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4>** 



AMEEICAN, ALMANAC 



EEPOSITOKY 



trSXFUI. KNOWLKSCE. 



FOB THE YEAR 



1845. 



BOSTON; 

PtIBLISHED BT JAMES MONROE b Co 

1844. 



Entered according to act of Congress, in the year 1844, 

Br Francis Bowen, 
in the Clerk's office of the District Court of the District of Massachusetts. 



boston: 
printed by 8. n. dickinson, 
washinoton street. 



PREFACE. 



Great pains have been taken "with the present volume of the Ameri- 
can Almanac to sustain that reputation for fulness and accuracy of in- 
formation by which the work has been distinguished during the sixteen 
years of its ejcistence. By the kindness of the officers of the departments 
at Washington, and of numerous correspondents in every part of the 
United States, returns and corrections are obtained up to the latest hour, 
so as to render the Almanac as perfect a contemporaneous record as is 
possible of the government, the judiciary, the finances, and the statistics of 
the country. Amid the vast amount of materials that are collected for use, 
the difficulty of selection is great ; but the editors have always considered 
that accuracy was a point of more importance Ihan variety or quantity, and 
they have endeavored to make the work a continuous register of those sta- 
tistical and miscellaneous facts only which may be depended upon, and 
which are mi>st valuable for present use, and for reference in future years. 
An article, in this volume, upon the mistakes committed in taking the 
census for 1840, shows how easy it is to get together a great body of sup- 
posed facts, which shall be almost worthless, from the inaccuracies with 
which they abound, and from the impossibility of separating truth from 
error. 

The astronomical calculations have been made, as in former years, by 
Mr. Benjamin Peirce, Ferkins Professor of Astronomy in Harvard Univer- 
sity ; they are very full, and are believed to be worthy, in every respect, of 
his high reputation as a mathematician. The lists of officers, and the 
particulars respecting every department of the general government, the 
judiciary, army, navy, post office, public lands, revenue, and expenditure 
of the United States, are given in the most condensed form, and with even 
greater minuteness than on former occasions. Each volume of the 
American Almanac is intended to be an original and independent work, 
not a page in it being copied from one in a former volume, without nu- 
merous additions and corrections, and far the larger portion of the matter 
being entirely new. The last volume, for instance, contained hardly any 
particulars respecting the commerce of the country; in the present vol- 
ume, there is more copious information respecting this subject, drawn 
from the official records at Washington, than was probably ever before 



IT PBXFACB. 

paUished in a single woik. It is given in a series of tables, presentiB^ 
compaimtive views of the articles of import and export, tonnage, duties 
collected, costs of collection, drawbacks, bounties, &c., for a period of 22 
years. The materials for these tables, being taken from the custom^ 
bouse returns, are deserving of full credit for accuracy and completeness. 
An article commenced last year is continued in the present volume, giv- 
ing the titles and abstracts of all the public laws passed at the last ses- 
sion of Congress. The subject will be resumed in each successive year, 
so that the series of volumes will give a full view, in the shortest com- 
pass, of the general legislation of the country. The register of colleges, 
theological, medical, and law schools, ke^ has been revised and corrected 
with great care, and is quite complete. The presiding officers of these 
institutions will confer a &vor upon the editor and the public, by Ibr- 
waiding to him a copy of their annual catalogue. 

Under the head of the Individual States will be fennd a very full view 
of thmr debts and finances, and many interesting details respecting the 
common schools, internal improvements, and chariteble establishments. 
The American Obituafy for the year is the only full record of the kind 
preserved in the country, and great care is taken to render it complete 
and accurate. The information reqsectin^ the States of Europe, eqiec- 
ially Great Britain, if derived from the latest authorities, and is complete 
enough for ail common purposes of reference. 

The editor again offera his best thanks to the correspondente of the 
work, and respectfully solicits a continuation of their kindness. Any 
person who may notice errors in any part of the Almanac is earnestly 
requested to communicate them to the editor, for correction in the sub- 
sequent volume. But information to be used in the work for the next 
year must be received by him before the 1st of August 

Cambridge, Host. 
Cktober 1, 1844. 



Publisher's Adveb-tisexent. — This number contains 10 printed 
sheets; the postage, under 100 miles, is 15 cents-, over that distance, 25 
cents. The work will be sent by mail to any person who will remit $1 to 
the publisher at Boston. If the remittance be made without expense to 
the publisher, either by discount or postage, the Almanac will be sent by 
mail, pottage paid. 



CONTENTS 



PART I. 



CalMCKBAJt AND CCLSSTIXL PaVKOKlKA »&R TBI VXMl IStf. 



Chronological Cjrckts, 

Signs of iIm Zodiac, 

BeginniDg Riid length of Seasons, . 
Movable Festivals of the €kardb, . 

Jbwish Caler.dar, 

Mahometan Cntendar, 

Height of the greatest Tides, . . . 

Tide Table, 

Darkness of the Nights in 3845, . . 
Calxndar^ — ^January^&c^ . . . 

Eclipses in 1845, 

Transit of Merovry^ 

Oorultations, 

Eclipses of Japiter'^s Sat«11ites, . . 
A pp roatdhei of maaeHA to 'Stars, . . 
SaUun^s BiiigSf 



3 9)i«csof VenasaodMam, ...... ^ 

4 Sidepeal Time, increase «C 48 

4 Latitude and Longitude or Places, . . 49 

4 Latitude and Long, of Observatories, . fit 

5 Ephemeris of the Sun, S3 

5 Apparent Places of the Pole Stac, . . . JSH 
« Places of the principal fixed Stars, 61 

7 Dr. Young's Refractions, 69 

8 Sun's Parallax in Altitude, 7# 

10 Meteorological Inpokmation: — Ta- 

J2 bles fur Caoibridgpe, Saco, Dov<*r, Meu- 
"36 <k>n, Worcester, A|nl»erst, Trenton, 
40 Lambertville, Savannah, Augusta^ N. 
43 Orleans, Natchez, SteuDoaville^ 
45 Bluomington, Flowering of Fruit 
47 Trees, Pioweoug of Plants, . . . 71-81 



PART II, 



ViTITBO StATXS. 



t. executive tSovermneiit, 

Votes for Presidents 

Cabinet Nominations, 

Officers in tbe Departments, . . 

Collectors of Customs, 

Postmasteis in the Ctaef Cities, . 
S. Congress, 

Sfnate, 

House of Representatives, . . . • 

Alphabetical List of Represents, . 

9. Judiciary, 

Circtnt Courts, 

Supreme Court, 

District Courts, 

4. Tntereourie with Foreign Nations,- 
Consuls in Foreign Couutries, . . 
Foreign Ministers, . ...... 

Foreign Consuls in the U. S., . . 

5. Navy List, 

6 Army List, 

West Point Academy., 

7. Post Office Establishment, . . . . 

8. Mintj 

9. Public Lands, 

1-0. Revenue and Expenditam, . . . 

I>eJ>t of ihe ILB^ 



11, 
12. 
13. 
14. 



, 87 
€8 
«1 
«2 
«4 
^ 

08 
K)0 
103 
105 
105 
106 
106 
109 

no 

114 15 
114116. 
118 17. 
121 le. 

125 19- 

126 20. 
130 21. 
133 22. 
137 23. 
140 24. 



U. S. Revenue for 53 yean, . . . 14t 

U. S. Expenditure for 53 years, . . 143 

Abstracts of Public Laws, .... 144 

Mistakes in the Census, 154 

Whale Fishery, 16« 

Commerce, 162 

Tonnage of the U- S- 175 

Cottons imfiorted for 22 years, . . 175 

Foneign goods imported, &c., . . . 176 

Value' ofExports, 22 years, . . . 177 

Value of Imports, 22 years, . . . . 177 

Tonnage in Foreign Trade, . . - 178 

Dutie.4 and Revenue, 22 years, . . 179 

Articles imported, 2*2 years, .... 180 

Countiies whence imported, . . . 182 

Articled exported, 22 years, .... 183 

Population of the Cities, 184 

State Elections, &c., 184 

Governors of Stialea, Asc, 18S 

Colleges, 186 

Medical Schools, 191 

Theological Schools, 193 

Law Schools, 193 

Religious Denominations, .... 103 

Population at six enumerations, . 200 

Slaws in ihe United States, . . . iM 



VI 



CONTBMTS. 



IifDiYiDiTAL States. 



1. 

2. 

3. 

4. 

6. 

6. 

7. 

8. 

9. 

10. 

11. 

12. 

13. 

14. 

15. 



Page 

Maine, 201 

New Hampshire, 203 

Vermont, 206 

Massachusetts, 208 

Rhode Island, 215 

Connecticut, .218 

New York, 221 

New Jersey, 228 

Pennsylvama, 231 

DelaM'are, 238 



Maryland, 239 

Virgiiiin, 244 

North Carolina, 248 

South Carolina, 2.51 

Georgia, • . . . . 253 



16. 
17. 
18. 
19. 
20. 
21. 
22. 
23. 
24. 
25. 
26. 
27. 
28. 
29. 
30. 



Page 

Alabama, 2SS 

Mississippi, 258 

Louisiana, 202 

Arkansas, 265 

Tennessee, 267 

Kentucky, ... 271 

Ohio, 274 

Michigan, 278 

Indiana, 284 

Illinois, 280 

Missouri, 287 

Florida Territory, 290 

Wisoonsin Territory, 291 

Iowa Territory, ; 292 

District of Columbia, 293 



American States, 294|Briiish American Provinces, 



294 



Europe. 



Sovereigns of Europe, 295 

European States, ; 296 

Great BritHin, 297 

Number of the Clergy, 301 



Revenue of Great Britain, .301 

Wool and Woolen Muiiufactares, . . 309 

Shipping in Great Britain, 308 

France, 3U3 



American ORituary, 3041 Corrections aiid Additions, 

Chronicle of Events, 3251 



330 



INDEX. 



rage I Page 

▲iMtracts of Public Laws, 144' Governors of States,. ilff 

Alabama, 255 Great Britain, 297 

Airierican Obituary, 304 Illinois, 896 

American Slates, 294 Import, articles of, 22 years, 180 

Apponioiimeut fur 28th Congress, . . 97 Im {torts, value of, 22 years, 177 

Arkansas, S65 Indiana, 284 

Army Li:*t, 121 Intercourse with Foreign Nations, . . 109 

Articles imported 22 years, 180 Iowa, 292 

Articles exported, 22 years, 183 'Jewish Calendar, 5 

Baptists, Summary of, 197 Judiciary, U. S., 105 

Briti;<h American Provuices, 294 Jupiter's Satellites, Eclipses o^ . . . 45 

Caliinet, Officers in the, 87 Kentucky, 271 

Cabinet Nominations since 1841, . . . 91 Luiiiudc and Longitude of Places, . . 49 

Calendar; January, &c., 12 Law Schools, 102 

Census, Mistakes in the, 154 Laws, Abstracts of, ... 144 



Chnmide of Events, 325 

Chronological Cycles, 4 

Church Festivals, 5 

Circuit Courts, 105 

Cities, Population of, 184 

Clergy in Great Britain, 301 

Collectors of Customs, 94 

Colleges, 186 

Commerce, 362 

Commercial Statistics, 175 

Congress, 97 

Connecticut, 218 

Consuls, Foreign, in U. S., 114 

Cinisuls in Foreign Countries, .... 1 10 

Corrections and Additions, 330 

Cottons imported in 22 years, .... 175 
Countries M'hence goods are brought, 182 

Darkness of the Nights, 10 

Debt of the United States, 140 

Delaware, 238 

Departments, Officers in the, .... 92 

Discs of Venus and Mars, 48 

District Courts, 108 

District of Columbia, 293 

Duties and Revenue, 22 years, .... 179 

Eclipses ill 1845, 36 

Elections, State, 184 

Ephemens of the Sun, 53 

Episcopal Church, 193 

European States, 296 

Executive Governntent, . 87 

Expenditures, U. S., for 53 years, . . 143 

Export, articles of, 22 years, 183 

Exports, value of, 22 years, 177 

Festivals of the Church, 5 

Fixed Stnrs, Apparent Places of, . . 61 

Florida Tcmt»>ry, 290 

Flowering of Fruit Trees, 83 

Foreign Goods imported 176 

Foreign Ministers, 114 

Foreign Trade, tonnage in, 178 

France, 308 



Louisiana, 262 

Mahometan Calendar, 6 

Maine, 201 

Maryland, 239 

Massachusetts, 206 

.Medical Schools, 191 

Mercury, Transit of^ 40 

Meteorological Information, 71 

Michigan, 278 



Mint, 



130 



Oemgia, * Sa3|6«cani'to Rings, 



Mississippi, 258 

Missouri, ... 287 

Mistakes in the Census, 154 

Navy List, 118 

New Hampshire, 2(0 

New Jersey, 228 

New York, 221 

Nights, Darkness of the, 10 

North Carolina, 248 

Observatories, Lat. and Long, of, . . S3 

Occuitations, 43 

Ohio, 274 

Parallax in Altitude of the Snn, ... 70 

Pennsylvania, 231 

Planeu, near approaches of, 47 

Plants, Flowering of. 84 

Pole Star, places of the, 89 

Population bv six enumerations, . . . SOD 

Population of Cities, 184 

Postmasters, 95 

Posi-Office Establishment, 126 

Presidents, Votes for, 88 

Public Lands. 133 

Retractions, Dr. Young's, 69 

Religious Denominations, 193 

Representatives, House of, ^ 100 

Revenue and Expenditure, ' 137 

Revenue, U. S., for 53 years, .... 142 
Revenueof Great Britain, . ..... 301 

Rhode Island, 215 

Roman Catholic Church, 193 

Satellites of Jupiter, Eclipses of, . . . 45 



▼Ul 



>,B«giimiiif ttd lagthofy. . 4>Tide Table, 

Senate of tte U. 8~ 9e:Tiiies, Heiglif of GreatesC, . 

SUppnff m Great Briiain, 802 Tonnage of the U. B.,. . . 

Sidereal Time. Ineieaae of, 48; Tonnage in Porrign Trade, 

Sign* of the flanela, 3|Traiiah of Merewy. . . . . 

Slarea in tiw Unifed fltatea, 9D0 Venue and Maie,.Diac»ofr. 



Vermont, 

Virginia, 

Voles (or PreeidenUi, . 
Wmc Point Acaderay, 



Soolb Carolina, 851 

Soverewne of EoTope, 296 

Stare, Fixed, Apnarent Flacea of, . . 61 

Scale Eleeiinne,icc^ 1S1 ..,« ....... ^» 

Sim. Epbemerie of ibe, 53i Whale Flehery, . . . . 

Son's nnXlmx in Altinide, . . • . . 70 Wiaamain Territory^ . 

Supreme Cowt, 160 Wool in Great Britam, 

Te nn ese ee , SK7 Yonng'a Refractions, . 

TieolofkdS^ooIi, ltte[Zodiac, Sign* of tbe^ . 



B 

7 

175 

179 

40 

49 

S0» 

2U 

H» 

]^ 

KO 

4 



THI 



AMERICAN ALMANAC, 



FOK 



1845. 



PABT I. 



^ 



TXX 



AMERICAN ALMANAC, 

FOftTHSTEAB 

1845, 

Being the latter part of the 69th, and the beginning of the 70th, 
year of the Independence of the United States of America ; 

^ the 6558th year of the Julian Period ; 

'' the latter part of the 5605th and the beginning of the 
5606th, year since the creation of the world, according to 
the Jews ; 

'' the 2598th year (according to Yarro) since the foundation 
of Rome ; 

<< the 2592d year since the era of Nabonassar, which has been 
assigned to Wednesday, the 26th of February of the 3967th 
year of the Julian Period, which corresponds, according to 
the chronologists, to the 747th, and, according to the as* 
tronomers, to the 746th year, before the birth of Christ ; 

'' the 2621st year of the Olympiads, or the first year of the 
656th Olympiad, beginning in July, 1843, if we fix the 
era of the Olympiads at 775i| years before Christ, or at or 
about the beginning of July of the year 3938 of the Julian 
Period ; 

'' the latter part of the 1260th, and the beginning of the 1261st 
year (of twelve lunations) since the Hegira, or flight of 
Mahomet, which, as is generally supposed, took place on 
the 16th of July, in the year 662 of the Christian era. 



I. THE CALENDAR 
AND CELESTIAL PHENOMENA FOR THE YEAR 



s 



SIGNS OF THE PLANETS, &o. 

The Sun. ^ Mars. 

The Earth. g Vesta. 

P_0 a The Moon. fi Juno. 

5 Pallas. 



9 Mercury. 
$ Venus. 



$ Ceres. 

1|. Jupiter. 

Yl Satam. 

U Herschel or Uranus. 

£ A fixed star. 



(5 Conjunction, or having the same Longitude or Right Ascension. 
D Quadrature, or differing 90® in " " " 

S (h)position, or " 180° in « u a 

A The ascending, t} the descending node. 



4 CHBOMOLOeiCAL CTCI»Si^ AlOllt OF TKB BOAIAC, HO. [lSi5. 

The niffk -^ it piefixad to the latitade, or deeliaatioti, of the Sun, or 
other heavenly hody, when norths and the sign — when touth ; but the 
foimer prefixed to the honily motioB of the Moon in latitude, indicatei 
that she is approaching, and the latter that she ia receding firom, the 
morth pole of the ecliptic. 

The letters M.ji^m,a^ denote Mtrmng and j^termoon. 



CHRONOLOGICAL CYCLES. 



Dominical Letter, • £• 

Epact 22 

Lunar Cycle, or Golden Number, 3 



Solar Cycle, • 
Roman IndictioB, 
Julian Period, 



6 
• 3 
6558 



SIGNS OF THE ZODLA.a 



Spring 



Summer, 
signs. 



1. cp Aries. 

2. ^ Taurus. 

3. n Gemini. 
4 G Cancer. 

5. j) Leo. 

6. n$ Virgo. 



Autumn 
signs. 

Tenter 
signs. 



7. :^ libra. 

8. m Scoipio. 

9. / Sagittarius. 

10. VT Capricomus. 

11. ta Aquarius. 

12. H Pisces. 



BEGINNING AND LENGTH OF THE SEASONS. 



h. in* s. 



Sun enters Vf (Winter begins) 1844, Dec. 2l8t, 11 22 56 M."! 
*' '' cp (Spring '' 1845, March 20th, 35 32 A. M. Time 
•* ** G (Summer «• ** June 21 st, 9 34 18M. V at 

:^( Autumn ** " Sept. 22d, 11 45 41 A. Wash'ton. 

Vf ( Winter •* « Dec. 21st, 5 18 54 A. J 



M 



Sunin the Winter Signs • . • 89 1 12 36 

** ** Spring 92 20 58 46 

«* « Summer . . . . 93 14 11 23 

« " Autumn 89 17 33 13 

" north of Equator, (Spring and Summer) 186 11 10 9 
«'south of " (Winter and Autumn) 178 18 45 49 

Le^Qgth of the tropical year, commenciiig f 

at the winter solstice, 1843, and termi- > 365 5 55 58 

nating at the winter solstice, 1844, 3 
Mean or average length of the trc^ical year, 3d5 5 48 49 



1845.] 



MOTABLX FXSTXYALS. JXWISH CALXIIDAX. 



MOVABLE FESTIVALS OF THE CHURCH, IN 1843. 



Septttagesima Sunday, 
Quina. or ShroYe do. 
Ash Wed. Lent begins, 
Mid Lent Sunday, 
Palm do 

Eaater do 

Low do 



Jan. 19th 
Feb. 2d 
« 5th 
Mar. 2d 
" 16th 
•* 23d 
" 30th 



Rogation Sunday, Apr. 27th 

Ascen. Day, or Holy Th. May Ist 
Whitsunday or Pentecost, ^ 11th 

Trinity Sunday, " 18th 

Corpus Christi Day, ) u qqiI 

Ffite Dieu, > '^ 

Advent Sunday, Nov. 30th 



JEWISH CALENDAR. 

[Tlw anniTenaries marked with an asterisk (*) are to be strictly obsenred.] 

Tear. Names of the Months. 

5605 Sebat begins . Jan. 10, 1845. 

** Adar begins Feb. 9, " 

" Veader begins .(intercalary month) . Max. 10, ** 

•« " 13th Fast of Esther .... «* 22, " 

« « 14th ♦Purim ..... " 23, «* 

•« ** 15th Schuscan Purim . . . . ** 24, * 

** Nisan begins Apr. 8, **, 

" ** 15th *Beginning of the Passover . . « 22, ** 
M (* 16th ^Second Feast, or Morrow of the 

Passover " 23, ** 

* •* 21st ♦Seventh Feast . . . . ' « 28, « 

« « 22d ♦End of the Passover ..." 29, •» 

« Ijar begins May 8, •* 

•« « 18th Lag Beomer .... " 25, " 

'* Sivan begins June 6, ** 

•« « 6th ♦Feast of Weeks or Pentecost -. " 11, " 

•« « 7th ♦Second Feast . . . . « 12, « 

** Thammus begins July 6, " 

<* >* 17th Fast for the taking of the Temple " 22, **. 

** Ab begins • Aug. 4, " 

« " 9th ♦Fast for the burning of the Temple " 12, « 

« EIuI begins Sept 3, « 

9606 Tisri begins ♦Feast for the New Year . Oct. 2, '* 
« « 2d ♦Second Feast for the New Year « 3, ** 
« " 4th Fast of Gedaljah, ... « 5, ** 
** ** 10th ♦Fast of the Reconciliation or Atone- 
ment « 11, ** 

«• «• 15th ^ ♦Feast of the Huts or Tabernacles " 16, «• 

" •* 16th ♦Second Feast of the Huts . " 17, «* 

1* 



6* M'ASoicsTAir OAtKiriiAft. [ISid; 

Tear. Nim«t ef IIm Mbiitk»« 

5Q06 Tisri 2l8t Feast of Palms or Branches Oct 22, 1845^ 

•* ** 22d *£ndoftheHut,orCoagregatiOBFeft94 << 23, ** 
«« <^ 2Sd *RejoiciAgfor the discovery of tlM Lair <^ 24, * 

** Marchesvan begins Nor. 1, * 

« Chisleu begins « 30, " 

** *< 25th Conseeiatioa of the Temple . Pec. 24, ^ 

« Thebet begins « 30, «« 

u « 10th Fast for the Siege of Jerusalem Jan. 8, 1846. 

The Jewish year generally contains 354 days, or 12 lunations of the 
Moon, bat, in a cycle of 19 years, an intercalary month (Yeadar) is 7 
times introduced, for the putpoee of rendeiing the average duration of 
the year quite or nearly correct. 



MAHOMETAN CALEKITAll. 

Year. Names of the Mbntha. 

1261 Muharrem ^ Jan. 10, 1849* 

" Saphar *• Feb. 9, ** 

** Rabia L " Mar. 10, « 

" Rabia IL « April 9, « 

« JomadWr. " May 8, « 

« JomadhilL " June 7, " 

♦* Redjeb " July 6, « 

« Chaban " Aug. 5^ " 

« Ramadan ** (Month of Fasting) . . Sept. 3, " 

« Schcwall " (Bairam) .... Oct 3^ " 

" Dsu'l-kadah « Nov. 1, « 

« Dsu'l-heijah " Dec. 1, « 

1262 Muharrem « "30^" 

The Mahometan Era-^^ir f«dm the flight of *Mah6m^ to Medina, 
July 16th, A. D. 662. 

The Mahometan year is ptirely lunar; it consists of 12 synodicfU 
periods of the Moon, or of 354 days, 19 times in a cycle of 30 years,, 
and 11 times of 355 days. The average length of this year is therefore 
354|J days, which differs only thirty-three seconds from the truth ; a degree 
of exactness that only could have been attained by a long series of obser- 
vations. But as no allowance is made for the excess of 11 days in the 
length of a tropical year over the time of 12 revolutions of the Moon, it 
is obvious that in about 33 years, the above months will correspond to 
every season and eVery part of the Gregorian year. 



1^ 



HXIOKT of ftPEilid TIDS8. 



HEIGHT or THE GREATEST OR SPRING TIDES IN 18«8; 

Oon^nsMi by the fortmdd pf'taplace {Micainique Osteite; Vol. IL pp. 2^9 

Ptiris ed,, ahd [2858] Bowd. edJjj 



NeworFuU 
])Aoon. 



Height of 
the tide. 



New Moon, 

FuU ** 

New « 

FnU " 

New « 

FuU « 

New " 

FuU ** 

N^w " 

FuU « 

New « 

FoU « 

New « 



d. 
Jan. 8, 

23» 
Feb. 6, 

22, 
Mazeh 8, 

23, 
April 6, 

22, 



June 
July 



6, 
21, 

19, 
4, 



2M. 

9M. 

1 A. 

2M. 

IM. 

3 A. 

3 A. 

2M. 

5M. 
11 M. 

7 'A. 

6M. 
11 M. 



1.03 
0.84 
1.05 
0.95 
1.02 

im 

0.93 
1.02 
0.82 
1.00 
0.75 
1.00 
0.75 



New or Foil 
Moon- 



Full Moon, 

New 
FuU 
New 
FuU 

New 
FuU 
New 
FuU 
New 
FuU 
New 



(4 
tt 
t( 
U 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 

u 



July 
Aug. 

Sept 

Oct 



Ntft.- 
Dec. 



-X- 

19, 

n, 

1, 

15, 

15, 
30, 

Id, 

29, 
28, 



Height of 

thijB tide. 



iiil 

2M. 
8^t 

4 A. 

5 A. 
6M. 
5M. 

A. 
A. 
A. 
A. 
A. 



7 
8 
9 
2 
6 



1.04 
0^2 
1.08 
91 
105 
0.97 
0.95 
0.91 
0.85 
0.99 
0.78 
1.03 



The unit of altitude at any place, ia the height at that place of that 
tide which -arrives aJbout a day and a half after the time of i^ew or Full- 
Moon, when the Sun and Moon at the moment of conjunction or opposi- 
tion are at their mean distance from the Earthy and in thi6 -ghiSM of the' 
celestial equator. 

l^his umt of altkude, i^hich must he derired from observtitiou for each 
place, multiplied by the quantities in the above table, gives th^ height of 
the spring tides at that place during the present year. 

By the above table it appears, that the highest tides of l'84t$' wiU be 
those of February 8, Au^st 19, and September 17. 

The actual rise of the tide, however, depends so much upon the stfeh^^th 
and direction of the wind, that it not unfrequently happens that a tide, 
which would, inde)pendently of these, have been small, is higher than 
another,- otherwise much greater.- But when a tide, which arrives wheii 
the Sun and Moon ai^e in a favorable position for producing a ^^eyt eleva* 
tion, is still further increased by a very strong wind, the rise of the water 
will be uncommonly great, sufficient perhaps to cause damage. 

The formula, from which these tides were computed, is, however, 
strictly true only for Brest and its vicioity, and must be regarded as a 
very uncertain approximation for the coast of the United States. 

The fdUowing table contiund the Unit^of Altitude of several pprb^ ibid 
places on the coast of America, according to the beirt au^oritiek. 

The unit of altitude of the several j>laces^uQi the'.Bay of Fundy vrid 
ascertained by^xeeent observations. 



F«et 
Advocate Harbor, (Bay^of Fundy) 50 
Andrews, St. • *• •25 
Annapolis, (N. 9.) • • • 30^ 
Apple Kiver • • • 50 

Augustine, St ... 

Ba»n of Mines, (Bay of Fundy) 
Bay, Bristed • • ' • 

" Broad . • • • 
■ " Buzzard's • «. 

" Casco 



5 
60 
8 
9 
5 
9 



tt 



' ■■ feet 

Bay, Cigneoto, (north psft'of Bay 

of Fundy) /• ' . 60 
St. Mary's • • • 16 
Vert • . • • 7 

Beaver Harbor • • • 7 
Bell Island Straits • • 30~ 
Block Island • • • ' • 6 
Boston .... 11| 
Cape Ann • • • « 11 
if Blomidom, (day of Fundy) GO 



TIBX TABLS. 



{1845., 



u 
II 
« 
tt 
w 

M 

l( 
il 
It 

M 



Cape Chat • 

Cod Light Hoofe • 
'* Harbor 

D'Or,(Bayof Fundy) 

Henlopen • • 

Henry 

Lookout • 

May • 

St Alary 

Sable 

Split, (Bay of Fondy) 
Chabliston, (S. Cj 
Cumberknd (Basin Fort) head 

the Bay of Fundy 
Digby, (N. S.) . 
Eastport 
Elisabeth Isles 

" Town Point 
Florida Keys 
Gay Head, (Vineyard) 
George's River 
Georgetown Bar 
Goulasborough 
Green Islands 
Gut of Annapolis 
Out of Censor 
Halifax 

Hampton Roads 
Hillsborou|rh Inlet 
Holmes*s Hole 
John's, St. (N. B.) 
« " (N. F.) 
Xennebeo 
Keunebunk 
Lon^ Island Sound 
Louisburg, (C. B.) 
Machias 
Marblehead 
Mary's, St Bar • 
Monomoy Point 



of 



TMt 

13 

6i 
11 
50 

5 

4i 

9 

6 
14 

9 
55 

6 



71 
30 
25 

5 

5 

5 

5 

9 

4 
12 
16 
30 

8 

8 

5 

5 

4 
30 

7 

9 

9 

5 

5h 
12 
11 

7 

6 



Moose River, (Bay of Fnndy) 

*' Inland, (Me.) 
Mount Desert 
Mouths of the Mississippi 
Nantucket, Shoal and lown 
Nassau, (N. P.) 
New Bedford 
Newburyport 
New Haven 
Newport • 

New Yobs 
Norfolk 



Partridge Island, (Bay of Fundy) 55 

Fassamaquoddy River • 35 

Penobscot River 10 

Plymouth • • •111 

Portland .... 9 

Port Homer • • . • 8 

" Hood .... 6 

'* Jackson .... 8 

" Roseway ... 8 

Portsmouth, (N. H.) • • 10 

Prince Edward^s Island 6 

Providence .... 5 

Rhode Island Harbor • 5 

Richmond • •4 

Salem, (Mass.) • • • 11 

Sandwich Bay • ■ 8 

Sandy Hook ... 5 

Seven Isles Harbor • 31 

Sbeepscut River 9 
Shubenacadie River, (B. of Fun.) 70 

Simon's, St. Bar 6 

" « Sound 6 

Townsend Harbor 9 

Truro, (Bay of Fundy) • . 70 

Vineyard sound • • 5 

Windsor, ( Ray of Fundy) • 60 

Wood's Hole ... 5 

Yarmouth, (N. S.) • • • 12 



FMt 

30 

25 
12 

U 
5 
7 
5 
10 
8 
5 
5 
5 



TIDE TABLE. 

The following Table contains the difference between the time of high 
water at Boston, and at a large number of places on the American coast, 
by which the time at any of them may be easily ascertained, by tubtract- 
ifig the difference at the place in Question from the time at Boston, when 
the sign — is prefixed to it ; and oy adding it, when the sign is +. 
. The time of high water, in the calendar pages, is of that tide which 
immediately jirece^et the southing of the Moon. 



• 


h. m. 


n. n.' 


Albany 


. + 4 12 


Bay, Casco' . — 45 


Andrews, St . 





« Chebucto .—40 


Annapolis, (N. S.) 


. —030 


*< Genevieve dc St Barbe 


Annapolis, (Md) 


— 4 18 


» Buzzard's . . . — 3 50 


Augustine, St 


. —4 


*« Narraganset — 3 53 


Bay, Bristed 


— 3 45 


« Pistolet . — 445 


•^ Bioad . . 


. . —045 


« St Mary's —20 



tM,] 



tiStt «▲)&«. 



u 

M 
CI 
U 
«l 
U 
« 
U 
CI 
(C 

cc 

tt 
U 



Bay, Sandwich, (N. S.) 

„ Schecatica 
Bermuda Inlet • 
Gape Aaa 
Caneor 
Charles . 
Chat . 
Chnrc&ifl 
God • • • 
Fear • • 
Hatteras 
Henlopen • 
Henry 

Lookout • 

St Mary . 
May 

B;omaiii,(S. C.) . 
Sable, (N. S.) 
Split . 
Charleston . 
Cumberland, (Basin Fort) 
Eastport 

Elizabeth Town Poiat, 
Florida Key 
Fort St John 
Fryinjrpan Shoals, • 
Gay Head • 

Georgetown Bar 
Goulasborough, . 
Gut of Annapolis 
Gut of Cansor 
Halifax 

Hampton Eoeds 
Harbour, Amelia 
" Beaver 
*• Nantucket 
" Rhode Island 
" Seven Isles • 
** Townsend • 
Hillsborough Inlet 
Holmes's Hole 
Ice Cove 

Island, Anticosti, W. end 
Bell, Straits of 
Block 
Button 
Elizabeth 
Fox 
Green 
Moose 

Prince Edwaid 
lUiode 
Sable 
Seal 
J4neiro, Rio 
John's, St (N. B.) . 



u 
a 
u 
<i 
cc 
cc 
u 
cc 
cc 
cc 

CI 



li. na. 


. —230 


. —030 


. —430 





. —3 


. —3 45 


. +030 


. —410 





. —330 


. —230 


— 245 


. —3 50 


. —3 50 


. —230 


. —245 


. —3 30 


. —330 


. -^-O 15 


. —4 


> . +0 30 





. —2 36 


— 240 


. —230 


. —5 


. —353 


. —430 


: —0 30 


. —1 30 


. —330 


— 4 


. —330 


. —3 


. —245 


+ 030 


. —4 45 


. —0 30 


. —045 


. —4 


. —1 20 


. —1 30 


. +4 


. —2 15 


. —3 53 


. —440 


. —250 


. —0 45 


. —250 


. —0 


. —1 


. —445 


. —3 


. —245 


. +5 


. +030 



John's, St (N. F.) 
Kennebec . • 

Kennebunk 
Louisburg; • • 

Machias • • 
Marblehead . , 
Martha's Vineyard, ( W. Ft) 
Mary's, St Bai^ 
Monoraoy Point • 
Mount Ciesert • 
Nantucket, (Town) 
» (Shoal) 
Nassau, (N. P.) . 
New Bedford . • 
Newburyport 
New Haven 
New London 
Newport • • 

Nsw York 
Nootka Sound 
Norfollc 

Ocracock Inlet % 

Old Point Comfort 
Philadelphia 
Plymoutn • • 
Portland 

Portsmouth, (N. H.) 
Port Campbell 
" Hood . 
Howe • 
Jisckson 
Roseway • 

Royal . 

Providence 
Quebec 
Race Point 
Richmond 
River, Apple . • 

" St Croix . 

<< Delaware, entrance 

« Georflfc's 

" Penobscot 

** Sheepscut 
Salem, (Mass.) • 
Salvador, St 
Sandy Hook 
Savannah 
St Simon's Bar 
" w Offing 
« (( Sound . 
Sunbury 
Tarpaulin Cove 
Vineyard Sound . 
Windsor . . : 
Wood's Hdl0 



k. m. 


— 5 


— 045 


— 15 


— 4 15 


— 030 





— 3 53 


— 4 





— 030 


+ 030 


-^044 


— 4 


— 3 30 


— 15 


— 14 


— 2 36 


— 350 


•«*22b 


+ 050 


— 3 


— 230 


— 5 25 


+ 2iW 





— 045 


— 15 


— 2 30 


— 4 


-3 


— 330 


— 3 15 


— 4 14 


— 3 5 


— 530 


— IS 


+ 420 


— 30 





-2 30 


— 048 


— 045 


— 045 


— Q 


+ 4 15 


— 436» 


— 3 15 


— 4 


— 230 


— 2 


— 2 38 


— 3a 


+ 030 


— 2 56 



DARKNESS OF THE NIGHTS DTTRING THE TEAS lG4ft. 
For Boiton,lfiu> Fori, Pluladiiphia, WaMi^<m, V- 
He namber of honn M ihe top of Iha fNige dendiea tha arsnigE tune la iba mooili tto 
Iba end cfpTpninf twiligbt 10 llM begintuiif oTmoniiiig Iwilight, 

The dou in iIk uUe duwte tbs honn of endn dulmw, when then ]t neidwr la 
" — ~DT IwiUghl, uid U»]T diapodlloil dencpta the boun before or after midnfgbl. 



1 


rwnuT 


Feb-T 


Much 


April 


H.T 


lun 


Jul, 


Aug 


StIM 


Oct. 


Nor. 


Dec. 


11 h. 


lib. 


Sh. 


8h. 


7 b, 


Sh 


«b 


Tb. 


8h. 


Bb. 


lib. 


19 h. 




_...l. 


:.:.... 


■■■■:: 


"■'" 


:; 


...- 


..?■ 


...Q- 


..s'" 


? 


:::: 


z~... 




.,._■-■ 


,.._- 


.._.- 


....~ 


....® 


s" 


-" 


:;: 


■"I 


,...- 


'H 


•"■"■ 




-.^"'*" 


....a" 


Q. 


I- 


■": 


- 


■-" 


":.. 


a. - 


'C 


«. 




„ 


_.-■ 


■■"■■ 


...-■ 


.-■ 


'.. 


■■■ 


«." 


a.- 


... 








u 


..__. 






._ 


„ 


a-- 


.■■ 












13 


.._.. 


f- 


.... 




«■■ 


,- 


•■ 






1 ■ 
1 


• 




IS 

u 


tt-~ 




<■- 


<■ 








• 


1 
•1 






n 
















IE 








18 












• 








... 




U 










• 














ao 








• 












...„ 




at 


• 




• 








■ 




... 


» 


— 1. 


M 
















-5 


....B 






9S 




• 










. 






.....■■ 


.....-■ 


M 




. 


. 




,. 




,.» 




....■ 




.....-■ 


ES 




.. 


.. 


■ 


•D 


.!> 






....■■ 


-...-■ 


.....—■ 


M 




_ 


... 


.. 


.. 




... 


...-■ 




.,„— 


.....—- 


ar 




.... 


...■ 


~Tt 


.. 






... ■ 


....-■ 


.....•■■■ 




9S 


.... 


....•» 


„..•■» 


...■■J 


: 


-■ 


; 


■■■" 


...-. 


-■;■■ 


s- 


...©" 


31 


-■"■* 




■•-■■ 


...■■ 


•■" 


"■■ 


"■■ 


"g- 


_..- 


■s" 




•-■— 



DAKKirSSS or TBS NieKT8, 



1845.] 

BARENESS OF THE NIGHTS DURING THE TEAR 184& 

For Charlatofij New Orkani^ ifc. 



11 






3 
3 

4 

5 

7 
8 
9 
10 
U 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
SO 
21 
92 
S3 
91 
SS 
96 
27 
28 
39 
90 
31 



January 
Uh. 



• •••• 



•••••• 



.•D 



Feb'y. 
10 h. 



0- 



d 



Biarch 
9h. 



.0 



([•••• 



April 
8h. 



May 

7h. 



<[•" 



•9 



e- 



June 
7h. 



July 
71u 



•0 



f 



C" 



.../D 



<[" 



C- 



Aug. 



••0 

**f t 



Sept. 
Oh. 



•0 



C... 



• 


• 


•• 


•• 


••• 


••• 


• •• 


•<•• 


• ••• 


....D 


• Tl 


• 


•••• if 


•••• 


•• 


• 


•••• 


• ••• 


•• 


•• 


•■<• 


•••• 




• •• 



Q."' 



<[.••" 



Oct 
10 h. 



1 



Nov. 
Uh. 



^,«... 



.*.]> 



..]> 






i 



Dee. 
Uh. 






<[••• 



..mD 



0. 



.•]> 



.0 



.••.•]> 



0. 



.••0 



12 Ja/nuary^ First Month, begins on Wednesday. [1845. 


Twiiij^ b«gin« and ends. Mean taie . 


Boffton, 


let day 


7th day. 


Idthday. 


19th day. | 


2Sth day. | 


Begins. 
h>Ql* 
5 48 m 


Ends 
h.in. 

6 3aa 


Begins. Rnds. 
h. m. h. on. 

5 48m 6 24a 


Begins. 
h.m. 
5 48m 


I^ds. Begins 
h. m. h. m. 

6 29a 5 47m 


. Ends, 
h.m, 

635a 


Begins. 
h.ui, 
5 44m 


Bnds. 

6 4ea 


N* Yoik, 


5 40 


6 29 


5 46 6 26 


5 46 


631 545 


637 


542 


6 44 


W«h. 


643 


^89 


544 699 


5 44 


6 34 5 43 


639 


5 41 


6 45 


^Mfiec* 


5 35 


6 33 


536 637 


5 37 


641 536 


646 


5 35 


6 SI 


NlOxfi, 


5 31 


6 37 


533 «40 


5 34 


644 i 


S33 


649 


5 32 


6 54 


rXSIOXB AITD APOGXS 01* THX MOOR. 

Perigee, 7th Avjy Oh. M. | Apogee, 19th day, 5h. A. 


PKASKS O* THV MOON. 

Last Qnarter, lit day. lOh. 12.9m. M. Full Moon, S3d day, 9h. IS.Im. M 
New Moon,' 8tfa «< » kJ^ A. Last Quarter, aOth "^ 6 4*7.^ A. 
Firtt Quarter, 15th « 3 43.7 M- 


A 


1 

■s 

1 


Sun's ifg^r limb rises and setis, (corr. lor refract.) Ml T. 


High Water. M.' time. 


1 

•a 

1 

1 


4 


. r 


9S 






• 

1 


i 


|-8 


W. 


h.m. 
7 30 


Mets. 

h.m. 

4 38 


rises. 
h.m. 

7 25 


sets. 
h«m. 

4 43 


rtses, 
h.m. 

7 19 


sets. 
h.m. 

4 49 


rises. 
h. m. 
7 3 


sets. 

h«mu 
5 6 


rues. 

h.m. 
6 57 


sets. 
h.m. 

5 11 


h.m. 
357m 


h.m. 
137m 


• h.nv 

• • • 


2 


Th. 


m 


39 


25 


44 


161 


60 


3 


6 


57 


12 


444 


294 


Q 44m 


3 


F. 


30 


40 


25 


45 


19 


SL 


3 


7 


67 


13 


541 


3 21 


1 41 


4 
5 


S. 
8u. 


30 
7 30 


41 


25 


46 
4 47 


19 
7 19 


03 


3 


7 


68 


13 


654 


434 


2 54 


4 43 


7 2& 


453 


7 3 


5 8 


6 58 


5 14 


8 llm 


5 6im 


4lim 


6 


M, 


30 


43 


25 


48 


19 


54 


3 


9 


53 


14 


924 


7 4 


524 


7 


Tu. 


30 


44 


25 


4ft 


19 


55 


3 


10 


58 


15 


10 26 


8 6 


629 


8 


W. 


30 


45 


2^ 


50 


19 


56 


3 


11 


68 


16 


1121 


9 1 


721 


9 


Th. 


30 


46 


2a 


51 


19 


57 


3 


12 


68 


17 


12a 


962 


812 


10 


F. 


. *^ 


47 


24 


53 


19 


58 


3 


13 


68 


18 


059 


10 39 


8 69 


11 
l"? 


S. 
Su, 


29 
7 29 


48 


24 


53 


18 


59 


3 


14 


58 


18 


144 


1124 


944 


4 49 


724 


4 54 


7 18 


5 


7 3 


5 14 


6 58 


5 19 


996CI 


6a 


10 26m 


13 


M. 


28 


50 


23 


55 


18 


1 


3 


15 


68 


20 


3 9 


49 


11 ft 


14 


Tu. 


28 


51 


23 


56 


17 


2 


3. 


16. 


53 


21 


349 


129 


1149 


15 


W. 


27 


53 


22 


58 


17 


3 


3 


17 


57 


22 


43a 


3 12 


33a 


16 


Th. 


27 


64 


22 


59 


17 


4 


3 


17 


57 


23 


520 


3 


120 


17 


F. 


96 


55 


21 


5 Q 


16 


5 


2 


18 


57 


23 


629 


4 9 


929 


1$ 
19 


S. 


26 


56 


21 


1 


16 


6 
5 7 


2 

7 2 


19 
5 20 


67 
6 57 


24 

5 26 


743 


522 


342 


725 


4 5B 


720 


5 2 


716 


8 56a 


6 38a 


466a 


20 


M. 


24 


69! 


20 


3 


14 


8 


1 


20 


56 


26 


10 1 


7 41 


6 1 


21 


Tu, 


23 


«. ^ 


18 


4. 


14 


9 


1 


21 


66 


27 


10 43 


a28 


648 


22 


W. 


22 


1 


18 


5 


13 


10 


1 


22 


56 


28 


1126 


9 6 


7 26 


23 


Tfc 


22 


^ 


18 


7 


12 


12 





23 


66 


29 


• • • 


942 


8 2 


24 


F. 


81 


4: 


17 


8. 


12 


13 





24 


66 


30 


9 2m 


10 17 


a37 


25 
20 


S. 


20 


5 


16 


9 


11 


14 


659 


25 


65 


31 
532 


037 


10 49 


9 ft 


5tt. 


720 


5 6 


7 15 


5 10 


7 10 


5 15 


659 


526 


654 


1 9m 


11 2ia 


9 4fa 


27 


M; 


19 


7 


14 


11 


10 


16 


58 


27 


' 54 


33 


141 


1166 


10 16 


2a 


Tu. 


19- 


9 


14 


13 


9 


17 


. 68 


29 


. 63 


34 


2 16 


• • • 


10 51 


29 


W. 


17 


10 


13 


14 


8 


19 


57 


30 


63 


35 


261 


31m 


1189 


30 


TL 


Ifi 


U 


- 12- 


15 


8 


20 


57 


31 


62 


36 


329 


1 ft 


• • • 


31 


F. « 15 


13 


11 


17 


7 


21 


56 


33. 


63 


37 


4 14 


1 64 


14m 



1845.] 



Jcmuary has Thirty^one Days, 



19 



Paasage of the Meridian (meaii time) and Declinalion of the PlaneU. 

~~ 25th dii^. 



Ist day 



South*. 
li*ni. 

1 soa 

94^11 
8 16 

3 3ia 
3 14m 

11 42 

.0 18a 

5 6 
1 51 
5 25 



Dec. 

— 20 23 
— 20 15 
— ^16 29 
— ^16 24 

— 12 
-|-3 4 
— 26 50 

— 2 17 
— ^19 18 
-(-022 



7th day. 



Sottths. 
h. m. 

49a 

9 5im 

8 10 

3 18a 
2 48m 
11 27 



Dec. 

— ^18 63 
— 21 26 
— ^17 33 
— ^15 23 
-4-0 1 
-f-3 10 



4 46 

1 30 

5 2 



5a — 25 51 



- 1 56 
— 19 9 
-|-0 25 



13th day. 



Souths. Dec. 
h. m. 

11 56m| — ^18 39 
9 69 
8 2 

3 5a 

2 23m 
11 12 
11 52 

4 25a 

1 9 

4 39 



I 



ST 



1 
2 
3 

4 

6 

7 
8 
9 
10 
11 



8 3 
«> 



h. m. 

5 4im 

631 
724 
821 



922m 
10 25 
1128 

029a 

1 27 

221 

3 11 



s. 

13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 



S, 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 

^ 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 



Moon rises or sets. Mean time. 



16 
— ^18 36 
— ^14 22 
-[-0 21 
4-3 19 
—86 41 
— 1 32 
18 58 
-|- 29 



19th day. 



Souths. Dec. 
h. m. 

11 7ml — ^19 18 



10 8 



7 64 —19 29 



2 5ia 
1 56m 

10 57 

11 38 
4 6a 
49 
4 16 



42 



•13 18 
14-0 61 

-332 
— 26 28 

— 1 7 
— ^18 48 
-f-0 33 



Souths 
htm. 

10 38m 

10 16 

746 

2 38a 

1 3om 

10 41 

11 25 

3 46a 
028 
353 



Dec. 

— 20 14 
--S2 48 

— 20 19 
— ^12 14 

4-130 
+ 348 
— 26 14 
— 040 
— 18 37 
4-038 



I 



rtses. 
h. m. 



56m 

2 6 

3 IS 



359a 
445 

6 31 

6 16 

7 2 
7 49 
838 



926a 

10 14 

11 3 
U 60 

8 
036m 
1 22 



2 7m 

2 63 
339 
428 
6 18 
6 13 



4 20m 
6 37 

sets. 

5 37a 
653 

8 4 

9 15 



i0 2ia 

1125 



I 



rtses. 
h. m. 



64m 

2 2 

3 14 



4 26m 

5 33 
sets. 

6 4ia 
666 

8 7 

9 16 



28m 
129 
2 27 
324 



4 16m 
6 4 
648 

rises. 
6 3la 
6 37 
735 



8 38a 
943 

10 60 

11 67 



1 8m 



I0 20a 

1124 



026m 
126 
223 
3 19 



4 12m 

5 

6 44 

rises. 
634a 
639 
738 



830a 
9 42 

10 49 

11 54 



1 4m 



s 

I 



rues. 
h.m. 



5im 

2 

3 10 



4 2lm 
528 
sets., 

6 47a 

7 

8 9 

9 17 



10 2ia 
1123 



24m 

1 23 

2 19 

3 16 



4 7m 

4 65 

540 

rises. 

638a 

6 41 

739 



8 40a 
943 
10 47 
U 52 



1 om 



I 

6 



nses. 
h.m. 



45m 

1 50 

2 57 



4 6m 

6 12 
sets. 

5 59a 

7 8 

8 15 

9 19 



10 19a 

11 17 



16m 

1 12 

2 6 

3 1 



3 62m 

440 

525 

rius. 
54da 
648 
742 



8 4ia 

940 

10 40 

11 43 



048m 



o 



rtses. 
h.m. 



044m 

1 47 

2 54 



4 im 

5 7 

sets. 

6 6a 

7 14 

8 18 
921 



10 19a 

11 17 

• • • 

14m 

1 9 

2 3 
2 56 



3 47m 

434 

621 

rises. 
5 63a 
661 
7 46 



8«a 

940 
10 40 
U 41 



46m 



PHENOMENA AND OBSERVA- 
TIONS. 

Sundays and Holidays. 



Washington Mean ^Kme. 
d. h. m* , f 

1 6 8a. ^ in Q 

2 10 64a. ^ Btationanr. 

4 6 22m.^ <JC ^ 2 3N. 

6 7 64a. ^ 9C, 9 0'28N. 
2d Sunday after Christmas, 
Epiphany. 

6 10 37a. (J^^X, * 151 S. 

6 1144a. 6^Q 

6 6 46m. ^ in Perihelion. 
Mahom'n Year 1261 begins. 

7 om.]l gr. Hel. Lat S. 

Ut Sund. after Epiphany. 

8 4 33a. ($ $(Cy i; 2 1 S. 

9 11 36m. 6n<Ly li 5 30 S. 
9 7iia. ^9/>oph.* 052 N. 

12 7 30m. 5 in Inf. i © 

13 2 44m.^^ibQ^ ^ 39S. 
13 6 38m. ^J5^C JJ|f618S. 
Septuagesima Sunday. 

13 1 19a. i 9C; 9 5 33 S. 

14 30m. ^ 9 DOph,5|C 44 N. 

16 2 7a. ^ gr. Hel. Lat. N. 

17 1 om.^ 94f, * 113 S. 

17 10 22m. i ik£^ 5|C 30 S, 

22 24m.^ 6?^^ * 029 N. 
Sexagesima Sunday. 

22 18a. <J $W^T\j 3|C0 19 S. 

23 1 26a. ^ stationary. 

28 lusBa. i ^4oph * 1 7 N. 

89 1H7m.^>iO 

31 10 40a. i <?IAOph.?|C 1 N.| 



14 Febmqry, Second Month, begin* on Satttrday. [1845. 1 


'fwiJipil Mgina uidaidt. MCHniune. I 






In dnv 


7lh dny. 




19ihd«y. 








h.D 


£t^^^ 




b'^' 




h. m. 


^ 


a- 


Bomb. 


tsam 






ua. 


sssm 


1 3a. siSL 


.7 1W 


i 9n.|7,7».i 


N.Yodt. 


lar 


)G1 


!i31 


S7 


las 


7 4 5ie 


7 10 


ilO 


7 16 


WiA. 


S3t 




M 


W 


sat 


' * 


IS 


710 


tio 


7U 


Ch»rl». 


tu 


.« 


u 




933 


' < 517 






7 IS 


N. OrlV 


s» 






3 


511 7 8 1 


16 


l7ia 15 11 


118 


ntit^tt »K» tPooMi OF tBi Mens. 

P«ime.*lhdw,8h.M. 1 Aiyjri.,Mtl.d,T,Hh.A. 


NcvMdqp, fllh dBT, lb. 97.-'hn. a. { FuU Moon, Sid dlf, Ul 18.1m. H. 
Fl«. Qonler, lilh " llh. HI Jm. A. | 


1 

■s 


1 


9,p^Wli«i>bi«««awtt,(ci.ir.ar«ft«t) M.T. 


High W««.M- Tim.. 1 




i 


!^ 


h 


1 


^ 


1. 


1 i 


h 


h 


i 


a 






s 


1 


f 






! A 


^ 


1 




h. n> 


Hi 




h^ 


'uk 


»IJ. 

h. m 




h n. 


TM. 


h m 




h m 


tm. 


"2 




7 14 
TIS 


B14 

S15 




s» 




list 


156 




161 


9 38 


6 am 


24Sm 

39tai 


1 am 
9 inn 


.iO 


' » 


$!3 


155 


IS 34 


ISO 


338 


oiam 


:■ 


M. 




w 










64 


36 




3» 




827 


3 47 


^ 














a* 




36 




40 


913 


0B3 




5 


W. 








ta 




IM 






48 










t 


Ih 




sn 










n 


3H 








863 


7 13 


1 


h'. 




n 




M 






M 


sn 




49 


OS 




8 


8 
ft 






es 


3 


as 


lie 


IS 


GO 


40 


46 


43 


044 


10 M 


844 


A-i. 




iss 




lar 


IM 


S31 


i4n 


6 41 


I4S 


>44 


123a 


11 3m 


9S3m 


If 


M, 




ae 








va 


4fl 




44 


45 




1149 


ft 9 


11 


l-ii 




37 


ll» 






33 




4« 




46 


239 


oioa 


39 


12 


W 




so 


68 






34 


46 




43 




3 14 


OH 


a 14 


15 


Th 






e? 


33 


M 


35 


45 




42 


47 


350 


1 30 


160 


14 


K, 


>» 


M 




S4 






44 






4R 


433 




03W 


15 


a. 


ST 


33 


H 


3S 


(U 


38 


43 


4K 


40 


49 


527 


3 7 


127 


A., 


a.w 


6 34 


:S-J 


13fi 


ISO 


539 


143 


5 47 


133 


lisn 


045a 


4e6a 


346» 


r 


M. 






Si 






40 


41 


4ft 


38 




en 






I' 




19 












40 


411 






027 




527 


If 


W 


n 








47 


42 






36 


la 


10 a 


8 1 


691 


•n 


1-h. 




36 


in 






43 


3S 




35 


63 




8 41 


7 1 


■/1 


F 


« 




411 


4S 








53 






130 




739 


aa 


S. 


« 


43 


45 


43 


43 


46 


30 


5B 


33 


66 




9S3 
M(6a 


TiS 


9.1 


•;« 


I14S 


S4» 


It 44 


^44 


l<4l 


5 4; 


fias 


^(^ 


<32 


sss 


Qian 


V^ 


VI. 


« 


« 


42 


48 








*4 


31 






UBS 




ttfi 














49 


m 


65 


30 




118 


134 


964 


yii 


w. 


41 






4H 


37 


SO 






29 


ee 


164 




am 


V,: 


Ih 




4fl 




40 






30 




2H 


SB 


92S 


an 




aw 


h\ 


3T 


49 


36 


SO 


34 


ta 


se 


67 


sn 


IB 


3 7 47 


1161 


































-M 



iaA^.j 




■ ■_• • ■ ■ - * ^^'- ' - --—-—- — ■ — » s 



16 



Pasaase of the Meiidtau (meaH time) and Deoliaatktt of the PlaHeiik 



7tii day. 



-w 



ibthWy. 



5 



9 



Ul day. 



Soatki, 
h. in. 

10 28in 
10 26 
73d 

2 23a 
55m 

10 23 

11 10 

3 29a 
4 
396 



Dec 

— 21 3 
— «2i5 

11 

—10 50 
4-2 5f5 
-[-4 11 

55 
7 
— 13 24 
-f-045 



S&utk». 
h. m. 

I0 3()m 
10 35 
730 

2 90, 
026m 

la 7 

10 50 

3 4a 

11 43m 
3 4a 



Dec. 

-21 11 
-=2124 
—2148 
— 053 
20 
33 
— 24 37 
+ 23 
— 18 12 
-f- 51 



%\ 



I »i: y. 



Souths. 
h. m. 

10 37m 

10 42 
723 
1 56a 

1153 
9 5im 

10 43 
24<)a 

11 22m 

2 4ia 



Dec. 

•> < 
—20 39 

-20 10 

— 22 22 

— 845 

-4-428 

-[-5 

— 24 16 

-(-ft53 

— ^19 

-|- 058 



li. m. 
10 4dm 

10 50 
7 15 
143a 

11 25 
035m 

10 S9 
2 26a 

11 smi 
2 19a 



De 



iC. 



— ^19 22 
— 18 35 
— 22 49 
— 738 
-j-529 
+ 593 
—©3 56 
-}-l 25 
— ^17 50 
-f-1 6 






h. m. 

u im 

10 56 
7 8 

129a 

10 56 
91dm 
10 15 

2 8a 

i0 4im 
1 56a 



p 



s. 

3 

4 
5 

Si 
7 

S. 

lOi 
11 
13 
13 

14 

1^ 

S. 

17 

18] 

1910 

2(Axi 

21 

221 

& 
24 
25 
26 
27 
'281 



Is 

b. m. 

7 lom 



8 lom 

lau 
11 

5a 

057 

1 47 



a36a 

a2B 

4 

Am 

544 

em. 

780 



a 6a 
8 as 

»44 

31 
18 
g 

3m 



050BCI 
137 
»2S 
916 

4 9 

5 6 



Uoon rises or seta. Meaii time. 



roes. 
h. III. 

2 15m 



3 2im 

4 21 

5 14 

5 50 

6 5ia 

7 50 



9 7a 

10 12 

11 IS 



oimn 

1. 13 

2 7 



2SBm 

343 

424 
S 1 
risa, 
526a 
627 



7 36a 
841 
40 
1O<0B 



^ 

^ 



rtaes 
h.m. 
9 100(1 



3 17m 

4 17 
510 
556 
mm, 

8 



7a. 
1010 
11 13 



12m 

1 

2 2 



a Sim 

333 
419 
457 
rises, 
5 96a 
61 29 



7a4a 

.840 
947 

loss 



Tmil a smn 



nset, 

h.m. 
2 7m 



8 nnx 

41» 
5 
5i» 

se$s» 

655a 

750 



6a 

10 8 

11 10 



8mj 

1 6 
1 58 



2^m 

994 

4X5 

498 

rises. 

599a 

6>39 



736a 
8 30 
04S 

10 tt 

11 » 



I 



h. ra. 
1 S2m 



258m 

a57 

4 58 

5 41 
sets. 

6 58a 
8 



9 9a 

10 2 

11 
U 66 



Odom: 

1 43 



9 34m 
8 20 
4 2 

4 42 
nkes* 

5 34a 

6 31 



7 3aa 

834 
9 37 

10 41 

11 46 



ntes. 

h. m. 
1 48m 



2 5im 

3 69 
448 
539 
Sits, 

7 la 

8 1 



9 2a 

10 1 

10 57 

11 59 



47m 

138 

228m 

3 14 
358 

4 38 
rises.^ 
537a 
634 

733a 

834 

935 

10 37 

11 41 



Dec. 
• « 
— ^17 19 

— ^16 40 
—83 10 
— 6 29 
--630 
--6 
—03 32 
-}-l 57 
— ^17 39 
4-1 18 



PHENOMBNA AND OBS£lU 
VATIONS. 

iuniays and Holidays, 



Washingtoik Mian Time, 
dv h. m. ^ I 

1 6 34a. ($ ^<£ ^ 5 S. 

^rove SundoAf. ' 

9 11 im.($ ^9 $ 1 2N. 

3 7 oa. Jf in Penkeliim. 
Ash Wednesday. 

4 8 5em. 9 in ;5 

4 5ua. ($ $C ); 3 7 S. 
4 6 28a. <J9<r 9 3 55 S. 

Isi Sunday in Lent. 
4 11 38a. ^ gf. elon. 25 38W. 

6 3 58m. ^1^<I >2^38S. 

7 3 8m.^J^9 9 oaiN. 
9 2 4om.l} in Q 

10 oa6m.j9<£ 9 5 15 S. 
10 ii7m.<J^C ^5 44 8. 
2d Sunday in Lent, 
It 5 «m.f $ ©int. Hg't 1.419 

13 22a. 4 9 ? $ 4 7 S. 

14 7iia. 6^^y i;^ 3 46N 
18 10 6 a. 6$P Oph.* 1 51 N. 
19 6 18m. $ m Aphelion. 
Washington b. 1732. 

3d Sunday in Lsnt, 

21 1 i^m. ($ $ 9 ij 48 S. 

21 8 43a. <{ § li § 53 S. 
29 5ia. 3 9 h 902s. 

22 4 14a. 3 df «^Opb.* 4« S. 

27 3 UKL.i ^DOph^Sk 1 3dN. 



16 








March 


t 


Third Months begins on Saturday. [1845.| 




Twilight begins and ends. Mean Time. | 




1 


1st day. 1 


7lh day. 


1 13th day. |i 


19th day. 


35th day. | 




Begins, 
h. m. 


Rnds. 
h m. 


Begins. Ends, 
h. m. h. m. 


Begins, 
h. m. 


Ends, 
h. m. 


Begins. Ends, 
h. m. h. m. 


Begins 
h. m. 


. Ends, 
h. m. 


Boflt(Ml) 


6 3in 


733a 


4 63m 730a 


443m 


7 37a 


4 asm 


L 745a 


49Qm 


763a 


N. York, 


6 4 


733 


464 738 


444 


7 35 


4 34 


7 43 


483 


7 49 


Waah. 


5 6 


781 


455 737 


446 


7 34 


4 36 


740 


436 


746 


Charles. 


5 7 


7 19 


4 60 734 


461 


7 39 


4 43 


733 


434 


738 


N. OrlV 


6 7 


7 19 


6 733 


463 


7 37 


4 45 


731 


437 


735 


PSRZOEB AND APOOBS OF THB MOON. 

Perigee, 3d day, 9h» A. | Apog«e, 15th day, 7h. A. | Perigee, S8th day, 8h. M. 


PHASBS OF THB MOON. 

Last Quarter, Ist day, ffh. 5.4ni. M. FuU Moon, 23d day, 3h. IOlSbh. A. 
New Moon, 8th *^ Ih. 29.3m. M. Laat Quarter, 30th << llh. a8J2ni. M. 
Pirat Quarter, 16th " 8h. 44.7m. A. 


• 

i 


• 

1 

1 


Sun*8 Mfper limb riaes and sets, (oorr. for refract.) M. T. 


Higli Water. M. Time. 


i 

•* 


1< 


1- 

f 


|JS 




i 


1 


0* 


rtset. 

h. m. 


$et9. 

h. m. 


riut. 
h. m. 


sett. 
h. m. 


nses. 
h. m. 


ut». 

h. m. 


rues. 

h. m. 


MtS. 

h. m. 


rises. 
h. m. 


sets. 

h. m. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


V 

h. m. 


1 


S. 


S36 
6 34 


5 60 
5 51 


6 35 
6 33 


5 51 


633 


5 63 


S38 


5 68 


9 36 


6 
6 


3 5im 


1 3im 


. . . 


2 


Su, 


5 62 


31 


5 64 


6 37 


5 68 


8 35 


4 46m 


3 36m 


046m 


3 


M. 


33 


62 


33 


53 


30 


66 


36 


60 


34 


1 


6 3 


343 


3 3 


4 


Tu. 


31 


54 


30 


55 


38 


66 


35 


6 


33 


8 


735 


6 15 


395 


5 


W. 


29 


55 


38 


56 


27 


67 


34 


1 


22 


3 


9 4 


644 


5 4 


6 


Th. 


28 


66 


37 


57 


36 


69 


33 


1 


21 


3 


10 7 


7 47 


6 7 


7 


F. 


26 


6R 


30 


60 


34 


69 


33 


3 


30 


4 


11 


840 


7 Q 


8 
9 


S. 


26 
6 23 


60 
6 


24 
6 23 


6 


33 


6 


31 


3 


19 


6 
6 5 


1144 


934 


744 


1 


621 


6 1 


8 30 


6 3 


8 18 


022a 


10 2m 


833m 


10 


M. 


21 


1 


31 


3 


19 


3 


19 


4 


16 


6 


060 


10 89 


869 


11 


Tu. 


19 


2 


19 


3 


18 


3 


17 


6 


15 


7 


134 


1114 


9 34 


12 


W. 


17 


3 


17 


4 


16 


4 


16 


6 


14 


7 


2 9 


U 48 


10 9 


13 


Th. 


16 


4 


16 


5 


15 


5 


14 


6 


13 


8 


3 41 


2ia 


10 41 


14 


F. 


14 


6 


14 


6 


13 


6 


13 


7 


13 


9 


3 18 


068 


11 18 


15 
16 


S. 
5tt. 


12 
6 10 


7 


12 


7 


12 


7 


11 


8 


10 


9 


359 


139 


11 60 


6 8 


6 10 


8 


6 10 


6 8 


SIO 


6 9 


6 9 


6 10 


444a 


2 34a 


044a 


17 


M. 


9 


9 


9 


9 


9 


9 


9 


9 


8 


10 


553 


333 


163 


18 


Tu. 


7 


10 


7 


10 


7 


10 


8 


10 


7 


11 


720 


5 


330 


19 


W. 


5 


11 


5 


11 


6 


11 





11 


6 


11 


8 40 


620 


444 


20 


Th. 


3 


13 


3 


13 


3 


13 


5 


11 


5 


13 


943 


733 


643 


21 


F. 


3 


14 


2 


13 


3 


13 


3 


13 


3 


13 


10 33 


8 8 


638 


22 
23 


S. 



6fi0 


16 





14 
6 15 


1 

6 


14 


3 


13 


3 


13 
6 14 


11 7 


8 47 


7 7 


6 16 


5 60 


6 15 


3 1 


6 14 


8 1 


11 4oa 


930a 


740a 


24 


M. 


57 


17 


68 


16 


66R 


16 


5 69 


14 


5 50 


14 


• • • 


966 


8 16 


25 


Tu. 


55 


19 


56 


17 


66 


17 


68 


16 


68 


15 


16m 


10 34 


854 


26 


W. 


63 


30 


64 


18 


65 


18 


66 


16 


66 


16 


054 


11 9 


939 


27 


Th. 


63 


21 


63 


19 


64 


10 


65 


16 


55 


16 


139 


11 49 


10 9 


28 


F. 


60 


33 


62 


90 


63 


30 


54 


17 


64 


17 


3 9 


« • « 


10 63 


29 
30 


S. 
Sit. 


48 
646 


33 


60 


31 


51 


30 


63 


18 


53 


17 

6 18 


3S 


032m 


11 43 


6 24 


6 48 


6 32 


6 49 


631 


5 62 


6 18 


562 


3 42m 


1 S3m 


... 


31 


M. 


44 ' S&l 


46 


33' 47 


33 60 


19 


50' 18l 


439 


3 19 3om| 



Paaaage of ihe Meridian (mean time) and Becimation of the Pianett. 



17 



Aatday. 

atmitu. Dec. 
h. m. 

tl lom 
11 

7 3 

1 2ia 
10 33 

?m 

10 6 

1 5sa 

10 27m 

1 4ta 



-15 31 
— ^16 14 
-88 20 
-6 43 
+ 7 10 
-|-6.22 
— 23 24 

—17 32 

-f- 1 17 



7tli day. 



Souths, 
h. m. 

11 25m 

11 6 
656 
1 7a 

10 11 
850m, 
9 52 
1 30a 

10 6m 
1 19a 



— 12 9 
— ^12 62 
— 23 31 
— 4 46 
-j-8 6 
+ 6 57 
82 46 
+ 2 52 
— 17 21 
+ 1S6 



13th day. 



Souths. 
h. VL. 

11 42m 

U 11 
649 

54a 
945 

assm 

9' 37 

1 isa 
94sm 

57a 



Dec 

• • 
^8 01 

10 18 
— 23 36 
— 328 

•859 
-4-735 

2B36 
-|-3 25 
—17 11 
-f-1 33 



19th day. 



Souths. 
h. m. 

11 59m 

11 15 
6 42 

4la 
920 

8 16m 
923 

1 oa 

9 24m 
34a 



Dec 

O I 

— 3 8 

— 734 
— «3 36 

— 2 21 

4-946 
-f-8 14 
— 21 56 
+ 3 50 
— 17 1 
+ 1 41 



SrIVA' CtBy* 



Souths 
h. m. 

13a 

11 19m 

634 

27a 

8 56 

7 58m 

9 8 
4la 

9 2m 
13a 



Dec 

-f-22l 

— 443 
— 23 3Q 

— 1 15 

tl0 28 
855 
— «1 48 
+ 433 
— 16 52 
+ 1 49 



i 






3 

4 

5 

6 

7jll 

8 



S. 
10 
11 
12 

13] 
14 
15 

"s- 

17 
18 
19 
20 
21 



5. 
24 
25 
26 
27 
26 
29 



a a 



h. m< 
6 9m 



7 2m 

8 1 
858 
053 

10 45 
36 

ossa 



1 13a 

2 
2 48 
335 
424 

5 12 

6 



6 49a 
736 
823 
9 
055 
10 49 
2211 20 



s: 



g 

18m 

1 9 

2 3 
2 50 
353 
4 57 



iviooii rises ur seU. iVleaji 'J'ime. 



I 



nses. 
h. m- 

1 13m 



2 13m 

3 7 

3 53 

4 34 

5 9 

sets. 

6 48a 



7 53a 

8 53 

10 

11 
U 57 



43m 



1 36m 

218 

257 

330 

4 2 

4 31 

rises. 



6 26a 
796 

8 45 

9 56 
114 



7m 



•a 



nses. 
h. m. 

1 9m 



2 9m 

3 2 

3 49 

4 31 

5 7 

sets. 

6 46a 



7 52a 

8 56 

9 57 

10 56 

11 52 



44m 



1 3im 

2 14 

2 53 

3 28 

4 ' 
4 30 
rises. 



6 25a 
734 

8 43 

9 52 
10 50 



5 56m 



1 3m 
IBL 



3m 



5sm 

147 



I 



nses. 
h. m. 

1 4n] 



2 4m 

2 56 

3 45 
428 

5 5 

sets. 

6 48a 



750a 

8 54 

954 

10 52 

U4g 



iom 



1 27m 

2 10 
2 49 
324 
358 
429 
rises. 



6 25a 

7 31 

8 40 
948 

10 55 

11 58 



56m 
t42l 



I 



nses. 
h. m. 
40m 



1 49m 

2 44 

3 36 

4 19 
450 

sets. 

6 46a 



7 45a 

8 46 

9 43 
10 39 
1134 



25m 



1 12m 

1 55 

2 37 

3 14 

3 51 

4 25 
rises. 



6 22a 
724 
8 30 
936 
10 40 
1143 



40m 
L30. 



J! 



nsef, 
h. m. 

44m^ 



1 4im 

2 30 

3 33 

4 16 

4 98 

sets. 
6 46a 



7 45a 

844 

940 

10 30 

1120 



20m 



1 7m 

1 51 

2 33 

3 11 
3 49 
425 
rises. 



6 2ia 

7 24 
827 
933 

10 30 

11 38 



35m 
117 



PHENOBCENA AND OBSEBVA- 

Sktndays afid Holidays. 



^ 2 16 S. 

* 20 S. 
h 5 53 S. 
; 6 35 S. 
S 7 42 S. 



2* 



Waahiugton M««a Time, 
d. h. m. , , 

St. David. 

4th Sund, in Lent. 

2 7 im.<J ^C 

3 11 48m. ^ in Q 

5 1 Qm.iX^t 
5 6 95a. 6n.€. 

6 8 14a. ^ 9 C 

7 5 «2m. 6 S C 
5th Sunday in Lent. 

8 5 56a. <J>2«*yj * 130N. 

9 9 45a. 62i€. . Jt5 B S. 
10 3 45a. 9 ^^ Aphelion. 

u 6 3oa. ^ great. Hel.Lat. S. 

15 8 88m. 6 i^t 5jc 1 53 S. 

20 36© enters Y- ^p'^g bgs. 

Palm Sunday. 

St. Patrick. 

22 2 25a. ^ in sup. <{ Q 

24 9 4a. (JTziVJ *0 37 & 

25 3 45m. (5 (Jyif 5|C0 34N. 
Good Friday. 

25 25a. 6^7^t *03SN. 
Easter Sunday. 

28 7 om. J stationary. 
Lady Day. 

26 7 52a. ^ 9 O 

29 i68m.<J ^^ « 52N. 

29 3i5m.^ 6 S<>t^ 125 N. 

30 4 25a. ^fioQ 

Low Sunday. 

130 7 12a. ^^C ^ i-2A,S . 



18 


1 






April, 


Fourth MorUh, begins on 7\iesday. [1845. 




Twilight begins and eadih Mean time. 




1st day. 


7th day. 


13th day. | { 


19tl] 


iday. 


2Sthday. 


Begins, 
h. m. 


Ends, 
h. m. 


Begins. Ends, 
h. m. h. m. 


Begins, 
h. m. 


Ends. 
h.m. 


Begini 
h.m. 


k. Ends, 
h. m. 


begins, 
h.m. 


Enda. 
h. m. 


Boston, 


4 7 in. 


s la. 


3 55m.d 


9a. 


3 43 m. 


8 18a. 3 3110 


L. 8 27a. 


3 19m. 


8 37a 


N. York, 


4 11 


7 67 


3 SO 8 


5 


3 48 


3 14 3 37 


829 


326 


330 


WMh. 


4 15 


7 53 


4 4 8 


1 


3 53 


8 9 343 


B 17 


333 


325 


Charles. 


4 25 


7 43 


4 16 7 49 


4 7 


7 56 350 


8 


3 61 


3 5 


N. Orl's. 


4 29 


7 39 


421 744 


4 13 


7 49 


1 5 


753 


393 ^ 


7 66 


PEXIOEX Airs APOGSX OF THE MOON. 


Apogee, ISth day, 3h. A. | Perigee, a4th day, Noon. 


PHASXt OF TH> MOOK. 


New Moon, 0th day, Si. 32.3ni. A. Full Moon, 8M day, Sh. 4.1m. M. 
First Quarter, 14th day, 4h. 10.3m. A. Last Quarter, 98th day, 6h. 11.7m. A. 


1 

i 


• 

1 


Sun^s ^gjper limb rises and sets, (oorr. for refract.) M. T. 


High Water. M.Tim«. 


• 








• 

2 






|4 


rises. 
h. m. 


sets. 
h. m 


rises. 
h. m. 


sets. 
h. m. 


nses. 
h. m. 


sets. 
h. m. 


rises. 
h. m. 


sets. 
h. m. 


nses. 

h. m. 


sets. 

h. m. 


h. ni« 


h. m. 


'h.m. 


1 


Tu. 


6 43 


6 26 


5 45 


6 24 


5 46 


623 


5 49 


6 20 


5 49 


6 19 


556m 


3 36m 


1 56in 


2 


W. 


42 


28 


44 


26 


45 


24 


48 


21 


43 


20 


725 


5 5 


3 25 


3 


Th. 


40 


29 


42 


27 


43 


25 


46 


21 


46 


20 


8 49 


629 


4 40 


4 


F. 


38 


m 


40 


28 


41 


26 


45 


22 


45 


21 


950 


730 


550 


5 
6 


S. 


36 
5 34 


31 


38 


29 


40 


27 


44 


23 


44 


21 
6 23 


10 36 


8 16 


636 


6 32 


536 


6 30 


5 38 


6 28 


5 42 


6 23 


543 


11 20m 


9 om 


7 20m 


7 


M. 


32 


33 


34 


31 


36 


29 


41 


24 


41 


22 


1157 


937 


767 


8 


Tu 


31 


34 


33 


32 


35 


30 


39 


25 


40 


23 


034a 


10 14 


S34 


9 


W. 


29 


35 


31 


33 


33 


31 


3R 


25 


39 


23 


1 7 


10 47 


9 7 


10 


Th. 


27 


36 


29 


34 


31 


32 


37 


26 


3H 


24 


1 41 


1121 


9 41 


11 


F. 


26 


37 


23 


35 


30 


33 


35 


27 


37 


24 


2 13 


11 53 


10 13 


12 


S. 


24 


38 


26 


36 


28 


34 


34 


27 

6 28 


36 
5 35 


25 
625 


2 49 


29a 


10 49 


13 


Su, 


5 23 


6 40 


525 


6 33 


527 


635 


533 


3 28a 


1 8a 


1128111 


14 


M. 


21 


41 


23 


39 


26 


36 


32 


29 


34 


26 


4 13 


1 53 


13a 


15 


Tu. 


19 


42 


21 


40 


24 


37 


31 


30 


33 


27 


5 13 


253 


1 13 


16 


W. 


IS 


43 


20 


41 


23 


38 


30 


30 


32 


27, 


632 


4 12 


233 


17 


Th. 


16 


44 


IS 


42 


22 


39 


29 


31 


31 


28 


7 47 


527 


3 47 


18 


F. 


14 


45 


16 


43 


20 


40 


2R 


32 


30 


29 


853 


633 


453 


19 
20 


S. 
Su. 


13 
5 11 


47 


15 


44 


19 


41 


27 


32 


29 


29 
630 


943 


723 


543 


6 48 


5 13 


S45 


5 17 


642 


5 25 


6 33 


5 28 


10 28a 


8 8a 


6 28a 


21 


M. 


10 


49 


12 


46 


16 


43 


24 


34 


27 


») 


11 7 


8 47 


7 7 


22 


Tu. 


8 


50 


10 


47 


14 


44 


23 


35 


26 


31 


11 47 


927 


7 47 


23 


W. 


6 


51 


9 


48 


13 


45 


22 


35 


25 


31 


. • • 


10 8 


828 


24 


Th. 


5 


52 


8 


49 


12 


46 


21 


36 


24 


32 


28m 


10 50 


9 10 


25 


F. 


3 


53 


6 


50 


10 


46 


20 


37 


23 


33 


1 10 


11 34 


954 


26 
27 


S. 
Su. 


2 
5 1 


54 


5 


51 


9 


47 


19 


37 


22 


3:i 

634 


154 


• • • 


10 43 


6 55 


5 4 


52 


5 8 


6 48 


5 Id 


6S8 


5 21 


243m 


023m 


11 34a 


28 


M. 


4 50 


56 


2 


53 


6 


49 


16 


39 


20 


35 


334 


1 14 


• • • 


29 


Tu. 


53 


53 


1 


54 


5 


50 


15 


39 


19 


35 


438 


2 16 


38m 


30lW. 


56 


59 





55 


3 


51 


14 


40 


Id 


36 


548 


3 23 


1 4S 



1845.] 



April has Thirty Days. 



19 



Paasago of the Meridian (mean time) and Declination of the PlaneU. 



l8t 


day. 


Simths. 


Bee. 


h. m. 


O 1 


042a 


-f-8 60 


1133m 


--- 1 17 


625 


23 10 


12a 





8 30 


--11 8 


7 30m 


--945 


8 50 


2116 


02oa 


-f- 6 12 


8 37m 


^16 40 


11 6 


+ is« 



6 

a 

I 

o 

I 



Is 



1 

21 
8 



5. 



8 




Moon rises or sets. Mean time. 



I 



h. m. 

7 47ml 

8 30 
029 

4|l0 18 
5ll 5 



9 
10 
11 
12 

s. 

14 
15 
16 
17 

181 



n S2m 
30a 

127 

2 16 

3 4 
363 

4 41 



520a 

6 15 

7 1 

7 47 

8 32 
10 

Ig lO 7 

S. 10 67a 
211160 



22 
23 



8. 
28 
29 
30 



i 
47m 



24 147 

25 

26 



24B 
348 



4 47m 
544 
6 37 
737 



rtses, 
h. m. 

2 32m 

3 

3 40 

4 11 

sets. 



643a 

7 46 

8 47 
045 

10 39 

11 33 



13m 
062 

1 28 

1 60 
230 

2 60 

3 27 



•a 

j2 



rites, 
h. m. 

230m 

3 7 
340 

4 11 

sets. 



6 4la 
744 
8 43 
41 

10 34 

11 20 



rises. 
6 26a 
787 

8 40 

9 56 

10 56 

11 49 



033m 
1 10 



8m 

48 

1 25 

1 56 
228 

2 58 

3 28 



rises. 
6 23a 
735 
845 
62 

10 53 

11 45 



30m 

1 8 
1 43 



B 

I 

I 



rtses. 
h. m. 

2 26m^ 

3 4 

338 

4 11 
sets. 



639a 
7 40 
830 
036 
10 30 
11^4 



4m 

44 
121 

1 55 
226 

2 68 
328 



rises. 

6 2la 

7 31 

8 41 
47 

10 48 

11 40 



26m 

1 6 
1 41 



a 



rises. 
h. m. 

2 16m 

2 66 
334 
4 11 
sets. 



633a 
781 
8 27 
023 

10 15 

11 8 
11 49 



31m 

1 11 

1 46 

2 21 
265 
320 



rises, 

6 13a 

7 10 

8 28 
033 

10 33 

11 27 



15m 
53 
136 






O 



rises. 
h. m. 

2 13m 

255 
334 
4 11 
sets. 



6 3ia 

7 28 

8 23 
10 

10 10 

11 3 
11 46 



027m 

1 7 
144 
220 

2 65 
330 



rises. 

6 loa 

7 17 

8 23 
028 

10 28 

11 24 



12m 

55 

1 36 



PHENOMENA AND OBSERVA- 
TIONS. 

Sundays and Holidays, 



Washington Mean Time, 
d. h. m. • ' 

1 47m. (5 2e>y 5|cl 7N. 

1 10 44m.<JgO 

2 5 2om. 9 great. Hel. Lat. S. 
2 6 48m. ^ he >i 6 10 S. 
4 6 im. ^ in Perihelion. 

2d Sunday after Easter, 
6 3 2om.<5 5x>y * 127N. 
6 10 7a. <5 9 C 9 5 47 S. 
6 1133a. 39C 9 4 53 S. 
6 2 25a. ^ 9 9 9 50 N. 
6 5 6da. i JlQ 

6 6 3a.,<JJJ^C J^iSAS 
Zd Sunday after Easter, 

7 7 Qm.g great. Hel. Lat. S. 
7 11 5ia. (J § <C g 22 S. 
3i4m.n ^O 

11 3 62a. (5 g^ ft 4 20 S. 
14 i2da. ^gr. Hel. LatN. 

16 1147a. 6 9jlf 9 16 S. 
4th Sunday after Easter, 

17 7 4im. $ gr. elon. 19 49 E. 

18 11 6om. 2 9 fi S 4 6 S. 
St (Jeorge. 



28 2 48m. 5J stationary. 
Rogation Sunday, 
38 6 56m. (J ^C ^ 6 23 S. 
20 8 4im.<J9|g|^ 5|C 31 S. 
^ g^ d^<^ 1^ 6 25 S. 



20 



MoBif, Fifth Month, begins on Thursdag, flWflt 



Twiliyht begfins a»d enda. Mean time. 



Boston, 
N.Yodh 
Wadi. 
ChiiriM. 
N. Ori*s. 



Ist day. 



Begiiu. Euda. 
h. in. 

S 47a 



h. m 
a 7m 

3 14 
3 2i 
343 
3 51) 



8 40 
8 39 
8U 

8 3 



7th day. 



Begins, 
h. m. 

2 fifim 

3 4 
3 13 
3 36 
3 45 



Enda. 
h. m. 

8 57a 

8 49 

3 40 

8 17 

8 8 



13th day. 



Begins, 
h. m. 

2 4501 

2 54 

3 4 

3 23 
3 38 



Ends, 
h. m. 

7a 

858 
848 
894 
8 14 



19th day. 



Begins, 
h. m. 

235m 

2 4ft 

255i 

322 
333 



Ends, 
h. m. 

17a 
e 8 

8 57 
830 
8 20 



85th day. 



Begins, 
h. Qi. 

2 25m 

236 

2 47 

3 17 
3 28 



Ends, 
h. in. 

9 26a 

018 

9 7 

837 

8 26 



PKKIOKX AJID AP06XX OF THE MOOK. 

Apogee, 10th day, 9h. M. | Perigee, VtA day, 2h. ▲. 

PHASSS or THS MOOK. 

New Moon, Odidaj, 4h. 40.4m. M. I Fall Moon, SIst day, fi)h. 50.1m. M. 
Fiisl Quaker, 14th " 9h. 0.4m. M. | Last Quarter, 38th " Ih. I7.0ra. M. 



tli 






1 

2 



A 



4) 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 

11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 



Th. 
F. 

Su. 
M. 

Tu. 
W. 
Th. 
F. 

S. 



Son's tfifMr Umb rises and seta, (rorr. for refract.) M. T. 



j 



nses. 
h. m. 

4 56 

53 

S3 



M. 

Tu. 

W. 

Th. 

F. 

rsiStt. 



19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 

25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 



M. 

Tu. 

W. 

Th. 
F. 

S. 



4 50 
40 
48 
47 
46 
45 
44 



sets. 
h. m 

7 
1 
2 



4 43 

42 
41 
40 
39 
38 
37 



Su. 

M. 

Tu. 

W. 

Th. 

F. 

S. 



4 36 
36 
35 
34 
33 
32 
32 



3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 






nses. 
h. ra. 

4 50 

57 
56 



7 10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 



4 31 
30 
29 
29 
28 
27 
26 



Id 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 



4 54 
53 
52 
51 
50 
49 
4d 



sHs. 

h. m* 

6 56 
57 

58 



j6 59 
7 
1 
2 
3 
4 
6 



H 47 
46 
45 
44 
43 
42 
42 



a* 



nses. 

h- m. 

5 2 
1 




sets. 

h. m. 

6 52 
53 
54 



6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 



4 58 
57 
56 
55 
54 
53 
52 



14 51 

50 
49 
43 
47 
46 
46 



6 55 
56 

57 
58 
59 

7 
1 



I. 



nses 
h. m. 

5 13 
12 
11 



15 10 
10 
9 
8 
7 
6 
5 



sets. 
h. m 

6 41 
42 
43 



7 17 4 41 7 13 



7 24 
25 
26 
27 
27 
28 
29 



40 
39 
39 
83 
37 
36 

H 36 
35 
34 
34 
33 
32 
Oil 



14 
15 
16 
16 
17 
18 



7 19 
SO 
31 
Zi 

23 

33 



45 
44 
44 
43 
43 
42 
42 



4 41 
40 
40 
39 
39 
88 
87 



7 2 
3 

4 
5 
6 

7 
7 



15 5 

4 
3 
2 
2 
1 
1 



6 44 
45 
45 

46 
47 

47 
48 



7 8 
9 
10 
10 
11 
12 
13 



7 14 
15 
16 
16 
17 
19 
18 



^ 



N 59 

58 
58 
67 
67 



14 56 
56 
56 
55 
55 
54 
54 



40 
49 
50 
51 
51 
52 
53 



ni 



o 

« 

z 



nses. 
h. m. 

5 17 
16 
15 



^14 
13 
13 
12 
11 
11 
10 



|5 
9 

8 
7 
7 
6 
6 



6 53 
54 
55 
55 
56 
57 
57 



6 5d 
58 
59 

7 

1 
I 



5 5 
5 
4 

4 
3 
3 
3 



5 2 
1 
1 
1 





sets. 
h. m. 

637 
38 
39 

6~S 
40 
41 
42 
42 
43 
44 

45 
45 
46 

46 
47 

48 



ffigh Water. M. Time. 



I 
1^ 



h. m. 

7 7m 

8 21 

9 21 



10 lomi 
10 55 
1133 

lla 
046 

1 17 
1 52 



48 
40 
40 
SO 
SO 
SI 
52 



52 
63 
53 
54 
54 
55 



j 55 



2 28a 

3 4 

3 49 
483 

5 41 

6 51 
755 



2 



s 



856a 
9 47 

10 37 

11 22 

• • s 

om 

57 



h. 
4 
6 

7 

T 

8 

9 

9 

10 

10 

11 

0^ 



1 

2 

3 

4 

6 

6 

7 

8 

9 

9 
10 
11 



m. 
47m 

1 

1 



5om 

35 
13 
51 
26 
57 
33 






h. m. 
3 7m 
421 
5 21 



6 lom 

635 

7 33 
8U 

8 46 

9 17 
9 52 



8a 10 28m 



1 46m 

235 
327 
4 24 
526 

6 37 

7 40 

mmmmmmm 



44 

29 
18 
21 
31 
35 



11 4 
11 49 

ossa 

1 41 

2 51 

3 55 



36a 
27 
17 
2 
49 
37 
36 



iQm 

7 

4 

6 
17 
80 



4 56a 

5 47 

6 37 
722 
8 9 
8 57 
946 



10 35a 
1197 

• • • 

24m 

1 26 
237 
340 



Ma/y has Timty-one Days, 

Paagage of the Meridian (meari time) and Declination of the Planeta. 



21 




19th day. 



Souths. 
h. m. 

10 sdxn 
oa 

5 idm 

10 24 

5fi3a 

4 54m 

6 96 
9 53 
539 
8 46 



Dec. 

-j-13 
+19 
— ^19 

j-r 

4-12 
4-15 
— ^19 

+ » 
— ^16 

+ 2 



3 
42 
26 
51 
23 
32 
10 
24 

2 
57 



25th day. 



Souths. 
h. m. 

10 37m 

7a 
5 im 

10 10 
535a 

4 3im 

6 18 
035 
5 16 
8 23 



Dec. 

-j-12 28 
"4-21 21 
-18 50 
-4-841 
4-18 11 
-[-16 10 
— ^19 7 
-j-951 
— ^16 2 
4-3 2 



PHENOMENA AND OBSERVA- 
TIONS. 

Sundays and Holidays, 

Washington Mean Time, 
d. h. m. ^ ^ 

Ascension Day, 

3 8 4sm. ($ 9C 9 450 S. 

4 1 la. iJlC ^4 3 S. 
Sunday after Ascension, 
Eclip. of Sun, vis. in U. S. 

6 27m. <5 9 C 9 2 3 S. 
6 11 57m. ^ 2 <C 5f 8 S. 
Transit of ^ , visible in U. S. 
6 7 7a. n ^ o 

8 1 57m. 5J m Q 

Whit Sunday. Pentecost 

9 5 43m.n1fiO 
9 3 54a. (i i; 9 S 16 N. 
9 5 40a. ^ ^2 $34 49N. 

12 4 4ia. n 5 O 

16 1 12m Sup. (J 90 

17 7 37m. <J ^TjyS ^ 51 S. 

Trinity Sunday. 

18 5 33m. ^ in Aphelion. 
20 8 47a. § stationary. 
Moon Eclipsed, vis. in U. S. 
Cchrpus Christi. Fits Dieu. 
22 1 3im. n ? p 
Queen Victoria b. 1819. 

\st Sunday after Trinity, 

26 4 44a. (J ^C ^ 813 S. 

26 9 sea. ^ tic >i 6 31 S. 

27 9 om.O stationary. 

28 15a. 9 in Q 

29 9 57a. I2 stationary. 

30 4 28a. (J ipC ¥ 4 46 S. 






22 Tune, Siscth Month, begim an m^nday, [1849. 


TwUiirbt iMgint uid ends. M«mi Tiiim. 




Isi day. 1 


7th day. 


13th day. 


19th day. 


Sathday. 


1 

fa 


legius 
. m. 


. Ends, 
h. xn. 


Begius. 
h. m. 


£nds. 

Ii. m. 


Begiiu. Ends, 
h. n. h. ni. 


Begius. Ends, 
h. m. h. HI- 


Begiiu 
h. m. 


. Eatis. 
h. UK. 


Boston, a 


17m 


937m 


3 t3m 9 44 a 


3 9m 9 60 a 


3 8m 9 54a 


3 9m 


9 55a 


N. York, 2 


39 


9 35 


3 35 


B31 


393 937 


999 


940 


399 


941 


Wash. 3 


41 


9 13 


9 37 9 10 


3 30 934 


335 


937 


936 


036 


Charles. 3 


19 


9 41 


3 to 6 46 


3 10 6 fiO 


3 10 


859 


3 11 


853 


N. OrPt. |3 


94 


880 


333 1834 


{3 33 Id 39 


399 


834 


Is 93 


18 41 


^POOEB AND PXKIOIX OV TBX MOON. 


Apogee, 6th day, 6h. A. | Perigee, 30th day, Oh. M. 


PiUSKS OF THX MOOIf 


New Moon, 4th day, 7b. 50.7ni. A. Fall Moon, Idth dav, 0h. 9.9qi. A. 
First Quarter, 13th *< 10h.35.1m. A. Last Quarter, t6th ^^ leh. IS.Ora. IH. 


4 

1 

"o 

i 


Q 

1 


8«a's nfptr limb rUes aad aets, (corr. for refract.) M. T. 


ritgh Water. M. Time. 


• 

s 

1 




i. 
f 




2 


1 






h. m. 


sets. 
h. m. 


rises. 
h. m. 


sets. 
h. m. 


nses. 
h. m. 


sets. 
h. m. 


nses 
lu m. 


stts. 
h. m. 


ises. 

1. m. 


9eU. 

h. m. 


h. ra. 


h. ro* 


h. m- 


1 


Su, 


426 


7 30 


43t 


725 


437 


7 19 


4 64 


7 3 


S 


656 


a 43m 


6 33III 


443m 


2 


M. 


n 


31 


3Q 


36 


37 


19 


53 


3 


\ 59 


56 


948 


799 


549 


3 


Tu. 


S6 


33 


80 


27 


36 


90 


63 


3 


60 


57 


u>a9 


8 1» 


63& 


4 


W. 


34 


33 


39 


27 


36 


80 


53 


3 


SO 


57 


11 13 


8 53 


713 


5 


Tb. 


34 


83 


29 


88 


36 


21 


53 


4 


59 


56 


U 00 


930 


750 


6 


F. 


33 


.Tft 


39 


26 


35 


21 


53 


4 


59 


68 


oasa 


10 5 


6 35 


7 
8 


S. 
Su, 


33 


34 


38 


29 


35 


23 
723 


SB 
4 53 


5 


59 


56 
659 


1 


10 40 


9 


4 33 


7 3,5 


4 88 


7 30 


ina 


7 6 


459 


ia4a 


11 I4m 


i^34m 


9 


M. 


33 


35 


3d 


30 


34 


23 


53 


6 


59 


50 


3 8 


U48 


10 8 


10 


Tu. 


33 


36 


38 


31 


34 


34 


52 


6 


59 


7 


345 


935a 


1^45 


11 


W. 


33 


36 


36 


31 


34 


34 


52 


7 


59 





393 


1 3 


^133 


12 


Th. 


23 


37 


28 


32 


34 


35 


SU 


7 


59 





4 7 


1 47 


7a 


13 


F. 


98 


37 


36 


33 


34 


35 


52 


8 


59 


1 


458 


338 


056 


14 
15 


Su. 


3* 


75B 


38 

4 26 


33 


34 


36 
7 26 


53 
4 53 


8 


50 


1 
7 1 


6 


340 


^3 


7 33 


4 34 


7 8 


4 fi» 


7 5a 


445a, 


a da 


16 


M. 


33 


36 


sa 


;« 


34 


26. 


53 


9 


59 


3 


6 8 


546 


.4 8 


17 


^Tu. 


23 


30 


36 


34 


34 


37 


58 


9 


59 


3 


911 


65il 


5U 


18 


W. 


33 


39 


36 


34 


34 


27 


53 


9 


59 


3 


10 


749 


6 9 


19 


Th. 


33 


30 


38 


34 


34 


27 


62 


9 


£» 


3 


11 2 


648 


7 9 


20 


F. 


83 


39 


38 


34 


34 


27 


53 


10 


59 


3 


11 56 


936 


768 


21 

22 


S. 


S3 
4 23 


39 


39 


34 


35 


2fl 

7 23 


53 
4 53 


10 


59 


3 

7 3 


. • • 


10 28 


848 


739 


4 39 


7 34 


4 35 


7 10 


4 59 


46m 


U15a 


936a 


23 


M. 


23 


40 


29 


35 


35 


28 


53 


10 


59 


3 


135 


• • • 


10 8S 


24 


Tu. 


33 


40 


39 


35 


35 


38 


53 


10 


•y 




325 


sm 


11 14 


25 


W. 


33 


4Q 


39 


a*) 


35 


29 


S3 


11 







3 14 


54 


' . . • 


26 


Th. 


39 


49 


39 


tm 


35 


. 29 


S3 


11 







4 4 


14!l 


4m 


27 


F. 


' 34 


40 


30 


a*) 


36 


29 


54 


11 







4 55 


335 


056 


28 
29 


S. 
Su, 


34 

4 34 


40 


3A 


35 


36 


29 


54 


11 


1 


7 4 


553 


33^ 


1st? 


7 40 


4 30 


7 35 


4 36 


7 29 


154 


7 11 


5 1 


6 56m 


4 3Bm 


3 56m 


3« 


M. 8S 


40 


3X 35| 


37 


8^ 


56 


U 


1 


8 8 


5 43 


4 a 

• 



June has Thkiy Days, 




■■M«M*i 



131 



of tlie Meridian (mean time) and Declination of the IManeto. 



19th day. 



SouUu. 
h. m. 

10 45m 
42a 

4 5m 

9 13 

4S5a 

2 48m 

454 

8 16 

336 

648 



Dec. 

-|-a0 39 
-j-94 5 
— ^16 50 
-1-11 42 
-[-10 43 
-j-17 50 
— 10 42 
+11 34 
— ^16 1« 
-|-3 19 



93th day. 



Souths. 
h. m. 

u sm 
esoa 

3 49m 
850 

4 9a 

2 2im 

438 
756 
3 13 
625 



Dec. 

4-4 » 
-H3 3l> 
— 16 34 
4-12 20 
4-10 14 
-t-18 11 
—80 3 
-{•XL 55 
— ^16 17 
+ 3 21 



PHENOMENA AND OBSl&RVA. 
TIONS. 

Sundays and Holidays, 



Waflhing^ton Mean Time, 
d. h. m. . , 

2ci Sunday after Trinity, 
1 6 14m. <5 JIC jy 3 33 S. 

1 8 isa. ^ ^ T;t c? 2 4 S. 

2 6 53a. ({ 8 (C § 4 23 S. 
9 9 25a. ^ gj^Cetu 3|c 20 S. 
4 10 17m § gr. eSon. 23 49 W. 
4 11 em.^ ^yVJ 3|C0 32N. 

3i Sunday after Trinity. 

4 9 3oa. (5 I ACt 5|C 6T S 

5 5 48m. ^ 5«SC * 1 3N. 

5 7 37m. 6 9<L 9 2 29 N. 

6 9 2a. ^ $iM 5|cl48 S. 

7 4 43a. ^ gr. Hel. Lat. S. 
8 11 83m. 6 d?>y >|C 44 N. 

ah Sunday after Trinity. 
17 i6om.9 ($«y ^ 45 S. 
17 9 17a. 5 i^i Q 



21 9 34m.O ent. SZ Sum. beg. 
5th Sunday after Trinity. 



ll 6 30 S. 



4:0 



59 S. 
9 S. 



23 5 16m. 3 h<L 

St. John Baptist. 

23 9 ua. i ^C 

25 10 9m. ^ (J?SL 

20 3 4ia. 1^ in Q 

20 1133a. 6¥<L 

6th Sunday after Trinity, 

& 9 42a. J ^g M 3 2 S 



9 4 38 S. 



[54 


» 




^^ 


Julu. Sfmenth, Jltfattik. htttnmjt />n 


1\£0jtdnM. 


riftd/S 1 


«»-» ^.■.— ^, .^■i.^.^.ww.- _ 


~ 


--, ^ . - w ^- 1^ _ ^ _ ^ _| 


Twilight begins and enda. Mean Time. | 




1st day. 


7th day. 


13th day. | 


lOih day. 


dSthday. 1 


Begins, 
h. m.- 


Finds 
h. m. 


. Begins. Ends, 
h. m. h. m. 


Begins, 
h. m. 


Ends, 
h. m. 


Begins 
h.m. 


I. Ends, 
h. m. 


Begins, 
h.m. 


Euds.l 
h.m. 1 


Boston, 


2 13m 


54a 


2 lom 49a 


2 26m 


44a 


2 35m 


37a 


2 44m |0 23a 1 


N. York, 


2 26 


40 


2 32 36 


2 30 


31 


2 46 


025 


264 


18 


Wash. 


2 30 


027 


244 024 


2 51 


10 


2 SB 


14 


3 5 


7 


Charles. 


3 13 


8 53 


3 17 a 51 


322 


8 48 


3 27 


845 


333 


840 


N. Orl»8. 


3 25 


8 41 


320 830 


333 


8 37 


3 37 


834 


342 


830 ^ 


▲POGXX AND PXHIOXX OW THK MOON. 

Apogee, 3d day, lOh. A. | Perigee, 18ih day, lOh. M. | Apogee, 31st day, 4h. M. 


PHASES OF THK MOOIf. 

New Moon, 4thday,ilh. 21.7m. M. Full Moon, 10th day, Oh. 54.5m. M. 
First Quarter, Itith '^ Oh. 14.3m. M. Last Qaarter, SSth " lOh. 12 .Cm. A. 


• 

1 

o 


• 

1 
t 


Sun's upper limb rises and sets, (corr. for refract.) M. T. 


High Water. M. Time.| 


1 


1 


1- 

f 




is 


• 


1 




rues. 
h. m. 


sets. 
h. m. 


rises. 
h. m. ] 


sets. 
1. m. 


rises. 
h. m. 


sets. 
h. m. 


rises. 
h. m. 


sets. 
h. m. 


rises. 
h. m. 


sets. 

h. m. 


h.m* 


h. m. 


h. m. 


1 


Tu. 


4S5 


7 40 


431 ' 


r 35 


4 37 


7 29 


4 55 


7 11 


5 1 


7 4 


oum 


6 Sim 


sum 


2 


W. 


26 


40 


32 


35 


37 


20 


55 


11 


1 




10 5 


745 


6 5 


3 


Th. 


27 


40 


32 


35 


JiH 


20 


56 


11 


1 




10 50 


830 


650 


4 


F. 


27 


30 


33 


34 


38 


28 


56 


11 


2 




1132 


012 


732 


5 
6 


S. 


28 
4 20 


39 
7 30 


33 
4 34 - 


34 
7 34 


30 
440 


28 

728 


57 
4 67 


11 


2 


7 4 


9a 


40 


8 9 


7 11 


5 3 


44a 


ioa4m 


844m 


7 


M. 


20 


30 


35 


34 


40 


23 


58 


11 


4 




1 17 


10 57 


17 


8 


Tu. 


30 


38 


35 


»i 


41 


27 


58 


10 


4 




140 


1120 


49 


9 


W. 


31 


38 


36 


33 


42 


27 


60 


10 


5 




222 


2a 


10 22 


10 


Th. 


32 


38 


37 


33 


42 


27 


5 


10 


5 


3 


258 


038 


10 58 


11 


F. 


33 


37 


3S 


32 


43 


26 





10 


6 


3 


330 


110 


11 30 


12 
13 


S. 
Su. 


434 


37 
7 36 


30 
430 


32 


44 


26 
7 25 


1 
5 1 





6 


3 

7 3 


424 


2 4 


24a 


7 31 


445 


7 


5 7 


5 15a 


2 55a 


1 isa 


14 


M. 


35 


36 


40 


31 


45 


25 


2 





8 


2 


6 21 


4 1 


2 21 


15 


Tu. 


35 


35 


41 


30 


46 


24 


3 


8 


8 


2 


732 


512 


332 


16 


W. 


37 


34 


42 


20 


47 


24 


3 


8 





2 


8 47 . 


627 


4 47 


17 


Th. 


37 


34 


43 


20 


48 


23 


4 


8 


10 


1 


054 


734 


554 


18 


F. 


38 


33 


44 


28 


49 


23 


4 


7 


10 


1 


10 53 


833 


653 


19 
20 


S. 
Su. 


30 
4 40 


32 
7 32 


44 
4 45 


27 


50 


22 


5 


7 
7 6 


11 

5 11 




7 


11 45 


025 


7 46 


7 27 


4 50 


721 


5 5 


• • • 


10 15a 


8 35a 


21 


M. 


41 


31 


46 


26 


51 


21 


6 


6 


12 


650 


035m 


11 1 


021 


22 


Tu. 


42 


30 


47 


25 


52 


20 


7 


5 


12 


50 


121 


1146 


10.6 


23 


W. 


43 


20 


48 


24 


53 


10 


7 


5 


L3 


58 


2 6 


• • • 


10 49 


24 


Th. 


44 


28 


40 


23 


53 


18 


8 


4 


13 


57 


240 


029m 


1133 


26 


F. 


45 


27 


40 


22 


54 


17 


8 


3 


14 


57 


332 


112 


* ** * 


26 
27 


S. 
Su. 


46 
4 47 


26 
725 


50 
4 51 


22 


55 


17 





3 
7 2 


14 
5 15 


66 
655 


4 18 


1 58 


iRm 


7 21 


456 


7 16 


5 10 


5 6m 


246m 


1 6m 


28 


M. 


48 


24 


52 


20 


56 


15 


11 


1 


16 


55 


6 10 


3 50 


8 10 


29 


Tu. 


40 


23 


53 


10 


67 


14 


11 





16 


54 


720 


6 


3S0 


30 


W. 


60 


23 


54 


18 


58 


14 12 
13 13 





17 


64 


836 


6 16 


496 


31 


Th. 


SI 


21 


55 


17 


50 


6 60 1 18 


53 


043 


783 |543 1 



1846.] Juty has Thirty-one Days. ^ 25| 




Passage of the Meridian (mean time) and declination of the Planets. | 






1st day. 1 


7th day. 


13th day. 


19th day. 


25th day. | 




Souths. 


Dec. 


Souths 


Dec. 


Souths^ Dec. 


Smuhs. 


Dec. 


Souths. 


Dec. 






h. ni> 


e < 


h. m. 


• 1 


h. m. 


• 1 


h. m. 


e / 


h. m. 


O 1 




Q 


11 4im 


--^13 


14a 


--43 52 44a 
- -21 32 1 13 


t --ai 68 

--19 55 


1 8a 


--18 58 
--17 58 


126a 


-f-15* 




9 


05Ba 


>-22 48 


1 6 


119 


1 25 -|-15 43| 






3 32m 


—16 24 


3 14II] 


L — ^16 23 2 53m — ^16 30 


3 3im 


-^16 46 


8 7m 


— 17 1« 




g 


845 


--12 54 


8 30 


- -13 86 8 16 


-+-13 55 


8 1 


--14 90 


746 


->-14 43 




S 


354a 


--943 


I 334a 


--9 1( 


J 323a --836 


3 6a 


--7 59 


3 5la 


--721 




X 


1 54m 


- -18 15 


I27n: 


I - -18 11 


L 59m - -17 58 


3im 


--17 35 


sm 


--17 4 




Q 


4 10 


— 20 27 


346 


— 80 5" 


r 3 22 


— 21 31 


257 


— ftilO 


231 


—83 50 




It. 


737 


-|-12 15 


7 17 


-{-13 3! 


2 657 


-f-18 48 


636 


-f-13 3 


6 15 


-f-13 16 




% 


847 


—16 23 


222 


— ^16 3( 


» 1 57 


— ^16 37 


133 


—16 45 


1 7 


— ^16 53 




9 


6 1 


-|-323 


533 •4-32. 


1 5 15 


-{-325 


451 


-|-326 


427 


■4-324 




• 

1 




Moon rises or sets. Mean Time. || 






u 






« A 


PHENOMENA AND OBSERVA- 




^ 


i 


j 


* ^ & 


TIONS. 




•5 


Mn So 
BanTi 


I 




"ei 


m 

s 


Sundays and Holidays. 




P 


gS 


• 

2 


1 





• 

2 








rises. 


rises. 


rises. 


rises. 


rtses. 


Washington Mean Time. 






h. m. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


\i. m. 


h. m. 


d. h. m. . , 




1 


9 39m 


2 7m 


2 iim 


2 17m 


2 32m 


2 38m 


1 62m. 9 in Perihelion. 




2 


10 28 


2 52 


2 56 


312 


3 13 


325 


1 5 14m. ^ in Perihelion. 




3 


U 16 


sets. 


sets. 


sets. 


sets. 


sets. 


2 2 7m.n90 




4 


3a 


7 28a 


7 24a 


7 19a 


7 7a 


7 2a 


Independence declared 1776 




5 


050 


8 4 


8 


756 


745 


742 


3 5 58a. O in Apogee. 
7th Sunday after Trinity. 




5. 


1 35a 


8 35a 


8 3sa 


8 30a 


8 21a 


8 18a 




7 


220 


9 4 


9 2 


9 


854 


8 54 


4 8 iim. <5 2 C g 4 56 N. 




8 


3 3 


932 


932 


930 


927 


927 


5 7 om. ^ stationary. 




9 


3 47 


950 


9 50 


959 : 


LO 


10 


5 8 iia. g in sup. 6 O 




10 


431 


10 26 


10 27 


10 29 : 


L0 31 


10 34 


58 8ia.^$C 9 61N. 




11 


5 17 


10 55 


10 58 


11 


11 6 


11 9 


11 44a. b gr. Hel. Lat N. 




12 


6 6 


11 23 


1131 


1135 


LI 44 


11 49 


IS 7 om. $ in Aphelion. 
Bth Sunday after Trinity. 




6 S6a 


• • . 


• • • 


• • • 


« • • 


• • • 




14 


754 


5m 


lom 


15m 


027m 


032m 






15 


853 


051 


055 


1 


115 


122 


15 9 33a. 9 stationaxy. 




16 


955 


144 


149 


155 


2 11 


2 19 






17 


10 58 


rises. 


riies. 


rises. 


rises. 


rises. 


90 133m. (5 5;^ SI * 014N. 




18 


•*• 


48a 


6 45a 


6 42a 


6 30a 


6 28a 


20 45a. iri€ >2 6 25 S. 




19 
S, 


om 


737 


734 


733 


723 


7 21 


21 3 6m. ^ stationary. 
9th Sunday after Trinity. 




58m 


8 14a 


8 13a 


8 iia 


8 5a 


8 5a 




n 


1 54 


8 49 


848 


8 48 


845 


8 45 


21 3 27a. <J (J(C ^1145 S. 




22 


2 46 


920 


920 


920 


922 


923 






23 


337 


950 


9 51 


953 


9 57 


10 1 


23 im.? gr. Hel. Lat. N. 




24 


425 


10 20 


10 23 


10 25 


10 33 ' 


10 37 


34 7 3m.^9(C 9 4 25 S. 




25 


5 13 


10 53 


10 56 


11 


11 9 


11 15 


25 4 17m. (5 a 9 sons. 




26 

JL. 


6 


1127 


1133 


11 36 


11 49 


11 56 


38 11 17m. (J ^<L ^2 33S. 
10th Sunday after Tnmty. 




s. 


648m 


• • • 


• • • 


• • • 


• • • 


• « • 




28 
29 


736 
825 


6m 

49 


12m 

054 


oiem 

1 


3im 

1 15 


37m 

1 22 


29 5m.<5 gaCt * 23 S. 

30 9 32m. 6 9«SL * 1 7 S. 




30 


9 13 


137 


143 


148 


2 4 


2 11 


31 8 10a. 1 2O>ntens.oflt.0.311 




131 


10 1 13 29 


1933 


[339 


3 54 


3 1 


31 10 8a.. 6 .5^ * ^ *-* N. 



8 



1 



86 



August, Eighth Month, begins on JFHdaitf, 

Twiliyht begins and endi. Memii Time. 



[1846. 



7ih day. 



Bocton, 
N. Yor)^ 
WMh. 
ChailM. 
N. Ori'8. 



1st day. 



Begins, 
h. m. 

3 6SII1 

9 4 

3 14 

330 

34S 



Ends, 
h. m. 

9i7a 

9 8 

8 SB 

B33 

6 24 



Begins. Ends. 
h. in. 

9 sa 



b. m. 

3 6m 

3 14 
3S9 
3 49 
3 54 



8 88 
8 48 
8 95 
8 16 



13th day. 

Begins. Ends. 
h. m. 



h. m 
3 15m 
3 93 
3 80 
3 90 
3 60 



8 83 a 
845 

893 

9 18 
8 



lOih day. 


Begiiiii.i Kiid«. 


h. m. 


fa. in. 


3 24m 


8 4Sa 


338 


8 34 


398 


6 98 


356 


8 10 


4 4 


^ a 



aSlh day. 



Begins, 
h. m. 

3 34m 
3 40 

3 40 

4 3 

4 8 



Ends 
h. m. 

6 90a 

824 

8 18 

8 2 

796 



PKRIOXX AMD APOGKX OW THK MOOIf. 

Peritee, 19th day, 9h. A. j Apogee, 9yth day, Oh. A. 



PHASSS or TRX Mooir. 

Naw Moon, 3d d»y, 9h. 10.7m. M. 



First Quarter, 10th <* 5h. 3^.4ni. A- 



Full Moon, 
Last Quarter, 



ITlhday, 8h. 83m. M. 
94th •< Ih. 18.9m. A. 



I 

O 

I 



1 

2 

3 

4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 

id 

11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 

17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 

24 

25 
26 
27 
2d 
29 
30 

31 



Sun's i«9Mf limb rises and sets, (corr. for refract.) M. T. 



F. 

S_ 

Su. 
M. 

Tu. 
W. 
Th. 
F. 

S. 

ss; 

M. 

tu. 

W. 

Th. 

F. 

S. 



rises. 
h. m. 

4 8S 
53 



uts. 

h m 

7 90 
10 



Su. 

M. 

tu. 

W. 

Th. 

F. 

S. 



Su. 

M. 

Tu. 

W. 

Th 

F. 

Su. 



4 54 
65 
56 

57 

58 

60 





7 W 
16 
15 
14 
13 
11 
10 



1 

2 
3 

4 
5 

6 

7 



8 
9 
10 
11 
12 
14 
15 



5 16 
17 
18 
10 
20 
21 
22 

5 23 



I' 



nses. 
h. m. 

^56 
57 



ssts. 
h. m. 

7 16 
15 



r%se8. 1 sets. 
h. ra. h. m. 



456 
50 

9 
1 
2 
3 
4 




8 
7 
5 
4 
2 




6 50 
57 
55 

54 
Si 
51 
60 



6 48 
47 
45 
44 

42 

40 
30 

63?" 



7 14 
12 
11 
10 
9 
7 
6 



5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 



^12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 



15 10 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 

526 



5 

4 
3 
1 


6 56 
56 



I 



f 




1 



1 
2 
3 

4 
5 
6 
7 



6 55 
53 
52 

50 
40 
48 
46 



6 45 
44 
42 
41 
30 
38 

il 
635 



8 
9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 



p 15 
16 
17 
IS 
19 
20 
21 



7 12 
11 



nses. 
h. m. 

14 
14 



7 10 
9 



8 

7 

6J 

4 

3 



7 9 


6 50 
56 
57 
55 
53 



15 21 
23 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 



6 52 
60 
49 
48 
46 
45 
44 



sets. nses. 
h. m. h. ni. 



6 56 
57 



5 15 
16 
16 
17 
18 
IS 
19 



6 50 
55 
54 
53 
92 
51 
50 



520 
20 
21 
22 
23 
23 
24 



525 
25 
26 
27 
27 
28 
29 



6 42 529 



41 
40 
381 

37 
36 
34 



30 
31 
31 
32 
33 
33 



6 49 
48 
47 
46 
45 
44 
43 



[6 42 
41 
40 
30 
38 
37 
36 



16 35 
34 
33 

32 
31 
20 
28 



34 16 26 



I-8 



^ 10 
10 



sets 

h. m. 

6 53 
92 



^ 20 
21 
21 
22 
22 
23 
23 



6 51 
50 
49 

48 
48 
47 
46 



5 24 
25 

35 
26 
26 
27 

SB 



15 28 

29 
29 
30 
30 
31 
32 



532 
33 
34 
34 
35 
35 
36 

5l8 



45 
44 
43 
42 
41 
40 
30 



6 38 
37 
36 
35 
34 
33 
32 



16 31 
30 
20 
28 
27 
26 
25 

6^ 



High IVater. M. Time. 



^mi^tm^m 



11 3ia 



10 46m 



im 

40 



8 26m 



Atigust has Thirty-one Da/ys, 

Paaaage of the Meridian (mean time) aiid Declination of the PlaiieuT 




27 



10th dav. 



Souths. 
h. m. 

1 4oa 

1 42 

oiim 

6 41 

1 47a 
10 1 

3om 

4 44 

11 17a 

2 47m 



Dec. 

4-0 10 

4-4 8 
— 19 30 
4-15 48 
4-430 
4-13 i6 
— 25 42 
-f-l3 40 
— ^17 29 
+ 3 13 



25th day. 



SouiAs. 
h. m. 

127a 

1 45 
11 96 

6 14m 

19E2a 

034 

7m 

421 

10 S2a 

2 23m 



1 

4 



Dec. 

— » 

— 19Bff 
15 SB 
340 
12 8 
— 16 16 
-|-13 49 
— ^17 37 
+^3 9 



i 



PHENOMENA AND OBSERVA- 
TIONS. 

Sundays and Holidays, 



Washington Mean Time, 
d. h. m. , , 

1 7 2ia. U210 
2id45m.<$$/>gt ^ 6 S. 
nth Sunday after Trinity. 
3 5 5ro. ^g>X ^0 4N. 

1 12m. ^ in o 

6 26m. ^ 9 C 9 6 46 N. 

6a. ^ g C g 4 53 N. 

52m. ^ gr. MeL Lat. S. 

3 5im.5^0 
I2th Sunday aft. Trinity.'i!,*Xi: 

8 8 i2m.<J>2Vy sic 16 S. 

9 8 2a. (Sg^8 ^0 8N. 

14 4 46m. ^ in Aphelion. 

15 9 3(m.^ Sigt * 126N. 

15 11 27m. g gr. elon. 27 22 E. 

16 7 68a. 6^,€ >Z fe23 S. 
\3th Sundjky after Trinity. 

17 7 om. $ in Aphelion. 

17 5 13a. ^ ^C S 12 33 S. 

18 10 2m. g jO 
18 6 14a. (5 g 9 « 3 39 S. 

20 3i3a. ^9C 9 -< 14 S. 

21 4 3im. g $Ointen8.oflt.0.672 

I4th Sunday after Trinity. 

21 7 4om. <J 9 5 912s. 

22 10 26a. <J^C 4if 2 13 S. 
28 8 46a. § Stationary. 
30 5 16a. ^ in Perihelion. 
30 6 34a. 2[ stationary. 
30 8 22a. <J >z^>J * 1 54 N. 
15f^ Sunday after TrinUy. i 



M 


1 




SUtntp.mJitir, Ninth 


Wi / ^}7T//m 


bciti 


'.njt nn Ji/TnnAnaj 1 


1fil/)l 


■**^ -^"i » -^-.w^- 


■ — — '-— -^j 


f/V/^C.^ ^.^ _y. ^-^-^.| 


Twilight begtiit and end*. Mean time. | 




1st day. || 7th day. t 13th day. || 


19th day. 


25th day. 


Begins, 
h. m. 


Ends 
h. m. 


. Begins. ] 
h. m. b 


binds. 
. m. 


Begins, 
h. m. 


Ends. Begins 
h. m. h. m. 


k Cnds 
h. m. 


Begins.! ESnds. 
h. m. h. m. 


BoctoOi 


3 44m 


Bi«a 


3 6im 8 


4a 


350m 


7 528 4 7in 


7 40a 


4 iGm 


7 3Ba 


N.York, 


3 49 


8 11 


13 66 8 





4 3 


7 49 4 10 


7 37 


4 18 


786 


WMh. 


3 54 


S 6 


!4 7 66 


4 7 


7 45 4 14 


7 34 


491 


733 


Charles. 


4 8 


70 


418 743 


4 17 


734 483 


7 35 


498 


716 


N. Ort's. 


4 14 


746 


4 17 7 39 


4 81 


7 31 4 85 


7 99 


4 30 


7 14 


PKRIOVX AMD APOOSX OV THX MOON. 


Perigee, 19th day, Ih. A. ) Apogee,94th day, Noon. 


PHASES OF THE MOON. 


New Moon, 1st day, 4h. d6.5in. ▲. Full Moon, 15th day, 5h. 5.3m. A. 
First Quarter, 9th <' Oh. 15.8m. A. Last Quarter, a3d " 7h. 17.7m. M. 


1 


t 

1 


Sun's vpper limb rises and sets, (oorr. for refract.) M. T. 


High Water. M. Time. 1 


i 


i 


r 






• 


25 




rises. 
h. ra. 


sets. 
h. m. 


nses. 
h. m. 


sets. 
li. m. 


nses. 

h. m. 


sets. 
h m. 


rises. 
h. m. 


sets. 

h. m. 


nses. 
h. m. 


sets. 
h. m. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


1 


M. 


5 34 


6 35 


6 27 


ft 33 


5 89 


6 31 


.5 35 


6 85 


5 37 


23 


1128111 


9 2m 


7 33m 


2 


Tu. 


ao 


33 


88 


31 


30 


29 


35 


84 


37 


33 


11 56 


996 


756 


3 


W. 


87 


38 


29 


30 


31 


88 


36 


29 


3fl 


81 


87a 


10 7 


827 


4 


Th. 


SR 


30 


30 


88 


38 


26 


37 


21 


38 


19 


SO 


10 39 


859 


5 


F. 


29 


86 


31 


86 


33 


24 


37 


80 


39 


18 


1 33 


11 13 


933 


6 

7 


S. 
Su. 


30 
5 31 


86 


38 


84 


33 


23 


38 


19 


:w 


17 
6 16 


8 6 


11 46 


10 6 


6 85 


5 33 


6 83 


5 34 


6 21 


5 38 


6 18 


5 40 


3 45a 


095a 


10 45m 


8 


M. 


38 


83 


34 


21 


35 


20 


39 


16 


40 


15 


3 36 


1 6 


11 26 


9 


Tu. 


:« 


81 


35 


10 


36 


18 


40 


15 


41 


13 


4 18 


1 63 


oisa 


10 


W. 


35 


19 


36 


17 


37 


16 


40 


14 


43 


13 


5 37 


3 7 


1 27 


11 


Th. 


36 


17 


37 


15 


38 


15 


41 


13 


48 


11 


6 57 


4 37 


957 


12 


F. 


37 


15 


38 


14 


39 


13 


42 


11 


43 


10 


835 


6 5 


435 


13 
14 


S. 
Su. 


38 
5 39 


14 
6 12 


30 
5 40 


13 


40 


12 


42 


9 

6 8 


43 
5 44 


8 
6 7 


934 


7 14 


534 
6 27a 


6 11 


5 41 


6 10 


5 43 


10 37a 


8 7a 


16 


M. 


40 


10 


40 


7 


41 


9 


43 


7 


44 


6 


11 16 


8 56 


7 16 


16 


Tu. 


41 


8 


41 


7 


43 


7 


44 


6 


45 


5 


11 57 


937 


757 


17 


W. 


4S 


6 


43 


5 


43 


5 


45 


5 


45 


4 


• • • 


10 16 


836 


18 


Th. 


43 


5 


43 


4 


44 


4- 


45 


4 


46 


3 


Odom 


10 54 


9 14 


19 


F. 


44 


3 


44 


8 


44 


1 


46 


3 


46 


8 


1 14 


LI 31 


9 51 


20 
21 


S. 
Su. 


45 
5 46 


1 
6 


45 

546 



5 59 


45 
546 





47 


1 


47 


1 
6 


1 51 


• • • 


L0 27_ 
11 5a 


5 59 


5 47 


6 


5 47 


3 37m 


7m 1 


22 


M. 


47 


558 


47 


58 


47 


67 


48 


550 


48 


5 56 


3 5 


45 1 


11 A7 


23 


Tu. 


48 


50 


48 


55 


43 


56 


48 


57 


48 


57 


3 47 


1 87 


■ • • 


24 


W. 


50 


55 


50 


55 


49 


54 


49 


55 


49 


55 


4 37 


3 17 


037m 


26 


Th. 


51 


53 


51 


53 


50 


63 


60 


54 


50 


64 


550 


330 


160 


26 


F. 


62 


51 


52 


51 


51 


61 


50 


53 


50 


53 


7 13 


453 


3 13 


27 

28 


S. 
Su. 


53 
554 


49 


53 


49 
5 47 


52 

5 53 


49 


51 


51 
550 


51 
6 51 


51 
5 50 


839 


6 9 


4 39 


5 47 


5 54 


548 


5 62 


9 3im 


7 iim 


5 3im 


29 


M. 


55 


46 


55 


46 


54 


46 


53 


48 


52 


49 


10 13 


753 


6 13 


30 


Tu 


56 


44 


56 


44 


55 


45 


53 


47 


52 


48 


10 50 


830 


6 50 





lacUy. 


711 day. 


13lh d.7. 


IBih da,. 


25.hd.T. 1 




s^sar 


D«. 


£b»»^ 


Dec. 


i^i^ 


Dec 




&«uh,. 


D^^ 


S«ula. 


Dec. 








b. ID. 




h.TD. 






h.m. 




h.m. 




^ 


osea 


— 2 43 


o!2a 


— 1 


8 113811 


a-i-i 


20 


u 4m 


-\-It. 


18 49m 


\-M» 




118 


— 233 


in 


- 6 Mil 1 Ma 


— 840 








—14 20 








to 31 




B 10 8 


-loss 




—IB 30 


B31 


-13 55 




S 4ID 


-t-W 8 


IS 46111 


4-18 Mil s a7inH-w i^l 




4-10 13 


448m 


fioia 




tl4a 


- '253 


03ea 




043a 


4-1 




oaea 


■ -045 


13a 






e 4 


4-10 41 




f B34||9 14 


f « 




760 






f 8 2 








11 












—^33 




—27 31 


^ 


3 34m 


-h<3 47 


330IB 


-1-13 4 


4 3 Mn|-Hl3 39 


2 4im 


4-13 32 


2 ism 4-13 S3 


9 


lossa 


—17 46 






K-17 


57 






B 43a —18 8 




+ 3 4 


I30ni 


-h2»||l 8mH-a 


« 


4am 


rf249 


17m,-|-2 43 




M™nii«iot.ei». M™'fm», 




1 


is 




i 


1 


■3 
-■- 


T10N8. 


i 


II 




f 




1 


Ji 


_ 


X 




Sundat,^ tmd Holiday!. 






ut>. 




WuhingUH. Mean TLmc. 










h, m. 




d. h. m. 








a 7a 






3 040ra.,J!;<t 2 022S. 




osga 






839 


S3D 


3 3 Ma. a gr. Hei. Lat. S. 












7 15 












7 47 


7 50 


4 7i\m.i9C 9 352N. 

5 32oa.DaO 




S 3D 




9 IS 


825 


9 31 




342 
437a 


- - 


BM 






mk Sunday after Trimts. 




D4£a 


usTa 
























133 






,1 fl3.a. !Ji„Inf. ,JO 














13 asra. (Jftji'ori.*! 2 3. 
13 2i4m.,jHa: h 628 S. 








o4om 


054m 
















13 6 33a. ,i JC J ni5S. 




10 19 




3 






18 1126a. 6A€ W 410S. 




11 11a 


- 


ri^. 


riKj. 




nth Sunday after Trinilii. 




s 




648a 






n I37m.9 in Q 






aso 






10 a Bm. ^stationary. 




0«i 




ess 


7 3 




10 6 Sim. <5 ^C .a 2 9 S. 














IB T om. $ stationary. 

N 1 Jm,gai/3ori.*0 49S. 




333 




9 S 


822 






339 




es2 


S 8 




2« 4 4sm.!; BtatLonary. 
mk SnnHay after Trinity. 








g3£a 


axu 














830 






22 asTa. 5 inQ 










1 19 


1 32 




M 11 46a. O ent. ii AuL beg. 
13 835a. 69^^ *055N. 
27 4 »m. ^ in Perihelion. 


















837 


■ ■ ■ 


7m 


oiain 


OKm 














1 10 




niiiom.g gr.elon. 1751W. 








a 1 


2 4 


2 13 




»1169a.2l<C "S616W. 






asem 


Tm, 


3 am 


4 4 




19(fc SunAiu aftiT Trinity. 
St.Michaef 




S3un 


la 


1 s 


i »-- 


**- 




J-A.. 


»3S7a. ^.JoSiaSLl-SJ'- 



30 October, Tenth Month, begins on Wednesday, [1845. 


Twilight begins and endt. Mean Time. 




Ist day. 


7th day. 


13th day. 


19th day. 


2Sth day. | 


Begins, 
h. m. 


Ends, 
h. m. 


Begins. 1 
h. m. h 


Ends. 
1. m. 


Beguis. 
h. m. 


Ends, 
h. m. 


Begins 

\x. m. 


. Ends, 
h. m. 


Begins 
h. m. 


. Ends, 
h. m. 


Boston, 


4 23m 


7 17a 


4 30II1 7 


' 6a 


4 371X1 


6 56a 


4 44m 


6 4Ga 


4 som 


638a 


N. York, 


4 25 


7 16 


432 7 


' 4 


438 


6 64 


4 44 


646 


4 so 


633 


Wash'ton, 


4 27 


7 13 


433 : 


' 3 


438 


6 54 


4 44 


6 46 


460 


633 


Cha*8ton, 


4 32 


7 8 


436 7 


' 


440 


6 52 


4 45 


645 


4 49 


639 


N. Orl's, 4 34 


7 6 


437 658 


4 41 


6 51 


4-45 


6 45 


448 


640 


PERIGSB AMD APOOXB OW THK MOON. 

Perigee, 8th day, Noon. | Apogee, 22d day, 9h. M . 


PHASES OF 

New Moon, 1st day, 5h. 50.8m M. 
First Quarter, 8th " 6h. 22.9m. M. 
Full Moon, 16th " 4h. 48.2m. M. 


THE MOON. 

I^ast Quarter, 23d day, 3h. 6.1m. M. 
New Moon, 30th *^ 6h. 33.8m. A: 


1 -^ 


Sun's vpper limb rises and sets, (corr. for refract.) M. T. 


HighAVater. M Time. 

_ . A . 




po 

1 


• 


h 

►* 

S 




6 


m 


• 

a 


i 


la 


rises. 
h. m. 


sets. 
h. m. 


rises. 
h. m. 


sets. 
h. m. 


rises. 
h. m. 


sets. 
h. m. 


rtses. 
h. m< 


sets. 
h. m. 


nses. 
h. m. 


sets. 
h. m. 


h. m. 


h.. m. 


h. m. 


1 


w. 


5 67 


5 42 


5 57 


6 « 


5 50 


5 43 


5 64 


5 46 


5 53 


5 46 


11 23m 


9 3m 


7 23m 


2 


Th. 


68 


40 


58 


40 


57 


41 


65 


43 


54 


44 


11 58 


9 38 


758 


3 


F. 


59 


39 


59 


39 


58 


40 


55 


42 


64 


43 


32a 


10 12 


832 


4 
1 


S. 


1 
2 


37 
5 36 


6 
6 1 


37 


69 


38 


56 


41 


65 


42 

5 41 


1 7 


10 47 


9 7 


536 


6 


5 37 


5 57 


5 40 


5 56 


1 45a 


11 25m 


9 45m 


6 


M. 


3 


34 


S 


34 


1 


35 


57 


39 


56 


40 


2 26 


6a 


10 26 


7 


Tu. 


4 


32 


3 


33 


2 


34 


58 


37 


67 


39 


3 13 


53 


U 13 


8 


W. 


5 


31 


4 


31 


3 


32 


69 


36 


58- 


38 


4 10 


1 60 


oioa 


9 


Th. 


6 


29 


5 


30 


4 


31 


59 


35 


58 


37 


5 19 


2 59 


119 


10 


F. 


8 


27 


6 


.28 


6 


29 


6 


34 


59 


36 


6 49 


4 29 


2 49 


11 
12 


S. 
8u. 


9 
6 10 


26 


7 


27 


6 


28 
526 


1 
6 1 


33 
5 31 


6 
6 


35 
5 33 


8 12 


6 .52 


4 12 

5 Ida 


5 24 


6 8 


5 25 


6 7 


9 Ida 


6 5da 


13 


M. 


11 


22 


9 


23 


8 


25 


2 


30 


1 


32 


10 7 


7 47 


6 7 


14 


Tu. 


12 


21 


10 


22 


9 


23 


3 


29 


2 


31 


10 53 


8 33 


6 53 


15 


W. 


13 


19 


11 


20 


10 


22 


3 


28 


2 


30 


11 33 


9 13 


733 


16 


Th. 


14 


17 


12 


18 


11 


20 


4 


26 


3 


28 


• • • 


9 53 


8 12 


17 


F. 


15 


15 


13 


17 


12 


19 


5 


25 


4 


27 


12m 


10 30 


8 50 


18 
19 


S. 
Su. 


17 
6 18 


14 
5 li3 


15 
6 16 


15 
5 14 


13 
6 14 


18 
5 16 


6 

6 7 


24 
6 23 


4 
6 5 


26 
5 25 


50 


11 5 


9 25 
10 oa 


1 25m 


11 40a 


20 


M. 


19 


11 


17 


13 


15 


15 


8 


22 


6 


24 


2 


• • • 


10 36 


21 


Tu. 


20 


9 


18 


11 


16 


14 


8 


21 


6 


23 


236 


16m 


U 16 


22 


W. 


21 


8 


19 


10 


17 


13 


9 


20 


7 


22 


3 16 


056 


. • • 


23 


Th. 


22 


6 


20 


9 


18 


11 


10 


19 


8 


21 


4 3 


1 43 


sm 


24 


F. 


23 


6 


21 


7 


19 


10 


11 


13 


8 


20 


5 2 


2 42 


1 9 


25 
26 


S. 
Su. 


25 
6 26 


3 
5 2 


22 

6 24 


6 
5 4 


20 
6 21 


9 


12 


17 
5 16 


9 
6 10 


19 
5 18 


6 19 


359 


2 19 
334m 


5 8 


6 13 


7 34m 


5 14m 


27 


M. 


27 





25 


8 


22 


6 


14 


15 


10 


17 


8 40 


6 20 


440 


28 


Tu. 


28 


4 50 


26 


2 


23 


5 


15 


14 


11 


16 


9 31 


7 11 


5 31 


29 


W. 


20 


57 


27 





24 


3 


16 


13 


12 


15 


10 13 


7 53 


6 13 


30 


Th. 


30 


55 


28 


4 59 


25 


2 


16 


12 


12 


14 


10 51 8 31 


6 51 


31 


F. 


32 


64 


29 


58 


26 


1 


17 11 1 


13 


13 


11 29 9 9 


729 



1845.] October has 'thirty-one Days, 31 


» 


Passage of the Meridian (mean time) and Declination of the Planets. 




1st day. 


7th day. | 


J3th day. 


19th day. 


26tb day. 




Sovths. 


Dec. 


Stnahs 


Dec. 


Souths. 


Dec. 


Souths. 


Dec. 


Souths. 


Dec. 




h. m. 


• * 


h. m. 


, • 


h. m. 


• < 


h. m. 


O 1 


h. m. 


• 1 




^ losom 


+ 5 t 


) 11 m 


a+i 32 


11 15m 


— 246 


11 29m 


— 7 10 


11 42m 


— U 93 




9 2 5a 


— ^16 5£ 


i 2 loa 


— ^19 14 


2 16a 


^-«1 17 


2 22a 


—53 


229a 


— 24S2 




^90 


^18 12 


' 8 41 


— ^17 20 


824 


— ^16 22 


8 8 


—15 18 


782 


—14 9 




g 4 27m 


+16 IC 


1 4 6X1 


1+16 6 


342m 


+16 2 


3 18m 


+15 67 


9 63m 


+16 68 




on 58 


— 043 


\ 11 43 


— 1 25 


11 27 


— 2 7 


11 12 


— 2 47 


10 56 


— 327 




7 5a 


■4-45S 


\ 6 42a 


+ 3 62 


6 18a 


+ 2 53 


6 la 


+ 1 57 


5 4ia 


+ 1 7 




^9 12 


— 27 24 


\ 8 47 


— 27 11 


8 23 


—26 52 


3 


—26 28 


737 


—^36 




21 1 5om 


-f-iais 


' 1 24n 


1+12 59 


Q58m 


+12 46 


3im 


+12 31 


4m 


+12^16 




>2 8 19a 


— ^18 S 


7 55a 


— 18 11 


7 3la 


— ^18 11 


7 7a 


— 18 11 


6 44a 


—18 10 




l^U 49 


-|-23fi 


11 24 


+ 230 


11 


+ 225 


10 35 


+ 2 19 


10 11 


+ 2 14 




4 • 


Moon rises or sets. Mean Time. | 


PHENOMENA AND OBSERVA- 

■noNS. 




1 II 


• 


• 


• 

s 


• 


• 
OB 




^. Q OS 


1 

o 


• 


1 


j3 


73 
O 

• 


Sundays and Holidays, 






PQ 


S 


^ 


O 


Z 








sets. 


sets. 


sets. 


sets. 


sets. 


Washington Mean Time. 




- h. m. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


d. h. m. , 




1 11 57m 


5 36a 


5 38a 


5 40a 


5 46a 


5 49a 


1 10 54m. f 9© 




2 45a 


6 11 


6 13 


6 17 


623 


630 


Jewish year 5606 begins. 




3 1 37 


6 48 


6 51 


656 


7 7 


7 13 


2 7 5ia. <5 5 O 




4 232 


7 32 


7 37 


7 41 


755 


8 2 


4 3i7m.^ 9C 9 69 S. 
20th Sunday after Trinity. 




S. 3 29a 


S 23a 


8 27a 


8 33a 


8 48a 


8 55a 




6 427 


9 20 


9 25 


9 31 


9 46 


9 53 


7 la. ?J gr. Hel. Lat. N. 




7 526 


10 24 


10 29 


10 35 


10 48 


10 55 


10 7^9m.6n€ h 6 36 S. 




8 622 


11 31 


11 35 


11 39 


11 52 


11 59 


11 4 45m. <J 9 E£i: * 1 20 N. 




9 7 18 


• • • 


• • • 


• • • 


. . • 


• • • 


11 6 49m.^^<C ^ 912 S. 




10 8 U 


4Qm 


44m 


48m 


57m 


1 2m 


13 1 36m. 5 stationary. 




11 9 2 


1 51 


1 54 


1 56 


2 2 


2 6 


I3ii48m.79^«^ *134N. 
21st Sunday after Trinity. 




57 9 53a 


3 im 


3 2m 


3 4m 


3 6m 


3 9m 




1310 42 


rises. 


rises. 


rises. 


rises. 


rises. 


14 6 35m. ($.¥<£ 9 4 15 S. 




141132 


4 4da 


4 49a 


4 50a 


4 57a 


5 oa 


14 9 4a. 6 9*^^ * 29 S. 




15 8 


,5 20 


523 


5 27 


535 


5 40 


15 7 om.? stationary. 




16 2im 


5.56 


6 


6 4 


6 16 


622 


16 4 47m. 6 9 "'^'n. * 1 50 N. 




17 111 


636 


6 40 


645 


659 


7 4 


16 10 35m. <5 JJ/rC 21 222 S. 




18 2 2 


720 


7 24 


730 


745 


7 51 


16 8 37a. >i stationary. 
22d Sunday after Trinity. 




&'. 2 52m 


8 8a 


8 12a 


8 isa 


833a 


840a 


20 3 41 


S 58 


9 4 


9 8 


923 


930 


17 11 57m. <5 $ts» 5|C 1 7N. 




21 4 29 


953 


9 53 


10 3 


10 16 


10 23 


19 9 3oa. 3 9gOph.5|coccult 




22 6 16 


10 49 : 


L0 53 


10 57 


11 8 


1115 


21 8 25m. 9 in Aphelion. 




23 6 2 


11 47 : 


11 49 


11 53 


• • • 


• • * 


25 1 47m. n ^ 




24 6 47 


• • • 


• • . 


• • • 


3m 


8m 


26 2 57a. g m sup. i O 




25 7 31 

S" 8 15m 


046m 


048m 


05om 


57 


1 9 


29 2 17m. 8 210 

23d Sunday after Trinity. 
29 2 4a. (5 9AOp.* 119 S. 




1 45m 


147m 


1 48m 


1 52m 


1 53m 


27 9 


245 


2 46 


246 


2 48 


2 49 




28 9 47 


350 


3 49 


3 49 


3 47 


3 47 


30 8 68a. <J9dOph.5|c0 23N. 




2910 35 


sets. 


sets. 


sets. 


sets. 


sets. 


30 u 6ea. <5 5 C S 35 N. 




301127 


4 44a 


448a 


4 5ia 


5 2a 


5 7a 


Solar Eclipse, mvis. m U. S. 




31 88a 


696 


531 


536 


549 


666 


31 27m. S in 23 

































32 November, Eleventh Months begins on Saturday, [1845. 


Twilight begins aii^ ends. Mean Time. 




1 


1st day. 


7!h day. 


1 13th day. 


10th day. 


25th day. 


] 


legiiis-i Ends. 
u m* |h. m. 


Begins, 
h. in. 


En .is 
h. re. 


.1 Begins. Ends. 
1 h. m. h. ra. 


Begins, 
h. m. 


EInds 
h. m. 


. Begin 
h; m. 


s. E^id.->. 
h. m. 


Boston, 4 


\SBak 


oaoa 


5 5m 


6S3a 


5 iim 6 isa 


5 17m 


6 14a 


5 *^m.|6 iia 


N. Yoik, 4 


i 67 


681 


5 4 


6 24 


5 10 6 10 


5 16 


6 16 


531 


6 13 


WMh. 4 


i 67 


631 


5 3 


625 


5 8 691 


5 13 


6 18 


5 19 


6 15 


CharlM. 4 


\ M 


634 


460 


620 


5 3 6 36 

5 1 16 38 


5 7 


6 23 


5 13 


622 


N. Ori's. 4 


^63 


636 


4 65 


16 81 


5 « 


6 96 


S 9 


6 25 


PfeBIGH AND APOeU Off THS MOOlT. 

Perigee, td day, 4h.M. | , Apogee, lOth day, 4h. M. 


PHASKS OP THS MOOM. 


Fltst Qnatler, tMh day, Ih. 6.5m. A. Last Quarter, 21st day, llh. 17.9m. A. 
Full Moon, 13th " 7h. 4e.0m. A. New Moon, 20th " 6h. »3.dm. M. 


• 

1 

1 


• 
"8 

1 


Sou's ypper limb rises and sets, (corr. for refract.) M. T. 


High Water. M . Time. 


• 




II' 


1^ 




0* 


1" 


1 

is 


rues, sfts. 
h. m. h. tn. 


nses. 
h. m. 


sets. 
h. m. 


nses, sets. 
h. m.;h. m. 


rises. 
h. m. 


sets. 
h. m* 


nses^ 
h. m. 


sets. 
h. m. 


h. Tii« 


h. m. 


h. m. 


1 
2 


s. 


6 33 
6 34 


453 
452 


6 30 
B31 


4 57 
4 56 


B 27 
628 


5 
450 


18 
6 19 


5 10 


6 14 


5 13 


7a 


9 47in 


8 7m 


5 


6 15 


5 12 


48a 


10 2dm 


8 4sm 


3 


M. 


36 


a 


32 


55 


29 


58 


20 


8 


16 


11 


1 30 


11 10 


930 


4 


Tu. 


36 


50 


33 


64 


30 


67 


21 


7 


17 


10 


2 16 


11 56 


10 16 


a 


W. 


38 


40 


34 


53 


31 


56 


22 


7 


17 


10 


3 6 


46a 


11 6 


6 


Th. 


]39 


47 


30 


51 


32 


55 


23 


6 


18 





4 2 


1 43 


3a 


X 


F. 


40 


46 


37 


50 


33 


54 


24 


6 


19 


8 


5 11 


2 51 


1 11 


.8 
9 


S. 


,42 
6 43 


45 
4 44 


68 


40 


35 


53 


25 


4 


20 


8 
5 7 


631 


4 11 


2 31 


39 


4 48 


30 


4 52 


S 26 


5 3 


620 


7 46a 


526a 


3 46a 


10 


M. 


44 


43 


40 


47 


37 


51 


27 


2, 


21 


6 


3 54 


634 


4 54 


11 


Tu. 


46 


43 


42 


46 


30 


50 


28 


2 


22 


6 


9 48 


728 


548 


12 


W. 


47 


41 


43 


45 


40 


49 


39 


1 


23 


5 


10 33 


8 13 6 33 


13 


Th. 


48 


40 


44 


44 


41 


48 


30 





24 


5 


11 14 


8 54 


7 14 


14 


F. 


50 


30 


46 


43 


42 


47 


31 





25 


4 


11 54 


934 


754 


15 
16 


S. 


61 
6 52 


38 
4 37 


47 

S 48 


42 
4 41 


43 
6 44 


46 
4 45 


32 
S32 


4 59 

4 58 


26 
6 26 


4 
5 3 


• • • 


LOll 


8 31 


Sim 


10 45a 


9 5a 


17 


M. 


63 


36 


49 


41 


45 


44 


33 


57 


27 


3 


1 5 


LI 18 


038 


18 


Tu. 


64 


35 


50 


40 


40 


44 


34 


57 


28 


2 


1 3d 


LI 53 1 


13 


19 


W. 


65 


34 


51 


39 


47 


43 


35 


56 


29 


2 


2 13 


. . . J 


51 


20 


Th. 


.57 


34 


53 


39 


48 


42 


36 


56 


29 


2 


2 51 


osimi 


1 33 


21 


F, 


58 


'X\ 


54 


38 


49 


42 


36 


55 


30 


1 


333 


1 13 


. • • 


22 
23 


S. 

StT 


59 
7 


32 
4 31 


55 

56 


37 


60 


41 


37 


55 


31 


1 
5 1 


420 


9 


o9om 
1 lom 


4 36 


6 51 


4 41 


5 3R 


4 55 


6 32 


5 19m 


2 59m 


24 


M. 


2 


31 


57 


36 


52 


41 


30 


54 


»i 





6 31 


4 11 


2 31 


26 


Tu. 


3 


30 


58 


35 


53 


40 


40 


54 


34 





736 


5 16 


3 36 


26 


W. 


4 


30 


59 


35 


54 


40 


40 


64 


34 





8 40 


6 20 


4 40 


27 


Th. 


6 


29 


7 


34 


55 


40 


41 


54 


35 





933 


7 13 


5 33 


28 


F. 


6 


29 


1 


34 


56 


40 


42 


54 


36 





10 20 


8 


6 20 


29 

22 


S. 
5t4, 


8 


29 


3 


34 


68 


40 


43 


54 


37 




6 (ill 


11 5 


8 45 


7 5 


7 9U^28J 


7\jit 4.33u(64it>i 


Ami 


Si44i^ 


4^ 


0.iA9BX . 


i);2Mttb 





1845.] November has Thirty Days. 33 


Passage of the Meridian (mean time) and Declination of the Planets. 




1st day. 


7th day. 


13th day. 


19th day. 


2Sth day. | 


Souths. 


Dec. 


Souths. 


Dec. 


Souths. 


Dec. 


Soutks. 


Dec. 


Souths. 


Dec. 




h. m. 


e 1 


h. m. 


O 1 


h. m. 


O 1 


h. m. 


O 1 


h. m. 


o t 


S 


11 5dm 


— ^15 51 


oiia 


— ^19 9 


26a 


— 21 53 


4ia 


— 23 58 


056a 


—25 19 


9 


2 38a 


— S5 26 


2 45 


— 25 55 


253 


— 25 57 


2 59 


— 25 34 


3 6 


—24 45 




796 


— ^12 42 


723 


— ^1123 


7 10 


— ^10 1 


6 58 


— 834 


6 46 


— 7 6 


S 


222nl 


-}-l5 47 


1 55m 


+15 42 


1 26m 


+15 38 


57m 


+15 35 


27m 


+15 33 





10 38 


— 4 11 


10 23 


— 4 47 


10 7 


— 6 21 


9 61 


— 6 53 


935 


— 624 





5 19a 


+ 19 


5 oa 


— 21 


4 4ia 


— 57 


4 23a 


— 1 28 


4 sa 


— 1 54 


5 


7 12 


— 25 24 


6 51 


—24 49 


631 


— 24 10 


6 11 


—23 29 


552 


—22 45 


2f 


11 29 


-|-11 53 


11 2 


+11 39 


i0 35 


+11 26 


10 9 


+11 12 


9 43 


+11 


h 


6 17 


— ^18 7 


5 54 


— 18 4 


532 


— 17 60 


5 9 


— ^17 64 


4 47 


—17 47 


V 


042 


-|- 2 9 


9 18 


+ 2 5 


8 54 


+ 2 1 


8 30 


+ 1 58 


8 6 


+ 1 56 



■3 

I 






II 



1 



h. m. 
120a 



& 
3 

4 
5 
6 

7 
8 



5. 
10 
11 



2 19a 

3 19 

4 17 

5 14 

6 7 
659 
748 



Moon rises or sets. Mean Time. 



I 



8ets. 
h. m. 

6 16a 



7 13a 

8 15 
924 

10 33 

11 43 



8 37a 
925 

10 14 
12 11 3 

11 53 

S 

43m 



13 

141 
15 

8. 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 

s: 

24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 

S. 



S2m 



133m 

2 22 

3 9 
366 
441 
526 
6 8 



s om 

3 6 

4 13 

rises. 

4 32a 

5 14 

6 



;2 



sets. 
h* m. 

6 20a 



7 17a 

8 21 
927 

10 37 

11 46 



53m 



6 52m 

736 

823 

9 13 
10 
U 3 

3a 

I 



5a 



6 50a 
743 

8 39 

9 35 

10 34 

11 32 



2 im 

3 5 

4 11 

rises, 

4 37a 

5 18 

6 4 



sets. 

h. m« 

625a 



723a 

825 

932 

10 41 
1149 



55m 



654a 
748 
8 43 
939 

10 36 

11 34 



030m 

1 32 

2 35 

3 41 
448 

setf. 

4 6Ca 



2 im 

3 5 

4 

rises. 
4 40a 
523 
6 10 



7 oa 

7 63 
848 
943 

10 40 

11 35 



I 



sets. 
h. m. 

6 40a 



7 3da 

840 

945 

10 51 

11 66 



68m 



2m 

2 

3 



2 

3 

4 

rises. 

4 53a 

538 

6 25 



o 



s^. 
h. mi 

648a 



746a 
848 
9 51 
10 57 




1 



om 

2 



5 69a 



3im 

1 32 
234 
339 
446 
sets. 
5 2a 



32m 

1 32 

2 33 
336 
443 

sets. 
5 7a 



7 16a 

8 7 
869 

9 53 
10 47 
1140 



2 3m 

3 2 

4 3 

rises. 

5 oa 

5-44 
632 



722a 

8 14 

9 6 
9 68 

10 51 

11 44 



6 4a 6 loa 



36m 

1 31 

2 29 
330 
433 

sets. 
6 23a 



625a 



37m 

1 32 

2 29 

3 29 
430 

sets. 
6 30a 



PHENOMENA AND OBSERVA- 
TIONS. 

Sundays and Holidays, 



633a 



Washington Mean Time, 
d. h. m. ^ , 

1 4 54a. <J JeSoph.* 1 37 N. 
24^^ Sunday after Trinity, 

2 10 33a. i i ossf Hfil ON. 
240 36a. 9 ^(T $ 5 27 S. 
4 10 97a. nhO 

6 4 28a. <5 fty^Qri ^ 20 S. 

6 I4ia. 6%<L li 6 40 S. 

8 6 9m.^ ^C <J 7 19 S. 
26th Sunday after Trinity, 
10 4 4m. S in Aphelion. 
10 5a. 6 9<r 9 4 20 S. 
Olmsted^s Meteoric Shower. 
Moon Eel., vis. in U. S. 
12 5 27m. <5 fty'^ori. * 28 S. 
12 7a. i^<L 21 2 40 S, 
26th Sunday after Trinity, 
12 2 28a. S9it * 28N. 
12 10 ua. 9 S^' Hel. Lat. S. 
16 6 4om. i $lsff 5|c 1 16 N. 

16 37m.^ 9<pf jjc 1 18 S. 

17 3im.O ?0 
17 10 18a. <5 9af * 46 S. 

2'7th Sunday after Trinity, 

24 8 33m. <5 ftolori. * 1 34 S. 
26 6 8m.<5 9A2f *0 34S. 
26 10 15m. i $€pSSf * 3 N. 

30 2 15a. <J 8 <r g 6 47 S. 
30 3 8a. y gr. Hel. Lat. S. 
Advent Sunday, St Andrew. 



34 December, 


7\ae{fth Month, begins an Monday. [1845 j 




Tw-ihsrht he^is and ent\». Mean Time. | 


i 
I 


Isl day. 1 


7ih day. 


13ih day. | 


19th day. 


2Sih day. | 


3egiu9 
1. m. 


. Ends, 
h. m. 


Begins, 
h. m. 


Ends 
h. m. 


. Begins, 
h. m. 


Ends, 
h. m. 


Begins. Ends, 
h. m. h. m. 


Begins 
h. m. 


. Eiids.^ 
h. m. 


Boston, 1 


i 99m 


9a 


535in 


6 9a 


5 4om 


6 8a 


6 43n) 


6ioa 


5 46m 


6 14a 


N. York, J 


»97 


6 11 


533 


6 11 


537 


6 11 


6 41 


6 13 


544 


6 16 


WMh. { 


195 


613 


530 


6 14 


534 


6 14 


5 38 


.6 16 


5 41 


6 19 


Chmrie*. : 


J 17 


621 


523 


6 22 


526 


6 23 


5 29 


6 26 


532 


628 


N. Ori»». « 13 


6 25 


5 13 


6 96 


524 


6 17 


5 25 


620 


5 28 


639 


• PXKIOXK AND APOOSE OF THB MOOIT. 

Perigee, let day, lb. M. \ Apogee, 10th day, Ah. A. | Perigee, 29ih day, lOh. M. 


FtlASSe OF THB MOON. 

First Qoarter, &h day, 9h.44.tfm. A. Last Quarter, 21st day, 6h. 19J3m. A. 
Full Moon, 13lh »^ Ih. 34.8m. A. New Moon, 28th " 5h. 45.0ni. A. 


• 

1 


1 

1 


Sun's vfper limb rises and sets. (oorr. for refract.) M. T. 


High Water. M. Time. 


0* 




f 




• 

55 


• 




1^ 


rises. 
h..in. 


sets. 
h».tni 


rises. 
1. m. 


sets. 
b. m: 


rises. 
h. m. 


uts. 
h. m. 


rises. 

\i. m. 


sets. 
h. m. 


nses. 
h. m^ 


sets. 
h. m. 


h. oi* 


h. m. 


h. m. 


I 


M. 


7 10 


4 28 


7 6 


4 33 


7 


4 30 


3 44 


4 54 


6 39 


5 


35a 


10 inn 


835Xn 


S 


Tu. 


11 


28 


6 


33 


1 


39 


45 


54 


40 





1 29 


11 


090 


3 


W. 


12 


28: 


7 


33 


2 


39 


46 


54 


40 





2 9 


a 49 


10 9 


4 


Th- 


13 


S8> 


8 


33 


3 


39 


47 


54 


41 





259 


039a 


10 69 


S 


F. 


14 


28 


9 


33 


4 


38. 


47 


54 


49 





353 


133 


11 63 


6 

7 


S. 
Su. 


15 
7 16 


28 


10 


33 
4 33 


5 
7 6 


38 : 
438' 


48 
8 49 


54 


43 



5 


460 


2 30 


050a 
1 58a 


4 28 


7 11 


4 54 


6 44 


5 68a 


3 38a 


8 


M. 


17 


98 


12 


:« 


7 


38 


50 


54 


44 


1 


7 7 


4 47 


3 7 


9 


Tu. 


18 


28 


13 


33 


8 


38 


50 


54 


45 


1 


8 17 


557 


4 17 


10 


W. 


19 


28 


14 


:» 


9 


38 


51 


61 


46 


1 


921 


7 1 


591 


11 


Th. 


SO 


28 


15 


33 


10 


38 


52 


65 


46 


1 


ion 


7^1 


6 11 


12 


F. 


£1 


2S 


16 


33 


11 


38 


53 


55 


47 


2 


10 56 


8d6 


656 


18 

14 


S. 
Su. 


22 
7 23 


28^ 
429 


17 

7^8 


33 
4 33 


11 

7 12 


38 
438 


54 

8 55 


65 


48 


2 
5 2 


11 36 


9 16 


736 


4 55 


6 48 


• • • 


955a 


8 15a 


V5 


M. 


S!4 


8P 


10 


34 


13 


39 


56 


56; 


49 


3 


15m 


10 28 


8 48 


16 


Tu. 


d4 


^ 


10 


34 


13 


39 


56 


56; 


49 


3 


048 


11 3 


923 


17 


W. 


26 


29 


20 


34 


14 


40 


67 


66i 


60 


3 


1 23 


11 37 


957 


18 


Th. 


fid 


S9> 


20 


34 


14 


40 


67 


56' 


50 


3 


1 67 


• • ■ 


10 31 


19 


F. 


96 


30- 


21 


35 


15 


41 


58 


57| 


51 


4 


2 31 


oiim 


tl 9 


20 
21 




96 

71?7 


30 


21 


35 
4 36 


15 

7 15 


41 
4 42 


58 
8 59 


57. 

4 5«' 


6 52 


4 
5 5 


3 9 


49 


11 47 


431' 


7 22 


3 47m 


127m 


• » » 


22 


M. 


27 


31 


22 


36 


16 


42 


59 


58 


62 


5 


4 31 


2 11 


odim 


23 


Tu 


28 


32 


22 


37 


16 


43 


7 


69: 


63 


6 


562 


3 6 


1 52 


24 


W. 


29 


32* 


22 


37 


16 


43 





59 


63 


6 


634 


4 14 


934 


26 


Th. 


SS 


3;^ 


23 


38 


17 


44 





5 Oj 


63 


7 


743 


523 


343 


26 


F. 


S9 


33 


23 


38 


17 


44 


1 


i; 


64 


7 


8 82 


639 


468 


27 

28 


B. 


29 
7'^ 


34 


23 


30 


17 


45 
4 45 


1 


i: 


64 

55 


8 
5 9 


9 61 


7a 


661 


4 34 


7 24 


4 39 


7 13 


7 1 


5 2i 


10 43m 


8 23lli 


6 43m 


29 


M. 


29 


35 


24 


40 


18 


46 


2 


3 


55 


9 


11 33 


9 13 


7 33 


30 


Tu. 


30 


36 


24 


41 


18 


47 


2 


4 


65 


10 


25a 


10 5 


8 25 


31 


W. 


30 


87 


25 1 «8- 


19 


48 


3 


6. 66 1 11 


1 19 


10 69 


912 , 



xw^^fjy- 



Passage of the Meridian (meaii time) and Declination of ihe Planets. 



l;iih day. 
Souths. 




36 



iinu 



South*. 
h. m. 

1 6a 

920 
6 S 
10 23 
8 30m 

2 57a 
4 41 
d 3 

3 20 
6 31 



day. 



Dec. 



46 
— 18 6 

— 4P 
+15 43 

— 7 59 
•2 67 
19 29 

-|-10 36 
— ^17 13 
-|- 1 53 



25lh day 



Souths. 
h. m. 

090a 

3 19. 

55e' 

954 
8 14ra 

3 4ia 

424 

739 
869 

6 8 



Dec. 

— 21 17 
—16 48 
4-048 
4-15 61 

— 3 16 

— 3 2 
— 1«36 
-f-10 37 
—17 3 
+ 1 54 



PHENOMENA AND OBSERVA- 
TIONS. 

Sundays and Holidays, 



Washington Mean Time, 
d. h. m. 



1 4 14a. 
3 10 30a. 



S O intens. of It. 0.619 
h<L h6 36S. 

6 1 32a. ^ <f C <J 5 21 S. 

7 4 4aa, ^fl|[<[ V 418 S. 
9 136a. iiiC 4if 2 40 S. 

10 3 4m. § gr. elon. 20 36 £. 
2d Sunday in Advent 

11 7 om.ft in Aphelion. 

12 6 42m. 2^ 9$ '2 17 52N. 
15 11 54m. 6 9n^ * 54 S. 
15 9 24a. 9 Stationary. 

13 1 7m. 8 stationary. 
19 7 cm. 5 gr. Hel. Lat. S. 
Zd Sunday in Advent, 
19 2 iia. ij in $2 

19 7 25a. 2 9 h 9 49 S. 

19 8 38a. i 9iVy'* 32N. 

20 8 68m.<5^Ti5 * 017 S. 
20 10 52a. 9 gr. elon. 47 16 £. 
21 11 18m. n ^O 
Ath Sunday in Advent. 

21 6 19a. O ent. \J Win. beg. 
24 i3 47m. S in Perihelion. 

26 1 22a. 21 stationary. 
Christmas Day. 

27 11 58m. g in Inf. i Q 

28 oi^mDi^O 
1st Sunday after Christinas, 
28 i 33a. 3 ^ <C $ 1 10 S. 
31 11 2im. 6 iid h 6 28 S. 
31 4 50a. ^ 9l»L_* ^ ^^ S. 



SOI.IPSS or MAT 6tb. 



tl845. 



ECLIPSES IN 1845, and TRANSIT OF MERCURT. 

In the year 1845, tbeie will be four eeliptet; two of the Sun, and two 
of the Moon, and a Transit of Mercury. One of the solar eclipses will 
be partly visible in the United States, one of the lanar eclipses, and the 
transit of Mercury. 

I. Tuesday, May 6th. An annular Eclipse of the Sun, partially 
visible in the United States. 

Beginning of the general eclipse at 2h. 41.1m. M. [Mean Time at Wash- 
ington,] in latitude 27* 13' North, and longitude 30" 55' West of Green- 
wich. 

Beginning of the annular eclipse at 4h. 40.5m. M. in latitude 60* 43' N. 
and longitude 103' 39' W. of Greenwich. 

End of the annular eclipse at 5h. 12,1m. M. in latitude 72* 39' N., and 
longitude 136* 58' W. of Greenwich. 

End of the general Eclipse at 7h. 20.6m. M. in latitude 48* 6' N., and 
longitude 101* 9' E. of Greenwich, 

This eclipse will be visible throughout the greater part of Europe, the 
Northern part of Asia, the North Polar Sea, the North Atlantic Ocean, 
Greenland, Canada, New England, New York, New Jersey, Delaware, the 
North-eastern portion of Pennsylvania, and the North-eastern comer of 
Maryland. Being visible at the same time in Europe and America, U 
will be peculiarly vdluahkfor determining the relative longUudee of places in th$ 
two continenti. 

The phases of the eclipse for all places in the United States naay be 
determined with sufficient accuracy by means of the following tables.* 
The Sun*s semi-diameter and horizontal parallax are the same aa at con- 
junction, and may be taken from the following table : 

ELEMENTS OF THE ECLIPSES OF THE SUN. 



1845. 


May 5-6. 


October 30. 


Greenwich Mean Time of d in R. A. 


d. h. ID. ■• 

5 22 31 45.8 


h. in. 1. 

12 12 56.7 


and ]>'8 Right Ascension, 


2 52 59.94 


14 20 24.55 


]>'s Declination, 


N. ft 26 "1.9 


s.Usk h 


O's Declination, .... 


N. 16 33 31.5 


S. 14 38.8 


])'8 Horary Motion in R. A. . 


31 32.9 


35 10.8 


0'8 Horary Motion in R. A. 


2 24.9 


2 26.4 


T> 's Horary Motion in Declination, 


N. 6 12.2 


S. 8 20.7 


O's Horary Motion in Declination, . 


N. 42.1 


S. 48.9 


j> »s Equatorial Horizontal Parallax, 


54 56J5 


58 44i2 


0's Equatorial Horizontal Parallax, . 


8.5 


8.6 


])'8 True Semi-diameter, 


14 583 


16 0.4 


0*8 True Semi-diameter, . 


15 51.8 


16 8.5 



•The Almanac is indebted for the calcalationi of this Eelipie to Lieut. Charles B. 
Davit, of the United States Navy. 



1845.] 



XOLZPfS 07 MAT 6. 



37 



End of th« Edipfle in Mean Time of Place. 



w. 

Ln. 
fin. 
Or. 

o 

88 

81 
80 
79 
78 
77 
76 
75 
74 
73 
78 
71 
70 
69 
08 
67 

•M'a 


Geographical Latitude. 


1 

• 

88 

81 
80 
79 
78 
77 
76 
75 
74 
73 
72 
71 
70 
69 
68 
67 

riaw. 

DT. IbV 


45* 


44» 


43» 


48* 


4r 


40. 


39- 


38* 


h. m. c. 
443 43.8 
4 47 13.9 
450 43.3 
4 54 14.8 

4 57 47.7 

5 121.6 
5 4 56.5 
5 8 32 1 
512 06.6 
515 46.0 
5 19 24.4 
5 23 3.7 
5 26 43 J) 
5 30 25.1 
534 7J2 
5 37 50J2 


li.m. a. 

4 49 4.8 
4 52 36.1 
4 56 8.2 

4 59 41.0 

5 03 14.6 
5 06 49.0 
510 24J2 
514 0.4 
5 17 37.8 
5 21 16.0 
5 24 55.1 
5 28 35.2 
5 32 16.1 
5 35 56.0 


n. ni« s. 

t 

4 5057.4 

454 28.5 

4 58 0;3 

5 01 33.0 
5 05 06.3 
5 06 40.4 
51215.5 
5 15 51.6 
5 19 28.6 
5 23 06.7 
5 26 45.7 
5 30 25.6 
5 34 06.4 


h. m. a. 

4 52 50.7 
4 56 80.7 

4 50 51.8 

5 03 23.9 
5 06 57.0 
5 10 30.9 
5 14 05.8 
5 17 41.8 
5 21 18.8 
5 24 56.8 
5 28 35.8 
5 32 15.6 


h.m. a. 

4 54 40.5 

4 58 10.6 

5 01 41.8 
5 05 13.9 
5 06 46.8 
512 20.6 
515 55.4 
519 31.3 
5 23 06.1 
5 26 46.0 
5 30 24.8 

• 


h. m. a. 

4 56 27.9 

4 59 58.6 

5 03 30.1 
5 07 02.5 
5 10 35.6 
5 14 09.4 
5 17 44.0 
5 21 19.7 
5 24 58.3 
5 28 33.8 


h. m. a. 

45817.6 
6 01 47.8 
5 06 18.9 
5 08 50.8 
512 23.5 
515 57.0 
5 19 31.5 
5 22 06.8 
5 26 42.9 


h.m. a. 

5 00 06.5 
5 03 36.1 
5 07 06.5 
5 10 37.0 
5 14 10.1 
5 17 43.1 
5 21 17.1 
5 24 51.0 


45* 


44* 


43- 


4SP 


41* 


40» 


39" 


38* 


h. m. 
4 43.9 


h. n&. 
4 46.4 


h. m. 

4 48.8 


h. m. 
4 51.1 


h. m. 
4 63.4 


h.m. 
4 55.6 


h.m. 

4 57.8 


h.m. 
4 504) 



Digita eclipaed on the Son's northern limb tor plaoes in the United States, at the time 

of the SonHi nsing. 

- ■ - . . - . .. 


• Long. 


Oeogr^[»hical Latitude. 


t 


45* 


44» 


43* 


42» 


41* 


40- 


39" 


Tff 


• t 


• « 


• f 


O f 


• > 


• t 


• f 


O 1 


• 


88 



















8a 


81 


040 
















81 


80 


121 


032 














80 


79 


2 03 


113 


024 












79 


78 


244 


154 


106 


16 










78 


77 


3 26 


230 


147 


053 


009 








77 


76 


406 


3 17 


228 


1 40 


51 


008 






76 


75 


446 


356 


3 06 


2 21 


133 


045 


008 




75 


74 


524 


434 


348 


3 01 


2 13 


1 27 


42 


001 


74 


73 


602 


515 


428 


340 


353 


209 


124 


030 


73 


72 


639 


5 51 


506 


4 18 


333 


248 


804 


119 


78 


71 


713 


627 


543 


457 


4 11 


328 


843 


159 


71 


70 


746 


703 


6 19 


533 


448 


406 


321 


837 


70 


69 


812 


735 


658 


607 


524 


4 41 


358 


315 


69 


68 


834 


804 


722 


640 


550 


5 16 


434 


358 


68 


67 


852 


826 


7 51 


7 12 


633 


550 


509 


428 


67 


45* 


44* 


43» 


42» 


4r 


40- 


39* 


38» 



38 



SCtI»A« Ot MAY 6. 



[1849. 



Anglo of iMt point of oontftet from the northem point of the Sun's limb toward the East ; 
and, in an inverting telescope, from the southern point toward the West. 



1 

o 


Geographical Latitade. 


• Long. 


46" 


44' 


43* 


^r* 


41* 


40* 


9y 


38- 

• 


• t 


• t 


o r 


t 


f 


t 


1 


t 


83 


64 30.1 
















82 


61 


64a2J3 
















81 


80 


64 05U( 


63 17.6 














80 


70 


63 40.0 


63 02.5 


62 14.7 












70 


78 


63 33.0 


6B47.0 


6150.2 


6106.4 










78 


77 


63 17.0 


62 31.0 


01 43.1 


60 52.0 


6OO2.O 








77 


76 


63 01.0 


te 14.7 


6126.6 


60 36.8 


59 45.2 


88 53.5 






76 


76 


62 44J3 


6157.0 


01 09.4 


60 20.1 


59 28.1 


58 35.7 


57 39.0 




75 


74 


6!2 27J3 


6140.8 


60 51.9 


60 02.0 


59 10.5 


58 17.5 


57 2L7 


56 24.1 


74 


73 


6!^ 09.8 


6123.2 


60 33.9 


5945.0 


SB 52.4 


S7 58.9 


67 03.1 


88 05.7 


73 


72 


6152.1 


6105.2 


60 159 


59 26.4 


56 33.8 


57 39.9 


56 44.1 


85 46.8 


72 


71 


6134.1 


60 46.7 


59 57.5 


59 07.3 


58 14.7 


57 20.6 


56 24.8 


65 27.5 


71 


70 


61 15.6 


60 27.9 


69 38.7 


68 47.7 


57 65.1 


57 00.8 


56 05.0 


05 07.G 


70 


69 


60 56.6 


60 08.6 


69 19.0 


58 27.0 


ffr35.1 


56 40.6 


55 44.7 


64 47.3 


69 


68 


60 37.0 


50 48.8 


58 59.3 


58 07.7 


57 14.7 


56 20.1 


65 24.0 


64 26.5 


68 


67 


60 17.0 


50 28.7 


58 38.8 


57 47.1 


56 53.0 


55 69.1^ 


55 02.0 


64 06Ji 


67 


45* 


44" 


43. 


42° 


41" 


40" 


30* 


38° 



Ancle of the last point of contact fVx)m the vertex of the Sen's hrob toward the East ; 
and, in an inverting telescope, from the lowest point oi the Sun's limb toward the West. 



1 




Qeographioal Latitade. 

. . — . * 


m 


45" 


44* 


43* 


42- 


41» 


40- 


30* 


38» 


« t 


* 


t 


« r 


* 


r 


t 


* 





82 


107 
















82 


81 


106 58 
















81 


80 


106 56 


106 57 














86 


70 


106 54 


106 55 


106 57 












70 


78 


106 53 


106 54 


106 56 


106 54 










78 


77 


106 51 


106 53 


106 55 


106 52 


106 5» 








77 


76 


106 50 


106 52 


106 64 


106 50 


106 48 


106 46 






76 


75 


106 46 


106 40 


106 51 


106 49 


106 48 


106 44 


106 41 




78 


74 


106 48 


106 45 


106 47 


106 47 


106 47 


106 41 


106 38 


106 25 


74 


73 


106 40 


106 42 


106 43 


106 45 


106 47 


106 33 


106 20 


106 20 


73 


72 


106 35 


106 36 


106 38 


106 8» 


106 40 


106 89 


106 23 


106 15 


72 


71 


106 20 


106 27 


106 26 


100 30 


106 33 


106 26 


106 18 


106 11 


71 


70 


106 23 


106 20 


106 18 


106 23 


106 26 


106 20 


106 13 


106 07 


70 


60 


106 15 


106 14 


106 15 


106 1? 


106 10 


106 12 


106 06 


106 


60 


68 


106 07 


106 00 


106 11 


106 11 


106 11 


106 05 


106 


105 54 


68 


67 


105 50 


106 03 


106 07 


106 05 


106 03 


105 58 


105 53 


105 48 


67 


45* 


44» 


43* 


42* 


41- 


40» 


SO* 


3ar 



1646.] 



X0X<1VSB OF MAT 6. 



39 



Phaaes of the eclipse for particular places. 

{Note, For those places "which are marked with an asterisk, the phases hav^ been 
«ompiUed by a separtite computation. The oth^ phases are deiivea from the tables.] 



Place. 



Albany, N. Y., 
Amherst, (Col. Ch.)Ms., 
Augusta, (St.Ho^ Me., 
Bangor, (Court H.) Me., 
•Boston, State Houses 

Brunswick, ( ColL ) Me.« 
•Baflaao,N.Y.. 
•Canibridge, Mass., 
Concord, (St.Ho.)N. BL, 
Dover, N. H. 
£aatport. Me., 
Fffederickton, N. B., 
^Halifax. N. S. 
Hartford, (St.Ho.) Ct., 
Middletown, ( WU.) Ct., 
MontpeUer, vt. . 
Montreal, L. C, 
•Nantucket,(S.T.) Mass., 
'^New Bedford, Mass., 
Newbuiyport, Mass., 
•New Haven, (Coll.) Ct., 
Newport,(C.H.)R.I., 
•New York, Otj/ HalL 
Northampton, Mass., 
•Philadel^a, JET. 89. bin. 
Plymouth, (C.H.) Mass., 
•PorUand, Toum Hall. 
Portsmouth,(U.C.)N.H., 
PrincetoD,(N.H.)N.J. 
Providence, (U-H.) ^. L, 
•Quebec, L. C, 
•Splem, (E.I.M.H.) Ms., 
Springfield, (C.H.) Ms., 
•Toronto, or York, U. C, 
Trenton, N. J. 
Williamstown, Mass., 
Worcester, (A.H.)M8., 



M T. of Place at 




Digits of 


Angle of last point of 




Dura- 
tion. 


greatest 

vis.ecl. 

onO's 


contact from 


Ending. 


O rises. 


N. point 
toward E. 


Vertex 

ofQ 

toward K. 








N. limb. 


h. m. s. 


h. m. 


m. 


o > 


o « 


O 1 


5 9 1.7 


4 48.0 


21.0 


343 


60 31.8 


106 46 


12 51.3 


AS0J3 


22.6 


4 11 


59 53.4 


48 


26 5.7 


4 45.0 


40.5 


723 


60 39.6 


90 


30 50.8 


4 44.4 


46.4 


8 4 


60 42.7 


13 


IS 4.5 


4 60.3 


27.8 


5 10 


59 04.0 


34 


25 0.6 


4 46.9 


38.1 


7 1 


60 20.6 


19 


4 51 3.5 


4 40.1 


2.0 


21 


68 8.5 


57 


5 17 63.S 


4 50.3 


37.6 


6 fi 


69 26.7 


34 


18 5.8 


448.3 


29.8 


6 34 


60 16.6 


30 


20 13.6 


4 4a3 


3L9 


546 


60 6.2 


25 


37 24.1 


4 44.1 


53.3 


848 


60 13.5 





40 44.7 


4 41-5 


59.2 


854 


61 2.7 


105 49 


^52.6 


4 44.7 


65.2 


841 


58 50.2 


95 


11 24.9 


4 5L7 


19.7 


336 


59 27.0 


166 43 


10 59.1 


4 53.2 


18.8 


3 32 


59 14.9 


44 


15 57.2 


4 45.8 


30Ji 


5 41 


61 18.5 


39 


14 33.4 


4 42.6 


32,0 


6 6 


62 42.6 


41 


Id 39.4 


4 59.5 


27.2 


456 


58 12.0 


27 


17 1&6 


4 51.8 


25.5 


443 


58 47.7 


34 


19 34.3 


4 49.3 


30.3 


5 33 


59 45.2 


20 


9 30.6 


4 52.7 


16.8 


3 9 


59 6.7 


41 


15 37.8 


4 52.2 


23.4 


420 


58 46.9 


34 


4 40.8 


4 52.2 


10.5 


2 


58 55.2 


43 


12 21.8 


4 50.3 


22.1 


3 41 


59 53.9 


42 


4 59 18.1 


4 55.7 


9.6 


043 


56 34.6 


42 


6 18 47.9 


4 51.0 


27.8 


6 8 


58 58.7 


28 


23 2.5 


4 47.2 


35.8 


633 


60 17.6 


30 


20 23.2 


4 48.7 


31.8 


5 56 


59 57.6 


24 


146.2 


4 54.8 


7.0 


1 14 


56 44.0 


44 


15 44.6 


4 51.4 


24.3 


433 


50 5.8 


33 


25 21.3 


4 39.2 


46.1 


828 


63 0.7 


18 


13 48.9 


4 49.9 


28.9 


5 24 


59 35.5 


27 


12 7.9 


4 50.7 


21.4 


4 1 


59 42.4 


42 


4 50 41.3 


4 47.7 


3.0 


034 


62 46.9 


67 


5 8 4.3 


4 55.1 


7.0 


1 17 


58 39.0 


44 


10 57.7 


4 49.5 


21.5 


4 5 


60 24.1 


45 


15 17.0 


4 50.5 


24.8 


4 39 


59 36.0 


36 



The following table of elements will serve to calculate the eclipse for any place in 

the United Btates. 



^1 


Hour an- 


O'sR. A. 


0'sDec 
North. 


/r)a Dac 


ReL hourly 
motion in 


Hor. 
Par. 


For Inter- 
val of 




Is 


gle for 
Greenw. 


less 
C'sR. A. 


North. 


Dec 
II 


R.A. 


D's 
hour 
angle. 


Relat. 
R.A. 


h. m. 


f rr 


tt 


• 


• 


If 


tt 


t II 


t It 


tt 








16 

1 II 


17 

1 II 














il 45 


32 98 55 


1362.1 


32 58.7 


24 10.2 


334.3 


1747.2 


3297.3 


10 


225 


AJB 


60 


31 16 20 


1216.5 


33 2.2 


41^ 


333.9 


.3 


.2 


90 


450 


9.7 


56 


30 346 


1070.9 


33 6.7 


26 12.8 


.5 


J3 


.2 


30 


7 16 


14.5 


^ 


98 .61 11 


925.2 


33 9.2 


44.2 


.0 


.4 


.1 


40 


41 


19.4 


5 


27 38 37 


779.5 


33 12.7 


26 15.4 


332.6 


.6 


.0 


60 12 6 


24.3 


10 


20 26 2 


633.3 


33 16J3 


45.6 


.2 


.6 


3396.9 


1 14 31 


29.1 


15 


25 13 27 


488.2 


33 19.7 


27 17.9 


331.7 


.7 


.82 01 29 2! 58.3 1 



40 



TEAIISIT OF MSmOVET, MAT 8. 



[1845. 



IL Thursday, May 8. A Transit of Mercury, visible in the United 
States. The times of this transit may be found by the following tables : * 

Calculated for the United States in Mean Greenwich Time. 









IngreM. 












Egrese 


• 






1 




Geographical Latitude 


■ 




Geographical Latitude 


• 


Long. 


25» 


30» 


36" 


40- 


45° 


50- 


26° 


30° 


35' 


40* 


45? 


90P 




h. 


h. 


h. 


h. 


h. 


h. 


h. 


h. 


h. 


h. 


h. 


h. 




4 


4 


4 


4 


4 


4 




10 


10 


10 


10 


10 


10 







m. 8. 


m. 8. 


m. 8. 


m. 8. 


m. 8. 


m. 8. 


o 


m. 8. 


m. 8. 


m. 8. 


m. 8. 


m. 8. 


m. 8. 


o 


08 


19 12 


19 13 


19 15 


19 17 


19 17 


19 IS 


66 


49 4 


43 59 


48 55 


43 50 


48 47 


48 45 


68 


70 


16 


17 


18 


20 


20 


21 


70 


6 


49 


56 


51 


48 


46 


70 


T2 


20 


21 


22 


23 


23 


24 


78 


6 


1 


57 


62 


49 


47 


72 


74 


24 


25 


25 


26 


26 


27 


74 


7 


2 


m 


63 


50 


48 


74 


76 


88 


28 


29 


30 


29 


29 


76 


9 


4 


59 


54 


51 


48 76 


78 


32 


32 


32 


33 


32 


32 


78 


10 


5 


49 


65 


62 


49 78 


80 


36 


36 


36 


36 


35 


35 


80 


11 


6 


1 


56 


53 


50 


80 


fi» 


40 


40 39 


39 


38 


38 


82 


12 


7 


2 


67 


64 


51 


82 


84 


44 


43 43 


42 


41 


41 


84 


13 


8 


3 


58 


55 


58 


84 


8A 


47 


47 


46 


46 


44 


43 


86 


15 


10 


5 


49 


56 


63 


86 


83 


61 


6(1 


60 


49 


47 


46 


8B 


16 


11 


6 


1 


57 


54 


88 


90 


05 


64 


63 


62 


50 


49 


90 


17 


12 


7 


2 


SB 


55 


90 


98 


60 


68 


67 


66 


53 


52 


92 


19 


14 


8 


3 


59 


56 


98 


04 


20 3 


SO 1 


20 


58 


56 


54 


94 


20 


15 


10 


5 


49 1 


57 


94 


96 


6 


6 


4 


20 2 


59 


57 


96 


22 


17 


11 


6 


8 


59 


06 


96 


10 


8 


7 


6 


20 2 


59 


96 


23 


18 


Id 


8 


4 


49 


OB 


100 


14 


12 


10 


8 


5 


20 2 


100 


25 


20 


14 


9 


6 


i: 


100 


25* 


30* 


35- 


40» 


45° 


60° 




25° 


30° 


3S° 


40° 


45° 


50° 





Transit of Mercury calculated for particular places in Mean Time of place. 



Place. 



Albany, N. Y., 
Amherst, Mass., 
Baltimore, 
Boston, St, House f 
Brunswick, 
[BudTalo, 

Cambridge, Observ.j 
Charleston, S. C, 
Cincimiati, 
Hudson, Ohio, 
Montreal, 
Nantucket, 



Ingress. 



h. 
11 



ra. 8. 
23 27M 
29 18 

1 

6 



13 
35 



10 



11 



39 40 
3 53 
34 52 
59 46 
41 55 
54 2 
25 5 
38 55 



Egress. 



6 

5 

6 
5 



6 



m. 8. 
52 52A 
58 45 
42 25 

433 

9 9 
33 13 

4 20 
29 13 
11 11 
23 21 
54 30 
825 



Place. 



Ingress. 



Nashville, CTntirars'jr, 
New Haven, 
New Orleans, 
New York, 
Philadelphia, 
Portland, 
Princeton, 
Quebec, L. C, 
Toronto, U. C, 
University of Va., 
Washington, 

I 



h. 
10 
11 
10 
11 



m. s. 

32 31M 

27 37 

10 54 

23 22 

18 48 

37 58 

20 49 

34 18 

8 15 

5 88 

11 26 



Egress. 



h. m. 8. 
5 48A 
57 4 

4 49 18 

5 52 48 
48 .14 



7 27 
50 15 



6 

5 

6 3 44 

5 31 36 
34 51 
40 49 



* This Transit was calculated by Lieut. Davit. 



I84f.] 



XCLIP8X8 OF MAY 21, X>OX. 30, ^If D MOV. 13. 



h. in. 




9 9.0M 1 




10 23,2M 


Mean Tiine 


10 45.6 


at 


11 8.4 


Washington. 


22.6A 





IH. Wednesday, May 21. A total eclipse of tb« Moon, invisible in 
the United States. 

Beginning of the eclipse, 

Beginning of the total eclipse, 

Middle of H^e eclipse. 

End of the total eclipse, 

£nd of the Eclipse, 
Digits eclipsed, 13** 8' on the Southern limb. 

Angle of >the first point of contact from the Moon's N. point, l2l* £. 
Angle of the last point of contact from the North point, 108* W. 

This eclipse will be visible in the Pacific Ocean, Asia, New Holland, 
Africa, aad ,the East of Europe. 

IV. Thursday, Oct 30. An annular eclipse of the Sun, invisible in 
the United States. 

Beginning of the eclipse on the Earth, at 4h. 23.5m. A. [Mean Time 
at Washington,] in latitude 19" 37' South, and longitude 117" 59' East of 
Greenwich. 

Beginning of the annular eclipse at 5h. 47.0I&. A. in lutitilde 43** ^' i9* 
and longitude 88" 22' East. 

Central eclipse at Noon, at 7h. 4.8m. A. in latitude 75" 39' South, and 
longitude 172* 42' East. 

End of central eclipse at 7h. 38.8m. A. in latitude 67" 3?' .South, and 
longitude 68" 48' West. 

End of the eclipse on the Earth at 9h. 2.3m. A. in latitude 45" 17' South, 
and longitude 112« 10' West. 

This eclipse will be visible in the Southern Ocean, Australia, New 
Zealand, and South Tictoria. 

V. Thursday, Nov. 13. A partial eclipse of the Moon, visible in the 
United States, as follows : 



Beer, of] Mid. oflEnd of 



Jcg.o 

Bel. 



Albany, 

Amherst, Ms., 

Annapolis, 

Augusta, 6a., 

Augusta, Me., 

Baltimore, 

Bangor, 

Boston, 

Buffalo, 

Cambridge, 

Charleston, 

Cincinnati, 

Columbia, 

Columbus, 

Concord, 



h. m. 

6 15.2 

20.1 

4.0 

5 42.6 

6 30.9 
3.7 

35.1 
25.9 

5 54.5 

6 25.7 

5 50.4 
32.4 
45.7 
38.0 

6 24.3 

4* 



Eol. 



h. m. 

7 54.3 
59.2 
43.1 
21.7 

8 10.0 

7 42.8 

8 14.2 
5.0 

33.6 
4.8 
29.5 
11.5 
24.8 
17.1 
8 3.4 



Ed. 



h. m. 

9 33.4 
38.3 
22.2 
0.8 
49.1 
21.9 
53.3 
44.1 
12.7 
43.9 
8.6 

8 50.6 

9 3.9 

8 56.2 

9 42.5 



Detroit, 
Dover, Del. 
Dover, N. H. 
Frankfort, 
Fred*kton, N. B. 

Halifax, N.S. 

Harrisburg, 

Hartford, 

Hudson, Ohio, 

Indianapolis, 

Jackson, 

Jefferson, 

Lexington, Ey. 

Little Rock, 

Louisville, 



Begr. QOMid.of 
Ed. 



Jeg. Q 
Eel. 



h. m. 

5 38.3 

6 8.2 
26.6 

5 315 

6 43.2 
55.5 

2.9 
19.5 
44.6 
85.9 

9.7 

1.7 
33.0 

1.4 
28.2 



h. m. 

7 174 
47.3 

8 5.7 

7 10»6 

8 22.3 
34.6 

7 42,0 

58.6 

23.7 

5.0 

6 48.8 
40.8 

7 12.1 

6 40.5 

7 7.3 



End of 
Bd. 



h. m. 

8 56.5 

9 26.4 
44.8 

8 49.7 
10 1.4 

13.7 

9 2ia 
37.7 

2.8 
8 44.1 
27.9 
19.9 
51.2 
19.6 
46.4 



S0LIP8X OF HOT. 13. 



[1845. 



MilledgeTiUe, 
Mobile, Ala. 
Montpelier, 
Montreal, L. C. 
Nantacket, 
Nashville, 
Natchez, 
New Bedford, 
Newburjrport, 
New Haven, 
New Orleans, 
Newport, 
New York, 
Philadelphia, 
Pittsbure, 
Portlano, 



Beg. of 
Eel. 



h. 
5 

6 



6 



m. 

36.9 

18.3 

19.6 

16.9 

29.6 

22.9 

4.6 
26.5 
26.7 
18.4 
10.2 
24.9 
14.1 

9.5 
50.1 
28.8 



Mid. ofjEnd of 



Eel. 



h. 
7 
6 
7 

8 
7 
6 
8 

7 
6 
8 
7 



8 



m. 

16.0 

57.4 

58.7 

55.0 

8.7 

2.0 
43.7 

5j 

5.8 
57.5 
49.3 

4.0 
53.2 
48.6 
29.2 

7.9 



Eel. 



h. m. 

8 55.1 
36.5 
37.8 
34.1 
47.8 
41.1 
22.8 
44.7 
44.9 
36.6 
28.4 
43.1 
32.3 
27.7 
8.3 
47.0 



9 



8 

8 
6 9 



8 
9 
9 



B«i 



Portsmonth, 

Providence, 

Raleigh, 

Richmond, 

Rochester, N. Y. 

St. Louis, 

Savannah, 

Springfield, Bl., 

Springfield, Ms. 

Tallahassee, 

Toronto, 

Trenton, N. J. 

Tuscaloosa, 

Washington, 

Worcester, Ms. 



5 
6 



^.0 

Eel. 



.of) Mid. of End of 
Eel. Eel. 



h. m. 

6 27.1 
24.5 
55.0 
0.4 
58.8 
9.2 
45.6 
12.0 
19.6 
31.8 
52.9 
11.6 
19.4 
2.1 
23.0 



6 
5 

6 
5 
6 



h. n. 



8 



6 
7 
6 

7 



6.2 
3.6 
34.1 
39.5 
37.9 
48.3 
24.7 
51.1 
58.7 
10.9 
32.0 
50.7 
58.5 
41.2 
2.1 



h. rn. 



45.3 
42.7 
13.2 
18.6 
17.0 
27.4 
3.8 
30.2 
37.8 
50.0 
11.1 
29.8 
37.6 
20.3 
41.2 



The phases of the eclipse for other places may easily be found by 
means of the following table : 



If ean Time of Plaee. 



We»t 
L'ngitade. 


Cdipte begins. 


Eelipse enda. 


We«t 

L'ogitude. 


Edipse begin*. 


Eclipse ends. 


• 


A. n. 


h. nu 


o 


h. m. 


h. m. 


67 


6 42.2 


10 0.4 


84 


5 34J2 


8 52.4 


68 


38.2 


9 56.4 


85 


30.2 


48.4 


69 


34.2 


52.4 


86 


26.2 


444 


70 


30.2 


48.4 


87 


22.2 


404 


71 


26.2 


44.4 


88 


18.2 


36.4 


72 


22.2 


404 


89 


14.2 


32.4 


73 


18.2 


36.4 


90 


10.2 


28.4 


74 


14.2 


32.4 - 


91 


6.2 


24.4 


75 


10J2 


2a4 


92 


2.2 


20.4 


76 


6.2 


24.4 


93 


4 58Si 


16.4 


77 


2J2 


20.4 


94 


54.2 


12.4 


78 


5 58.2 


16.4 


95 


50.2 


8.4 


79 


54.2 


12.4 


96 


46.2 


4.4 


80 


50.2 


8.4 


97 


42.2 


0.4 


81 


46.2 


4.4 


98 


38.2 


7 564 


82 


42.2 


0.4 


99 


34.2 


524 


83 


38.2 


8 56.4 


100 


30 J2 


484 



The digits eclipsed are 11* 2' on the Moon's North limb. 

The first contact with the shadow occurs at 51* from the North point 
of the Moon*s limb towards the East j the last contact at 70" towaids the 
West. 



1845.] 



OCOULTATIOHi. 



43 



OCCULTATIONS. 

JElanents fir facilitating the eakulation of OccuUattofu whieh may he viiible in the 

Virited l^atee, in 1845. 



1 
Month. 


Star's 
Name. 


s 

6 


Washington, 
Mean Time of 
apparent con- 
junction in R. 

A. of Moon 
and Star. 


At the time of Coigonction. 


Limiting 
ParalleU 
between 
which the 
occult is 
visible. 


Apparent 

R.A.of 

Moon and 

Star. 


Apparent 
Declination of 
Star. 


Star 

Nor& 

of Moon. 


Jan. 12 


16H 


h. m. s. 
4 8 41 A. 


h. m. 8. 
23 28 29.39 


1 14 45.0 N. 


36 56 S. 


8P2N. 2S. 


16 


71 Cp 


5 


3 29 40 


2 40 40.83 


16 49 3.4 


41 57 


90 15 N. 




e«v 


6 


6 39 4 


47 7-66 


17 42 10.3 


9 31 


48 19 S. 






6 


56 25 


43.12 


17 24 13.2 


29 19 


74 2N. 


19 


3.4 


11 42 52 


5 28 25.51 


21 2 31.6 


31 56 


81 16 


20 


> n 


5 


11 56 1 


6 19 48.17 


20 18 11.4 


25 42 


69 5 


22 


1 23 


6 


6 10 18 


7 48 13.42 


16 11 52.3 


49 33 


90 23 


23 


a> 23 


6 


11 10 38 


8 47 29.92 


12 12 40.0 


50 1 


90 19 


24 


«» 23 


5 


26 14 M. 


50 2.80 


12 27 3.2 


23 56 


65 9 S. 


27 


^ a 


4.5 


4 38 56 


11 22 25.93 


2 9 7.3 S. 


60 51 


88 25.\. 


Feb.l2 


TtCp 


5 


11 14 11 A. 


2 40 40.43 


16 49 1.8 N. 


26 2S. 


68N. 2S. 


14 


«* y 


5.6 


5 11 31 


4 8 12.53 


20 11 36.5 


29 23 


75 9 X. 


16 


;t* Orion. 


5 


7 35 52 


5 54 45.27 


20 8 7.1 


56 29 


90 43 


22 


01 Ophi. 


6 


9 51 33 


10 55 42.98 


49 44.4 


47 13 


90 9 


28 


5 


11 25 48 


16 22 59.17 


21 7 41.6 S. 


17 13 


36 21 <. 


Mar. 2 


2 / 


6 


1 44 55 M. 


17 29 27.82 


21 48 41.6 S. 


35 5S. 


55N. 3 S. 




DOphi. 


5 


3 36 15 


34 10.22 


21 35 59.6 


24 27 


41 14 


3 


" / 


6 


5 53 6 


18 40 29.18 


20 29 34.7 


39 


65 IN. 


15 


^ « 


5.6 


17 2 


4 .58 39.42 


20 12 29.4 N. 


55 4 


90 44 




^ Onon. 


5 


11 8 32 A. 


5 45 14.43 


20 14 28.6 


42 44 


90 26 


19 


X C 


5.6 


9 6 59 


8 59 23.29 


11 17 4.5 


39 53 


90 7 


22 


*& 


4.5 


7 10 54 


11 22 26.59 


2 9 13.4 S. 


70 10 


88 39 


25 


ih^. 


5 


42 27 M. 


13 18 35.41 


11 54 9.6 


29 4 


63 10 S. 


28 


tit Opni. 


5 


4 55 27 


16 22 59.98 


21 7 43.4 


30 54 


51 7 


30 


^^ ^« . 


6 


1 34 8 


18 16 8.56 


20 36 58.7 


19 30 


40 18 


31 


2270 Bai. 


6 


3 6 1 


19 19 5.64 


18 39 54.3 


33 40 


61 4 


Apr. 1 


I^Vf 


3.4 


1 30 23 M. 


20 12 19.17 


15 15 50.1 S. 


4 39 S. 


34 N. 32 S. 


8 


TF CJp 


5 


4 12 34 A. 


2 40 39.82 


16 48 58.6 N. 


3 


40 24 


14 


1 23 


6 


6 34 58 


7 48 12.63 


16 16 23.2 


15 25 


53 12 


15 


A«23 


6 


7 31 39 


8 38 27.48 


12 40 22.3 


39 26 


90 8 N. 


16 


a«23 


5 


1 18 54 M. 


50 2.35 


12 27 2.9 


2 5 


39 30 S. 


24 


co' Bl 


4.5 


2 38 54 


15 57 48.34 


20 14 41.2 S. 


17 35 


3S 20 




w'm 


4.5 


2 52 11 


58 22.78 


20 26 41.9 


28 41 


50 10 


26 


^* / 


34 


3 15 22 


18 4 32.60 


21 5 32.1 


41 21 


66 3N. 


27 


rf/ 


5 


4 34 19 


19 8 36.44 


19 13 12.4 


47 57 


71 10 




e' / 


5 


6 14 12 


12 43.44 


18 7 49.3 


6 49 N. 


19 43 S. 


2fi 


i^Vf 


3.4 


6 59 54 


20 12 20.01 


15 15 47.0 


13 21 S. 


42 24 


2S 


y m 


5 


4 18 46 


21 1 10.58 


11 59 33.5 


24 10 


57 14 


30 


30 t» 


5.6 


4 58 10 


55 8.35 


7 15 55.4 


11 20 


44 26 



oooouiATiOHa. 



H«Kb. 


BlBT'. 1 

Mmms. t 


jDnctioninO. 


Al Ihs linui of Canjniiclion. 


occtdfU 


Moon and 




N.orB. 






^fsMi. 


Bar. 






VBlbl*. 


M.y8 


t ij 3.4 

>iOrioo. 5 

C Seit. 8 


6 32 38 M. 


5' 28' 23^99 


21 a 8^.8 N. 


11 ^i H. 


2'5N.&8. 




54 44.01 


20 8 6.2 


35 11 S. 


58 -7N. 


14 
16 

18 
SI 

2S 


8 16 4 


9 58 41.77 


6 30 20.1 


13 33 


51 22 s. 


p' XI B 


1 4 IM. 


10 55 43.63 


39 21.1 N. 


26 34 


96 Jl 


i4 5 


8 17 53 A 


13 18 35.61 


11 64 11.5 S. 


27 57 


i63 11 


» Ophi. 5 

a / 8 


10 1 41 


16 83 1.14 


21 7 44.8 


37 56 


60 1 


10 46 


17 29 30.10 


21 48 41.7 


57 53 


68 31 N. 


31 IS M 


34 12.52 


21 35 59.3 


47 23 


(^ ^„ 


29 


a 37 42 


33 19 0.07 


34 45.3 N 


22 11 ■ 


59 6 S. 


-' M 


2 47 S3 


19.94 


16 36.9 


32 13 


73 7 


Juri«2 
9 
12 

n 


Tt cp 5 

»E3 5.6 


5 38 9M 


2 40 40.35 


16 48 59.8 N 


2 a4S. 


39N.25S 


6 43 46 A. 


8 59 23.00 


11 34 7.4 


21 6 


62 13 


t A 4.5 
»L si 5 


10 18 57 


11 22 25.95 


a 9 11.4 S. 


B6 3 


88 34N. 


6 8 50 


15 44 24.55 


19 43 0.6 


9 43 


31 28 S. 


«' m 4.5 

ofl m 4.5 

d f S 

:>' ve 3.4 

53 rp B 


11 la 15 


57 48.94 


20 14 41.9 


19 


39 19 




U 29 21 


68 23.39 


20 36 42.6 


30 6 


51 9 


19 
20 
21 


10 18 46 


18 4 33.81 


21 5 30.2 


40 57 


64 3N. 


10 16 25 


19 8 37.87 


19 13 8.3 


46 17 


71 7 


11 6 55 


20 12 21.54 


15 15 40.4 


10 19 


39 27 3 


7 58 14 


2 38 44.10 


17 16 43.8 N. 


24 45 


66 1 


Juira 


i' S 5.6 
uij3 B 


4 58 19 M 

5 27 15 A 


4 38 38.84 
8 47 28.82 


30 12 28.7 N. 
13 12 45.1 


39 54 S. 
32 43 


90N.25N. 
79 1 




« -^ 5 


11 15 10 


15 33 5.29 


19 10 31.6 S. 


8 35 


31 28 S. 




» Ophi. 5 
D Ophi. 5 

;; I 

53 1^ e 


6 48 6 


16 23 1.36 


21 7 44.8 


14 34 


69, 6N. 


2; 


9 41 56 


17 34 13.07 


21 35 58.7 


19 49 


68 11 


5 21 56 M 


21 1 12.78 


11 59 22.0 


13 41 


45 24 S. 


35 36 


23 34 11.98 


56 4.2 N 


58 25 


90 21 N. 


2 8 37 


2 58 44.94 


17 16 46.5 


13 7 


51 13 S. 


Aug. 8 
12 


i ira 5 
P Ophi. 4.5 

684tMar) a 


7 13 14 A 


13 18 34.85 


11 54 7.3S. 


57 11 S. 


78N.83N. 


9 34 46 


17 11 46.79 


20 36 18.1 


16 23 


31 21 S. 


11 21 23 


13 29.91 


31 17 33,3 


37 81 


19 


13 


6 51 21 


18 6 2.46 


20 45 55.7 


33 43 


55 5 


10^5 20 


16 11.05 


20 36 54.8 


36 53 


60 1 




6 59 26 


19 8 38.23 


19 13 6.8 


50 56 


71 12 N. 


37 
29 
30 


8 2 56 


20 12 82.18 


15 15 37,1 


8 8 


36 29 S. 


3D 34 M 


6 23 52.61 


19 49 9.1 


20 50 


61 2N. 


1 £3 B 


3 39 30 


7 48 12,86 


16 11 57.1 


13 2 


53 13 8. 


A>£3 S 


4 3 33 


8 38 27.31 


13 40 85.2 


12 44 


90 13 N. 


Sept 5 


Lip ... ^ 


30 51 M. 


13 18 34.37 


50 4a ftfi.9 


B9 42 S. 
33 47 


78N.43N. 
53 5S. 



184&] 



XCLIPiXS OV THX 8ATSLLITX8 OV JVPITXI, 



45 



T%^^ .— .^ 




1 


AYaahington, 
Mean Time of 
apparent con- 
junction! inR. 
A. of Moon 
and Star. 


At the time of Conjunction. 


Limiting 
Parallels 
between 
which the 
occult is 
visible. 


Day of 

the 
MoQlh. 


Star's 
Najne. 

< 


Apparent 

R. A. of 

Moon and 

Star. 


Apparent 

Declination of 

Star. 


Star 

N.ora 

of Moon. 








h. m. s. 


h. m. s. 


o 1 M 


' H 


e o 


Sep.22 


jr'Orion. 


6 


11 56 53 A. 


5 45 49.74 


19 42 48.0 N. 


27 29 S. 


71 N. 10 N. 


23 


;t* Orion. 


5 


4 11 21 M. 


54 46.48 


20 8 8.2 


4 25 N. 


31 23 S. 


Oct 4 


* £5: 


5 


5 35 21 A. 


15 33 4.14 


19 10 17.9 S. 


47 25 S. 


71N.11N. 




X £^ 


5 


10 15 35 


44 23.28 


19 41 56.8 


55 56 


70 21 


24 


ai G 


6 


1 23 33 M. 


8 47 30.38 


12 12 38.7 N. 


15 28 


53 16 S. 


Nov. 6 


y* tBL 


6 


8 17 58 A. 


21 16 56.04 


10 23 48.3 S. 


7 20 S. 


40 N. 29 S. 


7 


6^ 


6 


10 58 7 


22 16 5.29 


5 36 38.6 


15 22 


52 20 


10 


^ H 


5 


6 54 51 


40 43.11 


6 44 54.9 N. 


52 33 


90 18 N. 


15 


• 8 


4 


28 59 M. 


4 19 39.43 


18 50 1.8 


47 38 


90 29 


20 


A»23 


6 


4 50 


8 38 29.89 


12 40 14.5 


24 32 


65 6S. 


23 


»fl 


6 


2 38 


10 47 46.99 


1 33 25.1 


58 28 


90 26 N. 




P* ^ 


6 


4 8 55 


55 43.50 


49 42.1 


58 43 


90 26 


25 


;t''B 


6 


3 57 13 


12 31 17.49 


7 8 40.4 S. 


20 9 


56 16 S. 


Dec. 3 


y «^ 


5 


7 35 5 A. 


21 1 11.85 


11 59 23.1 S. 


28 14 S. 


61 N. 10 S. 


4 


30 «t. 


5.6 


7 7 17 


55 10.12 


7 15 42.3 


2 3 


36 34 


6 


22 H 


6 


9 28 52 


23 44 5.39 


2 4 35.9 N. 


30 7 


70 7 


8 


^ H 


5 


30 10 M. 


40 42.90 


6 44 53.6 


49 12 


90 14 




^ H 


6 


11 33 23 A. 


1 428 57.65 


11 21 14.4 


2 28 


38 30 


13 


jf'Orion. 


6 


11 29 28 A. 


5 45 51.81 


19 42 46.0 


20 19 


60 3N. 


17 


X G 


5.6 


10 42 20 


8 59 25.53 


11 16 55.7 


26 54 


68 5S. 


20 


n Sextans 


6 


2 9 33 M. 


10 37 14.03 


3 17 45.0 


20 28 


58 15 


23 


«r njj 


5.6 


2 49 21 


12 59 50.57 


9 54 52.4 S. 


52 21 


80 17 N. 


25 


1682 Bai. 


6 


1 25 23 


14 42 58.33 


17 8 31.8 


66 50 


73 36 


31 


ci Vf 


6 


7 11 39 


21 36 46.38 


9 46 59.8 


51 39 


81 13 



ECLIPSES OF THE SATELLITES OF JUPITER IN 1845. 
VinbU in the United Statee, in Mean Time at Waehington. 



d. 


h. 


m. 


s. 




Sat 


d. 


h. 


m. 


s. 




Sat. 




Jan. 1 


9 


11 


23.7 A. Im. 


2 


Feb. 8 


8 


33 


45.0 


Em. 


1 




1 


11 


40 


43.7 


Em. 


2 


17 


4 


58 


2.0 




1 




2 


4 


26 


4.7 


Em. 


1 


20 


5 


57 


41.2 




2 


' 


7 


11 


53 


4.4 


Em. 


1 


24 


6 


53 


22.1 




1 




9 


6 


21 


58.4 




1 


27 


8 


34 


39.6 




2 




16 


5 


14 


24.2 




3 


28 


5 


24 


23.7 




3 




16 


8 


17 


48.3 




1 


Mayl7 


2 


43 


23.2 M. Im. 


1 




19 


6 


12 


34.8 




2 


24 


4 


37 


29.2 




1 




23 


6 


34 


51.9 


Im. 


3 


31 


4 


13 


11.8 




2 




23 


9 


16 


2.0 


Em. 


3 


Jane 2 





59 


58.7 




1 




23 


10 


13 


34.0 




1 


9 


1 


33 


16.5 


Em. 


3 




25 


4 


42 


32.0 




1 


9 


2 


53 


53.6 


Im. 


1 




26 


8 


49 


5.0 




2 


16 


3 


12 


0.0 




3 




30 


10 


38 


3.7 


Im. 


3 


16 


4 


47 


44.1 




1 




Feb. 1 


6 


38 


11.2 


Em. 

1 


1 


16 


5 


33 


1.1 


Em. 


3 


• 



46 



SC^flPMA Q7 TB« f4.T«|i|;*IT|e9 09 JU9ZTSS. 



[1845. 



d. 


h. 


m. 


». 


Bat. 


d. 


ii. 


m. 


«. 




r 


Jan. 25 


1 


9 


56.9 Im. 


1 


Oct 8 


7 


25 


42.4 A. 


Im. 


25 


1 


24 


30.0 


2 


8 


9 


34 


4.9 


Cm. 


3 


July 2 


3 


3 


40.7 


1 


9 


5 


37 


52.1 M. Im. 


1 


2 


4 


2 


3.8 


3 


11 





6 


27.1 




1 


9 


4 


57 


22.2 


1 


12 


6 


35 


8.5 A. 




1 


10 


11 


25 


f -1 A- 


1 


13 


5 


56 


51.5 JVl 




2 


18 


1 


19 


S6.8M 


1 


15 


11 


27 


7.4 A. 




3 


20 


1 


3 


44.4 Em. 


2 


16 


7 


14 


48.8 




2 


21 


.11 


16 


26.8 A. Tm. 


3 


18 


2 


1 


2.6 M. 




1 


22 


1 


33 


2.1 M. £m. 


3 


19 


1 


29 


46.5 A. 




1 


25 


3 


13 


5.7 Im. 


1 


23 


3 


28 


52.7 M. 




3 


27 


1 


13 


28.5 


2 


23 


9 


51 


0.5 A. 




2 


27 


3 


40 


54,6 Em. 


2 


25 


3 


55 


47.6 M. 




I 


29 


3 


16 


46.9 Im. 


3 


26 


10 


24 


33.7 A. 




1 


29 

Aug. 1 


5 
5 


32 

6 


32.6 Em. 
44.8 Im. 


3 
1 


31 
Nov. 3 


2 
2 


^53 
27 


21.3 M. Em. 
14.4 


2 
1 


2 


11 


35 


11.5 A. 


1 


4 


8 


55 


58.4 A. 




1 


3 


3 


50 


39.1 M. 


2 


7 


5 


29 


25.3 M. 




2 


3 


6 


17 


58.6 Em. 


2 


10 


4 


22 


21.7 




1 


10 


1 


28 


52.3 M. Im. 


1 


10 


r 

6 


47 


29.9 A. 




2 


13 


10 


12 


55.6 A. Em, 


2 


11 


10 


51 


7.8 




1 


17 


3 


22 


34.9 M. Im. 


1 


13 


5 


19 


58.S 




1 


18 


9 


50 


59.5 A. 


1 


13 


5 


38 


52.2 




3 


20 


10 


22 


41.5 


2 


17 


6 


17 


38.1 M. 




1 


21 





49 


44.9 M Em. 


2 


17 


9 


23 


31.3 A. 




2 


24 


5 


16 


20.1 Im. 


1 


19 





46 


26.5 M. 




1 


25 


11 


44 


45.4 A. 


1 


20 


7 


15 


19.9 A. 




1 


26 


9 


32 


23.9 E^i. 


3 


20 


7 


35 


13.1 


Im. 


3 


98 





59 


31.9 M. Im. 


^ 


20 


9 


40 


17.6 


Em. 


3 


28 


3 


26 


28.6 Em. 


2 


24 


11 


59 


30.9 




3 


Sept 2 


1 


38 


35.2 Im. 


1 


26 


2 


41 


53.7 M. 




1 


2 


11 


20 


56.5 A. 


3 


27 


9 


10 


49.;2 A. 




1 


3 


1 


32 


45.0 M. Em. 


3 


27 


11 


37 


53.2 


Tm. 


3 


3 


8 


7 


4.0 A. Im. 


1 


28 


1 


42 


30.1 M. Em. 


3 


4 


3 


36 


15.4 M. 


2 


Dec. 2 


2 


35 


29.9 




2 


9 


3 


32 


29.6 


1 


3 


4 


37 


28.8 




1 


10 


3 


21 


34.0 


3 


4 


U 


6 


26.5 A. 




1 


10 


5 


32 


38.7 Em. 


3 


5 


3 


40 


9.4 M. 


Tm. 


3 


10 


10 


1 


0.0 A. Im. 


1 


5 


3 


53 


29.4 A. 


Em. 


2 


11 


6 


12 


53.1 M. 


"2 


6 


5 


35 


17.7 


^^^ 


1 


14 


7 


31 


28.3 A. 


2 


12 


1 


2 


9.9 M. 




1 


16 


5 


26 


30.1 M. 


1 


12 


6 


29 


27.6 A. 




2 


17 


11 


55 


2.2 A. 


1 


13 


7 


31 


2.7 




1 


21 


10 


7 


56.0 


2 


19 


2 


57 


59.6 M. 




1 


25 


1 


49 


11.2 M. 


1 


19 


9 


5 


25.2 A. 




3 


26 


8 


17 


42.1 A. 


1 


20 


9 


26 


53.8 




1 


29 





44 


18.3 M. 


2 


22 


3 


55 


55.5 




1 


Oct. 1 


5 


32 


58.0 A. Em. 


3 


26 


3 


46 


53.8 


Im. 


3 


2 


3 


43 


27^ M. Im. 


1 


26 


5 


49 


59.3 


Em. 


3 


3 


10 


12 


0.3 A. 


1 


26 


11 


41 


22.2 




3 


5 


4 


40 


39.2 


1 


27 


11 


22 


48.9 




1 


6 


3 


20 


36.9 M. 


2 : 


29 


5 


51 


51.9 




1 



1845.} PL A wits AWEOA6»iim Ttt* BTAES } Rl!f o« OF SATuaw. 47 

Near Approdchts to the Skari, md ihSr OecuHoHonB by the Banett, for the yMT 1845. 



Star's 
Naiii«* 



i 



MnCVBT. 

31 W 

129 (May) 

til 

/ 

763 (May) 

YiKin. 
28 111 

G 

fe Ophi. 
1878 (Ba.) 

MABfl. 

* Ophi. 
740 (May) 
D «i 
Ivi 
9 til. 

VBtTi.. 

nipifsa. 
73 K 

lATXTBH. 
▼BSUI. 



Washington, Mean 

Time of aj^parent 

eonjnnction m Right 

ABcension. 



At the time of ConjunctiDn. 



Star's appar- 
ent Bi^ht 
Ascension. 



cl. 
F6b. 23 
Apr. 20 
June 10 
Aug. 2 
9 

19 



6.7 

5 

7 

4 

BjDec. 
6.7 



h. m. 
8 22 M 
19 A. 
3 66 
10 43 M. 
8 20 
7 OA. 



h. 

ai 

3 

3 



m.. i. 
9 35.49 
6 0.28 

44 18.85 



8tar*d appapfem 
D«cUoatioti< 



10 24 40.48 
18 35 20.50 
57 41.62 



6 Jan. 7 

8.7 July 5 

7 11 

4.5 Aug. 11 
5 Oct. 19 

7 



1^ 
20 
16 
10 
25 
22 



4M 
3 1& A. 
9 15 
9 69 M. 
9 30 A. 
9 31 



6 

28 

53 

6 

9 

43 



M 

36.4 S 
0.4N. 
10.4 
00.1 
23.0 S. 
31.9 



Star 

N. or S. of 

Planet. 



16 56 57.23 21 20 30.3 S. 



Jan. 31 
Mar. 19 
Oct. 26 
Nov. 10 

26 



10 
7 
2 
1 

10 



33 A. 



7 

8 

10 

16 



58 39.29 
30 49.17 
57 2.12 
16 20.53 



22 

20 

8 

23 



1 32.4N. 
19 2.5 
10 14.4 

4 59.2 



1 

5 
5 
6 




Planet's hourly mo. 



InR. A. 



5.9 N. 
14.5 S. 
39.1 
57.5 

8.9N. 
35.4 



In Dec. 



.77 23 S 31.7 



16 22 



1 
2 
4 
1 

2 



15.28E. 

6.97 
12.88 
15.08 
11.80 

3.57 W. 



25.3 N. 

68.5 

69.5 

40.1 S 
11.2 

37.2 N. 



24M.18 29 



55 A. 
43 M. 
15 M. 



22 

23 



4 
6.7 



Aug. 3 5 5M. 

Mar. 29 .9 35M. 
Feb. 22 51 M. 



10 

34 

6 



58.1921 

6.65123 

44.88.14 



55.32 
21.02 



10 
6 



7 
37 

4 
34 
52 



37.1 S. 

40.2 

13.8 

65.3 

30.4 



13.14E. 

13.00 

13.14 

11.30 

12.61 

12.61 



4 11 0.79 15 14 58.7N. 



56 51.28 
21 38.28 



4 49 31.3N. 

of ? 
17 47 17.7 S. 



39.7 N. 

2 2.1 S. 

3 21.5 N. 
26.7 
2 33.2 N. 



N. 



4 54.4 S. 
hN.of? 
2 2.9 



6.72E. 

6.74 

2.88 

4.51 

5.05 



3.04E. 



2.23E. 

of?-h 

11.79E. 



»« 



34.0 N. 
29.1 
64.3 S. 
98.2 
24.7 
40.8 N." 



26.2 
33.1 
42.3 
72.8 
38.3 
38.3 



17.4 S. 
1.2 N. 
29.9 
34.4 
37.9 N. 



7. N. 



14.0 N. 

of?-h 
42.6 N. 



t These are occultations. 



PoHiion and Magnitude of the Rings of Satumt according to JSeseel and 
Struvejfor every fortieth day in the year, at 7 hours in the morning. 

M. Time at Washington. 



7h. M. 




1845 January ' 


.1 


February 


10 


March 


22 


May 


1 


June 


10 


July 


20 


August 


29 


October 


8 


November 17 


December 27 


w 


31 



a. 


b. 


P- 


/. 


r. 


34.64 


+11.09 


+7 34.4 


+18 40.5 


+17 47.9 


34.38 


9.99 


25.6 


16 53.6 


22.0 


36.40 


9.27 


15.3 


15 11.2 


16 55.4 


37.50 


9.12 


7.5 


14 4.3 


28.4 


40.07 


9.66 


6.1 


13 57.0 


1.0 


41.94 


10.73 


11.6 


14 44.8 


15 33.2 


41.89 


11.60 


19.4 


16 4.7 


4.8 


39.94 


11.53 


23.6 


16 46.8 


14 36.2 


37.38 


10.58 


21.7 


16 26.7 


7.0 


36.40 


9,24 


' 13.6 


15 8.1 


13 37.5 


35.26 


9.11 


12.4 


14 57.8 


34.5 



a denotes the semitransverse axis of the rings. 

b M u semiconjugate axis of the rings, positive when their 

northern surface is visible, negative when their southern. 



48 



DISCS OF VXXCU8 AHD XAES: SXSXBBAL TIMS. 



[1849. 



p denotes the inclination of the Northern semiconjofate axis of the rings 

to the circle of declination ; + when East, — when West. 

{ tt tt angle of elevation of the Earth above the plane of the rings, 

as seen from Saturn : -)- when North, — when South. 

{'<•*< elevation of the Sun above the plane of the rings, as seen 

from Saturn ; -f- when North, — when South. 
The Conjunction of Saturn will take place on the 22d of February, 

and the Opposition on the 8th of August. The Right Ascension of this 

planet wiU not during the year differ much from 21h., and its declination 

will not be less than 16® South, so that it will not rise to a great height 

even when in the meridian. 



A TahU thowung the lUuminatid Bniion of the JHtct of Venue aetd Mure, 
The numbers in this table are the versed sines of that portion of the 
Discs, which, to an observer on the Earth, will appear to be illuminated, 
the apparent diameter of the planet at the time being considered asimtly. 
To a spectator on the Earth, Venus appears most brilliant when her 
elongation is about 45^, and she is approacning her inferior conjunction, 
or receding from it ; in which positions she will not be this year. Mars 
is most bnlliant about the time of his opposition to the Sun, being then 
also nearest to the Earth, in which position he will be this year on the 
18th of August. 



1845. 
January 15 
February 14 
March 15 
April 15 
May 15 

June 15 



Venus. 

0.870 

0.925 

0.963 

0.990 

1.000 

0.990 



Mars. 
0.926 
0.903 
0.884 
0.870 
0.870 
0.993 



1645. 
July 15 

August 15 
September 15 
October 15 
November 15 
December 15 



Venus. 

0.958 

0.905 

0.837 

0.757 

0.656 

0.533 



Man. 
0.948 
0.999 
0.962 
0.902 
0.872 



INCREASE OF SIDEREAL TIME IN MEAN SOLAR HOURS, &o. 



Hours 


Increase. 




m. sec. 


1 


9.857 


S 


19.713 


3 


99.569 


4 


39.426 


6 


49ii89 


6 


59.139 


7 


1 8.995 


8 


18.859 





28.708 


10 


88.565 


11 


48.421 


19 


58.378 


13 


9 8.134 


14 


17.991 


15 


27.847 


16 


37.704 


17 


47.560 


18 


57.417 


10 


3 7i273 


20 


17.130 


81 


26.966 


23 


36.842 


93 


46.699 


94 


56.555 


Dftil 


jraccelera- 


tion 


of a star 
1 »i._ 



in passing the 
meridian, 
m. tee. 
3 55.9095 



Miu. 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
96 
97 
98 
90 
30 



Incr. 



sec. 

0.104 
329 
493 
657 
821 
966 

1150 
314 
479 
643 
807 
971 

2136 
300 
464 
628 
793 
957 

3121 
286 
450 
614 
778 
043 

4107 
971 
435 
000 
704 



Min. 


Incr. 


Sec. 


Incr. 


Sec. 


sec. 


sec. 


31 


5.093 


1 


0.008 


31 


32 


257 


3 


006 


39 


33 


421 


3 


008 


33 


34 


585 


4 


Oil 


34 


35 


750 


5 


014 


35 


36 


914 


6 


016 


36 


37 


6.078 


7 


019 


37 


38 


243 


8 


099 


38 


39 


407 





025 


30 


40 


571 


10 


027 


40 


41 


-735 


11 


090 


41 


42 


900 


12 


033 


42 


43 


7.064 


13 


036 


43 


44 


228 


14 


038 


44 


45 


392 


15 


041 


45 


46 


557 


16 


044 


46 


47 


721 


17 


047 


47 


48 


885 


18 


040 


48 


49 


8.050 


10 


059 


49 


50 


214 


20 


055 


50 


51 


378 


21 


058 


51 


Si 


549 


99 


060 


53 


53 


707 


23 


063 


03 


54 


871 


24 


066 


54 


55 


0.085 


25 


060 


55 


56 


100 


96 


on 


06 


57 


364 


87 


074 


07 


5B 


598 


98 


077 


OB 


00 


009 


90 


079 


00 


60 


8S7 


90 


0S3 


00 



Incr. 



sec. 
0.065 
088 
000 
093 
096 
090 
101 
104 
107 
110 
112 
115 
118 
121 
193 
126 
129 
131 
134 
137 
140 
143 
145 
148 
151 
153 
150 
159 
109 
104 



1845.] 



TABLX OF LATITtTDX AMJ) LONOITUDB. 



49 



LATITUDE AND LONGITUDE OF SOME OF THE PRINCIPAL 
PLACES IN THE UNITED STATES, &c., WITH THEIR DIS- 
TANCES FROM THE CITY OF WASHINGTON. 

The Longituded are reckoned from Greenwich, 

The CapUaU (Seatt of Government) of the States and Ihrritories are detig- 

noted by Italic Letters. 



Albany (Capitol), . N. Y. 
Alexandria, . . D. C. 

Amherst (Col. Chapel), Mass. 
AnnapoliSy . Md. 

Auburn, . . . N. Y. 
Augusta, . . Ga. 

Augusta (State House), Me. 
Baker's Island (Lights), Mass. 
Baltimore (Bat. Mon't), Md. 
Bangor (Court House), Me. 
Barnstable (New C. H.), Mass, 
Bata'N'ia, . . N. Y. 

Beaufort (Arsenal), . S. C. 
Boston (State House), Mass, 

Do. (Light), 
Bridgeport (Bapt. Ch.). Conii. 
Bristol (Episcopal Ch.), R. I. 
Brooklyn (Navy Yard), N. Y. 
Brunswick (College), Me. 
Buffalo, . . N. Y. 

Burlington, . . N. J. 

Burlington, . . Vt. 
Cambridge (Observatory), Ms. 
Camden, . . S. C. 

Canandaigua, . . N. Y. 
Cape Ann (North Light), Mass. 

Do. (South Light), 
Cape Cod (Light House), Mass. 
Castine, . . Me. 

Charleston (St. Mich's ChJ S.C. 
Charlestown (Navy Y'd), Mass, 
Chicago, . . n. 

Cincinnati (Fort Wash.), Ohio, 
Columbiaj . . S. C. 
Columbus, . . . Ohio, 
Concord (State House), N. H. 
Dayton, . . Ohio, 

Dedham (1st Cong. Ch.), Mass. 
Detroitj . . . Mich. 

5 



Latitude, 
North. 


Longitude, West, 
in degrees. 1 in time. 


Dist. fiom 

Wash*ton. 


o 1 « 


1 " 


h. m. 8. 


miles. 


42 39 3 


73 44 49 


4 64 59.3 


376 


33 49 


77 4 


5 8 16 


6 


42 22 15.6 


73 3128 


450 6 


383 


38 58 35 


76 33 


5 6 12 


37 


42 55 


76 28 


6 6 52 


339 


33 28 


81 54 


527 36 


680 


44 18 43 


60 50 


439 20 


595 


42 32 12 


70 47 28 


4 43 10 


452 


39 17 23 


76 37 30 


5 630 


38 


44 47 50 


68 47 


435 8 


661 


41 42 6 


70 18 34 


4 41 14.3 


460 


42 59 


78 13 


5 12 52 


370 


32 25 57 


80 4123 


5 22 45.6 


029 


42 21 22.7 


71 4 9 


4 44 16.6 


43^ 


42 19 41.1 


70 53 43 


4 43 33.9 




41 10 30 


73 11 46 


4 58 47 


284 


41 40 3 


71 17 19 


4 45 9.3 


409 


40 41 50 


73 59 30 


4 55 58 


227 


43 53 


69 55 1 


4 39 40.1 


568 


42 53 


78 55 


5 15 40 


376 


40 5 10 


74 IB 37 


4 50 30.5 


156 


44 27 


73 10 


458 40 


440 


42 22 21.3 


71 738 


4 44 30.5 


431 


34 17 


80 33 


5 22 12 


467 


42 54 


77 17 


5 9 8 


336 


42 38 21 


70 34 48 


4 42 19.2 


470 


42 38 13 


70 34 48 


4 42 19.2 




42 223 


70 366 


4 40 16 


507 


44 22 30 


68 45 


4%> 




32 46 33 


79 57 27 


5 19 49.8 


544 


42 22 


71 333 


4 44 14.2 


433 


42 


87 35 


550 2 


763 


39 5 54 


84 27 


537 43 


497 


33 57 


81 7 


524 23 


500 


39 57 


83 3 


5 32 12 


396 


43 12 29 


71 29 


445 56 


474 


39 44 


84 11 


536 44 




42 14 57 


71 10 59 


444 44 


422 


42 24 


82 53 


531 52 


526 



50 



TABLX OF tAtlTTTDS AND J.OV&lTVt>t, 



[1845. 



Dorcliester (Ast. Obs.), Mass. 
Dover, , . . Del. 
Dover, . . . N. H. 
Easton (Court House), Md. 
Eastpor^ . . • Ma 
Edenton, . . N. C. 

Exeter, . . . N. H. 
Frankfort, . . Ky. 
Fredericksburg, . Va. 

Frederkkton, . N. B. 

Frederick, . . Md. 

Greorgetown. . » S. C. 
Gloucester (Univ. Ch.), Mass. 
Do. (E. Fnt L't.) 

Do. rTen Fnd Isl. Vt) 
Greenfield (2d Con. CIl), Mass. 
Hagerstown, , , Md. 
Halifax, . . N. S. 

Hallowell, . . Me. 

Harrisburg, , . Pa. 
Hartford (State House), Conn. 
Holmes's Hole ( Windmill),Ms. 
Hudson, . . N. Y. 

Hudson (Reserve Coll.), Ohio, 
Huntsville, . . Ala. 

Indianapolis, . Ind. 

Ipswich (Eastern Light), Mass. 
Do. (West. Light), 

M'pi. 

M'ri. 

Fa. 

U. C. 

Tenn. 

Pa. 

Ky. 

Ark. 

N. Y. 

Ky. 



Jackson, 

Jefferson, 

Key West, (S. W. Pt;) 

Kingston, 

Knoxville, 

Lancaster, 

Lexington, 

Little Kock, 

Lockport, 

Louisville, 

Lowell (St. Ann's Ch.), Mass. 

Lynchburg, . . Va. 

Lynn Church, . Mass. 

Machias Bay, . . Me. 

Marblehead, . . Mass. 

Marblehead (Light), Mass. 

Middletown (W. Univ.), Conn. 

Milledgeville, . . Ga. 

Mobile, . • . Ala. 

Montpelier, , . Vt 

Monomoy Point Light, Mass. 



Latitude, 
North. 


LoDgitad 
in degree*. 


e, Weft, 
in time. 


Dist. from 
WashHon. 


• I a 


. ' n 


h. m. 8. 


mjlee. 


42 19 10 


71 4 19 


4 44 17.3 


432 


39 10 


75 80 


5 2 


114 


43 13 


70 54 


443 36 


490 


38 46 10 


76 8 


5 4 32 


80 


44 54 


66 56 


427 44 


778 


30 


77 7 


628 28 


284 


42 S8 


70 55 


443 40 


474 


38 14 


84 40 


538 40 


651 


38 34 


77 38 


6 10 32 


56 


46 3 


66 45 


427 




39 24 


77 18 


012 


43 


33 21 


79 17 


5 17 8 


482 


42 36 44 


70 40 19 


4 42 41.3 


462 


42 34 49.6 


70 40 11 


4 42 40.8 


466 


4236 4 


70 40 17 


4 42 41.1 


463 


42 35 16 


72 36 32 


4 50 26.1 


396 


39 37 


77 35 


5 10 20 


68 


44 39 20 


63 36 40 


4 14 28.7 


936 


44 17 


69 50 


4 39 30 


593 


40 16 


76 50 


5 7 20 


110 


41 45 60 


72 40 45 


450 43 


335 


41 27 15 


70 36 38 


4 43 26.5 


457 


42 14 


73 46 


4 55 4 


345 


41 U42 


81 23 45 


5 25 35 




34 36 


86 57 


5 47 48 


726 


39 55 


86 5 


6 44 20 


673 


42 41 8 


70 46 17 


4 43 5 


462 


42 41 8 


70 46 34 


4 43 6.3 




32 23 


90 8 


6 032 


1035 


33 36 


92 8 


6 8 32 


930 


24 32 


81 47 30 


5 27 10 




44 8 


76 40 


5 640 


456 


35 59 


83 64 


535 36 


616 


40 236 


76 20 33 


5 6 22.2 


109 


38 6 


84 18 


5 37 12 


534 


34 40 


92 12 


6 8 48 


1068 


43 11 


78 46 


5 15 4 


403 


38 3 


85 30 


5 43 


590 


42 38 46.7 


71 19 2 


4 45 16 


439 


37 36 


79 22 


5 17 23 


198 


42 27 51 


70 57 25 


443 50 


441 


44 33 


67 22 


429 28 




42 30 24 


70 51 24 


4 43 25.6 


450 


42 30 14 


70 50 39 


4 43 22.6 


443 


4133 8 


72 39 


4 50 36 


325 


33 7 20 


83 19 45 


5 33 19.0 


642 


30 41 48 


87 69 


5 51 56 


1U33 


44 17 


72 36 


450 24 


624 


41 33 35 


69 69 56 


440 


600 



184&1 



ZAU^ 07 i^^TXJVDVi AJIO LOHOZTVDS. 



a 



Montreal, , • L. C. 
Nantucket (S'th Tower), Mass* 
NashviUe (University), Tenn* 
Natchez (Fort Panmure), M^pi- 
Newark, , . . N. J. 
N. Bedford (Mar.'s Ch.) Mass. 
Newborn, . . N. C. 
Newburg, . . N. Y. 

Newburyport (2d Pres. C), Ms. 

Do. (Li^ts), Mass. 

Newcastle, . . Del. 
New Haven (College), Conn. 
New London. . . Conn. 
New Orleans (City Hall), La. 
Newport (Court House), R. L 
New York (City HaQ), N. Y. 
Nobsque Point Light, Mass. 
Norfolk (Farmer's Bank), Va. 
Northampton (1st C. Ch.) Mass. 
Norwick • . Conn. 
Pensacola, . • Fa. 

Petersburg, . . Va. 
Philadelphia (Ind'ce H.), Pa. 

Do. (High Sch. Obs.) 

Pittsburff, ' . . Pa. 

Pittsfield (1st Con. Ch.), Mass. 
Plattsburgh, . . N. Y. 
Plymouth (Court H.), Mass. 
Portland (Town H.), . Me. 

Do. (Light), 
Portsmouth (Unit. Ch.), N. H. 

Do. J Light), 
Ponghkeepsie, . . N. Y. 
Princeton (Nassau Hall), N. J. 
Providence (Univ. Hall), R. L 
Quebec (Citadel), . L. C. 
Baleigh, . , N. C. 

JRieJimond (Capitol), Va. 

Rochester (R'r House), N. Y. 
Sable (Cape), . . Fa. 
Sackett^s JHarbor, N. Y. 

Saco, . . • Me. 
St. Augustine, . . Fa. 
St. Louis, . . M'ri. 
Salem (E. I M. Hall), Mass. 
Sandwich ^Ist Con. Ch.), Mass. 
Savannah (Exchange), Ga. 
Schenectady, . N. Y. 

Springfieldj . . E. 



Latitude, 


Lonptade, Weit, 


Di«t. from 


North. 


in de^ees. 


In time. 


Waah'ton. 


• / « 


• 1 a 


h. m. n. 


milei. 


45 31 


73 35 


4 54 20 


601 


41 16 56 


70 6 12 


4 40 24.8 


490 


36 933 


86 49 3 


5 47 16.2 


714 


3134 


9124 42 


6 5 38.8 


1146 


40 45 


74 10 


456 40 


216 


4138 7 


70 56 49 


4 43 43.3 


429 


35 20 


77 5 


5 820 


337 


4131 


74 1 


456 4 


232 


42 48 32 


70 52 47 


4 43 31*1 


466 


42 49 30 


70 49 6 


4 42 18.0 


409 


39 40 


75 33 


6 8 


103 


4118 30 


72 56 45 


4 5147 


301 


4122 


72 9 


448 36 


354 


29 57 30 


90 


6 


1203 


4120 


7119 12 


4 45 16.8 


403 


40 42 40 


74 1 8 


4 56 4.5 


226 


4130 57 


70 39 37 


4 42 38.5 


450 


36 50 50 


76 18 47 


5 5 15.1 


217 


42 19 9 


72 36 15 


4 SO 33.2 


376 


4133 


72 7 


448 28 


362 


30 24 


87 10 12 


5 48 40.8 


1050 


37 13 54 


77 20 


5 920 


144 


39 56 59 


75 9 54 


5 39.6 


136 


39 57 9 


75 10 37 


5 42.5 




40 32 


80 2 


520 8 


223 


42 26 55 


73 15 36 


4 53 2.3 


380 


44 42 


73 26 


453 44 


639 


41 57 26 


70 40 19 


4 42 41.3 


439 


43 39 26 


70 20 30 


44122 


642 


43 30 


70 12 12 


4 40 49 




43 435 


70 45 50 


4 43 3J3 


491 


43 330 


70 43 


442 52 




4141 


75 55 


455 40 


301 


40 20 41 


74 39 30 


458 38 


177 


41 49 22 


7124 43 


4 45 39.2 


394 


46 49 12 


71 16 


445 4 


781 


35 47 


78 48 


5 15 12 


285 


37 32 17 


77 27 28 


5 9 49.9 


122 


43 8 17 


77 51 


5 11 24 


361 


24 50 


81 15 


525 




43 55 


75 57 


5 3 48 


407 


43 31 


70 25 


441 44 


^ 528 


29 48 30 


8135 


520 20 


841 


38 37 28 


90 15 39 


6 1 2.6 


856 


42 31 18 


70 53 53 


4 43 35.5 


446 


41 45 31 


70 30 13 


4 42 0.8 


456 


32 456 


81 8 18 


6 24 33J2 


662 


42 48 


73 55 


465 40 


391 


39 48 


89 33 


56S12 


801 



02 



TABLX OV LATITVOX AMD LOVOITTJOS. 



[1845. 



Springfield (Court H.). Mass. 
Squam Harbor (Li^htj, Mass. 
Straitsmouth. Island (Light), " 
Stratford, . . Conn. 

TaUahassee. . . Fa. 
Taunton (Trin. Con. CLjjMass. 
Toronto or York, . U. C. 
Trenton^ . . . N. J. 
Troy, . . . N. Y. 
TuscaloosOj . . Ala. 

University of Virginia, Va. 
Utica (Dutch Church), N. Y. 
Vandalia, . . II. 
Vevay, . . . Ind. 
Vincennes, . . Ind. 
Washington (Capitol), D. C. 
Washington, . . M'pi. 
Wheeling, . . Va. 
Williamstown (Con. Ch.) Mass. 
Wilmington, . . Del. 
Wibnington, . . N. C. 
Worcester (Ant. Hall), Mass. 
York, . . . Me. 

York, ... Pa. 
Yorktown, . . Va.. 



Latitude, 
North. 


LoDfitad 
in degrees. 


e, Weit, 
in time. 


Diet, from 
Wii«h»ton. 


o ' u 


• ' " 


h. m. •• 


mtlei. 


42 6 4 


73 35 45 


450 23 


367 


42 39 46 


70 41 8 


4 42 44.5 


466 


42 30 41 


70 35 36 


4 42 22.4 


471 


41 11 7 


73 845 


452 35 


287 


30 28 


84 36 


538 24 


896 


4154 11 


71 5-56 


4 44 23.6 


415 


4333 


70 20 


5 17 20 


500 


40 14 


74 30 


458 36 


166 


43 44 


73 40 


454 40 


383 


33 13 


87 43 


550 48 


853 


38 2 3 


78 31 29 


5 14 5.9 


134 


43 6 40 


75 13 


5 0S2 


3S3 


38 50 


89 2 


556 8 


731 


38 46 


84 59 


539 56 


556 


38 43 


87 25 


549 40 


693 


38 53 23 


77 1 24 


5 8 5.6 




31 36 


9120 


6 520 


1146 


40 7 


80 42 


522 48 


264 


42 42 40 


73 13 10 


4 52 53.6 


406 


30 41 


75 28 


5 162 


106 


34 11 


78 10 


513 40 


416 


42 16 17 


71 48 13 


4 47 13.3 


304 


43 10 


70 40 


442 40 


500 


30 58 


76 40 


5 640 


87 


37 13 


76 34 


5 6 16 





LATITUDE AND LONGITUDE OF THE PRINCIPAL FOREIGN OBSER- 
VATORIES. 



Obserratories. 



[The Longitudes are firom Greenwich.] 



Altona, 

Amiagh, 

Berlin, « 

Brussels, 

Cambridge, 

Cape of Good Hope, 

Dorpat, 

Dublin, 

Edinburgh, 

Gottingen. 

Greenwicn, 

Koningsberg, 

Munich, . 

Paris, . 

Petersburg, 

Rome, • 

Turin, 

Vienna, 

5* 



Latitude. 



I 

53 32 

54 21 
53 31 

50 51 
53 13 
33 56 
58 22 
53 23 

55 57 
5131 

51 28 
64 43 
48 8 
48 50 
50 56 
41 53 
45 4 
48 13 



ik N. 

13.7 N, 
15.5 N. 

10.7 N. 

61.8 N. 
3 S. 

47 N. 
13 N. 
23.2 N. 

48 N. 
39.0 N. 
60 N. 
45 
13 
31 
53 

6 
35 



N. 
N. 
N. 
N. 
N. 
N. 



Longitude in time. 



h. m. 8. 
39 46.6 E. 
26 35.5 W, 
63 35.5 E. 
17 29.0 E. 

33.5E. 

1 13 55.0 E. 
1 46 55 E. 
35 33 W. 
13 43.6 W. 
30 46.5 E. 

0.0 

1 23 0.5 E. 
46 26.5 E. 
9 21.5 E. 
8 1 15.8 E. 
49 53.7 E. 

30 48.4 E. 

1 5 31.0 E. 



Jt.fypanrt A* 


M <lf 0»MW 


ieK. 




JARY. 




BHIIAftt. 




P. culm. 




S.D.culm. 












110.03 




1 8.0S 




10J8 






18 


M.TO 






m«3 
urn 


1 


7.30 

e.99 


mi9 


1 


a.n 




s 




*s ^;- 


9-S9 
S.3S 




O.30 


*l|S 


1" 


aw 


lb If 




o 


{.■n 


'i - 






C.S8 


i 


B.J4 




8.49 


8^ 








9.as 








uu.u^T. 


-gHUreal^ ^ 






■aQM.o("r. 


6i,der«a 


«oaH«/w 


TimeM 


D. 


D«lin». 




HT. li™ 






SoDib. 


4a».Tt«.. 






h. m. Kc. 








li.ni.»ee. 










13SS.97 


M 46 19.11 




4TSS.42 


2 






fiS 8.66 


4je.OT 


MS1.B7 




10 97 M,0 


14 e.so 


54 5.92 


5ao.« 


« 18.53 




IB 10 1.4 


14 15,58 


Ca 1.77 


G 47.19 


S9 4S.09 




IS 51 aa.] 


1190.51 














8 51.88 


fl 40.35 


7 38,20 








8 51.44 


7 S.M 


11 94.7fl 




14 M 48.3 


14 30.53 


13 47.9B 






9 


14 30 38.1 




17 44.S6 


TS5.97 


11)97.68 


10 


11 17 10.0 


14 33.92 


9141.10 


aie.s4 


ZMUM 


1, 


13 S7 90.5 


14 33^ 


assi.M 


8*2.99 


97 30.99 


12 


I3 37 3i.4 


14 39.73 


39 34.31 


B 5.S9 




13 


13 17 97.9 


I4 31JB 


33 30.76 






14 








B 43.99 


39 10.86 


15 


19 38 33.0 




4133.87 


!0 0.85 


« 7.sa 


16 


13 15 50J 


14 93.53 


45 90.43 


10 99^ 


47 3.77 


17 


11 « S1.0 


1118.19 


40 16.08 


,0 48.7B 


SI (k33 


18 


11 33 48.4 










19 






6710.0a 


1124.M 


KS3.M 


ao 


10 CO S0.3 


11 0.68 


29 1 Mi 


LI 41.87 


90 3 60.0» 


ai 


ID 99 90.5 


I3 53.SB 


S 3.1B 




8 46.6S 


22 












23 












34 










18 36,93 


25 


9 iia,5 




30 10.41 


1S54.T4 


93 39.73 


26 


a 39 19.3 


13 B.44 


£4 45.96 




96 29.33 


27 




19 67.71 






a>9s.gs 


28 




13 46.46 


3a39JK 




34 99.14 


29 




12 31.71) 


30 36,02 


13M.7I) 


33 10.00 










.o.> .<» <... . iS4?.e8 


43ia.5S 















Jt Jpporml iVoM 


at Ommmck. 






MARCH. 


JfFEIC: 1 


It. 


Baml-Dlu, 


B.D.cokd. 






ltenii.&luD 


8.6. cbE: 




a 


19 B.B 


"' 5™' 


i 


J 


U 0.8 




i 


4 


9.1 


0.13 


8 


: 


0.3 


,'^y 


s 


e 


7.8 


s.oi 


A'i 


5 


IS 60.7 


t.m 


1 1 


8 
10 


a.8 


1» 


7 
9 


MO 


4.98 


Ui 


12 


fl.S 


4.70 


ass?- 


11 


se.0 




14 
16 


8.3 


4.« 
4.b5 


If S 


13 
15 


67.5 


4.02 


^ih 


18 






c h 


17 


60.5 


6.03 


£i= 


20 






sii- 


19 


08.0 




22 

24 


3? 


4.43 


n% 


68.4 


6,28 
8.41 


in 


26 

28 


S.E 


4.3S 
4.30 


1 * 

5" 


MA 
G3.0 


S.S6 

S.6S 


s i 

b 


30 


1.4 


4.41 


63.4 




32 


0.B 


4.43 






62.9 


6.M 


s 


D 


Dcdinii 




*5. 


P 


DEOIinai. 


adibiAppar. 


~g|.de»*l 




Soulh," 


4w«r. If™ 


h™™" 




Nonh. 


lilliiT^ 






















7 311 M.fl 




33 36 33.02 




4 30 8.0 


3 58.23 


38*8 74 


2| 




13S3.4S 






4 69 13.0 




43 4S 


30 


i 


S4S S.i 


12 0.74 


44 38.72 




5 32 12.7 




46 41 


S* 


< 




USfl.S6 


49 25.a« 






3 2.32 


80 38 


40 


t 


itatll.6 


ii42.es 


82 21,83 




B 7 55.1 


3 44.e8 


8134 


96 


t 


5 3S38.a 


113S.03 








2S7JM 








5iai».5 




13 14.03 




83 12.3 




1 3K 




i 




ioao.m 






7 15 40,3 


163.00 


624 


01 


! 




10 44.*S 


8 B.04 






130.22 




IB 


10 


4 a 2.6 


I0 1».S3 


13 4.S0 


IC 


a 14.0 


11S.89 


H17 




11 


3 3S30.3 


10 13.03 


W 1.14 


11 


B 22 18.9 


1 3.H 


18 11 


37 


12 




SS6.B2 


10 67.09 


12 






33 10 


83 


13 


2SI18.S 






13 










14 


ssTse.B 


9S3.4B 


BTSRJU 


14 


9 27 41^4 


18.31 


30 : 


^ 


15 








15 


9 49 10.4 


4-0 1,31 


34 


48 


16 






35 43. S 


loioaejj 


13,50 


37 87 


03 


17 






30 40. 7 




27.00 






18 






43 37. S 






46 50 




19 


0M13.T 












60 


20 


S3J.3 


7 37.71 


613a 


1134 S.3 


1 8.79 


63 43 


35 


21 


NOW 8.S 


710.46 


68 20. 1 


1164 27.8 


131.01 


67 30.80 ' 


22 


41 47.8 




BO 33. 2 




133.90 


3 1 30.35 


23 


1 sas.e 




3 18. 3 








24 


189 a.i 


0S4.O9 


7in.33 


24 


13 64 33.0 








25 


1 H3e.3 


e S.S2 


11 12.37 


25 


13 14 9.9 


2 a.s5 


nte 


Oil 


26 






18 B.43 


26 


13 33 33.0 


3 18.83 


17 22 


67 


27 


2 39 36.9 


E 39.33 


10 6.ee 


27 










28 


3 3 a.B 






28 




2 38.23 






29 




4 6i.ae 




29 


14 X 34,0 




39 13 




30 


3 4R13.7 




30 6i.B3;!30 


14 M 81.0 


S 35.40 




79 


31 


4 IS SB i 


4 14.<B 


31 63.19 


31 




3 3Jl 


37 5 





1845.] 



XPHEMERI8 OF THX SUN. 



55 



Jt Apparent Noon at Cfreenwich, 



MAY. 1 


JUNE. 


D. 


Semi-Diam. 


S. J), culm. 


• •« 


1^ 


Semi-Diam. 


. S D. culm. 




M^» 


1 « 


m. see. 


b 

s 

^ 




f u 


m. sec 


• 

,1 . 


1 


15SB.0 


1 5.00 


2 


15 47.0 


1 8.38 


3 


S2.5 


6.14 


4 


46.7 


8.48 


5 


53.0 


6.30 


1 ^ 


6 


46.5 


8.57 


§ ^ 


7 
9 


51.6 
51.1 


6.46 
6.63 


<5 .« 00 


8 
10 


46.3 
46.1 


8.65 
8.?i 


'^S at 


11 


60.7 


6.80 


m-.- 1 - 


12 


45.8 


8.78 


Ss 1 - 


13 


50.3 


6.06 


J3li2| 


14 


458 


8.83 




16 


40.0 


7.12 


«-^S -300 


16 


45.6 


8.86 


's^ n^ 


17 


40.6 


7.28 




18 


45.5 


8.88 




19 
21 


40.2 
48.0 


7.44 
7.50 


S "I 


20 
22 


45.4 
45.3 


8.80 
8.68 


■B la 


23 


48.5 


7.74 


24 


45.2 


8.86 




25 


48.2 


7.88 


Si S 


26 


45.1 


8.83 


^ 1 


27 


47.0 


8.02 


I) 


28 


45.1 


8.7S 


& " 


29 


47.5 


8.15 


30 


45.0 


8.72 


i 

T-l 


31 


47.3 


8.27 


^ 


32 










EquatofT. 


Sidereal 






Equal, of T. 


Sidereal 


D. 


Declina. 


to be subtr.fr. 


Time at 


D. 


Declina. 


9ub.fr Appar. 
till 15th. 


Time at 




North. 




mean noon 




North. 


mean noon 




» 1 a 


m. sec 


h. m sec. 




» 1 a 


m. sec. 


h. m. sec. 


1 


15 7 8.4 


3 3.31 


2 37 5.34 


1 


22 4 46.0 


2 31.35 


4 30 18.57 


2 


16 25 7.0 


3 10.57 


41 1.89 


2 


22 12 42.8 


2 22.14 


43 16.12 


3 


15 42 52.3 


3 17.26 


44 58.45 


3 


22 20 16.6 


2 12.54 


47 11.63 


4 


16 21.1 


3 23.30 


43 55.00 


4 


22 27 24.7 


2 2.55 


61 8.24 


5 


16 17 34.1 


3 28.05 


53 61.66 


5 


22 34 10.5 


1 52.22 


65 4.70 


6 


16 34 30.8 


3 33.05 


56 43.11 


6 


22 40 32.5 


1 41.56 


50 1.35 


7 


16 51 11.1 


3 38.38 


3 44.67 


7 


22 46 30.8 


1 30.60 


5 2 57.01 


8 


17 7 34.6 


3 42.24 


4 41.22 


8 


22 52 5.0 


1 19.34 


6 54.47 


9 


17 23 40.0 


3 46.64 


8 37.76 


9 


22 57 16.2 


1 7.&3 


10 51.02 


10 


17 30 20.8 


3 48.26 


12 34.33 


10 


23 2 1.2 


56.10 


14 47.58 


11 


17 55 1.0 


3 50.44 


16 30.89 


11 


23 6 22.0 


44.15 


18 44.14 


12 


18 10 14.2 


3 52.06 


20 27.44 


12 


23 10 20.3 


32.00 


22 40.60 


13 


18 25 0.1 


3 53.11 


24 24.00 


13 


23 13 53.1 


10.70 


26 37.25 


14 


IS 30 45.3 


3 63.62 


23 20.55 


14 


23 17 1.5 


— 7.25 


30 33.81 


15 


18 54 2.7 


3 63.57 


32 17.11 


15 


23 10 45.2 


-|-0 5.32 


34 30.37 


16 


10 8 1.0 


3 52.07 


36 13.67 


16 


23 22 4.2 


17.00 


33 26.02 


17 


10 21 30.8 


3 51.83 


40 10.22 


17 


23 23 53.0 


30.74 


42 23.48 


18 


10 34 50.0 


3 50.14 


44 6.78 


18 


23 25 26.3 


43.56 


46 20.04 


19 


10 47 68.3 


3 47.90 


43 3.33 


19 


23 26 33.1 


56.42 


50 16.60 


20 


20 37.3 


3 45.12 


51 60.89 


20 


23 27 13.2 


1 0.20 


64 13.15 


21 


20 12 56.0 


3 41.80 


65 66.45 


21 


23 27 23.4 


1 22.17 


63 0.71 


22 


20 24 54.0 


3 37.94 


50 53.00 


22 


23 27 13.0 


1 35.04 


6 2 6.27 


23 


20 36 31.1 


3 33.65 


4 3 40.66 

1 


23 


23 26 44.6 


1 47.87 


6 2.82 


24 


20 47 47.1 


3 23.04 


7 46.11 


24 


23 25 46.3 


2 0.65 


50.33 


25 


20 68 41.7 


3 23.20 


11 42.67 


25 


23 24 21.4 


2 13.35 


13 55.04 


26 


21 14.6 


3 17.24 


15 39.23 


26 


23 22 32.7 


2 25,06 


17 62.50 


27 


21 10 25.8 


3 10.70 


10 35.73 


27 23 20 10.3 


2 36.44 


21 40.05 


28 


21 SO 14.0 


3 .3.34 


23 32.34 


28, 23 17 41.4 


2 60.78 


25 45.61 


29 


21 38 41.8 


2 66.40 


27 28.90 


29 


33 14 33.8 


3 2.05 


20 42.17 


30 


21 47 46.3 


2 43.50 


31 25.46 


30 


23 11 11.8 


3 14.03 


33 38.73 


31 


21 56 28.0 


2 40.14 


35 22.01 


31 


23 7 20.4 


3 26.71 


37 35.8? 



KrKBKius or T 





JULY. 








AUOUBT. 




K 




S.D.«1«. 




Semi-Diui 


S.D.CDlm. 










s . . 




i 


2 


uu.a 


18.93 


^ U 47.0 


l 457 


1 


4 


40.0 




i i - 






6 


49.0 


e!48 


6Ji3 


,1 1 


8 
10 


tt.3 


8.3B 


J-- ._- 47.8 
|| Ii 48.3 


Oi» 
5.80 




12 






It "^ 




14 


tS.4 


8.01 


5.60 


11 


IE 






B.4I 


18 


44.6 




6.38 


ao 






S.13 


23 




5.41 








7.23 


4.86 




4S.3 


7.0S 


4.53 


^ i 




4B.5 




& Bi.a 


4.01 


» 








1 S 




i 


32 


4T.0 


e.sT 


4.40 






EqnM. of T. 
tahtaHdidlo 


Sidereal 






a--^'^- 


"gi3ere»r 


D 


Declina. 


Time HI 


D 


Declins. 






Nottk, 




b™sec! 






*^«t*™ 


°™.™.'' 


1 


23 7 80.4 


328.71 


37 3S.38 


1 




a oaa 


830 48.53 


2 






4131.94 


2 




3 60.64 


43 45.00 


3 






45 38.40 




17 30 2.3 




47 41.04 


4 


23 53 20.B 




.40 24.96 




17 11 lOJ 


6 47J)8 




5 


SB 47 33.1 


4 11.13 






16 SB 2.0 


S 41.74 




6 


2143 1.5 


4 31.47 






16 41 37.1 


5 35.60 


60 31^11 


7 


22 35 48^ 


4 31.43 


7 1 14.62 








3 37.98 


8 






5 n.it 


( 


U T69.I 




7 34.41 


S 






7.74 


9 


16 60 46.8 


5 13.68 




10 


W 14 40.V 


4 68.98 


13 4.30 


10 


16 33 19.3 


3 6.W 


15 17.efi 


11 


a eas^ 


6 7.23 


17 0.81 




15 IS 38.8 


4SS.B0 


1914.06 


12 






30 67.41 


Ii 


U Sr 39.8 




33 10.83 


13 




sS3.4a 






U 38 K.6 


435.B9 


27 7.1K 


14 














31 3.74 


15 


2I316S.3 


S 33.06 








4 13.85 




16 


Bl E2 15.fl 




3fl43.M 




13 43 33.1 


4 1.73 


38 68.65 


17 










13 34 26.7 




43 53.40 


18 








u 


13 6 8.5 




46 49.08 


19 


aj SI 6.5 




48 33.30,19 




3 22.33 


60 48.61 


20 


30 40 O.B 


5SB.K 


S3 39JC 


20 


13 25 56.0 


3 8.88 


6143J>7 


21 


ao 28 34.4 


B7B 


66 26.42 


21 


12 0.2 


3 64.48 


68 30.03 


22 






8 22.97 


22 








23 






4 10.63 


S3 






32.73 


24 






e 10.00 


24 


11 S 7.6 


3 9.06 




25 


19 39 S4.a 


8 9.90 


12 12.M' 


25 




153.53 


14 25.83 


ae 


19 2« 10.8 




10 e.2o' 


26 


10 23 33.0 




18 23.30 


27 


19 12 40.9 






27 


10 2 38.9 




■ 22 ie.!>l 


28 






24 2.31 


28 


41 20.6 


1 01.08 




29 


18 44 50^1 




27 68.80 


29 




44.43 


30 12.01 


30 




S 5.93 




30 




28.34 


31 S.00 


31 


18 IB M.1 


8 3.11 


35 61.07" 


31 


8 37 0.0 


8.32 


38 5.13 



Jll JppartHt tfooti at Orttrntieh. 





SEPTEMBBl 




rOBEfe. 







Somi-Diun 


a. D. cilE 


rn.cas: 














^ 


2 


1SS3.0 


I 4.31 




14.39 


i % 


4 


tOA 


*M 






6 










s 




4.11 






"7. ". 


10 


S6.0 


4.07 




4.89 


|4|l 


12 










asl- 


14 










¥% 


16 


M.5 


4.01 




3.99 


IB 


ST.l 


4.01 




6.40 


silt 


20 








6.04 


J|S| 


22 










24 


«.B 


(.00 




6.03 


26 








0.34 


28 


».T 








£) 


30 


le D.3 






B.B7 


i 


32 






,.--, 


6.90 






S^u^'i.ofT 


Sidereil 






a-i'.s. 


Sidsnal 


D 


Dedin.. 


tl«^.fr. 


Timeal 






TlmeM 




North. 


Jpp^ TUk.. 






Bouth. 


Appa,. K™. 


















h. m. HC. 




8 16^.3 




10 49 1.70 




3 13 69.0 




ia«0 18;97 


2 






40 98.90 




337 18.9 




44 14.89 


3 


7 3ise.* 


48.09 


49M.31 




4 34.0 




43 11.38 


4 




I 7.45 


S3Sl.3e 




4 93 48.9 


1116.81 


89 7.03 


5 






S7 47.a 








68 4.48 


6 


S24M.4 


1 43.90 


IX 144.47 










7 


a 3 19,1 


S fl.97 


8 41.09 


7 


S33 4.8 


19 0.10 


3 67.68 


8 


6M4M 


sa7.io 


37.57 


S 




19 96.83 




9 




9 47.80 




9 








10 


4H32.B 




iT30.es 


10 


8 « 43,S 


19 68.03 


16 47^ 


11 


i 3135.7 


3 90.10 


9197.93 


11 


7 4 98.0 


13 13.49 


10 43.80 


12 


4 6 39.0 




9S 93.78 


12 








13 




4 11.01 


39a).33 


13 


7 49 33 J 


13 49.79 




14 


3 23 39.7 


4 39.10 


33 10.89 


14 




13 68,70 


3133.45 


IS 


9 69 33.9 


4 53.M 




15 






39 30.01 


16 


3 30 94.7 


6 14.4S 




16 




14 99,98 


30 98.86 


17 




G3S.«e 


45 8.54 


n 






43 93.11 


18 


149 57.3 




40 3.09 


18 






47 10.66 


19 


123 39.8 


18.09 






10 9 8.6 


14 67,78 


61 10.39 


20 


1 3 90.1 


30.13 


BosajM 


2( 


10 93 43.6 


IS 8.13 


65 19.77 


21 


3»aa.7 


7 0.13 


19 5a.7s 


21 


10 46 11.6 


IS 17.83 


69 0.SI 


22 


019 3S.7 


7 91^18 


22 


11 30.0 


16 96^ 


14 3 6.88 


23 


So 3 48.4 


T41.S8 




23 




IS 36.19 


7 9.43 


24 


30I3.J 


8 9.S9 


19 49.41 


24 


11 48 30.8 






25 






10 38.96 


25 


19 9 94.3 




U6S.S4 


26 




843^ 


90 3i.Sl 


26 


19 30 0.8 


16 66.86 


18S9.00 


27 


1«)S9J> 


9 3.30 


94 39.08 


27 


13 60 96.4 


10 1.9S 


99 49.84 


28 


9 3 83.7 


91tJ.»7 


ssae-ffi 


28 


13 10 38.9 


16 6.69 


96 46.90 


2fl 


81717.3 


49.M 


39 3S.H 


29 


13 30 38.7 




30 41.76 


30 


9W39JI 




3*!i.n 


30 


13 60 98.3 


W19.B0 


34 38^0 


Ui 


313 09.9 


ID 11.34 


31 


14 10 0.7 


16 16.18 


39 34.86 



itriiBMius OP ia> Bv». 
M Jppvft Ifomt et QrtnmiA. 



hovEMflBa. 


DECEMBER. 




D 


e™i-Di.in 


S. D. culm. 




D 


Semi-Diui 








1 


w e-a 


l'».90 


.1 i 




16 16.0 




1 S 
i t 




3 
5 




7.36 


: 


16.5 






^ 


10.4 


7.5B 






158 






9 


WM 




$ii 




18.0 




U IS 




11 




8.07 


hii- 


1 






ill 




13 
IS 


n.i 


8^ 

8.06 


iip 


13 
IS 


18.6 






17 
19 




0.01 




1 
IS 










31 


13.S 


0.S3 


2 


17.0 






23 


13.T 




03 s 


|23 








35 




o-es 


s i 


■2S 


17.2 




g h 




27 


x*.a 


e.ss 


1) 


,27 






} i 




29 


14.8 


10.04 


4 


29 


17.3 






3) 


1B.0 


10.83 


p 


3 


17.3 










^-^^A 


HdcRsI 






Eqou. ofT. 


auo,^ 




D. 


Dedina. 




D. 


BedinB, 


-ifi^ 


TloeU 






Soaih. 


Hfor. Tim. 






Nonh. 




















b. m. Mc. 




1 


14 S9 aijs 




14 43 31.41 


1 


3150S3.5 


10 41J6 


18 40 48.08 




8 




1617.43 




2 


81 69 67.1 


10 19J)1 


44 44.83 




3 


15 7 20.4 


16 17.W 


GO 24.6! 






65^ 


48 41.10 




4 


15 24 07.9 




sisaM 


4 


31 10 47.6 


030.93 


18 37.75 




5 


IS 44 10.8 


16 14.81 


58 17.63 


5 


3184 34.0 


8 0X0 


60 34^30 






w ass.» 


16 12J13 


16 2 14.W 


6 


33 3154.3 


8 40.07 


[7 30.90 




7 




16 0.03 




7 


23 38 48.0 


8 14.78 


4*7.42 




B 




» 4.00 




S 




7 4841 


8 23.88 




9 


IflN S.S 




14 3.86 


9 






IS30l53 




10 


17 13 6.5 


IS 54.17 


18 0.40 


10 


12 66 48.4 


54.33 


10 17.00 




11 


17 M 47.0 


15 47.68 


2156.98 


11 


83 164.3 


20.77 


3013.05 




12 


IT 45 10.5 


13 40.12 


25 63.51 


12 


33 6 33.7 








13 






30 50.07 


13 


23 10 43.8 


6 30.40 


33 ».7» 




14 


IB 17 1.5 


15 23.69 


33 40.62 


14 




S 1.S7 


38 3.38 




15 


i8 3iiaa.a 


15 13.71 


3? 43.18 


15 




4aa.K 


35 59.88 




16 




15 1.88 


4130.74 


16 


33 30 30.6 


4 3Si 


38 60.43 




17 








17 


23 2140.0 




43 58.09 




18 




14 37.69 


49 39.86 


18 




3 4.87 


47 40.55 




19 


10 30 65.1 




E 20.41 


19 




3 35.16 


al 48.11 




SO 


10 44 39^ 


U 10.13 


67 35.00 


20 


23 20 67.0 


2 5J» 


55 42.66 




21 


MSB 3.1 


13 5S.11 


U 133.51 


21 


23 87 24.4 


135.33 


60 30.31 




22 


son 4.4 


13 39J8 




22 




1 6.30 


18 3 36.58 




23 




13 22.61 


9 1S.6S 


23 




35.24 


7 33J14 




24 


20 35^0.0 


13 5.16 


13 12.18 


24 


23 35 03.8 


— 5.19 


1138.88 




25 


BO 47 63.4 


IS 46.03 


17 8.71 


25 


23 24 20.7 




15 36.45 






20 58S3.S 


13 37.92 


21 5.3.^ 


26 




0*4.72 


10 39.01 




27 


ai 10 S0.1 


18 8.17 


35 I.B6 


27 


33 20 8.1 


134.53 


23 18^ 




28 






28 58.41 




23 17 18.S 


164.17 


37 14.13 




29 


SI sin* 


1130.53 


33 54.0ft' 






3 33.03 


aiu-tt 




30 


31 41 t4.7 


11 4.67 


30 61^ 


30 




3 63.34 


35 e^ 




31 


31 00 13.5 


10 42.16 


40 48 J 


31 


33 6(4.0 


sn.TR 


39 4-70 





iBiS.] APFARSITT PtACsft OT ftt< VOtt 8TAX. 

TVue Jpparefit Places of ihi PoU Stcar^ for eoery day ofthi yw. 
Epoch. — The Upper Culmination at Greenwich. 



^ 



















1 








JAlfHAKT. 


VEBKUi.RT. 


MARCH. 


▲PXIL. 


HAT. 


aUmBMinotis. 


aUraaaMinoris. 


aUrsaa Minoris. 


aUrsaa Minoris. 


aUrsse Minoris. 




(Potaris.) 


{.Polaris.) 


(Polaris,) 


(Polaris.) 


(Polaris.) 


of the 


1 

•• 


1 


4 


i 


* 

1 

IS 


• 


1 


1 


6 

< 


1 


Ubnth. 


1 


i 

A 


M 

P4 


1 


P4 


1 


P4 


i 




• 

1 


h. 


e 


h. 


«' 


h. 


« 


h. 


• 


b. 





1845. 


1 


88 


1 


88 


1 


88 


1 


88 


1 


d8 


m. nc. 


I II 


iHaee. 


1 IT 


m. Me. 


/ » 


n. tet. 


/ » 


fukiee. 


1 u 


1 


3 56.82 


29 23.6 


3 32.61 


29 23.1 


3 15.29 


2917.7 


3 7.60 


28 68.5 


314.36 


23 59.3 


2 


56.04 


23.6 


31.88 


22.9 


14.84 


17.4 


7.60 


68.2 


14.81 


59.0 


3 


55.26 


23.7 


31.15 


23.8 


1440 


17.2 


7.62 


67.9 


15w26 


58.8 


4 


54.48 


23.8 


30.43 


22.7 


lago 


16.9 


7.65 


67.6 


15.72 


5B.6 


5 


53.70 


23.9 


29.72 


22.6 


13.53 


16.6 


7.60 


67.3 


16w20 


68.3 


6 


53.91 


23.9 


29.01 


22.4 


13.12 


16.3 


7.73 


66.9 


1«.69 


58.0 


7 


59.12 


24.0 


28.31 


22.3 


12.72 


16.0 


[I'Sl 


m 


17.19 


67.8 


8 


51.33 


24.0 


27.61 


22.1 


12.33 


15.8 


7.96 


66.0 


17.71 


57.5 


9 


50.54 


24.1 


26.92 


22.0 


11.97 


15.5 


8.09 


65.7 


18.24 


57.3 


10 


49.74 


24.1 


26^25 


21.8 


11.62 


15.3 


8.23 


65.4 


18.78 


57.1 


11 


4&94 


24.1 


25.59 


21.7 


11.29 


15.0 


8.38 


65.1 


19.32 


56.9 


12 


48il4 


24.1 


24.93 


21.5 


10.97 


14.7 


8.54 


64.8 


19.87 


56.7 


13 


47.33 


24.1 


24i28 


21.3 


10;66 


14.4 


8.71 


64.5 


20.43 


56.5 


14 


46w53 


24.1 


2d;64 


21.1 


10.36 


14.1 


8.90 


64.2 


21.01 


56J2 


15 


4&74 


24.1 


23.00 


20.9 


10.08 


13.8 


0.11 


63.9 


21.60 


56.0 


16 


44.96 


24.1 


22.37 


20.7 


9.81 


13.5 


9.35 


63.6 


22.21 


55.8 


17 


44.17 


IM.0 


21.76 


20.5 


9.55 


13.2 


9.59 


63.3 


22.83 


55.6 


18 


43.38 


24.0 


21.15 


20.3 


0.32 


13.9 


9.84 


63.0 


23.45 


55.4 


19 


42.50 


24.0 


2a56 


20.1 


9.10 


12.6 


10.10 


62.7 


24.03 


55.2 


20 


41.90 


23.9 


19.98 


19.9 


8.89 


12.3 


10.37 


62.4 


24.72 


£5;0 


21 


41.02 


33.9 


19.42 


19.6 


8.70 


13.0 


10.65 


63.1 


25.37 


54.9 


22 


40.24 


23.9 


18.87 


19.4 


8.53 


11.7 


10.95 


61.8 


26.03 


54.7 


23 


39.46 


23.8 


18.32 


19.1 


8.38 


11.3 


11.77 


61.5 


26.69 


54.6 


24 


36.68 


23.8 


17.78 


18.9 


3.23 


11.0 


11.61 


61,2 


27.37 


54.4 


25 


37.91 


23.7 


17.26 


18.7 


8.10 


10.7 


11.96 


60.9 


23.05 


54.2 


26 


37.14 


23.7 


16.75 


18.4 


7.97 


10.4 


12.33 


60.6 


23.75 


64.1 


27 


36.37 


23.6 


16J34 


1S.2 


7.86 


10.1 


12.71 


60.3 


29.46 


53.9 


28 


3&61 


23.5 


15.76 


18.0 


7.78 


9.7 


13.11 


60.1 


30.17 


53.8 


29 


34.85 


23.4 


15.29 


17.7 


7.72 


0.4 


13.52 


59.8 


30.89 


53.7 


30 


34.10 


23.3 






7.67 


9.1 


13.93 


59.6 


31.61 


53.5 


31 


33.35 


23.2 






7.62 


8.8 


14.36 


59.3 


32.34 


53.4 


32 


33.61 


23.1 






7.60 


8.5 






83.07 


53.3 



60 



APPARXRT PLACX8 OV TBS POLX STAR. [I845w 

3h« Jpparent Bace8 of the IhU Star^for every day of the year. 
Epoch. — The Upper Calmination at Greenwich. 





JUHS. 


JULY. 


AUGUST. 


SXPTXMBXK. 


OCTOBXS. 


«Urs8B MinorisJ 


<xUrs8B Mmoris. 


aUrsae Minoris. 


uUrss Minoris. 


aUrsce MinoiiB. 




{Polaru.) 


{Polaris.) 


(Polaris.) 


(Polaris.) 


(Polaris.) 


6.7 

of the 
Month. 


m 

1 

■a 

3 


1 

i 

a 




1 
& 


9 

! 


• 

1 


m 

i 


• 

1 


1 


• 

1 


h. 





h. 


e 


h. 


• 


h. 


o 


h. 


« 


^ ^\ M t^ 


1 


88 


1 


88 


1 


88 


1 


88 


1 


88 


1845. 


nuno. 


1 H 


m. MM). 


/ K 


m. Mb 


1 II 


in. MC> 


1 II 


ID. MC. 


• li 


1 


3 33.07 


28 53.3 


3 67.27 


28 51.9 


4 22.37 


28 55.8 


4 42.27 


29 3.9 


4 82.84 


29 14.5 


2 


33.81 


83.2 


88.12 


82.0 


23.12 


56.0 


42.77 


4.2 


63.01 


14.8 


3 


34.55 


53.0 


88.96 


82.1 


23.86 


56.2 


43.27 


4.6 


63.18 


18.2 


4 


35.31 


52.9 


89.80 


52.1 


24.60 


56.4 


43.77 


4.9 


53.34 


18.6 


6 


36.07 


52.8 


60.63 


52.2 


26.33 


56.6 


44.25 


5.3 


83.48 


16.0 


6 


36.84 


52.7 


61.46 


82.2 


26.05 


56.S 


44.72 


8.6 


83.60 


16.3 


7 


37.61 


52.6 


62.30 


62.3 


26.76 


57.0 


45.16 


5.9 


53.71 


16.7 


8 


38.39 


52.5 


63.13 


82.4 


27.47 


57.3 


45.60 


6.3 


63.81 


17.1 


9 


39.18 


52.4 


63.96 


82.4 


29.18 


57.5 


46.04 


6.6 


53.90 


17.6 


10 


39.97 


S2.3 


64.80 


82.5 


28.89 


57.7 


46.47 


6.9 


53.98 


17.9 


11 


40.77 


82.2 


65.64 


52.6 


29.59 


58.0 


46.88 


7.2 


54.04 


18J3 


12 


41.57 


82.2 


66.47 


62.7 


30.27 


68.2 


47.28 


7.6 


54.10 


18.6 


13 


42.37 


52.1 


67.30 


52.8 


30.94 


58.4 


47.67 


7.9 


54.14 


19.0 


14 


43.17 


52.1 


66.13 


82.9 


31.61 


58.7 


48.05 


8.2 


54.16 


19.3 


15 


43.98 


8Z.0 


68.95 


53.1 


32.28 


5S.9 


48.43 


8.6 


54.18 


19.7 


r 16 


44.80 


52.0 


69.76 


S3.2 


32.94 


89.2 


48.80 


9.0 


54.19 


20.1 


17 


45.61 


51.9 


70.57 


53.3 


33.59 


89.5 


49.15 


9.3 


54.18 


20.4 


18 


46.43 


51.9 


71.38 


53.4 


34.22 


59.8 


49.49 


9.7 


54.16 


20.8 


19 


47.25 


51.9 


72.20 


53.5 


34.84 


60.0 


49.93 


10.1 


64.12 


21.3 


20 


48.07 


51.9 


73.01 


53.6 


35.46 


60.3 


60.14 


10.5 


84.06 


21.6 


21 


48.90 


51.8 


73.82 


63.8 


36.07 


60.6 


50.44 


10.8 


53.99 


22.0 


22 


49.73 


61.8 


74.62 


53.9 


36.68 


60.9 


60.74 


11.1 


53.91 


22.4 


23 


50.56 


51.8 


75.41 


54.1 


37.28 


61.2 


51.02 


11.5 


53.82 


22.8 


24 


51.39 


51.8 


76.19 


54.3 


37.87 


61.5 


51.30 


11.8 


83.72 


23.1 


25 


52.22 


61.8 


76.98 


54.4 


38.45 


61.8 


51.57 


12.2 


53.62 


23.5 


26 


53.05 


51.8 


77.77 


64.6 


39.03 


62.1 


61.81 


12.6 


83.50 


23.8 


27 


53.88 


61.8 


78.55 


54.8 


39.60 


62.4 


52.08 


13.0 


53.37 


24.2 


28 


54.72 

• 


51.8 


79.32 


55.0 


40.16 


62.7 


52.24 


13.4 


53.23 


24.6 


29 


65.57 


51.9 


80.09 


66.2 


40.71 


63.0 


52.45 


13.8 


83.07 


24.9 


30 


56.42 


51.9 


80.86 


55.4 


41.24 


63.3 


82.65 


14.1 


02.80 


28.3 


31 


57J27 


51.9 


81.62 


65.6 


41.76 


63.6 


52.34 


14.5 


82.68 


28.7 


32 






82.37 


55.8 


42.27 


63.9 






62.46 


26.0 



1845.] APPABSNT PLA0X8 0« THE PBXNOIPAL 7XZXD 8TAB8. 61 

True^ppareiU Flaeaofthe B>U Star for every day,andof Thirty'SevmoftheBrin' 

cipal Fixed Siartf far every tenUi day of the year. 

Epoch.—- The Upper Culminatioii at Greenwich. 











1 






^UnaB Minoris. 


a AndromedflB. 




IfOVXMBBK. 


DXCXMBIK. 1 




























1 

♦5 


i 




1 












aUrses Minoris. 


aUrssB Minoris. 






fe; 


^ 


^»^ 


(Polaris.) 


(FoUxris^ 








• 

1 


t 


• 

p 


Day 


1 


1 


1 


1 


. 




h. 


e 


h. m. 


o 


of the 


5§ 

• 


• 


1845. 


18 
m. MC. 


86 
1 i> 




MC 


28 


MonsSk. 


u 


0) 

P 


a 




Jan. 


1 

11 
21 


2151.59 
51.80 
52.71 


35 43.9 
40.6 
37.4 


24.06 
23.82 
23.79 


14 19.8 
18.8 
17.6 




h. 
1 


86 


h. 
1 




88 




1845. 


auMe. 


1 i> 


m. MC 


' 1/ 




31 


64.31 


34.5 


23.67 


16.1 


1 


4 52.46 


29 26.0 


4 40.70 


29 35.5 


Feb. 


10 


66.64 


31.9 


23.57 


14.5 


2 


52.24 


26.3 


40.13 


35.7 




20 


50J27 


29.8 


23.50 


12.8 


3 


62.02 


26.7 


39.56 


35.9 


Mar. 


2 


2.41 


28.2 


23.47 


11.2 


4 


51.78 


27.0 


38.96 


36.2 




12 


5.86 


27.1 


23.46 


9.6 


5 


51.53 


27.3 


38.37 


36.5 




22 


9.44 


26.3 


23.51 
^23.60 


8.2 


6 


61.28 


27.7 


37.T7 


36.7 


Apri] 


1 


13.04 


27.1 


7.0 


7 


51.01 


28.1 


37.15 


36.9 




11 


16.51 


27.9 


23.74 


6.1 


8 


50.71 


28.4 


36.52 


37.1 




21 


19.72 


29.3 


23.92 


5.7 


9 


50.40 


28.7 


35.88 


37.3 


May 


1 


22 61 


31.3 


24.14 


5.6 


10 


50.07 


29.0 


35.23 


37.6 




11 
21 


25.02 
26.89 


33.6 
36.4 


24.40 
24.69 


5.9 
6.5 


11 


40.74 


29.4 


34.57 


S7^ 




31 


28.20 


39.4 


25.01 


7.6 


12 


49.40 


29.8 


33.91 


38.0 


June 10 


28.88 


42.6 


25.35 


9.0 


13 


49.04 


30.1 


33J24 


2SJi 




20 


28.93 


45.9 


25.66 


10.7 


14 


48.67 


30.5 


32.57 


38.3 




30 


28.34 


49.3 


26.02 


12.6 


15 


48.30 


30.8 


31.90 


38.5 


July 


10 


27.15 


52.3 


26.36 


14.8 


16 


47.91 


31.1 


31.21 


38.7 




20 


25.36 


56.4 


26.66 


17.2 


17 


47.51 


31.4 


30.51 


38.9 




30 


23.08 


58.2 


26.04 


19.6 


18 


47.10 


31.7 


29.80 


39.1 


Aug. 


9 


20.22 


60.7 


27.19 


22.1 


19 


46.68 


32.0 


29.08 


39.3 




19 


16.97 


62.9 


27.40 


24.6 


20 


46.24 


32.3 


28.36 


39.5 




29 


13.36 


64.6 


27.56 


27.0 












Sept, 


8 


09.49 


36 6.0 


27.71 


29.3 


21 


45.79 


32.6 


27.64 


39.6 




18 


66.40 


6.9 


27.80 


31.4 


22 


45.33 


32.9 


26.90 


39.8 




28 


61.21 


7.3 


27.85 


33.4 


23 


44.87 


33.2 


26.16 


39.9 


Oct. 


8 


56.99 


7.2 


27.87 


36.1 


24 


44.40 


33.5 


26.41 


40.0 




18 


52.85 


6.5 


2785 


36.6 


25 


43.01 


33.8 


24 66 


40.1 




28 


48.89 


5.5 


27.79 


37.9 


26 


43.40 


34.1 


23.91 


40.3 


Nov. 


7 


45.21 


63.9 


27.72 


38.8 


27 


42.87 


34.4 


23.14 


40.4 




17 


41.88 


618 


27.62 


39.6 


28 


42.34 


34.7 


22.37 


40.5 




27 


30.04 


50.4 


27.50 


39.8 


29 


4180 


35.0 


21.60 


40.6 


Dec. 


7 


36.74 


56.6 


27.37 


39.8 


30 


41.26 


35.2 


2082 


40.7 




17 


35.13 
^34.09 


63.6 


27.23 


39.6 


31 


40.70 


35.5 


20.06 


40^ 




27 


49.9 


27.09 


38.9 


32 






19.28 


40.9 




37 






26.94 


38.0 



6 



IHm Appottid Ftaea of TMrty-aoiH 6/ thi BineipiU tteed Stars, for eoery 

teittk day of the year. 

Epoch. — The Upper Culmination at Greenwich. 





/fCdtt 


tfArietU. 


ciCati. 


a Tauri. 
{JOdebcaran.) 


a Aarig». 
{CapMa.) 






4 


1 


X 


• 


1 


• 

1 


1 


«; 

^ 


i 

*» 

^ 

tf 


1 




h. IB. 


• 


n* in. 


• 


h. m. 


• 


h* m. 


o 


b. m. 


• 




.^ ^K M mm 


035 


18 


1 68 


83 


3 64 


3 


4 27 


16 


6 6 


48 




1845. 
Jan. 1 


we. 

49.16 


1 N 

49 61.3 


iee. 

fi8.61 


1 n 

43 45.6 


12.70 


28 42.0 


■M. 

4.29 


1 n 

1133.3 


•ee. 
18.16 


1 ti 
«63.7 




11 


49.02 


81.7 


8S.3S 


45.2 


12.60 


41.2 


4.24 


33.0 


18.14 


66.0 




21 


48.80 


82.0 


96.24 


44;6 


12.46 


40.5 


4.16 


32.7 


18.06 


e6il 




31 


48.77 


81.9 


28.09 


43.9 


12.34 


39.9 


4.05 


32.3 


17.98 


87.0 




Feb.lO 


48.67 


81.6 


87.94 


43.0 


12.19 


39.3 


3.90 


32.0 


17.74 


67.6 




20 


48.58 


81.0 


87-79 


42.1 


12.03 


38.9 


3.74 


31.6 


17.88 


08.0 




Mar. 2 


48.52 


80.2 


87.66 


41.1 


11.68 


38.6 


3.66 


31.3 


17.27 


66.1 




12 


48.48 


79.1 


87.55 


40.1 


11.75 


8R.4 


3.36 


30.9 


17.01 


07.9 




22 


.49.48 
^48.58 


77.7 


87.47 


39.3 


11.63 


36.4 


3.21 


30.6 


16.76 


07.4 




Apr. 1 


75.9 


87.44 


36.3 


11.54 


38.6 


3.06 


90.3 


16.88 


66.6 




11 


48.61 


74.1 


87.44 


37.6 


11.49 


38.9 


2.94 


30.1 


16.38 


65.6 




21 


48.73 


72.0 


.87.49 
^87.60 


37.1 


11.49 


39.5 


2.65 


89.9 


16.16 


64.4 




May 1 


48.90 


69.9 


36.9 


^ 11*52 
^ 11.61 


40.3 


8.81 


89.8 


16.05 


63.1 




11 


49.11 


67.6 


27.76 


36.9 


41.4 


2.81 


89.9 


15.99 


61.7 




21 


49.36 


65.3 


87.96 


37.2 


11.74 


42.6 


. 2.88 
^ 2.98 


90.1 


16.00 


60.3 




31 


49.62 


62.9 


86.20 


37.7 


U.91 


43.9 


90.5 


.16.07 
^16,22 


68.8 




Jan. 10 


49.91 


60.6 


29.47 


38.6 


13.12 


45.4 


3.10 


31.0 


87.3 




20 


66.28 


S8.5 


86.77 


39.7 


18.36 


47.0 


3.29 


31.7 


16.41 


66.1 




30 


60.54 


66.5 


89.06 


41.0 


18.63 


46.7 


3.61 


32.5 


16.66 


65.1 




JnlylO 


60.86 


64.7 


89.41 


42.5 


18.98 


60.4 


3.76 


33.3 


16.96 


64.8 




20 


51.16 


63.2 


29.74 


44.1 


13.81 


82.1 


4.02 


34.3 


17.87 


53.6 




30 


51.45 


68.0 


90.06 


45.8 


13.51 


63.7 


4.31 


35.1 


17.63 


G3.1 




Aug. 9 


51.72 


51.1 


90.37 


47.6 


13.61 


65.1 


4.61 


96.1 


16.01 


68.8 




19 


51.96 


50.6 


90.66 


49.3 


14.10 


66.4 


4.91 


37.0 


13.40 


62.7 




29 


58.16 


60.5 


30.93 


61.1 


14.37 


57.5 


. 6.21 


37.8 


16.80 


68.8 




Sept. 8 


62.31 


50.7 


31.17 


82.7 


14.63 


66.3 


6.61 


39.5 


19.21 


63.1 




18 


52.44 


61.2 


31.38 


64.2 


14.66 


66.9 


6.80 


39.0 


19.61 


63.5 


28 


fi2.52 


62.0 


31.56 


55.7 


16.07 


69.2 


6.06 


39.5 


80.01 


64.8 


Oct. 8 


52.66 


63.1 


31.70 


66.9 


15.86 


69.3 


6.34 


39.8 


20.39 


65.0 




18 


62.57 


54.3 


31.82 


63.0 


15.41 


69.1 


6.69 


39.9 


20.76 


66.9 




28 


52.55 


55.6 


31.90 


50.0 


15.54 


66.6 


6.81 


40.0 


21.10 


66.9 




Nov. 7 


».50 


67.1 


31.95 


69.7 


15.63 


66.2 


7.00 


39.9 


21.41 


68.1 




17 


62.42 


56.4 


31.96 


60.3 


15.70 


67.6 


7.17 


39.7 


81.69 


69.4 




27 


62.33 


69.8 


31.05 


60.7 


15.74 


56.6 


7.31 


39.6 


81.98 


60.7 




Dec. 7 


68.22 


61.0 


31.91 


60.9 


15.74 


66.0 


7.41 


39.8 


33.10 


68.1 




17 


62.06 


68.0 


31.64 


60.9 


15.71 


65.1 


7.47 


39.9 


88.83 


63.5 




27 


61.96 


08.9 


31.74 


60.8 


15.66 


64.3 


7.49 


36.0 


32.30 


64.9 




37 


51.83 


63.5 


31.63 


60.4 


15.67 


63.5 


7.47 


96.8 


88.30 


66.3 





1S4M 



A7PAUBKT SLACKS OF TBS fEIIfOZVAL SIX«D STAi;^. 



2hM 4Rparm< JPIacef •/ 3%ti^-t««m o/ tA« JMncipol Fixtd SUutm^ for CMry 

Unih d4Ky of the ytar, 

* Epoch.'— The Upper Ctilounation at Gieenwich. 





/9 Orionif . 


/9Taari« 


'Oriooii. 


aOrionia. 


aCanuMaJorifl. 




(fi^.) 
















• 

4 


1 


4 


1 


i 

< 


j 


• 
O 

J3 


1 


4 


1 




«• 


^^£ 


«■ 


«• 


^^m 


«■ 


^ 


^^m 






6 

& 


s 

M 


• 

1 




• 

1 


1 


• 

1 


1 


1 


h. m. 


• 


h» m. 


« 


b. in. 


• 


h. m. 


• 


h. m. 


• 


^ tf^ M B* 


5 7 


8 


5 16 


28 


5 24 





5 46 


7 


6 38 


16 


1845. 


we. 


/ »» 


ne. 


1 u 


we. 


1 II 


we. 


1 11 


we. 


1 II 


Jan. 1 


7.67 


23 73.7 


32.55 


28 12.5 


7it2 


2513.2 


49.31 


82 15.9 


21.G3 


30 35.7 


11 


7.64 


76r4 


33.66 


12.8 


7.62 


14.5 


49.33 


15.0 


21.67 


38.0 


21 


7.S8 


78.8 


32.61 


13.1 


7.58 


15.6 


49.31 


14.2 


21.68 


40.2 


31 


7.48 


78.0 


32.42 


13.4 


7.50 


16.6 


49.25 


13.5 


21.54 


42.2 


Fab.lO 


7.35 


79.0 


32.28 


13.5 


7.38 


17.4 


49.15 


13.0 


21.46 


43.9 


20 


7.19 


79.7 


32.12 


13.6 


7ia 


18.0 


49.01 


12.5 


21.32 


45.2 


Mar. 2 


7.01 


80.2 


31.93 


13.5 


7.06 


18.5 


48.85 


12.2 


21.16 


46,3 


12 


6.69 


80.4 


31.73 


13.4 


6.88 


18.7 


48.67 


12.0 


20.98 


47.1 


22 


6.64 


80.3 


31.53 


13.1 


6.70 


18.8 


48.49 


11.9 


20.79 


47.5 


Apr. 1 


647 


80.0 


31.35 


12.7 


6.53 


18.7 


48.38 


11.9 


20.59 


47.6 


11 


6.39 


79.5 


31.18 


12.2 


6.38 


18.4 


48.16 


12.0 


20.40 


47.4 


21 


6.20 


78.7 


<31.05 


11.6 


6.25 


17.9 


48.02 


12.2 


20J28 


46.9 


May 1 


6.11 


77.7 


30.96 


11.1 


6.16 


17.2 


47.92 


12.5 


20.08 


46.1 


U 


6.06 


764 


30.92 


10.5 


6.10 


16.4 


47.85 


. 12.9 


19.96 


45.0 


21 


6.06 


76.0 


30.92 


10.0 


6.09 


15.4 


47.83 


13.5 


19.87 


43.6 


31 


6 ^-^ 

6.18 


73.4 


30.97 


9.5 


6.12 


14.3 


47.84 


14Je 


19.83 


42.1 


Jilli.10 


71.5 


^31.07 
^31.24 


9.1 


. 6.19 
^ 6.32 


13.0 


.47.90 
"48.01 


15.0 


19.82 


40.3 


20 


6.31 


69.6 


8.9 


11.5 


15.9 


19.85 


38.4 


30 


6.47 


67.8 


31.43 


8.7 


6.47 


10.1 


48.15 


16.8 


.19.92 
"20.08 


36.5 


July 10 


6.67 


65.9 


31.66 


8.7 


6.66 


8.7 


48.32 


17.8 


34.3 


20 


6.89 


64.1 


31.91 


8.7 


6.87 


7.3 


48.58 


18.8 


20.18 


32.3 


30 


7.13 


62.5 


32.20 


8.9 


7.11 


5.9 


48.75 


19.7 


20.35 


30.4 


Aug. 9 


7.39 


61.0 


32.50 


9.1 


7.36 


4.7 


49.00 


20.6 


20.55 


88.7 


19 


7.67 


69.S 


32.81 


9.3 


7.63 


3.7 


49.26 


21.3 


20.77 


27.3 


29 


7.05 


58.9 


33.14 


9.7 


7.91 


2.9 


49.54 


21.9 


21.08 


26.1 


Sept. 8 


8.23 


58.3 


33.46 


10.0 


8.19 


2.4 


49.89 


22.3 


21.28 


25.8 


18 


8.S1 


98.1 


33.79 


10.3 


8.47 


2.1 


50.11 


22.4 


21.55 


24.9 


28 


8.79 


58.2 


34.11 


10.6 


8.75 


2.2 


50.39 


22.4 


21.83 


25.0 


Oct 8 


9.05 


68.7 


34.42 


10.9 


9.02 


2.5 


60.68 


22.1 


22.12 


85.6 


18 


9.30 


69.6 


34.72 


11.2 


9.28 


3.1 


50.96 


21.6 


22.41 


26.4 


28 


9.64 


60.7 


35.01 


11.5 


9.63 


4.0 


51J22 


21.0 


22.60 


27.7 


Nov. 7 


9.76 


62.2 


35.27 


11.7 


9.76 


5.1 


51.47 


20.1 


22.96 


89.4 


17 


9.03 


63.8 


35.50 


12.0 


9.96 


6.4 


51.70 


19.1 


23.22 


314 


27 


10.09 


65.6 


35.70 


12.3 


10.14 


7.8 


51.90 


18.1 


23.46 


33.7 


Dec. 7 


10.21 


67.5 


35.87 


13.6 


10.28 


9.3 


52.07 


17.0 


23.65 


36.1 


17 


10.29 


69.3 


35.99 


13.0 


10.39 


10.7 


62.21 


16.0 


23.82 


38.6 


27 


10.33 


71.1 


36.07 


13.3 


10.45 


12.1 


62.30 


15.0 


83.94 


41.1 


37 


10.33 


72.8 


36.10 


13.7 


10.47 


13.4 


62.35 


14.0 


244)8 


43.6 



64 AYPAUtHT FLA0S8 OF THX FUNOirAL PIXSD STABS. 11845. 

Drue jipparetU Fiaea of Tkurty-ieom of th€ Brineipal Fixed Stars, for every 

tenth day of the year. 

Epoch. ^ The Upper Calmination at Greenwich. 



1845. 

Jan. 1 
11 
21 
31 

Feb.lO 
20 

Mar. 2 
12 
22 

Apr. 1 
11 
21 

May 1 
11 
21 
31 

Jun. 10 
20 
30 

July 10 
20 
30 

Aug. 9 
19 
29 

Sept. 8 
18 
28 

Oct 8 
18 
28 

ISoY. 7 
17 
27 

Dec. 7 
17 
27 
37 



c^ G«minonun. 


{Castor.) 


• 

fid 


• 

1 

• 
Q 


n» in. 


e 


7 34 


32 


K«. 


1 •• 


44.95 


13 10.2 


45.09 


10.6 


.45.17 


11.2 


45:20 


11.8 


45.17 


12.5 


45.09 


13.2 


44.96 


13.9 


44.80 


14.6 


44.01 


15.1 


44.41 


15.5 


44.20 


15.7 


44.01 


15.6 


43.84 


16.6 


43.70 


15.4 


43.59 


15.0 


43.52 


14.5 


43.49 


13.9 


43.51 


13.2 


43.56 


12.4 


X 43.66 
^43.82 


11.7 


10.8 


44U)0 


10.0 


44J20 


9.2 


44.43 


8.3 


44.69 


7.5 


44.98 


6.6 


45.26 


6.8 


45.60 


4.9 


45.93 


4.1 


46.28 


3.3 


46.68 


2.6 


46.97 


1.9 


47.31 


1.4 


47.63 


1.0 


47.93 


0.8 


48.19 


0.8 


48.40 


0.9 


48.57 


1.3 



aCaaiaMinoris. 
{^rocjfOH.) 


6 


* 

1 

<s 


h. m. 


• 


7 31 


6 


13.43 


1 II 
36 54.9 


13.55 


53.6 


13.63 


62.4 


13.65 


51.5 


13.63 


60.7 


13.56 


60.1 


13.45 


40.7 


13.31 


49.4 


13.16 


40.2 


12.96 


49.2 


12.81 


49.3 


12.65 


49.6 


12.50 


40.9 


12.37 


50.3 


12.28 


50.7 


12.21 


61.3 


12.18 


51.9 


12.19 


58.6 


12J33 


53.3 


^12.30 
12.41 


64.1 


54.9 


12.55 


55.5 


12.72 


56.1 


12.91 


56.5 


13.12 


56.8 


13.36 


56.9 


13.61 


56.7 


13.88 


56.4 


14.16 


65.7 


14.45 


54.9 


14.74 


53.8 


15.04 


52.5 


15.33 


51.1 


15.60 


49.6 


15.86 


48.1 


16J)6 


46.5 


16.27 


45.1 


16.41 


43.7 



ft 6«minonim. 
{Polha.) 






a 



o. in. 
7 35 



52.09 
52.24 
S2.33 
52.37 
52.35 
5B.2R 
52.17 
52.02 
51.84 
51.65 
51.46 
51.27 
61.10 
50.96 
50.85 
50.77 
60.74 
60.74 
50.78 
50.87 
51.00 
51.16 
51.34 
51.56 
61.80 
62.07 
52.35 
52.65 
58.07 
53.30 
53.63 
83.97 
54.30 
54.01 
54.90 
55.16 
56.39 
55.56 



e 

28 

23 31.7 
31.3 
32.1 
32.5 
33.1 
33.6 
34.2 
34.8 
35.3 
35.7 
36.0 
36.1 
36.1 
36.0 
35.8 
35.5 
35.1 
34.6 
34.1 
33.5 
32.9 
32.3 
31.6 
30.9 
30.1 
29.3 
28.5 
27.6 
26.8 
25.8 
24.9 
24.1 
23.4 
22.7 
22.3 
31.9 
21.8 
21.9 



a Hydra. 



I 



f 

tf 



» 

Q 



h. m. 
19 

MC 

60.25 
60.47 
60.64 
60.77 
60.84 
60.87 
60.85 
60.79 
60.70 
60.58 
60.44 
60.30 
60.15 
60.01 
50.88 
50.77 
59.67 
59.60 
50.55 
50.52 
59.52 
59.55 
.69.61 
' 59.70 
59.82 
59.96 
60.13 
60.34 
60.57 
60.83 
61.11 
61.41 
61.72 
62.03 
62.33 
02.63 
62.90 
63.13 



e 

7 
I II 
59 31.4 

33.7 
35.8 
37.8 
39.5 
41.0 
42.3 
43.3 
44.1 
44.6 
44.9 
44.9 
44.7 
44.4 
43.8 
43.1 
42.3 
41.3 
40.2 
39.1 
37.9 
36.7 
35.6 
34.5 
33.7 
33.1 
32.7 
32.7 
33.0 
33.7 
34.7 
36.0 
37.7 
39.6 
41.7 
43.9 
46.3 
48.4 



a Iieonia. 
(Regulus.) 

Q 






h. m. 
10 



8.72 
8.06 
9.20 
9.37 
0.49 
9.57 
9.60 
9.5S 
9.53 
9.43 
9.32 
9.10 
9.06 
8.02 
8.79 
8.67 
8.67 
8.48 
8.41 
8.37 
8.35 
6.35 
8.3d 
8.43 
8.53 
8.63 
8.78 
8.95 
9.16 
0.40 
9.67 
9.96 
10.27 
10.59 
10.02 
11.24 
11.54 
11.81 



12 

42 976 
06.1 
65.0 
64.1 
63U) 
63.2 
63.8 
63.3 
63.6 
64.0 
64.6 
65.1 
65.7 
66.3 
66.9 
67.4 
67.8 
68.2 
68.5 
68.7 
63.9 
68.9 
68.8 
69.5 
68.1 
67.5 
06.6 
656 
64.4 
63.0 
61.4 
69.7 
57.9 
56.0 
64.3 
63.4 
60.8 
49.3 



1845.] 



APPAESNT PLACES OF THE PRINCIPAL FIXED BTAB8. 



65 



2Wi€ nAjpparoA Ilace$ of Thirty-teoen of the Primipal Fixed Stony for every 

tenth day of the year. 

Epoch. — The TJpper Culmination at Greenwich. 





a Una Majoris. 


j^LeoDis. 


a Virginis. 
iSlpica.) 


a Bootig. 
{Arctmti.) 


a'liibm. 






• 

1 
6 

& 


• 

t4 


■1 

• 
Q 


• 

1 


1 


«5 


• 

1 

• 

1 


1 

Pi 


6 

& 


h. m. 


p 


h. m* 


• 


h. m. 


• 


h. in. 


e 


h.m. 


f • 


1845. 
Jan. 1 


10 54 

■ee. 
8.93 


63 

t tt 
34 46.8 


11 41 

aee. 

10J29 


15 
25 64.5 


13 17 
■ec. 

3.95 


10 
31 4.4 


14 8 

■ec 

35.se 


19 
< II 
69 20.0 


14 43 

MO. 

19.36 


15 

4 *l 

23 37.1 


11 


0.46 


47.2 


10.60 


62.9 


3.28 


6.4 


96.24 


17.8 


19.68 


38.6 


21 


9.93 


48.2 


10.89 


61.5 


3.60 


8.4 


36.67 


15.9 


• 19.91 


^ 40.2 


31 


10.32 


49.7 


11.15 


60.5 


3.90 


10.3 


36.88 


14.4 


30.34 


41.8 


Feb.lO 


10.63 


61.6 


11.37 


50.8 


4.18 


12.1 


37.19 


13.3 


20.55 


43.3 


20 


10.85 


53.8 


11.54 


59.5 


4.43 


13.7 


37.47 


12.7 


20.85 


44.7 


Mar. 2 


10.97 


56.3 


11.67 


59.5 


4.64 


16.1 


37.72 


13.6 


31.13 


46.0 


12 


11.00 


58.9 


11.75 


59.8 


4.82 


16.3 


37.94 


12.7 


31.38 


47.2 


22 


10.93 


61.6 


11.79 


60.3 


4.97 


17.2 


38.13 


13.3 


31.60 


48.2 


Apr. 1 
11 


10.79 


64.1 


11.80 


61.0 


5.07 


18.0 


38.28 


14.3 


21.80 


40.0 


10.67 


66.5 


11.77 


61.9 


5.16 


18.5 


38.40 


16.5 


21.96 


40.6 


21 


10.30 


68.6 


11.71 


62.8 


5.19 


18.8 


38.48 


17.0 


33.10 


50.0 


May 1 


9.98 


70.4 


11.63 


63.8 


6.21 


18.9 


38.63 


18.6 


32.20 


60.3 


11 


9.63 


71.7 


11.54 


64.8 


5.20 


18.9 


38.65 


20.2 


22.28 


50.4 


21 


9.27 


72.6 


11.43 


65.7 


6.17 


18.7 


38.64 


21.9 


32.33 


60.6 


31 


8.91 


73.0 


11.32 


66.6 


6.12 


18.4 


38.50 


33.5 


32.35 


50.4 


Jun. 10 


8.66 


72.9 


11.20 


67.4 


5.05 


18.0 


38.44 


36.0 


22.34 


50.8 


20 

• 


8.23 


72.3 


11.09 


68.0 


4.97 


17.6 


38.36 


26.4 


22.30 


50.0 


30 


7.94 


71.3 


10.98 


68.5 


iJ87 


17.0 


38.26 


27.5 


22.24 


40.6 


July 10 


7.68 


69.9 


10.88 


68.8 


4.77 


16.4 


3S.13 


28.4 


22.16 


40.2 


20 


7.46 


68.0 


10.79 


69.0 


4.65 


15.7 


37.99 


29.1 


22.05 


48.8 


30 


7.29 


658 


10.71 


69.0 


4.54 


15.0 


37.86 


29.6 


31.92 


48.3 


Aug. 9 


7.18 


63.3 


10.64 


68.8 


4.42 


14.3 


37.70 


29.7 


21.78 


47.7 


19 


7.12 


60.5 


10.60 


68.4 


4.31 


13.6 


37.65 


29.5 


21.64 


47.1 


29 


7.13 


57.4 


10.58 


67.8 


4.21 


13.0 


37.40 


29.1 


21.40 


46.5 


Sept. 8 


^ 7.20 


54.0 


.10.58 
"10.62 


66.9 


4.13 


12.4 


37.27 


28.4 


21.36 


46.0 


18 


7.34 


50.7 


65.8 


4.07 


12.0 


37.16 


27.4 


31.23 


46.4 


28 


7.55 


47.4 


10.70 


64.6 


4.05 


11.7 


37.07 


26.0 


21.13 


44.0 


Oct. 8 


7.83 


44.2 


10.81 


63.0 


M 4.07 
^4.13 


11.7 


37.02 


24.4 


21.07 


44.6 


18 


8.17 


41.0 


10.96 


61.3 


11.8 


.37.01 
37.05 


22.6 


21.04 


44.3 


28 


8.58 


38.1 


11.15 


50.4 


4.24 


12.2 


20.2 


.21.06 
^21.14 


44.2 


Nov. 7 


0.05 


35.4 


11.38 


57.3 


4.40 


12.9 


37.14 


17.8 


44.4 


17 


9.56 


33.0 


11.66 


66.1 


4.60 


13.9 


37.27 


15.3 


81.27 


44.0 


27 


10.12 


31.0 


11.96 


62.9 


4.84 


16.2 


37.46 


12.7 


21.44 


45.5 


Dec. 7 


10.70 


29.5 


12.26 


50.7 


6.11 


16.7 


37.68 


10.1 


21.66 


46.4 


17 


11.29 


28.6 


12.69 


48.6 


5.42 


18.4 


37.95 


7.3 


21.02 


47.6 


27 


11.86 


28.2 


12.92 


46.6 


5.74 


20.2 


38.34 


4.8 


22.21 


4S.0 


37 


12.41 


28.3 


13.24 


44.9 


6.07 


22.2 


38.56 


2.5 


22.52 


50.3 



6# 



66 



APPABSNT PLACES OP THE PRINCIPAL FIXED STABS. 



[1845. 



Th»$ jfyparent Flacti of Thirty'teven of the Bincipal Fixed Stan^ for every 

tenth day of the year. 

Epoch. — The Upper Culmination at Greenwich. 





fi Una Mioorig. 


/9 Libra. 


u Corona Bore- 
alis. 


«t Serpenfis. 


/9^ Seorpioaig. 




• 

1 

■s 


• 

1 


1 

*« 

* 
M 


• 
• 

& 


1 
1 


■ 

1 


5 

< 

— 

1 


• 

1 

• 

1 


• 

< 


• 
• 


h. m. 


e 


h. m. 


e 


h. m. 


e 


li. m. 


e 


b. m. 


e 


1845. 


14 51 


74 


15 3 


8 


15 28 


27 


15 36 


6 


15^56 


19 


■ee. 


« »« 


•ee. 


1 It 


MC* 


1 II 


KC. 


f II 


MC. 


/ II 


Jan. 1 


9.81 


46 61.7 


40.63 


43 25.0 


7.27 


14 14.6 


38.12 


54 58.2 


26.03 


22 90.3 


11 


^0.58 


59.5 


40.94 


26.6 


7.56 


12.1 


38.41 


56.2 


26.32 


31.2 


21 


11.42 


57.9 


41.26 


23.2 


7.87 


9.9 


38.71 


54.3 


26.64 


32.3 


31 


12.30 


56.9 


41.57 


29.7 


8.20 


8.2 


39.01 


52.7 


26.96 


33.3 


Feb.lO 


13.18 


56.6 


41.86 


31.1 


8.52 


6.8 


39.31 


61.3 


27.23 


34.4 


20 


14.04 


67.0 


42.18 


32.4 


8.84 


6.0 


39.61 


GOJi 


27.60 


35.5 


Mar. 2 


14.85 


58.0 


42.46 


33.4 


9.14 


5.8 


39.90 


49.5 


27.92 


36.4 


12 


15.57 


69.7 


42.72 


34.2 


9.42 


6.0 


40.17 


49.2 


28.22 


37.3 


22 


16.10 


61.8 


42.96 


34.8 


9.68 


6.7 


40.42 


4942 


28.49 


3R.1 


Apr. 1 


16.69 


64.4 


43.17 


36.2 


9.91 


7.9 


40.64 


49.5 


28.76 


3R.7 


11 


.17.05 


67.4 


43.35 


35.4 


10.10 


9.4 


40.84 


50.2 


23.99 


39.3 


21 


17.27 


70.5 


43.51 


35.4 


10.26 


11.3 


41.01 


51.1 


29.20 


39.5 


May 1 


17.35 


73.7 


43.63 


36.2 


10.39 


13.4 


41.15 


52.2 


29.38 


39.8 


11 


17.28 


76.9 


43.73 


34.9 


10.49 


15.6 


41.26 


53.5 


29.63 


39.9 


21 


17.07 


80.0 


43.80 


34.5 


10.65 


17.9 


41.35 


54.9 


29.66 


40.0 


31 


16.74 


82.9 


43.84 


34.0 


10.56 


20.2 


41.40 


56.3 


29.75 


40.1 


Jun. 10 


16.30 


85.4 


43.86 


33.5 


10.57 


22.4 


41.43 


67.7 


29.81 


40.0 


20 


15.76 


87.6 


43.84 


32.9 


10.53 


24.5 


41.42 


59.0 


29.83 


• 40.0 


30 


15.11 


89.4 


43.79 


32.3 


10.45 


26.3 


41.38 


60.3 


29.82 


39.8 


July 10 


14.41 


90.6 


43.72 


31.8 


10.35 


27.9 


41.32 


61.4 


29.78 


39.7 


20 


13.65 


91.4 


43.62 


31.2 


10.22 


29.3 


41-23 


62.4 


29.70 


39.5 


30 


12.86 


91.6 


43.61 


30.6 


10.07 


30.3 


41.11 


63.2 


29.69 


39.2 


Aug. 9 


12.04 


91.3 


43.37 


30.1 


9.90 


30.9 


40-97 


63.9 


29.46 


38.9 


19 


11.24 


90.5 


43.22 


29.6 


9.71 


31.2 


40-32 


64.4 


29.31 


38.5 


29 


10.45 


89.2 


43.07 


29.2 


9.52 


31.2 


40-66 


64.6 


29.14 


38.1 


Sept. 8 


9.70 


87.4 


42.93 


28.8 


9.33 


30.8 


40-50 


64.7 


28.97 


37.7 


18 


9.00 


85.1 


42.79 


28.5 


9.14 


30.0 


40-34 


64.5 


28.81 


37.2 


28 


8.39 


82.4 


42.67 


28.3 


8.98 


28.9 


40-20 


64.1 


28.66 


36.7 


Oct. 8 


7.83 


79.4 


42.59 


28.3 


8.85 


27.4 


4009 


63.5 


23.53 


36.3 


18 


7.47 


76.1 


42.54 


28.4 


8.75 


25.5 


40-01 


62.6 


28.44 


35.9 


28 


. 7.20 
^ 7.07 


72.5 


42.53 


28.7 


8.69 


23.4 


39-96 


61-5 


23.39 


35.6 


Nov. 7 


68.4 


42.57 
"42.67 


29.2 


. 8.6S 
^ 8.73 


20.9 


39-97 
"40-03 


00.1 


28.39 


35.4 


17 


7.10 


64.0 


30.0 


18.0 


58.3 


.28.43 
^28.65 


35.4 


27 


7.29 


60.9 


42.81 


31.0 


8.8.'3 


15.2 


40-13 


66.5 


35.6 


Dec. 7 


7.63 


57.3 


43.00 


32.2 


8.98 


12.3 


40-28 


54.5 


28.70 


36.0 


17 


8.11 


54.0 


43.23 


33.6 


9.18 


9.4 


40-48 


62.5 


28.91 


36.5 


27 


8.73 


51.1 


43.60 


35.1 


9.42 


6.5 


40-72 


60.4 


29.16 


37.3 


37 


0.45 


48.6 


43.79 


36.6 


9.70 


3.9 


40-98 


49.3 


29.43 


93.2 



1845.] APPARENT PLACES OF THE PRINCIPAL FIXED STARS. 

2Wi€ JpparevU Placet of Thirty-seven of the Principal Fixed Stars, for every 

tenth day of the year. 

Epoch. — The Upper Culmination at Greenwich. 



6^ 





a Scorpionia. 
{Antares.) 


a Ophiachi. 


a Lyra. 
( Vega.) 


^Aqoils. 


a AqailB. 
{AJUair,) 




6 

t 


• 
• 


• 

o 

< 

.» 


• 

1 

• 




• 
• 


• 

s 
< 


1 

• 

n 




1 

• 


h. m. 


o 


h. m. 


e 


h. m. 


o 


h. m. 


o 


h. m. 


• • 




16 19 


26 


17 27 


12 


18 31 


38 


19 17 


2 


19 43 


8 


1845. 
Jan. 1 


■ec. 
54.82 


1 II 
4 50.9 


44.02 


40 40.5 


■ee. 
40.33 


1 II 
36 36.1 


MC. 

.4O..')0 
^40.61 


/ II 
48 42.1 


MC. 

12.83 


1 n 

27 61.8 


n 


55.11 


51.4 


44.21 


36.4 


40.45 


33.0 


40.6 


.12.89 
" 13.00 


60.3 


21 


55.43 


62.0 


44.44 


36.4 


40.61 


30.0 


40.74 


39^ 


43.6 


31 


55.76 


52.7 


44.69 


34.6 


40.82 


27.3 


4a91 


38.1 


13.14 


47.1 


Feb.lO 


56.10 


63.6 


44.96 


33.1 


41.07 


24.9 


41.10 


37.0 


13.31 


45.B 


20 


56.44 


54.3 


46.24 


31.9 


41.35 


23.0 


41.32 


36.2 


13.51 


44.7 


Mar. 2 


56.77 


55.1 


45.53 


31.1 


41.66 


21.5 


41.56 


35.7 


13.73 


43.9 


12 


57.09 


65.9 


45.82 


30.7 


41.97 


20.6 


41.61 


35.4 


13.97 


43.5 


22 


57.39 


56.7 


46.11 


30.7 


42.30 


20.2 


42.08 


36.4 


14.23 


43.4 


Apr. 1 


57.67 


57.4 


46.39 


31.2 


42.63 


20.6 


42.93 


35.3 


14.50 


43.6 


11 


57.93 


58.0 


46.65 


32.0 


42.96 


21.4 


42.65 


36.5 


14.79 


44.3 


21 


58.17 


53.5 


46.90 


33.2 


43.26 


22.8 


42.93 


37.5 


15.06 


45.3 


May 1 


56.39 


69.0 


47.13 


34.7 


43.59 


24.6 


43.22 


38.7 


15.37 


46.6 


11 


58.58 


50.5 


47.34 


36.4 


43.67 


26.9 


43.50 


40.2 


15.66 


43.2 


21 


58.73 


69.9 


47.63 


38.2 


44.12 


29.6 


43.76 


41.8 


16.93 


60.0 


31 


58.86 


60.3 


47.68 


40.2 


44.34 


32.5 


44.00 


43.6 


16.19 


61.9 


Jan. 10 


58.94 


60.6 


47.80 


42.2 


44.61 


35.6 


44.22 


46.4 


16.43 


64.0 


20 


56.96 


60.9 


47.38 


44.2 


44.64 


36.6 


44.41 


47.2 


16.64 


66.1 


30 


59.00 


61.1 


47.93 


46.2 


44.72 


41.7 


44.67 


48.9 


16.81 


58.fl 


July 10 


56.97 


61.2 


47.94 


48.0 


44.76 


44.7 


44.68 


60.6 


16.94 


60.9 


20 


56.91 


61.3 


47.91 


49.6 


44.74 


47.6 


44.76 


52.1 


17.04 


03.1 


30 


53.31 


61.3 


47.84 


51.0 


44.67 


50.3 


44.78 


63.5 


17.09 


63.8 


Anff. 9 


68.67 


61.3 


47.74 


S2.2 


44.56 


68.6 


44.77 


64.7 


17.09 


65.4 


19 


58.52 


61.1 


47.60 


53.2 


44.40 


64.7 


44.71 


56.7 


17.05 


66.8 


29 


53.34 


60.8 


47.44 


53.9 


44.21 


56.3 


44.62 


56.5 


16.97 


67.9 


Sept. 8 


56.16 


60.4 


47.26 


54.4 


43.96 


57.6 


44.49 


57.2 


16.86 


68.8 


18 


57.98 


59.0 


47.06 


54.6 


43.73 


58.4 


44.34 


67.6 


16.72 


69.5 


28 


57.91 


59.3 


46.89 


54.5 


43.47 


58.8 


44.17 


67.3 


16.56 


60.9 


Oct. 8 


67.66 


66.7 


46.71 


64.1 


43.22 


58.7 


43.99 


67.8 


16.39 


70.0 


18 


57.64 


68.1 


46.55 


63.4 


42.97 


56.2 


43.81 


57.6 


16.21 


60.0 


28 


67.47 


57.5 


46.41 


52.4 


42.73 


67.2 


43.66 


67.3 


16.04 


60.6 


Nov. 7 


57.44 


56.9 


46.31 


61.2 


42.52 


55.7 


43.61 


56.7 


15.68 


60.0 


17 


57.47 


66.4 


46.26 


49.7 


42.35 


63.8 


43.39 


55.9 


15.75 


66.2 


27 


^57.56 


56.2 


46.25 


47.9 


42.23 


61.5 


43.30 


65.0 


15.64 


67.S 


Dec. 7 


57.70 


56.0 


^46.26 
^46.38 


46.0 


42.16 


46.9 


43.26 


63.9 


15.57 


66.0 


17 


67.89 


66.1 


43.7 


42.14 


46.1 


43.25 


62.7 


15.54 


64.6 


27 


56.13 


56.3 


46.51 


41.6 


. 42.17 
^42.27 


43.1 


43.28 


61.4 


15.66 


63.1 


37 


58.40 


66.7 

_£ 


46.68 


30.4 


39.6 


43,36 


60.1 


15.50 


61.6 



68 



APPAUtlfT YLAOSS OF THE PUlfOIPAL FIXED STABS. 



[1845. 



SVw JtffomA FlaciM of Thirty-itvm of the Bindpal Fixed Stan^ for ofeqf 

tenth day of the year, 

£poch.^Tlie Upper Culn^natioa at Oreenwich. 





a Cygni. 


<e C«phel. 


o Aqoarii. 


aPigcAaitralis. 


flt Peffasi. 




w ^ 












(FomaUutta,) 


{Marltab^ 




1 


i 


i 


1 


4 


• 


i 


• 


i 


1 








1 


• 

A 


04 


i 


1 


i 


1 


• 

A 


lum. 


• 


h. m. 


e 


h. in. 


• 


h. m. 


e 


h. m. 


• 




90 96 


44 


2114 


61 


21 57 


1 


22 49 


80 


22 57 


14 


1845. 




1 tt 


■ec 


# n 


■ee 


« H 


we. 


1 n 


■ee. 


.' If 


Jan. 1 


8.14 


43 56.2 


61.16 


55 67.8 


49.33 


8 68.0 


4.36 


26 34.3 


3.02 


22 31J» 


11 


6.09 


55.5 


50.96 


65.1 


49.29 


68.7 


4.26 


33.9 


2.93 


90.1 


21 


^ 8.15 


52.6 


60.64 


62J. 


49.27 


69.5 


4.19 


33J2 


235 


283 


31 


49.3 


, 50.78 
^50.82 


59.0 


49.28 


70.1 


4.14 


32.2 


230 


27.6 


Feb.lO 


8^ 


46.5 


55.4 


.49.31 
^49.39 


70.6 


4.12 


31.0 


2.77 


26^ 


20 


8.42 


43.6 


50.94 


52.3 


71.1 


4.14 


295 


2.77 


25.1 


Mar. 2 


QM 


41.5 


61.14 


494 


49.49 


71 J2 


^4.19 
^ 4.29 


27.9 


3.oa 


24.1 


12 


8J87 


39.6 


5141 


46.9 


49.63 


71.1 


25.9 


23J2 


22 


0.16 


38.2 


51.75 


44.7 


49.79 


70JB 


442 


23.9 


22.6 


Apr. 1 


9.43 


37.4 


52.16 


43.1 


49.98 


705 


4.50 


21.7 


3.14 


22^ 


11 


0.62 


37.1 


ffi.61 


42a 


50.21 


60.4 


4.79 


19.5 


3.3ii 


224 


21 


10.18 


37.4 


53.10 


41.6 


50.46 


68.2 


5.08 


17.2 


3^ 


22.9 


May 1 


10.55 


38.3 


53^ 


41.8 


50.73 


66.9 


5.30 


15.0 


3.79 


23.7 


11 


10.02 


39.7 


54.14 


42.6 


51.02 


65.3 


5.60 


12.9 


4.07 


243 


21 


11.28 


41.6 


54^ 


44.0 


51.32 


63.5 


5.92 


10.7 


4.37 


26.2 


31 


11.62 


44.0 


55.16 


45.9 


51.63 


61.6 


6.26 


6.7 


4.68 


27.9 


Jim. 10 


IISQ 


48.7 


55.62 


48.3 


51.93 


59.7 


6.60 


7.0 


4.99 


29.9 


20 


12.21 


49.7 


56.08 


51.1 


52.22 


57.8 


6.95 


5.5 


5.30 


32.0 


30 


12.45 


53.0 


56.30 


54.2 


S2.50 


55.0 


7.28 


4.3 


5.60 


34.2 


July 10 


12.63 


56.3 


56.66 


57.6 


52.75 


54.0 


7.59 


3.4 


538 


96.5 


20 


12.78 


50.7 


56.60 


61.1 


52.96 


52.4 


7.87 


2.8 


6.14 


363 


30 


12.84 


63.0 


57.08 


64.8 


53.13 


50.8 


8.12 


2.6 


64)6 


41.0 


Aug. 9 


12.86 


66.2 


57.00 


68.4 


63.27 


49.5 


6.32 


2.8 


6.55 


43.1 


19 


12.82 


69.2 


57>06 


72.0 


53.36 


48.4 


6.48 


3.2 


6.09 


45.1 


29 


19.73 


72.0 


66.96 


75.4 


53.41 


47.5 


6.59 


4.0 


6.79 


46.9 


Sept. 8 


12.50 


74.6 


56.79 


7Br6 


53.41 


46.8 


8.65 


5.0 


635 


46.6 


18 


12.40 


78.7 


56.55 


81.5 


53.38 


40.3 


8.66 


6.2 


6.87 


50.0 


28 


12.18 


78.5 


56.25 


84.1 


53.31 


46.1 


6.63 


7.5 


638 


51.1 


Oct. 8 


11.94 


7«.8 


55.90 


86.3 


53.21 


46.0 


6.56 


9.0 


631 


52*0 


18 


11.66 


80.7 


55.52 


88.0 


53.09 


46.1 


6.45 


10.4 


6.73 


52.7 


28 


11.41 


81.1 


55.12 


89.2 


53.96 


46.4 


8.32 


11.7 


6*63 


53-1 


Nov. 7 


11.15 


81.0 


54.70 


89.8 


5S.82 


46.8 


8.17 


13.0 


6.52 


53.2 


17 


10.90 


60.4 


54.28 


89.9 


52.68 


47.3 


6.01 


14.0 


6.89 


53.1 


27 


10.67 


79.3 


53.87 


89.4 


52.55 


47.9 


7.85 


14.9 


6.26 


523 


Dec. 7 


10.47 


77.7 


53.49 


88.4 


52.43 


48.6 


7.69 


15.5 


6.13 


52*9 


17 


10.31 


75.7 


53.15 


86.8 


62.32 


49.4 


7.54 


15.8 


6.00 


51*4 


27 


10.19 


73.3 


62.85 


84.7 


52.24 


50.2 


7.41 


15.8 


5.89 


50-5 


37 


10.12 


70.7 


52.02 


82.2 


52.18 


51.0 


7.30 


15.6 


6.78 


40<) 



1845.] 



DR. TOUKS'8 SBFKACTIONS. 



69 



Dr. Young't Refractions^ the Barometer being at 30 inches, and the inter- 
nal Thermometer at 50, or the external at 47, degrees; with the correc- 
tions for + one inch in the barometer, and for — one degree in the ther- 
mometer of Fahrenheit. From page 19 o/ Vol. \st of Bearson's Practictd 
Astronomy. 



• 

< 


cqS 


«2ffl 




*3 
< 


cqS.2« 




< 




<Sn 




• 






5£ 


• 


1 n 


H 


O 1 


< 

o ' 


H 
1 ff 


Q + 
u 


n 


1 

• 1 




5+ 


Q 1 


1 

o 1 




5+ 

a 


Q i 


' u 


u 


N 


1 11 


a 


;«.,')i 


74 


8;1 


3. 

• 


14.35 


30 


2^ 


8. 


6.35 


13,3 


,95 


14. 


3.49,9 


7,70 


,460 


5 


32.53 


71 


7,6 


5 


14.10 


29 


2,2 


10 


6.23 


13,1 


,93 


10 


3.47,1 


7,61 


,464 


10 


31.53 


69 


7,3 


10 


14. 4 


29 


2,2 


20 


6.21 


12,3 


,92 


20 


3.44,4 


7,52 


,458 


16 


31. 5 


67 


7,0 


15 


13.50 


28 


2,1 


30 


6.14 


12,6 


,80 


303.41,8 


7,43 


,453 


20 


30.13 


65 


6,7 


20 


13.35 


2S 


V 


40 


6. 7 


12,3 


,79 


403.39,2 


7,34 


,443 


25 
30 


29.24 
28.37 


63 
61 


6,4 
6,1 


25 
30 


13.21 
13. 7 


27 
27 


2,0 
2,0 


SO 
0. 


6. 


12,1 

11,9 


,77 
,76 


60 
15. 


3.36,7 


7,26 

7,18 


,444 
,439 


5.54 


3.34,3 


35 


27.51 


59 


5,9 


35 


12.53 


26 


2,0 


10 


5.47 


11,7 


?74 


30j3.27,3 


6,95 


,424 


40 


27. 


flR 


5,6 


40 


12.41 


26 


1,9 


20 


5.41 


11,6 


,73 


16. 3.20,6 


6,73 


,411 


45 


36.24 


56 


6,4 


45 


1^.28 


25 


1,9 


30 


5.36 


11,3 


,72 


30 3.14,4 


6,51 


,399 


50 


25.43 


55 


5,1 


50 


12.16 


25 


1,9 


40 


5.30 


11,1 


?71 


17. 3. 8,5 


6,31 


,386 


55 
1. 


25. 3 


53 


4,9 


55 
4. 


12. 3 
11.52 


25 
24,1 


1,8 
1,70 


50 


5.25 


11,0 
10,8 


,70 
,60 


30 
18. 


3. 2,9 


6,12 
5,94 


,374 
,362 


24.25 


52 


10. 


5.20 


2.57,6 


5 


23.4d 


50 


4,6 


10 


11..30 


23,4 


1,64 


10 


5.15 


10,6 


,67 


19 


2.47,7 


5,61 


,340 


10 


23.13 


49 


4,5 


20 


11.10 


22,7 


1,58 


20 


5.10 


10,4 


,65 


20 


2.38,7 


5,31 


,322 


15 


22.40 


48 


4,4 


30 


10.50 


22,0 


1,53 


30 


5. 6 


10,2 


,64 


21 


2.30,5 


5,04 


,305 


20 


22. 8 


46 


4,2 


40 


10.32 


21,3 


1,48 


40 


5. 


10,1 


,63 


22 


2.23,2 


4,79 


,290 


25 
90 


21.37 
21. 7 


45 
44 


4,0 
3,9 


50 
5. 


10.15 
9.59 


20,7 
20,1 


1.43 
1,38 


50 


4.56 


9,9 

9,8 


,62 
,60 


23 
24 


2.16,5 


4,57 
4,35 


,276 
,264 


11. 


4.51 


2.10,1 


35 


20.33 


43 


3,8 


10 


9.42 


19,6 


1,34 


10 


4.47 


9,6 


,59 


25 


2. 4,2 


4,16 


,252 


40 


20.10 


42 


3,6 


20 


9.27 


19,1 


1,30 


20 


4.43 


9,5 


,58 


26 


1.58,9 


3,97 


,241 


45 


10.43 


40 


3,6 


30 


9.11 


18,6 


1,26 


30 


4.39 


9,4 


,67 


^ 


1.53,8 


3,91 


,230 


60 


19.17 


39 


3,4 


40 


8.58 


18,1 


1,22 


40 


4.36 


9,2 


,66 


28 


1.49,1 


3,65 


,219 


65 

2. 


18.52 
18.29 


39 
33 


3,3 
3,2 


50 
6. 


8.45 
8.32 


17,6 
17,2 


1,19 
1,15 


50 
12. 


4.31 


9,1 
9,00 


,55 

,556 


29 
30 


1.44,7 


3,50 
3,36 


,209 
,201 


4.28,1 


1.40,5 


5 


18. 5 


37 


3,1 


10 


8.20 


16,8 


1,11 


10 


4.24,4 


8,86 


,548 


31 


1.36,6 


3,23 


,193 


10 


17.43 


36 


3,0 


20 


8. 9 


16,4 


1,09 


20 


4.20,8 


8,74 


,541 


32 


1.33,0 


3,11 


,196 


15 


17.21 


36 


2,9 


30 


7.58 


16)0 


1,06 


30 


4.17,3 


8,63 


,533 


33 


1J»,5 


2,99 


,179 


20 


17. 


35 


2,8 


40 


7.47 


15,7 


1,03 


40 


4.13,9 


8,51 


,524 


34 


1.26,1 


2,88 


,173 


25 

30 


16.40 
16.21 


34 

as 


2,8 
2,7 


50 
7. 


7.37 
7.27 


15,3 
16,0 


1,00 

,98 


60 
13. 


4.10,7 


8,11 
8,30 


,517 
,509 


36 


1.23,0 


2,78 
2,68 


,167 
,161 


4. 7,5 


1.20,0 


35 


16. 2 


33 


2,7 


10 


7.17 


14,6 


,95 


10 


4. 4,4 


8,20 


,503 


37 


1.17,1 


2,68 


,155 


40 


15.43 


32 


2,6 


20 


7. 8 


14,3 


,98 


20 


4. 1,4 


8,10 


,496 


33 


1.14,4 


2,49 


,140 


46 


15.25 


32 


2,5 


30 


6.59 


14,1 


,91 


30 


3.58,4 


3,00 


,490 


30 


1.11,8 


2,40 


,144 


60 


15. 6 


31 


2,4 


40 


6.61 


13,8 


,89 


40 


3.55,5 


7,39 


,482 


40 


1. 0,3 


2,32 


,139 


65 


14.51 


30 


2,3 


50 


6.43 


13,5 


,87 


50 


3.52,6 


7,79 


,476 


41 


1. 6,9 


2,24 


,134 



70 



8UZf'« PAKAlrLAX IH AhTlTVDK. 



[1S4& 



Table of JUfractionSf conHnued, 



i 


d^ 


5«- 


i£ 


< 


dS 


&» 


ai 


• 


d« 


•2d 


H 


< 


nh 




&i 


< 


1^ 


f^ 


57 


• 

• 


1^ 


II 


ri 

u 


1 

• 


f4 




r7 

II 


1 

• 






II 


c 


1 N 


II 


• 


II 


H 


42 


1.4,6 


2,16 


,130 


55 


40,8 


1,36 


,082 


67 


24,7 


,83 


,050 


79 


11,2 


,38 


,023 


43 


1.8,4 


2,09 


,125 


56 


39,3 


1,31 


,079 


68 


23,5 


,79 


,047 


60 


10,2 


^ 


,021 


44 


1. 0,3 


2,02 


,120 


57 


37;8 


1,26 


,078 


69 


22,4 


,75 


,046 


81 


9,2 


,31 


,018 


45 


58,1 


1,96 


,116 


58 


36,4 


1,22 


,073 


70 


21,2 


,71 


,043 


92 


8,2 


,27 


,oiq 


45 


56,1 


1,38 


,112 


59 


35,0 


1,17 


,070 


71 


19,9 


,67 


,040 


W 


7,1 


,24 


,oid 


47 


54,2 


1^81 
1,75 


,104 


60 
61 


:«{,« 


1.12 
1,08 


,067 
,065 


72 
73 


18,9 


^63 
,69 




84 
66 


6,1 


,20 
>17 


,010 


4S 


52,3 


32,3 


17,7 


5,1 


49 


fiO,S 


1,60 


,101 


on 


31,0 


1,04 


,062 


74 


16,6 


,66 


,033 


86 


4,1 


,14 


,008 


50 


48,8 


1,63 


,097 


63 


29,7 


,99 


,060 


76 


15,5 


;® 


,031 


87 


3,1 


,10 


,006 


51 


47,1 


1,58 


,094 


64 


98,4 


,95 


,067 


76 


14,4 


,48 


,029 


H8 


8,0 


,07 


,004 


& 


46,4 


1,S2 


,090 


65 


27,2 


,91 


^wm 


77 


1«,4 


,45 


,027 


89 


1,0 


,08 


,oota 


58 


43,8 


1,47 


,688 


66 


25,0 


,87 


,to3 


79 


12,3 


;« 


,025 


90 


0,0 


,00 


,00M 


54 


42,2 


1,41 


,0861 


67 


24,7 


^83 


H 


79 


n,2 


,38 


^023 








1 



The correction for an increase of altitude of one inch in the barometer, 
or for a depression of one degree in the thermometer, is to be etdded to the 
tabular refraction ; but when the barometer is lower than 30 inches, or 
the thermometer higher than 47 degrees, the correction becomes ntbtrac- 
five. 

When great accuracy is required, 0,003 inch should be deducted from 
the observed height of the barometer, for each degree that the thermome- 
ter netr it is above 50 degrees, and the same quantity added fox an equal 
depression. 



ji Table of the SwCe Parallax in JlUitude, 



San's 
Altit. 


^un's Horisontal Parallax. 


Sun's 
Ahit 


San^B Horisontal Paxallaz. 




i» 


If 


« 


u 


n 


If 


ii 


ji 


<i 


M 


• 


8.4 


8.5 


8.6 


8.7 


8.8 


e 


8.4 


8.5 


8.6 


8.7 


8.8 





8.40 


8.50 


8.60 


8.70 


8.80 


46 


5.94 


6U)1 


6U)8 


6.15 


6.22 


5 


8.37 


8.47 


8.57 


8.67 


8.77 


50 


6.40 


5.46 


5.53 


6.59 


5.66 


10 


8.27 


8.37 


8.47 


8.57 


8.67 


55 


4.82 


4.88 


4.98 


4.99 


5.05 


15 


8.11 


8.21 


8.31 


8.40 


8.60 


60 


4i20 


4.25- 


4.30 


4.35 


4.40 


20 


7.89 


7.99 


8.06 


8.18 


8J27 


65 


3.55 


3.60 


3.63 


3.68 


3.72 


25 


7.61 


7.70 


7.79 


7.88 


7.98 


70 


2.87 


2.91 


2.94 


2.96 


3U)1 


30 


7J» 


7^ 


7.45 


7.53 


7.62 


75 


2.17 


2.20 


2.23 


2J36 


2.28 


86 


6.88 


6.96 


7.04 


7.13 


7J21 


80 


1.46 


148 


1.40 


1-51 


1-53 


40 


6.44 


6.61 


6.60 


6.66 


6.74 


85 


0.73 


0.74 


0.75 


0.76 


0.77 


45 


6.94 


6.01 


6.08 


6.16 


6.23 


90 


0.00 


O.OQ 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 



Logarithm for converting Sidereal into Mean Solar Time 
** " ** Mean Solar into Sidereal Time 

A second of time, at the Equator, contains 1521 feet 



+ 9.9988126 
+ 0.0011874 



n METEOEOLOGICAL INFOEMATION. 



L METEOROLOGICAL TABLES FOR CAMBRIDGE, ilAss. 
Summary of tktMitoroii^ical Obtavationi madt at the Obiavaloiy 6/ Ear- 
vtB-d 0>Uigt. By W. O-onfA Bond. JTortA Lai. AT' 23'. Lon. Wat of 
Grtaanchjll" nv. From May lH, VMS, t« Slay Ut,l8ii. 



2. WiRDB AHB CCOUDB. 





Haalhlt Mui of Uh fane at 

Ih. Wind. 0-6, .tUnhoQn. 


u«iu>iri»>»oroi<ttdt. 






0-l5,«ll«l««nr^ 
























H>u, 


a£h^ 


Honlli. 


Ban. 

liM. 


A.H. 


P.M. 


p.V 




Sdd- 
riH. 


A.H. 


P. U. 


F. M 


«d> 


^ 


1843. 
























May, 




1.S 




1.0 


13 


5.5 


S3 


5.0 


35 


g.Bfl 


2.166 


Jani, 


1.4 


1.1 




6 


1.1 


1.3 


4.3 


3,7 


e.7 


<A 


4.50 


5.377 


July, 


1.3 


1.6 




.9 


1,3 


1.5 


4,3 


8,8 


3.9 


3.8 


3.6S 


9470 


Septen^T, 




1.0 




6 


15 


1.2 


6,8 


63 


5* 


5.0 


5.70 


&740 


l!3 


1.4 




5 


1.0 


1.3 


4.3 


4,1 


4.7 


A& 


4.4S 


1.530 


OctobeT, 


1.3 


1.4 








1,4 


53 


4.9 


5.5 


4.6 


S.07 


5*14 




1.5 


IS 




S 


(i.i 


15 


4.0 


5.6 


5.5 


5.0 


S.08 


4.196 


Decembei! 


1.3 


1.2 




4 


1.3 


1,3 


as 


6.6 


73 


63 


6.62 


3344 


1814. 




























1.4 


1.4 




7 


1,5 


1.5 


4,6 


4.8 


4.3 


4.0 


4^ 


4594 


S^' 


13 


1.8 


1 


4 


0,9 


IJi 


45 


5,0 


5.0 


5.3 


4.S5 


3.033 


i.e 


1.6 




B 


1.3 


1.5 


6.1 


5.9 


73 


7.0 


6.58 


5.844 


April, 


1.1 


IZ 


] 


4 




1-2) 


S.0 


5.3 


4.8 


4.B 


4.95 


0343 


Me>n, 


T33 


T30 


1 


eo 


Tn 


1335:06 


"5:56 


"531 


"550 


"Tn 


46.140 






■ 























Mean Tempera, at 
the hours mentioned 



73 MSTXOBOLOOICAL INFOBMATIOH. [1845. 

* The figures in this column express the difference between the two 
preceding columns. 

The greatest range of the barometer, in 24 hours, was on the 12th and 
13th of February, =1.260 inches. 

The barometer was 
Lowest, February 13th, at 9 JL M.=29.044,— attached thermometer, 50' 
Highest, April 2d, at 9, A. M.,=30.826,— « " 35- 

Extreme range during the year, 1.782. 

The mean height of the barometric column, at the hours specified above, 
during the year, was 29.968 ; its cistern being 44 feet above the mean 
level of high water, Charles River, at Brighton Bridge. 

' for the year, 45.80 

of the Spring mo's. 45.57 

Summer 67.77 M. of Sum. & Win, 45.02. 
Autumn 47.40 M. of Spr. & Aut. 46.48. 
Winter 22.27 

Mean of Summer's heat, at 3, P. M. 76.87 
Maximum heat, June 24-27, July 22, -f- 91.0 
Minimum " Jan. 12, — 9.0 

Range of thermometer during the year, 100.0 

The external thermometer, Fahrenheit's scale, has entire exposure on 
the north side of the building ; the sun never shines directly upon it, and it 
is affected by reflected heat only occasionally, at the 3 P.M. observation, 
and this probably to a small amount ; it is fixed on a bracket projecting 
six inches from the wall, and is six feet above the surface of the ground. 
The barometric observations have been corrected for capillary action, 
and reduced to the temperature of 32° Fahrenheit, but not for elevation. 
The rain gauge is a cubical box of zinc, 10 inches by the side, and rests 
on the surface of the ground. 

The hours of observation adopted in these tables, are those generally 
used by observers in England. The mode of notation for the winds and 
clouds also deserves notice. In the former case, denotes a perfect calm, 
and 6 the greatest violence of the wind. In the latter case, denotes a 
sky without any clouds, and 10 a sky completely overcast. As uniformity 
in these tables is very desirable, it is to be wished that this method 
should be adopted by observers throughout the country. 



1845.] 



MSTSOBOLOOICAI. IM FORMATION. 



7a 



II. METEOROLOGICAL TABLES FOR SACO, Mk. 

Lot, 43- 31' iV., Long. 70* 26' W. 

By John M. Batchelder. 



1843. 



July, 

Aug. 

Sept. 

O.t, 

.\ov. 

Uec. 

1844. 
Jan. 
Feb. 
Mar. 
April, 
May, 
Jane, 



Monthly Means of 
Barometer. 






30.01230 
30.09730 
30.101 
29.948 



30.072 






&< 
t^ 



02030.01630.016 
09330.13330.106 



S 



30.06930.10030.097 
29.9.'55 29.957 29.9.53 
30.06230.07230.069 
30.066 30.063 30.082 30.077, 



30.00329. 

30.032 30, 

S0.06530 

30.223 

29.999 

30.025 



Mean, 130.055 



29. 
29. 
.30 



989 
108 
061 
866 
976 
020 



30.025 



29 

30 
30 
30. 
29. 
GO 



99929.997; 

12930.090 

1-09530.074 

30.100 

29.9S8 

02630.024 



212 

C9() 



30.06830.049 



Monthly 
Attached Tl 


Means of 


Monthly 
External TIi 


Menna 


I of 


ierm»meter. 


lermometer. 


)i 


^ 


^ 




• 


^ 


si 




-i 


o; 


a: 


. 


• 

< 


• 


(C 


j 


t* 


Ol 


t* 


9 


t* 


09 


t* 


< 


< 


70.97 


i 


^ 


^ 


5i 


67.96 


66.74 


72.00 


69.90 


64.64 


69.74 


69.51 


68.71 


75.5i 


70J)2 


71.52 


67.36 


76.03 


60.61 


71.00 


64.07 


67.26 


66.53 


65.95 


59.93 


69.90 


6:3.00 


64.28 


59.65 


63.22 


62.97 


61.93 


44.81 


63.6- 


45.48 


47.99 


56.30 


62.7.) 


66.60 


61.87 


28.93 


38.00 


30.50 


32.48 


55.45 


63.32 


62.74 


€0.5) 


22.48 


31.0; 


IM.51 


26.20 


52.07 


62.07 


64.03 


59.30 


6.45 


20.94 


14.32 


13.9a 


54.59 


63.86 


64.69 


61.05 


13.56 


30.41 


21.55 


21.04 


57.29 


62.61 


64 23 


61.38 


26.01 


38.18 


30.42 


31.07 


61.03 


64.27 


64.80 


63.37 


40.40 


57.10 


44.50 


45.65 


58.19 


60.29 


61.67 


60.12 


51.94 


66.32 


52.32 


64.65 


64.23 


68.00 


66.93 


66.39 


62.40 


71.90 


62.23 


63.40 


59.86 


65.42 


65.56 


63.61 


40.79 


61.90 


48.99 


44.97 



2. Winds and Clouds. 





Monthly Means of 
Force of Wind. 


Monthly Meant of QlondA. 






















1^ 




^ 


S 


1^ 




t^ 


S 


^ 




Amoontof 
each mon 




• 

< 


o; 


o; 


• 


< 


o; 


• 

0* 


, 




t* 


Ol 


r«» 


9 


t* 


Ol 


»* 


9 


1843. 


•d 
< 


< 


^ 


i 


< 


^ 


5? 


a 


July, 


1.4 


2.1 


1.1 


1.53 












August, 


0.8 


1.6 


L4 


1.27 












September, 


1.6 


2.0 


1.1 


1.57 










0.864 


October, 


1.4 


2.2 


1.5 


L70 










6.013 


November, 


1.8 


1.8 


1.5 


1.70 










4.146 


December, 


1.0 


1.6 


1.5 


1.33 










2.028 


Xb44* 




















January, 


0.8 


1.2 


1.6 


1,20 


3.3 


3.7 


4.1 


3.70 


4.446 


February, 


1.2 


1.6 


1.6 


1.47 


4.4 


4.3 


4.8 


4.50 


1.626 


March, 


2.0 


2.4 


1.9 


2.10 


6.7 


6.0 


4.5 


6.07 


6.219 


April, 
May, ' 


1.3 


1.8 


1.4 


1.50 


4.0 


3.0 


4.6 


4.17 


OMO 


1.3 


2.4 


1.7 


1.80 


4.0 


6.3 


6.6 


6.27 


3.076 


Jane, 


1.3 


2.5 


1.5 


1.77 


4.7 
4.50 


4.9 
4.62 


4.1 


4.ff7 


2.424 


Mean, 


1.32 


1.93 


1.48 


1.56 


4.62 


4.56 


31.676 



Maximum heat, September 4, 1843, +90' ) 

Minimum heat, January 28, 1844, —18* ) *^«®' ^^^' 



74 KenOBOLOQIOJlK. IMrOUHTIOH. [lS43. 

Th« T«por ttota the Mis of Saeo river {which are near the place of 
ohiervBlion ) cauiei an average iocrease ot temperature, in very cold 
weather, of about six degrees. On the morning of Jan S6, the thermo- 
meter, at the diitance of half a mile from the falls, was — SS*. 
Numher of iall* of snow, S4 ; aggregate depth of snow, 7 feet 
Bifer cloaed bj ice, Deceajber lat ; river opened, March SS. 

IIL METEOROLOGICAL TABLES FOR DOVER, N. H. 

Lai. 43- 13' N., Long. ^0' 5i'W. 

For (if Ytari 1833-1843; by Ata J. Tlyli. 

1. T*atB »0E Tbn TKiBs.— Part. I 







Table ro 


B Tbk Tbabb. 


-Part IL 








1 


Tb.niK.B.tt.t. 


■5 

1 


We.tl«t. 


|1 

1 


i 


i 


1 
1 
1 


1 


1 


i 


1 
?.'i7 




■b 


1&33, 




Fan. 19 


US" 


July S2, 


107 45.1' 09 






Feb. 6 


9S 


July 26 


112,45.3 




vr),' 


.l.'i 


55 


63.5 












I27 43.J 




Wi*. 


m 






1836, 


— n 




9f* 


July « 


11542.! 


W 


v;i-; 


7W 


5- 


61.4 


1837, 


—IS 




!I5 


July 1 


113 43.; 


4.-. 


•JM 


5'^ 


fii 


61.3 


1638, 






ini 


July 5 


113 45.; 


7'.> 




45 


.■V 


65.7 


)&39, 


-u 




US 


July ao 


10946.! 


4:t 


■.M.-i 


r)(i 


fii 


63.4 




-14 


Jan. 17 


Ifl3 


July 17 














1S41, 


-IH 


Jan. 5 


m 




114 40.6 












1843, 


i—B 


Jan. 6 


«7 


'""» 


10547. 


52% 


256 


37 


73 


64.4 



3. Table for thb Tuts 1843. 



The coldest day in the year was January 13th ; mean of three obMr- 

valioOB, 2° above 0. 

The narmeat day ia the year wai July 2d ; mean of three obMmtioBI, 
81 K° above 0. 

The lowest temperature was 8° below 0. January etb. 

The highest lempenLlure was 97° above 0. July 3d. 

Range of the year, IDS'. 

IV. METEOBOLOGICAL TABLE FOR MENDON, Ma»». 

Zat. 42' 06' 33" N., Long. 11' 33' 33 " W. from GrtnoBich. 

Bt/ John Gto. Mctcalf, at D. Far tkt Tear 1842. 




V. METEOROLOGICAL TABLE FOB WOBCESTER,Mass. 

Lai. ii" 15' 49" N.; tUcaiion 4B3 firt ; for Ihe Year 1M3. 



TI. METEOROLOGICAL TABLES FOR AMHERST, M*ss. 

Lai. 42' 39' IS", Long. 72'3r36. 

I. Table op thk Weather for 1S43. 

From tht lUeleorological Journal of Amherit College, kepi by Profator SttiU, 





^ 


r 


■= 










. 


1 


1 


1 






































■< 


a 


f'' 


r^ 








p 


i.ch. 

as.TT 


Baron.. mcBn. 


nchJinch 


ncliJiiirli 


Hicli.ltn<'h.'iiiFh.;inch 






4b!h Ura 


5?ra W^ 


«•« 


^•n 


M?? 


BiroUlwraU 




























































































JU^^'-^f'^^j^J' 






s*w 




MS 


""Iri 




l'?7 


»!■!, 


;?. 


^'^ 


















































































































































■'■ "^''•'- inrM iimi idi ' liWi HiO 


II.H HWiiTOI U*.' IW i.W 1U.M-1U0 



CoMPitaisoM OF ra« ^AST Sivsn Ts^m. 



Ye.r. 


lear. 


1««. 


18». 


1640. 


.S41. 


1642. 


1643. 


M»n. 


FBilofWwer, 

luchBJOfS.Hl*, 

an«winwm.or 


SBAm 

38*.0J 

« 

1836-7 


3e.Bi 

M 

1837-8 


w.-m 

«.S3 

28 

l838-« 


afl.780 

47.W 

IS36-40 
4X 


4I.SS 

69 
1840-1 
8« 


38M 


1B4*J 
OX 


90.746 

«.80 



TIL METEOROLOGICAL TABLE FOB TRENTON, N. J. 

For tA< Yfor 1843; iy Dr. f. J. Eaing, 
Observations at Sunri«e, 2 P. AL, and 10 P. M. 



March, 

mS",' 

July,' 

Aug. 
Sept. 
Oct. 

Nov. 



Year, 



41 12742 
45:29. 

49.44 
40 97.19 



fIfs.SOX. 



ki 



Crocus, Peach, Cheir;. 



First Frost, 27tli. 
First Snow, 7th. 



Total Depth, 27 jacties. 



The hottest day of the year was July 2d, the mean of that day being 
65". There were 70 days, the mean temperature of which wa» 70", or 
above. The coldest day was February 13tb, its mean being 13°.33, 
There were 30 days, the mean temperature of which was 33=, or below. 
Only IS of the tains were accompanied with Uehtcing and thunder. 



78 

VIII. METEOROLOGICAL TABLES FOR LAMBERTVILLE, 

Hdnteheon Co., N.J. 
io(, 4I)'> 33' N. iong. 74''56'W.,-iv ac-. i.H. JV«™i. 

1. SUMUAKY ?0)t THE YeAB ENDIKO JuNE 30, 1814. 



(a) July 2.— (ft) Jan. 28.— (e) April 3v— (d) Jan. 17^e) July 2.— 
{/) Dec. 14.— (g) Jan.n^A) Jan. 31.— (t) July 37.— {» Feb. 17^(fc) Dec. 
34.— (() Feb. la.— (m) June 8.— (n) Jan. 4.— (o) Jan. 19.— {p) April 30^ 
(!) July 16.— (r) Feb. 5— (t) Jan. 26.— (J) May 4.— (u) July 19.-(p) June 
1.— (m) Jan. l.—{x) Dec. 38. 



3. Weati 



I Teai 



3 Jtrn: 



30, 1844. 



JfonU.^. 


S 


t 


i 


11 


-r 


i 


1 


t 


1! 


JiTy,'*l. 




"tr 




^s:47r 


April, 




"""a- 




*78i5- 


Augiiil, 








la.iBO 


M«y, 


















6.3ea 










a.44a 


O^ber, ' 






3* 




■"""^'eu. 


23 






IS.^tlt 










4:^40 


Yr- 1843, 






]37 


Sl.lM 














!15 
















4!«>S 


Yr leill 










Fehrui^, 






9 


1,089 


-Yr. 1840, 


31 





























Semark. — The figures in the above table, under the heads of " Clear," 
and " Cloudy," denote the number of days whkh were perfectly cliar, or 
tntirily riourfj, at the times when the respective entries were made, viz. at 7 
A- M., and at 2 and 9 P. M. ; and, so ^ as obsen'cd, during the day. 



IX. METEOROLOGICAL TABLES FOB SAVANNAH, G*. 
For Iht Tiar mding May 21(t, 1844; eommunicattd hy Dr. John F. Biiejf. 











^' 


Uonilia. 










•Hig H. 




)Lgwe.l. 


Tern*'™" 


™ 




s 






















S 


i s 




s 


!" 


V 


1£ 


» 


S 


i 


" 




S 


< 


( d; 


& 


< 




t 


^ 


ai 




1 




























Ih 


lU 


1 65 




i;,sh,'i 


SS 


74 


hfi 


7ft 


6.663 


7 


July,' 




l> 


n Fis 




74 Vh 


74 


77 


nn 


Wl 


5.41 oil Ol 








; 


74 VI 




7ft 


Hft 


SO 


7.360151 


Septembei, 




U4M 




W 71 


If 




•w. 


S1 


14S< 


', 




iihl^V 






i:i&. 


V 




7y 


m 










78fi« 


f 


aolfif 


4!> 


Kt 


67 


ns 


(KW; 


; 




ite 


lisop 


:nit4 


W 


47 


^!l 


fi! 


O.HW 


;■ 


1S44. January, 




68,Mai 


t;j(i';ii! 


111 


44 


1.14 


4H 


■i,7ii.'i 


i; 












4.". 


«2 


(Xl 


(J.4i; 


r 






77,65124 






S" 


fiS 




fi<Mf 




April, 


afi|7s 


94'7GI 1 




-w 


61 


7fi- 




Slfif 


:■ 


i^y,' 


wit 


96 63 


-' 


64 63 


73 


72 


86 


ri 


2.245 


_3 

72 


Annual Mean, 


1 


1 












37.170 



The holteat day was July 18th, 1843, when the thennooietet at 3 P. 
M. ttood at 96 degrees. The coldest day was January 27tb, 1844, when 
the thermometer at 7 A. M. stood at 20 degrees. 

The thermometer hangs in a southern piazza, 15 feet from the ground. 



^. 


q 


Highoil. 


1 


Low«l. 


Monlhly Meui. 


s 


S 

307S3 
.34 
,21 
.26 
.24 
.25 
.35 
.34 
.33 
.36 
.47 
.32 




s 

29.6S 
.97 
.87 
.93 
.66 
.DO 
,76 
t.51 
.70 
.71 
.97 
,76 


S 

.63 
,91 
.81 
.60 
.88 
.80 
.74 
.61 

'.m 

SO 


s 


i 


S 




1843. June, 
July,' 
August, 
Septem. 
October 
Novem. 
Decern. 

1844. January, 
Februa 
March, 
April, 
May, 


21 
13 
5 
30 
31 

■i9 
13 
6 
2 


■JU 


■JO 
30 
16 
26 
23 
21 
4f 
35 
37 

47 
33 


30 


ao'u 

34'20 
21 3 
2614 
2327 
25,11 

£!■? 

3324 
37 16 
47120 
23:13 


:iy 


95 

67 
V7 
91 

s 

92 
07 
95 
75 

80 


JO.ll 
.12 
.06 
.12 
.01 
.12 
.12 
.06 

!o9 
.18 


3U.10 
.10 
.06 
.11 
S9,99 
30.09 
.09 
.02 
.07 
.03 
.15 
.10 


30.11 
.11 

j)e 

30!99 
30.11 
.09 
.05 
.09 
.07 
.15 
.12 


Annual Mean. 




1 


1 















•Highest, 30.57 inches:— tLowest, 29.31 :— Range, 0,04. 



METEOROLOGICAL TABLE FOB AUGDSTA, G*. 
Zo(. 33* 28, Xot^. 81- 5i'. Bg Sam'l Himn HoOinMk, J. K. 
Obiervaiions at Sunrite, 1 P. Jl, and 9 P. M. 



J 




■^■ss;- 


We.lh«. 


11 




n:«i 




^ 

4?:^ 


j 


1 


1 
1 


1 


i 

1 


1 


1 




! 
Ii 


f 
1 


1 

1 


















































































r;- 




































































wm 


nfliw 


7STO 


BOJMih 
M.lEth 




n 




17 




1 


J» 


i^ 














































™^ 


SIS 


76M 


«a»«i 




« 


^ 


lU 


> 


J 


110 


a 














































V1J» 


1636 




TS-ffld 




















«.M 




M««., 


eoas 


70-51 


ea.es 


S34I 


43.S9 


loa 


w 


140 


71 


tI 


i40 


81 » 


S 


I.M 





Coldeal day, March 24th. Hottest day, July 18lh. 

March 6th, mowed for IS hours, and fell to Ihe depth of 15 iuchM t 

January 4th, a shock of earthquake at 9b. lOm. P. M. 

XI. METEOROLOGICAL TABLES FOE NEW ORLEANS, La. 

Lot. 99" 5T 30" a:, Long. W W. of GrameicK For tht Year 1842 ; beit^m 
Milrecl of a Journal kept by D. T. LiUtt, Ooirtiponding ibmbir of Ih* 
Louitiana Socitty of Nalwat Hiilory and Scitactt. 



1842. 


T.«^..u,. 


B.r,.e... 1 








^ 












a a 




^ 


S 


i 


a 








s 


£ 


1 1 j 










STs 






















M-(. 














53.aB5.1'57.i 


.^1,5 


id'M 


30.ai 


30.33 






54.8'(H.9;57.( 




;».( 


4h.( 


■.mv. 


30.15'30.15 


31 


March, 








W.( 


(0 21 


30.31 30.20 


Si 


April, 




v;,; 


VI.! 


lfl.( 


1011 


30.0930.09 


aoati 


?S)ft[ 


At 




76.3 83.576.; 


ID.I 


•Wf 


(M 


ton 


30.13 30.11 


30.3? 


99,1); 


.3i 




a.l&7.6'&0.f 


«.i 


iH( 


33.C 


inn! 


)o.og|3a.io 


30. 1^ 


9H.«: 


.a; 


July, 






>n( 


24.5 


<(j 1 ', 


30.1730J5 




;in.o( 


.a* 


August, 










tni'> 


30.13 30.11 




moi 


w 


78.7 835 77.* 






"HI 


mm 


30.06 30.07 




WW 






36.578.a!67J 


■n.( 


41..- 


4.1.; 


m.v 


30.13 30.11 


■M).'i4 


WH" 


.31 




56.4'65,9:S6.t 


«M 


m 


4S.( 


(o.n 


30,14 30.17 




,flt.K 


.w 


Decemher, 


48.260.5 51.1 


JsU,b 


Jl-C 


39.; 


jo.a7 


30.35 30.36 


30,57 


10.01 


.a 


Annual Mean, 


66.9 76.568.4 


93.5 


30.0 


63.5 


30.16 


30,1S30.14J 


30.S7 


B9-6ri 


771 



I54S.] 

3. Wbathek, Qd. 



...... 


1 




.r 
s 

lO 

5 
9 

12 

14 
18 

3 
13 

5 


c.™.,w,.a. 


1.9 

i; 

2.1 
1^2 

;5 

2.0 


i 

■s 
■| 
1 


~9 
3 
2 
5 
4 
2 
4 

n 

5 

14 


i 
1 

~3" 
4 




1 

s 

3 

4 

2 


2 
2 
2 
1 

2 

6 
9 


3 

1 

1 



1 


4 

22 


e 

4 
13 

S 
10 

13 
6 
9 

3 

a 

86 


1 

2 
3 
2 


4 

4 
6 
3 

16 
5 

e 

4 
2 
3 


1 
1 

2 
3 
3 
4 

a 

3 
4 

3 
35 


January, 
February, 

March, 
April, 

E: 

Joiy, 

August, 
October, 


b 

b 
b 
5 
a 


4 

a 
n 

9 


13 
13 
IS 
13 
18 
19 
19 
13 

11 

9 

n 


7.759 
a.S75 
3.074 
0.612 
1.679 
6.536 

eiuo 

1.415 

3,761 
1.422 


82 


170 


113 


63 


18 


39 


46.034 



B the 21st of January, and the warmest 



XII. METEOROLOGICAL TABLE FOR NATCHEZ, Mise 

For 1843, Lot. 31° 34', Lang. 91° 24' 42"; iy Htnn/ Ibofcy. 





Thermom 


M»r 


B.«n».«. 


Aiiached 


Ram. 


Weather. 1 








MU». 


£ 1 . 


i 


i i i 




S 


£ 


1 


1 






















16.2 56,( 
















F.'b, 


45,1 51.2 




29.700 39.805 39,800 


47,1 


M.t 


5,1? 






Mar., 


41.347,1 


S1.3 29.789 29.801 29.785 


44,2 


J9< 


5''2 


6,oe 


S 


April 


53. 71.5 


77 3,29.775 ,29.784 29.774 


is,- 


71 ,f 


;5,f 








9.376,4 


«.7 29.777,29.793,29.797 




MU 


w,- 


',/.16 






72.580. 


B4.a 29.808 20.790 ,39.7114 


74. 


79,7 


m 


HM> 


c 


July, 


75. 62.- 


8^,5,39.824 20.817 39.825 


7(1> 


■15,t 


Kit 


B.7,'1 






73,881,1 83.9 20,528 29,8^3 ,29.821 


73 ; 


tfl,; 




«.■;!■ 






74.981.4 82,9,29.789 29.817 29.783 


7.\fi 


<1,1 




4,h;( 


c 




58.4(15.3 68.129.850 29,853 29.799 




Mi 


in 9 






Nov., 


S6.7 01.& 64.3 29.352 29,863129.843 


Wl 


i2.2 


i15 


11 94 





Dec, 


48.2 52.2 55.1 29.942 39.912 ;29, 880 


49,(1 


53.2155,7 


14.oa 




Mean 


60.7 67.3 70.5la9.62O 2L1.830 ,29.857 62.3 


68,3 70.4:78,67 


ib 



Coldest, 33. 29. 40. Mar. 16. Barometer lowest, 39= 32', Mar. a7tb. 

Hottest, 75. 86. 92. July 16. Barometer highest, 30° 37', Dee. I3th. 
Depth of rain the current year, ia inches, 78.67 
Mean for three previous years, 60.59 

Days of rain the current year, ■ . 104 

Uean for six previous years, . . . hO^i 



93 MSTBOKOLoeiOAL UktOMMATlOm. [IM^. 

XIIL METEOROLOGICAL TABLE FOR STEUBENVILLE, Oaio. 

Lot. 40'2S 'itfl, Long. SO' 4V 2i" W. EtecationaiovttuUttiattrai Battimore 
670 /«t. £y Jtoaicell Mirih. 



M:iRh, 



strat3,M 



£ 1^ 



i^iVag.iuaiMHSB.TS' 

3» 39.4l039.4H%.tl8'ai.ga Ii3.M 
so SS.S03 39.519^.0)7 39.81 W.lOi . 



3) 38^1»».931 29.SaS39.90 3B£Si SB 
30 39.48190^,90.184 inn 98.03] S3 
3 39.438^9.440^.430^.09 33.Tffi 98 
90.4gg | 80.4iep^ i9-9« as.?(K 33 



n 107 143 100)910 



S3M 





TJ.eniu.menr 




1 


* 












iU 


r 


1 


ll. 


Me.d.| 


1 


Mean. 






























i 


1 


t 
























s 


1 


t. 


■g 


1 


^^ 






S 


^ 


ll 


^ 


£ 


S 


4 


1 

3 


i -g 


■s 


t 


t 


£ 


If 




o 


i 


re 


9 




e 
















jBnuBry 






■wi 




■qiT 






^.80 


■Sfll) 


ass 


„ 


, 




„l 


if 14 


























































» 


























































































































































































































1 








0*1 






3 00 
41 04 








Year, 




gal 


si 9 


19.40 iOAl 


10.40 


30.M 


«.ss 


10 


KM 


317 


148 


>j» 



1^5.] HITBOkOLOOICAL IH*OB>«TIOn. 88 

Xiy. METEOROLOGICAL TABLE FOR BLOOMIITOTOK, I*. 
For iht Yiar 1S43 ,- by Jt.T.S. Arrtn. 



It day in the Tear, was July 16th; 83° 3' aboT* 
The colde«t day was February 6tU; 8° 3' below 0. 
The highest temperatore, was July ISlh; 95° above 0. 
The lowest temperature, was February 7tb ; 1B° below 0. 
Mean temperature for the year, 45° Od'. 
Range of temperature, for the year, 114°. 
Mississippi river opened, April 8th. 



XV. FLOWERING OF FBUIT TREES. 



F1>«. 


Yair. 


F»ch. 


Cheny. 


Apple. 


Cambridge, Mais^ 


1844 


April 27-30. 
April 55. 


April 27- 
April 35 


30, May 4-13. 


New Haven, Conn., 


1S44 


May 7. 


Perth Amboy, N. J., 
Trenton, N. J, 


l!il44 


April IS. 


April 17 


April ae. 


1844 


April 13. 


April 14 


April 24. 


Lambertville, N. J, 


1844 


April 14. 


April 17 


April 19. 




1844 


Aprils. 


April 11 


Apr 1 14. 


Baliimore, Md.. 


1844 


April IQ. 


April 12 


Apnl 15. 


King Geo., C. H,, Va., 


1844 


April 7. 


April 10 


Apnl 13. 


Augusta, Ga., 


1844 


Feb. 26. 


Almo 


id trees, Feb. 17. 


Natchez, Miss., 


1844 


Jan. 28. 




March 24. 


Columbus. OMo, 


1844 


•April 10. 


April 13 


April 16. 


Madison, Wise. Ter., 


1844 April 15. 




April 26. 



• Twenty or thirty days later than usual. 



84 MSTSOEOLOaiCAL INFOEMATIOIf. [1845- 

XVI. FLOWERING OF PLANTS AT MARIETTA, Ohio, 

For the Year 1843. By S. P. HOdreth, M. D. 

April Ist, crocus in bloom ; 2d, cro'wn imperial, two inches high ; 3d, 
snow fell two inches deep ; 4th, blackbird and martin appear ; 8th, snow- 
drop in bloom; 14th, Hepatica triloba; 19th, early hyacinth; 20th, Aronia 
botryapium, or Juneberry ; 21st, crown imperial ; 22d, Sanguinaria Cana- 
densis ; 23d, hyacinth ; 24th, peach tree begins to open its flowers on the 
sunny side of hills, but not in low grounds ; 25th, wood anemone ; 26th, 
fumitory and birthwort; 27th, peach in bloom generally — last year it 
opened on the 19th of March, a difference of thirty-eight days ; 29th, plum 
in bloom. On the morning of the 25th, there was a frosty but not so 
hard as to injure the blossoms of the peach. 

May 1st, pear and cherry in bloom ; 5ih, apple in blossom^- last year it 
was open on the 2d of April, a difference of thirty-three days ; a few tn, 
lips of the early varieties open ; 6th, red-bud in bloom — this fine flower- 
ing tree usually opens at the same time with the apple ; 7th, Cornus flor- 
ida ; Sth, white oak putting out its leaves — the old Indian rule for plant- 
ing their corn, which was probably founded on ancient observation, that 
before that period, the earth was not sufiiciently warmed for the com to 
vegetate in a healthy manner ; 9th, apple shedding its blossoms ; 13th, 
quince tree in bloom; 16th, purple mulberry; 17th, Calceolaria lutea ; 
18th, hickory ; 19th, black walnut shedding its aments; 22d, Ribes villo- 
sus; 24th, Acacia robinia — this is a very cautious tree, and never puts 
out its bloom till all danger from late frosts is past; 25th, Prunus Virgin* 
ianus ; 27th, rose Acacia, in gardens ; 30th, white Chinese peony. 

The mean temperature for the summer months was 71''15, which is 
3''-71 above the summer of 1842. The amount of rain in these months, 
was only 745 inches, while in the former year it was 1575 inches. June 
2d, there was a smart frost in the morning, but not so hard as to destroy 
the young and tender fruit of pears, apples, &c., it being protected 
by the shelter, and by the radiation of caloric from the leaves. 7th, 
Osage orange in bloom; 8th, peas fit for the table — in ordinary years 
they are ready by the 20th of May. 9th, strawberries ripe ; 11th, various 
hardy roses in bloom ; 18th, Franklinia ; 23d, cucumbers ready for eat- 
ing grown in the open air, but protected when small by a box, like a 

hand glass ; 26th, Sambucus in bloom ; 27th, purple mulberry ripe ; 29th, 
red Antwerp raspberry and currant ; July 1st, Catalpa in bloom. The 
ripening of the early summer fruits is not so much retarded by the ac- 
tion of a cold spring, as the blooming of flowers. 



THS 



AMERICAN ALMANAC, 



FOE 



1845. 



PART II. 



UNITED STATES- 



I. EXECUTIVE GOVERNMENT. 

The i4th Prestdential tenn of four years, since the estahlishment of 

the government of the United States, under the Constitution, hegan on 

the 4th of March, 1841 ; and it will expire on the 3d of March, 1845. 

Salary. 
JOHN TYLER, of Virginia, JVenrfenf, $25,000 

Vacancy, Vice B-aident. 5,000 

General William Henry Harrison, of Ohio, having heen elected hy a 
majority of 174 of the electoral votes, was, on the 4th of March, 1841, 
inaugurated President of the United States, in the city of Washington, 
and died on the 4th of the succeeding April. In consequence of this 
event, the duties of the office have devolved on John Tyler, of Virginia, 
who had been elected by the same majority Vice President; in accord- 
ance with the provision of the Constitution of the United States, which 
says : ^ In case of the removal of the President from office, or of his death, 
resignation, or inability to discharge the powers and duties of ssAd office, 
the same shall devolve on the Vice President." 

Tbs Cabinet. 

The following are the principal officers in the txteutive department of 

the government, who form the Cabinet, and who hold their offices at the 

will of the Pre^dent 

Salary. 
John C. Calhoun, South Carolina, Secretary of States $6,000 

George M. Bibb, Kentucky, Secretary of the lYeamryy 6,000 

William Wilkins, Pennsylvania, Secretary of Wary 6,000 

John Y. Mason, Virginia, Secretary of the Navy, 6,000 

Charles A. Wickliffe, Kentucky, Postmaster General, 6,000 

Joha N«lsoo, Maryland, JUomey Cknerai, 4,000 



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90 VNITIO fTATSf. [1845. 

RECAPITULATION AND REMARKS. 

Ist Term, 1789. Electors 90, and 60 voles for O. Washington. J. Adams had ^4 ; 
John Jay (N. J. 6, Del. 3, Va. 1) ; R. H. Harrison (Md. 6) 6 ; J. Rutledge (S. G. 6) 6 ; 
J. Hancock (Pa. 2, Va.'l, S. C. 1) 4| G. Clinton (Va. 3) 3 ; S. Huntington (Q. 2) 2 { 
John Milton (Ga. 2) 2; J. Armstrong (Ga. 1) 1 ; Ed. Telfair (Ga. 1) 1 ; B. Lincoln (Oa. 

I) 1 : — total 60. Rhode Island, New York, and North Carolina did not assent to the 
Constitution in season to vote for President in 1780. 

2d, 1703. Electors 135. 132 votes for G. Washington, and 3 (Md. 2, S. C. 1) vacan- 
cies. J. Adams received 77 votes ; G. Clinton GO ; T. Jefferson ( Ky. 4) 4 ; A. Burr (S. 
C. 1)1:— total, 132. 

3d, 1707. Electors 138. J. Adams received 71 votes ; T. Jefferson 68 ; T. Pinckney 
60 ; -A. Burr 30 ; S. Adams (Va. 15) 15 ; Ol. Ellsworth (N. H. 6, Mass. 1, R. I. 4) 11 ; 6. 
Clinton (Va. 3, Ga. 4) 7 ; John Jay (Ct. 5) 5 ; James Iredell (N. C. 3) 3 ; G. Washingrton 
(Va. 1, N. C. 1) 2 ; J. Henry (Md. 2) 2 ; S. Johnson (Mass. 2) 2 ; Ch. C. Pinekney (N. 
€. 1) 1. 

4th, 1801. Electors 138. T. Jefferson received 73 votes ; A. Burr 73 ; J. Adams 65 ; 
Ch. Pinckney 64 ; John Jay (R. 1. 1) 1. The election was carried to the House of Rep- 
resentatives, and Mr. Jefferson was, on the 36th ballot, chosen President by the votes 
of N. Y., N. J., Pa., Md., Va., N. C, Ga., Tenn., and Ky ; and Mr. Burr, Vice Presi- 
dent. AAer this, the Constitution was altered, so as to require the President and Vice 
President to be separately voted for. 

5th, 1805. For a full view of the votes, see Table. 

6th, 1800. For President; J. Madison 122 votes ; C. C. Pinckney 47 ; G. Clinton (N. 
Y. 6) 6 ; 1 vacancy (Ky.) : — total 176. For Viee President; G. Clinton 113 votes ; Rnfixa 
King 47 ; J. Langdon ( Vt. 6, Ohio 3) ; J. Madison (N. Y. 3) 3 ; J. Monroe (N. Y. 3) 
3; 1 vacancy (Ky.) — total 176. 

7th, 1813. See Table. One vacancy in Ohio. 

8th, 1817. For President; J. Monroe 183 votes ; RuAis King 34 ; 4 vacancies (Del. 1, 
Md. 3)4: — total 221. For Vice President; Daniel D. Tompkins 183 votes; John E. 
Howard (Mass. 22) 22 ; James Ross (Ct. 5) 5 ; J. Marshall (Ct. 5) 5 ; R. G. Harper (Del. 
3) 3 ; 4 vacancies (Del. 1, Md.3) : — total 221. 

0th, 1821. For President ; J. Monroe 231 ; J. Q. Adams (Mass. 1) 1 : —total 232. For 
Vice Presidtnt; D. D. Tompkins 218 ; R. Stockton (Mass. 8) 8 ; D. Rodney (Del. 4) 4 ; 
R. Rush (N. H. 1) 1 ; R. G. Harper (Md. 1) 1 :— total 232. 

lOlh, 1825. For President; A.Jackson 00 votes ; J. Q. Adams 84; Wm. H. Crawford 
41 ; Henry Clay 37 : — total 261. Mr. Adams was elected by the House of Represen- 
tatives. See Table. For Vice Presidtnt; J. C. Calhoun 182; N. Sanford30; N. Macon 
(Va. 24) 24; A.Jackson (N. H. 1, Ct. 8, Md. 1, Mo. 3) 13; M. Van Buren (Ga. 0) 0; 
Henry Clay (Del. 2) 2; 1 vacancy (R. I.) : —total 261. 

nth, 1820. See Table. 

12th, 1833. For President; A. Jackson 210 votes; Henry Clay 40; J. Floyd (S. C. 

II) 11 ; W. Wirt (Vt. 7) 7 ; 2 vacancies (Md.) : —total 286. For Viee President; M. Van 
Buren 180; John Sergeant 40; Wm. Wilkins (Pa^30) 30; Henry Lee (S. C. 11)11; 
Amos EUmaker (Vt. 7) 7:— total 286. 

13th, 1837. For President ; M. Van Buren 170 ; Wm. H. Harrison 73 ; Hu. L. White 
26; Daniel Webster 14 ; W. P Mangum 11: — total 204. For Vice President; R. M. 
Johnson 144 ; Francis Granger 77 ; John Tyler 47 ; Wm. Smith 23 : — total 204. 

14th, 1841. For President; W. H. Harrison 234; M. Van Buren 60:— total 204. 
For Vice President; John Tyler 234; R. M. Johnson 48; L. W. Tazewell 11; J. Polk 
1:— total 204. 



xai5.] 



popular vote ', cabinet nominations. 
Popular Vote; 1837 an© 1841. 



»1 





1837. 


1841. 


States. 


Van Baren. 


Others. ^ 


Harrison. 


Van Baren. 


Maine, 

New Hampshire, 

Vermont, 

Massachusetts, 

Rhode Island, 

Connecticut, 

New York, 

New Jersey, 

Pennsylvania, 

Delaw^are, 

Maryland, 

Virginia, 

North Carolina, 

South Carolina,* 

Georgia, 

Alabama, 

Mississippi, 

Louisiana, 

Tennessee, 

Kentucky, 

Ohio, 

Michigan, 

Indiana, 

Illinois, 

Missouri, 

Arkansas, 


22,300 

18,722 

14,037 

33,501 

2,964 

19,234 

166,815 

26,347 

91,475 

4,155 

22,167 

30,261 

26,910 

22,126 
19,068 

9,979 

3,653 
26,120 
33,435 
96,948 

7,360 
32,480 
18,097 
10,995 

2,400 


15,239 

6,228 

20,991 

41,093 

2,710 

18,466 

138,543 

26,892 

87,111 

4,738 

25,852 

23,368 

23,626 

24,930 

15,637 

9,6S8 

3,383 

35,962 

36,955 

105,405 

4,000 

41,281 

14,983 

8.337 

i;238 


46,612 
26,434 
32,445 
72,874 
5,278 
31,601 

225,812 
33,262 

144,019 

5,967 

33,528 

42501 

46,676 

40,264 
28,471 
19,518 
11,297 
60,391 
58,489 
148,157 
22,907 
65,308 
45,537 
22,972 
4,363 


46,201 
32,670 
18,009 
51,948 
3,301 
25,296 

212,519 
31,034 

143,676 
4,884 
28,752 
43,893 ' 

. 34,218 

31,933 

33,991 

16,995 

7,617 

48,289 

32,616 

124,782 

21,098 

61,695 

47,476 

29,760 

6,049 


Total, 


762,149 
736,736 


736,736 


1,274,783 
1,128,702 


1,128,702 


Majority, 


25,413 


146,081 



• No vote by the, people. 

Cabinet Nominations since the 4tb of March, 1841. 



1. Stats Department. 

Daniel Webster, of Mass., resigned. 
H. S. Legate, or S. C, deeeoMd, 
A. P. Upshur, of W^L.ydeceaMd. 
J. C. Calhoun, of S. C. 

2. Treasttky Depaktmbnt. 

Thomas Ewing, of Ohio, resigned. 
"Walter Forward, of Penn., resigned. 
C. Cashing, of Mass., rejected. 
J. C. Spencer, of N. Y., resigned. 
James S. Green, o{ N. J., rejected. 
George M. Bibb, of Ky. 

3. War Department. 

John Bell, of Tenn., resigned, 
J. C. Spencer, of N. Y., resigned. 
J. M. Porter, of Penn., rejected. 
W. Wilkins, of Penn. 



4. Navy Department. 

George E. Badger, of N. C, resigned. 
A. P. Upshur, of Va., resigned. 
David Henshaw, o{ Mass., rejeettd, 
T. W. Gilmer, of Va., deceand. 
John Y. Mason, of Va. 

6. Post Office Department. 

F. Granger, of N. Y., resigned. 
C. A. Wickliffe, of Ky. 

6. Attorney General. 

J.J. Crittenden, of Ky.^ resigned. 
H. S. Legare, of S. C., deceased. 
John Nelson, of Md. 

Summary. 

Nominations, 24 ; confirmations. 18 ; re- 
jections, 4 ; reiignaUons, 10 ; deatiut, 3. 



Rob. Greenhow, TVani/ator, 
"'"'lEdw. Stubbs, DUbur. jSgent, 



m vvite9 statss. 

Dkpartment of Statc. 
John C. Calhoun, Secretary. 

Salnry. 

R. K. Cralle, Chief Clerk, $2,000 Horatio Jones, Oerk, 

W. C. Zantzinger, do. 
DiplomaXie Bureau. 

Wm. S. Derrick, CUark, 1,600 
'William Hunter, Jr. do. 

Francis Markoe, Jr. do. 1,400 

A. H. Derrick, do. 900 

Consular Bureau. 

Robert S. Chew, Gerk, 1,400 

Jas. S. Ringgold, do. 1,400 

Home Bureau. 

T. W. Dickins, Clerk, 1,400 

George Hill, do. 1,400 

C. H. Winder, do, 1,400 



[tms^ 



Salary. 

ei,ooo 

800 

1,600 
1,450 



BUent Office. 

H. L. Ellsworth, Com. Pa$, 3,000 
Chief Clerk, 1,600 
Charles M. Keller, | Exam- ( 1,500 
Charles G. Page, j inns. \ 1,500 
Henry Stone, | Msist. ( 1,250 

W. P. N. Fitzgerald, j Exam. [ 1,250 
A. L. Mclntire, Draughtsman, 1,200 
Hazard Knowles, Machinist, 1,250 



Treasust Department. 
George M. Bibb, Secretary. 



Salary. 
McC. Young, CAw/ C/€r*, $2,000 

Comptrollers. 

James W. McCuHoh, 1*^ Comp. 3,500 
James Lamed, Chief Clerk^ 1,700 
Albion K. Parris, 2d Comp. 3,000 
Geo. D. Abbot, Chief Clerk, 1,700 

Jiuditors. 

Ist Auditor, 3,000 
John Underwood, Chief Clerk, 1,700 

Wm. B. Lewis, 2d Auditor, 3,000 

James Eakin, Chief Clerk, 1,700 

Peter Hagner, 3d Auditor, 3,000 

Jas. Thompson, Chief Clerk, 1,700 

Aaron O. Dayton, Ath Auditor, 3,000 

Th. H. GiUis, ChUf Clerk, 1,700 

S. Pleasanton, 5<A Auditor, 3,000 

Thomas Mustin, CAw/ C&rA;, 1,700 



Salary. 

William Selden, Treasurer, $3,000 
W. B. Randolph, Chief Clerk, 1,700 

Begister's Office. 

Thomas L. Smith, Register, 3,000 
Mich. Nourse, Chief Clerk, 1,700 



Solicitor's Office. 
Ch. B. Penrose, Solicitor, 



3,500 



Th. H. Blake, Com. Gen. 3,000 

John Williamson, Recorder, 2,000 
John M. Moore, Chief Clerk, 1,800 
Jos. S. Wilson, Chief Clerk of 

private Land Claims. 1,800 

John Wilson, Chief Clerk of ' 

Surveys, 1,800 



184d.] 



SXSOTmTS OOTXmNKSHT. 



03 



Salary. 
Daniel Parker, Chief Clerk, $2,000 

Bureau of Indian Affavrz, 

T. H. Crawford, CmnmiuUmer, 3,000 
S. Humes Porter, Chief Oerk, 1,600 

Pension Bureau, 

Jas. L. Edwards, Commissioner, 2,500 
Geo. W. Crump, Chief Clerk, 1,600 

Hkcui Quarters of the Army. 

"Winfield Scott, Maj. Gen. Com'nding. 
R. Jones, Brev. Brig. Oen. 4r jidj\ Gen. 
L. Thomas, Maj, 4r Msist. do. 

Quartermatter^s Bureau, 

T. S. Jesup, Br. Maj. Gen. ^ Q. M. Gen. 
A. R. Hetzel, Capt. Sf Jtesist Q. M. 
Wm. A. Gordon, iVtn. CUrk, $1,600 
Subsistence Bureau. 

G. Gibson, Breo. Br. Gen. 4r Cbm. 

General of Subsistence. 
John C. Casey, Capt, (^ Assist. Com. 
Bichard Gott, Chief Clerk, $1,600 



War Dspastment. 

William Wilkins, Secretary. 

Salary. 
Pay Bureau. 

N. Towson, Brev. Br, Gen, 4r 

Paymaster General, 
Nathaniel Frye, Chief Clerk, 1,700 

Medical 4r Surgical Bureau. 

Thomas Lawson, Surg. Gen, 2,500 

H. L. Heiskell, Surgeon, 

R. Johnson, Chief Clerk, 1,150 

Engineer Bureau. 

J. G. Totten, Col. ^ Chief Engineer. 
G. L. Welcker, Lieut, if Assist. Eng. 
Benj. Fowler, Chief Clerk, 1,200 

Jhp(^aphical Bureau. 

John J. Abert, Col. ^ Chief Top. Eng. 
W. H. Swift, Assistant Ibp. Eng. 
Geo, Thompson, C^ief Clerk, 1,400 

Ordnance Bureau, 

Geo. Talcott, Lt. Col. in charge of Bur, 
W. Maynadier, Capt. ^ Assist, 
Geo. Bender, Chief Clerk, 1,200 



Navy Department. 

John Y. Mason, Secretary. 

A. Thomas Smith, Chief Clerk, salary $2,000. 

Salary. 
Lewis Warringfton, Chief of the Bureau of Docks and Navy Yards, $3,500 

William M. Crane, do, do. Ordnance and Hydrography, 3,500 

Charles Morris, do. do. Construct. Repairs Sf Equip. 3,000 

Wm. B. Shubrick, do. do. provisions and Clothing, 3,000* 

Thomas Harris, do. do. Medicinu 4r Surg. Lutrum, 2,500 

Alex. D. Bache, Chief of the Coast Survey, 6,000 



Post Office Department. 

Charles A. Wickliffe, Postmcuter General. 

Selah R. Hobbie, 1st Assistant Postmaster (Sen., Contract Office, 
J. W. Tyson, 2d do. do. do. Appointment Office, 

John S. Skinner, Sd do. do. do. Inspection Office, 

John Marron, Chief Clerk, Post Office Department, 
M. St. C. Clarke, Auditor of the Treasury for ike Post Office^ 
PeUr G. Washington, Chief Clerk of the Auditor, 



Salary. 
$2,500 

2,500 

2,500 

2,000 

3,000 

2,000 



M 



0HITBD mtATKM. 



pAAS. 



Collectors of Customs in ths peincipal Ports. 
[Corrected in the jyeaaury Deparimenty July I5thj 1844.] 



Ports. 
Eastport, Me. 
Machias, Me. 
Cnstine, Me. 
Belfast, Me. 



Collectors. 
Bion Bradbury. 
Wm. B. Smith. 
Chas. J. Abbott. 
6eorg« Thacher. 



WaMoboro', Me. Georg« AUeo. 
Wiscasset, Me. Moses Shaw. 
Bath, Me. Parker Sheldon. 

Portland, Me. John Anderson. 
Portsmouth, N.H. Lory Odell. 
NewburyportjMs. H. W. Kinsmaii. 
Gloucester, Ms. Eli F. Stacy. 
Salem, Mass. James Miller. 
Marblehead, Ms. James Gregory. 
Boston, Mass. Lemuel Williams. 
Fall River, Mass. Chas. J. Holmes. 
Barnstable, Mass. Eben'r Bacon. 
N. Bedford, Mass. Jos. T. Adams. 
Edgartown, Ms. Leavitt Thaxter. 
Nantucket, Mass. W. R. Easton. 
Providence, R. L W. R. Watson. 
Bristol, R. L John Howe. 
Newport, R. L William Ennis. 
Alburgh, Vt. A. W. Hyde. 

New London, Ct. G. Carpenter. 
New Haven, Ct. James Donaghe. 
Middletown, Ct Austin Baldwin. 
Fairfield, Ct. Jos. Thompson. 
Plattsburgh, N.Y. Wm. F. Haile. 
Ogdensb'gh, N.Y. David C. Judson. 
Sackett's Hr. N.y. J. O. Dickey. 
Genesee, N. Y. L. B. Langworthy. 
Oswego, N. Y. G. H. Mc Whorter. 
Niagara, N. Y. Amos S. Tryon. 
Buffalo, N. Y. J. H. Lathrop. 
Sag Harbor, N. Y. H. T. Dering. 
New York, N. Y. C. P. Van Ness. 
PerthAmboy,NJ. Solo. Andrews. 
G. Egg Harb.N.J. M. D. Canfield. 
h. Egg Harb. N J. Sam. S. Downs. 



Ports. Collectors. 

Philadelphia, Pa. Calvin Bl3rthe. 
Presque Isle, Pa. Chas. W. Kelso. 
Wilmington, Del. Arnold Naudain. 
Baltimore, Md. N. F. Williams. 
Annapolis, Md. Richard Sands. 
Vienna, Md. B. H. Crockett 

Georgetown, D.C.H. Addison. 
Alexandria, D. C. George Brent. 
Tappahann*k, Va. John A. Parker. 
Petersburgh, Va. Hugh Nelson. 
Richmond, Va. Thomas Nelson. 
Norfolk, Va. Conway Whittle. 

Ocracoke, N. C. Sylv*r Brown. 
Wilmington.N.C. Murphy V. Jones. 
Camden, N. C. Geo, W. Charles* 
Plymouth, N. C. Joseph Ramsay. 
WashingtonjN.C. Thos. H. Blount. 
Newborn, N. C. T. S. Singleton. 
Beaufort,, N. C. J. E. Gibbl«. 
Charleston, S. C. Wm. J. Grayson. 
Georgetown, S.C. Thos. L. Shaw. 
Savannah, Geo. Edw. Hardin. 
St. Mary's, Geo. Archibald Clark. 
Mobile, Ala. Collier H. Minge. 

N. Orleans, Lou. Thos. Barrett. 
Teche, Lou. George Royster. 

Cuyahoga, Ohio, Wm. Milford. 
Miami, Ohio, J. H. Forsyth. 
Sandusky, Ohio, Elias H. Haines. 
Detroit, Mich. Edward Brooks. 
MichiPck, Mich. S. K. Harring. 
Pensacola, Flor. Robert Mitchell 
St. Johns, Flor. James Dell. 
Apalachicola, Fl. Hiram Nourse. 
St. Augustine, Fl. A. W. Walker. 
Port Leon, Flor. Wm. H. Ware. 
Key West, Flor. A. Gordon. 



Ift4&] 



09 



Postmasters iv tbs CbIsf Citiss ako TownSi^ 
[Corrected in the Post Office Department, July ISA, 1844.] 



Cotter. 
Augusta, Me. 
Bangor, Me. 
Bath, Me. 
Brunswick, Me. 
Calais, Me. 
Hallowell, Me. 
Portland, Me. 
Robbinstown,Me. 
Saeo, Me. 
Concord, N. H. 
Pover, N. H. 
Hanover, N. H. 
Keene, N. H. 
Nashua, N. H. 
Portsmouth, N.H. 
Brattleboro', Vt. 
Burlington, Vt. 
Middlebury, Vt 
Montpelier, Vt. 
Andover, Mass. 
Boston, Mass. 
Charlestown; Ms. 
Lowell, Mass. 
Lynn, Mass. 
Nantucket, Mass. 
N. Bedford, Mass. 
Newburyport,Ms. 
Northampton ,Ms. 
Salem, Mass. 
Springfield, Mass. 
Taunton, Mass. 
Worcester, Mass. 
Newport, R. I. 
Pawtucket, R. I. 
Providence, R. I. 
Bridgeport, Conn. 
Hartford, Conn. 
Middletown, Ct. 
New Haven, Ct 
Nsiw LoBdOTi, Ct. 



Postmtuttrs. 

A R. Nichols. 
C. K. Miller. 
Thomas Eaton. 
T. S. McLellan. 
Wm. Goodwin. 
Ichabod Nutter. 
S. P. Lyman. 
Josiah H. Vose. 
Th. W. Shannon. 
Robert Davis. 
A. A. Tufts. 
Jona. Freeman. 
Chas. L. Putnam 
David Philbrick. 
Samuel Gookin. 
F. H. Fessenden. 
William Noble. 
Charles Bowen. 
Geo. W. Read. 
Samuel Phillips. 
Nath*l. Greene. 
Wm. Sawy«r. 
Jacob Robbins. 
Benj. Mudge. 
Samuel H. Jenks. 
Simeon Bailey. 
Benj. W. Hale. 
Amos H. BuUen. 
C. Foot. 
Galen Ames. 
Ch. R. Vickery. 
M. L. Fisher. 
Asher Robins. 
David Benedict. 
Edw. J. Mallett. 
Isaac Sherman. 
Joseph Pratt. 
Eli Wilcox. 
Henry Huggint. 
J. H. Turner. 



CUres. fostftuaters. 

Norwich, Conn. J. H. Townsend. 
Albany, N. Y. Jas. D. Wasson. 
Auburn, N. Y. W. C. Beardsley. 
Batavia, N. Y. F. FoUett. 
Bingh'pton, N. Y. Tracy Robinson. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. George Hall. 
Buffalo, N. Y. C. C. Haddock. 
Canandaigua,N.Y. Jas. M. Wheeler. 
Catskill, N. Y. W. W. Van Login. 
Cooperst'n, N. Y. Robert Davis. 
Elmyra, N. Y. Levi J. Cooley. 
Geneva, N. Y. James Rees. 
Hudson, N. Y. J.McKinstry. 
Ithaca, N. Y. J. M. Mc Gormick. 
Lockport, N. Y. H. W. Scovel. 
Newburgh, N. Y. James Belknap. 
New York, N. Y. John L. Graham. 
OgdensVgh, N. Y. P. B. Fairchild. 
Oswego, N. Y. James Cochran. 
Owego, N. Y. Daniel Ely. 
Po'keepsie, N. Y. J.VanBenthuysen. 
Rochester, N. Y. S. G. Andrews. 
Rome, N. Y. J. Hathaway. 
Saratoga, N. Y. Thos. J. Marvin. 
Schenectady,N.Y.Wm. C. Bouck. 
Syracuse, N. Y. Henry Raynor. 
Troy, N. Y. George R. Davis. 

TJtica, N. Y. A. G. Dauby. 

Westpoint, N. Y. C. Berard. 
Whitehall, N. Y. W. H. Kirkland. 
Newark, N. J. John J. Plume. 
N. Brunsw'k, N. J. John Simpson. 
Paterson, N. J. Wm. D. Quin. 
Princeton, N. J. A. J. Berry. 
Trenton, N. J. Joseph Justice. 
Carlisle, Peiln. Wm. M. Porter. 
Chambersb'h, Pa. D. D. Durborow. 
Easton, Penn. Abraham Coryell. 
Erie, Penn. Andrew Scott. 

Harrisbtti|[fa, Pi. Ja»et Petc«ek. 



90 



UmnD STATXt. 



[1845, 



CHties. PMtmasten, 

Holidaysb'h, Pa. James CaBTey. 
Lancaster, Penn. Mary Dickson. 
Philadelphia, Pa. James Hoy, Jr. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. Robert M. Riddle. 
PottsWlle, Penn. John T. Werner. 
Reading, Penn. Charles TroxelL 
Wilkesbarre, Pa. J. P. LeClerc. 
Wihnington, Del. Wm. R. Sella. 
Baltimore, Md. T. Finley. 
Cumberland, Md. William L3mn. 
Frederick, Md. John Rigney. 
Hagerstown, Md. F. Humrichouse* 
Alexandria, D. C.Daniel Bryan. 
Georgetown,D.C. H. W. Tilley. 
Washington, D.C. William Jones. 
Abingdon, Va. J. E. Gibson. 
Charlottesv*e, Va. T. Wayt. 
Fred'burg, Va. R. T. Thom. 
Lynchburg, Va. Lilbum H. Trigg. 
Norfolk, Va. A. Gait. 

Petersburg, Va. John Minge. 
Richmond, Va. B. Peyton. 
Wheeling, Va. David Agnew. 
Winchester, Va. John Wall. 
Fayette ville, N.C.John McRae. 
Greensboro*, N.C. L J. M. Lindsay. 
Newbem, N. C. W. G. Bryun. 
Raleigh, N. C. T. G. Scott. 
Wilmington, N.C. W.C.Bettencourt. 
Camden, S. C. J. N. Ganewell. 
Charleston, S. C. Alfred Huger. 
Columbia, S. C. A. H. Gladden. 
Georgetown, S.C. Wm. McNulty. 
Yorkville, S. C. Samuel Melton. 
Athens, Ga. W. L. Mitchell. 

Augusta, Ga. E. B. Glascock. 
Columbus, Ga. G. W. E. BedelL 
Darien, Ga. H. W. Hudnall. 

Macon, Ga. K. Tyner. 

Milledgeville, Ga. £. Daggett. 
Savannah, Ga. G. Schley. 
Apalachicola, Fl. Geo. F. Baltzell. 
Pensacola, Flor. H. Kelly. 
Tallahassee, Flor. Miles Nash. 



OUies. Fostmasten, 

Florence, Ala. J. D. Coffee. 
Greensboro', Ala. John Street, Sen. 
Huntsville, Ala. George Cox. 
Mobile, Ala. J. W. Townsend. 
Montgomery, Ala.Neil Blue. 
Tuscaloosa, Ala. Wm. D. Marrest. 
Jackson, Miss. Howell Hobbs. 
Natchez, Miss. Woodson Wren. 
Vicksburgh,Miss. N. D. Coleman. 
N. Orleans, Lou. Alex. G. Penn. 
Little Rock, Ark. B. Williams. 
Columbia, Tenn. Hillery Langtry. 
Knoxville, Tenn. J. W. Campbell. 
Memphis, Tenn. M. B.Winchester. 
Nashville, Tenn. Rob. Armstrong. 
Frankfort, Ky. Wm. Hardin. 
Lexington, Ky. Joseph Ficklin. 
Louisville, Ky. L. H. Mosby. 
Maysville, Ky. Jas. W. Coburn. 
ChilUcothe, Ohio, J. R. Anderson. 
Cincinnati, Ohio, W. H. H. Taylor. 
Cleveland, Ohio, Benj. Andrews. 
Columbus, Ohio, John G. Miller. 
Dayton, Ohio, Thomas Blair. 
Newark, Ohio, Levi J. Houghey. 
Steubenville, 0. Wm. Collins. 
Toledo, Ohio, Andrew Palmer. 
Zanesville, Ohio, Israel Hoge. 
Ann Arbor, Mich. George Danforth. 
Detroit, Mich. Thos. Rowland. 
EvansvillCy Ind. Daniel Chute. 
Indianapolis, Ind. Saml. Henderson. 
Lafayette, Ind. R. S. Ford. 
Madison, Ind. Andrew Collins. 
New Albany, Ind. Alex. S. Burnett. 
Terre Haute, Ind. Joseph O. Jones. 
Vincennes, Ind. Jas. W. Greenhow. 
Alton, 111. B. F. Edwards. 

Chicago, m. William Stuart. 

Galena, 111. R. W. Carson. 

Jacksonville, 111. E. A. Mears. 
Shawneetown,Ill.John Stickney. 
St. Louis, Mo. S. B. Churchill. 
Milwaukie, W. T. Jouah A, Noonan. 



II. CONGRESS. 
T Population ahd AprOftTioiiiiEi 

For the 28lk Cimgmi. 





=3 


1 


I 


It 


S 


•5 




1 


H 


a 

S ■ 




ii 


L 


ITAIIB. 


■% 


a 


;1 


ll 


V 


s| 




:| 


1^ 


Is 


|ls 


tt 


1^ 

1 




3 


■=2 


1 


Ig 


> 




^ 


g 




7.i)33"~ 


^ 


i 


Marne. . . . 


501,793 




"501793 


' 6 




294,574 


1 


284,573 i;653 


6 


M«Ma«huBelW. 


■737,699 




737,699 20,899 


la 


Rhode Island, . 


108,630 


5 


108,828 36,148 R 




Connecticut, . 


309,976 


17 


309.971 ;27 ,251 


6 


Vermont, . 


2Eii,P4& 




291,9481 9,228 


6 


New York, 


2,428,931 


42,4-26,91925,709 


3Q 


NewJeraey, . . 


373,306 


674 373,03619,636 




PeDDBjlvania, . 


1,724,033 


64I,7a4,007J27,6S7 


S6 


Delaware, . 


76,065 


2,605 


77,043| 6,363 


3 


Maryland, 


470,019 


89,737 


434,12410,044 


8 




1,339,797 


448,987 


1,060,202 2 


17 


North Carolina, 


763,419i24fl,&n 


6S6,0B2i 18,973 


11 


South Carolina, . 


594596 337,036 


463,582 39,502 R 


9 


Georgia, . 


6!tl,392 260,944 


579,014 13,574 


10 




590,7561253,532 


489,343 65,263 B 


9 




375,051 


195,211 


897,56614,846 


6 


Looiiiana, . 


35a',4Il 


168,452 


285,030 2,310 




Tennessee, 


829,210 


163,059 


755,86649,166 H 


13 


Kentucky, , 


779,828 


182,258 


706,924 124 


19 


Ohio, . . . 


1,519,457 


3 


1,519,405 35,185 


23 


ndia^a, . . 


663,669 


3 


685,60449,744 B 


12 


llinoi., . . . 


476,163 


331 


476,0S0!51,970 R 


e 


MiMouri, . . 


383,702 


56,240 


360,400, 7,006 


7 


Arkansas, . . 


97,574 


19,935 


69,600 18,920 


3 


Michigan, . . 


212,267 


~ 


218,267j 227 


S 
323 1 27S 



The following table shows the total number of members by the differ- 
•at ratios since the adoption of the Constitution : 

Tear 1789, Fixed by the Constitution, 65 members. 



■ Inclading Michijui and AriciiL 



98 VMtttll tftJLtBS. [1S%5. 

2, CoJVOftKCB. 

Thb Congress of the United States consists of a Senate and House of 
Representatives, and must assemble at least once ^very year, on the 1st 
Monday of December, unless it is otherwise provided by law. 

The Senate is composed of two members from each State ; and of 
coarse, the regular number is now 52. They are chosen by the legisla- 
tures of the several States, for the term of six years, one third of them 
being elected biennially. 

The Vice President of the United States is the President of the Senate, 
in which body he has only a casting vote, which is given in case of an 
equal division of the votes of the Senators. In his absence a President, 
pro tempore^ is chosen by the Senate. 

The House of Representatives is composed of members from the sev- 
eral States, elected by the people, for the term of two years. The Repre- 
sentatives are apportioned among the different States, according to popu- 
lation. The 2Sth Congress is chosen according to the act of Congress of 
1842, the ratio being " one Representative for every 70,680 persons in 
each State, and of one additional Representative for each State having a 
fraction greater than one moiety of the said ratio, compated according to 
the rule prescribed by the Constitution of the United States." The law 
of 1842 also requires, that the Representatives of each State " shall be 
elected by districts composed of a contiguous territory equal in nuinber 
to the number of Representatives to which said State may be entitled, 
no one district electing more than one Representative." The present 
number is 223 Representatives, and 3 Delegates. 

Since the 4th of March, 1807, the compensation of each member of the 
Senate and House of Representatives has been $8 a day, during the period 
of his attendance in Congress, without deduction in case of sickness ; 
and $8 for every twenty miles* travel, in the usual road, in going to and 
returning from the seat of government. The compensation of the Presi- 
dent of the Senate, pro tempore^ and of the Speaker of the House of Rep- 
resentatives, is $16 a day. ^ 

TWEKTY-ElOHTB CoNOBESS. ThE SbNATB. 

Willis P. Manouu, of North Carolina, President pro tempore, 
[The figures denote the expiration of the terms of the Senators.] 



Name. Residence. 

Maine. 

John Fairfield, Saco, 1849 

George Evans, Gardiner^ 1847 

New Hampshire. 

Qkarles G. Atherton , Nashua, 1 849 
Levi Woodbury, B>rtimouth,lBi1 



Name. Residence. 

Vermont. 

William Upham, Mmtpelier, 1849 
Samuel S. Phelps, Middlehwry, 1845 

Massachusetts. 

Rufus Chbate, Boston, 1845 

Isaac C. Bates, Northagnpton, 1847 



Name. 



Q«gi4QBce. 
Bhode htand. 



Name. 



B««d4»ce/ 
•4kibama. 



John B. Francis, 1845 Arthur P. Bagby, Tuscaloosa^ 184? 

J. F. Simmons, PnmdencZy 1847 Dixon H. Lewis, Lowndesboro\ 1847 

Connecticut. Mississippi, 

John M. Niles, Hartford^ 1849 J. HendlBrson, Pass Christian^ 1845 

Jabez W. Httntington,iVbrwteA, 1851 R. J. Walker, MadiaonmlUy 1847 

New York. Louisiana, 

Silas Wright, Jr., Cantonj 1849 Henry Johnson, 1849 

N. P. Tallmadge, Bm^hkeepstef 1845 Alex. Barrow, Baton MougB^ 18^7 

New Jersey, Arkemsas. 

William L. Dayton, Trenlon^ 1845 A. H. Sevier, Lake Pbrt^ 1849 

Jacob W. Miller, Morristown, 1847 Wm. S. Fulton, Little Rock, 1847 

Pennsylvania, Tennessee, 

James Buchanan, Lancaster, 1849 Ephraim H. Foster, Nashville^ 1845 

Daniel Sturgeon, Uniontoum, 1845, Spencer Jarnagin, Athens, 1847 



Delaware, 



Kentucky. 



R. H. Bayard, Wilmington, 1845 John J. Crittenden, JPr<wiJfc/flr<, 1849 

Thomas Clayton, Newcastle, 1847 J. T. Morehead, do, 1847 



Maryland. 



Ohio. 



Wm, D- Merrick, Men's Fresh, 1845^ William Allen, ChUUooihe, 18^7 
James A. Pe^rce, VjoU Co. 1849 Benjamin Tappan, SteubenvOk, 1^45 



Wm. C. Rives, Bentivoglio, 1845 
Wm. S. Archer, Elk HiU, 1847 

iVbr(A Carolina. 

Wm. H. Haywood, Jr., Baieif^ 1849 
W. P. Mangum, Bed. fibuntcani 1847 

South Carolina. 

George M'Duffie, Edg^fidd C,K, 1849 
Daniel £. Huger, CAar2g«toum, 1547 



(xeorgia. 

Walter T. Colquitt, Columbus, 1849 
John M. Berrien, Savannah, 1847 



Augustus & Porter, JhtroU, 
William Woodbridge, da. 

Indiana. 

E. A. Hannegan, Covingion, 
Albert S. VihiXe, Laf ay eUe, 

Blinoit, 

Sidney Breese, Clinton Cb, 
James Semple, Man, 



1845 
1847 



1849 
1845 

1^9 
1847 



Missouri, 

David R. Atchison, Platte City, 1849 
Thomas H. Benton, 1^. Louis, 1845 

Officers of the Senate. 

Asbury Dickens, Secrdary. 

Edward Dyer, Seigeanl at Arrm* 

Robert Beall, Ihorkeq>er, 

Septimus Tuston, Chaplain, 

Gales & ScatoB, JHntev. 



100 



UNITED STATES. 



[1645 



.. ''•'^. House op Representatives of the 28th Conobess, 

which will expire on the 3d of March^ 1845. 

[The numbers attached to the namet show the Districts in each State from which the 

members were chosen. When no numbers are given, they were chosen by general 

ticket] 

John W. Jones, of Virginia, Speaker. 



Name. Resideooe. 

Maine. — 7. 

7. Cary, Shepard, 

2. Bunlap, Rob. P., Brunswick. 
6. Hamlin, Han'l, Hamden. 

1. Herrick, Joshua, ^ennebunk Ft. 
4. Morse, F. H., Bath. 

3. Severance, L., Augusta. 

One Vacancy. 

New Hampshire. — 4. 

Burke, Edmund, Newport- 
Hale, John P., Dover. 
Norris, Mos., Jr., Pittsfield. 
Reding, John R., Haverhill. 

Vermont. — 4. 

2. CoUamer, Jacob, Woodstock. 

4. Dillingham, P. Jr. , Waterbury. 

1. Foote, Solomon, Rutland. 

3. Marsh, Geo. P., Burlington. 

Massachusetts. — 10. 

3. Abbott, Amos, Andover. 

8. Adams, J. Q., Quincy. 

6. Baker, Osmyn, Amherst. 

10. Grinnell, Jos., New Bedford. 

5. Hudson, Cha's., Westminster. 

2. King, Daniel P., South Danvers. 

4. Parmenter, W., £. Cambridge. 

7. Rockwell, Jul., Pittsfield. 

9. Williams, Hen., Taunton. 
1. Winthrop, R. C, Boston. 

Rhode JsZafuf. •— 2. 

1. Cranston, H. Y., Newport. 

2. Potter, E. Jl., S. Kingstown. 

Connecticut. — 4. 

3. Catlin, G. H., Windham. 
1. Seymour, T. H., Hartford. 



Name. Residence. 

4. Simons, Sam'l, Bridgeport. 

2. Stewart, John, Midd. Haddam. 

New York. — 34. 

7. Anderson, J. H., White Plains. 

13. Barnard, D. D., Albany. 

17. Benton, C. S., Mohawk. 

29. Carroll, C. H., Groveland Cen. 

21. Gary, Jerem. E., Cherry Valley. 
9. Clinton, Jas. G., Newburgh. 

26. Dana, Amasa, Ithaca. 

8. Davis, Rich. D., Poughkeepsie. 
16. Ellis, ChessePn, Waterfoid. 

6. Fish, Hamilton, New York. 

27. Green, Byram, Sod us. 

30. Hubbell, W. S., Bath. 

19. Hungerford, O., Watertown. 
34. Hunt, Washing., Lockport. 

18. King, Preston, Ogdensburgh. 

5. Leonard, M. G., New York. 
4. Maclay,Wm. B., New York. 

32. Moseley, W. A., Buffalo. 

2. Murphy, H. C, Brooklyn. 
28.' Patterson, T. J., Rochester. 

3. Phcenix, J. P., New York. 

11. Pratt, Zadoc, Prattsville. 

22. Purdy, S. M., Norwich. 
25. Ralhbun, Geo., Auburn. 

23. Robinson, 0., Mexico. 

14. Rogers, Ch*s, Sandy HilL 
10. Russell, Jerem., Saugerties. 

12. Seymour, D. L., Troy. 

33. Smith, Albert, Batavia. 

15. Stetson, Lem., Keeseville. 
1. Strong, S. B., Setauket. 

31. Tyler, Asher, EUicottsviUe. 

24. WheatoD) Hor., Pompcy. 

One Vacancy. 



040,] 



oov« 



un 



Mbw JtrMfM •^ & > 

1. Elmer, L. Q. C^ BridgBton. 

3. Fartsei Isaac 6^ FSemingtOB. 

4. Eirkpatrick,* L^ N. Brunswick. 

2. Sykes, George, Mount Holly. 

5. Wright, Wm., Newark. 

i^fWMyZtiama. — 24. 
11. BidUck, B. A^ Wilkesbane. 

16. Black, James, Newport 
10. BTodfaead,E.,Jr. Easton. 

8. Bro'wn, Jere., Goshen. 
24. Buffington, Joa, Eittannin|^^ 

21. Darnigh, Cora., Pittsbui^. 
20. I>ickey, John, Beaver. 

19. Foater, H. D., Greensfoiug. 

22. Hays, Samuel, Franklin. 

4. IngexsoU, C. X, Philadelphia. 

2. Ingersoll, J. R., Philadelphia. 

17. Irvin, James, Milesbnrg. 

6. Jenks, M H., Newtown. 

7. McIlvaine,A.R., Brandy wine. 

1. Morris, Edw. J., Philadelphia. 
15. Nes, Henry, York. 

13. Pollock, , 

14. Ramsey, AlexV, Harrisburg. 

23. Reed, C. M., Erie. 

9. Ritter, John, Reading. 

18. Ste"wart, And'w, Uniontown. 

3. Smith, John T., Philadelphia. 

5. Yo8t^ Jacob S., Pottstown. 

Ont Vacancy. 

JMaware. — 1. 
Rodney, G. B., Newcastle. 

MaryUmd. — 6. 

2. Brengle, F., Frederick Co. 
1. Causin, J.M. S., St Mary's Co. 

4. Kennedy, J. P., Baltimore. 

5. Preston, J. A., Harford Co. 

6. Spence, Th. A., 

3. Wethered, J., Baltimore Co. 

Fwgwtia.— 15. 

1. Atkinson, A., Smithfield. 

9» 



Name* Residnec. 

7. Bayley, T. H., Drummondt'n, 

[Acoomac Co. 

12. Chapman, A. A., Union. 

9. Chilton, Sam'l, Warrenton. 

3. Coles, Walter, Robert*n's StoM. 
2. Dromgoole,GvC., Sammit 

5. GoggiD, W( L., OtterbridgOb 

13. Hopkins, G. W. Abingdon. 

4. Hubard, E. W., Curdsville. 

6. Jones, John W., Petersburg. 

10. Lucas, Wm. F., Charlestown. 

8. Newton, W., Hague. 
15. Steenrod, L. J., Wheeling. 

14. Summers, G.W., Eenhawa. 

11. Taylor, Wm., Lexington. 

North Ckirolina. — 9. 

8. Arlington, A.H., Hilliaxdsten. 

2. Barringer, D. M., Concord. 
1. Clingman, T. L., Asheville. 

7. Daniel, J. R. J., Halifax. 

4. Deberry, Edm., Lawrenceville. 
6. McKay, J. J., Elizabethtown. 

9. Rayner, Kenn., Winton. 

3. Reid, David S., ReidsviUe. 

5. Saunders, R. M., Raleigh. 

South CaroUna, — 7. 

1. Black, Jas. A., Cherok. Works. 

5. Burt, Artemas, Abbeville. 

4. Campbell, John, ParnassQS. 

6. Holmes, L E., Charleston. 

7. Rhett, R. B., Blue House. 

2. Simpson, R. F., Pendletonvills. 

3. Woodward,J.A., Winnsboro. 

Georgia. — 8. 
Black, Edw. J., Jacksonboro. 
Chappell, A. H, Macon. 
Clinch, D. L., 
Cobb, Howell, Athens. 
Haralson, H. A., La Grange. 
Lumpkin, J. H. Rome. 
Stephens, A. H., Crawfordsville. 
Stiles, Wm. H., Cassville. 



103 



UNITXD 8T4TE8. 



[1845. 



2. 

6. 
1. 
5. 
7. 
4. 



3. 
2. 

1. 
4. 



10. 

3. 

6. 
11. 

4. 

7. 

1. 

9. 

5. 

a 

2. 



1. 
4. 
8. 
9. 
2. 
3. 
5. 



Name. Residence. 

Alahanuu — 7. 
Belser, Jas. E., Montgomery. 
Chapman, R. H., Somerville. 
Dellet, James, Claiborne. 
Houston, 6. S., Athens. 
Mc Connell,F.6.,Ta]ladega. 
Payne, W. W., Gainesville. 

Ont Vacancy, 

MUmsippi. — 4. 
Hammett, W. H., 
Roberts, R. W., 
Thompson, J., Oxford. 
Tucker, Tilghman M., 

Lotdtiana, <— 4. 
Dawson, J. B., St. Francisville. 
Labranche, A., New Orleans. 
Slidell, John, New Orleans. 
Morse, Isaac £., 

jirkansas.^-l. 
Cross, Edward, Washington. 

Tennessee. — 11/ 

Ashe, John B., Brownsville. 
Blackwell, J. W., Athens. 
Brown, A. V., Pulaski. 
Brown, Milton, Jackson. 
CuUom, Alvan, Livingston. 
Dickinson,D.W.,Murfree8boro. 
Johnson, A., Greenville. 
Johnson, Cave, Clarksville. 
Jones, G. W., Fayetteville. 
Peyton, J. H., Gallatin. 
Senter, Wm. T., Panther Sp'gs. 

Kenttickij. — 10. 

Boyd, Linn, Belleview. 
Caldwell, G. A., Columbia. 
Davis, Garrett, Paris. 
French, Rich'd, Mt. Sterling. 
Green, Willis, Green's. 
Grider, Henry, Bowling Gr*n. 
Stone, Jas. W.,' Taylorsville. 



Name. Residoice. 

7. Thomasson,W.P., Loaisville. 

10. Tibbatts, J. W., Newport 

6. White, John, Richmond. 

Ohio. — 21. 

11. Brinckerhoff, J., Mansfield. 

18. Dean, Ezra, Wooster. 

1. Duncan, Alex., Cincinnati. 
9. Florence, Elias, Circleville. 

20. Giddings, J. R., Jefferson. 

12. Harper, Alex'r, Zanesville. 

13. Johnson, P. B., McConnellsv'e. 

16. Matthews, Jas., Coshocton. 

17. McCauslen,W.C., Steubenville. 

7. McDowell, J. J., Hillsborough. 
15. Morris, Joseph, Woodsfield. 

5. Potter, E. D., Toledo. 

3. Schenck, R. C, Dayton. 

6. St John, Henry, Tiffin. 

19. Tilden, D. R., Ravenna. 

4. Vance, Joseph, Urbana. 

8. Van Meter, J. J., Piketon. 

14. Vinton, S. F., Gallipolit. 

2. Weller, J. B., Hamilton. 

T\oo Vacancies. 

Michigan. — 3. 

2. Hunt, Jas. B., Pontiac. 

3. Lyon, Lucius, Kalamazoo. 
1. Mc Clelland, R., Monroe. 



Indiana. - 

5. Brown, Wm. J., 

6. Davis, John W., 

2. Henley, T. J., 
10. Kennedy, A., 

1. Owen, Rob. D., 

8. Pettit,John, 

9. Sample, S. C, 
4. Smith, C. B., 

3. Smith, Thos., 

7. Wright, J. A., 



-10. 

Indianapolis. 
Carlisle. 
N. Washington. 
Muncietown. 
New Harmony- 
La Fayette. 
South Bend. 
Connorsville. 
Versailles. 
Rockville. 



Illinois. — 7. 
5. Douglass, S. A., Quincy. 



i845.] 



COII9ftSS8. 



103 



Name. Residence. 

3. Ficklin, 0. B., Charleston. 
7. Hardin, John J., Jacksonville. 
6. Hoge, Joseph B., Gralena. 

2. McClemand, J. A., Shawneet'n, 
1. Smith, Robert, Alton. 

4. Wentworth, J., Chicago. 

Missouri. — 5. 

Bower, G. B., Paris. 
Bowlin, Jas. B., St. Louis. 
Hughes, Jas. M., Liberty. 
Jameson, John, Fulton. 



Name. Residence. 

Relfe, Jas. H., Caledonia. 

TeBB.1 TORIES. 

Florida.-^ IDeUgate, 
Levy, David, St. Augustine. 

Wisconsin. — 1 Iklegate. 
DodgeV Henry, Dodgeville. 

Iowa. — 1 Delegate. 
Dodge, Aug. C, Burlington. 



Officers of the House of Bepresentatives. 



Caleb J. McNulty, 
Newton Lane, 
Jesse E. Dow, 
Blair & Rives, 





Salary. 


Clerk, 


$3,000 


Sergeant-at-jirmtf 


1,600 


Doorkeeper, 


1,500. 


IMwters. 





Alphabetical List of the Rep&ssentatxvbs. 



Name. State. 

Abbott, Amos, Ms. 

Adams, John Q., Ms. 
Anderson, Jos. H., N. Y. 
Arrington, A. H. N. H. 
Ashe, John B. Ten. 
Atkinson, Arch. Va. 
Baker, Osmyn, Ms. 
Barnard, Daniel D., N. Y. 
Barringer, Dan. M., N.C. 
Bavley, Thos. H., Va. 
Beiser, James £., Ala. 
Benton, Chas. S., N. Y. 
Bidlack, Benj. A., Pa. 
Black, Edw. J. Ga. 

Black, James, Pa. 

Black, Jas. A., S. C. 
Blackwell, J. W., Ten. 
Bower, Gusta. B., Mo. 
Bowlin, Jas. B., Mo. 
Boyd, Linn, Ky. 



Name. State. 

Brengle, Francis, Md. 
Brinckerhoff, Jacob, 0. 
Brodhead, Rich. Jr., Pa. 
Brown, Aaron V., Ten. 
Brown, Jeremiah, Pa. 
Brown, Milton, Ten. 
Brown, Wm. J., Ind. 
Bufiington, Joseph, Pa. 
Burke, Edmund, N. H. 
Burt, Artemas, S. C. 
Caldwell, G. A., Ky. 
Campbell, John, S. C. 
Carroll, Chas. H., N. Y. 
Cary, Jere. E., N. Y. 
Cary, Shepard, Me. 
Catlin, Geo. H., Ct. 
Causin, J. M. S., Md. 
Chapman, .A ug. A., Va. 
Chapman, Reuben, Ala. 
Chappell, Abso. H., Gra. 



Name. State* 

Chilton, Samuel, Va. 
Clinch, Duncan L., Ga. 
Clingman, Th. L., N. C. 
Clinton, Jas. G., N. Y. 
Cobb, Howell, Ga. 

Coles, Walter, Va. 

Collamer, Jacob, Vt. 
Cranston, Henry Y., R.I. 
Cross, Edward, Ark. 
Cullom, Alvan, Ten. 
Dana, Amasa, N. Y. 
Daniel, J. R. J. N. C. 
Darragh, Cornelius, Pa. 
Davis, Garrett, Ky. 
Davis, John w. Ind. 
Davis, Richard D., N. Y. 
Dawson, John B. La. 
Dean, Ezra, O. 

Deberry, Edm., N. C. 
Dellet, James, Ala., 



Ifii 



UMt«K». ftTATBt. 



lia^ 



Nan*. State. 

Dickey, Joba, Pa. 

Dickenson, D. W., Ten. 
Dillingham, Paul, Jr., Vt. 
Dodge, A. C.,i>c2. Wis. 
Dodge, Henry, Dd, la. 
Douglass, Steph. A»t III. 
Dromgoole. Geo. C, Ya. 
Duncan, Alex., O. 

Dunlap, Robert P., Me. 
Ellis, Cheselden, N. Y. 
Elmer, L. Q^ C, N. J. 
Farlee, Isaac 6., N. J. 
Ficklin, Orlando B. HI 
Fisb, Hamilton, N. Y 
FIorencA. EHas, O. 

Foote, Solomon, Vt. 
Foster, Henry D., Pa 
French, Richard, Ky. 
Giddings, Joshua B., O. 
Goggin, Wm. L. Va. 
Green, Byram, N. Y. 
Green, WilUs, Ey. 

Grider, Henry, I^. 

Grinnell, Joseph, IVls. 
Hale, J6hn P., N. H. 
Hamlin, Hannibal, Me. 
Hammett, Wm. H., Mis. 
Haralson, Hugh A., Gra. 
Hardin, John J., 111. 
Harper, Alex., O. 

Hays, Samuel, Pa. 

Henley, Thos. J., lud 
Herrick, Joshua, Me. 
Hoge, Joseph. B;, III. 
Holmes, Isaac E., S. C. 
Qopkins, Geo. W^ Va. 
Houston, Geo. S,, Ala< 

gubard, £dm. W., Va. 
♦ibbell, Wm. S., N. Y. 
l}iidson, Charles, Ms. 
IJttghes, Jas^ M., Mo. 
Hungerford,' Orr,, N. Y. 
l{unt, Jaji, Br, Mich. 
I^upt, Washington,N.Y. 
Ipgersoll, Chas. J., Pa. 
Ii)^rsoll, Joa. R., Pa. 
IrvtQ, James, Pa. 

Jflimeson, John, Mo. 
Jtnks, Mi(^hael H., Pa. 
Johnson, Andrew, Tea. 
Jphnson, Cave, Xea. 
Johnson, Parley, B., O. 
Jpnes, Gfeo, W. Ten. 
Jfpes, John W., Va. 



Name. 9late 

Kennedy, Andrew, Ind. 
Kennedy, John P., Md. 
King, Daniel P., Ms. 
King, Preston, N.Y. 
Kirkpatrick, L., N.J. 
Labranche, Alcee. La. 
Leonard, Moses G., N.Y. 
Levy, David, Dd, Flor. 
Lucas, Wm. F., Va 
Lumpkin, J. H., Gra. 
Lyon, Lucius, Mich. 
Maclay, Wm. B., N. Y. 
Marsh, Geo. P. Vt. 

Mktthews, James, O. 
Mc.Causlen, W. C, O. 
McClelland, Rob., Mich. 
Mc demand, J. A., 111. 
McConnell, F. G., Ala 
McDowell, Jos. J. O. 
Mc Ilvaine, A. R., Pa. 
McKay, J. J., N. C. 

Morris, £dw. J., Pa. 
Morris, Joseph, O. 

Morse, Freeman H., Me. 
Morse, Isaac £., La 
Moseley, Wm. A., N. Y 
Murphy, H. C, N. Y. 
Nes, Henry, Pa. 

Newton, W., Va 

Norris, Moses, Jr., N.H 
Owen, Rob. D., Ind 
Parmenter, Wm. Ms. 
Patterson, T. J., N. Y. 
Payne, Wm. W., Ala. 
Pettit, John, Ind. 

Peyton, Jas. H., Ten. 
Ph<Enix,J, P., N.Y 
Pollock, Pa. 

Potter, Elisha, R., R. I. 
Potter, Emery D-, O. 
Pratt, Zadock, N. Y. 
Preston, Jacob A., Md. 
Pupdy, Smith M., N. Y. 
Ramsey, Alex., Pa. 

Ralhbun, George, N. Y. 
Rayner, Kenneth, N. C. 
Reding, John R., N.H. 
Reed, Chat, M., Pa. 
Reid, Dfevid S., N. C. 
Relfe, Jas. H., Mo. 

Rhett, R. B,, S. C. 

Ritter, John, Pa^ 

Roberto,.Bob. W., Mis. 



Name. State. 

Robinson, OryiUe, N. Y. 
Rockwell, Julius, Ms. 
Rodney, Geo. B. Del. 
Rogers, Charles, N. Y. 
Russdl, Jeremiah, N. Y. 
Sample, Saml. C, Ind. 
Saunders, R. M., N. C. 
Schenck, Rob. C., O. 
Senter, W. T., Ten. 
Severance, Luther, Me. 
Seymour, D. L. N. Y. 
Seymour, Th. H., Ct. 
Simons, Samuel, Ct. 
Simpson, Rich. F., S. C. 
Slideil, John, La. 

Smith, Albert, N. Y. 
Smith, Caleb B., Ind. 
Smith, John T., Pa. 

Smith, Robert, 111. 

Smith, Thomas, Ind. 
Spence, Thos, A.,. Md. 
Steenrod, Lewis J., Va. 
Stephens, Alex. H., Ga. 
Stetson, Lemuel, N. Y. 
Stewart, Andrew^ Pa. 
Stewart, John, Ct. 

Siiles, Wm. H., Ga. 
St. John, Henry, 0. 

Stone, James, Ky. 

Strong, Selah B., N. Y. 
Summers, Greo. W., Va. 
Sykes, Geo., N.J. 

Taylor, Wm., Va. 

Thomasson, W. P., Ky, 
Thompson, Jacob, Mis. 
Tibbatts, John W., Ky. 
Tilden, Daniel R., O. 
Tucker, Tilgh. M. Mis. 
Tyler, Asher, N. Y. 
Vance, Joseph, O. 

Vanmeter, John J., O. 
Vinton, Samuel F., O. 
Weller, John B., O. 

Wentworth, John, III. 
Wethered, John, Md. 
Wheaton, Horace, N. Y. 
White, John, Ky. 

Williams, Henry, Mi. 
Winthrop, Rob. C^ Ms. 
Woodward, Jos. A, S. C 
Wright, Jos. A., Ind. 
Wright, William, N.J, 
Yost, Jacob S., Pa. 



1S45.I JTTDiciAaY. 105 

III. THE JUDICIARY. 
Places and Times of boldinq the Ciecuit Couets. 

Maine. Porfton<i--lst May and Ist October. 

N. Hampshire. Portsmouth — 8th May j — Exeter— Sih. October. 

Vermont. Windsor— 21st May ; — Rutland—^ October. 

Massachusetts. Boston — 15th May and 15th October. 

Rhode Island. Neioport— 15th. June ; — P/widencfr— 15th November. 

Connecticut. i ^'^ Oivenr-ith Tuesday in April ;— Bar(/br«f-3d 

( 1 uesday m September. 

N. Yore, S. Dist \ ^7 rSi*""^'^^'*?*^^^^ l?^- 1st Monday in AprU, 
' ( last Monday in July and November. 

N. Yore, N. Dist. \ -^'^^^-3^ Tuesday in October ; - Canandaigua^ 
' I Tuesday next after third Monday in Jun e. 

New Jersey. TrenJton — Ist April and 1st October. 

Penn., E. Dist Philadelphia — 11th April and 11th October. 

i>«»«r -07 nr.o. J Pittsburg— M Monday in May and Nov.: — WiOiaim»* 
MNN., w. litsT. .J p^rt— 3d Monday in June and September. 

•^ C Newcastle — Tuesday following 4th Monday in May ; — 

i^ELAWARE. I Dow^^Tuesday following 3d Monday m Oct. 

Maryland. Baltimore — 1st Monday in November. 

Virginia, £. Dist. Richmond — 1st Mon. in May, and 4th Mon. in Nov. 

Virginia, W. Dist Lewisburg^—lat Monday in August 

N. Carolina. Raleigh — 4th Monday in May, and 2d Mon. in Dec. 

c r« S Charleston — 2d Tuesday in April ; — Oolumbia-Aik 

S.Carolina. | Monday in November. 

' f Savannah — Thursday after th^ 1st Monday in May ; 

Georgia. 'I — MHUdgeoiUe — Thursday after the 1st Monday in 

[ November. 

Alabama, S. Dist Mobile — 3d Monday in April, and 4th Mon. in Dec. 

Alabama, N. Dist. Huntsville — 1st Monday in June. 

Mississippi. Jackson — 1st Monday in May and November. 

Louisiana, E. Dist New Orleans — Ist Mon. in April, and 3d Mon. in Dec. 

(Nashville — 1st Monday in March and September; — 
Tennessee. A Knoxville — 3d Monday in April and October; r" 

( Jackson — 2d Monday m October and April. 

Kentucky. Frankfort — 1st Mon. in May, and 3d Mon. in Nov, 

Ohio. Columbus — 3d Monday in May and December. 

Michigan. Detroit — 3d Monday in June, and 2d Monday in Oct 

Indiana. Indianapolis — 1st Monday in December. 

Illinois. Vandalia — last Monday in November. 

Missouri. St. Louis — 1st Monday in April. 

Arkansas. Little Rock — 2d Monday in April- 

Tk n 5 Washington— Aih Monday in March and November ; 

iJiST. COLUMBIA. I ^-^lexandria^Ut Monday in May and October. 



SartiHl CODXT. 



RoprBTwey, 


BBltimore, MA. 


Chiifjuitict, 


1636, 


»5,000 


Jow^h Story, 


Cuabri4ge, Mmi. 


J—ociaU Xuiict, 


1811, 


4,500 


Rwmcy. 










John McLmp. 


Cincinnati, Ohio, 


ie. 


18J», 


4,500 


roc^. 










Junei M. Wayoe, 




ito. 


I8S6, 


4,300 


Jol^ McKinley, 


Florence, Ala. 


do. 


1837, 


^500 


John Catron, 


NashipillB, Tenii. 


do. 


1837, 


4,300 


P«lM V. D»niel, 


Bichmond, Vs. 


do. 


3841, 


4,500 


John Nriwn, 


Baltimore, Md. 


Jtttonuy Otrural, 


1843, 


4,000 


Bwj. C. Howard, 


Baltimore, Md. 


RiporUr, 


1S43. 


1,000 


WMiAm T. Carroll, 


TVajhinglon, 


Clnk, 




1,000 


AlUBQder Hunter, 


Washington, 


JHoriftoJ, 




Fee>, &c. 



l*e SupteoM Court i» held id the City oT Washington, tuid hai om u 
anmiBllj, commencing oa the 1st Monday of December. 



OODRTS : —JUDGES, 



] DiHrfcU. 


A*./*i, 




S,.l„s^ 




ft/- 




I Maine, 


PonUind, 


mm 


Gortiam Parks, 


tsa>a.{ 






H»WlBW Harvey, 




iSo 


Jo^l E«»lm<.t,r 


^d» 






toFlfH"'"^' 


BoJn,_^^J 




Charles Daiia, 








(: 




InT]"^-'^; 


A, T. JudMii, 






Charlt^a Chspmwi, 


200 do 




&S:fS:w, 


Auburn, *' 
New Yort, 


'i 




an do 

F'..Ac 




iHi"^^' 


Ph. Dickerson, 




u ■ 


aatt ». Greeue, 






Ajvhib'ld Rauddl 






"v'^.S:"^li„«n, 


F'a.*c 




n>om„ Irwin, 


PHubarf,^ 




swjir 






WiUnrd Hajl, 


Wilminpon, 




WiLliao H. Roger., 


aoedo 




li Midland,' 


Uplon S. HetUb, 


BBJIimore, 


V 


.CoLliiuLee,'^ 


F't.ic 




t-JI^S: 








tof^si. 


1M0&£ 




I, S. PeDiijrbsclier 






300 do 






Htirry Pon.r, 


Raleish, 




Duncan R.MoBae, 


SCO do 




^gauih cuD^xa^ 


R. B. QUelui.1, 


ClBrJealon, 


8; 


euwaril McCrady, 


aoodo 




John C. Nlwll, 


S«vw.nah, 


^ 


enryILJ«jl™q, 


aoodo 




|^-''T|.|i«: 


Wqi, Ci»wfcrd, 


MobUe, 


3,50g 


'a! »: A<-kUaV' 


St 






B.J.GhoU™, 


Atbeiu, . 


3,000 


Ox:arF. BLedioe, 
R. M. Gaiiiu, 


SOD do 

300 do 




|l«. % gj"^ 


T.RMcCeleb, 


New Orleuu, 


3,000 


BaiUe Pevlon, 
Cukb L. Swsyze, 


000 do 

900 do 








• 


1 










M. B. Bmwn, Naslnilla, 


l,600l 




SOOdo 




^ ' E.'Di«: 




J 


Thoma; C. llyon. 


200 do 




diUntuoiy, 


TTi, B. Monroe, {FrmUbrL 
^. H. I^avitl, ■ S«rub™.iU«, 


i,soo' 




200 do 




aOhio, 


l,*!)!* 


Charles Anlhooy, 


200 do 




aindi^a, 




1000 


CoonLsnd CuHbing, 


200 do 




n^Ulinoii/ 




1>10 


fuslin Bollerteld;' 


iWOdo 




aa^HiMouri, 


1,20U 


Wni,M. McPherMra, 


^d. 




SMIdugan, 


Senj. Jobiison) iLiiUe lUclc, 


1^00 




son do 






MUOO 


S,"li^H?m^!ni'it, 


SCO do 






■4m 


Philip R. F«.d.ll, 


?'•.*« 





• CoirecMd u the Depanmtut cf Bute, Ivlj 90, lSt4. 



18454 



jimxotA'Vr. 



*)7 



Circuit Cotjkts. 

The United States are divided into the followinn^ nine judicial cirenitt, In 
each of which a Circuit Court is held twice every year, for each State witkin 
the circuit, by a Justice of the Supreioe Court, assigned to the circuit, and hf 
the District Judge of the State or District in which the Court sits. 

Presiding Judge, 
Mr. Justice Story. 



1st Circuit, Maine, New Hampshire, Mass. and R. 1, 
Vermont, Connecticut, and New York. 
New Jersey and Pennsylvania. 
Delaware, Maryland, and Virginia, 
Alabama and Louisiana, 
N. Carolina, S. Carolina, and Georgia^ 
Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, and Michigan, 
Kentucky, Tennessee, and Missouri, 
Mississippi and Arlcansas, 

There is a local Circuit Court held by three Judges in the District of Colttei- 
bia, specially appointed for thlLt purpose. The Chief Justice of that Court lite 
also as District Judge of that District. 



2d 


do. 


3d 


do. 


4th 


do. 


5th 


do. 


6th 


do. 


7th 


do. 


8th 


do. 


9th 


do. 



Mr. Chief Just. ItkAkj. 
Mr. Justice Daniels. 
Mr. Justice Wayne. 
Mr. Justiee McL««it 
Mr. Justice Catron. 
Mr. Justice McEinlej. 



MARSHALS, AND CLERKS. 



.^A. 



Motr^tais. 
1 John D Kinsman, 
2 1. W. Kelley, 
3; William Barron, 
4 'Solomon Linoola, 
5|S. Harulu>m, 
GlBeniiing Mann, 

7 Clark Robinson, 

8 Silas M. Stilwell, 

9 J. A. Simpson^ 

10 George M. Keim, 

11 Heory C. Rosier, 

12 Nathaniel Wolfe, 

13 Moreau Forrest, 

14 E. Christian, 

15 James Points, 

16 Wesley Jones. 
17Thos. D. Condy, 
IS Hend. Willingham, 
19 W. Armistead, 

90 Benj. Patteson, 
21 A. K. McClong, 
23 Anderson Miller, 

23 A. S. Robertson, 

24 W. H. Bassett, 

25 R. J. Chester, 

26 B. H. Sheppard, 

27 R. M. Woods, 

28 W.B. Blackburn, jr. 
39 John McElvain, 

30 Robert Hanna, 

31 Thomas M. Hope, 

32 Wra. C. Anderson, 

33 (i. S. Humphrey, 

34 Henry M. Rector, 
36 Alexander Hnnte/j^, 



Residence. 
Portland, 
Salisbory, 
Bradford, 
Boston, 
Providence, 
Hartford, 
Buffalo, 
New York, 
Trenton, 
Philadelphia, 
Meadvdie, 
Newcastle, 
Baltimore, 
Richmond, 

S"*,aunton, 
aleigh, 
Charleston, 
Savannah, 
Mobile, 
Huntsville, 
Pontotock, 
Vicksburg, 
N. Orleans, 
Washington, 
Jackson, 
Nashville, 
Greenville, 
Versailles, 
Columbus. 
Indianapolis, 
Springfield, 
Payette, 
Munroe, 
Little Rock, 
WMh^^gton^ 



Ptrv. 
$200 &rs. 

200 do. 

200 do. 
Fees. ftc. 

200 &f. 

200 do. 

200 do. 
Fees, Sec, 

200 &f. 
Fees.&c. 

200 Jbf. 

200 do. 
Fees, Ac. 

200 &f. 

200 do. 

400 do. 
Fees, Ac. 
do. 

200 &f. 

200 do. 

200 do. 

900 do. 

200 do. 

900 do. 

200 do. 

200 do. 

800 do. 

800 do. 

200 do. 

200 do. 

200 do. 

200 do. 

200 do. 

809 do. 



Clerks, 

John Mussey, 
C. W. Cutter, 

E. H. Prentisa, 
Francis Bassett, 
John T. Pitman, 

C. A. Ingersoll, 
R. B. mier, 
Fred. J. Betts, 
Rob. D. Spencer, 

F . Hopkinson, 
B.J.Roberts, 
W.A.Mendenhal, 
Thomas Spicer, 
Heuiy Oil»on, 

Moore, 

W. H. Haywood, 
James JarVey, 
George Glenn, 

D. FQeS. 

G. R. CUfton^ 
G. M. Ragsdale, 
William Bums, 

N. R. Jennings, 
Caleb Green, 
N. A. McNairy, 
W. C. Mynatt, 
J. H. Hanna, 
William Miner, 
Hfenry Hurst, 
J. F. Oroings. 
Joseph Gamble, 
John Winder, 
William Pifild, 



ResitUnee, 
Portland, 
Portsmouth, 
Mdntpelier, 
Bostdn, 
Providence, 
New Haven, 
Utica, 
New York, 
Mt. Holly. 
Philadelpnia, 
Pittsburg 
Wilmington, 
Baltimore. 
Richmond, 
Clarksburg, 
Raleigh. 
Chaxleston, 
Savaiuah , 
Mobile, 
Hunuville, 

Jackson, 

N. Orleans, 

Nashville, 

Knoxville, 

Frankfort, 

Columbus, 

Corydon, 

Spnngfield, 

St. Louis, 

Detroit. 

Little R6ck, 

Washington, 



1^. 
Feet, 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
d9« 
do. 
do. 
do. 
doi - 
do. 
do. 
do. 

t: 

do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 

do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 



1 



108 



VMITSO 8TATK9. 



[184d. 



Plaoxs and Times of holding the Distkiot Courts. 



Mains. 

N. Hampshisk. 

VSKMONT. 

Massachusetts 
Kbods Island. 

Connecticut. 

New York, 
S. District. 



New Yoke, 
N. District. 



New Jbkset. 

Pennsylvania, 
£. District. 

Pennsylvania, 
W. District 



Delaware. 

Maryland. 

Columbia. 

Virginia, 

E. District. 



Virginia, 

W. District, 



{ 



! 



N. Carolina. 



8. Carolina. 



I 



WUcasset — 1st Tuesday in September; — Portland — 
1st Tuesday in February and December; — Ban- 
gor— 4th Tuesday in June. 

{Portsmouth — 3d Tuesday in March and September ; — 
Exeter — 3d Tuesday in June and December. 

i^uftonrf— 6th of Oct. ;— TTwu/aor— 24th of May. 

! Boston — 3d Tuesday in March, 4th Tuesday in June, 
2d Tuesday in Sept., and 1st Tuesday in Dec. ' 

i Newport — 26 Tuesday in May, and 3d in October; — 
Providence — 1st Tuesday in August and February. 

New Havenr— 4th. Tuesday in February and August;— 
Hartfordr^-Ath Tuesday in May and November. 

< New York — Ifet Tuesday of each month. 

Jlbany — 3d Tuesday in January;-^ Olico-^2d Tues- 
day in July ; — Rochester — 3d Tuesds^ in May ; — 
Buffalo— 2d Tuesday in October. — One term an- 
nually in the countj of St, Lawrence, Clinton, or 
Franklin, at such time and place as the judge may 
direct. 

jyenton — ^2d Tuesday in March and September, and 
3d Tuesday in May and November. 

f Philadelphia — 3d Monday in February, May, August, 
and November. 

{Pittsburg — 1st Monday in May, and Ist Monday in 
October; — WiUiamsport — 1st Monday in October. 

' Newcastle and Dover — alternately, on the 4th Tuesday 
in Nov. 1789; and three other sessions progres- 
sively, on the 4th Tuesday of every 3d calendar 
month. 

i Baltimore— on the 1st Tuesday in JVIarch, June, Sep- 
tember, and December. 
Washington — 1st Monday in June and December. 

! Richmond — 12th of May, and 12th of November ; — 
Norfolk — 30th of May, and 1st of November. 

Staunton — 1st day of May, and 1st day of October; — 
Wythe Court House — 3a Monday in April and Sep- 
tember; — Charleston — Wednesdays after the 2d 
Monday in April and September; — Clarksburg — last 
Mondays in March and August ; — Wheeling — Wed- 
nesdays after the first Mondays in April and Sept. 

{Edenton — 3d Monday in April and Oct ; — Newbum — 
4th Monday in April and Oct. ; — Wilmington — 1st 
Monday after the 4th Monday in April and Oct. 

Charleston — 3d Monday in March and September, 1st 
Monday in July, and 2d Monday in Dec. ; — Laurens 
Court Mouse — the next Tuesday after the adjourn- 
ment of the Circuit Court at Columbia. 



1645.] 



INTBSCOUaSB WITH VOREXGN NATIOZfS. 



109 



Gkokgia. 

Alabak A, N. Dist. 

Alabama, ( 

M. District ( 

Alabama, S. Dist 

Mississippi. 

Louis'a, E. Dist 

Louis'a, W. Dist 

Tbnnesske, 
£. District 

Tbkbbsseb, 
W. District 



Kbhtuckt. 
Ohio. 

MiCHIGAIf. 

Imdiana. 

Illimois. 

MiSSOUBI. 

Abkabsas. 



Savannah — 2d Taes. in Feb., May, Aug., and Nor. 

HuntsviUe — 2d Monday in April and October. 

Tkiscaloosa^-Ath Monday in May, and 1st Monday after 
the 4th Monday in November. 

Mobile — 1st Monday in May, and 2d Monday in Dec. 

Jackson— 4^th. Monday in January and June. 

New Orleans — 2d Monday in December. 

Opelousas Court Houst-— 2d Monday in June. 

< KnoxoiUe — 3d Monday in April and October. 

Nashville — 4th Monday in May and NoTember; — 
Jackson — 2d Monday in October and April. 

IVankfort — Ist Monday in May and 3d Monday in 
November. 

Columbus — ^3d Monday in July and 4th Monday in 
December. 

Detroit — 3d Monday in June and 2d Monday in Oct 

huHanapolis — ^last Monday in May and November. 

Vandalia — 1st Monday in May and December. 

Jeffierson City — 1st Monday in March and September. 

lAttU Bock — 1st Monday in October. 



! 
i 



IV. INTERCOURSE WITH FOREIGN NATIONS.— Aug., 1844. 

The pay of Ministers Plenipotentiary is $9,000 per annum, as salary, 
besides $9,000 for outfit The pay of Charges d' Affaires is $4,500 per 
annum ; of SecreUries of Legation, $2,000 ; of Ministers Resident, $6,000. 

The government of the United States is represented by Ministers 
Plenipotentiary at the Courts of Great Britain, France, Russia, Prussia, 
Austria, Spain, Brazil, and Mexico; and by Charges d* Affaires at the 
Courts of most of the other foreign countries with which this country is 
much connected by commercial intercourse. 

1. MlBISTEBS AWD DIPLOMATIC AOENTS OF THE UnITBD StATBS 

IN Fo&EION CoUNTBlES. 



Edward Everett, 
William R. King, 
Charles S. Todd, 
Henry Wheaton, 
Daniel Jenifer, 
Wilson Shannon, 
Henr3r A. Wise, 
WasiuogtOA Irving, 

10 



Mnisters Flenipotintiary in 1844. 

Appointed. Foreign States. 
Great Britain, 
France, 
Russia, 
Prussia, 
Austria, 
Mexico, 
Brazil, 
Spain, 



Mass. 


1841 


Ala. 


1844 


Ken. 


1841 


R. I. 


1837 


Md. 


1841 


Ohio. 


1844 


Va. 


1844 


N.Y. 


1842 



Capitals. 

London. 

Paris. 

St Petersburg. 

Berlin. 

Vienna. 

Mesdco. 

Rio Janeiro. 

Mubid. 



no 



VHITSB STAVSS* 



[1849. 



Caleb CusluDg, 
George Brown, 



Trancis R. "Rivik, 
J. L. Martin, 
John S. Maxwell, 
Theodore S. Fay, 
J. K Clay, ' 



Mass. 
Mass. 



Appointed. Foreign States. 



1843 I China. 

1843 Sandwich Isles. 



Salary. 

$9,000. 

3,000. 



Stcretaries cf Legation, 
G, Britain. 



France. 
Russia. 
Prussia. 
Austria. 



Jasper H. Livingston, Spain. 
Robert M. Walsh, Brazil. 

B. E. Green, Mexico. 

Salary. 
Fletcher Webster, China, f 4,500. 



Jtftntffcr Bendeni, 



Appointed. 

Dabney S. Carr, Md. | 1843 | Turkey, 

John P. Brown, Dragoman to the Legation. 

Charg6$ d^Jffamt in 1844. 



\ Constantinoptev 
Salary, $2,500. 



Appointed. 

Christopher Hughes, Md. 1842 

Thomas G. Clemson, Pa. 1844 

George W. Lay, N. Y. 1842 

William W. Irwin, Pa. 1843 

WilUam M. Blackford, Va. 1842 

Allen A. Hall, Tenn. 1841 

William Crump, Va. 1844 

James C, Pickett, Ky. 1838 

Tilghman A. Howard, Ind. 1844 

William Boulware, Va. 1841 

William Brent, Jr.. Va. 1844 

Robert Wickliffe, Jr. Ky. 1843 

Abraham Rencher, N. C. 1843 



Netherlands, 

Belgium, 

Sweden, 

Denmark, 

New Grenada, 

Venezuela, 

Chili, 

Peru, 

Texas, 

Two Sicilies, 

ArgentineRepub. 

Sanlinia, 

Portugal, 



Hague. 

Brussels. 

Stockholm. 

Copenhagen* 

Bogotd. 

Caraccas. 

Santiago. 

Lima. 

Washington. 

Naples. 

Buenos Ayres^ 

Turin. 

Lisbon. 



2. List of Cozcsuls and Commercial Agezcts of the United 
States in Foreign Countries, and of the Places of their 
Residence \ — Corrected in the Department of State to July 20^A, 1844. 

IHT* Those marked thus * are Commercial Agents. 



Argentine Republic, or Buenos 
Atres. 

Amory Edwards, Buenos Ayres. 

Austria. 

J. G. Schwartz, Vienna. 

George Moore, Trieste. 

Albert Dabadie, Venice. 

Baden. 
George F. Gerding, Manheim. 

Barbary States. 
John F. Mullowny. j '^'^^^^ 



John H. Payne, Tunis, Tunis. 

Dan. S. Macauley, Tripoli, Tripoli. 

Belgium. 
Samuel Haight, Antwerp. 

Brazil. 

Charles B. Allen, Maranham IsL 

Charles J. Smith, Para. 

G. T. Snow, Pemambuco. 

George W. Gordon, Rio Janeiro. 

George Black, Santos. 

St. Catherine's 
Island. 



Lemuel WeUs, 



i 



1849J 



XMTBKCOXJSSB WIIS FO»»I«ll NATIONS. 



Hi 



John C. Pedrick, Bio Grande. 
Al-H. Tyler. { »^^,.«-« 

Central Ambkica. 
Stsphen H. Weexns, Guatemala. 
A. Follinf, TruziUo, (Honduras) 

Ebepu R. I>on:, Valpafaiso. 

P. H. Delano, Talcahuano. 

Samuel F. Ha^iland, Coqnimbo. 

China. 
Thomas G. Peachy, Amoy. 
Paul S. Forbes, Canton. 

Dbnkakk. 
Charles F. Ryan, Copenhagen. 

Edmund L. Bainals,^ Elsineur. 

David Rogers^ Santa Craz. 

E«TFT, iWia ^ 

Alexandria. 

£<IUAT0B. 

Seth Sweetser, Guayaquil 

Fkanob. 
XiOrenzo Draper, Paris. 

Hooper C. Eaton, Lyons. 
Reuben G. Beasley, Havre. 
John W. Grigsby, 
Daniel C. Crozall, 
Thomas Hulme, 
Essex R. Livingston, Nantes. 
F. M. Aboyneau, La Rochelle. 



Gbbat Butain. 
JEngUmd. 

Thomas Aspinwall, 
James Hagarty, 
Francis B. Ogden, 
Robert W. Fox, 
Thomas Were Fox, 
Joseph R. Croskey, 
Albert Davy, 



London. 

LiverpooL 

BiistoL 

Falmouth. 

Plymouth. 

Cowes. 

Leeds. 



Scotland. 
Robert Grieve, 
Edward Baxter, 
Thomas McGuire» 

JreUmd, 
Thomas Wilsom 
James Shaw, 
James McHeniy, 
John Murphy, 
Michael Keni^edy, 



Leith. 

Dundee. 

Glasgow. 

DubUn, 

Beliast 

Londondeny. 

Cork. 

Gahray. 



hmidimfiMmtfp^fmdJfiietu 
Horatio Sprague, Gibraltar. 
Wm. W. Andrews, 
* Win. Carroll, 
Isaac Chase, 



Isl. of Malta. 
Isl. St Helena. 
Cape-Town. 



Bordeaux. 

Marseilles. 

Sedan. 



Wut Miet, 

( Pointe-a 
John W. Fisher, i Pitre, Guade- 

\ loupe. 

Philip A. de C.6«y, { ^^, 

S^uth Anurica, 
Joseph W. Fahens, Cayenne. 

Jtfiiea, 
Fiancis Lacrouts, Algiers. 



R,i«np.D.rii«r,{i'-j;^^^: 

NMrthjSmmca. 

Israel D. Andrews, St. John's, N. B. 

T. B. Livingston, Haliftx, N. S. 

James Primrose, Pictou, N. S. 

Cha's H. Delavan, Sidney, N. S. 

Wtit Indus. 
Wm. T. Tucker, Berm^da. 

m* xv T\ V ^ ( Nassau, Baha^ 
Timothy DarUng, | ^ 5^}^^^^ 

John Arthur, Turk's Island. 

Robert M. Harrison, Kingston, Ja. 

{St Christo- 
pher and An- 



Wm. R. Hayes, 



1^ tigua. 

Barbadoes. 

Trinidad. 



il2 



VHITSP STATES. 



South jimerica. 



Mosei Benjamin, j S^Guiana. 

jiustralia, 
J«ne. H. Williams, { %^li,f,''' 
Elisha Hathaway, Jr. Hobart Town. 

East Indies. 
Joseph Balestier, Singapore. 

Bombay. 
James B. Higginson, Calcutta. 
Tho's W. Waldron, Hong Kong. 

6&EXCE. 

6. A. Perdicaiis, Athens. 

Hanseatic, or Fbeb Cities. 

John Cuthbert, Hamburg. 

A. D. Mann, Bremen. 

Frankfort on 
the Maine. 



Ernest Schwendler 



•1 



Hanovbk, Hesse Cassel,& Hesse 
Dahmstadt. 

Charles Graebe, CasseL 

Hayti, ob St. Domingo. 
Joseph C. Luther, Pt. au Prince. 
Wm. B. Grooch, Auz Cayes. 

Geo. F. Ushur, Cape Hajrtien. 

Mexican Republic. 

John Black, Mexico. 

Manuel Alvarez, Santa F6. 

Tampico or 
Santa Anna 
de TamauU- 
. pas, 

Metamoros. 

( Vera Cruz and 
( Alvarado. 

Tabasco. 

( Laguna, 



Franklin Chase, 



Richaid S. Belt, 
F. M. Dimond, 
Edward Porter, 



Leonard RAlmy, I -^-.„j^ 

John F. McGregor, Campeachy. 
Thomas O. Larkin, Monterey. 
John Parrottj Mazatlan. 



[ISid. 

Albert M. Gilliam, | ^j? ,^5V*" 

' ( CO, (Calif.) 

Jos^ Maria Cas&nos, San Bias. 

John A. Robinson, Guaymas. 

P.deRegilyEetrada{^-id^^^^j 

Muscat, Dominion of the 

hnawm of 

Syed Ben Calfaun, Muscat. 

flsl. Zanzibar, 
Richard P. Waters, -j near E. coast 

[ of Africa. 

The Nethkblakds, oe Hoi.i.ait9. 
Charles Nichols, Amsterdam. 
W. S. Campbell, Rotterdam. 

Colonies. 

W. H. Freeman, Curasao, W. L 
O. M. Roberts, Batavia, Java. 

New Gbenada. 

Ramon L. Sanchez, Carthagena. 
Th. W. Robeson. Santa Martha. 
J. A. Townsend, Panama. 

Pacific Islands, Independent. 

S. R. Blackler, .Tahiti, Soc. L 
P. A. Brinsmade, Hawaii, San. L 

John B. William., {Ba7m»^d^ 

Pebu. 

Stanhope Prevost, Lima. 
Alex. Ruden, Jr., Paita. 

PoBTUaAL. 

Wm. H. Vesey, Lisbon. 

Louxs Tinelli^ Oporto. 

hUmds. 
Cha*s W. Dabney, Fayal, Azores. 
John H. March, Funchal, Mad 

Ferd. Ganlner. ) «^,^«Ve«l. 

Pbussia. 
Frederick Schillow, Stettin. 



164&] 



IHTBKCOURSI WIV8 VOUU«N NATIONS. 



113 



RoMX, 0& Pontifical States. 

George W. Greene, Rome. 
James £. Freeman, Ancona. 
Henry 7. Brent, Ravenna. 

Russia. 

A. P. Gibson, St. Petersburg. 

Alex. Schwartz, Riga. 

Edmund Brandt, Archangel. 

John Ralli, Odessa. 

Sa&dinia, SSfngdom f^ 

C. Edwaidf Lester, Genoa. 
Victor A. Sassemo, Nice. 



Saxony. 



John G. Flagel, 
George Mbhr, 

Spain. 

Maximo de Aguirre, 
Alexander Burton, 
George Read, 
P. Pou, 
Obadiah Rich, 



Leipsic. 
Dresden. 



Bilbao. 
Cadiz. 
Malaga: 
Barcelona. 
Port Mahon. 



Cuba, 
Robert B. Campbell, 
Thomas M. Rodney, 

Samuel McLean, 

Michael Mahon, 

John Hartman, 
William Hogfin, 

Franklin Gage, 
Joseph Raymond, 



Havana. 

Matanzas. 

i Trinidad de 
Cuba. 

{Santiago de 
Cuba. 

Baracoa. 

Nuevitas. 

Cien Fuegos. 

Cardenas. 

Manzanillo. 



Puerto Rico, 

James C. Gallaher, Ponce. 

Gurdon Bradley, Mayaguez. 

Wm. H, Tracy, Guayama, 

O. S. Morse, St. John's. 



Other Spanish Idandt, 

Joseph Cullen, Tenerifie, Canary. 
H. P. Sturgis, Manilla, Philipp. 

SWEDBN AND NoRWAT. 

C. D. Arfwedson, Stockholm. 
C. A. Murray, Gothenburg. 

Helmich Janson, Bergen. 

Switzerland. 
Seth T. Otis, Basil or Basle. 

Henry Mahler, Zurich. 

Texas. 

Morgan L. Smith, Velasco. 

A. M. Green, Galveston. 

W. W. T. Smith, Matagorda. 

Stewart Newell, Sabine. 

Turkey. 

George A. Porter, Constantinople. 
David W. Offley, Smyrna. 
Jasper Chasseaud, for aU 8i/ria, 

Tuscany. 

Joseph A. Binda, Leghorn. 
Edward Gamage, Florence. 

Two Sicilies. 

Alexander Hammett, Naples. 
John M. Marston, Palermo. 
John L. Pa3rson, Messina; 

Uruguay or Cisplatine 
Republic. 

Robert M. Hamilton, Monte Video. 

Venezuela. 

Franklin Litchfield, Puerto Cabello. 
John P. Adams, Laguayra. 
Charles A. Leas, Maracaibo. 

WURTEMBURO. 

Frederick List. Stuttgard. 

The only consuls who receive salaries are those for London, $2,000, 
Tangier, $^000, Tunis, $2,000, Tripoli, $2,000, and Beiiout, $500. 

10# 



114 



VmtED 8TATXt. 



[1845< 



3. Foreign Ministers and their Seorstaries, 
Accredited to the Government of the United States, 



Foreign Skates. Envoys Ex. ^ Min. Hen. 
Great Britain, Richard Pakenham, 



France, 



M 



Russia, 



M. Alph. Pageot, 
Alexander Bodisco, 



(C 



Spain, 



SeeretarieSf ^e. 
James Hudson. 
W. 6. Lettson, Mtachi, 
Chatry de Lafosse. 
M. de Sampayo, Mtachi. 
George Khremer. 
Mr. de Stoekl, Jttachi, 
M. Calderon de la Barca, Sr. Tacon. 

Mr. Liguez y Bardaxi, AttaM, 
Don J. N. Almonte, Aogel Cos, Sec. of Leg. 

Argentine Rep. Carlos Maria de Alvear, Mn. Hemp, and Extraard. 

Emilio de Alvear, Sec. of Leg. 

JMinisters Resident. 
Vacamcy. 

J. C.de Figaniere e Morao. Jttachi^F.de Menezes de Brito 
Chev. Gaspar Jo86 de Lisboa. [do Rio. 



u 



Mexico, 



Prussia, 

Portugal, 

Brazil, 



Charges d'Affoxres. 
Netherlands, Chev'r J. C. Gevers. 
Belgium, M. Charles Serruys, Baron A. Vanderstraten Ponthon, 

Chevalier Hulsemann, \Scc.of Leg, 

Chevalier Gustavus de Nordin. 

M. Steen de Bill6. 

Count Albert Lupi de Montalto. 

Isaac Van Zandt. 



Austria, 

Sweden, 

Denmark, 

Sardinia, 

Texas, 



4. Foreign Consuls and Vice-Consuls in the United States.* 

A IA»t of Foreign Ckmstds and Vue- Consuls in the United States^ for whom 
Exequaturs have been issued from the Department of State. 

C7* Those marked thus * arc Consuls' General; — thus f Vice- Consuls: — the rest aio 
Consuls. 

Austria. 

J. W. Langdon, Boston. 
fJoseph Granahl, Savannah. 
C. J. Hohenburgher, New Orleans. 



Baden. 

*Johan. W. Schmidt, New York. 
Frederick Frey, New Orleans. 
tJacob H. Eimer, New Orleans. 



Bavaaia. 

G. Heinrich Siemon, New Tork. 
C. Fred. Hagedom, Philadelphia. 

Belgium. 

tLoring F. Wheeler, Eastport. 
Thomas A. Deblois, Portland. 
Henry G. T. Mali, New York. 



• This list is necessarily imperfect in some degree, as no official record of the foreim 

very exeruoi 

e list, are rei 

subsequent 




1845.] 



FOKXXGN CONSULS, feG^ 4N THC UNITED 8TATS8. 



115 



tHippoIyte Mali, 
fJohn D. Bates, 
Adolphe E. Borie, 
Samuel D. Walker, 
A. W. NolUng, 
Auguste Branda, 
Greorge A. Hopley, 
John C. Ferrill, 
Charles Auz6, 
tWilliam Porter, 
tTh. A. Pinckney, 
Edward Mallard, 



New York. 

Boston. 

Philadelphia. 

Baltimore. 

Richmond. 

Norfolk. 

Charleston. 

Savannah. 

Mobile. 

Apalachicola. 

Key West. 

New Orleans. 



Brazil. 
♦L. H. F. De Aguira. 
Archibald Foster, Mass., N.H., and 

Maine, Boston. 
tGeo. S. Wardwell, Providence. 
fC. Griffin, Connecticut. 

tL. F. De Figaniere, New York. 
tEdward S. Sayres, Philadelphia. 
1 Greo. H. Newman, Baltimore, 
t Christopher Neale, Dist. of Colum. 
tMyer Myers, Norfolk. 

tJn. P. Calhorda, Wilming'UjN. C. 
tS. Chadwick, Charleston,S.C. 

fJohn W.Anderson, Savannah. 
Jas. W. Zacharie, Louisiana. 
tPeter Reynand, New Orleans. 

Srctntn. 
Thomas Searle, Boston. 
Herman Oelrichs, New York. 
Christop. F. Plate, Philadelphia. 
^Albert Schumacker, Baltimore. 
Ant. Ch. Cazenove, Dist. of Col. 
Lewis Trapman, Charleston. 
Eleazer Crabtree, Savannah, 6a. 
Freder'k Rodewald, New Orleans. 

Brunawiek. 
JohannD.Kleudgen,New York. 

Chili. 
Franklin H. Delano, New York. 

Jknmark. 
George M. Thatcher, Mass., Me. 
N. H., and R. L, Boston. 



fSamuel Beck, N. York, Conn., and 
part of N. J., New York. 

t Christopher Neale, Dist. of Colum- 
bia and the ports on the Potomac. 

tFrederick Myers, Virginia, (ports 
on the Potomac excepted,) to re- 
side at Norfolk. 

tP. K. Dickinson, Wilmington, N. C. 

W. Crabtree, Georgia. 

J. F. C. F. Ules, N. Orleans, 

Ecuador. 
James H. Causten, Washington. 
Samuel Sweetser, Philadelphia. 

France. 

*De la Foret, New York. 

Max Isnard, Boston. 

tJ. Picket, Boston. 

M. B. B. de L. D'Hautrieve, Philad. 
Sr. Pillavoine, Baltimore. 

Ct. de Montholon, Richmond. 
tJ. B. A. M. Des^ze, Norfolk. 
Count de Choiseul, Charleston. 
De L. de Villeret, Savannah. 
fLouis Julienne, Natchez. 
Jean J. Aversenc, Mobile. 
Aim^ Roger, New Orleans. 

Frankfort on the Maim. 

Fred. Wysmann, New York. 
Arnold Halbach, Philadelphia. 

Greai Britain. 

Joseph J. Sherwood, Portland. 
Th. Colley Grattan, Mass., Boston. 
tE. A. Grattan, Boston. 
Anthony Barclay, New York. 
J. Mc. Tavish, Maryland. 

W. Ogilly, N. and S. Car. 

C. J. Peshall, Wilming'n,N.C. 

Chas. L. Fitzgerald,Flor.and Ala. 
A. L. Molyneux, Georgia. 
J. Crawford, New Orleans. 

Greece. 

Eugene Dutilh, New York. 
Henry G. Andrews, Boston. 



116 

Cfuatemala. 
^Antonio de Aycenena. 

JatXBiwrg, 
Johann W. Schmidt, New York. 
Fred*k Rodewald, Baltimore. 
Louis Trapmann, Charleston. 
F. W. Schmidt. Louisiana. 

Hanover. 



imiTXO STATIi. 



1184ft 



L. H. Meyer, 
tA. W. Hupeden, 
John Leppien, 
Edward Uhrlauh, 
J. A. Van Cooth, 
J. B. Bher, 



New York. 
State of N. Y. 
Philadelphia. 
Baltimore. 
Charleston. 
New Orleans. 



tB. Homer Dixon, Boston. 
fThomas Thaxter, Salem, Mass. 
J. C. Zimmerman, N. Y., N. J., and 
Conn., New York. 



Henry Bohlen, 
Frederic B. Graff, 
tJ. A. Van Cooth, 
P. J. Lechteitner, 
tOliver O'Hara, 
Myer Myers, 



Eiector of Bk$$€ and Grand Duke 
ofFuida, 
Conrad W. Faher, New York. 

Grand Duke of Hesse, 
Antoin BoUerman, New York. 

Zjubeck. 
William Kruger, New York. 

Mecklenberg- Schwerin, 
*Leon Herchenrath, Charleston. 

Mexico, 

^Juan de la Granga, New York. 
tEdward Cahot, Boston. 
tFelix Merino, Philadelphia, 

t Charles Tieman, Baltimore. 
fRohert Adger, Charleston. 
tOtoaL.Dabelsteen,New Orleans. 
tJuan Herbst, Pittsburg. 

fD. Juan F. Cortes, Natchitoches. 
fAld. A. M. Jackson, Pensacola. 
Lewis Ramirez, St. Louis^ Mo. 
Antonio Niel, Independence, Mo 
tGeorge P. Ward, Florida. 
fCarlos Lebaron, Mobile, Ala. 

Netherlands. 
Thomas Dixon, for Mass., Me., N. H., 
and R. I, Boston. 



Philadelphia. 

Baltimore. 

Charle8ton,S.C. 

Annapolis. 

Key West. 

Norfolk. 



t Godfrey Bamsley, Savannah. 
H. C. Gildemeester, N. Orleans. La. 
Stevenson Forbes, Alabama and 
Florida, Mobile. 

New Grenada, 
*Don Domingo Acosta. 

Oldenburg. 

E. Pavenstedt, New York. 

Chas. T. Lowndes, Charleston, S. C. 

Portugal. 

tP. Noailles Searle, New York, 
t Ant. J. Gouvea, N. Orleans, La. 
Jn. M. L. Smith, Baltimore, Md. 
tD. Antonio G. Vega, Mass., R. I„ 

and New Hampshire, Boston. 
tPaniel J. Desmond, Penn. and N.J. 
fJ G. Doon, Savannah. 

t Christopher Neale, Dist. of Col . 
tWalter Delacy, Norfolk, Va. 

Prussia. 

J. C. Lang, Philadelphia. 

Ludwig Brauns, Maryland. 
tWilhelm Vogel, New Orleans. 

Borne. 

^Peter Amed^e Hargons. 
fMartin Mantin, New Yoric. 
t Charles Picot, Philadelphia. 
tXh. Jos. Bizonard, Baltimore. 
tWm.D'Azet Senac, Norfolk. 
tSamuel Wright, Savannah. 
tHenry Perret, New Orleans. 



1845.] FOAEIGN CONSULS, leC., IN TBS UNITED STATES. 

Russia, 



117 



♦Alex. Evstaphieff, New York. 
tAlexander Baker, New York. • 
t A. W. Thaxter, Jr., Boston. 
tCharles L. Kuster, Baltimore. 
tC. Jean. Cazenove, Dist of Col. 
Edward Johns, New Orleans. 

Sardinia. 

Laigi Mossi, Consid Gm.^ N. York. 
tNicholas Reggio, Me., N. H., 

Mass., and R. I., Boston. 
fDaniel J. Desmond,for Penn., N. J., 

and Pel., Philadelphia. 
fL. A. Edmondston, Charleston, S.C. 
tA. Felix George, Mobile. 
Antonio Michourd, New Orleans. 

8axe Ooburg and Gotha, 
Carl Frederick Haussmaft, for U. S. 

8ax€' Weimar, 

♦Fred. Aug. Mensch, New York. 
Edward Stucken, New York. 

Saxony, 

♦Ch. Aug. Davis, New York. 
J. Randolph Mahler, New York. 
tCharles J. Cazenove, R. I., Mass., 

N. H., and Me., Boston. 
Robert Ralston, Philadelphia. 
F. Ludwig Brauns, Md., Baltimore. 
J. F. C. Ules, New Orleans. 

Spain. 

♦Don Pablo Chacon,Philadelphia. 
tDon Ant. G. Vega, Boston. 
F. Stoughton, New York. 

tXh. Am. Deblois, Portland. 
tF. Moreno, Pensacola. 

tD. Ponce, Savannah. 

tDon Jos6 J. Cruzat, Mobile, 
t Antonio Larruaga, Charleston. 
Antonio Pizarro, Baltimore. 
tWalter de Lacy, Norfolk. 



tJohn Notliss, Key West. 

A. A. Villalobos, New Orleans. 

Sweden and Norway. 
tCharles J. Hunt, Mass., N. H., and 

Me., Boston, 
t Claudius E. Habicht, New York. 
tRichard Seldener, Pa., Philadel. 
tF. B. Graf, Baltimore. 

tJohn H. Brent, Alexandria, D. C. 
tDuncan Robertson, Norfolk. 
tDiedr. Miesegaes, New Orleans. 
tFran. H. Wilman, Savannah. 
tJos. A. Winthrop, South Carolina. 
George Westfield, Mobile. 
John Merle, La., and Miss., New 

Orleans. 

Suntzerland. 

Louis P. De Luge, New England 

and New York, New York. 
J. G. Syze, Penn., N. J., and Dela- 
ware, Philadelphia. 
A. Ott, for Ind., HI., Ohio, Mich., 
and Wisconsin Ter. 

Tkxas. 

Nath*l Amory, Boston. 

Aug. W. Radcliff, New York. 

Cyrus Joy, Philadelphia. 

H. Williams, Baltimore. 

Wm. B. Hamilton, Richmond. 

Samuel G. Taylor, Norfolk. 

Th. L. Hamilton, Charleston. 

Wm. Bryan, New Orleans. 

T. T. Pettyplace, Mobile. 

Joseph B. Browne, Key West. 

A. McGuffy, Cincinnati. 

Hucany. 

tW. H. Aspinwall, New York. 
Carlo Gavenni, Mobile. 

J\do Sicilies. 

*D, Rocco Maruscelli, New York. 
♦Don Domenico Morelli, Philadel. 
tNicholas Reggio, Boston. 



118 



VKITBD 8TATSS. 



[1849. 



tB. D. Potter, 
tint CUsbe, 
fLuca Palmieri, 
tGeo. H. Newman, 
tN. E. Fowls, 
tAatonio Pomer, 
6. A. Trenholm, 
tGoffredo Barasley, 
to. Wolff, 
to. A. Barelli, 



ProTidence. 
N. Haven, Ct 
Philadelphia. 
Baltimore. 
Dist. of Col. 
Norfolk. 
Charleston, S.C. 
Savannah. 
Mobile. 
New Orleans. 



Vruguay, 



E. S. Tobey, 
tG. F. Darby, 
tJoseph Cabot, 
tT. B. Garf, 
tG. L. Lowden, 



Boston. 
New York. 
Philadelphia. 
Baltimore. 
Charleston. 



tC. J. Manson^, Mobile. 

tE. Dudley Head, New Orleans. 

Vmezuda, 

Silas G. Whitney, Boston. 

tJohn P. Bigelow, Boston. 

Juan B. Purroy, New York. 

W. McUhenny. Philadelphia.' 

J. F. Strohm, Baltimore. 

Aaron Milhado, Norfolk. 

Wurtimberg, 

^Ferdinand L. Brauns, Baltimore. 
John D. Fink, Ala., Mp., La., and 
Florida, New Orleans. 



1. 



V. NAVY I,IST. 

COKKANDEBS OF SqUABSONS. 



David Conner, 


Commodore, Home Squadron. 


Daniel Turner, 


do. Coast of Brazil. 


Joseph Smith, 


do, Mediterranean. ^ 


A. J. Dallas, 


do. Pacific Ocean. 


F. A. Parke?, 


do. East Indies. 


M, C. Perry, 


do. Coast of Africa. 


2. 


COMUANDSES OF NaVT YaRQS. 


Geo. W. Storer, 


Portsmouth. 


John H. Aulick, Washington 


John B. Nicolson, 


Boston. 


Jesse Wilkinson, Norfolk. 


S. H, Stringham, 


New York. 


E. A. F. Lavallette, Pensacola. 


George C. Read, 


Philadelphia. 





3. P08.T Captains. 

John Downes, Boston. 

Jacob Jones, New York. 

W. Compton Bolton, Norfolk. 



4. Commanders of Naval Sta- 
tions. 

Charles G. Ridgeley, Baltimore. 
Uames Renshaw, Charleston, S. C. 



9. Naval Astlum. 
Charles W. Morgan, ChvemoTf Philadelphia. 



1845.] 



ITATT LIST. 



119 



6. Ofvicxbs 07 THX Navt. 
Cap<atnt.'-^9. 



James Barron, 
Charles Stewart, 
Jacob Jones, 
Charles Morris, 
Ii. Warrington, 
Wm. M. Crane, 
James Biddle, 
C. G. Ridgely, 
John Downes, 
Jesse D. EUiott, 
Stephen Cassin, 
James Rensbaw, 
A. S. Wadaworth, 
George C. Read, 
H. £. Ballard, 
Samuel Woodhonse, 
Alexander J. Dallas, 
J. B. NicolBon, 



Jesse Wilkinson, 
T. Ap C. Jones, 
Wilham C. Bolton, 
W. B. Shubrick, 
C. W. Morgan, 
L. Kearny, 
F. A. Parker, 
E. R. McCall, 
Daniel Turner, 
David Cionner, 
William M. Honter, 
John D. Sloat, 
Matthew C. Ferry, 
C. W. Skinner, 
John T. Newton, 
Joseph Smith, 
L. Rousseau, 



George W. Storer, 
F. H. Gregory, 
P. F. Voorhees, 
Benjamin Cooper, 
David Geisinger, 
R. F. Stockton, 
Isaac McKeever, 
J. P. Zantzinger, 
Wm. D. Salter, 
Ch. S. McCauley, 
T. M. NeweU, 
E. A. F. Lavallette, 
T. T. Webb, 
John PercivGu, 
John H. Aulick, 
W. V. Taylor, 
Bladen Dmany, 



S. H. Stringham, 
Isaac Mayo, 
William Mervine, 
Thomas Crabb, 
Thomas Paine, 
James Armstrong;, 
Joseph 3 moot, 
Samuel L. Breeze, 
Benjamin Page, 
John Gwinn, 
Thomas W.Wyman, 
Andrew Fitzhogh, 
W. K. Latimer, 
Hiram Paaldmg, 
Uriah P. Levy, 
Charies Boarman, 
French Forrest. 



7. Pat of the Navt, jwr amwm. 



JPcDy. 
CAPTAms, 66, Senior, in serviee, $4,500 

Do. do. on leave, 3,500 

Captains of Squadrons, 4,000 

Do. do. on other duty, 3,500 



Do. do. off duty, 

CoMMAKDXSs, 96, in sea service, 

Do. at navy yards, or on 

other duty. 

Do. on leave, &c., ' 

liisirTBNANTs, 328, commanding. 



Do. 
Do. 
StTBosoirs, 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 



8^500 
2,500 

3,100 
1,800 
1,800 
1,500 
1,200 



on other duty, 
waiting orders, 

69, 1st 5 years in com., 1,000 

in navy yards, fte., 1^350 

in sea service, 1,333 

of the fleet, 1,500 

2d 5 years, 1,200 

at navy yards, &c., 1,500 

in sea service, 1,600 

of the fleet, 1,800 

3d 5 years, 1,400 

ftt navy yards, ftc., 1,750 

in sea service, 1,866 

of the fleet, 2,100 

4th 5 years, 1,000 

at navy yards, &e., 2,000 

in sea service, 2,133 

of the fleet, 2^00 

20 years and upwards, 1,800 



Toy* 

SvsGXoirf, at nitvy yards, &c«, ||2^0 

Do. in sea service, 2,400 

Do. of the fleet, 2,700 

Passed Assistant Sttbgxons, 23. 

Assistant Suiu>Koif s, 42, waiting 

orders, 

at sea, 

after passing, &e., 
at sea after passing, 
at navy yards, 



650 
950 
660 
1,900 
950 



Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
PUBSXBS, 64. 

Chaplains, 21, in sea service. 
Do. on leave, &c. 

Passed Midshipmen, 170, on duty. 
Do. waiting orders, 

Midshipmen, 317, in sea service. 
Do. on other duty. 

Do. on leave, &c.. 

Masters, 32. 

of ship of the line at sea, 1,100 

Do. on other duty, 1,000 

Do. on leave, &c., 750 

PsoFBSSOHs of Mathematics, 22, 1,200 

Teachers at naval schools, &c., 3, 480 



do. aAer passing, 1,150 



1,200 
800 
750 
600 
400 
350 
300 



Boatswains, 32 
Gunners, 39 
Carpenters, 35 
Sailmakers, 33 



of a ship of the line, 750 
of a frigate, 600 

on other duty, 500 
on leave, &c., 300 



Note. One ration per day, only, is allowed to all officers when attached to vessels 
for sea service, since the passage of the law of the 3d of March, 1835, regulating the 
{»ay of the navy. Tmehers receive two rations per day, at 20 cents each. 



120 



UNITES STATS8. 



[1845. 



8. Ybssels op Wae op the United States Navy. — Jidy^ 1844. 

[The names of officers marked thus * have the rank of Commanders; thus t JUeuteni- 

ants; the rest are Captains. 



Name and Rate. 



Sk^s of the Line.— 10. 
Guns. 
Franklin, 74 

Columbus, 74 

Ohio, 74 

Norih Carolina, 74 

Delaware, 74 

Alabama, 74 

Vermont, 74 

Virg^iiiia, 74 

Pennsylvania, 120 

New York, 74 

Frigates^ 1st Class.— 13. 

Independence, Razee, 54 

United Slates, 44 

Constitution, 44 

Potomac, 44 

Brandywine, 44 

Santee, 44 

(Cumberland, 44 

Sabine, 44 

Savannah) 44 

Raritan, 44 

Columbia, 44 

St. Lawrence, 44 

Congress, 44 

Frigates, 2d Class.^2. 

Constellation, 36 

Macedonian, 86 

Sloops of War.— 23. 



John Adams, 

Boston, 

Viiicennes, 

Warren, 

Falmouth, 

Fairfield, 

Vandalia, 

St. Louis, 

Cyaiie, 

Levant, 

Saratoga, 

Ontario, 

Marion, 

Decatur, 

Preble, 

Yorktown, 

Dale, 

Portsmouth, 

Plymouth, 

Albany, 

Germantown, 

St. Mary's, 

Jamestown, 



20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
18 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 



Where and when 
bailt. 



Philadelphia, 1815 

Washington, 1819 

New York, 1820 

Philadelphia, 1820 

Gosport, Va., 1820 



Philadelphia, 1837 



J. P. Zantzinger, 



Boston, 1814 

Philadelphia, 1797 

Boston, 1797 

Washington, 1821 

do. 3825 



James Armstrong, 
J. Percival, 
T. M. Newell, 
F. A. Parker, 



Boston, 1842 

New York, 1843 

Philadelphia, 1842 

Washington, 1836 



Portsmouth, 1841 



Baltimore, 1797 
Norfolk, r«&ut;/, 1836 



Norfolk, r<;6ut/f, 1820 

Boston, 1825 

New York, 1826 

Boston, 1826 

do. 1827 

New York, 1828 

PhUadelphia, 1828 

Washington, 1828 

Boston, 1837 

New York, 1837 

Portsmouth, 1842 

Baltimore, 1813 

Boston, 1839 

New York, 1839 

Portsmouth, 1839 

Norfolk, 1839 

Philadelphia, 1839 

Portsmouth, 1843 

Boston, 1843 
New Yorkj 
Philadelphia, 
Washington, 
Norfolk, 



Commanded by 



W. M. Hunter, 
B. Dulany, 



Samuel L. Breese, 



A. J. Dallas, 
F. H. Gregory, 
D. Geisinger, 



Philip F. Voorhees, 



Isaac Mayo, 



*G. J. Pendergrast, 
* Frank. Buchauau, 
*J. B. Hull. 
*J. R. Sands, 
*S. W. Downing, 
*J. S. Chauncey, 
Isaac McKeever, 
*C. K. Stribling, 
♦Hugh N. Page, 
♦Josiah Tattnall, 
*J. S. Nicholas, 

• • • • 

•Joel Abbot, 
*T. W. Freelon, 



•Henry Henry, 



Where employed. 



Under repairs, Bost. 

New York. 

Rec'g Ship; Boston. 

Rec'g Ship, N.York. 

Norfolk. 

On stocks, Portsm'th. 

do. Boston. 

do. do. 

Rec'g Ship, Norfolk. 
On stocks, do. 



Boston. 
Pacific Ocean. 
East Indies. 
Home squadron. 
East Indies. 
On stocks,Portsm'th. 
Mediterranean. 
On stocks, N. York. 
Pacific Ocean, 
Coast of Brazil. 
Mediterranean. 
On slocks, Norfolk. 
Coast of Brazil. 



Norfolk. 

Coast of Africa. 



New York. 
Coast of Brazil. 
Home Squadron. 
Pacific Ocean. 
Home Squadron. 
Mediterranean. 
Home Squadron. 
East Indies. 
Pacific Ocean. 

do. do. 
Coast of Africa. 
Rec'g Ship, Bait. 
In ordinary. Boston. 
Coast of Atrica. 
New York, 
do. do. 
Philadelphia. 
Preparing for sea. 
Meaiterranean. 
On the stocks. 

do. do. 

do. do. 

do. do. 





1845.] 




AftMT 


LIST. 


121 




Name and Rate. 


Where and when 
bttilt. 


Commanded by 


Where employed. 




Brigs.^7. 












Gan8. 










Dulphin, 


10 


New York, 1836 


• • • • 


Norfolk. 




Porpoise, 


10 


Boston, 1836 


*T. T. Craven, 


Coast of Africa. 




Bainbridge, 


10 


Boston, 1842 


•W. D. Newman, 


Coast of Brazil. 




Perry, 


10 


Norfolk, 1843 


♦J. S. Paine, 


East Indies. 




Soraers, 


10 


New York, 1842 


«J. T. Gerry, 


Home Squadron. 




Truztun, 


10 


Norft>lk, 1643 


♦Henry Bruce, 
*W. H. Gardner, 


Coast of Africa. 




Lawreuce, 


10 


Baltimore, 1843 


Home Squadron. 




Schooners.— S. 












Shark, 


10 


Washington, 1821 


fN. M. Howison, 


Pacific Ocean. 




Enterprise, 


10 


New York, 1831 




Boston. 




Boxer^ 


10 Boston, 1831 


• • • • 


do. 




Bxpenment, 


4 


Washington, 1831 


*F. Vamnm, 


Rec^g vessel. Phila. 
Home Squadron. 
Norflk. 
Packet service. 




Flirt, 
Wave, 
Phenix. 
Ou-ka-iiy«e, 


I 


Transferred from 
War Department. 


fJ. A. Davis, 
tA. Sinclair, 






Purchased, 1843 




Norfolk. 




Steamers.— S. 












Fulton, 


4 


New York, 1837 


• • • • 


In ordinary, N. York. 




Poinsett, 




Trans. War Dep. 
Philadelphia, 1841 


fR. Semmes, 


Surveying. 




Mississippi) 


•ID 




In ordinary, Boston. 




Union, 




Norfitik, 1842 
Philadelphia, 1843 


tH. H. Bell, 


Home Squadron. 




Princeton, 




R. F. Stockton, 


Special service. 




Michigan, 

Col. W. S. Hamef) 




Erie, Pa., 1844 


•Wm. Inman, 


Lake Erie. 




{ 


Transferred from 


tE. B. Boulwell, 


Coast service. 




Gen. Taylor, 


War Department. 


tE. Farrand, 


Coast of Florida. 




J^ore Skips.— A. 












Relief, 


6 


Philadelphia, 1836 


tH. K. Hoff, 


Pacific Ocean. 




Brie^ 


8 


Baltimore, 1813 


tN. W. Duke, 


do. do. 




t^xington, 


8 


New York, 1825 


tW. M. Glendy, 


Mediterranean. 




Pioneer, 




Boston, 1836 


tT. D. Shaw, 


Coast of Brazil. 








•Paixhan Ouns. 





VI. ARMY LIST. 

WiNFiELD Scott, JHHe^'ot Gtneral^ General'in' CkUf — Head Quarters, 
Washington City. 

Inspectors Qenebal of the Armt. 

Colonel George Croghan, | Colonel S. Churchill. 

Field Officers of Regiments. 

First Dragoont. 

Colonel S. W. Kearny, 
Lieut Col. R. B. Mason, 
Major Clifton Wharton. 

Second Dragoons. 



Col. D. E. Twiggs, 
tLieut. Col. "W. S. Harney, 
Major T. T. Fauntleroy. 



First ArtOUry. 

Col. I B. Crane, 
Lieut. Col. B. EL Pierce, 
Major L. Whiting. 

Second Artillery. 

Col. James Bankhead, 

tLieut Col. A. C. W. Fanning, 

Major John Erving. 



U 



t Colonel by brevet. 



122 



VMITBD STATS 8. 



[184& 



Third ArHUery. 

4'Col. W. K. Armistead, 
Lieut. Col. W. Gates, 
Major W. L. McClintock. 

Fourth Artillery, 

Col. J. B. Walbach, 
Lieut. Col. M. M. Payne, 
li^jor F. S. Belton. 

First Infaviry. 

Col. W. Davenport, 
Lieut. Col. H. Wilson, 
I^jor G. Dearborn. 

Second hifaaiitry, 

♦Col. Hugh Brady, 
Lieut. Col B. Riley, 
Major J. Plympton. 

Third Jnfwntry. 

Col. J. B. Many, 

Lieut. Col. E. A. Hitchcock, 

Major W. W. Lear. 

•Brigadier General by brevet. 



Fourth Inf(mtry» 

Col. J. H. Vose, 

Li^ut. Col. John Garland, 

Major Thomas Stamford. 

Fifth JnfoMtry, 

*Col. G. M. Brooke, 
Lieut. Col. J. S. Mcintosh, 
Major W. V. Cobbs. 

Sixth Infantry. 

*Col. Z. Taylor, 
Lieut. Col. G. Loomis, 
Major W. Hoffman. 

Seventh Infantry. 

*Col. M. Arbuckle, 
Lieut. Col. W. Whistler, 
Major Jacob Brown. 

Eighth Infantry, 

♦Col. W. J. Worth, 
Lieut Col. N. S. Clarke, 
iMajor W. G. Belknap. 
$Lieut. Colonel by brevet. 



2. Militia Fokcb of thb United States. 
jibstract of the United States MliUa^from the Army Register for 1844. 



is 

II 

Maine, 

N. Hampshire, 

Massachusetts, 

Vermont, 

Rhode Island, 

Connecticut, 

New York, 

Nev^r Jersey, 

Pennsylvania, 

Delaware, 

Maryland, 

Virsinia, 

N. Carolina, 

S. Carolina, 

Georgia, 

Alabama, 

Louisiana, 

Mississippi, 

Tennessee, 

Kentucky, 

Ohio, 

Indiana, 

Illinois, ^ 

Missouri, 

Arkansas, 

Michigan. 

Florida Terj, 

Wisconsin T., 

D. Columbia, 


fa 

1643 
1843 
1842 
1843 
1842 
1843 
1842 
1829 
1843 
1827 
1838 
1843 
1841 
1843 
1839 
1839 
1829 
1836 
1840 
1843 
1841 
1832 
1641 
1841 
1625 
1642 
1831 
1840 
1832 


|i 

a 

s 

26 

12 

9 

12 

5 

9 

la-s 

19 
51 
4 
22 
27 
28 
SO 
30 
31 
10 
15 
25 
43 

31 

45 

6 

1 

1 

023 


General Staff 
Officers. 


Field Officers 
&c. 


Company Of- 
ficers. 


Total Com- 
missioned 
Officers. 


Non-commis- 
sioned Offi- 
cers, Musi- 
cians, and 
Privates. 


• 

< 


95 
30 
30 
51 
35 
30 

863 
58 

188 

8 

68 

60 

67 

135 
96 

167 
46 
70 
79 

143 

110 
213 

11 

1 
6 
3 


540 

333 

98 

224 

99 

311 

2,590 

435 

1,417 

71 

. 544 

723 
554 
746 
564 
183 
392 
859 
1,074 

566 

658 

97 

9 

36 

24 


1,659 

1,244 

464 

801 

277 

914 

6,574 

1,476 

6,156 

364 

1,763 

4,882 

2,969 

2,041 

2,212 

1,382 

542 

348 

2,644 

3,745 

2,154 

1,692 

33 

128 

68 


2,320 
1,619 

601 
1,068 

416 

1,264 

10,162 

1,988 

7,812 

447 
2,397 
6,232 
3,787 
2,750 
3,092 
2,164 

781 

825 
3,607 
5,005 

2,861 

2,606 

157 

1,334 

43 

160 

90 


42,345 
28,070 
86,010 
22,827 
14,540 
45,729 

170,725 
37,183 

239,718 

8,762 

44,467 

iioioo 

62,524 
50,005 
54i220 
42,168 
14,027 
35,259 
67,645 
80,510 

51,052 

57,081 
1,871 

45,716 

784 

5,054 

1,153 


44,665 
29,689 
86,611 
23,915 
14,956 
46,993 

180,887 
39,171 

247,530 

9,229 

46,864 

116,732 
66,311 
62,755 
57,312 
44,332 
14,806 
36,064 
7li52 
85,515 

180,256 
53,913 

8:i,2:f4 

59,689 
2,026 

47,050 

627 

6,223 

1,249 


2,685 


ft,4l0 


47,750 


66,625 


1,419,965 


1,749,062 



1845.] 



9 AKMT LIST. 



133 



3. Military Posts. 



P08t«. 



Fort PickAns, ) 
Fort McRee, j 
Fort Morgan, 
Fort Pike, 
Fort Wood, 
N. Orrs Barracks. 
Baton Rouge Bar'u, 
Fort Jesup, 
Fort Towaon, 
Fort Washita, 
Fort Gibson, 
Fort Smith, 
Fort Scott, 
Fort Leavenworth, 
Jefferson Barracks, 
Fort Des Moines, 
Fort Atkinson. 
Fort Crawfonl, 
Fort SnelUuff, 
Fort Wumebago, 
Fort Brady, 
Fort Macldnac, 
Fort Gratiot, 
Detroit Barracks, 
Buffalo Barracks, 
Fort Niagara, 
Fort Ontario 
Madison Banacl^s, 
Plattsburg Barracks, 
Fort Adams, ) 
Fort Wolcoit. ) 
Fort Tnimbull, 
West Point, 
Fort Col um DOS 
Fort Hamilton 
Fort La Payett< 
Fort Mifflin, 
Carlisle Barracki, 
Hancock Barracks, 
Fort Sullivan, 
Fort Preble, 
Fort Consiitntioo, 
Fort Independence, 
Fort McHemy, 
Fort Severn, 
Fort Washington, 
Fort Monroe, 
Fort Johnston, ) 
Port Caswell, j 
Fort Maoon^ 
Fort Moultne, ) 
Ciistle Pinckney, ) 
Ogleth'rpe Barracks, 
Fort Marion, 
Key West, 
Fort Brooke, 



tte,) 



State or Terri- 
tory. 



Florida, 

Alabama, 
Louisiana, 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 
Arkansas Ter. 

do. 

do. 

do. 
BUssonri Ter., 

do. 
Missouri, 
Iowa Ter., 

do. 
Wisconsin T., 
Iowa Ter., 
Wisconsin T., 
Michigan, 

do. 

do. 

do. 
New York, 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

Rhode Island, 

Connecticut, 
New York, 

New York 
Harbor, N. Y., 

Pennsylvania, 

do. 
Maine, 
do. 
do. 
N. Hampshira, 
Massachusetts, 
Marylafid, 
do. 
do. 
Virinnia^ 
N. Carolma, 
do. 
do. 
Charleston 
Harbor, S. C. 
Georgia, 
Florida, 
do. 
do. 



Post Office. 



Pensacola, 

Mobile, 
Fort Pike, , 
New Orleans, 
New Orleans, 
Baton Rouge, 
Fort Jesup. 
Fort Towson, 

do. do. 
Fort 6ib«on, 
Fort Smith, 
Fort Scott, 
FortLeavenw'th, 
Jefferson Baraks, 
Fairfield, 
Prairie da Chien, 

do. 
Fort Snelling, 
Fort Wiimebago, 
Saolt St. Marie, 
MichilUmaciuac, 
Fort Gratiot, 
Detroit, 
Buffalo, 
Youngatown, 
Oswego, 
Sacket^s Harbor, 
Plattsburg, 

Newport, 

New London, 
West Point, 
New York, 
Fort Hamilton, 

Philadeiphia, 

CarUslp, 

Houlton, 

Eastport, 

Portland, 

Portsmouth, 

Boston, 

Baltimore, 

Annapolis, 

Fort Washington, 

Old P'nt Comfort, 

Smithviile, 

do. 
Beaufort, 

Charleston, 

Savannah, 
St. Augustine, 
Key West, 
Tampa Bay, 



Permanent Com- 
manders. 



MajJacob Brown, 

Capt. Fran. Lee, 
Bvt. Maj. Rains, 
Capt. S.W.Moore, 
Lt. Col. Whistler, 
C0I.D. E. Twiggs, 
Bt. Maj. Andrews, 
Bvt. Col. Harney, 
Lt. Col. Loomis, 
Maj. Hoffman, 
Bt. Maj. Graham, 
Col. S.W.Keamy, 
Col. J. H. Vose, 
Capt. Jas. AUen, 
Capt. Sumner, 
Col. Davenport, 
Lt. Col. Wilson, 
Capt. W.R.Jouett, 
Capt. A. Johnston, 
Capt. M. Scott, 
Lt. Col. Mcintosh, 
B. B.Gen. Brooke, 
Lt. Col. Riley^ 
Capt. T. Moms, 
Ca^t. Bamum, 
Maj. J.Plympton, 
Capt. G A.W4ite, 

Lt. Col. Pierce, 

Capt Merchant, 
Maj. R. Delafield, 
Col. J. Bankhead, 
Maj. John Erving, 
Capt. A. Lowd, 
Capt. G. S. Drane, 
Capt. Washington, 
Maj. L. Whiting, 
Bt.Maj. Saunders, 
Capt. G. Porter^ 
Bvt. Maj. Dimick, 
Not garrisoned, 
Lt. Col. Payne, 
Bvt. Maj. Gardner, 
Not garrisoned. 
ColJ.B.Walbach, 
Bt. Lt. CoLCfailds, 

Capt. W. Wall, 
Bvt. Brig. General 

Armlstead, 
Lt. Col. W. Gates, 
B. B. Gen. Worth, 
Bvt. MaJ. Wright, 
B. Lt. CoLBelknap, 



Regiment 
and Co.rps. 



7th infantry. 

7th infantry. 
7th infantry. 
7th infantry. 
3d dragoons. 
2d dragoons. 
6th infantry. 
2d dragoons. 
6th inmntry. 
6th infantry. 
4th infantry. 
Istdragoons. 
4th infantry. 
IstdragQons. 
Istdraxoons. 
1st intantry. 
1st infantry. 
Ist Infantry. 
15th injury. 
5th infantry. 
5th infantry. 
5th inftmtry. 
2d infantry. 
SdinAuitry. 
2d infantry. 
2d infantry. 
2d infantry. 

1st artillery. 

2d artillery. 
Engineers. 
2d artillery. 
2d artillery. 
2d artillery. 
2d artillery. 
4th artillery. 
1st artillery. 
1st artillery. 
1st artillery. 
Ut attiliery. 

4th artillery. 
4th artillery. 

4th artillery. 
3d artillery. 

3d artillery. 

3d artillery. 

3d artillery. 
8th infantry. 
8th infantry. 
8th infantry. 



124 



XTHITBD STAT^. 



[1845. 



4. Rank, Grade, and Pay of the Armt. 



Rank and classification of Officers. 



Major General, 

Aid-de-Camp, in addition to pay &c., of Lieut., 

Brig^adier General, 

Aid-de Camp, in addition to pay &c., of Lieut., 
Adjutant General — Colonel, 
Assistant Adjutant Greneral — Major, 
Assistant Adjutant General — Captain, 
Inspector General — Colonel, 
Quartermaster General — Brig. General, 
Assistant Quartermaster General — Colonel, 
Deputy Quartermaster Greneral — Lt. Colonel, 
Quartermaster — Major, . . . 
Assistant Quartermaster — Captain, 
Commissary Gren. of Subsistence — Colonel, 
Assist. Com. Gen. of Subsistence — Lt. Col., 
Commissary of Subsistence — Major, 
Commissary of Subsistence — Captain, 
Paymaster General, ^2,500 per annum. • 

Paymaster, 

Surgeon General, $2,500 per annum. 
Surgeons of ten years' service. 
Surgeons of less than ten years' service, . 
Assistant Surgeons of ten years' service. 
Assistant Surgeons of five years' service, 
Assist. Surg'ns, of less than five years service, 

Officers of the Corpe of Engineers — Cbrps of 
Top, Engineers^ — Ordnance Department, 

Colonel, 

Lieutenant Colonel, ..... 

Major, 

Captain, 

First Lieutenant, 

Second Lieutenant, 



Officers of Matmted Dragoons, 

Colonel, . . . ^. ; 

Lieutenant Colonel, .... 

Major, 

Captain, 

First Lieutenant, . . . . 
Second Lieutenant, .... 



Officers of the ArtiUery — Infantry, 

Colonel, 

Lieutenant Colonel, 

Major, . . . . •. 

Captain, 

First Lieutenant, 

Second Lieutenant, 

Adjutant, in addition to pay, &c., of Lieut., 



H 

$200 


Number 
of rations 
per day. 


No. of 
horses 
allowed. 


15 


7 


24 


1 


2 


ld4 


12 


5 


20 




2 


90 


6 


5 


60 


4 


4 


50 


4 


3 


90 


6 


5 


104 


12 


5. 


90 


6 


5 


75 


5 


4 


60 


4 


4 


50 


4 


3 


90 


6 


5 


75 


5 


4 


60 


4 ' 


4 


50 


4 


3 


60 


4 


4 


60 


8 


4 


60 


4 


4 


50 


8 


3 


50 


4 


3 


33 33 


4 


2 


90 


6 


5 


75 


5 


4 


60 


4 


4 


50 


4 


3 


33 33 


4 


2 


33 33 


4 


2 


90 


6 


5 


75 


5 


4 


60 


4 


4 


50 


4 


3 


33 33 


4 


2 


33 33 


4 


2 


75 


6 


4 


60 


5 


3 


50 


4 


3 


40 


4 




30 


4 




25 


4 




10 




2 



o 8 ^ 

d ^ O; 

4 

3 

2 
2 
1 
2 
3 
2 
2 
2 
1 
2 
2 
2 
1 



2 
2 

1 
1 
1 



2 
2 
2 
1 
1 
1 



2 
2 
2 
1 
1 
1 



2 
2 
2 
1 
1 
1 



1845.] AKMT LIST. 125 

5. MiLiTAKT GxoaaAPHiCAi. Depabtmbnts. 

The order districting the United States into nine military departments 
is rescinded, and the country is hereby divided into two military geo- 
j^raphical divisions, the boundaries of which will be the same as those 
established at the reduction of the army in 1821, with the exception of 
the present 4th and 9th military departments, which will not be included 
in either division. 

Western Division. — The countnr west of a line drawn from Fond du Lac, 
Lake Superior, to Cape Sable, Florida, and embracing the part of Wis- 
consin Territory west of said line, Iowa Territory, the States of Illinois, 
Missouri, Kentucky, Tennessee, Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi and Ala- 
bama, West Florida, and the Indian country West of the Mississippi hver 

Eastern Division. — The States of Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, 
Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Penn- 
sylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South darelina, 
and Georgia. 

^h Military Department. — The States of Ohio, Indiana, and Michigan, 
and that part of Wisconsin Territory not included in the Western Di- 
vision. 

9th Military Department. — East and Middle Florida. 

Until otherwise directed, the present arrangement of Military Depart- 
ments Nos. 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, and 8, [See Almanac for 1844, page 129,J will 
be continued, and the senior officer in each will report to and receive in- 
structions from the commanders of divisions. 

Brevet Major General Gaines is assigned to the command of the West- 
ern, and Brigadier General Wool to the command of the Eastern division, 
and will, for the present, establish their head quarters, respectively, at 
New Orleans, La., and Troy, N. Y. 

The head quarters of departments will remain as now established, 
except the head quarters of the 5th department, which will be at Fort 
Columbus, N. Y. 

The regular force, as now authorized by law, consists of 716 commis- 
sioned officers, 17 storekeepers, 40 sergeants, 250 enlisted men for the 
ordnance service, and 7,590 non-commissioned officers, musicians, arti- 
ficers, and privates j making an aggregate of 6,613 men. 

West Point Academy. 

A statement transmitted to Congress shows, that the number of cadets 
admitted into the institution since its establishment, is 2,942 

Of which have graduated, 1,206 Disbanded, or dismissed, 33 

Resimed before graduation, 61 Killed in service, 11 

Declined commisions, 6 Died in service, 147 

Resigned, 323 Now in service, 542 

Of those now in service, there are 4 colonels, 6 lieutenant colonels, 13 
majors, 173 captains, 170 first lieutenants, 131 second lieutenants, 70 bre* 
vet second lieutenants, 5 paymasters, and 1 military storekeeper. 

The amount appropriated for the institution, since its establishment« 

Tor buildings, library, apparatus, &€., is, $711,399 88 

For salaries, pay, subsistence, &(C, ^,291, 501 27 

$4,062,901 15 
11* 



126 



UNITED STATES. 

VIL POST-OFFICE ESTABLISHMENT. 



[18^9. 



1. 2\ibU of Mail Service for the Tear preceding the let ofJufy^ 1843, as stated 

hy the First Assistant Postmaster General, 



States and 
Territories. 


Length 

of 
Routes. 


Annual Transportation. 


Total 
Transpor- 
tation. 


Total Coat. 


Horse and 
Sulky. 


Stage and 
Coach. 


Railroad 

and 
Steamboat. 


Maina, 

N.Hampshire, 

Vermont, 

Massachusetts, 

Rhode Island, 

Connecticut, 

New York, 

New Jersey^ 

Pennsylvania, 

Delaware, 

Maryland, 

Virginia. 

N. Carolina, 

S. Carolina, 

Georgia, 

Florida, 

OhiOj 

Mich g^n, 

Indiana, 

Illinois, 

Wisconsin, 

Iowa, 

Missouri, 

Kentucky, 

Tennes&ee, 

Alabama, 

Mississippi, 

Arkansas, 

Louisiana, 

Cost, 


MUea. 
3,941 
2,279 
2,404 
3,373 
338 
1,924 

13,018 
2,024 

10,328 

619 

2,335 

11,740 
6,945 
4,400 
6,587 
1,735 

11,577 
3,622 
6,362 
7,027 
1,641 
413 
7,809 
7,475 
6,761 
6,133 
4,478 
3,372 
1,825 


Mile*. 
290,211 
115,789 
130,164 
172,710 

15,444 
116,404 
883,141 
102,271 
979,002 

48,786 
230,320 
1,123,562 
692,748 
287,824 
446,494 

85,174 
917,593 
274,498 
562,924 
362,074 
112,008 

69,680 
470,128 
535,000 
540,276 
630,128 
653,018 
387,232 
211,536 


MUea. 
702,900 
466,060 
683,266 
914,816 
66,456 
444,874 

2,903,686 
408,822 

1,612,744 
109,324 
283,400 
779,594 
689,922 
498,788 
781,923 
107,604 

1,854,181 
367,952 
612,768 

1,060,660 

83,834 

57,512 

626,722 

731,822 

698,764 

622,410 

322,920 

112,944 

7,488 


MllM. 

36,400 

73,632 

(a) 

610,556 

29,952 

209 J»0 

991,238 

220,228 

429,066 

(6) 
373,290 
483,284 
333,840 
149,968 
SS20,106 
77,106 
205,262 
114,252 


Mllet. 

1,020,511 

655,481 

713,430 

1,598,081 

111,852 

770,608 

4,778,064 

731,321 

3,020,862 

158,110 

887,010 

2,386,460 

1,616,510 

936,580 

1,448,526 

269,884 

2,977,086 

756,702 

1,175.692 

1,468,530 

195,842 

127,192 

1,386,850 

1,814,604 

1,239,040 

1,299,388 

914,002 

631,376 

264,264 


$71^7 
43,908 
46,009 

131,749 
10,115 
61,371 

352,329 
62,330 

187,437 
8,308 

147,235 

199,753 

151,495 

122,378 

171,671 
44,199 

194,fc07 
40,635 
68,688 

121,269 

12,234 

6,919 

69,081 

130,566 
96,065 

218,066 
05,680 
63,825 
37,976 


35,776 




390,000 
647,772 


146,848 
38,064 
SliiOO 
45,240 


142,295 


11,146,229 


18,414,174 
$1,611,568 1 


6,692,402 


35,252,805 


2,947,319 




$602,064 


$733,687 


$2,947,319 





Additional expenses of mail agencies incident to the railroad and 
steamboat mails, and payable under the head of transportation, $28,965.(c) 

A change has been adopted in the preparation of this table, to make it 
conform to the mode of keeping the accounts in the Auditor's office, 
and occasional reports furnished from time to time. The entire 
service and pay of the route is set down to the State under which it 
is numbered, though extending into other States, instead of being divided 
among the States in which each portion of it lies. This change is neces- 
sary to prevent the seeming discrepancies that must appear in every in- 
stance, and are liable to be taken as evidence of gross error in the state- 
ment. 

(a) The steamboat route on Lake Champlain is under a New York number. 

(b) The Baltimore, Wilmin^on & Philadelphia railroad is under a Maryland number. 
(e) The other expenditures mcident to transportation, such as amounts paid fur ship, 

•teamlwat, and way letters, locks, 4u;., are not included in this table, because they are 
tiie subjects of separate appropriation and account. 



1845.] 



POST-OFFICB ESTABLI8HMSNT. 



127 



From a report transmitted to the Senate by the Postmaster General, of 
the number of paid and unpaid letters, free letters, drop letters for deliv- 
ery ; regular newspapers subject to postage ; do. free of postage ; do. oc- 
casional or irregular ; pamphlets and magazines, periodical ; do. not peri- 
odical, which passed through the post offices in the United States during 
the month of October, 1843, and an estimate for the year based thereon, 
with other information in the possession of the Department, we have 
compiled the following abstract : 



Number of letters subject to postage, 
Number of free letters, 
Number of drop letters for delivery, 
Regular newspapers subject to postage, 

" « free, 

Occasional or irregular. 
Pamphlets and magazines, periodical, 

not periodical, 



K 



U 



U 



In October. 


The Year. 


2,022,296 


24,267,552 


234,641 


3,015,692 


85,542 


1,026,504 


3,027,879 


36,334,548 


596,760 


7,161,120 


518,676 


6,224,112 


134,646 


1,615,752 


24,588 


295)056 



2. Post- Office Statistics for the year ending Jtme 30, 1843. 





Length of 

miitAV 


Total of 


Total of 


Gross am't 


Newspap. 


^et post- 


States. 


annual 


annual 


of letter 


&■ paraphl. 


age for 




A VUi^9. 


transport. 


cost. 


postage. 


postage. 


the year. 




Miles. 


Milefl. 


Dollars. 


Dollars, 
86,744 


Dollars. 


Dollars. 


Maine, 

New Hampshire, 


3,941 


1,029,511 


71,447 


21,522 


66,831 


2,279 


655,481 


43,906 


52,900 


11,164 


41,349 


Vermont, 


2,404 


713,430 


46,009 


53,909 


12,629 


41,333 


MaAaachasetts, 


3,373 


1,698,081 


131,749 


299,192 


43,172 


246,962 


Rhode Island, 


338 


in,»>2 


10,115 


36,671 


6,560 


30,474 


Connecticut, 


1,924 


770,608 


51,371 


95,282 


17,921 


74,M8 


New York, 


13,018 


4,778,064 


352,329 


877,538 


95,575 


725,187 


New Jersey^ 


2,024 


731,321 


62,.330 


58,784 


9,313 


46,116 


Pennsylvama, 


10,328 


3,020,862 


167,437 


395,669 


60,198 


334,846 


Delaware, 


619 


158,110 


8,303 


13,230 


2,268 


10,396 


Maryland, 


2,335 


887,010 


147,235 


141,661 


16,086 


122,787 


Dist. Colnmbia, 








39,497 


2,940 


19,572 


Virginia, 


11,740 


2,386,460 


199,753 


190,110 


33,863 


148,976 


North Carolina, 


6,945 


1,616,510 


151,495 


63,759 


11,745 


47,552 


South Carolina, 


4,400 


936^80 


122,378 


104.095 


12,058 


66,613 


Georgia, 
Florida, 


6,587 


1,446,525 


171,671 


]26;434 


17,641 


05,660 


1,735 


269,884 


44,199 


19,439 


1,695 


14,734 


Ohio, 


11,577 


2,977,036 


194,607 


234,407 


49,406 


183,445 


Michigan, 


3,522 


756,702 


40,635 


65,455 


10,515 


41,356 


Indiana, 


6,362 


1,175,692 


68,688 


65,266 


12,727 


46,116 


Illinois, 


7,027 


1,458,530 


121,269 


78,486 


13,413 


55,343 


Wisconsin, 


1,541 


195,842 


12,234 


19,992 


2,793 


16,278 


Iowa, 


413 


127,192 


6,919 


]2,.330 


1,726 


9,373 


Missouri, 


7,809 


1,386,850 


69,081 


80ii04 


10,307 


61,841 


Kentucky, 


7,475 


1,814,604 


130,566 


106,705 


14,833 


77,727 


Tennessee, 


6,761 


1,239,040 


96,065 


82,366 


12,223 


60,101 


Alabama, 


6,133 


1,299,386 


218,('55 


111,864 


13,996 


89,149 


Mississippi, 


i'iE? 


914,002 


95,580 


68,841 


9,345 


49,734 


Arkansas, 


3,372 


531,376 


53,825 


17,362 


2,.360 


12,819 


Louisiana, 


1,825 


264,;^ 


37,978 


124,589 


7,546 


104,261 


Total, 


142,205 >35,252,8Q5 


2,947,319 


3,712,786 


636,547 


2,957,528 



136 



VMITBD STATlf. 



[184& 



3. NmdMT of Bm QfieeSy Fxtettt of But Boadi^ amd R eoimu and Exprn- 
dititrts of the B»<t- Office Department j with the amomit paid to POetmatten 
amd for traneportation of the Mail.* 



Yew. 


Number 
of Post 
Offices. 


Extent of 

Post 

Roads. 


Revenae 

of the 

Depaitmeot. 


Expenditures 

of the 
Department. 


Amount paid for 


Compen. of 
Postmasters. 


Transporta. 
of the Mail. 


1790 


75 


MU<w. 
1,875 


DoDan. 
37,935 


DoUmn. 
33,140 


Dollan. 
8,198 


Dolkn. 
83,081 


1795 
1800 


453 
903 


13,307 
30,817 


160,630 
280,804 


117,993 
813,904 


30,878 
69,343 


75,.369 
138,644 


1806 


1,568 


31,078 


431,373 


377,367 


111,568 


839,636 


1810 


3,300 


30,406 


551,684 


495,969 


149,438 


337,966 


1815 


3,000 


43,748 


1,043,065 


748,121 


841,901 


487,779 


1816 
1817 


3,360 
3,459 
3,618 


48,673 
58,089 


961,783 
1,008,973 


804,488 
916.615 


865,944 
308,916 


581,970 

580,189 


1818 


59,473 


1,130,335 


1,036,633 


346,429 


664,611 


1810 


4,000 


67,696 


1,304,737 


1,117,861 


375,888 


717,881 


1830 


4,500 


73,493 


1,111,987 


1,160,926 


352,295 


783,426 


18S1 


4,660 


78,808 


1,069,037 


1,184,383 


337,599 


815,681 


1833 


4,799 


83,763 


1,117,490 


1,167,673 


355,299 


786,618 


1833 


4,043 


84,860 


1,130,116 


1,166,995 


360,463 


767,464 


1834 


6,183 


84,860 


1,197,768 


1,188,019 


383,804 


768,939 


1835 


5,677 


14,063 


1,306,535 


1,339,043 


411,183 


785,646 


1836 


6,160 


94,068 


1,447,703 


1,366,713 


447,737 


885,100 


1837 


7,003 


105,336 


1,534,633 


1,468,959 


486,411 


942,345 


1838 


7,630 


105,336 


1,660,916 


1,689,945 


548,049 


1,086,313 


1839 


S,004 


115,000 


1,707,418 


1,788,133 


559,337 


1,153,646 


1830 
1831 
1833 


8,450 
8,686 
9,305 


116,176 
115,486 
104,466 


1,850,663 
1,997,811 
9,358,570 


1,933,708 
1,086,133 
8,266,171 


595,334 
635,083 
715,481 


1,374,009 
1,853,926 
1,483,507 


1833 


10,1:27 


119,916 


9,617,011 


8,980,414 


836,283 


1,894,638 


1834 


10,093 


119,916 


8,823,749 


2,910,605 


897,317 


1,935,544 


1836 
1896 
1837 

1R3R 
1839 

1840 
1841 


10,770 
11,001 
11,767 
13,519 
12,730 
13,468 
13,778 


112,774 
118,964 
141,343 
134,818 
133,999 
155,739 
155,086 


3,9m,356 
3,408,383 
4,100,606 
4,335,078 
4,477,614 
4,539,365 
4,379,396 


8,757,350 
8,841,766 
3,303,488 
4,681,833 
4,654,718 
4,769,110 
4,443,768 


945,419 
818,803 
891,3ffl 
983,948 
980,000 
1,088,935 
1,016,645 


1,719,007 
1,638,093 
1,996,787 
3,131^ 
3,885,623 
3,896,876 
8,984,389 


1849 
1843 


13,733 
13,614 


149,738 
143,395 


4,646,346 
4,996,985 


4,335,053 
4,374,713 


1,147,856 
1,486,394 


3,087,796 
8,947,319 



* The Reitenm of the Post-Office Department is derived chiefly from pottagt; a tri- 
fling amount is received from penalties for violations of the post-office laws. The Ex- 
penditures of the Department consist of the items for compensation of postmastersj 
transportation of the mail, and certain other miseeUmneous expenses. 



30 miles, 


6 cents. 


80 " 


10 " 


150 « 


12K" 


400 " 


18%" 




25 « 



2645.] POST-OVFXCS bstablisbm&kt. 129 

4. Rates of Postage. 

On a Single Letttr^ competed of one piece of paper. 

For any distance, not exceeding 
Over 30, and not exceeding 
Over 80, and not exceeding 
Over 150, and not exceeding 
Over 400, 

A Letter composed of two pieces of paper, is charged with double these 
rates; of three pieces, with triple; and of four pieces, with quadruple. 
** One or more pieces of paper, mailed as a letter, and weighing one ounce^ 
shall he charged with quadruple postage ; and at the same rate, should the 
weight be greater." " Letter postage is to be charged on all hand-bills, 
printed or writlen; prices current, sealed or unsealed; prospectuses, 
proposals for new publications, circulars, lottery-bills and advertisements, 
blank forms, sheets of music, deeds, law processes, policies of insurance, 
and manuscript copy for publication. You will also charge letter postage 
on all packets that are closely enveloped and sealed, so that what they 
contain cannot be known." Instructions of the Ihstmaster General, 

Newspaper Ibstage, 

For each Newspaper^ not carried out of the State in which it is publish- 
ed, or, if carried out of the State, not carried over 100 miles, 1 cent. Over 
100 miles, and out of the State in which it is published, 1^ cents. 

Magazines and Pamphlets. 

If published periodically, dist. not exceeding 100 miles, 1)^ cts. p. sheet. 

Do. do. distance over 100 " 2^ " " 

If no^ pub. periodically, dist. not exceeding 100 ** 4 " " 

Do. wdo. distance over 100 " 6 " " 

<^ Every Printed Pamphlet or Magazine which contains more than twenty- 
four pages, on a royal sheet, or any sheet of less dimensions, shall be charged 
by the sheet ; and small pamphlets, printed on a half or quarter sheet, of 
royal or less size, shall be charged with half the amount of postage 
charged on a full sheet." ** A pamphlet is a small unbound printed 
book. A magazine is a pamphlet published periodically in numbers, 
containing articles on science, literature, politics, news, &c. You will 
charge periodical pamphlet postage on magazines, almanacs, college 
catalogues, and annual reports or minutes of societies." Instructions of 
the Postmaster General. 

The postage on Ship Letters^ if delivered at the office where the vessel 
arrives, is six cents ; if conveyed by post, two cents in addition to the 
ordinary postage. 



130 VZfZTSD 8TATI8. [1840. 

5. Pbivzlege ov Fbanking. 

Letters and packets to and from the following officers of the govem- 
ment are by law received and conveyed by post, free of postage ; 

The President and Vice President of the United States ; Secretaries of 
State, Treasury, War, and Navy; Attorney General, Postmaster General, 
and Assistant Postmaster Greneral ; Comptrollers, Auditors, Register, and 
Solicitor of the Treasury; Treasurer; Commissioner of the General 
Land Office ; Commissioners of the Navy Board, Commissary General ; 
Inspectors General; Quartermaster General; Paymaster General; Super- 
intendent of the Patent Office ; Speaker and Clerk of the House of Rep- 
resentatives ; President and Secretary of the Senate ; and any individual 
who shall have been, or may hereafter be, President of the United States; 
and each may receive newspapers by post, free of postage. 

Each member of the Senate, and each member and delegate of the 
House of Representatives, may send and receive, tree of postage, news- 
papers, letters, and packets, weighing not more than two ounces, (in 
case of excess of weight, the excess alone to be paid for,) and all docu- 
ments printed by order of either House, from the period of sixty days 
before he takes hi« seat in Congress, till the next meeting of the next 
Congress. 

Postmasters may send and receive, free of postage, letters and packets, 
not exceeding half an ounce in weight ; and they may receive one daily 
newspaper each, or what is equivalent thereto. 

Printers of newspapers may send one paper to each and every other 
printer of newspapers within the United States, free of postage, under 
such regulations as the Postmaster General may provide. 



Salary. 
R. M. Patterson, Director^ $3,500 
Isaac Roach, JVeaturer^ 2,000 

Franklin Peale, Chief Coiner, 2,000 
J. R. Eckfeldt, Jasayer, 2,000 



VIIL MINT. 

Officers of the Mnt at Philadelphia, 

Salary. 

J. R. McClintock, Ifelier ) «n aaa 

and Refintr, ] '^'^^ 

Chr. F. Gobrecht, Engraver, 2,000 

W. C. Dubois, Asst, Ateayer, 1,300 



Officers of the Branch at New Orleam, La^ 
Salary. 



J. M. Kennedy, Superintend, 2,900 
Wm. P. Hort, Aeeayer^ 2,000 

John L. Riddell, Mdt, ^ R^ 2,000 



Salary. 



PhiL B. Tyler, Omer, $2,000 

Hor. C. Cammack, TWosurer, 2,000 



1845.] 



HINT. 



131 



Offietn of the Brcnnch at DahlonegOy Oa, 

Daniel H. Mason, Coiner^ 



Salary. 
J. F. Cooper, Stqterintend, $2,000 
Isaac L. Todd, Ateayery 1,500 



Salary. 
$1,500 



Officers of the BroMck at CharloUe, N. C, 



Salary. 
O. W. Caldwell, Superintend. $2,000 
J. H. Gibbon, Aseayer, 1,500 



John R. Bolton, Coiner^ 



Salary. 
$1,500 



1. Statement of the Deposits for Coinage, at the Mint of the United States^ 

and its Branches^ in the year 1843. 



Gold, 

From Mines in tbe United States, 
Coins of the United States, old standard, 

Foreign coins, 

Foreign Ballion, 

Total of Gold, .... 

Silver. 

Bullion from the United States, . . • 

Foreign Bullion, 

Foreign Coins, 

Total of Silrer, .... 

Thtal, . . . 


$1,045,445 

28,251 

6,630,594 

384,651 


8,088,941 
3,742,150 


$8,640 

272,691 

3,460,819 




11,831,091 



2. Statement of the Coinage of the Mint of the (Mted StaUs^ and Branches^ 

in the Year 1843. 



Denomiiiictioiia. 


Pieoes. 


Value. 


Denominations. 


Pieces. 


Value. 


Gold. 

Eaffles, 
Half Eagles, 
Quart'r Eagles, 

Copper. 
Cents, 


250,624 
855,085 
530,853 


8,108,797.50 
24,283.20 


Siher. 

Dollars, 
Half Dollars, 
Quar. Doirs, 
Dimes, 
Half Dimes, 

Total, 


165,100 
6,112,000 
1,613,600 
1,520,000 
1,165,000 


3,834,750.00 


2,428,320 




11,967,830.70 



eftht 


branch mxMifi 


Dm the commmcemmt of Ihdr optrationt, in 1838. 


1794 ( 


aoj.». 1 •ii.vii. 


COFP», 


WDDII cotRtoi. 1 


V«Loe. 


Viltie. 


Value. 


No.orPi«» 


V<Jii«. 


571,483 00 


•370,693 80 


»1 1,373 00 


1,834,430 


•453.541 60 


17113) 

17fl6 


103,737 50 


79,077 50 


10.324 40 


1,210,370 


192.129 40 


1797 


103,423 50 


12,391 45 


0,510 34 


1,095,165 


135.524 39 


1799 


205,610 00 


330,391 00 


9.797 00 


1,308,341 


645,696 00 


1799 


213,263 00 


423,513 00 


9,106 06 


1,365,68! 


645,906 68 


1600 


317,700 00 


221,396 00 


39,279 40 


3.337,972 


371,335 40 


iSOl 


422,570 00 


74,758 00 


13.636 37 


1,571 J90 


510,956 37 


1S03 


423,310 00 


56,343 00 


34,423 93 


3,613,669 


516,075 93 


1603 


258,377 50 


67,118 00 


25,203 03 


3,790,630 


370,696 63 


1604 


358,643 50 


100,340 50 


12,844 94 


3,046,639 


371,637 94 


1&03 


170,367 50 


149,389 50 


13,483 46 


3,260,361 


333,239 46 


idoa 


324,505 00 


471,319 00 


3,260 00 


1,916,409 


801,094 00 


1807 


437.495 00 


597,449 75 


9,653 21 


2,731,345 


1,044,595 96 


1606 


264,665 00 


694,300 00 


13,090 00 


2,935,666 


982,055 00 


i8oe 


169,375 00 


707,376 00 


9,001 53 


3,661,634 


684,753 53 


1610 


501,435 00 


538,773 50 


13,660 00 


3,036,418 


- 1,165.&69 50 


ISll 


497,903 00 


606,340 00 


2,495 93 


1,648,570 


1,108,740 93 


181 S 


290,435 00 


814,029 30 


10,755 00 


2,761,646 


1,116,219 50 


1S13 


477,140 00 


620,931 50 


4,183 00 


1,765,331 


1,102,271 50 


ISU 


77,270 00 


581, 6b7 50 


3,578 30 


1,833,6591 


643,635 60 


1615 


3,175 00 


17,306 00 




69,607 


20,483 00 


1816 




28,575 75 


26,209 83 


3,668,135 


56,785 57 


1817 




607,783 50 


39,484 00 


5,163,967 


647,367 50 


1819 


343.940 00 


1.070,454 50 


31,670 00 


5,537,064 


1,345,064 50 


181B 


359.613 00 


1,140,000 001 36,710 OO 


3,074,723 


1,436,336 00 


1830 


1,319,030 00 


301,680 70| 44,075 50 


6,492,509 


1,664,786 30 


18a] 


189,333 00 


923,763 45 


3,690 00 


3,139,349 


1,016,977 45 


1823 


68,98') 00 


903,606 50 


20,723 39 


3,913,788 


915,509 ^ 


1823 


73.435 00 


895,590 00 




2,166,465 


967,075 00 


1834 


93,200 00 


1,753,477 00 


13,620 00 


4,796,694 


1,959,297 00 


1638 


158,393 00 


1,564,583 00 


14,926 00 


5,176,760 




1636 


93,345 00 


2.002,090 00 


16,344 25 


5,774,434 




1637 


131,565 00 


2,969,200 00 


33,577 32 


9,097,645 




1638 


140,145 00 


1.575,000 00 


33,636 34 


6,196,653 




1839 


295,717 50 


1,994,579 00 


16,360 00 


7,674,501 




1830 


643,105 00 


3,495,400 00 


17,115 00 


9,357,191 




1831 


714,370 00 


3,175,600 00 


33,603 60 


11,793,264 




1633 


799,435 00 


3,579,000 00 


33,620 00 


9,136,367 




1833 


976,550 00 


2;. 00 


28,160 00 


10,307,790 




1934 


3,r' ■ -■'0 0( 


3,. 00 


19,151 00 


11.637,643 




1835 




3,. 00 


39,499 00 






1836 


4^; 10 00 


3,t 00 


33,100 00 


13,719,333 


7,764,900 00 


1637 


1,1 13 00 


2,( 00 


55,563 OO 


13,010,731 


3,299,698 00 


1839 


1,1 13 00 


a,; 00 


63,703 00 


15,760,311 


4,206,540 00 


1939 


J ! 13 00 


3,1 00 


31,286 61 


11,611,594 


3,576,467 61 


1940 


It 12 50 


!,■ 00 


24,627 00 




3,436,632 50 


1941 


I ( . 17 50 


1,1 00 


13,973 67 


8,811,966 


2,240,321 17 


1843 


1,634,170 50 


2,: 00 


23,933 90 


11,743,153 


4,190,754 40 


1643 


9,108,797 50 


3,934,750 00 


34,363 20 


14,640,593 


11,967,630 70 


39,125.688 00 


83.384,084 90 979,620 96 


264,246,071 


102,489,993 86 



1845.] 



THS PUBLIC LANDS. 



133 



4. StaUment of the Anmud Jmounts of Deposits of Gold Jbr Coinage^ at the 
Mint of the United States and its Ranches j from the Mines of the United 
States. 



Deposited at the United States Mint, Philadelphia. 



Yean. 


Viiginia. 


North 
Carolina. 


1824 




$5,000 


1825 




17,000 


1^6 




1^0,000 


1627 




21,000 


1828 




46,000 


1829 


$2,500 


134,C0O 


1830 


24,000 


204,000 


1831 


26,000 


294,000 


1832 


34,000 


456,000 


1833 


104,000 


475,000 


i&U 


62,000 


3H0,000 


1885 


60,400 


263,500 


1836 


02,060 


148,100 


1837 


52,100 


116,900 


1838 


55,000 


66,000 


1839 


67,600 


53,500 


1840 


38,995 


36,804 


1841 


25,736 


76,431 


1842 


42,163 


61,629 


1843 


48,148 


62,873 


Total, 


694,642 


2,939,737 



South 
Carolina. 



$3,500 
26,000 
22,000 
45,000 
66,C00 
38,000 
42,400 
55i00 
29,400 
13,000 

6jaoo 

5,319 

3,440 

223 

0,Uv9 



360,881 



Georgia 




Ten- 
neMee. 


Alaba- 
ma. 


$212,000 

176,000 

140,000 

216,000 

415,000 

319,900 

201,400 

83,600 

36,000 

20,300 

91,113 

139,790 

150,276 

66,619 


$1,000 

1,000 

7,000 

3,000 

100 

300 

1,500 
300 
104 

1,212 

2,768 


$500 
4,431 
1,803 
5,579 
4,786 


2,258,004 


18,304 


17,159 



Various 
Souices, 



$1,000 



12,200 



200 



13,717 
415 



27,532 



7'otal at 
ILS^ni. 

~$5,000 

17,000 

20,000 

21,000 

46,000 

140,000 

460,000 

520,000 

678,000 

866,000 

898,000 

698,5C0 

467,000 

282,0($0 

171,700 

138,500 

176,766 

248,478 

273,587 

180,728 



6,316,250 



Deposited at the Branch Mints. 



Teeuv. 



1838 
1830 
1640 
1841 
1842 
1843 

Total, 



Branch at 

Charlotte, 

N. C. 



$127,0C0 
126,836 
124,726 
129,847 
174,508 
272,064 



054,961 



Branch at 

Dahlonega, 

Ga. 



$135,700 
113,035 
121,858 
161,974 
323,372 
570,090 



1,426,019 



Brftnch at 

New Orleans, 

La. 



$700 
6,869 
2,835 
1,818 
5,630 
22,573 



40,425 



Total at 
Branch Mints. 



$263,400 
246,740 
249,419 
293,639 
503,510 
664,717 



2,421,425 



Mint and 
Branches. 



Total Depos. 

its of U.S. 

Gold. 



$4.35,100 
385,240 
426,185 
542,117 
777,097 

1,045,445 

8,737,684 



IX. PUBLIC LANDS. 

1. Qftantities^ Surveys ^ SakSy Reservations, ^c, of the Public Lands. 
[From a Report made by the Treasury Department to Congress, in 1843.] 

Estimated quantity of land yet to be sold, inclading the 

unceded terri tory south of latitude 49% - - - 1,084,064,993 
Deduct reservations, 7,526 779 



Leaving 



12 



1,076,^38,214 



184 



VKITXD 8TATX8. 



[1S45. 

Aares. 



Value, at $1 25 per acre, - - - $1,345,672,767 50 

Of the above quantity, the Indian title is 
extinguished to 367,947,165 

Unextinguished, ... - 716,117,828 

Surveyed, 272,646,356 

Unsurveyed, 811,418,637 

Of the Public Lands there have been sold 
107,796,536 acres, bringing - - $170,940,942 62 

Paid for Indian title, Florida and Louis- 
iana purchase, including interest, - $68,524,991 32 

Paid for surveying and selling, including 
pay of salaries and fees, * - - . 9,966,610 14 

78,491,601 46 
Balance, being the net funds derived -.»__ 

from the public lands, - - - $92,449,341 16 

In addition to lands sold, there have been granted for internal improve. 

ment, education, military services, reservations, &c., 33,756,559 acres. 

Acres. 

Of the Public Lands, Virginia, New York, Massachusetts, 

and Connecticut, ceded 169,609,819 

Georgia ceded 58,898,522 

North and South Carolina ceded 26,432,000 

Purchased of France and Spain, 987,852,332 

[From the Land Gommiuionen' Report for 1843.] 

2. Statement of Public Lands sold, and of Payments into the Drecuury on 
account thereof in the year 1842. 



States and 
Territories. 



Ohio, 

Indiana, 

Illinois, 

Missouri, 

Alabama!, 

Mississippi, 

Louisiana, 

Michigan, 

Arkansas, 

Wisconsin, 

Iowa, 

Florida, 

Total, 



Lands sold, after deduct- 
ing erroneous entries. 



Acres. 



35,715.58 

55,795.31 

437,404.20 

158,330.96 

118,827.24 

43,066.15 

45,360.38 

25,000.16 

24,391.29 

127,805.58 

50,907.72 

5,033.11 



1,129,217.58 



Purchase 
Money. 



$47,380.75 

69,748.09 

646,834.93 

197,633.72 

148,534.17 

64,958.45 

56,700.44 

31,250.21 

30,489.18 

163,778.90 

64,747.13 

6,916.39 



1,417,972.06 



Amount received in Cash. Treas- 
urer's Receipts, and Treasury 
Notes. 



Gash. 



$42,776.93 

69,584.13 

462,166.54 

196,424.64 

143,966.10 

53,943.31 

47,973.16 

31,096.63 

29,062.67 

169,907.65 

56,046.58 

4,505.59 



1,299,561.93 



Treasur- 
Re- 
ceipts. 



er's 



$2,^00 



2,053.00 
200.00 



1,200.00 



6,053.00 



Treasury 
Notes. 



$72,796.72 

304.11 

3,960.13 

1,015.14 

8,727.28 

151.58 

406.51 

3,870.05 

3,337.80 

2,030.8 



06,598.09 



Amount 

paid into the 

Treasury 

during the 

Year. 



$57,325.36 

72,920.01 

650,071.97 

196,401.63 

100,920.90 

49,433.29 

76^50.86 

22,337.83 

20,964.16 

115,906.95 

66,394.75 

6,06D.r 



1,335,078 



.671 



SutHud 


L>nd<»ld,>l\.rd«dacl 
IngerroneoiueniriM. 


Amounl received in Cash, Treas 


piUdiDlaIhe 
dnn™K 




Acres. 


PurehBM 


cuh. 


^«'pl»" 


'^^T 


Total, 


B,lSO.ia 

1SI 
iS 


813,750,3^ 

38^ .4a 

■«0,«3.01 

4Sflio.a 

45|85l!s 


»13^1,53 
a}>7,78 

351,810.44 
195^.48 
34564.27 
30,344.50 
11,187 a 

i45;aoo!o- 

US flUM 






3M,a!1.83 
331,647.39 
I48,l«3.Fa 
40>0.M 
39,39iiJ0 

33,»j3.«0 
19»,50OJ8 
140^«i 






»li00.00 

soo.oo 


ta;mx 


3 033.17 
8,973.20 




""■•" 


:::::::::: 








lflB9,9S7.EB 


1,380,*».04 


1^^16J7 


l^.*, 


31,6I7J!1 


i^eoffeja 



A. Exhibii a/ tht QuanJtfy o/ Atiltc £<md lold, and tlu amount paid by tht 
J\rcltiua-f thcTiof, in each Stati and Ttrrilory, m laeh Ytar;Jrim IBSi, to 
itu 30(A of Aptonir, 1843, inelutivt. 





IfflS. 


1830. 


IMO. 


Acre.. 


DoUon. 


A«ei. 


Dollsn. 


Acni. DoUan. 


Ohio, 

KDdi. 
Ark. 

Fl^i., 
Total, 


S43,093'8; 
Bl)a,424« 
TTSpMOM 
6I«.«!3-32 

isesee-13 

B71,0T4-» 

ll 

«|lf47 
3,4W,9W4S 


Ida'* 19-37 
lB7,170-37 

e4a,fBri: 
33B;oeo-a 

m'fier-* 

aiSTB-ia 


943,444' 70 
818,748'ai 

I,i3a,srfl-31 

1,038,(MS'ES 
'12193581 

j»^iai-3: 


31S,30S.S 

«,4«^7e 


33/l5fr 41,327.47 

iie,se§- i4S,e4S-») 

mXlS- 486,0478 
B72,4W- 7»,310-14 

BB,Ta4- nfiooet 

■sis «:!! 



130 



VNITKD 8TATS8. 



[1849. 



States 

and 

Territo- 

riefl. 


1841. 


184S. 


First three quarters 
of 1&43. 


Acres. 


Do'lars. 


Acres. 


Dollars. 


Acres. 


% 

Dollars. 


Ohio, 

Indiana, 

niinoid, 

Mo. 

Ala. 

Mp. 

La. 

Mich. 

Ark. 

Wiscon. 

Iowa, 

Florida, 

Total, 


43,613.71 

93,682.96 

335,553.00 

269,471.91 

50,705.36 

21,635.85 

05.111.95 

18,167.59 

64,860.75 

101,731.17 

73,673.17 

6,388.67 


59,589.66 

117,425.40 

419,755430 

336,843.84 

61,332.81 

27,044.61 

n9,.305.05 

22,709.87 

66,831.78 

1-27,446.31 

92,103.-39 

7,965.84 

1,463,364.06 


35,715-58 

65,795-31 

437,404-20 

]56,3::0e6 

118,827-24 

43,06615 

45,.360-38 

25,000-16 

24,391-29 

127,605-58 

50,997-72 

5,533-11 


47,380-75 

e«,748-09 

648,634-93 

197,63!]- 72 

146,534-17 

54,968-45 

66,700-44 

34,250-21 

30,480'18 

163,778-60 

63,747-13 

6,916-39 

1,417,972-06 


9,180-12 

29,279-76 

269,912-14 

282,361-09 

160,290- 8^ 

27,65562 

36,488-21 

9,194-80 

36,643-43 

114,0-29-04 

118,878-11 

6,177-63 


13,75(,'28 

36,660-42 

337,393-73 

352,824-19 

200,46300 

34,578-27 

45,610-20 

11,493-48 

45,951-63 

145,491-18 

148,.597-64 

7,72206 


1,164,7C6.11 


1,129.217-58 


1,099,987-83 


1,380,426-04 



5. Statement of the annual receipts from the Land Officts into the JWasury, 
on account of the Public Lands sold, from 1801 to the 30th of Septtmber 
1843, inclusive; also, the moneys received by the IWasurer of the United 
States^ Marshals^ 6fc,, on the same a4:cowU, and the amotmt received for Lands 
sold prior to the opening of the Land Offices.* 



Years. 


Amount. 


Years. 


Amount. 


1801 


$168,125 01 


1823 


$916,523 10 


1802 


188,628 02 


1824 


984,418 15 


1803 


165,675 69 


1825 


1,216,090 56 


1804 


487,526 79 


1826 


1,393,785 09 


1805* •••»■•«• 


540,193 80 


j 1827 


1,497,053 82 


1806 


765,245 73 


1 1828 


1,018.308 75 


1807 


466,163 27 


1829 


1,517,175 13 


1808 


647,939 06 


1830 


2,329,356 14 


is;;9 


442,252 33 


1831 


3,210,815 48 


1810 


696,548 82 


1832 


2,923,381 03 


1811 


1,040,237 53 


1833 


. 3,967,681 55 


1812 


710,427 78 


1834 


4,857,600 69 


1813 


835,655 14 


1835 


14,757,600 75 


1814 


1,135,971 09 


1836 


24,641,979 86 


1815 


1.287,959 28 


1837 


6,770 036 52 


1616 


1,717,985 03 


1838 


4,081,939 47 


1817 


1,991.220 06 


1839 


7,076,447 35 


1818 


2,606,564 77 


1840 


3,292,220 29 


1819 


3,274,422 78 


1841 


1,363,090 04 


1820 


1,635,871 61 


1842- 


1,335,797 52 


1821 


1.212,966 46 


1843 Sept. 30. 


1,286,688 33 


1822 1,803,581 54 ' 


112,959,157 21 


Received by Treasurer U. S., mar 


slials, &c., 


244,954 14 




113,204,111 35 


Amount received prior to opening 


' land offices, 


100,783 59 


Grand 


Total, 


113,304.894 94 



• The amounts here given differ from those in the preceding table, for the respective 
years, because all the money received for the land was n«»t at once paid into the U. 8. 
Treasury, but the minor land offices were sometimes in debt to the general Treasury at 
the close of the year, and sometimes paid up the debt of a former year. 



1845.] 



BEYENUS Alls XXPBNDITUIIS. 



137 



6. iSRiovf of the several States and Taritories, under the Distribution Act 
of Aih September J 1841, of the residue of the net proceeds of the Pitblic Lands 
sold m the half year ending dOth June^ 1842, amounting to 9562,144 18. 



Statef and Territories. 


Prec Popula- 
tion. 


Slaves. 


Federal 
numben. 


Distribntive 
shares. 


ILfoiVlA 


PJM 7Q^ 




501,793 
284,574 


517,554 90 
9,955 64 


JrlalUc, • 

New Hampshire, 


> a 




284,573 


1 


Massachusetts, 








737,698 


1 


737,699 


25,807 92 


Rhode Island, . 








108^825 


6 


108,828 


3.807 28 


Connecticut, 
Verraont, 
New York, . 








309,998 
9Q1 CiAR 


17 


310,008 

291,948 

2,428,919 


10,845 43 
10,213 61 
84,974 15 








2,428,917 


4 


New Jersey^ 








372,632 


674 


373,036 


13,050 42 


Pennsylvania, 








1,723,969 


64 


1,724,007 


60,313 27 


Delaware, 








75,480 


2,605 


77,043 


2,695 30 


Maryland, 








380,282 


89,737 


434,124 


15,187 54 


Virginia, . 








790,810 


448,987 


1,060,202 


37,090 48 


North Carolina, 








607,602 


245,817 


655,092 


22,917 97 


South Carolina, 








267,360 


327,038 


463,583 


16,218 15 


Georgia, 








410,448 


280,944 


579,014 


20,256 43 


Alabama, . 




I. 




337,224 


253,532 


489,343 


17,119 35 


Mississippi, 








180,440 


195,211 


297,567 


10,410 19 


Loui»ana, 








183,959 


168,452 


285,030 


9,971 59 


Tennessee, . 








646,151 


183,059 


755,986 


26,447 63 


Kentucky, 








597,570 


182,258 


706,925 


24,731 31 


Ohio, . 








1,519,464 


3 


1,519,466 


53,157 63 


Indiana, . 








685,863 


3 


685,865 


23,994 54 


Illinois, 








475,852 


331 


476,051 


16,654 33 


Missouri, . 








325,462 


58,240 


360,406 


12,608 57 


Arkansas, 








77,639 


19,935 


89,600 


3,134 60 


Michigan, 
Wisconsin, . 








212 267 




212,267 
30,941 


7,426 03 
1,082 45 








30,934 


11 


Iowa, 








43,096 


16 


43,106 


1,508 03 


Florida, 








28,760 


25,717 


44,190 


1,545 96 


District of Columbia 


'» 


39,018 


4,694 


41,834 


1,463 53 


Total, 


t 


14,676,034 


2,487,356 


16,068,447 


562444 18 



X. REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE. 
[From a Report of the Secretary of the Treasury, December 6, 1843.] 

1. Statement of duties^ revenues^ and public expenditures^ during Hk calendar 
year 1842, and from Jan. 1 to July 1, 1843, exchmoe of trust funds. 

The receipts into the treasury were as fol- 
lows : 



From customs, viz — 

During the first quarter,* • • 
Daring the second quarter, 
Daring the third quarter, • • 
During the fourth quarter,* 

Total costoma, 

1«» 



For 1842. 

$1,840,721 15 

6,138,390 62 

6,281,659 18 

3,927,137 81 

1M89|M6 76 



Six mos. of 1843. 

$2,940,804 16 

4406,039 75 



7,046,843 91 



138 



UNITCD 8TATS8. 



[184d. 



From sales of public lands, 

From miscellaneous sources, 

Total receipts, exclusive of loans, &c., • • 

Treasury notes under act of Feb. 15, 1841,* • • 
Treasury notes under act of Jan. 31, 1842,* • • 
Treasury notes under act of Aug. 31, 1842, • • 

Avails of loans of 1841, and 1842, 

Avails of loan of March 3, 1&43, 

Total from notes and loans, 

Total means, 

The expenditures, exclusive of trust funds, 
were, viz ; 

Civil List. 

Legislature, 

Executive, 

Judiciary, • • • '^ 

Governments in the Territories, 

Surveyors and their clerks, » 

Officers of the Mint and branches, 

Commissioner of the Public Buildings, ^ • • • • 

Secretary to sign patents, 

Total civil list, 

Foreign Litercourse. 

Salaries of ministers, 

Salaries of secretaries of legation, 

Salaries of charg6s des affaires, 

Salary of minister resident to Turkey, 

Outfits of ministers and charges des affaires. 
Salary of dragoman to Turkey, and contin- 
gencies, 

Diplomatic agents in Europe, attending to to- 
bacco interest, 

Contingent expenses of all the missions abroad 
Expenses incurred by the legation to Mexico, 

in relation to prisoners, 

Contingent expenses of foreign intercourse,* 
Salary of the consuls at London and Paris,* • 
Belief and protection of American seamen,* • 
Clerk-hire, office-rent, &c., to American consul, 

London, » 

Intercourse with Barbary powers, 

Interpreters, guards. &c, at the consulates in 

Turkish dominions, 

Expenses of the commission under conyen 

tion with Mexico, 

Outfit of charge d'afiaires to Denmark, 

To establish commercial relations with China, 
Compensation for certain diplomatic services. 

To commissioner to Sandwich Islands, 

Extra compensation to late Smithsonian ag't. 
Total foreign intercourse, 

MisceUantout. 
Surveya of public lands, 



r For 1642. 


Six iiMHi.of 1843. 


$1,336,797 52 


$697,818 11 


120,260 12 


120,663 44 


19,643,966 40 
1,060,206 05 


8,065,325 46 




7,914,644 83 


45,350 00 


2,408,554 89 


617,000 00 


3,425,329 87 


4,883,358 36 




6,934,000 00 


14,808,735 64 


12,479,706 36 


34,452,702 04 


20,545,033 82 


1,203,513 16 


335,183 92 


887,615 23 


440,808 82 


560,990 87 


287,058 04 


141,264 82 


79,260 92 


51,141 46 


33,309 93 


44,077 55 


19,050 00 


3,000 00 


1,419 44 


1,500 00 


750 00 


2,893,103 09 


1,196,931 07 


62,012 85 


33,507 29 


16,465 71 


7,850 00 


55,369- 15 


25,325 00 


4,395 00 


2,765 00 


45,000 00 




2,025 00 


1,952 53 


8,500 00 




45,819 29 


23,557 37 


5,150 00 


810 75 


25,500 00 


8,000 00 


2,166 66 


1,007 06 


58,410 52 


27,867 02 


3,444 47 


1,400 00 


11,509 00 


4,803 87 


3,000 00 




9,117 12 






4,500 00 




40,000 00 




15,081 49 




2,150 00 




3,815 73 


357,684 77 


204,393 13 


• 

91,664 78 


23,901 51 



1845.] 



BXTSMDS AND BXPENDXTUKE. 



130 



Support and maintenance of light-^houses, &c., 

Marine hospital establishment, 

Public buildings, &c., in Washington,* • • 

Furniture of the President's house, 

Support of the penitentiary, 

Sixth census, 

Patent fund, 

Distribution of the sales of public lands. 
To meet the engagements of the Post- Office 

Department, 

Public buildings in Iowa territory, 

Printing, &c., ordered by Congress, 

Building custom houses, &c., 

Survey of the coast of the United States,. 

Mint establishment, • 

Two per cent to the State of Mississippi, 
Two per cent, on sales of public lands in Ala., 

Relief of sundry individuals, 

Miscellaneous claims unprovided for, 

Survey of the northeastern boundary line,' • • 
Insane hospital for the District of Columbia, 

Bridge across Pennsylvania avenue, 

Removal of the statue of Washington, 

Purchase of ground north of General P. O.,* • 
Lighting lamps on Pennsylvania avenue,* • • • 
Auxiliary watch in the city of Washington,- 
Expenses incidental to the issue of treasury 

notes, 

Expenses incidental to the loans, 

Support of lunatics of the Dist. of Columbia, 
Three and five per cents, to certain States, • • 
Relief of the cities of the Dist. of Columbia,- - 

Debentures and other charges, • 

Additional compensation to collectors, fee.,- • 

Payment of horses, &c., lost, 

Duties refunded under protest, 

Repayment for lands erroneously sold, 

Documentary history of the American revo- 
lution, 

To Maine and Massachusetts under treaty of 

Washington, 

Sales of lands ceded by Ottowa Indians, 
Testing the electro- magnetic telegraphs, 
Results and acc't of the exploring expedition. 
Ail other items of a miscellaneous nature, 
Total miscellaneous, 



t • • • 



Vkder the dincHon of the War Department. 

Army proper, 

Military academy, 

Fortifications, and other works of defence, - 
Armories, arsenals, and munitions of war, 

Harbors, roads, rivers, &c., 

Surveys, \ 

Light- houses and marine hospitals, 

Pensions, 

Indian Department, 



For 18<3. 

$389,388 

114,771 

164,963 

1,500 

10,503 

190,136 

47,220 

425,607 



84 
73 
56 
00 
50 
94 
00 
68 



53,697 00 

600 00 

40,532 6S 

109,560 03 

87,263 00 

84,782 87 

144,214 33 

119,207 61 

407,696 33 

8,290 34 

49,901 42 

3,000 00 

12,000 00 

860 00 

23,243 75 

1,100 00 

2,396 79 

3,095 19 

4,923 19 

4,000 00 

70,901 78 

132,724 05 

375,004 00 

23,637 62 

2,825 98 

183,479 17 

16,468 99 



19,384 92 



3,420,548 07 



|Sizmos.ofl843. 
$184,548 46 
50,134 54 
21,698 60 

4,500 00 
26,752 14 
19,925 00 
83,233 79 

21,303 00 
14,400 00 
41,618 00 
25,571 64 
26,300 00 
33,020 00 



72,078 77 

904 75 

21,382 05 

7,000 00 

2,500 00 



3,416 57 

1,581 04 

11,346 79 

500 00 

10,492 31 

93,560 64 

2,450 00 

100,923 85 

28,596 69 

143,478 78 

7,712 59 

34,468 00 

300,000 00 

20,679 90 

8,000 00 

5,000 00 

12,985 12 

1,465,964 53 



3,641,778 29 

178,776 05 

958,277 90 

738,979 79 

108,482 34 

37,708 32 

14,804 13 

1,445,212 76 

|l ,097,006 66 



1,693,274 73 

63,605 10 

404,083 78 

328,203 94 

104,698 68 

21,472 00 

4,667 04 

836,277 36 

4Ufi&S 30 



ua 



ITNITXD STATS S. 



ltS45. 



Claims of tixs State of Virginia,* • • • 
Arming and equipping the miHtia,* • 
Payments to militia and volunteers, 
Meteorological observations at militafj posts 
Relief of sundry individuals, 



• ••^••«a 



Totnl under direction of the War Dep*t, • 

Vnder the Direction of the Naufy Department, 

Pay and subsistence, including medicines, &c., 
Increase,, repairs, armament and equipment, 

Contingent expenses, 

Navy yards, 

Navy hospitals and asyhim, 

Magazines, 

Survey of the coast from Apalachicola bay to 

the mouth of the Mississippi, ' 

Charter of steamers for the survey of Nan 

tucket shoal, 

Arranging, preserving, &c., collections made 

by the exploring expedition, 

Erecting the statue of Washington, 

Suppression of the slave trade, 

Relief of sundry individuals, 

Marine corps, 

Pensions to invalids, widows, &c., 

Survey of the harbor of Memphis, Tenn., 

Building depot of charts, 

Use of Babbitt's anti-attrition metal, • • • • 

Total under direction of the Navy Pep't, 

Public Debt. 

Paying the old public debt, 

Interest on the loans of 1841, 1842, and 1843, 

Redemption of Treasury notes, • • • 

Interest on Treasury notes, 

Total public debt, 

Total expenditures, 



. • • • • 



For 1842. 

$16,915 53 

211,811 10 

420,837 43 

1,000 00 

52,917 66 



Six inos.of 1843, 

#6,572 50 

84,540 75 

109,649 34 

56,753 79 



8,924,507 97 



4,048,441 52 

3,114,473 10 

485,166 04 

235,328 29 

24,182 27 

619 13 

10,925 28 

4,345 39 

15,100 00 

4,000 00 

2,584 57 

1,998 79 

377,829 32 



4,158,384 31 



8,324,993 70 



5,165 25 

405,894 07 

7,704,674 84 

362,134 78 



2,079,546 42 

916,172 35 

339,505 63 

67,055 60 

13,245 59 

306 00 

3,923 53 



2,000 00 

2,000 00 

1,324 76 

203,077 79 

21,449 00 

111 12 

3,000 00 

20,000 00 



3,672,717 79 



5,224 32 
386,187 88 
332,788 32 
137,406 95 



8,477,868 94 861,607 47 
32,398,906 54 11,559,998 3^ 



2. StaUnmt of the DAt of the Vmted States, December 1, 1843. 

$208,009 34 



t. Of the (old) funded debt, being unclaimed principal and 
interest, returned firom the late loan offices, 

d. Outstanding certificates, and interest to 31 st December, 
1798, of the (old) unfunded debt, payable on presenta- 
tion, 

3. Treasurer notes issued during the late war, payable on 
presentation, 

4. Certificates of Mississippi stock, payable on presentation, 

5. Debts of the corporate cities of the District ot Columbia, 
assumed by the United States, viz: 

Of the city of Washington, $900,000 00 

Alexandria, $210,000 00 

Georgetown, 210,000 00 



24,214 29 

4,317 44 
4.320 09 



$1,31^0,000 00 



1845.] RSTSNUE AND EZFSNDITtTKE. 141 

6. Loans, 
viz: Under the act of 21st July, 1841, re- 

deenoable Ist January, 1845, 5,672,976 88 

Under the act of 15th April, 1S42, re- 
deemable Ist January, 1863, 8,343,886 03 
Under the act of 3d March, 1843, re- 
deemable 1st July, 1853, 7,000,000 00 



7. Outstanding treasury notes : 

Of the several issues prior to 31st Au- 
gust, 1843, *3,917,725 92 
Of notes issued and paid out under 
the act of 3d March, 1843, 247,500 00 



21,016,362 91 



4,165,225 92 



Total debt, f 26,742,949 99 

* This sum includes $98,300, in the hands of the accounting officers. 

a Revenue a$id Expenditure from July 1, 1843, to March 1, 1844. 

From a subsequent report of the Secretary of the Treasury, made up' 
to February 29, 1844, we gather the following particulars : 

The balance in the treasury on the 1st of July, 1843, was $10,434,507 55 

The receipts from that time till 29th Feb'y, 1844, were 

From Customs, $15,102,688 26 

Lands, 1,337,052 79 

Incidentals, 84,208 62 

Loan of 1843, 70,231 35 

Treasury notes, 1,919,800 00 



The payments for the same period have been 
For civil list, miscellaneous, and for-* 

eign intercourse, 3,530,065 IS 

Military, 6,174,485 13 

Naval, 4,703,956 13 

Reimbursing treasury notes, 9,758,711 49 

Interest on treasury notes, 547,286 67 

Interest on public debt, 647,434 97 



18,513,981 02 
28,948,488 57 



25,361,048 93 



Balance in the treasury, 1st March, 1844, 3,587,439 64 

From these data it would appear, that the amount of the na- 
tional debt, including treasury notes as a part of said debt, has been re- 
duced $7,778,680 14, between the Ist July, 1843, and the 29th February, 
1844. Thus— 

Amount of treasur]^ notes redeemed, $9,758,711 49 

Amount received for treasury notes, $1,919,800 00 
Receipts for loans for 1843, 70,231 35 

1,980,031 35 

Showing a reduction of indebtedness of 7,778,680 14 



142 



VITXTSD 8TATXS. 



[1845. 



Statement of the Receipts into the National Thanajy from Customs^ hter- 
not Revenue and Direct Taxes, and Sales of Public Jjo/nds^ frontons of a 
doUar being exchdtd. 



Tears. 



178fr-01 
1782 

1708 
1794 
1799 
1799 

»7«7 
1796 
1799 
180O 

1801 

i6a» 

1803 

VSfA 

1805 
1806 
3807 

isoe 

1809 
1610 
18U 

1812 

1813 
1814 
1815 
1815 

1817 
1818 
1819 
1820 

1821 
1823 
1823 
1824 

1825 
1826 
1827 



9 



1829 
18S0 

1831 
1802 

1833 
1834 
1835 

1836 

1837 

1838 
1839 
1840 

1841 

1842 
mo8.of'43 



Cnstama. 



•4^,473 
3^,671 

4^,306 
4,801,065 

5,568,461 
6,567,988 

7,549,650 
7,106,062 
6,610^440 
9,060,933 

10,750,779 
12,438,336 

10,479,418 
11,096,565 

12,836^487 
14,667,698 
15^45,593 
16,363,500 

7,29a»031 

8,583,909 

13,313,223 

6,958,776 

13,224,623 
6,996,772 

7,^262,942 
36,306,675 

26,283,348 
17,176,385 
20,283,609 
15,005,612 

13,004,447 
17,589,762 
19,088,433 

17,878,396 

29,096,714 
23,341,332 
19,712i»3 
23,205,904 

22,681,966 
21,922,391 
24i24,442 
28,465,237 

29,032,509 
16,2;i4,957 
19,391511 
23,409,940 

11,165,970 
16,155,455 
23,136,397 
13,496,834 

14,481,998 
18,176,721 
13,179,116 



Internal and 
direct taxes. 



$208,943 

837,706 
274,090 
337,755 
475,9290 

675,491 

644,356 

779,130 

1,543,620 

1,562,377 
828,464 
287J050 
101,139 

43,631 
75,865 

47,784 
27,370 

11,562 

19,879 
9,962 
5,762 

8,561 
3,862,482 
6340,733 
9,378,344 

4,512,288 

1,219,613 

313,244 

137,847 

98,377 
88,617 
44,580 
40,865 

28,102 
26,228 
22,513 
19,671 

25,838 
29,141 
17,440 
18,422 

3,153 

4,216 

14,723 

1,099 



8ales of lands 

and 
misceUaneons. 



$4,836 

83,541 
11,963 

444 

167,726 
186,6^ 
165,676 
467,527 

540494 
765,246 
466463 
647,939 

442,252 

696,549 

li40J336 

710,428 

835,655 
1,135,971 
1,287,950 

1,717,965 

1,991,226 
2,606,565 
3,274,423 
1,635,872 

1,212,966 

1,808,582 

916,523 

964,418 

1,216,090 
1,393,785 
1,495,945 
1,018,309 

1,517,175 
2,329,356 
3,210315 
2,623,381 

3,967,682 
4,857,661 
4,757,601 
4,877,180 

6,863,556 
3^14,184 
7^1,118 
3,494,356 

1,470,295 
1,434,878 
1,426,029 



«Aggregate ci Receipts 



In each year. 



$4,399,473 
3,652,914 

4,593i)12 
5,075,155 
5,926,216 
7,048,114 

8,206,662 

7,762,383 

7,389,585 

10,624,997 

12,500382 
13,455^)26 
10,932453 
11,687,231 

13,520,312 
15,508^)9 
16,359,469 
17/133,659 

7,749,835 

9,299,737 

14,363,423 

9,674,968 

14,066,639 
ll,017i225 
15,411,634 
47,403,204 

32,786,83^ 
21,002i63 
23,871,276 
16,779,331 

14,315,790 
19,481,961 
20,049,536 
18,903,609 

21,349,966 
24,763^45 
21,230,641 
24,243,504 

24^224,979 
24,280,888 
37,452,697 
31,107,040 

33,003,344 
21,076,774 
34463335 
48,288,219 

16,029,526 
19,369,639 
30,397,515 
16,991,191 

15,952,293 
19,611,599 
14,605,145 



in each pe> 

riod or 
font years. 



$8,051,487 



22,642,497 



33,985,647 



48,575,694 



62,427,449 



41,087,963 



67,900,902 



94,440,032 



72,750,896 



91,580,396 



107,065,604 



136,531,972 



84,787,872 



50,169,037 



1845.] 



BXyBNUE AKX) EXPENDITURE. 



143 



5. Statement of tht ExpetuUttires of the United Statee, exdueive of paymmits 
on accowU of the Public Debt^ ana from TViMt limdSffraetione excluded. 



r 



YeaiB. 



1789-91 
17S8 

1708 

1794 
1795 
1790 

1797 
1798 
1799 
1600 

1801 
1809 
1803 
1804 

1805 
1806 
1807 
1808 

1809 
1810 
1611 
1813 

1613 
1814 
1615 

isie 

1817 
1818 
1810 
16120 

1621 
18S23 
1823 
1824 



IBM 
1887 
1888 

1820 
1830 
1831 
1832 

1833 
1834 
1835 
1836 

1837 
1836 
1839 
1840 

1841* 
1842t 
1843t 



Civil Ust, 

foreign inter- 

coune, and 

miscel'neous. 



$1,063,401 
654,257 

472,450 

705,598 

1J67,037 

772,485 

1,246,904 
1,111,088 
1,039,392 
1,337,613 

1,114,768 
1,462,929 
1,842,636 
2,191,009 

3,768,588 
2,891,037 
1,697,897 
1,423,286 

1,215,804 
1,101,145 
1,367,291 
1,683,086 

1,729,435 
2,206,029 
2,896,871 
2,989,742 

3,518,987 
3,835,839 
3,057,212 
2,592,022 

2<223,122 
1,967,996 
2,022,094 
7,155,306 

2,748,544 
2,600,178 
2;U4,777 
2,886,052 

3,092,214 
3,226,416 
3,064,346 
4,574,841 

6,051,789 
4^399,779 
3,720,167 
5,388,371 

5,524 J253 
5,666,703 
4,994,562 
5,561,878 

943,527 
0,215,946 

6,665,452 



Military es- 
tablishniouL 



$835,618 
1,228,594 

1,237,090 
2,733,540 
2,573,059 
1,474,661 

1,194,055 
2,130,837 
2,582,693 
2,625,041 

1,755,477 

1,356,589 

944,958 

1,072,017 

991,136 
1,540,431 
1,564,611 
3,196,985 

3,771,109 

2,555,693 

2,259,747 

12,187,046 

19,906,362 
20,608,366 
15,394,700 
16,475,412 

8,621,075 
7,019,140 
0,365,421 
6,154,518 

5,161,114 
5,635,187 
5,258,295 
5,270,255 

5,692,831 
6,243,236 
6,675,742 
5,701,203 

6,250,530 
6,752,689 
6,943i239 
7,982,877 

13,096,152 

10,064,428 

9,420,313 

16,466,110 

19,417,274 
19,936,318 
14,266,961 
11,621,438 

2,122,061 

13,908,898 

8,248,916 



Naval estab- 
liahmeat. 



$570 
53 



61,409 
410,562 

274,784 

d82j633 
1,381,346 
2,856,069 
3,448,716 

2,111,424 

915,563 

1,215,231 

1,189,833 

1,597,500 
1,649,641 
1,722,064 
1,884,068 

3,427,759 
1,654,244 
1,965,566 
8,959,365 

6,446,600 
7,311,291 
8j660,000 
3,90^278 

3,314,596 
2,953,095 
8,847,640 
4,367,990 

3,319,243 
2^224,459 
2,508,766 
2,904,562 

3,049,064 
4,216,903 
4i263,878 
3,918,796 

3,308,745 
3,239,439 
3,656,183 
3,956,370 

3,901,357 
3,056,960 
3^4^980 

5,800,763 

6,852,060 
6,975,771 
6^95,008 
6,124,456 

784,269 
0,946,503 
7,963,678 



Aggregate of Ezpenditnies 



In each year. 



1,919,589 
1,877,904 

1,710,070 
3,500,547 
4,350,658 
3|581,900 

2,623,591 
4,623,223 
0,480,167 
7,411,370 

4,981,669 
3,737,060 
4,002,625 
4,452,850 

6,357,234 
6,061,109 
4,984,573 
6,504,339 

7,414,672 

5,311,082 

5,502,604 

17,829,499 

38,062,397 
30,127gS86 
26,9S3JS71 
28,373,433 

15,454,610 

13,606,674 
16,800,S73 
13,134,530 

10,723,479 
9,827,642 
9,784,155 

15,930,145 

11,490,409 
13,062,316 
12,254,397 
]S,606/M1 

13,651,460 
13,220^534 
13,863,766 
16,514,086 

28,049,296 
18,420,467 
17,005,419 
29,655,244 

31,798,587 
31,578,785 
95,466,547 
23,327,772 

3,819,850 
96,366,347 
23,078,047 



In each pe- 
riod of 
four yean. 



$^,797,498 



13,088|306 



21,338,351 



17,174,433 



•*.•— M*^a> 



33,927,344 



36,147,607 



108,637,086 



08,696,067 



46,065,«21 



49,3ia/n9 



56,249,879 



87,130,428 



113,188,091 



53,264,944 



• From January 1, to March 3, 1841. 
I From Mwrcb 4^ 1849, tp March 4, 1643. 



t From Blaich 4, 1841, to March 4, 1843. 



144 



UNITED STATES. 



[1845. 



XI. TITLES AND ABSTRACTS OF THE PUBLIC LAWS, 
Passed at the first session of the 28th Cong&ess. 

jibstract of the jippropriation Bills. 
Cml and Difiomatic Exptnaet. For the year ending June 30, 1845. 



Congress — pay of members, 

do. incidental expenses, 

President of the United States, 
Repairs of Capitol, President's House, &c., 
Department of State, 
Treasury Department — pay of officers, 

do. do. incidental expenses, 

War Department — pay of officers, 
do. do. incidental expenses, 

Navy department, 
Patent Office, 
Post- Office Department, 
Surveyors and their clerks. 
United States Mint and Branches, 
Governments of the Territories, 
Judiciary^ 
Miscellaneous, 

Light-House Establishment, ' 
Surveys of Public Lands, 
U. S. Bank for Custom House at Philadelphia, 
Intercourse with Foreign Nations, 
For offices created by act of Aug. 26, 1842, 



$351,600 00 

172,610 50 

25,000 00 

19,097 25 

48,200 00 

317,400 00 

45,980 00 

98,200 00 

23,705 00 

75,251 50 

4,300 00 

172,270 00 

69,020 00 

134,020 00 

88,847 25 

531,419 67 

288,524 33 

397,159 89 

206,510 00 

225,000 00 

358,275 74 

50,882 50 



Deficiencies in appropriations for year ending June 30, 1844, 211,270 82 



jirmy jSppropriation BiU^ 

Navy jSppropriation BiU^ 

Indian Department and Indian Treaties, 

Pensions, Acts Nos. 12 and 35, 

Post-Office Department, 

Military Academy, 

Deficiency in former appropriation for seamen. 

Improvement of certain harbors and rivers, 

Building and repairing fortifications, 

Missouri horses lost in the Florida war, 

Sales of condemned naval stores for naval service. 

Repairing the Court House in Alexandria, 

Navy Yard and Depot at Memphis in Tennessee, . 

To test the submarine telescope, and mark the boundary 



$3,914,544 45 
3,372,213 10 
5,712,914 33 
971,330 11 
1,048,050 00 
4,530,000 00 
116,845 50 
40,500 00 
655,000 00 
537,745 00 
34,500 00 
116,922 79 
550 00 
100,000 00 
of Mo., 6,000 00 



1845.] TITLES AND ABSTRACTS OP THE PUB&IC LAWS. 



145 



Improvements on west shore of Lake Mich., (Nos. 37, 38,) $25,000 00 

Deficiency in Naval appropriations for 1844, . . 532 000 62 
Improvements in Iowa and Florida, and Hospital at Key 

West, (Nos, 43, 44, 45,) . . . e4,500 00 

Insane persons in the District of Columbia, . 4 ooo 00 

Private Bills, in which sums are specified, . . 55 557 35 

Total, .... $21,838,273 26 

No. 1 . ^n Act to supply a deficiency in Ihe appropriation for the fiscal year 
ending June 30, 1844, for the relief and protection of Jmerican Seamm. See 
abstract on page 144. Jan. 22, 1844. 

No. 2. An Act to authorize th^ President of the United States to direct trans- 
fers of appropri^aions in the Naval servixx^ under certain circumstances. From 
unexpended appropriations for the naval service, $200,000 may be trans- 
ferred to th« appropriation for the increase, repairs, armament, &c., of the 
navy ; provided, that balances be not taken from the appropriations for 
navy yards, nor any transfer- be made which will afterwards require 
another appropriation to supply the deficiency. Feb. 23, 1S44. 

No, a An Act changing the time of holding the Courts at Clarksburg and 
ot Wheeling, in the Western District of Virginia^ and the Circtdt Court of the 
Vhited States for the District of Arkansas. See pp. 105, 108. March 4 1844. 

No. 4. An Act to repeal the Act entitled ^^An Act to amend the Act of March 
10, 1838, entitled * An Act to change the time of holding the Circmt and District 
Courts in the District of Ohio.'' " See pp. 105, 109, March 4, 1844. 

No, 5. An Act to amend the Act entitled " An Act to establish branches of 1M 
JMtne of the United States.^^ The oath required may be taken before the 
judge of any court of record in the State where the branch is situated. 
April 2, 1844. 

No. 6. An Act directing the disposition of certain unclaimed goods^ wares 
or merchandise^ seized for being iUegaUy imported into the United States. The 
collector shall make a list in duplicate of goods that are seized, describing 
them, and shall cause them to be appraised by two sworn appraisers, who 
shall receive $1.50 a day each. If the value appraised be $100 or less 
the collector shall advertise the goods for three weeks, requiring the own- 
ers to appear and claim them within ninety days. The claimants may 
give a bond to the United States for $250, with two sureties, providing 
that, in case of condemnation, they will pay costs and expenses, and the 
bond shall be given to the District Attorney, who shall proceed thereon. 
If no claim be made, or no bond given, withia the time specified, the col- 
lector shall give twenty days notice of sale, and at the end of that time 
shall sell the goods, and deposit the proceeds to the credit of the Treas- 
ury. Within one year after the sale, the claimant may apply for a re- 
mission of forfeiture, if he can show that he was in such circumstances 
ts not to know of the seizure, and that the forfeiture was made without 

13 



140 UNITED 8TATX8. [1845. 

negligence on his part; and the Secretary of the Treasury, upon satis- 
factory proof, may grant this application, and restore the proceeds of the 
sale. If no such application be, made within a year, the proceeds shall 
be distributed according to law. April 2, 1844. 

No. 7. ^n Act reqmring one of the Judges of the Circuit Court for the JDis- 
trict of Columbia^ hereafter to reside in Alexandria. When a vacancy shall 
occur in this Court, the Judge to be appointed shall reside in Alexandria, 
a^d afterwards one shall always reside there. The Judges may exchange 
residences, if they see iit. April 4, 1844. 

No. 8. An Act to repeal so mtich of the Act approved Aug, 23, 1842, as re- 
quires the second regiment of dragoons to be converted into a regiment of r^emen^ 
after March 4, 1843. The riAeroen are to be remounted, and called the 
second regiment of dragoons. April 4, 1844. 

No. 9. An Act to change the time of holding the Spring term of the District 
Court of the United States for the Eastern District of Virginia, and of the Oir- 
cuit Court of Alabama. See pp. } 05, 108. April 12, 1S44. 

No. 10. An Act making appropriations fir the support of the Military 
Acculemy for the fiscal year endingj June dOth^ 1845. Sec abstract on page 
144. April 4, 1844. 

No. 11. An Act making an appropriation of certain moneys in the Treatwry 
fw the naval service. See abstract, (sales of condemned naval stores,) page 
144. April 22, 1844. 

No. 12. Appropriations for pensions. See abstract on page 144. 
April 30, 1844. 

No. 13. An Act giving the assent of Congress to the holding of an extra set- 
tion of the Legislative Assembly of the Territory of Jowa, An extra session 
may be held in June, 1844, but the expenses of it shall not be paid by the 
United States. April 30, 1844. 

No. 14. An Act for the relief of citizens of toums upon the lands of thg 
United StateSy under certain circumstcmces. When any part of the public 
lands has been settled as a town site, and therefore not subject to entry 
ynder the pre3mption laws, the corporate authorities thereof, or the 
county Judges of its county, may enter at the minimum price the land as 
settled in trust for the benefit of the occupants thereof, the execution of 
which trust, as to the disposal of the lots, &c., shall be regulated by the 
legislative authority of the State or Territory wherein it is situated ; but 
the entry must be made before the public sale of the land, and shall in« 
elude only such land as is actually occupied, and be made according to 
the act of April 24, 1820, and shall not exceed 320 acres. The authorities 
of the town of Weston, in the State of Missojuri, shall be allowed a year 
from the passage of this act to enter their lands. May 23, 1844. 

No. 15. An Act to authorize the transfer of the namm gf pensumers from 
the Qgtneitt m the StaUof Ktntueky to the agtney in dnamyUi^ fn the State of 



1845.] TITLES AND ABSTRACTS OF THB PUBLIC LAWS. 147 

Ohio. Such transfers may be made on the application of the pensioners* 
May 23, 1844. 

No. 16. jin Act rdating to the Port of entry in the JHttrict of Passor 
maquoddy, in the State of Maine. The port constituted under the act of 
March 3, 1803, shall also be a port of entry for vessels arriving from the 
Cape of Good Hope, and from places beyond. May 31, 1844. 

No. 17. An Act to amend the Judiciary Act pctssed September 24, 1789. 
Final judgments in any circuit court in any civil action brought by the 
United States, for the enforcement of the revenue Jaws, may be reexam- 
ined in the U. S. Supreme Court, upon writ of error, as in other cases, 
without regard to the sum in controversy, at the instance of either party. 
May 31, 1844. 

No. 18. Appropriations for fortifications. See abstract on page 144. 

No. 19. An Act directing a disposition of the maps and charts of the survey 
of the coast. The Secretary of the Treasury may dispose of them at such 
prices as he shall see fit Copies of each sheet, not exceeding 300, may 
be given to such foreign governments, departments of our own govern- 
ments, and literary and scientific associations, as he shall direct June 
3, 1844. 

No. 20. An Act to alter the places of holding the District Court of the United 
States for the District of New Jersey. See page lOS. June 4, 1844. 

No. 21. An Act relating to bonds to be given by Custom Howe Officers. The 
bonds required must be given before they are qualified to enter on the 
performance of their duties. June 4, 1844. 

No. 22. Appropriations for the improvement of harbors and rivers. 
See abstract on page 144. June 11, 1844. 

No. 23. An Act to amend an Act entitled " An Act to reorganize the General 
Land Office.^* The oflice of Solicitor of the Land Office is abolished ; the 
duties formerly required of him shall be performed by the Recorder of the 
Land Office, or by such other persons as the Land Commissioner shall 
direct. June 12, 1844. 

No. 24. An Act to establish a port of delivery at the city of Lafayette^ in 
the State of Louisiana. The city shall be a port of delivery, and a surveyor 
shall be appointed there ; vessels bound to it shall first make entry at 
New Orleans, and then may unlade at Lafayette, according to the direc- 
tions of law and of the Secretary of the Treasury. Vessels about to de- 
part from Lafayette, shall clear out with their cargoes at the custom- 
house in New Orleans, and depart as from New Orleans. Goods shall be 
entitled to drawback in the same way as if exported from New Orleans. 
June 12, 1844. 

No. 25. An Act relating to the wdading of foreign merchandise on the right 
bank of the river Mississippi^ opposite New Orleans. Foreign salt may be un- 
laden at any point on the right bank, between the upper and lower limiti 
of the municipalities of New Orleans. June 12, 1844. 



148 UNITED STATES. [1845l 

No. 26. An Act for repairing the roof of the Court Howe in Alexandria, 
$550, and the proceeds of the sale of the zinc with which it is now cov- 
ered, are appropriated for covering the roof with tin. June 15, 1844. 

No. 27. An Act granting a $ection of land for the improvement cf Grant 
riveTf at the town of Jbtosi, in Wisconsin Territory, Section 34, in town* 
ship 3 Northjin range 3 West, of the fourth principal meridian, is grant- 
ed for said purpose, the land to be sold under direction of the legislature 
of the Territory, reserving preemption rights to actual settlers. The 
Surveyor general of Wisconsin shall appoint three commissioners to eso 
timate the value of the lots without taking into view the improvements 
on them ; and the occupants may secure their lots by paying said assessed 
value within one year. The compensation of the commissioners shall 
not exceed $120. June 15, 1844. i 

No. 28. An Act relating to certain coUeetion districts^ and for other purposes. 
Ipswich, Mass., St. Mary's, and Snow Hill, Md^ Folly Landing, and East 
Hiver, Va., and Sunbury, Hardwick, and Brunswick, Gra., are abolished as 
separate cc^lection districts, and are constituted ports of delivery. They 
shall be annexed to other districts, as follows : Ipswich to Newburyport, 
St Mary's to Annapolis, Snow Hill to Vienna, Folly Landing to Cherry- 
stone, East River to Torktown, Sunbury and Hardwick to Savannah, and 
Brunswick to St Mary's. The following ports of delivery are discon- 
tinued : Chester and Nanjemoy, Md., South Quay, Va., Hertford, Mur- 
freesborough, and Swansborough, N. C. The office of assistant collector 
to reside at Jersey, N. J., is abolished. The port of entry for the district 
of Pearl river, Miss., shall be at Shieldsborough instead of Pearlington, 
which is made a port of delivery. The district of Mississippi shall be 
hereafter called the district of New Orleans. June 15, 1844. 

No. 29. An Act to establish a Navy Yard and Depot at or adjacent to the 
city of Memphis, on the Mississippi river , in the State of Tennessee, $100,000 
are appropriated to purchase the site and erect the buildings ; and the 
President is empowered to purchase the necessary water-rights, and to 
receive donations of land, water-rights, &c. June 15, 1844. 

No. 30. An Act for the relief of the widows and orphans of the officers^ sea^ 
men J and marines of the United States schooner Grampus^ and for other pur- 
poses. In order to fix the time for the commencement of the pensions, 
March 20, 1843, shall be deemed the day on which the Grampus was lost, 
and May 1, 1839, shall be deemed the day on which the Sea Gull was lost 
K any of the men shall have left no widow, and there be children under 
sixteen years of age, the pension to which the widow would have been 
entitled shall go to the children for a like period of five years. In case, 
also, of the death or intermarriage of the widow, the pension shall go to 
the children, and shall cease, if they die before the expiration of the five 
years. The accounts of James S. Thacher^ the purser who was lost in 
the Grampus, shall be settled, and a credit allowed for whatever sum may 



1845.] TXTLS8 AND A-BSTRACTS OF THE PUBLIC LAWS. 149 

appear to be due from him on the books of the Treasury Department. 
June 15, 1544. 

No. 31. jin Jlct to rqpeal an Act entitled " Jin Jlct directing the survey of the 
northern line of the reservation for the half-breeds of the Sclc and Fox tribes of 
Indians^ by the treaty of August 1824," approved March 3, 1843. The act is 
repealed, and the northern line, as run and marked by Jenifer S. Sprigs, 
in 1832 and 1833, is approved and established as the correct northern 
boundary. June 15, 1844. 

No. 32. An Act to authorize the selection of certain school lands in the Terri* 
tories of Florida, Iowa, and Wisconsin. Wherever the sixteenth sections 
may be included in private claims held by good titles, other and equiva- 
lent lands, in any land district most adjacent, may be selected in lieu 
thereof, and shall be entered in the register's office as school lands. 
June 15, 1844. 

No. 33. An Act granting to the county of JDuJmque certain lots of land in the 
tovm of Dubuque, Two lots and a half are thus granted, situated on the 
corner of Seventh and Locust streets, on which the old county jail now 
stands. June 15, 1844. 

No. 34. An Act to conjvrm to the city of Femandina, in Florida, certain lots 
reserved for public %tse by the Spanish Government. Lots 5 and 7, of block 2, 
are thus confirmed and relinquished for such uses as were designed in 
the original plan of said city. June 15, 1844. ^ 

No. 35. Appropriations for (widows') pensions. See abstract on page 
144. June 15, 1844. 

No. 36. An Act to test the utUity of the submarine telescope. The Secretary 
of the Navy shall cause proper experiments to be made, the expense not 
to exceed $3,000. June 15, 1844. 

' No. 37. An Act making appropriations for certain improvements on the west' 
em shore of Lake Mchigan. $12,500 appropriated, to construct a harbor at 
Southport, in Wisconsin. June 15, 1844. 

No. 38. An Act making appropriations to aid m completing the harbor at 
Racine, on the western shore of Ijoke Michigan. $12,500 appropriated to aid 
in completing the harbor. June 15, 1844. 

No. 39. Post- Office Department appropriation bill. See abstract on 
page 144. June 15, 1844. 

No. 40. An Act transferring the execution of a certain act from the Secre^ 
tary of the Treasury to the Secretary of War. The act for transferring the 
names of pensioners, approved May 23, 1844, is thus transferred. June 
15, 1844. 

No. 41. Appropriations for certain (naval) objects of expenditure,— 
chieAy for arrearages and deficiences. See abstract on page 145. June 
15, 1844. 

No. 42. An Act to establish certain post roads in the Tsnitory of Florida. 
Seven new roads established. June 15, 1S44. 

13* 



150 trniTED STATES. [1845. 

No. 43. »An Act making appropriations for certain improvements in the Ter^ 
ritory of Iowa. See abstract on page 145. June 15, 1844. 

No. 44. An Act making appropriations for certain improvements in tlie Ter- 
ritory of Florida. See abstract on page 145. June 15, 1844. 

No. 45. An Act to provide for the erection of a marine hospital at Key West, 
in the Territory of Florida. $25,000 appropriated. June 15, 1844. 

No. 46. An Act to authorise the Legislatures of the several Tetritories to 
regulate the apportionment of representation^ and for other purposes. They may 
apportion the representation in the two branches, from time to time, as 
they see proper ; but not so as to increase the number in the two bodies. 
Justices of the peace and all general officers of the militia, in the Terri- 
tories, shall be chosen by the people in such manner as the Legislatures 
may direct. June 15, 1844. 

No. 47. An Act to authorize the issuing of patents for cetiain lands in the 
St. Augustine land district^ in Florida^ the sales of which were not regularly re- 
ported. Individuals who applied to John C. Clelaud, while acting as re- 
ceiver at St. Augustine, for the entry of lands, and had made payment 
therefor, while he neglected to make the usual returns thereof, to tKe 
General Land Office, shall receive patents for such lands, if they have 
not been sold; in which case, t^e money paid shall be applied to the 
entering of any other land in the district. But this act shall apply only 
to those cases in which application has already been made to the General 
Land Office. June 15, 1844. 

No. 48. An Act to amend an Act entitled " An Act to provide for the armed 
occupation and settlement of the unsettled part of the peninsula of Florida.*^ 
When the location was made on lands afterwards discovered to be liable 
to overflow, the location may be changed to any other vacant quarter 
section in the district, if application for change was made before August 
4, 1843. When settlements were made on lands not previously surveyed, 
the settler may, after survey, locate his quarter section in any legal sub- 
divisions of contiguous sections, so as to make up 160 acres, and include 
his improvements. Settlers under said act may erect their buildings on 
other than the quarter section described in their permit, if they enter this 
other land, and pay for it, if in market ; or if otherwise, if they enter it 
within three months after it is offered at public sale : provided also, that 
the condition of cultivation be complied with. If the title of the United 
States to the land, or to any part of it not less than 40 acres, be defective, 
an equally large tract may be located elsewhere upon vacant surveyed 
lands. After the settler has complied with all the requirements of the 
act to which this is an amendment, he may perfect his title to the quar- 
ter section by paying $1.25 per acre for it. June 15, 1844. 

No. 49. An Act making appropriations for the support of insane persons in 
the District of Columbia^ and for other purposes. $400,000 appropriated for 
this puipose, the money paid for each person not to exceed four dollars a 



1845.] TITLES AND ABSTRACTS OF ^HS P17BLX0 LAWS. 1(91 

■week. The marshal of the District may maintain at Baltimore, or at some 
other suitable lunatic asylum, all lunatic paupers now chargeable upon 
the District of Columbia, and pay the expenses of their removal and 
maintenance in such asylum. The insane hospital, with the adjoining 
grounds, is granted to the Medical Faculty of Columbia College, for 
scientific purposes, and for an infirmary for medical instruction ; they 
giving security to keep the building in repair, and to return it in good 
order to the government when required. June 15, 1644. 

No. 50. An Jlct making appropriation for the payment of horses lost by the 
Missouri vohmteers in the Florida war, $34,500 appropriated, the value of 
the horses to be ascertained according to the acts for preventing Indian 
hostilities, approved March 3, 1839, and for appropriations for the support 
of the army, approved March 3, 1839. The act to provide for the pay- 
ment of horses, approved Jan. 18, 1837, is continued in force for a farther 
period of two years. June 15, 1844. 

No. 51. An Act to confirm certain entries of land in the St. Augustine land 
district^ in the Territory of Florida^ made under the preemption law of June 22, 
1S38. Patents shall be issued in all such cases, in spite of any informal- 
ity in the proof, if the settlers were driven from their homes by Indian 
hostilities, and thus prevented from making out the proof. June 15, 1844. 

No. 52. An Act to provide for the adjustment of Icmd claims wUhin the 
States of Missouri^ Arkansas^ and Louisiana^ and in those parts of the States 
of Mississippi and Alabama, south of the Slst degree of North latitude, and 
between the Mississippi and Perdido rivers. So much of the expired act Of 
May 26, 1824, as related to the State of Missouri, is hereby revived and 
refenacted for that State, and for the other States above mentioned, the 
District courts and its judges having the same jurisdiction in each of 
these States as was given by that act to the Court and Judge of Missouri. 
June 17, 1844. 

No. 53. An Act concerning the Supreme Court of the United States. The 
sessions of this Court shall commence in future on the first Monday of 
December. No Justice shall be obliged to attend more than one term of 
the Circuit Court in any district within one year, or unless he thinks the 
public interest requires it ; and at such term, appeals, and writs of error 
from the District Court, questions of law reserved by the District Judge, 
and cases of peculiar interest and diflSiculty, shall have the precedence in 
the arrangement of business. June 17, 1844. 

No. 54. An Act respecting the northern boundary of the State of Missouri. 
Three commissioners shall be appointed, one by the Governor of Iowa, 
one by Missouri, and a third, not a citizen either of Iowa or Missouri, 
appointed by these two, who shall ascertain and mark out the boundary 
line. The commissioners may appoint a surveyor, and the necessary 
assistants to aid them ; the compensation of the commissioners and sur- 
veyor shall be eight dollars a day ; and of the assistants, -not more than 



IH2 UHITJED STATBf. [1845. 

two dollars a day. The report of any two of the commissioners shall be 
final. This act shall not go into force till the Missouri legislature assent 
to it. $4,000 are appropriated to carry this act into effect. June 17, 1844. 

No. 55. jin Act to extend the charters of the District banks. Suits at law 
now pending against the banks whose charters expire July 4, 1844, shall 
not be estopped by the expiration of the charter, and all goods which 
would have become the property of the banks, shall enure to their trus- 
tees, assignees, or receivers. Said trustees may institute all necessary 
suits at law, first giving security for the costs. June 17, 1844. 

No. 56. An Act to enable the War Department to apply certain balances of 
appropriation^ and for other purposes. Unexpended balances of appropria- 
tions, under the acts of April 29, 1836, June 12, 1838, and March 3, 1839, 
even if they have been carried to the surplus fund, are re-appropriated, to 
settle arrearages for the suppression of Indian hostilities, so far as they 
may be necessary. June 17, 1844. 

No. 57. An Act to amend the Act entitled " An Act to incorporate the Alex- 
andria Canal Company ^^^ approved May 26, 1830. Any person doing wilful 
injury to the canal, shall be fined not less than $5, nor more than $50, to 
be recovered with costs before any justice of the peace of the District of 
Columbia, and be subject also to a suit for damages. No person not em- 
ployed in navigating the canal, or in the service of the company, 
shall walk, or drive upon their aqueduct over the Potomac, under a 
fine of not less than $1, nor^more than $5. The president and 
directors may make by-laws for the trade and travel upon the canal, 
not repugnant to any law of the United States ; and any person wilfully 
offending against any such by-law, after ten days' public notice of it 
has been given, shall forfeit $5 to the company. They may prescribe 
the form, dimensions, and equipments of any boats or floats used 
on the canal, and if the captain or owner refuse to comply with 
their regulations, they may order the same to be broken up and removed 
from the canal. They may charge the customary rates of dockage and 
wharfage on any pier they may erect in the Potomac, in connection with 
their canal, not interfering with the corporate rights of Alexandria. 
June 17, 1844. 

No. 58. An Act supplementary to an Act entitled " An Act to regulate arrests 
on mane process in the District of Columbia j* approved Aug. 1, 1842. No 
person shall be held to bail, if the debt, exclusive of interest and cost, be 
less than $50, and in cases where he may be held to bail under the act to 
which this is a supplement. But if the plaintiff, after obtaining judg- 
ment, shall make oath that the defendant has conveyed away his prop- 
erty, or is about to move it out of the District, with intent to hinder pay- 
ment of his debts, the clerk of the county court may issue a capias ad 
satisfaciendum^ and on the defendant's arrest under it, he may be brought 
by habeas corpus before the county court, or one of its justices, to whom 



1845.] TITLES AND ABSTRACTS OF THE PUBLIC LAWS. 153 

the plaintiff must show cause why th6 defendant should not be released ; 
either party may then demand a trial' by jury, and if they find for the 
plaintiff, the defendant may be remanded to prison. But females shall 
not be kept in custody, nor non-residents for debts contracted out of the 
District. Processes already in the hands of the marshal shall be 
executed. June 17, 1S44. 

No. 59. jin ^ct concerning conveyances or devises of places of public woT' 
ship in the District of Columbia. Land conveyed to trustees for the use of 
a congregation as a place for public worship, shall be held by the trus- 
tees for the purpose of the trust, and not otherwise. If any such convey- 
ance or devise has been or shall be made, it shall not be voided from the 
want of trustees to hold it, but the Circuit Court of the District shall 
appoint trustees, either originally, when there are none, or to fill vacan- 
cies from death, refusal, &c., and the legal title shall be exclusively vested 
in the whole number of trustees. A majority of the trustees may sue and 
be sued, without abatement by the death of any, or the substitution of 
others. They shall not hold in this way a tract of more than 50 acres in 
the county, or 3 acres in any incorporated town ; nor for any other pur- 
pose than public worship, religious or other instruction, burial-ground, or 
residence of their minister. June 17, 1844. 

No. 60. Jin Act to continue the pensions of certain widows. The act of 
March 3, 1843, granting pensions to certain widows, is extended for a 
further term of four years. Widows admitted by special acts to the ben- 
efit of the pension act of July 7, 1838, or of the act hereby extended, shall 
be entitled to the benefit of this act. 

No. 61. An Act sujppUmentary to the Act entitled '^ An Act to regulate trade 
and intercourse with the Indian tribes, end to preserve peace on the frontiers " 
passed June 30, 1834. The U. S. Courts in the District of Arkansas shall 
have the same jurisdiction over crimes committed in the Indian country, 
as they had before the Territory was changed into the State of Arkansas ; 
and the Indian country is annexed to the State of Arkansas, for the sole 
purpose of carrying this Act into effect. June 17, 1844. 

No. 62. An Act explanatory of the treaty made with the Chippewa Indians 
at SaginaWi Jan. 23, 1838. The first and second articles of this treaty 
shall be so construed, that, after Sept. 1, 1843, the miinmum price of the 
lands ceded by it shall be $2.50 an acre. June 17. 1844. 

No. 63. Civil and Diplomatic appropriation bill. See abstract on 
page 144. June 17, 1844. 

No. 64. Army appropriation bill. See abstract on page 144. June 
17, 1844. 

No. 65. Navy appropriation bill. See abstract on page 144. June 
17, 1844. 

No. 66. Indian Department appropriation bill. See abstract on page 
144. June 17, 1844. 



154 UNITBD STAT18. [1845. 

XII. MISTAKES IN THE CENSUS OF 1840. 

The last three volumes of the American Almanac contain copious ab- 
stracts of the information collected in the course of taking the sixth 
census. It was deemed proper to insert them, as the document was of 
high official authority, containing information that had been collected 
with great labor and expense, and which, if it had been correct, or even a 
tolerable approximation to the truth, would have been of vast impor- 
tance. The returns showed the results of an attempt, made under the 
patronage and direction of the General Government, to give a complete 
statistical survey of the United States. As such, great reliance was placed 
upon them, and arguments and deductions have been drawn from them 
in support of legislative and diplomatic proceedings of great moment. It 
is not too much to say, that this confidence was wholly misplaced, and that 
subsequent examination has shown the returns to be so very inaccurate, 
that any conclusions founded upon them are entirely unsafe. In respect 
to the mere enumeration of the inhabitants, perhaps, they may be trusted ; 
though, even in this respect, in the case of a single county in Maryland, 
that of Montgomery, a reexamination ordered by Congress showed an 
error of 800 in a population of 15,000, or more than^c per cent. 

In publishing the statistics of the census in the American Almanac for 
1843, before any of the blunders had been publicly exposed, we stated, 
that " the information here given can be considered only as an approxi- 
mation to the truth,'' that " there were some errors and deficiencies in the 
plan, and unavoidable mistakes and defects in carrying it into execution.'* 
Later scrutiny of the returns has shown the truth of these remarks in a 
greater degree even than we had anticipated. The scheme for taking the 
census and collecting the statistics was very unskilfully prepared ; ques- 
tions were propounded to individuals, that they could not, or would not, 
answer ; replies were given at random ; culpable negligence was shown 
by the marshals and their subordinates in committing these answers to 
paper ; and, to crown the whole, the returns were printed by the official 
printers at Washington in such a manner, that the typographical errors 
probably outnumbered the mistakes in the original papers. And these 
erroneous results have been embodied in a great number of publications, 
have been copied and commented upon in Europe, and have had a sensi- 
ble influence on the legislation and diplomacy of this country. Blunders 
committed by high authority, are apt to produce very wide and injurious 
effects. 

^ The general scheme of the census was faulty, as it involved the hope- 
less attempt to collect information of immense extent, variety, and mi- 
nuteness. It was proposed to ascertain " the aggregate value and produce 
of the mines, agriculture, commerce, and manufactures of the country, 
and the number of persons employed in them," and thereby to exhibit "a 
full view of the pursuits, industry, and resources of the several States and 



1S45.] MISTAKES IM TBB CENSUS 07 1840. 155 

Territories/' No European government ever attempted to execute so 
broad apian as this, for the obvious reason, that its execution, -with an 
ordinary degree of correctness, is impossible. In our volume for 1843, 
we remarked, that " all persons are not willing to make a full disclosure 
of their private concerns, their annual profits and amount of capital in- 
vested, especially when an undefined apprehension exists, that the facts 
thus obtained will be made the basis of future taxation. In certain re- 
spects, concealment is impossible, and the returns are probably very 
accurate. The number of manufactories and machines, of persons em- 
ployed, and, in many cases, the quantity of annual products, may be 
ascertained with great correctness. But the valuation of these articles 
must be quite arbitrary, and the statements of the amount of capital in- 
vested deserve little or no credence. In future attempts, it will be well 
to confine the inquiries to those points, on which individuals are able and 
willing to give full and precise information.'* 

On the other hand, the plan was a very defective one, as it did not pro- 
vide for collecting many kinds of information, that are quite accessible, 
which might be obtained with great accuracy, and which would have 
been of vast importance. In a country like this, it is very desirable to 
know the extent and direction of the great streams of immigration. The 
inhabitants should have been divided into those of native and of foreign 
origin, specifying in the latter case the countries whence they had emi- 
grated. Other classes might be formed of those who were born in the 
State where they resided, and those who had removed into it from 
other parts of the United States. The number of buildings used as places 
of residence can easily be counted, and they should be divided into those 
constructed of brick, stone, framed work, and logs. The number of build- 
ings used for purposes of public worship can easily be ascertained, and 
the religious denominations specified, to which they respectively belong. 
On these, and a great variety of other topics, precise information can be 
bad, and it would be of great use. 

In a former article upon the subject, we stated, that " government might 
do much for the progress of statistical knowledge, if it would organize 
and support a Statistical Bureau, connected with one of the Depart- 
ments at Washington, whose duty it should be, not only to contrive the 
plan and superintend the business of taking the census every tenth year, 
but at all periods to collect information relative to the great interests of 
the country, and to digest and publish it in the most convenient form. 
The salaries of a Superintendent and a few clerks would be the only ex- 
pense, and it is quite probable that an equal sum would be saved from the 
printing of the bulky and confused documents, which would be super- 
seded by the well-arranged, succinct, and far more accurate returns, pre- 
pared by men practised in the work, and devoting their whole attention 
to collecting the various materials. The legislative bodies are continu- 



1(SB UNITED STATES. [1845. 

ally making calls upon the several Departments for information upon 
particular subjects, and the demand is hurriedly answered by throwing 
together, in a loose form, whatever materials may be at hand, while it is 
confessed) that more complete and accurate returns might be obtainedi 
and put into a shorter compass and a more convenient shape, if time and 
labor could be spared for the work. Most European governments hava 
organized statistical offices of the kind here mentioned, and the reports 
which they publish, from time to time, are very valuable^" Congress haa 
since acted upon this suggestion, and established a Statistical Bureau, 
consisting of a Superintendent and two clerks. If competent persons are 
appointed to these offices, much good may be effected. 
; It is not necessary to search far for illustraiions of the errors commit- 
: ted in taking the last census. Many are appi'#^t on the very face of the 
returns. Thus, the number of tons of hemp (md flax, raised in one year 
in Kentucky, probably the largest hemp-growing State in the Union, is 
stated at 9,90*23.^ ; while the quantity for Virginia, where but little com* 
paratively is raised, is made to be 25,594J^ tons. The quantity of bitu- 
minous coal mined annually in New Hampshire is stated at 29,920 
' bushels J and for Connecticut, at 38,000 bushels. We never heard, that a 
1 bituminous coal-mine was worked in either of these Slates. The num- 
ber of slaves in Connecticut is said to be 17; in New Jersey, 674; in 
Pennsylvania, 64 ; though in each of these States, slavery has long since 
ceased to exist. The number of commercial houses engaged in foreign 
trade, in Boston, is said to be 142 ; in New Orleans, only 8 are given ; in 
'■ Louisville, Ky., only 1 is puf down ; while in Richmond, Va., there are 
said to be 17, and in Troy, N. Y., 44. In Salem, Mass., according to the 
census, there is not a dollar of capital invested either in foreign trade 
. or commission business; nor is there a lumber-yard or a butcher in the 
; whole city. No inquiry is necessary to show the falsity of these 
statements. 

The " American Statistical Association," established in Boston, Mass., 
sent a memorial to Congress during the past winter, drawn up by Messrs. 
William Brigham, Edward Jarvis, and J. W. Thornton, in which, though 
they " confined their investigations to the reports respecting education 
and nosology," they exposed an extraordinary mass of errors in the census. 
We can find room only for a few extracts from this memorial. 

" According to the census of 1840, there are in the United States 173 
Universities, or Colleges, containing 16,233 students. There is good reason 
to suppose, that the number of colleges given is almost twice as large as 
the true number, and that the number of students is exaggerated nearly as 
much. Four colleges, for example, are put down to Maine, which has 
two. Four to Massachusetts, which has three. Four to Connecticut, which 
has three,^^ &c. 
« la mwiy of the States, common schooU are supported by a public 



1845.] MI8TAKB8 IN TBI 0SR8UB pV 1840. 157 

tax, or by funds provided by the public, for the education of all the chil« 
dren within the respective States. All the children, therefore, who are 
educated at these schools, are educated, so far as instruction is concerned, 
' at the public charge-' In relatibn to Massachusetts, it is stated, that 
there are * 160,'257 scholars in comnoon schools,' and * 158,351 at public 
charge;' and in relation to New Hampshire, where schools are support* 
ed in a similar manner, it is stated, that there are * 83,632 scholars in 
common schools,' and only * 7,715 at public charge.' The instance of 
Connecticut might also be adduced, where the munificent provision of 
the school fund reaches every child in the State between the ages of four 
and sixteen, and is nearly sufficient to defray the cost of their instruction 
in the common schools. ,Yet in Connecticut, according to the census, 
only 10,912 children are taught at public charge, out of the 65^730 in the 
common schools.'^ 

** The most glaring and remarkable errors are found in the statetnenta 
respecting nosology, the prevalence of insanity, blindness, deafness, and 
dumbness among the people of this nation. 

" The undersigned have compared these statements with information 
obtained from other more reliable sources, and have found them widely 
varying from the truth; and, more than all, they have compared the 
statements in one part of the census with those in another part, and have 
found most extraordinary discrepances. They have also examined the 
original manuscript copy of the census deposited by the Marshal of the 
District of Massachusetts in the Clerk's office in Boston, and have com- 
pared this with the printed editions of both Blair & Rives and Thomas 
Allen, and found here, too, a variance of statements. 

" Your memorialists are aware, that some of these errors in respect to 
Massachusetts, and perhaps also in respect to other States, were commit* 
ted by the Marshals. Mr. William H. Williams, Deputy Marshal, statet 
that there were 133 colored pauper lunatics in the family of Samuel B. 
Woodward, in the town of Worcester ; but on another page he states, that 
there are no colored persons in said Woodward's family. Mr. Benali 
Blood, Deputy Marshal, states, on one page, that there were 14 colored 
pauper lunatics and two colored lunatics who were supported at private 
charge, in the family of Charles £. Parker, in the town of Pepperell, while 
on another page he states, that there are no colored persons in the ftmily 
bf said Parker. Mr. William M Jackson states, on one page, that there 
are in the family of Jacob Cushman, in the town of Plympton, four pauper 
colored lunatics and one colored blind person, while on another page he 
states that there are no colored persons in the family of said Cushman. 

*' But, on comparing the manuscript copy of the census at Boston with 
the printed edition of Blair & Rives, the undersigned are convinced that % 
large portion of the errors were made by the printers, and that hardly any 
of the errors of the original document are left out The original docnrnt »l 

14 



158 VRITSD tTATBt [184& 

finds the colored insane In twenty-nine towns, while tlie printed edition of 
Blair & Rives places them in thirty-five towns, and each makes them more 
than tenfold greater than the State returns in regard to the paupers ; and 
one edition has given twenty, and the other twenty-seven, self-supporting 
lunatics, in towns in which, according to private inquiry, none are to he 
found. According to the original and manuscript copy of the census, 
there were in Massachusetts ten deaf and dumh and eight hlind colored 
persons, whereas the printed editions of the same document multiply 
them into seventeen of the former, and twenty-two of the latter class of 
unfortunates. 

" The printed copy of the census declares that there were, in the towns 
of Hingham and Scituate, nineteen colored persons who were deaf and 
dumh, blind or insane. On the other hand, the undersigned are informed, 
by the overseers of the poor and the assessors, who have cognizance of 
every pauper and tax-payer in the town, that in the last twelve years no 
such diseased persons have lived in the town of Scituate ; and they have 
equally certain proof, that none such have lived in Hingham. Moreover, 
the deputy marshals neither found nor made record of such persons. 

^ The undersigned have carefully compared the number of colored in- 
sane and idiots, and of the deaf and dumh and blind, with the whole 
number of the colored population, as stated in the printed edition of the 
census in every city, town, and county of the United States, and have 
found the extraordinary contradictions and improbabilities that are shown 
in the following tables." [See next page.] 

" The errors of the census are as certain, if not as manifest, in regard 
to the insanity among the whites, as among the colored people. Wherev- 
er your memorialists have been able to compare the census with the 
results of the investigations of the State Governments, of individuals, or 
societies, they have found that the national enumeration has fallen far 
short of the more probable amount 

** According to the census, there were in Massachusetts six hundred 
and twenty-seven lunatics and idiots supported at public charge ; accord- 
ing to the returns of the overseers of the poor, there were eight hundred 
and twenty-seven of this class of paupers. • 

** The superintendents of the poor of the State of New York report one 
thousand and filly-eight pauper lunatics within that State ; the census 
reports only seven hundred and thirty-nine. 

" The Government of New Jersey reports seven hundred and one in 
that State ; the census discovers only four hundred and forty-two. 

** The Medical Society of Connecticut discovered twice as many luna- 
tics as the census within that State. A similar discrepancy was found ' 
in Eastern Pennsylvania, and also in some counties of Virginia. 

'^ Your memorialists deem it needless to go further into detail in this 
matter. Suffice it to say, that these are but specimens of the errors 



1845.] 



MISTAKES IK THE CBNSV8 OF 1840. 



U9 



that are to be found in the ^ sixth census,' in regard to nosology and 
education, and they suspect also in regard to other matters therein 
reported. 

** In view of these facts, the undersigned, in behalf of said Associationi 
conceive that such documents ought not to have the sanction of Con- 
gress, nor ought they to be regarded as containing true statements rela* 
tive to the condition of the people and the resources of the United States. 
They believe it would have been far better to have had no census at all, 
than such an one as has been published ; and they respectfully request 
your honorable body to take such order thereon, and to adopt such meas- 
ures for the correction of the same, or, if the same cannot be corrected, of 
discarding and disowning the same, as the good of the country shall re^^ 
quire, and as justice and humanity shall demand " 

We have room for the tables for only three of the States. 



MAINE. 



Towns. 



Limerick, 

Lymington, 

Scarboro', 

Poland, 

Dixfield, 

Calais, 

Coventry, 

Haverhill, 

Holderness, 

Atkinson, 

Bath, 

Lisbon, 

Compton, 

Freetown, 

Plympton, 

Leominster, 

Wilmington, 

Sterling, 

Danveis, 

HJn?hj»m, 



Total cord 


Colored 


iubabitUs. 


insane. 





4 


1 


2 





6 





2 





4 





1 1 



Towns. 



Industry, 

Dresden, 

Hope, 

Hartland, 

Newfield, 



NEW HAMPSHIRE. 






1 


1 


1 





2 





1 





1 





1 


1 


1 



Stratham, 

Northampton, 

NewHamptoD, 

Lyman, 

Littleton, 

Henniker, 



MASSACHUSETTS. 






2 


2 


4 





2 





2 





2 





2 


2 


2 



Georgetown, 

Carver, 

Northbridge, 

Ashby, 

Randolph, 

Worcester, 



Total eol'd 


Colored 


iuhabit'ts 


insane. 





3 


3 


6 


1 


2 





2 





5 













15 



2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
133 



* 30 t>f ihese are under 10 years of as;e. 






XUl WHALE FISHERY OF THE UNITED STATES. 

iitportt/nm Ou WhaU Filhiry into Ou United Snaa,for tht yiar 1843. 



P0»T1. 


1 

4 




8. 




2 




m 


Nantucket, . : 


18 


New Bedrord, . 






53 


Fairhaven, 






14 


Weslport, . . 
VfunUm, . 






i 









MattttpoiKlt, * 








Sippion, 
Edeiirtown, 
HoTmei't Hale, 












^ 








2 


Boiton, . 






3 


Falmouth, . 








Fall River, . 






2 


Pljmoith . . 









SomeiMt, . 






a 


Saleiu, . . 






a 


New London. . 






ao. 


Sloninglon, 








My.lic, . . 








S«^.rbor, . . 






24: 


New Ok. . 






s 










Bmlol, . . 






1 


Warren, . . 






11 


Piovidence, . 






1 


Newport, . 






1 


Bath, (Me.,) 








Hew York, . 








Cold Spring, 








rough keepsie, 






1 


In M»>.>,.nlm.n f, 


'nmi 


1,. 


m\ 





1 


1 


1 






1 


1 




& 


1,545 


£ 


11 


30,480 


54,000 


n 


61,5.-57 


4I,1BS 


380,631 


» 


14,330 


11,900 


105,200 




a,40o 


35 




i4 


i;093 










la 


1,700 


320 






1,520 




11,600 


i5 


6.460 




400 


18' '4001 




13,600 


n' 3,f«)0 


820 




15, 2165 


1,.110 


10,986 


t8 5,700 


820 


7,400 




780 


4,013 


32,000 


to 


3P0 


53 


500 


18 


442 


367 


4,330 


)G 


920 


1,800 


14,400 


,5 


4,250 


37,750 


337,400 


rS 


a,415 


12,343 


81,920 


16 


360 


4,560 


36.680 




4,220 


47,eS( 


424.640 


!5 


964 




56,800 


'4 


200 




16,000 


19 


300 


2,100 


16,800 


14 

(5 


eao 

7,740 






' v.»io 


116,200 




190 


2,41t^ 


36,000 


il 


a,050 

300 
1,520 


5( 




17 


fl,]00 


61,000 


!9 


160 


3,320 


26,600 


•a 


350 


a,500 


20,000 


,6931SS,45t. 


203,861 


1,843,061 
62,988 




1,90S,04'7 



Mr. Grinnell, of New Bedford, Mhu., a Memberof CongrcH during the 
l»t leMion, in a apeech upon Ihe tariff, made the fallowing itatementi : 

" I have prepared, with great care, a tahle fiom authinlic eourccl, to 
■how the cooiumption of domeilic and Toreign article! by our whaling 
fleet, now cooiitting of 650 ships, birki, brigi, and ichoonera, tonnaging 
300,000 tODt) cost at the time of lailiiig, ^,000,000i maiuiwl by 17,300 



1S45.] WBAXC FISBXRr. 161 

officer! and seamen, one half of whom are green hands when the vessels 
sail. By thi«i table it will be seen, that the annual consumption by this 
fleet is $3,845,500; only $400,000 is of foreign articles. This great source 
of wealth to the nation is dependent mainly on a home market for its 
products. The value of the annual import of oil and whalebone in a 
crude slate is $7,000,000 ; when manufactured, it probably is increased in 
value to $8,000,000, or $9,000,000. The whole amount of exports of oil, 
whalebone, and sperm candles, is only $2,000,000, leaving $6,000,000 or 
$7,000,000 to be consumed in this country. 

** Although this interest is not directly protected by the tariff of 1842, as 
sperm oil, whale oil, and whalebone are cheaper in this country than any 
other, yet those interested in it are decidedly in favor of the protective 
policy. They have found by experience, that, when the manufacturers 
and mechanics of this country are actively employed, they could sell the 
products of the fishery at fair prices ; when the duties have been low, and 
almost without discrimination in favor of such articles as are made in 
this country, that it has been difficult to make sales even at low prices. 
They are in favor of this policy, notwithstanding that the duties on each 
whale ship and outfits of 350 tons amount to $1,700; they find themselves 
fully compensated by the home market. 

" This fleet of whaling ships is larger than ever pursued the business 
before. Commercial history furnishes no account of any parallel ; our 
ships now outnumber those of all other nations combined, and the pro- 
ceeds of its enterprise are in proportion and diffused to every part of our 
country. The voyages of those engaged in the sperm fishery average 
three and a half years; they search every. sea, and often cruise three and 
four months with a man at each mast-head on the look-out, without the 
cheering sight of a whale." 



14* 



I6d 



VKITtD flTATlft. 



[1845. 



XrV. COMMBRCE. 

1. VaLUX of DtFrXRSRT AilTX^LXS I«POBTBi>. 

ValiH of Croodti Warti, and Mercltandise^ imported into the United States^ 
during the year ending September 30tA, 1842. 



Species of Merchandure. 



]^XB or Duty. 

Articles imported for the use 
of the United States, 

For PkUdtcpkiad Soeioies, tfc. 
Philosophical apparatus, 
Books, maps and charts. 
Statuary, busts, casts, «c. 
Paintings, drawings, etch 

ings and engravinft«, 
Cabmets of corns and gems, 

Specimens of botany. 

Models and inventions of ma 
chinery, 

Anatomical preparations, 

Antimony, regulus of 

Spelter or zinc, 

Burr stones, unwronght, 

Brimstone and sulphur. 

Bark of the cork tree, 

Clay, unwrougfat, 

Rags of any kind of cloth, 

Undressed Airs, 

Hides and ski&s, raw. 

Gypsum or plaster of Paris, 

Barilla, 

^**°*^» \ unmanufactured, 
Animals, for breed, 
Pewter, old, fit only for re- 
manufacture, 

Tin \ ^^ P*8fs *^<1 bars, 
» ( in plates and sheets, 

»"««' { oX^' ^** *"*"' 
in pigs and bars, 
in plates, suited to 
sheathing of ships, 
old, fit only to be 
re manufactured. 
Gold, 
Silver, 
Gold, 
Silver, 

Teas from India, China, &c.. 

Coffee, 

Wool, not exceeding 8 cents 
per pound, 

Cocoa, 

Pepper, 

Pimento, 

Cassia, 

Ginger, 

Camphor, 

Qmcksilrer, 

Opium, 



Copper, 

Bullion, 
Specie, 



Value. 



$17,118 

7,755 

21,153 

666 



6,85i 
4,94S 



643 

1,775 

6,995 

105,984 

10,634 

64,422 

3,868 

33,857 

468,220 

503,030 

4,067,816 

7i8,513 

75,418 

305,404 

148.112 

28;289 

1,145 

282,135 

922,309 

3,481 

3,202 

621,109 

381,197 

82,195 

56,365 

39,456 

700,929 

3,290,264 

4,527,108 

8,931,177 

685,649 

28,576 

92,977 

416 

16,748 

3,220 

7,93f) 

18,155 

90.')2I 

38,478 



Species of Merchftndlae . 



Crude saltpetre, 

Boracic acid. 

Soda ash, 

Bristles, 

Lastings and prunellas, for 

shoes or buttons, 
Epaulets and wmgs, of gold 

or silver. 
Linens, bteached and nnU'd, 
Articles not enumerated, 

MsRCHANSisB PATnre Dir- 
TISS AS Valoksm. 

Mami^iutures 6f Woolr^ 

Cloths and cassimeres, 

Merino shawls. 

Blankets, not above 75 cents 
each. 

Blankets above 75c. each, 

Hosieij, gloves, mitts, and 
bindmgs. 
Worsted stuff goods, 

Other manufactures of 

WdoUen yam. 

Worsted yam, 
Manufacturei of Cotton—' 

Dyed, printed, or coloredi 

While, 

Twist, yam and thread. 

Hosiery, gloves, mitts, and 
bindings. 

Nankeens direct from China 

Other manufactures of 
Manufactures of SiUe from Jn 
<fia, CAtna, tft. — 

Piece ^oods, 
Other articles, 

ManufoEttarti of fiftflfc, fnnn 
other pktees.-^ 

Piece goods. 

Hosiery, gloves, mitts, and 
binding's, 

Sewing Silk. 

Other manufactures of 
Silk and worsted goods, 
Camlets of goats' nair or ca- 
mels' hair. 
Lace, silk, silk veils, shawls, 

shades, &c.. 
Thread and cotton, 
Manufaetures of Fuat^ 

Linens, bleached and tm- 
colored. 



Value. 



#334,025 

29,775 
62,216 
74,395 

71,763 

078 

10J047 

3,123,358 



$30,627,486 



3,995,577 
185,298 

280,952 

285,281 

375,297 

8,366, 1i22 

336,989 

1,053 

216,558 

6,168^644 

1,285,894 

467,917 

1,087,621 

53 

638,486 



541,506 
23,413 



8,060,409 

70,754 

385,743 

333,545 

1,311,770 

2,122 

19,926 
657,982 

2,953,6181 



1845.] 



OOXMXftOV. 



4«3 



Species of Merchandise . 

Linens, dytd or colored, 

Other manufactures of 
Manujiietttres of Hemp-' 

Sail duck, 

Sheetinff, brown and white, 

Ticklenourgs, osnaburgs, 
and burlaps. 

Other manufactures of 
Bats Cap$, and Bonnets — 

Legh^straw, chip,grass,&c. 

Fur, wool, leather, and silk, 
MaoMtfaetunsofltonand Steel. 

Side arms. 

Fire arms, not specified, 

Drawing knives, 

Cutting knives. 

Hatchets, axes and adzes. 

Socket chisels. 

Steel yards and scale beams 

Vices, 

Sickles or reaping hooks, 

Scythes, 

Spades and shovels, 

Squares of 

Wood screws, 

Other manufactures of 
Mcaiufaetvres of-" 

Copper, 

BrMS, 

Tin, 

Pewter, 

Lead, 

Leatner, 

Marble, 

Wood, cabinet ware, 
** other manufactures of 

Gk>ld and silver, precious 
stones, &c., 

Watches and parts of 
Oiassware — 

Cut and not specified. 

Plain, 

Paying a duty of 20 per ct. 
Wares— 

Qhina and porcelain, 

Earthen and stone, 

Plated, hot specified} 

Gih, 

Japanned, 
Saddlery- 
Common tinned and ja- 
panned. 

Plated ^rass and polished 
steel. 
Square wire, for umbrella 

Stretchers, 
Coach and harness furniture, 
Carriages, and parts of 
Slates of all kinds, 
Quills, prepared. 
Black lead pencils, 
Paper hangings, 
Hair cloth and hair seating, 
Bohing cloths, 
Brushes of all kinds, 
Copper bottoms cut round Ac., 
SiWefodof plated wire, 



Value. 



9200,187 
3,758 

001,031 
610,880 

110,782 
37,042 

ff74,876 
20,803 

6,510 

05,137 

4,247 

1,100 

2,310 

7,905 

6,242 

12,267 

4,388 

35,520 

11,945 

1,767 

113,469 

2,617,(i01 

78,545 

162,362 

25,255 

' 13,120 

23G 

865,140 

16,845 

77,666 

176,800 

110,474 
399,424 

24,300 

71,952 

264,274 

148,255 

1,409,706 

84,668 

23,566 

34,781 



02,356 

96,289 

376 

4,379 

8,956 

118,853 

11,242 
4,479 

44,704 

64,670 
9,045 

62,884 
2,174 
1,550 



Species of Merchanifiae. 



Raw silk, 
Indigo, 

Wool, unmaunfactured, ex- 
ceeding 8 cents per pound, 
Coffee, 
Cocoa, 
Fruits— 

Almonds, 

Currants, 

Prunes, 

Figs, 

Raisms, 
Spices — 

Mace, 

Nutmegs, 

Cinnamon, 

Cloves, 

Pepper, 

Pimento, 

Cassia, 

Ginffer, 
Camphor, 

Clothing, ready made 
Articles not enum'd, 6 pr ct. 

(( u u -yQ \l u 

t( {( U jgi t( t( 



CI 

(( 
l< 
l( 
It 
tt 
(( 



(( 
(( 
(( 
(t 
(( 
(i 
(( 



(( 
t( 
u 
(( 

It 
tt 



15" « " 

20 ** ^* 

25 " " 

30 « " 

35 " « 

40 " " 

60 " " 



Ihtal, 



MXKCHANDISS PATIITO SPS- 

ciFic Duties. 

Flannels, 

Bockings and baizes, 

Caapeting — 

Brussels, Wilton, and treble 
ing^ned^ 

Other ingrained and Vene- 
tian, 
Floor cloth, patent, printed, or 

painted, 
Furniture oil cloth, 
Cotton bagging. 
Wmes— 

Madeira, 

Sherry, 

Sicily, 

Red, of France, 

Other, of France, 

Of France in bottles. 

Red, of Spain and Austria, 

Other, of Spain & Austria, 

Of other countries, in casks, 

" " « inbotUes^ 

Spirits from grain, 

" " other materials, 
Molasses, 
Vinegar, 
Beer, ale and porter, in casks, 

" " " »* in bottles. 



Value. 

f33,0(B 
731,350 

111,733 

7,461 

103,195 

122,874 
47,844 
42,134 
68,892 

797,967 

2,307 

06,716 

7,105 

46,145 

210,908 

80,926 

30,761 

3,403 

15,320 

28,3i2 

37,513 

7,913 

13,625 

91,104 

4,062,813 

672,233 

70,057 

772 

3,772 

134,821 

$49,209,065 



90,380 
69,900 



808,895 

33,414 

13,000 

7,341 

421,8^ 

165,132 

46,002 

93,004 

906,806 

118,706 

330,676 

37,256 

129,619 

113,370 

21,396 

226,563 

060,283 

1,942,575 

7,303 

2,800 

103,610 



iU 



VMITBS STATBS. 



[1845. 



Species of Merchandise. 



Valae. 



Oif— Spermaceti, 

Whale aud other fish, 

Olive, 

Castur, 

Linseed, 

Rapeseed, 
Chuculate, 
Sugar — Brown, 

White clayed or powdered 

Loaf. 

Caiiay, 
. Other refined, 
Carulies— 

Wax or spermaceti, 

Tallow, 
Cheese, 
Soap, 
TalJow, 
Lard, 

Beef and pork, 
Bacon, 
Butter, 

Saltpetre, refined . 
Epsom salts, 
Glauber salts, 
Tobcmco manufacturtd — Snuff, 

Cigars, 

Other than snuff and cigars. 
Cotton, 
Gunpowder, 
Glae, 
Ochre — dry, 

" in oil. 
Red and white lead. 
Whiting aud Paris white, 
Litharge, 
Orange mineral, 
Sugar of lead, 
jL«flK/— Pig, bar and sheet. 

Shot, 

Old and scrap, 
Cordage— cables and tarred, 
*' untarred and yam, 

Twine, packthread, &c., 
Corks, 

Copper — nails and spikes, 
Fire arms — muskets, 

" " rifles. 
Wire — Cap or bonnet. 

Iron A»teel,not above No. 14, 

Iron and steel, above No. 14, 

Iron — Tacks, brads, &c., not 

above 16 ounces per M., 

Tacks and brads, above 16 
ounces per M., 

Nails, 

Spikes, 

Cables, chain, and parts of 

Mill Saws, 

Anchors, 

Anvils, 

Blacksmith's hammers, 

Castings — ^vessels of 
" other. 

Round iron, as braziers* 
rods, of 3-]6th8 to 8-16ths 
of an inch diameter, 



91,7C)5 

1,102 

138,247 

b,755 

369,940 

186 

705 

5,434,750 

996,023 

23,286 

129 

109,371 

157 

262 

9,071 

66,139 

760 

3 

3,154 

6,2:32 

650 

1 

40 

40 

204 

860,742 

901 

414,651 

91 

3,361 

33,950 

2,-307 

28,747 

1,081 

86 

47, 

9,&t» 

255 

l! 

323; 

66,548 

19,491" 

79,040 

48,833 

4»i: 

17,739; 
354 
393, 

20,434| 
7,412; 

461 

237 

65,792 

523 

92,134 

5,253, 

9,911 

33,134 

2,309 

19,878' 

68,777 



37,767 



Species of Merchandise. 



Iron — 

Nail or spike rods, or nail 
plates^ slit, rolled, or ham- 
mered, 

Sheet and hoop, 

Band iit>ii, scroll iron, or 
casement rods, slit, roll 
ed, &c., 

Pig, 

Old and scrap, 
Bar^maimPd by rolling, 
Bar— manuf 'd otherwise, 

Steel, 

Hemp, 

Alum, 

Copperas, 

Wlieat floor, 

Salt. 

Coal, 

Wheat, 

Oats, 

Potatoes, 

Paper — Folio and quarto {^ost. 
Foolscap, draw'g k, writ^g, 
Printing, copperplate. &c., 
Sheatlung, binders', ac., 
All other. 

Books — 
Printed previous to 1775, 
In other lan^^u ages tlian En- 
glish, Latm, and Greek, 
In Greek and Latin bound, 
" " " " unbound 
All other — Abound, 
" " unbound, 
Not enumerated, 

Apothecaries' vials and bot 
ties, not exceedinsT 6 ounces 
Not exceeding 16 ounces. 

Perfumery and fancy vials oc 
bottles, not exceeding 4 oz. 
Not exceeding 16 ounces, 

Demijohns, 

Glass bottles, black, quart, 

Window Glass — 
Not above 8 by 10 inches. 
Not above 10 by 12 inches, 
Above 10 by 12 inches. 

Fish — Dried or smoked. 
Pickled Salmon, 
Mackerel, 
All other. 

Shoes and Slippers — Silk, 
Prunella, laMing, &c.. 
Leather, men's & women's. 
Children's 

Boots and bootees, 

Playing cards. 

Felts or hat bodies. 

Vitriol — ^blue or Roman, 
oil of 



(( 



Valiu of merchandise paying 

specific duties. 
Do. do. ad valorem, 
Do. do. free of duty, 



Total, 



Value. 



6860 
296,679 



1,023 

Z)5,2S4 

6,207 

2,053,463 

1,041,410 

597,317 

267,849 

38 

433 

46 

841,572 

380,635 

2,767 

7,027 

24,923 

11,667 

17,865 

823 

1,216 

16,<i9o 

4,411 

36,715 
],:3a2 
747 
15,161 
78,042 
30,792 

736 

89 

1,296 

117 

16,413 

74,800 

9,431 

24,586 

51,515 

6,186 

54,679 

58,812 

8,754 

2,968 

871 

22,021 

267 

25,154 

271 

31 

4 

1 

$20,325,516 
49,209,085 
30,627,486 

$100,102,067 



2. VaUu of Good,, Want, 



and Sb^handiK, impMtd into tit C 

I mmtht mding Am 3(»A, 1843. 



Specie, of MenJumdiH. 


Value. 




Talae. 


Fbbi or DVTt. 












m™ied«uffgood.. 


»<»,DS1 


"fltaUnhedSi-lM. 


tl,UT 


Wowed jani, 


«0,IM1 


For Philost^ai Sorinia. tc 
Philo«ipticm.ppsr'o.,ftc. 
BoDki. mapi tni Chang, 


1,539 
12ir71 




74,317 


Plaluary, bnau. ca.l.. He., 
Paiiiling., etthingj, and en- 

Mo/.S»Ti.™U«..ofma. 


'Si 
U1 


Velveu, cordi, molegkiiu 
futliaii, ^., 


1,739,319 
B3,flSa 


^chiM|x.^ ^^ 




Tmji.yam, andihread, 




J,88B 


HoiiFry, glovaa, miiui,uid 






biiidrngs 
All olher mann^tarH of 


307,843 
303,9JJ 


rode brimiume, 
ark or the cock ir», 


«,^ 


PM".'»"^S™we™*'^' 


"'SlI 


lay,Dninani.fae>und, 






i/m 


Anrmala for lined 


ii'ae 


Umbrella. paraiJl., uid 




B^illa. 


ISTO 


.unihadu, 




W«d7dre, in .lick., 


228,975 


b^DRBf inuftt tli S5M HOim 






SI,5?3 


^i**A««/ie*a. 




Oyp.om,orpi«ierofWri,, 
Pejv^.oU, 


6S,I51 




^•S! 


S£SX'SI^™««,a&= 


183,869 


BolUng cloi&s, 




'^^ ».d bara. 


jj'^ 


gaandwor-tedZd. 


SlB.'ffii 


In..3.«.dpU«,.,^d 
Ore, 

iSi'lf""""'' 






I,20S,1U 


Opecia, gold, ■ 


ie,oa5;8os 


Tbread and iriKniiin, 
Cotlooqollling.,iu^ 




Tea., ' ""• 

Tin,jnpip,bm,uidblo(to 


fi,1II,flCS 

ssss 




Wool, nol eiceedin* S cenli 


,;.. 


Gold, and I..H1., tcei 




Aror-^d... 


.^S 


Emb™?d'eTj'Si"goldiul^ 
Anicle.noI.prciaediPl 




•35,5J*,SM 




Ti(> u Viua». 




.=t....^ 






G-OM- 






1,S«,M6 


Ca°Tpe'lins,iio<.peolkd 




MeriuortBwL.ofw«<;]. 


41,438 


ChineHmaliinp,urfli 




^^u^^r"""*"^" 


!»,0M 


"^fi^dT*"'"^''""" 




Ea»»lin«7Seeiiueach, 






H0.IB17, ;loT6i, niiu, and 




^eredorpialei. 




bindiug., 


tlfm' BraMsr copper, 





166 



UMZTSD STATES. 



[184^. 



Species of Merchandise. 



Manufactures of Iron ^ Steel— 

Fire anna, not specified, 

Side tirms, 

Drawings &, cutting knives, 

Hatchets, axes, and adzes, 

S< cket ciii^eli*. 

Steel yards &. scale beams, 

Vice?, 

Sickles and reaping hooks, 

Scyihes, 

Spudes and shovels, 

Squares, 

Screws, other than wood 
screws, 

Needles, sewinfr, knit*g,&c. 

All other manufactures of 
Saddlery — 

Common, tinned, and ja- 
panned, 

Plated, brass, and polished 
steel, 
Manv/tictures of— 

Brass, 

Copper, 

Tin, 

Pewter, 

German silver, 

Bronze, 

Leather, 
Glass— 

Plate glaM, exceeding 14 by 
22 inches, 

Silvered, 

Framed, 

Paintings on glass, porce- 
lain, and colored. 

Manufactures of glass, not 
specified. 
Hats. bonnetSp ^e. — 

Legh'n, chip, straw, grass, 
&c., 

Plam leaf, ratan, willow, 
&c.. 
Wood— 

Cabinet ware. 

Other manufactures of 
Wares— 

Cliina and porcelain, 

Earthen and stone, 

Plated and gilt, 

Japanned, 

FVTS— 

Undressed, on the skin, 
Hals, caps, muffs & tippets. 
Hatters' and other furs, not 
specified. 

Hair cloth and hair seating. 

Brushes of all kinds, 

Paper hangings, 

Carriages and parts of 

Slates of all kinds, 

Black lead pencils, 

Copper bottoms.cut round,&c. 

Zinc, in plates and sheets, 

Chrnnometers, ship or box, 



Value. 



$25,736 
1,&79 

763 
3,149 
1,663 

2S5 
3,731 

833 

6,547 

3,222 

47 

256 

7,345 

681,281 



11,268 
27,097 

38,454 

25,170 

4,493 

1,9C8 

140 

33 

24,230 

14,492 

33,224 

4,385 

499 

8,991 

270,620 

600 

8,199 
53,060 

53,985 

534,051 

30,687 

8,400 

77,116 
6,249 

87,702 

15,112 

15,041 

17,752 

1,426 

•46,906 

1,214 

765 

37,747 

],oa5 



Species of Merchandise. 



Clocks, 

Wavches and parts of 

MaiiullMtures of gold and sil 

ver, 
Jewelry, ^Id and silver, 

" imitations of 
Quicksilver, 
Buttons and moulds. 
Teas, imported from other 

places than that of their 

growth or production. 
Coffee, imported m like man- 
ner. 
Corks, 

Prepared quills, 
Wood, unmanufaetured — 

Mahogany, 

Rose, 

Satin, 

Cedar, 
Tin— 

{ii pigs and bars, 

In plates and sheets. 
Hides and skins, 
WoiU— 

Not exceeding 7 cents per 
pound. 

Exceeding 7 cents per lb.. 
Cocoa, 
Pepper, 
Cassia, 
Camphor, 
Indigo, 
Articles not enumerated— 

At 7 percent. 

At 7* " 

At 10 

Atl2| 

At 15 

At 20 

At 25 

At 30 

At 35 

At 40 



it 
{( 

t( 
(( 
(( 



(( 

(( 
u 

C( 
K 
(( 
(( 



Totalf 

Mebchaivdtsb PAViiio Spe- 
cific Dtttixs. 

SiUcs— 
Sewing silk and silk twist. 
Pongees, and plain white 

sifk, for printing, &c.. 
Manufactures or silk, not 

specified, 
Raw silk, and all silk in the 

gum, &c., 
Silk and satin ShoeSj Boots^ 

Hats, ^c. — 
Shoes and slippers for men 

and women. 
Laced boots and bootees for 

men and women, 



Value. 

1 6,620 
261,088 

24.034 

9,060 

11.^5 

35114 

4,053 

634 

52,402 

80,876 

1,016 

98^ 

182 

82 

43 

82,164 

577,731 

2,328,071 

190,392 
54,605 
13,050 
39,324 
15,313 
5186 
36,840 

604 

7,905 

21,712 

2,06d 

124,427 

1,350,9S6 

419,769 

288,338 

3,614 

15,642 

$16,684,875 



196,709 

32,193 

1,719,616 

63,350 

1,117 
153 



1845.] 



COMMERCE. 



167 



Species of Merchandise. 



Silk and satin Skoes^ Bools^ 

Shoes aiid slippers for chil- 
dren, 

Silk hats for men, 

Silk and saiiu hats and 
bonnets for women, 
Flannels, 
Baizes, 
Capetintt — 

Wilton, 

Saxony, 

Treble ingrained, 

Brussels, 

Venetian, 

Other ingrained. 
Sail duck, 
Ck>ttou bagging, 

Do. do. or other mate- 
rials than hemp or flax, 
Floor cloth, patent, printed, 

or painted. 
Oil cloth on Canton flannel. 
Furniture oil cloth, not spe- 
cified. 
Oil cloth of linen, silk, Ac., 

for covers, 
WttuM. in casks and bottle* — 

Maaeira, 

Sherry, 

Champagne. 

Port, in bottles, 

Bur^ndy, in bottles, 

Claret, in bottles. 

Port, in casks. 

Burgundy, in casks, 

Tenerifle, in casks. 

Claret, in casks, 

White of France, in casks. 

White of France, in bottles, 

White of Portugal, 

Marsala^ or Sicily x\fadeira, 

Oiher wuies of Sicily, 

Of Spain, in casks. 

Of Spain, in bottles, 

Of Germany, in casks, 

Of Germany, in bottles, 

Of the Mediterranean, in 
ca»ks. 

Of the Mediterranean, in 
bottles. 

All other, in casks. 

All other, in bottles, 
Foreign Distilled Spirit*^ 

Brandy, 

From grain. 

From other materials. 
Cordials, 
jMoIasses, 
Vinegar, 
Beer, ale, & porter, in casks, 

" " " in bottles. 

Spirits of tarpentine, 
Otf— 

Spermaceti, 



Value. 



Species of Merchandise. 



$20 
6,574 

4,874;' 
17,779' 
19,670 
|i 
17,099 
1,141 
1,190 
161.918 
6,131 
4,301 
236,965 
105,193 

823 

2,492 
50. 

6,039 

660 

I 

9,075! 

6,491 

43,738 

624 

452 

18.391 

25,714 

464 

2,590 

134,598 

19,178 

5,109 

9,027 

3.482' I 

3,l35j| 

13,6851 

139' 

1,293 

1,226 

475 

24 

2,645 

170 

106,267 

121,647 

32,095; 

13,707. 

l,134,S20i 

2,2C6 

2.981 

63,12^} 

2 

225! 



oa 

While and other fish, 

Olive, in casks. 

Linseed, 

Of almonds, 

Of cloves, 
Cocoa, 
Chocolate, 
Sugar — 

Brown, 

White clayed. 

Loaf, and other refined, 

Candy, 

Syrup of sugar cane, 
Fruits— 

Almonds, 

■Currants, 

Prunes, 

Figs, 

Date*, 

Raisins, in boxes, ftc.. 

Other raisins, 

Nuts, nut specified, 
^ffius — 

Nutmegs, 

Cinnamon, 

Cloves, 

Black pepper, 

Hed pepper. 

Pimento, 

Cassia, 

Ginger, ground, 
»' m root. 
Camphor — 

Crude, 

Refined, 
CanfJles — 

Wax and spermaceti, 

Tallow, 
Cheese, 
Soap — 

Hard, 

Soft, 
Tallow, 
Starch, 
Pearl barley, 
Butter, 

Beef and Pork, 
Hamf* and Bacon, 
Bristles, 
Indigo, 

Woad or pastel, 
Ivory black, 
Opium, 
Glue, 

Gunpowder, 
Vitriol — 

Blue or Roman, 

Oil of 
Quinine, 
Tobacco^ nuinufaetured — 

SnuS; 

Cigar*, 

All other. 
Bleaching powder. 



Value. 



$358 

6,753 

94,681 

63 

1,272 

98,043 

620 

2,426,011 

64,932 

41,279 

339 

67 

55,361 

5,867 

3,6:38 

55,729 

286 

276,164 

38,604 

34,535 

14,688 

11 

43,513 

56,664 

1,426 

47,441 

43,791 

291 

2,188 

22,531 
11,825 

473 

348 

3,850 

1,279 

697 

1,526 

67 

563 

6,984 

2,731 

8,271 

432,035 

2,496 

339 

18,393 

823 

39 

11 

19 

8,355 

239 

463,431 

476 

69,205 



16flt 



URITSP 9TATI8. 



liU9f 



Speciea of Merchanduw. 



Sulphate of barytes, 
Cotton, unmaiiufactared, 
Tliibet, Angora, and other 

^at8' hair, 
J^nts — 

Ochre, dry, 
" in oil, 

While and red lead. 
Whiting and Paris white, 
Litharge, 
Sugar of lead, 
Cordage — 

Tarred and cablei, 

Untarred, 

TJntarred yam, 
Twine and packthread, 
Seines, 

Unmanufactured, 

Manilla, sun, and other 
hemps of India, 

Jute, Sisal grass, coir, &c., 
used fur cordage, 

Codilla, or tow of hemp or 

flax, *^ 

Flax, unmanufactured, 

Rugs of all kinds. j 

Hat bodies, or felts, made of 

wool, 
GkM— 

Watch crystals. 

Glasses or pebbles,for spec- 
tacles, 
Out Olass^ 

Cut one third the height or 
length thereof, 

Cut not aliove one half. 

Cut one half and exceeding. 

Cut chandeliers, candle- 
sticks, Ac, 
Piain Glass — 

Moulded or pressed, over 8 
ounces, 

Do.^ 8 oz. or under, 

Plam, moulded, or pressed 
tumblers. 

Plain, moulded, or pressed, 
stoppered, &c., 
Cfdinder WiniJouf Glass — 

Wot above 8 by 10 inches. 

Not alwve 10 by 12, 

Not above 14 by 10, 

Not above 16 by 11, 

Not above 18 by 12, 

Above 18 by 12, 
Croum Window Glass — 

Not above 8 by 10 inches. 

Not above 16 by 11, 

Above 18 by 12, 
Polished Plate Glass.not sttv'd— 

Not alx>ve 12 by 8 inches, 

Not al)Ove 14 by 10, 

Not above 16 by 11, 

Not above 18 by 12, 

Not above 22 by 14, 



Value. 



ia,i:4 

386,7€0 

14,078 

16,107 

905 

6,630 

904 

13 

497 

86,570 
5,796 
1,0*1 

3), 242! 
3,860 

223,882 

42,149 

37,164 

81,913 
15,193 
79,853 

95 

3,021 

2,948 



600 

805 

2,982 

2,353 



600 
1,121 

1,959 

2,630 

1,199 
1,612 
757 
1,156 
2,187 
6,571 

18 

59 

233 

30 

656 

1,401 

1,832 

2,140 



Species of Merchandise. 



Value. 



Apotheeofies* Vials ^ Bottles— 

Not exceeding 6 oz. each. 

Not exceeding 16 oz. each, 
Ptrfwmeni Viah and Bottles— 

Not exceeding 4 oz. each. 

Not exceeding 16 oz. eacn, 
Black and Green Bottles- 
Exceeding 8 oz. Hud not a- 
bove 1 quart each. 

Exceeding 1 quart each. 
Demijohns and Carbotf* — 

Not half a rallon each. 

Not above 3 galltins each. 

Exceeding 3 gallons each. 
Copper nails and spikes. 
Patent sheathing metal, 
Ltad — 

Pigs and bars. 

Shot, 

Old find scrap. 

In »heets and forms not spe- 
cified. 
Brass battery, or hammered 

kettles. 
Brass screws, 
Pins— ' 

Solid-headed, in packs of 
5,000 each. 

Pound pins. 
Fire Jmts — 

Muskets, 

Rifles, 
Cap or Bonnet Wire — 

Covered with silk, 

" with other mate^, 

Lwi and Steel Wire — 
Not above No 14, 
Above No. 14, and not t 

bove No. 25, 
Above No. 25, 

Tacks, bradSy and sprigs — 
Not above 16 oz. per M., 
Above 16 oz. per Af ., 

Manujaetures of Jbon— 
U'ood screws. 
Cut nails. 
Wrought nails, 
Snikes, cut or wrought, 
Cnain cables and parts, 
Choin, other than cablfs. 
Malleable irons or castings. 
Mill, cross cut, & pit saws, 
Steam, gas, or water tubes 

or pipes. 
Anchors, in parts. 
Anvils, 
Blacksmiths* hammers, 

sledges, &c., 
Castings, vessels of 
" all other. 
Glazed or tin hollow ware. 
Sad irons, hatters' and tai- 
lor's irons. 
Cast butts, or hinges, 
Axletrees, or parts thereof. 



•714 

96 
15 



14,180 
36 

3 

34 
610 

12 
276 

3 

SO 

190 

14 

1,734 



4,850 
9,720 

1,085 
370 

366 
175 

3,818 

1,771 
665 

168 
186 

7,551 

549 

12,711 

227 

24,196 

4,662 

3,235 

846 

2.710 

2:944 

16,153 

1,177 

6,911 

9,005 

11,197 

19|d43 
411 



1845.] 



OOKMSROS. 



169 



Species of Merchandise. 



MBUwfacUwts of ironr— 

Round or square iron, fWmi 
3-IOth8 to 10-16ih8 inch. 

Nail or spike rods, 

Sheet iron, except tagge^% 

Hoop iron, 

Band & scroll iron, & case- 
ment rods, 

Pig iron. 

Old and scrap. 

Bar, manuf 'a oy rolling, 
** " otherwise, 

Cast, shear, and German, 
All other, 
Leather — 
Tanned, sole or bend, 
Upper, not otherw. speci'd. 
Calfskins, tanned & dr'sed, 
Sheep skins, do. do. 
SkiverSj 

Goat skins, tanned &dr'sed, 
Morocco skins, do. do. 
Kid skins, do. do. 

Goat and sheep skins, tann 

ed and not dressed, 
Kid and lamb skins, do. do. 
Fawn, kid, & lamb, known 
as chamois, 
Leather CrUme* — 
Men's leather gloves. 
Women's leather gloves, 
Women's extra and demi- 

lenglh gloves. 
Children's leather habit do., 
Children's extra and deml 
length gloves, 
Boots^ f c, qfieatkeTf and other 
mataials^ 
Meu^s boots and bootees. 
Men's shoes and pumps, 
Women's boots & bootees, 
Wo'n's double-sole pumps. 
Women's shoes and slip- 
pers of prunella, &c.. 
Children's boots, bootees, & 
shoes, 
Ftgter — 
Folio and quarto post, 
Antiquarian and drawing. 
Medium, demy, foolscap, 

pot, and pith, 
All other writing, 
Copperplate, blotting, and 

copying, 
CoI'd. for labels & needles, 
Marble and fancy colored. 
Tissue, 

Colored copperplate, print- 
ers' and stainers'. 



Value. 



$11,005 

615 

132,322 

1,884 

1,392 
48,a61 

2,743 
511,282 
327,550 

185,907 
15,865 

546 

109 

19,2:38 

12,596 

4,539 

1,655 

1,534 

1,338 

699 

1,478 

10 

32,737 
115,553 

1,862 
2,617 

17 



9,697 
620 
427 
163 

6,623 

127 

3,201 
961 

1,767 
191 

4,946 

53 

317 

234 

645 



Species of Merchandise. 



Binders' boards, box do., 

mill boards, &«., 
Sheathing, wrapping, and 

cartridge, 
Playiiijg cards, blank and 

visinng, 
All other paper, 
BoiUa-' 
Blank books, botmd, 

Do., unbound, 
Latin or Greek, bound. 

Do., unbouna, 
Hebrew, Greek, Latin, or 

English, printed 40 years 

before imponation, 
Hebrew, bound. 

Do., unbound. 
Other than Hebrew, Greek, 

Latin, or English, bound, 

or in boards. 

Do., in sheets or pamph's, 
English, bound. 

Do., unbound. 
Printed and published one 

year before importation, 

and not republished in the 

United States, or 5 years 

before imponat'n, bound. 

Do., unbound. 
Reports of legislative com- 
mittees, Ac., 
Polyglots, lexicons, and die* 

tionaries, 
Salt, 
Coal, 

Coke, or culm, 
Breadstiifs-^ 
Wheat, 
Barley, 
Rye, 
Oats, 

Indian com. 
Wheat flour, 
Potatoes, 
Fish- 
Dried or smoked, 
Salmon, 
Mackerel, 
Herrings, 
All other, 



Value of merehatuiise paying 

^eijie duties^ 
Do. do, ad valorem^ 
Do, do. free of duty, 



Totai, 



Value. 



$12 

717 

32 
1,484 

310 

109 

813 

1,497 



3,234 
66t 
170 



25,090 
1,159 
9,742 

41,338 



1,753 
e,214 

206 

1,376 

710,4ti9 

116,312 

69 

8,401 

109 

8 

301 

3 

141 

11,417 

i,4n 

S6,S03 

67,457 

2,048 

3,704 



$13,494,340 
16,684,876 
35,574,5^4 

$04,753,790 



If 



170 



VRITSD 8TATI8. 



[184& 



3. Exports of the Produce of the United States. 

Summary Statement of the Value of the ExpofU of the Growth^ Produce^ and MmvfaC' 
twe of the United States, during the year ending on the dOth of Siptemberj 1642, and for 
wne months ending on the dO(h day of June^ VMS. 





Year ending 
Sept.30,t84d. 


9 mot. ending 


The Sea. 


June 30, 184(1. 






J?V«Ame«— 


. 




Dried fish, or cod fisheries, 


$567,782 


$381,175 


Pickled fish, or river fisheries, (herring, shad. 






salmon, mackerel,) 


162,324 


116,042 


Whale and other fish oil, 


1,315,411 


803,774 


Spermaceti oil, 
Whalebone, 


233,114 


310,768 


225,382 


257,481 


Spermaceti candles, 


318,997 


243,308 


The Forest. 






Skins and furs, 


598,487 


* 453,869 


Ginseng, 


63,702 


193,870 


Producti of Wood— 






Staves, shingles, boards, hewn timber. 


2,203,537 


1,026,179 


Other lumber. 


253,931 


211,111 


Ma^ts and spars, 


37,730 


19,6C9 


Oak bark, and other dye. 


111,087 


39,538 


All manufactures of wood, 


623,718 


391,31 2 


Naval stores, tar, pitch, rosin, and turpentine, 


743,329 


475,357 


Ashes, pot and pearl. 


882,741 


541,004 


Agriculture. 






ProductB of Animals — 
Beef, tallow, hides, horned cattle. 






1,212,638 


1,092,949 


Butter and cheese. 


388,185 


508,96S 


Pork, (pickled,) bacon, lard, live hogs, 


2,629,403 


2,120,020 


Horses and mules, 


* 299,654 


212.696 


Sheep, 


38,892 


29,061 


Vet^etabU Food—- 


• 




Wheat, 


916,616 


264,109 


Flour, 


7.375,356 


8,763,073 


Indian Corn, 


'345,150 


281,749 


Indian meal, 


617,817 


454,166 


Rye meal. 


124,396 


65,631 


Rye, oats, and other small grain and pulse, 


175,082 
323,759 


108,640 


Biscuit, or shipbread, 


312,232 


Potatoes, 


85.844 


47,757 


Apples, 


32,245 


32,825 


Rice, 


1,907,387 


1 .625,726 


Tobacco, 


9,540,755 


4,650,979 


Cotton, 


47,593,464 


49,119,606 


jdtU other J!gricultural ProdiKti — 
Flaxseed, 






34,991 


49,406 


Hops, 


36,547 


123,745 


Brown Sugar, 


8,S90 


3,435 


Indigo, 


1,042 


198 


Manufactures. 






Soap, and tallow candles, 


485,128 


407,105 


Leather, boots and shoes, 


168,925 


115,355 


Household furniture, 


290,997 


197,982 


Coac)ies and other carriages, * 


48,509 


48,036 



1645.] 



OOMHXmCX. 



171 



Hats, 

Saddlery, 

Wax, 

Beer, porter, and cider, 

Spirits from grain, 

Snuff and tobacco, 

Lead, 

Linseed oil, and spirits of turpentine, 

Cordage, 

Iron — 

Pig, bar and nails, 

Castings, 

All manufactures of. 
Spirits from molasses, 
Sugar, refined, 
Chocolate, 
Gunpowder, 
Copper and brass, 
Medicinal drugs, 
Cotton piece goodt — 

Printed and colored, 

White, 

TM'ist, 3ram, and thread. 

All manufactures of. 
Flax and hemp— bags, and all mann&ctures of^ 
Wearing apparel, 
Combs and buttons. 
Brushes, 

Billiard tables, and apparatus, 
Umbrellas and parasols, 

Leather and morocco skins, not sold per poand, 
Printing presses and type, 
Fire engines and apparatus, 
Musical instruments. 
Books and maps. 
Paper and stationery. 
Paints and varnish. 
Vinegar, 

Earthen and stone ware, 
Manufactures of— 

Glass, 

Tin, 

Pewter and lead. 

Marble and stone. 

Gold and silver, and gold leaf, 
Gold and silver coin. 
Artificial flowers and jewelry. 
Molasses, 
Trunks, 
Brick and lime. 
Domestic salt, 
Jirticlei not enumerated-^ 

Manufactured, 

Other articles, 

Thtal, _^ 





Year endiiii!: 


Ornos. ending 




Sept. 304842. 


June SO, 1b4;i. 




$65,&&2 


$39,843 




25,9S6 


17,653 




103,626 


137,532 




54,674 


44,064 




50,708 


21,395 




625,490 


278,319 




523,428 


492,765 




34,775 


29.434 




30,457 


22,198 




120,454 


120,923 




68,507 


41,189 




920,561 


370.581 




247,745 


117,537 




291,499 


47,345 




3,094 


2,032 




161,292 


47,088 




97,021 


79.234 




139,313 


108,438 


• 


385,040 


358,415 




2,297,964 


2,575,049 




37,325 


57,312 




250,361 


232,774 


sofl 


1,038 


326 


§ 


63,219 


28,845 




34,714 


23,227 




1,925 


4,467 




1,800 


415 




5,838 


4,654 


>and, 


22,502 


26.782 


9 


19,611 


20,530 




1,304 






16,253 


6,684 


• 


44,846 


23,643 




69,862 


51,391 




27,370 


28,994 


■ 


10j208 


7,555 


, 


7,618 


2,907 




36,748 


25,348 




5,682 


5,026 




16,789 


7,121 




18,921 


8,545 




1,323 


1,905 


• 


1,170,754 


107,429 


' 


7,638 


3,769 




19,040 


1,317 




3,916 


2,072 




6,728 


3,883 




39,064 


10,262 


■ 


608,976 


470,261 




1,359,163 


675,199 




92,969,996 


77,793,783 



m 



VICITZ1> 0TATX8. 



[1»5. 



4. Imports fbom, and Exports to, Foreign Cottntries. 

TabUexfttUHngthe Value qf Imports /rom^ and Exports to. each Foreign Country^ during 

the year ending September 30rA, 1842. 



1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

6 

9 

10 

11 

1*2 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

23 

24 

25 

26 

27 

2d 

129 

30 

31 

32 

33 

34 

35 

36 

37 



CoQMtliCf. 



lussia. 



Prassia, . . . 

Sweden, 

Swedish West Indies, 

Denmark, 

Daiiish West Indies, 

Huliand, 

Dutch East Indies, 

Dutch West Indies, . 

Dutch Guiana, 

Belgium. 

Hanse Towns, 

England, . . , 

Scotland, « 

Ireland, . . 

Gibraltar, 

Malta, 

British East In£es, 

Australia, . 

Cape of Good Hope, 

Rntish West Indies, . 

British Guiana, 

Honduras, 

British American Colonies, 
Prance, on the Atlantic, . . . 
France on the Mediterranean, 
French African Ports, • 
French West Indies, 
French Guiana, .... 
Miquelon and French Fisheries, 
Hayii, . . . . . 
Spain on the Atlantic, . 
Spain on the Mediterranean, 
Tenerifle and the other Canaries, 
Manilla, and Philippine Islands, 
Cuba, 

Other Spanish West Indies, . 

^Portu^af, 

30 Madeira, 

40 Fayal and the other Azores, 

41 Cape de Verd Islands, . 
42Iiary, ...... 

43 Sicily, 

44 Mediterranean Islands, 

45 Trieste, . . ' . 

46 Turkey, 

47 Morocco, .... 

48 Texas, 

49 Mexico, . . . 

50 Venezuela, . . . . 

51 New Granada, 

52 Central America, 

53 Brazil, 

54 Argentine Republic, . 

55 Cisplatiue Republic, 
50 Chili, . ... 

57 Peru, 

58 South America feaerally, . 

59 China, 

60 Asia generally, . . . ^ , 

61 Africa generally, 

92 West Indies generally, 

63 South Seas, 

64 Northwest coast of America, 

65 Uncertain places, . 



Total, 



Value or 
Imports. 



$1,350,1(16 

18,102 

890,934 

23,242 

554,321 

1,067,438 

741,048 

331,270 

74,764 

619,588 

2,274,019 

33,446,499 

655,050 

102,700 

12,268 

7,300 

1,530,364 

28,69:3 

23,815 

826,481 

15,004 

202,868 

1,762,001 

16,015,380 

958,678 

1C9,160 
60,172 

1,266,997 

79,735 

1,065,640 

91,411 

772,372 

7,650.429 

2,517,001 

142,587 

146,182 

41,049 

17,866 

967,528 

539,419 

14,291 

413,210 

370,248 

4,779 

4h0,&92 

1,995,696 

1,544,342 

176,216 

124,994 

5,948,814 

1,835,623 

581,916 

831,039 

204,768 

4,934,645 
979,689 
539,458 

41,747 



10,1 



Value of Expona, 



Doinesiic 
Pitxluc*. 



Wm 



$316,026 

149,141 

238,948 

129.727 

70,'766 

791,828 

3,236,338 

85,576 

251,650 

101,055 

1,434,036 

3,814,994 

36,681,808 

1,622,735 

49,966 

466,937 

11,644 

399,979 

52,651 

3,204,346 

115,091 

127iS9 

5,050,143 

15,340,728 

1,674,570 

3,899 

495,397 

44,063 

4,932 

844,452 

333,222 

221,808 

72,723 

235,732 

4,197,468 

610.613 

72;723 

43,054 

49,183 

103,557 

615,577 

237,861 

40,208 

748,179 

125,521 

278,978 

969,371 

499,380 

67,363 

46,619 

2,225,571 

265,356 

201,909 

1,270,941 

147,222 
737,509 
263,367 
472,841 
205,913 
1:28,856 

10,890 



100,16a,(iW 08,069,096 



Poreijfu 
Produce. 



Toial. 



$520,507 

7,547 

105,970 

3,320 

27,919 

157,260 

386,966 

193,560 

15,561 

176,646 

749,519 

8,032,140 

80,279 

115,961 
8,261 

8Cai}D29 



23,967 

2^462 

96,646 

240,166 

1,076,684 

73,868 

80 

23,609 

1,030 

65,514 

1,200 

16,576 

518 

100,444 

672,961 

19,718 

1,388 

1,930 

19,600 

11,529 

304,940 

195,797 

136,5!» 
76,515 

137,951 

664,862 

166,892 

46,381 

22,817 

375,931 

145,905 

67,966 

368,735 

1,200 

706,888 

224,014 

61,135 

1,790 

17,534 

8,570 



$636,593 

156,688 

344,918 

133,047 

98,585 

949,088 

3,023,326 

27f),]56 

867,231 

101,055 

1,610,664 

4,564,513 

39,613,948 

1,603,014 

49,966 

662,898 

19,035 

683,804 

62,651 

8,827,713 

118,453 

163,967 

6,190,309 

16,417,412 

1,748,438 

3,979 

519,008 

45,093 

4,932 

800,900 

834,423 

238,470 

13,241 

336,176 

4,770,449 

630,531 

74,111 

44,964 

68,783 

115,060 

620,517 

433,658 

40,208 

884,705 

802,036 

406,929 

1,534,233 

606,212 

103,724 

69,466 

2,601,502 

411,261 

869,967 

1,639,676 

148,422 

1,444,397 

578,281 

623,976 

207,703 

146,3S0 

2,370 

19,290 



11,721,538 104,091,834 



t84&l 



oouunwBits 



na 



& TabU aMbUkig tkt Vabu of SmporU from^ and EaqporU to^ aorA Fordgn 
CkuvMtry^ dwtng nme months ending June dOfA, 1843. 



OooaDrlM. 



1 Russia, 

2,l*nisiiia, 

3' Sweden, 

4 Swedish West Indies, 

5'Denmarkf 



Danish West Indies, 

lloUuid, 
8 Datch East Indies, 
9, Dutch We«t Indies, 
10 Dutch Guiana, 



11 
12 
13 



Belginra. 
Hanse Towns, 
England, 



14 1 Scot land, 
15 Ireland, 
16'- 
17 



18 British East Indies, 



19 

'20 

2t1 

122 

23 

24 

25 

26 

27 

iS 

69 

30 

31 

32 

33 

34 



Gibraltar, 
Malta, 



Australia, 

Cape of Good Hope, 

Bniish West Indies, 

British Honduras, 

British Guiana, 

British American Colonies, 

France on the Atlantic, 

France on the Mediterranean, 

Bourbon, , 

French West Indies, 

French Guiana, 

Miquelon, and French Fisheries, 

French African Ports, 

Hayii, . ... 

Spain on the Atlantic, 

Spain on the Mediterranean, 
35|Teneriffe and the other Canaries 
30 Manilla and Philippine Islands, 

Cuba, 

Other Spanish West Indies, 

Poitugal, .... 

Madeira, 

Fayal and the other Azores, 

Cape de Verd Islands, 

Italy, . . . 

Sictly, 

Sardinia, 

Trieste, 

Turkey, 

Texa^s, 

Mexico, 

Central America, 

Venezuela, 

New Granada, 

Brazil, 

Argentine Republic, 

Cisplatine Republic, 

Chili, 

Peru, 

South America generally, 

China, 

Europe generally, 

Asia generally, 

Africa generally, 

West Indies generally, 

South Seas, 
B5 Oiyserttln j^lftcef , 



37 
38 
89 
40 
41 
Ai 
43 
44 
45 
46 
47 
48 
49 
00 
51 
62 
63 
64 
66 
56 
57 
58 
50 

01 
02 
63 
64 



Talueof 
Imports. 



«743^d 

227^ 
51,318 

485,289 

430,823 

121.521 

280,571 

32,533 

171,605 

920,&65 

96,141,118 

128^16 

43,535 

23,915 

27 

689,777 

44,010 

31,192 

837,836 

136,688 

43,042 

857,006 

7,050,537 

609,149 

135,921 

40,411 

110 

896,447 

49,029 

415,009 

15,056 

409.290 

5,015,933 

1,076,125 

46,713 

7,160 

12,783 

4,713 

394,564 

169,664 

72,fi57 
182,854 
445,390 

2,782,406 
132,167 

1,191,280 
116,733 

3,947,658 
793,488 
121.753 
857,556 
136,563 

4,385,568 

445,637 
363,374 

46,845 
6^9 



TCWCBg 



Value of ExpoTte. 



IhiOAfwCic 
Produce. 



9309,867 

222,039 

18,381 

31,228 

74,657 

672,158 

1,098,327 

90,239 

204,937 

24,680 

1,674,224 

2,898,048 

37,1^,095 

2,363,354 

206.502 

218,251 

6,436 

237,576 

57,805 

30,053 

2,332,300 

92,278 

116,145 

2,617.003 

10,384,578 

1,186,294 

29,245 

281,828 

45,374 

5,-^15 

1,532 

610,796 

50,100 

7,098 

57,743 

2,926,922 

442,(»4 

59,096 

37,649 
8y560 

52,227 
541490 

32,558 
108.001 
460,240 
108.465 
106,240 
907,745 

34,460 
483,077 

72,009 

1,588,564 

166,083 

310476 

669,883 

96,713 

1,755,303 

36,066 

'J53,861 

881,080 

05,412 

5^,961 



L& 



Produce. 



TotftL 



976,9*<6 

18,330 

15,807 

2^40 

6,510 

74440 

338,140 

100,74S 

10,811 

296,48S 

392,984 

1,106,064 

lAfi5l 

1,180 

38,197 

11,471 

140,136 

11,232 

25,671 

16,304 

695 

107,417 

441,573 

83,701 

13,106 



42474 

210 

3,026 

54.435 

399,875 

11,321 

1438 

3456 

621 

4,078 

186,721 

51,871 

116,988 
68,014 
37,713 

56i.ir3 
18,497 

IOO4425 

c54l|«nrl 

323,704 
04,026 
75,549 

179460 



663,565 

140 

367,206 

32,189 

135 

IB4OS 



tms^ 



f0»6,793 

240460 

34,186 

33474 

81,167 

746498 

1,996.467 

193,981 

215,750 

24,G80 

1470,709 

3,201432 

38455,159 

2478.6II 

2004^ 

256,449 

17,907 

377,712 

69,037 

30,055 

2457,980 

108,562 

116440 

2,724^22 

104^,156 

1,260,995 

29,245 

201,936 

45,374 

5415 

1,532 

653,370 

50440 

11.024 

118,178 

345»,'07 

453,355 

60.634 

41,505 

9,100 

57,906 

728,221 

84,430 

108,091 

579,176 

176,479 

142,953 

1,471,937 

52,966 

563402 

16^1 joss 

1,792468 

262,109 

205,125 

1,049,463 

98,713 
3,418,998 

36406 
521,157 
303.249 

95,537 

77,766 



84,94648^ 



\9» 



m 



unvsB OT*.ns. 






6. Iktobtb a9i> ExvoBts or sack Svats. 
BitpoiU tmd Jbfttit ff mek Statt mtd Ttfriiarih dwmg Ms ywr f m f iwy wi tls a0<4 ^ 



States and 
Territories. 


Value of ImpoTtt. 


Vala« of EzporU. 


In Ameri- 
can vessels 


In Foreign 

vessels. 


Total. 


Domestic 
produce. 


Foreign 
' produce. 


Total. 


Maine, 

N. Hampshire, 

Vermont, 

Massachusetts, 

Rhode Island, 

Connecticat, 

New York, 

New Jersey^ 

Pennsylvania, 

Delaware, 

Maryland, 

Dist. Columbia, 

Virginia, 

North Carolina, 

8omh Carc^ina, 

Georgia, 

Alabama, 

Mississippi, 

Louisiana, 

Ohio, 

Kentucky, 

Tennessee, 

Michigan, 

Missouri, 

Florida, 


$547,956 

55,256 

200,868 

16,495,973 

320,368 

329,580 

51,523,055 

145 

6,757,228 

1,612 

3,996,365 

23,984 

278,536 

181,555 

1,042,424 

230JS25 

236,170 

6,179,027 
12,179 
17,306 
6,687 
79,982 
81,137 
164,412 


i68,90« 
6,»S 

l,490yMa 
3,324 
6,127 

6,352,549 

628,630 

1,945 

418,713 

5,122 

38,169 

6,849 

317,041 

111,239 

125,701 

1,864,563 
872 

802 
12,568 


•606,864 

60,481 

209,86E 

17,986,433 

323,692 

335,707 

57,675,604 

145 

7,385,858 

3,557 

4,417,078 

29,056 

316,705 

187,404 

1,359,465 

341,764 

363,871 

8,083,590 
13,051 
17,306 
5,687 
80,784 
31,137 
176,(81 


•1,043,172 

26,419 

5.'i0,298 

6,719,115 

323,437 

532,392 

20,739,286 

64,031 

3,293,814 

55,665 

4,635,507 

498,8% 

3,745,227 

344,650 

7,508,399 

4,299,151 

9,965,675 

27,427,422 
890,786 

262,229 
32,606 


•7,351 

128 

7,216 

8,4)67,905 

25,259 

8,637,492 

6,976 

476,913 

269,259 
2,855 
6,169 

17,324 
1,106 

976,727 

778 


•1,060,523 

26,547 

657,509 

9,807,110 

348,696 

632,382 

27,576,778 

70,907 

3,770,727 

55,665 

4,904,766 

501,675 

3,750,386 

344,650 

7,625,723 

4,300,257 

9,965,675 

86,404,149 
899,736 

262,299 
33,384 


Total, 


88,724,280 


11,437,807 


100,162,067 


92,960,996 


11,721,539 


104,691,5841 



7. Lnports and Eacporta of mch State and Territory^ during nine monthi 

ending June 30, 1843. 



States and 
Territories. 


Value of Imports. 


Value of Exports. 


In Ameri- 


In Foreign 


^ntftl 


Domestic 


Foreign 


Total. 




can vessels 
•197,673 


vessels. 




pn>«iuce. 


produce. 


Maine, 


•52,587 


•250,260 


8680,432 


«a,459 


•682,891 


N. Hampshire, 


6,836 


2,453 


8,289 


44,659 


115 


44,774 


Vermont, 


38,000 




38,000 


141,834 


28,137 


169,971 


Massachusetts, 


8,C66,249 


8,733,208 


16,769.462 


4,430,681 


1,974,526 


6,405,207 


Rhode Island, 


155,611 


147 


155,766 


105,2^2 


655 


105,847 


Connecticut, 


229,112 


1,729 


230,841 


307,223 




307,223 


New York, 


27,360,920 


3,995,620 


31,358,540 


13,443,234 


3,319,430 


18,762,604 


NewJersey^ 








8,033 


2,586 


10,621 


Pennsylvania, 


2,630,521 


130,109 


2,760,630 


2,071,945 


283,003 


2,354,948 


Delaware, 


1.762 


2,933 


4,685 


98,490 


192 


98,682 


Maryland, 


2,179,U9 


300,013 


2,479,132 


2,820,214 


105,342 


3,015,556 


Dist. Columbia, 


62,075 


33,367 


95,442 


284,763 


185 


284,948 


Virginia. 
N. Carolina, 


155,661 


31^1 


187,062 


1,954,510 


2,655 


1,957,165 


108,739 


2,237 


110,976 


171,099 




171,099 


S. Carolina, 


1,084,663 


810,056 


1,294,709 


7,754,152 


6,657 


7,760,809 


Georgia, 


146,316 


61,116 


207,432 


4,522,401 




4,622,401 


Alabama, 


839,068 


121,587 


360,655 


11,157,460 




U,157,460 


Mississippi, 














Louisiana, 


7,156,961 


1,013,064 


8,170,016 


26,658,924 


796,60d 


97,390,424 


Ohio, 


9,464 


1,320 


10,774 


120,108 




120,106 


Kentucky, 


8,145 




8,145 








Tennessee, 














Michigan, 


76,176 


186 


76,370 


202,994 




902,994 


Missouri, 














Florida* 


69.815 


98,817 
14j78f,9»l 


158,632 


760,336 


353 


. .760,688 


Total, 


49,971,876 


64j753,709 


77,793,783 


6,552^097 84,84«,4^ 



YMn. 




liaattium,,tt. 


TOUIOODV*. 


leis 


SS4»t74 


6I3,gG3 04 


1,108.1117 re 




eooiTwiB 


«7i,4ss as 


1^78418 »J 






Mi.iBoea 


1,3.«,V11 41 




«M.m»i 




1^184 JO 




9HMB 44 


SIT^SI 17 


i^Tst ei 


38M 


eiB,MT sa 


SSI 118 ea 


i;(E«;i« *t 




«ie,8D« 40 


m.m 3» 


1,WB,»58 70 




«ie.iwu 




i^am 17 




S3S.M0 7S 


aM!«l4R7 


i^^Msea 




fK»,miia 


JiB.iM ar 


i^S^m 


ISSi 


TOO.TBIOB 


Tsa,%3 8n 


i,*n,iio 77 






79j,«i as 


1,S34,18B 95 




747.170 4* 


e7^i■^34 


1,BS1«)7 TS 




ei3.ei9 37 


0*8.774 50 


1,741,391 87 


law 


8SI.I4iSS 




i,ano,7S7 HI 


1S30 


670,47* 31 


ais;»i in 


Mfli;778 4a 




»X.ii\ M 


047,^4^ 


iM;,iMai!s 






733.4[ta3a 


i;uii.uu ai 




Tsiiwn 7* 


B5U.l»i 21 


i,«n«,]4s i« 




SS7,t38 43 


M1,41R) 87 


1,7SS,9«7 14 


1335 


SSS^MIM 


839,118 40 


l,SH,ft4a 14 


IBM 


807,774 SI 


994,a» 14 


1^,IIN OS 




eio^r 3ft 


1W«,«140 


i,8MMSoe 






1,173,047 8ft 


i,B».«ia 80 




834,«44S4 


l,BW.aMfl7 


9>«,478 81 




BM,jn4i« 


i,8en,i»B3s 


3,l8(t7M IS 


1841 


»4S,8m« 




9,130,744 37 


13ta 




1^17,081 «0 


9,099,390 60 




i,Sm 




9.ise^«) 



OKtRD ttitXU 



1 8i|l|| 



:| ^1 1 
I I I 



It ig 

Ib j Sa I 

II i 



A atatrmtM raUUtM)r Ike voh* of Itu Bcporti of DotHettir Av^cc dai 
Vaa-iftutiirt. aiti •/ f^Uagn Mmkaiidut n-rxporiid, amamaUf, from 1831 



To-ntpdlns 




V. 


.««r.xPO 


T.. 














8.PLJ0.' 


piodi™,ftc 


















Free nf dm. 


P-Fing dmr. 


Tmal. 




isil 


• "■E'-KH 


SLU,7m,T3> 


#n,,ij;,7-i. 


KI,JUt,li>B 






»,SH,079 


11,IH.3ffi 


ii.iiMJoa 


■iiSSi;aa 


7'J.I<HI,J8I 


1821 


4),l£S.4ie 


, 1fiM.l<.t 




•glfiKifi^ 


74.ffil9jnO 


ift» 


93.s«»;wa 




IT.tM,l)7J 




Ts,i»a,6n 




«,9M.7*5 


e.B35>lU 


*(,7W,9ra 


aa'jmm 


w.s*^,as8 




Bl.OM.riO 


S,133,1(I8 


11).4<VI,11(M 


!M.sw,8ia 


nMi"^ 


law 


ae.Bit.6Bi 


7,79S,IS(I 


i5fli;,Da8 




e:t,-*N,ft!7 




5«,iiaB.oo9 




13,187^ 


ai;miioiT 


K^MIISM 




ts,iv>,m 


ajni^un 


11,4^7,401 


]SJUB,478 


M,36a^l 




s»,m,m 


s^i,iir 




14,18T,4T» 


73,R4!l,Me 


1331 


BWTT.WSJ 


J^),04.1 


1^,4^,483 


Ba,fm,sai 


eiviiiiS^ 




«3,m,'i70 






«. 100,4 73 


KJ 76,041 




M^I?,BOe 


v,4in,JM 




in,ft».73S 


Ki,ni),4ai 




B1,(W,IW 


I3,43:t.-aii 


io,e7s,s« 


Z!J1*.SII 


IW.^HB.IPS 


193J 


ioi,t3»,ie-i 


ia,wn,mii 


7,J4.1,8SS 


SOJ»l,4119 






108.818,880 




B,«K,S87 








WJM.4I4 


ia,448;91B 


8,400^13 


ei|^i,uM 


ll7;4lo!.-J7e 


1S38 


B«,o3a^i 


^tm.n^ 


4.4«i;h4 


i*^ai.»if 


iw.4M,ai« 


less 


^saJsasa\ 


12,486 .an 


«,™7j»e 


17,4nj,iWS 


1«I,(M9,4I8 




iia^s^ 


18,381 JUS 


6,S0S,BUO 


18,1*0,113 


1WJWD4« 




I06,38ii,ri» 


ll,a40,«M 


4.3^,1 a J 


1S,4W,091 


aisi\^m 




1«^,W» 


Va'.Dsi 


i83(,4M 


11,NI,S38 


lOIJ0l,S34 



[3. A ^atmat rxkibiling tke vatiu of Mirchaiidue intpartii from IS2t to 
1S13, and alto the anvnmi of Daiitt uAicA accntd aiaataltf HfMB Mcft JUer- 



NoTB^-TllS ipUM •! 



V ihs ehu(ei ia the tuilU. 



vn 



tmiTSO tTASBS. 



[1SA8. 



13. JS^atutical View cf the Ommetce of the Umttd StaJtea, exhibiting the value 
of Lnports and Exports, awutaUy, from 1821 to 1842. 



Yean ending 
Sept. 30. 



1821 
1883 
1823 
1894 
1835 
1826 
1897 

ia» 

1829 
1830 
1831 
183S 
1633 
1834 
1835 
1835 
1837 
1838 
1839 
1840 
1841 
1848 



Valiti ow Exports. 



Domestic pro< 



$43,671,894 

49,874,079 

47,155,408 

50^9,500 

66,944,745 

53,055,710 

58,921,691 

50,669,669 

65,700,193 

59,46*2,029 

61,277,057 

63,137,470 

70,317,698 

81,024,163 

101,181,083 

106,916,680 

95,564,414 

96,033,821 

103,533,891 

113,895,634 

106,382,723 

92,069,996 



Foreign mer- 
chandise. 



$21,302,488 
22,366,203 
27,543,022 
26,337,157 
32,590,643 
24,539,612 
23,408,136 
21,595,017 
16,658,478 
14,387,479 
30,033,526 
24,039,473 
19,822.735 
23,312,811 
20,504.495 
21,746,860 
21,854,963 
12,452,795 
17,494,525 
18,190,312 
15,469,C81 
11,721,538 



Total. 



$64,974,382 

72,160,281 

74,699/130 

75,086,657 

99,535,388 

77,595,322 

82,324^27 

72,264,086 

72,358,671 

73,849,508 

61,310,583 

87,176,943 

90,140,433 

104,336,973 

121,693,577 

128,663,040 

117,419,376 

108,486^616 

121,028,416 

132,085,946 

121,851,803 

104,691,534 



Valttb of 
Imports. 



I 



$32^)85,724 
&3,241,541 
77^79,267 
80,540,()07 
96,340,075 
64,974,477 
79,484,068 
88,509,824 
74,492,527 
70,876,920 
103,191,124 
101,029,266 
108,118,311 
326,521,333 
149,895,743 
189,930,035 
140,989,217 
113,717,404 
162,092432 
107,141 y519. 
127,946,177 
100,162^7 



14. Jbnoimt of Thimagt employed in the Fcreigifi Trade, annually, from 183] 

to 1842. 



Yean ending 
Sept. 30. 



TOSMAGX. 



18S1 

1823 

1823 

1824 

1825 

1836 

1827 

1838 

1829 

1830 

1831 

1833 

1833 

1834 

1835 

1636 

1837 

1838 

1S39 

1840 

1841 

1843 



American Yesseli. 



Cleared. 



604,947 
813,748 
810,761 
919,278 
960,366 
953,013 
£80,543 
897,404 
944,799 
971,760 
972,504 
974,865 
1,142460 
1,134,020 
1,400,517 
1,315.523 
1,266,623 
1,408,761 
1,477,928 
1,647,009 
1,634,156 
1,536,451 



Entered. 



765,0<J8 
787,961 
775,271 
f50,033 
860,754 
942,206 
918,361 
668,381 
872,949 
£67,227 
922,953 
949,622 
1,111,441 
1,074,670 
1,352,653 
1,255,384 
1,299,720 
1,302,974 
1,491,270 
1,576,946 
1,631,900 
1,510,111 



Foreign Yessels. 



Cleared. 



63,073 
97,490 
119,740 
102,5.§2 
95,060 
99,417 
131.350 
15i;080 
133,006 
133,436 
271,994 
367,505 
497,039 
577,'i00 
630,824 
674,721 
756,293 
604,166 
611,839 
706,466 
736,849 
740,497 



Entered. 



61JS26 

100y541 

119,468 
102,367 

nsfsa 

105,654 

137,589 

150^223 

130:743 

131,900 

281,948 

£03,038 

496,705 

638,052 

641,310 

680,213 

765,703 

592,110 

624,814 

712,363 

736,444 

733,775 



Iif4d.] 



COttKBftCX, 



VI9 



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t" ©J r» cv* c? OS w OD cLfio co -o" *^ t^ « W « « «5 «h io i^ 



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t^ A CO ^ n C9 






.11 



%eo«^s6d'^QSOst«c« 
oo©Jco«S^i^'S*»»^c*i> 

t #s r« r^ ^ •* f* _ •* ^ -^ -^» ' 

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r« #s «« «« ^ 

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8SS3SS89Se;3l^89$9^SoFSS6»8$^S 




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tits !3a-S! 8"« tsft sf^tfss *s?fsf^ 



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n i % . I' ^'n. i 



■■ H *i 



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180 



VVl'On STATES. 



[X84fl. 



10. Valitei of the prine^fat artidet of Marhanditi imported inio the 

StaJUe, ammaUy, from 1821 to 1842. 



Yean. 


Artiolxs. 








Linens and 




Cottonf. 


WooUenf. 


Silki. 


■lannfiicturet 
of flax. 


1821 


$7,589,711 


$7,437,'?37 


$4,486,934 


t2,5M,159 


1622 


10,346,907 


12,185,904 


6,840,928 


4,132,747 


1823 


8,554,877 


8,268,038 


6,718,4U 


3,808,007 


1824 


8,895,757 


8,386,597 


7,204,588 


3,873,616 


1825 


12,509,516 


11,393,364 


10,399,743 


3,887,787 


1826 


8,348,084 


8,431,974 


8,327,909 


3,987,026 


1827 


9,316,153 


8,742,701 


6,712,015 


9,656,786 


1828 


10,996,-270 


8,679,505 


7,686,640 


3,339,539 


1829 


8^362,017 


6,881,489 


7,192,698 


2,843,431 


1830 


7,862,326 


5,766,396 


5,932,243 


3,011,280 


1831 


16,090,234 


12,627,229 


11,117,946 


3,7^0,111 


1833 


10,399,653 


9,992,424 


0,248,907 


4,03104 


1833 


7,660,449 


13,262,509 


9,493,366 


3,132,557 


1834 


10,145,181 


11,879,328 


10,908.964 


5,485,389 


1835 


15,367,585 


17,834,424 


16,677,547 


6,472,021 


1836 


17,876,087 


31,080,003 


22,960,218 


9^307,493 


1837 


11,150,841 


8,500,292 


14r352,823 


5,544,761 


1838 


6,599,330 


11,512,920 


9,813;»8 


3,972,098 


1839 


14,908,181 


18,575,945 


21,678,086 


7,708,065 


1840 


6,504.484 


9,071,184 


9,761,223 


4,614,466 


1841 


11,757,036 


11,001,939 


15,511,009 


6,846,807 


1843 


9,578,515 


8,375,735 


9,448,373 


3,659,184 



Value of MarchandUe-^ Continued. 



Tean. 




AXTICLXS. 




Manafactnres 
of hemp. 


Manufacture! 

of iron and 

•teel. 


Eartlien, stone, 

and China 

ware. 


Specie and 
bullion. 


1821 


$1,120,450 


$1,868,529 


$763,883 


$8,004,890 


1823 


1,857,338 


3,1.55,575 


1,164,609 


3,369,846 


1823 


1,497,006 


2,967.121 


1,143,415 


5,097,896 


1824 


1,780,199 


2,831,703 


888,869 


6,473,1195 


1825 


2,134,384 


3,706,416 


1,086,890 


6,150,765 


1826 


2,062,728 


3,186,485 


1,337,589 


6,8:30,966 


1827 


1,883,466 


3,973,587 


1,181,047 


8,151,130 


1828 


2,087,318 


4,180,915 


1,554,010 


7,489,741 


1829 


1,468,485 


3,430,908 


1,337,744 


7,40:3,612 


1830 


1,333,478 


3,655,848 


1,259,060 


8,155,964 


1831 


1,477,149 


4,827,833 


1,624,604 


7,306,945 


1832 


1,640,618 


6,306,345 


2,024,020 


5,907,504 


1833 


2,036,035 


4,135,437 


1,818,187 


7,070,368 


1834 


1,679,995 


4,746,621 


1,591,413 


17,911,632 


1835 


2,555,847 


5,351,616 


1,697,688 


13,131,447 


1836 


3,365,897 


7,880,869 


2,709,187 


13,400,861 


1837 


1,951,626 


6,526,693 


1,823,400 


10,516,414 


1838 


1^1,757 


3,613,286 


1,365,536 


17,747,116 


18S9 


8,006,716 


6,507,510 


2,483,258 


5,595,176 


1840 


1,588,155 


3,184,900 


2,010,231 


&882,813 


1841 


^'21 


4,255,960 


1,536,450 


4,088,633 


1843 


3,873,534 


3,578,061 


1,557,961 


4,087,016 



Vatua of KnAandue imported — Continued. 





A„,c«.. 1 




Winefc 


SpUiu. 


H»U««. 


Teu 


Coffi^e. 


18Si 


vmM* 


788 




»i,*iJ,fl3a 






















































































































































































































































!;«-;oi9 











FoImi d/ JIaxluaidiM mportid — Cootiooed. 



YBlm. 


A.T,CLE.. 1 


9og.r. 


8^.. 


8pic«. 


Leul. 


"sxs' 








«310,«1 


SES4,TOI 




















































































































































































































































13 1! 













Viilut of ArticUt imported — Continued. 



IS. Slalmtnt exhiblling the value of cn-tam^niclei of Domrtlir Fndttte and 
Manufarturt, and of Builion and Sjwrie, txporltd, from 1821 (o 1842, 



Valut of .iiiiclei aparted — Conlinued. 



184 UNITXD 8TATV8. [1845. 

XV. Population of the Pbikcipal Cities. 





1790 


1800. 


1810. 


1820. 


1830. 


1840. 


New York, 


33,131 


60,469 


96,373 


123,706 


203,007 


312,710 


Philadelphia, 


42,520 


70,287 


96,664 


108,116 


167,118 


258.037* 


Baltimore, 


13,503 


26,614 


46,555 


62,738 


80,625!134,379'| 


New Orleans, 






17,242 


27,176 


46,310 


102,193 


Boston, 


18,038 


24,927 


32,250 


43,298 


61,392 


93,38a 


Cincinnati, . 




750 


2,540 


9,644 


24,831 


46,338 


Brooklyn, 




3,296 


4,402 


7,175 


12,042 


36,233 


Albany, 


3.498 


5,349 


9,356 


12,630 


24.238 


33,721 


Charleston, 


16,359 


18,712 


24,711 


24,480 


30,289 


29,261 


Washington, 




3,210 


8,208 


13,247 


18,827 


23,364 


Providence, 




7,614 


10,071 


11,767 


16,832 


23,171 


Louisville, 






1,357 


4,012 


10,352 


21.210 


Pittsburg, 




1,565 


4,768 


7,248 


12^5 


21,115 


Lowell, 










6,474 


20,796 


Rochester, 




, 




1,502 


9,269 


20,191 


Richmond, . 




5,537 


9,735 


12,046 


16,060 


20,153 


Troy, . . . 
Buffalo, 






3,885 


5,264 


ll,40i 


19,334 






1,508 


2,095 


8,653 


18,213 


Newark, , 








6,507 


10,953 


17,290 


St Louis, 








4,598 


5,852 


16,469 


Portland, . 




3,677 


7,169 


8,581 


12,601 


15.218 


Salem, . 


7,921 


9,457 


12,613 


12,731 


13,886 


1 5,08s 



Including the County. 



XVI. Table exhibiting the Seats of Chvemmenty the Times of Holding fitr 
Election of State Officers, and the Times of the Mseting of the Legislatm-tt 
of the several States, 



States. 



Seats of 
Government. 



Maliie]^ 

N. Hampshire, 

Vermont, 

Massachutetta, 

Rhode Island, 

Connecticut, 

New Totk, 

New Jersey, 

Pennsylvania, 

Delaware, 

Maryland, 

Virginia, 

N. Carolina, 

S. Carolina, 

Georgia, 

Alabama, 

Mississippi, 

Louisiana, 

Arkansas, 

Tennessee, 

Kentucky, 

Ohio, 

Indiana, 

Illinois, 

Missouri, 

Michifran, 



Augusta, 

Concord, 

Montpeller, 

Boston, 
I Provideactt, 
/ and Newpnrt, 

Hart. & N. Hav. 

Albany, 

Trenton, 

Harrisburg^ 

Dover, 

Annapolis, 

Richmond, 

Raleigh, 

Columbia, 

Milledgeville, 

Tuscaloosa, 

Jackson, 

Npw Orleans, 

Little Rock, 

Nashville, 

Frankfort, 

Columbus, 

Indianapolis, 

s*pringfie}d, 

Jefierson City, 

Detroit, 



Times of Holding 
Elections. 



2d Monday in 8ept. 
Qd Tuesday in March, 
1st Tuesday in Sept. 
.3d Monday in Nov. 

Ist Wed. in April, 

1st Monday in April, 
Ist Monday in Nov. 
2d Tuesday in Oct. 
2d Tuesday in Oct. 
2d Tuesday in Nov. 
Ist Wednesday in Oct. 
4th Thursday m April, 
Commonly in August, 
2d Monday in Oct. 
1st Monday in Oct. 
Ist Monday in Aug. 
1st Mon. & Tups. Nov. 
Ist Monday in July, 
1st Monday in Oct. 
1st Thursday in Aug. 
Ist Monday in Aug. 
2d Tuesday in Oct. 
1st Monday in A^g, 
1st Monday in Aug. 
1st Monday in Aug. 
[ist Monday in Nor. 



Times of the Meeting of the 
Legislatures. 



1st Wednesday ii»^ January. 
1st Wednesday in June. 
2d Thursday in October. 
1st Wednesday in January. 
Ist Tuesday in May. 
lust Monday in October. 
1st Wednesday m May. 
1st Tuesday rn January. 
4th Tuesday in January. 
Ist Tuesday in Jtmuary. 
1st Tuesday in Jan. fti«iiiita%. 
last Monday in' December. 
Ist Monday in December. 
2d Monday in Nov. hiatn, 
4th Monday in November. 
Ist Monday in Nov. bitnniattff. 
1st Monday in December. 
1st Monday i» Jan. Merni. 
1st Monday in January. 
fst Monday in Nov. msiin. 
Ist Monday in Oct. lienn, 
IsfMonday in December. 
1st Monday in December. 
1st Monday in December. 
Ist Monday in Dec. hienn, 
1st Monday in Nov. 5tsmi. 
Ist Monday in January. 



1845.] 



QOVEANO&S, JtC. 



185 



XVIL GOVERNORS OF THE SEVERAL STATES AND 

TERRITORIES, 

With their Salaries^ Terms of Office, and Expiration of their respective Thmt; 
the Number of Senators and Representatives in the State Legislatures, loith 
their respective Terms. 



States. 


Governors. 


Salary. 


Gov. 

Term, 
Years. 


Term expires. 


Sena- 
tors. 


Term 
Y'rs. 


Repre- 

senta 

lives. 


Term 
YVs. 

1 


Maine, 


Hugh J. Anderson, 


1,500 




Jan. 


1846 


31 




151 


N. H. 


John H. Steele, 


1,000 




June 


1S45 


12 




250 


1 


Vt. 


William Slade, 


750 




Oct. 


1845 


30 


A 


230 


1 


Mass. 


George N. Briggs, 


2,500 




Jan. 


1845 


40 




356 


1 


R-I. 


James Fenner, 


400 




May 


1845 


31 




69 


1 


Conn. 


Roger S. Baldwin, 


1,100 




May 


1845 


21 




215 


1 


N. Y. 


Wm. C. Bouck, 


4,000 


2 


Jan. 


1845 


32 


4 


128 


1 


N.J. 


Daniel Haines, 


2,000 


3 


Jan. 


1845 


18 


3 


58 


1 


Penn. 


David R. Porter, 


4,000 


3 


Jan. 


1845 


33 


3 


100 


1 


Del. 


Wm. B. Cooper, 


l,333i 


3 


Jan. 


1845 


9 


4 


21 


2 


Md. 


Francis Thomas, 


4,200 


3 


Jan. 


1845 


21 


6 


82 


1 


Va. 


James McDowell, 


3,333^ 


3 


Jan. 


1846 


32 


4 


134 


1 


N. C. 


Wm. A. Graham, 


2,000 


2 


Jan. 


1847 


50 


2 


120 


2 


S. C. 


Jas. H. Hammond, 


3,500 


2 


Dec. 


1844 


45 


4 


124 


2 


Ga. 


Geo. W. Crawford, 


3,500 


2 


Nov. 


1845 


47 


1 


130 


1 


Ala. 


Benj. Fitzpatrick, 


3,500 


2 


Dec. 


1845 


33 


3 


100 


1 


Mp. 


Albert G. Brown, 


3,000 


2 


Jan. 


1846 


30 


4 


91 


2 


La. 


Alex. Mouton, 


0,000 


4 


Jan. 


1847 


17 


4 


60 


2 


Ark. 


Sam'l Adams,* 


2,000 


4 


Nov. 


1844 


25 


4 


75 


2 


Tenn. 


James C. Jones, 


2,000 


2 


Oct. 


1845 


25 


2 


75 


2 


oJ^io, 


William Owsley, 


2,500 


4 


Sept. 


1848 


38 


4 


100 


1 


T. W. Bartley,* 


1,500 


2 


Dec. 


1844 


36 


2 


72 


1 


Mich. 


John S. Barry, 


1,500 


2 


Jan. 


1846 


18 


2 


53 


1 


Ind. 


James Whitcomb, 


1,500 


3 


Dec. 


1846 


30 


3 


62 


1 


III. 


Thomas Ford, 


1,000 


4 


Dec. 


1846 


40 


4 


91 


2 


Mo. 


John C. Edwards, 


1,500 


4 


Nov. 


1848 


18 


4 


49 


2 


Territ. 


















1 


Fl. 


John Branch, 


2,500 


3 


Aug. 


1848 


15 


2 


29 


1 


Wise. 


N. P. Tallmadge, 


2,500 


3 


Mar. 


1848 


13 


2 


26 


1 


Iowa, 


John Chambers, 


2,500 


3 


July 


1848 






26 





♦Acting Governors. 

In all the States except Virginia and South Carolina, the Governor is 
voted for by the people ; and if no one has a majority of all the votes, in 
the States in which such a majority is required, the Legislature elects 
to the office of Governor one of the candidates voted for by the people. 



10* 



166 



VRITSD BTATSS. [184& 

XVIII. COLLEGES IN THE 



Name. 



Place. 



1 Bowdoin. 
a Waterville,* 

3 Dartmouth, 

4 University of Vermont, 

5 Middlebury, 

6 Norwich University, 
1 Harvard Unireruty, 
ft Williams, 
Amherst, 

10 Holy Cros8,$ 

11 Brown University,* 

12 Yale 

13 Wasliington.f 

14 Wesleyan University ,i 

15 CoIurabia,t 

16 Union, 

17 Hamilton, 

Vh Hamilton Lit. and TbeoL* 
19 Geneva^t 
30 University of New York, 

21 St. John's.^ 

22 College of New Jersey, 

23 Rutgers, 

24 University of Pennsylva. 

25 Dickinsoii,^ 

26 Jefferson, 

27 Washington, 

28 Allegheny ,t 

29 Pennsylvania, 

30 Lafayette, 

31 Marshall, 
|32 West. University of Penn. 

33 Newark, 

34 St. John ^8, 

35 St. Mary'8,5 

36 Mount St. Mary»s,J 

37 Georgetown,^ 

38 Columbian,* 
3{' William and Mary,t 

40 Hampden-Sidney, 

41 Washin^on, 

42 University of Virginia, 

43 RandcIph-Macon,t 

44 Emory and Henry ,t 

45 Rector,* 

46 University of N. Carolina, 

47 Davidson, 

48 Wake Forest,* 

49 Charleston, 

50 South Carolina, 

51 Franklin, 

52 Oglethorpe, 

53 Emory ,t 

54 Mercer University,* 

55 Christ Coll. and £p. Inst.t 

56 University of Alabama, 

57 La Orange ,t 

58 Spring Hill,^ 

59 Centenary ,i 

60 Oakland, 

61 Louisiana, 

62 Jefferson, 

63 St. Charles,$ 

64 Baton Rouge, 

65 Franklin, 

66 Greenville, 



Brunswick, 

Water ville, 

Hanover, 

Burlington, 

Middlebury, 

Norwich, 

Cambridge, 



Presidents. 



Me. 
do. 
N. H. 
Vt. 

do. 
do. 
Mass. 
WiUiamstown, do. 



Amherst, do. 

Won ester, do. 
Providence, R. I 
New Haven, Con. 
Hartford, do. 

Middletown, do. 
New York, N. Y 
Schenectady, do. 
Cliuton, do. 

Hamilton, do. 

Geneva, do. 

New York, do. 
R(Mie Hill, do. 

Princeton, N. J. 
N. Brunsw^ick, do. 
Philadelphia, Penn. 
Carlisle, do. 

Canonsburg, do. 
Washingion, do. 
Meadville, do. 
Gettysburg, do. 
Easton, do. 

Mercersburg, do. 
Pittsburg, do. 

Newark^ Del. 

Annapolis, Md. 
Baltimore, do. 
Emmefsburg, do. 
Georgetown, D. C. 
Washington, do. 
WilUamsburc, Va. 
Prince Ed. Co. do. 
Lexington do. 

Charlottesville, do. 
Boydton, do. 

Glade Spring, do. 
Harrison Co. do. 
Chapel Hill, N. C. 
Mecklenberg Co. do. 
Wake Forest, do. 
Charleston, S. C. 
Columbia, do. 

Athens, Ga. 

Midway, do. 

Oxford, do. 

PenfielOj do. 

Montpeher, do. 
Tuscaloosa, Ala. 
La Grange, do. 
Sphnff Hill, do. 
BrandonSp*gs. Miss. 
Oakland, do. 

Jackson, La. 

Bringiers, do. 

Grand Coteau, do. 
Baton Rouge, do. 
Opelousas, do. 
Greenville, Tenn. 




Leonard Woods, Jr., D. D . 

Sheldon. 

Nathan Lord, D. D. 
John Wheeler, D. D. 
Benjamin Labaree, D. D. 
Truman B. Ransom, A. M. 
Josiah Quincy, LL. D. 
Mark Hopkins, D. D. 

Thomas F. Mullody. 
Francis Way land, D. D. 
Jeremiah Day, D. D. 
Silus Totlen, D. D. 
Stephen Oliii, D. D. 
Nath. F. Moore, LL. D. 
Eliphalet Nott,D. D. 
Simetm North, LL. D. 
Nathaniel Kendrick, D.D. 
Benjamin Hale, D. D. 
Th. Frelinghuysen, LL.D. 
John Harly, A. M. 
James Camahan, D. D. 
Abr. B. Ha3brouck,LL.D. 
John Ludlow, D. D. 
John P. Durbin, D. D. 
Matthew Brown, D. D. 
David McConaughy, D.D. 
H.J. Clark. A.M. 
C. P. Crauth, D. D. 
John W. Yeomans, D. D. 

Robert Bruce, D. D. 
E. W. Gilbert, D. D. 
Hector Humphreys, D. D. 
Gilbert Raymond, D. D. 
John McCafiVey, A. M. 
James Ryder, S. J. 
Stephen Chapin, D. D. 
Thomas R. Dew. A. M. 
William Maxwell, LL. D 
Henrv Rufliier, D. D. 
C Johnson, R*etor. 
L. C. Garland, A. M. 
Charles Collins, A. M. 
Charles Wheeler, A. M. 
David L. Swain, LL. D. 
Samuel WilliamsoiK D. D 
Samuel Wait, A. M. 
William T. Brantly, D. D 
R. Henry. D. D. 
Alonzo Ctiurch, D. D. 
Samuel K. Talmage, 
Aug. B. Longstreet, LL.D 
Otis Smith, 
Charles Fay, 
Basil Manly, D. D. 
Robert Paine, A. M. 
John Bazin, 
J. C. Thornton. 
Jere. Chamberlain, D. D. 
Wm. B. Lacy, D. D. 

Th. Soller, S. J. 
R. H. Ranny, 
Othon Boudet, 
James McLin, 



17M 
1820 
1769 

i:m 

1834 
1638 
1763 
1821 
1843 
1764 
1700 
1824 
1831 
1764 
1795 
1812 
1819 
1823 
1831 
1843 
1746 
1770 
1756 
1783 
1802 
1806 
1S16 
1532 
1832 
1836 
1819 
1833 
1784 
1719 
IbSO 
1790 
1821 
1683 
1783 
1812 
1819 
1832 
1839 
1839 
1780 
1838 
1838 
1795 
1804 
1785 
1836 
1837 

1839 
1R26 
1831 
1830 
1841 
1831 
1826 
1631 

1838 
1830 
1794 



1845.] 

UNITED STATES. 



0VLI.X0X8. 



187 





Inst- 




No. of , 






TUCt- 


No. of 


Minis- 


Stu- 


1 


ers. 

8 


Alumni. 


ters. 


dents. 


749 


121 


182 


2 


^7 


210 


70 


70 


3 


15 


2,228 


545 


331 


4 


6 


257 




109 


5 


6 


771 


245 


56 


6 


7 


88 




104 


7 


30 


5,804 


1,561 


250 


8 


8 


967 


331 


144 


9 


12 


662 


137 


142 


10 










11 


9 


1,496 


474 


169 


12 


35 


5,387 


1,385 


383 


13 


8 


246 


^ 


72 


14 


8 


229 


85 


110 


15 


11 


1,170 




95 


16 


11 


2,125 


306 


222 


17 


6 


467 


69 


113 


18 


10 


140 




74 


19 


8 






6C 


20 


12 


167 




151 


21 


13 








22 


13 


2,615 


483 


190 


23 


11 


391 


77 


21 


24 


14 


933 




111 


25 


8 


561 


140 


92 


26 


7 


698 


227 


164 


27 


6 


243 




76 


28 


5 


16 




100 


29 


4 


59 




76 


30 


7 


28 




130 


31 


4 


5 




49 


32 


5 


11 




64 


33 


5 


5 


2 


100 


34 


5 


124 


6 


27 


35 


16 


187 




160 


36 


12 


41 




130 


37 


15 


90 




140 


38 


10 


104 




25 


39 


4 






98 


40 


5 


8 




65 


41 


6 


126 




136 


42 


9 


1,236 




170 


43 


8 


'77 




73 


44 


4 






46 


45 








50 


46 


9 


787 


70 


160 


47 


3 


31 




44 


48 


3 


11 


6 


24 


49 




67 




50 


50 


8 




3 


134 


51 


9 


433 




116 


52 


6 


25 


1 


65 


.53 


5 


11 




70 


54 










55 


4 






35 


56 


8 


74 


2 


80 


57 


3 


50 




1C6 


56 


3 






70 


59 


6 






170 


60 


6 






160 


61 


9 


18 




109 


62 


14 




2 


122 


63 


9 






65 


64 


4 






45 


65 


4 






70 


66 


2 


110 




41 



Volumes in 
Libraries. 



24,8()0 
7,000 

16,500 
9,200 
7,054 

61,000 

7,500 

15,000 

17,700 

34,000 

7,900 

11,000 

14,000 

13,000 

7,000 

4,600 

5,400 



12,500 
12,000 
5,000 
11,200 
4,500 
3,300 
8,000 
2,270 
5,000 



3,500 
4,(X)0 

12,000 
3,500 

25,000 
4,200 
5,000 
8,000 
2,700 

16,000 

2,800 

10,000 
1,150 
4,700 
3,000 
13,000 
11,000 
2,000 



6,000 
2,200 
4,000 



1,850 
5,500 

300 

3,000 



Commencement. 



First Wednesday in Sept. 
Second Wednesday in August. 
Last Thursday in July. 
First Wednesday in August. 
Third Wednesday in August. 
Third Thursday ui August. 
Fourth Wednesday in August. 
Third Wednesday in August. 
Fourth Thursday in July. 
I^eptember 15. 

First Wednesday in September. 
Third Thursday in Augiist. 
First Thursday in August. 
First Wednesday in August. 
Day after first Monday ui October. 
Fourth Wednesday in July. 
Fourth Wednesday in August. 
Third Wednesday in August. 
First Wednesday in August. 
Wednesday precedmg 4th of July. 

Last Wednesday in June. 
Fourth Wednesday in July. 
The 15lh, 16th, or Hth of July. 
Second Thursday in Juiy. 
Last Thursday in September. 
Last Wednesday iji September. 

Second Wednesday in September. 

Last Wednesday in August. 

Early in July. 

Fourth Wednesday in September. 

The twenty-second of February. 

Third Tuesday in July. 

Last week in June. 

Near the last of July. 

First Wednesday in October. 

July fourth. 

Fourth Wednesday in September. 

L<a8t Thursday in June. 

July fourth. 

Second Wednesday in June. 

Last Wednesday in June. 

First Thursday in June. 
Last Thursday hi June. 
Third Thursday in June. 
Fourth Tuesday in February. 
First Monday in December. 
First Wednesday in August. 
Wednesday after 2d Monday in Not, 



Wednesday after 2d Monday in Dec. 
Early in June. 



First Wednesday in June. 
Thursday after 1st Monday in Dec. 

December. 

First of Novemlier. 

Third Wednesday in September. 



188 



UNITED STATES. 



[1845. 



COLLEGES IN THE 



Name. 



67 
G^ 
61) 
70 
71 
T2 
73 
74 
75 
76 
77 
78 
70 
80 
81 
82 
83 
64 
85 

m 

87 

88 

81) 

90 

91 

92 

93 

94 

05 

96 

97 

98 

99 

100 

101 

102 

103 

104 

105 

106 

107 

108 



Washington, 

Universny of Nashville, 

Kaat Tennessee, 

Jackson, 

Transylvania, 

St. Joseph's, § 

Centre, 

Auj?a3ta,t 

Cumberland, 

Georgetown,* 

Bacon, 

St. Mary's,} 

Universiiy of Ohio, 

Miami University, 

Franklin, 

Western Reserve, 

Keiiyon,t 

Granville,* 

Marieita, 

Oberlin Institute, 

Cincinnati, 

St. Xavier, 

Woodward, 

Indiana Stale University, 

S(tuth Hanover, 

Wabash, 

Ind Asbury Univer3ity,t 

St Gabrif rs,§ 

Illinois, 

Shurtleff,* 

AlcKendree,t 

Knox Manual Labor, 

University of St. Louis,} 

Kemper College, t 

St. Mar>''s,§ 

Marion, 

Missouri University, 

St. Charles,t 

Fayette, 

Michigan University, 

Marshall, 

St.Philip'3,§ 



Place. 



Wa=5hn Co. Tenn. 
Nashville do. 

Knoxville, do. 

Near Columbia, do. 
Lexington, Ken. 
Bardstown, do. 
Danville, do. 

Augusta, do. 

Princetown, do. 
Georgetown, do. 
Harrodsburg, do. 
Marion Co. do. 
Athens, Ohio, 

Oxford, do. 

New Athens, do. 
Hudson, do. 

Gambier, do. 

Granville, do 
Marietta, do. 

()l)erlin, do. 

Cincinnati, do. 
CiiiciiiiiHti, do. 
Cincinnati, do. 
Rloomington, Ind. 
South Hanover, do. 
Crawfordsville, do. 
Greencastle, do. 
Vincennes, do. 
Jacksonville, 111 
Upper Alton, do. 
Lebanon, do. 

Galesburg, do. 
St. Louis, Mo. 
St. Louis, do. 

Cape Girardeau, do 
Marion Co. do. 
Columbia, do. 

St. Chirles, do. 
Fayette do. 

Ann Arbor, Mich. 
Marshall, do. 

Near Detroit, do. 



Presidents. 



Philip Lindsley, D. D. 
Joseph Estabrook, A. M. 

H. B. Bascora, D. D. 
J. M. Lancaster, 
John C. Young, D. D. 
J. Tomlinson, D. D. 
F. R. Cosoit, D. D. 
Howard Malcom, D. D. 
E. S. Buniet, 
W. S. Murphy, S. J. 
Wm. H. McGuffey, LL. D 
George Junkin, D. D. 
William Burnett, 
George E. Pierce, D. D. 

D. B. Douglass, LL. D. 
.lonathan Going, D D. 
Joel H, Liiisley, D. D. 
Asa Mahan, A. M. 
Thomas J. Biggs, A. M. 
J. A. Elei, S.J. 

B. P. W. Aydelotte.D. D. 
Andrew Wylie, D. D. 

E. D. Mc Masters, D. D. 
Charles White, D. D. 
Matth. H. Simpson, D. D. 
J. P Bellier, 

Edward Beecher, D. D. 

Adiel Sherwood, 

John W. Merrill, A. M. 

Hiram H. Kellogg, 

J. Van de Velde, 

E. Cx Hutchinson, A. M. 

Hector JFigari, C. M. 

Hiram P. Goodrich, D. D. 

John H. Laihrop, A. M. 

J. H. FieldiiW, A. M. 

Archibald PaHerson, 

John P. Cleavelahd, A. M, 
Mr. Bowens. 



Foun- 
ded. 



1794 
1806 
1S07 
1830 
1798 
1819 
1H22 
18^ 
1825 
1830 
1836 
1837 
1821 
1809 
1S25 
182G 
1826 
183:2 
1832 
1834 
1819 
1840 

1827 

1829 
1833 
1839 
lf-^3 
1829 
1835 
18:34 
1837 
1832 
1840 
ie30 
1831 
1840 
18G9 

1837 

1839 



Remarks. 

The Colleges marked (*) are under the direction of the Baptists; thus (t) Episcopali- 
ans; thus (t) Methodists; thus {§) Catholics. With respect to the Colleges which are 
unmarked^ the prevailing religious influence of those thai are in the New England 
States is Congregationalism; of most of the others, Presbyterianism. 

By students in the above table, except a few of the Colleges in the Southern and 
Western States, is meant undergraduates, or members of the four collegiate classes ; 
not including such as are pursuing professional education, or such as are members of a 
preparatory department. 

Some of the Colleges above enumerated, are not in full operation ; and scarcely de- 
serve a place in the Table. According to the Census of 1840, there are in the U. Slates 
173 universities or colleges, containing 16,233 students. There are 3,242 academies and 
grammar schools, containing 164,159 students. It is evident, that the difference between 
a college and an academy is not very clearly defined, except that the former haa the 
exclusive right of granting degrees. 

The column of Libraries includes the number of volumes in the College Libraries and in 
the Students^ Libraries. 



1845.] 



C0LLSOS8. 



189 



UNITED STATES. (Continued.) 





Inst- 
ruct- 


No. of 
Alumni. 


No. of 
Minis- 


Stu- 
dents. 




ers. 
1 




ters. 




67 


110 




43 


68 


7 


316 




104 


69 


5 


40 




56 


70 


5 


8 


50 


100 


71 


7 


610 


3 


215 


72 


11 


150 




69 


73 


5 


143 




185 


74 


6 


60 




75 


75 


4 


82 




49 


76 


6 


20 


14 


132 


77 


8 






203 


78 


9 


21 




150 


79 


8 


140 


80 


166 


80 


6 


309 


7 


105 


81 


7 


84 




51 


«a 


10 


82 


23 


57 


83 


8 


115 


22 


67 


84 


5 






12 


85 


8 


21 




50 


86 


10 


8 




70 


87 


8 






84 


R8 


5 






50 


89 


6 




1 


20 


90 


6 


6 




59 


91 


5 






120 


92 


5 


12 




23 


93 


3 






70 


94 


7 






50 


95 


5 


43 


4 


54 


96 


6 


3 


2 


43 


97 


4 






47 


98 


4 






24 


99 


13 


10 




146 


100 


6 


8 


3 


19 


101 


5 








Itti 


5 


13 




45 


103 










104 


5 






85 


105 


2 






75 


lf« 


3 






(174 


107 


2 


7 




62 


106 


4 






30 



Volumes in 
Libraries. 



Commencement. 



1,000 
9,200 
3,307 
1,250 
4,500 
7,000 
4,000 
2,500 
1,050 
3,100 
1,200 
6,000 
2,500 
4,a52 
1,900 
6,247 
8,750 
3,000 
3,500 



800 
1,765 



2,000 



2,000 
1,000 



7,900 
6,400 
2,500 



I 



in Jive branch 
3,700 
3,000 



First Wednesday in October. 
First Wednesday in August. 

Third Wednesday in July. 

First August. 

Thursday after 3dWedMesday in Sept 

Thursday after 1st Wednesday in Aug 

First Wednesday in December. 

Last Thursday in June. 

Last Friday in September. 

Last week in July. 

First Wednesday in August. 

Second Thursday in August. 

Last Wednesday in September. 

Second Wednesday in August. 

First Wednesday in August. 

Second Wednesday in August. 

Last Wednesday in July. 

Last Monday in June. 



Last Wednesday in September. 
Second Wednesday in July. 

Last Wednesday in June. 
Fourth Thursday in July. 
Second Wednesday in October. 
Third Wednesday ui September. 
Third Tuesday in August. 
Last Thursday m July. 
Last Thursday in August. 
Last Thursday in September. 

Last weelftin August. 

es.) 

First Monday in October. 



Annual College Expenses. 



Name. 



Bowdoin, 

Dartmouth, 

Middlebury, 

Harvard, 

Williams, 

Amherst, 

Yale. 

Washington, 

Wesleyan, 

Hamilton, 

Geneva, 

New Jersey, 

Dickinson, 

TIniv. Virginia, 

Randolph Macon, 

William & Mary, 

Washington, Va. 

N. Carolina Univ. 

La Orange, Ala. 

Transylvania, 

Western Reserve 



Instruction. 



$24.00 
27.00 
20.00 
75.00 
3l).00 
33.00 
33.00 
33.00 
36.00 
26.00 
20.00 
40.00 
33.00 
75.00 
40.00 
70.00 
^.00 
60.00 
50.00 
40.00 
30.00 



Room-rent 
and other 
Col. Exp. 



$22.00 
13.24 
15.00 
15.00 
9.00 
15.00 
21.00 
19.50 
11.25 
15.50 
25.00 
20.00 
14.00 
23.00 
15.00 

12.00 
11.00 

12.00 
11.00 



Total 
College 
Charges. 



$46.00 
40.24 
35.00 
90.00 
39.00 
48.00 
54.00 
52.50 
47.25 
41.50 
45.00 
60.00 
47.00 
98.00 
45.00 
75.00 
42.00 
61.00 
50.00 
52.00 
41.00 



Board. 



39 weeks, $58.50 



38 
43 
40 
39 
40 
40 
39 
39 



do. 57.00 
do. 65.00 
do. 70to90.00 
do. 65.00 
do. 60.00 
do. 60to90.00 



do. 
do. 



38 or 39 do. 



40 
41 
43 
44 
41 
38 
43 
40 
41 
40 
42 



do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 



80.00 
58.50 
63.00 
80.00 
82.00 
75.25 

110.00 
77.00 

110.00 
80.00 
90.00 
90.00 

100.00 
50.00 



Wood, 

Lights, 

& Washing. 



$35.00 
9.00 



17.00 
20.00 

20.00 



25.00 
22.75 
20.00 
30.00 
20.00 
22.00 
20.00 
10.00 
25.00 
12.00 



190 UNITED STATES. [l845. 

The information exhibited in the preceding table has been derived from 
theoHicial statements contained in the Annual Catalogues of the several 
Colleges, mostly for the College years of 1812-3 and 1843-4. The sums 
are to be regarded as the average necessary expenses for the several ob- 
jects. The coUege chctrges, included in the first three columns, are subject 
to comparatively little variation ; but the other expenses are much more 
liable to change. With respect to several of the colleges, the expenses 
for washing, wood, and lights, are not mentioned. Other necessary 
expenses, not specified in the table, are such as relate to text-books, fur- 
niture of rooms, clothing, journeying, and pocket money, all of which 
vary according to circumstances, and the habits of individuals. 

Vacations in Colleges. 

Bowdoin. 1. Cora., 3 weeks; — 2. Friday aAer 3d Wed. Dec. 8 weeks; — 3. 

Friday after 3d Wed. May, 2 weeks. 
Walerville. 1. Com., 4 weeks ; —2. 2d Wed. Dec. 8 weeks ;— 3. Ist Wed. May, 

1 week. 
Dartmouth. 1. Com., 4 weeks; — 2. from near the 20th Nov. to near the lOlh of 

Jan. 7 weeks; — 3. Thursday preceding the last Wednesday, 

May, 2 1-2 weeks. 
Vermont Univ. 1. Com., 4 weeks ; — 2. 1st Wed. Dec. 8 weeks; — 3. 2d Wed. May, 

1 week. 

Middlebury. 1. Com., 4 weeks; — 2. last Wed. Nov. 1 week; — 3. 2d Wed. Feb. 

2 weeks ; — 4th. 3d Wed. May, 2 weeks. 

Harvard. 1. ( Two terms of 20 weeks each) from the end of the first terra, 

6 weeks ; — 2. from the end of the 2d term to Friday after Com- 
mencement, (4th Wed. Aug.) 6 weeks. 

Williams. 1. Com., 4 weeks; — 2. 3d Wed. Dec. 6 weeks;— 3. 1st Wed. May, 

3 weeks. 

Amherst. 1. Com., 4 weeks { — 2. from the Wednesday precedingc the annual 

State Thanksgiving, 6 weeks; — 3. 3d Wed. in April. 2 weeks. 
Holy Cross, 1. Last week in July, till Sept 15. 

Brown. 1. Dec. 14, 3 weeks, — 2. April 4, 4 weeks;— 3. July 25, till Com- 

mencement. 
Yale. 1. Com.. 6 weeks; — 2. 1st Wed. Jan. 2 weeks; — 3. last Wed. 

April, 4 weeks. 
Washington. 1. Com., 7 weeks, — 2. Thursday before Christmas, 2 weeks; — 3. 

'J'hursdav before 12th April, 4 weeks. 
Wesleyan Univ. 1. Com,, 4 weeks; — 2. Ist Wed. in Dec. 8 weeks ;— 3. 1st Wed in 

May 2 w^eeks. 
Columbia. 1. From August J, to the 1st Monday in October. 

Union. 1. Com., 6 weeks ; — 2. in Dec. 4 weeks ; — 3. m April, 4 weeks. 

Hamilton. 1. Com., 7 weeks; — 2. Dec. 4 weeks from Wed. before Christmas; 

— 3. 3d Wed. April, 4 weeks. 
Geneva. 1. Com., 6 weeks; — 2. from the Wednesday preceding Christmas, 

3 weeks ;-^ 3. from the next Wednesday to the middle of April, 

3 weeks. 
University of N.Y.I. Com., till 3d Wed. Sept. ; — 2. 2 weeks Sat. before Christmas; — 

3. 3 weeks 2d Mon. April. 
College of N. J. 1. Com., 6 weeks ; — 2. Christmas, 5 weeks. 
Rutgers. 1. Com., to Sept. 15 ; —2. Dec. 21 to Jan. 7 ;— April 7 to May 1. 

Penn. University. 1. Com., 6 weeks; —2. Dec. 2 weeks ; — 3. April, 2 weeks. 
Dickinson. 1. Cora, to the 15lh Sept. ; — a few days at Christmas, and near Uie 

1st of April. 
Jefferson. 1. Month of October; —2. Month of April. 

Washington. 1. Month of October ; — 2. Mouth of May. 

W. Univ.ofPenn.l. Christmas, 1 week; — 2. Months of July and August. 
St. Johns. 1. Good Friday, 10 davs ; —2. last Wed. in July to the Ist Monday in 

Sept. ; — 3. Dec. 23d to 1st Monday in Jan. 
St. Mary's. 1. Com. to the Ist Monday in Sept. 

Mt. St. Mary's. 1. July 1 to August 16. 
Georgetown. 1 Aug. 1 to Sept. 15. 

Columbian. 1. Com. to 1st Wed. Nov. ; — 2. 1st Wed. May to 1st Wed. July. 

William & Mary. 1. Com. (July 4) to 2d Monday in October 

Hamp Sidney. 1. From 4th Wed. Sept. to Ist Nov. ; — 2. 4th Thurs. April to Ist June. 
Washington. 1. Last Thurs. in June to 1st Sept. — A recess of 9 days at Christmai. 
Univ. Virginia. 1. July 4 to October 1st- 



1845.J 



MEDICAL SCHOOLS. 



191 



Univ. N. Carol. 1. Com., 6 weeks ; — 2. 4th Friday in Nov. 6 weeks. 

Cull. S. Caruliua.l. July 1 to the Ut Monday in October. 

Oglethorpe. 1. Com. to 1st Monday in Jan. ; — 2. ad Wed. of May, 4 weeks. 

U. of Alabama. 1. 4th Friday in July to isi Monday in Oct. ; — 2. Isi Monday of April, 

3 weeks. 
La Grange, Ala. 1. 2 terms, of 20 weeks from Ist Mon. iii July, and 21 weeks from 2d 

Mon. in January. Remainder of ihe year, vacation. 
Com., 3 inontlis, viz. July, August, and September. 
Com., 4 weeks ; 2. D«c. 20 to Jan. 10. 
Com. 5 1-2 weeks ; — 2. Isi Wed. April, 5 1-2 weeks. 
Com. to 22d Octol>er, 12 week». 
Com. to Isi .Monday in November. 
Com. to Thursday after 3d Wed. Oct.; — 2. after a session of 21 

weeks, 4 weeks. 
Com., 6 weeks ; — 2. in Feb. 21 weeks from 1st vacation, 4 weeks. 
Com. to the 1st of February. 
Com. 8 weeks; — 2. Christmas. 3 weeks. 
Com. to 1st Monday Oct. ; — 2. 10 or 12 days at Christmas ; — 3. 2d 

Thursday Mirch, 3 Wfeks. 
Cora., 6 weeks; — 2. 4ih Wed. Dec. 2 weeks;— 3. 3d Wed. 

April, 4 weeks. 
Last Thurs. in July till Ist Mon. in Oct. 
Com. to Isl Monday in Sept. — Only one vacation. 
Com., 10 weeks ; — 2. ending 2d Wed. March, 2 weeks. 
Com., 1 month ; — 2. Month of October. 
Com., 12 weeks. 

Com., 7 weeks; — 2. Christmas, 1 week; — 3. end of 2d terra, 
2 weeks. 

Knox Manual Labor. Two terms of 20 weeks each ; one beginning on the 3d Wed. 

of Sept., and the other on the 3d Wed. of February. 

Explanation. Vacations of Bo wdoin College; Ist^from Commencement's weeks; 
— 2</, from the Friday after the 3d Wednesday in December ^ 8 weeks ; — Sdjjrom the Friday 
after the 3c{ Wednesday in May^ 2 weeks. 



Mississippi. 




Ijouisiana. 




Nashville. 




E. Teiniessee. 




Transylvania. 




Centre. 




Augusta. 




Cumberland. 




Georgetown. 




Miami. 




West'n Reserve 


• X* 


Kenyon. 




CineiuMHti. 




Marietta. 




Indiana State. 




Illinois. 




Shurtleff. 





XIX. MEDICAL SCHOOLS. 




Manie Medical School, 
N. H. Medical School, 
Carieton Med. College, 
Vi. Medical College, 
Med. School Harv. Univ. 
Berkshiie Med. School, 
Med. Institut. Yale Coll. 
Coll. Phys & Surg. N. Y. 
Med. Instit. Geneva Coll. 
Med. Faculty Univ. N. Y. 
Albany Medical College, 
Me I. Dep. Univ. Penn. 
Jetferson Med. College. 
Med. Dep. Penn. Coll. 
Med. School Univ. Md. 
Washington Med. Coll. 
Med. School Colum. CoU. 
Med. School Univ. Va. 
Richmond Med. College. 
.Med. Coll. State of S.C. 
Med. College of Georgia, 
Med. Coll. of Louisiana, 
Med. Dep. Transyl.Univ. 
L..nuisville Med. Instit. 
.VIedical College of Ohio, 
Med. Dep. of Kemp. Col. 
Med. Col. Si. Louis Univ. 
Willoughby Med. Coll. 



Place. 



Brunswick, 

Hanover, 

Castlelon, 

Woodstock, 

Cambridge, 
iPittsfield, 

New Haven, 

New York, 

Geneva, 

New York, 
.Albany, 

Philadelphia, 
Do. 
Do. 

Baltimore, 
Do. 

Washington, 
I Charlottesville, 

Richmond, 
.Charleston, 
I Augusta, 
jNevv Orleans, 

Lexington, 
jLouisville, 

Cincinnati, 

St. Louis, Mo. 
Do. 

Wil loughby, 



Foun- 
ded. 

1820 


Prof. 


4 


1797 


6 


1818 


7 


1835 


7 


1782 


6 


1823 


5 


1810 


6 


1807 


8 


183.5 


7 


1837 


6 


1339 


8 


1765 


7 


1824 


7 


1839 


6 


1807 


6 


1827 


6 


1825 


6 


1825 


3 


1838 


6 


183:} 


8 


1&?0 


7 


1835 


7 


1818 


7 


ia37 


6 


1819 


8 


IPU 


9 


1636 


6 


1834 


5 J 



Stu 

~60 

80 

104 

94 

117 

10:3 

GO 

IH-i 

175 

323 

lOH 

42(5 

341 

60 

100 

25 

40 

45 

75 

15M 

115 

30 

214 

242, 

130| 

75| 
30 



Grad- 
uates. 



Lectures 
commence. 



464 
577 
555 
255 
547 
473 
709 
815 

53 
500 

38 

3,320* 

764 

I 

909 

81 

If 
124' 

1,351 

53 

331 

19 

57 



February ]5ih. 
Ist or 2d Th. Aug. 
4ih Thurs. in Aug. 
latThurs.in March. 
1st Wed. in Nov. 
1st Thurs. in Sept. 
6w.aft.3dTh.Aug 
l.st Monday in Nov. 
1st Tues. m Oct. 
La!»t Mon. in Oct. 
1st Tues. in Oct. 
1st Mon in Nov. 
1st Mon. in Nov. 
1st Mon. in Nov. 
October 31st. 
Ist Mon. in Nov. 
1st Moil, in Nov. 
1st Mon. in Oct. 
1st Mon. in Nov. 
yd Mon- in Nov. 
2d Mon. in Nov. 
3d Mon. in Nov. 
Isi Mon. in Nov. 
1st Mon. in Nov. 
Isl Mon. in Nov. 
Last week in Oct. 
1st Mon. in Nov. 
Last Mon. in Oct. 



* From 1791 to 18G8, inclusive. 



VMiTRC ST ma. 
XX. THEOLOGICAL SCHOOLS. 



XXL LAW SCHOOLS. 



Place. 


Name. 


Pcof. 


Smdenii. 


Carij.let'Pa^"''' 

^^';;s;^,^;SEio^ 


Harvard Univenily, 

Yale CJIepe, 

Law, Deparrmenl, N. Y. Univ. 

fvmlL'S'an'd'Mll^ College, 
Uiiiverairy of Vireiiiia, 

!n'rn'ns1a^K:„.i,y. 




•a 



Schools toi ihe study or law are much less frequented than (choots fat 
Ihe study of the other professions. The first institution of this nature, 
of mueh note, that was estahlished in the United Slates, nas (he Law 
School &t LitchSeld, in Connecticut, which bad, from 179S to 1627, 730 
■tudentij but it is now discontinued. 



1845.] 



RXLIGI0U8 DENOMINATIONS. 



193 



XXII. RELIGIOUS DENOMINATIONS. 

1. Protestant Episcopal Church. 
[From the " Churchman's Almanac."] 



Dioceses. 



Maine, 

N. Hampshire, 

Masj*achu4ens, 

Rhode Island, 

Vermont, 

Cuuneeticut, 

New York, 

We«tem N. Y., 

New Jersey, 

Pennsylvania, 

Dflaware, 

Maryland, 

Virriiiia, 

N. Carolina, 

S. Carolina, 

Georgia, 

Ohio, 

Kentucky, 

Tenne^see^ 

Mississippi, 

Arkansas, 

Louisiana, 

Alabama, 

Michigan, 

Illinois, 

Florida, 

!> ^ I Indiana, 

1^ .2 > Wiscon. 

25 Q ' Iowa, 

Missouri, 



Bishops. 



J P. K Henshnw, D. D. 
Carlton Chase, D. D. 
Manton Eastbuni, D. D. 
J. p. K. Henshaw, D. D. 
John H. Hi>pkins, D. D. 
Th. C. Browneli, D. D. 

B. T. Onderdonk, O. D. 
W. H. Df Lancey, D. D. 
George W. Doane, D. D. 

Vacanry. 
Alfred Lee, D. D. 
W. R. Whiitgham,D.D. 
Wm. Meade, D. D. 
Levi S. Ives, D. D. 
Chr. E. Gadsden. D. D. 
Stephen Elliott, D. D. 

C. P. Mc. Ilvaine, D. D. 
Beiij. B. Smith, D. D. 



James H. Otey, D. D. 



I Leonidas Polk, D. D. 

S. A. McCoskry, D. D. 
Philander Chase, D. D. 

/ Jackson Kemper, D. D. 



Cons. 



Act. 
1843 
1842 
1843 
1833 
819 
1830 
18.39 
1833 

1841 
1840 
1829 
1831 
1840 
1841 
1832 
1833 

1834 j 

1838 j 

1836 
1819 



1835 






7 

11 

48 

25 

28 

103 

201 

101 

49 

117 

1] 

96 

95 

30 

48 

17 

59 

22 

12 

14 

3 

7 

9 

23 

19 

4 

14 

8 

4 

16 



1,190 



Place and time of meeting 
of Conventions, 1844. 



July 10, Gardiner, 

June 26, Manchester. 

June 12, Boston. 

June 11, Newport. 

September 18, Manchester. 

June 11. 

September 25, New York. 

August 14. 

May 21, Newark. 

May 21, Philadelphia. 

May 29, Lewes. 

May 29, Baltimore. 

May 15, Lvnchburg 

May 22, Wa^hingum. 

February 17, Charleston. 

May 4, Savannah. 

September 12, Massillon. 

May 9. Covingtim. 

May 22, Nashville. 

Ma)r3. 

April 18, Natchitoches. 

May 2, Greensboro\ 

May .30, Flint. 

June 17, Edwardsville, 

January 6. 

June 7, Richmond. 



November 14, St. Louis. 



2. Roman Catholic Church. 

The first Catholic Bishop in the United States (John Carroll, D. D., 
of Baltimore) was consecrated in 1790. The Catholics increase rap* 
idly, mostly hy emigration from Europe. They have now 21 dio- 
ceses, 1 archhishop, 17 bishops, 8 bishops elect: and, according to 
the " Catholic Almanac " for 1S44, 611 churches and chapels, 461 stations, 
634 clergymen, 19 ecclesiastical seminaries, 261 clerical students, 16 
literary institutions for young men, 48 female academies, 60 charitable 
institutions, and 15 periodical publications *' devoted to the cause of 
Catholicity." 

Catholic Ecclesiastical Seminaries^ with the number of students, as 
stated in the "Catholic Almanac": — Philadelphia (30); Baltimore (16); 
Emtnitsburg (25); Charleston (9); Parish of Assumption, La. (8); Vin- 
cennes, (20); St. Louis, Mo. (14); St. Mary's, Barrens, Mo. (13); Rose 
Hill, N. Y. (31); Richmond, Va. (6); Nashville, Tenn. (4). 

17 



194 



UNITED STATES. 



[1845. 



Roman Catholic Church. 



Dioceses. 



Boston, 
Hartford, 
New York, 

Philadelphia, 

Pittsburg, 

Biiltiinore, 

Richmond, 

Chnrleston, 

Mobile, 

New Orleans, 

Natchez, 

Louisville, 

Nashville, 
Cincinnati, 
Vincnnnes, 
St. Louis, 
Chicnp-o, 
Little Rock, 

Detroit, 

Milwaukee, 
Dubuque, 




1 



( Maine, N. Harnpahire, Ver 
( montnnd Mas-sachusetts, 
Coniieclicut and R. Island, 

J New York and pait of New 
Jersey, 

j Part of Penn. and N. Jersey, 
( and Delaware, 

West. Dist. of Pennsylvania, 

Maryland and Dist. Columbia, 

Virginia, 

N. C, B. C, and Georgia, 

Alabama and Florida, 

Louisiana, 

Mississippi, 

Kentucky, 

Tonnessee, 

Ohio, 

Indiana, 

Missouri, 

Illinois, 

Arkansas, 

Michigan, 

Wisconsin Territory, 
Iowa Territory, 
Apost. Vic. — Oregon, 



i Benedict Fenwick, D. D. 
John Fiizpatrick, D.D.Coadj. 
William Tyler, D. D. 
( John Hughes, D. D. 
i John McCloskey, Cvadj, 

F. P. Kenrick, D. D., 

Michael O'Connor, D.D. 
Samuel Bccleston, D. D.,^bp. 
R. V. Whelan, D. D. 
Ignatius Reynolds, D. D. 
Michael Portior, D. D. 
Anthony Blanc, D. D. 
John J. fhanche, D. D. 
Benedict J. FlHget, D. D. 
6 J. Clinhrat, D. D., Coadj. 
Richiird P. Mileii, D. D. 
John B. Puicell, D. D. 
C. de la Hail indiere, D. D. 
Peter R. Kenrick, D. D. 
William Quarter, D. D. 
Andrew Byrne, D. D. 
Frederick R^s6 D. D. 
Peter P. L«fevrr, D D. Ceadj. 
J. M. Henni, V. G. 
Maithiiis Loras. D. D. 
F. N. Blanchet, 



27 

8 

01 

43 

20 
78 

9 
18 
18 
53 

7 

49 

6 
63 
37 
65 



15 

5 

12 

6 



634 



Statistics of the Roman Catholic Church throughout the World. 

[From the Metropolitan Catholic Almanac for 1844.] 
POPE GREGORY XVI., (mauro capkllari,) 

was bom at Belluno, in the Venetian States, 18th September, 1765 ; re- 
served ^' in petto" 21st March, 1S25; published Cardinal Priest, by th« 
title of St. Calixtus, 13th March, 1826; elected Pope, 2d February, 1631 ; 
consecrated bishop, and crowned, 6lh February following, being now 78 
years old. The present Pope is the 258th. Of these, one (Adrian IV., 
1154-1159) was an Englishman. 

The Sacred College consists of the following number of Cardinals : 

Created by Pius VII. — Bishops, 2; priests, 2; deacons, 1-5. Leo 
XTI. — Bishops, 4; priests, 5; deacon, 1-10. Gregory XVI. — Priests, 
40; deacons, 10-50. Total 65. Vacant hats, 5. Total of the Sacred 
College, 70. 

Of the Cardinals, the oldest is Card. Bussi ; the dean. Card. Pacca; 
and the youngest, the Card. Prince of Schwarzenberg. Of the whole 
body there are at 80 years of age, and upwards, 5 ; 70 do., 16 ; 60 do., 18 ; 
50 do., 14; 40 do., 9. 

During the reign of Gregory XVI. the deaths among the Cardinals 
amounted to 51. 



1845.] 



RELIGIOUS DENOMINATIONS. 



195 



The number of patriarchs in the church is 12; of archbishoprics and 
bishoprics, G&4: of coadjutors, auxiliaries, suffragans, &c., 95, as follows • 



Europe. 



States. 


Archb. 
2 


Biah'cs. 


Dioces's. 


Population. 


Albania and Epirus, 


4 


6 


88,788 


Austria, 


9 


24 


33 


15,555,916 


Baden, 


1 




1 


852,824 


Bavaria, 


2 


6 


8 


2,977.675 


Belgium, 


1 


5 


6 


4,217.750 


Cracovia, 




1 


1 


142,202 


France, 


15 


65 


SO 


31,000,000 


Greece, 


1 


3 


4 


22,900 


Hanover, 




2 


2 


216,758 


Hesse, Grand-duchy, 








203,632 


Hohenzollern Hechingen, 








21,000 


Hungary, 


3 


25 


28 


7,578,122 


Ireland, 


4 


23 


27 


7,500,000 


Ionian Islands, 


1 


1 


2 


2,630 


Islands of Archipelago, 




1 


1 


160 


Lombardy, Ven., 


2 


17 


19 


4,645,594 


Lucca, Duchy, 


1 




1 


168,198 


Malta and Gozo, 


1 




1 


109,000 


Modena, Duchy, 


2 


2 


4 


378,000 


Monaco, Principality, 








6,500 


Papal States, 


9 


59 


68 


2,732,436 


Parma, Duchy, 


2 


4 


6 


476,187 


Poland, Russian, 


1 


8 


9 


3,887,313 


Portugal, 


4 


17 


21 


3,549,420 


Prussia, 


2 


6 


8 


5,612,556 


Rhenish Provinces, 


1 


4 


5 




Russian Empire, 


2 


5 


7 


5,590,000 . 


San Marino, Republic, 








7,600 


Sardinia, 


7 


34 


41 


4,65).350 


Servia, 


1 




1 


10,000 


Spain, 


8 


51 


59 


12,286,941 


Switzerland 




4 


4 


S82 854 


Two Sicilies, 


22 


80 


102 


8,156,310 


Tuscany, 


3 


18 


21 


1,436,785 


Prim. Archb. Armenians, 


1 




1 


27,560 


Total in Europe, 


108 


469 


577 


124,903,961 


Total of BUf 


lopn'c*, 1 


with their 


Fopulat) 


ion. 


- 


Bishops 






Population. 


Europe, 


577 






124,993,961 


Asia, 


59 






1,155,618 


Africa, 


9 






757,751 


America, 


79 






25,819.210 


Oceanica, 


7 






3,050,000 


Grand total, 


731 






155,777,540 



196 



UNITED STATES. 



[1845. 



Missions. — Consistir^ of Vicariates and Pi-efectures. 



States. 


Vic. Apost 


Missionaries. 


Population. 


England, 


8 


624 


1,000,000 


Nassau, 






180,000 


Low Countries, 


5 


1,742 


1,304,890 


Gibraltar, 


1 


10 


13.000 


Sweden and Norway, 


1 


2 . 


2,000 


Denmark, 


1 


7 


3.000 


Scotland, 


3 


86 


100.000 


Saxony, 






*28,00O 


Saxe-Weinoar, 






10,174 


Wirtemburg, 






512,333 


Bukovina & Neoplanta, 


1 




14,000 


Italo- Greeks, 


3 


144 


30,000 


Constantinople, 


1 


46 


10,000 


Turkish Dalmatia, 




7 


7,206 


>foidavia and Walachia, 


2 


30 


64,000 


Bosnia, 


1 


106 


128,672 


Bulgaria, 


2 


12 


6.309 


Total, 


29 


2,816 


3,413,584 



* Besides this, is the German Confederacy, in which there are three Vicars Apostolic, 
and a Catholic population amounting to !2,0iS8,968. 



Europe, 

Asia, 

Africa, 

America, 

Oceanica, 

Total, 



Summary of Missions^ and their Population. 

Vicariates. Prefectures. Missionaries. 

29 2,816 

26 339 

5 7 112 

9 2 

2 



71 



9 



Population of the Catholic world, 



3,267 



Population. 
3,413,584 
1,577,000 
231,200 
1,380,300 
60,000 

5,662,084 



160,842,424 



3. Baptists. 

[From the Baptist Almanac for 1845.] 

Statistics of Baptist Sabbath Schools, 

The following is a partial sketch of Sabbath Schools. Connected with 
the New England Sabbath School Union, and throughout the New Eng- 
land States, are 

Schools. Scholars. Teachers. Volumes in Libraries;. 

694 59,359 7,253 121,852 

In 9 .Associations out of 42 in the State of New York, are returned on 
their minutes, 198 schools and bible classes, 2,115 teachers, 15,591 schol- 
ars, and 22,822 volumes in the libraries. 



1S45.1 



197 



The churches in the Hudson River Association for 1843, reported 6B3 
teachers, and 377 scholars thai profeased religion. 

East Jersey and New Jersey Associalions report 72 schools, 630 teach- 
ers, 4,016 BcholaiB, and B.SOS volumes. 

In Pennsylvania, 4 Assooiationa report 85 schools and hible classes, 
l,OCa teachers, S,0I7 scholars, and 16,113 volumes. The Philadelphia 
Association for 1S43, reports 108 scholars haptized. 

Maryland Union Association has 13 schools, 189 teachers, 1,264 schol- 
ars, and 2,462 volumes. 

The report of the Virginia Baptist Publication Society gives in that 
State an aggregate of 105 schools, 1,071 teachers, 5,227 scholars, 7,020 
volumes, and U2 conversions. 

The Chovan Association reports 10 schools, 110 teachers, and 605 
scholars. Sabbath Schools are planted in many of the churches in the 
Southern States. But very few of the Associations give returns. 

Getieral Svmmart/ of Baptists tn the Unitrd Suites. 





WTT^ 




Mii,i.. 












Cb's. 






Tolal. 




















Maine, . . . 
Ne«rlt:impahire, . 












io 














.■5 




Vennuiil, . 




yxi 


!J3 


















3U 






651 


Rlio.le Wand,' . . 












Xl 












tli 


3,4:01 




i.oie 


N««-y^rk,' : : 














l«:4SB 


New JtrMy, . 
















J'.UMjylvJm, . . 








« 


4^1)81 




alioa 
































6,n[ti 


^ulh CawliM' ■ ■ 


S 


4U7 


li" 


ST 


■iffH 


77 


t'^ 


Gffl>r)riii, . ' . '. 


as 


1? 


■lai 


101 


*m 


i 


li';i 


Al'abBma, .' .' '. 


14 


IM 


4! 


4,1S3 


a^ 




















" 


m 


■Hi 


*s 


»s 


« 


2,3*1 






SHU 






4,4'JS 






K^m^iky,'. . . 






um 




T;W4 




4,ais 












aim 




s^cna 


Ohio .''.'.'. 


as 


3«i 


s 


4ft 


4^«1 


i 


h;b40 


K\M/:sn, . 


9 










40 


J^ltO 






3i 








f 








M 










5-Jl 


T,.wlinih«U.iiie(ISmi« 




7,333 


T^ 


m 


8S,i34 






Anli-Missi^Bapti-l ih.. 




1,1107 






3,335 


U9;«e8 


g^MW 


Gramll^mLinU.Slwe^ 




8,230 


5,37S 


1,004 


(»>B 


707,943 


S3,441 


Teiai. ..." 












3SS 












95 


■iffa 










69 






■^-^ 


SK^JTI 




B-piiin in AinBri^.", ~ 


Sifl 


MyWl 


MJS" 


i,j^i 1 w,04a 


76V%4 


l«,410 



108 



VHITBD STATKB. 



Summary of Jtnti'BRttion BapHtt Jttsociationi. 



[1845. 



States. 


No. of 
Assucia- 

tiOHS. 


Ch'ches. 


Minis- 
ters. 


Licenses. 


Bap- 
tized. 


Total. 


All north of D. Col 

Virginia, 

North Carolina, , 

South Carolina, , 

Georgia, 

Alalmma, 

Louisiana, 

Mississippi, . 

Arkansas, 

Tennessee, . 

Kentucky, 

Missouri, . , 

litwa, . . , 

Illinois, . 

liiiiiana, 

Ohio, 


'■> 


10 

10 

10 

2 

15 



1 

4 

1 

26 

14 

11 

1 

15 

7 

11 


02 

94 
183 

n 

S38 

158 

4 

31 

10 

367 

161 

121 

10 

158 

119 

150 


60 
42 
80 

6 
79 
66 

2 
14 



179 

78 

67 

9 
80 
56 
62 


4 

6 

11 

8 

19 
9 
9 
2 
7 

11 
6 


113 
137 
230 
2 
416 
395 

64 

25 
645 

330 . 
300 
4 
321 
282 
172 


3,264 
5,102 
6,784 

250 

6,570 

6,421 

80 

604 

3€0 

13,824 

6,266 

4,424 

189 
4,159 
5,011 
4,155 


Total, 




147 


1,£07 


665 


88 


3,335 


69,G36 



Other Baptist Sectt in the United States. 

Six Principle Baptists. — 173d Anniversary, 1843. Churches, 17 ; Eld- 
ers, 22 ; added, chiefly by baptism, 397. Total, 3,055. These Baptists are 
chiefly in Rhode Island. 

Seventh Day Baptists. — These Baptists differ from the regular Baptists 
in no material feature, except in the strict observance of the seventh day, 
as we reckon time, instead of the first, or Lord's day. They are to be 
found chiefly in Rhode Island, New York, New Jersey, and a few churches 
in Pennsylvania, Virginia, and Ohio. They have a General Conference 
and four Associations, a Missionary Society, a Tract Society, and pub- 
lish a weekly paper. Churches, 59 ; Ministers, 46 ; Licentiates, 23 ; add- 
ed, (by baptisms, and by experience and letter,) 763. Total, 6,077. 

Free Will Baptists, 1843. — Yearly Meetings, 22; Quarterly Meetings, 
103; Churches, 1,165 ; Ministers, 771 ; Licentiates, 150. Baptisms in one 
year, 5,023. Total, 61,372. 

Church of Crod, (Baptists.) — Churches, 125; Ministers, (ordained or 
licensed,) 83; Communicants, 10,000; chiefly in Pennsylvania, Mary- 
land, and Ohio. 

Reformers, ( Campbellite Baptists.) — This class of Baptists have never 
published statistical tables of their numbers, except in two or three 
States. One of their order, in the " Original History of the Religious 
Denominations in the United States," estimates their numbers '* but little 
short of 200,000." On imperfect data, we estimate this class at 2,000 
Congregations, 1,500 Bishops, or Elders, and Evangelists, and 175,000 
Communicants. Their baptisms in one year probably equal 20,000. 

Christian Connection, (Unitarian Baptists,) 1842. — Conferences, 42; 
Churches, 650 , Preachers, 782 ; baptisms, 4,000. Total, 35,600. 



1845.] EELIGIOaS DENOMINATIONS. 199 

4. SUMMAET OF OTHEB ReLIGIOUS SeCTS IN THE TJnITED StaTES. 

Orthodox (hngregaiionalists^ in New England^ New Tork^ and the North' 
western States, 1843. — 1,420 churchei, 1,275 ministers, and 202,250 com- 
municants. 

Old School Presbyterians, 1844. — 2,156 churches, 1,523 ministers, 12,0S8 
additional in one year, and 166,487 communicants. 

New School Presbyterians, 1843. — Churches, 1,494; ministers, 1,263; ad- 
ditions in three years, 20,715; communicants, 120,645. 

Cumberland Presbyterians. — 570 churches, 300 preachers, and 60,000 
communicants. 

Associate Reformed, Reformed, and all other classes of Pre^ytericms.—' 
Churches, 530; ministers, 293 ; communicants, 45,500. 

Dutch Reformed, 1843. — Churches, 279; ministers, 271 ; communicants, 
31,214. " 

German Reformed, — Churches, 750; ministers, 191; communicants, 
75,000. 

Eioangelical Lutherans. — Churches, 1,232; ministers, 501; communi- 
cants, 146,300. 

Protestant Episcopal Church, 1843. — 1,254 clergymen, 1,232 churches, 
70,000 communicants. 

Moravians. — Churches, 22; ministers, 24 ; members, 6,600. 

Methodist Episcopal Church, 1843. — Conferences, 32 ; travelling preach- 
ers, 4,147 ; local preachers, 8,298 ; members of society, 1,157,249. 

Methodist Protestant Church, 1843. — 22 conferences, 1,300 travelling and 
local preachers, and 60,000 members. 

Reformed Methodist Church. — Conferences, 5; preachers, 75; members, 
3,000. 

TVesleyan Methodist Church. — 6 Conferences, 300 travelling and 300 
local preachers, and 20,000 members. 

United Brethren, (German Methodists.) — Conferences, 9 ; bishops, 3 ; 
circuits, 120; churches, 1,800; preachers, 500; members, 15,000. 

Evangelical Association, ( Germans, called Albrights ) — 250 preachers, 
600 congregations, and 15,000 members. 

Mmnonites. — 250 ministers, 400 congregations, and 58,000 members. 

Reformed Msnnonites. — They have a number of churches in Pennsylva- 
nia, New York, Ohio, and Indiana, all of which have pastors and deacons. 
For their numbers, see 2 Samuel, xxiv. 1. 

Unitarian CongregationcUists, — Churches, 300; ministers, 250; mem- 
bers, 30,000. 

Universalists in United States. — 1 General Convention, 13 State Conven- 
tions, 62 District Associations, 918 Societies, 576 meeting-houses, and 
about 500 preachers. 

New Jerusalem CAurcA, ( Swedenborgians.) — 42 churches, 30 ministers, 
and 5,000 members. 



200 



UNITED STATES. 



[1845. 



XXIII. POPULATION OF THE UNITED STATES. 
According to the Six Enumerations, From the Official Revision. 



States. 


1790 


ISOO 


1810 


1820 


1830 


1840 


Maine, .... 


96,540 


151,719 


228,705 


2<)8,335 


399,955 


501,793 


New Hampshire, 


141, 8tn) 


18:J,762 


214,:360 


244,161 


269,:328 


284,574 


Vermont, . . . 


85,416 


154,465 


217,713 


235,764 


280,652 


291,948 


INlassachusetts, . 


378,717 


42:3,245 


472,040 


52:3,287 


610,408 


737,699 


Rhode Island, . 


69,110 


69,122 


77,o:ji 


8:?,f)59 


97,199 


108,8:30 


Comiecticut, . . 


238,141 


251,002 


262,042 


275,202 


297,665 


309,978 


New York, . . 


340,120 


586,756 


959,949 


1,372,812 


1,918,608 


2,428,921 


New Jersey, . , 


184,139 


211,949 


249,555 


277,575 


320,823 


373,: 03 


Pennsylvania, . 


434,373 


602,3(>5 


810,091 


1,049,458 


1,348,233 


1,724,0:33 


Delaware, . . . 


59.0i)8 


64,273 


72,674 


72,749 


76,748 


78,085 


Maryland, . . . 


319,728 


341,548 


380,546 


407..350 


447,040 


470,019 


Virghiia, . . . 


748,:]08 


880,200 


974,642 


1,065,379 


1,211,405 


1,239,797 


North Carolina, . 


39:3,751 


478,10ri 


555,500 


6:38,829 


737,987 


753,419 


S.>nth Carolina, . 


249,073 


345,591 


415,115 


602,741 


581.185 


594,398 


(jeorgia, . . . 


82,548 


162,101 


252,4;i:i 


340,987 


516,823 


691,:392 


Alabama, . . . 






20,845 


127.<>01 


309,527 


590,756 


Vtississippi, . . 




8,850 


40yi5-2 


75,448 


1:36,621 


375,651 


Louisiana, . . . 






76,556 


15;},407 


215,739 


352,411 


Arkansas, . . . 






«•••••••■■ 


14,27:3 


r0,:i88 


97,574 


^Pennessee, . . . 


30,791 


105,602 


261,727 


422,813 


681,904 


82J},210 


iCb^itucky, . . . 


73,077 


220.r55 


4(K),51 ] 


564,317 


687,917 


779,828 


Ohit^ 

Michigan, . . . 
Indiana, .... 




45,365 


230,760 

4,762 

24,520 


581,434 

^ 896 


937,903 

31,639 

343,031 


1,519,467 
212.267 
685:866 




4,87C 


147,iV8 


Illinois, .... 






12.28:.' 


55,211 


157,455 


476,183 


\Iissouri, . . . 






20,84.'5 


66,586 


140,445 


383,702 


Dist. Columbia, . 
H'lorida, .... 
Wisconsin, . . 
■owa, .... 




14 OOT 


24,023 


33 0G9 


39,834 
34,7:^0 


43,712 
54,477 
30,945 
43,112 


















Totnl, . . . 


3.0-X>.9.>7 


/S.-^O^.O'V 


- '>P0.Q14 


9.6:^8,131 


19.8B6.9t?0i 17,063,.353 



XXIV. SLAVES IN THE UJflTED STATES. 



Stales. 


1790 1800 


1810 


18',20 


1830 


1840 


Maine, .... 
New Hampshire, 
Vermont, . . . 
Massachusetts, . 
Rhode Island, . 
Connecticut, . . 
New York, . . 
New Jerseyj . . 
Pennsylvaiua, . 
Delaware, . . . 
Maryland, . . . 
Virginia, . . . 
Nonh Carolina, . 
South Carolina, . 
Georgia, . . . 
Alabama, . . . 
Mississippi, . . 
Louisiana, . . . 
Arkansas, . . 
Tenne.<3ee, . . 
Kentucky, . . 

Ohio, 

Michigan, . . . 
Indiana, .... 
Illinois, . . ■. 
Missouri, . . . 
Dial. Columbia, . 

Florida 

Wisctmsin, . . 
Iowa, 




158 

17 



952 

2,759 

21,324 

11,423 

3,737 

8,887 

103,0:36 

203,427 

100,572 

107.094 

29;264 




8 





381 

951 

20,34:3 

12,422 

1,701) 

6,153 

105,6:35 

345,796 

13:3,296 

146,151 

59,404 

3,489 










103 

310 

15,017 

10,851 

795 

4,177 

111,502 

392,518 

168,824 

196,:365 

105,218 

17,088 
34,660 










48 

97 

10,088 

7,(>57 

211 

4,509 

107.:398 

425.'15:3 

295;017 

258.475 

149,656 

41,879 

32,814 

69,064 

1,617 

80,107 

126,732 










17 

25 

75 

2,254 

403 

3,292 

102,294 

469,757 

2:35,601 

315,401 

217,531 

117,549 

65,659 

100,588 

4,576 

141,6(0 

165,213 



32 


#747 

25,081 

6,119 

15,501 



1 


5 
17 
4 
674 
64 
2,605 
89,7:37 
448,987 
245,817 
327,0:38 
280,944 
253,532 
195,211 
168,452 
19,935 
183,059 
182,258 
3 

3 
.331 
58,240 
4,094 
25,717 
11 
lii 


3,417 
11,830 


13,584 
40,343 

135 


44,536 
80,561 

24 

237 

168 

3,011 

6,395 


190 

fl7 

10,222 

6,:i77 




3,244 


* " ! 


1 




1 


'f<.tr.l. . . . 


()9:.P07 


RO^.OIll 


1.191.^' 4 


1 'fJW <>;/<' .-»•». /.. I . 


■ • - o<^ 



• Not sldve.s, but " indented colored ., i . uiiis. 



•5 



INDIVIDUAL STATES. 



I. MAINE. 



Government. 



Hugh J. Anderson, of Belfast, Governor^ (term of office expires 

on the 1st Wednesday in Jan., 1846,) 
Philip C. Johnson, of Augusta, 



James White, 
Alfred Redington, 
Levi Bradley, 
Benjamin Carr, 
Isaac Ray, 
Nathaniel Mitchell, 
Alphens Lyon, 
David Dunn, 
Wm. T. Johnson, 
John W. Dana, 
Jeremiah Haskett, 



of Belfast, 
of Augusta, 
of Charleston, 
of Palermo, 
of Augusta, 
of Portland, 
of Waterville 
of Poland, 

of Fryeburg, 



,) 



Secretary of State, 

jyeasttrer^ 

AdjiUant Crenertd, 

Land Agent, 

Warden of State Prison, 

SupH of Insane Hospital, 

Bank Commissioners^ 

Speaker of the Howe, 
Clerk of do* 

President of the Senate, 
Clerk of do. 



Salary. 

$1,500 
900 
900 
700 
1,000 
700 
800 



Kzekiel Whitman, 
Ether Shepley, 
John S. Tenney, 
Otis L. Bridges, 
John Shepley, 



Judiciary. 

Supreme Judicial Cburt. 

of Portland, Chief Justice^ 

of Portland, Justice, 
of Norridgewock, do, 

of Calais, Jlttomey 

of Saco, Reporter, 

District Courts. 



Daniel Goodenow, of Alfred, West. Dist. 

Asa Redington, Jr., of Augusta, Mid. do. 
Frederick H. Allen, of Bangor, East. do. 

Municipal and Police Courts, 

Luther Fitch, of Portland, 

Ebenezer Clap, of Bath, 

Gustavus G. Cushman, of Bangor, 



tiCty 


$1,800 




1,800 




1,800 


rtneral, 


1,000 




1,000 


Judge, 


1,200 


do. 


1,200 


do. 


1,200 


Judge, 


700 


do. 




do. 


500 



202 



MAINE. 



[1845. 



Probate Courts. 



Counties. 



Judges. 



Residence. 



YorJc, 

Cuuit)erland, 
Lincoln, 
do. E. Dist. 
Hancock, 
Wusliiiigton, 
Kennebec, 
Oxford, 
Somerset, 
I'enobscot, 
Waldo, 
Franklin, 
Piscataquis, 
Aroostook, 



Win. A. Hayes, 
Barrett Poller, , 
Nath'l Groton, 
Joel Miller, 
Suin'l M. Pond, 
J. C. Talbot, 
Wm. Emmons, 
liVman Rawson, 
Charles Greene, 
iSamuel Cony, 
Jona. Thayer, 
Thomas Parker, 
Kleaz.W.Snow, 
S. G. Tuck, 



S. Berwick, 

Portland, 

Bath, 

Thomaston, 

Buckrifiort, 

K. Machias, 

Hallo we 11, 

Rumford, 

Athens, 

Orono, 

Camden, 

Farmington, 

Atkinson,, 

HaynesviUe, 



Sal- 
ary. 

$300 
400 
300 
100 
200 
250 
300 
2<K) 
130 
275 
1.50 
UKJ 
75 
100 



Registers. 



I 



j Wni. Hammond, 
I John Appleton, 
I GvQ. W. Nichols, 
I Heder Fales, 
J. D. Richards, 
Allien G. Lane, 
Fran. Davis, Jr., 
Geo F. Emery, 
Thos. C. .Tones, 
John Williams, 
Charles Palmer, 
Sevvall Cram, 
I Eben. S. Greely, 
Samuel Gooch, 



Residence. 



Eliot, 
I Portland, 
Wiscasaet, 
jTliomasiou, 
|Ells^vo^th, 
I Machias, 
'Augusta, 
I Paris, 

Ni»rridgew'k 
Bang^or, 
Belfast, 
New Sharon 
Dover, 
Uoulton, 



Sal- 
ary. 

liU>50 
900 
500 
150 
300 
400 
550 
350 
300 
550 
3001 
150{ 
125 
125 



Finances. 
[Extracted from the Report of the State Treasurer, Dec. 31, 1843. 



Total amount received by the Slate in 1843, 
Total amount expended by the State in 1843, 

Balance in the Treasury, January 1, 1844, 

Principal Items of Expenditure, 

Salaries of Exectitive officers, 

Miscellaneous expenses of Executive, 

Salaries and incidental expenses of the Judiciary, 

Pay of the Legislature, 

Interest on the State Debt, 

Costs in criminal prosecutions, 

Common Schools, 

Education of indigent deaf, dumb, and blind persons, 

Miscellaneous, 

Public debt paid off, ... 

Gratuities to Agricultural Societies, 

Stale Prison, .... 

Insane Hospital, . ; 

Printing, Binding, and Stationery, 

Militia Pensions, 

Militia, .... 

Indian Tribes, 

Chief Sources of Income. 



$739,516 43 
350,920 54 

388,595 88 



$13,750 25 
6,781 35 
17,874 75 
32,081 40 
100,344 24 
15,104 34 
29,115 46 
3,891 68 
25,473 60 
61,931 45 
1.391 00 
2,325 34 
1,787 07 
11,089 70 
1,748 00 
20.792 34 
5,438 57 



Land Office, .... 

Direct taxes, .... 

Bank tax, .... 

Balance from 1842, .... 

Miscellaneous, .... 

From the United States, on account of expenses on N. E. Boun 

dary, and Treaty stipulation, . . 433,721 52 

$1,663,431 22 



$55,636 65 

208,688 12 

27,823 56 

7,967 92 

5,478 65 



Whole amount of State Debt, 
Annual interest on this debt. 



98,771 90 



1845.] 



NEW HAMPSHIRE. 



203 



Condition op the Banks, June, 1844. 
There are 35 Banks in the State. 



Capital Stock, $3,009,000 00 

Bills in circulation, 1,602,327 00 
Net profits on hand, 117,342 78 

Due other hanks, 76,793 06 

Deposits not on interest, 887,170 34 
Deposits bearing interest, 143,381 69 



Total due from Banks, 5,836,014 87 



Gold, silver, &c., $224,106 85 

Real Estate, 254,055 80 

Bills of other Banks, 139,361 32 
Due from other Banks, 551,986 65 
Notes discounted, &c., 4,666,503 45 



Total resources, 5,836,014 07 

Last semi-ann. dividend, 90,295 00 



Common Schools. — The v^^hole nuraher of persons in the State, he- 
tween the ages of 4 and 21 years, as returned to the Secretary of State's 
office for 1843, is 214,353; and School fund No. 11, as apportioned by the 
Stale Treasurer, is at the rale of 13 cents to each child. In addition to 
this, the several cities, towns, and plantations are required by statute to 
raise by direct taxation a sum not less than 40 cents for each inhabitant. 

Mit-iTT A. — An important change has been recently made in the militia 
system of this Slate. 

By an Act of the Legislature passed March 22, 1844, the enrolled 
militia are made subject to no active duty whatever} except for the choice 
of officers, or in case of insurrection, war, invasion, or to prevent inva- 
sion, or other public danger, or emergency ; in which case, the governor 
and commander-in-chief is authorized and required to order out, from time 
to time, by draft or otherwise, as many of the militia as the necessity 
of the case may require. 

The enrollf^d militia consists, with the usual exemptions, of all able- 
bodied while male citizens, from 18 to 45 years of age. 



n. NEW HAMPSHIRE. 



Government. 



For the Year ending on the first Wednesday of June^ 1845. 



John H. Steele, of Peterborough, 

Thomas P. Treadwell, of Concord, 

Henry S. Rand, of Portsmouth, 

John Atwood, of Concord, 

Charles H. Peaslee, of Concord, 



Salary. 
Governor, $1,000 

Secretary of State, 800 

Deputy Sec. of State, Fees. 
Treasurer, 600 

Adjutant General, 400 



204 KBW HAMPSHI&K. [1845. 

Timothy Hoskins, of Westmoreland, President of the Senate, 

Harry Hibbard, of Bath, Speaker of the House. 

Moody Currier, of Manchester, Clerk of the Senate. 

Eocecutive Council. 

Coonties. Coancillon. 

(Rockingham and part )„,..,_ ^ ^ ^, 

of Merrimack, ] ^^'^'■^ ^ C"""> "^ N'^*""- 

f Strafford, Belknap, ) • . „ ^, .. , t 
1 and Carroll, j Jos.ah Barflett, of Lee. 

Hillsborough and part ) 

of Merrimack, ] William Parker, of Francistown. 

Cheshire and Sullivan, Francis Holbrook, of Surry. 
Grafton and Coos, Caleh Blodgett, of Canaan. 



1st District, 


2d 


do. 


3d 


do. 


4th 


do. 


5th 


do. 



{ 



The Governor, Executive Council, Senate, and House of Representa- 
tives, are elected annually on the 2d Tuesday of March ; the official year 
commencing on the 1st Wednesday in June. The State'is divided into 
five Districts for the choice of Councillors ; and again divided into tu^elve 
Districts for the choice of Senators; the number composing these two 
bodies helng« limited hy the Constitution, while the number of Represen- 
tatives is unlimited — every town possessing 150 ratable male inhabitants 
being entitled to one Representative, and one for each additional 300. 

Judiciary. 

The Superior Court of Judicature consists of a chief justice and two 
associate justices, who hold one term annually in each of the ten coun- 
ties of the State, for the hearing and determining questions of law, &c. 
This Courtis also vested with Chancery jurisdiction for certain purposes. 

The judges of the Superior Court of Judicature are, ea: q^cio, judges of 
the Court of Common Pleas. This Court, before whom all actions for 
the recovery of debts and the enforcement of contracts, and all jury trials 
are brought, consists of one of the justices of the Superior court, who 
sits as chief justice of the Court of Common Pleas, and of two county 
judges, generally appointed from among the yeomanry, whose principal 
duty it is to attend to the ordinary business of the county, its roads, ex- 
penses, &c. Terms are held semi-annually, in each of the counties. 

Superior Court. 

Appointed. Salary, 
Joel Parker, of Keene, Chief Justice, 1S38 $1,400 

Andrew S. Woods, of Bath, Associate Justice, 1840 1,200 

John J. Gilchrist, of Charlestown, do. 1840 1,200 



1845.] 



»BW BAMFSHIRS* 



205 



Circuit Court. 



Charies F. Gove, of Nashville, 
Ira A. Eastman, of Gilmanton, 
Lyman B. Walker, of Concord, 



Appointed. Salary. 

1843 1,200 

1843 1,200 

Attorney General^ 1843 1,200 



Judget of the Court of Common Pleat. 



Coanties. 


Justices. 


Residence 


Salary. 


Rockingham, 

Strafford, 

Belknap, 

Carroll, 

Merrimack, 

Hillsborough, 

Cheshire, 

Sullivan, 

Grafton, 

Coos, 


( Bradbury Bartlett, 
( James Pickering, 
{ George L. Whitehouse, 
1 Hiram R. Roberts, 
( Thomas Cogswell, 
( Henry Y. Simpson, 
( Nathaniel Rogers, 
I Thomas P. Drake, 
{ Benjamin Wadleigh, 
I Aaron Whittemore, 
( Jacob Whittemore, 
I Jesse Carr, 
( Horace Chapin, 
1 Nathan G. Babbitt, 
\ Ambrose Cossit, 
( Eleazer Jackson, 
( David C. Churchill, 
1 Nathaniel S. Berry, 
j Joshua Marshall, 
1 Richard Eastman, 


Nottingham, 

Newington, 

Farmington, 

Somersworth, 

Gilmanton, 

New Hampton, 

Wolfebo rough, 

Effingham, 

Sutton, 

Pembroke, 

Antrim, 

Goffstown, 

Winchester, 

Westmoreland, 

Claremont, 

Cornish, 

Lyme, 

Bristol, 

Stratford, 

Lancaster, 


$3 per day during attendance at Court, and 
10 cents per mile for travel. 



Courtt of Probate. 



Counties. 


Judges. 


Salary. 


Registers. 


Salary. 


Rockingham, 


John Sullivan, 


$334 


David A. Gregg, 


$462 


Strafford, 


Benning W. Jenness, 


167 


Enoch Berry, 


233 


Belknap, 


Warren Lovell, 


142 


Jeremiah ELkins, 


1S3 


Carroll, 


Jonathan T. Chase, 


142 


Obed Hall, 


183 


Merrimack, 


Horace Chase, 


245 


Joseph Robinson, 


345 


Hillsborough, 


Luke Woodbury, 


276 


Samuel N. Patlee, 


383 


Cheshire, 


Larkin Baker, 


225 


Elijah Sawyer, 


300 


Sullivan, 


John L. Putnam, 


175 


Uriel Dean, 


225 


Grafton, 


Walter Blair, 


275 


Samuel Swasey, 


380 


Coos, 


Benj. Hunking, 


100 


George A. Cossit, 


125 



State Peison. 

Samuel G. Berry, Warden^ William Berry, Deputy Warden, Rev. John 
Atwood, Chaplain, Ezra Carter, M. D., Phygkian. 

18 



206 



▼SKMOIVT. 



fl845. 



Finances. 
[From a Report to the Leg^slatare, Jane 13, 1844.] 

Receiptt, 



Balance in the Treasury, June 7, 1843, 

Temporary loans, 

From sundry individuals, 

From railroad tax, 

State tax payable in 1S42 and 1843, 

Total, 
Amount in Treasury, June 5, 1844, 

ExpendUures, 

Salaries of Executive and Judiciary, 

Members of the Legislature, 

Loans repaid, 

To several towns, from railroad tax, 

For deaf mutes and the blind, 

Military appropriations, 

New Hampshire Law Reports, 

State Printers, 

Orders by the Legislature, 

Miscellaneous, 

Total, 



$5,960 80 
40,000 00 
1,086 95 
10,160 00 
59,408 44 



116,616 


19 


7,249 


57 


18,792 46 


15,444 


80 


55,673 


86 


4,949 68 


1,950 


00 


3,080 


58 


2,063 


71 


1,643 


65 


3,993 69 


1,773 


99 



109,366 62 



ra. VERMONT. 



William Slads, 
Horace Eaton, 
John Spalding, 
Jas. McM. Shafter, 
Ferrand F. Merrill} 
Henry Hale, 
David Pierce, 
DeWltt C. Clarke, 
Ferrand F. Merrill, 
Gustav. H. Loomis, 
Chipman Swain, 
F. W. Hopkins, 
Thomas Kidder, 



Government. 

Salary, 
of Middlebury, Governor, (term ends Oct 1845,) $750 
of Enosburg, Lieut- Gov. 4r iVes. Sen^ pay, $4 a day. 
of Montpelier, TVeosiirer, 500 

of Burlington, Secretary of State, 275 

of Montpelier, Deputy ^Jlclimg Sec, of State. 
of Burlington, Sec'y CivU ^ Military Affaire, 200 

of Woodstock, Auditor y 150 

of Brandon, Secretary of the Senate, 250 

of Montpelier, CUrk of the Houte of Rep,, 400 

of Montpelier, State Librarian, 100 

of Windsor, Superintendent of State Prieon, 500 
of Rutland, Adjutant Sf Inspector General, 150 
of Windsor, Chaplain of State iVt«on, 400 



1845.] 



VSRMONT. 



807 



The Senate, estabUshed in 1836| consists of 30 xnembeis ; each coanty 
being entitled to at least one, and the rest being apportioned according to 
population ; and the House of Representatives is coHiposed of about 230 
members, one member from each town. Pay of the members of each 
House, $1.50 a day, during the session of the legislature. 



Charles K. WilUamt, 
Stephen Royce, 
Isaac F. Redfleld, 
Milo L. Bennett, 
William Hebard, 
William Slade, 



Judiciary 


• 


Supreme Court, 


of Rutland, 


. Chief Juetictf 


of St. Albans, 


Associate Judge, 


of Montpelier, 


do. 


of Burlington, 


do. 


of Randolph, 


do. 


of Middlebury, 


Reporter^ 


County Officers. 



Salary. 
$1,375 

1,375 

1,375 

1,375 

1,375 

450 



Cotmties. 



Assistant Judges. 



Benningto-n, 

Windham, 

Rutland, 

Windsor, 

Addison, 

Orange, 

Chittenden, 

Washington, 

Caledonia, 

Grand Isle, 

Franklin, 

Lamoille, 

Orleans, 

Essex, 



Benj. F. Olin, 
John H. Sanderson, 
John Smith, 
Eraery Wheeloek, 
Zimri Howe, 
Ezra Jnne, 
David Peirce. 
Reuben Wasnbum, 
Calvin Solace, 
Fordyce Huntmgton, 
Martin Flint, 
Tappan Stevens, 
John Van Sicklen, 
John Allen, 
Charles Sampson, 
Sheffield Hayward, Jr., 
Calvin Momll, 
James Gilchrist, 
Samuel Adams, 
Ira Hill, 
Augustus Burt, 
James Davis, 
John Warner, 
Calvin Burnett, 
David M. Camp, 
Alvah R. French, 
Geor^ E. Holmes, 
Martin French, 



State Attorneys. 



A. L. Miner, 
John Kimball, 
WilUam C. Kittridge, 
Sewall FuUam, 
Ozias Seymour, 
Jefferson P. Kidder, 
Henry Leavenworth, 
Oramel H. Smith, 
Bliss N. Davis, 
Frederick Hazen, 
William C. Wilson, 
Wm. H. H. Bingham, 
John H. Kimball, 
Wm. Heywood, Jr., 



Clerks. 



Sam't U. Blaekmer. 
Marshal Miller. 
Fred. W. Hopkins. 
Norman Williams. 
Samuel Swift. 
Calvin Blodget. 
Henry B. Stacy. 
Daniel P. Thompson. 
Samuel B. Mattocks. 
Joel Allen. 
Joseph H. Brainard. 
Philo O Camp. 
Henry M. Bates. 
Allen Gould. 



The Judiciary powers are vested in a Supreme Court, consisting of five 
judges ; in County Courts, or Courts of Common Pleas, comprising five 
circuits, each County Court being composed of one judge of the Supreme 
Court, who is, ex o^cio, chief justice of the County Courts of his circuit, 
and two assistant judges for each county ; and in justices of the peace ; 
all the judges and justices being chosen annually by the Legislature. 



208 MA8SACHT78ITTS. [1845. 

The Supreme Court sits once, and the County Courts twice, a year 
in each county. Each judge of the Supreme Court is chancellor of a 
circuit. The Court of Chancery has two stated sessions annually in 
each county. An appeal from the decree of the chancellor lies to the 
Supreme Court. 

Common Schools. — There is an accumulating State School Fund 
of 200,234 95, which is not at present appropriated. 

An annual tax is assessed for the support of Common Schools, of nine 
cents on the dollar, which amounts to ahout $70,000. A part of the in- 
terest accruing upon the U. S. deposit money, amounting to about $20,000, 
also goes to their support. The whole control of the Schools is left to 
the School Districts, and all expenses are paid by taxes upon their respec- 
tive inhabitants, with the aid of the above-named tax and deposit money. 

Vermont Asylum for the Insane, Brattleboro.' 

William H. Rockwell, M. D., Superintendent and I%ysician; Doctor 
Samuel B. Low, Assistant PhysiciaM; Mrs. Ann F. Wilkinson, Matron, 
In the last year, 224 patients have enjoyed the advantages of the institu- 
tion. Of these, 88 have been discharged, leaving 136 patients on the 1st 
of October, 1843. 

Of the recent cases, 87)^ per centhave recovered, while of the chronic, 
or old cases, only 333^ per cent, have recovered. The terms are fixed at 
$2 per week, or $100 per year, if the patient remain so long. 



IV. MASSACHUSETTS. 
Government. 

For the Year ending on the 1st Wednesday in Jamuary^ 1845. 

Salary. 
George N. Briggs, of Pittsfield, Chvernor, $2,500 

John Reed, of Yarmouth, Lieutenant- Governor^ $4 a day. 

John G. Palfrey, of Cambridge, Sec, of the CommonweaUhj 1,600 

Thomas Russell, of Plymouth, DreaMtrer and Receiver Gen., 1,600 

James F. Boyd, of Charlestown, Adjutant Creneral and Keeper 

of Military Stores^ 1,500 

William Tufts, 1st Clerk, Sec. of State's Office, 1,000 

Joseph Foster, 1st Clerk, Treaswrer's Office, 1,000 



isis:] 



KAMA CB USX ITS. 



809 



Salary. 
Horace Mann, of Boston, Sec, of the Board of Education, 1,500 

Josiah Quincy, Jr., of Boston, Pretident of the SeruUe. 
Thomas Kinnicutt, of Worcester, Speaker of the Houee ofBep, 
Charles Calhoun, of Boston,^ Clerk of the Senate, $8 per day. 

Charles W. Storey, Jr., of Boston, Clerk qf the House, $8 per day. 





JUDICIAET. 










Supreme Judicial Court. 








Lemuel Shaw, 


of Boston, 


Chief Justice, 






$3,500 


Samuel S. Wilde, 


of Boston, 


Justice, 






3,000 


Charles A. Dewey, 


of Northampton, 


do. 






3,000 


Samuel Hubbard, 


of Boston, 


do. 






3,000 


Theron Metcalf, 


of Dedham, 


Reporter, 






300 


Asahel Huntington, 


of Salem, 


District Forney, 


N. 


Dist. 700 


John H. Clifford, 


of New Bedford, 


do. 




S. 


do. 700 


Ezra Wilkinson, 


of Dedham, 


do. 




Mid. do. 700 


William Porter, Jr., 


of Lee, 


do. 




W. 


do. 700 


Samuel D. Parker, 


of Boston, 


Attomeu, 


Co. 


Suffolk, 1,500 



Cowrt of Common Pleas. 



Daniel Wells, of Greenfield, 

Emery Washburn, of Worcester, 

Joshua H. Ward, of Salem, 

Charles Allen, of Worcester, 

Pliny Merrick, of Worcester, 



Chief Juttice, 
Associate Justice, 

do. 

do. 

do. 



1,800 
1,700 
1,700 
1,700 
1,700 



Probate Courts, 



Counties. 


Judges. 


Salary. 


B«gister8. 


Salary. 


Barnstable, 

Berkshire, 

Bristol, 

Dukes, 

Essex, 

Franklin, 

Hampden, 

Hampshire, 

Middlesex, 

Nantucket, 

Norfolk, 

Plymouth, 

Suffolk, 

Worcester, 


Nymphas Marston, 
Wm. P. Walker, 
Oliver Prescott, 
Theod. G. Mayhew, 
Daniel A. White, 
R. E. Newcomb, 
Oliver B. Morris, 
Ithamar Conkey, 
Samuel P. P. Fay, 
Samuel Mitchell, 
Sherman Leland, 
Wilkes Wood, 
Willard Phillips, 
Benj. F. Thomas, 


$300 
375 
400 
100 
600 
240 
240 
240 
700 
150 
400 
350 
800 
600 


Timothy Reed, 
Henry W. Bishop, 
Anseim Bassett, 
B. C. Marcbant, 
Nathaniel Lord, Jr., 
Geo. Greirnel, Jr., 
Justice Willard. 
Samuel F. Lyman, 
Isaac Fiske, 
George Cobb, 
Jonathan H. Cobb, 
Jacob H. Loud, 
H. M. Willis, 
Charles G. Prentiss, 


$400 
500 
600 
100 

1,200 
400 
400 
400 

1,200 
250 
600 
600 

1,500 

1,200 



18* 



210 



HASSAOHirSETTS. 



[184$. 



John Gray Rogers, 
James C. Merrill, 
Abel Gushing, 



} 



Ihlice Churt of Boston. 
Jtisticet, 



{ 



1,500 
1,500 
1,50Q 



Finances. 

Balance in the Treasury, January 1. 1843, . . $41,652 69 

The ordinary receipts in 1843, exclusive of money borrowed. 



were — from the Bank tax, 
Auction Tax, 
Interest on bank deposits, 
Attorney for Suffolk County, 
Proceeds of Lands in Maine, 
Alien passengers, 

Public lands, by Act of Congress, Sept. 1842, 
Miscellaneous, 
Probate assessments, 
Martha Johonnot*s Annuities, . 
Total of ordinary receipts, 



$313,269 45 
46,995 20 
448 39 
3,620 60 
1,373 53 
4,926 76 
3,177 43 
1,137 99 
4,218 07 
2,257 14 



The expenditures in 1843 for ordinary purposes were. 

State scrip redeemed in 1843, 

5 per cent State stock sold. 

Cash on hand for ordinary purposes, January 1, 1844, 

Indebtedness of the Cbmmonwealth^ Jatmary 1, 1844. 



381,424 56 

423,077 25 
370,364 58 

52,712 67 
50,613 00 

2.099 67 
7,649 00 

$9,748 67 



Five per cent, stock, due 1844, 
" « « " due 1845, 
« " « " due 1846, 

Western Railroad assessments. 
Total for all purposes, 

Credit of the State loaned to railroads, 

Total liabilities of the State, 



Principal ExpenditiMres in 1844. 

Pay of the Council, Senate, and Representatives, 

Salaries established by law, 

Balances to County Treasurers, . . . 

Militia services. 

Support of paupers, military and other accounts. 

Interest on State Stock, 

Interest on Scrip to Western Railroad, 

Miscellaneous, 

State Printing, 



$47,538 08 

46,550 00 

37,140 00 

1,015,548 58 



1,146,776 66 
5,049,555 56 

6,196,332 22 



73,768 50 

61,862 10 

29,b0l 38 

27,295 25 

67.652 03 

8,916 56 

46,762 43 

8,273 25 

7,777 19 



1845.] HABSACHtrSBTTB. 311 

Slocla and varunu FuHdi bdorigitig to the OomnKtuceallh. 

10,000 share* Western Railroad Stock, . $1,000,000 00 

Holes, StocliH, 59.61240; School Fund for IndUni, 2,500 00: 62,312 40 
Massachuselts School Fund, . . . 563,095 63 

Charles River and Warren Bridge Fund, . . 25,6';0 31 

Treaty of Washington. .... 150,000 00 

Weitern Railroad Sinkiog Funds, . . 271,353 32 



F TBE BETlTKnS C 





■:| 


■s. 


if 


11 i^U 


}? 




1-; 




1" 


!!l 


ti 


s= lial 


-'1^ 






Coumi«. 


°l 




«!.!l!f 


1,861 






W & 


11 


III 


liE 




Kll 


Saflhlk, 


,,... 


«3,acO 00 2,303 ei 45 


««,i01 M 


«I=5«M 


E«H,' 


424 


6,i*j5o era 


SI 


lOS 4S 


1,361 




5,417 37 


MiddteHi, 


«2S 


4681 50 i,m 






1,SS7 


6?;S8o 


8,966 84 




S)v 


3,183 00 1 V^ 




90 53 




34,^ 3t 


i;75a 79 


















Hampdeii, 






1S9 


S3 


10 1! 






l,e!M3 


Fraulilm,' 


10 


145 M 


340 








9,ara SI 




Berkjhire, 




30 00 










11>t07 


9,010 08 


Norfolk,^ 




2,978 30 




■n 


39 SO 




aa,-Ka84 


1,851 eu 


Bri.lQ|,' 


1B7 


2,504 00 








vre 


sB.oioas 


6,418 77 


Plymoilh, 


UO 


14M60 








301 


15,965 48 


^708 40 


BMUMBblt, 




SJ4C0, 113 




S3 18 




11,308 01 


127 30 


DiikM Co., 




as 


143 


S 1 




■1,5S0 0C 




NBu,uct«^ 


34 1 300 00' leo 1 70 

3.5M - 35.0*0 H.f3«nrB- 


•m-^ 


:# 




4e,i&iai 






fIStft 
ADJXciaT Statu. 



liTiildwl 



400,000 



iw;lasso 






ISaMtOWofiluiiii 



k1 IB loflntd by tfjv SiBtB . 

ric Riilrosd CompaDy, who pur fori 

; m New HampihinlliereuiSSmtl 



FffcWwf Autraoij. Amount of capHal inbtcribed, $931,000; amoDDt 
paid in, $440^4^; amount expended, $323,537.6& The road is now 
opes to Concord, and will probably he open toFitchburg before Jan. 1&45. 

Hariford and SprinffiM BaUrnad. Length of the line in JHaisachusetU 
B miiea, and the stock subicribed for building tbi> part of the lOad ii 
860,000. SO miles more, in Connecticut, are lo be built by the Hartfbid 
and New Haven Railroad Companj. 

Wt^t SiBtkbridgt Bailroad. This load is now used I^ the Housatonie 
Railroad Companjr. 

TIu WarttAa Branch Railroad has a capital of $3,300 ; the eitinated 
cost of the road ii S3,000. 



3a»ki in XamchtoMi fimn 1803 to 1&I3. 



1845.] 



UAS8ACHT78ETT8. 



213 



Receipt of Cotton at Boston, 
[From the Boston Daily Advertiser.] 





• 

as 

s 




i 


• 


• 

1 


• 

m 




Dates. 


-s 


• 




£3 


1 


1 


• 




o 


Xi 


"5 


at 

> 


•3 


S 


3 




t* 


,2 


M 


d 


a 


• 


& 




55 


1^ 


O 


OQ 


< 


OQ 


b* 


October, 1842, 


344 




1,028 


376 






1,748 


November, " 


1,'*4 




3,178 


2,085 






7,157 


December. " 
January, 1843, 


9,;-o 


912 


2,848 


2,241 






15,381 


11,172 


3,222 


3,855 


2,123 


2,388 




23,060 


February, " 


10,048 


4,908 


1,190 


369 


3,684 


2,010 


22,215 


March, »' 


3,598 


6,908 


1,170 


1,312 


4,391 


1,083 


18,462 


April, <* 


6.049 


2,088 


541 


250 


447 


60S 


9,981 


May, " 


5,100 


1,475 


1,165 


1,161 


1,927 




10,9u»8 


47,885 


19,511 


14,975 


9,917 


12,837 


3,707 


108,832 


October, 1843, 


630 




1,206 


603 






2,440 


November, " 


6.232 




1,663 


1,546 






9,446 


December, " 


3,088 


894 


1.^69 


282 






5,733 


January, 1844, 


11,682 


2,187 


1.l>» 


4,664 


1,708 




21,727 


February, " 


17,006 


7,358 


4,209 


2,237 


4,880 


487 


36,177 


March, « 


19,341 


8,216 


3,806 


3,396 


1,213 




35,962 


Aoril, « 
May, « 


7,277 


5,603 


206 


383 


3,433 


450 


17JJ52 


591 


2,834 


556 


997 


1,181 


477 


6,686 


65,851 


27,142 


14,603 


14,096 


liJ,4L5 


1^14 


135,523 



Arrived <iuringthe above period, 1842 and 1S43, 
For sale, 
*' To manufacturers, 



34,619 
74,213 



Do. 
Do. 



do. 
do. 



106,833 

135,523 
Ahttract of the Musachusetta School Returns for 1843. 



1843 and 1844, for sale,* • • •67,039 
« " « to manuPra, 68,484 



Counties. 


Number of towns which 
have made returns. 


• 

a 

I 


• 

a 
a 


• 

i 

s, 

o 

• 


No. of scholars of all 
ages in the schools. 


In 

Snmm'r 


In 

Winter. 


Suffolk,* 

Essex, * 

Middlesex, 

Worcester, 

Hampshire, 

Hampden, 

Franklin, 

Berkshire, 

Norfolk, 

Bristol, 

Plymouth, 

Barnstable, 

Dukes County, 

Nantucket, 

Total, 


2 
28 
47 
55 
21 
18 
25 
24 
22 
17 
20 
13 
3 
1 


95,773 

94,987 

106611 

95;313 

30,897 

37,366 

28,812 

41,745 

53,140 

60,164 

47,373 

32,548 

3,958 

9,012 


$110,000,000 00 

31,110,204 00 

37,592,082 00 

29,804,316 00 

7,298,351 00 

10,138,423 71 

6,548,694 00 

9,546,926 76 

15,522,527 00 

19,493,635 84 

10,694,719 00 

4,896,683 00 

1.107,343 00 

6;074,374 00 


133 
316 
421 
570 
204 
208 
2a5 
222 
201 
258 
312 
163 
18 
13 

3,173 


14,926 

17,536 

23,122 

20,508 

5,955 

7,584 

6,108 

7,058 

10,707 

8,594 

8,614 

5,692 

312 

1,153 


14,893 

17,773 

25,234 

25,794 

7,265 

0,268 

7,825 

7,923 

12,000 

11,545 

10,402 

9,063 

759 

1,246 


296 


737,699 


299,878,329 31 


\M,\.S\ 


161,020 



* The returns for the city of Boston are taken from those of the last year. 



JUlract cf tkt School lUbm* — CMtmwf. 





11^ 


11008 


■9,S5B 




118 


B 


1l« 


358 










































































ssc 


S 














































































































































Totd. 






184^ 


I^ 


la^ 




a,iu 


.;»1 



JAalrMl — Cbriwim/. 





A«r^ 




Uiii 111 


J 


5 


s 




boud. 


DIODlb. 


1 


1 


1 


CmUh. 






Eg-s,- ^il 


i 

5 
1 


i 


1 

5 


Tb 


To 


«S. 


Of 
Fem. 


il 


m 

•0 


Saflhlk, 


gnmainse 


813 It 


S8 50»S8,1M 44 


Bwoe 








£mi, 


49 61 U 61 




8M «i^7 89 


•43 31 




lai 


K» 


MiddluR, 






5 74 »1,SS8 50 
















4 M 5>!,437 M 


1229 18 






asB 




aa^ us 




s la 17,210 M |4;wi f» 




83 


eoa 


^sss;!^'' 


18 (ej 10 s 


531 


5 la ai,sas w Is^ 3t 

4 3S 14,030 BT 6,010 10 




a> 




Boriokire, 


la 4s^ 11 n 




5 13 i4,a;o s 7,102 46 


'< 


51 


itaa 


Nnriblfc, 


SlBl 13 81 


»a» 




; 


ae 


so 


BriMol, 




771 


5 07 3V>)9 19 S,43£ «T 






9W 


Plymimk 






4 75 31 778 13 l379 30 






144 


B>rm»bl., 




7a 


4 38 14,088 80 1^73 as 


i 


47 


9S 


Dukei CoDTtlT, 


asssi ISB- 




5 01 2^)00 00 f 




9 




Niinmi:li«r, 






B 00 S^OO 00 










32 ill la S2| ? K\ 6 51 510,590 0235,894 03 


J 


-ssr 


m:. 



1645.] 



ftSODB X8t.AN]>. 

Jbttract of the Schotd BOums — Cbntinued, 



S15 



Coanties. 



Suflblfc, 

Ssitex, 

Middtesez, 

Worcester, 

Hampshire, 

Hampden, 

FratikHn, 

Berkshire, 

Norfolk, 

BristoL, 

Ply mouth, 

Barnstable, 

Dukes Go , 

Nantucket, 

Total, ■ 



•T3 

s 

bo 

bo 

■< 



8,769 
5,052 
8,292 
4,184 
1.250 
2,830 

500 
5,381 
2,683 
1,490 

400 
1,350 



86 
10 
00 
00 
12 
50 
43 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 



5 1,778 01 1^268 



M 



o-C c 

'5£^ 2 

d OD C es 
« 3 U O 



100 

229 

126 

142 

50 

29 

50 

50 

95 

162 

90 

107 

19 

19 



a, 

Ji 
i 

a 

I 

o 

CO 

bo 
S 

4f 



1,200 

1,721,23 
595. 2 
538.10 
151.12 
118. 2 
104.12 
274.12 
603. 6 
828.16 
431. 6 
404.18 
86. 6 
12 



s 

I 



S 



7,070 1-5B6,611 



3,000 

4,940 

2,447 

3,342 

1,157 

795 

912 

949 

2,038 

2,820 

1,572 

1,808 

356 

475 



d 

o 

'S 

•3 

■«-• 
Vi 

-a 

bo 

I 



90,000 00 

34,427 92 

15,600 22 

14,248 12 

2,048 12 

4,627 09 

2,286 20 

10,723 79 

19,796 78 

14,228 78 

5,949 73 

13,148 00 

1,514 75 

5,661 00 



234.552 48 



'a 






o 
S 



$9,050 OOj 
80,606 72 
15,162 51 
15,127 01 

5,455 67 
28,428 62 

6,876 43 
21,053 17 
68,950 51 
11,667 00 
13,836 56 



« 



09 

S 
■g 

a 

o 



$502 80 

4,118 51 

902 20 

779 28 

327 34 

1,71829 

44158 

1,908 47 

3,828 27 

627 00 

83910 



I 

g 



S « 



9 
OQ 



O. 
o 






6,214 222 15,276 84 



V; a, 

6 S 

o o-A 



$299 00 
40413 
662 00 
61211 

L430 70 
183 61 
58135 
900 84 
17100 
638 71 
662 50 
140 00 



6,625 93 



V. RHODE ISLAND. 



Government 



Jaues Fennes, 
Byron Diman, 
Henry Bowen, 
Stephen Cahoone, 
Joseph M. Blake, 



For the Year ending theUt TSusday in May, 1845. 

Salary. 
Governor, $400 

Lieutenant Governor, 200 

, Sec. of State, $750 and fees. 



of Providence, 
of Bristol, 
of Providence, 
of Newport, 



General TVeoiurer, 
Attorney General, 



500 
Fees. 



of Bristol, 

These officers, and the Senators and Representatives, are elected annu- 
ally, on the Ist Wednesday of April, for the year commencing let Tuesday 
of May. 

The Senate consists of the Governor, Lieutenant Governor, and one 
Senator from each of the thirty-one towns in the State. 

The House of Representatives consists of 69 members. The present 
ratio is one Representative to every 1,530 inhabitants, and fractions of 
more than half are represented. Each town is to have one, and no town 
more than 12, Representatives. 



216 &BODE ISLAND. [1845. 

The qualifications of electors are as follows : Every male tioftt^ citizen 
of the United States, who has resided in the State two years, and in the 
town where he proposes to vote six months, who has been registered at 
the town clerk's office at least seven days before the election, and who 
has paid within one year a tax of one dollar, or has been enrolled in a 
military company and done military duty at least one day within the 
preceding year, shall be entitled to vote ] likewise, every male citizen 
(naturalized foreigner) of the United States, who, in addition to the pre- 
ceding qualifications, possesses real estate in the town or city worth 
$134 over all incumbrances, or which rents for $7 per annum, 

JUSICIART. 

Supreme Court. 

Salary. 

Job Durfee, of Tiverton, Chief Justice, Entries and $650 

Levi Haile, of Warren, jissociate Justice^ do. 550 

William R. Staples, of Providence, do, do. 550 

George A. Brayton, of Warwick, do, do. 550 

The Judges of the Supreme Court hold their offices until they are 
removed by a resolution passed by both Houses of the Assembly, and 
voted for by a majority of the members elected to each House. The 
Court of Common Pleas in each of the five counties consists of a Justice 
of the Supreme Court, who sits as Chief Justice, and two Associate Jus- 
tices, who are elected for each county. The Justice of the Supreme 
Court, who sits in the Common Pleas, does not sit in the Supreme 
Court on appeals firom his own decisions. The Associate Judges of the 
Common. Pleas, Sheriffs, Clerks, &c., are elected annually by the Legis- 
lature. 

During the past year a new code of laws was prepared and pub- 
lished, and it went into effect in Sept, 1844. It contains many important 
improvements upon the old laws. The rights of married women aie 
effectually secured to certain sorts of personal property. The laws 
regulating interest are so modified, that, upon a plea of usury, the plain- 
tiff will notwithstanding recover the principal of his debt, with the legal 
interest 

PrBLio Schools. 

By an act of the General Assembly, passed January, 1828, a permanent 
school fund was commenced, which was invested in bank stock, and now 
amounts to upwards of $50,000. The sum of $25,000 per annum is paid 
from the State treasury to the school committees of the several towns 
for the support of public schools. The interest of this State's portion of 
the deposit of the United States* suiplus revenue, and moneys ans- 
iD|^ firom several other sources, are also applied to the suj^port of public 
schools. 



lS45i,] RBODB island' 217 

During the past year, Henry Barnard, Esq. has been actively employed, 
under the direction of the Legislature, in examining the public schools, 
diffusing information, and endeavoring to improve their condition. A 
bill is no'w^ before the Legislature, which will probably pass, by which 
the schools will be placed under the care of a superintendent, and will 
be in many respects materially improved. 

Abstract from the Annual Returns of Public Schools, made to the Gen- 
eral Assemibly in May, 1844 : 

Number of School Districts, 359 Number of Schools, 428 

Do. Male Teachers, 342 Do. Female Teachers, 173 

Average number of scholars attending, . . . 14,528 

Paid from the State Treasury for Free or Public Schools, $25,095.74 

Paid by the towns for the same, . . . 27,918.83 

Since 1838, regular returns have been required. The following is a 
comparative statement of a portion of these returns: 







Scholars. 


Expended for 


Year. 


Male. 


Female. 


Incidentals. 


Instructions 


1839, 


8,112 


5,636 


$2,971 50 


^32,383 36 


1840, 


10,202 


7,550 


4,103 80 


36,095 98 


1841, 


11,253 


9,000 


6,312 64 


40,516 01 


1842, 


12,479 


9,372 


5,482 00 


39,088 43 


1843, 


11,960 


8,132 


6,898 55 


42,944 29 


1844, 


11,811 


10,345 


5,405 47 


48,335 76 



There is a literary institution at Providence, called the " Providence 
Athenaeum,-' the library of which contains 10,585 volumes. Another, at 
Newport, called the " Redwood Library," contains 4,500 volumes. 

Finances. 

Reeeiptt. \ Expenditurea, 

Balance in May, 1843, $15,003 08 Salaries, $3,600 00 

From Supreme Court, 1,582 83 Senators, 2,269 30 

Common Pleas, 511 31 1 Representatives, 5,347 60 

Licenses, &c., 3,230 50 Supreme Court, 8,483 85 

Pedlers, 3,225 00 Common Pleas, 2,761 53 

Bank Tax, 25,249 15, Printing laws, 278 97 

Interest on Deposit Fund, 11,951 3o| Accounts allowed, 24,069 30 

Lotteries, 6,750, 00, Insurrectionary expenses, 922 59 

Int. on School Fund Stock, 2,565 00, Constitutional convention, 45 00 
Pawtucket Turnpike, 850 00 Public Schools, 24,410 05 

*" '" - -.^~ .- g^g^^g Prison, 5,500 00 

Balance in May, 1844, 6,159 20 



Miscellaneous, 1,363 47 

U. S. Public Lands, 468 75 

From Gov. King, &c., 1,100 00 

From Deposit Fund, 10,000 00 



19 



83,850 39^ 



83,850 39 



218 



OONMXOTICUT. 



[1845. 



VI. CONNECTICUT. 

For the Year ending on the Ut Wednesday in May, 1845. 

Sateiy. 



Roger S. Baldwin, of New Haven, Governor^ 

Reuben Booth, of Daubijry, Lieul. Gov. and Pre^, Senate, 



Joseph B. Gilbert, 
Paniel P. Tyler, 
Abijah Carrington, 
Seth P. Beers, 
Chas. J. Mc Curdy, 
Lucius G. Peck, 
Nelson L. White, 



of Hartford, 
of Windham, 
of Milford, 
of Litchfield, 
of Lyme, 



$1,100 
20O 

Treasurer, 1,000 

Secretary, $84 and fees. 

Comptroller, 1,000 

Commisir of the Schoql Ftfnd, 1,250 
Speaker of the House. 
Clerk of the House. 
Clerk of the Senate, 



A plurality of votes elects State senators and members of Congrea«^ 
For HU other officers a majority is necessary. 

Judiciary. 



Samuel Church, 
Henry JVt W^t^, 
William L. Stoira, 
Joel Hinman, 
, Thomas Day, 



Supreme and Superior Court. 

Thomas g. Williams, of Hartford, Chief Justice, $1,100 

of Salisbury, Associate Justice, 1,050 

of Lyme, do* 1,050 

ofMiddletown, do. 1,050 

ofWaterbury, do. 1,050 

of Hartford, Reporter, 350 

A term of the Superior Court is held by one judge twice annually, in 
each county of the State, and the Supreme Court, constituted of the five 
judges, meets annually in each county. The judges of this Court hold 
their offices until seventy years of age. 

County Court. '^ A County Court is held by one judge three times 
each year, in the several counties. The judges of this Court axe ap- 
pointed annually by the Legislature. 



Counties. 


Judges. 


Residence. 


Attorneys. 


Residence. 


Hartford, 
New Haven, 
New London, 
Fairfield, 
Windham, 
Litchfield, 
Middlesex, 
Tolland, 


Samuel Huntington, 
Noyes Darling, 
Benj. Pomcroy, 
Thos. T. Whittlesey, 
Jared D. Richmond, 
Wm. M. Burrall, 
John C. Palmer, 
Benj. Pinney, 


Hartford, 
New Haven, 
Stonington, 
Danbury, 
Ashford, 
Canaan, 
£. Uaddara, 
Ellington, 


Isaac Toucey, 
R. J. Ingersoll, 
John T. Wait, 
Silas H. Hickok, 
George S. Catlin, 
D. C. Sanford, 
Samuel Ingham, 
Loren P. Waldo, 


Hartford, 
New Haven, 

Norwich, 

Danbury, 

Windham, 

New Milford, 

Saybrook, 

Tolland, 



1S45.] 



CONHXCTICUT. 



319 



The Superior and County Courts have civil, criminal, and eq^uity ju- 
risdiction, and, to a large extent, concurrent and original jurisdiction. In 
all civil actions where the damages, or matter in dispute, exceed $35, 
the County Court has jurisdiction, and the Superior in all cases where 
the damages, or matter in dispute, exceed $70. The County Court 
has exclusive jurisdiction of breaches of the peace, not cognizable by 
justices, and concurrent jurisdiction with the Superior Court in all other 
criminal cases, except where the punishment is death, or imprisonment 
for life, in which latter cases, the Superior Court has exclusive jurisdic- 
tion. In civil cases, appeals lie in all cases from the County to the fiu* 
perior Court, where the matter in dispute exceeds the sum of $70. 

Finances for 1843-44. 

The State owes no debt, and has, beside the School Fund, productive 
bank stock amounting to $400,000. 
Balance in Treasury, April 1, 1843, 
Avails of State tax of one cent on the dollar of Grand List, 
Dividend on Bank Stock owned by the State, 
Bank Tax, ..... 

Miscellaneous, .... 

Interest on School Fund, . . . « 



$23,105.30 

37,000.00 

26,618.00 

3,032.00 

15.478.00 

117,717.60 



J^incipal Expenditiures from March Sist, 1843, to April Isty 1844. 



Pay of m.embera of General Assembly, 

Salaries of Executive Ofiiceis, 

Salaries of Judges, and Reporter of Supreme and County Courts. 

Judicial expenses, ..... 

Charitable establishments, 

Midcellaneoas, ..... 

Support of Common Schools^ (payable out of School Fund,) 

Expenses of managing School Fund, do. do. do. 

Oroinary expenses of the Government, about 



$16,253.00 

3,184.00 

8,250.00 

31,020.00 

4,300.00 

8,066.00 

li7.<)47.05 

3,578.85 

72,000.00 



Permanent Ftmdt. 

Bank Stock, for the current expenses of Government, 
School Fund, appropriated io Common Schools, 
Town Deposit Fund, 



$400,000.00 

2,051,423.77 

764,670.61 



View of the different Branches of the School Fund, in 1^25, 1831, and 1844. 



In Bends and Mortgages, 

Bank Stock, 

Cultiv'd lands and buildings, 

Wild lands, 

Stock in Massachusetts, 

Cash in the Treasury, 

Total, 


In 1825. 


In 1831. 


lAl&*L 


$1,432,299.40 

77,600.00 

167,020.19 

18,199.38 

2,159.59 

22,155.77 


$1,423,716.42 

99,950.00 

196,595.90 

164,144.60 

1,320.00 

17,230.95 


$1,695,407.4^ 

221,700.00 

78,367.00 

52,493.75 

210.00 

3,245.58 


1,719,434.24 


1,902,957.87 


2,051,423.77 



220 



COMNKCTICUT. 



[1845. 



School Districtiy Children^ and amount of Dividend for each County. 



Name of County. 


Number 

of 
Districts. 


Number 

of 
Children. 


Total amount of 

Dividend to each 

County. 


Hartford, .... 

New Haven, 

New London, . 

Fairfield, . . 

Windham, 

Litchfield, 

Middlesex, 

Tolland, 


257 
221 
220 
236 
168 
295 
125 
129 


15,019 

12.63S 

12,399 

14,152 

7,5S4 

10,441 

6,978 

4,873 

84,084 


$21,026.60 
17,693.20 
17,358.60 
19,812.80 
10,617.60 
14,617.40 
9,769.20 
6,822.20 


LG51 


117,717.60 



Deaf and Dumb Asylum at Hartford. — The number of pupils under 
instruction the past year has been 142. The Institution has existed 27 
years, and "has educated 619 persons, of whom 50 were beneficiaries of 
Maine, 71 of New Hampshire, "^6 of Vermont, 179 of Massachusetts, 
and 72 of Connecticut. The annual charge of a pupil is, in consequence 
of the large funds of the institution, the small sum of $100. 

State Prison. — There are now 203 prisoners in the Connecticut State 
Prison. The expenses of the institution last year were about $11,000, 
and its income, in round numbers, $18,000. 

Bankruptcy. — The final result in Connecticut. — Proceedings under the 
Bankrupt law of 1842, in the State of Connecticut, have been brought to 
a close, with some few exceptions. The work has been so far com- 
pleted, that the following may be deemed nearly correct. There are, 
however, a few cases still pending in the Circuit Court, and a few in the 
District Court, still undecided. 

The whole number of cases presented is 1537. Of these, 1517 were 
voluntary cases, and the residue, 20, were compulsory cases. 

These cases have been disposed of as follows: 
Withdrawn, rejected, and abandoned, . . 22 

Now pending in the Circuit Court, undecided, . . 6 

Postponed for cause, in the District Court, about . 20 

Involuntary cases, where there has been no application for discharge, 1^ 
Discharges decreed, .... 1,480 

1,547 
Aggregate amount of debts in 1368 cases, . . $10,218,581 00 

The remaining 169 cases, where the amount of the debts 
has not been ascertained, may be estimated at 1,262,431 00 



Debts, whole amount, 



$11,481,012 00 



lS4d.] HBW TOBK. 221 



VU, NEW YORK. 

Government. 

Salary. 
Wm. C. Bougk, Crovemory (term expires Jan. 1, 1845,) $4,000 

I>. & Dickinson, i ^"^ ^^- ^'^ ^**- ^^^*' P^^' ^ I 

I a day during the session. ) 

Azariah C. Flagg, Comptroller, 2,500 

Samuel Young, jSsc. State and Superint. ChmmSm SckoolSj 2,500 

Philip Phelps, Ut Deputy ComptrolUt, 1,500 

Thos. Farringtonr, l^eamrer, I,60tf 

John Willard, JDqmty Treasurer, 1,300* 

George P. Bairker, JUtomey Creneral^ 1,009 

Nathaniel Jones, Surveyor General, 1,000 

Jonas Earll, Jr., of S3rracu9e, ^ct. Caiial ObfrtmU, (jB^'tiy 2,000' 

Geo. W. Little, of Cherry Valley, do, do, 2,000 

Daniel P. Bissell, of Moscow, do, do, 2,000 

Benjamin Enos, of De Ruyter, do, do. 2,000 

Legislature, — The Senate consists of 33 members, who are elected for 4 
years, 8 being chosen annually. Pay, $3 a day. 

The House of Assembly consists of 128 members. Payj $3 a day. 

Elisha Litchfield, of Delphi, Speaker of the Assembly. 

James R. Rose, of Albany, Clerk of the Assembly. 

Judiciary. 

Court of Chancery, 

Salary. 

Reuben H. Walworth, of Saratoga Springs, Chancellor^ $3,000 

John M* Davison, of Albany, Register^ 2,500 

[and $2,500 for clerk hire and office expenses. 
Hiram Walworth, of New York, Assistant Register^ 3,000 

[and $5,000 for clerk hire and office expenses. 
Alonzo C. Paige, of Schenectady, Reporter, 500 

Vice- Chancellor's Court. 

» Sialary. 

Wm. T. McCoun, of N. York, 1st Circuit, Ptee-Chan, Fees and $2,000 

Lewis H. Sanford, do. 1st Circuit, Assistant Register^ 2,500 

F. Whittlesey, of Rochester, 8th Circuit, Vice-Chancellor^ 1,600 

[The other judges are Vice-chancellors for their respective- Circuits.] 

12* 



222 



NKW TOBH. 

Supreme Court. 



Samuel Nelson, of Coopers town, 

Greene C. Bronson, of Albany, 

Samuel Beardsley, of Utica, 

Nicholas Hill, Jr^ of Albany, 



Chief Justice, 
Associate Justice, 

do. 
Reporter, 



[1845. 



Salary. 

$3,000 

3,000 

3,000 

500 



Circuit Courts. — There are eight Circuit Courts, and the circuits cor- 
respond, in territory and name, to the eight senate districts. 



Judges. Circuits. 

William Kent, 1st Circuit, 

Charles H. Ruggles, 2d 



(( 



Amasa J. Parker, 


3d 


John WiUard, 


4th 


Philo Gridley, 


5th 


Robert Monell, 


6th 


Bowen Whiting, 


7th 


Nathan Dayton, 


8th 



II 



M 



(( 



i( 



U 



tt 



Samuel Jones, 
Aaron Vanderpoel, 
Thomas J. Oakley, 

J. P. Hall, Reporter. 



Residence. 


Salary. 


lit, New York, 


$1,600 


Poughkeepsie, 


1,600 


Albany, 


1,600 


Saratoga Springs, 


1,600 


Hamilton, 


1,600 


Greene, 


1,600 


Onondaga, 


1,600 


Lockport, 


1,600 


of the City of New York. 






Salary. 


' Chief Justice, 


$2,500 


Associate Justice, 


2,500 


do. 


2,500 


Jesse Oakley, CUrh. 





Couarts of Common Plecu. — Courts of Common Pleas are held in each 
county, consisting of a first or presiding judge, and four assistant justices. 



Manufacture of Salt. 

A Table showing the amount of Salt inspected annually in the County of Onon' 
daga,from 1826 to 1843, both inclusive, and the amotmt of duties on the same. 



Bate. 


No. of bushels 


Am't of Duties. 


Date. 


No. of bushels. 


Am't of Duties. 


1826 


827,508 


$103,438.50 


1835 


2,209,867 


$132,592.02 


1827 


983,410 


122,926.25 


1836 


1,912,858 


114,771.48 


1828 


1,160,888 


145,111.00 


1837 


2.161,287 


129,677.22 


1829 


1,291,280 


161,410.00 


1838 


2,575,032 


154,501.92 


1830 


1,435,446 


179,430.75 


1839 


2,864,718 


171,883.08 


1831 


1,514,037 


189,254.38 


1840 


2,622,305 


157,338.30 


1832 


1,652,985 


206,660.62 


1841 


3,340,769 


200,446.14 


1833 


1,838,646 


229,580.75 


1842 


2,291,903 


137,514.18 


1834 


1,943,252 


116,595.12 


1843 


2,694,859 


161,693.54 



1845.] 



NICW YORK. 



223 



Canals.— The cost of the canals, and the revenue received from thezDi 
during the year ending Sept. 30, 1843, are shown in the following table: 



Erie Canal, 
Erie Enlargement, 
Champlain Canal, 
Oswego do., 
Cayuga and Seneca do., 
Crooked Lake do., 
Chemung do., 
Chenango do., 
Black River do., 
Genesee Valley do., 
Oneida Lake do., 
Oneida River Improvement, 



Cost. 

$7,143,789.86 

13,291,616.00 

1,257,604.26 

565,437.35 

236,804.74 

156,776.90 

641,600.58 

2,417,000.00 

1,511,967.00 

3,555,000.00 

50,000.00 

59,432.57 

$30,885,029.26 



The annual interest upon $30,885,029.26, at 514 per cent, 
the average interest upon the present State aebt, is 

The net revenue from all the State Canals, for the year 
ending 30th Sept. 1843, after deducting the cost of the 
collection of tolls, and the maintenance of the canals, is 

Deficit of the canals to pay 5)^ per cent, upon the cost. 



Revenue. 

$1,730,614.74 

99,683.51 
29,147.35 
16,557.15 
460.82 
8,140.26 
13,323.54 

12,292.44 
225.04 
257.01 

$1,910,701.86 
$1,698,676.60 

1,456,760.60 
$241,915.91 



The following tables show the amounts of Flour and Wheat brought 
from the West to the Hudson River during the last five years : 



Floub. 


1839 


1840 


1841 


1842 


1843 




bbls. 


bbls. 


bbls. 


bbls. 


bbls. 


.April, 
Mey, 


21,616 


30,933 




16,094 




120,366 


240,884 


249,487 


221,155 


185,066 


June, 


177,457 


239,818 


224,071 


175,908 


253.512 


July, 


65,165 


117,213 


151,056 


122,737 


234,205 


August, 


24,672 


154,931 


136,523 


102,735 


254,079 


September, 


83,549 


239,719 


254,573 


259,483 


314,969 


October, 


203,868 


395,095 


268,808 


411,025 


417,025 


November, 


255,716 


320,144 


321,048 


252,258 


414,832 


December, 


14,763 


36,400 


19,279 






967,213 


1,805,137 


1,624,845 


1,561,395 


2,073,708 



Whiat. 


1839 


1840 


1841 


1842 


1843 




bush. 


bush. 


bush. 


bush. 


bush. 


April, 


5,820 


11,072 




21,654 




May, 


54,414 


76,060 


24,540 


93,139 


43,373 


June, 


36,449 


79,029 


36,541 


44,948 


58,962 


July, 


11,345 


49,290 


56,007 


71,195 


88,716 


August, 


14,795 


125,a57 


47,776 


138,089 


119,086 


September, 


134,720 


430,476 


189,079 


215,047 


190,368 


October, 


156,163 


402,659 


249,169 


169,081 


195,955 


November, 


160,616 


217,241 


150,001 


157,112 


130,886 


December, 


6,647 


4,310 


8,603 






560,959 


1,395,194 


761,976 


930,265 


1 827,346 



294 



NSW TOEK. 



[184:^ 



Statement of produce and tolls, received at Albany, from the com- 
mencement of canal navigation, to the close of August, 1S44 : 



Canal open. 

Tolls, 

Flour, 

Pork, 

Beef, 

Ashes, 

Wheat, 

Corn, 

Barley, 

Cheese, 

Butter and Lard, 

Wool, 



1843. 

May Ist. 
$152,372.26 
584,499 bbls. 
22,971 
5,966 
26,544 
40,674 bush. 
63,206 
3,946 
988,302 lbs. 
3,144,081 
1,376,489 



u 
u 
u 



it 



(( 
it 



1844. 

April 18th. 
$217,924.69 
739,888 bbls. 
25,459 
17,357 
29,368 
104,004 bush, 
9,258 " 
21 094 " 
1,070,039 lbs. 
2,763,900 " 
3,004,800 »* 



u 



FlNANCSS. 

Debt of the State. 



Erie and Champlain Canal debt, 

£ri«* Canal Enlargement, 

Oswego Canal, 

Cayuga and Seneca Canal, 

Chemung Canal, 

Crooked Lake Canal, 

Chenango Canal, 

Black River Canal, 

Black River temporary loan, • 

Genesee Valley Uanal!, 

Oneida Lake Canal, 

Improvement of the Oneida River, 



$2,055,1-43.47 

9,343,000.00 

421,304.00 

237,000.00 

641,600.58 

120,000.00 

2,417,000.00 

1,493,000.00 

18,967.00 

3,553,000.00 

50,000.00 

61,276.13 



Total Canal Debt, 30th Sept., 1843, . . 20,411,291.18 

The annual interest on this debt is $1,111,662.46. $14,872,009.95 bears 
5; $1,892,145.23, 6 percent; and $3,647,136, 7 per cent, interest. 

There is also the General Fund Debt, amounting to $5,423,415.33, on 
which the annual interest is $265,599.38. The total debt of the State, 
therefore, is $25,834,706.51, on which the annual interest is $1,377,261.84. 
But there are available means on hand, amounting to $1,951,575.66 ; leav- 
ing the actual balance to be provided for, $23,883,130.85. 

There is also a contingent liability for stocks issued on loans to Rail- 
road Companies. This liability amounts to $1,720,000. 

PubUc Revenue and Expenditures for the fiscal year ending Zdth Sept.y 1843. 



Tolls, after deducting the expenses of collection, 

Rent of surplus water. 

Interest on current canal revenue, 



Revenue from the General Fund, from all sources, 
Proceeds of mill-tax, 



$1,910,701.86 
1,241.25 
8,156.37 

1,920,099.48 
496,611.41 
576,114.92 



2,9fi2,82S.8i 



1846.] 



MXW YOSK. 



225 



Expenditures on the State Canals, for all 

purposes, including interest, . $1,465,310.20 

Expenses for the support of government, 

and for all charges on the general fund, 

including interest, . . 1,027.249.83 



Surplus, 



2,492,560.03 
500,265.78 



The capital and annual revenues of the several funds appropriated to 
the purposes of education, are as follows, viz : 

Capital. Revenue. 

Common School Fund, $1,975,093.15 $107,370.62 

Literature Fund, 268,990.57 18,852.43 

United States Deposit Fund, 4,014,520.71 222,657.84 



Total, 



6,258,604.43 



348,880.89 



Railroads in New York, 



■ 

Names. 


L'gth. 

In 
miles. 

~i6~ 

20^ 

78 
53 
26 
78 
43 
31 
38^ 


Cost. 


Number 

of 
Pass'gers. 


Income. 


FiXpenses. 


Miihawk and Hudson, 
Troy and Schenectady, 
Saratoga and Schenectady, 
Troy and Saratoga, 
Utica and Schenectady, 
Utica and Syracuse, 
Auburn and Syracuse, 
Auburn and Rochester, 
Tonawanda, 
Attica and Buffalo, 
Albany and W. Stockbridge, 


1^1,053,848 
633,519 
312,695 
475,884 

2,200 815 

1,160;219 
761,058 

1,728,361 
600,000 
266,275 

1,752,544 

18,967,189 


115,290 
71,344 

147,868 

114,843 

83,316 

105,190 

67,604 

66.896 


^,947 
26,999 
42,242 
44,325 

248,647 

163,701 
86,891 

189,693 
76,227 
45,899 


$58,780 
30,'.09 

128,850 
66,796 
38,531 

100,201 
48,606 




383 




991,671 


472,173 



Common Schoolt. 

[Compiled from the Annual Report of the Superintendent, Jan 13, 1844.] 

The 59 counties of which the State consists, are divided into 897 towns 
and wards, and these again are subdivided into 10,875 school districts. 
Of the 59 counties, all, with the single exception of Levtris, have ap- 
pointed county superintendents. The total number of children between 
the ages of 5 and 16, residing in the several school districts, exclusive of 
the city of New York, is retarned at 607,996 ; while the aggregate num- 
ber of children, of all ages, who have attended school for a longer or 
shorter period during the year ending January 1, 1843, is reported at 
610,354. In the city of Nevvr York, it is estimated that there are 75,000 
children between the ages of 5 and 16 ; and of these, 47,428 have attended 
school for a longer or shorter period during the last year. This swells 
the grand aggregate of children under instruction in the schools of the 
State, for the year reported, to 657,782 j an increase of 59,000 over the 
number returned the preceding year. 



S26 NSW TOEK. V [1845^ 

The number of male teachers in the winter schools is stated at 
5,170 ; of female teachers, 635. In the summer schools, there were 1,024 
male, and 5,699 female teachers. During the winter, the average monthly 
compensation of male teachers, exclusive of board, has been $14.28 ; that 
of the females, $7. In the summer, the male teachers received, on an 
average, 915 per month, the females, $6. 

There are 9,368 school houses in the State; 969 of brick or stone, 
the remainder of logs, or framed wood. Of these, 3,160 were in good 
repair ; 2,870 in comfortable condition ; and the remaining 3,319 " unfit 
for the reception of man or beast." 

The common school fund, on the 30th of September, amounted to 
$1,975,093, and there belong to it also 357,824 acres of land, valued at 
$178,412. The amount of public money expended in all the school dis- 
tricts in the State, during the year reported, was $660,727, and the amount 
contributed by the people in these districts was $509,376, making in all 
nearly $1,100,000 expended in the payment of teachers' wages, and the 
purchase of books for school libraries. The report furnishes a variety of 
extracts from the communications made by the different county superin- 
tendents, all tending to show a gradual improvement in the schools, and 
furnishing conclusive evidence of the wisdom and propriety of the la^ra 
of 1841 and 1843, intrusting the duties of inspection and supervision to 
county and town superintendents. 

Paupers in New York. 
[From the returns of the Superintendents of the Poor in every County.] 

In 1843, the number of county paupers relieved or supported was 78,233 ; 
number of town do., 4,521. Whole number of regular paupers, 82,754, 
or about 1 to 30 of every inhabitant in the State. But in addition to these, 
there were 62,047 paupers temporarily relieved by the public officers, 
making an aggregate of paupers in the State of New York, of 144,801, or 
about 1 to every 18 of the inhabitants. 

The whole expenditure for the poor during 1843, is $592,353.29 

but the value of the labor of the paupers, amounting to 58,658.85 

must be deducted, and the net expense is $533,694.44 
which is raised by annnal taxation. 

During 1842, the expense was . . . 917,738.^ 

Deduct pauper labor, ( . . . . 57,133.30 

$460,604.72 
This shows an increase of pauper expenses of the year 1843, over 
those of 1842, of $72,989.72, or an increase in a single year, of over 15 
per cent, in the expenditures. 

The average weekly expense of each pauper during the year 1843 was 
58 cents and 2 mills j do., during the year 1842, 64 cents and 6 mills. 



1845.] KKW YORK. 227 

This shows that the expense of supporting each pauper has decreased 
8 per cent., and yet the whole aggregate of expense has increased 15 per 
cent. This solely arises from an increase in the number of paupers. This 
increase was 21,314 over the preceding year. Yet it is proper to bear in 
mind, that about oae third of this increase occurred in the city of New 
York. 

On the 11th of April, 1842, a law passed, directing the county superin- 
tendents of the poor to make detailed returns, not only of the name, age, 
sex, and native country of every town or county pauper, but also '^ a state- 
ment of the causes, either direct, or indirect, which have operated to 
render such person a pauper.'^ At the first glance, it will be perceived, 
that information of this character must be invaluable, as it could be the 
pioneer to sound and safe legislation upon this complex question. 

Under this new law, returns have been received from every county in 
the State, except Albany, Green, Suffolk, and Warren. Of the 25,624 
paupers returned in these special reports, of natives of the United States, 
there were, males, 8,104; Females, 6,312; total, 14,415. Of natives of 
Ireland, there were, males, 4,442; females, 2,849; total 7,291. Of natives 
of England, there were, males, 871; females 533; total 1,404. Of na- 
tives of Scotland, there were, males, 178 ; females, 107; total, 285. Of 
natives of Germany,, there were, males, 461 ; females, 207 ; total, 668. 
Of paupers coming from Canada, there were, males, 220; females, 159; 
total, 379. Of natives of France, there were, males, 133 ; females, 63 ; 
total 196. 985 paupers were reported without giving their native country. 



Cbmparatwe Statement of the hnportg and Exports of the Digtrict of New 
Yorkj during the first six months of the year 1843, and the first six months 
of the year 1844. 



Imports. 


Paying duty, 
Free, 

Total, 


1843 
$12,886,411 
11,944,264 

24,830,675 


1844 
$32,023,702 
6,656,260 




38,679,962 




Duties, 


4,646,271 


11,421,507 


Exports. 


Domestic goods. 
Foreign goods, 


8,650,672 
2,185,885 


14,676,724 
2,442,310 



Total, 10,836,557 17,119,034 

The annual report of the city inspector shows the number of buildings 
erected in the city of New York, in 1843, as follows : 842 brick dwellings ; 
117 wooden dwellings; 156 brick dwellings and stores; 27 brick and 
granite stores; 48 shops and factories; 12 brick stables: 20 brick stores; 
8 biick churches; and 43 other buildings ; making, in all, 1273 edifices. 



828 Miw JiBsir. [184d. 

VIII. NEW JERSEY. 

Government. 

Salary. 
Daniel Haines, of Sussex Co., Chvemor^ and ex officio 

Chancellor of State^ (term of office expires, Jan. 1845,) $2,000 

James Patterson, of Monmouth Co. V. Frtt.ofLeg. OowncU, 3.50 a day. 

Ch. G. McChesney, of Trenton, Secretary of State^ 200 and fees. 

Joseph Taylor, of Cumberland Co. SpeakerofHo.ofMsembly^ 3.50 a day. 

James M. Newell, do. Clerk of do» 3.50 a day. 

Alexander Boyles, of Sussex Co. Clerk of Leg, Cotmcil^ 3.50 a day. 

Thomas Arrowsmith, of Trenton, Treasurer^ (elec. yearly,) 1,000 

Sam'l. R. Gummere, do. Clerk in Chancery. Fees. 

Judiciary. 

Court of Errors and Appeals. — This Court is composed of the Chan- 
cellor, the judges of the Supreme Court, and six other judges, appointed 
by the Governor, with the consent of the Senate, who hold office for six 
years, one judge vacating his seat each year, in rotation. 

Court of Chancery. — The Chancellor is appointed by the Grovemor, 
with the consent of the Senate, and holds his office for seven years. 
This Court holds four terms annually at Trenton, on the 3d Tuesday 
in January, 1st Tuesday in April, 2d Tuesday in July, and 2d Tuesday in 
October. 

Supreme Court. 

Term expires . Salary. 

Jos. C. Hornblower, of Newark, Chief Justice. 1846 $1,500 

Ira C. Whitehead, of Morristown, Associate Justice^ 1848 1,400 

John Moore White, of Woodbury, do. 1844 1,400 

Daniel Elmer, of Bridgeton, do. 1848 1,400 

James S. Nevius, of New Brunswick, do. 1845 1,400 

James Wilson, of Trenton, Clerk, 1847 Fees. 

Robert E. Spencer, of Mount Holly, Reporter, 1847 200 

Richard P. Thompson, of Salem Co., Attorney General, 1846 Fees&80 

The Judges are appointed by the Governor, with the consent of the 
Senate, and hold office for seven years. 

The Supreme Court holds four terms each year at Trenton ; on the last 
Tuesday in February, 2d in May, 1st in September, and 2d in November; 
and the judges of this court hold Circuit Courts and Courts of Oyer and 
Terminer four times a year in each county, except the counties of Atlan- 
tic and Cape May, in which two terms only are held. Inferior Courts of 
Common Pleas are held four times in a year in each county, by judges 
appointed by the Legislature, for five years, who receive fees, but no 
salary, and the number of whom is limited to five in each county. The 
compensation of a judge is not to be diminished during his term. 



1845.] MBW JBBSBT. 229 

New Cbnstitution. — A Conyentlon of delegates, chosen by the people, 
assembled at Trenton, May 14th, 1844, and prepared the draft of a new 
ConstitatioD, which was submitted to the people on the 13th of Aagust, 
was accepted by a great majority^ and went into operation Sept. 2, 1844. 

The right of suffrage is given to every white male citizen of the 
United States, who has resided in the State one year, and in the county 
where he claims to vote five months ; paupers, idiots, insane persons, and 
criminals, being excluded. 

Members of the Senate and of the General Assembly are elected yearly, 
on the second Tuesday of October, and meet on the second Tuesday in 
the next January, when the legislative year commences. The Senate 
consists of one Senator from each county, elected for three years, one 
third going out each year. The General Assembly shall consist of not 
more than 60, chosen annually, by apportionment under the census. 

The Legislature shall not create any debts or liabilities, which shall 
singly, or in the aggregate with any previous debts, exceed one hundred 
thousand dollars, except for purposes of war, or to repel invasion, or to 
suppress insurrection, unless the same shall be authorized by a law, for 
some single object, or work, to be distinctly specified therein ; which 
law shall provide the ways and means, exclusive of loans, to pay the 
interest of such debt, and also to pay and discharge the principal of such 
debt or liability within thirty-five years from the time of the contracting 
thereof, and shall be irrepealable until such debt be fully paid ; and no 
such law shall take effect until it shall have been submitted to the people, 
and have received a majority of all the votes cast for and against it ; and all 
money to be so raised shall be applied only to the specific object stated, 
and to the payment of the debt created. 

The fund for the support of free schools, and all money added to it, shall 
remain a permanent fund, and shall not be used for any other purpose. 

Charters for banks and money corporations require the assent of three 
fifths of the members of each House, and are limited to twenty years. 

The Grovemor holds office for three years, and receives a salary not to be 
altered during his continuance in ofiice. He has a veto on the laws, but 
a majority of both houses may pass the law again, after reconsideration, 
and it shall go into effect, in spite of the veto. In case of his death, re- 
signation, or removal, the President of the Senate takes his place. 

Amendments to the Constitution must be passed by two Legislatures 
in succession, and then be referred to the people, and if accepted by a ma- 
jority of the people, shall go into effect. But amendments shall not be 
proposed oftener than once in five years. 

CONOBESSIONAL DISTRICTS. ^ 

1. Cumberland, Gloncpster, Atlantic, Salem, and Cape May countiea. 

2. Burlington and Monmouth. 

3. Hunterdon, Mercer, Somerset, and Middlesex. 

4. Warren, Sunsex, and Morris. 

5. Essex, Hudson, Bergen, and Passaic. 

20 



230 



nSW JC&8XY. 



[1845. 



Common Schools. 



School fand in 1841, ^36,068.66 No. of Digtriots nturned, 8d4 

do. in 1843, 344,495.63 No. of childnn in the returaed 

do. in 1843, 350,058.02 Districts, 71,849 

There are about 1,500 School Dist's. 

The sum of $30,000 was duly distributed to the several county collectors 
from the income of the State Fund. 

The whole amount of moneys paid by the township collectors to the 
trustees of districts in townships, from which reports have been received, 
is $60,330.55. 



Finances. 
[Fcora the Treasurer's Report for the year ending Oct. 10, 1843.] 
Heceipts, Payments, 



1843. Cash OB hand, $10,871.54 

1843. State Tax, 40,00000 

Transit duties on Railroads 

and Canal, 37,382.88 

Dividends on Railroad and 



Canal Stock, 
Interest on Bonds, do., 
Incidental receipts. 



1,020.00 
1,817.00 



$103,091.42 
Treasurer, U. S. pub. lands, 14,657.17 
Temporary loans, 10,000.00 



Legislative expenses, $22,745.80 
Salaries, Gov., Judges, &c., 13,596.67 
State Prison Inspectors and 

advances, 7,167.41 

Costs of conviction & trans> 



12,000.00 portation of prisoners, 5,620.55 



$127,748.59 



Inst, of deaf, dumb, & blind, 3,814.98 
Inciden. and various exp's, 8,892.52 

$61,838.02 
Loans and interest, 50,204.25 

Bal. in Treas., Oct. 15,1843, 15,706.32 



$127,748.59 

$103,091.42 
10,871.54 

$92,219.88 
61,838.02 

Amount of fund for the support of Com. Schools, Oct. 1842, 344,495.63 



Total amount received in 1843, from ordinary sources, 
Deducting balance from 1842, 



Total amount paid, (exclusive of loans,) 



Meceipti of Revenue. Bank Tax, 

Dividends in Bank and Railroad Stock, 
Interest on Loans, &c., 



Paid. Contingent expenses, 

Distributed to the different counties, 

Amount of the fund, Oct. 1843, 



$17,821.67 
1,428.50 
16,539.40 35,789.57 

$380,285.20 
227 18 
30,000.00 30,227.18 

$350,058.02 



Of this amount, $11,090.85 is unproductive, and of doubtful value. 



1946.] PSlfNSTI.VANXA. 231 



IX. PENNSYLVANIA. 



Government. 



Salary. 
David R. Porte&, Governor^ (tenn of office expires on the 3d 

Tuesday in January, 1845,) $4,000 

Charles McCliixe, of Cumberland Co., Sec. of State^ and 

Superintendent of Common Schools^ 1,700 

Thomas L. Wilson, Jkputy Secretary of State^ 1,000 

Job Mann, State Dreasitrery 1,400 

William F. Packer, Auditor General^ 1,400 

Jacob Sallade, Surveyor Gen., a/nd See. of the Land Qfice^ 1,200 

Thomas J. Rehrer, Deputy Surveyor General, 1,000 

Richard M. Crain, Deputy Secretary of the Land Ofiee, 1,100 

Adam Dlller, Adjutant General^ 300 

Henry D. Rogers, State Geologist, 2,000 

William P. Wilcox, Speaker of the Senate. 

James R. Snowden, Speaker of the House of Bepresentativet. 

James Clarke, \ 

William B. Foster, Jr., > Ckmal Commisnoners. 
Jesse Miller, 3 

After the 3d Tuesday in January, 1845, the salary of the Governor will 
be $3,000. 

JunioiABY* 
Supreme Court. 

Salaiy. 

John B. Gibson, of Carlisle, Chief Justice, $3,666.67 

Molton C. Rogers, of Lancaster, Associate Justice, 2,400.00 

Charles Huston, of Bellefonte, do. ^ 2,400.00 

John Kennedy, of Pittsburg, do, 2,400.00 

Thomas Sergeant, of Philadelphia, do. 2,400.00 

Ovid F. Johnson, of do. Attorney General, $300 and fees. 

Joseph S. Cohen, Brothonotary for the East District, Fees. 

Abner L. Pentland, do. West do. do. 

P. C. Sedgewick, do. Middle do. do. 

The Judges of the Supreme Court receive, in addition to their salaries, 
$4.00 a day, ^ while on the circuits, as a full allowance for travelling 
expenses." By a law passed in 1843, the salaries of those who succeed the 
present incumbents will be as follows : Chief Justice, $1,800, Associate 
Justices, $1,600 ; and, is addition, $a a day while on the circuits 



232 



PENNSYLVANIA. 



[1846. 



They hold court in bank, once a year, in four ieveral districts; — 1st, 
for the Eastern District, at Philadelphia; 2d, for the Middle District, at 
Harrisburg; 3d, for the Korthern District, at Sunburyj 4th, for the 
Western District, at Pittsburg. 

District Qmrts. — There are four District Courts, which are invested 
with the civil jurisdiction of the Common Pleas, in their respective Dis- 
tricts, in all cases exceeding a certain amount. 



District Court for the City and County of Philadelphia, 



Thomas M'Eean Pettit, 
George M. Stroud, 
Joel Jones, 
E. C. Dale, 



President Judge^ 
Judge, 

do. 
Prothonotary. 



Salary. 

$2,000 
2,000 
2,000 



District Covartfor the City and County of Lancaster, 

Alexander Hayes, Judge, 

District Court for the County ofjiUeghany. 



Robert C. Grier, 
Vacancy. 



President Judge, 



Salary. 
1,600 

Salary. 
2,000 



District Court for Earie, Crawford, Venango, Warren, and Mercer. 



James Thompson, 



Judge, 



Salary. 
2,000 



Courts of Common Pleas. — The State is divided into 20 Districts, for the 
sessions of the Court of Common Pleas. The President Judge of the 
District of Philadelphia and the Associate Judges have each a salary of 
$2,600. The President Judges, in all the other districts, have each a salary 
of $2,000, and their Associates $120. 

Districts. President Judges. 

1. Philadelphia, . . . Edward King, 

Judges, James Campbell, John R. Jones, Anson V. Parsons. 



2. Lancaster, 

3. Berks, Northampton, and Lehigh, 

4. Centre, Clinton, and Clearfield, 

5. Alleghany, .... 

6. Erie, Crawford, Venango, and Warren, 

7. Bucks and Montgomery, 

8. Northumberland, Lycoming, and Columbia, 

9. Cumberland, Perry, and Juniata, 

10. Westmoreland, Indiana, Armstrong, and Cambria, Thomas White. 

11. Susquehanna, Munroe, Wyoming, Wayne, Pike, William Jessup. 



Ellis Lewis. 
John Banks. 
Geo. W. Woodward. 
Benjamin Patton. 
Gay lord Church. 
Thomas Burnside. 
Joseph B. Anthony. 
Samuel Hepburn. 



1845,] 



PBt^NSYLVANIA. 



233 



12. Dauphin, Lebanon, Sehuylkill, and Carbon, 

13. Luzerne, Bradford, and Tioga, 

14. Washington, Fayette, and Greene, 

15. Chester and Delaware, 

16. Franklin, Bedford, and Somerset, 

17. Beaver, Butler, and Mercer, 

18. Porter, McKean, Warren, Jefferson, and Elk, 

19. York and Adams, 

20. Huntingdon, Mifflin, and Union, 



Nat. B. Eldred. 
J. N. Conyngham. 
Nathaniel Ewing. 
Thomas S. Bell. 
Jeremiah S. Black. 
John Bredin. 
Alex. M«Calmont. 
Daniel Durkee. 
Abraham S. Wilson. 



Finances. 



Total amount received in 1843, 
Total amount expended in 1843, 

Principal Items of Expenditure, 

Salaries of Exec, officers, $14,100.00 
Salaries of the Judiciary, 69,566.67 
Other ordinary expenses 

of government. 
Internal Improvement, 
Common Schools, 
Charitable Estab'ments, 
Miscellaneous, 
Domestic creditors. 



200,000.00 

747,263.92 

339,777.32 

20,618.73 

8,607.68 

1,261,236.78 



Militia expenses, 42,448.59 

Pensions and gratuities, 46,007.76 

Loans and interest paid, 135,046.17 

Cancelled notes, 508,000.00 



$3,404,434.37 
3,523,324.02 

Chief Sotirces of ^ome. 

Taxes on estates, $554,452.06 

Tax on Bank dividends, 25,529.76 
Income of Pub. Works, 1,049,244.19 

6,645.76 
29,310.50 
59,661.78 
47,090.10 



Miscellaneous, 
Auction commission, 
Auction Duties, 
Tavern licenses. 
Duties on dealers in for- 

eign merchandise, 63,857.24 

Collateral inherit, tax, 22,337.05 
Tax on certain offices, 3,668.12 

Tax on writs, 37,769.86 

Tax on corporation stocks, 38,510.79 
Sales of stocks in 1843, 1,395,411.84 



Debts and Property. 



Debt, JprU 1, 1844. 



6 per cent stocks, 
5 do. do. 
4)^ do. do. 

Relief notes at 1 per cent, interest, 
Loan, 6 per cent.. 

Domestic creditors — scrip outstanding. 
Interest on loans, due 1st Feb. 1844, 

20* 



$4,331,013.99 

32,934,763.73 

200,000.00 

1,292,449.68 
171,636.00 



$37,465,777.72 

1,464,085.68 
166,504.65 
955,426.13 

$40,051,794.18 



234 



PSNMBYLVAMIA. 



[1845. 



Ptoperty of the Commonwealth, 

Stock in sundry corporations, (par value) 

Public Works, (cost of construction) 

Public buildings and grounds at Harrisburg, (estimated) 

Money due on lands unpatented, (estimated) 

Stale arsenals, powder magazine, &c., (estimated) 



82,002,507.56 

28,616,375.01 

250,000 00 

200,000.00 

100,000.00 

$31,168,972.57 



The Tax Bill which passed both houses of the Legislature, in 1844, 
has received the signature of Gov. Porter, and has consequently become 
a law. It levies a tax of three mills on every dollar of the valuation of 
real and personal property in the State, which it is estimated virill exceed 
$600,000,000. The tax, of course, will amount to over $1,800,000. The 
revenue derived from other taxes will amount to $400,000, and the net 
income of the public works, is estimated, at the minimum, at $550,000, 
making an annual revenue, in all, of $2,750,000. The interest on the 
public debt of every description, is about $2,000,000, and the expenses of 
government, including appropriations to the public schools, less than 
$600,000. Ample provision is therefore made to enable the State hereafter 
to meet its engagements, and for the restoration of the public credit. 

Omal and Railroad Tolls. 



Years. 


Amount. 


Years. 


Amount. 


1830, . 


$25,748.68 


1838, 


$959,336.32 


1831, 


. 38,241.20 


1839, . 


. 1,076,045.47 


1832, . 


50,909.57 


1840, 


1,195,751.33 


1833, 


. 151,419.69 


1841, . 


. 1,055.394.60 


1834, . 


309,789.15 


1842, 


907.093.12 


1835, 


. 684,357.77 . 


1843, . 


. 1,019,401.15 


1836, . 


837,805.72 




g 


1837, 


. 975,350.49 


Total, . 


. $9,286,644.26 



Years. 

1833, 
1834, 
1835, 
1836, 
1837, 
1838, 
1839, 
1840, 
1841, 
1842, 
1843, 



Colwmhia and Philadelphia Railway. 

Length 82 miles — cost $4,204,969.96. 
Revenue. 

$5,002.58 

40,240.32 
183,609.80 
260,657.83 
353,566.18 
390,636.32 
389,973.97 
445,552.32 
411,536.96 
345,081.63 
369,496.08 



Expenditure. 

None, 
do. 
$163,691.31 
288,388.91 
403,996.74 
197,200.69 
264,287.22 
550,238.33 
339,169.86 
340,208.42 
288,502.84 



$3,195,353.09 



$2,835,084.32 



1S43.] l-ENNSlfLViHI*. 

Couuon Schools. 
Stalutical IklaiU ofSckooU in Ihe leveral Coant 



Slaiiitieal DttinU eftht SchaoU — Conlinutd. 





Scholau. 


Be 


»... 


Eipendimre. 


t!l 


H 


1. ' 
g 


11 




i 


•"ii 






1! 


■ 


^1 




1 


£^S 




jl 


=1 

5-5 


1 


p 


1 


1 

11 


1 


Ad«», 




49 


4ecu. 


*. 


87,447 68 


«S,IIB13 


•80188 


»8m48 


AUegheay, 


184 








37,41B93 


39,127 40 


2,805 2( 


0,191 2; 






BO 


40 




4,709 34 


5,624 08 




'oiBoe 


Bedfocri, 






3S 




7 413 31 


7,867 31 




1,20121 


3S 


40 






7>.oa 


8^753 « 


47S40 


2^7 63 


Beik>, 


87 


80 


33 




8,424 SI 


8,070 71 


1,607 49 


5,278 21 


Bndbrd, 






^ 




" ■"■• 1 


6,039 44 


475 45 


'»77H 


BucL.,^ 


10( 


4J 








15',379 17 


1,527 5; 


1,000 ai 


BnUe^ 










« 


7,588 74 




W29 


Gambia, 


81 


39 


B 






2,588 33 


24101 


16S3J 


Csnlra, 




40 


11 






8 174 eal 


482 89 


1,0W« 


Cbetler, 




4T 


M 




10 


33,297 40 2,410 19 


fl 131 » 


SSk 


31 




37 




V 


3,219 48 




'aoios 













3,137 20 


178 78 


1,017 oa 


Climon, 




38 








a>5 32 


809 07 




Colambin, 


a 


43 


38 




« 


4,313 15 


671 49 


695 11 


CtxwhrS', 












11,881 8S 


173 23 


2,401 X 






48 








15,'l48 44 


1,090 « 


2^99 03 


Dauphin, ' 




86 


1 






10,717 41 




5^8157 


Delaware, 













11,420 83 


1,137 5 


1,919 70 








33 






11398 04 


'483 6 


'■^M 


Fayetle, 




45 


45 




n 


8,142 30 






FranLlLn, 


:i 


48 








12,145 & 


1,212 35 


1,920 57 


Gre«ne7 






42 








^78 82 


I,l8e2S 


Humingdon, 






44 




<■ 


101h87 6! 
0,058 00 




2^538 37 


Indiana, 




48 


30 






235 04 


3^98144 


Jeff^ 


3$ 










9,498 40 


298 19 


1792 84 




m 


40 


33 






3,412 02 


243 32 


'l2S21 


lIHi^st, 


4S; 


sa 








87,457 65 


2,80185 


11,399 58 


Lebanon,' 






^ 




31 


a,fl38 84 


'33125 


3^31 


Lehigh, 












2 487 00 




37 4S 


Luzerne, 


4! 




fi 




a 


uIms* 


1,105 20 


1,0M37 


li^r^if 


'« 


40 

9i 


¥i 










802 M 


Mer«r, 




40 








ioil^a 






Mifflin,' 




46 




3,il2 




8,887 08 
2,75100 


385 97 


885 80 






38 




s,m 






55 31 


M™i™mei7, 










87 12,058 00 
10 14318 03 


2,056 83 


1,849 8^ 




1,T«' 






s;9so 


1307 84 


1,877 8! 






3S 


3140 




3,038 Otf 


'347 22 


728 W 


Perry, 








3,671 


si 


4,423 49 


385 so 




PiKo,' 




38 


33 






1,318 81 


13 00 




Schgjlfcill, 














563 


675 59 








4,483 




7;T87R 


891 ftt 


1,^00 7t 








30 


a,171 




2,328 74 


140 5B 












4,M7 




7,890 4: 


11121 


832 


TU.i», 


la 




» 


3753 








1,477 15 


Union 


IK 


SI 




a,a8i 


60 4,374 7S 


538 91 


2>95 20 


Venaiifw, 




30 


33 


3,2-je 


IS 3 710 001 


90 88 


1,0011^ 










2,230 


in 3,081 37 


l'»26 


'ms 


WMwlijion, 








e,a04 


36' 13,439 01 


1,577 SJ 


2,181 et 








33 


9839 


10 4 3B0 7S 






wSlmirelttid, 


27 




34 


8S77 


78 13,S7! tft 
_.,..._7B 8,3«10 




1,877 et 


YoA. 


108 


IML 


IS- 


^ 


'SS3 41 
38,149 51 


639 95 


, T"»l, 


5^ 


io,9an 90 


448,307 61 


^jM 



1845.] PENNSYLVANIA. 237 

In the Ist school district, embracing the city and county of Philadel- 
phia, the number of schools is 215 ; of which, 1 is the High School, 40 
Grammar Schools, 18 Secondary, 76 Primary, and 80 not classified. The 
whole number of teachers, including the professors of the High School, 
is 499 ; 87 males, and 412 females. The aggregate amount of salaries is 
$136,843; average to each, $274.23. The number of pupils is 33,384, exhib- 
iting an increase of 5,222 since the last report. A number of schools 
for colored children are embraced in the above summary, which is taken 
from an abstract from the semi-annual returns. The expenses of the 
Board of Control for all purposes, except the erection and fitting up of 
school houses, have been $288,766.66 for a year and a half; or an average 
of $192,511.18 per annum. This includes cost of tuition, fuel, books, sta- 
tionary, and supplies of every description ; also, the expenses of the Sec- 
retary of the Board and the Comptroller, repairing school houses, and all 
the other items which are included by the Auditors under the head of 
general expenses. Divide this sum by 33,384, (the total number of schol- 
ars,) and it will be seen that the annual average expense of each. pupil for 
all the purposes above stated, has been $5,76. The total amount of ex- 
penditure in 1842 was $255,852.92. The expenditure from January 1st 
to June 30th, 1843, was $118,028.76. 

Statistics op thb Charitable Institutions in the State. 

Philadelphia House of Refuge^ incorporated March 23, 1827, for the refor- 
mation of Juvenile Delinquents. The ground and buildings have cost 
$83,381.81, and are incumbered with a debt of $27,000. No boy can be 
retained after the age of 21, and no girl after the age of 18. The pupils 
receive a good education, and some suitable trade. At any time during 
their stay in the institution, the managers may, if they think them wor- 
thy, bind them out, with their consent^ as apprentices. In 1843, 74 boys 
and 34 girls were admitted, and 56 boys and 34 girls were discharged ; 
and there remained in the institution, on the 3lst of December, 1843, 110 
boys and 58 girls. 87 were committed by magistrates, 15 by courts, and 
6 returned after having left the House. 37 boys and 23 girls were sent at 
the request of parents or near relatives. The average age of the boys 
was 13^ yearS) of the girls 14)^; average number of inmates, 152. 

The Pennsylvania Institution for the Deaf and Dumb was incorporated 
and endowed Feb. 8, 1821. The neighboring States of New Jersey, Dela- 
ware, and Maryland, have passed laws appropriating certain sums of 
money annually towards the support of their own deaf and dumb citi- 
zens in this institution. The purpose of the institution is the instruction 
of this unfortunate class of the community. During the year 1843, 24 
pupils were admitted into, and 14 left, the institution ; and there remained . 
on the 31st of December, 1842, 66 males, and 55 females; total 121. Of 
this number, 83 are supported by Pennsylvania, 7 by New Jersey, 12 by 
Maryland, 3 by Delaware, and 16 by their friends, or the institution. 



238 DICLAWARE. [1843. 

X. DELAWARE. 

Government. 

SMaty. 

William B. Coo per, of Laurel, Ghvemor, (term of office 

expires on the 3d Tuesday in January, 1845,) $1,333^ 

John W. Houston, of Georgetown, Secretary of State, Fees and 400 

Gardiner H. Wright, of Millsborough, State Tmuurer, 500 

Simon Spearman, of Smyrna, JtudUor^ 500 

Pay of the members of the legislature, $3 a day. 

Judiciary. 

Superior Court, 

Salary. 

James Booth, of New Castle, Chief Justice, $1,200 

Samuel M. Harrington, of Dover, Jlssociate Justice, 1,200 

John J. MilHgan, of Wilmington, do. 1,000 

One Vacancy, 

Edward W. Gilpin, of do. Attorney General, Fees and 300 

Court of Chancery, 

Salary. 

Eensey Johns, Jr., of New Castle, ChoMvieUor, $1,100 

Orphan's Court. 
The Chancellor and one of the Associate Judges of the Superior Court 

Registers^ Courts, 

Joshua E. Driver, of New Castle, Jlegisier of WUls, Fees. 

Charles Polk, of Dover, tio, do. Fees. 

Peter Parker, of Georgetown, do, do. Fees. 

Common Schools. — The State has a school fund of $175,750. The 
number of scholars in the public schools is 11,376. Provision is made 
by law for a free school within every three miles square of territory. 

Willard Hall, of Wilmington, ^ 

Charles Marim, of Dover, > Superintendents of Free Schools. 

Joshua G. Baker, of Milton, ) 

Finances. 

The total valuation of this State on the tax list is $25,324,718 ; annual 
tax, 70,092 -, balance in the treasury, $516,132. The State owes no debt. 



1845.1 



MARYLAND. 



239 



XL MARYLAND. 



G0VEB.NMEnT. 

Balarf. 
Francis Thomas, of Frederick, Governor^ (terra of office expires 

on the 1st Monday in January, 1845,) *$4,200 

2,000 

2,500 

800 

Fees. 

Fees. 

Fees. 

1,000 

500 

500 



Wm. Van Buskirk, of Alleghany Co., Secretary of State^ 
Dennis Claude, of Annapolis, Treasurer ^ 

Lyde G. Mc Blair, of Annapolis, Surveyor General^ 

Josiah Bayly, of Dorchester Co. Mtorwy General, 



John S. Gittings, of Baltimore, 
George G. Brewer, of Annapolis, 



J. H. T. Magruder, 
John N. Watkins, 
Richard I. Crabb, 
Richard Thomas, 
W. H. Watson, 



CommUiioner of LoanSj 
Rtgixter of the Land Office^ 
State Lihranan, 
Adjutant Creneral, 
Armorer, 

of St. Mary's Co. President of the Senate, 
of Baltimore, Speaker of the House. 



do. 
do. 
do. 



Theodoiick Bland, 
Louis Gassaway, 
Cornelius McLean, 



Judiciary. 
Court of Chancery. 

Appointed. 
of Annapolis, 1824, 
do. 
do. 



Chancellor^ 

Register, 

Auditor, 



Salaiy. 
$3,600 

Fees. 



John Buchanan, 
William B. Stone, 
Stevenson Archer, 
Thomas B. Dorsey, 
Ezek. F. Chambers, 
Ara Spence, 
Richard W.Gill, 



Court of Appeals, 

Appointed. Salary. 

of Williamsport, 1824, Chief Judge, $2,500 

of Charles Co., 1844, Associate Judge, 2,200 

of Bel-Air, 1823, do, 3,000 

of Ellicott's Mills, 1824, do. . 2,200 

of Chestertown, 1835, do. 2,200 

of Snowhill, do. 2,200 

of Annapolis, Clerk ^ Beporter, Fees. 



Nicholas Brice, 

W. G. D. Worthington, 

Alexander Nisbet, 



Baltimore City Court. 

Chief JuiSge, 
Associate Judge, 
do. 



$2,400 
1,500 
1,500 



* And the ase of Uie " Governors home." 



n 



340 MARYLAND. [1845. 

The State is divided into six judicial districts, each comprising two, 
three, or four counties. For each district there are a chief judge and two 
associates, who constitute the County Courts for the respective counties 
in the district. These Q,re the common law courts of original jurisdiction 
in the State ; and they have jurisdiction of all claims for fifty dollars and 
upwards, appellate jurisdiction from the judgment of justices of the peace, 
and equity jurisdiction within the counties coextensive with the chan- 
cellor. The six chief judges constitute the Court of Appeals for the 
State, which has appellate jurisdiction of cases at law and in equity, ori- 
ginating in the County Courts, the Orphans' Courts, (of which there is 
one in each county,) and the Court of Chancery. 

Finances. 

Total amount received in 1843, . . $680,428.81 

Total amount expended in 1843, . 665,969.90 



IHncipal items of Experuiiture. 

Salaries of civil officers, $11,794.50 
Salaries of the Judiciary, 39,176.42 
Expenses of Legislature, 56,702.74 



Chief sources of Income. 

Dividends on stocks, $63,442.50 

Direct taxes, 367,232.51 

Auction duties, 29,169.83 



Interest on the Stale debt, 273,376.32 Baltimore & Ohio R.R. Co., 56,496.73 



Loans of 1841, 131,524.18 

Common Schools, 77,717.67 

Charitable Establishments, 20,000.00 
Miscellaneous, 7,000.00 

Colleges and Academies, 19,600.00 



Balance from 1842, 58,858.23 

Licenses granted by county 
courts, 79,011.10 

Tobacco inspection in Bal- 
timore, 20,781.05 



Whole amount of State debt, . . $12,004,784.98 

Annual interest on this debt, . 656,021.16 

Public Debt. — A report to the Legislature, made Feb. 13, 1844, gives 
the following particulars respecting the public debt. 

The funded debt of the State is . . $15,204,784.98 

The amount held by the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Co., ^ 
which is not a cliarge upon the Treasury is . 3,200,000.00 

Leaving an actual debt of . 12,004,784.98 

The productive capital of the State, besides its Bank 
stock, consists of the following: 
In the Slock of the Baltimore and Washington Railroad 

Company, the Stale holds $550,000 — worth, 

at the market price, $75 per hundred, 412,500.00 

In the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company, 

$500,000 — worth $39 per hundred, 195,000.00 

And other stocks worth about . 10,000.00 

617,500.00 



Leaving a balance of debt of . . 11,387,284.98 

But besides this productive stock, the State holds a large amount of 

capital and credits, at present unproductive, but which must, nevertheless, 

in the course of a period not very remote, become of considerable value. 



1845.] MAETLAND. S4i 

Much the largest portion of this capital consists of the bonds and 
stock of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal Company — of the Baltimore 
and Susquehanna Railroad Company — • and the Susquehanna and Tide 
Water Canal Company. 

The committee suppose that, under the most unfavorable circumstances, 
the capital and credits of the State, 'which are at this time unproductive, 
would, if so applied, pay $5,600,000. The debt of the State, then, de- 
ducting her productive capital, i^t present market prices, is, as we have 
seen, ..... $11,387,284.98 

She holds unproductive capital, and credits, which would 

pay at this time, at least, . . 5,000,000.00 

Leaving only the sum of . . . $6,387,284.93 

^nd of this balance, there belongs to the sinking fund, 1,160,075.09 

Actual debt, .... $5,227,209.89 

Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. 

Receipts for the year ending September 30, 1843. 

For transportation of passengers, . $204,939.79 

" " freight, . . . 281,620.15 

" « U.S. mails, . . 41,235.11 

From the Washington Branch, . . . 42,004.59 

For sundries, .... 5,435.44 



$575,235.08 
Ordinary expenses for the year, . . 287,153.72 

Net revenue, .... $288,081.36 

Revenue on the main road, from January to July, 1843, 329,764.43 

« " «• '« « « « " " 1844, 276,665.09 

The cost of the road has been as follows : 

Stock in the Washington branch road, . . $1,032,600.00 

Cost of road to Harper's Ferry, . . 3,465,048.79 

Real estate and depots, .... 266,156.86 

Locomotives, cars, &c., . . • 268,794.35 

Cost of road west of Harper's Ferry, . . " 5,554,403.13 

Total cost, .... $8,587,003.13 

CONOEESSIONAL DISTRICTS 

1. St. Mary's, Charles, Calvert, Prince George's, Montgo.i ery, and Anne Amndel, 
excepting Howard District. Population, 74.737. 

2. Alleghany, Washington, and Frederick. Population, 77,840. 

3. Carroll and Baltimore Counties, Howard District, and the ISih, 13th, and 14th 
wards of Baltimore city. Population, 78,45'J. 

4. The first eleven wards of Baliimore city. Population. 79,626. 

6. Harford. Cecil, Kent, Queen Anne's, and Caruune. Population. 61,471. 
6. Talbot, Dorchester, Somerfct, and Worcester. Population, 62,185. 

21 



242 MARYLAND. [1845. 

Maetland Pemitentiart. 

Tlie total gain by tlie labor of the convicts, and the commercwl opeia- 
tions of the institution, during the year ending on the 30th of November, 
1643, was $30,275 29. The expenses during the same period, including 
the salaries of officers, and charges of every description, amounted to 
$29,791.63, leaving an excess, or net profit for the year, of $483.66. 

The average number of prisoners in confinement during the year was 
299 ; eight more than the average of 1S42. 

The number received during the year was 97. Of this number, 86 
were males, and 11 females; 62 whites, and 35 blacks; 74 Americans, 
and 23 foreigners, viz: 15 natives of Germany, 1 of Turkey, 1 of Prussia, 
1 of Russia, 4 of Ireland, and 1 of France. Of the whole number, 97, 
32 were convicted in the courts of Baltimore. 

There were discharged during the year — by expiration of their sen- 
tencef«, 67; by pardons, 12 ; by death, 21 ; in all 100. There remained in 
confinement on the 30th of November, 287. 

Common Schools. 

Each of the counties has for some years been entitled to receive $800 
per annum, or more, out of the school fund ; but it is variously distri- 
buted, and some counties get more. St. Mary's and Charles counties 
give their share to one institution — the Charlotte Hall Academy, or 
school. In other cases, the portion of a county is divided between two 
or more academies or schools, and in some counties it is distributed to 
the primary schools. Attempts have been made to procure a law to 
distribute the whole of the school fund to these schools, but, as yet, no 
such law has been passed. 

By an act of the General Assembly, passed Feb. 2S, 1826, entitled "An 
Act to provide for the public instruction of youth, in primary schools, 
throughout this State," provision was made for the establishment of 
primary schools in every county of the State in which, at the then ensuing 
election for delegates to the General Assembly, a majority of the voters 
should express their will in favor of the system. 

A few of the counties adopted it ; and, under various provisions of law, 
there are primary or common schools in most of the counties. 

From a report on the draft of a code for the support of common 
schools, made to the General Assembly in 1843, we gather some facts 
illustrative of the condition of public schools in this State. Eight of the 
counties have made no returns. The following is a part of the informa- 
tion furnished by the other counties: 

" In Anne Arundel county, there are twenty-eight primary school dis- 
tricts, of which number twenty- two are in operation. The cost of school 
houses is about $300 each. There are twenty-three teachers employed. 
The lowest sum paid to any teacher is $200 ; the highest $500 ; the gross 



1845.J MARYLAND. 243 

amount of salary paid to all the teachers is $7,065. The number of 
scholars in all the schools is 525. The amount levied by the county for 
the support of primary schools is $2,400. The sum levied by the several 
districts amounts to $3,005.62. The amount received from the State, for 
the year 1842, was $2,167.82. 

" In the Howard district, there are twenty primary schools. The cost 
of the buildings in which the schools are held, would average $200 each. 
There are twenty teachers, with an average salary of $300 each. The 
schools are kept open an average of nine hours. The average number 
of scholars in attendance on all the schools is 526. The amount levied 
by the district is $1,800; that received from the State, $1,500. 

" In Alleghany county, there are eighty-eight common schools. The 
supposed cost of the houses in which the schools are held is $25. The 
teachers of eighty-two of the schools receive from the State $50 each, 
and those of the six other schools $25 each. In addition to this, the 
teachers charge $2 per quarter for each scholar, which is paid by the 
parents. The average number of scholars in attendance upon each 
school is about 20. There is no levy made by the county for the support 
of schools; the amount received from the State is about $1,000. 

In Caroline county, there are 24 common schools. The average num- 
ber of scholars in attendance upon each, is 12. The amount received 
from the State is about 3,441. The county makes no levy for the schools. 

" In Charles county, there are twenty-nine primary schools. The aver- 
age cost of the buildings in which the schools are held is $300. There 
are twenty-nine teachers with salaries averaging from $200 to $450 each. 
The schools are kept open about eight hours per day. The county is by 
law required to levy $3,000 annually upon the property within its limits. 
The amount annually received from the State is about $3,200. There 
are taught in the schools of this county between 700 and 800 scholars. 

" In Cecil county, there are no primary schools. One third of the 
schools are kept in private houses and in churches. The cost of houses 
built expressly for schools is, on an average, $75, and they are built by sub- 
scription. There are about forty teachers in the county, who receive 
from $2.50 to $3 per quarter for each scholar. The county makes no 
levy for the support of schools. The amount received from the State is 
about $3,000 per annum. This fund is paid to the orphan's court, and by 
it is distributed to the several election districts. 

" In Dorchester county, there are forty-four primary schools. They are 
generally held in churches and private buildings, erected prior to the 
adoption of the primary school system in the county. Where houses 
have been erected, the cost has been from $150 to $200 each. There are 
usually about forty-four teachers in the county, independently of those 
engaged in the three academies in the county. The sum paid to teachers 
is from $150 to $200; and where there is a good teacher, the parents, by 
subscription, increase the allowance of the county. As to the number of 



244 viBoiMiA. [1845. 

hours the schools are kept open, our iuformant says, * no mortal man can 
answer the inquiry. It is intended they should he open in the forenoon 
from 8 to 12, and in the afternoon, from 2 to 5 o'clock; but in some of 
the districts, I am informed, they are not open over two hours in the day, 
and in several of the schools, not over one or two days in the week ; yet 
they (the teachers) receive their draft, and obtain their money.' Some 
of the schools have in attendance forty scholars, others ten, average 
about twenty. The amount levied upon the county is $4,000 ; that re- 
ceived from the State, about 33,000. The clerk of the commissioners of 
the county, speaking of the want of qualification on the part of some 
of the teachers, observes, * I have receipts from some (of them) that a 
Philadelphia lawyer could not read.' 

*' In Frederick county, there are eighty school districts. The cost of 
school houses, from $450 to $S00; the two buildings in Frederick city 
cost — the one, $1,400, the other, $1,700. There are seventy-four teachers 
in the county, who receive from $60 to $100 per annum each. The 
number of scholars is from 2,500 to 3,000. The total number of 
scholarji in the county is estimated at 9,000. The amount received from 
the State was, in 1841, $2,540.57, in 1842, $2,314.95. Amount levied by 
county has been, heretofore, $8,000." 

The public schools in the city of Baltimore are popular, and in a flour- 
ishing condition. Each scholar pays one dollar a quarter for tuition. 
The amount required from the city treasury, for the support of these 
schools, in 1844, was $29,372.79. The amount of tuition fees received in 
1843, was $9,725 13. The whole number of public schools in the city 
was 24, and the number of scholars, 3,455. 



XII. VIRGINIA. 
Government. 



Salary. 
James McDowell, of Rockbridge, Grovemor, (term ends 

Jan. 1, 1846,) ^3,333j^ 

John Rutherfoord, of Richmond, Senior CotmciUor of StaUy 

(term ends March 31, 1645,) 1,000 

John F. Wiley, of Amelia Co. Cknmcillor of State, 

(term ends March 31, 1846,) 1,000 

John M. Patton, of Richmond, Councillor of States 

(term ends March 31, 1847,) 1,000 

Fabius M. Lawson, of Richmond, TVeasurery 2,000 

James E. Heath, do. Auditor, 2,000 

James Brown, Jr., do. 2d Auditor, and Superintendml 

of the Literary Fund, 2,000 



1845.] vi&GiKiA. 245 

Stafford H. Fajker, do. Register of the Land Officty 1,500 

Sidney S. Baxter, do. Attorney (xeneral, Fees & 1,000 

W. H. Richardson, of Henrico Co., Secretetry of the Commonwealth^ 

Adjutant General, and Librarian^ 1,720 
Thomas F. Lawson, of Richmond, Clerk of the Council, 1,000 

Charles S. Morgan, do. Superinten. Penitentiary, 2,000 

Edward P. Scott, of Greenville, Speaker of the Senate^ $6 a day. 

The Governor, Treasurer, Auditor, and 2d Auditor are, ex officio, mem- 
bers of the Board of Public Works, Literary Fund, and North Western 
Turnpike. They do not receive compensation for this service. 

JUDICIAKT. 

Court of Appeals. 

Elected in Salary. 

William H. Cabell, of Richmond, President, 1830, $2,750 

Francis T. Brooke, of Spottsylvania Co., Judge, 1830, 2,500 

John J. Allen, of Botetourt Co., do, 1840, 2,500 

Robert Stanard, of Richmond, do. 1839, 2,500 

Briscoe G. Baldwin, of Staunton, do, 1842, 2,500 

Joseph Allen, of Richmond, Clerk of the Eastern Circuit, 1,000 

John A. North, of Lewisburg, Clerk of the Western Circuit, 1,000 

The judges are entitled to receive, in addition to their salaries, 25 cents 
a mile for necessary travel. The Court of Appeals holds two sessions 
annually ; one at Lewisburg, Greenbriar county, for the counties lying 
west of the Blue Ridge, commencing on the 2d Monday in July, and con- 
tinuing 90 days, unless the business shall be sooner despatched ; the other 
at Richmond, for the counties lying east of the Blue Ridge, commencing 
at such times as the Court may from time to time appoint. 

General Court, 

The State is divided into ten Judicial Districts, and each District into 
two Circuits, except the 4th, which comprises three. The third Circuit 
of the 4th District is the 21st District of the State, containing but a single 
Court, called the " Circuit Superior Court of Law and Chancery for the 
county of Henrico and city of Richmond." In this Court, there are two 
judges; one on the law side, with a salary of $1,800; the other on the 
chancery side, with a salary of $2,000. On the death, resignation, or re- 
moval of either of the two judges now attached to this court, his duties 
are to devolve on the other, without any increase of salary. In all the 
other circuits, the chancery and common law jurisdictions are blended in 
the same judges, each of whom has a salary of $1,500, and $4 for every 20 
miles of necensary travelling. 

21« 



246 



VIRaiNIA. 



[1845. 



Judges. Residence. 

1. Richard H. Baker, of Nansemond Co. 

2. James H. Gho<«on, of Petersburg. 

3. Geo. P. Scarbarg, of Accomac. 

4. Vacant. 

5. John T. Lomax, 

6. John Scott, 

7. John B. Clopton, 

8. Daniel A. Wilson, of Cumberland Co 

9. William Leigh, of Halifax Co. 
la N. M. Taliaferro, of Franklin Co. 
11. Richard H. Field, of Culpepper Co. 



of Fredericksburg, 
of Fauquier Co. 
of Richmond. 



Judges. Residence, 

12. L. P. Thompson, of Staunton. 

13. Isaac R. Douglass, of Morgan Co. 

14. Daniel Smith, of Rockingham Co. 

15. Benjamin Estell, of Wythe Co. 

16. James E. Brown, of Wylhe Co. 

17. Edward Johnston, of Botetourt Co. 

18. Edwin S. Duncan, of Harrisoa Co. 

19. D. W. McComas, of Wylhe Co. 

20. Joseph L. Fry, of Wheeling. 
21 ( Philip N. Nicholas, of Richmond. 

( John Robertson, do. 



A Circuit Superior Court of Law and Chancery is held twice every 
year in each county and in some corporations. 

The judges who hold the Circuit Courts, are also required to hold, 
every year, two terms of the Greneral Court in the Capitol at Richmond. 
It is the duty of fiAeen of the judges to attend this Court, eleven being 
necessary to form a quorum. One term begins on the last Monday in 
June; the other, on the 1st Monday of December. The judges are re- 
quired to arrange themselves into four classes, of five judges each, one of 
which is exempt, in rotation, from attending the court. 

The General Court has appellate jurisdiction in the last resort in crim- 
inal cases ; also, original jurisdiction of probates and administrations, and 
some claims of the Commonwealth. Its judges, or a portion of them, sit 
as a special Court of Appeals, in cases in which the judges of the Court 
of Appeals proper are disqualified by interest or otherwise. 

County Courts. — A Court sits in each Countj' every month, held by four 
or more Justices of the Peace. These Courts, formed of plain farmers or 
country gentlemen, are invested with a jurisdiction wider than that of 
any other Court in the State, covering almost the whole field of cogniz- 
ance, civil, criminal, legal, and equitable. Any one Justice can hold a 
Court with jurisdiction over all causes in which the value does not exceed 
1520. At the monthly and quarterly sessions, which are held by four or 
more Justices, deeds and wills may be proved, and chancery matters and 
suits at common law be heard and determined, with a right of appeal to 
a Superior Court. These Courts, exclusively, try slaves for all offences; 
and they examine free persons charged with felony, previously to their 
trial in the Circuit Court. Free Negroes and Indians are on the same 
footing with slaves. 

Finances. 

The Fund of Internal Improvement, and the Literary Fund, are State 
corporations, each having its own resources and expenditures. The re- 
sources of each, in part, come from the public treasury. Thus, in the 
Fund for Internal Improvement, the greater part of the State debt is reg* 
istered, and the interest payable on the same comes throuo^h the warrant 
of the second Auditor. Should the revenue of this fund be insufficient, 
the deficiency it paid out of the Treasury. 



1«45.] 



VIRGINIA. 



247 



Ckixf Bems of Eocpmditure, 

Interest on State debt* $314,752.9S 
Interest on temporary loan, 13,246.37 
Charitable Establishments, 69,5 1 9.76 
Appro'n to Univ. of Va.,j: 15,000 00 
Military Institute at Lex'n,t 7,750.00 
Common Schools.! 70,058.42 

Public Guard at Rich'd, 22,488.59 
Exp. of Gen. Assembly, 103,334 94 
Officers of Government,^ 80,910.43 
Internal Improvements, 6,229 18 



Chief sources of Income. 

Commonwealth proper, 

Revenue Taxes, $655,293.95 
Militia Fines, 13,42.').30 

Miscellaneous Taxes, 45,110.13 
Bank Dividends &c., 128,230.90 
Temporary loans, 370,000.00 
Miscellaneous, 17,570.20 

Total revenue $1,229,630.48 

Board of Public Works, 136,273.16 
Literary Fund, do., 82,980.06 

$1,448,883.69 



Taxes for 1843. 



Lots, 
Lands, 

252,176 Slaves, 
331,918 Horses, 
9,962 Coaches, 
87 Stages, 
2,625 Carryalls, 
5,290 Gigs, 

Licenses to merchants, 
8,048 Gold Watches, 
18,994 Silver Watches, 
14,882 Metallic Clocks, 
34,169 other Clocks, 
Interest on stocks, &c.. 
Income, over $400, 
Attorneys, 
Physicians, 



$73,761.98 

282,201.14 

11'6,000.96 

46,468.52 

24,424.75 

301.00 

2,839.81 

3,667.71 

96,005.06 

8,048.00 

5,663.50 

7,441.00 

8,542.25 

15,023.97 

7,497.97 

3,198.16 

2,488.40 



2,876 Pianos, 
Plate Tax, 
Insurance Offices, 
Pedlers, 
Ordinary Keepers, 



$4,823.00 
1,557.19 
1,580.20 
3,204.00 

16,941.72 



Houses of private entertain*t,3;651.37 
Venders of lottery tickets, 10,000.00 



Exhibiters of shows. 

Owners of stud horses, 

Dentists, 

Wills, deeds, &c., 

Bridges, 

Ferries, 

Newspapers, 

Various deductions. 
Net amount. 



220.00 
4,730.00 
140.00 
2,727.50 
158,79 
228.78 
310.00 

$753,866.73 
57,468.33 

$696,39840 



Property of the State. 



Bank Stock, 

James River Scrip, 15 per cent, stock, 
Loans to corporate companies, 
Stock in corporate companies, 



$4,205,700.00 
238,000.00 
1,017,400.00 
5,741,452.52 $11,202,552.52 



*The balance of interest on the Public Debt, amounting to $123,305.23, was paid out 
of the revenue of the Board of Public Worka. 

t Part of this amount, say $1,500, is taken from the surplus revenue of the Literary 
Fund. 

^Dui of the revenues of the Literary Fund, which last year amounted to jg82,9e0.06. 

\ This amount doe^ not include the 2d Auditors department, the expense of which is 
paid equiiUy out of the revenue of the Board of Public Works aufl Literary Fund. 



248 NORTH CAEOLIHA. [1845. 

Whol« amount of State Debt, . $7,350,280.30 

Annual interest payable thereon, : . 430,427.31 

Revolutionary War debt, 6 per cent. *24,039.17 

War debt of 1812, 7 « « *319,000.00 

Internal Improvement, 6 percent. $5,166,534.13 
" « 5 •* " 1,365,30000 

" " 6>^* " 25,300.00 6,557,134.13 

Subscription to Bank Stock, 6 per cent, 450,107.00 

Debt held by State institutions, . . $1,386,418.94 

by citizens and corporate bodies of Va., 2,977,373.15 

in Maryland, D. C, and States of the Union, 495,289.00 

Great Britain, . . . 2,427,899.21 

France, Germany, and Switzerland, . 63,300.00 

$7,350,280 30 
Deduct stock held by the State, . . . 1,386,418.94 

Aelual debt of Virginia, . . . $5,953,861.36 

* Held by Literary Fond. 



XIII. NORTH CAROLINA. 

GOYEBNMENT. 

Salary. 
William A. Graham, of Hillsborough, Governor, (term of 

office, from Jan. 1, 1845, to Jan. 1, 1847,) $2,000 

William Hill, of Raleigh, Secretary of State, $800 and fees. 

John H. Wheeler, of Lincoln Co., Treasurer, 1,500 

William F. Collins, of Chatham Co., Comptroller, 1,000 

Cotmcil of State. — Henry Fitts, of Warren Co. ; Gabriel Holmes, of 
New Hanover Co. ; Thomas N. Cameron, of Fayetteville j Henry W. 
Conner, of Lincoln Co. ; Alexander W. Mebane, of Bertie Co. ; James 
Watt, of Rockingham Co.; and David Watson, of Chatham Co. 
Pay, $3 per diem while in service, and $3 for every 30 miles' travelling. 

Judiciary. 

Supreme Court. 

Salary. 

Thomas Raffin, of Orange Co. Chief Justice, $2,500 

Frederick Nash, of Hillsborough, Jheodate Justice, 2,500 

Joseph J. Daniel, of Halifax, do. 2,500 

James Iredell. of lUleigh, Seiner, { '^ttf the Rep^! 

Edm. B. FiMman, CUrk. 



1845.] NORTH CAROLINA. 249 

The Supreme Court holds two sessions in each year, in the City of Ra- 
leigh; to wit, on the second Monday in June and the last Monday in De- 
cember; and continues to sit at each term until all the business on the 
docket is determined, or continued upon good cause shown. It has power 
to hear and determine all questions at law, brought before it by appeal 
from a Superior Court of Law, and to hear and determine all cases in 
equity, brought before it by appeal from a Court of Equity, or removed 
there by the parties thereto. It has original and exclusive jurisdiction in 
vepealing letters patent, and also has power to issue writs oi certiorari^ 
icire facias^ habeas corpus^ mandamtti^ and all other writs which may be 
proper and necessary for the exercise of its jurisdiction. 

The Judges of the Supreme and the Superior Courts are elected by 
joint ballot of both houses of the General Assembly, hold their offices 
during good behavior, and, under a provision in the amendments to the 
constitution of the State, their salaries cannot be diminished during their 

continuance in office. 

*<' 

Superior or Circuit Courts. 

Judges, Salary, $1 ,950 each. I Solicitors. 

Thomas Settle, of Rockingham. David Outlaw, of Bertie Co. 

John M. Dick, o{ Greensboro\ Henry S. Clarke, of Beaufort Co. 

D. F. Caldwell, of Salisbury, j Robert Strange, of Fayetteville. 

R. M. Pearson, of Davie Co. |Cadwallader Jones, Ji*. of Orange Co. 

John L. Bailey, of Hillsborough. Hamilton C. Jones, of Rowan Co. 

M. E. Manly, of Newbern. 'John G. Bynum, of Rutherford. 

Wm. H. Battle, of Chapel Hill. | 

Spier Whitaker, of Halifax Co., Attorney CUneral. 

"Salary of a Solicitor — $20 for each Court which he attends, besides 
fees for conviction. The Attorney General receives, in addition, $100 
for each term of the Supreme Court which he attends. 

The Superior Courts of law and the Courts of equity are holden in 
eacli and every county of the State, twice in each year, by the Judges 
thereof. For this purpose, the State is divided into seven circuits, each 
of which comprises about ten counties, and the Judges ride these circuits 
alternately, according to an arrangement agreed upon among themselves, 
the only restriction imposed upon them in making the arrangements be- 
ing, that no Judge shall ride the same circuit twice in succession. As 
Judges of the Superior Courts of Law, they have jurisdiction of all pleas, 
real, personal, and mixed ; of all suits and demands relative to legacies, 
filial portions, and estates of intestates ; and also, of all pleas of the State 
and criminal matters of what nature, degree, or denomination soever, 
whether brought before them by original or mesne process, or by certiorari^ 
writs of error, appeal from any inferior Court, or by any other way or 
means whatsoever. As Judges of the Courts of Equity, they have all 
tiie jurisdiction and powers appertaining to Courts of Chancery. 



2SQ 



NQBTS CAROLIZTA. 



[184$. 



FlSA2CC£S. 

Fund for the support of Government. 



Chief itenu of Beceipt. 

Am't on hand, Nov. 1/42, 829,002.66 
Distrib'n of U. S. land fund, 25,983.60 
Direct taxes, 77,7SS.41 

Bank Tax, 5,201.30 

Miscellaneous, 7S8.64 



138,764.61 
The State owes no public debt. 



0iief Expendittarea, 

General Assembly, $42,893.98 

Judiciary, 27,482.40 

Executive officers and exp. 6,573.74 
Interest on Railroad bonds, 42,884.00 
Public Printing, 3,372.62 

Contingences, 2,325.65 



IMerary Fund, 



Chief items of Receipt. 

Am't on hand, Nov. 1, '42, $57,998.30 
Loans, &c., repaid, 34 511.57 

U. S. land fund, 23,147.14 

Bank dividends, 63,269.75 

Miscellaneous, 14,524.99 



Chief Expenditures. 



103,451.75 
Bal. on hand, Nov. 1, '43, 63,043.99 



Experimental Farm, $17,020,93 

Common Schools, 57,847,07 

Wilmington R. R. bonds, 50,000 00 
Purchase of bank stock, 2,700.00 
Exp. of Literary Board, 954,30 

Miscellaneous, 1,885,46 



130,407.76 



The receipts of the Internal Improvement Fund, during the year, 
amounted to $28,833.97 ; the disbursements to $1,784.03*, leaving a bal- 
ance on hand, Nov. 1, 1S43, of $27,049.60 

Wilmington and Raleigh Railroad. 

The receipts on the Railroad, during the year 1843, for the cDnve3rance 
of passengers, freight, and mail, amounted to . $122,108.72 

And by Steamboats, .... 104,066.27 



Total, 
The expenses during the same period were, 
On the Railroad, 
In the Steamboats, 



$226,172.99 

$70,176.09 
77,990.08 

$148,166.17 

Profits of Railroad and Steamboats, . . $78,006.82 

The current expenses of the year, compared with those of the preceding 
year, were reduced $49,170. 

The receipts on the Railroad in 1841 amounted to $162,628 ; in 1842, 
$128,850 ; and in 1843, $122,108. 

On the Steamboat Une,in 1841, $131,385} in 1842, $101, 960 j in 1843, 
$104,066. 



1845.] 



ttdUTB CAK6LIAA. 



HSi 



XIV. SOUTH CAROLINA. 



GOVEENMENT. 

James H. Hammond, Governor^ (term expires Dec. 1844,) 
Isaac D. Witherspoon, of York, LiaUenant Governor. 

Robert Q. Pinckney, of Charleston, Secretary of State, 



Salary. 
$3,500 



William Laval, 
B. R. Carroll, 
Julius J. Du Bose, 
Thomas Frean, 
H. Bailey, 
John A. Leland, 
F. H. Elmore, 



Fees, 

2,000 
2,000 
1,600 
Fees. 



of Charleston, Comptroller C^eneral, 

do. 7Vea«ttrer, Lower Division. 

of Columbia, do. Upper Division, 

of Newberry, Surveyor General, 
of Charleston, Attorney General^ 1,100 and Fees, 
of Columbia, Super't of Public Works, 1,500 
of Charleston, JVw. Bank of the State of S. C. 3,000 

A. Patterson, President of the Senate. 

W. F. Colcock, Weaker of the House of Representatvoes. 

W. B. MsiTtin, Clerk of the Senate, ' 1,000 

lliomas "W. Glover, of Orangeburg, Clerk of the House of JRep^s. 1,000 





Judiciary. 








Chancellors in Equity. 










Appointed. 


Salary. 


Job Johnston, 


of Newberry, 


1830 


$3,000 


William Harper, 


of Fairfield, 


1835 


3,000 


David Johnson, 


of Columbia, 


1815 


3,500 


Benj. Fane oil Dunldn, 


of Charleston, 


. 1837 


3,000 


Judges of the General Sessions and Common PUas. 








Appointed. 


Salary. 


D. L. Wardlaw, 


of Abbeville, 


1841, 


$3,000 


John S. Richardson, 


of Sumter, 


1818, 


3,500 


Josiah J* Evans, 


of Society Hill, 


1829, 


3,000 


Edward Frost, 


of Charleston, 


1844, 


3,000 


A. Pickens Butler, 


of Edgefield, 


1835, 


3,000 


J. B. O'Neall, 


of Newberry, 


1835, 


3,000 


J. J. McMuUan, 


of Lancaster, State Reporter, 1841, 


1,500 



By a law passed at the last session of the Legislature, judges can hold 
office only up tb the age of sixty-five years. 

Courts of appeals in Law and Equity for hearing and determining all 
appeals, and motions in arrest of judgment, and for a new trial, are held 
in Columbia, on the first Monday in May, and on the fourth Monday 
in November, in every year. A similar Court sits in Charleston, on the 



252 



SOUTH OA&OLXNA. 



[1S46. 



Ist Monday in January, for cases brought up from the Courts in the Dii* 
tricts of Georgetown, Horry, Beaufort, Colleton, and Charleston. 

The Courts for the correction of Errors, consisting of all the Chan- 
cellors, and Judges of the Courts of Law, are held at such time during 
the sitting of the Courts of Appeal, as the Chancellors and Judges may 
appoint. Alexander Herbemont, Clerk of the Court of Appeals, 

Statement of the Public Debt. 




Amount 
outstauding. 

$] 93,501 85 

250,000.00 

300.000.00 

10.000.00 

141,662.50 

1,035,555 55 
964.444 44 
200,000.00 
200,000.00 
200,000.00 

3,495,164.35 



Rate 


When 


per 


reimburse 


cent. 


able. 


3 


At will. 


5 


1S45 


5 


1S46 


6 


1850 


5 


185S 


5 


1860 


6 


1870 


6 


1848 


6 


1850 


6 


1852 



Object of the Loan. 



Payment of Revolu'y Claims. 
Internal Improvements. 

do. do. 

Benefit of Mrs. Randolph. 
Sub. to S. Western R. R. Bank 
Rebuilding city of Charleston. 

do. do. 

L9an&Sub.toL.C.&C.R.R.Co. 

do. do. do. 

do. do. do. 



$1,051,422.00 — Amount of Surplus Revenue deposited with the State. 
2,000,000.00 — Amount of Loan to the L. C. & C. Railroad, guarantied 
by the State. 

" It is highly probable," says Governor Hammond, " the State will 
never be called on to refund the Surplus Revenue, though her liability for 
it should never be forgotten, in an estimate of her debt. It is to be hoped 
that her guaranty of the Railroad bonds is only nominal, and that in dae 
season they will be discharged by the Railroad Company. I therefore 
deduct these items, in stating the Public Debt, for which certain and 
early provision must be made, at three millions and a half." 

The receipts into the State Treasury in 1843 were $299,196.16, and the 
expenditures $277,833.77. The balance in the treasury, including an un- 
expended balance of previous appropriations, was about $57,000. 



Common Schools. 

A Free School Fund exists in this State, but it has done little good, 
and Governor Hammond recommends,~that it should be applied to the 
support of Academies in the several districts \ he remarks, " The Free 
School system has failed. This fact has been announced by several of 
my predecessors, and there is scarcely an intelligent person in the State, 
who doubts that its benefits are perfectly insignificant, in comparison 
with the expenditure. Its failure is owing to the fact, that it does not 
suit our people or our government, and it can never be remedied. The 



18i5.] «KOBOIA. 8^ 

paapera, for whose children it is intended, hut slightly appreciate the ad- 
vantages of edacation ; their pride revolts at the idea of sending their 
children to school as *poor scholars'*; and besides, they need them at home 
to work. These sentiments and wants can, in the main, only be coun- 
tervailed by force. In other countries, where similar systems exist, force 
is liberally applied. It is contrary to the principles of our institutions to 
apply it here, and the Free School system is a failure. The sum which 
is annually appropriated for the support of free schools, if equally divided 
for one year among the twenty-eight districts of the State, giving two 
pojtions to Charleston district, will be sufficient to build in each a good 
Academy. If thereafter, one thousand dollars a year was appropriated 
to each academy, a teacher of the highest qualifications might be secured 
for every one, and a saving of about eight thousand dollars per annum 
effected by the State. If, in addition to this salary, the profits of his 
school were also given to the teacher, the rates of tuition could be re- 
duced, to the advantage of the tax-payers, and he might be required to 
instruct, free of charge, such poor scholars as should be sent to him." 



XV. GEORGIA. 

GOVEBNMEHT. 



Salary. 
GxoRaiE W. Ceawfoed, of Richmond Co. Governor^ 

(term of office expires, November, 1845,) $3,000 

Nathan C. Barnet, of Clark Co. Secretary of State, 1,600 

William H. Mitchell, of Baldwin Co. IVeawrer, 1,600 

David E. Bothwell, of Jefferson Co. Comptroller Generdly 1,600 

P. M. Compton, of Butts Co. Surveyor General^ 1,600 

John S. Thomas, of Baldwin Co. Director of the Central Bank. 

Anderson W. Redding, of Harris Co. Keqter of itu Penitentiary, 
Jesse H. Campbell, of Baldwin Co. Com'r of the Deaf and Dumb. 

Charles Dougherty, of Clark Co. President of the Senate, $5 a day 

Benj. F. Hardeman, of Oglethorpe Co. Secretary of the Senate^ 500 

Charies J. Jenkins, of Richmond, Co. Speaker of H, of Rep., 6 a day. 
Aug. C. Ferrell, of Troup Co. Clerk of H. of Rep., 500 

The pay of the members of the Legislature is $4 a day. 

The constitution has been so altered as to divide the State into 47 Sen- 
atorial districts, and to reduce the number of Senators from 93 to 47, and 
the Representatives from 201 to 130, which will be the number elected 
in October, 1845. 

23 



254 GiomoiA. [1845. 

Judiciary. 

The State is divided into eleven Circuits, with a Judge for each. 

Salaiy. 
Charles S. Henry, of Chatham Co., Judge of the Eastern Circuit, tl,800 
John Schley, of Richmond Co., do. Middle do. 1,800 

Garnett Andrews, of Wilkes Co^ do. Northern do. 1,800 

Junius Hillyer, of Clark Co., do. Western do. 1,800 

Francis Cone, of Greene Co., do, Ockmulgee do. 1,800 

Carlton B. Cole, of Twiggs Co., do. Southern do. 1,800 

Edward D. Tracy, of Bihb Co., do. Flint do. 1,800 

Joseph Sturgis, of Muscogee Co., do. Chattahoochee do. 1,800 

Aug. R. Wright, of Cass Co., do. Cherokee do. 1,800 

E. Y. Hill, do. Coweta do. 2,100 

Lott Warren, do. Southwestern do. 2,100 

John W. Flournoy, Mtomey General^ $250 and perquisites. 

Wm. B. Fleming, of Chatham Co., Judge of Court of Oyer and 

Terminer^ Savannah, 1,000 

John W. Wilde, of Richmond Co., Judge of Churt of Oyer and 

Terminer^ Augusta, 1,000 

Inferior Court. — An Inferior Court is held in each county, composed 
of five justices, elected by the people every four years. These Courts 
possess the powers of Courts of Probate. The justices have no salary. 

Railroads. 
[From the last Report of the Engineer of the Central Railroad.] 

" The road being now completed, and in successful operation through- 
out its whole extent, it is proper that I should present a report of its en- 
tire cost, its present condition, and the result of its operations since the 
date of my last report. 

" The track was extended to the depot at Macon, and a train passed 
over the whole line on the 13th of October, 1843 ; the Macon depot was 
open for regular business on the 1st of November. The trains have 
passed over the whole line every day since that period, Sundays excepted. 

" The whole length of the road from depot to depot, is 190 miles, 1600 
fcfit^ and the whole cost is $2,581,723, of which $168*,343 is for motive 
power and cars; and $68,000 damage by the freshet of 1841. Average 
cost of the road per mile, $12,702. Average annual cost of repairs per 
mile, $317." The Company has now 14 engines, and about 100 burden 
cars. 

The earnings of the road for 13 months ending Dec. 1, 1843, $227,531.94 

Expenses of conducting the road for that period, 134,341.43 

The earnings from Dec. 1, 1843, to March 1, 1844, . 86,716.00 

The earnmgs during March, 1844, about . 25,000.00 

The earnings during March, 1843, . . . 7,944.00 



r 



1845.] 



ALABAMA. 



255 



The Western and Atlantic Railroad, according to the Governor's report, 
Nov. 22, 1843, had cost $2,915,008. The grading is nearly completed, 
with the exception of the tunnel, which is 500 yards in length. The 
wooden superstractore is completed 52 miles, and the iron has heen pro* 
cured for that distance, and 33 miles of it have heen laid down. The en- 
gineer helieves, that $500,000 will he sufficient to finish the road, and put 
on it the necessary equipments of motive power and cars. 



Finances. 

Total amount received hy the State in 1843, 
Total amount expended, 



$314,905.29 
267,764.11 



Principal items of Expenditure. 

Salaries of Ex. officers, $12,900 
Miscellaneous exp. of Exec. 4,000 
Salaries of the Judiciary, 20,250 

Pay of the Legislature, 93,348 

Interest on State deht, 95,000 

- Whole amount of State deht. 
Annual interest on this deht, 



Chief sources of Income, 



Direct Taxes, 
Bank Tax, 
Balance from 1842, 
Miscellaneous, 



$270,335.44 
24,705.33 
39,374.00 
81,378.00 



$1,600,000 
95,000 



CONQRESSIONAL DISTRICTS. 



1. Applinglon, Biyan, BaNoob, Camden, Chatham, Effingham, Emanuel, Olyna, 
Lauren*, l«il>erty, Lowudea. McLitosh, Montgomery, Tatnall, Telfair, Twiggs, ware, 
and Wayne. Population, 69,517. 

2. Baker, Decauir, Dooly, Early, Irwin, Lee, Macon, Marion, Muscogee, Pulaski, 
Randolph^ Stewart, Sumter^ and Thomas. Population, 74,506. 

3. Bibb, Crawford, Hams, Houston, Monroe, Pike, Talbot, and Upson. Popula- 
tion, 75^929. 

4. Campbell, Carroll, Coweta, Fayette, Heard, Henry, Meriwether, Newton, and 
Troup. Population, 71,031. 

5. Caaa, Chattoo^, Cherokee, €obb, Dade, DeKalh, Floyd, Fonyth, Gilmer, Gwin- 
nett, Murray, Paulding, and Walker. Population, 70.176. 

' 6. Clarke, Elbert, Franklin, Habersham, Hall, Jackson, Lumpkin, Madlaon, Babun, 
Union^and Walton. Population, 72,400. 

7. Baldwin, Butts, Greene, Jasper, Jones, Mbrgui, Oglethorpe, Putnam, Taliaferro, 
and Wilkinson. Population, 68,725 

8. Burke, Columbia, Hancock, Jefferson, Lincoln, Richmond, Scriven, Warrej% 
Washington, and Wilkes. Population, 72,788, 



XVL ALABAMA- 



GOVXRNMBNT. 

Benjamin Fitzpatrick, Governor, (term of office expires on 



Salary. 



the Ist Monday in December, 1845,) 
William Garrett, Secretary of State, 

Jefferson C. Vandyke, Comptroller of PubHc Jkeounts^ 
Samuel G. Frierton, Stats Treasurer, 
ThomaB D. Clarke, of Talladega Co., Jttomey General^ 



$2,500 
Fees and 1,000 
Fees and 1,000 
Fees and 1,000 
Fees and 425 



296 ALABAMA. [184& 

The Secretaiy of State fa elected for two yean; and the Comp- 
troller and Treasurer annually; all by a joint vote of the two Houses of 
the General Assembly. 

The Senate consists of 33 members, elected for three years, one third 
annually ; the Hoitse of Rtpreetntatwee^ of 100 members, elected annually. 
The pay of the members of both houses is $4 a day each. 

Nathaniel Terry, Pretidewt of the Senate, 
A. B. Moore, Speaker of the House, 

JuDrciAKT. 

Supreme Court. 

Salary. 

Henry W. Collier, of Tuscaloosa, Chief Jiittice, $2,250 

Henry Goldthwaite, of Mobile, jSssociate Justice^ 2,250 

John J. Ormond. of Tuscaloosa, do, 2,250 

The judges of the (Supreme and Circuit Courts, and also the Chancel- 
lors, are elected by a joint vote of the two Houses of the General Assem- 
bly, for six years. The judges are the reporters of their own decisions, 
and are allowed to print, at their own expense, any number, not exceed- 
ing 500, of their reports, to be circulated out of the State. 

The Supreme Court has appellate jurisdiction only, — and only upon 
points of law, taken up from the Circuit or County Courts, by writ <rf 
error. This Court sits at Tuscaloosa, the seat of government, on the le^ 
Mondays of January and June. 

Court of Chancery; — established in 1839, and remodelled in 1841. 

dalitry» 
Southern Division, Anderson Crenshaw, of Greenville, Butler 

Co., Chanc^l&r, $1,500 

This division includes the counties of Mobile, Baldwin, Washington, 
Clarke, Sumter, Marengo, Monroe, Conecuh, Covington, Butler, Data^ 
Coffee, Henry, Barbour, Pike, Montgomery, Lowndesy and Wilcox. 
Middle Division, Joshua L. Martin, of Tuscaloosa, Chancellor, $1,500 
This division includes the counties of Russell, Chambers^ Randolph, 
Macon, Tallapoosa, Coosa, Autauga, Dallas, Perry, Greene, Tuscaloosa, 
Pickens, Fayette, Marion, Walker, Jefferson, Bibb, and Shelby. 

Northern Division, Alexander Bowie, of Talladega, Chancellor ^ 1,500 
This division includes the counties of Lauderdale, Franklin, Law- 
rence, Limestone, Madison, Morgan, Blount, St. Clair, Marshall, Jackson, 
DeKalb, Cherokee, Benton, and Talladega. 

One session of the Court is held annually in each Division, and the 
Chancellors are required to alternate with each other, so that ndther 
may preside twice in sucoesfion in either Division. A Chancery Court 
if h^ld in Montgomery, on the Ist Monday in July in each year. 



in p. TMielBD, 

Daniel cJtemui, 
leorre W. Lane, 

lamtiel Cbnpinan,' 
Ibmham Mariin, 
ieo. ■VP. Slone, 






) Wiltuim M. bi 
l,SOI}NilliBDielCoak, 
....... T^ Lin^, 



Wh,' I l)50o|Tti 



. . HayneTille. 

Mstlb. W. Lindsey, TumlooH. 

Edward A. O'Nid, Flonnai. 

iajn AcUen, Hunuvilla. 

F Walker, Mobtlo. 

. B-SlrodfiT Livijictton. 

Won'W. Harril, MonleDDieiy. 



The Circuit Court hsa otiginiil jurisiUetion in M civil and CTtmioal 
causes in the SUte ; and appcIlBtejaiisdiction in all appeals tai ctrtioraiU 
branght up from inferior tribunals. All Circuit Court judgei and chao- 
cellors elected after Ihe passage of an Act approved Dec. 39th, 184S, an 
to receive a sakr; of Sl.SOD. ThU accounts for the inequality in the 
•alaries mentioned ahove. The altomeys receive $250 and fees. 

Two Criminal Courts are held in the city of Mobile, by the judge and 
(olicitoi of the sixth Circuit, on Ihe 4th Mondays of Februai; and Jun& 



the 



The total amount of oulstanding bonds of the State of Alabsma, on 
day of Nov. 1842, was Se,634,SS5. This amount has not been in- 



creased. 

The legialalure, at its session 
cents per hundred dollars on n 
species of property, sales at auc 
4et amount to S334,42g, exclusiv 
dolph, which will yield S3,00D a 
mery 813,348.90. The circulalio 



in 1843, passed an act laying a tax of 30 
•al eslate, and specific taxes upon other 
tion, Ik. The taxes Bsaessed under thit 
e of the counties of Franklin and Ran- 
noie. Mobiie paid S39,01Q.36; Montgo- 
>□ of the State banks is $4,319,856. 



A rough statement of the Treasurer's operations in 1843: 
Cr.— Payment for valueless 16th sections for 1843, tSl1l>,000 

Do. lor previoas years, .... 151,000 

a of banks, 



Dr.— Interest <<d debts due, rents, real estate, taxes, 900,000 

The deficit bas been paid from the capitals of the banks. The eipeoies 
of the year IB44 will be diminished. No money will be payable on ac- 
count of valueless I4th sections. The expenses of the banks and gov- 
emment wilt be diminiahed, and we presume the interest on the schools 
and university funds will be reduced to six per cent. This will mats d 
nduction of above £400,000. 
S3* 



99ft vimtuFn. [1845. 

XVII. MISSISSIPPI 
Government. 

Albert G. Brown, GoMmor, (term of office fiom January, 

1844, to January 6, 1846,) $3,000 

Wilson Hemiugway, Secntary of State, (term ends Nov. 1845,) $3,000 

William Clark, StaU Dreaturer, do. 2,000 

James £. Matthews, jSuditor of Public J9ecmmt$, 2,000 

Jesse^Speieht, Pnwidmt of the SemUe, 

J. L. Toite«, Sptahar of tU Mmm. 

JUBIGIABY. 

High Court of Enron and j^fpeait. 

Term end«% Salary . 
William L. Sharkey, of Yicksburg, Pruiding Judge, Nov. 1847, $3,000 
Alexander M. Clayton, Judge, do. 1845, 3,000 

J. S. B. Thatcher, of Natches, do, do. 1849, 3,000 

John D. Freeman^ of Jackson, jSttomey Gen, do. 1845, 1,000 
John M Buffield, do. Clerk. Fees. 

This Court, which has no jurisdiction except what |)roperly belongs to 
a Court of Errors and Appeals, holds its sessions annually at Jackson, 
commencing on the Ist Mondays in January and November. 

iSb^Mrtor Court of Cktmeoy, 

Ttitm ends. Salary. 
Robert H. Buckner, of Hinds Co., ChaneOor, Nov. 1849, $4,000 

R. L. Dixon, of Jackson, Clerk, 

H. Dickinsco, Ftc< Chancdior, Nov. 1847. 

J. C. Alderson, Clerk, 

This Court, which has jurisdiction over all matters, pleas, and com- 
plaints whatsoever, belonging to, or cognizable in, a Court of Equity, 
holds two sessions annually, at the city of Jackson, on the 1st Mondays of 
December and June, and continuing aa long as business sequireSk It also 
^oldis two sessions a year, at Columbus and Pontotoc. 

DUtrict Chancery Court, ^* . 

ftolary. 

Joseph W. Chalmers, Vice Chancellor, $3/)00 

M. McCarthy, Clerk, at Columbus, Fees. 

M. N. W. Smith, do. at Fulton, do. 

Jas. C. Alderson, do. at Holly Springs, do. 

W. Hemingway, do. at Canrollton* do. 



1S1&I 



KMBIftfil^i. 



399 



Time ofhoidwg Court. 

For the counties of Lowddes, WiBston, Octlbbedia, KeAper, Noxubee, 
and Neshoba, 1st Monday in May and November. For the counties of 
Itawamba, Pontotoc, Monroe, Chickasaw, and Tishatningo, 3d Monday in 
May and November. For the counties of Marshall, Coahoma, Tippah, 
Be Soto, Ponola, La£atyette,'and Tunica, 1st Monday in January and July. 
For the counties of Carroll, Choctaw, Holmes, Yalabusha, and Talla- 
hatchie, 3d Monday in June and December. 

This Court has concurrent porwer and jurisdiction within the district 
with the Supferior Court of Chancery, when the amount in controversy 
does not exceed $500,000. The Vice Chancellor is elected for the term 
of 4 years ; appoints the Clerks, who hold their office for 4 years ; be 
must be at least 30 years of age. Appeals may be made to the Superior 
Court of Chancery, unless by consent of both parties, when the same 
may be taken directly to the High Court of Errors and Appeals. 

District or Circuit Courts, 

The Judicial divisions were reorganized in 1840, and formed into 11 
Districts, or Circuits. The salary of the Judges is $2,000 each. 



Dist. Judges. 



District Attorneys. 



Counties of the Districts. 



1. Oeorge Coalter, 

2. B. F. Canithers, 

3. C. C. Cage, 

4. T. A. Waiis, 

5. 'HenryMown^er, 

6. H. S. Bennett, 

7. J. H. Rollins, 

8. Jas. M. Howry, 

9. Stephen Adams, 

10. M. L. Fitch. 

11. V. T. Crawford, 



Elbridge G. Walker, 

a F. NeiU, 

Stanhope Posey, 
E. G. Peyton, 

John Watts, 

Henry €hmy. 

Franklin Smith, 
George A. Wilson, 

John W. Thompson, 

Robert C. Perry, 
John T. Lamkin, 



Warren, Claiborne, Washington, and Bo- 
livar. 

Yalabusha, Carroll, Choctaw, and Taila 
hatchie. 

Adams, Wilkinson, and Jefferson. 

Smith. Copiah, Simpson, Scott, Newton, and 
Neshoba. 

Jackson, Jones, Green, Perry, Wayne, Jas- 
per, Clarke, and Lauderdale. 

Noxubee, Lowndes, Kemper, Winstoii, 
and Octibbeha. 

Hinds, Madison, and Rankin. 

De Soto, Coahoma, Tunica, Ponola, Lafay 
ette, and Marshall. 

Monroe, Itawamba, Tishamingo, Pontotoc, 
Chickasaw, and Tippah. 

Yazoo, Holmes, Attala, and Leake. 
Hancock, Marion, Pike, Amite, Franklin, 
Lawrence, and Covington. 



A Circuit Court is holden in each county twice a year. This Court 
has original jurisdiction, in civil cases, in which the principal of the sum 
in controversy exceeds $50. It has chancery jurisdiction in all eases 
under (500 ; and has power to foreclose mortgages, without limit as to 
sum. It has also exclusive criminal jurisdiction. 

Judges of the High Court of Errors and Appeals, and the Chancellor, 
are chosen by the electors for six years ; the Judges of the Circuit Courts. 
Attorney Greneral, and District Attorneys, as well as all military officefs, 
art chosen by the ritotdn for four yeafs ; all othsr oflGtrs,ft>rtwoyetts. 



260 



MISSISSIPPI. 



[1845. 



FlNAMOSS. 



During the Fitcal Tear ending Mxreh 1, 1843. 



Total amount received^ 
• Total amount expended, 

IMncipal items of ExpmdUwre, 

Salaries of Ex. officers, $8,869.99 
Miscellaneous exp. of Exec. 2,701.36 
Expenses of Judiciary, 106,689.41 
Pay of the Legislature,* 7,127.00 
Interest on the State debt, 3,117.41 
Internal improvement, 3,303.90 

Miscellaneous, 172,619.34 



$311,179.99 
304,428.41 



Chief sources cf Income. 

Direct taxes, $308,634.77 

Licenses to retail spiritu* 

ous liquors, 8,635.78 

Hawkers and Pedlers, 1,311.47 

Brokers, 1,000.00 



Total, 



319,057.84 



tWhole amount of State debt, . . $2,615,049.15 

Two millions bear 6 per cent interest; a part of the remainder only 
bears interest 

*The Legislature wag not in session during that fiscal year; add $33,607.64 to 
$7,1*27.00, and we have $40,734.64 as the expense of legislation for the January session 
in 1842. 

t $615,049.15 outstanding warrants and funded scrip, Dec. 30, 1843. The two millions 
are Planters' Bank bonds. There are also five millions of Union Bank bonds, which 
having been issued without warrant of constitution, the State refuses to acknowledge 
any liability to pay. 

Educatiom in Mississippi. 



Proportion and Number of Whites above the age of 20 who cannot read and 
write — of whites above 20 — whites between 5 and 20 to edueatef ifc. 





Prop, of 


iNo. ofwh. 










N. Mississippi. 


whites a- 
boveSOys. 


above 20 
years who 


No. ofwh. 
above 20 


Total 
whites be- 


Primary 
and 


Number of 


Counties. 


who can- 


cannot 


tween 5 


common 


scholars. 




not read 


read and 


years. 


and20yrs. 


schools. 






and write. 


write. 










Attala, 


1 in 6 


189 


1,122 


1,126 


6 


85 


Bolivar, 


lin 




205 


113 


1 


14 


Carroll, 


lin 50 


40 


2,076 


1,961 


11 


267 


ChickHsaw, 


lin 6 


134 


778 


837 


4 


93 


Choctaw, 


lin 5 


293 


1,599 


1,770 


15 


303 


Coahoma^ 


lin 5 


77 


380 


265 


3 


69 


De Soto, 


lin 65 


24 


1,582 


1,532 


13 


323 


Itawamba, 


lin 2 


645 


1,683 


1,826 


7 


124 


Lafayette, 


lin 6 


260 


1,496 


1,366 


7 


158 


Lowndes, 


lin 164 


15 


2,460 


2,129 


8 


221 


Marshall, 


lin 30 


181 


3,649 


3,603 


26 


583 


Monroe, 


lin 6 


305 


2,008 


2,057 


10 


110 


Noxubee, 


lin 25 


63 


1,578 


1,411 


4 


70 


Octibbeha, 


lin 7 


115 


862 


753 


13 


247 


Ponola, 


lin 8 


112 


931 


625 


4 


92 


Pontotoc, 


lin 13 


97 


1,162 


1,125 


3 


86 


Tallahatchie, 


lin 37 


17 


624 


457 


3 


48 


Tippah^ 


lin 




2,658 


2,915 


11 


967 


Tishammgo, 


lin 7 


282 


2,079 


2,405 


14 


301 


Tunica, 


i in 11 


28 


305 


160 


1 


63 


Winston, 
Yallobusna, 


lin 




1,224 


1,211 


1 


29 


lin 47 


58 


2,719 


2,381 


21 


658 


North Mississippi, 


lin 13 


2,925 


33,170 


31,406 


186 


4,109 



1845.] 



MISSTSSXPri. 



S61 



Table— Continued. 





Prop. «»f 


No. of wh. 










S. Miasissippi. 
Conn ties. 


whites a- 
bove20ys. 
who can- 


above 20 

years who 

cannot 


No. of wh. 
above 20 


Total 
whites be- 
tween 5 


Primary 

snd 
common 


Number of 
scholars. 




not read 


read and 


years. 


and 20 yis. 


schools. 






and write. 


write. 










Adams, 


lfftl» 


24 


2j968 


1,259 


13 


269 


Amite, 


lin 6 


233 


1,559 


1,450 


11 


199 


Claiborne, 


lin 13 


iS 


1,702 


1,046 


9 


183 


Clarke, 


lin 6 


17d 


872 


826 


6 


107 


Copiahf 


lin 4 


525 


1,960 


2,127 


12 


2il 


ODvinnon, 
Franklin, 


lin 4 


202 


799 


740 


3 


76 


lin 4 


223 


837 


805 


10 


147 


Greene, 


lin 4 


127 


456 


493 


3 


40 


• Bancoeir, 


lin 3 


330 


«M 


831 


3 


47 


Hinds, 


lin 99 


61 


2JJ71 


3,215 


18 


391 


Holmes, 


lin 7 


221 


1,684 


1,379 


13 


301 • 


Jackson, 


lin 5 


123 


602 


567 


3 


49 


Jasper, 


lin 20 


47 


970 


1,129 


3 


83 


Jefferson, 


1 in 117 


10 


1,153 


844 


15 


318 


Jones, 


lin 




407 


436 






Kertper. 
Lauderdale, 


lin 6 


m 


1,132 


1,913 


11 


285 


lin 




1,512 


1,569 






Lawrence, 


lin 5 


273 


1,390 


1,510 


5 


118 


Leake, 


lin 2 


208 


688 


594 


4 


69 


Madison, 


lin 21 


85 


1,832 


1,591 


2 


125 


Marion, 


1 in 5 


159 


814 


' 878 


1 


20 


NeshdbB, 


lin 4 


145 


654 


690 


4 


65 


Newton, 


lin S 


265 


631 


693 


S 


48 


lin 2 


230 


565 


541 


6 


88 


Pike, 


Im 


872 


1,377 


1,487 


12 


942 . 


Rankin, 


lin 5 


193 


1,059 


1,104 






Scott, 


lin 7 


02 


430 


472 






Simpson, 


lin 6 


178 


912 


1,122 






Smith, 


lin 2 


201 


553 


641 


4 


79 


Wayne, 


lin 3 


174 


471 


455 






Warren, 


lin 16 


184 


2,974 


1,284 


7 


176 


Washington, 


lin 




405 


141 






Wilkinson, 


lin 31 


48 


1,494 


1,175 


5 


97 


Yazoo, 


lin 10 


147 


1,490 


1,164 


11 


255 


South Mississippi, 
North Mississippi, 


lin 7 


5,434 
2,925 


40,762 


32,843 


196 


4,127 


1 ill 13 


33,170 


31,408 


186 


4,109 


Total, 


lin 9 


8,359 


73,932 


64,251 


382 


, 8,236 . 



Two new conntSM have been formed, one by dividing^ Bolivar, called 
** Sunflower;** and Utte other by dividing Washington,- called " Issaquena.** 

Pbnitentiaey. — The number of convicts, November 28, 1842, was 
56; received during one year after that date, 27 ; making in all 83. Dur- 
ing tlie same time, there were discharged, by expiration of sentence, 8, 
and by pardon, 5. Two died, and one escaped; leaving 67 on the 27t1i 
of November, 1843. The income of the institution during this time 
Tvas $15,083.07 ; and the expenditures $15,086.71. 



262 



10UZ8IAMA. 



[1845. 



XVIII. LOUISIANA. 



Govern MBKT. 

Alsxansbr Mouton, of VennilUonville, Governor^ 

(from January 4th, 1843, to January 4th, 1847,) 
Robert C. Nicholas, of St. James, Secretary of Statt^ 



William Debuys, 
Louis Brin^er, 
John S. Armant, 
Isaac T. Preston, 
Raphael Toledano, 
Martin 6. Penn, 
Felix Garcia, 
Charles Derbigny, 



of St. James, 
of Jefferson, 

of Covington, 



Salary. 



$6,000 
2,000 
4,800 
600 
2,000 
3,000 



of New Orleans, Treasurer, 

Surveyor General, 
Adj. and Inspector Creneral^ 
Attorney Creneralj 

Auditor of Auction Accounts^ 2,500 
State JVigtneer, 3,500 

of German Coast Co., Bret, of the Senaief $4 a day. 
of Jefferson, Speaker of the House^ $4 a day. 

The Senate consists of 17 members, elected one half biennially, for the 
term of 4 years. The House of Representatives has 60 members, elected 
biennially. The legislature meets annually, and the members of both 
branches receive $4 a day during the session, which usually lasts 90 or 
100 days. The Secretary of State, and State Treasurer, are ex officio mem- 
bers, and form the Board of Currency, with an additional salary of $1,200. 



Judiciary. 






Supreme Court, 






■ 




flalary. 


Francois X. Martin, of New Orleans, 


Judge, 


$5,000 


Alonzo Morphy, do. 


do. 


5,000 


Henry A. Bullard, of Alexandria, 


do. 


5,000 


Edward Simon, Western District, 


do. 


6,000 


Rice Garland, do. 


do. 


5,000 


Adolphe Cuvillier, Clerk at New Orleans, 




Fees 


Stephen £. Curry, do. Alexandria, 




Fees 


Merit M. Robinson, Reporter, 


^ 


Perquisites. 


This Court has appellate jurisdiction only in all 


cases where the matter 


in dispute exceeds $300. 




■ 


District Courts. 

■ 




Salary. 


A. M. Buchanan, of New Orleans, Jwrfge, 


1st District, 


$4,000 


Thomas C. Nichols, of Donaldsonville, do. 


2d do. 


2,500 


Isaac Johnson, of St. Franclsville, do. 


3d do. 


2,500 



1845.] LouisiAMA. 263 

Hpiace F. Diblieoz, of Plaquemine, Jwtgej M DUtrict, $2,500 

George R. King, of Opelousas, do. 5th do. 2,500 

H. Boyces, of Rapides, do. 6th do. 2,500 

E. K. Wilson, of Monroe, do. 1th do. 2,500 

Jesse R. Jones, of Covington, do. Sth do. 2,500 

Thomas Curry, of Yidalia, do. 9th do. 2,500 

James 6. Campbell, of Natchitoches, do. 10th do. 2,500 

These Courts, except in the 1st District, hold two terms dnnually. 
They exercise criminal jurisdiction, except in the 1st District, where it 
is transferred to the Criminal Court. 

New Orleans Courts, 

Salary. 

ParUh Court. — Charles Maurian, Parish Judges $3,000 

Commercial Court. — Charles Watts, Judge, 4,000 

Court of Probate. — Joachim Bermudez, Judge, 3,500 

£% Qwrt. — Thomas W. CoUens, Presiding Judge, 3,000 

Criminal Court. — Ist District, John Francois Canonge, JtMi^c, 3,000 

These Courts, and that of the Ist District, hold sessions for 8 months in 
the year. The City Court is required to be open every day, except Sun- 
days and holydays, in the year. 

Court of Errors and Appeals vn Criminal Cases. 

Salary, 

Thomas C. Nichols, (Judge of 2d District,) I 

Isaac Johnson, ^ do. 3d do. ) > Judges, $500 

George R. King, ( do. 5th do. ) J 

The legislature has lately provided " a Court of Errors and Appeals 
in Criminal cases," to be composed of three of the District Judges, 
with an additional salary of $500 per annum. The law says, *'this 
Court shall have appellate jurisdiction only, with power to review ques- 
tions of law ; which questions shall be presented by bills of excep- 
tions taken to the opinion of the Judges of the lower Court, or by as- 
signment of errors apparent on the face of the record, taken and made in 
the manner and form as is now provided by law for appeals in civil cases." 
This court is required to hold two sessions annually in New Orleans, 
commencing the first Monday of February and July of each y^ar. 

Finances. 
[From a Repoji to the Legislature, February 23, 1844.] 

The receipts from Jan. 1, 1843, to Dec. 31, 1843, $746,797.64 

Expenditures during the same year, 652,560.43*^ 

Balance, Jan. 1, 1844, $94,237.21 

Of this balance, 42,157.14 are in notes and bonds at present unavailable. 



1 



204 I*OUX«IAlfA. [idiSi 

There was, boweY«|-t at tbi* d»te, i^ balance of inteijBil due on Vmda U* 

iued by the State for her own benefit, Qther tbaa those issued to the ppop-. 
erty banks, amounting to $142^515.42 

And appropriations dae to schools, 8S,490.08 

Making amount due Jan. 1, 1844, f ^1,005^ 

The State is responsible on the various bonds issued by her, and on 
deposits made with her, for a sum amouating to $91,433,508.03, exclusiv^e 
of interest. 

From this should be deducted— 
Ist, The amount of the surplus revenue 

of the federal government, deposited 

with the State, $477,910.14 

2d, The amount deposited fof vacant eetatea, 27,692.89 

$^5,602.08 
3d, The amount of bonds issued to muni- 

cipaUties Nos. 2 and 3. 529,920.00 $1,035,523.03 

Which leave a balance of State liabilities for $20,396,000.00 

These liabilities consist of two distinct and separate classes: 

First, Such as were incurred by the State for administration purposes ; 
for the purpose of sustaining and carrying on the government of the 
State ; for the furtherance and prosecution of enterprises undertakeu for 
the advantage of the citizens ; or for objects which seemed to promise 
pecuniary profits to the State. These, excluding interest, amount to 
$3,898,000.00. 

Second, Such as were incurred by the State for the purpose of furnish- 
ing different corporate institutions with capital tq be employed iu banking. 

These consist of the following, viz: 

For the Union Bank, .... $7,000,000 

For the Citizen*s Bank, .... 7,120,000 

For the Consolidated Association, . 2,380,000 

Maying, exclusive of interest, . . $16,500,000 

The Union Bank hae thus far feiithfully paid the amount due on the 
bonds issued to her by the State. The two other institutions have failed^ 
and gone into liquidation ; but they hold notes, secured by roortgafiss of 
real estate, from which, it is believed, enough will ultimately be obtained 
to pay off all the bonds issued to them. 

The State owns property which is thought to be abundantly sufficient 
for the redemption of the bonds issued for her own proper use and bene- 
fit. This property consists, first, of bank stock, (Bank of Louisiana, 
$2,000,000', Mechanics' and Traders' Bank, $150,000; Louisiana State 
Bank, $60,000,) amounting to $2,210,000. Secondly, the right to select 
500,000 acres ifrom the unappropriated U. S. lands remaining in the State, 
worth at least $4 an acre. The value of these lands then is $2,000,000. 
Thirdly, various lands and public improvements, estimated at $650,000. 
The wnole available property, then, is $4,860,000. It is proposed to sell 
this property as fast as it can be done without materially depreciating its 
value, and with the proceeds to pay off the State's own proper debt 



1845.] 



ABKANSAS. 



265 



XIX. ARKANSAS. 

'GOVERNMEMT. 

Salary. 
Samuel Adams, of Johnson Co., Acting Governor,, 

(term of office expires November, 1844,) $2,000 

David B. Greer, of Little Rock, Secretary of State, 800 

£lia8 N. Conway, do. Auditor of Public AccotmtSf 1,400 

Jared C. Martin, do. TVeiuurer^ 1,000 

Samuel Adams, of Johnson Co., President of the Senate, $5 a day. 

'W. S. Oldham, of Wash'n Co., Speaker of the House, $5 a day. 

John Widgery, Secretary of the Senate, $8 a day. 

Stephen S. Tucker, Clerk of the Houses $8 a day. 



Daniel Ringo, 
Thomas J. Lacy, 
"Wn^ K. Sebastian, 
George C. Watkios 
Luke E. Barber, 
Albert Pike, 



Supreme Court. 

of Little Rock, 
of Phillips Co^ 
of Helena, 
of Little Rock, 

do. 
of Little Rock, 



Chief Justice, 
Associate Justice, 

do. 
Attorney General, 

Clerk, 
Reporter, 



Circuit Court. 



Salary. 

$1,800 

1,800 

1,500 

600 

Fees. 

200 



Judges. 
Ist Circuit, John T. Jones, 
2d do. Isaac N. Baker, 
3d do. Thos. Johnson, 
4th do. Joseph M. Hoge, 
5th do. Ji J. Clendenln, 
6th do. John Field, 
7th do. R. e. S. Brown, 



Salary. 

$1,000 
1,200 
1,200 
1,200 
1,200 
1,000 
1,000 



u 



u 



J300 
300 



Prosecuting Attorneys. Salary. 
Wm. N. Stanton, Fees & $300 

Wm. Bocage, 
A. R. Porter, 
Alfred M. Wilson. 
G. C. Watkins, 
J. P. Tapper, 
William Walker, 



IC 



u 



600 
300 
300 



The Supreme Court has appellate jurisdiction only, except in particu- 
lar cases pointed out by the constitution. The judges are elected by the 
General Assembly, by a joint vote of both Houses, for eight years. 

The Circuit Court has original jurisdiction over all criminal cases, 
which are not otherwise provided for by law; and exclusive original ju- 
risdiction of all crimes amounting to felony at the common law ; and 
original jurisdiction of all civil cases which are not cognizable before 
Justices of the Peace, until otherwise directed by the General Assembly; 
and original jurisdiction in all matters of contract, where the sum in 
controversy is over one hundred dollars. The Judges are elected by the 

General Assembly, for a term of 4 years. 

23 



266 



▲ BKAMSAS. 



[1845: 



7b62t ofiht Sheriffi and CUrkt of the several Countiea in the State ofj8rkan»a». 



(humtiet. 



Arkansai, 

Bradley, 

Benton, 

Conway, 

Crawford, 

Carroll, 

Crittenden, 

Clark, 

Chicot, 

Desha, 

Franklin, 

Fulton, 

Greene, 

Hempsteadj 

Hot Springs, 

Independence, 

Izard, 

Jefferson, 

Jackson, 

Johnson, 

Lafayette, 

Lawrence, 

Monroe, 

Madison, 

Marion, 

Mississippi, 

Montgomery, 

Newton, 

Ouachita, 

Pulaski, 

Pope, 

Phillips, 

Pike, 

Perry, 

Poinsett, 

Randolph, 

Sevier, 

Saline, 

Scott, 

Searcy, 

St. Francis, 

Union, 

Van Buren, 

Washington, 

White, 

Yell, 



Sheriffs, 



Clerks, 



John L. Jones, 

J. H. D. Scobey, 

John H. Hammock, 

John Murray, 

Eli Bell, 

Charles Sneed, 

G. W. tinderhill, 

Willis S. Smith, 

Wilford Gamer, 

Gardner Cooper, 

Emanuel Speegle, 

Daniel Beck, 

James Clark, 

Wtlliam Arnett, 

J. W. Pendleton, 

Wm. L. McGuire, 

Simeon E. Rosson, 

John J. Hammett, 

James Robinson, 

W. M. H. Newton, 

James Abraham, 

Thos.Mc Carroll, 

Philip Costar, 

P: M. Johnson, 

Thos. D. Wood, 

J. C. Bowen, 

[The act establishing this 

the Ist June, 1844.J 
Allen Bellah, 
Hezekiah Dews, 
James Lawson, Jr., 
Samuel M. Hays, 
Miller Irvin, 
Lewis Huddleson, 
John Greathouse, 
James Stotts, 
Joseph Spikes, 
Isaac N. Jackson, 
G. W. Rutherford, 
Jesse B. Garret, 
Isham Hodges, 
James M. Halbert, 
John H. Cornish, 
John O. Young, 
Presley R. Smith, 
Milton Sanders, 
Theo. P. Sadler, 



Geo, W. S. Cross. 
Simeon Chisholm. 
John Smith. 
H. H. Higgins. 
Alex'r McLean. 
Jonathan A. Hicks. 
Samuel T. Gilbert. 
James S. Ward. 
Johnson Chapman. 
D. G. W. Leavitt. 
J. W. Pendleton. 
Isaac King. 
Jas. L. Atchison. 
Simon T. Sanders. 
Lawson Runyon. 
Charles H. Pelham. 
B. H. Johnson. 
Thomas S. ^ames. 
Green Sylvy. 
Aug. M. Ward. 
Rich'd F. Sullivan. 
Joseph B. Wilmath. 
J. C. Montgomery. 
Henry B. Brown. 
Jas. M. Cowdrey. 
J. P. Edrington. 
county to be in force on 

J. M. Ross. 
Philip Agee* 
Herndon Haralson. 
John R. H. Scott. 
William KelleT. 
David S. Dickson. 
Isaac Russell. 
Lewis H. Sutfin. 
Thomas O. Marr. 
James Penney. 
Ezra M. Owen. 
Edw. Featherston. 
John M. Hensley. 
John A. Parrott. 
J. R. Moore. 
P. Matthews. 
Benj. A. Pierson. 
John W. Bond. 
James C. Gault. 



Common Schools. — The legislature, at the last session, passed an act 
establishing a system of common schools ; but few schools have yet been 
organized under the law. The surplus revenue deposited with the State, 
and some other funds, are made a fund for the support of common schools. 



1845.] TENNESSEE. 267 

XX. TENNESSEE. 

Government. 

Salary. 
James C. Jones, Governor^ (term of office expires Oct. 1845,) $2,000 

John S. Young, Secretary of State, '- $750 and fees. 

Matthew Nelson, Treaswrer, ^ Suft of Public LutrucHon, 1,500 

Felix K. Zollicoffer, Comptroller, 2,000 

"West H. Humphreys, Attorney General, ^ Reporter^ 1,000 

Gerard Troost, State Geologist, 500 

Josiah M. Anderson, 'Speaker of the Senate, 
Daniel L. Barringer, Speaker of the House. 

The legislature consists of a Senate of 25 members, and a House of Rep' 
resentatives of 75 members j all elected for two years. The members of the 
present legislature were elected in August, 1843. Pay of the Senators 
and Representatives, $4 per day. 

The Judges of the Supreme Court are electied by a joint vote of the 
two Houses of the General Assembly, for the term of 12 years ; and those 
of the inferior courts, in the same manner, for the term of 8 years. 

Judiciary. 

Supreme Court, 

Salary. 
William B. Turley, of Jackson, Judge, Western Division, $1,800 

IVilliam B. Reese, ofEnoxville, do. Eastern do. 1,800 

Nathan Green, of Winchester, do. Middle do. 1,800 

Court of Chancery. 

Salary* 
AndrewMcCampbell,of Paris, Chancellor, Western JHvision, $1,500 
Tho's L. Williams, ofEnoxville, do. Eastern do. 1,500 

Terry H. Cahal, . of Columbia, do. Middle do. 1,500 

Bromfield L. Ridley, of McMinnville, cto. Fourth do, 1,500 

Circuit Courts. — The State comprises 14 circuits, and the judges were 
elected in January, 1836. Salary of each judge, $1,500. 



1. Seth J. W. Lacky, of Jonesborough. 
3. Eben'r Alexander, of Knoxyille. 

3. John O. Cannon, of Madisonviile. 

4. Abraham Caruthers, of Carthage. 

6. Samael Anderson, of Murfreesboro'. 

6. Thomas Mancy, of Nashville* 

7. Mortimer A. Martin, of Clarksnlle. 



8. Edm. Dillahnnty, of Columbia. 

9, William R. Harris, of Paris. 
10. John Read, of Jackson. 
U. Wm. C. Dunlap, of Bolivar. 

12. R. M. Anderson, of New Market. 

13. A. J. Marchbanks, of McMinnville. 

14. Benj. C. Totten, of Huntingdon. 



268 TIMHIBSXE. [1845. 

Ffl^ANCiES. 

Chief sourcei of Income, 



Direct tazes, $1 19,661 .67 

Bank tax, 14,750.00 

Income of State funds, 291.678.75 

Balance from 1842, 189;590.47 

Miscellaneous, 120.00 

Am*t received in 1843, $253,531.67 

Amount expended, 315,188.25 



Principal item$ of Expenditure. 

Salaries of Ex. officers, $17,085 82 
Salaries of the Judiciary, 35,346.25 
Incidental exp. of Judiciary, 2,921 .03 
Pa}r of the Legislature, 22,018.68 
Incid'al exp. of Legislature, 5,176.79 
Interest on the State Debt, 173,678.75 
Internal Improvement, 4,689.00 

Common Schools, 117,087.40 

Charitable Establishments, 1,411.85 
Miscellaneous, 7,364 28 . . 

Academies, 18,000.00 

Whole amount of State debt, . . $3,260,416.66 

Annual interest on this debt, . . 173,678.75 

Of the Stale debt, $1,997,250 pays 5 per cent ••' ' • 

Do. do. 263,1 66?i pays 6jji Do. .. ' ; 

Do. do. 1,000,000 pays 6 Do. 

The fiscal year is from the first Monday of. October to the first Monday 
of October, including the former, and excluding the latter ; and the above 
** items of expenditure " represent the sums paid in that period in 1S42-3, 
on the several specified accounts, but da not truly set forth- the a^tdal 
expenditures of the whole year 1843. Thusy the sum of $92,01^98, **p«r 
of the Legislature," is the pay of that body at itt s^ession of 1H42, which 
commenced on the day of the beginning of the fiscal year, 1842 - 3. The 
pay of the Legislature for 1843, will he shown in the Almanac fbr 1845. 
The total valvie of taxable property in. Tennessee is •■ foilowB : -^ ^-^ 



Land, $69,298,493 

Town lots, 8.404,498 

Negroes, 42,631,238 



White polls, 85,284 

Carriages, 390,158 



$120,809,671 

The Umoerntif of NashviUe has a permanent fund of about $45,000, 
which bears interest at 6 per cent., out of which interest and the tuition 
fees, the expenses of the institution are bOrne. Besides this, there is due 
to it about $15,000. These constitute the sum total of its endowments ; 
and when we remember, that the first of these sums was derived from 
certain lands which Congress, by its act of 1806, ch. 31, required the State 
to appropriate to the use of two Colleges, one in East and one in West 
Tennessee, we ate reduced to the mortifying necessity of a^ihittifig, tliat 
the institution owes nothing to the munificence of the State. The sake 
remark is applicable to the University of East Tennessee, and, ihdsed, to 
every literary institution in the State. 

The same act of Congress required the State to appropriate 100,000 
acres of land in one body for the use of Academies, one in each county 
in the State. By the act of the Legislature of 1837, c. 107, § 8, the iieg' 
islature appropriated the annual sum of $18,000 to the Academies, on 
condition that they should relinquish to the State all claims to those 
lands. This relinquishment was made, and in constderation'of it, the 
faith of the State is pledged to the annual payment of the $18,000 to thois 
institutions. 



184&] TENHBS8XK. , 269 

Common Schools. 

I. The first proTiaion made by law for the creation of a Common School Fund in Ten- 
.neasee was by an act passed in the year 18S3. It established offices for receiving 

entries of vacant lands north and east of a certain line, which passes across the State, 
called the Congressional Reservation Line. These lands were to be entered at 12^ 
cents per acre ; and the moneys received were to be paid by the entry-takers, every 
three months, to the .Agents of the Bank of the State of Tennessee in their respective 
counties, except Davidson and Knox, in which counties they were to be paid to the 
principal banks. All these moneys were to be lent oat by the banks and their agents, 
and the principal was to *' remain and constitute a perpetual and exclusive fund for the 
establishment and promotion of Common Schools in each and every county in the State." 

II. The taxes on those lands were also to constitute a part of the perpetual fund, and 
the tax collectors were to keep them separate, and pay them over to the bank and its 
i^ents, who were to make a semi-annual distribution of the interest upon the proceeds 
ofthose lands and taxes, among the School Commissioners created by the same law. 

III. By an act passed in 1827, the following funds were ^' appropriated to the en- 
conragement and support of Common Schools forever." 1. All the capital of the new 
State Bank, except the one half of the sum already received, and the interest on that 
capital. This capital was a million of dollars, " in bills emitted on the credit and secu- 
rity of the borrowers, the whole to be warranted by the State on the proceeds of the 
sales of its unappropriated lands." 2. The proceeds of the sales of the Hiwassee lands. 
3. All lands previously appropriated in the State to the use of schools. 4. All the va- 
cant and unappropriated land in the State, to which the Slate had, or might have, title. 
5. All the rents and mesne profits of School lands, accrued and not already appropri- 
ated, or to accrue. 6. All the funds denominated school, or common school funds, in 
the act of 1823, not already otherwise disposed of. 7. The donation made to the State 
by Mason Lee, of South Carolina, with a certain exception. 8. The donation of John 
Rice, of 5,000 acres of land. 0. All other donations that had been, or might be, made to 
the State, unless for some other specific purpose. 10. All the stock owned by the State 
in the old bank of the State, at Knoxville, amouniiug to 400 shares of the stock of that 
bank, together with the dividends due thereon. 11. Escheated lands. 12. All the per- 
sonal efiects of intestates having no kindred entitled by the laws of distribution to the 
tame. 

IV. By the amended Constitution of 1834, art. 11, J 10— " The fund, called the Com" 
num School Fundj and all the lands and proceeds thereof, dividends, stocks, and other 
property of every description whatever, heretofore by law appropriated by the Greneral 
Assembly of the State for the use of Common Schools, and all such as shall hereafter be 
appropriated, and the interest thereof, shall be inviolably appropriated to the support 
and encouragement of Common Schools throughout the State, and for the equal benefit 
of the people thereof; and no law shall be made authorizing said fund, or any part 
thereof, to be diverted to any other use than the support and encouragement of Common 
Schools ; and it shall be the duty of the General Assembly to appoint a Board of Com- 
missioners for such term of time as they may think proper, who shall have the general 
•uperintendenceof said fund, and who shall make a report of the condition of the same, 
from time to time, under such rales, regulations, and restrictions as may be xequired 
by law." 

y. This Board, consisting of the Treasurer, Comptroller of the Treasury, and an ex- 
ecutive officer called the Superintendent of Public Instruction, was created by an act 
passed at the session of 1835 - 6, and was made a body politic and corporate, with per- 
petual succession, and the power of holding and possessing property of every kind in 
trust, for the use of common schools, by the name and style of the " Board of Commis^ 
gUmert of Common Schools for the State of Tennessee J^ As a preliminary measure to 
the organization of the schools, it was made the chief basincit of this Boatd, and 

23* 



270 TimissSKi. [iai5. 

elpeclally of th« Superintendent, to colleet tb* Oommon School Fand, and to iovteitit 
in the stock of the Planters' Bank. 

VI. By an act passed at the teaaioB of 1837 'Q^ the *^ Bank of Tennessee " was es- 
tablished, and " the whole of the Common School Fund, whether vested in the stock of 
the then existing banks of the State, or in the hands of the Superintendent of Publie In- 
•tmction, or in the hands of county agents or other persons, except so much a» may hare 
been vested in any works of internal improTemeat, was made a part of the OBpiialof 
diat Bank. And the Superintendent was to pay the fund, aa well as the pmeeeds vf 
certain lands, to the Bank as part of its capital, and was to receive from the bank Stcte 
stock, or certificates of debt therefor. Of the dividends of the Imnk, one hondred thou- 
sand dollars was annually set apart for Common Schools, and the fidth of the Stale 
pledged for its annual appropriation to that object, and eighteen thoumad - ilollan to 
Academies. 

VII. The school fund having been thus created, and a large part of it oolleoled aad 
invested under these laws, an act was passed at the same session of 1837 - 8, ** to estab- 
lish a system of common schools in the State," retaacted and amended by an act passed 
at the session of 1S39~ 40, by which it is made the duty of the superintendent, every year, 
on the third Monday in July, to apportion the school moneys to the ooimtiea, accordingto 
the ratio of their white children between the ages of 6 and 16 years, respectively, as 
compared with the white children of the whole Stale within those ages, ascertained by 
the county school commissioners. 

The Fund now consists of t 

1. Bank Stock. 

Union Bank, .... $48,89400 

Planters' Bank, .... 244,500.00 

Fanners and Merchants* Bank of Memphis, . 700.00 

Bank of Tennessee, . . • . 821i594.40 

2. Turnpike Stock, .... 44,304.90 « 

3. Real Estate, ..... 3,000.00 

4. Suspended Debt. 

Due from the Superintendent, Feb. 1, 1844, . 77,710.96 

From County Agents, &c. Oct. 1, 1843, estimated . 100,580.93 

$1,350,324.49 
The am't distributed on the 3d Monday, 15th July, 1844, was'* $117,087.40 
The scholastic population was then 348,313 children, each of whom of course re* 

ceived about 47 1-7 cents. 
• The eunount distributed on the 3d Monday of July, 1842, was $119,750 ; and on the 9d 

Monday of July, 1843, was $116,750. 

4 

Congressional Districts. 

1. Washington, Johnson, Hawkins, Sullivan, Carter, Green^ and Cocke counties. 

2. Sevier, Claiborne, Morgan, Jefferson, Campbell, JBlount, Anderson, Munroe, and 
Grainger. 

3. Rhea, Knox, Bradley, Polk, McMmn, Marion, Roane, Meigs, Hamilton, nod 
Bledsoe^ . 

4. Coffee, Warren, Overton, Van Buren, Fentress, White, De Kslb, and Jackson. 
6. Franklin, Marshall, Lincohi, and Bedford. 

6. Hardin, Hickman, Maury, Giles, Lawrence, and Wayne. 

7. Williamson, Wilson, Cannon, and Rutherford. 

8. Sumner, Smith, and Daridson. 

0. Humphreys, Dickson, Montgomery, Henry, Stewart, Robertson, and Benton. 

10. Shelby, Hardeman, Fayette, Haywood, McNairy, Lauderdale^ and Tipton. 

11. Carroll, Madison, Weakley, Gibson, Perry, Penderson, and Obion. 



1845.] 



KENTUCKY. 



^, 



XXI. KENTUCKY. 



GOVEBNMBNT. 



William Owsley, of Boyle Co., Governor, (tenn of office 

expires in September, 1848,) 
Archibald Dixon, of Henderson Co., Lieut. Governor and 

Speaker of the Senate. Pay, $6 a day, while presiding. 
Ben. Hardin, of Frankfort, Secretary of ^cUe, 



Benjamin Selby, do. 

Thomas S. Page, do. 

James Robertson, do. 

James Davidson, do. 

Craig & Henry, do. 

Peter Dudley, do. 

Ambrose W. Dudley, do. 

George A. Robertson, do. 

Ryiand T. Dillard, do. 

John L. Helm, do. 



Auditor of Public Accounts, 

2d Auditor^ . 

Register of the Land Office, 

ly-eamrer. 

Keepers of the Penitentiary, {^ the 

AdjutcMt General, 

QuartermCLsten General, 

State Librarian, 

Sup. of Public Instruction, 

Speaker of the House, 



Salary. 
$2,500 



$750 

1,250 

1,500 

1,250 

1,250 

profits.) 

150 

100 

250 

750 



The Senate consists of 38 members, elected for four years, one fourth 
being elected every year. The House of Representatives consists of 100, 
elected annually on the 1st Monday in August. Pay, $3 a day, besides 
mileage. The Speaker receives $6 a day, and the Clerks $10 a day each. 



Judiciary. 



Cknert of Appeals, 



Ephraim M. Ewing, of Russell ville, 

Daniel Breck, of Richmond, 

Thomas A. Marshall, of Lexington, 

Jacob Swigert, of Frankfort, 
Owen 6. Cates, do. 

James C. Coleman, do. 

Benjamin Monroe, do. 



Chief Justice, 
Judge, 
do. 
Clerk, 



Salary. 

$1,500 
1,500 
1,500 
Fees. 



Attorney Gen., $300 and fees. 
Serjeant, Fees* 

Reporter. 



John L. Bridges, 
Mason Brown, 
A. H. Rennick, 
Joitph Gray, 



General Court. 



of Danville, *i 

of Frankfort, r^"' 



do. 
do. 



Clerk, 
Serjsamt, 



Salary. 

$1,300 
1,200 
Fees. 
Fees. 



273 



KKNTUCKT. 



[1845. 



LouitvUU Chancery Court. 









Salary. 


;3amuel S. Nicholas, 


of Louisville, 


ChanceUoTf 


$2,000 


Charles J. Clarke, 


do. 


Clerk, 


Fees. 


Joseph Mayo, 


do. 


Muster, 


Fees. 


John A. Crittenden, 


do. 

Circuit Courti. 


Marthal, 


Fees. 



The State is divided into eighteen Circuits or Districts, and the follow- 
ing are the Circuit Judges, who have each a salary of $1,200, except the 
Judge of the 5th Circuit, who receives $1,500, and the Judge of the 12th, 
$1,300, Each Circuit has an attorney, who receives $300 and fees. 



1. 
2. 



6. 
6. 

7. 

6. 

0. 

10. 

n. 

12. 

13. 
14. 
15. 
X6. 
17. 
18. 
19. 



Judges. Residence. 

Walker Reid, Washington. 

Henry O. Brown, Cynihiana. 
Richard A. Backner,Jr.Lexing:ton. 
James Pryor, Carrollton. 

John J. Marshall, Looisvlile. 
Asher W. Graham, Bowling Green. 
Benj. Shackleford, Hopkinsville. 
Christopher Tompkin8,Gla8gow. 
Samael Lusk, Lancaster. 

James Simpson, Winchester. 

Kenaz Farrow, - Mount Sterling. 
John L. Bridges, Danville. 

Armist. H. Charchill, Elizabethtown. 
John Calhoon, Hardinsbure. 

Tonstall Quarles, Whitley C. H. 
Wiley P. Fowler, Smithland. 
Mason Brown, Frankfort. 

Richard A. Buckner, Greensbnrgh. 
George R. McKee, Lancaster. 



Attorneys, 
Harrison Taylor, 
Wm. W. Somhgatc, 
Alex. H. Robertson, 
Richard Logan, 
Nathaniel Wolfie, 
Alexander R. Macy, 

Vacancy. 
Zachariah Wheat, 
Geo. C. Thurman, 
Robert C. Clarke, 
Andrew Trambo, 
Joshua F Bell, 
Thoa. W. RUey, 
Alfred Allen, 
Wm. B. Moor«, 
Richard L. Mayes, 
Thos. L. Crittenden, 
Wm. R. McFerrin, 
G. V. Goble, 



Residence, 

Washington. 
Covington. 
L»exington. 
Carrollton. . 
Louisville. 
Bowling Green. 

Columbia. 

Springfield. 

Paris. 

Owingsville. 

Danville. 

Bardstown. 

Hardinsburg. 

Mount Vemon. 

Maj'field. 

Frankfort. 

Glasgow. 

Lawrence. 



Board of Interical Improvement. 



Thomas Metcalfe, 
James Davidson,'*^' 
Austin P. Coz,=)^ 



Salai^. 

$1,000 
100 
500 



of Nicholas, President, 

of Frankfort, State Treaturer, 

do. Secretary, 

* Members ex officio. 

The Governor is authorized to make such temporary appointments' of 
Engineers, as may be deemed expedient by the Board. 



Finances. 

The State debt is $4,064,500, of which $615,000 is at the rate of 5 per 
cent., and the balance at 6 per cent, interest. The Commissioners of the 
Sinking Fund have promptly paid the interest on the debt. The Commu* 
turners of the Sinking Fund are W. Owsley, Governor and Chairman ex officio; 



1845.1 



KENTUCKY. 



273 



loKh Tilford, Bwdenl of the NoHhsrii, Bank of Kentucky ; Virgil Mc Knight, 
I^etident of the Bank of Kentucky ; Joshua B. Bowles, President of the Bank 
of JJouisviUe; Ben. Hardin, Secretary and TreoMtrer. 

Banke. There are three principal Banks. (1.) The Bank of Kentucky, 
at Louisville ; capital, $3,700,000, of which the State owns 7,239 shares, 
of $100 each. It has hranches at' Lexington, Maysville, Danville, Greens- 
burgh, Hopkins ville, and Frankfort. Virgil Mc Knight, President, and Geo, 
C. Gwafhmey, Cashier. (2.) Northern Bank of Kentucky, at Lexington ; 
capital, $2,237,000. John Tilford, President -^ M. T. Scott, Caehier, It has 
branches at Paris, Richmond, Covington, and Louisville. The 'State owns 
2,540 shares, at $100 each. The usual dividend is 1 per cent, per annum, 
1(3.) Bank of Louisville^ capital, $1,083,800, hranches at Paducah and 
Flemingsbnrgh. The State owns 406 shares. The usual dividend is 6 
per cent, 'Value of taxable property, in 1843, $196,729,033 ; white males 
over 21, in 1843, 124,700. Total revenue, $312,235.86, exclusive of Bank 
Atocks, tolls on rivers and roads, and profits of the Penitentiary. Surplus 
in the Treasury, Oct. 10, 1843, $64,614.10 

Board of Education. 

Ryland T. Dillard,of Lexington, Superintendent of Public Instruction^and 
€3udrman ex officio. Salary, $750 and expenses. Ben. Hardin, Secretary 
of State, and Owen 6. Gates, jittomeif General, members ex officio. 

State Instit-Utions.-— Xuno^c «is^Ziim, at. Lexington, founded in 1822, 
Average number of inmates during 1843, . . 170 

Veafand Dumb Asylum, at Danville, founded in liB22. Ptapils, 24 

School for the Blind, at Louisville, founded in 1842. Pupils, 19 

Marine Hospital^ at Smithland. 

P^mtentiary, established in 1798. Number of convictk in 1843, 166 

" Average annual profits for four preceding years, $28,000. 



1 I 



Number of Boatt that have passed, and amount of ThUs received, on the 

I/misviUe and Portland Canal. 



Tean. 


Steamboats. 


Flat and keel 
beats. 


Tons. 
76,323 


Amount received. 


1831 


406 


421 


12,750 77 


1838 


453 


179 


70,109 


25,756 12 


1833 


875 


710 


169,685 


60,736 92 


1834 


938 


623 


162,000 


61,848 17 


1835 


l;^ 


355 


200,413 


80,165 24 


1836 


1,182 


260 


182,220 


88,343 23 


1837 


1,501 


165 


242,374 


145,424 60 


1838 


1,058 


438 


201,750 


121,107 16 


1839 


1,666 


578 


300,406 


180,364 02 


1840 
1841 


1:^1 


393 
309 


2^,841 
189,907 


134,904 55 
1W,944 59 


1843 


'983 


183 


172,765 


.05,005 10 


1843 


1,206 


88 


332,264 


107,274 65 




13,756 


4,70i 


2,425,587 


1,227,625 20 



274 OHIO. [1845. 

XXIL OHIO. 

Govern KENT. 

Salarf. 

Thomas W. Babtlbt, of Mansfield, Acting Governor^ (tenn of 

office expires on the 1st Monday in December, 1844,) $1,000 

Samuel Galloway, of Ross Co., Secretary vf State^ 500 

John Brough, of Fairfield Co., Jhiditor of State, 730 

Joseph Whitehill, of Warren Co., Treasurer of State, 730 

Holderman Crary, Chief Clerk in DepH of Public Work*, 800 

John M. Armstrong, Chief Clerk in the Jh*ditor*s Office, 600 

John Patterson, Warden of the State PemUeiivtiary, 800 

E. Gale, Mjutant General, 100 

W. F. Sanderson, Quartermaster General, 100 

Thomas Kennedy, Librarianof the State Lihrary, 400 

Commisrioners of the Board of Public Workt. 

SalaTj. 
William Spencer, of Dayton, $730 

Rodolphus Dickinson, of Lower Sandusky, 730 

Leander Ransom, of Columbus, 730 

Joseph Lake, Acting Commissioner of tfie Canal Fund, 660 

The Auditor and Treasurer of State are advisory Commissioners of 
the Canal Fund. 

. Thomas W. Bartley, of Mansfield, President of the Senate, 

John M. Gcallagher, of Springfield, Speaker of the House. 

D. A. Robertson, Clerk of the Senate. 

C. Borland, Clerk of the House, 

Judiciary. 

Supreme Court, 

Ebenezer Lane, of Sandusky City, 

Reuben Wood, of Cleveland, 

Matthew Burchard, of Warren, 

Nathaniel C. Reed, of Cincinnati, 

Edwin M. Stanton, of Steubenville, 

The Judges of the Supreme Court, the President and Associate Judges 
of the Courts of Common Pleas, and the Judge of the Superior Court of 
Cincinnati, are elected by the legislature, for seven years. Of the Judges 
of the Supreme Court, the oldest in commission is Chief Judge. Two 
of the four Judges form a quorum, who hold a court in each county once 
every year. 





Elected. 


Salary. 


CkUf Judge, 


1837, 


$1,500 


Jtssoc, Judge, 


1840, 


1,500 


do. 


1842, 


1,500 


do. 


1842, 


1,500 


Reporter, 







1845.] OHIO. 275 

Superior Court of Cincinnati. 

David K. Est^, of Cincinoati, Judge^ Salary, $1,200 

This Court has concurrent jurisdiction, with the Court of Common 
Pleas of the county of Hamilton, at common law and in chancery. 

Courts of Common Pleat. 











Salary. 


George B. Holt, 


of Dayton, 


Judge Ist Circuit, 


$1,200 


Ozias Bowen, 


of Marion, 


do. 2d 


do. 


1,200 


Ehen Newton, 


of Canfield, 


do. 3d 


do. 


730 


Corrington W, SearU 


i; of Zanesville, 


do. m 


do. 


1,200 


John Pearce, 


of CarroUtown, 


do. 5th 


do. 


730 


John H. Keith, 


of Chillicothe, 


do. Qth 


do. 


1,200 


£lijah Yance, 


of Lebanon, 


do. nth 


do. 


. 1,200 


John E. Hanna, 


of Mc Connelsville, 


do. 6th 


do. 


1,200 


W. B. Caldwell, 


of Cincinnati, 


do. 9th 

• 


do. 


1,200 


Owen T. Fishback, 


of Batavia, 


do.lOth 


do. 


1,200 


Jacob Parker, 


of Mansfield, 


do. nth 


do. 


1,200 


Joseph R. Swan, 


of Columbus, 


do. 12th 


do. 


1,200 


Myron H. Tilden, 


of Toledo, 


do. 13th 


do. 


730 


Benjamin Bissell, 


of Painsville, 


do. 14th 


do. 


1,200 


William Eennon, 


of St. Clairsville, 


do.l5th 


do. 


1,200 



The several Courts of Common Pleas are held, three times a year, by 
a President Judge and three Associate Judges, in most of the counties ; 
but in the counties very recently organized, only twice a year. Three of 
the above-mentioned Judges receive but $730 per txnmtm, because they 
"Were elected after the law of January, 1844, reducing the salaries of pub- 
lic officers, was passed. The Associate Judges receive $2.50 a day. 

* Finances. 

Balance remaining in the Treasury, November 15th, 1842, $64,361.25 
Amount collected and paid by County Treasurers, in the 
year ending November 15th, 1843, . . . 199,468.72 

Miscellaneous items of revenue, • . 64,440.31 

Total receipts, . . $328,270.28 

Expenditure during the year, . . . 233,462.36 

Balance in Treasury, November 15, 1843, . . 94,807.92 

The following are some of the chief items of expenditure : 
State officers, $7,600.00 Lunatic Asylum, $19,000.00 



Judges and Reporter, 25,800.00 

Ohio Legislature, 43,072.00 

Deaf and Dumb Asylum, 9,814.73 



Institution for the Blind, 10,300.00 
Board of Public Works, 3,600.00 
State Printer, . 18,491.18 



276 



QH1Q» 



[1845. 



Amount of taxable property, and of taxes assessed diiring the year 18^. 



No« of acres of land, 32,025,808 

Valae, inclnding houses, $84,440,180 

Value of town lots and buildings, 21,056,202 



No. of horses, 




368,457 


Estimated value, 




$14,788,240 


No. of cattle, 




700,654 


Efltiiiiated value. 




$5^3,799 


Capital and money 


at interest, 


7,120,998 


No. of pleasure carriages. 


11,997 


Estimated value. 




$694,375 



Total am*t oftaxable property, $133,663,794 



State and Canal Tax, 
County und School Tax, . . 
Road Tax, 

Township and Poor Tax, 
Cofporation and Bridge Tax, 
Physicians* and Lawyers' Tax, 
School-house Tax, 
Delinquencies, 



$984,809.19 
606,358 <38 
190,979.30 
185,428.88 
194,257.59 
6,276.92 
17,037.63 
325/304.98 



Total Taxes, 



$2,361,842.81 



The whole amount of the State debt is $18,668,321.61. Of this, how- 
ever, $1,406,267.46 are owned by the State itself, being a part of the per- 
manent school fund. $14,345,212.50 bear interest at 6 per cent., $1,500,000 
at 7 per cent, and $550,000 at 5 per cent. The annual interest on this 
debt is regularly paid, being provided for by the proceeds of the public 
works, and by a permanent tax imposed by law. 



Common Schools. 

School Funds accruing during the year 1843 : 
Five per cent interest on surplus revenue. 
Tax, &c., for common school purposes. 
Interest on special funds for common schools. 
Interest on proceeds of 16th section in every township. 



$100,314.50 
99,814.32 
28,387.98 
56,133.92 



Total, $284,521.91 

The law requires minute and specific returns of the condition of the 
schools each year; but there are no means of enforcing this law, and it is 
quite generally neglected. The few returns received in 1843 are so in- 
complete as to be worthless. The Secretary of State remarks, that " not 
a few of the township superintendents lack the capacity to make a re- 
port with the form before them." 

Internal Improvements. 



Names of Works. 


Length 

in 
miles. 


CosU 


Revenue in 
1843. 


Expeniliture 
in 1843.« 


Ohio Canal, 
Miami Canal, 
Miami Extension, 
Wabash and Erie Canal, 
Walhoridmg Canal, 
Hocking Canal, 
Muskingum Improvement, 
W. Res. & Maumee Rond, 


334 
85 

139 
91 
25 
56 
91 
31 


$4,695,203.09 

1,237,552.19 

3,167,440.80 

3,009,923.29 

607,268.99 

975,481.01 

1,628,028.29 

256,334.93 

15,577,233.16 


^22,754.82 

68,640.09 

8,291.48 

35,922.96 

837.77 

4,756.63 

23,167.01 

7,254.19 


$114,897.77 

36,326.05 

8,579.64 

210,908.73 

39,004.91 

105,143.58 

143,814.25 

1,782.13 

S665,452.e0 


Total, 


852 


471,624.29 



* Including, in most cases, amount expended on construction daring the year. 



1S45.] 



oaio. 



277 



The follo'ifing titular Btatimieat ex^bits the amoaqt received on the 
Oluoand Hianu CaojaU, and the amount paid since Pecember X, 1826 : 



OhioCanaL 



Tean. 






1827 
1828 
1829, 
1830 
1831 
1832 
1833 
1834 
1S35. 
1836 
1837 
1838 
1839 
1840 
1841 
1842 
1843 



Received for 

tolls, fines, and 

water-rents. 



$1,500.00 

4,000.00 

7,000.00 

30,493.93 

64,864.17 

79,982.48 

136,555.70 

164,488.98 

185,684.48 

211,823.32 

293,428.79 

382.135.96 

423,599.84 

452,122.03 

416,202.63 

387,442.22 

322,754.82 



Paidool- 
lectors and 
inspectors. 



§700.00 
900,00 
1,100.00 
1,300.00 
2,100.00 
3,600.00 
4,125.00 
5,325.00 
5,325.00 
5,650.00 
7,050.00 
7,250.00 
8,200.00 
8,500.00 
t9,240.73 
9,000.00 
9,000.00 



J^'denfiineeTs, 

sopenntend- 

ents, and for 

repairr.* 



$33,741.26 

71,853.49 

75,875.10 

84,846.81 

115,688.82 

192,344.99 

195,627.13 

113,002.95 

124,263.49 

129,217.51 

114,897.77 



Miami Caaal. 



Received 
for tolls, 
fines, and 
water- 
rents. 



Paid col- 
lectors &. 
inspect- 
ors. 



Paiii engi- 
neens, su- 
perinten- 
dents, & for 
repairs. 



$8,042.70 
20,941.36 
30,082.33 
36,643.88 
36,847.47 
50,470.63 
50,040.99 
51,917.00 
51,116.52 
62,833.40 
77,863.09 
78,601.19 
70,321.53 
72,612.88 
58,460.34 
68,640.09j 



n,200 
1,200 
1,550 
1,700 
1,975 
2,225 
2,225 
2,225 
2,675 
2,700 
2,500 
2,500 
2,672 
2,926 
2,500 



$10,329.59 

6,938.05 

6,605.06 

9,237,91 

5,668.83 

7,940.37 

16,927.57 

28,768.77 

46,556.91 

32,657.25 

44,991.19 

22,553.55 

50,780.55 

20,634.70 

t36,326.05 



* Until 1833, when the canal was finished, repairs were charged as. 
construction. t This amount includes tolls refunded. 

I This includes expenditures on the Warren County Canal. 

Received at Clevdand via the Ohio Canal. 



Years. 


Barrels of Flour. 


Basb. of Wheat. 


Barrels of Pork. 


BushelaofCoal. 


1833, 


96,302 


386,760 


22,758 


49,134 


1634, 


105,336 


333,868 


33,884 


95,634 


1835, 


132,319 


387,232 


19,814 


60,473 


1836, 


167,431 


463,821 


13,572 


84,124 


1837, 


903,691 


549,141 


42,057 


183,484 


1838, 


287,465 


li229,01S 


39,055 


73,292 


1839, 


284,8^ 


1,515,820 


30,717 


134,881 


1840, 


605,461 


2,155,407 


23,017 


172,206 


1841, 


441,425 


1,564,421 


29,797 


478,370 


1843, 


492,711 


1,311,665 


52,272 


466,844 


1843, 


677,369 


813,536 


13,177 


^7,834 



Insanity. — In the Ohio Lunatic Asylum, there have been admitted, 
during the pas4 year, 207 patients •— number discharged, 69. During the 
&s% years that the institution has been in operation, 473 insane persons 
have been admitted, of whom 203 have been cured. The following are 
the causes of the insanity of all who have come under the care of the 
Institution since its foundation : 



Intemperance, 
III health, 

24 



25 
78 



Seduction, . 
Fear of want, 



1 

4 



278 



MXOHfGAN. 



[1845. 



Paerpemlf • 
Constitutional, 
Intense application, 
Injuries of the head, 
Excessive joys, . 
Domestic troubles, . 
Domestic affliction^ 
Disappointed love, . 
Jealousy, 

Hereditary, • . 
Periodical, . 

Physical causes. 



32 


. 28 


5 


. 6 


1 


. . 28 


18 


. 16 


6 


, 93 


28 


. 280 



Loss of property. 
Religion of all kinds, 
Disappointment, &e.. 
Masturbation, . . 
Epilepsy, 
Unknown, • 
Fright, 

Indulgence of temper, 
111 treatment, 
Suicidal, . . 
Homicidal, . . , 

Moral causes, . 



12 

57 

14 

25 

27 

63 

6 

3 

7 

22 

5 

193 



XXIII. MICHIGAN- 



GoVBRNMEMT. 

Salary. 
John S. Barry, of Constantine, Governor^ (term expires 

Ist Monday of January, 1846,) $1,500 

Origen D. Richardson, of Pontiac, Lieut. Crovemor, Pay, $6 a day. 

1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

500 

1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

400 



Robert P. Eldredge, of Macomb Co. Secretary of State, 

Charles G. Hammond, of Branch Co, Auditor- General, 

John J. Adam, of Lenav^ee Co. Treamrer, 

0. C. Comstock, Sen. of Ann Arbor, Superintend. Public Instruc. 



Douglass Houghton, 
O. C. Comstock, Jr., 
Digby V. Bell, 
Isaac E. Crary, 
^zra Williams, 
John E. Schvtrartz, 
Peter Morey, 
Jonas H. Titus, 



of Detroit, 

of Marshall, 

do. 

do. 

of Detroit, 

do. 



State Geologist, 
ConCr of Int. Improvement, 
Omir of the Land Office, 
Recorder of do. 
Quartermajiter General. 
Adjutant and Inspector General, 300 
of Tecumseh, Judge Advocate GeneraL 
of Jackson, Agent of State Prison, 1,000 



The Senate consists of 18 members, elected for tvro years ; the House of 
Representatives, of 53 members, elected annually. Pay of each, $3 a day, 
during the session of the legislature. The seat of government is at De- 
troit, or wherever the legislature shall direct, till 1847, v^hen it is to be 
permanently established. 

Edwin M. Cust, of Livingston Co., President pro tern, of the Senate. 
Edwin H. Lothrop, of Kalamazoo Co., Speaker of the HouMt, 



1O40.J 


MIOHIOAN 


279 




JUDIOI- 


IRT. 




Kandolph Manning, 
Anthony Ten Eyck, 
Austin M. Gould, 


Court of Chancery, 

of Detroit, Chancellor, 

Register of Ut Circuit, 
do. 2d do. 


Salary. 
$1,500 


Kdmund Bice, 




do. 3d do. 




Alfred Tread way, 
John Barber, 


• 


do. 4th do. 
do. 5th do. 





E. B. Harrington, of Detroit, Reporter of Supreme Court and Court 

of Chancery f 500 

There are 5 Chancery Circuits. The terms of the 1st Circuit are held 
annually at the city of Detroit, on the 3d Tuesday in July, and the 1st 
Tuesday in February ; of the 2d Circuit, at Ann Arbor, on the 2d Tues- 
day in January and July; of the 3d Circuit at Kalamazotf, on the 3d 
Tuesday in January, and the Thursday next after the 4th Tuesday in 
June ; of the 4th Circuit at Pontiac, on the 1st Tuesday in May, and the 
Tuesday afterthe 2d Monday in November ; of the 5th Circuit, at Adrian, 
on the Ist Tuesday in January, and the 3d Tuesday in June. 

Supreme Court, 

Salary. 

£paphrodittts Ransom, of Kalamazoo, Chief Justice^ $1,600 

Chafles W. Whipple, of Pontiac, jSjuociaU Justice^ 1,500 

Alpheus Felch, of Monroe, do, do, 1,500 

Daniel Goodwin, of Detroit, do. do. 1,500 

Elon Famsworth, do. Jlttomey General, Fees & 800 

Anthony Ten Eyck, do. Clerk of ist Circuit, Fees. 

The Judges of the Supreme Court are appointed by the Governor, with 
the advice and consent of the Senate, for the period of 7 years. The 
terms of this court are held at Detroit, on the 1st Tuesday in January and 
June ; at Ann Arbor, on the last Tuesday in December ; at Kalamazoo, 
on the 1st Tuesday in July ; and at Pontiac, on the 4th Tuesday in June. 

Circuit Courts. — There are 4 judicial circuits, in each of which one of 
the Judges of the Supreme Court sits as presiding Judge. 

Presiding Judge. Presiding Judge. 



1st Circuit, Daniel Goodwin. 

2d do. Alpheus Felch. 



3d Circuit, Epaphroditu8 Ransom. 
4th do. Charles W. Whipple. 



District Criminal Court, for Wayne, Washtenaw, Jackson, and Oakland. 
B. F. H. Witherell, of Detroit, Presiding Judge, Salary, $1,000. 



999 MlcitTOAfi. [1^^. 

FxnaHces. 

I. Oeneral Fund. Estimated annual cirrreht expenses of State Gov- 
vernment, for 1844 : 

Salaries of Governor and Executive oflScers, $12,600 

Judiciary, including Attorney General and Reporter, . 9,900 

Legislature, ...... 20,000 

Printing laws, docunaents, &€. . . 3,000 

Expenses of the State Prison, over earnings, . : 8,000 

Miscellaneous appropriations, . . . 2,500 
Int. on $100,000, General Fund stock, and $60,000, Penitentiaiy do., 9,600 

** on about $20,000 delillquent tax stock, 1,400 

** on warrants, &c. payable from General Fund, . 3,000 

70,000 
Estimated revenue for current expenses for 1844 : 
State tax of two mills, for 1843, ... 4^^,396 

Specific tax on banks, brokers, and pedlers^ . . 1,500 

Oifice charges on delinquent taxes, . . . 3,000 

Interest collected on delinquent taxes, say . . 12,000 

$71,836 

II. Imtemal J^provemint Dd^.-^Tht State has received, or acknowl- 
edges due, on her five miMion loan dehU iBtludiiig interest from Jtily 2d, 
1841, to July Ist, 1845, funded or proposed to be funded, the sum of 
$2,987,000, or nearly $3,000,000 ; the annual interest of which, at 6 per 
<rent, will be about $180,000. The annual receipts on the Central and 
Southern Railroads, on which the State relies for the payment of the 
above interest, are estimated, when the former shall be completed to Kal- 
amazoo, at from $350,000 to $400,000, one half ^ which or inor^, when 
the roads are fully stdcked tvith locomotives and cars, wUt be net profits, 
amounting to $175,000 or $200,000. 

III. Univernty Stock, The interest on this stod^, $100,000 at 6 p«r 
cent , or $6,000 per anniun, is met regularly from the income of the Uni- 
versity Fund, which now averages about $8,000 a year. 

lY. JLoaru to Railroad Compames, The only other stocks of this State, 
not enumerated above, were issued in pursuance of two loans to Railroad 
Companies, for which the State is contingently liable ; one of $100,000 to 
the Detroit and Pontiac Railroad Company, and one of $20,000 to the 
Palmyra and Jackson Railroad Company. For the principal of the latter 
loan, and $6,300 of back interest, the State sold the road in June, 1844, and 
bid it in at $22,000. Fifteen miles of it, from Palmyra to Clinton, had 
been finished fi^r two years or more, except ironing, and had been used 
some on the wooden superstructure. It is suj^osed, that that part of the 
road lying north of the southern railroad of the State will be ironed by 
the State, and converted into a branch of that road. On the loan of $100,000 
to the Detroit and Pontiac Railroad Company, it is expected that the 
State will receive pay before the close of the year 1846 ; if not, the lien 
which the State has on the road is deemed ample security. 



1845.] KICHIOAN. 281 

IifTXXNAL Impeovembhts. 

Board of Commissioners, 

O. C. Comstock, Jr. of Marshall, Acting Commissioner^ salary, $1,000. 
The Secretary of State aad State Treasurer are ex officio members. 

The Central Bcairoady which was in operation during 1842 and 1843, 
from Detroit to Jackson, 80 miles, has been extended to Marshall, 112 
miles from Detroit. Under the appropriation of 150,000 acres of State 
lands, for continuing the road beyond Marshall to the village of Kal- 
amazoo, a distance of 32 miles further toward^ Lake Michigan, the 
grading has been mostly completed, and a large portion of the timber for 
the superstructure got out. An additional appropriation of 64,000 acres 
of land was made by the Legislature of 1844, which, it was estimated, 
i¥ould be sufficient to get that part of the road ready for iron by the sum- 
mer or fall of 1845; and there was also appropriated $75,000 of the un- 
pledged proceeds of the road for the purchase of the necessary iron. The 
Southern i2(zt2roa«2, which has been in operation from Monroe to Adrian, 36 
miles, since 1841, was completed to Hillsdale, 68 miles from Monroe, in 
October, 1843. The proceeds of the Central and Southern Railroads, for 
the fiscal year ending November 30, 1843, and for the first seven months 
of that year, and of the 3^ar ending Nov. 30, 1844, have been as follows : — 

Fiscal year 1943. First 7 mos. 1843. First 7 mos. 1844. 
Central Railroad, $149,986.51 $50,817.16 $98,547.87 

Southern Railroad, 24,040.50 4,192.95 32,108.26 

$174,027.01 $55,010.11 $130,656.13 

As the Central Railroad will extend to Marshall, 32 miles further than 
last year, for the last four or five months of the year ending Nov. 30, 1844, 
the proceeds of that road for 1844 are estimated at about $225,000; and 
the proceeds of the Southern Railroad for the year at $75,000, or up- 
wards; or for both roads at $300,000. 

The Erie and Kalamazoo Railroad is constructed by a private compa- 
ny, and is in operation from Toledo to Adrian, 30 miles. The Detroit and 
Pontiac Railroad, also constructed by a private company, is in operation 
from the former to the latter place, 25 miles. No statements of the pro- 
ceeds of either of those roads are published. The former has never paid 
any dividend to its stockholders ; and a large portion of its former busi- 
ness is being drawn off by the State Southern Railroad to Monroe. The 
road from Detroit to Pontiac is doing a respectable and increasing business. 

CoLLi:6i8. — Th« only public and permanently organized literary in- 
stitution in the State^ which may be considered as fairly in operation, is 
the " University of Idichigan^^ which was opened for the reception of stu- 
dents in the fall of 1842, since which time, the number of students has 
been gradually increasing. Last collegiate year, there were three classes, 

24* 



382 KiOHroAX. [1845. 

a freshman, sophomore, and janior, consisthif of about 60 students. Of 
the five professors appointed by the Board of Regents, and constituting the 
present Faculty, only two, the Professor of Ancient Languages, and the 
Professor of Mathematics, have been in actual service, and in receipt of 
salaries. During the last year, a tutor was added, to enable these gen- 
tlemen to perform, ad mterim, the duties to sotne extent of Ihe Professor 
of Mora] and Mental Philosophy, and of a Professor of Natural Philoso- 
phy. It is expected, that the Professor of Moral Philosophy will enter 
upon the duties of his chair at the beginning of the next academic year. 
The University has a very valuable cabinet of natural history, (see Al- 
manac, 1844,) and a well-selected library of about 4,000 volumes. There 
are now four preparatory schools, beside the one at Ann Arbor, the seat 
of the University, in operation, supported in part by the Board of Regents, 
as branches of the University ; namely, at Kaldteazoo, White Pigeon, Te- 
cumseh, and Romeo, having in all, under their charge^ at the last rejiorts, 
about 150 students. In Detroit, aS well tti at some other points in the 
State, there are some well Conducted aAd useful grammar or high schools, 
where the elements of a liberal English education are taught In some 
of them are taught, also, some of the i^ncient and principal mod^jte 
languages. 

Charters have been granted for some three or four literary institutions, 
to be organized on private foundations, or connected more or less with 
some one of the leading Christian denominations. The '* Wfesleyaa Sem- 
inary," at Albion, in Calhoun county, has its buildings partly up, and is 
getting under way with very fair prospects and very respectable means 
for an infant institution ; the funds for its endowment having been mostly 
contributed by members of the Methodist persuasion. A chafter for an 
institution to be called " Marshall College ** vt^as obtained by the Rev. 
John P. Cleveland, formerly a Presbyterian clergyman in Detroit, and 
latterly at Marshall, but who is now settled at Cincinnati, Ohio ; and it 
is not supposed that the institution will soon, if ever, be organized, as 
originally contemplated. The Baptists have a " Literttry Institute " 
chartered, which was at one time partially under way at Kalamazoo, bat 
which is probably superseded at present by the branch of the University 
at that place. The Catholics have a charter for an institution called 
" St. Philip^s College," located near Detroit, but which has not made 
much progress yet towards beiiig opened as a collegiate institution. 

State Land Offiox. 

This Office was opened in April, 1849, and ha^ the general charge and 
disposition of the school, university, internal improvement, and ether 
lands, belonging to the State. Part of the 500,000 acres granted by Con- 
gress to this State for purposes of internal improvement were adver- ' 
tised for sale, and brought into market about the middle of July, 1843 ; 



IBIS.] ■icaroAH, 383 

•nd during the A}4 raonthf to Dec. 1, 1843, there was sold of these and 
•ther internal improvenaent lands, to the amount of $61,941.31, all of 
which, except a few dollars, was paid in internal improvement warrants. 
An additional quantity of these half million acres of internal improve- 
ment lands, as also of some 6ther State lands, were brought into market 
it ^tthe, 1844, and are selling off rapidly for State warrants. 

Payments of princix^al or interest due on school or attivei^ty landk cu 
he made either at the land office br it the State treasury. About 25 per 
eeht Only of the principal on sales of school or university lands !s re- 
qnired to be paid, except at the option of the putchaser ; iht unpAtd bal- 
ance bearing an interest 6f 7 per cent, pef linnum. A part of what has 
been paid in on account of the principal of those funds remains in the 
State treasury ; but the greater portion has been loaned oat to difibhsAt 
couhties or inditiduat^ on botids aiid tkiortgagesi or other securitiei. 

State PlusoN.-^The State Penitentiary, situated at Jackson,, is toft- 
ttrneted on the Auburn piaxL The number of prisonere October 31, 1848, 
was 87; received during the year ending October 31, 1843, 43; dis- 
charged during the year, 36; number remaining October 31, 1843, 94. 
The earnings of the convicts for the year 1843, aie estimated by the 
agent at $10,346.36 ; but the convicts being mostly employed in extend- 
ing the prison wail, and rebuilding a prisofi shop burnt in August, 1843, 
the sum of $8,000 was drawn from the State treasury for their support 

OoMKON Schools. — Amount of school moneys apportioned frOm the 
State treasury amongst the several school-districts, for the last three 
years, being the net income of the school fund during that period. 

Year Scholars. " Rate per scholar. Amount Spportioned. 

1842 48,4^ 32 cents. $15,496.96 

1843 32,141 Sl7 " 19,292.17 

1844 66,8ld 42 <' 28,063.96 
Number of districts that repotted last yedr, 1,743. Average ntiiklm 6f 

months school was kept, about four. Amount raised in the several dis- 
tricts for school purposes, $44,705.90, in addition to which, and to the 
$28,000 derived from the school fund, there will be levied and collected 
in each of the counties, a tax of half a mill on the dollar, which will peM, 
throughout the State, about $14,000; making in all about $87,000 raised 
for school purposes, ot fully one half more than the whole tax assessed 
fbr the support of the State government. Michigan ranks next to five of 
the six New England States, as to having the least comparative nuihher 
of adults within her limits, unable to read and write. Great exertions are 
made, and great interest is felt, throughout the State generally, for the 
maintenance of good common schools ; and it is believed, that both as to 
means for educating the rising generation, and as to the success of her 
school system, she is but little, if at all, behind t&e most forward of the 
eastern States. 



ISDIANA. 



[1845. 



XXIV. INDIANA, 



James Whitcomb, of Yigo, 



Jesse D. Bright, 
William Sheets, 
Royal Mayhew, 
H^ J. Harris, 
James Morrison, 
James M. Ray, 
Michael G. Bright, 
T. J. Eeynolds, 
Joseph R. Pratt, 
T. B. Kinder, 



GOVEBHMSNT. 

Salary. 

Governor, (term of office 

expires In December, 1846,) $1,500 

of Jefferson, Lieut, Governor^ Pay, $3 a day. 

of Indianapolis, Secretary of State, 800 

do. jyeamrer of State, 1,000 

do. Juditor of Public Jiccouwts^ 1,000 

do. President of the State Bank^ 1 ,300 

of Indianapolis, Cashier of the State Bank, 1,100 

State Jtgent, $1,000 and travelling expenses. 

of Indianapolis, Qiuartermaster General, 100 

of Jeffersonville, Keeper of the Pemtewtiary, Profits. 

of Indianapolis, State Librarian, 300 



JuniciART. 
Supreme Court, 



Isaac Blackford, 
Charles Dewey, 
Jeremiah Sullivan, 
Henry P. Cobum, 



Salarf. 
1,<K)0 
1,500 
1,500 
Fees. 



of Indianapolis, Chief Judge, 

of Charleston, Judge, 
of Madison, do, 

of Indianapolis, Clerk, 

The judges are appointed by the Governor and Senate for 7 years, and 
the senior in commission is the Chief Judge. This court holds its ses- 
sions at Indianapolis, in May and November. It has appellate jurisdic- 
tion only, except in capital cases, and cases in chancery in which the 
President of the Circuit Court may be interested. 



Circuit Courts, 



Ore. President Judges, 
1st, Isaac Nnylor, 
2d, J. H. Thompson, 
3d, Miles C. Eggleston, 
4th, Blisha Embree, 
fith, William J. Peaslee, 
6ih, J. T. Elliott, 
7th, John Law, 
8th, John W. Wright, 
9tb, E. M. Chamberlain, 
10th, David McDonald, 
11th, David Kilgore, 
13th, James W. Borden, 



of Grawfordsville. 
of Salem, 
of Madison, 
of Princeton, 
of Indianapolis, 
of Newcastle, 
of Vincennes. 
of Logansport. 
of Elkhart, 
of Washington. 
ofYorklown. 
of Ft. Wayne,' 



Proseeuting Attorneys, 

Joseph E. McDonald. 

William A. Porter, of Corydon. 



John Dumcmt, 
James Lockhart, 
A. A. Hamilton, 
Jacob B. Julian, 
John P. Usher, 
Spier S. Tipton, 

Vacant. 
William G. Quick, 
John M. Wallace, 
W. H, Coombs, 



ofVevay. 

of Mount Vernon. 

of Columbus. 

of Centreville. 

of Terra Haute. 

ofLoganapoit. 

of Martinsville, 
of Aiidersonto wn. 
ofPt. Wayna. 



1B42.] INDIANA. 283 

The President Judges and the Prosecuting Attorneys are elected by 
the legislature, — the judges for 7 years, and the attorneys for 2 years; 
and the Associate Judges and Clerks of the Courts are elected by the 
people for 7 years. The President Judges receive each a salary of $800 
and the Judge of the 5th Circuit is allowed $300 in addition, optional 
with the County Cooiinissioncrs of his Circuit ; the Attorneys have each 
a salary of $150 and perquisites. The Judges hold two terms in each 
county annually. There are two Associate Judges in each county, who 
receive $2 a day daring the session. 

In TEEM AL IhPROVBMBNTS. 

Jndxcmapolit and Madison Bmlroad.-^'DcLe distance between Indiana- 
polis and Madison is about 80 miles. The railroad is nearly completed 
to Columbus, about 40 miles, half way between the two first-named 
points. 

The Wabath cnul lEarie Ckmal begins at the town of Toledo, on the Mau- 
mee bay, at the western extremity of lake Erie, passes up. the valley of 
the Maumee river a distance of 75 miles in the State of Ohio, and thence 
through the State of Indiana, a further distance of 145 miles to Lafayette, 
making the whole length now opened, 220 miles. The canal is in rapid 
progress from Lafayette to Terre Haute, 90 miles, two thirds of the work 
being completed. From Terre Haute to Evansville, about 140 miles, 
•ome 45 miles am nearly finished, and $225,000 have been expended on 
the remainder. The whole canal will be 450 miles long, it is oi large 
dimensions, and has been built at a great cost The lower portion of 
this -caaal, iior a distance of 60 miles, is 6 fetX deep, and 60 leeX wide. 

FlNANCC<8. 

The revenue paid in for the year ending October 31 st, 1843, was 
$213,716.66. The amount of the cooimon school fund, <ierivM froln 
bank dividends, was $50,243.44. The number of acres of land assessed 
in 1843, was i4y674,599. The value of all property taxed, Was $103^709,853- 
The number of polls taxed was 121,919. The internal improvements of 
the State consist of one railroad, three turnpike roads, and fiv^ canala. 
The amount of the State debt was #13,890,000X10; of tvhich sum, 
$1,527,000.00 accrued from bank stock, and the balance fox internal im- 
provements. The expenses of government in 1843, were $90,897 \ for 
1 844, they are estimate at ^100,000. The incoixie is iestimated at $240,000^ 
mostly paid in State Tieasuxj Notes- 



288' ILLINOIS. [1845. 



XXV. ILLINOIS. 



GOVERNMENT. 

Salarf. 
Thomas Ford, of Springfield, Governor, (term ends Ist Mon- 
day in December, 1846,) $2,000 
John Moore, of McLean Co., Lieutenant Governor, $6 a day 

during the session, and $4 for every 20 miles of travel. 
Thompson Campbell, of Galena, Secretary, (including clerk hire,) 1,500 
William L. D. Ewing, of Hillsborough, jiuditor, (do.) 1,850 

Milton Carpenter, of Hamilton Co., Dreaturer, (do.) 1,1)00 

Walters & Weber, Public Printers, 
The Governor is, ex officio, Fimd Commissioner, 
Norman H. Purple, of Peoria, Bank Commissioner, 
Jacob Fry, of Lockport, Acting Commissioner on the Canal. 
Joel Manning, of Lockport, Secretary of the Commissioner, 

Each member of the legislature receives $4 a day during the session, 
and $4 for every 20 miles of travel. The Lieutenant Governor is Speaker 
of the Senate. Samuel Hackelton, of Fulton Co., Speaker of the House, 



JUDICIART. 

St^eme Court. 

Salary. 

William Wilson, of Carmi, Chief Justice, $1,500 

Samuel D. Lockwood, of Jacksonville, jSssociate Justice, 1,500 

Thomas C. Browne, of Galena, do. 1,500 

James Shields,* of Belleville, do. 1,500 

Kichard M. Young, of Chicago, do, 1,500 

John D. Catou,* of Kendall Co, do, 1,500 

Samuel H. Treat, of Springfield, do. 1,500 

Walter B. Scales^ of Mount Vernon, do, 1,500 

Jesse B. Thomas,* of Springfield, do. 1,500 
James A. McDougal, of Jacksonville, jJttomey Gen,, $700 and feef. 
J. Young Scammon, of Chicago, Reporter. 

Ebenezer Peck, of Springfield, Clerk, Fees. 

*lEIo}ding office by ExecutiTe appointment. 

The judges are elected by the legislature, and hold their offices during 
good behavior. Five constitute a quorum. The judges all perform 
circuit duties, the State being divided into nine circuits, or preside in the 
Circuit Courts. There are nine Staters attorneys, "who are elected by 
the legislature bienially. Salary, $350 and fees. 



1845.] Hissoiru. 287 

The only other courts now in the State are those held by probate 
justices and justices of the peace. The former have jurisdiction in 
actions of debt or assumpsit by or against administrators, &c., where the 
amount in controversy does not exceed $1,000, and the general powers 
of probate courts. The -latter have jurisdiction in actions of debt or 
assumpsit, not exceeding in amount $100; and exclusive jurisdiction in 
cases of assaults and battery. In trespass to personal property and tro- 
ver, where the damages claimed do not exceed $20, justices of the peace 
have also jurisdiction. In all suits for debts, where the damages claimed 
exceed $20, the Circuit Courts have jurisdiction, and they are Superior 
Courts of general jurisdiction, both civil and criminal. 

The Governor and Justices of the Supreme Court constitute a Council 
of Revision, which acts upon all laws, approving or disapproving them. 

Illinois Canal. — The report of Gov. Davis and Capt. Swift on the 
niinois Canal, which has excited a strong interest, has been published. 
Some of the principal facts exhibited by the report are, 1st, The amount 
of liabilities of the canal is $5,239,792, and the amount of promissory 
notes, &c., applicable to the extinguishment of those liabilities, $393,034, 
leaving a balance of $4,846,756. 2. The expense of completing the canal 
will depend upon the arrangements made for the supply of water ; viz. 
$1,600,000 in case one plan be pursued; $1,680,000 in another case; 
$1,800,000 if both the Fox and Calumet rivers are embraced, together 
with the sources relied upon under the first plan. 3. The propeity pro- 
posed to be pledged is a satisfactory security for the proposed loan of 
$1,600,000, and will reimburse the same with interest. 4. The works 
may be completed in three years. 5. A subscription of a million of 
stock has been make in the United States, but whether reliable or not, 
the commissioners are unable to state. Considerable attention is given 
to the question whether a preference can be given under the act of 1843, 
to the subscribers to the new loan of $1,600,000. Chancellor Kent has 
given the opinion that such a preference can be legally given. 



XXVI. MISSOURI. 

Government. 



Term end«. Salary. 
John C. Edwards, Governor, Nov. 1848, $2,000 

James Young, Lieutenant- Governor, do. do. 

James L. Minor, of City of Jefferson, Secretary of State, 

and Supermtendent of Common Schools, Fees & 1,300 



318 



luftsoumi. 



U349. 



Hiiam H. Baber, of City of Jefivnon, Jwditifr. JM. Jt^ K«h. 18^ $IJ00 
Peter 6. CaoTi^r, do. TlrM^furot, Pee. 1844, M^ 



100 

10ft 

1,500 



Samuel M. Bay, do. Jttorm^ Qtnmii^ Feb. 1&4€^ 

John Heavd, A^V o/Lamhy Feb. Ij84d, 
Gvstavtts. A. Fanont, of GH^r q£ Jfifieison, JdjutaiHt GenenU^ 
Gkeoi^ W. MiUer, do. iQuarterrruuter GeiMrs/^ 

Silu B«ed, Surveyor Gmaral, 

Fesdii^and Keattett, of St. Loum^ Fresidml cf State Bmk* 

Henry Shurlda, do. Cashier do. 

The Lieutenant-Governor is, ex officio^ President of the Senate, and 
receives $4,50 a day while presiding over the Senate \ and the pay of the 
Speaker of the House of Representatives is the same. The Senators are 
chosen every fourth year, and the Representatives every second year. 
Their pay is $3 a day. The legislature meets at the City of Jefferson 
biennially, on the 4th Monday in November. 



2^000: 



JUDICIABT. 



&ii>preme Court, 



George Tompkins, of City of Jefferson, Prendin^ J^jgf, 
William. B. Nap^on, do. Associate Judge^ 

William Scott, do. do^ 



^100. 
1,100. 
1,100. 



The Sopieipe Court is held at the City of Jeffexson. Thia Court exp 
ereises af^lUte jurisdiction from the Circuit Court, and. ban. original 
junadiction in casea. of. habeas corpus, mandamus, &c. 



Circuit Courts. 



James W. Morrow, 
John D. Leland, 
Ezra Hunt, 
P. H. McBride, 
John F. Ryland, 
A. A. King, 
F. P. Wright, 
Montgomery Blair, 
John H. Stone, 
John D. Cook, 
James A. Clark) . 
Henderson Young, 
Charles S. Yancey, 
Chaflet K. Alien, 



l«t Circuit, 

2d do. 

3d do. 

4th do. 

5th do. 

6th do. 

7th do. 

8th do. 

9th do. 

10th do. 

11th do. 

12th do. 

13th do. 

14th do 



SaJt^ry. AUoraers. 

$1,000 Samuel M. B|ay, 
1,000 James Grordon, 
1,000 G. Porter, 
1,000 Jas. C. Abemathy, 
1,000 H. Young, 
1,000 George W. Dunn, 
1,000 Mark L. Means, 
1,000 John Bent, 
1,000 John S. Biickey, 
1,000 Albert Jackson, 
1,000 B. F. Stringfellow, 
1,000 Peter H. Burnett, 
1,000 Jas. H. McBride. 
1,000 P. O. Minor, 



Salary. 
250 & fees. 

250 do. 

250 do. 

250 do. 

250 do. 

250 do. 

250 do. 

250 do. 

250 do. 

250 do. 

250 do. 

250 do. 

250 do. 

2d0 do. 



1845^ Hissouw, !389 

A Girciiit Coart ibr eack county is held twice in each year. The 
jurisdiction of the CircaiC Court extends to all matters of tort and con- 
tracts over 90 dollars, where the demand is liquidated, and over 50 dollars, 
where the agreement is parol. It has exclusive criminal jurisdiction, and 
superintending contiol over the County Courts and Justices of the Peace, 
subject to the correction of the St^reme Court The Circuit Court is 
held in each county. The Judges of the Supreme and Circuit Courts 
are nominated by the Governor, and confirmed by the Senate ; and they 
hold their office during good behavior, though not beyond 65 years of age« 

Court of Common PUcu of St. Lotds, 
Mia, M. Krum, of St. Louis, Judge, Salary, $2,000 

Criminal Court of St. Louis, 
A. W. Manning, of St Louis^ Judge, Salary, 1,000 

This is a local tribunal, established for exercising criminal jurisdiction 
only in the county of St. Louis. An appeal lies to the Supreme Court 
The Judge is appointed by the concurrent vote of the two Houses of the 
General Assembly ; and he holds his office during good behavior. 

CbiMity Courts, — The jurisdiction of the County Courts is limited to 
matters of probate and local county affairs, as roads, &c. A County 
Court sits in each county, and is composed of three justices, who are 
elected by the people, and hold their offices ibr four years. An appeal 
lies to the Circuit Court. 

Finances. 



Chief sources of Income. 

Direct taxes, $130,000 

Income of State funds, 32,270 

Amount of State debt, 922,000 

Annual interest on debt, 71,000 



Principal items of Expenditure. 

Salaries of 'Rx. officers, $9,150 

Expenses of Executive, 4,000 

Salaries of Judiciary, 22,550 

Expenses of Legislature,* 56,000 

Interest on State Debt, 71,000 

Common Schools, 12,000 

Charitable Establishments, 160 

• The Ijegislatnie sat, in 1842-3, 100 days. 

The expenditure of the State is generally equal to its income, leaving 
little or no balance for a sinking fund. 

Mode of authenticating deeds made in other States to lands in Mis ouri. — If 
a deed is acknowledged or proved in Missouri, it must be before some 
Court having a seal, or some judge, justice, or clerk thereof, or some jus- 
tice of the peace of the county in which the real estate conveyed, or af- 
fected, is situated. 

2o 



990 FZrOttTOA* P^^ 

If acknowledged or proved out of Mistonri, and within the 17nited 
States, it mvst be by any Conrt f4 the United Slatet, Or of liny State or 
Territory, having a seal, or by the elerk of any snch Conrt 

If acknowledged or proved without the United States, it must be by 
any Court of any State, Kingdom, or Empire, hating a seal, or b^ fh# 
Hayor of any city having an official seal. 

The parties must be known to the oAcer, or proted to be (Wch, by flf 
least two credible witnesses. 



XXVII. FLORIDA TERRITORT. 

GoVSBNMSnT. 

Salaiy. 
John Baahcb, troeentor, (appointed August 11, 1844,) #2,500 

Thomag H. Duvall, fliscrefory, (appointed Sept., lS4l J 1,500 

Thomas H. Austin, Trtaxwrtr. 

The Legislative Council is composed of a Senate of 15 members, 
elected for two years, and a House of Representatives eompOseil of 29 
members, elected annually, on the 2d Monday in October* The Legis- 
lative Council meets annually at Tallahassee, on the 1st A^nday ia 
January. Pay of members, $4 a day, and $4 for every 80 milee' travel. 





Judiciary. 






Digtriets. 


• 

Judges. 


Residence. 


Salary. 


Middle, 


Samuel J. Douglass, 


Tallahassee, 


$1,800 


Eastern, 


Isaac H. Bronson, 


St. Augustine, 


2,300 


Apalachicola, 


Samuel W. Carmack, 


St. Joseph*s, 


1,800 


Western, 


Dillon Jordan, jr., 


Pensacola, 


1,800 


Southern, 


William Marvin, 


Key West, 


2,300 



Districts. Marshals. District Attorneys. Salary. 

Middle, John G. Camp, Tallahassee. Charles S. Bibtey, TallahMsee. fSOO 

Eastern, John Beard, St. Augnstine. Thomas Douglas, St. Augustine. 200 

Apalachicola, Eobert Myers, Apalechic<da. Oeoif e S. Ifowkhis, ApalacUeola. 900 

Western, Ebenezer Dbrr, Pensacola. Walker Anderieil, l^rtwaeola. 900 

Southern, Jos. B. Browne, Key West. George W. Macrae, Key West. 900 

• 

The Court of Appeals, consisting of the Judges of the seveml Snpeiior 
Courts, is held annually at Tallahassee, on the Ist Monday in January. 
i he I'erritory comprises 20 counties, and the County Courts are held 
iemiannually by the Judges in the respective counties. 



A^S^'J wi9coirsiK. 291. 



XXVIIL WISCONSIN TKRRITOJIY, 

Nathaniel V. Tallhadoe, of Madison, Oovemor and Super- 
intendent of hidian Affaire^ (term expires March, 1648.) $2,500 
George R. C Fk>yd, of Madison, Secretary of the Taritory, 1,200 
Joshua Hathaway, Luther Padcer, and ClintoH Walworth, Caned 

Commissioners. Pay, $3 a day when in service. 
Jk>hn Y. Smith, of Madison, Sup't of Thrritoricd Property tmd Librwianj 300 
Alexander Botkin, of Mad^XL, Jbtdii^r^ 60 

James Morrison, do. l\^eamrery 60 

The government was organized in 1836. The Legislatioe Assembly con- 
sists of a CouduiJl •f 13 meodher^, elected for 2 years, aufi a House of 
.Repsesentative^ of ^ o^oahers, electttd aonually, on the 4^ Monday of 
Septemher. Their pay is $3 ji day during the session, jind $3 ibr evexy 
20 miles' traveL All town and cauiity officers are elected hy the peop)®. 

VL M. Strong, of Racine, JVencZenC of Ike OmnioCL 

George H. Wa&er, ef Milwaokle, Speaker of ^ Bouse. 
Benj. €. Eastman, Secretary of the €inmeit 

John CatUn, Chirf Cierk of th€ fOnm. 

JtTDI<»A&T. 

Supreme Cbftt. 

Sjilaxy. 

Charles Dunn, of Elk Grove, Chief Ju^e of Sup. Court^ $1,800 

David Irvin, of Madison, Associate. Justice do. 1,800 

Andrew G. Miller, of Milwaukie, do. do. 1,800 

T. W. Sutherland, ci Madison, Attorney^ Fees and 250 

Charles M. Prevost, Marshal, Fees and 200 

La Fayette Kellogg, of Madison^ Clerks Fees. 

Thomas P. Burrett, Beporter, 

JHstrid Courts. — The Territory is divided into three judiciid districts, in 
each of which a district court is held twice a year, for each county within 
the district, hy a Judge of the Supreme Court, assigned to the district, 
wJho. appoints his ow» cl^kt ^^^ ^^^ original jurisdiction of all real and 
personal actions ancii^g under the constitution and la^Krs of the United 
^»tates and of the Territory, and appellate jurisdiction from Judges of 
Probate and Justices of the Peace. 

•1st J^st, Ipwa, Grai^t, and Crawford, Mr. Justice Punn. 

^ do. Green, Rock«¥lf«lvprth, Jefferson, and Dane, Mr. Justice Irvin. 
M do. Brown, Milwaiikie« and Racine, Mr. Justice Miller. 



292 JOWM. p84SL 

The STipreme Court appoints its own clerk, and holds its session at 
Madison, on the third Monday of July; it has appellate jurisdietion of all 
cases from the Pistriet Courts, and original jurisdiction of all cases of 
wumdamuB, quo warrtuUc, prohibition, error, &c. Its decisions are report- 
ed by an attorney appointed by the Court, and published with the laws 
every year. An appeal lies to the V^ S. Supreme Court. 



XXIX. IOWA TERRITORT. 

GoTBBHKXlfT. 

Salarf 

John Chambi&s, of Iowa City, Governor and Superintendent of 

Indian jSffav^t, (term from July 15th, 1844, to July, 1848,) $2,509 

Samuel J. Burr, of Iowa City, Secretary^ 1,200 

William L. Gilbert, do. Jtuditor^ 100 

Morgan Reno, do*. TVeaturer amd JJbrano^ 210 

John M. Coleman, do. Territorial Jgent 4r Sup't of Capitol^ 1,000 

Edwin Guthrie, of Fort M&disonj Warden of the Pemtentiaryf 50O 

This country was erected into a territorial government by an act of 
Congress, of June, 1838, to take effect on the 4th of July following. The 
legislative power is vested in the Governor and a Legislative Assembly, 
which meets annually on the 1st Monday of December, at Iowa City, the 
seat of government; and it consists of 13 members of the Council, elected 
for two years, and of a House of Representatives consisting of 26 mem- 
bers, elected annually. Fay of the members, $3 a day^ and $3 for every 
20 miles' travel. 

On the 5th of April, 1843, the people voted, by a majority of 2,400, to 
form a State Constitution. A convention for this purpose will meet in 
October, the delegates to it being chosen in August. 

By a census taken in 1844, it appears that the population of this terri- 
tory is now 82,254. 

JVDICIASY. 

Salarf. 

Charles Mason, of Burlington, Chief Justice^ $1,800 

Joseph Williams, of Bloomington, Jtssociate Jiutiee^ 1,800 

Thomas S. Wilson, of Du Buque, do, 1,800 

John G. Deshler, of Bloomington, Jttomey^ Fees and 200 

Isaac Leffler, of Burlington, J&r«Aa2; Fees and 200 

Wm. J. A. Bradford, of Davenport, Biportef^ 300 

George S. Hampton, of Iowa City» Ctofe, Fee*. 



It4f] 



DIftXAI&T or COLUMBIA. 



293 



.Momei^ lit District, 


Fees. 


do. 2d do. 


Fees. 


do. dd, do. 


Fees. 



L. D. Stockton, of BucOfigtoa, 

James P. Carlton, of Iowa City, 
Jjunej Crawloid, of Du Buque, > 

The Judges are appointed §ot four years, and the term of the present 
Judges expires July 4th, 1^6. The Territory is divided into three ju- 
diciU dis^ts, and the Judges peribnn circuit duties. The Supreme 
Court, composed of all the Judges, meets annually, ia July,$it Iowa City. 



XXX. DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA. 

The District of 0)luinbia is under the immediate government of Con- 
gress. The city of Washington became the seat of the government of the 
Uaited States, in ISOO^ and it is the residence of the President, and the 
«tker €luef executive officers of the national government 



Judiciary. 



Circua Court o/the Ditfyict. 



William Cranchf 
Buckner Thruston, 
James S. Morsel, 
Philip R. FendaU, 
Alexander Hunter, 
William Brent, 
Edmund I. Lee, 



of Washington, 

do. 
of Georgetown, 
of Washington, 

do. 



Salary^ 

Chkf Judge, $2,700 

jStisociate Judge, 2,500 

do. 2,500 

jSlttomey, Fees, &c. 

Marshal, do. 

Clerk for Wasfm^on County, do. 

Clerk for JUexamdria County, do. 



District Court for the District, at JUexandria. 

William Cranch, Judge. Edmund I. Lee, Clerk. 

Cruninal Court for the District* 

■ 

James Dnnlop, of Georgetown, Judge, 

William Brent, Clerk for WeMngton County, 

Edmand L Lee, Clerk for Jtlexandria County, 



Salary. 
$2,000 

Fees. 

Fees. 



Nathaniel P. Causin, 
Edward N. Roach, 
Christopher Neal, 
Bernard Hooe, 

25* 



Orphans* Court. 

Washington Co., 

do. 
Alexandria Co., 

do. 



Judge, 
Register, 
Judge, 
Register, 



Salary. 
$1,000 

Fees. 

1.000 

* 

Fees. 



94 



AKERXCAlf STATrS. 

AMERICAN STATES. 
Rqmblies of North America. 



[184du 



United States, 


PopalatioD. 


CapitaJs. 


Pratidtiiti. 


17,069,453 Washington, 


John Tyler. 


Mexico, 


*7,044,140 Mexico, 


A. L. De Santa Anna. 


Central Amenca, 


2,000,000 San Salvador. 




Yucatan, 


580,948 Merida, 


Miguel Barbachano. 


Hayti, 


933,000 Cape Hayticn, 


Gen. Guerrier. 


Texas, 


250,000 Austin, 


Samuel Houston. 




Republics of South America. 


Argentine Repnb. 


2,000,000 


Buenos Ayres, 


Don Juan M. de Rosas. 


Peru, 


1,700,000 


Lima, 


General Gamarra. 


New Grenada, 


1,931,684 


Bogoti, 


General Herran. 


Bolivia, 


1,500,000 


Chuq^uisaca, 


General Ballivian. 


Chili, 


1,500,000 


Santiago, 


General Bulnes. 


Venezuela, 


900,000 


Caraccas, 


Greneral Paez. 


Equator, 

Isth's of Panama, 


600,000 


Quito, 


Juan Joseph Floies. 




Panama, 


Thomas Herrara. 


Paraguay, 


300,000 


Assumption. 




Uruguay, 


150,000 


Monte Video, 


Fructuoso Rivera. 




Empire. 


Emperor. 


Brazil, | 


5,130,418 Rio Janeiro, 


Pedro II. 



* According to a census prepared in 1841, by the Mexican " National 
Institute of Geography and Statistics." But this number includes 
Yucatan and Texas, and is evidently too small. 

The present population of most of the above States has not been very 
recently ascertained with any exactness. 



BRITISH AMERICAN PROVINCES. 

Sir Charles T. Metcalfe, Chvemor- General^ Vice-Admiral^ and Captain- 
General of all the British Provinces of North America, 



Provinces. 


Area in 
sq. miles. 


Population. 


Lieutenant-Govemon. 


Lower Canada, 

Upper Canada, . 

New Brunswick, . 

Nova Scotia, with C. Breton, 

Prince Edward's Island, . 

Newfoundland, . , 

Honduras, 


194,815 
147,000 
27,700 
17,500 
2,134 
35,913 
62,740 


499,739 

506,055 

130,000 

199,870 

34,666 

81,517 

3,958 


Sir W. Colebrooke. 
Viscount Falkland. 
Capt. H. V. Huntley. 
Sir John Harvey. 
Col. Fancourt. 



EUROPE. 



REIGNING SOVEREIGNS OF EDEOPE. 



•The King of 8»ionT ii « OirtoKs, Ihoujh Iha jre«ler p»n of bii lobjecu sre ProKilMft ,■ 
lleKiIlgof Baliininii* AdlcUOfU.thoiighluoubjecUsnnioirlT Cbltoliei,' and Uk Kiogof 
inte* ua OuUie, ihough nwuofhuHibjecUanodlia Orttk Our*. 



3dd 



BTATtS Oy XTTAOPE. 



[L84S. 



STATES OF EUROPE 
hi 1837, with the form of ChnemmetUy Square MUi^ and Papulation, 



States and Titles. 



Andorra, Pytenees, Rqntbiiki 
*Anhalt-Bemburg, Duehy^ 
*Anhalt-Cothen, 4o. 
^Anhalt-Dessau, do, 
^AiMtria^ AnptM, 
*Baden^ Grand Du^^ 
*Bavana, Kingdom^ 

Belgium, do. 
*Bremen^ Free OUfff 
^BrunsMnck, A«e%, 

Church, States of, Popedom^ 

Cracow, Republic^ 
tDenmark, Kingdom^ 

France, do. 
•Frankfort, Free Ctty, 

Great Britain, Kingdom, 

Greece, do. 

^Hamburg, Free Oily, 
•Hanover, Kingdom-^ 
•Hesse- Casael, Electorate.i 
* Hesse-Darmstadt, G. Dueky, 
•Hesse-Horaburff, Landg'^a^U 
•Hohenzollem- Hechingen IV. 
•Hohenzol.-Sigmaringen, do. 

Holland, Mrith Luzemborg, 

Icmian Islands, 12qMi6{te, 
•Lichtenstein, Aww^po/i^, 
•Lippe-Detmold, do. 
♦Lubec, Free Oityy 

Lucca, JDweAy, 

•Mecklen.-Schweren, G. J)u. 
•Mecklenburg-Slrelitz, do. 

Modena ana Massa, Jhuh^y 

Monaco, IVtnopottty, 
•Nassau, i>vcAy, 
^Oldenburg, Grhnd Vuckyy 

Parma, Duekif^ 

Portugal, Kingdom^ 
♦Prussia, do. 
*neus^ rrindpalities of 
^Russia, Errqjue^ 

San Marino^ iiigniUie, 

Sardinia, Kmgdom^ 
♦Saxony. do. 
•Saxe-Altenburg, Ducky^ 
•Saxe-Coburg and Gotlia, do. 
♦Saze-Mein.-Hildburg., do. 
♦Saxe-Wiemar-Ei8enach,(/o. 
♦Schwartzburg, Principal, of 
♦Schauenburg-Lippe^ Prin, 

Sicilies, The Two, Fjngdom. 

Spain, do. 

Sweden and Norway, <lo. 

Switzerland, RepMte^ 
{Turkey, Bmjpire^ 

Tuscany, Grand Jhteky^ 
♦"Waldeck, Prineysalityj 
•Wurtemburg, Kingdom, 



Form of Government. 



With two syndics and a council, 
States having limited powers, 
Do. do. 

Do. do. 

AbsDlutemoiujcchy, except Hnngiry, Ac. 
Limited sovereignty ; — two chambers, 
Limited monarchy ; do. 

Do do. 

RepubKe ; — senate md -convention, 
Limited sovereignty ; — one chamber. 
Absolute elective sovereignty. 
Senate and chamber of representatives, 
Absolute monarchy }— ' with pro v. ata tea, 
Limited monarchy ; — two chambers., 
Republic ; — senate and legislative body, 
Limited monarchy ; — lords and comnjoas. 
Limited monarchy, 

Republic ; — senate and common council. 
Limited monarchy ; — two chambers, 
Limited sovereignty ; — one chamber. 
Limited sovereignty ; — two chambers, 
Absolute sovereignty, 
Limited ', — one cnamber. 

Do. do. 

Limited monarchy ; — two chambers. 
Under Brit, protec. ; — council and cnamb. 
Limited monarchy, with one chamber, 

Do. do. 

Republic ; — senate and common council. 
Limited sovereignty, with one chamber. 
Limited monarchy, with one chamber, 

Do. do. 

Absplute sovereignty, 

Do. 
Limited sovereignty ; — two chambers. 
Absolute sovereignty, 

Do. 
Limited monarchv ; — one chamber of rep. 
Absolute monarchy ; — provincial states. 
Limited sovereignty ; — one chamber. 
Absolute monarchy. 
Senate and council of ancients, 
Absolute monarchy. 
Limited monarchy ;— two chambers, 
Limited monarchy; — one chamber, 

Do. do. 

Do. do. 

Do. do. 

Dp. do. 

Do. do. 

Limited monarchy, with a council, 
Limited monarchy^ with a legislature, 
Lim. monarchy, with a diet and storthing, 
Confederation of republics ; — a diet, 
Absolute monarchy, 
Absolute sovereignty. 
Limited sovereignty ;— one chamber. 
Limited monarcny ; — two chambers. 



Total, 



Sqn 
Mil 



neuv 
es. 



190 
336 
310 
337 
855,226 



5,712 

28,435 

12,569 

■07 

1,525 

17,048 

490 

59,762 

202,1^ 

116,700 

10,206 

149 

14,600 

4,386 

3,196 

154 

136 

383 

13,800 

QQA 
WfO 

52 

432 

142 

410 

4,701 

1,094 

2,073 

50 

1,736 

2,470 

2,184 

34,500 

106,302 

586 

8,041,809 

21 

28,830 

5,705 

491 

790 

880 

1,403 

756 

205 

41,521 

176,480 

284,530 

17,206 

163,140 

8,302 

455 

7 



Population 




15,300 

45,500 

36,400 

57,600 

3i,100jOOO 

lJ24O,000 

4,300,000 

iJ23O,O00 

57,800 

250,000 

8,500,000 

184,300 

8,097^ 

S6IKI0 

25,30ei000 

ISSilOO 

l,679iW0 

600/100 

765^000 

84/100 

sum 

42,300 

2J920/100 

842/100 

SM 

78JM» 

46^ 

145/100 

478/KO 

86J300 

aoo/No 

6,700 
272,700 

aoo/XN) 

440/100 

3,400/MID 

13,800,0" 

83,400} 

51,100/100 

7J00 

4,500!000 

1,08O/»O 

113,700 

138/100 

146^ 

843/100 

118/ne 

86^000 
7,650,0r" 

11,963,1000 
4!l5O,|000 
2^16/100 

12,000,«D 

sB/m 

3 ,6110,000 



3,706,8711233,^,800 



♦ Member of the Confederation of Germany. 

t The QnUinmtal part, 21,472 aq. miles, 2,040,000 inhabitants : the Xshatds. QRSfjfi sq. miles, 
ffr,400mhabitantt. » » "^ » i i «^ 

t Including tlieffovemments of Perm, Viatka. Kazan, Simbirsk, Pensta, Saratof, Aatrachan, 
and part of Orenburg : — also Poland, with 47,670 sq. milas, and 4,100,000 inhaibitanls. 
k Including Walladua, Moldavia, and Sarvia. 



1845.] OBEAT B&ITAllf. 297 

GREAT BRITAIN. 
Thx Rotal Family. 

The Queen. Alezandrina Victoria, born May 24, 1819; married Feb. 10, 
1840, to Prince Albert Francis Augustus Charles Emanuel, of Saxe Co- 
burg and Grotha, bom Aug. 26, 1819. 

Prmcesi Royal, Victoria Adelaide Mary Louisa, born Nov. 21, 1840. 

Prince of Wales, Albert Edward, bom Nov. 9, 1841. 

IMncese Royal, Alice Maud Mary, bom Apiil 25, 1843. 

Jt Royal I^rincef Alfred Ernest Albert, born August 6, 1844. 

The Queen Dotbager, Adelaide Amelia Louisa Teresa Caroline, widow 
of King William IV., sister of the reigning Duke of Saxe-Meiningen, 
bom August 13, 1792. 

Bar Majeity*8 Mother, Victoria Maria Louisa, Princess Dowager of 
Leiningen, Duchess of Kent, bom Aug. 17, 1786. 

Royal Princes and Prinee$H»» 

Emest Augustus, (King of Hanover,) Duke of Cumberland, bora Jane 
5, 1771, married May 29, 1815, to Frederica Carolina Sophia, daughter of 
the Duke of Mecklenburgh-Strelitz, and widow of Frederic William, 
Prince of Solms-Biaunfels, born March 2, 1778. Jetue^ Greorge Frederic, 
bom May 27, 1819. 

Adolphus Frederick, Duke of Cambridge, bom Feb. 24, 1774, married 
May 7, 1818, to Augusta Wilhelmina Louisa, daughter of the Landgrave 
of Hesse, bora July 25, 1797. luue, George William, bora March 26, 
1819; Augusta Caroline, July 19, 1822 ; Mary Adelaide, Nov. 27, 1833. 

Mary, Duchess of Gloucester, bora April 25, 1776. 

Sophia, bom Nov. 3, 1777. 

MiNiSTBT. — Sqdeniber^ 1841. 

Salary. 

Sir Robert Peel, JBort., First Lord of the Ti-easury, £5,000 

Lord Lyndhurst, Lord High Chamcellor, 14,000 

Lord Wharacliffe, Lord President of the Councay 2,000 

Duke of Buccleuch, Lord Pivy Sealj 2,000 

Sir James R. G. Graham, Secretary of State — Home Dep, 5,000 

Earl of Aberdeen, Secretary of State — Foreign Dep, 5,000 

Lord Stanley, Secretary of State — Colonial Dep, 5,000 

Rt. Hon. Henry Goulboum, Chancellor of the Exchequer^ 5,000 

Earl of Haddington, First Lord of the Mmiralty, 4,500 

Sir Edward KnatchbuU, Paymaster- (General, 2,500 

Earl of Ripon, Pvsidmt of Board of Oontroi, 2,000 

Rt. Hon. W. E. Gladstone, President of the Board of lYade. 

Sir Thomas Freemantle, Secretary at Wary 2,580 

Duke of Wellington, Commander of the Forces, 

*^Th€ above form the CMnsts 



998 



0WiAT BHIT^IV* 



U«4i5. 



Sir Greorge Cockburn, 

Sir W. Hall Gage, 

Sir Geo. Francis Seymour, 

Capt. William Gordon, 

Hon. H. T. Lowry Cole, 

Earl of Liverpool, 

Earl of Jer&ey, 

Earl of Rosslyn, 

Sir William W. Follett, 

Mr. Thesiger, 

Sir Henry Haxdinge, 



Lord Haytesfanry, 

Sir Edward B. Sugden, 
Lord Eliot, 
T. B. C. Smith, 
R. W. Greene, 



Lord Ommim$ner of Hu AdnwraUy, 



u 
tt 
t( 



U 



U 

u 



u 
(( 
u 

Ci 



Lord Steward of the £[Qwehol4' 
Muter of the Bhrte, 
Mouter of Stag-Homede, 
jSttomey' General, 
Solicitor' General. 
Governor- General of Indiu. 

Ireland. 



Lord 

Lard ChemedUr^ 

Secretary of State, 
Attorney- General. 
SoUekm^GemeroL 

PAJLLIAMBaX. 



X20,000 
8,000 



The Parliament of Great Britain consists of a House of Lords and a 
House of Commons. 

The House of Lords consists of Lords Temporal, who «ie Beers of the 
realm, and whose honors, immunities, and privileges are heieditaTy ; and 
Lords Spiritoal, consisting of Archbishops and Bishops. 

The House of Lords is composed of all the five oiders of nobility of 
England, viz : dukes, marquises, earls, viscounts, and barons, who have 
attained the age of 2t years, and labor under no disquali^cation ; of 16 
representative peers from Scotland; 28 representative peers from Ireland; 
H English archlHshops and 24 bishops, and 4 representative Irish bishops. 
The number of each, in 1844, was as follows : 

Peers of Scotland, (elected 1841,) 16 
Peers of Ireland, (elected for life,) 23 
English Archbishops and Bishops, 26 
Irish Archbishops and Bishops, 4 

Thud, 459 

House of Commons. 

Elected July, 1841.*-- Rt. Hon. Charles S. Lefevre, -^i^fArcr. 

The House of Commons consists of knightli, citizens, and bnigesses, 
respectively chosen bj counties, cities, and boroughs, e,pportioaed as 
ibllows: 



Dukes, (3 Royal Dukes,) 


,23 


Marquises, 


20 


Earls, 


115 


Viscounts, 


21 


Barons, 


206 



iMtl 



aflAT »fti9Aiir. 



f OrantiM, • • 
Engllind and Wales, tbti UniveTBities, 

I Cities and botoisighs, 



159 
4 

337 



} 



Scotland, 



helftlid, 



^ ( Counties, 30 ) 

( Cities and boroughs, . • 23 ) 

r Counties, 64 

for 4 University, .... 2 

I Cities and boroughs, ... 89 
Total. 



} 



299 



500 



53 



105 



658 



The Union of Ireland was carried into effect January 1st, 1801 : and 
the Parliament which sat the same month, and which included the mem- 
bers from Ireland, is styled the Ist hnperkA ParUamtnt; and the Parliament 
whieh assembled January 29, 1833, is styled the llfA inperial^ or Itt JU- 
fdrmed ParUameni, The following table exhibits the succession of Par- 
liaments since the union with Ireland : 



2d Imperial Pariiament, 


3d do. 


do. 


4th do. 


do. 


5th do. 


do. 


6th do. 


do. 


7th do. 


do. 


8th do. 


do. 


9th do. 


do. 


10th do. 


do. 


11th Im. or lot Ref. do. 


19lh do. ad 


do. 


13th do. 3d 


do. 


14<h do. 4th 


do. 



When assembled. 



August 

November 

November 

November 

Axkgpal 

April 

November 

October 

Jmie 

Jannary 

February 

October 

August 



31,1802 
25,1806 
«7,18(W 
21, 1812 
4,1&18 
23,1820 
14,1826 
26,1830 
14, 1831 
29,1833 
10,1835 
15,1837 
19, 1841 



Wheii disBolvedi 



October 

May 

September 

Jwie 

Febraary 

June 

July 

April 

December 

December 

July 

June 



24,1806 
27,1807 
29, 1812 
10, 1818 
29,1820 

2,18-^ 
94,1830 
22,1831 

3,1832 
30,1834 
17,1837 
23,1841 



Existed. 


Y. 


M. D. 


4 


1 25 





6 2 


4 


10 2 


5 


6 16 


1 


6 25 


6 


1 


4 


1 92 





5 27 





5 20 


2 


25 


1 


4 26 


4 


1 2 


1 





JtTDIClARY. 

IBgh Court of Chtmcery.^^hoTd Lyndhurst, Lord High ChancdUtr; 
salary, £14,000 : — Lord Langdale, Master of the Rolls, £7,000: — Sir 
Launcelot Shad well. Vice- Chancellor, £6,000. 

Cotui of the QuLcefCt Bench. — Lord Denman, Lord Chief Justice; 
£10,000: — Sir J. Patteson, Sir J. Williams, Sir J. T. Coleridge, and Sir 
Wm. Wightman, Judges, £5,500 each. 

Court of Common Pleas.— Sir N. C. Tindal, iorrf Chief Justice, £8,000 : 
Sir Th. Coltman, T. Erskine, Sir W. H. Maule, and Sir C. Cresswell, 
Judges, £5,500 each. 

Court of Exchequer. — ^ir Frederic Pollock, Lord Chief Baron, £7,000: 

Sir John Gumey, Sir James Parke, Sir £. H. Alderson, Sir R. M. Rolfe, 

Barons, £5,500 each. 

Scotland. 

Court of Sessions. — Is* Division. David Boyle, Lord President, £4,300 : 
J. H. Mackenzie, Lord Mackenzie ; J. Fullerton, Lord Fullerton ; Francis 
Jeffrey, Xor(^ Jeffrey, Judges, £2,000 each. 



300 



GBSAT BEITAIM. 



[1845. 



2d JXvitim, — John. Hope, Lord JutHee Clerk^ £4,000. — Alexander Ma- 
oonochie, Lord Meadowbank ; J. H. Forbes, Lord Medwyn ; Si^ J. W. 
Moncrieff, Lord Moncrieff, Jtuiges, £2,000 each. — Those of the Judges 
who are also Judges of the Criminal Court, have an additional £600 a 
year. 

Outer IhuM; PamumerU Lords Ordinary^ attached equally to both JXvisiofU 

of the Court, H. Cockbur n, Z^rci Cockbum; J. Cunninghame, Lord Cun- 

ninghame ; Sir J. A. Murray, Lord Murray ; James Ivory, Lord Ivory \ 

Alexander Wood, Lord Wood. 

ireUmd, 

Court of Chancery. — Sir Edward B. Sugden, Lord Chancellor, £8,000: 
Francis Blackbume, Muter of the RoUs^ £4,500. 

Court of the Queen^e Bench. — Hon. £. Pennefather, Lord Chief Justice, 
£5,070. Charles Burton, Philip C. Crampton, Louis Perrin, Judges, 
£3,692 each. 

Court of Common Fleas. — Hon. John Doherty, Lord Chief Justice, 
£4,615. Robert Torrens, Nicholaus Ball, and J. D. Jackson, Judges, 
£3,692 each. 

Archbishops amd Bishops of England. 



Cons. 
1813 


AnhbiOups. 


Diooeies. 


No. 
Bene- 
fices. 


Gross In- 
come. 


\Vm. Howley, D. D., Primate. 


Canterbury, 


346 


£129,946 


1791 


Edward Harcourt, D. C. L. 
Bishops. 


York, 


891 


223,220 


1824 


Charles J. Blomfield, D. D. 


London, 


640 


267,662 


1826 


Charles R. Sumner, D. D. 


Winchester, 


419 


153,995 


1812 


George Henry Law, D. D. 


Bath and Wells, 


430 


120,310 


1820 


John Eaye, D. D. 


Lincoln, 


1,261 


373,976 


1820 


William Carey, D. D. 


St. Asaph, 


143 


42,592 


1824 


Christopher Bethell, D. D. 


Bangor, 


123 


35,064 


1827 


George Murray, D, D. 


Rochester, 


94 


44,565 


1827 


Edward Copleston, D. D. 


Llandaff, 


192 


36,347 


1829 


Richard Bagot, D. D. 


Oxford, 


196 


51,895 


1830 


James Henry Monk, D. D. 


Glouces. & Bristol, 


536 


158,608 


1830 


Henry Phillpolts, D. D. 


Exeter, 


613 


194,181 


1836 


Joseph Alien, D. D. 


Ely, 


150 


56,495 


1842 


Ashurst Turner Gilbert, D.D. 


Chichester, 


267 


82,673 


1837 


Edward Denison, D. D. 


Salisbury, 


397 


134,255 


1837 


Edward Stanley, D. D. 


Norwich, 


1,026 


331,750 


1837 


Thomas Musgrave, D. D. 


Hereford, 


321 


93,552 


1839 George Davys, D. D. 


Peterborough, 


593 


98,381 


1843 John Lonsdale, D. D. 


Litchfield and Cov. 


610 


170,104 


1839|H. Pepys, D. D. 


Worcester, 


223 


73,255 


1840 Connop Thirlwall, D. D. 


St. David's, 


409 


60,653 


1831 


Edward Maltby, D. D. 
Hugh Percy, D. D. 
John Bird Sumner, D. D. 


Durham, 


192 


74,557 


1827 


Carlisle, 


124 


22,487 


1828 


Chester, 


630 


120,310 


1836 


Charles Th. Longley, D. D. 


Ripon, 




t 


1841 


T. V. Shorn B. T). 


So'lor and Man, 


23 


3,727 



1649.] 



OBXAT BRITAIir. 



301 



ASCHBISHOPS AND BiSHOPS OF IkBLAND. 



I 



1805 
1831 



1843 

1803 
1804 
1842 



Archbishops. 



Lord J. 6. Beresford, D. I). 
Richard Whately, D. D. 

JSuhops, 

Edward Stopford, D. D. 
Charles Lindsay. D. D. 
Ld. R. P. Tottenham, D. p. 
Robert Daly, D. D. 



Dioceses. 



Armagh. 
Dublin. 



Meath. 
*Kildare. 
•Clogher. 
Cashel, &c, 






Bishops. 



1842 J. 'A O'Brien, D.D. 
1812 John Leslie, D. D. 
1820 Richard Mant, D. D. 
1828 Rich'd Ponsonby, D. D. 
1831 Samuel Kyle, D. D. 
1831i Edmund Knox, D. D. 
1839 Thomas Plunket, D.D. 
1839 Ludlow Tonson, D. D. 



Dioceses. 



Ferns &, L. 

♦Elphin. 

Down&CJon 

Deny. 

Ck>rk. 

Limerick. 

Tuam&K. 

Killaloe. 



* The bishoprics thus marked are to be abolished when they beooi&ie vacant. 

English Colonial Bishops. 



Cons. 


Bishops. 


Dioceses. 


Allowance. 


Clergy. 


1825 


John Inglis, D. D. 


Nova Scotia, 


£2,400 




1643 


Aubrey G«orge Spencer, D. D. 


Jamaica, 


4,000 




1842 


Thomas Parry, D. D. 


Barbadoes, 


4,000 




1832 


Daniel Wilson, D. D, 


Calcutta, 


5,000 


37 


1836 


George J. Mountain, D. D. 


Quebec, 


1,500 




1836 


Thomas Carr, D. D. 


Bombay, 


2,500 


12 


1836 


Wm. Grant Broughton, D. D. 


Australia, 


2,000 




1837 


G. T. Spencer, D. D. ' 


Madras, 


2,500 


24 


1839 


John Strachan, D. D. 


Toronto. 








Vacanty 


Newfoundland 






1841 


G. A. Selwyn, 


New Zealand. 






1842 


W. P. Austen, D. D. 


Brit. Guiana. 






1842 


George Tomlinson, D. D. 


Malta&Gibral. 






1842 


F. R. Nixon, D. D. 


Tasmania, 






1842 


D. G. Davis, D. D. 


Antigua. 







Number of the C/«»gy. — From a return, just laid before the House of 
Commons, of the staff of the Church of England: 
Number of benefices, 10,987 Vacancies and recent institut'ns, 199 



Resident incumbents, 
Non-resident incumbents, 



6,699 
3,736 



Sequestrations, 
No returns, 



37 
316 



The number of curates serving benefices on which the incumbents are 
non-resident, is 2,711. The number of curates assistant to resident in- 
cumbents, is 2,032. Total number of curates, 4,743. 

Under X50 a year, 312 £80 and under £90, 642 

£50 and under £60, 574 £90 and under £100, 184 

£60 and under £70, 326 



£70 and under £80, 



482 



Total under £100,' 



2,521 



The RRVENtTE. 



Total income of the year ending Jan. 5, 1844, 
The previous year. 



£50,071,943 
44,329,865 



26 



Btfduet a deciesse in 


— 


Stamps, 


^£64,945 


Taxes, 


83,106 


Post Offie«, 


13,000 


Crown lands, 


15,500 




£12,211,777 




11,486,107 



3dd OAVXT ntiTAnr* [1848. 

This increase arises from— 
Excise, £387,503 

Property Tax, 4,678,204 

MiscellaneouSy 1,055/UO 

Total income of quarter just ended, 
Corresponding quarter of last year, 

Wool, aud Woollxn MANUFAOTtJixs.*- According to Mtums lately 
made to the House of Commons, the quantities of wool imported into 
Great Britain in the year 1843, were 21,132,852 Ihs., the produce of Brit- 
ish possessions, and 28,110,741 lbs., the produce of foreign countries, 
making a total of 49,248,093 lbs. In 1842, the total quantity imported 
was 45,881,639 lbs.; in 1841, 56,170,974 lbs.; in 1840, 49,436,284 lbs., and 
the average of 14 years, from 1830 to 1843 inclusive, 45,500,000 lbs. 

Of the imports of 1843, there was received from the Cape of Good 
Hope, 1,728,453 lbs.; from the British East Indies, 1,888,023 lbs.; from 
New South Wales, 11942,557 lbs.; from Tan Dieman's Land, 3,993,040 
lbs. ; and from Southern Australia, 1,387,514 lbs. Of the quantity im- 
ported from foreign countries, there were rteeived from Russia, 3,511,916 
lbs. ; from Germany, 16,805,448 lbs. ; from the States of the Rio de la 
Plata, 1,879,653 lbs.; and from Peru, 2,535,200 lbs. Of the foreign wool, 
17,736,888 lbs. were charged with a duty of Id. per lb. ; 7,804,918 lbs. with 
a duty of ^d. per lb.; and 1,906,636 lbs. (alpaca or lama wool,) with a 
duty of 28. 6d. per cwt. 

The total declared value of British Woollen Manufactures exported to 
British possessions in 1843, was £1,307,191 ; and to foreign countries, 
£5,483,041. 

Shiffing in G&xat BaitAiM Aifx> Ixxlani^. 

The number and tonnage of sailing vessels, registered in England, on 
the 3l8t day of December, 1843, was as follows : 

Number. Ton«. 

Under 50 tons each, 
Over 50 tons each, 
Steam vessels under 50 tons, 
" " over 50 tons, . 

In Scotland, sailing vessels, 
^ steam vessels. 
In Ireland, sailing vessels, 
" steam vessels, 

Sailing vessels which entered inwards coastwise, in the year 1843 : 

Number. Steamers. Tonnage. 
In England, 98,295 9,294 

Scotland, 19,053 2,688 12,532,207 

Ireland, 16,476 2,651 



6,155 


185,832 


10,627 


9,019,414 


337 


8,119 


209 


63,923 


3,549 7 
128 J 


481,670 


1,921 ) 
81 J 


198,418 



1845.] 



F&ANCS. 



303 



The amount of tonnage of vessels which cleared outwards coastwise 
in the same period, was 12,571,031 tons. 

The number and tonnage of British sailing vessels which cleared in- 
wards during the year from the colonies were 

Number. Tonnage. 

6,404 1,405,054 

Cleared outwards, 6,264 1,427,283 

Steamers from the colonies, 344 72,477 

^ cleared outwards for do., 357 80,185 

The number aod toinnagis/9f British vessels to and from foreign ports 
in the vame penod, were 



Sailu^ VMtek inirardi, 
" " . outwards, 

Steamers inwards, 

" outwards, 
l^unkgD. sailing vessels, invsards, 

" ** " outwards, 

Foreign steamers, inwards, 

" '** outwards, 

Tesseh hnflt and registered in 1943, 



Namber, 

11,263 
11,228 
2,439 
2,314 
8,259 
7,375 . 

538 

548 

653 

77« 



Tonnago, 

1,737,210 
1,791,755 



77,034 
132^732 



FRANCE. 
MiKtssiBT^— October 29, 1840. 



Marshal Soult, Duke of Balmatia, 

M. Guizot, 

M. Martin (du Nord,) 

Admiral Duperre, 

Count Duchatel, 

M. Cunin Gridaine, 

M. Teste, 

M. Villemain, (Peer,) 

M. Lacave Laplagne, 



Bres. of the 
Minister of 
Mifdster of 
Jdmister of 
Minister of 
Minister of 
Minister qf 
Minister of 
Minister of 



CoiMcU and Min, of War, 

Foreign Affairs. 

Justice and JMUe Worship. 

Marine and the Oolornes. 

the Interior. 

Commerce and JlgrictUture. 

Public Works. 

Public hutntction. 

Finance. 



PopuLATiojf. — The following is a statistical and official table of the 
population of France since the year 1700 : 



1706, 

1762, 
1784, 
1769, 
1802, 
1806, 



19i669,329 

21,769^63 ' 

24,800;000 

25,065,883 

27,349,008 

29^07,425 



1820, 
1826, 
1831, 
1836, 
1842, 



30,461,875 
31,858,937 
32,569,223 
33,540,910 
34,194,875 



The population of Paris, according 4» the census of 1841, ajxkounts to 
-912,330; and, if the troops of th« garrison and strangers are added, to 
1,935)000. 



AMERICAN OBITtJARY. 

1843. 

Aug. 10. — In New Brunswick, N. J., Robert JUdraim^ X.X. i>., aged 68, 
a native of Ireland, whence he came with Emmet and others. He was 
much distinguished as a man of science, and was made Professor of 
Mathematics successively at Rutgers' College, N. J., and Columbia Col- 
lege, N. Y. 

Oct. 26. — In Boston, Ms., Bifn, JSldm Bradford^ aged 78. He had been 
Secretary of the commonwealth, and had written several valuable works 
of biography and history, among which was a ^ History of Massachtt- 
setts." He was ever ready to lend all his influence to any measure of 
reform and philanthropy, which promised to improve the welfiire of his 
fellow-men. He was bom in Duxbary, Ms., a lineal descendant of Wil- 
liam Bradford, the second governor of Plymouth colony, and graduated at 
Harvard College, in 1786. He afterwards became a tutor in that institn* 
tion, and having completed his studies for the ministry, was settled ms a 
pastor at Wlscasset, Me. He remained there eight years, when he was 
obliged to leave on account of a failure of his health. He held the office 
of Secretary of State in Massachusetts from 1812 to 1824, and his public 
life was irreproachable. 

Dec. 24. — In Providence, R. L, Gm, Edward Carringtonj aged 63. He 
was a man of high character, distinguished for his enterprise and liberal- 
ity. His name has been honorable among the eminent merchants of 
Providence, and his character in private lift irreproachable. 

Sept. 28. — At sea, on board the bark Due d'Orleans, S. X. V. deih 
enger^ an American sculptor, of high reputation. 

Oct. 23. — In Northboro', Ms., Bon. Joteph Dama^ for many years a mem- 
ber of the State senate, aged 69. 

Dec. 22. — At Pittsford, Yt., Calvin Drmy^ aged 78, for forty years one 
of the deacons of the Congregational church in that place. 

Nov. 22. — At his residence, in Centreville, Md., Hon,Iliehard T3gh' 
man EarU^ in the 77th year of his age, deeply deplored by his children, 
relatives, and friends. He was an eminent lawyer of the old school, and 
commenced practice in the year 1787, and continued therein to June, 
1810, when he was appointed Chief Judge of the second judicial district, 
and in virtue thereof Judge of the Court of Appeals. In these high sta- 
tions he acquitted himself with great ability, and to the entire satisikc- 
tion of the public. In June, 1834, his bodily strength gave way, and be- 



.AMXBXakK OXITSXAST JOB. 1843. 30(( 

-timiDf lit coHld BO lamgu diiehftige hli datiira with ii» ^ame fidelity 
fwkieh he had pnvioulj done, he reai|poed his seat on the heiieh, and 
Boaght repose in retirement with his family. 

Jlis adtive bonness habits, eoatracted in early life, noTer Ibraook him 
VBtil within a few wteeda of his death, and are worthy to be imitated by 
Ihe -young who are. in pnrauit of knowledge and fame. His imtiriog efforta 
jnade him what he was, a sound lawyer, and an able judge. He levep- 
«nced and respected the Chiistian religion, of which he was a sincere 
believBr, ezpeneBcing its consolationB before, and more especially in. his 
last illness. He retained his fajculties almost to the last moment of his 
exietence, was perfectly resigned to the will of his heavenly Father, and 
ezpibed without a pang or atniggle, amidst the lamentations and tears of 
idis affliottd and fond femily, who williong mourn the great loss they have 
■ustaiaed. 

Oct 18. — At Bridgetoh, N. J., Ebenezer Elmer, aged 91. An officer of 
the rafoluiionaiy army, and the last survivor of the Jersey line, for sev- 
esal years a Repzesentativie of the State in the Congress of the United 
Stales, and Fvesident of the Society of the Cincinnati for New Jersey. 

Nov. 23. — In Fauquier Co., Va., Thtmat Fitzhugh, aged 81. He was a 
highly respected citizen, and had been for many years presiding judge of 
the county eouft. 

Nov. 9. — In Andover, Ms., Ckorge Gatft Etq,, aged 53. He graduated 
-at Harvard College in 1810, and soon after his admission to the bar, re- 
moved from J>edham, his native town, to Boston, where he continued in 
ihe practice of his profession till his decease. He was a man of good 
•ease, sound judgment, and a kind and amiable disposition. 

Dec. 14.— In Washington, D. C, Charles W. GoUUborough, chief of the 
Bureau of Provisions and Clothing of the Navy Department, and author 
of a Naval History of the United States. He was one of the oldest and 
most respected inhabitants of the city. 

Dec. 7. — In Cleveland, Ohio, Hon, Ralph GraMger, aged about 50, He 
was a native of Suffield, Conn., and graduated at Yale College, in 1810. 
He was several times a member of the Ohio State Senate. 

Aug. 16. — In Newark^ N. J., WiUiam HaUey, aged 73, one of the oldest 
members of the bar in New Jersey, and at one time Judge of the Com- 
mon Pleas for Essex county, and Mayor of Newark. He was an active 
and enterprising man, and had contributed much to the improvement of 
Newark, where he had resided more than half a century* 

Nov. 20. — In Philadelphia, Peon., FerdvMmd Rudolph Eatsler, aged 74, 
late Director of the United States Coast Survey. Mr. Hassler was a na- 
tive of Geneva, and came to this country j use before the war of 1812} 
being introduced by Mr. Gallatin. His high attainments as a mathema- 
tician and a man of science were universally recognised, arid the duties 
of the important office, which he held for so many years, were dischai|^ 
by him with great fidelity and skilL 
26* 



306 AXSRICAN OBITUABT VOE 1848. 

Sept. 10.-^ At Jaekson, Mils., CoL Jndrtw JSC^»,«g«d aboijt 60; an em- 
inent lawyer, formeriy of Tennesaee, nrach respected for his talents and 
private virtues. 

Nov. 10. -^ In New Haven, Ct., Robi$uon 8, JBtNman, Esq. aged 42. He 
had been Clerk of the Senate of the State, and of the Superior and Coun- 
ty Courts, a Oeneral of Brigade in the military corps, and at the time of 
his death was Judge of the Probate Court for the District of New Haven. 

Dec. 24. — ' In Boston, Ms., WUliam JSmmtoH, Etq., aged 86, a graduate 
of Harvard College in 1774, and formerly a teacher of youth in New 
Brunswick, Pennsylvania, and Louisiana. 

Nov. 27. — - At Sault St. Marie, M^. Siuan JbAnffon, widow of the late 
John Johnston, Esq., of Antrim county, Ireland, aged 67. She was a 
daughter of Wabojeeg, chief of the Chippewa nation. . Her grand&ther 
was present on the plains of Abraham, in 1758, as one of the allies of 
Montcalm. 

Oct. 22. — Near Selma, Ala., Col Thomas Kknan^ in the 73d year of his 
age. The deceased was a native of North Carolina, and son of a worthy 
revolutionary patriot. He was for a number of years, and as long as he 
would consent to serve in that capacity, a member of Congress from 
Alabama. 

Oct. 3. — In St. Genevieve, Mo., Hon, Ltwii F, Zmn^ Senator of the 
United States from Missouri, aged 49. He was bom near Louisville, 
Ky., where he spent the early part of his life, and studied medicine under 
Dr. Gait. He removed to St. Genevieve, Mo., for the practice of his 
profession, in 1815, and soon became eminent. He was appointed to the 
U. S. Senate in 1933, and remained a member of that body till the time of 
his death. The subject in which he took the deepest interest, and to 
which he devoted himself with untiring assiduity, was the occupation 
and settlement of the Oregon territory. Though not distinguished as a 
debater, he was highly respected by his political associates, and was 
much beloved in private life. 

Dec. 26. — In Stratford, Ct., Rev. James Harvey Lmstey. He was a na- 
tive of Brandford, Conn., and graduated at Yale College, in 1817. He 
officiated several years as a Baptist clergyman, and afterwards, in conse- 
quence of ill health, turned his attention to subjects of Natural History. 
Communications from him in this department of science are published 
in the American Journal of Science. 

Nov. 3. — At Clermont, N. Y., Him, Edward P. Livingston, aged 63. He 
inherfted a large estate in Columbia county, N. Y., where he resided from 
his youth, his scat being one of the finest on the banks of the Hudson. 
He had been much in public life, having been a member of the State 
Senate for many years. In 1830, he was chosen Lieutenant-Gover- 
nor of the State. He was an estimable man, of cultivated mind and ac- 
complished manners. 

Sept. 14. — At Louisville, Ky., Dr. Jndrew Macrsry, aged about 73. He 



AMEKIOAN OBITUART FOB 1843. 307 

wa0 bom in Delaware, Bee. 27, 1775, and removed to the neighborhood 
of Natchez, Miss., in 1803. He was a deacon in the Presbyterian chareh. 
Few men have lived more respected and beloved, or died more regretted. 

Dec. 17. — In Morristown, N. Y., Jacob Jtfotm, aged 67. He was proba- 
bly the oldest editor of a newspaper in the State, having established " The 
Genius of Liberty," in 1798. He continued to be an editor for mOre than 
thirty^ve years. 

Oct. 24.— In New Yorkj N. Y., Col. Thomas R Mercein, aged 61. He 
was at one time a member of the Legislature, and was distinguished for 
activity and usefulness as a citizen. 

Oct. 15. — Near Savannah, Gra., Col. John MUm^ member elect of the 
House of Representatives of the present Congress, in the 39th year of his 
age. He was a young lawyer of great promise, and had the confidence 
of the people so early as to be sent to the State Legislature in 1828, where 
he so established his character, that, when it was necessary to make ex- 
traordinary exertions to obtain privileges for the Central Railroad, in 
1834, which it was feared would be refused by the Legislature, he was 
solicited to be one of the Chatham delegation ; and his efforts contributed 
much to the success of that enterprise. On the first Monday of October, 
1843, Col. Millen was elected a member of Congress. 

Oct. 3. — In Belchertown, Ms., Mrs. Asa Morse^ in the lOOth year of her 
age. She was born in Walpole, in May, 1744. She was the mother of 
seven children, six of whom are liviug. She had sixty-two grandchildren, 
forty-one of whom are living ; one hundred and forty-four great-grand- 
children, one hundred and thirteen of whom are living; ten great-great- 
grandchildren, nine of whom are living. 

Dec. 8.— In Plattskill, N. Y.,Reo.Damd Ostrander^ an aged and re- 
spectable clergyman of the Methodist Episcopal Church, who had re- 
cently completed the 50th year of his labors in the ministry. 

Oct. 19.— Near St. Martinsville, La., John Palfrey, Esq., in the 77th year 
of his age. The deceased was a native of Boston, Mass. ; was a member 
of one of the first American mercantile houses established in New Or- 
leans ; has been one of the most respectable planters of Attakapas since 
1811, and a member of the Legislature in 1819 and '20. Mr. Palfrey was 
the youngest son of Col. William Palfrey, who was paymaster-general 
of the American araiy for several years, and aid-de-camp of General Wash- 
ington during the revolutionary war. 

June 3. — In Montrose, Susquehanna county. Pa., Hon. Mmon H.Itead^ 
a Representative in Congress from Pennsylvania, aged 53. He was a 
native of Vermont, and graduated at Williamstown College, Mass. In 
1814, he removed to Montrose, Pa., where he became a respectable mem- 
ber of the Bar. In 1827, he was elected to the Legislature, and five years 
afterwards was made a member of the Senate. In 1840, he was appointed 
Treasurer of the State, and was subsequently chosen to fill a vacancy as 
member of Congress. 



908 AMERICAN OSITT7A&T FOB 1943. 

Nov. 90. — Tn Ra|»|mh«tiitoek county, Ta., JK^ . JbAti JRftftittf, agfed 95. 
He served !■ the revolutionary army, in whieh he ftttaiaed the rank of 
Major, and negotiated the exchange for thepnaoneraohtamed by the con- 
vention at Saratoga, in 1777. Afterwards, he waa a mender of the Leg- 
islature of Virginia for thirteen succesatva yean, and had igreat inflnence 
in its deliberations. 

Dec. 10. — In Bennington, Vt, (kn. David Robinson j aged SO. !Be was 
born in Hardwick, Ms., November 11th, (OM Style,) 17M. He was the 
son of Samuel Robinson, a captain in the old French war, and came to 
Bennington with his father in October, 1701, to a log-hut built for the 
reception of the family in the centre of the Centre Tillage, and on the 
same spot of ground where he continued to reside eighty-two years. He 
married, early in life, a daughter of Captain Stephen Fay, one of the first 
settlers. He also, early in life, united with the church in that town. He 
always contributed liberally to public improvements, and public institu- 
tions, civil and religious. Temperate in his habits and active in busi- 
ness, he long retained the vigor of a firm constitution, formed in early 
life by the hardships and privations common to pioneer settlements. 

Dec. 14. — In Cabarras county, K. C, Rev. John Robinson^ D. D^ of the 
Presbyterian denomination. He was about eighty years of age, and for 
more than half a century, was one of the most distinguished and useful 
ministers of the Gospel in the State. 

Oct. 28. — In Sussex county, Del., Hon. TTiomas Robinton^lzXe member 
of Congress from Delaware. 

Oct. — At Rodney, Miss., Dr. John H. Savage^ of yellow fever. He was 
a distinguished physician, and held the office of Professor of Chemistry 
at Oakland College. He was much respected in private life. 

Oct. 31. — In Newbern, N. C, Hon. Charles Shepard, formerly a Repre- 
sentative in Congress. 

Pec. 4. — In Racine county, Wisconsin Territory, JRter. David jSustin 
Sherman, aged 63. He was a native of New Haven, Conn., and graduated 
at Yale College in 1802. For six years he was a tutor in Yale College, 
and several years President of a college in East Tennessee. At the time 
of his death, he was a Missionary in the Wisconsin Territory. 

Sept 24. — Near Washington, Franklin county, Mo, Hon. David Steri- 
gerty a native of Pennsylvania. On emigrating to Missouri, he settled as 
an attorney in Franklin county. He was, for several years, a member of 
the General Assembly, and died universally respected. He was Judge of 
the 9th judicial circuit of the State of Missouri. 

Oct. 31. — At Kingwood, Hunterdon county, N. J., H^s. Zeruiah Stew^ 
arty aged 103 years, 7 months, 19 days, widow of David Stewart. By her 
first husband, George Opdycke, she had eleven children. Her descend- 
ants are as follows : eighty-four grandchildren, one hundred and eighty 
great-grandchildren, and thirty-nine great-great-grandchildren; making 
altogether three hundred and fourteen. 



AHftaiCAN OBITUABT FOB. 1843. 309 

Ann. 27.— At ^^^ Sulphur Springs, Ya., J3im. Lewis SummerB^ «ged 65, 
for twenty^-four years one of the Judges of the General Court of Virginia. 
He Was a member of the convention that revised the constitution of the 
State, and in that body, and 6n the bench, his services were of great im- 
portance, and were highly appreciated. 

Dec. 26.— In Chesterfield, Ma,^ Maj\ John Tbylor, formerly of North- 
ampton, aged 81. He graduated at Harvard College in the class of 1786, 
and was for several years a member of the Legislature. 

Dec. 6. — In Philadelphia, Penn., Col, John M. .Toylor^ aged &2. He was 
Commissary- Grenera) of the American army under Montgomery at the 
siege of Quebec, in 1775, and he remained in the service, performing his 
duties with honor to himself, and advantage to the countoy, till 1779. 
The latter years of his career were spent in private life, where he was 
much beloved and zespected. 

Dec. 18. — In Poughkeepsie, N. T., Hon. Smith TWiprnm, one of the 
Justices of the Supreme Court of the United States, aged 76. He studied 
law with Chancellor Kent, and the first public office which he held was 
that of district attorney in the old middle district of New York. In 18(^1, 
he was appointed to the Supreme bench in his native State, and in 1814 
he became Chief Justice. This station he held till President. Monroe 
called him into the cabinet, in 1818, as Secretary of the Navy. This 
ofilce he filled with great ability ; but a judicial rather than a political 
post was his true position, and a vacancy occurring in 1823, he was ap- 
pointed Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. 
He held this post till his death ; and it is enough to say, that his legal 
acumen, his learning, and his integrity, added lustre to that dignified sta- 
tion, and were worthy of the fame of his colleagues, Marshall, Washii^g- 
ton, and Story. His private life was as pure and exemplary as his public 
career, and his memory will long be cherished by a laige circle of friends. 

Sept. — In London, England, James Trecotkick^ E8q,y late of Addington 
Place, near Croydon Surry, aged 90 ye^s, a native of Boston, and a grad- 
uate of Harvaid College, of the class of 1773. Mr. Trecothick was the 
only son of the late Jas. Ivert, Esq. of this city; but he left America before 
the Revolution. He took by will the ample estates of his uncle, Barlow 
Trecothick, a distinguished merchant and Member of Parliament for 
London, and, on his accession to this property, assumed the family name 
and arms of the testator. 

Nov. 10. — In New York, N. Y., Col John ThmbuU^ofNew Haven, Ct., 
aged 87. He was born at Lebanon, Ct., June 9th, 1756. His father, Jon- 
athan Trumbull, was Governor of Connecticut during the whole war of 
the Revolution. At an early age, John Trumbull entered the revolu- 
tionary army, and after serving with his regiment in the field, became a 
member of Gen. Washington's military family. After the Revolution, he 
went to Europe to perfect himself in his favorite art of painting, having 
it always at heart to perpetuate on canvass some of the great scenes and 



31D AitiesicAif osrrvABT jtdb 1848. 

pre«t men of th« Revolatioo. Font of his historical psiiitifigs, tbo Bee- 
IsTttion of IiMl€p«iid«n€e, th« SQirender at Saratoga^ tha Sumnder ^f 
Cornwallia, and the Reai^atiom of Gen. Waeiiiiigtoii at Annapolis, axe 
preseired in the Rotunda of the Capitol at Waahington, and mltkovgh they 
are not marked by the highest qualities of fsnins, they do honor to hia 
reputation aa an artist IVhile in England, he btcame, by the «hoic« of 
Wm. Pinckney and Christopher Gore, the 6Kk Conamiasioner under the- 
Jay Treaty, for the settlement of American claims vpen £nglnnd ; and 
holding) as he did, the determining vote on mil contested cases, he was so 
fortsfnate as to «cquif>e the entire respect and confidence of both parties 
by the strict impartiality and justice of his decisions. As a soldier, stn 
artist, a diplomatist, and a gentleman, he was honored and faelovvd thorough 
several generations. 

Sept. 22. — In Framingham, Ms., Rev. Henrf Ware, J^., D. J>., aged 49, 
lately Parkman Professor of Pulpit Eloqseoco and the Pastoral Care in 
the Divinity School attached to Hanraid University. Dr. Wase was bom 
in Uingham, Ms., in 1793, and gmdnated at Harvard College, in 1812. He 
was engaged for a time as an instractor an Phillips Academy, Exeter, 
N. H., but was chiefly occupied in the work of prepsmlion for tha Chris- 
tian ministry, the profession which had been his choice firom his you& 
up. He completed his theological studios in 1816, and on the fint day of 
the Allowing year was ordained as pastor of the Second Church in Bos- 
ton. After thirteen years* labor in this pfaioe, he was dismissed, al his 
own request, and went to travel in Europe for a year, with a view to the 
improvement of his health. On his return, he accepted the pvofeseonhip 
in Harvard tfrnversity, which he held till the somBser^^ 1842, when the 
decline of his heakh obliged him to resign it, and retire into the country. 
His publications were numerous, mostly on subjects of practical religion, 
and they had a wide circulation, which was merited by the simple, taste- 
ful, and eloquent spirit in which they were conoposed. Few poiaons 
have been more successful in winning the afieclaon and respect of all who 
Icnew him, 'either as a pastor, an instractor, or a OMin. To a very large 
circle, it seemed as if the skies had grown darker after the death of Henry 
Ware. He belonged to that Christian sect, of which Buckroinster and 
Channingwere the distinguished ornaments, and his memory is naturaHy 
allied with theirs, as their equal in purity and beauty of chameter, in in- 
tellectual taste and fertility, in eloquence of speech, and in seal and de- 
votion in the cause of their common Lord. His parishioners and pupils, 
as well as his more intimate fiiends and relatives, were fondly attached 
to him ; on any emergency, they sought his counsel, and his words of 
wisdom were uttered with a gentleness and hunoility, that never failed of 
their perfect effect. His death can hardly be regretted, fat the latter part 
of his life was one long disease, and in his published works, and theaweet 
recollections of him that remain in the minds of many, there is an en- 
during monument to his memory. 



AVmiCAlt OmTVABT FOR X844* dll 

B9pt.S0.«— At t)i6 B«7of St Louif, Miff., JHehard W, Webb^', Enq., 
«£•<} about 4^ a lawyer of distinction, and formerly a member of the 
legislature. He was a maB of fine talents, and of strict integrity, 

Aug.*~ In Richfield, N. T^ Mn. John WUlnnUj a gi^eat-graDdson of the 
celebrated Eoger Williams, aged 100 years and 7 months, He was oiw 
dained as a Baptist minister when he wa« 2$ years old, and was well 
known in Foster, R. L, where he resided a long time, as elder John Wil* 
liams* He was familiar with the private history of bis famous ancestori 
and gave many interesting anecdotes of his life and times. He was re- 
spected as a roan of strong understanding, of unafiected piety, and as a 
sabstantial and good citizen. He has left a numerous offspring, including 
many descendants to the fifth generation. 

1844. 

May. — In New York, N. Y., Frederick S. *Agate^ aged 37. He was a 
historical painter of considerable reputation, and his productions entitled 
him to a high rank among American artists of the present day. 

Feb. 6. — Near Lexington, Va., Jlndrew Mexander^ Esq.^ aged 75, one of 
the oldest and most respected citizens of Rockbridge county. He was 
well known in bis native State, as a member of the Legislature, and an 
active laborer in works of public improvement. 

Aug. 19. — Near Carthage, Tenn., in the 67th year of his age, Col. Boh- 
ert AlUn, He was bred a merchant, and first settled in Carthage soon after 
that town was established, nearly forty years ago, where he continued to 
live engaged in trade, and as clerk of the county court, for a great num> 
ber of years. He served as a volunteer, and commanded a regiment under 
General Jackson, with great credit and ho/ior, in the South, during the 
late war. He was subsequently elected and reelected to Congress from 
the Smith and Wilson district, until he chose to retire. 

May 29. — In Newport, R. I., William Moore Mhton^ brother of the dis- 
tinguished artist, aged 62. 

April 14. — In Nevrton, Sussex county, N. J., Thomas 0. jinderson, for- 
merly a lieutenant in the TJ. S. Navy, aged 60. He was one of the com- 
pany under Decatur, who captured and burned the frigate Philadelphia 
in the harbor of Tripoli. 

June 17. — In Stockbridge, Ms., Luke jlshbumer^ aged 71. He was born 
hi India, on the Malabar coast, of an affluent and respectable English 
family, and was sent to be educated in England. He returned to India, 
and settled at Bombay, where he remained till IS 17, having inherited a 
large fortune there. The health of his family then induced bim to leave, 
and, coming to this country, he settled at Stockbridge, where he resided 
till his death. His mind was richly cultivated, bis manners agreeable, 
and his character commanded great respect. 



312 AMimiCAM OBITVABT VOE 1844. 

April 21. — In PhilafklpUa, Pa., Him. Henry BaZe^umi, one of tke Jadgef 
of the Supreme Court of the United States, aged 6<5. He was a native of 
New Haven, Ct., and graduated at Yale College, in 1797. For sereral 
tessions, he was an active member of the House .of Representatives, in 
Congress, from the western part of Pennsylvania. ^ A long professional 
career of distinguished eminence and ability secured to the deceased the 
respect and esteem of his professional brethren, and the confidence of a 
large circle of clients and friends. His political life was no less remark- 
able than his prolessional career and ability ; and the untiring fidelity of 
his labors on the bench of the highest judicial tribunal of the land won for 
him the applause of the whole nation.'^ 

Jan. 5. — In Groton, Ct., Hon, Noyet Barber, aged 63, for fovrteen years, 
from 1821 to 1835, a Representative in Congress from Connecticut, and 
much respected by all who knew him. He was intelligent and indefati- 
gable as a member of Congress, and, without pretending to any merit in 
oratory, he was most useful to his constituents, and highly esteemed 
by his fellow-representatives. As a private citizen, he was greatly 
beloved. 

May 10. — In Baltimore, Md., David ^amum, JEsg., aged 74, the well 
known and respected proprietor of Barnum's Hotel. 

June 20. — In Lincolnton, N. C, Gen, Paul Barringer, of Cabarras coun- 
ty, aged 65, long distinguished as a useful and patriotic citizen of 
North Carolina, and for many years a member in both branches of her 
Legislature. 

Feb. 10. — At Fredericksburg, Va., Carter Beverley , Esq«t aged 72. 
Feb. 27. — At Andalusia, near Philadelphia, Penn., Nkhoku Biddle, for- 
merly President of the Bank of the United States, aged 58. " Mr. Biddle 
was a native of Philadelphia, born on the 8th of Jan., 1786. His father, 
Charles Biddle, was a distinguished whig of the Revolution. He com- 
menced his education at the Pennsylvania University, and graduated at 
Princeton. At the age of nineteen, he officiated as Secretary to General 
Armstrong, in his mission to France, and accompanied him in a tour of 
Europe. He remained three years abroad, part of the time attached to 
Mr. Monroe's mission to St. James's. On his return, he devoted himself 
to the study of law, and to literary pursuits, to which he was fondly at- 
tached. The productions of his pen were always distinguished for beauty 
of style and force of argument. He edited for a time the Port Folio. 
In 1810, he was elected to the State Legislature, where he aided efficiently 
in instituting the school system of that State. In 1814, he was elected 
to the State Senate. In 1819, Mr. Monroe appointed him one of the di- 
rectors of the Bank of the United States; and in 1823, on the resignation 
of Mr. Cheves, the president of that institution, Mr. Biddle was elected 
as his successor ; and in that capacity, which he filled for nearly twenty 
years, he figured conspicuously in the history of this country. The time 



AMERICAN OBITUARY FOR 1844. 313 

to foiTO ft true and abiding estimate of Jhe eventful incidents in which he 
-was BQOst active has not yet arrived. That he was nnfoitunate is all 
that can now be pronounced with confidence." 

Jan. 12. — In Boston, Ms., William BigeUw, aged 70. He graduated at 
Harvard College in 1794, and wts for some time instructor of the Boston 
Public Latin School. In the latter part of his life, he was a corrector of 
the press in Cambridge. His wit and talent for ready and humorous versi- 
fication will long be remembered by his friends and contemporaries. 

April 28. — In New Haven, Ct., Mraham Bishop, Esq.^ in his 82d year. 
He was a native of New Haven, and graduated at Yale College in 1778. 
Through a large part of his life he was an active politician, and for more 
than twenty years Collector of the port of New Haven. 

Jan. 5. — In Boston, Ms., Rev. Lucius BolIeSj D. D., aged 64, formerly 
pastor of the first Baptist Church in Salem, but for many years senior 
Secretary of the American Baptist Board of Foreign Missions. 

April 24. — In Washington, D. C, Hon. Peter E. Bossier, a Representa- 
tive in Congress from Louisiana. He was of French descent, his family 
being one of the first that settled in the colony. He had served for ten 
years in the Senate of the State, before being chosen to Congress, and in 
every station had secured the respect and esteem of his countrymen. 

Jan. 30. — At Jackson, Miss., Hon. John D. Boyd, Senator from Attala 
county, aged 44. 

April 30. — In Huron county, Ohio, Gen. Henry R. Brinkerhoff, aged 56, 
a memoer of Congress from Ohio. He was a native of Adams county, 
Pa., and emigrated at an early period to Cayuga county, N. Y. During 
the last war, he served in command of a company of volunteers, and dis- 
tinguished himself particularly at the battle of Queenstown Heights. In 
1837, he emigrated to Ohio, where he soon gained the respect and esteem 
of his fellow-citizens, and was elected by them to Congress, in 1843. 

April 15. — In Boston, Ms., Charles BiUJinch, ^sg., aged 81. He gradu- 
ated at Harvard College in 1781, and subsequently travelled in Europe, 
where he gratified his strong taste for architectural studies. On his re- 
turn, he devoted himself to architecture at a profession, and drew the 
plans for the erection of the State House at Boston, and of the Capi- 
itol of the United States, at Washington. He was much esteemed as an 
artist and a man. 

July 17. — At his residence at the Cherokee Mission, in the Cherokee 
nation West, Jesse Btishyheadi Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of the 
Cherokees. The subject of this notice was a person of great distinction 
among his tribe. He was in his acquirements a self-made man ; he ob- 
tained in his youth a very limited English education, which he improved 
so as to become a good English speaker, as well as an able orator in 
the Cherokee.^ He was a correct interpreter and translator, and at his 
demise was much engaged in translating English into Cherokee. 

27 



314 AHBEXDAN QBITUA«T FQK 1844- 

He occupied many public statloof, which he 4i«ckarged with fidelity, 
»ad for the good of his people. 

Jan. — In Tarboro, N. C, Molj, Jamn W, Clarke in th^ 65th yeair pf bif 
age. He was born in Bertie county, educated a;t Princeton College, mar- 
ried and settled in Edgeconib, where hi had reaid^d aboyt forty y^arf. 
He serred several years in the l.egislature of his State in both branchea, 
both from Bertie and Edgecomb counties, and irepresented that district in 
Congress in the years 1815 and 1816. 

Aug. 8. -^ In New York, N. T., John Q. Cbs/er, well known a^ a sue* 
cessful and honorable merchant, aged 82. "Mi. Coster was bom in Eaat 
Friesland, Holland, in August, 1762. In his youth, in his own country, 
he was intended for the medical profession, and studied physic and sur- 
gery some two years with his brother, long an eminent surgeon in the 
British army. Changing his views, he embarked for America about fifty 
years ago, and commenced his active career of business as a merchant in 
the city of New York. In this occupation he was eminently fortunate, 
and he secured the esteem of his fellow-citizens by his enlarge4 ▼iews, 
his integrity, and great private worth. 

Feb. 11. — At Albany, N. Y., Hon. Eitk Cbwen^ aged 56, a Judge of the 
Superior Court of New York, much respected for his abilities, his knowl- 
edge of the law, and his amiable character. 

June 25. — In Evansville, Ind., JUo/or Jervis CutltTy aged 76. The de- 
ceased was the second son of the Rev, Manasseh Cutler, who for fiity- 
two years was Pastor of the Congregationalist Church of Hamilton, Ms., 
the negotiator in 1787 with the Congress of the old confederation for the 
famous purchase of a million and a half of acres for the Ohio Company, 
by means of which was eiSected the first settlement of that great State, 
and from 1800 to 1804, the Representative in Congress from the Lynn 
district, in Massachusetts. If the father deserves the credit of paving the 
way for the settlement of this then savage wlldemess, the son is entitled 
to be considered the pioneer of the settlement itself. In 1788, at the early 
age of nineteen, he was one of the little band of forty-eight, who emigrated 
from Massachusetts under Gfen. Rufus Putnam, and pitched their tents at 
Marietta, in the very centre of the battle grounds of the Indians and* Ken- 
tuckians of that day ; and he has often been heard to say, that he was the 
first man who ever cut down a tree to make a clearing for a habi- 
tation in what is now the fourth State in the Union. Of that little band 
of hardy pioneers, he was probably the last survivor. The deceased was 
an officer of the Ohio Militia, and of the regular army, but the scene of 
his services happened to be at no time that of actual conflict. He lived 
a long, useful, and eventful life, proverbial with everyone who knew him 
for his sterling integrity and kind-heartedness, and he died lamented 
by all. 

June 3. — On board the U. S. frigate Savannah, in Callao bay, Com. 
Alexander J. Dallas, aged about 55. Commodore Dallas entered the Navy 



AttSBiCAN OdITtJABY FOB 1844. 315 

%h XtiidiBhlpmftn, on the 2Sd day of Noyediber, 1805, and had, of course, 
been in the naval ftervice, in which he enjoyed an enviable leputation, 
nearly thirty-nine years. He was the son of Alex. J. Dallas, who so dis- 
tinj^ished himself at the head of the Treasury Department at the most 
criticil period bf the history of this counhy, and ^as the brother of Mr. 
Dallas, whose name is now before the people as a candidate for the Tice- 
Pltesidency. 

June 20. — In Cumberland, R. I., Hon. J. S. Bexttr, aged 90. He was 
t^orn in Ctimberland,in 1754, and was engaged in the study of law, when 
the revolutionary war broke out. He immediately joined the army, with 
the rank of lieutenant, and served throughout the war. He retired in 
1785, With the rank of major, having setved for two years as assistant 
adjutant-genetal. Washington appointed him supervisor of the revenue 
for Rhode Island, and hfter this office was abolished, he was elected chief 
Judge of the Common Pleas, which office he held for seven years. In 1830, 
he retired from Providence to his native place, to close a life full of years 
and honors in retirement and peace. 

^ata. 1'5. — At Jacksonville, 111., Crm. Joseph Duncan^ formerly Governor 
of the txkXt. fie served in the army with mtich credit during the late 
war with Great Britain, and was appointed afterwards to several offices 
of distinction- and trust, in which he acquired great reputation. 

Ang. 25. — In Je^erson county. Mo., Hon, Danid DunkHny jbrmerljr 
iGroVernoT of Missouri, aged 54. He had long been distinguished in the 
politics of the State, and had secured the respect and esteem of a great 
body of its inhabitants. 

April 2. — At Philadelphia, Pa., Ikter S. Duponetau^ Esq., President of 
the American Philosophical Society, aged 84. He was a native of France, 
and came to this country as the aid-de-camp of Baron Steuben, in 1778. 
He served in the American army during the war, and then established 
himself as a lawyer in Philadelphia, where he soon obtained distinguished 
success. His publications were numerous, and his profound researches 
in the sciences of Jurisprudence and General Philology, and especially 
in the aboriginal languages of America, are well known to the learned, 
both in Europe and America. 

March 6. — In Prince George's county, Md., Hon. Gabriel DmaU, aged 
03, formerly Judge of the Supreme Court of the United States. He was 
of Hxrguenot descent, ttnd served as clerk to the first Legislature of Mar 
ryland, before the Declaration of Independence. He was chosen a 
member of Congress in 1794, was made Comptroller of the Treasury in 
1802, and was appointed a Judge of the Supreme Court in 1811, which 
office he held for more than twenty years. He was distinguished for im- 
partiality as a Judge, and for integrity and useAilness as a citizen. 

June 13. — At New Haven, Timothyjkoighty Etq.^ aged 66. Mr. D wight 
was the oldest son of the late President Dwight, whose name he bore, 
and whom he strikingly resembled, both in personal appearance and in 



316 AKBEICAN OBITUABT FOE 1844. 

character. He was a native of Stratford, Ct., but had been a rerident of 
New Haven for more than forty years. He firat entered into buiinest in 
New York, but removed to New Haven when about twenty-five years of 
age, and has ever since been one of the most prominent merchants in 
that city, having retired from business only a year ago. He was a man 
of rare integrity. 

Feb. 16.— At St. Louis, Mo., Hon. Fhilip K Engle^ late Judge of the 
Circuit Court of St. Louis. 

May 27. — la East Brookfield, Ms., Deacon Livi Farwellf of Cambridge, 
steward of Harvard College, aged 60. 

Jan. 3. — In New York, N. Y., Col. John Fetlowet, aged 84, a native of 
Sheffield, Ms., and a graduate of Yale College, in 1783. Hie political 
principles were those of Jefferson, his religious, those of Tom Paine, with 
whom he was very intimate in the latter part of that celebrated infidel's 
life. The tastes of Col. Fellowes were literary and antiquarian. He 
had published a work on the authorship of Junius, another on Freema- 
sonry, and another on some passages in the life of Gen. Putnam. 

Feb. 21. — In Sussex co., N. J., Hon, Samuel Fowler , aged 65. He was a 
distinguished member^ of the medical profession, and had been a Repre* 
tentative in Congress for two terms, from 1833 to 1837. 

March 1. — At Washington, D. C, Hon. Henry Flicks aged 48, a Repre- 
sentative in Congress from Pennsylvania. He was b6rn in Northumber- 
land, was educated as a printer, became an editor of a paper, served for 
three sessions in the State Legislature, and was finally chosen to Con- 
gress. He lived respected and esteemed, an honest and honorable mai^. 

Aug. 15. — At Rosewood, near Black Rock, Ark., Honr William S> Ful- 
to«, Senator of the United States firom the State of Arkansa«, Mr. Fulton 
has been a Senator from Arkansas from the date of its admission to the 
Union. He was a native of Maryland, but during the late war took up 
his residence in Tennessee, and was Private Secretary to Gen. Jackson. 
He was afterwards appointed by Gren. Jackson Secretary of the Territory 
of Arkansas, and subsequently Governor, which office he held until the 
Territory was admitted into the Union as a State. 

July 23. — In New York, N. Y., Gabrid Furmanj Efq., aged 88, a citisen 
of high character and moral worth. 

Feb. 28. < — By the accident on board the steamer Princeton, David Gar' 
diner, Eeq., aged about 55. He was a resident of New York, and was 
highly esteemed by a large circle of friends and acquaintances. He had 
been a member of the State Senate, and had held other important public 
trusts. 

Feb. 12. — In Adams county, Mies., Col, Henry A. Garrett, aged about 
38, a lawyer by profession, a man of good intellect and kind feelings, and 
much beloved within the circle o( his acquaintance. 

Jaa 23 — In Raleigh, N. C., WilUam Gaaton^ Associate Justice of tb« 



r 



AMXKICAN OBITUABT FOB 1844. 317 

Supreme Cotirt of North Carolina, one of the most emine&t and respecta- 
1)le men in the State. 

Feb. 19. — Near Stanton, Ta., a tlave, named Ct75crf , aged 112 yean. 
He was a -servant to Col. 'Washington at the time of Braddock*s defeat, 
and was afterwards present in the same capacity at the surrender of 
Comwallis. 

Feb. 28. — By the accident on board the 17. S. steamer Princeton, Hon, 
Thomoi W, GUmery of Charlottesville, Va., Secretary of the Navy for the 
United States. He was a Representative from Virginia in the 27th Con- 
gress, and had held many other public trusts, which he discharged with 
great ability. He was respected in public, and beloved in private life. 

March 3. — In Lost Creek Valley, Pa., Hon, JmoB Quttim, formerly a 
member of Congress from Pennsylvania. 

April 13. — At Newton, N. J., Job 8. HdUted, aged 71. He was a member 
of the bar of New Jersey for nearly fifty years ; of eminent private worth, 
and distinguished as a patriot and a Christian. 

May 25.— In Washington, J). C, Joseph TT. Hand^ Eiq^ aged 52, chief 
clerk of the Patent Office. He was a native of Madison, Ct., and gradu- 
ated at Yale College in 1813. He always had the confidence of those 
associated with him for his capacity and integrity. 

Jan. 14. — In Berlin, Ct , M^s, Ruth Hart, aged 101. Her husband. Gen. 
Selah Hart, was an officer in the army of the Revolution, and for many 
years represented his town in the General Assembly. 

April 1. — In West Bridgewater, Ms., Maj, Dawid HartwtU^ aged 89. 
He enlisted in the army of the Revolution in the spring of 1775, and 
served two years, being present in most of the important battles ^which 
were feught during that period. After the war, he was for a long time 
major in the Massachusetts militia, and he enjoyed a pension till the 
time of his death. 

Jan. 3.— In Cambridge, Ms.,Xei;t Htdge^ L.L. D.,aged 78, formerly, and 
for many years, Alford Professor of Moral Philosophy in Harvard Col- 
lege. He was a diligent and &ithful instructor, and was much respected 
by his pupils, and beloved in private life. Dr. Hedge was the author of 
a small treatise on Logic, and the editor of an approved abridgment of 
Dr. Brown's Lectures on the Philosophy of Mind. 

Feb. 14. — In New Orleans, La., filbert Hoa, Etq.f a member of the 
Senate of Louisiana, aged 38. He was a prominent lawyer in the city, 
had been in the councils of the State for some years, where he had 
served with much credit to himself, and to the great advantage of his 
constituents. 

May 22.— In Bangor, Me., Bark Holland, Esq., aged 91, an officer of the 
Revolution, and a pioneer in the settlement of Eastern Maine. 

March 31. — In Saybroek, Ct, JUv. Fnderick Wiltiam Hotchkiss, in the 
82d year of his age. He was a native of New Haven, and graduated at 

27* 



318 XMXEICAN OBITUAET'FOE 1844. 

Yale College, in 1778. In resisting the attack t>f the British on New Ha- 
ven, in 1779, he acted as aid to the commanding officer. At this time, he 
lost his father and two uncles. For more than sixty years, he was pastor 
of the Congregational church in Sayhrook, and was very highly esteemed 
by the community in which he resided. 

Jan. 20. — In Newcastle, Me., Hon, Edward Kavanagh, aged 48, late 
Governor of the State, and for four years a Representative in Congress. 

March 29.— At Norfolk, Va., Com. E, BmdUton Krnnedy, of the United 
States Navy, aged 65. At the time of his death, he was commander of 
the line of battle-ship Pennsylvania. 

Feb. 28. — By the accident on board the tJ. S. steamer Princeton, Com, 
Beverley Kemumy chief of the Bureau of Construction, Repairs, and Equip- 
ment in the Navy Department. He had long been attached to the naval 
service of the United States, in which he had attained a distinguished 
reputation. 

Feb. 21. — At Easton, Md., JbAn Leeds Kerr, Esq., late Senator of the 
United States, aged 64. He had long been distinguished at the bar of the 
eastern shore of Maryland, and was eminent in public life. 

Aug. 29. — In Concord, Mass., Hon. John Keyes, aged 57. He was bom 
in Westford, 1787; was graduated at Dartmouth College in 1809 ; studied 
law, and was admitted to the Middlesex bar in 1812. He opened an office 
in Concord, and continued there in the practice of his profession until the 
time of his death. He was a delegate to the convention for amending 
the constitution, in 1820. In 1822-23, he was a representative in the 
General Court from Concord. From 1823 to 1830, he was a member of 
the Senate. Subsequently, he was in the House of Representatives for 
many years, and for a period presided over that body as Speaker. In ad- 
dition to these, he held various other offices of trust and responsibility, of 
a less public character. He discharged the duties of all the trusts which 
he assumed with ability and success. 

Jan. 26. — In Utica, N. Y.^ Hon. Joseph Sxridand, aged 73, one of the old- 
est and most respectable inhabitants of the city, of which he was the 
first Mayor. He was born in Lisbon, formerly a part of Norwich, Ct., 
and graduated at Yale College, in 1790. For nearly fifty years, he had 
occupied a prominent position in Oneida county. He was often chosen 
a member of the State Legislature, and was once elected a Representative 
in Congress. 

June 10.— In Washington, Pa., Hon. Isaac Leet, aged 42, formerly a 
Representative in Congress. He was for four years a member of the 
State Senate, and had held other public offices, acquitting himself in ev- 
ery case with fidelity and honor. 

. April 7. — In New York, N. Y., Gen. Morgan Xctots, aged 89. He was 
the son of Francis Lewis, one of the signers of the Declaration of Inde- 
pendence, and was bom in New York, in 1754. He graduated at Prince- 
ton College in 1773, joined the American army in 1775, was made a colo* 



JLKE&irAN OBlTtJABT FOB 1B44. 319 

ii«l and chief of the ateff of Gen. Gates, was preseht at tlie surrender of 
Burgoyne, accompanied Gen. Clinton in the expedition up the Mohawk, 
and served throughout the war with great credit. In 1791^ he was made 
attorney-general of New York, was appointed chief justice in 1801, was 
elected Governor in 1604, and became a member of the State senate in 
1810. He took an active part in the late war as quartermaster-general ef 
the army. ** He was a gallant soldier, an accomplished statesman, a kind 
{mrent, a benevolent man, and a ^ood citizen." 

Feb. 11. — At Baltimore, Md,, Hon. Richard jB.Magnider,MBOcisiie]udge 
of the 6th judicial district of Maryland, aged 57. He was an able jurist, 
and a highly respected man. His professional accomplishments, strict 
integrity, and assiduity in the performance of his public duties, were well 
known to all the Baltimore bar. 

Feb. 28. — By the accident on board the steamer Princeton, Virgil 
Maxcy, Esq.^ of Maryland. He was bom in Massachusetts, graduated at 
Brown University, in Providence, R. I., of which institution his brother 
was the President, and studied law in Litchfield, Ct. He removed to Ma- 
ryland while yet young, and completed the study of the law with Robert 
G. Harper, with whom he was afterwards associated in its practice. Soon 
acquiring distinction and the confidence of his fellow- citizens, he was re- 
peatedly elected a member of the Legislature. President Jackson ap- 
pointed him Solicitor of the Treasury, and soon afterwards he was made 
chargi (Vaffaires to Belgium, in which station he continued for five years. 
Returning to his native State, he was for several years actively engaged 
in law and politics, and secured the respect and esteem of all who knew 
him. He was a ripe scholar, a pure statesman, add a good and honora- 
ble man. 

May 17. — In New Brunswick, N. J., George P. MolU&on^ Esq,, aged 37, 
Attorney- General of the State. He was graduated at l^assau Hall, and in 
1S27 was admitted* to the bar, where he soon gained a high standing. He 
was several times elected to the Legislature, and was at last appointed 
Attorney- General, which ofiice he sustained with great ability. 

April 3. — At Columbus, Ohio, Gen. Hanan A. Idbqre, aged 34, a Rep- 
resentative in Congress from that district. He was a native of Vermont, 
studied law at Rochester, N. Y., and began the practice of it at Columbus, 
Ohio, where he soon obtained distinction. ** Whilst he enjoyed the un- 
limited confidence of his political friends, he always retained tjt^e respect 
and esteem of hit political opponents.** 

Jan. 10.-^ Li Butternuts, Otsego county, N. Y., Gen. JglcoK Hiorris, aged 
88. He was the second son of Gen. Lewis Morris, one of the signers of 
the Declaration of Lidependence, and was bom at Morrisania, Pec. 28th, 
1755. He entered the Auierican army at an early period in the war, and 
became aid -de-camp to Gen. Lee, with whom he was present at the bat- 
tles of Fort Moultrie and Monmouth. He became a settler on the Morria 



320 AMSBICAZI OBITUABT FOE 1544. 

Patent in 1787, and reiided theie till his deatk He wai repeatedly 
elected to tlie Aaaembly from Otsego county, and as Senator from th« 
old Western District. For many years before his death he had lived in 
repose, an ornament to the society in which he mingled, liberal in his 
deportment and the nse of his ample means, and the patriarch of a nume- 
rous and respectable family. 

Aug. 11. — At Reading, Pa., Hon. Henry A, Muhlenberg, aged 62, the 
Democratic candidate for Governor of the State of Pennsylvania. He 
was a distinguished and popular politician, was a member of Congress 
from 1829 to 1838, and for some years was minister from this country to 
Austria. 

Feb. 3. -- In Boston, Ms., Israel Mtmson, Esq., aged 78. He was a native 
of New Haven, and graduated at Yale College, in 1787. For a short 
time; he practised as a physician in Branford, Ct., but soon left the medi- 
cal profession for mercantile life. At the time of his death, he was one 
of the oldest and most respectable merchants in Boston. He was a lib- 
eral benefactor of several literary and charitable institutions. 

May 16. — At East Windsor, Ct., Bev. Jsahel Nettleton, J). V., Professer 
in the theological seminary at that place, aged 60. He was a native of 
Killingworth, Ct., and graduated at Yale College in 1809. He was the 
author and compiler of several publications, the most important of which, 
in regard to its immense circulation, is the " Village Hymns." 

Jan. 18. — In Philadelphia, Pa., the Eev. Gilbert Wesley iVbe/tng, a native 
of Westphalia, in the 94th year of his age. He was Pastor of the German 
Reformed church at Amville, and preached throughout the Revolution 
to the battalions in the cause of freedom, in New Jersey. 

April 28. — In Amherst, Ms., Bev. Isaac Orr, aged 51, the inventor of 
the air-tight stove. He graduated at Yale College, in 1818, having dis- 
tinguished himself as a scholar, particularly in Mathematics and Natural 
Philosophy. He was afterwards a teacher for some years in the Asylum 
for the Deaf and Dumb in Hartford, Ct., and he labored for some time in 
the service of the American Colonization Society. He was a man of 
great ingenuity, and of great purity and integrity of character. 

Jan. 5. — In Salem, Ms., Joseph Peabody, Esq., a distinguished and 
wealthy merchant, respected and beloved by all who knew him. 

Feb. 9. — In Nelson county, Va., Mcajah Pendleton, aged 86, a soldier of 
the Revolution, and for fifty years a zealous member of the Methodist 
church. It is believed, that he was the leader in the Temperance Refor- 
mation in Virginia, if not in the Union. Before the year 1800, it is known 
that he signed a temperance pledge, and carried it about, soliciting and 
obtaining signatures. His own pledge he kept faithfully till his death, 
extending it to wine and cider, which he considered as alcoholio drinks, 
differing from whisky only in strength. 

June 21. — In New York, N. Y.,John Pintard, Esq., aged 85, an emi- 



AHXSICAN O^ITUAET FOR 1844. 321 

nent and respectable raerchant, and a Vice-President of the American 
Bible Society. 

Feb. 19, — At Burlington, Vt., John JPomeroy, M. /)., aged 78. When 
quite young, be served in the revolutionary army, and afterwards studied 
medicine. He established himself in Burlington, in 1792, and was the 
most distinguished physician and suj^eon in that part of the State for 
more than 40 years. 

Jan. 13. — In Attakapas, La., Hon. Mexande^ Porter^ Senator of the Uni- 
ted States, aged 58. He was born in Ireland, and his father having fallen 
a victim there to the political disturbances of 1798,, he emigrated to this 
country, and settled in Nashville, Tenn. He at first engaged in com- 
merce, but afterwards studied law, and removed to Louisiana about 1809, 
where he soon acquired distinction. He assisted in forming the consti- 
tution of the State, and became a Judge of the Supreme Court, and after- 
wards a Senator in Congress. Endowed with great natural abilities, 
thoroughly acquainted with the science of law, having a cultivated taste 
ftnd popular manners, he was for a long time one of the most eminent 
*nd highly respected public men of the State. 

March 20. — At Niagara Falls, N. Y., Gen. Peter B. Porter ^ aged 71. He 
was born in Salisbury, Ct., and graduated at Yale College in 1791. His 
name is connected with most of the important events in the history of 
weetern New York ; and as an officer in the army during the last war 
with Great Britain, he rendered important services to his country. He 
was for some time Secretary of War of the United States. 

April 11. — At sea, on a voyage to the Azoief^y Ueo, Edword Q. Pres- 
eott, rector of the Episcopal church in Salem, N. J., aged 38. 

Feb. 9. — In Jefferson City, Mo., Thomas Beynolda^ Governor of Mis- 
souri, aged 51. He was a native of Kentucky, and emigrated to Illinois, 
where his abilities soon promoted him tp the office of Judge of the Su- 
preme Court of that State. Thence he emigrated to Mijssouri, in 1828, 
and filled with distinguished honor the several offices of Legislator, Judge, 
and Governor. He died by his own hand, assigning as a reason the vio- 
lence of his political enemies. 

Jan. 20.-^ At Nashville, Tenn., Maj. Henry M, Hutledge^ only son of Ed- 
ward Butledge, a signer of the Declaration of Independence, and after- 
wards Governor of South Carolina, aged 68. He was born in 1775, was 
made Secretary to Gen. C. C. Pinckney, Ambassador to France, in 1707 ; 
commissioned Major in the U. S. army in 1799 ; served several years in 
the Legislatune of his native State, and removed in 1816 to Tennessee, 
where he has held many responsible stations. He was greatly esteemed 
as a gentleman of integrity and benevolence. , 

April 5. -^ At Philadelphia, Pa., Professor John Scmderzon, of the Phila- 
delphia High School, aged 57. He wrote the " Biography of the Signers 
pf the Declaration of Independence/' a work iQ several volumes, and of 



322 AKEBICAIC OBITUAEY FOB 1844. 

coDiiderable repute, and several volamei of a book entitled *' The Ameri- 
can in Paris." 

March 1.— In Roxbury, Ms., Hon, Ehenezer Seaver^ aged 81. He was a 
Repreeentative in Congress forty yean ago, and continued a member of 
that body for ten years. 

March 12. — At sea, on board the V. S. frigate Columbia, which he 
commanded, Capt, Edward JR. Shubrick^ aged about 50. He entered the 
naval service in 1809, and served during the whole of the late war 
with England under Commodore Rodgers. He obtained the rank of Cap- 
tain in February, 1837. He was appointed to the command of the Co- 
lumbia, to act with the squadron on the coast of Brazil, in May, 1842* 
The climate of Brazil proved un&vorable to a complaint of the liver, bb- 
der which he had long suffered, and the exposure incident to the service, 
united with the disease, at last caused his death. He was thus takea 
away, in the midst of his career, from a profession which he was well 
calculated to adorn, and for which he always professed an enthusiastic 
attachment. He was brave and fidthful in the performance of his 
duties, and diligent, upright, and honorable in every transaction ef life. 

June 4. In Salem, Ms., Capt. Jesse Smithy aged 88. He was present la 
the battle of Bunker Hill, and was afterwards drafted into Washington's 
Guards, among whom he served in the battles of Brandywine, Trenton, 
Germantown, and Monmouth. 

June 20. — In Boston, Ms., M-. Samuel Sprt^tUj aged 90, a soldier of the 
Revolution, father of the poet, Mr. 'Charles Sprague. 

June 26. — At Annapolis, Md., Hon. John Stephen^ for twenty years one 
of the Judges of the Court of Appeals of Maryland. He was formerly a 
member of the Executive Council, and was often chosen to the Legisla- 
ture, till 1824, when he was appointed Judge. He was a learned and able 
jurist. In private life he was greatly respected, and he obtained a high 
reputation as « judge. ^ 

April 10. — At Watertown, N. T., Hon. Micaft Sterling, aged 63. He was 
bom at Lyme, Ct., and graduated at Yale College, in 1804. He had been 
for some years a member of the Senate in thfe State Legislature, and was 
for a time Representative to Congress. 

Aug. 15. — At Saratoga Springs, N. Y., WHXiam L. t^one, Esq., for twen- 
ty-four years editor of the New York Commercial Advertiser, aged 58. 
He wat highly respected in private life, and was temperate, judicious, and 
candid in his conduct of a public press. Besides his labors as an editor, 
ke published several historical woiits of coneideMible merit. Among 
these was a memoir of Brant, the celebrated Indian ehief^ a life of Red 
Jacket, the well-known Indian orator, and a Volume on the history ef 
Wyoming. For some years he had been superintendent of common 
schools in the city of New York, and his services in the cause of eduea- 
tioB entitled him to the gratitude of the community. 

March. — In Kaskaskia, QI., Jokn StuffM>tan^ a revolntionary soldier, 



AUERICAN OBXTUA&T FOR 1844. 323 

ag«d 109. He was on« of the first settlers of Bourbon county, Ey. His 
Ikealties remained unimpaired to the last. 

March 30. — In Norwalk, Ohio, Hon. Lewis Burr Sturges^ aged 82. He 
was a aative of Fairfield, Gt^ and graduated at Tale College in 1782. 
From IS05 to 1817, he was a Representative in Congress from Con- 
necticut. 

March 28. — At New Brunswick, N. J., Capt. Jlhraham 8, Thn BycA?, of 
the United States Navy, aged 58. 

Jan. 2. -—In Somerset county, N. J., Sarah Ten Eyck^ aged 101 yean 
and 9 days. 

June 14. — In New Haven, Ct., Byn. Nathaniel Terry, aged 76. He was 
a native of Enfield, Ct., and graduated at Yale College, in 1786. He was 
a Representative from Connecticut in the 15th Congress, and held various 
offices in his native State. His residence was in Hartford, but he died in 
New Haven, while on a visit to his son. 

May 24. — In Plymouth, Ms^ Br. James Ihacher, a surgeon in the rev- 
olutionary army, aged 90. He was present at many of the principal bat- 
tles of the Revolution, and terminated his services at Yorktown. He was 
the author of several approved medical works, but his publications most 
known were the ** Military Journal," and the " History of Plymouth." 
He was a zealous antiquarian, and a warm friend of the Pilgrim Society 
of Plymouth. " The excellence of his private character secured for him 
the respect and esteem of a wide circle of fViends, and as a citizen he was 
public spirited and disinterested." 

Aug. 10. — In Natchez, Miss., James Tooley, Jr. , aged 28, a miniature 
painter of much promise, and greatly beloved by his friends. 

June 13. — In New Haven, Ct., Jthiel TouMj aged 60. He was a native 
of Thompson, Ct., and was extensively known as an architect. 

Feb. 28. — In Charlotte, Vt., Stephen TkirrUl, aged 101. He served under 
Gen. Abercrombie in the campaign of 1758, and during nearly the whole 
period of the revolutionary war. 

Feb. 28. — By the accident on board the U. S. steamer Princeton, Hon. 
jibd Parker Upshur, Secretary of State of the United States, aged 58. He 
was the son of Littleton Upshur, and was born in Northampton county, 
Ya., on the 17th of June, 1790. He received his classical education at 
Yale and Princeton Colleges, and studied law under the instruction of his 
friend, the late Hon. William Wirt, at Richmond, where he practised his 
profession from the year 1810 till 1824, when he removed to Vancluse, 
his patrimonial residence, in Northampton county, Va. In the courts of 
that county, and of Accomac, he continued the practice of his profession 
until the 15th of December, 1826, when he was appointed by the Legisla- 
ture to fill the vacancy on the bench of the General Court, caused by the 
death of his maternal uncle, the late Judge George Parker. He had pre- 
viously represented his native county in the State Legislature. Qn the 
5th of October, 1829, he was elected a member of the Greneral Convention 



324 ahxrioan obituaet for 1844. 

of Virginia. He published ft pamphlet containing a review of Judge Sto- 
ry*a work on the Constitution of the United States, and contributed many 
articles to the newspapers on the topics of the day. On the reorganiza- 
tion of the judicial system of Virginia, under the new Constitution, he 
was reappointed, April 18, 1831, to a seat on the bench of the General 
Court, and was assigned to the third judicial circuit. This office he con- 
tinued to fill uixtil the 13th of September, 1841, when he was appointed by 
President Tyler, Secretary of the Navy. On the 24th of July, 1843, he 
was transferred, under the same administration, to the office of Secre- 
tary of State, which station he held at the time of his death. 

April 23. — At Vicksburg, Miss., Maj. B. Vick^ aged 83, a native of Vir- 
ginia, who removed to Mississippi in 1807. 

June 8. — At Geneseo, N. Y.. Hon, James Wadtworth, aged 76, a distin- 
guished and wealthy citizen of the western part of New York. He was 
a native of Durham, Ct., and graduated at Yale College, in 1787. In 
company with his brother, he purchased a large tract of land on the 
Genesee River, about the close of, the last century. The rise in value of 
this property made him very rich, and he made a generous use of his 
large fortune in promoting the diffusion of knowledge and encouraging 
science. He established and endowed the first Normal school in the 
State, and assisted in perfecting the system of common school libra- 
ries. He was in every respect the architect of his own fortune and fame, 
and the reputation and influence which he enjoyed were fairly earned, 
and wisely and generously used. 

Jan. 22. — In Boston, Ms., WUliam WkUaker, Esq., aged 56, a member of 
the Massachusetts Senate from the Franklin district, a man of high char- 
acter and honorable feelings. 

July 10. — At Elizabethtown, N. J., Hon. JkacLc H WiUiamion, aged 67. 
He was Governor and Chancellor of the State from 1817 to 1829. After 
1829, he retired from public life, except in 1844, when he was called to 
preside over ttie convention that revised the constitution of New Jersey. 
He was an able jurist, an excellent public officer, and as a citizen, highly 
respected and beloved. 

July 22. — In Washington, D. C, Tally R. Wise, JBig., first Auditor of 
the Treasury, aged 47. 

May 11.— In Miami, Ohio, Dr. Stephen Wood, aged 82. He was the last 
survivor of the band of pioneers who were associated with John Cleves 
Symmes in the settlement of North Bend, in 1789, and at the period of his 
death had resided longer in the State, probably, than any individual living. 



CHRONICLE OF EVENTS. 



184 3. 

July 31. — Th« Sandwich Islands, a surrender of Which to the British 
crown had been effected a few months before by the violent proceedings 
of Lord G. Paulet, were ceded back to their native Prince by Rear Ad- 
miral Thomas. 

Aug. 26. — The U. S. steam frigate Missouri, Captain John T, Newton, 
while lying at anchor in the Bay of Gibraltar, took fire, and was entirely 
destroyed, the officers and crew being saved. 

Sept. 15. — A revolution took place in Greece, the troops at Athens 
revolting, and, under the command of Col. Calergis, assisted by the people, 
compelling King Otho to dismiss his ministers, and accept a constitu- 
tional form of government. , 

Sept. 15. — A hurricane did great injury to the towns of Port Leon and 
St Marks in Florida, nearly every building in them being prostrated, and, 
in the former, 14 live« were lost. 

Sept. 19. — A dreadful accident occurred on board the steamboat Clip- 
per, at Bayou Sara, Louisiana, from the bursting of her boiler, by which 
about 20 persons were killed, and many others seriously wounded. 

Oct. 14. — A check was put on the progress of " Irish Agitation'^ by 
the arrest of Mr. Daniel O'Connell and his son, on a charge of '* conspir- 
racy and other misdemeanors." They were held to bail in the sum of 
dE2,000f 

Oct. 24. — A very destructive fire occurred at Canton, China, by whicb 
more than 1,400 houses were burnt, including the Danish Factory, Tur- 
ner's Factory, and part of the French Factory. 

Nov. 9. — A French squadron, uti^er the command of Admiral I)u 
Petit Thouars, took possession by force of the Society Islands, deposing 
the native sovereign, Queen Pomare. The transaction was afterwards 
disavowed by the French government, and the sovereignity restored to 
the native princess. 

Dec. 24. — A feaiful crime was committed on Staten Island, N. Y., the 
house of Capt. Houseman being broken open and pillaged, his wife and 
infant child murdered, and the house set oh fire. 

Dec. 31. — Amasa Sprague, Esq., a very respectable nierchant of Crans- 
28 



32fi CHEoniCLs or xvbmts, 1844. 

ton, R. I., was murdered on hii own farm, io the day time, by Mrrae per* 
ions unknown. 



1844, 

Jan. 4. — The steamboat Shepherdess, in ascending the Mississippi, a 
little below St. Louis, struck a snag and was lest, twenty or thirty of the 
passengers being drowned. 

Jan. 14. — A convention wa^ rati-fied between the authorities of Yucatan 
and Mexico, by which peace was declared, and the former country agaia 
annexed to the latter. 

Jan. 25. — A disgraceful affray took place in the hall of the House of 
Kepresenlatives, at Washington, Mr. "Wellei, a member from Ohio^ at- 
tacked Mr. Shriver, a correspondent of one of the newspapers, and gave 
him 8 severe beating. 

Feb. 3. — Continued cold weather, throughout the northern part ef tiie , 
United States, closed up most of the harbors with ice, and obstructed the 
passage of the mails for more than a week. Long Island Sound was 
frozen over a few miles above New York, and at Boston, a canal, seven 
miles long, was cut through the ice, to allow the English steamer to go 
out to sea. 

Feb. 12. — After a protracted trial at Dublin, Daniel O'Connell, and 
the other persons indicted for conspiracy with him, were found guilty. 

Feb. 16. — A duel was fought near Washington, D. C, between Mr. 
Julian May and Mr. Joseph Cochrane, with rifles, and at the first fire, the 
latter was shot though the head, and survived but a few hours. 

Feb. 21. — The poor-honse at Nantucket took fire in the night, and ten 
of the inmates perished in the flames. 

Feb. 28. — A terrible accident occurred on board the U.S. steamer 
Princeton, Capt. Stockton, during an excursion on the Potom^Cj a large 
party of distinguished persons being on board. One of the very large 
guns, made of wrought iron, under the superintendence of Capt. Stock- 
ton, on being fixed the third time, burst, and the explosion instantly 
killed Mr. Upshur, Secretary of State, Mr. Gilmer, Secretary of the Navy, 
Com. Kennon, chief of one of one of the naval bureaus, Virgil Maxcy, 
Esq., recently Charg6 cPJffaires to the Hague, Hon. David Gardiner, of 
New York, and two or three domestics, besides wounding ten or twelve 
of the crew. The President of the United States, the other members of 
the Cabinet, and many ladies were on board, all of whom fortunately 
escaped without injury. 

March 1. — The steamers De Soto and Buckeye ran against each other 
on the Mississippi river, and the latter almost immediately sunk, by 
which accident more than 60 persons were drowned. 
March 3.— A destructive fire occurred at Manchester, England, by 



OHRONICLX OF EVENTS, 1844. 327 

wliic)i a Urge block of warelioases vras destroyed, and a loss incurred of 
over £100,000. 

March 30. — The General Assembly of Rhode Island made a formal 
protest against the right of Congress to interfere with the domestic 
ctiTairsof that State, by inquiring into the manner ill which the present 
government of it was established. 

March 31. — A frightful accident occurred at Felantix, in the Balearic 
Islands. A crowd of people were assembled in an old cemetery to hear 
a sermon, when an old wall adjoining the place of assembly, suddenly 
fell down, and killed nearly four hundred persons. 

April 12. — A treaty of annexation between the United States and 
Texas was signed b}' President Tylier,tind it was announced that it would 
-soon be sent for confirmation to the Senate of the United States. 

April ^3. — A personal encounter took place in the House of Repre- 
centatives of the United States, between two of the members, Mr. White, 
0f Kentucky, and Mr. Rathbun, of New Yoik: rough words passed, 
which were followed with blows. Another person, named Moore, not a 
member, attempting to interfere, tind being repulsed, iired a pistol at the 
member who thrust him back, and the ball seriously wounded one of the 
^officers of the Hotise. 

April 29. — The tax bill, whkh had passed in both hranches of the Penn- 
sylvania legislature, received the signature of the Governor, and became 
a law. Its effect is to raise money enough to pay the interest on the pub- 
lic debt, and restore the credit of the State. 

May 1. — A convention of the Whig party assembled at Baltimore, and 
nominated Henry Clay for President, and Theodore Frelinghuysen for 
Vice President of the United States, It was supposed that 50,000 per- 
sons were present on the occasion. 

May 4. — A serious accident o<'CUiTed on the Philadelphia and Balti- 
tnore Railroad, hear Havre de Grace. Two trains proceeding in opposite 
directions came in c-oatact,-and three or four persons were killed, and 
about a dozen wounded. 

May 6-8. — Fearful riots took pla<;e in Philadelphia, and continued for 
three days, growing out of a quarrel between the Native American party 
and the Irish residents of the city. Thirty dwelling houses, a seminary, 
and three churches were burned, fire-arms were used, and fourteen per^^ 
cons were killed, and about forty wounded. The disturbances were at 
last pu^ down by the military.' 

May 17. — A schooner was upset in Chesapeake Bay, and two n>en and 
five women were drowned, only the master, Wm. Flowers, and his brother, 
escaping with their lives. 

May 18. — Great freshets took place on the Arkansas and Red rivers, 
by which some lives were lost, and much property destroyed. 

May IS,— A great fire took place in New Orleans^ La^ by which about 



328 cHKomcLB or xvbnts, 1844. 

200 buildings were burnt, and property to tbe amount of a quarter of 

a million of dollars destroyed. 

May 27-29. — A convention of tbe Democratic party waa held at Bal- 
timore, Md., when James £. Folk of Tennessee, was nominated for Pres- 
ident of the United States, and George M. Dallas of Pennsylvania, for 
Vice President. 

May 30. — Daniel O^Connell was sentenced at Dublin to 12 months 
imprisonment, a line of £2,000, and to give security in the sum of £5,000 
for his good behavior for seven years. The persons convicted with him 
were sentenced to 9 months imprisonment, and a fine of £50 each. 

June 8< — The treaty for the annexation of Texas to the United States 
was rejected by the U. S. Senate, by a vote of 35 to 16. 

June 11. — The Eastern Harbor Bill, which had been passed by both 
Houses of Congress, was returned with President Tyler's objections, and 
being sustained only by a vote of 103 to 84, not two thirds, 'was lost. 

June 17. — Congress adjourned, after a session of six months and a half, 
having passed 66 public laws, 102 private acts, and -20 joint resolutions. 

June 18. — Great floods about this time in the Missouri and Mississippi 
rivers, making them overflow their banks and do great damage. 

June 25. — A destructive fire broke out in Grotort street, Boston, by 
which about 20 buildings were burned, and property to the amount of 
$100,000 destroyed. 

June 27. — Joe Smith, the Mormon prophet, and his brother Hiram^ 
who had been arrested by Gov. Ford, and were in jail, at Carthage, 111., 
were murdered by a mob of a hundred persons in disguise, who broke 
into the prison. 

July 7. — A renewal of the disgraceful riots at Philadelphia, attended 
with great excitement and loss of life. A battle was fought between the 
mob and the military, musketry and artillery being vied oa both sides, 
and forty or fifty persons were killed or wounded, vA'military force of 
5,000 men was assembled under the orders of the Governor, and the dis- 
turbances were at last quelled. 

, July 25. — Mehemet Ali abdicated the sovereign power of £g3rpt, in 
favor of his son, Prince Ibrahim, and left the country on a pilgrimage to 
Mecca. He changed his mind, however, and returned to Cairo and to the 
government, after an absence of only four days. 

July 26. — An attempt was made to assassinate the King of Prussia by 
a man named Tscheck, supposed to be insane, who fired two pistol shots 
into the royal carriage, neither of which took eflect. 

July 27. — A destructive fire at Brooklyn, N. Y., by which twenty-six 
houses were burned, and property to the amount of $100,000 destroyed. 

Aug. 6. — Another Prince was born to the royal family of England, 
being the second son and the fourth child of the present Queen, and her 
consort Prince Albert. 



CHKONICLK OF SVEMTS, 1844. 329 

Aug. 6 — Tangier, in Morocco, was bombarded by a French squadron, 
under the command of the Prince de Joinville, and the fortifications of 
the town completely destroyed. 

Aug. 15. — Mogadore, a town on the seacoast of Morocco, was bom- 
barded by the French squadron under the Prince de Joinville, the forti- 
fications ruined, and the town itself set on fire. A few days before, a 
battle was fought at Oued Islay, between the Moors and the French un- 
der Gen Bugeaud, in which the former were entirely defeated, with the 
loss of 800 men. 

Aug. 24. — Great outrages committed in Rensselaer cotinty, New 
York, by a body of the tenantry, wh« refused to pay their rents, and mal- 
treated the officers of justice who were sent to compel them. 

Sept. 4. — The decision of the House of Lords was given on the case 
of O'Connell and his associates, reversing the judgment of the Court, and 
setting the prisoners at liberty. 

Sept. 10. — Peace was concluded between France and Morocco, Ih 
which all the demands of the former power were granted. 

Sept. 19. — A great mass convention of the Whig party was held at 
Boston, Daniel Webster presiding, when it was estimated that about 
25,000 persons from other towns were present. 



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