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Full text of "Americana, featuring Lincoln autographs, John Brown documents, presidential and other historical manuscripts, a Volk bust of Lincoln, from the collection of Dr. Charles Wesley Olsen, Chicago. Sold by his order; and another source ... February 6 [1962]"

016,973 



f The Well-Kaown Dr. Charles Wesley Olsea 

r Collection of Liacoln & John Brown 
Papers ... (Parke-Bernet sale, 1962) 




L I E) R^A FLY 

OF THE 

UN IVLRSITY 

or ILLINOIS 

A Bequest from 
Marion D. Pratt 



016.973 

P222a 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign 



http://www.archive.org/details/americanafeaturiOOpark 



The Weil-Known 

DR CHARLES WESLEY OLSEN 

Colledion of 

LINCOLN & JOHN BROWN PAPERS 
PRESIDENTIAL AND OTHER 
HISTORICAL AUTOGRAPHS 




TOGETHER WITH HISTORICAL & 

LITERARY MATERIAL FROM 

ANOTHER SOURCE 

Public Au£lion 
Tuesday • February 6 at 1:45 />. m. 

• 

PARKE-BERNET GALLERIES • INC 

980 Madison Avenue * New York 
1962 



Sale Number 2084 
FREE PUBLIC EXHIBITION 

From Tuesday, January 30 through Saturday, February 3 

10 a.m. to 5 p.m. i Tuesday until 8 

Closed Sunday and Monday 

OPEN TO DEALERS * MONDAY • FEBRUARY 5 * BY APPOINTMENT 

PUBLIC AUCTION SALE 

Tuesday Afternoon 
February 6 at 1 :45 p.m. 



EXHIBITION AND SALE AT THE 

PARKE-BERNET GALLERIES- INC 

980 MADISON AVENUE • 76TH-77TH STREET 
New York 21 

TRAFALGAR 9-8300 



Sales Conducted by 

LOUIS J. MARION 

WILLIAM A. SMYTH • THEODORE J. MULDOON 

CHARLES A. HELLMICH • JOHN L. MARION 

1962 




Lincoln from Life by L. W. VOLK 
[number 155] 



AMERICANA 

Featuring 

LINCOLN AUTOGRAPHS 
JOHN BROWN DOCUMENTS 
PRESIDENTIAL AND OTHER 
HISTORICAL MANUSCRIPTS 

A VOLK BUST OF LINCOLN 




FROM THE COLLECTION OF 

Dr Charles Wesley Olsen 

Chicago ' sold by his order 
AND ANOTHER SOURCE 




Public Auction 
Tuesday ' February 6 at 1:45 p.m. 

PARKE-BERNET GALLERIES • INC 

New York • 1962 



REGARDING REMOVAL OF PURCHASES 

All purchases not removed by the buyer by 
5 p.m. on Thursday of the week following the 
sale will be turned over to Messrs. Day and 
Meyer — Murray and Young, 1166 Second 
Avenue, New York, for removal and storage 
at the expense and risk of the purchaser. 



The Parke-Bernet Galleries 

will execute your bids without charge 

if you are unable to attend the sale in person 

Telephone: Tnafalgar 9-8300 
Cable: Parkgal 



PRICED CATALOGUES 

A priced copy of this catalogue may be 

obtained for one dollar for each 

session of the sale plus 

the cost of the 

catalogue 

PRINTED IN THE U.S.A. 



r^.ir 



CONDITIONS OF SALE 



The property listed in this catalogue will be offered and sold on the following 
terms and conditions: 

1. The word ''Galleries," whenever here used, means the Parke-Bernet 
Galleries, Inc. 

2. The Galleries has endeavored to catalogue and describe the property cor- 
rectly, but all property is sold "as is" and neither the Galleries nor its con- 
signor warrants or represents, and they shall in no event be responsible for, 
the correctness of description, genuineness, authorship, provenience or condi- 
tion of the property, and no statement contained in the catalogue or made 
orally at the sale or elsewhere shall be deemed to be such a warranty or rep- 
resentation, or an assumption of liability. 

3. Unless otherwise announced by the auctioneer at the time of sale, all bids 
are to be for a single article even though more than one article is included 
under a numbered item in the catalogue. If, however, all of the articles under 
a numbered item are either specifically designated by the auctioneer at the time 
of the sale or designated in the printed catalogue as a "Lot," then bids are to 
be for the lot irrespective of the number of items. However, in book cata- 
logues, all bids are to be for the lot as numbered, unless specific notification 
to the contrary is given by the auctioneer at the time of sale. 

4. The highest bidder acknowledged by the auctioneer shall be the purchaser. 
In the event of any dispute between bidders, the auctioneer shall have absolute 
discretion either to determine the successful bidder, in which event his deter- 
mination shall be final, or to re-offer and resell the article in dispute. If any 
dispute arises after the sale, the Galleries' sale record shall be conclusive as to 
who was the purchaser, the amount of the highest bid, and in all other respects. 

5. If, the auctioneer, in his sole and final discretion, decides that any original 
bid is not commensurate with the value of the article offered, or, having 
acknowledged an original bid, that any advance thereafter is not of sufficient 
amount, he may reject the same. 

6. The name and address of the purchaser of each article or lot shall be given 
to the Galleries immediately following the sale thereof, and payment of the 
whole purchase price, or such part thereof as the Galleries may require, shall 
be made immediately by the purchaser. If the foregoing condition, or any 
other applicable condition herein, is not complied with, the sale may, at the 
option of the Galleries, be cancelled and the article or lot re-offered for sale. 

7. Unless the sale is advertised and announced as an unrestricted sale, or aS 
a sale without reserve, the consignor has reserved the right to bid personally 
or by agent; and if the consignor or his agent is the highest bidder, less than 
full commissions may, under certain defined circumstances, be payable. 

8. Except as otherwise provided in paragraph 6 hereof, title will pass to the 
highest bidder upon the fall of the auctioneer's hammer, and thereafter, the 
purchaser shall bear the sole risk and responsibility for the property. 

9. All property purchased is to be paid for in full and removed from the 
Galleries at the purchaser's risk and expense immediately after the conclusion 
of the sale. As to any property not so paid for in full, in addition to all other 
remedies available to the Galleries by law, including, without limitation, the 
right to hold the purchaser liable for the bid price, the Galleries, at its option, 
may either (a) cancel the sale, in which event all payments made by the 



CONDITIONS OF SALE — Concluded 



purchaser shall be retained as liquidated damages, or (b) resell the same 
without notice to the purchaser and for the purchaser's account and risk, 
either publicly or privately, and, in such event, the purchaser shall be liable 
for the payment of any deficiency plus all costs, including warehousing, the 
expenses of both sales, and the Galleries' commissions at its regular rates. All 
property not promptly removed by the purchaser may be removed by the 
Galleries to a warehouse for the account and risk and at the expense of the 
purchaser. 

10. Items or categories in this catalogue which are subject to the Federal 
Excise Tax on jewelry, clocks, silver, gold, furs, etc., are designated by an 
asterisk (*). Unless acquired by a registered dealer for resale the purchaser 
will be required to pay in addition to the amount of his bid, the Federal 
Excise Tax equivalent to 10 per cent of the bid. 

11. Unless exempt from the payment thereof, the purchaser will also be 
required to pay the New York City sales tax of 3 per cent of the bid. 

12. The Galleries, without charge for its services, may undertake to make 
bids on behalf of responsible persons approved by it, including the consignor, 
subject to the Conditions of Sale and to such other terms and conditions as it 
may prescribe. The Galleries reserves the right, however, to decline to under- 
take to make such bids and when undertaking to make such bids shall in no 
event be responsible for failing correctly to carry out instructions. 

13. The Galleries, at the purchaser's risk and expense, will facilitate the 
employment of carriers and packers for the purchaser's account, but will not 
be responsible for their acts in any respect whatsoever. 

14. Any and all claims of a purchaser shall be deemed to be waived and 
shall be without validity unless made in writing to the Galleries within ten 
days after the sale. 

15. Neither the auctioneer nor any other representative of the Galleries shall 
have the authority to waive or alter, in whole or in part, any of these Condi- 
tions of Sale, or, except as provided in paragraphs 6 an 9 hereof, orally to 
cancel any sale. 



Sales Conducted by 

LOUIS J. MARION 

WILLIAM A. SMYTH • THEODORE J. MULDOON 

CHARLES A. HELLMICH • JOHN L. MARION 



PARKE-BERNET GALLERIES- INC 

LESLIE A. HYAM • President 

LOUIS J. MARION • Executive Vice-President 

MARY VANDEGRIFT • ANTHONY N. BADE • Vice-Presidents 

MAX BARTHOLET • Secretary and Treasurer 

ROBERT F. METZDORF • Assistant Vice-President 



ESPECIALLY NOTEWORTHY ITEMS 
IN THIS SALE 

A Letter from Benjamin Franklin to Katy Greene 

Early Legal Papers by Abraham Lincoln 

John Brown's Family Bible 

A Fine Thomas Jefferson Letter about Commerce on the 
Mississippi 

A Washington Document about Spies on Long Island 

A Legal Document Written and Signed by Daniel Boone 

A Document Signed by Paul Revere, about a Tavern License 

An Annuity Receipt of Martha Washington's 

President Truman's Letter about John L. Lewis 

A Log of the U.S.S. "John P. Kennedy" 

MS of a Speech by Benito Mussolini 



AFTERNOON SESSION 
Tuesday, February 6, 1962 at 1:45 p.m. 

CATALOGUE NUMBERS 1 TO 281 INCLUSIVE 

"AN ADDITIONAL STATE ... BY THE NAME OF TENNESSEE" 

1. ADAMS, JOHN QUINCY. A.L.s., "John Q. Adamsr 1 p., 4to, ''The 
Hague, August 6, 1796." With integral address leaf reading "Sylvanus 
Bourne, Esqr., Consul of the United States, Amsterdam.'^ (Olsen) 

An interestiivg letter, written while Minister to The Netherlands. Mentions 
Rufus King's arrival in England; that "An additional State, I understand by the name uf 
Tennessee has been admitted into the representation of the Union;'' that Mr. Sedgwick 
and Mr. Goodhue are chosen Senators in Congress from the State of Massachusetts;" 
and "it is said I am to be removed to Lisbon, but I shall probably remain here some 
months longer." He was appointed to Lisbon, but in the meantime he was commissioned 
Minister Plenipotentiary to Prussia. 



INDIANA LAND GRANT 

2. ADAMS, JOHN QUINCY. D.s., 1 side of an oblong folio vellum sheet, 
with seal; Washington. 3 Jan. 1828; a deed to 115 acres of land in Monroe 
County, Indiana, registered at Crawfordsville in the name of one Richard B. 
Thompson; a portion of the holograph insertions faded, 2 pencilled sums in 
one blank corner. (Olsen) 



THE POET-PRESIDENT 

3. ADAMS, JOHN QUINCY. Autograph Poetical Ms., the author's name 
inserted at the head in another hand, 4 pp., folio; no place or date; ''The 
Plague in the Forest. A Fable,'' 12 ten-line stanzas in rhyme, a mildly cynical 
fabliau on the power of the predatory to find a scapegoat. A fine, clean copy 
of a piece displaying well Adams' felicitous touch in light verse. 



4. AMERICAN MILITARY OFFICERS. Major Marcus A. Reno, censured 
for his conduct at the Custer Massacre. A.L.s., ll/o pp., 12mo; New York, 
24 Dec. 1885; transmitting an article on the Massacre and offering an article 
on Mosby <* Major George A. McCall, Mexican War Hero. A.L.s.. 1 p.. 
4to; New^ Orleans, 13 Dec. 1849; requesting transportation for travel on 
orders to Santa Fe and explaining a delay caused by illness. Together 2 pieces. 

1 



KINDLY READ CONDITIONS OF SALE IN FOREPART OF CATALOGUE 



B. ARNOLD, RUM-SELLER 

5. ARNOLD, BENEDICT. A.N.s., on slip of paper approximately 31/2 by 6 
inches; St. Johns, Newfoundland, 2 May 1786; an order to deliver five gallons 
of rum. 

Lacking military employment, Arnold entered into a trading business with Canada and 
the West Indies. In 1787 he and two of his sons resided in St. Johns for an extended 
period. 



AN EARLY LETTER 

6. ARTHUR, CHESTER A. As a law student of 22. A.L.s., 3I/2 PP-r square 
8vo; West Troy, 20 Aug. 1853; to Campbell Allen at Clifton Park, N.Y., 
informing him that he has made arrangements for a substitute to fill Allen's 
teaching job during his current illness and that he may return to it when 
well; in wishing Allen a speedy recovery, Arthur quotes the poetry of Robert 
Burns twice at some length. With original envelope and remaining portion of 
seal. (Olsen) 



7. BEECHER, HENRY WARD. A.N.s. (with initials), 1 p., 12mo; 31 Jan. 
n.y. To his wife. With an A.L.s. from Mrs. Beecher. Together 2 pieces. 

He suggests she add a note to a letter. Reports of the weather. "Goodbye with much 
love from your old but affectionate husband." Together with a letter from Mrs. Beecher 
(A.L.s., Ip., 8vo; 11 Jan. 1896) forwarding her husband's writing. 



AN AGREEMENT WRITTEN AND SIGNED BY DANIEL BOONE 

8. BOONE, DANIEL. Pioneer and frontiersman. A.D., signed as a witness, 
in the abbreviated form "Dal Boone" which he often used, also signed by the 
contracting parties Amos Morris and William Horbur; 1 p., oblong 8vo; 
[Kanawha County, (West) Virginia] 16 Dec. 1789; ''Artickels of agreement 
Between Amos Morris and William Horber^ [sic] concerning the transfer of 
a quarter acre of land "«i the same rate that Col Lewis Sells Lotts to other 
parsons for CashJ' Tipped to a mat, with an engraved portrait. A small hole 
in the center affecting a few words; a few words faded and a portion of the 
document lightly stained. (Olsen) 

Examples of Boone's handwriting as extensive as this are extremely rare. He had 
moved from Kentucky in the previous year to settle briefly at Point Pleasant on the 
Great Kanawha. He engaged as usual in a number of occupations, running a store for 
a while, occasionally contracting for supplies to the troops, and surveying. His reputa- 
tion and standing were recognized by his new neighbors and, at their petition, he had 
been appointed Lieutenant-Colonel of the County two months before the date of the 
present document. 

[See illustration] 
2 



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KINDLY READ CONDITIONS OF SALE IN FOREPART OF CATALOGUE 



BOOTH'S PROMPT COPY 

9. [BOOTH, JOHN WILKES. Actor, assassin of Abraham Lincoln.] W. T. 
MONCRIEFF. The Spectre Bridegroom; or, a Ghost in Spite of Himself. 12mo, 
old hand-lettered wrappers: mav lack a half-title. In case. iOlsen) 

New York. 1821 

hiscribed by Booth on the front wrapper: "/. W. Booth, Arch St. Theatre/The Spectre 
Bridegroom/1858''' At this time Booth was serving an apprenticeship year in Philadelphia 
at the Arch St. Theatre; the speeches of Capt. Vauntington in the present text are 
marked in pencil, the part being just such a minor one as Booth may have played, 

10. BRECKINRIDGE, JOHN C. A.L.s., 1 p., 4to; 14 Feb. 1855. To Presi- 
dent Franklin Pierce. 

He adds his endorsement to the recomm.endations of a "worthy and intelligent" young 
man from Lexington, Ky., formerly from New^ Hampshire, and hopes that Pierce will 
give the request his favorable consideration. 

AN EARLY RECORD 

11. BROWN, JOHN, Abolitionist, and his first wife, Dianthe Brown. D.s. 
by both, 1 p. folio, attested and docketed on the verso; Hudson, Ohio, 15 Feb. 
1825; a deed for the sale of a little more than an acre of land to one Elisha 
Ellsworth for the sum of $15.00. Folded; mended at the fold. {Olsen) 

BROWN THE WOOL-MERCHANT 

12. BROWN, JOHN. Abolitionist. A.L.s., 1 p., 4to; Springfield, Mass., 7 
Apr. 1849; to Simon Perkins at Akron. Ohio. With integral address leaf. 
{Olsen) 

Perkins w'as Brown's partner in the raw wool commission firm of Perkins & Brown, 
set up to market Ohio wool to Massachusetts mills. He discusses business difficulties 
and possibilities of profit, mentioning that a sale to a French firm has made the man- 
ufacturers take notice. He also speaks of sorting wool, an operation at which he was 
extremely skillful. See: Leland's Life and Letters of John Brown, London 1885 or Cedar 
Rapids 1910, pp. 63-67. 

ON PROSPECTS IN KANSAS 

13. BROWN, JOHN. Abolitionist. A.L.s.. 2 pp.. Ito; Brown's Station, Kan- 
sas Territory, 14 Dec. 1855; to Orson Day at Whitehall. New York, in part 
discussing arrangements for Day's removal to Kansas. Faded, some light 
stains. (Olsen) 

Day was probably a relative of Brown's second wife, Mary Anne Day of Whitehall, N.Y. 
More significant than the family matters discussed are Brown's news and opinions 
concerning Kansas: he now believes the Free State men in the majority and has great 
ho[)es for the unsuccessful Topeka Movement in its attempts to set up a Free State 
government. He also requests Day to purchase a New York draft for $146.38, to be 
sent to Massachusetts Arms Co. in payment for weapons forwarded to him "tvithout 
which ive might have been placed in very awkivard circumstances." 

4 



AFTERNOON SESSION TUESDAY. FEBRUARY 6tH 



RRcm \ THE FARMER 

14. BROWA, JOHA. AholUionist. A.L.s., 2 i)}).. {5\u: Tiuy. A A.. Ma\ 
1859; to his wife and family in Westport, N. Y.. on supplies being sent to the 
family farm and directions for work to be carried out. iOlsen) 
Written by BroAvn while en route to Boston and Concord for his last fund-raising trip, 
this letter is largely occupied with family matters, including a suggestion that the women 
of the family "rig out right" and help in the fields. There is one curious reference to a 
box "containing the old granite monuments" which may or may not have something to do 
with the supplies of arms which Brown was gathering. 



15. BRO\^'\. JOHX. Abuliti(mi.st. Cut signature affixed to an A.X.s. by 
Mary D. Brown, his widow. 1 p.. 12mo; North Elba (X.Y.), 13 Mar. 1860; 
to an unnamed correspondent, transmitting the signature. iOlsen) 

Written 3 months after Brown's execution; "should have ansicered sooner but lie have 
been sick so much I had not time." 



JOHN BROWN'S BIBLE, WITH HIS FAMILY RECORD 

16. [BROWA. JOHN.] Abolitionist. The Holy Bible, containing The Old 
and New Testaments. [King James version.] 4to, contemporary full sheep; 
spine repaired, the old spine preserved. In case. (Olsen) Philadelphia, 1835 

Lnscribed by Brown on the verso of the front endpaper: "John Browns Book/ 
Bought June 1839." A later inscription on the opposite flyleaf reads: "Property of /Mrs. 
Ella Thompson Toivne/652y2 Westmount Drive/ West Hollywood,/ California.'" Assuming 
that Mrs. Towne was using her maiden name as middle name, the provenance of this 
Bible becomes clear — it is the Bible mentioned by Brown in his will of 1 Dec. 1859: 
"I give to my daughter Ruth Thompson my large old Bible, containing the family 
record." From Mrs. Thompson it must be presumed to have passed to her daughter, 
Mrs. ToAvne. The text of Brown's will is to be found in Leland's Life and Letters, 
London, 1885, at pp. 616-617. 

The four-page family record is filled out in Brown's hand: he also notes that 
it was drawn up in part by his father, Owen Brown, shortly before his 81st birthday. 
The final entry records the death of John's son Frederick in the following terms: 
"Frederick Brown 2d was Murdered at Osawattomie in Kansas Aug 30th 1856 Aged 
26 years." In his letter of 7 Sept. 1856 to his family, he thus describes the occurrence: 
"On the morning of the 30th of August an attack was made by the Ruffians on 
Osawatomie, numbering some four hundred, by whose scouts our dear Frederick was 
shot dead without warning — he supposing them to be Free-State men, as near as w^e 
can learn.'' See Leland, op. cit., p. 317. 

Some passages marked in pencil, including, significantly. Jeremiah xxii. 13-16, com- 
mencing. "Woe unto him that buildeth his house by unrighteousness, and his chambers 
by wrong; that useth his neighbor's service without wages, and giveth him not for his 
work." 
An intimate relic of a great historic figure 

[See illustration overleaf J 
5 



KINDLY READ CONDITIONS OF SAT.E IN FOREPART OF CATALOGUE 



WITH LOCKS OF HAIR 

17. [BROWN, JOHN.] Abolitionist. Mary D. Brown, his widow. Cut 
A.N.S., 7 lines; Rohnerville, 13 Sept. 1877; to an unknown correspondent. 
Affixed to a larger sheet, together with 2 locks of hair in a board box under 
glass and a reproduction of an 1858 portrait of John Brown. iOlsen) 

The opening of the A.N.s. reads: "/ will enclose a lock of hair and a little of his 
beard." Presumably the locks mentioned were of John Brown's hair, and are those 
attached to the present piece. 



THE ROAD TO KANSAS 

18. BROWN, JOHN, JR. Son of the abolitionist by his first wife. A.L.s., 
2 pp., folio; Brown's Station, Kansas Territory, 23 Jan. 1856; to Orson Day, 
a relative of his father's second wife, at Whitehall, N.Y., on emigrating to 
Kansas. (Olsen) 

This letter, according to the opening paragraph, duplicates a letter being written at 
the same time by Brown Senior to the same man at another address. The letter is 
noteworthy for its information on the route and means of travel to Kansas and mentions 
persons and firms who may be helpful on the journey. 



PART OF THE BROWN PRIVATE ARMY 

19. [BROWN, JOHN.] Abolitionist. A group of 4 A.Ls.s. by sons of John 
Brown, as described below. Together 4 pieces. {Olsen) V.p., v.d. 

Comprises: A.L.s. by Oliver Brown, 2 pp., 4to, Ossawatomie, Kansas Territory, 6 Jan. 
[1856], to his mother and siblings, describing primitive living conditions in Kansas 
and commenting bitterly on Free State politics; A.L.s. by Jason Brown, 1 p., 8vo, 
Akron, 0., 22 Mar. 1883, transmitting an A.L.s. (not present) by his father; A.L.s by 
Salmon Brown, 4 pp., 8vo, Ferndale [Calif.], 29 Oct. 1891, to Walter R. Benjamin, 
offering John Brown letters and memorabilia for sale because of financial difficulties; 
A.L.s. by Jason Brown, 2 pp., 8vo, Ben Lomond, Calif., 6 Dec. 1900, to F. B. Sanborn, 
attempting to borrow money on his farm. 



20. [BROWN, JOHN. Abolitionist.] A.L.s. by his son Watson Brown and 
Isabelle Brown [Watson's wife?], with a postscript s. by Mary D. Brown, 
John Brown's second wife; 2 pp., 4to; North Elba [N.Y.J, 27 May 1857; to 
Oliver Brown, son of John, concerning family plans for the farm at North 
Elba; the mother's postscript attempts to clear up the matter of a small debt 
which she thinks has been paid twice. (Olsen) 

6 



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[number 16] 



KINDLY READ CONDITIONS OF SALE IN FOREPART OF CATALOGUE 



21. [BROWN, JOHN.] Abolitionist. 2 A.Ls.s.. 1 by his widow and 1 by his 
daughter Anne, as described below. Together 2 pieces. [Olsen) 

Kansas & Calif., 1882, 1895 

Comprises: A.L.s. by Mary D. Brown, the \\i(iow, 2 p])., 8vo, Topeka, 13 Nov. 1882, 
to F. B. Sanborn, fund-raiser for Brown and later his biographer, describing in oart 
her return from her only trip East after Brown's death, probably financed by Sanborn 
in part though never so described by him in the biography; A.L.s. by Annie B[rown] 
Adams, 6 pp., 8vo, Petrolia, Calif,, 31 Mar, 1895, describing at length her poverty and 
depression ["an outcast, the daughter of an outcast"" \ and her Avillingness to part with her 
share in a gold medal given the Brown heirs. 



BUCHANAN TO VAN BUREN 

22. BUCHANAN, JAMES. A.L.s., 1 p., 4to, Lancaster, 9 May 1837. To 
''His Excellency Martin Van Bur en. President of the U. States T (Olsen) 

Written by the then Senator Buchanan (later President) to President Van 
BuREN, Buchanan recommends Woodburn Potter of Philadelphia for a Lieutenancy in 
the army: General Gaines speaks highly of him and would like to have him on his 
staff; he would feel much gratified if President Van Buren would make the appointment, 

23. BUCHANAN, JAMES. As U. S. Senator. A.L.s., 1 p., 4to; Lancaster 
[Pa.], 26 Dec. 1843; to Henry Welsh, describing his travelling plans and dis- 
cussing political matters. 

Buchanan asserts his neutrality in the rivalry between H. A. P. Muhlenberg and 
Francis R, Shunk for the Democratic candidacy for Governor of Pennsylvania; he also 
mentions a '"withdrawal" of his own, probably his decision not to work actively for the 
Democratic Presidential nomination in the coming year. 



BURR MENTIONS HAMILTON 

24. BURR. AARON. A.L.s.. 1 p.. 8vo; n.p., n.d. [New York, before 1801]; 
to Egbert Benson at Poughkeepsie. With integral address leaf, which is de- 
fective in the margins. (Olsen) 

Burr attempts to retain Benson as council in a suit involving £50,000. "I am told an 
application is also herewith made to you by the def[endan]t who has already Lawrance 
and Hamilton — therefore expect you with me who am alone." The letter almost certainly 
dates from the period 1783-89 during which Burr and Hamilton were the most important 
and active members of the New York bar. 

25. BURR. AARON. L.s., 1/2 p., 4to; [New York] 14 Feb. 1833; to Ogden 
E. Edwards, sending a note for $157 to be placed to his credit in lieu of funds 
delayed in transit from Richmond. With integral address leaf. Annotations 
in pen and in pencil, in other hands, concerning this letter and Burr's life. 
(Olsen) 

At this time Burr, although 77, still retained a fair practice and was not living in the 
destitution which followed the break-up of his marriage to Mme. Jumel some two years 
later. 

8 



AFTERNOON SESSION TUESDAY. FEBRUARY 6tH 



THE DELAWARE INDIANS 

26. CALHOUN. JOHN C. A.L.s.. 1 p.. 4to. Department of War. 19 July, 
1823. To ''Mr. Solomon U. Hendricks, Vernon, New York."" iOlsen) 

Written Avhile Secretary of War in President Monroe's cabinet. Writes: "/ have just 
received a letter from Gov. Clark, dated the 1th ult. enclosing the answer of the Delaware 
Indians to the Speech of the Stockbridge Nations claiming a part of the Delaware 
annuity under the treaty of St. Mary^s in the year 1818 . . . the Delawares refuse to 
relinquish any j)art of the annuity uithnut the Stockbridge nation uill go and reside 
among them. . . ." 



27. CALHOUN. JOHN C. L.s.. li/o pp.. 4to; 25 Feb. 1823. To Nicholas 
BiDDLE, at Philadelphia. 

Writing; to Biddle as agent for the War Department, Calhoun gives official instructions 
about handling employees, pensioners, and other matters. 



28. CALHOUN. JOHN C. A.L.s., 3 pp.. 4to; Washington. 4 Sept. 1824; to 
T. Worthington, former Governor of Ohio and at this time Ohio Representa- 
tive in Congress, explaining that the illness of one of his children prevented 
Calhoun from visiting Ohio on a recent tour, and closing with the hope that 
an unidentified bid by \^ orthington on some government proposal will be 
successful. Some folds partially s])lit. I Olsen I 



MAP OF A SHIPS RUN TO CALIFORNIA. 1855 

29. CARTOGRAPHY. Chart, on Mercator's projection, showing the course 
of the ship "Boston Light.'* Boston to San Francisco. 1 p.. sm. folio; 1855. 
Slightly damp-stained. 

A decorative chart, showing the position of the "Boston Light" every five days: she 
left Boston 30 Dec. 1854 and arrived in San Francisco 102 days later. Signed by W. 
Collagon. The map is professionally done and has colored pen-work decoration at the 
top, with an explanatory inscription, and a profile of the coastline of Fernando de 
Noronha. A most attractive piece of cartography. 



30. CASS. LEWIS. A.L.s.. l'._, pp.. Ilo: Washington. 25 Jan. 1836. To 
Henry D wight, Geneva, N. Y. 

He recommends various men for posts in a Detroit hank, and discusses the best arrange- 
ments and appointments. Urges D^\ight to visit Detroit. 



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CHURCHILL SEEKS A MILITARY POST 

3L CHURCHILL, SIR WINSTON S. British statesman and soldier. A.L.s., 
2% PP-^ 12mo, on mourning stationery; London, "1L5.99"; to Sir Evelyn 
Wood, Adjutant General of the Army, concerning his wish to have a commis- 
sion in the Reserve. (Olsen) 

After thanking Wood for his promptness in putting through his resignation from the 
regular service, Churchill remarks, "/ went down to Oxfordshire to see the Yeomanry 
and I cannot say that I was vy much attracted to the service. If I could become an 
officer of the Reserve, I should like that much better . . . I hope there is some provision 
for such as I. For nearly seven years I have been receiving a military education. I am 
anxious to do of my own free will^ what in other countries would be regarded as a 
sort of disagreeable liability.'''' He closes by asking how he may apply for a reserve 
commission. 



32. CLARK, WILLIAM. Explorer. Doc. s., in pencil, as Gov. of the Missouri 
Territory. 1 p., 8vo; St. Louis, 29 April 1814. 

A signed order for rations for Capt. F. Geiser's troop of 47 soldiers. 



33. CLAY. HENRY. A.N.s. "H. Clay," i/^ p., 4to; Washington, 9 June 1835. 
To Nicholas Biddle, in Philadelphia. Address on p. 4. 

He sends a warm letter of recommendation for General Owens of North Carolina, who 
will deliver the letter personally. 



CLAY ON SLAVERY AND LIBERIA 

34. CLAY, HENRY. A.L.s., 1 p.. 4to. Washington, 18 Feb. 1837. To "Mr. 
G. H. Welch:' (Olsen) 

Pertains to the petition of the American Colonization Society which labored to move 
Negroes from the United States to Liberia. 

"/ have reed, your letter requesting me to communicate an account of the proceedings 
in the Senate on the petition which I presented from the A. Colozn. Society for an 
Act of Incorporation . . . The object of the petition ivas opposed, and it ivas laid on 
the table. This result I attribute to two causes; 1st, the excitement prevailing in regard 
to abolition which produces an unwillingness to touch the African subject in any form. 
And 2ndly the policy of the V. Buren party to impress the South with the belief that 
it is friendly to southern interests. . . ." 



35. CLEVELAND, GROVER. A.L.s., 1 p., 8vo, New York, 22 Jan. 1890. 
Written on business stationery of his legal firm. (Olsen) 

To Mr. T. Wingfield Bullock, writing '7 am fully of the opinion that no young man 
should reach his majority without having seriously considered the questions connected 
with his duty as a citizen. . ." 

10 



AFTERNOON SESSION TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6tH 



36. CLEVELAND. GROVER. In the interim between his two Presidential 
terms. A.L.s.. 3 pp.. 12mo; New York, 18 Mar. 1891; to Henry Watterson, 
editor of the Louisville, Ky., Courier-Journal, on Watterson's current political 
predictions and political gossip. 

Watterson often opposed Cleveland, and in the next year fought his third nomination 
bitterly; the present letter, however, is entirely friendly in tone. 

37. CLEVELAND. GROVER. After his second term in the Presidency. 
A.L.s. , 11/2 pp., 12mo; Princeton, 3 Jan. 1899; to a Mr. Northrup of Syracuse, 
thanking him for a Christmas gift, "The Life of Samuel S. Cox." (Olsen) 

BOOTH AND LINCOLN 

38. CIVIL WAR. Excerpts from a Washington hotel register, cut and pasted 
to a piece of framer's board, with one entry in the display hand of J. Wilkes 
Booth (Lincoln's assassin), giving his name and residence as Baltimore; with 
other entries in clerks' hands for Gen. Nelson A. Miles, Gen. Joseph ("Fight- 
ing Joe") Hooker, and Abraham Lincoln, the Lincoln entry being dated 20 
May 1863. With matte and reproduction of a photograph of Booth. (Olsen) 

Washington, 1863 

39. CODY. WILLIAM F. ("BUFFALO BILL") A.N.s., 1 p., 8vo; 8 April 
1888. To a female correspondent, saying he is sending his photograph, as re- 
quested, and will be glad to receive hers, as suggested. He excuses himself for 
delay in answering "caused by pressure of business (&c." On stationerv of 
"Buffalo Bill's Wild West Co." 

40. COOLIDGE. CALVIN. As Gov. of Massachusetts and Vice-Presidential 
candidate. A.L.s.. 2 pp., 12mo; Boston, 15 July 1920; to Miss Laura A. 
Skinner at New York, with thanks for her political help. 

'^WePe it not for the faith of people like you public service would lose its power to 
attract ivhat is best in our citizenship." A.Ls.s. by Coolidge, a busy man in the age of 
the typewriter, are extremely rare. 

41. COOLIDGE. CALVIN. As President. Typed L.s.. 1 p., square 8vo; 
Washington, 4 Apr. 1927; to Mr. Lynn Cady at Plymouth, Vermont, con- 
cerning care of the Coolidge premises there and a purchase of maple syrup. 
"A request has come from Aurora that she wants some fence fixed around the house... 
She says the cattle get into the lot. 

"fl^^e shall be glad to buy some maple syrup from you. We could take six or eight gal- 
lons, or perhaps ten when you get around to send it down. I did not hear anything from 
Lynds so I do not know iihether he did any sugaring on my land this year or not." 
A homey letter, and very Yankee, by a man who retained his New England charac- 
teristics throughout life. 

11 



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42. COOLIDGE, CALVIN. Typed L.s. and inscribed photograph. (Olsen) 

T.L.s., as President, 1 p., 4to; Washington, 16 Jan. 1926. To Myron T. Herrick, Ambas- 
sador to France, acknowledging a letter and mentioning Herrick's pleased comments 
on the new Embassy building *> Portrait photograph, 11% x 
inscribed: 'To American Legion /W'ith Regards Calvin Coolidgey 



43. CUSTER, GEORGE ARMSTRONG. As commander of the Seventh Cav- 
alry. A.L.S., 8 pp.. 12mo; Monroe, Mich.. 7 Nov. 1874; to Stillson of the 
[N.Y.?] Daily World, largely on politics. 

On the point of joining his regiment at Fort Abraham Lincoln, Custer writes for the 
World to be send him and then rather obviously angles for a commission as political 
and military secret correspondent. He castigates Gen. Lewis Merrill for his contemporary 
activities against the Ku Klux Klan and suggested irregularities, and comments tartly 
on Grant's desire for a third term and supposed political ambitions of Sherman. A most 
remarkable letter for even a notoriously unruly and ambitious junior officer to write 
about his superiors. 



SCIENCE ON THE TRAIL 

44. DARWIN, CHARLES. Naturalist. A.L.s.. 1 p.. 12mo; Beckenham, 6 
Jan., no year, ca. 1875; to his druggist, asking about the composition of a 
'^'^ spermaceti ointment^^ which he has been buying for some years. (Olsen) 

He wants to know about the ointment ''because I blackened some young shoots of plants 
with this ointment mixed with Lamp-black & it produced an extraordinary effect on 
the shoots, which I think cannot be accounted for merely by the exclusion of light" 



DAVIS' BOY'S DOG 

45. DAVIS, JEFFERSON. A.L.s. to Col. J. D. Hoover. 1 p., 8vo; 15 Apr. 
1857; endorsed on verso. 

He encloses a note for the President (James Buchanan: the note is not present.) The 
dog Hoover gave them is doing well. He expects to leave soon, ''the Boy being I hope 
now quite out of danger." 



NAVAL HEROES 

46. DECATUR, STEPHEN, and JACOB JONES. American naval officers. 
L.s. by both men, the text in Jones' hand. 1 p., folio; New London. 22 Nov. 
1813; forwarding and seconding an application to William Jones (1760- 
1831) on behalf of the son of the Rev. Dr. Channing. further noting that they 
believe Capl. Hull to have recommended the applicant as well. 

Jones had a connnand in Decatur's squadron at this time and had commanded the If asp 
in action against the Frolic the previous October, an engagement which won him the 
praise of Congress and other awards. 

12 



AFTERNOON SESSION TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6tH 

47. DEMOCRATIC PRESIDENTS. Typed L.s. by Woodrow Wilson, as 
President, 1 p.. 8vo, Wash., 20 Nov. 1916, condoling with a Congressman 
on the loss of his seat in the recent election •^ Typed L.s. by Harry S. Tru- 
man as ex-President, 1 p., 4to, Independence, 18 Apr. 1958, identifying him- 
self as the First Lieutenant in an old picture, which he will autograph, and 
asking for a copy for his Library files, if available. Together 2 pieces. 

DICKENS REFERS TO A PORTRAIT 

48. DICKENS. CHARLES. A.L.s.. 1 p., 8vo, 'Wedy. Morning;' undated. 
With integral leaf addressed ''A. Fletcher, Esquire, Dean St.;' with subscrip- 
tion in lower left ^'Charles DickensJ' (Olsen) 

An interesting letter. Invites Mr. Fletcher to dine with them on the day the letter 
was written. In a six-line postscript he writes below the signature "A most mean 
signature, but I am writing under the soothing influence of Mr. Pickering the author 
of that meek portrait still unfinished . . . Apropos. Kate wants her picture (only for 
the day) if you can send it by bearer". 

49. DOUGLAS, LORD ALFRED. Friend of Oscar Wilde. A.L.s., 4 pp., large 
square 8vo; Sussex, 15 Jan. 1940; on his Life of Oscar Wilde. Both sheets 
with one hole punched for insertion of the letter in a notebook, affecting a 
few letters only. 

To a Mr. Wyndham. He states that he cannot help his correspondent with information 
about Lady Wilde, for "/ never even met her." He then goes on to say that he has 
written a Life which is to be published by Duckworth, although at first he had refused 
to do it for them, "05 / said I was sick and tired of the whole subject." He criticizes 
Shaw's lack of knoAvledge about Wilde and ''the appalling Frank Harris." In a post- 
script he mentions that he has defended Wilde in the book, and ends: ''Also his character 
had much that was lovable & I think he was brutally treated." 

50. DOUGLAS, STEPHEN A. Speech of Mr. Douglass [sic] ... on The Bill 
to Refund General Jackson's Fine. Washington, 1844 <* Speech of Senator 
Douglas ... in the Senate of the United States, May 15 & 16, 1860. [Wash- 
ington, 1860] V Reply of Hon. Jefferson Davis ... to the Speech of Senator 
Douglas, In the U. S. Senate, May 16 & 17, 1860. Washington; National 
Democratic Executive Committee, 1860. Together 3 pamphlets, 8vo, dis- 
bound. (Olsen) 

Jackson described the first speech as his own defense for the occurrences at New Orleans 
in 1815; the 2 later speeches are on non-interference with slavery in the Territories. 

"SUCCESS . . . APPLICATION AND HARD WORK" 

51. EDISON, THOMAS A. T.L.s.. 1 p., 4to; 20 Mar. 1929. To Milton J. 
Lesser of Los Angeles. 

He is glad a boys' club has been named for him and sends an inspirational message: 
"Success in any line of endeavor can only be achieved by application and hard ivork. . . ." 

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52. EDDY. MARY BAKER GLOVER. Founder of Christian Science. Printed 
D.S., 1 p., oblong 8vo; Concord, probably shortly after 1889; biographical 
questionnaire with two entries filled out in Mrs. Eddy's hand, including her 
signature. 

In response to one query, Mrs. Eddy gives her name as ''Mary Baker G. Eddy" and 
her place of birth as New Hampshire, omitting to enter the date; in response to the 
other query she notes that she moved to Concord from Boston in 1889. The remainder 
of the questionnaire, for a Bibliography of Concord Writers, is left blank. 



"IT IS NOT SO EASY TO APPROACH THE TRUTH" 

53. EINSTEIN, DR. ALBERT. Physicist. Typed N.s., 1/2 p., 4to; Princeton. 
12 Nov. 1946; concerning a letter on magnetic fields which has been for- 
warded to him. {Olsen} 

After acknowledging receipt of the letter; Einstein continues: '7 hare to confess, how- 
ever, that your generalizations appear to me utterly unfounded. I know it from my own 
work that it is not so easy to approach the truths 



EISENHOWER TO TRUMAN 

.54. EISENHOWER, DWIGHT D. As President-elect. Typed draft or tran- 
script of a telegram, signed by Eisenhower, 1 p., 4to ; no place, 5 Nov. 1952 ; 
to Harry S. Truman at the White House, concerning arrangements for an 
Eisenhower man to sit with the Director of the Budget and for Eisenhower's 
proposed trip to Korea. 

Sent the morning after Eisenhower's election, the telegram begins, '7 deeply appreciate 
your courteous and generous telegram . . . I am most appreciative of your offer of the 
use of the Independence but assure you that any suitable transport plane . . . will be 
satisfactory for my planned trip to Korea" . . . &c. 

55. ERICSSON, JOHN. Engineer and scientist. A.L.s., 1 p., 8vo; 27 June 
1857. To John B. Kitching. 

He has received $50.00 on account of work done on the Table Caloric. He tells the 
length of time it took for him to plan the machine and do the drawings, and expresses 
satisfaction on the rapid completion of the work. (At this time Ericsson was still 
experimenting with caloric systems — the direct transference of heat to supply power.) 



JACKSON'S CABINET 

56. EVERETT, EDWARD. A.L.s., 3 pp., Ito; Washington. 15 Feb. 1829. 
To Judge Lane. 

He thanks him for a map. Gives detailed news about political maneuvering in Washing- 
ton, and outlines the probable membership of Andrew Jackson's cabinet; many of the 
most famous names of the period are mentioned, Hopes Lane will visit him in New 
England. 

14 



AFTERNOON SESSION TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6tII 



57. [FILLMORE- PKHS. MILLARD.] Autograph Alhuni. containing the 
signatnres of President Fillmore. Members of his cabinet. Senators and Rep- 
resentatives in the 31st Congress (4 Mar. 1849 — 3 Mar. 1851); also signa- 
tures of the Sergeant-at-arms of the House of Representatives, and Clerk of 
the House. Comprises 293 signatures. Written on one side of 76 leaves. 4to 
volume, leather-backed marbled boards. iOlsen) 

A MOST INTERESTING MEMENTO. Oil the inside of the front cover is >vritten "The book 
of autographs ivas procured by the Page of the House, Master Duval in January 
1851. . . ." 

Among the signatures are those of: President Millard Fillmore, Sec. of State Daniel 
Webster, Sec. of Navy William A, Graham, Sec. of War C. M. Conrad, Act. Sec. of 
War Reverdy Johnson, P. M. General Collamore, and Postmaster General M. K. Hall. 
The Senators include: Jefferson Davis, William Upham, R. C. Winthrop, John Davis, 
William H. Seward, William L. Dayton, James M. Mason, Pierre Soule, Stephen A. 
Douglas, James Shields, Lew Cass, Sam Houston, and others. 

The Representatives include: Elbridge Gerry, Horace Mann, Preston King. Thomas 
Ross, James A. Seddon, John C. Mason, Andrew Johnson (later President of the United 
States) , and others. 

58. FILLMORE, MILLARD. A.L.s., as Congressman. 21/0 pp.. 4to; Wash- 
ington, 25 Dec. 1840; to his cousin, Mrs. A. S. Dixon; a Merry Christmas 
letter, full of warmth and affection, urging Mrs. Dixon to come visit him; 
with many gallantries to a married woman friend whom Mrs. Dixon has 
described glowingly •** A.L.s., after his Presidency, on mourning stationery, 
3 pp., 12mo; Buffalo. 2 Nov. 1854; to his sister-in-law Mrs J. E. Fillmore at 
St. Paul, in part offering to check the Minnesota statutes to help her in some 
legal problem. Together 2 pieces. 

A FINE LETTER 

.59. FRANKLLX. BEXJAMLX. A.L.s., 1 p., folio; Philadelphia. 6 June 1763; 
to "Dear Katy' [Mrs. Catherine Ray Greene, wife of William Greene, later 
colonial Governor of Rhode Island] ; concerning a forthcoming trip to Xew 
England. Repaired at folds. 

Franklin had mentioned his plans in a letter to Mrs. Greene dated 23 Jan. 1763 [Life 
ed. by Bigelow, 3rd ed., i, p. 4351. He writes, in reply to a letter from her dated 24 
Apr.: "yoM desire to knoiv the time I expect to be your uay . . . / can only tell you, that 
I purpose setting out tomorrow; and having Business to do, & Friends to see in several 
Places, I suppose it may be near the End of the Month before I reach your Government." 
He sends regards to her sister, I\Irs. Anne Ray Ward, wife of Samuel Ward, Governor of 
Rhode Island in 1762 and later. Of Gov, Ward, he says, "Ask him whether he does not 
find, (as General Shirley told me. when supersed[ed] by Lord Loudon, that he found) 
a low seat the easiest." Franklin was prohably urging by this that Ward give up the 
ten-year feud between himself and Stephen Hopkins over the Governorship. 
Franklin was one of the few who signed both the Declaration of Independence and the 
Constitution. 

[See illustration overleaf] 
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60. FREMONT, JOHN C. A.N.s., 1 p., 8vo; Washington, 27 Nov. 1841. To 
Major T. P. Andrews, asking him to arrange for a payment. 

61. GANDHI, MOHANDAS K. Indian religious and political leader. Typed 
postcard signed; Wardha, 21 March 1934; to an American who has asked for 
a photograph. Traces of glue on the edges of the address side. (Olsen) 

The reply is characteristic: ""Dear friend, I keep no picture of myself. I am sorry there- 
fore to have to disappoint you.'' 

62. GEORGE H, KING OF GREAT BRITAIN. D.s., 1 p., folio; 17 Jan. 
1742/3. 

An order to the pay-master to withhold six pence in the pound of all moneys issued on 
the Hessian establishment. Countersigned by Sandys, Rushout, and Gybbon. 



WATER FOR THE HORSE GUARDS 

63. GEORGE HI, KING OF GREAT BRITAIN. Doc. s., 1 p., folio; 4 Aug. 
1790. Endorsed by George Yonge. An order to the Paymaster-General to pay 
twenty pounds to Thomas Ware for supplying water to the Horse Guards, 
(Olsen) 

64. GRANT, ULYSSES S. As Lieutenant-General. Autograph Telegram 
signed, 1 p., 4to; City Point, Va., 10:30 a.m., 30 Sept. 1864; to Maj.-Gen. 
Halleck at Washington, on the situation before Petersburg and Confederate 
troop movements. 

Grant reports all quiet at Deep Bottom, from which the colored troops of the 18th Corps 
had moved to assault and capture Battery Harrison the day before; Lee did not attempt 
to retake the position until the following day, an attempt which failed disastrously. He 
reports Meade moving out on his left, and ''Nothing heard from Sheridan through South- 
ern sources since Tuesday evening.'" The message is marked to be sent in cipher. 



A CIVIL WAR PASS 

65. GRANT ULYSSES S. A.D.s. "f/. 5. Grant, Brig. Gen. Comr 1 p., 4to, 
''Head Quarters, Dist. S. E. Mo., Cairo, September lOth 1861." Government 
stamp on recto and verso. (Olsen) 

"All ferry boats at this place and government transports plying between St. Louis Mo. and 
Paducah, Ky., will pass Dr. G. Aigner ... he being on public service" 

66. GRANT, ULYSSES S. D.s., 1 p., folio. Galena, 111., Aug. 28, 1865. 
Unused engraved certificate of membership in the "Soldiers Monument Asso- 
ciation;" with 5 vignette engravings, including a portrait of President Lincoln. 
General Grant was President of the Association. (Olsen) 

16 



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[number 59] 



KINDLY READ CONDITIONS OF SALE IN FOREPART OF CATALOGUE 



GRANT AND GARFIELD 

67. GRANT, ULYSSES S. and JAMES A. GARFIELD, Eighteenth and 
Twentieth Presidents. Two Autograph Recommendations (on one page), one 
signed by James A. Garfield (later President) and the other by M. Welker, 
Members of Congress from Ohio. [18 Dec. 1865]. On the verso of the sheet 
is the docket by "f/. S. Grant, Lieut. Gen.'' dated 18 Dec. 1866. The recom- 
mendations are that Asst. Surgeon E. B. Elson of the 19th Ohio Volunteers be 
advanced one grade by brevet. {Olsen) 

68. GRANT AND HIS CABINET. Signatures of Grant and Colfax and 7 
Cabinet officers on 5 pages printed with their titles, 4to, folded but unbound; 
no place [Washington], no date [first administration, but not before Nov. 
1870]. 

In addition to the signatures of Grant and Vice-President Colfax, the following signatures 
appear: Hamilton Fish (State), George Boutwell (Treasury), William Kelknap (War), 
George Robeson (Navy), John Creswell (Postmaster General), A. T. Akerman (Attorney 
General), and C. Delano (Interior). 



69. GUILLOTIN, DR. JOSEPH IGNACE. Proposed the method of decapi- 
tation which bears his name. D.s. together with one Duchatel, 11^ pp., 8vo; 
Paris, 18 nivose An 3 [1794]; to Citizen Thuret concerning permits for the 
movement of works of art and science. {Olsen) 



70. HAMILTON, ALEXANDER. As an attorney at the New York bar. 
A.N.S., 4 lines on an oblong 12mo sheet; docketed New York, 30 Oct. 1785; 
to Nicholas Lowe, merchant of New York, sending an enclosure to be for- 
warded. Verso with traces of a previous mounting and a few scribbled sums. 



71. HAMILTON, ALEXANDER. Secretary of the Treasury. L.s., 1 p., 4to; 
Treasury Department [Philadelphia], 21 June 1792; to Sharp Delaney. Col- 
lector (>f the Customs at Philadelphia, asking him to find and recommend a 
suitable third mate for the revenue cutter on the Pennsylvania station. (Olsen) 



COLONIAL SALT-MAKING 

72. HANCOCK, JOHN. D.s., 1 p.. square 8vo; In Congress [Phila.]. 31 
July 1775; appointing a committee, which wisely included Dr. Franklin, to 
''inquire into the Cheapest & easiest Methods of making salt in these Col- 
onies.'' Docketed on verso of integral blank leaf ''Congress. Lead Com- 
mittee." Hancock's signature is fine and bold, "John Hancock President." 

18 



AFTEK_\00-\ SESSION TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6tH 



73. HARDING, WARREX G. As Senator. Typed L.s., 1 p., 4to: no place, 
28 Feb. 1920; to Mrs. Upton in Warren, Ohio, discussing Sen. Wadsworth 
and suffragism and unspecified difficulties at a political meeting in Columbus 
%• As President-elect. Typed L.s., 1 p., 4to; Marion, Ohio. 21 Jan. 1921; to 
a Mr. Pena in New York, the correspondent of a Latin- American newspaper; 
he cannot say anything about relations with Pena's country while still a pri- 
vate citizen, but outlines his intentions broadly. Together 2 pieces. 

74. HARDIXG. \^'ARRE\ G. Address of the President of the United States 
at the Burial of an Unknown American Soldier at Arlington Cemetery Novem- 
ber 11, 1921. 8vo, original printed wrappers. In half levant case. Signed at 
THE END OF TEXT BY Hardixg. Washington, 1921 

75. HARDIXG. WARREX G. D.s.. 1 ]).. large folio, District of Columbia. 
21 Feb. 1946. Counter-signed by H. M. Daugherty, Attorney General. Ap- 
pointment of a notary public in Washington. D. C. iOlsen) 

16. HARRISOX, WILLIAM HEXRY. Before his Presidency, as ''The Squire 
of North Bend." A.L.s., 1 p., square 8vo; Xorth Bend [Ohio], 29 May 
1834; to Robert Buchanan, merchant, at Cincinnati. Offset from an engraved 
portrait on verso. 

Harrison reports that the loss of one of his boats on its way to New Orleans will require 
S500 to be advanced on his wool clip. He describes the growth of his flock and the weight 
of the fleeces, asking Buchanan for the money. If he cannot supply it, he anticipates 
selling a draft at 120 days. 

77. HARRISOX. BEXJAMIX. Original autograph telegram, signed. 1 p., 
4to. \^'ashington, 5 Xov. 1889. Sent to ''Gov. Miles C. Moor, Olympia, 
Wash'n TerJ' Marked "Govt, rate.'' (Olsen) 

Written while President. Regarding the choosing of Senators; calls attention to Section 
TAventy-four of the Enabling Act "and to the proceedings in South Dakota." 

"YOUR MA WILL RETURN HERE" 

78. HARRISOX. BEXJAMIX. Original autograph telegram, signed. Sent Lo 
his daughter Mrs. J. R. McKee. Indianapolis, Ind. 8vo. n.p.. n.d. Written 
on a scrap of paper. ( Olsen i 

"Your mu uill return here on Saturday and leave for Deep Park Tuesday or l\ ednesduy. 
W here uill you iio? B. Harrison.'' 

"WISKEY FOR THE IXDIAX PRISEXORS" 

79. HARRISOX. WILLIAM HEXRY. As Aide to Gen. Wayne. A.D.s., 3 
lines on a sheet torn to size approximately 3 by 8 inches; Greenville [Ohio]. 
13 Feb. 1795; an order to "Ishue nine Rations of wiskey for the use of the 
Indian priscnors at iireenville.'' [Olsen] 

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80. HAYES, RUTHERFORD B. D.s, 1 p., oblong folio, Washington, 9th 
of July 1878. Countersigned by William M. Evarts, Secretary of State. Ap- 
pointing Edgar A. Bates as Notary Public in the District of Columbia. Tear 
across center fold. (Olsen) 



81. HAYES, RUTHERFORD B. As President. A.L.s., 3 pp., 8vo; Washing- 
ton, 23 Aug. 1880; to James M. Dalzell, praising a recent meeting of the 
Ohio Soldiers and Sailors of the Union and commenting on the history the 
organization; docketed by Dalzell for newspaper insertion. A tear at top of 
the first page affects only the printed heading. 



82. HEINTZELMAN, SAMUEL PETER. Confederate soldier. A.L.s., 1 p.. 
4to; Columbus, Ga., 17 Sept. 1837. To Gov. William Schley of Georgia. 
Endorsed on p. 4. 

Following orders from Gen. Jessup, commanding in Florida, he will muster into service 
any volunteers Schley sends, for service in Florida. 



83. HENRY, PATRICK. Doc. s., 1 p., sm. 8vo; 28 Feb. 1785. 

A printed form, filled in and signed by Thomas Meriwether, stating that the representative 
of Thomas Chandler is entitled to a land grant allowed to the lieutenant in the State 
Navy for a three-year service. Countersigned at bottom: "P Henry." 



PATRICK HENRY'S MEDICINE BILL 

84. [HENRY, PATRICK. As Governor of Virginia.] A bill for services and 
medicines owed to Drs. William and Thomas Carter, listing charges dating 
from 10 Apr. to 12 Aug. 1785 and receipt of a portion of the sum on 3 
June 1786. (Olsen) 



A LAWYER'S LIFE IN ILLINOIS 

85. HERNDON, WILLIAM H. Lincoln's law partner and biographer. A.L.s., 
4pp., 4to; Springfield, 111., 13 Feb. 1890; to a Mrs. Surtt, recounting details 
of a lawyer's life on the Illinois circuits in mid-Nineteenth Century. (Olsen) 

The letter is headed "Notes — 1st Installment," and may have been intended to serve as the 
basis for some formal work on the place and period. Although Lincoln is not mentioned, 
it describes the life which lawyers led on such circuits in his time with considerable 
frankness and detail, particularly about the conviviality of both bar and bench. 



20 



AFTERNOON SESSION TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6tH 



A MILITARY APPOINTMENT 

86. HITLER, ADOLF. Typed D.s.. 1 ]).. folio; ^TUhrer Headquarters," 
6 Mar. 1943; a military order, promoting General of Infantry Hollidt, a 
divisional commander, to the command of the 6th Army; Hitlers signature 
is in the almost shorthand form characteristic in military orders of the period. 
iOlsen) 



CHRISTMAS GREETINGS AND NEW YEAR WISHES FROM HITLER 

87. HITLER, ADOLF. Typed note s., Berlin, Christmas 1942. 

On a large-sized correspondence card is a typed message sending a gift, "mit den herzlich- 
sten Gliickicunschen fiir das Weihnachtsfest und zum Neuen Jahr." He thanks his corre- 
spondent for many happy hours. 



88. HOUSTON, SAM. As Gov. of Texas. L.s., 11/2 p., 8vo; 6 Oct. 1859. To 
J. B. Floyd, Sec. of War. Endorsed on p. 4. 

He recommends that the President appoint Edward Clark, Lt.-Gov. of Texas, to the Board 
of Visitors for West Point, and states Clark's qualifications, 

89. HOOVER, HERBERT. Typed L.s. and T.N.s. {Olsen) 

T.L.S., as Sec. of Commerce, 1 p., 4to; Washington, 31 July 1922. To Dr. Tressler of 
the Bureau of Fisheries, directing him to attend an exposition in Brazil, '> T.N.s., while 
candidate for Presidency, 1 p., 4to; Washington, 25 Sept, 1928, To Myron T. Herrick, 
acknowledging a note. 

90. ISABELLA OF SPAIN. Patroness of Columbus. D.s. "Yo la Reyna," 
1 p., folio; 23 Feb. 1504. In Spanish. 

An order to her chamberlain, Sancho de Paredes, to give 15 ells of crimson velvet to the 
Monastery of St. Anthony, in Segovia, for adornment of the church. At the bottom of 
the page is a receipt for the cloth, signed by Brother Juan de Vaja, 

91. JACKSON, ANDREW. L.s. and A.N. (third person). (Olsen) 

L.S., as Major-General in command of the Southern Dept., 1 p,, 4to; Nashville, 6 Jan. 1818. 
To John C. Calhoun, acknowledging receipt of dispatches from the War Dept. <♦ 
A.N. (third person), as President, V2 P-^ 12mo; 5 May 1836. To Major Trudo of New 
Orleans, inviting him and his wife to dinner; he refers to himself as ''the President". 
With integral address leaf. 

92. JACKSON, ANDREW. D.s. ''Andrew Jackson''; also signed by Vames 
A. Hamilton,'" Acting Sec. of State. 1 p., folio, undated. Unused copy of ship's 
papers. With U. S. Seal. Mended in folds with cellophane tape. (Olsen) 



21 



JEFFERSON AND THE NAVIGATION OF THE MISSISSIPPI 

93. JEFFERSON, THOMAS. As Secretary of State. A.L.s. with initials, 
probably a retained copy or draft, II/2 pp., 4to: Philadelphia. 12 Mar. 1791: 
to William Short, charge d'affaires for the U. S. at Paris, on the diplomatic 
difficulties raised by the claims of Joseph Ste. Marie against the Spanish. 

Ste. Marie's claims were for goods seized in 1787 by Spanish soldiers on the east hank of 
the Mississippi, just recently brought to the attention of the U. S. government, as Jefferson 
writes 4 years later. Jefferson tells Short of the urgency of the situation in no uncertain 
terms, transmits copies of his despatches to Carmichael, charge d'affaires at Madrid, and 
asks Short to use the most strenuous efforts to get French diplomatic pressure to bear on 
the Spanish. 

"The inclosed papers will explain to you a case ivhich imminently endangers the peace of 
the U.S. ivith Spain . . . of so bold a feature as to render dangerous to our rights a 
further acquiescence in their suspension. The middle ground held by France betiveen us & 
Spain, both in friendship & interest, requires that we should communicate ivith her ivith 
the fullest confidence on this occasion . . . A cession of the navigation of the Mississippi, 
& ivith such privileges as to make it useful & free from future chicane, can be no longer 
dispensed with on our part; & perhaps ivhile I am writing something may have happened 
to cut off this appeal to friendly accommodation . . . &c." 

Washington took an active personal interest in this matter. See his letter suggesting cor- 
rections in the dispatches to Carmichael, Writings, Vol. 31, p. 232, [10 Mar. 1791]. Short 
and Carmichael together later commenced the negotiations with Spain brought to a suc- 
cessful conclusion by Pinckney in the treaty of 1795. 
A marginal chip affects one letter of the above dispatch. There are two corrections in text. 

JEFFERSON AND MADISON 

94. JEFFERSON, THOMAS. D.s., on vellum, 1 p., folio, 16 Nov. 1803. Also 
signed by James Madison, as Secretary of State. Grant of land to ''Samuel 
Smith, a Surgeon for three years" for his services to the United State in the 
Virginia Line on Continental Establishment. With three dockets on verso, one 
off which is by Gen. Henry Dearborn, Secretary of War. With seal. Soiled; 
some of the writing faded. (Olsen) 

"THE GOLD BEARING MOUNTAIN TERRITORIES" 

95. JOHNSON, ANDREW. Autograph Signature to an endorsement, written 
on an envelope with printed word "Executive," and the date "May 27, 1865." 
(Olsen) 

The envelope has the printed words "Case of" followed by the manuscript words "James 
L. Fisk, Capt. & Asst. Q.M. U. S. Vols.": he was recommended by Senator Ramsey of 
Minn, for retention in service and detailed for duty as "Superintendent Emigration from 
the North West to the Gold bearing mountain territories." Then follows the printed words 
"Referred to" followed by "the Hon. Secretary of War for his consideration . . ."; then 
the signature of President Johnson. 

96. JOHNSON, ANDREW. As President. D.s., 1 p., 4to; Washington, 12 
Mar. 1868; printed form filled out in clerk's hand and signed by Johnson, 
authorizing the Secretary of State to affix the Seal of the ignited States to 
instructions on the Nicaraguan Treaty of 21 June 1867. 

22 



97. JOHNSON, ANDREW. Memorandum signed ''Andrew Johnson^ Writ- 
ten on a card with the printed word "Executive" at top, followed by the word 
"Memorandum." 1 p.. narrow 8vo. "Elxecutive Office. June 2, 1865." Order 
to the Secretary of War brevetting Major Asa Holt to Lt. Colonel. {Olsen) 



98. JOHNSON, ANDREW. D.s., 1 p., oblong folio, Washington, 10 Aug. 
1867. Countersigned by Secretary of State William H. Seward. With seal. 
Divided down center fold; cross folds breaking. (Olsen) 

Appointing John S. Waheron "to perform the duties of the Office of Treasurer of the 
United States at New Orleans, Louisiana . . . until the case of William R. Whitaker who 
has been suspended by the President from the performance of the duties of said office, 
shall be acted upon by the Senate . . .". 



99. KIPLING, RUDYARD. A.L.s., 1 p., 8vo, "The Elms. Rottingdean, Nr. 
Brighton," 23 Dec. 1898. To John Thomas Lee Framed with a portrait. 
(Olsen) 

Replying to a seeker of his autograph. "/ feel personally indebted to you for the neat, 
expeditious and businesslike style in which you. though an autograph fiend . . . most of 
the others forget the money . . . ". 



KOSSUTH'S PEN 

100. *KOSSUTH, LOUIS, Hungarian Patriot. A.L.s., II/2 pp., small 4to, 17 
June 1852. To W. T. Coggeshall. Framed. Also, a gold pen, presented to 
Coggeshall by Kossuth, as mentioned in the letter. Together, 2 pieces. [Olsen) 

An interesting Kossuth memento. William Turner Coggeshall, to whom the letter is 
addressed, was a journalist, and author, and was connected with a number of newspapers 
and magazines, the most important of which was the monthly Genius of the West. In 1852 
he accompanied Kossuth from Cincinnati on the remainder of his American tour, reporting 
his speeches for the press. 

The letter by Kossuth was written about a month before his departure from America. 
"You are to leave us and that is a sad word. From Cincinnati through all my wandering 
through the U.S. you, have honored me by your company and shared my toils as a friend: 
reporting my speeches ivith untiring assiduity & with rare accomplishment of intellectural 
skill. If the principles I advocated should leave any trace in your principles, and if the 
seed I have sown should once bring a fruit beneficial to humanity, I will have to thank 
chiefly to you for it. Your reports made the millions of your countrymen my audience . . . 
"Remember me kindly my dear friend; alloiv me to request you to keep for my sake the 
pen I take the liberty to present to you, as a souvenir. Let me hope (as I indeed wish) 
that ivhen the roaring of the first cannon send you the tiding that ive are fighting over the 
battle for freedom once more, you ivill come to Hungary, and report ivith that very 
pen . . ." 

The pen referred to in the letter accompanies it and is of gold (including the nib). It is 
of hexagonal shape, and has engraved in script on the gold holder "Souvenir from L. 
Kossuth, to W. T. Coggeshall, 1852." The nib (or pen point) has the name stamped 
thereon 'Tiffany, Young, and Ellis, No. 271 Broadway, N, Y." 
* Subject to the 10 per cent Federal Excise Tax 

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LAFAYETTE INQUIRES ABOUT NEW HARMONY 

101. LAFAYETTE, MARQUIS DE. French statesman and soldier. A.L.s., 
2 pp., square 8vo; La Grange. 30 June 1827; to a Miss Bayley at Paris, in 
part discussing his re-entry into French poHtics. In English. With integral 
address leaf, one margin of which has traces of glue from a former mounting. 
( Olsen ) 

The Marquis regrets the failure of a plan by which Miss Bayley Avould have visited 
La Grange, then, in accepting her congratulations on his recent election, castigates the 
anti-liberal French electoral system. He also inquires after close friends or relatives at 
New Harmony, Ind. 



102. [LEE, GEN. ROBERT E.] Funeral Obsequies. October 15, 1870. Order 
of Procession . . . etc. Broadsheet, 4to. Edges lightly tanned, a small portion 
of a former mount adhering to the verso. [Arlington, Va., 1870] 

Lee died at Arlington 12 Oct. 1870. In addition to the Faculty and students of his own 
college, the funeral was attended by the Faculty and cadets of the Virginia Military 
Institute. 



103. LETTERS BY PRESIDENTS. John Tyler. As President. A.L.s., 1 p., 
8vo; Washington, 12 Nov. 1841; probably to the Secretary of the Navy, 
asking that he remember Capt. Gardiner's son, whom he wants to place in 
the Navy, "when the wants oj the service may require if^ *♦* Franklin 
Pierce. After his Presidency. A.L.s., 2 pp., 12mo; Water Head (England), 
4 Aug. 1859; to Mr. Whittemore at Liverpool, describing his itinerary on a 
tour of the Lake District. Together 2 pieces. 



GARFIELD AND ARTHUR 

104. LETTERS BY PRESIDENTS. A.L.s., by James A. Garfield as Con- 
gressman, 11/2 pp., 4to, Wash., 31 Jan. 1872. to A. W. Campbell of Wheeling, 
regretting that he cannot assist Campbell with a problem and mentioning his 
work in Congress v A.L.s. by Garfield as Presidential candidate, 1 p., 4to, 
Ohio. 1 July 1880. thanks for congratulations and commenting on a rather 
distant relationship *> A.L.s. by Chester A. Arthur as an attorney, 2 pp., 
12mo, N. Y., 21 Nov. 1878, changing an appointment with his doctor. 
Together 3 pieces. 

24 



AFTERNOON SESSION TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6tH 



Abraham Lincoln 

[catalogue numbers 105 TO 206 inclusive] 

AX EARLY LIXCOLX MAXLSCRIPT 

105. LIXCOLX. ABRAHAAL Petition in the autograph of Abraham Lincoln, 
comprising eight Hnes. Signed by 85 citizens "o/ the Upper and Lower Lick 
Creek,'' in Sangamon County. llUnois. Circa 1836. 2 pp.. and portion of a 
leaf, folio. In cloth slip-case with inner cloth protecting folding. 
An early Lincoln document. The petition, entirely in Lincoln's hand, reads: 'To the 
Honorable the County Commissioner's Court for the County of Sangamon. We, the under- 
signed citizens of the Upper and Lower Lick Creek Justices Districts respectfully request 
that the said two Districts be throicn into one. and that there be hut two Justices & two 
Constables therein''; then follow the signatures of 85 citizens. 



106. LIXCOLX, ABRAHAM, A. D.. but signed by ''John D. Urquhart, 
Guardian ad litem of the within named infant defendants^ 1 p., small 4to, 
[6 July 1839]. (Olsen) 

Comprises thirteen lines in Lincoln's autograph. This is the answer, written by Lincoln, 
but signed by John D. Urquhart, which was filed in the Sangamon Circuit Court by 
Lincoln. See W. E. Barringer's Lincoln Day by Day. i, p. 113. 



107. LIXCOLN, ABRAHAM. Printed form of justice subpoena filled out 
BY LINCOLN and signed by Thomas Moffet. J. P.: 2^4 hy TVo inches: Spring- 
field. 111.. 22 Jan. 1842: summoning Cason Pemberton and Samuel and Joseph 
Tibbs to give depositions in the suit of \^ illiam R. Miller against Abraham 
and Clarkson Freeman, returnable 7 Feb. 1842. 38 words and figures in 
Lincoln's hand. 

An early sample of Lincoln's hand. At this time he was practising law with Logan as 
partner. A ^'i'illiam Miller, possibly the complainant in this case, served with Lincoln 
in the Black Hawk War. 



108. LIXCOLX, ABRAHAM. Document entirely in autograph of Abraham 
Lincoln; signed by his client, plaintifL Leroy L. Hill. 21/4 pp., folio. [14 
Jan. 1843.] (Olsen) 

Bill filed in case of Leroy L. Hill v. Hezekiah Thatcher. With subscription "Sworn and 
subscribed before me this 14th day of January 1843. Samuel H. Treat, Judge." Another 
subscription in the autograph of Judge Treat, signed, addressed to "The Clerk of the 
Sangamon Circuit Court" regards a bond which the plaintiff, Leroy L. Hill, is to file. The 
case was tried on 24 Mar. 1843 and was dismissed. 

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LINCOLN AS A DIVORCE LAWYER 

109. LINCOLN, ABRAHAM. Autograph copy of commissioner's affidavit of 
Charles B. Dutcher, in the divorce case of ''Polly Alger vs Addison Alger.'' 
[6 Jan. 1844.] (Olsen) 

W. E. Barringer in ''Lincoln Day by Day. A chronology," under date of 6 Jan. 1844, quotes 
from the official record of the court in which the case in question was filed, stating "Lin- 
coln does paper work for Sangamon Circuit Court divorce case: writes acknowledgment 
of notice in Alger v. Alger and signs for "Baker & Bledsoe,' and writes commissioner's 
affidavit for Charles B. Dutcher, who signs it." 



AN UNUSUAL LEGAL ITEM 

110. LINCOLN. ABRAHAM, A.D.s, "Lincoln, p.g.'' 5 pp., folio, [6 Mar. 
1844.] Tear in last leaf. 

A BILL OF COMPLAINT WRITTEN AND SIGNED BY LINCOLN AND FILED ON MaRCH 6, 1844 

"Of the March term of the Circuit Court of Sangamon County". He was the attorney 
for the plaintiff in the case of Joel Johnson versus Josiah Wickersham. 
An unusually lengthy document. This complaint, not recorded in Barringer's Lincoln 
Day by Day, begins: "Joel Johnson, plaintiff, complains of Josiah Wickersham, defend- 
ant, being in custody &c. of a plea that he render to the said plaintiff the sum of one 
hundred dollars which he owes to, and unjustly detains from him. For that the said 
defendant heretofor to wit, on the tiventy-fourth day of February in the year of our 
Lord one thousand eight hundred and forty three at the county aforesaid was and for 
a long time before had been an acting constable, did then and there take of and from 
the said plaintiff other and greater fees than are set doivn and allowed in the statute 
in such case made and provided to the form of said statute, that is to say, the said 
defendant did then and there take of and from the said plaintiff, in Auditor's warrants, 
then and there being of greater lalue than fifty cents to the dollar, the sum of one 
dollar for serving and returning such one of twenty several executions . . . ". 



111. LINCOLN, ABRAHAM. A.D.s. -Moore & Lincoln p.d.C followed by 
an agreement (6 lines) in Lincoln's autograph, signed ''Moore & Lincoln 
p.d.r and signed by John Stuart, (Lincohi"s first law partner I the opposition 
lawyer. Docketed by Lincoln on verso. [19 May 1845.] (Olsen) 

A Plea in the case of George L. Hill vs. Illinois Central Railroad Company, filed in 
De Witt County, Illinois, 19 May 1845. Recorded in Lincoln Day by Day, ii, p. 121, 
pub. 1960. 



LINCOLN IN CHANCERY 

112. LINCOLN. ABRAHAM. Autograph Document. Legal paper in hand of 
Lincoln. [31 July 1845.] Circuit Court, Sangamon County. (Olsen) 

Case of Traitor vs. Hill, In chancery. "This day came the defendant and filed the report 
of the Master in Chancery herein, ivhich is approved by the Court. And it is ordered 
adjudged and decreed by the court the Bill of complaint of the complainant be dis- 

26 



AFTERNOON SESSION TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6tH 



Number 112 — Concluded^ 

missed, and that the defendant recover of and from the said complainant, his costs in 
this behalf expended, and that he have execution therefor." 

Logan and Lincoln appeared for the defendant. In Lincoln Day by Day, 1809-1865 
(pub. 1960), I, p. 254, under date of 31 July 1845, is "Report of master-in-chancery in 
Trailor v. Hill is approved and bill of complaint dismissed. Defendant files affidavit, and 
on motion it is ordered that execution issue for costs." 

113. LINCOLN, ABRAHAM. Portion of an A.D.s. ''Lincoln & Herndon p.g^ 
This is a portion of the declaration in case of Beerup & others vs. Isaac S. 
Britton. Docketed ''Filed Nov. 25, 1850." Defective; mended. [Olsen) 

114. LINCOLN, ABRAHAM. A.D. ''Lee C. Wallace vs. Albert L. Miller and 
others. Chancery, with injunction.'' Bill of complaint. [3 Aug. 1852.] Filed 
in Springfield. (Olsen) 

AFFIDAVIT IN LINCOLN'S AUTOGRAPH. IN RE CASTRATION OF 
A BULL— SIGNED BY LINCOLN'S CLIENT, THE DEFENDANT 

115. LINCOLN, ABRAHAM. An affidavit in the autograph of Abraham 
Lincoln, signed by Moses Thorpe, whom Lincoln was defending in a law suit 
in Piatt County. Illinois. The document has a statement at end "Subscribed 
to & sworn before me this 11th day of October 1852. /. C. Johnson, Cleric.'^ 
1 p.. folio, i Olsen) 

Legal briefs filed in piatt county by Lincoln are very rare. This affidavit was sub- 
mitted in the case of Ford vs. Thorpe in Piatt County, Illinois, and is docketed on verso: 
^'Affidavit of Moses Thorpe. James Ford vs Moses Thorpe. Filed October 11, 1852. 
/. C. Johnson. Clerk. Case 3." 

This document illustrates how the irrepressible humor of Old Abe sometimes unconsciously 
appeared even in a dry legal brief. It involves the castration of a bull by Moses Thorpe, 
but the bull ''died of such castration' and then comes Lincoln's humor in the affidavit: 
''That the bull did not belong to said plaintiff at any time during the life of said bull, 
or at any time after his change of condition by which he ceased to be a bull.'' 

116. LINCOLN. ABRAHAM. Document in the autograph of Abraham 
Lincoln; signed by ''John Sherer" ... 1 p.. oblong 8vo. Vermilion County, 
16 May 1855. iOisen) 

A demand notice addressed to James Lawrence by John Sherer. "/ hereby demand of 
you, the possession of the farm lying one mile and a half west of Georgetown, knoivn by 
the name of the Jordan farm, situated in the county of Vermillion [sic] and State of 
Illinois...! authorize you to deliver such possession to the hearer hereof..." 

LINCOLN AS A RAILROAD LAWYER 

117. LINCOLN. ABRAHAM. Four A.Ds.s. "Moore ci Lincohr written on 
11/2 PP- folio. Docketed "/. C. Johnson (K: Bros. vs. III. C. R. Road. Filed 
May 18, 1855. Robert Lewis, Clerk.'' Filed in De Witt County. (Olsen) 
Four pleas for the defendant, Illinois Central Railroad, with Clifton H. Moore. 

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118. LINCOLN, ABRAHAM. Document in the autograph of Abraham 
Lincoln; signed by the Judge ''David Davis."" 1 p., folio. [23 Oct. 1855.] 
{Olsen) 

Lincoln wrote and filed this bill of exceptions in the case of 'T/ie People of the State 
of Illinois vs. George High'^, in an "Indictment for larceny brought by a change of 
venue from Vermilion County.'^ On the verso of the sheet is the docket in Lincoln's 
hand "People vs. George High. Bill of exceptions" . George High was sentenced to three 
years in Champaign Circuit Court for horse stealing. On 7 Nov, 1857 Lincoln wrote 
a pardon petition for George High, and filed it in Danville. 



LINCOLN LOSES AN ELECTION 

119. [LINCOLN, ABRAHAM, and WILLIAM H. HERNDON.] 2 double 
folio printed tally sheets for precincts in Menard County, 111., filled out in 
pen and pencil, recording the votes for Presidential electors and others. 

Illinois, 4 Nov. 1856 

Lincoln and Herndon are entered on both sheets as Presidential electors for Fremont; 
on one sheet Lincoln's name is misspelled "Lincon". The precincts covered are Locust 
Valley and the Courthouse at Petersburg. Menard County is just north of Springfield 
and remains sparsely populated even today. The votes are tallied by the "thumb and 
fingers" method of tallying by fives, and Lincoln and his law partner were decisively 
defeated, one precinct going for Fillmore and one for Buchanan. 



120. LINCOLN, ABRAHAM. A. Endorsement s., 2 lines, on verso of A.L.s. 
by U.S. Deputy Marshal J. Mayo, 1 p., folio; Paris, 111., 15 Dec. 1857; to 
U.S. Marshal Harry Wilton at Springfield, 111., concerning levies on farm 
property at Paris. Docketed in a third party's hand with the date [incor- 
rectly?] 15 Dec. 1858. 

Lincoln's endorsement reads: "The within letter explains itself; and is of especial inter- 
est to you". Not in the Collected iforks; the action involved has not been identified. 



121. LINCOLN, ABRAHAM. N.s., 5 lines, 8vo; Springfield, 111., 12 June 
1860; complying with a request from one R. N. Phelps for Lincoln's autograph 
shortly after his nomination for the Presidency. 



122. LINCOLN, ABRAHAM. A.L.s., 1 p., 8vo ''Executive Mansion, June 10, 
1861." To "Hon. Sec. of War," Simon Cameron. Dockets on verso. [Olsen) 

Lincoln writes: "Please let Col. Montgomery C. Meigs be appointed Quarter-Master- 
General". 

Lincoln had written to Gen. Winfield Scott on 5 June 1861 informing him that he 
wanted to appoint Meigs as Quarter-Master General, but the Secretary of War Simon 
Cameron, did not consent and had introduced Col. Charles Thomas, the oldest in the 
Quarter Master General's Department; Lincoln faced a problem of seniority. However, 
Lincoln nominated Meigs on 13 July 1861 and he was appointed by the Senate. 

28 



AFTERNOON SESSION TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6tH 



123. LINCOLN, ABRAHAM. A. Memorandum s., comprising seven lines, 
reading: ''Please add this to Mr. Senator Doolittle's list sent in a day or two 
ago. A. Lincoln. July 19, 1861." (Olsen) 

This memorandum appears on a letter from Senator James R. Rood of Wisconsin, dated 
"July 19, 1861", recommending appointment of C. Seth Cushman as first lieutenant and 
Charles L. Noggle as second lieutenant in the new regiment of the regular army. Noggle 
was appointed to the Second Infantry, and Cushman to the Fourteenth Infantry. 

"GIVE THIS LADY SOME SUITABLE EMPLOYMENT" 

124. LINCOLN, ABRAHAM. A. Endorsement s., [Washington] 4 Sept. 1861; 
trimmed to size 3% by 3% inches and pasted to a slightly larger piece of 
framer's board. Worn and slightly stained. (Olsen) 

"I shall be very glad if any of the heads of Departments, or Bureaus, can give this lady 

some suitable employment. A. Lincoln". A printed slip pasted beneath states that the 

note refers to a Miss Anne Mary Griffin. Published in Collected Works of Lincoln 
(Rutgers), IV, pp. 508-9. 

125. LINCOLN, ABRAHAM. N.s. on blank carte de visite; [Washington] 
28 Oct. 1861; ''Sec. of War, please see the bearer, Mr. Blackwell.^^ 

LINCOLN AND THE IRISH BRIGADE 

126. LINCOLN, ABRAHAM. A. Endorsement s. (nine lines), dated 16 Nov. 
1861; on the second sheet of a letter signed by Governor Edwin D. Morgan 
of N. Y., addressed to Simon Cameron, Secretary of War. The two sheets 
separated. (Olsen) 

Lincoln's endorsement reads: "The appointment of Mr. W. W. Leland is desired by the 
Irish Brigade, including much of the elements of the late 69th & of Col. Mulligan's 
regiment. If it is possible to oblige them in this, let it be done. A. Lincoln. Nov. 
16, 1861". 

The letter of Governor Morgan recommends appointment of William W. Leland of New 
York City as brigade commissary designated by Thomas F. Meager, acting brigadier 
general of the Irish Brigade. Leland was appointed with rank of captain from 16 Nov. 
1861. 

127. LINCOLN, ABRAHAM, D.s. "AbraJmm Lincoln.'' 1 p., folio, Washing- 
ton, 26 Dec. 1861. Countersigned by Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton. 
On vellum (time stained), with engraving at top of sheet and symbolic 
engraving at bottom. (Olsen) 

Appointment of John F. Price as "First Lieutenant in the Fifth Regiment of Infantry." 

128. LINCOLN, ABRAHAM. A.L.s., 1 p., 8vo, "Executive Mansion, March 
24, 1862." To "Hon. Sec. of War,'' ordering him to "Let Ward B. Burnate 
he appointed a Brigadier General of Volunteers." (Olsen) 

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129. LINCOLN, ABRAHAM. Cut signature "Abraham Lincoln"; cut from j 
portion of a document; with date 18 April 1862. Matted with a carte-de-visite I 
photograph of Lincoln. iOlscn) 

130. LLNCOLN, ABRAHAM. D.s. "Abraham Lincolnr 1 p.. large folio, 30 
April 1862. Countersigned by Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton. Warrant 
appointing William B. Slaughter ""Commissary of subsistance of Volunteers 
with the rank of Captain.'' On vellum; some slight stains. Framed. (Olsen) 



131. LLNCOLN, ABRAHAM. A.N.s., on slip of paper (3 by 2 inches), 
30 Aug. 1862. In a metal frame; enclosed in an old leather case with sunken 
compartment. (Olsen) 

The note reads: "Gen. Halleck please see Lieut. Moser who left Centreville at 4 p.m. 
yesterday." 

"HOW DOES IT LOOK NOW?" 

132. LINCOLN, ABRAHAM. A.L.s., 1 p., narrow 8vo, Washington, ''Sep. 8. 
1862." Reads: ''Major General McClellan, Rockville, Md. How does it look 
now? A. Lincoln.'" (Olsen) 

"McClellan replied at 5.30 p.m. Tn reply to your dispatcli of 5 O'clock this p.m., I 
have the honor to state that General [Alfred] Pleasanton at 4.20 p.m., reports from 
Dawsonville that his advance, vvithin 3 miles of Poolesville . . , uas fired on by artillery, 
the shells passing over them; also, that infantry were moving out of the woods in force 
at that point . . . Colonel Farnsworth has occupied Poolesville . . . Six prisoners were 
taken, and some wounded . . . Our loss only 2 or 3 wounded.' '" — The Collected Works 
of Lincoln, R. P. Easier, editor. 



LINCOLN AND THE DOCTORS 

133. LINCOLN, ABRAHAM. A. Endorsement s. (two lines), dated 21 Jan. 
]863; on the verso of a letter, signed by eminent surgeons of New York. 
Silked. [Olsen) 

Lincoln's endorsement reads: "Submitted to the Secretary of War. A. Lincoln, Jan. 21, 
1863". Edwin M. Stanton was then Secretaiy of War. 

This endorsement appears on the verso a letter signed by four eminent surgeons of 
New York City, dated 9 Jan. 1863, recommending Dr. Frank H. Hamilton for Medical 
Inspector General of the Army. The signers are: Valentine Mott, well-known surgeon, 
author, and a man of "firsts" in surgery; Willard Parker, surgeon (credited with being 
the first ill America to operate successfully on an abcessed appendix), James R. Wood, 
surgeon and autiior (one of the organizers of the Bellevue Hospital .Medical College), 
and Stephen Smith, surgeon and author (one of the organizers of the Bellevue Hospital 
Medical College; his Handbook of Surgical Operations was invaluable to Civil War 
Surgeons) . 

30 



I. I(\(»()\ SESSION TUESDAY. FEBRUARY 6tH 



APPOINTMENT OF A REVENUE OFFICER 

134. LINCOLN. ABRAHAM. D.s. "Abraham Lincolnr 1 p.. large folio. 
27 Feb. 1863. Also signed by Salmon P. Chase, Sec. of Treasury. Breaks in 
folds. Accompanied by envelope in which commission was mailed. (Olsen) 

Appointment of Luther A. Hall as Assessor of Internal Revenue for the Ninth Collection 
District of Ohio. 

Attached to the above is the "Form of Oath for Assessors and Assistant Assessors", 
signed by Luther A. Hall; notarized. 

135. LINCOLN. ABRAHAM. A. Endorsement s.. comprising 10 lines, reading 
'^'^Sec. of War please see Hon. Mr. Marvin, who recommends J. P. Butler, for 
Provost-Marshal for his Dist. I think attention to this case is necessary. 
A. Lincoln. April 4. 1863." The letter is split in center fold. {Olsen) 

Lincoln's endorsement is written on an A.L.s. by Edwin D. Morgan, formerly Governor 
of N. Y., 2 pp., 12mo. New York "April Sd" 1863, introducing Representative-elect 
James M. Marvin, of the Eighteenth Congressional District of New York, who ''wishes 
to confer ivith you in relation to the appointment from his district under the conscrip- 
tion act". Morgan's letter is addressed "His Excellency Abraham Lincoln, Prest.", and 
written on his business stationery. 

136. LINCOLN, ABRAHAM. D.s. "Abraham Lincoln.'' 1 p., folio, Washing- 
ton, 7 April 1863. Countersigned by Edwin M. Stanton. Secretary of War. 
On vellum, with engraving at top of sheet and symbolic engraving at bottom. 
(Olsen) 

Appointment of Frank J. Crawford as "Commissary of Assistance icith the rank of 
Captain.'^ 

ENDORSEMENT BY PRESIDENT LINCOLN ON A LETTER 
WRITTEN TO HIM BY EX-PRESIDENT MILLARD FILLMORE 

137. LINCOLN, ABRAHAM. A. Endorsement s.. (comprising nine lines), 
dated 19 May 1863; written on the fourth page of an A.L.s. by Ex-President 
Fillmore. 2 pp. (with two lines on the third page), "Buffalo, May 16, 1863." 
{ Olsen) 

Lincoln's endorsement addressed to Judge Advocate General John Holt reads: "Judge 
Advocate General, please examine and report upon this case. The young man is nephew 
of Ex-president Fillmore, who writes the within letter. A. Lincoln. May 19. 1863." 
Ex-President Fillmore addresses his letter "To His Excellency Abraham Lincoln'' re- 
questing a court of inquiry for his nephev,% First Lieutenant George M. Fillmore of the 
Third Artillery, dismissed on 17 April 1863, for intemperance. Roy B. Basler in The 
Collected W orks of Abraham Lincoln. \\. \>\). 223, states in a note to Lincoln's endorse- 
ment on Fillmore's letter "The register of letters received by the judge advocate gen- 
eral lists a missing letter or endorsement dated May 23. 1863. from John G. Nicolay 
(No. 410) that the president will take no action on the enclosed papers of Lieutenan! 
Fillmore." 

The conjunctiojn of thf.sk two prksu)e.ntial names is most unusual 

31 



KINDLY READ CONDITIONS OF SALE IN FOREPART OF CATALOGUE 



138. LINCOLN, ABRAHAM. A Endorsement s. (comprising 6 lines), reading 
'7 shall be glad for this promotion to be made, so soon as it can be consist- 
ently. A. Lincoln. July 16, 1863." (Olsen) 

Listed in Basler's The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, and was then owned by 
Theodore S. Charrney, Chicago, Illinois. "Lincoln's endorsement is written on a copy 
of an undated letter from Gov. Joel Parker of New Jersey, recommending that Brigadier 
General Gershom Mott be made a Major General. Mott was not promoted until a year 
later. See Lincoln to Stanton, Aug. 11, 1864, infra^'. 

Gov. Parker's undated letter is on stationery of "State of New Jersey, Executive Depart- 
ment" marked "copy"; at end is (Signed) Joel Parker, Governor of New Jersey. 



PARDON OF A DESERTER 

139. LINCOLN, ABRAHAM. Memorandum, signed by Lincoln. 1 p., 12ino, 
Executive Mansion, 4 Aug. 1863. (Olsen) 

The memorandum, in the hand of a secretary, reads: "Let Abraham Lower, 72nd Regi- 
ment Pa Vols., now under arrest in Philadelphia for desertion be pardoned and dis- 
charged from the military service of the United States." Sergeant Lower, Co. A, was 
discharged by special order on 5 Aug. 1863. 



CASE OF THE UNRULY CAPTAIN 

140. LINCOLN, ABRAHAM. A.L.s., 1 p., 8vo, "Executive Mansion, Wash- 
ington, Sept. 1, 1863." To Joseph Holt, Judge Advocate General. (Olsen) 

7 am told that Carbery Lay, a Captain in the I2th Regular Infantry has been dismissed 
by a Court-Martial. Please get the record, and examine the case & report to me." 
No reply has been discovered. Captain Joseph Carbery Lay was cashiered on 21 July 
1862 for being drunk on duty and for breach of arrest. Reappointed a second lieutenant 
in the Seventeenth Infantry on 30 Oct. 1863, he served until he resigned as first lieu- 
tenant on 12 Sept. 1864. — Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln. 



PARDON OF A GETTYSBURG VETERAN 

141. LINCOLN, ABRAHAM. A.L.s., 1 p.. 8vo, Executive Mansion. Wash- 
ington, 28 Jan. 1864. To ''Hon. Sec. of War J' Edwin M. Stanton. (Olsen) 

Lincoln pardons a soldier who was to be executed for desertion, because since 
HIS desertion he has fought at Gettysburg and in several other battles. J^incoln 
had ordered Gen. Meade on 25 Jan. 1861 to suspend execution of the death sentence of 
Robert Gill. Gill's pardon was announced in AGO Special Orders No. 42, 28, Jan. 1864. 
His execution was to take place on Jan. 29th. 

Lincoln writes Stanton: "Co/. Thomas C. Devin represents that Robert Gill, now of 
Co. D, 6th N. Y. Cavalry, of tvhich he Col. D. is the Colonel, is under sentence of death 
for desertion & that since his desertion, he has fought at Gettysburg and several other 
battles & has otherwise behaved well, and he asks that said Gill be pardoned and sent 
to his Regiment. Let it be done " 

32 



AFTERNOON SESSION TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6tH 



142. LINCOLN, ABRAHAAL A. Endorsement, s., reading ''Submitted to the 
Sec. of War. A. Lincoln. April 1. 1864." (Olsen) 

This endorsement appears on an A.L.s, by Joseph C. Segar, House of Representatives, 
1^/^ PP-j 4to, 4 Mar. 1864, which he addressed to President Lincohi, intervening for Col. 
James T. Close to be appointed a Paymaster in the Army. Col. Close "was among the 
first, if not the very first to raise a regiment in his portion of the State". Colonel Close 
of Virginia had been removed from the post of Marshal of the eastern district of Virginia. 



143. LINCOLN, ABRAHAM. A. Endorsement s., reading ''Submitted to the 
Sec. of War & Gen. Ilalleck. A. Lincoln. April 22, 1864. * [Olsen) 

Written on the integral leaf of an A.L.s. by Representative Reuben E. Fenton (Gov. of 
N.Y. 1865) to President Lincoln. Introducing Representative William A. Sackett, Rep- 
resentative from N.Y., who wishes to speak to him about promotion of his son Col. 
William Sackett, 9th N. Y. Cavalry. Col. Sackett was promoted to Bvt. Brig. Genl. 
U.S.V. (Treveilian Station, Va.), 11 June 1864 and died three days after his promotion, 
at Treveilian Station. 



LINCOLN ACCEPTS A NAVAL RELIC 

144. LINCOLN, ABRAHAM. L.s., 1 p., 4to, Executive Mansion, Washington, 
12 May 1864. To "John Birely Esq. {Birely & Son), Philadelphia.'' (Olsen) 
Thanks Mr. Birely for a cane, which was made from the wood of the United 
States Alliance, the first American-built man of war that hoisted the Stars and 
Stripes in the American Revolution. 

Lincoln writes: "/ have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your favor of the 11th 
May and the accompanying cane. I beg that you ivill accept the assurance of my cordial 
gratitude for your kindness . . . ". 

In the Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy B. Basler, Editor, vol. vii, p. 337, 
Lincoln's letter is reprinted, and a footnote states: "John Birely, shipbuilder of Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania, wrote Lincoln: T send you today, by Adams Express, a walking 
cane, the wood of which was taken from the wreck of the United States ship Alliance, 
(now lying in the River Delaware), the first American built man of war, that hoisted 
the glorious stars and stripes in the War of Independence ... It is a relic ol the olden 
times and you would do me an honor by accepting it. It comes from an old soldier 
and officer in the War of 1812 . . . ". This letter is in the R. T. Lincoln Collection, 
Library of Congress. 



145. LINCOLN, ABRAHAM. Half length portrait, seated, holding a paper in 
his left hand. Oval, within a decorative framework. Line engraving; colored 
by hand. Large 4to size. *^ A. Endorsement signed, comprising 6 lines, dated 
31 May 1864. On paper measuring 314 ^Y 2 inches. Together 2 pieces, framed 
as one. (Olsen) 

The autograph endorsement reads: "Will the Provost Marshall please give the bearer 
James Johnson & J. C. Lucas (both Colonels) a pass to visit at Camp Casey? . . . ". 

33 



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146. LINCOLN, ABRAHAM. D.s. ''Abraham Lincolnr 1 p.. folio. \\ ashing- 
ton, 1 July 1864. Countersigned by Sec. of \^ ar Edwin M. Stanton. On vellum, 
with engraving at top of sheet and symbolic engraving at bottom. iOlsen) 

Appointment of Lewis Hill as "Commissary of siihsJstance of volunteers tcith the rank of 
Captain'. 

147. LINCOLN, ABRAHAM. A.N.s.. comprising 10 lines, dated 24 July 1864. 
Mounted on a sheet of paper and matted with portrait. iOlsen) 

This note, removed from an attendant letter, reads: "/ know nothing personally of Mr. 
Rohrer, but shall be very glad if the Sec. of Interior can oblige the gentlemen who 
ivrites the within letter. A. Lincoln. July 24, 1864". This note was sent to John P. Usher, 
then Sec. of the Interior. Mr. Rohrer has not heen identified. 

148. LINCOLN, ABRAHAM. A.N.s.. comprising eight lines on both sides of 
a sheet of paper (3 by 2^4 inches). Dated 7 Nov. 1864. ♦*♦ Two photogravure 
portraits of Lincoln, back to back. Together 3 pieces, framed as one [Olsen) 

Leave of absence granted to Lieut. A. W. White for five days ''with pass & transporta- 
tion to Philadelphia & back to W\ishington\ 

149. LINCOLN, ABRAHAM. Slip of paper (31/0 by 1% inches) with the 
following in autograph of Lincoln ''Approved. A. Lincoln. Dec, 10, 1864." 
{ Olsen) 

A MISTAKE IN DATE 

150. LINCOLN, ABRAHAM. A. Endorsement s.; cut from a letter. Reads: 
""Let this man take the oath of Dec. 8, 1865 (sic). A. Lincoln. Jan. 17, 1865." 
Lincoln has given the date of oath as "Dec. 8, 1865" whereas it should be 
"Dec. 8, 1863." Framed with a steel engraved portrait of Lincoln. (Olsen) 

LINCOLN REJECTS RED TAPE 

151. LINCOLN, ABRAHAM. Autograph Endorsement, signed (5 lines), 
dated 4 Feb. 1865; on the integral sheet of a letter. (Olsen) 

Lincoln's endorsement reads: "This is too large a job for the officers to be encumbered 
with noiv in the midst of preparation for the approaching draft. A. Lincoln. Feb. 4, 1865"'. 
Brigadier Gen. J. B. Fry, Provost Marshall General, had received a letter signed by five 
men "Committee of the Board of Supervisors of the County of New York", dated "Wash- 
ington, Feb. 4, 1864 (sic)" for 1865. He made a transcript of it and sent it to the 
Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton, who made an endorsement on the second sheet 
"The demand of the Committee appears to me unreasonable and impracticable, but the 
Provost Marshall General will put on it such force as he can and in the meantime go 
on ivith the draft. Filling the army cannot be delayed by calls on the office of the 
Provost Marshal that ivill require months to file and which can serve no other purpose 
than delay". After the endorsement by Lincoln, Sec. of War Stanton writes "/ concur 
with the President that the job is too large for the present . . . The draft will go on 
in the meantime". 

The letter of the Committee of the Board of Supervisors of the County of New York 
requests Gen. Fry to furnish figures of the total enrollment of the United States in 

[Continued 
34 



AFTERNOON SESSION TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6tIT 



Number 151 — Concluded] 

which was apportioned the quota assigned 23 Dec. lHf)4; also surplus years of ser\iee 
due to whole United States. Then follow columns listing 'W. Y. Cong' I dists", '^Enroll- 
menC\ '^Aggregate Years furnished to'\ ''Quota July 18", "Excess of years furnished'", 
''Quota Dec. 19th'\ "Deficiency"', "Surplus", etc. 



LINCOLN AND JOHNSON 

152. LLNCOLN. ABRAHAM. A. Endorsement, signed (cut from a petition). 
16 Feb. 1865. ''Let the prisoner be discfiarged on taking the oath of Dec. 8, 
1863. A. Lincoln, Feb. 16. 1865." Above this is the autograph signature of 
Andrew Johnson as "Milt. Gov. & B. C" of Tennessee; he was Vice-President 
in Lincoln's second administration. (Olsen) 



153. LINCOLN, ABRAHAM. A. Endorsement s.; cut from a letter. Reads: 
'''Let these men take the oath of Dec. 8, 1863 & be discharged. A. Lincoln. 
March 17, 1865." Framed with a steel engraved portrait of Lincoln. (Olsen) 

LINCOLN TO HIS WIFE — GRANT HAS 
SURROUNDED PETERSBURG 

154. LINCOLN. ABRAHAM. A.L. (signature clipped), or A. Draft for a 
telegram, to Mary Todd Lincoln in Washington. 1 p., 8vo; City Point. 
2 April 1865. On stationery of Head Quarters Armies of the United States. 

Writing at 8:15 p.m., Lincoln informs his wife that a telegram from Grant sent at 
4:40 p.m. announces "that he has Petersburg completely enveloped" and has captured 
12,000 men and fifty guns. Lincoln says he may go out and see Grant the following 
morning. "Tad and I are both well" and they look forward to the arrival of Mrs. Lincoln 
and her party. 

[See illustration over'eaf] 

A SPLENDID PORTRAIT 

155. LINCOLN. ABRAHAM. Bust, in plaster. Painted green. Incised on back, 
''Lincoln from Life by L. W. Volk." Height 321/2 inches. 

\ oik executed his bust of Lincoln in 1860 from life sittings. F. L. Bullard in Lincoln 
in Marble and Bronze, p. 91, states: "His bust of Lincoln was completed on June 7, 
1860 . . . This probably is the bust Volk exhibited in Paris in 1867; it was destroyed 
with the burning of the building of the Chicago Historical Society in 1871, but the 
original model was rescued from the flames". 

[See frontispiece] 

156. LINCOLN, ABRAHAM. Bust statuette. Cast in pewter. Height 9 inches. 

35 



KINDLY READ CONDITIONS OF SALE IN FOREPART OF CATALOGUE 



A SIGNED PORTRAIT 

157. LINCOLN, ABRAHAM. Carte-de-visite portrait; with light stain. With 
autograph signature ''A. Lincoln.'' In a metal frame, (Olsen) 

158. LINCOLN, ABRAHAM. Abraham Lincoln. Andrew Johnson. Union 
Candidates for President and Vice President. Colored lithograph. Litho- 
graphed by E. B. & E. C. Kellogg, Hartford, Conn. Publisher's name, E. P. 
Whiting, 57 Fulton St. New York in lower right corner. Published in 1860. 
Upright small folio. In an old, probably contemporary, frame. 

159. LINCOLN, ABRAHAM. Abraham Lincoln, Sixteenth President of the 
United States. Bust portrait. Lithograph in colors. Published by Currier & 
Ives. 152 Nassau Street. Folio. Matted. 

160. LINCOLN, ABRAHAM. Contemporary enlargement of a photograph 
portrait of President Lincoln, with printed title on the mount: ''The latest 
photograph of President Lincoln, taken on the balcony at the White House, 
March 6, 1865. H. F. Warren, Waltham, Mass.'' Folio. With autograph signa- 
ture ''Lincoln" cut from a letter and mounted in cut-out in the mat. Framed 
as one piece. (Olsen) 

161. LINCOLN, ABRAHAM. Abraham Lincoln, Sixteenth President of the 
United States. Assassinated April 14, 1865. Lithograph. Published by Currier 
& Ives. Small folio. Matted. 

162. LINCOLN, ABRAHAM. Abraham Lincoln, the Nation's Martyr. Assas- 
sinated April 14, 1865. Lithograph in color. New York, published by Currier 
& Ives, 152 Nassau Street. Folio. 

163. Another copy of the preceding. Lithograph in black. Framed; stain in 
lower corner. 

164. LINCOLN, ABRAHAM. Lincoln at Home. Colored lithograph. Pub. by 
E. B. & E. C. Kellogg, Hartford, Ct. Oblong small folio. Circa 1860. In an old 
pine frame. 

165. LINCOLN, ABRAHAM. Bust portrait, full face. Steel engraving, by 
John A. O'Neil. Folio size •** Autograph signature "Abraham Lincoln," and 
that of "William H. Seward" on one sheet, cut from a document. Together 
2 pieces; framed as one. (Olsen) 

166. LINCOLN, ABRAHAM. Bust portrait. Wood-engraving by Timothy 
Cole; signed by Cole in pencil. Framed and matted. Executed in 1928. (Olsen) 

167. LINCOLN, ABRAHAM. The Funeral of President Lincoln. New York, 
April 25th 1865, passing Union Square. Lithograph, in black. Published by 
Currier & Ives, 152 Nassau St., N. Y. 1865. Oblong small folio; in old frame. 

36 



mi ^Mtim ^mm -ti the llaitii states, 

.X^ ^^^ ^^ A...^^ .^^w. 




' TT^ ^T^ ""^^ f^ r^--- ^^/^-^^^^ |j 

. tri:i, 6J^ fx4^:'^j2^ a^ ,r^x. ^^^^^^ ^a--^ y^— .^ i^:::^ ^ 



[number 154] 



KINDLY READ CONDITIONS OF SALE IN FOREPART OF CATALOGUE 



168. LINCOLN FAMILY PORTRAIT. Depicting: President and Mrs. Lincoln 
and their three sons, Robert Todd (in uniform), Thomas ("Tad"), and 
William Wallace. Lithograph in colors. Oblong folio. Circa 1864. Framed. 
iOlsen) 



169. LINCOLN FAMILY, THE. Lithograph, by Currier & Ives, N.Y. Entered 
according to Act of Congress, 1867, by Currier & Ives in the Qerk's office. 
Oblong small folio. In a rustic frame. Bland No. 1881a. (Olsen) 



170. [LINCOLN, ABRAHAM.] Journal of Proceedings of the Joint Select 
Committee ... to investigate tlie condition of the State Bank and Branches. 
8 pp., 8vo; removed from a binding and wire-stitched, the stabholes of the 
previous binding present. Springfield, 111., 1840 

The pagination indicates that this is excerpted from a longer account of the proceedings 
of the Illinois Legislature. Lincoln served as a member of the 8-man committee, but 
apparently did not prepare any of the several reports. 



APPARENTLY AN UNRECORDED VARIANT 

171. LINCOLN, ABRAHAM, Speech of the Hon. Abram [sic] Lincoln, In 
Reply to Judge Douglas. Delivered in Representatives' Hall, Springfield, 
Illinois, June 26th, 1857. Pamphlet of 8 pp. (7 pp. printed), 8vo, folded but 
entirely uncut and unopened. Bright and clean, a portion of the main fold 
split. [Springfield, 1857?] 

Except for the date in the heading, the pamphlet presents no evidence as to time or 
place of printing. 

Monaghan No. 9, possibly an earlier variant, since Monaghan gives the correct spelling 
of Lincoln's first name in his description of the caption title. Monaghan also notes a 
vertical trim size of only 8% inches, which would allow only a quarter inch on the 
present copy's 8Mj inch type body. 



A LINCOLN FIRST EDITION 

172. LINCOLN, ABRAHAM. Political Debates between Hon. Abraham 
Lincoln and Hon. Stephen A. Douglas, in the Celebrated Campaign of 1858, 
in Illinois . , . 8vo. brown ripple cloth, with ])lind-stamped design on covers, 
consisting of an eight-point star within circles, floriated designs at corners, all 
within ruled borders; title on spine, in gilt, with the period after the name 
Douglas; small ink blot on title-page and writing on inside of front cover. 
In a cloth case. (Olsen) Columbus. 1860 

First edition. Collated with Mr. E. J, Wessen's description of the First Edition, in 
Tfie Papers of the Biblioiiraphical Society of America^ Vol. 40, Second Quarter. 1946. 

38 



AFTERNOON SESSION TUESDAY. FEBRLAKY 6tH 



AN ADDRESS TO THE ARMY 

173. LLXCOLX. ABRAHAM. To the Army of the Potomac. 4 pp.. 12mo. the 
first page onlv })eino: printed: a holograph docket on the last page. Pierced 
for sewing. ( Olsen i Washington, 22 Dec. 1862 

In this address. Lincoln tlianks the Army of the Potomac for the courage and skill 
shown at the Battle of Fredericksburg, although they were not victorious. Collected 
Works (Rutgers), vi, p. 13. 

THIRD SEPARATE PRINTING OF THE FINAL 
EMANCIPATION PROCLAMATION 

174. LINCOLN. ABRAHAM. By the President of the United States of 
America. A Proclamation. [Emancipation Proclamation.] Folio leaflet of 4 
pages, printed on the first page only. Fine. Washington. 1 Jan. 1863 

Eberstadt, Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation, No, 10. Official State Department Folio 
Edition and the Third Separate Printing of the final Proclamation, probably printed 3 
January and preceded only by the State Department informational 12mo leaflet and a 
newspaper offprint. Complete with thr blank leaf, which is trimmed off in some copies. 
Eberstadt located 6 copies in 1950. 

AN IMPORTANT PRINTING 

175. LINCOLN. ABRAHAM. General Orders No. 1. [Emancipation Procla- 
mation.] War Department, Adjutant General's Office. January 2, 1863; with 
General Orders 2—201. 3 Jan.— 30 June 1863. Bound in 1 vol.. 12mo. half 
morocco; hinges cracked. (Olsen) Washington. 1863 

Charles Eberstadt, in Lincoln's Emancipation Proclanuition [X.Y.. 19501, assigns the 
printing of this issue of the final Proclamation to 7 Jan., making it the 5th separate 
printing, preceded by State Department issues and one newspaper broadside. Since the 
text is essentially an enabling order to carry out the provisions of the preliminary 
Proclamation, this War Department issue may be considered the first enforcing the 
Proclamation. Eberstadt, op. cit., No. 12. 

A RARE EDITION OF THE GETTYSBURG ADDRESS 

176. [LINCOLN. ABRAHAM.] E. Everett. An Oration delivered on the 
Battlefield of Gettysburg (10 Nov. 1863), at the Consecration of the Ceme- 
tery. 8vo. lacks printed wrappers; removed from a bound volume. In a 
morocco-hacked slip case. \ Olsen) New York. 1863 

The rare New York edition. Lincola's Gettyskurg Address appears on p. 40. Mr. 
Jay Monaghan in his Lincoln Bibliography 1839-1939. described it as "one of its first 
appearances in booklet form'". The present appearance of Lincoln's Gettysburg address 
was, before 1942. considered as the first appearance in book-form, but Mr. Paul \L Angle, 
Historian of the State of Illinois, in his article Four Lincoln Firsts [Papers of the 
Bibliographical Society of America, vol. 36. First Quarter. 1942), described a 16-page 
pamphlet iiublisherl at the "V^'ashington Chroiiiclc Office about 24 Nov. 1863. and states 

[Continued 

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Number 176 — Concluded^ 

"Certainly it appeared long before the carefully printed 48-page booklet which has here- 
tofore been credited with its first publication." The present printing of Lincoln's 
address contains the sentence "It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this," 
which is omitted in the first printing, in pamphlet form, issued by the Washington 
Chronicle office. 

FIRST AUTHORIZED EDITION OF THE 
GETTYSBURG ADDRESS 

177. [LINCOLN, ABRAHAM.] Address of Hon. Edward Everett, at the 
Consecration of the National Cemetery at Gettysburg . . . with the Dedicatory 
Speech of President Lincoln . . . etc. Map. 8vo, new wrappers; the map 
mounted. "First authorized edition of Lincoln's address" — U.S.iana, No. 
3401; preceded by New York and Washington printings. [Olsen) 

Boston, 1864 

178. LINCOLN. ABRAHAM. The Letters of President Lincoln on Questions 
of National Policy. 12mo, original printed wrappers; spine chipped and 
partially split. (Olsen) New York, 1863 

Includes letters to Greeley, Fernando Wood, the Albany Committee, Gov. Seymour and 
others, on such matters as the Emancipation Proclamation, the suspension of habeas 
corpus, and the prosecution of the w^ar. Monahan, Lincoln BibL, No. 226. 

A SCARCE FOREIGN BIOGRAPHY 

179. [LINCOLN. ABRAHAM.] Bungener. F. Lincoln: Sa Vie. son Oeuvre 
et sa Mort. 12mo, original cloth; very small chips in the front hinge, other- 
wise a fine and bright copy. Presentation copy, the name of the recipient 
and the date [Christmas. 1865] blotted out in ink. (Olsen) Lausanne, 1865 

180. [LINCOLN. ABRAHAM.] Herndon. William H.. and Jesse W. Weik. 
Herndon's Lincoln. The True Story of a Great Life. Illustrated. 3 vols., 8vo, 
original cloth, covers lightly stained. In 1 cloth case. First edition. (Olsen) 

Chicago: Belford, Clarke & Co. [1889] 

181. [LINCOLN, ABRAHAM.] Leland, Charles Godfrey. Abraham Lincoln 
and the Abolition of Slavery in the United States. Portrait frontispiece; foxed. 
Small 8vo, full oasis niger, gilt top, by Lakeside Press Bindery. In cloth 
case. (Olsen) New York. 1879 

182. [LINCOLN. ABRAHAM.] Oakleaf, J. B. Abraham Lincoln: His 
Friendship for Humanity and Sacrifice for Others. An Address . . . delivered 
at Augustana College . . . etc. View and 2 portraits. 8vo, full leather. One of 
100 signed copies, the present copy with a signed presentation inscription 
to W. A. ["Billy"] Sunday, the famous evangelist. (Olsen) 

[Moline. 111.. 1910] 
40 



AFTERNOON SESSION TUESDAY. FEBRUARY 6tH 



183. [LINCOLN. ABRAHA^L] Tarbell. Ida M Ahraham Lincoln: Lincoln 
as Storekeeper and Soldier in the Black Hawk War. hi: McClures Magazine, 
issue for Jan. 1896. 8vo, original magazine wrappers, laced in board covers; 
contents leaf pasted to inside of front wrapper. First publication of this 
portion of Miss Tarbell's Life of Lincoln. iOlsen) New York, 1896 

184. [LINCOLN, ABRAHAM.] Wayne Whipple, editor. The Story-Life of 
Lincoln. Illustrated. 8vo, full levant, gilt edges, with portrait and miniature 
as described below. In case. iOlsen) N.p. [1909] 

A colored miniature painting of the bearded Lincoln, as he appeared early in his 
Presidency, is let into the front cover, under glass and with a metal frame. A reproduc- 
tion of a photograph of the beardless Lincoln, ca. 1859, is let into the inside front cover. 

A LINCOLN FAMILY WILL 

185. LINCOLNIANA. Christopher Bush. Father of Lincoln's stepmother, 
Sarah Bush [Johnston] Lincoln. D.s. with '^his mark" and by [Major] Ben 
Helm as witness, 21/9 PP-- folio : Elizabethtown, Hardin Countv. Kentuckv, 
24 Feb. 1812 and 8>eb. 1813: the will of Christopher Bush, witnessed by 
Helm, followed by the attestation for probate signed by Ben Helm alone. 
Docketed with date of proof and entry. 

The Sally Johnston mentioned in the will was at this time the wife of Daniel Johnston; 
widowed in 1814. she married Thomas Lincoln 2 Dec. 1819. 

186. LINCOLNIANA. Rev. Peter Cartwright. Pioneer Methodist minister 
and presiding elder: Democratic candidate beaten by Lincoln in the Con- 
gressional election of 1846. A. Endorsement s.. on verso of printed marriage 
license. 1 sheet, oblong 8vo; Sangamon County. 111.. 1 Jan. 1835; certifying 
that he had married Matthew Rogers and Susannah Overstreet 22 Dec. 1834. 
One fold parted. 

187. LINCOLNIANA. David Davis. Circuit Judge and friend of Lincoln, 
later appointed by Lincoln to the Supreme Court. A. D.s.. 2 pp.. 4to: Danville. 
111., undated in text but with pencilled note reading ''Oct. Term 1849" : draft 
of a decision granting the petition of the administrator of an estate, with a 
description of the real estate involved inserted in another hand, in pencil. 

LINCOLN'S TEACHER 

188. LINCOLNIANA. Azel W. Dorsey, Schooheacher, taught Lincoln for a 
time in Indiana in 1824. D.s. ''A. W . Dorsey.'' 1 p.. oblong 12mo. with 
endorsements on reverse: no place. 7 Jan. 1807: as one of the signatories on 
a promissory note. 

Lincoln Day by Day assigns Lincoln's attendance at Dorsey's school to the year 1824 
and states that he attended for about six months. 

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189. LIM^OLNIANA. Stephen A. Dok.las. Linculu^ oppoiu-nt in the great 
debates of 1858. D.s. ''Stephen A. Douglass,'' the form of the family name 
used by his father; 2 pp. folio; Illinois. 23 Mar. 1843; a draft decision 
ordering a sheriff's foreclosure sale. Douglas was an Illinois Supreme Court 
judge at the time. 

190. LIXCOLNIANA. Stephen A. Douglas. N.s., 1 p., 12mo. mounted; 
Washington, 17 Mar. 1860; complying with a request for his autograph *** 
Robert Lincoln. Typed L.s., 1 p., 4to; Chicago. 19 Feb. 1903; to 0. S. 
Mahon at Dubuque, explaining that the few letters in his father's hand which 
he had were burned in the Chicago fire and suggesting that for purposes of 
handwriting analysis Mahon could use the autobiography written out for 
J. W. Fell as reproduced in The Autobiography of Abraham Lincoln. To- 
gether 2 pieces. 

191. LLXCOLMANA. Elmira: The Daily Advertiser, 2 pp., folio; Elmira, 
N. Y., 24 Oct. 1860, with Republican election notice giving electors for 
Lincoln and Hamlin v Republican Ticket, 1 sheet. 6I4 hy 3% inches, no 
place [1860], giving electors for Lincoln and Hamlin <* Ohio Union Presi- 
dential Ticket, 1 sheet, 8I4 by 3% inches, printed in red and blue, no place 
[1864], giving electors for Lincoln and Johnson v and 1 other similar, with 
the corner chipped affecting two or three letters. Together 4 pieces. 



PASSES TO FORD'S THEATRE 

192. LINCOLNIANA. Ford's Theatre, Washington. 2 passes to perform- 
ances at this theatre, one an engraved pass for "Season — 1863-4-5," the other 
a printed pass, filled out in holograph, running from 5 May 1863 to 5 June 
1865. Both include the date of the assassination of Abraham Lincoln at this 
theater. Together 2 pieces, in 1 leather case. iOlsen) 

193. LINCOLNIANA. Mentor Graham. Schoolteacher; taught Lincoln sur- 
veying at New Salem in 1833. 2 Ds.s. by Graham and others; 1 folio sheet 
with oblong 16mo sheet pasted to bottom; no place, 18 Nov. 1852; holograph 
appraisal o:*; the effects of George Ohmart, deceased, with printed affidavit 
attached. 



194. LINCOLNIANA. Bowling Green. "Squire" and Justice of the Peace 
at New Salem; encouraged Lincoln in the study and practice of law. D.s. on 
a scrap of paper approximately 31/2 by 8 inches; [New Salem, 111.] 1 Dec. 
1837; signature as J. P. to an affidavit concerning a horse trade. 

42 



AFTERNOON SESSION TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6tH 



A PASS TO THE EXECUTION OF THE ASSASSINS 

195. LIXCOLNIANA. Maj.-Gen. W. S. Hancock, commanding the defenses 
of Washington. L.s., 1 p., 8vo, mounted; Washington, 7 July 1865; to Maj.- 
Gen. J. F. Hartranft- a pass admitting newspaper correspondent George Alfred 
Townsend to the Military Prison ^'hetween the hours of 11 a.m. and 2 p.m.'' 
It was at this time that Mrs. Suratt and others accused of complicity in the 
assassination of Lincoln were executed. 



INAUGURAL BALL PROGRAM, 1861 

196. LINCOLNIANA. Inauguration Ball. Printed dance program on 2 sheets 
of light cardboard joined by ribbons, 4 pp., 24mo; the second leaf tipped to a 
slightly larger board with tape. 2 ribbons, red and blue, are still present; the 
third, probably white, is lacking. iOlsen) [Washington] 4 March 1861 

A quotation by Lincoln is printed on the front cover. The program was evidently used 
at the Ball, for 13 of the 16 dance "engagement" lines are filled out in pencil with 
the names of feminine partners, the most favored lady being a Miss Caroline Proctor. 



197. LINCOLNIANA. Last Week! The Original Lincoln Log Cabin! Now on 
exhibition at the Parade Ground, Boston Common. Broadsheet, narrow 4to. 
Boston, no date v [Lincoln Anniversary.] By the President of the United 
States of America. A Proclamation . . . Theodore Roosevelt. Broadsheet, folio. 
Washington, 11 Feb. 1909 v Executive Order. [For commemoration of 
Lincoln's death.] Woodrow Wilson. Broadsheet, folio. Washington, 13 Apr. 
1915. Together 3 pieces. 



TICKET TO LINCOLN'S FUNERAL 

198. LINCOLNIANA. Printed Ticket, with mourning border, to the funeral 
of Abraham Lincoln. Cardboard, 314 by 5 inches, pasted in leatherette folder; 
lightly stained. {Olsen) [Washington] 1865 

Reads: "SOUTH. / (french rule) / Admit the Bearer to the / EXECUTIVE MANSION, 
/ On WEDNESDAY, the / 19th of April, 1865." Such tickets were taken at the door; 
the present ticket may have been held by one of the Springfield, 111., delegation, which 
arrived too late to attend. 



199. LINCOLNIANA. [Lincoln's Funeral.] Order of the Procession. 1-page 

leaflet, 8vo. Flne. [Washington, ca. 17 Apr. 1865] 

A rare leaflet, the text reduced from the War Department leaflet. Official Arrangements, 
issued over the signature of Asst. Adj.-Gen. Nichols. Monaghan, No. 661. 

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200. LINCOLNIANA. Lincoln's Law Partners in Sprlngfield, Illinois. 
A group of 3 A.Ds.s., as described below. Together 3 pieces. 

Springfield, 111., 183L52 

Comprises: A.D.s. by John T. Stuart, Lincoln's first partner (1837-41), 1 p., 4to, 3 Mar. 
1831, notice of taking a deposition; A.D.s. by Stephen T. Logan, Lincoln's second part- 
ner (1841-44), 1/2 p., folio, March 1852, reply to a bill of particulars; A.D.s. by Wil- 
liam H. Herndon, Lincoln's partner from 1844 until Lincoln's death, 1 p.. 4to. March 
1849, notice of compliance with a judgment. 



201. LINCOLNIANA. "The Long Nine." A group of 8 documents, as briefly 
described below, each signed by one of Lincoln's 8 companions in the Illinois 
legislature of 1836, all elected from Sangamon County, designated "The Long 
Nine" because of their height. Together 8 pieces. Illinois, 1829-43 

Comprises: D.s. by John Dawson, 8vo, 1829; D.s. by Ninian Edwards and others, folio, 
1843; D.s. by William Elkin, 8vo, 1833; D.s. by Job Fletcher, narrow sheet, 1842; 
D.s. by A. G. Hemdon, 12mo, 1830; D.s. by Andrew McCormick, 12mo, corner defective, 
1831; D.s. by Dan Stone, narrow sheet, 1835; D.s. by R. L. Wilson and others, folio, 
1835. "The Long Nine" are credited with the successful lobbying which won Springfield 
its position as state capital. 



202. LINCOLNIANA. The Nation Mourns. Lined lettersheet, 4 pp., 12mo, the 
first page with elegiac engraving and verse. No place or date *♦* Funeral 
Procession of President Lincoln, as it started from the Depot in Philadelphia, 
April 22d, 1865. Broadsheet, 8vo, with a commemorative verse. Philadelphia, 
4 July 1865 •♦* Memento Mori. Broadsheet, folio, with portrait. No place or 
date V and others similar. Together 6 pieces, broadsheets, leaflets, and 
magazine. 



203. LINCOLNIANA. [Asst. Adj.-Gen. W. A. Nichols.] Official Arrange- 
ments at Washington for the funeral solemnities of the late Abraham Lincoln 
. . . The following order of arrangement is directed: — Order of the Proces- 
sion . . . etc. 3-page leaflet, 12mo. Fine. 

[Washington: War Dept., 17 Apr. 1865] 

A rare leaflet, giving the order of the procession and timing of salutes. Monaghan No. 
654. 

A RARE ENGRAVING 

204. LINCOLNIANA. Reading the Emancipation Proclamation. Steel 
engraving. Depicts a group di Negroes before a fire-place; a soldier is reading 
the Proclamation to them. In the lower margin is a remarque of Lincoln 
surrounded by a two-line quotation from the Proclamation and the date 
1 Jan. 1863. Oblong folio. In an oak frame. (Olsen) 

44 



PARKE-BERJVET GALLERIES • IJVC 

980 MADISON AVENUE • NEW YORK 21 
Telephone TRafalgar 9-8300 



1 desire to place the following bids for the 



Sale on 



19. 



These bids are to be executed at prices as low as other competitive bids permit 
and not exceeding the amount herein named, are so much per piece OR per 
LOT, AS INDICATED BELOW, and are made subject to the Conditions of Sale 
printed in the catalogue of this Sale. 

Name 

Address -^ 



Shipping Directions. 
Signed 



Lot No. 


NAME OF OBJECT 


Bid is per piece unless bidder 
writes "PER LOT" below 


BID 



















































































































X Place bids on this sheet for oj^e sale only, with full name and address, terms cash. 'I 
\ References or cash deposit should accompany orders from persons unknown to the Galleries X 



AFTERNOON SESSION TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6tH 



205. LINCOLNIANA. Stuart, John T.; W. H. Herndon; and John A. 
McClernand. A.D. in Herndon's hand, signed by all 3 men; 1 p., 4to; 
Springfield, 111., 11 Mar. 1859; to Judge Breese, reporting on the examination 
of a candidate for the bar and recomimending his admission. 

Stuart had been Lincoln's partner, and Herndon was his partner at the time. McCler- 
nand was a prominent Illinois politician, well known to Lincoln. 

206. LIXCOLMANA. William Howard Taft. A. Quotation s., 14 lines 
about Lincoln, on Supreme Court stationery; 1 p., 8vo; no place or date; 
matted and framed under glass. A display piece, firmly written in clear black 
ink. 



207. [LINCOLN, MARY T.] Lock of hair of Mrs. Abraham Lincoln; and a 
photograph, bust length, of Mrs. Lincoln. The lock of hair and photograph 
are each in a sunken compartment, with gilt metal framed, in an old com- 
position folding hinged case. Case measures 21/^ by 3 inches. 

A SPLENDID MEMENTO. Accompanying the above is a certificate signed by Richard S. 
Hagen, Secretary-Treasurer of "Friends of the Lincoln Shrines," Galena, Illinois. The 
certificate is on the stationery of the '"Friends of the Lincoln Shrines," dated June 27, 
1958, and is subscribed to and sworn to before a Notary Public. 

The certificate reads in part "The swatch of hair of which this lock is part was obtained 
by this organization from Mary Edwards Brown of Springfield, Illinois, the grand- 
daughter of Ninian Edwards who married Elizabeth P. Todd, sister of Mary Todd 
Lincoln". 

208. LINCOLN, MARY. Half-length portrait, seated, holding a fan in right 
hand. Oval, within a decorative framework. Line engraving; colored by hand. 
Large 4to size v Closing salutation, from a letter, in her autograph reading 
''Very respectfully, Mary Lincoln.'' Together 2 pieces, framed as one. iOlsen) 

209. LOGAN, JOHN A. A.L.s.. 1 p.. 4to; Chicago. 29 Sept. 1873. To Gen. 
0. E. Babcock. Marked "Confidential." 

He sends information about and recommendations for the Pension Office in Chicago. 
This is to clarify an earlier letter. Babcock may show the President what he writes. 
In a postscript he says the financial outlook is better, and the President's letter has done 
much good. 

JACK LONDON'S BOOKPLATE 

210. LONDON, JACK. Two T.Ll.s. to Hellier Denselow, London; with 1 
envelope. Together 3 pieces. 

T.L.S., 1 p., 8vo; 15 Mar. 1914. He thanks Denselow for the drawing of a bookplate: 
he likes it so well he is discarding his present plate. He sends a list of his books 
(not present) and asks him to select several to be sent. •> T.L.s., with envelope. 1 j).. 
4to; 28 July 1914. He comments on Kipling and says how much he wishes Kipling 
could do for the Klondike what he has done for India. Notes what he has himself 

[Continued 

45 



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Number 210 — -Concluded^ 

written on prize-fighting. Gives Denselow permission to quote from his letters. He is 

just leaving the ranch. 

London letters are becoming increasingly scarce 

ASSOCIATION ITEM 

211. [LONGFELLOW, HENRY W.] [Eaton Stannard Barrett.] Woman; 
A Poem [caption title]. Small 4to, sewn; lacking signature A, probably title 
and half-title. [London, 1810 or 1818?] 

The ascription and date are taken from Halkett & Laing; in the absence of the prelimi- 
naries, the title is the only guide remaining. 

Inscribed at the top of the first page, "Henry W. Longfellow / 1822"; the signature, 
finished with a flourish beneath, has a number of characteristics similar to the hand of 
the mature poet. At the time of writing, Longfellow was 14 or 15 years of age. An 
additional inscription in another hand, at the side, sheds no further light. 

212. MADISON, DOROTHEA PAYNE [TODD]. "Dollef Madison, First 
Lady and famous hostess. A.N.s., y^ p., 4to; no place or date; to a Mrs. 
O'Sullivan, regretting that she cannot visit Mrs. O'Sullivan because of the 
heat ''and the exertion of assorting papers for the Bank^s safe keeping during 
my short absence from the City.'' With integral address leaf, bearing Mrs. 
O'SulIivan's name but no address. {Olsen) 

213. MADISON, JAMES. D.s., 1 p., folio, on vellum, 10 Aug. 1810. Counter- 
signed by the Deputy Collector at New York. With seal. Ship's papers, Defec- 
tive at top of sheet. It is curious that the date is given as "year of Our Lord 
one thousand ten hundred and ten.'' [Olsen] 

214. MADISON, JAMES. A.N. (third person) and Doc. s. (Olsen) 

A.N. (third person), 1 p., 4to; 15 Aug, 1814. To Mr. Norvell of the Treasury Dept., 
asking him to call to discuss a letter; refers to himself as "/. Madison' in text. With 
integral address leaf; catalogue description pasted at bottom of text leaf. ♦*♦ Doc. s., as 
President, 1 p., folio (vellum) ; Washington, 17, Aug. 1814. Warrant appointing Richard 
Lemman a midshipman in the Navy. Signature somewhat faded. 

THE CHIEF JUSTICE WRITES THE PRESIDENT 

215. MARSHALL, JOHN. A.L.s., 11/2 pp., 8vo; Richmond, 20 Nov. 1818. 
To President James Monroe. Address and endorsement on p. 4. 

He writes in support of Corbm Braxton, son of Carter Braxton, who seeks a federal 
office. He recommends him on grounds of character and points out he was recently 
unfortunate in being wrecked, with his Negroes, off the coast of Florida while on his 
way to settle in the new territory. The endorsement notes that Mr. Stephen Sayre was 
given the appointment. 

A FINE ASSOCIATION PIECE 

[See illustration] 
46 






♦ 



>U0^ 



/ 






^ 



t 



[number 215 



KINDLY READ CONDITIONS OF SALE IN FOREPART OF CATALOGUE 



216. MARSHALL JOHN. Later, Secretary oj State and Chief Justice. A.N.s., 
oblong 8vo; Washington, 7 Mar. 1800; "Mr. Hamilton, Please allow Mr. 
Fulton to examine the records in the Govt, case against the Packet Co." 
Lightly stained. (Olsen) 

"Mr. Hamihon" may or may not have been Alexander Hamilton, then Inspector-General 
of the Army; "Mr. Fulton", however, was not Robert Fulton, who was then in Europe. 
Marshall was a Congressman. 

217. McKINLEY, WILLIAM. D.s., 1 p., oblong narrow 8vo, Columbus, Ohio, 
13 Aug. 1892. Printed form of receipt for $15,441.25 from "Gen'l Wm. B. 
Franklin, Acting Treasurer, National Home for D. V. S." Signed as Governor 
of Ohio. {Olsen) 

218. McKINLEY, WILLIAM. Bejore his Presidency. Typed N.s., 1 p., 8vo; 
Canton, Ohio, 21 Feb. 1896; declining an invitation. {Olsen) 

219. McCLELLAN, GEORGE B., Union General. A.L.s., 1 p., 8vo, Head- 
quarters, Army of the Potomac, Washington, 5 Dec. 1861. To "My dear Miss 
HarkkerJ' Framed with a j)ortrait of Gen. McClellan. (Olsen) 

"Allow me to thank you most warmly for your flag — it is not only a comfort to me but 
an encouragement when I find that the young ladies of the land feel so much interest 
in the cause in which we are engaged. I know that the men will sure fight more truly 
in a cause when they are supported by the ladies . . . ". 

DOES VIRGINIA VALUE INDEPEDENCE? 

220. MONROE, JAMES. A.L.s., 2i/o pp., 4to; Richmond. April 1783; to 
John Francis Mercer, sometime member of the Virginia legislature, on 
Virginia politics. 

Monroe opens by assuring Mercer that he does not think an attack will be made on him 
in the legislature, but guarantees that he and [Samuell Hardy will squelch it if it 
occurs. He then regrets Mercer's failure to be re-elected to the legislature and com- 
ments at length on the condition of the State at the end of the War: "The era hath 
now arriv'd and an important one it is ivh puts it in dependence on ye measures wh 
ivill be noiv adopted ivhether ye people of ye State are to esteem their Independence as 
a blessing or a curse." He ends with acid comments on "wild and visionary'^ political 
projects. 

221. MONROE, JAMES. As Secretary of State. Printed D.s., 1 p., 4to; Wash- 
ington, 11 July 1812; to the Marshal of the District of Maine, concerning the 
surveillance of British subjects in his district due to the declaration of war 
with Great Britain. {Olsen) 

SIGNED BY TWO PRESIDENTS 

222. MONROE, JAMES, as President, and JOHN QUINCY ADAMS, as Sec- 
retary of State. Engrossed document signed by both as above, 1 p., folio; 
Washington, 28 Oct. 1817; Letters patent appointing David B. Mitchell as 

[Continued 
48 



AFTERNOON SESSION TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6tH 



Number 222— Concluded] 

Commissioner to negotiate a treaty with the Creek Nation for the cession of 
lands in Georgia. With Seal of the United States. Repair at fold affecting a 
few letters. In cloth folder. 

Mitchell, twice Governor of Georgia, was heading into a difficult situation, with the 
whites hungry for land and the Indians resentful of the outcome of the War of 1812. 
He succeeded in his mission, getting a satisfactory treaty in 1818, hut was shortly 
after removed from his office on charges of smuggling slaves. 



MANUSCRIPT OF A SPEECH 

223. MUSSOLINI, BENITO. Fascist Dictator of Italy. A.Ms, in ink, 12 pp., 
square 8vo; [Rome] 1 September, Year 20 of the Fascist Era [1942]; on 
the inauguration of the Demanio Agricolo Comunale. a scheme for relieving 
wartime food shortages by cultivating public lands near large cities •♦* Type- 
script of the same address, 6 pp., 4to, with an additional phrase inserted by 
Mussolini on p. 5. Together 2 pieces. Mussolini manuscripts are rare. 



224. NAPOLEON I. As First Consul of the French Republic. Autograph en- 
dorsement signed, on the first page of a holograph document, 6 pp., 4to, 
which is also signed on the last page by Berthier; 17 Frimaire an 8 [1800] ; 
a resume of the charges preferred against one Brig. -Gen. Merlin, with his 
replies, referred to the Consulate for action. Badly browned and chipped in 
the margins, preserved in paper and cellophane folders tied into light board 
covers, with a transcript (in French) of the visible portions. 

Napoleon first makes a false start: "Le faire juger et le d le £?", which is crossed out. 
He then writes: "f/ cessera ses jonctions et sera mise en jugement — Bonaparte." Merlin 
was charged with misconduct and disobedience with the Army of Italy, Macdonald 
being his accuser. He is not identified by other names, but was probably Antoine 
Eugene Merlin, brother of Merlin "de Thionville". 



225. NAPOLEON I. Emperor of the French. Endorsement signed "Nap;' St. 
Cloud, 9 Germinal an 13 [1805]; on the face of an A.L.s. by Mme. 
Maveste[?] Deviry, Lady-in-Waiting to the Princess Louis [Hortense de 
Beauharnais], 2 pp., folio; Paris, 7 Germinal; recommending her nephew, a 
Quartermaster in the Cuirassiers, for a commission as Sub-Lieutenant. With 
other endorsements and signatures. iOlsen) 

The endorsement signed by Napoleon directs the letter to be sent to the Minister of War 
for information on the length of the young soldier's service. Another endorsement 
notes that the information was sent to Napoleon on the 10th Germinal. 

49 



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MANUSCRIPT LOG OF THE U.S.S. "JOHN P. KENNEDY" 
SURVEYING THE NORTH PACIFIC IN 1853-1855 

226. NAVY, UNITED STATES. Manuscript log or journal, 224 pp., sm. folio, 
kept by George Harrison Ritchie on board the U.S.S. "John P. Kennedy," 
6 May 1853-29 Nov. 1855. 

The "Kennedy" was part of Comm. Cadwalader Ringgold's expedition for "prosecuting a 
survey and reconnaissance, for naval and commercial purposes, of such parts of Behring 
Straits, North Pacific Ocean and China Seas, as are frequented by American whaleships, 
and by trading vessels in their routes between the United States and China." The coasts 
of Japan, the Kuriles, the Sea of Okhotsk, and the shores of northern Asia were visited. 
Ritchie was purser on board the "Kennedy", and this is his personal journal. His entries 
make interesting reading: he mentions names of vessels, ports of call, lists the officers 
of several ships, and mentions Comm. M. C. Perry, who opened commerce with Japan. 
The vessel stayed two months at the Cape of Good Hope; he tells of islands passed 
after leaving that port. There is a pen-and-ink sketch tipped in of the island of St. Paul. 
The ship then headed up through the Indies, touching Sumatra, Java, Singapore, Shang- 
hai, and Hong Kong. At Hong Kong, Ringgold was judged unfit to lead because of 
his mental condition and Lt. John Rodgers was given the command. Elaborate descrip- 
tions of Japan are given, and later, of Ola, in Siberia. The vessel reached Brooklyn in 
November 1855: "On arriving in the City we all put up at the St. Nicholas Hotel. What 
a glorious thought. Home once more." 
An interesting, detailed account of a ship with a prescient name.. 



A FINE LETTER ON NURSING 

227. NIGHTINGALE, FLORENCE. ''The Lady with the Lamp.'' A.L.s. in 
pencil, 8 pp., 12mo; London, 17 Oct. 1887; to William Blake Richmond the 
artist, giving advice about training his only daughter as a nurse, and mention- 
ing Richmond's portrait of Miss Nightingale. {Olseii) 

Miss Nightingale advises Richmond that in her opinion 18 is too early to start nursing 
training: "There are sacred secrets belonging to the sick which 18 could not & ought 
not to be able to understand — And there are secrets the very reverse of sacred, the 
secrets of vice, about Patients which their Nurse must know if she is not to be made 
a fool of ... A gentlewoman, or gentle girl, would be either shocked & run away, 
or she would be hardened, ivhich is the ivorse evil of the two." In closing she mentions 
a recent illness. 



OPTION ON LOGO ACRES 

228. PENN, WILLIAM. Quaker and proprietor of Pennsylvania. D.s. on 
marginal fold, 1 large sheet of vellum, 13 by I8I/2 inches; England, 12 May 
1684; an engrossed indenture acknowledging payment by one John Draike[?] 
of 5 shillings for an option on 1,000 acres of Pennsylvania land. Complete 
with seal. {Olsen) 

50 



AFTERNOON SESSION TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6tH 



SIGNED PORTRAITS 

229. PHOTOGRAPHS. Ulysses S. Grant, as full General. Cabinet photo- 
graph, 5I/2 X 414 inches, showing Grant seated and in uniform, ca. 1865; 
signed on the mount ''f/. 5. Grant General <* Brigham Young, Mormon 
leader. Small oval portrait photograph 2% by 2 inches, a three-quarter face 
bust, ca. 1870, signed by Young on the mount. Together 2 pieces. 

230. PIERCE, FRANKLIN. Before his Presidency. A.N.s., 7 lines, 4to; Man- 
chester, N.H., 25 May 1848; notifying 2 persons in Boston, probably a legal 
firm, of his intention to honor a summons to a Court of Inquiry in Frederick, 
Md. {Olsen) 

231. POLK, JAMES K. A.L.s., third person, 1 p. (four lines), 19 Jan. 1839, 
accepting an invitation to dine tendered by Mr. & Mrs. Butler. (Olsen) 



THE TREATY WITH THE TWO SICILIES 

232. POLK, JAMES K. D.s., 1 p., 4to, Washington, 14 April 1846. (Olsen) 

Authorizing the Secretary of State to affix the seal of the United States to "a full power 
authorizing the exchange of the ratification of the Treaty of Commerce & Navigation be- 
tween the U.S. & the Two Sicilies, concluded and signed on the 1st of December 1845, 
at Naples". In the lower corner is ''For Mr. Alexander Hammett, U. S. Consul at Naples". 

233. PORTER, W. D. Naval officer. A.L.s., 1 p., 12mo; New York, 25 April 
1863. To L. J. Cist. 

He encloses a sketch of his own life (not present), and gives details of his career. Cist 
was an assiduous collector of autographs in Cincinnati. 

234. PRESIDENTS' SIGNATURES. A group of 4 pieces signed by men who 
at one time held the office, as described below. V.p., 1899-1909 
Comprises: Typed L.s. by Benj. Harrison, after his Presidency, 1 p., 4to, Indianapolis, 
24 Nov. 1899, concerning his obligations as Purdue trustee; D.s. by Wm. McKinley as 
President, 1 p., 4to, Wash., 11 May 1897, authority to affix the Seal of the U.S.; typed 
L.s. by Taft as President-elect, 1 p., 12mo, mounted on board, N. Y., 23 Feb. 1909, 
promising to send signed quotation; Quotation signed by Taft, 1 p., 12mo, mounted on 
board, dated as delivered at Phila., 22 Feb. 1909. 

235. REMINGTON, FREDERIC. Illustrator. A.L.s., 1 p., sm. 4to; 10 May 
1892. To Julian Ralph. 

An amusing an informal letter to Ralph, who was a writer. It is addressed: "Indited to 
the Greast [sicl Living Descriptive Writer. I Prostrate myself — / make Salam — Sela — 
That settles the 'Dakotahs'. . ." He may try to arrange a dinner-party, but his plans are 
not certain. ''Well — god bless or d — you, it matters little— we will meet." 

51 






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236. REMINGTON, FREDERIC. American artist oj the West. A.L.s.. IV2 PP-, 
12mo; New Rochelle, 25 Nov. [1901]; to Bertelli of the Roman Bronze 
Works, who cast his sculpture at this period, mentioning 3 of the works. 

'\Send one Cheyenne & one Broncho B. on Saturday Dec 7 — to Clausens Gallery 381 Fifth 
Ave, for my show. . .Let me know when Buffalo Signal is finished since I want to come 
over immediately and see it. It ought to be shipped early in December.'^ 
According to McCracken, Frederic Remington [Phila., 1947], pp. 94-96, Bertelli much 
improved the quality of Remington's castings by use of the method known as cire perdue. 



A PLEA FOR A NEW TAVERN 

237. REVERE, PAUL. Patriot and silversmith. D.s. with flourish, 3 pp., 
square 12mo; Boston, 6 Jan. 1791; the petition of George Trench to open a 
tavern "ai his house in Ann Street near the Conduit;'^ with the signatures of 
Trench, Town Clerk William Cooper, and 12 other citizens of Boston. Parted 
at the center fold, gauzed; a defect in the upper margin of both leaves affect- 
ing a few words. (Olsen) 

The first page carries the signed petition of Trench, the second the approbation of the 
Selectment signed by Cooper, and the third the recommendation signed by Revere and 
the other citizens. A docket notes that the petition was granted. 

[See illustration] 



UNUSUAL PHILATELIC ITEM 

238. ROOSEVELT, FRANKLIN D., as President, and HAROLD L. ICKES, 

as Secretary of the Interior. Mint sheet of 100 2-cent U.S. postage stamps, 
Presidential Issue of 1938, displaying a portrait of John Adams, Plate No. 
21893 in the upper left margin, signed in the left margin by both Roosevelt 
and Ickes. 

239. ROOSEVELT, FRANKLIN D. As Governor of New York. Typed L.s., 
1 p., 4to; on Executive Chamber stationery but from Warm Springs, 4 Dec. 
1930; to R. L. Scaife of the Houghton Mifflin Co., publishers, in Boston; 
inviting Scaife and his family to come spend a night in Albany but asking 
that he phone first "m order that you do not run into twenty-five other people 
wlio are discussing roads — hospitals — or even politics!'' 

240. ROOSEVELT, FRANKLIN D. As President. Typed N.s. with bold initials 
"f. D. /v.," V2 P-r 8vo; on White House stationery, 15 Feb. 1939; to Franklin 
Brooks at Larchmont, N.Y. 

An engaging condolence on an accident: "/ am glad your eyes escaped. It makes less 
matter about your hair. You and I would not suffer much if ive lost what remains F^ 

52 




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[number 237] 



KINDLY READ CONDITIONS OF SALE IN FOREPART OF CATALOGUE 



241. ROOSEVELT, FRANKLIN D. L.s., 1 p., 4to, "Warm Springs, Ga., May 
2, 1929;" written on stationery of "State of New York, Executive Chamber, 
Albany." To Hon. Hamilton Holt, Rollins College, Winter Park. Fla., regretting 
that he could not accept his invitation; he has to be back in Albany on June 
7th. (Olsen) 



"MY OLD SHIPMATES" 

242. ROOSEVELT, FRANKLIN D. L.s., 1 p., 4to, "Executive Mansion, 
Albany, New York," 5 Nov. 1932. (Olsen) 

To Elmer J. Whitman of Chicago, stating ''Although pressed for time by last-minute 
campaign activities, I am snatching just a moment to thank you for your friendly letter 
of October \st. It was good of you recall my trip aboard the U.S.S. Dyer during the war, 
and I am delighted to know that I am enjoying the continued interest and support of one 
of my old shipmates . . . ". 

243. ROOSEVELT, THEODORE. After his Presidency. Typed L.s., 21/0 
pp., 4to; New York, 16 May 1911; to Mr. Haskett of Yonkers, refusing an 
invitation to speak and going into detail about the difficulties of a lecturing 
ex-President. 

'To attempt to address each institution which I thought was doing admirable work, and 
to which I wish well, would result in my turning myself into an itinerant lecturer, and 
losing every particle of power to do good to any institution^ He describes the planning 
of his recent speaking tours. 



ON THE TRAIL 

244. ROOSEVELT, THEODORE. After his term as President. A.L.s., 1 p., 
4to; ''North of Kenia' [sic], 24 Sept. 1909; to a Mr. McQueen, congratu- 
lating him on the publication of a book on the part of Africa through which 
he is at the time travelling. Folds strengthened at the back. 

Written in indelible pencil, as were many letters and dispatches by Roosevelt on this 
African safari, described by him in African Game Trails. 



ROOSEVELT AND THE CHEROKEES 

245. ROOSEVELT. THEODORE. 2 Ds.s., 1 by officials of the Cherokee Nation 
and 1 by Cherokee officials and Roosevelt; Cherokee Nation, 19-21 Nov. 1901, 
and Washington, 20 Dec. 1901; typed copy of Cherokee Senate Bill No. 6 
and printed attestation signed. Together 2 pieces. (Olsen) 

The typed bill, signed by the Cherokee officials, provides for change of a voting precinct. 
The printed attestation, signed by T. M, Buffington as Principal Chief, is also signed as 
approved by Roosevelt. 

54 



AFTERNOON SESSION TUESDAY. FEBRUARY 6tH 



CHEROKEE TRIBAL FUNDS 

246. ROOSEVELT. THEODORE. As President. D.s. by Roosevelt and officials 
of the Cherokee Nation, l^/o pp., folio; Tahlequah. Indian Territory, 29 Sept. 
1905. and Washington, 17 Aug. 1907; Joint Resolution Xo. 1 of the National 
Council of the Cherokee Nation, requesting settlement on 3 questions, approved 
})y the President. [Olsen) 

The document is signed by officials of the Cherokee Senate and Council and by the Prin- 
cipal Chief W. C. Rogers. The Cherokees request decisions from Congress on the dis- 
tribution of tribal funds, sale of tribal lands and maintenance of tribal schools. 

247. ROOSEVELT. THEODORE. Two Typed N.s. and 1 Doc. s. {Olsen) 
T.N.S., as Vice-President e'ect, 1 p., 8vo; Oyster Bay, 27 Feb. 1901; acknowledging re- 
ceipt of a letter, v Doc. s., as President, 1 p., folio (vellum), with seal; Washington, 2 July 
1908. Appointing John H. Gregory, Jr., to be Secretary of Legation at Managua, Nica- 
ragua. The signature has faded. <' T.N.s., as President. 1 p., Bvo: Washington, 7 Nov. 
1904, Sends thanks for the political support of veterans. 

248. ROOSEVELT. THEODORE. After his Presidency. Typed N.s., 1 p., 4to; 
Oyster Bay, 15 May 1916; acknowledging receipt of a letter. (Olsen) 

249. ROOSEVELT, THEODORE. Half-length photograph, facing front. 
"Copyright, Pach, 1904, N. Y." Folio size. With autograph inscription by 
President Roosevelt in the lower part of mount ^'With the regards of Theodore 
Roosevelt. Feb. 20th 1909." Framed. {Olsen) 

250. RUSKIN, JOHN. A.L.s., IVs pp., 12mo; Coniston. 23 Dec. 1886; to W. 
H. Jowett. mentioning his Praeterila and other works. [Olsen) 

251. RUSSELL. WILLIAM HOWARD. Pictures of Southern Life, Social, 
Political, and Military. 12mo, original wrappers; front wrapper repaired and 
gauzed. In case. (Olsen) New York, 1861 
Collects the letters written by Russell, famous Crimean war correspondent, for the London 
Times, dating from 30 Apr. to 23 June 1861. U.S.iana, 8862. 

252. SHAW, GEORGE BERNARD. A corr. card s. with initials; Ayot St. 
Lawrence, 2 Nov. 1932; to Charles Rowley, Jr. The front of the card shows a 
contemporary photograph of Shaw. 

''Somebody has written to me that you will be 93 or 193 — / forget which — tomorrow, and 
that I promised to send you a copy of my new play . . . The play is not published yet 
so here is my picture (taken about 50 years ago) instead.^' 

253. SHAW, GEORGE BERNARD. A corr. card s. with initials; Ayot St. 
Lawrence, 21 Aug. 1944; to Mrs. Dodd Granger, refusing to send a photo- 
graph. 

"You should know by this time that I will not be shoved upon your unfortunate daughters 
(or anyone else) to whom I am only a ridiculous old back number . . . They can never 
see me as you remember me. They cannot even see you as I remember you and photo- 
graphed you. So there!" 

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254. SLAVE ADVERTISEMENT. Broadside. ''lOO Dollars Reward. Ranaway 
from the subscriber, on the 24th instant, Len Clasco, about 28 years old, . . . 
His father and mother are owned by Dr. M. J. Stone, in Woodville, Prince 
George's County . . . Richard W. Bowie, near Upper 'Marlboro,' P. G. Co., Md. 
January 31st, 1855." With imprint "Printed at the 'Marlboro' Gazette Office." 
Wrinkled and stained. Framed, 

AN IMPORTANT MORMON PUBLICATION 

255. SMITH, JOSEPH. Doctrine and Covenants of the Church of the Latter 
Day Saints. Carefully selected from the Revelation of God. and compiled by 
Joseph Smith, Junior Oliver Cowdery, Sidney Rigdon, Frederick G. Williams 
(Presiding Elders of said Church). Proprietors. 16mo. full modern calf: light 
stains in text; one leaf Avith a natural paper defect. iOlsen) 

Kirtland, Ohio, 1835 

Second edition of the revelations, and the first with the title "Doctrine and Covenants". 
"In its new form the first part consists of lectures on faith, originally delivered before 
a class of the elders, in Kirtland, with questions and answers, pp. 5-74; the second part 
"Covenants and Commandments"' contains the relevations included in the earlier 'Book of 
Commandments' differently arranged." Has the two Indexes, pp. i-xxiii: and "Notes to 
the Reader," p. xxv. 



256. SMITH, JOSEPH, JR., Mormon prophet, and Samuel Rigdon, Mormon 
elder, later dissident. Engraved banknote of the Kirtland Safety Society Bank 
signed by both men, denomination $5, 3 by 6% inches. (Olsen) 

Kirtland, Ohio, 10 Feb. 1837 



257. SMITH, SAMUEL F. A.MS.s. of the fourth verse of '^America." In- 
scribed by Smith ''Written in 1832. June 19, 1895." 8vo. Framed. (Olsen) 



258. STEVENSON, ROBERT LOUIS. Photograph, signed (in pencil) ; cabi- 
net size; the print is stamped "The Falk Studios" and "Falk . . . Sydney" is 
printed on the mount. 

MANUSCRIPT OF AN ELEGY 

259. STOWE. HARRIET BEECHER. A.Ms.s. of a poem entitled 'Vnly a 
year J' 3 pp., 12mo: no place, the date incomplete; a threnodv on the death 
of an infant, in 11 quatrains, possibly inspired by the death of her son 
Samuel Charles ["Charlie," Jan. 1848-'july 1849]. In case. A defect in the 
upper right corner affects three words. { Olsen) 

56 



AFTERNOON SESSION TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6Tn 



THE DISCO\ ERER OF CALIFORNIAN GOLD 

260. SUTTER. JOH\ A. A.L.s., 1 p., Ito; 17 Dec 1856. To Col. Warren, 

in Sacramento City. 

Sutter explains how busy he has been directing Indian laborers at some works on which 
he is engaged; it is now raining, and he has time to write. He is sending the material 
Warren requires and apologizes for delay. He could use a good horticulturist for a few 
months' time. Written in a very decorative script. 

261. TAFT. WILLIAM HOWARD. Two typed letters signed; 1911 and 1929. 
\Olsen) 

T.L.S., as President. 1 p.. 8vo, marked ''Personal in Taft's hand; Washington, 25 May 
1911. To Hugh O'Neill of the Denver Times, promising to improve the policies of the 
Forestry Bureau, as O'Neill has suggested. "> T.L.s., as Chief Justice, 1 p., 4to; 3 Sept. 
1929: on Supreme Court stationery. To the president of Rollins College, commenting on 
his own recent illnesses. 

262. TANEY, ROGER B. As Sec. of the Treasury. L.s., 1 p., 4to; 16 April 
1834. To Archibald M. Hyde. 

He approves an appointment of a deputy collector of customs at Canaan, \ermont; the 
rate will remain the same. 

263. TAYLOR. ZACHARY. As Lieut. -Colonel of the 1st Infantry. A.L.s.. 1 p.. 
4to; Cantonment Bay. St. Louis, 30 June 1821; to 3rd Auditor Flagner at 
Washington, returning receipts for funds and vouchers for disbursements. 

264. TAYLOR. ZACHARY. Unused printed form of ship's sailing papers. 
Signed by President Taylor and by J. M. Clayton, Secretary of State. Blank 
portion supplied in left margin. Silked. [Olsen) 

265. TRUMAX, HARRY S. L.s., 1 p., 4to, -'United States Senate,'' 4 Oct. 
1944. Senator, later President, Truman complies with the request of a private 
soldier in Camp Texas, and sends him his picture and autograph. (Olsen) 

PRESIDENT WOULD NOT APPOINT JOHN L. LEWIS, PRESIDENT OF 

THE UNITED MINE WORKERS, AS A DOG-CATCHER— SENATOR 

BISHOP HAD SUGGESTED HIM AS AMBASSADOR TO RUSSIA 

266. TRUMAN, HARRY S. Thirty-third President. L.s.. 1 p.. 4to, ''X^Tiite 
House, Washington, May 2, 1949." To ''Honorable Neal D. Bishop. Senator 
First District. Denver, Colorado" v Two Ls.s. by John L. Lewis, President of 
the United Mine Workers of America, each 1 p.. 4to, 5 Oct. 1950 and 11 July 
1951. Together 3 pieces. (Olsen) 

An imerestlng group of letters. Senator Bishop had written to President Truman on 
29 April, 1949, suggesting that he appoint John L. Lewis as Ambassador to Russia. 
President Truman replied to Senator Bishop's letter: 'T have already apfiointed a good 

[Continued 
57 



KINDLY READ CONDITIONS OF SALE IN FOREPART OF CATALOGUE 

Number 266 — Concluded^ 

man to that post and for your information I wouldn't appoint John L. Lewis dogcatcher 
and, I think, you understand that is the case. I appreciate the good humor in your letter." 
Senator Bishop undoubtedly showed the letter to John L. Lewis, or sent him a transcript. 
On 5 Oct. 1950 John L. Lewis wrote to Senator Bishop: "Conceivably it is true that the 
President's choice of words was again unfortunate. One could, however, persuade one's 
self that he was thinking only in terms of problems of state and have no intent to 
belittle or sneer gratuitously at a private citizen. Assuredly, the President of the United 
States w^ould not permit his personal feelings to sway his judgment on appointments to 
public office. 

"Presidential appointment to the office of Dogcatcher would postulate creation of a new 
Federal Bureau with its accompanying personnel of thousands of employees and, in con- 
sequence, an increase to the tax Burden. 

"Naturally, the first duty of the Bureau of the Dog, if staffed by the undersigned, would 
be to collect and impound the sad dogs, the intellectual poodle dogs and the pusillanimous 
pups which now infest our State Department . . . The President could ill afford to have 
more brains in the Dog Department than in the Department of State." 
The other letter of John L. Lewis, 11 July 1951, is addressed to Dr. Charles W. Olsen, 
thanking him for his letter of July 18th, and "You gave me a chuckle in causing me 
to remember the dog letter incident ... I do hope you will believe that in sending 
my letter to Mr. Bishop 1 had no intent to derogate the intelligence of your Kerry Blue 
dog . . . ". 

267. TYLER, JOHN. A.L.s., 1 p., 8vo, N.p., n.d. circa 1843-44. To John C. 
Spencer, Secretary of Treasury (3 Mar. 1843-1 May 1844), mentioning In- 
spectors to be relieved of office at Richmond and giving names of those 
replacing them. Written while President. (Olsen) 

268. VAN BUREN, MARTIN. Before his Presidency. A.L.s., 1 p., 4to; Rome, 
N.Y., 15 Sept. 1832; to Thomas W. Olcott at Albany, asking his help in 
negotiations to invest $10,000 in a bond held by Philip van Rensselaer, with 
postscript on verso saying he has not been able to pay postage because it is 
Sunday — '7 am ashamed to sajT With integral address leaf, postmarked 
at Rome. 

269. VAN BUREN, MARTIN. Endorsement and A.N.s., 1820 and n.d. [Olsen) 

Van Buren and Charles E. Dudley. A.L.s. by Dudley, 1 p., 4to; Albany, 1 Aug. 1820. 
To John C. Calhoun, Sec. of War, recommending Edwin Caldwell of Albany for an Army 
appointment; subscribed beneath by Van Buren: '7 cordially concur in the preceding. 
M. V. Buren." (Dudley and Van Buren were State Senators at the time: Dudley later 
succeeded to the U.S. Senate seat resigned by Van Buren.) ♦*• A.N.s. (initials), 1 p., 
12mo; n.d. Asking a Mr. Dayton to prepare a dispatch "m regard to the Maine affair." 
Probably written while Sec. of State and referring to the Maine Boundary dispute 
(c. 1830). 

270. WALLACE, LEW. A.L.s., 1 p., 8vo; Crawfordsville, 11 May 1892. To 
E. W. Halford. 

He sends a letter from Hubbard which the President should see. If Hubbard proceeds 
to any publication, it should be knoAvn that Wallace had nothing to do with it. 

58 



AFTERNOON SESSION TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6tH 

COLONIAL SPIES: 
WASHINGTON DEALS WITH PLUNDERING SOLDIERS 

27L WASHINGTON, GEORGE. L.s., 1 p., folio; Fredericksburg [N.Y.J. 
31 Oct. 1778; to Major [Ebenezer] Gray, on restraining indiscriminate 
plundering by men sent to Long Island to gather intelligence. 2 marginal 
repairs. 

'7i has been intimated to me that several persons, have gone over to Long Island, under 
the pretext of gaining intelligence, and indiscriminately distressed and plundered the in- 
habitants. As such a conduct is totally incompatible with obtaining information or making 
discoveries I do not imagine you have given any sanction to such proceedings. But that 
so pernicious a practice may be the more effectually prevented — you ivill prevent any per- 
sons whatever from making excursions to the Island — and only employ those as spies or 
observers, in whom you can place a proper confidence." 

The present letter not addressed on the verso, since it was enclosed in the letter of the 
same date sent to Brig.-Gen. Charles Scott, as noted at the end of the text of the Scott 
letter printed in The Writings of George Washington, Vol. 13, pp. 185-88. In the Scott 
letter Washington notes reports that 2 Continental officers are selling plunder in Con- 
necticut and orders their arrest. 

MARTHA WASHINGTON'S ANNUITY 

272. WASHINGTON, MARTHA. Doc. s., 1 p., 12mo. Mt. Vernon, 17 Jan. 
1801. Endorsement on verso. 

On a narrow slip Mrs. Washington acknowledges receipt from Dr. Stuart of "three hun- 
dred dollars in part of my annuity for the last year." Examples of Mrs. Washington's 

SIGNATURE SELDOM COME INTO THE MARKET. 

[See illustration overleaf] 

273. WEBSTER, DANIEL. Senator and Secretary of State, A.L.s., II/2 pp., 
12mo; no place, 6 Apr., no year; to ''Mr. Walker/' demanding action in a 
legal case. Inlaid in a larger sheet. 

A very testy letter, carefully marked "Private" — ''Depend upon it, you will never receive 
the Report, until you say, & adhere to it, that at a time named, you will proceed to decide 
the case . . . None of my associates know that I write this. We will never finish, but upon 
absolute compulsion." 

YOUNG WESLEYS LEAVE THE NEST 

274. WESLEY. CHARLES, SR. Methodist divine and hymnologist. A.L.s.. 
1 p., 12mo; Bristol, 4 Oct. 1787; to his son Samuel, the musician, admonish- 
ing him that he and his brother Charles must now support themselves. 
Docketed in another hand "Copy to SawJ' with date. Lower corner and bottom 
edge chipped. iOlsen) 

"Hitherto I have provided for your Brother & you with a willing Mind. It is no longer in 
my power. You & Charles are now able to do it for yourselves . . . the manner is left 
entirely to yrselves either to board out, or with your Mother." The autograph of Charles 
Wesley is very rare. An important and intimate family letter. 

59 



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WESLEY COMEORTS HIS MECE 

275. WESLEY, JOHN. Methodist leader. A.L.s., 1 j)., square 8\o; White- 
haven, 28 May 1781; to his niece Sarah Wesley at London, first mentioning 
that he awaits passage to the Isle of Man and then offering religious condol- 
ence on the death of a Mr. Waller. With integral address leaf and seal; a 
marginal portion of the address leaf, with writing, is missing. Tipped to a 
sheet of flimsy, with a covering leaf describing the contents. [Olsen] 

From context it would appear that Waller was betrothed to Sarah Wesley, who died un- 
married. Her uncle bids her to learn from her loss: "The removal of Mr. Waller into a 
better world, may be another Blessing to you: As is everything which disengages us from 
transient things, & teaches us to live in Eternity." 



276. WESLEY, MRS. SARAH. Wife of the Rev. Charles Wesley and mother 
of Samuel and Charles Wesley. A.L.s., 1 p., 4to; [Bristol], 23 Mar. [ca. 
1770] ; to her son Charles, studying music at London, addressed in care of 
his father. Repaired with some letters affected, and silked. (Olsen) 
An affectionate letter to a young adolescent away from home, mentioning that his brother 
"little Sammy," who later also became a distinguished musician, misses his musical com- 
panionship. 



WRITTEN IN HER BLINDNESS 

277. WESLEY, MRS. SARAH. Widow of the Rev. Charles Wesley and mother 
of Samuel and Charles Wesley. A.N.s., 1 p., 8vo; London [ ?], dated in another 
hand 18 Dec. 1817; scrawled in her blindness, addressed either "Dr. Son' or 
"Dr. Sam/' speaking of her blindness and urging the addressee to visit her. 
(Olsen) 



278. WHITMAN, WALT. Photograph, signed; cabinet size, mounted. 

The portrait shows the bearded poet, seated in a rustic chair, wearing a sweater and a 
slouch hat, facing left. On his uplifted index finger is a butterfly which he regards with 
attention. 



PLANS FOR "SALOME" 

279. WILDE, OSCAR. A.L.s., 4 pp., 12mo; Paris [1861]; to the Princess 
Alice of Monaco; on Salome and A House of Pomegranates. 

Concerning Salome, Wilde says he has arranged for the English production but hopes to 
have the premiere in Paris. He refers to A House of Pomegranates as follows: "In a 
few weeks my volume of Faery Tales comes out, and I have taken the liberty of dedi- 
cating the best to you." The story so described is The Fisherman and his Soul. 

60 



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280. WILSON, WOODROW. Half-length photograph, by Harris & Ewing, 
Washington, D. C. Signed on the mount "fPoodrow WilsonJ' Measures 13 x 
91/4 inches. {Olsen) 



THE UNITED STATES HAS NO FOREIGN FUNDS 

281. WOLCOTT, OLIVER, JR. Second Sec. of the Treasury. L.s., 1 p., 4to; 
20 June 1795. To Charles Lee, in Alexandria. 

". . . I am to inform you, that the United States have no Funds in Europe upon which 
bills can be drawn at the present moment." 



{end of sale} 



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