 106. 
(BrCCne. arms : Az., three stags, trippant, or. 

Page 58. Plate VIII. 

(BrCCnWOOb. arms: Arg., a fess, between three mul- 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



167 



Page 100. Plate XIII. lets, pierced, of the field, in chief, 
and three ducks, passant, in base : all sa. 

(BrCgOr^. arms : Arg., a fir tree, growing out of a 
Page 131. Plate XVI. mount, in base, vert, surmounted by 
a sword, in bend, ensigned by a royal crown, in the dex- 
ter chief point : all proper. In the sinister chief and 
dexter base, a lion's head, erased, az., langued, gu. 
Quartering FORBES: Az., three bears' heads, couped, 
arg., muzzled, gu. 

(5riSW0lb. Arms: Arg., a fess, gu. [and not sa., as in 
Page 27. Plate III. our example], between two grey- 
hounds, courant, sa., within a bordure, or, as a differ- 
ence. 

Add. and Corr. : We find, in the 1884 edition of Burke'S 
Armory, that this family is extinct in the main line, and 
Edward Elbridge Salisbury, Esq., LL.D., states, in 
the Magazine of American History lor 1884, that "Sir 
Matthew GrESWOLDE never existed." But the emigrant 
did come from the neighborhood of Solihull, Co. War- 
wick, the Greswolde family estate. He arrived at 
Windsor in 1639, and removed to Saybrook between 
1650 and 1660. 

Motto : Fortiter et celeriter. [Strongly and quickly.] 
[Mrs. Martha J. Lamb's History of New York City, 

(Buion. 

Page 107. 

IbalCS, or Ibale. arms : Gu., three arrows, or, feath- 
Page 32. Plate XII. ered and barbed, arg. 

IballCtt. Arms : Or, a chief, engrailed, sa. Over all, on 
a band ; engrailed, gu., three be- 
zants. 

Crest: Out of a ducal coronet, or, a 
demi-lion, arg., holding, in the paws, 
a bezant. 

Gen. and Hist. Rem. : These are the 
arms of the Hallets or Halletts 
of Highajn, near Canterbury. They 
were brought here by William Hal- 
LET, of Co. Dorset, England, who 
acquired large estates on Long 
Island, New York, in 1645-50, Ry- 
KER'S Newtown, /I.02 ; FREEMAN'S 
Hist, of Cape Cod, Mass., //., igg, 
etc. 

IbamerSle^. arms : Gu., three rams' heads, couped, or. 
Page 127. Plate XV. 

IbanCOCf?. arms : Gu., a hand, couped and erect, arg. 
Page 19. Plate II. On a chief, of the last, three cocks, 
of the first. 

Ibarlahenben. 

Page 122. 




IbatCb. Arms : Gu., two demi-lions, rampant, or. 

Page 84. Plate XII. Add. AND CORR. : We give here arms 
borne by various Hatch families, 
similar to the colored plate in tinc- 
tures, but not in design. Crest, 
motto, etc., are the same. These 
arms are blazoned : Gu., two demi- 
lions, passant guardant, couped, in 
pale, or. 




Ibawhins. arms 




Arg., on a saltire, sa., five fleurs-de- 
lis, or. 

Crest : On a mount, vert, a hind 
lodged : proper. 

Motto : Toujour s pret. [Always 
ready.] 

Gen. and Hist. Rem.: Found in 
Gore's Roll of arms. No. 2j, as 
belonging to Abigail HAWKINS, 
who died in 171 1. 

Same Arms as the Baronets Hawkins 
of Kelston, Co. Somerset (Cr. 1778). 



Iba^. Arms : Arg., three inescutcheons, gu. 

Page 40. Plate V. , SAME ARMS as the Hays, Earls of 
Erroll ; Earls of Kinnoull ; Earls and Marquesses of 
Tweddale ; Lords Newton ; Baronets Hay of Park, Co. 
Wigtoun, of Smithfield a?id Haystoun, Co. Peebles, of 
Alderston, Co. Haddington. 

Iba^ben (Iba^bOn). arms: Quarterly, arg. and az., a 
Page 57. Plate VIII. cross, engrailed, counterchanged. 

Ibaipben. 

Page 58. 

Iba^nes. 

Page 123. 
Same Arms as the Haynes of Thimbleby Lodge, Co. York, 
except that the latter bear the cresents paly wavy, in- 
stead of barry und^e. 

IbCatbCOtC. Arms: Erm., three pomeis, each charged 
Page 14. Plate I. with a cross, or. 

Add. and Corr. : Motto of the English house : Loyault^ 
vie oblige. [Loyalty binds me.] 

Same Arms as the Heathcotes, Lords Aveland (yet ex- 
tant) ; Baronets Heathcote of Normanton, Co. Rut- 
land. 

Ibensbaw. 

Page 103. 

IbCrriCf?. arms: Arg., a fess, vair^, or and gu. 

Page 109. Plate XIV. SAME ARMS as the HERRICKS of 

BaiLmanor, Co. Leicester. [Walford's Co. Families.'] 

IbiChS. Arms : Gu., a fess, wavy, between three fleurs- 
Page 133. Plate XVI. de-lis, or. 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



Same Arms as the Baronets HiCKS of Campden, Co. Glou- 
cester, later, Earls of Gainsborough (Ext. 1798). The 
Baronetcy has been created anew for Sir Michael 
Hicks-Beach, the distinguished statesman. 

IbiniTian. arms: Vert, on a chevron, or, three roses, 
gu., slipped and leaved, of the first. 
Crest : On a mount, vert, a wyvern : 
proper — ducally gorged and lined, 
or. 
Gen. and Hist. Rem.: These arms 
[which belong to an English family 
of Inman] are borne by the de- 
scendants, in this country, of Ser- 
gent Edward HiNMAN, of the Body 
Guard of Charles I., who is found, 
in 1650, at Stratford, Ct., and is sup- 
posed to be the Edward HiNMAN, 
an early settler in Providence, R. I. 
[R. R. HiNMAN : Family Records of 
the HiNMANS, etc., 1856 ; Brown'S W. Sifnsbury, Ct., 
Settlers, J2^ 

IbOar. Arms : Arg., an eagle, displayed, with two heads, 
Page 21. Plate II. within a bordure, engrailed, az. 

[sometimes sa.]. 
Same Arms as the Baronets Hoare of Stourhead, Co. 

Wilts ; and the Baronets HOARE of Annabelle, Co. Cork. 

Ibolcombe. 

Page 141. 

IbOlt. Arms : Az., two bars, or. In chief, a cross, for- 
m^e fitch^e, of the last. 

Crest: A squirrel, sejant, or, holding 
a hazel-branch, slipped and fructed : 
all proper. 

Motto : Exaltavit humiles. [He ex- 
alted the humble.] 





Gen. AND Hist. Rem. : Nicholas Holt, 
the emigrant, came, in 1635, and 
settled at Newbury. His descend- 
ants claimed the estates of the 
Holts of Askton Hall, Co. War- 
wick, but failed to justify their de- 
scent as far as the possessions. 
Same Arms as the Baronets HOLT of Ashton Hall, Co. 
Warwick (Ext. 1782). 

IbOpMnS. Arms : Sa., on a chevron, between two pis- 
Page 113. Plate XIV. tols, in chief, or, and a silver medal, 
with the French King's bust, inscribed Louis XV., tied, 
at the top, with a red ribbon, in base ; a laurel chaplet, 
in the center; a scalp, on a staff, on the dexter, and a 
tomahawk, on the sinister : all proper. A chief, embat- 
tled, arg. 

1boI?ohe. 

Page 85, 




Ibople?. Arms 



IbOpftinS. Arms: Sa., on a chevron, or, between three 
pistols, of the last, three roses, gu. 
Crest : A tower, sa., in flames : proper. 
Mottoes : Vi et ani?no. [By force and 
courage.] 
Inter primos. [Among the 
first.] 
Gen. AND Hist. Rem.: These arms 
are borne by the Hopkinses, of 
Maryland, themselves descended of 
the Co. Berks family. The painted 
coat of arms we give in Plate XIV. 
proceeds evidently from the same 
arms, although more recent. [L. B. 
Thomas : Genealogical Notes, p. ^p.] 
Same Arms as the Hopkinses of Tidmarsh House, Co. 
Berks. [WaleORD'S Co. Families?^ 

Arg., on a fess, gu., cotised, wavy, sa., 
three crescents, or, all between as 
many pheons, of the third. In the 
centre chief point, a lion, rampant, 
of the second. 

Crest : Out of a mural crown, gu., a 
garb, or. Issuant therefrom, a ser- 
pent : proper. 

Motto : In copia cautus. [Prudent in 
prosperity.] 

Gen. and Hist. Rem. : Burke states 
that this coat of arms was granted 
to George Augustus HOPLEY, Es- 
quire, of Charlestown, S. Ca., U. S., 
son of Joseph HOPLEY, Esquire, 
sometime Governor of St. Vincent. 

IbOWarb. arms : Gu., a bend, between six cross cross- 
Page 67. Plate IX. lets, fitch^e, arg. 

Same Arms as the Howards, Dukes of Norfolk; Earls of 
Suffolk and Berkshire ; Earls of Carlisle ; Barons La?ier- 
ton; Earls of Effingham ; Earls of Wicklow, etc., etc. 

IbOWell. Arms : Gu., three towers, triple-turreted, arg. 
Page 81. Plate XII. Add. AND CORR. : Page 81, read: 
Edward HowELL sold the Manor of Westbury in 
Marsh-Gibbon, Co. Bucks, England, instead of West 
btiry-in-March, Gibbon. 

1bOWlan&. arms: Arg., two bars, sa. In chief, three 
Page 139. Plate XVL lions, rampant, of the last. 

IbUbbarD. arms: Quartered, arg. and sa., on a bend, 

gu., three lions, passant, or. 
Crest: A boar's head, couped, gu., collared, ringed and 

lined, arg. In the mouth, a spear, sa., headed, of the 

second. 
Gen. and Hist. Rem. : These arms are given by BuRKE to 

the HUBBARDS, HuBARTS, or HUBBERDS of Birch- 




AMERICA HERALDICA 



169 



anger, Co. Essex, as granted to that family in 1578. 
We find in the Copp's Hill Burial Ground, in Boston, 
the tombstone of the HUBBARD family, bearing the 
same arms (1746), [without clear indication of the field]. 
Nathaniel HUBBARD, in 1736, was qualified Esquire in 
Prince's Chronological History of New England. [He- 
raldic Journal, II., 134.] 

IbUQCr. Arms : Arg., a human head, emitting flames, 
Page 67. Plate IX. between two laurel branches, fruc- 
ted, in chief, and an anchor, erect, in base : all proper — 
between two flaunches, az., each charged with a fleur- 
de-lis, or. 

Ibunt. Same Arms as the Hunts of Boreatton, Co. 
Page 124. Salop. 

IbUrr^, Arms : Arg., a lion, rampant, gu., and, in base, 
Page 118. Plate XV. two mullets, az., pierced, of the 
field. 

IbUtCbinSOn. arms : Per pale, gu. and az., sem6e, of 
Page 19. Plate II. cross crosslets, or, a lion, rampant. 
Also, Plate XVII. arg. 

Add. and Corr. : Burke acknowledges the American 
family. The erroneous tincture of the lions, in Plate 
II., was a fault of the engraver. Plate XVII. only is 
correct. 

Same Arms as the HutchinSONS, Earls of Donoughmore ; 
Baronets Syw^^-HUTCHINSON, of Castle Sallah, Co. 
Wicklow. 

UndliS. Arms : Az., a lion, rampant, arg. On a chief. 
Page 81. Plate XI. of the second, three mullets, of the 
first. 

Same Arms as the Inglises of Glencorse House, Midlo- 
thian, N. B. [Walford's Co. Families^ 

UrVing. arms: Arg., three small sheaves, or bundles, 
Page 68. Plate X. of holly, — two and one, — each con- 
sisting of as many leaves, slipped, vert, banded, gu. 

Same Arms as the Forbes-\^NY^^ of Drum, Co. Aberdeen. 
[Walford's Co. Families?^ 

JaCftSOn. Arms : Gu., a fess, between three shovellers, 
tufted on the head and breast, arg., 
each charged with a trefoil, slipped, 
vert. 

Crest : A shoveller, as in the arms. 

Motto : Innocentia securus. [Secure 

'Bl^itBffrSfifc?^ ''^ ^'^ innocence.] 

I^Gen. and Hist. Rem.: The Her- 
aldic Journal (II., 140) states 
that the tomb of Thomas JACKSON, 
in the Copp's Hill Burial Ground, 
in Boston, bears these arms. It is 
next to the Quincy family tomb. 

Same Arms as the Jacksons, Baronets 
of Beach Hill, Co. Surrey (Ext.). 




JafErC?. Arms: Paly of six, arg. and sa., surmounted 
Page SB. by a fess, of the first, charged with 

three stars of the second. 
,,h - -•' "^ Crest: The sun shining through a 
C'^^Wl<i-% cloud: proper. 

f''^*#«,.S®?-^ Motto: Post nubila Phoebus. [After 
\'.^J2^.. -^ .^"^ / rlniirl«;_ <;iin5;hine.1 



clouds, sunshine.] 




3aV). Arms : Az., a chevron, or. In chief, a demi-sun, 
Page 25. Plate III. in its splendour, between two mul- 
lets, of the last ; in base, on a rock, two birds (or one 
single bird) : all proper. 

Add. and Corr.: The emigrant, Augustus Jay, born in 
1665, came to New York in 1685. The date of 1745, 
which we give in our notice, is the date of the purchase 
of the Rye, Westchester Co., estate. 

3C'ffriCS. Arms : Sa., a lion rampant, or, between three 
Page 34. Plate IV. scaling ladders, of the last. 

Add. and Corr. : There are less than fifty American fam- 
ilies, endorsed by Sir Bernard BURKE, as descending: 
from English, or Scotch, or Irish families, bearing arms- 
Among these few is to be found the family of JEF- 
FRIES, of Boston, New England, America, absolutely 
distinct from the JAFFREYS, of New Hampshire, also, 
mentioned in BURKE's General Armory. 

The Motto of these Jeffries is: Fac recte et nil time.. 
[Act right and never fear.] 

JObnCS. Arms : Az., a lion rampant, between three 
Page 90. Plate XIII. Crosses form^e fitch^e, or, a chief, 
of the last. 

3obnson. 

Page 140. 

JObnStOnC. arms : Arg., a saltire, sa. On a chief, gu.,. 
Page 91. Plate XIII. three cushions, or. 

JOSSCllgn. Arms: Chequy, gu. and az., on a fess of 
the first, an annulet, or. 
Crest : A bear's head and neck, sa.,. 

muzzled, or. 
Gen. and Hist. Rem.: The founders 
of the JosselYN family in America 
were two brothers, John and Henry, 
who were in New England in 1638. 
In deeds of the time, etc., they are 
qualified Gentlemen. It is, however, 
erroneous to claim for their descend- 
ants any connection with the JOCE- 
LYNS, Earls of Roden, who bear to- 
tally different arms. [Barry's 




1 70 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



Hist, of Hanover, Mass., 335 ; N. E. HiST. AND Gen. 
Register, II., 14.] 

30U6t. Arms : Az., two pennons [in French Jouets\ 
Page 138. Plate XVI. Crossed saltirewise, or, between a 
mullet, in chief, and an escallop, in base, of the last. 

JO^UffC. Arms: Arg., on a pile, az., three dexter 
gauntlets, of the field. 
Crest : A cubit arm, in armour [or 
vested, az.], grasping, in the hand, 
a scimitar: all proper. 
MOTTO: T ant que je puis. [As much 

as I can.] 
Gen. and Hist. Rem.: These arms 
were borne, in 1663, by John JOY- 
LIFFE, of Boston, Mass., Gentleman. 
They were the ancient devices 
which GUILLIM recognizes as hav- 
ing belonged " to John Jolliffe, of 
the City of London, Esquire, Gov- 
ernor of the Muscovy Company, 
descended from the JOLLIFFES of 
Botham, in Co. Stafford." [S. G. 
Drake: Hist, and Antiq. of Boston, 1836; BuRKE's 
Peerage, Baronetage, and Kjiightage, i88j.^ 
Same Arms as the Jolliffes, Barons Hylton, only the 
pile in the latters' arms is vert. 




Ikinsman. arms 



Per pale, az. and gu., three saltires, 
arg. 

Crest : A buck : proper — lodged in 
fern, vert. 

Gen. and Hist. Rem. : We have here 
a full, clear pedigree, extending 
from John KINSMAN, or Kynnes- 
MAN (1337), to Robert KINSMAN, 
the colonist, born in 1607, son of 
Harold KINSMAN of Broughton, Co. 
Northampton, who came over to 
Boston, Mass., in 1634. [L. W. 
Stickney : The Kinsman Familyl\ 



"Slip. Arms : Az., a chevron, or, between two griffins, se- 
Page 16. Plate I. jant and confronts, in chief, and a 

dexter hand, couped, in point, arg. 

XanCC? [&C]. arms: Az., a pennon, or, the flag flying 
Page 24. Plate III. towards dexter, arg. [not towards 
sinister, as in our example]. Over all, a bar, or. 

Same Arms as the DE Lancis, Vicomtes de Laval and de 
Nouvian, in Normandy (France). 

XatbrOp, arms : Cyronny of eight, az. and gu., an 
Page 22. Plate 11. eagle displayed, arg. 





^-=M=^ 



Add. and Corr. : We have good authority for the arms 
we give, but we must admit that the LOWTHROPPE. 0/ 
Lowthorpe, Co. York, from which the colonist is sup- 
posed to descend, bore : 

Arms : Quarterly, gu. and sa., an eagle displayed, arg. 

Crest: A Cornish chough: proper. [Rev. E. B. HUNT- 
INGTON : The Lo-Lathrop Family, 1884.'] 

XaWrenCC. arms : Arg., a cross, raguly, gu. 

Page 33. Plate IV. ADD. AND CORR. : We give here, in the 
text, the arms more generally used 
by the descendants of the colonists 
mentioned in our notice, and which 
are the arms [but not the crest] 
borne by the LAWRENCES of Tver, 
Co. Buckingham, whose Baronetcy 
became extinct in 17 14. It adds to 
the blazoning above: On a chief, of 
the second, a lion, passant guar- 
dant, or. 

It may be stated here that close 
and impartial researches, made by 
the distinguished genealogist. Rev. 
L. B. Thomas, seem to have established the fact that 
the colonists mentioned in our notice can not be proved, 
as yet, to be descended from the Lawrences of Ashtoft 
Hall, as is fondly believed by their descendants. 

Xawrance. 

Page 33. 

XCC of Virginia. Arms : Gu., a fess, chequy, az. and or. 
Page 66. Plate IX. between ten billets, arg. — four in 
Also. Plate XVII. chief, three, two and one, in base. 

Add. and Corr. : The shield on Plate XVII. is the only 
exact one. Our artist's mistake was caused by erro- 
neous — although quite ancient — documents, sent us 
from Virginia. 

Same Arms as the Baronets Lee of Langley, Co. Salop 
(Ext. 1660). 

lee of aLee. 

Page 66. 

XCdQCtt. Arms : Az., on a bend, arg., three hearts, gu. 
Page 49. Plate VII. On a chief, of the second, three 
martlets, sa. 



Xemon. 

Xemmon. 

Xeman. 

Page 124. 



Same Arms as the Baronets LemmON, or 
Leman of Northaw, Co. Herts (Ext. 
1762), descended from Sir Joh7t Le- 
MAN, Mayor of London (1616). 



!iLC0nar6. arms : Or, on a fess, gu., three fleurs-de-lis, 
of the field. 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



171 




Crest : Out of a ducal coronet, an he- 
raldic tiger, arg., maned and tufted, 
or. 
Motto : Pour bien ddsirer. [To desire 
well.] 
~^ Gen. and Hist. Rem. : These arms 
are in T. Gwilt-Mapleson's Hand 
Book of Heraldry (1852). The emi- 
grants were John and Henry LEON- 
ARD, who came from Pontypool, Co. 
Monmouth, Wales, and settled at 
Taunton, Mass. There are proba- 
bilities that they did belong to the 
Leonard stock. {Genealogical Memoir of the LEON- 
ARDS, 1851^ 
Same Arms as the Leonards, Earls of Sussex and Barons 
Dacre ; Baronets of Wickhajn Court, Co. Kent ; Baronets 
Barrett-Leonard of Belhus, Co. Essex. 

ILCVCrCtt. Arms : Arg., a chevron, between three lev- 
Page 35. Plate IV. erets, courant, sa. 
Same Arms as the Leveretts of Great Chelsea (1632). 

5LCWiS. Arms: Arg., a dragon's head and neck, erased, 
vert, holding in the mouth a bloody 
hand : proper. 
Crest : A dragon's head and neck, 
erased, vert. [Sometimes the 
dragon in the crest, holds also the 
bloody hand of the shield.] 
Gen. and Hist. Rem.: There are 
several Virginia families of the name 
of Lewis, between which there 
is no known connection. The 
Lewises of Eastern Virginia origi- 
nate with General Robert LEWIS, 
who came over from Wales, to Vir- 
ginia, in 1038, and was a very large landed proprietor, 
having received a grant of more than thirty thousand 
acres of land. [Henning'S Statutes, VIH. ; Bishop 
Meade's Old Churches, Ministers and Families of Vir- 
ginia, //., 231,325 ; Virginia Hist. Register, V., 24.] 

HLinbSa?. arms: Quartered — I stand 4th: Gu., a fess. 
Page 105. Plate XIV. chequy, arg. and az. 2d and 4th: 
Or, a lion, rampant, gu. ; the shield, debruised of a rib- 
bon, in bend, sa., over all. 

Add. and Corr. : Our colored plate does not seem to 
correspond with the blazoning of the English heraldic 
authorities, which place the ribbon over the 2nd and 3d 
quarters only ; that is, over the Abernethy arms, 
where it belongs. But we have copied exactly the en- 
graving furnished us by the last descendants of the 
colonist we mention in our notice. 

Same Arms as the Lindsays, Earls of Crawford and 
Balcarres, the Lords Spynie (title dormant), the Baronets 
of Evelick, Co. Perth. 




Xin3ee. 

Page 94. 

%isle. 

Page 125. 

!IliVing0tOn. arms: Quarterly— ist and 4th: Three 
Page 13. Plate I. gilly-flowers, gu., within a double 

Also, Plate XVII. tressure, flory counter-flory, vert, 

for Linlithgow. 2nd quarterly-quartered — ist and 
4th : Gu., on a chevron, arg., a rose [or fleur-de-lis, as in 
our example], two lions, passant combattant, of the 
first, for Hepburn. 2nd and 3d : Az., three martlets, 
or. 3d grand quarter: Sa., a bend, between six billets, 
or, for CalLENDAR. 

Add. and Corr. : The father of the emigrant quartered 
simply the arms of LiNLITHGOW and Callendar, and 
used cingue-foils, not gilly-flowers, in the 1st and 2nd quar- 
ters. Above the shield he used four Hebrew characters, 
sigmlymg Ebenezer. We give, in our Plate XVIL, what 
we believe to be the only regular, correct Livingston 
arms. 

Same Arms as the Livingstones, Earls of Linlithgow; 
the Earls of Callendar ; the Baronets LIVINGSTONES of 
West^uarter, Co. Stirling; the Earls of Newburgh, Vis- 
counts Kelsyth, Viscou?its Tiviot. 

XlO^b. Arms : Gu., a lion, rampant, or, within a bor- 

Page 135. Plate XVI. dure, of the last. 
Same Arms as the Lloyds of Femey Hall, Co. Salop. 

[WaLFORD'S Co. Families.'] 

ILlO^b. Arms : Quartered — Ist and 4th : Sa., ahe-goat, pas- 
sant, arg. 2nd and 3d: Az., three 
cocks, arg., armed and combed, gu. 
Crest : A he-goat, salient. 
Motto : Esto vigilans. [Be watchful.] 
Gen. AND Hist. Rem. : Thomas Lloyd, 
the colonist, was the third son of 
Charles LlOYD of Dolobran, and of 
Elizabeth STANLEY (of the great 
house of Stanley). He espoused 
the Quaker faith, and joined Wil- 
liam Penn in the colonization of 
Pennsylvania, where he was Deputy- 
Governor, Master of the Rolls, and 
President of the Council (1684-1693). He had come 
over to America in 1683, and died in Philadelphia in 
1694. There are no descendants of his in the male line. 
The Lloyds of Dolobra^i, still count among the lead- 
ing families of Great Britain. [Lloyd and Carpenter 
Genealogy, 1870; SMITH'S LlOYD Family of Penn- 
sylvania.] 
Xorb. Arms : Arg., on a fess, gu., between three cinque- 
Page 22. Plate II. foils, az., a hind, passant, between 
two pheons, or. 

XOritlQ, Arms : Quarterly, arg. and gu., a bend, en- 
Page 59. Plate VIII. grailed, sa. 




172 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



XOWClI. Arms : Sa., a hand, couped at the wrist, grasp- 
Page 20. Plate II. ing three darts — one in pale and 
two in saltire — arg. 

XOWn&CS. Arms : Arg., fretty, az., on a canton, gu., a 
Page 63. Plate IX. leopard's head, erased at the neck, 
or. 

Same Arms as the Lowndes of Bright-well Park, Co. Ox- 
ford, and of Waddon Hall, Co. Bucks. [Walford's 
Co. Families^ 

XU&IOW. Arms : Arg., a chevron, between three bears' 
Page 26. Plate III. heads, erased, sa. 

Add. and Corr. : In spite of BURKE 
giving the above arms to the LUD- 
LOWS of Hill Deverill, Co. Wilts, 
the American LUDLOWS insist on 
martens being substituted for bears, 
and for using exclusively the crest 
B, blazoned : A lion, rampant, sa., 
bezant^e. We are inclined to think 
that the family is right. 
Same Arms as the Ludlows of Seend, Co. Wilts. [Wal- 
ford's Co. Families^ 

XU&Well. Arms: Gu., on a bend, arg., between two 
Page 64. Plate IX. towers, or, three eagles, displayed. 




Arms : Arg., a chevron, between two cocks, 
Plate III. affront^e, in chief, and a lion, pas- 



Xuquer. 

Page 28. 
sant, in base, gu. 
Add. AND Corr. : Other arms, registered in the French 
authorities on heraldry as belonging also to the L'EcUY- 
ERS deMuret, are found, since the emigration, in the 
possession of the American LUQUERS. These are bla- 
zoned : Az., on a chevron, arg. [the ordinary is thus 
maintained in both shields], five roses [or torteaux], 
gu., between three mullets, or. 

X^man. arms: Quarterly — 1st and 4th: Per chevron. 
Page 60. Plate VIII. gu. and arg. [and not arg. and gu., 
as in our example], in base, [and not in chief, as in our 
example], an annulet, of the first, for Lyman. 2nd : 
Gu., a chevron, between three sheep, arg., for LAMBERT. 
3d : Quarterly-quartered — ermine and gu., over all, a 
cross, or, for OSBORNE. 

Add. and Corr.: The ist and 4th quarters, z>., the LY- 
MAN arms proper, are to be found in no English work 
on heraldry ; the only per chevron, gu. and arg., being 
found as the arms of AddOTT. 

The arms of LEY are : per chevron, or and g2i. Per- 
haps researches might be made in that direction. Let 
us remark here, that there exist thousands of authentic 
arms never published in any heraldic work. 

HpnCb. Arms: Az., a chevron, between three trefoils, 

Page 95. Plate XIII. slipped, or. 
Same Arms [and family] as the Baronets Lynch-Blosse 

of Castle Carra, Co. Mayo. 




X^nOC. Arms : Gu., on a chief, or, three tau-crosses, of 
the first. 

Crest: A demi-grififin, segr6ant, gu., 
holding a tau-cross, of the shield. 

Gen. and Hist. Rem.: Judge Simon 
Lynde, the colonist, born in 1624, 
was presented to Charles L by Sir 
Joh7i Digby, first Earl of Bristol, as 
a relation. He emigrated to New 
England in 1650, and died in 1687. 
His son, Nathaniel, was the first 
Treasurer of the College School of 
Saybrook, afterwards Yale College. 
[E. E. Salisbury: Family Memo- 
rials; N. E. Hist, and Gen. Reg- 
ister, IX., 323.] 

fIDclDiCftar. arms: Quartered— ist and 4th: Or, an 
Page 130. Plate XVI. eagle, displayed, with two heads, 
gu. 2nd and 3d : Per bend, embattled, arg. and gu. ; 
over all, an escutcheon, or, charged with three stags' 
horns, erect, gu., two and one. 

Same Arms as the Boyles, Earls of Glasgow, etc. 

flDallet^lPreVOSt. same arms as the Courtes de-^^-L. 
Page 53. let, of France and Switzerland. 

flDar{?bam. arms: Az., on a chief, or, a demi-lion, ram- 
pant, issuant, gu. 

Crest : A lion of St. Mark, sejant 
guardant, resting the dexter fore- 
paw on a shield, arg. 

Gen. and Hist. Rem.: These arms, 
borne and used by William Mark- 
HAM, who was Deputy-Governor of 
Pennsylvania, are those of the 
Markhams of Sedgebrook, Co. Not- 
tingham (Baronetcy Ext. 1779), and 
more anciently of the MaRKHAMS 
of Markham, Co. Notts. [N. Y. 
Gen. and Biog. Record, VIII., 
349 ; Pa. Hist. Society's Records?^ 
Same Arms as the Markhams of Becca Hall, Co. York. 
[Walford's Co. Families?^ 

flDartipn. 1 
flDartin. 

Page 95. 

fIDaSCar'CnC. arms: Arg., a Hon, rampant, gu. ; on a 
Page 34. Plate IV. chief, az., three mullets, or. 

Add. and Corr. : It is given in Jouffroy d'Escha- 
VANNES' Nobiliaire as : Arg., a lion, rampant, gu. ; in 
chief, three mullets, sa. Governor MASCARi;NE had the 
arms we give registered at the Heralds' College, London. 

fIDatber. 

Page g6. 

flDa?. 

Page 126. 




AMERICA HERALDICA 



173 




flDerriH. arms: Arg., a bar, az., between three pea- 
Page 129. Plate XVI. cocks' heads, erased : proper. 

flDib&lCtOn. Arms : Arg., fretty, sa., on a canton, per 
Page 66. Plate IX. chevron, or and sa., a unicorn's 
head, erased per chevron, gu. and or, the horn, sa. 

Same Arms as the Baronets MiDDLETON of Crowfield 
Hall and Shrubland Hall, Co. Suffolk. 

flDillCr. Same Arms as the Baronets Miller of Oxen- 
Page 97. hoath, Co. Kent (Ext. 1714)- 

flDUner. arms : Sa., three snafffe-bits, or. 

Crests: A. A snaffle-bit, of the shield. 
B. A horse's head, couped, 
arg., bridled and maned, 
or, charged on the neck 
with a bezant. 
Motto : Addit frena feris. [He reins 

in the untamed beasts.] 
Gen. and Hist. Rem. : Nathaniel Mil- 
ker, of New York, father of the Rev. 
John Milner, a clergyman of the 
Church of England (1761), was him- 
self descended from MichaeiyilU^'E.'R, 
of Lynn, Mass., who removed to 
Long Island in 1640. He claimed descent from the 
Milners of Pudsey, Co. Kent, whose arms he bore. 
(Berry's Kent Genealogies; Bolton's Hist, of West- 
chester Co., N. v., //., jdj.J 
Same Arms [except tinctures] as the Baronets MiLNER of 
Nun-Appleton Hall, Co. York. 

flDinCr. Arms : Gu., a fess, arg., between three plates. 

Page 35. Plate III. 
Add. AND CORR. : The Mynors family, of Co. Worcester, 

bears these arms and the crest we give. The Motto 

is : Fac et spera. [Act and hope.] 

flDonrOC. \ arms : Or, an eagle's head, erased, gu. 
flDUnrOe. ' same arms as the Baronets MUNRO of 
Page 38. Plate V. Foulis, Co. Ross, N. S. (Cr. 1634). 

flDOntaQUC. arms : Arg., three fusils, conjoined in 

Page 72. Plate X. fess, gu., between three pellets. 
Add. AND Corr. : The fusils in our example ought to be 

conjoined. 
Same Arms borne, as first quartering, by the MONTAGUS, 

Dukes of Manchester, by the Barons Rokeby, and by the 

late owners of a number of extinct titles. 

flDOntgOmer^. arms: Quartered— ist and 4th: Az., 
Page 17. Plate I. three fleurs-de-lis, or, for Mont- 

Also, Page 88. GOMERIE. 2nd and 3d : Gu., three 

annulets, or, stoned, az., for Eglinton. All within a 
bordure, or, charged with a tressure, flory counter-flory, 
gu., for SetON. 

Add. and Corr. : See, also, for the proper blazoning of 
the arms of the Montgomeries of Lainshaw, real heirs 




to the Earldom of Eglinton, our special notice, page 88. 
Same Arms as the Earls of Eglinton and Winton ; the 
Earls of Mount Alexander (Ext. 1757); the Comtes de 
Montgomery, in France ; the Baronets Montgomery 
of Skelmorlie, Co. Ayr. 

fIDOrgan. arms: Vert, a lion, rampant, or. 

Gen. AND Hist. Rem.: Three brothers 
[according to the family history], 
James, John, and Niles MORGAN, 
came from Llandaff, Glamorgan- 
shire, Wales, to Boston, in 1636. 
John left soon for Virginia; Niles 
settled at Springfield, Mass., and 
James at New London, Ct. The 
arms we give were made use of at 
an early date. They are attributed by English authori- 
ties to the Morgans of Co. Monmouth, Wales. [MOR- 
GAN Genealogy, 1869; Whitmore'S American Gene- 
alogist, 256.] 
flDOrriS. arms: Quartered — 1st and 4th: Gu., a lion, 
Page 14. Plate I. reguardant, or. 2nd and 3d : Arg., 

three torteaux. 
Same Arms as the Morrises of Netherby, Co. York. 
[Walford'S Co. Families.\ 

flDO0eIe?. Arms: Sa., a chevron, arg., between three 
mill-picks, or. 

Crest: An eagle, displayed, ermine. 

Motto : Mos legem regit. [Custom 
rules the law.] 

Gen. and Hist. Rem.: The colonist 
Henry MOSLEY, or MOSELEY, set- 
tled at Dorchester, Mass., and his 
son, Capt. Samuel MoSELEY, was a 
gallant soldier, and died in 1680. 
His seal, used on various deeds, bore 
the arms we give. The crest and 
motto are supplied by BURKE. 
They belong to the MOSELEYS of 
Rolleston, Co. Stafford (Baronetcy 
ext. 1779). [Heraldic Journal, IL, 181 ; Miscel- 
lanea Genealogica and Heraldica, IIL, 98.] 

flDOUntfOrt. arms : Bendy of ten, or and az. 

Page 106. Plate XIV. 

flDunSell. arms: Arg., a chevron, between three 
Page 38. Plate V. maunches, sa. 

Same Arms as the Maunsells of Fort Eyre, near Galway, 
Ireland. [Walford's Co. Families^ 

IRiCOU. Arms: Or, a lion's head, between three hawks' 
Page 53. Plate VII. heads all erased, gu., within a bor- 
dure of the last. 

Same Arms as the Baronets NiCOLSON of Carnock and 
Tilicoultrie (Cr. 1686). 

IRiCbOlSOn. arms: Az., on a chevron, arg., between 




174 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



Page 63. Plate IX. four suns, splendant, proper [and 
not gic, as in our example], a cathedral, gu. 
Add. and Cork.: This branch of the family, mentioned 
in our first notice, was extinct with the Sir Francis 
Nicholson, who received the grant of arms. The mis- 
take of the artist is, therefore, of less importance, as it 
concerns no living descendant of the grantee. 

IFliCbOlSOn. arms: Erminois, on a pale, sa., three 

Page 152. Plate XVII. martlets, or. 
IROrman&ie [be], arms : Arg., on a fess, gu., between 

Page 120. Plate XV. three martlets, sa., in chief, and 

three blackbirds, of the last, two and one in base, three 

bezants. 

IROrt [IDan]. arms : Az., a fess, wavy, arg. [to repre- 
Pao-e 77. Plate XI. Sent a river], between two stars, or. 



IRorton. 

Page iig. 

IRo^es. 



Arms : Gu., a fret, arg. ; a bend, vair, over all. 
Plate XV. 



Arms : Az., three cross crosslets, in bend, arg. 

Crest: on a chapeau, gu., turned up, 

ermine, a dove, holding, in the beak, 

an olive branch : proper. 

Motto : Nuncia pads oliva. [The 

olive, messenger of peace.] 
Gen. and Hist. Rem. : The tombstone 
of Rev. Ja7nes NOYES (1719), in the 
ancient burying ground of Stoning- 
ton, Ct., bears these devices. He 
was the son of the Rev. James 
NOYES of Newbury, who was born 
in Wiltshire, in 1608, and came to 
New England with his brother, 
Nicholas, in 1634. [Heraldic 
Journal, H., 84; Coffin's History of Newbury, Mass.; 
NoYES Genealogy, 1861.] 
Same Arms as the Noyes of East Mascalls, Co. Sussex. 
[WaLFORD'S Co. Families^ 




©bell. Arms: 



Arg., three crescents, gu. 

Crest : An eagle, displayed, gu. 
Gen. and Hist. Rem. : William Odell, 
whose descendants made early use 
of the above arms, was at Concord, 
Mass., in 1640. In 1644 he removed 
to Fairfield, Ct. His son, William, 
was one of the principal proprietors 
of Rye, Westchester Co., N. Y., in 
1 66 1 . [Bolton's Hist, of Westches- 
ter Co., N. v., //., 6sj\ N. Y. Gen. 
and Biog. Record, XVII., 57.] 



Arms: Gyronny of eight, arg. and gu. In the 
. Plate XVI. dexter gyron, arg. ; in chief, an oak 
branch, fructed: proper. 




©liver. Arms : Arg., a hand and arm, issuing from out 
of clouds, on the sinister side, fess- 
ways, and grasping a dexter hand, 
couped at the wrist : all proper. 
Crest: A martlet, arg. ; in the beak a 

sprig, vert. 
Gen. and Hist. Rem. : John Oliver, 
Gentleman, a merchant of Bristol, 
England, was the father of Thomas 
Oliver, a second son, who reached 
Boston in 1632, and was the ruling 
Elder of the First Church. The 
arms used in the family from the 
start are those of the Olivers of 
Lewes, Co. Sussex, England. [S. G. Drake : Hist, and 
Antiq. of Boston, 2gj {1856)1. 

©tis. 

Page 149. , 

©yenbribge. 




Arms : Gu., 




lion, rampant, arg., tail 
double-queued, vert ; on a bordure, 
of the last, eight escallops, or. 
Crest : A demi-lion, rampant, tail 
double-queued, arg., langued and 
armed, gu., holding, in the dexter 
paw, an escallop, or. 
Gen. and Hist. Rem.: Rev. John 
Oxenbridge of Daventry, Co. 
Northampton, A.M. of Oxford 
(1623), travelled extensively in the 
West Indies, and finally, settled at 
Boston, in 1669, as Pastor of the 
First Church. These arms are rec- 
ognized in the Heralds' Visitation of l6j^. [HERALDIC 
Journal, II., 178.] 

]PaQC Arms : Or, a chevron, between three martlets, az. 



: Gu., three fleurs-de-lis, arg. ; a chief, 
vair. 

Crest : A hand holding a palm branch : 
proper. 

Motto : Ut palma Justus. [As straight 
as a palm.] 

Gen. AND Hist. Rem. : Two brothers, 
Guy and Edward Palmes, probably 
of the English family of Palmes of 
Naburn, Co. York, were settled in 
Connecticut in 1658. These arms 
are the reproduction of the seal of 
Edward Palmes, who died in New 
London in 1714. [HERALDIC JOUR- 
NAL, I., 159.] 

Same Arms as the Palmes of Naburn 
[Walford's Co. Families.'] 



Page 65. 


Plate IX 


Page 126. 




palmes. 


Arms 




Hall, Co. York. 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



175 



parsons. 

Page 149. 

pCCh. Arms: Arg., on a chevron, engrailed, gu., three 
Page 108. Plate XIV. crosses, form^e, of the field. 

Same Arms as the Pecks of Cornish Hall, near Holt, Co. 
Denbigh. 

Ipeirce. 

Page 128. 

IPClbam. Arms : Az., three pelicans, arg., vulning 
Page 18. Plate 11. themselves : proper. 

Same Arms as the Pelham-Clintons, Dukes of New- 
castle; the Earls of Chichester ; the Earls of Yar- 



]pCn. Arms: Erm., on a canton, az., a pelican, or, 

Page 17. Plate I. vulning herself, gu. 

Add. and Corr. : Burke says Dimblesby instead of Wil- 

lingsby, and states that this coat was granted in 1594. 

]pCnn. Arms: Arg., on a fess, sa., three plates. 

Page 40, Plate V. 

IPCnninQtOn. arms : Or, five fuslls, conjoined fesswise, 

Page 86. Plate XII. az. 
Same Arms as the Penningtons, Barons Mwicaster. 

Ipepperell. 

Page 145. 

pe^StCr [be]. Arms : Az., on a terrace, a tree, vert, 
Page 24. Plate III. between two sheep, grazing, arg. 

Add. and Corr. : The present head of the family does not 
countenance the addition of the two sheep, arg. 

The first emigrant ancestor reached New Amsterdam 
in 1640-45. 

pC^tOn. Arms : Sa., a cross, engrailed, or. 

Page 63. Plate IX. SAME Arms as the Baronets PEY- 
TON of Islehain, Co. Cambridge (dormant 1815); the 
Baronets PEYTON of Kfiowlton, Co. Kent (Ext. 1683) ; 
the Baronets Peyton of Luddington, Co. Cambridge 
(Cr. 1776). 

iPbClpS. Arms : Arg., a lion, rampant, sa., between six 
Page 76. Plate XL cross crosslets, fitch^e, gu. 

ipbilipSC Arms : Az., a demi-lion, rampant, rising out 
Page 14. Plate I. of a ducal coronet, arg., surmounted 

by a ducal coronet, or. 

Add. and Corr.: We blazon here the shield we give in 
our Plate I., according to the description of Bolton 
[Hist, of Westchester Co., N. Y., I., £1^1 ; but we must 
state that we find in Burke's General Armory (ed. of 
1884) the following notice : 

" Philipse (Philipsburg, America): Az., a lion, ramp- 
ant, or. Crest : Out of a ducal coronet, a demi-lion, 
rampant." Motto : (As given page 14). 




pbippen. 

(Fitz-Pen.) 

Page 98. 

IPiCrrepOnt. arms: Arg., sem^e of cinque-foils, gu., a 

Page 39. Plate V. lion, rampant, sa. 

Same Arms as the Earls and Dukes of Kingston (Ext. 1773) ; 

the Earls Manvers. 

pOlbemUS. arms: Quartered— ist and 4th: Az., a 
Page 79. Plate XL lion, passant, or ; a canton of the 
last. 2nd and 3d : Arg., a fess, gu., between a wheel, 
sa., in chief, and a heart, of the second, in base. 

IPOOrC. Arms : Arg., a fess, az., between three mullets. 

Crest: A tower, sa., masoned, arg. 
Motto : Pauper non in spe. [Poor, but 

not in hope.] 
Gen. and Hist. Rem. : James Poore 
came from Co. Wilts, England, to 
Newbury, Mass., in 1635. Alice, 
Samuel, and Daniel PoORE, brothers 
and sister, all under age, arrived in 
^j\ 1638, with the family of Richard 

^ J Dummer. A Thomas PoORE died 

in Andover, Mass., in 1695. They 
are supposed to have belonged to one stock, and to be 
all descendants from Philip POOR of Amesbury, Co. 
Wilts, England {0. 1571), he being the first of the family 
to add an e to his name. The connection with the Eng- 
lish house is fairly established. [S. E. TiTCOMB : Early 
New England People, 201 J\ 

pOpbam. Arms: Arg., on a chief, gu., two stags' 
Page 79. Plate XII. heads, cabossed, or. 

porter. Arms : Arg., on a fess, sa., between two barru- 
lets, or, three church bells, of the 
first. 
Crest : A portcullis : proper — chained, 

or. 
Motto : Vigilantia et virtute. [By 

watchfulness and bravery.] 
Gen. and Hist. Rem.: Among the 
companions of John Warham (1635) 
in the settlement of Windsor, was 
Johi Porter, sixteenth in descent 
from William de la Grande, a Nor- 
man Knight, who acquired land, at 
the time of the Conquest, near Kenilworth, Co. War- 
wick, England. His son, Roger (or Ralpli), was " Grand 
Porteur" to Henry I., from which the name of Porter is 
derived. [Descendants of John Porter, etc., 1882. 
Records in the London Heralds' College.'] 

poultne?. 

Page 150. 




176 



AMERICA HERALDICA 




iPrCblC. ) Arms: Gu., on a pale, or, between four 
iPrCbbIC ) lions' heads, erased, arg., three dia- 

monds, sa. 
Crest : A lion's head, erased, or. 
Gen. and Hist. Rem. : Copies of this 
coat of arms have been preserved 
from the beginning of the XVIII. 
century in the families descended 
from the eldest son of Abraham 
Prebble, the emigrant, who came 
over from Co. Kent, England, in 
1636, settled in Scituate, Mass., and 
married a daughter of Elder Nathan- 
iel TiLDEN, also a Kent man. These 
arms were granted, in 1585, to George Prebble of York, 
England. It is admitted that the Prebbles removed 
from Co. York to Co. Kent at the end of the XVI. cen- 
tury. The name is now generally written Preble, with 
one b. [Geo. H. Prebble: Gen. Sketch of the First 
Three Generations of Prebbles, 1868?^ 

iPrCSCOtt. Arms : Sa., a chevron, between three owls. 

Page 113. Plate XIV. arg. 
Same Arms as the Baro?iets Prescott of Theobald's Park, 

Co. Hereford (Cr. 1794.) 

iPrCVOSt. Arms : Az., a dexter arm, in fess, issuing 
Page 39. Plate V. from a cloud, in the sinister fess 
point, grasping a sword, erect : proper — pomel and 
hilt, or. 

Add. and Corr. : The English Baronets Prevost add, in 
chief, two mullets, arg. Their crest is as follows : A 
demi-lion, rampant, az., charged on the shoulder with a 
mural crown, or. The sinister paw grasping a sword, 
erect, as in the arms. 

Old Motto : J'ai bien servi. [I served well.] 

Same Arms as the Baronets Prevost of Belmont, Co. 
Hants (Cr. 1805). 

prince. 

Page 129. 

provooet. 

Page 148. 

plpnCbOn. arms: Per bend, arg. and sa., three roun- 
Page 85. Plate XII. dies, within a bordure [sometimes 
engrailed], counterchanged. 

©UinClp. Arms: Gu., seven mascles, conjoined [closer 
Page 23. Plate II. than they are in our example], 
three, three and one, or. 

Add. and Corr. : Although no connection is claimed with 
the Earls of Winchester, the arms are the same. We 
may mention that T. C. BANKS, Esq., in his Dormant 
and Extinct Baronages of England, considers the QuiNCY 
emigrant to America as descended from one of the 
younger sons of Baron Saier de QuiNCI. 



The motto can be more accurately translated : An 
immaculate mascle. 
Same Arms as the Earls of Winchester (Ext. 1264). 

IRanbOlpb. Arms: Gu., on a cross, or, five mullets, gu. 
Page 65. Plate IX. ADD. AND CORR. : The English author- 
ities say : On a cross, arg., five mullets, sa. Our exam- 
ple is taken from three different bookplates of the RAN- 
DOLPHS of Virginia, all three very clearly drawn, and 
showing the tinctures as we give them. 

IRapaljiC. arms : Az., three bars, or. 

Page 46. Plate VII. 



Arms: Quarterly — ist: Or, a mountain, az., 
IRaSep. ) inflamed : proper. 2nd : Gu., the 

Page 132. Plate XVI. three legs of the Island of Man, 
armed : proper — conjoined in the center at the upper 
end of the thigh, flexed in triangle, the spurs, or. 3d : 
Or, a galley, sails furled, pennons flying, sa. 4th : Gu., 
a lion, rampant, arg. En surtout, an inescutcheon, 
party per pale, gu. and sa., a fess, between three fleurs- 
de-lis, or. 

TRawle, 

Page 146. 

IRaWSOn. Arms: Per fess, az. and sa., a castle, with 

Page 87. Plate XII. four towers, in perspective, or. 
Add. AND Corr. : Burke says that the castle is arg., but 

E. B. Crane, in his " Rawson Family" (1875), gives the 

tinctures we reproduce. 
Same Arms as the Rawsons of Nidd Hall, near Knares- 

borougk, Co. York. [Walford's Co. Fatnilies.'] 

IReab. Same Arms as the Reades of Ipsden House, Co. 
Page 52. Oxford, [Walford's Co. Families.'] 

1RCat)e. Arms: Gu., on a bend, n6bul6e, arg., three 

Page 52. Plate VII. shovelers, az. 
Add. and Corr. : In the notice read Wenburie instead of 

Wenburn. 

"Kensselaer [Dan]. Gu., a cross sory, or. 

Page 15. Plate I. ADD. AND CORR. : These arms were 
Also, Plate XVII. borne by David Van Rensselaer 
subscriber [in 1852] to Gwilt-Ma- 
PLESON'S Hand Book of Her- 
aldry. The family in general 
bears: Gu, a cross moline, 
arg. (Plate XVII). We have 
been asked to reproduce the 
full Van Rensselaer coat 
of arms, as copied from the 
window of the Old Albany 
Dutch Church. We give, there- 
fore, an exact fac-sitnile of the 
arms as found there, but do 
not pretend to give the tinc- 
tures as, except concerning 




AMERICA HERALDICA 



177 



the first quarter, which constitutes the arms proper, there 
seems to have always been some uncertainty as to the 
tinctures of the three other quarters. 

IRicbarbs. 

Page 130. 
IRijher. arms : Az., a rose, arg., between three stars, or. 

Page 51. Plate VII. 

IRObCrbCaU. arms : Sa., a chevron, or ; in base, a 
Page 76. Plate XI. tower between two annulets, arg. ; 
on a chief, arg., a cross crosslet, gu. 

IRobinson. 

Page 151. 

IRogerS.' same arms as the Baronets ROGERS of Wis- 
Page 114. dome, Co. Devon (Cr. 1699), raised 

to the Peerage in 187 1, as Barons Blatchford. 

IROOmC. Arms : Arg., a fess, pean ; in chief, a lion, pas- 
Page 84. Plate XII. sant, gu. 

IROOSCVClt. Arms : Arg., on a mount vert, a rosebush. 
Page 76. Plate XI. with three roses : proper. 

1RU606[1. Arms : Arg., a chevron, between three cross 
Page 18. Plate II. crosslets, fitch^e, sa. 

Add. and Corr. : In 1820, James 
Russell of Co. Gloucester, Eng- 
land, father of Gen Lechmere RuS- 
SELL, applied for a confirmation of 
arms, as descending from the Rus- 
SELLS of Co. Worcester. He ob- 
tained the following grant for him- 
self and for James and Charles 
Russell, of Boston .■ 
Arms : Arg., on a chevron, between 
three cross crosslets, fitch^e, sa., an 
eagle's head, erased, or, within a 
bordure, engrailed, gu., charged with eight bezants. 
Crest : A demi-lion, rampant, arg., charged, on the 
shoulder, with a saltire, couped, az. Between the paws, 
a cross crosslet, fitch^e, erect, sa. 

Of course, the American families entitled to impale or 
quarter RusSELL arms, will use the original coat in- 
herited, and not the new one, to which only the heirs of 
Charles &nd James of Boston, are entitled. 

IRutQCrS. Arms : Arg., a lion, rampant, sa., debruised 
with a bar, gu., charged with a star 





of the field. In chief, a demi-eagle, 
displayed, of the second. 

Crest : A demi-Hercules, grasping in 
his dexter hand a club : all proper. 

Motto : Tantes Da Dir. 

Gen. and Hist. Rem. : These arms are 
copied from a bookplate of Hen- 
drick Rutgers, descendant of the 
colonist, Rutgers Jacobsen van 

ScHOENDERWOERT, alias RUT or 
Ruth van Woert, who sailed from 
Holland for the New Netherlands 
in 1636. He became a prominent 
citizen of Beverwyck (Albany), and 
rented the Patroon's Brewery in partnership with Ger- 
ritse van Schaick. His brother, Teunis jACOBSEN, came 
over in 1640. [PEARSON'S Early Settlers of Albany ; 
Mrs. Martha J. Lamb: History of the City of New 
York, I., 'J2J ; N. y. Gen. and Biog. Record, X., 156.] 

IRUtberfUrb. arms : Arg., an orle, gu. ; in chief, three 

Page 29. Plate III. martlets, sa., beaked, of the second. 

Same Arms as the Baro7is Rutherfurd, Earls of Teviot. 

SaliSbUr^g. arms: Gu., a llon, rampant, arg., ducally 
Page 22. Plate II. crowned, or, between three cres- 
cents, of the last. 

Add. and Corr. : John Salisbury of Boston, was very 
probably, of the same stock as Edward SALISBURY,, 
tracing back to the Salisburys of Wales. 

The Salisbury crest varies. We gave the crest 
probably derived from the Salisburys of Cotton Hall, 
Co. Denbigh ; and it was on the front of that old resi- 
dence. It was also used by the late Rev. Sir Charles J. 
Salusbury of Co. Denbigh. But this double-lion crest 
is not universal in the family. 

The motto should be rendered : It suffices for the 
lion (symbolizing the family) to have thrown down ; 
z. e., they trample not on fallen foes. 

Same Arms as the Baronets SaLUSBURY of Llewcny, Co. 
Denbigh (Ext. 1684). 

SaltOnStall. arms : Or [some say arg.], a bend, [and 
Page 42. Plate VI. not a fess, as in our example, Plate 
Plate XVII. VI.,] between two eagles, displayed, 

sa. 

Add. and Corr. : We give a new and correct engraving 
of this coat of arms in Plate XVII., but must insist on 
or as the field. [HERALDIC JOURNAL, I., 164, and 
Burke's General Armory for 1884..'] 

Gen. AND Hist. Rem.: Gurdon Saltonstall [and not 
Gordon] was Governor of Connecticut, from 1708 to 
1724, having graduated from Harvard College, in 1684, 
and settled as Minister at New London, in 1691. 



178 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



Further correcting our notice (page 42), we will state 
that Gilbert SaltONSTALL had two sons, Samuel and 
the Sir Richard vi)\o was Mayor of London in 1597. It 
was Samuel's son, Richard (who was thus the grandson 
of Gilbert), who came over as one of the Patentees of 
Massachusetts Bay, bringing, in 1630, the Charter estab- 
lishing Winthrop as Governor. 

S3n5^S. ) Arms : Or, a fess, dancett^e [of three points 
" " and not ol four, as in our example], 

VII. between three cross crosslets,fitch^e. 



San&s. 

Page 48, 



gu- 




Add. and Corr. : The Latin motto reads: Probum non 
poenitet. May be translated : Honesty leaves no regret. 

Same Arms as the Barons Sandys of Ombersley (Cr. 1743, 
Ext. 1797) ; the Barons SANDYS of Ombersley (Cr. 1802) ; 
the Baronets Sandys of Northborne Court, Co. Kent 
(Ext. 1726); the Baronets SANDYS of Wilberton, Co. 
Cambridge (Ext. 1644) ; the Baronets Sandys of Mis- 
senden Castle, Co. Gloucester (Ext.). 

SanfOrt), arms: Ermine, on a chief, gu., two boars' 
heads, couped, or. 
Crest : A demi-eagle, displayed . . 
Gen. AND Hist. Rem. : These arms, 
which are those of the Sandfords 
of Co. Northtunberlatid, England, 
are found on several tombstones, in 
the Old Burial Ground, at Newport, 
R. L, consecrated to the memory of 
members of the SanfOrd family of 
Rhode Island. The dropping of 
the d is of no material importance 
in the case. The tombstones are 
dated 1J21. 

There is a New York family of Sandford, claiming 
connection with the English family of Sandford of 
Sandford, Co. Salop, whose ffrw/.r are: Quarterly, per 
fess, indented, az. and ermine. Crest : A falcon, wings 
endorsed, preying on a partridge: proper. Motto: 
Nee temere, nee timide. It is said that the English 
house recognizes these American relatives. 

SaCQCnt. Arms : Arg., a chevron, between three dol- 
phins, hauriant, sa. 

Crest: A bird, wings elevated. 

Gen. and Hist. Rem.: These arms, 
so described in GORE'S Roll of 
Arms, No. ji, are stated there to 
have belonged to Peter Sargent, 
one of H.M.'s Counsellors for the 
Massachusetts Bay Province, who 
came from London in 1667, and 
died, s.s., in 18 14. 



SaVaQC, Arms : Arg., six lioncels, rampant, sa., three, 
Page S3. Plate XII. two, and one. 




Same Arms as the Earls RIVERS (Ext. 1728). 

SCbCnCft. Arms : Quartered — 1st and 4th : Barry of 
Page 50. Plate VII. six, arg. and az., for Tautenburg. 
2nd and 3d : Sa., a lion, rampant, or, for Nydeggen. 

Scbermerborn. 

Page 127. 

Scbieffelin. arms: Tiered, per fess, sa. and or. On 

Page 93. Plate XIII. three piles — two conjoined with 
one, between transposed — invected, counterchanged, 
as many cross crosslets, of the first. 

SCbU^lCr. Arms : Vert, issuing from a cloud, proper. 
Page 15. Plate I. a cubit arm, in fess, vested, az., 

holding, on the hand, a falcon, close : 
all proper. 
Add. and Corr. : We give here shield 
and crest as copied from a very old 
bookplate. The wrong crest had 
been placed, page 15, opposite the 
correct blazoning. 




Scott of Hncrum. Arms : Arg., three lions' heads. 
Page 115. Plate XV. erased, gu. 

Same Arms as the Scotts, Baronets of Ancrum, Co. Rox- 
burgh, Scotland (Cr. 1671.) 

Scott Of Virginia. Arms : Or, on a bend, az., a mullet 
Page 77. Plate XI. of six points, between two cres- 
cents, arg. 

Add. and Corr. : The English authorities say crescents of 
the field, and not arg., as our example, taken, however, 
from an American ScOTT bookplate. 

Scott of Xong irsIanD. 

Page 77. 

ScabUrig. arms : Arg., a fess, engrailed, between three 
Page 141. Plate XVI. ibexes, passant, sa. 

Sears. 

Page 99. 
SetOn. Arms: Or, three crescents, within a tressure. 
Page 80. Plate XI. flory counterflory, gu. 

SeWall. Same Arms as the Sewells of Newport, Isle 
Page 100. of Wight. 

Seymour. 'SsK-m-E. K^US ^.^ t^^e: Dukes of Somerset ; the 
Page 149. Marquesses of Hertford ; the Barons 

Seymour of Sudeley (attainted 1549); the Baronets 
Seymour of Langley, Co. Bucks ; the Baronets SEYMOUR 
of High Mount, Co. Limerick. 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



179 



SbeafEe. 

Page 131. 

Sbippen. arms: Arg., a chevron, between three oak 

Page 80. Plate XI. leaves, gu. 

SbirlClg. Arms : Paly of six, or and az. ; a canton, er- 
Page 71. Plate X. mine. 

Same Arms as the Earls Ferrers; the Baronets SHIRLEY 
of Preston, Co. Sussex (Ext. 1705); the Baronets Shir- 
ley of Oathall, Co. Sussex (Ext. 1815). 

Sbute. 

Page 144. 

Sirn0]|'[SYMES]. arms : Ermine, three increscents, gu. 
Crest : A demi-griffin, segr^ant. 
Motto : Injtistitia virtutes omnes. [In 

justice are all virtues.] 
Gen. and Hist. Rem. : These arms 
are found in the Burial Ground of 
St. Peter's Church, Philadelphia, on 
a tomb consecrated to the SiMS 
family. The arms are those of the 
Symes of Daventry, Co. Northamp- 
ton (granted 1592). The crest is 
different. [HERALDIC JOURNAL, 
III., 1 18; 'W^-LViOKTU'S Hyde Gene- 
alogy, 755.] 
: Quarterly — ist: Az., a ship at anchor, 
oars in saltire and sails furled, with- 
in a double tressure, flory counter- 
flory, or, for Orkney. 2nd : Arg., 
a cross, engrailed, az., for ROSSLYN. 
3d : Az., a ship under sail, or, for 
Caithness. 4th : Or, a lion, ramp- 
ant, gu., for Spar. 
Add. and Corr. : Burke says: "These 
different coats are found marshalled 
in different ways by the descendants 
of the Earls of Orkney and Caith- 
ness." However, we prefer to give 
here the exact and original arms of 
the SiNCLAIRS, blazoned as follows : 
Arms : Quartered — 1st and 4th : Az., a ship at anchor, 
oars in saltire and sails furled, within a double tressure, 
flory counter-fiory, or, for ORKNEY. 2nd and 3d : Or, 
a lion, rampant, gu., for Spar. 4th : Az., a ship under 
sail, or, the sails, arg., for CAITHNESS. Over all, divid- 
ing the quarters, a cross, engrailed, sa. 
Crest and Motto : As given, page 29. 
Same Arms as the Sinclairs, Earls of Orkney and Caith- 
ness ; the Lords Sinclair; the Baro?iets Sinclair of 
Ulbster, Co. Caithness (Cr. 1686), etc., etc., 

Sittart [IDan]. arms: Ermine, an eagle, displayed. 
Page 78. Plate XI. gu. [sometimes sa.] On a chief, of 
the second, a coronet, or, between two crosses, patt^e, 
arg. 




Shaate. 

Page 139. 

SWpWitb. Arms : Arg,, three bars, gu., a greyhound. 
Page 128. Plate XV. in full course, in chief, sa., collared, 
or. 

Same Arms as the Skipwiths, Baronets of Prestwould, Co. 
Leicester. 

Stnitb of Scars&ale. Arms : Or, on a chevron, gu., be- 
Page 49. Plate vil. tween three cross crosslets, fitch^e, 
sa., three bezants. 

Smitb of morwfcb. 

Page 49. 

SneUing. 

Page 132. 

SnOW&Cn. arms : Arg., on a fess, az., between three 
escallops, gu., three mullets, az., 
pierced,' of the field. 

Crest : A peacock in his pride. 

Gen. and Hist. Rem. : Richard Snow- 
den of Wales, who is said to have 
held a commission under Oliver 
Cromwell, came to Maryland in the 
XVII. century. His son, Richard, 
is mentioned as a well-known owner 
of land in Maryland, near South 
River, in a deed dated 1679. [Rev. 
L. B. Thomas : Genealogical Notes, 
/J^(i8i7).] 

Spotswoo&. 

Page 100. 
StanbiSb. arms : Sa., three standing-dishes, arg. 

Page 126. Plate XV. Same Arms as the Baronets StaN- 
DISH of Duxbury, Co. Lancaster (Cr. 1677, Ext. 1812). 

StCCl. Arms: Arg., a bend, chequy, sa. and ermine, be- 
tween two lions' heads, erased, gu. 
On a chief, az., three billets, or. 
Crest : A lion's head, erased, gu. 
Gen. and Hist. Rem.: These are 
found on the tombstone of Captain 
John Steel (0. 1768), in the King's 
Chapel Burial Ground, Boston. His 
father, Thomas Steel, was born in 
Scotland, in 1664, and died at Bos- 
ton, Mass., in 1735. [Heraldic 
Journal, II., 20 ; N. E. Hist, and 
Gen. Register, XVIII. , 270.] 
Same Arms as the Steeles, Baronets of Hempstead, Co. 

Dublin. 
Stetson. ) Arms : Arg., a bend, az., between two grif- 
StUtSOn. ) fins, sejant, sa. 

Page 68. Plate X. 

Stilcman. same arms as the Stylemans-Le Strange 





AMERICA HERALDICA 



Page 133. 0/ Hunslanlon, Co. T>ioT{olk. [WaL- 

FORD'S Co. Famz/ies.] 

Stockton. Arms : Gu., a chevron, vair, between three 

Page 99. Plate XIII. mullets, Or. 

StOb&ar&. Arms: Sa., three stars, within a bordure, 
Page 58. Plate VIII. arg. 

StOrrS. Arms : Or, a fess, dancett^e, gu., between 
Page 70. Plate X. three stars, az. 

Stougbton. 

Page 142. 

Strang's, arms : Gu., two Hons, passant guardant, or 
Page 51. Plate VII. [often, al.so, arg.]. 

StUrgiS. arms : Az., a chevron, between three cross 
Page 81. Plate XII. crosslets, fitch^e, within a bordure, 
engrailed, or. 

StUlgVCSant. arms : Per fess, or and gu. In chief, a 

Page 26. Plate III. hound, following a hare ; in base, a 

stag, courant : all proper and contourn^. 
Add. and Corr. : Both T. Gwilt-Mapleson and J. B. 

RiETSTAP give exactly these arms and crest. Mrs. 

Martha J. Lamb gives an engraving, showing the 

charges, not contourn^, 

Sumner. arms : Ermine, two chevronels, gu. 

Page 69. Plate X. SaME ArMS as the SUMNERS of 

Puttenham Priory, Co. Surrey. [Walford'S Co. Fami- 
lies?^ 

S^monbs. 

Page 144. 

'JECmpIC. Arms : Arg., two bars, sa., each charged with 
Page 45. Plate VI. three mullets, or. 

Same Arms as the Viscounts Palmerston (Ext. 1868); the 
Baronets Temple of Stow, Co. Bucks (Cr. 1612); the 
Baronets TEMPLE of Sheen, Co. Surrey (Ext. 1699). 

^batcber. 

Page 117. 

'JTbOtnaS. arms : Arg., a chevron, lozengy, or and sa., 
Page 112. Plate XIV. between three ravens, close, of the 
last. 

^bOmpSOn. arms : Or, on a fess, dancett^e, az., three 
Page 50. Plate VII. Stars of the field [sometimes arg.] ; 
on a Canton, of the second, the sun, in its splendor: 
proper. 

tlbOrnbifte. arms : Arg., six gouttes, three, two, and 
Page 20, Plate 11. one, gu. On a chief, of the last, 
three leopards' faces, or. 

Add. and Corr. : The name must be spelt Thorndike, and 
not Tlwrndyke. 

UrbrOOp. Arms : Gu., a bar, between two chevrons, arg. 
Page 48. Plate VII. 




vlilbCn. Arms : Az., a saltire, ermine, between four 

Page 134. Plate XVI. pheons, or. 
Same Arms as the Tyldens of Milstead Manor, Co. Kent. 

[Walford'S Co. Families.'] 

XTilgbman. 

Page 147. 

Simpson. arms : Per chevron, gu. and arg. In chief, 
two lions, rampant, of the second ; 
in base, an oak tree : proper — 
fructed, or. 

Crest : A piece of battlement, arg. ; 
thereon, an eagle, rising: proper, 
in the beak, a slip of oak, vert, 
fructed, or. 

MOTTO: Paratus et fidelis. [Ready 
and faithful.] 

Gen. and Hist. Rem. : These arms 
are borne in this country by the 
descendants of the grantee, Robert 
Timpson, an oflicer in the Royal 
Army, who distinguished himself by 
gallant services against the French 
in the West Indies. He received this grant of coat-ar- 
mor in 1767, as recorded in BURKE. 

^OmpftinO. same arms as the Tompkinses of Rich- 
Page 135. mond Park, near Limerick. [WaL- 

FORd's Co. Families.] 

tlOWnSenb. arms: Az., a chevron, ermine, between 
Page 44. Plate VI. three escallops, or [sometimes arg.]. 

Same Arms as the Marquesses Townshend ; the Earls Syd- 
ney; the Baroness Greenwich (Ext. 1794). 

XTuckerman. 

Page 147. 

ITUrnCr. arms ; Sa., a chevron, ermine, between three 
fers-de-moline, or; on a chief, arg., a lion, passant, gu. 

Crest: A lion, passant, gu., holding, in the dexter paw, a 
■laurel branch, vert. 

Gen. and Hist. Rem: These are the arms, borne by the 
valiant Captain William TURNER, of Boston, Mass., who 
commanded, in 1676, an expedition against the Indians, 
and who died bravely, at the head of his men, at the 
crossing of the Green River. [S. G. DRAKE: Hist, 
and Antiq. of Boston ; p. ^ig — (/<?5(5).] BURKE says of 
,, the family bearing these arms : " They were of Thorves- 
ton, Co. Devon. Humphrey TURNER, Esquire, of Thor- 
veston, was forty-six year old at the Visitation of the 
Heralds, in 1620. He was a son of Anthojiy TURNER, 
and grandson of Anthotiy TURNER, both of the same 
place. 

'JIUttlC. Arms: Az., on a bend, arg., doubly cotised, or. 
Page 70. Plate X. a lion, passant, sa. 

^^ICr. Arms; Sa., on a fess, erminois, between three 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



l8l 



Page 23. Plate 11. mountain-cats, passant, ermine, a 
cross, moline, between two crescents, gu. 
Add. and Corr. : The motto is that of the Randolphs of 
Virginia. 

TTl^nQ. Arms : Arg., on a bend, cotised, sa., three mart- 
Page 19. Plate I. lets, or [and not two, as in our ex- 
ample]. 

Add. and Corr. : Burke gives these arms to the Golds- 
worthy family. 

"UlnbCrbill. arms : Arg., a chevron, sa., between three 
Page 72. Plate X. trefoils, slipped, vert. 



"msber. 

Page loi, 
erased. 

IDassall. 



Add. and Corr. : The lions' gambs ought to 
have been drawn coupcd, and not 
The blazoning is correct. 

n ; in base, a 



Arms : Az., in chief, a sur 
Page 85. Plate XII. chalice, or. 
Gen. and Hist. Rem. : The Vassal arms are engraved on 
a tomb by the roadside in the old Cambridge, Mass., 
burial ground. 

Demon. same arms as the Earls of Shipbrook (Ext. 
Page 134. 1783); the Barofzs Vernon ; the 

Baronets Vernon of Hodnet, Co. Salop (Ext. 1723). 

IDOOrbeee [IDan]. arms : Quartered— ist and 4th : A 
Page 40. Plate V. tower, or, voided, of the field. 2nd 
and 3d : Arg., a tree, eradicated, vert. 

THUainWrigbt. arms : Gu., on a chevron, az., between 
Page m. Plate XIV. two feurs-de-lis, of the field, a lion, 
rampant, within a bordure, engrailed, sa. 

TKHaltOn. arms: Arg., a chevron, gu., between three 
hawks' heads, erased, sa. 
Crest : A wild man : proper — wreathed 
about the middle and temples, arg. 
and sa. ; holding, in the dexter hand, 
a trefoil, slipped, or; in the sinister 
^^ hand, a spiked club, or. 

'Z' Gen. and Hist. Rem. : These arms 
were borne by the Walton family 
of New York, merchants of great 
reputation in the last century. Cap- 
tain William WaLTON was the first 
colonist of the name, and the arms 
borne by himself and his descend- 
ants connect him with the Waltons of Walton, Co. 
Lancaster, England. [Mrs. Martha J. Lamb's Hist, 
of New York City, II., spS.] 

IKHalWOrtb. arms : Gu., a bend, engrailed, arg., be- 
Page go. Plate XIII. tween two garbs, or. 

Manton. 

Page 136. 

Wlar5. Arms : Az., a cross, ilory, or. 
Page 85. Plate XII. 





HlDlatrCn. arms : Gu., a llon, rampant, arg. ; a chief. 
Page 27. Plate III, chequy, or and az. 

Add. and Corr. : In Burke these 
arms appear not as those of the War- 
rens of Poynton, but as belonging 
to a London family of Warren. 
The Earls of Surrey bore : chequy, 
or and az. ; and the Warrens of 
Poynton, a younger branch, bore : 
Chequy or and az., on a canton, 
gu., a lion, rampant, arg. 

We give here engraved the arms 
borne by Sir Peter Warren, then 
Captain [later Admiral] in the Royal 
Navy, who bought large estates in 
the Mohawk Valley (1742). He was the younger son of 
a British naval officer of the ancient family of Warren 
of Warrenstown, Co. Down, Ireland. He bought, also, a 
large estate on Manhattan Island, called Greenwich. 
He married the beautiful Miss Susanna De Lancey, and 
became thus identified with the oldest New York 
blood. [Mrs. Martha J. Lamb : History of the City 
of New York, I., 58or\ 

liKUattS, Arms : Arg., an oak tree, growing out of a 
Page 122. Plate XV. mount, in base, vert. Over all, on 
a bar, az., a crescent, between two mullets, of the first. 

IKOlCHd. Arms : Or, a lion, rampant, double-queued, sa., 
armed and langued, gu. 

Crest : A demi-lion, double-queued, of 
the shield. 

Motto : Semper paratus. [Always 
ready.] 

Gen. and Hist. Rem. : William Wells, 
a lawyer from Norwich, England, 
came over [before 1640] and settled 
at Southhold, L. I., New York. He 
is said to have been the son of the 
Rev. William WELLES. Prebendary 
of the Church of St. Peter Mancroft, 
at Norwich. On the tombstone of 
the Rev. Peter are found the arms we give. 

TKHenbCU. arms •. Per fess, arg. and az. ; in chief, a 
Page 52. Plate Vll. Dutch galleon, on the sea, under 
sail, with royal flag of Holland flying, flags, sails, hull, 
etc., proper; in base, two anchors, in saltire, heads 
downward and flukes upward : proper. [In our exam- 
ample the flukes are downward.] 

TKIlentWOrtb. arms: Sa., a chevron, between three 
Page 73. Plate X. leopards' faces, or \and tiot heads'] 

as in our example]. 
Same Arms as the Earls of Strafford (Ext. 1695, revived 
1 71 1, again Exf. 1799); t^ie. Marquesses of Rockingham 
(Ext. 1782); the Earls Fitz-William ; the Baronets 
W'El^T'^OKTB. of North Elmsall, Co. York (Ext. 1741); 




l82 



AMERICA HERALDICA 




the Baronets Wentworth of Bretton, Co. York (Ext. 
1792) ; the Baronets Wentworth of Gosfield, Co. Essex 
(Ext. 163 1). 
1ilGlCtbCrC&. Arms: Gu., a chevron, between three 
flesh-pots, or. 
Crest : A goat's head, erased. 
Gen. and Hist. Rem. : The grant of 
arms of the Wethereds ofAshlynd^ 
Hertfordshire, England, was the 
third issued by the College of Heralds 
{152J). Thotnas WethereD, of that 
same house, died, in 1719, of morti- 
fication, consequent on his failure in 
business, after the South Sea Bubble. 
In 1720, his widow, Mrs. Dolly 
Wethered, with three sons and two 
daughters, removed to America and 
settled near Boston, Mass. On the advice of her son, 
Richard, she removed to Maryland, where her descend- 
ants have since prospered. [Rev. L. B. Thomas : 
Genealogical Notes, l§g {i8jy).'] 

TKHetmOrC. ) arms: Arg., on a chief, az., three 

[MbitmOre]. S martlets, or. 

Page 83. Plate XII. ADD. AND CORR. : This coat of 
arms is different from that used by the English families 
of the name, save one branch, given in Joseph Emer- 
SON'S Heraldry (1780). It is remarkable, however, 
that various branches of the WetmORE family bore 
these arms before the visit of the Rev. James Wetmore 
to England (1723). [James C. Wetmore : The Wet- 
more Family of A-merica, 1861.^ 

"JKHbiting, arms: Per saltlre, az. and ermine, a lion's 
Page 71. Plate X. head, erased, or ; in chief, three 
bezants. 

Add. and Corr : There is another, slightly different, coat 
of arms, used by William WHITING, of Hartford, on 
his seal (1687). It is blazoned : Az. two flaunches, 
ermine, etc. [HERALDIC JOURNAL, I, 160). 

Mbitnei?. arms : 

Page 51. Plate VII. 



Az., a cross, compon^e, or, and gu. 
[Sometimes sa.]. 



Milber. arms : 




Gu., from a fess, or, charged with two 
barrulets, az., a demi-lion, rampant, 
issuant of the second. 

Crest: A savage's head, affront^e, 
couped at the shoulders, the 
temples entwined with woodbines : 
all proper. 

Motto : Virtuti moenia cedant. [Let 
fortresses yield to valor.] 

Gen. AND Hist. Rem : Martha Wild- 
er, widow of Thomas WILDER of 
Shiplake, Co. Oxford, said to have 
belonged to the WiLDERS of Co. 
Berks, descending from Nicholas 



Wilder {tempo. Henry VII], came over to New Eng- 
land in 1638, with her son, Thomas, who settled later at 
Charlestown, Mass. [Rev. Moses H. WILDER: The 
Book of the Wilder s, 1878 ; Wyman'S Charlestown, 
Mass., Gen., II., lojo.] 
Same Arms as the Wilders of Purley Hall, Co. Berks. 
[WalFORD'S Co. Families?^ 

XKHilMnSOn. arms: Az., a fess, erminois [and not 
Page 73. Plate X. ermine, as in our example], between 
three unicorns, passant, arg. 

Same Arms as the Wilkinsons of Harpeley Hall, Co. 
Durham. [Walford'S Co. Familiesl\ 

Millarb. 

Page 148. 

Williams of IROjburg. arms : Sa., a Hon, rampant, 
Page 60. Plate VIII. arg., armed and langued, gu. 

Milliams of Boston, 

Page 61. 

Milliams of IDirgtnia. 

Page 139. 

Millis [M^lles]. 

Page 103. 

MillOUgbbp. arms : Or, fretty, az. 

Page 83. Plate VII. AdD. AND CORR. : SaV AGE'S Conjec- 
ture, that Deputy-Governor WiLLOUGHBY was of the 
WiLLOUGHBYS of Parham, has been disproved. His 
descent from the heraldic family is admitted by Mr. 
Cockayne, himself a WillOUGHBY, the present Norroy 
King of Arms. But the particular line of descent has 
not yet been discovered. \Mo7iograph by Mrs. E. E. 
Salisbury.] 

The FRETTY of the WiLLOUGHBY arjns should be 
i?iterlaced ; and the crest borne by the Deputy-Governor, 
and by his forefathers, was : A lion's head, guardant, 
couped at the shoulders, or, fretty, az. 

Same Arms as the Barons WiLLOUGHBY d'Eresby; the 
Barons WiLLOUGHBY of Parham (Dormant since 1779) ; 
the Barons Aveland. 

WlilSOn. Arms : Per pale, arg. and az., three lions' 
Page 73. Plate X. gambs, erased, fessways in pale, 
counterchanged. 

TKHinSlOW. arms: Arg. [some say or'], a bend, loz- 
Page 45- Plate VI. eng6e, arg. and gu. 

Add. and Corr. : The arms are better blazoned and more 
exact: Arg., on a bend, gu., seven lozenges, conjoined, 
or. [Mr. and Mrs. D. Parsons Holton: Winslow 
Memorial, iSjy.] 

The Motto Decoptjis floreo, found on some ancient copies 
of these arms, has, in modern times, been written De- 
captus floreo, and, with some, Decarptus floreo — all 
having a central idea: "Truth crushed to earth shall 
rise again." 

WlintbrOP. arms : Arg., three chevrons, crenelle, gu. 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



183 



Page 20. Plate I. Over all, a lion, rampant, sa., armed 

Also, Plate XVII. and langued, az. 

Add. and Corr. : The blazoning above applies only to 
our illustration, Plate XVII., the correct one. 

Burke, who recognizes the American WiNTHROPS, 
says o( the ma/io ; "It has probably been adopted as 
late as 1 700, being the anagram oljohn WiNTHROP (Hope 
wins a throne)." 

Our error, as shown by the incorrect illustration, Plate 
I., has been committed by many before us, S. G. Drake 
amongst others. 

imiOlCOtt. Arms : Arg., a chevron, between these chess 

Page 47. Plate VII. rooks, sa. 

TKHOObbUH. Arms: Or, three crescents, gu. 

Page 15. Plate I. ADD. AND CORR. : The old line of 

the Barons Crewe of Stene was created i66i, and ended 
1721 ; there were three Barons, John, and his two 
sons, Thomas and Nathaniel, Bishop of Durham. This 
is the family which was allied and in correspondence 
with Richard Woodhull, of Brookhaven, N. Y. 

TKHOOlSC^. Arms : Sa. [and notgu., as in our example 
Page 7y. Plate XI. of Plate XL], OH a cross, engrailed, 
Also, Plate XVII. arg., a lion, passant guardant, gu., 

between four leopards' faces, az. On a chief of the 
second [and not or, as in our example of Plate XL], a 
rose, of the third, enclosed by two Cornish choughs : 
proper. 

Add. and Corr. : The example, Plate XVIL, is the only 
correct one. 

ixnortbington. same arms as the worthingtons 

Page 102. of the Bryn, Co. Chester. [Wal- 

FORD'S Co. Families.'] 

Add. and Corr. : The motto is translated; In valor worthy 
of his ancestors. 

TKIlrlSbt. Arms: Sa., a chevron, engrailed, arg., between 
three fleurs-de-lis, or. On a chief, of 




the last, as many spear-heads : 
proper. All within a bordure, wavy, 
ermine. 
Crest : On a mount, vert, and within an 
annulet, or, a dragon's head, couped 
at the neck, arg., sem^e of annulets, 
sa., and murally gorged, gu. 
Motto : Mens sibi conscia recti. A 

mind conscious of right.] 
Gen. and Hist, Rem.: In Burke's 
Gen. Armory for 1884., these arms 
are attributed to the Baronets 
Wrights of South Carolina (Cr. 
1772). We have an old bookplate of Sir James 
Wright, last Royal Governor of the colony of Georgia, 
bearing the same devices, except that the chevron is not 
engrailed, and bears a mullet, for difference. The crest 
is a plain dragon's head. 

IKIl^Cft [Dan]. arms: Sa., a cross, or, between eight 
Page 39. Plate V. sprigs of thistle, arg., stalked and 
And Plate XVII. leaved, vert, placed saltirewise, two 

by two. On an escutcheon of pretence, az., a wheel, or. 

Add. and Corr: The Plate XVII. alone is blazoned, as 
it alone gives the proper tinctures and charges. Our 
first example was taken from a faulty painting in T. 
GwILT-MaplesON's Ha}id Book of Heraldry, to which 
Gen. G. P. Van Wyck subscribed in 1852. 

%ZXi% [&e]. Arms: Sa., a field marshal's baton, or staff 
of dignity, in bend, or. 

Crest: Out of a ducal coronet, or, 
the staff of the shield, between two 
pennons. 

Gen. and Hist. Rem. : Frederic Au- 
gustus DE Zeng, son of Baron DE 
Zeng, Chamberlain to the Duchess 
of Saxe-Weissenfels, was an officer 
in the Hessian Contingent of the 
British Army (17S1), and after the 
war, he settled in New York, where, 
in 1784, he married Mary LAW- 
RENCE, and started the Zeng fam- 
ily of America. [Rev. L. B. 
Thomas : Gen. Notes, 6g {i8jf) ; N. Y. Gen. and 
Biog. Record^ 





A VOCABULARY OF HERALDIC TERMS 



USED IN THIS WORK^ 



A. 



. ddorsed — Placed back to back. 

Affrontie — Front faced ; full-faced ; often used in the same 
sense as guardajit. 

Annulet — A ring. 

Antique Crown — A gold circle, from which rise a number of 
rays or points. 

Argent — Silver; in color, white. Abbreviation: arg. 

Armed — When the horns, claws, teeth, or beak, or talons, of 
any beast, or -bird of prey, are represented as being 
of a tincture different from the creature itself, it is 
said to be armed of the specified tincture. 

Attired — Horned ; a term used in speaking of the horns of 
stags, etc. 

Azure — Blue. Abbreviation : az. 



Ba 



^ mid — A fillet, with which 3. garb or a sheaf of arrows is 
bound. 

Banded — Bound together with a band. 

Bar — A diminutive of the/wj, being but one-fifth of the 
field in width. 

Barbed — A term denoting — 1st, the green leaves, or petals, 
that appear on the outside of a full-blown rose ; 2d, 
the pointed head of an arrow or spear. 

Bars-gemelle — Barrulets, placed together in pairs. 

Barrulet — A narrow bar, being one-fourth the width of the 
latter. 

Barry — Signifies that the field is divided into a certain 
number of bars; the number is always specified. 

Bariuays — Arranged horizontally ; in the direction of a bar. 

Baton — A staff, or truncheon. When used as a mark of il- 
legitimacy, the baton is a diminutive of the bend-sin- 
ister, being one-fifth of its width, and couped ^t both 
extremities. The arms, when thus surmounted, are 
said to be debruised. 

Battle-axe — A broad-edged axe, with pointed back, formerly 
used in battle. 

Beaked — A term applied to cocks, etc., when the tincture of 
the beak is specified. 



* Our kind friend and co-worker in the field of heraldic researches , 
Charles E. S. Rasay, Esq., M.A., etc., consented to prepare, for 
America Heraldica, this series of definitions, which combine happily — 
in our opinion — a finished originality of expression with a due respect 
for accepted traditions. — [Ed.] 



Belled — Having bells affixed to some part. 

Be7id — A figure formed by two parallel lines, drawn from 
the dexter chief to the sinister base ; it is one-third of 
the field in width. 

Bendlet — A diminutive of the bend, being one-half the width 
of the latter. 

Bend-sinister — This figure differs from the bend only in be- 
ing drawn in the opposite direction, viz. : from the 
sinister chief to the dexter base. 

Bendy — Signifies that the shield is divided, bendwise, into a 
number of equal parts ; the number is always speci- 
fied. 

B endways, or Bendwise — The same as in bend. 

Bezants — Gold roundles. 

Bezant^e — Strewed with bezants. ' 

Billet^e — Strewed with billets. 

Billets — Figures of an oblong square form. 

Bordure — A band one-fifth the width of the shield, and en- 
tirely surrounding it. 

Bretiss^ — See embattled. 



y^a 



'abossed — The head of an animal, full-faced, cut off close 
behind the ears, so that no part of the neck is visible. 

Cadence, or Cadency — Distinction of houses. 

Caduceus — The wand of Mercury. 

Caltrap — An instrument formerly used to retard the pro- 
gress of the enemy's cavalry, by laming the horses. 
It was formed of four short, but strong, iron spikes, 
so conjoined that when it was thrown on the ground 
one point would always be erect. 

Calvary — The three steps (technically grieces) upon which 
is placed a Latin cross. 

Canton — A square, at the corner of the chief, occupying one- 
third of the latter. 

Cap of Mainte?zance — A cap of crimson velvet, lined and 
turned up with ermine. 

Catherine-wheel — A wheel, used for torture, having from six 
to ten exterior spikes, or teeth. 

Celestial Crown — A circle of gold, from which rise several 
rays, or points, each of which is charged on the top 
with a small estoile. 

Chained — Having a chain attached to some part, usually to 
the collar. 

Chapeau — The same as cap of maintenance. 

Chaplet — A garland, or wreath, of laurel, oak leaves, etc. 



i86 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



Charged — A figure bearing any device upon it is said to be 

charged therewith. 
Cheeky, or Chequy — Divided into small checks, or squares, 

of two different tinctures. 
Chevron — A figure formed by two bars, one-fifth of the 

shield in width, issuing, respectively, from the dexter 

and sinister bases of the shield, and conjoined at its 

centre. 
Chevronel — The diminutive of the chevron, being one-half 

the width of the latter. 
Chief — The upper portion of the shield, one-third of the 

latter in width, separated from the 7?f/i!^ by a horizon- 
tal line. 
Cinque-foil — The five-leaved grass. 
Close — With wings closed. 
Cockatrice — An imaginary monster, with the head, body, 

wings, and feet of a cock (scales being substituted 

for feathers), and the tail of a dragon. 
Collared — Having a collar about the neck. 
Combatant — Fighting. 
Combed — Having the comb of a certain tincture ; a term 

applied to cocks and the cockatrice. 
Compon^e, or Company — Composed of not more than two 

rows of squares of two different tinctures. 
Confronts — Facing, or fronting, each other. 
Conjoined — Joined together. 

Contourn^ — Turned towards the siyiister side of the shield. 
Cotice, or Cotise — A bejidlet, reduced one-half, and borne on 

each side of the bend. 
Cot iced, or Cotised — Placed between two cotises ; sided, or 

accompanied by another. 
Couchant — Lying down ; an animal coiichant always has its 

head raised. 
Counterchanged — A mutual changing of the tinctures. 
Cou7!ter-embattled — See embattled. 
Cowiter-jlory — See jlory. 

Counter-passant — Passing in opposite directions. 
Couped, Coupe'e — Cut off evenly. 
Courant — Running. 

Coward — A term applied to an animal represented as hav- 
ing its tail between its legs. 
■Crenelh'e — The same as embattled. 
Crescent — A half-moon, with the horns directed upwards. 

If the horns are directed towards the right, it is 

Q.a\\t.A increscent ; if \.oviz.xAs 'Ave. \^{\., decrescent. 
■Crined — A term used for the hair or beard when it is of a 

different tincture from the rest of the charge. 
Cross — A figure formed by conjoining th.^ pale and the f ess. 
Cross-crosslet — A cross having its arms crossed by a short 

bar at a little distance from their extremities. 
Cross-fitchife — The lower arm is sharpened to a point, so that 

the cross may be set in the ground. 
Cross-fleurie , or Cross-flory — The extremities of this cross are 

adorned with fleurs-de-hs. 
Cross-kumett^e — The extremities do not touch the sides of 

the shield. 



Cross-moline — The extremities are curved, in shape like a 

fer-de- moline. 
Cross-patonce — The arms end '\r\. fleurs-de-lis that extend to a 

pattde form. 
Cross-pattde — The arms are all of equal length, and small at 

the centre, but go on widening to the ends, which 

are very, broad. 
Cubit Ann — The hand and arm couped at the elbow. 
Cuffed — Having a cuff of the tincture specified. 



Da 



'ancettde — Denotes that the teeth of a zig-zag line are 
large and wide, the points never exceeding three in 
number. 

Depressed — Flattened. 

Dexter — Right ; the right-hand side of the escutcheon, but 
the left to the spectator. 

Displayed — Expanded ; a term used to denote the position 
of the wings of birds. 

Dolphin — A kind of fish ; reckoned, in heraldry, as the king 
of fishes. 

Domed — Having a dome of the tincture specified. 

Dragon — A fabulous monster, with serpent-like body cov- 
ered with scales, having wings and four legs. Its 
tail and tongue are armed with the conventional 



Ea 



stmg. 



>ared — Having ears of the tincture specified. 

Embattled, etc. — When the upper line of 2.fess, etc., is drawn 
so as to resemble the battlements of a wall, it is called 
embattled ; when the lower line is so drawn, it is 
called counter-embattled ; when both upper and lower 
lines are so drawn, they are said to be embattled- 
comiter-embatiled. But when both upper and lower 
lines are so drawn that the projections, or " battle- 
ments," are directly opposite one another, they are 
designated as bretissd. 

Einbowed — Crooked, or bent. 

Etnbrued — Dipped in blood ; a term applied to any weapon 
that is bloody. 

Endorsed — Placed back to back. 

Enfiled — When any object (especially the heart of a man or 
beast), is placed on the edge of a sword, or when a 
coronet or wreath surrounds the middle of a bearing, 
it is said to be enfiled with it. 

Engrailed — Indented in curved lines. 

Ensigned — A term used to indicate that a charge, or object, 
is ornamented by another placed above it. 

Eradicated — Torn up by the roots. 

Erased — Torn off roughly. 

Ermine — A white fur adorned at regular intervals with 
black spots. 

Ermines — A black fur adorned at regular intervals with 
white spots. 

Erminois — A fur, gold, powdered with black spots. 

Escallop, or Escallop-shell — The shell of the scallop, or es- 
callop-fish. 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



187 



Escroll — A scroll wherein a motto is inserted. 
Estoile, or Etoile — -A star with six waved rays or points, un- 
less otherwise expressed. 
Expanded — The same as displayed. 



Fe, 



eathered — The same as flighted. 

Fer-de-Moline — The mill-rind, or iron fixed to the centre of 
a mill-stone, by which the wheel turns it. 

Fess — A figure formed by two horizontal lines drawn across 
the shield ; it is one-third of the field in width and is 
always placed in the centre. 

Fess Point — The central point of the shield. 

Fesswise, or Fessways — The same as in fess. 

Field — The surface of the escutcheon, or shield. 

Finned — Having fins of the tincture specified. 

Fire-ball — A grenade, or bomb, inflamed proper. 

Fitclu'e — Pointed ; sharpened to a point. [See cross-fitchie^ 

Flanches — Figures formed by drawing arched lines from the 
upper angles of the shield to the respective base 
points. 

Flesh-pot — A three-legged, iron pot. 

Fleur-de-lis — A bearing in the royal arms of France ; by 
some supposed to represent a lily, by others, a lance- 
head, while still others claim it is a rebus, founded 
on the name of Louis VII. of France. 

Fleurie — ^See cross-fleurie. 

Flexed — Bent. 

Flighted — Feathered ; a term used in regard to arrows. 

/7or)/— Ornamented with the fleur-de-lis. When a double 
tressure is ornamented with eight fleurs-de-lis issuing 
from each tressure, the alternating ^^^r-i/i?-//.? turned 
in an opposite direction, it is designated as flory 
counter-flory. 

Flowered — Having flowers of the tincture specified. 

Forces — Pincers. 

Formce — The same aspati^e. 

Fountain — A roundle, barry-wavy of six, argent and azure. 

Fraisiers, or Erases — A term used by Scottish heralds to 
designate the cingzce-foils of the Fraser family shield. 

Fret — A figure formed by two narrow bars, or sticks, in 
saliire, interlaced within a mascle. 

Fretty — Signifies that the field is covered with a number of 
narrow sticks, or bars, lying in the directions of the 
bend and bend-sinister, and interlacing one another. 
When more than eight pieces occur, the number is 
specified. 

Fructed — Bearing fruit of the tincture specified. 

Fusil — An elongated lozenge. 

Fusilly — Covered with fusils. 



Ga 



Galleon — A large, four-decked, armed ship, formerly used 
by the Spaniards for trade in time of war. 
Galley — The same as lytnphad. 
Ganib — The leg of an animal from the knee joint. 
Garb — A sheaf of grain. 
Gauntlet — A steel glove. 
Garnished — Adorned with. 



Gorged — Having a coronet, ring, or band around the neck. 
An animal having a ducal coronet around its neck is 
said to be ducally gorged. 

Gorget — A band or ring placed around the neck. 

Griffin — An imaginary animal with the body and feet of a 
lion, and the head and wings of an eagle 

Guardant — Full-faced; looking right forward at the spec- 
tator. 

Gules — Red. Abbreviated, ^zi!. 

Guttife — Sprinkled with drops of the tincture mentioned. 

Guttde d'eau — Sprinkled with drops of argent. 

Guttife de sang — Sprinkled with drops of gules. 

Guttle d'or — Sprinkled with drops of or. 

Guttife de poix — Sprinkled with drops of pitch [sable]. 

Gyron — A figure formed by two straight lines drawn from 
the edge of the shield and meeting in an acute 
angle at the centre. A shield covered with such 
figures is termed Gyronny, and the number of them 
is always specified. 



Ha, 



abited — Clothed. [See vested^ 

Hauriant, or Haurient — A term describing a fish in an up- 
right position. 

Heraldic Tiger — A tiger with the head of a dragon — except 
that the tongue is not armed — and with three or four 
tufts of hair along the neck, and one tuft on the 
breast. 

Hilted — -A term applied to a sword or dagger when the 
tincture of the hilt is specified 

Holy Lamb — A lamb passant, carrying a banner charged 
with a cross. 

HumeMe — Signifies that the extremities of the figure are 
cut off, and nowhere extend to the edges of the 
shield. 

Hurts — Blue roundles. 



/ 



bex — An imaginary beast with the body of a stag, having 
two straight serrated horns projecting from its fore- 
head, a short tusk on its nose, and tufts of hair on its 
neck, chest and tail, which latter is like that of a lion. 

In Base — In the lower part of the shield. 

In Bend — Placed diagonally ; in the manner of a bend. 

In Chief — Placed in the upper portion of the shield. 

Increscent — See crescent. 

hidented — Cut like the teeth of a saw. 

Inescutcheon — A small escutcheon borne within the field and 
usually placed at the. fess point. 

In Fess — Placed horizontally; in the manner of a. fess. 

hi her piety — See pelicaft. 

In his pride — A term applied to the peacock when borne 
affront^e, with his tail spread. 

In Lure — See lure. 

In Pale — Placed perpendicularly ; in the manner of a. pale. 

In Point — A term used of swords, etc., when so arranged 
that their points almost meet in base. 

In Saltire — Arranged in the form of a saltire. 

Interlaced — Linked together. 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



Ismiant — Rising or issuing from the midst of anything. 

J" essed — Having7>jjfj of the tincture specified. 
Jesses — The leather thongs that fasten bells to the legs of 
falcons. 

J_^angued — Tongued ; having a tongue of the specified 
tincture. 

Leaved — Having leaves of the specified tincture. 

Legged — Having legs of the specified tincture. 

Leveret — A young hare. 

Lined — Attached by a line, usually affixed to the collar of 
an animal ; also applied to the lining of a mantle, etc. 

Lioncels — A term by which lions are designated when more 
than three are placed on a shield. 

Lodged — A term applied to a deer when represented as 
lying on the ground, head upwards. Beasts of prey, 
when in this position, are said to be couchant. 

Lozeng^e, or Lozejigy — Covered with lozenges. 

Lure — Two wings co?iJomed with their tips downward, joined 
with a line and ring ; two wings conjoined and in- 
verted are said to be in lure. 

Lymphad — A one-masted vessel, rising at the stem and 
stern. It is usually represented with sails furled, 
and with oars. 

IVl anche, or Mattnch — A sleeve of the fashion of the XII. 

century. 
Maned — Having a mane of the specified tincture. 
Martlet — A bird (supposed to be the house-martin) with 

feet and beak cut ofT. 
Mascle — A perforated lozenge. 
Membered — A term denoting that the beak and legs of a 

fabulous monster, or of a bird other than a bird of 

prey, are of a different tincture from its body. 
Moline — See cross-moline. 
Mullet — A figure resembling a five-pointed spur rowel ; 

whenever /zVrci'a? it is so blazoned. 
Mural Crown — A gold circle, the rim of which represents a 

wall adorned with battlements. 
Muzzled — Having the mouth banded, or tied up. 



Na. 



aiant — Swimming; applied to fish when born horizon- 
tally across the field. 

Naval Crown — A gold circle, bearing on its rim the sterns 
of vessels alternating with masts, a large sail being 
affixed to each of the masts. 

NebuUe — Clouded ; a term denoting that the outlines of a 
figure run arched in and out, or are waved, so as to 
resemble clouds. 

Nowed — Knotted ; tied in knots. 



o, 



Ordinary — A common term, used to designate any of the 
following charges : Cliief, pale, bend, bend-sinister, 
fess, cross, saltire and chevron; so called because 
they are the more anciently and ordinarily used. 

Orle — A narrow border within the shield at some distance 
from the edges. 

Over All — Signifies that the charge thus designated is 
placed over some other charge or charges. 



Fa 



// the first, seco7id, etc. — Of the first (or second, etc.) tinc- 
ture mentioned. So of the field means of the same 
tincture as the field. 
Oj — Gold; in color, yellow. 



ale — A figure formed by two perpendicular lines drawn 
from the top to the bottom of the shield. It is one- 
third of the field in width, and is always placed in 
the centre. 

Palet^The diminutive of the pale, being one-half the width 
of the latter. 

Paly — Signifies that the shield is divided by perpendicular 
lines into several equal parts, the number of divisions 
being always specified. 

Paschal Lamb — The same as holy lamb. 

Passant — Passing ; a term applied to animals when repre- 
sented as walking. 

Passed — Inserted in, or put through, some object. 

Patonce — See cross-patonce. 

Pean — A black fur, powdered with gold spots. 

Pegasus — The winged horse. 

Pelican — The heraldic /^/z'caTz is drawn like an eagle with a 
long neck, and is generally represented as pecking 
her breast ; when in her nest, feeding her young, she 
is said to be in her piety. 

Pellet — A black roundle. 

Pelletee — Strewed with pellets. 

Pendetit — Hanging down. 

Pennon — A small flag, terminating, usually, in two sharp 
points. 

Per Chevroji — Signifies that the field or charge is divided 
into two parts by lines drawn from the dexter and 
sinister base, and meeting in the fess point. 

Per Fess — Signifies that the field, or charge, is divided 
into two equal parts by a horizontal line. 

Per Pale, or Party per Pale — Signifies that the field, or 
charge, is divided into two equal parts by a perpen- 
dicular line. 

Per Saltire — Signifies that the field, or charge, is divided 
into four parts by such lines as form a saltire. 

Pheon — The barbed head of a dart or broad arrow. 

Phcenix — An imaginary bird resembling the eagle ; it is 
always represented as issuing from flames. 

Pile — A figure resembling a wedge, and, unless otherwise 
specified, issuing from the middle chief, and tapering 
to a point towards the base. 

Plates — Silver roimdlcs. 

Pomeis — A green roundle. 

Pommelled — Having a pommel, or knob, of the tincture 
specified ; as a sword or dagger. 

Popinjay — A small, green parrot, with red beak and legs. 

Preying — A term used to denote any ravenous beast, or 
bird, standing on, or devouring, its prey. 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



189 



Proper — Represented in its natural, or proper, colors. 

Pur fled — Adorned with ermines, peans, or with golden tufts. 

Purpura — Purple. 



Q. 



. uartered, etc. — A shield, charge, or crest, divided into 
four equal parts by two lines crossing each other at 
right angles, is termed quartered ; each of these parts 
is a quarter. However, a shield so designated must 
contain but two coats-of-arms, the first and fourth 
quarters being the same, and the second and third 
quarters being alike. If this is not the case, the 
shield is said to be quarterly, even though it has but 
four divisions. 

Quarterly, etc. — A shield, or charge, divided into any num 
ber of parts by lines drawn through it at right angles 
to one another is said to be quarterly of that 
number — the number always being specified. Each 
of these parts is termed a quartering; and if one or 
more of these quarterings be quartered it is said to 
be quarterly-quartered, and the quartering thus quar- 
tered is termed a grand quarter. 

Quatrefoil — The four-leaved grass. 

Queue — The tail ; a term used in describing the tails of 
animals. 



Ra 



^adiant — A term used to describe an object that has 
rays or beams surrounding it. 

Ragulde, Raguly, or Raguled — Jagged or notched in an irri- 
. gular manner. 

Rampant — Denoting an animal when represented as stand- 
ing erect on its hind legs. 

Rayonn^e — The same as radiant. 

Reflexed — Bent or turned backward. 

Reguardant — Looking back. 

Respecting — A term applied to all animals, except beasts of 
prey, when placed face to face. 

Ringed — Encircled or marked with rings. 

Roundles — Small, circular plates, or bosses, of various tinc- 
tures, distinguished from one another by the names 
bezant, plate, torteau, hurt, pellet, pomeis, fountain, 
[each of which, see.] 



wJa 



Sable — Black. Abbreviated, sa. 

Salient — Leaping. 

Saltire — A figure like a St. Andrew's cross ; formed by con- 
joining the bend and bend-sinister. 

Saltireways, or Saltirewise — The same as in saltire. 

Scaling-ladder — A ladder used in scaling the walls of 
besieged castles and cities. 

Scimitar — A curved sword. 

Sea-lion — An imaginary animal with the head and shoulders 
of a lion, fins for paws, and the nowed tail of a fish 
for a body. 

Segrdant — A term applied to the griffin when he is repre- 
sented as ravipant. 

Sejant — Sitting. 

Semde — Sprinkled, or strewed. 



Sinister — Left ; the left-hand side of the escutcheon, but 
the right to the spectator. 

Slipped — Cut from the trunk, or -branch. 

Splendant — The same as in his splendour. 

Stalked — A term applied to a plant when the tincture of the 
stalk is specified. 

Statant — Standing. 

Studded — Adorned with studs, or knobs. 

Surtout, or En surtout — Signifies an inescutcheon placed in 
the centre of the shield, and partly concealing what- 
ever may have been previously emblazoned thereon. 

T 

J. albot — A kind of hunting-dog, between a hound and a 
beagle. 

Tasseled — Decorated with tassels. 

Tau-Cross — -A cross formed like a Greek T or tau. 

Terrace — A mound upon which some object stands. 

Tiered — A term indicating that the shield is divided into 
three equal parts. 

Tilting-spear — A long, heavy spear, used at tilts and tourna- 
ments. 

Torteaux — Red rou?idles. 

Trefoil — The three-leaved grass, generally represented 
slipped. 

Tressure — A band, half the width of the orle, passing en- 
tirely around the shield at some distance from the 
edge ; it is usually borne double. 

Trippant — -A term applied to the antelope, buck, hart, etc., 
when they are represented with their right fore-foot 
raised, and the other three feet on the ground, as if 
walking. 

7a/iff^^Adorned with a tuft or tufts of the tincture 
specified. 



Un. 



ndde — The same as wavy. 

Unicorn — -An imaginary animal with the body of a horse, but 

with cloven hoofs, and a tail like a lion's. It is 

adorned with a long, twisted horn, projecting from 

its forehead, and on its chin and legs are tufts of hair. 

y air — A fur, always argent and azure, unless otherwise 
described. It is represented by a number of small 
bell-shaped shields, of one tincture, arranged horizon- 
tally in such a manner that the bases of those in the 
upper line are opposite to the bases of others, of 
another tincture, below. 

Vambraced — Encased in armor. 

Vert — Green. 

Vested — Clothed ; usually applied in blazoning to a portion 
of the human body. When an entire figure is clothed 
it is said to be habited. 

Voided — Cut out, so that nothing but the edges of the figure 
are left to show its form. 

Volant — Flying. 

Vulned — Wounded. 

Vulning — Wounding. 



igo 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



Wa. 



ater-bougct — A vessel anciently used by soldiers for 
carrying water. 
Wattled — A term used of cocks, etc., when the tincture of 
their gills is specified. 



Wavy — Formed like waves, having always three risings, like 

waves rolling. 
Winged — Having wings of the tincture specified. 
Wyvern — An imaginary animal, with the head of dragon, 

the wings and feet of a bird, and the body and tail 

of a serpent. 




POSTSCRIPT 




S we close this comprehensive — but not, in any way, exhaustive — ^work, we think that it 
is but fit to add a few remarks, and a few heartfelt expressions of sympathy and 
gratitude. 

And, first of all, let us put the reader on guard against the thought that 
we discriminated in the least when we chose a certain number of coats of arms 
to be inserted in the colored plates, leaving the others to be engraved in black 
and inserted in the text. There has never been, in this respect, any preconcerted 
plan of arbitrary classification ; but the colored plates, requiring many months in which to be painted 
by hand, engraved in twelve colors, and printed, comprised our first and original effort. To this 
was added, subsequently, and, as the new documents accumulated on our hands, a nearly equal 
number of arms, crests, and notices, in every respect as worthy of public attention. In the Appendix 
itself are found none but legitimately used armorial bearings, with somewhat shorter notices, it 
is true, but without any discourteous intention, on our part, to throw the slightest discredit on 
their possessors as such. 

As for the selection of arms, etc., it has strictly followed the original intentions of the Editor. . 
No arms have been admitted that could not be shown to have been transmitted through regular 
descent, or to have been used before 1720; i.e., before the invasion of the pseudo-heraldists, distri- 
butors of assumptive arms. As stated, also, from the first, no pecuniary considerations, not even the 
promise of one or more subscriptions, induced the Editor to open these pages to unwarranted pre- 
tensions. Working independently of the families themselves, receiving gratefully, but never soliciting, 
information, the Editor seemed thus to be gratuitously adding to the difficulties of his task. But his 
judgment was correct in so far that it prevented any suspicion of interested motives to come, as 
a damaging shadow, between the public and the compiler. Left to his own resources, he husbanded 
them to the best of his abilities, and he now gives to the American student of Heraldry and Gene- 
alogy a theme upon which to criticise, to improve, and, even perhaps, to manifest his qualified ap- 
probation. 

Indeed, many have done so already ; and the list of our correspondents includes nearly all 
the names prominent in the study of ancient family history. We refrain from publishing these, as 
we feel keenly on what delicate ground we are treading here ; and wish, above all, to call forth 
more precious help of the kind, in the future, by our discreet use of names. But our deep feeling 
of gratitude — as now expressed — ^will reach them, all the same, be they in Massachusetts or in New 
York, in New Jersey or in Pennsylvania ; — wherever a kind voice has arisen to encourage the com- 
piler, not sparing him words of warning or well-deserved criticisms —all duly made the most of and 
methodically classified. 



192 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



As to our co-laborers in bringing out this book — certainly a worthy specimen of American 
handicraft, — to our friendly and talented illustrator, to the lithographers, who spared no trouble to 
give a proper dress to the expression of his artistic thought, to our kind and never-weary typo- 
graphers, — to the many helpers who have bestowed on us more than their time or their usual at- 
tention to business, we address here the deeply felt assurance of our grateful regard. 

And with these few last words, we lay down our pen, after a long period of minute work, 
hoping to have erected herein a durable — if modest — monument, not to the trivial vanity of a few, 
but to the sterling virtues and to the noble deeds of that colonial period which has made us what 



we are. 



TlVOLI-ON-HUDSON, N. Y. 
26 March, 




E. deV. VERMONT. 



The Great Seal of the United States, the facsimile of which is 
found here, is officially blazoned as follows: 

Arms : Paleways of thirteen pieces, argent and gules, a chief, azure ; 
the escutcheon on the breast of the American Eagle displayed : 
proper — holding, in his dexter talon, an olive branch, and, in 
his sinister, a bundle of thirteen arrows: all proper; — and in 
his beak a scroll, inscribed with this 

Motto : E pluribus wmm. [One of many.] 

Crest : Over the head of the Eagle, which appears above the es- 
cutcheon, a glory breaking through a cloud : proper — and sur- 
rounding thirteen stars, forming a constellation, argent, on an 

azure field. 



■^r^rt--^ 



America HnRAbBiGA 



A COMPILATION OF 



(lOKn OF ARm$ 



;.^., <:/- c 



CRESTS HND MOTTOBS 



OF 



PROMINENT AMERICAN FAMILIES 

^GCCLGD in tm (^OUnCRY BGFOHG 1800 



EDITED BY E. de V. VERMONT 

ILLUSTRATED BY AUGUSTE LEROY 



THE AMERICA HERALBIGA PaBl2lSHiNG ASS0CIATI0N 

744 BROADWAY 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



This certifies that only FIVE HUNDRED Copies of this 

volume have been printed, and that the plates 

have been immediately destroyed. 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



A COMPILATION OF 



ta 



?ii(. 



fll Irajs, fftsts aiiS f ottaes 



OF 



PROMINENT AMERICAN FAMILIES 

SETTLED IN THIS COUNTRY BEFORE 1800 



EDITED BY E. DE V?^^VERMONT 
ILLUSTRATED BY AUGUSTE LEROY 



IRew l?orft 
THE AMERICA HERALDICA PUBLISHING ASSOCIATION 

744 BROADWAY 



Entered, according to Act of Congress, in the year 1889. by 



E. DE V. VERMONT. 
1 the office of the Librarian of Congress, 



t Washington. 



AU rights reserved. 



S'fW i'^'^' 



'^ 



Plates Engraved and Printed by Liebler & Ma 
New York. 



Letter-press by Haight & Dudley, 
Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 



TO OUR SUBSCRIBERS 




HEN, on the 20th of March, 1887, the compiler of America Heraldica, sent 
to the press the last pages of his book, he took especial care to mention 
in his Postscript, the fact that his work, if comprehensive, "was not in any 
way exhaustive." Such an affirmation implied the promise that his earnest 
and conscientious efforts should be henceforth directed, for several years to 
come, towards the task of completing, correcting and beautifying, with pen 
and artist's brush, his first attempt to record the names and arms of those 
ancestors of the American democracy who counted, in the Old World, 
among the well born and the honored ones. 

Such a promise the Editor redeems to-day, guided and instructed by his growing experience in 
the field of genealogical researches ; helped by many items of information forwarded him from all parts 
of the country, from England, from Holland, from France ; encouraged by letters, and words of mouth 
from such distinguished specialists as the Rt. Rev. Monsignor Seton, D.D., Edward Elbridge Salisbury, 
Esq., LL.D., the Rev. Beverly Robinson Betts, H. Farnham Burke, Esq., " Somerset Herald," George 

B. Chase, Esq.. Edmund Abdy Hurry, Esq., Frank d'Aulte, Esq., — our esteemed friend whose sudden 
loss we mourned but a few months ago — J. B. Rietstap, Esq., J. Edward Carpenter, Esq., Mrs. S. 

C. Savage, A. D. Weld French, Esq., Richard C. Lichtenstein, Esq., R. H. Brock, Esq., and the 
heads of many of our best and oldest families, both east and south, Knickerbockers and Huguenots, 
Puritans and Cavaliers, from the sunny Carolinas to snow-visited Massachusetts. With but one ex- 
ception, the press of the United States understood the nature and the scope of this publication and 
gave it its intelligent and hearty support. The nonsensical accusation of class-building, of anti-republican 
attempt to create or perpetuate a blooded aristocracy, fell to the ground, as utterly void of meaning 
and possibility. Instead, there grew in the minds of readers and critics, a decided conviction that 
books of this kind are the natural born enemies of frauds, false impersonations, society " humbugs " 
and all despicable apes of old European customs and traditions. Nothing kills silly vanity and un- 
justified pretenses as well as clear, limpid truth does. When it is more generally understood that arms 
and crests have a distinct meaning and a genuine worth only when belonging to their bearer de jure 
as well as de facto, then the use of such devices, precious in their legitimate owners' eyes, as the 
relics of an honored past, will be restricted to these few, these very few, who can rightfully treasure 
them as they do the faded miniature of a lovely ancestress or the battered sword of a soldier grand- 
father. 

Our readers will find hereafter inserted certain documents of real value, which are often quoted 
but little known to others than book-worms and amateur heraldists. They have been published before, 
but are not always accessible ; we have therefore thought that a compilation like ours would lack one 
of its most precious elements if it did not present, with such notes and commentaries as the docu- 



VI TOOURSUBSCRIBERS 

ments suggested, the few home sources from which many of our designs and notices have drawn their 
most valuable details. 

Let us add, finally, that a few coats of arms — a dozen perhaps — inserted in our Volume I., will 
be found again in our colored plates. Some important reason — altogether in the interest of exact 
truth — has guided us in this repetition, as will be apparent to our readers, if they take the trouble 
of comparing the duplicated shields. 

In a postscript — following a General Index of the whole work — we propose to give our con- 
cluding, unbiased opinion of the work as a whole, hoping for the last portion of it the same cordial 
welcome granted our Volume I. 

E. DE V. VERMONT. 




EARLY DOCUMENTS 



CONCERNING 



THE FAMILIES OF GENTLE BLOOD 

WHO SETTLED IN NORTH AMERICA BEFORE 1800 



THE GORE ROLL OF ARMS 

We propose to place on record in this work a transcript of this very valuable collection of the arms 
of New England families, made during the last century. The original MS. is at present inaccessible, but 
the first publishers, the editors of the Heraldic Journal, defunct twenty-three years ago, had the advantage 
of a very careful copy, painted by Isaac Child, Esq., a gentleman well versed in the rules of Heraldry, 
and his transcript may be accepted as entirely authentic* 



* The earliest coats recorded are dated in 1701 and 1702, the latest in 1724; it seems highly probable that the 
dates refer to the time when the memoranda were made, because there is no other reason for affixing a special date. 
Thus the first coat is that of Deane Winthrop, of Pulling Point, 1701. Certainly this was not the first appearance of 
the Winthrop arms, nor was Deane the head of the family at the time. Again, the arms were probably recorded at 
the dates affixed, since the earliest name of the Gores entered in the book was that of Samuel Gore, or John Gore, 
both born after 1750, and at this late date he could hardly have collected the information placed under the shields. 
These inscriptions are also peculiar, since they give only the rank of the bearer at the time named. For example. 
Spencer Phips, 1710, is called one of the Council and Justice of the Peace. Would any one in 1778, have omitted 
the fact that Phips became Lieut. Governor of the State in 1734? 

It is then desirable to know who was the artist at so early a date. Mr. Child's copy says, made by John Gore, 
but it is certain that an English heraldic MS. which was ' preserved with this book, had inscribed in it the name of 
Samuel Gore. Mr. Drake has also a bill dated in 1783, from Samuel Gore to Gov. John Hancock, in which these 
items occur : 

To painting chariot body and wheels, .... £1^ 

" painting sett of coach wheels, . . . . .1.4 

" drawing arms on paper, ..... 3 

From this we may argue that Samuel' was probably the painter. I presume he was the son of John* and 
Francis (Pinkney) Gore, who were married in 1743, and that John was the son of Obadiah' and Sarah (Kilby) Gore, 
and born 29 Dec, 1718. Savage records that the first of the name here was John' of Roxbury, 1635, who d. 1657. 
His son Samuel' m. Elizaljeth Weld, and died in 1692, leaving sons Samuel' and Obadiah,' the latter b. 1688. This 
Obadiah' was grandfather of the presumed artist. The successive generations seem to have been carpenters and house- 
wrights, nor can we learn from the inventories any mention of this book. 

The only suggestion we can make is, that since the dates under so many of these shields coincide with the 
death of the bearers, the painter may have been employed to engrave the coffin-plates, or to furnish hatchments or 
banners, both of which we know were used here at the funerals of noted citizens. 

We give the arms as they stand in Mr. Child's copy, though many of them are of families not resident here, 
as this may show the amount of credit to be given to the artist. Several of the coats were left unfinished, and 
probably some were not distinguishable. Such as it is, however, the roll constitutes a very valuable addition to our 
sources of information, and research seems to confirm its correctness. [Committee of publication of the Heraldic 
Journal^ 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



1. Dean WiNTHROP of Pulling Point, co. Suffolk, 1701. 
Argent, three chevrons, gules, over all a lion rampant, 

sable. 

Crest, on a mount, vert, a hare, courant, ppr. 

[Note. Deane was the sixth son of Gov. John Winthrop 
of Mass., and died in 1704.] 

2. Capt. Henry CRAFTS, son of the late Duke of Mon- 
mouth, Commander of her maj^ ship Gosport, 1702. 

Lozengy, argent and azure, a crescent for difference. 
Crest, a demi-lion, gules. 

3. Richard MiDCOT of Boston, Esq., county of Suffolk. 
One of his Majesty's Council of the Province of Mass., 1702. 

Azure, an eagle displayed, argent ; on a chief, gules, three 
escallops, gold. 

Crest, a demi-eagle displayed, holding in the beak an 
escallop. 

[Note. Richard Middlecott came from Warminster, co. 
Wilts, and died in 1704. BURKE gives these arms to a 
Lincolnshire family.] 

4. Dr. John OwEN, of the Island of Antigua, 1702. 
Gules, a boar, argent, collared and chained to a holly 

bush, on a mount in base, ppr. 

Crest, a boar's head palewise, couped. 

5. Anna, vi'iie. ol Peter Sargent, Esq., of Boston, 1702. 
The shield is Sargent (See No. 31) impaling Shrimpton. 

Argent, on a cross, sable, five escallops of the field. 
Crest, a demi-lion, azure, holding in his paws an escallop. 

6. John Jay (or JOY) of Medford, county of Middlesex, 
1702. 

Argent, a chevron, azure, on a chief of the second, three 
martlets of the field. 

Crest, a cormorant's head. 

[This gentleman has yet to be traced.] 

7. John Lego, of Boston, Esq., county of Suffolk. 
Sable, a buck's head, cabossed, argent. 

Crest, out of a coronet, gold, five ostrich feathers, azure. 
[This family was of Marblehead.] 

8. Madame Amia Leverit, widow of John Leverit, Esq., 
Gov. of the Colony of Mass., 1682. 

1st, Argent, a chevron between three leverets, sable. Im- 
paling, 2d, Gold, on a cross, gules, five bells, argent. 

Crest, a scull. 

[Note. The arms impaled are certainly those of Sedg- 
wick. Savage says Leverett married Sarah Sedgwick, dau. 
or sister of Major Robert S.] 

9. Edward BRATTLE of Marblehead, county of Essex. 
Brattle and Legg 1707. 

Gules, a chevron, gold, between three battle axes, argent. 

Crest, a dexter arm, vambraced and embowed, grasping 
a battle-axe. 

The impalement is of the Legg arms, described in No. 7. 

[Note. This Edward was a younger brother of Thomas, 
(see No. 30,) and married Mary, daughter of John Legg.] 

10. Anna, wife of John RICHARDS, Esq., one of his 
Majesty's Councilors of the Province of Mass. Richards 
and Winthrop 1707. 



Argent, four lozenges conjoined in fesse, gules, between 
two bars, (sable ?). Impaling, WiNTHROP, as in No. I. 

No crest. 

[John Richards who used a seal in 1685, was son of 
Thomas Richards of Dorchester, whose widow Welthian 
also used them on her will in 1679.] 

11. Charles Frost, of Boston, 1707. The shield is im- 
paled, being 

1, Frost. Argent, a chevron, gules, between three tre- 
foils, slipped. 

2, Davis. A stag trippant, gold. 
Crest, a head, within sprigs of (laurel?). 

[This was Charles Frost, b. 1683, son of John and grand- 
son of Nicholas F. of Kittery, who was born at Tiverton, 
CO. Devon, about 1595.] 

12. Nathaniel Norden, Esq., of Marblehead, one of his 
Majesty's Council. NORDEN and Lat 

Argent, on a fesse, gules, between three beavers passant, 
a crosslet fitchee between two fleurs-de-lys, gold. 

Crest, a demi-beaver, holding in his mouth a branch of 
leaves. 

The impalement is gules, a cross patonce, argent. 

[This is is the Latimer arms, and I find he married Mary, 
daughter of Christopher Latimer, or Lattimore of Marble- 
head. Norden died in 1727.] 

13. Lady Mary, formerly wife to Sir William Phips, Knt., 
Governor of the Province of Mass., .... of Peter 
Sargent, Esq., of His Majesty's Council. Sargent and 
Spencer, 1705. 

The shield is Sargent (See No. 31) impaling quarterly, 
argent and gules — -in the second and third quarters a fret, 
gold — over all, on a bend, sable, three escallops, gold. 

Crest, out of a ducal coronet a griffin's head, gorged with 
a bar gemelle, gules, between two wings expanded. 

[Note. Peter Sargent came from London, 1667, and 
though Savage does not record his first wife, she would 
seem to have been Anna Shrimpton. His second wife, the 
widow of Gov. Phips, was daughter of Roger Spencer, of 
Saco, Maine, 1652. Another daughter m. Dr. David Ben- 
nett, and had Spencer Bennett, who took the name of his 
uncle Phips, and is recorded in the next article. 

As to the Sargent arms we may note that Peter used 
them in 1693, as appears by his seal on a power of attorney, 
now at Salem.] 

14. Anthony Chickley, Esq., Attorney-General of the 
Province of Mass., 1706. 

Azure, a chevron between three mullets, gold. 

No crest. 

[He died in 1708. He was bapt. 31 July, 1636, at Pres- 
ton-Capes, North-Hants, England, and was the son of Wil- 
liam and Elizabeth Checkley. From the arms the family 
may have been related to that of the famous Archbishop 
Chichele.] 

15. John Chamberlain, Esq., of the Island of Antigua, 
1707. 

Gules, an inescutcheon between eight mullets in orle, 
argent. 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



Crest, out of a ducal coronet, gold, an ass's head, argent. 

i6. John Paul, of Boston, Mass., 1709. 

Azure, a lion rampant, argent, between eight fieurs-de-lys 
in orle, gold. 

Crest, a stag's head, cabossed, gules. 

[Note. This is evidently the arms of John Pool, or 
Poole.] 

17. Edward E , Esq., of Pembrouck in Wales. 
Gov. of the Province of Pennsylvania, 1705. 

Azure, a winged antelope, gold. 
Crest, a stag's head erased, gold. 

18. William SKINNER of London, merchant, 1707. 
Sable, a chevron, gold, between three griffins' heads, 

erased, argent, a crescent for difference. 

Crest, a griffin's head erased, argent, holding in the beak 
a hand couped, gules. 

19. Henry Harvie, Fort Major of Province Newfound- 
land, 1708. 

Gules, on a bend, argent, three trefoils slipped, azure. 
Crest, a leopard, ermine, holding in the dexter paw a 
trefoil slipped, azure. 

20. Widow Mary APTHORP, widow of Charles Apthorp, 
of Boston, 1709. 

1st, Per pale nebuly, argent and azure, in fesse two mul- 
lets, counterchanged. Impaling 2d, Quarterly, and , 

four eagles displayed, gules. 

No crest. 

21. Spencer PhipS, Esq., of Cambridge, county of Middle- 
sex, one of His Majesty's Council, and Justice of the Peace 
for the County, 17 10. 

Sable, a trefoil slipped, ermine, between eight mullets, 
argent. 

Crest, a bear's paw, sable, holding a trefoil slipped, 
ermine. 

[Note. These arms were used by Sir Wm. Phips, and 
very probably were granted him. The same are borne by 
the Marquess of Normanby, but despite the assertions of 
the Peerages, his ancestor, Constantine Phipps, was not a 
son of our Governor, and probably only most remotely 
connected. We hope our English friends will explain this 
matter more satisfactorily.] 

22. John Foster, Esq., Col. of the Life to the Earl of 
Bellomont, Governor of the Province of Mass., Justice of 
the Common Pleas for the County of Suffolk, and one 
of His Majesty's Council, 1710. 

Argent, a chevron vert, between three bugle-horns, 
stringed, sable. 

Crest, a dexter arm embowed, the hand grasping a spear. 

23. Susannah, widow of Jolin FOSTER, Esq., of Boston. 
Foster and Hawkins, 17 10. 

1st, Foster as in No. 22. 

Impaling 2d, Argent on a saltire sable, five fleurs-de-lys, 
gold. 

Crest, on a mound vert, a hind lodged, ppr. 

[This seemed to be an error in the Christian name. 
Abigail, dau. of Thomas Hawkins, married John Foster, 
and died in 171 1.] 



24. Gurdon Saltonstall, Esq., Gov. of the Colony of 

Connecticut, 1742. Saltonstall and Whit 

(Wi-iittingham). 

1st, Gold, a bend between two eagles displayed, sable. 

Impaling 2d, Argent, a fesse, (azure ?) over all a lion 
rampant, gules. 

Crest, out of a ducal coronet, gold, a pelican's head, 
vulning its breast. 

[Note. Gov. Saltonstall, son of Nathaniel, and grand- 
son of Richard Saltonstall, Jr., and Meriell Gurdon, mar- 
ried, for his third wife, Mary, dau. of William Whitting- 
ham, and widow of Wm. Clarke. The grandfather was 
John W., who was son of Baruch W., and grandson of the 
distinguished reformer, William Whittingham, Dean of 
Durham.] 

25. Samuel WHITE, of Boston, merchant, 1712. 

Gules, a chevron between three boars' heads, couped, 
argent. 

Crest, out of a mural coronet, gules, a boar's head, argent. 
[This has also to be identified.] 

26. William TAYLOR, Esq., Col. of the Second Regiment 
of Foot, at the taking of the Government of Port Royal, 
afterward Lt.-Gov. of the Province, and one of the Council, 
1711. 

Per saltire, gold and gules, an eagle displayed. 

Crest, a demi-eagle displayed, gules, double headed, and 
in each beak a cross-crosslet. 

[William Taylor was the son of William Taylor, by his 
wife, Rebecca Stoughton. He died in 1732. These arms 
were used by him on his seal.] 

27. James CUTTING of Barbadoes, merchant, 1712. 
Azure, two swords, argent, in saltire, hilted, gold — on a 

chief of the second, three lions, rampant, of the field. 

28. Elizabetli, wife of Simeon Stoddard, Esq., of Boston, 
merchant, 1712. STODDARD and Eu . . . (Evance ?). 

1st, Sable, three estoiles within a bordure, argent. 

Impaling, 2d, Argent, a chevron between three fleurs-de- 
lys, sable. 

Crest, a sinister arm, embowed, habited, gules, holding 
in the hand the stalk of a flower. 

29. Gillis Dyer, Esq., Colonel of the Life-guard to his 
Excellency, Joseph Dudley, Esq., Governor of the Prov- 
ince ; Sheriff of the County of Suffolk, 1713. 

Argent, on a bend cottised, azure, three crescents, gold. 
Crest, a mailed arm, gauntleted, holding a dagger upright, 
hilted, gold. 

[Giles Dyer died 12 August, 1713.] 

30. Thomas BRATTLE, Esq., Treasurer of Harvard Col- 
lege, and Fellow of the Royal Society, at Boston, in the 
County of Suffolk, 1713. 

Gules, a chevron, gold, between three battle-axes, argent. 

Crest, a de.xter arm, embowed, vambraced, holding in the 
hand a battle-axe, gold. 

[He was the son of Thomas Brattle, of Charlestown, who 
died in 1683, the wealthiest man probably in the Colony, 
says Savage.] 



10 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



31. Peter SARGENT, Esq., one of His Majest3''s Council 
for the Province of Mass., 1 7 14. 

Argent, a chevron between three dolphins embowed, 
sable. 

Crest, a bird rising. 

[He was from London, 1667, and d. J. /. 1714. See No. 

'3-] 

32. Elizabeth, wife of Simeon STODDARD, Esq., of Bos- 
ton, 1714. Stoddard and Roberts. 

Stoddard impaling — Per pale, argent and gules, a lion 
rampant, sable. 

Crest, a stag's head, erased, per fesse (argent and gules). 

[This impalement is difficult of explanation. Simeon 

was son of Anthony Stoddard, and married ist, Mary ^ 

who d. 1708. He m. 2d, May, 1709, Elizabeth, widow of 
Col. Samuel Shrimpton, who d. April, 1713. Third, in 
May, 171 5, Mehitable (Minot) widow of Peter Sargent. His 
second wife, the widow Shrimpton, was dau. of widow Eliz- 
abeth Roberts, of London.] 

33. Capt. Thomas RICHARDS, of Boston, in the county of 
Suffolk, 1714. 

Argent, four lozenges, conjoined in fesse, gules, between 
two bars, sable. 

No crest. 

[This was probably the son of James Richards, of Hart- 
ford, and nephew of John R. (shield No. 10. ante). He 
died December, 1714. James Richards' tomb, at Hartford, 
we are informed, bears these arms.] 

34. Isaac AdDINGTON, Esq., Secretary of the Prov. of 
Mass., Judge of Probate for county of Suffolk, Justice of the 
Peace, and one of His Majesty's Council, 1715. AddinG- 
TON and Norton. 

I. Per pale, ermine and erminois, on a chevron, counter- 
changed, four lozenges, between three fleurs-de-lys. 

Impaling, Gules, a fret, argent, over all a bend vairy, gold 
and gules. 

Crest, a wild-cat, ermine. 

[Isaac Addington was son of Isaac Addington by his wife, 
Anne Leverett. He married, first, Elizabeth, dau. of Grif- 
fith Bowen, of London, and secondly, Elizabeth, widow of 
John Wainwright, and dau. of William Norton. She was 
niece of Rev. John Norton, and this branch was from the 
Nortons of Sharpen'now, co. Bedford.] 

35. Elizabeth, wife of Elisha CoOK, of Boston, Esq. 
Cook and Leverett, 171 5. 

Cook (as in No. 36) impaling Leverett. 

[She was the daughter of Gov. John Leverett.] 

36. Elisha Cook, of Boston, Esq., one of his Majesty's 
Council of the Province of Mass., 171 5. 

Gold, a chevron chequy, azure, and of the field, between 
three cinquefoils of the second. 

Crest, a unicorn's head, gold, between two wings endorsed, 
azure. 

[Elisha Cook was son of Richard of Boston, said to have 
come from Gloucestershire. He died Oct. 1715. His son, 
of the same name, married the dau. of Richard Middlecot.] 



37. Andrczv Belcher, Esq., Commissary General of the 
Province of Mass., and one of his Majesty's Council, 1717. 

Gold, three pales, gules, a chief vair. 

Crest, a greyhound's head erased, ermine, with a collar, 
gules, and ring, (gold ?). 

[Andrew Belcher, a settler here in 1639, married Eliza- 
beth, daughter of Nicholas Danforth, and had Andrew, the 
person here recorded, who married Sarah, daughter of 
Jonathan Gilbert of Hartford. He died in Oct., 1717, 
having acquired a large fortune. His son Jonathan was 
the Governor of Mass. These arms are on Andrew Belcher's 
seal on his will.] 

38. Joseph Lemon of Charlestown, in the County of Mid- 
dlesex, 1717. 

Azure, a fesse between three dolphins embowed, argent, 
an annulet for difference. 

Crest, a pelican in her nest, feeding her young. 

39. George CALDWELL of London, merchant, now of 
Boston, county Suffolk, 1717. Caldwell and Mane. 

The first coat is quarterly, viz.: i. Per pale crenelle, gules 
and argent, three bear's paws erased. 

2. . . . , three fleurs-de-lys. 

3 and 4. Argent, a galley, sable. 

Over all a pallet, ermine. 

Impaling. Per chevron florj', sable and gold, in chief 
three bezants, in base the stump of a tree (? sable.) 

Crest, a hand gauntleted, holding a bear's paw erased. 

[This must be a foreign coat, the style being so strange.] 

40. Elisha Hutchinson, Esq., Col. of the First Regiment 
of Foot in the co. of Suff., Capt. of Castle William, Chief 
Justice of the Court of Common Pleas in the co. of Suff., 
and one of the Council, 1717. 

Per pale, gules and argent, a lion rampant, argent, 
between eight cross-crosslets, gold. 

Crest, out of a ducal coronet, gold, a cockatrice, vert, 
combed, gules. 

[He was the son of Edward Hutchinson of Boston, co. 
Lenc, and of Boston, N. E. He died Dec, 1717. His 
grandson was Governor of Massachusetts.] 

41. f^azo/// Winthrop, Esq., Maj.-General of the Province 
of Mass., Chief Justice of the Court of Assize, and one of 
his Majesty's council, 1717. 

Arms as No. i. Motto, Spes Vincit Thronuni. 

[Wait-Still Winthrop was son of Gov. John W. of Conn., 
and grandson of Gov. John of Mass., hence nephew of 
Deane Winthrop, (shield No. I.) He died November, 
1717.] 

42. Nicholas Paige of Rumney Marsh, Col. of the Second 
Regiment of Foot in the County of Suffolk, 1717. 

Argent, on a bend, three eagles displayed. 

Crest, a demi-eagle, displayed. 

[He was from Plymouth, co. Devon, 1665, and married 
Anne, widow of Edward Lane, niece of Gov. Joseph Dud- 
ley. He died late in 1717.] 

43. Jolui HUSE, Esq., of Salem, in the County of Essex, 
merchant, 1717. 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



II 



Argent, an estoille of sixteen points, gules. 
Crest, three trees, proper. 

44. Capt.John Browne, of Salem, in the County of Essex, 
merchant, 1718. 

Argent, on a bend double cotised, three eagles displayed, 
a crescent for difference. 

Crest, an eagle displayed. 

[This John Browne has not yet been distinguished from 
others of the name.] 

45. Daniel WlBOND, of Boston, Capt. of Marines on board 
his Majesty's ship Chester, 1717. 

Sable, a fesse (gold ?), between three swans, argent, mem- 
bcred, gules. 

Crest, a dragon's head, apparently. 

[These arms are those of Wyborn, co. Kent. 

46. Eliakim HUTCHINSON, Esq., one of his Majesty's 
Council for the Province of Mass, 1718. 

Arms as in No. 40, but with a label of three points, 
argent, over all. 

[Eliakim was son of Richard Hutchinson, a wealthy iron- 
monger of London, and cousin of Edward of Boston. He 
died in 1 71 8, probably.] 

47. Robert BARKER, of Ipswich, co. of Suffolk, Great 
Britain, 1718. 

Per fesse nebuly, azure and sable, three martlets, gold, a 
canton, ermine. 

Crest, a hind, lodged. 
[See No. 62.] 

48. Sir Thomas LuCAS, of Colchester, Great Britain, 
1718. 

Argent, a fesse between six annulets, gules, three in 
chief, as many in base. 

Crest, out of a ducal coronet, gold, a demi-griffin, with 
wings expanded, gules. 

[See No. 62.] 

49. John BrittON, of Tollingham, Great Britain, impaled 
on the dexter side with CHUTE, 1718. 

1st, Chute, viz.. Gules, three swords bar wise, the points 
to the dexter, argent. 

Impaling 2d, Britton : Quax'terly, per fesse indented, 
argent and gules, in the first quarter, a mullet, sable. 

Crest, a demi-lion collared, therefrom a cord, bowed, and 
held in the dexter paw. 

[See No. 62.] 

50. John Wood, of Westlitton, in Yorkshire, Great Britain, 
171S. 

Sable, on a bend, argent, three fleurs-de-lys of the field, a 
crescent for difference. 

Crest, a wolf's head erased, sable, collared, gold. 
[See No. 62.] 

51. Edward StURTON, Esq., Great Britain, 1718. 
Sable, a bend, gold, between six plates. 

Crest, a demi-friar, holding in the dexter hand a whip 
with three lashes. 
[See No. 62.] 

52. Robert CHICHESTER, of Raley, in the co. of Devon in 
Great Britain, 1718. 



Chequy, gold and gules, a chief vairy, gold and gules. 
Crest, a heron rising, holding an eel in the beak. 
[See No. 62.] 

53. Joshua Gee, CO. Suffolk, shipwright, 1720. Gee and 
Thatcher. 

1st on a chevron, between three leopard's faces, as many 
fieurs-de-Iys. 

2d, a cross, moline, on a chief, three grasshoppers. 

Crest, a wolf stataut reguardant, ermine. 

[Joshua Gee was son of Peter Gee, of Boston, 1667. 
Savage seems to make some confusion in the marriages, by 
saying that Joshua m. Elizabeth, dau. of Rev. Thomas 
Thornton, but it seems that he married Elizabeth, dau. of 
Judah Thatcher, and gr. dau. of Thornton. She afterwards 
became the third wife of the Rev. Peter Thatcher, of Mil- 
ton, her second cousin. 

The relation was this, Thomas Thatcher, of Plymouth, 
Mass., was son of Rev. Peter, rector of St. Edmund's, Salis- 
bur)', CO. Wilts, and nephew of Anthony ; Judah was son of 
Anthony Thatcher, and cousin of Thomas ; Rev. Peter, son 
of Thomas, and Elizabeth, dau. of Judah, were thus second 
cousins. These Thatcher arms are confirmed by the Suf- 
folk Wills.] 

54. Wigglesworth SWEETSER, of Boston, co. of Suffolk, 
1720. 

Argent, on a fesse azure, three saltires couped, gold. 

[Seth Sweetser came in 1637, aged 31, from Tring, co. 
Hertford. His son, Benjamin m. Abigail, probably dau. of 
Edward Wigglesworth, and had a son Wigglesworth Sweet- 
ser, who had a son of the same names.] 

55. Sir John Earkley, of Stratton in Somersetshire, Gr. 
Britain, 1719. 

A chevron between ten crosses pattee. 
Crest, a unicorn passant. 
[See No. 62.] 

56. George Whithouse, of Kingston, Island of Jamaica, 
1719. 

Per chevron florj', sable and argent, in chief two escallops, 
and in base a tower, all counterchanged. 

Crest, five spears, one in pale and four in saltire. 

[Note. This is evidently the coat of Whitehorn, though 
it is precisely reversed from Burke's description.] 

57. Samuel Brown, Esq., of Salem, Justice of the Court 
of Common Pleas, Col. of the First Regiment of Foot, co. 
of Essex, and one of his Majesty's Council. 

Arms the same as No. 44. 

[William Browne, of Salem, son of Francis B. of Brandon, 
CO. Suffolk, came here in 1635, aged 26. His son William 
married Hannah Curwin, and had Samuel, the one here 
recorded.] 

58. i^ra«mBRINLEY, of Newport, Colony of R. I., now of 
Boston, 1719. 

Per pale, sable and gold, a chevron between three escal- 
lops, counterchanged, within a bordure, argent, charged 
with eight hurts. 

Crest, an escallop, gules. 



12 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



[He was son of Thomas of Datchett, co. Bucks, was of 
Newport, an Assistant in Rhode Island, and died in 1719.] 

59. Sir Thomas CULPEPPER, Baron of Thornsway, co. of 
Kent, G. Britain, 1719. 

Azure, a bend engrailed, gules. 

Crest, a falcon, with wings expanded. 

[Note. This coat is clearly wrong, being color on color. 
It should be argent, a bend engrailed, gules. See also 
No. 62.] 

60. Joseph Dudley, of Roxbury, CO. of Suffolk, Esq., Gov. 
of the Province of Mass. Bay, New England, and New 
Hampshire, 1720. 

Gold, a lion rampant, azure, the tail forked. 

Crest, a lion's head erased. 

[This was the son of Gov. Thomas Dudley. We may 
note that the Dudley lion was usually vert, instead of 
azure.] 

61. Johji Mansale, of Bristol, merchant, 1710. 
Argent, a chevron between three maunches, sable. 
Crest, a griffin's head, couped. 

[SeeNo. 62.] 

62. Thomas CHUTE, of Marblehead, co. of Essex, 1719. 
Gules, semee of mullets, gold, three swords, argent, hilted, 

or, barways, the centre sword encountering the other two ; 
a canton, argent and azure (vert ?), thereon a lion of Eng- 
land. 

Crest, a dexter cubit arm in armor, the hand grasping a 
broken sword. 

[In the N. E. Register, XIII., 123, it is stated that Lionel 
Chute of Ipswich, was son of Anthony Chute, and the de- 
scendant of Alexander Chute, of Taunton, co. Somerset, A. 
D. 1268. Lionel's son James married an Epes, of Ipswich, 
and had a son, Thomas, born in 1692, the one here men- 
tioned. 

The MS., which was then copied for the Register, comes 
down only to this generation of Thomas Chute. It had 
evidently been seen by the author of this GORE list, since 
the arms pricked on it are those of Sturton (51), Bartley 
(55), Lucas (48), Gee (53), Culpepper (59), Baker (47), Wood 
(50), Britton (49), and Chittester (52), which are Nos. 47, 
48,49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 55, and 59 in this List, except that 
Bartley, Baker and Chittester, should be Barkley, Barker, 
and Chichester, as given by us. Mansale (No. 61), also 
occurs in the marriages.] 

63. Sa^nuel VmiAAVS, of Boston, co. of Suffolk, 1721. 
Argent, a lion rampant, sable, collared and chained, gules. 
Crest, a lion, as in the shield, collared and chained, gules. 
[This was very probably Samuel Phillips, goldsmith, of 

Salem, son of Rev. Samuel P., of Rowley, who was son of 
Rev. George P., of Boxford, co. Suffolk, and Watertown, 
Mass. George Avas son of Christopher Phillips, of Rainham, 
St. Martin, co. Norfolk, and was born about 1593.] 

64. William HUTCHINSON, Esq., of Boston, co. of Suf- 
folk, Justice of the Peace, 1 72 1. 

Arms as in No. 46, but without the label, and identical 
with No. 40. 



[He was the son of Eliakim Hutchinson, and died in 
1721.] 

65. Edward Fell, of Boston, co. of Suffolk, 1720. PELL 
and Clarke. 

Quarterly, i and 4, ermine, on a canton ■ a pelican 

vuhiing herself, gold. 

2 and 3, Gules, three swords, argent, hilted, gold, erect, in 
fesse. 

Crest, on a chaplet, vert, a pelican vulning herself. 

66. Thomas Savage, Esq., of Boston, Col. of the First 
Regiment of Foot, co. of Suffolk, 1720. 

Argent, six lioncels, sable. 

Crest, out of a coronet, gold, a bear's paw erased, sable. 

[These arms are on the tombstone of Major Thomas 
Savage, in the King's Chapel Yard, Boston.] 

(>■]. Elizabeth, wife oi John Yeomans, Esq., of the Island 
of Antigua. Yeomans and Shrimpton, 1721. 

1, Sable, a chevron between three spears, upright. 

2, Argent, on a cross, gold, five escallops of the field. 
Crest, a dexter arm, in armor, embowed, the hand grasp- 
ing a spear. 

[John Yeomans was grandson of John Y., Lieut.-Governor 
of Antigua. Elizabeth was daughter of Samuel Shrimpton, 
Jr., and great-granddaughter of Henry Shrimpton.] 

68. Zechariah TuTTLE, of Boston, co. of Suffolk, Lieu- 
tenant of Castle William, 1721. 

Azure, on a bend, argent, double cotised, gold, a lion 
passant, sable. 

Crest, a bird (Cornish chough ?) holding in its beak a 
branch of olive. 

[These arms are those of Tothill.] 

69. Mrs. Anna Wade, of Medford, co. of Middlesex, 
1721. 

Azure, a saltier between four escallops, gold. 

Crest, a hippopotamus. 

[The Wades of Medford were sons of Jonathan, of Ips- 
wich, Mass., who owned lands in Denver, co. Norfolk. 
This Anna may be the dau. of Nathaniel Wade and Mercy 
Bradstreet, born in 1685.] 

70. Jonathan MOUNTFORT, of Boston, co. of Suffolk, 1722. 
Bendy of eight, gold and azure. 

Crest, a lion's head, couped. 

71. Daniel Stoddard, a naval officer of the port t)f Bos- 
ton, 1723. 

Sable, three estoilles within a borduie, argent, a crescent 
for difference. 

Crest, a demi-horse , erased, environed round the 

body with a coronet, gold. 

72. Widow of Joseph DUDLEY, Esq., of Roxbury, co. of 
Suffolk, 1722. 

1st, Gold, a lion rampant (azure?). Impaling. on a 

bend double cotised, three martlets. 

Crest, a wolf's head, erased. 

[This is evidently Rebecca, daughter of Edward Tyng, 
and wife of Gov. Joseph Dudley. She survived her hus- 
band, and died Sept., 1722. These arms of Tyng are on 
old plate, still preserved in the family. See, also. No. 79.] 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



13 



73. Mary, widow of Francis Brinley of Newport, in 
the Colony of Rhode Island. Brinley and BORDEN, 1722. 

1st, Per pale, argent and gold, a chevron between three 
escallops, countcrchanged, within a bordure, argent, charged 
with eight hurts. Impaling, argent, three cinquefoils, 
azure. 

Crest, an escallop, gules. 

74. Jolin JEKYLL of Boston, Esq., Collector of the Cus- 
toms for the Counties of Suffolk, Middlesex, Plymouth, 
Barnstable, and Bristol, 1723. 

Gold, a fesse between three hinds trippant, sable. 
Crest, a horse's head couped, argent, maned and bridled, 
sable. 

75. Capt. Henry BURN of the Island of Christophers, 1723. 
Gold, a chevron between three pelican's heads erased, 

azure. 

Crest, out of a ducal coronet of gold, a pelican's head. 

•j^). Benjamin PiCKMAN, Esq., of Salem, co. of Essex, 
1723. 

Gules, two battle-axes in saltire, gold, between four mart- 
lets, argent. 

No crest. 

[Benjamin Pickman, of Salem, says Savage, was third 
son of Nathaniel, of Bristol, England, where he was bap- 
tized at Lewen's Mead, (Bristol) in 1645, had a son Benja- 
min, who died in 171S, leaving a son Benjamin, born 1708. 
These arms are also in the Salem Churchyard.] 

TJ. William DUMMER, Esq., of Boston, co. of Suffolk, 
Lieut.-Gov. of the Province of Mass., one of the Council, 
and Capt. of Castle William, 1723. 

Azure, three fieurs-de-lys, gold, on a chief of the second, 
a demi-lion of the field. 

Crest, a demi-lion azure, holding in the dexter paw a 
fleur-de-Iys, gold. 

78. John Waire, of the Island of Jamaica, merchant, 
1723. 

Gules, two wings conjoined in lure, argent, over all a 
bend, azure. 

Crest, an ostrich's head, with wings elevated, holding in 
the beak a key. 

[The arms are those of Warre.] 

79. Jonathan TyNG, Esq., of Woburn, co. of Middlesex, 
Colonel of the Second Regiment of Foot, Justice of the 
Court, 1724. 

Argent, on a bend cotised, sable, three martlets, gold. 

No crest. 

[He was son of Edward Tyng, and died in January, 1724. 
The family was one of the most prominent in Massachu- 
setts, and was connected by marriage with many of the 
families already noted as using arms.] 

80. James TiLESTONE, of Boston, co. of Suffolk, 1724. 
Azure, a bend cotised between two garbs, gold. 

Crest, out of a mural coronet, gules, a greyhound's head. 
[These are the arms of Tillotson.] 

81. John Frizell, of Boston, merchant. Frizell and 
FOWLE. 



1st, Quarterly, i and 4, argent, three antique crowns, 
gules. 

2 and 3, Azure, three cinquefoils, argent. 
Impaling 2d, Argent, three trees, proper. 
Crest, a stag's head, between two halberts. 

82. Henry Ros\VELL, of London, merchant, 1723. 
Per pale, gules and azure, a lion rampant, argent. 
Crest, a lion's head couped, argent, langued, gules. 

83. John SiL * * N, of the North of England, Great 
Britain, 1723. 

Argent, on a bend cotised, sable, three annulets of the 
field. 

Crest, two bear's paws erased, the dexter one, gules, the 
sinister, proper, holding a branch upright (?) gules. 

84. Richard Waldron, Esq., of Portsmouth in Piscate- 
qua, alias New Hampshire, 1724. 

Argent, three bulls' heads cabossed, horned, gold. 

85. BOARLAND. 

Argent, two bars, gules, over all a boar, rampant (Azure?) 
Crest, a broken lance. 
Motto, Press Through. 

[These arms are used by a Scotch family, and also by the 
Borlands of Boston, Mass.] 

86. Gushing. 

Quarterly, l and 4, ... an eagle displayed. 

2 and 3, . . . two dexter hands, open, couped, a 
canton, chequy. 

Crest, two bear's paws, holding a ducal coronet, from 
which is suspended a heart. 

[No colors or name are marked on this sketch. The 
family, however, is a distinguished one here, and the pedi- 
gree will be found in the New England Historical and 
Genealogical Register, for 1865.] 

87. Paddock, of Gloucester. 
[An unfinished sketch.] 

88. Sir Edward Sprague, Knt. 
Gules, a fesse between three trefoils. 

Crest, out of a naval crown, a demi-lion, crowned. 

89. Lathrop. 

Gyronny of eight, azure and gules, an eagle displayed, 
argent. 

Crest, a game-cock. 

90. Joshua WiNSLOW, Esq. 

Argent, on a bend, gules, eight lozenges conjoined, gold. 
Crest, the stump of a tree. 

[More correctly the bend should be, gules, lozengy, gold, 
but we give it as it is painted.] 

91. Sayward, of York. 

Gules, on a fesse, argent, between two chevrons, ermine, 
three leopard's faces of the field. 
Crest, a tiger's head, couped. 
[Henry Sayward was of York, Me., 1664.] 

92. Scolly. 

Three shovellers. [No colors.] 

93. Whitwell. 

(Gules?), a fesse chequy, gold and sable, between two 
bars gemelles. 



14 AMERICA HER A LDICA 

94. Thovtas Kneeland, of Essex. 98. Christopher KiLBY, Esq. 

A lion rampant, gold, holding in the dexter paw an Argent, three bars, azure, in chief as many annulets of 

escutcheon, charged with a cross formee. the last. 

Crest, a demi-lion. Crest, an ear of maize, stripped open. 

95. Argent, a chevron gules between three pine apples. Mottoes, Persisio, and Gratia Gratiam Parii. 

vert, on a canton a fleur-de-lys, in the centre point a Baro- 99. Gilbert McAdaMS. McAdams, Kilby and Cl.ARKfc. 

net s badge. Gules, three crosses-crosslet fitchee, argent. 

Crest, out of a ducal coronet a mailed arm embowed, the On an escutcheon of pretence Kilby (as in No. 82), 

hand grasping a staff; theron a flag. quartering Clarke, viz., a bend raguly and trunked between 

Mottoes, Peperi and Virtute. three roundles. 

[These arms, though not clearly emblazoned, are certainly [We presume that this Christopher Kilby and Gilbert Mc- 

those of Sir Williatn Pepperell] Adams were brothers-in-law. At all events, in 1760, Chris- 

96. Beach. topher Kilby, of London, then of New York, and Gilbert 
Gules, three lions passant, gold, over all a bend charged McAdams, of New York, joined in a sale of land in Boston. 

with three stag's heads, cabossed. A certain Christopher Kilby married Sarah Clarke, 18 

Crest, a bird rising. August, 1726, which may account for the quartering of the 

97. Bell, of Boston. arms on the above shield. It will also be noted that the 
Azure, a fesse, ermine, between three bells, gold. Gores and Kilbys intermarried.] 

[It will be noticed that the last thirteen coats are not 
finished in the drawing, and the names of the owners are 
not all specified.] 



PRINCE'S LIST OF ESQUIRES IN 1736^^" 

The first volume of Prince's Chronological History of New England, printed in Boston in 1736, 
contains a list of 735 subscribers, embracing undoubtedly the most prominent patrons of literature of 
the day. The titles are given with punctilious care, and, at the end, the author writes " seeing that 



* This list has its meaning and purpose admirably illustrated by the following remarks and quotations which we 
find recorded in the work entitled The Descendants of William and Elizabeth Tuttle, by George Frederic TUTTLE : 

The title Honorable was entirely unknown in our records until 1685, and subsequently for many years was applied 
only to the Governor and seldom even to him. The next title was that of Esquire, and meant the same as in England, 
temp. Elizabeth and James I. Mr. Thomas Wells was a magistrate for 17 years, deputy Governor, one year, and was 
chosen Governor the second time before he was dignified with Esquire. The next title was Geyitleman, but seems to have 
been soon discarded in Connecticut. The prefix Master (Mr.) belonged to all gentlemen including those designated by 
the higher marks of rank. Master corresponds very nearly to the English word Gentleman. In Connecticut it embraced 
clergymen and planters of good family and estate, who were members of the General Court, also, those bred at a university 
and those of sufificient education to manage the general affairs of the colony, civil or ecclesiastical, and who had been 
sufficiently well born. Comparatively few of the representatives of the townes, even though they might be returned year 
after year, were honored with the title. To be called Mr., or to have one's name recorded by the Secretary with that 
prefix 200 years ago was a more certain proof of rank of the individual as respects birth, education and good moral character 
than anyone of the high sounding titles with which many men of no merit whatever in our day of swift locomotion are 
content to cajole others in order that they may be enriched in their turn with the same spurious currency. " It may be 
observed by reference to our colonial records that there were scores of men of good family and in honorable stations who 
still did not possess all the requisite qualities of masters. It was seldom that young men of whatever rank were called 
masters. Sir was sometimes applied to young gentlemen under-graduates at a college. Goodman was used in speaking of 
the better sort of yoemen, laborers, tenants and others above the grade of servants, who owned a small estate and bore a 
good moral character. There are several instances of deputies to the General Court being called Goodman. Goodivife or 
Goody was the corresponding feminine title. Mrs. was applied to the wives of Masters and also to unmarried females of the 
higher class. Military titles were considered of a veiy high order. Previous to 1654 the highest military officer in the 
colony was Captain." [Hollister'S Hist, of Connecticut^^ 

Felt, in his History of Ipswich, relates that a man was degraded from the title of Mr. for a misdemeanor. 

Palfrey, in his History of New England, says: " There was great punctiliousness in the application of both official 
and conventional titles. Only a small number of persons of the best condition (always including ministers and their wives) 
had Mr. or Mrs. prefixed to their names. Goodman and Goodwife were addressed to persons above the condition of 
servitude and below that of gentility." 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



15 



some Gentlemen's names in the List happen to be printed without their proper additions, and fearing 
it ma}'' be so with others, we crave pardon for such omissions." We may safely assume then that the 
title Esquire annexed to 104 names on this list, was intended to designate those who were in the 
habit of using coats-of-arms ; unless indeed an exception may be made in the case of those holding 
high official positions. At all events the list is well worth republishing. It is as follows ; the names 
being inscribed in alphabetical order : 



Richard Abbe, of Windham. 

Samuel Adams. 

Hon. John Alford. 

Job Almy, of Tiverton. 

Edward Arnold, of Duxbury. 

John Ballentine. 

Gov. Jonathan Belcher. 

Andrew Belcher. 

Hon. Thomas Berry, of Ipswich. 

William Bollan. 

Francis Borland. 

John Boydell. 

Hon. Melatiah Bourne, of Sandwich. 

William Brattle, of Cambridge. 

Francis Brinley. 

Benjamin Browne, of Salem. 

John Bulkely, of Colchester. 

Hon, Theophilus Burrill, of Lynn. 

Samuel Cary, of Charlestown. 

Hon. John Chandler, of Woodstock. 

Hon. John Chandler, of Worcester. 

Ezekiel Cheever, of Charlestown. 

Charles Church, of Bristol. 

George Cradock. 

Hon. John Cushing, of Scituate. 

Hon. Thomas Cushing, of Scituate. 

Samuel Danforth, of Cambridge. 

Hon. Paul Dudley, of Roxbury. 

Hon. William Dummer. 

Samuel Dummer, of Wilmington. 

Joseph Dwight, of Brookfield. 

John Eastwicke. 

John Fayerweather. 

John Flint, of Concord. 

Henry Flynt. 

Richard Foster, Sheriff of Middlesex. 



Hon. Francis Foxcroft. 

William Foye, Treasurer of the Prov. 
of the Mass. Bay. 

Joseph Gerrish, of Newbury. 

Robert Gibbs, of Providence. 

Hon. Edward Goddard, of Framing- 
ham. 

Thomas Graves, of Charlestown. 

Samuel Greenwood. 

Robert Hale, of Beverly. 

Hugh Hall. 

Stephen Hall, of Charlestown. 

Joseph Heath, of Roxbury. 

Nathaniel Hubbard, of Bristol. 

Hon. Thomas Hutchinson. 

Hon. Edward Hutchinson. 

John Hunt. 

Hon. John Jeffries. 

Thomas Jenner, of Charlestown. 

John Jones, of Hopkinton. 

Henry Lee, of Worcester. 

Joseph Lemmon, of Charlestown. 

Elkanah Leonard, of Middleboro. 

Hon. Hezekiah Lewis. 

Benjamin Lincoln, of Hingham. 

Caleb Loring, of Hull. 

Byfield Lyde. 

Benjamin Lynde, Jr., of Salem. 

Israel Marshfield, of Springfield. 

John Metcalfe, of Dedham. 

Hon. Jeremiah Moulton, of York. 

Hon. John Osborne. 

Hon. Thomas Palmer. 

Hon. John Peagrum. 

Benjamin Pemberton. 

Hon. William Pepperrell. 



Henry Phillips, of Charlestown. 

Hon. Spencer Phipps. 

Benjamin Prescott, of Groton. 

William Pynchon, jr., of Springfield. 

Hon. Edmund Quincy. 

Hon. John Quincy. 

Hon. Jonathan Remington. 

Jacob Royall. 

John Ruck. 

Daniel Russell, of Charlestown. 

Nathaniel Sartle, of Groton. 

Samuel Sewall. 

William Shirley. 

Ebenezer Stevens, of Kingston. 

Hon. Anthony Stoddard. 

Hon. Samuel Thaxter, of Hingham. 

Thomas Tilestone, of Dorchester. 

John Vinton, of Stoneham. 

John Wainwright, of Ipswich. 

John Walley. 

Jonathan Ware, of Wrentham. 

Peter Warren, Commander of H. M. 

ship Squirrel. 
Samuel Watts. 
Hon. Samuel Welles. 
Francis Wells, of Cambridge. 
Hon. Jacob Wendell. 
Oliver Whiting, of Billerica. 
Hon. Joseph Wilder, of Lancaster. 
Hon. Josiah Willard. 
Hon. Isaac Winslow, of Marshfield. 
Edward Winslow. 
Joshua Winslow. 
Hon. Adam Winthrop. 
Benjamin Woods, of Marlboro'. 



i6 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



EARLY AMERICAN HERALDIC BOOK-PLATES^ 



Abercrombie, James, Penn. 
Adams, John Ouincy, Mass. 
Agnew, James, N. Y. 
Allen, John, Mass. 
Allison, Joseph J., Penn. 
Alsop, Richard, Conn. 
Anderson, Alexander, N. Y. 
Apthorp, Mass. 
Archer, William, Va. 
Assheton, Ralph., Penn. 
Assheton, Judge William, Penn. 
Atkinson, Theodore, N. H. 
Atkinson, Wm. King, N. H. 
Baldwin, Jonathan, Mass. 
Baldwin, Luke, Mass. 
Ball, Flamen, N. Y. 
Bancker, A., N. Y. 
Bancker, Charles N., N. Y. 
Bancker, Gerard, N. Y. 
Banister, John, Va. 
Barton, William, Penn. 
Bartram, John, Penn. 
Beatty, J. M.D., Penn. 
Bedlow, William, N. Y. 
Belcher, Jonathan, Mass. 
Berchell (van), N. Y. 
Beresford, Richard, S. C. 
Beverly, Plenry, Va. 
Beverly, William, Va. 
Blackley, Absalom, N. Y. 
Bloomfield, Penn. 
Boiling, Robert, Va. 



Bolton, Robert, N. Y. 
Boucher, Jonathan, Va. 
Boudinot, Elias, N. J. 
Bowdoin, James, Mass. 
Bozman, John Leeds, Md. 
■Brasher, Philip, N. Y. 
Brearly, David, N. J. 
Bridge, Charles, N. Y. 
Brimage, William, Va. 
Brown, David, N. Y. 
Brown, Thomas, Mass. 
Bulkley, Mass. 
Burk, James Henry, Va. 
Burnet, John, N. Y. 
Byrd, William, Va. 
Cabell, Dr. George, Va. 
Cabot, William, Mass. 
Callander, John, Mass. 
Carmichael, William, Md. 
Carroll, Charles, Mass. 
Carroll, Charles, Md. 
Gary, A., Mass. 
Gary, Thomas, Mass. 
Gary, Miles, Va. 
Gay, Gabriel, Va. 
Chandler, Gardiner, Mass. 
Chandler, Rufus, Mass. 
Ghawney, Penn. 
Child, Francis, N. Y. 
Child, Thomas, Mass. 
Glarkson, David, N. Y. 
Clarkson, Matthew, N. Y. 



Clinton, DeWitt, N. Y. 
Cock, William, N. Y. 
Coffin, John, Mass. 
Golden, Cadwalader D., N. Y. 
Cooper, Myles, N. Y. 
Courtenay, Henry, Mass. 
Grookshank, Judge, Penn. 
Curwen, Mass. 
Gutting, James S., N. Y. 
Gutting, William, N. Y. 
Dana, Francis. Mass. 
Dana, Richard H., Mass. 
Dan forth, Mass. 
Day, John, Penn. 
Denny, William, Penn. 
Dering, Thomas, Mass. 
Dinwiddle, Robert, Va. 
Dove, Dr. J., Va. 
Drayton, S. C. 
Duane, James, N. Y. 
Dudley, Joseph, Mass. 
Dumaresq, Philip, Mass. 
Dyckman, States Morris, N. Y. 
Dyckman, J. G., N. Y. 
Edwards, Isaac, N. C. 
Elam, Samuel, R. L 
Ellery, Benjamin, R. L 
EUiston, Robert, N. Y. 
Emerson, William, Mass. 
Erving, William, Mass. 
Eustace, Col. John S., N. Y. 
Ewing, John. Penn. 



* According to Mr. Richard C. LiCHTENSTEIN, of Boston, from whose admirable compilation the greatest portion 
of this list is drawn, the leading American Book-plate engravers of the last century, and of the earlier part of the 
present century, were : 

Thomas JOHNSON (1708-1767). 

Samuel HiLL, who was in the profession in Boston before 1790. 

Nathaniel HURD, of Boston (1729-1777). 

Paul Revere, of Boston (1735-1818). 

Francis GARDNER, of Boston (1745). 

Henry DawkinS. His earliest dated book-plate bears the date, 1754. 

Joseph Callender, of Boston (1761-1821). 

Amos Doolittle (1754-1832). 

Peter Rushton MAVERICK, of New York (1755-1807). 

Peter MAVERICK, of New York, son of the above (1780-1831). 

James TURNER, of Philadelphia. 

John Mason FuRNASS, a nephew of Nath. Hurd, known to have practiced his profession in 17S6. 

Alexander ANDERSON, of New York (1775-1870). 

E. Gallaudet, of New York. 
Other signatures are also found upon several valuable heraldic book-plates of an early date ; such are the names 
of ROLLINSON, ROBSON, Smithers, Child, etc. It is a fact worthy of remark that most of the Southern Heraldic 
book-plates are due to' the hand and artistic taste of English engravers, as most of the young men of gentle birth 
from Maryland, Virginia, the Garolinas, etc., were sent England to finish their education, and secured, at that time, the 
book-plates which were to adorn their own libraries. 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



17 



Fenwick, Penn. 
Fitz-Hugh, Va. 
Foot, Eben, N. Y. 
Forman, Md. 
Foster, Isaac, Mass. 
Fowler, C, R. I. 
Foxcroft, John, R. I. 
Frankland, Henry, Mass. 
Franklin, John, N. J. 
French, Jonathan, Mass. 
Gardiner, John, Me. 
Ghiton, William R., Penn. 
Gibbs, James, N. Y. 
Giles, James, N. Y. 
Gilpin, T., Penn. 
Gilpin, Henry D., Penn. 
Gilpin, John F., Penn. 
Goelet, John, N. Y. 
Graeme, Elizabeth, Penn. 
Graham, Henry Hale, Penn. 
Gray, Mass. 
Green, Francis, Mass. 
Greene, Benjamin, Mass. 
Greene, David, Mass. 
Greene, Thomas, Jr., Mass. 
Greenleaf, W., Mass. 
Gurney, Henry, Penn. 
Hale, Robert, Mass. 
Hallowell, Robert, Me. 
Harrison, Richard, N. Y. 
Hay, Barrack, N. Y. 
Herbert, W., N. J. 
Herman, Sam. Fred., Penn. 
Hicks, Elias, N. Y. 
Hicks, Whitehead, N. Y. 
Hoffman, William C, N. Y. 
Hoffman, Philip C, N. Y. 
HoUingsworth, Levi, Pa. 
Holyoke, Edward Aug., Mass. 
Hopkinson, Francis, Penn. 
Hopkinson, Joseph, Penn. 
Horsmanden, N. Y. 
Hunter, Archibald, Penn. 
Hurd, Isaac, Mass. 
Ingersoll, Jared, Conn. 
Inglis, N. Y. 
Inglis, John, Penn. 
Innes, Colonel, N. C. 
Iredell, James, N. C. 
Izard, R. I., S. C. 
Jackson, James, Mass. 
Jarvis, Sam. Farmer, Mass. 
Jeffries, Dr. John, Mass. 
Jenkins, Robert, Mass. 
Johnson, John S., N. Y. 
Johnson, Thomas, Mass. 
Johnson, W. S., N. Y. 



Johnston, J., N. Y. 

Johnston, Thomas, N. Y. 

Johnston, G., Md. 

Jones, Samuel, N. Y. 

Jones, Gabriel, Va. 

Judah, Benjamin P., N. Y. 

Judah, B. S., N. Y. 

Keese, John, N. Y. 

Kemble, Peter, N. J. 

Kempe, John Tabor, N. Y. 

Kerr, John Leeds, Md. 

King, Rufus, N. Y. 

Kingston, Penn. 

Kip, Isaac L., N. Y. 

Kissam, Benjamin, N. Y. 

Kunze, John Christ., Penn. 

Ladd, N. H. 

Lardner, Lynford, Pa. 

Lee, Philip Ludwell, Va. 

Lee, R. H., Va. 

Leiper, Va. 

Lenox, David, Penn. 

Lewis, Morgan, N. Y. 

Linn, Rev. Matthias, Penn. 

Livingston, William, N. Y. 

Livingston, Robert R., N. Y. 

Livingston, Peter R., N. Y. 

Livingston, Edward, N. Y. 

Livingston, Robert L., N. Y. 

Livingston, Brockholst, N. Y. 

Livingston, Walter, N. Y. 
Livingston, W. S., N. Y. 
Livius, Peter, N. H. 
Lloyd, John Nelson, N. Y. 
Logan, James, Penn. 
Logan, William, Penn. 
Loring, Mass. 
Low, Cornelius, N. Y. 
Lowell, John, Mass. 
Lowell, John, Jr., Mass. 
Ludlow, Gabriel, N. Y. 
Ludwell, Philip, Va. 
Lukens, John, Penn. 
Magill, John, Md. 
Mann, John Preston, R. I. 
Martin, Luther, Md. 
Masterton, Peter, N. Y. 
Mayo, John, Va. 
McAlish, Penn. 
McComb, John, N. Y. 
McCoun, Wm. T., N. Y. 
McKenzie, Surgeon, Va. 
McLean, Hugh, N. Y. 
Mercer, John, Va. 
Meredith, Jonathan, N. Y. 
Milner, James, Va. 
Minot, Mass. 



Moore, Lambert, N. Y, 

Moore, Nathaniel F.,"N. Y. 

Morgan, Dr. John,'Penn. 

Morris, James, N.;Y. 

Morris, Roger, N. Y. 

Morris, William Lewis,;N.,Y. 

Morris, Gouverneur, Penn. 

Morris, Isaac, Penn. 

Murray, Me. 

Murray, Joseph, N. Y. 

Murray, James, Va. 

Ogden, N. J. 

Oliver, Andrew, Mass. 

Osborne, Samuel, Mass. 

Otis, Harrison Gray, Mass. 

Pace, Henry, Mass. 

Page, Francis, Va. 

Panton, Francis, N. Y. 

Panton, Francis, Jr., N. Y. 

Parke, John, Va. 

Parker, B., Va. 

Parker, Samuel, N. H. 

Pasley, William, N. Y. 

Paulding, W., N. Y. 

Penn, Thomas, Penn. 

Penn, William, Penn. 

Pennington, Penn. 

Pepperell, Sir Wm., Mass. 

Perkins, Thos. H., Mass. 
Peyster (de), Fred., N. Y. 
Pickering, Henry, Mass. 
Pickering, John, Jr., Mass. 
Pierce, W. L., N. Y. 
Pintard, John, N. Y. 
Popham, W., N. Y. 
Powell, Philip, Penn. 
Powell, Samuel, Penn. 
Powell, Have, Penn. 
Power, James, Va. 
Proctor, Col. Thos., Penn. 
Provost, Samuel, N. Y. 
Provost, John, N. Y. 
Quincy, Josiah, Mass. 
Randolph, Ryland, Va. 
Randolph, John, Va. 
Rensselaer (Van), H. K., N. Y. 
Rensselaer (Van), P., N. Y. 
Rensselaer (Van), S. K., N. Y. 
Revere, Paul, Mass. 
Robinson, Va. 
Robinson, Beverly, N. Y. 
Royal, Isaac, Mass. 
Rush, Benjamin, Penn. 
Russell, James, N. Y. 
Russell, Thomas, Mass. 
Rutgers, Hendrick, N. Y. 
Rutledge, S. C. 



i8 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



Saltonstall, Walter, Mass. 
Saltonstall, William, Mass. 
Samuels, James, Penn. 
Sargent, Daniel, Mass. 
Sargent, Epes, Mass. 
Schuyler, Philip, N. Y. 
Scott, John, Penn. 
Sears, David, Mass. 
Seton, William, N. Y. 
Sewall, Mass. 
Shippen Edward, Penn. 
Silvester, Peter, N. Y. 
Simpson, Jonathan, Mass. 
Skelton, Reuben, Va. 
Smith, Hezekiah, Mass. 
Smith, James Scott, N. Y. 
Smith, Thos. J., N. Y. 
Smith, William, Mass. 
Smith, W. P., N. Y. 
Smith, John Jay, Penn. 
Smith, Wm. P., Penn. 
Smith, Capt. John, Va. 
Smith, S. C. 

Smith, John Adams, N. Y. 
Smith, Thos., Jr., N. Y. 
Smith, Sam, N. Y. 
Smyth, Andrew, N. Y. 



Spaight, N. C. 
Spooner, Joshua, Mass. 
Spry, William, N. Y. 
St. Clair, Sir John, N. C. 
Stearns, Mass. 
Stephens, William, N. Y. 
Stewart, James, N. Y. 
Stuart, Anthony, Md. 
Sullivan, John, N. H. 
Swan, James, Mass. 
Taylor, William, N. Y. 
Tazewell, John, Va. 
Thomas, Isaiah, Mass. 
Tillotson, John, N. Y. 
Tracy, Nathaniel, Mass. 
Tripp, Lott, N. Y. 
Turberville, Geo. L., Va. 
Tyler, Andrew, Mass. 
Tyler, Joseph, Mass. 
Tyng, Dudley A., Mass. 
Vaughan, Benjamin, Me. 
Vaughan, Samuel, Me. 
Vaughan, Samuel, Jr., Me. 
Vose Benjamin, Me. 
Wallace, Joshua Maddox, N. J. 
Waller, Benjamin, Va. 
Warren, John C, Mass. 



Washington, George, Va. 
Washington, Bushrod, Penn. 
Wentworth, N. H. 
Wetmore, Prosper, N. Y. 
Wetmore, W., Mass. 
Wheelwright, Nath., Mass. 
Whitebread, W., N. Y. 
Wilkes, Charles, N. Y. 
Williams, Mass. 
Williams, John C, Mass. 
Wilson, David, Mass. 
Wilson, James, Mass. 
Winthrop, W., Mass. 
Winthrop, John, Mass. 
Wiseman, Joseph, Penn. 
Wisner, Polydore, N. Y. 
Wolcott, Oliver, Conn. 
Wood, Joseph, Penn. 
Wormley, Ralph, Va. 
Wynkoop, C. C, N. Y. 
Wynkoop, Peter, N. Y. 
Wyck (Van), N. Y. 
Wythe, George, Va. 
Yates, Christopher C, N. Y. 
Yates, Peter W., N. Y. 
Young, T. P., N. Y. 



LIST OF PASSENGERS IN THE "MAYFLOWER." 

BEING THE NAMES OF THOSE WHO CAME OVER FIRST, IN THE YEAR 1620, AND WERE THE FOUNDERS OF NEW PLYMOUTH, 

WHICH LED TO THE PLANTING OF THE OTHER NEW ENGLAND COLONIES. THIS LIST OF THEIR "NAMES" 

AND FAMILIES WAS PRESERVED BY GOVERNOR BRADFORD AT THE CLOSE OF HIS HISTORY, AND 

IS HERE PRESENTED IN THE ORDER IN WHICH HE PLACED THEM. THE VALUE OF 

SUCH AN ACCURATE LIST CANNOT BE TOO HIGHLY ESTIMATED. 



Mr. John Carver ; who was chosen their first Governor 
on their arrival at Cape Cod. He died the first spring. 
Katharme, his wife ; she died a few weeks after her hus- 
band, in the beginning of summer. 

Desire Minter ; afterwards returned to her friends, in 
poor health, and died in England. 

John HOWLAND ; man servant, afterwards married the 
daughter of John Tillie, and had ten children. 

Roger Wilder ; man servant, died in the first sickness. 

Williain Latham ; a boy, after more than twenty years 
visited England, and died at the Bahama Islands. 

A maid servant ; who married, and died one or two years 
after. 

Jasper MoORE ; who died the first season. 

Mr. Williain BREWSTER ; their Ruling Elder, lived some 
twenty-three or four years after his arrival., Mary, his wife ; 
died between 1623 and 1627. Love Brewster ; a son, mar- 
ried, lived to the year 1650, had four children. Wrestling 
Brewster ; youngest son. 



Richard MORE and Brother ; two boys placed with the 
Elder. Richard afterwards married, and had four or more 
children. His brother died the first winter. 

Mr. Edward WinslOW ; Mr. W. afterwards chosen Gov- 
ernor, died 1655, when on a commission to the West Indies. 
Elizabeth, his wife ; died the first winter. Mr. W. left two 
children by a second marriage. 

George SOULE and Elias Story; two men in Winslow's 
family. G. Soule married and had eight children. E. Story 
died in the first sickness. 

Ellen More ; a little girl placed in Mr. Winslow's family, 
sister of Richard More, died soon after their arrival. 

Mr. William BRADFORD ; their second Governor, author 
of the history of the Plymouth Colony, lived to the year 
1657. Dorothy, hAS ^\[s; died soon after their arrival. Gov- 
ernor Bradford left a son in England to come afterwards ; 
had four children by a second marriage. 

Mr. Isaac Allerton ; chosen first assistant to the Gov- 
ernor. Mary, his wife ; who died in England in the first 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



19 



sickness. Bartholomew ; son, married in England. Remem- 
ber and Mary, daughters. Remember married in Salem ^ 
had three or four children. Mary married in Plymouth, had 
four children. 

John Hook ; servant boy, died in the first sickness. 

Mr. Samuel FULLER ; their physician. His wife and 
child remained and came over afterwards ; they had two 
more children. 

William BUTTEN ; servant, died on the passage. 

John Crackston ; who died in the first sickness. John 
Crackston, his son ; who died some five or six years after. 

Capt. Myles Standish ; who lived to the year 1656 ; 
chief in military affairs. Rose, his wife ; died in the first 
sickness. Capt. Standish had four sons living in 1650, by a 
second marriage. 

Mr. Christopher Martin and his wife ; Solomon Prower 
and John Langmore, servants ; all died soon after their ar- 
rival. 

Mr. William. MULLINS, his wife, Joseph, a son ; these three 
died the first winter. Priscilla, a daughter; survived and 
married John Alden. Robert CARTER, a servant ; died the 
first winter. 

Mr. William WHITE ; died soon after landing. Susanna, 
his wife; afterwards married to Mr. E. Winslow. Resolved, 
a son ; married and had five children. Peregrine, a son ; 
was born after their arrival at Cape Cod, he cannot, there- 
fore, be numbered among the passengers proper ; married 
and had two children before 1650. 

William HOLBECK and Edward THOMSON, servants ; 
both died soon after landing. 

Mr. Stephens HOPKINS, and Elizabeth, his wife ; both lived 
over twenty years after their arrival, and had a son and four 
daughters born in this country. Giles and Constantia, by a 
former marriage. Giles married; had four children. Con- 
stantia married ; had twelve children. Damaris, a son, and 
Oceanus, born at sea ; children by the present marriage. 

Edward DOTY, and Edward LiTSTER, servants. E. Doty 
by a second marriage had seven children ; after his term of 
service, went to Virginia. 

Mr. Richard WARREN ; his wife and five daughters were 
left, and came over afterwards. They also had two sons ; 
and the daughters married here. 

John BiLLINGTON ; he was not from Leyden, or of the 
Leyden Company, but from London. Ellen, his wife ; John, 
his son ; who died in a few years. Francis, the second son ; 
married and had eight children. 

Edward TlLLIE, and Ann, his wife ; both died soon after 
their arrival. Henry Samson and Humility Cooper, two 
children, their cousins. Henry lived, married, had seven 
children. Humility returned to England. 

John TiLLIE, and his wife ; both died soon after they 
came on shore. Elizabeth, their daughter ; afterwards mar- 
ried /o/z« Howland. 



Francis CoOKE; who lived until after 1650 ; his wife and 
other children came afterwards, they had six or more chil- 
dren. John, his son ; afterwards married ; had four children. 
Thomas ROGERS ; died in the first sickness. Joseph, his 
son ; was living in 1650, married and had six children. Mr. 
Rogers' other children came afterwards, and had families. 

Thomas Tinker, wife and son ; all died in the first sick- 
ness. 

John Rigdale, Alice, his wife ; both died in the first sick- 
ness. 

Jajnes Chilton, his wife ; both died in the first sickness. 
Mary, their daughter ; lived, married, and had nine children. 
Another married daughter came afterwards. 

Edzvard FULLER, his wife ; both died in the first sickness. 
Samuel, their son ; married ; had four children. 

John Turner, two sons ; names not given ; all three died 
in the first sickness. A daughter came some years after- 
ward to Salem and there married. 

Francis Eaton, Sarah, his wife ; she died the first winter ; 
by a third marriage he left three children. Samuel, a son ; 
married and had one child. 

Moses Fletcher, John Goodman, Thomas Williams, 
Digerie PRIEST, Edmond Margeson, Richard Britterige, 
Richard Clarke ; these seven died in the general sickness. 
The wife of D. Priest, and children, came afterwards, she 
being the sister of Mr. AUerton. 

Peter BROWN ; lived some fourteen years after, was twice 
married, and had four children. 

Richard GARDINER ; became a seaman, and died abroad. 

Gilbert WiNSLOW ; after living here a number of years, 
returned to England. 

John Alden ; " a hopeful young man," hired at South- 
ampton, married Priscilla Mullens, as mentioned, and had 
eleven children. 

John AllERTON. 

Thomas ENGLISH. 

William Trevore, and ELY ; two seamen ; are com- 
monly, but incorrectly reckoned in the number of the first 
company of passengers for the Colony ; Bradford himself 
says : " Two other seamen were hired to stay a year, etc., 
etc., when their time was out they both returned." Ac- 
cordingly he says of the MAYFLOWER company : " These 
being about a hundred souls, came over in the first ship." 
Afterwards he adds ; " Of these one hundred persons who 
came over in this first ship together, the greatest half died 
in the general mortality, and most of them in two or three 
months' time." Omitting those two hired sailors who re- 
turned, and counting the person that died and the child 
that was born while on the passage as one passenger, we 
have the exact number, one hundred, of the PILGRIM Com- 
pany, " who came over in the first ship." And, diS fifty-otte 
died the first season, this enumeration makes good those 
other words of the historian, that " the greater half died in 
the general mortality." 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



1^' 

PLATE Wr 






//<r.y/// 





m^JJrt 





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K.deir.l/ERSrZOET, Eoiraff 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



Ipbillps 



This Pennsylvania family of that name is issued 
from the county Lancaster, England, family of 
Philips of Heath House, founded by Natha^iiel 
Philips, Esq., of Manchester (b. 1693, d. 1776). 
John, the youngest son of Nathaniel (b. 1734, d. 
1824), purchased, in 1777, the estate oi Bank Hall, 
in the township of Heaton-Norris, county Lan- 
caster, England, and had from his wife Sarah 
Leigh [of the Leighs of Oughtrington Hall, 
county Chester, England], seven sons and three 
daughters. The second son, Henry Philips, came 
over to America where he married, in 1696, Sophia, 
■ daughter of Benjamin Chew, Judge of the High 
Court of Errors and Appeals in Philadelphia, Pa. 
Their daughter and sole heiress, Sarah, married 
J. C. Montgomery, Esq., of Eglinton, N. Y., and 
had issue. 

The third son of Johri Philips, Nathaniel-George, 
died in New York, unmarried. The fifth son, 
James, died in Philadelphia, unmarried ; the sev- 
enth son, who settled at Philipsburg, Pa., married 
the daughter of Rev. Edward Lloyd and had issue. 
The estate of Bank Hall went to the fourth son, 
Francis, and after him to his son Francis Philips 

ASPINALL. 

Arms : Per pale, azure and sable, within an orle 
of fleurs-de-lis, argent, a lion, rampant, erminois, 
ducally crowned and holding between the paws a 
mascle, or. A canton, ermine. 

Crest : A demi-lion, rampant, erminois, collared, 
sable, ducally crowned, or, holding in its paws 
a fleur-de-lis, azure, within a mascle, or. 



Motto : Simplex munditiis. [Plain and neat.] 

John Burke's History of the Commoners of Great Britain 
and Ireland, II., jp^. 

Rev. L. B. Thomas: Genealogical Notes, 58-1877. 

FaIRBAIRN'S Crests of Great Britain and Ireland, Jjci. 

Papworth & MORANT : An Ordinary of British Armo- 
rials, i2g. 



lErac^ 



Thomas Tracy, known as Lieutenant Tracy, on 
account of his having been appointed, in 1673, an 
officer of the " New London County Dragoons," 
enlisted to fight the Dutch and the Indians, was 
the descendant, in the nineteenth direct generation, 
of John de Sudeley, Lord of Sudeley and Tod- 
DiNGTON, in county Gloucester, England. Wil- 
liam de Sudeley, his second son, having inherited 
the estates belonging to his mother, Grace Tracy, 
heiress of Henry de Tracy, of Barnstable, county 
Devon, took the name of Tracy for himself and 
his descendants. 

The Tracys of Toddington, have furnished a 
long dynasty of High Sheriffs of Gloucestershire, 
and a branch of the family has been called to 
the peerage, in 1642, as Viscounts Tracy of 
Rathcoole. The head of this branch was the great 
uncle of Thomas Tracy, the American settler. 
The latter came over, in 16 10, from Tewkes- 
bury, where he was born, to Salem, New Eng- 
land. He took an active part in the founding 
of Wethersfield, later Saybrook, in the colony of 
Connecticut. Finally he removed to Norwich, 
Conn., where he became one of the original pro- 
prietors of the "nine mile grant." Twenty-seven 
successive times he was elected to the Legisla- 



22 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



ture, and was, in many other ways, entrusted 
with the management of public affairs. 

Arms : Or, an escallop in the chief point, 
sable, between two bendlets, gules. 

Crest : On a chapeau, gules, turned up, ermines, 
an escallop, sable, between two wings, or. 

Motto : Memoria pit aeterna. [The memory of 
the pious is eternal.] 

Mrs. Matilda O. Abbey : Genealogy of Lt. Thomas 

Tracy, of Norwich, Conn., 1888. 
Sir Bernard Burke's Peerage, Baronetage, &€., of the 

United Kingdom, 1887. 
Caulkins' History of Norwich, Conn., 200-§ {i86f). 
Walworth's Hyde Genealogy, I., 4.3^-61 ; //., ioj6-gi. 
Andrews' History of New Britain, Conn., 357-8, 375. 
American Ancestry, II., 128. 



Strieker 



The old Knickerbocker family of the name 
[spelt also Stryker, Striker, Stricker], takes 
its origin, in this country, from two brothers, 
Jan and Jacobus Van Strycker who, in 1643, 
obtained from the States General of the Nether-' 
lands, a grant of land in the colony of New 
Amsterdam, upon condition that they took out, 
with them, to America, and at their own ex- 
pense, twelve other families. The offer was not 
finally acted upon until eight years thereafter, 
when the younger brother Jacobus, and his wife 
and children, left their native village of Ruinen 
and reached New Amsterdam in 1651. Jacobus 
Strycker removed later to Long Island, where, 
in 1673, he was elected to the responsible office 
of Schout [High Sheriff] of all the Dutch towns 
on Long Island. He was an artist of no com- 
mon talent and a portrait of himself by himself 
is still in the possession of his descendants. 

Jan, the eldest brother, followed Jacobus in this 
country in 1652, and became very soon one of the 
trusted citizens of the colony. He appears as a 
patentee in both the Nichols and Dougan pat- 
ents (1667 and 1685). 



The arms of the family as given here, were 
borne for centuries by the ancestors of the Knick- 
erbocker settlers of the name. There is extant 
a pedigree of the Strycker family down to 1791, 
giving fourteen descents, and Judge James Stry- 
ker (b. 1792, d. 1864), a man of great eminence 
in his day as a jurist and a patriot, took the 
trouble to make researches in Holland concerning 
these devices. 

Arms : Paly of four, or and gules, three boars' 
heads, sable, armed, azure. 

Crest: Out of a ducal coronet, a griffin's 
head, sable, between two palm branches, in orle, 
vert. 

Supporters : Two dragons, dexter side, gules, 
sinister side, or. 

Motto : In extremis terribilis. [Most terrible 
at bay.] 

Gen. W. S. Stryker. Genealogical Record of the 

Strycker family, i88y. 
Mrs. Lamb's History of New York, I., 205-201. 
O'Callaghan's New Netherland Register, 147 and 1^4. 
O'Callaghan's Colonial History of New York, H.,374. 
Bergen's Kings Co., N Y., Settlers, 287-go. 
American Ancestry, III., 48. 
J. B. RlETSTAP's General Armorial, //., 2d Edition. 



SSruen 



John Bruen oJ Stapleford, county Chester, 
England, descended in direct and unbroken line 
from Robert Le Bruen [an evident corruption 
from the French name Le Brun], already owner 
of the Stapleford, Cheshire, estates, in 1230. 

The second son of John Bruen, Obadiah 
Bruen, and his sister Mary are known to have 
been in North America in 1639. Obadiah was 
entered as freeman of Plymouth Colony in 1640. 
Later he became one of the patentees of the 
colony of Connecticut, and finally figured as one 
of the founders of Newark, New Jersey, in 1667. 



AMERICA HERALD ICA 



1 

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AMERICA HERALDICA 



The arms borne by the descendants of Obadiah 
Bruen are those borne by his ancestors, from 
the XIII. century down to his time. They are 
found in the Visitations of 1566, 1580, 1613, and 
in many other official deeds and documents. 

Arms : Argent, an eagle displayed, sable. 

Crest : On a wreath, a fisherman, party per 
pale, argent and sable, each several article of dress 
counterchanged ; in the right hand a fisherman's 
staff, and in the left a landing net thrown over 
the shoulder. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Artnory of Great 
Britain, Grc, 1884.. 

Papworth & MORANT: An Ordinary of British Armo- 
rials, 2p7. 

Omerod's History of County Chester, England. 

Glover's Ordinary ; Harleian MSS., 13^2-14.59. 

Hinman'S Connecticut Settlers, 331-34- 

New Jersey Historical Society Collections 
VI., 112. 



Ipenbleton 



We have here a clear and uninterrupted pedigree 
from George Pendleton, of Manchester, Lanca- 
shire, England, who, removing to Norwich, is 
known to have made use of the arms we give. 
His greatgrandson, Philip Pendleton, son of 
Henry Pendleton, of Norwich, England, came 
over to and settled in Virginia, in 1676. The 
distinguished statesman and patriot, Edmund Pen- 
dleton, whose name is indissolubly connected 
with the noblest acts of the Revolutionary period, 
was a grandson of the first settler and the direct 
ancestor of the late Senator, and present U. S. 
Minister to Berlin. 

Arms : Gules, an inescutcheon, argent, between 
four escallops, or. 

Crest : On a cap of maintenance, gules, turned 
up, ermine, a dragon, or, wings inverted, holding 
in its paw an escallop, argent. 



■ Motto : Manens qualis manebam. [Staying just 
as I am.] 

Documents furnished by the College or Heralds, 
London. 

Rev. Canon Raines: History of Lancashire Chantries. 
DO. : Private collections, vol. XIX. 

Alden'S American Epitaphs, V., ip, 20. 

Austin's Rhode Island Genealogical Diet. 

Bangor, Me., Historical Magazine, I., g2. 

Bishop Meade's Old Churches and Families of Va., 
II., 298-p. 

New England Historical and Genealogical Reg- 
ister, XV., 63. 

American Ancestry, II., 93. 



Iberbert 



A descendant of the Herberts 0/ Pembroke, 
England, settled early in the XVII. century, in 
the colony of Virginia, where it is said that his 
widow married Francis Howard, the royal gov- 
ernor of the time. In February, 1665, the son 
of this Herbert, Francis Harbor or Herbert, 
settled in East New Jersey, and took the oath 
of allegiance in Elizabethtown. He became a 
large landowner in that region, and his direct 
descendants intermarried with the best blood of 
that colony and of the New York colony. They 
continued to prosper as civil engineers, surveyors 
and landed squires. A book-plate, undoubtedly 
anterior to 1740, reproduces the arms we give. 
That book-plate has been in the direct line of 
descent of the above Francis Herbert, of East New 
Jersey. 

Arms : Per pale, azure and gules, three lions, 
rampant, argent. 

Crest : A lion of the shield. 

Motto : Ung lay, ung roy, ungfoy. [One Law, 
one King, one Faith.] 

Bouton's Hist, of Concord, N. H., 66§-yo. 
Thomas's Families of Maryland, 8y-8. 
Sheldon's Hist, of Deerfield,Mass. 



24 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



Ipeabob^ 



Francis Peabody, of St. Albans, county Hert- 
ford, England, born in 1614, came to New Eng- 
land in the ship " Planter," in 1635. His name, 
with the qualification of "husbandman" is found 
in the Augmentation Office lists, in Rolls Court, 
Westminster Hall, London. 

The settler first resided at Ipswich, then at 
Hampton, in old Norfolk county. When Hamp- 
ton was included in the New Hampshire bound- 
aries, Francis Peabody moved to Topsfield, Essex 
county, Mass. He was one of the most prominent 
men of this town and a large landowner. 

The arms given were first used in the Ameri- 
can family of Peabody, after 1796, i. e., after 
the head of the family, at that time, had re- 
ceived a certificate to that effect, issued by a 
private Herald's office, in London. But a slight 
value might be attached to this certificate, if we 
did not find the name included in Burke's Visita- 
tions and also in J. B. Rietstap's last edition of 
his Armorial Gdn^ral. As the fairness and honesty 
of Mr. Rietstap have never been doubted, we must 
admit that his colossal archives contain some facts 
substantiating the claims of the American Pea- 
bodies to the arms we insert and which they have 
borne now for almost a century. 

Arms : Per fess, n6bulg, gules and azure ; two 
suns in their splendor, ranged fesswise, in chief ; 
a garb, argent, in point. 

Crest : An eagle, regardant, proper. 

Motto : Murus ceretis conscientia sana. [A 
clear conscience is a wall of iron.] 

Austin's Rhode Isla^id Genealogical Dictionary. 

New England Hist, and Gen. Register., II., 153- 

61, 261, 361-72. III., ^5p. 
Peabody Genealogy, 1867. 
American Ancestry, I., 61. 
Bangor, Me., Historical Magazine, I., 214.. 
Mass. Hist. Collections, 3d series, VIII., 358. 
J. B. Rietstap: Armorial Gdn^rallL, 2d edition, 1887. 
Sir Bernard Burke : Visitations of Seats and Arms, 2d 

series, I., 11. 



Hbercrombie,orHbercromb^ 

This branch is the so-called Pe^msylvania branch 
of the old Scotch family of Abercrombie. The 
Pennsylvania Abercrombies descend from John 
Abercrombie of Glasshaugh, second son of Alex- 
ander Abercrombie of Birkenbog, Scotland, 
Grand Falconer to Charles I., and of Elizabeth 
Bethune. The elder son of this Alexander, Alex- 
ander of Birkenbog, was the head of the Aber- 
crombie family, as the Abercrombies of that ilk 
became extinct in his grandfather's lifetime. He 
was created first Baronet of Birkenbog (1636.) 
The Lords Abercrombie descend from the second 
son of the said first Baronet. Thus the Aber- 
crombies of Philadelphia belong to the same 
stock as the Lords of the name The first settler 
in America, James Abercrombie, came over from 
Dundee, Scotland, to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 
about 1750. He was an officer in the Royal Navy 
and was drowned in the German Sea, circa 1759. 
He left one son, the Rev. James Abercrombie, 
D.D., a distinguished divine of the Protestant Epis- 
copal Church. His father was ya»2i?j- Abercrombie, 
of Dundee (born Jan. 12, 1693) ; his grandfather 
was Thomas Abercrombie, of Dundee, who married 
(Sept. 15, 1684), Agnes Aikman. This Thomas 
must have been the son of the above-mentioned 
Johji Abercrombie of Glasshaugh, whose arms 
the first settler brought over with him. 

There is still extant the book-plate used by the 
first settler, who, having married (Nov. 27, 1753), 
in Philadelphia, Margaret Bennett, had her arms 
impaled with his own on his book-plate. Some 
ancient wine glasses, brought over by the first 
settler, had the arms engraved in a very old- 
fashioned manner. A few of these glasses are still 
in the possession of the family. 

The representation of the family is now in the 
keeping of the Rev. James Abercombie, D.D., of 
Martinez, Ca. ; he is the greatgrandson of the first 
settler, as are also his brother, Charles Steadman 
Abercrombie, of New York City, and his cousin, 
Dr. John Baynton Abercrombie, of Pinellas, Florida. 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



2!; 



Arms : Argent, a fess engrailed, gules, between 
three boars' heads, couped, azure. 

Crest : A bee, volant, proper. 

Mottoes : Above the shield. Vive ut vivas. 
[Live, that you may have life.] 
Under the shield. Metis in arduis 
aqua. [An equal mind in dif- 
ficulties.] 

John Burke : History of the Commoners of Great Britain 
and Ireland, III., i. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Artnory, &c., 1884.. 

• Papworth & MoranT: An Ordinary of British Armo- 
rials, 4JJ. 

Fairbairn'S Crests, I., 3. 



Jones 



Since Captain Thomas Jones, emigrated from 
Strabone, Ireland, to America, in 1692, and after 
doing his duty to his God and King at the 
battle of the Boyne, settled upon the valuable 
estate given him by William III., at Fort Neck, 
on the south side of Long Island, N. Y., his 
descendants have occupied an important position 
in the land of his adoption. The settler died in 
1 713, and Dawkins engraved, on a book-plate 
used by his grandson, Samuel Jones, the arms 
which the Captain brought over with him from 
the old fatherland. 

David, the son of the emigrant, was a judge 
of the Supreme Court of the colony, from 
1758 to 1773, and was for thirteen years Speaker 
of the Provincial Assembly. His son. Judge 
Thomas Jones, who died unmarried, built the 
mansion known later as the Floyd-Jones man- 
sion. The brother of David, William by name, 
was the father of Chief Justice Samuel Jones, 
whose book-plate we mention above. The Chief 
Justice was a member of the convention of 1778, 
which adopted the Constitution of the United 
States. His eldest son became also Chief Justice 
of the Supreme Court of the City of New York. 

Arms : Per bend, ermine and ermines, a lion, 
rampant, or, within a bordure of the last. 



Crest : The lion of the shield. 
Motto : Trust in God. 

[These arms are found on plate XXII. The 
arms of another family of Jones, found in an 
earlier plate, are blazoned in the notice concern- 
ing the Jones of Virginia, to whom they belong.] 

Thompson's History of Long Island, N. Y., 338. 

Mrs. Lamb's History of New York City. 

Jones' History of New York During the Revolutionary 

War, I, 58-67. 
N. Y. Genealogical and Biographical Record, IV., 

40-2 ; VI., 60-2. 
N. Y. Historical Society Collections, II., 490-1. 
History of Queens Co., N. Y., 552-4. 



Mbite 



Colonel Thomas White, of Maryland, the father 
of the renowned Episcopalian Bishop, William 
White, was the descendant, in the seventh gen- 
eration, of John White of Hulcoti, county Bed- 
ford, England, who died in 1501, and whose will 
is still on record. The Visitation of Bucking- 
hamshire, dated 1634, gives five generations, from 
John of Hulcoti, down to the grandfather of 
the colonel. The arms are found emblazoned in 
the same pedigree. We find no crest described. 
Joseph Lemuel Chester, Esq., LL.D., went into 
minute researches covering the early ancestors, in 
the male line, of Colonel White and his illus- 
trious son. His work has been published, and is 
such as to satisfy the most critical, as to the 
right of that family to make use of coat-armo- 
rial devices. 

Arms : Argent, on a chevron, between three 
wolves' heads, erased, sable, a leopard's face, or. 

Account of the meeting of the descendants of 
Colonel Thomas White, in 1877, pub. in 1879. 

London Heralds' College, ist C, 26, folio gy6. 

London "Builder," 27, April, 1878. [Account of 
Sion College.] 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory, etc., 1884. 



26 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



Xewis 

This Maryland family of Lewis has always used 
the arms we give, and occupied important social 
rank in Virginia, Maryland and Pennsylvania. 
The early settler of the name arrived in America 
before 1700 and married a Thomas, of the Mary- 
land Thomases. He settled in Fairfax county, Vir- 
ginia, where his son, Joseph Lewis, was born in 
1713. From there Joseph Lewis moved to Calvert 
county, Md., and later to Baltimore county, in the 
same colony. His son, Captain Joseph Lewis, born 
in 1747, served with distinction in the Revolution- 
ary War. His son, Elisha Lewis (b. 1792), was a 
volunteer during the war of 181 2, and promoted 
to officer's rank on the field of battle. Later he 
freed all his slaves. 

The Maryland Lewises belonged originally to 
the county Monmouth, England, Lewises, the 
arms of whom they bore ever since their arrival 
in the New World. They descend from Sir 
Robert Wallis, Knt. Lord of Llanorth, temp. 
Edward HI. 

Arms : Cheeky, or and sable, on a fess, gules, 
three leopards' heads jessant-de-lis of the first. 

Crest : A leopard's head jessant-de-lis, or. 

Motto : La fortune passe partout. [Good luck 
overcomes everything.] 

T. Nicholas' Co. Families of Wales, 6j4-go4. 
Dwnn's Visitations of Wales. 
Sir T. Philipps : Glamorganshire Pedigrees. 
Meyrick'S History of county Cardigan, Jjp. 
PapwORTH & Morant: An ordinary of British Armo- 
rials, 'jg2. 



Haverhill, Mass., where he settled and died in 

1793- 

The name Ladd or Lade [both spellings be- 
longing distinctly to the same family] is essen- 
tially a Kentish name. The estate of Bowyck in 
the Hundred of Loringsborough and the parish 
of Eleham was, in very ancient times, the residence 
of the Ladds. They certainly owned this estate 
before the time of Henry VI., as various wills 
mentioning the fact executed by members of the 
family are still to be found in the prerogative 
office, Canterbury. Thomas Ladd died in posses- 
sion of Bowick manor, in 1515 ; so did his 
grandson, Vincent, in 1563. It passed in 1601 — 
through the marriage of Sylvester Ladd, daughter 
and co-heiress of Vincent Ladd, into the Nether- 
sole family. 

The name is only found in county Kent and 
county Sussex, England, and all the documents 
point to the existence of but one family of Ladd, 
previous to the XVII. century. 

In 1730, John Ladd, a direct descendant of 
the above Vincent, was created a baronet by 
George II. In the next generation the baronetcy 
became extinct. 

Arms : Or, a fess, wavy, between three escallops, 
sable. 

Crest : A panther's face, sable, spotted, or. 

Motto : Constant and ferme. 
W. H. Ireland: Hist, of Kent, I., icig. 

HaSTED'S Kent, //., 815. 
Berry's Kent Genealogies, J42. 

DO. Sussex Genealogies, 24.6. 
J. & J. B. Burke's His. of Ext. and Dormant Baron- 
etcies of England, Ireland and Scotland, 1844. 



Xa66 



2)inwi6bie 



Daniel Ladd, from county Kent, England, came 
over to America in 1623. He resided successively 
in Ipswich, Salisbury (1640-45), and finally in 



A book-plate engraved for and owned by Robert 
Dinwiddie, the Governor of Virginia from 1752 
to 1758 [o. 1770], is so characteristic of the 



''M ERICA HERAhDICA 



PLATE ^^H~ 




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yCe-iyt&'il^ 



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I 



K,deV.VEH^2012T, EoiTor^, 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



27 



heraldry of the time, and the name of its owner 
is so honorably connected with the history of the 
leading southern colony that we give it a place 
in this work. Besides, through the descendants of 
the governor's brother, Lawrence Dinwiddie, Pro- 
vost of Glassgow, Scotland, the family has still 
representatives in America. 

The Dinwiddie is an ancient Scottish family. 
On the "Ragman's Roll" — the list of barons and 
men of note who subscribed submission to Edward 
I. in 12^96 — appears the name of Alleyn Din- 
wiTHiE, the progenitor of the Dinwiddies, long 
seated on lands called after them, in county Dum- 
fries. 

Robert Dinwiddie — the governor — was born at 
Germiston, near Glasgow, Scotland, in 1693. It 
is evident, that the family arms, as borne by the 
governor, had been submitted after his successful 
terms of office, to some changes recalling his 
period of statesmanship in Virginia. So with the 
motto, which happened to have been that of 
many refugees and exiles before it was assumed 
by Robert Dinwiddie. 

Arms : Per fess, in chief, a landscape, trees, 
etc.; thereon an archer [a redman in the book- 
plate] shooting with a bow and arrow at a stag, 
passant, regardant, all proper ; in base, on the 
dexter a castle and flag, and on the sinister, rocks, 
between them the sea, on it a ship sailing, with 
one mast, all proper. 



Blanb 

Theodoric Bland, sometime a merchant at Luars, 
in Spain, a descendant of the Blands of Lons- 
dale, in Westmoreland, England, came over to 
Virginia in 1654. He settled at Westover, on 
the James river, where he died April 23, 1671, 
aged forty-one. He was a man of wealth and 
culture, a member of the King's council for Vir- 
ginia, and married a daughter of Governor Ben- 
nett. His descendants intermarried with the prom- 
inent Virginia families of Swan, Randolph, Mayo, 
Lee, Beverley, Boiling, Banister, Tucker, etc. 

Arms : Argent, on a bend, sable, three pheons. 



Crest : Out of a ducal coronet, or, a lion's 
head, proper. 

Motto : Sperate et vivate fortes. [Hope and 
live like braves.] 

Ch. Campbell's History of Virginia, 670. 

Bishop Meade's Old Churches and Families of Vir- 

gi7iia, I., 44.6. 
Slaughter's Bristol Parish, Va., I., ^7. 
N. Carlisle : Hist, of the ancient families of Bland, 

1826. 
Kent's British Banner displayed, 6pj. 
J. Burke's Hist, of the Commoners, etc., IH., 326. 
Harleian Society's Publications, IV., 89, 182. 
Thoresby's Ducatus Leodietisis, p_j, 208. 



Crest : An eagle with wings endorsed and in- 
verted, and holding in the dexter paw a guinea 
pig- 

Motto : Ubi Libertas ibi Patria. [Where is 
liberty there is my country.] 

R. A. Brock: The Official Records of Robert Dimvid- 

die, II., introduction. 
Ch. Campbell: History of Virginia, 4S2. 
Henry Howe: Historical Collections of Va., go. 



IRorrie 

The Pennsylvania family of the name was 
founded in this country by Isaac Norris, son of 
Thomas Norris, of the island of Jamaica. Thomas 
Norris had left England in 1678, with his family 
on account of the persecutions of the Quakers 
in England, which sect he had joined some years 
previously. They all but one perished in the 
great earthquake which destroyed Port Royal in 



28 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



1692. Isaac, the only survivor, came over to 
Philadelphia, where he married Governor Thomas 
Lloyd's daughter and became the progenitor of 
a large descendance. 

He is known to have kept jealously the proofs 
of his gentle ancestry, as manifested by his having 
his coat of arms — the one we give — painted upon 
his carriage. His son, Isaac Norris, was elected, 
in- 1750, speaker of the Provincial House, and 
took steadily the part of the people against the 
proprietaries. 

Arms : Argent, on a chevron between three 
ravens' heads, erased, sable, a mullet, or, for 
difference. 

Crest : A raven's head of the arms. 

Motto : Reminisci ubigue patriam. [Remember 
everywhere thy country.] 

Journal of Isaac Norris, (i745)-i867. 
Miscellanea Gen. and Heraldica, new series, I., loi. 
Harleian Society Collections, VIIL, 163, IX., 80. 
Chauncy'S Hertfordshire, 4^6. 



SSissell 

The family of Bissell [spelled also Bisselle 
and Bysselle] fled from France to England, to 
escape the religious persecution which followed 
the massacre of St. Bartholomew day (1572). 
John Bissell, the first settler of the name in 
America, arrived at Plymouth, Mass., from county 
Somerset, England, in 1628. He removed in 1640 
to East Windsor, Conn., and was one of the 
founders of this prosperous township. A careful 
investigation shows that the arms used to the 
present day, by the descendants of the above John 
Bissell, were brought over by his grandfather 
from France to England, and were registered 
there at the College of Heralds, London. 

Arms : Gules, on a bend, argent, three escal- 
lops, sable. 



Crest : A demi-eagle with wings displayed, 
sable, charged on the neck with an escallop 
shell, or. 

MoTTO : In recto decus. [Honor is to be found 
in the straight road.] 



The General Armory of Great Britain, 
14.6, 7. 



Sir B. Burke 

etc., 1884. 
Hine'S Lebanon, Ct., Historical Address, I 
Hinman's Conn. Settlers, 235-40. 
Litchfield County, Ct., Illustrated History, 
Orcutt's History of Torringto7i, Ct., 653-5. 
Stiles' Gen. of Bissell Family, 185^. 
Stiles' Hist, of Windsor, Conn., 540-54. 



Carter 



The Carters of Corotoman, count among the 
leading Virginia families. They prove descent 
from Richard Carter, of Garston, in Penth Wal- 
ford, county Herts, England, mentioned in the 
Visitation of Hertfordshire, dated 1634. His sec- 
ond son, John Carter (i 649-1 669), came over to 
America with his wife, Sarah Ludlowe. He set- 
tled on Corotoman Creek, near the mouth of the 
Rappahanok. His greatgrandson, Charles Carter, 
of Shirley, changed the family motto [given be- 
low] to Nosce te ipsum (know thyself). 

We have a book-plate from one of the early 
members of the Carter of Corotoman family. 

The arms under their present form were granted 
in 1612. 

Arms : Argent, a chevron between three St. 
Catherine's wheels, vert. 

Crest : On a mount, vert, a greyhound, sejant, 
argent, sustaining a shield of the last, charged 
with a St. Catherine's wheel, vert. 

Motto : Purus sceleris. [Innocent of crime.] 

Berry's Hertfordshire Pedigrees. 

Hasted's Kent, HI., 182. 

Morant's Essex, //., 411. 

Bishop Meade's Old Churches and Families of Virginia. 

Sir B. Burke's General Armory, etc., 1884. 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



29 



XTtemaine 

The ancient family of Tremayne, originally of 
Cornwall, settled later in county Devon, England, 
in consequense of the marriage of a Tremayne 
with the heiress of Trenchard of Collacombe, in the 
parish of Lamerton where, for many years, was 
situated the chief seat of the family. 

In 1634, Arthtcr Tremayne, of Collacombe, mar- 
ried a daughter of Sir Richard Greville, of Howe, 
leaving a numerous family, besides Edmund Tre- 
mayne, who succeeded him and became the head 
of the family of Tremayne of Heligan, Cornwall 
and Sydenham, Devonshire. 

The early settler in America, John Tremaine, 
who was born in 161 2 and died in 1697, undoubt- 
edly belonged to this particular branch of the 
family. He counted among the leaders of the 
Connecticut colony, where he fixed his residence 
in 1666. 

Arms : Gules, three dexter arms conjoined at 
the shoulders and flexed in triangle, or, fists 
clenched, argent. 

Crest : Two arms embowed, vested, or, hold- 
ing between the hands a head, proper, on the 
head a hat, sable. 

Motto : Honor et hones tas. 

Tuckett's Devonshire Pedigrees, 114.. 

J. Burke's Commoners, I., igj. 

Sir B. Burke : The Landed Gentry, etc. 

Harleian Society Documents, VI., 284. 

G. Olivia and P. Jones : Westcote's Devonshire, 58^. 

American Ancestry, II., 129. 



IDawt^es 



In the last years of the XVIII. century, George 
Wright Hawkes came from county Stafford to 
New York where he decided to settle and to found 
a family. He brought with him the arms we 



give hereafter, quartering the Hawkes of Rushall 
of Staffordshire arms with the arms of the 
Wrights of Langton, county Derby, and also 
county Stafford. The fob-seal he used and which 
had these devices engraved on it, is still in the 
possession of the family. George Hawkes was 
born in 1773, at Dudley, England. He married 
in New York city, in 1810, Anne Lawrence, 
daughter of Judge Advocate General John Law- 
rence (who presided at the trial of Major Andr6). 
Bishop Provoost officiated at the wedding which 
took place in Trinity Church, New York. George 
Hawkes died in England where he returned for 
a visit in 1818. His descendants are still resi- 
dents of New York. 

Arms : Azure, three bends, or, a chief, ermine. 

Crest : A hawk on a hawk's lure. 

Motto : For titer et honeste. [Courageously and 
honestly.] 

Sims' Pedigrees. MSS. 1077,10!. 103; 1173, fol. 94, &c. 
Sir B. Burke's Heraldic Illustrations, Ij6. 
R. E. Chester-Waters, Genealogical Notes of the kindred 
families of Lo7igridge, Fletcher and Hawks. 



IRearniP 



Michael Kearny, the American founder of this 
distinguished New Jersey and New York family, 
came over to America in the early part of the 
XVIII. century. After a short residence in Mon- 
mouth county, in the East Jersey proprietary 
Province, he settled, in 1716, in Perth Amboy. 
He had come from Ireland with ample means, 
and with a wife who died in Philadelphia. Mi- 
chael married later, Sarah, daughter of Governor 
Lewis Morris. He became successively secretary 
of the province, surrogate, etc. His son Michael 
entered the British Navy as an officer, and died 
s. i. His descendant, Philip Kearney, of Amboy, 
N. J., was a lawyer of great prominence ; the 



30 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



grandson of that Philip, also Philip by name, 
became celebrated as one of the distinguished 
Revolutionary generals. 

The arms brought over ■ by Michael and used 
by him and by his descendants to this day, 
are those of. the Kearnys of Blancheville, of 
Drom, county Tipperaiy, Ireland. In the pedigree 
of that family the Christian name of Philip and 
Michael are found in every generation for two 
centuries back. 

Arms: Argent, a lion rampant, proper, on a 
chief, gules, three pheons, or. 

Crest : A hand in armor grasping a sword 
palewise, proper, hilted, or. 

Motto : Sustine and abstine. [Sustain and for- 
bear.] 

Sir B. Burke's Landed Gentry, ph Edition. 

DO. Supp. 5th Edition. 

Mrs. Lamb's History of New York, I., J06-756. 
Pennsylvania Magazine, V., 100. 
Whitehead's Hist, of Perth Amboy, N. J., go-2. 



inheritance. The principal representatives of the 
American family of the name are the Hon. Clif- 
ford Stanley Sims, of Mount Holly, New Jersey, 
sometime United States Consul in Canada, and 
now the president of the New Jersey Society of 
the Cincinnati, and his brother, John Clarke Sims, 
of Philadelphia, a trustee of the University of 
Pennsylvania. The family are in possession of data 
concerning a very full and interesting pedigree, 
based on deeds, leases, transfers of real estate, 
wills, etc., establishing the descent of the Sims 
from the main stem — that of the Sims of county 
Roxburgh, Scotland. 

The arms we give are known to have been 
brought over by the emigrant, and have been in 
use among his descendants ever since. 

Arms: Gules, a chevron between two stars [or 

spur-rowels], or, pierced of the field, in chief, and 

a battle axe [or halbert], palewise of the second, 
in point. 

Crest : A demi-lion rampant, proper, grasping 
in his dexter paw a battle axe [or halbert], or. 



Motto : Ferio, tego. [I strike and defend ] 



Sims 

This well known Pennsylvania and New Jersey 
family originates in this country with John Simm, 
born 1769, in county Cumberland, England, who 
emigrated to America in 1793, when he changed 
the spelling of his name to Sims ; he descended 
in the 24th generation and in direct male line, 
from Sym of Yetheram or Witram Tower, Rox- 
burghshire, Scotland. The family are not connected 
with that of Sims or Symes, of Philadelphia, men- 
tioned in our first volume (p. 179), and which 
derives its origin from the Symes of Coventry, 
county Northampton, England. 

John SiMMS or Sims occupied positions of trust 
in Philadelphia and elsewhere, and is known to 
have visited the old country, at least once, for 
the purpose of collecting the proceeds of some 



Scottish Arms, being a Collection of Armorial bear- 
ings. \A. D., IJ76-1678.'] 

Sir Bernard Burke : The Landed Gentry of Great 
Britain and Ireland, 2d Edition. 

Sir Bernard Burke : The General Armory, 1884.. 

Fairbairn's, Crests, //., 4.35. 

Harleian Society Publications, XI., no. 



©allup 



John Gallop [or Gallup, or Gollop], the first 
settler of the name, born in 1590, was the fourth 
son of Thomas Gallop, gentleman of North 
Bowood, styled of Strode, county Dorset, Eng- 
land, and of a daughter of Thomas Crabb of 
Nosterne, in the same county. He came over to 
Boston in 1634, and his wife Christobel followed 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



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• y / < /// r/ f // 



'/rr// r/ ' /// r/ ///// 



TVaguste LEI^O:^Pinx. 



E.deVVER^OIZT, Eorrof^. 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



31 



him over a short time later. He died in Boston 
in 1650. His will is one of the earliest on record. 
His son, Captain John Gallop, was killed in the 
Narragansett Swamp fight, December 19, 1675. 
The connection of the American Gallups with 
the Gallops of Strode is proven by documents 
and correspondence in the possession of the Massa- 
chusetts Historical Society. 

Arms : Gules, on a bend, or, a lion passant, 
guardant, sable 

Crest : A demi-lion, bendy, or and sable, hold- 
ing in his dexter paw a broken arrow, gules. 

Motto : Be bolde, be wyse. 

J. Burke : History of the Commoners, I., 600. 
Sir B. Burke : T/ie Landed Gentry, 5th Edition. 
HUTCHINS' Dorset, 11. , 111-13. 
Babson's Hist, of Gloucester County, Mass., ^4.. 
Barry's Hist, of Framijigham, Mass., 24.^. 



Richard Bowen, who emigrated in 1640 to 
America, and settled at Rehobath, Mass., was 
the eighth son oi James Bowen, of Llwyngwair, 
county Pembroke, Wales. 

The family, originally the Ab-Oweins, of Pentre 
Evan, county Pembroke, still flourishes, in the 
old Country, and occupies the old family estate of 
Llwyngwair, near Haverfordwort, Pembrokeshire. 
The descendants of Richard Bowen, in this 
country, have also multiplied and prospered. The 
arms we give are used both by the Welsh and 
the American branches of the main stem. 

Arms : Azure, a stag, argent, with an arrow 
stuck in the back and attired, or. 

Crest : A stag standing, vulned in the back 
with an arrow, proper. 

MoTTO : Esse quam videri. [To be rather than 
to seem.] 

Wyman'S Charlestown, Mass., Genealogies, I., 101-2. 
Barry's Hist, of Framingham, Mass., igo. 



Dwnn's Visitation of Wales, I., no, 116-20, 162, i6j, 

i66-yo, 180, 222. 
Sir B. Burke, The Landed Gentry, &c., 4.th Edition. 
Caermarthenshire Pedigrees, 21, 47, 51. 
Cardiganshire Pedigrees, 98, 112, 117. 
Meyrick's History of Co. Cardigan, 175, 194.. 
T. Nicholas' County families of Wales, 895. 
Pembrokeshire Pedigrees, 119, 124, &c. 



Xispenatb 



Antoine Lespinard [more correctly Les Espin- 
ards] was one of the prominent Huguenots driven 
away from the prosperous city of La Rochelle, 
in southwestern France, by the early religious 
persecutions (1650). 

He brought with him to America — by way of 
Holland, his first refuge — his first wife, Abigail 
by name, and founded in this country, the promi- 
nent Lispenard family, now extinct in the male 
line. He settled at New Rochelle, but had his 
business interests in the city of New Amsterdam 
[New York]. 

Recent heraldic researches have connected this 
family with the northern Spanish stock of Les- 
pinar, which was constrained to leave its father- 
land also on account of its religious faith, in the 
time of King Philip, H. [XVI. Century], and in 
the worse days of the Holy Inquisition. 

The Lispenards took rank immediately among 
the richest and most prominent citizens of the 
young city. The son of the first Anthony, David, 
became a vestryman of old Trinity Church ; his 
son, John, left no male issue. The son of the 
second son of the first Anthony, Leonard, married 
a Rutgers. His son, Anthony the third, married 
a Barclay. The male descent ceased with the 
three sons of this Anthony, as they all died 
without male issue. The fifth child of Anthony 
(the 3d), Sarah, married Alexander L. Stewart, 
of an excellent Scotch-Irish stock. 

Arms : Argent, on a mount, vert, a tree of 
the second between a small saltire, gules, in dex- 
ter base point and a lion rampant, sable, in 
sinister base point. 



32 



AMERICA HERALDICA 



Used as a Crest : A French Count's coronet, 
proper. 

J. B. RiETSTAP's Armorial General, Second edition, 1886-88. 

Bolton's History of Westchester Co., N. Y. II. 530. 

Mrs. Martha J. Lamb's History of New York City. I. 
723- 

New York Genealogical and Biographical Record- 
II. 70, VIII. 185. 

Dr. Baird'S History of the Hugtienots in America. 

S. Whitney Phcenix : The Whitney family of Connecti- 
cut. 



Power's History of Sangamon Co., III. 516-7. 

Smith's History of Delaware Co., Pa. ^8^. 

Whitehead's Hist, of East Jersey, 1856. 

Hasted's Hist, of Co. Kent. II., 4.81. 

Dwnn's Visitation of Wales. I., 285, 307, 320, 328. 

Harleian Society's Publications. V., 218. 

The Herald and Genealogist. VI., 652. 

Harleian MSS. Meredith of Stanton {Herefordshire']. 

1140, fol. yo b, II 51), fol. 6p b, 144.2, fol. 72 b, 1545, 

fol. 77 b. 



Smitb 



/Ifterebitb 



Jonathan Meredith, and Elizabeth, his wife, 
were born in county Hereford, England, settled in 
Philadelpnia about the year 1750. Jonathan dis- 
posed of ample means and his children married 
in the best New Jersey families, the Ogdens, the 
Morrises, etc. Among his grandchildren was 
William M. Meredith, Secretary of the Treasury 
(1849-50). 

The arms the emigrant brought over with him 
were those of the Merediths of Stanton (origin- 
ally Welsh), settled at the time of his departure 
in county Hereford, England. These arms are not 
found in Burke's Armorial General, but in Glover's 
Ordinary, as the arms of Sir Philip ap Meredith 
ap Bladerike. 

Arms : Or, a lion rampant, sable, gorged with 
a collar and chain affixed thereto reflexed over 
the back, or. 

Crest : A demi-lion rampant, sable, collared 
and chained, or. 

Motto : Heb Ddum heb Ddim, a Dum a digoti. 
[With God everything, without God nothing]. 

Davis' History of Backs Co., Pa. 665-6. 
Futhey's History of Chester Co., Pa. 655. 



Samuel Smith, an early settler of that name in 
Philadelphia, came over from Europe to Ports- 
mouth, N. H., in 1740, but removed to Penn- 
sylvania and died there in 1780. Of his ancestry 
in the old country nothing is known, but the 
fact that the arms we give were brought over 
by Samuel Smith himself, engraved upon several 
pieces of old family silver, which upon close 
inspection, by special experts, have been proven 
to date as far back as the XVI. century. The 
son of Samuel, Jonathan Smith, married into 
the Bayard family, was a member of the Conti- 
nental Congress for Pennsylvania and one of the 
signers of the Articles of confederation. His 
grandson, Jonathan Bayard Harrison Smith, mar- 
ried a Miss Henley, of the Virginia Henleys, 
herself a descendant of Martha (Dandridge) Wash- 
ington's sister. 

We find, on close examination, that these arms 
have been borne by an Amsterdam, Holland, 
family of Smith. The early settler came over 
by way of Holland. That much is known. A 
very serious probability arises therefrom that he 
belonged to the family the arms of which he 
undoubtedly used rightfully. 

Arms : Or, a unicorn salliant, azure. 

Crest : The unicorn of the shield. 

J. B. Rietstap'S Armorial Gdn&al, 2d edition {1886-88). 




AMERICA HERALDICA 



Amongst the early patrons of this undertaking we' find the following prominent ladies and gentlemen 

Hon. Thomas F. Bayard, Hon. John Jay, Hon. W. Waldorf Astor, Hon. Hamilton Fish, Geo. 
Chase, Hon John R. Voorhis, Elias W. Van Voorhis, Geo. M. Van Nort, Arthur Sandys, Mrs. W. H. Schiel 
elin, Mrs. Sacket Moore Barclay, Dr. de Lancey M. Barclay, Gen. John Watts de Peyster, Edward Elbridge 
Salisbury, James S. Sands, Dr. John Coert DuBois, Enos T. Throop, Dr. George H. Butler, J. V. L. Pruyn, 
Hon. Th. C. Amory, Wm. H. de Lancy, John P. Townsend, Jacob Wendell, Col. William Jay, A. D. Schenck, 
U. S; A., Edw. O. Wolcott, D. W. Lyman, Edw. Polhemus, Theodore Chase, J. W. Beekman, Geo. R. 
Howell, Monsignor Robert Seton, Chas. B. Gookin, Edw. R. Johnes, Louis Mesier, Hon. Warner Miller, 
Judge Crawford Livingston, Geo. Gilpin, Lewis A. Scott, Gen. Lewis Merrill, Mrs. Hicks-Lord, Col. Theo. 
A. Dodge, U. S. A., John W. Hamersley, Geo. T. Tilden, H. P. Gregory, Gen. C. W. Darling, Howland 
Pell, Edmund A. Hurry, W. A. Russell, W. Lloyd Jeffries, Frederic Gallatin, Elbridge T. Gerry, Lucius 
Tuckerman, Mrs. H. R. Bishop, Stephen Salisbury, Eugene T. Lynch, Alexander Graham Bell, J. Randolph 
Coolidge, Martin E. Greene, David Foster, Chas. U. Williams, D. F. Appleton, The London Heralds' Col- 
lege, The Harleian Society, etc., etc., etc., and every Public Library and Historical Society of importance 
throughout the country. 




JI lew New5pzs.pcr (^ommenl5 received during puI)Iic?i.Iion of Volume I. 

[PKHTS 1 TO •*.] 

New York Herald : This extraordinary work offers a kind of safeguard against the unwarrantable use of crests or 
coats of arms by persons who have no conceivable right to them. 

New York Times : There is no humbug about this work. Mr. de Vermont continually cites well-known and esteemed 
authorities. 

New York World : A sumptuous publication. Mr. de Vermont deserves every credit for the energy and thorough- 
ness with which he has entered upon his work. 

New York Morning Journal : A most superb volume : as a work of art and literary curiosity it is one of the most 
remarkable productions of the century. 

Brooklyn (N. K) Eagle : Nothing better in the way of printer's art has been issued from the American press. 

Richmotid {Va.) Whig: It justifies the claim that it is an honest effort to preserve the record of legitimate armorial 
distinctions that belong, by right of descent and inheritance, to American families. 

Boston Journal : AMERICA HERALDICA represents the first comprehensive and disinterested attempt which has been 
made to collect and reproduce the coats of arms, crests and mottoes of American families. It is a work of unique interest, 
prepared with great elegance. 

Boston Gazette : The beauty and the interest of the work will doubtless secure for it a full list of subscribers. 
Wilmington {Del.) Every Evening : The editor has gone about his work in the true scientific spirit. . . . . 
He sensibly believes that a just pride of lineage can never peril Republican institutions. 

New York Town Topics : A work of great erudition. It is likely to be to America what " Burk's Peerage " is to 
England. 

New York Genealogical and Biographical Record : A large and singularl)' sumptuous volume. It is of the graceful 
size and form called atlas. The mechanical execution of the work is in all points admirable. . . . We commend 
the intelligence and usefulness of Mr. de Vermont's design. 

New York Star : No pains have been spared to make this book accurate. Mr. E. de V. Vermont has been at work 
for years, consulting the oldest available authorities. 

Providence {R. /.) Star : The great beauty of the work and its entirely unique character have won an assured place 
for it in American literature, and we heartily congratulate the talented editor upon the fulfillment of his promises. It is a 
veritable art production. [^Hundreds of similar notices have been spotitaneously published all over the cou7itTy.'] 

Sole Publishers: THE AMERICA HERALDICA PUBLISHING ASSOCIATION, 

744 Broad-svay, New York. 




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